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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02654
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-13-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02654

Full Text



Girls weightlifting: C.R., Citrus square off yet again /


I-FR IDAYI


CITRUS


COUNTY,,


TODAY & Saturday morning -
HIGH Partly cloudy and windy
5LO with some decrease in
LOW
32 clouds later in the day.
PAGE A4
JANUARY 13, 2012 Florida's Best Communit


ONICLT
L www.chronicleonline.com
L Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


Wanted: angel with wings


Occupy
Citrus rally
this weekend
An Occupy Citrus
General Assembly
and rally will take
place from 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
14, at Courthouse
Square in Inverness.
A meeting will pre-
cede the rally at
noon. The rally is for
any citizen con-
cerned about corpo-
rate money in
politics, Social Secu-
rity, Medicare, livable
wages, affordable
housing, health care
costs and dwindling
resources. For infor-
mation, email occupy
citrus@gmail.com.
-From staff reports


SHOCKING VIDEO:
War crimes?
Footage purports to
show four Marines
urinating on the corpses
of Taliban fighters, and
U.S. promises a full
investigation./Page A14
WATCH YOUR HEAD:
Space plunk
Russian craft planned
for Mars moon mission
expected to fall into the
sea Sunday or Monday.
/Page A14
WINTER WEATHER:
I : I I


Snow pow
Alaska residents try to
dig out of snow-covered
homes./Page A14
NIGERIAN OIL:




40 jz) ,A)7 1*



Tensions,
prices rise
Union threatens to halt
Nigerian oil production;
world oil prices soar in
response./Page A14
OPINION:
It's hard
to argue
against anyone
who is trying
to create
jobs.



SCENE:
Big screen
A look at the year's
upcoming movies.
/Page Cl


Comics .......... C9
Community .......C7
Crossword ....... .C8
Editorial ........ A12
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6
Lottery Numbers ...B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds .... .. .C10
TV Listings ....... C8


6 I18l47l8l1 II 2002!


Beloved resident needs help

returning home for final days


NANCY KENN
Staff Writer
INVERNESS -


E


Tindale Van Ness
wants to come
home.
Known as "Grand-
mother" to hun-
dreds of Citrus
County kids of all
ages who grew up in
the local 4-H clubs
and learned to ride
horses from her, it's


DY Brookhaven, Miss., under
hospice care. But she
wants to die at home in In-
Eloise verness, in the farmhouse


Elo
Van P


she and her hus-
band, "Mr. Mike"
Van Ness, built on
Croft Avenue
- where she lived for
, ,~ more than 60 years
where she
raised her kids and
where her husband
ise died.
Ness This past Septem-
ber, she and daughter Ricki
Abbe went to Mississippi
See Page A5


Mrs. Van Ness' last dying
wish to come home to In-
verness for her final days.
Currently, she's in


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Citrus County
Sheriff's Office East-side Patrol
Commander Capt. Buddy Grant has
thrown down the gauntlet for the
criminally inclined.
"If you don't like what we are
doing, you really have three op-
tions: quit committing crimes, move
out of the county or you go to jail,"
Grant said.
What the sheriff's office is doing
is assiduously following a new kind
of policing that is quickly gaining
favor by both disrupting the activi-
ties of criminals and drastically cut-
ting crime rates.
Intelligence-Led Policing (ILP)
involves the collection and analysis
of information on habitual offend-
ers and their affiliates.
The method began in the U.K.
back in the 1990s, but quickly
gained currency as law enforce-
ment agencies began tackling ter-


Eloise Van
Ness is
pictured
during a
Hernando
cattle
drive in
2008. Her
family is
seeking
help in
getting
the ailing
Mrs. Van
Ness from
Mississippi
to
Inverness,
where she
wants to
spend her
final days.
Special to the
Chronicle


The thing is, we have a few people
committing most of the crimes,
and a lot of them know each other.


Capt. Buddy Grant
sheriff's office east-side patrol commander.


rorism. It has since taken root in the
U.S. and Florida. Hillsborough
County and Pasco County also use
the policing technique.
"It is heavily driven by technol-
ogy, but our deputies are out there
making contact with the persons of
interest and all these other people
they know. That information is then
fed back to our analysts, who put
everything together. It's a team ef-
fort, and if a crime happens, it helps
us quickly identify who we think is
involved," Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said.
He said in police parlance, the
process is called "scrubbing."
It is Grant and his crew who take


the lead in the scrubbing process.
Grant meets with unit leaders
every Tuesday to list and de-list Cit-
rus County's most watched. This
week, there were about a dozen on
the list and just as many who went
off the list.
"It is all based on intel we gath-
ered about them," Grant said.
He said those who were removed
from the list either cleaned up their
acts or are in jail. Others may have
moved. A new list is generated
every month, Grant said.
"The thing is, we have a few
See Page A7


Proposed Levy nuclear plant draws speakers


Residents talk about facility's

potential impact on environment


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- With
two nuclear plants in Levy
County looming on the hori-
zon, residents voiced their
opinions Thursday about
the effect on the Nature
Coast's environment.
Three judges came to the
Plantation Inn Resort to lis-
ten to them: two engineers,


Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau
and Anthony J. Baretta, and
an attorney, Alex S. Karlin,
who was the chairman.
They were assigned by the
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission (NRC) Atomic
Safety and Licensing Board
to conduct contested hear-
ings for the Levy plant's
Combined License Applica-
tion to construct and oper-
ate the plant.


Karlin first explained
that the judges were inde-
pendent of the NRC Atomic
Safety and Licensing
Board. He said only one
contention currently was
admitted in the Levy COLA
review. It was filed by the
Nuclear Information and
Resource Service, the Ecol-
ogy Party of Florida and the
Green Party of Florida.
The contention states the
Draft Environmental Im-
pact Statement (DEIS) and
its reliance upon State of
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection


Conditions of Certification
fails to comply with codes
and regulations because it
fails to address impacts of
constructing and operating
the proposed facility on
wetlands, floodplains, spe-
cial aquatic sites and other
waters associated with both
dewatering and salt drift
and salt deposition from
cooling towers that use salt
water being situated in an
inland, freshwater wetland
area.
Allowing the contention
See Page A7


EDC

president-

elect

walks out

following

split vote

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO -A split deci-
sion to allow the city gov-
ernments to designate their
own representatives on the
Citrus County Economic
Development Council
board triggered the newly
selected president-elect to
resign abruptly and leave
the regular
board meet-
ing in haste
morning.
b "I can see
where this
is heading,"
Dale Mc-
Andy Clellan said
Houston after an-
nouncing his resignation.
"If you don't see where this
is headed, read online
(Chronicle) Sound Off ... I
apologize, but I'm leaving."
The chorus of disap-
proval began during the dis-
cussion of an agenda item
that was introduced during
the board's
last meet-
ing in No-
ve mber.
Crystal
River City
Manager
Andy Hous-
ton pro-
Dale posed the
McClellan EDC's by-
laws, which stated the city
managers from both Crystal
River and Inverness had to
sit on the board, be changed
so the Crystal River City
Council could select its own
representative from the city
on the board.
After a brief discussion
during the November meet-
ing, it was agreed the issue
would be shelved and ad-
dressed at the next regular
board meeting. During
Thursday's meeting, John
Siefert, executive director
of the EDC, announced the
executive board had de-
cided to leave the bylaws as
is.
Houston, though he said
he appreciated the board's
recommendation, called at-
tention to the fact if a
county commissioner-not
the county administrator -
can speak for the whole
county, a city council mem-
ber could also represent its
city.
"The city should have
that right," Houston said.
Inverness City Manager
Frank DiGiovanni agreed,
stating the bylaws only say a
member of the county com-
mission has to be appointed
to the board, while the city
managers are the only ones
mentioned specifically by
title.
Dr Philip Geist, area di-
rector of the Small Business
Development Center at the
University of North Florida,
uniform to make sure all
governmental entities are

the county, not the cities,"
Siefert asserted. "The
BOCC (Board of County
Commission) provides the
funds for this board."
Houston, however, ques-
tioned what the board had
to fear in changing the by-
laws.
"The council just wants to
have that flexibility," he
added.
Following much debate, a
motion from Houston to
modify the bylaws passed
See Page A5


VOLUME 117 ISSUE 159


Eyes on crime


Special to the Chronicle
Deputies Thomas Indorato, left, and Joe Casola talk to a Citrus County resident recently. The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office is on the second year of implementing Intelligence-Led Policing (ILP). The technique involves informa-
tion gathering and analysis to both deter and solve crimes.

Technique involves information gathering; analysis to fight crime





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lecanto-area residents are in for a rare treat when
the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers
(IGSDB) host an event here, from January 9th 14th,
at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites. The company has
identified this region as prime territory for purchasing
your precious metals-especially gold and silver. The
IGSDB estimates that local residents have millions of
dollars worth of valuables that they no longer need
or want. That is where the IGSDB comes in-they
specialize in buying those items from local sellers in
the U.S., Canada and Europe.
Items like gold coins, scrap gold, sterling silver
and tea sets also diamond rings are in high demand
right now, and IGSDB is purchasing massive quantities
of them on behalf of their global network of collectors,
dealers and refineries.
Currently on an international tour, IGSDB has
included Lecanto on its list of stops for this week.
Residents are urged to mark their calendar for this
special opportunity to meet one-on-one with gold,
silver and diamond specialists.
Because of IGSDB's low overhead, extensive
resources and massive volume, the company is often
able to pay out more than other dealers and retailers.
Many customers are surprised at how much they
are offered for seemingly small amounts. "I had two
bent herringbone necklaces, a class ring, and some
outdated earrings that I brought to a show. I walked
out with $425 in less than 15 minutes," said a satisfied
guest.
Providing an economic boost to each region it
visits, the IGSDB projects to pay out $350,000 at
each event-a testament to the high volume of items
they purchase and the prime prices being paid. Offers
are made based on rarity, numismatic value, condition
and market value.
Company spokesman Matthew Enright says, "We
just paid $4,700 for a loose 1.25-carat diamond.
Our mission is to pay local residents on the spot for
sterling silverware, fine jewelry, coins and precious
metals-especially silver and gold." The company has
seen a huge influx of gold lately. "Customers have
been scrambling to cash into the record-high value of
gold," adds Enright. For those who are unsure if their
items are genuine gold or silver, or simply costume,
company will test it for free. "The best strategy is to
bring all items to the show for a free evaluation from
our specialists. It always amazes me how a small
handful of gold and silver can turn into hundreds of
dollars in just a few moments. We test, weigh, and buy
items right on the spot," Enright says.
At a recent show, a small-town dentist had a nice
pay day. "I have been collecting dental gold for years
from patients who didn't want their extracted teeth.
It really added up-my check is for over $31,000!"


While most people don't have buckets of dental gold
at their fingertips, they do have $750 worth of scrap
gold scattered throughout their homes or mismatched
earrings.
In addition to scrap gold, fine jewelry and
diamonds, coins are a big hit. Offers will be made on
all coins dated 1970 and earlier-gold coins, silver,
silver dollars, half dollars, quarters, nickels and dimes.
Enright explains, "U.S. coins made before 1970 are
worth more than their legal tender amount because
they contain 90% silver. Rare dates and mint marks
can make them even more valuable. We recently paid
$78,000 for an amazing coin collection. One couple
brought in a rusty coffee can filled with silver coins,
sawdust, and a dead spider. The can had been in
the basement for years. We were happy to send them
home with a check for more than $700!"
Lecanto-area residents should start collecting their
valuables now to bring to the free event, which runs
Monday Saturday. Deals will be made and money
will be paid on the spot. Attendance is expected
to be high, but no appointment is needed. Enright
encourages everyone to take advantage of this special
opportunity to meet directly with specialists from the
International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers. He
concludes, "It's a great chance for people to cash in
their old diamonds, jewelry, coins and scrap gold.
This is a seller's market, so don't miss out!"


COSTUME AND GOLD JEWELRY


SILVER


GOLD COINS


WHO INTERNATIONAL GOLD,'-IIr.
^BISELL THE;fHIR GOLDSLVER,






Dv IAMONDS &TREASURE
WHEREOLIDAYINNE..o SII^H
^^ SUITES
903 E. GULF TOLAKEHW
^LEBANigLg3,A61
WHEN JANUARY 9TH 1 A 1
^^^^^MON-FRI 9AM-6B|M

^^^^^SATURDAY 9AM^4PM
DIRECTIONS 352.341.3515
INFORMTT

WRIST & POCKET
WATCHES


INTERNATIONAL


Buyers


MILITARY ITEMS


GOLD & SILVER

"EXPRESS PASS"


NO WAITING IN LINE


GOLD 1
TRADING AT ALL TIME HI
OW IS THE TIME TO CASH


Bring this pass and beat the lines
Don't miss your chance of cashing in
at these Record High Gold & Silver
Prices

ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers


paying on the spot for valuables this week

in Lecanto!
By David Morgan
STAFF WRITER


mmmmmmm
mmmmmmm=


A2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012







Page A3 -FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY


Busy year prompts small changes at Daystar


Group seeks to foster
healing, racial unity
The Institute for Healing
Racism, an informal discus-
sion group to foster healing
and racial unity, will meet
from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 14, at Central Ridge
Library, 425 W. Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
All are welcome to the
meetings, scheduled for the
second Saturday each
month.
Political training starts
Saturday Jan. 14
Florida Campaign for Lib-
erty will host a two-day politi-
cal training school Jan. 14
and 15, specifically intended
to teach how to win political
fights. The sessions are not
focused on learning how to
research a bill or how to
schmooze lawmakers, ac-
cording to information pro-
vided by local coordinator
Edna Mattos. They're aimed
at confronting those who
would seek to take away
freedoms.
On Sunday, Jan. 15, there
will be special instructions on
fundraising, voter outreach,
media and other advice for
potential candidates, cam-
paign managers and
activists.
The cost is $30 per person,
which covers all materials,
lunch on Saturday and
snacks on Sunday.
RSVP required by going to:
www.donationpages.com/
Directory/EventECard/1452.
If unable to access the Inter-
net, participants can pay at
the door.
The sessions, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14,
and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
15, will be at the Inverness
Women's Club, 1715 Forest
Ave., Inverness, off State
Road 44.
For more information, call
407-908-2749 or fax 407-
933-4242.
Lincoln Day dinner
scheduled for Feb. 10
The annual Lincoln Day
Dinner will be Friday, Feb. 10,
at the College of Central
Florida's Citrus Campus on
County Road 491 in Lecanto.
Social hour starts at 5:30
p.m. and dinner is at 7 p.m.
Keynote speaker at the
dinner is U.S. Rep. Richard
Nugent, R-Brooksville.
Tickets are a $50 donation,
which covers the cost of din-
ner. There will be a cash beer
and wine bar.
To purchase tickets, con-
tact C.J. Dixon at 352-
220-0458.
Corporate sponsorships
are available by calling Avis
Craig at 352-634-2116.
Hazardous waste
drop-off tomorrow
The county's next haz-
ardous household waste col-
lection is Saturday, Jan. 14,
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the
Citrus County Central Land-
fill, on Gulf to Lake Hwy. in
Lecanto.
Hazardous waste collec-
tion is free to the public at the
Citrus County Central Landfill
each Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m.
For more information, call
352-527-7670 or visit the
county website at: www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm, or
send e-mail to hazwasteinfo@
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
-From staff reports


Correction

Due to reporter error, the
cookbook featured in Thurs-
day's Over Easy column was
misnamed. The name of the
book is "A Well-Seasoned
Kitchen," and its authors are
Sally Clayton and Lee Clay-
ton Roper.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by


mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling 352-
563-5660.


Nonprofit hopes to

smoothprocesses
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER It was a busy
year for Daystar Life Center
Possibly the busiest it has ever
seen.
According to the nonprofit organ-
ization which supplies clothing,
food, financial assistance and other
services to people in need, although
food requests were down from the
previous year, the number of house-
holds helped went up.
Denise Kennard, executive direc-


tor, said Friday that Daystar pro-
vided roughly 26,000 services and
served more than 3,300 families in
2010. Surprisingly, only 1,500 of
those served were repeat clients.
"You think the same clients come
back year after year," she said, "but
it was less than half."
Also during 2011, Daystar gave
out more than 160,000 pounds of
food, which was down from 175,530
pounds distributed in 2010.
Nevertheless, while the demand
for food assistance from Daystar
was slightly down, the need for
monetary aid was up almost 10 per-
cent. Daystar provided a whopping
total of $152,205.61 worth of assis-
tance to those who needed help
with goods, utilities, transportation


and prescriptions in 2011. Just in
clothing alone, Kennard said
Daystar gave out more than $26,000
worth, according to their thrift store
sales.
"We were very busy," she said.
But what came as the biggest sur-
prise in 2011 was seeing an increase
in the number of homeless families
coming through their doors.
"The problems are becoming a lot
more complex," Kennard said.
It's not just about having enough
food for dinner at the end of the
week. The issues involve people on
the verge of losing their homes due
to lengthy unemployment or fami-
lies who can't keep up to date on
their utility bills.
It's a growing problem in Citrus


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Barbara Grimes, Inverness Garden Club chaplain and past president, looks through some of the club's archives
Thursday with current club president Audrey Shepard. In the background, Sandra Hume looks at the display of
craft items made by club members.



Garden Club celebrates 40


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

On Thursday, the mem-
bers of the Inverness Gar-
den Club met at
Whispering Pines Park
recreation building to
look back on their 40
years as a club and to


look forward.
Over the past 40 years
the club has: presented
living trees to local
schools, given countless
educational programs in
the community, put on
flower shows, coordi-
nated a Bicentennial
Salute on Patriot's Day in


1976 at Courthouse
Square, dedicated a "lib-
erty tree" on July 4, 1976,
at Cooter Pond, helped
underwrite the cost of
landscaping signs on U.S.
41 and State Road 44 in
Inverness and given away
thousands of trees and
shrubs.


Coming up: On Friday,
Jan. 20, garden club mem-
bers will be at Winn-
Dixie, Publix and
Wal-Mart (all in Inver-
ness) giving away 1,000
Dahoon holly trees. For
information about the
club, call Gert Taber at
352-726-8714.


Hospital trustees seek consultant for health plan


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Not
everything in the new law
involving Citrus Memorial
hospital is up for legal
debate.
The new law also directs
the Citrus County Hospital
Board of Trustees to de-
velop a community health
plan.
Board members say they
do not have the expertise to
do that, so they plan to hire
a consultant
The board, at its Feb. 12
meeting is expected to ap-
prove sending requests for
proposals to companies to
write a plan that addresses
Citrus County health care


needs.
Board
chairman
Michael
Small-
.. ridge said
he and
CCHB
Michael chief exec-
Smallridge utive offi-
cer Vickie
LaMarche are compiling a
list of stakeholders to invite
to the process.
He said before that
process begins in earnest,
the board should be di-
rected by an expert.
"The more time I spent
on this thing, the more I re-
alized we need a profes-
sional," Smallridge said.
The legislation gives lit-


tle direction. Section 5,
number 2 reads simply that
the board of trustees will
"develop and implement a
county health plan." It
doesn't say what the plan
should include.
Smallridge said at least
two counties, Broward and
Alachua, have county
health plans. "Seems like
they're all generally the
same thing," he said.
Asked why the hospital
board doesn't simply re-
view other counties' health
plans as a basis for the Cit-
rus plan, Smallridge said a
consultant would know
best how to do that.
"There's no two counties
the same," he said. "What
I've been told and what I've


read, if you try to assemble
something that is not pro-
fessionally done, you take
the risk of alienating or
leaving some people out."
Smallridge said he had
no idea about the potential
cost of a consultant.
The law took effect in
July, except for Section 16,
which gives trustees
member control of the Cit-
rus Memorial Health
Foundation. The founda-
tion sued the state and
trustees to overturn that
section and all sides are
awaiting a ruling from a
Leon County judge.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


unty, Kennard said. Therefore, in
e new year, Daystar will focus on
eamlining and implementing
vices to better serve families in
ed.
We're going to try to re-arrange
offices a bit," she said. "We're
ing to smooth out processes and
structure to help homeless
lilies."
)aystar is open from 9 a.m. to 2
n. Monday through Friday. It is lo-
ed at 6751 W Gulf-to-Lake High-
y, across from the Publix
upping center in Crystal River.
For more information, call 352-
5-8668.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
i be reached at 352-564-2924 or
iles@chronicleonline. com.



Modest

growth

predicted

for tax

collection

Associated Press

TALLLAHASSEE Cit-
ing an "abnormally slow re-
covery," state economists on
Thursday continued to pre-
dict modest growth in the
coming year's tax
collections.
The new forecast is in line
with past predictions,
meaning it is expected to do
little to make a dent in the
state's nearly $2 billion
budget shortfall.
Now the GOP-controlled
Legislature must decide
whether to accept the new es-
timates and move ahead on
putting together a new
budget or delay and hope
that the state's economy picks
up more than anticipated.
So far it appears top leg-
islative leaders remain di-
vided on what to do next.
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos suggested
again that legislators should
think about waiting until
later in the year
"I firmly believe that this
gives us, as the budget writ-
ers for this state, more rea-
son to proceed with
caution," Haridopolos said
in a statement. "As I have
stated before, I firmly be-
lieve it's important that we
finalize a budget only when
we are confident that we
have the most accurate and
reliable numbers possible."
The state's fiscal year
starts July 1 and usually leg-
islators wait until early May
before passing the annual
budget. Lawmakers started
their annual session early
this year in order to deal
with the once-a-decade job
of drawing new maps for
congressional and legisla-
tive districts.
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-
Clearwater, said many sena-
tors agree with Haridopolos
about postponing any work
on the budget.
"What's the rush?" Lat-
vala asked.
That attitude has not been
shared by leading House Re-
publicans, who say there's no
reason that legislators can't
finish all their work within
the normal 60-day calendar
House Speaker Dean
Cannon, R-Winter Park, said
that getting the budget done
will help send the right mes-
sage to Floridians.
Gov Rick Scott also said
he would like to see legisla-
tors finish on time.
"Unless somebody has a
better idea.... It seems to me
we ought to go forward and
get it done," Scott said.
Part of the stalemate
could be about the normal
posturing that goes on be-
tween the two chambers at
the start of the session. But
there are political ramifica-
tions either way
Some voters could get
upset if legislators are
forced to return for a spe-
cial session later in the year
But Latvala said if the
economy continues to re-


cover, there's a chance that
lawmakers could have more
money and avoid the need
for extensive budget cuts.






A4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012




Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
James Lee Godwin, 47,
Yankeetown, at 11:49 a.m. Tues-
day on charges of interfering with
a fire sprinkler system (in a cell)
and criminal mischief. Bond
$2,500.
Daniel Joseph Piemon-
tesi, 53, 7822 E. Wisp Terrace,
at 11:44 a.m. Tuesday on
charges of burglary and grand
theft (pills and jewelry). He was
released on own recognizance.
Katie Danielle Mazzei, 25,
7795 W. Chass. Drive, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:20 a.m. Tuesday
on a charge of fraud with com-
munication. She was released
on her own recognizance.
Quincy Wayne Allen, 29,
771 N. Conant Ave., Crystal
River, 11:15 a.m. Tuesday on
charges of introduction of contra-
band into a detention facility and
possession of marijuana. Bond
$5,500.
James Edward Borton,
34, 908 Constitution Blvd., Inver-
ness, 8:35 p.m. Tuesday on
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance (Roxycodone)
and paraphernalia. Bond $4,500.
Joshua R. Keller, 22, 5639
S. Scarlet Oak Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 9:45 p.m. Tuesday
on charges of trafficking in stolen
property (copper tubing), bur-
glary and grand theft. Bond
$10,000.
Burglaries
M A burglary to an unoccupied
residence occurred on April 10,
2011 in the 5100 block of S.
Teresa Point, Homosassa.
M A burglary to an unoccupied
residence occurred on Nov. 28 in
the 3100 block of E. Grapeleaf
Lane, Inverness.
A burglary to an unoccupied
residence occurred at about 11
a.m. Jan. 9 in the 1600 block of
N. Oakhaven Terrace, Inverness.
A burglary to an unoccupied
residence occurred at about


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each type
of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Offense Re-
ports to see lists of burglary, theft and vandalism.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* To volunteer for the Citrus County Sheriff's Office Vol-
unteer Unit, call Sgt. Chris Evan at 352-527-3701 or
email cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


7 p.m. Jan. 10 in the 300 block of
S. Roselyn Way, Lecanto.
Thefts
A petit theft occurred at
about 10 p.m. Jan. 8 in the 1200
block of Cypress Cove Court, In-
verness.
A vehicle theft occurred at
about 6 p.m. Jan. 9 in the 7400
block of W. Vineyard Drive,
Homosassa.
A grand theft ($300 or more)
occurred at about 3 a.m. Jan. 10
in the 8200 block of E. Jane
Lane, Floral City.
A petit theft occurred at
about 6 a.m. Jan. 10 in the 4400
block of W. Pinto Loop, Beverly
Hills.
A petit theft ($100 or more)
occurred at about 8 a.m. Jan. 10
in the 1000 block of S.E.U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
A retail petit theft occurred at
about 9:50 a.m. Jan. 10 in the
100 block of S. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 4:50 p.m. Jan. 10 in the
1800 block of N.W. U.S. High-
way 19, Crystal River.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 6 p.m. Jan. 10 in the
2800 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A retail petit theft occurred at
about 7 p.m. Jan. 10 in the 3700
block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Crys-
tal River.


Vandalisms
A vandalism ($200 or more)
occurred at about 10:30 p.m.
Jan. 7 in the 80 block of S. Otis
Avenue, Lecanto.
A vandalism ($200 or less)
occurred at about 10 a.m. Jan. 3
in the 8600 block of W. Moon-
haze Court, Crystal River.
A vandalism ($1,000 or
more) occurred at about 6 p.m.
Jan. 7 in the 2400 block of E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
A vandalism ($200 or less)
occurred at about 11:30 p.m.
Jan. 9 in the 1200 block of N.
Foxrun Terrace, Inverness.


Fla. to close 11 prisons


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
state of Florida is closing
seven of its state prisons
and four work camps for a
savings of roughly $90 mil-
lion through 2013.
But what wasn't clear
after Thursday's announce-
ment was how many of the
nearly 1,300 employees
who work at those facilities,
including corrections offi-
cers, would still have jobs.
"I'm not going to guaran-
tee we can place every-
one," said Corrections
Secretary Kenneth S.
Tucker. He did say he
would reach out to other
state agencies and county
sheriffs to find jobs for cor-
rections workers.
Tucker said individual
facilities were evaluated
for closing based on a scor-
ing system that includes
factors such as cost per in-
mate. Another was "com-
munity impact," which
counts the loss of business
to local vendors.


The final decisions were
strictly business, he said.
He noted the state has
more prison room than it has
inmates, about 116,000 beds
for 100,000 current inmates.
The prisons being closed
are Broward Correctional
Institution in Fort Laud-
erdale, Demilly Correc-
tional Institution in Polk
City, Gainesville Correc-
tional Institution in
Alachua County, Hillsbor-
ough Correctional Institu-
tion near Tampa, Indian
River Correctional Institu-
tion in Vero Beach, Jeffer-
son Correctional
Institution in Monticello
and both units of New
River Correctional Institu-
tion in Raiford.
Work camps being shut-
tered are River Junction
Work Camp in Chatta-
hoochee, Caryville Work
Camp in Washington
County, Hendry Work Camp
in Immokalee and Levy
Forestry Camp in Ocala.
No inmates will be re-
leased early as a result of the


agency's consolidation plan.
Inmates at the prisons and
camps slated for closure will
be moved to other facilities.
Ken Wood, acting presi-
dent of Teamsters Local
2011, the union that repre-
sents corrections officers,
noted that the closings an-
nouncement came just as
union and state representa-
tives were about to review
new contract proposals.
"The closings of these
prisons are on the backs of
hardworking officers who
keep Florida communities
safe," Wood said.
Sen. Mike Fasano said
Tucker had been briefed
him on the closures earlier
this week. The New Port
Richey Republican chairs
the subcommittee on Crim-
inal and Civil Justice Ap-
propriations, which
oversees the budget for the
corrections department.
Fasano said about 300
corrections employees, in-
cluding corrections offi-
cers, quit or retire every
month.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

Fictitious Name Notices........................C14

Meeting Notices.....................................C14
Lien Notices ............................................ C 14


Miscellaneous Notices..........................C14

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices..........C13

Notice to Creditors/Administration......C13

..... Self Storage Notices..............................C13


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 20 knots.
Seas 4 to 6 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Expect partly
cloudy and breezy conditions today.


75 54 NA 75 53 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by-
SPTODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 57 Low: 32
Partly cloudy and windy

I SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 59 Low: 30
Partly cloudy

r l SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 65 Low: 36
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 73/50
Record 84/20
Normal 71/48
Mean temp. 62
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.15 in.
Total for the year 0.15 in.
Normal for the year 1.18 in.
"As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 29.89 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 57
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 57%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper, Elm
Today's count: 7.6/12
Saturday's count: 7.1
Sunday's count: 8.8
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/13 FRIDAY 8:46 2:34 9:11 2:59
1/14 SATURDAY 9:41 3:28 10:06 3:53


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
1B.7


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:53 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ...................7:25 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................10:35 P.M.
MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:04A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness/Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even
addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd
addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River*
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Lov
7:50 a/3:53
6:11 a/1:15
3:58 a/11:2
7:00 a/2:52


*At King's Bay
Friday
w High/Low
a 8:38 p/4:12 p
a 6:59 p/1:34 p
2a 4:46 p/11:51 p
a 7:48 p/3:11 p


***At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
8:43 a/4:41 a 9:14 p/4:51 p
7:04 a/2:03 a 7:35 p/2:13 p
4:51 a/12:01 p 5:22 p/--
7:53 a/3:40 a 8:24 p/3:50 p


Gulf water
temperature


66
Taken at Aripoka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.69 27.72 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.48 34.48 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.59 36.62 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.21 38.22 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision- In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY


Thursday Friday
City H L Pep. Fcst H L City


Albany 37 32 .57 rs 39 21
Albuquerque 42 24 s 46 24
Asheville 54 33 .02 pc 33 19
Atlanta 59 40 s 43 23
Atlantic City 57 46 .66 w 46 28
Austin 51 37 s 58 25
Baltimore 57 44 .60 w 41 26
Billings 43 18 pc 47 24
Birmingham 51 35 s 44 25
Boise 35 19 pc 39 23
Boston 43 36 .91 sh 49 26
Buffalo 45 37 .76 sn 31 19
Burlington, VT 34 19 .06 sn 39 8
Charleston, SC 66 45 s 52 32
Charleston, WV 50 41 .14 sn 28 18
Charlotte 58 43 s 45 26
Chicago 37 26 .25 sn 21 12
Cincinnati 47 23 .12 sn 27 16
Cleveland 45 39 .04 sn 28 21
Columbia, SC 65 45 s 49 27
Columbus, OH 46 31 .25 sn 26 15
Concord, N.H. 32 26 34 rs 40 18
Dallas 42 31 s 54 35
Denver 40 -6 s 46 24
Des Moines 18 10 pc 24 15
Detroit 41 34 .17 sn 32 20
El Paso 45 32 s 55 32
Evansville, IN 45 19 .04 pc 26 18
Harrisburg 49 42 .61 w 35 23
Hartford 39 36 .76 sh 46 26
Houston 60 41 s 57 34
Indianapolis 41 16 .04 sn 20 12
Jackson 48 38 s 47 28
Las Vegas 58 34 s 59 39
Little Rock 48 31 s 44 27
Los Angeles 76 52 s 73 48
Louisville 46 23 .09 c 27 19
Memphis 47 29 pc 42 27
Milwaukee 36 23 .22 SI 23 12
Minneapolis 14 10 pc 15 8
Mobile 62 47 pc 52 30
Montgomery 57 40 s 49 25
Nashville 47 27 .01 pc 36 22
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstonns; wzwlndy.
@2012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Thursday Friday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 60 50 pc 50 31
New York City 45 42 1.39 w 45 29
Norfolk 65 52 .01 w 48 27
Oklahoma City 37 22 s 51 26
Omaha 20 9 pc 29 18
Palm Springs 75 56 s 70 45
Philadelphia 53 40 .68 w 43 26
Phoenix 65 45 s 68 42
Pittsburgh 46 41 .55 sn 25 17
Portland, ME 33 25 1.10 sh 43 21
Portland, Ore 44 27 pc 48 33
Providence, R.I. 43 37 1,54 sh 50 25
Raleigh 59 44 s 46 25
Rapid City 34 6 pc 41 26
Reno 48 18 S 48 22
Rochester, NY 45 36 .59 sn 34 17
Sacramento 65 31 s 60 33
St. Louis 39 16 .15 pc 26 17
St. Ste. Marie 37 27 .02 sn 13 -6
Salt Lake City 33 15 pc 36 23
San Antonio 54 40 s 59 30
San Diego 70 55 s 73 49
San Francisco 62 40 s 60 44
Savannah 69 45 s 53 29
Seattle 43 29 pc 45 39
Spokane 30 13 pc 32 21
Syracuse 41 36 .68 sn 36 14
Topeka 27 16 pc 37 20
Washington 57 44 .24 w 40 26
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 81 Stuart, Fla. LOW -26 Fraser, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 85/68/pc
Amsterdam 44/35/pc
Athens 53/39/s
Beijing 35/14/s
Berlin 40/31/rs
Bermuda 71/66/ts
Cairo 60/48/sh
Calgary 38/21/pc
Havana 80/63/ts
Hong Kong 67/62/sh
Jerusalem 49/41/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
,..- ur Lt,1
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


57/40/pc
45/33/pc
52/30/c
74/46/pc
28/8/sn
32/25/sn
46/34/pc
91/74/ts
58/39/pc
78/62/pc
49/35/s
31/14/sn
36/39/sn


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


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JA. 111 AN.2 JN.La





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lawmakers consider


hospital measures


The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE A
House panel Thursday ap-
proved a bill that would lead
to circuit judges reviewing
the sales or leases of public
hospitals, amid signs that
opposition to the proposal
could be evaporating.
The Safety Net Hospital
Alliance of Florida, which
includes public hospitals,
fought and ultimately
helped kill a similar pro-
posal last year. But Nick
larossi, a lobbyist for the al-
liance, said Thursday it can
support a review process,
though it would like to see
some changes in the bill.
"I think cooler heads have
prevailed from last year,"
larossi said after the House
Health & Human Services
Quality Subcommittee
unanimously approved the
proposal (HB 711).
Public hospitals face
mounting political pressure,
as Sen. Don Gaetz, R-
Niceville, is sponsoring an-
other bill designed to create



EDC
Continued from Page Al

with a majority vote. Ex-
pressing tremendous disap-
proval with the board's
decision, McClellan immedi-
ately announced his resigna-
tion, stating he did not want
to get involved in "politics".
"I see what's going on," he
said.
Both Houston and Geist
asked McClellan to stay, but
he refused and left the
room.
"I'm sorry for that,"
County Commissioner Joe
Meek, EDC president, said
apologetically following Mc-
Clellan's departure.
McClellan said during a
telephone interview Thurs-
day afternoon that he has no
plans on returning to the
EDC board. He contends the
cities want to "control
everything" and be equal to


stricter oversight of sales or
leases of the facilities. Also,
Gov Rick Scott has made
clear he wants major
changes in public hospitals,
appointing a commission
that recently offered wide-
ranging recommendations.
Rep. Ed Hooper, a Clear-
water Republican who is
sponsoring the House pro-
posal, said public hospitals
might be trying to work out
differences on the sale-or-
lease issue because they an-
ticipate a bill passing this
year. Hooper also said he
thinks Scott would be re-
ceptive to such a bill.
"I think that's why every-
body's playing nice," he said.
Hooper and other sup-
porters argue that the sales
or leases of public hospitals
need more public scrutiny
Also, for-profit hospital com-
panies, such as Health Man-
agement Associates and
Tenet Healthcare, have
backed the bill because they
say they want to ensure fair
competition when public fa-
cilities are sold or leased.


the county though they only
represent 7 percent of the
county's populace.
The owner of M&B Dairy
in Lecanto said he was not
going to stand by and allow
someone with aspirations to
become a county commis-
sioner to jockey their way
onto the board.
"It's like watching your
kid take drugs," he said.
"That was just raw politics
I'm not going to
participate."
McClellan, however, said
both Meek and Siefert did
nothing wrong and he will
continue to be head of the
Agriculture Alliance of Cit-
rus County and a member of
the EDC.
Siefert said Thursday af-
ternoon that he definitely
still wants to keep the agri-
culture alliance on board
and if they must, the EDC
will select another member
from the group.
However, Siefert said he


ANGEL
Continued from Page A]

to visit Ricki's daughter
While there, Mrs. Van Ness,
89, fell and fractured her hip,
but she was healing, said
daughter Ginger Jackson.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Van Ness
had grown frail. Because her
granddaughter's house was
warmer than the farmhouse
in Inverness, the plan was
for her to stay in Mississippi
through the winter
That was before her
health took a turn for the
worse. Now she's dying and
may only have days left -
and she wants to come
home.
The family needs ideas. Or
an angel who knows how to
make things happen.
Jackson said her mother
can't fly It's a 10-hour drive,
and a car trip wouldn't be
comfortable for her, even
life-threatening. They're
thinking about renting a mo-
torhome. Right now the fam-
ily is overwhelmed and torn
about what to do.
"We just got back from see-
ing her," said Midge Tindale,
Jackson's cousin. "We went
there to bring Aunt Eloise
back home, but we knew we


is hoping McClellan
reconsiders.
"We don't want to lose
him," he said.
Nevertheless, the resigna-
tion will not change how the
EDC does business and
Siefert said the whole issue
with changing the bylaws
was "bureaucratic" and
something Houston was
under the direction of his
council to do.
"I don't see that as politi-
cal," Siefert said.
Houston stated during a
phone interview Thursday
evening that the EDC by-
laws was an issue he raised
alone to the council and the
decision to push for the
change was not driven by
anyone on the council.
No one was "champing at
the bit" to be on the EDC
board, Houston said, but the
council felt it was a proce-
dural thing they wanted
changed.
As far as the change in the


The family is thinking about renting
a motorhome. Right now they
are torn about what to do.


couldn't But we have to get
her here. My aunt was hold-
ing my hand, begging me to
get her home, and I have to
do whatever I can to do this
for her"
Jackson said her mother,
who suffers from dementia,
said she was on a train and if
they stayed on it long
enough, it would get them to
Inverness.
"In my heart, I think she
was trying to figure out how
we could get her home,"
Jackson said. "My kids think
that even if she died on her
way here ... at least she
would know she's on her way
home."
Even though Mrs. Van
Ness wasn't born in Citrus
* County, she has called it
home since she moved to In-
verness with her parents
when she was a girl. The
* family lived off Turner Camp
Road on Cato Lake. Young
Eloise rode to school on a
horse.
t When she met her hus-
band, a rancher from way
back, she fit right in with the


bylaws having to do with
anyone on the city council
running for county commis-
sion, Houston said it wasn't
true and he intends to call
McClellan and clear up any
misinformation.
"I'm hopeful he'll recon-
sider," Houston said.
In other news:
Patty Silvey, treasurer
and head of the micro-loan
committee, resigned from
the board. Stating that Sil-
vey wants to focus her atten-
tion on her job with
SunTrust Banks, Meek pub-
licly thanked her for her
work with the EDC.
The EDC will be looking
for a new representative of
the financial industry to
join the board.
Siefert announced he
would continue to work full-
time as executive director
while a subcommittee
works for the next three
months on developing a suc-
cession plan.


life, riding the open ranges
of rural Citrus County She
has had a life-long love of
horses, her favorite being an
Arabian stallion she named
"Rookie."
Decades ago, she started
Eases Rough Riders 4-H
horse club and volunteered
with 4-H for 49 years. That's
where Hal Porter, Citrus
County Fair Board manager,
first met her when he was 8.
He grew up always having
Mrs. Van Ness in his life.
"She and 'Mr Mike'
adopted me into their family,
and I worked side by side
with them," Porter said. "She
taught me how to be a good
man. She taught me right
from wrong and how to work
She's given me advice and
has been my moral example.
I'm a different person for
having known her, and she's
extremely respected by all
the fair family and 4-H fam-
ily I'm going to miss her
dearly when her time comes.
It's an end of an era for me."
Jackson said 4-H, the
rodeo and horse shows have


In November, a surprise
announcement that Siefert
wanted to cut back his hours
and give the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
more responsibility in the
form of support services
caused a slight uproar from
board members who felt the
proposed idea lacked detail
and direction.
It was proposed Thursday
that a succession committee
be formed to thoroughly
map out the future of the
EDC and create a plan on
how to proceed when
Siefert eventually steps
down.
U Marla Chancey, director
of the Citrus County Visitors
and Convention Bureau,
joined the EDC board as the
new representative from
the Citrus County Tourism
Development Council. The
position was left vacant
after Gail Oakes, owner of
the Homosassa Riverside
Resort, resigned last year


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 A5

been her mom's whole life. A
few years back, the arena at
the county fairgrounds was
named after her Up until
two years ago, she rode in
the annual cattle drive as
part of the Hernando South-
ern Heritage Days.
"She started the horse
shows here," Jackson said.
"They made her an honorary
member of the fair board
and when they dedicated the
arena to her, they gave her a
buckle for her belt She
loved that. She taught so
many to ride. There's not a
kid who was in 4-H that she
hasn't touched."
Jackson said having her so
far away now has been diffi-
cult for the family There's
too many of them for every-
one to travel to Mississippi,
and so many who want to say
good-bye.
"If anyone can help, give
us ideas we don't know
what to do and time is run-
ning out," she said. "But she
will eventually be home. The
Van Ness cemetery is off (US
41), and that's where she'll
be buried."
Call Ginger Jackson at 352-
746-9604.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkennedy@ chronicle
online.com or 352-564-2927.


Siefert stated he, Meek
and Houston have sent let-
ters to the chief executive
officer of Sears Holding
Corporation to try keep
Sears in the Crystal River
Mall. In the meantime, he
said the EDC would be
working with Boxer Retail,
the Dallas-based receiver
that took over management
of the mall in May, to see if
the EDC and possibly the
City of Crystal River could
create some incentives to
entice a new company to the
location. Several members
gave the suggestion of look-
ing for a business outside of
retail.
The EDC board voted to
give Siefert the green light
to advocate for the forma-
tion of a metropolitan plan-
ning organization (MPO).
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at 352-564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
corn.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Evelyn Coon, 99
INVERNESS
Evelyn Coon died Jan. 12,
2012, in Inverness, Fla.

Floy 'Junior'
Fudge Jr., 74
Floy Lee "Junior" Fudge
Jr, age 74, died Tuesday,
Jan. 10, 2012, at his resi-
d e n c e
under the
loving care
of his family
and HPH
Hospice. A |
Funeral >
Service of
Remem- _-__
brance will Floy
be held on Fudge Jr.
Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012, at 3
p.m., at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory The family will receive
friends in visitation from 2
p.m. until the hour of
service.
Junior was born on Nov.
23, 1937, in Deland, Fla., to
the late Floy L. Fudge Sr
and Louise (Taylor) Fudge.
He was a long-distance com-
mercial truck driver Junior
enjoyed fishing and going to
garage sales. He collected
pocket knives and firearms.
A social and outgoing man,
he enjoyed playing pranks
on his friends and family
He was Baptist by faith.
Survivors include his wife
of 55 years, Joyce "Helen"
Fudge, Lecanto; his son
Robert (Michelle) Fudge, In-
verness; brothers, Roy T
(Barbara) Fudge, Tavares,
George (Sharon) Fudge,
Daytona Beach, Charles
(Diane) Fudge, Homosassa;
and sisters, Betty Jean
Fudge, Baytown, TX, Linda
Burns, Scottsdale, AZ, Ethel
Kay Jones and Tina Jones,
both of Baytown, TX; three
grandchildren; three great-
grandchildren; and many
loving nieces and nephews.
He was preceded in death
by his daughter Laverne; a
son, William Lee; and two
brothers, William Donald
and James Edwin.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Ethel
McCauley, 62
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ethel Mildred McCauley,
62, of Crystal River, died
Wednesday Jan. 11, 2012, at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River. Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory Crys-
tal River, FL.

Norma Pelt, 84
YANKEETOWN
Norma D. Pelt, of Yankee-
town, died Thursday, Jan.
12, 2012.

Dean
Poulos, 63
LEESBURG
Dean A. Poulos, age 63,
Leesburg, died Monday, Jan.
9, 2012. The Divine Liturgy
will be held on Monday, Jan.
16, 2012, at 10 a.m. at St.
Michael the Archangel
Greek Orthodox Church.
Burial will follow in Hills of
Rest Cemetery in Floral
City. The family will receive
friends in visitation on Sun-
day, Jan. 15, 2012, from 3 to 5
p.m. when a Trisagion serv-
ice will be offered at Chas.
E. Davis Fuineral Home with
Crematory in Inverness.
Dean was born on Octo-
ber 14, 1948, in Brooklyn,
NY, to John and Alice (Vlas-
sis) Poulos. He was em-
ployed as a medical
technician for American
Home Patient. Dean was an
artist, working in oil paint-
ing and an excellent accor-
dion player He enjoyed
golfing. Dean was Greek Or-
thodox by faith.
Survivors include his
three sons, Christopher
Poulos, Dorchester, MA,
Dennis (Kelli) Poulos, Rock-
land, MA, Jonathan (Shan-
non) Poulos, Woburn, MA;
his mother, Alice Poulos,
Lecanto; his brother, Dennis
(Charlene) Poulos,


Hawthorne, NJ; a sister,
Marion (Bernie) Bienwald,
Center Port, NY; and a
grandson, Jonathan. He was
preceded in death by his fa-
ther, John on May 21, 2004,
and his brother John
Gregory on May 23.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.


Mary 'MaryLou'
Pugatch, 58
BEVERLY HILLS
Mary L. "MaryLou" (Mar-
inucci) Pugatch, age 58, of
Beverly Hills, FL, passed
away on January 9, 2012,
after a long and courageous
battle with cancer She was
the daughter of the late
Guerino and Mary
Marinucci.
Mary was born on October
6, 1953, in Boston, MA, and
moved to Citrus County, FL,
in 1997. Mary defied the
odds and survived more
than 15 years after being di-
agnosed with stage III breast
cancer She was a strong-
willed fighter and will be
greatly missed by her family
Mary is survived by her
son, Ryan Pugatch, of Ash-
land, MA; her sisters, Bar-
bara Sciarra, of Hernando,
FL, and Judith Day, of Her-
nando, FL; and several
nieces and nephews. She
was preceded in death by
her brother, Michael
Marinucci.
Her family will be con-
ducting a private service. In
lieu of flowers, her family
requests that expressions of
sympathy be made to the
American Cancer Society.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.




Joseph
Rovin, 93
CITRUS HILLS
Joseph Rovin, 93, of Citrus
Hills, Florida, passed away
on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012, at
Woodland Terrace Nursing
Home. Joe was born to Russ-
ian immigrants in New York
City on Monday, June 10,
1918. He was preceded in
death by his
sister, Sally
Nocchi and ,
her hus- --- i
band Harry, '*
and by one
grand- d -
daughter,
Core y
Rovin. Joseph
With his Rovin
wife Renate, he retired to
Beverly Hills, Florida in
1983. Joe became an avid
tennis player and enjoyed
extensive traveling and
cruising in this country and
abroad. He was a member of
the local POW organization.
He and his wife were char-
ter members of the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.
Joe served in World War
II and was captured and be-
came a POW in Germany
until liberated by the
French.
He is survived by his wife,
Renate Wilms-Rovin; two
sons, Dennis Rovin and wife
Laura, and Alan Rovin and
wife Beth, both of New York,
New York; five grandchil-
dren; and eight great-grand-
children.
Both a Memorial Service
and burial at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery in Bush-
nell, Florida are being
planned for the near future.
Memorials in Joe's name
may be made to The Citrus
County Family Resource
Center, 2435 N. Florida Av-
enue, Hernando, Florida
34442 or Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, Florida 34464.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
www.ferofuneralhome.
com.


Robert
Watson, 90
HOMOSASSA
Robert Curtis Watson, 90,
of Homosassa, died Thurs-
day, Jan. 12, 2012. Graveside
services with military hon-
ors are scheduled for Fri-
day, Jan. 20, at 2:30 p.m. at
Florida National Cemetery,
Bushnell, Florida. Arrange-
ments under the direction
of the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness, Florida.





James 'Bud'
Willis, 79
HOMOSASSA
James Forrest Willis
passed away at his resi-
dence in the loving arms of
his wife of 32 years, Diane
Plasman
Willis, and .
Hospice of
Citrus
County on
January 9,
2012. He
was born in
Memphis,
TN, to For- James
rest and In- Willis
olene Willis. He moved from
the mountains of North Car-
olina to Homosassa until his
death. James retired from
the Naples Fire Depart-
ment in 1988 and was a Ko-
rean Army veteran.
James leaves behind his
best friend, loving and de-
voted wife, Diane P Willis;
sons, James D. (Lisa) Willis,
Ron Willis, Larry Wills and
Andy (Janis) Willis; sisters,
June Montegue and Dorothy
(Ed) Steiner; granddaugh-
ters, Alanne Willis and
Katherine Willis; two great-
grandsons; sister-in-law,
Sharon (Toby) Scott; his pre-
cious dogs, Amanda Jean
and Mollie Lynn; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Bud was loved by all who
came in contact with him
during his lifetime. He was
a gentle giant. He will be
greatly missed. RIP dear
loved one. Donations may
be made to Hospice of Cit-
rus County. Professional
services entrusted to New
Serenity Memorial Funeral
Home & Cremation Svcs.,
Inc. 352-563-1394.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Ilona Wolf, 71
CHOCOWINITY,
N.C.
Ilona H. Wolf, 71, of
Chocowinity, N.C., died
Wednesday Jan. 11, 2012, at
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River, FL. Private Crema-
tion arrangements are
under the care of Strickland
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory Crystal River, FL.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid
obituaries.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or fax (352)
563-3280.
Phone (352) 563-5660
for details.


Fla. drops in national



education ranking


Spending cuts, student performance blamed


Associated Press

MIAMI After years of
soaring toward the top,
Florida fell from fifth to
11th in a nationwide educa-
tion ranking, a drop driven
largely by weaker student
performance and spending
cuts.
Education Week's annual
"Quality Counts" report
gave the state a C-plus over-
all, down from a B-minus
the year before. The study
grades states based on six
indicators, including K-12
achievement, standards, as-
sessment and accountabil-
ity, and school finance. The
nationwide average was a C.
The biggest drops in
Florida were seen in ele-
mentary and secondary ed-
ucation performance, where
the state's score declined in
all three areas measured -
achievement levels, gains
and the poverty gap. Thirty-
seven percent of fourth
graders scored as proficient
in math on the National As-
sessment of Educational
Progress in 2011, three
points lower than the previ-
ous year, bringing the state's
ranking from 26 down to 33.
Meanwhile, the gap be-
tween low-income and more
affluent students grew.
Florida's overall aca-
demic achievement score
fell by more than 5 points, a
bigger decline than in other
states.
State education spending
also got poor marks, going
from an A last year to a D-
plus in the 2012 report.
Nearly 98 percent of stu-
dents in Florida attend
school in districts where per
pupil spending is less than
the nationwide average.
Those numbers are based
on 2009 figures, and educa-


Florida's education system
ranks among the best, but we still
face some challenges.

Rick Scott
Florida governor.


tion spending has only de-
clined in the years since.
"You see a spending pic-
ture that is really of con-
cern to those interested in
public education in
Florida," said Sterling
Lloyd, project manager for
"Quality Counts."
Lawmakers in Florida
cut education spending last
year by $1.35 billion, or
nearly 8 percent. This year
Gov Rick Scott's recom-
mended budget includes a
$1 billion increase.
"Florida's education sys-
tem ranks among the best
in the nation, but we still
face some challenges,"
Scott said in a statement.
"I'm confident we will con-
tinue to improve."
Education Commissioner
Gerard Robinson said re-
sults from any additional
spending won't show up im-
mediately but will be a fac-
tor in future success.
"We know that our edu-
cational system has been
strained by the economic
downturn," Robinson said.
Florida did receive praise
for its standards, assessment
and accountability practices,
which include rating school
performance, sanctioning
those schools with the lowest
achievement levels and pro-
viding them assistance. The
state was given an A in this
category and ranked fifth
nationwide.
The discordant results -
strong accountability but


weak student performance
- show how complicated it
is to improve achievement,
Lloyd said.
"What it really tells us is
that student achievement is
not driven by a particular set
of policy but affected by a
range of factors," he said. "It
helps to have strong ac-
countability policies, but you
have to have a system that is
functioning well as a whole."
Nationwide, Maryland
was ranked first for the
fourth year in a row, fol-
lowed by Massachusetts,
New York and Virginia.
Florida's performance in
the nationwide rankings
had improved dramatically
in recent years and the
drop is likely to bring new
questions into the ongoing
debate about how to boost
student performance. Law-
makers approved sweeping
changes last year, getting
rid of tenure for new teach-
ers and creating a new
teacher evaluation system
that heavily depends on
student test scores.
"Last year Florida was
recognized for its historic
climb from 31st to fifth
place in just four years,"
said Patricia Levesque, ex-
ecutive director of the
Foundation for Florida's
Future, which is chaired by
former Florida Gov Jeb
Bush. "But this year's lower
ranking is a reminder that
success is never final, and
reform is never finished."


Associated Press

MIAMI -A federal judge
on Thursday urged federal
and state environmental of-
ficials to take real, concrete
steps toward reducing pol-
lution in the Florida Ever-
glades and move away from
the endless court battles
that have stalled progress
for more than two decades.
Saying he is committed to
holding government's "feet
to the fire," U.S. District
Judge Alan Gold pressed
the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and the
state of Florida to work out
the differences in compet-
ing Everglades restoration
plans and come up with a
guaranteed way to pay for
the costly work.
"Elsewise, what we're
doing is going around in
circles, again, trying to fine-
tune something without the
ability to implement it,"
Gold said. "We ought to be
able to state clearly what
we can do and can't do."
The hearing was the lat-
est of many in a lawsuit
originally filed in 2004 by


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the Miccosukee Indian
tribe whose reservation
is in the Everglades -
claiming state and federal
agencies have repeatedly
failed to enforce Clean
Water Act standards in the
vast wetlands. An even
older lawsuit over many of
the same issues dates to
1988.
Last year under Gold's
watch, the EPA proposed a
new $1 billion restoration
plan focused on expanding
huge manmade, buffering
marshes used to filter phos-
phorous from the water be-
fore it flows into the
Everglades. The phospho-
rous comes from fertilizer
used on farms such as
sugar plantations and sub-
urban yards, promoting
growth of unhealthy vege-
tation and choking out na-
tive plants.
A few months later, Re-
publican Gov Rick Scott
proposed an alternative
that the state's attorneys
described Thursday as less
time-consuming and less
costly The EPA is review-

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S"InMemory" a(
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
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or
Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
amiller@chronicleonline .com


ing that plan to see if it
meets federal water quality
standards, even as the
agency tussles with the
state over authority to issue
water discharge permits.
"We want to get on with
the business of restoring
the Everglades," said
Christopher Kise, attorney
for the state Department of
Environmental Protection.
"We haven't lost any mo-
mentum. To the contrary,
we have gained momentum
in the past several months."
Anyone who has followed
the Everglades lawsuits has
heard similar sentiments
before, usually with less-
than-desirable results. Paul
Schwiep, attorney for the
Friends of the Everglades,
noted that the state's new
proposal came only after
the EPA seemed poised to
take over much of the con-
trol of restoration following
orders issued last year by
Gold.
"We do have some skepti-
cism about this, but we are
willing to talk," Schwiep
said.


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Judge urges progress on


Everglades pollution fixes


A6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Putnam: Fla. should be



leader in renewable energy


The News Service of
Florida
TALLAHASSEE
Florida Agriculture Com-
missionerAdam Putnam on
Thursday outlined a series
of energy proposals dealing
with renewable sources
and diversification in what
is expected to become the
grist for legislation in the
weeks ahead.
Calling for tax incentives,
regulatory changes and the
repeal of the renewable
portfolio standard, Putnam
said his 12-point plan was a
modest but significant step
forward as the state tries to
jumpstart efforts that have
been thwarted in recent
years by a lack of consensus
among players including
major utilities, emerging
energy companies and con-
sumer advocates.
With the state now deriv-
ing more than half of its en-
ergy from natural gas, a
percentage that is ex-
pected to increase to 70
percent, Putnam said
Florida must diversify its
generating capabilities to
include more nuclear and



PLANT
Continued from Page Al

does not imply that its alle-
gations are reasonable,
only that it meets the re-
quirements for formal
adjudication.
Two other contentions
have been submitted for ad-
mission, both based on the
Fukushima nuclear disaster
in Japan.
Therefore, the public was
invited to speak about the
issues of dewatering, salt
drift and Fukushima. Peo-
ple signed up to speak for
five minutes. They also
could submit written state-
ments that the judges would
review.
First to speak among the
39 who signed up for the af-
ternoon session was John
Siefert, executive director of
the Citrus County Economic


Putnam said Florida must diversify
its generating capabilities to include
more nuclear and renewable sources.


renewable sources as rea-
sonably priced natural gas
becomes increasingly
more expensive.
"It's important we take
that first step to building the
momentum for a long- term,
consistent energy policy for
the state of Florida," said
Putnam, who presented his
plan to the House Energy
and Utility Subcommittee.
A committee bill is ex-
pected to be released
within a couple weeks.
Florida's trek toward an
aggressive renewable en-
ergy policy has been ham-
pered by infighting and the
conflicting priorities of ex-
isting utilities, environmen-
tal groups, consumer
advocates and myriad alter-
native energy providers of-
fering options from biomass
to solar and wind.
Among a longer list of
recommendations, Putnam
called on lawmakers to re-


Development Council.
"The environment is ex-
tremely important to Citrus
County and its economic fu-
ture," Siefert said.
"Progress Energy and their
predecessors have been
major participants in pro-
tecting that environment be-
cause the potential for their
existing nuclear power
plant and the future ones
must be conscious of the po-
tential environmental is-
sues as they come up."
Dr. Lynn Ringenberg of
Tampa, representing Physi-
cians for Social Responsi-
bility, said, "We know there
is no cure for radiation ex-
posure."
The incidence of cancer
increased as an outcome of
Chernobyl and likely also
would increase in Japan,
Ringenberg said. She urged
the discontinuation of the
building of nuclear power
plants.


instate a tax exemption on t
renewable energy technol- l
ogy related investments, a
package totaling up to $16
million a year. The credits t
would be split between
sales tax ($1 million) and
tax breaks on investment
($10 million) and produc-
tion (up to $5 million.)
Created in 2006, the tax
incentives were allowed to
expire after receiving min-
imal attention by industry,
an indifference Putnam
said Thursday was due to
technology lagging behind.
"They were a good idea
then. They are a good idea
now," Putnam said of the in-
centives. "They will find
more takers than they did t
then."
Arguably one of Putnam's
more controversial recom-
mendations would allow in-
vestor owned utilities like
Florida Power & Light or
Progress Energy to develop t


Betty Berger of Inglis said
the Levy plant would run
pipes through the Inglis
Recreation Area, which is
part of the greenway As the
barge canal could be dug no
deeper than 12 feet before it
opened the Floridan Aquifer,
Berger said the Levy plant
should not be allowed to dig
100 feet for a foundation.
Michael Fuller of Crystal
River said Progress Energy
was to be commended for
choosing the Levy County
site instead of Crystal River
and also the model of the re-
actor as he said it was a
more friendly design for the
environment.
Theodora Rusnak, presi-
dent of the Citrus County
Council, said the council in-
cluded about 10 percent of
residents.


up to 1 percent of their
power generation with re-
newable energy sources
that would not be required
by law to be least-cost alter-
natives. Previous attempts
to transfer renewable costs
;o ratepayers have been
largely unsuccessful.
Last year, a proposal to
increase rates by 2 percent
;o pay for renewable energy
died in the Senate, where
Budget Committee Chair-
man JD Alexander, R-Lake
Wales, said the measure
would be too costly for
ratepayers.
Putnam said the cap the
lesser of 75 MW or 1 per-
cent of total capacity -
would limit the impact on
consumers while pushing
utilities to diversify their
power generation
"This is a very modest
step toward expanding re-
newable energy in a way
hat protects customers and
puts the PSC in the driver's
seat," Putnam said.
Subcommittee chairman
Scott Plakon, R-Longwood,
said a bill would be forth-
coming in the next two to
;hree weeks.


'After research and study,
the council is opposed to the
building of the two nuclear
power plants in Levy
County," Rusnak said.
Rusnak also spoke of the
100-foot depth for the foot-
ings of the plant This would
be filled in to an area eight
feet above the current
ground level.
"That will then change
the way the surface water
flows over the land, as well
as creating tremendous di-
versions in the aquifer,"
Rusnak said.
Rusnak said council
members felt this would
cause irreversible damage
to the springs and wetlands.
Mack Harris of Lecanto
told the judges he had con-
sidered the impact of all en-
ergy generations.


CRIME
Continued from Page Al

people committing most of
the crimes, and a lot of them
know each other," he said.
Grant said the process is
like a series of circles of
friends, relatives, acquain-
tances and partners in crime.
If a person of interest is
identified, they are watched
both overtly and covertly to
establish all their links -
from close friends to their
friend's cousin's baby's
mothers to their immediate
family
For some, Grant said the
watching is extremely overt,
especially if the person a
habitual offender and con-
tinues to persist in the life of
crime.
"For some, the pressure is
so great they would just
leave the county or quit
committing crimes," Grant
said.
Dawsy said the policing
technique has undoubtedly
helped reduce major crimes
in the county by nearly 9
percent in the past year. He
said the sheriff's office's
2012 goals are to fight drug
and property crimes. He
also wants to aggressively
keep the pressure on would-
be offenders, another fea-
ture of ILP
Intelligence-led policing
is predicated on the notion
that a principal task of the
police is to prevent and de-


"Of all the environmental
impacts taken in totality, the
nuclear plant makes the
biggest impact on the envi-
ronment as the best source
and I encourage the licens-
ing of this plant," Harris
said.
Dixie Hollins, president
of Citrus Mining and Tim-
ber, described what it was
like growing up with the
Crystal River power station
as his neighbor.
'At one time, we had over
18 inches of rain there in two
weeks," Hollins said.
"Progress Energy and
Florida Power cooperated
with us to help us drain the
water off the uplands, flat-
lands to the north so that it
would not have a direct im-
pact on the 7,000 acres of
planted timber that was


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 A7

tect crime rather than sim-
ply to react to it, according
to Capt Grant.
"We are not going to let
them (criminals) dictate the
terms of engagement. We
have decided to be proactive
and make it uncomfortable
for them to commit crimes
in our county," Grant said.
He points to an anecdotal
case of a couple who moved
into Floral City, but had a
checkered background else-
where and even had a war-
rant to answer to if they ever
returned. The ILP pilot pro-
gram was started in Floral
City in 2010.
"But we watched these
people and made contact
with them at every opportu-
nity and made it known to
them that we were aware of
what they used to do. Any-
way, they ended up packing
up and returned to where
they came from knowing
there was a warrant waiting
for them," Grant said.
He said many of the per-
sons of interest have com-
plained about ILP tactics.
Grant said those complaints
are invalid since every ac-
tion the sheriff's office en-
gages in is within legal
bounds.
He, however, urges those
who feel harassed to do
something simple stop en-
gaging in criminal activity
"Our goal is the safety of
the law-abiding residents of
this county and we are not
going to let a few people dis-
rupt that," Grant said.


owned by us and Georgia
Pacific."
When the cooling towers
were built, Hollins said he
was concerned about salt
drift affecting the 7,000
acres of young pine trees.
The utility built monitors to
make sure there was no salt
drift impact.
Under the current sched-
ule for Levy's license appli-
cation, the Final Safety
Evaluation Report and Final
Environmental Impact State-
ment will be issued in April.
Complete mandatory and
contested hearings are set
for December. The license is
expected to be issued during
the first quarter of 2013.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online, cornm or 352-564-2916.


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning January 16, 2012.

HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


Waterbody Plant
Hernando Pool Pondweed / Tallow /
Nuphar
Inverness Pool Pondweed / Floating /
Tallow / Hydrilla /
Nuphar
Floral City Pool Floating / Tallow


Herbicide Used
Aquathol / Diquat /
Garlon 3A / Glyphosate /
Aquathol / Diquat /
Garlon 3A / Super K /
Glyphosate
Diquat / Garlon 3A


MECHANICAL HARVESTING
Inverness Pool Tussocks
All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated
areas will be identified with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the
necessary water use restrictions. For further information, please call 352-527-7620.
Citrus County
Division of Aquatic Services


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Miracle -Ear(& I









Police precincts in Detroit move to business hours


Plan calls for more cops on the

street to combat rising crime


Associated Press

DETROIT Fighting
crime is a 24-hour job, but
Detroit police stations will
be sticking to business
hours.
The department is rolling
out a plan to close precincts
and district headquarters to
the public after 4 p.m. It's an
effort to put more officers
on patrol, especially in the
most besieged neighbor-
hoods, without adding to the
city's $200 million budget
deficit.
The policy took effect this
week in an especially tough
area on the city's east side.
Over the next month, the
practice will spread to the
six other stations.
At the first precinct to
adopt the new system,
Michael Morris stopped by
to make an accident report.
He said he would reserve
judgment.
"Let's see the response
time on the street," Morris
said. Then he'll be able to
say if it's working.
Officers are still inside
the building around the
clock, but at night public ac-
cess is limited to a phone in
the foyer linked to a 24-hour
crime-reporting unit.
Smaller communities
have adopted the same ap-
proach, but Detroit will be
the largest American city to
try it. Police Chief Ralph
Godbee said the idea would
"re-engineer" how the de-
partment operates.
Closing precincts to the
public by late afternoon is
not expected to save money
It just reassigns officers and
their duties. Two clerks
have typically staffed the
midnight shift at each
precinct, and a recent sur-
vey by the chief's office
showed they take an aver-
age of only two reports each
night, Godbee said.
Like many police depart-
ments, Detroit's force is
under severe financial con-
straints. The city has about
2,700 officers, down from


4,000 a decade ago. Another
100 officers could be laid off
by next month without fed-
eral grant money
There are few areas to
make cuts other than jobs,
something the police chief
and Mayor Dave Bing are
loath to do, particularly in
light of the city's violent
crime rate, one of the high-
est in the country, and a
spike in murders.
Compounding matters is
Detroit's size: 139 square
miles. Although the popula-
tion has fallen from 1.8 mil-
lion in 1950 to 700,000 today,
officers must still patrol a
large area.
"We have done a disserv-
ice to our community by
spreading ourselves thin,
giving citizens the belief
that we will respond to
things that are not an emer-
gency," Godbee said. The
changes are mainly "for
those brave men and
women that are overtaxed
out there" answering calls
for service.
Godbee expects to put 100
to 150 officers more officers
on patrol.
Restricted and light-duty
officers are being moved to
the 24-hour unit that will han-
dle non-emergency calls that
might normally have gone to
the front desk at neighbor-
hood precincts. That part of
Detroit's policy was gleaned
from Milwaukee, which
began a similar program in
2008. Milwaukee officers who
in the past would have han-
dled complaints in person
can now be sent to areas with
rising crime.
"If we don't stay in public
spaces, crime goes up and
citizens lose heart," Mil-
waukee Police Chief Ed-
ward Flynn said. But his
department has not reduced
the hours its seven precincts
are open to the public.
Some smaller police de-
partments, including in De-
troit's better-off suburbs,
already close their front
desks during slower evening
hours. But Nancy Kolb, a


Associated Press
Detroit Police Chief Ralph Godbee explains moves to streamline the police department and offer better service during a
news conference at the Northeastern District Police Station. Police precincts and district headquarters in Detroit will be
closed to the public for 16 hours each day as officials push more officers from behind desks and out into the streets where
many residents feel they're under siege by crime.


senior program manager
with the International Asso-
ciation of Chiefs of Police,
has not heard of any city the
size of Detroit adopting a
similar policy
A lot of agencies are turn-
ing to volunteers to work the
front desks and using more
social media.
"It's not always possible
for an officer to go to neigh-
borhood watch meetings,
but residents can use social
media to engage with that
officer," Kolb said.
Bing, who is trying to keep
Detroit from being taken
over by an emergency finan-
cial manager, is cutting 1,000
city jobs in the next few
weeks. Services like fixing
lights and sidewalks and
cutting grass are being re-
duced. The mayor is also

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seeking medical and pen-
sion concessions from city
unions.
Other cities are reluctant
to tinker with their police
forces, even if doing so
might save money
Officials in Baltimore,
which has a deficit of more
than $50 million, have not
considered cutting hours at
their nine police precincts
and headquarters, largely
because such a step would
close doors on community
outreach.
"We have a lot of situa-
tions where people come
into the districts to report
crime," police spokesman
Anthony Guglielmi said.
"It's a big part of our


community policing."
In New Orleans, eight dis-
trict offices are open around
the clock. Most are staffed
overnight by a desk sergeant
and two officers.
"You have citizens who
will still feel more comfort-
able reporting crime by
coming into the districts,"
New Orleans police
spokesman Frank Robert-
son said.
In Detroit, the precincts
have often been seen as is-
lands of safety.
"I really don't know how
it's going to work," said
Ardella Jackson, who also
filed an accident report
Tuesday at the precinct with
shorter hours. "We don't


really like changes."
Godbee has stressed that
the precincts won't be aban-
doned at night And though
there will be no access to
front desk areas, a limited
number of officers will be
inside performing other du-
ties. But he prefers people
become familiar with the
telephone reporting system
for non-emergencies such
as neighbor complaints,
property damage reports
and fender benders.
"If the situation calls for
me to have an officer come
to the station to deal with
them," he said, "I would
rather do that than have
that officer sitting there like
the Maytag repair person."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


kCiii o i





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Union threatens oil production


shutdown in Nigeria; prices soar


Associated Press

LAGOS, Nigeria A
major union threatened
Thursday to stop the beating
heart of Nigeria's economy
- crude oil production as
part of a nationwide strike
and protests grippingAfrica's
most populous nation.
World oil prices climbed
on the news. Nigeria is the
fifth-largest oil exporter to
the U.S., and a shutdown
would force American re-
fineries to replace 630,000
barrels per day of crude.
The union's ability to en-
force a shutdown, beginning
Sunday, across the swamps
of Nigeria's southern delta
to its massive offshore oil
fields, remains in question.
But the threat of a strike
caused jitters on global oil
markets as traders world-
wide worried about supply
Nigeria has been para-
lyzed by a strike that began
Monday after President
Goodluck Jonathan's gov-
ernment abandoned subsi-
dies that kept gasoline
prices low. Overnight, prices
at the pump more than dou-
bled, from $1.70 per gallon
to at least $3.50 per gallon.
The costs of food and trans-
portation also doubled in a
nation where most people
live on less than $2 a day
Anger over losing one of
the few benefits average
Nigerians see from being an
oil-rich country, as well as
disgust over government
corruption, have led to
demonstrations across this
nation of 160 million people
and violence that has killed
at least 10 people.
The Petroleum and Natu-
ral Gas Senior Staff Associa-
tion of Nigeria, which
represents about 20,000
workers, said it would be
forced to "apply the bitter
option" of closing down all
oil and gas production if the
government refused to rein-
state the gasoline subsidies.
Union president Ba-
batunde Ogun said if fields
are shut down, it could take


Associated Press
A man protests the removal of a fuel subsidy by the govern-
ment on Thursday in Lagos, Nigeria. A union representing
20,000 oil and gas workers in Nigeria threatened it would
shut down all production starting Sunday to take part in the
crippling nationwide strike over spiraling fuel prices.


six months to a year to
restart them.
"We ... believe that if
everything comes to a stand-
still, the government will
budge," Ogun told reporters
in Lagos. Petrol dollars
dominate Nigeria's economy
and represent the majority
of its government revenues.
Ogun also said a natural
gas shutdown would turn off
the nation's power grid, which
is already in shambles.
Negotiations between
labor and the government
ended Thursday night with-
out any announcement. Of-
ficials said they would
resume Saturday
So far, Nigeria's oil indus-
try hasn't felt the effects of
the national strike. Many of
its operations are auto-
mated, both for efficiency
and to avoid having staff
work in the Niger Delta's
maze of creeks, where crim-
inal gangs and militants tar-
get workers for high-dollar
kidnapping.
Foreign companies also
run large offshore fields, far
from the chaos of growing
demonstrations across the
country Shipments from
offshore platforms move im-
mediately to market
But if something breaks, if
the pressure in the wells
fluctuates, or if countless
other problems occur that


cause an automatic system
shutdown, there wouldn't be
anyone there to get produc-
tion running again.
When pressed about how
the threatened shutdown
could affect the automated
parts of the industry, Ogun
did not offer an answer.
Most oil firms, including
the dominant Royal Dutch
Shell PLC, say they are
monitoring the situation.
Kenneth Arnold, an inde-
pendent petroleum consult-
ant and former Shell
engineer, said it "would be
very easy to shut down"
Nigeria's oil fields. Bringing
in replacement workers to
run the fields raises dan-
gers, he said.
"It may not be safe to stay
there," Arnold said. "In
Nigeria, people get killed in
the oil fields. There are
local bad guys who want a
share of the action."
Other companies with
subsidiaries in Nigeria in-
clude Chevron Corp., Exxon
Mobil Corp., Italy's Eni SpA
and French firm Total SA,
which operate in tandem
with the state-run Nigerian
National Petroleum Corp.
Levi Ajuonoma, a
spokesman for the state-run
oil firm, said it had not ad-
justed its production and
shipping forecasts over the
strike. It will take time for


Crude oil imports
A major union in Nigeria has
threatened a full shutdown
of crude oil production.
Nigeria is the fifth-largest oil
exporter to the United States.
U.S. crude oil imports by
country of origin*
_.:.. -,:ober 2011
--Canada 24.5%
--Mexico 10.7%
--Saudi Arabia 10.2%
--Venezuela 8.1%
H-- Nigeria 6.3%
Russia 6.2%
Colombia 5.3%
L Iraq -1 5%
-- ,Orr,r countries 24.2%
SOURCE: Dept. of Energy AP
Nigeria's government cof-
fers to feel the impact of the
lost revenue, as oil and nat-
ural gas cargoes go out
months ahead. That means,
at least in the short term,
supply to the U.S. would not
be affected.
However, a shutdown
could impact futures oil
prices on global stock mar-
kets potentially raising
the cost of gasoline for U.S.
consumers.
Oil prices were up much
of the day Thursday over
concerns about the impact
of a Nigerian shutdown on
global supplies, with bench-
mark crude rising by as
much as $1.38 to $102.25 per
barrel in New York. Prices
retreated later in the day on
rumors that Europe would
delay an embargo of Iranian
oil, to end the day down at
$99.10.
"The subsidy issue pro-
vokes such strong emotions
because it is viewed as one
of the few benefits that
Nigerians receive from liv-
ing in an oil-producing na-
tion," Barclays Capital said.
"If the protests continue or
gain momentum, they will
pose a major challenge to
the Jonathan government
and potentially exhaust the
capacity of an administra-
tion already facing a sus-
tained security threat."


Obama requests


$1.2T hike in


borrowing limit
Associated Press they could vote on the mat-
ter when they returned.
WASHINGTON Presi- "Washington's mounting
dent Barack Obama asked debt is a drag on our eco-
Congress Thursday for an- nomic recovery, and this
other $1.2 trillion increase request is another re-
in the nation's debt limit, a minder that the president
request that is largely a for- has consistently punted on
mality but which carries the tough choices needed
election-year implications, to rein in the deficit and
It was the third and final protect important pro-
such request the president grams for American sen-
was allowed under a deal iors from going bankrupt,"
the White House reached said Brendan Buck,
with lawmakers in August spokesman for House
to prevent a government Speaker John Boehner, R-
default. Ohio.
Congress has 15 days to The increase would
reject the president's re- boost the debt limit to $16.4
quest. Majority House Re- trillion, which should be
publicans, eager to criticize enough to allow the gov-
the president's spending ernment to keep borrowing
policies, immediately an- until the end of 2012, or just
nounced they would hold a after the presidential elec-
vote next week on a resolu- tion.
tion of disapproval. The debt limit is the
But such a resolution amount the government
would not clear the Demo- can borrow to finance its
cratic-led Senate, and the operations. It has soared
White House says Obama because the government
would veto an objection, has run record deficits
anyway, in order to avoid over the past decade. In
default. August, Congress and the
Obama originally administration agreed to
planned to make this re- raise the borrowing limit
quest in December, but by $2.1 trillion in three
with Congress on vacation steps. The deal was
until mid-January, law- reached hours before a po-
makers asked the presi- tential default on the na-
dent to delay his request so tion's debt.



EPA rejects appeal

of Shell Arctic permit
Associated Press for Shell's drill ship in the
Chukchi Sea.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska- A Shell subsidiary
Royal Dutch Shell cleared hopes to drill up to
another roadblock in its three exploratory wells in
quest to drill exploratory the Chukchi during the
wells in Arctic waters. open water season next
The Environmental Pro- summer.
tection Agency's Appeals Shell also hopes to drill
Board on Thursday re- up to two exploratory wells
jected challenges to an air in the Beaufort Sea off
permit the agency granted Alaska's north coast.


Scientists say cut soot,


methane to curb warming
Associated Press If adopted more widely, best way to attack climate
the scientists calculate that change, air pollution, or
WASHINGTON An in- would reduce projected hunger, but reducing those
international team of scien- global warming by 0.9 de- chemicals are among the
tists says it's figured out how grees Fahrenheit by the better ways and work simul-
to slow global warming in year 2050. Without the taneously on all three prob-
the short run and prevent measures, global average lems, Shindell said.
millions of deaths from dirty temperature is projected to The study even does a
air: Stop focusing so much rise nearly 2.2 degrees cost-benefit analysis to see
on carbon dioxide. Fahrenheit in the next four if these pollution control
They say the key is to re- decades. But controlling methods are too expensive
duce emissions of two pow- methane and soot, the in- to be anything but fantasy
erful and fast-acting causes crease is projected to be They actually pay off with
of global warming only 1.3 degrees. It also benefits that are as much as
methane and soot. would increase annual yield ten times the value of the
Carbon dioxide is the of key crops worldwide by costs, Shindell said. The
chief greenhouse gas and almost 150 million tons. paper calculates that as of
the one world leaders have Methane comes from 2030, the pollution reduc-
spent the most time talking landfills, farms, drilling for tion methods would bring
about controlling. Scientists natural gas, and coal min- about $6.5 trillion in annual
say carbon dioxide from fos- ing. Soot, called black car- benefits from fewer people
sil fuels like coal and oil is a bon by scientists, is a dying from air pollution,
bigger overall cause of global byproduct of burning and is less global warming and in-
warming, but reducing a big problem with cook creased crop production.
methane and soot offers stoves using wood, dung and In the United States,
quicker fixes. coal in developing countries Shindell calculates the
Soot also is a big health and in some diesel fuels measures would prevent
problem, so dramatically worldwide. about 14,000 air pollution
cutting it with existing tech- Reducing methane and deaths in people older than
nology would save between black carbon isn't the very 30 by the year 2030.


700,000 and 4.7 million lives
each year, according to the
team's research published
online Thursday in the jour-
nal Science. Since soot causes
rainfall patterns to shift, re- |
during it would cut down on
droughts in southern Eu-
rope and parts of Africa and
ease monsoon problems in
Asia, the study says.
Two dozen scientists from
around the world ran com-
puter models of 400 differ- |
ent existing pollution
control measures and came
up with 14 methods that at-
tack methane and soot. The |
idea has been around for
more than a decade and the
same authors worked on a
United Nations report last
year, but this new study is I
far more comprehensive.
All 14 methods captur-
ing methane from landfills
and coal mines, cleaning up
cook stoves and diesel en-
gines, and changing agricul-
ture techniques for rice
paddies and manure collec-
tion are being used effi-
ciently in many places, but
aren't universally adopted,
said the study's lead author,
Drew Shindell of NASA.


LiGHTn SHINE 2012
Pr.-. l.t s- & )nh ,,nr .d f l, r i I Fm ,' nn. l .i-,,u. -,


Who Started the

Myth About a

Fountain of Youth?
by Dr. J. Michael Francis, Professor and Chair of the
Department of History, University of North Florida,
Jacksonville. A lecture and visual presentation on the
Spanish exploration and colonization of Florida as
we approach 500 years of Florida's Spanish heritage.

S This presentation is funded by the Florida Humanities Council under
a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

This Light Shine event is producedby Shepherd of the Hilts as aneichnent e-e
program for Citrus County and co-sponsored by the Cinus County Chronicle jtRONM jEl


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 A9


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AIOFRDA, ANART1,H01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


OHw eT"S *R 'I"HTINRIE


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 3429786 6.79 -.08 CheniereEn 72984 9.46 +.39 SiriusXM 705997 2.11 +.07 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1049575129.51 +.31 NovaGldg 54739 9.19 +.10 Microsoft 442967 28.00 +.28 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 736012 13.92 +.06 AvalnRare 22206 3.02 +.25 Intel 421803 25.75 -.05 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
Citigrprs 566583 31.60 +.33 RareEleg 18618 6.10 -.13 RschMotn 332159 16.44 +.83 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
FordM 479059 12.14 +.07 NwGoldg 17205 10.78 -.01 Oracle 299192 27.17 +.28 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Cho %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
MarineMx 7.86 +.97 +14.1 QuestRMg 3.20 +.65 +25.5 AmicusTh 4.54 +1.04 +29.7 inmgqualification n-Stockwasa new issue in te last year.The 52-week high and lowfig-
Headwatrs 2.45 +.28 +12.9 TasmanM g 2.07 +.21 +11.3 EastVaBk 2.48 +.48 +24.0 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
DicksSptg 40.94 +4.54 +12.5 MtnPDia g 4.50 +.40 +9.8 HghwyH 2.82 +.49 +21.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt-Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
Hyperdyn 2.86 +.30 +11.7 Quepasa 3.92 +.34 +9.5 PacBiosci 3.69 +.64 +21.0 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
Vonage 2.44 +.25 +11.4 EngySvcs 3.13 +.27 +9.4 KellySB 16.67 +2.87 +20.8 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
WmsSon 34.32 -4.76 -12.2 AdmRsc 34.31 -3.29 -8.8 RexEnergy 11.63 -2.07 -15.1
Cameltlnfo 2.17 -.28 -11.4 HKN 2.31 -.20 -8.0 Big5Sprt 8.16 -1.31 -13.8 _TiT__ _'_ _
KidBrands 3.13 -.38 -10.8 HMG 3.86 -.29 -7.0 CarolTrBk 2.50 -.37 -12.9


Delhaize 53.72 -5.88 -9.9 AlmadnMg 2.69 -.17 -5.9 BroadVisn 15.55 -1.80 -10.4
FtBcppfB 11.80 -1.20 -9.2 Medgenicn 3.20 -.19 -5.6 Synutra 4.24 -.49 -10.4


1,854 Advanced
1,171 Declined
110 Unchanged
3,135 Total issues
105 New Highs
14 New Lows
3,902,673,393 Volume


267 Advanced
186 Declined
37 Unchanged
490 Total issues
16 New Highs
1 New Lows
80,305,142 Volume


DIARY


1,534
961
132
2,627
63
25
1,658,682,542


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Last
12,471.02
5,209.36
451.54
7,681.26
2,286.52
2,724.70
1,295.50
13,616.14
770.49


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+21.57 +.17 +2.07 +6.30
+13.18 +.25 +3.78 -.38
-.04 -.01 -2.83 +10.31
+19.28 +.25 +2.73 -5.40
+6.83 +.30 +.36 +5.48
+13.94 +.51 +4.59 -.39
+3.02 +.23 +3.01 +.91
+37.60 +.28 +3.23 -.21
+3.25 +.42 +3.99 -3.77


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkNYMel 21.76 +.26
Barday 12.16 +.37
BariPVix 30.66 -.50
BarrickG 48.81 +.04
ABBLtd 20.23 +.37 BasicEnSv 19.96 -.70
AES Corp 12.55 -.11 Baxter 51.79 +.93
AFLAC 44.07 -.14 Beam Inc 51.50 +.15
AGCO 49.93 -.07 BeazerHm 3.07 -.12
AGL Res 41.09 -.03 BectDck 74.69 -.05
AK Steel 9.53 -.25 BerkHaAll 7850.00 +936.00
ASA Gold 27.93 +.32 BerkH B 78.50 +.50
AT&TInc 30.12 +.13 BestBuy 24.76 -.05
AbtLab 55.16 -.26 BIkHillsCp 33.59 -.07
AberFitc 44.74 -.52 BlkDebtStr 3.98 -.05
Accenture 53.94 +.27 BlkEnhC&l 12.90 -.00
AdamsEx 10.14 +.05 BIkGbOp 13.90 -.01
AMD 5.82 +01 Blacksbtne 15.31 -.28
Aeroposfi 16.41 +.24 Boeing 75.51 +.77
Aetna 43.93 -.26 Boise Inc 7.58 +.04
Agilent 39.52 +.60 BorgWarn 73.97 +1.44
Agnieog 37.45 -.29 BostBeer 101.90 +1.24
Agriumg 74.29 ... BostProp 98.21 -1.68
AlcatelLuc 1.80 +.05 BostnSci 5.56 +.02
Alcoa 9.93 +.30 BoydGm 7.86 +.30
AllegTch 49.96 -.03 Brandyw 9.80 -.08
Allergan 88.56 +.30 BrMySq 34.12 +.02
Allete 41.09 +.13 BrkfldOfPr 16.33 +.17
AlliancOne 3.00 +.02 Brunswick 19.73 +.61
AlliBGIbHi 14.29 +.05 Buckeye 62.87 -.56
AlliBInco 8.15 C. &J Egyn 18.79 -.90
AlliBern 14.53 -.18 CBLAsc 15.67 -.33
Allstate 29.07 +.03 CBREGrp 17.43 -.12
AlphaNRs 22.55 +.35 CBS B 28.08 -.07
AIpAIerMLP 16.55 +.04 CFInds 166.29 -.87
Altria 28.84 ... CH Engy 56.73 +.38
AmBev 36.00 +.39 CITGrp 37.25 +.11
Ameren 32.34 -.01 CMSEng 21.71 +.06
AMovilL s 22.77 +.08 CNO Find 6.45 +.01
AEagleOut 13.07 -.01 CSS Inds 20.73 +.08
AEP 41.35 +.12 CSXs 23.68 +.20
AmExp 49.65 +.70 CVREngy 22.25 +.20
AmlntGrp 25.43 +.06 CVSCare 42.15 +.11
AmSIP3 6.55 -.02 CblvsNYs 14.10 -.25
AmTower 62.45 +.20 CabotO&G 67.15 -2.47
Amerigas 41.19 -.82 CalDive 2.62 +.04
Ameriprise 51.91 +.16 CallGolf 5.94 +.21
Anadarko 78.74 -.98 Calpine 15.55 +.13
AnalogDev 37.31 +.40 CamdenPT 59.61 -1.59
Ann Inc 23.04 +.38 Camecog 20.29 +1.04
Annaly 16.37 +.09 Cameron 51.91 +.50
Anworth 6.22 -.09 CampSp 32.58 +.31
AonCorp 46.67 +.24 CdnNRsgs 37.69 +.06
Apache 94.30 -1.94 CapOne 48.40 +.69
Aptlnv 22.40 -.53 CapifiSrce 6.86 +.01
AquaAm 21.36 +.15 CapM pLB 14.55 +.07
ArcelorMit 19.83 +.50 CardnlHIth 41.86 +.28
ArchiCoal 15.66 -.03 CareFusion 22.88
ArchDan 29.14 +.21 Carnival 35.14 +.78
ArmourRsd 7.06 +.03 Caterpillar 101.94 +2.30
Ashland 59.68 +.87 Celanese 47.19 +1.30
AsdEstat 15.60 -.27 Cemex 5.77 +.17
AssuredG 15.60 +.51 CemigMpf 18.62 +.17
ATMOS 32.44 -.05 CenterPnt 19.16 -.16
AuRicoVg 8.72 -.05 Cntyink 36.64 +.03
Avon 17.88 -.01 Checkpnt 10.79 +.05
BB&TaCp 27.05 +.29 ChesEng 22.17 -.32
BHPBilILt 76.39 +1.23 ChesGrann 22.55 -.46
BP PLC 44.20 +.14 ChesUfi 42.20 +.35
BRFBrasil 19.56 +.59 Chevron 104.97 -2.80
BRT 6.31 -.04 Chieos 11.01 +.26
BakrHu 48.29 -1.92 Chimera 2.74
BaIlCprs 37.82 +.91 ChiMYWnd 2.18 +.16
BcBilVArg 8.20 +.18 ChinaUni 19.50 -.94
BeoBrades 17.90 +.10 Cigna 45.38 -.38
BeoSantSA 7.22 +.08 Cimarex 60.80 +.45
BeoSBrasil 8.80 +.13 CindBell 3.25 -.03
BkofAm 6.79 -.08 Cifgrp rs 31.60 +.33
Bklreldrs 4.88 +.42 CleanHs 63.21 -1.12
BkMontg 57.60 +.49 CliffsNRs 71.39 +1.16


Clorox 68.37 +.44
Coach 61.35 +.35
CobaltlEn 18.96 +.69
CCFemsa 95.39 +1.09
CocaCola 67.57 -.49
CocaCE 25.77 -.08
CohStlnfra 16.55 -.04
Colfax 32.90 +.97
ColgPal 88.55 +.04
CollctvBrd 14.08 -.74
Comerica 29.26 +.54
CmclMis 13.50 -.38
CmwREIT 18.90 +.03
CompSci 24.88 +.30
ComstkRs 14.48 -.90
Con-Way 29.82 -.10
ConAgra 26.99 +.11
ConocPhil 70.76 -1.25
ConsolEngy 36.51 +.51
ConEd 58.98 -.20
ConstellA 21.00 +.02
ConstellEn 36.72 -.25
ContlRes 72.53 -2.19
Cnvrgys 12.79 +.01
Corning 14.20 -.12
CorpOffP 22.98 +1.32
CottCp 6.28 +.02
Covance 44.89 -3.71
CoventryH 29.73 -.14
Covidien 45.80 -.37
Crane 49.18 -.33
CSVS2xVxS 23.58 -.76
CSVellVSts 7.50 +.11
CredSuiss 23.23 +.45
CrwnCsfie 46.25 +.01
Cummins 99.23 +.66
CurEuro 127.76 +1.20

DCT Indl 5.38 +.04
DDR Corp 13.41 +.34
DHT HIdgs .79 +.02
DNPSelct 11.15 +.03
DR Horton 14.24 +.11
DSW Inc 46.39 -.44
DTE 53.58
DanaHldg 14.76 +.13
Danaher 50.80 +.54
Darden 44.65 +.11
DeanFds 10.99 +.10
Deere 84.44 -.06
DeltaAir 8.87 +.26
DenburyR 17.63 -.47
DeutschBk 37.00 +1.12
DBGoldDS 4.84 -.05
DevonE 63.38 -.30
DiaOffs 58.38 +1.10
DicksSptg 40.94 +4.54
DxFnBull rs 76.81 +.98
DrSCBr rs 23.39 -.28
DirFnBrrs 31.13 -.44
DrxEnBear 10.96 +.27
DirxSCBull 50.40 +.53
DirxLCBull 66.84 +.38
DirxEnBull 47.80 -1.27
Discover 26.33 +.47
Disney 38.73 +.03
DomRescs 50.93 -.24
DEmmett 19.90 +.06
Dover 59.92 +.87
DowChm 32.56 +1.13
DrPepSnap 37.96 -.19
DuPont 48.10 +.80
DukeEngy 21.28 -.12
DukeRlty 12.68 +.19
E-CDang 6.13 +.14
EMC Cp 22.48 +.39
EOG Res 103.88 +.87
EQTCorp 49.16 -1.75


EastChm s 46.09 +1.38
EKodak .67 -.14
Eabons 49.17 +.90
EV EnEq 10.45 +.03
Ecolab 59.81 +.48
Edisonlnt 40.54 -.10
BPasoCp 26.65 +.06
Ban 13.86 +.14
BdorGldg 14.13 -.21
EmersonEl 49.25 +1.42
EmpDist 20.49 -.20
Emulex 8.81 +.40


EnbrEPts 32.64 +.07
EnCanag 17.90 -.37
Enerplsg 24.22 -.67
EnPro 34.78 +.36
ENSCO 47.12 -.20
Entergy 71.43 -.17
EntPrPt 46.62 +.05
EqtyRsd 54.07 -.98
ExeoRes 8.54 -.37
Exelisn 9.58 +.16
Exelon 40.18 -.32
ExxonMbl 84.74 -.34
FMCTchs 52.89 +.91
FairchldS 13.13 +.28
FamilyDIr 53.92 +.14
FedExCp 91.19 +1.43
FedSignl 4.12 -.01
Fedlnvst 17.66 +.28
Ferrellgs 17.34 -.31
Ferro 6.11 +.32
FidNatlnfo 27.10 -.13
FstHorizon 8.74 -.02
FTActDiv 8.57 -.01
FtTrEnEq 11.22 -.01
FirstEngy 42.20 +.20
RagstBch .68 +.01
Hotek 12.42 -.06
Ruor 54.19 +1.49
FordM 12.14 +.07
ForestOils 13.86 -.16
FrankRes 96.57 -.10
FMCG s 42.45 +.80
Fronftine 4.48 -.03


FurnBrds 1.56 +.43

GATX 44.66
GabelliET 5.18
GabHIthW 7.33
GabUIl 7.85 -.05
GafisaSA 4.96 -.02
GameStop 24.18 -.20
Gannett 14.75 +.02
Gap 18.14 +.20
GenDynam 70.94 +.85
GenElec 18.93 +.05


GenGrPrp 14.84 -.13
GenMills 40.64 +.22
GenMobtrs 24.67 +.20
GenOn En 2.48 -.09
Genpact 14.58 +.04
Genworth 7.72 -.08
Gerdau 9.39 +.18
GlaxoSKIn 44.59 +.17
GlimchRt 9.02 -.28
GoldFLtd 15.63 +.24
Goldcrpg 45.99 +.75
GoldmanS 101.21 +1.45
Goodrich 124.18 -.14
GoodrPet 15.36 -1.47
Goodyear 13.84 +.06
GtPlainEn 21.54
Griffon 10.34 +.41
GuangRy 17.88 -.01
Guess 29.90 +.87
GugSolar 3.12 +.13
HCA HId n 23.32 -.48
HCP Inc 40.81 -.28
HSBC 38.66 +.11
HSBCCap 26.00 -.05
Hallibrtn 34.73 -.65
HanJS 14.75 -.03
HanPrmDv 13.47 -.09
Hanesbrds 23.22 -.31
Hanoverlns 36.13 +.32
HarleyD 40.75 +.86
HarmonyG 12.05 +.18
HartfdFn 18.21 +.32


HawaiiEl 25.95 +.04
HItCrREIT 55.25 -.25
HItMgmt 5.91 -.41
HIthcrRlty 19.00 -.19
Heckmann 6.44 -.22
HeclaM 4.80 +.19
Heinz 52.94 +.13
HeimPayne 59.30 -2.89
Hertz 13.09 +.22
Hess 57.01 -.93
HewlettP 26.95 +.32
HighwdPrp 30.77 -.06


Hill-Rom 30.12
HollyFrts 26.81
HomeDp 43.39
HonwIllnfi 57.19
Hospira 32.28
HospPT 24.39
HostHofis 15.65
HovnanE 2.29
Humana 93.89
Huntsmn 11.03
Hyperdyn 2.86
IAMGIdg 17.17
ICICIBk 29.96
ING 7.99
iShGold 16.08
iSAsfia 22.48
iShBraz 62.13
iShGer 20.10
iSh HK 15.85
iShJapn 9.13
iShKor 53.19
iSMalas 13.73
iShMex 55.82
iShSing 11.40
iSTaiwn 12.23
iSh UK 16.30
iShSilver 29.31
iShDJDv 54.13
iShChina25 36.84
iSSP500 130.00
iShEMkts 39.65
iShiBxB 114.10
iShB20T 119.69


iShBl1-3T 84.51
iSEafe 50.14
iShiBxHYB 89.12
iSR1KV 65.79
iSR1KG 59.56
iSRuslK 71.70
iShR2K 76.80
iShREst 57.43
iShDJHm 13.29
iShSPSm 70.95
iSSCVal 73.37
iStar 6.75


ITTCps 22.02 +.38
Idacorp 41.99 +.19
ITW 49.50 +.45
Imafon 5.90 +.02
Imax Corp 21.30 +.07
IngerRd 35.05 +1.73
IntegrysE 52.46 -.26
IntcnfiEx 114.94 +2.33
IBM 180.55 -1.77
InfiGame 17.78 +.52
IntPap 31.74 +.60
Interpublic 10.59 +.13
Invesco 21.72 +.43
IronMtn 31.52 -.06
ItauUnibH 20.00 +.17
IvanhM 18.90 +.01

JPMorgCh 36.85 +.19
Jabil 21.50 +.02
JacobsEng 43.47 +2.16
Jaguar g 7.16 +.33
JanusCap 6.91 -.04
Jefferies 15.42 +.88
JinkoSolar 7.02 +.14
JohnJn 65.23 +.10
JohnsnCfi 35.10 +.58
JoyGIbl 84.02 +1.81
JnprNtwk 21.29 -.02
KB Home 8.60 -.02
KBRInc 31.14 +1.39
KTCorp 14.67 +.01
KCSouthn 72.59 +.16


Kaydon 32.80 +.31 MitsuUFJ 4.34 -.02 PerkElm 22.37 +.34 RegionsFn 4.69 -.11
KAEngTR 27.57 -.03 MobileTele 16.11 -.16 Prmian 19.75 -.39 ReneSola 2.34 +.09
Kellogg 51.44 -.12 Molyeorp 29.75 +2.11 PetrbrsA 25.93 +.33 Renrenn 4.07 +.22
KeyEngy 15.22 -.68 MoneyG rs 17.74 +.05 Petrobras 28.21 +.60 RepubSvc 28.17 +.87
Keycorp 8.22 +.03 Monsanto 80.27 +.42 Pfizer 21.99 +.09 Revlon 14.36 +.15
KimbClk 72.84 +.31 MonstrWw 8.47 -.09 Pharmerica 13.74 -1.23 ReynAmer 41.10 +.16
Kimco 17.15 +.06 Moodys 36.72 +.94 PhilipMor 76.45 -.15 RioTnto 54.74 +1.18
KindME 82.67 +.36 MorgStan 17.17 +.07 PhilipsEl 18.57 +.02 RiteAid 1.32 -.02
KindMorn 33.08 -.31 MSEmMkt 13.55 +.11 PiedNG 33.05 -.19 RockwAut 79.61 +1.63
Kinrossg 12.85 +.04 Mosaic 54.59 -.45 Pier1 15.11 -.04 RockColl 57.50 +.30
KodiakOg 9.38 -.26 MotrlaSolu 46.17 +.07 PilgrimsP 5.96 +.42 Rowan 31.81 +.26
Kohls 46.41 +.40 MotrlaMob 38.50 -.01 PimoStrat 11.26 -.09 RylCarb 29.52 +1.25
Kraft 38.22 +.29 NCRCorp 16.62 -.12 PinWst 47.66 +.11 RoyDShllA 69.94 -1.77
KrispKrm 7.35 +.05 NRG Egy 17.63 +.04 PioNtrl 96.56 +2.21 Royce 12.77 -.01
Kroger 23.98 -.11 NVEnergy 15.82 -.26 PitnyBw 19.28 -.05 RoycepfB 25.65 +.09
LDKSolar 5.28 -.24 NYSEEur 27.61 -.16 PlainsEx 36.70 +.06 R land 18.21 -.30
LSICorp 6.88 + 11 Nabors 18.08 -.65 PlumCrk 38.79 +.30
LTCPrp 31.73 -.25 NatFuGas 48.73 -1.60 Polariss 58.58 -1.13
LaZBoy 12.87 +.61 NatGrid 48.62 +.12 Polypore 51.10 +3.73 SAIC 13.11 +.07
Ladede 40.25 +.08 NOilVarco 73.30 -.34 PostPrp 42.49 -.57 SAPAG 53.25 -.15
LVSands 45.23 +.38 NatRetPrp 26.60 -.09 Potash s 43.45 -.35 SCANA 44.17 +.01
LearCorps 42.31 +.92 Navistar 40.08 +10 PwshDB 27.35 -.39 SKTIcm 13.15
LeggMason 26.12 +.58 NewAmHi 9.71 -.15 PSUSDBull 22.57 -.15 SpdrDJIA 124.53 +.24
LennarA 22.18 -.07 NJRscs 48.27 -.25 Praxair 109.53 +1.81 SpdrGold 160.38 +.71
Level3rs 18.59 +.59 NYCmlyB 13.33 +.10 PrecDrill 9.86 -.57 SpdrlntRE 32.96 +.42
LbtyASG 3.93 +.03 NYTimes 7.98 +.20 PrinFnd 26.26 +.20 SPMid 165.72 +.32
LillyEli 40.18 +.20 NewellRub 17.43 +.07 ProLogis 29.72 +.10 S&P500ETF129.51 +.31
Limited 40.30 +.81 NewfidExp 38.30 ProShtS&P 39.16 -.08 Spdr Div 54.42 +.11
LincNat 21.57 -.11 NewmtM 64.04 +.70 PrUShS&P 18.13 -.08 SpdrHome 18.65
Lindsay 56.12 -.65 NewpkRes 9.46 -.14 PrUlShDow 14.65 -.06 SpdrS&PBk 21.61 +.05
Linkedlnn 68.98 +.25 Nexeng 17.86 +.12 ProUltQQQ 89.03 +.72 SpdrLehHY 38.60
LizClaib 9.16 +.21 NextEraEn 59.39 +.18 PrUShQQQrs41.17 -.34 SpdrS&PRB 26.33 +.11
LloydBkg 1.77 +.05 NiSource 22.53 +.06 ProUltSP 49.28 +.21 SpdrRefi 52.84 +.06
LockhdM 81.69 +.91 NikeB 99.10 +.96 PrUShtFnrs 52.78 -.41 SpdrOGEx 53.57 -.49
LonePnegn 6.90 -.02 NobleCorp 31.17 +.67 ProUShL20 18.48 +.03 SpdrMetM 53.26 +.46
Lowes 26.39 -.14 NokiaCp 5.31 -.01 ProUSSP50011.96 -.08 Safeway 20.53 -.26
3889+1 Nordsm 48.93 -.05 PrUSP500 s 65.90 +.42 StJoe 17.06 +1.19
M&TBk 81.45 +.84 NoestUt 34.26 +.02 PrUltCrders 40.82 -1.88 Saks 9.20 -.05
MBIA 13.22 4 +10 NorthropG 59.75 +1.24 PrUShCrde rs38.41 +1.59 Salesforce 105.68 -.14
MDC 20.47 +.25 Novartis 56.73 +.24 ProUltSlv s 49.12 +.47 SJuanB 20.94 -.38
MDU 21.81 -.02 NSTAR 44.20 +.24 ProUShEuro 20.67 -.41 SandRdge 8.13 -.34
MEMC 4.91 +.16 Nucor 42.27 +.16 ProctGam 65.81 +.13 Sanofi 35.75 -.09
MFA End 6.89 06 NuvMupp 1482 +.04 ProgrssEn 54.14 -.24 SaraLee 18.97 -.03
MFA Fnd 6.89 -.+01 NvMu ISI&G 8.05 +.04 ProgsvCp 19.70 +.05 Sdichlmbrg 69.70 -.46
MCR 9.30 +.01 NuvQPf2 8.15 +.11 ProUSR2Krs 35.50 -.18 Schwab 12.47 +.01
MGIC 4.40 +.08 OGEP 55.50 23 Prudent 55.11 +.76 SeadrillLtd 35.15 +.22
MGMRsts 12.13 +.17 OGEEy 55.50 -.23 PSEG 31.17 +.02 SealAir 18.03 +.42
Macquarie 29.10 +.20 OcciPet 97.82 +1.2 PubStrg 133.76 -.46 SelMedHId 8.12 -.05
Macys 35.04 +.20 .82 +.24 PulteGrp 7.69 -.01 Sensient 38.98 +.44
MageiMPtr 65.01 -.32 OfficeDpt 2.36 +.01 PPrlT 5.23 ... SiderurNac 9.36 +.17
Magnalgs 39.66 +.94 OldRepub 9.25 -.01 QEP Res 28.40 -.71 SilvWhtng 31.30 +.29
MagHRes 6.15 +.14 Olin 21.05 +.30 Qihoo360n 16.75 -.12 SimonProp 127.01 -1.03
Manitowoc 11.09 +.04 OmegaHIt 19.95 QuanexBld 17.00 +.35 Skechers 13.10 +.19
Manulifeg 11.66 +.14 Omncre 32.90 -2.46 QntmDSS 2.58 +.16 SmithAO 43.01 +.42
MarathnOs 30.65 +.07 Omnicom 45.87 +.82 Questar 19.34 -.13 SmithfF 23.70 -.05
MarathPn 32.64 -.25 ONEOK 87.65 -.71 QksilvRes 6.26 -.25 Smucker 79.08 +.27
MktVGold 54.72 +.41 OneokPts 54.96 -.14 Quiksilvr 4.26 +.28 SoJerInd 55.65 -.21
MVOilSvn 118.34 -1.06 OrientEH 7.53 -.05 RPM 24.03 +.40 SouthnCo 45.11 +.05
MktVRus 27.96 -.23 OshkoshCp 24.47 +.12 RadianGrp 2.97 +.27 SthnCopper 33.41 +1.01
MktVJrGld 26.77 +.17 Owenslll 22.33 +.70 RadioShk 10.16 +.08 SoUnco 42.44 +.25
MktVAgri 49.77 -.21 Ralcorp 86.14 -.40 SwstAirl 8.97 +.09
MarlntA 33.85 +.83 RangeRs 54.36 SwstnEngy 29.77 -.15
MarshM 31.37 +.18 PG&ECp 41.91 +.26 RamesFn 32.96 -1.22 SpectraEn 30.69 +.23
MStewrt 4.49 +.09 PHH Corp 10.70 Rayoniers 45.40 +.02 SprintNex 2.32 +.02
Masco 11.93 -.06 PNC 62.09 +.79 Rayoniers 45.40 +.02 SprintNex 2.32 +.02
McDrmlnt 12.00 +.16 PNM Res 17.88 -.21 Raytheon 49.48 +.68 SP Mas 36.34 +.51
McDnlds 100.57 +.64 PPG 88.00 +1.40 Rltylnt 1235.407 +.08 SP HCnSthC 35.59 +.01
McMoRn 13.48 -.18 PPLCorp 28.00 -.21 RealEnt 12.47 +17 SPCnSt 32.17 .01
MeadJohn 72.48 -.13 PVH Corp 76.17 +2.27
Mechel 10.05 +.37 PallCorp 59.92 +2.02
MedomHIth 60.25 1.06 Pandoran 11.92 -.53 .
Medtrnic 38.85 -.34 PatriotCoal 9.02 -.08
Merck 38.61 +.20 PeabdyE 37.16 +.13 The remainder of the
MetLife 35.93 +.14 Pengrthg 10.41 -.15
MetroPCS 8.56 +.13 PennVaRs 26.54 +.14 NYSE listings can be
MetroHIth 8.38 -.02 PennWstg 20.53 -.27
MidAApt 58.80 -1.94 Penney 34.26 -.30 found on the next page
Midas 8.20 +19 PepBoy 10.78 -.11 p
PepsiCo 64.62 -.39


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.41 +.05
AbdnEMTel 18.05 -.01
AdmRsc 34.31 -3.29
AdeonaPh 1.85 +.11
AdvPhot .84 +.03
Adventrx .61 +.01
AlexeoRg 6.72 +.07
AlldNevG 32.57 -.21
AlmadnMg 2.69 -.17
AmAppared .97 -.03
AntaresP 2.20 -.01
Aurizong 5.20 -.07


AvalnRare 3.02 +.25 CheniereE 19.22 +.70
Bacterin 2.47 +.13 ChiGengM 1.06 +.12
Banro g 4.42 +.07 ChinaShen 1.77 +.04
BarcUBS36 42.26 -.60 ClaudeRg 1.41 -.01
BarcGSOil 25.17 -.57 ClghGlbOp 11.04 -.06
BrclndiaTR 50.59 -.22 CornerstStr 6.81 +.02
BiolTme 6.00 +.10 CrSuiHiY 2.94
BrigusGg 1.13 +.01
BritATob 91.88 +.71 DeourEg .46 +.00
CAMACEn .92 DenisnMg 1.58 +.10
CanoPet .08 -.00 EVLtdDur 15.37 -.07
CardiumTh .36 -.04 EVMuni2 14.26 +.12
CelSd .32 +.02 ElephTalk 3.00 +.02
CFCdag 21.14 +.25 EllswthFd 6.98 +.09
CheniereEn 9.46 +.39 EntGaming .24 +.02


ExeterRgs 2.97 -.04
FieldPnt 5.17 +.44
FrkStPr 9.67 +.09

GamGldNR 15.35 -.01
GascoEngy .21 -.03
Gastargrs 3.03 -.08
GenMoly 3.31
GoldenMin 8.27 +.68
GoldStrg 1.76 +.03
GranTrrag 4.85 -.02
GrtBasGg 1.04 -.02
GtPanSilvg 2.23 +.02
Hemisphrx .23 -.01
HooperH .70 +.01


HstnAEn 13.67 -.58
ImpOilgs 45.10 -.45
InovioPhm .44 +.01
IntellgSys 1.52 -.07
IntTower g 4.65 +.02
lnvVKAdv2 12.70 +.25

KeeganRg 3.88 -.08
KimberRg 1.09 +.02
LongweiPI 1.34 +.04


MGT Cap .06 +.02
MadCatzg .63 +.03


MdwGoldg 2.03
Minefndg 11.73
NavideaBio 2.87
NeoStem .56
NBRESec 3.85
Nevsung 6.16
NewEnSys .65
NwGoldg 10.78
NAPallg 3.12
NDynMng 6.41
NthnO&G 24.61
NovaBayP 1.31
NovaGldg 9.19
OrionEngy 3.16


-SeabGldg 18.41
SynergyRs 3.13
ParaG&S 2.34 +.02 TanzRyg 2.79
PhrmAth 1.32 +.03 Taseko 3.06
PbnDrill 9.99 -.01 TasmanM g 2.07
PolyMetg 1.26 +.03 TimberlnR .58
PyramidOil 3.89 -.06 Timminsg 2.12
Quepasa 3.92 +.34 TrnsafiPet 1.37
QuestRMg 3.20 +.65 TriVley .14
RareEleg 6.10 -.13 Tnale .14
Rentech 1.56 -.02 TriangPet 6.99
Richmntg 11.60 -.10 UQM Tech 1.80
Rib 36g 160 USGeoth .37
Ulurus .19
Ur-Energy .94
SamsO&G 2.25 +.04 Uranerz 2.16


UraniumEn 3.27 +.17


VangTotW 44.33 +.14
VantageDrl 1.04 +.01
VirnetX 27.00 +.17
VistaGold 3.34
Walterlnv 19.16 +.22
WFAdvlnco 10.22 -.05
WFAdMSec 14.78 +.12
WstC&Ggs 1.78 +.11
WizzardSft .13 +.00
YMBiog 1.66 -.01


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


ASML HId 41.74 -.10
ATP O&G 7.00 -.05
AVIBio h .91 -.02
Abraxas 3.27 -.06
AcadaTc 36.98 -.03
Accelrys 7.43 +.28
Accuray 4.55 -.06
Achillion 11.76 +.10
AcmePkt 27.23 -.07
AeordaTh 26.71 -.29
AcfvePw h .91 +.05
AcfvsBliz 12.56 -.05
AdobeSy 29.23 -.09
Adtran 31.53 +1.07
AdvEnld 11.66 +.35
AEternag 1.68 -.01
Affymax 6.95 +.01
Afymetrix 4.66 +.22
AkamaiT 33.57 -.43
Akorn 10.74 -.30
AlaskCom 2.71 +.08
Alexion s 74.32 +.68
Alexza .83 -.03
AlignTech 24.71 +.76
Alkermes 18.18 +.04
AllosThera 1.56 +.06
AllscriptH 18.75 -.23
AlnylamP 10.08 +.82
AlteraCp If 38.63 +1.09
AlterraCap 23.69 +.17
Amarin 7.32 -.18
Amazon 175.93 -2.97
Amedisys 10.19 -.15
ACapAgy 28.23 +.07
AmCapLd 7.35 +.01
AmSupr 4.46 +.24
Amgen 67.54 +1.14
AmkorTIf 4.90 +.06
Amylin 11.47 +.32
Anadigc 2.62 +.12
Anlogic 58.79 +.04
Analystlnt 6.06 -.15
Ancestry 27.74 -.17
Ansys 57.44 +.61
A123Sys 2.43 +.02
ApolloGrp 57.21 -.02
Apollolnv 7.07 +.01
Apple Inc 421.39 -1.16
ApldMafi 11.80 +.09
AMCC 7.74 +.12
Approach 32.27 +.71
ApricusBio 5.07 -.19
ArchCap s 37.21 +.06
ArenaPhm 1.66
AresCap 15.88 +.01
AriadP 13.88 -.19
Ariba Inc 26.79 +.05
ArmHId 27.00 +.01
Arris 11.00 +.12
ArubaNet 19.51 +.13
AscenaRfi 33.94 +.31
AscentSol h .58 +.02
AsialnfoL 8.02 +.14
AspenTech 17.10 +.18
AsscdBanc 12.40 +.05
AstexPhm 2.08 +.02
athenahlth 55.96 +.86
Atmel 8.95 +.05
Autodesk 32.30 +.12
AutoData 54.96 +.35
Auxilium 20.06 +.62
AvagoTch 31.68 +.48
AvanirPhm 2.77 +.13
AVEO Ph 14.97 +.39
AviatNetw 2.05 -.07
AvisBudg 12.63 +.38
Awareh 2.93 -.01
Axcelis 1.60 -.01
BBCN Bp 10.19 +.09
BEAero 41.00 -.25
BGC Ptrs 6.24 +.06
BJsRest 45.46 -.33
BMC Sft 32.72 +.86
Baidu 128.30 +.11


BeacnRfg 22.36 +.23 Compuwre 8.38 -.05
BeasleyB 3.38 ... Comverse 6.11 -.18
BebeStrs 8.51 -.06 ConcurTch 50.04 +.66
BedBath 59.80 -1.00 Conmed 27.00 +.14
Big5Sprt 8.16 -1.31 ConstantC 25.15 +1.15
BioDIvrylf 2.23 +.36 CorinthC 2.66 +.06
Biocryst 2.92 +.41 CostPlus 11.97 +.03
Biodel h .58 -.04 Costeo 79.95 -.04
BioFuelEh .63 +.01 Creelnc 23.82 +.60
Biogenldc 116.30 +.59 Cresud 11.52 +.01
BioMarin 35.54 -.67 Crocs 18.40 -.16
BioMimefc 2.07 +.09 CrosstexE 13.50 -.12
Bionovorsh .17 -.01 Ctrip.eom 23.81 +1.17
BioSante .52 -.01 CubistPh 41.64 +1.07
BlkRKelso 8.71 -.05 Curis 4.55
BlueCoat 25.64 +.01 CypSemi 17.75 +.32
BlueNile 35.93 -.99 CytRxh .27 -.01
BobEvans 35.07 +.10 Ctori 2.59 +.18
BreitBurn 19.09 -.05
Brightpnt 11.59
Broadcom 32.66 +1.60 Daktronics 10.08 +.06
BroadSoft 28.01 +.46 DeckrsOut 86.51 -1.96
BroadVisn 15.55 -1.80 Delcath 4.21 +.09
Broadwdh .72 +.05 Dell Inc 15.94 +.14
BrcdeCm 5.93 +.04 DemandTc 13.17 +.01
BrooksAuto 10.95 -.04 Dndreon 13.79 -.56
BrukerCp 13.29 +.09 Dentsply 36.39 +.54
CA Inc 21.82 +.88 Depomed 6.11 +.26
CBOE 25.30 -.02 DermaSci 7.69 +.10
CH Robins 66.34 -.18 DexCom 10.27 +.14
CMEGrp 233.23 +7.23 DiamndFlf 33.13 +.44
CVBFnd 10.63 +.05 DigRiver 15.09 +.52
Cadence 10.17 -.05 Diodes 22.03 -.11
CalumetSp 21.39 -.28 DirecTVA 43.09 -.60
CdnSolar 3.51 -.07 DiscCmA 43.53 +.56
CapCtyBk 9.79 +.07 DiscCm C 39.38 +.80
CapProd 7.35 -.11 DiscovLab 2.17 +.07
CapFedFn 11.75 +.10 DishNetwk 28.68 -.03
CpstnTrbh 1.14 +.03 DollarTree 82.98 +.97
Cardiomg 2.50 +.04 DonlleyRR 14.73 -.01
CareerEd 9.51 +.43 DotHillSy 1.38 +.01
CaribouC 15.57 +.97 DragonWg 3.76
Carrizo 27.02 -.51 DrmWksA 17.95 -.06
CarverB rs 9.64 +.64 DryShips 2.29 +.06
Cavium 33.02 +1.67 Dunkinn 26.17 +.31
Cbeyond 8.59 +.01 DurectCp .78 +.00
Celgene 73.20 +1.13 Dynavax 3.80 +.18
CellTherrsh 1.19 +.03 E-Trade 9.25 +.23
Celsion 1.75 -.05 eBay 31.58 +.06
CentEuro 4.34 -.26 EagleBulk 1.09 +.01
CEurMed 6.26 -.04 EaglRkEn 11.35 +.01
CentAI 9.89 +.21 ErthLink 6.79 +.01
Cerners 62.00 -1.00 EstWstBcp 21.42 +.08
CerusCp 3.03 -.06 Ebix Inc 23.42 +.71
Changyou 22.00 +.08 EducDev 4.94
ChrmSh 4.70 -.02 8x8 Inc 3.43 +.08
Chartlnds 60.11 +2.34 ElectSd 15.60 +.37
CharterCm 57.46 +1.31 ElectArts 19.51 +.13
ChkPoint 52.33 +.05 Emeore If 1.22 +.06
Cheesecake 29.46 +.34 EndoPhrm 36.06 +1.05
ChelseaTh 5.15 +.03 Endobgix 11.78 +.17
ChildPlace 48.67 -.32 EnerNOC 10.69 +.54
ChinaGrnT 2.94 +.44 EngyCnvh .57 +.14
Chinalnfh .70 +.02 ErgyXXI 32.47 -.04
ChinaMed 3.30 -.09 Entegris 8.96 -.03
ChrchllD 52.35 +.72 EntropCom 5.43 -.03
CienaCorp 14.60 +.29 Epocratnh 8.79 +.26
CinnFin 31.47 +.03 Equinix 112.58 +1.10
Cintas 37.42 -.18 EricsnTel 9.81 -.03
Cirrus 20.01 -.19 ExactScih 9.49 +.54
Cisco 19.15 +.08 Exelids 5.00 -.13
CitrixSys 65.44 +.37 ExddeTc 3.24 -.02
CleanEngy 13.62 +.56 Expedias 28.87 -.44
Clearwire 1.93 +.07 Expdlni 42.60 +.10
ClickSft 10.14 +.48 ExpScripts 48.87 +.04
CoffeeH 9.68 +.36 ExtrmNet 3.05 +.03
Cognex 40.39 +.16 EZchip 31.37 +1.40
CognizTech 69.11 -1.17 Ezcorp 26.73 +.21
CogoGrp 1.99 +.08 F5Netwks 110.81 +.09
Coinstar 45.53 +1.05 FLIRSys 25.79 +.52
ColdwtrCrk .92 -.02 FSI Infi 4.36 -.04
ColumLabs 2.55 -.11 FairptCm n 4.25
ColSprtw 44.87 -.18 Fastenals 45.86 +.64
Comcast 25.50 +.08 FiberTwrlf .22 +.01
Comcspcl 25.00 +.11 FifthStFin 10.19
CmcBMO 39.56 -.20 FifthThird 13.83 +.08
CommSys 14.87 +.07 FinclEngin 24.27 +1.33
CmplGnom 2.86 -.13 Fncllnst 16.56 +.06


Finisar 18.91 -.03 Informat 35.92 +.11
FinLine 19.20 -.20 Infosys 51.85 -5.02
FstCashFn 35.53 +.47 Inhibitex 24.57 +.22
FMidBc 11.29 +.05 InnerWkgs 9.97 +.24
FstNiagara 9.58 +.30 IntegLfSci 24.41 +.93
FstSolar 41.59 -.21 IntgDv 5.96 +.14
FstMerit 16.30 +.05 Intel 25.75 -.05
Fiserv 61.04 +1.32 InteractBrk 15.25 +.06
Flextrn 6.26 +.06 InterDig 42.60 -.08
Flowlnt 3.81 +.14 Intrface 11.55 +.45
FocusMda 21.32 +.35 InterMune 15.32 -.82
ForcePro 5.55 ... InfiBcsh 19.78 +.21
FormFac 5.06 -.05 InfiSpdw 25.93 +.37
Fortnets 21.06 +.44 Intersil 10.67 -.12
Fossil Inc 86.78 +7.41 Intuit 55.29 +.11
FosterWhl 21.27 +1.09 InvRIEst 7.35 -.15
Francescn 22.51 +1.29 IridiumCm 7.58 +.12
FronterCm 5.03 -.01 IronwdPh 11.79 +.42
FuelSysSol 19.15 +1.37 Isis 7.59 +.21
FuelCell 1.00 -.01 Itron 39.12 +.17
FultonFncl 10.63 +.11 IvanhoeEn 1.05 -.05
FushjCo 812+.6 Ia 11.54 +.54

GTAdvTc 8.38 -.02 JASolar 2.02 +.08
GTxInc 3.81 +.02 JDSUniph 11.64 -.02
GalenaBh .72 +.03 JackHenry 33.19 +.10
Garmin 40.80 -.27 JkksPac 13.41
Gentex 30.66 +.44 Jamba 1.65 -.01
Genfivah 7.47 -.10 JamesRiv 7.39 -.22
GeoEye 21.73 -1.40 JazzPhrm 46.78 -1.82
Geores 29.12 +.52 JetBlue 5.58 -.10
GeronCp 1.72 -.01 JoeJeansh .59 +.05
GileadSd 44.90 +.50 JonesSdah .79 +.14
GladerBc 13.21 +.11 KIT Digit 9.62 +.34
GIbSpcMet 13.45 +.04 KLATnc 48.80 -.52
GluMobile 3.10 +.08 KeryxBio 2.68 -.01
GolLNGLtd 44.35 +.31 Kulicke 10.69 +.03
Google 629.64 +3.68 L&L Engy 2.85 -.10
GreenMtC 47.24 -.23 LKQ Corp 32.01 +.02
GreenPlns 10.77 +.34 LPL Inv 33.14 +.20
GrifolsSA n 5.67 +.02 LSI Ind If 6.57 +.11
Grouponn 19.26 +.26 LamResrch 39.88 -.01
GrpoRn 7.57 +.06 LamarAdv 29.90 +.81
GulfportE 30.81 -.30 Lattce 6.48 +.32
HMN Fn 1.85 -.07 LeapWirlss 10.08 +.55
HMS Hd s 32.30 +.17 LegacyRes 28.93 +.65
HSN Inc 36.50 +.30 LedPhrm 1.44 +.05
Halozyme 9.86 -.11 LibGlobA 42.94 +.26
HancHId 34.57 +.30 LibCapA 83.18 +1.49
HansenMed 2.46 ... LibtylntA 17.05 -.01
HanwhaSol 2.00 +.29 LifeTech 46.78 +.62
Harmonic 5.33 +.05 LifePtH 36.52 -.39
Hasbro 33.09 -.16 LimelghtN 3.08 -.03
HawHold 5.97 -.03 Lincare 25.30 +.11
HrfindEx 14.23 +.08 LinearTch 30.89 +.04
HSchein 68.00 +.04 LinnEngy 35.95 -1.75
HercOffsh 4.10 -.16 Liquidity 36.79 -1.16
HercTGC 10.08 -.13 LiveDeal 3.38 +.52
Hibbett 47.05 +.78 LodgeNet 2.77 +.04
HimaxTch 1.24 +.01 Logitech 8.02 +.24
Hologic 19.26 +.31 LookSmart 1.45 +.02
Home Inns 27.56 +.73 Lulkin 74.43 +.41
HorsehdH 10.66 +.08 lululemns 6124 +.67
HotTopic 7.20 +.17
HubGroup 33.80 +.79
HudsCity 7.12 -.14 MCGCap 4.09 +.09
HumGen 9.11 -.33 MELASci 3.65 -.05
HuntJB 47.34 +.82 MGE 44.59 -.22
HuntBnk 5.97 +.03 MIPSTech 5.51 +.09
IAC Inter 41.93 +.49 MKS Inst 29.27 +.38
II-VI s 20.37 +.55 MTS 43.88 +.12
IPC 31.89 -.41 MSG 29.37 +.57
IPG Photon 47.39 +.57 MagicJcks 14.83 +.18
iShAsiaexJ 52.00 +.44 Magma 7.17 +.01
iShACWI 43.17 +.02 Majeseo 2.98 +.05
iShNsdqBio 112.31 +.78 MAKOSrg 34.01 -.18
Icon PLC 18.53 -.15 ManTech 34.64 +1.78
IconixBr 17.93 +.65 MannKd 2.74 +.11
IdenixPh 12.71 -.35 MarinaBrs .91 +.02
Ikanosh .75 +.04 MarvellT 15.23 -.04
Illumina 36.23 +2.22 Masimo 19.90 +.67
ImunoGn 12.30 +.50 Mattel 28.90 -.12
ImpaxLabs 19.89 -.05 Madmlntg 26.28 +.03
ImperlSgr 2.79 +.12 MaxwIlT 17.94 +.15
Incyte 16.42 +.25 MeeoxLane 1.39 +.13
Infinera 7.16 +.09 MedAssets 10.38 +.03
InfoSpace 11.85 +.19 MedicActn 5.40 +.06


