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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02661
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-22-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02661

Full Text



Wrestling: Citrus hosts annual Ed Kilpatrick event, r(B1


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy. Light
78 south winds. Patchy fog
LOW after midnight.
51 PAGE A4
JANUARY 22, 2012


I -- S o U NI D :


HOMEFRONT:




I





Warm winter
Capture the sunshine in
bold colors./HomeFront
ENTERTAINMENT:
SUNDAY EVENING
C B D/l
O WESH NBC 19 19
SIWEDUPBS 3 3
B OWUFT PBS 5 5
0 cWFA NBC 8 8 8
O f ABC 20 20 20

Tonight's TV
Find listings for Sunday
evening TV, plus the
crossword./Page A14

BUSINESS:


Former agent: 'Perseverance is a gift'


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO In the
Bible, it's called the book of
James.
Gary, with a throaty
laugh, said it should be
called the book of Gary.
His favorite passage is
James 1:2: "Consider it pure
joy, my brothers, whenever
you face trials of many
kinds."
No truer words sum up
how Gary sees his life. He
has weathered many turbu-
lent storms in his 65 years of


living, but he still smiles.
As a former state nar-
cotics agent, he saw how il-
licit drugs could destroy
people. As a person who
took prescription pills on
and off for years to cope
with chronic pain, he knows
how prescription drugs can
unexpectedly take hold of
your life.
But what's kept him afloat
all these years, he said, is
the love and support of loyal
friends, a devoted wife and
his strong faith in God.
See Page A8


'Pill Mill'law assist
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
Even for veteran crime fighters like Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office's Tactical Im-
pact Unit Sgt. Justin Ferrara, the battle
against out-of-control prescription pill
crimes can be a little daunting.
The data is staggering- every few min-
utes in the nation, a life is lost to prescrip-
tion drug abuse. Since 2009, more
Floridians have died as a result of pre-
scription drugs than the use of cocaine,


Manatee mani;


Net Zero
The U.S. Army post Fort
Hood works to eliminate
landfill waste./Page Dl
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:


$2 toaster
This vintage appliance
still works, the owner
says. John Sikorski
finds this toaster
interesting./Page E6
OPINION:
We
commend the
sheriff's office
for not
sweeping the
incident under
a rug.



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week's guide.

Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds................ D5
Crossword ............ A14
Editorial .......... ...C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies .................. A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together..................A16


6 184578 LJ l o


DAVE SIGLE
B.J. Falduto shows Marie Garofona some of the unique candle bottles she has on display Saturday at the
Manatee Festival. Falduto is the owner of Candle Bottle Sensations. Gates for the festival will open today
a.m. to 4 p.m. and admission for adults is $3.

Annual festival draws crowds to heart of Crystal Rivet


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
Following a chilly first half
of the week, mild weather
Saturday made for a per-
fect day of family fun at
this year's Florida Manatee Festi-
val in downtown Crystal River.
Celebrating 25 years of manatee
mania, the two-day event featur-
ing crafters, fine artists and food
vendors from all over the country
is expected to be a huge draw for
visitors and residents alike.
Setting up more merchandise
on the shelves inside her modest
tent, Florence McNeill-Priestley
marveled at the size of the festival
and shared her enthusiasm over
being a part of the day's events.
"This is my first time here.
That's why I'm so excited," she
said. "It's so big."
Priestley, who traveled all the
way from Nalcrest, was selling
glassware and other handcrafted
goods decorated with designs
made from car vinyl. She said she
does well for herself traveling all
over the country, selling her prod-
ucts at fairs and festivals.
When asked how sales were
doing Saturday, her response said
it all.
"Are you kidding me? People
were here at 8:30 and I've been
selling nonstop," she said.
A few feet away, Annette
'Annie" Greene enthusiastically
promoted her unique purses to
passersby in hopes of snagging a
sell. The Weeki Wachee vendor
has been making the purses since
1990.
Handicapped and not able to
work for a living, Greene said sell-
ing the purses not only gives her a
little extra cash in her pocket, it
gives her something to do.
Mesmerized by one purse in
particular, Alice Gilliland contem-
plated buying it for several min-
utes before finalizing the


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Shane Keim, 5, shows off his dance moves while Mighty Mongo performs
Saturday at the Third Street Pier in Crystal River. Bands will perform
throughout the weekend near the pier.


* WHAT: Florida Manatee
Festival.
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 22.
ADMISSION: $3; children
12 and younger admitted free.
WHERE: Downtown Crystal
River (U.S. 19 at Citrus
Avenue).
PARKING: Bus shuttle service
from Crystal River Mall
parking lot $1.
TOURS: Boat tours: $9.

transaction. Her friend in tow,
Kathleen Forrest, said she,
Gilliland and a few other friends
from Hernando County were at
the festival for the second year in
a row and having a blast.
"We visit the vendors and then
See Page A5


MORE INSIDE


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Kayakers crowd the water Satur-
day at Three Sisters Springs as
thousands wandered around the
property during the first open
house of the year.
* Three Sisters Springs Open
House lures visitors to the
public property./Page All


ing law enforcement
heroin and morphine combined. Again,
since 2009, prescription drug deaths have
surpassed traffic fatalities. According to a
LosAngeles Times article from September
2011, this is the first time that drugs have
accounted for more fatalities than traffic
accidents since the government started
tracking drug-induced deaths in 1979.
"It is a huge problem, but I think there
are two new things that recently happened
which would quickly change those figures.
You will soon see the numbers start going
See Page A9




Newt


a takes SC


^ primary


SC verdict:

Gingrich by a

significant lead

Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. For-
mer House Speaker Newt
Gingrich stormed to an upset
win in the South Carolina
primary Saturday night,
dealing a sharp setback to
former front-runner Mitt
Romney and scrambling the
race for the Republican
presidential nomination.
"Thank you, South Car-
olina!" Gingrich swiftly
tweeted to his supporters.
He appealed for a flood of
donations for the next-up
/r Jan. 31 primary "Help me
deliver the knockout punch
in Florida. Join our Money-
bomb and donate now," said
his tweet
-R/Chronice Already, Romney and a
Florida group that supports him
Florida were on the air in Florida
with a significant television
ad campaign, more than $7
million combined to date.
' Aides to the former Massa-
chusetts governor had once
dared hope that Florida
would seal his nomination
S- if South Carolina didn't
first but that strategy ap-
peared to vanish along with
the once-formidable lead he
held in pre-primary polls.
Former Pennsylvania
Sen. Rick Santorum and
Texas Rep. Ron Paul trailed
badly in the South Carolina
voting.
Exit polling showed Gin-
grich, the former House
speaker, leading by a wide
margin among the state's
heavy population of conser-
vatives, tea party supporters
and born-again Christians.
For the first time all year,
Romney trailed among vot-
ers who said they cared
See Page A4


Associated Press
Republican presidential can-
didate Newt Gingrich takes
part in a TV interview Satur-
day during a campaign event
at the Grapevine Restaurant
in Spartanburg, S.C.


CITRUS COUNTY







Best Community L Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 V


IE 168




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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GOLD
ANYTYPE NEW OR OLD
10K 14K 18K 22K 24K
WE BUY ALL SOLID GOLD ITEMS
NEW USED OR BROKEN
WE NEEDYOUR:
High School Rings Bracelets
Old Mountings Necklaces
0 Wedding Bands Dental Gold
Charms Broken Chains
Old Watch Cases Broken Gold
TOP PRICES
PAID!!
YOU KNOW AND
TRUST US
PRIVATE AND
CONFIDENTIAL!
We buy at top prices and
pay immediately in CASH. Of
course, there will never be any
charge for our advice or
opinion.


GOLD COINS
$1.00 Gold Coins (US) BRING IN F
$2.50 Gold Coins (US) BEST OFFE
$3.00 Gold Coins (US)
$5.00 Gold Coins (US) ABSOLUI
$10.00 Gold Coins (US) HIGHEST
It hm $20.00 Gold Coins (US) PRICES PA


FOR
*RS!


TE
ID!


Also, Buying Foreign Gold
Coins. Prices are subject to
change due to fluctuations in
precious metals market.







STERLING
& SILVER


WE BUY ANY STERLING
SILVER ITEMS
NO SILVER PLATE
PLEASE!!


Silver Coins Gold Coins
We Will Buy All U.S. Minted Coins
CONSIDER BRINGING EVERYTHING
We have surprised many people who thought their
items were not valuable enough to consider. The
expert evaluators we hate gathered together offer you
a wealth of knowledge and experience. We are
accustomed to paying thousands of dollars for valuable
items. Don't miss this opportunity. Perhaps we'll help
you find a real treasure in those hidden away pieces.
There's never a charge for our consultation or sen ice.

YOU MAY HAVE THOUSANDS OF
DOLLARS WORTH OF ITEMS
GATHERING DUST
Almost everyone has something of value they no longer
need or want: Inherited items. jewelry that doesn't fit
your st)le. watches that are old or elen broken, silver
pieces. Several items that might be useless to YOU...
may be considered treasures by the collectors from our
vast international network.


1. The R&C Roadshow specializes in
evaluating and buying new and antique
jewelry. Our generations of experience
qualify us to evaluate everything from
small pieces to the finest and most
valuable estate jewelry.
2. The R&C Roadshow has an undisputed
reputation.We work in compliance with
your Local and State Government.
3. Owners of rare pieces say that it is
extremely difficult to find buyers who
have the experience and knowledge to
pay top market prices most jewelry
stores won't even make you a credible
offer.
4. This is an ideal opportunity to have your
valuables evaluated (especially if you
inherited them) by experts right here in
this area. Come in for a free evaluation
and cash offer NO APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY.
5. If you are not wearing or enjoying the
items that you have, then this is a
great chance for you to convert them
to CASH. This is much better than just
holding on to hard to sell diamonds
jewelry & coins.
CHECK TO SEE IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THESE
ITEMS WE ARE BUYING


Rare & Important Jewelry
H' Diamond Bar Pins
Antique Bracelets
Diamond Bow Pins
Pocket Watches
Sapphire & Diamond Jewelry
Patek Phillipe Watches
Ruby & Diamond Jewelry
Emerald & Diamond Jewelry
Vacheron & Constantin Watches
Jewelry from the 20's, 30's, & 40's
Silver & Gold Boxes
Nicely Carved Old Cameos
R. Chaarus Statues


* Diamond Earrings
* Hamilton Watches
* R. Lalique Glass
* Rolex Watches
* Diamonds from 1 to 20 CTS.
* Antique Lockets
* Lladro
* Victorian Jewelry
* Cartier & Tiffany Items
* Gold or Silver Mesh Purses
* Art Deco Jewelry
* Railroad Watches


DIAMONDS
1/4 Carat Diamond up to..........$225.00
1/2 Carat Diamond up to.......$1,100.00
1 Carat Diamond up to..........$4,500.00
2 Carat Diamond up to........$14,000.00
3 Carat Diamond up to........$22,000.00
5 Carat Diamond up to......$950,000.00
We will pay you CASH for your Diamonds
with or without GIA Certificates. If you
have larger stones then listed please bring
them in for a FREE evaluation. Remember
WE PAY MORE!
WE ALSO BUY BROKEN
AND CHIPPED
DIAMONDS




All Diamond Engagement
Rings All
Diamond & Art Deco
Jewelry
AL TYPES & SIZES
PLATINUM
We buy all types of platinum such as
mountings, Crucibles, Wire & Foil,
Screens,Thermo-coupling wire. Bring
these items in to be tested so we can
quote you an accurate price on your
items.


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low.


SILVER COINS
Silver Dollars (before 1936) High Prices
Half Dollars (before 1965) Paid!
Quarters (before 1965)
Dimes (before 1965) Best Offers!
Nickels (before 1938)
War Nickels (1942-1945) High prices
Indian Head Pennies Paid
U.S. coins only. We also buy
Proof Sets,Commemoratives,
Mint Sets, 40% Silver Coins.


GENT'S OLD
WATCHES
WORTH A FORTUNE
IN CASH


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TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around

THE STATE

Citrus County

TPO seeking citizen
volunteers for group
The Citrus County Trans-
portation Planning Organiza-
tion (TPO) meets monthly in
Inverness in the Inverness
Government Center. The
TPO seeks to complete cre-
ation of a Citizen's Advisory
Committee (CAC).
The Citizen's Advisory
Committee will provide public
input to the TPO Board on
transportation issues. The
CAC will consist of seven
members, each of whom
shall be a resident of a TPO
member locality.
The CAC will assist the
TPO in the formulation of
goals and objectives for
shaping the urban environ-
ment, conduct public informa-
tion programs, and provide
an effective citizens' review of
the preliminary findings and
recommendations of any
TPO study.
The TPO's goal is to create
a unified, coordinated pres-
ence and develop a stronger
position in regional trans-
portation planning and fund-
ing issues.
For information, contact
Gary Maidhof, Citrus
County's operations and proj-
ects officer, at 352-527-5202
or by email at gary.maidhof
@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Historical Society
meets Jan. 27
The Citrus County Histori-
cal Society's annual meeting
will be Friday, Jan. 27, in the
courtroom of the Old Court-
house in Inverness. A lunch-
eon will begin at 11:30 a.m.
The meeting will follow at
12:30 p.m. with the installa-
tion of officers and directors
by Betty Strifler, Citrus
County clerk of the court. The
annual awards of the society
will be presented after the
installation.
The annual meeting is
open to all society members
who will be eligible to vote for
officers and directors. You do
not have to be a member,
however, to attend the
luncheon. The cost of the
luncheon is $10. Catered by
Joe's Deli, it will feature
lasagna with meat or vegeta-
bles. Reservations should be
made by Wednesday, Jan.
25, by calling 352-341-6427.

St. Petersburg

Design for St. Pete
pier chosen
Ajury considering designs
for a new pier in St. Peters-
burg has picked a winner.
The city announced Friday
the panel chose a design
called "The Lens," an oval
with looping bridges, pro-
tected dock and a canopy to
be St. Petersburg's new wa-
terfront icon. If the city council
agrees, the new pier will re-
place the present inverted-
pyramid structure on Tampa
Bay downtown. It was built in
1973. Architects and design-
ers made up the jury that
chose the design from
among the top three finalists,
who presented their plans
during a public meeting in
December. "The Lens" was
designed by architect Michael
Maltzan. Development of the
final design is expected to
take a year.

Campaign TRAIL

U Angela Vick, Republican
for Citrus County clerk of
court, will have a fundraiser
from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 4, at the Quail Run
Community Center, 1490 E.
Redpoll Trail, Hernando. In-
formation: Angie Snodgrass,
352-302-8319.

The Campaign Trail is a


listing ofpolitical happen-
ings for the 2012 election
season. Send events or
campaign fundraisers
to Mike Wright at
m wrigh t@chronicle
online, com.
-From staff and wire reports


Teen mentor defies odds, autism


17-year-old Citrus High School

student honored by

Big Brothers Big Sisters


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS On a re-
cent afternoon inside a fast-
food restaurant in
Inverness, it was apparent
Caitlin "Caity" Bryant might
not care for handshakes or
engage in much eye contact,
but overall, the 17-year-old
Citrus High School student
is cheerful and really ex-
cited about her latest honor:
being named High School
Big of the Year by Big Broth-
ers Big Sisters.
"It's nice to be recognized
for my hard work," she said.
As any parent would be,
Marianne Bryant could not


contain her happiness.
"Oh, we're so proud of
Caity," she said.
But beyond the antici-
pated delight, Marianne's
joy is amplified by the fact
she wasn't sure she would
ever see the day she would
be talking about her daugh-
ter finishing up high school
and preparing for college.
The first time the Chroni-
cle wrote about Caity in
2000, she was a precocious,
inquisitive 5-year-old who
was sweet and loving, but at
any moment could have
what her family described
as a "meltdown," the mother
of all tantrums.
It wasn't because Caity


had disci-
plinary is-
sues or was
a bad kid.
1 She's autis-
tic; her offi-
c i a 1
diagnosis
Caitlin w a s
Bryant PDDNOS or
Pervasive
Developmental Disorder,
Not Otherwise Specified.
And although it's mild,
she still exhibits varying de-
grees of characteristics as-
sociated with autism.
Nevertheless, Marianne
said her daughter has come
a long way So many people
in the community supported
Caity throughout the years,
so she said it was nice when
three years ago Caity be-
came a "Big" with BBBS
and decided to give back to
her community as a mentor
From 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
every Wednesday, Caity


spends time with her "Lit-
tle" at the high school.
"I get satisfaction from
just seeing him. He's
changed a lot," Caity said.
"He's focusing on his
schoolwork and he's calmed
down a lot."
Being a Big has helped
her see what younger chil-
dren are going through, she
explained.
"I wanted to give him a
role model," she said. "I
think every kid should have
a role model."
Though Caity is autistic,
she explains that it's never
been an excuse or a reason
to not be the best she can be.
"I don't see it as a disabil-
ity I see it as a learning dis-
ability," she said. "I've gotten
better over the years."
With high school wrap-
ping up, Caity has already
been accepted to Stetson
University in Deland, where
she plans to study sports


management so she can
eventually go into public
relations.
"She knows a lot about
sports," Marianne said.
Her favorite teams are
the Tampa Bay Rays, the
University of Florida Gators
and the University of North
Carolina Tar Heels.
Not at all nervous about
possibly entering into a
male-dominated profession,
Caity quickly states what
her goal in life is.
"I want to be in history I
want to be the greatest," she
said with a chuckle.
Seeing how far Caity has
come, Marianne can envi-
sion that for her daughter.
"I think for Caity, she just
keeps going," she said. "It's
nice to see her make the
turnaround."
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at
352-564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.



County


sets 3


Tuesday


meetings

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Three meetings in a row
are lined up Tuesday for the
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners
(BOCC).
Starting at 8 a.m., the
BOCC will meet as the Cit-
rus County Port Authority
Board.
The agenda will include a
report from the port direc-
tor, County Administrator
Brad Thorpe.
It will cover the status of
responses to the request for
qualifications for the Port
Citrus feasibility study, the
status of the port element
within the county's compre-
hensive plan, an update
about the Florida Ports
Council, a renewal of corpo-
rate membership within the
Gulf Ports Association and
upcoming meetings regard-
ing ports and port activities.
The Port Citrus logo and
website will be reviewed for
approval.
An item has been set on
the agenda for persons
wishing to address the
board.
At 9 a.m., the BOCC will
conduct a public workshop
to present proposed
changes to the Land Devel-
opment Code and provide
feedback to staff. All mem-
bers of the public wishing to
speak at the "open to the
public" portion of the
meeting will have three
minutes for a request or
presentation.
At 1 p.m., the regular
BOCC meeting will begin.
Public presentations and
proclamations will begin at
1:30 p.m.
At 3 p.m., the board will
approve and authorize the
chairman to sign a letter to
the governor supporting
limited changes to work-
force board oversight.
The letter states in part
that the BOCC is concerned
that reducing local gover-
nance and accountability
with an increase in state-
level oversight will not
solve the issue accountabil-
ity and transparency in the
handling of government
funds.
It "only inserts another
level of a government that
will impede with the roles of
job training," the letter states.
Public comment will be
invited after this item.
Copies of agendas are
available at wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us/. Click on Agen-
das/minutes at the top left of
the home page.
All meetings will convene
in Room 100 of the Citrus
County Courthouse at 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness.


Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2916


JIM SAUNDERS
The News Service Of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE Point-
ing to an "unprecedented
combination of circum-
stances," Progress Energy
Florida and consumer and
business representatives
have reached a major
agreement that would re-
solve questions about base-
electric rates and
nuclear-power projects.
The agreement, an-
nounced Friday, would lead
to an increase in 2013 in
customers' overall electric
bills. But those increases
would be somewhat tem-
pered by $288 million in re-
funds related to a massive
repair project at a Crystal
River nuclear plant.
Also, the agreement
would eliminate the need
for a potentially con-
tentious base-rate case be-
fore the Florida Public
Service Commission and
would set a fixed amount
that customers would pay
during the coming years for
a proposed Levy County nu-
clear plant
"This agreement pro-
vides certainty in these un-
certain times both for our
customers and our com-
pany," Progress spokesman
Tim Leljedal said.
State Public Counsel J.R.
Kelly, whose office repre-
sents consumers in utility
issues, said attorneys have
been working on an agree-
ment for months. He de-
scribed it as a "tremendous
settlement," though he said
neither he nor Progress got
everything it wanted.
The Public Service Com-
mission would have to ap-
prove the agreement,
which also was negotiated
by attorneys for the Florida


An agreement announced Friday
would lead to an increase in 2013
in Progress Energy customers'
overall electric bills. Those
increases would be tempered by
$288 million in refunds.


Retail Federation, the
Florida Industrial Power
Users Group, White
Springs Agricultural Chem-
icals and federal agencies.
Those parties often get in-
volved in utility issues be-
cause they represent major
electric users.
Under the agreement, a
residential customer who
uses 1,000 kilowatt hours of
electricity a month would
see a $4.93 increase in 2013.
That customer currently
pays $123.19 a month. The
utility industry commonly
uses a 1,000-kilowatt hour
residential bill as bench-
mark, though usage and ac-
tual costs vary widely
among customers.
Progress, the state's sec-
ond-largest utility behind
Florida Power & Light, has
gone through a tumultuous
period in recent months. A
large part of that is because
of a repair project that has
shut down a Crystal River
nuclear unit and spurred
questions about whether
Progress botched the work.
The agreement calls for
$288 million in customer
refunds of what are known
as "replacement power
costs" related to the repair
project. Those costs stem
from Progress needing to
buy or generate electricity
elsewhere to make up for
the lost production at Crys-
tal River.


Kelly said the agreement
calls for $129 million in re-
funds in 2013 and $129 mil-
lion in 2014 that would be
spread among all Progress
customers. Also, it calls for
an additional $10 million
each year in 2014, 2015 and
2016 that would mostly be
limited to residential
customers.
Progress has said it in-
tends to repair the plant
and get it back online,
though it remains possible
the plant would need to be
closed. The settlement
would provide assurances
that the Office of Public
Counsel and other parties
would not challenge a deci-
sion to repair the plant or
the method of repair, as-
suming work which is
currently on hold starts
by the end of 2012.
Separate from the Crys-
tal River repairs, Progress
also has faced controversy
about its proposal to build
two nuclear reactors in
Levy County. Under a state
law, the company has been
allowed to bill customers
for initial work on the proj-
ect, though the reactors
would not start generating
electricity for years, if ever.
Using the example of the
1,000-kilowatt hour resi-
dential customer, the agree-
ment would allow Progress
to collect $3.45 a month
over five years for the Levy


nuclear project. At least
part of that money would go
toward Progress' efforts to
get a critical license for the
project.
Barring the settlement,
Kelly said Progress was ex-
pected to seek larger
amounts of money for the
Levy project in coming
years.
Leljedal said the agree-
ment also will likely lead to
pushing back the estimated
date the first nuclear reac-
tor at Levy would start op-
erating. Progress had
estimated the start in 2021.
Early this year, Progress
also was expected to take
initial steps toward asking
the Public Service Commis-
sion for a base-rate in-
crease in 2013. Base rates
cover many of the day-to-
day costs of operating utili-
ties and are often one of the
most-contentious issues
that go before the PSC.
The agreement would
grant a $150 million base-
rate increase, effective next
year. Kelly said his office
has looked at company doc-
uments and finances and
was concerned that
Progress might receive a
base-rate increase that
would be "significantly
more" than $150 million if a
case moved forward.
In the 29-page document,
the parties say they are try-
ing to reduce uncertainty
and resolve the complicated
nuclear and base-rate issues.
"(The) parties recognize
that the issues addressed
by this agreement resolve
in a comprehensive man-
ner an unprecedented com-
bination of circumstances
at a difficult time in the
Florida economy, and that
all Floridians have been af-
fected by the current eco-
nomic climate," it reads.


Seeing sea cows


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
A manatee and her calf swim over the boat ramp and up to the dock on the Chassahowitzka River. The river,
which is spring fed, provides manatees a warm refuge, as they seek the 72- to 74-degree spring water when the
temperatures drop during the winter months.


Progress reaches accord on rates, refunds






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaigns Saturday at Tommy's Country
Ham House in Greenville, S.C.


PRIMARY
Continued from Page Al

most about picking a candi-
date who could defeat Pres-
ident Barack Obama this
fall. Gingrich was ahead of
the field for those voters'
support.
Romney, the former Mas-
sachusetts governor, swept
into South Carolina 11 days
ago as the favorite after being
pronounced the winner of
the lead-off Iowa caucuses,
then cruising to victory in
New Hampshire's first-in-
the-nation primary
But in the sometimes-sur-
real week that followed, he
was stripped of his Iowa tri-
umph GOP officials there
now say Santorum narrowly
won while former Utah
Gov Jon Huntsman dropped
out and endorsed Romney
and Texas Gov Rick Perry
quit and backed Gingrich.
Romney responded awk-
wardly to questions about re-


leasing his income tax re-
turns, and about his invest-
ments in the Cayman Islands.
Gingrich, the former speaker
of the House, benefited from
two well-received debate
performances while grap-
pling with allegations by an
ex-wife that he had once
asked her for an open mar-
riage so he could keep his
mistress.
By primary eve, Romney
was speculating openly about
a lengthy battle for the nomi-
nation rather than the quick
knockout that had seemed
within his grasp only days
earlier
There were 25 Republican
National Convention dele-
gates at stake, but political
momentum was the real
prize with the race to pick an
opponent to President
Barack Obama still in its
early stages.
In all, more than $12 mil-
lion was spent on television
ads by the candidates and
their allies in South Carolina,
much of it on attacks de-


signed to degrade the sup-
port of rivals.
Interviews with voters as
they left polling places
showed nearly half saying
their top priority was finding
a candidate who could defeat
Obama in the fall, followed by
wishes for experience, strong
moral character and true
conservatism.
In a state with 9.9 percent
unemployment, concern
about the economy was high,
and almost one-third of those
voting reported a household
member had lost a job in the
past three years.
The exit poll was con-
ducted for The Associated
Press and the television net-
works by Edison Research as
voters left polls at 35 ran-
domly selected sites. The sur-
vey involved interviews with
1,577 voters and had a margin
of sampling error of plus or
minus 4 percentage points.
Santorum announced
shortly after the polls closed
that he would open his cam-
paign in Florida on Sunday


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Daniel Lee Moore, 31, of
1165 County Road 464, Lake
Panasoffkee, at 1:43 p.m. Fri-
day on a felony charge of driv-
ing with a suspended/revoked
license (habitual traffic offender)
and a violation of probation on
an original misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery. No bond.
Michelle Elizabeth
Feuchter, 48, of 414 N.
Michaelmas Terrace, Crystal
River, at 2:14 p.m. Friday on a
misdemeanor charge of retail
petit theft. Bond $250.
Daniel P. King, 37, of 1130
E. Rhapsody Lane, Hernando,
at 2:21 p.m. Friday on a misde-
meanor charge of battery. Bond
$500.
David J. Belknap, 43, of
605 Zephyr St., Inverness, at
2:21 p.m. Friday on a misde-
meanor charge of battery. Bond
$500.
Kenneth D. Renew, 33, of
1567 River Bend Road, Weber
City, Va., at 4:30 p.m. Friday on
an active Pasco County warrant
for a violation of probation on an
original felony charge of robbery
by sudden snatching. No bond.
Burglaries
A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at 11:59 Jan. 11 in the
6200 block of E. Turkey Trail
Drive, Hemando.


ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also on the sheriff's
site, click on Crime
Mapping for a view of
where each type of
crime occurs in Citrus
County.

A burglary to a conveyance
and a petit theft occurred at 9:30
p.m. Jan. 17 in the 5500 block
of W. Bungalow Court, Crystal
River.
A burglary to an occupied
residence occurred at 11 p.m.
Jan. 17 in the 500 block of S.
Jackson Street, Beverly Hills.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence and a vehicle
theft occurred at noon Dec. 3 in
the 7700 block of N. Lazy Trail,
Crystal River.
M A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at 8 a.m. Jan. 17 at
Suncoast Boulevard, Crystal
River.
A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at 5 p.m. Jan. 18 in the
5000 block of S. Slow Point,
Homosassa.


A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at 7 p.m. Jan. 18 in the
300 block of N. Venturi Avenue,
Crystal River.
A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at 9:30 p.m. Jan. 18 in
the 600 block of N. McGowan
Ave., Crystal River.
M A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at 10 p.m. Jan. 18 in
the 700 block of Newton Ave.,
Inverness.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at 8
a.m. Jan. 19 in the 900 block of
E. Hartshom Lane, Pine Ridge.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at 10
a.m. Jan. 19 in the 700 block of
N.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal River.
Thefts
A petit theft occurred at 4
p.m. Jan. 19 in the 2900 block
of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
A petit theft occurred at 4
p.m. Jan. 19 in the 200 block of
N. Suncoast Boulevard, Crystal
River.
M A theft of a controlled sub-
stance occurred at 6 p.m. Jan.
19 in the 4000 block of S. Sun-
coast Boulevard, Homosassa
Springs.
Vandalism
A vandalism ($200 or
more) and a petit theft occurred
at 8 p.m. Jan. 17 in the 7700
block of W. Seven Rivers Drive,
Crystal River.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Fictitious Name Notices......................0D7

Bid Notices...............................................D7

A Meeting Notices...................................D7

Miscellaneous Notices........ ...........0D7

Notice to Creditors/Administration........D7

", ; Surplus Property.. .......................... D7
.F.: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


mainly ozone.


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M. Burlington, VT
M. Charleston, SC
M. Charleston, WV
Charlotte
S Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
W Nashville


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s
s
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
PC
s
ts
pc
ts
pc
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Partly cloudy with a chance
of isolated showers today.


L75 50 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by"
-- TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 51
AM Fog; Partly cloudy to sunny

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 52
AM Fog; Partly cloudy to sunny

1 TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 57
Partly cloudy to sunny


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 77/46
Record 86/13
Normal 71/42
Mean temp. 62
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.66 in.
Total for the year 0.66 in.
Normal for the year 2.03 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.06 in.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
1/22 SUNDAY 4:20 10:34 4
1/23 MONDAY 5:13 11:25 5


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
:47 1
:38 1


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT
0 SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY.
FEB. 7 FEB. 14 MnOONSET TODAY


LJOR
)N)
11:01
11:51


.6:01 P.r
.7:23 A.M
.6:39 A.I
.5:40 P.R


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.f -dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County: Irrigation is limited to twice per week.
Even addresses: Thursday and/or Sunday before 10am or after 4pm.
Odd Addresses: Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10am or after 4pm.
No restrictions on fountains, car washing or pressure washing. Hand watering requires the
use of a shut-off nozzle.
PLEASE CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL NEW PLANT MATERIAL.
Questions, concerns or reporting violations, please call Citrus County 352-527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 4:09 a/12:14 a 6:02 p/1:15 p
Crystal River** 2:30 a/10:37 a 4:23 p/10:25 p
Withlacoochee* 12:17 a/8:25 a 2:10 p/8:13 p
Homosassa*** 3:19 a/12:14 p 5:12 p/--


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
4:58 a/1:03 a 6:32 p/1:53p
3:19 a/11:15 a 4:53 p/11:09 p
1:06 a/9:03 a 2:40 p/8:57 p
4:08 a/12:02 a 5:42 p/12:52 p


Gulf water
temperature



64
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.73 27.70 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.38 34.36 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 36.52 36.51 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.03 38.00 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


- .
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 81 68 .01 ts 75 61
New York City 29 23 .39 s 36 34
Norfolk 60 40 .47 sh 47 42
Oklahoma City 43 21 w 69 32
Omaha 24 11 rs 40 23
Palm Springs 82 53 pc 67 47
Philadelphia 31 25 .38 c 40 37
Phoenix 72 48 pc 69 43
Pittsburgh 28 19 .39 pc 44 39
Portland, ME 16 6 .07 s 27 25
Portland, Ore 52 43 .05 r 44 38
Providence, R.I. 23 18 .41 s 31 27
Raleigh 58 46 .42 sh 44 41
Rapid City 56 8 pc 40 19
Reno 45 35 .49 rs 44 30
Rochester, NY 27 17 .11 pc 36 33
Sacramento 59 48 1.12 sh 57 39
St. Louis 32 21 ts 50 35
St. Ste. Marie 18 -5 .01 c 31 30
Salt Lake City 53 33 .74 pc 39 25
San Antonio 68 49 pc 80 44
San Diego 62 54 .09 pc 65 49
San Francisco 57 49 .10 r 54 45
Savannah 76 58 .01 c 67 55
Seattle 44 40 .34 r 47 40
Spokane 40 27 .13 sn 34 29
Syracuse 26 16 .17 pc 32 31
Topeka 33 13 c 52 29
Washington 34 28 .24 c 38 36
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 85 Harlingen, Texas LOW-26 Ely, Minn.

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 85/70/pc Madrid
Amsterdam 45/41/sh Mexico City
Athens 57/46/s Montreal
Beijing 28/6/s Moscow
Berlin 40/35/sh Paris
Bermuda 70/64/c Rio
Cairo 65/48/s Rome
Calgary 34/25/pc Sydney
Havana 81/56/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 62/50/sh Toronto
Jerusalem 46/40/r Warsaw


60/45/s
50/40/pc
57/32/pc
73/48/pc
20/18/pc
17/9/c
52/42/c
87/74/pc
61/47/pc
74/67/sh
47/39/sh
37/34/c
36/32/rs


.16 s
pc
.33 sh
1.48 ts
.47 c
pc
.29 c
pc
.16 ts
.04 rs
.17 s
.10 pc
.01 s
.15 sh
.21 pc
.40 sh
r
pc
.10 pc
.75 sh
.17 pc
.13 s
ts
rs
rs
.02 pc
s
c
.16 c
.11 s
ts
.06 c
.06 ts
pc
ts
.64 pc
c
.08 ts

.01 ts
.07 ts
.47 c


C I T R U S


C U N TY


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 41%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, elm, maple
Today's count: 8.6/12
Monday's count: 11.0
Tuesday's count: 10.9
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


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JAN.23 JAN. 30


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


.....................

......................


ITI UMO I l um l ...............


A4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


P
P
P
P





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Senate draws lines, House draws purse


Week in state gov't andpolitics
JIM SAUNDERS AND prove new political bound-
MICHAEL PELTIER aries for Senate and con-
The News Service of gressional districts.
Florida Perhaps the biggest sur-
prise was the amount of bi-
TALLAHASSEE The partisan support for the
Florida Senate isn't wasting plans, with seven of the Sen-
time. ate's 12 Democrats joining
Senators this week tack- Republicans to vote in favor
led perhaps the most con- "This was a true biparti-
troversial issue of the san vote on maybe the most
legislative session, over- contentious issue in poli-
whelmingly approving plans tics," said Haridopolos, R-
to redraw boundaries for Merritt Island.
Senate and congressional But that didn't quiet op-
districts. At the same time, ponents, who contend the
Senate President Mike maps are an incumbent-pro-
Haridopolos moved quickly tection plan that will keep
to revive a controversial the GOP in firm control of
proposal that would priva- Florida politics. The Senate
tize prisons across the votes are the first step in
southern half of the state. what likely will be a drawn-
The House worked at a out process that will include
slower pace, maneuvering legal challenges.
bills through committees "The maps passed today
without bothering to go to protect every incumbent
the House floor. But senator and ensure another
Speaker Dean Cannon gave decade of complete Repub-
the first clear indications of lican control of Tallahas-
how the House wants to ap- see," Florida Democratic
proach the budget, going Party Chairman Rod Smith
along with Gov Rick Scott's said after the votes Tuesday
push for more education "And the Florida Constitu-
funding but rebuffing major tion is no less offended by a
Medicaid cuts for hospitals. Democrat voting to protect
"The House budget will their seat than a Republican
prioritize K-12 education," voting to do the same."
Cannon wrote. "This subcom- The debate will shift
mittee will receive the great- across the Capitol in the
est percentage of the General coming week. The House
Revenue allocation as well as Redistricting Committee is
the greatest increase in fund- scheduled to vote on its pro-
ing," Cannon said. posals Jan. 27 with a floor
MAPPING THE FUTURE coming as early as Feb. 2.
After months of hearings, PRISON PRIVATIZATION
the Senate voted 34-6 to ap- Haridopolos, Rules


Chairman
J o h n
Thrasher, R-
St. Augus-
tine, and
Budget
Chairman
JD Alexan-
der, R-Lake
Wales, were
peeved
when a
L e o n


County cir-
cuit judge blocked a plan to
privatize prison facilities in
18 counties.
The judge said lawmakers
improperly approved the
plan in budget fine print, in-
stead of in a regular law.
That led this week to the
Senate pushing forward
with a bill that would revive
the plan.
On Friday, Haridopolos
said he will send a contro-
versial prison-privatization
plan to another committee
for review following con-
cerns by Sen. Mike Fasano,
R-New Port Richey, for
closer review of the initia-
tive that initially was
scheduled only for a hear-
ing in Thrasher's Rules
Committee.
Fasano, R-New Port
Richey, sent a letter to Hari-
dopolos arguing that bills
dealing with the privatiza-
tion plan are of "such a mag-
nitude" that they deserve to
be heard by three commit-
tees that focus on criminal-
justice and government


oversight
issues.
Hari -
dopolos, R-
Merritt
Island, re-
leased a
memo a
short time
later saying
he would
send the
primary


privatiza-
tion bill (SB 2038) to the
Budget Committee, which is
chaired by Alexander, a
chief proponent of
privatization.
BUDGET ALLOCATIONS
Two weeks into the 2012
session, House budget lead-
ers followed through on
promises to push forward
with writing the new budget,
despite sentiments in the
Senate for going slow until
more economic data is
made available.
In releasing budget allo-
cations the determination of
how much each part of the
budget will include -
House Speaker Dean Can-
non said the chamber would
honor Gov Rick Scott's call
to pump an additional $1
billion into public
education.
But the Winter Park Re-
publican chose not to commit
to massive cuts to hospital re-
imbursement rates as pro-
posed by Scott, a former
health care executive.
In a memo, Cannon


Weekly ROUNDUP


pointed to a plan that law-
makers passed last year to
transform Medicaid into a
statewide managed-care
system. Though Cannon did
not specifically mention
Scott's proposal, the memo
said the House wants to use
the managed-care plan to
change Medicaid funding
for hospitals.
"The House will continue
to work toward a simplified
hospital funding model,
consistent with the Florida
Medicaid reform enacted
into law last year, recogniz-
ing that this effort will re-
quire more time-consuming,
meticulous work and the in-
vestment of stakeholders,"
Cannon's memo said.
The House plan sets aside
$100 million with three-
quarters of that money re-
curring for lowering
taxes. Scott proposed de-
ducting $23 million for tax
cuts this year, with a consti-
tutional amendment allow-
ing for further reductions.
The House blueprint
would also set aside $1 bil-
lion in reserves, a long-
standing goal of both
chambers.
UNEMPLOYMENT
Providing a backdrop for
all budget negotiations, the
state's economy continued
to move in the right direc-
tion. The state's unemploy-
ment rate in December fell
0.1 percentage points to 9.9
percent, the first time since
April 2009 the state's jobless
rate fell below double digits.
Gov Scott was quick to
point out that more than


MANIA
Continued from Page Al

we hit Caf6 on the Avenue
for lunch," Gilliland said
clutching her second pur-
chase of the day
Forrest said she mostly
enjoys just having a nice,
enjoyable day out with
friends.
Across the main thor-
oughfare, Coleen Brady
buzzed around her down-
town business, The Wine
Shop III, catering to patrons
roaming around her estab-
lishment.
She described the festival
as pleasant and "a good
event." She also said it was
very good for exposure and
she expected it would be an
excellent fundraiser for the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce.
A.J. Newmann decided to
let her flavors do the selling
at her booth, which featured
seasonings, dips and spices
galore. She also had some
quirky cork art made from
old wine corks on display
The Wisconsin resident
said it was her first time
vending in Florida, and she
was thoroughly enjoying
herself.
"It's been a good day," she
said. "It was a little slow


WEEKLY LINEUP
Nearly a dozen medical
professionals share
their expertise with
columns in Health &
Life./Tuesdays
Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the
week from the recipes
in the Food section.
/Thursdays
Get a jump on weekend
entertainment with the
stories in Scene.
/Fridays
See what local houses
of worship plan to do in
the Religion section.
/Saturdays
Read about area
businesses in the
Business section.
/Sundays
Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving
money and cashing
in on antiques in
HomeFront./Sundays
Approval for story ideas
must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors
before a reporter is
assigned. Call Editor
Charlie Brennan at
352-563-3225, or call
Sandra Frederick,
managing editor, at
352-563-5660. Be
prepared to leave a
message.


PiK


Ill
/4-
4-.


first thing this morning, but
it has picked up."
Jack and Linda Nicholas
made the short trip over
from Inverness to enjoy the
good weather and festivi-


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ties. Remembering two
years ago when freezing
cold temperatures put a
damper on the weekend-
long festival the couple
agreed it was much better


this year.
"It's nice," Linda
Nicholas said, "and we love
the manatees."
The Florida Manatee Fes-
tival is hosted and organ-


People flocked Saturday to Crystal River to enjoy the 25th
annual Manatee Festival in the newly streetscaped Citrus
Avenue area of downtown. Citrus Avenue connected to the
Third Street Park, where manatee boats gave tours of
King's Bay.
DAVE SIGLERIChronicle


ized by the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, the
Rotary Clubs of Citrus
County and the City of Crys-
tal River, with generous
sponsorship from a number
of local companies and or-
ganizations.
The festival, which has
vendors on both sides of


U.S. 19 and Citrus Avenue,
runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today The cost is $3 for
adults, and children
younger than 12 are free.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


;I iuI i I


-- t
at a""


NEW PATIENTS AND EMERGENCIES WELCOME
Hablamos Espaiol

CHILDREN'S CLEANING,

FILLINGS AND SEALANTS

MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED
Accepting: Chase Health Advance and CareCredit
*D0150, D0274, D1110 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to p,...... i
payment, or be reimbursed for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and ii -..
hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee services, examination, or '
Cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty area by the American Dental Association or the Florida Board of i. ii
Some restrictions may apply


140,000 jobs have been cre-
ated since December 2010;
an accolade the Democrats
say ignores opportunities
because of decisions made
by Scott to refuse federal
transportation money and
plans to privatize prisons.
INTERNET CAFES
Taking his strongest stand
yet, the governor this week
said he believed Internet
caf6s were illegal or should
be illegal, inserting himself
into a high profile feud.
With opposing factions
jockeying for position on the
issue of expanded gambling
in the state, Scott defended
the state's lottery program
but said the storefront caf6s,
which offer computerized
slots and other sweepstakes
games, are skirting the law.
Meanwhile, the House
and Senate continue to spar
over whether to ban the
storefront operations or
heavily regulate the nearly
1,500 venues now operating
across the state. The Senate
Regulated Industries Com-
mittee on Thursday ap-
proved a bill to regulate the
caf6s.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: The Senate ap-
proved its plans to redraw
political boundaries or state
and congressional districts,
a development expected to
be followed in the House
over the next few weeks.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "It's gambling in
every sense of the word."
Rep. Scott Plakon, R-Long-
wood, who sponsored a bill
to ban Internet caf6s.


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STATE


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Doris Allen, 81
HOMOSASSA
Doris J. Allen, 81, a long-
time resident of Dearborn,
Michigan and Homosassa,
Florida, died Jan. 17, 2012.
Doris is survived by her
husband of 62 years,
Richard Allen; daughter,
Gail Allen; sons, Jeff, Brian
(Cheryl) and Tom (Irene)
Allen; grandchildren, Corey,
Kacie, Serena and Joseph
Allen; brothers, Guy (Mar-
ion) and John (Fran) Chris-
tian; and brothers-in-law
Joseph Maloney and John
Reyman. She was preceded
in death by her parents,
Agnes and Guy Christian,
and sisters Betty Maloney
and Wilma Reyman.
She was a devoted
mother, wife and friend to
many, throughout her 81
years. She was a very
friendly, generous person,
who will best be remem-
bered as a great storyteller,
attentive listener and for
her incredibly infectious
laugh. There will be a pri-
vate wake to commemorate
her life, date not yet deter-
mined. In lieu of flowers,
donations in her memory
can be made to the
Alzheimer's Association -
http://www.alz.org or a char-
ity of your choice.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

James
Androski, 47
HOMOSASSA
James Michael Androski,
47, of Homosassa, FL,
passed away on January 19,
2012.
He was
born on Jan-
uary 11,
1965, in
w Boston, MA,
S to Francis
Androski
and Donna
Jones. He
James served his
Androski community
proudly as a
former Crystal River Police
officer. James was a former
member of the Elks Lodge
and a member of St. Bene-
dicts Catholic Church in
Crystal River.
He is survived by his chil-
dren, James Pickering of
Taunton, MA, Karah and
Alyssa Androski of Citrus
Springs, FL, and his step-
daughter Brittni Richards
of Citrus Springs, FL; par-
ents Frances and Brigitte
Androski of Homosassa, FL,
and Donna and Daryl Jones
of Citrus Springs; his former
wife Kathy Androski of Cit-
rus Springs; and bothers
Frank Androski of Brocton,
MA, and Christopher An-
droski of Taunton, MA.
Visitation will take place
from 6 to 8 p.m., Tuesday,
January 24, 2012, at Brown
Funeral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto, FL. A Mass of
the Resurrection will be
held at 10 a.m. Wednesday,
January 25, 2012, at St.
Benedicts Catholic Church
in Crystal River.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. corn.


In r. Anss











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George Lee, 75
CRYSTAL RIVER
George E. Lee, 75, of Crys-
tal River, died Friday, Janu-
ary 20, 2012, at the Hospice
House
of Citrus
County.
He was
born May
11, 1936, in
S New York,
NY, and
came here
40 years ago
George from Long
Lee Island, NY
He was a
U.S. Air Force veteran and
the former owner of Lee's
Trucking of Crystal River He
was also employed at Central
Catholic School and St
Benedict Catholic Church.
He is survived by his wife,
Barbara; a son, Russell Lee;
daughter, Saundra Mercuri;
and three grandchildren.
A memorial prayer serv-
ice will be held at St. Bene-
dict Catholic Church on
Monday, January 23 at 11
a.m. Strickland Funeral
Home of Crystal River is as-
sisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Gaylord
Hulsebus, 72
DUNNELLON
Gaylord "Huck" Hulse-
bus, 72, of Dunnellon, FL,
passed away January 16,
2012. He was born on No-
vember 12, 1939, to Everett
and Ophelia Hulsebus in
Fort Madison,IA.
Huck was a member of
the NRA, AOPA and an
Army veteran.
He is survived by sons,
Anthony and David; daugh-
ter, Cinderella Andres;
brother, Stuart; as well as
six grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
A graveside service for
Huck will be held at 2 p.m.
Monday, January 23,2012, at
the Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell, FL, with
full military honors.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.





Harold
Harper, 82
LECANTO
Harold L. Harper, 82, of
Lecanto, died Friday, Jan.
20, 2012. Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.


Russell
Smith, 82
HERNANDO
Russell Smith, 82, of Her-
nando, FL, died Wednesday,
January 18, 2012, at Citrus
Memorial
hospital.
He was
born on
June 19,
1929, in
Dunnellon,
FL, to the
late Alzo
A and Alberta
Russell Smith. He
Smith worked as
a heavy
equipment operator engi-
neer in the construction in-
dustry. Russell was united
in Holy Matrimony to the
deaconess Lucile Smith.
He is survived by wife,
Lucile Smith, of Hernando,
FL; one son, Gregory Smith
of Hernando, FL; one
brother, Earl Smith of Inver-
ness, FL; two sisters, Eddie
Lee Riley of Erie, PA, and
twin sister, Ruth Twiggs (Al-
fred) of Hernando, FL; two
sisters-in-law, Alwillie
Smith of Inverness, FL, and
Geneva Bell of Orlando, FL;
godchildren Pastor Tammy
Langley, Latoria Hollis,
Deleen Houston and Gre-
gory Clark Jr; two special
daughters, Jennifer and
Shelia Wright-McAboy; one
special son, Blaze White;
and a host of nieces
nephews, cousins and sor-
rowing friends.
Funeral services for Rus-
sell Smith will be conducted
Tuesday, January 24, 2012,
at 11 a.m. at the Hernando
Church of the Living God,
3441 E. Oleander Lane, Her-
nando, FL, Pastor Gladys
Brown officiating and
Bishop Theodore N. Brown,
eugolist.
Interment will follow in
the Hernando Community
Cemetery, Hernando, FL.
Friends may call 9 to 11 a.m.
Tuesday at the Church of
the Living God.
Arrangements entrusted
to: Cason Funeral and Cre-
mation Services, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Betty
Starkey, 89
HOMOSASSA
Betty Jane Starkey, 89,
Homosassa, passed away,
January 19, 2012.
She was a member of
First United Methodist
Church, Homosassa.
She is survived by a son,
John (Barbara), New Port
Richey; daughter, Gerry S.
Graham (Jim) and loving
family
A memorial service will
be held at a later date.
Michels & Lundquist Fu-
neral Home in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.


The Beverly Hills Civic
Association, Gerry Jones/
The Travel Club and the
CHRONut LE
are proud to welcome back


V1 Soft Sounds@

of Carol Kline
and "Love Bucket"

Performing their very highly acclaimed...

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Curtis Peterson Auditorium, Lecanto
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Tickets are $15 and may be purchased at:
BB&T, Nature Coast Bank, Cadence Bank,
Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club
or visit burnthemortgage.com



0ooo009 For information call 527-8002 or 287-1421


Vickey
Branco, 31
BROOKSVILLE
Vickey Ann Branco, 31, of
Brooksville, died Monday,
Jan. 16, 2012.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services taking place at a
later date in Fall River,
Mass.

Lydia Pillau, 87
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lydia T Pillau, 87, of
Crystal River, died Friday,
Jan. 20, 2012.
Funeral services will be
held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan.
24, 2012, at Wilder Funeral
Home, with Pastor Marcus
Rooks officiating.
Internment will follow at
Florida National Cemetery
Family will receive friends
Tuesday from 10 a.m. until
the hour service.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Florence
Polliard, 100
MOUNT DORA
Florence R. Polliard, 100,
of Mount Dora, died Thurs-
day, Jan. 19, 2012.
Local arrangements will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, with services tak-
ing place at a later date in
Mercer, Pa.

Edward
Woller, 92
HOMOSASSA
Edward Woller, 92, of Ho-
mosassa, died Saturday, Jan.
21, 2012.
Local arrangements will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, with services tak-
ing place at a later date in
Kenosha, Wis.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@ chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or society
in charge of
arrangements.
Additionally, all
obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline.
com.



S In loving memory
Bradley J. Clegg
4 12/30/50-01/22/10 1
C Your memory will
4 always be a very big
part of my life. I miss R
4 you everyday. You are
Forever in my heart.
fv i Love, i
S, Linda
SpprpapztTapzy


Obituaries


RICHARD MCVAY
Pensacola News-Journal

PENSACOLA Pen-
sacola's oldest Catholic
church has been desig-
nated one of the nation's 72
minor basilicas under an
order by Pope Benedict
XVI.
The parish of St Michael
the Archangel, which
traces is roots to the 16th
century exploration of
Northwest Florida, was
canonically established in
1781. The current church
building, located at the
southwest corner of
Palafox and Chase streets,
was constructed in 1886.
"It's a very nice honor for
the area and for the local
church," Monsignor Luke
Hunt said.
The parish submitted
the application to the Vati-
can for the basilica desig-
nation in 2003 with the
hopes of receiving it in
time for Pensacola's 450th
anniversary celebration in
2009.
"Unfortunately, it didn't
happen then," Hunt said.
"One of our priests in
Rome asked about it, and it
was immediately acted
on."
Basilica is an honor be-
stowed on a church
deemed by the pope to
have historical and spiri-
tual importance.
Churches are catego-
rized as either major or
minor.
The Catholic Church's
four major basilicas are lo-
cated in Rome.
There are more than
1,500 minor basilicas
around the world, in addi-
tion to those in the United
States.
The closest minor basil-
ica to St. Michael is the
Cathedral Basilica of the
Immaculate Conception in
Mobile, built in 1850 and
designated in 1962. St.
Michael is the fourth
church in Florida to re-
ceive the designation.
"It's a very happy ending
to a very long process,"
said the Rev Peter
McLaughlin, pastor of the
church. "It's wonderful for
the parish and great for the
community."
McLaughlin said the
process began about 10
years ago, but the applica-
tion had to be resubmitted


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after the first application
contained an irregularity.
"Fortunately it was re-
viewed and found to
be exceptional," said
McLaughlin, who has led
the church for the past 7 1/2
years.
The church's historical
significance can be seen,
McLauglin said, in the
number of records on
Catholic families.
"I can't begin to count
how many old Pensacola
Catholic families have
their roots in St. Michael
parish," he said.
Parish member Nancy
Fetterman said parish-
ioners are thrilled with the
news.
"This is the best news
Pensacola could have. To
make a community church
even a minor basilica is a
special feather in our hat,"
said Fetterman, who has
researched the history of
the church.
"(The parish) repre-
sented the Catholic Church
in the frontier town of Pen-
sacola and was recognized
as a taming force for its
citizens."
The church will com-
memorate the event on
Feb. 10 at a special Eu-
charist celebration.
Other special events are
likely to complement the
celebration, Hunt said.
Archbishop Thomas G.
Wenski, apostolic adminis-
trator of the Diocese of
Pensacola-Tallahassee,
will be the principal cele-
brant at the Mass.
"With this honorific title
comes a strengthening re-
lationship of this church
with the Chair of Peter,"
Wenski said in a statement
announcing the designa-
tion. "St. Michael the
Archangel becomes an
ideal center for special
liturgical and pastoral min-
istry in the Diocese of
Pensacola-Tallahassee."
Wenski attributed the
designation to years of
work by Bishop John Ri-
card, bishop emeritus of
the diocese.
"I thank Bishop Ricard
for his vision of bringing
this designation to St.
Michael the Archangel,"
Wenski said in a video-
taped message.
Ricard led the diocese
from 1997 until his retire-
ment last year.


To Place Your

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msnyder@chronicleonline.com
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Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
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Community-Wide Fitness Challenge

February 6 through March 18, 2012

No excuses this year Join the 8th Annual Fitness Challenge
* You get points for a variety of types of exercise
* Teams select the fitness level category to compete in:
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and ask for details. CJ ne co


Vatican honors


Pensacola church


St. Michael the Archangel

named minor basilica

under papal order


A6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


We pause to remember the 53,000,000 lives (

lost since Roe vs. Wade January 22, 1973.




