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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02648
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-07-2012
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02648

Full Text



NFL: Lions' Johnson nearly unanimous All-I


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Variably cloudy with a
73 10 percent chance of
LOW showers.
49 PAGE A4
JANUARY 7, 2012


Fire damage
estimated at
$45,000
HOMOSASSA-
The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office Fire
Rescue Division re-
sponded to a struc-
ture fire shortly
before 4 p.m. Thurs-
day at 6360 S. Lima
Ave., Homosassa.
Firefighters en-
countered heavy
smoke and flames
coming from the
small building and
began a defensive
attack. The fire was
controlled within 18
minutes of arriving
on the scene.
Additional engines
from the fire stations
at Sugarmill Woods,
Lecanto, Connell
Heights, South
Lecanto, Beverly
Hills and Crystal
River VFD arrived on
scene to provide ad-
ditional staffing and
water supply. Nature
Coast EMS provided
rehabilitation support.
The fire caused
extensive damage to
the small residence
and its contents.
The American Red
Cross was contacted
to provide assistance
for the resident. The
damages were esti-
mated at approxi-
mately $30,000 for
the structure and
$15,000 for the con-
tents. No one was
hurt in the blaze.
Firefighters were
on scene for approxi-
mately two hours.
-From staff reports


25 dead
Terrorists blamed for
attack in Syrian
capital./Page A10
NOWHERE TO GO:
Hog jam
Beverly Hills resident at
a loss for what to do
after hogs tear up his
yard./Page A3
ANIMALS SEIZED:
Seven taken
Citrus County Animal
Control takes pit bulls,
bull dogs from
residences./Page A4


COMING UP:


New Jan. 8
The Viewfinder returns
to book format with
more grids and more
content!/Sunday, Jan. 8


Comics . . . . .C9
Community ...... .C7
Crossword ....... .C8
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ...... B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies ......... C9
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ...... .C10
TV Listings ...... .C8


6 184ll 78 2002! U


IMS traffic plan dropped


District decides to reopen

school entrance after three days

of congestion on U.S. 41


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Three
days of changing the traffic
pattern at Inverness Mid-
dle School was enough for
Citrus County School Dis-
trict officials to realize it
wasn't working.
The district on Monday
will reopen the Ella Street
entrance to Middle School
Drive after congestion at


the school on U.S. 41 wors-LI
ened Friday morning.
Parents waited 30 min-
utes or more on U.S. 41 or
Middle School Drive to
drop off their children at
school, which started seven
minutes late because of
late-arriving students.
Assistant Superinten- MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
dent of Schools Mike Motorists wait in traffic Thursday morning along U.S. 41 in
Mullen said a crossing Inverness as traffic slows to a crawl because the traffic pat-
tern in and out of the Inverness Middle School had been
See Page A2 changed.


FRC's new digs


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Mark Tate fries fish recently at the Family Resource Center Outreach Center. It has been set up in the Hernando
Civic Association Center which was donated to the organization. Tate recently earned his GED and is planning to
start working with computers.


Family


resource center benefits from donated building


Philip Zock
works on
one of the
computers
available
at the
outreach
center.
The center
offers a
place for
community
members
to have a
meal, use
the
computer
or sit and
watch
television.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HERNANDO The holidays
may be over, but not the needs of
the people served by the Family
Resource Center in Hernando.
Last March, the Hernando Civic
Center disbanded and donated
their 40-by-60-foot newly refur-
bished clubhouse to Ginger West's
resource operation, which West
and her crew of volunteers turned
into an outreach center.
It's used as a place where people
can apply for food stamps, meet
with veterans' services or The Cen-
ters, use the computer
See Page A2


Clerk of courts says this term is her last


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
It was 24 years ago when
Betty Strifler shocked
the Citrus County politi-
cal world by becoming
the first Republican
elected to a major local
office when voters made
her Clerk of Courts.
Strifler easily handled
a couple of re-election
opponents and was re-
elected the last 12 years
without opposition.
Now it's someone
else's turn to lead the
office.
Strifler, 62,
See .PageA2


Citrus
County
Clerk of
Courts
Betty
Strifler,
right,
speaks
with
customer
service
clerk
Amanda
Tyre
Friday
afternoon
at the
Crystal
River
satellite
office.
MATTHEW
BECK/
Chronicle


Residents


discuss


plans for


Three


Sisters

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Exactly a month before the
stakeholders are supposed
to meet to hammer out al-
ternatives in the backyard
fight over the development
of a potential tourism draw,
some of the neighbors had a
chance to quiz officials
Thursday night
Crystal River City Man-
ager Andy Houston, Gary
Williams of Southwest
Florida Water Management
District (SWFWMD) and
Michael Lusk of the Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge took questions and
comments from roughly two
dozen residents about the
conceptual plans to add
panache to Three Sisters
Springs as an ecotourism
spot.
At the forefront are three
fundamental issues: the
placement of a kayak land-
ing/launch; whether it is
going to be a passive or ac-
tive urban nature refuge
with access for all; and
whether more spots should
be available for future visi-
tors to see the sea cows up
close and personal and
where will they be
located.
Three Sisters was pur-
chased in 2010 through the
marriage of public and pri-
vate funding after the prop-
erty was slated for housing
development. The city of
Crystal River and South-
west Florida Water Man-
agement District own the
property and it is managed
by the U.S.Fish and Wildlife
Service (FWS).
The Florida Communi-
ties Trust, which was a
major contributor to the ef-
fort, holds sway over the
property on how it should
be best utilized for public
use. Their grant money
came with a weighted point
system about what features
to include in an eventual
plan to develop the acreage
into a public space com-
mingled with the natural
preservation.
The water district also
has plans to use the south-
east corner of the property
for a stormwater filtering
wetland to help shield the
bay and springs from pol-
luted stormwater runoff
from businesses on U.S. 19.
In September, officials
from the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge and
representatives from the ar-
chitectural firm Watson,
Tate, Savory, Liollio pre-
sented to the public a plan
to develop Three Sisters
Springs.
The plan includes trails, a
road with an entrance from
Culter Spur Boulevard,
parking lots, a visitor center,
a fishing area on Lake
Lynda and a possible bird-
watching nook on the banks
of the lake. The plan has
since been tweaked some
and now includes a pro-
posal to move the visitor
center and one of the park-
ing lots to a satellite loca-
tion adjacent to the
property at one of the empty
storefronts on U.S. 19.
But Thursday, the infor-
mal gathering initially took
a surprising line when most
of the questions were about
permitting.
Resident Jewel Lamb
wanted to know if permit-
ting for the proposed land-
scaping and construction
work at the property will be
done according to city
standards.
See PageA2


I ; I I -


iAk/B1





A2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


FRC
Continued from Page Al

to search for jobs or just
play a game, watch a movie,
work at a jig saw puzzle or
play a game of darts, grab a
cup of coffee or a free meal
at noon.
It also serves as an office
for Mid-Florida Homeless
Coalition administrator
Barbara Wheeler, a meeting
place for NA (8 p.m. Thurs-
days) and even an occa-
sional dance hall for the Up
With Downs group of young
adults with Down syn-
drome.
Plus, it serves as a warm
place to hang out after peo-
ple return from the
overnight cold-weather
shelter
It's homey, with a corner
area of couches and a TV, a
large table with a cheery
blue checkered tablecloth
loaded with snacks. There's
a pot of hot coffee in the
kitchen, a piano to play Out-
doors people can grill or fry
some fish.
On Wednesday, West gave
an impromptu tour.
"We have a washer and
dryer so folks living in
their cars or in the woods
can do laundry," West said.
"It's limited to one load
per person per week. It's
not intended as a Laun-
dromat for people in the
neighborhood."
She added, "This is our
outreach center, but it's not
a homeless outreach center,
although we certainly do
serve the homeless; we
serve the whole community
here."
Every other Wednesday,
local physician Dr. James
Lemire volunteers his
time, offering a free med-
ical clinic, by appointment
only.
"What we're really look-
ing for is a Physician's As-
sistant who can work under
him so we can have a clinic
every week," West said.
Local churches provide
daily free noon meals at the
outreach center and dinner
on Tuesday night. Also, a
local Methodist church pro-
vides Sunday lunch at 1 p.m.
A lot of what they do, West



CLERK
Continued from Page Al


LOCAL


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Nurse Lisa Strong prepares the exam room at the outreach
center for a clinic staffed by a doctor who stops by and gives
free medical care.

Local churches provide daily free
noon meals at the outreach center
and dinner on Tuesday night. Also,
a local Methodist church provides
Sunday lunch at 1 p.m.


said, is little things that lead
to big changes in a person's
life. For example, helping
people get their birth cer-
tificates so they can put
their kids in daycare so they
can get a job.
Or in the case of Mark
Tate, paying for his GED
classes.
Tate, one of the homeless
men who help West out
every day at the center, told
the Chronicle in March that
if he could do anything, he'd
want to learn computers
and get a job in that field.
One day West asked him
what was holding him back
and he said the cost.
"Well, we can take care of
that," she told him. The next
day he went and took the
test and started classes. He
has since earned his GED
and Monday he starts com-
puter classes at Withla-
coochee Technical Institute.
"We're so excited for


clerk and tax collector rou-
tinely draw plenty of inter-
est for a job that is mostly
statute-driven and pays
$118,000 a year.


announced Friday she In 1988, Strifler was one
would not seek re-election of seven candidates to re-
and is retiring when her place the retiring Walt Con-
term ends in De- nors.
cember Strifler informed
"It's really been Citrus County judges
an honor for me to on Wednesday of her
serve as clerk in Cit- decision and met
rus County," Strifler with staffers Friday
said during an in- in Crystal River and
terview with the Inverness.
Chronicle. The clerk's office
Strifler immedi- Betty oversees local courts
ately threw her sup- Strifler and is the official
port to chief deputy clerk keeper of public county
Angela Vick, a 21-year vet- records. Strifler's office
eran of the office | conducts audits of
who said she will county programs
file her paperwork along with nearly
Monday morning to 1,000 constitutional
run for clerk this and statutory func-
year. / tions or duties.
"Endorsement is In the new court-
not the correct house, her office is
term," Strifler said. the first one visitors
"Angela has a very Vick see when they walk
broad range of ex- into the lobby
perience in the clerk's of- Strifler said she and her
fice. She is well qualified for staff have put in place
the position. nearly all the major initia-
Vick likely will not be the tives they've set out to do, in-
only candidate. Open con- cluding:
stitutional offices like the 0 Providing index and


him," West said. "That's one
of the things we do here -
help people with education.
It's the little stuff that often
makes the difference."
Nikki Canary, West's
daughter and a regular face
at the center, said the suc-
cess of the Family Resource
Center has everything to do
with the people in the
county who support it.
"Because it's the citizens of
the county that take care of
us, we can take care of the cit-
izens of the county," she said.
"Mom always says that pa-
perwork will never be more
important than people."
West added, "Thirty years
ago when we started all this
I said I'll never take funding
that keeps us from helping
certain people... It's a pretty
neat place here."
The Family Resource
Center outreach facility is at
3848 E. Parsons Point Road,
Hernando. Call 344-1001.


imaging of county records
on the Internet in 2002.
Automated payroll
process for county and clerk
employees.
Imaged county commis-
sion agenda and backup
documents, and made them
available on the clerk's web-
site. The office also pro-
vides live and archived
video board meetings on the
clerk's website.
Court docket and calen-
dar available on the Inter-
net.
Trained customer-ser-
vice clerks.
Developed a call center
to provide assistance that
receives 237 calls daily Stri-
fler said 91 percent of all
calls are answered in two
minutes.
The office is generally ab-
sent of controversy, but not
totally immune.
In 2009, then-County Ad-
ministrator Anthony
Schembri accused both Vick
and Strifler of altering an
audit of the county's infor-
mation technology program
to place one of Schembri's
administrators in a poor
light.
Both Strifler and Vick an-
grily denied the accusation,


PLANS
Continued from Page Al

"I just think if the rest of
us have to pull permits, you
should too," Lamb said.
Jack Huegel, who noted
that he is charged with com-
ing up with alternatives to
the proposed plan for the
property, and therefore
peppered the three officials
with a succession of
queries. Huegel, too, had
several questions about per-
mitting until another resi-
dent, Joe Chrietzberg,
thought the line of question-
ing seemed like residents
needed to assert control
over the process of change.
City manager Houston
assured everyone the terms
of the management plan
call for periodic oversight



TRAFFIC
Continued from Page Al

guard at Middle School
Drive and U.S. 41 changed
his routine to allow more
traffic flow on U.S. 41. That.
however, resulted in back-
ups on Middle School Drive
so severe that it created a
bottleneck.
Mullen said parents,
frustrated with the delays,
stopped their cars to let
children out before reach-
ing the school. Mullen said
when officials realized that
was taking place, they
quickly decided to shelve
the one-entrance idea.
"It went from bad to
worse," Mullen said. "We're
not going to sit around, if
we know something is not
going to get better, and let it
fester like that"
The district had decided
to block the Ella Street en-
trance to the school be-
cause of congestion on Ella
and Turner Camp Road,
and the mingling of vehi-
cles with students walking
to and from school.
Mullen said a traffic
count in December
showed 180 vehicles a day
entering the school site
from Ella.
When the second semes-


and Schembri issued public
apologies to both.
Strifler and Vick said Fri-
day that the announcement
to employees would include
Vick's decision to run for of-
fice.
"We think it's fair they
should know that," Vick

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SO YOU KNOW
0 A workshop to come
up with alternatives to
the plan being pro-
f posed is set for 6 p.m.
Feb. 8.

and that the city plans on
following through with
those stipulations.
Huegel pressed on about
the location of the kayak
f landing site and wondered
if it were possible to move
it to the proposed
SWFWMD wetland site?
Williams of SWFWMD was
not enthusiastic about that
possibility, but did not rule
it out completely
Refuge manager Lusk
i also made his case about
the need for viewing areas
' "flush with the ground" for
t visitors to view the mana-


ter started Wednesday, the
district closed a gate, block-
ing access to Middle School
I Drive from Ella before
school in the morning and
when school let out in the
afternoon.
That resulted in lengthy
traffic jams on U.S. 41,
caused by parents driving
their children to school
and normal morning traffic
between Inverness and
Hernando.
District officials said
t Thursday they thought that
changing the traffic pattern
at Middle School Drive
t would lessen the backups,
but it only made the situa-
tion worse.
"Because the traffic was
backing up so much, par-
ents were getting impatient
and dropping off children
t in areas where it's not
t safe," Mullen said.
District officials have
I been trying to find a solu-
tion to the parent dropoff
and pickup at Inverness
Middle to avoid congestion
and mingling of vehicles
and children.
A consultant recom-
mended several options, in-
cluding closing the Ella
* entrance, enlarging the
parking and adding vehicle
lanes. The school board,
wanting to save money dur-
ing a tight budget year


said. "They have to under-
stand there is no obligation
to support me."
They said, however, that
politics will be kept out of
the clerk's office during the
campaign and they only
sought to inform the staff.
"This is a form of commu-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

tees around Gator Hole.
He said while it is not a
necessity to have them, he
thinks it will help increase
the number of spots visitors
can view manatees
throughout the facility
Mike Kirk, who, along with
his wife Susan, made a pres-
entation to the Chronicle Ed-
itorial Board last Wednesday,
said there are enough areas
for people to view manatees
on the property without hav-
ing to add new ones.
"We just want them to fol-
low what the management
says," Kirk told the Edito-
rial Board.
A workshop to come up
with alternatives to the
plan being proposed is set
for 6 p.m. February 8.
Chronicle reporter AB.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


while still addressing the
problem, decided in the fall
to close the Ella access
without the other improve-
ments to see how it would
affect traffic.
Mullen said Friday it's
clear the problem that re-
sulted will only be solved
by reopening the Ella en-
trance.
Mullen said a crossing
guard will be added at the
school site beginning Mon-
day to ensure safety for
children walking along
Ella.
About 1,100 students at-
tend Inverness Middle
School. While about 90 per-
cent have bus assignments,
many parents drive to
school to avoid their chil-
dren standing in the cold or
dark at bus stops.
School board member
Thomas Kennedy said he
understands the dilemma
but he hopes it can be
solved without a major
budget hit.
"We don't want to divert
hundreds of thousands of
dollars from the classroom,"
he said, "just for those min-
utes each day parents are in
the pickup line."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or
m wright@ chronicle
online, com.


nication," Strifler said. "Ei-
ther they get it from some-
one else or they read about
it in the newspaper."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicle
online, com.


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TATE7&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




THE STATE Arrest made in Circle K robbery


Citrus County

Family invites public
to 100th birthday party
The family of Ethel Winn, a
longtime local educator and
the oldest living Citrus High
School alumnus still in Citrus
County, invites former stu-
dents and community people
as well as family and church
friends to attend Winn's
100th birthday party.
The open-house party is from
2 to 5 p.m. today at First United
Methodist Church, 4801 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. Cake
and punch will be served.
Meek to speak
at GOP gathering
The Republican Club of
Citrus Ridge will have its ini-
tial meeting at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Jan. 12, at the Pine
Ridge Country Club. Citrus
Ridge includes Citrus Hills,
Citrus Springs, Pine Ridge
and Beverly Hills, but all Re-
publicans are invited.
Citrus County Commis-
sioner Joe Meek will be the
guest speaker and will take
questions.
Pine Ridge Country Club
will serve dinner from 6 to 7
p.m. for those interested.
Groups sponsoring
day of service
The Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. Day of Service Project will
be held Monday, Jan. 16.
Citrus County residents are
invited to honor King's legacy
by making the holiday "A Day
On, Not A Day Off."
Organizers of this day of
service are Nature Coast Vol-
unteer Center, Retired & Sen-
ior Volunteer Program and
Citrus Builders Care, Inc.
Residents are encouraged
to gather friends, neighbors,
church groups, clubs and
civic organizations to join in
supporting the project by reg-
istering to volunteer.
Registered volunteers will
meet at the Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
for a brief orientation and
then drive to their assigned
locations. A light breakfast
and T-shirts will be supplied.
For more information or to
register for the event, call the
Nature Coast Volunteer Center
at 352-527-5950 or send an
email to ncvc@bocc.citrus.
fl.us. Registration forms can
be found at www.nature
coastvolunteercenter.org.

Tallahassee

Traffic deaths up
over holidays
Preliminary figures show
111 people died on Florida's
roads during an 18-day holi-
day period through Jan. 2.
That was almost double the
60 deaths recorded over an
18-day holiday period a year ago.
Florida state troopers
made 505 arrests for driving
under the influence of alcohol
and drugs. Overall traffic cita-
tions issued by troopers,
though, dropped from 40,000
to 35,000.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA Investi-
gators have made an arrest
in the recent armed robbery
of a Circle K store in Ho-
mosassa, according to the
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice.
Robert Lee Cason, 20,
3602 W. Riverview Lane,
Dunnellon, was arrested
Friday after tips were re-
ceived following the


publication of surveillance The clerks allegedly said
images of the robbery on the Cason told them he needed
Crime Stoppers the money for his
website. mother's funeral
The two clerks at and added that "this
the store on 400 S. is what drugs will
Suncoast Blvd., said do to you." He then
a man entered the reportedly fled on
business around 11 foot out of the busi-
p.m. Tuesday and ness. Witnesses also
demanded ciga- noted the robber
rettes and all the Robert had on a dark-col-
money He also re- Cason ored baseball cap
portedly brandished a and a dark blue bandana
handgun. around his neck.


Investigators knocked on
Cason's girlfriend's door
Friday and he surrendered
to deputies.
Cason reportedly told in-
vestigators he has witnesses
to corroborate that he was
busy selling Roxys (pills) at
the time of the robbery, but
could not name them at that
moment. He also admitted
to other robberies, but de-
nied any knowledge of this
one. He allegedly told inves-
tigators he owns a dark blue


bandana.
Cason added he has an ac-
quaintance who owns a gun
fitting the description of the
firearm used in the robbery
and may have traded it for
drugs. He initially denied
touching the gun, but said he
may have handled it at the
acquaintance's residence.
Bond was set at $50,000.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


Stuck in hog heaven


Beverly Hills

MATTHEW BECK
Chronicle

BEVERLY HILLS
n 25 years Albert
Geerts says he's
never seen anything
like it.
Thursday morning,
the 90-year-old Beverly
Hills resident and his
wife awoke to their
once-immaculate back
yard on West Sugar-
berry Lane and found it
turned upside down, lit-
erally
At first, Geerts says
he thought the problem
was armadillos rooting
about, but after confer-
ring with neighbor and
close friend Michael
McConnell, the two
came to the realization
the problem was much
bigger than that.
They discovered the
destruction was from
wild hogs.
"The animals are get-
ting chased out of
there," Geerts said,
pointing to a large
wooded area behind his
home.
In recent weeks he
said a major logging op-
eration has begun re-
moving trees behind his
home, and Geerts be-
lieves the hogs are
being displaced by the
removal of habitat.
The wooded area be-
hind his home includes
a large piece of land
measuring hundreds of
acres in the northeast-
ern portion of Beverly
Hills.
The two men have
sought help for the
problem, but requests
from both the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
and Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC)
have not helped.
"They said it's our
problem," McConnell
said.
According to Gail
Tierney, spokeswoman
for the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, when a
call comes in and offi-
cers are dispatched for
a nuisance-animal call,


man left with few options after wild hogs destroy his backyard


: *' I - ."';- "" "

e.K
". ... ... . .-"
.-- .. .. .

MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Albert Geerts, left, and his Beverly Hills neighbor Michael McConnell discuss Geerts'
lawn and the destruction a group of wild hogs caused in his yard Thursday.


it is purely a public
safety mission.
"Officers are not
trained or authorized to
trap or relocate wild an-
imals," she said. "If an
animal needs to be re-
moved, the officer will
provide information for
a nuisance animal
trapper."
FWC offers similar
assistance when con-
tacted about hogs.
"We don't have any-
body that is going to go
and deal with hogs," Of-


ficer Jeff Summers said
Friday "They can hire a
trapper or shoot it them
themselves, but hogs on
private land are not a
regulated animal by
FWC."
Shooting the animal
isn't an option for
Geerts because dis-
charging a firearm in
his Beverly Hills neigh-
borhood is illegal, Sum-
mers said.
The FWC website de-
scribes the animals as
omnivorous, meaning


they eat all kinds of
foods, both plant and
animal.
The website also said
that trying to prevent
pigs from coming onto
your property is usually
futile. However, they
say fencing can prevent
them from entering
small yards and
gardens.
FWC says wild hogs
inhabit all 67 counties
in the state and prefer
oak-cabbage palm ham-
mocks, freshwater


marshes and pine
flatwoods.
Geerts isn't the only
person in his neighbor-
hood with the problem.
Yards at four other resi-
dences adjacent to his
have been torn up by
hogs rooting with their
snouts for morsels to
eat.
Geerts said trying to
fix the yard at present
is not an option.
"If I try to fix up my
yard and repair the
damage to the grass, as
long as those animals
are still around, I'm
wasting my time and my
money," Geerts said.
McConnell estimates
the damage done Thurs-
day night to his friend's
St. Augustine grass to be
roughly a 60-by-30
square-foot patch. He
also believes by the
tracks left in the yard
there is at least one
very large animal.
"One of these hogs is
200 to 300 pounds
based on the size of the
print," he said. "And
there are several other
smaller animals with it.
It's probably a mother
and several little
ones."
Both men are at a loss
for what to do next, and
McConnell says he
doesn't believe his eld-
erly neighbor can ac-
complish the job on his
own.
"We'd like help to get
rid of this problem, but
we don't know where to
turn," McConnell said.
Due to difficulty that
Geerts has hearing on
the telephone, Mc-
Connell says he will
field phone calls from
anyone interested in
helping to remove the
destructive animals or
with suggestions on how
the problem may be re-
solved. He can be con-
tacted by calling
352-513-4483.
Chronicle staff writer
Matthew Beck can be
reached at (352)564-2919
or mbeck@chronicle
online com.


-From staff and wire reports




Planning board backs retirement centers' requests


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

Places for seniors to live
should increase this year, as
two plans gained recom-
mendations on Thursday
The Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development Re-
view Board backed a
request to allow 20 addi-
tional residents at an exist-
ing assisted living facility
and looked favorably on a
church's request to build 24
units of independent living
housing for seniors. These
applications will be recom-
mended to the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC) for
approval.
The owners of Sunflower
Springs Assisted Living Fa-
cility (ALF) on Yulee Drive
in Homosassa asked to in-
crease its current 84 beds by


20 beds for a total of 104
beds, with no change to the
current structure.
"What the applicant told
us is that, with the economy,
more and more people want
to share a room," said
Joanna Coutu, principal
planner, presenting the re-
quest. "When they have
someone who wants to dou-
ble up, they have to close
another room. The request
for 104 beds would be the
maximum allowed in the
land-use district."
Dr. William Dixon, one of
the partners in the invest-
ment group that built the
ALF, said the group origi-
nally planned to build an in-
dependent living facility
"In doing so, we designed
a building with very spa-
cious rooms," Dixon said.
"When the building crunch
came and we decided we


had to make it an assisted
living facility instead, we
found that all our costs were
what was in the walls, and it
didn't cost us so much to
leave these big rooms."
Dixon said the 74 rooms at
Sunflower Springs were 30
percent to 50 percent larger
than rooms in other ALFs
he had seen, and could be
used as a marketing tool.
"We thought we would
probably stabilize at about
80 residents and essentially
be full," Dixon said. "What
we found was that the rooms
were so large that a hus-
band and wife would come
in and say, 'Rather than tak-
ing a two-bedroom (apart-
ment), we'll just keep one of
these large single-people
(apartments)."'
Not too long ago, the ALF
reached 80 residents, and had
about seven rooms empty


"It seemed logical for us
to ask you to consider an ad-
ditional 20 beds," Dixon said.
"The reality is, we'll proba-
bly stabilize at 90 general
occupancy It's unlikely we'll
go to 100 or 104. It would be
nice for us economically, but
that won't happen."
Dixon said the original
parking space was designed
to accommodate residents
in independent living with
cars, but when it was
switched to an ALF, most
residents were aged 80 and
older and did not drive.
Therefore, parking was ad-
equate, Dixon said.
Staff also said require-
ments were met for land-
scaping, maintaining
wetlands and having an
evacuation plan.
Pastor Mark Gabb of St.
Paul's Lutheran Church in
Beverly Hills presented


plans for 24 units of an in-
dependent living facility
"This project has been in
the works for well over a
dozen years," Gabb said.
After running into some
"snags," the church's cur-
rent objective was to get
Phase 1 off the ground.
"We've determined that
there is definitely a market
for this kind of product in
the community," Gabb said.
"We intend to market it not
just to the local community, but
in our church family we
have a lot of people living up
north who are interested."
Gabb said it would be the
first phase of a venture the
church would like to even-
tually involve the 70 acres of
land that it currently owns.
A Beverly Hills man's
request to build a garage for
a recreational vehicle was
approved for recommenda-


tion to the BOCC, with one
vote by PDRB member Paul
Wheeler against it.
George Derewenko
sought a variance to build a
20-feet-high garage at 5803
N. Carnation Drive, where
the allowable structure
height is 18 feet. Wheeler
questioned whether it
needed to be that high. The
remainder of the board fa-
vored granting the variance
because the structure would
shelter the RV and would
follow the architecture of
the house.
The board also backed
a request that would facili-
tate the construction of a
Dollar General Store at 4421
N. Carl G. Rose Highway,
Hernando.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online. com or 564-2916.


*






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Men rescued after accident


-;_ .- ... .






CAPTAIN B. LEWIS/Special to the Chronicle
Around 11:30 a.m. Friday, three Crystal River Coast Guard Auxiliary members headed to a rescue on the Crystal River. A
boat ran into a channel marker near Shell Island, tossing its occupants into the cold water. There were no injuries.

Two tossed from 17-foot boat after hitting channel marker


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
What started as a day of
fishing ended up with a res-
cue from frigid waters for
two Leesburg sailors.
According to Karen Parker,
spokeswoman for the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service, the
men were both preoccupied
reading charts and ran the
17-foot boat into a channel
marker just west of Shell Is-
land. Both were tossed into
the water from the impact
"A good Samaritan came
along and was able to get


them to shore," she said Fri-
day night. "It was a brief
rescue."
However, with no one at
the helm, the boat contin-
ued to spin in circles. A
USFWS officer was able to
jump on board and get it
under control, Parker said.
The two men suffered from
mild hypothermia because of
the cold water temperatures
but refused medical treat-
ment, Parker said.
Crystal River Coast Guard
Auxiliary Capt. Jim Simon
said he and two other mem-
bers were working on the
auxiliary boat shortly be-


fore noon Friday when they
heard an SOS message
come across the radio. They
immediately called it into
the U.S. Coast Guard in Yan-
keetown.
Three members of the
auxiliary got into the boat-
Zero-One and headed out
to the scene. The Coast
Guard also launched a boat
from Yankeetown
"We launched a boat, but
the incident was ended re-
ally quick so by the time we
got there, it was over," Petty
Officer Joseph Howell said
Friday afternoon.
The USFWS was the first


to arrive, followed by Zero-
One.
"We were able to get the
two men into our boat, turn
on heaters and get their wet
clothes off," Simon said.
"We carry blankets with us
so we were able to start get-
ting them warmed up right
away."
Simon said both men had
life jackets on.
"I believe this is what
saved their lives," he said.
Chronicle managing edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can be
reached at 352-564-2930 or
sfrederick@chronicle
online.com.


Pit bulls, bull




dogs removed




from homes


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

Living conditions for
dogs found Thursday at
two residences in Ho-
mosassa were considered
so poor that the animals
were removed.
Citrus County Animal
Control officers began re-
moving seven dogs, from
among many found at two
separate locations on South
Rock Crusher Road, at
about 5 p.m., according to a
report from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. The
pickup took about an hour to
complete. All the dogs were
bulldog and pit bull mixes.
Five dogs were removed
from 1351 S. Rock Crusher
Road.
These animals included:
a red and white adult fe-
male in heat, tethered too
short, chain too heavy; a
brown, white and black
adult female tethered too
short, no adequate shelter
(small plastic barrel only);
a brown and white adult
female tethered too short,
chain too heavy, in a very
hungry condition as it was
trying to eat sticks and
leaves from around tether
area; a white adult male
tethered too short, chain
too heavy; and a tan and
white adult female in an
elevated pen with three
very large, heavy hooks
hanging from the collar


weighing about 8 pounds.
All tethered dogs were on
heavy chains weighing
more than one-eighth of the
dogs' body weight that were
5 to 10 feet in length, not the
required 20-foot length.
Notice was posted at
1351 S. Rock Crusher on
the rear door of the resi-
dence, with duplicates on a
tree next to where one dog
was tied, plus on the door
of the cage where another
dog was found. Photos
were taken of all notices.
Two dogs were removed
from 1295 S. Rock Crusher
Road. These included a
black and white adult male
tethered too short on a
very heavy chain and a
brown and white adult fe-
male with severe injury to
its lower lip and jaw area.
Its lower lip was hanging
open, and the dog was un-
able to close it. This dog
was removed from an ele-
vated homemade, plywood
and wire cage.
Written notice was not
left at 1295 S. Rock
Crusher because a resi-
dent was present and ac-
knowledged removal of the
two dogs. The resident was
advised that he or his
brother would have five
days to claim their dogs, as
well as citations from the
county's animal shelter.
If the dogs are not
claimed, they will be con-
sidered county property.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc



pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 5 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
be smooth. Partly cloudy today.


NA NA NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
forecast by.
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 73 Low: 45
Variably cloudy; 10% chance of a
showers
| SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 48
Partly cloudy


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 50
Mostly sunny


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


Gulf water
temperature


57
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.73 27.73 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 34.58 34.56 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.69 36.68 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.37 38.35 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision, In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 72/37
Record 88/24
Normal 71/49
Mean temp. 55
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.04 in.
Total for the year 0.04 in.
Normal for the year 0.57 in.
"As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.15 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 49
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Juniper and elm
Today's count: 8.4/12
Sunday's count: 10.1
Monday's count: 10.0
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
1/7 SATURDAY 3:29 9:42 3:55 10:08
1/8 SUNDAY 4:18 10:31 4:45 10:58

CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:48P.M.
( SUNRISE TOMORROW....................7:25 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY........................ 4:33 P.M.
JAM .11 J.11 1 JAN.23 JM MOONSET TODAY ......................5:53 AM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness/Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even
addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd
addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:29 a/12:39 p 5:30 p/-
Crystal River* 1:50 a/10:01 a 3:51 p/9:42 p
Withlacoochee* 1:38 p/7:49 a /7:30 p
Homosassa-* 2:39 a/11:38 a 4:40 p/11:19 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
4:13 a/12:20 a 6:05 p/1:17 p
2:34 a/10:39 a 4:26 p/10:25 p
12:21 a/8:27 a 2:13 p/8:13 p
3:23 a/12:16 p 5:15 p/--


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H L Pep. Fcst H L City


pc
s
sh
sh
s
pc
s
c
ts
pc
s
c
.01 c
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
c
pc
pc
s
pc
s
s
pc
pc
ts
s
c
s
pc
sh
pc
pc

c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/now mix; s=sumy; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstomns; wzwIndy.
02012 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 74 52 ts 73 58
New York City 53 36 s 50 34
Norfolk 69 33 pc 62 40
Oklahoma City 67 37 pc 55 36
Omaha 49 30 pc 45 27
Palm Springs 78 47 s 72 46
Philadelphia 56 27 s 53 34
Phoenix 73 47 s 71 47
Pittsburgh 56 39 pc 41 27
Portland, ME 29 19 .04 pc 43 26
Portland, Ore 39 31 .02 c 45 35
Providence, R.I. 53 26 s 52 31
Raleigh 66 33 pc 65 43
Rapid City 44 28 c 41 24
Reno 53 23 s 46 19
Rochester, NY 53 32 c 40 29
Sacramento 61 33 s 62 35
St. Louis 70 48 pc 50 32
St. Ste. Marie 42 21 sn 30 13
Salt Lake City 45 23 c 39 21
San Antonio 74 50 pc 72 49
San Diego 68 50 s 62 44
San Francisco 56 44 s 57 42
Savannah 70 35 pc 69 51
Seattle 40 37 .05 c 45 38
Spokane 36 26 c 34 25
Syracuse 51 29 pc 43 28
Topeka 59 34 pc 51 31
Washington 63 33 s 58 36
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 84 Lufkin, Texas LOW -8 Frenchville,
Maine
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/70/s
Amsterdam 46/41/sh
Athens 45/36/sh
Beijing 34/16/pc
Berlin 43/39/sh
Bermuda 67/61/pc
Cairo 62/48/s
Calgary 38/27/s
Havana 78/58/pc
Hong Kong 68/58/pc
Jerusalem 58/40/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid

Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


63/45/s
52/43/s
55/29/s
71/43/s
34/14/sf
34/31/sn
50/42/sh
82/71/ts
55/38/s
79/68/pc
46/33/pc
35/21/pc
37/32/rs


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


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0 C 106 W. Main
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A4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ex-Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Weston dies at 64


Associated Press


LONDON Bob Weston,
a British guitarist who
played with Fleetwood
Mac, has died aged 64.
Police say Weston's body
was found in his north Lon-
don home on Tuesday after


neighbors raised the alarm.
Police said Friday that
his death was not being
treated as suspicious. An
autopsy revealed the
causes of death as gastric
intestinal hemorrhage, cir-
rhosis of the liver and
throat problems.


Weston joined Fleetwood
Mac in 1972 as replacement
for Danny Kirwan, and played
on the band's albums "Pen-
guin" and "Mystery to Me."
But during an American
tour the next year, Mick
Fleetwood discovered
Weston was having an affair


with his wife, Jenny Boyd.
Weston was fired.
He released several solo
albums and played with mu-
sicians including Long John
Baldry, Murray Head, Sandy
Denny and Steve Marriott.
He is survived by a
brother.


Orthodox Christians celebrate Epiphany


Associated Press

ISTANBUL Orthodox
Christian worshippers
plunged into chilly waters
across southern and eastern
Europe on Friday to re-
trieve crucifixes in cere-
monies commemorating
the baptism of Jesus Christ.
Hundreds of members of
Istanbul's tiny Greek Ortho-
dox community and tourists
from neighboring Greece
attended the Epiphany cer-
emony of the Blessing of the
Waters. About 20 faithful
leaped into the wintry wa-
ters of the Golden Horn
inlet to retrieve a wooden
cross thrown by the spiri-
tual leader of the world's
Orthodox Christians, Ecu-
menical Patriarch
Bartholomew I.
Apostolos Oikonomou, a
40-year-old Greek partici-
pating in the swim for the
fourth year, clinched the
cross. "This year I was the
lucky guy," he said. "I wish
everybody peace and happy
new year."
Christians worldwide cel-
ebrate the feast of
Epiphany as Jesus' revela-
tion to the world as the son
of God. While Western
Christians mark it as the day
the biblical Magi are said to
have arrived to view the
baby Jesus, Orthodox Chris-
tians commemorate Jesus'
baptism in the Jordan River
Some Orthodox Christian
churches, including those
in Russia, Egypt, Syria and
Lebanon, follow a different
calendar, and Friday was
Christmas Eve, with
Epiphany on Jan. 19.
In Bulgaria, young men
marked Epiphany by jump-
ing into rivers and lakes to
recover crucifixes cast by
priests in an old ritual. Tra-
dition there holds that the
person who retrieves a cross
will be freed from evil spirits.
Priests of Bulgaria's Or-
thodox Church said prayers
for prosperity and blessed
the colors of army units, a
tradition abandoned by the
communist regime in 1946
and re-established in 1992.


M:.. . .A.

Associated Press
Romanians ride Friday during a traditional Epiphany celebration race in Pietrosani, Romania.
According to the local Epiphany traditions, following the religious service, villagers get
their horses blessed with the Holy water, then compete in a race.


President Georgi Parvanov
greeted the military parade
in Sofia, the capital.
In the mountain city of
Kalofer, in central Bulgaria,
200 men in traditional dress
waded into the icy Tundzha
River with national flags.
Inspired by the music of a
folk orchestra and by home-
made plum brandy, they
danced a slow "mazhko
horo," or men's dance,
stomping on the rocky
riverbed. Led by the town's
mayor, a bass drummer and
several bagpipers, the men
danced for nearly an hour,
up to their waists in the
cold water, pushing away
floating chunks of ice.
In the Romanian village
of Petrosani, north of
Bucharest, some 1,000 vil-
lagers gathered for a tradi-
tional blessing of horses to
give thanks for the animals
who play an important role
in sustaining livelihoods.
"They drag wood and
stones for us, and this is a
celebration for them too,"
said Catalin Ristea, a 20-
year-old agricultural worker,
sporting a cowboy hat on


his blonde-streaked hair.
Orthodox priests sprin-
kled more than a dozen
horses with holy water, and
horses took part in im-
promptu log-dragging com-
petitions cheered on by
villagers. A tiny Shetland was
the star of Epiphany as it
doggedly pulled a cart
weighed down with 10 locals.
Friday's celebration was
crowned by a horse race as
riders without saddles or
stirrups charged across the
misty fields. Villagers ate
spicy meatballs cooked on
an open grill and washed
down with red wine, while
children enjoyed swirls of
pink candy floss.
In Istanbul, dozens of po-
lice in riot gear stood guard
at the outdoor Epiphany
ceremony as a precaution
following past protests by
nationalists against the Pa-
triarchate, which dates
from the Byzantine Empire.
Bartholomew has called
for the reopening of a the-
ology school on an island
near Istanbul that trained
generations of church lead-
ers, including himself, until


it was closed by Turkey in
1971 under a law that put
religious and military train-
ing under state control. The
Halki Theological School
closed its doors entirely in
1985, when the last five stu-
dents graduated.
In Kosovo, minority Serbs
who live surrounded by Al-
banians in the enclave of
Gracanica rose early Friday
in bitterly cold weather and
cut down oak trees from
nearby woods, gathering
branches to adorn the en-
trance to their houses as
tradition dictates.
Kosovo was the ancient
seat of the Serbian Ortho-
dox Church, which has hun-
dreds of monasteries and
churches in a region domi-
nated by ethnic Albanians.
Many Roman Catholics
also marked Epiphany on
Friday Across Poland, be-
lievers celebrated with reli-
gious processions, including
a gathering in Warsaw at-
tended by thousands. The
Communists banned Poles
celebrating Epiphany and
it was only reinstated as a
state holiday in 2011.


John
Kotwica Jr., 87
BEVERLY HILLS
John J. Kotwica Jr, 87, of
Beverly Hills, FL, passed
away Wednesday, Jan. 4,
2012, at Citrus Memorial
Hospital.
A native of Chicago, IL, he
was born March 16, 1924, to
John J.
Kotwica Sr.
and Lucille
(Szczesny)
SKotwica,
and was a
S lifelong tool
and die
maker in
John aviation
Kotwica Jr. parts man-
ufacturing. John moved to
Beverly Hills from Chicago
in 1997 with his wife of 66
years, Jean M. Kotwica, who
survives him. Mr. Kotwica
was a WWII U.S. Navy vet-
eran from 1944 to 1946, serv-
ing as a Machinist Mate, and
was a member of American
Legion Post No. 155. He was
a parishioner of Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church and
served as Eucharistic Min-
ister; a member of Knights
of Columbus (Fourth De-
gree) and a member of the
Polish-American Club, both
of Beverly Hills. Mr Kotwica
was a driver for the Skill
Bank and also a 25 Gallon
Blood Donor.
In addition to his wife,
Jean, John is also survived
by son Jerome (Elizabeth)
Kotwica, Las Vegas, NV;
daughter Joyce (Wayne) Lip-
ski, Naperville, IL; grand-
children Christine, Mark,
Brian, Sarah and Megan;
and several nieces and
nephews. Mr. Kotwica was
preceded in death by a
daughter, Janice Kotwica;
two brothers, George and
Larry Kotwica and a sister,
Eleanor Kayne.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated Monday,
Jan. 9, at 9 a.m. from Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church, Beverly Hills with
Fr. Frank Lubowa, Cele-
brant. Entombment will fol-
low in Fero Memorial
Gardens with military hon-
ors by American Legion
Post 155. Friends will be re-
ceived on Sun., Jan. 8, from
2 to 6 p.m. with Knights of
Columbus ceremony at 5
p.m. In lieu of flowers,
please make memorial con-
tributions to Hospice of Cit-
rus County. wwwfero
funeralhome.com.


Stella
Andrews, 93
HERNANDO
Stella Andrews, 93, of
Hernando, died Thursday,
Jan. 5,2012.
Private cremation
arrangements under the di-
rection of Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.




Louis
Carmer, 86
LECANTO
Louis Edward Carmer, 86,
of Lecanto, died Sunday,
Dec. 25, 2011, at Hospice
House in Lecanto.
A memorial service will
be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan.
10, 2012, at St Paul's Wels
Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. In-
urnment with military hon-
ors will follow at Fountains
Memorial Park, Homosassa
Springs.
Wilder Funeral Home.

Ledressta
Clark, 58
OCALA
Ledressta Clark passed
away on December 25, 2011
at her residence under Hos-
pice of Marion County.
Funeral

will be held
on Sunday,
January 8,
2012, at 1
p.m. at Holy
Band of In-
spiration
Ledressta Church,
Clark 1019 N.W.
10th St, Ocala, FL. Inter-
ment will be at St. Mary's
Cemetery, Silver Springs,
FL. Bishop Lillie Hanks of-
ficiating.
Professional services ren-
dered by New Serenity Me-
morial Funeral Home &
Cremation Svcs, Inc.
352/563-1394.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline.com.

Roberta
Cox, 73
GALLOWAY, OHIO
Roberta F Cox, 73, of Gal-
loway, Ohio, died Thursday,
Jan. 5, 2012, at Hospice of
Citrus County, Inverness.
Services and burial will
be in Ohio. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of the
arrangements.


NASA questions Apollo

commander's sale of list


Associated Press

MIAMI NASA is ques-
tioning whether Apollo 13
commander James Lovell
has the right to sell a 70-page
checklist from the flight that
includes his handwritten
calculations that were cru-
cial in guiding the damaged
spacecraft back to Earth.
The document was sold by
Heritage Auctions in Novem-
ber for more than $388,000,
some 15 times its initial list
price. The checklist gained
great fame as part of a key
dramatic scene in the 1995
film 'Apollo 13" in which actor
Tom Hanks plays Lovell
making the calculations.
After the sale, NASA con-
tacted Heritage to ask
whether Lovell had title to
the checklist. Greg Rohan,
president of Heritage, said
Thursday the sale has been
suspended pending the out-
come of the inquiry The
checklist, he said, is being
stored in the company's vault
Rohan said Lovell provided
a signed affidavit that he had
clear title to the ring-bound
checklist, which is standard
procedure. Heritage does
robust business in space
memorabilia and this is the
first time NASA has raised
questions about ownership
of its items, he added.

fdas. E. .9b. U
Funeral Home With Crematory
GERALD CUNNINGHAM
Service: Tuesday -9:00 AM
ROBERTA COX
Service: Jerry Spears Funeral Home
Columbus, OH
JOHN R. OLDFIELD
Service: Saturday 2:00PM Chapel
STELLAANDREWS
Private Cremation Arrangements
WAYNE SHINN
Private Cremation Arrangements
726-8323


"It's one that is near and
dear to our hearts," Rohan
said of the space collectibles
business. "We, like a lot of
people, consider these astro-
nauts to be national heroes."
The latest inquiry follows
a federal lawsuit NASA filed
last year against Apollo 14
astronaut Edgar Mitchell
seeking return of a camera he
brought back from his 1971
moon mission. That lawsuit
was settled in October when
Mitchell agreed to give the
camera to NASA, which in
turn is donating it to the Na-
tional Air and Space Museum.
NASA spokesman Bob Ja-
cobs said the lawsuit and in-
quiry do not represent an
aggressive, broad new agency
effort to recover space items.
The Apollo 13 moon mis-
sion was aborted about
200,000 miles from Earth
when an oxygen tank ex-
ploded on April 13, 1970,
jeopardizing the three-man
crew's ability to return
home. AstronautJack Swigert
famously said "Houston,
we've had a problem here"
after the explosion.

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline com
or
Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
amiller@chronicleonlineLcom


''^ Citrus County now has


I ,Single Stream Recycling
It takes less work to do the right thing!
SAll accepted materials are now recycled in a single container
nR The materials listed below will be accepted at all sites
I The Materials Include: (Please empty and rinse all containers before placing in bin)
rE Newspapers & Advertising Inserts
I Magazines, Catalogs & Telephone Books plse
C Office Paper (White & Colored) & File Folders NO gat*
SJunk Mail, Envelopes & Bagged Shredded Paper tOgaSItb*
:Y A Paperboard & Boxboard (like cereal, cracker boxes r
& & paper beverage holders (please flatten)
C Corrugated Cardboard & Paper Bags (please flatten)
A Milk & Juice Cartons (please flatten)
L Juice Boxes & other Aseptic Containers
L Glass Food & Beverage Containers (lids removed)
I #1 through #7 Plastic Food, Beverage & Household Containers
S(lids removed) Lids may be recycled after removal
i _Metal (Steel, Tin & Bi-Metal) Food, Beverage Containers
N Metal Lids (separated from metal and glass containers)
5 Aluminum Containers, Food Trays and Foils (balled)
S Empty Aerosol Cans (Non-Hazardous Substances only, including
Food, Beauty, Fragrance & Household Products)
Please DO NOT place these items in the containers:
0 Styrofoam (Computer, furniture, appliances packing, unused EPS cups &
Polystyrene labeled #6 can be recycled at the Central Landfill Recycling Center)
0 Batteries (Recycle at the Central Landfill)
0 Hard back books (Remove covers and recycle or donate)
B0 Electronics (Recycle at the Central Landfill)
0 Ceramics or dishes
o 0 Yard waste or trash
0 Food waste
0 Motor oil /Anti-freeze containers
PU 0 Hazardous waste containers
S0 Light bulbs, window glass, mirrors, drinking
glasses & aquariums (Fluorescent bulbs may be recycled at the Central
Landfill first 6 free of charge)
0 Plastic grocery bags and plastic wrap (Bags may be recycled at your supermarket)
0 Miscellaneous: clothes, furniture, appliances, mattress / boxsprings, etc.
(Donate usable clothes and furniture. Furniture, appliances, mattress /
boxsprings, carpet and padding from your home accepted free of charge
F at the Central Landfill)
Contaminates in the bins may make the material unacceptable for sale thereby
F requiring landfill disposal and reducing the income for the centers sponsoring groups
F *Solid Waste Management (352) 527-7670 / landfillinfo@bocc.citrus.fl.us
L I----- I------ mmm---I -mmmm- mII


Obituaries


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 A5











AS ATRDYJAUAYTH01 SMOCKSEiuCUTY IN)ECHRONICL


IHowTKs *R 'EA H IT "I I W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2849980 6.18 -.13 RareEle g 71005 5.76 +.94 Microsoft 978758 28.11 +.43 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1239510127.71 -.33 CheniereEn 38596 9.00 -.30 Oracle 551790 26.93 +.34 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDR Fncl 670471 13.40 -.09 AvalnRare 30298 2.84 +.23 PwShs QQQ439898 57.81 +.20 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
FordM 578253 11.71 +.12 SamsO&G 22452 2.42 +.11 SiriusXM 433585 2.00 -.04 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SprintNex 498649 2.19 -.05 VirnetX 21318 26.73 +2.01 Intel 344533 25.25 -.15 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd-Loss in last 12 mos. ec Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Cho %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
ETrSPlat 27.70 +4.25 +18.1 RareEleg 5.76 +.94 +19.5 FFinSvc 2.38 +.88 +58.7 inmg qualification. n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
TrnsRty 3.04 +.39 +14.5 FlexSolu 2.60 +.25 +10.6 HovnEn pfA 2.24 +.64 +40.0 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
HovnEntun 9.83 +1.13 +13.0 AvalnRare 2.84 +.23 +8.8 HampRB rs 3.41 +.71 +26.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
XuedaEd 4.11 +.42 +11.4 FieldPnt 4.64 +.37 +8.6 ArtsWay 8.15 +1.32 +19.3 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
KrispKrm 7.12 +.70 +10.9 StreamGSv 3.30 +.25 +8.2 AtlCstFn h 2.65 +.41 +18.3 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
CSVS2xPall46.67 -3.84 -7.6 Geokinetics 2.17 -.13 -5.7 Spreadtrm 14.98 -4.28 -22.2
FamilyDIr 53.63 -4.33 -7.5 MdwGoldg 2.06 -.12 -5.5 IntegLfSci 24.49 -6.01 -19.7
FtBcppfA 13.00 -.90 -6.5 EagleCGr 7.20 -.37 -4.9 RFMicD 4.54 -1.10 -19.5


OfficeMax 4.48 -.31 -6.5 NewConcEn 2.35 -.11 -4.5 Vical 3.64 -.64 -15.0
ChrisBnk 2.06 -.14 -6.4 Bacterin 2.45 -.11 -4.3 SyntaPhm 4.39 -.75 -14.6


1,395 Advanced
1,627 Declined
104 Unchanged
3,126 Total issues
94 New Highs
13 New Lows
3,481,484,669 Volume


DIARY


242 Advanced
197 Declined
45 Unchanged
484 Total issues
16 New Highs
5 New Lows
80,259,836 Volume


1,113
1,381
140
2,634
42
34
1,673,947,527


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
467.64 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Last
12,359.92
5,069.03
451.20
7,557.68
2,295.11
2,674.22
1,277.81
13,398.89
749.71


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
-55.78 -.45 +1.17 +5.87
-2.18 -.04 +.98 -2.11
-2.68 -.59 -2.90 +10.66
-42.29 -.56 +1.08 -5.30
-9.46 -.41 +.74 +6.72
+4.36 +.16 +2.65 -1.07
-3.25 -.25 +1.61 +.50
-30.34 -.23 +1.58 -.76
-2.58 -.34 +1.19 -4.84


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BkofAm 6.18 -.13
BkMontg 56.44 -.01
BkNYMel 20.45 -.30
Barday 11.47 -.10
ABBLtd 19.24 -.40 BariPVix 31.76 -.49
ACE Ltd 70.03 +.17 BarnesNob 11.19 -.05
AES Corp 12.23 -.09 BarrickG 47.54 -.48
AFLAC 44.24 -.62 Baxter 50.14 +.48
AGCO 47.64 +.80 Beam Inc 50.58 -.04
AGLRes 41.18 -.53 BeazerHm 2.86 +.12
AK Steel 8.75 +.06 BectDck 73.03 +.34
AOL 15.83 +.37 BerkHaAl114500.00-1150.00
ASA Gold 26.95 -.35 BerkH B 76.39 -.54
AT&T Inc 29.68 -.28 BestBuy 24.22 +.78
AbtLab 55.86 -.51 BIkHillsCp 33.67 +.02
AberFitc 44.91 -.98 BIkDebtStr 3.98 -.02
Accenture 51.83 -.09 BlkEnh&l 12.67 +.04
AdamsEx 9.95 +.02 BIkGlbOp 13.69 +.04
AdvAuto 71.50 +.33 Blackstone 14.90 +.31
AMD 5.43 -.03 BlockHR 16.26 +.02
Aeropostf 16.05 -.03 Boeing 73.98 +.45
Aetna 44.07 +.44 Boise Inc 7.37 +.05
Agilent 37.4 4 +.40 BorgWarn 65.12 -.98
Agniomg 37.76 -.20 BostBeer 102.66 +.98
AlcatelLuc 1.56 -.02 BostProp 99.22 -.28
Alcoa 9.16 -.20 BostonSci 5.30 -.04
AllegTch 47.98 -.23 BoydGm 6.95 -.30
Allergan 87.07 Brinker 26.53 -.12
Allete 40.06 -.44 BrMySq 34.22 +.06
AlliBGIbHi 14.38 -.07 Brookdale 15.71 -.47
AlliBInco 8.13 ... Brunswick 18.90 +.04
AlliBern 14.88 +.08 Buckeye 63.67 -.50
Allstate 28.02 +.28 CBLAsc 15.95 -.11
AlphaNRs 21.20 -.52 CBREGrp 15.96 -.26
AlpTotDiv 4.46 +.02 CBSB 27.79 -.18
AIpAlerMLP 16.72 -.08 CFInds 157.99 -1.67
Altria 28.72 -.11 CH Engy 56.47 -.86
AmBev 34.48 -.31 CMS Eng 21.63 -.20
Ameren 32.09 -.64 CNO Find 6.15 -.04
Amerigrp 65.07 +2.55 CSS Inds 20.09 -.09
AMovilLs 22.53 +.02 CSXs 22.69 -.07
AmAxle 11.40 +.28 CVREngy 20.98 +.50
AEagleOut 13.40 -.12 CVSCare 41.46 -.29
AEP 40.79 -.16 CblvsNYs 14.85
AmEx 48.27 -.53 CabotO&G 80.65 -2.06
AmlntGrp 23.54 -.37 CalDive 2.58 -.01
AmSIP3 6.56 -.03 CallGolf 5.62 -.03
AmTower 60.25 -.10 Calpine 15.85 -.34
Amerigas 44.68 -1.16 Camecog 18.56 -.25
Ameriprise 51.09 -.15 Cameron 49.87 -.02
AmeriBrgn 38.59 +.10 CampSp 31.45 -.36
Anadarko 80.27 -.53 CdnNRsgs 38.08 -.52
AnalogDev 35.90 -.24 CapOne 45.16 -.02
Ann Inc 23.00 -.22 CapifiSrce 6.56 -.11
Annaly 16.06 +.11 CapMplB 14.48 +.03
Apache 97.04 -.13 CardnlHIth 41.56 +.66
AquaAnm 21.45 -.06 CareFusion 25.48 -.19
ArcelorMit 18.67 -.65 CarMax 30.32 -.59
ArchCoal 15.36 +.02 Carnival 32.91 -.36
ArchDan 29.07 -.17 Caterpillar 95.76 +.24
ArosDoren 19.29 -.50 CedarRIty 4.63 -.10
ArmourRsd 7.17 +.03 Celanese 44.57 -1.15
Ashland 59.33 +.76 Cemex 5.43 -.14
AsdEstat 16.24 -.10 CenterPnt 19.54 -.26
AssuredG 14.28 -.11 Cntyink 37.02 +.21
ATMOS 32.65 -.20 Checkpnt 10.96 -.08
AuRicog 8.45 +.01 ChesEng 23.98 +.36
AveryD 29.59 +.36 ChesUfi 42.79 -.45
Avon 17.54 +.07 Chevron 108.31 -.79
BB&TCp 25.79 -.38 Chicos 10.68 -.30
BHP BilILt 72.45 -.93 Chimera 2.64
BP PLC 44.08 -.17 Cigna 43.61 +.40
BPZRes 2.81 -.14 CindBell 3.16 -.06
BRT 6.10 -.01 Cinemark 18.29 +.25
BakrHu 51.26 +.44 Cifgrp rs 28.55 +.04
BailCps 37.12 +.85 CleanHs 63.16 -.02
BcoBrades 17.12 +.05 CliffsNRs 66.59 +.20
BcoSantSA 6.91 -.23 Clorox 67.16 -.03
BcoSBrasil 8.13 -.06 Coach 62.64 +.78