MediCo 19.02 +.15 PattUTI 19.12 -1.30
Medivafon 55.35 -.27 Paychex 31.12
MeleoCrwn 10.57 +.19 PeopUtdF 13.53 +.12
MentorGr 13.40 +.01 PeregrineP .94 +.01
MercadoL 86.51 +2.75 PerfectWld 10.76 +.55
MergeHIth 4.93 +.05 Perrigo 97.49 +.07
MeritMeds 12.87 +.33 PetSmart 53.14 +.60
Methanx 25.59 +1.19 PetroDev 31.29 -.18
Microchp 35.75 -.05 Pharmacyc 17.56 +1.00
Micromet 8.83 +.13 Pharmssts 136.92 +.45
MicronT 7.27 +.05 PhotrIn 6.73 -.06
MicrosSys 49.15 +.62 Polyomms 17.17 -.04
MicroSemi 18.61 +.45 PoolCorp 32.59 +.02
Microsoft 28.00 +.28 Popular 1.53 -.01
Micrvisn h .35 -.00 Potlatch 32.79 +.69
MillerHer 19.18 +.62 Power-One 4.95 +.07
Misonix 1.97 +.04 PwShs QQQ 58.39 +.23
MitekSys 8.83 +.75 Powrwvrs 1.82 -.05
Molex 25.96 +.24 Pozen 4.28 +.01
Momenta 19.20 +.04 Presstekh .68 +.12
MonstrBev 95.03 +2.63 PriceTR 59.37 +.04
MoSys 3.95 +.03 PrSmrt 60.86 +1.75
Motricity .86 -.05 priceline 476.18 -1.52
MuliFnEIc 25.40 +3.87 PrimoWtr 2.85 +.09
Mylan 22.28 -.03 PrinctnR h .09 +.00
MyriadG 20.75 -.23 PrivateB 12.89 +.19
NIl HIdg 22.09 +.75 PrUPShQQQ17.13 -.24
NPS Phm 6.88 +.08 PrUltPQQQs 77.62 +.91
NXPSemi 17.60 +.02 PrognicsPh 8.89 -.01
Nanosphere 1.62 +.03 ProgrsSfts 18.56 +.10
NasdOMX 24.96 -.09 ProspctCap 9.99 +.08
Natlnstrs 25.72 +.18 PureCycle 1.85 +.10
NatPenn 8.93 +.12 QIAGEN 15.18 +.06
NektarTh 6.29 +.05 QlikTech 25.21 +1.49
NetLogicM 49.77 +.03 Qlogic 16.10 +.31
NetApp 34.43 -.32 Qualeom 56.33 +.71
Netease 44.62 +.08 QualityS s 37.21 -.59
Netfiix 92.15 ... QuantFurs .80 -.03
NtScout 16.50 +.05 QuestSft 19.23 +.16
Newport 16.52 +.77 Questmor 35.27 -.07
NewsCpA 18.89 +.09 RFMicD 4.76
NewsCpB 19.14 +.11 RPXn 15.41 +.41
NobltyH If 5.32 +.02 RTI Biolog 4.20 -.04
Nordson s 42.42 +.43 Radware 31.95 +.55
NorTrst 42.52 +.26 RAM En h 3.20 +.07
NwstBcsh 12.80 +.02 Rambus 8.28 +.01
Novavax 1.35 +.02 Randgold 110.86 +1.97
Novlus 44.13 -.21 Regenrn 78.26 +.90
NuVasive 13.72 -.40 RentACt 36.15 -.21
NuanceCm 28.75 +.27 RschMotn 16.44 +.83
NutriSyst 13.76 -.51 Respnsysn 10.27 +.14
Nvidia 14.10 -.09 RetailOpp 11.76 -.02
NxStageMd 16.92 +.37 RexEnergy 11.63 -2.07
OCZTech 8.13 +.46 RightNow 42.75 +.02
OReillyAu 81.82 +.44 RiverbedT 27.16 +.16
Oclaro 3.77 -.06 RosettaR 45.22 -.80
Omnicell 17.72 -.13 RossStrss 51.15 +.45
OmniVisn 13.07 -.12 RoviCorp 27.51 +.78
OnAssign 11.30 ... RoyGId 68.26 -.37
OnSmcnd 8.30 -.03 RoyaleEn 4.45 -.23
Oneothyr 6.91 -.34 RubieonTc 11.66 +.34
OnyxPh 42.96 +.48 rue21 22.27 -.45
OpenTxt 49.77 -.01 RuthsHosp 5.95 +.52
OpenTable 45.46 -.44 anair 2884 53
OpnwvSy 1.94 +.17 W I inH
Opnext 1.02 +.08
OpbmerPh 12.84 -.12 S1 Corp 9.55 -.05
Oracle 27.17 +.28 SBACom 44.72 +.30
Orexigen 2.02 +.17 SEI Inv 18.29 +.08
Oritani 12.90 -.09 SLM Cp 13.70 -.06
Orthfx 38.30 +2.07 STEC 9.93 +.20
OtterTail 22.32 +.08 SVB FnGp 55.26 +.17
Overstk 6.83 -.19 SXC HIth 62.90 -1.75
SabaSoftw 9.41 +.31
SagentPh n 21.82 +.03
PDL Bio 6.14 -.01 SalixPhm 49.36 +1.02
PFChng 32.04 -.47 SanderFm 50.41 +3.00
PMC Sra 6.03 -.01 SanDisk 50.48 -.07
PSSWrld 22.98 -.31 Sanmina 10.43 +.23
Paccar 42.31 +.12 Sanofi rt 1.25 -.03
PacBiosci 3.69 +.64 Santarus 4.47 +.25
PacEthrs 1.14 +.08 Sapient 12.77 -.09
PacSunwr 1.70 -.01 Satconh .54 -.00
PanASIv 24.17 -.31 SavientPh 2.47 +.05
PaneraBrd 144.12 +.09 Schnitzer 44.28 +.61
ParamTch 19.21 +.10 SdClone 4.20 -.09
Parexel 20.68 -.66 SdGames 11.34 +.18
Patterson 31.00 +.57 SeamoastBk 1.71 -.01


SeagateT 19.37 +.68
SearsHldgs 34.00 +1.10
SeattGen 18.44 +.05
SelCmfrt 22.99 +.12
Selectvlns 18.10 +.10
Semtech 25.84 -.08
Sequenom 4.52 -.03
SvcSourcn 16.46 +.50
SvArtsrsh .29 -.03
ShandaGm 4.33 +.20
Shire 100.74 +.53
ShuffiMstr 12.57 +.02
Shutterfly 24.06 -.89
SityTech 4.75 -.03
SigaTech h 2.74 +.02
SigmaDsg 6.03 +.16
SigmaAld 65.23 +1.23
SignatBk 62.42 +.05
SilicGrln 12.58 +.24
Silinmlmg 4.80 -.08
SilicnMotn 22.35 -1.19
Slcnware 4.98 +.09
SilvStdg 15.23 +.12
Sina 60.12 +2.64
Sindair 12.74 +.17
SiriusXM 2.11 +.07
SironaDent 45.52 +.10
Skullcdyn 12.25 -.24
SkywksSol 17.98 -.05
SmartTcg 3.97 +.08
SmtHeath .48 +.07
SmithWes 4.66 -.05
SmithMicro 1.51 +.06
SodaStrm 37.30 -.70
Sohu.cm 54.54 +1.59
Solazymen 11.07 -.17
SonicCorp 6.73 -.02
Sonus 2.55 +.05
SouMoBc 22.69 +.24
Sourcefire 30.11 +.02
SpectPh 15.67 -.20
Spreadtrm 16.55 -.50
Stamps.cm 29.22 +2.56
Staples 15.07 +.05
StarBulk .95
StarSdent 2.50 -.02
Starbucks 47.60 +.48
SfDynam 14.92 -.04
StemCell rs .78 +.01
Stericyde 83.66 +2.89
SMadden s 36.68 +.08
StewEnt 5.95 +.01
SunBcpNJ 3.00 -.07
SunHIth 3.96 -.04
SunOpta 4.60 +.30
SunPower 7.79 +.36
SusqBnc 9.31 +.13
SwisherHy 3.67 +.04
Symantec 16.08 -.17
Symetricm 6.06 +.19
Synapfcs 33.29 +1.43
Syneron 10.50 -.30
Synopsys 27.81 +.12
Synovis 27.91 +.02
SyntaPhm 4.50 -.04
TBSIntAh .23
TDAmeritr 16.66 -.08
THQ .71 -.04
TTM Tch 11.25 +.59
tw tdeleom 20.09 -.06
TakeTwo 14.58 +.08
TaleoA 37.34 +.61
Targacept 5.78 +.16
TASER 5.22 +.06
TechData 51.75 -.03
Tekelec 10.99
TICmSys 2.52 +.07
Telikh .19 -.00
Tellabs 3.99 +.02
Tengion h .68 -.06
TeslaMot 28.25 +.02
TesseraTch 18.03 -.04
TevaPhrm 44.26 +.31
TxCapBsh 31.94 -.12
Texlnst 31.37 +.64
TexRdhse 15.46 +.06
Theravnce 17.67 +.05
Thoratec 30.02 -.06


TibeoSft 24.31 +.34
lVo Inc 10.28 +.11
TowerSm h .69 +.01
TractSupp 80.20 +7.27
Travelzoo 30.28 +.48
jTridentM .12 +.02
TrimbleN 43.78 +.71
TripAdvn 28.46 +.67
TriQuint 5.62 +.10
TrstNY 5.79 +.04
Trustmk 25.45 +.01
USATechh 1.12 -.11
UllWrldwd 15.08 +.43
UltaSalon 71.93 +.15
Ultratech 26.45 +.64
Umpqua 12.93 +.07
UtdOnln 5.63 +.05
US Enr 3.10 +.03
UtdTherap 47.96 -.26
UniTekGS 3.28 -.12
UnivDisp 42.32 +.81
UnivFor 33.46 +.24
UranmRs .82 +.02
UrbanOut 24.55 +.62


VCAAnt 20.55 +.13
VOXX(InD 11.26 +.17
ValueClick 16.76 +.10
VanSTCpB 78.07 +.02
VanlntCpB 82.63 -.04
Veeeolnst 23.58 +.10
Veltn 7.72 +.13
VBradley 33.88 -1.12
VerintSys 26.84 -.06
Verisign 35.81 +.23
Verisk 39.80 -.43
VertxPh 37.07 -.25
ViacomB 47.89 +.61
Vical 3.76
VirgnMdah 23.58 +.15
ViroPhrm 28.01 +.47
VistaPrt 29.58 -.02
Vivus 12.23 +.18
Vodafone 27.81 +.09
Volcano 23.48 -.28
WarnerCh 16.70 +.21
WashFed 15.23 -.10
Web.com 11.50 -.09
WebMD 26.68 +.20
Websense 18.37 -.31
Wendys Co 5.39
WernerEnt 24.99 +.08
Westmrd 12.68 -.09
Wstptlnng 33.56 +.42
WetSeal 3.29 +.01
WholeFd 71.93 -.34
WilshBcp 3.80 +.08
Windstrm 11.97 +.05
Winn-Dixie 9.38
Wintrust 31.72 +.27
Woodward 43.91 +.01
Wowjointh .54 -.01
Wynn 109.80 -2.09
XOMA 1.84 +.27
Xilinx 33.46 +.61
YRC rs 11.09 -.30
Yahoo 15.66 +.13
Yandexn 19.05 -.15
Yongye 4.40 +.10
Zagg 7.13 -.31
Zalicus 1.23 -.02
Zllown 27.19 +.94
ZonBcp 18.65 +.15
Zopharm 5.02 -.13
Zpcar n 14.92 -.02
Zogenix 2.60 -.01
Zumiez 31.16 -.47
Zyngan 8.45 +.12


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3120 4.3140
Australia .9678 .9705
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.7845 1.8013
Britain 1.5342 1.5320
Canada 1.0189 1.0196
Chile 500.65 506.45
China 6.3181 6.3198
Colombia 1840.50 1860.50
Czech Rep 19.92 20.37
Denmark 5.7988 5.8568
Dominican Rep 38.72 38.90
Egypt 6.0395 6.0375
Euro .7796 .7876
Hong Kong 7.7664 7.7660
Hungary 240.05 245.17
India 51.584 51.895
Indnsia 9155.00 9155.00
Israel 3.8320 3.8480
Japan 76.76 76.87
Jordan .7091 .7100
Lebanon 1505.00 1505.50
Malaysia 3.1415 3.1395
Mexico 13.5690 13.6452
N. Zealand 1.2590 1.2566
Norway 6.0109 6.0560
Peru 2.695 2.695
Poland 3.44 3.52
Russia 31.5505 31.7246
Singapore 1.2897 1.2918
So. Africa 8.0583 8.1009
So. Korea 1152.47 1161.50
Sweden 6.9311 6.9569
Switzerlnd .9438 .9551
Taiwan 30.00 30.01
Thailand 31.77 31.64
Turkey 1.8508 1.8561
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6732
Uruguay 19.4499 19.4499
Venzuel 4.2927 4.2927


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



li- Yesterday PvsDay

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.028 0.015
6-month 0.05 0.05
5-year 0.83 0.88
10-year 1.92 2.00
30-year 2.97 3.06



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Feb 12 99.10 -1.77
Corn CBOT Mar 12 6111/2 -40
Wheat CBOT Mar 12 605 -36
Soybeans CBOT Mar12 11821/2 -201/2
Cattle CME Feb 12 121.25 -.07
Sugar (world) ICE Mar12 23.27 -.42
Orange Juice ICE Mar12 178.10-10.00


SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1647.30 $1619.40
Silver (troy oz., spot) $30.092 $29.2bb
Copper (pound) $3.6440 $3.422b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$l1499.00 $1414.bO

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.1 ... 9.53 -.25 +15.4 Microsoft .80 2.9 10 28.00 +.28 +7.9
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.8 15 30.12 +.13 -.4 MotrlaSolu .88 1.9 16 46.17 +.07 -.3
Ametek .24 .5 20 45.72 +1.40 +8.6 MotrlaMob ......... 38.50 -.01 -.8
BkofAm .04 .6 ... 6.79 -.08 +22.1 NextEraEn 2.20 3.7 15 59.39 +.18 -2.4
CapCtyBk ...... 22 9.79 +.07 +2.5 Penney .80 2.3 21 34.26 -.30 -2.5
CntryLink 2.90 7.9 17 36.64 +.03 -1.5 PiedmOfc 1.26 7.2 23 17.58 -.12 +3.2
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 31.60 +.33+20.1 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.6 21 54.14 -.24 -3.4
CmwREIT 2.00 10.6 26 18.90 +.03 +13.6Regionsn .04 .9 28 469 11 +91
Disney .60 1.5 15 38.73 +.03 +3.3 SeasHIdgs .33 34.00 +1.10 +7.0
EKodak. ..........67 -.14 +3.4 Sersd .33 34.0. +1.10 +7.0
EnterPT 2.80 6.5 25 43.22 -1.01 11 Smucker 1.92 2.4 20 79.08 +.27 +1.2
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 84.74 -.34 SprintNex ... ...... 2.32 +.02 -.9
FordM .20 1.6 7 12.14 +.07 +128 TimeWarn .94 2.5 14 37.61 +.25 +4.1
GenElec .68 3.6 16 18.93 +.05 +5.7 UniFirst .15 .2 16 61.85 +.52 +9.0
HomeDp 1.16 2.7 19 43.39 -.07 +3.2 VerizonCm 2.00 5.1 16 38.92 +.02 -3.0
Intel .84 3.3 11 25.75 -.05 +6.2 Vodafone 2.10 7.6 ... 27.81 +.09 -.8
IBM 3.00 1.7 14180.55 -1.77 -1.8 WalMart 1.46 2.5 13 59.50 +.10 -.4
Lowes .56 2.1 19 26.39 -.14 +4.0 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.27 -.74 +.6
McDnlds 2.80 2.8 20100.57 +.64 +.2 YRCrs ......... 11.09 -.30 +11.2


m


A10 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 All


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: Dr5001n t 35.43 +.09
Balancp 16.12 +.02 GNMA 16.05 +.01
RetInc 8.74 -.01 GrChinaAr 30.29 -.02
Alger Funds B: HiYIdA p 6.28 +.01
SmCapGr 6.58 +.02 StratValA 27.88 +.19
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 30.87 +.12
BalanAp 15.90 +.03 DreihsAcInc 10.19 +.03
GlbThGrAp61.53 +.36 Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 35.11 +.17 EMktGr 26.64 +.09
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEmI 42.61 +.26
LgCpGrAd 26.89 +.11 Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 15.76 -.01
GIbThGrBt 53.05 +.31 AMTFMuInc 9.94 +.04
GrowthBt 25.09 +.09 MulbCGrA 7.87 +.03
SCpGrBt 28.14 +.14 InBosA 5.70
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 17.69 +.03
SCpGrCt 28.28 +.14 NatlMunlnc 9.77 +.05
Allianz Fds Insti: SpEqtA 15.59 +.01
NFJDvVI 11.83 +.01 TradGvA 7.47
SmCpVi 29.86 +.05 EatonVance B:
Allianz Funds A: HlthSBt 9.45
SmCpVA 28.46 +.05 NatlMulnc 9.77 +.05
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 23.86 +.07 GovtC p 7.45 -.01
TargetCt 14.44 +.07 NatMunlnc 9.77 +.05
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 19.38 +.07 FltgRt 8.87
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 9.91 -.01
LgCaplnv 18.41 +.07 LgCapVal 17.74 +.03
Ameri Century 1st: FBR Funds:
Growth 25.57 +.09 Focuslnvtn47.43 +.22
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 22.16 +.04 LgCappn 15.81 +.09
EqlncAp 7.42 +.02 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: NwInc 10.67
AIICapGr 27.48 +.02 FPACres 27.18 -.05
Balanced 16.33 +.03 Fairholme 24.86 +.16
DivBnd 11.00 ... Federated A:
Eqlnc 7.41 +.01 MidGrStA 35.39 +.14
Growthl 25.36 +.09 MuSecA 10.46 +.02
Heritagel 20.52 +05 TfiRtBdp 11.30
IncGro 25.16 +.05 Federated Insti:
InfAdjBd 12.79 -.02 KaufmnR 4.86 +.04
IntDisc 9.05 +.04 TotRetBd 11.30
InfiGrol 9.79 +.04 StrValDvlS 4.79
NewOpp 7.62 +.02 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 11.97 +.04 EnergyT 35.47 -.23
OneChMd 11.71 +.03 HltCarT 21.81
RealEstl 20.27 -.14 Fidelity Advisor A:
Ultra 23.69 +.14 Nwlnsghp 20.18 +.05
Valuelnv 5.82 +.01 StrnA 12.12 +.02
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor I:
AmcpAp 19.57 +.08 EqGrIn 59.19 +.27
AMuiAp 26.36 +.07 Eqln n 23.79 +.04
BalA p 18.65 +.03 IntBdl n 11.48
BondAp 12.58 +.01 Nwlnsgtln 20.43 +.06
CaplBAp 49.19 +.02 Fidelity AdvisorT:
CapWGAp 32.75 +.10 BalancT 15.33 +.03
CapWAp 20.56 +.07 DivGrTp 11.93 +.04
EupacAp 35.74 +.10 EqGrTp 55.43 +.25
FdlnvAp 36.62 +.14 EqInT 23.43 +.04
GovtAp 14.41 ... GrOppT 36.96 +.14
GwthAp 29.87 +.09 HilnAdTp 9.52
HITrAp 10.77 +.01 IntBdT 11.45 -.01
IncoAp 16.90 +.01 MulncTp 13.38 +.03
IntBdAp 13.64 OvrseaT 15.42 +.12
InfiGrlncAp 27.50 -.07 STFiT 9.26
ICAAp 27.96 +.05 StkSelAIICp 18.26 +.06
LtTEBAp 16.24 +.01 Fidelity Freedom:
NEcoAp 24.59 +.07 FF2010n 13.32 +.01
NPerAp 26.89 +.10 FF2010K 12.31 +.01
NwWrldA 47.22 +.18 FF2015n 11.12 +.01
STBFAp 10.08 ... FF2015K 12.34 +.01
SmCpAp 34.50 +.20 FF2020n 13.38 +.01
TxExAp 12.70 +.03 FF2020K 12.67 +.01
WshAp 29.02 +.06 FF2025n 11.06 +.01
Ariel Investments: FF2025K 12.72 +.01
Apprec 40.93 +.12 FF2030n 13.14 +.02
Ariel 45.69 +.17 FF2030K 12.84 +.02
Artio Global Funds: FF2035n 10.83 +.02
InfiEqIr 23.10 +.04 FF2035K 12.86 +.02
IntEqlllr 9.75 +.01 FF2040n 7.55 +.01
Artisan Funds: FF2040K 12.90 +.02
Intf 20.25 +.11 FF2045n 8.92 +.01
InfiValr 25.40 +.08 Incomen 11.34
MidCap 35.04 +.33 Fidelity Invest:
MidCapVal 20.18 +.08 AIISectEq 11.60 +.03
SCapVal 15.45 +.06 AMgr50n 15.30 +.02
Baron Funds: AMgr70rn 15.84 +.04
Asset 47.10 +.26 AMgr20rn 12.85 +.01
Growth 52.44 +.30 Balancn 18.58 +.03
SmallCap 23.76 +.17 BalancedK 18.58 +.03
Bernstein Fds: BlueChGrn 43.94 +.13
IntDur 13.86 -.01 CAMunn 12.57 +.03
DivMu 14.88 +.02 Canadan 51.04 -.06
TxMgdlnI 12.77 +.05 CapApn 25.69 +.08
BlackRock A: CapDevOn 10.54 +.03
EqtyDiv 18.48 +.04 Cplncrn 8.81 +.01
GIAIAr 18.61 +.05 ChinaRgr 26.18 +.04
HiYInvA 7.50 +.02 CngS 465.09
InfiOpAp 28.71 +.17 CTMunrn 11.99 +.03
BlackRock B&C: Contra n 69.06 +.18
GIAICt 17.35 +.05 ContraK 69.02 +.18
BlackRock Instl: CnvScn 24.13 +.13
BaVIl 25.53 +.13 DisEqn 22.33 +.07
EquityDv 18.52 +.04 DiscEqF 22.30 +.07
GIbAllocr 18.70 +.06 Divlntln 26.10 +.12
HiYdBd 7.49 +01 DivrslntKr 26.06 +.12
Brinson FundsY: DivStkOn 15.27 +.03
HiYIdlY 6.01 DivGthn 27.09 +.09
BruceFund385.28 -.48 EmergAsrn26.05 +.10
Buffalo Funds: EmrMkn 21.26 +.12
SmCapn 25.76 +.18 Eqncn 42.39 +.08
CGM Funds: EQIIn 17.75 +.05
Focusn 27.28 +.28 ECapAp 15.71 +15
Muti n 25.84 +.18 Europe 25.89 +.25
Realtyn 27.19 -.27 Exch 323.88
CRM Funds: Exportn 21.23 +.03
MdCpVII 27.60 +.17 Fidel n1 32.09 +05
Calamos Funds: Fiftyrn 17.95
Grwt p 48.25 +.22 FItRateHi r n 9.71
CavertI invest FrlnOnen 26.58 +.07
Calvert Invest: GNMAn 11.87
Incop 15.76 .04 Govtlnc 1076 -.01
InfaElAp 12.28 .02 GroCon 8482 +39
SocBdialAp 28.38 +.04 Grolncn 18.77 +.03
SocBdp 15.77 -.02 GrowCoF 84.73 +.39
SocElAp 34.38 +13 GrowthCoK84.74 +.39
TFLgp 16.15 +05 GrStratrn 19.73
Cohen & Steers: Highlncrn 8.75 -.01
RltyShrs 61.04 -.43 indepnn 22.84 +.06
ColumbiaClass A: InProBdn 12.83 -.03
Acornt 27.84 +.15 IntBdn 10.90
DivEqlnc 9.77 +.04 ntGovn 10.97
DivrBd 5.06 ... InMun 10.52 +.01
DivOpptyA 8.15 +.03 InfDiscn 28.01 +.14
LgCapGrAt23.19 +.10 InfiSCprn 17.77 +.08
LgCorQAp 5.85 +.01 InvGrBdn 11.71
MdCpGrOp 9.58 +.05 nvGBn 7.74
MidCVIOpp 7.54 +.04 Japanr 923 -04
PBModAp 10.57 +.01 JpnSmn 8.39 -.11
TxEAp 13.86 +.03 LgCapVal 10.46 +.02
SelCommA42.57 +.20 LatAm 51.66 +.42
FrontierA 10.12 +09 LevCoStk n 26.78 +.17
GlobTech 20.22 +.10 LowPrn 36.90 +.17
Columbia Cl l,T&G: LowPriKr 36.88 +.18
EmMktOpIln 7.72 +.02 Magellnn 65.36 +.16
Columbia Class Z: MagellanK 65.29 +.16
AcornZ 28.81 +.16 MDMurn 11.47 +.02
AcornlntZ 35.13 +.14 MAMunn 12.49 +.02
DivlncoZ 13.83 +.03 MegaCpStknlO.44 +.02
IntBdZ 9.30 ... MIMunn 12.37 +.02
IntTEBd 10.87 +.01 MidCapn 27.64 +.09
LgCapGr 12.45 +.04 MNMunn 11.90 +.01
LgCpldxZ 25.03 +.06 MtgSecn 11.21 +.01
MdCpldxZ 11.07 +.02 Munilncn 13.18 +.02
MdCpVIZp 13.30 +.04 NJMunrn 12.10 +.03
ValRestr 46.77 +.22 NwMktrn 15.77 +.02
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMilln 29.75 +.08
ComRett 8.23 -.09 NYMunn 13.46 +.03
DFA Funds: OTCn 56.81 +.21
InfiCorEqn 9.46 +.05 OhMunn 12.14 +.02
USCorEqlnll.16 +.04 100oIndex 9.08 +.02
USCorEq2nl11.03 +.04 Ovrsean 27.30 +.31
DWS Invest A: PcBasn 22.14 -.01
CommAp 16.69 +.05 PAMunrn 11.23 +.02
DWS InvestS: Puritnn 18.10 +.02
CorPIslnc 10.78 ... PuritanK 18.10 +.02
EmMkGrr 15.26 +.09 RealEn 27.77 -.21
EnhEmMk 10.04 +.01 SAIISecEqF11.60 +.03
EnhGlbBdr 9.99 +.04 SCmdtyStrtng.02 -.11
GIbSmCGr 35.90 +.23 SCmdtyStrFn9.03 -.11
GlblThem 20.91 +.07 SrEmrgMkt 14.97 +.10
Gold&Prc 16.10 +.11 SrslntGrw 10.31 +.05
GrolncS 16.75 +.05 SerlnfiGrF 10.33 +.05
HiYldTx 12.43 +.03 SrslntVal 8.13 +.02
IntTxAMT 11.99 +.02 SerlnfiValF 8.14 +.02
InfiFdS 37.47 +.20 SrInvGrdF 11.71
LgCpFoGr 29.77 +.14 StIntMun 10.84 +.01
LatAmrEq 39.62 +.34 STBFn 8.50
MgdMuniS 9.25 +.02 SmllCpSrn 17.32 +.07
MATFS 14.92 +.05 SCpValur 14.54 +.02
SP500S 17.22 +.04 StkSelLCVrn10.67 +.04
WorldDiv 22.12 +.05 StkSlcACapn25.23 +.08
Davis Funds A: StkSelSmCp 18.67 +.06
NYVenA 33.65 +.17 Stratlncn 10.85 +.01
Davis Funds B: StrReRtr 9.28 -.04
NYVenB 32.20 +.16 TotalBdn 10.95
Davis Funds C: Trend n 69.56 +20
NYVenC 32.48 +.16 USBI n 11.79 -.01
Davis FundsY: Utilityn 16.86 -.02
NYVenY 33.99 +.17 ValStratn 26.41 +11
Delaware Invest A: Valuen 66.10 +31
Diverlncp 9.18 -.01 Wrldwn 17.72 +.04
SMIDCapG 23.03 +.04 Fidelity Selects:
TxUSAp 11.81 +.03 Airn 36.03 +.20
Delaware Invest B: Banking n 17.27 +.10
SelGrBt 31.59 +.10 Biotchn 93.46 +.54
Dimensional Fds: Brokrn 43.66 +.15
EmMCrEqnl8.03 +.12 Chemn 102.69 +1.44
EmMktV 27.37 +.20 ComEquipn22.88 +.14
IntSmVan 14.02 +.11 Compn 56.12 +.34
LargeCo 10.20 +02 ConDisn 24.05 +.13
TAUSCorE2n8.97 +.03 ConsuFnn 11.69 +.07
USLgVan 20.08 +.03 ConStapn 70.95 +.10
USMicron 13.72 +.07 CstHon 37.59 +.10


US TgdVal 15.98 +.07 DfAer n 81.47 +.42
US Small n 21.35 +.11 Electrn 47.83 +.39
USSmVa 24.23 +.15 Enrgyn 50.63 -.33
InfiSmCon 14.21 +.10 EngSvn 66.79 -.52
EmgMktn 24.78 +.14 EnvAltEnrn15.80 +.27
Fixdn 10.31 FinSvyn 53.27 +.15
IntGFxlnn 12.91 -.01 Goldrn 45.13 +.33
IntVan 15.00 +08 Healthn 127.67 +.10
Glb5Fxlncn 10.93 Insur. n 45.87 +.19
TMUSTgtV 20.92 +.09 Leisrn 100.30 +.76
2YGIFxdn 10.09 Materialn 66.61 +.98
DFARIEn 23.19 -.17 MedDIn 57.95 -.44
Dodge&Cox: MdEqSysn 25.92 +.03
Balanced 69.93 +.26 Mulhmdn 45.14 +.24
Income 13.40 +.01 NtGasn 30.57 -.31
InflSt 29.71 +.20 Pharmn 13.74 +.04
Stock 106.24 +.47 Retail n 52.32 +.09
DoubleUne Funds: Softwr n 79.82 +.35
TRBdI 11.08 Tech n 89.69 +.46
TRBdNp 11.07 Telcm n 44.36 +.35
Dreyfus: Transn 51.84 +.25
Aprec 40.95 -.01 UtilGrn 51.88 -.12
CTA 12.20 +.03 Wirelessn 7.34 +.04
CorVA 22.47 Fidelity Spartan:
Dreyf 8.73 +.03 ExtMkInn 37.02 +.17
DryMidr 26.89 +06 5001dxlnvn 45.87 +.11


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dx I 45.87 +.11
Infillnxlnvn 30.13 +.13
TotMktlnvn 37.32 +.10
USBondl 11.79 -.01
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdvn45.87 +.11
IntAdrn 30.13 +.13
TotMktAdrn37.32 +.10
First Eagle:
GIbIA 45.84 +.07
OverseasA 20.52 +.01
First Investors A
BIChpAp
GloblA p 6.18 +.02
GovtAp 11.63 +.01
GrolnAp 14.93 +.04
IncoAp 2.49
MATFAp 12.33 +.04
MITFAp 12.65 +.03
NJTFAp 13.59 +.03
NYTFAp 15.08 +.04
OppAp 26.95 +.07
PATFAp 13.57 +.04
SpSitAp 23.56 +.10
TxExAp 10.13 +.03
TotRtAp 15.57 +.03
ValueBp 7.18 +.01
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.05 -.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.84
ALTFAp 11.62 +.02
AZTFAp 11.19 +.04
CallnsAp 12.54 +.03
CAIntAp 11.97 +.03
CalTFAp 7.24 +.02
COTFAp 12.11 +.03
CTTFAp 11.30 +.03
CvtScAp 14.38 +.05
DblTFA 12.24 +.03
DynTchA 29.52 +.06
EqlncAp 17.05 +.03
Fedlntp 12.36 +.03
FedTFAp 12.35 +.03
FLTFAp 11.81 +.02
FoundAlp 10.07 +.02
GATFAp 12.42 +.03
GoldPrMA 39.23 +.31
GrwthAp 46.27 +.31
HYTFAp 10.46 +.03
HilncA 1.96
IncomAp 2.12
InsTFAp 12.30 +.03
NYITF p 11.80 +.02
LATFAp 11.82 +.02
LMGvScA 10.40
MDTFAp 11.82 +.02
MATFAp 11.95 +.03
MITFAp 12.19 +.01
MNInsA 12.76 +.02
MOTFAp 12.54 +.03
NJTFAp 12.47 +.02
NYTFAp 11.97 +.02
NCTFAp 12.69 +.02
OhiolAp 12.88 +.03
ORTFAp 12.39 +.03
PATFAp 10.72 +.02
ReEScAp 14.82 -.12
RisDvAp 35.33 +.09
SMCpGrA 35.13 +.25
Stratlncp 10.20 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.10 +.01
USGovAp 6.94 +.01
UbIsAp 13.08 -.02
VATFAp 12.03 +.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.56 +.05
IncmeAd 2.11
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.14
USGvC t 6.90 +.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 20.25 +.04
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 21.92 -.03
ForgnAp 5.94 +.03
GIBdAp 12.59 +.05
GrwthAp 16.57 +.09
WorldAp 14.04 +.06
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 16.56 +.09
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.41 -.03
ForgnC p 5.82 +.03
GIBdCM p 12.61 +.05
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.41 +.03
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S nc 11.70
US Eqty 40.29 +.19
GMOTrust IIll:
CHIE 20.92 -.05
Quality 22.20 +.03
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 21.13 +.06
InfilntrVl 18.99 +.03
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 10.75 +.05
InfiCorEq 25.55 +.04
Quality 22.20 +.02
StrFxInc 16.25 -.01
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 49.15 +.21
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.57 +.01
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 34.64 +.12
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 22.93 +.15
HiYield 6.94
HYMuni n 8.69 +.04
MidCapV 34.87 +.11
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.29 +.01
CapAplnst 38.21 +.12
Infllnvt 53.71 +.45
Int r 54.18 +.45
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 30.48 +.20
DivGthAp 19.43 +.05
IntOpAp 13.10 +.06
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppIn 30.47 +.19
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 39.11 +.24
Div&Gr 19.92 +.05
Advisers 19.87 +.07
TotRetBd 11.67
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.36 +.01
StrGrowt 12.26 +.01
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.60 -.20
HIthcareS 15.29 +.05
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.92
IVA Funds:
WSdwideAt 15.50 +.01
Wldwide I r 15.50 +.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.30 +.06
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.67 -.37
UtliBes 16.68 -.01
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 16.58 +.05
CmstkA 15.93 +.07
Constp 22.20 +.08
EqIncA 8.54 +.02
GrlncAp 19.19 +.04
HilncMu p 7.82 +.02
HiYldp 4.06
HYMuA 9.56 +.02
InfiGrow 25.62 -.02
MunilnA 13.57 +.03
PATFA 16.44 +.04
USMortgA 13.01 +.01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 13.55 +.06
MunilnB 13.54 +.03
US Mortg 12.95 +.02
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 22.55 +.03
AssetStAp 23.21 +.03
AssetSbi r 23.41 +.03
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.86
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.91 -.01
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 24.44 +.11
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.86
ShtDurBd 10.97
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.32 +.03
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.85
HighYld n 7.72 +.01
lntmTFBd n 11.36 +.02
ShtDurBd n 10.97
USLCCrPIs n20.70 +.09
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 24.99 +.04
ContrarnT 12.75 +.09
EnterprT 60.06 +.17
FIxBndT 10.56 -.01
GlUfeSciTr 26.27 +.04
GIbSelT 10.25 +.10
GITechTr 16.47 +.10
Grw&lncT 30.81 +.09
JanusT 28.13 +.08
OvrseasTr 33.42 +.32
PrkMCValT 20.83 +.04


ResearchT 29.19 +.06
ShTmBdT 3.06
TwentyT 53.64 +.19
VentureT 53.71 +.18
WrldWTr 41.72 +.22
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn27.16 +.12
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.54
RgBkA 13.02 +.06
StrlnAp 6.47 +.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.47 +.01


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 11.61 +.04
LSBalanc 12.48 +.03
LSConsrv 12.75 +.01
LSGrwth 12.25 +.04
LSModer 12.45 +.02
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 17.52 +.16
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 17.93 +.16
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 115.43 +.49
CBApprp 14.21 +.05
CBLCGrp 21.17 +.10
GCIAIICOp 7.72 +.04
WAHilncAt 5.80
WAMgMup 16.55 +.04
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 19.35 +.09
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 27.64 +.14
CMValTrp 38.88 +.11
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 27.32 +.09
SmCap 25.77 +.23
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.14 +.03
StrlncC 14.69 +.03
LSBondR 14.08 +.02
StlncA 14.61 +.03
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.04 +.01
InvGrBdY 12.05 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.05 +.03
FundlEq 12.63 +.05
BdDebAp 7.73
ShDurlncAp 4.56
MidCpAp 16.41 +.08
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.59
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.56
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.19 +.07
MIGA 15.74 +.08
EmGA 42.84 +.23
HilnA 3.39
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.30 +.03
UtilA 17.03 +.02
ValueA 23.11 +.09
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.17 +.07
GvScBn 10.55 -.01
HilnBn 3.40
MulnBn 8.65 +.02
TotRBpn 14.30 +.03
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 13.98 +.06
Valuel 23.21 +.09
MFS Funds Insti:
lnfiEqn 16.08 +.03
MainStay Funds A:
HiYldBA 5.85
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.62 +.03
GovtBt 8.90
HYIdBBt 5.82
IncmBldr 16.28 +.03
InfilEqB 9.52 +.07
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 35.54 +.21
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 73.84 +.57
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 6.80 +.02
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.23 -.01
Indialnvr 14.75 +.12
PacTgrlnv 20.77 +.05
MergerFdn 15.58
Meridian Funds:
Growth 42.94 +.20
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.41
TotRtBdl 10.41
Midas Funds:
MidasFdt 3.87 +.03
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.45 +.06
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.76 +.02
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 12.37 +.05
MCapGrl 34.08 +.23
MCapGrPp 32.88 +.23
Muhlenkn 52.81
Under Funds A:
GwthOppA 26.06 +.13
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn29.20 +.10
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 11.95 +.03
GblDiscA 27.62 +.05
GIbDiscC 27.42 +.05
GIbDiscZ 27.95 +.04
QuestZ 16.54 +.03
SharesZ 20.40 +.04
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 19.59 +.02
Genesis 33.77 +.04
Geneslnst 47.41 +.06
Intl r 15.25 +.09
Partner 25.35 +.06
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 49.21 +.06
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.40 +.01
Nichn 44.73 +.14
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.92
HiYFxlnc 7.10
IntTxEx 10.79
SmCpldx 8.45
Stkldx 16.02
Technly 14.81
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.21 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.25 +.01
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 19.06 -.14
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 39.15 +.09
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 27.43 +.04
Globall 20.46 +.06
Intl lr 16.75 +.10
Oakmark 43.41 +.20
Select 29.29 +.17
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.90 +.01
GIbSMdCap 13.77 +.08
LgCapStrat 9.06 +.03
RealRet 9.59 -.03
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.65 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.78 +.03
CAMuniAp 8.20 +.03
CapApAp 44.12 +.17
CaplncAp 8.62
ChmplncAp 1.77
DvMktAp 30.29 +.03
Discp 55.70 +.29
EquityA 8.80 +.03
GlobAp 54.99 +.22
GIbOppA 27.96 +.13
GblStfrlncA 4.10 +.01
Gold p 37.30 +.26
IntBdA p 6.23 +.03
LtdTmMu 14.81 +.02
MnStFdA 33.28 +.04
PAMuniAp 11.34 +.04
SenFltRtA 8.11 +.01
USGv p 9.64 +.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.62 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.79 +.03
CplncB t 8.46 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.77
EquityB 8.13 +.02
GblSfrlncB 4.11 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.36
RoMuAp 16.40 +.04
RcNtMuA 7.05 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 29.94 +.04
InfiBdY 6.23 +.03
IntGrowY 25.89 +.14
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.71
TotRtAd 10.97 +.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.20 +.01
AIIAsset 11.71 +.01
ComodRR 6.62 -.08
Divlnc 11.35
EmgMkCur 10.03 +.07
EmMkBd 11.25 +.01
Fltlnc r 8.37 +.02
ForBdUnr 10.92 +.04
FrgnBd 10.64
HiYld 9.07
InvGrCp 10.40
LowDu 10.34
ModDur 10.63
RealRet 11.50 -.04
RealRhil 11.87 -.02
ShortT 9.71
TotRt 10.97 +.01
TRII 10.64
TRIll 9.64 +.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.13


ComRRp 6.50 -.07
LwDurA 10.34
RealRtAp 11.87 -.02
TotRtA 10.97 +.01
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.87 -.02
TotRtCt 10.97 +.01
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.97 +.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.19 +.01
TotRtnP 10.97 +.01


Name NAV Chg
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.77 +.14
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 47.32 +.11
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.58 +.01
InfiValA 17.70 +.13
PionFdAp 39.88 +.10
ValueAp 11.13 +.02
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.80 +.03
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 9.90 +.03
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 17.49 +.05
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.37 +.06
BIChip n 40.13 +.23
CABondn 11.18 +.02
CapAppn 21.18 +.08
DivGron 23.98 +.11
EmMktBn 12.76 +.03
EmEurp 16.37 +.10
EmMktSn 29.70 +.15
Eqlncn 23.89 +.07
Eqlndexn 34.92 +.08
Europen 13.45 +.12
GNMAn 10.16
Growthin 32.99 +.17
Gr&ln n 20.51 +.06
HIlthSci n 34.69 +.06
HiYieldn 6.56
InsfCpG 16.72 +.08
InfiBond n 9.74 +.06
IntDisn 38.15 +.29
Intl G&l 11.63 +.04
InflStkn 12.64 +.06
Japan n 7.34 -.03
LatAm n 41.74 +.41
MDShrtn 5.24
MDBondn 10.85 +.02
MidCapn 54.69 +.21
MCapVal n 22.06 +.07
NAmern 32.90 +.13
N Asian 14.26 +.03
New Era n 43.60 +.07
NHorizn 32.33 +.16
N Incn 9.69
NYBondn 11.60 +.03
OverSSFn 7.41 +.02
PSIncn 16.06 +.05
RealAssetrnlO.67 +.02
RealEstn 18.53 -.13
R2010n 15.31 +.03
R2015n 11.83 +.03
R2020n 16.31 +.05
R2025n 11.90 +.04
R2030n 17.04 +.06
R2035n 12.03 +.05
R2040n 17.10 +.06
R2045n 11.39 +.05
SciTecn 27.36 +.19
ShtBd n 4.82
SmCpStkn 32.66 +.14
SmCapVal n35.95 +.19
SpecGrn 17.45 +.08
Speclnn 12.41 +.02
TFIncn 10.28 +.03
TxFrH2n 11.13 +.02
TxFrSI n 5.69 +.01
USTIntn 6.25
USTLgn 13.58 -.01
VABondn 12.06 +.02
Value n 23.54 +.11
Principal Inv:
LgCGIIn 9.16 +.04
LT20201n 11.50 +.02
LT20301n 11.31 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.11 +.08
HiYldAp 5.41
MuHilncA 9.80 +.02
UElityA 10.74 +.02
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.50 +.05
HiYldBt 5.40
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvA p 9.26
AZ TE 9.33 +.03
ConvSec 18.98 +.04
DvrlnAp 7.34 -.02
EqInAp 15.60 +.04
EuEq 16.93 +.11
GeoBalA 12.31 +.03
GIbEqtyp 8.42 +.01
GrInA mp 13.31 +.04
GIblHIlthA 40.46 +.08
HiYdAp 7.43
HiYld In 5.79
IncmAp 6.80
IntGrln p 8.34 +.05
InvAp 13.04 +.03
NJTxA p 9.68 +.03
MulICpGr 50.42 +.16
PATE 9.35 +.02
TxExA p 8.79 +.02
TFInAAp 15.32 +.04
TFHYA 12.01 +.03
USGvA p 13.75 -.03
GIblUtilA 9.96
VoyAp 20.99 +.10
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.34 +.04
DvrlnBt 7.27 -.03
Eqlnct 15.46 +.03
EuEq 16.27 +.10
GeoBaIB 12.18 +.03
GIbEq t 7.62 +.01
GINtRset 17.76 +.05
GrInBt 13.08 +.04
GIbIHIthB 32.38 +.07
HiYldBt 7.42
HYAdBt 5.68
IncmBt 6.74
IntGrln t 8.29 +.05
InfiNopt 12.62 +.07
InvBt 11.76 +.02
NJTxB t 9.66 +.02
MulICpGr 43.27 +.14
TxExB t 8.80 +.02
TFHYBt 12.03 +.03
USGvBt 13.68 -.03
GlblUtilB 9.93
VoyBt 17.70 +.08
RS Funds:
IntGrA 15.90 +.04
LgCAIphaA 39.70 +.22
Value 23.84 +.04
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.45 +.05
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 15.10 +.07
MicroCapl 15.19 +.09
PennMulr 11.23 +.05
Premierl r 19.39 +.15
TotRetl r 13.00 +.04
ValSvc t 11.47 +.05
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.95
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.46 +.05
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 18.65 +.09
Schwab Funds:
HIltCare 18.00 +.06
lOOOInvr 36.51 +.10
S&P Sel 20.17 +.04
SmCpSl 19.77 +.08
TSMSelr 23.36 +.06
Scout Funds:
Infl 28.66 +.15
Selected Funds:
AmShD 40.73 +.20
AmShSF p 40.76 +.20
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 32.03 +.11
Sequoia 148.93 +.63
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.81 +.17
SoSunSCInv t20.51 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 53.05 +.16
Stratton Funds:
Mulf-Cap 34.43 +.10
RealEstate 27.24 -.21
SmCap 50.99 +.02
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.22
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.71
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.80
Eqldxlnst 9.81 +.02
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 17.11 +.09
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 14.60 +.13
REVallnstr 20.94 +.11
Valuelnst 41.78 +.32
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 24.47 .01
IncBuildAt 18.15 +.01
IncBuildC p 18.14
IntValue I 25.01 -.01
LtTMul 14.58 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.74 +.01
Income 8.78
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 76.49 +.75
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 8.98 +.01
Flexlncp 8.86 +.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 33.64 +.17
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 21.98 +.07


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 14.91 +.07
Gr&lnc 15.09 +.07
IncStk 12.59 +.05
Inco 13.12
Inf 21.76
NYBd 12.19 +.02
PrecMM 32.94 +.19
SciTech 12.87 +.03
ShtTBnd 9.16
SmCpStk 13.90 +.05
TxElt 13.46 +.02
TxELT 13.44 +.03
TxESh 10.81
VA Bd 11.40 +.04
WIdGr 18.06 +.10
VALIC:
MdCpldx 19.38 +.05
Stkldx 24.05 +.06
Value Line Fd:
LrgCorn 18.08 +.07
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 22.23 +.04
CAITAdmn 11.54 +.02
CALTAdmn11.65 +.03
CpOpAdl n 71.21 +.42
EMAdmr r n 33.07 +.18
Energyn 114.37 -.66
EqlnAdm n n46.79 +.10
EuroAdml n 52.30 +.42
ExplAdml n 69.01 +.23
ExtdAdm n 41.07 +.19
500Adml n 119.38 +.29
GNMA Ad n 11.09
GrwAdmn 32.82 +.11
HlthCr n 55.31
HiYldCp n 5.74 +.01
InfProAdn 27.83 -.04
ITBdAdml n 11.77 -.01
ITsryAdml n 11.70 -.01
IntGrAdm n 53.69 +.30
ITAdmln 14.19 +.02
ITGrAdmnn 10.02
LtdTrAdmn 11.18
LTGrAdml n 10.30
LTsyAdml n 13.20 -.02
LTAdmln 11.50 +.02
MCpAdml n 92.70 +.42
MorgAdm nn 56.37 +.28
MuHYAdrnm nlO.88 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.56 +.02
PrmCap r n 66.37 +.31
PALTAdrnm nll.52 +.02
ReitAdm r rn 82.55 -.61
STsyAdml n 10.80
STBdAdmlnlO.62
ShtTrAdn 15.94 +.01
STFdAdnn 10.86
STIGrAdn 10.67
SmCAdm n 34.71 +.12
TxMCaprn 64.49 +.15
TfpBAdmln 11.01
TStkAdm n 32.34 +.08
ValAdmln 21.15 +.04
WellslAdm n55.96 +.04
WelltnAdr n55.36 +.14
Windsorn 45.13 +.24
WdsrllAdn 47.25 +.18
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.42 +.04
CALTn 11.65 +.03
CapOppn 30.83 +.18
Convrt n 12.24 +.04
DivdGron 15.68 +.06
Energy n 60.92 -.36
Eqlnc n 22.32 +.05
Explrn 74.18 +.25
FLLTn 11.95 +.02
GNMAn 11.09
GlobEqn 16.48 +.06
Grolnc n 27.20 +.05
GrthEqn 11.18 +.03
HYCorpn 5.74 +.01
HlthCren 131.10 +.01
InflaPron 14.17 -.02
InflExplrn 13.14 +.13
IntlGrn 16.88 +.09
InfiVal n 27.20 +.09
ITIGraden 10.02
ITTsryn 11.70 -.01
LifeConn 16.42 +.02
LifeGron 21.62 +.06
Lifelncn 14.23 +.01
LifeModn 19.52 +.04
LTIGrade n 10.30
LTTsryn 13.20 -.02
Morgn 18.18 +.09
MuHYn 10.88 +.02
Mulntn 14.19 +.02
MuLtdn 11.18
MuLongn 11.50 +.02
MuShrtn 15.94 +.01
NJLTn 12.13 +.02
NYLTn 11.56 +.02
OHLTTE n 12.44 +.03
PALTn 11.52 +.02
PrecMtls r n 20.92 +.25
PrmcpCort n 13.88 +.07
Prmcp r n 63.97 +.29
SelValu r n 19.34 +.08
STARn 19.16 +.06
STIGraden 10.67
STFedn 10.86
STTsryn 10.80
StratEqn 19.08 +.07
TgtRe2005nl2.10 +.01
TgtRetlncn 11.65 +.01
TgRe2010n22.77 +.03
TgtRe2015 n2.52 +.02
TgRe202O0n22.13 +.05
TgtRe2025 n12.54 +.03
TgRe203On2l.43 +.05
TgtRe2035 nl2.84 +.04
TgtRe204O0n21.07 +.07
TgtRe205 n20.97 +.06
TgtRe2045 nl3.23 +.04
USGron 18.67 +.13
USValuen 10.54 +.02
Wellslyn 23.10 +.02
Welltn n 32.05 +.08
Wndsr n 13.38 +.07
Wndslln 26.62 +.10
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl rn89.12 +.38
MidCplstP nl 00.98 +.45
TotlntAdm r r22.37 +.11
Totlntllnst r n89.44 +.42
TotlntllP r n 89.45 +.41
500 n 119.37 +.28
Balancedn 22.23 +.04
EMktn 25.17 +.13
Europe n 22.46 +.18
Extendn 41.06 +.19
Growth n 32.82 +.11
LgCaplxn 23.91 +.06
LTBndIn 13.84 -.01
MidCap n 20.43 +.09
Pacific n 9.23 -.02
REITr n 19.35 -.14
SmCapn 34.69 +.12
SmlCpGth n22.28 +.09
STBndn 10.62
TotBndn 11.01
TotllntIn 13.37 +.06
TotStkn 32.34 +.09
Valuen 21.15 +.04
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 22.23 +.04
DevMklnstn 8.55 +.03
Extlnn 41.06 +.18
FTAIIWIdl r n79.66 +.38
Grwthlstn 32.81 +.10
InfProlnstn 11.33 -.02
Instldxn 118.60 +.28
InsPIn 118.60 +.28
InstTStldxn 29.27 +.08
lnsTStPlus r29.27 +.08
MidCplstn 20.48 +.10
SCInstn 34.71 +.12
TBIstn 11.01
TSInstn 32.35 +.09
Valuelstn 21.15 +.04
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 98.61 +.23
GroSign 30.39 +.10
ITBdSig n 11.77 -.01
MidCpldxn 29.25 +.13
STBdldxn 10.62
SmCpSign 31.27 +.11
TotBdSgl n 11.01
TotStkSgln 31.22 +.09
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.76 +.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 8.80
CorelnvA 5.86 +.01
DivOppAp 14.31 +.04
DivOppCt 14.17 +.04
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 38.55 +.16
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 11.98
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.57
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 19.61 +.07
Opptylnv 37.37 +.16
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.81
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.81
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.15 -.01
William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.10 +.10
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 17.94 +.04
Focusedn 19.18 +04


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 23.18 +.07
ChinaReg 7.19 +.04
GIbRs 9.69 +.02
Gld&Mtls 13.25 +.05
WdPrcMn 13.85 +.05
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.46 +.18
CABd 10.67 +.03
CrnstStr 21.48 +.04
GNMA 10.43 +.01
GrTxStr 13.71 +.03


Stocks finish higher




after late-day recovery


Associated Press


NEW YORK- A drop in
oil prices and strong bond
auctions in Europe drove
stocks to a slightly higher
close Thursday. The Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index
rose for the fourth straight
day
The Dow Jones industrial
average gained 21.57 points,
or 0.2 percent, to end at
12,471.02 It was down most
of the day, losing 64 points in
the first hour of trading, fol-
lowing a spike in unemploy-
ment claims and a weak
report on December retail
sales.
Materials and industrial
companies led the after-
noon recovery Caterpillar
and Alcoa rose the most in
the Dow. The S&P 500 fin-
ished up 3.02 points, or 0.2
percent, at 1,295.50. The
Nasdaq composite rose
13.94 points, 0.5 percent, to
2,724.70
Stocks drove higher in the
last hour and a half of trad-
ing after oil prices dropped
below $100 per barrel for
the first time this year. Oil
fell on rumors that Europe
will delay an embargo on
Iran. Crude plunged $2 a
barrel in just eight minutes,
ending at $99.


Market
Jan. 12,

Dow Jones
industrials


Nasdaq
composite


Standard &
Poor's 500


Russell
2000


NYSE
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:

Nasdaq
Advanced:

Declined:

Unchanged

Volume:



Also pushing
strong bond auc
and Spain. Eur
kets ended mc
after Italy and
highly successful
tions, easing w(
Europe's debt c
benchmark stoc


Business HIGHLIGHTS

Retail sales inched up in low levels of the fungicide carbendazim in its

December, ending record year own and competitors' juices.
Unme- DnAnnt n hirM 70f I ll0 l


IIIVIIIE EVEIVi tW 1111V WVVV
seasonal workers in spring

ATLANTA- Home improvement retailer
Home Depot Inc. said Thursday that it will hire
70,000 seasonal workers for the spring season,
its biggest season.
The number is about the same as last year,
company spokesman Stephen Holmes said.
Spring is the biggest season for home im-
provement projects as homeowners work on
projects for their homes, gardens and lawns.

Target goes local, nationally,

with boutique shops

NEW YORK Target said Thursday that it is
teaming up with unique specialty shops to offer
limited-edition merchandise, from dog biscuits to
platform shoes, as it attempts to further distin-
guish itself from rivals.
The company also confirmed reports that it will
test expanded displays of Apple products in 25
stores.
Target became a discount darling when it
began offering stylish clothes and trendy decor
under the same roof where shoppers could find
toothpaste and cereal. Yet sales growth has
been uneven and rivals are copying its 12-year-
old formula of partnering with designers. Target's
latest strategy ups the stakes.

2011's foreclosure rate lowest

since pre-recession

NEW YORK -About 1.9 million homes en-
tered the foreclosure process in 2011, the lowest
level since 2007 when the recession began, ac-
cording to a report Thursday by the foreclosure
listing firm RealtyTrac Inc.
The firm cautioned that the decline does not
necessarily indicate that the housing market is
getting better, as many foreclosures have been
delayed due to confusion over documentation
and legal issues involved in the process.

-From wire reports


(Dp Back For a Limited Timnel

























SOther locationR include

305 S.E. US 19 St Pete, Belleair Bluffs, Tampa, Bradenton,

AG52-795-7223 Spring Hill Clearwater, and Tarpon Springs,


Name Last
SP Consum 40.43
SP Engy 69.79
SPDRFncl 13.92
SP Inds 35.77
SPTedh 26.23
SP UIl 34.91
StdPac 4.13
Standex 37.66
StarwdHfl 52.61
StateStr 43.61
Steris 28.10
SIIlwtrM 11.99
StratHotels 5.84
Stryker 52.49
SturmRug 35.87
SubPpne 46.82
SuccessF 39.83
SunCmts 37.16
SunCoken 12.09
Suncorgs 32.03
Sunoco 42.44
Suntedi 3.16
SunTrst 21.05
SupEnrgy 28.52
Supvalu 7.31
SwiftTrans 10.06
Synovus 1.62
Sysco 29.33
TCFFncl 11.26
TE Connect 34.69


TECO 19.17
TJX 65.31
ThawSemi 13.83
TalismEg 11.92
Target 49.81
TataMotors 19.76
TeckResg 39.24
TelcmNZs 7.96
TelefBrasil 28.20
TelefEsps 17.26
TelMexL 14.84
TenetHlth 5.13
Teradyn 15.07
Terex 17.07
TerraNitro 179.50
Tesoro 23.36
TetraTech 9.18
Textron 21.32
Theragen 1.68
ThermoFis 49.78
ThmBet 57.26
3M Co 84.28
Tiffany 59.79
TimeWarn 37.61
Timken 45.27
TollBros 23.20
TorchEngy 2.97
Trdchmrks 44.11
TorDBkg 76.39
Total SA 50.17
TotalSys 20.58
Transocn 40.57


Travelers 59.80
Tredgar 23.87
TriConfi 14.73
TrinaSolar 10.32
TwoHrblnv 9.27
Tycolni 49.11
Tyson 19.96
UBSAG 12.19
UDR 23.89
UIL Hold 34.73
USAirwy 6.05
US Gold 4.13
USG 13.64
UltraPtg 26.49
UndrArmr 77.66
UniSrcEn 36.43
UniFirst 61.85
UnilevNV 32.95
UnionPac 111.05
UtdConfi 18.53
UtdMicro 2.31
UPS B 74.74
UtdRentals 31.25
US Bancrp 28.74
US NGs rs 5.90
US OilFd 38.06
USSteel 28.67
UtdTech 77.24
UtdhlthGp 52.87
UnvAmr 11.24
UnumGrp 22.33


ValeSA 23.29 +.11
ValeSApf 22.20 +.11
ValeantPh 49.38 +.67
ValeroE 20.94 +.49
VangTotBd 83.45 -.12
VangREIT 58.26 -.43
VangDivAp 55.38 +.03
VangEmg 39.96 +.20
VarianMed 71.70 +2.24
Vecren 29.32 -.23
Ventas 54.40 -.26
VeoliaEnv 10.88 +.34
VeriFone 37.36 -.08
VerizonCm 38.92 +.02
Visa 101.34 +2.23
Vishaylnt 10.48
VMware 87.88 -.04
Vonage 2.44 +.25
Vornado 78.83 -.54
WGL Hold 43.40 +.09
WPX En n 15.66 -.85
Wabash 8.46 -.49
WalMart 59.50 +.10
Wagrn 33.27 -.74
WalterEn 61.94 +.26
Warnaco 54.60 +.61
WsteMInc 33.83 +.50
Weathflnfi 15.62 -.09
WeinRIt 22.22
WellPoint 71.81 -.76


2.1 percent.
watch In Italy's first bond auc-
2012 tion of the new year, the
country was able to sell one-
+21.57 year bonds at a rate of just

12,471.02 2.735 percent, less than half
the 5.95 percent rate it had
+13.94 to pay last month. That's a

2,724.70 signal that investors are be-
+3.02 coming more confident in
Italy's ability to pay its debts.
1,295.50 Spain was able to raise

+3.25 double the amount of
money it had sought to raise
770.49 in its own bond sale as de-

diary mand for its debt was strong.
Both auctions were seen as
1,854 important tests of investor

1,171 sentiment.

: 110 Investors have been wor-
ried that Italy and Spain,
3.9 b the third- and fourth-largest

diary countries in the euro area,
might get dragged into the
1,534 region's debt crisis. Greece,

961 Ireland and Portugal have

: 132 been forced to get relief
from their lenders after
1.7 b their borrowing costs spiked
AP to levels the countries could

no longer afford.
stocks were The euro rose nearly a
tions in Italy penny against the dollar, to
ropean mar- $1.28, as worries eased
costly higher about Europe's financial
Spain held woes. The currency, which
ul bond auc- is shared by 17 European
worries about countries, fell to a 16-month
crisis. Italy's low against the dollar the
;k index rose day before.


WASHINGTON Retail sales barely rose in
December, but the gain was enough to lift the sea-
son's sales to a record level and help 2011 to the
largest annual increase in more than a decade.
Sales inched up 0.1 percent in December to a
seasonally adjusted $400.6 billion, The Com-
merce Department said Thursday. It was the
second straight month that sales have topped
$400 billion. Never before had monthly sales
reached that level.
The government revised the November sales to
show a stronger 0.4 percent gain twice the orig-
inal estimate. That pushed sales in November
above $400 billion on a seasonally adjusted basis.

Unemployment benefit

applications jump to 399,000

WASHINGTON -Applications for weekly un-
employment benefits spiked last week, largely
because companies let go of thousands of work-
ers after the holiday season.
Weekly applications rose by 24,000 to a season-
ally adjusted 399,000, the Labor Department said
Thursday. That's the highest level in six weeks.
Economists said such a jump is typical in early
January and downplayed the increase. It fol-
lowed three months of steady declines that
brought applications to their lowest level in more
than three years.

Coca-Cola says it told gov't

about fungicide in orange juice

WASHINGTON Coca-Cola Co. acknowl-
edged Thursday it was the company that alerted
federal regulators about low levels of fungicide in
its own orange juice and in competitors' juice,
prompting juice prices to rise and the govern-
ment to increase testing for the residue.
The Food and Drug Administration and the
Environmental Protection Agency have said or-
ange juice is safe to drink.
Atlanta-based Coca-Cola, which makes the
Minute Maid and Simply Orange brands of or-
ange juice, said Thursday it had notified FDA of


WellsFargo 29.61
Weso Inf 58.66
WestarEn 28.49
WAstEMkt 13.47
WstAMgdHi 6.08
WAstlnfOpp 12.69
WDigital 33.86
WstnRefin 15.13
WstnUnion 18.97
WesfikChm 51.24
Weyerh 19.86
Whrlpl 52.01
WhitngPts 50.31
WmsCos 28.14
WmsPtrs 63.01
WmsSon 34.32
Winnbgo 8.15
WiscEn s 34.34
WT India 17.21
WolvWW 36.39
Worthgtn 18.85
Wyndham 39.50
XL Grp 20.57
XcelEngy 26.69
Xerox 8.13
Yamanag 15.80
YingliGrn 4.98
Youku 19.36
YumBrnds 60.86
Zimmer 55.06
ZweigTI 3.12







Page A12 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13,2012



PINION


"A man in the house is worth two in the street."
Mae West, "Belle of the Nineties," 1934


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... .................. editor
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
J Curt Ebitz................ ............. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....... .................. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ......... ......... guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DEJA VU




Is Port Citrus



effort a repeat



of history?


It should not be a surprise
that Citrus County previ-
ously studied the idea that
a port should be constructed at
the Cross Florida Barge Canal
site in the northwest portion of
the county.
What is a surprise is that no
one remembered it and no one
involved in the current initia-
tive had a copy of the study that
was completed in
the late 1960s. THE I
As reported in
the Chronicle, Jeff Old Por
Nigels of Lecanto report di
was recently
cleaning out an OUR 01
old Spartan travel
trailer owned by Is hi
his late father-in- repeatir
law when he found
a copy of a 1969 study on Port
Citrus. The report detailed an
expansion plan that would
bring jobs, commerce and de-
velopment to Citrus County.
Needless to say, nothing
much came from the study
It's news today because the
county commission is once again
focused on doing a study to see
if the idea of building a port on
the barge canal makes sense.
It would be nice to think that
someone in county government
remembered the 1969 report,
but in truth there is not much
institutional history when it
comes to such things. County
Administrator Brad Thorpe


Missing dog
This is for the couple who found
the Jack Russell in Citrus Springs
on Sunday: Please give me a call
(at) 489-4844. We lost our Jack
Russell Sunday night and the chil-
dren are heartbroken.
Volunteer with pride
I'm a fifth-generation Floridian
and I'm calling in reference to
Tuesday's paper (Dec.
27), the "Volunteer n 0
board" for the school
board. I graduated from
high school in Florida 54
years ago and to be on
the school board, that
was an honor. They were
not paid. They were all
volunteers. I don't know
why they can't do that CA
now. Back then and of 563l
course, that was a long
time ago the school
board put the students as a prior-
ity and did the best that they
could for the students. And I just
think that the school board should
be voluntary. And just think,
wouldn't it be nice to say, "Yes, I
volunteered my time."
Just not right
I'm 70 years of age and I paid
into Medicare and Social Security
for years and years. I also have to
take out a Medicare supplement.
Yet I see in the newspaper that a
dentist takes Medicaid. When I
called them to find out if he takes
Medicare, he said, "No, we don't
take Medicare, we only take Medi-
caid." I've been paying all these
years for Medicare and a supple-
ment, and now I've got to take out
dental insurance and the people
on Medicaid get medical treat-
ment and dental treatment with-
out even paying. What a wonderful
country this is.


was still in high school at the
time and he probably had
other things on his mind.
The barge canal has always
stirred economic and strategic
interest dating back to the orig-
inal Spanish settlers of the
Sunshine State. While many
millions of dollars were spent
digging a portion of the canal
in the last century, the big ditch


SSUE:
-t Citrus
covered.

PINION:
story
ig itself?


has yet to prove a
success for any-
one who has
dared to dream.
Maybe this time
will be different.
Just maybe the
leaders of Citrus
County will be
able to figure out
how to make use


of the canal to move products
in and out of a small, regional
port. The plans are being ex-
plored in the name of expand-
ing employment opportunities
in an area devastated by the
crash of the home-building
business. It's hard to argue
against anyone who is trying to
create jobs.
But we do hope that in 2055
when some Lecanto resident is
cleaning out his father-in-law's
small spaceship that he doesn't
find a copy of the un-imple-
mented 2012 feasibility report
prepared for our current
county commission.
Time will tell.