Citrus County Right to Life Invites You to Attend Our



Roe-vs-Wade



Memorial Service


Monday, Jan. 23, at Noon

on the North Lawn of the Old Citrus County Courthouse
D James Abram L Bob &Terri Abrahamm Frank& Beth Abramowich 0 Fred & Patty Adams L E. Adams 0 David Adams O Shelby Adams IL i- .. I h I; ,11,H -.1,11. H I:,:.1 .. I b 1..,, -.1,,, . ,.. I -m.i... I_ I I,.. ,,:1,: -,Ium,,,F II 1 -IriI .
SLinda Alcoms Sam & Sharon Aldridge Ray &Terri Allee Wanda Allen James Altomare Sandra Altomare M & Mrs. Steve & -..... -, .. in.. .: --.1.:t |_ -i..Sn ..., ...I_ Mi &,,n,, -n,&,: ,I 1 T... ...: -,,1i. 11.
D Frances Anderson Thomas Arduengo l Norma Arkell Fabien & Louise Arnell Pinky Arteca Richard Arteca Richard Artisen E Pal .: ... .: -I ..... ...... I -....1 1. 1 , 11l. -I. I.. .l :11 1.. .. i: ,,,n, ,:,
D Sue Bailey D Dianne Bailey E Colleen Bailey D Maureen BairdL Lowell M. Baker Barbara & Ed Bakes Martha Balado L Louise Banc i 1 1 ........ 1, 1i: ,1.i1 .. .. I ii n:1 1 ,:i ....... .1 11 Ill., ii ll .., : 1. 1...
0 Ben & Carrie Barrera E James & Josephine Barter [ Marie Barter Martin & Beverly Bass [ Sharon Basualdo D Bill & Pat Baumgartner[ i .. I i,: 1 i. :,iil, .. ,: ,:, i,: I I i i 1:,1 i,:, nn ,.. : , ,: 1i,:, i ,.111. 1,1
D Bernard Belanger [ Stephanie Bell D Frank Bendowski E Lois Bennin D Barbara Benoya Barbara L. Benson D Mary Lou Benson E Mi. I. ,, I i .II. I, ..i, ,1 1 .. o i ii :i .1..: I I i,:, I i i ..:. i i :,..1,
D Matt Bescher E Jacqueline Best D Angelo & Adele Bianco D Albert Binde D Mr. & Mrs. Vernon Bishop L John Bivona D Florence Bivona i H,, I _11 1 .. i .11,, i I I,:1 i,1, I _i ,: ,i, ,i i I ,, .
D Margaret Bloom D James & Joanne Bobay D Caterina Bonoe Herman & Veronica Bont D Danny Boone D Jane Boone D Rose Marie Boor: L_ I I: 1 1 111,.11... I ... i h I 111, .. :, I.. : i, .. I, ,:: .. ,1 111. ,
D Teresa L. Bradley D E.J. & Linda Bradley D Cheryl & Fred Brannen E Ann C. Breault E Charlotte Brennan D Elissa & Patrick Brisbin E Mari.,, ,n,: i .. ... 1 l .. I 1: I,, 1:I .i l, 1:... 1
0 Rhonda Brown D Noreen Brown lTom &Jan BrownhillED Marjorie Bruening[I Elizabeth Brumble[ Dianne &GGeorge Buck ETracy &Dar, I I iI I l,: ,1,: lI. ,:i 1 .. : I .11 1.1 i I ill I ,: I i .iI i
D Matthew Maryanne Byrnes Mr. & Mrs. KennyCabrera AlexCaceresEl Elizabeth Callaghan[ Cindy &Jack Campbell& Family D Mar .l.,1,1, i :.,, ,,.' .. .. .:111I i ii ..I, i i ,,II .,: 1.,,:
0 Richard & Carlene Carroll D Mary Carter Joyce CassidyE Evelyn Castellaneta IJames &Shannon Castonguay [Joan Cecil Vic & Gii,.. 1.,, I 1 i- 1.:1..: : 1. : ..1.. 1.1i 1 i11 ,
F Michelle Chamberlain D Nancy C. Chandler D Ann Chapman D Maril Chergwin D Susan Child L Margaret Chilewski Harry & Marilyn Ch i I I .:I1 ,..,: I, i. 1.1i
F Edward ClarkL Paul & Mildred Clark 0 Louise Clemens 0 Barbara Clifton 0 Theresia ClutsD Dick & Glenna Cofran 0 Bernice ColbathEI0 Fi.. ii 1. 1 I .,:,i..,I d.II.. ....
E Conard Family Headquarters E Amanda ConnollyD [John Conroy E Howard Cooke E Jerry & Sue CoolmanE Ray CooperD Cliff & HeidiC, i.
E Joyce Corrado D Frank & Liz Correia[ IRon CorriveauE Jeannine Cote E Gay & Jack Couch l Jean Courtney El Robert & Barbara CoxeI, 1.1 -o
0 Mike & Sharon Cress 0 John Cromwell D Susan Cromwell D Lou Crosswhite E Jim & Billie Crouch D Margaret Csakvary D Joann Csaszali ... .
D Monsignor George Cummings D Bob & Rommy Cuneo D Robert Cunha D Lucille Currier [ Same & Mary Curtis D Brenda Cutrone D Kathy I.:,:, I, I
D Clarisse & Anthony D'Adamo D Manuel Da Silva D Mary Lou Dailey D John Dalton D Jean Daly L Kay Daniels L Rita Darling D Jacinta [, ,
D The Daugherty Family D Angel & Jenny Davila D Dick & Donna Davis D Gene & Deanna Davis D Jeannine & Ron Davis D Lou & Kathy Da
D Mr. & Mrs. Dominick De Falcol Stephen De Fiorel Madeline De Fiore E Concetta De LucaD Lynn Decker D Warren & Sylvia Deets E Tra,, I I.>
0 Marie Delalla 0 Karen Demicoli 0 Michael, Debbie, Melanie & Lauren Desautel [ George Deseutel [ David & Kelly Desmond E James & ,:
0 William & Barbara Dexter D Vic & Peggy Di Frisco D Ellin Di Giovanni D Bert Diaz [ Deanna Diaz [ Rosemary Dingman E Ben & Nancy Di ,
0 George & Mary DIuhy E Dorothy Dobos E Doug & Laurie Dodd E Theresa Doherty E Blanche Dooley El Joyce Y. Dorsten E Dianne Dotson
D Brian Dowling D Brian Dowling L Juanita Downum L Jackie Dracey D Sonya Dress D Frank Duarte L Rebecca Duarte D Peggy & Jim Du,
D Peter Duda L Jim & Barbara Dunigan D Tracie Dunkin L Joan Dunn D W. H. Duran L Ray & Faye Durrett L Dr. & Mrs. William H. Dwinelle
D Frank Ear D Vera Eddy [ Laveme Edwards E Lu Eggenberger l Joanne Ehmke E Alan & Gayle Eiler D Joi Ely l David Emerling l Marge iii
E Ralph & Janine Enger E Virginia & Grant Eriksen LE Joe & Andrea Eufrazio E John & Connie Evans [ Greg & Becky Evans E Barry & Mary i
0 Gilbert Evers E .ill, : I all .l,:li [I George & Lillian Fanning El Dewey & Frida Farmer [I Richard Feldman L Lorna & Steve Ferrante
L Stacy Fields L Jeanette Finck L Chris Finer 0 Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Finer L John Fischer L Rebecca Fisher L Thomas E. Fisher L Joan Fitzg,:i ,1
D Patricia Flaherty L Mary Jane FodorL Char Fontaine L J.M. Ford D G.R. Ford D Joshua Ford ] Dave Forster Betty, Derek& Jim Fowler
D Emie & Darla Fowler D Joseph & Suzanne Frank D Earl Frank D Cathy Frank D Helen Frank D Karen Frank L Monica Frank L Elizabeth Frai I
E Richard Frank l Jennifer Frank E Frank Family l Raymond & Marlene Frey E Lorraine Fricke l Ron Friesland l Wilford Friesland
0 Marilyn Friesland [ Bill & Betty Friess E Susan Froehlich [ Ronald Fry E Joyce Fry E Ed & Dolores Fuchs [ Pat Fulton [ Connie Garcia
0 Joan Garner [ Bill Gamer [ Marge Gavin [ Sharleen Gear E Frank & Dorothy Gentile E Carl & Tina Genzel [ Joseph Gerardo
E Rip & Judy Gettman E Richard & Barbara Gibbs E Ann & Tom Gidosh E Evelyn & Roger Gillette [ Constance Giordano [ Christine Giordan.
D Richard & Bernadette Giusti D Tina & Jim Glackin L Dee Glade D A.J. & Mary Ann Gogan L Rose Goodenough D Ben Gormson
D Rhea Grabarczyk ] Jason Grace D Grady L James Graham L James H. & Johnnie Graham L Bill & Terry Gramling D Gail Granger
E Anna Grasso E George & Margaret Gray l Linda Greeley E Mr. & Mrs. James L. Green E Virginia & Kenneth Green E Patricia Gregory
0 Joan & John Griffin L] Lynn Griffis [ Darren & Stacey Griffis E Darry Griffis ]E Diana Griffith E Bea Griffith[] Phillip & Jane Griffith
E Joseph Grimaudo E Charles & Lorraine Grimes E Jean Grivois E Maureen & James Grossman [I Jim & Merry Guinn E Karen & Van Gusha
E Charlotte Haag E Michael Haendiges L Donna Haendiges l Ellie Halagera [ Linda Halik O Joan & Kenneth Hall E Patricia Hall
D Margaret Hancock D Janet Handrick D Judy & Norm Hanson Pat Haras D Betty Hardesty L Karin Hardy D Nancy & Bernie Hamey
D Paul Harnish-Gerri Doom D John & Jan Harper Mr & Mrs. Paul Harrington LShirley & Kay Harsin 0 Mr. & Mrs. Shirley Harsin, Jr.
E Ted & Ginny Hart E Ted & Ginny Hart [ Debbie Hartje E Sharon Hartzell 0 Glenda Harwood E Dean & Nancy Haven E Dr. & Mrs. Dale Ha :
E Nola Hayden [ Diana Hayden E Mr. & Mrs. F. Hayes [ Bob & Anne Heath [ Helene Heaton E Norma & Roy Hedin E George & Lillian Hel .
0 Joan D. Hemsworth D Margaret Henry [ John & Joan Herbergerl lJohn HerronE Welda HerronE Mary Hickey[I Linda Higdon
E Cara & Casey Hill E Frances Himpele El Ethel Hitson [I Mr & Mrs. G.W. Hodum [I Mr & Mrs. Tom Hoey E Rosalind Hoffman El Julia Hoga
D Sandra & George Holman D Dylan Holmes D Susan Holmes D Mike Holt D Ruth Hooper D Mary Horan Kathy Horan D Jerry & Judy Hon, I
D Edith Hose L Len & Betty Houle D Barbara Howver L James & Eleanor Hoyt L Joshua, Rebekah, Josiah, Eleanor & Elijah Hrcka
E Tom & Pat Hubbell E Gail Hughes E Jim & Carolyn Hughes E Tracy Humble E Bob & Nadine Humphries E Frances Hutchings E Bruce Hylai 1
0 Jan Hyland E Mr. & Mrs. William lies E Steven Indelicato [I Kathleen Indelicatoe Alicia Indelicato [I Lee Inserra El Thomas & Beverly Isal ii.,:
E Laura Ivey LI Bobbie Jack [I Roxann Jackson E Carl Jackson [I Dave Jackson [I Mr & Mrs. Jack Jacobs [I Anthony Jaime [I Helen Janiss.
0 Lionel Janisse 0 Vance & Cindy Januszewski [I Rosemary & Walter Jeselson\ [ Rufus & Margie Johnson [I Rev. James Johnson
D Ernest S. Johnson L Carole E. Johnson D Edgar & Jane Johnston D Byron & Michelle Jones D Cyndy Jones D Kline & Peggy Jones
D Irma Jonza D Kathleen Jorgensen L Ron & Krista Joseph L Jack Joyce D James Justinger D Rolande Kane D Roland & Nancy Kapplemarn ,
E Jim & Bobbie Karibo D Sharon Karz E Barbara & Michael Kasica E Don Kaskie [ Casey & Faye Kearse E Greg & Darla Kell E Delores Kel
0 Scott & Carole Kemper E Mr. & Mrs. James Kendrick E Steve & Lisa Kennedy [I Katherine A. Kennedy E Rosalina Kerley
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0 Mike & Sally Krasny [I Ed Krausa [I William Krider [ W. & S. Kroetsch E Frances Kuebler El John Kuebler E Stanley Kulak [I Frank Kules ,
D Mary Anne Kurylowicz Anne Kuter0 Mary La Piana0 Patricia LamannaL Mr & Mrs. Ken Lancaster Noah & Lindsay Lane
E Mr. & Mrs. Ben Langer E Sylvia Langnon E David Lanzella E Suzanne Lanzella [ Mr. & Mrs. Ted Lapointe E John Larkin E Karen Last
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0 William McGuckin 0 Ruth McGuckin 0 Kathleen H. McGuire[ IMr & Mrs W. McHugh E John & Sue McInnis
D Dolores & Jim McLaughlin L Dan McMullen D Maureen McNiff D Jeff & Kay Meahl D Colleen Meahl D Ben Means Karen Meehan
E Theresa Melosci E Josephine Mennella d Art & Julie Meske J John & Amy Messer E Glenda Metheney [ Richard Metheney
0 Ray & Pat Michael E Thomas Michaels E Joyce Michaels E Scott Michaud E Melissa Michaud E Madeline Michaud
0 Tom & Diana Miles LI Jack &Kathryn Miles EKristin Miller E Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Miller ICorazon MillerE R.& J. Miller
0 Sarah Miller 0 Marian Minyard E Peter T. & DianeT. MitrosE John & Patti Mogg E Cynthia Molz E Richard Mommerency E Tom Momon.
D Joe & Marie Mooney D Tracey Mooney D Elizabeth Moore D Dennis Moore D John & Marlene Moran [I Mark Moree [I Donna Moreno
D Gary & Ruth Morgan Doreen Morgan Ed Murphy D Don & Janet Murphy L Edw. & Arlene Murphy D Mary Murray L Boyd & Janet Mil...:
O Jerry & Rosemary Naber E Stephanie Nathan E Theresa & Cory Neill E Teresita L. Nery E Shirley Nesbit E Roseann Nestor E Ray & Beck i :
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E Dick & Cindy Over [ Judy Ozment I Anna Palmer E Ann Panasik [ Mr & Mrs. Joseph Paoli i Ann A. Paparazzi E Kelley Kaye Parra
D Cynthia Parrella-Kerigan L Lindsey Parrella-Kerigan L Brittany Parrella-Reinhardt D Bruce & Ann Parry D M. Pastorella L Trish & Dave Patt...
D Richard & Pat Patterson D Mary Paul D Elina Paulos E Mr. & Mrs. Mix Paumier E St. John PeasterE Berthier Pelletier E William Bill Perr
D Ken PetersenE Pat PetersenE Florence Pfeffenbichler E Paul PflunnD Don & Connie PhillipsE Lois PhillipsE Sarah Phillips E Thomas Fill11 i,
0 William Pivnick 0 Bob & Cookie Plaisted [ Michael Plamondon [ Ron & Jackie Plos El Eleanor Podolske 0 John & Rose Pomeroy D Roben I, .
D Mary Posey [I Rebecca & Don Pound D Loyd Powell D Jon & Ruth Powers D Lynda Powers D Dave & Pam Preast D Don &Wanda Pridemc:
D Bob &Terry Prince [ Barbara Pukas D Gene & Pattie Pullen D The Pullen Family [ John Purdin [ David Quinlan D Anne Quinn [ Wayne L. i, ,
. RJ. & Tina, Tarra, Chance, Trent & Logan Raby L Christopher Raby D John & Marylynn Rairick D Mr. & Mrs. Fred Rampey D Barbara A. Rashl.
D Theresa, David, Melissa, Daniel & Luke RaynorE Kam& Jay Reagan D The Reaves Family l Dorothy Reckling D Mildred Redeker O Marg, i: ..
D Lee Reesey E Paul Reesly l La Verne Register E Diane Reguin D Peter Reguin D Scott Reinhard D Doris Reissfelder D Clint & Millie Repi I 1 1.- ,
D Jim & Sharon Rhoads D Henry Richard I Wayne Ricker D Bob & Mary Riddell ] Mike & Barb Ries D Rosemary Rietruski D Deborah Riggs I iIn : n i ,I 1.1, "I
SHoward Ringheisen Virginia Rinn d Chuck RisorL Paulette Ritchie Brenda Roach Marjorie Robateau Prudy Rodriguez D Rick Roci.,,:: r .1 ,,.i i,, i.,,,:
DFran & Bob Rondeau Hyacinth Rose D Linda Ross Vicky Ross L Dana Rossignol Julie Rouse Janet RunshangL 0Bud Runshang 0 I *11 I 1.
D Tina Marie Russano Doris, Terri, Cheyanne, Tori Ruttman D Paul & Jane Rux Anthony Salatino Clarence & Lynda Samm Henry & i 11,. I.. ,..^ h "
D Margaret Sanchez Helen Sanders Michelle Santiago D Juan Santiago Pafuti Santiago Tomasita Santiago D Rhiana Santoianni [ i,,,1 11 ,,,
D Billy & Candace Sasser Gemma Savard E Linda Scarano Jerome Schaaf E Clint & Amanda Schaek Connie Schedler Kathryn Sch:,,i, i 1 ... ..I i1, I:.
SJerrySchlaud HeleneSchmitta Mr. &Mrs. BernardSchneider Mr. &Mrs.John SchuellerL Earl &AnneSchuknecht RosemarySch ,l: I ,11,11 i .."' "
SWillo Scott 0 Mr. & Mrs. Donald Seagle LI Gerald Seguin LI Pat SeilerL] Chuck&Pam Sewell] Steve Sexton Vance &LindaShaffer 1.11 ..i. ii0 l, ,, Ih1, ,,"
SSusan ShauteL Dorothy Sheehan Lloyd & VirginiaShelton Richard Siebert Don & Debbie Sikes Manuel Silva LI MarySilva BaE n i .:, I I .. I ii ....,,
SMr. & Mrs. Stephen Simmons L Jean A. Skeldon Anthony & Karen Skrapits L France Slaby D Brian & France Slaby L Mary Smalley L F, ..1.111 1, n i, ..1. i . .
D Steven Smith D Donald &June Smith D Jeffrey Smith D John Smith D Marene Smith Joan Smith D Lewis & Kathy Smith D Bertha Sni( 'i' r I iih ,1,1 .,1 I I,:n ....:
SAnn & AlexSosnicki Sosnicki Family Joyce & RobertSparkes Zenaida R Sparks Jon & JoanneSpaulding ArleneSpeakman F..... ei..i...:.'. I hi, .: ,i B USIN ES
D Rita Staats Erica Stanley D Rosemary Stanley L Bob & Syria Stazko Jim & Rolonda Steele D John & Piallizzi Steely, Sr. & Family 0 R( .. I..1. ,1, i iiii ... i,,1 .., ,h l ,ln-.hii .i [ Ii
D Brian Stevens L Rick Stevens Barbara Stevens Ray & Shirley Stevenson L Shaun Stewart L Shaun & Sarah Stewart RodgerStewa Ii ,,, .. i i..h ,1 in ,,..n II ,, 1 in-i
DDoug&JudiStinsonLlGayeStokesL RyszardStradomski MarieStraight Bob&AnneStrattonLl MistyStreeterLITerryStreeterSr.[ i;,,, 1 ,1,1,111,1 i,, 1,1 1 I,,
SRosalie Suda Joyce Sukut Sandra SullivanE K.C. Summers Marianne Suozzi Melody Supernaw Jason SupemawE Dana Sutt: _,,i ..i,,1 ..i .. :,,, ,,- ,
SBrad Swasey Susan &Jim SweeneyL Mr.& Mrs. Robert Swiderski0 FrancesTaliercio D Guy & JoanTannerL Jim & BrendaTaylor I.,,,,- I,, I ,1 i i ,-, T i 1' -ll,. I ,-.I
D Joe & Dawn Theroux Amy Thompson Angie & Butch Thome Bernard & Erika Thyssen Tibbits Sandra Tobin D Roy & Jean Toney I ,,,: i -ii... i, i, 11..hge r, n, 11 .: i, -, ,,- , ,
OWilliamToshL Michael TosinL CarmenTravaglino PattyTreacyL 0AnnetteTremante Ceel TrentmannL Chester&VirginiaTriccaD0 i .. I l .. : i ,| -I *1: '."" . I
SJim &JanTurnerL Patricia Tush D Dan & DonnaTvenstrupI Dale & Mary Twining LalaineUmandapL Rome UmanosL Ray & Ruth U ,i,, I. ... ,i.,n: ~ ..i .. n:, jI-,,,- I_,
DJoseph&AmberUzarL ChristinaUzar Andy, Enzo & ElijahUzarL YvonneA.Vaccaro JohnVan Dorn Mary LouVan DornLI Mr &Mi i, .. ,H.. Ii ..11 I i ~ I .,,I ,I. I.,:-ii, .1U l_ . .-
O Elsie Van Winkle Debbie Vance Mauricio Velasquez D Carmen Velez0 SmirnaVelezD Alfred P VerhoevenE Paul &MaureenVervoonr f., i I_ -i ..1: li ,1,, .i, I i, ......... Ih 1 -,* ,- -,,I
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A right to hope. A right to tomorrow. A right to life.


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519 Cabot Street Inverness, FL 34452 352-563-7017
www.ccrtl.homestead.com


PLEASE SUPPORT OUR LOCAL CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS:
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ES &
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0 Pregnancy & Family Life Center
0 St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Men's Association
0 Suncoast Baptist Church

ADOPTION:


THE LOVING OPTION)


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 A7





A8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary schools
Meals include milk and juice.
Breakfast
Monday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, grits, cereal and toast.
Tuesday: Ham, egg and
cheese on warm flatbread, tater
tots, cereal and toast.
Wednesday: Pancake slider,
grits, cereal and toast.
Thursday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, oatmeal with
fruit, tater tots, cheese grits, ce-
real and toast.
Friday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, grits, cereal and toast.
Lunch
Monday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, mozzarella MaxStix, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, fruit juice bar, sea-
soned rice, milk, juice.
Tuesday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, chicken alfredo
with ripstick, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed green
beans, strawberry cup, milk,
juice.
Wednesday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, turkey wrap,
ham super salad, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, sweet
corn, seasoned rice, chilled
pears, crackers, milk and juice.
Thursday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, macaroni and
cheese, turkey super salad, yo-
gurt parfait plate, fresh garden
salad, steamed broccoli, apple
crisp, peach cup, crackers, roll,
milk, juice.
Friday: Hamburger on bun,



AGENT
Continued from Page Al

"They stuck by me. They
loved me," he said.
"Through it all, persever-
ance is a gift."
mEN
Gary has the scars to show
just how dangerous his un-
dercover work as a state nar-
cotics agent was in the 1970s.
Running his fingers over
the blemish on the back of
his head, it serves as a con-
stant reminder of the day
that changed his life in 1979.
He told his partner if he
was not back in five minutes,
something was wrong.
Everything went wrong.
Ambushed and struck in
the back of his head with a
tire iron, Gary laid on the
ground unable to see, barely
conscious and unsure if he
would survive the ordeal.
His partner came to his res-
cue just in time.
The beating was so severe,
it left Gary with a fractured
skull and a messed up back.
Still, as much physical
pain as he was in, Gary
pushed himself to return to
work as quickly as possible.
With about 200 guys just
itching for an opportunity to
take his place, he said there
was no time to sulk and com-
plain about being in pain.
Nevertheless, as time
went on, his vision started to


LOCAL


baked chicken nuggets, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, baked
french fries, ranch pasta salad,
milk, juice.
Middle schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, grits, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken, chicken al-
fredo, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, peas and carrots,
seasoned mashed potatoes,
cornbread, fruit juice bar, milk,
juice.
Tuesday: Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, pep-
peroni pizza, ham super salad,
PB dippers, garden salad,
sweet corn, peas, warm apple
crisp, chilled pears, crackers,
milk, juice.
Wednesday: Hamburger on
bun, baked chicken nuggets,


fade, and he had a constant
toothache-like pain in his
head that took 14 to 15 as-
pirins a day to ease.
"I was just in agony," he
said.
When aspirin was not
enough, Gary said he turned
to alcohol to numb not only
the physical, but also the
emotional pain he carried.
But when it seemed the
physical pain was finally
subsiding, he got into a dou-
ble fatal car crash.
The crash, which was not
his fault, aggravated his
back injury
The injury served as a
good excuse not to return to
work, but it also prompted
his first experience with tak-
ing prescription pills for
pain management.
The tricky thing about
prescription pills, Gary ex-
plained, is you never see
how it changes you. People
would ask him if he was OK
because he didn't seem like
himself. He would just
brush off their concerns and
attribute it to the pain.
Eventually, he got better,
stopped taking the pills and
got a job working at a police
department in Ohio.
When he was hired, Gary
said he requested not to
work the streets anymore.
But they asked him to do just
one more undercover case
involving organized crime.
He agreed, thinking it was
something simple.


[CR PET J, T.IE -rO..'.II.AloI'.- '_l'


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 8-5
Sat. 9-1o r
,, ,ir .


pm


CARaPET& L


i6L~
coto. ~4rP


527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
i 44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy., Lecanto (next to landfill) CCC2837
SERVING CITRU~~SCONYSCE17


____ 23 to 27ME S beans, french fries, juice bar,
Jan. 23 to 27MENUS crackers, milk.


yogurt parfait plate, fresh baby
carrots, green beans, seasoned
rice, colossal crisp french fries,
strawberry cup, milk, juice.
Thursday: Stuffed-crust
cheese pizza, cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, chef super
salad, PB dippers, garden
salad, glazed carrots, apple-
sauce, Jell-O, milk, juice.
Friday: Hot ham and cheese
sandwich, fajita chicken and
rice, fajita chicken salad bowl,
baby carrots, green beans,
ranch pasta salad, peach cup,
crackers, milk, juice.
High schools
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, grits, ce-
real and toast, juice and mik
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, tater tots, cereal and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, grits, cereal and
toast, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
tater tots, cereal and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch


Instead, it turned out he
would have to spend six
months in deep cover.
One day he fell and re-in-
jured his back and neck. He
went back to taking pre-
scription pills for the pain,
but eventually decided to
stop.
"That's when I found out
what withdrawal is about,"
he said.
The sweating. The pacing.
The inability to sleep or find
comfort
"I thought I was going to
die," he said.
By the third day, he was
OK, and Gary stopped taking
the pills for a while until he
got injured again. This time,
he said he was able to wean
himself off the medication.
He decided to retire from
the police department, and
he and his wife moved to
Florida.
Gary opened his own busi-
ness in Inverness. His line of
work required him to stand
for 10 to 12 hours a day, six
days a week on hard con-
crete floors.
Soon the pain he had
dealt with since the age of 29
was back so he saw a doctor
who prescribed him pain
medication.
"I would take it and ask
for a refill. The doctor would
say it really wasn't helping
me. Then you start lying and


M i rc le- E


I SIDE

Crystal River Mall
795-1484
Inside WAL*MART
Hwy. 200, Ocala
29Q1-1467


Monday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, pizza, fa-
jita chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, baby carrots, green
beans, french fries, juice bar,
crackers, milk.
Tuesday: Turkey and gravy
over rice, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh garden salad,
peas, baked french fries, peach
cup, crackers, milk.
Wednesday: Macaroni and
cheese, pizza, hamburger,
turkey wrap, turkey super
salad, PB dippers, baby car-
rots, baked beans, corn, mixed
fruit, cornbread, french fries,
crackers, milk.
Thursday: Crispy Mexican
tacos, chicken sandwich, pizza,
ham super salad, yogurt parfait,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
Spanish rice, french fries, ap-
plesauce, crackers, milk.
Friday: Oven-baled breaded
chicken, hamburger, pizza, fa-
jita chicken super salad, yogurt
parfait, fresh baby carrots, corn,
peas, seasoned rice, french
fries, strawberry cup, crackers,
milk.
Lecanto High School lunch
Monday: Hot ham and
cheese, macaroni and cheese,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken super salad,
pizza, yogurt parfait, baby car-
rots, green beans, baked


saying you're really, really in
pain, but it was emotional
pain," he said. "The physical
pain was manageable."
His wife threatening to
leave was the final straw so
he, again, tapered off his pill
usage until he did not need
them anymore. He began
getting nerve blocks and ex-
ercising to strengthen the
muscles in his back
And it helped until a disc
ruptured in his back and he
had to have surgery The
pills were back, but after
having the surgery Gary said
he felt relief he had not felt
in years.
For three years, he went
without pain or pain
medication.
However, all that came
crashing down yet again
when he accidentally
stepped backward off a curb
and fell.
He cracked three ribs,
crushed his wrist and
snapped his neck.
It took a year to have the
surgeries necessary to ease
his pain, but in the mean-
time, he was taking strong
prescription pills to deal
with it. At one point, he was
taking 200-milligram mor-
phine pills, the kind of
dosage hospice patients re-
ceive in their final days.

See AGENT/Page A9


jHearing Aid Repairs
| $ J6 7 ONE WEEKONLY
* MUST PRESENT COUPON *
SANY MAKE OR MODEL
rBattery Sale
I 89
I (Limit 2 per visit) I


Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey and gravy
over noodles, ham salad, yo-
gurt parfait, pizza, garden
salad, glazed carrots, french
fries, peas, peach cup, crack-
ers, milk.
Wednesday: Brunch bowl,
chicken alfredo, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, pizza, turkey
super salad, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, french fries, ranch
pasta salad, broccoli, tater tots,
mixed fruit, crackers, milk.
Thursday: Cheesy chicken
and rice burrito, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, macaroni
and cheese, pizza, ham super
salad, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, green beans, sweet
corn, french fries, applesauce,
crackers, milk.
Friday: Chicken tenders,
pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, fajita
chicken salad, parfait, baby car-
rots, french fries, seasoned
rice, sweet peas, strawberry
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian veg-
etable medley, peaches, slice
whole grain wheat bread, low-
fat milk.
Tuesday: Barbecued pork ri-
blet, Lyonnaise potatoes, warm
cinnamon apples with raisins,
graham cracker packet, slice
whole grain wheat bread, low-
fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad with
ham, cheese, boiled egg and
tomato, french dressing, carrot-
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whole wheat bread, low-fat
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Thursday: Roast chicken
thigh with chicken gravy, green
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Friday: Meatballs with brown
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LAW
Continued from Page Al

down significantly," Ferrara
said.
He said the new "Pill Mill"
law is choking the illicit side
of prescription pills, and law
enforcement is reaping the
benefits of another feature
of the law, which requires
pharmacies to share infor-
mation among each other
and with investigators.
"Now people can't fill pre-
scriptions here and then
run down to, say, Tampa and
try to do the same thing
down there. The pharma-
cies will know, and they
would tell us what the per-
son is trying to do," Ferrara
said.
Since October 2010, more
than 400 clinics were either
shut down or closed their
doors.
Prosecutors have indicted
dozens of pill mill opera-
tors, and dozens of doctors
have seen their licenses sus-
pended for prescribing
mass quantities of pills
without clear medical need.
The new laws also are
cutting off distribution. As of
July 2011, Florida doctors
are prohibited, with a few
exceptions, from dispensing
narcotics and addictive
medicines in their offices or
clinics.
As a result, doctors' pur-
chases of Oxycodone, which
reached 32.2 million doses
in the first six months of
2010, fell by 97 percent in
the same period in 2011.
Ferrara and his unit are
engaging a problem that is
undergirded by a percep-
tion he said points to the no-
tion that prescription drug
abuse is not as bad as the
use of other drugs, such as
heroin.
"The stigma is just not
there among the general
public. They just believe
that using or even abusing
pills is always based on le-
gitimate reasons," Ferrara
said.
"Another issue we face in
law enforcement is that pre-
scription drugs are legal. It
is not unusual to see a young
person walking around with
a bottle of drugs in their
pocket There is nothing we
can do if it was rightly is-
sued to them by a doctor,"
Ferrara said.
In some ways, Ferrara
said, prescription drugs are
more dangerous than illicit
ones because users don't
have their guard up.
"Because the stigma is not
there, some people think it
is OK to just keep popping
them. However, they have to
understand drugs are drugs,
whether they have opiates
or not"
Chronicle reporter AB.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.



AGENT
Continued from Page AS

After his final surgery, it
took Gary 28 days to reduce
his dosage and another 28
days to quit completely He
hasn't taken any prescrip-
tion pain pills since
November.

Gary feels the real root of
the issue is the desire to be
pain-free.
"People don't want to
hurt. I don't want to hurt. I
just want to be normal, and I
think a lot of people had to
take the medication to be
normal and function," he
said.
It's a vicious cycle when
one is battling chronic pain,
but now he said he just
prays he doesn't get hurt
again. But in the event he
does, he said he's made his
doctors aware of his situa-
tion, though he said he un-
derstands for a lot of people
it can be hard to come clean
with their physician.


The whole time, Gary be-
lieves God was in charge of
him.
"He showed me how
much I needed him," he
said. Now, he's just grateful
to know he's survived, and
it's his hope is his story can
touch someone's life and
help them make a change.
"He took care of me and it
made me trust God more. I
was blessed because I had
to learn my life," Gary said,
"and I'm blessed with the
wealth of people who love
me."
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at 352-
564-2924 orswiles@chronicle
online.com.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 A9


PILL MILL LAW
* Tightens rules for the writing of prescriptions and
pain-treatment plans.
* Penalizes doctors who over-prescribe painkillers with
minimum fines of $10,000 and 6-month suspensions.
* Requires doctors to use electronic or counterfeit-proof
prescription pads purchased from vendors approved
by the state health department and requires the ven-
dors to report monthly sales of pads to state officials.
* Establishes mandatory buy-back program for doctors
to transfer narcotics back to the distributors once the
prohibition on doctors dispensing certain addictive
drugs goes into effect.
* Makes it a first-degree misdemeanor if a pharmacist
knowingly fails to report to police an attempt to pur-
chase drugs fraudulently.
* Shortens from 15 days to seven days the length of
time that pharmacies are given to report prescription
information into the state drug database.
* Prohibits pharmaceutical companies from providing
money for the operation of the database.
* Requires wholesalers who sell controlled substances
to pharmacies to report distribution data to the state.
* Requires doctors who work at pain management clin-
ics to tell the state when they begin and stop working
at such a clinic.
* Allows law enforcement offices to look at or copy pain
clinic records without a search warrant.


DEA FACT SHEET:
PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE
* In 2009, there were 7 million Americans age 12 years
and older who abused prescription drugs for non-
medical purposes within the past month, up from 6.2
million in 2008. This represents a 13 percent increase
in just one year.
* In 2009, on average, 6,027 persons per day abused
prescription pain relievers for the first time. The total
number of individuals that initiated drug use with
prescription drugs exceeds the number of individuals
that initiated drug use with marijuana.
* Every day, on average, 2,500 teens use prescription
drugs to get high for the first time.
* 1 in 7 teens admit to abusing prescription drugs to
get high in the past year. Sixty percent of teens who
abused prescription pain relievers did so before the
age of 15.
* Fifty-six percent of teens believe that prescription
drugs are easier to get than illicit drugs.
* Two in 5 teens believe that prescription drugs are
"much safer" than illegal drugs. Three in 10 teens
believe prescription pain relievers are not addictive.
* Sixty-three percent of teens believe that prescription
drugs are easy to get from friends' and family's
medicine cabinet.
* According to the Center for Disease Control, prescrip-
tion drugs, including opioids and antidepressants, are
responsible for more overdose deaths than "street
drugs" such as cocaine, heroin, and amphetamines.
* The number of emergency room visits attributable to
pharmaceuticals alone is up 97 percent between 2004
and 2008
* The number of persons seeking treatment for pain-
reliever abuse is up more than fourfold between 1998
and 2008
* DEA works closely with the medical community to
help them recognize drug abuse and signs of
diversion, and relies on their input and due diligence
to combat diversion. Unfortunately, egregious drug
violations by practitioners do sometimes occur-
fortunately doctor involvement in illegal drug activity is
rare. When violations do occur, DEA will pursue
criminal, civil, and administrative actions against such
practitioners as warranted.
Source: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration


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Murders underscore meth dangers


Associated Press
FRESNO, Calif. -When a
23-year-old Fresno woman
fatally shot her two toddlers
and a cousin, critically
wounded her husband then
turned the gun on herself
last Sunday, investigators
immediately suspected
methamphetamine abuse in
what otherwise was inexpli-
cable carnage. It turned out
the mother had videotaped
herself smoking meth hours
before the shooting.
In family photos, the chil-
dren are adorable, the mother
pretty They lived in a large
apartment complex near a
freeway with neatly clipped
lawns and mature trees. The
father was recently laid off
from a packing house job.
"When you get this type of
tragedy, it's not a surprise
that drugs were involved,"
said Lt Mark Salazar, the
Fresno Police Department's
homicide commander.
"Meth has been a factor in
other violent crimes."
A Bakersfield mother was
sentenced Tuesday for stab-
bing her newborn while in a
meth rage. An Oklahoma
woman drowned her baby in
a washing machine in No-
vember A New Mexico
woman claiming to be God
stabbed her son with a
screwdriver last month, say-
ing, "God wants him dead."
"Once people who are on
meth become psychotic, they
are very dangerous," said Dr
Alex Stalcup, who treated
HaightAshbury heroin users
in the 1960s, but now re-
searches meth and works
with addicts in the San Fran-
cisco Bay Area suburbs.
"They're completely
bonkers; they're nuts. We're
talking about very extreme
alterations of normal brain
function. Once someone be-
comes triggered to violence,
there aren't any limits or
boundaries."
The Central Valley of Cali-
fornia is a hub of the nation's
methamphetamine distribu-
tion network, making ex-
tremely pure forms of the
drug easily available locally
And law enforcement offi-
cials say widespread meth
abuse is believed to be driv-
ing much of the crime in the
vast farming region.
Chronic use of the harsh
chemical compound known
as speed or crank can lead to
psychosis, which includes
hearing voices and experi-
encing hallucinations. The
stimulant effect of meth is up
to 50 times longer than co-
caine, experts say, so users
stay awake for days on end,
impairing cognitive function
and contributing to extreme
paranoia.
"Your children and your
spouse become your worst
enemy, and you truly believe
they are after you," said Bob
Pennal, a recently retired
meth investigator from the
California Bureau of Nar-


Associated Press
Aide Mendez is shown in this
undated file photo provided
by Fresno Police Depart-
ment. When Mendez shot
dead her children and cousin,
then gravely wounded her
husband before turning the
gun on herself, authorities
were not surprised to learn
she had spent days on a
methamphetamine binge.
cotic Enforcement.
Methamphetamine origi-
nally took root in California's
agricultural heartland in the
late 1980s and early 1990s as
a poor man's cocaine. Its use
initially creates feelings of
euphoria and invincibility,
but experts say repeated
abuse can alter brain chem-
istry and sometimes cause
schizophrenia-like behavior
Meth's availability and its
potential for abuse combine
to create the biggest drug
threat in the Central Valley,
according to a new report
from the U.S. Department of
Justice's Drug Intelligence
Center. From 2009 to 2010,
methamphetamine busts in
the Central Valley more than
tripled to 1,094 kilograms, or
more than 2,400 pounds, the
report says.
Large tracts of farmland
with isolated outbuildings
are an ideal place to avoid
detection, which is why the
region is home to nearly all
of the nation's "super labs,"
controlled by Mexican drug
trafficking organizations,
said John Donnelly, resident
agent in charge of the U.S.
Drug Enforcement Adminis-
tration office in Fresno.
"They have the potential
to make 150 pounds per
(each) cook," he said. "There
are more super labs in Cali-
fornia than anywhere else.
Every week another office
calls us St Paul, Dayton,
Kansas, Texas and says,
'We've got a meth case here'
and they say the suspects are
from Turlock or Visalia.
We're slinging it all over the
country from here."
Last month, a drug task
force working in four central
California counties busted
24 alleged members of the
Mexican drug cartel La Fa-
milia Michoacana with 14


It'


Cold medicine
limits sought
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.
- In the face of the state's
growing methamphetamine
problem, Missouri lawmak-
ers are again calling for
limits on over-the-counter
drugs that can be used to
manufacture the illegal nar-
cotic.
House member Stanley
Cox introduced legislation
this past week that would
lower the monthly and an-
nual limits on the amount
of pseudoephedrine a per-
son can buy. The limits
would include purchases a
person makes in another
state.
Cox, a Sedalia Republi-
can, also wants to require
that people with felony
drug convictions get a pre-
scription before purchasing
products that contain pseu-
doephedrine, which can be
used as a key ingredient in
meth.
The House passed leg-


isolation last ye
pseudoephed
available only
tion for all con
the measureE
opposition fro
ceutical group
the Senate.


pounds of poi
30 gallons of
17 guns, $110,0
a fleet of veh
phisticated hi(
ments for smu
Most law
agencies don't
on how mar
burglaries an
meth-related,
spending to
Drug IntelligE
2011 survey sa
the top contrib
crimes and thE
Across the v
dicts steal an
can resell -
plumbing, cc
lawn sprinkle
"We lose fi
hole covers a
Ceres Police
Werk, who sai
injured recent
fell into an
drain in a sh(
"Meth is the pc
and, frankly, th
ley is an impo
graphic area."
Authorities
involved in
chemical com
ues to evolve,
easier recipe
and Bake" thz
on the Interne


Associated Press
ABOVE: Police investigators gather outside the Silver Lake Apartment unit Monday where
four people were found shot to death in an apparent murder-suicide early the day before in
Fresno, Calif. BELOW: In this photo provided by the Lopez family, Eduardo Lopez, 33, holds
his son, Isaiah Echeverria. Lopez was stabbed and shot by his common law wife, Aide
Mendez, before she turned the gun on herself in their Fresno, Calif., apartment Jan. 15.
Lopez is listed in critical condition, while Isaiah Echeverria died at the scene.


ear to make an Oklahoma woman was ar-
Jrine products rested as she walked around
by prescrip- a Wal-Mart store for six
isumers, but hours before she was no-
saw heavy ticed mixing ingredients
m pharma- for Shake and Bake.
ps and died in In one of the recent at-
tacks by meth users, Aubrey
Ragina Mailloux received a
-From wire reports nine-month sentence in Bak-
ersfield Tuesday for stabbing
her 6-week-old infant in the
wdered meth, back and cutting her along
meth solution, her abdomen, jaw and neck
00 in cash and during a binge. The baby
ides with so- survived.
dden compart- "It's not illegal because we
gglenforcementg don't want people to feel bet-
enforcement ter. It's illegal because it
keep statistics makes good people do crazy
d thefts homicides, things," said Mailloux's de-
ad thefts are fense attorney, Mark An-
but those re- hony Raimondo.
the National thony Raimondo.
the National In Oklahoma, authorities
ence Center's charged Lyndsey Fiddler
ud the drug is with second-degree
eftorto violent manslaughter after an aunt
alls. eth d found her infant daughter in
alley meth ad- a washing machine thudding
ay metal they off balance in the spin cycle.
- agricultural The aunt told authorities
paperr wiring, that Fiddler had been up for
rs. three days using meth.
week," said In Albuquerque, N.M., last
Chief Art de month, Liehsa Henderson,
ie a woman was rt e high on meth, claimed to be
d a woman was God and told police God


yl e wiien se
unprotected
popping center
oor man's drug
ie Central Val-
verished geo-

say the science
creating the
pound contin-
,including an
called "Shake
at is available
t Last month,


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wanted her son to die after
allegedly stabbing him in the
neck with a screwdriver. The
boy survived.
Last Sunday, Fresno po-
lice found Aide Mendez
dead on the bathroom floor
of her home. Her children
- 17-month-old Aliyah


Echevarria and Isaiah
Echevarria, 3 were in the
bathtub. Mendez's cousin
was dead in the kitchen.
She had shot each in the
head. The children's father
remains hospitalized with
stabbing and gunshot
wounds.


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NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Festival boosts visitors to springs event


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
They arrived by kayak, pon-
toon boat, shuttle buses and
even by foot.
By the end of Saturday af-
ternoon, it was estimated
3,000 to 4,000 manatee en-
thusiast had entered the
gateway to Three Sisters
Springs in hopes of getting a
peek at the gentle sea cows
that congregate in the warm
waters of King's Bay
"We have seen at least a
thousand people in the first
few hours," Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge
Manager Michael Lusk said.
The first open house of
the year was held in con-
junction with the Florida
Manatee Festival in Crystal
River.
Retirees Debbie and Bob
Davis drove from their win-
ter home in Spring Hill to
spend some outdoors time
at the refuge.
"I love it," Debbie Davis,
of Burch Harbor, Maine,
said. "We are glad they kept
this land like this. Other-
wise it would look like it
does across the stream (a
housing development)."


t --- .- -. .... ..

RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Manatees can be seen swimming side by side with kayakers Saturday in the clear waters of Three Sisters Springs.


Normally, the property is
closed to the public, but
during the open house, com-
munity members get a
chance to observe the man-
atees in the natural springs,
which is a constant 72 de-
grees, making it a safe
haven in the winter months
from the colder waters in
the nearby Gulf of Mexico.
"Manatees do not like
water temperatures below
68 degrees," Lusk said.


"They are vegetarians and
have no natural predators,
so they are really gentle and
not aggressive. That is why
we can swim with them."
There were also some
special guest from out of
town. National Geographic
magazine was on hand to
shoot photos for an upcom-
ing segment on manatees.
Cameramen hovered above
the crowds in a cherry
picker basket as kayakers


mingled with mother mana-
tees and their calves.
Heather Henson, the
daughter of the late Jim
Henson, creator of Big Bird,
Cookie Monster, Bert and
Ernie and other famous
Sesame Street characters,
shared her own puppets
with the crowds. This year,
she introduced a manatee to
the show.
"This is its birth," she said
of the manatee puppet


hanging on a stick. "I swam
with a manatee (a few years
ago) and fell in love with
them. They are beautiful."
Henson has shared her
"Panther and Crane" pup-
pet show with crowds dur-
ing previous open houses at
Three Sisters Springs. But
this time around, she was
especially proud to intro-
duce the puppet made by
David Jordan, a puppeteer
who works with Nick-


elodeon and film companies
in Los Angeles.
"We had a puppet from
land and one from the air,"
she said. "Now, we have one
in the show from water."
Manatee expert Dr. Bob
Bonde, with the U.S. Geo-
logical Survey in
Gainesville, was also on
hand. He gave some insight
into the scientific side of the
manatee. He related the
creatures to a camel be-
cause of its kidney func-
tions, and the elephant
because of evolution.
"There are three types of
manatees," he told the
crowd. "There are Amazon
manatee, West African and
the type we have here, West
Indian manatee."
On the far side of the
property, Ceci Cote sat in
her motorized wheelchair,
scanning the water's edge
for something special.
"I have never seen a man-
atee," the 67-year-old
woman from Ohio said with
a giddy laugh. "I feel like a
little kid."
Chronicle managing edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can be
reached at 352-564-2930 or
sfrederick@chronicle
online.com.


Heather Henson introduces a manatee puppet for the first time at the Three
Sisters Springs Open House on Saturday. Henson is the daughter of the late
puppeteer Jim Henson.


Visitors to Three Sisters Springs on Saturday crowd the new boardwalk to view dozens of manatees swim-
ming in the warm waters.


LOCAL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 All












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


tionBRIEFState of the Union: Re-election time


Close call


Associated Press
This photo provided by
Christ Medical Center &
Hope Children's Hospital in
Oak Lawn, III., on Friday
shows an X-ray of a nail
embedded in Dante Au-
tullo's brain.

Nail removed from
man's brain
OAK LAWN, Ill. Dante
Autullo thought his doctors
were joking and was sure
he'd merely cut himself with a
nail gun while building a
shed.
But they assured him the
X-ray was real: A nail was
lodged in the middle of the
suburban Chicago man's
brain.
Autullo was recovering Fri-
day after undergoing surgery,
where doctors removed the 3
1/4-inch nail. It had come
within millimeters of the part
of the brain that controls
motor function.
The 32-year-old from Or-
land Park said he asked doc-
tors if they'd gotten the X-ray
out of their "joke file." He said
the doctors replied: "No man,
that's in your head."
Autullo said he was build-
ing a shed Tuesday and
using the nail gun above his
head when he fired it, but
didn't realize it struck him.

World BRIEFS

Long journey


Associated Press
Dutch sailor Laura Dekker,
center, hugs her sister and
mother on Saturday after
arriving to Simpson Bay,
St. Maarten. Dekker ended
a yearlong voyage aboard
her sailboat named
"Guppy" that made her the
youngest person ever to
sail alone around the globe.

Ship search finds
12th body
GIGLIO, Italy- Divers
plumbing the capsized Costa
Concordia's murky depths
pulled out the body of a woman
in a life vest Saturday, while
scuba-diving police swam
through the captain's cabin to
retrieve a safe and documents
belonging to the man who
abandoned the cruise liner after
it was gashed by a rocky reef
on the Tuscan coast.
Hoping for a miracle or at
least for the recovery of bodies
from the ship that has become
an underwater tomb rela-
tives of some of the 20 miss-
ing appealed to survivors of
the Jan. 13 shipwreck to offer
details that could help divers
reach loved ones while it is still
possible to search the luxury
liner. The clock is ticking be-
cause the craft is perched pre-
cariously on a rocky ledge of
seabed near Giglio island.
The death toll rose to at
least 12 Saturday after a
water-logged body was ex-
tracted from a passageway
near a gathering point for
evacuation by lifeboats in the
rear of the vessel, Coast
Guard Cmdr. Filippo Marini
said. It was not immediately
clear if the woman was a pas-
senger or crew member. Afe-
male Peruvian bartender and
several adult female passen-
gers were among the 21 peo-
ple listed as missing before
the latest corpse was found.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Vili-
fied by the Republicans who
want his job, President
Barack Obama will stand
before the nation Tuesday
night determined to frame
the election-year debate on
his terms, using his State of
the Union address to outline
a lasting economic recovery
that will "work for everyone,
not just a wealthy few."
As his most powerful
chance to make a case for a
second term, the prime-
time speech carries enor-
mous political stakes for
the Democratic incumbent


who presides over a coun-
try divided about his per-
formance and pessimistic
about the nation's direc-
tion. He will try to offer a
stark contrast with his op-
ponents by offering a vision
of fairness and opportunity
for everyone.
In a preview Saturday,
Obama said in a video to
supporters that the speech
will be an economic blue-
print built around manu-
facturing, energy, education
and American values.
He is expected to an-
nounce ideas to make col-
lege more affordable and to
address the housing crisis


still hampering the econ-
omy three years into his
term, people familiar with
the speech said. Obama will
also propose fresh ideas to
ensure that the wealthy pay
more in taxes, reiterating
what he considers a matter
of basic fairness, officials
said.
His policy proposals will
be less important than what
Obama hopes they all add
up to: a narrative of re-
newed American security
with him at the center, lead-
ing the fight.
"We can go in two direc-
tions," Obama said in the
campaign video. "One is to-


ward less opportunity and
less fairness. Or we can fight
for where I think we need to
go: building an economy
that works for everyone, not
just a wealthy few."
That line of argument is
intended to tap directly into
concerns of voters who
think America has become
a nation of income inequal-
ity, with rules rigged to help
the rich. The degree to
which Obama or his even-
tual Republican opponent
can better connect with
millions of hurting Ameri-
cans is expected to deter-
mine November's pres-
idential election.


Associated Press
KANO, Nigeria -A coordinated
attack by a radical Islamist sect in
northern Nigeria's largest city
killed at least 143 people, a hospi-
tal official said Saturday, repre-
senting the extremist group's
deadliest assault since beginning
its campaign of terror in Africa's
most populous nation.
Soldiers and police officers
swarmed Kano's streets as Nige-
ria's president again promised the
sect known as Boko Haram would
"face the full wrath of the law." But
the uniformed bodies of security
agents that filled a Kano hospital
mortuary again showed the sect
can strike at will against the coun-
try's weak central government.
Friday's attacks hit police sta-


tions, immigration offices and the
local headquarters of Nigeria's se-
cret police in Kano, a city of more
than 9 million people that remains
an important political and religious
center in the country's Muslim
north. A suicide bomber detonated
a car loaded with powerful explo-
sives outside a regional police
headquarters, tearing its roof away
and blowing out windows in a blast
felt miles away as inmates escaped
jail cells there.
Authorities largely refused to
offer casualty statistics as mourn-
ers began claiming the bodies of
their loved ones to bury before sun-
down, following Islamic tradition.
However, a hospital official told
The Associated Press at least 143
people were killed in the attack.
The official spoke on condition


of anonymity because he wasn't au-
thorized to release the death toll to
journalists. The toll could still rise,
because other bodies could be held
at other clinics and hospitals in the
sprawling city.
State authorities enforced a 24-
hour curfew in the city, with many
remaining home as soldiers and
police patrolled the streets and
setup roadblocks. Gunshots echoed
through some areas of the city into
Saturday morning.
Nwakpa 0. Nwakpa, a
spokesman for the Nigerian Red
Cross, said volunteers offered first
aid to the wounded, and evacuated
those seriously injured to local
hospitals. A survey of two hospitals
by the Red Cross showed at least 50
people were injured in Friday's at-
tack, he said.


Mild winter offers break from heating costs


Associated Press


TRAVERSE CITY, Mich.
- Ashley Tatum was three
months behind on utility
payments after leaving her
job at a coffee shop because
of pregnancy complications.
The mother of two owed
$648, and the tough economy
did not offer many options.
The Milwaukee resident
had one small reason to
hope: The winter has been
mild and her heating bills
low, offering an unexpected
chance to catch up on over-
due payments.
"It was helpful because
then I wouldn't have to
stress about getting all this
extra money," she said.
Although there have
been some cold snaps and
storms, the moderate
weather has been a boon to
millions of Americans, al-
lowing them to save money
on snow removal and per-
mitting outdoor activities to
continue well beyond
autumn.


Associated Press
Trucks with snowplows are for sale at a business Jan. 9
during the mild winter weather in Newstead, N.Y. The
warm, brown winter that has disappointed snow lovers in
much of the U.S. has put more green in the pockets of gov-
ernments and homeowners whose budgets were busted
last year by the high cost of plowing and running roaring
furnaces.


But few have been more
grateful than low-income
families, who are getting a
break from high heating
costs.
Tatum first noticed the
lower charges in November
Her bill covering most of
December was $164, less
than half the price from a
year earlier


"I was surprised," Tatum
said. "I called my sister and
said, 'Girl, is your bill
cheaper, too?' I'm happy
that we had those nice
warm days."
Initially, forecasters
made grim predictions that
this winter could rival or
exceed the cold, snowy as-
sault of 2010-11. But aver-


age temperatures have
been well above normal
across the Upper Midwest
and Northeast. Combined
with a lack of snow and ice,
the unseasonable condi-
tions have been a blessing
for many families who nor-
mally devote much of their
budgets to natural gas,
propane or heating oil.
In Michigan, tempera-
tures have been 15 percent
above normal since Octo-
ber, and plentiful fuel sup-
plies are driving down
natural gas prices.
"It's helping all cus-
tomers," said Judy Palnau,
spokeswoman for the
Michigan Public Service
Commission.
Utility company Con-
sumers Energy says its 1.7
million natural gas cus-
tomers in Michigan are
paying about 20 percent
less than a year ago.
The average residential
bill for January will be
$112, down from about
$140.


Sheriff:


Ariz.


couple


wanted


deputies


dead
Associated Press
YUMA, Ariz. An Ari-
zona couple who committed
suicide last month planned
to lure sheriff's deputies to
their remote, desert home
and kill as many as possible
before ending their own
lives, a top local law en-
forcement official said, as
an eerie series of videos the
couple made was released
this week.
Yuma County investiga-
tors found elaborate plans,
both in writing and in video,
in a blast-protected area
after Jesse Lee and Diedre
Firestone's Dome Valley
home exploded Dec. 23
while surrounded by
officers.
They had planned to blow
up the house as a SWAT
team entered, Capt. Eben
Bratcher told the Yuma Sun.
The couple's bodies were
found in the home two days
after the explosion. One
deputy suffered minor in-
juries when the blast
knocked him down.
"The motive behind their
plan is not known, but it was
clear they fully intended to
murder as many deputies as
possible prior to taking
their own lives," Bratcher
told the newspaper "These
people absolutely had a
plan, and I think they
wanted to die and make as
big of a scene as they could
possibly make."
In one of the videos re-
leased to the Yuma Sun, the
couple are seen sitting on
their balcony, calmly dis-
cussing what was about to
happen while waiting for
deputies to respond.
In another, Jesse Fire-
stone, 65, shows a .357 mag-
num rifle he planned to use
and the hole in the front
door of the home he was
going to fire through. He
even mentions some sheriff
deputies by name, saying
"it's nothing personal. Any-
way adios."
Footage also shows a
shrine the Firestones called
the "Church of Death,"
which features a Bible, two
binders with hand-made
covers titled the "Firestone
Gospel," and a picture of
Osama bin Laden.
What is not known and
may never be is if the explo-
sion actually happened pre-
maturely or if the
Firestones changed their
minds and decided not to go
through with their plans,
Bratcher said.
"This could have ended
up horribly, and we are
grateful none of our guys
were seriously injured,"
Bratcher said. "It was one of
those things you wouldn't
have ever expected to hap-
pen in Yuma. It is insane.
You read about this type of
thing in the paper happen-
ing somewhere else."
Authorities drove to the
home on the afternoon of
Dec. 23 after a man called
the sheriff's office and said
he had just shot his ill wife.
The man opened fire on ar-
riving officers, and that's
when the house blew up.
Before sheriff's officials
arrived, Jesse Firestone in
a video is seen standing in-
side his home using a cell
phone to call 911 to report
that he had just mercifully
shot his wife, which was
how they planned to lure
deputies to their resi-
dence. According to that
video, Diedre Firestone,
45, had been suffering from


"self-diagnosed" breast
cancer for the past 10
months, but refusing to get
treatment.
"I got to go kill my dogs
now," Jesse Firestone is
seen saying before he hangs
up the phone.