CCFemsa 95.75 -1.39
CocaCola 68.93 -.44
CocaCE 25.46 -.62
CohStlnfra 16.29 -.21
ColgPal 89.80 -.34
CollctvBrd 14.68 -.05
Comerica 27.92 +.54
CmclMfis 14.99 +.57
CmwREIT 17.86 +.01
CmtyHIt 18.31 +.86
CompSci 23.53 -.78
Con-Way 30.08 +.18
ConAgra 26.42 -.07
ConocPhil 72.66 -.57
ConsolEngy 38.57 -.06
ConEd 59.10 -.64
ConstellA 19.66 -.07
ConstellEn 37.57 -.14
Cnvrgys 12.59 -.04
Corning 13.52 +.24
CorrecInCp 21.72 +.76
CottCp 6.24 -.06
CoventyH 29.39 -1.21
Covidien 46.00 +.88
Crane 47.86 -.33
CSVS2xVxS 25.30 -.86
CSVellVSts 7.25 +.10
CredSuiss 22.32 -.76
Cummins 93.53 -1.17
CurEuro 126.71 -.74

DCTIndl 5.19 +.04
DDRCorp 12.75 +.13
DNPSelct 10.96
DR Horton 12.98 -.38
DSW Inc 42.64 -1.60
DTE 53.52 -.47
DanaHIdg 13.16 +.17
Danaher 48.33 -.26
Darden 44.34 -1.10
DeVry 41.40 +2.35
DeanFds 10.56 -.11
Deere 82.30 +.66
DeltaAir 8.32 -.01
DenburyR 17.27 -.05
DeutschBk 34.26 -1.97
DBGoldDS 5.07 +.04
DevonE 64.75 -.62
DexOneh 2.26 -.06
DiaOffs 56.28 +.67
DicksSptg 34.64 -.38
DxFnBullrs 69.49 -1.18
DrSCBr rs 25.45 +.22
DirFnBrrs 34.61 +.60
DirLCBrrs 27.98 +.11
DrxEnBear 10.67 +.16
DirEMBear 19.10 +.65
DirxSCBull 46.56 -.39
DirxLCBull 63.96 -.44
DirxEnBull 49.18 -.87
Discover 24.30 -.22
Disney 39.91 +.41
DollarGen 40.87 -.49
DomRescs 51.43 -.53
DEmmett 19.07 +.09
Dover 57.66 -1.02
DowChm 30.32 +.18
DuPont 46.04 -.66
DukeEngy 21.51
DukeRlty 12.10 -.15
E-CDarg 4.97 -.29
EMC Cp 22.01 +.11
EOG Res 102.43 +.28
EastChm s 41.32 +1.22
EKodak .37 -.05
Eatobns 45.29 -.37
EVEnEq 10.34
EVTxMGIo 8.47 +.01


Edisonlnt 40.39
BPasoCp 26.14
Ban 13.01
BdorGldg 14.39
EmersonEl 47.15
EmpDist 20.71
EnbrEPts 33.34
EnCanag 18.77
EngyTEq 40.90
EngyTsfr 47.48
EnPro 34.09
ENSCO 47.72
Entergy 71.50


EntPrPt 47.99 -.06
EqtyRsd 55.69 -.66
EsteeLdr 111.50 -1.17
ExomRes 9.75 -.18
Exelon 41.09 -.16
ExxonMbl 85.12 -.64
FMCTchs 51.57 -.15
FNBCp PA 12.01 +.01
FairchldS 12.19 -.12
FamilyDIr 53.63 -4.33
FedExCp 85.49 +1.40
FedSignl 4.02 -.14
Fedlnvst 17.13 +.60
Ferrellgs 18.48 -.25
Ferro 4.98 -.08
FidNatlnfo 26.43 -.47
FstHorizon 8.52 +.08
FTActDiv 8.48 -.04
FtTrEnEq 11.05 +.05
FirstEngy 42.21 +.15
Rotek 12.06 .19
FootLockr 24.96 +.22
FordM 11.71 +.12
FordMwt 3.06 +.07
ForestLab 30.60 +.07
ForestOil s 14.12 +.13
FranceTel 15.01 -.18
FMCG s 38.87 -.43
Fronfline 4.25 -.03
Fusion-ion 2771 +.20

GATX 43.07 -.50


GNCn 27.54 -.96
GabelliET 5.12 +.01
GabHIthW 7.24 +.03
GabUlI 7.93 +.12
GafisaSA 4.67 -.02
GameStop 24.87 -.39
Gannett 13.72 -.01
Gap 18.00 -.27
GenDynam 67.62 +.22
GenElec 18.65 +10
GenGrPrp 14.81 -.19
GenMills 40.07 -.34
GenMotors 22.92 +.75


GenOn En 2.48 -.06
Genworth 6.77 -.19
Gerdau 8.49 +.12
GlaxoSKIn 46.18 +.05
GlobPay 46.36 -1.63
GolLinhas 6.50 -.19
GoldFLtd 15.59 -.04
Goldcrpg 43.99 -1.17
GoldmanS 93.42 -1.16
Goodrich 123.64 +.24
GoodrPet 16.40 -.05
Goodyear 15.15 +.24
GrafTehdi 15.24 +.58
GramrcyC 2.48 +.13
GtPlainEn 21.28 -.04
GreenbCos 25.89 +2.00
Griffon 9.37 +.03
GpTelevisa 21.27 -.08
GuangRy 18.02 -.16
HCAHIdn 22.34 +1.05
HCP Inc 40.34 -.11
HDFCBks 26.66 -.41
HSBC 38.31 -.49
HSBC Cap 25.98 -.01
Hallibrtn 34.98 +.42
HanJS 14.78 +.02
HanPrmDv 13.23 -.03
Hanesbrds 22.38 -.11
Hanoverlns 34.27 -.38
HarleyD 39.58 -.31
HarmonyG 12.03 +.23
HartldFn 16.37 -.33
HawaiiEl 25.87 -.09


HItCrREIT 54.23
HItMgmt 7.49
HIthcrRlty 18.83
Heckmann 6.50
HeclaM 5.65
Heinz 53.02
HelmPayne 63.62
Hertz 12.15
Hess 56.42
HewlettP 26.40
HighwdPrp 30.02
HollyFrts 26.82
HomeDp 43.20


HonwIllnfi 55.18
Hospira 30.31
HospPT 23.62
HostHofis 14.99
HovnanE 1.75
Humana 92.25
Huntsmn 9.90
Hyperdyn 2.74
IAMGIdg 16.54
ICICIBk 27.90
ING 6.91
iShGold 15.76
iSAsfia 21.76
iShBraz 58.52
iShEMU 27.30
iShGer 19.29
iSh HK 15.55
iShJapn 9.06
iShKor 52.19
iSMalas 13.52
iShMex 54.30
iSPacxJpn 39.55
iSTaiwn 11.83
iShSilver 27.91
iShDJDv 53.68
iShChina25 35.17
iSSP500 128.27
iShEMkts 38.23
iShB20T 118.73
iShBl-3T 84.46
iSEafe 49.15
iShiBxHYB 88.90
iSR1KV 64.61


iSR1KG 58.81
iSRuslK 70.63
iSR2KV 66.71
iSR2KG 85.19
iShR2K 74.80
iShUSPfd 36.81
iShREst 56.83
iShDJHm 12.46
iStar 5.92
ITT Ed 63.85
Idacorp 41.20
ITW 47.79
Imafon 5.67


IngerRd 32.02 -.20
IntegrysE 53.19 -.47
IntcnfEx 115.01 -2.00
IBM 182.54 -2.12
InfiGame 17.33 -.01
IntPap 30.94 +.49
Interpublic 10.33 +.07
Invesco 20.77 +.20
InvMtgCap 14.11 +.13
IronMtn 31.62 +.44
ItauUnibH 18.80 -.02


JPMorgCh 35.36 -.32
JPMAlerian 39.37 -.31
Jabil 20.87 +.11
JanusCap 6.60 -.03
JohnJn 64.83 -.57
JohnsnCfi 33.17 +.27
JonesGrp 9.31 -.56
JnprNtwk 20.43 -.21
KB Home 7.20 +.06
KBR Inc 28.61 +.60
KCSouthn 69.68 -.28
Kaydon 31.54 -.27
KA EngTR 26.51 +.33
Kelbgg 50.51 +.04
KeyEngy 15.67 -.11
Keycorp 7.98 -.02
KimbClk 72.63 -.16
Kimco 16.45 -.19
KindME 83.39 -1.46


KindMor n 32.89 +.24 Monsanto 77.51 +.83 PhilipMor 77.08
Kinrossg 12.30 +.14 MonstrWw 8.35 +.03 PiedNG 33.36
KodiakOg 9.91 -.43 Moodys 35.83 +.14 Pier 1 15.00
Kohls 46.51 -.01 MorgStan 15.90 -.38 PimoStrat 11.45
Kraft 37.55 -.19 MSEmMkt 13.09 -.04 PinWst 47.39
KrispKrm 7.12 +.70 Mosaic 52.67 -.63 PioNtrl 94.01
Kroger 24.19 -.10 MotrlaSolu 46.55 -.12 PitnyBw 18.98
KronosWs 21.70 +1.45 MotrlaMob 38.46 -.15 PlainsAA 72.99
LSICorp 6.72 +.02 NCRCorp 16.68 -.03 PlainsEx 37.49
LTCPrp 31.27 +.05 NRG Egy 17.69 -.36 PlumCrk 37.47
LaZBoy 12.15 +.01 NVEnergy 15.75 -.19 Polariss 58.77
Ladede 40.25 -.41 NYSE Eur 26.97 -.15 PostPrp 43.15
LVSands 42.17 -.92 Nabors 18.90 +.13 Potashs 41.77
LearCorps 42.50 +.49 NatFuGas 53.20 -1.41 PwshDB 27.59
LeggMason 23.90 -.49 NatGrid 47.11 -.64 PSUSDBull 22.72
LeggPlat 22.76 -.37 NOilVarco 70.81 +.06 PSSPLwV 25.68
LennarA 20.40 -.37 Navistar 39.13 -.68 Praxair 107.96
Level3rs 17.96 +.24 NewAmHi 9.98 -.10 PrinFnd 24.47
LbtyASG 3.90 +.01 NJRscs 49.09 +.02 ProLogis 28.79
LibtProp 31.80 +.14 NYCmtyB 13.02 +.07 ProShtS&P 39.70
LillyEli 39.88 -.42 NewellRub 17.00 +.34 PrUShS&P 18.60
Limited 38.87 -.47 NewfidExp 38.18 -.51 PrUIShDow 14.90
LincNat 20.06 -.06 NewmtM 61.97 -.13 ProUltQQQ 87.16
Lindsay 55.23 -.77 NewpkRes 10.19 -.02 PrUShQQQ rs42.05
Linkedlnn 64.19 +.06 Nexeng 16.81 +.11 ProUIltSP 48.04
LiveNatn 9.66 +.14 NextEraEn 58.92 -.63 ProUShL20 18.82
LizClaib 9.61 -.03 NiSource 23.00 -.09 ProShtR2K 29.25
LockhdM 79.98 -.09 NikeB 97.99 -.17 ProUItR2K 35.77
LaPac 8.10 -.37 NobleCorp 30.29 -.08 ProUSSP50012.45
Lowes 26.34 -.03 NokiaCp 5.24 -.17 PrUltSP500 S 63.33
L BA 3445 +21 Nordstrm 49.74 -.87 ProUSSIvrs 14.67
NorfilkSo 75.31 -.45 ProUltSlv s 44.65
NoestUt 35.00 -.05 ProUShEuro 21.01
M&TBk 79.45 +.22 NorthropG 57.90 .25 ProctGam 66.36
MBIA 12.36 +.14 NSTAR 45.22 +.22 ProgrssEn 54.72
MDU Res 21.33 -.16 Nucor 41.17 +.22 ProgsvCp 19.51
MEMC 3.85 -.25 NuvMuOpp 14.80 ProUSR2Krs 37.47
MFA Fnd 6.76 +.08 NvMulSl&G 8.04 -.01 Prudent 52.73
MCR 9.29 +.04 NuvQPf2 8.05 +.03 PSEG 31.87
MGIC 3.91 -.16 OGEEngy 55.36 -.20 PubStrg 132.28
MGMRsts 11.13 ... OasisPet 31.63 -.99 PulteGrp 7.10
Macquarie 28.70 +.24 OcciPet 95.77 -.38 PPrlT 5.26
Macys 34.56 +.64 Och-Ziff 9.02 +.57 QEP Res 31.10
MageMPr 68.93 -.01 OfficeDpt 2.12 -.03 Qihoo360n 13.95
Magnalgs 36.22 +2.15 OfficeMax 4.48 -.31 QuanexBld 16.04
MagHRes 5.88 -.20 OldRepub 9.25 -.01 Questa 19.50
Manitowoc 10.10 +19 Olin 20.65 +.28 QksilvRes 6.99
Manulifeg 11.11 -.07 OmegaHIt 19.53 -.15 RPC 19.96
MarathnO s 30.69 -.57 Omncre 34.31 +.07 RPM 23.42
MarathPn 31.66 -.26 Omnicom 44.04 -.11 RSCHIdgs 18.58
MktVGold 53.35 -.55 ONEOK 87.21 -.23 Rackspace 41.66
MVOilSvn 117.30 -.28 OneokPts 57.22 -1.02 RadioShknGrp 2.44
MVSemin 31.21 -.04 OshkoshCp 23.11 +.16 RaioShkrp 9.85
MktVRus 27.08 -.10 OwensCorn 31.34 +.08 Rcorp 8603
MktVJrGId 25.62 -.29 Owenslll 21.30 +62 RangeRs 60.74
MarlntA 31.74 +.27 .62 Rayoniers 45.04
M ashM 30.72 -.43nr 4.
MStewrt 4.18 +.07 PG&ECp 41.06 +.01 Raytheon 48.08
Maso 11.40 -.14 PNC 59.91 +.10 Rltyln 34.79
MasterCrd 342.92 -9.49 PNMRes 17.91 -.10 RedHat 43.04
McDrmlnt 11.60 +.01 PPG 84.76 +.22 RegalEnt 11.73
McDnlds 100.60 +.77 PPLCorp 28.52 -.25 RegionsFn 4.41
McGrwH 46.01 +.07 PallCorp 56.18 -.90 Renren n 3.48
McMoRn 13.63 -.26 Pandoran 10.01 -.53 RepubSvc :27.84
MeadWvco 29.43 -.41 ParkerHan 77.64 -1.30 Revlon 14.52
Mechel 9.05 -.14 PariotCoal 9.02 -.08 ReynAmer 40.44
MedoHIth 60.83 +.87 PeabdyE 35.99 -.32 RioTinto 51.24
Medtrnic 39.03 +.54 Pengrthg 10.84 -.25 RiteAid 1.34
MensW 33.47 +.53 PennVaRs 26.20 -.15
Merck 38.47 -.27 PennWstg 20.45 -.58
MetLife 32.90 -.09 Penney 34.96 +1.19 '
MetroPCS 8.02 +.01 PepBoy 10.60 .28
MetroHlth 7.71 -.03 PepcoHold 20.04 -.24 Th r r
MKorsn 26.00 -.45 PepsiCo 65.39 -.83 The rem
MidAApt 62.74 -.32 PerkElm 21.12 +.59 N S
Midas 8.20 -.36 Prmian 20.33 -.06 NYSE Ii
MobileTele 15.67 -.19 PetrbrsA 24.13 -.28 found o
Molycorp 26.10 +60 Petrobras 25.69 -.42 u o
MoneyGrs 17.19 ... Pfizer 21.57 -.03


-1.13 RockTen 61.77 +3.35
-.15 RockwAut 72.38 -3.41
+.24 RockColl 56.55 +.13
-.02 Rowan 31.25 +.10
-.15 RylCarb 25.50 -.50
-1.49 RoyDShllA 73.76 +.80
Royce 12.57 +.01
-.94 Royce pfB 25.66 +.03
-1.16 Rand 16.93 +.16
+.08
+1.17
-.34 SAIC 12.42 -.13
-1.27 SAPAG 54.00 -.08
+.12 SCANA 43.76 -.18
+.08 SKTIcm 13.18 -.28
-.11 SpdrDJIA 123.53 -.42
+.05 SpdrGold 157.20 -.58
-.45 SPMid 161.93 -.15
-.45 S&P500ETF127.71 -.33
+09 SpdrHome 17.93 -.10
+.06 SpdrS&PBk 20.79 -.01
+.11 SpdrLehHY 38.47 -.03
+55 SpdrS&P RB 25.53 -.10
-.28 SpdrRefi 52.07 -.60
-.20 SpdrOGEx 54.59 -.60
-.28 SpdrMetM 51.31 +.03
+.08 STMicro 6.17 +.06
-.14 Safeway 21.23 -.05
+07 StJoe 14.65 -.14
-.47 StJude 34.61 -.31
+56 Saks 9.62 -.09
-1.95 Salesforce 101.06 +2.29
+.22 SJuanB 22.10 -.15
-.16 SandRdge 8.54 -.19
-.03 Sanofi 35.92 +.19
+.08 SaraLee 18.90 +.03
+.16 Schlmbrg 67.78 -.29
+.19 Schwab 12.04 +12
-.13 SeadrillLtd 34.33 -.05
-.75 SealAir 17.54 +.15
+.06 SempraEn 55.85 +.31
+.02 Sensient 38.31 +.06
-.56 SericeCp 10.67 +.12
-.56 SiderurNac 8.53 -.10
-.16 SilvWhtng 30.10 -.49
-.10 SimonProp 126.82 -.99
-.09 Skedichers 11.70 -.30
-.46 SmithAO 41.74 -.27
-.11 SmithfF 23.83 -.04
-.13 Smucker 77.42 -.26
-.11 SoJerInd 56.02 -.60
-.15 SouthnCo 44.48 -.46
+.07 SthnCopper 31.16 -.19
-.16 SoUnCo 42.40 +.02
-.65 SwstAirl 8.52 -.10
-.14 SwstnErgy 33.20 -.45
+.13 SpecraEn 30.45 -.34
+.03 SprintNex 2.19 -.05
-.09 SprottGold 14.49 +.07
+.34 SP Mais 34.77 -.05
+.15 SP HIthC 35.13 +.06
-.11 SPCnSt 32.16 -.21
-.11 SP Consum 40.05 +.06
+.24 SP Engy 70.44 -.42
-.04 SPDRFncI 13.40 -.09
-.16 SP Inds 34.59 -.07
-.53 SPTech 25.97 +.01
+.03 SPUFI 35.02 -.19




nainder of the

listings can be

n the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.44 +.04
AbdnEMTel 17.81 +.11
AdmRsc 32.89 +1.55
AdeonaPh 1.64 +.07
Advenlx .63
AlexomRg 6.59 -.27
AlldNevG 32.32 -.03
AmApparel .85 +.10
Anooraq g .55 +.07
AntaresP 2.08 -.05
Armour wt .01 +.00
Aurizong 5.29 -.08


AvalnRare 2.84
Banrog 4.17
BarcUBS36 42.73
BarcGSOil 25.96
BarcGsci36 34.68
BrclndiaTR 48.33
BrigusGg 1.02
BritATob 93.53
CAMAC En .92
CanoPet .09
Carderog 1.08
CardiumTh .37
CelSd .29
CFCdag 19.97
CheniereEn 9.00


+.23 CheniereE 18.50 +.17
-.01 ChiArmM .42 +.12
+.17 ChiGengM .93 +.18
+.06 ChinaNuti .55 -.15
+.09 ChinaShen 1.70 +.18
+.05 ClaudeR g 1.50 -.03
.01 ClghGlbOp 10.76 -.14
-.0 CornerstS 6.71
80 CrSuislno 3.68 +.01
05 CrSuiHiY 2.91 +.01

+.02
+.02
-.01 DeourEg .51 +.03
-.20 DenisnM g 1.37 -.04
-.30 EVLtdDur 15.47 +.06


EVMuniBd 12.64 +.08
EVMuni2 14.00
ElephTalk 2.91 +.17
EllswthFd 6.84 +.10
ExeterRgs 2.97 -.06
ExtorreGg 7.62 +.05


GamGldNR 15.00 -.02
GascoEngy .25 +.02
Gastargrs 3.31 +.09
GastarpfA 19.55 +.09
GenMoly 3.25 +.06
GeoPeto .20
GoldenMin 6.19 -.11


GoldStrg 1.73 -.02
GranTrrag 4.89 -.12
GrtBasG g 1.06 +.02
GtPanSilvg 2.19 -.03
Hemisphrx .20 -.01
HooperH .65 +.03
HstAEn 12.78 -.11
ImpOilgs 45.36 +.07
InovioPhm .44 +.01
IntellgSys 1.51 -.04
IntTower g 4.49 -.09
InvVKAdv2 12.53 +.07

LadThalFn 2.58 +.04
LucasEngy 2.62 -.02


-- IUr-Energy .87
Uranerz 1.99


MGT Cap .06 -.01
MadCatzg .53 -.01
MdwGoldg 2.06 -.12
Minefndg 10.81 -.21
NavideaBio 2.80 +.01
NBRESec 3.79 +.03
Nevsung 6.00 -.20
NwGoldg 10.76 -.01
NA Pall g 2.94 +.03
NthnO&G 24.22 -.96
NovaGldg 8.82 -.16


PacGEpfl 23.25 +.06 SamsO&G 2.42
ParaG&S 2.33 -.02 SeabGldg 17.00
PhrmAth 1.27 -.07 Senesco .24
PbnDrill 9.83 +.18 Solitario 1.58
PolyMetg 1.21 +.03 TanzRyg 2.71
PyramidOil 4.22 +.02 Taseko 2.82
Quaterrag .71 +.02 TasmanMg 2.07
QuestRMg 2.74 +.04 Tengsco .83
RareEleg 5.76 +.94 TrnsafiPet 1.42
Rentech 1.50 +.04 TravelCts 5.00
RexahnPh .39 -.01 TriValley .14
Richmntg 11.06 -.41 TriangPet 7.14
Rubion g 3.70 -.07 USGeoth .37


+.11 UraniumEn 3.08 -.02
+.07
-.02
+.20 VangMega 43.73 -.09
VantageDrl 1.05 +.03
-.02 VirnetX 26.73 +2.01
+.09 VistaGold 3.27 -.01
+.02 VoyagerOG 2.65
-.05 Walterlnv 20.11 -.49
+.16 WFAdvlnco 10.23 -.05
-.01 WT DrfChn 25.34 +.05
+.07 WizzardSft .13 +.00
+.00 YM Bio g 1.66 +.04


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


ASML HId 40.91 -.27
ATM Inc 21.27 +.74
ATP O&G 7.21 -.24
AVIBio h .82 +.06
Abraxas 3.35 -.10
AcadaTc 35.54 -.43
AcadiaHI n 11.36 +1.59
Achdiillion 7.92 +.09
AcmePkt 26.58 +.38
AomrdaTh 25.68 -.20
AcfvePw h .79 +.01
AcfvsBliz 12.24 +.13
AdobeSy 28.72 +.24
Adtran 29.02 -.40
AdvATech 5.79
AdvEnId 11.03 -.14
AdventSfts 23.74 -.01
Aegion 15.86 -.31
AeroViron 29.95 +.96
AEternag 1.65 +.06
Affymax 7.17 +.49
Afymetrix 4.31 +.15
AkamaiT 32.76 +.33
Akorn 10.91 -.17
AlaskCom 2.85 -.09
Alexion s 74.45 +2.04
Alexza .92 -.02
AlignTech 23.71 -.48
AlimeraSci 1.44 +.06
Alkermes 16.68 -.30
AllotComm 15.78 -.48
AllscriptH 18.28 +.21
AltairNano .65 +.05
AlteraCp If 37.49 +.03
AlterraCap 23.25 +.17
Alvarion 1.01 +.05
Amarin 6.75 +.37
Amazon 182.61 +5.00
Amedisys 10.85 +.35
ACapAgy 28.37 +.16
AmCapLd 7.23 +.02
AmSupr 3.71 -.10
Amrign 14.41 +.43
Amgen 64.76 +.35
AmkorTIf 4.64 +.03
Amylin 11.02 -.17
Anlogic 58.73 +.63
Analystlnt 6.35 +.35
Anaren 17.20 +.02
Ancesty 27.33 -.14
AngiesLn 13.23 -.56
AngioDyn 13.68 -.95
Ansys 56.94 -.36
A123 Sys 2.10 +.02
ApolloGrp 56.64 +2.92
Apollolnv 6.86
Apple Inc 422.40 +4.37
ApldMatf 11.01 +.18
AMCC 7.20 +.43
Approach 32.64 +.72
ArchCaps 37.46 -.04
ArenaPhm 1.62 -.09
AresCap 15.72 +.06
AriadP 13.52 +.31
Ariba Inc 27.67 -.06
ArkBest 20.32 +.44
ArmHId 28.02 -.69
Arris 10.69 +.08
ArubaNet 18.70 +.50
AscenaRi 32.38 -.22
AsialnfoL 7.60 +.07
AsscdBanc 12.14 +.13
athenahlth 53.20 +.42
Atmel 9.04 +.39
Autobytel h .75 +.01
Autodesk 30.96 +.14
AutoData 54.88 +.08
Auxilium 19.42 +.37
AvagoTch 28.31 -.18
AvanirPhm 2.20 +.09
AVEO Ph 13.97 -.61
AvisBudg 11.17 +.20
Aware h 2.94 +.09
Axcelis 1.70 +.16


BBCNBcp 10.03 -.08 ColSprtw 44.24 -.13
BEAero 39.79 +.83 Comcast 24.69 -.26
BGCPtrs 6.05 -.04 Comcspd 24.30 -.22
BJsRest 45.99 +.61 CmcBMO 38.59 -.04
BMCSft 32.01 -.78 CommSys 14.22 -.23
Baidu 121.09 -2.18 CommVIt 45.41 +.27
BeacnRfg 21.03 +.04 CmplGnom 3.71 +.33
BeasleyB 3.45 +.00 Compuwre 8.22 +.07
BebeStrs 8.52 +.22 Comtech 29.55 +.30
BedBath 59.94 +.20 Comverse 6.80
BioRelLab 16.63 -.18 ConcurTch 48.97 -.75
BioDIvrylf 1.85 +1.01 Conmed 26.63 +.17
Biodel h .58 -.05 ConstantC 22.51 -.07
BioFuelEh .62 -.03 CopanoEn 35.35 +.09
Biogenldc 115.50 +.24 Copart 46.59 +.14
BioMarin 36.61 +1.01 CorinthC 2.39 +.02
BioMimeic 2.00 -.21 CostPlus 11.66 +.63
Bionovorsh .22 -.01 Costom 81.13 -2.13
BioSante .49 +.01 CowenGp 2.70 +.11
BioScrip 5.22 -.14 CrackerB 51.08 +.46
BlueCoat 25.57 -.02 Cree Inc 22.45 +.09
BobEvans 34.62 +.54 Crocs 15.27 -.55
BostPrv 7.84 -.20 Ctrip.omm 22.95 -.56
BreitBurn 19.15 -.10 CubistPh 40.17 +.43
Brightpnt 10.97 -.05 Curis 4.39 -.13
Broadcom 30.14 +.69 Cymer 49.51 -.74
BroadSoft 26.53 +.38 CypSemi 16.81 -.10
Broadwdh .66 -.01 CitRxh .27 +.00
BrcdeCm 5.42 +.06
BrklneB 8.77 +.16
BrooksAuto 10.13 -.23 DeclcsOut 82.22 -1.33
BrukerCp 13.12 +.35 Delcath 3.87 +.31
BuffabWW 67.63 +.07 Dell Inc 15.34 +.17
CA Inc 20.57 +.26 DemandTc 13.15 -.01
CBOE 25.07 -.28 Dndreon 12.35 +1.73
CEVAInc 28.91 -1.57 Dentsply 35.19 -.21
CH Robins 67.98 +.17 Depomed 5.48 -.12
CME Grp 234.00 -4.62 DexCom 8.83 -.09
CNinsure 6.90 -.32 DiamndFlf 33.12 +.53
CVBFnd 10.26 -.07 DianaConn 5.84 +.12
CadencePh 4.01 -.02 DigitalGen 12.65 +.57
Cadence 10.19 -.18 DigRiver 14.51 -.20
CalumetSp 21.41 +.25 DirecTVA 43.85 -.58
CapCtyBk 9.61 -.22 DiscCmA 41.29 +.25
CapFedFn 11.67 -.08 DiscCmC 37.32 +.18
CpstnTrbh 1.13 -.03 DishNetwk 28.74 -.79
Cardtronic 26.09 -.74 DollarTree 82.57 -.44
CareerEd 7.74 -.19 DonlleyRR 14.77 -.23
Carrizo 28.05 +.35 DorchMin 23.09 +.03
CarverBrs 9.51 +.99 DragonWg 3.52 +.24
CatalystH 54.05 +1.10 DrmWksA 17.79 -.04
CatalystPh 1.20 -.10 DryShips 2.18 -.07
CathayGen 15.46 -.23 Dunkinn 25.47 +.30
Cavium 29.98 +.49 DurectCp .74 -.45
Celgene 67.22 -1.29 Dynavax 3.31
CellTherrsh 1.11 -.05 E-Trade 8.48 -.10
CelldexTh 3.12 +.13 eBay 30.63 -.08
Celsion 1.92 +.07 EV Engy 70.23 +2.09
CentEuro 4.04 -.02 EagleBulk .99 -.00
CEurMed 6.22 -.31 EaglRkEn 11.48 -.10
CentAI 9.03 +.04 ErthLink 6.66 +.09
Cepheid 34.65 +.37 EstWstBcp 20.72 +.03
Cerners 63.47 +1.04 Ebixlnc 22.29 -.31
ChrmSh 4.69 -.15 EducMgmt 23.24 +.29
CharterCm 56.62 -.36 EducDev 5.04 +.12
ChkPoint 51.36 -.91 8x8 Inc 3.23 -.06
Cheesecake 29.42 +.13 ElectSd 14.19 -.16
ChelseaTh 4.89 -.41 ElectArts 19.67 -.86
ChildPlace 48.93 -.65 Emomrelf 1.03 -.01
ChinaMed 3.01 -.04 EndoPhrm 33.80 -.64
ChrchllD 50.72 -.26 Endocyten 3.60 +.10
CienaCorp 13.57 +.39 EnerNOC 9.42 -.94
CinnFin 30.67 -.21 EngyCnvh .29 -.04
Cintas 37.31 +.80 EngyXXI 32.43 -.20
Cirrus 16.50 +.10 Entegris 8.77 +.04
Cisco 18.85 -.07 EntropCom 5.20 -.01
CitzRpBrs 12.76 +.35 EnzonPhar 6.54 -.17
CitrixSys 62.02 -1.63 Equinix 104.92 +.17
CleanEngy 13.25 -.03 EricsnTel 9.61 -.13
Clearwire 1.88 +.09 ExactScih 8.34 +.09
CoffeeH 8.56 -.20 Exelids 4.79 +.14
CogentC 16.86 +.03 EddeTc 3.13 +.32
Cognex 38.38 +.68 Expedias 29.25 +.48
CognizTech 66.41 -.88 Expdlni 41.66 +.64
CogoGrp 1.85 +.01 ExpScripts 49.39 +.92
Coinstar 40.98 -2.39 ExterranP 21.88 +.84
ColdwtrCrk 1.01 -.03 ExtrmNet 2.96 -.03
ColumLabs 2.48 +.06 EZchip 29.30 -.38


Ezomrp 25.83 -.36 iShNsdqBio 107.21 +.86
F5Netwks 106.72 +1.49 IonixBr 16.60 -.05
FLIRSys 25.11 -.39 IdenixPh 7.05 +.04
FSI Inf 4.06 +.19 Illumina 31.77 +.27
Fastenal s 45.21 +.08 Imunmd 3.37 +.02
FifthStRn 9.99 +.06 ImpaxLabs 20.20 +.03
FifthThird 13.49 +.02 ImperlSgr 3.29 -.23
FindEngin 22.04 -.31 Incyte 16.30 +.85
Fndlnst 16.18 -.12 Infinera 6.55 +.14
Finisar 17.39 +.43 Informat 35.90 +.07
FinLine 19.41 +.09 Infosys 53.92 -.09
FstCashFn 34.88 -.94 Inhibitex 9.87 +.24
FMidBc 10.58 -.16 Innophos 50.61 +.60
FstNiagara 9.01 +.04 Insulet 18.74 -.38
FstSolar 35.27 -.21 IntegLfSci 24.49 -6.01
FstMerit 15.45 -.44 IntgDv 5.48 -.11
Fiserv 58.40 -.29 Intel 25.25 -.15
Flextn 5.75 -.06 InteractBrk 15.15 +.02
FocusMda 18.63 -1.07 InterDig 42.20 -.01
ForcePro 5.55 ... Intrface 10.95 -.45
FormFac 5.15 -.04 InterMune 15.05 +.54
Forfnets 20.41 +.21 InftSpdw 25.38 -.15
Fossil Inc 78.46 -2.98 Intersil 10.36 +.07
FosterWhl 19.59 -.10 Intuit 53.12 +.73
FredsInc 13.87 -.28 IntSurg 460.46 -11.90
FronferCm 5.11 +.09 IronwdPh 10.78 -1.20
FuelCell .94 +.01 Isis 7.27 -.17
FultonFncl 10.14 -.12 IstaPh 7.18 +.15
Fl2pRZ.88 IvanhoeEn 1.19 -.08
TIdxva 9.98 +.15
GT AdvTc 7. 60 -.09


G-lll 23.38 -.81
GalenaBh .57 +.13
Garmin 39.41 -.23
GenProbe 60.06 +.78
Gentex 29.98 -.42
Genfivah 7.34 +.47
GeronCp 1.67 +.05
GileadSd 42.78 +.26
GladerBc 12.69 -.05
GIbSpcMet 12.71 +.13
GluMobile 3.00 -.01
GolLNGLtd 45.44 +.30
Google 650.02 -8.99
GrCanyEd 16.06 +.06
GrLkDrge 5.98 +.03
GreenMtC 43.17 -1.17
GrifolsSA n 5.39 -.05
Grouponn 17.81 -.07
GrpoRn 7.61 +.18
GulfportE 31.65 +.73
HMN Fn 1.90 -.10
HMS Hd s 31.21 +.10
HSN Inc 35.56 -1.02
HainCel 35.00 +.54
HancHId 32.90 -.06
HansenNat 95.38 +1.52
HanwhaSol 1.12 -.02
Harmonic 5.13 +.15
Harrislnth .60 -.02
Hasbro 31.90 -.74
HaupDig 1.12 +.23
HawHold 5.46 +.02
HrfindEx 13.98 +.01
HelenTroy 32.25 -.48
HSchein 66.13 -.09
HercOffsh 4.35 -.01
HimaxTch 1.07 +.02
Hittte 49.68 -1.82
Hologic 18.57 +.21
Home Inns 25.91 -.03
HorsehdH 9.85 +.11
HotTopic 6.90 -.13
HubGroup 32.64 +.33
HudsCity 6.83 +.16
HudsonTc 1.60 +.13
HumGen 7.72 +.22
HuntJB 44.72 +.49
HuntBnk 5.80 +.01
HutchT 1.51 -.08
IAC Inter 41.95 -.06
II-VI s 18.28 -.41
IPG Photon 38.76 +.79
iRobot 30.17 -.06
iShEurFn 14.46 -.26
iShAsiaexJ 50.42 -.45
iShACWI 42.47 -.33


j2Global 28.48 -.34
JA Solar 1.32 -.04
JDASoft 32.74 -.14
JDSUniph 11.12 +.12
JackHenry 32.59 -.35
Jamba 1.44 +.05
JamesRiv 7.62 -.17
JazzPhrm 45.39 +3.93
JetBlue 5.45 +.03
JiveSoftn 14.80 -.20
KITDigit 8.58 +.16
KLATnc 47.73 +.21
KellySA 15.15 +.43
KeryxBio 2.56 -.08
KnightT 14.07 -.43
KratosDef 5.96 -.04
Kulicke 10.32 +.55
LCA Vis 4.54 +.22
LKQ Corp 31.23 -.37
LML Pay 2.93 +.15
LPL Inv 30.85 +.09
LSI IndIf 6.16 +.09
LamResrch 37.84 +.47
LamarAdv 27.58 +.01
Lattce 6.09 +.02
LeapWirlss 8.62 +.06
LedPhrm 1.20 -.01
LibGlobA 42.21 -.08
LibCapA 81.44 -.45
LibtylntA 16.85 -.17
LifeTech 42.56 +1.56
LimelghtN 2.94 -.04
Lincare 24.78 +.09
LinearTch 30.06 -.19
LinnEngy 37.81 -.17
Liquidity 37.32 -.41
LivePrsn 12.00 -.04
LodgeNet 2.67 +.10
Logitech 7.79 +.15
LookSmart 1.37 +.02
LoopNet 17.15 +.21
lululemngs 53.68 +1.58
Luminex 20.61 -.25

MCGCap 3.89 -.10
MGE 44.97 -.34
MIPSTech 4.92 +.17
MTS 42.37 +.42
Magma 7.16 +.01
MaidenH 8.82 +.07
Majesom 2.97 +.04
MAKOSrg 28.78 -.38
MannKd 2.56 +.17
MarchxB 5.48 -.22
MarinaBrs .85 -.01


MarvelT 15.72
Masimo 18.47
Mattel 28.16
MattrssFn 23.69
Mattson 1.62
Maximlntg 26.09
MaxwlT 16.87
MedAssets 9.46
MedicAcin 5.14
MediCo 18.25
Medivafon 49.10
MelooCrwn 9.51
MentorGr 13.18
MercadoL 80.60
Mercerlnfi 6.69
MergeHIth 4.73
Micrel 9.88
Microchp 35.62
Micromet 7.69
MicronT 7.20
MicroSemi 17.51
Microsoft 28.11
Micrvisn h .41
MillererH 18.33
Mindspeed 5.25
Misonix 1.90
MitekSys 7.32
Molex 24.81
Momenta 18.51
MonroMuf 37.82
MorgHtl 5.70
Motricity .89
Movers 6.49
Mylan 21.47
MyriadG 21.19
NIl HIdg 21.41
NPS Phm 6.32
NXPSemi 16.90
Nanomtr 18.11
NasdOMX 24.43
Natlnstrs 24.75
NatPenn 8.86
NektarTh 5.73
NetLogicM 49.70
NetApp 35.33
Netease 44.28
Netfiix 86.29
Neflist 3.00
NetSpend 7.44
NetwkEng 1.26
NtwkEq 1.20
Newport 14.97
NewsCpA 18.30
NewsCpB 18.60
NobltyH If 5.54
Nordson s 41.85
NorTrst 41.01
NwstBcsh 12.70
Novavax 1.37
Novlus 41.84
NuVasive 11.35
NuanceCm 26.58
NutriSyst 15.36
Nvidia 14.54
NxStageMd 17.99
OCZTech 7.87
OReillyAu 79.86
Oclaro 3.42
OdysMar 2.99
OldDomFrt 38.93
OmniVisn 12.38
OnAssign 11.08
OnSmcnd 8.06
Onothyr 7.00
1800Rowrs 2.22
OnyxPh 43.55
OpenTxt 50.77
OpenTable 39.66
OpntTch 33.00
Opnext .92
OpbmerPh 11.93
Oracle 26.93
Orexigen 1.79
Orthfx 34.33
OtterTail 22.11
Overstk 6.99


PDLBio 6.13 +.04
PFChng 31.53 +.04
PMCSra 5.76 +.11
PSS Wrld 24.21 +.22
Paccar 40.14 -.22
Pacerlnfi 5.60 +.07
PacEth rs 1.03 -.08
PacSunwr 1.66 -.06
PanASIv 22.31 -.24
ParamTch 17.96 -.49
Parexel 21.11 +.03
Patterson 29.58 +.25
PattUTI 21.21 +.17
Paychex 30.79 +.03
Pegasys If 27.04 -.93
PeopUtdF 13.42 +.21
PeregrineP .91 -.04
PerfectWd 12.00
Perrigo 96.06 -.09
PetSmart 52.10 +.02
PetroDev 32.38 -1.37
Pharmacyc 15.04 +.02
Pharmssts 131.37 +.44
PhotrIn 6.32 -.01
Plexus 31.33 +1.04
Polyomms 16.48 +.42
Popular 1.49 +.02
Pwrlnteg 33.52 +.17
Power-One 4.09 -.03
PwShs QQQ 57.81 +.20
Powrwvrs 1.79 -.16
Presstekh .64 +.02
PriceTR 58.71 +.42
PrSmrt 60.63 -9.95
priceline 480.31 -5.90
PrimoWtr 2.57 -.04
PrivateB 12.81 +.39
PrUPShQQQ 17.69 -.18
PrUItPQQQs 75.28 +.77
PrognicsPh 8.54 -.06
ProgrsSfts 18.14 +.04
ProspctCap 9.64 +.04
PureCycle 1.75 -.01
QIAGEN 14.50 +.01
QiaoXing h .66 +.03
QlikTech 23.22 +.29
Qlogic 15.47 +.17
Qualomm 56.16 +.10
QualityS s 36.72 -.22
QuestSft 18.56 +.34
Questomr 38.95 -.25
QuickLog 2.99 +.29
RFMicD 4.54 -1.10
RPXn 13.50 -.53
RAM En h 2.82 -.20
Rambus 7.99 -.09
Regenrn 65.79 +4.85
RentACt 36.18 -.29
RepubAir 3.50 -.11
RschMotn 15.34 +.29
ResConn 10.37 +.23
RexEnergy 14.30 -.72
RightNow 42.73 -.02
RiverbedT 25.95 +.03
RosettaR 45.88 -.33
RossStrss 50.74 +.32
Rovi Corp 24.63 -.26
RoyGId 69.57 +.92
RubiomnTc 10.32 +.82
rue21 19.95 -.28
R anair 27.80 -.07

SBA Com 43.15 +.02
SEI Inv 17.58 +.03
SLM Cp 13.78 +.09
STEC 9.71 +.28
SVB FnGp 51.61 +.02
SXC HIth 58.75 -.40
SabaSoftw 8.57 +1.16
SabraHItc 12.73 +.13
SalixPhm 47.87 +.47
SanderFm 48.02 +.34
SanDisk 49.93 +.82
Sanmina 9.71 -.08
Sapient 12.50 -.19


Satomn h .60
SavientPh 2.44
Schnitzer 43.70
Schulmn 20.98
SciGames 10.48
SeaChange 6.75
SeagateT 18.30
SearsHldgs 29.20
SeattGen 17.42
SelCmfrt 24.00
Selectvlns 17.85
SemiLeds 3.59
Semtech 25.38
Sequenom 4.21
SvcSourcn 15.18
SvArtsrsh .30
Shire 99.06
ShuffiMstr 12.36
Shutterfly 23.86
SifyTech 4.23
SigaTech h 2.75
SigmaAld 62.34
SignatBk 61.16
SilicGrln 11.99
Silicnlmg 5.01
SilcnLab 43.66
SilicnMotn 22.10
Slcnware 4.75
SilvStdg 14.66
Sina 48.49
Sindair 12.51
SiriusXM 2.00
SironaDent 43.45
Skullcdyn 12.98
SkywksSol 17.15
SmartBal 5.21
SmtHeath .40
SmithWes 4.68
SmithMicro 1.31
SodaStrm 38.86
Sohu.cm 49.22
SonicCorp 6.55
Sonus 2.38
SouMoBc 22.50
Sourcefire 30.22
SpectPh 14.61
Spreadtrm 14.98
Staples 14.51
StarSdent 2.36
Starbucks 46.72
SfiDynam 14.47
SteinMrt 6.48
StemCell rs .79
Stereotads .77
Stericyde 77.45
SMaddens 34.36
StewEnt 5.79
Stratasys 33.93
SunPower 6.49
SusqBnc 8.86
SwisherHy 3.54
Symantec 15.78
Symetricm 5.46
Synapfcs 31.89
Synchron 28.70
Synopsys 26.87
Synovis 27.86
SyntaPhm 4.39
TDAmeritr 16.55
THQ .74
TTMTch 10.58
twteleomm 19.47
TakeTwo 14.76
TaleoA 37.25
Tangoen 15.00
Targacept 5.60
TASER 5.12
TechData 50.49
Tekelec 10.95
TICmSys 2.32
Tellabs 3.88
Tengion h .68
TennCBlfh .10
TescoCp 13.98
TeslaMot 26.91
TesseraTch 17.85
TevaPhrm 43.84
TxCapBsh 31.77


+.03 Texlnst 29.78
+.08 TexRdhse 15.24 +.04
-1.01 Theravnce 20.20 +.18
-1.17 Thoratec 30.13 -.27
+.08 TibomSft 23.83
-.28 TVo Inc 10.20 -.05
+.492 Toreador 4.75 -.50
+.01 TractSupp 69.71 +.29
+.62 Travelzoo 27.03 +.16
-.16 TridentM h .08 +.01
+.19 TrimbleN 40.15 -.62
-.04 TripAdvn 25.57 +.05
-.10 TriQuint 4.81 -.14
+.20 TrstNY 5.68 -.02
-.00 Trustmk 25.17 -.20
-1.44 Ubiquiftn 18.30 +.86
+.44 UltaSalon 69.52 -.04
-.28 Ultratech 25.85 +.07
+.04 Umpqua 12.68 -.02
-.78 Unilife 3.58 -.09
+.07 UtdCBksrs 6.49 -.75
+.18 UtdNtrIF 40.76 +.45
+.29 UtdOnln 5.51 -.02
-.51 US Enr 2.89 -.02
-.17 UtdTherap 48.52 +.43
+.01 UnivDisp 36.84 +2.12
-.20 UnivFor 30.51 -1.19
-4.48 UranmRs .77 -.03
+03 UrbanOut 27.67 -.31
-.04
+.01 -
+.03
-.13 VOXX)InD 8.92 +.17
ValenceTh .98 -.01
+.02 ValVis A 1.60 -.09
-.04 ValueClick 16.66 +.12
-.01 VanSTCpB 77.94 +.08
-.68 Veeomlnst 22.70 -.18
-1.72 Velin 6.36 -.10
-.14 VBradley 32.49 +.45
Verisign 35.40 -.34
+.20 Verisk 39.37 +.24
-.14 VertxPh 34.05 +.93
-.20 ViaSat 44.99 -.67
+09 ViacomB 47.45 +.48
-.01 Vical 3.64 -.64
+.36 VirgnMdah 21.93 +.33
+.07 ViroPhrm 27.93 -.23
-.16 Vivus 10.16 +.10
-.01 Vodafone 27.85 +.09
-.05 Volcano 22.95 -.39
+.52 WCAWste 6.49 -.01
-.98 WarnerCh 16.02 +.07
-.02 WashFed 14.59 +.28
+.79
-.05 WaveSys 2.38 +.08
-.10 WebMD 37.90 -1.38
Websense 18.50 -.02
-.02 Wendys Co 5.43 +.06
-.12 WernerEnt 24.64 +.30
+.27 Westmrd 13.30 +.09
+.05 Wstptlnng 32.63 -.48
+.02 WetSeal 3.22 -.02
-.03 WholeFd 72.88 +.13
-.75 Windstrm 11.70 +.09
+.30 Winn-Dixie 9.35 -.03
-.02 Woodward 42.58 -.07
-.93
+.03 WrightM 16.21 +.03
+.10 Wynn 106.94 -3.90
+.18 Xilinx 32.17 -.21
-.03 Xyratex 14.60 +.44
-.07 YRC rs 9.30 +.01
-.03 Yahoo 15.52 -.13
+.08 Yandexn 18.61 -.68
-.01 Zagg 7.71 -.14
-.06 Zalicus 1.16 -.03
-.02 Zhongpin 10.05 +.53
-.05 ZonBcp 17.64 +.02
-.06 Zopharm 4.15 -.15
-.21 Zogenix 2.82 +.18
Zoltek 8.17 +.36
+.03 Zumiez 31.27 +.32
-.03 Zyngan 8.81 -.10


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.3160 4.3080
Australia .9770 .9746
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.8521 1.8400
Britain 1.5426 1.5483
Canada 1.0266 1.0192
Chile 510.18 510.73
China 6.3158 6.3151
Colombia 1880.50 1880.50
Czech Rep 20.35 20.22
Denmark 5.8435 5.8171
Dominican Rep 38.85 38.85
Egypt 6.0350 6.0353
Euro .7859 .7823
Hong Kong 7.7657 7.7646
Hungary 247.89 249.36
India 52.723 52.985
Indnsia 9095.00 9119.00
Israel 3.8537 3.8461
Japan 77.02 77.18
Jordan .7095 .7095
Lebanon 1506.00 1505.50
Malaysia 3.1475 3.1485
Mexico 13.7179 13.7475
N. Zealand 1.2793 1.2802
Norway 6.0230 6.0177
Peru 2.695 2.695
Poland 3.53 3.52
Russia 32.1025 32.0285
Singapore 1.2931 1.2919
So. Africa 8.1797 8.1712
So. Korea 1159.78 1155.66
Sweden 6.9390 6.9318
Switzerlnd .9550 .9533
Taiwan 30.17 30.28
Thailand 31.72 31.67
Turkey 1.8791 1.8812
U.A.E. 3.6731 3.6732
Uruguay 19.5999 19.5999
Venzuel 4.2950 4.2949


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



li- Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.015 0.02
6-month 0.05 0.06
5-year 0.86 0.83
10-year 1.96 1.88
30-year 3.02 2.89



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Feb 12 101.56 -.25
Corn CBOT Mar 12 64312
Wheat CBOT Mar 12 6243/4 -42
Soybeans CBOT Mar12 11961/2 -121/2
Cattle CME Feb 12 120.32 -.63
Sugar (world) ICE Mar12 23.29 +.16
Orange Juice ICE Mar 12 177.75 +.15



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1616.10 $1565.80
Silver (troy oz., spot) $28.6b3 $2/.8/
Copper (pound) $3.4310 $3.431b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1404.bO $1399./O

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.3 ... 8.75 +.06 +5.9 Microsoft .80 2.8 10 28.11 +.43 +8.3
AT&Tlnc 1.76 5.9 15 29.68 -.28 -1.9 MotrlaSolu .88 1.9 16 46.55 -.12 +.6
Ametek .24 .6 19 43.02 -.52 +2.2 MotrlaMob ... ... ... 38.46 -.15 -.9
BkofAm .04 .6 ... 6.18 -.13 +11.2 NextEraEn 2.20 3.7 15 58.92 -.63 -3.2
CapCtyBk ...... 22 9.61 -.22 +.6 Penney .80 2.3 21 34.96 +1.19 -.5
CntryLink 2.90 7.8 17 37.02 +.21 -.5 PiedmOfc 1.26 7.3 22 17.18 -.12 +.8
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 28.55 +.04 +8.5 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.5 21 54.72 -.03 -2.3
CmwREIT 2.00 11.2 25 17.86 +.01 +7.3Regionsn 04 .9 26 4.41 .11 +2.6
Disney .60 1.5 16 39.91 +.41 +6.4 SearsHIdgs .33 29.20 -.92 -8.1
EKodak ..........37 -.05 42.8 SarSM gS ...3 ... -.92 -.1
EnterPT 2.80 6.4 26 43.87 +.08 +.4 Smucker 1.92 2.5 19 77.42 -26 1.0
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2 10 85.12 -.64 +.4 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.19 -.05 -6.4
FordM .20 1.7 7 11.71 +.12 +8.8 TimeWarn .94 2.6 14 36.55 -.24 +1.1
GenElec .68 3.6 15 18.65 +.10 +4.1 UniFirst .15 .2 15 60.82 +.76 +7.2
HomeDp 1.16 2.7 19 43.20 +.11 +2.8 VerizonCm 2.00 5.2 15 38.33 -.11 -4.5
Intel .84 3.3 11 25.25 -.15 +4.1 Vodafone 2.10 7.5 ... 27.85 +.09 -.6
IBM 3.00 1.6 14182.54 -2.12 -.7 WalMart 1.46 2.5 13 59.00 -.42 -1.3
Lowes .56 2.1 19 26.34 -.03 +3.8 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.08 +.36 +.1
McDnlds 2.80 2.8 20100.60 +.77 +.3 YRCrs ......... 9.30 +.01 -6.7