Protect public lands
For all of you opposed to selling
public lands- that's right, public
lands -you must let your voice
be known. You must contact your
officials, both local and state, and
let them know you do not want
public lands being sold. And you also
must go to www.watermatters.org/
to let them know that you do not
want your land being sold.
UND Out of work? Help
I'd like to say one
thing: These people who
are on unemployment,
sitting at home collecting
big bucks, feeling sorry
for themselves, who don't
go out and find a job,
should go to a nursing
home, the hospital, vol-
.0579 unteer your time and talk
to a lot of lonely people. I
work in a nursing home
and you'd be very surprised at the
ones in there who have no one,
that would love someone to come
in give them a smile on their face
and read to them or something.
God only helps the ones who help
themselves.
Irresponsible gun owner
Again, a young boy is in the
hospital in Tampa because of cel-
ebratory gunfire. Is that what you
call it down here celebratory
gunfire? Oh, that's when the po-
lice don't do anything about any-
body shooting weapons that are
close to anybody else's house. You
know, like 300 feet next to a
house or something like that.
More water, more pressure
This is in response to "Hydrant
colors explained." An increase in
gallons per minute out of a hy-
drant would also make an in-
crease in water pressure.


All Stars for a lifetime


CHARLESTON, S.C.
They are nearing 70 now, the
11 men who were 12-year-
old boys in 1955 and who
are remembered for the baseball
games they could not play They
were actually, with their
matching blue blazers and
striped ties, they still
are members of the
Cannon Street All
Stars.
The Cannon Street
YMCA is near the
Ashley River, which
flows toward the har-
bor and Fort Sumter.
The unpleasantness
that started there in Georg
1861 had left perti- OTI
nent questions unset-
tled 94 years later VOI
when the All Stars, all
African-Americans, decided to
enter this city's Little League
tournament. Charleston canceled
the tournament because blacks
and whites simply did not play to-
gether. Actually, they did, all the
time, in informal settings, on va-
cant lots. "Kids do not mess up
the world, adults do," says Leroy
Major, 69, the All Stars' pitcher
and a retired schoolteacher
Never mind, said the All Stars'
coach, who entered them in the
state tournament in Greenville.
That was too much for the 61
white teams, who withdrew. Well,
then, said the coach, we will head
for Rome, Ga., and the regional
tournament where the winners of
eight Southern state tournaments
would compete to see which
would go to the Little League
World Series in Williamsport, Pa.
Those running things at Rome
said the Cannon Street team
could not compete because it had
advanced by forfeit. But the na-
tional Little League organization
decided it wasn't the Cannon


ge
H



Street All Stars' fault that no one
would play them, so it invited
them to Williamsport as honored
guests. For many of them, it was
their first venture away from
Charleston, exciting and a bit
worrisome, because the route
north passed through areas
where the Ku Klux Klan was
restive.
When the All Stars
settled into the stands
at Williamsport, the
crowd began to chant,
"Let them play!" Ver-
mont Brown, 68, an
Army veteran and for-
mer Lockheed Martin
employee, who still is
e Will about the size of a Lit-
|ER tle Leaguer, remem-
bers that when he and
DES his teammates saw
the teams warming up
on the field, "We knew we would
have kicked their butts." They
probably would have, given the
pitching of Major. He is a former
Marine who is about twice
Brown's size. A mountain of
Christian serenity, he works with
his church, practicing what the
summer of 1955 taught him:
"Move on."
The spring chicken among the
Cannon StreetAll Stars organiza-
tion is Augustus Holt, 65. He was
too young to play with them but is
now the team historian. He be-
came interested in the events of
1955 when his son played Dixie
Youth Baseball, whose uniforms
had the Confederate battle flag
on their sleeves.
Dixie Youth Baseball, which
has removed the flag, came into
existence when Little League or-
ganizations in eight Southern
states seceded from the national
Little League after 1955. Its Offi-
cial Rule Guide stated: "The Or-
ganizers hereof are of the opinion
it is for the best interest of all con-


cerned that this program be on a
racially segregated basis; they be-
lieve that mixed teams and com-
petition between the races would
create regrettable conditions and
destroy the harmony and tran-
quility which now exists." Dixie
Youth Baseball, which in 1967 re-
moved that from its charter, has
produced major leaguers Bo
Jackson, Tom Gordon, Reggie
Sanders and Otis Nixon, all
African-Americans.
The year the Cannon Street All
Stars won without playing was
the year after Brown vs. Board of
Education, and the summer be-
fore the December when, 370
miles from here, Rosa Parks re-
fused to move to the back of a
Montgomery, Ala., bus. As the
boys were on the night bus trip
back from Pennsylvania, a 14-
year-old Chicago boy, Emmett
Till, visiting his relatives in Mis-
sissippi, was seized from his bed
and murdered.
"We haven't seen the best of it
yet," says John Rivers, 69, the All
Stars' shortstop who later studied
architecture at Hampton Insti-
tute and Columbia University
and today has offices in Atlanta
and Columbus, Ga. "The coun-
try's always getting better." It
speaks well of these spry gentle-
men of nearly three score and ten
that, without a trace of bitterness,
they are determined to keep
telling their story for the benefit
of old people who only dimly re-
member it, and for the edification
of young people who cannot
imagine it. It speaks well of the
nation that, without gentle re-
minders by people like the men
in the blue blazers, it has diffi-
culty remembering the way
things were.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Give and take
I am very disappointed by the
failure of the so-called super-
committee to do its job. I realize
the parties have serious differ-
ences of viewpoint, but still it
should be possible to come to an
agreement. Failure means dis-
ruption of government services,
drastic cuts to our military at a
very inopportune time and loss
of confidence in our government.
It seems that the Republicans
are concerned with the retard-
ing effect the federal govern-
ment is having on private
business investment, and the
danger excessive debt poses.
The Democrats seem to be most
concerned about income in-
equity and preservation of gov-
ernment jobs and services. Many
Democrats seem to believe that
the government can stimulate
the private sector through large
projects.
Everyone agrees that the huge
deficits must be addressed, and
that the majority must come
from spending cuts. That is the
agreement that led to the forma-
tion of the supercommittee.
The best way to get a compro-
mise is to offer the other side
what they need. Why can't the
Republicans agree to end the
Bush tax cuts? I personally be-
lieve increased taxes of any kind
are bad, but failure is worse.
Taxes are taken from profits,
and they are predictable. They
generally affect everyone in your
industry equally, not creating an
unfair advantage for some. Reg-
ulatory requirements cost


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
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email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
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We reserve the right to edit let-
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Letters must be no longer than
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
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money before profit, are unpre-
dictable and affect some busi-
nesses more than others.
Increased taxes are therefore
much less obstructive to busi-
ness than runaway regulation.
The Republicans could offer
taxes in exchange for a major
rollback and moratorium of reg-
ulations. All increased income
should be applied to the deficit,
and much more needs to be
added to get to their goal. But
with both sides having made
their respective groups happy,
they would be less restrained to
make the painful cuts that are
necessary to get our budget in
order.
This is just one idea, but solu-
tions do not come around by


yelling at each other publicly If
you need something, you have to
give the other side what they
need.
Don Clark
Floral City

No free seats
I remember growing up and
seeing Santa at the mall. Every-
one had a turn to sit on his lap,
pull his beard to make sure he
was real and, if you could afford
it, pay $5 for a Polaroid. But
even if you couldn't afford the
picture, you would not be turned
down by the jolly man.
I took my daughter to see
Santa and he could not even be
approached until you gave
$17.95 for a CD and up to four
poses. It's a shame for the kids
and it hurts me as a mom to not
be able to enjoy the look on their
faces because it's all about
money
Kimberly Sweet
Homosassa

Ashley's memory
I want to thank all those at the
Chronicle for including our little
angel Ashley Mirembe Strass in
your special article "Remember-
ing losses of 2011." We appreci-
ate you keeping Ashley close to
all those who knew her and
loved her so much. We feel hon-
ored that you included her as a
notable. God bless you.
Claude, Tracey and Nick Strass
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Holiday gratitude
During this holiday sea-
son, when we in Citrus
County are in the midst of
bleak economic conditions,
when too many of our resi-
dents are homeless, hungry
and unemployed, we
should all take pause and
give thanks for what we do
have and to those who have
contributed so much to-
ward the welfare of our
community So, the Citrus
Community Concert Choir
would like to publicly
thank those people and or-
ganizations who make pos-
sible our continued
existence, and that of our
scholarship program.
Our gratitude goes to our
sponsors: the Citrus County
Chronicle, Barbara Ben-
son, Dan's Clam Stand,
Paul & Shirley Perregaux,
Homosassa Printing, Dr.
Vladimir Visko, Madalyn
Crysler, Mary Ulyat, Suzanne
Johnston, Brooksville Nat-
ural Foods, Dr. Quehong
Pham, Mr. and Mrs. Ed-
ward Renfro, Jacki and Bill
Scott, Carol Wygle, Nature
Coast Unitarian Universal-
ist, Barbara Ouellette and
Robert and Nancy Lumley
We extend our many
thanks to our program ad-
vertisers: Captain Dave Jef-
ford (the Lureman), GW'S
Gold & Gems, Phillips CPA
Services, Sweet Traditions
Bakery & Deli, Homosassa
Printing, Chilson's Garage
(Floral City), Anytime Fit-
ness, Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans and Lawrence
Jaimeson, photographer
We also need to thank
Faith Lutheran Church for
the use of its Fellowship
Hall for our rehearsals,
and to the many other Cit-
rus County churches that
offer their facilities for our
concerts.
Lastly, on behalf of the
board of directors, I would
like to take this opportu-
nity to thank the perform-
ing members of the choir.
You buy your own music,
you pay all your own ex-
penses, and you contribute
your membership dues,
which are the financial
backbone of the organization.
Thank you again.
Robert Morris
Homosassa

Parking abuses
This letter is a long time
coming. I would like to ad-
dress all the people who
use the handicapped park-
ing spaces illegally I see
people parking in these
spots and they practically
run in and out of where
they are going. Some peo-
ple are just overweight and
others just have a cane, but
the majority are just misus-
ing these spots.
I see at Walmart and
other facilities people do
not even have a placard.
They just park and go do
their business. Why not?
There are no cops around
to question them.
I call the sheriff's office
and they say there's noth-
ing they can do. It's my un-
derstanding that the
person who uses the card is
supposed to be the recipi-
ent of the card and not a
dead or incapacitated card-
holder. I really don't be-
lieve the doctors would
write the people I see using
these cards a permit for
them. Why can't the state
require that the people
whose name is on these
cards show up in person to
apply for the cards? It is my
understanding they can be
applied for online. I don't
know; I go in person to get
mine. Why can't others do
the same?
It bothers me to see
young people as well as
others jumping out of big
SUVs and doing their busi-
ness. The cops say they
don't have enough deputies
to cover this type of prob-
lem, but I see the cops
parked beside the high-
ways in twos talking. I go to


Walmart and back and
when I come back, they are
still side by side talking.
Well, I've stated my case,
though I don't feel better
about it But maybe some
people will see my point
and stop abusing these
handicapped spots. There
are people like me who
need them when I can
find one.
Eulon Patrick
Crystal River


The cost of crime
Just finished reading the
Chronicle article about
Judge Ric Howard sentenc-
ing a mother four years for
severely beating her child
of two years ("Abusive mom
gets max sentence," Dec.
23), and some readers ques-
tioned why the jail time
was not more.
Keeping a prisoner
locked up costs Florida tax-
payers approximately
$37,000 yearly, and in this
case $150,000.
And in another case of
habitually serious abuse of
children, a man of 40 was
sentenced to life in prison
without parole. If the man
lives to an average lifespan
of 75, he would have a com-
fortable place to stay, do no
work, have three hots and a
cot every day, and all the
medical care he will ever
need. The cost to Floridi-
ans would be $1,302,500.
Somewhere between
punishing a person, making
them learn a lesson, and/or
protecting society long-
term, there ought to be a
better way to protect soci-
ety and save money
It might be a bit callous, but
so are the hideous crimes
these prisoners commit.
Perhaps prisons should not
provide a country-club at-
mosphere with everything
from exercise machines, TVs,
computers, libraries and a
heck of a lot more food
than millions of Floridians
receive. Is it more inhu-
mane to feed them more
food that many of us had to
eat during the Depression
years of 1932-1940 and
many of the poor today?
And just maybe the sen-
tences for those heinous
monsters who commit murder
and child abuse and cannot
live appropriately in soci-
ety could more often be to
spend a few minutes in a
comfortable electric chair
William C. Young
Crystal River

Septic agenda
In all honesty, I did not
know whether to criticize
the reporter's placing of a
lawyer's comment in prime
position in her article or to
praise her for not being so
gullible as to report the
"anecdote" he related to
the commissioners. Of
course, as the anecdote al-
leged, a chemical dye trace
compound is not in any way
analogous to the human
waste which a septic sys-
tem is designed to process
and reduce its toxicity lev-
els to environmentally ac-
ceptable ones.
The Agenda Item C4, was
simply to allow the com-
missioners to vote to spec-
ify the official procedure
by which the county would
levy, collect and enforce
non-ad valoram sewer
charges upon property
owners residing in unincor-
porated county areas. What
was quite extraordinary
and not reported was the
gesture of a senior spokesper-
son for the county who in-
vited delegates of the city
of Crystal River to speak at
length during considera-
tion of the said agenda
item C4, which apparently
did not involve the city
The underlying issue in-
volved charges upon the
property owners amount-
ing to millions of dollars to
go to the city, when the
state was under contract to
pay the city with public
money for the same thing.
What disturbs some
property owners the most
is that they are to suffer
high city charges when the
city itself has degraded the
crystal waters of the river
system, which the city now
alleges to remedy by re-
placing a few septic systems
with their sewer service.
For the record, wetland
forests which served to
make the river waters crys-
tal clear were stripped
away with steam drag lines


and burned to make way
for the city's roads and
buildings, canals were
dredged to give homes wa-
terfront status, the city's
sewage treatment plant
was discovered by state en-
vironmental regulators in
1991 to have illegally
dredged a connection from
its outfall to drain toxic
waste into a stream convey-
ing it into King's Bay, which
was officially determined
to have contributed to ex-


cessive algae and degrada-
tion of the water quality -
possibly for a very long time.
Norman Hopkins
Crystal River

Emotional story
On Christmas day after
eating a wonderful dinner,
I started reading the
Chronicle and came across
the story "Charlotte's wag"
(Chronicle, Dec. 25). By the
time I finished reading, my
tears were pretty much un-
controllable. I just want to
say "thank you" to Pattie
Amon and staff, the Pear-
sons, Dr. Julie, Friends of
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices and all volunteers for
helping this poor dog and
all the other animals cross-
ing through the Animal
Services door
I know your jobs are
nothing less than intense
and emotional. I truly ap-
preciate all you do for the
less fortunate animals of
Citrus County May God
bless all of you in the New
Year, and may God have
mercy on anyone who
could intentionally inflict
such misery upon an animal.
Kathy Frisbie
Homosassa

Creaky carts
I am writing this in the
hope of helping the Key
Training Center Thrift
Store in Inverness.
It is a great organization,
helping everyone involved
from employees to cus-
tomers. I am a regular at
the thrift store and have
noticed lately that all of the
shopping carts customers
and employees use are
badly in need of either re-
placement or repair
They are very squeaky
and annoying to others in
the store.
I hope someone in the
position to help comes for-
ward and helps. They cer-
tainly deserve it
Sherry Henderson
Inverness

Appreciating two
It is my pleasure to rec-
ognize two outstanding in-
dividuals who have made
significant contributions to
our community One gone
one still here.
I have reference to for-
mer Citrus County Veterans
Service Officers Mr. Royce
Carter and Mr. JJ Kenney
Both of these individuals
were outstanding service
officers not only assisting
veterans but brought in
many thousands of dollars
to our local economy I
have known both for a
number of years and can
attest prior to a number of
fundraisers to provide
funds for the CCVSO, they
would dip into their own
pockets (as well as mine
and several others) to en-
sure our veterans and their
families were cared for.
These gentlemen never
sought nor needed per-
sonal aggrandizement nor
do I. While they may not
qualify as a breathe of
fresh air, Mr. Carter served
another county and Mr.
Kenney continues to serve
locally as a county commis-
sioner. Thank you both.
Neville Anderson
Inverness


qLW
VNWERAL UCLK
2012.


Hot Corner: PAYROLL TAX CUT


Sabotaging S.S.
Why is it that none of the media men-
tions that the payroll reduction is coming
from the money for Social Secu-
rity? This is like stealing from So- A
cial Security. Social Security will 0
be good for about 30 years the
way it is. By doing this, it will
shorten the life by a couple of
years. This is like sabotaging So-
cial Security. If the taxpayers
knew this, they would be on the 4
phones to their representatives to
not allow this. The headlines CALL
should read, "Legislators to steal 5
money from Social Security for 000-
payroll tax reduction." Don't for-
get to call your legislators and tell them to
leave Social Security alone.

Please, explain
I would like someone on the Opinion
page to explain to me as succinctly as
possible why I should be rejoicing and cel-
ebrating the fact that the Democrats gave
me a two-month payroll tax reduction
when their victory, apparently-- if you


!


(


can call it that seems to be over the Re-
publicans, who wanted to give me a one-year
payroll tax cut. I don't understand why the
two-month cut is so much greater, more
wonderful for me than the one
UND year. I just don't understand it.
Malingering middle
If the readers would check the
B- records of this country, the mid-
dle-class people are the biggest
offenders of our problems with
taxes and drugs. They're the
0Y4 biggest drug users in this coun-
try. They are the ones that help
0 the Mexican people to make all
their money off of drugs. Middle-
class people are the biggest
users and offenders of the drug problems
we have in this country. It's a proven fact.
And Obama's trying to give them a tax
break? Come on. Give the people making
less than $30,000 or $40,000 a break -
a real break. And quit worrying about the
1 percent of the very wealthy. They're not
hurting us. It's the middle-class people
that keep abusing their privileges in this
country. They're abusing it.


SOUND OFF
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ir


I ASK U A UP s V AY! I


OPINION


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 A13


IL











NATION


&
CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


NationBRIEFS Panetta assures Afghans of full probe into video
Orphaned cubs


oc implicate negotia s


rootagepurports to show vmannes unnaungon corpses


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Penta-
gon leaders scrambled
Thursday to contain damage
from an Internet video pur-
porting to show four Marines
urinating on Taliban corpses
- an act that appears to vi-
olate international laws of
warfare and further strains
U.S.-Afghan relations.
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta called Afghan Pres-
ident Hamid Karzai to offer
assurances of a full investi-
gation and the top Marine
general promised an internal
probe as well as a criminal
one. Investigators moved


quickly to identify and in-
terview at least two of the
four Marines. They were
members of a battalion that
fought for seven months in
former Taliban strongholds
in southern Afghanistan.
Their unit, the 3rd Battal-
ion, 2nd Marines, returned
from Helmand province to its
home base at Camp Lejeune,
N.C., last September. Ma-
rine officials said a battalion
officer confirmed to investi-
gators Thursday, based on
his examination of the video,
that the four men depicted
urinating had been members
of the battalion. Two have
since moved to other units.


As the video spread
across the Internet in post-
ings and repostings, U.S. of-
ficials joined with Afghans
in calling it shocking, de-
plorable, inhumane and a
breach of military standards
of conduct. It shows men in
Marine combat gear stand-
ing in a semicircle urinating
on the bodies of three men
in standard Afghan clothing,
one whose chest was cov-
ered in blood.
It's not certain whether the
dead were Taliban fighters,
civilians or someone else.
The incident will likely
further hurt ties with
Karzai's government and


over a strategic partnership
arrangement meant to gov-
ern the presence of U.S.
troops and advisers in
Afghanistan after most in-
ternational combat troops
withdraw by the end of 2014.
It also comes at a delicate
time in relations among the
United States, Afghanistan's
elected government and the
Taliban insurgency fighting
for both territorial control
and cultural and religious
preeminence in Afghanistan.
The U.S. is trying to foster
peace talks between the
Karzai government and the
Pakistan-based Taliban high
command, and has made
unprecedented offers to
build trust with the insur-


JEBB HARRIS/Orange County Register
A newly arrived male moun-
tain lion cub plays with a
squash Wednesday at the
Orange County Zoo in Orange,
Calif. A pair of orphaned
cubs will go on display to
the public in the coming
months when their enclo-
sure is complete. The pub-
lic will be invited to name
them. The two cubs were
orphaned and only a few
weeks old when they were
picked up in Oregon last
August.

Amish men jailed in
dispute over signs
MAYFIELD, Ky. -Agroup
of Amish men were sent to jail
in western Kentucky Thursday
for refusing to pay fines for
breaking a state highway law
that requires their horse-drawn
buggies to be marked with or-
ange reflective triangles.
The men have a religious
objection to the bright orange
signs, which they say are flashy
and conflict with their pledge to
live low-key and religious lives.
Ananias Byler, the first of
10 Amish men who appeared
in Graves County District
Court on Thursday, was sen-
tenced to 10 days in jail.
"I totally understand your
objection," Judge Deborah
Crooks told Byler. "But you're
in violation, and it's not up to
me to change the law. It
doesn't really matter what I
think about any of this."
World BRIEF

Orphaned pups


Associated Press
A volunteer feeds a seal a
herring Thursday at the
Pieterburen seal creche,
north of the town of Gronin-
gen, northern Netherlands.


Nursery c
orphaned s
AMSTERDA\
that have lashed
coast this year h
a wave of orpha
seals some s
umbilical cords
tached wrenc
their mothers an
on beaches and
An existing see
the northern city
has been so inu
pups and older s
cent weeks it ha
temporary tent t(
in tanks and bat
are nurtured bac
They will event
turned to the wile
Storms and h
ate problems for
cause the sand
they bask remain
said Lenie 't Har
founded the nurn
known as the Se
tion and Resear
American volu
Utne, of Boston,
setts, said Thurs
the last 10 days,
100 seals have I
to the center for
and it now house
of the marine me


gents, including the planned
opening of a Taliban politi-
cal office to oversee talks.
Anti-American sentiment
is already on the rise in
Afghanistan, especially among
Afghans who have not seen
improvements to their daily
lives despite billions of dol-
lars in international aid.
They also have deplored the
accidental killing of civilians
during NATO airstrikes.
Pentagon officials said the
criminal investigation would
likely look into whether the
Marines violated laws of
war, which include prohibi-
tions against photographing
or mishandling bodies and
detainees. It also appeared
to violate the U.S. Uniform
Code of Military Justice.



Junked


probe to


crash in


next few


days

Associated Press
MOSCOW A Russian
spacecraft designed to bur-
nish the nation's faded
space glory in a mission to
one of Mars' moons has
turned into one of the heav-
iest, most toxic pieces of
space junk ever
It will come crashing down
to Earth in just a few days.
The Russian space agency
Roscosmos' latest forecast
has the unmanned Phobos-
Ground probe falling out of
Earth's orbit Sunday or
Monday, with the median
time placing it over the In-
dian Ocean just north of
Madagascar. It said the pre-
cise time and place of its un-
controlled plunge can only
be determined later, and un-
less someone actually spots
fiery streaks in the sky, no
one may ever know where
any surviving pieces end up.
Space experts agree it's
unlikely to pose big risks.
At 14.6 tons, the Phobos-
Ground is one of the heavi-
est spacecraft ever to
plummet to Earth, consider-
ably larger than the two de-
funct satellites that fell to
Earth last fall and landed in
the water. It's cylindrical
and about the size of a van.
Roscosmos predicted that
only between 20 and 30 frag-
ments of the Phobos probe
with a total weight of up to
440 pounds will survive the
re-entry and plummet to
Earth.
It's the third satellite to
crash out of the sky in under
five months: An old NASA 6-
ton atmospheric research
satellite came tumbling
down in September, and a 3-
ton German science satel-
lite followed suit in October.
But both were well past
their prime.
Russia's Phobos-Ground

and a glitch left it stranded
in orbit around Earth in-
stead of bound for Mars to
collect soil samples.
"What's different about
this re-entry is that it's not a
re-entry of an old, inert
satellite that just was expected
for years. It's something that
is coming down because of
an accident," said Jonathan
McDowell of the Harvard-
Smithsonian Center for As-
trophysics in Cambridge, Mass.
Another striking differ-
ence is the 12 tons of highly
toxic rocket fuel aboard
Phobos-Ground, accounting
for the bulk of its weight for
the long journey to the Mar-
tian moon of Phobos. This
makes it potentially the most
toxic spacecraft to fall ever.
Roscosmos insists all the
fuel will burn in the atmos-
phere and pose no danger,


and some experts in Russia
and the West share that
forecast


Associated Press
ANCHORAGE, Alaska The
worst winter anyone can remem-
ber in Alaska has piled snow so
high people can't see out the win-
dows, kept a tanker in ice-choked
waters from delivering fuel on
time and turned snow-packed
roofs into sled runs.
While most of the nation has
gone without much seasonal snow,
the state already known for winter
is buried in weather that has
dumped more than twice as much
snow as usual on its largest city,
brought out the National Guard
and put a run on snow shovels.
As a Russian tanker crawled to-
ward the iced-in coastal commu-
nity of Nome to bring in
much-needed fuel, weather-weary
Alaskans awoke Thursday to more
of the white stuff more than a
foot was expected to fall in An-
chorage and said enough was
enough.


"The scary part is, we still have
three more months to go," said
Kathryn Hawkins, a veterinarian
who lives in the coastal commu-
nity of Valdez, about 100 miles
southeast of Anchorage. "I look
out and go, 'Oh my gosh, where can
it all go?'"
The city has seen more than 26
feet of snowfall since November.
Snow is piled 8 feet high outside
Hawkins' home and she can't see
out the front or back of her house.
Her 12-year-old son has been slid-
ing off the roof into the yard.
In the nearby fishing community
of Cordova, the Alaska National
Guard is out helping clear snow
from streets and roofs. The city al-
ready been buried under 172
inches of snow since November;
snow began falling again after
midnight Wednesday
The city is struggling with a
place to put the snow that has al-
ready fallen before dealing with
more. Front-end loaders are tak-


ing scoop after scoop of snow from
large dump piles to a snow-melt-
ing machine.
"That's our big issue, getting our
snow dumps cleared for the next
barrage of snow," Cordova
spokesman Allen Marquette said.
More than 186 inches of snow
has fallen in Cordova this season,
including 59 inches for the first 10
days of January alone, according
to the National Weather Service.
The seasonal record of 221.5
inches was set in 1955-56.
Anchorage had 81.6 inches fall
as of Wednesday more than
twice the average snowfall of 30.1
inches for the same time period.
The weather service counts July 1
through the end of June as a snow
season.
This year's total already broke
the record 77.3 inches that fell
during the same time period in the
1993-94 season, and another 3
inches has fallen since midnight
Wednesday


Midwest gets first big snowstorm of season


Associated Press


IIudLeu wILI MILWAUKEE An un-
seals in re- usually mild winter finally
s erected a gave way to the Midwest's
o house them first big snowstorm of the
hs while they season Thursday, blanket-
ck to health. ing a region unfazed by a
ally be re- white Thanksgiving in a
d. layer of powder and pack
igh tides cre- that forced all-too-happy
r seals be- snow plow drivers off their
banks where couches and into the streets.
n underwater, The storm dumped sev-
t, who eral inches of snow on west-
sery formally ern parts of Wisconsin and
eal Rehabilita- Iowa before moving east-
ch Center ward into Milwaukee, St.
unteer Torrey Louis and Chicago, where
Massachu- up to eight inches were ex-
day thatin pected to fall by Friday
more than morning.
emore thanbIn a typical year, such a
been brought storm would hardly register
treatment in the upper Midwest. But
es some 350 forvirtuallythe entire season,
mammals. cold air has been bottled up
-From wire reports over Canada. La Nina, the


Vehicles face the wrong way on the U
over the Eau Claire River on Thursda
accident in Altoona, Wis.


cooling of the equatorial
Pacific Ocean that affects
weather worldwide, has
nudged the jet stream far-
ther north. And air pressure
over the northern Atlantic
has steered storm systems
away from the East Coast.


For
year-o
Wauw
try ou
skis h
was e
friend
no tim


S at the Lapham Peak cross
country ski area, about 25
t miles west of Milwaukee.
p "I wasn't worried," Longo
Z said. "I was just anxious."
S.' "This is Wisconsin," a
"' "a confident Ng said. "There's
going to be snow."
The storm dumped 2 to 6
inches of snow on eastern
- Iowa by Thursday evening,
.: and was expected to drop 3
:. /to 8 inches total on south-
f f ern Wisconsin and northern
f Illinois as it moves further
into the Northeast on Fri-
Associated Press day, according to Richard
I.S. Highway 53 bridge Castro, a National Weather
ay after a multiple-car Service meteorologist.
While the dry weather has
Steve Longo, a 47- been an unexpected boon
)ld chiropractor from to many cash-strapped
atosa, Wis., the wait to communities, which have
ut the cross country saved big by not having to
re got for Christmas pay for plowing, salting and
*xcruciating. He and sanding their streets, it has
i Alex Ng, 56, wasted hurt the seasonable busi-
ne in hitting the trails nesses that bank on the snow.


Associated Press
An Alaska Railroad plow clears the tracks along the Seward Highway on Wednesday next to Turnagain Arm near
Bird in Anchorage, Alaska.






Alaska buried


Big storm hits state as weary residents dig out


areas for
seal pups
M Storms
the Dutch
iave created
ned baby
o young their
are still at-
;hed from
d washed up
dikes.
al nursery near
of Groningen
intifoi %Aiifh











PORTS


Rays ink outfielder
Luke Scott to deal.
Player expected to
bolster offense for
Tampa Bay./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


l Football/B2, B5
0 Recreation briefs/B2
r Basketball/B3
| Sports briefs/B4
SNHL/B4
SScoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


Undefeated 'Canes hammer Leopards


Garvin's double-

double spurs
Citrus to 18-0
JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
INVERNESS A low-scoring
game can be called a number of
different things. But what the


crowd on hand witnessed last
night at Citrus High School was
just a good old-fashioned defen-
sive stand-off.
Behind Paige Garvin's game-
high 13 points and 10 rebounds,
the Citrus High School girls bas-
ketball team fended off visiting
Hernando and found its shot late
in the fourth quarter to take a
hard-fought 48-28 win.
The game didn't start off pretty,
as neither offense could find the


net, and neither defense would
give an inch. Hernando's Ebone
Plummer was a staple in the
paint for the Lady
Leopards, collecting
nine rebounds for
herself, and creat-
ing a wall that Cit-
rus' bigs just
couldn't get around.
But where the offense
was struggling, the Lady 'Canes'
defense surged. They held Her-


nando to 13 first-half points,
swiped seven steals and forced
the Lady Leopards into bad looks
for the majority of the
Sight.
"Defensively we
n did great tonight,"
r Citrus head coach
Brian Lattin said.
"We forced them into
long-range shots, and the
press yielded a lot of turnovers.
We just missed a lot of easy bas-


kets, and a lot of free throws. But
that's the thing about playing
good defense. When you play
good defense, your offense can be
off, and tonight was a good exam-
ple of that."
The offense wasn't off the en-
tire night, however. The Lady
'Canes (18-0) finally found their
rhythm in the fourth quarter,
mainly behind solid rebounding


Citrus


Photos by CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
Vickie Lapps, 17, a senior at Citrus High School, completes the clean and jerk portion of the match in the 139-pound weight class during a
weightlifting meet against Crystal River and Weeki Wachee on Thursday night at home. The Hurricanes came away with dominant victories over
both the Pirates and Hornets in a tri-meet.


Hurricanes score 65 points to easily outdistance Crystal River,


MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent
INVERNESS -As the season
winds down, the Citrus girls
weightlifting team hosted both
Crystal River and Weeki Wachee


in a tri-meet at
School.
The Canes
scored 65
points to easily
defeat both the
Pirates (23) and
Hornets (9).
Crystal River
showed to be a
little better pre-
pared squad
but were still
short of com-


Citrus High


I was
with the g
too muc

Citrus weightlifting c
upcoming meet


petitors in the 110- and 199-lb.
weight class.
"Our squad was more complete
at this match then in previous
meets (and) we showed great im-
provement in many areas," Crys-
tal River coach Randy Owens
said.
The Lady 'Canes demonstrated
the strength and dominance that
they have been noted for
"Our match last week against
Springstead was going to be our
major competition because they
are a strong competitor, but we
did win the meet with a score of
57-33," Hurricanes head coach
Tia Nelson said.


"I was concerned about the
girls lifting too much as we
needed to be prepared to com-
pete in the Keystone Heights In-
vitational on Saturday," Nelson
continued. "At this Invitational I
plan to use all my top lifters. Still
many of our girls produced their
best totals
tonight."
concerned In the 101-
pound weight
iris lifting class, Citrus'
Morgan Met-
h... zger took first
with teammate
Tia Nelson Sam Kennedy
coach said her team's grabbing sec-
at Keystone Heights. ond. In the 110-
pound weight
class, the Hurricanes' Lauryn
Rashley showed dominance once
again with a total lift of 255
pounds. Monica Coates claimed
second with a lift of 190 pounds.
In the 119-pound class Martina
Tafoya of the Lady Pirates
claimed first with a total lift of
230 pounds while teammate
Laynee Nadal captured second
with a total of 185 pounds.
Crystal River senior Tafoya has
been competing in this sport for
three years for the Pirates and is
showing great promise.
"I got into this activity mainly
to use this for conditioning for
track," Tafoya said.


Weeki Wachee


crystal River lirer viartina laroya prepares to oencn press against
Citrus and Weeki Wachee on Thursday evening.


Citrus' Aaron McIntyre domi-
nated the 129-pound weight class
with a total of 260 pounds. In the
139-pound weight class, the Hur-
ricanes' Vickie Lapps easily took
first with a total of 285 pounds
with teammate Brianna Salt-
marsh coming in second.
"As a senior I have been in the
weightlifting program at Citrus
for two years," Lapps said. 'A cou-
ple of my friends told me about
the weightlifting program and it
was being used for conditioning
and that really got my interest
"Once I got started, my coach
saw a great potential in me and I


have been with the program ever
since," Lapps added.
The Hurricanes' Hannah
Evans took top honors in the 154-
pound weight class while Sam
Kanawall and Kayla Copas stole
the spotlight with first and sec-
ond place in the 169-pound class
with total lifts of 260 and 255
pounds, respectively
In the 183 pound weight class,
Leslie Mena captured first with a
life of 260 pounds total while Aly-
cia Porro of the Pirates received
second place with a very close
See Page B4


Page B4


s it up


Florida's Demps picks track career over football


Gators running

back has eyes

on Olympics

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE
Florida running back Jeff
Demps is giving up his foot-
ball career to focus on track


and the 2012 Olympics.
Demps wants to vie for a
spot on the U.S. track and
field team. So he won't at-
tend any college football all-
star games or take part in
any NFL draft workouts.
"I can have the mindset of
a full-time track guy now,"
Demps said.
The senior started training
with Florida's track team this
week and hopes to return to
competition at the Virginia


Tech Elite Meet next month.
He plans to lose about 15
pounds off his 190-pound
playing weight
Demps fin-
ished his ca-
reer with
2,470 yards
rushing and 23
touchdowns. He
had 569 yards rush-
ing and six touchdowns this
past season. He also was a
dangerous kickoff returned,


averaging 28.8 yards a return
in his four-year career
On the track, Demps is a
four-time national
champion.
Demps is the
two-time de-
fending
NCAA Indoor
60-meter cham-
pion. He showed
Olympic potential when he
set a 100-meter junior world
record (10.01 seconds) at the


2008 Olympic Trials, chal-
lenging Olympian Tyson Gay
stride for stride in the heat
Training with Florida this
season should help Demps'
Olympic chances, especially
working with head coach
Mike Holloway Holloway is
an assistant coach for the
U.S. Olympic Team and
mainly works with sprinters
and hurdlers.
"What has made Jeff
unique is that Jeff has al-


ways done very, very good
things in track and field
while doing lifting and other
things that football players
do," Holloway said. "What
that tells me is that Jeff is a
very special guy If you can
run 9.9 (in the 100 meters)
and run 6.5 (in the 60 me-
ters) and do the things he
has done, training as a foot-
ball-slash-track guy, what
happens when he is just a
track guy?"


Lackluster

victory for

Hurricanes


Miller nets 2

but coach not

pleased in win
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Citrus girls
soccer coach Steve Ekeli was-
n't exactly celebrating after
the Hurricanes beat Ocala
Forest 3-1 Thursday night at
the Citrus Bowl.
"We wasted two days of
practice," Ekeli said. "To say I
am unhappy would be an un-
derstatement. We had the two
best days of practice. The first
half was a horrible mess."
The victory made the 'Canes
12-2-3 overall for the season.
Forward Deycasha Miller
scored a pair of goals for Cit-
rus. She blasted one in unas-
sisted from 15 yards out at
32:07 in the first half.
She scored her 33rd goal of
the season with 31:05 left in
the second half. She struck a
corner kick that went through
the Forest goalkeeper's hands
for a score.
Citrus goalkeeper Victoria
Ekeli booted in a goal on a
free kick. The kick was from
40 yards out and skimmed off
a player's back into the goal.
The insurance goal came with
7:07 left in the game.
The game was knotted at
1-1 in the first half.
Citrus came out in the sec-
ond half and was more ag-
gressive, taking 15 shots. They
had only nine in the first half.
The coach wasn't happy
with his team's play
"You need to fine tune stuff.
We don't care if we win 1-0,"
Steve Ekeli said. "We are just
not on the same page right
now. It isn't something we
can't overcome. As a coaching
staff, you want to be confident
going into district. I don't
know how to read this game."
"We did have outstanding
play by our senior midfielders
Rachel Albrecht and Kylie
Fagan," Steve Ekeli contin-
ued. "Rachel (had) a blue col-
lar game tonight. Kylie was
outstanding."
His two midfielders were
more satisfied.
"I think we turned it around
in the second half," Albrecht
said. "We played our game
and didn't let them beat us. We
worked to get better as a team,
passing and talking."
Fagan agreed with her Cit-
rus teammate.
"First half, we came out a
little sluggish but the second
half, we did a lot better,"
Fagan said.
Forest (14-4-1) scored one
goal with 24:31 left in the first
half. Daniela Cobb booted the
ball and Nicki Bradshaw
headed the ball in for the sin-
gle goal.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Bama stars leaving


Richardson,


Hightower,

Kirkpatrick

NFL-bound

Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
National champion Ala-
bama will once again try to
keep rolling after losing
three underclassmen to the
NFL draft.
All-Americans Trent
Richardson, Dont'a High-
tower and Dre Kirkpatrick
said Thursday they're leav-
ing school to start pro ca-
reers, three days after
helping the Crimson Tide to
its second national title of
their careers.
"To leave a legacy like me
and Dre have left here, to
have two national champi-
onships in three years, I
think that's pretty big for us
and our family and for the
University of Alabama," said
Richardson, a Heisman Tro-
phy finalist and Doak
Walker Award winner as the
nation's top running back
Richardson and Kirk-
patrick, a cornerback, at-
tended a news conference
announcing their decisions,
while middle linebacker
Hightower issued a state-
ment afterward.
Richardson and Kirk-
patrick are both projected
as potential top 10 picks and
Hightower is also regarded
as a potential first-rounder.
Alabama had a school-
record four first-round se-
lections last year, including
underclassmen Marcell
Dareus, Julio Jones and
Mark Ingram. The Tide
came back and went 12-1,
moving to 36-4 over the past
three years.
Richardson set school sin-
gle-season rushing records
with 1,679 yards and 21
touchdowns in his lone sea-
son as a fulltime starter
after running behind the
2009 Heisman winner
Ingram.
He and Hightower were
first-team AP All-America
selections while Kirkpatrick
was a second-teamer
The Tide beat LSU 21-0 in
Monday night's national title
game when the nation's top
defense yielded only 92 total
yards.
Richardson ran for 96
yards and scored the game's
only touchdown in the
fourth quarter after topping
100 as a freshman in the first
title game against Texas.
Richardson said he
wanted to be able to take
care of his mother-who he


, y ^... .l. .,,j' .. -. ,- .- .*** ...* .. ..


Associated Press
Alabama running back Trent Richardson announced he will enter the NFL draft and skip his
senior season with the national champions.


says has Lupus and still
works at a seafood restau-
rant and two young
daughters.
"It really took a toll on me
to make sure my momma
doesn't have to work any-
more or my grandma," said
Richardson, who lost two
aunts to cancer in the last
year. His grandmother had
retired, but returned to driv-
ing a school bus.
Richardson said he made
the decision Wednesday
night after sitting down with
his uncle and brothers. He
went home to Pensacola,
Fla., from the national
championship game in New
Orleans to discuss his future
with family
Richardson said he re-
ceived motivation from a
childhood in a tough neigh-
borhood where he lost
"quite a few friends" to early
deaths, drugs or prison.
"This place has changed


my life," Richardson said.
"It really turned me from a
teenager to a man, and a
grown man at that.
"I never thought I'd be in
college playing football, or I
never thought I'd be almost
done with my degree. In 2
1/2 years, I'm almost done
with my college degree.
That's big for me."
Hightower, the team
leader with 85 tackles, was
eligible for a fifth year of el-
igibility after missing most
of the 2009 national cham-
pionship season with a
knee injury He wasn't pres-
ent at the news conference,
and Saban only talked
about Richardson and
Kirkpatrick.
AP Sources: LSU CB
Claiborne turning pro
LSU All-American cornerback
Morris Claiborne has decided to
leave school a year early to
enter the NFL draft, said two


people familiar with the decision.
The people spoke to The
Associated Press on condition
of anonymity because LSU
has not announced Clai-
borne's decision. LSU has
scheduled a press conference
Thursday afternoon with coach
Les Miles.
Claiborne, who led LSU with
six interceptions this season
and returned one for a touch-
down, also won the Jim Thorpe
Award as the nation's top de-
fensive back. In addition, Clai-
borne was LSU's top kickoff
returned, averaging 25 yards per
return with one touchdown that
went 99 yards at West Virginia.
He is projected to be a poten-
tial top 10 pick in the draft.
Claiborne, who is from
Shreveport, initially came to
LSU expecting to play wide re-
ceiver but was quickly con-
verted to defensive back and
played in seven games in a re-
serve role as a true freshman.


Redskins hire


former Buc Morris


Associated Press

NEW YORK Former
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
coach Raheem Morris says
he has agreed to coach the
Washington Redskins' de-
fensive backs.
"I'm a football coach.
This is what I do, it's who I
am," Morris told the Tampa
Bay Times, which reported
his hiring Thursday
Morris will be reunited
with general manager
Bruce Allen, who was the
GM in Tampa Bay when
Morris returned from a
one-year stint as Kansas
State's defensive coordina-
tor to coach the Bucca-
neers defensive backs.
Morris was Tampa Bay's
defensive backfield coach
for four seasons. He re-
placed Monte Kiffin as de-
fensive coordinator in 2008
and Tampa Bay promoted
him to head coach in 2009
replacing Jon Gruden. He
had a 17-31-0 record in
three years as head coach.
The Buccaneers fired
Morris on Jan. 2.
Bears interview Olson
for passing coach
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -The
Chicago Bears were sched-
uled to interview former Tampa
Bay Buccaneers offensive co-
ordinator Greg Olson for their
passing coordinator/quarter-
backs coach opening on
Thursday.
The team said on its web-
site that the interview was to
take place at its headquarters.
Olson spent the past four
seasons on Tampa Bay's staff,
the last three as offensive co-
ordinator after serving as quar-
terbacks coach in 2008. He
oversaw the development of
Josh Freeman as the Bucca-
neers won 10 games in 2010,
but things soured in a big way


this season.
Tampa Bay dropped its final
10 games following a 4-2 start
and let coach Raheem Morris
go along with all his assistants.
Olson served as Chicago's
quarterbacks coach under
Dick Jauron in 2003 and held
a similar job with Detroit the
following year before being
promoted by the Lions to of-
fensive coordinator in 2005.
He spent the 2006 and 2007
seasons as St. Louis' offen-
sive coordinator.
The Bears are making
some changes after finishing
8-8 and missing the playoffs
for the fourth time in five
years. They fired general man-
ager Jerry Angelo and pro-
moted offensive line coach
Mike Tice to offensive coordi-
nator, replacing Mike Martz.
Tice will call plays and con-
tinue to be heavily involved
with the offensive line, with the
quarterbacks coach playing a
big role with the passing game.
Wilson tells Rockies
he'll go with football
DENVER Wisconsin
quarterback Russell Wilson
has told the Colorado Rockies
he has decided to play in the
NFL rather than stay in the
baseball team's minor league
system.
Wilson made up his mind
after helping Wisconsin reach
the Rose Bowl. He attended
Wisconsin after transferring
from North Carolina State.
Rockies general manager
Dan O'Dowd said Thursday
the team was informed Wilson
won't be coming to camp. He
said the Rockies had "no say
in his personal choice," but the
club wishes him the best as he
pursues pro football.
Wilson was drafted by the
Rockies in the fourth round
with the 140th pick two years
ago.


Associated Press
Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Raheem
Morris was hired Wednesday as the defensive backs
coach for the Washington Redskins.


Recreation BRIEFS


Time for Central Citrus
Little League signups
Central Citrus Little League
will have its 2012 spring ball reg-
istration at Central Ridge District
Park (Holder Field) from 6 to 8
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19. Regis-
tration on Saturday, Jan. 14, will
be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For more information, view
the Central Citrus Little League
website at www.eteamz.com/
centralcitruslittleleague.
Inverness Little League
holding registration
Inverness Little League is cur-
rently holding signups for the
spring season. There are still
three more signup dates or you
can go to Just Sports in Inver-
ness and sign up during busi-
ness hours.
The two dedicated signup
dates are Jan. 14 from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at the Whispering
Pines concession stand; and
Jan. 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
Whispering Pines community
room.
Tryouts will be held at Whis-
pering Pines on Jan. 21 and 28;
times will be posted.
Sign up now for
Fitness in Citrus
Are you determined to im-
prove your health in 2012? Get
a jump start by joining this year's
Fitness in Citrus Community-
wide Fitness Challenge. It be-
gins Monday, Feb. 6, and runs
through Sunday, March 18.
Team up with at least one
other person to enter either the
"steps" challenge or the "min-
utes of activity" challenge. Com-
pete with others of a similar
fitness level by choosing the ap-
propriate category: "just getting


started," "getting there" or
"jocks."
In the steps challenge you
earn points for each 500 steps
you take (you need to wear a
pedometer, widely available for
about $10). In the minutes of ac-
tivity challenge you earn points
for each 10 minutes of exercise
(from a specified list of activities.)
Registration closes Jan. 23.
Email fitnesschallenge@
tampabay.rr.com to get details
and registration forms (in pdf
file format).
'Race for the Kids'
on Feb. 11
Covenant Children's Home's
"Race for the Kids" will begin at
8 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 11, at
Spruce Creek Preserve, State
Road 200.
The event is a 5K run/1-mile
walk and Kids' Fun Run. Regis-
ter at cchfl.org or drcsports.com.
All pre-registered runners and
walkers are guaranteed a T-shirt
and gift bag. Awards will be pre-
sented to the top finishers in
each age group. All participants
in the Kids Fun Run will receive
a medallion.
For more information, call
352-861-4502.
Men's flag football
needs players
Men's Spring Flag Football
is scheduled to start in the last
week of February. This is a 7-
on-7 league for players who
are 18 and older. The league
is semi-competitive and plays
at Homosassa Area Recre-
ational Park.
Signups will be Feb. 6 to 10
at the Citrus County Resource
Center. Game times are 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. The league
plays two 20-minute halves


with a running clock. The last
two minutes of each half are
regular clock.
There is a $50 registration fee
required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for
help finding a team.
Get those roundball
rosters ready
Men's Spring Basketball is
scheduled to start in the last
week of February. This is de-
signed for players 18 and older.
The league is highly competitive
and plays at local indoor school
gymnasiums in Citrus County.
Each team may roster up to
15 players. Game times are 6, 7
and 8 p.m. The league plays
two 20-minute halves with a run-
ning clock. The last two minutes
of each half are regular clock.
Signups will Feb. 6 through
10 at the Citrus County Re-
source Center. There is a $50
registration fee that is required
to sign a team up. Team fees
are based on the number of en-
tries per league and are divided
up equally among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player interested in playing, call
for help finding a team.
Men's softball
to start soon
Men's Spring Softball is
scheduled to start Monday,
Feb. 20.
This is an 18-and-older


league that plays on Monday
and Wednesday nights at Bicen-
tennial Park.
Game times are 6:30, 7:30
and 8:30 p.m. Teams can roster
up to 25 players. Registration
will be Jan. 30 through Feb. 3 at
the Citrus County Resource
Center. There is a $50 registra-
tion fee required to sign up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are equally divided up. For
more information, call Jennifer
Worthington at 352-527-7547. If
you are a single player wanting
to play, call for help finding a
team.
Coed kickball
begins Feb. 22
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation kicks off the spring coed
kickball league Wednesday,
Feb. 22. The competitive league
is designed for players 18 and
older who have the "young at
heart" spirit of kickball.
The league shows up to play
in retro socks, shorts and sport-
ing team shirts, accompanied
with protective eyewear, on
Wednesday nights. Game times
are 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Each team fields 11 players with
a minimum of three women.
Teams can roster up to 25
people.
Signups will be Jan. 30
through Feb. 3 at the Citrus
County Resource Center. There
is a $50 registration fee required
to sign a team up. Team fees
are based on the number of en-
tries per league and are divided
up equally among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for


help finding a team.
Parks & Rec to host
coed softball
Coed Spring softball hosted
by Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will begin Feb. 22.
The league is designed for lev-
els of all play; however, with the
popularity of the sport continuing
to grow, if there are enough
teams there will be divisions set
up for the spring season.
The league plays on Tuesday
and Thursday nights at Bicen-
tennial Park with games at 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Each team is
required to have a minimum of
four women each game. Each
team may roster up to 25 partici-
pants. Signups will be Jan. 30
through Feb. 3 at the Citrus
County Resource Center.
There is a $50 registration fee
required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams. For more infor-
mation, call Jennifer Worthing-
ton at 352-527-7547. If you are
a single player wanting to play,
call for help finding a team.
Relay "Fore" Life
golf tourney
Eagle Buick of Homosassa
will present the Relay "Fore" Life
Celebrity Golf Tournament Sat-
urday, Feb. 18, at Juliette Falls
Golf Course. Shotgun start is at
9a.m.
Entry is $75, which includes
range balls and lunch. The tour-
ney is a four-person team
scramble format. Prizes will be
closest to the pin on par 3's and
longest drive. There will be a
silent auction and door prizes.
Hole sponsorships available


for $100, silver; $250, gold; and
$500, platinum.
Deadline to sign up is Friday,
Feb. 10.
Proceeds will benefit Team
Hope Crystal River Relay For
Life. For more information or to
register, email Nick.Maltese@
pgnmail.com or call 352-464-
7511, or email
Michele.Snellings@pgnmail.co
m or call 352-697-2220.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park offers
tennis lessons with Lindsay Ro-
driquez. Pre-registration and
pre-payment are required at the
park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the in-
structor.
Call 352-726-3913 for regis-
tration and information. Whis-
pering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for in-
formation.
Tai chi classes at
Whispering Pines
Tai chi class is offered at
Whispering Pines Park Recre-
ation Building. The class is 10 to
11 a.m. Cost is $20 for four
weeks with instructor Dave
Meredith. Gentle stretching pro-
vides participants with the ability
to gain balance, strength and
flexibility.
All classes require preregis-
tration and payment at the park
office; the class requires at least
five participants. Call 352-726-
3913 for information or visit
www.inverness-fl.gov (Recre-
ation & Leisure-classes).


B2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hawks soar past Bobcats, 111-81


Grizzlies maul

Knicks, 94-83

Associated Press

ATLANTA Josh Smith
scored 30 points, Joe John-
son added 23 and the At-
lanta Hawks won their first
game without All-Star cen-
ter Al Horford, routing the
Charlotte Bobcats 111-81
on Thursday night.
The Hawks learned ear-
lier in the day that Horford,
a leader on and off the
court, will miss at least
three months after tearing
the pectoral muscle in his
left shoulder Wednesday
night at Indiana.
With Horford sidelined,
Smith and Johnson came


through big time against
the hapless Bobcats, who
lost their fifth in a row and
dropped to 2-9. The Hawks
(8-4) dominated on the
boards, outrebounding
Charlotte 55-30.
Byron Mullens led the
Bobcats with 21 points in
his first career start.
Grizzlies 94, Knicks 83
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Rudy
Gay scored a season-high 26
points and the Memphis Griz-
zlies beat New York 94-83 to
end the Knicks' winning streak
at four games.
The Knicks played most of
the second half without scor-
ing leader Carmelo Anthony
after he sprained his right
ankle early in the third period.
He didn't return and X-rays
were negative.
Gay made 11 of 16 shots to


Associated Press
Charlotte Bobcats forward Tyrus Thomas, left, and Charlotte
center Byron Mullens sit on the bench during the final
minutes of the fourth quarter against the Atlanta Hawks on
Thursday in Atlanta. The Hawks won 111-81.
help the Grizzlies snap a improve to 4-6. O.J. Mayo
three-game losing streak and scored 18 points, also a sea-


son high, on 7-of-12 shooting
and had eight rebounds. Tony
Allen added 12 points, and
Marc Gasol had 10 points and
12 rebounds.
Anthony and Bill Walker
each scored 14 points to lead
the Knicks (6-5). Rookie guard
Iman Shumpert had 12 points,
but was 5 of 20 from the field.
Amare Stoudemire, saddled
with foul problems early,
scored a season-low six
points, converting only one of
his seven shots. New York set
a season low with its 83
points.
Bucks 102, Pistons 93
MILWAUKEE Brandon
Jennings scored 27 points
and Stephen Jackson added
25 to help the Milwaukee
Bucks beat the Detroit Pistons
102-93.


The Bucks improved to 4-0
at home and 4-6 overall, while
the Pistons dropped to 2-9
with their sixth straight loss
and fifth in a row on the road.
Detroit last lost six straight
from March 13-April 3, 2010.
Bucks coach Scott Skiles
became the 39th coach in
NBA history to reach 400 vic-
tories. He is 400-388.
A game after scoring a sea-
son-high 34 points, Jackson
was 9 of 17 from the field, and
had six rebounds and six as-
sists. Rookie Jon Leuer, mak-
ing his first start for the Bucks,
added 15 points and six re-
bounds.
Greg Monroe led the Pis-
tons with a career-high 32
points and had 16 rebounds.
Rookie point guard Brandon
Knight added 20 points.


Miami stuns


No. 5 Maryland


Lady Gators

fall to Bulldogs

Associated Press
CORAL GABLES -
Riquna Williams scored 34
points and No. 13-ranked
Miami defeated a top-five
team for the first time by
beating No. 5 Maryland 75-
63 Thursday night
Williams tied a career
high with eight 3-pointers,
the last coming with two
minutes left to put Miami
ahead by 11 points.
The Hurricanes (14-3
overall, 3-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference) extended
their home winning streak
to 34 games. Maryland (16-
1, 3-1) was held 21 points
below its scoring average
of 84.4 points per game,
best in the nation.
No. 9 Kentucky 61,
No. 6 Tennessee 60
LEXINGTON, Ky.-A'dia
Mathies drove the lane and
scored in traffic with 4.2 sec-
onds left to finish with a ca-
reer-high 34 points and No. 9
Kentucky beat No. 6 Ten-
nessee to snap the Lady Vol-
unteers' 36-game
Southeastern Conference win-
ning streak.
After Tennessee (12-4, 3-1)
was called for a charge and
Kentucky (15-2, 4-0) used a
timeout, Mathies took the ball
at halfcourt, dribbled into the
lane and hit a 7-foot floater off
the glass in the paint.
Kamiko Williams drove the
length of the floor, but missed
an off-balance 16-footer as
time expired.
Keyla Snowden added 11
points to help Kentucky win its
first four games in conference
play for the first time in history
to go with 15 straight at home.
No. 11 Ohio State 82,
Northwestern 72
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Tayler Hill scored 19 of her 24
points in the second half, eight
during a 10-0 run that helped
No. 11 Ohio State pull away
from Northwestern.
Hill iced the win for the
Buckeyes (16-1, 3-1 Big Ten)
on a 3-pointer 45 seconds re-
maining for a 78-69 advan-


Associated Press
Free agent Luke Scott agreed to a one-year contract with the Tampa Bay Rays in a deal announced Thursday.





Rays sign (hopefully)great Scott


Outfielder

agrees to

$6M contract

Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG -
Luke Scott is looking forward
to life in the AL East without
having to face Tampa Bay's
young, talented pitching
staff.
The power-hitting free
agent first baseman-out-
fielder was added to the mid-
dle of the Rays lineup
Thursday after agreeing to a
$6 million,.one-year contract
He will receive $5 million
this season, and the deal in-
cludes a $6 million club op-
tion for 2013 with a $1 million
buyout
Scott figures to be the
team's primary designated
hitter, although he also
brings some versatility that
will provide manager Joe
Maddon some flexibility on
defense.
"It's going to be a joy," Scott
said by telephone from Okla-
homa, where he is rehabbing


a shoulder injury that lim-
ited him to 64 games with
Baltimore last season. "Not
having to face that pitching
staff is definitely going to be a
relief. They have tremen-
dous arms in that rotation
and in their bullpen. ... It's
very tough to make a living
against that pitching staff."
The Rays are just as happy
to gain Scott's bat
The 33-year-old hit .269
and averaged 25 home runs
per year from 2008 to 2010
with the Orioles. He batted
.220 with nine homers and 22
RBIs before undergoing sea-
son-ending surgery in July to
repair a torn labrum in his
right shoulder.
"Luke has established
himself as one of the better
power hitters in baseball,
with consistent success in a
variety of roles against both
right- and left-handed pitch-
ers," Rays executive vice
president of baseball opera-
tions Andrew Friedman said.
"He's shown he can perform
in the American League East
and we expect him to be
healthy and productive again
in 2012."
While Scott doesn't antici-
pate being ready to play in


left or right field before May
or June, he and the Rays are
confident he'll be able to
handle the designated hit-
ter's role and possibly
even play first base by
opening day
"I'm very happy where my
shoulder is. I've taken all the
necessary precautions,
everything that's in my con-
trol to get to where I'm at
right now," Scott said. "I'm
very pleased that I've got full
range of motion, and my
strength is really coming
back very quickly I'm a little
bit ahead of schedule. ... I
don't see why I shouldn't be
ready"
Friedman isn't sure where
Scott, who also has played for
the Houston Astros, will
wind up in Tampa Bay's bat-
ting order but stressed it will
be in a "meaningful" spot
The acquisition likely also
means last year's primary
DH, Johnny Damon, won't re-
turn for a second season with
the Rays.
Damon hit .261 with 16
homers and 73 RBIs in 150
games in 2011, helping
Tampa Bay reach the playoff
for the third time in four
seasons.


'"Johnny was a big part of
our success on and off the
field.... Luke was a guy we've
had interest in for a number
of years. We saw an opportu-
nity to add him to our group,
and we're excited to add his
profile to our existing per-
sonnel," Friedman said.
A resident of De Leon
Springs, Fla. who graduated
from Deland High School be-
fore heading to Oklahoma
State for college, Scott said a
chance to play closer to home
for a pennant contender was
only part of the lure in sign-
ing with the Rays. So was
Tampa Bay's interest in him.
"They were very passion-
ate about having me become
a Ray," Scott said. "At the end
of the day, I want to go some-
where I'm going to be
wanted."
Over seven seasons with
the Astros and Orioles, Scott
has 112 homers and 341
RBIs. He had a combined 84
doubles and 75 homers in
his first three seasons with
Baltimore. The best overall
season of his career was
2010, when he hit .284 with
27 homers, 29 doubles, 72
RBIS and a .535 slugging
percentage.


tage. Samantha Prahalis
added 20 points and Amber
Stokes 11 as the Buckeyes re-
bounded from their first loss
Saturday at Michigan.
No. 19 Georgia 61,
Florida 55
ATHENS, Ga. -Anne
Marie Armstrong and Khaali-
dah Miller scored 19 points
apiece to lead No. 19 Georgia
to a win over Southeastern
Conference rival Florida.
Georgia (14-3, 3-1) led the
last 31 minutes of the game
but weathered a late rally by
Florida (11-6, 1-3).
Jennifer George led Florida
with 15 points and eight re-
bounds. Deana Allen added
14 points.
Armstrong led Georgia with
six rebounds and three steals.
She also turned the ball over
10 times.
No. 20 Delaware 69,
UNC-Wilmington 37
NEWARK, Del. Elena
Delle Donne scored 23 points
to lead No. 20 Delaware to a
win over UNC-Wilmington.
Delle Donne, the country's
leading scorer at 30.3 points
per game, had 14 points in the
first half as the Blue Hens (13-
1 overall, 4-0) built a 36-20
lead by intermission.
The 6-foot-5 junior hit 10 of
21 shots from the floor. She
also had five assists and five
rebounds.
The point total for the Sea-
hawks (8-7, 1-3) was their
lowest of the season. UNC-
Wilmington shot 24.1 percent
in the contest (14 of 58).
Clemson 52,
No. 22 N. Carolina 47
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Quinyotta Pettaway had 16
points and 12 rebounds and
Clemson beat No. 22 North
Carolina, denying Tar Heels
coach Sylvia Hatchell her
600th win at the school.
The result snapped a five-
game losing streak for the
Tigers (5-10, 1-3 ACC.) UNC
was held to a season low in
scoring and lost consecutive
games for the first time this
season.
Kelly Gramlich added 11
points for the Tigers, who lost
their previous 53 games
against ranked opponents.


Minnesota


shocks No. 7 IU


Associated Press

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -
Austin Hollins scored a ca-
reer-high 18 points to help
Minnesota beat No. 7 Indi-
ana 77-74 on Thursday night
Indiana's Christian Wat-
ford could have tied the score
but he missed a 3-pointer in
the closing seconds.
Rodney Williams scored 14
points and Julian Welch
added 10 for the Golden Go-
phers (13-5, 1-4 Big Ten), who
had lost four straight. Min-
nesota shot 6 of 13 on 3-point-
ers in the first half to take the
lead, then maintained it by
Minnesota's Austin Hollins
puts up a shot during the
second half against Indiana
on Thursday. Minnesota
defeated Indiana 77-74.
Associated Press


scoring in the paint and grab-
bing 12 offensive rebounds in
the second half.
Indiana freshman Cody
Zeller matched a season
high with 23 points for the
Hoosiers (15-2, 3-2). Jordan
Hulls scored 13, Will Shee-
hey 12 and Victor Oladipo 10
for Indiana, which had won
three straight.
The Hoosiers were 11-0 at
home, including victories
over then-No. 1 Kentucky
and then-No. 2 Ohio State.
Minnesota had been close
in three of its four Big Ten
losses. The Gophers lost in
overtime at Illinois, by five
at Michigan and by two at
home against Iowa.
Minnesota seemingly had
Thursday's game under con-
trol with a six-point lead
and the ball in the final
minute.