Blast kills 143


Associated Press
Red cross officials Saturday collect bodies of victims of Friday's bomb blast and gun attacks from a street in
Kano, Nigeria. Coordinated attacks claimed by a radical Islamist sect killed at least 143 people in north Nige-
ria's largest city, hospital records seen Saturday show, as gunfire still echoed around some areas of the sprawl-
ing city.

Radical Islamist sect blamed for attack in northern Nigeria











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes
found on Page Al
of today's
Chronicle.


can be
^-


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


e


s


Lamar Louise Curry, now 105 years old and a resident of Coral Gables, was a
5-year-old living in Key West when Henry Flagler's railroad arrived. She rode it over
the old Seven Mile Bridge a few times with her parents and remembers the
porcelain drinking cups and railroad trestle. "We were told to look out the window.
There was nothing but water. I was too young and took it for granted," said the
former American history teacher (at left with Flagler re-enactor Paul Jellinek).


Railroad


linking


Miami, Keys


turns 100

SUZETTE LABOY
Associated Press
-MARATHON
lorida is marking the
centennial of Henry
Flagler's Over-Sea
Railroad, which steamed
through the Florida Keys Jan.
22, 1912, carrying residents
and tourists from Miami
through the once-isolated
island chain to Key West for
the first time ever.
The engineering feat, referred to by
some at the time as the "eighth wonder
of the world," launched the Florida
Keys' tourism industry Its track
stretched 156 miles, nearly half of it on
bridges over water or swamps, built by
4,000 men working 10- to 12-hour days,
six days a week.
"It is perfectly simple. All you have to
do is build one concrete arch, and then
another, and pretty soon you will find
yourself in Key West," Flagler is quoted
as saying in the book "Henry Flagler:
The Astonishing Life and Times of the
Visionary Robber Baron Who Founded
Florida" by David Leon Chandler
In the days of cigar rolling, Key West
was the most populated city in Florida
and the richest city per capital. Flagler
hoped to make it a major port, invest-
ing some $50 million of his own money
(some experts say it was more) into the
project that took seven years to com-
plete.
Work began on the Seven Mile Bridge
in 1908, with more than 500 concrete
piers across the route's longest stretch


.-'.' -. 9 q '> -: .


ANDY NEWMAN/Florida Keys News Bureau
Pigeon Key is a tiny island west of Marathon, used as a base camp more than 100 years ago for workers building Henry Flagler's
Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad. The railroad's original Seven Mile Bridge, at left, was transformed into a road for cars in 1938
following the railroad's demise in 1935. A wider bridge, right, for the Florida Keys Overseas Highway, was opened in 1982.


of open water Innovative tools and ma-
chinery were introduced to cut through
trees and swamps and work over the
ocean.
Pigeon Key, a 5-acre coral island,
served as the home base for 400 work-
ers between 1908 and 1912. Most work-
ers came from New York, lured by
wages of about $1.60 a day to work in
the hot Florida sun, plagued by mos-
quitoes. They got food, housing and
Sunday off for church services. Alco-
hol and women were banned.
"They say the two things that slowed
down the completion of the railroad
were the mosquitoes and the lack of al-
cohol," said Kelly McKinnon, executive
director of the Pigeon Key Foundation,
a preservation, education and research
nonprofit.
Concerns that Flagler, in his 80s,
might die before the railroad was fin-


ished, led to marathon 12-hour shifts by
workers toward the end of the project,
McKinnon said. The efforts gave the
Keys city of Marathon its name.
Some 10,000 people turned out to
greet Flagler and his family on Jan. 22,
1912, as they arrived by train in Key
West.
"It was the most exciting thing that
had ever happened," said Claudia Pen-
nington, executive director of the Key
West Museum of Art & History at The
Custom House. "Everybody from
schoolchildren who had never seen a
train in their life to people who thought
it would be a great way to transport
freight and improve the economy was
there."
Lamar Louise Curry, now 105 years
old and a resident of Coral Gables, was
a 5-year-old living in Key West when
the railroad arrived. She rode it over
the old Seven Mile Bridge a few times
with her parents and remembers the
porcelain drinking cups and railroad
trestle.
"We were told to look out the window.
There was nothing but water I was too
young and took it for granted," said the
former American history teacher
Passengers could travel from Miami
to Key West for $7.18 in 1925 in less
than three hours. A one-way trip from
Jacksonville to Key West was $20.34 and
from New York to the Keys was $77.
The original Bahia Honda trestle bridge
is seen Jan. 1 in the Florida Keys, at
Bahia Honda. The bridge was built in the
early 1900s to carry Henry Flagler's
Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad on the
lower deck. Following the railroad's de-
mise in 1935, a top deck on the bridge
was created to carry automobiles.


Flagler even offered a 48-hour trip
from New York to Havana, by train and
steamship, with accommodations in
Flagler hotels on the way
In those days, riders thought the
train was flying at 25 mph. "It was the
idea of warp speed to them," Penning-
ton said. "Passengers were able to get
on a train with their winter coats from
New York, Boston or Washington and
the next day, they were in Florida
where it was sunny and warm."
Flagler died 18 months after the rail-
road's completion. Thousands of peo-
ple took the train during the next two
decades, but the 1929 stock market
crash and the Great Depression took
their toll. By the 1930s, the train and re-
sorts scaled back as "the elegance of
the Gilded Age was slipping away,"
Pennington said.
Then, the 1935 Labor Day Hurricane
wiped out 40 miles of track. The rail-
road was never rebuilt, though portions
of old bridges stand today over open
water and remain among the Keys'
most visited spots.
The Keys are marking the centennial
of the railroad's completion Jan. 22
with a Key West parade, Henry Flagler
re-enactor, museum exhibitions, and
more. Other exhibitions and events are
taking place across Florida, from Jack-
sonville and St. Augustine in the north-
east to Palm Beach and Miami in the
southeast
Even today's vacationers acknowl-
edge the impact the railroad had on
launching the state's tourism industry
"I think he set the groundwork for all
of this," said Vincent Rich, visiting the
Keys this week with his wife from Pitts-
burgh, Pa. "He had a big influence by
bringing life down here."


Chile

Suzanne Matthews and Jan Amstutz pose during a December trip
on the shore of Lago Llanquihue in Puerto Varas, Chile, with the Osorno Volcano
in the background.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lying woman



needs help


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D ear Annie: Six
months ago, I was
fired for stealing
from my job. I was too em-
barrassed to tell anyone, so I
lied to my parents, my
friends, everybody. I told
them I quit so I could go
back to school.
Then I lost my house be-
cause I didn't have the
money to pay the mortgage.
My parents told me that I'm
almost 40 and need to stand
on my own two feet. They
wouldn't let me move in
with them. My best friend
felt sorry for me and said I
could camp out in her guest
room until I got back on my
feet.
In that time,
I've fallen in
love with her
husband. I
couldn't help it.
"Alex" is amaz-
ing smart,
charming, kind,
athletic, attrac-
tive, the total
package. But it
makes me un- .
comfortable to
see him being so ANNI
affectionate MAILI
with his wife, al-
ways holding
her hand and stroking her
hair. I can't figure out why
their marriage has lasted 10
years. He's outgoing, and
she's shy She's also rather
plain. Alex doesn't seem to
realize that he could have
somebody so much better
looking and smarter. He
could have me.
I know his wife took me in
when nobody else would,
but you can't help who God
tells you to love. My mother
says I need therapy I don't
agree. I simply want to know
how to deal with my feelings
so I can be around my friend
without wanting to smack
that sweet smile right off
her face. Any advice? -
Crazy in Love
Dear Crazy: You steal
from your job, lie to your
family and then try to se-
duce your best friend's hus-
band. Alex is smart enough
to know a good woman
when he marries one. The
longer you stay in that house
the harder it will be for you.
Get any job, maybe two of
them, so you can afford an-
other place to live, even if it
means multiple roommates.
Then take your mother's ad-
vice and get some counsel-
ing to understand why you
keep trying to take things
that don't belong to you.
Dear Annie: Next fall, my
boyfriend and I will be


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 "Good Miss Molly"
6 Soft mineral
10 Escapade
15 Student at Yale
18 Form of quartz
19 Scream
21 Much too heavy
22 Blueprint
23 Takes care of
24 Demonstrated
25 Famous
26 Be worthy of
27 One of the Gabors
28 Notched, as a leaf
29 Ear bone
31 Grove fruit
33 Check
35 Top-notch
36 Boy or talent
37 Real estate mogul
38 Publish
40 Deceitful one
41 French cleric
42 Bag of scent
44 Roll with a hole
45 Off the-
47 Shadowy
51 Like some
tongues
52 bear
53 Cash in
55 Johnson or Heflin
56 Crippled
57 Patch of tiny plants
58 Sea dog
60 Think
62 Of the mouth
63 Pamper
65 She was Lucy
66 Unearth (with "up")
67 Marry
68 Dilettantish
69 English school
71 Swords
73 Family man
75 Butt
76 Strong and thick
77 Plant fluid
78 Recipe meas.
81 Gay
83 In that case
84 Peak (prefix)
85 Young animal
87 Attack
90 Sneaker or loafer
92 Get rid of


94 Reveal
95 Hoosegow
96 Like the Milky Way
98 Coty or Descartes
99 Scandinavian
100 Owned
101 Detective
Queen
103 Toward the left, on a ship
105 Comedies
106 Ogles
108 Length measure
109 Catkin
110 Urban areas
111 Bakery item
113 Eras
114 Elegant room
115 Wood or Portman
118 Darth of
"Star Wars"
119 Panacea
120 Deep cut
124 Kind of energy
125 Discourage
126 Tattered piece
127 Payable
128 Put up with
129 Sluggish
131 Holy Roman -
133 Prize of a kind
135 Chester-- Arthur
136 Unriddle
137 Casino employee
138 Soothing
ointment
139 Pasture
140 Wool cloth
141 Card with three spots
142 Immature



DOWN
1 Xbox buff
2 Pointed arch
3 Hawaiian porch
4 Abbr. in bus.
5 Absolutely!
6 Regal seat
7 Came to be
8 Exist
9 So-so grade
10 Agree
11 Concerning
12 Furry friends
13 Native of (suffix)
14 Make twice as great


Antelope
Sweater size
- city
Start to grow
Short pants of old
Sounded loudly
Facilitated
Holiday song
Kid
Elemental metal
Long story
Farm machine
Molt
Test-question
answer
Flew
Fleet of warships
Domineering
Healthy
Young person
Eager
Chimed
Patch location
Go with the -
Mail-delivery
official
Cheerful
Extra
Fable's point
Be great in
number
Nuisance
Burnett or
Channing
Animal restraint
Station
Foot digit
Analyze
grammatically
College VIP
Yarn
Hard to get
Handbags
Goddess of
victory
Turn aside
Hive occupants
Hurt
Bump off
Facet
Like some
candies
Presses
Dull
List of candidates
Talked and talked
Alliance acronym


Melodist's partner
Equal
Did office work
Flower part
- -de-camp
Lifework
Noted ring champ
Made lace
Carriage type
Of one's birth


116 "--- of Two
Cities"
117 Wine variety
118 Vitality
119 Neighbor of
Argentina
121 Make confused
122 Debonair
123 of Troy
125 Remove, in


printing
Box
Immediately
Came upon
Flavor enhancer
Corn spike


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


abroad at the same time.
"Dex" will have graduated
college. I will be a junior,
studying in Europe for six
months. He will be in Japan
for twice that time.
My father recently told
me about having a failed
long-distance relationship
while he was in the armed
forces, saying, "You know,
when you go abroad, that
will probably be the end for
the two of you. Just enjoy it
while you can."
Dex and I are already in a
long-distance relationship
(about five hours from each
other). He knows it will be
difficult but says he's willing
to wait for me, and
we will discuss liv-
ing together when
he returns. What
should I do? I
know I'll enjoy Eu-
rope to the fullest,
but I'm afraid I'll
be so lonely. -
Student Abroad
Dear Student:
Your father's
failed relationship
has nothing to do
E'S with yours. Yes,
BOX sometimes dis-
tance can create
insurmountable
barriers. If you are afraid
you cannot be without a
man in your life for a year,
then you aren't ready to
commit to Dex, and we sug-
gest you go your separate
ways now. That's an OK de-
cision to make, and you
shouldn't feel guilty. But if
you are determined to stay
with Dex, friends (not
boyfriends) can alleviate
your loneliness.
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Need a Bigger
Piece of the Pie," the single
mother who was barely able
to pay her bills. I was disap-
pointed that you did not sug-
gest she seek help from a
local church.
All the churches in my
area have food banks and
money for heat or electric
bills. There are no forms to
fill out, no questions to an-
swer, just the Lord's army
waiting with open arms. -
Northern Michigan


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Email questions to
anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 3rd Street,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.


A14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


II
[]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes
sometimes contain only basic
information regarding each
post. For more information
about scheduled activities,
meals and more for a specific
post, call or email that post at
the contact listed.
The annual trip to Hawaii
for veterans, their families and
friends is now being organized.
Many who have attended previ-
ously have enjoyed the en-
deavor with great tours, events
and memorial services for our
veterans.
This year's trip will be from
Feb. 21 to March 9, and will be
organized again by Don
McLean, U.S. Navy retired. Is-
lands to be visited include
Oahu (stay at the Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii
(KMC inside volcano) and Maui
(Royal Lahina Resort).
For information or to register
for the trip, call Don McLean at
352-637-5131 or email
dmclean8@tampabay.rr.com.
The U.S. Air Force is
looking for prior enlisted men
and women from all services in-
terested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously
obtained career fields or retrain-
ing into select career fields.
"A nationwide drive is under
way to fill openings requiring
skills many veterans already
possess," said SSgt. Eric Hur-
ley, from Inverness. "Some of
the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas,
cyber operation fields, and vari-
ous other specialties. Enlisted
career openings that include
the opportunities to retrain con-
sist of special operations posi-
tions and unmanned aerial
vehicle."
Assignment locations are
based on Air Force needs.
For more information, call 352-
476-4915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition has a new building
holding freezers, refrigerators
and all necessary requirements
to provide food to veterans in
need. Food donations and vol-
unteers are always welcomed
and needed.
The new CCVC location is
on the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul and
Independence, off U.S. 41
north. Hours of operation are
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Appointments are
encouraged by calling
727-492-0292.
CCVC general meetings are
at 10 a.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly at the DAV building in
Inverness, 1039 N. Paul Drive
off U.S. 41. All active duty and
honorably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and wid-
owers, along with other veter-
ans' organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. Members are encour-
aged to attend general
meetings.
Come see what the Citrus
Veterans Coalition is all about,
and if you feel you can assist in
the "Veterans Helping Veter-
ans" program, please come on
board as a member.
We provide food supple-
ments and nonperishable foods
to needy veterans through our
'Veterans Food Pantry." We
provide assistance to needy
and disabled veterans and their
families with minor repairs to
their homes through the gen-
erosity of volunteers who are in
the plumbing, electrical and
construction industry. We also
provide funds for annual schol-
arships to veterans' family
members who apply through
their school counseling
services.
Annual membership donation
is $10 for a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation, and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with Gary Williamson at
352-527-4537, or at the meet-
ing. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. For information
about the post and its activities,
call Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr. at 352-


795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
American Legion Riders at
Post 155 will host its second
annual Super Spaghetti Dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Feb. 1, at the post home.
Cost is $6, which includes
salad, all-you-can-eat spaghetti
with meatballs and/or Italian
sausage, garlic bread, dessert,
coffee and iced tea. The public
is welcome.
All money raised by the Rid-


ers is donated to various veter-
ans' and community charities.
For more information, call
Cindy Heather at 352-
563-9926, or Post 155 at
352-795-6526.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. The
American Legion Auxiliary is
the world's largest women's pa-
triotic service organization with
nearly 1 million members in
10,100 communities. The prin-
ciples of the American Legion
Auxiliary are to serve veterans,
their families and the
community.
Eligibility in the Auxiliary is
open to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and of de-
ceased veterans who served
during war time (also stepchil-
dren); stepchildren; and female
veterans who served during
war time. Call Unit President
Shawn Mikulas, 352-503-5325,
or membership chairman Bar-
bara Logan, 352-795-4233.
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155 will have its annual
Chili/Cornbread Cook-off and
Chinese Auction Saturday, Jan.
28, at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. After the judging, the chili
and cornbread will be available
for purchase for a nominal
donation.
If you would like to enter ei-
ther chili or cornbread, have it
at the post by 11:30 a.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 28.
While waiting for the judges'
decisions, enjoy the Chinese
Auction, which will feature
many items to win. Doors will
open about 11 a.m. and the
winning tickets will be picked
about 2 p.m. All members and
the public are welcome.
For more information, call
Unit President Shawn Mikulas,
352-503-5325, or Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
meals, bingo, golf, karaoke and
pool. Review the monthly
newsletter for activities and up-
dates, and call the post at 352-
746-0440. The VFW Post
10087 is off County Road 491,
directly behind Superior Bank.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. Wi Fi is now
available at the post; bring your
laptop or any other item that will
access the Internet and enjoy
the free service.
Friday dinner from 5 to 6:30
p.m. will feature baked pork
chops; cost is $8.
Information regarding any
post events is available at the
post or call 352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41. The
chapter hall is on the corner of
Independence Highway and
Paul Drive.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we ac-
cept donated nonperishable
foods for our continuing food
drive.
Our main function is to assist
disable veterans and their fami-
lies when we are able. Anyone
who knows a disabled veteran
or their family who requires as-
sistance is asked to call Com-
mander Richard Floyd
727-492-0290, Ken Stewart
at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClister
is available to assist any vet-
eran or dependents with their
disability claim by appointment.
Call 352-344-3464 and leave a
message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the vet-
erans' service office at 352-
527-5915. Mobility challenged


veterans who wish to schedule
an appointment for transporta-
tion to the VA medical center in
Gainesville may call the Citrus
County Transit office for wheel-
chair transportation; call 352-
527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-


erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
chapter hall, 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness.
The auxiliary plans a visit to
the VA nursing homes) and
needs toiletry items such as
packaged razors, combs, hair-
brushes, toothbrushes, sham-
poos and deodorant to fill ditty
bags, They are also accepting
cotton material and yarn to
make ditty bags, lap robes,
wheelchair and walker bags for
disabled veterans.
The auxiliary membership
has grown to include many
more extended families. Call
Auxiliary Commander Linda
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Adju-
tant Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334 for information.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary,
906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness.
Stop by the canteen and pick
up a current monthly calendar.
Call the post at 352-344-
3495 for information about all
weekly post activities, or visit
www.vfw4337.org.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Auxil-
iary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Dunnellon Young Marines
will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
For information about activi-
ties and the post, call Carl Boos
at 352-489-3544.
Rolling Thunder Chapter
7, a POW/MIA awareness
group, meets at 10 a.m. second
Saturday at the VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call Bob
Bruno, secretary, at
352-201-1228.
SA Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
meets at 1 p.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at the VFW in Bev-
erly Hills. New members are
welcome. Membership fee is
$30 a year. Female relatives
ages 16 or older who are a
wife, widow, mother, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or daugh-
ter-in-law of honorably dis-
charged Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are eligible to belong
to the Marine Corps League.
Female Marines (former, active
and reserves) and associate
members are eligible for MCLA
membership. Call President
Elaine Spikes at 352-860-2400
or Secretary/Treasurer Joan
Cecil at 352-726-0834
for information.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 352-
382-0876, or pass along this
phone number to the veteran.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 352-726-3339. Send
emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com.
Everyone is welcome. Post
and auxiliary meet at 6:30 p.m.
every second Thursday.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising and
nursing home visits.
The public is welcome to the
Friday night dinner and dance
at 5 p.m.


Alvenrl[tL ,
Is Waiting F.l'
DON'T FORGET TO BOOY1( O
ALASKA TRIP EARLY FOR GOOD DEALS!


---d~r.7 SIN ES 97


See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252,
Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
Call 352-795-5012 for
information.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-
ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For in-
formation about the post and its
activities, call 352-637-0100.
Friday is AUCE fish or three-
piece chicken for $7.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto Highway,
in the Beverly Plaza, invites all
eligible veterans and their fami-
lies to visit our post and con-
sider joining our Legion family:
American Legion, Sons of the
American Legion (SAL), or
American Legion Auxiliary
(ALA). Color Guard/Honor
Guard accepting volunteers.
American Legion Riders
Chapter now being formed.
Visit the post for printed sched-
ule or visit the website at
www.post237.org. For
information, call the post at
352-746-5018.
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, will host a poker
run Saturday, Jan. 28, starting
at 9:30 a.m. with registration at
American Legion Post 237.
Last bike out will be 10:30 a.m.
and last bike in will be 4:30 pm.
Cost for the event is $10 per
rider, which includes a poker
hand and a meal at the end of
the run. Best Hand wins the
poker run. No food will be
served before 4 pm. All vehicles
are welcome.
Proceeds from the American
Legion Post 237 poker run will
benefit Hospice of Citrus
County and American Cancer
Society Ovarian Cancer Re-
search. There are six stops: in-
cluding AmVets Post 441,
Inglis; American Legion Post
155; IRRU; Fraternal Order of
Eagles 4272, Homosassa;
Scoreboard Sports Bar; and
back to American Legion Post
237. There will be music and
door prizes. There will also be a
50/50 drawing.
For more information, call
352-746-5018 or ride chairman
John Roby at 352-341-5856.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace, at any time from Sept.
3, 1945, to the present or if said
service was outside of Korea
from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. For information, call
Hank Butler at 352-563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 352-344-
2529 or Bob Hermanson at
352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American


In Your Own Backyard!
,," Fast, Fun Airboat Rides
Manatee Viewing & Swimming
Pontoon Boat Tours & Rentals
Guided Fishing
1 X JFi Ik.D New Alligator Exhibit with BIG Gators
S- CAFE OPEN 8AM 3PM
37 SAA3 Gift
iU00 Shops
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4fl n Vumulan nr Unmncess


Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Call
Post Cmdr. Norman Brumett at
352-860-2981 or Auxiliary pres-
ident Marie Cain at 352-
637-5915.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 352-
726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson. We meet in the small
building to the left of the main
building. All former and current
post members, as well as all in-
terested veterans, are cordially
invited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander at 352-
697-1749. Your call will be re-
turned within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612; for
the Cabane, call La Presidente
Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. the third Tuesday of Jan-
uary, March, May, July, Sep-
tember and November. All
combat-wounded veterans, lin-
eal descendants, next of kin,
spouses and siblings of Purple
Heart recipients are cordially in-
vited to attend and to join the
ranks of Chapter 776. To learn
more about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit the
chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
The combat-wounded Patri-
ots of Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) cordially invite
all veterans and the public to at-
tend the seventh annual Purple
Heart Ceremony at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 18, at the
Florida National Guard Armory,
Crystal River.
The ceremony will commem-
orate the proud legacy of the
Purple Heart and pay tribute to
fallen heroes and wounded
warriors.
The ceremony will also fea-
ture the MOPH Department of
Florida Afghanistan/Iraq War


Memorial Portrait Mural. The
mural honors more than 300
Floridians who have fallen dur-
ing the Afghanistan/Iraq cam-
paigns and is the first memorial
to bear both the engraved
names and color portraits of
those who fell. Vocalists Paul
and Jackie Stevio will provide
patriotic music.
For more information, visit
the Chapter 776 web site at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 will conduct its regular
meeting at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819 meets
at 7 p.m. the last Thursday
monthly at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Superior Bank. Social hour
follows. All Marines and FMF
Corpsmen are welcome. Meet
new friends and discuss past
glories. Call Morgan Patterson
at 352-746-1135, Ted Archam-
bault at 352-382-0462 or Bion
St. Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698 is at 520 State Road
40 E., Inglis, one mile east of
U.S. 19. The Men's Auxiliary
meets at 7 p.m. the second
Monday. LAVFW meets at 5
p.m. and the membership
meeting is at 6:30 p.m. the third
Wednesday at the post.
Call the post at 352-447-
3495 for information about the
post and its activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
American Legion Herbert
Surber Post 225 meets at 7
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the New Testament Baptist
Church of Floral City, 9850 S.
Parkside Ave. adjoining Floral
Park, southeast side. All eligible
veterans are welcome to join.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2012 will be
at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill on the
following dates: Feb. 11, March
10, April 14, May 12, Sept. 8,
Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8.
E Attention: USS Columbus
vets Navy and Marine Corps
shipmates who served on the
USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12
from 1944 through 1976 and
the USS Columbus (SSN-762)
past and present, if you would
like to share memories and ca-
maraderie with old friends and
make new ones, contact Allen
R. Hope, president, 3828 Hob-
son Road, Fort Wayne, IN
46815-4505; call 260-486-2221
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Eastern Time; fax 260-492-
9771, or email Hope4391@
frontier.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Carmen Sharell Satchell
of Crystal River and Ryan
Denzell Nash of Fruitland
Park have announced their
engagement and forthcom-
ing wedding.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Elder
Christopher and Felicia
Satchell. She is a 2007 grad-
uate of Crystal River High
School. In the fall of 2012,
she will graduate from
Florida Gulf Coast Univer-
sity with her Bachelor of
Science degree in resort


Sherman and Jean
Ownbey of Inverness have
announced the engage-
ment of their son, Jeremy
Ownbey, to Katie Wells,
daughter of Susan Wells of
Weston and Ken Wells of
Franklin, N.C.
The bride-elect is a 2002
graduate of Cooper City
High School. Her fiance is
a 2002 graduate of Citrus
High School.
A formal wedding is
planned for March 2, 2012,


Special to the Chronicle

The Soft Sounds of Carol
Kline return to Curtis Peter-
son Auditorium at Lecanto
High School on Feb. 4 with
the "Country Diamonds
Show."
The concert benefits the
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club and will be opened by
local 12-year-old talent
Sophie Robitaille. She per-
formed at Teenstock 2011
and has performed for the
Tampa Bay Lighting, Tampa
Bay Rays, with Blood, Sweat
& Tears, at the Citrus
County Stampede Rodeo, at
the Homosassa Wildlife
State Park Festival of
Lights, and many other
events.
Two years ago, Carol and
George Kline performed


and hospitality manage-
ment with a concentration
in spa management.
Her fiance is the son of
the Rev. Dennis and
Fleeter Nash. He is a 2007
graduate of The Villages
High School. In the fall of
2012, he will graduate from
Florida Gulf Coast Univer-
sity with a Bachelor of Arts
degree in psychology
The couple will exchange
nuptial vows May 12, 2012,
at Macedonia Church of the
Living God.


at the Addison Hotel in
Boca Raton. The couple
will reside in Sunrise.


their Patsy Cline retrospec-
tive for the Boys & Girls
Clubs at the request of the
Beverly Hills Woman's Club.
This year, they will employ
their deep harmony as they
sing favorites of Dottie West,
Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton,
Tammy Wynette, George
Jones, Jim Reeves and, of
course, Patsy Cline.
Doors open at 1 p.m. with
the show starting at 2 p.m.
Refreshments and a Chi-
nese auction of gift baskets
will take place at
intermission.
Tickets are $15 and can be
obtained from Gerry Jones
(352-527-8002), Central
Ridge Boys & Girls Club
(352-287-1412) or at burn-
thermortgage.com, or at
BB&T, Cadence Bank or
Nature Coast Bank.


GetTOGETHER


Journey Seekers
to meet Feb. 6
All women are invited to at-
tend the next meeting of the
Lady Journey Seekers at 10:30
a.m. Feb. 6 at the Coastal Re-
gional Library, 8619 W. Crystal
St., Crystal River.
Lady Journey Seekers are
based in Citrus County and
offer meetings, local events,
day trips, bus trips, cultural trips
and cruises, along with multi-
day domestic and international
trips.
Women who do not have a
travel companion have the op-
portunity to meet others who
love to travel and discover new
places. All trips originate in
Citrus County.


Contact www.ladyjourney
seekers.com or call Val at
352-795-0358.
Have some fun with
Senior Friends
Senior Friends for Life will
take a trip Jan. 27 to Dunnellon
at 11:30 a.m. for lunch at
Abigail's Cafe & Coffee Shop,
20607 W. Pennsylvania Ave.
We will order from the menu.
Interested women must sign up
by Monday, Jan. 23.
Reservations must be made
for activities by signing the
signup sheet, or calling Myrna
Hocking at 352-860-0819, Ted-
die Holler at 352-746-6518,
Astrid Grant at 352-341-0346,
or Jackie Bouyea at 352-
527-6929.


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Engagement

Carroll/Schoenauer


Danielle Carroll and
Timothy Schoenauer of
Tampa have announced
their engagement and up-
coming marriage.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Richard
Carroll Jr. and Jamie
Carroll of Ennis, Texas,
and Roberta Holland-
Rowe and Lanceford Rowe
of Ocala. She is the grand-
daughter of Janice L.
Rolph of Crystal River.
She is a 2002 graduate of
Citrus High School and
2005 graduate of Central
Florida Community Col-
lege Cosmetology School.
She is a hair stylist with
d'amico Hair Lounge.
The prospective groom
is the son of Bob
Schoenauer, and Marjorie
Schoenauer and Paul Star,
all of Treasure Island.
He is a 1998 graduate of


Citrus High School and
earned his Associate of
Arts degree in 2001 from
Santa Fe Community Col-
lege. He graduated from
the UNF Railroad Insti-
tute in 2004 and is a con-
ductor for CSX Railroad.
Nuptial vows will be ex-
changed at 5 p.m. March
16, 2013, in Lakeland.


For the RECORD


Divorces 1/9/12 to 1/15/12
Gladys Aleman, Hialeah vs.
Jose Blas Aleman, Hernando
Joanne F. Burrell, Lorain,
Ohio, vs. John L. Burrell,
Floral City
Christopher James Cassidy,
Inverness vs. Laura Beth
Cassidy, Homosassa
Natesha Cooper, Key West
vs. David Cooper, Beverly
Hills
Paul Anthony Ear, Beverly
Hills vs. Rebecca Elizabeth
Ear, Lecanto
Michelle K. Hicks,
Dunnellon vs. James A. Hicks,
Dunnellon
Richard L. Jantzen,
Inverness vs. Ruth Ann
Jantzen, Ossining
Jackson Daniel Lee Jr.,
Crystal River vs. Cora L. Lee,


Crystal River
Mohamad Madani,
Brooklyn, N.Y., vs. Rosemarie
Madani, Inverness
Reyna Gidden Reinhard,
Hinesville, Ga., vs. Martin
Steven Reinhard, Charleston,
S.C.
John C. Roberts, Citrus
Springs vs. Kristin L. Roberts,
Citrus Springs
Samuel Benjamin Van
Woerkom, Ocala vs. Danielle
Elizabeth Van Woerkom,
Inverness
Ida E. Wagner, Crystal
River vs. Tim L. Wagner,
Orlando

Marriages 1/9/12 to 1/15/12
Randall Keith Johnson,
Lecanto/Ashley Marie
Conrad, Lecanto


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Underworld Awakening" (R)
ID required. In Real 3D. 1:50
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 8 p.m.
No passes.
"Contraband" (R) ID required.
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Beauty and the Beast" (G)
In Real 3D. 2p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Haywire" (R) ID required.
2 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Red Tails" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m.


"Underworld Awakening" (R)
ID required. In Real 3D. 1:30
p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Extremely Loud & Incredibly
Close" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Contraband" (R) ID required.
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Beauty and the Beast" (G) In
Real 3D. 1:35 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Mission Impossible: Ghost
Protocol" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for
area movie listings and entertain-
ment information.


Working TOGETHER


Habitat to dedicate
home in Inverness
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County announces its first
dedication ceremony of 2012,
at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at
the Matyisin home, Habitat
house No. 76, 788 N. Charles
St., Inverness.
Everyone is welcome.
Florida's State Housing Initia-
tives Partnership (SHIP) Pro-
gram provided construction
funds for the project, which


renovated a reclaimed home.
The new owner, like all Habitat
homeowners, was responsible
for investing 500 hours of
sweat equity into the project.
Persons interested in build-
ing their own home with Habi-
tat in 2012-13 should attend a
mandatory orientation meeting
at 10 a.m. Saturday, March
31, at Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church, 4421 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Lecanto. To
register, or for information, call
352-563-2744.


Thursday, Feb. 23


DUEfL
Gatorade Duel at DAYTONA
The fight to qualify for the 54th
annual Daytona 500 in two
action-packed races.
Each of the two races will have
half the entrants to the DAYTONA
500. The field is divided with the
first race having the cars which
qualified in the DAYTONA 500.


inl
Friday, Feb. 24
NEXTera
ENERGY.



NextEra Energy
Resources 250 NASCAR
Camping World Truck
Series
250 miles of intense racing
on Daytona's high banks
under the lights. Tough
trucks, tough competition.


Perplexing problems


of the rich, famous


No doubt you shook
your head when
you heard that
Tiger Woods' ex-wife, Elin
Nordegren, tore down a
$12 million waterfront
mansion that she had
bought in North Palm
Beach because she didn't
like it. Now it's being re-
ported that she tore down
the house because it had
termites. Hmmmm. Really?
Termites?
"What do you wanna do,
lady? Fumigate
or tear it down?"
That doesn't
quite explain
why she bought t
the house in the
first place. I don't 'J
know about you,
but whenever I
buy a house for
$12 million, I like
to get it in- Ji
spected. Sure, MUL
the inspection
costs a couple
hundred dollars, but who
knows? It could save you,
oh, $12 million. Or at least
the sellers might have
dropped the price to $11
million.
Also, when I spend $12
million on a house, I like
to buy something I like.
That way I don't have to
tear it down and build a
whole new house that's
going to cost me another
$12 million. It's hard to be-
lieve that in all of Florida,
with all the foreclosures,
Nordegren couldn't find
something she liked for
the same price or less.
Maybe she's just one of
those people who don't
know how to bargain.
Something tells me she's
not a coupon clipper.
Now, I don't know
Nordegren, and I'm sure
she's a nice person. It's
just that hearing numbers
like that thrown around so
casually makes the rest of
us a little crazy Millions of
people are out of work,
and a lot of the ones who
are working are struggling
to make ends meet. So
when they hear that some-
one is tossing money out
the window with a shovel,
well, it's demoralizing.
Of course, it's not as if
she didn't work hard for
that money She had to live
with Tiger in a living hell
of private planes, celebrity
friends, exotic travel and
unimaginable luxury
Those are six horrible
years she'll never get back.
Yes, he was, by his own ad-
mission, a lousy husband.
Like that's a rare thing.
Just in my own little circle,
I could tell you tales of
lousy husbanding that
make Tiger sound like
Prince Charming.


I'm not taking his side or
excusing him. I'm just say-
ing that the only really ab-
normal thing about this
whole situation is the
money involved. When
regular people get di-
vorced and it happens
every day it's not spread
all over the front page. We
don't usually read about
our friends' (or our own)
marital problems in Peo-
ple magazine, and we
don't read about who got
what in the set-
tlement. Was it
fair? Let's ask
some random
people who
don't know you
from Adam and
see what they
think.
We all like to
think that if we
M had that kind of
LEN money we
wouldn't throw
it away on silly
things like tearing down
mansions we really didn't
need in the first place. We
would do things for other
people; we would tear
down, say, only a $2 mil-
lion house and give the
other $10 million to char-
ity. Or maybe we'd give it
to some of our down-on-
their-luck, ne'er-do-well
relatives. Or spring it on
some friends who could
use a helping hand. Well,
maybe we wouldn't give
away the whole $10 mil-
lion that's left over, be-
cause we'd have to build a
new house and buy some
new furniture and hire a
cleaning person and a
pool boy. (I've always
wanted a pool.) So we'd
have only about $6 million
left over for good works.
But then we should
probably save half of that
for our old age and, oh,
yeah, we'll need some for
property taxes and gro-
ceries, and then the kids
will have to go to a good
college ... maybe we
should only give a million
to charity. Better to be safe
than sorry
Actually, let's put that
million dollars in a safe
place and wait and see if
we need it. Then we can
help people maybe not
this year, but in a few
years, when they really
need it.
For all we know, maybe
Elin Nordegren has given
a ton of money to good
causes. But all we'll ever
hear about is the teardown.

Jim Mullen's book "Now
in Paperback" is now in
paperback You can
email him at
jimmullenbooks. com.


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at (352) 341-6400
or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us/. For
proceedings filed in another county, contact the
clerk in that area.


FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY


mi .a

Mgs~a


Sunday, Feb. 26






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Name:.....................................................
Phone....................................................
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A -A - [-f- I---------


CITRUS COUNTY Anyutime oetore Noon on rFeruary it.

I IR$)NiCLE Thanks our
0009VLB www.chronicleonline.com loyal subscribers ASK US ABUT I PAY!


SEngagement

Satchell/Nash


SEngagement

Well/Ownbey


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A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


1
Ll











SPORTS


* Local tennis
columnist Eric
van den Hoogen
writes about the
importance of the
upcoming Crystal
River Open./B2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


LX


0 NBA, golf/B2
0 College basketball/B3
0 Joe Paterno update/B3
0 Sports briefs, NHL/B4
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NFL/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Humphreys heading to St. Johns River


CR senior set to

play field, pitch

for Vikings
J.M. SORACCHI
Chronicle
Tyler Humphreys had a check-
list of sorts when deciding where
to play baseball after he graduates
from Crystal River High School
this year
Humphreys, a shortstop and
pitcher for the Pirates varsity
squad, wanted to compete for play-
ing time early, play close to home
and begin his undergraduate work
toward an eventual degree in
criminal justice.
On Friday morning, in front of a
room full of people, Humphreys
signed a National Letter of Intent
to receive an athletic scholarship
from St. Johns River State College.


Although Humphreys won't step
foot on the collegiate campus as an
enrolled student until August,
Vikings head baseball coach and
athletic director Ross Jones is al-
ready looking forward to seeing
his newest signee in an SJR
uniform.
"I fully expect him to come in
and play right away," Jones said of
Humphreys. "With his ability, he
should be able to come in and
contribute."
St. Johns River State College is a
two-year school in Palatka County.
Humphreys will be the second Pi-
rate recently to become a Viking,
joining 2010 Crystal River High
School graduate Nic Dellatorre.
According to both Humphreys
and Jones, the player will be ex-
pected to see time at shortstop and
third base, while also possessing
the aptitude to pitch.
The ability to play less than 100
miles away from Crystal River ap-
See .Page B4


J.M. SORACCHI/Chronicle
Crystal River senior Tyler Humphreys, front center, signed a National Letter of Intent on Friday at Crystal River
High School to play collegiate baseball at St. Johns River State College in Palatka. Humphreys is flanked by
mother, Andrea, and father, Mike. In the back row, from left, is principal Mark McCoy, brother Jordan, CR
assistant coach Clayton Trenary, CR head coach Bobby Stack, grandfather Joe Brannon, St. Johns River
coach Ross Jones, former CR head coach Dan Comstock and travel ball coach Stephen Barton.


Photos by DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Citrus High School's Taylor Jackson looks to the referee for the pin on Lecanto High School's Nicholas Noland on Saturday during a 182-pound
match of the Ed Kilpatrick Individual Bracket Tournament at Citrus High School.




Unwelcoming hosts


Citrus wrestling takes

Ed Kilpatrick IBT,;

CR 7th, Lecanto 13th
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
INVERNESS -The Citrus Hurricanes
wrestling team won the 2012 Ed Kil-
patrick Classic with a score of 208 as it de-
feated 15 other teams on Saturday at
Citrus High School.
The Hurricanes had 11 out of 14
wrestlers advance to the finals. Eight Cit-
rus grapplers went to the championship
finals, while three others went to the con-
solation finals.
Nature Coast a district foe came in
second with 175 points, and Palm Bay
scored 171 to finish third.
Five Citrus wrestlers were crowned


More wrestling to read
For more on the Ed Kilpatrick event,
please see Monday's Chronicle.

champion of the event: Austin Kelly (120
pounds), Colton Jackson (152 pounds),
Nick McLean (160 pounds), Taylor Jack-
son (182 pounds) and Zach Collins (220
pounds).
Colton Jackson was named Outstanding
Wrestler of the tournament in the mid-
dleweight division (138-170 pounds).
Crystal River finished seventh with a
score of 63, and Lecanto finished 13th on
the day with 29 total points. The Pirates
had four wrestlers advance to the conso-
lation finals and Lecanto had one wrestler
advance.
See Page B4
Crystal River High School's Andrew Bilby
looks to pin Vanguard's Jason Carr on
Saturday at Citrus High School.


Serena


excels at


Aussie

U. S. female into

fourth round
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia -
Just before she walked on
court, Greta Am said she was
looking forward to the "privi-
lege" of playing her first
match against Serena
Williams. Some privilege.
The 13-time Grand Slam
champion overpowered Arn
6-1, 6-1 in 59 minutes on Sat-
urday for her 17th straight win
at the Australian Open.
The mis-
match was so
great that the
crowd was
muted, rous-
ing them-
selves only
when Arn
won her two
games and Serena
w h e n Williams
Williams completed her third-
round victory
Amto double-faulted twice to
end the match. As the players
shook hands at the net,
Williams looked briefly taken
aback and smiled.
"I told her it was an honor
to play against you," the 32-
year-old Am said. 'And she
told me, 'Oh, you are so sweet'he
I'm a big fan of hers. She's the
real No. lly."
Williams, who racked up her
501st career match win, is hop-
ing to become the second
woman over age 30 to win the
Australian title in the Open era.
"It makes me feel really
good," she said of her Hungar-
ian opponent's remarks. "I'm
really proud of the work that
I've been doing for so many
years, all the hard work"
Vania King's loss to Ana
Ivanovic left Williams as the
only American player left in
either singles draw. John
See Page B4


000AAH2


FAKE-UP

0:0100 -






B2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012



Humana Challenge
Saturday
At La Quinta, Calif.
Purse: $5.6 million
w-PGAWest (Palmer Course): 6,950
yards, par-72, q-La Quinta CC: 7,060 yards,
par-72, n-PGAWest (Nicklaus Course):
6,924 yards, par-72
Second Round
Mark Wilson 66n-62p 128 -21
Ben Crane 65n-63p -128 -18
ZachJohnson 68p-65q -133 -17
John Mallinger 67q-65n-132 -16
Robert Garrigus 73p-64q -137 -16
John Senden 69q-64n -133 -16
Jason Dufner 71p-63q -134 -15
David Toms 63q-65n -128 -15
Chris Kirk 68q-63n -131 -15
Jarrod Lyle 68p-67q -135 -14
Tommy Biershenk 68q-64n-132 -14
Brendon Todd 66p-67q-133 -14
Steve Marino 65q-68n -133 -14
Bobby Gates 68p-63q -131 -13
Chris DiMarco 68q-64n-132 -13
Kevin Chappell 65q-68n-133 -13
Harris English 69q-62n-131 -13
Ryan Moore 72q-61n -133 -13
Brandt Snedeker 64n-68p-132 -13
Martin Laird 66p-69q-135 -12
Johnson Wagner 68p-67q-135 -12
Bud Cauley 66q-67n-133 -12
Stephen Ames 66n-67p-133 -12
Brett Quigley 67p-68q -135 -11
Charles Howell III 69p-70q -139 -11
Lee Janzen 69n-66p-135 -11
CamiloVillegas 63n-68p -131 -11
Miguel Angel Carballo 69q-66n -135 -11
Brendon de Jonge 65q-71n -136 -10
Bob Estes 64n-70p -134 -10
Cameron Tringale 68n-64p-132 -10
Jeff Maggert 69p-65q-134 -10
Ted Potter, Jr. 64n-73p-137 -10
Kevin Sutherland 69n-68p-137 -10
Spencer Levin 68q-67n--135 -9
John Rollins 68n-68p-136 -9
William McGirt 67n-71p- 138 -9
Joe Durant 68p-71q--139 -9
Kyle Reifers 69p-69q 138 -9
Ken Duke 67n-65p-132 -9
Rory Sabbatini 68p-68q-136 -9
Brian Harman 69q-69n-138 -9
Pat Perez 67q-67n-134 -9
Jamie Lovemark 68q-68n-136 -9
Sang-Moon Bae 64n-69p-133 -9
James Driscoll 69q-70n-139 -8
Roberto Castro 68n-70p -138 -8
Carl Pettersson 71q-70n- 141 -8
Kevin Kisner 68q-73n-141 -8
Kevin Na 66n-68p-134 -8
JimmyWalker 70q-66n-136 -8
Jason Bohn 68p-70q -138 -8
Kevin Streelman 70n-66p-136 -8
Brian Gay 69n-68p-137 -8
Gary Christian 66n-68p- 134 -8
Paul Goydos 70q-69n- 139 -8
Justin Leonard 69p-68q-137 -8
DannyLee 69p-69q-138 -8
JoshTeater 71q-66n --137 -8
Michael Thompson 71n-67p-138 -8
Matt Bettencourt 68p-70q- 138 -7
Cameron Beckman 69n-70p-139 -7
Nick O'Hern 68p-70q-138 -7
Bo Van Pelt 67q-71 n 138 -7
Blake Adams 66p-71 q 137 -7
Seung-yulNoh 65n-70p- 135 -7
Marco Dawson 72p-70q -142 -7
Erik Compton 67n-69p-136 -7
Chez Reavie 70q-70n-140 -6
George McNeill 73p-65q-138 -6
Jeff Overton 67p-70q 137 -6
Ricky Barnes 68q-69n-137 -6
Brendan Steele 70n-69p -139 -6
Hunter Haas 72p6688q-140 -6
Matt Kuchar 71Gp-67q -138 -6
Troy Kelly 71p-70q- 141 -6
Michael Bradley 67n-67p-134 -6
Ryan Palmer 69q-71n-140 -5
Brandt Jobe 69p-74q 143 -5
Chad Campbell 71q-65n-136 -5
Stuart Appleby 71q-68n -139 -5
Harrison Frazar 68n-68p -136 -5
Mathew Goggin 65p-73q- 138 -5
Scott Brown 69n-70p 139 -5
Joe Ogilvie 70p-69q -139 -5
Kyle Thompson 69p-71 q 140 -5
Charlie Beljan 71p-69q-140 -5
VaughnTaylor 69q-68n-137 -5
Phil Mickelson 74q-69n-143 -5
Charley Hoffman 70p-71q-- 141 -5
ArjunAtwal 70q-68n- 138 -5
Derek Lamely 68n-71p-139 -5
Bill Haas 71n-69p- 140 -5
Chad Collins 65n-74p-139 -5
Briny Baird 70n-67p-137 -5
Kyle Stanley 68q-72n -140 -4
Tom Pernice Jr. 72p-71q -143 -4
Greg Chalmers 71q-68n-139 -4
Tom Gillis 69p-72q -141 -4
David Hearn 68n-69p-137 -4
Chris Stroud 70n-70p-140 -4
Kris Blanks 71p-69q-140 -4
Richard H. Lee 74q-67n 141 -4
Jerry Kelly 71p-70q -141 -4
Russell Knox 72n-66p-138 -4
Jason Kokrak 68p-66q- 134 -4
John Merrick 69n-71p--140 -4
SunghoonKang 72q-67n-139 -4
Chris Couch 74n-68p--142 -3
Troy Matteson 71 n-65p 136 -3
Ryujilmada 68p-69q-137 -3
JhonattanVegas 70p-72q-142 -3
D.J.Trahan 71q-68n-139 -3
Rocco Mediate 71p-69q- 140 -3
Brian Davis 70n-72p-142 -2
Jonas Blixt 73q-71n- 144 2
Bryce Molder 71n-69p--140 -2
J.J. Henry 71q-72n- 143 -2
Keith Fergus 73n-69p-142 -2
Anthony Kim 70n-70p -140 -2
Charlie Wi 71p-71q -142 -2
Rod Pampling 71q-69n- 140 -1
Tommy Gainey 70p-72q-142 -1
Stephen Gangluff 69p-73q-142 -1
Billy Mayfair 69n-71p -140 -1
Sam Saunders 73q-76n -149 E
Steve Elkington 69p-72q -141 E
Scott Piercy 70q-72n -142 E
Greg Norman 72q-71 n -143 +1
Gavin Coles 73p-72q- 145 +2
Steve Jones 73n-71p -144 +2
Tim Herron 76q-71n--147 +3
Bill Lunde 71p-71q- 142 +3
Trevor Immelman 76q-76n- 152 +3
Heath Slocum 70n-76p- 146 +3


Rich Beem 72n-73p-145 +3
Mike Miles 78n-72p-150 +5
J.J. Killeen 73q-73n-146 +5
Scott McCarron 78q-73n- 151 +7
David Duval 77n-75p 152 +9
David Mathis 76n-77p -153 +10
Mark Brooks 77p-76q-153 +12
Third-Round leaderboard
No players completed the third round
MarkWilson -21 thru 15
Ben Crane -18 thru 12
R. Garrigus -16 thru 13
John Senden -16 thru 11
Z.Johnson -16 thru 12
J. Mallinger -16 thru 14
Jason Dufner -15 thru 17
Chris Kirk -15 thru 9
David Toms -15 thru 11
Jarrod Lyle -14 thru 15
Steve Marino -14 thru 12
BrendonTodd-14 thru 12
T Biershenk -14 thru 12


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Humana event halted by wind


Wilson leads on

PGA Tour, but no

one completes round

Associated Press

LA QUINTA, Calif. When the
wind knocked a big scoreboard into
a lake and ripped a few trees out of
the ground Saturday, Mark Wilson
realized he really didn't mind if he
couldn't finish his third round at
the Humana Challenge.
Wilson and his fellow pros were
more than happy to wait out the
windstorm and just come back Sun-
day, when Wilson will attempt to
maintain his momentum for what
might be a marathon finish to the
erstwhile Bob Hope Classic.
Wilson held a three-stroke lead
over Ben Crane at 21 under when
play was suspended play midway
through the third round. Ferocious
wind reaching 35 mph caused dam-
age on all three courses, even in-
terrupting former President Bill


Associated Press
Mark Wilson hits his tee shot on the 13th hole during the third round of the
Humana Challenge golf tournament Saturday at La Quinta Country Club in
La Quinta, Calif.


Clinton's round with Greg Norman.
"I think they made the right call,"
Wilson said. "You don't want to see
anybody get hurt."


The pro-am tournament will re-
sume third-round play Sunday
morning without the amateurs.
They'll also attempt to finish the


fourth round, which could be tough
after the event's first wind delay
since 1999 the first on the PGA
Tour since 2009 in Houston.
Forsman takes
Champions Tour lead
KAUPULEHU-KONA, Hawaii Dan
Forsman had six back-nine birdies for a
7-under 65 and a two-stroke lead Sat-
urday after the second round of the
Champions Tour's season-opening Mit-
subishi Electric Championship.
Forsman, a two-time winner on the
50-and-over tour, had a 12-under 132
total at Hualalai Resort.
Brad Bryant had the day's low round,
an 8-under 64, to match 2010 cham-
pion Tom Watson (65) and Jeff Sluman
(66) at 10 under.
Forsman was back in the pack after
playing the front nine in 35. He birdied
Nos. 10 and 11, moved into a tie for
first with birdies at Nos. 13 and 14, and
pulled ahead by sinking an 11-foot
birdie putt at the 17th and hitting within
2 feet on the final hole to set up an-
other birdie.
The five-time PGA Tour winner
needed just 21 putts in his round.


Philly 86'd by Heat


Miami turns away

Sixers during

113-92 victory

Associated Press

MIAMI Chris Bosh scored 30
points, LeBron James added 28
points and nine rebounds and the
Miami Heat remained unbeaten
without Dwyane Wade in the
lineup this season, defeating the
Philadelphia 76ers 113-92 on Sat-
urday night.
Mario Chalmers scored 11 and
Joel Anthony finished with nine
points and nine rebounds for
Miami, which outrebounded
Philadelphia 52-31 and moved into
a tie with Orlando for first in the
Southeast Division. The Heat are 6-
0 this season without Wade, who
missed his third straight game with
a sprained right ankle.
Lou Williams scored 22 points
and Evan Turner added 16 for
Philadelphia, which has lost eight
of nine against Miami since the
start of last season, including a five-
game defeat in the opening round
of last season's playoffs.
Thunder 84, Nets 74
NEWARK, N.J. Kevin Durant had
20 points and a season-high 15 re-
bounds and the Oklahoma Thunder sti-
fled the New Jersey Nets on defense in
an 84-74 victory.
Playing in his first game since sign-
ing a five-year, $80 million contract ex-
tension, Russell Westbrook added 21
points and six assists and James
Harden had 16 points and nine re-
bounds off the bench.
Coming off a loss to lowly Washing-
ton, Oklahoma City (13-3) limited New
Jersey to 31 percent shooting from the
field, including 3 of 23 from 3-point
range. The Thunder also blocked 10
shots, with Serge Ibaka getting a sea-
son-high five.
Kris Humphries had 12 points and 16
rebounds to lead the Nets. Deron
Williams and MarShon Brooks had 14
points apiece and Jordan Farmar
added 13.
Pistons 94, Trail Blazers 91
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Rodney
Stuckey scored 28 points and the De-
troit Pistons won for only the second
time in 12 games, beating the Portland
Trail Blazers 94-91.


Raymond Felton lost control of the
ball at midcourt as Portland was trying
to tie it in the final seconds.
The Trail Blazers were down three
after Felton made two free throws with
37 seconds remaining. Stuckey missed
a wild driving attempt, and Portland re-
bounded and called a timeout with 15.6
seconds left.
Jamal Crawford drove for a layup
with 8.4 seconds to go, and Stuckey
answered with a pair of free throws.
Detroit fouled Felton at midcourt, pre-
venting Portland from trying a 3-point
attempt. He made both free throws, but
Stuckey made two of his own with 4.4
seconds left for a three-point lead.
Rockets 105, Spurs 102
HOUSTON Kevin Martin scored
25 points, Kyle Lowry had 14 points
and eight assists and the Houston
Rockets took advantage of Tim Dun-
can's absence to beat the San Antonio
Spurs 105-102.
Goran Dragic scored 14 and Samuel
Dalembert added 12 points and a sea-
son-high six blocks for the Rockets,
who have won six in a row.
Tony Parker had 24 points and a
season-high 13 assists for the Spurs,
who were playing their fourth game in
five nights. San Antonio coach Gregg
Popovich rested Duncan, who played
25 minutes in Friday night's loss to
Sacramento. Tiago Splitter had a ca-
reer-high 25 points and 10 rebounds for
the Spurs.
The Rockets shot 56 percent (44 of
79) to make up for the Spurs' 43-32
edge in rebounds.
Hawks 121, Cavaliers 94
ATLANTA- Joe Johnson scored 25
points and the Atlanta Hawks, coming
off a loss that prompted their coach to
say they quit, responded with a 121-94
rout of the Cleveland Cavaliers on Sat-
urday night.
Johnson scored 19 of his points in
the first half for Atlanta, which sat all its
starters in the final quarter. Jannero
Pargo, who opened the fourth with
back-to-back 3-pointers, had a season-
high 14 points.
Jeff Teague added 14 points as the
Hawks moved past Friday night's 90-76
loss at Philadelphia. After the loss,
which ended a four-game winning
streak, coach Larry Drew said "It got
tough for us and we quit."
Rookie Kyrie Irving scored 18 points
to lead the Cavaliers, who have lost
three straight and six of eight.