A6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 A7


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: Dr5001n t 34.94 -.07
Balancp 15.94 -.01 GNMA 15.99 +.01
RetInc 8.73 ... GrChinaAr 28.96 -.53
Alger Funds B: HiYIdA p 6.26 +.01
SmCapGr 6.40 -.02 StratValA 27.17 -.06
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 30.39 +.12
BalanAp 15.72 ... DreihsAcInc 10.10
GIbThGrAp59.69 -.18 Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 34.16 -.06 EMktGr 25.78 -.24
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEmI 41.52 -.29
LgCpGrAd 26.41 +.03 Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 15.25 -.18
GIbThGrBt 51.46 -.17 AMTFMuInc 9.76 +.04
GrowthBt 24.83 +.02 MuIbCGrA 7.75
SCpGrBt 27.38 -.06 InBosA 5.69 +.01
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 17.45 -.04
SCpGrCt 27.52 -.05 NatlMunInc 9.57 +.03
Allianz Fds Insti: SpEqtA 15.40 -.03
NFJDvVI 11.67 -.02 TradGvA 7.47
SmCpVI 29.53 -.06 EatonVance B:
Allianz Funds A: HIthSBt 9.32 +.06
SmCpVA 28.15 -.05 NatlMuInc 9.57 +.03
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 23.55 -.04 GovtC p 7.46 +.01
TargetCt 14.10 -.02 NatMunlnc 9.57 +.03
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 18.97 -.04 FItgRt 8.85 +.01
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 9.91 -.01
LgCaplnv 18.02 -.04 LgCapVal 17.50 -.04
Ameri Century 1st: FBR Funds:
Growth 25.21 -.02 Focuslnvtn46.34 -.32
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 21.81 -.02 LgCappn 15.53 -.01
EqIncAp 7.33 -.02 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: NwInc 10.67 +.01
AIICapGr 27.08 -.01 FPACres 27.04 -.01
Balanced 16.15 +.01 Fairholme 23.40 -.30
DivBnd 10.97 +01 Federated A:
Eqlnc 7.33 -.02 MidGrStA 34.34 +.06
Growth 25.01 -.01 MuSecA 10.35 +.03
Heritagel 20.01 -.03 TfiRtBdp 11.29 +.02
IncGro 24.76 -.02 Federated Instl:
InfAdjBd 12.81 +.03 KaufmnR 4.70 -.02
IntDisc 8.91 -.06 TotRetBd 11.29 +.02
InfiGrol 9.64 -.05 StrValDvIS 4.79 -.03
New Opp 7.45 ... Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 11.79 -.02 EnergyT 35.40 -.17
OneChMd 11.56 -.02 HItCarT 21.36 +.12
RealEstl 20.10 -.09 Fidelity Advisor A:
Ultra 23.34 -.08 Nwlnsghp 20.01 -.04
Valuelnv 5.74 -.01 StrlnA 12.08
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor C:
AmcpAp 19.19 ... Nwlnsghtn 18.97 -.04
AMuiAp 26.05 -.07 Fidelity Advisor I:
BalAp 18.46 -.02 EqGrIn 58.15 -.05
BondA p 12.54 +.02 Eqlnin 23.47 -.06
CaplBAp 48.98 -.19 IntBdln 11.45 +.01
CapWGAp 32.27 -.20 Nwlnsgtl n 20.25 -.05
CapWAp 20.42 +.02 Fidelity AdvisorT:
EupacAp 35.19 -.33 BalancT 15.17
FdInvAp 35.94 -.09 DivGrTp 11.66 -.01
GovtAp 14.39 +.02 EqGrTp 54.46 -.04
GwthAp 29.32 -.07 EqInT 23.12 -.06
HITrAp 10.72 +.01 GrOppT 35.94 +.06
IncoAp 16.79 -.03 HilnAdTp 9.46 +.02
IntBdAp 13.62 +.01 IntBdT 11.43 +.01
InfiGrIncAp 27.29 -.24 MulncTp 13.26 +.03
ICAAp 27.58 -.04 OvrseaT 15.14 -.12
LtTEBAp 16.19 +.02 STFiT 9.25
NEcoAp 23.97 -.07 StSelAIICp 17.86 -.03
NPerAp 26.45 -.12 Fidelity Freedom:
NwWrIdA 46.24 -.38 FF2010n 13.21
STBFAp 10.08 ... FF2010K 12.20 -.01
SmCpAp 33.50 -.14 FF2015n 11.03
TxExAp 12.58 +.03 FF2015K 12.24 -.01
WshAp 28.73 -.07 FF2020n 13.25 -.01
Ariel Investments: FF2020K 12.55 -.01
Apprec 39.84 +.09 FF2025n 10.93 -.01
Ariel 43.92 -.08 FF2025K 12.58 -.01
Artio Global Funds: FF2030n 12.99 -.01
InfiEqlr 22.72 -.15 FF2030K 12.69 -.01
IntEqlllr 9.61 -.06 FF2035n 10.68 -.02
Artisan Funds: FF2035K 12.69 -.02
Inf 19.84 -.16 FF2040n 7.45 -.01
InfiVal r 25.06 ... FF2040K 12.73 -.02
MidCap 33.58 +.07 FF2045n 8.80 -.02
MidCapVal 19.82 -.04 Incomen 11.29
SCapVal 15.10 -.04 Fidelity Invest:
Baron Funds: AIISectEq 11.43 -.01
Asset 46.15 -.11 AMgr50On 15.13 -.01
Growth 51.20 +.02 AMgr70rn 15.60 -.02
SmallCap 23.01 -.08 AMgr20rn 12.78 +.01
Bernstein Fds: Balancn 18.39
IntDur 13.85 +.02 BalancedK 18.39
DivMu 14.82 +.01 BlueChGr n 43.30
TxMgdIni 12.53 -.10 CAMunn 12.45 +.03
BlackRock A: Canada n 50.51 -.59
EqtyDiv 18.29 -.09 CapApn 25.12 -.03
GIAIAr 18.37 -.06 CapDevOn 10.37 -.04
HiYInvA 7.45 +.01 Cplncrn 8.76 +.02
InfiOpAp 28.18 -.26 ChinaRgr 25.37 -.33
BlackRock B&C: CngS 465.09
GIAICt 17.12 -.06 CTMunrn 11.89 +.02
BlackRock Instl: Contra n 68.46 -.16
BaVIl 24.98 -.07 ContraK 68.41 -.17
EquityDv 18.32 -.09 CnvScn 23.51 +.09
GIbAIIocr 18.45 -.06 DisEqn 21.95 -.05
HiYldBd 7.45 +.01 DiscEqF 21.92 -.05
Brinson FundsY: Divlntin 25.66 -.15
HiYIdlY 5.98 DivrslntKr 25.61 -.16
BruceFund382.39 -.65 DivSOn 15.05 -.06
Buffalo Funds: DivGthn 26.46 -.04
SmCapn 25.08 -.07 EmergAs r n25.51 -.23
CGM Funds: EmrMkn 20.70 -.21
Focusn 26.35 -.14 Eqncn 41.82 -.12
Muti n 25.02 -.06 EQII n 17.56 -.05
Realtyn 26.92 -.13 ECapAp 15.39 -.08
CRM Funds: Europe 25.37 -.12
MdCpVII 26.91 -.07 Exch 323.88
Calamos Funds: Exportn 21.00 -.04
GrwthAp 47.33 -.09 Fideln 31.64 -.06
Calvert Invest: Fifty r n 17.66 -.07
ai1verin 77 +.05 FItRateHi r n 9.70 +.03
Incop 15.77 +.0 FrnOnen 2621 -.07
SocialAp 28.18 +.02 GNMAn 11.85
Socip 2.18 +.02 Govtlnc 10.75 +.02
SocBdp 15.74 +.04 GroCon 8274 +.06
SocEqAp 33.79 -.08 Grolncn 1856 .05
TxF Lg p 15.96 +.05 GrowCoFn 8.65-.05
Cohen & Steers: GrowlCoK 82.66 +.06
R shrS 6056 -.26 GrowthCoK 82.66 +.06
RltyShrs 60.56 -.26 GrSratrn 18.98 -.03
Columbia Class A: Highlncrn 8.73 +.02
Acorn t 27.02 -.02 Indepn n 22.30 -.03
DivEqlnc 9.60 -.02 nProBdn 12.85 +.01
DivrBd 5.05 +.01 IntBdn 10.87 +.01
DivOpptyA 8.05 .02 IntGovn 10.96 +.02
LgCapGrA t22.87 -.03 IntmMun 10.47 +.02
LgCorQAp 5.77 -.01 InfiDiscn 27.52 -.21
MdCpGrOp 9.34 -.03 InfiSCprn 17.56 -.05
MidCVIOp p 7.36 nvGrBd n 11.68 +.02
PBModAp 10.47 -.01 InvGBn 77.3 +.02
TxEA p 13.72 +.03 Japan r 9.20 .06
SelCommA41.52 +.10 JpnSmn 8.48 .08
FrontierA 9.69 +.05 LgCapVal 10.25 -.02
GlobTech 19.74 +.02 LatAm 49.52 -.31
ColumbiaCl 1,T&G: LevCoStk n 25.88 +.10
EmMktOpln7.52 -.08 LowPrn 36.25 -.04
Columbia Class Z: LowPriKr 36.22 -.04
AcornZ 27.96 -.02 Magellnn 64.30 -.12
AcornlntZ 34.50 -.21 MagellanK 64.22 -.13
DivlncoZ 13.70 -.05 MDMurn 11.39 +.02
IntBdZ 9.28 +.02 MAMunn 12.38 +.03
IntTEBd 10.81 +.02 MegaCpStkn10.31 -.02
LgCapGr 12.16 -.02 MIMunn 12.27 +.02
LgCpldxZ 24.68 -.05 MidCap n 26.82 -.03
MdCpldxZ 10.82 MNMunn 11.83 +.02
MdCpVIZp 13.02 -.04 MtgSecn 11.19 +.01
ValRestr 45.66 -.13 Munilncn 13.08 +.03
Credit Suisse Comm: NJ Munr n 11.98 +.03
ComRett 8.28 +.01 NwMktrn 15.83 -.02
DFA Funds: NwMillen 29.07 -.15
InfiCorEqn 9.28 -.08 NYMunn 13.35 +.03
USCorEq nln10.95 -.02 OTCn 55.52 -04
USCorEq2nlO0.79 -.03 OhMunn 12.04 +.02
DWS Invest A: 0lOIndex 8.97 -.03
CommAp 16.48 -.07 Ovrsean 26.53 -.20
DWS InvestS: PcBasn 21.70 -.14
CorPlslnc 10.77 +.01 PAMunrn 11.14 +.03
EmMkGrr 14.77 -.13 Purioin 17.90
EnhEmMk 10.02 +.01 PuritanK 17.89 -.01
EnhGlbBdr 9.90 +.01 RealEn 27.54 -.15
GIbSmCGr 35.32 +.01 SAIISecEqF11.43 -.01
GIblThem 20.35 -.09 SCmdtyStrtng.09 +.03
Gold&Prc 15.57 -.10 SCmdtyStrFng.10 +.02
GrolncS 16.46 -.02 SrEmrgMkt 14.49 -.11
HiYldTx 12.28 +.04 SrslntGrw 10.13 -.07
IntTxAMT 11.88 +.03 SerlnflGrF 10.15 -.06
Infl FdS 36.99 -.25 SrslntVal 8.05 -.05
LgCpFoGr 29.27 -.03 SrlnvGrdF 11.69 +.02
LatAmrEq 37.87 -.29 StlntMu n 10.82 +.01
MgdMuniS 9.14 +.02 STBFn 8.50 +.01
MATFS 14.71 +05 SmllCpSrn16.86 .02
SP500S 16.98 -.04 SCpValur 14.20 -.02
WorldDiv 22.03 -.11 StkSelLCVrnl0.48
Davis Funds A: StkSlcACap n24.68 -.04
NYVenA 33.14 -.18 SllSelSmCp 18.26 -.03
Davis Funds B: Sfratlncn 10.82 +.01
NYVenB 31.72 -.17 SfrReRtr 9.27 +.01
Davis Funds C: TotalBdn 10.92 +.01
NYVenC 32.00 -.18 Trend n 68.18 -.03
Davis Funds Y: USBI n 11.77 +.02
NYVenY 33.48 -.18 Utilityn 16.89 -.07
Delaware Invest A: ValStra t n 25.77 +.05
Diverlncp 9.16 +.02 Valuen 64.60 -.07
SMIDCapG 22.41 +.09 Wrldwn 17.43 -.09
TxUSAp 11.67 +.02 Fidelity Selects:
Delaware Invest B: Air n 34.88 +.05
SelGrBt 30.95 +.16 Banking n 16.68 -.07
Dimensional Fds: Blotch n 88.35 +.64
EmMCrEqnl7.44 -.15 Brokrn 41.64 -.21
EmMktV 26.36 -.24 Chemn 98.58 -.01
IntSmVan 13.70 -.07 ComEquipn22.27 +.01
LargeCo 10.06 -.02 Compn 55.12 +.15
TAUSCorE2 n8.78 -.02 ConDis n 23.68 +.07
USLgVan 19.61 -.06 ConsuFnn 11.32 -.02
US Micron 13.38 -.04 ConStapn 70.76 -.44


USTgdVal 15.59 .03 CstHon 36.71 -.11
US Small n 20.79 -.05 DfAer n 78.83 -.01
USSmVa 23.54 -.07 Elect n 46.22 +.31
InfiSmCon 13.94 -.08 Enrgyn 50.52 -.24
EmgMktn 24.04 -.21 EngSvn 66.25 +.07
Fixdn 10.31 ... EnvAtEnrn15.21 -.05
IntGFxlnn 12.88 +02 FinSvn 50.67 -.33
IntVan 14.70 -.17 Goldrn 43.71 .25
Glb5Fxlncn10.91 +.01 Healthin 124.81 +.71
TM USTgtV 20.41 -.05 Insurn 44.74 -.13
2YGIFxdn 10.09 +.01 Leisrn 97.70 +.20
DFARIEn 23.00 -.12 Materialn 63.77 +.05
Dodge&Cox: MedDI n 57.35 +.74
Balanced 68.58 -.11 MdEqSysn 25.53 +.05
Income 13.33 +.04 Multmdn 44.44 -.12
InfiStk 29.22 -.20 NtGasn 31.14 -.13
Stock 103.79 -.31 Pharm n 13.62 -.01
DoubleUne Funds: Retailn 52.03 +.23
TRBdI 11.02 Softwr n 78.55 +.02
TRBdNp 11.02 Techn 87.56 -.07
Dreyfus: Telcm n 43.34 -.09
Aprec 40.80 -.17 Transn 50.34 +.05
CTA 12.07 +04 UtilGrn 52.18 -.25
CorVA 22.47 Wirelessn 7.22 -.01
Dreyf 8.58 -.01i Fidelity Spartan:
DryMidr 26.28 +.o01 ExtMklnn 36.04 -.02


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxlnv n 45.24 -.09
5001dx I 45.24 -.09
Infillnxlnvn 29.71 -.22
TotMktlnv n 36.72 -.07
USBondl 11.77 +.02
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdv n45.24 -.09
IntAdrn 29.71 -.22
TotMktAd r n36.72 -.07
First Eagle:
GIbIA 45.39 -.19
OverseasA 20.38 -.14
First Investors A
BIChpAp ...
GloblA p 6.08 -.03
GovtAp 11.61
GrolnAp 14.69 -.03
IncoAp 2.49 +.01
MATFAp 12.16 +.04
MITFAp 12.52 +.03
NJTFAp 13.43 +.04
NYTFAp 14.89 +.04
OppAp 26.37 -.02
PATFAp 13.40 +.04
SpSitAp 23.07 +.10
TxExAp 10.01 +.02
TotRtAp 15.38
ValueBp 7.10 -.02
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.09 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.84
ALTFAp 11.51 +.03
AZTFAp 11.06 +.04
CallnsAp 12.41 +.03
CA IntAp 11.87 +.03
CalTFAp 7.15 +.03
COTFAp 11.98 +.04
CTTFAp 11.18 +.04
CvtScAp 14.13 +.02
DblTFA 12.10 +.05
DynTchA 29.15 -.07
EqlncAp 16.85 -.05
Fedlntp 12.28 +.02
FedTFAp 12.22 +.05
FLTFAp 11.72 +.03
FoundAI p 9.95 -.02
GATFAp 12.29 +.03
GoldPrMA 37.88 -.28
GrwthAp 45.33 -.05
HYTFA p 10.34 +.05
HilncA 1.95
IncomAp 2.11
InsTFAp 12.18 +.03
NYITF p 11.73 +.02
LATFAp 11.71 +.04
LMGvScA 10.40 +.01
MDTFAp 11.72 +.03
MATFAp 11.82 +.04
MITFAp 12.10 +.02
MNInsA 12.65 +.03
MOTFAp 12.41 +.04
NJTFAp 12.36 +.03
NYTFAp 11.86 +.04
NCTFAp 12.57 +.03
OhiolAp 12.74 +.04
ORTFAp 12.26 +.05
PATFAp 10.61 +.03
ReEScAp 14.72 -.06
RisDvAp 34.95 -.16
SMCpGrA 34.21 -.14
Stratlncp 10.14 +.01
TtlRtnAp 10.05 +.01
USGovAp 6.92
UGIsAp 13.08 -.07
VATFAp 11.93 +.03
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.43 +.02
IncmeAd 2.09
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.13
USGvCt 6.88
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 20.02 -.04
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 21.51 -.06
ForgnAp 5.86 -.04
GIBdAp 12.46 +.01
GrwthAp 16.32 -.08
WorldAp 13.82 -.06
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 16.31 -.07
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.02 -.05
ForgnC p 5.75 -.04
GIBdCp 12.49 +.02
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.26 -.01
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Sl Inc 11.67 +.01
US Eqty 39.59 -.04
GMOTrust IIll:
CHIE 20.84 -.09
Quality 22.26 -.05
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 20.96 -.15
InfillntrVM 18.85 -.13
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 10.43 -.10
InfiCorEq 25.40 -.18
Quality 22.26 -.06
StrFxlnc 16.26 +.02
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 48.19 -.21
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.54 -.04
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 33.88 -.05
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 22.37 -.07
HiYield 6.92 +.01
HYMuni n 8.56 +.03
MidCapV 34.11 -.04
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.22 +.03
CapAplnst 37.60 -.01
Inftllnv t 52.37 -.47
Inftl r 52.83 -.47
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 29.76 -.05
DivGthAp 19.18 -.06
IntOpAp 12.82 -.14
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppl n 29.75 -.05
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 38.20 -.06
Div&Gr 19.66 -.06
Advisers 19.62 -.01
TotRetBd 11.64 +.02
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.32
StrGrowth 12.28 +.03
ICON Fds:
Energy S 18.73 -.06
HIltcareS 15.08 +.02
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.89
IVA Funds:
WMdwideAt 15.40 -.07
Wdwide I r 15.40 -.06
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.08
Invesco Funds:
Energy 38.93 -.08
Utiliies 16.71 -.09
Invesco Funds A:
ChartSp 16.37
CmstkA 15.60 -.01
Const p 21.82 -.04
EqlncA 8.44
GrlncAp 18.93 -.02
HilncMu p 7.75 +.02
HiYld p 4.04 +.01
HYMuA 9.45 +.02
InflGrow 25.39 -.19
MunilnA 13.42 +.04
PATFA 16.28 +.03
USMortgA 13.00 +.01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 13.24
MunilnB 13.40 +.04
USMortg 12.93 +.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 22.02 -.17
AssetStAp 22.66 -.18
AssetSblr 22.85 -.18
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.83 +.01
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.89 +.01
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 24.01 -.02
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.83 +.01
ShtDurBd 10.96 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.13 -.01
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.82 +01
HighYld n 7.68 +.01
lntmTFBd n 11.29 +.01
ShtDurBdn 10.96 +.01
USLCCrPIsn20.28 -.01
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 24.66 -.04
Contrarn T 12.53
EnterprT 58.80 +.07
FIxBndT 10.53 +.01
GlUfeSciTr 25.50 +.15
GIbSel T 9.84 -.05
GITechTr 16.16 +.05
Grw&lncT 30.18 -.11
Janus T 27.75
OvrseasTr 31.76 -.31


PrkMCValT 20.51
ResearchT 28.74 +.03
ShTmBdT 3.06
Twenty T 52.38 +.01
VentureT 52.40 -.10
WrldWTr 40.48 -.25
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn26.81 +.01
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.48 +.03
RgBkA 12.61 -.05
SrlnAp 6.43


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.43
John Hancock CIl1:
LSAggr 11.40 -.04
LSBalanc 12.33 -.01
LSConsrv 12.67 +.01
LSGrwth 12.06 -.03
LSModer 12.34
Lazard Insti:
EmgMktl 16.92 -.17
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 17.32 -.18
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 113.15 -.01
CBApprp 14.05 -.03
CBLCGrp 20.84 +.01
GCIAIICOp 7.61 -.02
WAHilncAt 5.78
WAMgMup 16.36 +.06
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 19.05 +.01
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 26.92
CMValTrp 38.19 -.06
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 27.09 -.03
SmCap 25.03 -.03
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.01 +.01
StrlncC 14.55 +.01
LSBondR 13.95
StrlncA 14.46
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 11.95
InvGrBdY 11.96 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 10.81 -.02
FundlEq 12.41 -.01
BdDebAp 7.69 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.55
MidCpAp 16.11
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.58
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.55
MFS Funds A:
MITA 18.93 -.07
MIGA 15.47 -.04
EmGA 42.27 -.06
HilnA 3.38
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 14.13 -.02
UtilA 16.89 -.07
ValueA 22.66 -.09
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 13.93 -.03
GvScBn 10.54 +.01
HilnBn 3.39
MulnBn 8.55 +.04
TotRBn 14.13 -.03
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 13.75 -.11
Valuel 22.76 -.09
MFS Funds Instl:
lnfiEq n 15.91 -.14
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.83 +.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.38 +.02
GovtBt 8.89 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.80
IncmBldr 16.12 -.01
InfilEqB 9.34 -.04
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 34.84 -.02
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 71.92 -.08
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 6.62 -.06
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.09 -.12
Indialnvr 14.03 +.03
PacTgrlnv 20.44 -.11
MergerFdn 15.57
Meridian Funds:
Growth 41.87 -.24
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.38 +.02
TotRtBdl 10.38 +.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.72 -.03
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.10 -.04
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.60 -.05
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 12.23 -.09
MCapGrl 33.25 -.02
MCapGrPp 32.08 -.02
Muhlenkn 52.27 -.04
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 25.45 -.15
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn28.66 -.07
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 11.82 -.03
GblDiscA 27.38 -.07
GlbDiscC 27.18 -.07
GlbDiscZ 27.71 -.07
QuestZ 16.38 -.02
SharesZ 20.17 -.04
Neuberger&Berm Fds:
Focus 19.40 -.01
Genesis 33.42 -.11
Geneslnst 46.92 -.16
Inftl r 15.05 -.08
Partner 24.84 -.09
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 48.71 -.16
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.36 +.01
Nichn 43.93 -.07
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.87
HiYFxlnc 7.07
lntTxEx 10.70
SmCpldx 8.28
Stkldx 15.87
Technly 14.53
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.17 +.01
Nuveen Cl R:
lntDMBd 9.19 +.01
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 18.92 -.10
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 38.47 +.07
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 27.21 -.13
Global 20.05 -.03
Inftl r 16.45 -.11
Oakmark 42.58 -.02
Select 28.52 -.05
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.84 +.01
GIbSMdCap 13.54 -.06
LgCapStrat 8.89 -.03
RealRet 9.54 -.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.54 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.59 +.04
CAMuniAp 8.00 +.04
CapApAp 43.56 -.03
CaplncAp 8.57 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.76
DvMktAp 29.59 -.17
Discp 54.37 -.07
EquityA 8.66
GlobAp 54.18 -.31
GIbOppA 27.15 -.04
GblStrlncA 4.07
Gold p 36.09 -.27
IntBdAp 6.18 -.01
LtdTmMu 14.72 +.02
MnStFdA 32.81 -.02
PAMuniAp 11.01 +.03
SenFltRtA 8.09 +.01
USGv p 9.61 +01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.50 +.02
AMTFrNY 11.60 +.04
CplncB t 8.40
ChmplncBt 1.76
EquityB 8.00 -.01
GblStfrlncB 4.09 +.01
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.34 +.01
RoMuAp 16.10 +.05
RcNtMuA 6.92 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 29.24 -.17
InfiBdY 6.18 -.01
IntGrowY 25.50 -.15
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.70 +.01
TotRtAd 10.90 +.03
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.09 +.01
AIIAsset 11.60 +.01
ComodRR 6.66 +.02
Divlnc 11.30 +.02
EmgMkCur 9.90 -.01
EmMkBd 11.25
Fltlnc r 8.34
ForBdUnr 10.84 +.01
FrgnBd 10.60 +.01
HiYld 9.05 +.01
InvGrCp 10.35 +.03
LowDu 10.31 +.01
ModDur 10.59 +.02
RealRet 11.51 +.06
RealRhil 11.87 +.04
ShortT 9.70 +.01
TotRt 10.90 +.03

TRIll 9.58 +.02


PIMCO Funds A:
AllAstAutt 10.03 +.01
ComRRp 6.53 +.02
LwDurA 10.31 +.01
RealRtAp 11.87 +.04
TotRtA 10.90 +.03
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.87 +.04
TotRtCt 10.90 +.03
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.90 +.03
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.08 +.01


Name NAV Chg
TotRtnP 10.90 +.03
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.46 -.03
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 46.64 -.13
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.54 +.02
InfiValA 17.36 -.15
PionFdAp 39.20 -.11
ValueAp 10.95 -.03
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.68 +.02
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 9.77 +.01
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 17.26 -.10
Price Funds:
Balanceun 19.13 -.03
BIChip n 39.46 -.01
CABondn 11.06 +.03
CapAppn 20.85
DivGro n 23.59 -.06
EmMktBn 12.75 -.01
EmEurp 15.87 -.12
EmMktSn 28.81 -.30
Eqlncn 23.46 -.04
Eqlndexn 34.44 -.08
Europe n 13.24 -.07
GNMAn 10.15 +.01
Growth n 32.39 -.03
Gr&ln n 20.25 -.02
HIlthSci n 33.58 +.38
HiYield n 6.54 +.01
InsfiCpG 16.44 +.01
InfiBond n 9.66 -.02
IntDis n 37.54 -.08
IntlG&l 11.48 -.10
InfiStkn 12.33 -.10
Japan n 7.31 -.05
LatAm n 39.73 -.24
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 10.76 +.03
MidCap n 53.58 -.04
MCapValn 21.59 -.03
NAmern 32.34 +.02
NAsian 13.99 -.16
New Era n 42.88 -.31
NHorizn 31.26 -.07
N Incn 9.67 +.02
NYBondn 11.49 +.03
OverS SFn 7.32 -.06
PSIncn 15.89 -.01
RealAssetr nl.43 -.07
RealEstn 18.38 -.08
R2010n 15.14 -.02
R2015n 11.68 -.02
R2020n 16.07 -.04
R2025n 11.71 -.03
R2030n 16.74 -.05
R2035n 11.81 -.03
R2040n 16.79 -.05
R2045 n 11.18 -.03
SciTecn 26.49 +.10
ShtBd n 4.82 +.01
SmCpStkn 31.71 -.06
SmCapVal n35.03 -.10
SpecGrn 17.10 -.05
Speclnn 12.35 +.01
TFIncn 10.17 +.02
TxFrHn 11.02 +.03
TxFrSIn 5.67
USTIntn 6.24 +.02
USTLgn 13.48 +.08
VABondn 11.94 +.03
Value n 23.03 -.03
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.03
LT20201n 11.38
LT20301n 11.19
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 16.72 -.02
HiYdA p 5.40 +.01
MuHilncA 9.69 +.02
UilityA 10.70 -.06
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.24
HiYIdBt 5.39
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.24
AZ TE 9.24 +.03
ConvSec 18.64 +.02
DvrlnAp 7.34 -.01
EqlnAp 15.27
EuEq 16.59 -.11
GeoBalA 12.16 -.01
GIbEqtyp 8.28
GrInAp 13.01 -.03
GIblHIthA 39.65 +.14
HiYdAp 7.38
HiYld In 5.77 +.01
IncmA p 6.78
IntGrlnp 8.15 -.07
InvAp 12.83 -.02
NJTxA p 9.58 +.03
MuliCpGr 49.20
PATE 9.26 +.02
TxExA p 8.72 +.03
TFInAp 15.18 +.04
TFHYA 11.89 +.06
USGvAp 13.78
GIblUtilA 9.91 -.08
VoyAp 20.31 +.04
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 15.19 +.04
DvrlnBt 7.28 -.01
Eqlnct 15.14
EuEq 15.94 -.12
GeoBaIB 12.03 -.01
GIbEq t 7.50 +.01
GINtRst 17.55
GrlnBt 12.78 -.03
GIbIHIthB 31.73 +.11
HiYIdBt 7.37
HYAdBt 5.66 +.01
IncmBt 6.72
IntGrlnt 8.10 -.07
InfiNopt 12.32 -.10
InvBt 11.58 -.02
NJTxB t 9.57 +.03
MuliCpGr 42.23
TxExB t 8.72 +.03
TFHYBt 11.91 +.06
USGvBt 13.71
GlblUtilB 9.88 -.08
VoyBt 17.13 +.03
RS Funds:
IntGrA 15.56 -.17
LgCAIphaA 39.07 -.20
Value 23.61 -.04
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.29 +.03
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 14.67 -.04
MicroCapl 14.80 -.07
PennMul r 10.96 -.02
Premierl r 18.80 -.03
TotRetl r 12.82 -.04
ValSvc t 11.23 -.02
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.90 +.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.27
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 18.12 -.16
Schwab Funds:
HIllCare 17.75 +.04
0lOOOnvr 35.96 -.07
S&P Sel 19.90 -.04
SmCpSl 19.24 -.06
TSM Selr 22.99 -.04
Scout Funds:
Inft 28.08 -.25
Selected Funds:
AmShSp 40.17 -.24
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 31.47 -.10
Sequoia 146.46 -.20
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.24 -.09
SoSunSCInv t 19.97 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 52.53 -.23
Stratton Funds:
Muli-Cap 33.73 -.03
RealEstate 27.03 -.11
SmCap 50.10 -.41
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.20 +.01
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.66
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.77 +.01
Eqldxlnst 9.66 -.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 16.93 -.13
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 14.18 -.07
REVallnstr 20.49 -.13
Valuelnst 40.53 -.46
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 24.22 -.15
IncBuildAt 18.01 -.01
IncBuildCp 18.01 -.01
IntValue I 24.75 -.16
LtTMul 14.53 +.01
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.72 +.01
Incom 8.75 +.02
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 74.41 -.55
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 8.94 +.02
Flexlncp 8.82 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 32.65 +.03


Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 21.86 -.08
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 22.95 -.02
ChinaReg 6.85 -.12
GIbRs 9.55 -.05
Gld&Mtls 13.04 -.05
WdPrcMn 13.48 -.11
USAA Group:
AgvGt 32.88 -.03
CABd 10.52 +.03
CrnstStr 21.27 -.04
GNMA 10.42


Name NAV Chg
GrTxStr 13.53 +.01
Grwth 14.71
Gr&lnc 14.83 -.01
IncStk 12.43 -.01
Inco 13.08 +.02
Inf 21.56 -.22
NYBd 12.06 +.03
PrecMM 32.06 -.20
SciTech 12.65 -.04
ShtTBnd 9.15 +.01
SmCpStk 13.56 -.05
TxElt 13.36 +.02
TxELT 13.28 +.03
TxESh 10.79
VABd 11.27 +.03
WIdGr 17.77 -.10
VALIC:
MdCpldx 18.93
Stkldx 23.72 -.05
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 17.75 +.01
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 21.99 -.01
CAITAdmn 11.43 +.03
CALTAdm n11.52 +.03
CpOpAdl n 69.62 +.02
EMAdmr r n 32.03 -.30
Energyn 115.19 -.63
EqlnAdm n n46.34 -.17
EuroAdml n 51.40 -.49
ExplAdml n 67.53 -.07
ExtdAdm n 39.97 -.03
500Adml n 117.73 -.25
GNMAAdn 11.08 +.01
GrwAdm n 32.40 -.02
HlthCr n 54.86 +.08
HiYldCp n 5.72
InfProAdn 27.86 +.06
ITBdAdml n 11.74 +.03
ITsryAdml n 11.68 +.02
IntGrAdm n 52.37 -.54
ITAdmI n 14.08 +.02
ITGrAdm n 9.98 +.02
LtdTrAdn 11.16
LTGrAdmIn 10.21 +.08
LTsyAdmln 13.10 +.08
LTAdmln 11.39 +.02
MCpAdml n 90.73 -.09
MorgAdm n 55.34 +.02
MuHYAdm nlO.77 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.46 +.02
PrmCapr n 65.29
PALTAdmn11.43 +.03
ReitAdm r n 81.88 -.40
STsyAdml n 10.79 +.01
STBdAdmln10.61 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.92
STFdAdn 10.85 +.01
STIGrAdn 10.65 +.01
SmCAdm n 33.85 -.06
TxMCaprn 63.52 -.11
TflBAdml n 10.98 +.02
TStkAdmn 31.82 -.06
ValAdmlIn 20.78 -.07
WellslAdm n55.64 +.01
WelltnAdm n54.70 -.08
Windsor n 44.02 -.09
WdsrllAdn 46.45 -.13
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.16 -.01
CALTn 11.52 +.03
CapOppn 30.15 +.01
Convrtn 12.02 +.01
DivdGron 15.54 -.01
Energy n 61.36 -.34
Eqlncn 22.11 -.08
Explr n 72.60 -.07
FLLTn 11.84 +.02
GNMAn 11.08 +.01
GlobEqn 16.16 -.07
Grolnc n 26.88 -.05
GrthEqnn 10.99
HYCorpn 5.72
HlthCren 130.02 +.18
InflaPron 14.19 +.04
InfiExplrn 12.80 -.10
IntlGrn 16.47 -.17
InfiVal n 26.68 -.27
ITIGrade n 9.98 +.02
ITTsryn 11.68 +.02
LifeConn 16.29
LifeGron 21.31 -.06
Lifelncn 14.16 +.01
LifeModn 19.30 -.03
LTIGraden 10.21 +.08
LTTsryn 13.10 +.08
Morg n 17.85
MuHYn 10.77 +.02
Mulntn 14.08 +.02
MuLtdn 11.16
MuLongn 11.39 +.02
MuShrtn 15.92
NJLTn 12.00 +.02
NYLTn 11.46 +.02
OHLTTE n 12.33 +.02
PALTn 11.43 +.03
PrecMtls r n 20.23 -.09
PrmcpCorn 13.66 -.03
Prmcp r n 62.94
SelValurn 18.90 -.03
STARn 18.89 -.02
STIGraden 10.65 +.01
STFedn 10.85 +.01
STTsryn 10.79 +.01
StratEqn 18.65 -.01
TgtRe2005nl2.03
TgtRetlncn 11.58
TgRe2010 n22.57 -.02
TgtRe201 5n2.38 -.02
TgRe2020n21.86 -.04
TgtRe2025 nl2.38 -.03
TgRe2030n21.13 -.06
TgtRe2035 n 2.64 -.05
TgtRe204On20.73 -.07
TgtRe205 n20.64 -.07
TgtRe2045 nl3.02 -.04
USGron 18.31 -.02
USValuen 10.37 -.03
Wellsly n 22.96
Welltnn 31.67 -.05
Wndsrn 13.05 -.02
Wndsll n 26.17 -.08
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPlrn87.71 -.84
MidCplstPI n98.83 -.10
TotlntAdm r r21.93 -.20
Totlntllnstr n87.68 -.80
ToIntlntllP r n 87.69 -.80
500 n 117.73 -.25
Balancedn 21.99 -.01
EMktn 24.39 -.22
Europe n 22.07 -.21
Extend n 39.97 -.03
Growth n 32.40 -.02
LgCaplxn 23.56 -.04
LTBndsn 13.74 +.08
MidCap n 20.00 -.02
Pacific n 9.11 -.09
REITrn 19.19 -.09
SmCap n 33.83 -.06
SmlCpGthn2l.72 -.04
STBndn 10.61 +.01
TotBndn 10.98 +.02
Totllntln 13.11 -.12
TotStkn 31.81 -.06
Value n 20.78 -.07
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 21.99 -.01
DevMklnstn 8.42 -.08
Extln n 39.97 -.03
FTAIIWIdl r n78.01 -.75
Grwthlstn 32.40 -.01
InfProlnstn 11.35 +.03
Instldxn 116.96 -.25
InsPIn 116.97 -.25
InstTStldxn 28.79 .06
lnsTStPlus r8.80 -.05
MidCplstn 20.04 -.02
SCInstn 33.85 -.05
TBIstn 10.98 +.02
TSInstn 31.83 -.05
Valuelstn 20.78 -.07
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 97.25 -.21
GroSig n 30.00 -.02
ITBdSig n 11.74 +.03
MidCpldx n 28.63 -.03
STBdldxn 10.61 +.01
SmCpSig n 30.50 -.05
TotBdSgl n 10.98 +.02
TotStkSgl n 30.71 -.06
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.74
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 8.60 -.07
CorelnvA 5.79 -.01
DivOppAp 14.07 -.06
DivOppCt 13.93 -.06
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 37.68 -.06
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.00
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.59
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 19.18 -.05
Opptylnv 36.68
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.81
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.81
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.11 +.02
William Blair N:
GrowthN 10.85 -.01
Yacktman Funds:


Fundpn 17.75 -.03
Focused 19.02 -.03


Positive jobs report





fails to lift stocks


Market watch
Jan. 6, 2012

Dow Jones -55.78
industrials 12,359.92


Nasdaq +4.36
composite 2,674.22


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-3.25

1,277.81

-2.58

749.71


Associated Press


The stock market offered
a reminder Friday that even
if the U.S. job market is im-
proving, there's plenty to
worry about elsewhere in
the world.
The unemployment rate
fell in December to 8.5 per-
cent, the lowest level in
nearly three years. Yet stock
indexes teetered between
small gains and losses all
day as traders fretted about
Europe's ongoing financial
drama.
Italy's borrowing costs
spiked to dangerously high
levels and the euro fell to a
16-month low against the
dollar. U.S. bank stocks fell
on concerns that the debt
crisis will spread through
the financial industry
The Dow Jones industrial
average ended down nearly
56 points and the S&P had a
tiny loss, its first of the year
Both gained more than 1
percent over the first week
of 2012.
Most European markets
closed lower after new data
showed economic senti-
ment and retail sales falling
across the region. Unem-
ployment is stuck at 10.3
percent in the 17 nations
that use the euro.
Europe's debt woes and
China's slowing economy
are overshadowing signs of
strength in the U.S. econ-
omy, said Doug Cote, chief
market strategist at ING In-
vestment Management


the first time since the re-
cession. Alcoa, which re-
ports earnings Monday, said
late Thursday it would close
an aluminum smelter in
Tennessee and other opera-
tions to cut costs.
The latest sign that the
labor market is strengthen-
ing failed to spur buying by
investors. The unemploy-
ment rate fell last month to
8.5 percent, while U.S. em-
ployers added a net 200,000
jobs, the Labor Department
said.
The economy has gener-
ated 100,000 or more jobs
each month for the past six,
the longest such streak
since April 2006. The num-
ber of people applying for
unemployment benefits last
week fell, pushing the four-
week average of new claims
down to its lowest level
since June 2008.
In other trading, the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index fell
3.25 points, or 0.3 percent, to
1,277.81. The Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 4.36, or 0.2
percent, to 2,674.22.
It was the second day in a
row of indecisive trading on
the stock market. The Dow
and the S&P closed nearly
unchanged Thursday The
indexes still had strong
gains in this first, shortened
trading week of the year.
The Dow is up 1.2 percent
this week, the S&P 1.6 per-
cent. Trading was closed
Monday, when the New
Year's Day holiday was
observed


Business HIGHLIGHTS


The


The J/ /.. Lars Berk, DMD & Robert Capozza, DMD
General Dentists


I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


Name Last Chg
StdPac 3.44 +.25
Standex 35.77 -.06
StarwdHf 50.42 -.23
StateStr 41.76
Statil ASA 25.79 -.19
Steris 30.04 +.14
Stryker 51.50 +.31
SturmRug 35.59 +.01
SubPpne 47.94 -.01
SuccessF 39.80 -.02
SunCmts 37.50 -.03
Suncor gs 30.71 -.13
Sunoco 41.58 +.19
Suntech 2.30 -.10
SunTrst 19.75 +.09
SupEnrgy 29.68 +.09
Supvalu 8.23 -.05
SwiftTrans 9.44 -.06
Synovus 1.60
Sysco 28.92 +.01
TCF Fncl 10.88 +.04
TE Connect 32.36 +.44
TECO 18.94 -.13
TJX 66.46 +.15
TRWAuto 34.81 +.59
TaiwSemi 13.15 -.11
TalismEg 12.36 -.80
Target 48.95 +.44
TataMotors 19.05 -.05
TeckResg 37.31 -.41


Teekay
TelcmNZs
TelefEsp s
TelMexL
Templelnld
TempurP
Tenaris
TenetHlth
Teradata
Teradyn
Terex
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TetraTech
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThmBet
3MCo
Tiffany
TW Cable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy
Trchmrks
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers


Tredgar 23.01 -.26 ValeroE 20.37
TriConfi 14.51 +.01 VangTSM 65.38
Trinity 29.69 -.39 VangREIT 57.84
TwoHrblnv 9.23 +.17 VangEmg 38.57
Tycolntf 48.21 -.01 VangEur 40.95
Tyson 20.32 +.04 VangEAFE 30.46
UBSAG 11.62 -.26 VarianMed 68.90
UDR 24.67 -.32 Vectren 29.46
UIL Hold 34.65 -.26 Ventas 53.70
USAirwy 5.60 +.13 VeoliaEnv 10.32
US Gold 3.62 +.04 VeriFone 36.80
USEC 1.30 -.12 VerizonCm 38.33
USG 11.38 -.01 VimpelCm 9.92
UniSrcEn 36.35 -.43 Visa 100.71
UniFirst 60.82 +.76 Vishaylnt 9.77
UnilevNV 33.27 -1.22 VMware 83.31
UnionPac 107.53 -.46 Vornado 76.94
UtdConftl 18.21 -.18 WGL Hold 43.32
UPSB 73.48 +.36 WPXEnn 17.28
UtdRentals 29.63 -.30 Wabash 8.70
US Bancrp 27.75 -.23 WaddellR 26.24
US NGs rs 6.64 +.22 WalMart 59.00
US OilFd 39.22 +.05 Walgrn 33.08
USSteel 27.30 -.49 WalterEn 58.73
UtdTech 73.90 -.43 WsteMInc 32.99
UtdhlthGp 52.78 +.19 Waters 74.15
G 2 2 WatsnPh 63.21
Weathflnfi 15.53
Mk k & WtWatch 68.00
Vale SA 22.36 -.39 WeinRIt 21.82
Vale SApf 21.25 -.34 WellPoint 70.73
ValeantPh 47.48 +.32 WellsFargo 28.94


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,395

Declined: 1,627

Unchanged: 104

Volume: 3.5 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,113

Declined: 1,381

Unchanged: 140

Volume: 1.7 b
AP


"The global risks continue
to exert their weight," Cote
said. Ultimately, improving
U.S. stronger consumer de-
mand, manufacturing activ-
ity and corporate profits
will drive U.S. stocks higher,
Cote said.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 55.78 points, or
0.5 percent, to 12,359.92.
Alcoa Inc. was the Dow's
biggest loser, slipping 2.1
percent. A Citi analyst fore-
cast that the aluminum
maker lost money in the
fourth quarter of 2011 for


Improving economy: More jobs,

higher prices at the gas pump

NEW YORK-As the U.S. economy recovers
and adds more jobs, Americans are paying the
price at the gas pump.
On Friday, the same day the government said
the unemployment rate dropped to 8.5 percent,
gasoline prices hit an average of $3.35 a gallon,
the highest ever for this time of year.
Gasoline prices are rising again after falling in
the last months of 2011. Motorists are buying
less gas than they did a year ago, but pump
prices are rising with higher oil prices.

Warner Bros. to impose 56-day

delay on DVD rentals

SAN FRANCISCO Millions of DVD renters
who want to check out Warner Bros' latest
movies won't get the chance until nearly two
months after the discs are available to buy.
The new restriction will double a 28-day delay
on DVD rentals that Warner Bros. reached with
Netflix's video subscription service two years
ago. A person familiar with the matter explained
the new rules to The Associated Press on Friday.
The person spoke on condition of anonymity be-
cause the changes won't be announced until
next week.


The person said Netflix Inc. conceded to the
demands for the 56-day rental delay to ensure it
can still buy Warner Bros. discs at a discount.
Redbox, another major DVD rental service,
says it hasn't agreed to extend its 28-delay on
Warner discs.

Gadget show has poor success

record with new products

NEW YORK The largest trade show in the
Americas must be a great place to show off new
products, right? Wrong. The International Con-
sumer Electronics Show is becoming a launch
pad for products that fall flat.
When the annual conclave kicks off next
week, organizers expect more than 140,000
people roughly the population of Syracuse,
N.Y. to descend on Las Vegas. They will mill
around 1.8 million square feet of booths and ex-
hibits, equivalent to 31 football fields.
The 2,800 or so exhibitors are hoping to set
the tone for the year by showing off tons of tablet
computers, throngs of 3-D TVs and untold num-
bers of slim, light laptops called ultrabooks.
But a look at products most heavily promoted
at CES in recent years reveals few successes.
Think netbooks, Palm's webOS software and
3-D TV. And many of the hottest gadgets never
appeared at CES.


,)1DA 11 1 tr-Hil ;,H. i '-~ ~~a M4" ; IH in m ''
PAW. A;:I .. pi u E.. 44 ,, ', I. I
. R :'. .M -h..N i i.. .: : 1. 10f,'A --77


12009 Cortez Blvd. I Brooksville

SPr *.,u,.J PI ..Oir .-1 ire He.niania, nl Onil C are Fanim ,


WestarEn 28.16
WAstEMkt 13.51
WstAMgdHi 6.08
WAstlnfOpp 12.72
WDigital 33.49
WstnRefin 14.83
WstnUnion 18.31
Weyerh 19.02
Whrlpl 49.48
WhiingPts 51.84
WmsCos 27.39
WmsPtrs 62.57
WmsSon 37.52
Winnbgo 7.56
WiscEn s 34.49
WT India 16.24
Worthgtn 17.66
Wyndham 37.64
XLGrp 19.93
XcelEngy 27.20
Xerox 8.10
Yamanag 15.02
Youku 15.67
YumBrnds 59.85
Zimmer 53.98
ZweigTI 3.05







Page A8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7,2012



PINION


"Compromises make a good umbrella
but a poor roof; it is a temporary
expedient."
James Russell Lowell, 1819-1891


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
o Charlie Brennan ............. ................. editor
Mike Arnold ........... .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz.............. ............ citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen mem ber
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


VICTIM OF THE TIMES





Closing of




Sears a loss




for county


The Sears store in the Crys-
tal River Mall is among
the 79 stores the retail
giant is planning to close this
year following a disappointing
fourth quarter for
the corporation.
This decision will
cost jobs in the THE I
county, reduce Sears
shopping options, Crystal F
and leave the al- slated t
ready-struggling
mall with one OUR 01
fewer anchor ten-
ant as it tries to re- A loss
cover from the loss cou
of other name
stores and foreclo-
sure action against its owner.
The story of how Sears has
gone from a dominant retailer
to a downsizing company is a
national business story that in-
volves many lessons about how
business models need to evolve
to meet changes in customer
expectations. For county resi-
dents, it is more personal, be-
cause it means loss of income
and loss of tax revenues.
Sears has long had a reputa-
tion for quality tools and appli-
ances, and has been a fixture
in the American retail land-
scape for more than a century.
Beginning as a catalog busi-
ness providing merchandise to
rural America, by the mid-20th
century the company had
grown into the largest retailer
in the nation, selling every-
thing from clothing and house-
hold goods to insurance, real
estate and credit cards.
During the ensuing years,
Sears went through many evo-
lutions, and its sales were af-
fected by a variety of factors,
including new competition
from other retailers and Inter-


S
st
Ri


P
f
un


net sales. By 2003 Sears was
struggling financially and was
ranked fourth as a retailer (be-
hind Wal-Mart, Target and The
Home Depot). In 2005 Kmart
bought the com-
pany and re-
named itself Sears
SUE: Holdings.
tore in The latest store
iver Mall closings are a con-
o close, tinuing pattern of
a company look-
INION: ing to cut losses
and boost its stock
for the prices. While clos-
nty. ing smaller stores
rather than invest-
ing in them may
be good for the corporate par-
ent, the decisions are a nega-
tive to the county and its
residents. The one positive for
Citrus County is the decision
that the Kmart in the mall and
the one in Inverness will stay
open.
It is too early to determine
the full impact the Sears clos-
ing will have on the mall, but it
is certainly a huge blow. The
survival and success of the
mall is important to both Crys-
tal River and to the county.
Aside from the shopping op-
portunities the mall offers, it
provides employment and it
has a taxable value of more
than $12 million.
Local officials can do little to
affect the decisions of a corpo-
rate giant, but they can act to
protect the interests of the city
and the county. This is a time
when the Economic Develop-
ment Council, the city of Crystal
River and the county need to
work together with mall man-
agement to recruit another
major tenant. And they need to
act fast. Time is not on their side.


LBJ, not Reagan
I read in Wednesday's paper
where somebody said that Presi-
dent Reagan signed a bill putting
Social Security in the general
fund. I'm afraid that was Lyndon
Baines Johnson.
Johnson's reasons
In today's paper (Dec. 28), some-
one called in and stated that Ronald
Reagan moved Social Security
money to the general fund. That's
incorrect. The money was moved to
the general fund when Lyndon John-
son was president and it was
moved there to cover up the huge
deficit the Vietnam War (created).


Reagan didn't do it
I'm responding to the article
in Sound Off saying "Return
money." The individual that
wrote that is wrong in their
facts.
It wasn't President Reagan that
took it out of the trust fund; it
was President Lyndon Johnson.
So if they would do a little his-
tory and a little background
check, they would find out that
they've got the wrong president
and the wrong dates.
It happened when Lyndon
Johnson was the president. This
is in reference to the article on
Wednesday (Dec. 28).


Please return valuables Call Animal Control


Would the person who
picked up my gray dress
purse from the basket in the
parking lot at Wal-Mart on
Sunday (Dec. 18) please re-
turn my extra car key and
my billfold, the pictures of
my dead husband and my
mom and dad that were
there and things that are so CAI
personal to me. I don't care
if you return anything else, 5(
but please return those to
the desk at Wal-Mart. Thank you
so much.


63


UINDI see today in the
JllND Chronicle there are a lot
p of write-ups about the
W FF deputy who shot the
3 dog. Apparently I was
out of state when this
9 happened ... I'm really
disappointed in the sher-
o iff's department. I
"* thought we had Animal
0(57 Control in Citrus County.
"U4 5 Why didn't the deputy
just go back to his car
and call Animal Control to control
the animal instead of shooting it?


The 'Oh, all right' candidate


Now that real voters in who know exactly what he's
Iowa have actually made thinking and planning, have set
real choices, two things up Restore Our Future, a group
are increasingly clear that swamped Newt
about the Republican l Gingrich under a deluge
race. Mitt Romney of negative ads. Newt
has the organization, even squawked that he
money and ruthless- was being "Romney-
ness to win the nomi- boated" a reference
nation. He also has to the vicious "swift
alienated Hispanic boat" attacks on John
voters and failed to Kerry in 2004. Obama
generate enough can expect the same
electricity to light up treatment.
even an energy- Cokie and For all the talk about
saving bulb. Steven Roberts tea party power, the Re-
Bottom line: Both OTHER publicans still tend to
sides have a plausi- VOICES pick the most familiar
ble path to victory in face, the next in line.
November And the The insurgents who did
outlook for President Obama is a run from Michele Bachmann
bit brighter than it was six and Herman Cain to Rick Perry
months ago. and Newt Gingrich turned out
Romney clearly learned some- to be monumental disappoint-
thing at Harvard Business School ments. And Republicans are so
about the value of long-term plan- desperate to beat Obama that
ning. Using Obama's campaign as many of them are willing to ignore
a model, he's figured out that Romney's spotty conservative cre-
Iowa and New Hampshire get far dentials. According to caucus en-
more attention than they deserve, trance polls, half the Iowa voters
By contesting primaries all over who thought the most important
the country and building a strong quality in a candidate was being
base of delegates, a candidate able to win in November picked
can survive short-term setbacks Mitt. Unemployment remains
and still win. Obama's biggest weakness, and
Romney understands this Romney ran strongly among
math. Recent Republican history caucus-goers who tab the economy
is littered with wannabes Mike as the top issue and prefer a pres-
Huckabee, Pat Buchanan, Pat ident with business experience.
Robertson who flared briefly But those advantages cannot
in the early states but quickly erase Romney's huge vulnerabil-
flamed out, suffocated by a lack of ities. He is, to put it charitably, a
organization and money Rick bore, a stiff, the "oh, all right"
Santorum, despite his strong candidate a Republican ver-
showing in Iowa, seems likely to sion of Al Gore, who used to joke
join that list. Romney does not. that he was so dull, his Secret
Team Romney understands the Service code name was "Al
new landscape reshaped by re- Gore." And with all Romney's
cent Supreme Court decisions. millions, he still won only 25 per-
Super PACs can now raise and cent in Iowa, the same figure as
spend unlimited amounts of four years ago and his upper limit
money, as long as they don't offi- in most national polls.
cially consult with the candidates Arthur Doenecke, a Romney
they're supporting. But they don't backer in Iowa, summed up this
have to. passion gap for The New York
Longtime Romney supporters, Times: "He's just, to me, not a


real person. He has the same ex-
pression on his face, always looks
the same, acts the same. He's al-
most robotic in his mannerisms.
He has no warmth. I find it diffi-
cult to connect. But I think of
who's left and can beat Obama,
he probably has the best chance."
For all of his rigid self-control,
Romney can make mistakes -
betting Perry $10,000, calling cor-
porations people, suggesting that
the housing market should hit
rock bottom. More seriously, he
has decided to demagogue the
issue of immigration by scream-
ing "amnesty" whenever an op-
ponent tries to sound reasonable.
That plays well with primary
voters (the Iowa electorate was 98
percent white), but Hispanics are
the fastest-growing group in the
country and could hold the key to
many swing states, from Colorado
and Nevada to New Mexico and
Florida. Obama won two out of
three Latino votes in 2008, and a
recent Pew poll shows him win-
ning the same margin over Rom-
ney this time.
Finally, there's Romney's past,
preserved indelibly on YouTube.
His own ad campaign against
Gingrich in Iowa showed that
negative commercials can be
very effective, and the Democrats
are already preparing a scorched
earth strategy that will highlight
Romney's record of closing com-
panies and firing workers during
his tenure at Bain Capital.
One disgruntled employee,
Randy Johnson, showed up in
Iowa (thanks to the Democrats)
and told reporters that Romney
put "profit before people,"
adding: "I think he is out of touch
with the average person." The
man who "Romney-boated" Gin-
grich into oblivion is about to get
"Bain-boated" with both barrels.

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


House has hands tied
It is often reported Congress
has a low rating and is referred
to as a do-nothing Congress.
The House of Representatives
won an overwhelming victory in
the 2010 elections. However, it
is at the mercy of the U.S. Sen-
ate, which makes up the other
half of Congress.
There are presently more
than 25 pieces of legislation the
Senate refuses to bring to the
floor for a vote. Therefore, it is
apparent that there are only
two ways in which proposed leg-
islation can be considered, and
that is to take back the Senate
or for the Senate leader to have
the courage to bring the bill to
the floor for a vote. That is the
essence of exercising the demo-
cratic process.
If the legislation does not fit
into the president's ideas, then
he always has the option to ex-
ercise his veto power
Robert G. Gempp
Crystal River

Caring donors
Thank you to all who sup-
ported the cause!
Jeanne Nally, a female vet-
eran, is no longer dependent on
others due to the many who so
generously gave money and
their support.
I would personally like to


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

thank the many who helped, in-
cluding Wear To Go Consign-
ment, Rolling Thunder, VFWs
and their women auxiliaries,
Citrus County Veterans Coali-
tion, American Legion 155, the
many individuals who
gave without leaving a name,
and special friends who help
whenever I ask Bonnie, Bar-
bie and Barbara Mills!


A special thanks to Frank Ro-
manelli, owner of Consignment
USA, who made sure Jeanne
not only got a dependable car
but has offered to give her free
service for as long as she has
the car!
Cynthia Holden
Lecanto

Fantastic show
My family was exceedingly
entertained attending the spell-
binding and extraordinary
Dec. 8 musical program at
Lecanto High School, highlight-
ing the remarkably sensational
vocal and instrumental talents
of Citrus County students.
What a show of professional-
ism and dedication exhibited by
the participating performers
under the auspices of remark-
ably talented music teachers
who coached and guided them!
We commend and congratulate
the sensational, spectacular
performers.
Evy Poulis' haunting rendi-
tion of "0 Holy Night" de-
servedly showered her with
thundering applause and a
standing ovation toward the
end.
We were overwhelmed with
pride at the students' program.
May their futures be bright.
Angela Moskes
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: LBJ





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sound OFF


S.S. fund untouched
This is in response to the
gentleman (who wrote) "De-
mand a 'no' vote" in today's
paper (Dec. 22). (That is)
absolutely ridiculous. This
$1,000 tax reduction in pay-
roll does not come out of
the Social Security trust
fund. That's absolutely ab-
surd. Obama and the ad-
ministration wanted one
year with a very slight re-
duction and a tax holiday
that the rich or $1 million-
plus make and that's how it
was going to be paid for, to
reimburse the Social Secu-
rity trust fund. The new pro-
posal of two months is
going to be done out of Fan-
nie Mae and Freddie Mac
with a small savings there
that will reimburse Social
Security trust fund.
High cost of care
I'd like to make a com-
ment on the high cost of
health care. Everybody's an-
noyed about Obamacare,
but that's not really the
issue. I think the biggest
issue is the cost of health
care. Our elected officials
need to regulate the total
amount of money that our
service providers and our
health care providers are
charging us. Give you an ex-
ample: I was just in a motor
vehicle accident and I re-
ceived a bill at home from
the ambulance. The ambu-
lance ride, as far as the bill
goes, was $800. No way that
that ride to the hospital
should be costing $800.
That's just one example of
the waste and the high cost
of health care that's plagu-
ing Americans. The biggest
issue is doing things to lower
the cost. That ride to the
hospital shouldn't cost more
than $100, but $800 is
ridiculous. I've heard many
stories about people going
into the hospital for just
stitches and their bill being
$500. Something's wrong.
Gas facts
This is for the caller who
called in last week saying that
gasoline prices under Presi-
dent Bush was $4 a gallon
and it was $4 a gallon at the
time that President Obama
took office. I'm sorry to in-
form him, but he needs to get
online to check his facts. The
price of gasoline in July of
'08 was over $4 a gallon, by
Dec. 12 it was down to $1.63
a gallon, and by Jan. 30 it
was $1.87 a gallon. So he
needs to check his facts.


Huntsman the man Americans lazy


Why don't you people
wake up? You want a conser-
vative. I heard on O'Reilly's
show, former President Clin-
ton said of all the candi-
dates, Jon Huntsman is the
most conservative candi-
date and the best economic
record that he has. So why
aren't they pushing him? It's
about time somebody does.
I know he's up in New
Hampshire working hard,
but you people need to
wake up. We need a states-
man and Jon Huntsman is a
statesman that has experi-
ence in many areas. Let's
hear from you.
Shrimping damage
There was an article a
week or so ago about (how)
the sports fishermen are to
blame for the shortage of
fish ... On the History
Channel, there's a show
about shrimping. They
drag the bottom with nets.
When they haul them in,
there are small fish in with
the shrimp. Shrimp are
sorted out and what is left
are hundreds of dead fish
per drag. Small fish grow
up to be big fish, don't
they? So who is really to
blame?
Thanks, Harriet
Harriet Haywood: Your let-
ter was beautifully written.
You are right on the ball
with your sentiments. I
agree with your exactly.
Thank you for your letter.


I'm calling the Sound Off
in reference to the people
complaining about illegal im-
migrants doing work. The
problem with that is, the
American people are lazy.
They don't want to work for
the minimum wage or $10 an
hour. They feel they are above
that and they want $30, $40
an hour. So these minimum-
wage jobs are going to the
immigrants. Quit complain-
ing, America. Take whatever
job you can get. California's
already complaining about
the minimum wage being
$10.25. There are jobs out
there. Americans are lazy and
they want more money per
hour. That's the bottom line.
Not workers' fault
To the person who wrote
about California's minimum
wage at $10.24 an hour and
can't blame the manufactur-
ers for moving jobs to China
where they work for a couple
of dollars an hour: It's time
to wake up. Did you see any
prices going down on any-
thing in this country? No. The
owners just got a lot richer.
So far this year, things have
doubled and tripled in price.
If the Chinese people tried to
live here on what they earn
there, they would be home-
less and hungry, just like a lot
of our people are.


Dogs at the pound
I am calling in response to
the lady who called Sound
Off about her poodle and the
lady who went to North Car-
olina to get another one for
her. I really don't understand
why you don't use a rescue
around here. There are so
many wonderful dogs looking
for homes in Citrus County
that are available at a rescue
or at a shelter, that it makes
no sense to go all the way to
North Carolina. A dog doesn't
need papers in order to be a
loving member of your family.
Please check out our local
rescues and our local shelter.
Support appreciated
For all those who have
called in to Sound Off about
my Jack Russell: I truly ap-
preciate the compassion
from others. The officer is
being investigated for the sit-
uation. It is not being shoved
under the table. I am waiting
on the results of the investi-
gation. Detective Davidson
with Internal Affairs has ap-
peared to be fair and unbi-
ased. This doesn't bring my
Princess back, but I do
thank him for his concern in
this matter. For the person
who said I should keep my
dog under control: I should
like to respond by saying she
should have been allowed to
be in her own yard.


No ads on busses
Sen. Bill Montford seems
to think you can start with
a small advertising on a
school bus. When will it
stop? First he'll have one
small one. Then the next
one will give another ex-
cuse why they need a dif-
ferent type of advertising,
and it never stops.
Why don't you just stop
asking for a raise?
Police blinkers
This is in response (to)
deputies with directionals.
You know, it is a law that
you must use directionals,
but who's going to give
them the ticket? And on top
of it, I think they should re-
call all their cars because
their directionals don't
work.
Thanks from angels
All of us Sugarmill an-
gels would like to say we
hope you had a great
Christmas and will have a
wonderful healthy New
Year.
We look forward to seeing
you all in 2012 and we'll
set our goal this year to
give you better and faster
service. We love you all and
welcome back, snowbirds.
Thank you, the Sugarmill
guys and girls.


Prosecute theft
I read where some lady
lost three of her lit deer out
of her yard that she'd had
for a long time. We had a
similar problem in Beverly
Hills where the same thing
happened. They stole lawn
ornaments off of our yard
as well as some of my
neighbors here. They just
think they're so cute and
funny to go steal stuff out
of people's yards. It would
be interesting to talk to
their parents some day. Of
course, they've all got ex-
cuses. Nobody's above the
law and they should be
prosecuted to the fullest,
and I mean the fullest.
Praise for Obama
Thank you, President
Obama, for ending the war in
Iraq and bringing our troops
home. Thank you for the
health care law, which pro-
vides health care for every-
one. Thank you for avoiding a
full-blown depression. Thank
you for capturing and killing
the biggest threat to our
country, Osama bin Laden.
You did all of this with one
hand tied behind your back,
thanks to the Republicans. If
the Republicans cared about
our country, they would have
helped our president and not
just try to hurt our country
every chance that they get..
Forget the shoes
How ironic that today,
Christmas Eve, I read in the
paper an article by Cokie
and Steve Roberts saying
that there is actual hunger
in our country, children that
are going hungry to bed,
Army wives lining up at 4 in
the morning to get a chance
to get free food and then I
turn the page and I see
sneakers for sale for almost
$200 a pair and people lin-
ing up and buying them in a
frenzy. This is so terrible.
Buy sneakers for $20 and
donate $150 to a food
bank. I don't think that
these sneakers are worth
the money, especially when
there is hunger in this
country.


SOUND OFF
To leave a Sound Off,
call (352) 563-0579.


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OPINION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 A9











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Surf'sup Nation adds 200,000 jobs in December

Surf's up

Unemployment rate drops to 8.5 percent \


Associated Press
A surfer bails off his board
Friday while riding a large
wave just south of the
Huntington Beach Pier in
Huntington Beach, Calif.
High surf will pound South-
ern California and the Cen-
tral Coast into the
weekend, with breakers
topping a dozen feet in
some places.


Gov't expands
definition of rape
WASHINGTON -The
Obama administration is ex-
panding the definition of rape,
including men for the first
time, when counting the num-
ber of victims.
It's a change supporters
said is long overdue. The ex-
pansion is important because
policymakers and lawmakers
use crime statistics to allocate
resources for prevention and
victim assistance.
Since 1929, the FBI has
defined rape as the carnal
knowledge of a female,
forcibly and against her will.
The revised definition covers
any gender of victim or at-
tacker and includes instances
in which the victim is inca-
pable of giving consent due
to the influence of drugs or al-
cohol or because of age.
Physical resistance is not
required.

WorldBRIEFS

Prayer


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Four painful
years after the Great Recession
struck and wiped out 8.7 million
jobs, the United States may finally
be in an elusive pattern known as
the virtuous cycle an escalating
loop of robust job growth, healthier
spending and higher demand.
The nation added 200,000 jobs in
December in a burst of hiring that
drove the unemployment rate down
two ticks to 8.5 percent, its lowest in
almost three years, and led econo-
mists to conclude that the improve-
mentin the job market might just last
"There is more horsepower to
this economy than most believe,"
said Sung Won Sohn, an economics
professor at California State Uni-
versity, Channel Islands. "The stars
are aligned right for a meaningful
economic recovery."
It was the sixth month in a row
that the economy added at least
100,000 jobs, the longest streak
since 2006. The economy added
jobs every month last year, the first


time that has happened since 2005.
And the unemployment rate,
which peaked at 10.1 percent in Oc-
tober 2009 and stood at 9.1 percent
at the start of last year, has fallen
four months straight
If economics textbooks and the
best hopes of millions of unem-
ployed Americans are confirmed,
the virtuous cycle may be under
way, which would suggest the job
market will get stronger yet.
When more Americans are hired,
they have more money to spend.
When more money courses through
the economy, businesses can justify
hiring more people. That means
more jobs, more spending and more
demand for businesses. Which
leads to still more hiring, spending
and demand.
That would be the reverse of the
vicious cycle that took hold during
the Great Recession. People lost
jobs and spent less money, so busi-
nesses rang up less sales and were
forced to lay off more people. That
led to even less spending and more
layoffs.


Associated Press
A construction worker directs a steel hoist at the foundation of a new condo
complex in Thursday in Sunrise, Fla. A burst of hiring in December pushed
the unemployment rate to its lowest level in nearly three years, giving the


economy a boost at the end of 2011.
"The labor market is healing,"
said Diane Swonk, chief economist
at Mesirow Financial. She cau-
tioned that "we still have a long way
to go years to recoup the losses
we have endured."
Indeed, the economy added 1.6
million jobs for all of 2011. That is
better than the 940,000 it added dur-


Suicide bombing


Associated Press
Syrian investigators, right, inspect the scene of a bombing Friday in the Midan neighborhood of Damascus,
Syria. An explosion ripped through a police bus in the center of Syria's capital Friday, killing many in an at-
tack authorities blamed on a suicide bomber, an official and state-run TV said.

Terrorists blamed in attack that kills 25, wounds dozens


Associated Press
Russian Prime Minister
Vladimir Putin prays early
Saturday during a Russian
Orthodox Christmas serv-
ice at Spaso-Preobrazhen-
sky Cathedral in St.
Petersburg, Russia. Christ-
mas falls on Jan. 7 for Or-
thodox Christians that use
the old Julian calendar in-
stead of the 16th-century
Gregorian calendar
adopted by Catholics and
Protestants and commonly
used in secular life around
the world.


11 dead after hot
air balloon crash
WELLINGTON, New
Zealand -All eleven people
on board have been killed
when a hot air balloon crashed
near the rural town of Carter-
ton, some 94 miles north of
the capital, Wellington.
Wairarapa District Health
Board spokeswoman Jill
Stringer said the 11 people
died when the balloon came
down near show grounds
north of the township in rural
Wairarapa county.
Police have confirmed
there were "multiple deaths"
when the balloon crashed.
Eyewitnesses told local
media of seeing up to 32 feet
of flames rising from the bal-
loon's basket before it plum-
meted to the ground.
Police said they have no
details yet of what caused the
early morning crash in clear,
bright conditions with minimal
wind. The region is well known
for its hot air ballooning.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
BEIRUT-A bomb ex-
ploded Friday at a busy
Damascus intersection,
killing 25 people and
wounding dozens in the
second major attack in
the Syrian capital in as
many weeks, officials
said, vowing to respond
to further security
threats with an "iron
fist."
The government
blamed "terrorists," say-
ing a suicide bomber had
blown himself up in the
crowded Midan district.
But the country's opposi-
tion demanded an inde-
pendent investigation,
accusing forces loyal to


the Syrian regime of
being behind the bomb-
ing to tarnish a 10-month-
old uprising against
President Bashar Assad.
"Is there anything
worse than these
crimes?" said Majida
Jomaa, a 30-year-old
housewife who ran to the
streets after hearing the
explosion around 11 a.m.
"Is this freedom?"
It was impossible to
determine the exact tar-
get of the blast, but a po-
lice bus was riddled with
shrapnel and blood was
splattered on its seats,
according to Syrian TV
video and a government
official. Blood also
stained the street, which


was littered with shat-
tered glass.
The bomber "deto-
nated himself with the
aim of killing the largest
number of people," Inte-
rior Minister Mohammed
Shaar told reporters.
State media said most of
the dead were civilians
but security forces were
also among them.
Midan is one of several
Damascus neighbor-
hoods that have seen fre-
quent anti-Assad protests
on Friday since the up-
rising began in March,
inspired by the revolu-
tions around the Arab
world.
The violence marks a
dramatic escalation of


bloodshed in Syria as
Arab League observers
tour the country to inves-
tigate Assad's bloody
crackdown on dissent.
The monitoring mission
will issue its first find-
ings Sunday at a meeting
in Cairo.
In a statement, the In-
terior Ministry vowed to
respond to any security
threats with an "iron
fist."
Syria's state media,
SANA, put the initial
death toll at 25 and more
than 60 wounded. The
death toll included 10
confirmed dead and the
remains of an estimated
15 others whose bodies
had yet to be identified.


Texas teen deported to Colombia back in US


Associated Press


DALLAS A Texas
teenager who was deported
to Colombia after claiming
to be an illegal immigrant
was back in the United
States on Friday and at the
center of an international
mystery over how a minor
could be sent to a country
where she is not a citizen.
The 15-year-old's family
has questioned why U.S. of-
ficials didn't do more to ver-
ify her identity and said she
is not fluent in Spanish and
had no ties to Colombia.
While many facts of the case
involving Jakadrien Lorece
Turner remain unclear, U.S.
and Colombian officials have


pointed fingers over
who is responsible.
Immigration ex-
perts say that while
cases of mistaken
identity are rare,
people can slip ,
through the cracks,
especially if they Jaka
don't have legal help Tur
or family members
working on their behalf.
But they say U.S. immigra-
tion authorities had the re-
sponsibility of determining
if a person is a citizen.
Jakadrien was on a flight
from Atlanta and would be
in Dallas by evening, her
mother, Johnisa Turner,
told the Associated Press.
She had said earlier that


she planned to
meet her daughter
when she arrives in
the city.
"Our day has
been hectic, hers is,
too," Turner said.
"Just as long as she
driven makes it home, just
rner as long as she gets
here."
Turner said she has "a
gazillion questions" for
Jakadrien. Federal and
local officials may have
plenty, as well.
The saga began when the
teen ran away more than a
year ago. Jakadrien's family
said she left home in No-
vember 2010. Houston po-
lice said the girl was


arrested on April 2,2011, for
misdemeanor theft in that
city and claimed to be Tika
Lanay Cortez, a Colombian
woman born in 1990. It was
unclear if she has been liv-
ing under that name.
Houston police said in a
statement that her name
was run through a database
to determine if she was
wanted by Immigration and
Customs Enforcement, but
the results were negative.
She was then turned over to
the Harris County jail and
booked on the theft charge.
The county sheriff's office
said it ran her through the
available databases and did
the interviews necessary to
establish her identity.


2010. In 2009, the most bruising
r of the Great Recession, the na-
lost more than 5 million.
ut it will take 6 million more
to get the United States back to
.t it had in December 2007,
mn the recession began. Econo-
ts forecast the nation will add
ost 2 million this year




Kenyan


activist


launches


anti-bribe


website


Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya One
Kenyan had to pay a $24
bribe to a traffic cop for
speeding but then suc-
cessfully argued that $8 of it
should be returned so he
could have something left to
pay bribes farther down the
road.
Another resident said po-
licemen only released her
husband from a traffic stop
after she hopped out of the
car while breastfeeding her
child.
Requests for bribes are so
frequent that Kenyans like
to trade their favorite tips
for dealing with them, and
now one man fed up with
the country's pervasive cor-
ruption has launched a
website where people can
share their stories.
Already the site has col-
lected more than 300 stories
in less than three weeks, said
its founder, Anthony Ragui.
A spokesman for Kenya's
government-funded Ethics
and Anti-Corruption Com-
mission said officials would
welcome the information
being gathered online at
www.ipaidabribe.or.ke.
"The fight against corrup-
tion calls for concerted ef-
forts from everyone. This
kind of initiative is some-
thing that would be most
welcomed, but it is impor-
tant the information is care-
fully analyzed," said
Nicholas Simani. "It is a
noble initiative."
Almost every Kenyan has a
bribery story to tell. Some
are punchlines to jokes
about the country's corrup-
tion. Others, like officials tak-
ing bribes to grant licenses to
dangerous drivers, have
more serious consequences.
Ragui, the website's
founder, returned to his na-
tive Kenya in 2007 after
working for the American
bank Wells Fargo.
"I saw a system that
works, where you pay your
taxes and get services in re-
turn," said the 37-year-old,
his eyes shining behind his
glasses. "I came back and
everyone was complaining
about corruption here. But
no one was doing anything
about it. So I decided to take
the first step."
Ragui's website uses soft-
ware from an Indian site -
also called ipaidabribe -
that has collected informa-
tion on more than 15,000
bribes since it was put up in
2010.











SPORTS


Penn State set to
name Patriots offensive
coach Bill O'Brien new
Nittany Lions head
man./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Football/B2, B5
0 Recreation briefs/B2
' U Dr. Ron Joseph/B2
SBasketball, hockey/B3
0 Golf/B3
0 Scoreboard, sports briefs/B4
0 Entertainment/B6


Johnson, Allen overwhelming All-Pro picks

R dd were the leading vote get- speaking for my own self, of the record. Johnson -
gerS name ters, each just one vote shy you learn exactly what you made it for the first time
of being a unanimous pick. need to do to be able to bal- after hauling in 96 catches
OB aiI Ltf b -a k Ai


Jzrst ream sD
Associated Press
NEW YORK Calvin
Johnson took one look at
the voting and smiled
broadly.
"That's sweet," he said, as
he studied The Associated
Press 2011 NFL All-Pro
Team. "That's one of the
best honors you can have
other than being a Super
Bowl champion. To be an
All-Pro is a tremendous
honor."
Johnson and Vikings de-
fensive end Jared Allen


Rodgers made the team for
the first time, easily beating
Drew Brees of the New Or-
leans Saints,
47 1/2 to 2 1/2.
Rodgers led AII-Pr4
Green Bay to For the ei
a league-best the AP's
15-1 record and seco
this season, please se
after taking
the Packers to
the Super Bowl title last
February
"I am a competitor,"
Rodgers said. "I care des-
perately about winning and
doing everything I can to
contribute. But personally,


o0
nt
N
nc
e


ance t e pressurelt ro1 te
outside with the pressure
from within, that you put on
yourself to be successful.
Last year's
run is really
team going to help
tire list of all of us and
FL first our prepara-
d teams, tion through
: PAGE B4 the week."
Johnson
and Allen re-
ceived 49 votes Friday from
a nationwide panel of 50
media members who regu-
larly cover the NFL. It was
the fourth All-Pro Team for
Allen, who led the league
with 22 sacks, one-half short


ior a 17.o-yard average and
scoring 16 touchdowns.
"The All-Pro Team to me
is one of the all-time ac-
complishments," said Allen,
who also was selected in
2007 through 2009. "Pro
Bowls are nice, but guys get
voted in longer than they
should and guys who de-
serve to go don't always get
to. It's the whole league. It's
not just an AFC and NFC
thing. So to me this is the
honor I hold the highest It's
something to put on the re-
sume and tell the grandkids
about"
See ALL Page B4


Associated Press
Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson made the NFL All-
Pro team for the first time after hauling in 96 catches for a
17.5-yard average and scoring 16 touchdowns.


Backyard


brawl


Photos by DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River's Cassidy Newcomer and Lecanto's Kendal Stark each had a hair-raising moment after heading a ball during the first half at Earl
Bramlet Stadium in Crystal River. The Panthers took a 4-0 victory over the Pirates.


Lecanto overcomes yellow, red cards to take


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER The last time
the Lecanto and Crystal River girls
soccer teams met up in mid-Decem-
ber, the score was tied for much of
the game, before the Pirates
managed to score in the final .....
minute and claim victory in a
very tight contest.
Friday night's soccer match
between Crystal River (11-4-1)
and the number one District For mo
seeded Lecanto Lady Pan- photos
others (11-4-2) would end differ- on this
ently, as Lecanto shut out the www.ci
Pirates 4-0, leavingno allowed online.
goals or doubts.
"We weren't ourselves that game,"
said Lecanto head coach Roselle
Lattin of the first meeting. "The team
was upset about that game and we
knew we needed to make some
changes so we could have some suc-
cess tonight. Obviously we want to
make sure to end our regular season
the best way possible."
Both teams were fiercely competi-
tive in a game that would see several


rE
, '
s
hr
c


yellow cards and even a pair of reds.
"Normally it doesn't get that
chippy," Crystal River head coach
Bill Reyes said. "Unfortunately it did.
"It's good to see a spark of intensity
but you have to keep your arms to
yourself." Reyes continued.
First-half action for the
most part would be evenly
matched between both teams.
A strong emphasis on defense
would result in few shots on
goal and many changes of
e possession.
click Lecanto midfielder Kayla
tory at Perry would change all of
onicle that with her 18th minute
om. goal (a goal she netted sec-
onds after missing her first
try), putting the Panthers ahead in a
position they would maintain
throughout the game.
Crystal River midfielder Delaney
See Page B4
Shoulder and elbows were flying
when Crystal River High School's
Melissa Cang Cuesta and Lecanto's
Megan Conley tried to win control of
the ball Friday in the first half.


testy match from Crystal River, 4-0


'Canes

rebound


with win

Pryor, Labrador

combine for 50

over West Port
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS The Citrus
boys basketball team bounced
back from a disappointing loss
to Hernando to hand West
Port its first district loss with
a 74-64 victory Friday
It was a completely differ-
ent 'Canes squad from the
previous night, when Citrus
(6-5, 1-2) was unable to dig out
of an early deficit and fell by
15 at home to the Leopards.
West Port dropped to 7-9
overall and 2-1 in the district.
A relieved Citrus coach
Tom Densmore got the turn-
around effort he was hoping
for
"What a difference a night
makes," Densmore said. "I
told them it looked like we felt
entitled to something Thurs-
day night. I implored them be-
fore the game to leave it all
here so that whatever hap-
pens, let's leave this gym leav-
ing everything we had behind.
And we did."
Senior forward Ryan
Labrador took a commanding
role early, helping his team
get a 17-10 advantage in the
opening minute of the second
period with six points and a
couple of key assists. He led
the night with 29 points, and
discussed his team's im-
proved play and motivated ef-
fort after the game.
"Thursday night, we came
See Page B4



NC nips


Citrus

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
Nature Coast High forward
Silvana Paonessa blasted in a
goal to give the Sharks a 1-0
girls soccer victory over Cit-
rus on Friday night at the Cit-
rus Bowl.
Paonessa booted a beautiful
shot which Citrus goalkeeper
Victoria Ekeli couldn't touch
and found the left rear corner
of the net. The goal came with
37:44 remaining in the second
half. Briana Baugher assisted
on the goal.
The game doesn't count in
the district play but Nature
Coast (13-1-1) avenged a 4-0
early season loss to Citrus (10-
3-1). The loss came on Dec. 9
at Brooksville.
Citrus outshot Nature Coast
27-17 in the game, with Nature
Coast goalkeeper Samantha
Oliveira making 18 saves.
Ekeli had four saves, but sev-
eral were outstanding.
See Page B4










A life lesson from competing in sports


yesterday, a local charity
asked my wife to provide a
motivational story to their
executive group. She asked me if
I remembered the story about
Adrienne, a local track athlete in
Arizona.
Adrienne was a girl
with cerebral palsy
who wanted to run for
the local USA Track
team comprised of 7-to-
15-year-old pre-high 5
school and high school
track athletes. When /j'-4
she arrived at practice, ..
the coach was some-
what hesitant because
of her impairment, but Dr. Ron
told her to run with the
team. DOC1
Due to her physical ORD
handicap she barely
ran; however she did
slowly hobble around the track.
She was about 11 years old and ex-
tremely determined. After a few
days of practice, the other kids on
the track club began to make fun
and called her retarded.
The coach called a team meet-


.4
Ij
rc
)E


ing and addressed the other ath-
letes. She informed them that
cerebral palsy was not a mental
issue but an injury to that part of
the brain governing voluntary
motor or muscle control basi-
cally limb movement.
The injured brain in
cerebral palsy, usually
occurring around birth,
sends out a signal for a
group of muscles to re-
main constantly con-
tracted and become
S spastic. In cerebral
palsy, the child has dif-
ficulty controlling the
beginning and ending of
Joseph muscular movements.
For all of you adults
OR'S who have had a muscle
ERS cramp, it is very similar
but usually without the
pain and never stops.
The person is never able to com-
pletely voluntarily control the re-
lease of the cramped or spastic
muscle. This causes loss of ability
to control their extremities and
thus the deformity.
In adults, another comparison is


the result of a stroke with spastic
and contracted muscles eventu-
ally leading to contracted joints
and limbs fixed in unusable or
barely usable positions.
Getting back to the coach and
Adrienne: the coach also told the
group that they were a team and
she was a teammate. The coach
further noted they were to support
her efforts and accomplishments
just as the coach did theirs.
As Adrienne was mentally
sharp and determined, she
worked harder than most of the
other kids. She would try to run
more, but really did not improve
because she could not control her
running muscles. The coach
asked her mother if she should
compete in the Special Olympics.
The mother adamantly insisted to
have her partake in the real
world. Today's politically correct
term is immersion.
Finally, after many workouts,
the coach concluded that Adri-
enne's one good arm functioned
without impairment. The coach
taught her how to throw the shot
put and discus. Adrienne partici-


pated in her first track meet and
finished the competition just
missing the medals, but she was
now competitive in the throwing
events.
Adrienne applied herself to the
field events, but longed for the
track. Over time, the other run-
ners on the team started to admire
how hard Adrienne applied her-
self and worked. Her teammates
became good friends. They would
stand up for her at track meets
against comments and cheered for
her in her events. They even asked
her to run in a relay with them
knowing they would get last place
but knew Adrienne loved to run
on the track.
At one meet the coach and Adri-
enne watched other kids in the
race-walk event. Race-walk rules
involve precise heel-toe foot
placement and a locked straight
knee. Imagine this in a child who
could hardly control her leg.
Coach worked with Adrienne to
see if she could heel-toe and lock
her knee when she walked. After
many weeks of hard and frustrat-
ing work, Adrienne pursued the


race walk on the track at one of
the biggest meets of the year.
She finally got her medal. With
all her teammates by her side,
Adrienne eventually won the Re-
gional Junior Olympic meet in her
age group and went on to USA
TRACK junior nationals.
To never underestimate a child,
no matter what their ability or dis-
ability, either physically or men-
tally, is the most important part of
this story that those around Adri-
enne, the children, adults, other
teams, officials and her especially
her coach will never forget.
My wife was that coach, and I
am not sure what Adrienne is
doing today, but everyone that
watched her find her talent will
not forget her struggle and forti-
tude in the face of physical im-
pairment. They all regarded her
not as disabled, but as an athlete.
Regardless of where she placed
in a track meet, she won. Remem-
ber, attitude is everything!
Ron Joseph, M.D. a hand and
orthopedic specialist, can be
reached at 352-212-5359 or
emailed at rbjhand@cox.net


LSU's re-deaux


Photos by Associated Press
LSU coach Les Miles works with his players during practice for the BCS championship Thursday at the Louisiana Su-
perdome in New Orleans. LSU will face Alabama in the BCS Championship game on Monday. Alabama running back
Trent Richardson runs during practice for the BCS championship Thursday at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans.

No. 2 Alabama will attempt to knock offNo. 1 LSU once again


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS From
Florida State's Sugar Bowl
meltdown 16 years ago to
New England's stunning
Super Bowl loss, history sug-
gests that it's tough to beat an
opponent the second time
around.
Top-ranked LSU is looking
to write a new chapter in its
Big Easy do-over with
Alabama.
"The opportunity to play
them again is something
we're going to embrace,"
Tigers star Tyrann Mathieu
insisted Friday
Not that they have much of
a choice. The Tigers (13-0) al-
ready beat the Crimson Tide
once this season on Al-
abama's home field, no less.
But they'll have to do it all
over again to claim the na-
tional championship, even if
that seems a bit unfair
Bobby Bowden can cer-
tainly sympathize with LSU.
Back in 1996, Bowden was
coaching Florida State
when the Seminoles
knocked off Florida 24-21 in
the regular-season finale
and took over the No. 1 spot
in the rankings. Then,
through an unexpected turn
of events in the conference
championship games, the
teams wound up paired
again in the Sugar Bowl.
The rematch was all
Florida. The Gators romped
52-20 to take their first na-
tional crown.
"I didn't like it," Bowden
said. "The team that lost, I
would think they love it. The
team that won, it's just hard
to get your boys as inspired
as the other team can get
inspired."
New England ran up
against the same thing in the
NFL four seasons ago. The
Patriots finished off a perfect
16-0 regular season with a
thrilling 38-35 win over the
Giants in New York.
Lo and behold, the Giants


still made the playoffs and
stunningly won three straight
postseason games on the
road, earning another shot at
heavily favored New Eng-
land now 18-0 in the
Super Bowl.
Well, we all know what
happened in the Arizona
desert. Actually emboldened
by that earlier loss to the Pa-
triots "it did give us a
sense of confidence that we
could play with New Eng-
land," Giants guard Chris
Snee remembered Friday -
New York pulled off an epic
upset, knocking off Tom
Brady and the seemingly un-
beatable Patriots 17-14.
"Obviously there was some
stuff that year that we used in
the Super Bowl that we had
seen we could take advan-
tage of in the first game," said
another Giants player, defen-
sive lineman Dave Tollefson.
Now, the Tigers face the


same predicament as
Florida State and New
England.
They've already put to-
gether a winning game plan
against the second-ranked
Crimson Tide (11-1), pulling
out a 9-6 overtime victory in
Tuscaloosa on Nov 5. Now,
the onus is on the Tigers to
counter all the new wrinkles
they'll surely see in the re-
match, changes that will un-
doubtedly be embraced by a
Crimson Tide team still
stinging from its only defeat
"It may give us a little edge
in our minds of what's got to
happen, what we've got to
do," Alabama linebacker
Nico Johnson said.
On the other side, LSU
coach Les Miles and his staff
must deal with an inevitable
human trait: It's tougher to
get players to recognize their
mistakes and be willing to
go along with any necessary


tweaks when they're com-
ing off a win.
The losing coach has no
such issues.
Bowden remembers
Florida coach Steve Spurrier
changing up his offensive
plan after the Seminoles
pounded Heisman Trophy
winner Danny Wuerffel in
their initial meeting.
"They made a big adjust-
ment," Bowden said. "They
went to the shotgun."
Alabama's changes aren't
likely to be that dramatic, but
there's little doubt that losing
to LSU a couple of months
ago provided the Tide with a
needed wake-up call. Coach
Nick Saban's team went into
that game ranked No. 1,
boasting a bruising runner in
Trent Richardson and a de-
fense that was being called
one of the greatest in college
football history
The Tide certainly didn't
look at LSU as a pushover -
heck, the Tigers had already
beaten the teams that would
go on to win the Rose Bowl
(Oregon) and Orange Bowl
(West Virginia) but Ala-
bama didn't react well when
faced with an opponent that
was willing to go toe-to-toe in
perhaps the most bruising
game of the year
Throw in an abysmal per-
formance by the special
teams (the Tide missed four
field goal attempts) and a
trick play gone awry (an end-
around pass was picked off at
the goal line), and it was the
Tigers celebrating at the end.
"We learned a lot from that
game," Alabama nose guard
Josh Chapman said. "That
game kind of made our sea-
son. We didn't finish in that
game. We didn't capitalize.
Those guys capitalized on
our mistakes. They finished
stronger than we did. We
learned a lot from that. The
coaches showed us: When
we're doing things right, it's
hard to beat us."


Sign up now for
Fitness in Citrus
Are you determined to im-
prove your health in 2012?
Get a jump start by joining this
year's Fitness in Citrus: Com-
munity-wide Fitness Chal-
lenge. It begins Monday, Feb.
6, and runs through Sunday,
March 18.
Team up with at least one
other person to enter either
the "steps" challenge or the
"minutes of activity" challenge.
Compete with others of a simi-
lar fitness level by choosing
the appropriate category: "just
getting started," "getting there"
or "jocks."
In the steps challenge you
earn points for each 500 steps
you take (you need to wear a
pedometer, widely available
for about $10). In the minutes
of activity challenge you earn
points for each 10 minutes of
exercise (from a specified list
of activities.)
Registration closes Jan. 23.
Email fitnesschallenge@
tampabay.rr.com to get details
and registration forms (in pdf
file format).
'Race for the Kids'
on Feb. 11
Covenant Children's
Home's "Race for the Kids" will
begin at 8 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
11, at Spruce Creek Preserve,
State Road 200.
The event is a 5K run/1 mile
walk and Kids' Fun Run. Reg-
ister at cchfl.org or drc-
sports.com. All pre-registered
runners and walkers are guar-
anteed a T-shirt and gift bag.
Awards will be presented to
the top finishers in each age
group. All participants in the
Kids Fun Run will receive a
medallion.
For more information, call
352-861-4502.
Men's flag football
needs players
Men's Spring Flag Football
is scheduled to start in the last
week of February. This is a 7-
on-7 league for players who
are 18 and older. The league
is semi-competitive and plays
at Homosassa Area Recre-
ational Park.
Sign-ups will be Feb. 6 to
10 at the Citrus County Re-
source Center. Game times
are 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
The league plays two 20-
minute halves with a running
clock. The last two minutes of
each half are regular clock.
There is a $50 registration
fee required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for
help finding a team.
Get those roundball
rosters ready
Men's Spring Basketball is
scheduled to start in the last
week of February. This is de-
signed for players 18 and
older. The league is highly
competitive and plays at local
indoor school gymnasiums in
Citrus County.
Each team may roster up to
15 players. Game times are 6,
7 and 8 p.m. The league plays
two 20-minute halves with a
running clock. The last two
minutes of each half are
regular clock.
Signups will Feb. 6 through
10 at the Citrus County Re-
source Center. There is a $50
registration fee that is re-


quired to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player interested in playing,
call for help finding a team.
Men's softball league
to start soon
Men's Spring Softball is
scheduled to start Monday,
Feb. 20.
This is an 18 and older
league that plays on Monday
and Wednesday nights at Bi-
centennial Park.
Game times are 6:30, 7:30
and 8:30 p.m. Teams can ros-
ter up to 25 players. Registra-
tion will be Jan. 30 through
Feb. 3 at the Citrus County
Resource Center. There is a
$50 registration fee required to
sign up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are equally divided up.
For more information, call Jen-
nifer Worthington at 352-527-
7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for
help finding a team.
Coed kickball
begins Feb. 22
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation kicks off the
spring coed kickball league
Wednesday, Feb. 22. The
competitive league is de-
signed for players 18 and
older who have the "young at
heart" spirit of kickball.
The league shows up to
play in retro socks, shorts and
sporting team shirts, accom-
panied with protective eye-
wear, on Wednesday nights.
Game times are 6:30, 7:30
and 8:30 p.m. Each team
fields 11 players with a mini-
mum of three women. Teams
can roster up to 25 people.
Signups will be Jan. 30
through Feb. 3 at the Citrus
County Resource Center.
There is a $50 registration fee
required to sign a team up.
Team fees are based on the
number of entries per league
and are divided up equally
among teams.
For more information, call
Jennifer Worthington at 352-
527-7547. If you are a single
player wanting to play, call for
help finding a team.
Parks & Rec to
host coed softball
Coed Spring softball hosted
by Citrus County Parks &
Recreation will begin Feb. 22.
The league is designed for
levels of all play; however,
with the popularity of the sport
continuing to grow, if there
are enough teams there will
be divisions set up for the
spring season.
The league plays on Tues-
day and Thursday nights at
Bicentennial Park with games
at 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Each team is required to have
a minimum of four women
each game. Each team may
roster up to 25 participants.
Signups will be Jan. 30
through Feb. 3 at the Citrus
County Resource Center.
There is a $50 registration
fee required to sign a team
up. Team fees are based on
the number of entries per
league and are divided up
equally among teams. For
more information, call Jennifer
Worthington at 352-527-7547.
If you are a single player
wanting to play, call for help
finding a team.


Recreation BRI EFS


B2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Penn State tabs Pats assistant O'Brien


Coach helped

engineer NE's

prolific offense

Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
New England Patriots of-
fensive coordinator Bill
O'Brien has agreed to be-
come Penn State's first new
head football coach in
nearly a half-century
Two people in the NFL
with knowledge of the
search told The Associated
Press on Friday morning
that O'Brien has told them
he plans to replace fired
coach Joe Paterno. Another
person familiar with the
search told the AP terms
and details still needed to
be set, and that deal could
be finalized Friday night or
Saturday
The persons spoke on
condition of anonymity be-
cause they were not author-
ized to speak about the
search.


ESPN, citing unnamed
sources, first reported
Thursday night an official
announcement would be
made Saturday, and that
O'Brien would remain with
the Patriots as an assistant
through the postseason. Two
people have told the AP the
report was credible.
According to a website
that tracks flights, a plane
registered to Penn State re-
turned from the Boston area
to State College on Friday
evening.
Acting Athletic Director
David Joyner declined com-
ment on the reports about
O'Brien when he arrived
Friday at the team's spa-
cious, glass-enclosed head-
quarters on campus. He was
scheduled to meet with the
coaching staff and other of-
ficials at the program.
"I'm not going to confirm
anything as I've always done
out of respect for people,"
Joyner said told reporters.
"When there is something to
confirm, I'll let you know."
By dusk, several coaches
had trickled out one-by-one
from the football building to


Associated Press
New England Patriots offensive coordinator/quarterbacks
coach Bill O'Brien is set to become Penn State's first new
head football coach in nearly a half-century, according to


multiple reports.
head home. Each declined
comment, though when
asked, a couple assistants
said they planned to return
to work Saturday
A person familiar with the
discussion told the AP Fri-
day evening that the assis-
tant coaches were informed
that a new head coach had
been hired, and was not


from the current staff,
though the replacement was
not identified. That person
also spoke on condition of
anonymity because no one
was authorized to speak
about the discussion.
Division I's winningest
coach with 409 victories, Pa-
terno was fired Nov 9 by
university trustees follow-


ing 46 seasons in the after-
math of child sex abuse
charges against retired de-
fensive coordinator Jerry
Sandusky. O'Brien has no
apparent ties to Penn State
and a proud program tar-
nished by a scandal that
also led to the departure of
school President Graham
Spanier.
O'Brien and Paterno do
share at least one connec-
tion though both coaches
attended Brown University.
"I understand Bill
O'Brien has been named
head coach and I want to
congratulate him on his ap-
pointment," Paterno said in
a statement to the AP pro-
vided by his family "I don't
know Bill, but I respect his
coaching record, and I am
particularly pleased we
share a connection to my
alma mater, Brown."
"Despite recent commen-
tary to the contrary, Penn
State football has always
been about more than win-
ning," Paterno added, citing
what he said was the pro-
gram's commitment to edu-
cation and community


service. "I am hopeful this
tradition will continue."
The staff was assembled
by Paterno, and most of
coaches had worked for the
Hall of Famer for years -
and in a couple cases,
decades.
The person familiar with
the search told the AP most
of the current staff could be
let go.
O'Brien had an interview
Thursday. A Patriots
spokesman declined com-
ment Thursday night, and a
university spokesman de-
clined comment Friday
This was O'Brien's first
year coordinating the Patri-
ots' high-scoring offense, but
he has also coached star
quarterback Tom Brady
since 2009 and spent 2008
coaching receivers.
O'Brien recently was in
the spotlight when he and
Brady got into a heated ar-
gument, shown on national
television, after Brady
threw an interception in the
end zone in the fourth quar-
ter of the Patriots' 34-27 win
over the Washington Red-
skins on Dec. 11.


Running of the Bulls

Rose, Deng

lead Chicago

by Orlando


Associated Press

ORLANDO Derrick
Rose and Luol Deng each
scored 21 points and the
Chicago Bulls held off a
fourth-quarter surge by Or-
lando to beat the Magic 97-
83 on Friday night for their
sixth straight victory
Carlos Boozer added 20
points for Chicago, which
led by as many as 17 before
the lead was trimmed to
three. The Bulls closed the
game on a 17-6 run.
Dwight Howard led the
Magic with 28 points and 15
rebounds.
The Bulls (7-1) are off to
their best start since win-
ning 12 of 13 to open the
1996-97 season. The latest
victory began a brutal
stretch for Chicago that in-
cludes seven games in nine
nights.
Orlando lost at home for
the first time this season. It
was the Magic's first game
against a 2010-11 playoff
team since their opener at
Oklahoma City.
Knicks 99,
Wizards 96
WASHINGTON Carmelo
Anthony made a go-ahead 3-
pointer with 15.5 seconds to
play and scored 37 points, and
the New York Knicks rallied for
a 99-96 victory that kept the
Washington Wizards winless.
Amare Stoudemire added 23
points and 12 rebounds, and
Tyson Chandler had 12 points
and 15 boards in the Knicks'
seventh straight victory over
the Wizards.
New York, which had lost
four of five, trailed by 15 points
early in the second quarter be-
fore Anthony and Stoudemire
went to work. They scored 22
of the Knicks' 24 points in the
quarter.
Thunder 109,
Rockets 94
OKLAHOMA CITY-- Kevin
Durant scored 26 points, top
reserve James Harden added
23 and the Oklahoma City
Thunder eased into their only
stretch of three games on con-
secutive nights by beating the
Houston Rockets 109-94.
The Rockets fell to 0-5 on
the road this season but get a
rematch Saturday night on
their home floor, where they've
won their only two games this
season.
The Thunder bounced back
after following their 5-0 start
with two straight losses and
were able to rest all of their
starters during the fourth quar-
ter at the front end of a busy
stretch on the schedule.
Pacers 87,
Celtics 74
BOSTON Danny Granger
had 15 points and Roy Hibbert
scored 11 with 12 rebounds
Friday night to lead the Indiana
Pacers to an 87-74 victory over
the Boston Celtics.
It was Indiana's first win in
Boston since 2007.


Associated Press
Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose shoots a layup past Orlando Magic's Chris Duhon (25),
Jason Richardson, rear, and Dwight Howard during the first half Friday in Orlando.


Ray Allen returned after miss-
ing one game with an illness and
scored 23 points for the Celtics,
who for the first time this season
lost a game with their starting
lineup intact. Paul Pierce, who
missed the first three games -
all losses scored 10 points on
3-for-17 shooting as Boston shot
just 39 percent.
Hawks 102,
Bobcats 96, OT
CHARLOTTE, N.C. The
Atlanta Hawks went to over-
time for a second straight night,
pulling out a 102-96 victory
over the Charlotte Bobcats on
Friday behind 23 points and 13
rebounds from Josh Smith.
The Hawks lost in triple-
overtime to the Miami Heat the
night before, but made sure
there wouldn't be multiple extra
periods needed by scoring the
first eight points, with early 3-
pointers by Jeff Teague and
Joe Johnson.
Marvin Williams added 15
points and nine rebounds, and
Al Horford scored 15 points for
the Hawks (5-3).
76ers 96,
Pistons 73
PHILADELPHIA- Spencer
Hawes had 16 points and 14
rebounds, Jodie Meeks scored
21 points, and the Philadelphia
76ers beat the Detroit Pistons
96-73.
In front of Hall of Famer Julius
Erving and their new owners,
the Sixers dominated the fourth
quarter to win their home
opener. Majority owner Joshua
Harris and CEO Adam Aron


promised sweeping changes to
the fan experience, slashing
ticket prices, revamping the
lighting, and even mingling with
fans for more feedback.
The biggest change, though,
is at center, where Hawes has
suddenly morphed from acces-
sory piece to regular double-
double threat. He had a crowd
of nearly 20,000 fans chanting
his name in the third quarter
after a string of big shots and
dominated a short-handed Pis-
tons team on the boards.
Nets 97,
Raptors 85
TORONTO Deron
Williams had 24 points and
nine assists, Anthony Morrow
also scored 24 and the New
Jersey Nets snapped a six-
game losing streak by beating
the Toronto Raptors 97-85.
DeShawn Stevenson added
15 points for the Nets, who
made a season-high 15 3-
pointers to win for the first time
since their opener Dec. 26 at
Washington.
New Jersey guard Jordan
Farmar came off the bench to
score 10 points and ex-Raptor
Kris Humphries matched a
season high with 16 rebounds.
Fifteen of New Jersey's 31
field goals were from beyond
the arc. The Nets made four 3s
in the first quarter, five in the
second, two in the third and
pulled away with four more in
the fourth, leading by as many
as 21 points.
Nuggets 96,
Hornets 88
NEW ORLEANS Danilo


Gallinari scored 23 points and
the Denver Nuggets went on a
19-0 run spanning the end of
the third quarter and the start
of the fourth, beating the New
Orleans Hornets 96-88.
The Nuggets scored the last
eight points of the third quarter
and took the lead for the first
time, 64-63 on Andre Miller's
shot in the lane to start the
fourth. They scored on their
first five possessions of the
fourth while the Hornets did not
get off a shot, committing four
consecutive turnovers.
Al Harrington had 14 points
off the bench for the balanced
Nuggets, who won their fourth
in a row. Andre Miller and Arron
Afflalo added 13 points, with Ty
Lawson contributing 12 points
and eight assists.
Cavaliers 98,
Timberwolves 87
MINNEAPOLIS -Antawn
Jamison had 22 points and six
rebounds to help the Cleveland
Cavaliers to a 98-87 victory
over the Minnesota Timber-
wolves on Friday night.
Kyrie Irving had 14 points,
five assists and five rebounds
and former Timberwolves
guard Ramon Sessions had 11
points, seven rebounds and six
assists for the Cavaliers, who
held Minnesota to three fast-
break points.
Kevin Love had 29 points
and 14 rebounds for the Tim-
berwolves, who have taken
two major steps backward
since beating Dallas and San
Antonio on successive nights
to start the week.


Surging Rangers


dump Pittsburgh


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Bran-
don Dubinsky had a goal and
an assist, Henrik Lundqvist
made 37 saves and the surg-
ing New York Rangers beat
slumping Pittsburgh 3-1 on
Friday night
Brad Richards scored his
15th goal of the season for
New York and Derek Stepan
took advantage a gaffe by
Penguins goalie Marc-Andre
Fleury to notch his ninth
goal as the Rangers won
their fourth straight.
New York improved its
position atop the Eastern
Conference by riding
Lundqvist, who has won six
straight starts. He held the
Penguins in check with a se-
ries of flashy glove saves
and dug in when Pittsburgh
turned the pressure up late.
Ben Lovejoy scored his
first goal of the season for
Pittsburgh and Fleury
stopped 18 shots but badly
misplayed a clearing at-
tempt in the third period,
leading to Stepan's goal.
The victory capped an
eventful week for New York,
which has surged to the top
of the Eastern Conference
standings over the past
month despite the presence
of camera crews that docu-
mented the build-up to the
annual Winter Classic in
Philadelphia on Monday
Devils 5, Panthers 2
NEWARK, N.J. Ilya Ko-
valchuk had two third-period
goals to lead New Jersey over
Florida.


Kovalchuk broke a 2-2 tie at
11:40, when he made a nice
rush up the ice and took a return
pass from Patrik Elias, who was
playing in the 1,000th game.
Kovalchuk added an empty-
net goal in the closing minute,
his 14th goal of the season.
The Devils got a first-period
goal from rookie Adam Hen-
rique and a second-period goal
from Elias.
It was Henrique's 11th goal
of the season and the 14th for
Elias. Zach Parise added an
empty-net goal.
The Panthers got a first-pe-
riod goal from Mikael Samuels-
son and a second-period goal
from Krystofer Barch.
Jacob Markstrom made 25
saves for Florida.
Johan Hedberg had 22
saves for the Devils.
Hurricanes 4, Sabres 2
RALEIGH, N.C. Eric Staal
had a goal and two assists to
lead Carolina past Buffalo.
Chad LaRose scored the go-
ahead goal with 11:50 left, Justin
Faulk also scored and Brandon
Sutter added an empty-net goal
for the Hurricanes.
They never trailed in winning
for the fourth time in seven
games. They have earned
points in three of four in their at-
tempt to escape the Eastern
Conference cellar.
Jason Pominville was cred-
ited with a bizarre goal and
added an assist, and Thomas
Vanek also scored for Buffalo.
The Sabres have lost nine of
12.


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Penguins' Evgeni Malkin battles with New York
Rangers' Marc Staal during the first period Friday in Pitts-
burgh. The Rangers came out of the game with a 3-1 win.



Byrd atop leaderboard

again at Kapalua


Associated Press

KAPALUA, Hawaii A
new PGA Tour season began
with a familiar name atop
the leaderboard at Kapalua.
Defending champion
Jonathan Byrd ran off six
straight birdies early in his
round Friday and opened
with a 6-under 67. That gave
him a one-shot lead in the
Tournament of Champions
on a breezy, splendid
afternoon.
Byrd hasn't won since his
playoff victory a year ago in
the season opener. He's try-
ing to become the third
player in the last eight years
to win in consecutive years


at Kapalua.
Steve Stricker, Webb
Simpson, Martin Laird and
Michael Bradley opened
at 68.
The winners-only field
has only 27 players, the
fewest since it moved to Ka-
palua in 1999. Lucas Glover
had to withdraw because of
a sprained knee from a pad-
dle board accident.
Oosthuizen leads with
62 at African Open
EAST LONDON, South
Africa Defending champion
Louis Oosthuizen shot an 11-
under 62 Friday to take a two-
stroke lead after the second
round of the Africa Open.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 B3






B4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 4 2 .667 -
Boston 4 4 .500 1
Toronto 3 4 .429 1 Y2
NewYork 3 4 .429 1Y2
New Jersey 2 6 .250 3
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 7 1 .875 -
Orlando 5 3 .625 2
Atlanta 5 3 .625 2
Charlotte 2 5 .286 4Y2
Washington 0 7 .000 6V2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 7 1 .875 -
Indiana 5 2 .714 1Y2
Cleveland 4 3 .571 2Y2
Milwaukee 2 4 .333 4
Detroit 2 5 .286 4/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 5 2 .714 -
Memphis 3 3 .500 11Y2
Dallas 3 5 .375 212
Houston 2 5 .286 3
New Orleans 2 5 .286 3
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 5 1 .833 -
Denver 6 2 .750 -
Oklahoma City 6 2 .750 -
Utah 3 3 .500 2
Minnesota 2 5 .286 312
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 3 2 .600 -
L.A. Lakers 4 4 .500 V2
Sacramento 3 5 .375 11Y2
Phoenix 2 4 .333 11Y2
Golden State 2 4 .333 11Y2
Thursday's Games
Miami 116, Atlanta 109,30T
San Antonio 93, Dallas 71
Sacramento 103, Milwaukee 100
Portland 107, L.A. Lakers 96
Friday's Games
Atlanta 102, Charlotte 96, OT
New Jersey 97, Toronto 85
New York 99, Washington 96
Philadelphia 96, Detroit 73
Indiana 87, Boston 74
Oklahoma City 109, Houston 94
Denver 96, New Orleans 88
Cleveland 98, Minnesota 87
Chicago 97, Orlando 83
Memphis at Utah, late
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, late
Portland at Phoenix, late
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Miami at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Washington, 1 p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Portland, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y Rangers 39 26 9 4 56116 82
Philadelphia 38 2311 4 50130 113
Pittsburgh 39 21 14 4 46122 103
NewJersey 40 2216 2 46111 116
N.Y Islanders 37 1417 6 34 88 116
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 37 2610 1 53138 69
Ottawa 41 21 15 5 47127 136
Toronto 40 2015 5 45129 128
Buffalo 40 1818 4 40106 119
Montreal 40 1518 7 37106 113
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 41 2013 8 48107 115
Washington 38 21 15 2 44114 110
Winnipeg 40 1916 5 43107 118
Tampa Bay 39 1719 3 37108 133
Carolina 42 1421 7 35110 141
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 41 2413 4 52132 120
Detroit 39 2513 1 51128 88
St. Louis 40 2312 5 51103 89
Nashville 40 21 15 4 46106 112
Columbus 39 1024 5 25 94 130
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 41 2513 3 53134 99
Minnesota 41 21 14 6 48 95 98
Colorado 42 2318 1 47114 116
Calgary 42 1819 5 41100 123
Edmonton 40 1621 3 35110 115
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
San Jose 37 2211 4 48107 87
Los Angeles 41 2014 7 47 88 92
Dallas 39 2216 1 45108 113
Phoenix 41 1917 5 43103 108
Anaheim 38 1022 6 26 88 127
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Boston 9, Calgary 0
Toronto 4, Winnipeg 0
N.Y Rangers 3, Florida 2, OT
Philadelphia 5, Chicago 4
Ottawa 4, Tampa Bay 1
St. Louis 4, Edmonton 3
Dallas 4, Nashville 1
Los Angeles 1, Phoenix 0, OT
San Jose 2, Columbus 1
Friday's Games
New Jersey 5, Florida 2
N.Y Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 1
Carolina 4, Buffalo 2
Colorado 4, Chicago 0
N.Y Islanders at Anaheim, late
Saturday's Games
Vancouver at Boston, 1 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 1p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 2p.m.
Columbus at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Buffalo, 7 p.m.


Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Nashville, 8 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary 10 p.m.
Washington at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 8 p.m.



2011 All-Pro Team
NEW YORK The Associated Press 2011
NFL All-Pro team selected by a national panel
of 50 media members:
OFFENSE
Quarterback-Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay.
Running Backs-Maurice Jones-Drew, Jack-
sonville; LeSean McCoy, Philadelphia.
Fullback-Vonta Leach, Baltimore.


SCOREBOARD


For the record


0 Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Friday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
8-1-6
CASH 3 (late)
8-4-9
PLAY 4 (early)
3-9-6-9
PLAY 4 (late)
4-4-1-9
FANTASY 5
3 10 22 29 36
MEGA MONEY
21 26 32 36
MEGA BALL


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (10 CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing Challenge Cup
(Taped)
NBA
5 a.m. (ESPN2) Portland Trail Blazers at Phoenix Suns
(Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at New Jersey Nets
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Florida at Tennessee
12 p.m. (11 ABC) Georgetown at West Virginia
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington at Utah
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida State at Clemson
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington State at Colorado
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Alabama at Georgia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (10 CBS) Michigan State at Penn State
4 p.m. (10 CBS) Connecticut at Notre Dame
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Miller Grove (Ga.) vs. Simeon (111.)
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (8 NBC) U.S. Army All-American Bowl
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) BBVA Compass Bowl Pittsburgh vs.
Southern Methodist
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Division I, Final North Dakota
State vs. Sam Houston State
9 p.m. (FSNFL) AT&T Cotton Bowl -Arkansas vs. Kansas
State (Taped)
NFL PLAYOFFS
4:30 p.m. (8 NBC) AFC Wild-Card Game Cincinnati
Bengals at Houston Texans
8 p.m. (8 NBC) NFC Wild-Card Game Detroit Lions at
New Orleans Saints
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Africa Open
(Same-day Tape)
5:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Hyundai Tournament of
Champions
SNOWBOARDING
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Snowboardercross Cup PGS
(Taped)
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) U.S. Snowboardercross SBX (Taped)
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paul Mitchell Progression Session -
Team SBX (Taped)

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
Boys Basketball
3 p.m. Crystal River vs. Ocala Christian Academy at OCA
Tournament
6 p.m. Lecanto at Lake Mineola
TBA Citrus at Sunlake Tournament
Wrestling
TBA Citrus at Deland Duals


Tight End-Rob Gronkowski, New England.
Wide Receivers-Calvin Johnson, Detroit;
Wes Welker, New England.
Tackles-Jason Peters, Philadelphia; Joe
Thomas, Cleveland.
Guards-Carl Nicks, New Orleans; Jahri
Evans, New Orleans.
Center-Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh.
Placekicker-David Akers, San Francisco.
Kick Returner-Patrick Peterson, Arizona.
DEFENSE
Ends-Jared Allen, Minnesota; Jason Pierre-
Paul, New York Giants.
Tackles-Haloti Ngata, Baltimore; Justin
Smith, San Francisco.
Outside Linebackers-Terrell Suggs, Balti-
more; DeMarcusWare, Dallas.
Inside Linebacker-Patrick Willis, San Fran-
cisco; NaVorro Bowman, San Francisco, and
Derrick Johnson, Kansas City.
Cornerbacks-Charles Woodson, Green
Bay; Darrelle Revis, New York Jets.
Safeties-Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh; Eric
Weddle, San Diego.
Punter-Andy Lee, San Francisco.
SECOND TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback-Drew Brees, New Orleans.
Running Backs-Ray Rice, Baltimore; Arian
Foster, Houston.
Fullback-John Kuhn, Green Bay.
Tight End-Jimmy Graham, New Orleans.
Wide Receivers-Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona;
Victor Cruz, New York Giants.
Tackles-Duane Brown, Houston; Joe Staley,
San Francisco.
Guards-Marshal Yanda, Baltimore; Logan
Mankins, New England.
Center-Ryan Kalil, Carolina, and Nick Man-
gold, NewYork Jets.
Placekicker-Sebastian Janikowski, Oak-
land.
Kick Returner-Devin Hester, Chicago.
DEFENSE
Ends-Justin Smith, San Francisco; Jason
Babin, Philadelphia.
Tackles-Geno Atkins, CincinnatilVinceWilfork,
New England, and Richard Seymour, Oakland.
Outside Linebackers-Tamba Hali, Kansas
City; Von Miller, Denver.
Inside Linebackers-Brian Cushing, Hous-
ton; London Fletcher, Washington.
Cornerbacks-Johnathan Joseph, Houston;
Carlos Rogers, San Francisco.
Safeties-Ed Reed, Baltimore; Earl Thomas,
Seattle.
Punter-Shane Lechler, Oakland.
Bowl Glance
Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
BYU 24, Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi State 23, Wake Forest 17


Insight Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14
Saturday, Dec. 31
Meineke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27, OT
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Cincinnati 31, Vanderbilt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
Illinois 20, UCLA 14
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Auburn 43, Virginia 24
Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Michigan State 33, Georgia 30, 30T
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon 45, Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT
Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan 23, Virginia Tech 20, OT
Wednesday, Jan. 4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
West Virginia 70, Clemson 33
Friday, Jan. 6
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 8
p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon (ESPN)
Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern Illinois
(10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 21
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m., (NFLN)


Warriors rout Royals
61-15 on road
The Seven Rivers girls bas-
ketball team traveled to Lees-
burg and routed the First
Academy Eagles 61-15 Friday
night.
The Warriors' top scorer was
Andrea Zachar, who snagged a
double-double with 29 points
and 13 rebounds. Alexis Zachar
scored 11 points and Tiana
Miele score 10. Kayleigh Kier-
nan scored just two points, but
had 12 assists.
The win brings the Lady War-
riors record to 8-4 overall and
4-0 in district play. They next
play Cornerstone at 6:30 p.m.
Monday in Gainesville.
SR boys fall 57-44
to First Academy
The Seven Rivers Christian
boys basketball team dropped


SOCCER
Continued from Page B1

Citrus had 18 shots on
goal in the second half and
some of them were near
misses.
"We had a lot of girls sick
this week," said Nature
Coast coach Lisa Masserio.
"I think we maintained the
intensity level and won a lot



HOOPS
Continued from Page BI

out really flat and we
weren't really focused,"
Labrador said. "We knew
West Port was the No. 1
team in the district, but we
think we can hang with any
team in the district if we
come out and play like we
can with a lot of intensity
and defense.
"They played really tight
defense, but as a team we
really moved around and
set screens and picks and
pick-and-rolls and every-
thing," Labrador added. "It


ALL-PRO
Continued from Page B1

One rookie made the
squad: Arizona's Patrick Pe-
terson was selected as the
kick returned. Peterson tied
an NFL mark when he ran
back four punts for touch-
downs, including a 99-
yarder in overtime to beat
the Rams.
Another cornerback, Dar-
relle Revis of the Jets, was
behind Johnson and Allen
with 48 selections. Ravens
outside linebacker Terrell
Suggs got 47.
One oddity: Both first-
team guards, Carl Nicks and
Jahri Evans, were from the
Saints. That hasn't hap-
pened since 1953, with De-
troit's Lou Creekmur and
Dick Stanfel.
In the All-Pro backfield
joining Rodgers, whose
quarterback rating of 122.5
broke Peyton Manning's sin-
gle-season mark, were Mau-
rice Jones-Drew of
Jacksonville, LeSean McCoy
of Philadelphia, and full-
back Vonta Leach of Balti-
more.



LECANTO
Continued from Page B1l

Owens would have a great
opportunity on net but not
be able to convert. Owens
showed great spirit in the
game, battling against
Lecanto defender Lauren
Cole at every turn.
Cole, always solid defend-
ing her end of the field,
would be a thorn in every
Pirate side, keeping the
Panthers in possession of
the ball.
Pirate forward Aubrie
Menster was also very effec-
tive in getting the ball in
close to net, providing a few
Crystal River opportunities
but Lecanto goalkeeper


Darah Nason (11 saves) per-
formed admirably, allowing
nothing past her.
A big moment occurred in
the final minutes of the first
half when Lecanto defender
Nicolette Wunderly got into
a tussle with Crystal River
forward Brooke Levins, re-
sulting in both players re-
ceiving red cards and being
ejected from the game.
Crystal River midfielder
Haley Dewhurst would take
the penalty kick in Levins'
stead, but Nason leapt for
the sprawling save to wrap
up the first half of play


Sports BRIEFS
a 13-point decision at First
Academy.
The Warriors received 16
points from Adam Gage and 14
points by Sam Jones.
Seven Rivers (11-4 overall,
4-1 district) are at Cornerstone
Academy on Tuesday.
Pirates prevail at
OCA tournament
The Crystal River boys bas-
ketball team got 26 points and
8 rebounds from sophomore
point guard Ty Reynolds en
route to a 48-41 victory over
Landmark Christian on Friday.
The Pirates are now 5-7
overall and plays host OCA at 3
p.m. Saturday.
Hurricanes run to 16-0
overall after victory
The Citrus girls basketball
team held off a hungry West Port
team to grab a 45-42 triumph.

of 50-50 balls."
Citrus coach Steve Ekeli
felt the loss could be a
blessing in disguise.
"We played exactly the
opposite of the way we had
prepared," Steve Ekeli
said. "We played way too
vertical.
"I think it's a great loss.
Nobody hates to lose more
than me but it's only a loss
if you don't learn anything
from it," Steve Ekeli said.

was really a team effort. We
played unselfish basketball
tonight."
Densmore was very im-
pressed with the senior's
showing against a formida-
ble defense.
"They made Labrador
work for everything," Dens-
more said. "He showed
what kind of player he is
tonight."
Citrus was down by two at
the half, but went on a 20-10
surge in the third to cap-
ture a lead that it would
never relinquish.
Sophomore point guard
Devin Pryor drained three
3-pointers and scored 21
points in the game, match-

It's the first All-Pro selec-
tions for Jones-Drew, the
league's rushing leader with
1,606 yards, and McCoy.
Leach made it last year with
Houston.
McCoy scored 20 touch-
downs, 17 rushing, and was
the brightest spot in a down
year for the hyped Eagles.
Yet...
"There are so many things
I can do better," he said. "I
look at the numbers and see
so many plays I left on the
field, so many yards. I can
perfect my game a lot
more."
Record-setter Rob
Gronkowski was the tight
end. The Patriot set the sin-
gle-season mark at his posi-
tion with 1,327 yards
receiving. Teammate Wes
Welker (league-high 122
catches) was the other re-
ceiver
Pittsburgh's Maurkice
Pouncey was the center,
with Philadelphia's Jason
Peters and Cleveland's Joe
Thomas at tackle.
Joining Allen on the de-
fensive line were ends
Jason Pierre-Paul of the Gi-
ants, and tackles Haloti
Ngata of the Ravens and

Lecanto would come back
even stronger after the
break, taking firm control
on the game, and producing
numerous shots on goal.
Pirate goalkeeper Min-
nah Barahas (16 saves)
would be assaulted on all
fronts as the Panthers ma-
neuvered the ball towards
the net more successfully
and maintained play deep
in Crystal River's side of the
field.
Lecanto forward Taylor
Christian would show a lot
of hustle throughout, even-
tually scoring the first goal
of the second half, six min-
utes in, putting her team up
by two.
"The referees did a good
job controlling the game.
And you play to the refer-


ees." Lattin said. "So we got
ourselves situated and we
played our game. That's
why we were so successful
at the end.
"We made some changes
at halftime." Lattin contin-
ued. "We strategize a little
bit more. We told them a
couple strategies that we
needed to use on defense,
what would bring us most
success. The girls did a re-
ally good job listening to the
coaches and communicat-
ing with each other. And it
worked the second half."
Panther midfielder Bre-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Lindsay Connors scored 21
points to lead the Hurricanes,
now 16-0 overall and 6-0 in dis-
trict. Citrus' Mary Wheeler
added 11 points.
The Hurricanes play 6 p.m.
Monday at The Villages.
CR boys soccer
ekes out 1-0 victory
The Crystal River High
School boys soccer team trav-
eled to West Port and came
home with a 1-0 win Friday
night.
Travis Swanson scored the
only goal for the Pirates, as-
sisted by Zach Brown. Keeper
Jerry Crawford had 20 saves.
The victory takes the Pirates'
overall record to 6-8-2. The
boys are 2-3-2 in district play.
The Pirates will next play at
Hernando on Monday night at
7:30 p.m.
From staff reports

"Nature Coast is well-
coached and the game was
well-played.
"My girls may be men-
tally fatigued. They are
physically in good shape."
Citrus beat county rival
Lecanto 3-0 Wednesday.
The Canes face Crystal
River at 7:30 p.m. Monday
in Crystal River.
The Canes will host the
district tournament during
the week of Jan. 19.

ing the production of West
Port's leading scorer, guard
Alec Jewell. Pryor and
Labrador each had four
steals, and senior forward
Jeloni Sammy added seven
blocks and eight rebounds
for the 'Canes.
Junior guard Kyle Pres-
nick made a pair of 3s to
total 11 points.
Citrus missed just 11
shots from the field in the
final three quarters, and
Presnick and Sammy
helped the 'Canes domi-
nate the boards during
their team's run in the
third.
The 'Canes next play
Tuesday at Wildwood.

Justin Smith of the 49ers -
who also placed third at DE;
the 49ers used him at both
spots.
"Actually, I knew that I
was going to have a great
year this year," said Pierre-
Paul, in his second season
with the Giants. "I came in
and last year I had an all
right season and I wanted to
do better than what I did
last year. Next season in
2012, I should be better than
this year."
The linebackers were
Suggs and DeMarcus Ware
of Dallas on the outside,
Patrick Willis and NaVorro
Bowman of the 49ers and
Derrick Johnson of the
Chiefs on the inside. Bow-
man and Johnson tied with
16 votes, half of Willis' total.
Revis and Charles Wood-
son of the Packers were the
cornerbacks, with Troy Po-
lamalu of the Steelers and
Eric Weddle of the Chargers
at safety
Both kickers were 49ers:
placekicker David Akers
and punter Andy Lee.
Repeaters from 2010 were
Polamalu, Revis, Willis,
Ngata, Evans, Thomas and
Leach.

anna Martin would have a
standout second half, get-
ting her foot on many op-
portunities to score before
finally adding her own tally
to the board in the 67th
minute.
The Pirates seemed to be
struggling to make their
own opportunities on goal,
but defensively the hustle
in the team was still alive.
Crystal River defender
Casidy Newcomer was put-
ting her all into keeping
control of her end of the
field, while Pirate mid-
fielder Melissa Cang Cuesta
sprinted in every direction
and threw herself into
every play
Lecanto midfielder Brit-


tany Putney would come
into the trailing minutes of
the game with a shot in goal
that the officials ruled
against but she would turn
right back around to score
the final goal of the game in
extra minutes, sealing the
victory and the shutout.
That score was not in-
dicative of the disparity be-
tween the teams," Reyes
said. "They just outplayed
us today That's the bottom-
line.
My hat's off to them,"
Reyes added. "And my hat's
off to Coach Lattin. And I
hope they do well in their
district playoffs."






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Playoff wait ends for Texans' Johnson


Houston hosts

Cincinnati in

Wild-Card round

Associated Press

HOUSTON Year after ago-
nizing year, Andre Johnson was
asked about his goals for the
season and his answer never
changed.
"I want to get this team to the
playoffs," he would say
Now, after years of often ter-
rible seasons, Johnson and the
Texans have reached that goal.
They will face Cincinnati on
Saturday in the franchise's first
playoff game.
This is Houston's 10th sea-


son, and Johnson has been playoffs. Johnson wasn't among
there for all but Year 1. That them, though he never thought
makes him the longest-tenured it would take this long.
player on the roster, and the "I always thought positive
only one who's been in Hous- about it," he said. "It's been


ton longer than
coach Gary Kubiak.
The receiver is
the face of the fran-
chise. When the
Texans were at
their worst, he was
one of the only rec-
ognizable names on
the team.
Johnson was long
considered one of


Cincinnati
Bengals (9-7)
at Houston
Texans (10-6)

* TIME: 4:30 p.m.
Saturday
* TV: NBC


the NFEs top receivers, and
many questioned why he chose
to remain with the Texans when
they were never even close to
reaching the postseason.
Some also wondered if this
team would ever make the


some frustrating
times and I've had
people ask me why
didn't I leave? Why
did I stay? I just
wanted to be a part
of something spe-
cial. I wanted to be
here when the Tex-
ans got in the first
playoff game."


Johnson had chances to
leave, but signed two contract
extensions. The second one
will keep him with the team
through 2016. Everyone in the
organization is happy the 30-
year-old receiver is finally get-
ting his playoff shot.


"Think about how long he's
stuck it out here in Houston,"
said Kubiak, who was hired in
2006. "A lot of guys in this day
and time move along, go some-
where else, lose their patience.
Andre has never done that.
He's been a rock around here."
Johnson has had a tough sea-
son, dealing with injuries to
both hamstrings. The seven
games he's played this season
are a career low. He finished
with more than 1,200 yards re-
ceiving the each of the past
three seasons, including a ca-
reer-high 1,575 in 2008, but had
a career-worst 492 this season.

Houston Texans wide receiver
Andre Johnson is in his 10th
season and is finally getting to
experience the NFL playoffs.
Associated Press


Burning up the turf


Saints welcome

Lions in NFC

wild-card game

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Sean Payton
cautioned against assuming that a
game featuring prolific quarter-
backs Drew Brees and Matt
Stafford would escalate into
a shootout.
If Payton really believes that, it is
only because coaches must con-
sider wide-ranging possibilities
and show respect to players on both
sides of the ball.
Odds makers have different pri-
orities, and they've set the over-
under at 59 for Saturday night's
first-round playoff game between
the Detroit Lions (10-6) and New
Orleans Saints (13-3). That is the
highest ever for an NFL playoff
game likely because no game has
ever involved two quarterbacks
coming off seasons quite so good.
Brees set single-season NFL
records for yards passing (5,476) New Orlean
and completion percentage (71.2) four quarter
this season, while Stafford joined coming off
Brees among two of only four quar-
terbacks ever to pass for more than Arizona in
5,000 yards in a season. Moreover, round, and
Brees and Stafford will be in ideal by 2 when t
passing conditions inside the 14 victory
Superdome. The reco:
Brees said he could understand playoff gar
why an offensive feast could be ex- zona victory
pected when the Lions return to Bay, also ir
the Crescent City for the second season, the
time this season, but he also agreed that same
with his coach that assuming how a took its
game will play out can be risky. beating.
"Obviously I know how explosive Statistica
Detroit is offensively," Brees said. plenty of re
"I also know that I think we feel like ticipate th(
we're playing (good) football as a Lions rack:
team and as an offense. But you of yards, if
know, it seems like, typically, when When thesE
you get weeks like this where shared the
everybody's hyping up one side of game on De
the ball ... and kind of predicting it 31 of 41 pas
to be a shootout or whatever, the Brees conn
defenses are off kind of quietly in yards. New
the corner making sure they come Detroit mig
out with their best performance." not for a ra
The previous high over-under ing several
was 57 when Brees' Saints hosted ence calls


Associated Press
is Saints quarterback Drew Brees, above, and Detroit Lions quarterback Matt Stafford, two of only
rbacks to finish a season with 5,000 yards passing, will be indoors in perfect conditions and
their best seasons when they face off in a playoff game Saturday.


the 2009-10 divisional
it was the over that hit
he Saints rolled to a 45-

rd for points scored in a
ne is 96 a 51-45 Ari-
y over Green
n the 2009-10 Detroit
week before (i1 )
Arizona team (10-)
Big Easy Ode
Saints
ally, there are TIME:
seasons to an- Saturda
e Saints and
ing up loads 0 TV: NB
f not points.
e two quarterbacks last
field in a Sunday night
ec. 4, Stafford completed
sses for 408 yards, while
ected on 26 of 36 for 342
v Orleans won 31-17, but
ght have scored more if
ash of penalties, includ-
offensive pass interfer-
and a personal foul.


Stafford threw an interception and
was sacked three times and the
Lions also had one field goal
blocked.
"We can't shoot ourselves in the
foot. We can't hurt ourselves in
penalties," Stafford
t Lions said this week "We had
at New over 100 yards of of-
fense called back.
rans Those yards would
(13-3) have led to points.... We
8 p.M. did some things that
ay were really unfortu-
nate. You do that
C against another team
that is playing good
football, it's going to be tough to
win."
After that game, Brees continued
on his record-smashing pace, while
Stafford finished with 5,038 yards,
behind only Brees and Brady
(5,235).
The defenses of both clubs fin-
ished near the bottom of the league
in yards allowed Detroit 23rd


NFL Stats CENTRAL


and the Saints 27th.
However, players on both squads
contend that the yards allowed sta-
tistic can be misleading. More im-
portant, they say, are third-down
and red zone stops. Lately, the
Saints' defense has begun to pro-
duce more turnovers while pre-
venting big plays and limiting
touchdowns, forcing teams to settle
for field goals.
During New Orleans' eight-game
winning streak to end the regular
season, opponents scored 20 or
fewer points six times, and no team
scored more than 24. That's a sta-
tistic that Lions coach Jim
Schwartz seemed to care about
more than most
"The thing that gets lost in this
whole offensive explosion they
have had is that the most points the
(Saints') defense has given up in the
last (five) weeks has been 20
points," Schwartz said. "That is
very good with so many explosive
offenses in the NFL."


ASU.QB



leaving



school


Sun Devils'

Osweiler declares

for NFL draft

Associated Press

TEMPE, Ariz. Already
committed to play basketball
at Gonzaga, Brock Osweiler
made the difficult decision to
instead play football at Ari-
zona State.
Three years later, Osweiler
found himself with another
choice to make and again
decided to
leave.
Osweiler
declared for
the NFL on
Friday and
will forgo his
senior season
at Arizona
State, leaving Brock
after one of Osweiler
the best seasons by a quarter-
back in the program's history
"While I bleed and sweat
maroon and gold, I have now
made the second most diffi-
cult decision in my life," Os-
weiler said in a statement. "I
have decided to declare my-
self eligible for the NFL draft.
It was an exceptionally diffi-
cult decision to make, but
having spoken to my family
and close friends, it became
clear to me that this is the
next path I must take to ad-
vance my personal and pro-
fessional career."
In his first full season as a
starter, Osweiler became the
first Arizona State quarter-
back to throw for 4,000 yards,
finishing with 4,036 while set-
ting school records for com-
pletions (326), attempts (516)
and completion percentage
(63.2). He also threw for 26
touchdowns, fourth most in
school history


Playoff glance
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 7
Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 8
Atlanta at New York Giants, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver, 4:30 p.m.
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta, N.Y Giants or New Orleans at San
Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh or Denver at New Eng-
land, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 15
Pittsburgh, Denver or Houston at Baltimore, 1
p.m.
Detroit, Atlanta or N.Y Giants at Green Bay,
4:30 p.m.
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
TBD
Pro Bowl on Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
NFC vs. AFC
Regular season
standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
y-New England
N.Y Jets
Miami
Buffalo
South
y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
North
y-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
x-Cincinnati
Cleveland
West
y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


Pct PF
.813 513
.500 377
.375 329
.375 372
Pct PF
.625 381
.563 325
.313 243
.125 243
Pct PF
.750 378
.750 325
.563 344
.250 218
Pct PF
.500 309
.500 406
.500 359
.438 212


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
y-N.Y Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas
Washington
South
y-New Orleans
x-Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay
North
y-Green Bay
x-Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
West
y-San Francisco
Arizona
Seattle
St. Louis


Pct PF
.563 394
.500 396
.500 369
.313 288
Pct PF
.813 547
.625 402
.375 406
.250 287
Pct PF
.938 560
.625 474
.500 353
.188 340
Pct PF
.813 380
.500 312
.438 321
.125 193


x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division
AFC individual leaders
Final
Quarterbacks
Att Comn Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE 611 401 5235 39 12
Schaub, HOU 292 178 2479 15 6
Roethlis., PIT 513 324 4077 21 14
Rivers, SND 582 366 4624 27 20
Mat. Moore, MIA 347 210 2497 16 9
Hasselbeck, TEN 518 319 3571 18 14
Flacco, BAL 542 312 3610 20 12
C. Palmer, OAK 328 199 2753 13 16
Dalton, CIN 516 300 3398 20 13
Fitzpatrick, BUF 569 353 3832 24 23
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Jones-Drew, JAC 343 1606 4.68 56 8
R. Rice, BAL 291 1364 4.69 70t 12
A. Foster, HOU 278 1224 4.40 43 10
McGahee, DEN 249 1199 4.82 60t 4
Mathews, SND 222 1091 4.91 39 6
Re. Bush, MIA 216 1086 5.03 76t 6
Benson, CIN 273 1067 3.91 42 6
S. Greene, NYJ 253 1054 4.17 31 6
Johnson, TEN 262 1047 4.00 48t 4
M. Bush, OAK 256 977 3.82 44 7
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Welker, NWE 122 1569 12.9 99t 9


Gronkowski, NE 90 1327 14.7 52t
B. Marshall, MIA 81 1214 15.0 65t
Bowe,KAN 81 1159 14.3 52t
Hernandez, NWE 79 910 11.5 46
St. Johnson, BUF 76 1004 13.2 55
R. Rice, BAL 76 704 9.3 52
Wayne, IND 75 960 12.8 56t
Washington, TEN 74 1023 13.8 57
M.Wallace, PIT 72 1193 16.6 95t
Punters
No Yds LG
Lechler, OAK 78 3960 80
Fields, MIA 78 3810 70
Moorman, BUF 72 3472 66
Scifres, SND 47 2234 71
B. Colquitt, DEN 101 4783 66
McAfee, IND 88 4102 64
Koch, BAL 73 3393 63
Mesko, NWE 57 2648 65
D. Colquitt, KAN 89 4084 68
Hartmann, HOU 58 2573 69
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG
Arenas, KAN 32 410 12.8 37
Bess, MIA 37 442 11.9 25
Cribbs, CLE 34 388 11.4 84t
Kerley, NYJ 29 317 10.9 53
A. Brown, PIT 30 325 10.8 60t
Edelman, NWE 28 300 10.7 72t
Mariani, TEN 46 490 10.7 79t
Br.Tate, CIN 51 543 10.6 56t
Jac. Jones, HOU 49 518 10.6 79t
L.Webb, BAL 30 301 10.0 68t
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
McKnight, NYJ 34 1073 31.6 107t
R. Goodman, SND 34 936 27.5 105t
A. Brown, PIT 27 737 27.3 52
Cribbs, CLE 39 974 25.0 63
C. Gates, MIA 34 843 24.8 77
Karim, JAC 27 652 24.1 37
Br.Tate, CIN 42 998 23.8 45
Mariani, TEN 32 748 23.4 49
McCluster, KAN 25 557 22.3 35
Woodhead, NWE 20 437 21.9 37
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret
Gronkowski, NE 18 1 17 0
R. Rice, BAL 15 12 3 0
A. Foster, HOU 12 10 2 0
Green-Ellis, NWE 11 11 0 0
Jones-Drew, JAC 11 8 3 0


Tolbert, SND 10 8 2 0 60
Decker, DEN 9 0 8 1 54
V. Jackson, SND 9 0 9 0 54
Mendenhall, PIT 9 9 0 0 54
Welker, NWE 9 0 9 0 54
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NE 59-59 28-33 50 143
Rackers, HOU 39-40 32-38 54 135
Nugent, CIN 33-34 33-38 49 132
Janikowski, OAK 36-36 31-35 63 129
Cundiff, BAL 38-38 28-37 51 122
Novak, SND 41-42 27-34 53 122
Bironas, TEN 34-34 29-32 53 121
Carpenter, MIA 26-26 29-34 58 113
Suisham, PIT 36-36 23-31 51 105
Folk, NYJ 44-44 19-25 51 101
NFC individual leaders
Final
Quarterbacks
Att Corn Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY 502 343 4643 45 6
Brees, NOR 657 468 5476 46 14
Romo, DAL 522 346 4184 31 10
Stafford, DET 663 421 5038 41 16
E. Manning, NYG 589 359 4933 29 16
M.Ryan,ATL 566 347 4177 29 12
Ale. Smith, SNF 446 274 3150 17 5
Cutler, CHI 314 182 2319 13 7
Vick, PHL 423 253 3303 18 14
C. Newton, CAR 517 310 4051 21 17
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
M.Turner, ATL 301 1340 4.45 81t 11
L. McCoy, PHL 273 1309 4.79 60 17
Gore, SNF 282 1211 4.29 55 8
M. Lynch, SEA 285 1204 4.22 47 12
S. Jackson, STL 260 1145 4.40 47t 5
B. Wells, ARI 245 1047 4.27 71 10
Forte, CHI 203 997 4.91 46 3
A. Peterson, MIN 208 970 4.66 54 12
Murray, DAL 164 897 5.47 91t 2
Williams, CAR 155 836 5.39 74t 7
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
R. White, ATL 100 1296 13.0 43 8
J. Graham, NOR 99 1310 13.2 59 11
Ca. Johnson, DET 96 1681 17.5 73t 16
Harvin, MIN 87 967 11.1 52t 6
Sproles, NOR 86 710 8.3 39 7
Pettigrew, DET 83 777 9.4 27 5
Cruz, NYG 82 1536 18.7 99t 9


Fitzgerald, ARI 80 1411 17.6 73t
Colston, NOR 80 1143 14.3 50
T. Gonzalez, ATL 80 875 10.9 30
Punters
No Yds LG
A. Lee, SNF 78 3970 68 5
Morstead, NOR 46 2204 64 ,
J. Ryan, SEA 95 4431 77 4
Kluwe, MIN 77 3517 60 4
Weatherford, NYG 82 3745 62 4
Masthay, GBY 55 2506 71
Zastudil, ARI 87 3929 66 4
Koenen, TAM 67 3023 65 4
Donn. Jones, STL 105 4652 65 ,
Podlesh, CHI 89 3903 70 ,
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG
D. Hester, CHI 28 454 16.2 82t
P Peterson, ARI 44 699 15.9 99t
GinnJr., SNF 38 466 12.3 55t
Cobb, GBY 26 295 11.3 80t
Washington, SEA 41 464 11.3 37
Sproles, NOR 29 294 10.1 72t
Weems, ATL 32 315 9.8 42
R Parker, TAM 23 210 9.1 34
Banks, WAS 36 328 9.1 55
Sherels, MIN 33 277 8.4 53
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG
Cobb, GBY 34 941 27.7 108t
Ginn Jr.,SNF 29 800 27.6 102t
Sproles, NOR 40 1089 27.2 92
Stroughter, TAM 20 540 27.0 78
Pilares, CAR 23 590 25.7 101t
Je. Norwood, STL 24 611 25.5 47
Logan, DET 33 832 25.2 42
Washington, SEA 43 1084 25.2 54
De. Thomas, NYG 25 607 24.3 40
S.-Howling, ARI 36 857 23.8 37
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret
L. McCoy, PHL 20 17 3 0
Ca. Johnson, DET 16 0 16 0
Jor. Nelson, GBY 15 0 15 0
C. Newton, CAR 14 14 0 0
M. Lynch, SEA 13 12 1 0
A. Peterson, MIN 13 12 1 0
Bradshaw, NYG 11 9 2 0
J.Graham, NOR 11 0 11 0
L. Robinson, DAL 11 0 11 0
M. Turner, ATL 11 11 0 0


Kicking
PAT FG LG Pt
Akers, SNF 34-34 44-52 55 16
Kasay, NOR 63-63 28-34 53 14
Crosby, GBY 68-69 24-28 58 14
D. Bailey, DAL 39-39 32-37 51 13
M. Bryant, ATL 45-45 27-29 51 12
Ja. Hanson, DET 54-54 24-29 51 12
Gould, CHI 37-37 28-32 57 12
Gano, WAS 25-26 31-41 59 11
Henery, PHL 46-46 24-27 51 11
Mare, CAR 44-45 22-28 45 11
NFL draft order
First Round on April 26-28 in New York


1. Indianapolis 2
2. St. Louis 2
3. Minnesota 3
4. Cleveland 4
5.Tampa Bay 4
6. Washington 5
7. Jacksonville 5
8. Carolina-x 6
9. Miami-x 6
10. Buffalo Bills 6
11. Kansas City-x 7
12. Seattle-x 7
13. Arizona 8
14. Dallas 8
15. Philadelphia 8
16. N.Y Jets 8
17. Oakland 8
18. San Diego 8
19. Chicago 8
20.Tennessee 9
21. Denver-y 8
22. Cincinnati-y 9
23. N.Y Giants-y 9
24. Houston -y 10
25. Atlanta-y 10
26. Detroit-y 10
27. Baltimore-y 12
28. Pittsburgh-y 12
29. New Orleans-y 13
30. New England-y,x13
31. San Fran.-y,x 13
32. Green Bay-y 15
x-Subject to coin flip
y-Subject to playoffs


Opponents
L Pct Pct W L
14 .125.539138 118
14 .125.590151 105
13 .188.559143 113
12 .250.531136 120
12 .250.551 141 115
11 .313.477122 134
11 .313.500128 128
10 .375.504129 127
10 .375.504129 127
10 .375.520133 123
9 .438.512131 125
9 .438.512131 125
8 .500.469120 136
8 .500.473121 135
8 .500.488125 131
8 .500.500128 128
8 .500.504129 127
8 .500.516132 124
8 .500.527135 121
7 .563.461118 138
8 .500.520133 123
7 .563.492126 130
7 .563.520133 123
6 .625.453116 140
6 .625.480123 133
6 .625.535137 119
4 .750.477122 134
4 .750.492126 130
3 .813.441 113 143
3 .813.449115 141
3 .813.449115 141
1 .938.457117 139


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Actress gets relief
from stalker
BURBANK, Calif. -A
civil judge has granted
Selena
Gomez a
three-
year re-
straining
order
against a
man ac-
cused of
Selena stalking
Gomez the
singer-
actress.
Superior Court Judge
William D. Stewart
granted the stay-away
order Friday in Burbank,
Calif The order requires
Thomas Brodnicki to stay
away from the "Wizards
of Waverly Place" star
and not attempt to con-
tact her
Another judge dropped
a felony stalking charge
against the 46-year-old
last year after determin-
ing prosecutors hadn't
proven he had caused
fear in the star Stewart
twice delayed issuing a
civil order until Brod-
nicki had an opportunity
to respond.
The judge noted Friday
that Gomez had reason-
able cause to be afraid of
Brodnicki, who threat-
ened to kill the 19-year-
old while on a psychiatric
hold.

Sheen donates to
tornado victims
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
Actor Charlie Sheen has
donated $25,000 to help
tornado
relief in
Alabama,
making
good on a
promise
to help
survivors
of the
Charlie deadly
Sheen twisters.
The
head of Tuscaloosa's
tourism agency, Don Sta-
ley, says Sheen gave
money that came through
his fundraising website.
The actor wrote a
check for about $15,000
after the website gener-
ated just $10,000 in
contributions.
Staley says the actor do-
nated the money shortly
before Thanksgiving.

NBC funding art
program in school
PASADENA, Calif. -
NBC is funding an initia-
tive to create musical
theater programs in U.S.
schools in need of arts
education.
The network says the
effort to launch stand-
alone musical theater
programs will begin this
month with a pilot group
of 20 schools nationwide.
NBC is joined on the
Make a Musical project
by iTheatrics, which
adapts musicals for stu-
dent productions and
provides tools for teacher
training.
NBC says the nonprofit
iTheatrics' Junior The-
ater Project aims to begin
another 180 programs
this fall, building toward
a 2014 goal of 1,000
school programs reach-
ing 1 million students.
Schools may apply for the
fall program at the web-
site makeamusical.org.
From wire reports


Comedy and corporate



indulgence intertwine


--...... p _ _ _


Associated Press
Actress Kristen Bell, left and actor Don Cheadle are seen while shooting a scene on the set of the upcoming Show-
time television series "House of Lies" in Los Angeles. The new series premieres Sunday at 10 p.m. on Showtime.


'House ofLies'premieres Sunday in Showtime series


SANDY COHEN
AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES From Enron's
collapse to the sub-prime mortgage
meltdown, corporate greed has
plunged the U.S. into recession,
toppled overseas economies and in-
spired the worldwide Occupy Wall
Street movement. But that doesn't
mean we can't laugh at it. "House of
Lies," a new dark comedy premier-
ing Sunday on Showtime, takes di-
rect aim at the one percent.
Don Cheadle and Kristen Bell
star as management consultants
who visit struggling companies
around the country to provide du-
bious but expensive advice, all
while having a good time on the
company dime. Their ultimate goal
isn't to improve the client's image or
bottom line, but to boost their own.
"It is manipulation at its finest,"
says Bell.
Based on Martin Kihn's 2005 book,
"House of Lies: How Management
Consultants Steal Your Watch and
Then Tell You the Time," the Show-
time series pokes a sharp finger at
the perversion inside the world of big
incomes and big expense accounts -


and adds a heavy dose of sex.
"The whole sexual side of it,
that's all spiced up," the author
says. "The real life of a consultant is
extremely dull."
Cheadle's character, Marty Kaan,
is the protagonist and chief manip-
ulator in "House of Lies." Impecca-
bly dressed and fluent in nonsense
business jargon, Marty is a smooth
talker who's happy to take advan-
tage of the corporate big-wigs he's
been hired to counsel. He leads a
team of consultants played by
Bell, Josh Lawson and Ben
Schwartz who complement and
emulate his slippery techniques.
It's a departure for Cheadle in
both character and venue. The 47-
year-old Oscar nominee (for 2004's
"Hotel Rwanda") is known mostly
as a movie star, with credits includ-
ing "Crash," "Iron Man 2" and the
"Ocean's Eleven" series.
He says he was drawn to the
small screen as both star and exec-
utive producer by the "House of
Lies" concept and "how insane this
character was."
"I've been fortunate to have a lot
of different experiences in my
quote-unquote career with the


kinds of characters I get to play,"
Cheadle says. "But I guess nobody
quite like him yet."
"Marty Kaan is kind of a bad
dude," says show creator Matthew
Carnahan. "He's not a great guy,"
and that's why it's so delicious to
have Cheadle play him.
"He's got such a squeaky clean
humanitarian image," Carnahan
says. "You put him in this part, and
I just think there's a lot you can get
away with."
Marty has sex with several
women each episode.
"They have a point system for
how many hotel workers they sleep
with while on the road," says exec-
utive producer Jessica Borsiczky.
Bell's character, Jeannie, is also a
departure from the sweeter roles
she's played on TV and in film.
"I don't think I've ever played
anyone as layered as Jeannie be-
fore, or as duplicitous," Bell says.
Marty and his team bring their
pricey advice to a mortgage bank, a
basketball team owned by a divorc-
ing couple, a pharmaceutical com-
pany and a megachurch all while
being threatened by a potential cor-
porate merger


Everybody's streaming Netflix, but what?


JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK Netflix's
streaming-video audience
of more than 20 million sub-
scribers has led many to
label it a kind of digital TV
network, and one that may
grow into an HBO rival if
it's not already
But unlike television pro-
gramming, which comes
with viewing guides, DVR
reminders and weekly
picks from all manner of
media, the Netflix instant
universe is a largely un-
charted, Byzantine library
prone to aimless clicking
and haphazard double
features.
Navigating Netflix re-
mains a challenge. While its
DVD library is extensive, its
streaming offerings are a
mishmash patchwork of
high-profile new additions,
familiar favorites and


Birthday: Because in the year ahead most of your hopes
and expectations will be founded upon realistic premises
and not on wishful thinking, many of your objectives will be
accomplished in a pragmatic and realistic manner.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Even if you sense that you
have the upper hand over another, it doesn't give you li-
cense to take advantage of him or her. Be honest and fair.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)- When performing a service
for another, keep accurate records of your time, effort and
all the parts you're supplying. If you don't, a misunderstand-
ing could arise down the line.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Upon occasion, you aren't
too prudent about managing your resources, and this could
be one of those times. Be extra careful whenever you have
your checkbook in hand.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Keep your lips closed and
your vest tight when it comes to important business or per-


Associated Press
Netflix's streaming-video audience of more than 20 million
subscribers has led many to label it a kind of digital TV net-
work, and one that may grow into an HBO rival if it's not
already.


stray oddities.
To be sure, it's easily one
of the best such catalogs
available, but it remains a
sliver of the possibility. Net-
flix obviously knows this,
and has worked to expand
its streaming library, signing


deals with movie studios
and television networks. It's
also pursuing original pro-
gramming that it hopes will
be an appetizing carrot to
viewers, like it has been for
HBO.
Certainly, many viewers


Today's HOROSCOPE
sonal matters. If you don't, you can expect a loss of some
friends and/or co-workers.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Stand up for your rights in-
stead of knuckling under to an insulting big mouth. A mouse
like him or her might have learned to roar like a lion, but he
or she is still just a mouse, in reality.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Be extremely careful if you
get involved in an arrangement that requires a cash outlay.
Make sure you know what you're doing, where your money
is going and what it will get you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) It's commendable to be your
own person, but it's not admirable to gratify your self-inter-
ests at the expense of another. Be mindful of how your be-
havior affects friends or companions.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) When formulating future plans,
make sure they are predicated upon actual projections and
not callow optimism. Miscalculating your future today could


are immediately drawn to
the flashiest offerings: the
first three seasons of
"Breaking Bad," the first
season of "Downton Abby,"
all five seasons of "Friday
Night Lights" and the first
four seasons of "Mad Men."
But what else? This week,
Netflix said subscribers
watched more than 2 billion
hours of movies and TV
shows in the last three
months of 2011.
Early winter is, for many,
a time to catch up on the
Oscar favorites. While most
of that movie watching will
need to take place in the
theater, many of 2011's best
documentaries can be
streamed on Netflix.
Netflix has also been a
breeding ground for cult
comedy, particularly the
short-lived "Party Down"
which few watched when it
was on the Starz network in
2009 and 2010.


bring you grief on the morrow.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There are some indications
that you could be operating on a different plane than your
friends. That's OK if both parties know and accept this. If
not, a serious misunderstanding could arise.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It can be courageous to rush in
where others fear to tread, but it can also be foolish if you
wade into a no-win, no-benefit situation. Don't try to butt
your head against overwhelming opposition.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If it's difficult for you to distin-
guish between false apprehension and real, intuitive per-
ceptions, you might forsake something that would be
beneficial.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you are considering
making an expensive, uninformed purchase, it might be
wise to have a friend who's in the know check things out for
you.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JAN. 5
Fantasy 5:3 9 17 26 36
5-of-5 1 winner $217,594.58
4-of-5 364 $96
3-of-5 10,404 $9

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call 850-487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Jan. 7,
the seventh day of 2012.
There are 359 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Jan. 7, 1942, the
Japanese siege of Bataan
began during World War II.
(The fall of Bataan three
months later was followed by
the notorious Death March.)
On this date:
In 1608, an accidental fire
devastated the Jamestown
settlement in the Virginia
Colony.
In 1610, astronomer
Galileo Galilei began observ-
ing three of Jupiter's moons
(he spotted a fourth moon al-
most a week later).
In 1789, the first U.S. pres-
idential election was held.
Americans voted for electors
who, a month later, chose
George Washington to be the
nation's first president.
In 1894, one of the earliest
motion picture experiments
took place at the Thomas
Edison studio in West Or-
ange, N.J., as Fred Ott was
filmed taking a pinch of snuff
and sneezing.
In 1927, commercial
transatlantic telephone serv-
ice was inaugurated between
New York and London.
In 1972, Lewis F. Powell,
Jr. and William H. Rehnquist
were sworn in as the 99th
and 100th members of the
U.S. Supreme Court.
In 1979, Vietnamese
forces captured the Cambo-
dian capital of Phnom Penh,
overthrowing the Khmer
Rouge government.
Ten years ago: British
Prime Minister Tony Blair and
nine U.S. senators swept into
Bargam Air Base in
Afghanistan for an unan-
nounced visit and promised
Afghan leaders their full sup-
port in rebuilding the shat-
tered country.
Five years ago: Newly
elected House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, interviewed on
CBS' "Face the Nation," said
Democrats running Congress
would not give President
George W. Bush a blank
check to wage war in Iraq.
One year ago: A package
addressed to Homeland Se-
curity Secretary Janet Napoli-
tano ignited at a Washington
postal facility, a day after fiery
packages sent to Maryland's
governor and state trans-
portation secretary burned
the fingers of workers who
opened them.
Today's Birthdays: Au-
thor William Peter Blatty is
84. Pop musician Paul Re-
vere is 74. Magazine pub-
lisher Jann Wenner is 66.
Singer Kenny Loggins is 64.
Actress Erin Gray is 62. Actor
David Caruso is 56. Katie
Couric is 55. Actor David
Marciano is 52. Sen. John
Thune, R-S.D., is 51. Actress
Hallie Todd is 50. Actor Nico-
las Cage is 48. Actor Doug
E. Doug is 42. Actor Kevin
Rahm is 41. Actor Jeremy
Renner is 41. Country singer-
musician John Rich is 38.
Actor Dustin Diamond is 35.


Actor Robert Ri'chard is 29.
Thought for Today: "One
cannot and must not try to
erase the past merely be-
cause it does not fit the pres-
ent." Golda Meir, Israeli
prime minister (1898-1978).











RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Passing the torch


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Drop


the


phony


facade
Thanks to the magic
of DVR, I've been
watching the first
three seasons of "Mad
Men."
Set in the early 1960s,
the series is about a New
York Madison Avenue ad-
vertising firm, centering
around one character,
Don Draper, who heads
the creative department.
He's a fascinating char-
acter aloof, suave,
handsome and morally
bankrupt. He's married
with two kids, but he
sleeps with anything in a
skirt. It's not uncommon
for him to not come home
for a few days.
His name's not really
Don Draper, but Dick
Whitman. His mother was
a prostitute who gave him
away to his alcoholic fa-
ther and his wife. His fa-
ther dies and the wife
remarries and Dick has
a pretty miserable
childhood.
He joins the military
and is sent to Korea
See Page C5


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
After 25 years as church pastor, the Rev. David Hamilton, right, is leaving Heritage Baptist Church in Beverly Hills to pursue a ministry as a
traveling missionary, helping small churches around the nation. The Rev. Barry Simmons, left, who has served as assistant pastor for the past
18 months, is stepping into the role as church pastor.


Church's belovedpastor steps down to go


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
BEVERLY HILLS
On Sunday, the Rev.
David Hamilton
lived up to his nick-
name "Sir Leaks A Lot."
After 25 years as pastor
at Heritage Baptist
Church in Beverly Hills,
Hamilton said a tearful
good-bye to the congrega-
tion he has loved and
served faithfully, and
passed the mantle of
leadership to the Rev.
Barry Simmons, who has


Music & more
The Jacob Brothers Gospel
Music Trio will perform at 6 p.m. today
at Joy Lutheran Church on S.W. State
Road 200 at 83rd Place, Ocala. The
Jacob Brothers Bob and Mike Jacobs
and Mike Lawyer are gospel veter-
ans and have been dedicated to the
ministry spreading the Gospel through
music since 1962.
They have traveled extensively and
produced more than 50 albums. A
freewill offering will be collected. Call
352-854-4509, ext. 221.
International concert organist
David Hart will present a recital at 3
p.m. Sunday at First United Methodist
Church in Ocala, at 1126 E. Silver
Springs Blvd. (State Road 40), diago-
nally across the street from the old Ritz
Hotel.
Hart has performed at Carnegie Hall,
numerous churches, and universities in
America, Germany, Holland, Great
Britain, Canada, and Australia. The pro-
gram will include Bach's renowned "St.
Anne Fugue," Mozart's "Fantasia in F-
minor" and works by Franck, Thalben-
Ball, Daniel-Lesur, and Vierne.
Admission is free; a freewill offering will
be collected. Call 352-537-0207.
The Diggles Family, full-time
Southern Gospel recording artists, will


been assistant pastor at
the church for the past 18
months.
Hamilton and his wife,
Ruth, will be traveling
around the nation in an
RV as missionaries to
small churches as part of
Independent Gospel Mis-
sions. Hamilton will be
doing a variety of things,
from serving as a substi-
tute for vacationing pas-
tors to helping churches
through the process of
searching for a new pas-
tor Three months will be
their maximum stay


Hamilton said when he
first went into the min-
istry he wondered how
he would know when it
was time to move on.
Quoting Colossians 3:15,
"Let the peace of Christ
rule in your hearts..'.' he
said whenever it was
time for him to move on
to a new church, God "re-
moved the burden of
ministry" and gave him
peace in his decision.
It was the same about
his decision to retire, al-
though emotionally he
doesn't want to leave be-


Religion NOTES


perform at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18,
at First Christian Church of Homosassa
Springs, 7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. All are welcome to attend. A
freewill offering will be collected and a
nursery will be available. Call 352-628-
5556. The Diggles Family is led by
Doug Diggles, who sings lead, tenor,
baritone, and bass, and plays the piano.
Christina sings, plays the violin, viola,
guitar, classical guitar, piano, mountain
dulcimer and mandolin. She helps in ar-
ranging songs and picking out parts for
Katie on her instruments. Katie adds the
third part in their family harmony. She
also plays the violin, mandolin, piano
and mountain dulcimer, and is beginning
to arrange instrumental pieces. Diane
Diggles brings an extra beauty to many
of the songs by interpreting them
through sign language. She also runs
the soundboard.
Hernando Church of the Nazarene,
2101 N Florida Ave in Hernando, will
host a concert with "The Browns," a
family whose gospel music stylings en-
gage audiences of all ages. The concert
is at 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22. Celebra-
tion Sounds, the orchestra and choir of
the church, will open the concert at 5:45
p.m. The public is invited to attend this
free concert. A love offering will be
collected.
Arizonans Dave Anderson and


cause he's grown to love
these people, he said.
"Even before Pastor
Barry came here, this
was planned," Hamilton
said. "I told the deacons
five years ago that they
needed to start praying
about and thinking about
finding an assistant that
will be the future
pastor."
Then, about three
years ago, Hamilton suf-
fered a stroke, which
scared the church mem-
bers and leaders.
After a year and a half


Kelly Patten will be in concert at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 24, at Joy Lutheran
Church on S.W. State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala. The concerts these men
present include gospel music, old-time
Sunday school songs, contemporary
Christian music and stories of God's
grace and mercy including "The Rescue
Story," which has been heard by millions
of people around the world. A freewill of-
fering will be collected. Call 352-854-
4509, ext. 221.
Food & fun
The Christian Women's Club of Ho-
mosassa invites all ladies to a "Queen
of the Day" brunch at 9 a.m. Tuesday
in the Southern Woods Clubhouse. The
speaker is Gaye Martin and the feature
is Karen Johnson with Mary Kay Cos-
metics. Cost is $13. Call Hazel at 352-
382-7990 for reservations.
All-you-can-eat pancakes,
sausage, coffee and orange juice
served from 8 to 10 a.m. the second
Saturday monthly at First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw
St., Homosassa.
Next breakfast is Jan. 14.
The United Methodist Women of
First United Methodist Church of Dun-
nellon invite everyone to a spaghetti
dinner on Saturday, Jan. 14, at the
Friendship Hall of the church at 21501


of searching, they found
Simmons.
Simmons and his wife,
Vicki, had been well ac-
quainted with the area,
he having driven a bread
delivery route for years
in the area. Most recently
he drove for Sonic
Courier and will con-
tinue driving two days a
week. The couple lives in
Citrus Springs.
"The Lord started talk-
ing to me about full-time
ministry back in 1999,"
See Page C5


W. State Road 40. Seatings are at 4:30
and at 5:30 p.m. Adult tickets are avail-
able in advance for a donation of $6,
children 10 and younger will be $3.
Adult tickets at the door will be a $7 do-
nation. (Limited number of tickets for
each seating.) Dinner includes all-you-
can-eat spaghetti with meat sauce,
tossed salad, garlic bread, dessert and
coffee or tea. For information or ad-
vance tickets, call the church office at
352-489-4026. Proceeds from the din-
ner will be used for UMW mission
projects.
Third Saturday supper will take
place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 21, in the Dewain Farris Fellowship
Hall at the Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu in-
cludes pot roast with veggies, biscuits,
pie, coffee and tea for $10 for adults and
$5 for children. Call the church at 352-
489-1260.
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church, on the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40 East in Dunnellon, has a
fish fry the first Friday monthly. Cost is
$7 for adults and students and children
are free.
The fish fry is open to the public and
takes place in the church pavilion.
See Page C2


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Top


religion


stories


of 2011

In terms of giant head-
lines and spilled ink,
there is no question
that the lightning strike by
U.S. special forces that
killed Osama bin Laden
was the year's most spec-
tacular news event, fea-
turing a deadly brew of
religion, politics and
violence.
Thus, it isn't surprising
that members of the Reli-
gion Newswriters Associ-
ation selected the death of
the world's most infamous
radical Muslim as No. 1 in
their poll to name the
year's top 10 stories on the
religion beat. In addition
to the symbolism of bin
Laden's death in a post
9/11 world, the poll's or-
ganizers said the killing
spurred "discussions
among people of faith on
issues of forgiveness,
peace, justice and
retribution."
However, when I think
about religion news
events in 2011, another
image from Pakistan
flashes through my mind
- a shower of rose petals.
I am referring to the ju-
bilant throngs of lawyers

See Page C5


'on the road' for ministry





C2 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all who are
single, widowed or divorced.
Call 352-860-0052 or 352-586-
5174 or email trustingheartmin-
istry@yahoo.com.
Special events
The Heirborne Drama
Team will present its new pro-
gram "Undone" as the kick-off
to their 2012 season at 6 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 15, at North Oak
Baptist Church in Citrus
Springs, at the corner of N. Elk-
cam Boulevard and N. Citrus
Springs Boulevard. This group
of talented high school students
uses mime, interpretive move-
ment and sign language set to
contemporary Christian music.
Heirborne, under the direction
of Tiffany Ledford, has been
ministering in churches and
youth events for more than 12
years and has been to several
other states and the Ukraine.
Everyone is welcome. Call 352-
489-1688 for more information.
"Sons of the Father" will
be in concert at 6 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 29, at North Oak Baptist
Church at the corner of N. Elk-
cam Boulevard and N. Citrus
Springs Boulevard in Citrus
Springs. Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-489-1688 for more in-
formation. A love offering will be
received.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church will host a "Military
Card Party" on Feb. 13, at the
church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness. Lunch will be served
at 12:15 p.m. with card play at
1 p.m. Fun, prizes, raffle. Cost
is $12 per player. Make up your
table of four or come as a sin-
gle and we will pair you. For
more information or reserva-
tions, call Dottie at 352-382-


RELIGION


3656 or Marilyn at 352-
746-6583.
The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalists will sponsor
an indoor flea market consist-
ing of all kinds of books and all
kinds of stuff and good things to
eat. Everyone is invited from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13,
and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Jan., 14. The address is 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Spring Hill (1/2 mile north of
County Road 491). Call Ray at
352-527-8154 or the church at
352-465-4225.
The Men's Ministry of
Abundant Life, Men of Pur-
pose, will meet at 8:30 a.m.
today at Oyster's Restaurant on
U.S. 19 in Crystal River. The
breakfast is open to all men in
the community. Men of Purpose
is focused on developing the
whole man spirit, soul and
body while providing oppor-
tunities to worship, fellowship
and participate in teachings
from the scriptures. Call the
church at 352-795-LIFE or visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
Beginning Sunday, Reflec-
tions Church will move down
Citrus Springs Boulevard to Cit-
rus Springs Middle School for
Sunday worship services at
10:15 a.m. Children's church
and child care available. Call
352-794-3326.
What is a mandala? Think
of a kaleidoscope a circle in
a square, that is beautiful sa-
cred art. You love looking at it
and it helps you to focus when-
ever you meditate, and thus be-
comes your special teaching
tool. The Nature Coast Unitar-
ian Universalists have sched-
uled a series devoted to
learning about mandalas. At
the 10:30 a.m. Sunday service
will be a talk by Patricia Kittle-
man, a student and teacher of
the mandala. The following
three Sundays of January at 1
p.m. are to learn how to draw
your own personal mandala.
The drawing sessions will be
led by Jan Hitchcock, art in-
structor from CCF. Cost is $10


In concert


Special to the Chronicle
Guy Penrod, formerly with the Gaither Vocal Band, will be in concert at 6:30 p.m. Monday,
Jan. 23, at Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1100 West Highland Blvd., Inverness. Tickets are
on sale now $10 for general admission and $15 for reserved. Tickets can be purchased
at the church office. Call 352-726-7335.


for each art class. All are wel-
come. The fellowship meets at
7633 N. Florida Ave., Citrus
Springs. Sign up with Pam at
352-489-3545.
Trinity Independent Baptist
Church will host its annual
Camp Meeting Sunday
through Friday. Evangelist
Eddie Goddard of Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., is the speaker
at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday.
Goddard and James Knox of
DeLand, Fla., will be the speak-
ers each evening at 7 Monday
through Friday. Special music
provided by Lance Carpenter. A


nursery will be provided for all
services. The church is at the
corner of Croft Road and
Hayes Street in Hernando. Call
Pastor Jerry Bloxton at 352-
726-0100.
St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will meet at
10:30 a.m. Thursday. Birthday
party/pizza after the meeting.
Pregnancy & Life Center needs
items or money to buy items to
fill layette baskets. Mothers of
newborn babies seeking help
from the Pregnancy & Life Cen-
ter receive a layette basket.
The play, "The Bickersons" is at


3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15. Light
refreshments served after. Cost
is $10. Buy tickets in the office
or after Masses today and Sun-
day. No ticket sales at door.
Nickel social at 11 a.m. Tues-
day, Feb. 7.
The Women's Ministry of
Abundant Life, Mary and
Martha's, will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Friday at the church at 4515 N.
Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. All women in the commu-
nity are invited to attend this
time with other Christian
women. Bring a covered dish
and come out and enjoy this


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

time together. Mary and
Martha's helps women grow
spiritually and provides oppor-
tunities for fellowship with other
women. Women's groups from
all churches in the community
are especially invited. Call the
church at 352-795-LIFE or visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
Calvary Chapel Inver-
ness will host a benefit for the
Life Choice Care Center at 7
p.m. Friday. Doors will open at
6 p.m. Comedian Michael Kel-
ley is the entertainment. Tickets
are $10 per person and can be
purchased by calling 352-341-
5176. Calvary Chapel is at 960
S. U.S. 41, Inverness. For infor-
mation, visit www.Michel
KelleyProductions.com.
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Women's Club will
present its annual "Military
Card Party" on Wednesday,
Jan. 18, at Our Lady of Fatima
Parish Hall, 550 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Doors open at 11
a.m. Lunch is at noon. Games
begin at 1 p.m. Entrance fee of
$12 includes lunch buffet, cof-
fee and desserts, and prizes.
Funds raised benefit the Preg-
nancy Center and Helping
Hands. For information and
reservations, call Event Chair-
person Joan Wirthman at 352-
726-5938 or Ann Maccabee at
352-637-4515.
The Council of Catholic
Women of Our Lady of Grace
Church will host their annual
"Tricky Tray Fund Raiser" on
Saturday, Jan. 21, in the Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. Doors open at 10
and drawings begin at 11:30
a.m. Tricky Tray features bas-
kets with contents valued at
$25 or more, raffles and money
trees. Items include a mah
jongg set, gift certificates for
golf, restaurants and supermar-
kets. Purchase a sheet of 25
numbered tickets for $5 for de-
posit in a bag adjacent to your
choice of baskets. The Life
South Blood Mobile will be on

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! .!... i

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
| (12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided














et Davidthe
Hea















13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious Schoolt

Sunday
9AM-Noon
000A93J


ME Crystal Crystal River
River CHURCH OF


Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School |
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor

First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


West
Sc\Citrus
Ir t oni i U'. L.L. IND


Htr / YUU LL rI II
A CAKING FAMILY
IN CHIST! II


CKYSTXL
RIVCK
VNITED
M'ETHODIST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
SA Stephen Ministry Provider:


Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.





US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
V Bob Dickey


THE -1
SALVATION
AD V CIRUS COUNTY
ARMY CoRPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller







Come -m m
grow
with us!

The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!

Pastor
Richard
Hart

Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth andChildren's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service
LocatBioi*mn:^^
Crystall R ivr Foida ;: [ij
(352)795-2594^B
htt:wwwcystaiivrasemiyTrg


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
II I . I .I r ,- t
'. ,: .[ H , ] ]
UM~iVS^
-rn^^^^^^^^^^^


I I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TORCH
Continued from Page C1

Simmons said. "We were at a church
in South Carolina where I was assis-
tant pastor from 2000 to 2003, then
came back to Florida where I was as-
sistant pastor at a church in New Port
Richey."
Sunday's service began with Hamil-
ton baptizing four people, then he
preached the first half of a sermon
about "God's sheep," then led the
church in a chorus of "God is So
Good," hugged Simmons and turned
the pulpit over to the church's new
pastor, who continued the sermon in
which he laid out his vision for the
church in the coming years.
One of the goals he set for the
church was an emphasis on children
and young families.
When Hamilton came to Heritage in
1987, the demographics of Beverly
Hills were completely different from
today Back then, it was predomi-
nantly retirees and so was the
church.
But now, Simmons said, their im-
mediate neighborhoods surrounding
the church in the town circle are filled
with young people and young chil-
dren.
He said he hopes to see the church's
one children's Sunday school class
multiply to four classes, and the adult
Sunday school from one to three.


"We need to be in our community,
loving them," he said. "They're not
going to come to us; we need to go to
them."
Joanne Kelley, a longtime member
at Heritage, said it will be difficult for
the church to see Hamilton leave, but
that they've had more than a year to
get to know Simmons and his family,
which makes for an easier transition.
"We'll miss Pastor Hamilton," she
said. "He's a wonderful teacher and
I've learned so much. I've been so
blessed to have sat under his teaching
... I have to say that he's the most hum-
ble man I've ever met in my life and a
faithful servant of the Lord Jesus
Christ."
Before Hamilton stepped down
from the pulpit at Heritage for the
final time as the church's pastor he
said, "This is not Pastor Barry's
church and it's not Pastor Hamilton's
church, but it's the Lord's church. It's
been God's grace to be with all these
years and to have been a part of God's
work here."
Simmons, as he took the pulpit for
the first time as the church's pastor,
replied, "We'll always call you Pastor
around here."
Heritage Baptist Church is at 2 Civic
Circle Blvd., Beverly Hills. Weekly
Sunday worship service begins at
10:15 a.m. For information, call the
church office at 352-746-6171.
Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy
can be reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.cornm or 352-564-2927.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

site. Ticket tenders will be avail-
able for blood donors and for those
who cannot stay. Proceeds go to
needed items for the church and
charitable contributions. Call
Bernita Becker at 352-344-0235.
Cinderella's Closet, held at
and sponsored by Cornerstone
Baptist Church of Inverness, will
take place one day only in 2012,
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 28, at the church, 1100 W.
Highland Blvd., Inverness. The
date is earlier in 2012, and will be
the only day the prom dress give-
away (IS/ARE) offered in 2012.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
parish Men's Association will spon-
sor its annual trip to Tampa Bay
Downs for a day of thoroughbred
horseracing on Wednesday, Feb.
1. Cost of $45 per person includes
round-trip bus transportation from
the church parking lot, entry fee
and reserved seating in the club-
house, racing program and a hot
buffet lunch. For ticket reserva-
tions, call C. Taylor at 352-746-
5584 or Lloyd Manning at
352-489-0289.
A rummage sale will take
place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thurs-


day and Friday, Feb. 2 and 3, and
9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 4, in
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational Chris-
tian Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Clothing, utensils, tools, etc., all at
bargain prices.
A five-night Carnival cruise
to benefit Serving Our Savior
(SOS) Food Pantry will travel to
Cozumel and Grand Cayman on
the Carnival Paradise on April 30,
2012. Funds raised will benefit the
needy in Citrus County. All cate-
gories of cabins are available.
Prices include cruise, port
charges, all taxes and fees, dona-
tions to Serving Our Savior pantry,
round-trip bus to Tampa, round-trip
bus driver tips and one-way porter
tips. Cancellation insurance
available.
All monies need to be in by Feb.
15, 2012. Call Lenore Deck at 352-
270-8658 or fax her at 352-270-
8665 or e-mail her at cruiselady
@tampabay.rr.com, or call Barbara
Johnson at 352-270-3391.
Helping Hands Thrift Store,
a ministry of Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, is open from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 South.
Proceeds fund the food pantry.
The store is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and


small appliances. Estate donations
are also accepted. Pick-up is avail-
able for larger donations. Items do-
nated are tax deductible and a
form is provided from Helping
Hands. Call 352-726-1707.
Citrus County has a nonprofit
organization known as "Family &
Friends Reaching for the Abili-
ties." FFRA is a support program
comprised of caregivers and their
loved ones who get together fre-
quently for activities, informative
discussions on government pro-
grams, social activities and more
regarding our situations. Call Ron
Philips at 352-382-7819 and/or at-
tend one of our meetings which
are held regularly at the Key Cen-
ter location in Inverness at 130
Heights Ave. The meetings take
place the second Friday monthly
starting at 9 a.m. with coffee and
refreshments. The public is invited.
Worship
January schedule for Floral
City United Methodist Church:
United Methodist Men breakfast
meeting at 7:30 a.m. today. All
men are welcome. Quilting and
sewing group will meet at 10 a.m.
Wednesday in Burkett Hall. UMW
will meet at 9:30 a.m. Monday in
Burkett Hall. All women of the

See NOTES/Page C6


SFloral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make ,
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


Glory to Glory
Ministries
SA Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!
Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org
Pastor Brian Gulledge
1274 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando, FL


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all$ i 2


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted '

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Come as you are!
E1NESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH







PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253




TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Li ftin Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


Way Baptist

Church


(Route 491)


Awana
August May
Sunday Eves.
From 5-7 PM
Our purpose: To honor the
Savior by shepherding
people into a meaningful
relationship with God

t Pastor
Steven L.Witt
(352)527-9900
www.shepherdsway
baptistchurch.org


1 Faith
Lutheran
Church (.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com





SShepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM.................. Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.................. Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................. Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
12 mi.east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


St. Scholastica COME
Worship With The
Roman Catholic Church of Christ
Church Floral City, Florida


Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Floral City, FL.


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


HERNANDO
SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST
CHURCH
1880 N. Trucks Ave.
Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 344.2008
_iorne, Fellowship &
)Vh Us In Jesus
1talh"urdary Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Pastor Dale Wolfe
www.hernandoadventist.com


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 C3


J
Ail





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Carter offers lessons



of faith in latest book


Associated Press

ATLANTA- Jimmy Carter
may never have been presi-
dent if he didn't go square
dancing.
The Georgia Democrat
credits a rural square dance
club he joined in 1953 with
helping him win a state Sen-
ate seat by a scant 66 votes.
"If I hadn't received support
from our square-dancing
friends, I would have lost and
never become a state senator,"
he wrote in his latest book,
"Through the Years with
Jimmy Carter" "And if that
had occurred, I never would
have run for office again."
Carter has penned 26 differ-
ent books, including child-
hood memoirs, treatises on
the Middle East and accounts
of his presidency But none
are like his latest, which offers
366 devotionals, each with a
biblical passage, a personal
story and an original prayer
The one-page items are
sprinkled with lessons Carter
gleaned from more than 30
years of teaching Sunday
school classes and anecdotes
from his country upbringing
to his ascent to the White
House and beyond.
"The totality of my teaching
presents a view of a lay per-
son. I'm not a theologian," he
said in an interview. "I'm ex-
tracting real messages from
the Bible or from Christian
faith that apply to daily exis-
tence and that's applicable
whether you're a farmer, a
journalist, a lawyer, a teacher
or a political office holder."
In the book, Carter is open
about struggles over his own
faith. He writes that he felt
"despondent and alienated
from God" after losing his
first bid for Georgia's gover-


nor in 1966, and said his wife
Rosalynn went through a
rough patch when he lost to
Ronald Reagan in 1980. But
he said he retrenched during
those dark times and worked
to remind himself of the role
religion has played in his life.
"If there is no basis for our
faith ... then how do we ac-
count for the presence of
Jesus Christ in hundreds of
millions of lives across the
globe?" he wrote in the book.
"How could Jesus still be
alive to me? How could so
many hearts be touched and
minds stimulated by Jesus to
seek ultimate truths about life
and the world around us?"
His book casts some politi-
cal debates with religious
overtones. He condemns the
Patriot Act and waterboard-
ing, writing that Christians
"cannot keep silent just be-
cause the injustice doesn't af-
fect our own families or
friends." And he said it would
be "foolish" for the devout to
deny global warming.
"While we may disagree on
the causes or rate of global
warming, shouldn't we all
agree that we have a respon-
sibility to take care of the
Earth?"
Carter is also candid about
some of his shortcomings, such
as his lack of patience, his
penchant for jealousy and his
fights with his wife over trivial
issues. One year, when he for-
got her birthday, he hastily
scrawled out a note to give to
her, and it turned out to be one
of her favorite gifts. It read: "I
promise that I will never make
another unfavorable comment
about tardiness."
Spread throughout the
book are history lessons, with
insights over the ancient ten-
sions between Jews and


Christians, the roles of politi-
cians and prophets in Biblical
times, and the impact of mar-
tyrs and apostles on Chris-
tianity's spread across the
globe. He tells those stories
with a healthy dose of jokes
he's heard from the pulpit
and the White House.
In one passage, he said his
brother Billy was on his death
bed when he told a friend he
had carried out a long affair
with the friend's wife.
"His friend's face dropped.
The man gulped a couple of
times and then Billy
laughed and said, 'No, I'm just
joking.' That was Billy."'
In another passage, Carter
mentions a USA Today poll
question that probes readers
on what they would ask if they
came face-to-face with God.
Carter didn't say what his an-
swer would be in the book,
but in an interview he said he
would ask about Christ's role
in the creation of the uni-
verse. He said he would not,
however, waste a question
asking about life after death.
"I'm supposed to have com-
plete faith in life after death as
a Christian who has, I would
guess, as strong a faith in Christ
as possible," he said, adding:
"I'd rather be surprised."
Carter said he hopes the
book will help send the mes-
sage that "God calls us to live
out our faith." He urges read-
ers to keep their religion in
mind, reach out to new people
and enjoy an expansive life.
After all, he writes, he never
would have guessed that
square dancing would have
helped him win an election.
"Rosalynn and I enjoyed the
square dancing but we've
probably enjoyed a lot more
what's happened since," he
wrote. "You just never know."


Sculptor chisels St. Damien
statue for Hawaii church
HILO, Hawaii -A sculptor on the island
of Hawaii is creating a life-size statue of St.
Damien for the Sacred Heart Church in
Pahoa, in the district where the venerated
Roman Catholic priest first worked after
being ordained in 1864.
William McKnight is chiseling a 7-ton
basalt boulder into a statue depicting a 5-
foot-10, 210-pound Damien topped by his
signature hat.
The sculpture will show Damien extending
his hand to help people.
The base will feature Hawaii Island's main
volcanoes, which also are meant to repre-
sent the Trinity, along with water symbolizing
Damien's crossing to Molokai, McKnight
said.
Damien was just 24 when he arrived in
Puna, his first parish. Church records show
he baptized nearly 100 people and per-
formed seven marriages in the few months
before he moved north to minister to people
in Kohala and Hamakua.
The priest is best known and honored for
work he did after moving to the isolated
peninsula of Kalaupapa on Molokai, where
he cared for exiled leprosy patients in the
mid-1800s when no one else would.
He contracted leprosy 12 years after he
arrived, and died of the disease four years
later in 1889.
The Vatican canonized Belgian-born
Joseph de Veuster, or Father Damien, in
2009.
A dedication ceremony will be in March to
coincide with the arrival of Bishop Larry
Silva, who heads the Diocese of
Honolulu.
Rhode Island faith leaders
urge state to help poor
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Rhode Island reli-
gious leaders are pressing state lawmakers
to remember homeless and poor residents
when they begin their work for the year.
The Rhode Island Interfaith Coalition or-
ganized a "vigil to fight poverty with faith" at
the Statehouse. The General Assembly
kicked off its 2012 legislative session on
Tuesday.
Leaders of the coalition say they'll ask
lawmakers to "govern with wisdom and com-
passion" during what they say is a "very try-
ing time in our state."


The state's unemployment rate is among
the highest in the nation, at 10.5 percent.
Federal census figures show some 12
percent of Rhode Island residents live in
poverty. A federal report issued last year also
estimated that as many as 1,070 state resi-
dents were homeless on a single night in
January.
Library sued over blocking
of religious content
ST. LOUIS The American Civil Liberties
Union has sued a small-town public library,
claiming it unconstitutionally blocks access
to websites related to Wicca and other mi-
nority religions.
The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in St. Louis
on behalf of Anaka Hunter, a resident of
Salem, a largely Christian community of
about 5,000 residents in the Missouri
Ozarks.
Hunter alleges she was trying to do re-
search at the Salem Public Library but filter-
ing software blocked access to many sites
about religions such as Wicca, an earth-
based religion, derived from pre-Christian re-
ligions and magical practices that promote a
peaceful and balanced lifestyle. Hunter was
also unable to access sites about Native
American religions.
The suit said some religions were labeled
"occult" or even "criminal."
Hunter was doing the research to learn
more about her Native American roots
through spirituality, the ACLU said. Once ac-
cess was denied, she complained to the li-
brary director, who unblocked some, but not
all, information.
Hunter also complained to the library
board, but the board was dismissive of her
concerns, the ACLU said.
Library director Glenda Wofford said it
isn't the library's intent to prohibit reasonable
use of the Internet for research and other le-
gitimate purposes.
She said she would have unblocked web-
sites but Hunter refused to specify which
sites she wanted to access, citing privacy
rights.
Federal law requires public libraries to
use filtering software that blocks access to
sites with explicit, pornographic and adult
content.
"The Salem library is a small, rural library,"
Wofford said. "We're unable to provide our
own filtering system."
From wire reports


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
4/ -^^*


I'/lf.// f '// 'l,/,/,/m 'vr
/ou 64f'wwhA
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260








A friendly church where

Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service

Bible Study & Prayer


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com


0AL "First For Christ"...John 1:41

FIRST _ii
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS |
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study

2018 olonde S., Ivernss3410


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912




For


Information

On Your

Religious

Advertising


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
Dan Sturgill
SSenior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ................ 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
|Wednesdays
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am




"







VIGIL MASSES:
4:00P.M. & 6:00P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. &10:30 AM.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PJt to 3:30 pMt Sat
orBy Appointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills |
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
U. .catholicweb.com .:


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



nature Coas

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





What is Unitarian
Universalism?
Many of our "founding fathers"
were either Unitarians or
Universalists. Today, UU is a
non-creedal path which allows
each person the freedom to
search for truth in many ways.
While our congregations
uphold shared principles,
individuals may discern their
own beliefs about spiritual and
theological issues.
Because of the diversity of
beliefs and life styles, our
congregation has rich dialogue
about many spiritual topics.
We are guided by 7 principles
which all UU's share, and put
into action in our church, our
communities and the world.
The Nature Coast Unitarian-
Universalist Fellowship is a
democratic and lay led
congregation. All are Welcome.
Details on our 7 principles,
services and activities are at
naturecoastuu.org,
WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)* Citrus Springs
465-4225


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
Worship ................ 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30


Religion BRIEFS


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, IN1


First Baptist Churchd
of Beverly Hills
Marple Lewis, HI Jeff Owen
Pastor Minister of Worship
and Youth
Sunday Services:
Bible Study 9:15 A.M.
Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Services:
Prayer and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
Located at the intersection of
Hwy. 491 (Lecanto Hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours 9-3 P.M. |
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com







{ff iniCo t


C4 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


RELIGION


ERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STORIES
Continued from Page C1

and demonstrators that greeted 26-
year-old Malik Mumtaz Qadri with
cheers, rose petals and flowers as he
arrived at an Islamabad courtroom to
be charged with terrorism and mur-
der. Witnesses said Qadri fired 20
rounds into Salman Taseer's back,
while members of the security team
that was supposed to guard the Punjab
governor stood watching.
Moderate Muslim leaders, fearing
for their lives, refused to condemn the
shooting and many of the troubled na-
tion's secular political leaders in-
cluding President Asif Ali Zardari, a
friend and ally of Taseer declined to
attend the funeral. Many Muslim cler-
ics, including many usually identified
as "moderates," even praised the act
of the assassin.
Calling himself a "slave of the
Prophet," Qadri cheerfully surren-
dered. He noted that he had killed the
moderate Muslim official because of
Taseer's role in a campaign to over-
turn Pakistan's blasphemy laws that
order death for those who insult Islam,
especially those who convert from
Islam to another religion.
A few weeks later, Pakistan's minis-
ter of minority affairs the only
Christian in the national cabinet -
died in another hail of bullets in Is-
lamabad. Looking ahead, Shahbaz
Bhatti had recorded a video testi-
mony to be played on Al-Jazeera in
the likely event that he, too, was
assassinated.
"When I'm leading this campaign
against the Sharia laws, for the abol-
ishment of blasphemy law, and speak-
ing for the oppressed and
marginalized persecuted Christian
and other minorities, these Taliban
threaten me," said Bhatti, who was im-
mediately hailed as a martyr by
Catholic bishops in Pakistan. "I'm liv-
ing for my community and suffering
people and I will die to defend their
rights."
Meanwhile, the gunmen tossed
pamphlets near Bhatti's bullet-riddled
car that threatened him by name and
stated, in part: "From the Mujahideen
of Islam, this fitting lesson for the
world of infidelity, the crusaders, the
Jews and their aides ... especially the


leader of the infidel government of
Pakistan, Zardari. ... In the Islamic
Sharia, the ruling for one who insults
the Prophet is nothing but death."
The assassinations of Taseer and
Bhatti placed 16th in this 2011 poll. As
for me, I fear that these events say as
much, or more, about the future of
Pakistan and trends worldwide than
the long-expected death of bin Laden.
Here's the rest of the Religion
Newswriters Association's top 10 list:
2. Congress holds intense hearings
on trends among American Muslims,
with the House focusing on evidence
of radicalism in some mosques and the
Senate focusing on crimes reported
against Muslims.
3. Kansas City Bishop Robert Finn is
charged with failure to report the sus-
pected abuse of a child the first ac-
tive American Catholic bishop to face
criminal prosecution in such a case.
4. Catholic leaders introduce a new
English version of the Roman Missal,
the first major change to this transla-
tion since 1973.
5. Leaders of the Presbyterian
Church (U.S.A.) vote to allow "local op-
tion" on the ordination of partnered,
noncelibate gay clergy.
6. Pope John Paul II is beatified -
the last step before sainthood in a
Vatican rite attended by a million-plus
people.
7. Radio preacher Harold Camping
predicts the end of the world, twice.
8. Evangelical progressive Rob Bell
publishes "Love Wins," a controversial
book challenging centuries of Chris-
tian doctrine about hell and damna-
tion.
9. The Personhood Initiative, de-
signed to outlaw abortion, fails at the
polls in Mississippi. The number of
laws restricting abortion, however,
rises nationwide.
10. Historians and readers celebrate
the 400th anniversary of the King
James Version of the Bible, while tra-
ditionalists, including Southern Bap-
tist leaders, criticize the latest gender
language tweaks in the New Interna-
tional Version.

Terry Mattingly is the director of the
Washington Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Colleges and
Universities and leads the GetReli-
gion.org project to study religion and
the news.


GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

where, after his commanding
officer the real Don Draper
- is killed, he switches dog
tags and assumes Draper's
identity and deserts the war
So, Dick, now Don, is a suc-
cessful ad man. However, be-
cause he can't completely shed
his real identity, he's con-
stantly looking over his shoul-
der, on guard lest someone
recognizes him as Dick and ex-
poses him.
That happens a few times.
He's on the train and someone
says, "Dick Whitman! How the
heck are you?"
Dick/Don's upper lip gets
sweaty as he tries to ignore the
person until he finally says,
"You've got the wrong guy."
Another time his younger
brother finds him and comes
to see him in New York. Don
gives him money and tells him
to go away (Spoiler alert: The
brother kills himself in a hotel
room.)
As creative and brilliant as
Don Draper is, even as he's the
envy of all the other ad men in
his office, he's an impostor.
He's Dick Whitman, son of the
town whore, and he's con-
stantly haunted by nightmares
of the former life he's trying to
hide.
Brennan Manning, former
Catholic priest and self-con-
fessed impostor in search of
his real self, writes about his
fake self and how he counts on
outside experiences to give


him inner meaning.
In his book, "Posers, Fakes
and Wannabes: Unmasking the
Real You," he writes, "For a
long time I hid from my true
self by performing in ministry
I constructed a fake identity
through sermons, books and
storytelling. I convinced my-
self that if the majority of
Christians thought well of me,
there was nothing wrong,
right? The more ministerial
success I experienced, the
more convincing the 'Poser'
became."
He adds, "For the Poser, it's
not whether you win or lose,
it's how you look playing the
game."
Eventually, Manning came to
the conclusion that to rid him-
self of his poser or impostor
ways, he needed to "call the
Poser out of hiding," accept
him, embrace him and bring
him to Jesus.
"Because whatever is de-
nied cannot be healed," Man-
ning writes. "We have to
acknowledge our selfishness
and stupidity and gradually ac-
cept that we're as poor and
broken as the next guy And
that it's okay, because if we
weren't then we would be
God."
He goes on to write, "When
we accept the truth about our-
selves and surrender it to
Jesus Christ, we find peace -
maybe not the constant emo-
tional experience of peace, but
genuine peace still, even when
we don't understand it"
Recently, I learned that one
of my favorite Christian writ-
ers, Heather Kopp, started a


blog, "Sober Boots," where she
writes about being a Christian
and being an alcoholic and
how the two are not an
oxymoron.
She says labeling herself an
alcoholic means that she will
always be broken in this par-
ticular way and that she can't
wish it away The label "recov-
ering" means that she under-
stands that when she wants a
drink, what she's really crav-
ing is grace and that being a
Christian means she "believes
God is making beauty out of my
brokenness."
"Sober Boots" refers to her
one-time habit of hiding wine
bottles inside her boots in her
closet, pretending on the out-
side she's something she's not.
Now that she admits she's a
drunk, she's free not to be.
She's now four years sober.
Don Draper never gets free
(so far in the series). He does
end up telling his wife every-
thing, but only after she finds
all his papers that he had
locked and hidden away in a
desk drawer and she di-
vorces him.
How tragic. By holding onto
his fake self, he loses
everything.

Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over, Victoria -
I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her lat-
est book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at 352-
564-2927, Monday through
Thursday, or via email
at nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular meetings for publication on the
Community page each weekday.
* Include the name of the organization, the time, day and place of the meeting, whether it
meets weekly, biweekly or monthly, and whom to call for details.
* Send in information attn: Community Page Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429, or fax to 352-563-3280, attention: Club meetings.
* E-mail to community@chronicleonline.com. Include "Club Meetings" in the subject line.
* For special events or fundraisers, submit a separate news release.


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor

F 43 Years of
RST Bringing Christ
FIR I I to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy, 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses
7:30 A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M.

726-1670


PRIMER IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel9fono: (352) 341-1711


W First First

A I Baptist[
Assembly Church of
.Z ^.. Inverness


550 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida
(352) 726-1252

SUNDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
7:45 a.m.
Bible Study
9:00 a.m.
Worship
10:30 a.m.
Bible Study for all
4:00 p.m.
Worship Choir Practice
5:15 p.m.
Awana
5:45 p.m.
Connection Classes
WEDNESDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
4:30pm Bread Basket Cafe
6:00pm Praise Kids
6:00pm Youth Ignite
6:00pm Mid-Week Worhsip
7:30pm Praise Team & Praise Band
Nursery Provided All Services
Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor
www.fbIIn"eIn"ss II


Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. 6:00 PM Bible Study
Children's Church School
Weekly
ALL ARE WELCOME


Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sirid.,, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship


I'moad

ist


ch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
4 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


INVERNESS
(I CHURCH
OF GOD
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sunda% ritef:



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The little Houset

Fellowship &
A Christian Ministry to enhance
believers by providing discipleship
training and counseling
Sunday Service
lOam
Life Skills Bible Study
Tues. 7pm
Free Coffee & Prayer
M-F 6:30-8:00am
Outreach Events
Joe and Kathi Hupchick
Servants of Christ
4929 E. Shady Acres Drive
Inverness, FL
352-726-9998 Cell 352-613-5216
jkhupchick@tampabay.rr.com


T First United

Vi4ory Methodist

injes S -Church


3esU of Inverness
At 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Victory Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Baptist Church Come as you are.
General Conference (352) 726-2522


I OFFICE: (352) 726i-110U7


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 C5





C6 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

church are invited. "Used
Treasures Sale" from 8 a.m. to
noon Saturday, Jan. 21, in
Hilton Hall. Dan Schall in con-
cert at 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
22, in the sanctuary. Connec-
tional meeting on Wednesday,
Jan. 25, in Hilton Hall with din-
ner served at 5:15 p.m. (call the
church to pre-register). Pro-
grams for adults and children
will follow dinner. "Chicken &
Biscuit" dinner from 3:30 to 6
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28. Menu
includes chicken and biscuit,
mashed potatoes and gravy,
salad, vegetable, dessert and
beverage for $7.50. Sunday
services are 8 a.m. in the 1884
church and 10:30 a.m. in the
main sanctuary. Bible studies
are at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 6
p.m. Wednesday. Call the
church office at 352-344-1771.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church has a "come as you
are" service with Communion at
5 p.m. Saturday. Sunday wor-
ship services begin with early
service with Communion at 8
a.m., Sunday school classes for
all ages at 9:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship hour at 9 a.m., and tra-
ditional service with
Communion at 10:30 a.m. Spe-
cial services are announced.
Nursery provided. The church
is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S.19), Crystal River. Call
352-795-5325 or visit www.st
timothylutherancrystalriver.com.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church will cele-
brate the first Sunday after the
Epiphany at Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. tomorrow with
Christian Formation at 9:15,
Sunday school at 10 a.m. and
nursery at 10:30 a.m. Healing
service and Eucharist at 10
a.m. Wednesday, followed by
Bible study and sack lunch.
SOS at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday. Evening Bible
study in parish hall at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
Today at 6 p.m. and Sun-
day at 9:30 a.m. at Faith
Lutheran Church, Pastor
Lane's sermon is, "Ripping
Open Heaven," from Mark 1:4-
11. The church his at 935 Crys-
tal Glen Drive in Crystal Glen
Subdivision off State Road 44
and County Road 490 in
Lecanto. Following the Sunday
service is a time of fellowship
and then at 11 a.m. Sunday
school and adult Bible study.
The church is handicapped ac-
cessible, has hearing assis-
tance and has a cry room for
small children. Visit faithle-
canto.com or call 352-527-
3325. Everyone is welcome.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise Sun-
day school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service featuring Bible
stories, skits, music and group
activities; Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for all
services except the 7:45 a.m.
class. Evening fellowship is at 6
with various services during
summer months. On Wednes-
days at 6 p.m. is a prayer meet-
ing, "Women in the Life Of
Jesus" study, "Youth Ignite,"
"Praise Kids" and a nursery for
age 3 and younger. Call the of-
fice at 352-726-1252. The
church is at 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
St. Anne's Anglican
Church is on Fort Island Trail
West, Crystal River. St. Anne's
celebrates the first Sunday after
the Epiphany (The Baptism of
Our Lord) with services at 8
and 10:15 a.m. St. Anne's will
host "Our Fathers Table" today
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
Wednesday from 10 to 11:30
in the sanctuary and 7 to 8 p.m.
in the parish library. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m.


Friday and Monday in the
parish library. Join St. Anne's
for a Bluegrass Gospel sing-
along at 6 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
22. Tim's United Bluegrass
Gospel Band will perform. All
are welcome.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Sunday services in-
clude the Holy Eucharist Rite 1
service at 8 a.m. and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 service at 10:30
a.m. Adult Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eu-
charist service and children's
church are both at 10:30 a.m.
Youth Sunday school and
young adult forum with lunch
follows the 10:30 a.m. family
Eucharist service. Feed My


RELIGION


Sheep feeding program for
people in need is at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday followed by a Holy
Eucharist and healing service
at 12:30 p.m. On Thursday,
Jan. 19, the Girl Scouts meet at
6 p.m. and Bible study at the
Radcliffes' is at 7:30 p.m.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way in Beverly Hills, returns to
its normal schedule with wor-
ship at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day. "Bible Information Class" is
at 4:30 p.m. Monday. Choir re-
hearsal is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Senior Fellowship is at 3 p.m.
Thursday in the Fellowship
Room. A free concert featuring
the popular Branches Band will
take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 31. For directions or more
information, call 352-489-3027.
Regular Sunday worship
services are at 8:15 and 11
a.m. at Joy Lutheran Church
on S.W. State Road 2100 at
83rd Place, Ocala. Sunday
school classes are at 9:45 a.m.
The German language worship
service is at 3 p.m. the first
Sunday monthly. The Wednes-
day evening worship service is
at 6:45. Pastor Ed Holloway
leads Bible study in the Gospel
of Luke at 3 p.m. Thursday.
The community is welcome.
Call 352-854-4509, ext. 221.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share in
Sunday's worship at the 8:30
a.m. blended service and 11
a.m. traditional service. Coffee
and doughnuts are served in
the fellowship hall from 9 to
9:45 a.m. Sunday school
classes for all ages begin at
9:45 a.m. Sunday evening
Bible study starts at 6. Wednes-
day services begin at 6:30 p.m.
and include children's ministry,
youth ministry (grades 6
through 12), adult Bible study
and prayer meeting. Sanctuary
choir practice follows at 8 .pm.
Call 352-726-4296 or visit
http://www.fbcfloralcity.org.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
the Children's Ministries Build-
ing. Sunday school begins at
9:30 a.m. with classes for
everyone. The church has
many Christian education op-
portunities for all ages at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Missionettes and
Royal Rangers Clubs meet for
children from the age of 3. All
teenagers are invited to the
youth group, "Gravity," with
Youth Pastor Jon Uncle. At the
present time, the adult class
meets in rooms 105 and 106 at
7 p.m. Wednesday. The church
is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Call the church at 352-
726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. Coffee hour fol-
lows both services. The church
is barrier free and offers a free
tape ministry and large-print
service helps and hearing de-
vices. A nursery attendant is
available for children ages 3
and younger. All are welcome.
Mary-Martha Circle meets at
9:30 a.m. Monday. Breakfast
fellowship at Mama's Kuntry
Kafe in Inverness at 8 a.m.
Tuesday and Bible study, "In
the Beginning," led by the Rev.
Bill Barrett, at 1 and 7 p.m. On
Wednesday, SOS at 8 a.m.,
Ruth-Naomi Circle at 1 p.m.,
Youth Night from 6 to 8 p.m.
and Chancel Choir at 7 p.m.
SOS at 9 a.m. Thursday and
WELCA Board at 1 p.m. Work-
day on the grounds at 7:30 p.m.
Friday. Call the church for more
information at 352-746-
7161 .The church is on County
Road 486, opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando.
NorthRidge Church will
host John Taylor, missionary to
Honduras, on Sunday. He will
minister during the 9 a.m. wor-
ship service. Everyone is invited
to attend. The church meets at
1715 Forest Drive, at the Inver-
ness Woman's Club building,
across from the Whispering
Pines Park entrance in Inver-
ness. The church's home group,
"Faith Journey Bible Study,"
meets the second and fourth


Wednesday monthly. A potluck
dinner begins at 6:30 p.m., fol-
lowed by the video series of
"Faith Lessons" that will help us
understand the Word and the
land of biblical times. For details
and location, call Kennie Berger
at 352-302-5813.
First Christian Church of
Inverness invites everyone to
worship and fellowship. Sunday
school is at 9 a.m. and the wor-
ship service is at 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday evening meals, be-
ginning at 4:45 p.m., are fol-
lowed by choir practice at 5 and
prayer and Bible study at 6 p.m.


The meals are $3 for adults and
$1.50 for children under age 12.
Call the church at 352-344-
1908, email fccinv@yahoo.com
or visit www.fccinv.com. The
church is at 2018 Colonnade St.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Sunday wor-
ship schedule: Traditional serv-
ices at 8 and 11 a.m.,
contemporary service at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school hour at
9:30 a.m., and coffee hour from
9 to 11 a.m. Ordination and in-
stallation of elders and deacons
will take place Sunday and the
Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach on "Prayer That Works,"
with readings from Luke 11:13-
13. The annual Men's Fellow-
ship "Trash and Treasure and
Bake Sale" is from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Thursday and Friday. Pro-
ceeds are given to charity, in-
cluding unsold items.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church, 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, welcomes everyone
to worship at Divine Liturgy on
Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers
at 5. A coffee hour/fellowship
gathering takes place after Di-
vine Liturgy every Sunday. The
church appreciates donations
of canned goods and other
nonperishable items, which are
donated regularly to the Citrus
County Resource Center. Visit
www.straphaelchurch.org.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
352-794-3372 or 352-795-
8883, or email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Trusting Heart Ministries
Bible Study group meets at 6
p.m. the second and fourth
Thursday monthly at 176 N.
Rooks Ave, Inverness. This
group is open to all denomina-
tions. Call 352-860-0052 or
352-586-5174 or email trusting
heartministry@yahoo.com.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and for
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups also meet at 9 a.m.
Sunday and 10 a.m. and 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. All residents
of the area are welcome. Sun-
day morning worship service is
at 10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school
classes begin at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowing fellowship, coffee and
goodies. The morning service
begins at 10:45. The Sunday
evening service begins at 6.
Midweek service is at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The church is on
East Parsons Point Road in
Hernando (directly across from
the Hernando Post Office).
At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms is
preaching verse by verse
through the Book of Revelation
during the morning service.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m.
with classes for all ages. Sun-
day church services are at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. with special
children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is
provided for all services. Every-
one is welcome to attend. The
church is at 9850 S. Parkside
Ave. in Floral City, just south of
Floral Park. Call 352-726-0360
for more information.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.


Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call 352-
795-4943 or 352-563-0056.
First Church of God (a
nondenominational congrega-
tion) worships at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday and includes a chil-


dren's church service. Evening
service at 6. Choir practice at 5
p.m. Wednesday, followed by
prayer time and Bible study.
JoyBelles ladies meet the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly. Men's
breakfast the last Saturday
monthly. Theme-planned fel-
lowship supper once monthly.
The "Saturday Night Gospel
Singing Jubilee" at 6 p.m. the
last Saturday monthly is open
to all. Refreshments and fellow-
ship follow. Church is at 5510
Jasmine Lane, Inverness. Call
352-726-8986.
Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
family life center, at 2018
Colonade Street. Sunday serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and
Beverly Hills on Tuesdays. Call
the church at 352-637-0923.
New Beginnings Fellow-
ship, 2577 N. Florida Highway
in Hernando, invites the com-
munity to spirit-led revival serv-
ices during the week and
Sunday worship services.
NBF's weekly schedule in-
cludes "Wednesday Night in the
River" and "Friday Night Fire"
services at 7 p.m. A fellowship
dinner precedes both meetings
at 6 p.m. Dinner guests are
asked to bring a dish to share.
Special guest ministers are in-
vited often. Child care provided.
Sunday celebration services at
8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
worship, Bible-based word
teachings and prophetic prayer
ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m.
service. Childcare provided for
the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call
352-726-8333.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m., followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays.
The church is in Old Ho-
mosassa at 10540 W. Yulee
Drive. Turn onto Yulee Drive
from U.S. 19 at Burger King,
follow to stop sign, turn left,
church is about one mile on left.
Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call 352-382-2557.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children's/youth program for
ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call 352-489-7515.


Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at 352-212-4320.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call 352-
746-3620.
All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
days at The Little House, 4929
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick
at 352-726-9998.
House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. at North Lecanto Highway
and North Dawson Drive, Her-
nando. Wednesday Bible studies
and youth meeting at 7 p.m.
Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Everyone
is welcome. Jessie Lolley is the
pastor. Call 352-621-7260 for
information.
House of Peace, a nonde-
nominational full-gospel church
and a division of House of
Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service. All are
welcome.
Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
North Avenue West,
Brooksville. Call 352-796-8331.
Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-746-1270.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit, Hernando, is a tra-
ditional Anglican mission with
ancient roots. The 1928 Prayer
Book is used. The church is at
1023 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way, Hernando. Call 352-
637-5922.
Just for kids
"Saturday Night KIDZ,"
for children 5 years old through
the third grade, is available on
Saturday nights while parents
and teenagers are involved in
"Praise, Prayer and Power" at
North Oak Baptist Church in
Citrus Springs. Bible stories
and activities for children are
led by a team of workers.
Child care is also available
for babies through 4 years of
age. Saturday night services
begin at 6 and everyone is wel-
come. The church is at the in-
tersection of N. Elkcam Blvd.
and N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Call
352-489-1688 for more
information.
Grace Bible Church in Ho-
mosassa invites all children in


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

preschool through eighth grade
to Awana Club from 6 to 8:15
p.m. Tuesday through April.
Awana is an acronym -'Ap-
proved Workmen Are Not
Ashamed' from 2 Timothy 2:15
in the Bible. Awana is one of
the largest nondenominational
children's and youth ministries
in the world. The church is at
6382 W. Green Acres St. in Ho-
mosassa. Call the office at 352-
628-5631.
The Episcopal Church of
the Advent offers Sunday
school classes for children
ages 3 through 12 from 10 to
10:45 a.m. Sunday. Immedi-
ately following Sunday school,
children may participate in the
celebration of Holy Eucharist
with the congregation. The
class is open to all area chil-
dren; they don't need to be
members of the church. The
curriculum is called "Godly
Play," and is taught by Maryann
Brennan and her helpers. The
church is 1.2 miles west of
State Road 200 on County
Road 484, across from the fire-
house. Call the church at 352-
465-7272.
First Baptist Church of In-
verness has AWANA from 5:15
to 7:15 p.m. Sunday. The pro-
gram is for children 2 years
through fifth grade. "Adult Con-
nection Classes" are during the
AWANA session. Call the
church at 352-726-1252 for in-
formation and registration. The
church is at 550 Pleasant
Grove Road.
Live & learn
FreshStart DivorceCare
is a 13-week video-based and
Bible-based program offered
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mon-
days through Jan. 30 in Room
1 of Inverness First United
Methodist Church. The program
is led by Grace Cardona and
child care is provided. Call the
church office at 352-726-2522
to sign up, or for more informa-
tion, call Grace Cardona at
352-634-1837.
Abundant Blessings
Messianic Congregation
hosts a teaching series titled,
"Prayers: The Keys To the
Kingdom (The Greatest Force
on Earth)" at 5 p.m. Thursday
at the Homosassa Springs
Public Library.
Learn how the Lord's Prayer
is a Kaddish, the vehicle or
Merkabah (chariot) to traverse
the five realms of being and the
10 dimensions of quantum
physics. Come and experience
Jewish Christianity and the way
Yeshua (Jesus) worshiped. Call
352-544-5700.
Peace Lutheran Church
offers Wednesday evening
Bible study, preceded by a
potluck meal, at 6:30 p.m.
Other opportunities for Bible
study are at 10 a.m. Wednes-
days and 9 a.m. Sunday. Sun-
day morning worship service is
at 10. All residents of Dunnellon
and surrounding communities
for dinner, fellowship and Bible
study on Wednesdays. "The
Church On The Hill" is at 7201
S. U.S. 41, five miles north of
Dunnellon. Call 352-489-5881
or visit www.PeaceLutheran
Online.org.


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County; friendly
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Page C7 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7,2012



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

HPH Hospice
offers orientation
The Citrus team of HPH
Hospice will have volunteer
orientation Jan. 18 and 20, at
the administrative office in
Beverly Hills next to Winn
Dixie.
HPH volunteers provide a
community service to local
residents who, due to the iso-
lation of illness, need assis-
tance and support.
HPH Hospice volunteers
also provide support to the
organization by performing a
wide variety of office duties,
special events and crafting.
HPH Hospice volunteers
strive to make a difference by
helping families make every
remaining moment with fam-
ily members the best it can
be.
For more information or to
register for the next volunteer
orientation, call Debi Shields,
volunteer coordinator, at 352-
527-4600.
Golden Agers
meet at church
The Golden Agers meet-
ings will resume at 11 a.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 10, in the fel-
lowship hall of First Baptist
Church of Floral City.
After a business meeting,
the Hernando Kitchen Band
will perform. A covered-dish
meal follows.
NARFE convenes
in Inverness
Chapter 776 of the Na-
tional Active and Retired Fed-
eral Employees Association
(NARFE) invites all active
and retired federal employ-
ees and surviving annuitants
to attend the next meeting at
12:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9,
at B&W Rexall Drugs, 214
U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
The 1 p.m. regular busi-
ness meeting will follow
lunch. Guest speakers will be
representatives of the
AARP's Tax-Aide program.
For more information, call
352-270-0185.
Writers, poets
gather Jan. 21
Citrus County Writers and
Poets Group will meet at 1
p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, at the
Central Ridge Library Com-
munity Room.
All who write for fun, or for
publication, are welcome.
Bring ideas of what you'd like
to accomplish with our group,
and a sample piece of writing
you'd like to share.
RSVPs are required
through www.meetup.
com/writersandpoets. Seat-
ing will be limited.
For more information, call
Charles Lawrence at 352-
613-3624.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Flip Flop


Special to the Chronicle
Flip Flop is a sweet, 4-year-
old grey tabby who has lost
her human and needs a
new home. Visitors are
welcome from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.hofspha.org.


These taxing times


Help available to

complete 2011 forms

Special to the Chronicle

AARP Tax-Aide will provide free in-
come tax form preparation and elec-
tronic filing services in Citrus County
again this year
AARP Tax-Aide is a nationwide
service of the AARP Foundation of-
fered in conjunction with the U.S. In-
ternal Revenue Service. It is a
volunteer-run program whose mission
is to provide high-quality free income
tax assistance to low- and middle-in-
come taxpayers with special attention
to those 60 and older It is not neces-
sary to be a member of AARP; taxpay-
ers of all ages are welcome to use this
service.
Volunteers are trained locally and
certified by the IRS to assist taxpayers
in preparing their federal income tax
returns. All taxes are prepared using
IRS/AARP-provided computers and
software and the returns are filed elec-
tronically free of charge. In Citrus
County, more than 110 volunteers pro-
vide this service at seven sites, open
Feb. 1 through April 14. The final day
for filing is April 17 this year
What to bring to the appointment:
Social Security cards or compara-
ble documentation for you, your
spouse (if applicable), all dependents
and anyone listed on your tax return.
An official photo ID (driver's li-
cense, passport, student ID or other
state-issued photo ID).
A copy of your 2010 income tax re-
turn, if available.
Income-related documents: forms
W-2, unemployment compensation
statements, SSA 1099, 1099R and other
1099 forms showing home mortgage in-
terest or other income.
Expense-related documents: re-
ceipts, cancelled checks or other doc-
umentation showing federal and state
taxes paid, 1098 forms, documentation






Lions donation
Lion Peg James, Crystal River Kings
Bay Lions Club eyecases
chairwoman, accepts a donation of
$300 from Lion John Myers,
president of the Inverness Lions
Club, at the 2011-12 Kings Bay
installation luncheon recently at
Oysters Restaurant.

RUTH LEVINS/Special to the Chronicle


WHERE TO GO:


All sites are by appointment only; you
must go to the library in person to make
an appointment; calls not accepted.
Central Ridge Library: 425 W.
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills, 352-
746-6622; from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. every
Friday, Feb. 3 through April 13 (except
Good Friday, April 6). Saturday only on
Feb. 18 and March 17 from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Appointments must be made in
person.
Citrus Springs Community Cen-
ter: 1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, 352-465-7007; from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. every Tuesday, Feb. 7 through
April 10. No appointment necessary;
first-come, first-served basis only.
Coastal Region Library: 8619 W.
Crystal St., Crystal River, 352-795-
3716; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Thursday, Feb. 2 through April 12.
Saturday only on Feb. 4, 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Appointments must be made in
person.
Crystal River Moose Lodge:
1855 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa,

of medical, dental, charity, property
taxes, mortgage interest paid, or busi-
ness expenses. Receipts for expenses
need to be in reasonable order and leg-
ible.
Brokerage statements or other
documentation showing cost basis
(purchase price) and date purchased
for all securities or property sold or
transferred during the tax year
All paperwork related to:
Health Savings Accounts (HSA);
IRA rollovers, including Form
5498;
The purchase of a home by a first-
time buyer;
Purchase and installation of en-
ergy-efficient products for a primary
residence;
Cancellation of Debt of a credit
card(s) or the foreclosure of a primary
residence;


352-795-2795; from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 6
through April 16. No appointment
necessary; first-come, first-served basis
only.
Floral City Public Library: 8360
E. Orange Ave., Floral City, 352-726-
3671; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Tuesday, Feb. 7 through April 10.
Saturday only on March 24 and April 7,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Appointments must be
made in person.
Homosassa Public Library: 4100
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa, 352-
628-5626; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every
Wednesday, Feb. 1 through April 11.
Saturday only on March 10 and April
14, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Appointments
must be made in person.
Lakes Region Library: 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness, 352-726-2357; from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every Wednesday,
Feb. 1 through April 11. Saturday only
on Feb. 25, March 31 and April 14, 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Appointments must be
made in person.

Dependent Care Provider infor-
mation: (name, address, employer ID
or SSN) and amount paid;
Documentation of self-employ-
ment income and expense (Tax-Aide
cannot prepare and e-file your return
if expenses exceed $10,000, or if you
had employees, inventory, cost of
goods sold, real estate, depreciation or
loss from operations.);
A check with your name printed
on it for direct deposit/debit of any re-
fund/balance due. (A check in your
checkbook is acceptable. A cancelled
check is not required. It must be a
check: no bank statements, deposit
slips or other documents will be ac-
cepted.);
If you receive a pension or annuity
from a former employer, bring the date
that you began to receive payments. (In
some cases, this is required.)


NAMI Citrus begins new year


N AMI Citrus' regu-
larly scheduled
meeting will begin
the new year Monday, Jan. 9,
at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, County Road 486,
Citrus HIlls. Doors open at
6:30 p.m.
Speaker will be Ginger
Kearns, of the Center for In-
dependent Living in
Lecanto. Her reputation for
problem-solving and know-


NAMICITRUS


ing how to navigate the
many avenues of assistance
available for a variety of is-
sues and disabilities will
make for a most informative
evening.
If you need "navigation
assistance," please plan on
attending.
Being a volunteer helping


an organization can seem
like an uphill task.
During our past two meet-
ings, we had speakers from
various agencies and it has
been thrilling to learn how
their efforts in concert
with ours have resulted
in dramatic life changes for
a vulnerable, underserved


population.
When you make a dona-
tion to NAMI Citrus, you are
a part of this success.
As always, you may call
our Warm Line at 352-341-
2273 for information. See
you on Jan. 9, beginning a
successful new year!

Marilyn Booth is a
member ofNAMI Citrus.


Clubs to celebrate 20th anniversary


It's 2012 and the Boys & Girls Clubs panded with a new club and facility in
of Citrus County will be Beverly Hills, the Central
20 years old in March of Ridge Boys & Girls Club.
this brand new year Each year we name a
This is an exciting time for Youth of the Year Our
us. During the past 20 years Youth of the
we have served thousands of Routh y of the Year for 20
Citrus County children. We Robert Halleen Boys &
have grown from one club in Girls Club. Roy has liter-
Crystal River with 99 mem- ally grown up in our clubs.
bers, to three clubs serving He has been a member
some 700 boys and girls each since 2006.
year Lane Vick Our children and their
We have been able to give BOYS & families participate in
out more than 500 scholar- community service proj-
ships during the past three GIRLS CLUBSects such as collecting toi-
years. let articles for the
During this same time, we Salvation Army, visits to
have received more than $701,141 in nursing homes, cleaning up litter
grants, and through various fundrais- along the Rails to Trails, working at
ing efforts have earned some $708,960. the animal shelter, canned food drives
Community members have volun- and cleaning up the shores of the
teered a total of 14,447 hours of time rivers. We've done recycling and tried
with our children. In 2009, we ex- to teach others the value of it.


United Way of Citrus County, Kids
Central Inc., the Early Learning Coali-
tion, Citrus County Sheriff's Office,
Citrus County School System, and
many businesses as well as generous
individuals have played a big part in
our growth.
We thank the people of the commu-
nities of Citrus County for their 20
years of support and ask them to stay
with us for the next 20 years. We prom-
ise it will be an adventure!
As far as we are concerned, the first
20 years is only the beginning. We are
proud of our past and expect the fu-
ture to be even better We will keep
working and reaching out to children
in our county, asking them to grow
with us. Great futures start at the Boys
& Girls Clubs.

Lane Vickis executive director of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County


Reserve


tables


now for


sale
Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County
Home & Community Edu-
cators' yard sale will be
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 11, at the Cit-
rus County Auditorium,
3610 S. Florida Ave, Inver-
ness (by the fairgrounds).
Proceeds will go to help
sponsor Citrus County
community projects. Or-
ganizers request that only
clean, pressed and like-
new yard sale items be
sold. Tables for the event
may be rented at a cost of
three tables for $30. Two
chairs will be included.
No stand-alone displays
are allowed due to fire
code and ADA require-
ments.
Reservations are se-
cured once payment re-
ceived. We accept checks
or money orders. Make
checks payable to the
CCHCE Council. For table
reservations, call Barbara
at 352-746-9245. Space is
limited.
Setup will be from 1 to 4
p.m. Friday, Feb. 10. The
Citrus County Home &
Community Educators do
not profit from the sales of
the sellers.


YMCA


programs

begin soon

Special to the Chronicle

At the beginning of the
school year, the Citrus
County YMCA received a
grant for its afterschool
programs, and through
the fall, 95 children in Cit-
rus County have received
full scholarships.
The scholarships are
through a grant made pos-
sible by the Florida De-
partment of Children and
Families, and Kids Cen-
tral Inc.
To apply for financial
assistance through the
YMCA to receive a schol-
arship, call the Citrus of-
fice at 352-637-0132.
There are 70 scholar-
ships available for the
third session of the pro-
grams, which begins the
week of Jan. 23 at nine
local elementary schools.
The six-week programs
will feature soccer, dance,
science and art, and will
be at the schools following
dismissal, from 3:40 to
4:40 p.m.
Registration is due by
Jan. 13. Both registration
and financial assistance
forms are available at
each participating school
office and online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Visit the Citrus County
page on the Y website and
download the form for
your child's school, along
with the financial assis-
tance form. The YMCA of-
fice is at 3909 N. Lecanto
Highway in Beverly Hills.

News NOTE

Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will
have its pancake breakfast
from 7:30 a.m. to noon
Sunday, Jan. 8.
Cost for adults is $4; chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for
$2. Menu includes all-you-
can-eat pancakes, choice of
bacon or sausage or combo,


orange juice and coffee or
tea.
For more information, call
Lion John at 352-746-4010.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.








SATURDAY EVENING JANUARY 7, 2012 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 I 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
WESH NBC 199 19 19 NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams TBA. (N) xc NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams TBA. (N) (In Stereo Live) Xc News Sat. Night Live
Priceless Great Romances The Lawrence Welk Show A tribute Being Served? Keeping Up As Time Goes By As Time Goes By Great Performances LA Phil's gala Tavis Smiley Reports LA Phil music
PBS 3 3 14 6 Antiques of 20th Century to movie music.'G' Christmas Appearances PG PG' 'PG' features Gershwin. (N) 'G'x director Gustavo Dudamel. 'G'
(WUET PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 The Lawrence WelkShow'G' Andy Griffith |Andy Griffith ** "Shake Hands With the Devil" (2007, Drama) Roy Dupuis.'R' Austin City Limits (N) PG' c Live From the Artists Den 'PG'
WFLA NBC M 8 8 8 8 8 8 NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams TBA. (N) (In Stereo NFL Football AFC or NFC Wild-Card Game: Teams TBA. (N) (In Stereo Live) Xc News Channel 8 Saturday Night
_NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 Live) cxat11PM(N) Live (N)'14'
Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! 'G' c Wheel of Fortune Wipeout Snowplow Sweeper; Republican Debate "Republican Presidential Candidates Debate in New Eyewitness News Hot Topics'PG'
W ABC W 20 20 20 20 Weekend G'X cWipeout Ski Lift. 'PG' Hampshire" Candidates discuss the issues. (N) (In Stereo Live) Weekend
To Be Announced CBS Evening 10 News (N) The Young Icons Rules of Rules of The Mentalist "Red Hot" A building 48 Hours Mystery (In Stereo) PG'X 10 News, 11pm Paid Program
(W CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) x G' Engagement '14' Engagement '14' explodes. (In Stereo) '14' (N)
WTVTFOX 13 10 3 1 3 1 3 FOX13 6:00 News (N) xa TMZ (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' s Cops"Odd Cops"Smooth Terra Nova "Within" Taylor and Jim FOX13 10:00 News (N) xc Hell's Kitchen The remaining four
SFx 13 13 13 13Arrests 4" (N) 14' Criminal" PG confront the mole. '14' xc chefs compete. '14' sa
WCJB ABC D 11 11 4 15 News |World News Entertainment Tonight (N) 'PG' Wipeout (In Stereo) 'PG' Republican Debate Candidates discuss the issues. (N) (In Stereo Live) News Crook & Chase
CLF IND 2 2 2 2 22 22 Cornerstone With John Hagee JackresVan Impe Great Awakening All Over the Freedom Today Great Awakening
ABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! G'X Wipeout Snowplow Sweeper; Republican Debate "Republican Presidential Candidates Debate in New ABC Action News Grey's Anatomy
ABC 11 11 11 11at 6 PM 'G' XWipeout Ski Lift. 'PG' s Hampshire" Candidates discuss the issues. (N) (In Stereo Live) at11 PM "Push" 14'
WMORIND 12 12 ioFamily Guy '14' c Family Guy'14' c The Big Bang The Big Bang House "It's a Wonderful Lie" House "Frozen" The team treats an Movie'MA'
WM IND ED 12 12Theory PG' Theory '14' Paralysis. (In Stereo) '14' x Antarctic scientist. '14' x
WTTA MNT D 6 6 6 6 9 Hollyscoop'PG' Paid Program Ring of Honor Wrestling '14' m That '70s Show That '70s Show Futurama'PG' Futurama'PG' Ring of Honor Wrestling 14' m Bones Half-eaten body found.'14'
WAC) TBN M 21 21 21 The Faith Show Summit Bible M & J Koulionos Life Center Church IHal Lindsey 'G' Variety Claud Bowers Tims Ministries |Spencer Wisdom Keys |St. Luke Lead
The King of 'Til Death 'PG' Two and a Half Two and a Half Criminal Minds The team pursues a Cold Case "Ravaged" A sister's NUMB3RS The team must track The Unit The team must defuse
cw M 4 4 4 4 12 121Queens PG' Men PG c' Men PG c' chameleonlike killer. PG death may have been murder. '14' down Granger. 'PG' s three dirty bombs. 14' x
WYKE FAM 16 16 16 16 Ford in the Fast To Be Announced I Spy Y' Cold Squad (In Stereo) '14' s (DVS) Da Vinci's Inquest (In Stereo) 14' sa Movie 'MA'
rAM M 16 16 16 16 Lane
WOGX FOX g 13 13 7 7 FOX 35 News at 6 (N) cx Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory Cops (N)'14' |Cops'PG' a Terra Nova "Within" '14' x FOX 35 News at 10 Late (N) x Hell's Kitchen '14' c
WVEI UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 FamiliadeDiez INoticiero Protagonistas'PG'(SS) Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) 13 Miedos (SS) |Noticiero
WXPX) ION 17 Psych (In Stereo)'PG' c Psych (In Stereo) 'PG' c Psych "In Plain Fright" 'PG' c Psych "Dual Spires" 'PG' c Psych (In Stereo)'PG' c Psych (In Stereo)'PG'x
E 54 48 54 54 25 27 Dog the Bounty Hunter PG' Storage Wars IStorage Wars Storage Wars IStorage Wars |Storage Wars IStorage Wars Storage Wars IStorage Wars Storage-Texas Storage-Texas
55 64 55 55 ***Y* "The Magnificent Seven"(1960) Yul Brynner.'NR' *** "Joe Kidd"(1972, Western) Clint Eastwood. 'PG' c Hell on Wheels "Derailed"'14' *** "Rio Bravo" (1959) 'NR'
52 35 52 52 19 21 Pit Bulls and Parolees 'PG' My Cat From Hell "Wildcat!" 'PG' My Cat From Hell (In Stereo) 'PG' Pit Boss (N) (In Stereo) 'G' Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) 'PG' Pit Boss (In Stereo) 'G'
ETD 96 19 96 96 The Game '14' |The Game '14' IThe Game'14' The Game '14' The Game'14' |The Game '14' The Game '14' The Game'14' "Truth Hall" (2008, Drama) Jade-Jenise Dixon, Karimah Westbrook. R
[iBAV0J 254 51 254 254 Real Housewives/Beverly r***/, "Braveheart" (1995) Mel Gibson. Premiere. A Scottish rebel rallies his countrymen against England. 'R '***/, "Braveheart"(1995) Mel Gibson. 'R'
fCe 27 61 27 27 33 **Y Extract I*/, "Delta Farce" (2007) Larry the Cable Guy'PG-13' c |**, "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby"(2006) Will Ferrell.'PG-13'x |Ron White: Behavioral Problems
CMT 98 45 98 98 28 37 *** "Grease"(1978, Musical) John Travolta. 'PG' \** "Footloose"(1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer. Premiere. 'PG' The Singing Bee (In Stereo)'PG' The Singing Bee
43 42 43 43 Paid Program |Paid Program Money in Motion |American Greed |Debt Do Us Part The Suze Orman Show (N)'G' Debt Do Us Part Debt Do Us Part American Greed
40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) ICNN Presents 'PG' c Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' c
DISN 46 40 46 46 6 5 Austin & Ally'G' Shake It Up!'G' Good-Charlie Good-Charlie lAustin & Ally'G' So Random! 'G' Wizards of Waverly Place 'G' A.N.T Farm'G' A.N.T Farm 'G' A.N.T Farm 'G' |A.N.T Farm'G'
33 27 33 33 21 17 Poker Europe World Series of Poker Europe SportsCenter (N) (Live) 14' c Poker Europe World Series of Poker Europe |World Series of Poker Europe SportsCenter (N) (Live) '14' E
[ESPN2) 34 28 34 34 43 49 The Fab Five xc High School Basketball Unguarded cx 30 for 30 (N)
EWTiN 95 70 95 95 48 Worth Living |God Weeps |Mother Angelica-Classic *** "The Jeweller's Shop" (1988) 'NR' IHoly Rosary Web of Faith 'G' ccThe Journey Home 'G'
29 52 29 29 20 28 Pixar Short Films Twenty computer-animated short films. 'PG' ***/, "Up" (2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed Asner. 'PG' ***Y, "Up" (2009, Comedy) Voices of Ed Asner. 'PG'
44 37 44 44 32 America's News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) The Five Journal Editorial |FOX News
26 56 26 26 Chopped Chopped "Make a Splash!"'G' Chopped "YaketyYak, Yak, Yak" Chopped "Class Acts" Chopped 'G' Iron Chef America
[FS 35 39 35 35 Action Sports World Tour College Basketball Alabama at Georgia. (N) (Live) UFC Unleashed 'PG, V Boxing Top Rank: Emmanuel Lucero vs. Diego Magdaleno.
(E) 30 60 30 30 51 How I Met |How I Met How I Met |How I Met |How I Met |How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men |Archer 'MA' |Archer 'MA'
67 PGA Tour Golf Hyundai Tournament of Champions, Second Round. From Kapalua, Hawaii. (N) (Live) Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf
lHALLI 39 68 39 39 45 54 *** "The Parent Trap" (1998) Lindsay Lohan. Reunited twin girls try to get their parents back together. | "Fixing Pete" (2011, Romance-Comedy) Brooke Burns. 'NR'N I"Fixing Pete" (2011) 'NR'
m***' "Avatar" (2009) Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in love ** "Arthur" (2011) Russell Brand. Premiere. An irresponsible playboy ** "Valentine's Day" (2010) Jessica Alba. Los Angeles residents wend
mow 302 201 302 302 2 2 with a native of a lush alien world. (In Stereo) PG-13' s must choose between love and money (In Stereo) PG-13' s their way into and out of romance. (In Stereo) PG-13' a
[filiGV) 23 57 23 23 42 52 House Hunters |Hunters Int'l House Hunters |Hunters Int'l Design/Dime |Dear Genevieve Color Splash 'G' |DonnaDec House Hunters |Hunters Int'l House Hunters |Hunters Int'l
HIST 51 25 51 51 32 42 Ax Men "Tipping Point" '14' E Ax Men "King of the Hill" 'PG' Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy
LIFE 24 38 24 24 31 "Nora Roberts'Montana Sky" (2007, Drama) John Corbett. 'NR' ** "Another Woman's Husband" (2000, Drama) Lisa Rinna. "Another Man's Wife" (2011, Suspense) Rena Sofer, Dylan Neal. 'NR'
"The Haunting of Sorority Row" (2007, Drama) Leighton Meester. A "Jodi Picoult's Salem Falls" (2011, Mystery) James Van Der Beek. A "The Initiation of Sarah" (2006, Suspense) Jennifer Tilly. Premiere. A girl
( _____) 50 freshman suspects a sorority house holds sinister secrets. 'NR' a man defends himself against a devastating accusation. 'NR' a becomes the focus of a battle between good and evil. 'N R'
*** "28 Days ** "She's Out of My League" (2010) Jay Baruchel. *** "Robocop"(1987, Science Fiction Peter Weller. A murdered police- ** "Sucker Punch" (2011) Emily Browning. Premiere. Aqirl's dream
320 221 320 320 3 3 Later"R' An average Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. 'R' man returns as a crime-fighting cyborg. (In Stereo) R'R world provides an escape from a dark reality (In Stereo) 'FG-13' E
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary |MSNBC Documentary
MTV 97 66 97 97 39 Teen Mom 2 (In Stereo) 'PG' Teen Mom 2 (In Stereo) 'PG' Jersey Shore '14' m Ridiculousness |*** "Hustle & Flow" (2005, Drama) Terrence Howard, Taryn Manning. (In Stereo) 'R'
65 44 53 Ultimate Factories 'PG' Ultimate Factories "Coca-Cola" Ultimate Factories Alaska State Troopers jAlaska State Troopers '14' Ultimate Factories
S 28 36 28 28 35 25 SpongeBob |SpongeBob iCarly G' |iCarly G' Victorious'G' |iCarly'G'a Victorious'G' |iCarly'G' Tfhat '70sShow That '70sShow Friends'PG' |Friends'PG'
I XYI 44 **2 ""The Notebook"(2004) Ryan Gosling. A man tells a story to a woman about two lovers. 'PG-13' **, '"The Notebook" (2004) Ryan Gosling. A man tells a story to a woman about two lovers. PG-13
Homeland "Pilot" **Y "Red" (2010, Action) Bruce Willis. iTV The CIA targets a team of ** "The Mechanic" (2011, Action) Jason Statham, Strikeforce: Rockhold vs. Jardine Luke Rockhold vs. Keith Jardine; Robbie
340 241 340 340 (iTV) 'MA' former agents for assassination. (In Stereo) PG-13' cx Ben Foster. iTV. (In Stereo) 'R'x Lawler vs. Adlan Amagov From Las Vegas.
tSPEEUJ 122 112 122 122 On the Edge (N) Stuntbusters Stuntbusters |Stuntbusters |Stuntbusters Stuntbusters AMA SupercrossYear in Review IAMA Supercross Special "Anaheim" (N) (Live)
[SPIKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 The Marine 2'R' ** "Behind Enemy Lines" (2001, Action) Owen Wilson. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' **/- "The Replacements" (2000) Keanu Reeves. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Perfect Storm
36 31 36 36 TBA Lightning Live! |NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Montreal Canadiens. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) |Lightning Live! Israeli Bask. |TBA Fight Sports MMA
t$YE 31 59 31 31 26 29 The Stand i*Y "End of Days" (1999, Horror) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Gabriel Byrne. R'X cc**Y "Constantine" (2005, Fantasy) Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz. Premiere. 'R' |**Y 9
CrgS 49 23 49 49 16 19 Friends '14' Friends'14' |Seinfeld 'PG' Seinfeld 'PG' Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory lBig Bang Theory Big Bang Theory |** "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail"(2009) Tyler Perry 'PG-13'
*** "Nevada Smith"(1966, Western) Steve McQueen, Karl Malden, **** "City Lights"(1931, Comedy-Drama) Charlie **** "Modern Times"(1936, Comedy) Charlie Chaplin. Charlie A Dog's Life
169 53 169 169 30 35 Brian Keith. Part-Indian hunts down his parents' killers. NR' a Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill, Harry Myers. G' Chaplin's comical commentary on automation's evils. G
53 34 53 53 24 26 Gold Rush "Lovestruck"'PG' Cops & Coyotes'14' c Gold Rush "Gold At Last"'PG' Gold Rush "On the Gold"'PG' Gold Rush (In Stereo) PG'X Gold Rush "On the Gold"'PG'
[TiC] 50 46 50 50 29 30 To Be Announced Dateline: Real Life Mysteries PG Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'PG' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries 14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries 14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'PG'
48 33 48 48 31 34 *** "The Fifth Element" (1997) Bruce Willis. 'PG-13' s **** "The Dark Knight" (2008) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. ** "Van Helsing" (2004)
(TRI 9 54 9 9 44 Sandwich Paradise 'G'x Extreme Pig Outs 'PG' m Ghost Adventures 'PG' c Ghost Adventures 'PG' Ghost Adventures 'PG' m Ghost Adventures: Scariest
truT] 25 55 25 25 98 98 Most Shocking '14' Top 20 Most Shocking '14' Top 20 Most Shocking '14' World's Dumbest... '14' World's Dumbest... '14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
TVJ 32 49 32 32 34 24 The Exes'PG' The Exes'PG' The Exes'PG' The Exes'PG' The Exes'PG' The Exes'PG' Love-Raymond |Love-Raymond Everybody Loves Raymond 'PG' Love-Raymond King of Queens
[A) 47 32 47 47 17 18 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit **Y "Funny People" (2009)
[WE] 117 69 117 117 Ghost Whisperer 'PG' m Ghost Whisperer "Cursed" 'PG' Ghost Whisperer 'PG'x Ghost Whisperer 'PG' ~ Ghost Whisperer '14' m Ghost Whisperer 'PG' c
WINi 18 18 18 18 18 20 Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14' America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine (N) x 30 Rock'14' |Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
At the bridge table, it is impor-
tant to pay close attention to the
exact spot cards in a suit or suits!
In today's deal, you are South.
East deals and opens three hearts.
What would you do?
East has a heart suit that does
not meet traditional pre-empting
standards: two of the top three or
three of the top five honors. But
players are much more cavalier
these days, pre-empting whenever
they have a weak hand and a long
suit. They hope to win more on the
swings than they lose on the round-
abouts.
You should overcall three no-
trump. Yes, you have only 18 high-
card points and partner might have
none. If West is loaded, you will go
down badly But you should assume
partner has about seven points. If
he doesn't, get a new partner, one


Bridge

North 1-7-12
+ Q 7
V 7 4 2
+ 8 5 4 2

West East
4986532 4J 104
V -- VKJ98653
AK QJ + 9
*J 10 6 4*52
South
AAK
VA Q 10
10 7 6 3
+ K Q 9 7
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
3I

Opening lead: + A
who holds better cards! In particu-
lar, do not make a takeout double


with only a doubleton in an unbid
major
What should West do? It is dan-
gerous to bid four spades, but it
works well here, going down only
one.
Against three no-trump, West
cashes four diamond tricks, then
exits with a spade. How would you
continue?
Since East must have the king
and jack of hearts, you have nine
tricks via two spades, three hearts
and four clubs. But you need two
dummy entries to take the two
heart finesses.
After winning the spade shift,
cash the king and queen of clubs,
noting the 3-2 split. Then carefully
overtake your club nine with
dummy's ace, play a heart to your
10, lead the carefully conserved
club seven to dummy's eight, take
the second heart finesse, and
claim.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NYUIT i


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

I love it It's like having --
a year round Cnrislm3a -
Ir ,n our yard





^-' -TO -
I i5 '-- .





HE PL-ANThP THE
NEW EVERGEIEN IN HI-
YARP TO --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:(Answers Monday)
(Answers Monday)


0
o .




o-




-I
0 0







-2


ACROSS
1 Mi. above sea
level
4 Bear's foot
7 Tooth anchor
11 Zodiac sign
12 Rustic road
13 Singer -
Adams
14 Turns into
wine
16 Upbeat beat
17 Sunday
dinner
18 Aykroyd and
Rather
19 Shuttle's
destination
20 Gloss target
21 Kind of sugar
24 Debacle
27 Big carnival
city
28 Ancient
ointment
30 Endangered
trees
32 Air quality
concern


Crow's-nest
locale
Mich.
neighbor
Threadbare
Any Elvis
recording
Shout of
disapproval
Really tiny
Port side
Fab Four
member
- Dunaway
of films
Edge
Navajo foes
Yin
complement
Princess
irritant
Cozy dwelling
Joule fraction
Dip in gravy

DOWN
Chatty alien
of TV
Bold look


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ASK LPN AFR
ROE LOAD SURE
LAPA L O AREA_

0PIPT MIf ST LISP
NAT EPOCH

DAEMRIEPEPUPI
SNIDE ELS HRS
INURE GI LT
STRUM ABE
FIRE IN FINITY
ERAS AULD CRO
TENT KLEE K EG
ENS LTD YEA


3 Pamplona
runner
4 Wheezes
5 Hill builder
6 Unseld of the
NBA
7 Backslide


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Thor's father
Fixes a
squeak
Lunar New
Year
Diminish
Snail -
Width of a cir.
Slangy hats
Fem. honorific
Objectives
Bah!
Come
unraveled
Clump of dirt
All, in combos
Pulpit
Sault Marie
Long chat
Angling a nail
Plant sci.
Allow to use
Twisted
After midnight
Watches
carefully
Openings
Layered
cookie
Enjoyment
So long!
Kayaking
accessory
Imitate an
annoying dog


D earAnnie: I'd been seeing
"Ralph" for more than
three years. We were ac-
tually living together
the last year. Ralph is
60, and I'm 55. Six
months ago, he an-
nounced that he
couldn't be in the rela-
tionship any longer.
After a lot of talk and
prodding on my part,
the only reason I could
get out of him was,
"It's not you. It's me."
What does that mean?
That's not a reason. AN N
Ralph said he still MAIL
loves me, and I'm to-
tally in love with him.
But not wanting to stay where I
wasn't wanted, I promptly moved
out. I then found out that Ralph
was seeing an old girlfriend.
They spent their time going out
and partying.
I've been so lost since this hap-
pened. I don't understand his
reasoning. I'm hoping he'll real-
ize we had something great to-
gether and come back to me.
Everyone, including Ralph's
family, wonders what's going on.
Is this a late-in-life crisis? Am I
wrong to keep hoping? Un-
lucky in Love
Dear Unlucky: Ralph could be
having a midlife crisis, but he
also could simply want to be with
someone else. We have no way to
predict his future actions, but we
will tell you that it is unwise to
wait for him. Live your life to the
fullest, which not only will keep
you active and happy, but will
allow you to meet new people,
which is always a plus.
Dear Annie: My son and his


wife went away for a weekend,
and she accidentally left her
wedding rings at home. When
they returned, the
rings were missing.
Her 17-year-old
brother, 20-year-old
sister and the sister's
boyfriend stayed at
the house to watch
their dogs. We later
found out that the
brother had a teenage
friend over, and we
think he stole the
rings.
IE'S My daughter-in-
BOX law's family is a bunch
of losers and thieves.
Her father insists no
one took the rings, and no one is
doing anything about it. My
daughter-in-law is a wonderful
person who helps her family all
the time, and this is the reward
she gets. She keeps telling me
she is going to file a police re-
port, but hasn't done it.
I am beside myself. My prob-
lem is, how do I handle an up-
coming family occasion? I don't
want to start a war, but neither do
I want these people in my house,
and I don't want to be around
them. What do I do? -A.
DearA: This is your daughter-
in-law's family, and although you
don't like them, you obviously
care for her. That means putting
up with her family now and then.
If you don't trust them in your
home, have the festivities else-
where in your son's home or at
a restaurant. You also can lock
up the valuables.
As for the missing rings, these
belong to your daughter-in-law,
and she gets to decide how she


wants to handle the alleged theft.
It's loyal of you to be angry on her
behalf, but it serves no useful
purpose if it also upsets her.
Please try to let it go.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "M.," whose siblings ex-
pected her to pay $100 for a meal
when she only ate a $10 salad. I
have been a waitress for years
and am always surprised when
people have issues with splitting
the check when they did not eat
or drink equally
There is absolutely no reason
not to ask for separate checks
when you order your meal. Even
if it is the restaurant's policy not
to do so for large parties, it still
can be done. Ask for the manager
if your server hesitates. Our in-
dustry is in a slump, and we will
do what it takes to make the cus-
tomer happy LJ.E.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W
Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los An-
geles, CA 90045. To find out
more about Annie's Mailbox
and read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at www.cre-
ators. com.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ASCOIF



FUWREC
II


y






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


VT REALLY LObG6 ME
NAMES o -STREETs
OR Say 'o MALLr
t.4,A SIOLVMtICE
uT MAkEO SEK5E.







Sally Forth


TAKE Tt6o0E 1ERE,
FoR EAAMPLE.TIrE
PEAC4 ORCHARP MALL.






- ...' _"_---


For Better or For Worse

(wmhAT5 RAPPEINIO- M SHE
rtoU, MICHAEL? SORRY -


Beetle Bailey


YOU'RE DYING TO F 2012 IS OUR
SAY SOMETHING LAST YEAR, AT
ELSE, AREN'T LEAST WE GOT
TOSEE ONE MORE
NEW MUPPET
'MOVIE.


Dilbert


The Born Loser

W GRAR1APA GAEAE ANWTCAT | I CA'T
TRAT USED TO BELONG T-- TELL
TO ATGRRBAA! ,- \ OU.


CAN'T TE-LL7L
T WA.E2 (


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


PJ--- -J .. r - -





Big Nate

I 4iATE TO BREAK
THIS TO YOU, DAD,
BUT YOUR DOODLES
INDICATE
A TOTAL
LACK OF
CREATIVITY. '_






Arlo and Janis -


"For pity's sake, Pa, how many times have I
told you not to order the extra-spicy?!"


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Dennis the Menace


LET ME TILL YOU ABOUT U'
MV 1AVORITEL YNKEI TkIll. G UY
POI ROASI RICIPE ,.,1iTr

,=1 ----.i-

t-rEri'ION!

IC (0- ,


The Family Circus


1/-7 L |
"P0 YOU GUUS6 KNOW HOW OR/WN5 IT WOULP
BE AROUND HERE WiTOUT M_?"
Betty


"I said 'because' and that's final!"


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"War Horse" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.
"We bought a Zoo" (PG) 1:30 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" (R) ID required.
1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked" (G)
1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:30 p.m.
"Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" (PG-13)
1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Devil Inside" (R) ID required. 2 p.m. 5 p.m., 8
p.m. 10:15 p.m.
"The Darkest Hour" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10 p.m.


"War Horse" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:35
"We Bought a Zoo" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:25
p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Adventures of Tintin" (PG) 4:10 p.m.
"Adventures of Tintin" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:35 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol" (PG-13)
1:25 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" (R) ID required. 1:15
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked" (G)
1:50 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODAY'S CLUE: M equals A


YKXGE JXYK UBGTV ... SHXR ZBUT


SBPRBGZ ... APV NBPL ZPUUTL KBUTZ


XGZYTMF BN TXEKY." HH SBBH 0

Previous Solution: "Those who bring sunshine into the lives of others cannot keep it
from themselves." J.M. Barrie
(c) 2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-7


DAG, WHY ARE YOU I'M TRYING
HONKING YOUR HORN TO G- lr,
AT THE GUY IN TO :..
FRONT OF US? 0




,-*- 4-Z 4


OH, VEAH, MAYBE IF I 1-
NOW I SEE TRY FLASHING MVV
> IT! YOU'RE HEADLIGHTS
LOOlING AT \ ,, _

4 'i15 J


FOR EXAMPLE, THAT'S
LOOK AT TH4E NOT A
WAY YOU MAN,
DREW THIS THAT'S A
MAN RIGHT WOMAN.
HEREI..


71 "n '7


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 C9








CIO ATUDAYJ~uiiy7, 212 LASIFIES Cmus ouir~ FL) HROICL


CITRUS COUNT




CHKONICLE Classifieds
www.chronicleonline.com Cl/ssifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS H

MONDAY-FR
8:00A.M.-5:(
CLOSED SATURDAY


WE GLADLY P

I~ 171 ...?


If one of your New
Years Resolutions
is that you are tired of
being alone & want
to meet a nice guy
for a compatible
companionship. I
might be the fellow!
I am a active wid-
ower in reasonable
good health looking
to meet a nice lady
between 65 & 75 or
so, who is in GOOD
HEALTH, attractive,
intelligent, affection-
ate, personable, who
has a lot of interest &
things to do. likes to
go & do things &
is a good
CONVERSATIONALIST.
My preference is a
slim or
petite lady, who
dresses well that I
can be proud to be
with. If you fit the
description, Please
give me a call
I would love to meet
you.(352) 527-0591

Oriental Lady need
friend, 73 yrs old, 5'5"
125 lbs, healthy, no
smoking or drinking,
love the outdoors,
Tsai P.0, Box 895
Waldo, Fl. 32694




12 ft. Native Kayak
with electric motor,
battery, paddle, and a
sail, and extras,
$500.
(352) 628-3097
2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$119,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
com (727) 415-7728
'91 Dodge
Caravan-Loaded
Excellent shape,
1 owner,$1795 or best
(352) 621-5265

BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday 7, Only 8a-?
LOTS OF STUFF *
1318W. Buttonbush Dr.

CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p
ESTATE SALE*
1417W. Pringle Place

Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus
garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $259,900.


OURS:T O Publica

DA.Y 0^** Chronicle / Daily
)OPM A AHomefront / Sun
t0 P.M. OR PCY R OLE
(/SUNDAY M Chronicle/ Mo
Sumter County Ti

ACCEPT (m IN Riverland News
t & South Marion Cit
New Ne seretMario



LA IV- /3


(-R IA RllI. IlVtlR ,J/ I
CHA, W/D hk-up $550.
352-382-1344, 423-0739

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $450 mo. + 2/1
Storage Bid. $550 ALL
HOMOSASSA
4/2/2+Carport $595
(612) 226-0091


Dinette Set
black wrought iron,
glass top, 5 chairs,
like new $350.
(352) 489-4804
HOMEMADE BOX
TRAILER 10'LONG
FRAME. MEASURES
6LX4WX4H. $400.00
352-563-1519

Lic. Experienced
HAIR STYLIST

To For Work for a
Team Based Salon
Apply within:
Nu-Yu Beauty Salon
4019 Beverly Hills Plz

Riverhaven Village,
Homosassa, FL
GREAT LOCATION,
GREAT HOUSE,
GREAT NEIGHBOR-
HOOD! 2147 sf, 3/2 +
Ir/dr comb, den, sun-
room, inside laundry,
all appliances. bit. by
Rusaw in 1989, well
maintained, upgrades,
move in ready.
Asking $160,000
all offers considered.
Realtors 3%
See visual tour:
www.visualtour.com/sho
w.asp?t=2656780&prt=10
003&sk=13
Frank or Helen Harris,
352-628-1434
email: hharris3


SATURDAY 7, 8a-2pm
902 Spruce Street
PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHF,elect. New
135 Honda, 4S, new EZ
Load trlr. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
TRAIL LITE
'01, 17ft, Hybrid,
Air, heat, fridge, bath,
shower, basement stor-
age, 460 lb bike carrier,
sleeps 6, excel. cond. ,
$4,995 (352) 422-1026
Treadmill
Weslo Electric treadmill
Good Condition $75.00
Call 352-637-1965



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



2 kittens both 10 weeks
old 1 is a female long hair
an 1 is short hair male
need to find them homes
due to mine an sons
ashma an allergies
please help me find them
homes, there good with
dogs an kids, they are
lovebugs,
(352) 560-3693
4 Free Kittens
(352) 419-4058
Free American
Bulldog, to a good
home, 4 years old,
male, white with red
spots, NEEDS A YARD,
up to date on shots,
friendly 352-400-6053
Free Calahulah mix
to good home, good
farm dogs, serious in-
quiries only, call
352-794-7385 or
352-212-7186
Free cat and
dog,serious inquiries
only please, Call
352-586-2629
Free horse manure ,pure
no shavings, you haul
352 513-4473
Free Horse Manure
and shavings
for garden
(352) 746-7044
FREE Horse Manure
GREAT FOR GARDENS
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
746-3545
FREE PINE STRAW
YOU LOAD & HAUL


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com1


Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera I Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
- Watch I/Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
-Wheelchair / Scooter I-
Rechargeables / Chargers I att
Airsoft/RC etc.

I 3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness

I New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Closed Saturday & Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Mention this coupon get a freepack of batteries.


Needs loving home.
Spayed, all shots, 1-1/2
yrs old, Please call
Megan, (352) 233-3837
Free retired Paso fino
horse to good home for
companionship only no
ride 352-513-4473
free to good home
Kittens, puppy,
cats & dogs
(352) 216-6668
FREE Turkey Oak wood
Large pieces. U pick up
& haul (352) 344-4482
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
STRAWBERRIES,
CABBAGE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inv. GIFT SHIPPING
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
CLOSED SUN
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 oer lb


$bUU REWARD
Have You
seen This Doa?


Fawn Cdor,

w/black

face mark-

ings,
English Staffordshire
Terrier Mix. 65 lbs
Lost, 1/3/2012
In Lake Park Area
Hernando
Name "Thunder"
813-230-9750
No Questions Asked

Sand read
Black Dog At Large
since 11/11
No secure Clues, Not 1
of the roadside Victims by
Howard's or on 490 by
RockCrusher,more i have
no word on deceased
Riley's Auto
Electric(490) approx
11/20 picked up by ?,
hit by a man
accidentally and moved
to roadside.-Any Help
would really Help.
(352)-503-6494
220-3890
Lost Cockatiel, female
Cinnamon Ginger color
responds to whistle
REWARD, Also Lost
Male Light orange, Cat,
yellow eyed, black
flea collar, name Max
off 41, Inverness
(352) 476-0055
Lost Gray Cat, Female,
fluffy w/ white feet, off
Malver Street btw.
Highlands & South
Apopka
REWARD
(352) 533-7415
352 -400-8903






REWARD $1000.
No Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
REWARD for
LOST DOG!
Vicinity of 486 and
Crooked Branch Rd.
Small, brown, chihua-
hua mix, responds to
"Angel." Please bring
her home! We miss
her very much. Re-
ward of $250.
Call Kristin @
422-3391 or
knoelle80@yahoo.com

REWARD
Lost Black & White
Border Collie
Name "Decaf"
Singing Forest Park
(202) 460-9261
Family Pet,
Heartbroken




FOUND ORANGE CAT
IN BEVERLY HILLS
PLEASE CALL TO DE-
SCRIBE HE MISSES HIS
MOMMY (231)597-6577



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500
Chld,'1 CaIre {


OFFICE ASSISTANT
WANTED
CITRUS KIA
is seeking a self
motivated Individual
who can multitask
and is familiar with
Word and Excel
programs.
$10/hour, Full Time,
Email Resume to
Lparisi@citruskia.com
or fax to
(352)564-8665.





BOOTH RENTAL
Nail Tech
Massge. Therapist
Esthetician
Permanent
Makeup
Office (352) 527-0077
Cell (352) 464-1166





HEALTH AIDE
Homosassa Area
Assist with care for
an elderly
lady in her home
352-382-1039

HOUSEKEEPERS
& HOUSEMAN

Ap ly within NO Calls
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA/
CAREGIVER
Must have Med Tech,
CPR & First Aide.
Call 344-5555 Ext. 102

CNA/HHA's

Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

DIETARY AIDE

PRN/PT position for
our skilled nursing
facility. We offer a
good salary & work
environment.
Apply In person.
Citrus Health and
Rehabilitation Center
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit


NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience

Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

P/T Receptionist

Busy Medical Office.
Medical Exp. a plus
Fax: Resume
352-746-5605

Receptionist
& Dental/Surgical
Assistant
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Experience
preferred, excel.
pay & benefits.
Fax Resume To:
352-564-0284
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com


RESIDENT
ASSISTANT
Nursing experience
preferred, caring for
Elderly. Must be
energetic and caring
Apply at
BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W Norvell
Bryant Hwy.Lecanto
EOE/DFWP

Veterinarian
Receptionist
Must have outstand-
ing organizational
skills, busy phones &
superior customer
service skills
Veterinarian
exp. preferred.
Please Call
352-843-8387
to Arrange for an
Interview





CASA IS HIRING

P/T Position Sat & Sun
7pm to 7am $8.hr
Must understand the
dynamics of
domestic violence.
Must have some exp.
helping others.
Applications taken at
CASA @ 1100 Turner
Camp Rd. Inverness
Fl. 34453


ition Days/Deadlines

.......................................1 PM Daily
day............................... 3 PM, Friday
ay...................................4 PM, Friday
iday..................................4 PM, Friday
mes / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
/ Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
izen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
ssenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


V


I


Youth Care
Worker
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for maximum risk
males committed to
the Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for

Youth Care Workers
Must be over 21
years of age, have
High School Diploma
and be able to pass
a Level 2 back
ground screening
Must be able to
com plete self- de-
fense and physical
intervention training.
Ability to tolerate
verbal and mental
abuse while main-
taining a professional
demeanor.
Ability to perform
appropriate crisis in-
tervention, including
physically breaking
up fights.
Pick up an
application at
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto,
Florida, 34461
Drug Free Workplace
/ EEO






Positions
Available

CAFETERIA STYLE
restaurant has open-
ings for a few hard
working employees
that can handle the
pressure of a fast
paced restaurant.
Multi-tasking in all
areas from customer
service to clean up.
Also seeking
experienced
BREAKFAST COOK.
All must pass
pre-employment
screening and drug
test. Fax resume to
352-563-4646 or
email to mary@
bellscatering.com





APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
Phone Sales, Commis-
sion Only from our Inver-
ness office 860-2522.

SALES/
INSPECTOR

Self Motivated,
Sales Experience,
We offer: Company
Truck, Benefits,
Paid Vacation.
Apply within
3447 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Inverness
(352) 746-2990





EXPERIENCED
HVAC TECHNICIAN
HVAC Technician
needed with install &
service experience. Call
860-2522.





$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip. dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay/
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS NEEDED
No nights,
No weekends.
Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI





BEEN.


INDUSTRIAL
EQUIPMENT OPER-
ATOR MECHANICS
Breen Energy Solutions is
looking for (12) Industrial
Equipment Operator Me-
chanics. Salary of $37K
to $45K. 1-year position
in Crystal River, FL. Medi-
cal, 401K, paid overtime,
relocation & housing
allowance. 15% bonus.
View details at
www.breenes.com/CRjobs.


OFFICE POSITION

Part Timecould be FT
to the right person,
Starting pay$8.50 per
hr. Excellent phone,
typing ,computer skills
Send resume and job
skills to: mrsims1955@
yahoo.com.
Location Inverness,
FL, In business over 20
years


P/T PHONE SALES
Research/Computer,
medical ad,
Exp.Personable,
Occas. day travel.
(352) 564-9442

Part-Time Float
Teller/CSR

CenterState Bank
Crystal River &
Inverness Offices.
Position is
20-29 hrs/wk.
Mon. Fri.
Experience Preferred.
Pease contact
Brenda Waller
352-860-0794
or visit company
website:
www.centerstatebank.
com for
application.
EOE/DFWP




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)











*PHYSICAL REHAB
TECH $475.
*NURSING ASST. $475.
*PHLEBOTOMY $475.
*EKG $475.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


ENROLLING
I For January I
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.


BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
L-- -1-1




8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182
COMMERCIAL Lawn
equipment w/custom
trailer Gravely & Stihl
342-308-3853



3X4 LALIQUE Crystal
BULLFROG New. $99.00
352-422-3886
BACCARAT 4X5 CRYS-
TAL ELEPHANT $99.00
352-422-3886
GONE W/THE WIND
PLATE 1988 & numbered
Scarlett & Her Suitors.
$35. 352-637-2647
GONE W/THE WIND
PLATE 1988 numbered
Scarlett and her Suitors.
35.00 352-637-2647
GONE W/THE WIND
PLATE Marry Me Scarlett
1991 & numbered. $35.
KINKADE'S HOME
SWEET HOME PLATE
First edition and num-
bered $35.00
352-637-2647



2 Kenmore Freezers-
chest med style $75.00
or an upright freezer
$100.00, works great
No calls before 10AM
(352) 628-4766
A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES up to $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914

Kenmore 70 Series
washing machine, HD
SC Plus, perfect cond,
6 years old, $150
(352)860-0412 or
352-201-8985
Kenmore side by side
fridge, bisque, 2yrs old
ice/water in door,
$350(352) 795-0596


"Gral
ene
Help


BEVERLY

HILLS
Saturday 7:30-2PM
Inside Home @
6142 N. Lecanto Hwy.
(behind St. Paul's
Lutheran Church)


5 17 2 3169 4 8
4 6 38 97251
289415763
7485 6 9312
691324587
352 1 7 84 9 6
176952834
1 3 47 7 8 126 2 5
9347816 2 56 41 725
825643179


MICRO WAVE USED
Oven $25.00 or best offer
352-513-4473
REFRIGERATOR GE
20.6 cubic foot, white
with ice maker in
freezer
$100 352-220-4480
Refrigerator Whirlpool,
side by side with ice
maker, electric range,
self cleaning, glass top
over stove microwave,
frigidaire, 8 yrs old.
bisque excel cond. All
for $650.352- 746-3171
Refrigerator, Frigidaire
21 cu ft. w/ ice maker,
2 yrs., like new
white, $275. obo
(352) 344-2615
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WASHER & DRIER
White used $70.00 for set
mharlow@tampabay.rr.com
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver.
352 263-7398
Whirlpool Refrigerator
white, side by side
ice maker &
water on door,
excel, cond $275.
(352) 382-2743
WHITE RANGE HOOD
has light & fan $15
352-419-5549



2 AUCTIONS
THURS. Jan. 5
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3pm
Outside only w/great
variety of furnishing,
tools & surprises!
********
$ SUN. JAN. 8
Antique &
Collectible Auction
Prev:10 Auction Ipm
Estate jewelry, coins,
furniture-Victorian to
Mid Century, rugs, Art,
pottery, crystal, MORE!
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc



GENERATOR PORTA-
BLE powered by Briggs &
Stratton; Wheelhouse
5550 watts. Model
1646-3. $687 new; sell for
$400. Call 352-382-3962.
MILWAUKEE 1/2 IN
DRIVER DRILL 18 V & 2
new
batteries,charger,case.Like new.
$130 firm
352-897-4154
TOOL BOX delta plastic
heavy duty tool box cross
over the truck bed.
$100.00 352-5134473



13 INCH SONY TV
W/REMOTE GREAT
FOR KID'S ROOM OR
KITCHEN $20.00
352-726-0686
Cabinet stereo w/ cas-
sette, record player,
radio,36in w/2 Fisher
speakers $25.00
(352) 560-6137
Panasonic Plasma
TV 58" like new,
must see $700 obo
(352) 382-3449



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



SOFA-*
Really nice sofa with
wood trim ..
$250.00 Call
352-419-6609
2 ANTIQUE WOOD
IRONING BOARDS Two
sizes, good condition -
$45.00 each (352)
382-4911
2PC DESK Off white
Ashley Computer desk w/
Hutch. Good condition.
sacrifice $85
352-897-4678
Alert-sofabed, clean,
green and mauve on
light beige, Need the
room! $85 Firm
(352) 628-3798
BEAUTIFUL COUCH
clean no rips, quality
leather 419-5549 $100


Sofa Bed,
$150.
(352) 795-7254
CHAISE VICTORIAN
STYLE BURGUNDY EX-
CELLENT CONDITION
$70 DVD/CD rack $30
352-777-1256
COFFEE TABLE OVAL
wood and glass Excel-
lent cond Very attrac-
tive $85. Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
COUCH & 2 CHAIRS.
Couch w/hide-a-bed, 1
recliner chair & 1 rocker
swivel. $Free.
634 0422
Crescent shape
sectional couch
seats 6, tan $200.
(352) 382-1541
Danish style room di-
vider with provision for
a bar, excel cond $100
Moving must sell!
(352) 726-5692
Dark wood bedroom
set, full/queen size
headboard(no bed),
dresser, chest of draw-


ETHAN ALLEN END TA-
BLE Antique Pine with
two drawers. Excellent
condition. $100.00
(352)382-3196
Fla Style sofa/sleeper,
loveseat,coffee table,
end tables & lamps. Ex-
cel. Cond.$375 Crystal
River (828) 483-4550
King bedroom set triple
dresser, mirror lamps,
mattress, box spgs,
nightstands $400 all
Lazyboy reclinerdouble
sofa$200(352) 726-5692
KITCHEN OR FLORIDA
ROOM TABLES WHITE
FORMICA
WOOD&VINYL 30.00
EACH 352 637 5171
KITCHEN TABLE WITH
LEAF & 4 CHAIRS Light
color wood. $100.00
352-489-6840
LEATHER SOFA 93"
AND LOVESEAT 68" -
100% leather all around,
taupe, good condition,
but some cat scratches,
$599.99 352-341-6991
LOVE SEAT & CHAIR
W/OTTOMEN Over-
stuffed. Great condition!
Earth tones. $100 each
352-897-4678
NICE DARK WOOD
FRAMED MIRROR 37
1/2 x 41. $50.00
Bathroom/Livingroom
(352) 382-4911
Oval Thick Glass
Cocktail Table
44 x 30 with ornate
brass base $135.
(352) 527-8961
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Recliner's
2 custom made, multi
color strip, like new
$300 each
(352) 382-4912
SEWING MACHINE
CABINET. Arrow Cab. 5
drawers, white w/oak
trim, exc. cond. asking
$125.352-212-7760
SLEEPER SOFA& RE-
CLINER Flex Steel neu-
tral color very good con-
dition $250.00
Recliner neutral color
good condition $100.00
352-628-2579
SOFA Leather
Black, makes bed
$190.
347-308-3853
Solid Oak corner en-
tertainment center
w/32" color TV, exc.
cond., $200
(815) 600-5133
TABLE/MIRROR SET
3pc Marble,glass & iron.
Coffee,in table &
mirror.Sacrafice $100
each 352-897-4678
Used floral couch. $50.
Very good condition.
Smoke free home. Must
pick up. 352 792 7610.
WOOD CHAIR VERY
OLD Desk or office
Good condition Dark
oak color $40. Pine
Ridge 352-270-3909



CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
The time is NOW!!! 20lb.
bag $4.00 352-563-1519
FARM SOLD Clearing
plants & statuary,
1000's of plants, OPEN
Sat/ Sun or call for
appt.(352) 465-0649
5019 W StargazerCitrus
Co. Dunnellon
GRAVELY Commercial
Stihl complete set-up
w/cust.trailer, many
items347-308-3853
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, fast track, 19
HP Honda engine
$2200 352-746-7357
SOLD!!!!
Snapper riding lawn
mower with attached
spreader and thatcher
$250, moving must sell!



BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday 7, Only 8a-?
LOTS OF STUFF *
1318W. Buttonbush Dr.

MOA I 14I,
SALE
Cinnamon Ridge
Sat 7-? 1 day Only
Two Family Sale!
780 Thyme Pt
710 Thyme Pt
(By Rock Crusher Can)







Citrus Springs
Sat Jan 7 8am-2pm
Furniture and more!
8363 N Upland Dr
CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat. & Sun. 9a-3p
ESTATE SALE*
1417 W. Pringle Place








Crystal River
Fri & Sat 8am-4pm
Tools, lawn mower
house items & clothes
5705 N Brookgreen Dr


M O VING


CLO SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


ers, mirror, night-
stand,$175 for all Call
after 10am.628-4766

Dinette Set
black wrought iron,
glass top, 5 chairs,
like new $350.
(352) 489-4804




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~NPI ~


CRYSTAL
AUTMOTIumVE


YvYwwYYw


'11 IMPALA


'10 300
w lowA


'10 ELANTRA


'10 CIVIC


1-800-W-8755 Ext.3160


$12,999 $16$99 $9,999 $13,99
OR$184 O OR~40 MO. I OR 141 Mo. 198 MO.


09 PT CRUISER


'09 JOURNEY
4--t-ypt


'09 WRANGLER


'08 IMPALA

|m I


F R E 4 RM SSA G E I N O A S E K W
1l800-58"755 FAA2W


$6,999 $11,999 s16,999 s$8999
oR $99 *0 0 oR$170 "o. 0$240M O. o$127 mo.


'08 CAMRY


'08 300


TOWN & COUNTRY


'06 ALTIMA


7LI


$1Q999 $10,999 $12999 $9,499
oR$155 MO 0. o$155 MO. 0 OR184M O I 0R$157 70.


'06 SILVERADO


'05 WRANGLER


'05 ACCORD


'04 F-250


$7999 $11,999 $7999 $11,999
0R E O. R E R EOVO 0RR I MO.


IND CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
NOMATE HEE O PLf^A N TO BUY!


0


0


*


1-800-W-8755 t.3160


FlREE 24HR RBORDE MESAGEWr bOA)SEC IN
1-800-5 -8755 Et.1717


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 Cll


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lb,800.58"7:55 idZ13


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1-800-8"755FAA20


|M 24 R R lME MMM ITHIFOAD PR IICN
i-WfO-5:8:4-875 E.61i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Our 2012 lineup of fuel-efficient cars,
trucks, SUVs and crossovers is here.
Get into the Ford you want with
great offers that make it easy for you to
get behind the wheel.
Come in today. And start the new year
in a brand-new Ford. You'll know why
Ford is the best-selling brand1 out there.
Get out of the old and into the new
at Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln today.


Start the new year in

a brand-new Ford.


2012 FUSION SE


$24,915 MSRP


-2,000
-500


Retail Customer Cash
Trade In Cash


$500 Ford Credit Cash

SALE PRICE

*21,9152


2012 TAURUS SEL


$29,250 MSRP


-300
-2,000


Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash


-500 Ford Credit Cash


SALE PRICE

$26,450


2012 ESCAPE XLT


$26,235
-300
-2,000
-500
-500


MSRP
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Trade In Cash
Retail Bonus Cash


SALE PRICE

$22,935


GRAT ELCTONOFQALIYPR SN EHCE
l ---( --
owl


'03 FORD WINDSTAR SE '02 FORD FOCUS WAGON ZTW
1 owner Loaded
$5,950 $6,950


'07 FORD FOCUS ZX4 '06 FORD ESCAPE XLT '08 FORD FOCUS SE
One owner
$9,950 $9,950 $10,950
B~saE'^^B t-ij11w"^-' "mi "W--.^^^


'05 GRAND MARQUIS LS '09 CHEVY AVEO LT
11,000 miles
$11,950 $13,950

[0GADAQUSLS


'08 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S
$18,950



'07 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
Signatue Limited, 30,000 miles
$21,950


'09 MERCURY MARINER
$18,950



'10 FORD FUSION HYBRID
40 MPG
$21,950


'07 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950


'10 FORD FUSION SE
$18,950


'08 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
All Wheel Drive, loaded.
$22,950


'09 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$15,950


'10 FORD FOCUS SE
$16,950


'08 LINCOLN MKZ '08 FORD FUSION SEL
65 000 miles, loaded 28,000 miles
$17,950 $17,950


'10 FORD E-350 CLUB WAGON
XLT, 12 passenger
$21,950
^tota0N


'09 FORD EDGE SEL '08 F.150 XLT CREW CAB 4X4
$22,950 $24,950
, I I II


'11 LINCOLN MKX '08 SHELBY GT 500 '09 F.150 CREW CAB 4X4
44,000 miles, like new, loaded Lariat
$31,950 $32,950 $32,950


37,'2,UUU miles
$44,950


Nick


Nicholas


C


rysta


R


lye


Hwy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on CYTD sales, 11/11. 2 Prices and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory
rebates with approved credit. Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit
Financing required. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible
for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good
through 1/31/12.


LIN


Call Toll Free
877-795-7371
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


COLN


C12 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


t RiverMi


'09 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
$19,950







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




7 MENS JE
Levi's 550
36 XZ
CRYSTAL RIVER Military
Saturday 7th, 8a-3p each (35
Tools, windows, doors, XL MES
plumbing supplies, SHIRTS
truck wheels, pool ta- IT
ble boat moto & more $4.00 (3
6188 W. Pine Circle

NEIGHBORHOOD
SA LE RADIO
BASE SC
FL ORAL channels i
FLORAL antenna a
CITY $65.00:
All Park Yard Sale,
Singing Forest Park
Corner of Old Floral
City Rd. & E. Keating 4 WHEE
Park St. Sat. Jan. 7 added
8amNn ___j brakes,NE

HERNANDO cost $15
35-
4291 N. Longvalley Road 352
Friday and Saturday, CLARITY
8a.m. until 4:00. Couch, 2 PHONE
Recliners, side-by-side phone-larn
Refrigerator, men's nice bers $:
clothes, end tables etc. 38
I DIGITAL
Vivicam 8(
era. Need:
HOMOSASSA Cnlyye
7770 W Ariane St House-
hold items,bedding, FOLD-/
dishes, RC airplane parts, 150FOR HI
books, collectibles, Wind- 6 CU FT
sor back chair. Thurs,Jan FOR ST
5 -Sat,Jan 7 8am-4pm. 727.
HO Child
ble, 5x9,\
S packs,
(352)
Home sal
15xl8x
compare
(352)
Homosassa HOOVER
Fri., Sat., Sun., 9a-? HAR
Tools, fishing items, lots CLEANEF
of household items dition-$
2141 S Stonebrook Dr HUFFY
INCH MC
RED HA
YARDSALE RON
352
Friday 10a-4p PERICa
Sat. 8a-4p 76"long w
In/Out. All proceeds go $50.00
to feed the hungry. 50
Helping Hands Ministry JOHN
7863 W. Homosassa TrI. Antiques
& F
B invites'
Big MO

HOMOSAS- JAN. 5

SA Hwy, (35
Saturday 7th, 8am KIDS TRA
Vintage, Vintage new Imma
Vintage & More plete set
1 Sycamore Drive acsseor
Sugarmill Woods 352-
Oak Firew

MOVING Pck
Mo0 1 G;4% can(
SALE (352)
SAND B
new! Ste
INV. $50 35

Highlands JANOMEE
Fn Sat. 8-3p new. Bou
Sony sterenosystem Used 6 r
pictures, nice glass- Cost
ware, rugs, clothes & $500 OBC
misc. 805 Windy Av STORA
INVERNESS SHEL F
SATURDAY 7, 8a-2pm STEEL 77
902 Spruce Street $90 72
WHEELB,
BIC FEET
GRAVEL
25.003
White
In Fl
LECANTO (301)
Citrus Cty
Largest Sale!
Indoor/Outdoor BEDSIDE
Hwy 44/Maynard Ave ADJUST
Tuesday-Friday 8a-3p NUM W,
Saturday 8am-3pm EACH 35;
63
MO V IG EXERCI
.... -- "-- TYPE MA
SA L.E ALSO
A K~


Lecanto 3
Friday, Sat Sun 7-? GO
Washer, dryer, furniture El
too much to list! fits
3812 W Northcrest Ct New
(3
YARD SALE MANU
S WITH
LEC
ONL
Homosassa
Sat 8a -? Table & M(
chairs, sofa, recliner CHAIR
gun,mower, reesee n
hitch & misc. Red
7170 W. Jackson Lane (6




4eI-^^ L% 1AE 2hl


352(
G<
LITE
s in
$11
52)
UAL
FO(
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OBII
, Je
ew
uce
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MEANS 38 X 30
0 & Bugle boy.
29 Dockers.
35/39(s)$4.00
52) 634-2737
N'S DENIM
Long Sleeve
52) 634-2737



SHACK 2048
CANNER 200
with telescoping
nd power plug.
352-794-3020



EL WALKER
eat,basket, hand
EW,never used
0.sell $75.00
344-2321
*AMPLIFYING
E Walker 300
ge lighted num-
30-excellent
12-0220
TL CAMERA
318 digital cam-
s memory card.
ars old. $15.00
746-1017
A-CART TFC
HOME/MARINA
FOLDS FLAT
STORAGE $90
857.6583
Tren's train ta-
with 2 power
no train $99
566-7478
fe, new in box
22, black, 5
tments, $200
795-9146
SPIN-SCRUB
D FLOOR
R excellent con-
25 382-0220
10SPEED 24
)UNTAIN BIKE
,RDLY USED
LY 50.00
6375171
TRUCK TOP-
no 61"widex
/slider windows
352-422-6865
I EDGAR'S
, Collectibles
furniture
You to A Big
VING SALE
-14, 9a-4p
Gulf to Lake
52) 302-8146
IN TABLE Like
iganarium com-
t. w/storage &
ies.Ask $100
897-4678
wood for sale
p load $50,
drop off
465-1820
OX Large like
ep 2 w/ cover.
.2-897-4678
G MACHINE
DC 4030 Like
ght Apr., 2011.
months. Orig.
was $699.
0 352-746-7355
GE RACK, 4
HEAVY DUTY
HELVING UNIT
24" D X 78" H
27.857.6583
ARROW 4 CU-
* GOOD COND
ONCE FOR
REDUCED TO
526375171
toilet, $20
loral City
616-4860




COMMODE &
ABLE ALUMI-
tALKER 20.00
2637 5171 352
37 5171
SE BIKE FAN
IDE IN USA IT
VORKS THE
ONLY 85.00
637 5171
O SCOOTER
, like new,
auto trunk
000. Sell $500.
422-4716
WHEELCHAIR
OTRESTS AND
(TENSIONS
00.00 352 637
5171
LITY POWER
et 1 exc cond.
batteries,
*d!$450.OBO
991-8046


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676






WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477




Baldwin Organ Fan-
Fare Theater Deluxe,
with headphone
jackgood condition
$300 obo(352) 746-6487
CASIO KEYBOARD
LK-33, programmed,
lighted keys, books,
stand. $100
352-476-9563
MUSIC LESSONS
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 352-422-7012




ARABIAN PALACE CAN-
DLE LANTERN New,in
box (was 44.95) 10.00
Linda 352-341-4449
COMPUTER DESK/
25.00 Wood/small good
condition Linda
COPPER/AMBER CAN-
DLE LANTERN New,in
box(was 34.95) 10.00
Linda 352-341-4449
FIRE AND WATER
FOUNTAIN New,in box
(was 29.95)10.00 Linda
352-341-4449
FLOOR TILES /12 X 12
about 80 pieces/30.00
Linda 352-341-4449
FOSTERIA GREEN
FOOTED TEA GLASSES
10 available 7"tall-
buy 4 or 10 $2.50 EACH
352-794-3020
KITCHEN TILES / 4-1/2 X
4-124 boxes/25.00 Linda
352-341-4449
MICKEY GARDENING
FIGURINE NEW,in box
(was 34.95) 10.00 Linda
MINI REFRIGERATOR
excellent condi-
tion/100.00 Linda
352-341-4449




50OFT TV antenna
$60.
(815) 600-5133
Aero Pilates Performer.
Model 55-4298A.
Includes neck pad and
cardio rebounder. Like
new cond. $150.
352-746-1644.
BREAKTHROUGH
WEIGHT LOSS Fastest
Safest Lazy Way to Blast
Away Fat!$49.95 Go to
Losel15in30.com
Exercise Gazelle
$50.
(815) 600-5133
Stamina Aero Pilates
Rebounder Pro
XP556 w/extras,
Call for info.$300
(352) 382-5769
TORSOTRACK EXER-
CISE MACHINE Brand
new, still in box Torso
track exercise machine.
$50. 352-476-9563
Treadmill
Weslo Electric treadmill
Good Condition $75.00
Call 352-637-1965
TREADMILL/WORKOUT
BENCH Weslow Pro 7.8
Treadmill, inclines, preset
workouts, safety lan-
yard.$175.00; Weiderpro
255 L Workout bench,
$50.00, Both items like
new. 352-795-5491
WESTLO PURSUIT 350
EXERCISE BIKE Ex-
cellent condition $100.00
352-489-6840




4 Boxes
Extra 12 gadge
shells $10 a box
(352) 503-2792
Brunswick Air
Hockey Game
$350.obo
352-302-8265



C;7 P cr!/0711I


CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
Charter Arms .38
Undercover Special
like new $275
352-746-0100
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500
GOLF "09" Tour Edge
Lift-Off Irons MRH 3-PW
Graphite Senior exc Cost
$499. sell $100.
Dunnellon 465-8495
Hunting Bow
Hoyt Trykon hardly
used,(bad shoulder)
Like new, viper sights,
ACC Arrows w/ rage
broadheads $450.
(352) 527-2792
SAIGAAK-47 Russian
American Armory Com-
pany AK-47, 7.62X39mm
Extras, original box, strap,
mags and ammo.
$650 obo 527-4910
SHUFFLE BOARD
Table, all accessories
$300. obo
352-302-8265
TORTOISE SHELL
STOCKMAN KNIFE
Brand new in box $12
352-860-2475

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.

Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 ( limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299
HOMEMADE BOX
TRAILER 10'LONG
FRAME.MEASURES
6LX4WX4H. $400.00
352-563-1519




1 BOUNCER DELUXE
ANIMAL MUSICAL $35
bounce $15 bear mobile
musical for crib butterfly
$10 352-777-1256
2 CAR SEAT EXCEL-
LENT CONDITION $ 35
EACH BABY GYM AC-
TIVITY $20 WALKER
$15 352-777-1256
BABY SLING Like
new.Slingeeze.Blk &
wht.Keep baby
close.Great for Nurse-
ing.$50 352-897-4678
BOUNCE DELUXE MU-
SICAL THE ANIMAL $35
bounce bear $15 mobile
musical for the crib but-
terfly $10 352-777-1256
Girls Never used! Bright
colors. Everything in-
cluded. Crib bedding,wall
decor etc.Pd 500
sacrifice $100.
352-897-4678
HIGH CHAIR Like new!
Neutral color, multi
position. $75
352-897-4678
SWING MUSICAL &
JUMPEROO BOUNCER
DELUXE $ 45 EACH
352-777-1256
TANDEM STROLLER
Like new! neutral
color.Graco. Pd $400
sacrifice $100
352-897-4678




FIREWOOD Dried, split
firewood $100 chord
352-476-9563


CIASSIFIEDS



GALILEO TELESCOPE
Almost new telescope.
Complete with case and
paperwork. $75.
352-476-9563










TASHA'S TOWING
We buy Junk and
Unwanted Cars.
352-426-4267
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
Wanted to Buy
Used Barber or Beauty
Shop Equipment
C-hairs rtc"


4 MALTESE
Pups, raised in living
room, very sweet, CKC,
FL Health Certs. Girls
$650 & boys $600.
352-212-4504,212-1258
7 Bullmastiff
Puppies
Adorable
$150. each
(352) 257-9508
AKC, Registered
English Bull Dog
Puppies for Sale
$1,800. (352) 543-0163
(727) 784-0732
(352) 493-5401
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Mini Long hair Dachs-
hunds blk & cream,
blk& tan choc & cream
M /F, H/C full blooded
$100 each 795-6870
352-220-4792
MINI-DACHSHUNDS I
have Mini-Dachshunds
for sale. Dapples, black
and tans, reds and
pibolds. Males and fe-
males. PPOP, florida
health cert, sample of
food and toy come with
each pup 352-463-7345

10 and read
Need a pet sitter for a
Cocker North of Crystal
River mall, Spring Run in
your home several times
a year. edjun@msn.com
794-3038
Shi-A-Poo Puppies
Paper trained, good
with kids, will not shed,
health certs. CKC reg.
Fern $275Males $250
Yorkie Poos $400 F
M $375(352) 489-6675
Shih-Tzu Pups, ACA
Lots of colors, average
$400-$600 + Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Small Breed puppies,
yorkies, chihuahua,
pomeranian, dachshunds
$250.00 and up.
COME SEE US AT
HOWARDS FLEA
MARKET HOMOSASSA
ROWi #1. 352 484-2113



FOR SALE
Ponies and horses,
used saddles and
tack,Diamond P Farm
352-873-6033


Livestock





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $450 mo. + 2/1
Storage Bid. $550 ALL
HOMOSASSA
4/2/2+Carport $595
(612) 226-0091

CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2 DW, CHA
$500. mo., No Dogs
(352) 795-9738


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 CJ13


5159 W. Disney Ln 2/2,
New AC, Lrg. Lot $425.
$400 dp (727) 480-5512
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH furn., Priv. ranch
No pets. (386)871-5506
Homosassa
2/2 remodeled, in
ground pool, 1st Ist sec.
$550/m(352) 503-3363
HOMOSASSA
3/2, $650mo.+ $650 sec
2/1/V2 $400mo+$400 sec
352-503-6747
352-628-1928
HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/2 & 2/1 no pets
(352) 637-1142
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964




Bank foreclosures
USED HOMES/REPO'S
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183

HOLIDAY SALE
Bad credit OK.!
New 2012 Jacobsen
w/ 5 yr. warranty.
Appx. 1200sq. ft. 3/2,
many upgrades.
Buy for only $36,900
or have delivered
and set up with A/C,
heat, steps & skirting
only $2,600 down,
$379.97/mo.
for 20 years W.A.C.
Come by or call
352-621-9181
Taylor Made Homes
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onsite shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K off All Homes
800-622-2832 x 210




2/2 SW Homosassa
on Fecnced /2 acre
$39,900. Cash $45,900 if
financed $5,000 down
(352) 527-3204
2/2, New Screen Rm,
New Back Rm, 1.4 AC
Steal It! $30K Firm.
6.4 Easy Credit Finance
Appraised at $39,500
(352) 637-6608
Crystal River
2/2 S/W: 16X80. $38,500
No agents, No financing
1/4 acre lot. Unfurn.
352-794-3362/345-9108
Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON 9' ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,200 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-9182
Homosassa
3/2 DWMH Fleetwood
'96. All new roof, car-
pet, & Appls. REDUCED
$8K, to $46K, Quick
SALE due to ILLNESS
OPEN HOUSE 9-5 Daily
incls New years Eve &
day@ 7038 W. Jackson
Ln. call (352) 503-7328
COME SEE!!!!!!!
Homosassa
3/2, fenced yard
$525./mo $5K down
Owner Financ Avail
(352) 302-9217


HOMOSASSA
3394 Arundel Terr
3/2/2, lamaniate & tile
floors, All appls. CHA
New Roof, $1500 moves
you in $650/mo
Rent to Own
Tony Tubolina Brk
Owner(727) 385-6330
INVERNESS
2/2 SW, 2 nice big
additions / AC fenced,
near lake, part furn.
$37k 352-341-1569
LECANTO
2 BR, SW on 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!!
$17K OBO
352-586-2976

Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over I acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-621-9181




FLORAL CITY
1992 34FT Park Model,
furn., w/2 slides &
screen rm, Exc. cond.
Moonrise Resort, $5,000.
352-419-6894 726-2553
Furnished 14 x 50 w/
added enclosure, vinyl
& scrn. rm.55+ Lecanto
Park, SS appl's
New W/D workshop
w/power, Remodeled
inside/out $11,000 obo
(352) 418-5926
Inv. Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, florida room,
carport, $15K obo
(352) 419-5114
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 BR. 1.5 BA
for $2.000. must be
approved 352-476-4964


INVERNESS
55+park, 1/1 carport,
screen room, shed,
$7000 (352) 726-8071

Sr. Park 2BR, 2Bath
completely furn., Bring
tooth brush & clothes.
New sub floor, carpet,
vinyl. 14x60 with car-
port and screen room
$18,000 (440) 855-0921

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled rent $600. long or
short Sell $54K OBO
(352) 307-4564

LECANTO 55+
*FOR RENT OR SALE
1/1, Furnished $525.
2/2 Furnished $550.
352-287-9175, 746-1189


Rock Cr Canyon
Area
3/2 DW, 6acres
fenced, gated,
Rent or Buy owner
financing avail
(352) 302-4546














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, carports, rovers,
wood decks, fla. rms.,
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



Affordable Mobile
mechanical, electrical
fiberglass, OB/IO/IB.
WE BUY BOATS
711 NE 6thAv. Cry Riv
352-795-5455

THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435


Your World






CHI)pNICLE


ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs. 352 613-2518




$75. per load Citrus co
for hauling your waste.
(352) 445-0973
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL/ Lic
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs. 352
364-2120/410-7383
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755


COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
Wall & Ceiling Repairs
& Sprays. Int/Ext.
Painting, since 1977









ANNIE'S ELECTRIC



Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303H
352-302-2366
All Home ecServRepairs






Ne clasma TV. Remodel
ANNIFree Est 726-2907RIC





EC-13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
New consair. Guardianel



621-1248 #ER00015377




A5STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
FreAll Types Fee Est726-2907
Comm/Res. 628-400213002699 Serving









BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
b FAST
v AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
EXP'D HANDYMAN
All phases of home
repairs. Exc. work
Honest, reliable,
goodprices.Pres/was
paint Ins/Li c860-0085







Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




MAID TO ORDER
House Cleaning *
(352) 586-9125
Have Vacum Will Travel




HOLIDAY CLEANING
& clean up.call
Citrus Cleaning Tea
or call for our
Handyman 352-
527-2279/302-3348





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584


#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L ,- ,,,. H,.-

352-795-5755





CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374




LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Parts Service &
Repair.Visit our store@
1332 SE Hwy 19
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

HAULING
FRE E ESTIMATES
scrap metals, haul for
FREE (352) 344-9273,


Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 20 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. oddwthis ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
10ys evngCtrsC
li/ns F 1489


Andrew Joehli
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est..Fire
wood avail.. 628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!

S ill( ,'t

You',r I\\r Id firSt.

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"If she doesn't show, d'yer wanna
come to Niagara Falls?"


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f D G UR ~ 1BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
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pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
Sand DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. "Glee" star Michele's emu cousins (2) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Skeletal bosom buddy (2) syllables in each word.
1@ 2012 UFS, Dist.by Univ. Uclck for UFS
4. Pulverized 16 oz. of coffee beans (1)


5. Squeezed a brand of toothpaste (1)


6. Integrates two funeral songs into one (2)


7. Official law annulment exactness (3)

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.arbraS CrokS.A

35-4-20 3276 035


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 BR. $550., 3BR House
$800., 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
HD cap access,.small
pet ok. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 BR I BA W/D hook
up, dishwasher, lawn
water & sewer $450 mo
(352) 212-9205
FLORAL CITY
FREE Use of boat ramp,
fishing dock, canoe &
Jon boat rentals. 1 BR
unit avail, walk to river
Trails End Camp, A
Friendly Place to Live
352-726-3699
FLORAL OAKS APTS
NOW RENTING
352-860-0829
62 + OR DISABLED
With or Without
Children.
Central heat /air
Water, & Sewer Incl
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Management
1 & 2 BD Apts.

8092 S. Floral Oaks Cir
Floral City FI 34436
TDD #771




EOE/Provider
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. $450. no pets
628-7300 or 697-0310
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D hkup., incls. H20,
trash, lawn, storage rm.
$500. + sec. 634-5499
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 $575 352-422-2393
Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

RAINBOW
GARDEN
APARTMENTS
11850 Rainbow
Garden Circle.
Dunnellon, Fla

(352) 465-3309
TDD #711
OPEN
Mon. & Tues. 9a-4p
Wed. & Thurs. 9a-3p
Friday 9am-Noon
Lunch Noon-lpm

Affordable living for
seniors 62 and older
with or without
children. Rental
Assistance Available
to those who qualify.
I & 2 Bedrooms
"This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."

SEVEN RIVERS
APTS

Absolutely Beautiful
Place to Call Home!
near the mall &
7 Rivers Hosp. fishing
walking trails near by
in a old Florida setting
Quite, clean,, well
maintain .Central
laundry room.



:.FP.:l,, ,' ,; ;?






V THIS OUT!
RAINTREE APTS
Accepting Applicants
Income based
housing. Low Rent
Stating @ $433
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
201 E. Hills St.
Inverness, Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:30am -4:30pm
Closed for lunch
12pm-1pm.
This insOtiuton is

Equal

Opporlunitly
Provider

& Employer


agg


V THIS OUT!
RAINTREE APTS II
Accepting Applicants
Income Based
Housing.
Elderly or Disabled
w/or without children
201 E. Hills St.
Inverness Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:30am -4:30pm
Closed for lunch
12pm-lpm.
This insltiion is

Equal

Opportunity

Provider

& Employer




-i-


CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528



INVERNESS 2/2/1
Heat Pool/wtr frt comm
$600. mo 317-442-1063
INVERNESS
2/2/1 Villa Wash/dry
pool $600.352-464-2731



CITRUS HILLS 2/2/1
Beautiful $775 Maint
Free(352) 613-5655
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer inc
$600mo 352-558-4477
CITRUS SPRINGS
New, 2/2, tile, All appl.
$625 (954) 557-6211
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/1
CHA, W/D hk-up $550.
352-382-1344, 423-0739
INVERNESS 2/1/1
Great Area no smk/pets
$600/mo. 1st, Ist & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 20 S. Osceola,
$525. mo. 352-697-1907
CITRUS SPRINGS
2 bedroom. 1 bath. 1868
W. Rutland Dr. $625 per
month. Pool. Beautiful
neighborhood.
(352)-433-6331
HERNANDO
2/1 $500. mo.
Skip Craven, Broker
/Owner 352-464-1515
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.
SUGARMILL
WOODS
3 bedroom. 2 bath. 18
Wild Olive Ct. Great
neighborhood. $725 per
month. (352)-433-6331








# Employment
source is...


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www. plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784


Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www. plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




BEV. HILLS 2/1.5
Fr Rm+ Gar.CHA, shed
$550. (352) 795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 RemodeledW/D
fenced,shed,$550 mo
inc water garb.lst/Dep
352-228-3454
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2, RemodeledNew
Carpet CHA, $650 +
Sec. 352-563-2480
CITRUS HILLS 3/2
Pool, 671 Olympia St
$1,050 mo, 637-1173
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1, $750. mo. w/opt
to Buy (352) 220-8893
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1 Lg Mast
suite $695 352-697-3133
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/2, tile firs,
nice area, across rails
to trails $825. no pets
(352) 598-0235
CR/HOM 3/2/1
RC Elem,
fenced, $575
352-220-2447 212-2051
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1 + Family Room
$650+dep 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
HERNANDO
3/2/1,Ig scr porch
fenc'd yd. Pets. OK
(352) 201-1675
Homosassa Springs
3/1 No pets, Clean
$800 mo (305) 619-0282
INVERNESS
2/1/1 Florida Rm, W/D,
fenced yd.pet ok $650
1 st/Ist/dp.352-344-0505
INVERNESS
2/1/1, Very clean well
maintained Lease. $750
mo., Fst, Ist, sec. Near
schools, Hospital. 4212 S
Apopka, 561-395-5735
INVERNESS
3 bdrm, 2 bath home with
screen end pool on lake.
Beautiful setting on
cul-de-sac, golf com.
$1000/mo,813-909-0234
INVERNESS
3/2, First/Last/Security
carport, fenced yard,
$700. 352-726-7692
INVERNESS
3/2/2 & 2/1/1, close to
town & shopping
352-212-3412
INVERNESS

3/2/2, Highlands
Starting @ $730.
352-601-2615

INVERNESS
Large 2/2/1 fenced
yard, pet w/ additnal
fee. 1st & sec $700 mo.
352-422-5482
SUGARMILL
WOODS. 3/2/2 golf
course home. Pool
w/solar & elect heat,
stainless apple. W/D
mediation garden,
basic yard care incl.
Golf, tennis & social
memberships avail.
$1295. 352 382-1373


1-7-12


garage,great rm w/pocket
sliders to 50x24 lanai,
cooks kitchen, Master
suite to die for.Much
more! $259,900.
352-860-0444
REDUCED TO $139,000
2BR/2BA house with
heated pool & fireplace
on I acre lot in Citrus
Hills. Exc. cond. Owner
finance with D/P +
approved credit.
Call 304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.



Apache Shores
2 bdrm. 1 bath. close to
lake central heat and
air, new well & water
softening system,
corner wooded lot.
Excellent Investment
opportunity, $35.000,
352-322-0454


Move In Special, 2005
Clean, 3/2/2, $745. 1st/
Last/Sec. 352-400-1501




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
Phone, pool incl. $110
wk. (352) 419-2480




CITRUS SPRINGS
Lease or Rent to Own
3/3/2/2, Custom Built
Pool Home on acre
2700 sf. MOVE SPECIAL
$699. 352-489-3997




CRYSTAL RIVER
Clean House, cable w/d,
$115/125wkly
$430/475mo. No hidden
cost. 563-6428
INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352 586-9932



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077


-U
FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are here hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




Homosassa 2,400 sq ft.
Commercial bid. 1.5AC.
Rent/Lease/Buy. 3%
Down Owner Financing.
Can be used as office
space or warehouse, 1
bath, full heat/AC, LG
bay door. 9119 W. Vet-
erans Dr. Located in
Suncoast Ind. Park.
159K Nevin Jenkins
352-302-8100




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yrd. new roof,
dble carport, $57,700
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076




Clearview 1 Acre
w/3 bdrm w/office/den off
master,2.5 baths,2plus


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


DEB INFANTINE

3 HOMES SOLD
In December
I Need Listings!

Real EstateL...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone:(352) 726-5855
Celi:(352) 302-8046
Fax:(352) 726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS





For SleO%
117 S Lunar Terrace
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Enclosed FR, Garage &
Carport,Large Yard.
UPDATED MUST SEE
$74.900 352-344-9290
mavery3@tampabay.rr.
corn

3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652

3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
2,000 sq.ft.
518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.InvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com

FOR SALE OR LEASE
2/2/1, enclosed porch,
Central Heat and Air
All Kitchen Appliances
$95.K (352) 742-2770


YOU'LL THIS!
Have it all! Inverness
Over Flowing With
Value!!! Highlands,
S.Carol Terrace. Huge
1 Family. Major up-
dates you'll enjoy
only in a new home.
Owner down sized,
will negotiate. In
nature's paradise this
4 bedroom 3 bath on
2.8 acres fits a family
with children who
love to play explorer.
Own deep well (no
water bills), plus new
whole-house water
treatment system,
16x34 in-ground
screened pool with
fountain and lights.
New 2-zone energy
efficient heat/cool;
new full attic R-30
insulation; new attic
solar fan; new
ducts/vents; updated
bathrooms, 2 new
AirMasteir cleaning
units to remove dust,
pollen, mold spores.
Majestic trees. Extra
long concrete drive-
way. Watch the deer
play from the lanai or
living room window.
Newer (2002) Timber-
line roof, ridge vents,
7 solar tubs thru out
the house. Two hot
water heaters. Wired
for generator. Com-
pletely chain link
fenced. Corral your
horses, park your
boat or RV. ON
property 7 palm trees
value miniumn $10K
each. Occupancy at
funding. Approx. 2700
sq ft under air.
$212,500.
(Price below Estimate
Zillow.com) Contact
owner, 352-556-1510,
352-238-6274 email:
rosepub@excite.com

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964




CRYSTAL RIVER 4/2
1950 SQ FT ON A DEAD
END ROAD 69K
352-257-3164




Ready to Move In
4/2/1, scr ingound pool
sitting on 2 lots
fenced,, close to town,
nice area $135K
(352) 628-9483

Riverhaven Village,
Homosassa, FL
GREAT LOCATION,
GREAT HOUSE,
GREAT NEIGHBOR-
HOOD! 2147 sf, 3/2 +
Ir/dr comb, den, sun-
room, inside laundry,
all appliances. bit. by
Rusaw in 1989, well
maintained, upgrades,
move in ready.
Asking $160,000
all offers considered.
Realtors 3%
See visual tour:
www.visualtour.com/sho
w.asp?t=2656780&prt=10
003&sk=13
Frank or Helen Harris,
352-628-1434
emai: hharris3
@tampabay.rr.com


2/2, Garage, heated
pool/spa, 8500 Gospel
Isl. Road, Inverness
$119,000 Owner financ-
ing, email for photo,
trader@tampabay.rr.
corn (727) 415-7728
CRYSTAL RIVER/OZELLO
REDUCED$100K 2+/2/2
Open floor plan,
Hardwood floors,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
LAKE ROUSSEAU
South side of Lake
2 bedrm cottage
fenced, 1/2 acre,
boat dock. $85,000
775-230-2240

Thank You To All
Our Loyal Clients


Happy Holidays

Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse. water
sewer are avail. MUST
SEE!!! 352-382-0535




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745





For Saleui a-1
10 ACRES FOR
SALE -SANTERRA
RANCHES SUM-
TER COUNTY
Beautiful 10 acre vacant
property in deed re-
stricted neighborhood
of Santerra Ranches in
Sumterville, Sumter
County for Sale Ma-
ture Oak trees and
open pasture make a
perfect atmosphere for
your future home and
barn..start living the
Florida country lifestyle
asking $110,000 Call
George (954) 383-7109




Premium Home Site on
Sky View Golf Course
Great price to build
your new custom,
maintenance FREE
home. Country Club
membership including
45,000 sf fitness & spa
$42,000 OBO
Call (910) 512-2550




BOAT LIFT
Single Pole,
1500 lb. capacity.
$900 obo
352-613-8453
EVINRUDE 120HP
1988 oil injected, power
tilt, strong motor, runs
great, must see! $1000
(352) 795-4240


Best Time To Buy!
I have lease options,
owner financing &
foreclosures
call Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Lakefront Gospel
Island Location
Spacious 3/2/2
Rent $800/mo
or purchase $125K
neg 908-322-6529


"99 Tahoe Sport
Pontoon 16 fft, 30 HP
Johnson, w/trailer
$4600 Floral City
(315)416-3628
12 ft. Native Kayak
with electric motor,
battery, paddle, and a
sail, and extras,
$500.
(352) 628-3097
14 ft. Aluminum
Boat
15 H, 4 stroke yamaha,
with trailer, dealer
install console stirring
$2,200, 352-344-2514.
'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
20ft Pontoon
2000 Fiesta, Fish N Fun,
no carpet, fiberglass fir,
85 Yamaha, Galv. trlr.
$6,500. 352-613-8453
23' MAKO CENTER
CONSOLE
1983 Mako 236 Center
Console. Boat is in great
shape and has recently
been serviced. Powered
by a 2004 225 Mercury
Optimax with 311 hours.
Engine is equipped with
the "Smart Craft" system.
Boat comes with new
t-top, cushions, Garmin
GPS and bottom reader,
trim tabs, VHF radio and
is Coast Guard ready.
Boat is sitting on a nice
aluminum I beam trailer
with trailer brakes and
spare tire. Lots of extras.
Move forces sale $6800
OBO. 352-613-0587
BAYLINER
1994, 22 ft.,
$3,500
(352) 503-6586
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500
Hobie ProAngler
14 ft. Fishing Kayak Mi-
rage Drive, nearly new,
many options $2,100
Homo.(906) 203-2221
PROLINE 20 CC
T-Top VHFelect. New
135 Honda, 4Snew EZ
Load trlr. $11,400 Extras
(352) 257-1161
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
SEAPRO
2003, 1700 cc, 90HP
Yamaha, 551b. troll mtr
canopy top, alum. trlr.,
2 live wells, shallow
draft, Let's test it out!
$1OK obo 352-344-8448
SUNTRACKER
20FT, with trailer, new
20HP Yamaha 4-stroke,
$5,000. (352) 419-6894
(352) 726-2553
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
























2001 38 ft Holiday
Rambler, Cummings
diesel,2 slides, fully
loaded ,sell or trade
property $60000
859-814-3573
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
Infinity 99 M/Home
by 4 Winds 35 Triton
V-10 gas, 44K mis. front
rear a/c, Onan Gen.
back up camera,
leveling jacks, TV fully
equipped in tow bars
& hitch + brks buddy,

all manuals for coach
& appls. NON Smoker
incs hoses, sewer &
electric hook-ups
7 new NEW Goodyear
tires See at Oak Bend
Village Route 40 W.
Dunnellon call for tour
(352) 465-6335 Was
$22,500 Now $19,750


'ui crown vic LX
Very good cond,
Low miles, $4,100
352-726-2139 or
352-637-2258
'08 Chrysler Sebr-
ing Touring
Convertible,34k miles,
loaded, $14995 firm
352-897-4520
CHEVROLET
'03, Cavalier, CS 4 DR.
loaded, 78K mil. auto
economy, 4 cyl., AC
CD, tilt, cruise, CLEAN!
$4,850.352-212-9383



FORD
2004 Mustang
Convertible-V6 50,000
miles,excellent condi-
tion,2 year Warranty
$10,900
352-628-6731

Happy New Year
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
LINCOLN
'06, Towncar, Signature,
37K miles, looks, drives
even smells like new.
$16,500. (352) 746-1184
LINCOLN
2001 Town Car,
new tires & brakes,
runs good $3,500. obo
(352) 533-3147
MARQUIS
1997 Mercury Marquis
128K, $2500 or best of-
fer 352-628-5487

IMMACULATE
SOLD!!!!
1999 CADILLAC
De Ville Cream puff
w/most options, 94k ong
miles, Pearl w/black roof.
94K orng miles, cream
puff, Pearl w/ Black roof.
$3995 860-0444


WINNEBEGO
2001 Chieftain 35U,
garaged, non smoker
no pets, 2 slides, Cen.
Heat Pump, exc. cond.
76K mi., $38,900
(352) 208-8292



2011 Grand Junction
5 wheel, 36 ft, 4 slides,
w/Bumper to bumper
for 16 years, too many
extras to list! $47,000
(603) 991-8046
'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, OwanGen. gas
tank, alumwheels
Lrg living area separate
cargo area $18,900
352-795-2975
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
Spirit of America
'07, 28 ft, Coachman,
4 new tires,2 new batts.
Ig. slide, sleeps 5, like
new REDUCED!
$10,950, 352-637-2735
TRAIL LITE
'01, 17ft, Hybrid,
Air, heat, fridge, bath,
shower, basement stor-
age, 460 Ib bike carrier
sleeps 6, excel. cond. ,
$4,995 (352) 422-1026
WILDERNESS
'06, 27 ft., (fiberglass)
1 slide out, Q.bed de-
luxe upgrades, sips 6
Well Maintained
$11,500 (352) 344-4087



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot





Towing 352-445-3909

Happy New Year
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for vour autos.


Altima 6800 k miles,
loaded, smells new.
Warranty until 2014.
Health forces sale
$17,950 (352) 513-4257
TOYOTA 03
Silver Camry XLE, 4 dr
4 cyl. auto 82k mi.
REDUCE D for quick sale
$8200 (352) 795-0381
TOYOTA 05
Camry XLE, 63K miles
excellent condition
new tires $12,000
(352) 302-6313
TOYOTA
'09, PRIUS
Under 50K miles,
pkge 5 leather seats
$15,750 (352) 746-3663



LINCOLN
2-1958 Continentals,
One restorable the
other for parts, good
rubber, $5,000
(352) 637-4642



CHEVROLET
1988 1500 Choo-Choo
Custom Red on red paint,
run great, many new
parts & tires. $2000. Flo-
ral City 610-703-6157

Happy New Year
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

SOLD!I
'97 Ford F250 HD
7.3 diesel, Supercab,
122K, many extras,mint



1993 FORD
EXPLORER XLT
2WD, Green with Tan int,
183K mi. Driven daily,
must sell. $1200/OBO
341-5770
Hyundai
'04 Santa FE. 100k mi.
good cond. Priced
under blue book.
$5500. 352-422-0751



'91 Dodge
Caravan-Loaded
Excellent shape,
1 owner,$1795 or best
(352) 621-5265
Dodge
'88, 1 Ton Van, runs
good 107k mi.camper
or cargo, Trailer Hitch
$975 (352) 503-7426



2004 Homes Motor
Cycle Hauler
Trailer 12x6
Like New $1,900
(716) 969-2781
2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
Harley Davidson
04, $9700., Bagger
Crystal River
Cell (727) 207-1619
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731



HARLEY-DAVIDSON
2008 FLHTCUSE7 CVO
Ultra Classic Electra
Glide CVO Screaming
Eagle 110 CI 105th Anni-
versary. Extreamly Clean!
$27,000.00
786-877-6097
HONDA
1996 CR 250R Great
Shape, Adult Ridden,
Never Raced. $1100.00
Firm Call 352-895-3311
KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760

Lucky U Cycles
(352) 330-0047

2009 Yamaha Vstar
650 EXTRA CLEAN
$4,200
352-330-0047

1990 HARLEY TOUR
GLIDECHEAP
$5,995.00

2007 HARLEY
DAVIDSON
ELECTRA GLIDE TRIKE
LOW MILES
$19,995.00
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
COM
2003 HONDA
SHADOW VT1100
LOADED,
WE FINANCE
$3,995.00

2010 HARLEY ULTRA
CLASSIC
EXTRA CLEAN, ABS
$17,995.00


t o r F I AMERICAN
1 ll Frank nyI Realtor ERAREALTY& INVESTMENTS
lI.J AL WAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
cell: (352) 464-2186 Office: 352-746-3600






Just a Phone Call Away!!


-eaven! z IVIODIIleS on LOIS. Z eadrooms eacn.
Separate Septic, Extra Lot for RV or Boat.
River close for fishing or boating.
MLS #351710 59,700


Ren Hufe




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL


HEVROLET


r------- r' -- / i .


100 YEARS OF CHEVROLET


NO PAYMENTS FOR 4 MONTHS!
MUST FINANCE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL, WITH APPROVED CREDIT ON SELECT YEARS, MAKES & MODELS.


! Ex
LJR


$10.700 oR $146


*
PER
MO.


rva,


$12,996 oR $178


*
PER
MO.


-"EAM


'IM --ft


-'Eq.


LA
~P


$18,996" OR260 M


2012
AVALANCHE


W 1M
24ROaeE
Af 3:!4jEi
~~are


$12,971 oR $177


2011
SILVE


*
PER
MO.


AND


$13,550 R$ 18 5 EP


2012
EQUINOX


M2owes4
4 1 V GWD9I
. Otg^


$18,854* OR$289,Mo.


2012
TRAVERSE


S22,996 OR $349M.


2012
SILVERADO
2500 DURAMAX
DIESEL


I a


$26,996 oR $399 .


$27,996 o$422 .


I


1 CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800-440-9054


CRYSTAL crystalautos.com
ICHEVROLET 352-564-1971
C H E V R 0 L E T 1035 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


'PRICE AND PAYMENT S UDE $2999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY AND ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT(1
TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PAYMENTS ARE 84 MONTHS AT 4% APR WITH APPROVED CREDIT. .CA'NOBE
WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURBPOg,. |1"
-, .' 2 o 3


C


I -


2012
SONIC


2012
COLORADO-


2012
MALIBU


2012
IMPALA


GEE.
IL


M-


--/f -r. 4N ^f^^


m


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 C15


2012
; CRUZE
5


F'qDS -'


I%


$ 15,896" R 246.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IMMEDIATE DEUVERY


~v a a ae f tw ao" a
2D' 2AREaERE
I II 1 : 3 3111 m11 VJ lu* VU6 a ls$a9





p~m a$?"* b
no ** .~t you ow
si 12%'OFCURNET %m siU.






MAITENNC. FREE



pow -- I 5. Pam

n? a*e=eggs

L O V 1'*-w.a a- Il


C16 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


,OW, AM


KI


-AL


P^ CERTIFIED -!
KIA SORENTOS
From $15, 000 A


CERTIFIED
KIA SOULS
from $14,000


" CERTIFIED'
KIA SEDONAS
.from $15,700,.


" CERTIFIED
KIA OPTIMAS
from $14,000


2004 KIA SORENTO EX Sunroof, Leather, 56,000 Miles.................................... G254539A................$7,995
2006 H O N D A O D Y S S EY 42,000 Miles ................................................. ...................... G207580A.............$13,995
2009 H Y U N D A I A C C E N T 10,726 Miles ...........................................................P3..........027..................$ 11,800
2011 FO R D R A N G E R A T 5,978 Miles................................................. ...................... 7384168A.............. $16,500
2007 TOYO TA TA CO M A 4WD, 32,523 Miles ...................................... .................G189028B.............$20,850
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO CREW CAB 64,297 Miles.......G011616A .............$16,200
2 0 12 N IS S A N A LT IM A 2,613 M iles ..................................................................................G029957A.............$ 19 ,2 0 0
THIS IS JUST SMALL PORTION OF OUR GIANT USED CAR SELECTION!
CALL US OR CHECK CITRUSKIA.COM FOR MORE.


CITRUS KIA "PEACE OF


I


NOW ON ALL USED VEHICLES SOLD
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a Dealership promise... When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we
will be at your side for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your driving. If anything, and we are talking anything breaks* on your vehicle, from the headlights to the taillights we will fix it for you at NO CHARGE. You
have trusted us for all your NEW car needs and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we want to prove to you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the state of Florida to buy a Used vehicle also.
MIND WARRANTY" PROGRAM At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"


KI


olI


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 C17


Ir




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Mazda3i Sport


at oth
^an/d


2012


r 1
*-w


I


I


S[II ~ I JI ITATA'


Lease s129 36 Mo.
For 12 Leaset


\up'i r.e. kie pin. i.\~ Le ..nu eye N'..-r uijv deajer .ji.~l~ed ~j I ..n~D- .IJ "i~ide iiU .dim~i'e rn..nidndner rvbhne; A. .f~Lj.i.-ijc' C Lei.' e J-[ yDjirieni r~e..uiIr[ m LI
1: EI..rire-, jl'au \iii>-knr. ar.11-L up, *C I.py J.Ic cnd J *>.Td L 0.-nc .z.,e1 ho c.wrr.I..."Cd *EtpHi-rCd ra.L !,T n.-,-,[JmL. -.r d.ic ,.srud nTi'..10'C .-ln.. U. JdcpL.ld.j-f r
IC-u I.' dr,-t'oj .5,0 L.rLv,-., .n *erun'ie Sr .- 1>.e ddlCid Phut*?'. ste lo. .ji..-lrilj, p..prp.s- u-[d% J~n^ 'idyts tin'k. ..1.~l 10 pI-,,'[ 'det r"r*gerr. .Ltiet L-


I -mI


ACURA

Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands

S2012 TSX


-Cu2FeCjiV
TSX Lease: $299 mo x 36 months.
$1,999 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit
Safety Rating Safe
NHTSA 4


0 Star ratings are pan of the U 5 Departmeni of Transportation s Satecar gov program (www salercar govl Models lestea w-Lh standard side-irrpaci a-rbags tSABs) r Based
on ALG s 2009 ana 2010 Residual Value Awards to' a Luxury Brand Subied Io IInmiltd availability. Through February 29. 2012. i0 approved lessees by Acura Financial
Services. DBA of American Honaa Finance Corp. C'osea-end lease for 2012 TSX 5 Speed Automatic IModel CU2F6CJW1. MSRP S30.695. Actual net capitalize cost S28.?51.43.
Tmal mromhly payments 110 T76 Oplion 10 purchase al lease end S19 337 85 Add.lional ,ease terms to' well-quaii.ed lessees Nol all 'eases will qualify H.gher lease rates
apply lor lessees will lower cred.I raligs or in dfferenn regions. Dealer parlicipallop may aiecl actual payrneni. MSRPs -nclde aeslinalon taxes. license. bile fees. options
and Instrance extra. Security deposit waived. Lessee responsible for maintenance excessive wearlear ana 15wrn over 10.000 mllearvear for vehicles with MSRP less than


FM


C18 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I )I


Hi


I I
All New
Redesigned!


MPG '
HWYllH


2.5L 4-Cyl DOHC 16V W/Dual VVT-1 Engine 6-Speed ECT-1 Transmission
Star Safety System Includes: VSC, TRAC. Air Conditioning AM/FM/CD Player
Cruise Control Power Windows Power Door Locks
MSRP.......................................... $22,770
Village Savings................................$2,772

n19,998


oniiII IA'L


I28
MPG
HWYI


#T111898


2011i I[L


9T 111iiI


51
MPG
CITY


N


i i


Star Safety System: VSC, TRAC, Anti-Lock Side Curtain Airbags & Dr. Knee Airbag
* AM/FM CD Player W/6 Spkrs Dr. Smart Key Sys. Rmte Keyless Entry & Push Button Start
Cruise Control Power Locks & Auto Up/Down Power Windows
MSRP........................................... $24,335
Village Savings.............................. $1,840

n22.495


wKiil il I


I] '2~r~ EV~
II


#T120247


20--
MPG
HWYI


2.5L DOHC 4 CYL.16V Engine W/Dual VVT-1 179 HP
Electronic Power Steering System Star Safety System: Enhanced Vehicle
Stability Control, Traction Control Air Conditioning With Air Filter
AM/FM CD W/6 Spkrs Cruise Control Power Windows/Door Locks/Keyess Entry
MSRP........................................... $23,779
Village Savings.............................. $2,289

s21.49OO


* 4.01 V6 DOHC 24V VVT-1 270 HP/278 LB-FT 5-Spd Automatic Trans W/Sequential Shift
Automatic Limited-Slip Differential Dual Zone Air Conditioning
AM/FM CD W/MP3/WMA, 6 Speakers Power Windows/Door Locks
MSRP........................................... $27,510
Village Savings.............................. $3,660

s23,8.50


Better Cars. Better Deals. Better Hurry!


iS ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenance
plan with roadside assistance


Stock #1110197
2008 SATURN VUE
FWD 4dr 14 XE
112,995


SlocP. r11110202
2008 KIASPORTAGE
2 WD Dr. 14 Auto LX
s11,995


Slock #11110220
2007 HONDA CR-V
4WD 5 Dr. EX-L
115,995


2006 LINCOLNTOWN CAR
4 Dr. Sdn Signature Limited
s11,995


2006 VW PASSAT SDN
4 Dr. 2.0T Auto
18,995


2005 CHllOETSIllVERADO 1500
Reg Cab
$6,995


SStock #1112000 Stock #11120024 Stock #11120097
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY HYBRID 2012 HONDA CIVIC 2007 IHYUNDAI ENTOURAGE
4 Dr. Sdn 4 Dr. Auto EX-L 4 Dr. Wgn GLS
s11,995 s19,995 $7,995


C-


352-628-5100


www.villagetoyota.com


tile, and $499 dealerfee
Prices include all Village Toyota
incentives Offers cannot be combined
All vehicles subject to prior purchase
All customerswho purchase or lease a
newToyota receive a 2 year, 25K mile
free maintenance plan Photos for
illustration purposes only We reserve
the right t coect typographical errors


VILLAGE
19 *


0 ,.,.


. I


SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012 C19


MUST PRESENT AD PRIOR TO PURCHASE


PWI--, '-Oqq


m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL


N


SSAN


15 YEAR / 150.000 MILE


LIMITED WARRANTY


2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5


2012 NISSAN FRONTIER


5APR
AVAILABLE


"FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6101


7714


OR $188
PER MO.


With $3999 cash or trade equity.


~bFREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
S 1-800-584-8755 Ext.6103
$15,999R $169*
With $3999 cash or tradPER MO.
With $3999 cash or trade equity.


2012 NISSAN
VERSA


2011 NISSAN
MAXIMA


I0 E
AVAILABLE


24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
00-584-8755 Ext.6112


With $3999 cash or trade equity.


*FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE wrnH INFO AND PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.6105
SAVE

$7,775
OFF MSRP


2012 NISSAN
ROGUE


0%
/O
AAPR*
AVAILABLE


^^*^FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND PRICING
S1-800-584-8755 Ext.6116

$19,699
OR 199 o.
Wrh $3999 cash or trade eauitv.


2010 NISSAN
MAXIMA


2008 NISSAN
ROGUE


2006 NISSAN
ALTIMA


2005 NISSAN
FRONTIER
-Itodair


2004 NISSAN
MURANO


*24,8801


OR.413


PER
MO.


*13,980 *9,880 *6,980 $11,98
o$*232" o1166" 1i116:1 o.199
MO. IM O. MO.


0
PER
MO.


N CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE

800-440-9054

crystalnissan.com

352-564-1971
937 5. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 34448


C20 SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012













IrL


Pr C


p.


'-V.


)-# I dti-r


u s


% www.chronicleonline.com


jfi


COUNTY T


ri t


..... i ... .... .. .. .


Ih... .,.,nllm


f






In Print & Online
SEvery Day



Chirerici CImmif 1.
MORE READERS THAN ANY OTHER LOCAL MEDIA
^ C_1 T RUS___ 0CUNT Y C L
www.chronicleonline.com

I ci....L $S OFF F
I P
YOUR CLASSIFIED AD*!
I *New ads only, discount applies to any ad over $50 in value I
m Telephone & walk-in orders only Offer Expires 2/15/12

(352) 563-5966


G2 Saturday, January 7, 2012


AFTER HOILDAY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WHOLESALE TO THE PUBLIC


Includes: delivery, set up, anchor, AC, steps, skirting


NTRACY
N AMANDA
N BUSTER
N KEN
SANNE
m WAYNE
N SAM
N MARIA
N MINDI


4BR, 2BA
3BR, 2BA
5BR, 2BA
3BR, 2BA
3BR, 2BA
4BR, 2BA
3BR, 2BA
3BR, 2BA
2BR, 2BA


1941 sq. ft.
1708 sq. ft.
1749 sq. ft.
1484 sq. ft.
1378 sq. ft.
1590 sq. ft.
1383 sq. ft.
1166 sq. ft.


Triplewide
Doublewide
Doublewide
Doublewide
Doublewide
Doublewide
Doublewide
Doublewide


840 sq. ft. Doublewide


42x60 .............. $83,995
32x56 ............. $68,495
28x66 ............. $61,200
28x56 .............. $59,995
28x52 ............... $56,995
28x60 .............. $53,995
26x52 ............. $49,495
28x44 ............. $45,795
24x36 ............. $36,563


PRESTIGE HOME CENTERS
1825 Hwy. 41 North, Inverness, FL 34450

1-800-841-0592 M-F 9-6 Sat. 9-5 Sun. 12-5 prestigehomes.net


- LOT MODELS


AFTER HOILDAY


Saturday January 7, 2012 G3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The Best in Community News
SCITRUSS ""-.COUNT V

www.chronicleonline.com
^^www.chronicleonline.com


Seven Days A


Week


Rain or Shine


The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County
Call 352-563-5655 To See How You Can Receive

2 Weeks Free


00A8SZ
)ASSZ


G4 Saturday, January 7, 2012


AFTER HOILDAY








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AFTER HOILDAY


Saturday January 7, 2012 G5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVENTORY"
CLEARANCE
HOME SERVICE MILITARY DISCOUNT FREE ESTIMATES
SINVERNESS 726-4465
138 N. Fla. Ave., US 41
CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9605
YOUR TOTAL FLOORING STORE 6633 W.Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lookfor the ghe'sCarpesign
or on our website: -. -.. -. -. ,., - .. ,-
WWW.JOESCARPET.COM 1996 1990 1999 2000 2001 200o 2003 2004 2005 06 20F 2W 200 9 2010 2011



Our Home Citrus


C I T R U 0 U N T Y
Cl IONICLE
k www.chronicleonline.com


Find it in the Chronicle
on January 28th
Ad deadline is January 10th


Back by popular demand our
comprehensive directory that
features those hard to find,
important phone numbers in
Citrus County; friendly guides
and pertinent information on
services, business,
organizations, local government,
recreation and more. A "Must"
for the office and home.
Call to reserve
your space today!
352-563-5592


qBs!BEO
DD^^y^^ oo nn' tt B ee^^^^


G6 Saturday, January 7, 2012


AFTER HOILDAY


w






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BlS




BEEF



"It's only natural."


* Ferris Beef comes from our herd of Black Angus cattle raised on
our farm on Duval Island, here in Floral City.
* Only the finest beef is selected to be sold in our store.
* Ferris Beef is hormone and antibiotic free.
* Our beef is aged and carefully cut to ensure you get the finest
meat available.
* A large variety of cuts are available: from hamburger and stew
meat to great steaks and tenderloin, There is something for
every budget and taste.
* Fresh from our farm to your family.





Ground Beef $099

Regularly $5.99/Lb. LB.


FERRIS BEEF
"It's only natural."

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FLORAL CITY
US HWY. 41 SOUTH Open Mon.-Sat 9am-5pm
Store: (352) 860-0366 Fax 726-2125
....... www.ferrisgroves.com *M


AFTER HOILDAY


At Thursday Adventure Auctions you are likely to find any & everything.
Truly asalefortheAdventurous WATCHWEBSITEFOR PHOTO CHANGES BYTUES. EVE.
I I I I I


I I I


jAN13 ONSITE AUCTION
111 CABOT ST., INVERNESS just off S. A opka
b i . .. . ... .. . r d


I I '1 4' i I I 'I
PREVIEW 11am Auction 1pm Unsorted highly collectible vintage postcards. One collection contains Em
many of firehouse and Hershey, PA and surrounding country side. The variety include Photo, Foreign,
Embossed, Fairy Tale, VehiclesyBuildings, Street Scenes, Animals, Comical, with and without postmarks, some
in sleeves, some in groups, some in box loads... but all worth a look. We also have first day issue albums w/the -
gold replicas. Watch the website for photos II.. I': I. I I rthe live & online auction.


- I I EL. ~ d 1 1,1 I I I. B I I ~.'. ~ ~ 1 I ~ ~W I I 1 I I I I W 1 U .1 LU E-~W I~~I I-f~~


* IrV4 E ii l 1 iiirll'J I Mi i I.' iilrl JI !i u b ir l;JillJ II I
PREVIEW 4pm Auction 6pm From two life long collectors and several consigners we have a variety of
early Carnival including several Northwood Peacock. Fenton, Dugan, Imperial, Aqua Opal and Opalescent.
Items from berry bows, vases, compotes, pitchers many rare and hard to find pieces. Plus a very nice
selection of Art and early American pressed, elegant depression and more. We have items in the -ri-inrl sales
boxes and many that will be sold in groups and lots. Always something extra for the attendees not i,....

Bring your cowboy boots and my mother will bring the cornmeal for sliding around the dance floor. Once again the
band from Catfish Johnnies will be along to jam and play for all those who wish to attend. Tickets are limited so please
call Maddy at 352-860-2108. Floral City Lions will I ..... l.,. fish fry prior and the dance at the hall. BYOB.

PREVIEW 10am Auction 1pm From several estates or- thin2 from the great set of madam ,
Alexander Dionne quintuplets to early children's toys, Ste n ll Creek collectibles, the coolest
1918 Modern Miss washing machine & Empire stove, from 1800's composition dolls to Howdy I1
Doody cowboy girlfriend Marionette in the original box. More as we unpack & call to consign.


~JW.W .j1J.1E IL.kYE II~.~~~ 1~.] Ti ~.!.U' ~ I,1,W~ E-~W ~I-~


PREVIEW 4pm Auction 6pm OK so we are just starting with this one and if you have a few special pieces that you
have been wondering why you have been holding on to them, let us sell them for you at this auction. Currently we have
thousands of sports cards and other related memorabilia and may even have a great die cast car collection.


2 REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY
AUCTION JAN. 20
6330 N. SHOREWOOD DRIVE, HERNANDO
HOME SOLD ABSOLUTE TO SETTLE ESTATE
Waterfront Home & Garage
PREVIEW 8am Auction 10am
Canal front. Sometimes it's the house, sometimes it's the lot, and sometimes
S !e all sort of
I. .1 h 1 h a The original
I I.I . . I essaw


abound.-
day to include furniture to tools and household. Fu


Swill be sold that
action.


630 W. WILD PINE CIRCLE
PARKSIDE VILLAGE, BEVERLY HILLS
HOME SOLD ABSOLUTE TO SETTLE ESTATE
Retirement Villa PREVIFW 1rm Auctinn 2nm
patio, open porch and high vaulted
retirement or winter home Persona
make for a carefree life style. axes w . .
.... '"" ". I," II1' "


U
P r na Pr p ~y d t th rw D~d y Arti n ABi 667. Th R a Eat ~y Mainy R a Eat *Ch~ tin D~d y Li RE Br k r~381 384. AL~4230.


JAN 24- 2 ON-SITE REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS INVERNESS
9798 E. BAYMEADOWS DR., INVERNESS PREVIEW 8am *Auction 9am
i 2 Baymeadows


'-0A1 TULIPTREE DR., INVERNESS
Lo i I friends who at one time dreamed of
S in 10x100 lot absolute.
& ,-I i1 is is a "for the Future"
buy.Taxes $62.72. IT ILL BE SOLD NO MATTER PRICE.
FEB 25- REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION
6168 N. MISTY OAK TER., BEVERLY HILLS PREVIEW 8am i Auction 9am
I , i , , ,

purchase a home in like new condition. Te home must be sold to settle estate for out of state heirs.

MAR16- REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION
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Personal Property sold together wDudley's Auction AB1667. The Real Estate by Main-ly Real Estate-Chdistine Dudley Lic RE Broker #381384. AU#4239.
For real estate inquires contact Chs @ 352-344-9588, Bob Bditain @ 813-317-8007.10% Buyers Premium. Dimensions are approximate.
Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588 A
BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE Up-To-Date Photos On Web www.dudleysauction.com A


Saturday January 7, 2012 G7


D UDI,,Y'is AUeiOIJ
4000 S. FLORIDA AVE., (U.S. 41 S) INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450
JNDAY ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTIONS
REVIEWS 10AM *AUCTIONS 1PM PREVIEWS 12PM AUCTIONS 3PM


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Father and Sons Hearing Aid Centers now offers a variety of rechargeable hearing instrument technology
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2240 HWY. 44 WEST, INVERNESS
352-860-1100
4155 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA
352-628-9909
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL (NEXT TO JC PENNEY)
352-564-8000


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G8 Saturday, January 7, 2012


AFTER HOILDAY


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