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SPORTS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 B3






B4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012



NBA All-Star Voting List
Game: Feb. 26 at Orlando
Released Jan.12
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Forwards
LeBron James, Miami, 640,789; Carmelo An-
thony, New York, 496,351 ; Amar'e Stoudemire,
New York, 178,797; Kevin Garnett, Boston,
173,161; Chris Bosh, Miami, 140,601; Paul
Pierce, Boston, 94,071; Luol Deng, Chicago,
85,086; Andrea Bargnani, Toronto, 54,739; Car-
los Boozer, Chicago, 53,477; Hedo Turkoglu,
Orlando, 43,154.
Guards
Derrick Rose, Chicago, 640,476; Dwyane
Wade, Miami, 637,912; Rajon Rondo, Boston,
253,969; Ray Allen, Boston, 174,934; Deron
Williams, New Jersey, 89,128; Jose Calderon,
Toronto, 42,929; John Wall, Washington,
38,025; Richard Hamilton, Chicago, 36,418;
Kyrie Irving, Cleveland, 27,713; Joe Johnson,
Atlanta, 23,384.
Centers
Dwight Howard, Orlando, 754,737; Joakim
Noah, Chicago, 75,038; Tyson Chandler, New
York, 61,774; Joel Anthony, Miami, 41,832;
JaVale McGee, Washington, 24,713; Al Horford,
Atlanta, 23,546.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Forwards
Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City, 633,538; Blake
Griffin, L.A. Clippers, 394,264; Dirk Nowitzki,
Dallas, 231,832; Pau Gasol, L.A. Lakers,
185,428; Kevin Love, Minnesota, 143,814;
LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland, 118,268; Tim
Duncan, San Antonio, 81,783; Lamar Odom,
Dallas, 59,686; Metta World Peace, L.A. Lakers,
39,006; Danilo Gallinari, Denver, 34,438.
Guards
Kobe Bryant, L.A. Lakers, 690,613; Chris
Paul, L.A. Clippers, 540,173; Ricky Rubio, Min-
nesota, 133,520; Steve Nash, Phoenix,
118,922; Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City,
107,197; Kyle Lowry, Houston, 90,725; Monta
Ellis, Golden State, 63,696; Manu Ginobili, San
Antonio, 50,765; Jason Kidd, Dallas, 49,596;
Chauncey Billups, L.A. Clippers, 42,657.
Centers
Andrew Bynum, L.A. Lakers, 496,597; DeAn-
dre Jordan, L.A. Clippers, 134,961; Marc Gasol,
Memphis, 102,116; Nene, Denver, 94,167;
Marcin Gortat, Phoenix, 62,631; Kendrick
Perkins, Oklahoma City 41,579.
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 7 3 .700 -
NewYork 6 5 .545 1V2
Boston 4 5 .444 212
Toronto 4 7 .364 3/2
New Jersey 2 9 .182 512
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 8 3 .727 -
Orlando 7 3 .700 12
Atlanta 8 4 .667 12
Charlotte 2 9 .182 6
Washington 1 9 .100 6/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 10 2 .833 -
Indiana 7 3 .700 2
Cleveland 4 5 .444 412
Milwaukee 4 6 .400 5
Detroit 2 9 .182 712
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 7 4 .636 -
Dallas 6 5 .545 1
Memphis 4 6 .400 212
Houston 3 7 .300 312
New Orleans 3 7 .300 312
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 10 2 .833 -
Portland 7 3 .700 2
Denver 7 4 .636 212
Utah 6 4 .600 3
Minnesota 3 7 .300 6
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 8 4 .667 -
L.A. Clippers 5 3 .625 1
Phoenix 4 5 .444 212
Sacramento 4 7 .364 312
Golden State 3 6 .333 3/2
Wednesday's Games
Indiana 96, Atlanta 84
Sacramento 98, Toronto 91
New York 85, Philadelphia 79
Chicago 78, Washington 64
Oklahoma City 95, New Orleans 85
Dallas 90, Boston 85
San Antonio 101, Houston 95, OT
Denver 123, New Jersey 115
L.A. Lakers 90, Utah 87, OT
Orlando 107, Portland 104
L.A. Clippers 95, Miami 89, OT
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 111, Charlotte 81
Memphis 94, NewYork 83
Milwaukee 102, Detroit 93
Cleveland at Phoenix, late
Orlando at Golden State, late
Friday's Games
Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Houston, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Boston, 8p.m.
Milwaukee at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Miami at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana, 7p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.
New York at Oklahoma City, 8p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Men's College
Basketball Scores
EAST
Boston College 59, Clemson 57
CCSU 71, Mount St. Mary's 66
Castleton St. 116, New England 87
Drexel 60, George Mason 53
LIU 82, Fairleigh Dickinson 64
Manhattan 75, lona 72
Mount St. Mary (NY) 83, Mount St. Vincent 72


Quinnipiac 78, Robert Morris 76
Regis 58, Wheelock 48
Sacred Heart 71, St. Francis (Pa.) 68
Siena 83, Rider 79
St. Francis (NY) 81, Monmouth (NJ) 64
Vermont 73, Binghamton 53
Wagner 78, Bryant 61
SOUTH
Alice Lloyd 76, Berea 57
Appalachian St. 56, Furman 50
Austin Peay 80, E. Kentucky 65
Charleston Southern 65, Presbyterian 58
Chattanooga 51, Wofford 48
Christian Brothers 69, West Alabama 54
Coastal Carolina 65, Gardner-Webb 63
Davidson 88, W. Carolina 67
Duke 61, Virginia 58
Elon 70, The Citadel 55
Fort Valley St. 78, Paine 75
Georgetown (Ky.) 75, Cumberlands 73
Georgia Southern 58, Samford 53
Georgia St. 75, UNC Wilmington 61
High Point 64, Winthrop 54
Idaho 90, Louisiana Tech 88, OT
Lee 63, Emmanuel (Ga.) 56


SCOREBOARD


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On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S TELEVISION SPORTS
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (SUN) Florida State at Duke
NBA
8 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Boston Celtics
10:30 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) Miami Heat at Denver Nuggets
BOXING
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Teon Kennedy vs. Chris Martin
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Joburg Open
(Same-day Tape)
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Sony Open in Hawaii
HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Pittsburgh Penguins at Florida Panthers
COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Minnesota-Duluth at Nebraska-Omaha
TODAY'S RADIO SPORTS
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Nature Coast at Crystal River

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR


Liberty 69, Radford 64
Loyola NO 67, Spring Hill 65
Middle Tennessee 70, FlU 59
Mississippi St. 62, Tennessee 58
Mobile 68, William Carey 64
Murray St. 66, Jacksonville St. 55
South Alabama 70, Louisiana-Lafayette 65
Spalding 84, Blackburn 52
St. Augustine's 68, Virginia Union 58
UALR 72, Louisiana-Monroe 51
UNC Asheville 89, Campbell 82
UNC Greensboro 73, Coll. of Charleston 66
VCU 65, James Madison 45
MIDWEST
Ashland 61, Tiffin 59
Columbia (Mo.) 76, Park 59
Concordia (Wis.) at Maranatha Baptist, ppd.
Detroit 80, Green Bay 73
Dickinson 76, Washington (Md.) 41
E. Illinois 68, UT-Martin 55
Endicott 69, Wentworth Tech 62
Findlay 67, Lake Erie 64
Graceland (Iowa) 58, Culver-Stockton 46
Hillsdale 78, Wayne (Mich.) 72
Ill.-Springfield 79, Wis.-Parkside 68
Michigan Tech 78, Lake Superior St. 70
Milwaukee 58, Wright St. 38
Minnesota 77, Indiana 74
N. Dakota St. 55, UMKC 54
North Dakota 69, Valley City St. 46
Oral Roberts 71, W. Illinois 70, 20T
S. Dakota St. 86, South Dakota 56
S. Utah 72, IUPUI 64
SE Missouri 85, SIU-Edwardsville 68
Saginaw Valley St. 67, N. Michigan 60
Wisconsin 67, Purdue 62
SOUTHWEST
Hardin-Simmons 60, Sul Ross St. 57
Houston Baptist 123, Crowley's Ridge 43
Howard Payne 94, McMurry 90
North Texas 84, W. Kentucky 67
FAR WEST
Arizona 81, Oregon St. 73, OT
Montana 78, N. Arizona 53
New Mexico St. 80, Utah St. 60
Portland St. 86, N. Colorado 75
Weber St. 63, Montana St. 49



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
.Y. Rangers 41 2710 4 58118 86
'hiladelphia 42 26 12 4 56142 124
Jew Jersey 43 2417 2 50119 124
'ittsburgh 42 21 17 4 46124 112
N.Y. Islanders 41 1520 6 36 98 129


Boston
Ottawa
Toronto
Buffalo
Montreal

Florida
Washington
Winnipeg
Tampa Bay
Carolina


northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA


40 2811 1
45 2415 6
42 2215 5
42 1819 5
43 1620 7
Southeast Division
GP W L OT
42 21 13 8
41 2217 2
43 2018 5
42 1721 4
45 1523 7


57148 77
54143 144
49135 131
41107 123
39110 119

Pts GF GA
50109 116
46119 120
45112 126
38115 146
37118 150


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA


Chicago 44 2613 5
St. Louis 43 2512 6
Detroit 43 2715 1
Nashville 43 2415 4
Columbus 42 11 26 5
Northwest Division
GP W L OT
Vancouver 45 2814 3
Minnesota 44 2216 6
Colorado 45 2320 2
Calgary 44 20 19 5
Edmonton 42 1622 4
Pacific Division
GP W L OT
San Jose 40 2411 5
Los Angeles 43 21 15 7
Dallas 41 2317 1
Phoenix 44 2017 7
Anaheim 41 1322 6


57144 127
56112 92
55138 101
52118 117
27101 142

PtsGF GA
59147 110
50103 110
48117 127
45109 127
36112 121

Pts GF GA
53118 94
49 93 95
47114 119
47111 114
32104 135


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Wednesday's Games
Washington 1, Pittsburgh 0
New Jersey 2, Edmonton 1, OT


Thursday's Games
Detroit 3, Phoenix 2, SO
Boston 2, Montreal 1
Philadelphia 3, N.Y Islanders 2
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 0
Carolina 5, Tampa Bay 2
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Nashville 3, Colorado 2, OT
San Jose 2, Winnipeg 0
Chicago 5, Minnesota 2
Anaheim at Calgary late
Dallas at Los Angeles, late
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 3 p.m.
New Jersey at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.


BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Announced club owners voted to ex-
tend the contract of Baseball Commissioner
Bud Selig through the 2014 season.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Agreed to terms
with RHP Chris Ray on a minor league contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Named Rick Down
minor league roving hitting instructor and Tom
Nieto manager of the Gulf Coast League Yan-
kees.
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Agreed to terms with
1 B-OF Luke Scott on a one-year contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS-Agreed to terms with 1B
Greg Dobbs on a two-year contract.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Agreed to terms
with OF Carlos Gomez and LHP Manny Parra
on one-year contracts.
BASKETBALL
Women's National Basketball Association
TULSA SHOCK-Acquired G Temeka John-
son from Phoenix for G Andrea Riley.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DALLAS COWBOYS-Named Bill Callahan
offensive line coach and offensive coordinator
and Jerome Henderson secondary coach.
NEW YORK JETS-Signed LB Matthias
Berning.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS-Named Ra-
heem Morris defensive backs coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTON BRUINS-Recalled F Jordan
Caron from Providence (AHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS-Recalled LW
Dane Byers from Springfield (AHL).
MONTREAL CANADIENS-Traded F
Michael Cammalleri to Calgary for F Rene
Bourque.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS-Recalled F
Cody Eakin from Hershey (AHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
LA GALAXY-Loaned F Robbie Keane to
Aston Villa (Premier).
NEWYORK RED BULLS-Signed D Markus
Holgersson.
PORTLAND TIMBERS-Traded F Kenny
Cooper to New York for a 2013 first-round draft
pick and allocation money.
COLLEGE
ALABAMA-Announced junior RB Trent
Richardson, junior CB Dre Kirkpatrick and jun-
ior LB Dont'a Hightower willenterthe NFL draft.
ARKANSAS-Announced the resignations of
linebackers coach Reggie Johnson, and gradu-
ate assistant coaches Richard Owens and
Brandon Sharpe, to take coaching positions at
Alabama-Birmingham.
BOSTON COLLEGE-Announced DE Max
Holloway will enter the NFL draft.
CLEMSON-Announced the resignation of
defensive coordinator Kevin Steele.


Hurricanes lock up top
seed in district tourney
The Citrus boys soccer team
improved to 6-0-1 in district play
following a 4-2 victory over Eu-
stis on Thursday night in Lake
County.
Michael Hetland earned a
hat trick with a trio of goals to
pace the Hurricanes (10-2-1
overall).
Pirates incur
wrath of Sharks
The Crystal River girls bas-
ketball team took a 59-29 loss
at Brooksville Nature Coast on
Thursday.
Megan Wells led the Pirates
(7-6 overall, 5-3 district) with 11
points.
Johnson at test without
crew chief Knaus
DAYTONA BEACH Five-


Sports BRIEFS

time NASCAR champion Jim-
mie Johnson, coming off the
worst season of his career, was
without his crew chief when
testing opened Thursday for the
Daytona 500.
But don't read anything into
the absence of Chad Knaus,
Johnson said.
Knaus was on a Hendrick
Motorsports-approved vaca-
tion to South Africa that most
who know the tightly wound
crew chief believe will help
him over the course of
NASCAR's grueling 11-month
schedule.
"Chad had such a great op-
portunity to go on a great vaca-
tion and really do something for
himself," Johnson said. "When
he asked me what my opinion
was, I was like 'Buddy, if upper
management clears it, I think
you have to do it.' I took that va-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




cation and it was good for me.
He needs that. So I am real
happy he is taking the time."
Johnson guessed it had
been almost a decade since
Knaus took his last real vaca-
tion in part because the No.
48 team ran poorly after Knaus
returned from a little rest and
relaxation. A tireless worker
who devotes nearly all of his
time to his race team, Knaus
has notably sacrificed marriage
and children in the interest of
winning races.
His commitment paid off with
55 victories since 2002 and a
NASCAR-record five consecu-
tive championships. His run
with Johnson was snapped last
season by Tony Stewart, and
Johnson finished a career-low
sixth in the final Sprint Cup
standings.
From staff, wire reports


Hurricanes storm TB


Lightning suffer

5-2 setback

Associated Press

TAMPA Jiri Tlusty had
two goals and an assist,
Tuomo Ruutu added a goal
and two assists, and Car-
olina defeated Tampa Bay,
5-2.
Tlusty scored twice dur-
ing Carolina's four-goal first,
helping the Hurricanes take
a 4-1 lead. Jay Harrison and
Tim Brent also scored for
the Hurricanes, who had
lost four of five. Eric Staal
had three assists, giving him
301 in his NHL career
Tampa Bay got goals from
Nate Thompson and Teddy
Purcell, but the Lightning
dropped their fifth straight
(0-4-1).
Senators 3, Rangers 0
NEW YORK Craig Ander-
son made 34 saves for his first
shutout of the season, Jason
Spezza scored twice, and the
Ottawa Senators beat the surg-
ing New York Rangers 3-0 on
Thursday night.
Milan Michalek also scored
for the Senators, who have won
five straight at Madison Square
Garden and seven of eight
there (7-0-1).
New York (27-10-4), which
entered with the most points in
the NHL, had won five straight
and 10 of 11.
Anderson's seventh career
shutout came nearly two years
after Ottawa's winning streak
began in New York with a 2-0
victory on Jan. 14, 2010. Ot-
tawa became one of the last
teams to register a shutout this
season. The Blackhawks and
Islanders are the only remain-
ing teams without one.
Henrik Lundqvist made 21
saves for the Rangers, who
had their fourth winning streak
of at least five games stopped.
Bruins 2, Canadiens 1
BOSTON Jordan Caron
and Milan Lucic scored, and
Tim Thomas stopped 33 shots
to lead Boston over Montreal.
Carey Price made 28 saves
for Montreal, which lost to
Boston for the third straight time
and fell to 3-8 since Randy
Cunneyworth took over as
coach.
Yannick Weber scored for
the Canadiens.
Montreal won the first two
matchups against the defend-
ing Stanley Cup champions,
winning home-and-home
games at the end of October.
But since then the Bruins have
won 25 of 30 games.
After the game, the Canadi-
ens said they traded forward
Michael Cammalleri to the Cal-
gary Flames for forward Rene



CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

total of 250 pounds
Repeat winners in the 199
pound weight class were
Swade Kelleher at 280
pounds total and Ingrid
Heggheim lifting 190
pounds total.



CANES
Continued from Page B1

that gave their offense the
opportunity for second and
third-chance buckets.
Lindsay Connors, who
ended with 13 points and
five assists, made a couple


Associated Press
Carolina Hurricanes left wing Alexei Ponikarovsky knocks
down Tampa Bay Lightning defenseman Marc-Andre Berg-
eron as they chase a loose puck during the first period
Thursday in Tampa.


Bourque. Cammalleri left the
game after the second period.
Flyers 3, Islanders 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Sergei
Bobrovsky stopped 33 shots,
and Philadelphia beat the New
York Islanders for the 26th time
in 28 games.
Scott Hartnell, Wayne Sim-
monds and Sean Couturier
scored for the Flyers (26-12-4),
who moved within two points of
the Atlantic Division-leading
New York Rangers. Kyle Ok-
poso and John Tavares scored
for the Islanders.
The Flyers (26-12-4) have
won 12 of 13 on Long Island
during their dominant run
against the Islanders. New York
(15-20-6) had won three
straight at home, including a 5-
1 victory over Detroit on Tues-
day.
Bobrovsky stopped Michael
Grabner on a penalty shot 2:49
in and made a spectacular
glove save on the Islanders
right wing late in the second.
The 23-year-old Russian has
tormented the Islanders since
joining the Flyers before last
season, going 7-0 against New
York.
Red Wings 3,
Coyotes 2, SO
DETROIT Pavel Datsyuk
and Henrik Zetterberg scored in
the shootout, and Detroit beat
Phoenix for its 13th straight
home win.
Valtteri Filppula, Johan
Franzen scored in regulation for
the Red Wings, who moved
within one home win of match-
ing the team's best streak.
Jimmy Howard stopped 25
shots to earn his 100th career
NHLwin.
Radim Vrbata, Taylor Pyatt


As a foreign exchange stu-
dent, junior Heggheim orig-
inally hails from Stryn,
Norway. She has adapted
well to this sport.
"I have found weightlift-
ing to be great and all the
girls are great to work with,
"Heggheim said. "All the
coaches are great to work
with and I really enjoy the
sport. Coach Chop really got


of key dishes to teammates
Shenelle Toxen and Mary
Wheeler on buckets that
would seal the deal for the
Citrus and close out the
team's 18th straight victory
"Our defense bailed us
out tonight," Lattin said.
"Like I said, we got some re-
ally good looks tonight, but
for whatever reason, we just


scored regulation goals for
Phoenix, and Vrbata added one
in the shootout. Mike Smith
made 40 saves.
Canucks 3, Blues 2, OT
ST. LOUIS Daniel Sedin
scored a power-play goal 46
seconds into overtime to give
Vancouver a victory over St.
Louis in a matchup for first
place in the Western Confer-
ence.
Alexandre Burrows had two
goals and drew the decisive
penalty for the Canucks, who
have an NHL-best 59 points -
three more than St. Louis.
David Backes was whistled for
boarding with 19.9 seconds to
go in regulation, and the Blues
were in disarray in overtime
after defenseman Roman Polak
broke his stick shortly before
Sedin beat Brian Elliott from the
right faceoff dot.
Jason Arnott scored both
goals for the Blues, who lead
the Central Division by a point
despite the end of a four-game
winning streak.
Predators 3,
Avalanche 2, OT
NASHVILLE, Tenn. David
Legwand scored his second
goal of the game at 4:26 of
overtime, and Nashville rallied
from a two-goal, first-period
deficit to beat Colorado.
Legwand scored the winner
on a rebound of his own shot.
The Predators have won
seven straight over Colorado
and nine of 10 overall in the se-
ries, dating to Feb. 4, 2010.
Legwand started the come-
back with a goal in the second
period, and Sergei Kostitsyn
tied it in the third. Nashville has
won three straight and six of
seven.


my interest because of the
exercise part of the activity
and I really love it"
Finally, the unlimited
class was dominated by
Abby Nelson with a total lift
of 260 pounds
The 'Canes will now pre-
pare themselves for the
Keystone Heights Invita-
tional tourney to be held 9
a.m. Saturday


weren't finding the net.
These kids always play
hard, always come out
ready Our energy level is al-
ways high, but it was just
one of those nights where
things didn't want to go our
way offensively"
Citrus returns to the court
tonight to take on visiting
Springstead in district play


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m. St. John at Seven Rivers
7:30 p.m. West Port at Lecanto
7:30 p.m. Springstead at Citrus
BOYS BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. Lecanto at West Port
7:30 p.m. Citrus at Springstead
8 p.m. St. John at Seven Rivers
7 p.m. Nature Coast at Crystal River
BOYS SOCCER
8 p.m. Lecanto at Springstead


N


N.
R
NE

N.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NFL playoffs resume Saturday


Saints, 49ers;

Broncos, Pats

headline action

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS (14-3)
At SAN FRANCISCO (133)
Saturday, 4:30 p.m., Fox
OPENING LINE Saints by 3
RECORD VS. SPREAD New
Orleans 13-4; San Francisco 11-4-1
SERIES RECORD --49ers lead
45-24-2
LAST MEETING Saints beat
49ers 25-22, Sept 10, 2010
LAST WEEK- Saints beat Lions
45-28; 49ers had bye
SAINTS OFFENSE OVER-
ALL (1), RUSH (6), PASS (1)
SAINTS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (24), RUSH (12), PASS (30)
49ERS OFFENSE OVERALL
(26), RUSH (8), PASS (29)
49ERS DEFENSE OVERALL
(4), RUSH (1), PASS (16)
STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES
- Saints have won six straight
against 49ers since losing 2001 sea-
son finale in final game before leav-
ing NFC West ... Saints set NFL
record by converting league-best
56.7 percent of third-down conver-
sions, including 41.3 percent when
needing at least 10 yards. Niners
second to last, converting 29.4 per-
cent of third downs.... New Orleans
has topped 600 yards past two
weeks, including playoff-record 626
against Detroit New England is
only other team to gain 600 yards in
game this season. ... Saints 9-0 at
home this season, averaging 41.6
points and 507.4 yards per game,
compared to 5-3 on road with 27.3
points and 441.6 yards per game...
New Orleans has lost all four road
playoff games in franchise history
... Saints QB Drew Brees has thrown
for 5,942 yards, including his one
postseason game, second to Dan
Marino's 6,085 in the 1984 regular
and postseason. ... San Francisco
playing first playoff game since
after 2002 season. Only long snap-
per Brian Jennings remains from
that team. ... 49ers had plus-28
turnover margin, leading league in
both takeaways with 28 and fewest
giveaways with 10.... San Francisco
had best average starting spot for
drives on offense and defense this
season, starting own drives on aver-
age at the 33.5 and opponents at the
24.3. ... 49ers allowed three rushing
TDs all in final two games the
fewest ever in 16-game season. ...
San Francisco QB Alex Smith com-
pleted just 40 percent of his passes
in red zone, the lowest figure among
24 QBs with at least 40 throws inside
opponent's 20. ... 49ers had 22 TDs
in 54 red-zone trips this season,
third lowest rate in NFL. ... San
Francisco K David Akers set NFL
record with 44 field goals this sea-
son, including seven from at least 50
yards.
DENVER (9-8)
At NEW ENGLAND (133)
Saturday, 8 p.m., CBS
OPENING LINE Patriots by 13
1/2
RECORD VS. SPREAD Den-
ver 8-9; New England 9-7
SERIES RECORD Broncos
lead 27-17
LAST MEETING -Patriots beat
Broncos 41-23, Dec. 18,2011
LAST WEEK- Broncos beat
Steelers 29-23, OT; Patriots had bye
BRONCOS OFFENSE OVER-


Associated Press
New England quarterback Tom Brady and the Patriots will have to defeat the Denver Broncos for a second time
this season as the two units meet in an NFL divisional playoff game. The first meeting was a regular season
meeting which the Patriots won 41-23 but the stakes are much higher this time, as the winner of this
contest will earn a spot in the AFC championship game.


ALL (23), RUSH (1), PASS (31)
BRONCOS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (20), RUSH (22), PASS (18)
PATRIOTS OFFENSE OVER-
ALL (2), RUSH (20), PASS (2)
PATRIOTS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (31), RUSH (17), PASS (31)
STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES
- In first meeting this season,
Broncos rushed for 167 yards in first
quarter but committed three
turnovers in second that enabled
Patriots to recover from 16-7 deficit
... Coaches Bill Belichick of Patriots
and John Fox of Broncos faced each
other in Super Bowl of 2003 season
when Fox was coaching Carolina
Panthers. Patriots won 32-29. ...
Broncos 2-0 against Patriots in play-
off games. In last one Jan. 14, 2006,
Denver forced five turnovers in-
cluding Champ Bailey's 100-yard in-
terception return on which he was
tackled at New England 1 won
27-13 and advanced to AFC cham-
pionship game.... Tim Tebow 8-4 as
starter this season after posting
franchise playoff high 125.6 passer
rating last Sunday ... Broncos led
NFL with 2,632 yards rushing (164.5
per game), led by Willis McGahee's
1,199. ... Demaryius Thomas' 80-
yard touchdown on Tebow's pass on
first play of overtime last Sunday
was longest OT TD in NFL postsea-
son history ... Against Steelers,
rookie LB Von Miller got only sec-
ond sack in five games he's played


with cast to protect torn ligament on
right thumb. He had 111/2 in regu-
lar season. ... Broncos 4-0 in over-
time this season.... Loss to Patriots
began regular-season ending three-
game losing streak for Broncos.
...Tom Brady's 14-5 postseason
record tied with Terry Bradshaw
for best by NFL quarterback with at
least 15 starts. Brady threw for 5,235
yards, second in league history to
Drew Brees' total of 5,476 this sea-
son. ... Belichick needs one win to
tie Chuck Noll's postseason total of
16, fourth most by a coach in league
history ... WR Wes Welker led NFL
with 122 catches and 1,569 yards re-
ceiving. TE Rob Gronkowski was
second with 1,327, a single-season
record for tight ends. His 17 touch-
down catches also were most by
tight end in NFL history ... Patriots
allowed second most yards of any
team this season, 411.1 per game,
but only 18th most points, 21.4. They
also led AFC in scoring with an av-
erage of 32.1 points ...Their turnover
differential of plus-17 was tops in
AFC, while Broncos were tied for
next to last at minus-12. ... MarkAn-
derson and Andre Carter led Patri-
ots with 10 sacks each. Carter out
for season with left quadriceps in-
jury sustained against Broncos.
HOUSTON (11-6)
At BALTIMORE (124)
Sunday, 1 p.m., CBS
OPENING LINE-Ravens by 71/2


NFL Stats CENTRAL


RECORD VS. SPREAD Hous-
ton 12-5; Baltimore 8-7-1
SERIES RECORD Ravens
lead 5-0
LAST MEETING Ravens beat
Texans 29-14, Oct 19,2011
LAST WEEK Texans beat
Bengals 31-10; Ravens had bye
TEXANS OFFENSE OVER-
ALL (13), RUSH (2), PASS (18)
TEXANS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (2), RUSH (4), PASS (3)
RAVENS OFFENSE OVER-
ALL (15), RUSH (10), PASS (19)
RAVENS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (3), RUSH (2), PASS (4)
STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES
- Baltimore making fourth playoff
appearance in four years; Texans in
postseason for first time.... Ravens
and Texans only defenses to rank in
top 4 in every major category, in-
cluding points allowed (Baltimore
third at 16.6 ppg, Houston fourth at
17.4).... Ravens FB Vonta Leach and
S Bernard Pollard played last sea-
son in Houston.... In October meet-
ing, Ravens scored final 16 points
and got five FGs from Billy Cundiff.
... Houston's Arian Faster ran for 153
yards against Cincinnati last week.
Record for RB in first two playoff
games is 278, set by Duane Thomas
of Dallas in 1970. .... Fster has run
for at least 100 yards in last three
games but had only 49 against
Ravens in October ... Texans WR
Andre Johnson had five catches for


90 yards and touchdown last week.
He did not face Baltimore in Octo-
ber because of hamstring injury ...
Houston's TJ. Yates became first
rookie QB drafted in fifth round or
later to win postseason game. ...
Ravens 8-0 at home for first time
and are 73-23 at home since the
start of 2000 season, but haven't won
home playoff game since Dec. 31,
2000, beating Denver before going
on to win only Super Bowl.... Balti-
more QB Joe Flacco 3-0 vs. Houston
in career, going 57 for 89 with four
TDs and one INT ... Ravens seeking
to advance to third AFC title game,
second under coach John Har-
baugh..... Baltimore 9-6 in postsea-
son. ... Ravens expect to have WR
Anquan Boldin back after he
missed two games with knee injury
Boldin had eight catches for 132
yards against Houston in October ...
Ravens RB Ray Rice was only NFL
player with more than 2,000 yards
from scrimmage (1,364 rushing, 704
receiving) and set franchise record
with 15 TDs. ... Baltimore LB Ray
Lewis, in 16th season, led team with
95 tackles and will be playing 16th
playoff game. He is lone remaining
member of 2000 Super Bowl
champs. ... Ravens S Ed Reed has
seven INTs in nine playoff games.
NEW YORK GIANTS (10-7)
At GREEN BAY (15-1)
Sunday, 4:30 p.m., Fox
OPENING LINE Packers by 9
RECORD VS. SPREAD New
York 9-8; Green Bay 11-5
SERIES RECORD Packers
lead 31-23-2
LAST MEETING Packers beat
Giants 38-35, Dec. 4,2011
LAST WEEK Giants beat Fal-
cons 24-2; Packers had bye
GIANTS OFFENSE OVER-
ALL (8), RUSH (32), PASS (5)
GIANTS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (27), RUSH (19), PASS (29)
PACKERS OFFENSE OVER-
ALL (3), RUSH (27), PASS (3)
PACKERS DEFENSE OVER-
ALL (32), RUSH (14), PASS (32)
STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES
- Giants and Packers meet for sev-
enth time in postseason. First five
meetings were for NFL Champi-
onship. ... Last playoff meeting be-
tween two teams was NFC
championship game in January
2008, when Giants K Lawrence
Tynes hit game-winning 47-yard FG
in overtime.... Packers beat Giants
38-35 on Dec. 4.... Giants playing in
31st postseason, most in NFL his-
tory ... Coach Tom Coughlin has led
Giants to five postseason appear-
ances, tied with Bill Parcells for
most in team history ... QB Eli Man-
ning has 11 postseason touchdown
passes, most in team history He had
franchise-record 4,933 yards pass-
ing and eight 300-yard games in reg-
ular season. ... Since start of 2005,
including playoffs, RB Brandon Ja-
cobs has 59 rushing TDs, tied for
fourth-most in NFL. ... RB Ahmad
Bradshaw one of seven NFL play-
ers with 1,800-plus yards rushing
(1,894) and 80-plus receptions (81)
since start of 2010 season.... WR Ha-
keem Nicks had six catches for 115
yards and two touchdowns in Gi-
ants' wild card win last week.... WR
Victor Cruz had team-record 1,536
yards receiving in regular season,
193 more than previous mark
(Amani Toomer, 1,343).... DE Jason
Pierre-Paul fourth in NFL during
regular season with 16 1/2 sacks.
Joined Lawrence Taylor and
Michael Strahan as only Giants with
16-plus sacks in a season.


NFL Playoff Glance
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 7
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
Sunday, Jan. 8
New York Giants 24, Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
New Orleans at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Denver at New England, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 15
Houston at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
N.Y Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
TBD
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
NFC vs. AFC, 7p.m.
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFC vs. AFC, 6:20 p.m.

Regular season
standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
y-New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo
South
y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
North
y-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
x-Cincinnati
Cleveland
West
y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


Pct PF
.813 513
.500 377
.375 329
.375 372
Pct PF
.625 381
.563 325
.313 243
.125 243
Pct PF
.750 378
.750 325
.563 344
.250 218
Pct PF
.500 309
.500 406
.500 359
.438 212


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF PA
y-N.Y Giants 9 7 0 .563 394 400
Philadelphia 8 8 0 .500 396 328
Dallas 8 8 0 .500 369 347
Washington 5 11 0 .313 288 367
South W L T Pct PF PA
y-New Orleans 13 3 0 .813 547 339
x-Atlanta 10 6 0 .625 402 350
Carolina 6 10 0 .375 406 429
Tampa Bay 4 12 0 .250 287 494
North W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 15 1 0 .938 560 359
x-Detroit 10 6 0 .625 474 387
Chicago 8 8 0 .500 353 341
Minnesota 3 13 0 .188 340 449
West W L T Pct PF PA
y-San Francisco 13 3 0 .813 380 229
Arizona 8 8 0 .500 312 348
Seattle 7 9 0 .438 321 315
St. Louis 2 14 0 .125 193 407
x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
AFC individual leaders
Final
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE 611 401 5235 39 12
Schaub, HOU 292 178 2479 15 6
Roethlis., PIT 513 324 4077 21 14
Rivers, SND 582 366 4624 27 20
Mat. Moore, MIA 347 210 2497 16 9
Hasselbeck, TEN 518 319 3571 18 14
Flacco, BAL 542 312 3610 20 12
C. Palmer, OAK 328 199 2753 13 16
Dalton, CIN 516 300 3398 20 13
Fitzpatrick, BUF 569 353 3832 24 23
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Jones-Drew, JAC 343 1606 4.68 56 8
R. Rice, BAL 291 1364 4.69 70t 12
A. Foster, HOU 278 1224 4.40 43 10
McGahee, DEN 249 1199 4.82 60t 4
Mathews, SND 222 1091 4.91 39 6
Re. Bush, MIA 216 1086 5.03 76t 6
Benson, CIN 273 1067 3.91 42 6
S. Greene, NYJ 253 1054 4.17 31 6
Johnson, TEN 262 1047 4.00 48t 4
M. Bush, OAK 256 977 3.82 44 7
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Welker, NWE 122 1569 12.9 99t 9


Gronkowski, NE 90 1327 14.7 52t
B. Marshall, MIA 81 1214 15.0 65t
Bowe,KAN 81 1159 14.3 52t
Hernandez, NWE 79 910 11.5 46
St. Johnson, BUF 76 1004 13.2 55
R. Rice, BAL 76 704 9.3 52
Wayne, IND 75 960 12.8 56t
Washington, TEN 74 1023 13.8 57
M.Wallace, PIT 72 1193 16.6 95t
Punters
No Yds LG
Lechler, OAK 78 3960 80
Fields, MIA 78 3810 70
Moorman, BUF 72 3472 66
Scifres, SND 47 2234 71
B. Colquitt, DEN 101 4783 66
McAfee, IND 88 4102 64
Koch, BAL 73 3393 63
Mesko, NWE 57 2648 65
D. Colquitt, KAN 89 4084 68
Hartmann, HOU 58 2573 69
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG
Arenas, KAN 32 410 12.8 37
Bess, MIA 37 442 11.9 25
Cribbs, CLE 34 388 11.4 84t
Kerley NYJ 29 317 10.9 53
A. Brown, PIT 30 325 10.8 60t
Edelman, NWE 28 300 10.7 72t
Mariani, TEN 46 490 10.7 79t
Br.Tate, CIN 51 543 10.6 56t
Jac. Jones, HOU 49 518 10.6 79t
L.Webb, BAL 30 301 10.0 68t
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
McKnight, NYJ 34 1073 31.6 107t
R. Goodman, SND 34 936 27.5 105t
A. Brown, PIT 27 737 27.3 52
Cribbs, CLE 39 974 25.0 63
C. Gates, MIA 34 843 24.8 77
Karim, JAC 27 652 24.1 37
Br.Tate, CIN 42 998 23.8 45
Mariani, TEN 32 748 23.4 49
McCluster, KAN 25 557 22.3 35
Woodhead, NWE 20 437 21.9 37
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret
Gronkowski, NE 18 1 17 0
R. Rice, BAL 15 12 3 0
A. Foster, HOU 12 10 2 0
Green-Ellis, NWE 11 11 0 0
Jones-Drew, JAC 11 8 3 0


Tolbert, SND 10 8 2 0 60
Decker, DEN 9 0 8 1 54
V. Jackson, SND 9 0 9 0 54
Mendenhall, PIT 9 9 0 0 54
Welker, NWE 9 0 9 0 54
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NE 59-59 28-33 50 143
Rackers, HOU 39-40 32-38 54 135
Nugent, CIN 33-34 33-38 49 132
Janikowski, OAK 36-36 31-35 63 129
Cundiff, BAL 38-38 28-37 51 122
Novak, SND 41-42 27-34 53 122
Bironas, TEN 34-34 29-32 53 121
Carpenter, MIA 26-26 29-34 58 113
Suisham, PIT 36-36 23-31 51 105
Folk, NYJ 44-44 19-25 51 101
NFC individual leaders
Final
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY 502 343 4643 45 6
Brees, NOR 657 468 5476 46 14
Romo, DAL 522 346 4184 31 10
Stafford, DET 663 421 5038 41 16
E. Manning, NYG 589 359 4933 29 16
M. Ryan, ATL 566 347 4177 29 12
Ale. Smith, SNF 446 274 3150 17 5
Cutler, CHI 314 182 2319 13 7
Vick, PHL 423 253 3303 18 14
C. Newton, CAR 517 310 4051 21 17
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
M.Turner, ATL 301 1340 4.45 81t 11
L. McCoy, PHL 273 1309 4.79 60 17
Gore, SNF 282 1211 4.29 55 8
M. Lynch, SEA 285 1204 4.22 47 12
S. Jackson, STL 260 1145 4.40 47t 5
B. Wells, ARI 245 1047 4.27 71 10
Forte, CHI 203 997 4.91 46 3
A. Peterson, MIN 208 970 4.66 54 12
Murray DAL 164 897 5.47 91t 2
Williams, CAR 155 836 5.39 74t 7
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
R. White, ATL 100 1296 13.0 43 8
J. Graham, NOR 99 1310 13.2 59 11
Ca. Johnson, DET 96 1681 17.5 73t 16
Harvin, MIN 87 967 11.1 52t 6
Sproles, NOR 86 710 8.3 39 7
Pettigrew, DET 83 777 9.4 27 5
Cruz, NYG 82 1536 18.7 99t 9


Fitzgerald, ARI 80 1411 17.6 73t
Colston, NOR 80 1143 14.3 50
T. Gonzalez, ATL 80 875 10.9 30
Punters
No Yds LG
A. Lee, SNF 78 3970 68 5
Morstead, NOR 46 2204 64 ,
J. Ryan, SEA 95 4431 77 ,
Kluwe, MIN 77 3517 60 ,
Weatherford, NYG 82 3745 62 ,
Masthay, GBY 55 2506 71
Zastudil, ARI 87 3929 66 ,
Koenen, TAM 67 3023 65 ,
Donn. Jones, STL 105 4652 65 ,
Podlesh, CHI 89 3903 70 ,
Punt Returners


D. Hester, CHI 28 454
P Peterson, ARI 44 699
Ginn Jr., SNF 38 466
Cobb, GBY 26 295
Washington, SEA 41 464
Sproles, NOR 29 294
Weems, ATL 32 315
P Parker, TAM 23 210
Banks, WAS 36 328
Sherels, MIN 33 277
Kickoff Returne


No Yds
Cobb, GBY 34 941
Ginn Jr., SNF 29 800
Sproles, NOR 40 1089
Stroughter, TAM 20 540
Pilares, CAR 23 590
Je. Norwood, STL 24 611
Logan, DET 33 832
Washington, SEA 43 1084
De. Thomas, NYG 25 607
S.-Howling, ARI 36 857
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush
L. McCoy, PHL 20 17
Ca. Johnson, DET 16 0
Jor. Nelson, GBY 15 0
C. Newton, CAR 14 14
M. Lynch, SEA 13 12
A. Peterson, MIN 13 12
Bradshaw, NYG 11 9
J.Graham, NOR 11 0
L. Robinson, DAL 11 0
M. Turner, ATL 11 11


Avg LG
16.2 82t
15.9 99t
12.3 55t
11.3 80t
11.3 37
10.1 72t
9.8 42
9.1 34
9.1 55
8.4 53
rs
Avg LG
27.7 108t
27.6 102t
27.2 92
27.0 78
25.7 101t
25.5 47
25.2 42
25.2 54
24.3 40
23.8 37


Kicking
PAT FG LG Pt
Akers, SNF 34-34 44-52 55 16
Kasay, NOR 63-63 28-34 53 14
Crosby GBY 68-69 24-28 58 14
D. Bailey DAL 39-39 32-37 51 13
M. Bryant, ATL 45-45 27-29 51 12
Ja. Hanson, DET 54-54 24-29 51 12
Gould, CHI 37-37 28-32 57 12
Gano, WAS 25-26 31-41 59 11
Henery, PHL 46-46 24-27 51 11
Mare, CAR 44-45 22-28 45 11
NFL draft order
First Round on April 26-28 in New York


1. Indianapolis 2
2. St. Louis 2
3. Minnesota 3
4. Cleveland 4
5.Tampa Bay 4
6. Washington 5
7. Jacksonville 5
8. Carolina-x 6
9. Miami-x 6
10. Buffalo Bills 6
11. Kansas City-x 7
12. Seattle-x 7
13. Arizona 8
14. Dallas 8
15. Philadelphia 8
16. N.YJets 8
17. Oakland 8
18. San Diego 8
19. Chicago 8
20.Tennessee 9
21. Denver-y 8
22. Cincinnati-y 9
23. N.Y Giants-y 9
24. Houston -y 10
25. Atlanta-y 10
26. Detroit-y 10
27. Baltimore-y 12
28. Pittsburgh-y 12
29. New Orleans-y 13
30. New England-yx13
31. San Fran.-yx 13
32. Green Bay-y 15
x-Subject to coin flip
y-Subject to playoffs


Opponents
L PctPct W L
14 .125.539138 118
14 .125.590151 105
13 .188.559143 113
12 .250.531 136 120
12 .250.551 141 115
11 .313.477122 134
11 .313.500128 128
10 .375.504129 127
10 .375.504129 127
10 .375.520133 123
9 .438.512131 125
9 .438.512131 125
8 .500.469120 136
8 .500.473121 135
8 .500.488125 131
8 .500.500128 128
8 .500.504129 127
8 .500.516132 124
8 .500.527135 121
7 .563.461118 138
8 .500.520133 123
7 .563.492126 130
7 .563.520133 123
6 .625.453116 140
6 .625.480123 133
6 .625.535137 119
4 .750.477122 134
4 .750.492126 130
3 .813.441 113 143
3 .813.449115 141
3 .813.449115 141
1 .938.457117 139


NFL


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 B5


r












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Susan Lucci to
host 'real-life soap'
NEW YORK-"All My
Children" veteran Susan
Lucci is returning to the
world of soap operas. But
this time, the stories will
be real.

Investiga-
tion Dis-
covery
network
says
Lucci
will host
Susan and nar-
Lucci rate
"Deadly Affairs." It said
Thursday the new series
will explore real-life
cases of romance gone
wrong and the crimes of
passion that resulted.
Lucci won lasting fame
as devious, often-wed
Erica Kane on the day-
time drama 'All My Chil-
dren," which aired from
1970 until ABC cancelled
it last September
Lucci describes
"Deadly Affairs" as a
"real-life soap." She calls
her hosting role on the
show "a perfect match."
She says she hopes the
show will shed some light
on human nature.
Filming of the 10-
episode season is ex-
pected to begin in March.
The premiere is slated
for this fall.

Court charges
Sarah Ferguson
ANKARA, Turkey A
Turkish court has
pressed charges against
Britain's Duchess of York
for secretly filming or-
phanages in Turkey
The court on Thursday
accused Sarah Firguson in
absentia of going "against
the law in acquiring
footage and violating pri-
vacy" of five children.
She faces a maximum
term of 22 1/2 years in
prison if convicted. No
trial date has been set.
Ferguson, the former
wife of Britain's Prince
Andrew, made an under-
cover trip to Turkey in
2008 to examine orphan-
ages for a British televi-
sion program. Secretly
filmed images that were
broadcast appeared to
show children tied to
their beds or left in cribs
at an orphanage near the
capital of Ankara.
It is not clear why it
took more than three
years to file charges
against Ferguson.

Gable's grandson
gets 10 days in jail
LOS ANGELES -
Clark Gable's 23-year-old
grandson has been sen-
tenced to 10 days in jail
for pointing a green laser
at a Los Angeles police
helicopter as it flew 800
feet over Hollywood.
City News Service says
the judge, who gave Clark
James Gable credit for
one day already served in
jail, also placed him on
three years' probation. He
was sentenced Thursday
Gable pleaded guilty
last month to felony dis-
charge of a laser
He flashed the laser
three times at the helicop-
ter while riding as a pas-
senger in a car on July 28.
Officers aboard the
helicopter pinpointed
the source of the 52-milli-
watt laser and directed
officers on the ground to
make an arrest.
-From wire reports


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 11
Powerball: 5 19 29 45 47
Powerball: 25
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 2 $200,000
No Florida winner
Lotto: 11 26 36 45 46 52
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 21 $7,849.50
4-of-6 1,396 $85
3-of-6 30,037 $5.50
Fantasy 5:3 7 8 12 30
5-of-5 2 winners $122,797.66
4-of-5 441 $89.50
3-of-5 13,144 $8
TUESDAY, JAN. 10
Mega Money: 30 41 42 43
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $1.8 million
Fantasy 5: 9- 16 25 26 32
5-of-5 2 winners $108,271.53

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, Jan. 13,
the 13th day of 2012. There
are 353 days left in the year.
Today's highlight:
On Jan. 13, 1982, an Air
Florida 737 crashed into
Washington, D.C.'s 14th
Street Bridge and fell into the
Potomac River after taking
off during a snowstorm, killing
a total of 78 people.
On this date:
In 1733, James Oglethorpe
and some 120 English colonists
arrived at Charleston, S.C.
In 1794, President George
Washington approved a
measure adding two stars
and two stripes to the Ameri-
can flag, following the admis-
sion of Vermont and
Kentucky to the Union. (The
number of stripes was later
reduced to the original 13.)
In 1864, composer
Stephen Foster died impov-
erished in a New York hospi-
tal at age 37. (In his pocket: a
note which read, "Dear
friends and gentle hearts.")
In 1966, Robert C. Weaver
was named Secretary of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment by President Lyndon B.
Johnson; Weaver became the
first black Cabinet member.
In 1990, L. Douglas Wilder
of Virginia became the na-
tion's first elected black gov-
ernor as he took the oath of
office in Richmond.
In 1992, Japan apologized
for forcing tens of thousands
of Korean women to serve as
sex slaves for its soldiers dur-
ing World War II.
In 2001, an earthquake es-
timated by the U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey at magnitude 7.7
struck El Salvador; more than
840 people were killed.
Ten years ago: Treasury
Secretary Paul O'Neill and
Commerce Secretary Don
Evans said on the Sunday
talk shows they had never
considered intervening in
Enron's spiral toward bank-
ruptcy, nor did they inform
President George W. Bush of
requests for help from the
fallen energy giant.
Five years ago: Two min-
ers were killed when a roof
collapsed inside the Brooks
Run Mining Co.'s Cucumber
coal mine in McDowell
County, W.Va.
One year ago: A funeral
was held in Tucson, Ariz., for
9-year-old Christina Taylor
Green, the youngest victim of
a mass shooting that also
claimed five other lives and
critically wounded Congress-
woman Gabrielle Giffords.
Today's birthdays: Co-
median Rip Taylor is 78. Ac-
tress Julia Louis-Dreyfus is 51.


Associated Press
Jean Dujardin portrays George Valentin, left, and Berenice Bejo portrays Peppy Miller in a scene from "The Artist."





The road to Oscar


Golden Globes get ball rolling toward Oscar night


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Hollywood's
first big show on the road to the
AcademyAwards will help determine
if silence is golden this season.
The black-and-white silent film
"The Artist" leads contenders for
Sunday's Golden Globes with six
nominations, among them best mu-
sical or comedy, directing and writ-
ing honors for Michel
Havanavicius and acting slots for
Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo.
Though still playing in narrow
release, the film has found enthu-
siastic audiences and has been a
critical darling since premiering at
last May's Cannes Film Festival,
positioning it as the first silent
movie with serious awards
prospects since the first years of
the Oscars in the late 1920s.
In an age of elaborate computer
effects and digital 3-D projection,
"The Artist" is such a throwback to
early cinema that it comes off as
something entirely fresh.
"It's very relaxing for people to
actually go to this movie," said Du-
jardin, nominated for best actor in
a musical or comedy for his role as
a silent-era star whose career im-
plodes when talkies take over "It's
a new visual and emotional expe-
rience for people. ... It's really
strange and rare to not hear any-
thing in the theater"
Tied for second-place at the
Globes with five nominations each
are George Clooney's family tale
"The Descendants" and the liter-
ary adaptation "The Help," both
competing for best drama.
Also in the running for best
drama: Martin Scorsese's family
adventure "Hugo"; Clooney's polit-
ical thriller "The Ides of March";
Brad Pitt's sports tale "Moneyball";
and Steven Spielberg's World War
I epic "War Horse."
For best musical or comedy, "The
Artist" is up against: Joseph Gordon-
Levitt's cancer story "50/50"; Kristen
Wiig's wedding romp "Brides-
maids"; Woody Allen's romantic
fantasy "Midnight in Paris"; and
Michelle Williams' Marilyn Mon-
roe tale "My Week with Marilyn."


Along with honors from trade
groups such as the directors, actors
and writers guilds, the Globes help
sort out key contenders for the Os-
cars, whose nominations balloting
closes Friday, with nominees an-
nounced Jan. 24.
A win Sunday can firm up a
film's prospects to triumph at the
Oscars, though the Globes have
had a bad track record predicting
eventual best-picture winners in
recent years.
Over the last seven years, only
one Globe best-picture winner -
2008's "Slumdog Millionaire" -
has gone on to claim the top honor
at the Oscars. Before that stretch,
the Globes had been on an eight-
year streak in which one of its two
best-picture recipients went on to
become the Oscar champ.
Last year, "The Social Network"
won best-drama at the Globes and
looked like the early Oscar fa-
vorite. But momentum later swung
to eventual Oscar best-picture win-
ner "The King's Speech."
The Globes generally do a better
job predicting who might take
home the acting Oscars. A year ago,
all four actors who won Oscars
earned Globes first- lead players
Colin Firth for "The King's
Speech" and Natalie Portman for
"Black Swan" and "The Fighter"
supporting stars Christian Bale
and Melissa Leo.
Along with Clooney, Pitt and
Williams, other established stars
nominated for Globes include
Meryl Streep in the Margaret
Thatcher tale "The Iron Lady,"
Leonardo DiCaprio in the J. Edgar
Hoover saga "J. Edgar," Glenn
Close in the Irish drama "Albert
Nobbs" and Kate Winslet in the
stage adaptation "Carnage."
The lineup also features many
newcomers to the awards scene,
among them Wiig for "Bridesmaids,"
Gordon-Levitt for "50/50," Michael
Fassbender for the sex-addict drama
"Shame," Rooney Mara for the
thriller "The Girl with the Dragon
Tattoo" and Brendan Gleeson for
the Irish crime tale "The Guard."
"The Help" picked up three act-
ing nominations: Viola Davis for


dramatic actress and Octavia
Spencer and Jessica Chastain for
supporting actress. Adapted from
Kathryn Stockett's best-seller
about black maids speaking out
about their white employers dur-
ing the civil-rights movement, the
hit drama has been a career-maker
for many of its collaborators, in-
cluding first-time director Tate
Taylor, a childhood friend of Stock-
ett, and producer Brunson Green.
The Globes are presented by the
Hollywood Foreign Press Associa-
tion, a group of about 85 entertain-
ment reporters for overseas outlets.
The ceremony, carried live on
NBC, is a more laid-back affair than
the Oscars, with Globe guests sharing
dinner and drinks that can loosen
up stars' tongues.
Ricky Gervais returns as host for
the third-straight year, despite un-
easy moments a year ago when he
took sharp swipes at celebrities
and Golden Globe organizers
themselves. It paid off with a boost
in TV ratings for the show, though,
so the Globes invited Gervais back.
Behind the scenes, the HFPA
and the Globes' longtime produc-
ers, dick clark productions, con-
tinue to fight in federal court over
which entity has the authority to
negotiate multi-million dollar
broadcast rights to future shows.
Although this year's telecast was
never in serious jeopardy, the
HFPA is anxious to try to negotiate
a better deal with other networks.
While Hollywood will be in party
mode right through the Feb. 26 Os-
cars, not every nominee will join
the fun. "Midnight in Paris" direc-
tor Allen, a notorious no-show at
awards ceremonies, said he does not
believe in competition among films.
"Who's to say Steven Spielberg's
film is better than Martin Scorsese's
or better than Francis Coppola's?
These guys are all wonderful film-
makers, and everybody does his
best," Allen said. "Who's to say what's
best? You can say that's your fa-
vorite, and that's fine.... But to say
it's better than another film, it's a
very subjective judgment. Someone
else may feel, 'No, I think this is the
better film.' It's unquantifiable."


Ringtone halts NY Philharmonic


Associated Press


NEW YORK It's the
dreaded sound at any live
performance a ringing
cellphone.
That's what happened
Tuesday night at Lincoln
Center's Avery Fisher Hall


Birthday: An unfulfilled ambition of yours has a good
chance of being gratified in the year ahead, but only if you
stick with it. Where you previously met with defeat, you
may now get a new opportunity that will grant you success.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You could emerge victori-
ous if you aren't afraid to take a well-calculated risk. In
order to accomplish your aims, you might have to be a bit
more assertive than usual.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A condition that is imbued
with negative overtones can be altered in your favor. Some-
one who has much more experience than you will be the
liberating factor.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -A job or project that you
can't handle on your own can be achieved with the help of
another party. The aid will come from somebody with whom
you have worked previously.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you see something you


during the final movement
of Gustav Mahler's Ninth
Symphony by the New York
Philharmonic.
Music Director Alan
Gilbert stopped the orches-
tra until the phone was si-
lenced.
When the iPhone's ring-


tone initially went off, the
conductor turned his head
to signal his displeasure.
But the ringing from the
first row persisted.
Gilbert asked that the of-
fending noise be turned off
and finally stopped the or-
chestra until it was.


Today's HOROSCOPE
could do but that has not been asked of you, don't ignore it,
do it. Special acknowledgement and/or rewards will be
given to the person who does good work and goes the
extra furlong.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) This could be an especially
good day socially for you. If you are fortunate enough to get
an invitation to an event where you could meet new people,
grab your hat and spats and get moving.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If the entire family pulls to-
gether when a financial issue threatens to rock the boat,
you can withstand any untoward effects that would have
otherwise come of it.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) In order to feel satisfied, you
could need to seek out some active mental and physical
outlets. Don't make any commitments that you can't wriggle
out of; keep your day open for sudden treks.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you run across a channel that


Betsy Vorce, speaking for
Lincoln Center, says an an-
nouncement is made before
every performance telling
audience members to turn
off their phones. If a device
does go off, ushers are di-
rected to discreetly ask the
owner to turn it off.


could bring you more money, give it your top priority imme-
diately. Current conditions favor adding to your income.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Whether it's normal for you or
not, you'll have excellent managerial skills, so don't back off
if someone tries to tell you otherwise.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) There may be someone whom
you'd like to help, but in order to do so, you might have to
let this person feel that he or she is helping you. Some peo-
ple have too much pride to accept assistance.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Rubbing shoulders with peo-
ple who have clout in your field of endeavor could be bene-
ficial. As long as you don't foist your plans on anybody,
business can be combined with fun.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You're apt to be in a
stronger position than you realize where your career is con-
cerned. Be alert, because opportunities are breaking out in
several directions simultaneously.


Country singer Trace Adkins is
50. Actor Orlando Bloom is 35.
Thought for Today: "Never
underestimate your power to
change yourself; never over-
estimate your power to change
others." H. Jackson Brown
Jr., American writer.











SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ON THE BIG SCREEN


Associated Press
Andrew Garfield portrays Peter Parker and Spider-Man in a scene from "The Amazing Spider-Man," set for release on July 3.

'The Amazing Spider-Man,' 'Dark Knight'return to theaters for 2012


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
LOS ANGELES Hollywood
is respecting the environment
and recycling again.
The prospect of a few dozen se-
quels, prequels, remakes and as-
sorted other reworkings of
familiar tales might sound tire-
some until you look over the
guest list studios have lined up.
More Batman with "The Dark
Knight Rises." More Peter Parker
with "The Amazing Spider-Man."
More short guys on a quest with
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" More vamps and were-
wolves with "The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn Part 2." More
cool sunglasses with "Men in
Black 3." More Iron Man, Thor,
Captain America and Incredible
Hulk with "The Avengers." More
prehistoric pals with "Ice Age:
Continental Drift." More travel-
ing zoo animals with "Madagas-
car 3: Europe's Most Wanted."
There's even more Curly, Larry
and Moe with "The Three
Stooges."
Add in three action flicks
based on classic fairy tales and
four 3-D reissues of major block-
busters, and 2012 might make
good on Hollywood's aim to lure
back audiences after movie at-
tendance last year dipped to its


lowest since 1995.
Here's a look at the year's com-
ing attractions:
Superhero parade
Nicolas Cage provides a winter
warm-up with "Ghost Rider:
Spirit of Vengeance" (Feb. 17), re-
turning as the bounty hunter
from hell on a mission to rescue a
child from the devil.
The heavy-hitters arrive this
summer. First up is "The
Avengers" (May 4), teaming
Robert Downey Jr. as Iron Man,
Chris Hemsworth as Thor, Chris
Evans as Captain America, Mark
Ruffalo as the Incredible Hulk,
Scarlett Johansson as Black
Widow and Jeremy Renner as
Hawkeye.
Directed by Joss Whedon, "The
Avengers" has S.H.I.E.L.D. leader
Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson)
assembling a superhero dream
team to battle Thor's bad brother
(Tom Hiddleston).
After two "Iron Man" flicks
with his billionaire inventor Tony
Stark at center stage, Downey
said it was an adjustment joining
an ensemble.
"In his world, there are just
people who satellite around him.
So this was sort of a mandatory
humility, and it's definitely get-
ting me in the right mindset for
parenting," said Downey, who's


Christian Bale portrays Batman in a scene from "The Dark Knight
Rises," set for release on July 20. This year's movies will range from
superheroes to vampires and teens fighting for their lives and teens in
fairy tales.


expecting a baby with wife Susan.
Next comes "The Amazing Spi-
der-Man" (July 3), with Andrew
Garfield taking over as Peter
Parker in director Marc Webb's
new take on how a mutant spider
bite turns the gangly teen into the
web-slinging hero.
"Every single human being can
relate to feeling like this ordinary
person (who) wishes they could
do so much more, and what
would happen if all of a sudden,
you're a skinny kid (who) could?"
said Emma Stone, who plays
Peter's romantic interest, Gwen
Stacy "If you've ever been a
teenager, you've felt like that. If
you've ever been bullied, you've
felt like that. I can relate to Peter
Parker in so many ways."
Then, Christian Bale returns as
Batman in "The Dark Knight
Rises" (July 20), director Christo-
pher Nolan's third and final tale
of the wealthy vigilante with all
the cool gadgets. Anne Hathaway
joins the cast as Catwoman.
After the late Heath Ledger's
Academy Award-winning per-
formance as the Joker in "The
Dark Knight," Nolan went with a
lesser-known villain over more
familiar Batman baddies such as
the Riddler or the Penguin. This


time, it's Bane (Tom Hardy),
known to comic-book fans as the
brawny brute who breaks Bat-
man's back and puts him in a
wheelchair
How will Bale's spine fare?
"I'm sworn to secrecy, and
we're not allowed to really talk
about it much," said Gary Old-
man, who returns as Batman's
police ally Jim Gordon. "I can say
this much, that the story's terrific,
that he's going to really go out
with a bang."
Fairy-tale makeovers
We've had dueling asteroid
flicks and dueling Truman
Capote biopics. Why not dueling
Snow Whites?
Julia Roberts is the wicked
queen to Lily Collins' Snow
White in "Mirror Mirror" (March
16), with the banished heroine
raised by dwarfish rogues and
leading a battle against the mean
old monarch.
"Twilight" star Kristen Stewart
is the warrior princess in "Snow
White and the Huntsman" (June
1), trained by a rugged hunk
("Thor" star Hemsworth) to wage
war against her own wicked
queen (Charlize Theron).
See Page C6


Spielberg crafts another masterful epic with War Horse'
W ith films like "Saving German families and individuals
Private Ryan" and during World War I. The tale be-
"Schindler's List" on his gins with the young horse, named
filmography, it's no question di- Joey, being sold to Albert Narra-
rector Steven Spielberg is a mas- cott's (Jeremy Irvine) family Al-
ter of the war genre and every bert raises Joey and trains him to
other genre for that matter This plow so his father will make
being the case, I could not wait enough money to keep their
for his new World War I epic house. Against all odds, Albert and
"War Horse" to be released on Joey succeed in plowing the farm.
Christmas day Liam Cash Sadly, this joy is quickly di-
With my high expectations and CASHMONEY finished whenAlbert's father is
... Christmas spirit, I walked into MOVIES forced to sell Joey to a captain in
the theater ready to be im- the English army (Tom Hiddle-
pressed. Hello, Academy ston) to make ends meet. From
Awards, let me introduce you to the film here, Joey travels through the course of the
that deserves to sweep the prizes this year war, passing from the English army, to the
Associated Press "War Horse" is the tale of a horse, obviously,
Jeremy Irvine portrays Albert Narracott in "War Horse." who impacts several English, French and See Page C5


Heather Foster
TEEN
REVIEW


'Midnight

in Paris'


breath of

fresh air
Flanked by huge
Hollywood names,
sandwiched be-
tween a rapturous Van
Gogh sky and a twinkly
Seine, Owen Wilson's vis-
age blithely strolls
through the idyllic "Mid-
night in Paris" movie
poster. But all the shim-
mer and romance are no
ploy; Woody Allen brings
forth a courageously
adorable movie.
As always, intellectual
banter inundates Allen's
script, yet it is so buoyant.
"Paris"' shrug-y protago-
nist has the gumption to
flitter about his writing
and yearn for the 1920s.
Oh-so-satisfyingly, poetic
justice grants him his re-
quest and he meets his
lost-generation heroes
face to face.
The conflict is simple,
literary icons facilitate
the quest and the resolu-
tion is whimsical "Mid-
night in Paris" is
something of a "Magic
School Bus" for adults.
Gil (Owen Wilson) the
novelist, his fiance Inez
(Rachel McAdams) and
her parents (Kurt Fuller
and Mimi Kennedy) take
an unromantic Parisian
vacation. While Inez has a
ball attending wine tast-
ings and fancy dances with
her high school crush Paul
(Michael Sheen) and his
girlfriend (Nina Arianda),
Gil is understandably un-
enthused. Deflated, Gil
takes to the streets to mull
over his latest book. Did
he ever get inspiration!
At the stroke of mid-
night, an antique cab spir-
its Gil to Paris in the 1920s.
Ecstatic to be in his fa-
vorite era, Gil hobnobs
with flappers, jazzmen and
cultural colossi such as
Ernest Hemingway, E Scott
Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein,
TS. Eliot, Picasso, Dali and
Man Ray All the while, Gil
finds himself falling for the
mysterious Adriana (Mar-
ion Cotillard).
If you have taken litera-
ture and art history
courses or are a recre-
ational culture buff, "Mid-
night in Paris" could be an
educational bash. The
whopping deck of person-
alities doesn't stray far
from textbook lore. Flat as
his flashcard buds, Hem-
ingway outwardly rambles
over his idiosyncratic
bravery and manliness.
Still, watching these
lovely caricatures slide
into the slots of our com-
mon imagination is satis-
fying, even comforting.
If only out of recogni-
tion, I beamed whenever a
time warp celeb strolled
into the picture.
What I love about "Mid-
night in Paris" is its cheer-
iness. Amid gentle
bickering and an overall
polite feel (excluding one
political dig) I almost for-
get "Paris" features dou-
ble-timing and a break-up.
Even as killjoy Gil,
Owen Wilson is cute as a
button. Wilson puts on this
apologetic demeanor that
makes his whiniest
episodes and dastardliest
mishaps charming.
As far as the plot, Gil's
journey to the 20s is sheer
magic. The luscious cine-
matography makes the
trip deliciously fairytale-
esque. With media getting
barraged by catastrophic


See Page C5


In Saturday Classifieds '\-,' a .
Shop in our ',
Garage and Yard Sales Category
SAVE BIG!


Jennifer Lawrence portrays Katniss Everdeen in "The Hunger
Games," set for release March 23. Lawrence is among several teens
fighting to the death in a televised competition in post-apocalyptic
North America.