Playing tennis f


On Jan. 28 and 29, the 7th An-
nual Crystal River Tennis
Open will be held at Crystal
River High School to benefit local
food programs. The boys and girls
tennis teams from the high school
would like to invite you
to join them in their ef- i f
fort to collect donations F.t
of toiletries and/or non-
perishable foods.
These kinds of pro- --
grams are always in v
need of help, but espe-
cially after the holi-
days when donations
tend to drop off a little. Eric v
So why not combine Hoo
the fun game of tennis ON T
with the serious busi-
ness of helping people
that have fallen on hard times?
The hardest part of pulling off an
event like this is to get the word
out. So when you are reading this,
please tell your friends, tennis
players and/or non-players about


a
o
E


this effort for a good cause.
There are a tremendous num-
ber of choices out there for people
to spend part of their weekend
doing something fun. The boys
and girls from the Crystal River
High School tennis
teams are hoping that
you will decide to
spend some of your
precious spare time
with them on the ten-
nis courts.
If you cannot partici-
pate in the tourna-
i ment, the volunteers
in den will be glad to accept
gen your donation during
ENNISI the weekend; just drop
:NNIS it of at the tennis
courts, they will be
there between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
on both days.
Entry fee: Donation of cash, toi-
letries and/or non-perishable
foods (suggested $20 per person
and $10 for second event).


Grizzlies 128, Kings 95
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Rudy Gay had
23 points, Mike Conley and O.J. Mayo
added 22 apiece and the Memphis
Grizzlies won their sixth straight, 128-
95 over the Sacramento Kings.
Marc Gasol had 20 points on 8-of-11
shooting and grabbed 11 rebounds,
while Marreese Speights contributed 12
points and 15 rebounds for Memphis,
which scored a season high.
Jimmer Fredette led the Kings with a
season-high 20 points and six assists,
while Donte Greene and DeMarcus
Cousins scored 19 apiece. Cousins
also had 11 rebounds and Tyreke
Evans had 13 points.
Bulls 95, Bobcats 89
CHICAGO Carlos Boozer scored





'or a goo

Divisions offered will be:
Women's, Men's and Mixed Dou-
bles, divided in A,B,C, and 60+.
2 matches guaranteed (Consola-
tion Round).
Deadline for Entries: Wednes-
day Jan. 25.
A question that comes up on a
regular basis concerning the
deadline is: "Why can I not sign
up till Friday evening?" The rea-
son for that is that it takes a whole
afternoon to make the draws and
than everybody has to be called
with their starting times. So the
draws are generally made on
Thursday afternoon.
That being said, please feel free
to still call in or e-mail if you de-
cide at the last moment to join in
on the fun. There are always peo-
ple that drop out at the last mo-
ment and sometimes draws will
have byes that could be filled with
a late entry.
There are tournaments that will
not allow this kind of flexibility,


17 of his 23 points in the second half to
lead the injury-depleted Chicago Bulls
to a 95-89 win over the struggling Char-
lotte Bobcats.
Luol Deng added 22 points and eight
rebounds as the Bulls won their sev-
enth straight at home and improved to
an NBA-best 15-3 despite the absence
of two starters and two key reserves.
Richard Hamilton added a season-high
18 points for Chicago.
The Bulls played their fourth straight
game without reigning NBA MVP Der-
rick Rose (sprained left big toe). They
also were missing starting center
Joakim Noah, a late scratch because of
a left ankle sprain.
Gerald Henderson Jr. led Charlotte
with 22 points, but the Bobcats lost their
fifth consecutive road game.





d cause

but for a good cause, it seems like
the right thing to do.
Check in at least 15 minutes
prior to your match. You will re-
ceive a call with your starting time
on Friday, Jan. 27.
Please sign up by contacting one
of the following volunteers:
Tournament Directors: Cindy
Reynolds at 352-697-3222 or
ReynoldsC@citrus.kl2.fl.us; Sally
deMontfort at 352-795-9693 or de-
Mont@embarqmail.com; Eric van
den Hoogen at 352-382-3138 or
hoera@juno.com.
The organizers would like to
stress they will adjust the sched-
ule for players that have USTA
matches or church that might
keep them from participating.
Again, if that does not work for
you, they will be available from 10
a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturday as
well as Sunday to accept your do-
nation at the tennis courts.
Hope to see you there, and
thank you.


Associated Press
Miami Heat forward LeBron James shoots over Philadelphia 76ers' Elton
Brand during the first half Saturday in Miami.


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FSU ends Duke's home streak


Snaer hits winning

3for 'Noles while

Notre Dame downs

No. 1 Syracuse

Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Michael
Snaer hit a 3-pointer as time ex-
pired, and Florida State snapped
Duke's 45-game home-court win-
ning streak with a 76-73 win by the
Seminoles.
With the game tied, Luke Loucks
sprinted up the middle of the court
before zipping a pass over to Snaer
on the right side in front of the
FSU bench. Snaer quickly
launched a shot that dropped
cleanly through the net, stunning
the once-rowdy crowd at Cameron
Indoor Stadium and sending the
Seminoles' bench spilling onto the
court in celebration.
Snaer scored 14 points in-
cluding a banked-in 3 to beat the
buzzer on the final play of the first
half- and the Seminoles (13-6, 4-
1 Atlantic Coast Conference) won
their fourth straight game.
Austin Rivers had 19 points for
the Blue Devils (16-3,4-1), including
a tying drive with 4.9 seconds left.
Xavier Gibson led Florida State
with 16 points.
No. 17 Florida 76,
LSU 64
GAINESVILLE Erik Murphy
scored 15 points and No. 17 Florida
beat LSU 76-64 to extend its home
win streak to 16 games.
The Gators (15-4, 3-1 Southeastern
Conference) had five players in double
figures, a balanced effort that helped
them overcome an off shooting night
from 3-point range. Erving Walker had
12 points, and Kenny Boynton, Bradley
Beal and Mike Rosario finished with 11
points apiece for Florida, which made
7 of 21 shots from behind the arc.
Justin Hamilton led the Tigers with a
career-high 27 points and eight re-
bounds. The 7-footer made 13 of 22
shots, nearly as many as the rest of
his team.
Hamilton helped LSU (12-7, 2-3)
trim the lead to 68-60 with 3 minutes
remaining, but the Gators pulled away
down the stretch.
Notre Dame 67,
No. 1 Syracuse 58
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Jack Cooley
scored 17 points and grabbed 10 re-
bounds Saturday night as Notre Dame
upset No. 1 Syracuse 67-58 and
handed the Orange their first loss after
20 straight victories.
Fans stormed the court after the
Irish's rousing victory. It was the eighth
time Notre Dame has beaten a No. 1
team that ties for fourth-most all-
time, with North Carolina having the
most with 12.
The Orange (20-1, 7-1) played with-
out starting center Fab Melo, who did
not make the trip and will not play
Monday against Cincinnati.
Without Melo in the middle, the 6-
foot-9, 248-pound Cooley was a major
force for Notre Dame (12-8, 4-3) and
the Irish won the rebound battle 38-25.
No. 2 Kentucky 77,
Alabama 71
LEXINGTON, Ky. Darius Miller


Associated Press
Florida State's Michael Snaer (21) and lan Miller celebrate Snaer's game-winning basket against Duke during the second half Saturday in Durham,
N.C. Florida State won 76-73, ending Duke's 45-game home winning streak in the process.


hit four free throws in the final minute
and freshmen Marquis Teague and
Anthony Davis each added two more
as No. 2 Kentucky edged Alabama 77-
71 on Saturday for its nation's best
47th straight home victory.
Kentucky (19-1, 5-0 Southeastern
Conference) led the entire second
half, but Alabama's Trevor Releford
scored all 17 of his points in the sec-
ond half to keep the Crimson Tide (13-
6, 2-3) close until the end.
Terrence Jones, who finished with 15
points, made Kentucky's final field goal
with 6:57 left, but the Wildcats hit 23 of
29 second-half free throw attempts -
including all eight in the final minute -
in a game that featured 45 fouls.
Doron Lamb had 14 points and
freshman Michael Kidd-Gilchrist added
13 for the Wildcats, who scored their
final 15 points from the free-throw line.
JaMychal Green had 22 points and
12 rebounds and Trevor Lacey added
10 points for Alabama, which lost its
third in a row.
No. 7 Kansas 69,
Texas 66
AUSTIN, Texas Jeff Withey
made a layup and free throw with 37
seconds left to give Kansas the lead,
and the Jayhawks survived another
tough fight with Texas.
Withey's three-point play put
Kansas up 68-66 and Thomas Robin-
son made a free throw with 8 seconds
left. Texas' J'Covan Brown got off a 3-
pointer with 2 seconds left but it
bounced off the rim. Brown also
missed with 15 seconds left.
Tyshawn Taylor scored 22 points
and Robinson finished with 17 points
and eight rebounds for Kansas (16-3,
6-0). The Jayhawks have won nine in
a row and are the only Big 12 team
still undefeated in conference play.
Brown scored 24 points for the
Longhorns (12-7, 2-4), who have lost
three in a row and absorbed their first


home loss of the season.
No. 5 Missouri 89,
No. 3 Baylor 88
WACO, Texas Ricardo Ratliffe
scored a career-high 27 points and
Missouri held on for the big road win.
Ratliffe had a big two-handed slam
dunk midway through the second half
when he scored six points in an 8-0
spurt that put the Tigers (18-1, 5-1 Big
12) up 68-58. Missouri still had a 10-
point lead with 3:07 left but didn't
score again until Ratliffe's two free
throws with a minute left.
Missouri had to make 10 of 12 free
throws in the final minute for the vic-
tory. Marcus Denmon's free throw with
4 seconds left made it 89-85 before
Brady Heslip hit a 3-pointer for Baylor
(17-2, 4-2), which has lost two in a row
after a 17-0 start.
Quincy Miller led Baylor with 29
points while Pierre Jackson had 20
points and 15 assists.
No. 9 Michigan State 83,
Purdue 58
EAST LANSING, Mich. Fresh-
man Branden Dawson scored 14
points to help Michigan State pull
away for the easy victory.
The Spartans (16-4, 5-2) moved into
a tie for the Big Ten lead by stopping
their second two-game skid this season.
The Boilermakers (14-6, 4-3) have
lost three of their last five games.
The Spartans led by seven at half-
time and built a 23-point lead midway
through the second half.
Purdue's Robbie Hummel didn't
make a shot for the first time in his in-
jury-filled career that dates to 2007.
No. 10 Georgetown 52,
Rutgers 50
WASHINGTON Otto Porter
scored the final six points, including
two free throws with 8.5 seconds left,
lifting Georgetown to the win.


Harry Sims led Georgetown (16-3,
6-2 Big East) with 12 points, 10 re-
bounds and two assists. He made 8 of
13 free throws, part of a 25-of-36 effort
from the line for the Hoyas.
Mike Poole made a long 2-pointer
with 2 seconds left on the shot clock and
Eli Carter made a 3-pointer to extend
Rutgers' lead to 5045 with 2:35 left.
Porter made a layup with 1:36 left,
and after Rutgers (11-9, 3-4) committed
an offensive foul, Porter made a jumper
with 1:10 left to tie the game at 50.
Tennessee 60,
No. 13 Connecticut 57
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Jarnell
Stokes had 16 points and 12 rebounds
in his first start, and Tennessee hit 7 of
10 free-throw attempts in the final
minute to secure the win.
The Volunteers (9-10) led by 10
points with 3:15 remaining in the sec-
ond half and had a 55-48 lead when
the Huskies' Jeremy Lamb sank a 3-
pointer with 37 seconds left. Lamb
then fouled Trae Golden, who hit one
of his two free throws before Shabazz
Napier hit a 3 to cut the Vols' lead to
56-54 with 23 seconds to go.
Niels Giffey fouled Tennessee's
Skylar McBee, who hit both free
throws to seal it.
Lamb led the Huskies (14-5) with 23
points. Napier finished with 18 points.
No. 19 Creighton 75,
Indiana State 49
OMAHA, Neb. Doug McDermott
had 12 points and Creighton cruised
to its eighth consecutive victory.
For McDermott, it tied a season low
for points, but it didn't matter.
Creighton hit seven of its first 10 3-
point shots, including four during a de-
cisive 17-5 first-half run.
The Bluejays (18-2) improved to 8-1
in the Missouri Valley Conference in
front of 17,411 the sixth-largest
crowd in school history.


Indiana State (11-9, 2-7) lost its third
straight and seventh in nine games
after a 9-2 start to the season.
Arkansas 66,
No. 20 Michigan 64
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. BJ Young
scored 15 points and Arkansas hit its
first 11 shots while remaining unde-
feated in Bud Walton Arena this season.
Trey Burke missed a 3-pointer at the
buzzer, giving the Razorbacks (14-5)
their second victory over a ranked op-
ponent at home, following a win over
then-No. 15 Mississippi State on Jan. 7.
Arkansas built a 34-14 lead on the
strength of its early shooting and led
49-33 early in the second half. The
Wolverines (15-5) cut the lead to two
before the Razorbacks regained con-
trol and held on in front of a sellout
crowd of 19,050.
Mardracus Wade added 12 points
and Rickey Scott and Hunter Mickel-
son had 11 apiece for Arkansas, which
shot 50 percent.
Zack Novak led Michigan with 17
points, and Jordan Morgan had 16.
No. 25 Kansas State 66,
Oklahoma State 58
STILLWATER, Okla. Freshman
Angel Rodriguez scored 14 points in
his second start, Jamar Samuels
added 12 points and 12 rebounds and
Kansas State snapped an 11-game
losing streak at Gallagher-lba Arena.
The Wildcats (14-4, 3-3 Big 12) held
Oklahoma State without a made basket
for a 15-minute stretch spanning half-
time, building up a 46-33 lead on Will
Spradling's runner in the lane with 9:08
to play. Then they held off a late charge
as the Cowboys (9-10, 2-4) closed to
59-56 with just over 2 minutes left.
Rodriguez and Rodney McGruder
combined to make seven of 10 free
throws down the stretch to seal the
Wildcats' first win in Stillwater since
1993.


JoePa in serious condition


Irish women triumph


Reports of

death false

Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Joe Paterno's doctors say the
former Penn State coach's
condition has become "seri-
ous" after he experienced
complications from lung
cancer in recent days.
The winningest major
college football coach of all
time, Paterno was diag-
nosed shortly after Penn
State's Board of Trustees
ousted him Nov 9 in the af-
termath of the child sex
abuse charges against for-
mer assistant Jerry San-
dusky Paterno's been
getting treatment since,
and his health problems
were worsened when he
broke his pelvis an in-
jury that first cropped up
when he was accidentally
hit in preseason practice
last year.
"Over the last few days
Joe Paterno has experi-
enced further health com-
plications," family
spokesman Dan McGinn
said in a brief statement
Saturday to The Associated
Press. "His doctors have
now characterized his sta-
tus as serious.


Associated Press
A family spokesman said former Penn State coach Joe Pa-
terno, who is battling lung cancer, is in serious condition
after experiencing health complications. The 85-year-old
Paterno has been in the hospital since Jan. 13 for obser-
vation for what his family had called minor complications


from cancer treatments.
"His family will have no
comment on the situation
and asks that their privacy
be respected during this
difficult time," he said.
Paterno's sons Scott and
Jay both took to Twitter Sat-
urday night to refute reports
that their father had died.
Wrote Jay Paterno: "I ap-
preciate the support (and)
prayers. Joe is continuing
to fight."
The 85-year-old Paterno
has been in the hospital
since Jan. 13 for observa-
tion for what his family had
called minor complications
from his cancer treatments.
Not long before that, he
conducted his only inter-


view since losing his job,
with The Washington Post.
Paterno was described as
frail then and wearing a
wig. The second half of the
two-day interview was con-
ducted by his bedside.
The final days of Pa-
terno's Penn State career
were easily the toughest in
his 61 years with the uni-
versity and 46 seasons as
head football coach.
Sandusky, a longtime de-
fensive coordinator who
was on Paterno's staff in
two national title seasons,
was arrested Nov 5 and ul-
timately charged with sex-
ually abusing a total of 10
boys over 15 years.


Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Skylar Diggins scored 20
points, Devereaux Peters
added 19 and No. 2 Notre
Dame routed Villanova 76-
43 Saturday for its 16th
straight victory
Notre Dame (19-1) re-
mained unbeaten at 7-0 in
the Big East, and won its
fourth straight game by
more than 20 points. The
Irish's national champi-
onship team won its first 23
games in 2000-01.
Rachel Roberts scored
14 for Villanova (12-7, 2-4),
which had 20 turnovers.
No. 4 Stanford 65,
Washington 47
STANFORD, Calif. -
Nnemkadi Ogwumike scored
17 points, Chiney Ogwumike
had 15 points and 11 re-
bounds and Stanford picked
up another victory at home.
Taylor Greenfield came off
the bench to score 12 points
and spark a late rally for the
Cardinal (17-1, 8-0 Pac-12),
who won their 73rd consecu-
tive home game and 65th
straight against a conference
opponent.
Jazmine Davis scored 16
points for the Huskies (10-7,
2-5), who lost their 12th
straight against Stanford. Mer-


cedes Wetmore added 11
points.
No. 7 Rutgers 72,
South Florida 66
TAMPA-April Sykes had
23 points and 10 rebounds,
Khadijah Rushdan scored 16
points and No. 7 Rutgers beat
South Florida 72-66.
Monique Oliver finished
with 14 points for the Scarlet
Knights (16-3, 5-1), who had a
six-game winning streak
snapped Tuesday in a 62-57
Big East loss to St. John's.
South Florida (11-9, 3-3)
got 15 points from Inga
Orekhova.
The Bulls were coming off a
66-63 overtime win over No.
21 DePaul on Tuesday. South
Florida completed a stretch of
playing four of five games
against Top 25 teams be-
fore beating DePaul, the Bulls
lost to ranked Georgetown
and Louisville and beat un-
ranked Seton Hall.
No. 3 Connecticut 88,
No. 21 DePaul 44
CHICAGO Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis tied a sea-
son high with 25 points and
No. 3 Connecticut breezed to
its fifth straight win, beating
No. 21 DePaul 88-44.
The Huskies (17-2, 6-1 Big
East) had won their previous


four games by an average of
44.5 points, and this one
never was in doubt, either.
They jumped out to a big lead
in the opening minutes and
snapped DePaul's 28-game
home winning streak.
Lewis set the tone, scoring
18 points as the Huskies built
a 53-23 lead. The freshman
hit 5 of 7 3-pointers and
grabbed seven rebounds.
Tiffany Hayes delivered her
eighth straight double-digit
scoring game, finishing with
14 points.
No. 1 Baylor 76,
No. 23 Kansas St. 41
WACO, Texas Brittney
Griner had 22 points and 12
rebounds as No. 1 Baylor
stretched its school-record
home winning streak to 34
with a 76-41 victory over No.
23 Kansas State.
The Lady Bears (19-0, 6-0
Big 12), one of only two unde-
feated women's teams in Divi-
sion I, took control of the
game with a 12-0 run midway
through the first half. Griner
started that spurt, and put
them ahead to stay, when her
short jumper and free throw
after being fouled on the shot
broke an 11-all tie.
Baylor has won all six of its
games this season against
Top 25 teams.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 B3






B4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012



NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 7
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
Sunday, Jan. 8
New York Giants 24, Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32
New England 45, Denver 10
Sunday, Jan.15
Baltimore 20, Houston 13
N.Y Giants 37, Green Bay 20
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan.22
Baltimore at New England, 3 p.m.
N.Y Giants at San Francisco, 6:30 p.m.
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.29
At Honolulu
NFCvs.AFC, 7p.m.
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFCvs.AFC,6:20p.m.



Australian Open
Sunday
At Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $26.83 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Fourth Round
Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def. Iveta Be-
nesova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Third Round
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Colin Fleming and Ross Hutchins (15), Britain,
6-4, 0-6, 6-2.
Women
Third Round
Svetlana Kuznetsova and Vera Zvonareva,
Russia, def. Gisela Dulko, Argentina, and Flavia
Pennetta (4), Italy, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Mixed
First Round
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Marcin
Matkowski, Poland, def. Nadia Petrova, Russia,
and Marcelo Melo, Brazil, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 10-5
tiebreak.



Saturday's Men Scores
EAST
American U. 67, Army 55
Bucknell 75, Holy Cross 41
Colgate 65, Navy 54, OT
Columbia 61, Cornell 56
Delaware 77, Georgia St. 74, 20T
Drexel 71, Northeastern 53
George Washington 60, Charlotte 52
Georgetown 52, Rutgers 50
Harvard 54, Dartmouth 38
LIU 73, Wagner 66
La Salle 80, Rhode Island 66
Marquette 79, Providence 72
NJIT 58, Texas-Pan American 57
Penn 84, Saint Joseph's 80
Quinnipiac 78, Bryant 71, OT
Robert Morris 81, Monmouth (NJ) 73, OT
Sacred Heart 62, CCSU 61
St. Bonaventure 95, Fordham 51
St. Francis (NY) 79, Mount St. Mary's 60
St. Francis (Pa.) 69, Fairleigh Dickinson 63
Stony Brook 58, Maine 52
Temple 73, Maryland 60
Villanova 79, St. John's 76, OT
Wake Forest 71, Boston College 56
West Virginia 77, Cincinnati 74, OT
Yale 73, Brown 60
SOUTH
Alcorn St. 61, Alabama St. 60
Appalachian St. 84, W. Carolina 72
Auburn 63, South Carolina 52
Bethune-Cookman 60, Delaware St. 59
Campbell 80, VMI 73
Charleston Southern 77, Winthrop 66
Clemson 64, Georgia Tech 62
Coastal Carolina 82, Radford 62
Coppin St. 77, NC Central 57
Davidson 80, The Citadel 51
Elon 88, Chattanooga 87
FAU 66, FlU 64
Florida 76, LSU 64
Florida A&M 68, Md.-Eastern Shore 63
Florida St. 76, Duke 73
George Mason 72, Towson 60
Georgia Southern 64, Coll. of Charleston 58
Hofstra 71, James Madison 69
Jackson St. 80, Grambling St. 67
Jacksonville 66, Kennesaw St. 50
Kentucky 77, Alabama 71
Liberty 84, High Point 78
Lipscomb 73, ETSU 65
Memphis 63, SMU 45
Mercer 69, North Florida 58
Middle Tennessee 68, South Alabama 47
Mississippi 66, Georgia 63
Mississippi St. 78, Vanderbilt 77, OT
Morehead St. 62, UT-Martin 56
NC A&T 62, Morgan St. 61
Nicholls St. 55, SE Louisiana 53
Norfolk St. 80, Hampton 75
Northwestern St. 64, McNeese St. 61
SC-Upstate 79, Belmont 78
Savannah St. 83, SC State 53
Southern Miss. 67, Marshall 63
Southern U. 75, Alabama A&M 69, OT
Tennessee 60, UConn 57
Tennessee Tech 77, SE Missouri 62
Troy 91, Louisiana-Monroe 63
Tulane 66, UTEP 58
UCF 48, UAB 41
UMass 79, Richmond 68
UNC Asheville 66, Presbyterian 58
UNC Wilmington 68, William & Mary 66
VCU 61, Old Dominion 48
W. Kentucky 65, UALR 53
Wofford 79, Furman 72
MIDWEST
Akron 84, Kent St. 75
Austin Peay 76, E. Illinois 64
Ball St. 75, N. Illinois 65
Buffalo 68, Bowling Green 66
Butler 63, Loyola of Chicago 57
Chicago St. 98, Houston Baptist 95, OT
Creighton 75, Indiana St. 49
Dayton 87, Xavier 72
Detroit 69, Wright St. 53
E. Michigan 41, Toledo 38
Evansville 79, Illinois St. 71
Michigan St. 83, Purdue 58
Missouri St. 51, Bradley 48
Notre Dame 67, Syracuse 58


Ohio 69, Miami (Ohio) 65
Ohio St. 79, Nebraska 45
S. Dakota St. 91, N. Dakota St. 88, OT
Saint Louis 68, Duquesne 41
UMKC 64, IUPUI 62
Valparaiso 60, III.-Chicago 55
W. Illinois 47, South Dakota 45
W. Michigan 64, Cent. Michigan 61
Wichita St. 85, S. Illinois 42
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 66, Michigan 64
Arkansas St. 79, Louisiana-Lafayette 74
Houston 82, East Carolina 76
Iowa St. 76, Texas Tech 52
Kansas 69, Texas 66
Kansas St. 66, Oklahoma St. 58
Lamar 92, Cent. Arkansas 78
MVSU 81, Prairie View 57
Missouri 89, Baylor 88
North Texas 75, Denver 74, OT
Oral Roberts 93, Oakland 86
TCU 54, Boise St. 52
Texas A&M 81, Oklahoma 75, OT
Texas A&M-CC 50, Sam Houston St. 49
Texas Southern 69, Ark.-Pine Bluff 55


SCOREBOARD


For the record


0 Florida LOTTERY


p
N
B
N
T(


O
A
c


c

c
ci


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:

LOTTERY
11 12 27 35 38 45
XTRA
5


CASH 3 (early)
7-9-7
CASH 3 (late)
7-6-2
PLAY 4 (early)
7-1-6-3
PLAY 4 (late)
4-4-1-7
FANTASY 5
8 27 33 34 35
POWERBALL
12 24 43 44 45
POWER BALL
7


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8:30 a.m. (SUN) LSU at Florida (Taped)
12 p.m. (ABC) North Carolina State at Miami
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) North Carolina at North Carolina State
2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas Tech at Iowa State
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Iowa at Penn State
3 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at LSU
4:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Colorado at Arizona
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Louisville at Georgetown
6:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington State at California
8:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Memphis at Alabama-Birmingham
NBA
6 p.m. (SUN) Milwaukee Bucks at Miami Heat
BOWLING
3 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bayer Viper Open (Taped)
FOOTBALL
3 p.m. (CBS) AFC Championship Baltimore Ravens at
New England Patriots
6:30 p.m. (FOX) NFC Championship New York Giants at
San Francisco 49ers
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo Golf
Champions (Same-day Tape)
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Humana Challenge
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mitsubishi Electric
Championship
GYMNASTICS
10:30 a.m. (SUN) Illinois-Chicago at Florida (Taped)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgia at Alabama (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Washington Capitals at Pittsburgh Penguins
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
10:30 a.m. (FOX) English Premier League: Arsenal vs.
Manchester United
TENNIS
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Round of 16 (Taped)
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Round of 16
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Australian Open Round of 16

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Texas-Arlington 63, Stephen F Austin 54
Tulsa 70, Rice 46
UTSA 80, Texas St. 75
FAR WEST
BYU 77, Pepperdine 64
Cal Poly 100, CS Northridge 54
Colorado 64, Arizona 63
Gonzaga 77, San Diego 60
Montana 85, Sacramento St. 56
Montana St. 84, N. Colorado 72
Oregon 75, UCLA 68
San Francisco 72, Portland 71
Utah 64, Arizona St. 43
Washington 76, Stanford 63
Washington St. 77, California 75
Wyoming 70, Colorado St. 51
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct (
'hiladelphia 11 5 .688
Jew York 6 10 .375
Boston 5 9 .357
Jew Jersey 4 12 .250
oronto 4 12 .250
Southeast Division
W L Pct (
)rlando 11 4 .733
Miami 11 4 .733
Atlanta 12 5 .706
;harlotte 3 13 .188 8
Vashington 2 13 .133
Central Division
W L Pct (
;hicago 15 3 .833
ndiana 10 4 .714
;leveland 6 9 .400
Milwaukee 5 9 .357
Detroit 4 13 .235 10


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
Memphis 9 6 .600
San Antonio 10 7 .588
Dallas 10 7 .588
Houston 9 7 .563
New Orleans 3 13 .188
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 13 3 .813
Denver 12 5 .706
Utah 10 5 .667
Portland 9 7 .563
Minnesota 7 9 .438
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 8 5 .615
L.A. Lakers 10 7 .588
Phoenix 6 9 .400
Sacramento 6 11 .353
Golden State 5 10 .333
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 121, Cleveland 94
Detroit 94, Portland 91
Miami 113, Philadelphia 92
Denver 119, New York 114,20T
Chicago 95, Charlotte 89
Houston 105, San Antonio 102
Dallas 83, New Orleans 81
Memphis 128, Sacramento 95
Oklahoma City 84, New Jersey 74
Utah 108, Minnesota 98
Sunday's Games
Boston at Washington, 1 p.m.
Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Charlotte at New Jersey 6 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 6p.m.
Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.


Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division


GP W L OT
N.Y. Rangers 46 3012 4
Philadelphia 46 2814 4
Pittsburgh 47 2617 4
New Jersey 47 2619 2
N.Y. Islanders 46 1921 6
Northeast Division
GP W L OT
Boston 45 3013 2
Ottawa 50 2717 6
Toronto 47 2319 5
Montreal 48 1821 9
Buffalo 48 1924 5


7
7
Florida
GB Washington
- Winnipeg
- Tampa Bay
- Carolina
i82 WE
9

GB Detroit
- St. Louis
3 Chicago
712 Nashville
8 Columbus
1 /2


GB


/2
6Y/2
- I
4B
1/2

4
6


Pts GF GA
64129 96
60154 134
56145 122
54128 134
44112 136

Pts GF GA
62162 92
60154 153
51144 144
45123 132
43117 148


Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
47 2215 10 54120 133
46 2519 2 52128 130
48 2220 6 50123 138
47 2023 4 44132 163
50 1724 9 43128 158
STERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
48 3215 1 65155 109
47 2912 6 64121 96
49 2914 6 64161 141
48 2816 4 60133 125
47 1328 6 32112 155
Northwest Division


GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 48 2915 4 62155 120
Colorado 48 2521 2 52124 137
Minnesota 47 2218 7 51107 122
Calgary 48 2220 6 50114 134
Edmonton 46 1725 4 38116 132
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 45 2614 5 57129 108
LosAngeles 48 2315 10 56106 107
Dallas 46 2420 2 50123 131
Phoenix 49 21 20 8 50127 132
Anaheim 46 1722 7 41121 141
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.


Friday's Games
GB Pittsburgh 5, Montreal 4, SO
- Carolina 3, Washington 0
- Tampa Bay 2, Dallas 1
3 Chicago 3, Florida 1
4 Saturday's Games
4 Detroit 3, Columbus 2, SO
Florida 4, Winnipeg 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 3, Boston 2, OT
Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 1
Vancouver 4, San Jose 3
Anaheim 2, Ottawa 1
Montreal 3, Toronto 1
N.Y. Islanders 2, Carolina 1, OT
St. Louis 4, Buffalo 2
Nashville 5, Chicago 2
Tampa Bay 4, Phoenix 3
Dallas at Minnesota, late
Calgary at Edmonton, late
Colorado at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Washington at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Carolina, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


Kapiton comes in
8th at big event
Inverness angler George
Kapiton finished the opening
tournament of the 2012 Ever-
Start series on Lake Okee-
chobee with an 8th-place finish.
Kapiton weighed in 14 bass
totaling 41 pounds, 6 ounces.
He earned $5,000 for his
top-10 finish.
On the co-angler side, Inver-
ness resident James Brooks
finished 10th, earning him
$800.


Sports BRIEFS
For complete results, go to
flw.com.
Philbin will try to turn
around Dolphins
MIAMI New Miami Dol-
phins coach Joe Philbin takes
over a team that hasn't been to
the Super Bowl since 1985 and
missed the playoffs nine of the
past 10 years.
Maybe that's why one of his
predecessors, Jimmy Johnson,
offered this tweet Friday: "Joe
Philbin new Dolphin


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




coach..good luck!"
The former Green Bay Pack-
ers offensive coordinator be-
came the seventh coach in the
past eight years for the Dol-
phins, who are coming off a
third consecutive losing sea-
son, their longest such stretch
since the 1960s.
The hiring was the latest turn
in an emotionally wrenching
month for Philbin, whose 21-
year-old son recently drowned
in an icy Wisconsin river.
From staff, wire reports


Bolts nip Coyotes, 4-3


Associated Press

GLENDALE, Ariz. -
Steven Stamkos scored his
NHL-leading 32nd goal,
Martin St. Louis and Steve
Downie each had a goal and
an assist, and the Tampa
Bay Lightning beat the
Phoenix Coyotes 4-3 on Sat-
urday night for their third
straight victory
Dwayne Roloson made 33
saves and improved to 7-10-
2 with his first win since
Nov 17 against Pittsburgh.
Teddy Purcell also scored
for Tampa Bay
Lauri Korpikoski, Keith
Yandle and Ray Whitney
scored for Phoenix.
Rangers 3, Bruins 2
BOSTON Marian Gaborik
scored twice, the second on a
third-try backhander with 3.6 sec-
onds left in overtime, and the
New York Rangers beat the
Boston Bruins 3-2 on Saturday in
a matchup of the top two teams
in the Eastern Conference.
Henrik Lundqvist made 32
saves for the Rangers. Ryan
Callahan also scored for the
Rangers, who lead the East
with 64 points.
Tuukka Rask stopped 30
shots for the Bruins, who played
most of the overtime down a
man, 4-on-3, after Andrew Fer-
ence drew a five-minute major
for driving defenseman Ryan
McDonagh into the boards and
was ejected.
Red Wings 3,
Blue Jackets 2, SO
DETROIT Valtteri Filppula
scored in the fourth round of a
shootout to give Detroit its 16th
straight home victory,
The streak tied Detroit with
the 1975-76 Boston Bruins for
the fourth-longest run at home
in NHL history.
Niklas Kronwall and Nicklas
Lidstrom scored for the Red
Wings in regulation, and Jimmy
Howard made 17 saves. Ryan
Russell and Nikita Nikitin
scored for Columbus, and Cur-
tis Sanford stopped 29 shots.
Flyers 4, Devils 1
NEWARK, N.J. Scott
Hartnell scored two power-play
goals, and Wayne Simmonds



WRESTLE
Continued from Page B1

Three out of four Pirates



SIGNING
Continued from Page BI

appealed to Humphreys.
"It's far away, but not too
far away," he said. "Palatka
is a small town, just like
Crystal River, and I liked
that about it."
The Vikings had been in-
terested in Humphreys for
a while and were finally
happy to see the Pirate
senior sign on the dotted



AUSSIE
Continued from Page B1

Isner lost Friday, the last
American man to exit
Coming off an injury-rav-
aged 18 months, Williams is
seeded 12th in Melbourne.
She hasn't held the top rank-
ing since 2010, the year she
won the last of her Grand
Slam titles.
On Saturday she spoke ex-
pansively about her off-court
activities: She's taking
courses in kinesiology and
management and preparing
for an appearance in a "pretty
big" TV show
Arn says "everybody
knows" if Williams hits top
form she will win the Aus-
tralian Open, where she has-
n't lost since 2008. She won
back-to-back titles in 2009 and
2010 and was unable to de-
fend her title last year while
she recovered from two foot


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Dwayne Roloson makes a save
as Phoenix Coyotes left winger Taylor Pyatt leaps to avoid
the shot as he sets a screen in the third period Saturday in
Glendale, Ariz. The Lightning won 4-3.


had a goal and two assists,
leading Philadelphia over NJ.
The Flyers (28-14-4) re-
mained four points behind the
Eastern Conference-leading
New York Rangers. The Devils
(26-19-2) lost for the second
straight time in the middle of a
six-game homestand.
Hartnell scored in the second
and third periods. Simmonds
assisted on Hartnell's first goal
and on Matt Read's second-pe-
riod tally, and then added an
empty-netter. Ilya Bryzgalov
made 30 saves to earn his 18th
win of the season.
Ducks 2, Senators 1
ANAHEIM, Calif. Jonas
Hiller made 31 saves, Corey
Perry scored, and Lubomir Vis-
novsky was credited with a goal
that Ottawa's Erik Karlsson
knocked into his own net during
Anaheim's victory.
The Ducks (17-22-7) are 7-0-
1 in their last eight and 10-9-3
since Bruce Boudreau took
over for fired coach Randy Car-
lyle on Nov. 30.
Canucks 4, Sharks 3
VANCOUVER, British Co-
lumbia Cody Hodgson
scored his second goal of the
game with 4:17 left, and Van-
couver beat San Jose.
Ryan Kesler and David
Booth also scored for Vancou-
ver (29-15-4), which is 1-1-1
halfway through its six-game
homestand.

won third place:
Johnathan Vargulish (120
pounds), Cody Thompson
(145 pounds) and Dylan
Ayala (138 pounds).
Lecanto's Nick Nighten-

line.
Crystal River head coach
Bobby Stack, who has
worked with Humphreys
the past two years as a Pi-
rate assistant, thinks the
Vikings are a great fit for
the unassuming player.
"His desire and love of
the game stand out," Stack
said. "He was an extremely
talented player before he
got (to high school), but
he's come a long way."
Jones echoed Stack's
feelings.


surgeries.
Because of her ranking,
Williams can't take the No. 1
spot with a win at Melbourne.
However, No. 2 Petra Kvitova,
No. 3 Victoria Azarenka and
No. 4 Maria Sharapova could
walk away with the top rank-
ing if they win the tourna-
ment
Next up for Williams is un-
seeded Russian Ekaterina
Makarova. After that, things
are likely to get a lot tougher
Sharapova is a potential quar-
terfinal opponent, and Wim-
bledon champion Kvitova
may await in the semifinals.
"I'm nowhere near where I
want to be," said Williams,
who came into the tourna-
ment nursing a sprained left
ankle. "I'm just trying to play
through it A little rusty, just
trying to play through my
rust"
Sharapova and Kvitova
joined Williams in advancing
to the fourth round on Satur-
day Between the three of


Islanders 2,
Hurricanes 1, OT
UNIONDALE, N.Y. John
Tavares scored his second goal
of the game 3:58 into overtime,
and the New York Islanders
beat Carolina for their third
straight win.
Tavares scored his 19th goal
of the season after extending
his career-best point streak to
12 games with a second-period
goal. Tavares has eight goals
and 13 assists during his
streak, the longest in the NHL
this season.
Panthers 4, Jets 3, SO
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -
Kris Versteeg scored two goals
and added an assist for Florida,
which snapped an eight-game,
road-losing streak with a
shootout win over Winnipeg.
Mikael Samuelsson scored
the Panthers' winning goal of
the shootout, which used 14
skaters. Mike Santorelli also
scored in regulation for Florida
(22-15-10), which also ended a
four-game skid.
Canadiens 3,
Maple Leafs 1
TORONTO Carey Price
made 32 saves, and Rafael
Diaz and Lars Eller scored
third-period goals in Montreal's
victory over Toronto.
Rene Bourque also scored
for the Canadiens, who lost at
Pittsburgh on Friday night.

gale (170 pounds) gave a
worthy effort on the day,
but fell to Zephyrhills' Joel
Morrison in the third-
place match to come in
fourth.

"He's a humble kid who's
going to work hard," Jones
said. "He's athletic and
he's a good-sized kid who
has the potential to get
bigger."
While Stack called
Humphreys a total package
as a ballplayer, the Pirate
coach expected his current
player to make an impact
inside the batter's box.
"He has a pretty good
understanding (with) his
approach at the plate,"
Stack said.


them, they lost six games.
Kvitova was leading 6-0, 1-0
when Russian opponent
Maria Kirilenko retired.
Sharapova, who won her first
two matches 6-0, 6-1, was
tested for the first time and
still came out with a 6-1, 6-2
win over U.S. Open semifinal-
ist Angelique Kerber
Like Williams, Sharapova
came into the tournament
short of matches. The three-
time Grand Slam champion
hurt her left ankle late last
season and didn't play a
tuneup event before the Aus-
tralian Open.
"Whether it's a Grand Slam
or anywhere else in the world,
if you're committed to playing
that tournament you have to
be ready from the first
match," Sharapova said.
It was a day of lopsided
scorelines on Rod Laver
Arena.
No. 1-ranked Novak
Djokovic routed Nicolas
Mahut 6-0, 6-1, 6-1.


(




(
6

GI

2





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Familar foes face off for AFC


New England hosts

Baltimore for right

to go to Super Bowl

Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Tom
Brady and the New England Patri-
ots made it to the AFC champi-
onship game with a high-powered
offense that piled up points and
yards.
Ray Lewis and the Baltimore
Ravens got there with a hard-
hitting defense that made it a
major challenge for opponents to
move the ball.
On Sunday, one of those teams
will advance to the Super Bowl be-
cause, most likely, of what they do
best.
"We've got our hands full this
week," Lewis said. "You watched
what they did last week against
Denver, just the way they came out
and ran their offense, how efficient
(Brady) was, how many different
receivers he hit with the ball. I
think their offense, period, is play-
ing at a very high level."
From start to finish, Brady
picked apart the Denver defense in
a 45-10 divisional playoff win.
The Patriots (14-3) needed five
plays to score on their first series
on Brady's 7-yard pass to Wes
Welker It took them seven plays to
reach the end zone on their second
series on Brady's 10-yard pass to
Rob Gronkowski. By halftime,
Brady had thrown five of his six
touchdown passes.


Associated Press
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and receiver Wes Welker
talk during practice Friday at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Mass. The
Patriots are scheduled to host the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC champi-
onship game on Sunday.
He had plenty of time to survey Brady's regular season was ex-
the field as the Broncos put little ceptional, even by his lofty stan-
pressure on him. The Ravens dards. He threw for 5,235 yards,
don't plan to let that second most in NFL
happen. history, with 39 touch-
"You don't want AFC down passes, 12 inter-
him back there just Championship ceptions and the
like, 'Oh, we're just league's third best
going to play catch Baltimore quarterback rating of
today,"' Baltimore Ravens at New 105.6, behind only
linebacker Terrell England Patriots Aaron Rodgers and
Suggs said. "You Drew Brees.
don't want him to Time: 3 p.m. Sunday The Patriots, with
zone in, get in his 0 TV: CBS Welker and
zone, so to say So I Gronkowski doing
think pressure is most of the damage,
going to be crucial, but it's always were second in the NFL with 428
crucial. But, particularly when you yards per game and third with an
are playing these type of quarter- average of 32.1 points.
backs, it's pivotal." "It's a very clever offense," Balti-


more coach John Harbaugh said.
"It's well put together."
Just like the Ravens defense.
Baltimore (13-4) allowed the
third fewest average yards, 288.9,
and points, 16.6, this season. It had
four takeaways in last Sunday's 20-
13 divisional playoff win over the
Houston Texans, the last by Ed
Reed with 1:51 left. Lewis had a
team-high seven tackles.
"They're great players. I've
played against both those guys
quite a few times," Brady said.
"You always enjoy going up against
the best because you can really
measure where you're at. You can't
take plays off against those guys.
You can't take things for granted
when you're out there against
them. You have to see where
they're at on every play because
they're guys who change the game."
And don't forget Suggs. He led
the AFC with 14 sacks, and, with
Lewis and Reed was picked as a
Pro Bowl starter this season.
The Ravens have a "very attack-
ing type defense," Welker said.
"They're very physical. They run to
the football really well. They rush
well, cover well, tackle well across
the board. They have a lot of great
players and a lot of playmakers."
But they haven't faced a passing
attack with the weapons the Patri-
ots have. Welker led the NFL with
122 catches and 1,569 yards receiv-
ing. Gronkowski was fifth with 90
catches and set an NFL record of
17 touchdown catches by a tight
end. And Aaron Hernandez, a tight
end who often lines up at wide re-
ceiver and had a 43-yard run out of
the backfield against Denver, was
14th with 79 receptions.


Giants, 49ers vie for NFC championship


Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO The Giants
boasted a physical, intimidating de-
fense with athletic linebackers and
stout linemen capable of stifling the
NFEs most productive offenses. San
Francisco featured a
high-powered pass- N
ing attack led by an Cham
eventual Hall of Champ
Fame quarterback in New Yol
his prime with re- at San F
ceivers capable of
turning short passes 49
into big gains. 0 Time: 6:3(
When the San
Francisco 49ers host m TV: FOX
the New York Giants
in the NFC championship game
Sunday for a shot at the Super Bowl,
the matchup conjures memories
from a previous era of this great ri-
valry even if the roles are some-
what reversed.
The elite quarterback now is New
York's Eli Manning, who connects
on big plays to Hakeem Nicks and
Victor Cruz in a similar fashion to
how Joe Montana and Jerry Rice
did for the dominant Niners in the
1980s.
San Francisco's current front
seven led by relentless defensive
lineman Justin Smith, rookie pass-
rushing specialist Aldon Smith and
fierce linebackers Patrick Willis
and NaVorro Bowman resembles
that old Giants group featuring Hall
of Famers Lawrence Taylor and
Harry Carson.
And who could have predicted
this surprising pairing?
The Giants (11-7) toppled defend-


F
Ri
ri


ing champion Green Bay 37-20 last
Sunday when everybody figured the
road to the Super Bowl would go
through Lambeau Field. Instead,
New York is traveling West to San
Francisco to face the upstart 49ers
(14-3) in a meeting of franchises with
so many fresh faces
:C on the big stage.
onship Jim Harbaugh's
onsp "mighty men" as he
k Giants calls them stunned
rancisco Drew Brees and the
eancs favored Saints 36-32
ars when Alex Smith hit
p.m Sunday Vernon Davis for the
game-winning 14-
yard touchdown
with 9 seconds
remaining.
Smith knows both the 49ers and
Giants showed it's anybody's game
come playoff time.
"Look at last week, I think every-
body thought the road was going to
go through Lambeau. I think every-
body assumed the NFC champi-
onship game was going to get played
there and look what happens,"
Smith said. "These teams at this
point, everybody's as good as each
other and it's all going to come down
to how you execute on that day
We're all capable of beating each
other, that's for sure."
Smith and Manning each orches-
trated five fourth-quarter come-
backs during the regular season, yet
Manning missed in a 27-20 loss at
San Francisco on Nov 13 when
Justin Smith batted away his last-
ditch pass attempt on fourth down in
the waning moments.
"This is about the NFC champi-


Associated Press
San Francisco 49ers tackle Derek Hall (71) and center Chase Beeler (61)
walk off the practice field Friday in Santa Clara, Calif. The 49ers are sched-
uled to host the New York Giants in the NFC Championship game on Sunday.


onship. It's an opportunity to get this
win and go on to the Super Bowl,"
Manning said. "We played them
once before. We know they're a good
team. There's no denying that.
They're playing great football.
They're playing with great confi-
dence. It's going to be exciting going
out there and having another shot
and seeing what we can do."
Niners long snapper Brian Jen-
nings is the only one left on either
side from San Francisco's last trip to
the playoffs in January 2003, when
the 49ers rallied for a stunning 39-38
comeback victory against the Giants
at Candlestick Park. San Francisco


also had beaten New York during
the regular season that year
It's sold out for Sunday's game
with rain in the forecast as the 49ers
look for their first trip to the NFC
title game since the 1997 season.
Former 49ers owner Eddie DeBar-
tolo Jr. will serve as honorary cap-
tain after team president and
nephew, Jed York, called him imme-
diately after beating the Saints with
the thoughtful invite.
Fittingly, DeBartolo owned the
team from 1977-98, when the 49ers
won five Super Bowls. He was affec-
tionately known as "Mr D" to his
players and coaches.


Associated Press
New England tight end Rob
Gronkowski had a record
season at his position.


Terrific


tight ends

Position

revolutionized

in 2011 NFL

Associated Press
From Gonzo to Gronk to
Graham, tight ends are run-
ning past, around and
through defenders at an un-
precedented rate. Hey, the
Patriots' Rob Gronkowski
does all of those things on
one play
Once a glorified tackle,
the position now requires
the skills of a wide receiver
- and a power forward.
Speed, size, athletic ability,
power and intelligence all
are in the mix.
Along with nicknames,
apparently
"The tight end position is
taking off," said San Fran-
cisco's Vernon Davis, who
also is called Duke; his dad is
Big Duke and he was Little
Duke as a kid before growing
to 6-foot-3, 250 pounds. "It's
almost as if you have to start
playing tight ends with cor-
nerbacks nowadays because
they're fast; these guys are
strong and they're making
plays they're making plays
like wide receivers."
Nobody has made more
plays at the position in one
season than Gronkowski,
who became an All-Pro in
his second NFL season by
catching 90 passes for 1,327
yards and 17 touchdowns.
The yards and TDs are
records, accomplished with
plenty of power and flash.
"The guy is a beast," Jets
cornerback Antonio Cro-
martie, but that seems to be
a common description for
most outstanding tight ends
in what a Hall of Famer
from the position, Shannon
Sharpe, dubs "the golden
age" for tight ends.
Gronkowski mixes size (6-
6, 265) and speed with great
hands. Huge, great hands.
He doesn't drop the ball,
and when he grabs it, he's
nearly impossible to tackle.
"He has run over a few
guys," noted fellow Patriots
tight end Aaron Hernandez,
who, along with Gronkowski,
has been dubbed the Boston
TE Party


Brees wants to stay a Saint


Associated Press
METAIRIE, La. Drew
Brees said he would be
"beyond stunned" if he and
the New Orleans Saints are
unable to agree on a con-
tract extension during this
offseason, echoing com-
ments by coach Sean Pay-
ton this week.
Brees added he doesn't
believe his next deal will
prevent the Saints from bid-
ding for some other key
members of their record-
setting offense who will be-
come free agents, including
Pro Bowl guard Carl Nicks
and receivers Marques Col-
ston and Robert Meachem.
"My No. 1 priority, and it
always has been this, is


New Orleans quarterback
Drew Brees is a free agent
but wants to remain with the
Saints.
keeping our team together
and making sure we have
the right guys in the right


positions to make a run at
this for a long time," Brees
said Friday by phone from
his offseason home in San
Diego. "We all kind of work
together on this thing.
"Put it this way: I'm not
worried one bit about my
contract or our ability to
keep guys at key positions."
At the same time, Brees
indicated whether some
players return is somewhat
out of his control, as is the
case every year
"Is it realistic to think we
can keep absolutely every-
body? I don't know how re-
alistic that is just because
every year on a team there's
turnover and I think that's
just the business we're in,"
Brees said.


The Citrus County Fair Association proudly presents


AnnTRUCK & Traor Pull


January 27 open 4 p.m. pull 6 p.m.
January 28 open 10 a.m. pull 1 p.m.
January 29 open 11 a.m. pull 1 p.m.
For more information call 726-2993 or C-,M
go to www.citruscountyfair.com H1RIN!CiE


gave on advanced ticket sales
One day:
Adult $8, children 4-11 $4
Two day:
Adult $15, children 4-11 $7
Three day:
Adult $23, children 4-11 $10


Sponsored by: Eagle Buick GMC, Holcim "US" Inc., Citrus County Chronicle.


-n 'SeLl Saturday, February 11, 2012 O2 6 to 11 p.m.
oFRus coUNTY Citrus Springs Community Center
SA night filled with fun, food, open bar, music, dancing, live and silent auctions,
S. old west games and so much more!
..!. ( .i..N........ ............ :' For more information call Citrus County ACS office 352-637-5577 or Dianne Brashear 352-726-6756
' ) (-)<... )

FOOTBALL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Rashida Jones
unveils rom-com
PARK CITY, Utah-
Rashida Jones was al-
most upstaged by her fa-
mous father, Quincy
Jones, at the Sundance
premiere of her film,
"Celeste and Jesse For-
ever," but the actress and
screenwriter didn't
mind.
"He's what he is, and
he will always be and
has always been, way be-

here,"
Jones
said Sat-
urday "I
feel lucky
to hang
out with
him. And
Rashida we're dif-
Jones ferent,
too. Peo-
ple like us for different
reasons."
She added that her dad
loved the film, which ex-
plores the nature of rela-
tionships, marriage and

ing in so-
ciety.
Jones'
first


effort
(with co
Quincy writer
Jones Will Mc-
Cormack)
emerged from "pain, lots
of pain."
"We're both very
deeply feeling people,
and we love to talk about
relationships and love
and feelings," she said.
"We like to be as inappro-
priate as possible when
things are grave and diffi-
cult, so I think it probably
came from that place. It
also came from, as an ac-
tress, reading so many
scripts, you kind of in-
trinsically absorb story-
telling script structure
into your being without
even knowing it, and we
wanted to try and tell this
story"
Jones stars in the film
alongside Andy Samberg,
Emma Roberts and Eli-
jah Wood.
She brought her folks
and her friends to Fri-
day's premiere, but un-
veiling the film was still
nerve-racking.
"I felt everything lit-
erally the whole spec-
trum of feelings," the
35-year-old said. "It felt 8
1/2 hours long."

Comedian heads
to principal's office
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -
Steve Harvey is relin-
quishing his role as one of
the Original Kings of Com-
edy to become an Ala-
bama school principal -
at least for one day
Students at Phillips
Academy in Birmingham
will be answering to Prin-
cipal Steve Harvey on
Thursday after the school
won a contest sponsored
by Harvey's morning radio
show and General Mills.
The Birmingham News
reported that Angela
Strozier, the mother of an
eighth-grader at Phillips
Academy entered the con-
test by submitting an essay
about the school's success.
In it, she described how
the deadly tornado out-
break in Alabama last
April had affected many
Phillips students.
-From wire reports


'West of Memphis'


Associated Press
Amy Berg, left, director and screenwriter of the documentary film "West of Memphis," poses with, from left, pro-
ducers Damien Echols and his wife, Lorri Davis, and producer Peter Jackson on Friday at the premiere of the film
at the 2012 Sundance Rim Festival in Park City, Utah. The film uncovers new evidence surrounding the arrest and
conviction of three men Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley Jr. in the 1993 murders of three 8-year-
old boys in West Memphis, Ark.


Film about murders shown at

festival producer says it saved suspect's life


Associated Press

PARK CITY, Utah Peter Jack-
son believes Damien Echols would
be dead now if not for a 1996 docu-
mentary that cast doubt on the
man's guilt in three child murders.
And Amy Berg, Jackson's col-
league on the Sundance Film Festi-
val premiere "West of Memphis,"
believes former Death Row inmate
Echols and two other men might
still be in prison if not for the inde-
pendent investigation launched by
"The Lord of the Rings" filmmaker
and his wife, Fran Walsh.
There's no better testament at
Sundance to the power of art and
artists than "West of Memphis,"
which premiered Friday night at
Robert Redford's independent-film
showcase. Sundance films often
come from mavericks who chal-
lenge the establishment. "West of
Memphis" is a tale of artists not only
challenging the system, but also
beating it.
Jackson, Walsh and Berg said
"West of Memphis" amounts to the
fair trial Echols, Jason Baldwin and
Jessie Misskelley known as the
West Memphis Three never got as
Arkansas teenagers when they were
convicted in 1994.
"We went into this case believing
that they didn't do it, and the facts
and the evidence we came out with
at the end completely supported
that," Jackson said in an interview.
"So is the documentary sort of pro-
viding the prosecution's point of
view? No, it's not. We're not inter-
ested in that They had their go back
in 1994. ... The documentary, it's the
case against the state, really"
The case was a shocker in the
rural Arkansas community where 8-
year-old Cub Scouts Michael Moore,
Steve Branch and Christopher
Byers were slain in 1993. Found
naked and hogtied, two of the boys
drowned in a drainage ditch, while
the third bled to death, his genitals
mutilated, evidence prosecutors
used to claim the children were
killed in a satanic ritual.
The defendants were convicted
based in part on a confession
Misskelley later recanted. Misskel-
ley and Baldwin were sentenced to
life in prison, while Echols was con-
demned to death and once came
within weeks of execution.
The case became a cause after
Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky's
documentary "Paradise Lost: The
Child Murders at Robin Hood
Hills," which premiered at Sun-


Today's birthday: In the approaching months, don't let it dis-
may you if you have to shoulder more career-related respon-
sibilities than usual. With the additional work will come more
rewards, such as acclaim, promotion and a fatter paycheck.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Your possibilities for suc-
cess could be severely impaired if you start jumping to con-
clusions. Once you get off course, it won't be easy to find
your way back on track.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you're presently indebted
to a friend, don't wait until she or he starts asking for repay-
ment. Save yourself a lot of embarrassment by letting your
pal know when you can start the reimbursement.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Whether or not you want it,
your associates will have a strong influence on how the day
turns out for you. If you're smart, you won't hang out with a
bunch of losers.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Obligations that normally


dance in 1996 and questioned
whether justice or misguided pub-
lic opinion was served in the trial.
Over the years, celebrities such as
Johnny Depp, Patti Smith, Eddie
Vedder of Pearl Jam and Natalie
Maines of the Dixie Chicks joined
the effort to free the men.
Jackson and Walsh watched "Par-
adise Lost" in 2005 and were out-
raged over the case. From their
home base in New Zealand, they got
in touch with Lorri Davis, who had
met and married Echols while he
was on Death Row and was leading
the fight to free the men.
"Justice should be beyond popu-
lar opinion, and in this case, it was-
n't," Walsh said. "The popular
opinion was these guys were guilty,
therefore, they're going down. It re-
ally was a done deal."
Over the next six years, Jackson
and Walsh financed their own in-
vestigation, hiring forensics ex-
perts, gathering DNA evidence and
tracking down witnesses to show
that the prosecution had convicted
innocent men.
"The way Peter and Fran just at-
tacked the case, it made us feel like
we had hope for the very first time,"
Echols, 37, said in an interview
alongside Davis.
The hope was well-founded.
Helped by evidence Jackson and
Walsh's investigation collected, the
case seemed headed toward a retrial.
Then last August, both sides
agreed to a rare legal maneuver in
which Echols, Baldwin and Misskel-
ley entered guilty pleas that al-
lowed them to maintain their
innocence and gain their freedom
for prison time already served.
Some people in Arkansas, includ-
ing the family of one of the murdered
boys, still believe the three men are
guilty Yet as the years passed, even
the families of the other two dead
boys became convinced that prose-
cutors went after the wrong suspects.
The mother of one boy and stepfa-
ther of another came to Sundance,
sharing hugs at the premiere with
Echols, who said he's "happy to call
them friends now."
Three years into their investiga-
tion, Jackson and Walsh contacted
director Berg, whose 2006 priest-
molestation documentary "Deliver
Us from Evil" earned an Academy
Award nomination. Berg signed on
to direct "West of Memphis," which
traces the 18-year history of the
case and features interviews with
Jackson and many witnesses and
experts he and Walsh worked with.


Today's HOROSCOPE

wouldn't be yours could be dumped in your lap. Don't turn
this into something worse than it already is by making
mountains out of molehills.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There's a chance you could
run into one of your least favorite people, in what would
otherwise be a most convivial setting. Don't let this party-
pooper ruin your good times.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) The slightest spark could ignite
a volatile issue between you and your mate, if you are edgy
and explosive. Once an argument is introduced, it could
metastasize frighteningly. Keep a cool head and a long fuse.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Refrain from unduly criticizing
the work of another, because it will only cause hard feel-
ings. In fact, the person might be so devastated that he or
she will never try the same thing again.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you haven't been managing
your resources too wisely lately or are still broke from the


Swag suites

abound at the

Sundance Film

Festival

Associated Press

PARK CITY, Utah Where
there are celebrities, there is
swag, and the Sundance Film
Festival is no exception. Nearly
a dozen gift suites opened their
doors Friday afternoon along
the city's Main Street.
Kate Bosworth, Andy Sam-
berg, Emma Roberts and
Rashida Jones are among the
famous folks who stopped by the
VEVO PowerStation SOREL
Suite, where they could indulge
in moisturizing facials and lip
treatments from Fresh cosmet-
ics and outfit their feet in snow-
ready footwear.
"I think we belong here," said
Kimberly Barta, global brand
director for SOREL snow boots.
"It just makes sense."
At the Alive Expo Green Pavil-
ion, guests could pick up natural
skincare products and hand-
made handbags by Kenyan arti-
sans from Tembo Trading Co.
The Bertolli Meal Soup
Chalet served up bowls of hot
soup and handed out sunglasses
and Lumene skincare products
to visitors. Joe Pastorkovich of
Lumene said Sundance is the
perfect place to introduce the
European brand to an American
audience.
"We're expanding into the
U.S., and our brand connects
well to Park City," he said. "It's a
good fit because of the natural-
ness of the product, and we're
unpretentious. This festival is
about independent film, and
we're an independent brand."
Italian shoe company Carlo
Pazolini also exhibited (and
gifted) its wares at the Sun-
dance fest as a means of ex-
panding its market reach.
"We're a European company
launching in the U.S., so we
wanted to get our name out
there," company executive Jen-
nifer Damiano said from the
Miami Oasis suite, where she
gave away high-end leather
shoes and handbags. Guests at
the suite were also treated to
gluten-free snacks, hair styling
by got2B, and cocktails from
DiSaronno and Patron.


holidays, you might not have the funds to participate in
doing something fun with friends.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Any restrictions you are experi-
encing aren't due to the persons with whom you're now in-
volved, so don't take things out on them. Grin and bear
your pain alone.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If the world is a bit too
gloomy for you, redirect your attention onto others instead
of dwelling exclusively on your own self-inflicted pain and
thwarted interests.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you're still operating on a
strict budget, don't start piling things on your credit cards just
to keep up with friends. You'll only prolong your predicament.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Meaningful objectives
might not be too easy to accomplish right at the moment. In
order to achieve them, it'll require far more effort than
you're likely to expend.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JAN. 20
Mega Money: 11 27 38 40
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 2 $3,448
3-of-4 MB 45 $335.50
3-of-4 760 $59
2-of-4 MB 1,117 $28
1-of-4 MB 10,843 $2.50
2-of-4 24,366 $2
Fantasy 5:4 14 16 21 36
5-of-5 3 winners $78,245.96
4-of-5 326 $116
3-of-5 10,241 $10
THURSDAY, JAN. 19
Fantasy 5:4 14 16 21 36
5-of-5 3 winners $78,245.96
4-of-5 273 $116
3-of-5 8,793 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Jan. 22,
the 22nd day of 2012. There
are 344 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 22, 1912, the
Florida Keys Over-Sea Rail-
road, which connected the
Keys with the mainland, went
into service; aboard the first
train to reach Key West was
the line's founder, Henry Fla-
gler. (Following the damaging
1935 Labor Day hurricane,
the rail line from the mainland
was abandoned and replaced
with a highway.)
On this date:
In 1498, during his third
voyage to the Western Hemi-
sphere, Christopher Colum-
bus arrived at the present-day
Caribbean island of St.
Vincent.
In 1959, 12 workers were
killed in the Knox Mine Disas-
ter in Pennsylvania.
In 1973, the U.S. Supreme
Court, in its Roe v. Wade deci-
sion, legalized abortions using
a trimester approach. Former
President Lyndon B. Johnson
died at age 64.
Ten years ago: Kmart Corp.
filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
protection. (Kmart emerged
from bankruptcy in 2003.) Jack
Shea, a gold medal-winning
speedskater and patriarch of
the nation's first family with
three generations of
Olympians, died in Lake
Placid, N.Y, of injuries suffered
in a car accident; he was 91.
Five years ago: A car
bombing of a predominantly
Shiite commercial area in
Baghdad killed 88 people.
Iran announced it had barred
38 nuclear inspectors on a
United Nations list from enter-
ing the country in apparent re-
taliation for U.N. sanctions
imposed the previous month.
One year ago: Drawing in-
spiration from the revolt in
Tunisia, thousands of Yeme-
nis demanded the ouster of
President Ali Abdullah Saleh
in a noisy demonstration that
appeared to be the first large-
scale public challenge to the
strongman.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind.,
is 84. Actress Piper Laurie is
80. Actor Seymour Cassel is
77. Author Joseph
Wambaugh is 75. Actor John
Hurt is 72. Actress Linda Blair
is 53. Actress Diane Lane is
47. Actor Balthazar Getty is
37. Actor Christopher
Kennedy Masterson is 32.
Pop singer Willa Ford is 31.
Actress Beverley Mitchell is
31. Rock singer-musician Ben
Moody is 31. Actress Sami
Gayle (TV: "Blue Bloods") is
16.


Thought for Today:
"Satire is a sort of glass,
wherein beholders do gener-
ally discover everybody's face
but their own." Jonathan
Swift, Anglo-Irish writer (1667-
1745).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


ote


here


301
-'.
L



302




3 '

305


.- id.. .1 . -_

Cr&L


Precinct Building Name
Red Level Baplisl Church


Precin
11025


ct Building Address
W Dunnellon Rd


101 Crystal River United Melhodisl Church 4801 N Cilrus Ave
102 River Gardens Baptist Church '3429 W Dunnellon Rd
104 First Baplisl Church of Crystal River 700 N. Citrus Ave
105 Cryslal River Cily Hall 123 NW Highway 19
107 Crystal Oaks Clubhouse 4958 W Crystal Oaks Dr
108 V.F.W. Building l2170 W. Vel Lane
109 Pine Ridge CommuniyL1 Bldg 5690 W Pine Ridge Blvd


Cirus Springs Commulllniy Center


1570 W Citrus Springs Blvd


' 200 Ouall RLun Communily Buildingt 1490 E Redpoll Trl L
- 201 Hernando Uniled Melhodisl Church 2125 E Norvell Bryani HWy
202 Cirus Hills Lodge 350 E Norvell Bryani HWy
203 Ceniral Ridge Library 425 W Roosevell Blvd
204 Knights of Columbus 2389 W Norvell Bryani Hy
205 Beverly Hills Lons Club 72 Civic Circle
206 Our Lady of Grace Church 6 Rooseveli Blvd
208 Good Shepherd Lulheran Church 439 E Norvell Bryani HWy
3 300 Cilrus Couniy Builders Associallon 1196 S Lecanlo HW
L301 Naiional Guard Armory 8551 W Venable St
S 302L West Cilrus Elks Lodge 7890 W Grover Cleveland Blvd
S30,5 Chlrlian Cenler Church 7961 W Green Acres S
307 Homosassa Mlelhlodis Churchl 8831 W Bradshaw St
S 400 First Unied Melthodisl Church Inverness 3896 S Pleasant Grove Rd
401 Crossroad Baplist Churchl 5335 E Jasmine Ln i
402 Church of the Nazarene 2101 N Florida Ave
403 Inverness Civ Hall 212 W Main S
404 Poinl 0 Woods Clubhouse 9228 E Gospel Island Rd |0
405 Cilrus Couniy Audlloriumll 3610l S Florda Ave ,.
406 American Italian Social Club 4325 S Lille Al PI t,
407 Floral Cily Melthodisl Churchl 8478 E Marvin St


Floral City Lions Club


8370 E Orange Ave


E I


Precinct Map
Supervisor of Elections
S100 Red LevelBaptisttChurch
S101 CrystalRiverUntedMethodistChurch
* 102 RiverGardensBaptistChurch
S104 FirstBaptistChurchCrystalRiver
] 105 CrystalRiverCityHall
S 107 CrystalOaksClubhouse
* 108 VFW Buding
S 109 PineRidge Communty Buildng
S 110 Citrus Sprngs CommunityCenter
S200 Quai Run CommunityBuiildng
* 201 HemandoUntedMethodistChurch
202 CtrusHis Lodge, BestWeste
* 203 Central Ridge Library
* 204 KnightsofColumbus
S205 BeveryHilsLions Club
* 206 OurLadyofGrace Church
S208 Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
S300 Ct CountyBulders Assocation
no 301 NatIonal Guard Armory
D 302 West CitrusElksLodge
ED 305 ChristianCenterChurch
S 307 Homosassa MethodstChurch
S 400 FirstUnited MethodstChurch
S401 Crossroad Baptist Church
402 ChurchoftheN-arene
0 403 Inverness City Hall
404 Point 0 Woods Clubhouse
S 405 Ctrus County Auditorium
S 406 American Itahan Socal Club
S 407 Floral City Methodist Church
S 408 FloralCy Lions ClubI


ct404 -
I .


o 405





407

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Map and chart courtesy of Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
The growing popularity of early voting options led the Citrus County Supervisor of Elections to consolidate precincts and polling places for the Jan.
31 Presidential Preference Primary. See the full map with this story online at www.chronicleonline.com or visit votecitrus.com.

Citrus County precinct andpolling place changes for 2012, a redistricting year


his is an unusual election Now, instead of 41 precincts, there
year; not only do we have a will be 31. This was done because of
Jan. 31 Presidential Prefer- the increasing number of voters
ence Primary, but 2012 is a redis- choosing to vote by mail or at early
tricting year. voting sites.
Redistricting happens once every When 61 percent of the voters
10 years. Redistricting is part of the -vote prior to an election in a presi-
United States Constitution requir- dential election year, it is time to
ing reapportionment of the repre- look at consolidation and cost
sentatives in Congress because of containment.
census changes. Susan Gill County elections officials are
Changes as a result of redistrict- GUEST doing their best to keep the public
ing always cause confusion because COLUMN informed of these changes. New
precincts and polling places voter information cards were sent to
change. voters who have a polling place
The Citrus County Supervisor of Elections change because of precinct consolidation. The
Office has consolidated precincts this year. Chronicle has been very helpful in printing our


news releases concerning election news and
changes, as have the other local weekly and
monthly publications. We continue to be on
radio spots and WYKE productions.
All Citrus County voters will receive a new
voter information card after the finalization of
redistricting and before the primary election
in August. The new information card is re-
quired, because even if you do not have a
polling place change, the district numbers for
one or all of our representatives in the U.S.
House of Representatives, state Senate and
state House will probably change.

Susan Gill is Citrus County supervisor
of elections. Visit votecitrus. com.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Thorny


issues


not sexy


Topics local

candidates

want to avoid
s the local Citrus
County commission
campaign season
begins, the early candi-
dates are out searching
for issues that will get
them elected.
The real issues are out
there, but few want to talk
about them because
they're not too sexy and
they're pretty difficult to
solve.
Even if a candidate has
solutions, it's more diffi-
cult to explain those solu-
tions so they make sense
in the world of local
politics.
During the 2010 elec-
tion season, the successful
candidates had two key is-
sues: First, they com-
plained about the paving
of Ottawa Avenue in Cit-
rus Hills; and second, they
proclaimed they were not
incumbents so they
should get elected.
Those positions worked
for everyone, as all the in-
cumbents lost their re-
election bids.
See Page C4


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Book REVIEW


'Garden of Beasts' revisits prewar Germany Legitimate
nddictinn


Eric Larson, "In the Garden of
Beasts: Love, Terror, and an Ameri-
can Family in Hitler's Berlin"
(Crown, New York, 2011, 448 pages)
$26.
MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
Most books of history provide an
overview of an event or period and
tell us what happened. But this
best-selling book is different we
see a major historical event through
the prism of a particular family's
experiences.
"In the Garden of Beasts" tells the
story of a professor of history at the
University of Chicago, William E.
Dodd, who was named ambassador
to Germany in 1933 by President
Roosevelt. It was not a job most pro-
fessional diplomats or public figures
aspired to, because Germany was in
an economic and political crisis that
opened the door to the rise of Hitler
Dodd had some connections within
the Democratic Party and had stud-
ied in Germany as a youth for two
years. Outside of the fact he could
speak German, he had no particular
diplomatic credentials.
So in July 1933, newly appointed
ambassador Dodd arrived in Ger-
many with his wife, Martha, and his
son and daughter. He soon realized
that the U.S. Foreign Service officers
working in the embassy were snobby
Ivy Leaguers (and often independ-
ently wealthy) who considered him
unsophisticated and lacking in un-
derstanding the finer points of diplo-
matic etiquette. Among other issues,
they felt it unwise for him to rent a
house from a wealthy Jewish family
This same elitist mentality domi-


Ambassador William E. Dodd sent
correspondences to Franklin Roosevelt
describing the German government's
repression of its citizens and, as time went by,
warning that the German military was growing
rapidly in size despite Germany's agreement in
1919 that it would not build up its military and
armament in violation of the treaties that
ended World War I.


nated the Department of State back
in Washington.
And the second set of problems he
faced was that German politics were
in turmoil with the expanding Nazi
movement, which blamed Jews for
losing World War I and all the hor-
rendous economic problems that
followed. Furthermore, the German
government seemed on the brink of
repudiating millions of dollars in
reparations which it had agreed to
pay to its European neighbors and
the United States at the peace con-
ference ending the war in 1919.
One of Dodd's tasks was to pres-
sure Berlin to pay the reparations
(despite the fact that the German
economy was wrecked by the con-
tinuation of the world-wide depres-
sion and by the debts connected
with the settlement). Dodd was also
tasked with providing Washington
insights into this quite unusual, if
not bizarre, movement of Nazism,
which had assumed an important
position in the government al-
though Hindenburg the man, not


the dirigible formally was the
government leader. Unfortunately,
he was in extremely poor health
and it was his eventual death in Au-
gust of 1934 that opened the door
for Hitler to solidify dictatorial con-
trol.
As the internal violence in-
creased, and the anti-Semitic poli-
cies escalated, Americans were
increasingly bewildered by events
in Germany Despite the violent
events, the Department of State pri-
marily urged Dodd to continue
pushing Berlin to pay the repara-
tions. It should be remembered that
at the time, many Americans and
a number of foreign service officers
on this staff-had anti-Semitic ten-
dencies. To his credit, the ambassa-
dor was horrified by what he saw
unfolding in Germany
Dodd sent correspondences to
Franklin Roosevelt describing the
German government's repression of
its citizens and, as time went by,
warning that the German military
was growing rapidly in size despite


Germany's agreement in 1919 that it
would not build up its military and
armament in violation of the
treaties that ended World War I. At
the same time, back in America, a
powerful isolationist movement de-
veloped, particularly in the Mid-
west, which called for Washington
to avoid getting entangled in "Eu-
rope's problems."
Meanwhile, his daughter Martha,
in her mid-20s, had a number of,
shall we say, romantic involvements
- at times with Nazis, and when
she became disillusioned with the
Nazis, she took up a torrid and long
romance with a Russian who was a
KGB operative. At one point she
took a long trip to Russia, which she
believed was benefiting from the
Communist government (although
what she saw caused her some seri-
ous second thoughts). Martha was
the subject of much public gossip in
Germany for her affairs with a
range of public figures.
While Roosevelt was more and
more realizing the threat of Ger-
many, he lacked the political sup-
port to begin to build up the U.S.
military Dodd's alarmist dispatches
from Berlin were also distrusted by
figures in the Department of State
even after Hitler marched into Aus-
tria in 1937.
Eventually, the power of the iso-
lationist movement and the critics
in the foreign service establishment
forced Roosevelt to ask Dodd to re-
sign. So the ambassador submitted
his letter of resignation and re-
turned to the United States in De-
cember of 1937. Disillusioned by
what was happening in Washington,
See Page C3


dilemma

n discussing with
coworkers the issue of
reliance on prescrip-
tion drugs, some people
came to mind.
One of those individuals
was asked if he'd write a
column about his depend-
ence on heavy-duty pain
killers; pills that afford
him some quality of life.
As a middle-aged man
with severe back prob-
lems, the dilemma of tak-
ing drugs to lessen pain -
vs. not doing so and living
in agony- is ever-present.
After giving the idea of
writing a first-person ac-
count of the balance be-
tween pain and
medication and reliance
on meds he declined. It's
just too personal to share
with the world.
Doubtless many, if not
most people, have friends
in a similar boat The three
who come to mind for me
all landed in the drug-de-
pendency dilemma due to
serious back injuries.
While there's a large
segment of society using
OxyContin or oxycodone
- or whatever for
recreational reasons, the
aforementioned Bad-Back
Trio were prescribed the
drugs by physicians who,
See Page C3


I


I' I


I.







OPage C2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012



PINION


"Crime is contagious. If the
government becomes a lawbreaker,
it breeds contempt for the law."
Justice Louis D. Brandeis, 1856-1941


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
JJ Curt Ebitz................................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris .................... ......... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DOG SHOOTING





Reprimand




for deputy




warranted


any in the community a stung
will applaud Sheriff advance
Jeff Dawsy for the dis- This
ciplinary action meted out to a weeks
deputy following
the fatal shooting THE ISSUE:
of Princess, a Jack
Russell terrier, Deputy shoots do,
during his attempt
to serve a warrant OUR OPINION
in November. Discipline fits
The deputy action.
used excessive
force when he
shot the small breed dog in the ternal i
spine, killing her instantly. He receive
said he was reacting to what he was re
felt was an aggressive dog bolt- agency
ing from inside a home without ordered
the owner's knowledge. with ar
We agree with the sheriff's of the s
office's official action. The assign(
deputy used poor judgment ices Di'
when making the split-second patrol 1
decision to fire his gun, poten- We c(
tially putting nearby residents fice foi
in harm's way. One would ex- dentui
pect that his training balances what w
the instinct to shoot a moving sulting
target with the ability to make ily's be
a sound situational assessment It is
and respond accordingly. ment o
Given how the situation was tively t
handled, the need for retrain- In mar
ing seems apparent. Princess death s
could have been kicked out of not whi
the way or he could have used dog.


Cassius Clay mission
they me
It's Cassius Clay, not Muham- tie bit o
mad Ali. People remember him
from being a boxing champion. WhomI
People remember him for being a If lob
showman. People remember him politician
for being a humanitarian. They're are sayi
celebrating his birthday. I remem- now,ho
ber him as I'm a veteran and I re- ing the
member him as a cowardly draft
dodger using his religion as an ex- C
cuse not to serve and de-
fend that right.
Where are they? OUND
Coyotes on the prowl in iF
Pine Ridge? I have lived
here for 10 years on six
acres of wooded property, f.
have seven wooded acres
behind me, and have yet
to see my first coyote. I'm CA.
wondering if this person 5630579
really lives in Pine Ridge, 563-0579
Fla., or where they're liv-
ing because there's not happens
any coyotes around my house. today. M
And I would love to go where he they rec
lives so I can see his coyotes. certain
Look again and see if you can world g
find any coyotes in Pine Ridge.
Shooting range Asl
Finally, the board of county Not a
commissioners (is) doing some- county a
thing that makes sense in this nasty, g
county. We're slowly drying up. raised t
Stores are leaving. Businesses are Many of
closing. This is going to be just a rienced
big parking lot for Ocala and ods in o
probably The Villages someday if with the
we don't do something. The pub- that situ
lic shooting range is about the of those
smartest thing they've ever done. and pur
We have nothing like that here. For many of
me to go to use a shooting range, tions of
I've either got to go down to
Brooksville or to Leesburg. What's
wrong with keeping those types of Here's
monies and those types of jobs it more
here in Citrus County? I don't un- on an er
derstand what the county com- him in t


gun or baton to halt the
'ing dog.
incident prompted
of angry letters to the ed-
itor and Sound Off
calls from Chroni-
cle readers. The
g. vast majority said
the deputy was in
: the wrong and
should be dealt
with swiftly and
strongly
Following an in-
investigation, the deputy
ed a written reprimand,
moved from the emer-
response team and was
d to undergo training
animal control as a result
hooting. He was also re-
ed to the Judicial Serv-
vision and will no longer
the streets of Inverness.
ommend the sheriff's of-
r not sweeping the inci-
nder a rug and looking at
vas a horrible action re-
in the death of a fam-
loved pet.
good for law enforce-
fficers to react instinc-
to dangerous situations.
ny cases it is a life-and-
situation for them but
ien it involves a small



ers are thinking of when
eet. This finally makes a lit-
f sense.
ido they represent?
byists are able to buy
ns' votes, as the headlines
ng that they're doing right
w then are they represent-
citizens?
itrus Memorial
To the person who was
complaining about peo-
ple bashing the Citrus
Memorial hospital be-
cause everybody's com-
plaining about them in
the newspapers: Did she
ever stop to think that
maybe she's one of the
few that have had good
service and have had
good luck and results at
Citrus Memorial? Don't
judge everything by what
s to you. That's the trouble
lost people think because
:eive certain obligations or
benefits, that the whole
ets the same treatment.
Iamed of actions
II of the retirees in our
are of the same ilk of that
rouchy woman who ha-
hat clerk unnecessarily.
us grew up and have expe-
a few low economic peri-
ur life and can sympathize
people today who are in
nation. We are very proud
people who work so hard
sue to get by and I am sure
us are ashamed of the ac-
that nasty woman.
Vhich is worse?
s some food for thought: Is
reprehensible (to) urinate
nemy's dead body or to kill
he first place?


Something to argue about


The Supreme Court can even with the federal government
pack large portents in paying most of the costs, in many
small details. When in late states their portion of Medicaid
March it considers the constitu- costs is the largest item in their
tionality of Obamacare, there will budgets, even exceeding educa-
be five and a half tion. And Obamacare,
hours of oral argument which forbids states to
- the most in almost make more restrictive
half a century This is the eligibility criteria it
because the individual adopted before this
mandate (Does Con- new burden, would
gress' power to regu- deny all Medicaid
late interstate funds to noncompliant
commerce extend to / states.
punishing the inactiv- This would cost most
ity of not buying insur- states billions of dol-
ance?) is just one of lars. For example, 26
the law's constitution- George Will percent of Florida's
ally dubious features. OTHER budget goes for Medi-
An hour of argument VOICES caid; if it lost federal
will be devoted to funds, it would require
whether Obamacare's enormous 60 percent of all tax revenues to
expansion of Medicaid is so coer- maintain today's pre-Obamacare
cive of states that it is incompati- benefits.
ble with federalism the In theory, state participation in
Constitution's architecture of dual Medicaid is voluntary; practi-
sovereignty. The court's previous cally, no state can leave Medicaid
rulings about compulsion point to- because its residents' federal
ward disallowing this expansion. taxes would continue to help
Spending on Medicaid, a theo- fund it in all other states. More-
retically cooperative federal- over, opting out of Obamacare's
state program, is approximately expanded Medicaid would leave
40 percent of all federal funds millions of poor people without
given to states and 7 percent of all affordable care. So Obamacare
federal spending. Enacted in leaves states this agonizing
1965 as a program for the poor, it choice: Allow expanded Medi-
has exploded. The increase in its caid to devastate your budgets, or
costs by the end of this decade is abandon the poor
expected to be $434 billion. Its The Constitution created a fed-
cost is projected to rise 7.9 per- eral government of limited and
cent a year faster even than enumerated powers, and
Medicare's (6.9 percent). promptly strengthened this with
Under Obamacare, however, the 10th Amendment. The
the cooperative nature of Medi- Supreme Court has held that the
caid has been radically revised in states therefore retain "a resid-
a way no states could have antici- uary and inviolable sovereignty"
pated before becoming inextrica- incompatible with federal "com-
bly entangled with it Obamacare mandeering" of states' legisla-
requires states to cover all per- tures and executives. Under
sons with incomes up to, effec- Obamacare's Medicaid expan-
tively, 138 percent of the poverty sion, states are dragooned for the
level. The federal government furtherance of federal objectives.
will pay all increased costs (other In 1987, the court upheld a fed-
than administrative costs) until eral law denying a portion of fed-
2016; by 2020 states will pay 10 eral highway funds to states that
percent of the expansion. But refused to implement a drinking


age of 21. The court held that the
threatened loss of funds only 5
percent was a "relatively
small" inducement and hence
"not so coercive as to pass the
point at which pressure turns
into compulsion." The court
thereby said the federal govern-
ment cannot behave like Don
Corleone, making offers states
cannot refuse. At some point, gov-
ernment crosses the threshold of
unconstitutional compulsion.
The crucial consideration is
the degree of threatened impov-
erishment. Because of Oba-
macare, the nation needs clarity
from the court. If it now thinks
Congress has unfettered power to
place conditions on states receiv-
ing money from it, the court
should explicitly disavow its co-
ercion doctrine. But if the coer-
cion doctrine is to survive,
Obamacare should not.
The Obamacare issues of Med-
icaid coercion and the individual
mandate are twins. They confront
the court with the same chal-
lenge, that of enunciating judi-
cially enforceable limiting
principles. If there is no outer
limit on Congress' power to regu-
late behavior in the name of reg-
ulating interstate commerce,
then the Framers' design of a lim-
ited federal government is nulli-
fied. And if there is no outer limit
on the capacity of this govern-
ment to coerce the states, then
federalism, which is integral to
the Framers' design, becomes
evanescent.
So, the time the court has allot-
ted for oral argument about Oba-
macare is proportional to the
stakes. This case is the most im-
portant in more than half a cen-
tury since the Brown v Board of
Education cases because, like
those, it concerns the nature of
the American regime.
--*--A
George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


-'* I /
"///


LETTERS to the Editor


Coyotes run wild
This is absolutely ridiculous!
The problem with wild coyotes
in the Pine Ridge area is defi-
nitely out of control!
We have lived here in Pine
Ridge for 10 years, and the howl-
ing from these packs of wild coy-
otes is not just frightening, but is
getting progressively louder and
closer to our backyard and pool
cage!
I agree with the caller in
(Sound Off) on Jan. 12, who said
"this has gone too far," when a
coyote showed its teeth and
growled at him at 8 a.m. next to
his mailbox!
The Pine Ridge Property Own-
ers Association should be con-
tacting the proper animal
control authorities to have these
wild coyotes trapped, removed
and relocated from Pine Ridge
to non-residential areas!
Are we going to do nothing,
and wait for a tragedy to happen,
such as being attacked by a wild
coyote in our own back yard?
I am so sick and tired of hear-
ing from wildlife animal sup-
porters saying "after all these
animals were here first."
Well "hello," that may have


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

been true many, many years ago,
before Pine Ridge was devel-
oped into a full residential area!
We all live here with gophers,


turtles, skunks, armadillos and
rabbits because none of these
wild critters are growling or
threatening our lives!
The wild coyotes are present-
ing a danger to all of us who live
here, and it is getting worse each
year
It is true, they have killed and
eaten almost everything in the
food chain here, and they need
to be relocated to the wilderness
where they belong, for their own
sakes and ours.
Enough is enough!
Maureen McGreevey
Pine Ridge

New product
Your new TV guide is greatly
appreciated by those of us with
diminished sight. It's easy to use
with separate pages for morning
programs, afternoon programs,
evening programs and late night
programs.
Its small size makes it easy to
store on an end table. The daily
lists of movies and sports (are) a
big plus. And it's only 25 cents a
week.
Stan Clewett
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inspiration on vacation? Reprise and revise


"When something
can be read without ef-
fort, great effort has
gone into its writing."
-Enrique Jardiel *
Poncela.
P oncela was a
Spanish play-
wright and nov-
elist who lived during
the first half of the 20th Fred B
century and who, for A SI
the most part, wrote OF I
humorous works.
I stumbled upon the
above quotation a few days ago
while doing research online re-
garding writing better dialogue -
that is, how to make a conversation
seem like a conversation and not
like a ping-pong match with "he


I
L
L


said" and "she said"
bouncing back and forth
across the page. I found
what I was looking for
and came away with
some very good point-
ers, but the words from
Poncela stayed with me
and, in thinking on it, I
would add that effort is
rannen meaningless without
LICE inspiration.
LIFE What does a writer
do when inspiration is
nowhere to be found?
Nothing is more boring than a
writer writing about writing, so
that isn't it, and as you might have
already guessed, today, for me, in-
spiration seems to have taken a
vacation. I could simply pull


something out of the air and ram-
ble, but then you'd know that, too.
No, what I usually do is go back
into my archives and pull out
something that was truly inspired
at the time and reprise it with re-
visions, so here comes a "Buns of
Steel Moment" one more time:
I've never been a macho man.
I've always had to do the best I
could by being cute. In my earlier
days, I was the little-boy-type cute,
but as age and poundage caught
up with me, I've become Pillsbury
Doughboy cute, but I've never,
ever had to fight off the women-
folk who were looking for a strong,
handsome, leading man.
Oh, sure, as a 90-pound weak-
ling, I considered the Charles
Atlas course. I liked the idea of


making mincemeat out of the
sand-kicking bully, but I let it slide
- I was having too much fun being
the girls' cute little buddy I went
for five-plus decades and never
even thought that I might evoke
wanton lust. That is, until while
walking along a sidewalk, I heard
a lady behind me yell, "Hey!"
I kept walking and she yelled
once more, "Hey, you, mister!"
I looked over my shoulder and
sheepishly asked, "Who? Me?"
She replied, "Yeah, you. Your
pants are ripped."
I felt a rush of embarrassment
and my face flushed crimson. I
reached back and to my relief the
seam of my trousers was solid, there
was no rip. The mystery woman
caught up and was now standing di-


rectly behind me. I checked my
pants once more and said, "My
pants are OK, they aren't ripped."
With lightning speed and to my
shock, amazement and chagrin,
she ran her hand ever so firmly
across the seat of my pants, then
smiled, winked and said, "You're
right My mistake."
I had been assaulted! I was the
victim of a female masher!
Forget Charles Atlas. Maybe I
can star in a commercial for
"Buns of Steel!"
And, there you have it inspi-
ration revisited.
--in--
Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


PACs can distort facts


In November, citizens will exercise the Citizen
most important right assured to them financial
by our Constitution: They will vote to eral welf
choose a president and representatives to tional ta:
Congress. They will decide the direction of citizens (
our nation for the next four years. ter what
Our nation's founders feared
democracy: One man, one vote,
majority rule. They knew that ,
once voters discovered they
could vote themselves benefits
from the treasury, they would do
so. Some would surely sacrifice /
the welfare of their nation to
their own self interests. There-
fore, they limited the right to
vote to citizens who had some Dr. William Dixon
"interest" for example
through owning property who OTHER
might be expected to be wise in VOICES
regards to preserving the union
and the Constitution.
Successive generations of venal politi- Most A
cians have corrupted the election process understa
to the point where, today, one needs only be decisions
a citizen 18 years of age and able to write preceden
his name to cast a ballot. He needs know Unfortun
nothing whatsoever about the governing jected to
principles embedded in the Constitution baser em
that protect the nation. Voter ignorance has tees. The
become the norm. have alwo
I first experienced this ignorance while tion.
standing in line to cast my ballot in New Laws x
York City I had studied the issues carefully time wh(
and watched the debates between Kennedy some dire
and Nixon before selecting Kennedy Some- union. Bu
one in line directly ahead of me stated that turnout iE
Kennedy was the best choice because he percent c
was so handsome. A second person said ignorant
that there was something about his hair treasury
that attracted a vote. icated mi
Kennedy was handsome and had great verse the
hair, so elect him! My vote counted no more the next(
than the vote of fools selecting a leader on hopes the
the basis of his hairdo. Or, today, exclusively
on his views on abortion or gay marriage or
unions or even his skin color. William
Voting to loot the treasury has, as well, Univer
become the norm. My generation receives and
Social Security and Medicare benefits from Adminis
the government. Many of them are inclined a surgeon
to protect their benefits by voting for achieving
whichever candidate promises to continue He was
those benefits even at the risk of bankrupt- at th(
ing the nation and levying burdensome
taxes upon young workers trying to raise D


SHADES
Continued from Page Cl

little doubt, had pain man-
agement as the priority
As one of the trio de-
scribes it, the pain is akin to
having an ice pick shoved
into one's spine.
Some seem to have man-
aged their access to, and use
of, these drugs better than
others. After all, drugs
deemed desirable among
recreational users have the
same effect on those with le-
gitimate injuries it's just
that their use is for legiti-
mate reasons.
One member of the trio, it
seems certain, developed a
habit that exceeded what
the doctor prescribed.
It's just speculation, but
- and this was a few years
ago the person often
seemed whacked out be-
yond what a doctor would
allow outside of an institu-
tional setting. It's fair to
guess the person was "doc-
tor shopping" getting the



REVIEW
Continued from Page Cl

he began traveling around
the country urging America
to build up its military in
the face of the German
threat. He died in 1940, by
which time most people rec-
ognized that he had been
right to see Hitler as a
global threat
After the war, Martha ran
into trouble with the con-
gressional committees that
suspected communism infil-
tration of America because


meds from more than one
physician; or, getting them
from some source other
than the doc.
In recently speaking with
another member of the Bad-
Back Trio, it's clear that the
anguish wrought by signifi-
cant, lifelong physical in-
jury overrides the option of
living in pain without the
drugs. With that came the
acknowledgement of
addiction.
What does one do?
Who knows.
It's easy for outsiders to
conclude that some doctors
over-prescribe and that
there should be a long-term
plan to wean patients from
hard-core pain pills. How-
ever, when an injury is per-
manent, so too as far as I
know is the pain.
It's been a couple of years
now, but one reader called a
couple of times to ask that
we do a story about her ad-
diction to and need for -
these medications. She said
people don't understand
that all who are taking such


she had traveled to Russia
while in Germany While not
a Communist, she did have
sympathy for Russia at a
time when that was
unfashionable.
What makes this book so
powerful is author Erik Lar-
son's eye for the interesting
details, the small confronta-
tions that mirrored larger
conflicts, and the personali-
ties of Germans on both
sides of the political spec-
trum. He praises Dodd, but
does not ignore some of his
misjudgments.
Larson is a professional
historian who writes like a


s receiving disability payments or
support from any of dozens of fed-
fare programs will vote for addi-
xes on hard working, productive
Obama's millionaire tax) no mat-
increasing taxes may do to the
economy
Twenty-million employees of
federal, state and local govern-
ments depend upon tax rev-
enues collected from the private
sector work force. The great ma-
jority of this group votes for can-
didates who will grow
government and raise taxes. To
increase their benefits and
salaries, they will gladly loot the
treasury as the founders pre-
dicted. Their unions are a detri-
ment to citizens in the
productive private sector of our
economy
mericans, given the chance to fully
nd the issues, to make informed
s based upon fact and historical
it, would vote to protect the nation.
lately, they will instead be sub-
distortions and appeals to their
options by political action commit-
e interests of the political class
ays trumped the welfare of our na-

will never be rolled back to the
en those permitted to vote had
ect "interest" in the survival of the
it, we are not without hope. Voter
s typically low, often less than 50
)f those eligible. A majority of the
and those who would loot the
do not bother to vote. A small ded-
nority of voters determined to re-
slide toward socialism can carry
election, as they did in 2010. One
ey will.


Dixon is a graduate of Columbia
rsity, New York Medical College
the USF College ofBusiness
traction. He served in the Army as
n and as a Special Forces Officer,
ig the rank of lieutenant colonel.
an assistant professor ofsurgery
e University of Georgia before
enteringprivate practice.
r. Dixon can be reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


meds are not junkies ex-
ploiting a prescription.
She had a good point.
Still, it's nearly impossible
to tell who in such a situa-
tion is sincere and who is on
an icy slope, logic-wise.
It's unfortunate that
Florida South Florida, in
particular has an assort-
ment of characters with
medical degrees who make
big money by prescribing
strong pain killers to those
with no legitimate need.
Those legitimately
trapped between pain and
addiction have enough to
contend with without being
stigmatized by those who
can't feel their pain.
Unfortunately, addiction
is addiction, with or without
chronic pain. "Quality of
life," in looking at the Bad-
Back Trio, becomes elusive.


Charlie Brennan is editor
of the Citrus County
Chronicle. He can be
mailed at cbrennan@
chronicleonline. com.


novelist. This book is just a
small peek at the origins of
World War II, but gives us a
broad perspective on what
happened and how people
behaved.
A great, but highly idio-
syncratic book history
told through the career of a
particular figure.


Michael Francis is a
Sugarmill Woods resident
who taught international
politics and U.S. foreign
policy at the University of
Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring.


eJjtrew'ia 1


SHot Corner: BIRDS


Still around
I live in Citrus Springs and maintain two
birdbaths with clean, shallow water. Be-
fore the rain on Wednesday, on Jan. 17, I
observed three robins, one bluebird, one
black-capped chickadee, one woodpecker
and at least eight little finches splashing
together. So the birds are still around.
They wanted water.
Birds need water
Regarding "Where have all the birds
gone?" These birds need a constant
source of water, fresh water. People
should be putting out a water bath for
them along with their birdfeeders and
there should be fresh water in it every day
consistently. You have to remember this is
drought time, even though it rained today,
but they need their consistent source of
water. Once you have water and the feed,
you will have birds visiting your site.
In my yard
I'm sitting here reading the paper and
see that thing in Sound Off about the
birds, the poor birds. Well, if they're all
worried about the birds, they're in my
back yard. There must be 50 robins in my
back yard. My feeders are full of finches
and I've got woodpeckers and squirrels
dancing and hopping in glee. Anyway, she
has nothing to be worried of. They're
probably all in my back yard. I'm taking
care of them.
It's the cats
You're asking about the birds, where
they're all at. If you've got any cats
around, especially the wild cats, they will
eat every one of them. They'll catch them
all. I live out here on the lake and they are
a nuisance like nobody's business. They've
scratched our trucks, our cars. They've
crapped in the yard. Some feed them,
some don't. There's just gobs of cats. So
there's your birds gone they ate them
all and everything else. And the squirrels,
they really love them too. I've seen them
do it, so I'm telling you the truth.


In my garden
In response to "Where have all the birds
gone?" They happen to be in my garden.
We care for them. We have blue jays, we
have robins, we have cardinals and we
have squirrels. So there's nothing the gov-
ernment can do. We have hummingbirds.
So I believe all the birds are in my yard -
our yard, sorry.
Spraying
I'm calling in regards to "Where have all
the birds gone?" I've done a little bit of
basic research and I think that I might
have a clue that maybe we should ask the
Mosquito Control where the birds went.
Maybe what they're spraying has chased
them away. I've seen and heard of this in
cities before where mosquito spraying
could actually chase the birds away for a
short time. They will return, but I think
maybe the summer spraying could have
chased them away.
Plenty of birds
I'm calling about the disappearing
birds. I live off (County Road) 581 and I
have plenty of birds all year around. My
feeder holds 5 pounds of Blackwell sun-
flower seeds, which I fill every three days.
No squirrels; my dog keeps (squirrels) at
bay. Maybe you people should have a bird
habitat, like bushes and dense trees, to
keep the birds around.
They're everywhere
I'm calling about the animals and the
bird disappearing. Well, if you just come
down to Page Street off of (County Road)
486, you'll find them all there. I've got a
bunch of them and they're everywhere.
They come in my yard and they steal all
my nuts. And the birds are getting killed
by cats constantly because there's so
many of them.
If you just tell those people from Bev-
erly Hills to come on down here to Page,
they'll find their birds, OK? There's mil-
lions of them. I don't know why. I go out-
side and they're everywhere.


Unnecessary roughness
Even The Florida Department of Chil-
dren and Families, otherwise known as
DCF, shows remarkable ability to upset
at-risk children. On December 29, 2011,
at the Inverness office, a DCF worker
pulled a small child from the hug of an
upset grandmother. Unnecessary rough-
ness and a lack of concern were dis-
played by both workers escorting two
young children to the car What is this
world coming to? The very people en-
trusted to help children and families
were the bad guys today
Jewlie P Gore
Inverness

We're honored
The Jan. 2 editorial "Water activists
turn tide on degradation" was a pleasure
to read. The credit given to Hank Cohen,
Gary Bartell and Nancy Argenziano is
appropriate and hopefully will encour-
age more members of government to sup-
port our environment. We of TOO FAR do
not strive to get our name in the paper,
but it does feel good and the support
helps our work.
Kudos to all the other groups, men-
tioned or not, for all they do.
Thank you and happy New Year.
Al Grubman
president, TOO FAR Inc.


Port partnership
Your recent article regarding several
Citrus County officials meeting with the
chairman of the Marion County Board of
County Commisioners to discuss the pro-
posed Port Citrus also referred to Dixie
Hollins being present. Clearly he is an in-
terested party, as he is a principal of a
company that is a major land owner who
could benefit directly if Port Citrus be-
comes a reality
Let me suggest that given such interest
and the mutual benefits contemplated by
such development, that a public/private
partnership agreement would be appro-
priate to further the development of the
project, including sharing of cost for the
feasibility study, attorney fees, etc. This
should be given some thought.
Carl A. Bertoch
Crystal River

Sound Off section
Whoop dee doo. A whole section of the
paper, Friday Dec. 30, dedicated to peo-
ple who call in. Either they do not have
the courage to sign a letter or else they
can't write. What are we coming to? What
a waste of money and paper. Why not
save the money and give us a free TV
guide?
Lloyd Beasley
Lecanto


families.


Letters to the EDITOR


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 C3






C4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012

Personal values
Re: The Entertainment
Page, Citrus County
Chronicle.
Just what is it about the
Entertainment Page that
the management of this
paper finds so "entertain-
ing?" We are constantly
bombarded with the sordid
details of the latest misad-
ventures of all the Holly-



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1


In 2010, people were
pretty angry
In 2012, they are still
pretty angry
But there are real issues
in county government that
we the voters should pay at-
tention to and that the can-
didates for county
commission probably don't
want to talk about.
What the candidates will
talk about in 2012 are three
things: Ottawa, Port Citrus
and the fact they are not in-
cumbents. That should not
be enough to get elected.
Complaining does not make
you a good leader.
Offering solutions to our
difficult problems is what
makes a leader.
Here's what county com-
mission candidates should
be talking about:
As county commission-
ers, what specifically are
you going to do to improve


wood trash.
If we're not being beaten
over the head with Charlie
Sheen, then it's about cou-
ples living together, having
multiple children out of
wedlock and breaking up
- surprise, surprise. And
then, there are the recycled
stories of how you can go to
the bottom of the gutter
with your drug addiction
on your way to fame and


the employment opportuni-
ties in our county? The un-
employment rate is about 11
percent and a lot of working
families are hurting.
What are you specifi-
cally going to do to run
county government in a
more efficient way? There
will be fewer tax dollars
available next year -
where will you cut first? Tell
voters about your spending
priorities so they can deter-
mine if your issues match
up.
Are you going to close
down libraries? Lots of re-
tirees and young people use
our libraries. Are they going
to be the first place you look
to make cuts?
What are you going to
do to protect our drinking
water? We are polluting our
water by using inefficient
septic tanks, allowing storm
water to run directly into
our waterways, and over-
pumping our aquifer. Do
you have the guts to do any-
thing about it, or will you
just give it lip service?
What are you going to


COMMENTARY


fortune. The list goes on.
People do not live in this
area because of the night-
clubs and bright lights.
This area has been, histori-
cally, a "Bible Belt" kind of
community Citizens retire
here for peace, quiet and
safety. The "Entertain-
ment" page does not reflect


do about all the county
water systems that were
purchased at too high a
price just a few years ago?
Are you going to raise water
rates in those communities
that have lots of voters or
will you just kick the can
down the road and hope
someone else does some-
thing about it?
What are your top pri-
orities for road improve-
ments in the county? Tax
dollars are now in short
supply Where do you think
these precious road dollars
should be used?
And what about funding
for the best park in a five-
county area Whispering
Pines in Inverness? The
county has backed down
from the amount it has
funded the park in recent
years. Inverness City Man-
ager Frank DiGiovanni, the
guy who helped build and
manage the park, thinks
that's an awful idea. What
would you do if elected?
What are you going to
do about the future of the
Beverly Hills Recreation


their set of personal values.
To prove my point, this
paper used to publish
weekly birth announce-
ments. The listings showed
an ever-increasing rise in
illegitimate births. There
arose a public outcry from
the Chronicle readership
lamenting the moral decay


Center and all those other
member-supported commu-
nity centers that are going
(or about to go) belly up?
Are you going to use tax dol-
lars to keep them open like
in Beverly Hills? Are you
going to close them down?
What criteria do you per-
sonally use to make those
decisions?
Do you have the guts to
step in and deal with the
Citrus Memorial hospital
controversy? The hospital
governing board is still col-
lecting tax dollars but is not
spending them on the
county hospital. Why should
we keep paying taxes when
they are not being used ap-
propriately? The county
commission approves the
tax request each year -
why doesn't the commission
step in and ask for some ac-
countability? Why doesn't
the county commission re-
fuse to approve the hospital
tax if the governing board is
not going to use the money
for the hospital?
There are lots of thorny
issues in our county, but ex-


Letter to the EDITOR


of the community. This
paper responded by ceas-
ing to publish the listings.
Problem solved? Hardly!
Most of these out-of-
wedlock births are
taxpayer-funded and the
beginning of the proverbial
"from cradle to the grave"
welfare system.
Community newspapers
should reflect worthy
moral values provided by


perience says the candi-
dates will all go after the
easy targets that get people
mad. Watch for lots of at-
tacks on the proposal to
study creating Port Citrus
because that's so easy
There was actually a
funny "Sound Off" pub-
lished in the Chronicle this
past week from a caller who
said the county should stop
wasting its time on the port
proposal and instead do
something about Sears and
the other stores that are
closing in the county.
Not to state the obvious,
but stores close in Citrus
County because they are not
generating enough revenue.
They are not generating
enough revenue because
too many people are out of
work. The port concept is
being studied because the
county commissioners be-
lieve they can create jobs by
attracting businesses that
will use the port.
The existing commission
has taken a risk in studying
the port because opposition
was inevitable. But voters


C**aE


J-n.T(JT/,/


22
ACT Musical: The Kids
Left, The Dog Died,
Now What?


Manatee Festival


The Fab Four


23


24


25


26


ll O [B I[?-


27
Fun and Fancy Fashion
Elks Fashion Show

Truck and Tractor Pull


28
Truck and Tractor Pull


29 30 31 1 2 3 4
Truck and Tractor Pull Mow-It Dinner Country Diamonds
Beverly Hills Civic Show Beverly Hills
Association Civic Association

2012 Festival of Books






5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Light Shine Celebrate Spring
German American
Dollars for Scholars Social Club
Doo-Wop


JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
Manatee Festival
Sgt. Dennis Flanagan Foundation
Sports Celebrity Auction Dinner
Sgt. Dennis Flanagan Foundation
Annual Golf Tournament
Keys to Fashion West Citrus Ladies Elks
Truck and Tractor Pull
SAWinter Wonderland
SCRWC Showtime
Music in the Park
SBeates Tibute
SFlorida Lifestyle Fashion Show
* St Scholastica CCW Fashion Show
Book Festival
SYoga Day USA
Concert at the Old Courthouse, The Porch Dogs
Early Childhood Expo
SWest Citrus Elks Fashion Show
ACT The Kids Left, The Dog Died, Now What?
* James Rogers Concert
* Music in the Park- Southern Sounds
FEBRUARY
*Fitness in Citius
* Jr. Achievment Bowl-A-Thon
SAfrican American Read In
* Jazz Valentine Concert
*'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Singing Valentines
* Grand Ole Opry
* German American Club Celebrate Spring
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
* Ozello Chili Cook Off and Craft Show
Academy of Environmental Science Dinner
SPJPII Goods-Services Auction
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* CF Performing Arts eries Cooking With
The Calamar Sisters
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
* Love Your Library Evening
SKiwanis Valentine Celebrity Dinner Dance
SGreek Festival
Crystal Oaks Military Card Party
* Tricky Tray, CCW of St. Scholastica
SFashion Sweethearts
SWest Citrus Elks Book Sale and Flea Market
SCattle Barons' Ball American Cancer Society
A Beatles Tribute
* Oscar Night 2012 "Promoting Literacy" SMW Rotary
* Rotary of Inverness Online and TV Auction
* Kiwanis Concert Live
SFloral City Library Book Sale
Mow It Dinner Beverly Hills Lions Club
S2012 Festival of Books
* Country Diamonds Show Beverly Hills Civic Assoc.
SLight Shine
Concerned Citizen Commendation Award and Dinner
* Runway For Rescues
MARCH
Fitness in Citrus
* Citrus Has Talent
* Manatee Car & Truck Show
* Luminary Art Nights
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Strawberry Festival
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Fort Cooper Days
* Citrus County Fair
* Clean Air Ride
* Corvettes in the Sunshine
* St Patrick's Day Golf Classic
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
* Scope it Out 5K
* SCORE Golf Classic


* Sugarmill Chorale
SCitrus County's Amazing Race
STricky Tray Crystal Oaks Civic
* Floral City Library Book Sale
SSt. Paddy's Pot of Gold Card Party and Luncheon
Ladies of the West Citrus Elks
* Music on the Square
SSalute to our Community CMH
SMilitary Card Party Knights of Columbus
* Will McLean Festival
* Habitat for Humanity Building Dreams
* Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale
* Charity Ball
Nature Coast Civil War Reenactment
SCreative Quilters Show
* Concerts at the Courthouse
* Spring is in the Air Fashion Show
STampa Bay Lightning Hockey Trip
Goods and Services Kentucky Derby PJPII
* Withlacoochee Wilderness
Canoe and Kayak Rally & Race
SFriends of Homosass Library Book Sale
* Citrus Community Choir Spring Concert
* Jury's Irish Cabaret
* Path Golf Toumament
* Music in the Park
* We Care Food Pantry Golf Tournament
* St. Patrick's Day Parade
* Risky Ears Children's Hearing Health Fair
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jimmy Crowley
* Bluegrass in Hernando
* Encore Ensemble The Last Dance of Dr. Disco
* Dublin City Ramblers
* Shrimpa-Palooza
APRIL
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Inverness Relay For Life
* CCBA Fishing Tournament
SWildlife Park Easter Egg Hunt
SJazz Appreciation Month Celebration
* Ozello Adventure Race
* Volunteer Fair
Citrus County Bass Challenge
SSheriff's Summer Safety Expo
SCentral Citrus Rotary Golf Classic
*Amercan Irish Club Golf Tournament
SCrystal River Relay For Life
United Way Spirit of the Community Awards Luncheon
SInverness Rotary Golf Tournament
SHomosassa Springs Easter Egg Hunt
* Jazz Appreciation Clinic
* Cirus Community Concert Choir
* Camp Good Hope Golf Tournament
* Music in the Park
SLetters Carriers Food Drive
Red Eagle Lodge Intertribal Pow-Wow
SJazz Spring Concert
Light Shine Florida's Cracker History
Tickle Me Fancy Dinner
SDiamonds in April
* Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
* Blessings in a Backpack 5K Run/Walk
. When Elvis Came to Town
* Three Sisters Music Fest
* Crystal River Power Squadron Military Card Party
*April Madness Basketball Tournament
* Rotary Blood Screening
* Coffee Tasting Event
* Harmony Heaven in 2011
* Walk for Life
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam
* Superintendent's Golf Tournament
* Lakeside Craft Show
* Boat Bash and Earth Day Extravaganza
* Steak and Steak
* Cattlemen's Fish Fry
* Sugarmill Chorale Concert
* Rays Senior Prom
* Sugarmill Woods Food Drive


* Florida Alps 5K
MAY
* Citrus Jazz Society Jam Session
* Informational Fiesta
* World's Greatest Baby Shower
* Winds, Rains or Flames All Hazards Expo
SCitrus Memorial Ball Champagne and Pearls
S832 K-9 Deputy Dogs Golf Tournament
SCrystal River Women's Club Entertainment Series
* Spring Into Summer
* Lecanto Relay For Life
* VFW District 7 Golf Tournament
Styles in Motion
SLions Spring Craft Fair
* ALLEGRO
* Crystal River Sharks Challenge
SKlezmer
SRays vs. Yankees trip
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
* Covenant Children's Home Charity Fish Fry
SLight Shine
* ACT Write Me a Murder
* Law Enforcement and First Responder
Appreciation BBQ
* Music in the Park
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Spring Finale
JUNE
* Cobia Big Fish Tournament
* Homosassa Fireworks & Poker Run
* Flag Day at Fort Cooper
* Rolling Thunder Independence Day Golf Tournament
* Music on the Square
SCitnus Jazz Jam
* Next Generation Professional Networking
SRays vs. Red Sox Trip
SRed Kettle Bar-B-Q
* Concerts at the Courthouse
* Encore Ensemble Theater- My Big Fat Italian Funeral
STeen Stock
* Citrus Memorial "We Care" Golf Tournament
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Tournament
832 K-9's Deputy Dog's Annual Golf Tournament
SVeterans Serving Veterans
* Encore Ensemble The Pajama Party Murders
JULY
Patriotic Evening
SFireworks over Kings Bay
Key Training Center Celebrity Auction
Key Run For the Money
Key Center Telethon
Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
SFirecracker 5K
Bevery Hills Recreation Military Card Party
SUncle Sam's Scallop Jam
SAmish Cook Book Signing
Follow That Dream Movie
SMaimeACT
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
AUGUST
* Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods Arts and Crafis
* Pregnancy and Family Uife Center Military Card Party
* So You Think You Can Dance Like A Star
* Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tourney
* Gator Club Kick Off
* Concert at the Courhouse Back 2 School Bash
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Great Music
for Your Summer Enjoyment
The King is Back
* The Other Volumn
* OC5K
SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show


The Cilrus Counly Fair Associalion proudly presents

13th Annual




YRUCK & 1ra or Pull

January 27 open 4 p.m. pull 6 p.m.