C2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012

DANCE
Ballroom and Latin
Dance Social, 7 to 10 p.m.
every other Saturday, at Bev-
erly Hills Recreation Center, 77
Civic Circle. Free half-hour les-
son at 7 p.m. Free snacks and
beverages. Cost $8 per per-
son. Call 352-746-5845 or visit
www.ballroomsocials.com.
Mixer Dance 8 to 11
p.m. first and third Fridays
monthly at Lake Panasoffkee
Recreation Center, 1582 County
Road. 459 (off County Road
470). Live music. Everyone
welcome, singles and couples.
Finger foods welcome, soda
is provided. Sponsored by
Sumter Singles. 352-424-1688.
Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance, 7:30
to 10:30 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at
Lake Panasoffkee Recre-
ation Park in the blue build-
ing at 1582 County Road
459 off County Road 470.
Lee Ann Noel Band will pro-
vide music Jan. 6. Dances
open to the public, married,
couples and singles, and
groups from churches and
RV parks. All ages welcome.
No alcohol. Finger foods or
soda welcome. For informa-
tion, call 352-424-1688.


SCENE


Spirit of Citrus
Dancers' will have a "Wel-
come Snow Birds" dance
party Saturday, Jan. 21.
Music by Butch Phillips.
Dances are at the Kellner
Auditorium Jewish Center in
Beverly Hills. Doors open at
6:45 p.m. A complimentary
dance lesson at 7 p.m.; gen-
eral dancing from 7:30 to 10
p.m. Admission $6 for mem-
bers; $9 for nonmembers. Ice
and coffee provided; sodas
and bottled water are avail-
able for a small fee. For infor-
mation, call Barb and Jack at
352-344-1383 or Kathy at
352-726-1495 or visit
www.socdancers.org.
Roaring Twenties tea
dance, 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, Jan.
27, at the West Citrus Com-
munity Center. Both dances
are $5 per person and a por-
tion of the proceeds go to In-
Home Senior Services. For
information, call Kris 352-527-
5993 at Central Citrus, 2804
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto,
or Brenda at 352-795-3831 at
West Citrus, 8940 W. Veter-
ans Drive, Homosassa.
Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom music,
twice a month at the commu-
nity centers, hosted by deejay
Sapphire. On the second


Fiddling around


Special to the Chronicle
Kid Fiddlers will play at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, at Cir-
cle Square Cultural Center at 8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala.
Kid Fiddlers is comprised of a mother and five children,
ages 9 to 20. Cost $10. For more information, visit
www.CSCulturalCenter.com or call 352-854-3670.


Wednesday monthly, the tea
dance is at Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
352-527-5993, at 1:30 to 4
p.m. On the last Friday


monthly, the tea dance is at
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, 352-
795-3831, from 2 to 4 p.m.
$5 per person with a por-


tion of the proceeds to bene-
fit In-Home Senior Services.
This is an all-year, ongoing
ballroom dance.
Allan O'Neal sings and
deejays every first Saturday
at Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Hwy. (County Road 491
across from Havana House
Cafe) Lecanto. Cost $10 per
person at the door. Call Linda
at 352-464-0004 in advance
for group savings. For 2012
dance schedule, visit
www.eventsolutionsbylinda.
Loyal Order of Moose
dinner dance, for members
and qualified guests, 5:30
p.m. Friday, Inverness
Lodge 2112 in Inverness.
352-726-2112.
Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East Cit-
rus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. 352-344-9666.
Inverness Square
Dance Club's beginner
square dance lessons, 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday at
East Citrus Community Cen-
ter, 9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, east of Inverness
on State Road 44. Call
Robert Scoff at 352-860-
2090 or 352-465-700. The


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

next enrollment for square
dance classes is in April.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thurs-
days at Beverly Hills Recreation
Center. $3 nonmembers. 352-
7464882 or 352-527-3738.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Fellowship Hall of
the First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon, 21501 W.
State Road 40, Dunnellon. 352-
489-1785 or 352465-2142.
Ballet Folklorico
"Quetzalli De Veracruz," a
traditional dance and music
group from Veracruz, Mexico,
3 p.m. April 15, 2012, at Cur-
tis Peterson Auditorium in
Lecanto High School at 3810
N. Educational Path,
Lecanto. Call 352-873-5810
or 352-746-6721 ext. 1416 or
email Boxoff1@cf.edu.
THEATER
Neil Simon's Rumors,
runs through 15, at Ocala
Civic Theatre. Evening per-
formances are at 8 p.m. with
matinee performances at 2
p.m. Tickets $20 for adults,
$18 for Signature Series sub-
scribers, and $10 for full-time
students. For tickets, call the
Ocala Civic Theatre box of-
fice at 352-236-2274 or visit
www.ocalacivictheatre.com.


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OCKTAILS AVAILABLE
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(352) 344-4443
Cocktails Available )-= S = "





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SPECIAL INTEREST
Wildlife Jeopardy pro-
grams monthly, noon to
12:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14,
in Children's Education Cen-
ter, Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park.
January's subject will be on
amphibians.
Mandalas series by Na-
ture Coast Unitarian Univer-
salists, at 7633 N. Florida
Ave, Citrus Springs.
At 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
15, 22 and 29 locals have
opportunity to learn how to
draw your a personal man-
dala for enjoyment, relaxation
and meditation. Jan Hitch-
cock to lead each art class.
Cost $10.
Sign up by calling Pam at
352-489-3545.
Crystal River of Life
Coffee House, Christian Fel-
lowship, conversation and
music from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Fri-
days, Village Cafe, 789 N.E.
Fifth St., State Road 44. 352-
817-6879.
College of Central
Florida's 2011-12 Interna-
tional Film Series:
Jan. 17 "The King's
Speech"
Feb. 7 "Last Train
Home"
Films will be shown at 2
p.m. Tuesday at the Apple-
ton Museum of Art, College
of Central Florida, 4333 E.
Silver Springs Blvd., and 7
p.m. at the CF Ocala Cam-
pus, Building 8, Room 110,
3001 S.W. College Road.
The viewing is free at CF. At
the Appleton, viewers must
pay museum admission. For
information about member-
ship, call 352-873-5808.
For more information, call
Joe Zimmerman at 352-854-
2322, ext. 1233 or visit www.
cf.edu/foundation/events/film
series.htm.
The College of Central
Florida's Hampton Center
Film Series is a free cultural
and educational outreach
program that presents three
enlightening films followed by
a brief discussion. Movies
include:
Friday, Jan. 20 "The
King's Speech."
Friday, Feb. 17 "The
Blind Side."
Friday, March 9 -
"Stand and Deliver."


SCENE


Movies begin at 6 p.m. at
the CF Hampton Center, 1501
W. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala.
Free popcorn and soda. For
information or to reserve a
seat, call 352-873-5881.
Monthly Bird Walk, 8
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, Pep-
per Creek Trail, Homosassa
Springs State Wildlife Park,
4150 S. Suncoast Blvd. Must
RSVP. Binoculars and field
guide recommended. 352-
628-5343. Seven bird walks
will be offered at the Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park this season
running through April 2012.
Chapter 156 of The Na-
tional Association of Watch
and Clock Collectors
(NAWCC) meeting, 8 a.m.
fourth Sunday monthly, Her-
nando Civic Center, 3848 E.
Parson's Point Road, Her-
nando. Call Roger Krieger,
president, at 352-527-2669.
Crystal River Preserve
State Park boat tour, 10:30
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Fridays,
Crystal River Preserve State
Park Visitor Center. $10 for
adults; $8 for children age 7 to
12; free, children 6 and
younger. Tickets go on sale in
the Preserve Visitor Center one
hour prior to departure; arrive
no less than 15 minutes prior to
departure. 352-563-0450 from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday or www.crystal
riverstateparks.org.
FARMERS' MARKETS
Market Day with Art &
Treasures, an outdoor event
with plants, produce, arts,
crafts, collectibles and more,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. second Sat-
urdays on the grounds of
Heritage Village, 657 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. Call
352- 564-1400.
Inverness Farmers'
Market, about 30 vendors,
fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and
more, 8 a.m. to noon, first
and third Saturdays monthly,
Inverness Government Cen-
ter parking lot. 352-726-2611.
Saturday at the Market,
Farmers' market, 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday weekly, in
front of the historic Court-
house, downtown
Brooksville. 352-428-4275.
Dunnellon's First Satur-
day Village Market, includes


Unusual musical


Special to the Chronicle
Edwin Martin portrays an insurance adjuster and is
receiving advice on insurance coverage for spider veins
from a client played by Chris Venable in the musical "The
Kids Left, the Dog Died, Now What?" It opens today and
runs through Jan. 22 at the Art Center Theater.



"The Kids Left, the Dog Died, Now What?" opens Fri-
day, Jan. 13 runs through Jan. 22 at the Art Center Theater.
Show times are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m.
Sunday. Tickets $18. Call 352-746-7606.
The Dick Doc Duo will present music, humor and book
signing from 2 to 2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13. The duo includes
retired Miami homicide captain Marshall Frank and former
forensic pathologist-pianist Jay "Doc" Barnhart.
Grammy Award-winning Blind Boys of Alabama in con-
cert at 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. The concert is sold-out.
The Porchdogs will headline Concerts at the Old Court-
house, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Citrus County
Courthouse. Cost $10. Doors open at 6:30. Reservations
necessary. Call 352-341-6436.
Olde Mill House Gallery & Printing Museum, "Pulp to
Print" workshop will be each month until May 2012. The mu-
seum is at 10466 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa. Call 352-628-
9411 for information.
Wildlife Jeopardy programs monthly, noon to 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, in Children's Education Center, Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. January's
subject will be on amphibians.


a variety of street vendors, 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. first Saturday
monthly, Dunnellon's Historic
District on West Pennsylvania
Avenue, Cedar and Walnut
streets. 352-465-9200.
Circle Square Com-
mons Farmers' Market new
fall/winter hours, from 4 to 7
p.m. Thursday. Winter hours
end in May. Find fresh sea-
sonal produce, flowers, plants,


fresh baked goods, hand-
made soaps, delicious pies
and more. Weekly cooking
demonstrations begin at 6
p.m. Circle Square Com-
mons is adjacent to On Top
of the World Communities at
8405 S.W. 80th St. in Ocala.
For information, call 352-
854-3670 or visit www.
CircleSquareCommons
FarmersMarket.com.


Gulfport Tuesday
Fresh Market, includes fresh
produce, seafood, art, live
entertainment, 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. every Tuesday, Gulfport
waterfront district (Beach
Boulevard). http://gulfport
florida.us/tuesday-morning-
fresh-market.
FESTIVALS
Cagan Crossing Art &
Craft Festival, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 29, at U.S. 27 and
Cagan Crossing Boulevard.
Free admission and parking.
For information, call Terri at
352-344-0657 or visit
www.tnteventsinc.com.
26th Annual Hogge-
towne Medieval Faire, Jan.
28 and 29 and Feb. 4 and 5, at
the Alachua County Fair-
grounds in Gainesville. Special
School Day celebration Friday,
Feb. 3, features half-price tick-
ets for guests. Faire hours are
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
and Sundays, and 9:30 a.m. to
3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. Admis-
sion is $14 for adults, $7 for
children ages 5 to 17 and free
for children younger than 5.
For more information, call 352-
334-ARTS or visit www.
gvlculturalaffairs.org.
18th annual St. Pete
Beach Corey Area Craft
Festival, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 28 and Sun-
day, Jan. 29, at Corey Av-
enue and Gulf Boulevard in
downtown St. Pete Beach,
595 Corey Ave., St. Pete
Beach. Free. Visit www.art
festival.com, email info@art-
festival.com or 561-746-6615.
MUSEUMS
"For the Love of the
Sea: Watercolors of Philip
Steel" is on display in Janu-
ary at the Appleton Museum
of Art, College of Central
Florida. The exhibit opens
Jan. 21 and exhibits 35 origi-
nal paintings produced by the
award-winning New England
artist whose nautical-themed
works reflect his knowledge
of the sea and deep respect
for those who make a living
from the ocean.
Daily admission to the Ap-
pleton Museum is $6 for
adults; $4 for seniors 55 or
better and students 19 and
over; $3 for youths ages 10-


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 C3

18; and free for members,
CF students, children age 9
and under, and active military
personnel and their immedi-
ate families.
"Katharine Hepburn:
Dressed for Stage and
Screen" exhibit runs through
Jan. 22, atAppleton Museum
of Art, College of Central
Florida. Exhibit features more
than 40 costumes and per-
formance clothes from the
screen legend's personal col-
lection. Admission $6 for
adults; $4 for seniors and
students 19; $3 for youths
ages 10-18. For information
call (352) 291-4455 or visit
www.AppletonMuseum.org.
"Phosphate Boom
Years in Citrus County" ex-
hibit opens at 5:30 p.m. Fri-
day, Dec. 2 and runs through
spring 2012 at Floral City
Heritage Museum. Exhibit
features the history of the
phosphate industry in Citrus
County and includes new
photos and artifacts. The Mu-
seum is open for free from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday
and Saturday and is in the
new Town Center at 8394 E.
Orange Avenue/County Road
48. For more information,
visit www.floralcityhc.org or
call Council Chairman and
Museum Director Frank Pe-
ters at 352-860-0101, email
the-fchc@hotmail.com. Spe-
cial viewing can be arranged.
Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum tours, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Tuesday through Satur-
day, Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
Olde Mill House
Gallery & Printing Museum,
"Pulp to Print" workshop will
be each month until May
2012. The museum is at
10466 W. Yulee Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-628-9411
for information.
Marion County's Mu-
seum of History and Ar-
chaeology showcases the
region's 13,000 years of
human habitation and
growth. The Museum is in
East Hall, at the McPherson
Governmental Complex, off
Fort King Street in Ocala, at
307 S.E. 26th Terrace. It will
be open seven days a week.


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C4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012

ART CLASSES
Dichroic glass fusion
class, 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 17, at Lorna Jean
Gallery. Cost $50 including
materials. Space limited. To
register, call Lorna Jean at
352-564-2781.
Acrylic Painting work-
shop, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 20, at Lorna Jean
Gallery. Instructor Bill Darrah.
Cost $60. To register, call
Lorna Jean at 352-564-2781.
The Florida Artists
Gallery, at 7737 S. Old Floral
City Road, Floral City, offers
several art classes taught by
local artists. For more infor-
mation about the classes, call
352-344-9300 or visit www.
Floridaartistsgallery.com. Up-
coming classes include:
Experience landscape
painting with acrylics, 1 to 3
p.m. Tuesday, beginners to
advanced. $15 per session.
To register, call instructor
Connie Townsend at 352-
400-9757.
Acrylics and Oils paint-
ing class, 1 to 3 p.m. every
Tuesday with Connie
Townsend for beginners to
advanced. Cost $15 per ses-
sion. For information, call
Connie at 352-400-9757 or
email ConnieTown@aol.com.
Painting with Watercolor,
9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Thurs-
days, Jan. 12 and 19. $15
per person if prepaid; $20 at
the door. Instructor Darla
Goldberg. Learn to enjoy the
magic of watercolor painting.
All levels of artists are wel-
come. Call Darla Goldberg at
352-341-6226.
Drawing with Ann, 10 to
11:45 a.m. Saturday, morn-
ings Jan. 14, 21 and 28 and
Feb. 11, 18 and 25. $20 per
class or $15 if paying in ad-
vance for month. Instructor
Ann Covington. Charcoal,
pencils and color pencils
available. Class size is lim-
ited. For information, call Ann
Covington at 352-726-2979.
Journaling with Art, 5 to
7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18
and 25. $20 per session. In-
structor Marti Estep. Work
with watercolor, pastel, col-
lage, pen and paint. No art
experience is necessary.
Each session introduces new
media and techniques. Po-
etry is woven throughout.
Contact Marti at artmarti@
tampabay.rr.com or call
352-419-5882.
Life Drawing, 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 16
and 23. $10 per person per
class if prepaid or $15 at
door. Instructor Darla Gold-
berg. Live model for class
and a small model fee will be
collected. Primarily a drawing
class, but students can bring
what ever medium they like.


SCENE


No photography permitted.
Call Darla Goldberg at 352-
341-6226.
PICASA Photo Improve-
ment Workshop, 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 and
26. $45 for the two sessions.
Instructor Gary Kuhl. "Practi-
cal application" workshops
with plenty of "online" demon-
strations of how to improve
the quality of photographs
using free software accessi-
ble to anyone with the capa-
bility of online hookup to
Google. One opportunity for
"outdoor" photo shoot in area
(minimal travel time). Contact
Gary at gwkuhl@gmail.com
or 352-232-0923.
College of Central
Florida Citrus Campus of-
fers creative art courses at
Cubby's Art Studio, 1065 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. Jan-
uary classes include:
Stained Glass, Begin-
ner/Advanced, 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 19 through
Feb. 9. $79. Students will learn
the copper foil method of
stained glass and will start with
a sun-catcher or a small panel.
To register or for informa-
tion on other noncredit
courses, call 352-249-1210 or
visit CFltraining.cf.edu. The
college will be closed Dec. 21
through Jan. 2 for winter
break. Register online any
time at CFltraining.cf.edu.
Art Center Academy of
the Arts winter classes begin
in January. Classes include:
Courses for 17-year-olds
to adults:
Painting with Acrylics, 1
p.m. Monday. Instructor
Sharon Harris. Limit of 15
students. Materials not in-
cluded. Call 352-527-9372.
Special Effects with
Acrylics, 3 p.m. Monday. In-
structor Sharon Harris. Limit
of 15 students. Materials not
included.
Dance improv/yoga,
10:30 a.m. Monday. Instruc-
tor Karen Hedley.
Acting, 5 p.m. Tuesday.
Instructor Mac Harris. Limit of
15 students.
Courses for 8-year-olds
to adults:
Dance Technique/ Im-
prov, 10 a.m. Saturday. In-
structor Jessica Watson.
Limit of 20 students.
Line Dance, 11 a.m. Sat-
urdays. Instructor Chelsey
Rigdon.
Courses for youths ages
7 to 16:
Acting, 4:30 p.m. Mon-
days and Wednesdays. One
course meets twice a week.
Youth Art, Tuesdays. In-
structor Sharon Harris. Limit
of 15 students.
Choral Voice, 4 p.m.
Thursday. Instructor Jackie
Stevio. Limit of 30 students.
Registration is open. Lim-


Seas to be seen

.i -


Special to me unronicle
"For the Love of the Sea: Watercolors of Philip Steel" is
on display in January at the Appleton Museum of Art,
College of Central Florida. The exhibit opens Jan. 21.
Daily admission to the Appleton Museum is $6 for
adults; $4 for seniors 55 or better and students 19 and
over; $3 for youths ages 10-18; and free for members,
CF students, children age 9 and under, and active mili-
tary personnel and their immediate families.


ited space is available, so
register before Jan. 13 for
winter courses. Academy
fees are $25 for each 12-
week course. For informa-
tion, visit www.artcenter.cc.
To register, call the Art Center
at 352-746-7606.
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand, 9
a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10 per class, per person.
Register at www.citrus
countyfl.org, click on Parks &
Recreation to register.
352-465-7007.
Classes at The Garden
Shed:
Party Time painting
classes, 4 to 6 p.m. every
Sunday. Supplies provided.
Bring food and beverage of
choice. Instructor Ken Rogers.
Calligraphy class, 6:30
to 8 p.m. Thursday, for five-
week sessions. Instructor
Gail Wepner. Openings still
available Jan. 15.
Pre-registration required for
classes. To preregister and for
details, call Louise at 352-503-


7063. The Garden Shed is
at 2423 S. Rock Crusher
Road in Homosassa.
Watercolor classes,
1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
with instructor Delores Witt,
at Lorna Jean Gallery,
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call
352-564-2781 to register.
Jewelry class, Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday,
with all materials included.
Limited to four adults per
class. For information, call
Lorna at Lorna Jean
Gallery at 352-564-2781.
Kids "Art & Craft" for
ages 8 through 12 from 3
to 5 p.m. Saturday at
Lorna Jean Gallery. Proj-
ects include drawing, paint-
ing, clay sculpting and
paper projects. All materi-
als are included. For infor-
mation, call Lorna or
Joseph at 352-564-2781.
Drawing 101 classes
for adults and children.
Learn basics with instructor
Joseph Thunderhorse. In-
dividual and group rates


are available. Call the Lorna
Jean Gallery for the schedule
at 352-564-2781.
ARTS & CRAFTS
Artist reception for
Betty Love, 1 to 3 p.m. Fri-
day, Jan. 13, at Art, Craft,
Bridal and Frame Inc. in
Town Square Shoppers Mall,
3021 U.S. 19, Spring Hill.
Free. Refreshments will be
served. Love's art work will
be on display in January.
Citrus Watercolor Club
meeting, 1 p.m. second Fri-
day monthly, United
Methodist Church on County
Road 581, Inverness. $5.
352-382-8973 or 352-
622-9352.
Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decora-
tive Painters, meets second
Saturday monthly at 8089 W.
Pine Bluff St., Crystal River.
352-563-6349, 352-861-
8567. www.mhdartists.com.
Spring Hill Art League
along with Easy Street
Home Decor will have a free
artist reception for Patricia
Ritter from 5 to 7 p.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 21. Refreshments
served. Patty's artwork will be
on display for January. Easy
Street Home Decor is at 100
N. Brooksville Ave.,
Brooksville. For information,
call Grace Ashcraft at 352-
556-3984.
Gulfport's First Friday
Art Walk, 6 to 10 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 4, over a half-mile up
and down scenic Beach
Boulevard. Third Saturday
Art Walk is 6 to 10 p.m. Jan.
21. Live musicians, including
The New Horizons Band and
others, will appear at venues
throughout the Village. Indus-
trial Art Center continues to
offer "Blow Your Own Glass
Masterpiece" mini classes.
Gulfport Art Walk is the First
Friday and Third Saturday of
every month, year-round.
Parking free. Free trolley
rides available from off-site
parking areas. Pet and family
friendly. For information visit
www.GulfportMA.com or call
866-ART-WALK.
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly,
Wildwood Public Library, 310
S. Palmer Drive, Wildwood.
352-748-1158. els34785@
yahoo.com.
Need lecraft Workshop
of FCNA offers instruction in
quilting, embroidery, knitting,
crochet and more, for begin-
ners to advanced levels at no
charge. This is a group of
needle artists who like to
share knowledge and experi-
ences of their craft. The
group meets from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. the second and fourth
Tuesday monthly at the Flo-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ral City Community House
(between the library and the
museum) on Orange Avenue.
Call Beth for more informa-
tion at 352-344-5896.
Cagan Crossing Art &
Craft Festival, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 29, at U.S. 27 and
Cagan Crossing Boulevard.
Free admission and parking.
For information, call Terri at
352-344-0657 or visit
www.tnteventsinc.com.
Wisconsin watercolor
artist Audrey Bunch-
kowski's pieces will be on
display in January at Lakes
Region Library on Druid
Road in Inverness. The art-
work can be viewed in the re-
search and computer area of
the library during regular
business hours. Audrey has
been wintering in Inverness
since 1998 and is a member
of the Citrus Watercolor Club
and the Stoneridge Snow-
birds Art Group. She has
work in Forgotten Treasures
and The Florida Artists
Gallery.
"Cleared Hot! An Ex-
clusive and Personal Pho-
tographic Journey into the
U.S. Air Force" will run
through Feb. 3, at Webber
Center Gallery, at College of
Central Florida, Ocala Cam-
pus, 3001 S.W. College
Road. Free and open to the
public. Gallery hours are from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday. For informa-
tion, call 352-873-5809.
Floral Design Study
Series, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, at Riverhaven
Village Community Club,
11450 W. Riverhaven Drive
in Homosassa. Six-week
class begins Feb. 1 and will
continue for six consecutive
Wednesday. Cost is $75 for
all six sessions. Call Elaine
Moore at 352-621-3004 for
more information and regis-
tration. The Riverhaven Gar-
den Club and the
Homosassa River Garden
Club are offering the classes,
which is six lectures/demon-
strations and critiqued,
hands-on workshops led by
talented, accredited instruc-
tors from throughout Florida.
Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at 10
a.m. first Wednesday. All
quilters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200 Mt.
FairAve., Brooksville. Bring
lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus),
352-666-8350 (Hernando).


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Music
Family karaoke with
deejay Allan O'Neal, 1 to 4
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, 22
and 29 at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto. Cost
$2 per person. Call O'Neal at
352-464-0003 for information.
Gregg AIIman, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 14, Ruth Eckerd
Hall. Special guest is Jaimoe's
Jasssz Band. Reserved tickets
$69.50, $42.50 and $35. Call
727-791-7400 or visit
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
Gordon Lightfoot, 7:30
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, Day-
tona Beach Peabody Audito-
rium. $48.65, $67.10.
www.ticketmaster.com.
The Lennon Sisters,
2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20,
Daytona Beach Peabody Au-
ditorium. $43.50, $49.65.
www.ticketmaster.com.
Nature Coast Friends
of Blues (NCFB) presents
the "2012 Live Music Series"
line up. All events are at the
Museum Cafe, 10466 W.
Yulee Drive in Old Ho-
mosassa. $7 non-members
and $5 members. All events
begin at 2 p.m. unless other-
wise noted. Visit www.ncf
blues.com for information.
0 Saturday, Jan. 21 -
Jennings and Keller return
with their inspired original folk
songs and more.
Saturday, Feb. 18 -
Jeff Hess of Mocassin
Slough opens the show with
a set of original songs pre-
pared especially for this gig.
From 3 to 5 p.m. listen to
Deja Blues.
The Country Sunshine
Band, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Friday, East Citrus
Community Center, 9907
East Gulf-to-Lake Hwy. (State
Road 44 East), Inverness.
Call Annie at 352- 465-4860.
John Thomas Tradi-
tional Country Music Show
and Jam, 6 to 9 p.m. Mon-
days weekly, Oxford Commu-
nity Center, 4027 Main St.,
Oxford. $5. 352-560-7496.
Pianist and singer An-
drea will perform an ex-
tended engagement in the
east dining room every
Wednesday, Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday beginning
at 6 p.m. at The Boathouse



CASH
Continued from Page C1

Germans and to several
other places. At the same
time, Albert keeps faith he
will be united with his clos-
est companion before the
dangers of war can affect ei-
ther of them.
The grand thing about
"War Horse" is it showcases
what Spielberg does best,
telling a great story The
movie doesn't try to cram
special effect-laden action
sequences or unrealistic
heroic feats into the plot line.
Instead, it focuses on what is
important, the heart and soul
of the film the story And
the story connects to the
viewer. It drew me in, made



FOSTER
Continued from Page C1l

lost-love formulas, it is re-
freshing to see a character
ditch romantic infatuation
for an enchanting world.
"Midnight in Paris" the
DVD is available through
Redbox and Blockbuster
Express. Trimmed with
English, Spanish and
French subtitles, dubbings,
art-house previews, a the-
atrical trailer and press
conference footage, the


SCENE


Restaurant, 1935 S.E. U.S.
19, Crystal River, 34429. A
dance floor is now available.
No admission charge. Reser-
vations are not necessary,
but recommended for dining
in the entertainment room.
Call 352-564-9636 for more
information or go to
www.jazzyandrea.com.
Jazz pianist Terry
Coats, 5:30 p.m. every
Thursday through Saturday
in November and December,
at The Olive Tree Restaurant,
963 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.
19), in Crystal River. Reser-
vations not necessary, but
recommended on weekends.
Call 352-563-0075 or visit.
www.olivetreedining.com.
Crystal River Music in
The Park is looking for any
talented individuals or groups
who would be willing to per-
form for two hours on the
third Saturday of any month.
All are invited to audition. For
details, call 352-601-3506.
Audition to become a
member of The Central
Florida Master Choir. Ability
to read music, harmonize
and match pitch required,
along with prioritizing re-
hearsals and performances.
Call Hal McSwain at 352-
237-3035 or 352-615-7677 to
schedule an audition. Visit
www.cfmasterchoir.com.
Travis Tritt, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 25, Lake-
land Center Youkey Theatre,
Lakeland. $44.95, $74.40.
www.ticketmaster.com.
Roberta Flack, 7:30
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26, The
Peabody Daytona
Beach.$51.70, $72.20.
www.ticketmaster.com.
Woodview Coffee
House, at 2628 Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, in fellowship
hall of Unity Church of Citrus
County, opens with a Talent
Showcase of area musicians,
starting when doors open at
6:30 p.m. Featured performers
appear at 8 p.m. Admission $7
per person. Refreshments
available. Featured season
performers and dates include:
Feb. 3 perennial audi-
ence favorites Deux Oh! will
perform.
For information www.
woodviewcoffeehouse.org or
Woodview@tampabay.rr.com
or 352-726-9814.


me care about the characters
and the horse, and stirred my
emotions in scenes of sorrow
and happiness.
For those who can
be squeamish about graphic
violent scenes prevalent in
most war films, don't worry
This PG-13 rated epic stays
far from the intensity seen in
"Saving Private Ryan."
That's not to say the battle
scenes are any less impres-
sive. Each conflict is beauti-
fully shot and visually
captivating. The film as a
whole includes beautiful
landscapes and set pieces
that fully immerse the
viewer in WWI Europe.
The music is a grand addi-
tion as well. John Williams,
who has composed some of
the most famous movie
themes of all time (Star Wars,


extra features are satisfac-
tory. Hearing what direc-
tor/screenwriter Woody
Allen has to say about
choosing his actors and cre-
ating his characters is nifty
All in all, "Midnight in
Paris" was a sweetie! I give
it an A.
With a running time of 94
minutes "Midnight in Paris"
is rated PG13 for sexual ref-
erences and smoking.


Heather Foster is a junior
at the University of
Florida.


Smooth sounds


-i
Special to the Chronicle
The Duprees will perform Saturday, Jan. 28, at Circle
Square Cultural Center, at 8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala.
For information, visit the website at www.CSCultural
Center.com or call 352-854-3670.


Willie Nelson concert, 7
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, in Cir-
cle Square Cultural Center at
8395 S.W. 80th St., Ocala.
For more information, visit
www.CSCulturalCenter.com
or call 352-854-3670.
The Fabulous Country
Diamonds, 2 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 4, to Curtis Peterson Au-
ditorium, Lecanto. Listen to
Carol and George Kline as
they entertain with the classic
country sounds of Patsy
Cline, Kenny Rogers, Dottie
West, George Jones, Dolly
Parton and others. Cost $15.
Doors open at 1 p.m. All pro-
ceeds benefit the Central
Ridge Club of the Boys and
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Tickets available at Citrus
Area Offices of BB&T Bank,
Cadence (Superior) Bank,
Nature Coast Bank and online
at www.BurntheMortgage.
com. For info or tickets, call
Gerry Jones 352-527-8002 or
Amy 352-287-1421.
George Jones, 7:30


Jurassic Park, Indiana Jones,
etc.) is back with his
usual collaborator (Spiel-
berg) and has created an-
other beautiful score.
Williams brings a stunning,
classical sound to "War
Horse" that lives up to his
reputation.
Spielberg has done it
again. Another instant clas-
sic has been brought to the
silver screen and thanks to
the brilliant acting, cine-
matography and captivating
story, "War Horse" is the


p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, The
Peabody Daytona Beach.
$52.75, $65.05. www.ticket
master.com.
Brandi Carlile
acoustic trio, 8 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 17, at Capitol Theatre.
Tickets on sale noon Fri-
day, Dec. 23. Reserved
tickets $46 and $36. Call
727-791-7400 or visit
www.atthecap.com.
Jimmy Buffet tribute
concert, by the Caribbean
Chillers, 3 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 18, in Curtis Peterson
Auditorium at Lecanto High
School. Only 1,000 tickets
will be sold. Tickets avail-
able at Regions banks, the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, the Key Center
Foundation, and from all
club members. For informa-
tion or to purchase tickets,
call Jim Harris at 352-382-
1470, Iris Whittaker at 352-
795-5541 ext. 1313, or
Wanda Ashley at 352-
228-2253.


best film of the year I give it
four stars out of four
"War Horse" has a run-
ning time of 2 hours and 26
minutes and is rated PG-13
for intense sequences of
war violence.


Liam Cash is a junior at
Seven Rivers Christian
School in Lecanto.
For more from his blog,
"Cashmoney Movies," visit
http://cashmoneymovies.
blogspot.com.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 C5


MUSIC REHEARSALS
Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle, two hours be-
fore sunset, Sunday, Fort Island Trail Beach Park,
Crystal River, at far end of the beach. Circle begins
an hour and a half before sunset. Bring drums and
percussion instruments (can be a 5-gallon paint
bucket or can filled with beans). Chair necessary,
beverages optional. Charlotte at 352-344-8009 or
Linda at 352-746-0655.
Encore Swing Band rehearses from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
every Monday at Calvary Chapel Caf6, 900 S. U.S.
41, Inverness. We are seeking a bass guitar player at
this time. For more information, call director Chaz
lannaci at 352-464-4153 or co-director David Mor-
gan at 352-302-3742 or email EncoreSwingBand@
embarqmail.com.
Chorus of The Highlands, The Citrus County chap-
ter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, rehearses
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday weekly at First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, In-
verness, 34452. All male singers welcome to join.
For information, call 352-382-0336.
Hernando Harmonizers, part of Men's Barbershop
Harmony Society, doors open at 6:45 p.m. and re-
hearsals start at 7 p.m. Monday, Nativity Lutheran
Church fellowship hall, 6363 Commercial Way,
Spring Hill. Written arrangements, training tech-
niques and professional direction provided. Call
352-556-3936 or 352-666-0633 or email
BASSharmonySingR@aol.com.
Summer Springs Sweet Adeline's Chorus invites
women of all ages to their open rehearsals from
1:30 to 4 p.m. Monday at St. John's Lutheran
Church, 10495 Sunset Harbor Road, Summerfield.
Chorus membership is not required. Carpool is avail-
able from Inverness. Call Nancy at 352-726-3323 for
information or to schedule a holiday program with a
quartet, ensemble, or whole chorus.
The Nature Coast Community Band, under the mu-
sical direction of Cindy Hazzard, rehearses from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Citrus County
Canning Plant Auditorium on Southern Street,
Lecanto. Contact Cindy at 352-746-7567 or
nccommunityband@earthlink.net.
Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc., rehearsals 7
p.m. Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church Fellowship
Hall, Lecanto. New members are welcome to audi-
tion, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Call 352-628-3492.
Sugarmill Chorale rehearsals are from 7 to 9 p.m.
Thursday in the choir room at First Baptist Church,
North Citrus Avenue, Crystal River. Enter the building
through the door under the black canopy by the big
trees and exit the same way. Email the director at
sugarmillchoraledirector@yahoo.com or call
352-697-2309.
Nature Coast Festival Singers' rehearsals, 7 p.m.
Monday, Nativity Lutheran Church, 6363 Commer-
cial Way (State Road 50), Weeki Wachee. Shirley at
352-597-2235.
Marion Civic Chorale rehearses from 6:45 to 9 p.m.
Monday at St. George Anglican Cathedral, 5646
S.E. 28th Street in Ocala. Repertoire this "semester"
will be Holocaust Cantata. Call 352-342-1796,
352-537-0207 or email wayne@fumcocala.org.
The Central Florida Master Choir is auditioning for
all voices, particularly tenors and basses. Rehearsals
are at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Countryside Presbyterian
Church, 7768 State Road 200, in Ocala. Call
352-615-7677 to schedule an audition.
The Ocala Accordion Club, meets and performs the
last Wednesday monthly Cherrywood Club House,
6253 S.W. 100th Loop, Ocala. Free. Call 352-854-
6236. Email FLACCASSOC@bellsouth.net.
www.accordions.com/florida.
Music rehearsals will run at least once a month,
space permitting.






Experience a world-class, permanent art collection and
year-round schedule of exciting temporary exhibitions,
unique musical events, workshops, lectures and more.
Through Jan. 15
SCENES FROM THE SOUTH: American Art from the
Collection of James Fuller
Presented is a series of southern landscapes painted
by some of America's finest artists.

Jan. 21-March 11
FOR THE LOVE OF THE SEA: Watercolors of Philip Steel
Showcased are more than 35 original paintings of boats and
the sea by this award-winning New England artist. On Jan. 21,
Steel will conduct a watercolor painting demonstration at 2 p.m.

Through Jan. 22 :::...::
KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen .........
View 40 costumes and fashions worn by Hepbum in films, on
> idie and television. Presented in part by Macy's.

*'. ?AVE TH DATEI Saturday, Jan.28 "
. APPLETO 25,AgiyVERSARY GAL4 BelleEpque
li.ckets available at theAppleliq or call 352.291-4415iPor ,,
spon ~ 5pr'tbtTes ParfilaZerlaK at zeflakp@edu.com.


SO.ARVCIeCa Presents: I'
l gAn Elegant Evening of Fine Dining & Dancing A

SCOSCA NIGHT 2012 2
CHINIM(IE 'IDrcmctino Literacy"
To benefit our local charitable endeavors in Citrus County

At: Sugarmill Woods Country Club
1 Douglas Street, Homosassa
On: Sunday, February 26, 2012 6 p.m.
Red Carpet Attire!


Four course dinner featuring:
Filet Mignon & Gulf Shrimp
Complimentary Open Bar
Music from the Movies
Chinese Auction

Tc order tickets call:
Linda Proffer 352-422-6951
Angela Tanzer 352-382-4700
Or visit:
www.RotarySMW.com for more information


I'


Ticket Prices
$125 each
$500 table of 4
$795 for table of 8 ($99ea.)

Tickets alsc available at:
Military Outlet on Citrus Avenue,
Crystal River or Gate House
Realty, Homosassa


SR III.'S


III ll ,I I I ] 1110 1 10 (.11111 M I III fp.'























RpNICL Curtis Peterson Auditorium
0009W9E


Tickets $22 on sale at:
Citrus Memorial Hospital
Regions Bank, Inverness
Allen Ridge Clinic
Sugarmill Woods Clinic
TD Bank, Inverness


MARKET DAY

WITH ART TREASURES


Saturday, 9:oo a.m.
Jan. 14th till 3:oop.m..



Local Produce. Plants, Pantry, Artistic Talent &
Vintage Collectibles on the 2nd Saturday of Each Month






on the Grounds of lHeritage Village, 657 N. Citrus Ave.
in theoof Historic Downtown Crystal River
wvw.ltieshloppesofhieritageiillage.coin
352-564-1400 / heritagevillageo8@yahoo.com


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


C 11 l H ld S


............ .............................


0[!!!!!1111111111111111111111111111 00 0* 0 0 0





C6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


SCREEN
Continued from Page C1

A magic beanstalk un-
leashes an army of super-
sized warriors in "Jack the
Giant Killer" (June 15),
starring Nicholas Hoult,
Stanley Tucci, Ian McShane
and Ewan McGregor.
Play it again, in 3D
George Lucas begins his
sci-fi saga all over, in 3-D,
with "Star Wars: Episode I
- The Phantom Menace"
(Feb. 10), the first of his six
space epics converted to
three dimensions.
James Cameron gives the
same treatment to "Titanic"
(April 6), whose 3-D version
coincides with the 100th an-
niversary of the luxury
liner's sinking.
Disney follows the suc-
cess of "The Lion King" in
3-D by adding an extra di-
mension for reissues of
"Beauty and the Beast"
(Jan. 13) and the Pixar Ani-
mation blockbuster "Find-
ing Nemo" (Sept. 14).
Family time
Also in 3-D is the latest
from Pixar, "Brave" (June
15), an action adventure set
in mystical Scotland with a
voice cast that includes
Kelly MacDonald and
Emma Thompson.
Among other family
flicks: "Madagascar 3: Eu-
rope's Most Wanted" (June
8), reuniting the zoo ani-
mals voiced by Ben Stiller,
Chris Rock, David Schwim-
mer and Jada Pinkett
Smith; "Ice Age: Continen-
tal Drift" (July 13), with Ray
Romano, John Leguizamo
and Denis Leary back to
voice the threesome of pre-
historic buddies; "Dr.
Seuss' the Lorax" (March
2), with Danny DeVito as
the voice of a grumpy forest
creature; "The Pirates!
Band of Misfits" (March 30),
with Hugh Grant and Salma
Hayek voicing rival bucca-
neers; Tim Burton's
"Frankenweenie" (Oct. 5),
featuring the voices of
Winona Ryder and Martin
Short in the story of a boy
who pulls a Frankenstein to
bring back his dead dog;
and the summer vacation
sequel "Diary of a Wimpy
Kid: Dog Days" (Aug. 3).
Creature features
It's a new beginning for
Middle-earth and twilight


SCENE


Associated Press
ABOVE: Chris Hemsworth
portrays Thor, left, and and
Chris Evans portrays Captain
America in a scene from
"The Avengers," expected to
be released May 4. RIGHT:
Julia Roberts portrays the
evil queen, left, and Lily
Collins portrays Snow White
in "Mirror Mirror," opening
March 16.

time for Bella Swan.
"The Lord of the Rings"
director Peter Jackson re-
turns to J.R.R. Tolkien's
fantasy realm with "The
Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey" (Dec. 14) the first
in his two-part prequel
chronicling how Bilbo Bag-
gins came to possess that
pesky evil ring.
"It's just such a fresh and
different story," Jackson
said. "'Lord of the Rings'
had that very serious,
grand, epic tone, and 'The
Hobbit' is much more mis-
chievous and kind of irrev-
erent, which is a breath of
fresh air for me."
"The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn Part 2"
(Nov 16) picks up where we
left off in Stephenie
Meyer's supernatural ro-
mance with Bella (Kris-
ten Stewart) newly changed
into a vampire, while her
bloodsucking hubby
(Robert Pattinson) and his
werewolf rival (Taylor
Lautner) aim to defend her


Leonardi DiCaprio portrays Jay Gatsby and Carey Mulligan
portrays Daisy Buchanan in "The Great Gatsby."


against a world of evil.
Unlike the romance-
heavy "Breaking Dawn -
Part 1," the finale is filled
with action and battles.
"It sort of turns into a
Kurosawa movie," said di-
rector Bill Condon. "It's
epic. It's vampires from all
across the world meeting in
one field."
Other creature features:
"Dark Shadows" (May 11),
with Johnny Depp,
Michelle Pfeiffer and He-
lena Bonham Carter in di-
rector Burton's take on the
vampire TV soap opera;
"Prometheus" (June 8), Ri-
dley Scott's return to his
"Alien" sci-fi world with a
space adventure starring
Theron, Noomi Rapace and
Michael Fassbender;
"Wrath of the Titans"
(March 30), with "Clash of
the Titans" stars Sam Wor-
thington and Liam Neeson
in another battle among
Greek gods and heroes;
"Underworld: Awakening"
(Jan. 20), with Kate Beckin-
sale returning to her vam-
pire-werewolf franchise;
"Abraham Lincoln: Vam-
pire Hunter" (June 22), fea-
turing the president
(Benjamin Walker) emanci-
pating the world from
bloodsuckers; "The Woman
in Black" (Feb. 3), with
"Harry Potter" star Daniel
Radcliffe as a grieving
lawyer who encounters a
vengeful ghost; and "World
War Z" (Dec. 21), starring
Brad Pitt in the story of a
worldwide zombie out-
break.
Time for action
Will Smith's Agent J trav-
els back in time to save his
partner, Agent K (Tommy


Lee Jones), in "Men in
Black 3" (May 25), which re-
unites both actors with di-
rector Barry Sonnenfeld
and nicely casts Josh Brolin
as the young Agent K.
Other sequels, updates
and spinoffs include: "Total
Recall" (Aug. 3), with Colin
Farrell as a blue-collar guy
who learns he might be a
deadly super-agent with fal-
sified memories; Dwayne
Johnson and Channing
Tatum in "G.I. Joe: Retalia-
tion" (June 29), the com-
mando sequel inspired by
the line of toy soldiers;
"Journey 2: The Mysterious
Island" (Feb. 10), with John-
son and Michael Caine in a
modern Jules Verne twist
that follows 2008's "Journey
to the Center of the Earth";
"21 Jump Street" (March
16), with Tatum and Jonah
Hill in a new take on the TV
show about undercover
cops at a high school; "The
Bourne Legacy" (Aug. 3),
with "Avengers" co-star
Renner as a new agent
caught up in the fallout
from the earlier films;
"Taken 2" (Oct. 5), with
Neeson going after more
bad guys that threaten his
family; "47 Ronin" (Nov 21),
a remake of the Japanese
classic, with Keanu Reeves
joining a band of samurai
avenging the death of their
master; and "The Expend-
ables 2" (Aug. 17), reuniting
Sylvester Stallone and his
all-star action crew on an-
other mission gone wrong.


Not everything on the ac-
tion front is a sequel or re-
make. With "Harry Potter"
done and "Twilight" near-
ing its end, a new youthful
literary series debuts in
"The Hunger Games"
(March 23), with Jennifer
Lawrence among teens
fighting to the death in a
televised bloodbath in post-
apocalyptic North America.
Among other new action
entries: "John Carter"
(March 9), with Taylor
Kitsch as Edgar Rice Bur-
roughs' beefy Mars hero;
"Battleship" (May 18), fea-
turing Kitsch, Neeson and
pop star Rihanna in a naval
adventure based on the
Hasbro game; "Contra-
band" (Jan. 13), starring
Mark Wahlberg as an ex-
smuggler forced back into
his old business; "Haywire"
(Jan. 20), director Steven
Soderbergh's thriller about
a betrayed black-ops expert
(mixed martial-arts star
Gina Carano); "Safe House"
(Feb. 10), with Denzel Wash-
ington as a renegade agent
and Ryan Reynolds as a
CIA guy on the run from
mercenaries; "The Grey"
(Jan. 27), starring Neeson as
leader of a team of oil work-
ers stranded in the Alaska
wilderness; and "Bullet to
the Head" (April 13), with
Stallone as a cop chasing
his partner's killer.
For laughs
The knuckleheads are
back. Directors Peter and


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Bobby Farrelly revive Curly
(Will Sasso), Larry (Sean
Hayes) and Moe (Chris Dia-
mantopoulos) in "The
Three Stooges" (April 13),
with the dimwits bumbling
to stardom on a TV reality
show.
Also among comedy high-
lights: "American Reunion"
(April 6), reteaming the
"American Pie" gang for a
high school reunion; "The
Dictator" (May 11), with
Sacha Baron Cohen op-
pressing the masses as a
Third World tyrant; "Wan-
derlust" (Feb. 24), starring
Jennifer Aniston and Paul
Rudd as Manhattanites on
hiatus from urban life;
"This Is 40" (Dec. 21), Judd
Apatow's "Knocked Up"
offshoot, with Rudd and
Leslie Mann reprising their
roles as troubled marrieds;
"I Hate You Dad" (June 15),
starring Adam Sandler as a
bad father trying to make
amends; "The Five-Year
Engagement" (April 27),
featuring Jason Segel and
Emily Blunt on a marathon
road to marriage; "Jeff Who
Lives at Home" (March 16),
starring Segel as a man-
child helping his married
brother (Ed Helms); "Joyful
Noise" (Jan. 13), a musical
comedy about church choir
divas (Queen Latifah and
Dolly Parton) at odds; "This
Means War" (Feb. 17), star-
ring Reese Witherspoon,
Chris Pine and Tom Hardy
in an action comedy about
CIA pals who fall for the
same woman; "Ted" (July
13), "Family Guy" creator
Seth MacFarlane's story of
a grown man (Mark
Wahlberg) saddled for life
with a talking teddy bear;
"Neighborhood Watch"
(July 27), with Ben Stiller
and Vince Vaughn as subur-
banites battling alien in-
vaders; and "Parental
Guidance" (Nov 21), star-
ring Billy Crystal and Bette
Midler as a couple enlisted
to help their daughter
(Marisa Tomei) with their
grandkids.
Serious stuff
While studios will add
more sober dramas to their
late-year lineups for Acad-
emy Awards consideration,
some heavy-duty stories al-
ready are on the schedule:
Executive producer
George Lucas' "Red Tails"
(Jan. 20) features Cuba
Gooding Jr. and Terrence
Howard in the World War
II story of black pilots in
the Tuskegee Airmen pro-
gram; "The Great Gatsby"
(Dec. 25) stars Leonardo
DiCaprio in the title role of
F Scott Fitzgerald's classic
about 1920s blue-bloods;
"Won't Back Down" (March
30) casts Viola Davis and
Maggie Gyllenhaal as
mothers aiming to salvage
their kids' inner-city
school; and Steven Spiel-
berg's "Lincoln" (Decem-
ber) has Daniel Day-Lewis
as the 16th president.
Spielberg has spent
more than a decade
preparing for his Abraham
Lincoln chronicle and set-
tling on the right actor.
"This was a project I
simply had to do," Spiel-
berg said. "It was a story
that needed telling, and I
finally have found my Lin-
coln after many years of
searching."


FoLoOoRoloDoA


po- ^Admissiong$3
M CShidrn ndr 2RE


Downtown Crystal River
January 21 & 22
Saturday 9 a.m 5 p.m. Sunda 9 as.- 4 P'..
Fine Arts .
Over 100 Crafters park & ride
Live Entertainment from the
Boat Tours : nall
Rock Climbing Wall
Children's Games
Beer Garden
Manatee Education
Sounds Like Buffett Contest V .

NI CITRUS COUNTY

for infrmtonvsi wwJitr' pgyiiIIBe. J3 1


r -aa-







Page C7 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE ;


News NOTES

Christian women's
group to meet
Dunnellon Christian
Women's Connection will
meet for a monthly luncheon
at noon Wednesday, Jan. 25,
at Springs Banquet Hall
(Springs Presbyterian
Church), 1060 W. Withla-
coochee Trail, (County Road
39), Dunnellon.
"Pack up and Hit the Road"
is the theme this month.
Guest speaker Julie Mariner
is originally from Wales, a fre-
quent traveler and once a
restaurateur.
Janet Baker of Crystal
River will talk about and dis-
play her machine embroidery
trunk show. She has led quilt-
ing seminars in various states
and her articles have ap-
peared in quilting magazines.
All women are welcome.
Tickets are $12 and deadline
for reservations is Thursday,
Jan. 19. Call Dot at 352-465-
1150 or Maggie at 352-465-
6153. Tickets must be
honored (paid for) if canceled
after Jan. 19.
Coin club meets
in Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Coin Club will
meet at 5:30 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 16, at 35 S. Melbourne
St., Beverly Hills.
The club has no dues. Its
purpose is to bring local coin
collectors together, and nu-
mismatic education.
The February meeting will
be at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Feb.
27, at Central Ridge Library.
For information, call Joe at
352-527-2868.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Nina, Jeanie


Special to the Chronicle
Nina, right, is a 3-year-old,
10-pound, spayed deer-
type Chihuahua. She likes
to fetch and enjoys tummy
rubs while being held like a
baby on your lap. She is
good with other small dogs
and cats, but wants an
adult home. She is crate
trained, leash trained,
housebroken, happy, re-
trieves and is a sweet-
heart. Jeanie, left, is a
7-year-old, 8-pound, spayed
long-haired Chihuahua, for
an adult home only, and
needs further housebreak-
ing. See these dogs and
others at weekly Saturday
adoption events from 10
a.m. to noon at Pet Super-
market, Inverness. If you
must give up your little
dog, phone 352-527-9050;
or for a Doberman pin-
scher, phone 352-795-
1745 and leave your name,
number and information
with how you need us to
help you. Foster parents
are always needed.


Learn about health with CMHS NewsNOTES


Workshops geared toward those with disabilities, their families


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus Memorial Health System and
the Key Training Center will provide
workshops on Women's Health Issues
on Tuesday, Jan. 24, and Men's Health
Issues on Tuesday, Jan. 31.
Both workshops will be presented
by a CRHS nurse and at 10 a.m., in the
Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center at
Key Training Center, 5521 Buster


Whitton Way, on the Lecanto campus
of the Key Training Center
Almost every family in America will
be touched by breast or prostate can-
cer at some point in time and every-
one is encouraged to learn symptoms
and talk to doctors about concerns.
For persons with developmental dis-
abilities, however, this early warning
system needs to be specifically taught,
and caregivers play a vital role in


keeping their loved ones healthy
The workshops are open to the pub-
lic, but with limitations. Because sen-
sitive issues will be addressed and
some of the adults with disabilities
may be discussing issues for the first
time, only female participants should
attend the Jan. 24 session. The Jan. 31
session will be for men only
For more information, call
Stephanie Hopper at 352-344-0288.


Feeding Citrus County


ROCHELLE KAISER/Chronicle
Various Feed Citrus board members and businesses involved in the construction of the new food bank distribution center
and We Care Food Pantry accepted a $5,000 donation recently from Ryan Beaty, chief executive officer of Citrus Memo-
rial Health System. The funds will continue to help further the construction of a food bank to serve all residents of Citrus
County. From left are Steve Ponticos, Paul Cash, Debbie Latin, Joanne Boggus, Ryan Beaty, Diane Toto, John Marmish,
Francesca Paar and Richard Wyckstrom.




Theater family mourns loss of member


adly another longtime theater
family member has passed away
The sudden death of former set
designer and builder Bill Baumgard-
ner came as shock to the theater com-
munity. Bill was noted for his
authentic set design and construction
during his many years with the Citrus
County Art League Performing Arts
Group and later with The
Art Center Theatre.
What initially sparked
his interest in set con-
struction and design oc-
curred when his wife was '
cast in a stage production. ,,
He thought it would be fun **;
to get involved in commu-
nity theater, where his
skills could be put to good Jeri Au
use. Eventually, he was co-
erced into taking speaking SPOTI
parts in the annual Shake- ON THI
speare In The Hills pro-
ductions. After a few
acting experiences, he returned to his
area of expertise.
Because of Bill's long battle with his
serious illness, he was finally forced to
abandon his theater involvement. His
wife Jean often referred to him as "the
comeback kid" because after each sur-
gery he began to return to a better
state of health. He was once again on


WE WANT
YOUR
PHOTOS


g-
L
E


the road to recovery when an accident
claimed his life. During his time with
community theater, Bill's contribution
to the field of set design and construc-
tion was recognized and will be re-
membered by all who knew him.
MEN
Opening now at The Art Center The-
atre is the annual winter
musical, this year's show ti-
tled "The Kids Left, The Dog
Died, What Next?" running
for only two weekends until
,, | Jan. 22. Stage West in Spring
Hill is presenting the drama
"A Streetcar Named Desire"
for the month of January and
Ocala Civic Theatre has
ustine scheduled five perform-
ances of the Neil Simon's
1IGHT comedy "Rumors" from Jan.
-ATER 11 to 15.
Regarding performances
...Encore Ensemble Theater
Inc. will have all its theater shows in
the Central Ridge Community Center,
its new home. Due to a beneficial part-
nership with Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, the group will have din-
ner theater shows in the newly named
Encore Ensemble Ballroom in that fa-
cility. Because of this arrangement,
Encore Ensemble Theater is able to


* Photos submitted electronically must have
resolution of at least 800, and be in JPEG
(.jpg) format.


offer a season of four interactive mys-
tery dinner theater productions. Mu-
sical revues are being considered as
off-season specials to supplement the
scheduled productions.
Opening on March 9 and playing for
one weekend only, is the first dinner
theater production of the new season
in the new home, "The Last Dance of
Dr Disco," an interactive comedy/mys-
tery that includes music from the
1970s. Following this first show are
three other Eileen Moushey audience-
participation murder mysteries: "The
Pajama Party Murders," "The Case of
The Hopeless Diamond" and "Win
Lose or Die." Dinner, comedy and
music have become trademarks of En-
core Ensemble Theater Inc.
With a new home and a new season,
Encore Ensemble Theater is excited
to announce the sale of season tickets
for these four dinner theater produc-
tions available from now until March
5, for $80. Since the individual price
per dinner show is $25, a season ticket
saves $20. Call the box office at 352-
212-5417.

Jeri Augustine is a producer/director
for Encore Ensemble Theater Inc.
and a longtime member of
The Art Center Theatre.


* All persons in the photo must be identified,
with full names, from left to right.
* For more information, call (352) 563-5660.


Citrus inventors
meet at library
Citrus County Inventors
will meet at 10 a.m. Friday,
Jan. 13, at Lakes Region
Library.
Charles Hannagan will dis-
cuss his business plan for
assisting inventors in the
process of taking their ideas
to market. He is in the
process of creating a web-
site, as well as documenta-
tion that will aid potential
inventors with their plans.
The meeting is open to all
those interested in the inven-
tion process, including sea-
soned inventors as well as
potential inventors. Speakers
are always needed.
There is no cost associ-
ated with the group. Call
Mary at 352-527-2827 for
more information.
Thinkers get
together at park
New Age Thinkers will
meet at 2 p.m. Saturday Jan.
14, in the Florida room at the
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
on U.S. 19.
Guest speaker will be
Suzanne Giesemann, author
of "The Priest and the
Medium." She will discuss
her unexpected journey from
a Navy commander and aide
to the chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, to a medium
and writer of spiritually in-
spired books. Giesemann
will explain some of the how-
to's of mediumship and
share ways to uncover your
own spiritual gifts. New at-
tendees are welcome.
For more information,
email miss-donna@
tampabay.rr.com or call
Donna at 352-628-3253.
German American
club to gather
German American Social
Club of West Central Florida
Inc. has announced a
change in meeting location
and dates. The club meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday at
Knights of Columbus Hall in
Lecanto, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway (County
Road 486).
The January meeting only
will be a week later, Jan. 16,
due to a scheduling change.
After a brief business meet-
ing, there is a social hour
with refreshments served.
Guests and new friends of
German heritage are always
welcome. Members are en-
couraged to attend.
For information, call 352-
637-2042 or 352-746-7058.
Wilderness Circle
to be Jan. 28
The Wilderness Circle
Gathering will be at 11 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 28. All are
welcome. It is free and Indian
blood is not required.
A potluck meal fix any-
thing you like follows the
prayer ceremony. There will
be afternoon music. Mackie
Sanford of Cherokee de-
scent will lead the prayers.
For information, call Betty
Berger at 352-447-2736 or
email bberger@bellsouth.net.


Religion NOTES


Inverness SDA
Saturday Sabbath school starts at 9:10 a.m.;
Saturday Children's classes begin at 9:30; Toddler
class at 9:45; adult Bible study at 9:50 a.m.
This is Communion Sabbath and Pastor John
Sabo will speak on 'The Commandments of Com-
munion" at the 11 a.m. service Saturday. Vespers
with Pastor Sabo begins at 5:30 p.m.
Prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Thrift
store is open 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday. The
Health Food Store is open 9 a.m. to noon and re-
opens again at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
The Health Food Store is also open after Ves-
pers on Saturday.
The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens, 4.5
miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
The church phone number is 352-726-9311.
See www.sda-inverness.org.
Hernando SDA
Hernando Seventh-day Adventist Sabbath serv-
ices start at 11 a.m. Saturday.
The adult Bible study begins at 9:15 a.m. Satur-


day with a song service, followed by a short pro-
gram and then main Bible study at 10 a.m.
Classes for children are at 9:30 a.m.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave., west of
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.
Glad Tidings
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday with
song, then study at Glad Tidings Church. Divine
hour follows at 11 a.m. Elder Shaffer will bring the
bread of life this sabbath. Avegan lunch will follow.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday. All are invited.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement Program)
alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly.
For information, call Bob at 352-628-1743. The
church is at 520 N.E. Third Ave., Crystal River.
Homosassa SDA
The 11 a.m. divine service Saturday will be a
prayer conference, "Revolution on our Knees," with
special video feed from Seventh-day Adventist
churches across Florida. Speaker will be Mike
Cauley, president of the Florida Conference of
Seventh-day Adventists.


Pastor Geoffrey Patterson will speak via special
video fee about "Back to the Upper Room" at 9
a.m. Sabbath school. Sabbath school study begins
at 10 a.m. with John Adams on "In the Beginning."
Sue Halstead will talk about "The Journey Begins"
at the 10 a.m. adult beginners Bible study class.
Prayer meeting is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Men's
study group meets at 6:30 p.m. Thursday.
For more information, call Bob Halstead at 352-
382-7753. The church is at 5863 Cardinal St.
Congregation Beth Sholom
The fall semester of the Etz Hayim Institute-
Adult Education Program of Congregation Beth
Sholom continues on Monday evenings:
Medieval Jewish History is offered 7 to 8 p.m.;
Studies in Bible: The Writings (Part 2) is offered
8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Classes are open to the entire
community. Each class is $5 per session, plus
textbook. Register by email at
mkamlot2@gmail.com or call 352-643-0995.
Spring semester begins Feb. 6 with new
courses: The 613 The Torah, the Five Books
of Moses, contains 613 commandments and Ju-


daism teaches that Israel obligated itself to ob-
serve all these commandments with the
covenant at Sinai. Class is 7 to 8 p.m. in 18 ses-
sions; $5 per session.
Movers, Shakers and Thinkers Part biogra-
phy, part ideas, part analysis: This class will ex-
amine the most prominent movers, shakers and
thinkers of the Jewish world during the past 100
years. Class is 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. for 18 sessions;
$5 per session.
Congregation Beth Sholom with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader, is the
only synagogue in Citrus County. It is at 102 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. Call 352-643-0995 or 352-
746-5303.
Advent Hope
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all ages.
The worship service begins at 11:30 a.m. After
the service, there is a weekly potluck.
Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to noon
each Wednesday. The church is at 428 N.E.
Third Ave., Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or
visit online at www.adventhopechurch.com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY EVENING JANUA RY 13, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/h Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Extreme Makeover: Extreme Makeover: 20/20 (In Stereo) Eyewit. Nightline
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CMT 98 45 98 28 37 "Overboard"** "Sweet Home Alabama" (2002 Romance-Comedy) Sweet Home Alabama (Season Premiere) (N) Sweet Home Alabama
98 45 98 28 37 Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. 'PG-13'
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Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TUETR / E

@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rghls Reserved
NAYNOl



LMOWEL



YPIRUF


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

f -1


He is so I
I' handsome!





WHEN THEY CAST A
CO-STAR FOR RIC.HARP
OGEI, THEY FOUNP A ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: U 1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: EVOKE QUOTA ZENITH COPPER
Answer: Curious about his dad's childhood, junior gave
his father A POP QUIZ


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Sir Winston Churchill said, "The truth is incon-
trovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may
deride it, but in the end, there it is."
Bridge declarers must seek the truth incon-
trovertibly the right play It will not always win,
due to the vagaries of the cards, but if you always
find the best line, you will be a winner
In today's deal, South is in four hearts. After
West leads the spade queen, what is the truth, the
right line of play?
When I run this deal in classes, the majority
adopt an incorrect approach. I cannot decide if
you should get bonus points for working out what
that is, or if it is better that it never occurs to you.
South's jump to game was a tad aggressive, but
he was no lie a member of the "if you smell a
game, bid it" club.
The "standard" line of play is: win with the
spade king, cash the spade ace, play a trump to
dummy, ruff the last spade in hand, and draw an-
other round of trumps. Then, when the 3-1 break
comes to light, declarer finally turns to clubs.
When East wins a trick in that suit, if he is a good
defender, he returns his last trump to kill both the
club ruff and the contract.
The better declarers see they have four losers in
their hand: two diamonds and two clubs. They also
notice the shorter club holding in the dummy and
they can ruff a club. They take the first trick, cash
the club ace, and lose a club. When they are back
in their hand, they ruff their last club high, draw
trumps, and claim.

North 1-13-12
4763
VA Q 4
+ 9 7 5 4 2
4 85
West East
4QJ109 48542
V 3 V 6 5 2
*+10 83 *AK6
K 9 7 4 2 Q J 10
South
4 AK
V K J 10 9 8 7
QJ
4 A6 3

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
1 T Pass 2 V Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: 4 Q


ACROSS
1 Mal de -
4 Broad bean
8 Chaney of "The
Wolf Man"
11 Expert
12 Joie de vivre
13 Hail, to
Caesar
14 Battery
chemical
15 Zither
17 Math
statement
19 Cache
20 Deli salmon
21 "Garfield" guy
22 Enlighten
25 While
28 Help out
29 Risked a
ticket
31 Sorority
member
33 Oboe feature
35 Alan or Cheryl
37 British rule in
India
38 Damsel


40 Century units
42 Turf strip
43 Quagmire
44 Small lizard
47 Bleak
51 Goes to bed
(2 wds.)
53 Travel choice
54 Home page
addr.
55 Cosmetics
brand
56 spumante
57 Moray
58 Actress
Tyne -
59 Kiddie's
ammo

DOWN
1 A great deal
2 Toledo's lake
3 Ballet's
Nureyev
4 UPS
competitor
5 Styptic
6 Comic strip
prince


Answer to Previous Puzzle


7 Popeye's
tattoo
8 Dalai -
9 Walkie-talkie
word
10 Teen outcast


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 B-movie
pistol
16 Kind of
column
18 Clark and
Orbison
21 Wynonna or
Naomi
22 Corn serving
23 Per (daily)
24 Suggestion
25 Faculty head
26 Ibsen woman
27 Toothed
wheel
30 Implored
32 Radio VIPs
34 Floppies
36 Textile
colorers
39 Gadget
41 Snare
43 Amusing
44 Bookbinder's
need
45 Limerick
locale
46 Amoebas
have one
47 MP prey
48 Soothe
49 Hayworth of
old movies
50 Cotton gin
name
52 Future fish


Dear Annie: I recently
moved into an apartment
with three other guys. We
get along well and
have fun together
One of my room-
mates is a serious
player and has no
qualms about dating
six women at the same
time. With each one,
he implies the rela-
tionship is exclusive.
He told me he does
this because he got
burned once. I told
him that's a risk in any AN N
relationship and he MAIL
should stop being part
of the problem.
Now he brings his various girl-
friends to the apartment. They
think he's a great guy who seems
so genuine. I have to interact
with them and feel horrible lying,
smiling and pretending I don't
know what's really going on.
What should I do? If I expose
him, it will sour our relationship.
At the same time, I can't keep
pretending his womanizing is
OK. Do I really have to move
again? New Yorker
Dear New Yorker: You cannot
become involved in every room-
mate's issues, nor can you be
every woman's protector, al-
though bless you for trying. These
women are responsible for their
own character judgments, good
or bad.
You have told The Snake how
you feel about his behavior, and
we think you should do so again,
more forcefully, pointing out he
has become the type of person he
detests. And when he brings a
girlfriend over, we recommend


you vacate the premises or re-
treat to your bedroom. You
should not be forced to put on a
phony face for his
benefit
Dear Annie: My son
recently married his
longtime girlfriend.
My wife and I paid for
the rehearsal dinner
and the honeymoon,
and the bridal couple
paid for the rest. The
reception was small,
and the ceremony
even smaller. They
IE'S also wanted no chil-
BOX dren younger than
high-school age. We
would have liked to
expand the guest list, but it wasn't
our money, and we didn't push.
My sisters felt their young chil-
dren should have been invited,
and one boycotted the wedding in
protest. Then, two months later,
our cousin married, opting for a
destination wedding. Neither my
sisters nor I could make it. After-
ward, the couple held a local re-
ception and specifically said "no
children." The same sister who
boycotted my son's wedding was
perfectly OK attending this child-
free reception.
My son is moving out of state
next year, and my wife and I are
retiring to Florida. I would just as
soon write off that branch of the
family, but my wife wants to make
a big deal out of this snub. Your
suggestions? -Put Out in Peoria
Dear Put Out: The two wed-
dings are not exactly comparable
in that your son is a closer rela-
tion to your sister's young chil-
dren than your cousin's child is,
and she was not as offended by


their exclusion. However, boy-
cotting your son's wedding was
petty and selfish. You need not
make a big deal out of this or
write them off. Moving away will
take care of any regular contact
while leaving open the possibil-
ity of reconciliation down the
road.
Dear Annie: "Worried Driver
in Lafayette, Ind." asked for a
universal sign to get people to
stop talking on their cellphones
while driving. Despite all the hys-
teria, the fact is in the 15 years
that cellphones have become
widespread, traffic accidents and
fatalities have decreased 25 per-
cent, according to the National
Highway Traffic Safety Adminis-
tration. Hawaii
Dear Hawaii: The problem
with quoting statistics is you have
to put them in context. Overall
traffic fatalities did dip, but "dis-
tracted driving" accidents (e.g.,
eating, drinking, adjusting the
radio and cellphone use) in-
creased by up to 16 percent. Also,
even though hand-held phone
use decreased by 5 percent and is
against the law in more states, 18
percent of distracted-driving fa-
talities involved cellphone use.
--In--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 5777 W Century
Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA
90045. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page at
www crea tors. com.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


QU EJEN WIAR YM
URANU S OGIES
I TAC ORACL
C ATE S
D WT E NESoT

UT AH AAHWOOD
UD
HEM I S SAN
EYES EBAY
|TUB MAMMAL ^
SHRUBS KAYED
IIROT SEDATE
HEEL D EK E S


C8 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


AIEA I VAMEO1Y I LOR4E (?A IL
THE Vi /WT, ORI ( SLOWOECT, AAOc OW-
ING FO R M OST CIOO SE Of rE RL Y i- Fla VLE!'
lOF or- MYRES'Y AM9 lWCOMWE-E1-r
ESTS6. CAREFULLY. MEMQOF1l-IE

ROZ17, IAIM 144
N t-'

7_^ 3^ .-, t V^'"^


Sally Forth


AND HOW IF I KNEW
DOES ONE THAT, WOULD I BE
SO THAT? FREAKING OUT OVER
AN INTERNAL MEMO
THREE PEOPLE ,
MIGHT SEE?


Dilbert


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


WHAT
HAPPENS THEN HELL
WHEN THE EXERCISE
UNCER- HIS STOCK
TAINT OPTIONS.
ENDS? j


The Born Loser

CE.CF, I WANTTO INFOR
>'OU TRA-I S LL RAVE ONR
WEEK OF VACAkION MUE TO
"--- -- ,,E. F.OA 2011,


Blondie


I OOU DON'T-YOU TOOK "(ES, SeUT I GOT s5CK TRkT
|'OUR. FnNALZO1 VACATION O MO-A ANt \T LTC O
WEEK IIN bECE-A&E.R.! ALL WEE-.,SO Il WAHTTO
_AtCi TTCAWK i


2 \K \A CATION NOW,


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS "Too hard, Lester. You're brushing
way too hard."


Doonesbury


Big Nate


I SO HOW CAN I SLEEP
WHEN I'M WALKING !'
AOUN THE B LOCK?


3-7j-77


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


" 'KNOW, IT WOULP SAVE. ME A LOT OF
STEPS IF I HAP A FRIPE IN MNW ROOM."
Betty


Frank & Ernest


STARTING NO,
WOW! JSTART(MG
O NOW.
tt START I N G
~ TOMORROW!


r vwAT'
^HOW COM~E7/
WA


BECAUSE HE HAS
DETENT1ON TODAY!
HE GOT BUSTED
FOP, ASSAULTING
TIE SODA MACHINE!
i 7 ATE MY
Dr S ^OLLAR..
if 11-W ^^.^ ^


Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Contraband" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Beauty and the Beast" (G) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:25 p.m. No passes.
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"We bought a Zoo" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20
p.m.
"Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol" (PG-13)
10:05 p.m.
"Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Contraband" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Beauty and the Beast" (G) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m.,


4 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Joyful Noise" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Devil Inside" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10 p.m.
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:35
p.m.
"We Bought a Zoo" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol" (PG-13)
1:25 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" (R) ID required. 1:15
p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


i THf ACCOUNTANT PA$S HIS Ll #
FIANCIAI.LA FgAJP 2/ D TCTOR T^T.
INVESTIGATIONS I f-Cl II SIOULL I
UNIT ( f r1L' FI i4 P TTHf 9 J-T! i
1 ., IN ACCOUNTS I





WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: T equals R


"Y BKLRH OJ Y JEYEOV ENOBD ENYE KBR


GKLRJ ENTKPDN; Y CHYX OJ Y SXBYGOV


ENOBD ENYE GKLRJ CYJE KBR."


ARBBREN EXBYB

Previous Solution: "I've been trying for some time to develop a lifestyle that doesn't
require my presence." Garry B. Trudeau
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-13


Peanuts


NO, I HAVEN'T HEARP
ANY DOUG6NUT5 CALLING
C'-- .C L "INUT 1 1




ji& "\' / NW '-~777^


Pickles


UH-- I WflS-TRINKING-
MORE ON-TRe LINES
OF G hrNG 'My H9iR
Cu~rp


I CAN'T GIVE YOU
A RAISE BECAUSE THE
ELBONIAN DEBT CRISIS
HAS CREATED ECONOMIC
UNCERTAINTY.


LUCKILY FOR US, OUR
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
GRANTED OUR CEO MORE
STOCK OPTIONS SO HE
WON'T LEAVE DURING
UNCERTAIN TIMES.


I CAN'T II, IT'S ALL THOSE
SLEEP NAPS YOU TAKE
("DUPING THE DAY


COMICS


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 C9






CIO FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


C CITRUS COUNTY




HRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

ff 0:"^H^iaf1;


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


If one of your New
Years Resolutions
is that you are tired of
being alone & want
to meet a nice guy
for a compatible
companionship. I
might be the fellow!
I am a active wid-
ower in reasonable
good health looking
to meet a nice lady
between 65 & 75 or
so, who is in GOOD
HEALTH, attractive,
intelligent, affection-
ate, personable, who
has a lot of interest &
things to do. likes to
go & do things &
is a good
CONVERSATIONALIST.
My preference is a
slim or
petite lady, who
dresses well ,that I
can be proud to be
with. If you fit the
description, Please
give me a call
I would love to meet
you.(352) 527-0591

Oriental Lady need
friend, 73 yrs old, 5'5"
125 lbs, healthy, no
smoking or drinking,
love the outdoors,
Tsai P.0, Box 895
Waldo, Fl. 32694





Malti-Poo Puppies, 10
weeks, small, adorable,
shots, have parents
$350(352) 795-5204





6550 W CYRUS
2 1/2 acres on SE corner
of Cyrus & Donovan.
Mkt. Value: $20,000
Assessed Value:$24,858
Sell for $18,000
Call 828-586-2283

'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736








BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 13, Sat. 14, Sun. 15
7am-2pm
50 S. Lucille Street

-X - -7 -4





BEVERLY HILLS
SATURDAY 14, 9a-3p
Crafts, Tools & More
3869 N. Grapefern Way
off forrest Ridge btw
honey Locust &
Sugarberry

CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, 2155 W.Greenway,
Remodeled $590. mo
352-697-1907

CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, 2356 W. Jungle,
$565. mo 352-697-1907


CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400.
352-344-8516
Downsizing Sale!
Dining set w/6 chairs,
Stainless steel kitchen
cart w/ wheels. White
computer desk, 2 sets
of rattan chair, Wicker
shelf, floor lamp, Make
me an offer!
795-0486 or 586-8233
Five boar goats,
females, some PG,
Must sell by Sunday
$335 takes all!
(352) 586-2590
FORD
2008 Focus 4 door
Sedan SE,automatic,
only 19,700 miles, Silver,
carport kept, great shape.
$11,000 OBO
352-563-0730
HERNANDO
2/2, 400 E Glasboro,
$675. mo 352-697-1907
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996
Inverness
3/2 clean & spacious,
close to hospital,$650
1st & sec. leave mess
(352) 270-3859
Inverness 4/2 Pool
$1400 1st/last
352-419-6724

V THIS OUT!
INVERNESS
721 Newton St; Saturday,
January 14; 7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Estate Sale
Everything is PRICED to
GO!
LECANTO
Saturday, 14, 7am -?,
Furniture, Toys & More
1228 N. Greentree Terr.
LOVESEATS /(TWIN)
HIDE-A-BEDS
2 loveseats w/
hideabeds and otto-
mans, lots of storage
$250 352-697-2290
MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
80K mi, one owner
shows like new $6,500
(352) 726-0258
QUEEN BEDROOM SET
11 pcs. Pecan wood,
Lots of storage,
Exc. condition, $1350
352-697-2290
Thoroughbred,
experienced, kid
friendly Showing on
Sunday. $600
(352) 586-2590
TV BLOWOUT SALE
Fri. and Sat 9am-3pm
small TVs $5.00,
large TVs $10.00
1729 W Gulf To Lake
Lecanto
20565 W Penn Ave
Dunnellon
The Path Store
While supplies last!



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



1/2 Lab, 1/2 Pitt
Female, 1 /2 yrs. old
Needs room to run
Good with animals and
Kids (352) 419-2623


Suu ku *****


4 1


8


Free Dogs
to Good Homes
Great Security
Come with Dog Houses
Not Recommended
if you have other dogs
(352) 564-0428
FREE
Two 5 Month Old Cats
Calico & Tabby
Rescued made healthy
cant keep
(760) 637-7335
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Kittens
9 weeks old.
(352) 341-0928
NEED REALLY GOOD
INSIDE HOME FOR 2
SEMI FERAL CATS
THAT CAN BE REALLY
NICE CATS WITH SOME
PATIENCE CAN GO TO
SEPARATE HOMES
PLEASES CALL FOR
MORE INFO
(231)597-6577




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
STRAWBERRIES,
CABBAGE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inv. GIFT SHIPPING
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
CLOSED SUN
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



BASSETT HOUND LOST!
Dunklin/Minifarms area
Please help me find my
dog, gate was left
open by a visitor and
she got out, her partner
was ran over the same
day. Please return my
baby, she was given to
me after I recovered
from breast cancer.
Please call me with any
information. I am griev-
ing over my male that
was killed, I can't lose
her too. She is a lemon
and white but is Tan
with freckles, Name is
Cloe.(352) 613-7919 or
352-257-5777
Jack Russell
male 9 y.o last seen
1/5/12, near FLoral City
Park(352) 422-2959
Lost Ipod Touch, on
1/11 in Kangaroo Gas
Station at C39 and
200,please call, my
daughter is
heartbroken, this was
her Christmas,
REWARD!!
(352) 400-0766






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519



5 pairs of Socker Shoes
in white bag in Holder
call to ID
(352) 586-7222


4puz.com


64


3 7 4 1h1
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera I Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
I- Watch I Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
-Wheelchair / Scooter I
Rechargeables / Chargers I
-Airsoft/RC etc. I

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Closed Saturday & Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Mention this coupon geta free pack of batteries.


CITRUS SPRINGS

INDOOR SALE
FRI. 13th 8a-2p
SAT. 14th 8a-1p
Books, Things, Snacks
UNITARIAN CHURCH
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy.41,1 mi. N. 491




OPEN HOUSE
DINNER!



TODAY!
Friday, January 13
11AM Close
BBQ Rib Dinner 5-7PM
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
7-11PM


INVERNESS EAGLES
8733 Highway 44 E
Inverness, FL
352-344-5337

Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
preciouspawsflori-
da.com
726-4700
"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAWS AT A
TIME"
ADOPTIONS
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL
U.S. Hwy. 19
Crystal River
Fri. Noon-4pm
Sat. 10am-5pm
Sun. Noon to 4pm
We are closed
all holiday weekends
PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy.
Inverness
(cats only)
Regular store hours

Adopt a
gescued Pet


View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adoptarescuedpet
.com or call
352-795-9550

ADOPTIONS are
held Sat
llamtill I1pm
Pet Supermarket
Inverness
We are in NEED of
FOSTERS to help save
more dogs. To foster
or volunteer please
contact us or come
to visit us at Pet
Supermarket
Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS


Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A. till 4:00 P.
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.orq.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 and
Conant.
Look for the big white
building with the
bright paw prints.




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500




WORK WANTED
local CDL Driver/Sales
Rep/ Route Sales etc.
Exc. driving record &
references! email:
apsteephill@yahoo
.com




CDA Pre-School
Teacher
Exp. only, w/back
ground clearance.
(352) 464-0605


TEACHER

Pt, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TADPOLES EARLY
LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




SECRETARY/
RECEPTIONIST-
CPA Firm -
This position sets the
stage for firm profes-
sionalism. Reliability
and punctuality very
important. Must have
excellent telephone,
typing, organiza-
tional, general office
and computer skills
(MS Word). Ability to
perform under heavy
seasonal workload.
$10to $13 DOE
w/benefits.
Fax resume to
352-795-1133.

Secretary/
Receptionist

P/T, MS Office Suite
proficient,exp'd
preferred. Send
resume to P.O. Box
1630, Lecanto, FI
34460 or call
(352) 621-5532










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA/HHA
Alzheimers Exp.
Call for Details
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352) 637-3111

CNA/HHA's
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Exp. Medical
Receptionist/ Ins.

For BUSY Chiropractic
office. Applicant
must be flexible &
able to multi-task.
Fax resume to;
352-726-3885

Granny Nannies
CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed Immediately.
Must be Certified.
(352) 794-3811

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

NURSE PRACTITIONER
(ARNP) or a
Physicians Assistant
(PA)
For a "Busy Specialty
Office".
Please send resume
to Citrus County
Chronicle, Blind Box
1749P, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FI
34429.

P.T. Tech
Part-time position
open for a physical
therapy clinic.
Experience preferred.
Please fax resumes
to (352) 726-7582.

P/T Chiropractic
Assistant.

For Busy office,
exp'd preferred.
Fax resume to:
352-726-3885

Receptionist
& Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Experience
preferred excel.
pay & benefits.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@


Youth Care
Worker
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for maximum risk
males committed to
the Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for
Youth Care Workers
Must be over 21
years of age, have
High School Diploma
and be able to pass
a Level 2 back
ground screening
* Must be able to
com plete self- de-
fense and physical
intervention training.
* Ability to tolerate
verbal and mental
abuse while main-
taining a professional
demeanor.
* Ability to perform
appropriate crisis in-
tervention, including
physically breaking
up fights.
Pick up an
application at
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
Drug Free Workplace
/ EEO




Exp. Line Cook
Apply In Person Only
Lollygaggers
744 SE US Hwy 19
NexttoMr.B's C.R.
Drug Free Work Place



A/C Sales Tech
2 needed now!
Must have clean FI Lic.
& EPA cer. Call Robert
352-287-4540



CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES
The Citrus County
Chronicle
Is seeking an
energetic Individual
to consult businesses
on the use of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire
to work In a fast
paced, fun,
environment please
apply today.
Essential Functions
* Develop classified
customers through
cold calling and
prospecting
Strong rapport
build ng,professional
communication and
good listening skills
* Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing
* Assisting with all
aspects Legal
advertising.
Qualifications
* High School
diploma or
equivalent
* Prior telemarketing
experience a plus
Send resume to:
marnold@
chronlcleonllne.com
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant

SALES/
INSPECTOR

Self Motivated,
Sales Experience,
We offer: Company
Truck, Benefits,
Paid Vacation.
Apply within
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Inverness
(352) 746-2990


We are Seeking
Experienced
Contractors
To assist with our
cable installation
needs. Please e-mail
your resume to
fljobs@kablelink.com
or apply at
Kablelink.com
(Career Center).
Email subject line
must say
"Cable Installation
Contractor, Job #26."




$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip. dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
No nights,
No weekends.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI

CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
lic./vehicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

EXPERIENCED
LAUNDRY
PERSON
Apply
BEST WESTERN
Crystal River

Music/Choir
Director
With piano capabili-
ties,, salary neg,
email resume to:
fcumcsecre-
tary@aol.com
FLORAL CITY UNITED
METHODIST
P.O. Box 47, Floral
City, F134436




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



TAYLOt'OLLEGE



NE&fW

2 Week Courses!
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300.
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


You can earn at least $800 per month
delivering the



Independent contractors delivering the Citrus County
Chronicle can earn as much as $1,000 a month
working only 3-4 early morning hours per day. The
Chronicle is a permanent part of Citrus County with
an excellent reputation. To find out more, call
and speak to one of our district managers or leave
your name and phone number and we will get right
back with you!

563-3201 ....


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





6 Person Hot Tub,
rarely used,
excel. cond.
$700 obo
(703) 585-6006
HOT TUB 4 person hot
tub with cover no spa
pack you haul $250.00 or
obo 352-637-6010




2009 Kenmore 5 cu.ft.
upright freezer,
warranty until 8/7/12
$175. (352) 726-2645

A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES u to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914

AMANDA
Washer/Dryer, X-Lg
cap. 7 cycles, Exc.
cond. $300. obo
(352) 794-6667
Elec. clothes dryer,
good condition
$85 cash
(352) 419-6719

GAS DRYER, GE
'06, Super capacity,
heavy duty, $175
You Pick Up
(352) 503-2855
GE washer, top loading,
great condition works
fine $100 OBO,
(352) 897-4282


ROUTES



AVAILABLE

NOW1!!









.' -









V Able to work early morning
hours before 6am
V Must be 18 years old
/ Florida driver's license
and insurance

If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant
between 1 and 2 am,
drive around to the back and
ask for a district manager.

1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River

IT REALLY PAYS
TO WORK FOR THE




m www.chronilctnln.


2 7 9568143 3
5461 397 8 2
1 3 84 2 7 9 5 6
953284617
7 2 46 158 3 9
6817934 2 5
4 1 29 5 6 3 7 8
8 9 5371264
3 6 78 4 2 5 9 1


NOW
ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
L ih




COMMERCIAL Lawn
equipment w/custom
trailer Gravely & Stihl
342-308-3853





Lawn Business
for Sale
Trailer, Mower &
Accounts $10,000
352-697-0844,






PICKERS

PEDDLERS

2ND SATURDAY VIN-
TAGE TREASURES &
ANTIQUE SALE Join
Pickers & Peddlers at
the 2nd Saturday Vin-
tage Treasures & An-
tique Sale along with
Market Day on Satur-
day, January 14th at
The Shoppes of Herit-
age Village at 461 N
Citrus Ave, Crystal
River. You can set-up
to sell your Vintage
Treasures & Antiques
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
for only $20. Its a fun
day of selling, buying
& swapping stories
with other Antiquers!
Sale applications are
available at Pickers &
Peddlers or you can
call to have an appli-
cation emailed to you
at (352) 897-7013 or
(352) 302-3666. See
you Saturday!


K~~yn^'TffI* TT









wwwhronicleolinfco
(ONN(TIN THERIGH

BUER WTHYOR ESAG


Sal^^


I Colectbl


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFI[EDS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


enmore erles
washing machine, HD
SC Plus, perfect cond,
6 years old, $150
(352) 860-0412 or
352-201-8985
Kenmore Electric
range $125
Microwave $75
or $150 both! Works
well (352) 726-6499
KENMORE
Washer & Dryer,
good cond.
$125 each
(352) 503-6960
KENMORE
Washer & Dryer,
super cap. hvy
duty $250. guarant
(352) 726-0619
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
Washer or Dryer, good
cond.$125 each
Refrigerator 18cu.
Kenmore, almond $175
(352) 476-2411




2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET Metal Commercial
Lateral Graphite Color
28"x30"x18" $45
727463-4411
6 PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS Mauve Color
Fabric, Armless $10 each
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR Ergonomic
Adjustable PreOwned
Fabric Covered $85
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (2)
PreOwned Commercial
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered $45 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS (4) Com-
mercial PreOwned Dark
Gray Fabric $25 each
727463-4411
ERGONOMIC DESK
CHAIR Commercial
PreOwned Fully Adjusta-
ble Fabric Covered $95
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $85
727-463-4411
METAL OFFICE DESK 6
Foot Long, Sand Color
$35 727-463-4411




3 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 12
Estate Adventure
Auction
Prev:12PM Auction 3PM
2007 Camry 14K ml.
Estate car, hand &
mech. tools. Quality &
leather turn., Hall full,
surprises- New-Antiques

SFRI. JAN. 13
ON SITE ESTATE Auction
111 Cabot St., Inverness
Prev:8AM Auction 9AM
Entire contents of home
Incl. Whole House LP
Gen. Loads- Fun&Value

*SAT.. JAN. 14
LIVE & ONLINE Antlaue
Collectible POSTCARDS
Prev:11 Auction 1pm
100+ lots- vintage &
antique, Linen, silk,
Embroidered, Holiday,
adv, 52nd Canadian
Milltary-WWI,
Ham radio cards+++
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc




CAMPBELL HAUSFIELD
AIR COMPRESSOR 10
GAL.NEEDS PAINT
ONLY 65.00 FIRM
352 637 5171


EXTEND'A BED RACK
Fits 2007 Ford Sport Trac
$25 727-463-4411
Forktrucks, floor mod
milling mach, welder,
planer, compressor,
rad saw, key mach.
(352) 563-1033
GENERATOR PORTA-
BLE powered by Briggs &
Stratton; Wheelhouse
5550 watts. Model
1646-3. $687 new; sell for
$400. Call 352-382-3962.
SEARS 33 GAL.
UPRIGHT AIR COM-
PRESSOR 5HP OILESS
MOTOR 100.00 FIRM
352 637 5171




Panasonic Plasma
TV 58" like new,
must see $700 obo
(352) 382-3449
TV BLOWOUT SALE
small TVs $5.00,
large TVs $10.00
1729 W Gulf To Lake
Lecanto
20565 W Penn Ave
Dunnellon
The Path Store
While supplies last!



COMPUTER MONITOR
17" Flat Screen $60
7274634411
COMPUTER MONITOR
17" LCD computer moni-
tor in excellent condition
746-3486 $25
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




FARM EQUIPMENT
1. Millcreek Manure
Spreader #27G $500.00
2.Kubota RTV1100 Utility
Vehicle 529 hours
$6000.00
3.Kubota BX2350 tractor
4 x4 465 hours with
mover deck, grass
catcher, front end loader
$8000.00
For inquiries call
353-601-7411




Hampton Bay
Alum.Top quality patio
set 42" x 72" glass top
table w/6 chairs $345.
(352) 746-2842




2 glass table tops
48" round, 35"x57"
rectangler, $49. ea
(352) 382-0741
4 Wood Bar Stools
30ins.high,light
colored,like new
cond.$60.00 OBO. Call
352 795-1495 anytime
36" ROUND CAFETERIA
TABLE Like New Rugged
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Base Misc Colors $65
727-463-4411
Black Entertainment
Center,
$50.
Sofa Bed,
$150.
(352) 795-7254
CHAIR large green
leather w otterman $60
352 447 4380
after 12 pm
COFFEE TABLE SET
Coffee table w/ 2 end
tables, double-glass
tops, Exc. condition
$100 352-697-2290
Corner Computer desk
w/top good condition
$35. (352) 795-1015
COUCH Floral couch,
great condition, $50 Cit-
rus Springs, must pick
up.(352)792 7610
COUCH White and black
couch $1,must pick up.
Call (352)792-7610
Downsizing Sale!
Dining set w/6 chairs,
Stainless steel kitchen
cart w/ wheels. White
computer desk, 2 sets
of rattan chair, Wicker
shelf, floor lamp, Make
me an offer!
795-0486 or 586-8233


Dinette Set
black wrought iron,
glass top, 5 chairs,
like new $350.
(352) 489-4804
Fla Style sofa/sleeper,
loveseat,coffee table,
end tables & lamps. Ex-
cel. Cond.$375 Crystal
River (828) 483-4550
FORMICA TOP COM-
PUTER DESKS (3) with
2 Drawer File Cabinet At-
tached 4'x24" $25 each
727-463-4411
Furniture for Sale
8844 E. Rosemont St.,
Inverness
(615) 504-6519
LEATHER SOFA 93"
AND LOVESEAT 68" -
100% leather all around,
taupe, good condition,
but some cat scratches,
$599.99 352-341-6991
LOVESEATS /(TWIN)
HIDE-A-BEDS
2 loveseats w/
hideabeds and otto-
mans, lots of storage
$250 352-697-2290
METAL FOLDING
TABLES (2) Wood Grain
6 Foot Long $35 each
727-463-4411
Oval Thick Glass
Cocktail Table
44 x 30 with ornate
brass base $135.
(352) 527-8961
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
PEDESTAL TABLE
Looks like butcher block.
No Chairs. 2 1/2 x 4'
$25.00 Call Ruth
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN BEDROOM SET
1 lpcs. Pecan wood,
Lots of storage,
Exc. condition, $1350
352-697-2290
Queen headboard
(hutch sale) and triple
dresser with mirror $100
352-601-4221
SEWING MACHINE
CABINET. Arrow Cab. 5
drawers, white w/oak
trim, exc. cond. asking
$125. 352-212-7760
SOFA
& Love Seat
w/pillows, beige,
very good cond
$300.(352)344-1608
SOFA Leather
Black, makes bed
$190.
347-308-3853
SOFA, LOVE SEAT,
CHAIR, OTTOMAN
Thomasville, Florida
Style,Very Nice $350
Riverhaven,Homosassa
352-503-6404
Solid Oak corner en-
tertainment center
w/32" color TV, exc.
cond., $200
(815) 600-5133
STACKABLE CHAIRS (4)
PreOwned Commercial
Metal Frame with Arms
Fabric Covered 2 for $35
727-4634411
WALNUT LATERAL FILE
CABINET Wooden 2
Drawer 34"x31"x21". $65
727-463-4411
WHITE PAINTED WOOD
BOOKCASE 40"x32"x12"
3 Shelves Organizer for a
Childs Room $30
727-463-4411




2 LazerZ. .H.P.
comm. mowers, 52"
deck, 23 Kaw. garage
kept. needs little work
$1500. obo628-7734
8' MAGNOLIA TREES
very nice 1/2 the price of
stores $75 call
352 257-3870
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
The time is NOW!! 20 lb
bag $4.00 352-563-1519
FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000's of plants, OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019 W StargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon


5' HOLLY TREES very
nice for the price $50.
352-257-3870
GRAVELY Commercial
Stihl complete set-up
w/cust.trailer, many
items347-308-3853
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, fast track, 19
HP Honda engine
$2200 352-746-7357




5' HOLLY TREES very
nice for the price $50.00 .
call 352-257-3870
8' TALL LITTLE GEM
MAGNOLIAS very nice
1/2 the price of stores
$75. call 352-257-3870
PLANTS
Christmas Cactus
Assorted colors
$5 and $8
Call Barbara 601-0345
SKYPENCIL BOXWOOD
TREES formal/elegant 5'
trees $45 call
352- 257- 3870







Bevery Hill, Fri.

Sat.

7a-3p,

antique

furn.
elect wheel chair
medical equip, many
new hsehid items
5405N Bedstrow Blvd


YARD SALE
Beverly Hills. Sat 8-12
Multi Family, many
items 229 S. Tyler St








BEVERLY HILLS
FRI SAT, 9a-3p
Crafts, Tools & More
3869 N. Grapefern Way
off forrest Ridge btw
honey Locust &
Sugarberry








BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 13, Sat. 14, Sun. 15
7am-2pm
50 S. Lucille Street
BIG YARD SALE!
Fri Sat Sun 9-5
Refrigerator, micro-
wave, 2 curio oak cabi-
nets, 2 dressers, Indian
collection, gas cast
iron grill, 2 roll away
beds, tv and much
more!
Machinist tools, gas
compressor, radio arm
saw, chop saw, collec-
tion of grills, Craftsman
lawn mower '97 Cad-
die Sedan Deville and
more! 352-465-1892
3837 SW Pompano Rd
Rainbow Lake Estates
CITRUS SPRINGS
A Church Wide Sale
to Benefit Missions
Sat. Jan 14, 9a-2p
Springs Presbyertian
Church
1060 W.Withlacochee
Trail.
CR 39 Dunnellon

CITRUS SPRINGS

INDOOR SALE
FRI. 13th 8a-2p
SAT. 14th 8a-lp
Books, Things, Snacks
UNITARIAN CHURCH
7633 N. Florida Ave.
Hwy. 41, 1 mi. N. 491
CRYSTAL RIVER
7049 W. Jeans Ln.
Moving sale.tools and
misc household items.
Jan 13th-15th.


CIASSIFIEDS




CRYSTAL RIVER
Wendy's Parking Lot Cit-
rus County Cruisers car
parts, household items,
sometimes baby clothes.
Sat. Jan. 14 8am to 1pm
No presales please.




Floral City
Fri., Sat., &Sun 9a-lp
saws, chop, table,
drill, 20' pontoon,
good furn., etc.
5677 S .Perch Point
off Gobbler

HOMOSASSA
11731 W. Timberlane Dr.
Rvrhvn Jan 14 9-1 Mov-
ing: hsehld,electronics,
golf, gardn, Christmas

V THIS OUT!
INVERNESS
721 Newton St; Saturday,
January 14; 7 a.m.-2 p.m.
Estate Sale
Everything is PRICED to
GO!
INVERNESS
ANNUAL TRASH.
TREASURE & BAKE SALE
Jan 12 & 13th. Thur Fri
8am 2pm. First
Presbyterian Church
206 Washington Ave.
All proceeds go
to charities.
INVERNESS
Fri Sat Sun
50's alum patio furn.
bimini boat top, bar
chairs, fishing,
large speakers
8025 E .Gator Ct
INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to the
feed veterans








LECANTO
Citrus Cty
Largest Sale!
Indoor/Outdoor
Hwy 44/Maynard Ave
Tuesday-Friday 8a-3p
Saturday 8am-3pm

LECANTO
Saturday, 14, 7am -?,
Furniture, Toys & More
1228 N. Greentree Terr.

PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 8a-2p.
5395 N. Red Ribbon Pt
antiques collectibles
generator, air com-
pressor, pwr tools. &
Tool chest full of tools









RIVER-

HAVEN
Sat Sun 9-2p
generator, tools,
Christmas Items
more much
115 43 Riverhaven Dr
Homosassa

TV BLOWOUT SALE
Fri. and Sat 9am-3pm
small TVs $5.00,
large TVs $10.00
1729 W Gulf To Lake
Lecanto
20565 W Penn Ave
Dunnellon
The Path Store
While supplies last!


YARD SALE

PINE RIDGE
Frl 9-2 & Sat 8-10 Pre-
cious moments, knick
knacks, toys, tools, lots
of new items & misc
5484 W. Corral Place


DANCE COSTUMES
Many different dance
costumes. Varying sizes.
Would like to sell whole
batch. $80 352-476-9563




HTC Droid Eris
Excellent condition!!!
Carrier unlocked! Extra
long-life battery, leather
case, hard-shell case,
USB cable, & charger.
$300 OBO; Call Mark @
(352)464-2644.




2 TABLES FOR FLOR-
IDA ROOM OR KITCHEN
I WHITE FORMICA 1
WOOD 30.00 EACH
3526375171
40QT COLEMAN ELEC-
TRIC COOLER LIKE
NEW $35 CAN USE IN
CAR 12 VOLT E-MAIL
PHOTO CALL 419-5981
AQUARIUM 10 GALLON
WITH ACCESSORIES
$50 352-613-0529
Backdrops for taking
pictures $25 each
Call 352-341-2399
BARBECUE GREAT
OUTDOORS GAS WITH
COVER GOOD CONDI-
TION $40 352-613-0529
Bogan Monopod
$15.00 each
Call 352-341-2399
Bogan Professional
Tripod #3051 $75.00
Call 352-341-2399
CARGO CARRIER
21x60x6. Used 3 times.
Paid $129, $60. Also
availabletrailer hitch and
balls. 352/513-4536
COMFORTER SET HAN-
NAH MONTANA IN-
CLUDES SHEETS AND
PILLOW CASES FULL
SIZE $50 352-613-0529
COMPUTER DESK...
Small / fair condi-
tion./25.00 Linda
341-4449
Display cases, good for
jewelry $10 each
Call 352-341-2399
EPAD NEW ANDROID
GOOGLE EPAD. 75.00
352-503-4646 OR
352-212-7788
FIREWOOD Split, dry
firewood. $100. Delivery
possible. 352-476-9563
FLOOR TILES...
12 x 12's/about 80
piecies.25.00/light colors
Linda 341-4449
Foot Bath plus
massager-heated, like
new $20. in box
Microsoft Scanner, new
w/PS & CD $15..
New white golf shoes
size 10 new $35.
(352) 382-3357
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL-JUMBO in excel
condition-immaculately
clean-$25 352 282 0220
JOHN EDGAR'S
Antiques, Collectibles
& Furniture
Invites You to A Big
Big MOVING SALE
JAN. 5-14, 9a-4p
7449 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, (352) 302-8146
Kulana 26 in Tandem
bike,loaded,xl saddle,
excel cond. $239 new,
sell $150 941-468-2602
MARTHA STEWART
Lighted tree.$45.00 Also
3 pc. lighted reindeer
set.$30.00 Very gd. cond.
352-344-5311
OSTER-GLASS JAR
BLENDER 12 SPEED
w/mini food
processor-excellent-$20
352-382-0220
OUTSIDE DOG HOUSE
Med. to Lge dog. 30W
32H 37D. $30.00
call Ruth
(352) 382-1000
WALL TILES... 4 & one
half X 4 and one
half/three boxes full/25.00
Linda 341-44449
WENGER TENT $40
LIKE NEW PERFECT
FOR 2 PEOPLE
419-5981


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 CIL


I~II


1-13 @ LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIck for UFS, 2012

"I gotta get new glasses."


opposing lounge
$25.00
Call 352-341-2399
WESTERN SADDLE
Western saddle tan and
brown approx. 16 in.
good cond. $100.00
352-513-4473
Youth Bed2 mattress,
fishing, boating, golf,
camping, hand &
power tools
(352) 445-0973




EXERCISE BIKE FAN
TYPE MADE IN USA.IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS REDUCED 75.00
352 637 5171
Hospital Bed,
like new condition,
clean,S$400 OBO,
(352) 897-4282
MANUAL WHEELCHAIR
WITH FOOTRESTS AND
LEG EXTENTIONS
ONLY 100.00
3526375171
MOBILITY POWER
CHAIR, Jet 1 exc cond.
new batteries,
Reduced!$450.0BO
(603) 991-8046
Wheelchair lift for car,
like new condition,
$350 OBO,
(352) 897-4282




BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676






WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




"NEW" LAP STEEL
PLAYS AND SOUNDS
PERFECT! READY TO
PLAY $100
352-601-6625


5 STRING
TRAVEL/STARTER
BANJO OPEN BACK
LIKE NEW PLAYS
GREAT! $85
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAGTUNER,STRIN
GS,STRAP,+MORE!"NEW'
PLAYS GREA'!$55
352-601-6625
CASIO LK-33 light-up
keyboard. Plays pro-
grammed songs if
wanted. $100. Playbooks
included. 352-476-9563
MUSIC LESSONS
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 352-422-7012




MOVING BOXS MOVING
BOXS SMALL.25
MED.50 L$1
352-726-3631




AB ROCKET $20 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTO GOOD
CONDITION 419-5981
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE OLDIE
BUT GOODIE ONLY
90.00 352 637 5171
MANUAL TREADMILL
HAS INCLINE WORKS
THE ARMS HAS ELEC-
TRONICS ONLY 85.00
352 637 5171
Stamina Aero Pilates
Rebounder Pro
XP556 w/extras,
Call for info.$300
(352) 382-5769
TORSO TRACK Brand
new, still in box. $50
352-476-9563
TREADMILL/WORKOUT
BENCH Weslow Pro 7.8
Treadmill, inclines, preset
workouts, safety lan-
yard.$175.00; Weiderpro
255 L Workout bench,
$50.00, Both items like
new. 352-795-5491
WEIDER-PRO Adjustable
Weight bench 500 lbs.
weight set, Retail $150
sell $75..
(352) 794-3672


-I

4 Boxes
Extra 12 gadge
shells $10 a box
(352) 503-2792
7 FOOT POOL TABLE
w/extra's 750.00 OBO
call 352-637-0167
BROWNING SWEET 16
SHOTGUN made in Bel-
gium mint condition
90% or better $1200
obo SERIOUS INQUIR-
IES ONLY MUST HAVE
FL DRIVERS LICENSE
352-598-5934
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
CANOE
16 foot aluminum $150
352-726-3631
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,400
352-344-8516
CONCEALED WEAPONS
COURSE
at the Inverness VFW,
Sat. Jan. 14, 2012,
10 am $55. The most
entertaining &
informative instruction
ever! Call 352-220-4386
for info & reservations
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
Golf Clubs -Mens,
Womens complete sets
w/bagsHybird set:
$200 each set
(352) 382-2457
POOL TABLE by Legacy
Billiards. Regulation 8',
solid wood, leather pock-
ets, camel felt, 1" slate.
All accessories. Price in-
cludes professional relo-
cation. $1300.
352-382-3962.
SAIGA AK-47 Russian
American Armory Com-
pany AK-47, 7.62X39mm
Extras, original box, strap,
mags and ammo.
$650 obo 527-4910


Admwft Ak
INA
4w

Z4 1 t A
Mv


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla. rms.,
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/lO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE 6th Av. Cry Riv
352-795-5455

* THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435




Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872


SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518





Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383

ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838


LOOK Brand New!
Custom textures & paint
* Ask about Popcorn
Removal (352)812-3388
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
& Sprays. Int/Ext.
Painting, since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
rear. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 *




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696


Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Liec.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work
Honest, reliable,
goodprices.Pres/was
paint Ins/Li c860-0085







Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




Citrus Cleaning Team
"Let us do your Winter
Cleaning." We also
have a handy man
for your needs.
527-2279/302-3348





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528


All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

352-795-5755






CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374









Let our DR Vac
Do the work
Call 502-6588
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
Leaves, TRIM, MULCH
Hauling FALL Clean
since '91 352 220-6761




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
RepairVisit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244





FREAK E ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
RlI off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201


Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens









Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
profess eional. Many





service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don t see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspeicius that

aeyou may be contact you


ing an unlicensed


wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re
quirements of the law.


provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.
ernment offices.


CITRUS SENIORS
SHUTTLE
DOCTORIPERSONAL
FLAT LOW FEE
MON-FRI 7AM-4PM
352-464-2946


L6. k
$60. Bahia Pallets
U-Pick Up. Special
Winter Pricing Call
Now!! 352-400-2221





A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est..Fire
wood avail.. 628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!







C12 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012



^ ^SCHWINN^ ^ Small Breed pup|
Man's bike, NEW, 21 yorkies, chihuah
spds. helmet, rear pomeranian, dachs
bracket, travel bag, $250.00 and u
bike lock, night lights & COME SEE US
xtra rear lights $215 HOWARDS FLE
(352) 322-6456 MARKET HOMOS.
TROLLING MOTOR Minn ROW i #1. 352 48
Kota, Riptide40,Tilt YORKIE, 4 yrs ok
Tiller,36" shaft with lbs, (man's dog &
EverStart band passed away
Marine Battery. Like New children, paid $8
$150.00 or best offer selling for $250.
352-382-4311 352-419-6838
| WE BUY GUNS |
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 ( limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$995.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
HOMEMADE BOX
TRAILER 10'LONG
FRAME. MEASURES
6LX4WX4H. $400.00
352-563-1519
Homemade Box Trailer,
5x10, good condition
$900 or best offer
(352) 341-2929



HIGH CHAIR Excellent
cond. Six positions and
reclines with removable
dishwasher-safe tray.
$45. Call 586-5680.


Sel orS


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




S.I



MM M

WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED- Liberty Meter
Will Pay Cash! Uses
Gold Sensor strips
(352) 527-7977



4 MALTESE
Pups, raised in living
room, very sweet, CKC,
FL Health Certs. Girls
$650 & boys $600.
352-212-4504,212-1258
7 Bullmastiff
Puppies
Adorable
$150. each
(352) 257-9508
AKC, Registered
English Bull Dog
Puppies for Sale
$1,800. (352) 543-0163
(727) 784-0732
(352) 493-5401
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Malti-Poo Puppies, 10
weeks, small, adorable,
shots, have parents
$350(352) 795-5204
Mini Long hair Dachs-
hunds blk & cream,
blk& tan choc & cream
M /F, H/C full blooded
$100 each 795-6870
352-220-4792
MINI-DACHSHUNDS I
have Mini-Dachshunds
for sale. Dapples, black
and tans, reds and
pibolds. Males and fe-
males. PPOP, florida
health cert, sample of
food and toy come with
each pup 352-463-7345
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fern $275Males $250
Yorkie Poos $400 F
M $375(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
starting@ $300. Home
raised, Beverly Hills,
FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net


Pies,
hua,
hunds
p.
AT
EA
ASSA
4-2113
d&5
hus-
y) No
100,
.00
8


Five boar goats,
females, some PG,
Must sell by Sunday
$335 takes all!
(352) 586-2590
FOR SALE
Ponies and horses,
used saddles and
tack,Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033
Thoroughbred,
experienced, kid
friendly Showing on
Sunday. $600
(352) 586-2590

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
Crystal River 3/1
$550, private in country
fenced yard
(352) 794-0475
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH furn., Priv. ranch
No pets. (386)871-5506
HOMOSASSA
2/2 $550. Month
352-464-3159
Homosassa
2/2 remodeled, in
ground pool, 1st Ist sec.
$550/m(352) 503-3363
HOMOSASSA
2/2, No Pets $500. Mo.
(352) 628-5696
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964




Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183

HOLIDAY SALE
Bad credit OK.!
New 2012 Jacobsen
w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200 sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
Buy for only $36,900
or have delivered
and set up with A/C,
heat, steps & skirting
only $2,600 down,
$379.97/mo.
for 20 years W.A.C.
Come by or call
352-621-9181
Taylor Made Homes

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From $499/month
Loaded.
3/2 From $399/month
Loaded.
Homes on Your Lot
0 Down.
800-622-2832 X 210




HERNANDO
3BR, 1BA, fenced yard,
$450, first & Sec.
(352) 212-9698




2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204

Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON '2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182


New Back Rm, 1.4 AC
Steal It! $30K Firm,
6.4 Easy Credit Finance
Appraised at $39,500
(352) 637-6608
Homosassa
3/2 DWMH Fleetwood
'96. All new roof, car-
pet, & Appls. REDUCED
$8K, to $46K, Quick
SALE due to ILLNESS
OPEN HOUSE 9-5 Daily
incls New years Eve &
day @ 7038 W. Jackson
Ln. call (352) 503-7328
COME SEE!!!!!!!
Homosassa
3/2, fenced yard
$525./mo $5K down
Owner Financ Avail
(352) 302-9217
HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/mo
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330
INVERNESS
2/2 SW, 2 nice big
additions / AC, fenced,
near lake, part furn.
$37k 352-341-1569
LECANTO
2 BR, SW on 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!
$17K OBO
352-586-2976
Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over I acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181




2/1 FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME,
Over 55 Park $190 Lot
Rent Village Pine, Inglis
Lot 4 A $9,500 OBO
(906) 281-7092
FLORAL CITY
1992 34FT Park Model,
furn., w/2 slides &
screen rm, Exc. cond.
Moonrise Resort, $5,000.
352-419-6894 726-2553
Furnished 14 x 50 w/
added enclosure, vinyl
& scrn. rm.55+ Lecanto
Park, SS appl's
New W/Dworkshop
w/power, Remodeled
inside/out $11,000 obo
(352) 418-5926
Homosassa Springs
2008 12x40 park model
home, completely
furnished, ready to
move in $23,500
Tony 828-674-9996
Inv. Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, florida room,
carport, $15K obo
(352) 419-5114
INVERENESS 55 +
Comm. 14X54 MH, 2/1
55' carport w/deck,
front scr room
w/storage shed, CHA
part furn, W/D, Reduce
to $5K, 352-344-1002
INVERNESS
55+park, 1/1 carport,
screen room, shed,
$7000 (352) 726-8071
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR 1.5 BA
for $2000. must be
approved 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled rent $600. long or
short Sell $54K OBO
(352) 307-4564
Rock Cr Canyon
Area
3/2 DW, 6acres
fenced, gated,
Rent or Buy owner
financing avail






(352) 302-4546














$800., 35 NE Hwy 12-563-9857
Crystal Rivert F
COA(352) 795-0021








AKView our webse
CRYSTAL RIVER







LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets


(352) 344-1025


- FiIm

Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500


HD cap access,.small
pet ok. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 BR 1 BA W/D hook
up, dishwasher, lawn
water & sewer $450 mo
(352) 212-9205
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg 2/1, W/D hkup, incld
water & lawn. $500 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
$450/$200 dp. incis Sat
TV electric, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450. no pets
628-7300 or 697-0310

INGLIS VILLAS
33 Tronu Drive
Ingls, Florida 34449
3521-447-0106
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8a-5p
Ask About Our
SPECIALS *
RENTAL ASSISTANT
AVAILABLE
Foreclosures
Welcome
This institution is an
equal opportunity
Provider & Employer
-
-

INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 $575 352-422-2393
Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bedrm $500
352-270-0218/216-0012,
RAINBOW
GARDEN
APARTMENTS
11850 Rainbow
Garden Circle.
Dunnellon, Fla

(352) 465-3309
TDD #711

OPEN
Mon. & Tues. 9a-4p
Wed. & Thurs. 9a-3p
Friday 9am-Noon
Lunch Noon-lpm

Affordable living for
seniors 62 and older
with or without
children. Rental
Assistance Available
to those who qualify.
1 & 2 Bedrooms
"This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.





SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

Absolutely Beautiful
Place to Call Home!
near the mall &
7 Rivers Hosp. fishing
walking trails near by
in a old Florida setting
Quite, clean,, well
maintain .Central
laundry room.









HERNANDO
2/2, 400 E Glasboro,
$675. mo 352-697-1907
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8400 or Least to Own
from $139/mo. $800.
down + LOt rent @
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Heat Pool/wtr frt comm
$600. mo 317-442-1063



CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer incd
$600mo 352-558-4477
HOMOSASSA
Extra Clean & Large
2/1, tile firs. Laun Rm.
Pet OK $450 mo
352-263-3382
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great Area no smk/pets
$6O00/mo. 1st, Ist & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp





BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 20S. Osceola,
$500. mo. 352-697-1907
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.


CLASSIFIED




2/1 $500. mo.
Skip Craven, Broker
/Owner 352-464-1515



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 +Carport. Off 488
near power plant.
$700/mo Incl. cable
352-257-8695






A l3k .


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2 $650.2/1/1 $600
P & R Realty
Gloria Bonner 697-0375
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1,2155W. Greenway,
Remodeled $590. mo
352-697-1907
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, 2356 W. Jungle,
$565. mo 352-697-1907
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $750. mo. w/ opt
to Buy (352) 220-8893
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, tile firs,
nice area, across rails
to trails $825. no pets
(352) 598-0235
CR/HOM 3/2/1
RC Elem,
fenced, $575
352-220-2447 212-2051
Crystal River
2/1 $550 mo+ dep.
semi furn.Call Mike W.
352-400-1387
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
House for rent Please
contact for details.

$600.00 per month
352-212-9682
CRYSTAL RIVER
Woodland Est. 3/2
$850. (352) 220-8365
DUNNELLON 3/2/2
RENT TO OWN
Close to Rainbow River
RUBLESRENTALS.COM
(561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718 attr 7pm
DUNNELLON, R.L.E.
2/1/2, 1 AC, $550/ mo.
352-572-2993. Victor
FLORAL CITY
3/1/2, 6 acres, private,
furn. $800. 352-212-2264
HOMOSASSA
3/2 Lg. Lot, Ist/last/dep.
$750.mo 352-228-3842
Homosassa Springs
3/1 No pets,Clean $800
mo. (305)619-0282, Cell
Homosassa/SMW
$450/up 2/1 dup
$575 2/1/1 home
$595 SMW 2/2/1 Villa
$875 SWM 3/2/2 villa
$695 meadows 3/2/2
Riverlinks Realty
(352) 628-1616
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Very clean well
maintained Lease. $750
mo., Fst, ist, sec. Near
schools, Hospital. 4212 S
Apopka, 561-395-5735
Inverness
3/2 clean & spacious,
close to hospital,$650
1st & sec.leave mess
(352) 270-3859
INVERNESS
3/2, First/Last/Security
carport, fenced yard,
$700. 352-726-7692
INVERNESS
3/2/2 & 2/1/I, close to
town & shopping
352-212-3412
INVERNESS
3/2/2, Highlands
Starting @ $730.
352-601-2615
Inverness 4/2 Pool
$1400 1st/last
352-419-6724
Inverness Hghlands
2/2/1 scrn. Irg. Pool fncd
yrd, tiled firs. Pets Okay
1st, last sec. $800 mo.
(352) 476-2209
INVERNESS
Large 2/2/1 fenced
yard, pet w/ additnal
fee. 1st & sec $700 mo.
352-422-5482
SUGARMILL
WOODS. 3/2/2 golf
course home. Pool
w/solar & elect heat,
stainless appl. W/D
mediation garden,
basic yard care incl.
Golf, tennis & social
memberships avail.
$1295. 352 382-1373


LRG 3/3/2.5 on 3 acres,
scr lanai,$875/month
(352) 628-5272



CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Furnished, Apt.
Qn. Bd., & Qn. Sofa Bd
$1,000 mo. incl util.
Access to Gulf
(863) 660-9383
or (863) 860-3588
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2/2, Custom Built
Pool Home on acre
2700 sf. MOVE SPECIAL
$699. 352-489-3997



CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/ 125wkly
$430/475mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428
FLORAL CITY
Furn. Rooms Avail
(352) 637-5708
Inverness
2 rooms both mast
suites, full hse prev.
$450ea incls util.
(678) 301-0009



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, Custom built
in '08 by Wheeler
Construction $129,500
Call (407) 739-2646 or
407-442-3597



3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yrd. new roof,
dble carport, $57, 700
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076
RENT TO OWNI
No credit check, 3
bdrm. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on I acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
352-860-1872 or
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORDY GURD1BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Towel off a double agent (1) Every answer isa rhymin
1. Towel off a double agent (1) air of words (like FAT C
I| and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Singer Lady's epic tales (2) they will fit in the letter


3. Queue to get baling string (1)


4. Hogback on the Golden Gate (1)

------I----0*--I---:


ig
AT
E), and


squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word.

@2012 UFS, Dist. byUniv. Uclick for UFS


5. Griever in a no-escape place (2)


6. Search engine's cavalry horns (2)


7. Stuffed-up breather's winter scarves (2)


SHIMalN sHa hANiS *L SHOfll S 0TOOO09'9 .HNHOO HaNOMIAT s
a9OIH aOI UT HNI HNIA'8 SVDVS SVOVO 'E AdS AI *I
1-13-12 SH[ASNV









3 /2/,FLRo+Asci a





Btarbar L.rookP.A


Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus
garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $259,900.
352-860-0444
REDUCED TO $139,000
2BR/2BA house with
heated pool & fireplace
on I acre lot in Citrus
Hills. Exc. cond. Owner
finance with D/P +
approved credit.
Call 304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.




Apache Shores
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
opportunity, $35.000,
352-322-0454





PFor Sale l
117 S Lunar Terrace
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Enclosed FR, Garage &
Carport, Large Yard.
UPDATED MUST SEE
$74.900 352-344-9290
mavery3@tampabay.rr.
com
3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft.
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.InvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
FOR SALE OR LEASE
2/2/1, enclosed porch,
Central Heat and Air
All Kitchen Appliances
$95.K (352) 742-2770

YOU'LL THIS!
Have it all! Inverness
Over Flowing With
Value!!! Highlands,
S.Carol Terrace. Huge
1 Family. Major up-
dates you'll enjoy
only in a new home.
Owner down sized,
will negotiate. In
nature's paradise this
4 bedroom 3 bath on
2.8 acres fits a family
with children who
love to play explorer.
Own deep well (no
water bills), plus new
whole-house water
treatment system,
16x34 in-ground
screened pool with
fountain and lights.
New 2-zone energy
efficient heat/cool;
new full attic R-30
insulation; new attic
solar fan; new
ducts/vents; updated
bathrooms, 2 new
AirMaster air cleaning
units to remove dust,
pollen, mold spores.
Majestic trees. Extra
long concrete drive-
way. Watch the deer
play from the lanai or
living room window.
Newer (2002) Timber-
line roof, ridge vents,
7 solar tubs thru out
the house. Two hot
water heaters. Wired
for generator. Com-
pletely chain link
fenced. Corral your
horses, park your
boat or RV. ON
property 7 palm trees
value miniumn $10K
each. Occupancy at
funding. Approx. 2700
sq ft under air.
$212,500.
(Price below Estimate
Zillow.com) Contact
owner, 352-556-1510,
352-238-6274 e-mail:
rosepub@excite.com

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage
and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties

Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.
Possess proof of liability insurance.
S. i Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.

,wJct2..I o, 1 Email: mgaouette@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River


Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
Rent $700/mo
or purchase $125K
neg 908-322-6529




2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$119,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
corn (727) 415-7728
CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
REDUCED$100K 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
LAKE ROUSSEAU
South side of Lake
2 bedrm cottage
fenced, 1/2 acre,
boat dock. $85,000
775-230-2240

Thank You To All
Our Loyal Clients


Happy Holidays

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
FLORAL CITY
FOR SALE 2.5 ACRES,
FENCED, ELECTRIC
AND WELL. $33000
CONTACT BILL
407-709-0888




6550 W CYRUS
2 1/2 acres on SE corner
of Cyrus & Donovan.
Mkt. Value: $20,000
Assessed Value:$24,858
Sell for $18,000
Call 828-586-2283
LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse, water
sewer are avail. MUST
SEE!!! 352-382-0535



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165Kobo
352 795-2027/ 634-4745





For Sale ,,,
10 ACRES FOR
SALE SANTERRA
RANCHES SUM-
TER COUNTY
Beautiful 10 acre vacant
property in deed re-
stricted neighborhood
of Santerra Ranches in
Sumterville, Sumter
County for Sale Ma-
ture Oak trees and
open pasture make a
perfect atmosphere for
your future home and
barn..start living the
Florida country lifestyle
asking $110,000 Call
George (954) 383-7109




INVERNESS,
Beautiful Wooded Lot
on Edged Dry Lake,
100 x 150 $8,900
Owner Finance
(352) 621-1664
Premium Home Site on
Sky View Golf Course
Great price to build
your new custom,
maintenance FREE
home. Country Club
membership including
45,000 sf fitness & spa
$42,000 OBO
Call (910) 512-2550




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453


Homos sa
Hom:: I


Citrus C unty
Hom:s I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m
Canoe Blackhawk-14,
fiberglass, new paint,
seats with backs, cush-
ions & paddles $495
(813) 361-4929,
Hernando




12 ft. Native Kayak
with electric motor,
battery, paddle, and a
sail, and extras,
$500.
(352) 628-3097
'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
14' Aluminum Boat
772 Mercury Trolling
Motor, swivel seats, tilt
trlr. New Tires $1,450
(352) 341-1569
20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trlr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453
'97, Fiberglass Boat
1 Oft 6", Light weight
1995 Evinrude, 15HP,
low hrs., $800 obo
352-628-7207
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHFelect. New
135 Honda,4S, new EZ
Load trlr. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
SEAPRO
2003, 1700 cc, 90HP
Yamaha, 551b. troll mtr
canopy top, alum. trlr.,
2 live wells, shallow
draft, Let's test it out!
$10K obo 352-344-8448
SUNTRACKER
20FT, with trailer, new
20HP Yamaha 4-stroke,
$5,000. (352) 419-6894
(352) 726-2553
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com


























2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loadedsell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
'94 Fleetwood
454 engine Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self
contained, 79k
$9,800. 352-795-6736
'95 Seabreeze
33 foot 24k miles,454
gas engine, $6500
352-220-9067
BOUNDER 34'
1987,454 Chevy GREAT
CONDITION, Everything
works, 79K mikes $4000
cell (719) 331-3886

I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974 (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35'Triton
V-10 gas, 44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV fully
equipped incl tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incls hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750
WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292




2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 36 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $43,500
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen. gas
tank, alumwheels


Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945


Sel trgI


Feather liite,loaded,
like new, w/extra's
Must SEE $6800
(352) 726-9647
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434

SOLD
WILDERNESS
'06, 27 ft., (fiberglass)
1 slide out, Q.bed de-
luxe upgrades, sips 6 7




Inside cargo cover
for a '09 and prior
Equinox,$60
(352) 344-4944




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CARS Any Condition
Up to $500., Free
Towing 352-445-3909

Happv New Year
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Cond
or not .Titled,no title, no
problem. Paying up
to$25K any make, any
model Call A.J.
813-335-3794/ 531-4298




3 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 12
Estate Adventure
Auction
Prev:12PM Auction 3PM
2007 Camry 14K ml.
Estate car, hand &
mech. tools. Quality &
leather furn., Hall full,
surprises- New-Antiques

SFRI. JAN. 13
ON SITE ESTATE Auction
111 Cabot St., Inverness
Prev:8AM Auction 9AM
Entire contents of home
Incl. Whole House LP
Gen. Loads- Fun&Value

SAT.. JAN. 14
LIVE & ONLINE Antlaue
Collectible POSTCARDS
Prev:11 Auction 1pm
100+ lots- vintage &
antique, Linen, silk,
Embroidered, Holiday,
adv, 52nd Canadian
Milltary-WWI,
Ham radio cards+++
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc
'01 Crown Vic LX
Very good cond,
Low mi, $3,900 obo
352-726-2139 or
352-637-2258
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
CHEVROLET
'03, Cavalier, CS 4 DR.
loaded, 78K mil. auto
economy, 4 cyl., AC
CD, tilt, cruise, CLEAN!
$4,850. 352-212-9383
CHEVROLET
2001 Tracker, 101K mi.,
6-cyl., good cond.
$3,800. (352) 344-2752
FORD
2008 Focus 4 door
Sedan SE,automatic,
only 19,700 miles, Silver,
carport kept, great shape.
$11,000 OBO
352-563-0730

Happy New Year
Consignment USA
WEDO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

Hyundai '05
Sonata, V6, low mis.
auto. Pwr steering, a/c,
good cond.$6k. obo
(352) 465-6224
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
LINCOLN
2001 Town Car,
new tires & brakes,
runs good $2800. obo
(352) 533-3147
MARQUIS
1997 Mercury Marquis
128K, $2500 or best of-
fer 352-628-5487
IMMACULATE

Mazda 01
Miada MX5
convertible 61k mi. exc
cond $8,250.(352)


419-4066/228-7670
MERCURY
'98, Mystique LX, 4 DR,
loaded, low mi, leather,
great MPG, auto, Clean
$3,250. 631-512-1667




863-0113 FCRN


TOYOTA 03
Silver Camry XLE, 4 dr
4 cyl. auto 82k mi.
REDUCE D for quick sale
$8200 (352) 795-0381
TOYOTA
'09, PRIUS
Under 50K miles,
pkge 5 leather seats
$15,750 (352) 746-3663
VW Jetta '00
diesel, auto. a/c, CD,
good runner $3500
(352) 447-2330




LINCOLN
2-1958 Continentals,
One restorable the
other for parts, good
rubber, $5,000
(352) 637-4642
MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
80K mi, one owner
shows like new $6,500
(352) 726-0258







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
1988 1500 Choo-Choo
Custom Red on red paint,
run great, many new
parts & tires. $2000. Flo-
ral City 610-703-6157
CHEVY '02 F10
Extra Cab, LF, 3rd door,
auto 6 cyc 117K mi,
extra clean $5400
(352) 212-4823
FORD 04
Lariat, super duty die-
sel, crew cabtan,
loaded, goose neck
hitch, new tires, brks,
140K mis. well maint
$12,500(352) 344-4087
FORD 95
F250, 4x4,460 eng.
Ext-cab. exc cond.$5k/
trade for sm truck or
vehicle of same value
352 302-9269/628-6985

Happy New Year
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org




Hyundai
'04 Santa FE. 100k mi.
good cond. Priced
under blue book.
$5500.352-422-0751




'91 Dodge
Caravan-Loaded
Excellent shape,
1 owner,$1795 or best
(352) 621-5265
CHRYSLER '02
Voyager LX, Slver, 3 rd
row seat, 6 cyc 109k mi
s,. $4995 (352) 212-4823




2004 Homes Motor
Cycle Hauler
Trailer 12 x 6
Like New $1,900
(716) 969-2781
2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
Harley Davidson
04, $9700., Bagger
Crystal River
Cell (727) 207-1619
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731



HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2008 FLHTCUSE7 CVO
Ultra Classic Electra
Glide CVO Screaming
Eagle 110 CI 105th Anni-
versary. Extreamly Clean!
$27,000.00
786-877-6097
KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 800 Custom
Only 2,100 miles
Garage Kept Like New
with Extras
Illness forces Sale $4,500
352-527-2286
KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760

Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2003 HONDA
GOLDWING TRIKE
W/TRAILER. LOADED
$18,995
2012 GOLDWING
801 MILES
$22,500.00
2004 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSICLOADED
$10,750.00
2009 HARLEY 1200N
ALL BLACK


$6,995.00

FINANCE AVAIABLEII
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
352-330-0047


Sel Strg


1/21 sale Unit's C6, 1, A4, C8/C9, 55 Suncoast Storage & Rentals, LLC
PUBLIC NOTICE
Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC according to provisions of the "Florida
Self-Storage Facility Act," Chapter 83, Part IV, Section 83.806 of the Florida Statutes,
hereby gives NOTICE OF DISPOSITION. Suncoast Storage and Rentals, LLC, 9034 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448 will dispose of the contents of the storage
spaces) listed below via competitive bidding, on Jan. 21. 2012 at 1 PM. Successful
bidder must pay in cash. All purchased items are sold as is and must be removed at
the time of the sale.
Space Number Occupant Contents
C6 Brown, Shawn Household
1 Cargal, William Household
A4 Clark, Robert Household
C8/C9 Holland, Charles Household
55 Redinger, Lari Household
January 6 and 13, 2012.


CIASSIFIEDS



'I


'I


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 Cl3


N i


864-0113 FCRN
Williams, Carrie Mae Peel 2011-CP-000361 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 2011-CP-000361
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CARRIE MAE PEEL WILLIAMS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CARRIE MAE PEEL WILLIAMS, deceased, whose
date of death was February 22, 2011 and whose social security number is
263-12-5277. The names and address of the Personal Representative and the Per-
sonal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
Personal Representative:
/s/ JEANETTE I. McKIBBEN
15931 NW County Road #231, Gainesville, FL 32606 Telephone No. 352-485-1747
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ HERBERT M. WEBB, III, Attorney at Law Florida Bar No. 160112
4400 NW 23rd Ave., Suite E, Gainesville, FL 32606 Telephone No. 352-372-5546
January 6 and 13, 2012.


869-0120 FCRN
Palcovich, Helen D. 2011-CP-517 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-517 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN D. PALCOVICH
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of HELEN D. PALCOVICH, deceased, whose date of
death was March 20, 2011, and whose social security number are xxx-xx-5939, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 13, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ DORIE E. PALCOVICH
1255 Nuuanu Ave #E2504, Honolulu, Hawaii 96817
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Marie T. Blume, Florida Bar No. 0493181 Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, FL 34451 Telephone: (352) 726-7778 Fax: (352) 726-7798
January 13 and 20, 2012.

870-0120 FCRN
Sasse, Frank 2011-CP-771 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011 CP 771 Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF FRANK SASSE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Frank Sasse, deceased, whose date of death
was September 5, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 13, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ William Sasse
61 Haliday Street, Clark, NJ 07066
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Kara Evans, Attorney for William Sasse Florida Bar Number: 381136
5308 Van Dyke Road, Lutz, FL 33558 Telephone: (813) 758-2173 Fax: (813) 926-6517
E-Mail: evanskeenedaol.com
January 13 and 20, 2012.


871-0120 FCRN
Snell, Ruth E. 2011 CP 776 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011 CP 776 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF RUTH E. SNELL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of RUTH E. SNELL, deceased, whose date of death
was September 14, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is January 13, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ David Eugene Snell
1105 West Cairo Drive, Dunnellon, Florida 34434
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 398535 Attny for David Eugene Snell
Slaymaker & Nelson, P.A. 2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352)726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223 E-Mail: tom@slaymakerlaw.com
January 13 and 20, 2012.


872-0120 FCRN
Birch, Rita C., 201 -CP-893 Notice to Creditors (Summ.Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2011-CP-893
IN RE: ESTATE OF RITA C. BIRCH,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of RITA C. BIRCH, deceased, File No. 2011-CP-893 by the Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date of death was Sept.
17, 2011, that the total value of the estate is $10,000.00, and that the name and ad-
dress of those to whom it has been assigned by such order is:
DAVID A. BIRCH 8700 North Star Blaze Drive, Crystal River, Florida 34428
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other t hose for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 13, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ DAVID A. BIRCH
8700 North Star Blaze Drive, Crystal River Florida 34428
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
/s/ PATRICIA M. MORING Florida Bar No.: 712809 Telephone: (352) 795-1797
Moring And Moring, P.A. 7655W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Suite 12, Crystal River, FL 34429
January 13 and 20, 2012.


873-0120 FCRN
Cox, Charles Andrew 20 F CP 905 Notice to Cred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE No.: 2011 CP 905
IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES ANDREW COX,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Charles Andrew Cox, deceased, whose date of
death was November 15, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the per-
sonal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 13, 2012.
Personal Representatives:
/s/ Charles Haddon Cox
2430 W. Laureen Street, Lecanto, FL 34461
/s/ Patricia Parkhill Cox


2430 W. Laureen Street, Lecanto, FL 34461
Attorney for Personal Representatives: /s/ Dawn Ellis My Florida Probate, P.A.
Dawn Ellis, Esq., for the firm Florida Bar No. 091979 P.O. Box 952, Floral City, Florida
34436-0952 Telephone: (352) 726-5444 E-mail: dawn@myfloridaprobate.com
January 13 and 20, 2012.


874-0120 FCRN
Novak, Anne E 2011-CP-898 Notice to Creditors (Summ, Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-898
IN RE: ESTATE OF ANNE E. NOVAK
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Anne E. Novak, deceased, File Number 2011-CP-898, by the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of death
was October 11, 2011: that the total value of the estate is $14,000.00 and that the
names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Janette Hamilton 7 Abbey Road, Dalkeith, Midlothian SCOTLAND EH22
Mhairi-Jane Ramage 210 Newbattle Abbey Crescent Dalkeith, Midlothian


N i


'I I.


SCOTLAND EH22 3LU
Kellie Hutchison 111 Newbattle Abbey Crescent Dalkeith, Midlothian
SCOTLAND EH22 3LP
Kathryn Holmes 32 Polton Cottages Lasswade, Midlothian SCOTLAND EH22
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 13, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Janette Hamilton
7 Abbey Road Dalkeith, Midlothian Scotland EH22
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
January 13 and 20, 2012.


875-0120 FCRN
Prosser, Lillian 2011-CP-854 Notice To Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2011-CP-854
IN RE: ESTATE of LILLIAN PROSSER
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Lillian Prosser, deceased, whose date of death
was July 16, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 13, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Judith M. Prosser
3404 Noyes Avenue, Charleston, West Virginia 25304
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Fla. Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone:(352) 726-1211
January 13 and 20, 2012.


876-0120 FCRN
Sullivan, Kenneth 201 -CP-786 Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-786
IN RE: ESTATE OF KENNETH SULLIVAN
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been
entered in the Estate of Kenneth Sullivan, deceased, File Number 2011-CP-786, by
the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was July 29, 2010: that the total value of the estate is $4,750.00 and that the
names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
Karen Sullivan, 7765 West Victoria, Chicago, Illinois 60630
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is January 13, 2012.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Karen Sullivan
7765 West Victoria, Chicago, IL 60630
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/ Michael Mounljoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
January 13 and 20, 2012.


877-0120 FCRN
Houston, Paul J. 2011-CP-841 Notice To Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2011-CP-841
IN RE: ESTATE of PAUL J. HOUSTON
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Paul J. Houston, deceased, whose date of
death was October 15, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 13, 2012.
Personal Representative:
/s/ William G. Houston
3935 Basin Harbor Road, Vergennes, VT 05491
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Fla. Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone:(352) 726-1211
January 13 and 20, 2012.


854-0113 FCRN
Vs, Ponficos, Andrew S 09-2011 -CA-003415, Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-003415
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANDREW S PONTICOS, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: ANDREW S PONTICOS
Last Known Address: 6 Byrsonima Court, Homosassa, FL 34446-4607
Also Attempted At: 7 Byrsonima Court West, Homosassa FL 34446
Also Attempted At: 355 Elmcroft Boulevard, Apt 6201, Rockville MD 20850 5684
Also Attempted At: 19 Pagoda Court, Homosassa, FL 34446
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 24, BLOCK B46, CYPRESS VILLAGE, SUGARMILL WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 86 THROUGH 150 INCLUSIVE, PLAT
BOOK 10, PAGE 1 THROUGH 150, INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK 11 PAGES 1 THROUGH
16, INCLUSIVE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AS AMENDED IN
PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87A OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before February. 6,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no sots to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days
of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at: Citrus County, John Sullivan
(352) 341-6700. You can also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA
Accommodation Request Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA
Coordinator in your county.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 27 day of December, 2011.
Betty Strifler, As Clerk of the Court
(Seal)
/s/ By /s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk

January 6 and 13,2012. 11-09099


855-0113 FCRN
Vs, Bellman, Marguerite E 09-2011-CA-004064, Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-004064
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARGUERITE E. BELLMAN, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: JASON K. BELLMAN
Last Known Address: 6301 West Cavalry Lane, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Also Attempted At: 8257 Pinehurst Road, Pasadena MD 21122 5736
Also Attempted At: 2124 Beach Drive, Pasadena MD 21122 5706
Current Residence Unknown
TO: MARGUERITE E. BELLMAN
Current Residence: 8257 PINEHURST ROAD, PASADENA MD 21122
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 15, BLOCK 161, PINE RIDGE UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 37 THROUGH 50, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before February. 6,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 27 day of December, 2011.
Betty Strifler, As Clerk of the Court


Noie oCeios


Foreclosum Sa:le]
Acdon Nodces


Fomclosum S:Iel
Action Nodc s I


Fomclosum Sale/
Acdon Nodces I







C14 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


/s/ By /s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk


January 6 and 13,2012. 11-10079


856-0113 FCRN
Vs, Madronal, Louis A, 09-2011 -CA-002616, Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-002616
FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LOUIS A. MADRONAL AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE ORTA FAMILY LIVING TRUST,
DATED NOVEMBER 4, 1997, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE ORTA FAMILY LIVING TRUST
DATED NOVEMBER 4, 1997
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 5, TRACT 10 OF BRENTWOOD, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 12, PAGES 70 TO 73, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before February. 6,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial
Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700, within seven (7) working days of your re-
ceipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired call, 1-800-955-8771, Florida
Relay Service 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 22 day of December, 2011.
Betty Strifler, As Clerk of the Court
(Seal)
/s/ By /s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk

January 6 and 13, 2012. 10-53172


857-0113 FCRN
Vs, Pietroburgo, Sebastian heirs 09-2011-CA-004107 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-004107
NEWEST BANK, F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF SEBASTIAN PIETROBURGO
AKA SEBASTIAN L. PIETROBURGO, et al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN CREDITORS OF THE ESTATE OF SEBASTIAN PIETROBURGO
AKA SEBASTIAN L. PIETROBURGO
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Residence Unknown

TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF
SEBASTIAN PIETROBURGO AKA SEBASTIAN L. PIETROBURGO
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT #1 IN BLOCK #392, ON MAP OF INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST SUBDIVISION, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OF PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 19, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before February. 6,
2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT
LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY
UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 22 day of December, 2011.
Betty Strifler As Clerk of the Court
(Seal)
/s/ By /s/ Kathy Stalbaum As Deputy Clerk

January 6 and 13, 2012. 11-13795


858-0113 FCRN
Vs. Paradiso, Anthony 09-2011-CA-004050 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-004050

FANNIE MAE ("FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION")
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY PARADISE; MELINDA PARADISE; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS A NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

To the following Defendant(s):
ANTHONY PARADISE MELINDA PARADISE
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 13, BLOCK 299, CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 116 THROUGH 129, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

a/k/a 3166 W RUSTY PLACE, CITRUS SPRINGS, FLORIDA 34433-

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324, on or before Feb.
6, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice
in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a
disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please
contact the Court Administrator at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450- 4299,
Phone No. (352) 637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or
pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice im-
paired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services).

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court this 29 day of December, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk

January 6 and 13, 2012. 11-05986 LBPS


859-0113 FCRN
Vs, Weills, Barbara 2011-CA-003718 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-003718
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BARBARA WEILLS, ET. AL,
Defendant(s),
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CASPER WILCZYNSKI A/K/A CASPER J. WILCZYNSKI AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
CASPER WILCZYNSKI A/K/A CASPER J. WILCZYNSKI if alive, and/or dead his (their) un-
known heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by,
through, under or against him (them).
Residence is unknown.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following
property in CITRUS County, Florida:

SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "A"

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700
South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 670-2299, within 30 days
after the first publication of this notice, and to file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or Petition.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 27 day of December, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts, As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of cer-
tain assistance, please contact the ADA Coordinator, Telephone (352) 341-6400, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, within 2 working days of you receipt
of this notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.

EXHIBIT "A" LEGAL DESCRIPTION


BEGIN AT THE MOST NORTHERLY CORNER OF LOT 7, BLOCK J, MAYFAIR GARDEN
ACRES, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGES 141 AND 142, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 05 MINUTES WEST
ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 6, BLOCK J, A DISTANCE OF 6.43 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 13 MINUTES WEST 44.39 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 47
MINUTES EAST 102.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 15 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST
116.49 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 206, AT PAGE 562, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD
SOUTH 73 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 75 FEET AND SOUTH 57 DEGREES 55
MINUTES WEST 2.34 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHEASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT
7, BLOCK J, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 05 MINUTES WEST 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING A/K/A LOT 7, BLOCK A, YATES SCENIC GARDENS, UNRECORDED.

January 6 and 13, 2012. BBWC2603/aq


PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2011-CC-3839

GENE KOLEN and CATHERINE KOLEN,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ALEXIS L. PULPHUS CHAPPELL, as Co-Personal Representative, heir at law, and benefi-
ciary of THE ESTATE OF EVELYN JEAN PULPHUS; WILLIAM E. THORNHILL, as Co-Personal
Representative, heir at law, and beneficiary of THE ESTATE OF EVELYN JEAN PULPHUS;
ANGELA KIRKLAND f/k/a ANGELA E. BOONE, as heir at law, and beneficiary of THE
ESTATE OF EVELYN JEAN PULPHUS; KEVIN A. TOLLIVER, as heir at law, and beneficiary
of THE ESTATE OF EVELYN JEAN PULPHUS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC, a Colorado lim-
ited liability company; JOHN DOE and/or JANE DOE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S);and all
parties claiming by, through, under or against the name Defendants, and all un-
known natural persons, if alive and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their
several and respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, or under those unknown natural person; the several and
respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or other persons claiming
by, through, under or against the Defendants and all claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of
the above named or described Defendants, or parties claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: ALEXIS L. PULPHUS CHAPPELL, as Co-Personal Representative, 16223 Sanford Ave-
nue, Cleveland, Ohio 44110; WILLIAM E. THORNHILL, as Co-Personal Representative,
1051 Blue Jay Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45231; and ANGELA KIRKLAND f/k/a ANGELA E.
BOONE, 14615 Burbank Blvd, Sherman Oaks, California 91411; on this 27 day of Dec.,
2011 (last known addresses), if alive and if dead, their unknown spouse, heirs, devi-
sees, legatees, grantees, assigns, successors, lienors, creditors, trustees, or other
claimants, and all other parties claiming by and through, under or against the above
named Defendant(s), or any one of them who are not known to be dead or alive;
and all unknown natural persons if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or
alive, their several and respective successors, their unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, or other
parties claiming by, through or under those unknown natural persons, and the sev-
eral and respective unknown directors, trustees, or other claimants, successors in in-
terest, shareholders, assigns, and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, un-
der or against any corporation (existing or dissolved, domestic, or foreign) or other
legal entity named as a Defendant; and all other claimants, persons, or parties, nat-
ural or corporate, or other form of legal entity, or whose exact legal status is un-
known, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendant or parties
or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands hereinafter de-
scribed and involved in this lawsuit.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for the following property in Citrus County,
Florida; LOT 25, IN BLOCK 38, OF UNIT 3-A, OF BEVERLY HILLS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 1, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA, has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to it on James A. Neal, Jr., Esquire of James A. Neal,
Jr., P.A., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 213 Courthouse Square, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450, on or before February 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on the Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.

DATED this 27 day of December, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, as Clerk of the Court
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk

Januray 6 and 13, 2012.


861-0113 FCRN
Vs, Fusco, Susan heirs 09-2011-CA-004042 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-004042

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF
SUSAN FUSCO, DECEASED; RICHARD FUSCO, HEIR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD
FUSCO, HEIR; JESSICA FUSCO, HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; FAIRMONT VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1l;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES
OF SUSAN FUSCO, DECEASED; RICHARD FUSCO, HEIR;
Whose residence are/is unknown.

YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the
above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon
the plaintiff's attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive,
Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within
thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a
suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit:

Lot 23, Block 4, FAIRMONT VILLAGE FIRST ADDITION, according to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 13, Pages 97 through 99, of the Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida.

If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the
Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's attorney, Law
Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1328,
telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publi-
cation of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or petition.
DATED at CITRUS County this 28 day of December, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(Seal)
By /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact John Sullivan, ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2
working days of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at 352-341-6700. You
can also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA. Accommodation Re-
quest Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in your
county.

January 6 and 13, 2012.


862-0113 FCRN
Vs, Von Kuehlman, William 09-2011-CA-003524 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-2011-CA-003524 DIVISION:

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA2 MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OA2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM VON KUEHLMAN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: SUE STANLEY
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1471 N Lagoon PT, Inverness, FL 34453
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in CITRUS County, Florida:

LOTS 15 AND 16, BLOCK 295 OF INVERNESS HIGHLANDS SOUTH, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 51 THROUGH 66, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa,
Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the
Citrus County Chronicle.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 27 day of December, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Court
(Court Seal)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk

"See Americans with Disabilities Act- If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in the proceeding, you are entitled at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone 352-341-6700
Fax: 352-341-7008

January and 13, 2012. F10035582


878-0120 FCRN
Vs. Torregiante, Joseph 2011-CA-004236 Notice of Action Foreclosure
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2011-CA-004236 Divsiion No. Section

NEWEST BANK, FSB.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOSEPH TORREGIANTE; et al.,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY

TO: JOSEPH TORREGIANTE RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH TORREGIANTE whose address is unknown but last
known address is 5473 S. GARCIA ROAD, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448
TRACY TORREGIANTE RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TRACY TORREGIANTE whose address is unknown but last
known address is 5473 S. GARCIA ROAD, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448


Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if
remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming
by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned
named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such
of the unknown named Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise
not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
described property, to-wit:

LOT 8, B.L. GORE, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, A PORT OF LOT 27, HOMOSASSA
COMPANY'S SUBDIVISION OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 3, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 38, HOMOSASSA COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, THENCE NORTH 2
DEGREES 41' 25" EAST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 38 A DISTANCE OF 65.34 FEET
TO THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A COUNTY ROAD AS DESCRIBED IN
DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 7, PAGE 101, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 15 DEGREES 08' WEST ALONG SAID NORTH-
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 677.26 FEET, THENCE NORTH 2 DEGREES
41' 25" EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE POINT


OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 18' 35" EAST 100 FEET, THENCE NORTH 2 DE-
GREES 41' 25" EAST PARALLEL TO SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 108.71 FEET,
MORE OR LESS TO THE WATERS OF THE HOMOSASSA RIVER, THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES
18' 35" WEST ALONG SAID WATERS A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF SAID COUNTY ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 2 DEGREES 41' 25" WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 108.71 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING.

more commonly known as 5473 S GARCIA ROAD, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448

This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, to it on Plaintiff's attorney, GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, PA,
whose address is 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110, Tampa, Florida 33607, on or before
30 days after date of first publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4 day of January 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, CITRUS County, Florida
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk

"In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to
any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, CITRUS County, 110
NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450, County Phone: 352-341-6430 TDD
1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service."

January 13 and 20, 2012. 800669.001246/jc


879-0120 FCRN
Vs, Ahrens, Nicole J. Coon 2011 -CA-004202 Notice ofAction Foreclosure
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY,
Case #: 2011-CA-004202 Division #:

Nationstar Mortgage LLC,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Nicole J. Coon Ahrens a/k/a Nicole J. Coon; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If liv-
ing and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above
named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Un-
known Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other
Claimants; Unknown Parties in possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claim-
ing by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY

TO: Nicole J. Coon Ahrens a/k/a Nicole J. Coon; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 3371 East Murray Street, Inverness, FL 34453

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants,
if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Citrus
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

LOTS 125, 126, 127 AND 128, IN BLOCK 66, OF INVERNESS HIGHLANDS, UNIT NO. 2, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 97 THROUGH
102, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

more commonly known as 3371 East Murray Street, Inverness, FL 34453.

This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL
33614 within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4 day of January, 2012.
BETTY STRIFLER, Circuit and County Courts
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.

January 13 and 20, 2012 11-222202 FC01


883-0113 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Sale
To: Oscar Montanez unit
number 19B. You are no-
tified that the property
stored by you with Post


Office Storage Inc.
182nd. Place. Citra Flor-
ida 32113. Contents to in-
clude some house hold
goods and a 1988 Jeep
Wrangler Vin #
2BCCZ814XJB539150.


Items to be sold to the
highest bidder at the
above address on Jan.
22, at 11 a.m. or thereaf-
ter. We reserve the right
to refuse any and all bids.
Jan. 13, 2012.


868-0120 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FSS 705.103, the following found item will be disposed as provided by
state statute unless claimed by the owner:
1. Women's Ring, silver in color with diamond-like stone

To make claim for the item, contact Betty Rideout, Evidence Custodian, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office at 352-341-7425.
Sheriff Jeffrey J. Dawsy
By: Patricia E. Bergerson, Staff Services Director

January 13 and 20, 2012.


880-0113 FCRN
1/24 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
TONY'S COLLISION CENTER
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to

Meeing


sell these vehicles on
01/24/2012, 10:00 am at
3251 South Florida Ave
INVERNESS, FL 34450, pur-
suant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. TONY'S COLLISION


Meeting^
Notices^


CENTER reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1FMDU84P6YUB84713
2000 FORD
January 13, 2012.



Meeting^
Notices^


865-0113 FCRN
1/26 meeting Citrus County Library System
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Special Library Advisory Board will hold their regular Meeting at
4:00 PM on Thursday, January 26, 2012, at Coastal Region Library
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River, FL 34428

ANY PERSON DESIRING FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS MEETING MAY CON-
TACT THE LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD RECORDING SECRETARY AT THE CITRUS COUNTY
LIBRARY SYSTEM, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 425 W. ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD, BEVERLY
HILLS, FLORIDA 34465. TELEPHONE (352) 746-9077

ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING BECAUSE
OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE COUNTY ADMINIS-
TRATOR'S OFFICE, 111 WEST MAIN STREET, THIRD FLOOR, INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450,
(352) 341-6560, AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352) 249-1292.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION OF THE
GOVERNING BODY WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING WILL
NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE MAY NEED TO PRO-
VIDE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD IN-
CLUDES TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
(SECTION 286.0101, FLORIDA STATUES)
/s/ WINN WEBB

January 13, 2012.


866-0113 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Executive Board of the Citrus County Transporta-
tion Planning Organization (TPO) will meet on Thursday, January 18, 2012 at 5:00 PM
at the Inverness Government Center, City Council Chambers, 212 West Main Street,
Inverness, Florida, to discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Transportation Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY: Gary W. Maidhoff, Operations and Projects Officer

January 13, 2012.


867-0113 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Transportation Planning Organiza-
tion (TPO) will meet on Thursday, January 18, 2012 at 5:15 PM at the Inverness Gov-
ernment Center, City Council Chambers, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida, to
discuss the business of the Transportation Planning Organization.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Administrator's Of-
fice, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2)
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Transportation Planning
Organization with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

BY: Gary W. Maidhoff, Operations and Projects Officer

January 13, 2012.


882-0113 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the


undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Florida Harvest
located at 7956 S. Baker
Ave., Floral City, FL 34436,
in the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of


Corporations of the Flor-
ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Inverness, FL,
this 11 day of Jan., 2012.
/s/ Bryan D. Lewis
Owner
Jan. 13 2012.


860-0113 FCRN
Vs, Pulphus Chappell, Alexis L, 2011-CC-3839 Notice of Action


me


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012




HEELS


INSIDE
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R C E F O R A L L T H I N G S A U T O M O T I V E


The 2012 Buick Verano delivers key luxury features and characteristics found in the Buick LaCrosse, in an efficiently packaged, right-sized vehicle for the compact luxury market. The all-new
Buick IntelliLink system uses Bluetooth or USB to connect the driver's smartphone to a 7-inch, LED high-resolution, full-color touch screen display radio.


Buick Enters 2012 Compact Sedan Segment



All-New Verano


Buick's 2012 Ver-
ano is the brand's
third new model
within the last two years.
And the all-new Verano
also is the first compact
entry into the luxury
market segment for the
GM marquee.
Verano might well be
thought of as a mini-
LaCrosse or Regal,
serving up all the same
luxurious amenities and
technological features
as its upper class sib-
lings, just in a more
diminutive and less ex-
pensive package. Its
componentry is unique
and specific, despite the
fact that it shares its
basic platform architec-
ture with the Chevy
Cruze.
The new 2012 Verano
displays the same rec-
ognizable sculptural de-


sign and styling cues as
the rest of the Buick sta-
ble including the familiar
black chrome waterfall
grille; bold, translucent
blue projector beam
headlamps; signature
portholes; plus stylish
custom 18-inch alloy
wheels to fill up the
prominent wheel wells
(17-inch rolling stock is
standard fare).
The gracefully arched
roofline flows from the
sharply raked wind-
shield to the sloping "C"
pillars, showcasing a
sporty overall profile. In
essence, the design lan-
guage of the compact
Verano delivers all the
refinement and detailed
craftsmanship of Buick
- simply in a new,
smaller size.
Verano comes in three
trims starting at


$22,585. The interior is
inviting and luxurious,
with premium seat com-
fort and support specifi-
cally tailored for the
compact sedan. The
overall execution is up-
scale in soft-touch mate-
rials and premium
leather, complemented
by state-of-the-art info-
tainment and connectiv-
ity. Metallic and wood
trims warm the cockpit
and cabin environment.
The instrument panel
blends with an inte-
grated center stack,
housing the infotain-
ment display, climate
controls and radio con-
trols. Neutral and
medium titanium colors
are offered on interiors


with leatherette/fabric
seating surfaces, while
ebony, cashmere and a
unique "choccachino"
color are offered on
available leather-
trimmed interiors. The
headliner cover is made
from a knit material, as
one of five layers of an
acoustically designed
headliner that helps in
quieting the passenger
compartment.
The 2012 Buick Ver-
ano is propelled by a
same potent and fuel ef-
ficient 2.4-liter Ecotec,
DOHC, 16-valve, VVT,
Direct injection, in-line
four-cylinder engine with
E85 capability. The
transversely mounted
front engine delivers


180 horsepower at
6,700 rpm along with
171 lb.-ft. of torque at
4,900 rpm, and mates to
a Hydramatic 6T45 six-
speed automatic trans-
mission that smoothly
gears motive energy to
the front wheels.
My Verano test-drive
originated in New York
City with a drive route
that took us through
beautiful upstate New
York and into Connecti-
cut, with our pre-produc-
tion test vehicle
delivering swift acceler-
ation, a most compliant
ride quality and an ex-
ceptional level of interior
quiet. Handling charac-
teristics qualified as
sporty with good road
holding capability and
an athletic and nimble
response.


The cabin's solitude is
aided by acoustic lami-
nated glass and innova-
tive applications of noise
reducing insulation,
without totally isolating
the driver and occu-
pants from surface
input.
Despite the new Ver-
ano's admirable per-
formance qualities, we
wouldn't be surprised to
see a turbocharged ver-
sion surface in the not
too distant future.
Whether turbocharging
is plugged into the
equation in the future,
the Verano should prove
to be a most welcome
addition to the new
Buick lineup. It is pinned
as a winner in the com-
pact luxury segment in
an affordable package.


2013 CHEVROLET SPARK
-T


The 2013 Chevrolet Spark mini car is a sporty four-passenger, five-door hatch designed to excite first-time buyers and city dwellers with its bold styling and colors, affordability, the safety of
10 standard airbags, fuel efficiency and maneuverability. Equipped with the 1.2L four-cylinder engine and five-speed manual transmission, Spark will offer competitive fuel economy. Chris Perry,
vice president, global Chevrolet marketing and strategy says, "Spark's vibrant exterior and interior colors make a fashion statement, but it is also affordable, safe, maneuverable and very fuel-
efficient." Source: Chevrolet


NEW ON WHEELS
BY ART VPSS, Motor Matters





D2 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


THE FAST LANE

Send us your automotive and auto club events
information to wheels@chronicleonline.com


LOCAL CLUB NEWS
SUNDAY
CITRUS COUNTY RETREADS meet for breakfast at 8 a.m.
Sunday at the restaurant at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness.
All makes and models of motorcycles welcome. Ride follows.

TUESDAY
CITRUS COUNTY CORVETTE CLUB meets each second
Tuesday on the month thereafter to Seven Rivers Golf & Country
Club 7395 W. Pinebrook Crystal River, FL. You can find directions
and maps on our web site www.citruscorvettes.com Guests are al-
ways welcome come check us out.
CITRUS A'S MODEL A FORD CAR CLUB meets the 1st
Tuesday of every month at 7:30pm at the Floral City Lions Club on
E. Orange Ave (next to the library) in Floral City, FL. www.cit-
rusas.com or contact Pat at 352-746-7790.

WEDNESDAY
INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB
meets for breakfast at 8 a.m. Wednesday at rear of B&W Rexall
Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris
at 726-6128.
CITRUS MOPAR CAR CLUB meets for breakfast and car
chat every Wednesday at 9 am at various restaurants in Citrus
County. All car enthusiasts are welcome to join them. For specific
locations call Ken McNally at 352-341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at
352-341-1019.
NATURE COAST CORVAIR CLUB meets the second
Wednesday of every month at 7:00 p.m. The club gathers at the B/W
Rexall Drug Store in Inverness. (They have a private dining room in
the back of their restaurant.) Their address is 214 US Hwy 41 S In-
verness. Most of of the club arrives at 6:00 p.m. to have dinner and
welcomes the company of other classic car and Corvair enthusi-
asts. For any additional information, contact David Langdon,
Secretary, Nature Coast Corvair Club, 352-563-1817, or by email at
dlangdonl @tampabay.rr.com.

THURSDAY
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R OF
DUNNELLON meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth
Thursday of each month at McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gath-
ering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call
chapter director Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION
CHAPTER T OF INVERNESS kick tire at 6 p.m. Thursday
at Burger King parking lot, corner of U.S. 41 and S.R. 44 East. Call
directors Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at
(352) 476-7151.
CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS CLUB meets on the first
Thursday on the month, at the Homosassa Moose Lodge at 7 p.m. If
interested in joining our club, you must have a vehicle 20 yrs or older.
Or come visit us on Saturday night at Wendy's (see Saturday).

FRIDAY
NATURE COAST MUSTANGs meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the
Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Homosassa across from the wildlife park.
Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening. Call Bob at 860-2598.
THE WANDERERS CLUB meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at
the parking lot of the Beall's Department Store on State Road 44
West of Inverness. Bring your old car and have fun with other car
enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscarclubofin-
vernessfl.com.
FRIDAY NIGHT THUNDER is hosted by the City of Inverness
and the Citrus MOPARS Car Club every third Friday of the month
from 5 to 8 PM at the Government Center at 212 W Main St in down-
town Historic Inverness. All cars, trucks, car clubs and spectators are
welcome for music, 50/50 drawing and more. Contact Ken McNally
at 352-341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at 352-341-1019 or go to
www.inverness-fl.gov for more info.

SATURDAY
FREE WHEELIN' SERTOMA CLUB MOTORCYCLE
CLUB meets at 9 a.m. Saturday "on the road." Call Rainer Jakob at
726-7903 for destinations.
NATURE COAST RETREADS meets at 8 a.m. Saturday at
Momma Sally's, US 19 in Crystal River. A ride follows. All styles of
motorcycles are welcome. Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-
2401.
CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS invites you to its weekly
cruise-in from 6 to ? (depending on the weather and no-seums) every
Saturday at the parking lot next to Wendy's in Crystal River. We have
oldies music, trivia, 50/50s and special events the second and third
Saturday of every month. Questions call Jim at 527-0024 or Lester
at 628-7021. www.citruscountycruisers.com.
CITRUS MOPAR Citrus MOPARS Car Club will have their
weekly cruise-in each Saturday at 5 PM with the Citrus County Cruis-
ers in the parking lot next to Wendy's on Rt. 19 in Crystal River. Call
Ken McNally at 352-341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at 352-341-1019
for more info.


LOCAL EVENTS A WNTSARSUTTOCANG
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 ___
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Open Wheel Modifieds, Sports-
man, Pure Stock, Miini Stock, Hornet Division, Dwarf cars. Call 726-9339 for
more information..

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11
CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Super Late Models, Modified Mini
Stock,Street Stock, Mini Stock, Hornet Division. Call 726-9339 for more infor-
mation..


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Open Wheel Modifieds, Sports-
man, Street Stock, Pure Stock ,Mini Stock, Pro Figure 8, Outlaw Modified Miini.
Call 726-9339 for more information.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Modified MiiniStock,Sportsman,
Pure Stock, Hornet Division, Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8s. Call 726-9339
for more information..


AV "SR INE


1. Crystal Chevy
866-434-3065

2. Crystal Chrysler
Dodge Jeep
866-434-3064
3. Crystal Nissan
866-434-3057


To advertise in


4. Nick Nicholas Ford
726-1231
5. Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
795-7371


1937 Packard Acquired after


Tireless Years of Search


ob Su barely old CLASSIC CLASSICS
was barely o BY VERN PARKER, Motor Matters
enough to


vote when the antique car bug bit him al-
most 50 years ago. That's when he says;
"I bought my first Packard out of a junkyard
in Bucks County, Pennsylvania for $100."
By 1964, Supina and his Packard shared
an address near Philadelphia, just down
the street from an automobile restoration
shop. It was at that shop, Supina recalls, "I
saw an artist's rendering of a 1937
Packard LeBaron Town Car."
From that day on Supina was on a quest to
find such a remarkable car. When new the
Packard LeBaron Town Car sold for
$4,990.
As an IBM systems analyst, Supina was
relocated from Pennsylvania to Maryland,
to New Jersey and finally to Texas. Wher-
ever he was sent Supina joined antique
car clubs hoping to find his dream car, "It
was a fruitless endeavor," he says.
Supina continued his dogged pursuit -
and on the hunch that Packard owners
probably know other Packard owners -
Supina began telephoning any Packard
owner he could informing them of his de-
sire to acquire a 1937 LeBaron Town Car
model. One day in 1978, Supina called
and rattled off the well-rehearsed plea for
a LeBaron Town Car. He was surprised to
hear, "Oh, I have a friend who has one -
and he wants to sell it."
A doubtful Supina called the friend and
made an appointment to see the 1937 ve-
hicle. "To my utter amazement, when I
walked into the back of the shop I saw the
unmistakable hulk of a LeBaron Town Car.
The owner had stripped it to a shell on a
rolling frame and then was overwhelmed
by the enormity of the task ahead."
After a 15-year effort, Supina had found his
elusive prize. He hauled the Packard
home on a trailer, along with three pickup
truck loads of parts. The 320-cubic-inch
eight-cylinder engine was totally disas-
sembled and the parts filled seven boxes.


For the next 10
years, the Packard
languished in


Supina's garage as he methodically took
inventory and determined if each part
should be restored, replaced or discarded.
Supina focused on each individual part, he
explains, because looking at the whole pic-
ture was too scary. "I realized I was miss-
ing a number of parts," he says.
In 1981, Supina bought a low-mileage
1937 Packard Super Eight sedan at an
Odessa, Texas, auction. "I rationalized that
I needed a complete car, so that when I
would pick up a piece of the LeBaron, I
could go to the sedan to find where it be-
longed," Supina says. A donor parts car
was purchased in Sarasota, Fla.
"The restoration has been a real chal-
lenge," Supina says. However, he em-
phatically says, "It had to be done."
"One of the most tedious tasks was mak-
ing the seat springs," Supina says. It was
painfully obvious that the car had been
subjected to years of weather without the
benefit of a garage. "The leather roof was
gone," Supina says, "and the seats were a
shambles."
Most of the seat springs were beyond re-
pair. Supina explains that the Packards
had pocketed seat springs so each spring
was encased in cloth ensuring that no two
springs could touch, causing a squeak. "I
had to make about 200 springs by coiling
the wire and then sewing the pockets,"
Supina says.
Throughout the restoration project, his
wife, Gail, encouraged Supina. Now that
the car is wearing a fresh coat of dark
green paint and rolling on a 139-inch
wheelbase with 130-horsepower at the dri-
ver's command, she comments, "It's a
pleasure to drive." The car is often seen on
the streets of their Richmond, Texas,
neighborhood.
Supina's only hard work now is whether to
drive his car or sit in the back and have
someone else do the driving.


Would you like your car to be considered for an upcoming article?
E-mail us your jpeg image, plus brief details and phone number.
Type "Classic Classics" in subject box to info@motormatters.biz.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ASK THE

AUTO

DOCTOR


WITH JUNIOR DAMATO


End of Daylight
Savings Time

Causes Driver
Visibility Issue
Dear Doctor: With Daylight
Savings time gone, I am going
to work in the dark in the morn-
ing and also driving home in the
dark. At 50 years old, I have a
hard time seeing in the dark. I
have seen a lot of ads for re-
placement headlights for my
2004 Ford Taurus. Would such
a thing help me see better at
night? Jan
Dear Jan: Before buying a re-
placement headlight bulb, check
the actual headlight capsule for
clarity I have replaced many
headlight capsule assemblies
over the years and also re-
placed the bulbs with Sylvania
Silver Star bulbs. The difference
is night and day The headlight
capsule in an aftermarket brand
is 50 percent less in cost than an
original. Beware of cheap after-
market replacements that will
discolor in a year. A good after-
market bulb will have a two-year
or longer warranty.

Dear Doctor: I might buy a
Toyota RAV4 with a V-6 for
some towing. I'd like to get it with
front-wheel-drive and put snow
tires on the front for winter.
Would the front-mounted snow
tires cause any problems? If I
stay below a 3,500-pound tow
limit would that work well for tow-
ing with regular tires? Michael
Dear Michael: The Toyota
RAV4 V-6 has ample power for
lightweight towing; however, you
need to check the exact tow rat-
ing of the vehicle. As for snow
tires on the front onntonly, no, the
recommendation is four snow
tires. I have to be up front with
you; if I were buying a RAV4, I'd
go with the all-wheel-drive, not a
front-drive. The AWD may have
a slightly lower tow rating, but
the big picture is a lot better, in-
cluding not needing snow tires.

Dear Doctor: I have a 2003
Honda Odyssey A few months
ago, I was unable to open the
driver side door with the key.
The key works in the hatch, pas-
senger side door and ignition.
Last month, my son, who owns
a 2003 Honda Civic, mentioned
he has the same problem with
his car. Is it an issue with 2003
Hondas, or a coincidence that it
happened to both of our cars?
Joel
Dear Joel: I've seen two key
problems with Honda vehicles:
door cylinder and ignition key
cylinders failures. In my opinion,
there is an early failure pattern
with the high key security design
that Honda used. I believe the
fault is a failure of the wafer de-
sign in the door cylinder and ig-
nition cylinder.

Dear Doctor: I'm thinking
about buying the GMC Terrain
or Chevy Equinox with a V-6 for
some towing. I've read that their
trannys shift slowly because of
fuel maximizing concerns. I
would not like that drivability
issue. Is it possible to reset the
shift limits to make them drive
smoother, and is it a big job?
Mike
Dear Mike: It is easy and sim-
ple to reprogram the transmis-
sion shift point and firmness of
the transmission. However, be-
fore we go any further, make
sure there is a button for a
"towlhaul mode" on the shift
handle. There are several com-


panies that sell a programming
tool that simply plugs into the
ALDL connector under the dri-
ver's side lower dash. The in-
structions are simple to follow.

Junior Damato is an
ASE-certified Master Technician.
E-mail questions to
info@motormatters.biz
Mail questions to:
Auto Doctor
3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347
Listen to Junior online at
www. 1460wxbr.com
Saturday from 7am to 10 am eastern time.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRUCK TALK
BY TIM SPELL, Motor Matters


Photos courtesy Tim Spell
Chevrolet's 2012 Silverado 2500 4WD LTZ Crew Cab, teamed with a Duramax 6.6-liter V-8 turbo-diesel and Allison 100 six-speed automatic transmission, benefits from an extensively strength-
ened chassis including fully-boxed, high-strength-steel frames. Towing capacity is 13,000 pounds. Off-road capability is enhanced with an optional Z71 Off-Road Suspension Package. The
test truck ups luxury with a new-for-2012 heated-and-cooled front seats.



Chevy Silverado 2500HD Heaps



on the Enhancements for 2012


Chevrolet rolled into the 2011 model year
with a new Silverado heavy-duty pickup
lineup significantly more capable and
sophisticated than the trucks preceding it. In the
new-design Silverado's second year, Chevy
builds off the upgraded styling and engineering,
and heaps on enhancements, geared to even
better meet the demands of serious truckers for
the 2012 model year.
The 2012 Silverado 2500 4WD LTZ Crew Cab
test truck is a solid, well-packaged representa-
tive of GM's heavy-duty truck lineup. The stan-
dard vehicle price is $45,190, and the tester is
pumped up with a long list of extras. Most im-
portant on this options list is the $7,195 Dura-
max 6.6-liter V-8 turbo-diesel, partnered with a
$1,200 Allison 100 six-speed automatic trans-
mission.
The Duramax unleashes 397 horsepower
and, more importantly, the grunt of 765 lb.-ft. of
torque. This output allows the test truck, with a
3.73 rear axle ratio, to pull a trailer up to 13,000
pounds and tote with its standard cargo box a
3,066-pound payload.
Key in the 2011 re-engineering of its heavy-
duty pickups was an extensive beefing up of the
chassis. The frame is constructed from fully
boxed assemblies, and there are more cross
sections, greater use of high-strength steel and
more-rugged hydroformed front sections. Team-
ing with the upgraded chassis were improve-
ments to the suspension systems adding
strength and capability at the front and rear.
Chassis strength is increased for 2012 with
"strategic enhancements" incorporated into the
chassis. By strengthening the cargo box sills
and other box structures as well as box
mounts, U-bolts and rear springs fifth-wheel
towing capacity is increased. Revised shock
tuning also contributes to towing efficiency. An
updated trailer hitch receiver boosts conven-
tional towing capacity.
Standard on Duramax-powered Silverado
HDs is a driver-selectable exhaust brake sys-
tem. Other available features contributing to en-
hanced control are trailer-sway control,
integrated trailer brake control, hill start assist,
automatic grade braking and intelligent brake
assist.


While the 4WD Silverado 2500HD has the
right stuff to handle most off-pavement needs,
the test truck ups the ante with a Z71 Off-Road
Suspension Package. This $295 extra ups ca-
pability with twin-tube shock absorbers; a 33-
mm front stabilizer bar; jounce bumpers that
accommodate large suspension variants; an un-
derbody skid-plate package with a frame-
mounted shield that protects the oil pan,
differential case and transfer case; and an au-
tomatic-locking rear differential.
A Z71-packaged pickup is identified with spe-
cial "Z71 4x4" graphics on the bedsides. New
for 2012 is a Z71 Off-Road Appearance Pack-
age ($545 on LTZ) that also adds the decals, as
well as: body-colored front bumper; chrome
mesh grille with body-colored surrounds; door
handles and mirrors; foglamps; bright doorsill
plates; and 18-inch polished forged-aluminum
wheels with LT265/70R-18E all-terrain tires.
Once inside the crew cab, the feel is spacious,
and the layout clean and refined. The LTZ is up-
graded with leather-upholstered front seats,
leather-wrapped steering wheel and wood-grain
accents. The test truck ups luxury with a new-
for-2012 heated-and-cooled front seats, which
are a $650 option.
Convenience is added with a $725 LTZ Plus
Package that includes Rear Park Assist, ad-
justable pedals, Universal Home Remote, rear
wheel-house liner, and an EZ Lift and locking


tailgate.
The tester's priciest interior option is a $2,250
navigation system with a touch screen and XM
NavTraffic with voice prompts. The LTZ has a
standard AM/FM/CD system with Bose premium
speakers, USB port, XM Radio and steering
wheel controls.
Passenger comfort is good for a heavy-duty
4WD pickup, with those in the LTZ's dual front
buckets benefiting from a tall, command-of-the-
road seating position and a view over the hood's
macho-looking dual raised black louvers. Ride
quality generally is good, but encounters with
some pavement irregularities can produce
bounciness.
Rear seating is a 60/40-split configuration,
with cushions that can be lifted with one hand
- providing space for cargo. Headroom and
legroom are excellent for rear-seated passen-
gers.
An extra measure of safety comes with a $395
package that includes: head curtain airbags for
front and rear outboard occupants, and seat-
mounted side-impact airbags for driver and
front-seat passenger. The tester also is fitted
with an optional $450 rear-vision camera, and
$55 camper-style heated and power-adjustable
black outside mirrors. The test truck is loaded
with a total of $14,789 in options, which along
with a $995 destination charge pushes the price
tag to $60,974.


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 D3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Suzuki Standing


Tall When Blue


Skies Hide Behind Dark Clouds


In 2006, Suzuki was selling 100,000 cars the U.S. It kept pace until the second half of
2008 when industry-wide sales dropped due to economic declines. By the end of 2008,
Suzuki was down 17 percent and by 2009; it was down another 48.5 percent. Supplier in-
terruptions from the Tsunami and earthquake in Japan, as well as the recent flooding in Thai-
land added to the drama. Backstage the automaker is also dealing with the strong value of
the yen, which hit at an all time high against the dollar a few months ago. Suzuki imports its
vehicles from Japan.
Even though its year-to-date sales as of October are up 17 percent, Suzuki has only sold
22,000 vehicles. And vehicles are selling at a slower pace. The SX4 is getting great reviews,
yet has sold only about 10,000 units through October. The Kizashi, a sedan with all-wheel-
drive has sold almost 6,000 units. That's a good month, not year, at a Ford dealership.
Suzuki's 264 dealers must be going crazy, especially the 174 of them that are standalone.
(Generally, Suzuki car dealers don't sell Suzuki motorcycles or the marine engines.)
"One of our challenges," says Jeff Holland, a spokesman for Suzuki, "is that our product
mix has changed drastically over the past few years." Suzuki has eliminated five models -
that may be a strategy but it also means the dealers have fewer models to sell. Only three
models are selling, the Kizashi, the Grand Vitara and the SX4. The only other model, the
Equator has sold less than 2,000 units.
It's not that Suzuki has bad cars: quite the contrary. The Kizashi and SX4 get good reviews
from the press. Edmunds.com's Inside Line remarked that the 2011 Kizashi was better than
the Jetta in terms of exterior styling, interior build and overall vehicle dynamics and per-
formance.
Time.com loved the Kizashi, saying, "the exterior styling is fresh, and the interior packs cool
features such as sporty seats and a nifty instrument cluster that give the car character. The
Kizashi's key asset could be its powertrain, which includes a new 4-cylinder aluminum en-
gine that can be matched up to either a six-speed manual transmission or a continuously vari-
able automatic transmission."
The Suzuki Kizashi was awarded the highest numerical score among midsize cars in the
proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 Automotive Performance, Execution and Lay-
out Study SM. The study, based on responses from 73,790 new-vehicle owners, measures
234 models and measures opinions after 90 days of ownership. Proprietary study results
are based on experiences and perceptions of owners surveyed in February-May 2011. That's
competing against the likes of Ford, GM and Toyota.


Its value proposition is great. Edmunds.com's true market value price for the manual Kiza-
shi is just over $19,000 and the SX4 hatchback is just over $17,000 with AWD and the base
price on the SX4 sedan is just under $14,000.
Kizashi ranked No. 1 most satisfying car in America for 2010 and 2011 in AutoPacific's
Owner Satisfaction Study. The study surveyed over 60,000 car owners against Mercedes,
BMW, Honda and Toyota vehicles.
So why isn't Suzuki selling more cars? Money. Though Suzuki is the fourth largest auto-
mobile manufacturer in Japan after Toyota, Nissan and Honda, it is a small player here in the
U.S.
One automotive advertising journalist estimates that Suzuki will spend an estimated $40 mil-
lion in advertising in the U.S. for 2011. Kantar Media, which tracks ad spending, reported that
General Motors spent $542 million on U.S. advertising in the first quarter of this year alone. In
the same period, Kantar says, Chrysler Group boosted its ad budget to $319 million, up al-
most 60 percent over the first quarter of 2010. Toyota Motor spent $307 million, an increase of
30 percent. Ford Motor weighed in with $299 million, up 27 percent.
Suzuki isn't going to fold its tent. Even behind dark clouds, the sky is always blue. And
Suzuki believes that blue will peak through for the well-regarded brand.
Kate McLeod, Motor Matters


Suzuki boldly challenges the otherwise sleepy midsize sedan segment with compelling designs
such as the Kizashi, the automaker's first all-wheel-drive sport sedan. The Suzuki Kizashi deliv-
ers a unique blend of dynamic performance attributes, premium design aesthetics and crafts-
manship yet to be experienced in the high-volume midsize category.


2012 Mazda3 features all-new





SKYACTIV for 40-mpg


Even though the Mazda3 was redesigned
for the 2010 model year, a refreshed
2012 model includes a major improve-
ment that couldn't wait for the next redesign. It's
the all-new high-efficiency direct-injection SKY-
ACTIV-G 2.0-liter gasoline engine, capable of
achieving an EPA-rated 40 mpg on the highway.
So, just what is SKYACTIV? According to the
folks at Mazda, it's a word that expresses the
phrase "The sky's the limit."
SKYACTIV also refers to Mazda's all-new
range of technologies that are aimed at improv-
ing the efficiency of the engines, transmissions,
bodies and chassis of the next generation of ve-


hicles.
SKYACTIV-G will be the standard engine in
all 2012 Mazda3 i Touring and Grand Touring
models. Mated to a standard all-new SKYAC-
TIV-MT six-speed manual transmission or op-
tional all-new SKYACTIV-Drive six-speed
automatic transmission, i Touring and Grand
Touring trims are available in either the sedan
or hatchback body styles.
The MZR 2.0-liter engine continues to be
available with the current five-speed manual as
standard equipment. Mazda3 i Sport models
also are available with the current five-speed au-
tomatic as an option.


The refreshed 2012 Mazda3 includes the first application of Mazda's all-new fuel-efficient and performance-oriented
SKYACTIV technology. Paired with the dependable 148-horsepower MZR 2.0-literfour-cylinder engine. The Mazda3
all-new SKYACTIV-G 2.0-liter gasoline engine is EPA-rated to achieve 40 mpg on the highway.


A range of entirely new technologies was
used in the direct injection SKYACTIV-G gaso-
line engine. With two choices for boosting fuel
economy, Mazda engineers chose to optimize
the compression ratio instead of using tur-
bocharging as most other automakers have
done.
Raising the compression ratio in a gasoline
engine increases its thermal efficiency, thus im-
proving fuel economy. However, high compres-
sion in conventional engines leads to "knocking"
and an associated reduction in torque. A re-
designed exhaust manifold, specially shaped
piston cavities and new multi-hole injectors per-
mitted raising the compression ratio to 13 to 1
without knocking, and resulted in a substantial
15 percent increase in torque over Mazda's cur-
rent 2.0-liter MZR gasoline engine.
Mazda managed to minimize pumping loss
by using continuously variable dual sequential
valve timing on the intake and exhaust valves.
This changes the opening and closing timing of
the valves, enabling the air intake quantity to be
controlled by the valves rather than the throttle.
With 20 percent lighter pistons, 15 percent
lighter connecting rods and a 30 percent reduc-
tion to internal engine friction compared to the
current 2.0-liter MZR engine, the new SKYAC-
TIV-G engine adapts faster to load changes and
fuel economy is improved by 15 percent com-
pared to the current engine. The SKYACTIV
technology delivers 155 horsepower at 6,000
rpm and 148 Ib-ft of torque at 4,100 rpm.
The heart of SKYACTIV-Drive 6-speed auto-
matic transmission is a newly developed six-


speed torque converter with a full range modu-
lated lock-up clutch for all six gears. The early
lock-up between engine and transmission by
the torque converter reduces the characteristic
loss of power during acceleration.
Mazda also has a redeveloped, manual six-
speed gearbox that's smaller, lighter and has
less internal friction resistance. By using ball
bearings on its shift rails, this new transmission
has an even better shift feel than before. Gear
changes feel crisp yet with minimal effort.
The 2012 Mazda3 sedan gets an EPA rating
of 40 miles per gallon on the highway when
equipped with the SKYACTIV-G 2.0-liter engine
and optional SKYACTIV-Drive six-speed auto-
matic transmission. Best of all, performance isn't
sacrificed in order to achieve that kind of fuel
economy. Acceleration is satisfying with either
transmission, but the smooth-shifting manual is
more fun to drive.
Also new is the Electro-Hydraulic PowerAs-
sist Steering system. Mazda's EHPAS system
employs a new setting for pump flow charac-
teristics that enables easier handling at slow
speeds while also offering more positive feed-
back and a better feeling for the road at mid-
range through to high speeds.
Mazda3 is Mazda's best-selling vehicle world-
wide and accounts for nearly two thirds of all
Mazdas sold in the United States. Prices range
from $15,200 to $23,700. As usual, optional
equipment can significantly increase what you
pay.
Dave Van Sickle, Motor Matters


B
BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453



'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894

20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trlr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453


PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHF,elect. New
135 Honda, 4S, new EZ
Load trlr. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
SEAPRO
2003, 1700 cc, 90HP
Yamaha, 551b. troll mtr
canopy top, alum. trlr.,
2 live wells, shallow
draft, Let's test it out!
$10K obo 352-344-8448
SUNTRACKER
20FT, with trailer, new
20HP Yamaha 4-stroke,
$5,000. (352) 419-6894
(352) 726-2553


'95 Seabreeze
33 foot 24k miles,454
gas engine, $6500
352-220-9067


2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
BOUNDER 34'
1987,454 Chevy GREAT
CONDITION, Everything
works, 79K mikes $4000
cell (719) 331-3886

Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds, 35' Triton
V-10 gas, 44Kmis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV, fully
equipped incl tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,
assisted for tow vech.
all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incls hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups,
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires, See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750


WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292



2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 36 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $43,500
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, Owan Gen., gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
JAY '07,16'
Feather liite,loaded,
like new, w/extra's
Must SEE $6800
(352) 726-9647


JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434


'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
CHEVROLET
2001 Tracker, 101K mi.,
6-cyl., good cond.
$3,800. (352) 344-2752
FORD
2008 Focus 4 door
Sedan SE,automatic,
only 19,700 miles, Silver,
carport kept, great shape.
$11,000 OBO
352-563-0730


Hyundai '05
Sonata, V6, low mis.
auto. Pwr steering, a/c,
good cond.$6k. obo
(352) 465-6224
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
MARQUIS
1997 Mercury Marquis
128K, $2500 or best of-
fer 352-628-5487
IMMACULATE
Mazda 01
Miada MX5
convertible 61k mi. exc
cond $8,250.(352)
419-4066/228-7670
MERCURY
'98, Mystique LX, 4 DR,
loaded, low mi, leather,
great MPG, auto, Clean
$3,250. 631-512-1667
VW Jetta '00
diesel, auto. a/c, CD,
good runner $3500
(352) 447-2330


LINCOLN
2-1958 Continentals,
One restorable the
other for parts, good
rubber, $5,000
(352) 637-4642

MERCURY
'74, Cougar XR7
80K mi, one owner
shows like new $6,500
(352) 726-0258




CHEVROLET
1988 1500 Choo-Choo
Custom Red on red paint,
run great, many new
parts & tires. $2000. Flo-
ral City 610-703-6157

CHEVY '02 F10
Extra Cab, LF 3rd door,
auto 6 cyc 117K mi,
extra clean $5400
(352) 212-4823


FORD 04
Lariat, super duty die-
sel, crew cab tan,
loaded, goose neck
hitch, new tires, brks,
140K mis. well maint
$12,500(352) 344-4087
FORD 95
F250,4x4,460 eng.
Ext-cab. exc cond.$5k/
trade for sm truck or
vehicle of same value
352 302-9269/628-6985



CHRYSLER '02
Voyager LX, SlIver, 3 rd
row seat, 6 cyc 109k mi
s,. $4995 (352) 212-4823



2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481


HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731




HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2008 FLHTCUSE7 CVO
Ultra Classic Electra
Glide CVO Screaming
Eagle 110 Cl 105th Anni-
versary. Extreamly Clean!
$27,000.00
786-877-6097


KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 800 Custom
Only 2,100 miles
Garage Kept Like New
with Extras
Illness forces Sale $4,500
352-527-2286


D4 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~NPI ~


CRYSTAL
AUTMOTIumVE


YvYwwYYw


'11 IMPALA


'10 300
w lowA


'10 ELANTRA


'10 CIVIC


1-800-W-8755 Ext.3160


$12,999 $16$99 $9,999 $13,99
OR$184 O OR~40 MO. I OR 141 Mo. 198 MO.


09 PT CRUISER


'09 JOURNEY
4--t-ypt


'09 WRANGLER


'08 IMPALA

|m I


F R E 4 RM SSA G E I N O A S E K W
1l800-58"755 FAA2W


$6,999 $11,999 s16,999 s$8999
oR $99 *0 0 oR$170 "o. 0$240M O. o$127 mo.


'08 CAMRY


'08 300


TOWN & COUNTRY


'06 ALTIMA


7LI


$1Q999 $10,999 $12999 $9,499
oR$155 MO 0. o$155 MO. 0 OR184M O I 0R$157 70.


'06 SILVERADO


'05 WRANGLER


'05 ACCORD


'04 F-250


$7999 $11,999 $7999 $11,999
0R E O. R E R EOVO 0RR I MO.


IND CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
NOMATE HEE O PLf^A N TO BUY!


0


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*


1-800-W-8755 t.3160


FlREE 24HR RBORDE MESAGEWr bOA)SEC IN
1-800-5 -8755 Et.1717


FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 D5


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1-800-8"755FAA20


|M 24 R R lME MMM ITHIFOAD PR IICN
i-WfO-5:8:4-875 E.61i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Our 2012 lineup of fuel-efficient cars,
trucks, SUVs and crossovers is here.
Get into the Ford you want with
great offers that make it easy for you to
get behind the wheel.
Come in today. And start the new year
in a brand-new Ford. You'll know why
Ford is the best-selling brand1 out there.
Get out of the old and into the new
at Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln today.


Start the new year in

a brand-new Ford.


2012 FUSION SE


$24,915 MSRP


-2,000
-500


Retail Customer Cash
Trade In Cash


$500 Ford Credit Cash

SALE PRICE

*21,9152


2012 TAURUS SEL


$29,250 MSRP


-300
-2,000


Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash


-500 Ford Credit Cash


SALE PRICE

*26,450


2012 ESCAPE XLT


$26,235
-300
-2,000
-500
-500


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Trade In Cash
Retail Bonus Cash


SALE PRICE

$22,935


GRAT ELCTONOFQALIYPR SN EHCE
l ---( --
owl


'03 FORD WINDSTAR SE '02 FORD FOCUS WAGON ZTW
1 owner Loaded
$5,950 $6,950


'07 FORD FOCUS ZX4 '06 FORD ESCAPE XLT '08 FORD FOCUS SE
One owner
$9,950 $9,950 $10,950
B~saE'^^B t-ij11w"^-' "mi "W--.^^^


'05 GRAND MARQUIS LS '09 CHEVY AVEO LT
11,000 miles
$11,950 $13,950

[0GADAQUSLS


'08 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S
$18,950



'07 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
Signatue Limited, 30,000 miles
$21,950


'09 MERCURY MARINER
$18,950



'10 FORD FUSION HYBRID
40 MPG
$21,950


'07 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950


'10 FORD FUSION SE
$18,950


'08 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
All Wheel Drive, loaded.
$22l950


'09 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$15,950


'10 FORD FOCUS SE
$16,950


'08 LINCOLN MKZ '08 FORD FUSION SEL
65000 miles, loaded 28,000 miles
$17,950 $17,950


'10 FORD E-350 CLUB WAGON
XLT, 12 passenger
$21,950
^tota0N


'09 FORD EDGE SEL '08 F.150 XLT CREW CAB 4X4
$22,950 $24,950
, I I II


'11 LINCOLN MKX '08 SHELBY GT 500 '09 F.150 CREW CAB 4X4
44,000 miles, like new, loaded Lariat
$31,950 $32,950 $32,950


37,'2,UUU miles
$44,950


Nick


Nicholas


C


rysta


R


lye


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on CYTD sales, 11/11. 2 Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory
rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit
Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible
for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good
through 1/31/12.


LIN


Call Toll Free
877-795-7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


COLN


D6 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


t RiverMi


'09 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
$19,950




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I )I


Hi


All New
Redesigned!


ji I IO$EOU
_ PRICE
MPG While Supplies Last!
#T -111


2.5L 4-Cyl DOHC 16V W/Dual VVT-1 Engine 6-Speed ECT-1 Transmission
Star Safety System Includes: VSC, TRAC. Air Conditioning AM/FM/CD Player
Cruise Control Power Windows Power Door Locks
MSRP........................................... $22,770
Village Savings................................$2,772

19p998


11


PLY


Star Safety System: VSC, TRAC, Anti-Lock Side Curtain Airbags & Dr. Knee Airbag
* AM/FM CD Player W/6 Spkrs Dr. Smart Key Sys. Rmte Keyless Entry & Push Button Start
Cruise Control Power Locks & Auto Up/Down Power Windows
MSRP........................................... $24,335
Village Savings.............................. $1,840

n22.495


I IIK'i iI I


I] '2~r~ EV~
II


#T120247


20--
MPG
HWYI


2W
MPG #T11169o
HWY I ,, 2.5L DOHC 4 CYL.16V Engine W/Dual WT-I 179 HP
Electronic Power Steering System Star Safety System: Enhanced Vehicle
Stability Control, Traction Control Air Conditioning With Air Filter
AM/FM CD W/6 Spkrs Cruise Control Power Windows/Door Locks/Keyess Entry
MSRP...........................................$23,779
Village Savings................................$2,289

S21.4Aoo


* 4.01 V6 DOHC 24V VVT-1 270 HP/278 LB-FT 5-Spd Automatic Trans W/Sequential Shift
Automatic Limited-Slip Differential Dual Zone Air Conditioning
AM/FM CD W/MP3/WMA, 6 Speakers Power Windows/Door Locks
MSRP........................................... $27,510
Village Savings.............................. $3,660

s23,8.50


Better Cars. Better Deals. Better Hurry!


iS ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenance
plan with roadside assistance


Stock #1110197
2008 SATURN VUE
FWD 4dr 14 XE
112,995


SlocP. r11110202
2008 KIASPORTAGE
2 WD Dr. 14 Auto LX
s11,995


Slock #11110220
2007 HONDA CR-V
4WD 5 Dr. EX-L
115,995


2011 KIA FORTE 2005CHEllOETSIllVERAD 1500
5 Dr. HB Auto SX Reg Cab
s17,995 56,995


Slock w 1110348
20090 CADILLAC CTS
4 Dr. Sdn. RWD w/1SB
121,995


2009 FORD RANGER
2WD 4 Dr. SuperCab Sport
s15,995


SStock #1112000 Stock #11120024 Stock #11120097
2008 TOYOTA CAMRYHYBRID 2012 HONDA CIVIC 2007 IHYUNDAI ENTOURAGE
4 Dr. Sdn 4 Dr. Auto EX-L 4 Dr. Wgn GLS
s11,995 s19,995 $7,995


C-


352-628-5100


MUST PRESENT AD PRIOR TO PURCHASE


www.villagetoyota.com


tile, and $499 dealerfee
Prices include all Village Toyota
incentives Offers cannot be combined
All vehicles subject to prior purchase
All customerswho purchase or lease a
newToyota receive a 2 year, 25K mile
free maintenance plan Photos for
illustration purposes only We reserve
the right t coect typographical errors


MPG '
HWY Hl


IMIT


VILLAGE
19 *


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012 D7


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Jeep


NEW YEAR CELEBRATION


;-1


2012 200


*FREE 24 HRREORDED MESSmAG
W19IHI
s1 990-848 MO x.30


PER
s399 MO.

2012 TOWN & COUNTRY


2012 JOURNEY


BUYFOR
$19,855
2012 CHALLENGER
--A _A


BUY FOR


2012 RAM
QMML-Vmr F .


2012 WRANGLER


!269I
FRE 4 R ECR E R ESG


2012 LIBERTY


SAVE


2012 GRAND CHEROKEE


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BUY FOR
'16,888


'299.P


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE: 800-440-9054


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BROOKSVILLE HOMOSASSA
INVERNESS


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D8 FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


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