January 28 open 10 a.m. pull 1 p.m.

January 29 open 11 a.m. pull 1 p.m.


Save on advanced ticket sales

One day: Adult S8, children 4-11 S4
Two day: Adult sI5, children 4-11 S7
Three day: Adult S23, children 4-11 SO10


F.:.r n .:,r_ iill-:,rn ai i.: i i .:-a ll
.\ .\\ u- .- or A. ,:,.r .:. i:'
, ,Iru ,, Iu I, I. r ,- ,,n


* Veterans Golf Tournament
* Jazz Society Jam Session
* Citrus 20120 Fundraiser
* Save our Waters Week
Rays vs. Yankees
* Rays vs. Red Sox
* Christmas in September
United Way Kick Off
Business Women's Alliance Health & Fitness Expo
Industry Appreciation Luncheon
Industry Appreciation Week EDC Barbecue
* 832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
* VFW Post 10087 Golf Outing
Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
Music on the Square
* CF Professional Development Series
* Two Good Soles
Matt Curley Memorial Blood Drive
Barbecue Blast
Under One Roof Campaign Auction
Honeymoon From Hell
Page it Forward
* Sunset Festival
* Country Western Hoedown Cruise
Beat the Sheriff Race
* ACT Rumors
Encore Ensemble The Case or The Hopeless Diamond
OCTOBER
* Sertoma Okltoberfest
Oktloberfest German American
Bikes and BBQ
Habitat For Humanity Golf Tournament
SJazz Jam
Rails to Trails Bike Ride
SArtisans Boutique
Great American Cooter Festival
Day of Caring/Make a Difference Day Food Drive
National Wildlife Refuge Week
SScarecrow Festival
West Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
* Cooter Blast
Harvest lime Festival
Haunted Tram Ride
SCooterween
Greek Festival
Spike Fitzpatrick Memorial Golf Toumrney
Haunted Halloween
Hernando Heritage Days
Comedy Night at Citrus Springs
SSwing for a Cure
Nerieds Military Card Party
Lakeside Craft Show
* Chamber Business Expo
Nature Coast All Veterans Reunion
Citrus Garden Club Shades or Autumn
Fr. Willie Classic Golf Memorial
2nd Annual Ford Car & Truck Show
SCar Show for Charity
We Care Golf Tournament
SA Night at the Museum
* Citrus Springs Memorial Library Fall Book Sale
* Jazz Goes to Movies
Nature Coast Fine Arts and Irue Crafts Show
SCitrus Haunted" Hills 5K
Page it Forward
Make a Difference Day
Authors Fair
Robby Brown Memorial Golf Toumament
*CASI Chili Cook Off
Movie on the Square
Ladies of the West Citrus Elks Fall Card Party
Light Shine
Art Fair and Auction
Halloween Scramble for Hospice
* Candlelight Vigil
Fall Fling
Health & Wellness Fair


CHkONicEI


Sponsored by: l..i-lc Ilii'k (1i( C.
iJ-k il l II III ( 'Ill ll Illll ( 'Illh ll 'lkC


NOVEMBER
* BH Lions Foundation Craft Fair
* Inglis/Yankeeltown Arts and Seafood Festival
* Festival ol The Arts
* Jazz Society Jam
* Rotary Blood Screening
Blues & Bar-B-Que
SVeterans Fair
* Veterans Day ParadelMemorial Service
* Veterans Appreciation Show
* Stone Crab Jam
* CCBA Home & Ouldoors Show
Carulh Camp Challenge
SParade of Trees
* Cilrus Stampede Rodeo
* Winter Wonderland Crafl Show
Ozello Arts A Crafts Festival
SJazz Concerl
SFriends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
SSOS Goir TournamenI
Festival of the Arts Wine Tasting
* Veteran's Appreciation Week
* Annual Christmas Toy Run
* King's Bay 5K Run
* Hospice free of Remembrance
* Concert at the Old Courthouse, Jim Hurst
* Inverness Fall Classic
* BFF Society Fashion Show
* My Big Fat Italian Funeral
* Light Shine Dunnellon Concert Singers
* Silver Jubilee Fashion Show
* Precious Paws Fundraiser
* Recycle Day
* Never ForgeL 5K Run/Walk
* Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast
* Cooking for a Cause
* Wish Upon a Child Golf Tournament
SK-9 Karnival
* Cut-a-thon
* Cilrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
SMusic in the Park
Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die
DECEMBER
SFather Christmas Ball
Fort Cooper Slate Park Nights of Ughts
Floral City Heritage Days
Beverly Hills Chrishnas Parade
SChristmas Craft Show
SCRWC Silver Bells
* Crystal River Christmas Parade
* Jazz Holiday Concert
*Jazz Jam
* Invemrness Christmas Parade
SHomosassa Boal Parade
Sugarmill Chorale Christmas Concedl
SAlrboal Christmas Parade
Citrus Springs Holiday Parade
SNutcracker Ballel
Celebration of Lights
* ACT Richard Gilewilz
* Inverness Winter Celebration
* ACT Halvan Youth Theatre
* Frosty's Winter Wonderland
* Annual Holiday Party
* Suncoasi Business Masters Auction
* Rotary or Sugarmill Woods Golr Tournament
* Beverly Hills Recreation Center Military Card Party
* Cilrus Springs Rockin the Holiday
SCitrus Springs New Year's Eve Ball
* Send Them To Serve Golr Toumameni
* IOTA TV and Online Auction
* Citrus Community Concert Choir's Messiah
SMake a Smile Happen
SMusic in the Park
*Adopt a Chrisbnas Tree
* Elvis & Friends
* Encore Ensemble Win, Lose or Die


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

worthy moral leadership.

Joe D. Gilbreath
Dunnellon
Editor's note: The Chron-
icle welcomes birth an-
nouncements for publi-
cation. Due to privacy con-
cerns, the announcements
are not provided by hospi-
tals, but parents can submit
them. Email community@
chronicleonline. com.


told them to do something
about creating jobs, and the
port could be one part of the
solution. But the Monday-
morning-quarterback group
is going to jump all over this
because suddenly every-
body is an expert on ports.
The message this type of
shrill campaigning sends is
that elected officials should
not take risks that are not
part of business-as-usual.
But it's the business-as-
usual nonsense that has
given us one of the highest
unemployment rates in the
nation.
Don't let candidates get
away with it. Ask them the
tough questions and hold
them accountable.
Don't vote for the candi-
date who complains the
most; vote for the one who
has solutions you agree
with.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
His email address is
gmulligan@chronicle
online. com.












BUSINESS UN
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Net




Zero

Fort Hood

aims high with

trash-free goal
JEREMY SCHWARTZ
Austin
American-Statesman

FORT HOOD, Texas -
The goal is as ambitious as
it is daunting: The minicity
that is Fort Hood is seeking
to eliminate the nearly
20,000 tons of waste it sends
annually to landfills by 2020
- and do so without receiv-
ing any outside funding.
To put that goal into some
perspective, consider: The
city of Austin, itself one of
the nation's most aggressive
municipalities when it
comes to recycling and re-
ducing waste, hopes to
reach a similar goal by 2030,
a full decade later
Fort Hood officials have
begun looking at a number
of ways to reduce the post's
waste stream, from large-
scale composting to semi-
annual postwide garage
sales.
The sprawling Army post,
which is home to 50,000 sol-
diers but hosts a daily popu-
lation of 80,000 to 100,000,
currently sends about 56
percent of its waste to the
post landfill, which is oper-
ated by a private contractor
Within eight years, the post
hopes to get that number
close to zero.
Fort Hood officials are
looking to Austin, which has
been working toward its
zero-waste goal for several
years, for inspiration and
technical advice, and local
programs such as the Uni-
versity of Texas' Trash to
Treasure could be reborn
on the Army post.
Officials with Austin Re-
source Recovery, the city's
trash and recycling depart-
ment, see the Fort Hood ini-
tiative as an important part
of regional recycling efforts
that could lure specialized
recycling processors to the
area.
Austin Resource Recov-
ery Director Bob Gedert,
who has begun meeting with
his Fort Hood counterparts
to share ideas, said that
while Austin might not pro-
duce enough plastic or glass
recyclables to persuade re-
processing manufacturers
to open a plant here, other
zero-waste initiatives like
Fort Hood's could help the
region produce the guaran-
teed volume of material
they are seeking.
"We could consider a cor-
ridor of economic develop-
ment efforts (tied to)
recycling industries from
Fort Hood to San Antonio,"
he said.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL/Austin American-Statesman
In this Jan. 12 photo, recycle operations manager Jaycee W. Turnquist speaks about how they handle massive recy-
cling material at their recycling facility in Fort Hood, Texas. Fort Hood is seeking to eliminate the nearly 20,000 tons
of waste it sends annually to landfills by 2020 and do so without receiving any outside funding.


Fort Hood's waste initia-
tive is part of a larger Army-
wide program dubbed Net
Zero and announced last
year While Fort Hood fo-
cuses on finding ways to
eliminate waste, other
Army installations are look-
ing for ways to reduce en-
ergy and water
consumption, produce
more energy on-site and re-
cycle water so Army posts
take less from nearby wa-
tersheds. (Two installations,
including Fort Bliss in El
Paso, are experimenting
with all three areas at once.)
The idea is that the les-
sons learned at the pilot in-
stallations will be shared
throughout the Army in
coming decades, resulting
in Army posts that produce
as much water and energy
as they use and don't send
waste to landfills. Officials
say that beyond the envi-
ronmental benefits, the ef-
fort also has security
implications: locally pro-
duced energy, for example,
makes military bases less
vulnerable to attacks on
electricity grids.
The effort is already win-
ning attention and kudos
from the local environmen-
tal community.
"In the last two or three
years, the military has got-
ten the message that what's
good for the environment is
good for the taxpayer and
good for the soldier," said
Jim Marston, head of the
Environmental Defense
Fund's Texas office. "The
military has often given us
things we learn to use in
daily life. We ought to pay
attention because there
may be lessons we can learn
to adapt"
To some degree, military
installations may have ad-
vantages when it comes to
instituting aggressive initia-
tives like Fort Hood's zero
waste: namely, a command
structure in which leaders
can order soldiers to, say,


separate organic matter
from their nonorganic
trash. But Fort Hood offi-
cials say such an approach
won't get the results they're
looking for
"We need to change the
culture, not run around or-
dering people to do this and
that. We will get pushback,"
said Steve Burrow, Fort
Hood's chief of environ-
mental programs. "It has to
have buy-in from folks."
Jaycee Turnquist, who
has run Fort Hood's recy-
cling center for nearly two
decades, agreed that elimi-
nating waste will require a
change in mindset among
the post's soldiers and
employees.
"It's going to take time
and one heck of an out-
reach program," Turnquist
said.
That outreach is being
funded by revenue from
Fort Hood's recycling pro-
gram, which boasts the
largest facility in the Army
Last year, the recycling
plant processed nearly 10
tons of paper, plastic bot-
tles, scrap metal and alu-
minum cans, bringing in
more than $1.7 million.
After paying salaries and
making physical improve-
ments and repairs, the
money left over will go to-
ward an advertising cam-
paign for the Net Zero
Waste program.
Fort Hood officials, faced
with the prospect of not re-
ceiving any dedicated fund-
ing for the initiative from
the Department of Defense,
say other waste elimination
strategies should not cost
much. "If you do zero waste
correctly, you don't need a
bunch of money," Burrow
said.
Some of the ideas being
considered by Fort Hood
officials are aimed at re-
ducing the waste produced
by the post's transitory pop-
ulation. Because soldiers
and their families fre-


Alexia Bartholomew separates newspaper from white
paper by hand at the recycling facility.


quently move in and out of
Fort Hood, lots of house-
hold goods and old furni-
ture often end up in the
landfill. Officials are hop-
ing to change that with
some relatively simple so-
lutions currently being con-
sidered by work groups:
Instituting semiannual
postwide garage sales
where departing families
could sell items to those
moving in. While families
occasionally have individ-
ual yard sales, officials
hope postwide sales will
get more participation. The
Army post is also looking at
establishing a program
similar to the Trash for
Treasure program used at
UT, where departing stu-
dents donate goods that in-
coming students can buy
Opening a furniture re-
pair shop where residents
and employees could bring
their old items instead of
throwing them away
Leveraging the post's
purchasing power to re-
quire vendors to support
the Net Zero effort by


reusing materials and recy-
cling, and establishing
agreements with manufac-
turers for buyback
programs.
Instituting double-
sided computer printing
throughout the post and
promoting the use of
reusable tote bags.
Developing a program
to track reusable items like
old desks and construction
material and storing them
in a central location.
Exploring a postwide
or regional composting
program to capture food
waste, which can account
for 30 percent of the post's
landfill waste.
Expanding an experi-
mental single-stream recy-
cling program, currently in
use at one of the post's
housing villages. While of-
ficials say Fort Hood is not
large enough to support a
dedicated single-stream
processing center, which
receives unsorted recy-
clables, they are looking at
partnership possibilities
with nearby cities.


Get the right people for the right job


We know that a qualified, the bottom-line costs of a bad hire
well-trained talent pool is add up when hiring costs, compen-
as critical to business station, disruption to the business
growth and development as busi- and mistakes, failures and missed
ness growth and develop- opportunities are fac-
ment is to the economic tored in. Resoomay esti-
health of our community. mates that hiring the
In large part, it's about wrong second-level man-
hiring the right people ager at an annual salary
for the right job. of $62,000, and keeping
This is what Michael them on the payroll for 2
Alter, president of Sure- 1/2 years, will cost you
Payroll, one of the na- $840,000. I am not kid-
tion's leading online ding.
payroll services, had to L That calculation actu-
say about the issue for Laura Byrnes ally tracks what Brad
Inc.com: "Hiring is a WORKFORCE and Geoff Smart came up
tough business. It takes CONNECTION with in their best-selling
patience, proper screen- book, "Topgrading."
ing and careful analysis. After interviewing more
With so many talented people out of than 50 organizations, and adding in
work right now, it's going to take the time wasted, lost production,
some time to find the one who re- and other collateral costs, they esti-
ally fits the bill." mated the true cost of a mis-hire of
Time and, if you don't get it right, someone making $100,000 was $1.5
money, million.
Consider what happens if you get Whether their math is bang on or
it wrong. Resoomay, a company that not, it does drive home the basic no-
developed software to help evalu- tion that there's no such thing as a
ate job candidates, suggested that free bad-hire. That's one very big


reason why Workforce Connection
has the tools and a team of profes-
sional, experienced business devel-
opment managers to help you with
new hires. I'm talking about helping
with everything from developing
job descriptions, posting open posi-
tions, recruiting, screening and as-
sessments, interviewing all at no
charge to you. For eligible job can-
didates, we may even help offset the
employers' costs of on-the-job
training.
But what if you've already got it
right, what if you've hired the per-
fect employee or a whole slew of
perfect employees? What can you
do to ensure they remain qualified
and well-trained for today's dy-
namic workplace?
Mike Hall, president and CEO of
Nature Coast Emergency Medical
Services, has the answer: Work-
force Connection's Employed
Worker Training (EWT) program.
Nature Coast EMS has served Cit-
rus County for nearly 12 years and
is the county's exclusive, nonprofit
Advanced Life Support (ALS) 911
emergency responder and medical


transportation provider There's no
question that, as one of only four
ambulance services in Florida and
130 in the country to earn national
accreditation, they are at the top of
their game. Certainly, for the resi-
dents of Citrus County, having qual-
ified, well-trained first responders
more than contributes to the eco-
nomic health of the community it
can mean the difference between
life and death.
Designed to meet the special re-
quirements of local employers, the
EWT program helps elevate current
employees to better jobs and better
wages within your company
through customized training. The
EWT program helps pay for that
training by reimbursing employers
up to 50 percent of training costs for
a maximum of $20,000.
Priority areas for these funds in-
clude certificate-based training,
training existing employees for ad-
vancement to open up jobs for
entry-level positions, and green
jobs. EWT programs are available


Page D4


Canceling


credit


cards a


hassle

DEAR BRUCE: I
have several open
credit card ac-
counts with no outstand-
ing balances and high
available credit limits. It
worries me because of the
identity-theft epidemic.
My problem is I have
written to several credit
companies in the past and
requested that my ac-
counts be closed due to
non-usage. I also sent
copies to the three credit
agencies. Equifax re-
turned my letter, along
with a note saying it didn't
know what I wanted. That
frightened me. I thought
my letters had effectively
closed my accounts, but
not so.
Online, the accounts are
still listed, but with a mes-
sage that there is a prob-
lem with the account or
that they are experiencing
some difficulties with
their system.
Last year, one of my ac-
counts canceled by writ-
ten request was
reactivated in a scam. The
company "credited" my
closed account with $10,
which they told me in a
letter I could keep if I
used my credit card by
some deadline. Of course
I did not use the account,
so they debited my ac-
count for the measly $10
and I now have an open,
active account again. I
have received new cards
and am getting a state-
ment again.
Is that legal? How can I
absolutely get my ac-
counts closed without
them still being active
with the credit compa-
nies/banks? Kim in San
Diego
DEAR KIM: There is no
question that identity
theft is alive and well. On
the other hand, there is no
point in getting an ulcer
over this.
First, you should under-
stand that your maximum
liability, even if there is
identity theft, is only $50
- not something to keep
you awake at night. When
you wrote to Equifax, your
letter probably got to a
low-level clerk who could
not figure out which way
was up.
I would send another
letter, this time by certi-
fied mail with return re-
ceipt requested, to
Equifax and to the compa-
nies that are issuing these
cards. Be very clear that
you wish to close the ac-
counts and, if possible,
clip the cards in half and
enclose them. In addition,
ask the companies to ac-
knowledge that the ac-
counts have been closed.
I know this is a nui-
sance, but it's part of the
society we live in. These
companies do not want
you to cancel, because an
account on the books has
value. If you are insistent
enough, eventually the ac-
counts will be canceled.
Even if something does go
wrong, you'll have fully
documented that you re-
quested they be canceled.
DEAR BRUCE: Just
wanted to let you know
that my mother and I used
to listen to you regularly
during the '80s. It was al-
ways a period I could re-
flect on as a happy time,
having shared it with my


Page D4









D2

SUNDAY
JANUARY 22, 2012


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


numberr Connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Sunday fun at Manatee Festival


The 25th annual Manatee
Festival continues today!
The Manatee Festival &
Fine Art Show continues
today on the streets of down-
town Crystal River. If you
didn't make it to the festival
yesterday, be sure to come
today! From the artists, food,
children's events, a beer gar-
den and marketplace, there
is something for everyone. It
is also a great opportunity to
take one of the educational
boat tours of King's Bay con-
ducted by professional dive
captains to see manatees in
their own environments.
Hours today are 9 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Once again, we thank our
sponsors for their generous


* WHAT: Florida Manatee Festival.
* WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012.
* ADMISSION: $3; children 12 and younger free.
* WHERE: Downtown Crystal River (U.S. 19 at Citrus Av-
enue).
* PARKING: Bus shuttle service from the Crystal River
Mall parking lot $1.
* TOURS: Optional boat tours: $9.


support in making this great
event a reality for our
community:
2012 Manatee Festival
sponsors:
Title sponsor
Progress Energy
Presenting sponsor
Crystal Automotive


Platinum sponsor
Tampa Bay Times
Gold sponsors
Hometown Values
Bright House Networks
Sibex Electronics
Silver sponsor
Citrus 95


F


oL OoR


Bronze sponsors
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center


Credit Union
Job Site Services
Childhood Development
Services


Suncoast Schools Federal Nature Coast EMS


Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center


Member spotlight
"We are servant leaders. We do
the right thing. We don't settle."
These are the guiding principles
of the skilled and compassionate
associates, physicians and vol-
unteers at Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center who bring
health care excellence to your
community.
Since 1978, Seven Rivers Re-
gional has served the residents
of Citrus, Levy and south Marion
counties. Located four miles
north of the Crystal River Mall
on U.S. 19, the hospital is peace-
fully tucked away from busy
streets, surrounded by mature
live oaks and native pines.
Fully accredited by The Joint
Commission, Seven Rivers Re-
gional is designated a Certified
Primary Stroke Center To ensure
the highest level of stroke care, the
hospital maintains the Stroke
Emergency Specialists alliance
with UF and Shands and volun-
tarily participates in the Ameri-
can Stroke Association's "Get With
The Guidelines" quality initiative.
Should emergency care be
needed, the hospital's ER Extra
program emphasizes extra fast,
extra easy and extra great pa-
tient care. View ER wait times
online, via smartphone or by tex-
ting your ZIP code to ERTIME
(378463).
Surgery is one of the most ac-
tive programs at Seven Rivers
Regional. The hospital main-
tains seven advanced, full-


LIj
~-


~in


-A' ]
Staff members of Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center discuss the new high-definition technology in one
of the Smart ORs.


service operating suites (two
with "smart" integrated high def-
inition technology) and one urol-
ogy operating room. A wide
range of robotic, endoscopic, la-
paroscopic, thoracic, orthopedic,
urological and vascular proce-
dures are available.
The hospital's state-of-the-art
Cardiovascular Center offers di-
agnostic cardiac catheterization
and percutaneous coronary inter-
vention by board certified medical


and interventional cardiologists.
Seven Rivers Regional is also
home to Citrus County's only
comprehensive medical rehabil-
itation unit, a place where pa-
tients receive around-the-clock
nursing care and physical, occu-
pational and speech therapy six
days a week, up to three hours
each day For many patients, this
aggressive approach reduces re-
covery time after a major illness
or injury and results in signifi-


cantly better and longer lasting
outcomes.
Hospital associates and affili-
ated physicians maintain an ac-
tive role in the community,
offering free health education
workshops, attending health
fairs and sponsoring nonprofit
organizations that support
health-related programs.
For a complete list of hospital
services and community events,
visit SevenRiversRegional.com.


A


Copp Winery
Festival Champion
Citrus County Chronicle
See you there!


Chamber Calendar
of Events
* Feb. 9: After Hours
Business Mixer-
Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute.
* Feb. 10: February
Chamber Luncheon at
The Plantation Inn,
Crystal River.
* Feb. 21: After Hours
Business Networking
Mixer Cypress Cove
Care Center, Crystal
River.
* Feb. 22: BWA February
Luncheon College of
Central Florida.
* March 3: Floral City
Strawberry Festival -
Floral Park in Floral
City.
For information, call
352-795-3149, or visit
www.citruscounty
chamber.com.


FACEBOOK USERS


Next Generation Professionals announce Goal Setting Workshop


Next Generation Professionals of
the Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce has partnered with College
of Central Florida to offer profes-
sional development workshops that
provide hands-on experience.
These workshops provide career-
minded individuals younger than
45 with the knowledge, skills and
abilities (KSAs) needed for long-
term success.
The first workshop, "Get a Grip!
Goal-Setting for Success," is 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Col-
lege of Central Florida in Lecanto.


7th Heaven Salon


Attend this workshop to learn
what it takes to get control and
move your life in the right direc-
tion. Successful professionals know
things rarely turn out the way you
desire if all you do is daydream
about them. It's not enough simply
to want something you must
identify the goal and structure
yourself around achieving it. You'll
learn and practice simple, proven,
goal-setting techniques and leave
with a plan for taking control of
your future.
Registration fee is $40 for Citrus


I Next
Generation
Professionals


County Chamber of Commerce
members; $49 for non-members.
Lunch is provided. Call 352-249-
1210 to register.
For additional information about
NGP, call the Citrus County Cham-


7th Heaven Salon is a new Chamber member that recently celebrated its Chamber mem-
bership with a ribbon cutting. With a special focus on stylish haircuts, hair extensions, ker-
atin express treatments, shellac manicures, spa pedicures, spray tanning, eyebrow and
facial sugaring and 15-minute teeth whitening, 7th Heaven is a one-stop salon located at
3353 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Inverness. For information, call 352-344-HAIR or visit
www.7heavenSalon.com.


ber of Commerce at 352-795-3149 or
visit facebook.com/ngpcitrus..
Next Generation Professionals of
the Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce is dedicated to making the
community we live in a better place
for all citizens.
NGP connects, engages and em-
powers young professionals in
their professional and personal
lives through networking events,
professional development work-
shops and community involvement.
Learn more on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/ngpcitrus.


* We know you like us,
so now "LIKE" us on
Facebook!
* Use your smartphone
to scan the QR code
above. It will take you to
the Citrus County
Chamber of Com-
merce's Facebook page.
* Don't have a smart-
phone? Visit the page at
http://www.facebook.
com/CitrusChamber.
* Visit the website at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com.


2012 Chamber Board of Directors


MATTHEW BECK/For the Chamber
Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill installed the officers for the Chamber's 2012 Board of
Directors at the Chamber's luncheon on Jan. 13. From left are: Previous Past Chair -
Rob Wardlow, Williams, McCranie, Wardlow and Cash; Chair Bill Winkel, Winkel Con-
struction; Chair Elect- John Murphy, Citrus County Chronicle; Secretary Ken Frink,
Citrus County Director of Public Works; Susan Gill, Supervisor of Elections. Missing: Treas-
urer Gerry Mulligan, Citrus County Chronicle.


-


oD


.%,





CIRCUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Villages appoints
VP in Citrus Hills
The Villages of Citrus Hills
has appointed David Pisano its
vice president of sales and
marketing.
Heralded as one of the Top
50 Best Master-Planned Com-
munities in the United States by
the nationally distributed Where
to Retire magazine, Citrus Hills
offers Florida living in a variety
of village styles including both
traditional single-family homes
and easy maintenance de-
tached villas.
The stylish neighborhoods
are highlighted by gated en-
trances for added privacy and
impeccably manicured land-
scaping to create an excep-
tional country club environment
catering to the demands of
today's family and active retire-
ment lifestyles.
All choices provide owners
with convenient access to the
many recreational and club fa-
cilities including 4 champi-
onships golf courses, three
clubhouses, an activity center,
multiple dining venues, both in-
door and outdoor swimming
pools, the 45,000 BellaVita Spa
& Fitness Center and two ten-
nis centers, featuring Skyview's
Har Tru and hard surface
courts.
To further complement the
resident's calendar, The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills offers more
than 250 planned activities,
events and clubs each month.
David Pisano brings to The
Villages of Citrus Hills 25 years
of experience in the real estate
industry which includes manag-
ing successful master-planned
communities throughout the
Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, South-
east and the Northeast.
As a senior executive of one
of the nation's top home-build-
ing companies, Pisano was
continually recognized as an in-
tegral component to superior
customer satisfaction levels,
while assembling respectable
talent and delivering high qual-
ity product and amenities.
Pisano, his wife Diana, and
their four children call Terra
Vista of Citrus Hills home.
Stephen Tamposi, a principal
for Citrus Hills Investment Prop-
erties, developer of The Vil-
lages of Citrus Hills, said,
"adding David as our team
leader is an important strategic
complement to our business
plan. His reputation of deliver-
ing results is surpassed only by
his commitment to achieving
superior customer satisfaction
levels.
"We explored a variety of op-
tions and believe David will
help achieve the greatest return
for this community, while ensur-
ing optimal value for our more
than 7,300 property owners."
The Welcome Center for The
Villages of Citrus Hills is at
2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd. in
Hernando.
Visit the websiteonline at
www.CitrusHills.com.


New Concepts stylist
Ia I ~ a


Special to the Chronicle
Georgeann Nealey has joined the team of stylists at New
Concepts Hair Salon in Crystal River. Originally from Citrus
County, Nealey provided salon services for 10 years here to
her guests before moving to Texas and working at some
high-end salons. Nealey said, "my stylist experience in Texas
provided a great opportunity to improve my skills, and now
I'm bringing them back to Citrus County. I am really glad to
be back, and it is great to see all of my wonderful guests
and friends." Nealey can be contacted at 352-563-0005 or
at NewConceptsHairSalon.com.


Raby advances in
FL Park Service
Christoper Raby, 1993 Citrus
High School graduate, was re-
cently promoted to assistant
park manager
of Matanzas
River Geolog-
ical Park,
which con-
sists of
Faver-Dykes
State Park
and Washing-
ton Oaks Chribstopher
State Park-. Florida State
Both are just Park System.
south of St.
Augustine.
Raby started in May 1998 as
an ops (operations staffer) at
Fort Cooper State Park.
In September 1998, he was
hired full time at Collier-Semi-
nole State Park in the
Everglades.
In February 2000, he trans-
ferred to Anastasia State Park
in St. Augustine. His duties in-
cluded supervising the Junior
Ranger program, moving sea
turtle nests to safer locations
and relocating the endangered
Anastasia Beach Mouse when
the government refurbished the
beaches.
In November 2003, he trans-
ferred to Matanzas River State
Park Systems, assuming all
maintenance and remodeling
duties.
While being employed by the
state, Raby has received more
than 20 awards, attended many
schools and seminars, taught at
the Ranger Academy and has
been named District 3 em-
ployee of the month twice.
In February 2005, Raby com-
pleted an intense program on
"Ignition, Attack and Command"
for fighting fires, became burn
and crew boss and received his
burn certificate.
Training was provided by the
National Wildlife Coordinating
Group, consisting of Florida Di-


vision of Forestry, Forestry Of-
fice of Camp Blanding, St.
Johns River Management Dis-
trict, Florida Park Service, Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency,
Forest Service, Department of
Agriculture, Marion County First
and Rescue and U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service.
At that time, only five Florida
Stat Park rangers had com-
pleted this extremely difficult
course.
His proud parents are
Wayne and Mary Lou Raby of
Inverness.


Coupon class
offered Feb. 4
Learn how to save 50 per-
cent or more on your groceries
using practical methods that
can make a difference. A
coupon class will be offered
from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 4, at the Ceili, N.E. Fifth
St., downtown Crystal River.
Cost is $10 cash at the door.
The class itinerary includes:
learning to shop strategically;
understanding sales cycles;
finding the lowest advertised
price; collecting and organizing
coupons; using coupons and
online resources effectively,
and discussing other ways to
maximize your savings.
Because space is limited, ad-
vance registration is required.
For information or to register,
email thesunshinesliopper
@gmail.com or visit http://
thesunshineshopper.com.
HPH Hospice doctor
on national board
David McGrew, M.D., med-
ical director of HPH Hospice for
more than 25 years, has been
appointed to
serve on the
National
Board for
Hospice Med-
ical Director
Certification
organizing
board. This
board, in con- McGrew
junction with H H se
the American HPH Hospice.
Academy of Hospice and Pal-
liative Medicine (AAHPM) will
work to raise the standard of


S CITRUS- 5 COUNT N

CHIkoNCiE


care provided by hospice med-
ical directors nationally.
McGrew is a founding mem-
ber of the American Academy
of Hospice and Palliative Medi-
cine and is the past president of
the Florida chapter. Since 2000,
McGrew has been President of
the Hospice and Palliative
Physician Services LLC, a
physician group providing
home care to hospice and pal-
liative medicine patients in
Pasco, Hernando and Citrus
counties.
Citrus Memorial
welcomes CMO
On Friday, Jan. 20, Citrus
Memorial Health System an-
nounced the appointment of
Dr. Lester
Martinez-
Lopez as
Chief Medical
Officer.
Martinez-
Lopez joins
Citrus Memo-
rial with al-
most 34 Dr. Lester
years of ex- Martinez-
perience in Lopez
the medical Memorial
field. He Health System.
comes most
recently from Martinez Medical
Consulting LLC, where he
served as president.
In this role he provided con-
sultation services for clinical
and medical research organiza-
tions, helping to identify best
practices regarding medical
quality improvement, patient
safety, medical education and
utilization management.
Prior to his work with Mar-


tinez Medical Consulting, Mar-
tinez-Lopez was Chief Medical
Officer at Brandon Regional
Hospital where he provided
leadership in optimizing med-
ical staff performance and par-
ticipation in patient safety,
patient service experience,
quality improvement initiatives
and regulatory affairs.
In 2005, Martinez-Lopez re-
tired from the U.S. Army with
the permanent rank of major
general as the first Hispanic to
head the Army Medical Re-
search and Materiel Command
at Fort Detrick, Md. His respon-
sibilities included directing the
Army's worldwide medical re-
search, acquisition, and logis-
tics program. He oversaw a
vast research portfolio that in-
cluded cancer, trauma, infec-
tious diseases, biodefense,
chemical defense, nutrition, en-
vironmental health, aviation
medicine and telemedicine re-
search. In addition, he directed
the premier national biological
and chemical defense laborato-
ries and research program and
led the development of the Na-
tional Biodefense Campus at
Fort Detrick, Md.
Prior to these duties he was
the commanding general of the
Center for Health Promotion
and Preventive Medicine at
Edgewood, Md. In this assign-
ment he directed a worldwide
public health organization, re-
sponsible for preventive medi-
cine, health promotion and
wellness, global medical sur-
veillance, occupational and en-
vironmental health, and health


Page D4


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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 D3





D4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


DIGEST
Continued from Page D2

risk communication. During his
previous military career he was
the commander of three distinct
hospitals, oversaw military
health support during Hurricane
Mitch in Central America, and
served as the chief medical offi-
cer of the United Nation's Mis-
sion in Haiti.
Martinez-Lopez received his
medical and post-graduate
training at the University of
Puerto Rico School of Medicine
and received a Master of Public
Health from Johns Hopkins
University.
He is board-certified in Fam-
ily Practice and Aerospace
Medicine. Martinez-Lopez is a
Fellow of the American Acad-
emy of Family Practice, mem-
ber of the American College of
Physician Executives, member
of Delta Omega Public Health
Honor Society, Board Member
of the National Alliance for His-
panic Health and Vice Presi-
dent of the Board of Puerto
Rico's Comprehensive Cancer
Center.
"Dr. Martinez will bring with
him a wealth of medical and
clinical experience," said Ryan
Beaty, president and chief ex-
ecutive officer of Citrus Memo-
rial Health System. "We're
thrilled to have him join our sen-
ior management team where
he will play a key role in the
organization."
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is a 198-bed, not-for-profit
community hospital that pro-
vides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. More
than 150 physicians and 1,000
employees provide a wide
range of services at the Inver-
ness campus and at medical
offices and clinics in Citrus and
Sumter counties. Citrus Memo-
rial is fully accredited by the
Joint Commission and is fully li-
censed by the state of Florida.


BUSINESS


Shredding event
set in Inverness
BizCo of Citrus County Inc.,
plans a shredding event Feb.
11 in the Bealls parking area,
2851 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness. A shredder truck
from Ocala will be present at
this location from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m. to provide for the shred-
ding and lawful disposal of sen-
sitive documents and papers.
Almost anything with sensitive
data, including CDs and DVDs,
can be included.
Individuals and business
owners may bring their docu-
ments and papers which re-
quire shredding. Everything that
will fit into a 10-ream copy
paper box, 11.5 by 17.5 by 10
inches, will be shredded for a
fee of $10.
Business records of any kind
should never just be tossed into
the trash or re-cycling bin
where they can become a
windfall for identity-theft crimi-
nals. All business records which
have no further use should be
shredded.
Individuals should pay spe-
cial attention to the mail, as this
is a favorite source for identity
theft. Anything with your name
and address (or account num-
ber) should be shredded. This
includes most bills.
LifeSouth, nonprofit partner of
BizCo of Citrus County, will
have the Bloodmobile at this lo-
cation also, and is asking for
your blood donations. Life
South will provide hot dogs and
soft drinks to donors. Your blood
donation can save three lives.
BizCo of Citrus County Inc., is
a not-for-profit cooperative of
business professionals who
have specialized knowledge in
the 15 essential areas that make
a business successful. BizCo of
Citrus County Inc. exists to help
businesses in Citrus County.
Whether you are starting a new
business, or are already in busi-
ness but need to plan the next
step to make your business suc-
cessful, BizCo of Citrus County


Inc. can assist you.
For information, call 352-628-
6624, or visit www.bizcoteam
citrus.com.
Bay Area earns
Angle's List award
CRYSTAL RIVER- Bay
Area Air Conditioning & Heating
has been awarded the presti-
gious 2011 Angie's List Super
Service Award, an honor be-
stowed annually on approxi-
mately 5 percent of all the
businesses rated on the na-
tion's leading provider of con-
sumer reviews on local service
and health providers.
"This is the third year we
have received this award from
Angie's List, and once again we
are honored," said David
Hutchins, president and
founder of Bay Area Air Condi-
tioning. "We are proud of our
tradition of service and assuring
that all of our customers have
complete satisfaction, whether
it is the installation of a new
system or the repair/mainte-
nance of an existing one," he
added. "We do more, it's why
people trust us we have
earned a reputation for doing
the job right the first time."
"Only a fraction of the busi-
nesses rated on Angie's List
can claim the sterling service
record of being a Super Service
Award winner because we set a
high bar," said Angie's List
Founder Angie Hicks. "The fact
that Bay Area Air Conditioning
can claim Super Service Award
status speaks volumes about
its dedication to consumers."
Angie's List Super Service
Award winners have met strict
eligibility requirements including
earning a minimum number of
reports, an exemplary rating
from their clients and abiding by
Angie's List operational
guidelines.
Ratings are updated daily on
Angie's List, but members can
find the 2011 Super Service
Award logo next to business
names in search results on
AngiesList.com.


Angie's List collects con-
sumer reviews on local contrac-
tors and doctors in more than
500 service categories. More
than 2 million consumers across
the U.S. rely on Angie's List to
help them make the best hiring
decisions. Members get unlim-
ited access to local ratings via
Internet or phone, exclusive dis-
counts, the Angie's List maga-
zine and help from the Angie's
List complaint resolution service.
Grand opening
event set for spa
Just Relax Massage and Spa
plans a grand opening event
from 5 to 8 p.m. Feb. 4 at 3190
Aerial Way, Brooksville, in the
Kohl's and Target shopping
center.
The therapist will offer com-
plimentary 10-minute chair
massages. Staff will serve food,
champagne and more. Visitors
will have a chance to win a free
60-minute Swedish Relaxation
massage.
For more information, call
352-345-4897.
Fundraiser set for
Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County Inc. plans its fifth
annual Building Dreams Wine
& Food Pairing Benefit from 6
to 10 p.m. Thursday, March 8,
at Skyview Clubhouse at Terra
Vista. Enjoy gourmet food
paired with exquisite wines, ac-
companied by the smooth
sounds of live jazz/R&B/soul
and a silent auction.
Tickets are $50 in advance
and $60 at the door (if avail-
able). For tickets and informa-
tion, call 352-563-2744. Every
dollar raised at this event helps
pay for the lumber and nails,
cement and shingles, plumbers
and permits needed to take a
new home from sitework to
move-in.
Habitat not only helps elimi-
nate substandard housing, but
provides business for local con-
struction services, tax dollars
for local government, and stabi-


lization of local neighborhoods.
The Habitat for Humanity
Wishing Well Fundraiser draw-
ing will take place during the
benefit. Tickets for $1 each are
now on sale at the Inverness
and Crystal River ReStores, or
call 352-563-2744. Tickethold-
ers need not be present to win.
All proceeds assist Habitat
for Humanity of Citrus County's
mission to build decent, afford-
able homes for low-income
families.
SECO wins awards
for community aid
Sumter Electric Cooperative
(SECO) has won two distinct in-
ternational "Communitas
Awards" for the co-op's lead
role in the Camp Boggy Creek
Project in Lake County and for
SECO's overall Commitment to
Community.
SECO won in the Company
Sponsored Volunteer Project
category and won in the most
prestigious category in the
competition, which was the
Leadership in Community Serv-
ice & Corporate Social Respon-
sibility category.
Camp Boggy Creek is an in-
ternationally known camp for
very seriously ill children. The
camp is the only multi-disease
therapeutic camp program in
Florida that provides medically
supervised, recreational activi-
ties for children with chronic or
life threatening illnesses.
SECO won the Company
Sponsored Volunteer Project
category because of the co-
op's leading role in making
Camp Boggy Creek's 14 family
cabins more energy efficient
through duct repair, caulking,
weather stripping, etc.
In addition, a brand new 32
panel solar system was in-
stalled to heat the camp's pool.
The pool is used for recreation
and for therapy and was being
heated by expensive propane.
The Leadership in Commu-
nity Service & Corporate Social
Responsibility award was pre-
sented to SECO for its overall


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

commitment to the communi-
ties it serves, the co-op's em-
ployee support for the many
humanitarian needs in our vari-
ous counties, SECO's support
and participation in our local
chambers and economic devel-
opment organizations, the
SECO Angel Fund activities
and much, much more.
The judges were obviously
impressed with the depth and
consistency of SECO's efforts
on behalf of the people living in
its service territory.
Communitas is Latin for peo-
ple coming together for the
good of the community. These
awards are sponsored by the
Association of Marketing and
Communications Professionals
and recognize exceptional busi-
nesses, organizations and indi-
viduals that are unselfishly
giving of themselves and their
resources and those that are
changing how they do business
to benefit their communities.
Restaurant uses
inflatable bull
BEVERLY HILLS If you
haven't seen a 30-foot-tall bull,
now's your chance. Skeet's
Family Barbeque has invited
"Skeet" the Bull to spend a few
days in front of the restaurant to
help announce it is now serving
breakfast.
When Skeet's opened last
year, it had originally served
breakfast and lunch. After a few
months, managers decided to
forgo breakfast for a dinner
service.
Now almost in its second
year, they are pleased to again
serve breakfast at the request
of their many customers.
For information on Skeet's
Family Barbeque or the new
breakfast menu, visit 3887 N.
Lecanto Highway in Beverly
Hills, go to www.skeetsbbq.com
or call Charlene Sestito, man-
ager, at 352-527-7250.
Skeet's Family Barbeque is
open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday to Saturday and from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.


WORKFORCE
Continued from Page Dl

to for-profit, private companies as
well as nonprofits.
Right now, Nature Coast EMS is
training Emergency Medical
Technicians (EMTs) in advanced
life support in order to become
paramedics. Nature Coast EMS
dispatches an ALS paramedic
team for every 911 emergency call
in the county.
"It's going incredibly well ..'.'
Mike Hall said of the EWT pro-
gram. "We find they are engaged
in the class as well as engaged as


employees. They feel we've in-
vested in them, and that makes
them even better team members."
I can almost hear the chorus of
"yes, buts" out there. You think
that because dollars are involved,
you're in for a big ball of sticky, red
bureaucratic tape.
Listen to what Jane Bedford has
to say on the subject Jane, a reg-
istered nurse and Nature Coast
EMS' education director, said it
has been "absolutely awesome"
working with Workforce on the
project and that her business de-
velopment liaison made "every-
thing very clear."
"(Workforce) did a very good
job," she said. "Without that


(EWT) funding, our team mem-
bers would not be able to do (ad-
vanced training)."
Again, there is no charge for our
employer services. Interested? If
so, the person you need to talk is
Business Development Manager
Frank Calascione.
"EWT is really a win-win for
both the employer and the em-
ployee being trained," Frank ex-
plained recently "The employer
gets a more qualified worker and
can use that to market their busi-
ness and improve quality. The em-
ployee is trained to a higher
standard than before and has
greater value to the employer and
therefore has better prospects for


advancement."
If you'd like to find out if you're
eligible for the EWT program, get
in touch with Frank at 352-637-
2223 or send him an email at
fcalascione@clmworkforce.com.
Like Frank said, the Employed
Worker Training program is "win-
win." It's also one more way that
Workforce Connection demon-
strates we mean business.


Laura Bymes, APR is a certified
workforce professional and
communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Contact
her at 352-291-9559 or 800-434-
5627, ext. 1234, orlbyrnes@


clmworkforce.com. Workforce
Connection is a member of the
Employ Florida network of
workforce services and re-
sources. Workforce Connection is
an equal-opportunity
employer/program. Auxiliary
aids and services are available
upon request to individuals with
disabilities. All voice telephone
numbers listed above may be
reached by persons using
TTY/TDD equipment via the
Florida Relay Service at 711. If
you need accommodations, call
352-840-5700, ext 7878 or email
accommoda tions@clm workforce.
com. Make request at least three
business days in advance.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

mother Good to know you're
still around.
My question is, I am plan-
ning on going into the finan-
cial arena, dealing with
insurance of various types,
among other things. What is
your advice for making an
honest and successful go at
this endeavor? L.P, Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.
DEAR LP: Thanks for the
kind words. I have enjoyed
talking to so many of you guys
during the past 30 years.
You are going into a tough
area. Financial advice has to
be carefully dispensed to be
certain it does not appear
that you are acting in your
own interest rather than the
clients'.
Be sure you give each po-
tential client the time that is
necessary to point out things
that can be subject to misin-
terpretation. It may be that
an annuity is the best way for
someone to go, but you must
be extraordinarily careful to
demonstrate that you are
choosing the annuity route
not because of the high com-
mission that may be gener-
ated, but because the product
is legitimately useful for the
client's circumstance.
Be prepared to answer
questions with candor It is
not appropriate for clients to
ask how much you earn on
the sale of an insurance-type
vehicle (annuity), but you
may tell them that you get a
commission on the sale, that
it is how you make your living
and that you would not rec-
ommend this particular
product unless it was totally
appropriate.
You must establish a rela-
tionship, even if it means
doing some things that gener-
ate no commission, to let your
potential clients know you
have their best interest at


heart.
DEAR BRUCE: Perhaps
you can shed some light on a
question that truly bothers
me and perhaps many others.
Why is it that I am required to
pay income taxes on my So-
cial Security, my retirement
pension and the interest
earned on my savings ac-
counts? I have been retired
for 21 years and am 83 years
old. It doesn't seem fair that I
have to pay but large compa-
nies are allowed massive
write-offs on their taxes. I
seem to recall that I had al-
ready paid taxes on the
salary that I earned before I
received my take-home pay-
check. I feel like Uncle Sam
is "double dipping." After 40
years of working and serving
Uncle Sam, something seems
wrong to me. I worked hard
and steady, and put my
money in CDs and IRAs. I left
my 401(k) with my employer
when I retired. How much
more am I expected to pay if
I or my heirs decide to cash
everything out? -EA,Attle-
boro, Mass.
DEAR EA: You mention
you are 83. I am looking at
your handwritten letter, and
in my best days, my writing
was nowhere near as clear
and easy to read as yours is
now.
As to your comments,
there's not a thing in the
world you can do about it If
anybody told me 25 years ago
that you'd be paying income
tax on your Social Security if
your other income was rea-
sonably high in the govern-
ment's opinion, I would have
told them they were smoking
crazy cigarettes. But that is
the case now.
The analogy of the large
companies really isn't as
valid as you may think. The
headline writers are very
happy to write about all the
big companies that pay no
taxes, but in reality they are
paying tens if not hundreds of
millions of dollars in taxes in


one form or another But that
doesn't sell newspapers or
magazines.
Certainly, many taxes
you're paying now are on
funds that you already paid
taxes on. These decisions are
made by your government
(Congress), and there's noth-
ing I know of that will change
that No matter how you slice
it, our government is desper-
ate to raise more money, and
if you were to talk to many of
these people, they'd tell you
"you can afford it," which in
my opinion is utter nonsense.
But you may as well get used
to it, because that's the way
it's going to be. I don't like it
any more than do you and
probably millions of others.
DEAR BRUCE: I know a
young couple who are getting
a place of their own. Would it
be best for them to buy or
rent? In the future they plan
to move to another state, but
not sure how far in the future
this is. Whichever way they
decide to go, rent or buy, they
will need help monetarily
Any thoughts? Grand-


mother in Arizona
DEAR GRANDMOTHER:
Unhappily, there is no one-
size-fits-all guideline. There
are so many variables.
If the young couple plans to
move in a relatively short
time, it's a no-brainer: rent!
You're not locked in, you
have no money invested and
it's pretty easy to move.
Leases can be broken.
If they're planning on
being at this location for at
least three years prefer-
ably five years or more in
today's depressed market,
buying a home makes a lot of
sense. This assumes the cou-
ple has enough income to ei-
ther put down at least 20
percent of the purchase price
or put aside at least 20 per-
cent for emergencies. If that's
the case, they must shop
carefully and understand the
neighborhood they're moving
into.
DEAR BRUCE: In May, I
should have all of my credit
cards and medical bills paid.
However, we still owe more
than $20,000 on our vehicle


and $115,000 on our home.
Where would it be wisest to
put any extra money? Should
we pay off our car to elimi-
nate that faster or pay toward
our home to build more eq-
uity? J.P in Idaho Falls,
Idaho
DEAR J.P: Other things
being equal, and without the
specific numbers in hand, it
likely would be better to pay
off the car rather than make
extra payments on your mort-
gage. There are two variables
here: 1) Any interest you pay
on your mortgage will result
in a modest tax benefit.
There is no tax benefit when
paying on the car unless it is a
business vehicle. 2) Unless
you have an old mortgage
that you have never refi-
nanced, you likely are paying
considerably less interest on
the mortgage than you are on


the vehicle. If those two vari-
ables are as I have surmised,
you'd be far better off paying
off the car first
Once that obligation is re-
tired, you might wish to con-
sider paying more on your
home. Again, there are some
variables. If you are an astute
investor, very likely you
would be earning more on
the money by investing it
than paying down the mort-
gage. If, on the other hand,
you are one of those folks -
and there are lots of you -
who are absolutely risk-
averse, then paying off the
mortgage is the better choice.


Send your questions to
Smart Money PO. Box 2095,
Elfers, FL 34680. Send
email to bruce@
brucewilliams.com.


Take Stock in Children of Citrus County presents


"Dollars for Scholars"

&0 Doo-Wop OA


Tickets
$10


Sunday, February 5,2012 ~ 3 p.m.
Curtis Peterson Auditorium
Located in the Lecanto School Complex
hits of the '50s and .. .
Lola and the Saints' songs from their new CD
"Embraceable You"
Tickets are available at: TSIC ( ..
CCSO Operations Center, Inverness, >
CCSO Emergency Operations Center, Lecanto,
& Havana House Restaurant, Lecanto. Tok Stpck in
Tickets will also be available at the door. oooscChildrerf ..
For ticet i *iImat I,."please call 352-422-2348


Pinecasle R -- ..i1"'V IrIistI a&nd
S I 'I f ^ Winner In Concert...












The Lar ry Stvepno luegass Band

Friday, January 27, 2012
Doors Open 6 p.m. Show 7 p.m. 9 p.m.
St. Timothy Lutheran Church
1070 North Suncoast Blvd.* Crystal River, FL
Tickets and general info. (352) 795-5325 or 634-2388
A limited number of tickets may be available at the door the day of
the show. Tickets are free. A love offering will be collected.
For more info visit wwwJarrystephensonband.com &
OOOACLW wwwsttimothylutherancrystalriver.com






CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY





HkONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


K 5TH-^ ia0:1is


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 D5


Classifieds



Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines


Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily

Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday

Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday

Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday

West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


A GENT, 69-79+ with old
fashion manors. Would
be my ideal friend, to
share simple joys. If you
are tender hearted,
optimistic and like
laughter, it would be
great to hear from you.
Send response to
Blind Box 1752 M
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Bvd. Crys. Riv. Fl. 34429

Emily, Hi Honey, I have
not talked to you in
quite a while. Bought
new phone, new com-
pany and new answer-
ing machine. Address
is the same phone
number is 352-419-7673.
Call or stop by.
Your Lover, Rodie
Would a handsome
man in his seventies
like to meet a still
attractive widow who
is independent, and
needs desperately a
good man for
company?
Please respond to:
Citrus Chronicle
Blind Box 1751P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River, FI
34429.
WWS seeking female
for friendship. Age not
important. Semi-retired,
NS, ND. Real Estate
interest a plus. Call
Randy(352) 563-1033



INVERNESS
2/2/1.5 Scenic views,
quiet neighborhood,
Irg. yd., tile/berber.
Super clean, $650 Mo.
(352) 476-4896
MEN'S 2X,XL,L UNDER-
SHORTS Tommy Hilfiger,
Lowrider, Playboy.
4 for $1.00
(352) 634-2737
Pontoon 18'
88' Fiesta, 40hp Eviinr
runs great solid fir,
good carpet bimini
capt chrs,'07 gal tril.
w/new tires, $3550
352-586-9498
Side by Side,
whirlpool, white, works
perfectly
$250
(352) 621-0942
YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MORE! Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 425-0109



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Appliances and MORE
Call (352) 224-0698



ADULT CATS
Declawed, spayed &
neutered
(352) 344-3138
America Pit Bull
Black & White 4 months
old female, needs lov-
ing forever home with
NO CATS!!!!

Fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens,bare
soil or as mulch. You load
and haul away.
352-628-9624
FREE CATS
2 Males, 1 Female
4 kittens, 4 weeks
(352) 447-0072
Free Female cat to a
good home,8 years
old, black and white,
short hair, spayed and
declawed, inside cat
only, up to date on
shots, 352-212-1598
Free Horse-Paso Fino,
gelding, very gentle, 22
years old, good health,
to great home only.
(352) 341-0923
Free Pine Cones, great
for crafts, large,
bagged and ready for
pickup. (352) 621-3929
FREE
PLYMOUTH
ROCK ROOSTER
(352) 302-6955
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
To Approved Home
Large Mixed, Dog
By Appt., for Info Call
(352) 794-3768




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
STRAWBERRIES,
CABBAGE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inv. GIFT SHIPPING
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
CLOSED SUN
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500


LOST seT of Keys, bweet-
Bay in Crystal River on
1/19/2012, On a
Jiegermeister key
chain, has a key fob on
it, please call, I really
need my keys. Thank
you.352-794-0215,ask
for Michelle.






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519




Disable Veterans
trailer lic plate found at
boat dock on 44, it has
been turned in to Inver-
ness Police dept.
Found
Female Tri Color Cat
Near Bealls Parking Lot
Inverness
(352) 344-0024
Found male dog,
found on 01/16, near
Hwy 200 in Hernando,
white with brown
markings, call to
identify, (352) 601-0989
Found Necklace
Call to identify
Beverly Hills Plaza
(352) 746-2417




AIRPORT RIDES
(352) 746-29291




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500




JOB NEEDED
local CDL Driver/Sales
Rep/ Route Sales etc.
Exc. driving record &
references! e-mail:
apsteephill@
yahoo.com
Need a break? I will sit
with your loved one
during the day.
(352) 503-5007




OFFICE PERSON
Wanted, must have
good computer skills,
self motivated goal
oriented and de-
pendable Hrly+ ben-
efits, Send reseme to
mdp@newair.biz
or fax to
352-628-4427




Spa Rm for Rent
for massage Therapist
or Esthetlclan
By Day, Wk. or Mnthly
Cell (352) 464-1166











Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA/HHA
Alzhelmers Exp.
Call for Details
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352) 637-3111

CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

NOW HIRING

RN'S
All Units, wlth Hospltal
Experience

Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T RN
Oncology Experience
a plus, but not
required. Excellent
pay & benefits.
Fax Resume to:
352-795-2017

Receptionist
& Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Experience
preferred, excel.
pay & benefits.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com

RECEPTIONIST
For Busy Medical
Office
Please Send Resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447




ANGELS
SEEKING ANGELS
Experienced
caregivers
for private duty
in elderly clients' homes.
Seeking AM/PM, weekends
and 24-hr help. References
and full background
check required!
CNA preferred.
Call Visiting Angels
M-F 8-5
(352) 620-8484




INSURANCE
AGENT
Looking for motivated
220 or 440 agent. If you
are dishonest, lazy or
don't care, don't
bother. Apply
Insurance Den
5447 S. Oakridge Dr.
Homosassa
352-628-56129
insuranceden@
aol.com
Key Training
Center

F/T Outside Sales
position-soliciting
advertising sales
for radio station. Ex-
perience preferred.
High school
diploma/GED re-
quired.

Apply in person at
Key Training Center
Business Office-
5399 W Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto FL
34461. *EOE*

Sunshine Gardens
Crystal River
Assisted Living facility
is opening soon.

state-of-the art,
loving home We cur-
rently are seeking a
full time
MARKETING DIRECTOR
Ideal candidate
will be a dynamic,
self-starter with a
bachelor's degree
minimum and two
years outside or
business to business
sales experience
with demonstrated
success. Candidate
must also possess
strong networking,
marketing, and
closing skills. Must be
able to self-manage,
be a team player,
and have a passion
for the elderly. Base
salary plus commis-
sions, based on exp.
Please e-mail resume
and cover letter to
hr@sgwseniors.com.




CHG&CC
is now accepting
applications for all

positions.

Please apply in
person Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:30pm at
The Grille Restaurant
505 E Hartford St
Hernando. No phone
calls please.

*EXP. COOKS
& SERVERS
Apply in person
Mon-Fri. 9am-11am
COACH'S
114 W. Main St.
Inverness EOE
EXP. LINE COOK

Apply in Person 2492 N.
Essex Ave., Hernando
NO PHONE CALLS
EXP. LINE COOK

Aoolv in Person
at Cracker's
Bar & Grill


F/T, Receptionist
/Hostess
needed for
high end country
club restaurant.
Experience required.
Applicants must be
professional, organ-
ized and able to
multi-task. Resumes
& applications
accepted Tues-Fri
from 2:00-4:00pm at
2100 N Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando





2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427




CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES

The Citrus County
Chronicle
Is seeking an
energetic Individual
to consult businesses
on the use of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire
to work In a fast
paced, fun,
environment please
apply today.
Essential Functions
* Develop classified
customers through
cold calling and
prospecting
* Strong rapport
bulldlng,professlonal
communication and
good listening skills
* Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing
* Assisting with all
aspects Legal
advertising.
Qualifications
* High School
diploma or
equivalent
* Prior telemarketing
experience a plus
Send resume to:
marnold@
chronlcleonllne.com

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant

Manager Needed
Openings in mgt. Exp.
Pref'd but not req'd
Training & Benefits
$650 $850. Call Ms.
Watson 352-436-4460

PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL
EXP. SALES TECHS
Needed. Our proven
in home Sales Record
Company Vehicle
Hourly Pay
Commission
Benefits
APPLY 5882 Hwy 200





2 AC SALES TECHS

Needed. Experience
preferred. $60K+
annually + benefits.
Email or Fax Resume
mdp@newair.biz
Fax 352-628-4427

AUTO
TECH/MECHANIC
Apply in person to Allen
Ridge Tire & Auto, 1621
N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto,
FL 34461 (Look for 491
road construction in front
of our shop) Has repaired
a variety of makes and
models of autos, is
familiar with computers,
dependable, and owns
his/her own tools. Clean
driving record required.
Pay based on experience.


Sills
FLOOD, FIRE,
MOLD REMEDIA-
TION TECH
Seeking applicants
with WRT, AMRTand
FSRT certifications.
Also seeking appli-
cants with Xactimate
experience. Please
e-mail your resume to
jd@restorationx.com.

Service Writer

Will train the right
person
Apply at Ridgeline
Tire & Service, Inv.

We are Seeking
Experienced
Contractors
To assist with our
cable installation
needs. Please e-mail
your resume to
fljobs@kablelink.com
or apply at
Kablelink.com
(Career Center).
Email subject line
must say
"Cable Installation
Contractor, Job #26."





$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip. dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

Community
Center Aide
Announcement
# 12-04
Full time position
working at various
Community Centers
assisting the volun-
teers and clients with
activities and special
functions. Must pos-
sess a valid Florida
Driver License. Start-
ing pay $7.69 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online
by Friday, January 27,
2012 EOE/ADA

Floor Technician
Announcement
#12-05
Full time semi skilled
janitorial position
maintaining floors in
various County build-
ings and facilities.
Load and transport
equipment and
supplies. Continuous
moving of office
furniture. Graduation
from H.S or GED cer-
tificate. Knowledge
of floor care such as
stripping, waxing and
buffing. $7.69 hourly
to start. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online
by Friday, January 27,
2012 EOE/ADA


years' management experience. Prior
experience in an ambulatory setting preferred.
National Healing offers comprehensive
training from nationally recognized wound care
experts, a supportive environment and a
competitive salary and benefits package.
Interested candidates may apply online at:
www.nationalhealing.com

Na o


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED

Seniors Welcome
No nights, No wknds.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI



CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule.
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925


LAWN TECHS
Salary + Commission.
Must have HS diploma
or GED, clean FL driver's
license, must be willing
to work. Applicants
from 9a to 5pm Dally
(352) 628-3352




SALES
NATIONAL
~CREMATION
SOCIETY,
Floridas Oldest and
Largest, Seeks
PreNeed Sales
Counselors
for Citrus County
Commission Sales, P/Tseniors

Computer skills a must
Call Dave LeMay at
850-228-4935 or emal resume
to David LeMay sci-us com







Temporary
Employment
Opportunities
Citrus County Parks
& Recreation has
casual temporary
summer positions
available.
Summer Youth Camp
Site Supervisor,
$9.50 hr. 20-40 hours
weekly. Must be at
least 18 years of age.
(2 positions available)
Summer Youth Camp
Coordinator,
$10.50 hr., 20-40
hours weekly. Must
be at least 21 years
of age. (1 position
available)
Summer Youth Camp
Counselor,
$7.69 hr., 20-40 hours.
Must be at least 16
years of age. (30 po-
sitions available)
Lifeguards,
$7.75 hr., flexible
hours. Must be at
least 16 years of age.
(10 positions avail.)
Casual Labor
employment
applications may be
obtained on line at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
and must be
returned to the
Parks & Recreation
Office located at the
Citrus County
Resource Center,
2804 W Marc
Knighton Ct.,
Rm 149, Lecanto, FL
Mailed applications
must be sent to
Citrus County Parks
& Recreation,
2804 W Marc
Knighton Ct, Key 11,
Lecanto, FL
34461-8334 EOE/ADA


COMMUNITY REP
Work with exchange
students from all over
the world! Ayusa is hir-
ing Community Repre-
sentatives to work
part-time with interna-
tional students and
their host families. For
more info call Katherine
855-533-0997 or visit
www.ayusa.org.




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



TAYLORICLLEGE


NEJI)RfW

2 Week Courses!
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FULL SPECIALTY
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
L-- --- J




8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182




Mullet Hut
for sale, Hwy 19 Sunny
Days Plaza, Homosassa
33 yrs in business
cell (607) 743-4662
_


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the




Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!


563-3201 ..


ITALIAN MOVIE
POSTER La Spaccone"
(The Hustler); color,
11" x 17" framed. $25.
352-382-3962
MOVIE POSTER "Color
of Money" Newman &
Cruise. Color, 27" x 40",
framed, billiards theme.
$40. 352-382-3962
MOVIE POSTER "The
Hustler" Paul Newman.
Color, 27" x 40" framed,
billiards theme. $40.
352-382-3962
MOVIE POSTER Jackie
Gleason & Paul Newman
in "The Hustler"; B & W,
12" x 18" framed. $25.
352-382-3962
MOVIE POSTER Jackie
Gleason in "The Hustler";
black & white, 24" x 36"
framed. $35.
352-382-3962












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




Hot tub for 2, new
motor, pump and
heater, Excel. cond.
$700 Firm(352) 563-1933



22 cu ft. refrigerator
good shape. $140
37 Inch, Panasonic TV
$135.
(352) 628-4766
A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES up to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
Amana
Washer/Dryer, X-Lg
cap. 7 cycles, Exc.
cond. $200. obo
(352) 794-6667
APPLIANCES Kenmore
w/d $100 pr & Refrig
side/side ice maker $250,
GE glass top range $ 250
& dishwasher $100
352-212-2657
GE 2 door refrigerator,
top freezer, beige,
works great 1 18 cubic
feet $75.00
(352) 382-2350
HVAC 3V2 Ton,
Heat & Air Conditioning
Unit, Ruud, 6 yrs. old
runs, in good cond.
$225.
(352) 527-2446


Kenmore
Upright Freezer
almond, 16 cu. ft.
$100
Call (352) 726-8086
KENMORE
Washer & Dryer,
good cond.
$125 each
(352) 503-6960
KENMORE
Washer & Dryer,
super cap. hvy
duty $250. guaranty
(352) 726-0619
Side by Side,
whirlpool, white, works
perfectly
$250
(352) 621-0942
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each.Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
WATER SOFTENER
Whole House Water
Softener (Used)
Very Good Condition -
$200.00 Phone:
269-532-8100




(6) PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS Mauve Color
Fabric Armless $10 each
727-463-4411
2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET Commercial Metal
Lateral 28"x30"x18"
Graphite Color $45
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR Ergonomic
Adjustable PreOwned
Fabric Covered $85
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (2)
PreOwned Commercial
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered $45 7274634411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Dark
Gray Fabric $25 each
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-463-4411
Ten, 4 Drawer, Hon
Filing Cabinets
$45. Ea
(352) 628-1030
Ask for Tara



JAN. 24TH
2TNVERIESS
VACATLTS
9AM 9798 E.
Baymeadows Dr.,
Building site. Premier
communities w/homes
$150-$500K
ALSO 9769 Tulip Tree Dr.,
Lake Estates
SOLD ABSOLUTE
DudleysAuctlon.com
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 Maine-ly RE
381384 10% BP


ROUTES



AVAILABLE



NOW!!



















V Able to work early morning
hours before 6am
V Must be 18 years old
V Florida driver's license
and insurance

If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant
between 1 and 2 am,
drive around to the back and
ask for a district manager.

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS
TO WORK FOR THE

% C I T U C 0 U N T...
wwchot .c nlcofln e.ch o


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(ONNE(TIGTHEf RIGHT


^^BUYER WIH YOUR MESSAGE

^^ "i~i*a 11 *. 1 | j 1||ii ln J i B







D6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


CRAFTSMAN 23 GAL.
UPRIGHT COMPRES-
SOR 110 5 HP NEEDS
PRESSURE SWITCH
ONLY 100.00 464 0316

Electric Lincoln Welder
Input 230 Volts,
50 amps Out put 225
$100 firm
(352) 726-0198





SONY 13 INCH TV
WITH REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION $20.00
352-726-0686





2 sets of bi-fold doors.
new. $80,24 inches
(352) 419-5549





COMPUTER MONITOR
17" Flat Screen $50
727-463-4411

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

Monitor 16" screen
includes Key board.
mouse & 1 pr speakers
$30.Printer $15.
(352) 564-0955





"***DINING SET***
54"RD GLASS TOP
PEDESTAL TABLE,
TUSCAN STYLE
4 CHAIRS
$260 634-2004

36" SQUARE CAFETE-
RIA TABLE Like New
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Base
$65 727-463-4411

36" ROUND CAFETERIA
TABLE Like New Rugged
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Base Misc Colors $65
727-463-4411

Cherry lighted
Curio 40"w x 80,
7 glass shelves
$500
(352) 586-6746

COFFEE TABLE SET
Coffee table w/ 2 end
tables, double-glass
tops, Exc. condition
$100 352-697-2290


KITCHEN OR FLORIDA
room Only 15.00 each
352-637-5171
COMPUTER DESK..
Small/fair condition
$25.00 Linda 341-4449
CURIO CABINET
wood and glass, lighted,
excell condition. $60.00.
352-621-4711
Desk Chairs
exec style, good condi-
tion $50 each. Moving!
(352) 382-4912
DESK- office
style,metal/formica
top,drawers on both
sides. $35.00 obo
352-621-4711
DINING ROOM TABLE:
78Lx38Wx30H, cherry
finish with 6 chairs in
great condition for
$350. Call (352)
489-1527.
Floral couch great
condition $50 In Citrus
Springs,must pick
up.(352)792-7610.
FORMICA TOP COM-
PUTER DESKS (4) With
2 Drawer File Cabinet At-
tached 4ft x 24inches $25
each 727-463-4411
FREE TWIN BED,
Black headboard, frame,
and box spring. No top
mattress. Must pick up.
Call 352-586-1970
FURNITURE over stuff
chair and ottoman nice,
clean & pretty $100.00
352-897-4678
King Size
Bdrm Set. Sealy pillow
top, chest of drawers.
dresser/mirror 2 night
stands,.$1500
(352) 586-6746
King Size Bed with oak
headboard,w/ phone
& Light connection, Ig.
drawers and storage in
bottom of bed, good
cond. $400 795-7513
Kitchen Table
w/padded bench &
2 chairs $60.
Kitchen Table 2 chairs
$40. (352) 503-6972
Leather couch and
loveseat, beige, good
condition $500
(352) 634-4225
LOVE SEAT Condition
excellent neutral color
need the room $55 best
offer 352 794-3422
LOVESEATS /(TWIN)
HIDE-A-BEDS
2 loveseats w/
hideabeds and otto-
mans, lots of storage
$250 352-697-2290
METAL FOLDING
TABLES (2) PreOwned
Wood Grain 6 Foot $35
each 727-463-4411
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808


LOVE SEAT very nice
and clean 100.00
352-897-4678
QUEEN BEDROOM SET
S1pcs. Pecan wood,
Lots of storage,
Exc. condition, $1350
352-697-2290
QUEEN SLEEPER
SOFA Used, but very
clean. Florida style.
$100.00 352-257-5722
for details
Recliners-2 custom
made, multi color
stripe, like new $250
each. Moving!
(352) 382-4912
Sofa and loveseat
set, multi print,
exc. cond., $75.
(352) 637-0967
SOFA AND LOVESEAT
Traditional floral print sofa
berry and green accents
Sofa 92L 38W Loveseat
is 68L 38W 5 yrs old in
excellent condition
$200.00 3525270324
SOFA Used, but extra
clean. $100.00
352-257-5722 for details.
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
PreOwned Commercial
Metal Frame with Arms
Fabric Covered 2 for $35
727-463-4411
WALL MIRROR marble
frame with wrought iron
frame must see to appre-
ciate 100.00
352-897-4678
WALNUT LATERAL
WOOD FILE CABINET 2
Drawer 34"x31"x21" $65
727463-4411
WHITE PAINTED WOOD
BOOKCASE 3 Shelves
Great for a Childs Room
40"x32"x12" $30
727-463-4411



CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
The time is NOW!! 20 lb
bag $4.00 352-563-1519
Echo weedeater
SRM 210, $85.00.
Works well
(352) 563-9987
FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000's of plants, OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019 W StargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon
Hustler riding mower
Fast track zero turn
$2200 obo Craftmans
ridng mower 42" deck
$400.(352) 746-7357
LAWN MOWER -
CRAFTSMAN L2000 Au-
tomatic, 22 HP, 42"cut,
with low hours. Good
condition. $575.00 Call
352-344-3112
Mickey MOUSE FIGUR-
INE Outside decoration
new was $35.00 Selling
for $10 Linda
(352) 341-4449


1 GL. BLUE BUTTERFLY
CLERODENDRUM at-
tract butterflies will reach
12'of beauty, call
352-257-3870
5' HOLLY TREES very
nice for the price $50 less
than stores. call
352-257-3870
9' TALL LITTLE GEM
MAGNOLIA TREES
beautiful and 1/2 price of
stores $75. Delivery avail-
able. call 352-257-3870







BEVERLY
HILLS/PINE RIDGE
5185 N. BEDSTROW
BLVD FRI/SAT/&SUN
8am-lpm BEAUTY
SALON EQUIP-FACIAL
UNIT 8 in 1
W/CHAIR-TAN UNIT-
FURNITURE- TVs- NOV-
ELTY ITEMS-NASCAR
COLLECTABLES- XMAS
STUFF-BOSE &SONY
SPEAKERS-RECORD
ALBUMS-GAME
UNITS,PS & OTHERS
W/GAMES-TOOLS-POOL
TABLE & LOTS MORE

HOMOSASSA
Sat. 21,& Sun. 22, 8-4
MOVING SALE *
Everything Must Go!
Clean furn., 3 gun cab.,
nice antiques, kit. ware,
art work, decorative
items, outdoor gear.
2359 S. Columbine Ave.

HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS

YARDMSAE
Sat Sun 8:30 am Starts
NO early birds
7634 W. Fern Lp.




3X WOMEN'S TOPS &
SHORTS Select Plus size
tops & shorts 3X NOW 2
for a $1.00 Cookie
352 634-2737
GIRLS BABY CLOTHES
Sizes 03- and 3 mos. 60
pieces total. $40.00/
From a smoke free
home352-637-4916
GIRLS BABY CLOTHES.
Newborn 35 pieces
$15.00 From a smoke
free home 352-637-4916
MEN'S 10.5 HARLEY
DAVIDSON MOTORCY-
CLE BOOTS Black High
$25.00 352 634-2737
MEN'S 2X,XL,L UNDER-
SHORTS Tommy Hilfiger,
Lowrider, Playboy.
4 for $1.00
(352) 634-2737


CLASSIFIED



MEN'S DENIM JEANS
44 M Duke $2.00 EACH
MEN'S Denim Long
Sleeve Shirts $2.00 each
352 634-2737
MEN'S TEE'S XL, L,
Bike Week, Special Ops,
Pistons, Harley. Assorted
4 for $1.00
(352) 634-2737
Two ladies Leather
coats 7/8 & 9/10
$35 Ea.Leather Jacket
$20.AII good cond.
(352) 637-4645



1HP, Submersible
pump, $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485
24" MOUNTAIN BIKE
10 speed HUFFY RED
HARDLY USED ONLY
$45.00
352 464 0316
48" Glass Dinette Set,
with 4 swivel Chairs,
$95
8 ft. fiberglass Type 2
Ladder $45
(352) 726-7765
5th Wheel Hitch
draw tight trailer load
15,000. pounds,
vechiles 37,500. $295
cash (352) 344-5159
AQUARIUM 10 GALLON
WITH ACCESSORIES
INCLUDES TABLE $50
352-613-0529
Back-To-Life
Therapeutic Massager
New $200 sell. $100 obo
(352) 726-0292
BALD EAGLE / NEW
Was 59.00 / selling for
20.00 Linda 341-4449
BILLIARDS THEME
POSTER "The Rat Pack";
black & white, 25" x 36"
framed. $35.
352-382-3962
CHAINSAW & GAS
TRIMMER
Poulan chain saw $50.
Homelite trimmer $30.
716-860-6715
COME-ALONG RACHET
Sears 2000 lb $16.50
860-1039 phone
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA FULL
SIZE INCLUDES
SHEETS @ PILLOW
CASES $50 613-0529
COMMERCIAL
Bubble Gum
Machine,2 Jars on
pedestal
$60 352-364-3009
CUISINART WINE CHIL-
LER HOLDS 6 BOTTLES
OR 2 EXCELLENT CON-
DITION NEW 200.00
ONLY 90.00 464 0316
Electric Gate Opener
Mighty Mule 350 + solar
panel, + 12V battery +
3 remotes, also can be
powered by 120 V
have manual, & all
hardware, cost $689.
Sell $475 obo, 341-0791


DESK 2 piece light wood
desk good condition
100.00 352-897-4678
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER Oak finish
CD/VCR/DVD storage &
31 1/2" x 28" TV opening
$40. 716/860-6715
EXTEND'A BED RACK
Fits 2007 Ford Sport Trac
$25 727463-4411
FARM FRESH EGGS
brown and green eggs
$2.00 a dozen
352-220-3189
GEORGE FORMAN
GRILL-LARGE- in excel-
lent condition-immaculate
$25 352-382-0220
Heavy Duty Aluminum
Folding Ramp
81Lx54W
$65.
(352) 637-5209
ITALIAN MOVIE
POSTER "La Spaccone"
(The Hustler) color, 11" x
17" framed. $25.
352-382-3962
Janome Memory Craft
9000 embroidery/
sewing machine, plus 8
memory cards &
access. & lessons $475.
(352) 249-7892
KITCHEN TILES 4 X 4'S
three boxes $25.00
Linda 341-4449
Large capacity,
locking mailbox, new
was $130, selling for $60
(352) 637-4534
MOVIE POSTER Paul
Newman in "The Hustler";
black & white, 24" x 36"
framed. $35.
352-382-3962
PHILIPS DVD AM FM
STEREO HOME THEA-
TER SYSTEM 6 Speak-
ers Subwoofer remote

PILATES PERFORMER
EXERCISE MACHINE w/
instruction video and fold-
outs $125, Bakers rack
w/ glass shelves, $40
352-860-0444
POLISH COMPOUND 38
Ibs,industrial, $75 for
metal fabricators
860-1039 ph.
RUBBER MAID WASTE
RECEPTACLE 35 Gallon
Rugged Commercial
Steel New In Box Asking
$45 727-463-4411
Tripod, aluminum, very
good condition, $20
(352) 563-1933
TURBINE ROOF VENTI-
LATOR Sears, new,
$16.50 860-1039 phone
WENGER TENT $40
LIKE NEW, PERFECT
FOR 2 PEOPLE
352-419-5981
WESTERN SADDLE,
Brown and tan good
cond 17 inch, $100.00
firm 352-513-4473.
Wii Console- like new
cond.,w/balance
board & all attach-
ments, 7 games, most
new in box $200 for all
795-0113 or 464-0650


INVACARE ZOOM
220 SCOOTER, exc.
cond. very good
batteries, $350.
(352) 726-8208
Jazzy 1113
Low Rider power chair
w/ new batteries, exc
cond cover & manuel
$550.(352) 726-3263
MANUAL TREADMILL
GIVES A GREAT
WORKOUT IT ALSO
WORKS THE ARMS
ONLY 85.00 464 0316
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WIYH FOOT RESTS
ONLY 100.00
352-464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676






Uncirculated COINS
State Quarters-$ 10 rolls
& $25 bagsWheat
pennies, NOT a dealer,
Call for prices!
352-634-5308



MUSIC LESSONS
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 352-422-7012



CHINA DINNERWARE
Fine china svc. of 8 w/
petite floral pattern &
silver trim. $100 Call
352-586-6746
COPPER,AMBER CAN-
DLE LANTERN / NEW
Was 35.00/selling for
10.00 Linda
(352) 341-4449
FLOOR TILES ... 12 x 12
about 80 pieces $25.00
Linda 341-4449
IT. CHEF KITCHEN COL-
LECTION 28X40 picture,
cutting board, cheese
board, trivets, etc. $100
Call 352-586-6746
LG. CANDLE LANTERN /
NEW Was 40.00/selling
for 10.00 LINDA
(352) 341-4449
LOUVERED DOORS
Bi-fold 36"x80" White
Good Condition 2 sets
$60 Can e-mail pic
352-382-3650
OIL PAINTING 40" X 52"
Ocean scene. $100 Call
352-586-6746
WATER CROCK ON
STAND ceramic jug with
spout on wooden stand
holds 5 gallon bottle
352-503-6037 $ 35.00


Ocean scene. $100 Call
352-586-6746
WATER JUG with spout
holds 5 gallon bottle on
wooden stand $35.00
352-503-6037



AB LOUNGER
Ab lounger, excellent
condition. $50 Call
352-586-6746
Boflex Extreme
Brand New
3 months Old
$550 obo
(727) 643-7652
Electronic Treadmill.
folds up for storage.
fair cond. ready to
use,$100 takes it
(352) 637-4534
Horizon RST 5.6
Tread mill, $200.
(352) 527-9518
MANUAL TREADMILL
GIVES A GREAT
WORKOUTIT ALSO
WORKS THE ARMS
ONLY 85.00 464 0316



BUYING FIREARMS
Cash paid for firearms,
ammo, and reloading
equipment. Call
352-556-1789
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165.000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
ELECTRIC SCOOTER
Razor E200, Green,
Runs great! $150 OBO.
Call 352-628-2176
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
Golf Clubs,2 sets Ladies
graphite w/bags $90 &
$135.2 Ladies Big Ber-
tha 460 Drivers.Golf
bag.(352) 382-0051

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Jan. 28th 9-5p
Sun. Jan 29th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
Marlin 30-30
Model 336 CS
Lever Action, sling,
scoop, w/ box of shells
$400. (352) 422-8090


TRAK NAVAGATOR 200
20" $400.Bike Raleigh
SE-7 22" Bike $100.used
very little, new shape
(352) 344-8242

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238

Winchester Model 12
12 gage pump shotgun
very good cond.
manufactured 1948,
30" vent-rib barrel
2-3/4" chamber.
full choke, check it
Walmart stock and
forend asking $950
(508) 642-9163
Your choice, never
used, 10" barrel Ruger,
44 magnum, $690.
7-1/2" barrel Ruger, 44
magnum, $550
(352) 726-7932 Iv. msg




2004 H & W Flatbed
Utility Trailer, dual axle
5,000 GBW rating, ship-
ping weight 1,200 lbs
1,000 (352) 637-2846,
Kathy

EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 (limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$995.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




BABYS R US 2 seat
stroller cup holders and
trays storage paid
400.00 asking 100.00
352-897-4678
BABYS R US HIGH-
CHAIR natural colors
clean like new 100.00
352-897-4678


Strdnes Diw sc'y


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, carports, rovers,
wood decks, fla. rms.,
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)













We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44asher &CR
491. (352) 746-1998




Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/lO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-795-5455

V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435




Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm. jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518





Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


*. fDiamond Brite,
3r .Florida Gem
>'-rm'. Marcite Decks
Pavers
FREE Tile
ESTIMATES -

GREG'S COMPLETE
E REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
L,CENSE 352-746-5200
& INSURED5-4550


COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
Make Walls & Ceilings
Look Brand New!
Custom textures & paint
* Ask about Popcorn
Removal (352)812-3388
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
& Sprays. Int/Ext.
Painting. since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair Guardian
Homestandby. &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002

BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194


"Repaint
Sl' ciali. t"

n In-lenor & E.terior
/ 11, li1, h, .,

FREE ESTIMATES -

352-465-6631


DRE *ETALANN


Cuslom Furnilure I///i'
& Cabinelry -ttiT-# I
Furniture
Refinishing
& Repair WILL CONSTRUCTION
Antique Restoring 352-628-2291
.ES I PreventDryerFiresNow.com


ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lie &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lic. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Scott 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
30

yrs exp lie/ins Dale
352-586-8129


A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
100% Guar. *Free Est
*H 352-257-9508 *i
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 k
EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work
Honest, reliable,
goodprices.Pres/was
paint Ins/Li c860-0085







Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




Citrus Cleaning
Team. top quality
work & great
rates. 302-3348
(352) 527-2279


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services
S* ALL Home
Repairs
S* Small Carpentry

SScreening
q* Clean Dryer
Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352.344-0905
ceLL 400-1722


handicap. License
Y House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
YARD CLEAN UP
Flowers, Bushes, Mulch
Rock & MOREl Call for
Your Yard Make Over
Lic/Ins (352) 425-0109



Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374


* 1 Day Cabinets Laminates
* Remodeling Supplies Woods
* Refacing Supplies Glues
* Hinges Saw Sharpening
Cabinet Supplies & Hardware



3835 s. Pittsburgh Ave., Homosassa, FL
OOOA7 5352-628-9760


| Installations bh Brian CBCI2-ass

PermitAnd
.R E Engineering Fees
,REE Up to $200 value
COPES POOL ------------ aue
AND PAVER LLC m
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer! .oSiding Soffit Fascia Skirting Roofovers Caports
Refinish your pool during the cooler months. Screen Rooms DecksWindows Doors Add ons
3524003188 ww.Aace352-62u-75i19
^>J^"TW"^ _1 8. |gw.Advancedaluminumofcitrusxcom Q|


LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, TRIM, MULCH
Hauling FALL Clean
since '91 352 220-6761



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
RepairVisit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244












HAULING
A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS
Everything from A to Z


FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,




Chris Satchell Painting
ASAP
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./Ext. Paititng
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lie/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave

Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
1i0. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
30 yrs exp lie/ins Dale
352-586-8129









Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40






Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-

business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


AAA ROOFING

Call the "eak6uste"
Free Written Estimate


:*100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
| Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000ARD


$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing. Call
Now!! 352-400-2221





A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lie. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est.
352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


. REMODE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LADIES WATCH very
nice crystal band and
face by anne klein $
75.00 firm 352-503-6037


Sell or


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy

Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED
Waiting Room Chairs,
and Beauty shop sham-
poo sink (352) 586-7685








#2758438332 CALL
352-628-4294



2 SHELTIES AKC regis-
tered, male 3yrs old and
female 4yrs old, very
gentle. asking 400.00 for
both call 352-287-3390
4 MALTESER
Pups, raised in living
room, very sweet, CKC,
$650 & boys $600.
352-212-4504,212-1258
7 Bullmastiffl

Puppies
Adorabler
$150. each
(352) 257-9508
AKC, Registered
English Bull Dog
Puppies for Sale
$1,800. (352) 543-0163
(727) 784-0732
(352) 493-5401

Beagle Puppies
8wks. old, tri colors
$100. Cash.
(352) 447-2018
Black Mouth Curl Mix,
named Tex looking for
a home, playful,
friendly,Great family
dog. needs fenced yd
(218) 780-1808

r^&^i1


Lv3 Duuuy la d yeal
old brindle bulldog mix.
He's well behaved,
knows basic com-
mands, very gentle,
and lovable. He's look-
ing for a forever home.
He has all shots and is
neutered and
micro-chipped. Call
352-270-8512
FEMALE YORKSHIRE
TERRIER Free to a good
home. 10 year old
spayed female. Owner
passed away.
Call 352 341 4704, leave
message
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832

FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783
Malti-Poo Puppies, 10
weeks, small, adorable,
shots, have parents
$350(352) 795-5204
MINI-DACHSHUNDS I
have Mini-Dachshunds
for sale. Dapples, black
and tans, reds and
pibolds. Males and fe-
males. PPOP, florida
health cert, sample of
food and toy come with
each pup 352-463-7345
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $300. Lots of
colors, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpous.net



FOR SALE
Ponies and horses,
used saddles and
tack Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033
Thoroughbred,
experienced, kid
friendlyShowing on
Sunday. $600
(352) 586-2590

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
"# "# A- r- "


Emerald Valley Evitex,
1 gallon, less 1 cup
$75.
(352) 270-9372




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453




'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
18ft Runabout
with a Galv. Trailer
$400. (352)476-1113
20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trir.
$6,500. 352-613-8453
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500
FUN DECK
'88, Evinrude
w/ Trailer, Runs Great
$3,000
352-257-5284
HOUSE BOAT
30 ft fiberglass, hrd
wood frs, & more
Live Aboard or eniov
weekends in Paradise
$14,500 (423) 320-3008
Pontoon 18'
88' Fiesta, 40hp Eviinr
runs great solid fir,
good carpet,bimini
capt chrs,'07 gal tril.
w/new tires, $3550
352-586-9498
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

























2000 Rialto Winn22ft
20MPG runs great, new
generator,86K See to
appreciate $19 500
(352) 746-6559
2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings

loaded.sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
2009 DODGE RAM
3500, quad cab, terbo
deisel, loaded 27K mi.
still in warr. $30,00 obo
(419) 307-8954, ALSO
2010 MONTANA
Mountaineer, 5th wheel
36ft., 3 slides, great rm.
layout, like new
$32,500 obo Downsizing
(419) 307-8954
'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736

I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35' Triton
V-10 gas.44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV, fully
equipped inci tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incis hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups,
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750
NOMAD
'01, 19.5 ft., great cond.
Fully self contained
$2,800 obo
(727) 643-7652
SUNSEEKER '05
29 ft. Class. C. nearly
all options, generator,
needs awning fabric,
non smoker, 33k mi.
Only $26,500., 464-0316
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292


2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 40 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumperto bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $37,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen. gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434


I BUY RVS,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
SPARTAN
1983, 30 FT.,
good condition
$1,800
(352) 563-2896




Diamond Plate Truck
Tool Box
Good Condition
$60.
(352) 344-9479
Maroon Cap 63V2 x 80
Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
broke & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$400.OBO352-795-3920
Seats for 2003 Town &
Country Van
1 Middle seat and back
row split bench seat
Gray Leather all 3 for
$200 (352) 344-4192




BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond
or not .Titled,no title, no
problem. Paying up
to$25K any make, any
model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




'00 Lincoln LS
All power V8, leather
seats, well maintained,
runs great,153K, $4000
(352) 795-1015
'03 Buick LeSabre
Runs Perfect, electric
everything,89k, silver,
totally clean $5000 firm
352-586-9570
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
'89 Chevy Baretta
Runs good, $1800 obo
Blue, 5 speed,
Great first car!
352-746-4789

BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

KIA
'06, Spectra EX, white,
65k miles, warranty til
2016, very good cond
$7,000 neg. 527-0424
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
LINCOLN '09
MKS, 28K mi. $45K new
asking $16,500. loaded
heated & cool seats,
white/ black leather.
rear sensors, premium
auto system, smells
NEW 352-513-4257
Mazda 01
Miada MX5
convertible 61k mi. exc
cond $8,250.(352)
419-4066/228-7670



MUSTANG
2004 Convertible-V6
50,000 miles excellent
condition
2 Year warranty -$10,500
352-628-6731
TOYOTA
'09, PRIUS ,
Under 50K miles,
pkge 5 leather seats
$15,750 (352) 746-3663




MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
80K mi, one owner
shows like new $6,500
(352) 726-0258







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes
Only $28.50
includes a photo


Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BIG SALE!
Consignment USA
WEDO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518& 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

FORD 04
Lariat, super duty die-
sel, crew cab tan,
loaded, goose neck
hitch, new tires, brks,
140K mis. well maint
$12,500(352) 344-4087


FORD 95
F250,4x4,460 eng.
Ext-cab. exc cond.$5k/
trade for sm truck or
vehicle of same value
352 302-9269/628-6985
VW'83
5 spd. restored, a/c
CD, bedliner & ton-
neau cover, new
tires/paint $4500
(352) 447-2330




MERCURY '97
Mountaineer,cranberry
red, 5.0 L, 126K mi. ex-
cel. shape all receipts
$3,500 (352) 503-2792
SUBARU
'03, Outback, LL Bean
Edition, Michelins, 85K
mi. All whl, dr. $8,500
obo (352) 726-9369



900-0229 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board



RM


CIASSIFIEDS




Classic Jeep CJ-5
runs great, looks great
w/many new parts.
$4500 (352) 586-3107




2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
'07 HD Sport 1200
Lowl500 miles, Perfect
cond.,custom exhaust,
blackwindshield, $6900
(352) 564-0856

KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at





354-0122 SUCRN


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 D7


Harley Davidson
04, $9700., Bagger
Crystal River
Cell (727) 207-1619

Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2003 HONDA
GOLDWING TRIKE
W/TRAILER. LOADED
$18,995
2012 GOLDWING
801 MILES
$22,500.00
2004 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSICLOADED
$10,750.00
2009 HARLEY 1200N
ALL BLACK
$6,995.00

FINANCE AVAIABLEll
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
352-330-0047




govdeals.com from Jan.
15 until Feb. 29, 2012.
Jan. 15 thru Feb. 29, 2012



Nic t r s


Shilling, Herbert J. 2011-CP-859 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-859 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF HERBERT J. SHILLING
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of HERBERT J. SHILLING, deceased, whose date of
death was October 27,2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, #101,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT' S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 15, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Linda Gies
610 Green Valley Road, H-7, Palm Harbor, Florida 34683
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ G. Andrew Gracy, Attorney for Linda Gies, Florida Bar Number: 0570451
Peebles & Gracy, P.A., 826 Broadway, Dunedin, Florida 34698
Telephone: (727) 736-1411 Fax: (727) 734-0701 E-mail: probate.gracylaw@verizon.net
January 15 and 22, 2012.


361-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE OF
ABANDONED PROPERTY
The personal property of
Danielle Richards, 9297 N.


Saponaria Dr., Citrus
Springs, FL 34433 is to be
sold at 9297 N. Saponaria
Dr., Citrus Springs, FL
34433, on Feb. 5, 2012, at
11:00 A.M. The property


consists of Clothing, pic-
tures, make-up, personal
items and children's cloth-
ing & toys.
Jan. 22 & 29, 2012.


364-0122 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
TPO RFQ No. 12-01
Port Feasibility Study
The Citrus County Transportation Planning Organization (CCTPO) is seeking proposals
from qualified firms or individuals interested in providing transportation planning and
related management services to the CCTPO Board. The scope of the study is pro-
vided in general within this announcement, and any questions related to that scope
should be directed to:
Contact info: Citrus County Transportation Planning Organization
c/o Gary W. Maidhof Operations & Projects Officer
Citrus County Lecanto Government Building
3600 W. Sovereign Path Suite 267, Lecanto, FL 34461
Phone 352-527-5202
The CCTPO reserves the riaht to reject any and all proposals, and to select the pro-


SEALED Responses are to be submitted on or before February 22, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to
Wendy Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Responses is scheduled for February 22nd, 2012 @ 2:15 PM
at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only informa-
tion conveyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who sub-
mitted Responses.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Qualifications Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on
the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.

CITRUS COUNTY Transportation Planning Organization
Gary Maidhof, Staff CCTPO
January 22, 2012.


359-0122 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTYCONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAYJanuary 25, 2012 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461
DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
ERNEST PASKEY LEONARD FRESHMAN
GERRY GAUDETTE ROBERT CABLE
(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES
(5) SCHEDULED TO MEET THE BOARD:
1. JOHN L. ERVIN:TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AN ACTIVE INSULATION
CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY CARD.
2. ROBERT DAVID SOVERCOOL: TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AN ACTIVE
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY CARD.
3. JOHN LAWERENCE ARRINGTON:TO MEET THE BOARD FOR AN ACTIVE
INSULATION CONTRACTOR COMPETENCY CARD.
(6) CITATIONS: NONE
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TIONLICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PRO-
CEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION 286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560 AT LEAST
TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE
TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580) OR LECANTOGOVERNMENTBUILDING (352-527-5310).
January 22, 2012.


360-0122 SUCRN
2/1 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Wednesday, February 1, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. at the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Crystal River, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
January 22, 2012.


351-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Rid # 92012-30 HVAC UNIT RFPLACFMFNT FOR INVFRNF


S S MIDDLE SCHOOL


MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING WED. FEBRUARY 1, 2012 @ 10:00 A.M.
AT TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER, ROOM 101
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB VendorBid website;
Automated Vendor Application & Bidder Notification System:
www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board
January15, 22 and 29, 2012.


352-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid # 2012-31 HVAC UNIT REPLACEMENT FOR LECANTO HIGH SCHOOL
MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING WED. FEBRUARY 1, 2012 @ 10:00 A.M.


AT TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER, ROOM 101
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB VendorBid website;
Automated Vendor Application & Bidder Notification System:
www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board
January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.


353-0129 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County School Board will accept sealed bids for:
Bid # 2012-32 HVAC UNIT REPLACEMENT FOR TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER
MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING WED. FEBRUARY 1, 2012 @10:00 A.M.
AT TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTER, ROOM 101
Bid specifications may be obtained on the CCSB VendorBid website;
Automated Vendor Application & Bidder Notification System:
www.vendorbid.net/citrus/
Sandra "Sam" Himmel
Superintendent, Citrus County School Board
January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.


350-0129 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid- Reroofing of Citrus High School Bldg, #3
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Reroofing of Citrus High School Building #3 will be received by
the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00 p.m. local time March 15, 2012, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Citrus High School, 600 West Highland Blvd.,
Inverness, Florida in the Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur February 20,2012 at 10:00 a.m..
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers &
Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, Florida 32803 upon deposit of a
check made payable to the Citrus County School Board in the amount of $100.00
per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the return of these Documents in
satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the opening of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.
CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, INVERNESS, FLORIDA
BY: Sandra Himmel, Superintendent of Schools
January 15, 22 and 29, 2012.


358-0122 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB 005-12
Meadowcrest Lift Station #1 Rehabilitation Project
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide all labor and materials to complete the following construction project
which includes but is not limited to:
1) purchase and installation of two (2), prefabricated buildings that will house:
a. new electrical equipment and
b. a permanent, on-site emergency generator/fuel tank
2) purchase and installation and integration of new electrical equipment to
include but not limited to:
a. New Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) Cabinet
b. New Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Cabinet for process control
c. Two (2) new VFD's
d. new Mini Power-Zone for 120V circuits
e. Two (2) new (Pump) Soft Starters
3) demolition of the existing block structure
4) new concrete slab installation
5) purchase and installation of a new odor control unit
6) purchase and installation of new, upgraded telemetry equipment
7) purchase and installation of a chain link fence
8) site restoration
9) misc. site work
Minimum Requirements for Submittina a Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Underground Utility Contractor License
2. All other required licenses/Certifications to perform this Scope of Services
3. Certified General Contractor or Builder License
Register General Contractor or Builder License If the license is registered in a
county other than Citrus County, Bidder must have obtained a competency card by
the County's Licensing Board at time of submittal of a Bid
A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference: A Pre-Bid Conference will be held on Janu-
ary 20, 2012 at 10:00 AM pm at the Lecanto Government Building in Room 280 lo-
cated at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before February 23, 2012 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for February 23, 2012 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at these meetings because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget
at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page then select "BIDS". Or, call the Office of Management
& Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
Winn Webb, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
January 22,2012.


363-0122 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 006-12
Mowing/Trimming/Litter Pick-up
Curbed Roadways/Medians/DRAs
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida invites interested parties
to submit a Bid to provide mowing, trimming and litter pick-up services for the
Curbed Roadways/Medians/DRAs in Citrus County.
Minimum Reauirements For Submittina A Bid
Bidder must presently have, or will procure at time of award of a contract, person-
nel, materials and equipment necessary to perform the services outlined in this Invi-
tation to Bid.
Bidder must have an individual on site during the mowing, trimming and litter pick-up
who is certified in work zone safety (Maintenance of Traffic (MOT) Intermediate
Level) in accordance with the Florida Department of Transportation requirements.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before February 10, 2012 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for February 10, 2012 at 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a disabil-
ity or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at
(352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Winn Webb, Chairman

January 22,2012.


901-0122 TH/SUCRN ITB 12-1
PUBLIC NOTICE
COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT
3001 SW College Road, Ocala FL. 34474
Invitation to Bid (ITB)
ITB 12-1 Welding Equipment
The College of Central Florida is seeking competitive bids from qualified sources to
provide welding equipment for the Levy Campus Welding Lab. The list of the re-
quired equipment is listed in the bid, which can be obtained through the College
Purchasing Department. The College will make the award for the items by "all or
none.
For Solicitation Inquiries and copies: Stewart E. Trautman Jr., Director of Purchasing
(352) 854-2322 Extension 1227


ITB 12-1 -Bids will be accepted until:
Date: Thursday February 2, 2012
Time: 2:00 PM
Location: CF Ocala Campus, Purchasing Department, Founders Hall, Building 1,
Room 101

An Equal Opportunity College
January 19 and 22, 2012.


362-0122 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Ridge Repair and
Handyman Services
located at 2056 W.
LaBonte Circle, Beverly
Hills, FL 34465, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register the said name


with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, FL.
Dated at Beverly Hills, FL,
this 17 day of Jan., 2012.
/s/ James Kuszik
Owner
Jan. 22, 2012.


cosal Irial is usermu ov ine CCTPO Boa s.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


jIj ]\J -=Jg


Nl


WI


1999 FORD KROWN VICTORIA
Only 55k miles. N2C120P
$7,468
L[ .


2000 MERCURYGRANDMARQUISLS 2004 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 2003 FORD MUSTANG CONVERT 2003 FORDECONOLINE E150 CONVERSION 2004 NISSAN TITAN SE EXT CAB 2005 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4
Low miles and low price. N1T472A Very nice eep. NP5664A Top down fun. N1T403D Like new and loaded. N1T494A One owner& reody fora newhome.N1T498A Local trade with low miles. N2TO93A
$7,968 $9,968 $9,968 $11,968 $13,468 $13,668


2009 FORD FOCUS SE 2003 FORD F250 XIT 4X4 SUPER CAB
Great fuel economy. N2CO78A Ready for work or play. N1T179A
$13,968 $13,968


2uuY rUKU rULU3 3
Only 19k miles. N2C120D
$14,968


2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Great economy. NP5662
$18,968
. . .. ,-rf If


2008 FORD EXPEDITION E. BAUER
One owner local trade. N2T108A
$18,968


2004 NISSAN MAXIMA SL
Come drive this one. N1T456A
$14,968


ZU I I FrKU rlIA 3
Can you say 40 mpg. N2CO76A
$17,968
^kX -i J


2005 CHRYSLER 300 C 2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT
This thing has a hemi in it. NP5681 Well cared for SUV. N2C010D
$14,968 $16,568




2007 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID 2006 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 SPORT
Think green. N2C130A Only 29k miles. NP5653A
$17,968 $18,968
^ i^_ ''* ~


2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING LIMITED 2006 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 E.BAUER 2008 FORD RANGER XLT SUPER CAB 2007 FORD EDGE SEL 2009 GMC SIERRA C1500 EXT CAB
Only 17k miles. NP5635 Low miles and like new. NP5582 Only 25k miles on this 4x4. N1T441D Affordable cross over. N1T310A Only 9k mileson this local trade N1TO14D
$19,968 $19,992 $20,968 $20,968 $21,668
j =m"Z6A dugbA 79ft


2009 NISSAN ROGUE SL 200710YOTAIAOMAPRRHiSS(AB 2008 FORD EDGE SEL 2011 FORD E250 VAN 2011 JEEP COMPASS LIMITED
A must to drive. N1T257A One local owned trade. N1T476A A great cross over. N1C181A A real work horse. NP5649 Only 7k miles. N1T131 A
$21,668 $21,968 $22,668 $22,968 $22,968




2010 MINI COOPER 2009 BUICK LUCERNE CXL 2010 FORD FUSION SEL 2007 CADILLAC STS 2008 MINI COOPER S


Fun to drive. NP5628 Loadedandlots of luxury N23M Super clean NP5546 Only 25k miles on is luxury car NP5660
$23,668 $23,668 $23,978 $24,668


2006ORD 150 ARIAI4X4 UPERCREW 2011 FORD TAURUS SEL
Only 21k miles and like new. NP5677 This is one you have to drive. NP5642 T[
$26,968 $26,968 7


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2006 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 4X4 LIMITED 2009 FORD TAURUS X SEL
Moon roof &navigation&only 16miles.NP5682 Still smells new. NP5680
$23,668 $23,668


Really different in a good way. N1T210A This all wheel drive vehicle is real cool. NP5600
$25,968 $26,968




2009 LINCOLN MKS 2010 FORD FI50 RAPTOR 4X4 EXT CAB
Believe it or not its really a lincoln. NP5667 Loaded raptor with nav and sun roof. N2T113A
$29,968 $41,668


a


20 2 N2C140
2012 FIESTA


MSI


Dealer Discount
Retail Customer Cash


SN2C121
2012 FOCUS SE


15,090 MSRP 19,720
-91 Special Discount -35
Dealer Discount -686
-500 Retail Customer Cash -2,000


$14,999 $16,999


N2T105
2012 ESCAPE XLT
MSRP 25,695
Dealer Discount -896
Retail Customer Cash -2,000
Retail Bonus Customer Cash -500
Trade-In Assistance Bonus Customer Cash -500

$21m799


2000 FORD MUSTANG GT 2006MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS GS
Top down five speed fun. N2CO33D Full size luxury. N1T318B
$13,995 $14,668
1 NE ----


Extra extra clean. N1T484D cooking oranew home& ovesis. N2T055A
$16,968 $17,668
^*^sZii f--Jft^


2008 LINCOLN MKX 2010 LINCOLN MKZ
he luxury cross over. NP5663 Yes it is a lincoln. NP5572
$28,968 $28,968
\


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 D9


I


RP




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-T' v LYw


CRYSTAL
AUOMTif^CIViE


'11 IMPALA


'10 300


'10 ELANTRA


'10 CIVIC


$12,999 $16$99 $9,999 $13999
oRPE PR 0 P ER 198
OR~lBON MO.D240HWMO. OR $141 Mo.$98M O.


'09 PT CRUISER


'09 JOURNEY
7 -- *k


'09 WRANGLER


'08 IMPALA


p :;T 13 Vill -l
&Ib:f~: Pb:yk^-l^ ^


R IE R M ITHINFOAM S .WI
1l800-58"755 FAA2W


$6,999 $11,999 $16,999 $8,999
o R$99 9* 0 oR$170M oI. o$240M O. o$127 t.


'08 CAMRY


'08 300


TOWN & COUNTRY


'06 ALTIMA


$1Q999 $10,999 $12999 $9,499
oR$155 O 0RE p$155PER 0 I184 ME 0R $157 E0r
LO~lMo O~lMo.O. IMuO. Rl o


'06 SILVERADO


'05 WRANGLER


'05 ACCORD


'04 F-250


$7999 $11,999 $79999 $11,999
$RPER 0RPER PER
,oR$133 MOLLR lTN99&ToRN A133MO. 0$243AmEo.





CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
^^^'800=440=9054f~s


0


0


TIAT


0


IlIEE2R REOREDMESAG WrHINFO ANDSWb PRK
1-800-5 -8755 Et.1717


|^REE 4 RREREDMEEWrINFOAN &I b^C
1-800-58"755 Ext.376


D10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


||E24HR!lREDOl=J BMH NDMDIS'b PCIN
1-800-58"755 EdZI32


Ft M MSAL


l~FREE 4 R EDREDMISAE rH NO N &MPR
1l800:58"755 Ex.376


FRE 4 M RDRE NW rHINF N PGRPMI


FRE24H EDREDMSAGtE Wr NOANDW RCN


|R !iEE24H l=JME MSAG ITH INFO AM PEKP
1l800-58755:F=di322


l2 iH-RJM ITH INFOAN
1l800-5"755:Ed.6204


FI!Ni^'-J^H iNlD'
^i-NO b:^=75 E .120


FRE2 RFRE OAE W-rJ H INF N II PRIC
1-800:58"755 Ex.610


lRIEE24HRREOEDMB IH INFOAM PMWI
1-800-8"755FAA20


|N !l RR l=JD i|ITI A j
i-NfOi.8:jb: Ed.6215c





r Section E -SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


I IOME 'RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


INSIDE
I Sikorski's
r. Attic
PAGE E6


ESTATE GUIDE


This product image courtesy of
Wayfair shows the Rachael Ray
Porcelain Enamel 10-Piece Cook-
ware Set in Yellow. Yellow can be
cheerful and uplifting, or mellow
and warm. It plays well with all
woods and most other colors, and
complements a wide range of
decor styles.


rJL./


'i


~5jj~jjJJ~5I LII


IIj
/II H
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11ii


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1 I I "j'"U










E2 SUNDA'I~ JANUARY 22, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


HORSE COUNTRY!!!
*ALMOST 10 ACRES OPEN PASTURES
Large Scrn. Pool 20x36 BARN
Huge Great Room Fully Fenced w/Gate
Great Appliances Truly A Must See
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
VIRTUAL TOURS 11 www.Florilistlingin j .com
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.FloridaLlstinglnto.com


.I _.. .I .....1 i....
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* Lots of Upgrades 3BD/2BA/3 Car Garage
* Lovely 2 Acres Gas Fireplace
* Heated Pool Hardwood Floors
* Living & Family Rooms
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


3565 E. COVE PARK TRAIL
ARBOR LAKES HOME
This marvelous 2/2/2 home features a
1 4x48 screened lanai to just devour. When
it's time to come inside you'll have a master
bedroom with a large walk-in closet and a
tiled bathroom. Open floor plan for those
evenings of entertaining.
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garylltman@remax.net


O iitr-ni.. A11 L Ii
1628 W. REDDING STREET, HERNANDO
* Beautiful 3BR/2.5BA/2CG Citrus Hills Home
* Den/Office Great Room
* Nicely Updated Kitchen Pool & Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Private Wooded Setting

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net I


CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT
SAILBOAT WATERFRONT CHARM WITH
GULF ACCESS AND OWNER FINANCINGII
Looking for a 3BR, 2BA waterfront home, look no
further Home features an open floor plan,
woodburning stove, screened gazebo, sea wall,
covered boat slip/lift and much more
DIR US Hwy 19 N to NW 19thStallthe
wa to end around curve, to L on NW 17th St,
to home on L, see sign
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email dawnwright@remax.net











CRYSTAL RIVER!!
2 Bedroom with office/den, 2 bath,
2 car carport, block home, fenced
backyard, remodeled, family room,
screen porch, shed, close to town.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


Zd I W. BUAUMUNI LANt
LECANTO
S3BR/2BA/2CG Timberlane Home Living Room/Nice Kitchen
* Lg. Utility Room Enclosed Lanai
*Newer Roof & A/C Well Maintained
* Nice Private Acre
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net



Enter house #1040







3/2/2
BRENTWOOD HOME
1,690 Sq. ft. living Built 2005 Large
Lania Formal dining Ceramic tile -
Cul-de-sac.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200 I
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


Nicely maintained 3/2/2 on cul-de-sac close
proximity to Rockcrusher Elementary Open floor
plan, split bedrooms, 4th bedroom or office,
ceramic tile thru, eat-in kitchen, formal dining,
updated baths, new roof 2007 A great home at a
great price A MUST SEEI
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-39290
Email mailhosalhei 'ieloa. nel
VIRTUAL TOURS al -www mailha salhei ieioa. coin I


* lj~y /2/2 on I Acre
* Split Floor Plan
* Large Living Room
* Owners Motivated


2421 N. Hwy, B


n How much
home can I

comfortably

afford?
1 For more information call:
Ben Branch
352.564.2250
NMLS ID: 432391

BankofAmerica 41 Home Loans
B*04MAfl WiaNA.Mei ifr* [i1 Lem er
] JAIN.LJrl..lfl. 1. i.l i n .


COUNTRY LIVING AT ITS BEST
with this 4/2 5/2 situated on 2 39 AC in
Homosassa This 2-story 2,400+ sq ft charmer
has formal living/dining, Ig kitchen, 20x24 fam rm
w/woodburning FP, plus tons of hidden storage
Den/office has a closet and could be used as a
5th bedroom Adjoining 2/1 on 4 85 AC can also
be purchased for a great family compound Call for
your personal showing
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


MOVE-IN READY!
Lovely 3/2/2 w/new roof, recently painted
and updated French doors out to 55 ft. long
screened lanai in Riverhaven Village. Kitchen
has breakfast bar open to dining and family
room with woodburning fireplace. Recently
reduced.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com


10238 H. NATCHEZ LP., DUNNELLOH
Greatly reduced, rare find in beautiful river front River Oaks
Eastl This impeccably maintained 3/25/2 pool home is
situated on a large park-like lot Interior features include but
not limited to split plan, ceramic tile, upgraded kitchen, plant
shelves, tankless water heater and tasteful paint/carpet
Master bath boasts duel sinks, garden tub and walk-in
shower Schedule your private viewing todayll
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


* In-Uround rool
* Large Bedroom
* Dining Area
* Bring All Offers


CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 F
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recycling calendars


Y ou' ve
probably
replaced
your old calendar
with a new one.
Did you throw
last year's calen-
dar away? There
are plenty of
ways to reuse it.
I'm fond of calen-
dars that have
recipes, so I can
later pick my fa-


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


vorite pages and save them
in a binder. Many have
beautiful pictures that can
be saved. Visit wwwhandy
facts.com/calendar.html to
see how you can make your
old calendar good as new by
saving it for an upcoming
year whose dates match up.
How have you reused
your old calendars?
Here are a few
suggestions:
Puzzles: Cut the photos
into puzzle pieces for young
kids. No fancy scissor work
required; simply cut them
into squares.
Add a cardboard or card
stock backing to make them
more sturdy
Bookmarks: Cut and lam-
inate them with contact
paper to make bookmarks.
Rewards: One reader, I.C.
from Georgia, shares: "I let
my students pick pictures
out of calendars as rewards
for doing what they should.
This works really well if the
calendar has lots of kitten,
puppy, sports or car
pictures."


Binder decora-
tions: Three-ring
binders with im-
ages on the cover
are quite a bit
more costly than
their plain coun-
terparts. Stu-
dents can slide a
calendar picture
into binders that
have a clear
pocket sleeve
and switch them


out on a regular basis
throughout the upcoming
year.
Gift tags and envelopes:
Cut calendar images to use
as gift tags for special
occasions.
Punch a hole and attach it
with ribbon or simply tape
the tag to the gift. Another
reader, Marie from New
York, adds: "Visit wwwivy
joy com/printcards/envelope
.html for a template to make
envelopes out of old calen-
dars, or use any envelope
you already have as a tem-
plate to trace."
Learning tools: Cut the
month names out and use
them as flashcards for
young children to learn
each month of the year. You
can create a matching game
by cutting out the numbered
squares. Preschoolers and
kindergarteners can prac-
tice their numbers by writ-
ing in each square, too.
Another reader, Diane from
Iowa, shares: "I used old
calendars with my students
as story starters, or to help


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
S Realtor. A HOusE Realtor-E l
S302.3179 SOLDNwa-' 287-9022 M
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700
6340 N. WHISPERING OAKS LP.
IN OAK RIDGE
.II h 1 1 1.. I r
i .. .- . t...r I nL ..' I 1 h
91318 W. BUITONBUSH DR.
BEVERLY HILLS

I 1,,, I II I ..I 1 -. ".n d
I I ... ... ,,.-., -. h d


them generate ideas for de-
scriptive essays about the
people or the scenes. I've
also cut out and used the
numbers as a way of draw-
ing for chores, turns, etc.
Whoever got No. 1 got the
first turn."
School lockers: Kids
enjoy decorating their lock-
ers and can use the calen-
dar pictures in their own
lockers or use them to deco-
rate their friends' lockers on
birthdays.
Origami: They won't work
well for all paper-folding
projects, but old calendars
are great for making folded
boxes or paper beads. Visit
instructables.com/id/How-
to-Make-Paper-Beads/ for a
paper bead-making tutorial.
Check your local library for
origami books such as
"Trash Origami: 25 Paper
Folding Projects Reusing
Everyday Materials" by
Michael G. LaFosse and
Richard L. Alexander.
See FRUGAL/Page E10


Anderson, Ruiz
hit new highs N
Coldwell Banker In-
vestors Realty congratulates
Erna Anderson on finishing
in the top 10 percent of all Cit-
rus County sales agents for
sales volume in 2011. Erna Erna
attributes attaining this high Anderson
level of sales volume to her Coldwell
dedication, hard work, and Banker
knowledge of the local real Investors
estate market. Erna can be Realty.
reached at 352-464-4604, or at the Coldwell
Banker Investors Realty office, at 352-726-
9553.
Coldwell Banker is also proud to announce
that Cinda Ruiz closed more than $2 million in
sales volume in 2011.
Cinda's enthusiasm for the real estate pro-
fession, her hard work and knowledge of our
local market has helped propel her to this
achievement.
She can be reached at 352-634-3897 or at
the Coldwell Banker Investors Realty office at
352-726-9553.
ERA's Hite joins
national organization
ERA American Realty & Investments is
pleased to announce that Robin Lisa Hite,
PRM, a local leader in residential property man-


agement, was recently ac- a .
cepted as a member of the ;
National Association of Resi-
dential Property Managers
(NARPM). With her member-
ship, Robin also becomes a
Citrus County representative
for the West Coast Chapter of
NARPM. Robin Lisa
Robin joins more than Hite
2,000 residential property ERA American
managers throughout the Realty.
United States, who manage everything from
single units to fourplexes. Members represent
more than $6 billion worth of residential proper-
ties nationwide.
ERA is proud of Robin's professional accom-
plishment. Please contact her at 352-746-6008,
or by email at robin hite@hotmail.com.

DIGEST DEADLINES
Submit information for the Real
Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday
for publication Sunday.
News notes are published as space is
available.
Photos cannot be returned without a
self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Photos submitted electronically
should be in maximum-resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.


Lk4 h ITRUS RII R1EA LI LI y


Amnda & Kirk olm Tom Balfour lil Aems & Hi Steiner Art Paty
O SSoc.M REACTOR RALTOR-BROKER REACTOR


lAS


746-9000


* 0 S


44 N. ME

4144 N. MAE WEST, .


I 7170 N. CRACKLE, . i.- $109,9


202 DESOTO 2/1.5/1 $57,900 S. HARRISON, 2/1/1 352747 $44,900 N. CORTLAND DR., 2//2 352002 $74,500

713 _PTH_2//1 32984 $92,5 00F9S"0
.. .,, .
6 GREENWOO 349939 3/2/1 $499OO 0 P 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS, 348850 $159,000
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 E3










Use rock powder to feed your soil Last garden
A 1 .14


Ground-up rocks

are especially rich in

minerals who 'd

ofguessed, right?

LEE REICH
For The Associated Press
If you feel like getting out in the gar-
den, now is as good a time as any to
spread rock on the ground.
Or not (more on that later).
You say your ground already has
enough rocks in it? True enough, but
the rock I'm talking about is a powder,
and is likely a different kind of rock
from what you already have.
But why put down more rock of any
kind? The reason is that rock powders
sold for garden use are particularly
high in minerals.
For example, rock phosphate is, as
the name implies, rich in phospho-
rous, one of the "big three" nutrients
needed by plants. In fact, rock phos-
phate is the stuff, after being treated
with sulfuric acid, that becomes the
phosphorous in synthetic fertilizers.
Colloidal phosphate, also known as
soft phosphate, is a similar product,
this one ground up finer than rock
phosphate.
Two other commonly used rock
powders granite and glauconite -
are rich sources of potassium, another
of the "big three" nutrients needed by
plants. (The third, nitrogen, is not
found in rocks.)
Glauconite is also called greensand,
or Jersey greensand if that's where it
was mined. And it is greenish.
Besides the major nutrients phos-
phorous and potassium, these rock
powders are also sources of micronu-
trients. Micronutrients are needed in
only minuscule amounts by plants, but
nonetheless are essential to their
health. A soil can be naturally defi-
cient in micronutrients: For example,
pockets of molybdenum deficiency
exist in Nevada soils; natural cobalt
deficiencies exist over much of Iowa
and parts of the Northeast.
Synthetic ("chemical") fertilizers
generally supply no micronutrients at
all.
Because they are merely ground-up
rocks, rock powders do not readily


See POWDER/Page E13


LEE REICH/Associated Press
This photo shows Jersey greensand fertilizer, left, and rock phosphate in New Paltz, N.Y. Rock pow-
ders sold for garden use are particularly high in minerals.


January


this week

Master Gardeners

will be on hand

Special to the Chronicle
Do you long for the look of a lus-
cious deep-green lawn like you had
up North? Well, sorry to say, you live
in the wrong place. Did you know
there are cold-season grasses and
warm-season grasses?
We here in Citrus County cannot
grow perennial cold-season turf
grass. There are distinct differences
between cold-season grasses and
warm-season grasses; thus, cold-sea-
son grasses will not survive here.
Warm-season turf grasses also have
unique characteristics within each
variety that should be considered
when trying to choose and maintain
a lawn.
The final remaining January Mas-
ter Gardener Plant Clinics, offered
by the Citrus County Cooperative
Extension Service, will focus on
Florida grasses. The clinic is at 2
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 at the Ho-
mosassa Library
Master gardener volunteers will
be available to respond to any other
gardening questions.
Call 352-527-5700.


12805 N. RIVER GARDEN DR., DUNNELLON 91 W. FOREST OAK PL, BEVERLY HILLS
Custom 3BR 2BA Riverfront home on 1/2 acer 3BR 2.5 BA in lovely Oak Ridge Community
RV parking area with electric & water hookup Solar heated pool & spa, Summer kitchen,
Dock for boat launch, great location. $325,000 40-year roof. $219,900



6329 N. MISTY OAK TER, BEVERLY HILLS 6301 N. MISTY OAK TER., BEVERLY HILS
3BR 2BA with loads of upgrades. 3BR, 2BAwith oversized kitchen, corian countertop,
Lovely wood floors and 18" Tile. block glass in bath area, Hurricane shatter proof films on
Expanded screened lanai. $160,000 windows. Must see to appreciate. $149,900
Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129 m


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS

S-We have the fines
-- team of
subcontractors


6 900thJUT
w ilat Of Citrus t
HOMEBUILDER Cc049056
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
1 352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~11111~ IV1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Everything is digital: Now, even shower valves


Q We're
remod-
*eling
our master bath-
room to include a x
new modern
shower stall with
all the bells and
whistles. My con-
tractor suggested
that we go with Ed Del
one of the new ASK
type of electronic PLU
"digital" shower PLUP
mixing valves, in-
stead of the traditional man-
ual-type valve.
Can you please give me
some additional informa-
tion on these new electronic
shower valves? Freddy,
Florida
A. Digital tub and shower
valves are catching on fast
- partly because the prod-
ucts are becoming afford-
able, and a lot easier to
install and operate, and
also, because of all the cool


things they can
do to enhance the

experience.
For instance,
you can zone off
different shower-
heads and, with
the push of a but-
ton, change the
Grande water direction.
THE Or automatically
BER fill your bathtub
IBER to the perfect
temperature
while you're shaving.
Operating controls can
also be added outside the
shower area, so you can ac-
tually start your shower as
soon as you get out of bed,
then walk right into a nice
hot shower
Bright display screens
can show the water temper-
ature and how the water is
being controlled.
Bottom line: The gadgetry
is wonderful, but just re-


American Realty & Investments
5 ~5 117 S. Hwy 41 Inverness, FL
M (352) 634-2371 Cell (800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA bob@bjldavis.comn
For a Visual Tour of our listings andallMLS:bdavis.com


Ak


PERFECT FOR A LAID-BACK
FLORIDA LIFESTYLE
S 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths,
Built in 1999
2-Car garage
Fireplace in family room
Pool with 1/2 bath
__1 One acre
$169,900 MLS 351571
A GEM OF A HOME
2 Master suites
2-Car garage
Caged pool
*Remodeled kitchen, baths
Newer roof, C/H/A
Half-acre
-t $149,900 MLS 351129
A BRILLIANT FLOOR PLAN
1st Floor: master suite, a den,
a half bath, dining/great room,
eat-in kitchen, lanai.
7:I 2nd Floor: 2 bedrooms,
S hall bath, walk-in attic.
Maintenance $155/mos: exterior
paint, roof care, lawn/shrub care,
irrigation, basic cable, heated
Spool/clubhouse. Adjacent to our
46-mi. Rails to Trails
W I M ERE Priced $125,000-$129,900


member that it needs elec-
tricity to operate. So in case
of a power failure, have a
good backup plan so you
don't end up "high and dry"
in your shower!


Master plumber Ed Del
Grande is the author of "Ed
Del Grande's House Call,"
the host of TV and Internet
shows, and a LEED green
associate. Visit
eddelgrande. com or write
eadelg@cs.com. Always
consult local contractors
and codes.


0I ,RU & I OFFICES


O


Sandra Olear




Brian Murray



BM




DickHildebranit




Florence Cleary




Helen Forte




Jane 0. Gwynn



Joann Martin




Mat Robinson




TamliMayer


OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-2
6, REDUCED GK


MLS #351319 $229,000
3/2+den w/cathedral ceilings, bright
kitchen wit skylight, insulated 2 car
shower, double sinks and walk-in closets
Directions: Rte 491 to Pine Blvd., to fight
on Apple Valley, to fight on Apricot
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238
OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-2


Charming 3/25/2 pool home on a corner acre lot

to south on Fresn to west on Massachsetts, to home
on left.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


Ir' r, ...... ..i. /NC 6-"1"- .. re v..I ..., i
MLS #351513 $124,900 MLS #352603 $117,900
villa Eat in kitchen, newer appliances
Great locabon Don't miss outi
Directions: te 486 to the Brentwood Entrance, to right Directions: Rte 486 to south on Annapolis, to
on Brentwood Ci, and follow tohomeon right right on Boston, to Volusia on right.
Jo Ann Martin 352-613-2238 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478
REDUCED 20K REDUCED 30K


l
SHNS photo courtesy Kohler
Digital tub and shower valves are catching on fast.


SPrudential

Florida Showcase
Properties


RENTALS AVAILABLE


Open 1 Days For Your Con
20 W. Norvell Bryant H
Hernando, FL 34442
1-888-222-0856 (352) 7
1481 Pine Ridge Blv
Beverly Hills, FL 344(
1-888-553-2223 (352) 5


lenience U
tw y. Joy Holland

p46-0744 r.

65 KathyDagle
.27-1820
erties.com

BUSE SUN13 124
0USE SUN 12-3 LoriNickerson




MLS #352621 $129,900
move-in condition with tile walk
then cabinets, 2 kitchen pantries,

o #M227.
wynn 352-302-1926 Mike McHale
UCED 11K





MLS 351736 $239,000
? 3/3/2 POOL HOME ON
S ACRES! Beautiful
surrounds the updated
d pool & spa w/new Steve Dobbyn
finish, newer deck w/
d kitchen, tile floors, etc.
NDING P



a e Teresa Bower
301, S Mulliu.- Si
MLS #349807 $64,900
to this clean wonderful Joann Condit
cutive design 2/2/2.
perfection. Roof, A/C,
ffngerator all within
s., & cabinet space, ,| I
Srm. w/closet. F '
e Affiliates, Inc., a | w1'i .
its related entitles, F 1"
fM a Barry Cook


OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


MLS #351453 $184.900
"PP "r" ^ P


Sareas, exra tall kit
Perfect set-u p and plenty of room for a pool
Directions Rte491toPinefRidgeBl., to first eight ,
on Persimmon, to right on Red Ribone n, to #5395 straight up hill t
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Jane O'G
NEW LISTING REDI


MLS #353214 $65,000
Imperial Executive II with lots of
storage, central water and sewer, 2
large bedrooms, 2 baths and
2 car garage, sprinkler system,
fenced- yard, oversize lot (112X120)
plus a new Roof in 2004.
PENDING


GOT HORSES?
2 GORGEOUS
landscaping
home. Heated
Dianondbhrte
pavers, update'


T Q tb5 N. Litle uove lerr. wiU W. rox 1Io0OW LI. I //U t. ireiana I. -
MLS #351821 $199,500 MLS #352834$79,999 MLS #346743 $158,000
Immaculate 3/2/2.5 home w/a lovely SHORT SALE. Private 3/2/2 on 1.21 Beautiful 3/3 home w/great open Move right mi
master bedroom w/sliders to the self acres. Split bdrm plan, with on-suite plan situated on the "Oaks" golf Imperial Exe
cleaning heated pool. A large nook master bdrm featuring WIC(s), course,with a stunning view of the Maintained to
overlooks the pool and backyard plus laminate flooring & jetted tub. Tiled 16th hole. Conan kitchen counters, windows, re
a storage shed, new pool pump and open floor plan with FR leading to lanai, walkways and driveway have 5 yrs. Lg rm
newlanai screening. screened inground pool. beautiful pavers drive, inside laundry
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estat
Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and
registered n many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


i. i
a'-9- 4', ..


Jackie & Bob Dvis


For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: www.floridashowcaseprop


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 E5


(
[


-







E6 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information......352-563-5592
.................................................. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information......................352-563-5966
News information.............................................. 352-563-5660
....................................... ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


Plan on planting?



Order up a soil test


You probably already
knew that Florida's state
tree is the cabbage palm,
and its state marine mammal is
the manatee, but did you know
that Florida has an official state
soil, called Myakka fine sand?
The soils of Florida offer a
unique gardening environment,
especially for those of us who
have gardened in other parts of
the country or world. While it
may appear to be "just sand" to
the untrained eye, Citrus


IL

L


Audre
FV


County's soils can vary dramatically in soil
pH and nutrient content (levels of phos-
phorus, potassium, calcium, etc.)
Soil characteristics influence which
plants will grow and thrive, as well as what
type of fertilizer should be used. Winter is
the perfect time to have your soil tested
before you begin any spring planting or
fertilizing. For $7, the University of
Florida's Soil Testing Laboratory will test
your soil for pH, lime requirement, and
levels of phosphorus, potassium, magne-
sium and calcium. This information is
vital to selecting the right plants and fer-


tilizer for your yard.
Approximately two-thirds of
Citrus County residents do not
need to apply additional phos-
phorus in the form of fertilizer
because their natural levels of
phosphorus are so high. The re-
maining one-third of residents
: have low phosphorus levels
that do justify the use of a fer-
y Durr tilizer with phosphorus. Be-
N cause phosphorus is a water
pollutant, it's important to
know which group you fall into.
Soil pH is a measure of the soil's acidity
or alkalinity, and it affects the availability
of nutrients for plants and soil microbial
activity. A pH value less than 7 is acidic, a
pH of 7 is neutral and a pH value greater
than 7 is alkaline. Nutrients are generally
most available to plants in the pH range of
5.5 to 6.5 or 7, so this is the preferred pH
for most plants.The easier, longer-lasting
solution is to choose plants suited to the
existing pH rather than trying to drasti-
cally change the pH.
See SOILUPage E7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Inside...




I


I|


Sunshine hue
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Umbrella stand is Majolica; background on Hawkes cut glass


Dear John: I have at-
tached some pho-
tos of a few items I
am interested in finding
out a little info
on. The um-
brella vase and
the pink vase
were given to
me by my
grandmother. I
believe the um-
brella vase is
Majolica. It has
no markings on John S
the bottom at SIKOI
all. The pink AT
vase has some
numbers on the


bottom, and says USA and
some other letters I am
not quite sure of.
I purchased the toaster
from an estate sale many
years ago for under $2. It
still works; we used it in
our camper for a number
of years until I decided
maybe it had some value,


i
R


and we have since treated
it with a little more care!
If I were interested in sell-
ing these items, any ideas
where I would
go? I am a little
wary of going
the eBay route.
Anything you
might know
would be ap-
preciated. -
S.K, Internet
Dear S.K.:
korski Yes, you are
SKI'S correct the um-
.nc brella stand is
in the Majolica
collecting cate-
gory I think it was pro-
duced in Europe over 100
years ago. The floral pat-
tern is very attractive. Po-
tential dollar value is $100
to $200 range.
The pink vase was made
in the 1940s by the Weller


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Electric toasters are a specific category of collector interest. This
is an unusual example; could it be worth anything? LEFT: This umbrella
stand is an example of Majolica. It was likely produced in Europe more than
a century ago. It might sell for $100 to $200.


See ATTIC/Page E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SOIL
Continued from Page E6

To submit a soil sample to the Uni-
versity of Florida's laboratory, down-
load instructions at http://soilslab.ifas.
ufl.edu/ESTL_files/SS18700.pdf, or stop
by the Citrus County UF/IFAS Exten-
sion at 3650 W Sovereign Path, Lecanto
for mailing materials (instructions, pre-
addressed box and soil bag).


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

Company Potential dollar value is
below $50.
Electric toasters are a category of
collector interest. The one you have
has an interesting look. In order to
help you, I need several good photo-
graphs. Make sure to look it over care-
fully for any maker's marks.
Dear John: I have a small sterling sil-
ver antique pitcher with the following
information on it: On the bottom, in a
small circle, is "Beacon Silver Company,
Taunton, Mass., Quadruple, #810."
On one side, the initials "HEM" are
engraved. On the other side, there is a
leaf-and-branch engraved design. In-
formation about this item would be
appreciated. S.H., Internet
Dear S.1: The name Beacon Silver
Company is a trade name used by EB.
Rogers Silver Co., in Taunton, Mass.
The small pitcher you own is not ster-
ling silver, as indicated by the word
"quadruple" on the bottom of the
pitcher, meaning quadruple plated.
There is no specific collector interest.
Potential dollar value is catch-as-
catch-can.
Dear John: Approximately 40 to 50
years ago, I worked in a restaurant on
Long Island. One day, Elizabeth Taylor
and Eddie Fisher came in on their
way to the Hamptons. They were not
married at the time, each one being
married to someone else.
They were gracious enough to sign
the receipt, and I have had it all these
years. The receipt is not in good
shape; however, the signatures are
perfect. My question is, is it worth any-
thing? I realize the signatures would
have to be authenticated, and I have
no problem with that request.
What would be my next step, and
where would I go to have it authenti-
cated? My sincere thanks for any in-


The instructions and soil bags, as
well as other free educational materi-
als, are also available at our Florida-
friendly Landscaping booth at the 25th
Annual Florida Manatee Festival &
Rotary Craft Fair in Crystal River
today, Jan. 22 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For questions on soil testing or
other Florida-friendly Landscaping
topics, call 352-527-5708, or send an
email to Audrey Durr@bocc.citrus
.fl.us.
For more information online, visit

formation you may give me. JR.,
Internet
Dear J.R: Wow, that was your lucky
day. It would be a good idea to have the
receipt along with the story mounted
in acid-balanced materials. Current
potential dollar value is in the $100 to
$200 range. To have them authenti-
cated, contact www.psacard.com.
Dear John: I have a set of eight crys-
tal champagne glasses with "Hawkes"
etched on the bases. Through some In-
ternet research, I was able to deter-
mine the pattern to be 2-5. I could get
no other information, such as when
they were probably made and current
value. They are in like-new condition.
Can you help? -M.E.M., Internet
Dear M.E.M.: The Hawkes name is
widely recognized in the antique cut
glass collecting world. Thomas Gibbon
Hawkes, 1846-1913, moved to America
from Cork, Ireland in 1863. Coming
from a long line of glass-making fami-
lies, he learned the art of cutting glass
in Brooklyn, New York. In 1870, he be-
came superintendent of the cutting
shop at Coming Glass Works in Com-
ing, New York.
Collectors specifically look for the
beautiful cut-glass vases and other
hollowware produced by Hawkes dur-
ing the late 19th and early 20th cen-
tury Stemware, champagne glasses,
etc., are low on the totem pole of col-
lector interest. Current potential dol-
lar values are low. It would be best to
pass them on in the family If they
were sold, current potential dollar
value would be below $25 each.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429 or asksikorskiaaaol. com.


Citrus County's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District's
website at www.WaterMatters.org, and
the University of Florida's website at
www.SolutionsForYourLife.org.
The Citrus County Florida Yards &


Neighborhoods program is a free pub-
lic education program that is funded
jointly by the Citrus County Depart-
ment of Water Resources and the
Coastal Rivers and Withlacoochee
River basin boards of the Southwest
Florida Water Management District.


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDELINES
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to take photos of commu-
nity events. Call 352-563-5660 for details.


ADZA Lll -- -
o, oN $89,900. ,l ul uu,, n ,oow l ,,g, polii., REm ThFi a n I I
appliances and fixtures Home features vaulted ceiling split floor 0 1
plan and rear screened porch. MLS #352281. i, ii i ..1 i ',,, ,
6145 S. Esmeralda Ter., Lecanto. m Fuller 352-212-5752/ ,,, ONLY 574 900 ..
Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Tomika Spires.Hanssen 352-586-6598/Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 E7







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


KiM COOK
l-F r l ," A ,i, inti 'id 1'/',-,,

Iin Ineter\ on't be ot er
fe I' e or : couple llonre
SI \ ie thl bllt e l-
rej (li tie n11n is
:limllibill' j little
hil..her in the I sk.\.
jnid feeniL j li title \' jrlier
Ejrl.\ slriln_ c, ta l.ls jid shel-
telr iiil' H.zines .lre lettiln' the ii11en
in thoo. nith l \eLrle ohit ello-w
lies in I) j nt. tlli ill'dln 's t jii

i)plitti I. Ir niellom jid m\-rin It
Il.\ \well \ lth All mood ,d .d
iiis.t other l, r j ld :i:,iiiple-
iiients j \ ide rjAlne ot decor,
st.mles \\hiether.\,ii're bold,
enoIL.h tor e L oilk or prefer the
sotterl illIStjrd.\ side ot tie hlle.
. ello,\ is worth co-,-n.iderh n,
It's j color, thjt \wjkes i|p .i
kitchen. jid DeLonilii'l re-
telentl IIi itr d ced I Jil\ c1:,lle:-

.|)|)lil lces IIc hldes jil e r'21iz-
InU.. ello,\ tli t'. c,:.tteine fot:r hie
e.\ebjll'.
RjIchjel R.\. Kitclienimd jind


Le Creiiset have kitchenware in
thie lille
Ald \ i'll fI ind graphic print
iiiies jnd NMjrimekko sheet sets
At Crite & Birrel with pops of
.ellow' The Zest margarita
pitcher mnid glasses feature a
zingy swirl of citron, and there
are lemon-printed dishtowels
here, too. But there also are
pieces in a more muted, creamy
gold -the Georgie ceramic
lamp base would work with a
sleek leather desk or a floral
sofa. Curry flavors the Baxter
rug, and there's the Silhouette
sofa in a similar tone.
Wildon Home's Rawlins pow-
dercoated-wire accent table is a
light and airy way to introduce
the color, and could go indoors
or out when the warmth returns.
CB2 has a low-slung glass and
steel coffee table with yellow
enameled wheels; a step stool in
marigold; and a gorgeous round
serving bowl coated on the in-
side in gold.
Yellow and white is a fresh,
happy combination. Rizzy


See YELLOW/Page E9


Use yellow to brighten up


winter's gloom


This is the
Crate & Barrel
DeLonghi toaster.
LEFT: The Crate
& Barrel Georgie
Table Lamp.
Crate & Barrel/


0


E8 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


0


V







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


YELLOW


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 E9


Continued from Page E8


Home's throw pillow collection feature
zippy yellow floral, starburst and circle
tifs; Thomas Paul's Flock rug comes ii
crisp canary and white pattern. Califo
Kreme design studio has done both bi
and bird motif wall coverings in that c
combination, great on an accent wall
give a small space some punch.
Michigan-based furniture maker Er
Kuczynski has designed a cool, moder
coffee table that he offers in a choice
glossy or matte yellow finishes. In a rc
with gray, navy, or black and white fur
you've got a statement piece.



SOURCES
www.westelm.com -
Senegalese woven basket, I
www.wayfair.com Wildon
Home Rawlins wire accent
table, $69.99; EK Living TC
yellow coffee table, $1,940;
Rachael Ray cookware,
$139.99; Rizzy Home pillov
sets of 2, $68 and up; Thor
Paul Flock rug, $196 and ul
Kreme California Birds Coll
tion wallpaper roll, $195.
www.crateandbarrel.com -
Zest margarita pitcher anT
glass $22.95, $8.95; Citrus
dots mug. $5.95: DeLonghi
Kmix toaster, coffee maker,
$99.95, $129.95; Chloe ch,
$999; Georgie lamp, $329.
www.cb2.com Yield coffe
table. $449: Hitch marigold
stool. $169: Liquid yellow-
lined bowl. $49.95.


A Senegalese w
for storing stuff .i
door or in the f.ii
room, comes in ji


oven basket, great


t the front:t
I II\ -:.


unexpected yel-
,es low graphic at ..-
e mo- West Elm. ''/
na If you're '
rnia's interested I I
itterfly in trying ...'-.-. '
olor paint, re-
or to member that
yellows look
ic more intense on ...
n, cube the wall than inI st
of other colors. At i d
lom yellow is great in te\-
niture, tiles or accent piece e-. biit
on walls it can ii.n.le the
nerves. Consider the Iluht in
a yellow room. both nitiir.l
and artificial: P.le I ello ',s in
north-facing rooi.s i:i n look
peaked,; :et s-:ooithe i Slninn.
fp e .An intens-.e. .jt1 -
.99 r.ted ,ello'w ijv
''veri'vlelii n I
The doi less ,r soiith
4 Crate Ifi I r1 'ii N. Illt
& Barrel 'I iiuke j iiIllI
s Zest wriOder ro'oiiI
vs pitcher. or entr,
nas loo]k like j
p: ,Jeivel
ec- b: o\
Ben-


\ellii i. Yel-
Slow\ T,).Puz and
% Biliiihle Bee are
air, ll \'.j'rin. Xers -
tile shades. If
you're looking for -
*e little exuberance.
F take a look at R. in
Slicker and Siunn Sjtilr-
dayfromMythi: Paint EBen
the names sound upbeat.


-_ ..-
J. c


'- -- .'..--




6.
/...:A%.-s. -c; "-r;- vJ: -. ,. ..-
"- ; ," "",//.



-- .. ..


-,--



Thispr
f--.- image
Z of Way
--- Wildon
Rawlir
_- i Tabli



- ,'
-- _-:_. :;: 5

- _-



-- - .. _
---


-
.
- ",


oduct
courtesy
fair shows
Home's
is Accent
e.
S.I 1 Press


Iii


: The
rate & Barrel 3
Citrus Dot
mug.
The Wayfair
Rizzy Home
Decorative
Pillow in
White/Yellow.
Wayfair/Crate & Barrel/
Associated Press


Il


U ---


The Crate & Barrel Chloe Chair
Sin Bella Citrine.
Crate & Barrel/Associated Press


CONVENIENT TO SOUTHERN WOODS!
* 3+office/3/3 custom heated pool home Well for yard with new pump
* 25x16 family room great "man room" 2 waterfalls w/stucco arched framing
* Granite kitchen has walk-in pantry Deep private estate size lot
#351520 $257,000
SeeVirualT ours.III .A r.e.salIe.!...IsIIB.com.


fIl Jeanne
Gaskill
Realtor-
352-476-5582


KNEW ON THE MARKET


BANK OWNED FLORAL CITY, FL lt I
Waterfront 3BR/2BA mobile on wide canal. ioat dock. iru lls.
Great weekender, winter or year round living. $29900 MLS#321216
$34,900 MLS#352914 \
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471_4
Email: roybass tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352 302-6714


"MAMERICAN
ERA REALTY& INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Ir-ll 352-746-3600 Office


0


I "


N1


Alan
DeMichael
352-613-5752


I ALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMN


F q


.Ij







E10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

MEN
Dear Sara: When I was lit-
tle, my mom was the car-
penter in our family. A lot of
our gifts were handmade,
because my family didn't
have much money. I re-
ceived a wooden doll cradle
for Christmas when I was
five or six, which I played
with a lot. It's maybe 2 feet
long with high sides and is
made out of plywood, so it's
quite sturdy
I still have it and can't
part with it, but it's cur-
rently being stored in the
garage, out of use. I would
like to bring it down and use
it in the house somehow, not
just for decoration, but per-
haps to provide storage.
Maybe I could put a couple


of potted plants in it?
Any suggestions? S.D.,
Minnesota
Dear S.D.: I really like
your potted plants idea. You
could use it to hold craft
supplies, magazines, fire-
wood or towels. You could
put it in your laundry room
to hold laundry supplies.
Maybe use it to hold pet toys
or a home emergency kit. It
could hold winter gear such
as hats, boots, gloves/mit-
tens or umbrellas, or be
used as an indoor comfort
kit to hold items such as a
throw blanket, pillow, book
and slippers. It would make
another young child happy,
so I'd consider gifting it to
someone else, too.
Dear Sara: My wife has
recipes that sound great, but
I'm allergic to nuts! Is there
something we can use in a
cookie recipe that has the
consistency of peanut but-


ter, as a nuts-free substi-
tute? -B.C., email
Dear B.C.: I can't say this
will work for all cookie
recipes, and the texture will
change a bit, but you can
give soy nut butter a try It
has no tree nuts of any kind
in it I'm not sure if you have
any allergies to seeds, but
sunflower seed butter might
work for your cookie
recipes, too. Many people
with less severe nut aller-


gies use Nutella, almond or
cashew butter as well.
Dear Sara: Can I use pow-
dered milk in things like
boxed au gratin potatoes or
Pasta Roni fettuccine noo-
dles that call for a little
milk?
I know these aren't the
healthiest dishes, but I have
several on hand that I
bought on sale. Besides
being cheap, powdered milk
would be convenient when


regular milk isn't handy,
with no worries about the
expiration date. Can the
substitution be made and
would it be equal to the
measurement called for
with regular milk? Mer-
rilee, Michigan
Dear Merrilee: Yes, you
can substitute powdered
milk for fresh milk. I would
mix up a container (a quart
at a time would work well)
according to the package di-


Yes, you can substitute powdered milk for fresh milk.
I would mix up a container (a quart at a time would
work well) according to the package directions and
refrigerate it overnight prior to using it. Then you
can use it for drinking, cooking or baking and have
what you need on hand for the next few days.


REALTY GROUPi Tr V
& Brenwood esale


Detached Villa/3Bd/2Bath/2Car/Pool/Woodview Villas
One of a kind pool home in Terra Vista. Large private lot with extended
patio and lush landscaping. This home will please even the most
discriminating buyer. Loaded with upgrades.
M LS#352030................................................................. $299,900


Detached Villa/2Bd-Bonus Room/2Bath/2Car/Brentwood Villas
Make Offer! Comfy and Cozy describe this Fully Furnished Villa in
Brentwood. This home is ready for move in. Close to the community
pool and exercise area.
M LS#349929.......................................................... $119,000


T-... ; &
Term. otso oeSca eb- rhpicue wt l etl


Fully Furnished Immaculate end unit townhome with extensive tile
flooding, Conan counter tops and nice private lanai. Social Club
Membership included.
#1169....................................................................................$1150


I i lownnome/lua/z.sb atn/lr ar/ibrentwooa lownnomes
Unfumished End Unit Townhome, Spacious Kitchen w/ Breakfast Bar,
Upgraded Lighting fixtures, tile in all wet areas. Great location in
Brentwood. Social Club Membership Induded.
#1158.................................................................................. $1000


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center


4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
tg Office: 352-746-3600
!p 4b. 4..". 1.1


T See Va T a


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

reactions and refrigerate it
overnight prior to using it.
Then you can use it for
drinking, cooking or baking
and have what you need on
hand for the next few days.
Or you can make a smaller
amount and use only what
you need for your specific
side dishes by using the con-
version chart available at
everydayfoodstorage.net/ha
ndouts/milk-conversion-
charts.pdf.


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut Street, Kansas City
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


|


I* I


I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To lDace an ad. call 563-5966


Real Estate Classifieds

Classifieds In Print


and

IOnline


All


The Time


Fax (352 56-56 1. Tol Fre (88 85-24 10 Em il clsiid~hoilo~n.co0 0esie ww. 0 oin-c


Brooksville
NO DEPOSIT
$100. PER WEEK
2/1, WATER GARBAGE
INCLUDED
Call Tom
352-754-8687
C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
DUNNELLON
5159 W. Disney Ln 2/2,
New AC, Lrg. Lot $425.
$400 dp (727) 480-5512
HERNANDO
2/1 no pets $310.
+ 1 mo sec.
1/1 liv kit combo
$225+sec(352)249-7883


mo. 3/2, 2-acre lot,
Cent. Air, Washer/Dryer
Storage, $625 mo. No
pets, (352) 860-0904
HERNANDO
2BR, 2BA, carport, sun-
room, kitch. equip., new
carpet, W/D hookup,
good neighbors, $500
352-697-0136 344-8313
HERNANDO
3BR, 1 BA, fenced yard
$450, first & Sec.
(352) 212-9698
HERNANDO/INV.
2BR, 1BA, C/H/A, $350
no pets, 1 st, last, sec.
352-564-0578
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH turn., Priv. ranch
No pets. (386) 871-5506
Homosassa 2/1
off Hwy 19, Ig fenced
yardshed $450 mo
352-422-1300
HOMOSASSA
3/2, $600mo.+ $600 sec
Lrg3/2 $650mo+ $650dp
352-503-6747
352-628-1928
HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/2 & 2/1 no pets
(352)637-1142

INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182


INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period in the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 includes H20.2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964





Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183

HOLIDAY SALE
Bad credit OK.!
New 2012 Jacobsen
w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200 sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
Buy for only $36,900
or have delivered
and set up with A/C,
heat, steps & skirting
only $2,600 down,
$379.97/mo.
for 20 years W.A.C.
Come by or call
352-621-9181
Taylor Made Homes

INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5,
carport, screen rm.
shed $6900
(352) 586-7962

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964


Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
$5k for your used
Mobile Home any
condition
800-622-2832 x 210





on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down


New Back Rm 1.4 AC
Steal It! $30K Firm,
6.4 Easy Credit Finance
Appraised at $39,500
(352) 637-6608
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assum Mortg. Priv Fin. 2
Mast Suites New appls.
horses ok, $33e900
Cridland Real Uving.
J. Desha 352-634-6340
Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON '2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182

HOLDER
3/2, Fireplace, fncd,
yd $450/mo 10% down
Owner Finance Avail
(352) 302-9217
Homosassa
3/2 DWMH Fleetwood
'96. All new roof, car-
pet, & Appls. REDUCED
$8K, to $46K, Quick
SALE due to ILLNESS
OPEN HOUSE 9-5 Daily
incls New years Eve &
day @ 7038 W. Jackson
Ln. call (352) 503-7328
COME SEE!!!!!!!
INVERNESS
2/2 SW, 2 nice big
additions / AC, fenced,
near lake, part furn.
$37k 352-341-1569
LECANTO
2 BR, SWon 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!!
$17K OBO
352-586-2976


Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over 1 acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181







Lot 4 A $9,500 OBO
(906) 281-7092
2/1 Manatee, Clean
55+ 3TAC H, porch,
$110 lot rent, $12,900.
#37, 109 Stag Ct.,
Inverness, FL 34450
Beverly Hills
55 + park 2/2 fully
remodeledIlg screen
lanaicarport, shed,
laundry ,landscape & ir-
rigationn all appliances
Club house activities
Heated pool.Lot rent
$258, $39,900
Call 352-422-0927
Dunnellon, Fl 2 bedroom.
2 bath. 1997 Redman
14x60 MH. 2 BR 2 Bath.
New kitchen, new roof,
Air conditioner only 3 yrs
old. 12 x 14 glassed in
patio, tiled floor. Two
sheds, one is 10x12,
other is 12x14. Lot rent is
$240.00 pm Asking
$31,500.00 Call
352-465-1761
EEDGE WATER OAKS
55+ Comm.lake ac-
cess, 2/1.5, 12x56
turn.12 x 30 scr. porch,
shed, new 200 amp.
$11,500(352)419-6477


Furnished 14 x 50 w/
added enclosure, vinyl
& scrn. rm.55+ Lecanto
Park, SS appl's
New W/D workshop
w/power, Remodeled
inside/out $11,000 obo
(352) 418-5926
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8 400 or Lease to Own
from $139/mo.
$800.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Inv. Ft Cooper 55+
carport, REDUCED TO
$12K (352) 419-5114
INVERENESS 55 +
Comm. 14X54 MH, 2/1
55' carport w/deck,
front scr room
w/storage shed, CHA
part furn, W/D, Reduce

INVERNESS
55+park. 1/1 carport,
screen room, shed,
$7000 (352) 726-8071
INVERNESS
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
oer 00. must be
approved 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled rent $600. long or
short Sell $54K OBO
(352) 307-4564

LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE*
1 /1, Furnished $525.
2/2 Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189


Rock Cr Canyon
Area
3/2 DW acres
fenced, gated,
Rent or Buy owner
financing avail
(352) 302-4546


C21 tm






REAL ESTATE, INC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
835 NProperty Management19








2/2/1............ $650
2/2 Apartments. $495
2/1/1............ $600
2/2 Villasew our websit$550


2/2/2 $725
2/2/1 ............ $500
PLUS MANY MORE
CALL TODAY!
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Managerment
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate



CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/I BA $375-$500
BEVERLY HILLS
1 Rm Eff, All Util. incl.
Cable,Sep. Kit./ bth
$525. mo.,pet ok

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
HD cap access,.small

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg 2/1, W/D hkup, inold
water & lawn. $500 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499

FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450. no pets

INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 $575 352-422-2393
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-270-0218/216-0012,


Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS
Affordable Rent,
Accepting
Applications
62 and older plus
disabled with or
without dependants
2151B N. River Reach
Cir., Crystal River.
Rental Assistance
Available
to those who qualify.
1 & 2 Bedrooms
Office Hrs ; Mon. Fri
8a to 12pm & 1pm to
3:pm
TDD Hearing impaired
number:
1-800-955-8771
"This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."
(352) 795-8024


SEVEN RIVERS
APTS
Absolutely Beautiful
Place to Call Home!
near the mall &
7 Rivers Hosp. fishing
walking trails near by
in a old Florida setting
Quite, clean,, well
maintain .Central
laundry room.
352-795-3719
Directions:
Hwy 19 turn w. at
Days Inn, first right
onto Tallahassee Rd



E0M HOUSIQB
OPPORTUNITY


=ACTON
( NTAL MANAGEMENT REAL, INC.




HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
CRYSTAL RIVER
1365 N.E. 5th Ave. 2/1 Home on corner lot. Very
clean, near downtown. 928 sq. ft........................ $500
10350 W. Deepwoods Dr. 2/2/1CP House on 5 wooded
acres! New carpet, paint, tile, A/C! 1,200 sq. ft ..............$ 750
11184 W. Samson Ln. JUST REDUCED!! 3/2/2
House charming w/open floor plan, large screen lanai,
1,437 sq. ft...................................................... $ 9 0 0
HOMOSASSA
80 Douglas St., Sugarmill Woods 3/2/2 Large
home, screen room, rent incl. lawn. 1919+ sq. ft....... $850
7650 W. Homosassa Tr. 2/1 Duplex nice & clean,
outside sto. Has well. 1536 sq. ft........................ $500


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 Ell










Use rock powder to feed your soil Last garden
A 1 .14


Ground-up rocks

are especially rich in

minerals who 'd

ofguessed, right?

LEE REICH
For The Associated Press
If you feel like getting out in the gar-
den, now is as good a time as any to
spread rock on the ground.
Or not (more on that later).
You say your ground already has
enough rocks in it? True enough, but
the rock I'm talking about is a powder,
and is likely a different kind of rock
from what you already have.
But why put down more rock of any
kind? The reason is that rock powders
sold for garden use are particularly
high in minerals.
For example, rock phosphate is, as
the name implies, rich in phospho-
rous, one of the "big three" nutrients
needed by plants. In fact, rock phos-
phate is the stuff, after being treated
with sulfuric acid, that becomes the
phosphorous in synthetic fertilizers.
Colloidal phosphate, also known as
soft phosphate, is a similar product,
this one ground up finer than rock
phosphate.
Two other commonly used rock
powders granite and glauconite -
are rich sources of potassium, another
of the "big three" nutrients needed by
plants. (The third, nitrogen, is not
found in rocks.)
Glauconite is also called greensand,
or Jersey greensand if that's where it
was mined. And it is greenish.
Besides the major nutrients phos-
phorous and potassium, these rock
powders are also sources of micronu-
trients. Micronutrients are needed in
only minuscule amounts by plants, but
nonetheless are essential to their
health. A soil can be naturally defi-
cient in micronutrients: For example,
pockets of molybdenum deficiency
exist in Nevada soils; natural cobalt
deficiencies exist over much of Iowa
and parts of the Northeast.
Synthetic ("chemical") fertilizers
generally supply no micronutrients at
all.
Because they are merely ground-up
rocks, rock powders do not readily


See POWDER/Page E13


LEE REICH/Associated Press
This photo shows Jersey greensand fertilizer, left, and rock phosphate in New Paltz, N.Y. Rock pow-
ders sold for garden use are particularly high in minerals.


January


this week

Master Gardeners

will be on hand

Special to the Chronicle
Do you long for the look of a lus-
cious deep-green lawn like you had
up North? Well, sorry to say, you live
in the wrong place. Did you know
there are cold-season grasses and
warm-season grasses?
We here in Citrus County cannot
grow perennial cold-season turf
grass. There are distinct differences
between cold-season grasses and
warm-season grasses; thus, cold-sea-
son grasses will not survive here.
Warm-season turf grasses also have
unique characteristics within each
variety that should be considered
when trying to choose and maintain
a lawn.
The final remaining January Mas-
ter Gardener Plant Clinics, offered
by the Citrus County Cooperative
Extension Service, will focus on
Florida grasses. The clinic is at 2
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 at the Ho-
mosassa Library
Master gardener volunteers will
be available to respond to any other
gardening questions.
Call 352-527-5700.


12805 N. RIVER GARDEN DR., DUNNELLON 91 W. FOREST OAK PL, BEVERLY HILLS
Custom 3BR 2BA Riverfront home on 1/2 acer 3BR 2.5 BA in lovely Oak Ridge Community
RV parking area with electric & water hookup Solar heated pool & spa, Summer kitchen,
Dock for boat launch, great location. $325,000 40-year roof. $219,900



6329 N. MISTY OAK TER, BEVERLY HILLS 6301 N. MISTY OAK TER., BEVERLY HILS
3BR 2BA with loads of upgrades. 3BR, 2BAwith oversized kitchen, corian countertop,
Lovely wood floors and 18" Tile. block glass in bath area, Hurricane shatter proof films on
Expanded screened lanai. $160,000 windows. Must see to appreciate. $149,900
Call Lili Garcia For Showings At 352-302-9129 m


NEW HOME & HOMESITE IN SUGARMILL WOODS

S-We have the fines
-- team of
subcontractors


6 900thJUT
w ilat Of Citrus t
HOMEBUILDER Cc049056
Hwy. 19, 4/2 miles south of Homosassa Springs. 8016 S. Suncoast Blvd.
1 352-382-4888 www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com
NEW HOMES, VILLAS, REMODELS & COMMERCIAL


E4 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~11111~ IV1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Recycling calendars


Y ou' ve
probably
replaced
your old calendar
with a new one.
Did you throw
last year's calen-
dar away? There
are plenty of
ways to reuse it.
I'm fond of calen-
dars that have
recipes, so I can
later pick my fa-


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


vorite pages and save them
in a binder. Many have
beautiful pictures that can
be saved. Visit wwwhandy
facts.com/calendar.html to
see how you can make your
old calendar good as new by
saving it for an upcoming
year whose dates match up.
How have you reused
your old calendars?
Here are a few
suggestions:
Puzzles: Cut the photos
into puzzle pieces for young
kids. No fancy scissor work
required; simply cut them
into squares.
Add a cardboard or card
stock backing to make them
more sturdy
Bookmarks: Cut and lam-
inate them with contact
paper to make bookmarks.
Rewards: One reader, I.C.
from Georgia, shares: "I let
my students pick pictures
out of calendars as rewards
for doing what they should.
This works really well if the
calendar has lots of kitten,
puppy, sports or car
pictures."


Binder decora-
tions: Three-ring
binders with im-
ages on the cover
are quite a bit
more costly than
their plain coun-
terparts. Stu-
dents can slide a
calendar picture
into binders that
have a clear
pocket sleeve
and switch them


out on a regular basis
throughout the upcoming
year.
Gift tags and envelopes:
Cut calendar images to use
as gift tags for special
occasions.
Punch a hole and attach it
with ribbon or simply tape
the tag to the gift. Another
reader, Marie from New
York, adds: "Visit wwwivy
joy com/printcards/envelope
.html for a template to make
envelopes out of old calen-
dars, or use any envelope
you already have as a tem-
plate to trace."
Learning tools: Cut the
month names out and use
them as flashcards for
young children to learn
each month of the year. You
can create a matching game
by cutting out the numbered
squares. Preschoolers and
kindergarteners can prac-
tice their numbers by writ-
ing in each square, too.
Another reader, Diane from
Iowa, shares: "I used old
calendars with my students
as story starters, or to help


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
S Realtor. A HOusE Realtor-E l
S302.3179 SOLDNwa-' 287-9022 M
WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Girl 746-6700
6340 N. WHISPERING OAKS LP.
IN OAK RIDGE
.II h 1 1 1.. I r
i .. .- . t...r I nL ..' I 1 h
91318 W. BUITONBUSH DR.
BEVERLY HILLS

I 1,,, I II I ..I 1 -. ".n d
I I ... ... ,,.-., -. h d


them generate ideas for de-
scriptive essays about the
people or the scenes. I've
also cut out and used the
numbers as a way of draw-
ing for chores, turns, etc.
Whoever got No. 1 got the
first turn."
School lockers: Kids
enjoy decorating their lock-
ers and can use the calen-
dar pictures in their own
lockers or use them to deco-
rate their friends' lockers on
birthdays.
Origami: They won't work
well for all paper-folding
projects, but old calendars
are great for making folded
boxes or paper beads. Visit
instructables.com/id/How-
to-Make-Paper-Beads/ for a
paper bead-making tutorial.
Check your local library for
origami books such as
"Trash Origami: 25 Paper
Folding Projects Reusing
Everyday Materials" by
Michael G. LaFosse and
Richard L. Alexander.
See FRUGAL/Page E10


Anderson, Ruiz
hit new highs N
Coldwell Banker In-
vestors Realty congratulates
Erna Anderson on finishing
in the top 10 percent of all Cit-
rus County sales agents for
sales volume in 2011. Erna Erna
attributes attaining this high Anderson
level of sales volume to her Coldwell
dedication, hard work, and Banker
knowledge of the local real Investors
estate market. Erna can be Realty.
reached at 352-464-4604, or at the Coldwell
Banker Investors Realty office, at 352-726-
9553.
Coldwell Banker is also proud to announce
that Cinda Ruiz closed more than $2 million in
sales volume in 2011.
Cinda's enthusiasm for the real estate pro-
fession, her hard work and knowledge of our
local market has helped propel her to this
achievement.
She can be reached at 352-634-3897 or at
the Coldwell Banker Investors Realty office at
352-726-9553.
ERA's Hite joins
national organization
ERA American Realty & Investments is
pleased to announce that Robin Lisa Hite,
PRM, a local leader in residential property man-


agement, was recently ac- a .
cepted as a member of the ;
National Association of Resi-
dential Property Managers
(NARPM). With her member-
ship, Robin also becomes a
Citrus County representative
for the West Coast Chapter of
NARPM. Robin Lisa
Robin joins more than Hite
2,000 residential property ERA American
managers throughout the Realty.
United States, who manage everything from
single units to fourplexes. Members represent
more than $6 billion worth of residential proper-
ties nationwide.
ERA is proud of Robin's professional accom-
plishment. Please contact her at 352-746-6008,
or by email at robin hite@hotmail.com.

DIGEST DEADLINES
Submit information for the Real
Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday
for publication Sunday.
News notes are published as space is
available.
Photos cannot be returned without a
self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Photos submitted electronically
should be in maximum-resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.


Lk4 h ITRUS RII R1EA LI LI y


Amnda & Kirk olm Tom Balfour lil Aems & Hi Steiner Art Paty
O SSoc.M REACTOR RALTOR-BROKER REACTOR


lAS


746-9000


* 0 S


44 N. ME

4144 N. MAE WEST, .


I 7170 N. CRACKLE, . i.- $109,9


202 DESOTO 2/1.5/1 $57,900 S. HARRISON, 2/1/1 352747 $44,900 N. CORTLAND DR., 2//2 352002 $74,500

713 _PTH_2//1 32984 $92,5 00F9S"0
.. .,, .
6 GREENWOO 349939 3/2/1 $499OO 0 P 9570 N. CITRUS SPRINGS, 348850 $159,000
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 E3










E2 SUNDA'I~ JANUARY 22, 2012 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


HORSE COUNTRY!!!
*ALMOST 10 ACRES OPEN PASTURES
Large Scrn. Pool 20x36 BARN
Huge Great Room Fully Fenced w/Gate
Great Appliances Truly A Must See
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
VIRTUAL TOURS 11 www.Florilistlingin j .com
VIRTUAL TOURS at www.FloridaLlstinglnto.com


.I _.. .I .....1 i....
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
* Lots of Upgrades 3BD/2BA/3 Car Garage
* Lovely 2 Acres Gas Fireplace
* Heated Pool Hardwood Floors
* Living & Family Rooms
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


3565 E. COVE PARK TRAIL
ARBOR LAKES HOME
This marvelous 2/2/2 home features a
1 4x48 screened lanai to just devour. When
it's time to come inside you'll have a master
bedroom with a large walk-in closet and a
tiled bathroom. Open floor plan for those
evenings of entertaining.
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garylltman@remax.net


O iitr-ni.. A11 L Ii
1628 W. REDDING STREET, HERNANDO
* Beautiful 3BR/2.5BA/2CG Citrus Hills Home
* Den/Office Great Room
* Nicely Updated Kitchen Pool & Enclosed Lanai
* Nicely Landscaped Private Wooded Setting

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net I


CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT
SAILBOAT WATERFRONT CHARM WITH
GULF ACCESS AND OWNER FINANCINGII
Looking for a 3BR, 2BA waterfront home, look no
further Home features an open floor plan,
woodburning stove, screened gazebo, sea wall,
covered boat slip/lift and much more
DIR US Hwy 19 N to NW 19thStallthe
wa to end around curve, to L on NW 17th St,
to home on L, see sign
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email dawnwright@remax.net











CRYSTAL RIVER!!
2 Bedroom with office/den, 2 bath,
2 car carport, block home, fenced
backyard, remodeled, family room,
screen porch, shed, close to town.

DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: djmfl@yahoo.com


Zd I W. BUAUMUNI LANt
LECANTO
S3BR/2BA/2CG Timberlane Home Living Room/Nice Kitchen
* Lg. Utility Room Enclosed Lanai
*Newer Roof & A/C Well Maintained
* Nice Private Acre
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net



Enter house #1040







3/2/2
BRENTWOOD HOME
1,690 Sq. ft. living Built 2005 Large
Lania Formal dining Ceramic tile -
Cul-de-sac.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200 I
Email: kcunningham@remax.net


Nicely maintained 3/2/2 on cul-de-sac close
proximity to Rockcrusher Elementary Open floor
plan, split bedrooms, 4th bedroom or office,
ceramic tile thru, eat-in kitchen, formal dining,
updated baths, new roof 2007 A great home at a
great price A MUST SEEI
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-39290
Email mailhosalhei 'ieloa. nel
VIRTUAL TOURS al -www mailha salhei ieioa. coin I


* lj~y /2/2 on I Acre
* Split Floor Plan
* Large Living Room
* Owners Motivated


2421 N. Hwy, B


n How much
home can I

comfortably

afford?
1 For more information call:
Ben Branch
352.564.2250
NMLS ID: 432391

BankofAmerica 41 Home Loans
B*04MAfl WiaNA.Mei ifr* [i1 Lem er
] JAIN.LJrl..lfl. 1. i.l i n .


COUNTRY LIVING AT ITS BEST
with this 4/2 5/2 situated on 2 39 AC in
Homosassa This 2-story 2,400+ sq ft charmer
has formal living/dining, Ig kitchen, 20x24 fam rm
w/woodburning FP, plus tons of hidden storage
Den/office has a closet and could be used as a
5th bedroom Adjoining 2/1 on 4 85 AC can also
be purchased for a great family compound Call for
your personal showing
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


MOVE-IN READY!
Lovely 3/2/2 w/new roof, recently painted
and updated French doors out to 55 ft. long
screened lanai in Riverhaven Village. Kitchen
has breakfast bar open to dining and family
room with woodburning fireplace. Recently
reduced.
JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com


10238 H. NATCHEZ LP., DUNNELLOH
Greatly reduced, rare find in beautiful river front River Oaks
Eastl This impeccably maintained 3/25/2 pool home is
situated on a large park-like lot Interior features include but
not limited to split plan, ceramic tile, upgraded kitchen, plant
shelves, tankless water heater and tasteful paint/carpet
Master bath boasts duel sinks, garden tub and walk-in
shower Schedule your private viewing todayll
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


* In-Uround rool
* Large Bedroom
* Dining Area
* Bring All Offers


CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 F
Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net


E2 SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





r Section E -SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012


I IOME 'RONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL


INSIDE
I Sikorski's
r. Attic
PAGE E6


ESTATE GUIDE


This product image courtesy of
Wayfair shows the Rachael Ray
Porcelain Enamel 10-Piece Cook-
ware Set in Yellow. Yellow can be
cheerful and uplifting, or mellow
and warm. It plays well with all
woods and most other colors, and
complements a wide range of
decor styles.


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40 January22- 28, 2012 VIEWFINDER CITRU COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FACTORY
AUTHORIZED i
DEALER


t turn to the experts,'


AIR CONDITIONING
W & HEATING


State Certified
CAC010415


' Having an

air duct leak

does just that
Leaky ducts contribute to the loss
of cool ancd warm conditioned air
resulting in high energy bills. They
also force your system to work
harder and wear out sooner.
Excess humidity levels caused by
leaky ducts can lead to cosily home
repairs and musty odors and other
indoor air qualityy (IAQ) issues.
You can (ount on the experience
anid skill ol Bay Area employees,
who have been sealing ducts for
years. Let them seal your (ducts to
50% or less, GUARANTEED!

AEROLSEAL.

Certified Duct Diagnostics & Sealing


3W5 352-795-C(gOL
www.bayareacool.com
Resources: http://www.doe.goviarticles/breakthrough-berkeley-mist-sealant-technology-potential-save-americans-5-billion-year


Call today and start saving[


40 January 22 28, 2012


VIEWFINDER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE