<%BANNER%>
Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02613
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 12-03-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02613

Full Text



Denied: No. 3 Orange hold off No. 9 Gators to avoid upset/B1


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Mostly sunny with winds
78 at 6 mph and gusts of
LOW 14 mph.
53 PAGE A4
DECEMBER 3, 2011


CITRU.J COUNTY




HRONICLo

www.chronicleonline.com
; Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 117 ISSUE 118


Want copies? That'll be $108,000


Bank robbery
suspects
sought
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office inves-
tigators are ramping
up efforts to track
down the armed
men who robbed a
Floral City bank on
Thursday.
According to sher-
iff's office spokes-
woman Gail Tierney,
a statewide be-on-
the-lookout (BOLO)
for the two men has
been updated, and
the processing of the
recovered stolen ve-
hicle has been
completed.
But because the
investigation remains
open and active, de-
tectives are reserv-
ing any comments at
this time, Tierney
said. The sheriff's of-
fice has released still
images of the
robbers.
Anyone with infor-
mation about this
crime is asked to
contact 911, or
Crime Stoppers of
Citrus County Inc.,
by texting CITRUS
plus the tip to
274637 (CRIMES),
clicking on
www.crimestoppers
citrus.com or calling
(888) ANY-TIPS toll-
free. Tipsters may be
eligible to receive a
cash reward of up to
$1,000.
-From staff reports



CHRISTMAS TIME:
Local parades
Beverly Hills, Crystal
River events take place
today./Page A3


Auditingfirm hired by Citrus County Hospital

Board of Trustees submitted public records request


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS The
costs borne by taxpayers in
the ongoing Citrus Memo-
rial hospital dispute could
rise again over the price
of public records.
An auditing firm hired
by the Citrus County Hos-
pital Board of Trustees
sent a public records re-
quest to the hospital July
29, listing 62 exhibits it
wished to receive copies of.
The requested documents,
some containing hundreds


of pages each, included
bond reports, minutes of
meetings, budgets and
other detailed financial in-
formation.
Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation attorney Clark
Stillwell responded with a
letter Aug. 10. He noted
that the county hospital
board, or CCHB, had al-
ready requested and re-
ceived many of those
same documents. He also
suggested the auditing
company narrow its
request.
The Citrus County Hos-


pital Board is the taxing
authority for the public
hospital. The Citrus Memo-
rial Health Foundation
leases the hospital from
CCHB and runs day-to-day
operations.
Two weeks ago, the Mel-
bourne-based company
RSM McGladrey Inc. sent
Stillwell a second letter.
This one contained a list of
requests that replaced the
first one of close to 100
copies of documents and
reports the company
wished to receive.
Carmina Clark, a direc-


tor with McGladrey, ac-
knowledged in her letter
that the CCHB already had
in its possession several of
the documents. Clark said
she wanted her request
filled anyway
Stillwell sent the list to
Mark Williams, the hospi-
tal chief financial officer,
and asked him to provide a
cost breakdown for the
time it would take hospital
employees to prepare the
documents.
Williams' estimate:
$108,000.
Williams, in his email re-
sponse Thursday to Still-
well, said the information
was readily available with
the hospital board or


Heart of gold


0 TANNENBAUM:


Holiday hints
Tips on how to keep live
trees fresh all
season long./Page A3

IN THE NATION:
Jobless rate
November
unemployment drop
driven partly by
optimistic small
businesses./Page A10


ENTERTAINMENT:
I :- --.-


Age gap
Older actresses face
hurdles when competing
for roles./Page B6


Comics .......... C9
Community .......C7
Crossword ........ C8
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ........ B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B4
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ...... .C10
TV Listings ....... C8


6 1 84178 2002! 5I


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Cal and Marilyn Ringquist and their golden retriever, Buddy, have been through some good times together, but
shortly after adopting the dog they learned he had heart disease and a limited life expectancy. Buddy's future was
uncertain, as surgery would have cost thousands of dollars. To their delight, the Ringquists learned of a study by
University of Florida veterinarians to test the effectiveness of a new surgical procedure. Buddy was one of 14 dogs
selected for the procedure and is now happy and healthy.

Dog thrives after receiving test surgery at University ofFlorida


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS It was love at
first sight when Cal and Marilyn
Ringquist first laid eyes on Buddy
Cal, an avid dog lover, said he's
had dogs most of his life. So when
he decided he wanted another dog,
he knew exactly which breed he
wanted a golden retriever.
"I had one in the past," he said,
"and they're good dogs."
Thus, when a local pet super-
market held an adoption event fea-
turing rescued dogs, Cal and
Marilyn decided to check it out.
They could have picked any dog,
but the couple agrees they feel
their match with Buddy, a playful
golden retriever pup with big gor-
geous eyes, was predestined.


We felt God set this up. He's our
miracle dog.
Cal Ringquist
about his golden retriever, Buddy,
now a healthy 4-year-old.


"Buddy walked right up to me
and put his head on my foot," Cal
recalled, "and that was it."
Later during the adoption
process when Buddy came to the
Ringquists' home for a home visit,
it was clear Buddy had already de-
cided where he needed to be. As
soon as he came through the door,
Cal said Buddy took off running
and jumped right into his lap as he
sat in the recliner


"He chose us," Marilyn said with
a grin.
For two months, the Inverness
couple enjoyed the company of
their new golden retriever puppy
But almost immediately, the joy
turned to distress when a routine
examination revealed Buddy had a
pronounced heart murmur.
"(The veterinarian) said on a
See Page A9


Foundation agrees to buy rehab properties


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LECANTO Citrus Me-
morial Health System will
add a pair of physical re-
habilitation clinics to its
assets over the objection of
a rival who believes the
competition isn't fair.
The Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation Board
of Directors voted Friday to
purchase the land and
buildings of Gulf Coast


Aquatics and Rehab in
Crystal River and Inver-
ness for a price not to ex-
ceed $1.8 million.
CMHS had already pur-
chased the business five
years ago, but was leasing
the buildings. Property tax
plus the $272,540 lease cost
CMHS about $300,000 an-
nually, while the five-year
note on a purchase will be
about $360,000 annually,
hospital Chief Executive
Officer Ryan Beaty said


during the board's meeting,
conducted Friday at the
College of Central Florida.
Beaty and other CMHS
administrators believe the
purchase will pay for itself.
They said the facilities
have earned $700,000 to $1
million combined annually
the past five years.
The lease expires July 1
and CMHS was to tell the
owner by Dec. 31 whether
it planned to buy the prop-
erties or continue the


lease.
Some foundation direc-
tors balked at the cost. Two
appraisals were conducted
with a $200,000 difference
between them in value.
"I still think the price
consideration is way out of
line," director Bob Collins
said.
However, board member
David Langer said it made
no sense to continue

See .Page A9


BOCC


gets new


cellular


phones


Out with

BlackBerrys, in

with iPhones

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer


The county commission-
ers and four county staff
have new cell phones be-
cause of compatibility is-
sues with the county's new
email system.
Citrus County purchased
nine of the model Apple
iPhone 4S with 16 gigabytes
of memory The model is ad-
vertised on Internet web-
sites with prices ranging
from $450 to $750 each.
The cost to the county
was only $199.99 for each
Apple iPhone, according to
Lindsay Ubinas, public in-
formation officer
Members of the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC)
Winn Webb, Rebecca Bays,
Dennis Damato, John "JJ"
Kenney and Joe Meek, and
county staff County Admin-
istrator Brad Thorpe,
County Attorney Richard
Wesch, Water Resources Di-
rector Robert Knight and
Ubinas were given the new
phones as improved com-
munications tools.
According to Ubinas, the
previous cell phones, which
were BlackBerry devices,
were not compatible with
Microsoft Exchange. The
nine people need cell
phones to check emails and
calendars.
Recently, the county gov-
ernment switched its email
system from GroupWise to
Microsoft Exchange for two
reasons. Ubinas said the
constitutional officers and
other county agencies al-
ready use Microsoft, so the
change brought the BOCC's
system up to industry
standard.
"It paves the way for bet-
ter networking," Ubinas
said.
The second reason was
that Novell, the owner of
GroupWise, was sold to an-
other company The change
to Microsoft would protect
the BOCC for service and
upgrades.
Todd Dunn, information
systems coordinator, said
some newer software was
not compatible with Group-
Wise and not all features
could be used.
The BOCC approved the
change to Microsoft Ex-
change on the consent
agenda at its Sept. 13 meet-
ing. The cost for a three-
year agreement for the
license was $113,693.50.
Dunn said it was a state -
negotiated price that in-
cluded a complete suite of
upgrades.
"It got us caught up to
current systems," Dunn


Apple iPhone 4S has
been described as a
portable office that can take
the place of a laptop com-
puter in some cases. Ac-
cording to the
manufacturer, one model
can edit and print docu-
ments and send faxes, as
well as connect to the Inter-
net and send and receive
email.
The BOCC has a county-
wide telephone budget that
funds all the county govern-
ment's cellphones and desk
phones, including the nine
Apple iPhones. At present,
the county supports 205 cell
devices of several different
See .Page A9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lighting the way to Christmas


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Is-
abella Mann loves
Christmas.
"It's my favorite holiday,"
the bubbly 7-year-old girl is
quick to announce.
Friday evening she was
mesmerized as Mayor Jim
Farley read the classic
Christmas story "Twas the
Night Before Christmas"
during the city of Crystal
River and the Pilot Club of
Crystal River's Tree Light-
ing ceremony held behind
City Hall.
Isabella and some 200
people turned out for the
festive evening which cul-
minated with Santa arriving
atop a fire truck, along with
Mrs. Claus and his helper,
Jessica the Elf, who handed
out candy canes to kids of all
ages while Santa gave hugs
and high-fives.
As the crowd counted
down to zero, Mayor Jim
Farley put his hand on the
magic switch to light the
tree, signaling the start of
the holiday season in the
coastal city. Continuing in
the spirit of celebration,
Saturday night at 6 p.m.,
floats will replace cars
along U. S. 19 for the annual
holiday parade.
Phyllis Alber, president of
the Pilot Club of Crystal
River, said the evening is re-
ally about the community
coming together to cele-
brate the holiday
"We have been doing this
for many years," she said.
"It's about the spirit of
Christmas."
City Manager Andy Hous-
ton praised the group for
picking up the struggling
event and moving it forward
again.
"They are doing a great
job," he said.
For the third year, the Crys-
tal River Middle School Jazz
Band entertained the crowd
with a swing version ofJingle
Bells, Frosty the Snowman
and Feliz Navidad.
"It is a different class of
songs and different instru-
mentation," teacher and
band leader Mike Williams
said. "It has more of a swing


TO ENTER:
Enter online @
chronicleonline.com
click on "Features",
enter contest or
fill out this form, mail or
bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
Anytime before Noon on
December 19.


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: A member of the Crystal River Middle School Jazz Band gets ready to perform Fri-
day night in Crystal River during the city's tree lighting ceremony. LEFT: Crystal River Mid-
dle School Jazz Band member Jarrett Flynn pauses a moment during warm-up for a
performance at the Crystal River Christmas tree lighting ceremony Friday night. BELOW
LEFT: Mayor Jim Farley read "Twas the Night Before Christmas" Friday night as part of the
city's tree lighting ceremony sponsored by the Pilot Club of Crystal River. He said it is his
11th year of reading the classic holiday story. To see more photos of the event, click on this
story on the Chronicle's website at www.chronicleonline.com.


r I
sound mixed in with the tra-
ditional song. They will also
be in the parade Saturday"
Band member Jarrett
Flynn, 14, took a few min-
utes out to relax before the
performance.
"This is fun," he said and
he sat behind his drums and
cymbals.
In the crowd waiting for
the celebration to start,
Sean Schwartz, from Ho-
mosassa, said he wants to
teach his four children the
true meaning of the
holiday
"There is more to it than


just getting presents," he
said as he bounced 5-month-
old Sofia in his arms.
Siblings Tyler, 2, Katelyn,
8 and Jonathan, 7, Vrabel
were there for a glimpse of
Santa Claus.
Katelyn carried her
brother up to the jolly
bearded Santa and intro-
duced her brother.
"It's Santa," she could be
heard saying.
Chronicle managing edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can be
reached at (352) 564-2930 or
sfrederick@chronicle
online.com.


A Beautiful

Holiday

Centerpiece

from

The Flower Basket
(352) 726-9666
2600 Hwy 44 W., Inverness
wwwflowerbasket-fl com

------------------------------------
Name............................. ...............
Phone.............................. .............
Em ail............................. ...............
-------------------- -----------------
Citrus Publishing employees and their
families are not eligible.


C CITRUS COUNTY E
CIkIONi1ciE
1i www.chronicleonline.com

Says Thank You to our faithful subscribers
ASKUSAB OU A


Letters to


The Citrus County Chronicle and the Crystal River Mall want to help
you get your letter to Santa. Cut out this letter, fill it with your dreams
and wish list for Christmas and drop it by our Santa's Mail Box at
the Crystal River Mall.


We will also publish all of the letters
on www.chronicleonline.com
for all to read and enjoy.
Drop your letter by the Crystal River
Mall before December 20, 2011.

Hwy 19, Crystal River


CRYSTAL RIVER
M.A.L.L
In sponsorship with the
Cii iK()N!i


Three Sisters Spring Master Plan Public Meeting
September 21, 2011
4 J iUsa n


DRAFT CONCEPT


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



THREE SISTERS SPRINGS



Be Informed


Cherished Natural Treasure Challenged...
Crystal River's Management Plan for the Three Sisters Springs Site
impacts NATURAL wonder and beauty BE INVOLVED!
|' Don't miss this PUBLIC WORKSHOP to discuss
the Management Plans and related concerns
Conserve Protect Preserve
Tuesday, December 6, 2011 6:00 pm
O -. Crystal River City Hall 123 Hwy. 19


-10


I 'FOR S 1:RB S : O IY I


A2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


LOCAL


Watson Tate : .-, L







Page A3 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3,2011



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Elections office
opens in CR
The satellite elections of-
fice in Crystal River opens
Monday, Dec. 5, according to
Supervisor of Elections
Susan Gill. The last day to
register to vote or change
party affiliation is Jan. 3,
2012, for the Presidential
Preference Primary. The
Presidential Preference Pri-
mary is Jan. 31, 2012.
The new office is located at
801 S.E. Hwy. 19 in Crystal
River. Office hours are from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday. For more in-
formation, call (352)
795-5338.
The main office in Inver-
ness is located at 120 N.
Apopka Ave. Call the Inver-
ness elections office at (352)
341-6740 or use our website
at www.votecitrus.com.
Road closures
begin Monday
Daytime road closures for
West Horace Allen Street be-
tween North Lecanto High-
way and North Maylen
Avenue will begin on Mon-
day, Dec 5, and run through
Dec 15, as the County Road
Maintenance Division pre-
pares the road for paving.
Paving will be scheduled
soon after preparation is
complete. Access will be
maintained for citizens who
live in the affected area. For
more information, call the
Road Maintenance Division
at (352) 527-7610.
Tea party meeting
on Thursday
The public is invited to at-
tend the Citrus County Tea
Party Patriots' meeting on ju-
dicial activism, at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 10, at the In-
verness Women's Club, 1715
Forest Ave., Inverness.
The guest speaker will
be Jesse Phillips. Phillips pro-
motes the need for citizens to
take their voting responsibility
seriously and to be active
and informed in making
decisions.

Bradenton

Deputy suspended
over Facebook
A Manatee County Sheriff's
deputy was suspended for
discrediting a sergeant on
Facebook.
The suspension, reported
Friday by the Bradenton Her-
ald, followed an internal af-
fairs investigation into the
actions of deputy Gerald Kall
following a car accident in
September.
According to the report,
Kall was driving a sheriff's car
Sept. 14 when was involved
in the crash. Kall posted a
link to a newspaper article
about the crash on Facebook
and commented that the in-
vestigating sergeant
"screwed up the report."
-From staff and wire reports


Clarification

A Duke Energy press re-
lease on credit financing,
rather than a Chronicle corre-
spondent's story on the topic,
was mistakenly run under the
correspondents byline in Fri-
day's edition on page A5. The
Chronicle regrets the mix-up
and any misunderstanding it
may have caused.

Correction

The telephone number to
call for tickets to the Nut-
cracker 2011 performance on
Saturday, Dec. 3, at Curtis
Peterson Auditorium is (352)
637-4663, not as reported in
the Friday, Dec. 2 edition of
the Chronicle.


The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling (352)
563-5660.


Twenty-six die in wrecks over holiday


Staff report
Although the Thanksgiv-
ing turkey feast might be a
recent memory with efforts
turned towards Christmas
and Hanukkah shopping,
some holiday well-wishers
have a not so fond reminder
of the day


Florida Highway Patrol
Director Col. David Brier-
ton recently announced pre-
liminary results from the
agency's Thanksgiving holi-
day period enforcement
efforts.
During Nov 23-27, FHP is-
sued more than 12,000 traf-
fic citations and assisted


nearly 3,000 motorists on
roadways. Troopers made
136 arrests for driving under
the influence of alcohol or
drugs and cited nearly 5,000
drivers for speeding and
more than 1,300 for failure
to buckle up.
Also, 26 people died in
crashes in the state during


the Thanksgiving weekend,
according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
"The Florida Highway
Patrol works hard to en-
sure residents and visitors
make it safely to their des-
tinations," Brierton said.
"We are very proud of the
dedicated service and


Take care of the tree


creating the floats, and not
only to support them but
support the Crystal River
area businesses and get into
the holiday spirit."


MATTHEW BECK
Chronicle

HOLDER John
Allen says if you follow
some basic guidelines,
your fresh-cut Christmas
tree will stay healthy
enough that "you should
be able to hang hearts on
it in February"
Allen, who works the
Christmas tree lot at
Snow's Market and Char-
lie's Produce on County
Road 491 in Holder says,
"There's no reason if you
take care of it, your tree
won't last for months."
Veteran Christmas tree
lot operator Walter
Bevington has staffed the
L&L Tree Farms' lot for
23 consecutive Christmas
seasons. He runs the tree
lot located between Crys-
tal Chevrolet and Not-
tingham Square on U.S.
19 in Crystal River
Like Allen, Bevington
says there is no reason to
be reluctant about buy-
ing a live tree.
"A lot of people worry


TIPS TO KEEPING A TREE HEALTHY
* Keep the tree away from any heat source.
* Don't let the base that holds the tree go dry -
keep it watered.
* Don't put too many lights on the tree; it tends to
dry out the needles.


about the durability of
these trees. But if you
keep them watered there
is no reason they won't
last months. If they stay
watered, they're good."
Like most of the tree
lots in the area, Allen's
and Bevington's Frazier
Fir Christmas trees come
from northern North
Carolina. Bevington's
come from Banner Elk.
Both tree lot operators
have similar tips to keep
the trees looking their
best
"First," Bevington says,
"keep it away from any
type of heat source. Sec-
ond, make sure to keep it
watered don't let the
base the tree sits in go
dry And third, don't put


too many Christmas
lights on the tree. That
tends to dry out the
needles."
He also highly recom-
mends a fresh cut to the
base before the tree
leaves the lot.
"A fresh cut will help
the tree take up more
water," he said.
Allen recommends
after getting the freshly-
cut tree to its destination,
place it in a 5 gallon
bucket full of water
"That tree will absorb
about a gallon of water
overnight that first day
you bring it home," he
said.
Tree prices at both lots
range from $25 to $175 for
the tallest trees measur-


ing taller than 13 feet. So
handling is important to
protect your investment.
Both men said busi-
ness has been good early
this season since opening
around Thanksgiving.
"We've had a $10
coupon in the newspaper
lately so that's helped,"
Allen said. "We've sold a
lot of trees so far"
Bevington says he ex-
pects the two lots L&L
Tree Farms operates in
the county will sell in
the neighborhood of
1,200 trees this year The
second lot the farm op-
erates is in Inverness on
State Road 44, across
from Badcock
Furniture.
"The next two week-
ends will be the busiest
for us," he said. "People
will be buying their trees
and getting ready for
Christmas."
Chronicle staff writer
Matthew Beck can be
reached at (352) 564-2919
or mbeck@chronicle
online, com.


Furry friends entertain at Alpaca Farm Days


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
LECANTO Frankie, a friendly al-
paca with a funny personality, and his
furry friends will be offering some
good old-fashioned southern hospi-
tality during Florida Alpaca Farm
Days at the Funny Farm in Lecanto.
From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and
Sunday, Bob Proctor, who owns Funny
Farm with his wife Peggy, said his
farm will be open and his alpacas will
be entertaining the masses with their
lovable charm and sweet
dispositions.
Earlier this year in September dur-
ing National Alpaca Farm Days, Proc-
tor said nearly 300 people visited his
farm during the two-day event.
"It was the biggest one we ever
had," he said.
This time, he's expecting even
more people thanks to the milder,
cooler weather
"A couple of days ago we already
started getting calls for directions,"
he said.
The Proctors will have hot cider


.-r
BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Alpacas are on display today at two
area farms as part of Florida Alpaca
Farm Days.
and Christmas cookies to offer the
public. There will also be alpacas
available for children to interact with
and take photos with as a memento.
Differing from National Farm Days
this year, Proctor said this weekend
people can expect to see baby alpacas
ranging from as young as 10 days to
two weeks old on his farm.
Last year during Florida Farm
Days, Proctor said visitors to the farm
had the unbelievable experience of
watching some live births. Anywhere


from 30 to 35 people would gather to
watch.
Currently, he said he has one preg-
nant female alpaca that is about 10
days overdue.
"It could happen again. She could
drop that baby right during Farm
Days," he said. "It would be neat if we
have another one."
All Farm Days events are free to the
public. Children need to be accompa-
nied by an adult.
Two local farms will be participat-
ing in this year's festivities:
Funny Farm is at 718 Rusk Lane
in Lecanto, and will be open to the
public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both
days. For more information, call (352)
228-3251.
Alpaca Magic USA is at 4920
Grover Cleveland Blvd., in Ho-
mosassa, and will be open to the pub-
lic from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days.
For more information, call (352)
628-0156.
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


commitment to highway
safety exhibited by our
troopers."
Preliminary data for all
law enforcement agencies
that was released Thursday
shows this year's death toll
was three more than last
year, but 10 fewer than in
2009.




Two


holiday



parades


today

CATHY KAPULKA
Staff Writer
BEVERLY HILLS The
holiday season is in the air
and will be on the streets of
Beverly Hills and Crystal
River today
The annual Beverly Hills
Christmas parade starts at
10 a.m. and will roll down
Beverly Hills Boulevard
starting at Melbourne Street
and ending at the bottom of
Civic Circle.
The theme of the parade
is "Florida Christmas," and
is sponsored by Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, Citrus County Parks
and Recreation and the
Beverly Hills Lions Club.
Tom Mize, Lions' first vice
president and parade chair-
person, said there are 32 en-
tries in the parade, which
include various community
groups, civic organizations,
horse-riding groups, high
school organizations and
The National Guard.
He said the Lions Club,
which is at 72 Civic Circle,
would serve free hot dogs
and sodas after the
parade.
Judging the parade this
year will be: Joe Meek, Cit-
rus County commissioner;
Susan Gill, Citrus County
supervisor of elections; and
Nancy Hautop.
Mize was happy to say
that Santa Claus would
make an appearance at the
end of the parade riding on
a fire truck.
"Give the kids a treat and
bring them out to see the pa-
rade," he said. "You'd be
surprised at all of the sen-
iors that are out there. It's a
traditional thing that's been
going on for a long time."
The annual Crystal
River night parade, which
is sponsored by the City of
Crystal River and the Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce, will begin at
6 p.m.
Lighted floats and parade
participants will prome-
nade down U.S. 19 from
N.E. Third Avenue south to
Port Paradise Road. The pa-
rade consists of 70 entries
and will run approximately
until 9 p.m.
Don Taylor, Deanna Bev-
erly, Ken Frink and his
daughter Kia will judge the
parade in five categories:
originality, creativity, appli-
cation of rules, overall ap-
pearance and the
"Christmas factor," which is
a category based on how
well an entry relates to
Christmas.
Josh Wooten, chamber
president, said this year's
parade grand marshals
would be Edgar and Kay
Tolle. He said the Tolles are
native residents of Crystal
River.
Santa Claus will make his
annual appearance at the
parade riding a fire truck.
"He has not missed one to
date, and we fully expect
him to be at this one,"
Wooten said.
"We would love to have
people come and view this
parade," he added. "People
put a lot of time and effort in


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Rick Zeller puts a fresh cut on the bottom of a Frazier fir Christmas tree recently at the L&L Tree Farms' lot
in Crystal River. One tip to keep live trees healthy for well past the Christmas holiday is to make a fresh cut
at the bottom of the tree before taking it home.

Christmas trees can live for months with proper care






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I .












I,
I/
________( _


p.








.

- ..

.. .




--



-t --'s .
..k ... -rt-


Riders enter the arena as legal gambling on barrel racing begins for the first time on Thursday in Gretna.



Barrel racing opponents get win


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Oppo-
nents of gambling on quar-
ter horse barrel racing in
Florida won another pre-
liminary legal victory Fri-
day as the number of
lawsuits, appeals and ad-
ministrative complaints
filed over the issue contin-
ues to grow.
Administrative Law
Judge Cathy Sellers said
during a conference call
with the parties that she
would let traditional flat
track quarter horse racing


interests amend their com-
plaint in a way that could
keep that case going even if
they lose another in Circuit
Court.
Besides those two cases,
three others related to bar-
rel racing are pending in an
appellate court.
"It's beginning to sound
like the 12 days of Christ-
mas," said Ralf Michels, a
lawyer for the state Division
of Pari-Mutuel Wagering. "I
just don't know how many
lawyers are filing. I don't
know what number to put
on that in the song."


Michels noted the divi-
sion sometimes has sided
with the barrel racing advo-
cates and at other times
with opponents.
The Florida Quarter
Horse Racing Association
and Florida Quarter Horse
Breeders and Owners Asso-
ciation contend that betting
on barrel racing, a women's
rodeo sport that requires far
fewer horses and riders
than flat track racing, vio-
lates state racing rules.
They argue it's an attempt
by pari-mutuel facilities to
qualify on the cheap for


more lucrative card rooms
and possibly slot machines.
A recent appellate court
ruling saying the Legisla-
ture can permit slot ma-
chines at pari-mutuel
facilities such as dog and
horse tracks and jai alai
frontons, across the state
has been appealed to the
Florida Supreme Court.
The Florida Quarter
Horse Track Association
supports barrel racing and
contends it's a legitimate
form of gaming, although
never before done in
Florida.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
Sheryl Gay Daugherty,
40, 3086 State Road 421, Lake
Panasoffkee, 12:01 a.m. Thurs-
day on a charge of driving under
the influence. According to an
arrest report, Daugherty was
observed driving over the out-
side lines twice and crossed the
center line. When she was ap-
proached, Daugherty appeared
confused and failed field sobri-
ety tests. Bond $500.
Daniel Anthony Scheer,
19, 6901 W. Arlington Road,
Homosassa, 2:49 a.m. Thurs-
day on charges of driving under
the influence and damage to
property or person. According to
an arrest report, Scheer ran off
the road and flipped his vehicle.
He later failed field sobriety
tests. Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
Jeremiah Jerome
Kinsler, 23, 2538 W. Elm Blos-
som St., Beverly Hills, 4:41 p.m.
Monday on a charge of petit
theft on an active Citrus County
warrant. Bond $500.


Matthew James Neal, 19,
4697 W. Wheatfield Lane, Dun-
nellon, 11:51 p.m. Tuesday on a
charge of felony aggravated as-
sault with deadly weapon with
intent to kill for pointing and
cocking a hunting rifle at several
people in a parking lot. Bond
$49,000.
Douglas Brownson, 42,
4320 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crys-
tal River, 5:04 p.m. Wednesday
on a charge of carrying a con-
cealed weapon. Bond $500.
Maddie L. Cryer, 24, 130
S. Suncoast Blvd., Lot 34, Crys-
tal River, 9:44 p.m. Wednesday
on a charge of grand theft. Bond
$2,000.
Tre Michael Nelson, 20,
9836 W. Arms Drive, Crystal
River, 9:50 p.m. Wednesday on
a charge of grand theft and pro-
viding false information to a
pawnbroker. Bond $4,000.
Starr Ann Gibson, 40,
3602 W. Riverview Lane, Dun-
nellon, 1:01 a.m. Thursday on a
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance, cannabis,
drug paraphernalia and driving
with suspended or revoked li-
cense. Bond $6,500.


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.

* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on Of-
fense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and van-
dalism.

* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.

* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Unit is
comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus
County. Members come from all walks of life and
bring with them many years of life experience. To
volunteer, call Sgt. Chris Evan at (352) 527-3701 or
e-mail cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc


PC


PC
pc
pc
pc


PC
pc
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast

pc
pc
pc
s
pc
s

PC
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 20 knots. Seas 2 to
4 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
choppy. Partly cloudy today.


72 48 NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusve daily
forecast by:
V TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 53
Mostly sunny


SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
.~ High: 79 Low: 55
Sunny to partly cloudy

Y MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh: 80 Low: 54
Sunny to partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 77/53
Record 85/30
Normal 75/53
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 55.36 in.
Normal for the year 50.28 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.30 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m.
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active poll'
Composites, Grass, F
Today's count: 5.3/
Sunday's count: 5
Monday's count: 5
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with polluta
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
12/3 SATURDAY 1:06 7:40 1
12/4 SUNDAY 2:02 8:22 1


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
:15 E
:42 8


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY........
MC. 17 DE. 24 J.I1 MOONSET TODAY.........


er
Pa
71


Gulf water
temperature



66
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.09 28.06 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.15 35.11 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.28 37.23 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.20 39.15 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. in no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211,

THE NATION


S lo
San




53% .. a

n: r chk age Honol.lu
alm 30 -- s "--
12 s


.8
5.5

ints



LJOR
N)
8:08
1:50


.5:32 P.
.7:08 A.
.1:12 P
1:00 A.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/lnverness/Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even
addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd
addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
- nr.j;. j i' jTer;n.j 5,. ih .ji- ;r..i T;rr. : H-i.-ni j a ring and micro-irrigation of plants
,.:r., ir,r I nr.: ..a. t .:..- r.:r, .i,* .jr,,.] an y time.


TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 11:48 a/7:37a -- /7:36 p
Crystal River' 10:09 a/4:59 a 10:37 p/4:58 p
Withlacoochee* 7:56 a/2:47 a 8:24 p/2:46 p
Homosassa*" 10:58 a/6:36 a 11:26 p/6:35 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
12:16 a/8:50 a 1:13 p/8:34
11:34 a/6:12 a 11:24 p/5:56
9:21 a/4:00 a 9:11 p/3:44
12:23 p/7:49 a -- /7:33


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
S Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
M. Burlington, VT
M. Charleston, SC
M. Charleston, WV
Charlotte
S Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
S Mobile
Montgomery
w Nashville


p
p

p


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. FcstH L
45 23 s 44 30
40 30 .01 rs 44 21
59 24 s 56 33
64 33 s 63 42
56 27 s 49 40
64 55 .47 c 73 53
59 26 s 50 40
37 26 c 35 18
64 30 s 65 45
45 24 pc 38 22
50 35 s 44 37
39 31 .18 pc 49 43
37 25 .06 s 38 29
66 31 s 67 47
52 25 s 61 38
63 25 s 58 37
43 33 .02 r 49 41
48 29 s 55 40
39 32 pc 50 42
66 29 s 62 37
46 28 pc 50 39
44 21 s 41 26
59 45 .05 ts 68 39
31 3 .01 sn 25 10
39 13 rs 39 25
40 33 .09 pc 43 41
49 37 pc 53 33
53 29 pc 59 48
53 26 s 46 32
50 25 s 46 34
71 53 c 77 65
47 29 pc 54 41
66 29 pc 70 55
52 43 pc 54 37
61 36 c 65 56
64 48 s 65 45
54 31 s 60 48
63 35 pc 69 55
39 30 .01 r 42 39
34 14 sn 34 25
68 35 pc 71 56
65 30 s 69 45
59 27 s 63 45


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


.O 50-_ o
.. __ .- ,
Sk a'b. I -

J 80 70so




FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 69 36 pc 72 62
New York City 52 39 s 49 40
Norfolk 62 33 s 56 38
Oklahoma City 41 35 .05 ts 60 31
Omaha 36 13 sn 35 19
Palm Springs 63 50 s 61 41
Philadelphia 54 34 s 48 37
Phoenix 61 44 sh 59 36
Pittsburgh 43 25 pc 49 36
Portland, ME 47 25 s 40 31
Portland, Ore 49 37 trace pc 47 34
Providence, R.I. 52 28 s 46 34
Raleigh 64 29 s 57 35
Rapid City 39 14 pc 26 15
Reno 52 20 pc 35 13
Rochester, NY 38 30 .07 pc 47 37
Sacramento 73 47 s 57 34
St. Louis 45 32 c 58 46
St. Ste. Marie 31 19 trace rs 38 33
Salt Lake City 41 21 pc 33 20
San Antonio 64 59 .10 c 74 58
San Diego 64 53 s 64 44
San Francisco 71 55 s 60 45
Savannah 66 31 s 68 48
Seattle 44 35 .01 pc 42 37
Spokane 40 22 pc 35 20
Syracuse 41 27 .04 s 45 32
Topeka 41 19 r 45 24
Washington 55 34 s 51 38
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 86 Harlingen, Texas LOW-8 Douglas,
Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/73/pc
Amsterdam 51/42/sh
Athens 61/41/s
Beijing 40/20/s
Berlin 45/39/sh
Bermuda 68/65/pc
Cairo 69/52/s
Calgary 34/16/sf
Havana 77/59/pc
Hong Kong 71/61/s
Jerusalem 62/42/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


60/46/pc
52/42/sh
52/32/pc
75/41/s
36/36/s
34/30/sn
51/42/r
82/69/pc
64/47/sh
70/58/s
64/55/r
45/41/pc
41/31/pc


C I T R U S


C U N TY


LHKON1CLt
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: (352) 563-5655
Marion County: (888) 852-2340
13 wks.: $36.65* 6 mos.: $64.63*
1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call (352) 563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

(352) 563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County (352) 563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at (888) 852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus (352) 563-5966
Marion (888) 852-2340
To place a display ad: (352) 563-5592
Online display ad: (352) 563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 563-5665, Newsroom 563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
.. Meadowcrest
444 o office
Norvell Branti Hwi 1624 N.
Dunkeneld Meadowcrest
Dunkenteld _- Cannondale Dr Blvd.
Ave Crystal River,
S\ Madowcrest FL 34429
N I \ '- "

S 1 Inverness
Courthouse office
To pkins St. square
0 C 106 W. Main
41Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
Gerry M ulligan ............................................................. ......... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan................................. ..................................... Editor, 563-3225
Tom Feeney .......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ................................................................ Online M manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan .... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
John Murphy.................................................... Classified Manager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon .................................................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ............................................. ................. ................ 56 3 -3 2 6 1
S o u n d O ff ............................................. .................... . .................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9

The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
S Phone (352) 563-6363
1 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
106 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL 34450
PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


STATE/LOCAL


.J





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Activists want Lolita freed


Whale at

center ofsuit

Associated Press

SEATTLE Supporters
have offered $1 million for
her release. Annual demon-
strations have demanded
her return to the North-
west. Over the years,
celebrities, schoolchildren
and even a Washington
state governor have cam-
paigned to free Lolita, a
killer whale captured from
Puget Sound waters in 1970
and who has been perform-
ing at Miami Seaquarium
for the past four decades.
Activists are now suing
the federal government in
federal court in Seattle,
saying it should have pro-
tected Lolita when it listed
other Southern Resident
orcas as an endangered
species in 2005.
"The fact that the federal
government has declared
these pods to be endan-
gered is a good thing, but
they neglected to include
these captives," said Karen
Munro, a plaintiff in the law-
suit who lives in Olympia,
Wash. Plaintiffs include two
other individuals, the Ani-
mal Legal Defense Fund
and People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals.
The lawsuit, filed in No-
vember, alleges that the
fisheries service allows the
Miami Seaquarium to keep
Lolita in conditions that
harm and harass her and
otherwise wouldn't be al-
lowed under the Endan-
gered Species Act. The
lawsuit alleges Lolita is
confined in an inadequate
tank without sufficient
space and without compan-
ions of her own species.
The agency is still re-
viewing the lawsuit, said
Monica Allen, a spokes-
woman with the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, whose fish-
eries service oversees ma-
rine mammals.
Lolita, who is estimated
to be about 44 or 45, is the
last surviving orca captured
from the Southern Resi-
dent orca population dur-
ing the 1970s. She is a
member of the L pod, or
family Female orcas gener-
ally live into their 50s


Associated Press
Trainer Marcia Hinton performs with Lolita during a performance at the Miami Seaquar-
ium, in Miami in this 1995 file photo. Celebrities, documentary artists, even the former
Washington state governor over the years have sought to free Lolita, who was captured
from Puget Sound waters in 1970 and has been performing stunts at the Seaquarium for
four decades. Activists are now suing the federal government in a U.S. District Court in
Seattle, saying the government erred by not including captive animals when they listed
the whales as endangered in 2005.


ON THE NET
www.orcanetwork.org
www.miami
seaquariem.com

though they can live
decades longer
The J, K, and L pods fre-
quent Western Washing-
ton's inland marine waters
and are genetically and be-
haviorally distinct from
other killer whales. They
eat salmon rather than ma-
rine mammals, show an at-
tachment to the region, and
make sounds that are con-
sidered a unique dialect.
The whales, with striking
black coloring and white
bellies, spend time in tight,
social groups and ply the
waters of Puget Sound and
British Columbia.
When the National Ma-
rine Fisheries Service
listed the Southern Resi-
dent orcas as endangered
- in decline because of
lack of prey, pollution and
contaminants, and effects
from vessels and other fac-
tors it didn't include
whales placed in captivity
prior to the listing or their
captive-born offspring.
They're "not maximizing
opportunity to protect the
species if you exclude cap-


tive members," said Craig
Dillard, litigation director
for the Animal Legal De-
fense. Lolita should have
the same protections as
other wild orcas, he added.
He noted that the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service is
currently considering
whether to give all captive
chimpanzees the same pro-
tection as wild
chimpanzees.
The Miami Seaquarium
declined to comment on the
lawsuit. It issued a state-
ment saying Lolita is active,
healthy, well-cared for and
plays an important role in
educating the public about
the need to conserve the
species. Lolita has learned
to trust humans completely,
the statement says, and
"this longstanding behav-
ioral trust would be dan-
gerous for her if she were
returned to Puget Sound,
where commercial boat
traffic and human activity
are heavy, pollution is a se-
rious issue and the killer
whale population has been
listed as an endangered
species."
Howard Garrett, co-
founder of the nonprofit
Orca Network based on
Whidbey Island, Wash., said
returning her to Northwest


waters is the right thing to
do. It would be healthier for
her, and allow her to rebuild
family bonds with the L pod.
"She remembers where
she came from. I think she
will remember her water
and her family," said Gar-
rett, who has spent years
advocating for her release
and whose group plans to
help Lolita transition back
to Northwest waters.
Munro joined the lawsuit
because she believes Lolita
deserves to retire and re-
turn to the Puget Sound,
where she can swim natu-
rally and attempt to reunite
with her family
She became an advocate
for the majestic creatures,
after witnessing a "very vi-
olent, distressing scene" of
orcas being torn from their
pods while out sailing in
1976. The captors used ex-
plosives, boats and sea-
planes to chase the animals
into shallower waters and
netted them, she said.
"They were taking these
orcas away purely for
money and profit, because
they make huge amounts of
money from whale shows.
They (orcas) don't belong in
these aquariums," she said,
adding "Lolita deserves to
come back."


Gov't leasing land to control flooding


Anita Aiken, 80
CRYSTAL RIVER
Anita Aiken, 80, Crystal
River, died Nov 27, 2011.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto, FL.

Mattie
Gibbs, 100
LECANTO
Mattie R. Gibbs, 100, of
Lecanto, FL, died Friday,
Dec. 2, 2011, at Brentwood
Health Center in Lecanto.
Mattie
was born
June 22,
1911, in
Lecanto to \ ti..'
the late .-\ -
William H. -
and Laura
Barnes
Ross. After Mattie
marrying Gibbs
Clifford Gibbs she moved
with her family to Savan-
nah, GA, and then to
Picayune, MS. She returned
to Lecanto in 1973. She was
a member of the First Bap-
tist Church of Lecanto.
Mattie was preceded in
death by her husband, Clif-
ford M. Gibbs; 2 sons, Clifford
M. Gibbs, Jr, and Richard E.
Gibbs; and 8 siblings.
Mattie is survived by her
son, Wm. David Gibbs and
wife Charlotte, of Valdosta,
GA; daughter-in-law Jean-
nine Hodgdon, of Lecanto;
sister, Jeannette Argo, of La-
Belle, FL; 10 grandchildren,
Richard, Robert, Ross, Paul,
Jeanie, Lori, Bill, Patricia,
Sheri and Michael; 20 great-
and six great-great-
grandchildren.
RFneral services will be
held at 11 a. m., Monday, Dec.
5, 2011, at the First Baptist
Church of Lecanto, with Pas-
tor Gary Bailey officiating.
Burial will follow in the Mag-
nolia Cemetery Friends will
be received at the church
Monday from 10 a.m. until the
hour of service. Donations in
memory of Mattie may be
given to Susan G. Komen For
the Cure, Attn: Donor Serv-
ices, PO. Box 650309, Dallas,
TX 75265-0309. Condolence
may be given at www.wilder
funeral.com.

Jimmy
Heath, 51
INVERNESS
Jimmy Lee Heath, 51, In-
verness, died Nov 20, 2011.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto.


Charles
Nettles, 69
BRADENTON
Charles Nettles, 69,
Bradenton, died Dec. 1,
2011.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto, FL.

Alfred
Nowak, 56
HOMOSASSA
Alfred S. Nowak, 56, Ho-
mosassa, died Nov30, at his
home.
Private cremation under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crematory
in Lecanto, FL.

Jean Troxel, 67
HOMOSASSA
Jean Marie Troxel. 67, of
Homosassa, FL, died Thurs-
day, Dec. 1, 2011, at Bayonet
Point Hospital in Hudson,
FL.
She was born Dec. 2,1943,
in Washington, DC and
moved to Homosassa from
Pace, FL, in 2006. After 25
years of service she retired
from the Mutuel Depart-
ment Money Room for
Maryland Thoroughbred
Racing. Jean enjoyed knit-
ting and crocheting and was
a member of the Catholic
Church.
She is survived by her
husband of 32 years, Glen R.
Troxel, of Homosassa; son
Edward Belschner and wife
Rasa of Columbia, MD;
daughter Ariana C. Troxel,
of Homosassa; step-sons
Michael Troxel and wife
Kelnelma of Abderdeen,
MD, and Richard Troxel, of
Westminister, MD; step-
daughter Cheryl Glass, of
New Windsor, MD; brother
Armand Ridolfi, Venice, FL;
sister Mary Bouroughs, of St
Louis, MO; and grandchil-
dren, Nathan Belschner,
Kristen Roberts, Jeffrey
Turco, Hunter Turco, Noah
Glass, Dustin Troxel and
Demier Aricapa.
A memorial service for
Jean will be held at 10 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 5, 2011, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa Springs, FL,
Friends will be received
Monday from 9:30 a.m. until
the hour of service. Condo-
lence may be given at
www.wilderfuneral.com.

SO YOU KNOW
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's paper.


Associated Press

OKEECHOBEE Short
on cash to make big land
purchases with public
money, environmental offi-
cials are increasingly turn-
ing to ranchers and other
landowners to help in proj-
ects aimed at flood preven-
tion, water quality
improvement and Ever-
glades restoration.
Eight ranchers north of
Lake Okeechobee signed
land management deals
this week with the Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection and the South
Florida Water Management
District. The water man-
agement district is now in-
volved in about 100 such
contracts, which are seen
as a cheaper alternative to
traditional government
land acquisition programs.
"It's cost-effective for the
government, it's profitable
for the ranchers and it's
good for the environment,"
said Melissa Meeker, exec-
utive director of the water
management district.
The projects vary from
site to site, but often take
the shape of the one
Meeker and other officials
surveyed at Dixie Cattle
Ranch in Okeechobee.
Woody Larson, the ranch's
owner, has built simple
berms, levees and other
catchment areas to hold
rainwater
Holding the water on site
acts as a flood prevention
tool at Lake Okeechobee,
where waters run south. By
preventing it from running
into the lake, runoff is also
kept out of estuaries, where
freshwater can alter the
salinity levels, which in
turn can disturb sea grass, a
cornerstone of life in such
bodies of water. And the


water storage also plays
into larger Everglades
restoration efforts, by curb-
ing the flow of phospho-
rous, a fertilizer that fosters
the growth of cattails that
can limit native vegetation.
"The health of the Ever-
glades is about getting the
water right," said Herschel
Vinyard, the DEP secretary
"And a key part of getting
the water right is getting the
land right"
Perched atop a swamp
buggy, Larson sloshes along
through his sprawling
ranch. Cows rest in the
shade beneath palm trees;
birds fly in formation over-
head. A foot or two of water
now covers some areas that
were once dry
Proponents of the pro-
gram say it's far cheaper
than buying up huge swaths
of land, plus by keeping
ranches in private hands,
they remain on the tax rolls.
Under the deal, Larson will
receive $150 a year for
every acre foot of water
storage, or about $146,500
annually
"There has to be some in-
centive," he said, "or we
wouldn't do it."
Though pilot public-pri-
vate land management
projects similar to the one
at Dixie Ranch began
around 2005, they're ex-
pected to become increas-
ingly popular out of
financial necessity
State lawmakers cut
Everglades restoration
funding this year from $50
million to $29 million,
slashed water management
district property taxes by
$210.5 million, and with-
held funding from the
Florida Forever land-buy-
ing program.
Meeker said land man-
agement deals are just "a
piece of the puzzle" and


still must "be coupled with
our larger regional storage
and water quality projects."
State Sen. Thad Altman,
R-Viera, who is helping or-
ganize a new Everglades
caucus in the Legislature,
said "land acquisition is the
cornerstone of restoring the
Everglades" and that he
hopes to see Florida For-
ever funded next session.
But he said land manage-

haN.N E. baMtH4
FuneralHome With Crematory
MARY BLANTON
Service: Hopewell Funeral Home
Plant City, FL
BERTHA CONWAY
Service: Sat.Dec. 10,11:00 AM
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church
ANNEE. SMITH
Private Cremation Arrangements
LEWIS HILL
Graveside Service: Tue. 2:30 PM
Florida National Cemetery
726-8323 MQ


ment deals such as those
signed this week are also
positive tools, particularly
in tough budget times.
"You can buy a lot more,"
he said.

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad, I
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline.com
or
Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
miller @ chronicleonline .om

-Lis aspior torun dteA


* BUYERS OF PRECIOUS
METALS & ESTATES






(}JIM GREEN JEWELERS
66 SBext t oet




1665 US Hwy 19 South* Crystal River Shopping Ctr. (Next to Sweet Bay)
T-T


on BRAND NEW
Holiday Decor Gifts Galore
Gift Wrap Tree Trim And More!


25% off
any one non-sale item with this
coupon now through Saturday, Dec. 24
Goodwill-Suncoast
Not valid on sale items
or mattresses.
One discount per
customer per day.



Crystal River
.. 408 N. Suncoast Blvd.
Spring Hill Superstore
4750 Commercial Way
Ocala Superstore
2830 SW 27th Ave.



Goodwill l

For more store locations:
....... ....www.goodwill-suncoast.org

EC


Obituaries


Officials turn to ranchers on

environment efforts


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 A5







A6 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


T M E R I


I HowTKs *R 'RIDHE T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2714718 5.64 +.11 Rubicong 51003 3.96 +.31 RschMotn 543468 16.77 -1.81 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1865891124.86 -.11 NwGoldg 35319 10.63 -.44 Microsoft 510517 25.22 -.06 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncI1246204 12.91 +.17 NovaGldg 26817 10.76 -.37 Cisco 455301 18.55 -.03 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
JPMorgCh 890738 32.33 +1.87 AntaresP 23880 2.74 +.15 Intel 393245 24.64 -.28 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
GenElec 676621 16.09 +.18 CheniereEn 22268 9.83 +.01 SiriusXM 353612 1.86 -.02 Chg: Loss or gain fortheday No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: ld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amencan Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
AlexBld 44.39 +6.33 +16.6 Aerosonic 3.39 +.51 +17.7 FstSecurrs 2.15 +1.02 +90.4 mngqualification n-Stockwasa new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and lowfig-
AmrRlty 2.25 +.30 +15.4 VirnetX 22.16 +2.62 +13.4 Amertns pf 6.27 +2.27 +56.8 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
Navios 3.90 +.50 +14.7 Arrhythm 3.66 +.31 +9.3 YRCrs 12.78 +3.18 +33.1 Holder owes Installments of purchase pnce. rt- Right to buy security at a specified pnce. s-
PSKBWCap30.05 +3.24 +12.1 Rubicong 3.96 +.31 +8.5 MitelNetg 3.53 +.79 +28.8 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the lastyear. wi -Trades will be settled when the
OldRepub 8.98 +.91 +11.3 Augusta g 3.48 +.27 +8.4 Zumiez 28.99 +5.62 +24.0 stock is issued. wd When distributed, wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
WirlssHT 29.40-10.67 -26.6 ASpecRIty 7.80 -.90 -10.3 Crumbunh 2.52 -1.58 -38.5
IPSXR1K 37.98 -7.13 -15.8 GranTrrag 5.73 -.50 -8.0 FstBcMiss 7.60 -1.29 -14.5 i
TenetHlth 4.18 -.50 -10.7 QuestRMg 2.85 -.22 -7.2 Schmitt 3.31 -.44 -11.7


DirDGIdBII 30.26 -3.32 -9.9 AvalRaren 3.05 -.19 -5.9 Magal 4.56 -.52 -10.2
GCSaba 7.31 -.78 -9.6 WisPpf 100.00 -6.00 -5.7 Wstmlndpf 23.50 -2.68 -10.2


1,854 Advanced
1,188 Declined
96 Unchanged
3,138 Total issues
106 New Highs
13 New Lows
4,039,433,814 Volume


DIARY


261 Advanced
201 Declined
32 Unchanged
494 Total issues
10 New Highs
6 New Lows
81,823,169 Volume


1,514
994
153
2,661
41
41
1,611,389,810


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
459.94 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99AmexIndex
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 200


Last
12,019.42
4,946.67
443.63
7,453.55
2,252.37
2,626.93
1,244.28
13,080.04
735.02


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
-.61 -.01 +3.82 +5.60
+37.57 +.77 -3.13 -2.41
-4.44 -.99 +9.54+11.18
+3.12 +.04 -6.41 -3.84
-13.16 -.58 +1.99 +6.99
+.73 +.03 -.98 +1.37
-.30 -.02 -1.06 +1.60
+8.17 +.06 -2.10 +.60
+4.27 +.58 -6.21 -2.83


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BoBrades 17.15 +.16
BoSantSA 7.57 +.10
BmSBrasil 8.06 +.08
BkofAm 5.64 +.11
ABBLtd 18.63 -.05 BkMontg 58.39 +.32
ACELtd 68.38 -.22 BkNYMel 19.29 +.19
AESCorp 11.94 -.17 Barday 11.86 +.65
AFLAC 43.71 +.67 BariPVix 40.79 -.03
AGLRes 40.42 -.47 BarnesNob 16.16 +1.57
AKSteel 8.22 +.04 BarrickG 51.02 -1.79
vAMR .39 +.06 Baxter 51.46 -.67
AOL 14.47 +.55 Beam Inc 51.98 +.04
ASA Gold 28.92 -.33 BeazerHm 2.42 +.12
AT&TInc 28.96 +.12 BectDck 73.64 -.50
AUOptron 4.93 -.11 BerkHaA116475.00-450.00
AbtLab 54.15 -.37 BerkH B 77.44 -.37
AberFitc 49.00 +1.12 BestBuy 27.60 +.53
Accenture 58.38 +.41 BigLots 36.28 -3.45
AdamsEx 9.68 -.02 BioMedR 17.90 +.08
AMD 5.65 -.05 BIkHillsCp 32.89 +.10
Aeropost 16.27 +.08 BlkDebtStr 3.72
Aetna 41.01 -.67 BlkEnhC&l 12.52 +.02
Agilent 36.76 -1.06 BIkGlbOp 14.00 +.04
Agniomg 43.04 -1.31 Blackstone 14.77 +.55
AlcatelLuc 1.67 +.03 BlockHR 15.03 -1.03
Alma 9.91 +.10 Boeing 71.30 +.32
AlexBld 44.39 +6.33 BorgWarn 67.11 +.04
AllegTch 49.94 +.03 BostBeer 102.51 +1.61
Allergan 83.57 -.61 BostProp 93.73 +.16
Allete 39.30 -.58 BostonSci 5.50 -.40
AlliBGlbHi 14.40 +.04 BoydGm 6.46 -.24
AlliBlnco 8.13 +.01 Brandyw 8.64 +.05
AlliBern 13.19 -.07 BrMySq 32.77 -.13
Allstate 26.68 +.12 BrkfidOfPr 15.01 +.37
AlphaNRs 24.11 +.12 Brunswiek 18.09 -.20
Alria 28.41 -.27 Budckeye 63.96 -.18
AmBevs 34.51 -.17 CBLAs 14.43 +.44
Ameren 32.47 -1.23 CBREGrp 16.51 +.01
AMovilLs 23.89 +.36 CBSB 25.56 +.14
AmAxle 8.64 +.15 CFInds 140.73 -6.25
AEagleOut 14.17 +09 CHEngy 55.74 -.02
AEP 39.25 -.37 CIT Grp 34.00 +.32
AmExp 48.23 +.44 CMS Eng 20.79 -.33
AmlnlGrp 23.18 +18 CNOFind 6.21 +01
AmSIP3 6.50 +.01 CSS Inds 19.75 +.17
AmTower 59.08 +.48 CSXs 21.65 -.08
Amerigas 43.95 +.08 CVREngy 18.60 +.54
Ameriprise 45.98 +.50 CVSCare 38.29 -.19
AmeriBrgn 37.01 -.23 CblvsNYs 15.14 +.20
Anadarko 80.48 +.10 CabotO&G 86.41 +.63
AnalogDev 35.26 +.05 CallGolf 5.65 +.11
AnglogldA 47.02 -1.40 Calpine 15.06 +.09
Ann Inc 24.43 +.71 Camecog 19.05 +.25
Annaly 16.23 +.07 Cameron 52.87 -.94
Anworth 6.30 +.05 CampSp 32.54 +.01
AonCorp 46.01 +.14 CdnNRsgs 37.06 -.26
Apache 96.47 -2.01 CapOne 45.34 +.59
Aptlnv 21.89 +.14 CapiiSrce 6.50
AquaAm 21.87 -.06 CapM pB 14.40
ArcelorMit 19.01 +.01 CardnlHlth 41.44 -.93
ArchCoal 16.20 +.01 CareFusion 24.90 -.27
ArchDan 29.99 -.23 CarMax 29.47 +.29
Ashland 55.56 +.34 Carnival 33.43 +.39
AsdEstat 15.78 -.12 Caterpillar 96.29 -.53
AssuredG 11.25 +.26 Celanese 45.57 -.57
AstoriaF 8.00 +.26 Cemex 4.78 +.06
AstaZen 45.20 -.30 Cemigpf 16.61 -.79
ATMOS 32.52 -1.62 CenterPnt 19.63 -.17
AuRicog 9.56 -.21 CntyLink 35.48 -.72
AveryD 26.97 +.07 Checkpnt 11.99 +.02
Avon 16.67 -.07 ChesEng 25.44 +.14
BB&TCp 23.40 +.34 ChesUf 42.19 -.24
BHPBiIILt 75.30 +1.30 Chevron 101.69 -.14
BHPBilplc 61.76 +1.29 Chios 10.22 -.11
BPPLC 43.29 +.54 Chimera 2.63 -.01
BPZRes 3.20 +.10 Chubb 66.22 -.76
BRT 6.25 +.07 Cigna 43.07 -.52
BakrHu 53.62 -1.63 CindBell 2.88
BallCps 34.92 -.11 Cinemark 20.00 +.08


Name Last Chg


ACMoorelf 1.59
AMCNetn 34.66 -1.15
ASMLHId 40.66 +1.33
ATP O&G 7.30 -.21
AVIBio .69 +.01
AXTInc 4.05 +.13
Abiomed 19.89 -.02
Abraxas 3.70 +.05
AcadaTc 34.96 +.19
Accuray 4.23 +.20
Achillion 6.85 -.05
AcmePkt 35.60 +1.81
AordaTh 22.53 -.65
AcfvePwr .72 +.07
AcfvsBliz 12.27 -.14
AdobeSy 27.11 -.03
AdolorCp 4.60 -.09
Adtan 32.74 +.55
AdvATchlf 5.76 +.01
AdvEnld 10.00 +.21
AEternag 1.64 +.03
Affymax 5.25 +.12
Affymetix 4.29 -.07
AgFeedhlf .57 -.08
AkamaiT 29.00 -.16
Akorn 10.83 -.02
AlaskCom 5.33 +.07
Alexions 66.98 -2.28
Alexza 1.02 +.03
AlignTech 24.37 -.13
Alkermes 14.86 -.55
AllosThera 1.27 -.09
AllotComm 17.51 +.69
AllscriptH 18.96 -.47
AlteraCplf 37.15 -.40
AlterraCap 22.55 -.10
Amarin 7.78 +.35
Amazon 196.03 -1.10
Amedisys 12.28 +.46
ACapAgy 28.38 -.15
AmCapLd 7.18 +.15
AmPac 8.06 +.35
AmSupr 4.11 -.04
AmCasino 17.57 +.02
Amgen 58.10 +.10
AmkorTIf 4.59 +.12
Amylin 10.50 -.37
Anadigc 2.23 +.12
Anlogic 55.93 -.29
Analystlnt 4.94 +.09
Ancesty 23.62 +.32
AngiesLn 14.01 +1.46
Ansys 60.33 -1.13
AntheraPh 6.48 +.69
A123Sys 2.27
ApolloGrp 49.89 +1.02
Apollolnv 7.18 -.01
Apple Inc 389.70 +1.77
ApldEnerh .09 -.01
ApldMaf 10.83 +.06
AMCC 7.24 -.06
Approach 31.29 +.40
ApricusBio 4.94 +.18
ArchCaps 37.29 -.19
ArenaPhm 1.68 +.05
AresCap 15.51
AriadP 11.90 -.41
Ariba Inc 29.70 -.52
ArmHId 27.85 -.24
Arris 10.58 -.06
ArthroCre 29.62 +.17
ArubaNet 21.35 +.14
AscenaRf 27.69 +.17
AsialnfoL 8.62 -.11
AspenTech 17.88 +.08
AsscdBanc 10.47 +.12
AstexPhm 1.67 +.07
athenahlth 59.42 -.47
Athersys 1.66 +.34
Atmel 9.06 +.22
Audvox 7.22 +.26
Autodesk 33.97 -.30
AutoData 51.30 -.20
Auxilium 17.51 +.57


Cifgrprs 28.17 +1.18
CleanHs 59.49 -.07
CliffsNRs 68.34 -.74
Clorox 65.21 +.30
Coach 62.20 -.49
CCFemsa 86.41 -.35
CocaCola 66.38 -.45
CocaCE 25.82 +.01
CohStlnfra 15.98 -.06
ColgPal 90.19 +.08
CollctvBrd 13.70 -.19
Comerica 25.21 +.07
CmclMfs 13.99 +.09
CmwREIT 16.60
CmtyHIt 18.77 -1.06
CompSci 24.67 -.05
Con-Way 28.40 +.62
ConAgra 25.29 +.09
ConocPhil 72.55 +.79
ConsolEngy 40.72 -.19
ConEd 58.61 -.90
ConstellA 19.07 -.10
ConstellEn 39.31 -.71
Cnvrgys 12.60 +.01
Corning 13.22 -.25
CottCp 6.45 +.15
Covidien 45.33 -1.12
Crane 47.38 +.16
CSVS2xVxS 43.41 -.07
CSVellVSts 5.85 +.01
CredSuiss 24.61 +.86
CrwnCsfe 43.70 +1.03
Cummins 95.73 -.59
CurEuro 133.55 -.56

DCTIndl 4.73 +.01
DDRCorp 11.58 -.04
DNPSelct 10.79 -.09
DR Horton 11.89 -.04
DSWInc 46.05 +.36
DTE 51.69 -.94
DanaHldg 12.50 +.36
Danaher 47.50 -.91
Darden 47.53 +.08
DeanFds 10.17 +.08
Deere 77.69 -1.04
DeltaAir 8.41 -.11
DenburyR 16.63 -.07
DeutschBk 40.00 +1.08
DevonE 65.39 +.29
DexOneh 1.63 -.01
DiaOffs 60.17 -.16
DicksSptg 39.79 +.77
DxFnBullrs 62.82 +1.93
DrSCBrrs 28.44 -.34
DirFnBrrs 40.62 -1.39
DirLCBrrs 31.03 -.02
DrxEnBear 11.58 +.03
DirEMBear 18.41 +.18
DirxSCBull 44.33 +.46
DirxLCBull 59.70 -.03
DirxEnBull 48.40 -.07
Discver 24.21 +.17
Disney 36.61 +.62
DollarGen 39.94 -.15
DomRescs 50.56 -.79
Dover 55.88 +1.12
DowChm 27.75 +.18
DuPont 47.02 -.27
DukeEgy 20.62 -.08
DukeRlty 11.55 +.08
Dynegy 3.15 +.21
EMCCp 23.26 +.09
EOGRes 102.56 +.03
EastChms 38.42 -.49
EKodak 1.02 -.04
Eatons 44.83 +.24
EatnVan 23.93 +.28


AvagoTch 31.16 +1.25 CogoGrp 1.66
AvanirPhm 2.37 +.04 Coinstar 41.50 -.20
AviatNetw 1.75 ... ColdwtrCrk .91 -.01
AvisBudg 12.18 +.40 ColumLabs 2.16 -.01
Awareh 3.02 -.09 Comcast 23.36 +.79
Axcelis 1.33 +.05 Comcspd 23.19 +.81
BBCNBcp 9.29 +.02 CmcBMO 37.19 +.33
BEAero 38.69 -.23 CommSys 13.61 +.49
BGCPtrs 6.25 +.07 CommVlt 49.70 +.28
BMCSft 34.47 -.82 CmplGnom 3.49 -.15
Baidu 134.09 -.74 Compuwre 8.51 +.24
BeacnRfg 19.22 -.16 Comtech 30.35 +.13
BeasleyB 3.60 -.15 Comverse 6.46 -.08
BebeStrs 7.45 -.21 Conmed 25.89 -.23
BedBath 60.81 +.70 Conns 11.92 +.54
BioRetlab 12.14 +.02 ConstantC 23.02 +1.12
BioFuelEh .77 +.12 CorinthC 2.68 +.03
Biogenldc 113.24 -3.24 CostPlus 9.51 +.93
BioLase 2.71 -.14 Costo 86.73 -.36
BioMarin 34.53 -.54 CowenGp 2.60 +.11
BioSante 2.52 +.04 CrackerB 48.70 +1.14
BIkRKelso 8.61 +.04 CreeInc 24.59 -.24
BlueCoat 17.81 -.35 Crocs 15.84 +.40
BobEvans 33.40 +.25 CrosstexE 12.43 +.61
BonTon 3.06 -.09 Ctrip.om 26.18 -.34
BostPrv 7.75 +.06 CubistPh 38.10 -.34
BreitBurn 18.03 -.06 Cyclacelh .73 +.02
BrigExp 36.49 +.01 CypSemi 18.76 -.10
Brighpnt 10.06 -.05 CytRxh .35 -.01
Broadcom 29.99 -.65 Co i 2.64 -.07
BroadSoft 36.36 +1.71
Broadwdh .65 +.03
BrcdeCm 5.35 -.02 DealrTrk 25.79 +.33
BrooksAuto 9.92 +.30 DeclksOut 106.88 -.06
BrukerCp 12.77 -.23 Dell Inc 15.70 -.10
BuffabWW 64.19 -.16 DeltaPtrrs .56 -.01
CAInc 21.03 -.17 Dndreon 8.62 -.14
CBOE 26.57 -.45 Dentsply 35.37 -.76
CH Robins 67.98 +.33 Depomed 4.82 -.11
CMEGrp 253.31 +3.31 DexCom 8.24 +.24
CNinsure 6.85 +.41 DiamondF 29.30 -.20
CTCMedia 9.96 +.02 DigitalGen 12.19 +.23
CVBFnd 9.90 +.09 DigRiver 15.43 -.06
CadencePh 4.45 +.17 DirecTVA 46.82 -1.05
Cadence 10.82 +.06 DiscCmA 41.49 +.31
CdnSolar 2.85 -.27 DiscCmC 38.16 +.70
CapCtyBk 10.31 +.07 DiscLabrs 1.69 +.11
CapProd 5.90 -.22 DishNetwk 26.21 +1.63
CapFdFrs 11.33 +.13 DollarTree 81.75 -.30
CpstnTrbh 1.04 +.04 DonlleyRR 14.83 +.05
CareerEd 7.36 +.12 DrmWksA 18.11 +.20
Carrizo 28.55 +.23 DryShips 2.42 -.08
CarverBrs 13.81 +1.26 Dunkinn 24.75 -.25
CathayGen 13.77 +.17 Dynavax 3.20 -.01
Cavium 32.99 ... E-Trade 9.07 +.17
Celgene 61.21 -1.55 eBay 29.60 -.08
CellTherrsh 1.11 +.02 EagleBulk 1.18 +.08
CelldexTh 2.90 +.09 EaglRkEn 10.78 +.28
Celsion 2.18 +.07 ErthLink 6.26 +.05
CentEuro 5.01 +.26 EstWstBcp 19.26 +.11
CentAI 9.55 +.04 EbixInc 20.34 -.67
Cepheid 34.55 +.22 EchoStar 23.07 +.60
CeragonN 8.34 +.37 EdgarOnlh .40
Cereplast 1.13 +.04 EducMgmt 23.09 +.57
Cerners 60.99 -1.14 EducDevh 5.33 +.08
CerusCp 2.99 +.11 8x8 nc 3.73 +.16
ChrmSh 4.56 +.33 ElectSd 12.63 +.07
Chartlnds 60.31 -.64 ElectArts 23.00 -.33
CharterCm 53.08 +.27 EndoPhrm 33.64 -.51
ChkPoint 54.64 -.34 Endobgix 11.38 -.06
Cheesecake 28.80 +.27 EngyCnvh .33 +.01
ChelseaTh 5.45 +.07 EngyXXI 31.79 +.64
ChildPlace 53.98 -.06 Entegris 8.52 +.07
ChinaCEd 5.21 ... EntropCom 5.20 -.22
ChinaMed 3.32 -.10 Equinix 101.83 -.16
ChinaRE 4.82 +.06 EricsnTel 10.21 -.23
ChrchllD 49.40 +1.05 ExactScih 8.54 +.11
CienaCorp 11.95 -.10 Exelids 4.21 -.33
CinnFin 28.92 -.08 EddeTc 2.71 -.04
Cintas 30.35 +.13 Eqxedia 28.10 +.07
Cirrus 16.83 +.44 Eqxdlni 42.11 -.09
Cisc 18.55 -.03 EqxScripts 46.61 +.11
CitzRpBrs 10.93 +.04 ExtmNet 3.00 +.09
CitrixSys 70.78 -.57 EZchip 30.97 +.05
CleanEngy 12.94 ... F5Netwks 112.42 +1.35
Clearwire 2.14 +.11 FLIRSys 25.74 -.91
CoffeeH 9.94 +.47 FSIlln 3.00 +.03
CognizTech 68.50 +.91 Fastenals 41.60 -.17


EVEnEq 10.24
EVTxMGlo 8.25
Ecolab 55.84
Edisonlnt 38.46
BPasoCp 25.29
Ban 10.75
BdorGldg 17.43
EmersonEl 51.36
EmpDist 20.89
EnbrEPts 30.65
EnCanag 20.24
EndvSilvg 11.09


EnPro 34.77 +1.54
ENSCO 51.20 -.65
Entergy 69.64 -.89
EntPrPt 46.28 -.13
EqtyRsd 54.25 +.12
ExoRes 11.78 +.11
Exelisn 9.14 -.01
Exelon 43.33 -.72
ExxonMbl 79.79
FMCTchs 53.18 +.47
FairchldS 13.09 -.11
FedExCp 82.14 +.11
FedRlty 89.40 +1.98
FedSignl 3.81 +.15
Ferrellgs 22.89 +.16
Ferro 5.83 +.13
RdNatlnfo 24.91 +.30
FstHorizon 7.56 +.02
FTActDiv 8.36 -.05
FtTrEnEq 11.01 +.02
FirstEngy 44.29 -.40
Rotek 9.62 +.63
Ruor 53.84 -.57
FootLockr 24.59 +.71
FordM 10.90 +.31
FordMwt 2.72 +.19
ForestLab 29.89 -.02
ForestOils 16.38 +.80
FrankRes 98.44 -.75
FMCG s 39.30 +.02
FronterCm 5.55 -.09
Fronline 3.04 +.05


Fusion-ion 31.96 +.26

GATX 40.62 -.40
GMXRs 1.62 +.03
GabelliET 5.23 +.06
GabHIthW 6.89 -.05
GabUlI 7.45
GaisaSA 6.19 -.12
GameStop 23.22 -.14
Gannett 11.91 +.65
Gap 18.70 -.11
GenDynam 65.72 -.78


GenElec 16.09 +18
GenGrPrp 13.92 -.03
GenMills 39.96 +.06
GenMotors 21.28 +.32
GenOn En 2.66 -.06
Genworth 6.47 -.07
Gerdau 7.75 +.01
Gildan 16.99 +.63
GlaxoSKln 44.18 -.12
GolLinhas 7.98 -.01
GoldFLd 16.52 -.57
Goldarpg 51.39 -2.12
GoldmanS 97.25 +2.82
Goodrich 122.41 -.29
Goodyear 14.12 +.20
GtPlainEn 20.87 -.06
Griffon 9.24 -.01
GpTelevisa 20.35 -.07
GuangRy 17.76 -.26
Guess 28.24 -1.37
HCAHIdn 22.45 -1.74
HCP Inc 37.69 -.39
HDFCBks 28.77 +1.34
HSBC 39.57 +.73
HSBCCap 25.81 -.05
Hallibrtn 36.58 +.17
HanJS 14.78 +.14
HanPrmDv 12.87 +.07
Hanesbrds 23.20
Hanoverlns 35.02 -.38
HarleyD 37.80 +.66
HarmonyG 13.93 -.34


FiberTwrlf .15 -.07 iShACWI 42.89 -.02
FifthStRn 9.77 +.08 iShNifty50 22.68 +.59
FifthThird 12.12 +.17 iShNsdqBio 101.75 -.66
FindEngin 22.80 +.60 IconPLC 16.60 -.09
Fndlnst 16.41 +.14 IonixBr 17.00 +.28
Finisar 16.48 +.36 IdenixPh 8.22 +.62
FinLine 21.26 +.33 Illumina 27.78 -.16
FstCashFn 37.42 -.12 ImunoGn 12.23 -.10
FMidBc 9.73 +.34 ImpaxLabs 19.58 +.23
FstNiagara 8.89 +.22 ImperlSgr 5.80 +.66
FstSolar 47.77 +.22 inContact 4.38 +.16
FstMerit 14.47 +.23 Incyte 14.24 -.20
Fiserv 57.68 +.23 Infinera 6.97 +.23
Flexrn 5.93 +.02 InfinityPh 9.49 +.35
Flowlnt 2.59 +.09 Informat 45.64 +.43
FocusMda 19.93 +.22 Infosys 52.81 +.40
ForcePro 5.51 +.02 Inhibitex 15.51 +.37
FormFac 5.71 -.13 InsightEnt 15.07 +.04
Forfnets 24.39 +.37 Insulet 18.64 +.44
Fossil Inc 89.91 +1.33 IntegLfSci 31.27 -.37
FosterWhl 19.14 +.63 IntgDv 5.84 +.05
Francescn 16.00 +.64 Intel 24.64 -.28
Fredslnc 13.69 +.22 InteractBrk 15.06 +.30
FreshMkt 39.15 -.37 InterDig 43.63 -.20
FuelCell .92 +.01 Intrface 11.52 -.01
FultonFncl 9.34 +.08 InterMune 18.65 +.25
FushiCo 746 -17 InterNAP 5.09 +.06
J[ B I InlSpdw 24.47 +.32
Intersil 10.76 -.06
GTAdvTc 8.45 +.29 Intuit 52.72 -.20
G-lll 18.20 +.83 IntSurg 433.85 -1.74
Garmin 37.12 +.56 InvRIEst 7.01 +.11
GenProbe 62.02 -.65 IridiumCm 7.27 +.35
Genomic 28.07 +.74 Isis 7.27
Gentex 31.11 +.58 IsleCapri 4.19 -.30
Genfvah 5.81 -.15 Iron 35.29 -.11
GeoEye 18.93 +.36 IvanhoeEn .91 -.06
Geores 29.36 +1.43 ba 11.50 +.50
GeronCp 1.70 -.06
ilGdSi 39.40 -27


aellaO 39.40 -.2
GladerBc 11.88 +.11
GlblEduc 10.82 +.06
GlbSpcMet 14.66 +.03
GluMobile 3.75 +.32
GolarLNG 43.66 +.90
Google 620.36 +6.59
GreenMtC 56.32 +2.40
GreenPlns 10.72 +.19
Greenlight 24.09 +1.00
GrifolsSAn 5.36 +.18
Grouponn 18.95
GrpoRn 7.03 -.03
GulfportE 33.35 +.35
HMNFn 1.85 +.09
HMS Hd s 29.92 +.31
HainCel 36.62 +.25
Halozyme 9.31 -.04
HancHId 30.09 +.46
HanmiFnd .89 +.02
HansenMed 2.38 +.07
HansenNat 93.83 +1.75
HanwhaSol 1.41 -.06
Harmonic 5.31 -.02
Hasbro 36.04 +.64
HawHold 5.86 -.08
Healthwys 6.41 -.21
HrfindEx 13.55 +.06
HSchein 64.05 -.55
HercOffsh 4.09 +.24
HiTchPhm 42.68 +1.13
HimaxTch 1.05 +.01
Hittte 54.98 +.62
Hologic 17.16 -.39
HomeAwn 25.94 -.04
HorsehdH 8.99 -.02
HotTopic 7.35 +.11
HudsCity 5.84 +.23
HumGen 7.57 +.06
HuntJB 45.69 +.22
HuntBnk 5.21 +.03
HutchT 1.79 +.18
IAC Inter 42.45 +.27
IdexxLabs 72.98 -1.79
II-VIs 18.59 -.86
IPG Photon 40.68 +.11
iRobot 32.66 +.46
iShAsiaexJ 52.38 -.11
iShACWX 37.99 -.02


j2Global 27.30 +.33
JASolar 1.75 -.12
JDASoft 32.90 +.47
JDSUniph 10.91 +.10
JackHenry 32.92 +.05
JacklnBox 20.63 +.57
JamesRiv 8.14 -.09

JazzPhrm 39.03 +.29
JetBlue 4.44 +.14
JoeJeansh .58 +.04
JosABank 49.35 +1.24
JoyGlbl 90.16 -1.13
KIT Digit 9.41 +.42
KLATnc 46.95 -.28
KeryxBio 2.65 +.04
KratosDef 5.70 -.31
Kulicke 9.26 +.20
LKQ Corp 29.93 +.09
LSI Indlf 6.45 +.24
LamResrch 42.24 +.60
LamarAdv 24.67 +.52
Lattce 7.03 +.06
LeapWirlss 8.86 +.11
LedPhrm 1.20 +.06
LibGlobA 40.38 +.31
LibCapA 76.71 +1.49
LibtlntAh 15.87 -.16
LifeTech 38.97 -.20
LifePtH 37.69 -1.35
LimelghtN 3.13 +.12
Lincare 23.88 +.06
LinearTch 30.64 -.09
LinnEngy 37.20 +.55
LivePrsn 12.47 -.01
LodgeNet 2.27 +.13
Logitech 8.21 +.14
LookSmart 1.30
Lulkin 71.30 +1.73
lululemnas 4969 +2.52

MBFncl 16.94 +.20
MCGCap 4.52 +.13
MGE 43.98 -.17
MIPSTech 4.67 -.03
MTS 40.09 -.47
MSG 28.88 -.12


HartdFn 17.91 +.04
HawaiiEl 25.66 -.19
HItCrREIT 49.53 -.25
HItMgmt 7.47 -.64
HIthcrRlty 17.66 +.23
HeclaM 5.97 -.26
Heinz 52.38 -.17
HelmPayne 58.31 +.46
Hertz 11.83 +.40
Hess 59.65 +.16
HewlettP 27.68 -.54
HighwdPrp 28.40 -.25


HollyFrts 24.47 +1.04
HomeDp 39.94 +.60
HonwIllnf 54.13 -.04
Hormels 28.99 -.94
Hospira 27.64 -.65
HospPT 21.90 +.19
HostHofs 14.31 +.14
Humana 89.11 +.08
Huntsmn 11.07
Hyperdyn 3.77 +.03
IAMGIdg 19.34 -1.07
ICICI Bk 30.72 +.96
ING 7.96 +.34
iShGold 17.03 +.01
iSAsfia 23.31 +.27
iShBraz 60.01 +.13
iSCan 27.19 -.21
iShGer 20.33 -.11
iShHK 15.79 -.17
iShJapn 9.33 +.03
iShKor 55.59 -.39
iSMalas 13.77 -.06
iShMex 55.04 +.34
iShSing 11.66 -.03
iSTaiwn 12.34 -.15
iShSilver 31.65 -.21
iShDJDv 52.33 -.33
iShChina25 36.40 -.22
iSSP500 125.34 -.02
iShEMkts 39.77 -.12
iShiBxB 111.50 +.94
iShB20T 118.64 +1.64


Magal 4.56
Magma 7.16
MaidenH 8.41
Majesco 3.08
MAKOSrg 28.76
MannKd 3.04
MarinaBio .16
MarvellT 13.79
Masimo 20.60
Mattel 28.45
Maximlntg 25.73
MaxwlT 17.09
McC&Sch 8.70
MedAssets 9.49
MedicAcIn 4.84
MediCo 19.16
Medivafon 47.71
MelcoCrwn 10.03
MentorGr 12.71
MercadoL 85.34
Mercerlni 5.78
MergeHIth 5.05
MeridBio 18.42
Micrel 10.61
Microchp 34.65
Micromet 6.52
MicronT 5.80
MicroSemi 18.05
Microsoft 25.22
Micrvisn h .44
Misonix 1.97
MitekSys 7.31
MitelNetg 3.53
Molex 24.73
MolexA 20.37
Momenta 16.42
Motricity 1.33
MulmGm 7.32
Mylan 19.50
Myrexs 2.73
MyriadG 21.29
NABIBio 1.78
NETgear 36.89
NIC Inc 13.59
NIl HIdg 22.48
NPS Phm 6.03
NXPSemi 17.52
NasdOMX 25.90
NatPenn 8.33
NektarTh 4.92
NetogicM 49.31
NetApp 36.54
Netease 46.51
Netiix 66.37
Nefist 2.86
NtScout 17.01
NetSpend 6.66
NewsCpA 17.60
NewsCpB 18.00
NobltyHIf 6.30
NorTrst 38.27
NwstBcsh 12.36
NovfiWrls 3.21
Novavax 1.46
Novlus 35.18
NuVasive 12.83
NuanceCm 24.06
NutriSyst 11.94
Nvidia 15.72
NxStageMd 19.07
OCZTech 7.42
OReillyAu 77.03
Oclaro 2.80
OdysMar 2.45
OldDomFrt 38.58
Omnicell 16.72
OmniVisn 11.63
OnAssign 10.34
OnSmcnd 8.04
Oncothyr 6.86
OnlineRes 2.73
OnyxPh 43.81
OpenTxt 56.17
OpenTable 36.24
OpnwvSy 1.65
Opnext 1.03
OpbmerPh 11.71
Oracle 31.20


iShB1-3T 84.48
iS Eafe 50.79
iShiBxHYB 86.92
iSR1KV 62.57
iSR1KG 58.19
iSR2KV 64.78
iSR2KG 84.50
iShR2K 73.50
iShREst 54.67
iStar 5.33
ITTCps 19.85
Idacorp 40.67


ITW 45.95 +.83
Imafon 5.99 +.08
IngerRd 33.23 -.20
IntegrysE 50.76 -.61
IntcnlEx 123.42 -1.28
IBM 189.66 +.21
InfGame 16.99 +.10
IntPap 28.77 +.95
Interpublic 9.54 +.02
Invesco 20.28 +.05
InvMtgCap 15.61 +.12
IronMtn 29.90 +.30
ItauUnibH 18.55 +.20
vanhMa 2018 -1.09

JPMorgCh 32.33 +1.87
Jabil 20.71 +.31
JacobsEng 42.05 +.78
JanusCap 6.56 +.22
Jefferies 12.40 +1.10
JohnJn 63.47 -.98
JohnsnCf 31.73 +.63
JonesGrp 10.24 -.03
JnprNtwk 22.60 +.35
KBHome 7.94 +.36
KTCorp 16.14 +.06
KCSouthn 67.86 -.91
Kaydon 30.88 -.02
KAEngTR 24.06 +.06
Kelbgg 49.12 +.14
KeyEngy 14.69 -.03


Orthfx 32.20 -1.89
OtterTail 21.17 -.13
Oversk 8.24 -.08

PDLBio 6.30 -.04
PFChng 31.02 +.62
PMCSra 5.43 -.01
PSSWrld 24.10 +.02
Paccar 40.34 -.01
PacEthrs 1.49 +.14
PacSunwr 1.32 +.01
PanASlv 24.56 -.92
PaneraBrd 142.10 -.46
ParamTch 20.91 +.28
Parexel 19.48 +.05
Patterson 30.13 -.42
PattUTI 21.35 +.44
Paychex 29.22 +.05
PnnNGm 37.38 +.62
PensonWw 1.17 +.04
PeopUdF 12.49 -.02
PeregrineP .97
PerfectWd 10.96 -.06
Perrigo 98.96 +1.80
PerryEllis 15.08 +.45
PetSmart 48.99 +1.14
PetroDev 34.97 +1.29
PharmPdt 33.19 -.03
Pharmacyc 15.63 +.71
Pharmssts 128.44 -.63
PhotrIn 5.85 +.12
Pizzalnn 6.28 -.17
Polyomms 16.76 +.11
Popular 1.54 +.05
Power-One 4.25 +.04
PwShsQQQ 56.62 -.16
Powrwvrs 2.21 +.02
Presstekh .55 +.01
PriceTR 57.50 +.92
priceline 486.48 -1.95
PrimoWtr 2.94 -.15
Primoris 14.01 -.12
PrinctnRh .10 +.01
PrivateB 9.35 +.07
PrUPShQQQ 19.41 +.15
PrUltPQQQs 70.79 -.68
PrognicsPh 7.00
ProspctCap 9.23 +.03
ProspBcsh 39.34 +.47
PureCycle 1.90
QIAGEN 14.53 -.37
QlikTech 28.78 +.60
Qlogic 14.72 -.14
Qualoim 54.34 -.39
QltyDistr 10.16 +.28
QualityS S 35.46 -.79
QuestSft 18.79 +.39
Questoir 43.20 -.43
QuickLog 2.82 +.13
Quidel 17.55 -.01
RFMicD 6.31 +.13
RPXn 13.37 -.27
Radvisn 6.29 -.14
Rambus 7.86 -.08
Randgold 104.26 -2.57
Rdiff.cm 8.35 +.09
Regenrn 58.28 -1.93
RentACt 36.00
RschMotn 16.77 -1.81
RetailOpp 11.16 -.01
RexEnergy 15.43 -.07
RigelPh 7.77 +.25
RiverbedT 26.23 -.21
RofinSinar 24.19 +.10
RosttaGrs .28 +.03
RosettaR 52.82 -.53
RossStrs 92.42 +.14
RoviCorp 27.21 -.29
RoyGId 79.61 -.49
RoyaleEn 4.21 +.27
RubioinTc 9.10 -.37
rue21 24.20 +.48

SlCorp 9.66 -.03
SBACom 41.34 +.52
SEllnv 16.66 -.05


Keycorp 7.20 -.02 Molyorp 32.51 -1.46
KimbClk 70.73 -.57 MoneyGrs 17.06 +.26
Kimco 15.59 ... Monsanto 70.42 -2.78
KindME 78.78 -.02 MonstrWw 7.34 +.13
KindMorn 31.00 +.74 Moodys 34.95 +.16
Kinrossg 13.75 -.22 MorgStan 15.52 +1.01
KodiakOg 8.97 +.08 MSEmMkt 13.70 +.05
Kohls 50.51 +.14 Mosaic 51.21 -1.56
Kraft 36.50 ... MotrlaSoln 46.80 +.39
KrispKrm 7.16 +.02 MotrlaMon 38.78 +.06
Kroger 23.36 -.01 NCRCorp 17.35 -.02
LDKSolar 3.76 +.14 NRG Egy 19.37 -.30
LSICorp 5.77 +.07 NVEnergy 14.99 -.27
LTCPrp 28.68 -.07 NYSEEur 27.66 -.36
LaZBoy 11.88 +.31 Nabors 17.52 -.18
Ladede 39.70 -.02 NatFuGas 58.76 +.74
LVSands 46.02 -.67 NatGrid 47.52 -1.74
LearCorps 41.50 +.64 NOilVarco 71.05 -.38
LeggMason 26.27 +.10 NatRetPrp 25.38 -.67
LeggPlat 22.41 -.05 Navios 3.90 +.50
LennarA 18.41 -.04 Navistar 40.23 +1.86
LeucNafi 23.75 +.41 NeuStar 34.33 -.05
Level3rs 20.45 +.14 NewAmHi 10.06 -.10
LbtyASG 3.93 ... NJRscs 46.40 -.60
LillyEli 37.37 -.27 NYCmtyB 11.91 +.08
Limited 42.61 ... NYTimes 7.73 +.29
LincNat 20.06 -.15 NewellRub 15.02 -.20
Lindsay 55.48 -.33 NewfdExp 45.60 -.32
Linkedlnn 67.89 +.11 NewmtM 67.03 -1.78
LizClaib 8.42 +.31 NewpkRes 9.27 +.20
LloydBkg 1.52 +.04 Nexeng 15.77 -.12
LockhdM 77.82 -1.16 NextEraEn 55.76 +.18
LaPac 7.87 -.31 NiSource 22.56 -.26
Lowes 24.31 +.44 Nicor 55.31 -.43
SNikeB 96.25 +1.00
iB H NobleCorp 34.65 -.08
NolkiaCp 5.62 -.05
M&TBk 73.88 +.97 Nordsrm 47.17 +.07
MBIA 10.62 +.41 NorflkSo 75.01 +.23
MDU Res 21.25 -.70 NoestUt 34.34 -.51
MEMC 4.28 +11 NorthropG 56.99 -.34
MFAFnd 6.79 -.01 Novarts 53.51 -1.07
MCR 9.04 +.05 NSTAR 44.91 -.80
MGIC 3.06 -.03 Nucor 40.32 +.85
MGMRsts 10.19 -.01 NIMO 14.52 +.01
Macquarie 26.49 +.39 NvMulSI&G 7.90 +.04
Macys 32.54 +.38 NuvQPf2 7.90 -.04
MageiMPtr 64.90 +.53 OGEEy 52.44 -.07
Magnalgs 35.47 +.30 OasisPet 30.54 +.49
MagHRes 4.80 +.24 OcciPet 95.92 -.91
Manitowoc 11.18 +.01 Och-Ziff 7.99 +.16
ManpwrGp 38.01 +1.35 OfficeDpt 2.36 +.14
Manulifeg 10.99 +.19 OfficeMax 4.74 +.18
MarathnOs 27.77 +.05 OilSvHT 123.75 -1.15
MarathPn 33.31 -.64 OldRepub 8.98 +.91
MktVGold 58.25 -2.05 Olin 19.18 +.06
MktVRus 30.29 -.51 OmegaHIt 17.54 +.02
MktVJrGId 29.65 .41 Omncre 33.14 +.29
MarlntA 30.92 +.34 ONEOK 83.12 -.05
MarrVacn 16.23 +.33 OneokPts 52.38 +1.00
MarshM 30.37 .. OshkoshCp 20.95 +.26
MStewrt 3.01 +.11 Owenslll 19.66 +.15
Maso 9.32 -.11
McClatchy 1.14
McDrmlnt 11.69 +.11 PG&ECp 38.03 -.49
McDnlds 95.70 +.20 PNC 53.97 +.50
McMoRn 15.87 -.01 PNMRes 18.68 +.02
Mechel 11.12 +.13 PPG 84.87 -1.68
MedoHIth 57.48 +.19 PPLCorp 29.68 -.10
Medrnic 34.61 -2.19 PVHCorp 72.78 +5.16
Merck 35.48 -.20 PallCorp 53.54 -.69
Meritor 6.22 +.08 ParkerHan 82.11 -.91
MetLife 31.76 +.63 PatriotCoal 10.04 +.04
MetroPCS 8.29 -.01 PeabdyE 38.22 -.08
MetroHIth 7.41 -.01 Pengrthg 10.42 -.09
MidAApt 57.82 +.72 PennVaRs 24.45 +.04
Midas 8.70 -.01 PennWstg 18.36 +.02
MitsuUFJ 4.33 ... Penney 32.98 +.76
MobileTele 16.00 -.63 PepBoy 11.73 +.07


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 6.94 -.01
AbdnEMTel 18.05 +.04
AdmRsc 28.00 +.58
AdeonaPh 1.19 +.21
AdvPhot .61 +.08
Advenbx .62 +.01
AlexoRg 6.84
AlldNevG 33.41 -1.08
AlmadnMg 2.55 -.11
AmApparel .57 +.02
AntaresP 2.74 +.15
Augustag 3.48 +.27


Aurizong 5.87
AvalRaren 3.05
Bacterin 2.11
Banrog 3.88
BarcUBS36 43.82
BarcGSOil 25.74
BlkMunvst 10.08
Brigusgrs 1.28
BritATob 91.79
CAMACEn 1.13
CanoPet .16
CardiumTh .32
CelSd .30
CFCdag 22.25
CheniereEn 9.83


-.08 CheniereE 16.06 +.12
-.19 ClaudeRg 1.77 -.06
-.06 ClghGlbOp 10.88 +.09
CrSuiHiY 2.88 -.02
+.21 Crosshgrs .37 -.02
+.25

-.02 DejourEg .33 +.01
-79 DenisnMg 1.43 -.02
+.02 EVLtdDur 15.05 +.13
+.02
+ EVMuni2 13.43 +.01
-.01
.01 EllswthFd 6.79 +.21
+.05 EvolPetol 7.30 +.05
+.01 ExeterRgs 3.17 -.08


GabGldNR 16.05
GascoEngy .18
Gastargrs 3.44
GenMoly 3.24
GeoPeto .30
GoldResrc 20.22
GoldenMin 6.60
GoldStrg 2.01
GranTrrag 5.73
GrtBasGg .95
GtPanSilvg 2.24
Hemisphrx .24
HstnAEn 14.24


ImpOilgs 42.55 -.26 MdwGoldg 2.43 +.05 PbnDrill 11.11 +.21 SeabGldg 21.42
IndiaGC .32 +.01 Minefndg 11.55 -.48 PlatGpMet 1.09 +.03 Senesco .25
InovioPhm .41 -.04 MinesMgt 2.33 -.07 PolyMetg 1.25 ... SilverBull .60
IntellgSys 1.72 -.01 NeoStem .55 +.04 Procerars 15.76 -.72 SprottRLg 1.56
IntTowe 4.75 -.11 Neoprobe 2.34 -.02 PyramidOil 3.83 +.01 TanzRyg 2.85
i i 3ii NBRESec 3.65 -.02 Quaterrag .70 -.04 Taseko 2.97
Nevsung 5.89 -.13 Quepasa 3.92 -.05
KeeganRg 4.27 -.10 NwGoldg 10.63 -.44 QuestRMg 2.85 -.22 TrnsafPet 1.37
KimberRg 1.21 +.10 NAPallg 3.11 -.06 RareEleg 5.14 -.22 TriValley .19
LadThalFn 2.29 +.04 NDynMng 6.91 -.04 Rentech 1.50 +.05 TriangPet 5.93
LongweiPI 1.47 ... NthnO&G 24.26 -.38 RexahnPh .49 +.02 USGeoth .41
Lucaing,,2 230 0 ii -l Ridimntg 11.45 -43 Ulurus 35
Ujj nj 96 i Ur-Energy 1.00
MadCatzg .59 +.01 ParaG&S 2.59 -.04 Uranerz 1.88
Metalico 3.48 +.08 PhrmAth 1.16 -.05 SamsO&G 1.90 +.03 UraniumEn 2.92


VangTotV 44.45 -.03
VantageDrl 1.16 -.05
VirnetX 22.16 +2.62
VistaGold 3.59 -.04
VoyagerOG 2.44 -.04
Walterlnv 22.19 -.01
WFAdvlnco 9.68 -.04
WFAdMSec 14.51 +.03
WirelessT 1.33 +.01
WizzardSft .16
Xfone .56 -.12
YMBiog 1.35 -.03
ZBBEngy .61 +.06


SORL 2.74 -.06
STEC 9.03 -.16
SVBFnGp 46.14 +.25
SXCHIth 56.92 -2.40
SalixPhm 43.74 +.23
SanderFm 50.25 -.47
SanDisk 50.32 +.46
Sanmina 8.64 +.07
Sanofirt 1.33 +.03
Sapient 11.89 -.18
Satconh .71 -.01
SavientPh 2.22 -.07
SciGames 8.32 +.01
SeagateT 16.17 -1.23
SearsHdgs 58.56 +1.08
SeattGen 16.41 -.03
SelCmfrt 19.73 +.42
Selectvlns 16.32 +.28
Semtech 23.82 -.07
Sequenom 4.17 +.03
SvcSourcn 14.00 +.46
SvArtsrsh .35 -.00
ShandaGm 4.38 -.08
Shire 99.38 -1.00
ShoreTel 6.14 +.06
Shutterfly 29.09 +1.53
SifyTech 4.40 +.08
SigaTechh 2.06
SigmaDsg 6.55 +.06
SigmaAld 64.42 -.29
SignatBk 58.64 +1.19
Silicnlmg 4.90 +.05
SilicnMotn 19.20 -.21
Slcnware 4.60 -.08
SilvStdg 14.16 -.43
Sina 68.52 +2.11
Sindair 10.32 -.04
SiriusXM 1.86 -.02
SironaDent 43.90 -1.44
Skullcdyn 13.86 -.87
SkywksSol 16.35 +.19
SmithMicro 1.05 +.03
SodaStrm 30.41 +.26
Sohu.cm 50.99 +.59
SolarCap 23.09 +.41
Solazymen 12.10 -.26
SoltaMed 2.51 +.23
SonicCorp 7.34 +.08
Sonus 2.53 -.03
SouMoBc 21.90 +.15
SpectPh 14.04 -.17
Spreadtrm 26.41 +.92
Stamps.cm 26.62 +.36
Staples 14.33 +.01
StarBulk 1.11 +.01
StarSdent 2.64 +.04
Starbucks 43.91 +.32
SfDynam 13.43 +.24
StemCel rs 1.81 -.01
Stericyde 79.67 -.86
SMaddens 35.99 +.86
StoneMor 24.34 +.75
SunHIth 3.03 -.05
SunPower 7.31 -.07
SusqBnc 7.99 +.03
Susser 21.20 -.59
SwisherHy 3.77
Symantec 16.10 -.14
Symetricm 5.11 +.06
Synaptcs 32.21 -.07
Synopsys 27.44 -.06
Synovis 18.15 -.31
Syntolmh 1.05 +.02
TDAmeritr 16.00 -.11
TGCInds 8.37 +.23
THQ 1.74 +.11
TTMTch 11.23 +.35
twteleom 18.55 +.09
TakeTwo 13.66 -.16
TaleoA 32.96 +.70
Targacept 7.58 +.22
TASER 6.11 -.03
TechData 49.96 +.31
Tekelec 10.96 -.03
TICmSys 2.55 +.01
Tellabs 4.05 +.12
TennCBlIh .08 +.01
TeslaMot 33.30 +.70


TesseraTch 16.91 -.15
TevaPhrm 39.70 -.04
TxCapBsh 29.08 +1.21
TexRdhse 14.07 +.27
The9Ltd 7.05 +.99
Thoratec 30.44 -.21
TiboSft 27.60 +.37
iVo Inc 9.57 -.29
Towersht 2.47 +.08
TractSupp 72.20 -.03
TransceptP 8.00 -.48
Travelzoo 26.77 -1.05
TrdentM h .24 +.01
TrimbleN 43.46 +.73
TriQuint 4.72 +.14
TrstNY 5.28 +.10
Trusimk 22.48 +.40
UTStarcm 1.31 +.04
UTiWrldwd 13.83 +.32
UltaSalon 74.19 +5.70
Umpqua 12.41 +.11
UBWV 27.94 +.79
UtdOnln 5.47 +.15
US Enr 2.71 +.06
UtdTherap 41.67 +.13
UnivDisp 40.89 +.64
UnivFor 28.15 +.62
UranmRs .94 -.02
UrbanOut 27.09 -.31


VCAAnt 19.82 -.09
ValVisA 2.07 +.14
ValueClick 15.74 +.34
VanSTCpB 77.32 +.05
Veeolnst 25.53 +.39
Veli n 7.28 -.22
VBradley 37.29 +.14
Verisign 33.42 -.45
Verisk 39.30 +.55
VertxPh 29.25 -.14
ViacomB 42.63 -.49
Vical 4.69 +.10
VirgnMdah 22.43 -.10
ViroPhrm 23.55 -.21
VisnChina 1.44 +.31
VistaPrt 32.91 +.24
Vivus 10.52 +.02
Vodafone 26.80 -.40
Volcano 23.38 -1.67
WarnerCh 16.01 -.10
WarrenRs 2.99 +.17
WashFed 13.15 +.14
WebMD 35.49 -.55
WernerEnt 23.84 +.57
WAmBcp 42.28 -2.15
Wesbird 10.29 +.21
Wsptlnng 29.97 +.86
WetSeal 3.52 +.02
WholeFd 68.37 +.52
Windstrm 11.76 +.07
Winn-Dixie 5.20 -.06
Wintrust 28.41 +.64
Woodward 40.22 +.22
WrightM 14.66 -.26
Wynn 118.41 -.55
XenoPort 4.83 +.23
Xilinx 33.11 +.05
YRCrs 12.78 +3.18
Yahoo 16.05 -.18
Yandexn 21.36 -.56
Zagg 11.12 +.12
Zalicus .95 +.02
Zllown 22.06 +.43
ZonBcp 16.21 +.31
Zopharm 4.89 -.14
Zpcarn 15.16 +.37
Zoltek 8.90 -.17
ZoomTech 1.23 +.07
Zumiez 28.99 +5.62


PepsiCo 64.28
PerkElm 19.00
Prmian 20.13
PetrbrsA 25.24
Petrobras 27.54
Pfizer 19.89
PhilipMor 75.47
PiedNG 32.37
Pier 1 13.15
PimoStrat 11.54
PinWst 46.50
PioNtrl 92.85
PitnyBw 18.53
PlainsEx 35.68
PlumCrk 36.37
Polaris s 61.53
PostPrp 40.10
Potash s 42.29
PSUSDBull 22.12
PSHYCpBd 18.05
Praxair 100.46
PrecDrill 11.62
PrinFnd 24.30
ProLogis 27.80
ProShtS&P 41.03
PrUShS&P 19.94
PrUIShDow 16.00
ProUltQQQ 83.36
PrUShQQQ rs44.59
ProUltSP 45.49
PrUShtFnrs 62.82
ProUShL20 19.18
ProUltFin 42.87
PrUPShR2K 14.11
ProShtR2K 30.19
ProUltR2K 34.40
ProUSSP500S13.86
PrUltSP500s 58.62
ProUSSIvrs 12.32
ProUltSlvs 59.27
ProUShEuro 18.99
ProctGam 64.66
ProgrssEn 53.55
ProgsvCp 18.60
ProUSR2K rs 40.15
ProvEng 9.58
Prudent 50.40
PSEG 32.31
PubStrg 129.55
PulteGrp 6.16
PPrIT 5.11
QEPRes 31.73
QuanexBld 15.17
QntmDSS 2.65
Questar 19.42
QksilvRes 7.88
RPCs 19.72
RPM 23.50
RadianGrp 2.24
RadioShk 11.58
Ralcorp 81.47
RangeRs 70.53
RJamesFn 29.60
Rayoniers 40.65
Raytheon 45.35
Rltylno 33.26
RegionsFn 4.22
Renren n 3.79


+.19 RepubSvc 26.78 -.57
+.05 ResMed 25.78 -.03
+.08 Revlon 15.29 -.16
+.14 ReynAmer 41.26 -.44
+.24 RioTinto 52.20 +.04
-.14 RiteAid 1.20
-.22 RobtHalf 27.01 +.62
-.17 RockwAut 74.62 +.48
-.09 RockColl 54.34 -1.08
+.05 Rowan 33.25 -.07
-.60 RoyalBkg 47.76 +1.49
-.89 RylCarb 27.46 +.25
+.08 RoyDShllA 69.60 +.27
+.57 Royce 12.22 +.03
-.15 Ro ceB 2548 +.11
+.66
+.59
-1.22 SCANA 43.14 -.29
+.07 SKTlcm 14.56 -.27
+.12 SLMCp 12.64 -.08
-.39 SpdrDJIA 120.06 -.07
+19 SpdrGold 169.82 +.19
+.06 SPMid 160.31 +.40
+30 S&P500ETF124.86 -.11
+.02 SpdrHome 16.79 +.16
+.04 SpdrS&PBk 19.31 +.25
+.02 SpdrLehHY 37.91 +.23
-.61 SpdrS&P RB 23.59 +.21
+.24 SpdrReil 52.56 +.56
-.06 SpdrOGEx 55.32 +.48
-1.56 SpdrMetM 53.50 -.33
-.57 STMicro 6.32 -.02
+.95 Safeway 20.21 +.14
-.16 StJoe 14.60 +.14
-.09 SUude 35.83 -2.70
+.22 Saks 9.49 +.02
+02 Salesforce 119.64 +1.26
-.09 SJuanB 23.92 -.04
+.16 SandRdge 7.52 +.02
-.79 Sanofi 34.49 -.58
+15 SaraLee 18.92 -.12
+.58 Schlmbrg 75.01 +.14
-.33 Schwab 11.67 -.26
+01 SeadrillLd 34.83 +.11
-.24 SealAir 17.82 +.19
-.25 Sealy 1.93 -.03
+.44 SemiHTr 30.60 -.20
-.34 Sensient 37.21 +.02
+.05 SiderurNac 8.33 -.05
+.08 SilvWhtng 33.01 -.70
+.06 SilvrcpMg 7.34 -.37
-.27 SimonProp 122.80 -.20
+.28 Skechers 12.80 -.14
+.03 SmithAO 39.44 +1.15
+.08 SmithfF 24.39 +.02
-.21 Smucker 74.90 -.18
+.42 SoJerlnd 54.85 -1.13
+.15 SouthnCo 43.76 -.30
-.11 SthnCopper 30.67 -.54
-.03 SwstAirl 8.28 -.05
+.26 SwsthEngy 37.69 -.21
-.90 SpectaEn 29.77 +.38
+.20 SprintNex 2.60 -.10
+.51 SP Mais 34.00 -.30
+.06 SP HIthC 33.51 -.42
.13 SPCnSt 31.74 -.11
+.10 SPConsum 39.07 +.30
+.13 SP Engy 70.42 -.06


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.






Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.2830 4.2880
Australia .9777 .9768
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.7870 1.7980
Britain 1.5598 1.5689
Canada 1.0178 1.0150
Chile 515.08 515.75
China 6.3552 6.3597
Colombia 1942.00 1947.50
Czech Rep 18.74 18.77
Denmark 5.5458 5.5238
Dominican Rep 38.52 38.53
Egypt 6.0093 6.0145
Euro .7459 .7430
Hong Kong 7.7665 7.7708
Hungary 226.53 226.95
India 51.155 51.470
Indnsia 9019.00 8995.00
Israel 3.7464 3.7386
Japan 78.03 77.76
Jordan .7099 .7105
Lebanon 1505.50 1506.00
Malaysia 3.1290 3.1400
Mexico 13.5333 13.5684
N. Zealand 1.2848 1.2833
Norway 5.7845 5.8037
Peru 2.699 2.702
Poland 3.35 3.33
Russia 30.9575 30.7605
Singapore 1.2841 1.2825
So. Africa 8.0610 8.0728
So. Korea 1129.18 1128.33
Sweden 6.7503 6.7707
Switzerlnd .9208 .9164
Taiwan 30.16 30.11
Thailand 30.83 30.84
Turkey 1.8278 1.8285
U.A.E. 3.6730 3.6735
Uruguay 19.6999 19.6999
Venzuel 4.2949 4.2925


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.003 0.02
6-month 0.05 0.07
5-year 0.91 0.93
10-year 2.03 1.96
30-year 3.02 2.92



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jan 12 100.96 +.76
Corn CBOT Mar12 59514 -6/4
Wheat CBOT Mar12 62512 +111/4
Soybeans CBOT Jan12 11353/4 +734
Cattle CME Feb 12 123.25 -.47
Sugar (world) ICE Mar12 23.45 -.14
Orange Juice ICE Jan 12 177.60 +.35



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz.. spot) $1747.00 $1685.50
Silver(troyoz., spot) $32.621 $31.012
Copper (pound) $3.5/25 $3.2680
Platinum (troy oz., spot)t1548.50 $1533.10

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


DIARY


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


I I gI


Make your life a bit



EASIER!!


and get ONE MONTH FREE




- f i V www.chronicleonlifn.romn M5 S S



JEZ Pay





563-5655 It'sEZ !
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


I AASDAQ NATIONAL5MARKET 11


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.4 ... 8.22 +.04-49.8 McDnlds 2.80 2.9 19 95.70 +.20+24.7
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.9 15 28.96 +.12 -1.4 Microsoft .80 3.2 9 25.22 -.06 -9.6
Ameteks .24 .6 19 42.62 +.26 +8.6 MotrlaSoln .88 1.9 17 46.80 +.39 +23.0
BkofAm .04 .7 ... 5.64 +.11 -57.7 MotrlaMo n ... ... ... 38.78 +.06 +33.3
CapCtyBk .40 3.9 23 10.31 +.07-18.2 NextEraEn 2.20 3.9 14 55.76 +.18 +7.3
CntryLink 2.90 8.2 16 35.48 -.72-23.2 Penney .80 2.4 20 32.98 +.76 +2.1
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 28.17 +1.18-40.4 PiedmOfc 1.26 7.7 21 16.45 -.01-18.3
CmwREIT 2.00 12.0 23 16.60 ...-34.9 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.6 20 53.55 -.33 +23.2
Disney .60 1.6 15 36.61 +.62 -2.4 RegionsFn .04 .9 25 4.22 +.10-39.7
EKodak .. ... ... 1.02 -.04-81.0 SearsHldgs ... ... ...58.56 +1.08-20.6
EnterPT 2.80 6.4 26 44.03 ... -4.8 Smucker 1.92 2.6 19 74.90 -.18 +14.1
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.4 10 79.79 ... +9.1 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.60 -.10-38.5
FordM ...... 5 10.90 +.31-35.1 TimeWarn .94 2.7 13 34.41 +.20 +7.0
GenElec .60 3.7 13 16.09 +.18-12.0 UniFirst .15 .3 15 57.18 +.25 +3.9
HomeDp 1.16 2.9 17 39.94 +.60 +13.9 VerizonCm 2.00 5.3 15 37.85 +.08 +5.8
Intel .84 3.4 11 24.64 -.28+17.2 Vodafone 2.10 7.8 ... 26.80 -.40 +1.4
IBM 3.00 1.6 15189.66 +.21+29.2 WalMart 1.46 2.5 13 58.09 -.52 +7.7
Lowes .56 2.3 17 24.31 +.44 -3.1 Walgrn .90 2.7 11 33.12 -.76-15.0







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 A7


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: GrChinaAr 33.43 +.05
Balancp 15.72 +.01 HiYIdAp 6.14 +.02
Retlnc 8.64 +.02 StratValA 26.56 +.04
Alger Funds B: TechGroA 31.50 +.02
SmCapGr 6.26 +.01 DreihsAclnc 10.06 +.05
AllianceBern A: Driehaus Funds:
BalanAp 15.28 +.02 EMktGr 28.60 +.02
GlbThGrAp62.15 -.24 EVPTxMEmI43.53 +.02
SmCpGrA 34.57 +.23 EatonVance A:
AllianceBern Adv: ChinaAp 17.18 -.21
LgCpGrAd 26.01 +.04 AMTFMulnc 9.44 +.02
AllianceBern B: MulICGrA 7.70 -.02
GIbThGrBt 53.27 -.21 InBosA 5.60 +.01
GrowthBt 24.58 -.02 LgCpVal 16.91 +.02
SCpGrBt 27.60 +.18 NatlMunlnc 9.21 -.01
AllianceBern C: SpEqtA 15.60 -.02
SCpGrCt 27.78 +.18 TradGvA 7.45
Allianz Fds Instl: Eaton Vance B:
NFJDvVI 11.27 +.02 HIthSBt 9.79 -.07
SmCpVI 30.29 +.01 NatlMulnc 9.21 -.01
Allianz Funds A: Eaton Vance C:
SmCpVA 28.83 ... GovtCp 7.44 +.01
Allianz Funds C: NatMunlnc 9.21 -.01
AGICGrthC 23.44 -.09 Eaton Vance I:
TargetCt 14.21 +.02 FltgRt 8.79 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: GblMacAbR 9.89
LgCaplnst 18.73 +.04 LgCapVal 16.97 +.03
Amer Beacon Inv: FBR Funds:
LgCaplnv 17.74 +.03 Focuslnvtn50.40 +.18
Amer Century Adv: FMI Funds:
EqGroAp 21.24 LgCappn 15.23 -.02
EqlncAp 7.13 +.01 FPA Funds:
Amer Century Inv: Nwlnc 10.74
AIICapGr 27.76 -.04 FPACresn 27.20 -.04
Balanced 15.88 +.02 Fairholme 25.19 +.18
DivBnd 11.09 +.03 Federated A:
Eqlnc 7.13 ... MidGrStA 34.32 -.01
Growthl 25.82 -.04 MuSecA 10.11 +.02
Heritagel 20.20 +.03 TfRtBdp 11.32 +.03
IncGro 24.08 +.01 Federatedlnstl:
InfAdjBd 13.16 +.06 KaufmnR 4.80 +.01
IntDisc 9.19 +.03 TotRetBd 11.32 +.03
InfiGrol 9.87 +.02 StrValDvIS 4.69 -.02
NewOpp 7.38 +.03 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChAg 11.89 +.02 EnergyT 35.66 -.06
OneChMd 11.53 +.01 HItCarT 20.57 -.15
RealEstl 19.44 +.06 Fidelity Advisor A:
Ulra 23.28 -.06 Nwlnsghp 19.96 -.03
Valuelnv 5.52 ... SblnA 12.32 +.02
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor C:
AmcpAp 18.82 -.04 Nwlnsghtn 18.94 -.03
AMufAp 25.53 +.03 Fidelity Advisor I:
BalAp 18.19 +.03 EqGrIn 58.48 +.06
BondAp 12.50 +.04 Eqlnin 22.84 +.06
CaplBAp 49.07 -.05 IntBdln 11.40 +.03
CapWGAp 32.45 ... Nwlnsgtln 20.20 -.03
CapWAp 20.60 +.03 Fidelity AdvisorT:
EupacAp 36.55 +.03 BalancT 14.98 +.01
FdlnvAp 35.52 -.02 DivGrTp 11.44 +.04
GovtAp 14.64 +.04 EqGrTp 54.48 +.05
GwthAp 29.29 -.03 EqlnT 22.48 +.06
HI TrAp 10.62 +.04 GrOppT 35.65 +.01
IncoAp 16.56 +.02 HilnAdTp 9.38 +.03
IntBdAp 13.59 +.02 IntBdT 11.38 +.03
IniGrlncAp 28.31 -.04 MulncTpe 13.03 +.02
ICAAp 27.05 +.03 OvrseaTx 15.64 -.12
LtTEBAp 15.97 +.02 STFiT 9.25 +.01
NEcoAp 24.21 ... SkSelAIICp 17.69 +.04
N PerAp 26.82 -.05 Fidelity Freedom:
NwWrldA 48.01 +.04 FF2010n 13.50 +.03
STBFAp 10.08 +.01 FF2010K 12.48 +.03
SmCpAp 33.88 +.11 FF2015n 11.27 +.03
TxExAp 12.33 +.02 FF2015K 12.51 +.03
WshAp 28.03 -.02 FF2020n 13.56 +.03
Ariellnvestments: FF2020K 12.83 +.03
Apprec 38.46 +.09 FF2025n 11.19 +.02
Ariel 42.28 +.34 FF2025K 12.86 +.03
Artio Global Funds: FF2030n 13.30 +.03
InfiEqlr 24.11 ... FF2030K 12.97 +.03
IntEqlllr 10.14 +.01 FF2035n 10.93 +.02
Artisan Funds: FF2035K 12.95 +.02
Inf 20.26 -.12 FF2040n 7.63 +.02
InfiValr 25.11 -.04 FF2040K 13.00 +.03
MidCap 34.49 -.02 FF2045n 9.00 +.02
MidCapVal 21.25 -.01 Incomexn 11.36 +.01
SCapVal 16.44 +.04 Fidelity Invest:
Baron Funds: AIISectEq 11.98 -.01
Asset 46.60 +.03 AMgr50n 15.11 +.04
Growth 51.23 -.02 AMgr70rn 15.79 +.05
SmallCap 23.06 +.09 AMgr20rn 12.89 +.04
Bernstein Fds: Balancn 18.19 +.02
IntDur 14.11 +.05 BalancedK 18.19 +.02
DivMu 14.64 +.02 BlueChGrn 43.41 +.14
TxMgdlnI 13.10 +.04 CAMunn 12.23 +.03
BlackRock A: Canada xn 50.52 -1.39
EqtyDiv 17.86 -.01 CapApxn 24.79 +.05
GIAIAr 18.81 -.02 CapDevOn 10.39 +.01
HiYInvA 7.34 +.03 Cplnc rn 8.70 +.03
InfOpAp 29.18 +.01 ChinaRgrx 26.14 -.72
BlackRock B&C: CngS 465.09
GIAICt 17.51 -.01 CTMunrn 11.79 +.03
BlackRock Instl: Contran 68.32 -.08
BaVII 24.58 +.02 ContraK 68.37 -.08
EquityDv 17.90 -.01 CnvScn 23.04 +.06
GIbAllocr 18.92 -.01 DisEqxn 21.38 -.30
HiYdBd 7.34 +.03 DiscEqFx 21.35 -.34
Brinson FundsY: Divlntlxn 26.17 -.43
HiYdlY 5.85 ... DivrslntKrx 26.12 -.50
BruceFund38507 ... DivSkOn 14.86 +.08
Buffalo Funds: DivGth n 26.03 +.09
SmCapn 24.97 +.05 EmergAsrxn26.46 -.47
CGM Funds: EmrMkxn 21.65 -.28
Focusn 26.54 +.15 Eqlncn 40.69 +.10
Mutln 25.19 +.12 EQIIn 16.97 +.01
Realtyn 25.83 +.10 ECapApx 15.78 -.26
CRM Funds: Europex 25.99 -.45
MdCpVII 26.52 -.06 Exch 323.88
Calamos Funds: Exportxn 20.59 -.06
GrwthAp 50.41 -.15 Fideln 31.33
Calvert Invest: Fifty r n 17.45 .02
Incop 15.66 +.11 FItRateHirn 9.64 +.01
InfiEqAp 12.52 +.01 FrlnOnen 26.54 +.05
SocialAp 28.01 +.05 GNMAn 11.88 +.02
SocBdp 15.80 +08 Govtnc 10.85 +.03
SocEqAp 35.52 +.02 Gon 8.8 .02
TxF Lgp 15.59 +.03 Grolncn 17.98 +.07
Cohen Sters + GrowCoF 85.46 -.02
Cohen & Steers:
Rlhrs 5.22 +.19 GrowthCoK 85.44 -.02
RltyShrs 58.22 +.1y Grctatrn 1Q1 +.05
ColumbiaClass A: Highlncratrn 198.5713 +.0
Acornt 27.82 +.12 Highncrn 8.57 +0
Indepnn 22.50 +.08
DivEqlnc 9.39 InProBdn 13.04 +.06
DivrBd 5.00 +.02 IntBdn 1083 +03
DivOpptyA 7.89 -.02 IntGovn 11.03 +.02
LgCapGrAt2289 -.06 InfMun 10.33 +.01
LgCorQAp 5.62 -.01 lnfDiscxn 2819 .31
MdCpGrOp 9.85 +01 InlSCprxn 18.02 -.37
MidCVIOpp 7.25 +.01 InvGrBdn 11.70 +.04
PBModAp 10.46 +.03 InvGBn .67 +03
TxEAp 13.45 +.02 vGBn 7 +03
SelComm A 43.25 -.12 Japanr 9:48 +03
FrontierA 9.55 +.04 JpnSm x n 8.65 -.07
GloTech 19.77 .05 LgCapVal 10.57 +.04
GlobTech 19.77 -.05 Lt 458 _.3
G: LatAmnx 49.58 .63
Columbia Cl I,T&G: LevCoStk n 25.37 +.07
EmMktOpln8.42 -.04 LowPrn 35.80 +.02
Columbia Class Z: LowPriKr 35.79 .02
AcornZ 28.75 +.13 Magellnxn 63.34 -.15
AcornlntZ 35.14 -.04 MagellanKx63.26 -.22
DivlncoZ 13.36 +.02 MDMurn 11.23 +.02
IntBdZ 9.20 +.03 MAMunn 12.18 +.02
IntTEBd 10.63 +.01 MegaCpStknlO.01 +.05
LgCapGr 12.56 +.03 MIMunn 12.09 +.02
LgCpldxZ 24.40 MidCap n 26.96 +.05
MdCpldxZ 11.03 +.03 MNMunn 11.70 +.02
MdCpVIZp 12.74 +.03 MtgSecn 11.14 +.01
ValRestr 45.58 -.07 Munilncn 12.86 +.02
Credit Suisse Comm: NJ Munr n 11.74 +.02
ComRett 8.51 +.02 NwMktrn 15.92 +.03
DFA Funds: NwMilln 29.66 +.02
InfCorEqn 9.52 +.01 NYMunen 13.14 +.02
USCorEql n10.74 +.02 OTCn 56.61 +.30
USCorEq2n10.55 +.03 OhMunn 11.85 +.02
DWS Invest A: 1001ndex 8.84 +.01
CommAp 16.92 -.04 Ovrseaxn 27.51 -.76
DWSInvestS: PcBasxn 22.31 -.12
CorPlslnc 10.67 +.03 PAMunrn 10.96 +.02
EmMkGrr 15.36 ... Puritnn 17.74 +.06
EnhEmMk 10.05 +.04 PuritanK 17.74 +.06
EnhGlbBdr 9.96 -.01 RealEn 26.34 +.09
GIbSmCGr 36.84 -.10 SAIISecEqF12.00 -.01
GlblThem 20.92 +.01 SCmdtyStrtn9.32 +.02
Gold&Prc 20.87 -.45 SCmdtyStrFn9.33 +.02
GrolncS 16.23 ... SrEmrgMkt 15.60 +.02
HiYldTx 12.00 +.01 SrslntGrw 10.37 +.02
IntTxAMT 11.64 +.02 SerlnflGrF 10.40 +.01
InflFdS 38.76 +.07 SrslntVal 8.34 +.03
LgCpFoGr 29.08 -.02 SrlnvGrdF 11.70 +.04
LatAmrEq 42.53 +.10 StlntMun 10.75
MgdMuniS 8.95 +.01 STBFn 8.49
MATFS 14.33 +.02 SmllCpSrn 16.56 +.03
SP500S 16.61 -.01 SCpValurx 13.71 -.12
WorldDiv 22.40 -.11 StkSelLCVrn10.28 +.01
Davis Funds A: StkSlcACap n24.55 +.06
NYVenA 32.54 ... StkSelSmCp 18.03 +.11
Davis Funds B: Stratlncn 11.02 +.02
NYVenB 30.98 ... StrReRtr 9.54 +.03
Davis Funds C: TotalBdn 10.91 +.03
NYVenC 31.26 +.01 Trendn 68.30 +.06
Davis FundsY: USBI n 11.73 +.04
NYVenY 32.96 ... Utilityxn 16.67 -.23
Delaware Invest A: ValStra tn 25.39 +.06
Diverl Incp 9.30 +.03 Valuexn 63.09 -.47
SMIDCapG 23.88 +.14 Wrldwxn 17.48 -.05
TxUSAp 11.38 +.02 Fidelity Selects:
Delaware Invest B: Aim 36.49 -.15
SelGrBt 31.41 +.12 Bankingn 15.57 +.21
Dimensional Fds: Biotchen 83.33 -.40
EmMCrEqnl8.12 -.03 Brokrn 41.30 +.84
EmMktV 27.97 +.01 Chemn 94.57 -.63
IntSmVan 14.24 +.02 ComEquipxn22.74 +.01
LargeCo 9.85 -.01 Compn 55.40 +.08
TAUSCorE2n8.59 +.03 ConDisn 23.40 +.20
USLgVan 19.15 +.10 ConsuFnn 11.15 +.07
USMicron 13.13 +.11 ConStapn 71.66 -.22
USTgdVal 15.36 +.11 CstHon 34.84 +.27
USSmalln 20.43 +.13 DfAern 78.16 -.23


USSmVa 23.29 .18 Electxn 45.31 +.03
InflSmCon 14.58 +.01 Enrgyn 50.98 -.09
EmgMktn 26.00 -.05 EngSvn 68.88 -.18
Fixdn 10.34 +.01 EnvAltEnrxnl5.28 -.28
IntGFxlnn 13.02 +.05 FinSvn 49.60 +.97
IntVan 15.25 +.06 Goldrn 48.55-1.17
GlbSFxlncnll.18 +.03 Healthn 131.17 -.95
TMUSTgtV19.97 +.16 Insurn 44.21 +.11
2YGIFxdn 10.22 ... Leisrn 95.47 +.51
DFARIEn 22.16 +.06 Materialn 63.13 -.48
Dodge&Cox: MedDI n 54.71 -.53
Balanced 67.04 +.06 MdEqSysn 26.05 -.52
Income 13.30 +.05 Mulndn 42.88 +.51
InlS k 30.60 -.01 NtGasn 31.43 -.15
Stock 100.66 +.02 Pharmn 13.17 -.05
DoubleUne Funds: Retail n 54.18 +.26
TRBdI 11.06 Softwrn 85.02 +.14
TRBdNp 11.06 ... Tech n 90.08 +.29
Dreyfus: Telcm n 43.67 +.13
Aprec 40.31 -.03 Transn 51.41 +.21
CTA 11.81 +.03 UtilGrxn 51.51 -1.49
CorVA 22.47 ... Wirelessxn 7.25 -.41
Dreyf 8.48 Fidelity Spartan:
DryMidr 27.29 +08 ExtMklnn 36.21 +.13
Dr5001nt 34.73 -.01 5001dxlnvn 44.21 -.01
GNMA 16.25 +.02 Intllnxlnvn 31.38 +.13


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
TotMktlnvn 36.32 +.02
USBondl 11.73 +.04
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdvn44.21 -.01
IntAdrn 31.39 +.14
TotMktAd rn36.33 +.02
First Eagle:
GlblA 46.57 +.05
OverseasA 21.87 +.02
First Investors A
BIChpAp 20.88
GloblAp 6.09 +.01
GovtAp 11.58 +.01
GrolnAp 14.29 +.01
IncoAp 2.43 +.01
MATFAp 11.86 +.03
MITFAp 12.25 +.02
NJTFAp 13.13 +.03
NYTFAp 14.60 +.03
OppAp 26.97 +.06
PATFAp 13.11 +.02
SpSitAp 24.43 +.05
TxExAp 9.81 +.01
TotRtAp 15.14 +.03
ValueBp 6.88
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.04 -.02
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.84
ALTFAp 11.32 +.02
AZTFAp 10.86 +.02
CallnsAp 12.15 +.03
CAIntAp 11.64 +.03
CalTFAp 7.00 +.02
COTFAp 11.76 +.02
CTTFAp 11.01 +.02
CvtScAp 14.02 -.01
DblTFA 11.81 +.03
DynTchAe 29.83
EqlncAp 16.51 +.05
Fedlntp 12.01 +.02
FedTFAp 11.98 +.03
FLTFAp 11.55 +.02
FoundAlp 10.00
GATFAp 12.07 +.02
GoldPrM Ax 41.26
GrwthApx 44.81
HYTFAp 10.14 +.02
HilncA 1.91 +.01
IncomAp 2.06 +.01
InsTFAp 11.97 +.02
NYITF p 11.50 +.03
LATFAp 11.52 +.02
LMGvScA 10.41
MDTFAp 11.53 +.02
MATFAp 11.61 +.02
MITFAp 11.98 +.02
MNInsA 12.42 +.03
MOTFAp 12.19 +.02
NJTFAp 12.14 +.02
NYTFAp 11.67 +.02
NCTFAp 12.34 +.02
OhiolAp 12.52 +.03
ORTFAp 12.03 +.02
PATFAp 10.42 +.02
ReEScAp 14.00
RisDvApx 34.16
SMCpGrA 36.40
Stbatlncp 10.10 +.04
TtlRtnAp 10.24 +.04
USGovAp 6.90 +.01
UlIsApx 12.92
VATFAp 11.74 +.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 12.81 +.04
IncmeAd 2.04
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.08 +.01
USGvCt 6.86 +.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 19.73
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 22.19 +.09
ForgnAp 6.32 +.04
GIBdAp 12.85 +.04
GrwthAp 16.78
WorldAp 14.13
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 16.88 +.06
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 21.52 +.08
ForgnCp 6.14 +.03
GIBdCp 12.87 +.04
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 16.58 +.02
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.69 +.05
S&S PM 39.34 +.02
GMOTrust:
USTreas 25.01
GMOTrust III:
Quality 21.74 -.08
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 21.22 -.06
InllntrVI 19.40 +.03
GMOTrust VI:
EmgMktsr 11.76 -.02
InfiCorEq 26.24 +.01
Quality 21.74 -.09
StFxlnc 16.98
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 48.47 -.03
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.15 +.01
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 33.55 -.09
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 23.60 +.03
HiYield 6.86 +.04
HYMunin 8.38 +.01
MidCapV 33.91 -.09
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.13 +.04
CapAplnst 37.82 -.01
Intllnvt 54.09 +.08
Inl r 54.77 +.08
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 29.67 +.20
DivGthAp 18.52 +.01
IntOpAp 13.23 -.05
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 29.74 +.20
HartfordHLS IA:
CapApp 37.89 +.13
Div&Gr 19.25 +.01
Advisers 19.25 +.07
TotRetBd 11.52 +.05
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
SrTotRetr 12.45 -.05
StGrowth 12.74 -.06
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 19.51
HIthcareS 14.34 -.15
ISI Funds:
NoAmp 7.91 +.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 16.53 +.02
WldwideIr 16.56 +.01
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 11.83 -.01
Invesco Funds:
Energy 39.53 -.12
Utliies 16.58 -.20
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 16.20 -.05
CmskA 15.05 +.09
Constp 21.83 -.05
EqlncA 8.20 +.02
GrlncAp 18.20 +.04
HilncMu p 7.63 +.02
HiYld p 3.96 +.01
HYMuA 9.28 +.01
InfiGrow 25.97 -.02
MunilnA 13.14 +.03
PATFA 15.99 +.03
USMortgA 12.99 +.01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 13.34 +.07
MunilnB 13.12 +.03
USMortg 12.92 +.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 22.93 +.07
AssetStAp 23.75 +.07
AssetSbl r 24.00 +.07
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.83 +.04
JPMorgan C Class:
CoreBdp 11.88 +.03
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 23.69 +.05
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBondnll.83 +.04
ShtDurBd 10.98 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 9.99
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.82 +.04
HighYldn 7.70 +.03
InfnTFBdnll .14 +.02
ShtDurBdn 10.98 +.01
USLCCrPlsn20.02 +.01
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 24.89 +.06
ContrarnT 12.46 +.05
EnterprT 58.59 +.04
FIxBndT 10.61 +.05
GllUfeSciTr 24.51 -.21
GIbSelT 9.85 +.04
GITechTr 16.14 +.04
Grw&lncT 29.77 +.01
JanusT 27.71 -.03
OvrseasTr 37.15 +.41
PrkMCValT21.94 -.05
ResearchT 28.62 +.04


ShTmBdT 3.06 +.01
TwentyT 61.13 -.05
VentureT 56.30 +.17
WrldWTr 41.10 +.13
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn26.46 -.07
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.39 +.05
RgBkA 12.51 +.16
StlnAp 6.39 +.01
John Hancock B:
StlncB 6.39 +.01


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock C 1:
LSAggr 11.56
LSBalanc 12.46 +.01
LSConsrv 12.77 +.03
LSGrwth 12.26
LSModer 12.46 +.02
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp 23.44 +.08
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 18.64 -.04
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 18.99 -.05
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 112.86 -.36
CBApprp 13.78 +.01
CBLCGrp 23.93 -.09
GCIAIICOp 7.81 +.03
WAHilncAt 5.70 +.02
WAMgMup16.01 +.03
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 22.19 -.08
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 26.07 +.06
CMValTrp 36.84 +.13
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 26.67 +.02
SmCap 24.98 +.08
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.00 +.02
StrlncC 14.52 +.02
LSBondR 13.95 +.03
SklncA 14.44 +.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.08 +.05
InvGrBdY 12.08 +.04
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 10.46 +.05
FundlEq 12.16
BdDebAp 7.57 +.03
ShDurlncAp 4.53
MidCpAp 15.85 -.04
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.56 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.53 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 18.78 -.02
MIGA 15.74 -.04
EmGA 42.35 -.09
HilnA 3.32 +.01
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 13.94 +.02
UtilA 16.78 -.04
ValueA 22.25 -.02
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.10 -.04
GvScBn 10.52 +.02
HilnBn 3.32 +.01
MulnBn 8.37 +.01
TotRBn 13.94 +.01
MFS Funds I:
RelnT 14.28 +.05
Valuel 22.36 -.01
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 16.55 +.01
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.75 +.02
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 15.06 +.02
GovtBt 8.86 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.72 +.01
IncmBldr 15.92 +.01
InflEqB 9.63 -.01
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 33.33 +.04
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 70.92 -.60
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 7.43 -.02
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 16.12 -.01
Indialnvr 15.37 +.23
PacTgrlnv 21.45 +.08
MergerFdn 16.00 +.01
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.25 +.06
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.41 +.04
TotRtBdl 10.41 +.04
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 4.21
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 14.15 -.03
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 15.63 +.03
MorganStanley Inst:
InfEql 12.69 +.05
MCapGrl 36.00 -.21
MCapGrPp34.81 -.20
Muhlenkn 51.44 +.04
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 27.09 -.03
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn28.63 -.01
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 11.74 -.01
GblDiscA 27.24
GlbDiscC 26.82 -.03
GlbDiscZ 27.64
QuestZ 16.75 +.02
SharesZ 19.93
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 19.08 +.07
Genesis 35.17 +.01
Geneslnst 48.74 +.02
Inl r 15.36 -.05
Partner 24.93 +.05
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 50.39 +.02
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.27 +.03
Nichn 44.93 +.05
Northern Funds:
Bondldx 10.87
HiYFxlnc 6.93
MMIntEqr 8.70
SmCpldx 8.10
Stkldx 15.47
Technly 14.82
Nuveen Cl A:
LMBAp 11.07 +.01
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstn 18.22 +.05
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 37.83 -.12
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 27.86 -.08
Globall 20.23 -.03
Infllr 16.94 +.15
Oakmark 41.71
Select 28.12 -.06
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.06 +.01
GlbSMdCap 14.12 +.01
LgCapStrat 8.84
RealRet 9.85 -.06
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.35 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.23 +.02
CAMuniAp 7.77 +.02
CapApAp 43.28 -.18
CaplncAp 8.60
ChmplncAp 1.74
DvMktAp 31.02 +.03
Discp 58.16 +.10
EquityA 8.56 -.03
GlobAp 55.85 -.07
GIbOppA 27.25 -.04
GblStrlncA 4.05
Goldp 42.09 -.90
IntBdAp 6.31
LtdTmMu 14.53 +.02
MnStFdA 31.84 +.09
PAMuniAp 10.59 .02
SenFltRtA 8.03 +.01
USGvp 9.67 +.03
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.31 +.01
AMTFrNY 11.24 +.03
CplncB t 8.43
ChmplncBt 1.74
EquityB 7.86 -.03
GblStrlncB 4.07
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.29
RoMuAp 15.65 +.03
RcNtMuA 6.72 +.02
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 30.77 +.03
InfiBdY 6.31
IntGrowY 26.15 -.03
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.76
TotRtAd 10.82 +.03
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.53
AIIAsset 11.95
ComodRR 7.81
Divlnc 11.23 +.05
EmgMkCur 10.12
EmMkBd 11.25 +.04
Fltlncr 8.30 +.02
ForBdUnr 11.02 -.01
FrgnBd 10.62 +.03
HiYld 8.89 +.04
InvGrCp 10.57 +.06
LowDu 10.31 +.01
ModDur 10.69 +.03
RealRet 13.13 +.12
RealRhil 12.24 +.06
ShortT 9.76
TotRt 10.82 +.03
TRII 10.48 +.03
TRIII 9.52 +.03
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.46


ComRRp 7.67
LwDurA 10.31 +.01
RealRtAp 12.24 +.06
TotRtA 10.82 +.03
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 12.24 +.06
TotRtCt 10.82 +.03
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.82 +.03
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.52
TotRtnP 10.82 +.03


Name NAV Chg
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.04 -.05
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.17 +.09
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.53 +.03
InflValA 17.93 +.02
PionFdAp 38.69 -.05
ValueAp 10.78 -.01
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.49 +.01
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdCt 9.59 +.02
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 17.19 -.01
Price Funds:
Balance 19.14 +.02
BIChipn 39.13 -.09
CABondn 10.84 +.02
CapAppn 20.76 +.03
DivGron 23.14 -.01
EmMktBn 12.90 +.03
EmEurp 17.46 -.02
EmMktSn 30.12 -.07
Eqlncn 22.74 +.07
Eqlndexn 33.65
Europen 13.75 -.02
GNMAn 10.14 +.01
Growth n 32.24 -.05
Gr&lnn 19.89 +.01
HIlhSci n 32.96 -.38
HiYieldn 6.41 +.03
InsflCpG 16.42 -.04
InfiBondn 9.96 -.03
IntDisn 38.48 +.08
IntlG&l 12.03 +.01
InflStkn 12.89 -.01
Japan n 7.48 +.01
LatAmn 44.57 +.11
MDShrtn 5.22
MDBondn 10.57 +.01
MidCapn 58.18 -.06
MCapVal n 22.39
NAmer n 33.07 -.10
N Asian 17.43 -.05
NewEran 46.17 -.14
NHorizn 35.87 +.11
NlIncn 9.67 +.03
NYBondn 11.27 .02
Overs SFrn 7.63 +.01
PSIncn 15.90 .02
RealEstn 17.73 +.08
R2010n 15.41 +.02
R2015n 11.85 +.01
R2020n 16.27 +.02
R2025n 11.83 .01
R2030n 16.88 +.01
R2035n 11.89
R2040n 16.90
R2045n 11.27
SciTecn 26.66 -.02
ShtBdn 4.81
SmCpStkn 34.25 +.15
SmCapVal n35.53 +.18
SpecGrn 17.17 +.01
Speclnn 12.26 +.03
TFInc n 9.97 +.02
TxFrHn 10.82 +.02
TxFrSIn 5.63
USTIntn 6.26 +.02
USTLgn 13.87 +.16
VABondn 11.72 +.02
Value n 22.54 +.05
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.41 -.02
LT20201n 11.52 +.03
LT20301n 11.32 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 16.72 +.03
HiYldAp 5.30 +.02
MuHilncA 9.51-
1420.35
NatResA 49.18 -.15
UblityA 10.57 -.06
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.33 -.01
HiYldBt 5.29 +.01
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.68
AZTE 9.05
ConvSec 18.55 +.04
DvrlnAp 7.28
EqlnAp 14.93 +.03
EuEq 17.64
GeoBalA 11.86 +.02
GlbEqtyp 8.42
GrlnAp 12.65 +.05
GIbHIthA 43.12 -.40
HiYdAp 7.22
HiYld In 5.64
IncmAp 6.76 +.03
IntGrln p 8.75
InvAp 12.65 +.01
NJTxAp 9.38 +.01
MulCpGr 48.92 -.04
PATE 9.11 +.01
TxExAp 8.58 +.02
TFInAp 14.90
TFHYA 11.69 +.01
USGvAp 14.07
GIblUtilA 10.07 -.15
VoyAp 20.31 +.08
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 14.91
DvrlnBt 7.22
Eqlnct 14.79 +.03
EuEq 16.81
GeoBalB 11.75 +.03
GlbEqt 7.57
GINtRst 17.78
GrlnBt 12.42 +.05
GIblHIhB 35.23 -.33
HiYldBt 7.21
HYAdBt 5.53
IncmBt 6.70 +.03
IntGrlnt 8.61
InfiNopt 13.04 -.01
InvBt 11.33 +.01
NJTxBt 9.37 +.02
MulwCpGr 42.02 -.03
TxExB t 8.58 +.02
TFHYBt 11.71 +.01
USGvBt 14.00
GlblUtilB 10.03 -.15
VoyBt 17.14 +.06
RS Funds:
IntGrA 15.88 -.01
LgCAIphaA 38.77 -.12
Value 23.13 -.02
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 1.25 -.01
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 16.04 +.01
MicroCapl 15.68 +.05
PennMulr 11.20 +.04
Premier r 20.42 +.03
TotRetl r 12.75 +.04
ValSvc t 11.84 -.03
Russell Funds S:
StatBdx 10.93 +.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.01 -.04
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 18.83 -.05
Schwab Funds:
HIhCare 17.08 -.15
10001nvr 37.26
S&PSel 19.73 -.01
SmCpSI 20.49 +.09
TSMSelr 22.81 +.01
Scout Funds:
Inl 28.74 +.01
Selected Funds:
AmShD 39.53 +.03
AmShSp 39.44 +.03
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 31.25 -.02
Sequoian 144.04 -.21
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.44 -.12
SoSunSClnv tn2.10+.10
St FarmAssoc:
Gwh 51.84 -.06
Stratton Funds:
MulD-Cap 33.12 -.02
RealEstate 26.13 +.09
SmCap 49.40 +.27
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.20 +.03
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.70 +.01
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bdldxlnst 10.72 +.04
Eqldxlnst 9.54 +.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 18.19
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 14.71 +.08
REVallnstr 20.58 +.11
Valuelnst 41.63 -.05
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 24.71 +.06
IncBuildAt 17.79
IncBuildCp 17.79
IntValue I 25.27 +.07
LtTMul 14.38 +.02
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.61 +.02
Incom 8.66 +.05
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 79.83 -1.51
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp8.72 +.05
Flexlncp 8.76 +.04
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 32.21 +.11


Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 22.46 +.01
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 22.68 -.07
ChinaReg 7.31 -.02
GlbRs 10.16 -.02
Gld&Mtls 16.72 -.39
WdPrcMn 16.70 -.22
USAA Group:
AgvGt 32.80 -.08
CABd 10.25 +.02
CrnstStr 21.86
GNMA 10.39


Name NAV Chg
GrTxStr 13.25 +.01
Grwth 14.52 -.05
Gr&lnc 14.52
IncSk 12.12 -.03
Inco 13.03 +.03
Inl 22.33 -.01
NYBd 11.81 +.02
PrecMM 39.12 -.91
SciTech 12.67 -.04
ShtTBnd 9.14
SmCpSk 13.26 +.06
TxElt 13.14 +.01
TxELT 13.03 +.02
TxESh 10.76 +.01
VABd 11.07 +.01
WIdGr 18.01 -.06
VALIC :
MdCpldx 20.13 +.06
Stkldx 24.95
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 17.50 -.04
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmlIn 21.71 +.03
CAITAdmn 11.20 +.02
CALTAdmn11.27 +.02
CpOpAdln 71.74 -.61
EMAdmrrn 33.81 -.08
Energyn 122.01 -.16
EqlnAdmnn44.71 -.05
EuroAdml n 54.86 +.03
ExplAdml n 66.94 +.10
ExtdAdmn 39.77 +.16
500Adml n 115.07 -.02
GNMAAdn11.16 +.01
GrwAdmn 32.08 -.04
HlthCr n 55.36 -.52
HiYldCp n 5.61 +.03
InfProAdn 28.22 +.12
ITBdAdml n 11.79 +.05
ITsryAdmln 12.11 +.03
IntGrAdm n 54.82 -.01
ITAdmln 13.83 +.03
ITGrAdmn 10.02 +.05
LtdTrAdn 11.11 +.01
LTGrAdmlnlO.15 +.12
LTAdmln 11.17 +.02
MCpAdml n 90.57 +.04
MorgAdm n 55.56
MuHYAdmnlO.56 +.01
NYLTAdn 11.26 +.02
PrmCap r n 66.84 -.59
PALTAdmn11.21 +.01
ReitAdmrn 78.60 +.20
STsyAdml n 10.84 +.01
STBdAdmlnlO.65 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.91 +.01
STFdAdn 10.92
STIGrAdn 10.63 +.01
SmCAdmn 33.63 +.12
TxMCaprn 62.90 +.03
TfBAdmln 10.99 +.04
TStkAdmn 31.16 +.02
ValAdmln 20.09 +.02
WellslAdm n54.89 +.19
WelltnAdm n53.64 +.13
Windsorn 43.01 +.05
WdsrllAdn 45.49 +.02
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 23.97 +.04
CALTn 11.27 +.02
CapOppn 31.04 -.26
Convrtn 12.18 +.03
DivdGron 15.20 -.05
Energy n 64.95 -.08
Eqlncn 21.32 -.03
Explrn 71.83 +.11
FLLTn 11.62 +.02
GNMAn 11.16 +.01
GlobEqn 16.46 +.01
Grolnc n 26.33 -.03
GrthEqn 10.96 -.03
HYCorpn 5.61 +.03
HlthCren 131.15 -1.22
InfaPron 14.37 +.06
InlExplrn 13.74 +.03
IntlGrn 17.21
InfiValn 28.21 +.02
ITIGraden 10.02 +.05
ITTsryn 12.11 +.03
LifeConn 16.32 +.03
LifeGron 21.38 +.02
Lifelncn 14.24 +.03
LifeModn 19.39 +.02
LTIGraden 10.15 +.12
LTTsryn 13.55 +.16
Morgn 17.90
MuHYn 10.56 +.01
Mulntn 13.83 +.03
MuLtdn 11.11 +.01
MuLongn 11.17 +.02
MuShrtn 15.91 +.01
NJLTn 11.74 +.01
NYLTn 11.26 +.02
OHLTTEn 12.11 +.02
PALTn 11.21 +.01
PrecMtls r n 23.83
PrmcpCorn 13.57 -.08
Prmcp r n 64.37 -.57
SelValu rn 18.70 -.02
STARn 19.04 +.03
STIGraden 10.63 +.01
STFedn 10.92
STTsryn 10.84 +.01
StatEqn 18.59 +.05
TgtRe2005nl2.29 +.03
TgtRetlncn 11.63 +.03
TgRe2010n22.99 +.04
TgtRe2015nl2.59 +.02
TgRe2020 n22.16 +.02
TgtRe2025nl12.54 +.01
TgRe2030n21.36 +.02
TgtRe2035 n2.78 +.01
TgtRe2040n20.93 +.01
TgtRe2050 n20.84 +.02
TgtRe2045nl3.15 +.01
USGron 18.34 +.01
USValuen 10.19 +.02
Wellslyn 22.66 +.08
Welltnn 31.05 +.07
Wndsrn 12.74 +.01
Wndsll n 25.62 +.01
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n92.77 +.16
MidCplstP n98.70 +.05
TotlntAdm r r23.06 +.01
Totlntllnst r n92.27 +.01
TotlntllP rn 92.29 +.01
500 n 115.04 -.03
Balancedn 21.70 +.03
DevMktn 8.97 +.02
EMktn 25.70 -.06
Europe n 23.52 +.01
Extendn 39.70 +.15
Growth n 32.07 -.05
ITBndn 11.79 +.05
LgCaplx n 23.05
LTBndn 13.75 +.16
MidCapn 19.93 +.01
Pacific n 9.58 +.04
REITrn 18.42 +.05
SmCapn 33.56 +.12
SmlCpGthn21.61 +.06
SmlCpVln 15.13 +.07
STBndn 10.65 +.01
TotBndn 10.99 +.04
Totllntln 13.78
TotStkn 31.15 +.02
Value n 20.09 +.03
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 21.71 +.03
DevMklnstn 8.90 +.01
Extlnn 39.77 +.16
FTAIIWIdl r n82.48 +.01
Grwthlstn 32.08 -.04
InfProlnstn 11.50 +.05
Instldxn 114.31 -.02
InsPIn 114.32 -.02
InstTStldxn 28.19 .01
InsTStPlus r8.20 +.02
MidCplstn 20.01 +.01
SCInstn 33.63 +.12
TBlstn 10.99 +.04
TSlnstn 31.16 +.01
Valuelstn 20.09 +.02
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 95.05 -.02
GroSign 29.71 -.03
ITBdSig n 11.79 +.05
MidCplcbdxn 28.58 +.01
STBdldxn 10.65 +.01
SmCpSign 30.30 +.11
TotBdSgl n 10.99 +.04
TotStkSgl n 30.07 +.01
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.72 +.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.02 +.03
CorelnvA 6.04
DivOppAp 13.92 +.01
DivOppCt 13.75
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 39.76 +.23
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIIAp 12.15
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.72
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSklnv 20.07 +.06
Opptylnv 36.37 +.05
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.81
Wells Fargo Instl:
UItSTMuA 4.81
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.04 +.05
William Blair N:
GrowhN 11.14 +.02


YacktmanFunds:
Fundpn 17.39 -.05
Focusedn 18.59 -05


Stock market closes





best week since 2009


Associated Press


NEW YORK An early
rally fizzled on the stock
market Friday but still left
the Standard & Poor's 500
index up 7.4 percent for the
week, its biggest gain since
March 2009.
A surprise drop in the
U.S. unemployment rate
sent stocks higher in early
trading, but the gains faded
during the afternoon.
The Dow Jones industrial
average dropped 0.61 of a
point to close at 12,019.42.
The Dow ended the week up
7 percent, the largest weekly
gain since July 2009.
Bank stocks rose sharply,
continuing a weeklong rally
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
jumped 6.1 percent, the most
among the 30 stocks in the
Dow average. Morgan Stan-
ley leapt 6.9 percent, the sec-
ond-biggest gain of any stock
in the S&P 500 index.
European stock indexes
and the euro rose after Ger-
man Chancellor Angela
Merkel made a speech
pushing for tighter rules on
government spending.
Merkel said the 17 countries
that use the euro must
quickly restore market con-
fidence by making financial
controls stricter.
Bond yields for Spain and
Italy fell, a sign that in-
vestors are becoming more
confident in the ability of
those countries to pay their
debt. France's CAC-40 and
Britain's FT-SE each rose
1.1 percent.
Markets could be in for
more volatility next week as
European leaders prepare
for a summit to propose new
measures for containing the
crisis.
The Labor Department
reported before the market
opened that the unemploy-
ment rate fell to 8.6 percent


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Merkel wants treaty House panel Zynga hopes to

rewrite to fix euro subpoenas Corzine raise $1B in IPO

BERLIN German Chan- WASHINGTON -Acongres- NEW YORK- Hoping to


sional panel has subpoenaed
former New Jersey governor
and U.S. Sen. Jon Corzine to
testify next week about his role
leading MF Global, a brokerage
firm that collapsed this fall after
a failed bet on European
debt.The Dec. 8 hearing will be
a rare moment in Washington.
Congressional historians can't
recall another time when a for-
mer member of Congress was
summoned to testify before
Congress about a matter under
federal investigation.


harvest some fresh cash, the
online game company behind
"FarmVille" said Friday that it
plans to raise $1 billion in an
initial public offering of up to
100 million shares.
Zynga Inc. is the latest in a
spate of IPOs by Internet com-
panies this year, ranging from
professional networking service
Linkedln Corp. to the online
deals site Groupon Inc. Face-
book's public debut is expected
sometime after April next year.
From wire reports


Primary Care Specialists


w 'we t IN 9cw4t Pa aee-tt- fac 'e d etPc44a










Alistair Co, MD





OPEN HOUSE












Come and Meet our Newest Team Member

Refiesh mcnts -

Offices in Citrus Springs. Inverness & Our New Office in Homosassa 352 3 2
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd. IJust North of Sugarmill Woods Entrance) 352 38




NWYORKSTOCKEXCANGE


Name Last Chg
SPDRFncl 12.91 +.17
SP Inds 33.71 -.07
SPTech 25.74 -.02
SP UDI 34.75 -.36
StdPac 3.16 -.07
Standex 32.04 +.32
StarwdHf 48.43 +1.19
StateSt 39.98 +.76
Steris 29.73 -.04
Sterlitie 8.36 +.20
STlwtrM 11.02 +.30
StatHotels 5.29 +.31
Sbyker 47.62 -1.91
SturmRug 29.95 -.47
SubPpne 47.12 +.28
SunCmts 34.93 +.22
Suncorgs 30.22 +.11
Sunooo 39.00 +.20
Suntech 2.59 +.16
SunTrst 18.57 +.58
SupEnrgy 30.46 +.37
Supvalu 7.29
SwiftTrns n 8.72 +.24
Synovus 1.48 -.03
Sysco 29.13 +.40
TCFFncl 9.72 -.17
TE Connect 31.42 +.14
TECO 18.42 -.27
TJX 62.24 -.32
TRWAuto 32.91 +.17
TaiwSemi 13.12 -.09


Talbots 1.54
TalismEg 13.49
Target 52.88
TataMotors 18.37
TeckResg 37.22
TelcmNZs 7.80
TelefEsp s 18.55
TelMexL 15.02
TempurP 53.81
Tenaris 37.43
TenetHlth 4.18
Teradyn 13.16
Terex 16.25
TerraNitro 157.16
Tesoro 24.50
TetraTech 9.36
Texlnst 29.97
Textron 19.05
Theragen 1.62
ThermoFis 46.54
ThmBet 52.01
ThomCrkg 7.11
3MCo 79.76
Tiffany 67.60
TWCable 63.80
TimeWarn 34.41
Timken 41.83
TollBros 20.23
TorchEngy 2.35
Trchmrks 42.62
TorDBkg 71.46
TotalSA 51.42


TotalSys 20.07
Transom 42.76
Travelers 54.24
Tredgar 20.99
TriConfi 14.21
TrinaSolar 8.11
TwoHrblnv 9.32
Tycolnf 47.48
Tyson 20.16
UBSAG 12.24
UDR 23.52
UGI Corp 28.50
UIL Hold 34.21
USAirwy 4.84
US Gold 3.84
USEC 1.28
USG 10.60
UltraPtg 34.57
UniSrcEn 36.32
UniFirst 57.18
UnilevNV 32.99
UnionPac 102.69
UtdConfl 19.26
UtdMicro 2.24
UPSB 71.07
UtdRentals 27.96
USBancrp 25.72
USNGsrs 7.91
US OilFd 39.03
USSteel 27.81
UtdTech 76.54
UtdhlthGp 48.23


UnvslCp 42.19 -3.53 WtWatch 61.79
UnivHIthS 38.88 -1.66 WeinRIt 20.87
p 22.0 WellPoint 68.91
" MM vuWellsFargo 26.07
WendysCo 5.07
Valassis 20.93 .82 WestarEn 27.28
Vale SA 23.50 +.34 WAstEMkt 13.20
ValeSApf 22.20 +.39 WstAMgdHi 5.79
ValeantPh 46.19 +.44 WAstlnfOpp 12.80
ValeroE 22.56 +.44 WDigital 31.44
Valspar 35.59 -.72 WshtRefin 13.42
VangTotBd 83.40 +.27 WstnUnion 17.55
VangTSM 64.01 -.03 Weyerh 16.77
VangEmg 40.64 -.10 Whrlpl 49.45
VangEAFE 32.16 +.11 WhibngPts 49.21
VarianMed 62.83 -.23 WmsCos 32.37
Vecten 28.41 -.55 WmsPtrs 59.54
Ventas 51.24 -.45 WmsSon 39.16
VeoliaEnv 12.55 -.14 Winnbgo 6.35
VerizonCm 37.85 +.08 WiscEns 32.96
VimpelCm 11.54 -.28 WT India 17.94
Visa 97.20 -.56 Worthgn 17.15
Vonage 2.58 +.20 Wyndham 35.85
Vornado 74.00 -.10 XLGrp 20.75
WGL Hol 42.26 -.38 XcelEngy 25.84
Wabash 7.44 +.14 Xerox 8.22
WalMart 58.09 -.52 Yamanag 16.14
Walgrn 33.12 -.76 YingliGrn 4.47
WalterEn 71.68 -.36 Youkun 19.91
WsteMlnc 31.23 -.01 YumBrnds 56.25
WatsnPh 62.86 +.03 Zimmer 48.92
Weathflnfi 15.08 +.12 ZweigTI 3.08


ii
e
9
tl


3
ii


p
P

ii
2
F
a
s.
w
2


IE
tE
s
d
p

i
h
g
ti


tory, following a 946-point

Market watch gain in October 2008.
Dec. 2,2011 "This market has been
gripped with fear for a long
Dow Jones -0.61 time," said Peter Cardillo,
industrials 12,019.42 chief market economist at
Rockwell Global Capital.
Nasdaq +0.73 "And I think some of these
composite 2,626.93 fear factors are beginning to

Standard & -0.30 dissipate."
Poor's 500 This week's strong stock
1,244.28 performance is partially a

Russell +4.27 reflection of the market's in-
2000 735.02 creased volatility since Au-
gust, when concerns that
NYSE diary Europe's debt was spinning
Advanced: 1,854 out of control made dra-

Declined: 1,188 matic stock price swings the
norm. On Monday the S&P
Unchanged: 96 500 broke a 7-day slide that

Volume: 4.0 b had taken the index down

Nasdaq diary 7.9 percent.
Advance 14 The improvements in the
Advanced: 1,514 U.S. job market are "an-
Declined: 994 other illustration that the

Unchanged: 153 US economy is, for now at
Volume: least, shrugging off the
Volume: 1.6b AP global economic downturn
and fears about the collapse
ast month, the lowest level of the euro-zone," Capital
n 2/2 years. Economists had Economics Chief U.S. Econ-
xpected the rate to stay at omist PaulAshworth said in
percent. But a key reason a note to clients.
he unemployment rate fell Merkel and French Presi-
o much was that more than dent Nicolas Sarkozy will
00,000 people gave up look- meet Monday to discuss
ng for work and were no changes to European Union
longer counted as unem- treaties. The talks will cul-
)loyed. minate in a Dec. 9 summit of
The Nasdaq composite EU leaders, where the pro-
ndex inched up 0.73 to posals are expected to be
,626.93. The Standard & debated and detailed. Ana-
'oor's 500 index fell 0.31 of lysts say stricter controls on
point to 1,244.28. The S&P spending could encourage
urged 7.4 percent over the the European Central Bank
ieek, the most since March to offer more short-term
009. help for governments strug-
Decisive steps by world gling with their debts.
leaders to right Europe's If the European Central
teetering economy sent Bank takes a larger role in
tocks soaring on Wednes- buying government debt, "it
lay The Dow jumped 490 will certainly be a relief to
points its biggest gain since markets," Cardillo said,
larch 2009 and its seventh- "and maybe even mean Eu-
argest one-day point gain in rope avoids falling into a
history The weekly point deep recession. Not that it's
ain of 787 in the Dow was going to cure all the prob-
he second-biggest in its his- lems of Europe."


cellor Angela Merkel pushed
forward Friday with what mar-
kets see as an emerging plan
for more effective action to con-
tain the European financial cri-
sis, urging tougher rules
against government overspend-
ing. She said next week's Euro-
pean Union summit would take
up ways to enforce compliance
and write those changes into
EU treaties. The push by
Merkel on debt rules mght be
paired with help from the Euro-
pean Central Bank.







Page A8 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3,2011



PINION


"Our major obligation is not to
mistake slogans for solutions."
Edward R. Murrow, 1908-1965


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
a Charlie Brennan .................. ....................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GRAY TSUNAMI




Florida and



Citrus County



trendsetters


Historically, a majority of
the world's population
has been concentrated
in the 40-and-below age group.
However, decreasing birth
rates and increased longevity
have caused the world's age


composition to
dramatically shift
upward, with the
U.S. among the
most rapidly aging
developed nations
in the world.
America's aging
trend is com-
pounded by the
fact that the rolls
of seniors 90 and
older are increas-


viewed for impacts on the eld-
erly and work toward making
services and social opportuni-
ties easily accessible.
Key to accessibility is the de-
sign and development of resi-


dential


THE ISSUE:
America's aging
population.

OUR OPINION:
Upward trend offers
challenges and
opportunities.


ing at an accelerated rate. Over
a century ago, fewer than
100,000 Americans reached 90.
Now, nearly 2 million Ameri-
cans are 90 or older, with this
number projected to reach 8.7
million by mid-century.
This gray tsunami is ex-
tremely relevant to Florida
and Citrus County.
While the percentage of peo-
ple over age 65 is about 13 per-
cent nationally, Florida's
percentage of residents 65 and
above is more than 17 percent,
making it the oldest state de-
mographically. Of Florida's 67
counties, Citrus County is near
the top of the demographic
chart at 31.9 percent, behind
Sumter, Charlotte and High-
lands counties.
The numerous and substan-
tial impacts of a proportionally
older population present com-
plex challenges for Florida
communities. Nevertheless,
the impacts also offer opportu-
nities for Florida communities
to creatively redesign their in-
frastructures and reshape
their policies to support resi-
dents of all ages.
With Citrus County near the
top of Florida's demographic
chart, it has the opportunity to
be on the cutting edge of devel-
oping livable communities that
integrate and support resi-
dents no matter what their age.
Foremost to grasping this op-
portunity, land use regulations
and public policy should be re-


areas that support
multiple trans-
portation options.
This would ame-
liorate the isola-
tion that occurs
when one is no
longer able to
drive as well as fa-
cilitate the ability
of seniors to pur-
posefully con-
tribute, socially or
economically


Housing options for seniors
should address their desires
and circumstances relative to
lifespan transition from inde-
pendent living to attendant
care. Programs to enable the
elderly to age in place, such as
the National Association of
Home Builders Fixing to Stay
project and the Habitat for Hu-
manity's ReHabitat program
that uses volunteers to help re-
pair existing homes for elderly
people, should be given priority.
Also, we should tap the skills
and talents of those seniors
searching for opportunities to
use them in a meaningful way.
Accordingly, the private, public
and nonprofit sectors should
work together to create and op-
timize strategies that attract
and connect with seniors to
add value to their lives, as well
as our community.
Recognizing that the shortage
of affordable and well-designed
transitional housing, mobility
options and opportunities for
community engagement make it
difficult for the elderly to main-
tain independence and a high
quality of life, it is imperative
that Citrus County and other
communities make a commit-
ment to creating livable com-
munities for all ages.
Otherwise, the challenges of
an aging population will be-
come a burden rather than an
opportunity, not only for the eld-
erly but also for communities
across Florida and the nation.


T he United Way of Citrus County is trying to help feed the hungry
this year and you can help. If each family in Citrus County con-
tributed $30 (or more), the fundraising organization could meet its
goal for 2012. The United Way just gave
$50,000 to match a private $50,000
grant to push for the completion of the
food pantry in Homosassa Springs.
Once completed, this pantry will pro-
vide food supplies to 51 nonprofit and
church groups in our community that feed the hungry.
Do your part and mail a contribution to The United Way, c/o Gerry
Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429.


Thanks for your help.


- Gerry Mulligan


Birthday ball
This is in response to "Marines'
birthday" on Nov. 18. There was a
Marine Corps Birthday Ball and a
military mall honoring the Marine
Corps birthday. Both had been ad-
vertised. Call the Marine Corps
League Citrus Detachment 819
for more information, 746-1135.
Semper Fi.


We want Tebow
My question is: Why didn't we
get Tim Tebow and John Fox in-
stead of what we have now?

SOUND OFF
To leave a Sound Off, call
(352) 563-0579.


Proving neatness isn't everything


In 1964, two years after gradu-
ating from Harvard, Barney
Frank went to Mississippi as
a civil rights worker ThatAugust,
at the Democratic National Con-
vention in Atlantic City, N.J., a
group of blacks calling them-
selves the Mississippi
Freedom Democratic
Party asked to be
seated as the state's of-
ficial delegation.
Some liberals
thought white Missis- '.
sippians might support
the Freedom Party's
bid, but Barney was
deeply skeptical. He
sent a telegram to his Coki
friends in Atlantic City, Steven
warning them not to OTI
count on that help VOI
"until you've heard the
ayes of their whites."
We've told that story many
times because it was Barney at
his best: a brilliant political
strategist who also happened to
be the wittiest guy around. And
he turned out to be right. Con-
vention delegates, urged on by
President Johnson, rejected the
Freedom Party because they
were afraid of angering Southern
conservatives.
When Barney announced re-
cently that he was leaving Con-
gress after 32 years, the reaction
in Washington was extraordinary
The online newspaper Politico
ran the story across the top of
Page One under the headline,
"Frank Legacy: 'One of a Kind."'
And he was certainly the only
Jewish, gay, left-handed con-
gressman who spoke with a thick
New Jersey accent while repre-
senting suburban Boston.
But those labels are only part
of his legacy Even though he was
the first gay lawmaker to come
out in public, in many ways Bar-
ney was more a throwback than a
pioneer When it came to Con-


gress, he was very old-fashioned.
He believed in the institution, he
believed in compromise, and he
believed in the legislative
process. That's why he worked
with the Bush administration to
pass legislation that saved the fi-
S nancial system in
2008.
Opponents liked to
demonize him as a
S doctrinaire liberal,
and while he was cer-
tainly an ardent sup-
porter of gay rights,
his critics always got
him wrong. His sister
Ann Lewis, a longtime
e and Democratic strategist,
Roberts once described the
IER two of them as "the
CES pragmatic caucus of
the progressive wing."
The question they al-
ways asked was: "How are we
going to get it done?"
That sense of pragmatism, of
finding a workable solution to a
practical problem, is exactly
what's missing in a capital
slashed and burned by ideologi-
cal warfare. And while it's true
that Barney was facing a tough
re-election fight, he's also leaving
Congress because the old-time
virtues he's always lived by are
no longer valued here.
"To my disappointment, the
leverage you have within the gov-
ernment has substantially dimin-
ished," he told Politico. "The
anger in the country, the currents
of opinion are such that the kind
of inside work I have felt best at is
not going to be as productive in
the foreseeable future."
We admit our prejudice. Barney
is one of our oldest friends. He and
Steve were born three years and a
dozen blocks apart in Bayonne,
N.J. Their families knew each
other and attended the same syna-
gogue. And in the fall of 1959, when
Steve was 16, he had a five-minute


conversation with Barney that
changed his entire life.
Barney was home from college,
and they ran into each other at
the Jewish Community Center
You and your twin brother, Marc,
should apply to Harvard, Barney
told Steve. And while Steve was
not quite sure where Harvard
was, the twins took his advice and
stayed in Barney's dorm room
when they went to Cambridge for
their interviews. Both got in, both
went (Marc is still there, teaching
economics), and when we got
married in 1966, Barney was an
usher in our wedding.
By 1971, Barney was working in
Washington as a congressional
aide, but he soon quit, saying,
"The only good job in the office of
a young congressman is being the
young congressman." The next
year he was elected to the Massa-
chusetts Legislature. In 1980, he
won his own seat in Congress. De-
spite his rising eminence, he usu-
ally looked like he had slept in
his office in the same di-
sheveled suit he'd worn all week.
In one early campaign he turned
this trait to his advantage, run-
ning on the slogan, "Neatness
isn't everything."
Barney has his flaws, of course.
He can be rude, impatient, sar-
castic and that's on a good day
One advantage of leaving Con-
gress, he admits, "is that I don't
have to pretend to be nice to peo-
ple I don't like." But if any of us
limited our friendships to perfect
people, we'd all be pretty lonely
We would admire Barney
Frank even if he were not our
friend. But we're very glad he is.
--In--
Steve and Cokie's new book,
"Our Haggadah," was published
last spring by HarperCollins.
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at steve
cokie@gmail.com.


MAT S ks
6w\\ m JIMex@anolwtm


SLETTERS to the Editor


Best interests
For the past two years, I've been
following the Citrus Memorial
mess, and for the past two years
I've read most of the minutes from
the Citrus County Hospital Board
meetings. For the past three
months, I have been attending
the meetings of both boards.
From my observations by being
a patient at Citrus Memorial,
having a tour of the hospital and
attending the Hospital Founda-
tion meetings, the Foundation is
trying to and is succeeding to op-
erate the hospital so it can pro-
vide the best possible care for all
the people of Citrus County.
The Citrus County Hospital
Board is made up of wonderful,
caring people whose intention is
to look out for the best interests
of Citrus County. They really
want to provide the best medical
services for all. These
wonderful people I feel are being
ill advised by their legal counsel.
These two groups of wonder-
ful, caring and hardworking
people who volunteer their time
without any compensation need
to get together, without legal
counsel present, to fix the prob-
lems. Right now you are not
doing what is best for me and
the rest of the persons in this
county.
Every time I go to a county
hospital board meeting, I hear
about another lawsuit. This
needs to stop now.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters sent
via email. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone
numbers will not be published or
given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


As implied by a very wise
woman, "legal counsel works for
boards, not the other way
around." It is my experience that
the only winners in these situa-
tions are the attorneys.
Justin Krumholtz
Inverness


No representation
Well, they're at it again. And as
always, the beat goes on.
Ever notice that whenever cuts
are proposed, the only things on
the table are defense, Medicare,
and Social Security? Never a
word about the thousands
upon thousands of financial
giveaways to all the big-money
interests that donate millions of
dollars to senators and congress-
men. Don't forget to mention
the guy in charge of this mess.
Here's a thought: How much
would a re-election campaign
cost one of these flimflam artists
if they represented the American
people, rather than the corporate
and special interests they
really do represent? The only
reason they need millions of dol-
lars is to fool the very easily
fooled American voters into be-
lieving they're doing a great
job. And you know, they really
are. It's too bad they're not doing
it for us, the forgotten people who
gave them their winning tickets
to instant millionaire status.
The only times things don't get
worse is when elected represen-
tatives are in gridlock or on va-
cation. Come to think of it,
maybe they should be made to
leave their cellphones on their
desks when they leave the office,
and pledge not to talk to one an-
other while not a work.
David A. Robinson
Weeki Wachee


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Sound OFF


IH
(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PHONES
Continued from Page Al

types. These cellphones
cost between $2 and $3 a



COPIES
Continued from Page Al

Florida Auditor General.
"This request amounts
to nothing more than ha-
rassment and takes away
valuable man hours from
my staff that is already
stretched to the limit,"
Williams wrote.
CCHB trustees hired
McGladrey in late January
to conduct a forensic audit
of the hospital's finances,
trustees' attorney Bill
Grant said.
He said Friday that
trustees wanted a com-
plete audit of the hospital
following a Florida Audi-



REHAB
Continued from Page Al

property when CMHS al-
ready owns the business.
"We're just wasting money
leasing," Langer said. 'After
five years all we'll have is a
bunch of papers saying we
paid our rent"
Private caregivers said
the hospital's purchase
creates an unfair competi-
tion because CMHS is
funded in part by tax
dollars.
"We are just tired of the


month each, Ubinas said.
Not every cellphone is
matched to a specific
county employee. Some
cellphones are designated
to county vehicles or to a
county park.


tor General's report that
questioned some of the ac-
counting practices at the
hospital.
Grant said McGladrey's
fee amounts to approxi-
mately $20,000.
He said Friday he hadn't
heard of the hospital's es-
timate for providing the
documents. Grant said the
hospital was inviting a law-
suit with an estimate that
high.
"They want to go there,
that's their business," he
said. "If I was them, I'd be
real careful about that."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or
mwright@chronicle
online.com.


hospital's focus of using
taxpayer dollars to com-
pete against the public,"
Lee Jacobson, a physical
therapist at TLC Rehab,
said. "We would like a
more level playing field."
Dr. Paresh Desai said he
opposed taking property
off the tax roll.
"This building is paying
taxes right now," he said.
"Citrus Memorial does not
pay taxes."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or
mwright@chronicle
online. com.


GOLD
Continued from Page Al

scale from one to six, it was
a four," Cal said.
The veterinarian re-
ferred them to the Univer-
sity of Florida's Veterinary
Teaching Hospital in
Gainesville where doctors
diagnosed Buddy with hav-
ing severe subvalvular aor-
tic stenosis (SAS), a
common congenital heart
disease found in golden re-
trievers, Rottweilers and
Newfoundlands. It causes
the walls of the main artery
to the heart to thicken,
making it hard for blood to
flow to and from the heart.
"His heart was beating
twice as fast as a regular
dog's," Cal said.
Using only traditional
methods of therapy for
such a disease, health ex-
perts estimated Buddy


would only live an addi-
tional 18 to 25 months. And
if the couple chose to pay
for surgery to help correct
the condition, it would cost
them thousands of dollars.
Luckily, Buddy's primary
veterinarian on UF's cardi-
ology team, Mandi Kleman,
had just secured funding to
perform a study on the ef-
fectiveness of a new surgi-
cal procedure that could
help Buddy's condition.
Buddy was one of 14 dogs
chosen to participate in the
study, which allowed Buddy
to become one of the first
dogs to receive a cutting
balloon valvuloplasty at no
charge to the Ringquists.
Cal explained the proce-
dure is essentially a double
angioplasty where the hard-
ened artery walls were cut
and then expanded by a
high-pressure balloon to in-
crease blood flow to
Buddy's heart.
Two days after the proce-


THURS., DEC. 8, 2011 9:00AM 12 NOON
Plantation Inn in Crystal River in the Magnolia Ballroom
REFRESHMENTS and DOOR PRIZES
Many Travel Representatives including:
Holland America,AMA Waterways, Royal Caribbean, Carnival Cruises,Pacific Delight,
Scenic River Cruises, MSC Cruises, Trafalgar Tours, Globus Tours,Viking River Cruises,
Isram World Tours and Collette Vacations
Please R.S.V.P. Tally Ho 352-860-2805 or dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
TALLY-HO a tallyhovacations.com
t/ r FL Seller of Travel 10131
___ __ __' .___ 352-860-2805


dure, Buddy went home
with his battle wound a
tiny incision on his neck.
He also had to wear a mon-
itor for a while, which
would watch for any irreg-
ular heartbeats or
arrhythmias.
However, over the past
two years, Cal said Buddy's
health has really improved.
"He's been doing good,"
Marilyn added.
Buddy still has to take
beta blocker medication
and an omega-3 fatty acid
supplement, but overall, he
runs, jumps and plays like
any other dog.
"He's a 4-year-old puppy,"
Cal said with a laugh.
Due to his incredible
journey, Buddy has re-
cently fallen into new-
found fame. He was
recently featured in Pu-
rina Today's Breeder mag-
azine, and he has garnered
tons of attention at Citrus
Memorial Health System,


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 A9

where Marilyn is the exec-
utive secretary of the heart
center where similar pro-
cedures to Buddy's are
performed on humans.
If you ask Buddy about
becoming a star, he just ma-
jestically looks off into the
distance before rolling
around on his back with de-
light.
"He's very modest," Cal
said. "No ego at all."
Being devout Christians,
Cal and Marilyn said they
believe it was meant for
Buddy to be their dog. After
they adopted him, Marilyn
said the doors just opened
to help Buddy get better,
and they couldn't be
happier.
"We felt God set this up,"
Cal said. "He's our miracle
dog."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles @chronicle
online.com.


INSIDE Hearing Aid Repairs
S SEA 69NEWEEKNLS
|A Crystal River Mall MUST PRESENTCOUPON I
L ANY MAKE ORMODELJ
795-1484 -------
Inside WAL*MART ery Sale
SHWy 200, Ocala (Lm 2 per visit)
r 291-1467 L_ o~po J


72 UA WE'LL MEET OR BEAT ANY
|72 HOUR G R) COMPETITORS PRICE*

BLIND FACrRYFREE
LECANTO~ -TREETOPS PLAZA : slaaon
1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY 1 BBB In Home Consulting
0527-001 2 www.72-hourblinds.com
10 ^ I W 1-877-746-0017 *MustpesentwrittenestimatefromcompetitorforthispnceT




CAN YOUR

BANK DO THIS?


100% Liquid Account...1.5%*

One Year...................2.25%*

Three Year....................3.0%

Longer terms and higher interest rates
are available. Many of these can also
be used for IRA accounts.


American Insurance Advisors
Faithfully Serving Citrus County
for 20 Years!
3 S. Melbourne Street
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
352-746-3332
*$50,000 max. Rates effective 1/10/11. Subject to change. Rate
guarantees & conditions vary by contract. All products
underwritten by the GCU. Not FDIC insured. 0008X37


: .COM


Deal Ends Midnight Sunday Dec. 4
aM srF. .-sf.i -.tA .

HD&SoUnM^&


Get the Facts: Florida Newspapers

Your local newspaper is a vital community asset. It provides local news
and advertising not available anywhere else. It is a community partner that
assists business' to communicate with customers and keeps residents well
informed. Florida newspapers, serving the communities of Florida yesterday,
today and tomorrow.

FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... VIBRANT AND VITAL...
GET THE FACTS.


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


0008XHJ


CITRUS COUNTY ^-

C IIR ON ICL E
www.chronicleonline.com
Scarborough 2010


,:. ,-


I












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


onBRIEFS Unemployment rate lowest since 2009

Toppled


November drop driven partly

by optimistic small businesses


Associated Press
A van parked in the High-
land Park section of Los
Angeles and another car
are shown damaged by
trees early Thursday, Dec.
1, as high Santa Ana winds
up to 50 and 60 mph tore
through the Southland. The
high winds flipped over
trees and trucks and
knocked out power. About
200,000 people in South-
ern California and thou-
sands more in Utah
remained without electric-
ity Friday. Authorities said
some areas might not have
power restored until
Sunday.


Republicans pass
anti-regulation bill
WASHINGTON In an
ambitious gesture to their
business allies, House Re-
publicans passed legislation
Friday to reduce what the
GOP calls "an avalanche" of
unneeded, costly regulations.
Opponents call the bill an
attempt to prevent the gov-
ernment from protecting
Americans at their work-
places, in their homes and
when they want a breath of
fresh air.
The 253-167 vote sent the
bill to the Democratic-run
Senate, where it's likely to
die. Just in case, the White
House has issued a veto
threat. Republicans insist the
mostly technical legislation
would simply force federal
agencies to follow presiden-
tial directives that have often
been ignored. The objective,
the GOP says, is to allow
companies to use their
money to hire workers. But
Democrats, the White House,
and government watchdog
groups insist the aim is to get
rid of aggressive rules ap-
proved by the Obama admin-
istration regulations that
businesses complain about
constantly.
Ky. church revisits
interracial ban
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -When
Stella Harville brought her
black boyfriend to her family's
all-white church in rural Ken-
tucky, she thought nothing of
it. Then in August, a member
of Gulnare Free Will Baptist
Church told Harville's father
that Chikuni couldn't sing
there anymore. And last Sun-
day, in a moment that seems
from another time, church
members voted 9-6 to bar
mixed-race couples from join-
ing the congregation.
The policy has drawn a
firestorm of criticism in just a
few days and sent church
leaders scrambling to over-
turn it, perhaps as early as
Sunday.
The National Association of
Free Will Baptists distanced
itself from the resolution in a
statement Thursday, saying it
"neither condemns nor disal-
lows" interracial marriage.


World BRIEF

Cool ride


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
unemployment rate, which
has refused to budge from
the 9 percent neighborhood
for two and a half frustrat-
ing years, suddenly dropped
in November, driven in part
by small businesses that fi-
nally see reason to hope and
hire.
Economists said there
was a long way to go, but
they liked what they saw.
The rate fell to 8.6 per-
cent, the lowest since March
2009, two months after Pres-
ident Barack Obama took
office. Unemployment
passed 9 percent that spring
and had stayed there or
higher for all but two
months since then.
The country added
120,000 jobs in November,
the Labor Department said
Friday The economy has
generated 100,000 or more


jobs five months in a row -
the first time that has hap-
pened since April 2006, well
before the Great Recession.
"Something good is stir-
ring in the U.S. economy,"
Ian Shepherdson, an econo-
mist at High Frequency Eco-
nomics, said in a note to
clients.
The stock market finished
flat for the day but up 787
points for the week. The
only bigger point gain in a
week was in October 2008,
when stocks lurched higher
and lower during the finan-
cial crisis.
The report showed that
September and October
were stronger months for
the job market than first es-
timated. For four months in
a row, the government has
revised job growth figures
higher for previous months.
September was revised
up by 52,000 jobs, for a gain
of 210,000. October was re-


vised up by 20,000, for a gain
of 100,000.
Unemployment peaked at
10.1 percent in October
2009, four months after the
Great Recession ended. It
dipped to 8.9 percent last
February and 8.8 percent
last March but otherwise
was at or above 9 percent.
Obama, who faces a re-
election vote in less than a
year and a presidential
campaign that will turn on
the economy, seized on the
decline to argue for expand-
ing a cut in the tax that
workers pay toward Social
Security.
The tax cut affects 160
million Americans. It lowers
the Social Security tax by up
to $2,136 a year A worker
earning $50,000 a year saves
$1,000 with the tax cut. It
will expire Dec. 31 unless
Congress acts.
Republicans and Democ-
rats have supported an ex-
tension, but differ on how to
pay for it. The Senate on
Thursday defeated plans
from both parties. Republi-
cans had proposed paying
for the cut by freezing the


pay of federal workers
through 2015. Democrats
wanted to raise taxes on
people making $1 million or
more a year
"Now is not the time to
slam the brakes on the re-
covery Right now it's time
to step on the gas," Obama
said Friday
Inside the unemployment
report, one of the most
closely watched indicators
of the economy's health,
were signs of improvement
for small businesses, which
employ 500 or fewer people
and account for half the jobs
in the private sector
The government uses a
survey of mostly large com-
panies and government
agencies to determine how
many jobs were added or
lost each month. It uses a
separate survey of house-
holds to determine the un-
employment rate.
The household survey
picks up hiring by compa-
nies of all sizes, including
small businesses and com-
panies just getting off the
ground. It also includes
farm workers and the self-


Dying for rain


Associated Press
A cow tries to eat from a dried-out cactus Thursday on a field near the city of Torreon, Mexico. Mexico is see-
ing the worst drought since 1941, when the country began recording rainfall. Drought will continue to plague
northern Mexico during the winter months, and the situation will likely worsen, authorities said.

Northern Mexico wilting under worst drought on record


Associated Press

DURANGO, Mexico -
The sun-baked northern
states of Mexico are suf-
fering under the worst
drought since the govern-
ment began recording
rainfall 70 years ago.
Crops of corn, beans and
oats are withering in the
fields. About 1.7 million
cattle have died of starva-
tion and thirst.
Hardest hit are five
states in Mexico's north, a
region that is being
parched by the same
drought that has dried
out the southwest United


States. The government is
trucking water to 1,500
villages scattered across
the nation's northern ex-
panse, and sending food
to poor farmers who have
lost all their crops.
Life isn't likely to get
better soon. The next
rainy season isn't due
until June, and there's no
guarantee normal rains
will come then.
Most years, Guillermo
Marin harvests 10 tons of
corn and beans from his
fields in this harsh corner
of Mexico. This year, he
got just a single ton of
beans. And most of the 82-


year-old farmer's fellow
growers in this part of
Durango state weren't
able to harvest anything
at all.
The family has five
plots of 20 acres each in
the town of San Juan del
Rio, an area at the foot of
the Sierra Madre Occi-
dental mountains dotted
with farming and ranch-
ing villages whose only
water comes from sea-
sonal rains.
Those have been lack-
ing for more than a year
in much of Mexico. It's
been the country's worst
dry spell since 1941,


when the government
began recording
rainfall.
"This is the most severe
drought the country has
registered," President
Felipe Calderon said
Thursday at a meeting
with governors from the
hardest hit states of Du-
rango, Zacatecas, Chi-
huahua, Coahuila and
San Luis Potosi.
Those states average
about 21 inches of rain
annually
This year they got 12
inches, according to Mex-
ico's National Weather
Service.


Camp Victory passes to Iraqi control


Associated Press


-uf s -,-. rCAMP VICTORY, Iraq Inside
^'*-b palace walls built by Saddam Hus-
sein, U.S. generals plotted the war's
course, tracked the mounting death
S toll and swore in new American citi-
zens under gaudy glass chandeliers.
Just outside the palace, American
troops whacked golf balls into man-
made lakes or fished for carp, while
Associated Press others sat down with a cigar and a can
A tame elephant sprays of nonalcoholic beer hoping for a
water at foreign tourists respite from incoming rockets or mor-
during a safari ride Friday in tar shells. Ever since the soldiers of
Sigiriya, about 62 miles the 3rd Infantry Division fought their
northeast of Colombo, Sri way into the Baghdad airport grounds
Lanka. nearly nine years ago, the sprawling
-From wire reports area they renamed Camp Victory has


held a special place in the American
military experience in Iraq.
On Friday, the base that at its height
was home to 46,000 people, was
handed over to the Iraqi government
as part of American efforts to move all
U.S. troops out of the country by the
end of the year
"The base is no longer under U.S.
control and is under the full author-
ity of the government of Iraq," said
U.S. military spokesman Col. Barry
Johnson. He said that by 2 p.m. on Fri-
day, there was no longer any U.S.
troop presence at the base.
The transfer of the country's largest
American military base to Iraqi cus-
tody happened with little fanfare, and
no ceremony was held.


Associated Press
U.S. Army soldiers return June 29,
2004, to Camp Victory, near Baghdad,
Iraq, following a mission. On Friday, the
base was handed over to the Iraqi gov-
ernment as part of American efforts to
move all U.S. troops out of the country
by the end of the year. The base is no
longer under U.S. control.


employed, who aren't in-
cluded in the survey of
companies.
The household survey has
shown an average of 321,000
jobs created per month
since July, compared with
an average of 13,000 the first
seven months of the year
When the economy is ei-
ther improving or slipping
into recession, many econo-
mists say, the household
survey does the better job of
picking up the shift because
it detects small business
hiring.
"We might finally be see-
ing new business creation
expand again, which is crit-
ical to the sustainability of
the recovery," said Diane
Swonk, chief economist at
Mesirow Financial, a finan-
cial services company
The National Federation
of Independent Business, a
small business group, said
Friday that its own survey of
small companies in Novem-
ber found that more of them
are planning to add workers
than at any time since Sep-
tember 2008, when the fi-
nancial crisis struck.



Europe

embraces

German

might

Associated Press
BERLIN For more
than half a century, the
legacy of World War II has
meant that the mere men-
tion of a new rise of German
power sent shudders
through European nations.
Now, Germany is increas-
ingly calling the shots for
the entire continent and
few seem to mind.
Polish Foreign Minister
Radek Sikorski whose
nation lost millions of peo-
ple in the Nazi invasion and
occupation shocked
many this week when he
made a dramatic appeal for
greater German influence.
"You know full well that
nobody else can do it," he
told a largely German audi-
ence in Berlin. "I will prob-
ably be the first Polish
foreign minister in history
to say so, but here it is: I fear
German power less than I
am beginning to fear Ger-
man inactivity"
European leaders are
panicked over unsustain-
able debt that could take
down the entire global econ-
omy From the streets to the
halls of power, all eyes are
trained on Germany by
far Europe's biggest econ-
omy -to lead the continent
out of crisis.
On Friday, German Chan-
cellor Angela Merkel
pushed forward with a
Berlin-engineered action
plan for containing Europe's
crisis, calling for tougher
rules to keep national budg-
ets under control. She set
the agenda for next week's
critical European Union
summit, saying it would
grapple with a strategy to
make sure countries follow
the rules and write those
changes into EU treaties.
At the same time, she
talked down any fears of
German preeminence in
Europe.
"Our guidelines for next
week are clear, but it is im-
portant for me to say that
they have nothing to do with
fears or concerns that we
are reading about or hear
that Germany wants to dom-
inate Europe or some such,"
she said. "That is absurd."
Increasingly, however,
such fears appear to be get-
ting more subdued.
Austrian Chancellor
Werner Faymann, whose
nation often lives in the
shadow of its giant northern
neighbor, dismissed out of
hand any worries about re-
newed German dominance.
"I'm really happy," he said


of Merkel's initiatives for
saving Europe.












SPORTS


McNabb unclaimed,
becomes free agent
MINNEAPOLIS Donovan
McNabb is a free agent after the
13-year veteran was unclaimed
by the waiver deadline Friday af-
ternoon.
The Minnesota Vikings granted
McNabb's request to be cut on
Thursday, ending a disappointing
11-week run in purple. McNabb
was 1-5 as a starter in Minnesota
before the Vikings benched him
for rookie Christian Ponder.
McNabb asked for his release
in hopes he could catch on with a
team that would give him a chance
to play in the final five weeks.
His hometown Chicago Bears
were one possibility. The Bears
lost starter Jay Cutler to a broken
thumb two weeks ago, but have
decided to stick with Caleb Hanie
as the starter in hopes that he
can keep the team in playoff con-
tention while Cutler recovers.
Eagles' Reid not
worried about job
PHILADELPHIA- Eagles
coach Andy Reid said he is fo-
cused on getting better and isn't
concerned about his job security.
Philadelphia lost 31-14 at
Seattle on Thursday night to fall
to 4-8 on the season. It was the
Eagles' second loss by at least
17 points in five days.
Reid is in his 13th season and
has two years remaining on his
contract. The dean of NFL coaches
was once called "Coach for Life"
by Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie.
Reid said he is putting all of his
energy into getting better because
that's something he can control.
Philadelphia, which has reached
the playoffs nine of the last 11
years, needs to win its remaining
four games to avoid only its sec-
ond losing record since 2000.
Reid made his remarks on Fri-
day. For stats from Thursday's
game, see Page B4.
Source: Bell, Marlins
agree to $27M deal
MIAMI -A person familiar
with the negotiations told The As-
sociated Press All-Star closer
Heath Bell has agreed to a $27
million, three-year contract with
the Miami Marlins-their first
free-agent deal since beginning
courtships last month with sev-
eral top players.
The person spoke Friday on
condition of anonymity because
the agreement had not yet been
announced. It is subject to Bell
passing a physical.
Bell had more than 40 saves
each of the past three seasons
for the San Diego Padres. This
year he had 43 in 48 chances
with a 2.44 ERA.
The deal was first reported by
ESPN.com. The Marlins are un-
certain of the availability of their
closer this year, Leo Nunez. He's
on the restricted list after he ad-
mitted to playing under an as-
sumed name.
Packers LBs out
against Giants
GREEN BAY, Wis. When
the Green Bay Packers lost both
starting inside linebackers by
halftime of their Thanksgiving
game at Detroit, the defense was
forced to improvise with its ver-
sion of the silent count.
The Packers didn't have the
benefit of relaying calls from the
sideline to the defense on the
field using a radio device be-
cause A.J. Hawk and Desmond
Bishop were out of the game with
calf injuries. They were the two
players the team designated to
wear helmets with speakers to
carry alignment calls from coach
Winston Moss before each play.
Since the Packers by league
rule couldn't have another player
wear the special helmet, the
coaches resorted to using hand
signals with the defense in the
second half of their win over the
Lions. Hawk and Bishop won't
play Sunday when the unbeaten
Packers meet the New York Gi-
ants on the road, but the line of
communication will be open
again for the Green Bay defense.
Rookie D.J. Smith and second-
year player Robert Francois are


preparing to start for the first time
this season. They replaced Bishop
and Hawk in the last game and
made significant contributions as
the Packers improved to 11-0.
-From wire reports


Woods
returns to
form, builds
big lead in
Sherman
Oaks./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Adult sports/B2
0 College football/B3
0 Basketball/B3
0 Hockey/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Golf/B5
0 Tennis/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Magic-Thunder, Clippers-Warriors set for Dec. 25

Two games added to opening-day schedule, setting up Christmas Day marathon


Associated Press

NEW YORK Okla-
homa City will host Or-
lando before Blake Griffin
and the Los Angeles Clip-
pers visit Golden State on
Christmas night, running
the NBAs planned open-
ing-day schedule to five
games.
Those games were
added Friday to the three
that were already set when
the 2011-12 schedule was
originally unveiled:
Boston at New York, Miami
at Dallas, and Chicago at
the Los Angeles Lakers.


Commissioner David
Stern said the league
hoped to open the season
with that triple-header
after announcing a tenta-
tive agreement on a new
labor deal with the play-
ers last Saturday But the
league decided to add two
later games, with the
nightcap featuring Mark
Jackson's debut as War-
riors coach.
The revised 66-game
schedule will be released
Tuesday night during an
NBA TV special.
TNT will televise the
opener, while ABC gets


the NBA finals rematch
and the matchup between
MVP Derrick Rose and
Kobe Bryant, whose Lak-
ers will be playing their
first game under former
Cleveland coach Mike
Brown. The final two con-
tests will air on ESPN.
The Thunder reached
the Western Conference
finals last season behind
league scoring champion
Kevin Durant, while the
Magic face the uncer-
tainty of Dwight Howard's
future with the team.
"It's a different opening
day than has ever hap-


opened in the past and
Christmas Day games
have always been a big
day for the NBA," ESPN
analyst Jeff Van Gundy
said in a statement. "This
unique situation com-
bined with the unveiling
of a championship banner
for the Mavericks in a fi-
nals rematch, and then to
see the Lakers and the
debut of Mike Brown as
head coach, those things
are all going to be very
compelling."
The Dec. 25 opening date
is contingent on the CBA
being ratified next week.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Crystal River High School's D.J. Layton and Andrew Dyakon go up for a header to win the ball away from
Taylor High School's Ricardo Vargas in district soccer action Friday at Panther Stadium. The Pirates and
the Wildcats were scoreless in the first half, with both teams taking a number of good shots on goal that
missed the net by inches.


Tied and





trounced

Crauford shines as boys tie 0-0


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
Crystal River High
boys head soccer
coach Bobby Ver-
lato was about as happy
as any coach could be
under the circum-
stances.
His Pirates (4-3-1 over-
all, 1-2-1 district) just fin-
ished a 0-0 tie against
Taylor High (5-1-1, 2-0-1)
Friday night at Earl
Bramlett Stadium.
Taylor fired 25 shots
on goal. Pirate goal-
keeper Jerry Crawford
managed 13 saves and he
and his defense kept
Taylor out of the net.
Many of Crawford's
saves were the diving
and smothering kind.


Eighty minutes of
scoreless soccer would
frustrate and disappoint
most coaches.
Pro football coaching
great Vince Lombardi
once said that a tie is like
kissing one's sister Ver-
lato was smiling and said
he felt like his team won
the game.
"That was a victory,"
Verlato said. "It was a
quality opponent. Right
now, we are trying to find
ourselves. Jerry Craw-
ford, our senior keeper,
this was his first start He
played great tonight and
kept us in the game. I
think he had 10 legiti-
mate saves.
"It was a total team


See Page B4


The Crystal River High School girls took on Tay-
lor High School in district play Friday at Pirates
Stadium. Crystal River's Delaney Owens got
sandwiched between Taylor's Daisy Meza, left,
and Mireya Galatza, right, but the tight defense
didn't stop the Crystal River girls from handing
the Wildcats an 8-0 defeat.

Girls go on scoring spreeas

Pirates mercy-rule Taylor

LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
he girls soccer match played Friday night
was more like a Crystal River High scor-
ing party than an actual game.
Aubrie Menster was the rock star She
scored four as the Pirates mercy-ruled Taylor
High 8-0 at Earl Bramlett Stadium. The Pi-
rates are now 6-2-1 overall and 3-1 in district
See Page B4


Lawyers for the league
and players' association
resumed negotiations Fri-
day on the remaining is-
sues, the so-called B-list
items such as drug testing,
the draft eligibility age
and the commissioner's
power to discipline. The
goal is to complete the
agreement Tuesday so it
could be presented at a
meeting of player repre-
sentatives Wednesday,
then both sides would
vote to ratify it Thursday
If that happens, training
camps and free agency
would open next Friday




Orange


edge


Gators

Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y -No. 4
Syracuse remained un-
beaten with a 72-68 win over
No. 10 Florida on Friday, as
coach Jim Boeheim main-
tained a stoic facade amid
an intense federal investi-
gation into his program.
It's the second game since
the firing of longtime asso-
ciate head coach Bernie
Fine, who has been accused
by three men including
two former Syracuse ball-
boys of molesting them as
minors.
Fine, who was fired
Sunday, has denied the
allegations.
Just as he was in Tues-
day's home win over East-
ern Michigan, Boeheim was
greeted by a nice ovation
when he was introduced to
a crowd of 24,459. It was the
largest on-campus atten-
dance in the nation so far
this season, and it included
former Syracuse star
Carmelo Anthony and for-
mer Orange assistant Rob
Murphy, in his first year at
EMU, in front-row seats.
Syracuse (8-0) breezed to
its first seven wins with an
average margin of victory of
26 points, but the Gators (5-
2), whose only previous loss
was by seven at No. 2 Ohio
State, figured to provide a
stiff challenge and they did
in a game that seemed like a
midseason encounter in the
Big East.
But, once again, the game
was secondary on the first
Friday of December
Some sex abuse victims'
advocates have said Boe-
heim should resign or be
fired after the accusations,
as well as Boeheim's dis-
paraging comments regard-
ing the accusers in defense
of his longtime friend.
After initially saying
Fine's first two accusers
were lying to make money
in the wake of the Penn
State sex abuse scandal,
Boeheim backed off those
comments in a statement
after Fine's firing was an-
nounced Sunday
Two days later, Syracuse
University Chancellor
Nancy Cantor supported
Boeheim's new stance.
Boeheim, in his 36th sea-
son as head coach, said
See Page B3


Associated Press
Florida's Scottie Rosario,
right, drives to the basket
Friday against Syracuse's
Scoop Jardine during the first
half in Syracuse, N.Y.






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS




H T .
0 z
0 z
o 0
Hn'rlNG THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE SPORTS


IN


THE


jAME


Diabetes not an end to sports


What do these great athletes have
in common: multi-gold medal
Olympic swimmer Gary Hall Jr;
baseball players Jackie Robinson, Ty
Cobb and "Catfish" Hunter; tennis star
Arthur Ashe; and boxers Sugar Ray
Robinson and "Smokin"' Joe Fraizer?
It's the same thing these non-athletes
have in common: American Idol star
judge Randy Jackson; drummer Tommy
Lee; singer Meat Loaf, Fox commentator
and ex-governor ofArkansas Mike Huck-
abee; and Soviet
premier Nikita
Khrushchev
The answer is
diabetes mellitus.
There are basi-
cally two types of
diabetes, type 1
and type 2. Dia-
betes is a disease
affecting the abil-
Dr. Ron Joseph ity of the body,
DOCTOR'S specifically the
ORDERS pancreas, to pro-
duce the vital hor-
mone insulin. The function of insulin is
to help the energy units in the body's
cells use blood sugar, known as glucose,
to produce energy Specifically, the mus-
cle cells of athletes must have insulin
and thus energy for workouts and
competition.
When Hall was first diagnosed, he
noted how difficult it was. "It was a
shock. It was a disappointing, terrible
experience, frightening. It took time to
accept and come to terms with being di-
abetic. I thought diabetes was a disease
that happened to older people who had
neglected their health," he told C.EK.
magazine in 2000.
Hall further noted that there was a
learning curve and that he had had
"spent my whole life exercising and eat-
ing right I didn't abuse myself... I was
told it was the end of my swimming
career."
Hall had type 1 diabetes, mainly af-
fecting teens and children, and it was in
fact no fault of his own. It did not end his
career in fact he began to swim and
compete better, winning his Olympic
medals.
In type 1 diabetes, insulin-producing
cells in the pancreas are gradually de-
stroyed by one's own body, and insulin
production stops. This accounts for 5 to
10 percent of cases in the U.S., diag-
nosed mainly in children and teens.
On the other hand, type 2 diabetes ac-


~j-v -


.-l~lli'


DAVID SANDERS/Anzona Daily Star
Team Type 1 cycling members Mark Suprenant, left, of New Hampshire, and Andy Mead, of Philadelphia, speak with Nevaeh Lara,
7, on Nov. 17 about the importance of exercise in managing Type 1 diabetes at the Diamond Children's Medical Center in Tuc-
son, Ariz. The elite group, comprised of all riders with Type I diabetes, aims to bring awareness to the disease and to meet and
support others such as Lara, a second-grader at Borton Primary Magnet School who was diagnosed with the disease this past


counts for over 90 percent of adult dia-
betes. People with type 2 are able to pro-
duce insulin; however, the insulin
produced is not able to help the body's
cells use blood sugar or glucose for en-
ergy. The number of children diagnosed
with type 2 is increasing as a result of in-
active lifestyles and obesity.
The exact causes of type 2 diabetes
are not completely understood. The dis-
ease has a strong hereditary component
Major contributing causes are obesity,
race, age, high blood pressure and
inactivity
We can't do much about race and age,
but being significantly overweight and
inactive can be changed in a beneficial
manner. Changing diet both calories
and fat content and walking for as lit-
tle as 2 1/2 hours per week or about 12 to
15 minutes per day reduced the devel-


opment of diabetes 58 percent over a
three-year period.
Diabetes should not be a hindrance to
competing or working out in any sport.
Studies over the years have shown that
training even in endurance sports posi-
tively affects the body's ability to in-
crease insulin's action and more
efficiently utilize glucose, i.e. blood
sugar, to make energy for our body
David Weingard did not stop running,
swimming or biking when diagnosed
with late onset typel diabetes. He was
one of only a few with this disease to
complete an Ironman, a grueling race
made up of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile
bike ride and a 26.2-mile run.
Brittany Vogt, as a high school senior,
had a 3.8 grade average, marched in the
school band, ran her own volunteer pro-
gram for juvenile diabetes and was cap-


tain of the track team. Having type 1 did
not slow her down after being diagnosed
at age 11; she became even more active
with the proper medical treatment.
"It was very, very hard the first couple
of years ... I was scared ... I didn't know
that I was going to be OK", she said in an
interview with JDRF, the Juvenile Dia-
betes Research Foundation.
Brittany is also a track athlete. She
broke her school record in the pole vault
and went on to participate in state.
Attitude is everything, and with the
correct attitude, diabetes can be man-
aged through the proper medical treat-
ment, weight loss, diet and exercise.
Sport participation and workouts can be
a great, fun part of the treatment.
Ron Joseph, M.D., orthopedic special-
ist, can be reached at (352) 212-5359 or
rbjhand@cox.net.


Carney rolls 813 series; Glowacki has second 299 game


CONGRATULA-
TIONS: Brian Car-
ney had game scores
of 267, 267 and 279 '^.
for an 813 series in
the Nov 23 Wednes-
day Night Men's
league. Also, Eric
Glowacki had a 299 Br
Br
game for the second Ca,
time this season in had 81
the Men's league.
Bob Mannella shot a 290
game during the SunCoast
Seniors league Nov. 22 by


r
3


rolling 11 strikes in
a row.
THURSDAY
S NIGHT 12-WEEK
LEAGUE: The
) league meeting of
/ the Holder Hotshots
-4 will be Dec. 15 at 7
ian p.m., and bowling
ney will begin Dec. 22.
series. The teams are four-
persons, all men, all
women or mixed. Call Peggy
Nevels, secretary, at (352)
465-0757 to pre-register, ei-


their as a team or
individually
League and tournament
scores for the week ending
Nov 27:
MONDAY NIGHT SPE-
CIAL: Handicap: Bryan
Craig 286; Matt O'Brien 279;
Raul Rosales 771; Mark
Smith 762; Anna Dooley
264,726; Debbie Smith 258;
Bridget Foley 731. Scratch:
Eric Glowacki 277; Matt
O'Brien 268,691; Mark
Smith 747; Dorine Fugere


236,649; K C Cridland
235,638.
PRESERVE PIN-
BUSTERS: Handicap: Lou
Metcalfe 271; Bob Swarm
255; Jim Isnor 705; Peck
Noland 685; Patricia Met-
calfe 245; Jan Miller
240,654; Lorraine Guay 658.
Scratch: Lou Metcalfe
243,572; Bob Swarm
233,568; Jan Miller 184,486;
Betty Noland 182; Wanda
Schroeder 502.
SUNCOAST SENIORS:


Handicap: Bob Mannella
330,752; Jack Connell
273,717; Helen Simonson
245,646; Wanda Klik 240;
Lynda Morgan 651. Scratch:
Bob Mannella 290,632;
Frank Reesby 247,643;
Wanda Klik 180,457; Barb
Steffen 168,487; Pat Combs
168.
LADIES' CLASSIC: Hand-
icap: Melissa Simmons
270,716; Carol McHale
257,703. Scratch: Melissa
Simmons 212,542; Myla


Wexler 192; Lisa Morgan 500.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
MEN: Handicap: Eric
Glowacki 317; Larry Nevels
312; Brian Carney 852; Jay
Rizzo 806. Scratch: Eric
Glowacki 299; Brian Carney
279,813; Joe Brooks 279;
Sean Fugere 737.
BOWLERS OF THE
WEEK: Bridget Foley, 104
pins over her average, and
Bryan Craig and Brian Car-
ney, 168 pins over their
averages.


Recreation EVENTS


Tai chi classes at
Whispering Pines
Tai chi class begins Dec. 6 at
Whispering Pines Park Recre-
ation Building. The class is 10
to 11 a.m. Cost is $20 for four
classes with instructor Dave
Meredith. Gentle stretching pro-
vides participants with the abil-
ity to gain balance, strength
and flexibility.
All classes require preregis-
tration and payment at the park
office. Call (352) 726-3913 for
information or visit www.inver-
ness-fl.gov (Recreation &
Leisure- classes).
Register now for
boat parade
Registration is now open for
residents to enter their holiday
decorated boats and participate
in the 27th annual Christmas
boat parade on the Homosassa
River, slated for Dec. 17.
There is no entry fee to par-
ticipate. A lead boat will help
guide the boats past the hun-


dreds of children waiting on-
shore for an up-close view.
Every participant receives a
prize.
Register by calling (352) 302-
5779 or at The Freezer in old
Homosassa.
Girls' volleyball club
is forming
A new volleyball club, Reflect
Sports Volleyball Club, is
forming.
The club is open to inter-
ested players from any school
- girls age 14 to 17. Tryouts
will be from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 4, at Crystal River
High School. Players will re-
ceive a packet of information
and learn about the club.
For more information, call
Coach Mike Ridley at (352)
897-4368 or email ridleym@
citrus.kl2.fl.us.
'Kicks For Kids'
kickball coming up
Were you picked last for kick-
ball in grammar school? Were


you ever referred to as the
"easy out" in dodge ball? Well,
now that you've finally grown
and have spent some time in a
gym or learned that fun is how
you make it, here's your chance
to redeem yourself.
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County will host its first "Kicks
for Kids" kickball tournament
fundraiser, presented by Dillons
Irish Pub, on Saturday, Dec. 3,
at Whispering Pines Park in In-
verness. This tournament is for
adults 18 and older.
It's time to reinvent your
childhood; to change the
course of those bad playground
memories. Gather your cowork-
ers, friends, family, whatever it
takes to form a team of 11 to 15
players. Teams must be co-ed,
with a minimum of four women
per team.
Don't have enough for a
team? Register and we will
form a team of "free agents"
who are eager to play.
Corporate sponsorships are
available for teams, as well. Is


your team better than that of
your fellow businessmen? Is
your organization up for chal-
lenging another? Call them out
and we will help. Challenges
will be posted on the website
and on the Boys & Girls Clubs'
Facebook page. Challenges
may also be used in future
advertising.
Detailed information and reg-
istration forms can be found on
the website at www.citrus
bgc.com, or call Suzanne
Clemente at (352) 621-9225.
Registration forms are also
available at Dillons Irish Pub in
downtown Inverness or at
Whispering Pines Park.
Dragon boaters'
open house Dec. 3
Nature Coast Dragon Boat
Club will have an information
open house from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at River-
side Resort, 5297 Cherokee
Way, Homosassa.
New members are being
courted to start weekend


practices. Call Mike at (352)
220-6024.
Fishing club heading
to St. Augustine
The Beverly Hills Fishing
Club is preparing to visit the na-
tion's oldest city St. Augus-
tine for a "Holly Jolly
Christmas" on Dec. 15 and 16.
The trip includes an
overnight stay in a ocean-front
hotel, four meals, a narrated
Jolly Trolly ride, lunch at the
Columbia restaurant and a
Christmas lighting display.
All are welcome. Call Pat at
(3522) 257-9328 for
information.
The club is also planning a
trip to the Show Palace Dinner
Theater in Hudson on Dec. 18.
Limited seating is available.
Auxiliary 15-4 of-
fers safety program
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4 of
the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
offers Paddlesports America, a
safety program designed to at-


tract novice paddle enthusiasts.
This four-hour program pres-
ents five chapters of safety
information.
Topics include:
Know Your Paddlecraft:
parts of a canoe and kayak, un-
derstanding paddlecraft charac-
teristics, selecting your paddle
for both canoe and kayak.
Before You Get Underway:
knowing your paddlecraft's ca-
pacity and how to file a float
plan.
Operating Your Boat
Safely: how to enter and exit a
canoe or kayak safely, securing
the paddlecraft and sharing the
waterways with others.
The program will be offered
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 10, at West Citrus
Community Center, 8940 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa. A
fee of $20 for materials will be
charged.
For more information, call
Elaine Miranda at (352) 564-
2521 orAl Hepner at (352)
795-9875.


e SATURDAY DE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


= College Football PREVIEWS =


No. 1 LSU (12-0, 8-0) vs.
No. 12 Georgia (10-2, 7-1)
4 p.m. (CBS)
Line: LSU by 13 1/2. Series
Record: LSU leads 15-12-1.
KEY MATCHUP
LSU running game vs. Geor-
gia defense. There's nothing
fancy about the Tigers, who
send out waves of running
backs to overpower opponents.
Michael Ford leads the way
with 721 yards, Spencer Ware
has 687, Alfred Blue chips in
with 445 and freshman Kenny
Hilliard is coming off a career-
best 102 yards against
Arkansas. Georgia's 3-4 de-
fense, led by OLB Jarvis Jones,
has blossomed in its second
year under coordinator Todd
Grantham. The Bulldogs have
been especially tough to run
against, allowing just 94.8
yards per game.
No. 3 Oklahoma State
(10-1, 7-1) vs. No. 13
Oklahoma (9-2, 6-2)
8 p.m. (ABC)
Line: Oklahoma State by 3.
Series Record: Oklahoma
leads 81-17-7.
KEY MATCHUP
Oklahoma State's passing
game vs. Oklahoma's second-
ary. The last two opponents
with top-10 passing attacks
both beat the Sooners by rack-
ing up more than 450 yards
through the air. With quarter-
back Brandon Weeden and All-
American receiver Justin
Blackmon, the Cowboys rank
second in the nation in passing
(401.6 yards per game).
No. 5 Virginia Tech
(11-1, 7-1) vs. No. 21
Clemson (9-3,6-2)
8:02 p.m. (ESPN)
Line: Virginia Tech by 7.
Series Record: Clemson
leads 18-12-1.
KEY MATCHUP
Clemson WR Sammy
Watkins against Virginia Tech's
defense. The Hokies limited the
nation's most electrifying fresh-
man to three catches for 38
yards in the first meeting be-
tween the teams a 23-3
Clemson win on Oct. 1 and
Watkins has been slowed by a
shoulder injury. His involvement
could be critical for the Tigers,
though, as they try to rebuild
QB Tajh Boyd's confidence
after his recent struggles.
No. 7 Houston (12-0,
8-0) vs. No. 24 Southern
Miss (10-2, 6-2)
Noon (ABC)
Line: Houston by 13. Se-
ries Record: Southern Miss
leads 8-5.
KEY MATCHUP
Keenum vs. the Southern
Miss defense. The sixth-year
quarterback virtually has no
more records to break, and the
offense will finish the year as
one of the best in NCAA history,
even if it's held under 35 points
for the first time this season.
But the Golden Eagles may
have the best defense Houston
has seen all season, ranking
26th overall (338.4 yards per
game) and 25th in scoring (20.5
points per game). Southern
Miss also has a school-record
seven interception returns for
touchdowns this season.
No. 9 Boise State
(10-1, 5-1) vs. New
Mexico (1-10, 1-5)
6 p.m. (The Mtn)
Line: Boise State by 48 1/2.
Series Record: Boise State
leads 2-0.


KEY MATCHUP
Kellen Moore vs. New Mex-
ico's defense. Moore will be
playing his last game in a Bron-
cos uniform and it's hard to
imagine he won't be motivated
to shine. That doesn't bode well
for a Lobos defense that hasn't
stopped the run or the pass
much all season. Moore is look-
ing for career win No. 49 and to
eclipse 14,000 yards in total of-
fense in his career against a
New Mexico defense ranked
117th in points allowed and
119th in total yards allowed per
game.
No. 11 Michigan State
(10-2, 7-1) vs. No. 15
Wisconsin (10-2, 6-2)
8:17 p.m. (Fox)
Line: Wisconsin by 9 1/2.
Series Record: Michigan
State leads 29-21.
KEY MATCHUP
Wisconsin RB Montee Ball
vs. Spartans run defense. In
the first meeting this season,
Wisconsin jumped to a 14-0
lead, then lost Ball to an injury
during the second quarter. With
Ball out, the Spartans rallied
and eventually took a 31-17
lead early in the fourth quarter.
Ball's return rejuvenated the
Badgers, helping them rally to
tie the score at 31 in the final
minute only to lose the game
on a memorable "Hail Mary"
pass. With Ball healthy, the
Spartans must find a way to
stop him.
No. 16 Kansas State
(9-2, 6-2) vs. Iowa State
(6-5, 3-5)
11:45 a.m. (FSN)
Line: Kansas State by 11.
Series Record: Iowa State
leads 49-41-4.
KEY MATCHUP
Kansas State's defense
against Iowa State QB Jared
Barnett. The Wildcats have
been one of the better defenses
in the Big 12, a conference not
particularly strong on that side
of the ball this year. They'll get
a test from Barnett, a freshman
who has been solid since taking
over as the starter for Steele
Jantz midway through the sea-
son.
No. 18 TCU (9-2, 6-0)
vs. UNLV (2-9, 1-5)
2:30 p.m. (Versus)
Line: TCU by 39 1/2. Series
Record: TCU leads 8-1.
KEY MATCHUP
TCU's trio of running backs
vs. UNLV's defense. The ex-
pectation of wet conditions will
put the spotlight on TCU's Way-
mon James, Matthew Tucker
and Ed Wesley, who each have
at least 600 yards rushing and
have combined for 18 touch-
downs. The Horned Frogs aver-
age 212 yards rushing, second
in the league only to run-ori-
ented Air Force. The Rebels
give up 449 total yards a game,
including 195 on the ground.
No. 19 Baylor (8-3, 5-3)
vs. Texas (7-4, 4-4)
3:30 p.m. (ABC)
Line: Baylor by 3. Series
Records: Texas leads 73-23-4.
KEY MATCHUP
Baylor WRs Kendall Wright
and Terrance Williams vs.
Texas CBs Carrington Byndum
and Quandre Diggs. Wright and
Williams are the touchdown tar-
gets for Griffin, combining for
22 TD receptions. Byndum and
Diggs anchor what has become
a dominant Texas secondary.
Griffin has burned defenses all
season throwing deep to Wright
and Williams.


Associated Press
The Buffalo Sabres' Thomas Vanek battles for the puck Friday with the Detroit Red Wings' Valtteri Flippula during the
second period in Buffalo, N.Y.



Red Wings win 7th straight


Associated Press

BUFFALO, N.Y -Jimmy
Howard made 27 saves, and
the Detroit Red Wings
stretched their winning
streak to seven with a 4-1
victory over the Buffalo
Sabres on Friday night.
Jakub Kindl, Johan
Franzen, and Valtteri Filp-
pula scored first-period
goals for Detroit (16-7-1),
which last won seven in a
row in March 2010. Pavel
Datsyuk pushed the lead to


4-1 by scoring into an empty
net with 1:17 left.
Howard, making his 17th
straight start, was steady
throughout. In the second
period he robbed Jason
Pominville, who was left
alone in the slot. He then
stopped Nathan Gerbe on a
breakaway in the third.
Jochen Hecht spoiled
Howard's shutout bid with
6:13 remaining.
Jhonas Enroth, making
his ninth straight start in
place of No. 1 goalie Ryan


Miller, made 32 saves for
the Sabres (13-11-1), who
have lost three of four.

Wild 4, Devils 2
ST. PAUL, Minn.- The Min-
nesota Wild scored three goals
on their first four shots and
sent New Jersey goalie Martin
Brodeur to the bench in the
first period of a 4-2 win over
the Devils on Friday night.
Dany Heatley, Kyle Brodziak
and Casey Wellman scored in
a 3:03 span of the first period


to turn an early deficit into a 3-
1 lead and knock Brodeur out
of the game just 8:17 in.
Brodziak sealed the win with
another goal in the third period.
Niklas Backstrom made seven
saves in the first period, and Josh
Harding, who played the final
two periods, stopped all 22
shots he faced for Minnesota.
Zach Parise had a goal and
an assist, and Ilya Kovalchuk
also scored for the Devils.
Johan Hedberg made 11 saves
in relief of Brodeur.


No. 3 Notre Dame tops Pp BRIEFS
DCHS girls notch win

' D %" T n T (r1. f fP 1in first district game


1 emi, iauy '~xauui ~ iaii


Associated Press


SOUTH BEND, Ind. Devereaux
Peters scored 16 points and Natalie
Novosel added 14 to lead third-
ranked Notre Dame to a 69-38 win
over Penn on Friday night.
Kayla McBride chipped in with 10
points and nine rebounds for Notre
Dame (6-1), which jumped out to a 14-
3 lead and pressured the Quakers
into 23 turnovers, including 15 on
steals.
Kara Bonenberger had nine points
and seven rebounds to lead Penn (4-
2). Leading scorer Alyssa Baron, who
came in averaging better than 20
points, was held to seven.
Notre Dame outrebounded Penn
49-34.
Peters scored eight points and
Novosel had the other six during
Notre Dame's opening 14-3 run,
while the Quakers made only one of
their first ten shots. The Irish broke
off a 14-0 run later in the first half for
a 32-7 lead with 6:32 to go before half-
time.
Notre Dame opened the second
half on a 16-8 run to put the game out
of reach.

No. 11 Rutgers 63, Florida 49
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. Erica
Wheeler scored 15 points, and April
Sykes and Monique Oliver added 12
points each to help Rutgers remain un-
beaten.
Betnijah Laney chipped in 10 points for
the Scarlet Knights, who are off to their
first 8-0 start since 2005.
Jordan Jones scored 20 points to lead


turnover-plagued Florida (6-2), which hit
only 2 of its first 11 shots to open the sec-
ond half and committed 22 miscues that
Rutgers turned into 22 points. Deana
Allen added 11 points for the Gators, who
snapped a six-game win streak.
No. 23 Wisconsin-Green Bay 66,
Marquette 50
GREEN BAY, Wis. -Adrian Ritchie
scored 15 points, and Julie Wojta had 12
points and 12 rebounds to lead Wiscon-
sin-Green Bay.
Lydia Bauer scored 12 points and
grabbed 10 boards for the Phoenix (6-0),
who avenged a three-point loss to the
Marquette last year Green Bay's only
loss in the regular season.
Green Bay led 29-28 at halftime thanks
to 15 Marquette turnovers.
Katherine Plouffe scored 15 points to
lead the Golden Eagles (4-4), who made
just two field goals over the final 9 min-
utes of the game.
No. 25 Vanderbilt 77, Denver 56
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Christina Foggie
scored 18 of her 23 points in the first half
to lead Vanderbilt.
Foggie eclipsed 20 points for the third
straight game, knocking down six 3-point-
ers for the Commodores (8-0). Elan
Brown had 13 points and Kady Schrann
and Jasmine Lister each added 10.
Denver's sloppiness accounted for a
28-point halftime deficit. The Pioneers
committed a season-high 23 turnovers, with
Vanderbilt scoring 33 points off the miscues.
Katelyn Murdoch led Denver (5-2) with
12 points on 2-of-11 shooting and Mor-
gan Shell had 10.


The Lady Hurricanes basketball team
was victorious in its first district match of
the year, beating the Central High School
Bears 53-28 Friday night.
Top scorers for the 'Canes were: Paige
Garvin with 12 points; Mary Wheeler with
9 points; Marissa DuBois with 8 points;
Treleasha Simmons with 8 points; and
Guards Lindsay Connors and Elizabeth
Lynch with 7 points each.
The win takes the 'Canes to 7-0 overall
and 1-0 in district play. Citrus will next
play on Tuesday, when the Lady 'Canes
host West Port at 7:30 p.m.
CRHS girls hand
Eustis a loss
The Crystal River Lady Pirates basket-
ball team defeated the Eustis Panthers
55-40 Friday night, taking the team to 4-2
overall and 2-0 in district competition.
Top scorers for the Pirates were: Caitlin
Hannigan with 18 points, 4 steals and 3
assists; Lamechia Richburgh with 8 points,
9 rebounds and 4 steals; and Megan Wells
with 6 points, 6 assists and 5 steals.
The Lady Pirates will host Nature
Coast on Tuesday night.
LHS boys top Springstead
The Panthers traveled to Springstead
and came home with a 76-48 win over
the Eagles Friday night.
Lecanto's two leading scorers in the
game were Mikey Makros with 21 points
and Richie Rizzolo with 11 points. The
Panthers stayed perfect with the win, im-
proving to 5-0.
The Panthers will next play Tuesday
when they travel to Central High.
The JV team also beat the Eagles, win-
ning 55-49.
-From staff reports


Mountaineers rally; Bulls end worst GATORS
Continued from Page B1


season since 2004 on three-game skid


Associated Press

TAMPA West Virginia
found a way to win again,
clinching a share of the Big
East title and remaining in
the running for the league's
automatic berth in the Bowl
Championship Series.
The 22nd-ranked Moun-
taineers have done it by re-
bounding from a
disappointing loss to
Louisville in early Novem-
ber to win three straight
tight games, including
Thursday night's 30-27 vic-
tory over South Florida.
Now if they can get some
help from another team
looking for a piece of the
title, their success in their
first season under coach
Dana Holgorsen will be-
come even sweeter
"We set that goal at the be-


ginning of the season. We
could've tanked it. We
could've folded the tent,"
Holgorsen said after Tavon
Austin returned a kickoff 90
yards for a touchdown, Pat
Miller scored on a 52-yard
interception return and
Tyler Bitancurt kicked a 28-
yard field goal as time ex-
pired, giving West Virginia a
portion of the conference
crown for the second
straight year
The Mountaineers (9-3, 5-
2) finished the regular sea-
son on a three-game
winning streak, beating
Cincinnati by three points,
Pittsburgh by one and going
down to the wire again
Thursday night.
With some help from
Cincinnati this weekend,
they will get into the BCS for
the first time since 2007.


The Mountaineers pulled
even with Louisville in the
conference standings and
likely will receive the
league's automatic BCS bid
if Cincinnati beats Con-
necticut on Saturday to cre-
ate a three-way tie for the
league title.
Louisville earned a share by
beating USF last week. The
Cardinals hold the tiebreaker
over West Virginia if the
race ends in a two-way tie.
But with a three-way dead-
lock, the BCS spot goes to
the team that's ranked high-
est in the final BCS rankings.
USF (5-7, 1-6) finished its
season on a three-game los-
ing streak and failed to
qualify for a bowl bid for the
first time in seven years.
Four of USF's losses came
in the closing seconds of games
the Bulls could have won.


South Florida, wrapping
up its second season under
Skip Holtz, lost seven of
eight following a 4-0 start
that included a win at Notre
Dame. That victory lifted
the Bulls into the Top 25 for
a four-week stay that ended
when they dropped their
Big East opener. The third
losing season in the school's
relatively brief football his-
tory ended a streak of six con-
secutive bowl appearances.
USF went 5-6 in 1997-the
year former coach Jim Leav-
itt began the program and
went 4-7 in 2004, its second
season in Conference USA.
"I'm disappointed that we
couldn't get it done for the
seniors ... because they
worked so hard and they
contributed so much for this
program," Bulls linebacker
Sam Barrington said.


after Tuesday night's game
that he's never been wor-
ried about his job through-
out his tenure at his alma
mater and has not consid-
ered resigning.
Against the Gators, Boe-
heim's players responded
again.
Brandon Triche had 20
points and Scoop Jardine
finished with 16 and seven
assists for the Orange.
Kenny Boynton led Florida
with 22 points and Erving
Walker had 17.
Neither team led by more
than six points in a first
half that was tied six times.
Florida, which entered
the game shooting 42.9 per-
cent from beyond the arc
and was averaging 12 3-
pointers a game, went 3 of
14 from long range in the
period all by Erving
Walker-while the Orange
struggled even more, hit-
ting just 1 of 10.


Syracuse still managed
to forge ahead at the break,
31-27, behind seven points
each from Kris Joseph, Fab
Melo and Triche.
After the Orange built a
39-30 lead early in the sec-
ond, Boynton led the
Gators back with three 3s,
the last putting Florida
back on top 49-46 with 9:19
to go. Triche tied it for the
fourth time in the period 11
seconds later with his first
3 of the game.
Jardine fed Joseph for a
one-handed slam to break
the tie and Jardine's steal
and layup had the Orange
up 54-49 with 6:20 to go and
the crowd shaking the Car-
rier Dome.
The roar reached an-
other crescendo when Jar-
dine hit a runner in the
lane as the shot clock
neared zero, Joseph fed
C.J. Fair for a baseline
jumper, and Jardine hit a 3
from the left wing in a span
of 2:19. That gave Syracuse
a 61-53 lead with 3:52 left
and the Gators couldn't
rally back.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 B3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boys soccer
Crystal River 0,
Taylor 0
Wildcats 0 0 0
Pirates 0 0 0
Scoring: Taylor none. Crystal River none.
Shots: Taylor 25, Crystal River 8. Saves: Taylor
5, Crystal River 13. Records: Taylor (5-1-2, dis-
trict 2-0-1); Crystal River (4-3-1, 1-2-1).
Girls soccer
Crystal River 8,
Taylor 0
Wildcats 0 0 0
Pirates 7 1 8
Scoring: Taylor none. Crystal River Aubrie
Menster (unassisted) 35:03; Cheyenna Lyons
(unassisted) 30:23; Brooke Levins (Lyons as-
sist) 25:10; Menster (Melissa Cang Cuesta as-
sist) 22:17; Haley Dewhurst (unassisted) 11:29;
Menster (Levins assist) 9:39; Menster (Lyons
assist) 6:20; Natalie Ezzell (unassisted) 31:48.
Shots: Taylor 0, Crystal River 25. Saves: Taylor
6, Crystal River 0. Records: Taylor (0-7, district
0-3); Crystal River (6-2-1, 3-1).
Citrus 4,
Leesburg 0
Leesburg 0 0 0
Citrus 2 2 4
Scoring: Leesburg- none. Citrus Connor
Killeen, penalty shot 22:05, Killian McLean
(Austin Wilcoxon assist) 39:08, Austin Wilcoxon
(Ryan Dolan assist) 41:10, Robert Cignarelli
(Josh Marsden assist) 71:30.
Shots: Leesburg 16, Citrus 14. Saves : Lees-
burg 8, Citrus- 12. Records: Leesburg (5-3-
1), Citrus (4-1, 2-0).
Boys basketball
Eustis 65,
Crystal River 41
Panthers 15 21 14 14- 64
Pirates 7 2 21 11 41
Pirates (41) -Ty Reynolds 11, Sean Hall 3,
Trevor Phillips 9, Danien Westfall 4, Jesus
Benedetti 5, Kaleb McColley 8, Robert Speak-
man 23, Sam Franklin 8
Panthers (64)- Data not available
3-Point Goals Ty Reynolds 2, Sean Hall 1,
Jesus Benedetti 1, Kaleb McColley 2.
Fouled Out: None on either team
Fouls: Panthers 14, Pirates 13
Records: Pirates: 2-3 overall; Panthers 5-0
overall.


Seahawks 31, Eagles 14
Philadelphia 0 7 0 7- 14
Seattle 7 10 7 7- 31
First Quarter
Sea-Lynch 15 run (Hauschka kick), 9:19.
Second Quarter
Sea-Lynch 40 run (Hauschka kick), 14:50.
Phi-McCoy 1 run (Henery kick), 11:43.
Sea-FG Hauschka 49, :16.
Third Quarter
Sea-Tate 11 pass from Jackson (Hauschka
kick), 8:04.
Fourth Quarter
Phi-McCoy 2 pass from Young (Henery
kick), 12:51.
Sea-Hawthorne 77 interception return
(Hauschka kick), 4:24.
A-67,039.
Phi Sea
First downs 20 15
Total Net Yards 330 347
Rushes-yards 25-132 33-174
Passing 198 173
Punt Returns 0-0 3-0
Kickoff Returns 4-92 1-24
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 4-146
Comp-Att-Int 17-29-4 13-16-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-10 3-17
Punts 4-46.3 5-39.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 5-28 5-30
Time of Possession 29:40 30:20
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Philadelphia, McCoy 17-84,
Young 5-32, Brown 2-11, D.Jackson 1-5. Seat-
tle, Lynch 22-148, Washington 6-9, Tate 1-8,
Forsett 2-5, Jackson 2-4.
PASSING-Philadelphia, Young 17-29-4-208.
Seattle, Jackson 13-16-0-190.
RECEIVING-Philadelphia, Cooper 5-94,
McCoy 4-49, D.Jackson 4-34, Celek 3-21, Avant
1-10. Seattle, Tate 4-47, Robinson 4-41, Miller
2-53, Obomanu 2-28, Baldwin 1-21.

NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 26 15 7 4 34 82 64
N.Y Rangers 22 14 5 3 31 65 49
Philadelphia 23 13 7 3 29 80 68
New Jersey 24 1211 1 25 60 68
N.Y Islanders 23 711 5 19 47 74
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 23 15 7 1 31 81 50
Toronto 25 14 9 2 30 82 81
Buffalo 25 1311 1 27 69 67
Ottawa 25 1211 2 26 77 86
Montreal 26 1011 5 25 65 68


For lthe record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected Friday
in the Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
2-0-6
CASH 3 (late)
7-0-7

PLAY 4 (early)
4-1-8-3
PLAY 4 (late)
7-4-3-3

FANTASY 5
1-2-8-13-26

MEGA MONEY
6-13-21-34
MEGA BALL
2


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (CBS) North Carolina at Kentucky.
1 p.m. (SUN) Teams TBA.
3:15 p.m. (ESPN)Arkansas at Connecticut.
3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Gonzaga at Illinois.
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Teams TBA.
5:15 p.m. (ESPN) Pittsburgh at Tennessee.
5:15 p.m. (ESPN2) South Florida at Kansas.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ABC) Conference USA Championship Southern
Mississippi at Houston.
12 p.m. (ESPN) Connecticut at Cincinnati.
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Syracuse at Pittsburgh.
12:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Iowa State at Kansas State.
2:30 p.m. (VERSUS) UNLV at Texas Christian.
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Texas at Baylor.
4 p.m. (CBS) SEC Championship Georgia vs. LSU. From
the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Pac-12 Championship UCLA at Oregon.
(Taped)
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) BYU at Hawaii.
8 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma at Oklahoma State.
8 p.m. (FOX) Big Ten Championship Michigan State vs.
Wisconsin.
8 p.m. (ESPN)ACC Championship Clemson vs. Virginia Tech.
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) Nedbank Golf Challenge, Third Round. (Same-
day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) Chevron World Challenge, Third Round.
3 p.m. (NBC) Chevron World Challenge, Third Round.
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Q-School, Fourth Round.
12 a.m. (GOLF) UBS Hong Kong Open, Final Round.
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) New York Rangers at Tampa Bay Lightning.
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at San Jose Sharks.
SKATING
1 p.m. (NBC) ISU Grand Prix: Cup of Russia. (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League Soccer Newcas-
tle vs. Chelsea.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
WRESTLING
8 a.m. Citrus at Troy Smith Duals.


Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Florida 25 13 8 4 30 68
Washington 24 1211 1 25 72
Tampa Bay 24 1111 2 24 65
Winnipeg 25 1011 4 24 71
Carolina 27 815 4 20 64
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Detroit 24 16 7 1 33 73
Chicago 26 15 8 3 33 85
St. Louis 24 14 8 2 30 59
Nashville 25 12 9 4 28 66
Columbus 25 715 3 17 59
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Minnesota 26 16 7 3 35 64
Vancouver 25 1410 1 29 78
Edmonton 25 1210 3 27 67
Colorado 25 11 13 1 23 68
Calgary 24 1012 2 22 54


Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 25 15 9 1 31 65 67
LosAngeles 25 13 8 4 30 59 56
SanJose 22 14 7 1 29 64 51
Phoenix 24 13 8 3 29 65 58
Anaheim 24 713 4 18 54 77
Friday's Games
Chicago 5, N.Y Islanders 4, SO
Detroit 4, Buffalo 1
Minnesota 4, New Jersey 2
St. Louis at Colorado, late.
Columbus at Edmonton, late.
Philadelphia at Anaheim, late.
Saturday's Games
Montreal at Los Angeles, 3:30 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7p.m.
Ottawa at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers atTampaBay, 7 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Florida at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


Warrior boys run over Buffalo


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

LECANTO The Warrior
boys delivered a convincing
82-57 win against The Vil-
lages in their gym on Friday
Seven Rivers Christian
senior guard Sam Jones tied
for a game-high 15 points
and dished out 10 assists.
He also grabbed seven steals.
"On both ends of the
court, Sam led the way -
defensively and offen-
sively," Seven Rivers coach
Jim Ervin said. "He ran the
show for us from the point
guard, and just does what


Sam Jones does, to be hon-
est with you.
"He's one of our best play-
ers, but every night at prac-
tice he's diving all over the
place for loose balls."
The Warriors (2-1, 0-0) led
by as much 16 in the first pe-
riod, and sustained a lead of
around 10 to 14 points into
the middle of the second
quarter. They went on to
limit the Buffalo to four
points for the remaining five
minutes of the half to go
ahead 48-27 heading into
the break.
The Villages (1-3, 0-0)
made five 3-pointers in the


Lady Panthers dominate


JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent


In a game that started out
close, the Lecanto High
School girls basketball team
lit up the Springstead Lady
Eagles for 62 points en route
to a 62-37 drubbing Friday
night at Lecanto High School.
Lecanto's defense kept
Springstead frustrated
throughout the night. The
Lady Eagles couldn't hang
on to the ball, as they turned
the ball over 18 times for the
game and got dominated on
the boards. Junior Miranda
Barber led the defensive
charge for the Lady Pan-
thers, recording five re-


bounds and five steals, with
teammates Marie Buckley,
Megan Straight and Kylie
Sisk recording a handful of
steals and rebounds them-
selves.
Led by Buckley's game-
high 20 points, Lecanto's of-
fense couldn't be stopped.
Great ball movement and
smart shots made it almost
impossible for the Lady Ea-
gles to keep up.
"That's we what try to do
all season," Lecanto head
coach Brittany Szunko said.
"We try to keep the ball
moving, keep the run-and-
gun style and keep the de-
fense guessing."
Lecanto's biggest strength


second half as Seven Rivers
backed off their press over
sportsmanship considerations.
The Warriors were outre-
bounded 10-3 in the second
period, but they shot well
enough for it not to matter.
Six Warriors shot for dou-
ble-figures. Sophomore for-
ward Trey Wieand and
senior forward Trey Gask-
ins each scored 14. Sopho-
more guard Adam Gage
posted 13 points, while jun-
ior Jared Bogart and senior
Lucas Ebert added 12 and
10 points, respectively
Seven Rivers next plays at
Belleview Tuesday



Springstead
was its defensive depth.
With the bench on the court,
Springstead could only pull
in 17 of their total 37 points.
Coach Szunko made it a
point to frustrate the Lady
Eagles.
"They have a couple of
players that we wanted to
make it a point to keep the
ball out of their hands," she
said. "We kept throwing dif-
ferent looks, tried to frus-
trate them and keep the
pressure on them."
Lecanto improves to 7-2
overall with the victory,
notching yet another district
win. The Lady Panthers'
next game is next Tuesday
at home against Central.


NIU rallies to win MAC 23-20


Associated Press

DETROIT Mathew
Sims kicked a 33-yard field
goal on the final play to cap
a furious comeback that
gave Northern Illinois a 23-
20 victory over Ohio in the


Mid-American Conference
title game Friday night.
The Huskies (10-3) trailed
20-0 after an abysmal first half
before rallying behind quar-
terback Chandler Harnish.
Ohio (9-4) led 20-7 in the
fourth quarter, but Harnish


CHS boys shut out


STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent

The biggest moments are
those that require the best
effort, and although early in
the season, the Citrus boys'
soccer team was able to
achieve that feat, blanking
visiting Leesburg 4-0 in an
early key district matchup
Friday night.
Hurricanes coach David
Assumpcao watched his
team produce four different
goal scorers, accompanied
by a solid defensive effort that
joined the attacking foray,
while being backed by stel-
lar goalkeeping throughout
A fast-paced match from
the opening whistle, early
pressure eventually cracked
the Leesburg defense, as
Manny Nelson drew a hard
foul on Citrus' Josh Mars-
den in one-on-one coverage
in the corner on the Lees-
burg side. The foul war-
ranted a penalty shot, which
Connor Killeen methodi-
cally banged home into the
net in the 18th minute.
Killian McLean added a


goal during stoppage time
before the half, to give Cit-
rus a 2-0 edge. Austin
Wilcoxon charged in to
chase down a send toward
the front of the net, and
when Leesburg keeper
Shawn Fordham came well
out of the box, the ball came
offa deflection and bounced
toward the vicinity of
McLean, who picked up the
gift in close and sent it to the
back of the net high out of a
defender's reach.
Wilcoxon would score a
little over a minute into the
second half off a feed from
Ryan Dolan, and the Hurri-
canes (4-1 overall, 2-0 in dis-
trict play) were well on their
way
"We came strong, and the
intensity was high. I ask the
kids every game to bring
their best, and they played
their best tonight," said As-
sumpcao.
An early dodged bullet
followed by solid play in the
goal helped Citrus preserve
and build on the lead on
Leesburg (5-3-1). Down 1-0
in the 23rd minute, the


threw a 32-yard touchdown
pass to Martel Moore, then a
22-yarder to Nathan Palmer
to tie it with 2:52 left
Sims, who missed an extra
point earlier, redeemed
himself after Harnish moved
the Huskies into range.




Leesburg
Fighting Jackets' Ben Rizzo
danced around a defender
in single coverage from the
corner, and closed in for an
open shot on goal. But his
boot sailed just high enough
to graze off the crossbar and
out of play
Hurricanes keepers Chris
Malz and Alan Verone (sub-
bing in midway through the
second half) combined for
12 saves to earn the shutout.
"Leesburg did an excel-
lent job, I think, of pressur-
ing us on the defensive end
(in the second half)," said
Assumpcao. "They took
some shots not so much on
target, but it scared
us..Chris Malz did a fantas-
tic job, able to sustain some
of those shots."
In the 71st minute, Robert
Cignarelli put the icing on
the cake for Citrus, served
up by Marsden, who sent a
perfectly chipped cross
from the right of the box to
Cignarelli, who deked around
a lone defender for an easy
shot on goal, making it 4-0.
Citrus next hosts Tavares
Tuesday for a 7:30 p.m. start.


Seven Rivers girls rout The Villages


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

LECANTO The Seven
Rivers Christian girls' bas-
ketball squad jumped
ahead 16-6 in the opening
period and continued to ex-
pand its lead for a dominat-
ing 53-17 home defeat of
The Villages Friday
The score resembles the
Warriors' (3-1, 0-0) blowout
of Ocala Christian Academy
earlier this week, but Coach
Rick Kiernan sees Friday's
victory as a more impres-
sive feat
"This was a much more
disciplined win for us," he
said. "The Villages is a very
good team. We had scouted
them and I was very nerv-


ous about playing them.
"(Buffalo junior forward
Asia) Marion can score from
anywhere on the court, and
(Buffalo junior forward
Braelyn) Tate can hit 3-
pointers like you wouldn't
believe," he added. "But we
did a good job shutting both
of them down and getting
Marion into foul trouble."
Marion was The Villages'
(1-3, 0-0) team-leading
scorer for the night, but was
limited to 10 points.
Seven Rivers junior for-
ward Andrea Zachar con-
trolled the boards for 17
rebounds while also scoring
a game-high 18 points.
The Warriors held the
Buffalo scoreless in the
third period, helping them


gain a 42-15 advantage by
the quarter's end.
Midway into the fourth,
the clock ran without stop-
pages due to the mercy rule.
Warriors senior Kayleigh
Kiernan totaled 12 assists
and seven rebounds from
the point, while sophomore
forward Alexis Zachar added
13 points and eight rebounds.
Junior forward Caitlen
Fenton collected five steals
and scored 8 points for the
Warriors.
Seven Rivers' only weak
spot was at the foul line,
where they were 5-for-18.
They out-rebounded The
Villages 42-20.
The Warriors host Central
Florida Christian Academy
next Thursday


Crystal River no match for Eustis


MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent

The opening period the
Panthers started with a run-
ning game, and while the Pi-
rates attempted to keep
pace, their offense created
too many turnovers
throughout this and the re-
maining periods. As a result,
after the first two minutes of
the first period, the Pan-
thers took a lead of 7-0. The
Pirates were not able to pull
themselves together, and
the Panthers were victori-
ous 64-41.
Throughout the first half
the Pirates did not do a good
job of handling the ball.
With the Panthers playing
man-to-man most of the
game, many pass plays by
the Pirates were picked off
for scores.
"Their diamond press



BOYS
Continued from Page B1

game. Tuesday, we lost to
The Villages. This was a big
game. We were led on de-
fense by Charles Moschello,
our captain. We stayed to-
gether We knew their team
would be fast They had a lot



GIRLS
Continued from Page B1

play Taylor High is 0-7 and
0-3.
Menster, a junior forward,
scored the first goal.
Cheyenne Lyons booted in
the second goal at 30 min-
utes.
Brooke Levins, fresh off a
hat trick against The Vil-
lages, scored goal No.3 with
an assist from Lyons.
Menster booted in her
second goal, and the Pi-
rates' fourth, with an assist
from Melissa Cang Cuesta in


certainly forced us into giv-
ing the ball up giving them
easy baskets and our heads
went into a turtle-like
mode," Pirates head coach
Steve Feldman said.
The third period pro-
duced much of the same.
The Pirates could not take
control and their play
showed frustration and lack
of confidence.
"You cannot dig out of a
26-point hole for yourself at
halftime. I also thought that
we played extremely tenta-
tively, and I do not know
why," Feldman said. "They
certainly squeezed
turnovers out of us in the
first half."
One standout for the Pi-
rates is Sam Franklin. He
took control of the defensive
boards most of the game.
Many of the blocked shots of
the Panthers were the result


of skill. We even changed
the way we had been play-
ing defense a little bit.
"It would have been nice
to get a goal, but I am so
proud of the guys after the
week we had. We were try-
ing to find everybody to-
gether. It was huge. They
had a lot of shots. Not all
were on frame. The de-
fense is going through a


the game's 22nd minute.
Midfielder Haley De-
whurst then rocked in a di-
rect kick for the fifth goal.
Menster then scored with
Levins picking up the assist.
Menster managed the
fourth goal at 6:20 with
Lyons assisting. Menster
booted it in from six yards
out.
The score was 7-0 at the
half.
It appeared the Pirates
scored another goal late in
the first half, but the offi-
cials ruled it was not an ac-
tual score.
Natalie Ezzell mercifully
ended the game unassisted


of Franklin's heads-up play-
ing. Franklin was 2 points
shy of a triple-double.
"I tried to play hard and
help my team win and try to
make something happen,"
Franklin said. "We did not
get their half-court offense.
They tried to speed it up
and then slow it down, and
that is when we play our
best ball."
In the fourth period, the
Panthers switched to a zone
defense, but the Pirates
could not capitalize in their
outside shooting. However,
with two minutes left in the
game, The Pirates ran a
breakaway, Ty Reynolds to
Danien Westfall to Sam
Franklin for the score. With
some great single efforts by
the Pirates, they just could
not get back into the game.
Their next game will be
away at Nature Coast.


transition. The guys are
trying to buy into the pro-
gram. We played a good
team game."
The Taylor coach looked
disappointed and not nearly
as happy as the Pirates
coach.
"(It was) very physical,"
Taylor coach Ricardo
Jaimes said. "We could have
done better, though."


with 31:48 left in the half.
There was no question
who was going to win this
game, and Menster was
truly on.
"I wanted to score," said
Menster, who has had a
three-goal night before. "It
was a nice effort by every-
body We are a good team."
"We played good at times
and looked bad at times,"
Crystal River High coach
Bill Reyes said. "We did
what we came to do. Our
passing at times was very
good. For the most part, it
was a good effort. We had
some lapses. It was a solid
effort."


B4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


SCOREBOARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Chevron World
Challenge Par Scores
Friday at Sherwood Country Club,
Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Yardage: 7,023 yards. Par 72. Purse: $5 million.
Second Round
Tiger Woods 69-67-136 -8
Matt Kuchar 72-67-139 -5
K.J. Choi 66-73-139 -5
Zach Johnson 73-67-140 -4
Hunter Mahan 72-68-140 -4
Rickie Fowler 71-70-141 -3
Jason Day 74-68-142 -2
Gary Woodland 73-70-143 -1
Bubba Watson 75-70-145 +1
Jim Fuyrk 71-74-145 +1
Steve Stricker 69-76-145 +1
Bo Van Pelt 74-72-146 +2
Bill Haas 78-69-147 +3
PaulCasey 79-68-147 +3
NickWatney 71-78-149 +5
Martin Laird 77-74-151 +7
Keegan Bradley 76-75-151 +7
Webb Simpson 73-79-152 +8
UBS Hong Kong Open
Leading Scores
Friday at Hong Kong Golf Club, Hong Kong.
Purse: $2.75 million.Yardage: 6,730. Par: 70.
Second Round
Rory Mcllroy, Northern Ireland 64-69-133
Alvaro Quiros, Spain 64-69-133
Richie Ramsay, Scotland 68-66-134
Panupol Pittayarat, Thailand 69-65-134
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 65-70-135
Danny Lee, New Zealand 70-65-135
Pariya Junhasavasdikul, Thailand 70-65-135
Peter Hanson, Sweden 68-68-136
David Horsey England 64-72-136
Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 70-66-136
Martin Wiegele, Austria 70-66-136
Marcus Fraser, Australia 67-69-136
Berry Henson, United States 69-68-137
Darren Beck, Australia 66-71-137
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand 68-69-137
Y.E. Yang, South Korea 68-69-137
Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain 69-69-138
Juvic Pagunsan, Philippines 68-70-138
Stephen Dodd, Wales 70-68-138
Peter Lawrie, Ireland 69-69-138
Nedbank Golf
Challenge Scores
Friday at Gary Player Country Club, Sun
City, South Africa.
Purse: $5 million.Yardage: 7,590. Par: 72.
Second Round
G. McDowell, Northern Ireland 70-67-137
Robert Karlsson, Sweden 69-69-138
Jason Dufner, United States 70-68-138
Martin Kaymer, Germany 70-68-138
Lee Westwood, England 68-70-138
Kyung-tae Kim, South Korea 70-70-140
Simon Dyson, England 70-70-140
Anders Hansen, Denmark 72-69-141
Luke Donald, England 70-71-141
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 68-74-142
Darren Clarke, Northern Ireland 74-69-143
Francesco Molinari, Italy 72-77-149
BMW New Zealand
Open Scores
Friday at Clearwater Golf Club,
Christchurch, New Zealand
Purse: $400,000.Yardage: 7,125. Par: 72.
a-amateur
Second Round
Craig Parry, Australia 70-69-139
Brad Kennedy, Australia 68-71-139
Josh Geary, New Zealand 71-68-139
a-Jake Higginbottom, Australia 72-68-140
Leigh McKechnie, Australia 69-71-140
Doug Holloway, New Zealand 69-71-140
Rohan Blizard, Australia 72-69-141
Nicholas Cullen, Australia 70-71-141
Jin Jeong, Australia 73-69-142
Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 74-68-142
Adam Crawford, Australia 74-69-143
Steve Alker, New Zealand 71-72-143
Mahal Pearce, New Zealand 70-73-143
Brad Mclntosh, Australia 78-66-144
Brent McCullough, Australia 74-70-144
Steve Jones, Australia 73-71 -144
Carl Brooking, New Zealand 72-72-144
Michael Foster, Australia 76-68-144
Ashley Hall, Australia 73-71-144
James Carr, Australia 73-71-144
Michael Wright, Australia 74-71 -145
Jim Cusdin, New Zealand 68-77-145
Andrew Tschudin, Australia 75-70-145
Leigh Deagan, Australia 72-73-145
Rhys McGovern, Australia 73-72-145
Choi Joon-woo, South Korea 74-71-145
Andrew Evans, Australia 71-74-145
Luke Bleumink, Australia 72-73-145
Peter O'Malley, Australia 72-73-145
Kieran Pratt, Australia 75-70-145
David Small, New Zealand 77-68-145
Marcus Cain, Australia 73-72-145
LPGA Final Qualifying
Tournament Scores
Friday at LPGA International, Daytona
Beach, Fla.
Champions Course: 6,389 yards, par-72.
Legends Course: 6,468 yards, par-72.
a-amateur
Third Round


Christine Song
Jennie Lee
Jacqui Concolino
a-Stephanie Kono
Junthima Gulyanamitta
Thidapa Suwannapura
Paola Moreno
Dori Carter
Angela Oh
Min Seo Kwak
Stephanie Sherlock
Maude-Aimee Leblanc
Sandra Changkija
Jodi Ewart
Karlin Beck


66-70-70-
71-71-69-
70-72-71-
67-71-75-
71-73-70-
68-80-68-
73-71-72-
74-71-71-
70-75-72-
71-74-72-
73-72-72-
75-71-71-
73-72-72-
70-73-74-
71-72-74-


PGA Tour
Qualifying Scores
Friday
n-Jack Nicklaus Course (Host Course).
7,204 yards. Par 72.
s-PGAWest Stadium Course. 7,300 yards.
Par 72.
La Quinta, Calif.
Purse: $1,057,500
Third Round


Will Claxton
Bobby Gates
Matt Jones
Seung-yul Noh
Vaughn Taylor
Billy Hurley III
Harris English
Brian Harman
Tommy Biershenk
Brendon Todd
Brad Fritsch
William McGirt
Stephen Gangluff
Brett Wetterich
Marco Dawson
Paul D. Haley
Jarrod Lyle
Kent Jones
Dicky Pride
Adam Hadwin
Charlie Beljan
Kevin Kisner
DeanWilson
Daniel Summerhays
Bob May
Bob Estes
Chris Tidland
Jeff Maggert
Tag Ridings
Roberto Castro
Matt Davidson
Sang-Moon Bae


64n-70s-69s-
67s-70n-68s-
67n-68s-70s-
69n-72s-64s-
65n-72s-69s-
65s-71n-70s-
68s-67n-72s-
69s-71n-67s-
70s-70n-68s-
71s-68n-69s-
72s-67n-69s-
65n-73s-70s-
72s-72n-64n-
72s-72n-64n-
73s-68n-67s-
71n-70s-67s-
68n-72s-68s-
68n-72s-68s-
67s-72n-70s-
70s-69n-70s-
70n-73s-66s-
67n-71s-71s-
67n-71s-71s-
64s-73n-72s-
70n-71s-68s-
67s-73n-69s-
71s-74n-65n-
66s-72n-72s-
68n-73s-69s-
71s-71n-68s-
68s-75n-67s-
65s-76n-69s-


GOLF/TENNIS


Woods builds big lead in Thousand Oaks


Associated Press

THOUSAND OAKS,
Calif. -Tiger Woods knows
he's playing better than he
has in the last two years,
and he has the leaderboard
to prove it.
Woods hit a half-dozen
extraordinary shots Friday
in the Chevron World Chal-
lenge on his way to a 5-
under 67, giving him a
three-shot lead over Matt
Kuchar and KJ. Choi going
into the weekend at Sher-
wood Country Club.
It was the second straight
tournament that Woods had
the 36-hole lead. Three
weeks ago at the Australian
Open, he was one shot
ahead until a 75 in the third
round. Woods wound up in
third place at The Lakes,
his best finish of the year.
With each round, it looks
as though his best might not
be too far behind.
Woods had two eagles,
and nearly had a third with
a flop shot from behind the
13th green that he was still
talking about long after his
round. Not even a double
bogey on the par-3 15th hole
when a gust knocked his
ball into the water could
keep him from a comfort-
able lead after two rounds.
"I want the lead after four
days," said Woods, winless
in his last 26 official starts
dating to the Australian
Masters in November 2009.
"Two days is nice, but four
days is even better. I know
I'm playing better, and it's



McDowell


leads by 1


halfway


through


Nedbank

Associated Press

SUN CITY, South Africa
- Graeme McDowell re-
covered from a double-
bogey seven at No. 14 to
birdie two of his last three
holes Friday for a 5-under
67 and a one-shot second-
round lead at the Ned-
bank Golf Challenge.
The Northern Irishman
moved to 7 under for the
tournament and ahead of
four players who shared
second at Sun City.
American Jason Dufner
had four birdies in his 68
to go to 6 under on his
Nedbank debut. Robert
Karlsson (69), Martin
Kaymer (68) and defend-
ing champion Lee West-
wood (70) were also one
off the lead with Dufner
Top-ranked Luke Don-
ald was tied for eighth at 3
under with his 1-under 71
after he bogeyed two of
his first four holes in an
inconsistent round that
included four birdies and
three bogeys.
Charl Schwartzel, who
shared the overnight lead
with Westwood, slipped to
10th in the 12-man field with
a 2-over 74 at Gary Player
Country Club to go to 2
under in the $5 million in-
vitational tournament.
Going for the $1.25 mil-
lion winner's prize, Mc-
Dowell had seven birdies
alongside his double
bogey at No. 14, with five
of those birdies coming on
the back nine.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods, left, walks to the tee Friday after K.J. Choi, of South Korea, hit his shot on the sixth hole during the
second round of the Chevron World Challenge golf tournament at Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif.


nice to see my position on the
leaderboard equating to it."
Woods was at 8-under 136
and will play in the final
group Saturday with
Kuchar, who still is trying to
figure out how to finish off
a good day at Sherwood.
At least this time, Kuchar
only came up short and into
the water on the 18th for a
bogey In the opening
round, he was two shots out


of the lead until a triple
bogey on the 16th and a
bogey on the 17th sent him
to a 72. Kuchar played well
again as the wind arrived in
the middle of the round,
and shot 67 to match Woods
and Zach Johnson for the
best score of the day
Choi had a three-shot
lead over Woods through
six holes and was staying
with him until hitting in the


water twice on the par-3 15th,
taking a quadruple-bogey 7.
Choi bounced back with a
birdie and salvaged a 73.
He's still very much in
the mix, though Choi saw
what he might be up against
on the weekend.
"To put it simply, today he
played like an artist," Choi
said about Woods. "It's pretty
clear that he's really recov-
ered and is back in his old


form again, and he missed a
few putts, but it was really
good to see him play well."
Woods' only bad hole was
the 15th, where he had no
complaints about the shot.
He hit an 8-iron just like he
wanted, then could only hope
the wind swirling through
that corner of the small
canyon left the ball alone. It
didn't He went into the water
and missed his bogey putt.


McIlroy, Quiros split 1-under lead Three-way

AssociatedPress tie in N.Z.
e I ti in N.Z


HONG KONG Rory
McIlroy of Northern Ire-
land retained a share of
the lead at the Hong Kong
Open on Friday after
shooting a 1-under 69 in
the second round.
The U.S. Open champion
was joined at 7-under 133
by first-round co-leader Al-
varo Quiros of Spain, who
also had a 69.
Panuphol Pittayarat of
the Philippines shot a 65
and Scotland's Richie
Ramsay had a 66 to sit a
shot back in second.
McIlroy had the chance
to grab the outright lead at
the last hole, but missed a
4-foot putt for par to finish
an up-and-down round
with a bogey, his second
over the last three holes.
Two-time Hong Kong
Open champion Miguel
Angel Jimenez of Spain
and New Zealand's Danny
Lee were two shots behind
the leaders at 5-under 135.
David Horsey of Britain,
who had a share of the lead
after the opening day
alongside McIlroy and
Quiros, slipped to 4 under
after a 72.
Defending champion Ian
Poulter shot a 68 that in-
cluded an eagle, three birdies
and three bogeys. He was
among a group of eight tied
for 21st six shots back.
McIlroy blamed his poor
finish on a hectic schedule.
"I'm mentally and physi-
cally fatigued and it
showed in a couple of tired
swings toward the end. But
I don't think the season was
long, I made the season
long for myself. It was not
as if I was obligated to
play," said McIlroy, whose
round included four
birdies and three bogeys.
McIlroy has had a busy
two months, figuring in a
number of lucrative un-


Associated Press
Alvaro Quiros of Spain talks with his caddy Friday at the
9th hole during the second round of the Hong Kong Open
in Hong Kong.


sanctioned events that in-
cluded the Lake Malaren
Shanghai Masters, where
he won.
The 22-year-old also made
a weeklong jaunt across
China sponsored by a Hong
Kong tycoon's property
company, playing 18 holes
spread across seven cities.
"It is all a matter of rest.
I had two weeks off in the
Maldives in between the
HSBC Champions in
Shanghai and the World
Cup (in Hainan last week),
but I got sick during this
time and I was on the drip


for three days," he said.
McIlroy shot a flawless
opening round of 64, but
managed to hold onto a
share of the lead despite
struggling to find his touch
Friday
"I was not feeling myself
today I didn't feel as if I
played as well as yesterday
It's just my energy levels
are low. But it is all not bad.
I'm still tied for the lead,"
said McIlroy
McIlroy needs a top-two
finish to have a shot at over-
taking Luke Donald in the
European Tour money race.


Associated Press

CHRISTCHURCH, New
Zealand Two-time PGA
Tour winner Craig Parry
birdied the final three
holes Friday for a 3-under
69 and a share of the sec-
ond-round lead in the New
Zealand Open.
The 45-year-old Aus-
tralian matched compa-
triot Brad Kennedy and
New Zealand's Josh Geary
at 5 under on the Clearwa-
ter Golf Club course.
Kennedy had a 71, and
Geary shot a 68.
Australian amateur Jake
Higginbotham (68), coun-
tryman Leigh McKechnie
(71) and New Zealand's
Doug Holloway (71) were 4
under.



Song adds


to lead at


Q-School

Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Christine Song shot a 2-
under 70 on Friday on LPGA
International's Champions
Course to increase her lead
to five strokes after the third
round of the LPGA Final
Qualifying Tournament.
Song had a 10-under 206
total in the five-round event
The top 40 and ties will
receive LPGA Tour mem-
bership.
Jennie Lee was second
after a 69 on the Champions
Course. Jacqui Concolino and
amateur Stephanie Kono
were 3 under Concolino had
a 71, and Kono shot a 75.


Ferrer rallies to beat Del Potro; Spain leads 2-0


Associated Press

SEVILLE, Spain -
David Ferrer put Spain on
the brink of another Davis
Cup title by rallying for a 6-
2, 6-7 (2), 3-6, 6-4, 6-3 victory
over Juan Martin del Potro
on Friday to give the hosts
a 2-0 lead over Argentina in
the final.
After Rafael Nadal earned
a dominant win over Juan
Monaco in the first match,
Ferrer looked to be in trou-
ble after Del Potro went
ahead 2-1 in sets.
But the Argentininan
seemed to struggle with fa-
tigue and nerves down the
stretch, double-faulting on
set point in the fourth to
force a decider
Ferrer then jumped out


to a 5-1 lead before clinch-
ing the victory with his 28th
forehand winner.
Nadal eased to a 6-1, 6-1,
6-2 win over Monaco ear-
lier Friday, and Feliciano
Lopez and Fernando Ver-
dasco can close out the se-
ries for four-time
champion Spain against
David Nalbandian and Ed-
uardo Schwank in Satur-
day's doubles.
The United States is the
only nation to have rallied
from a 2-0 deficit in the
final, in 1939 at Australia.
Ferrer dropped to his
knees and let out a long
scream after winning a
nearly five-hour match to
leave the South Americans
on the verge of failing for
the fourth time in a final.


Ferrer's comeback
looked unlikely after Del
Potro took control in the
second and third set, with
the former U.S. Open
champion's booming fore-
hand dictating many of the
rallies. Of Del Potro's 71
total winners, 39 came
from his forehand as the
cold conditions favored the
his game.
But with Nadal and
Spain's team willing him
on, Ferrer capitalized on
Del Potro's errors as the
Argentinian followed up
one of his 10 aces with his
fifth double-fault to take it
to a decisive set
The fifth-ranked Ferrer
carried the momentum
and the support of the ma-
jority of the 26,000 specta-


tors into the decider, and
broke in the fourth and
sixth games for a 5-1 lead.
Nadal returned to the
comfort of clay after a dis-
appointing performance at
last week's ATP World Tour
Finals in London, and his
best play followed as he
broke Monaco seven times.
Monaco struggled to repel
Nadal as the Spaniard con-
verted the first of 14 break
chances with a forehand
passing shot for a 2-1 lead.
Ferrer and Nadal are a
combined 27-0 in Davis
Cup matches on clay, a sur-
face Spain hasn't lost on for
22 ties, including a record
20 straight on home soil
dating to 1999 as it vies for
its third title in four years.
It beat Argentina in 2008.


Associated Press
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates
defeating Argentina's Juan
Monaco on Friday after the
first match of the Davis Cup
Final, in Seville, Spain.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 B5


m 1 440b -


I












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

'Up' sell


Associated Press
A full scale rendition of the
house in the animated
movie "Up" is in Herriman,
Utah. This highly detailed
recreation of the house
from the Academy Award-
winning movie "Up" has
become a curious visitor
attraction in this suburban
development south of Salt
Lake City. It's now been
sold by the builder to a
couple who loved the
movie as much as he did.

Utah home in-
spired by Disney
movie 'Up' sold
SALT LAKE CITY- A
Utah house modeled
after the home featured
in the animated movie
"Up" has been sold to a
family who are self-de-
scribed Disney and Pixar
fanatics.
Clinton and Lynette
Hamblin of Pentaluma,
Calif., are buying the
home in Herriman, Utah,
for $400,000.
The Hamblins say they
were searching for a
home in California that
was similar to the color-
ful cottage seen in the
movie when they heard
about the Disney-ap-
proved "Up" house in
Utah.
Builder Adam
Bangerter has said the
blueprints for the house
were drawn based en-
tirely on details found in
the popular movie. Much
of the home had to be
custom-designed.
The house has a sten-
ciled front lawn mailbox,
a vibrant exterior paint
and colorful murals in-
side that make it immedi-
ately recognizable to
"Up" fans.

Bob Marley heirs
sue over name
MIAMI -A feud has
erupted within the first
family of reggae.
The widow and nine
children of Bob Marley

his half-
are suing

brother in
Florida to
stop use
of the
Marley
name to
promote
Bob an annual
Marley Miami
music
festival and other
businesses.
The lawsuit contends
businessman Richard
Booker and several affili-
ated companies are vio-
lating copyright and
trademark laws by using
Marley's name and other
intellectual property
That includes the an-
nual Nine Mile Music
Festival in Miami and a
tour business at the Nine
Mile area of Jamaica,
where Marley grew up
and is buried.
Marley died of cancer
in 1981 at age 36.
The federal lawsuit
filed in Fort Lauderdale
seeks unspecified dam-
ages and to stop unautho-
rized use of Marley's
name.
-From wire reports


Actresses aging out?


Lawsuitputs

spotlight on career

barrier

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -A million-dol-
lar lawsuit by an actress who claims
her job prospects were damaged
when she was outed online as a 40-
year-old has run smack into con-
ventional wisdom: If Sandra
Bullock, 47, and Helen Mirren, 66,
are getting steady work, bias against
older actresses surely must have
vanished.
Film stars Meryl Streep, Halle
Berry and Glenn Close are also
members of the 40-plus and em-
ployed club. On TV the majority of
the "Desperate Housewives" fe-
male leads are nearing 50, while
Emmy Award-winning Julianna
Margulies of "The Good Wife" is 44.
But industry insiders and unions
say star power obscures the ageism
gap between high-profile perform-
ers and working stiffs a unique
aspect of Hollywood's division of
the haves and have-nots.
"There is a tendency for all of us
to think of the actors we see all the
time and whose names we know,"
said Duncan Crabtree-Ireland, the
Screen Actors Guild's deputy na-
tional executive director and gen-
eral counsel.
"But the vast majority of charac-
ters on TV and film are portrayed
by people we don't know and who
are struggling to make a living as an
actor," he said.
Want examples? Think of search-
ing a movie's closing credits to iden-
tify an actor in a minor role, or the
somewhat familiar face that pops
up as the guest victim or killer on a
TV crime drama.
Older actresses face more hiring
hurdles than their male counter-
parts, according to employment sta-
tistics from SAG and the American
Federation of Television and Radio
Artists, as well as the experience of
those on the front lines.
Women over 40 make up 24.3 per-
cent of the U.S. population, the 2010
census found. In comparison, union
casting analysis show actresses over
40 years old get 12.5 percent of roles
for television and film. Men of that
age are also about a quarter of the
population but nearly equal their
ranks in casting.
(Television doesn't do well by
women overall, who are 50.8 per-
cent of the U.S. population but are
seen in only a quarter of roles, ac-
cording to union statistics.)
The picture is no prettier when it
comes to earnings in the youth-ob-
sessed industry In 2010, for exam-
ple, actresses ages 41 to 50 working
in SAG-covered film and TV proj-





Louisiana sees


4
.1pc


\'~


\ ..


Associated Press
U.S. actress Meryl Streep attends a photo call Nov. 14 for "The Iron Lady"
at a central London venue.


ects earned a total $58 million -
compared to the $160 million paid
to actors in that age group.
The guild is heartened by the
high-profile older actresses who are
finding work, especially on TV and
Crabtree-Ireland said, "We hope
that this will be the beginning of a
trend for all of our members, but
our data doesn't show that."
Among the groundbreakers are
Close, 64, of "Damages" and the up-
coming theatrical release "Albert
Nobbs"; Kyra Sedgwick, 46, of "The
Closer"; and Marg Helgenberger,
52, "CSI: Crime Scene
Investigation."
That's progress, given that super-
star Bette Davis was 42 when she
played an aging actress on the brink
of irrelevance in "All About Eve"
(1950) and was 56 when she starred
as an elderly "spinster" descending
into madness in "Hush ... Hush,
Sweet Charlotte" (1964).
Compare that to Dana Delaney
and her role as a smart, sexy med-
ical examiner in "Body of Proof."
Delaney turns 56 next March.
"It's a miracle I'm still working,"


said Salma Hayek, 45, whose credits
include the newly released "Puss in
Boots" and "Frida" (2002), for which
she received an Oscar nomination.
"They told me you'll never work be-
cause I have the accent.... They told
me you're not going to work after 35
or 30, and I've never been busier in
my life."
But non-marquee performers see
a different script. The lawsuit filed
in October by an actress identified
only as "Jane Doe" contends that
"lesser-known forty-year-old ac-
tresses are not in demand in the en-
tertainment business."
How her age became public is at
the heart of the suit. She says it was
through the Internet Movie Data-
base Pro website IMDbPro, the sub-
scription-based counterpart to the
popular and free IMDb, which are
subsidiaries of Amazon.com.
IMDbPro's home page boasts that
"Industry Insiders Use Pro," which
offers 80,000 representation listings
for actors, directors, and producers.
Those listings generally include,
among credits and contacts, birth
dates.


surge in TV & film projects


Associated Press


As cast and crew of the
HBO television series
"Treme" filmed in the
French Quarter, a ware-
house elsewhere bustled
with stage hands prepping
for production on the Will
Ferrell comedy "Dog Fight"
while a helicopter prepared
to take flight for the shoot-
ing of the new 3-D IMAX
film, "Hidden World."
The stream of film activity
this late in the year is posi-
tioning Louisiana to hit, if
not exceed, last year's
record of more than 100 film
and TV projects, said Chris
Stelly, executive director of
the Office of Entertainment
Industry Development, the
state agency that promotes
Louisiana's film, theater,
music and digital


Birthday: Some stronger and more ambitious elements of
your personality will be aroused in the year ahead because
of the actions you'll be willing to take. You're likely to de-
velop a more feasible course where your probabilities for
success are heightened.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)- It might become neces-
sary for you to make certain that everyone in your charge
knows the rules that have been laid down for their own
good. Don't let anything be ignored.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)- Don't build impediments in
your fertile imagination. You'll find that once you get on a
roll, several things that you thought to be difficult will actu-
ally be relatively easy to do.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Be sure to give those
whose friendships you treasure the benefit of the doubt on
any calls they have to make. If you don't, one of your pals
might feel you don't trust them.


Associated Press
In this Feb. 15, 2011 photo, actor John Seda speaks during
an interview with the Associated Press on the set of the
HBO television series "Treme" outside the Chicky Wah Wah
Lounge in New Orleans.
media industries, ment hubs of California and
Stelly said this is also New York.
likely more film activity "It's incredible," he said.
than in any other U.S. state "The holidays and the sum-
outside of the entertain- mer months, those are usu-


Today's HOROSCOPE
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Although you might get com-
mercially involved with an individual who is exceptionally
tight-fisted and shrewd, as long as you're not indifferent or
naive, you'll do OK.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Our mode of behavior easily
influences our peers. If you nurture a long face, you'll not
see too many people smiling at you. Conversely, laugh,
and the world laughs with you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) The demands placed on you
by others could be rather surprising, but instead of letting
them upset you, you'll thrive on them and let them fuel your
feelings of self-worth.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Even though you might not
ask for it, you could be the recipient of some excellent ad-
vice. The counsel you receive will be extremely helpful and
constructive.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Although your companions


ally slower times for the
film industry here, but last
year and this year that has-
n't been the case."
Other projects filming be-
tween now and Christmas
include the Mark Wahlberg
action flick "Broken City"
and the TV police drama
"Common Law." In the new
year, production is set to
begin on Quentin Taran-
tino's "Django Unchained,"
Summit Entertainment's
caper film "Now You See
Me" and the Columbia Pic-
tures drama "Maersk Ala-
bama," starring Tom Hanks.
Louisiana accepted more
than 130 applications for its
tax incentive program in
2011 and hosted more than
100 film and TV projects for
the second year in a row.
That's about triple previous
years, Stelly said.


might be scattering their efforts, your focus will be centered
on some very meaningful objectives.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Because you'll have worked out
your plans well in advance, things should go smoothly for
you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Because you'll have your plans
worked out, most joint endeavors should work out rather
well for you. Those with whom you associate will want to
follow your lead.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you discuss in detail with your
family or those who are involved exactly what your present
plans are, you should meet with not only their approval but
their cooperation as well.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) This is not the time to be
silent if you feel you've earned something that the powers-
that-be might be unaware of. You shouldn't want what
you've accomplished to be overlooked.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, DEC. 1
Fantasy 5: 5 27 28 32 33
5-of-5 2 winners $109,884.61
4-of-5 262 $135
3-of-5 8,571 $11.50
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30
Powerball: 2 6 34- 35 -47
Powerball: 22
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 7 -11 -13 -36 -37 -51
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 46 $4,323.50
4-of-6 2,288 $70
3-of-6 49,609 $5
Fantasy 5: 2 25 27 28 30
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 321 $555
3-of-5 9,515 $21.50
TUESDAY, NOV. 29
Mega Money: 4 18 24 26
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7 $984.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in


Today is Saturday, Dec. 3,
the 337th day of 2011. There
are 28 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Dec. 3, 1911, Italian
film composer Nino Rota,
known for scoring works by
such directors as Federico
Fellini and Luchino Visconti,
as well as the first two "God-
father" movies, was born in
Milan.
On this date:
In 1833, Oberlin College in
Ohio the first truly coedu-
cational school of higher
learning in the United States
- began holding classes.
In 1947, the Tennessee
Williams play "A Streetcar
Named Desire" opened on
Broadway.
In 1967, surgeons in Cape
Town, South Africa led by Dr.
Christiaan Barnard per-
formed the first human heart
transplant on Louis
Washkansky, who lived 18
days with the new heart.
In 1979, 11 people were
killed in a crush of fans at
Cincinnati's Riverfront Coli-
seum, where the British rock
group The Who was
performing.
Ten years ago: Enron
took steps to bolster its weak
financial footing following its
historic bankruptcy filing, ar-
ranging $1.5 billion in financ-
ing and slashing 4,000 jobs,
or 20 percent of its work
force.
Five years ago: Venezue-
lan President Hugo Chavez
won re-election, defeating
Manuel Rosales.
One year ago: During a
surprise holiday-season visit
to Afghanistan, President
Barack Obama told cheering
U.S. troops at Bagram Air
Field they were succeeding
in their mission fighting
terrorism.
Today's Birthdays:
Singer Andy Williams is 84.
Movie director Jean-Luc Go-
dard is 81. Singer Jaye P.
Morgan is 80. Actor Nicolas
Coster is 78. Actress Mary
Alice is 70. Rock singer Ozzy
Osbourne is 63. Actress
Heather Menzies is 62. Rock
singer Mickey Thomas is 62.
Country musician Paul Gregg
(Restless Heart) is 57. Actor
Steven Culp is 56. Actress
Daryl Hannah is 51. Actress
Julianne Moore is 51.
Olympic gold medal figure
skater Katarina Witt is 46.
Actor Brendan Fraser is 43.


Singer Montell Jordan is 43.
Actor Royale Watkins is 42.
Thought for Today: "Fac-
ing it, always facing it, that's
the way to get through. Face
it." Joseph Conrad, Polish-
born English novelist (born
this date in 1857, died 1924).







CI R O NTY 3,....



RELIGION _
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Righteous relevance


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


SCOTT TAKUSHI/St. Paul Pioneer Press
The worship team, including Gregg Rohde, left, and Jessica Halverson, perform during Sunday morning worship service at High Point Church in
Inver Grove Heights, Minn.


Hipster take on Christian faith aims to


I''


r i~


SCOTT TAKUSHI/St. Paul Pioneer Press
Lead Pastor Tory Farina, center, talks with churchgoers in the lobby of the Inver Grove Heights,
Minn., theater where High Point Church holds its Sunday services.


Christmas programs
The drama and music min-
istries of First United Methodist
Church in Inverness will pres-
ent an annual Christmas musi-
cal drama titled, "First
N-O-E-L," at 4 p.m. today. The
church is at 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road (two miles south of
Applebee's). Call (352)
726-2522.
Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness will host its seventh an-
nual free dinner theater at 7
tonight and Sunday. Doors
open at 6 p.m. The event is
free; reservations are required.
Call (352) 726-1480. Welcome
back to "Cricket County," where
those crazy cousins are up to it
again. Last year they were try-
ing to have a nice Christmas
combining two very different
cultures country and classy.
This year the cousins reunite to
read an amendment to Uncle
Zeke's will. The rich are hoping
to get richer and the country
folks are just trying to find them-
selves.
Through a lot of laughter,
they once again find the real
meaning of Christmas the
birth of our Savior, Jesus Christ.
Come watch the hilarity as two
worlds collide and chickens fly.
Calvary Chapel is at 960 S.
U.S. 41, Inverness.
The Central Florida Master
Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold
W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a
Christmas concert at 3 p.m.
Sunday at First United
Methodist Church, at 1126 E.
Silver Springs Blvd. (State Road
40), diagonally across the street
from the old Ritz Hotel. The pro-


reel in skeptical younger generation


JESSICA FLEMING
St. Paul Pioneer Press
INVER GROVE HEIGHTS, Minn.
The pastor preaches in designer
jeans and skateboarding shoes. He
tweets links to his blog and chats
with churchgoers on Facebook.
As members walk into the movie the-
ater or auditorium for services, the pas-
tor and his wife are in the front row,
singing along and pumping their fists to
loud pop music, played by a live band
featuring electric guitars.
Suburban megachurches, move over
There's a hipper game in town.
"We know a lot of people have left
their mainline churches because it's
boring," said Tory Farina, 31, lead pas-
tor at High Point Church in Inver Grove
Heights. "They felt they were forced to
go. We want them to love it.... Our Sun-
day services feel like a concert."
High Point, which currently meets in
an Inver Grove Heights movie theater,
is a small portion of an exploding reli-
gious movement in the Twin Cities and
nationally
See Page C6


siah" at 4 p.m. Sunday at Dun-
nellon Presbyterian Church,
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
Aside from the solos, all audi-
ence members are invited to
sing along with the choir mem-
bers on selected Christmas
section pieces. Members of the
choir will be in the audience to
assist.
If you have your own copy,
please bring it. A limited num-
ber of copies will be available.
Singing is optional. A freewill of-
fering will be collected at the
conclusion of the concert.
World-renowned solo
handbell artist Christine D. An-
derson will present a free local
Christmas concert. "Christmas
in Bronze," at 4 p.m. Sunday
at Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. Spon-
sored by Crystal River United
Methodist Church and Citr-
usCountyFL.com, the free con-
cert, "Christmas in Bronze", is
open to all and an optional love
offering will be collected. Visit
citruscountyfl.com, email
concert@citruscountyfl.com or
call (352) 564-2020.
The Lecanto Ward of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter-day Saints, 3474 W. South-
ern St., will show the broadcast
of the First Presidency Christ-
mas Devotional at 8 p.m.
Sunday.
The Ward Christmas Social
is at 6:30 p.m. Friday. Bring an
unwrapped toy for a needy
child. Sunday Sacrament meet-
ing begins at 10 a.m. Visitors
are welcome.
See Page C2


Religion NOTES

Council of Catholic Women


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Deanery of the St. Petersburg Diocesan Council of Catholic Women recently
held their Fall Deanery Conference, hosted by Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills. Attending this Conference were the new Deanery officers. From left are Virginia Rinn,
treasurer; Juanita Bowden, recording secretary; Jeannette Kollar, president; the Rev.
Michael Smith, spiritual adviser; Alice McAlister, spirituality chairman; Constance Taylor,
corresponding secretary; Clair Schroder, leadership chairman; and Delores Glade, service
chairman. The National Council of Catholic Women consists of more than 4,000 affiliated
Catholic women's organizations in parishes and dioceses throughout the United States,
representing hundreds of thousands of Catholic women. The St. Scholastica CCW will have
a luncheon on Dec. 16 at Crystal Oaks Community center to help support the Pregnancy
and Family Life Center in Inverness, and in January they will be collecting funds for the
homeless. If you are a Catholic woman 18 years of age or older and would like more infor-
mation on belonging to this organization, call Jeannine at (352) 527-2209.


gram, titled "Carols from
around the World," will include
the Poulenc Christmas Motet(s),
the premiere of two original
works, and carols from the


Huron Nation, Russia, Ukraine,
France, Germany, Britain, Amer-
ica and others. Free admission.
An offering will be collected. Call
(352) 537-0207.


The Dunnellon Chorale,
under the direction of Jeanne
Wolfanger and accompanied by
Nicole Miglis, will present a
sing-along Handel's "Mes-


The



'rest'



of the



story

In the past few years,
my husband and I
have made it a tradi-
tion to eat Christmas din-
ner at a nearby inn that
serves a humongous
buffet.
Without fail, every time
we go I bemoan the fact
that my stomach can't ac-
commodate large quanti-
ties of food.
I've seen people eat
stacks of pancakes the
size of Rhode Island and
whole sides of beef and
think that maybe I can do
that too, but I can't.
One Christmas I de-
cided I was a big girl and
could keep up with the
people eating wheelbar-
row portions from the buf-
fet; however, I discovered
that when you go well past
the full point, the food
tends to overflow. Thank-
fully, I made it to the
ladies room in time.
Since then, I've learned
See Page C5


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Jewish


Book



Month

ews have been called
the People of the
Book for centuries.
Actually, we could be
called the people of the
books, since we are for-
ever preoccupied with
texts. In fact, Judaism is a
text-based religion, with
its emphasis on the Torah,
Prophets, Writings, Tal-
mud and all the commen-
taries. With all the
attention given to books, it
is no wonder that Jews
have set aside a whole
month to highlight and
promote writings of Jew-
ish interest and/or by Jew-
ish authors.
Actually, it was a librar-
ian at the Boston Public
Library who came up with
the idea. In 1925, Fanny
Goldstein setup an exhibit
at the library to promote
Jewish books, similar to
the displays we have here
in our libraries that focus
on timely monthly topics.
The display was to focus
on what she called Jewish
Book Week
The idea caught the at-
tention of Rabbi S. Felix
Mendelsohn of Chicago,
and in 1927, with the
rabbi's help, the idea
spread throughout Amer-
ican communities. For the
See Page C5





C2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

The choir of First Baptist
Church of Floral City will per-
form its Christmas cantata at
7 p.m. Friday. The concert is
free and everyone is welcome
to attend. A dessert fellowship
will follow the performance. The
church is at 8545 E. Magnolia
St. Call (352) 726-4296 or visit
www.fbcfloralcity.org.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church's Grace Handbell Choir
and a group of eight singers
from the Presbyterian Church
and the Dunnellon Methodist
Church have been invited to
participate in the Nature Coast
Community Band's Christ-
mas concerts at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10, at Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1100
Highland Ave., Inverness, and
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11,
at First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. All seats are
freewill offering.
First Christian Church of
Inverness invites everyone to a
good old-fashioned Christmas-
oriented Gospel concert by
"The River Jordan" at 6 p.m.
Saturday Dec. 10. Admission is
free. A love offering will be ac-
cepted. Call the church at (352)
344-1908.
The adults of First Assem-
bly of Dunnellon will present the
"12 Voices of Christmas" at
10:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 11.A
family movie will be shown that
evening. The children's Christ-
mas program is at 6 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 18. Traditional
Christmas Eve candlelight
Communion service is at 6:30
p.m. Christmas morning cele-
bration worship service is at
10:30. (No evening service
Dec. 25.) All are welcome. The
church is at 2872 W. Dunnellon
Road (County Road 488),
across the road from Nichol's
Lumber. Call (352) 489-8455.
The chancel choir of Good


RELIGION


Shepherd Lutheran Church will
present its annual holiday
concert during the 11 a.m. wor-
ship service Sunday, Dec. 11.
The children's Nativity play
will be performed during the
8:30 and 11 a.m. services Sun-
day, Dec. 18. Christmas Eve
worship services with Holy
Communion are at 5 and 7 p.m.
All are invited to these special
events. Call the church for
more information at (352) 746-
7161.The church is on County
Road 486, opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando.
The Chorus of Beverly
Hills will celebrate the holidays
with the Christmas concert
"Angel's Song" at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 11, in the sanctuary
of the Beverly Hills Community
Church, 82 Civic Circle. The
first half of the program will con-
sist of secular Christmas songs
and the second half of the con-
cert will be a performance of
special selections from the
Christmas cantata "Angel's
Song." The public is invited to
attend. Tickets ($5) are avail-
able from chorus members and
through the church office. Di-
rector Renate Williams and ac-
companist Ruth Carruthers will
lead the group. Call the church
office at (352) 746-3620 or
Volena Van Gunst at (352)
746-5680.
Inverness Church of God
will present the Christmas mu-
sical, "Mary, Did You Know?"
in the 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
worship services Sunday, Dec.
18. Pastor Larry Powers invites
the public to attend. The church
is at 416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Call the church at (352)
726-4524.
First Church of God, 5510
E. Jasmine Lane will present
"A Christmas Gift to Citrus
County" at 2 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 18. This gospel concert
will feature Phyllis Morgan, for-
mer pianist for the Lawrence
Welk Show and piano accom-
panist for Norma Zimmer for
more than 15 years. There is
no charge. A love offering for


Phyllis will be collected. Doors
open at 1 p.m. Pastor Tom
Walker invites to public.
First Lutheran Church will
present "A Festival of Nine
Lessons and Carols," featur-
ing music and scripture read-
ings to tell the story of the birth
of Christ, at 3 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 18, in the sanctuary at
1900 W. State Road 44, Inver-
ness. This is a divine service to
celebrate the Nativity, just as it
is traditionally performed every
Christmas Eve at Kings Col-
lege, Cambridge, England.
Everyone is invited. There is no
admission charge. Afreewill of-
fering will be collected. Call the
church office at (352) 726-1637.
The Central Florida Master
Choir will be at Dunnellon Pres-
byterian Church at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 18, as part of their
concert series. They will pres-
ent their seasonal concert,
"Carols from Around the
World," with a freewill offering
taken at the end of the concert
with all proceeds going to the
Master Choir. The church is at
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
The annual Christmas
cantata by Crystal River United
Methodist Church will be pre-
sented at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec.
18. "A Christmas Promise,"
under the direction of Margaret
Williams, will include the bell
choir, sanctuary choir, praise
team and children. The church
is at 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call
(352) 795-3148.
"Everlasting Light," con-
temporary Christmas music
blended with traditional carols,
will be presented by the wor-
ship choir of North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs at 6
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18. Christ-
mas goodies fellowship will fol-
low. The community is invited.
The church is at the corner of
N. Elkcam Blvd. and N. Citrus
Springs Blvd. in Citrus Springs.
Call (352) 489-1688 for more
information.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene invites everyone to
take time to make Christ the


focus of the Christmas season
and join us for "HerNaz Christ-
mas Live 2011." Pastor Walt
will direct the dynamic, spirit-
filled choir and orchestra in this
free presentation at 6 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 18, at the church, at
2101 N. Florida Ave. on U.S. 41
in Hernando.
Sale away
A yard sale to benefit its
food pantry will open for the first
time in the parking lot of First
Presbyterian Church of Crystal
River from 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
today. The church is at 1501
S.E. U.S. 19 adjacent to the
Sweetbay plaza. For more in-
formation or to rent a space at
the sale, call (352) 746-7585.
Flea market and bake
sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
today at St. Lawrence Church,
320 Dade Ave., Bushnell (off
Highway 301). Sloppy Joe's,
hotdogs and drinks available.
For reservations, call Mrs. Petty
at (352) 793-7773.
"Snowman Bazaar" from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. today hosted by
the Women of First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
West, Inverness. Arts and
crafts/vendor fair with a bake
sale, lunch, coffee and cold
drinks available for purchase. A
portion of the proceeds will go to
help support HOME, a Christian
home for pregnant and unwed
teenage mothers and their ba-
bies. Call (352) 726-1637.
A bake sale sponsored by
the Holy Myrrhbearers of St.
Raphael Orthodox Church will
take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today and from noon until sold
out on Sunday. Purchase ethnic
and traditional pastries and
breads early for the holidays.
Come early for the best selec-
tion. The church is at 1277 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness. Visit
www.straphaelchurch.org for
directions.
The Altar and Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will host a
craft fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10, in Father


Stegeman Hall. The church is
on the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40 north of Dunnel-
Ion. More than 30 crafters will
be there along with several new
skilled artisans who will sell a
wide variety of handmade
goods. Light refreshments will
be available for a nominal fee.
Call Pat at (352) 489-1984.
Cornerstone Christian Sup-
ply, a ministry of Inverness
Church of God, is having a
Christmas sale through Dec.
24. Stop in and pick up a copy of
our Christmas catalog for
coupons and sale details. The
bookstore is an excellent source
for all your Christian needs:
Bibles, music, greeting cards,
books, T-shirts, gifts, etc. Corner-
stone Christian Supply is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call the
bookstore at (352) 344-2470.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call (352) 726-1707.
Special events
A Southern Gospel concert
featuring "The Pickerings" will
take place at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day at Christian Center Church
on U.S. 19, one mile south of
the Grover Cleveland/Halls
River intersection in Ho-
mosassa Springs. A freewill of-
fering will be accepted. This
interfaith community concert is
conducted the first Sunday
monthly.
St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women's next meet-
ing is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday.
Christmas luncheon at the
Boathouse Restaurant after the
meeting. Make out check for


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

$14 to St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women by Monday for
luncheon. Forms are in the of-
fice. The CCW is sponsoring
the Gift for Jesus. Pregnancy &
Life Center needs items, or
money to buy items to fill layette
baskets. Mothers of newborn
babies seeking help from the
Pregnancy & Life Center re-
ceive a layette basket. The play
is Jan. 15. Light refreshments
served after. Cost is $10. Nickel
social at 11 a.m. Feb. 7.
Citrus County has a non-
profit organization known as
"Family & Friends Reaching
for the Abilities." FFRA is a
support program comprised of
caregivers and their loved ones
who get together frequently for
activities, informative discus-
sions on government programs,
social activities and more re-
garding our situations. Call Ron
Philips at (352) 382-7819
and/or attend one of our meet-
ings which are held regularly at
the Key Center location in In-
verness at 130 Heights Ave.
The meetings take place the
second Friday monthly starting
at 9 a.m. with coffee and re-
freshments. Public is invited.
Abundant Life will give
away free hot dogs and ham-
burgers during a Christmas
sing-along from 3 to 5 today at
the church at 4515 N. Tallahas-
see Road, Crystal River. Take a
break from the busyness of the
season to enjoy free food and
some Christmas singing. Visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org or
call 795-LIFE.
Hernando United
Methodist Church, at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, contin-
ues Advent services. In keeping
with theme of gifts, during Sun-
day services at 10 a.m., the
topics include: Tomorrow -
"The Gift of Love." Dec. 11 -
"The Gift of Joy." Dec. 18 -
"The Gift of Peace." Pastor
Tyler Montgomery leads an Ad-
vent study on Wednesdays
called "Christmas Gifts That

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !. 'I

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA "i.


Special
Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising
Information



West I
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.

[Y1
2


US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


4 Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


CASSEMBUE50FGODI|
Come ~
grow
with us! 7

The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service


Cj Crystal
05 River
Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager





HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CA IN FAMILY
IN CH KIST!

CKYSTXL
RIVCE
UNITED
METHODIST
CH U CH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider.


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


(Crystal River
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
795-5325
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Blueqrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
8:00am & 10:30am
Sunday School
All Ages &Adults 9:30am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i ili Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
Ul I' ,,,d .... i r ;t

-I-


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY COPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
39EeWjGrvh
621-5532 ooo-,.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Won't Break," an Advent study
for adults by James W. Moore.
On Sunday, Dec. 18, the choir
will present its cantata, "Child of
Hope," directed by Debbie
Thompson, accompanied by
John Petro, organist, and Anita
Jackson on the keyboard. On
Christmas Eve at 6 p.m., there
will be a candlelight ceremony
proceeding outside to the
manger with children participat-
ing. Christmas Day service is at
10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 25. Call
(352) 726-7245.
The Proclaimers Quartet


RELIGION


will be at Hernando Church of
the Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando, on Sunday.
The Hernando Nazarene Cele-
bration Sounds choir and or-
chestra will open the concert at
5:45 p.m. The Proclaimers will
perform at 6 p.m. The public is
invited to this free concert. A
love offering will be collected.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness welcomes back
Bryan Popin for another concert
to "kick off" the Christmas sea-
son at 6 p.m. Wednesday.
Popin will be joined by the
church's Worship Team and
Praise Kids. The church is at
550 Pleasant Grove Road. A
love offering will be collected.
Call (352) 726-1252.


St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will meet at
10:30 a.m. Thursday. Christ-
mas luncheon at the Boat
House after the meeting. The
form for reservations and pay-
ment is available in the office.
St. Benedict Council of Catholic
Women will put on a play on
Jan. 15. Cost is $10 per per-
son. Light refreshments will be
served.
Homemade Christmas
cookies will be for sale at the
annual "Cookie Walk" spon-
sored by the United Methodist
Women from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10, at Crystal
River United Methodist Church,
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Participants will purchase a


carry-box for $8, then walk
around the room and choose
the cookies they want to fill their
box. There is no limit to the
amount of cookies put into the
box as long as the lid can be
closed.
All kinds of cookies available.
There will also be a table of
crafts for sale. Proceeds will
support missions throughout
Citrus County. Call (352)
382-7232.
Spinning the top, called a
dreidel, is a traditional game
played at Chanukah. Judi Sie-
gal, Jewish educator and reli-
gion columnist for the Citrus
County Chronicle, will explain
what the dreidel can teach. Sie-
gal will speak on this topic at


10:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, at
the Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Siegal is the president of Con-
gregation Beth Israel of Ocala.
She will relate how the
Chanukah story has affected
world history.
Refreshments and discus-
sion will follow. Call (352) 465-
4225 or visit naturecoastuu.org.
All are welcome.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River will host
free 15-minute memory
screenings for adults 50 and
older from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 13. Appoint-
ments required. Call (352) 795-


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C3
5325. Participants will meet pri-
vately with Jerry Fisher, MSW,
program specialist for the
Alzheimer's Association, Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter. While the
screening is not considered a
diagnostic tool and is not in-
tended for those who have de-
mentia or Alzheimer's, it is
extremely helpful when it
comes to determining if there is
a memory problem.
GriefShare seminar is of-
fered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 4 through
March 28, at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church. Call (352)
746-6200 or visit www.seven
rivers.org.
See NOTES/Page C4


O


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA








Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3 6 1 6


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com

T -I


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM.................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM........Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
/2 mi. east of U.S. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Glory To Glory

Ministries




COME AND JOIN US:
Sundav.s 10:30.ain
LOC TION:
Holder CoininIlnitv Center
70:i40i: [I Fl.:rl i Av -
Be-v- rl, Hill FL :JJ'46
S 566-6613


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
0006YE Floral City, FL.



W Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Christian Formation
9:15 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Liftir Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
wwwfbcfloralcity.org

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

0 p(
Pfert




Doows

4 .. ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices


St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School
/5


Come as you are!
CEIES.IS
COMMUNITY CHURCH







PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg. ,
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253



H V" nund o
The Nazarene
A Place l4 Belhong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Way Baptist

Church

965 N. Lecanto Hwy.
(Route 491)


Awana
August May
Sunday Eves.
From 5-7 PM
Our purpose: To honor the
Savior by shepherding
people into a meaningful
relationship with God

- Pastor
Steven L. Witt
(352) 527-9900
www.shepherdsway
baptistchurch.org


H


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomersfeel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com

Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information

The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander
Sunday School 9am
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Herando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com
"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


R Faith
Lutheran
Church L.C.M
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


Hem:;d;rI.Irl 4'


a 3790 E. Parson's Point Rd.
44
352 734
Visit us on the Web at
wwwAchemmade.cm


I-


L!





C4 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Worship
Living Water Ministries is
open at its new location at 1
Beverly Hills Blvd., in Beverly
Hills at the corner of County
Road 491.The thrift store is
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday. The
store is accepting clean,
saleable donations of jewelry,
clothing, household items, furni-
ture and appliances. Pick-ups
are available for larger dona-
tions, and tax deductible forms
are available on request. Call
(352) 270-8886. Services and
meetings also take place at the
new location. Sunday praise
and worship service is at 5 p.m.
with music, and a Bible-based
message by Pastor Wayne
Wilkinson. A Christian 12-step
support group meets at 6 p.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study at 7:30. Free breakfast
and Bible study is at 8:30 Sat-
urday mornings. The Christian
Youth Center will open soon.
Living Water Ministries is a non-
denominational church where
everyone is welcome to all
events. The ministry's motto is
"Come as you are ... but ex-
pect to be changed."
The Rev. Mary Louise De-
Wolf will reference writings from
the "Jesus Seminar" and the
works of Bishop John Shelby
Spong, a liberal Christian, on
Sunday at the Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalists fel-
lowship, 7633 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs. Learn how a hu-
manist explores a possible view
of Jesus' teachings as a guide
for living. Call (352) 465-4225
or visit naturecoastuu.org.
Floral City United
Methodist Church is at 8478
E. Marvin St., across from the
elementary school. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
meeting is at 7:30 a.m. today.
All men are welcome. The


RELIGION


United Methodist Women's
Christmas luncheon is at 11
a.m. Monday followed by a
short meeting and installation of
officers for 2012. "Intergenera-
tional Night" is Wednesday,
Dec. 14, in Hilton Hall. Dinner is
at 5:15 with activities from 6:30
to 7:30 p.m. Pre-register for the
dinner. The choir will present a
Christmas medley at the 10:30
service Sunday, Dec. 18.
Christmas Eve services are at 7
p.m. in the main sanctuary and
9 p.m. in the 1884 church. A
combined service will take
place at 9 a.m. Sunday, Dec.
25, in the 1884 sanctuary.
There will be no 10:30 a.m.
service.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church will cele-
brate the second Sunday of Ad-
vent with Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. tomorrow with
Christian Formation at 9:15,
Sunday school at 10 a.m. and
nursery at 10:30 a.m. Healing
service and Eucharist at 10
a.m. Wednesday followed by
Bible study and sack lunch.
SOS at Key Training Center
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday.
Evening Bible study in parish
hall at 7 p.m. Thursday.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church has a "come as you
are" service with Communion at
5 p.m. Saturday. Sunday wor-
ship services begin with early
service with Communion at 8
a.m., Sunday school classes for
all ages at 9:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship hour at 9 a.m., and tra-
ditional service with
Communion at 10:30 a.m. Spe-
cial services are announced.
Nursery provided. The church
is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S.19), Crystal River. Call
(352) 795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutherancrystal
river.com.
Faith Lutheran Church is
in Crystal Glen Subdivision,
Lecanto, on State Road 44 and
County Road 490. Today at 6
p.m. and Sunday at 9:30 a.m.,
Pastor Lane will give his ser-


mon from Mark 13:33-37, titled,
"An Unlikely Preacher." Follow-
ing the Sunday service is a time
of fellowship with Bible study
and Sunday school at 11 a.m.
The second Midweek Advent
service, "On Your Knees," is at
5 p.m. Wednesday followed by
a potluck covered-dish supper.
The church is handicapped ac-
cessible, has assistance for the
hearing impaired, and a cry
room for small children. Call
(352) 527-3325 or visit fatih
lecanto.com.
"Living in the Great Until" is
the message topic for the Sat-
urday night service at 6 tonight
at North Oak Baptist Church.
Join us for "Praise, Prayer and
Power" to live life in this world.
Child care through age 4 is
available. The church is at the
intersection of N. Citrus Springs
Blvd. and N. Elkcam Blvd. in
Citrus Springs. Call (3520 489-
1688 for more information.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featur-
ing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the
7:45 a.m. class. Evening fellow-
ship is at 6 with various serv-
ices during summer months.
On Wednesday at 6 p.m. is a
prayer meeting, "Women in the
Life of Jesus" study, "Youth Ig-
nite," "Praise Kids" and a nurs-
ery for age 3 and younger.
Christmas Eve candlelight serv-
ice is at 6 p.m. The Christmas
morning service is at 10. All are
invited to join us in celebrating
Christmas. Call the office at
(352) 726-1252). The church is
at 550 Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
St. Anne's Anglican
Church is on Fort Island Trail
West, Crystal River. St. Anne's


celebrates the second Sunday
of Advent at the 8 and 10:15
a.m. services tomorrow. St.
Anne's will host "Our Fathers
Table" today from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Overeaters Anony-
mous meets Wednesdays from
10 to 11:30 in the sanctuary
and 7 to 8 p.m. in the parish li-
brary. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and
Monday in the parish library. St.
Anne's will host its annual
Christmas Wassail sing-along
at 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18.
Annie and Tim's United Blue-
grass Gospel Band will per-
form. All are welcome.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, conducts
worship at 8 and 10:30 a.m.
with Sunday school and Bible
class at 9:15 a.m. Church deco-
rating will begin at 9 a.m. today.
Choir rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Midweek Advent serv-
ices are at 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day with the adult choir singing
followed by a congregational
meeting. St. Paul's School and
Precious Lambs Preschool
Christmas services are at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 20, and
10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Dec.
21. "Christmas Eve Candlelight
Services of Lessons and Car-
ols" will take place at 6:30 and
10 p.m. Christmas Day service
is at 10: a.m. New Year's Eve
service is at 6:30 p.m. New
Year's Day worship services
are at 8 and 10:30 a.m. The
community is invited. Call (352)
489-3027.
The Rev. David Rawls,
pastor of Crystal River United
Methodist Church, will preach
the second in a series of ser-
mons, "The Journey to Bethle-
hem," on Sunday. The theme of
the sermon, based on Matthew
1:18-24, is "Are You Listening
for God to Speak?" The title of
the sermon is "Joseph of
Bethlehem."
The church is at 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave. Traditional services are
at 8 and 11 a.m. A contempo-
rary service and Sunday school


is offered at 9:30 a.m. Call
(352) 795-3148.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Sunday services in-
clude the Holy Eucharist Rite 1
service at 8 a.m. and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 service at 10:30
a.m. Adult Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eu-
charist service and children's
church are both at 10:30 a.m.
Youth Sunday school and
young adult forum with lunch
follows the 10:30 a.m. family
Eucharist service. Fun activities
and fellowship are planned.
Feed My Sheep feeding pro-
gram for people in need is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service at 12:30 p.m.
Visit stmaggie.org. The church
is an equal opportunity
provider. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Sunday wor-
ship schedule: Traditional serv-
ice at 8 and 11 a.m.,
contemporary service at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school hour at
9:30 and coffee hour from 9 to
11 a.m. For the second Sunday
of Advent, Holy Communion will
be celebrated and the Rev.
Craig S. Davies will preach on
"Is the Church Ready For
Christmas?" with readings from
Mark 13:32-37. Do you have a
favorite Christmas story? Is
there a special song you would
like to share? Perhaps you
have a favorite Christmas
poem. If so, we want to hear
about it. The church will have a
special evening with dinner at 6
and a program at 6:45 p.m.
Wednesday. You are the pro-
gram. Make reservations now
for this special evening of food,
fellowship, fun and remember-
ing. Call (352) 637-0770.
Everyone is invited to see the
free Friday night movie, "Faith
Like Potatoes," at 6:30 p.m.,
Dec. 9. Free hot dogs and pop-
corn. New-member class at 4
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11. Call the
church office at (352) 637-0770


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

by Monday for reservations.
Regular Sunday worship
services are at 8:15 and 11
a.m. at Joy Lutheran Church
on S.W. State Road 2100 at
83rd Place, Ocala. Sunday
school classes are at 9:45 a.m.
The German language worship
service is at 3 p.m. the first
Sunday monthly.
The Wednesday evening
worship service is at 6:45. Pas-
tor Ed Holloway leads Bible
study in the Gospel of Luke at 3
p.m. Thursday. The commu-
nity is welcome. Call (352) 854-
4509, ext. 221.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
the Children's Ministries Build-
ing. Sunday school begins at
9:30 a.m. with classes for
everyone The church has many
Christian education opportuni-
ties for all ages at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Missionettes and
Royal Rangers Clubs meet for
children from the age of 3. All
teenagers are invited to the
youth group, "Gravity," with
Youth Pastor Jon Uncle. At the
present time, the adult class
meets in rooms 105 and 106 at
7 p.m. Wednesday. The church
is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Call the church at (352)
726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. The church is
barrier free and offers a free
tape ministry and large-print
service helps and hearing de-
vices. A nursery attendant is
available for children ages 3
and younger. All are welcome.
Advent worship service at 7
p.m. Wednesday preceded by
a potluck supper at 6 p.m. Call
the church for more information
at (352) 746-7161.The church
is on County Road 486, oppo-
site Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando.

See NOTES/Page C5


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH

U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida

Sunday Masses
7:30A.M., 9:00A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30- 3:30 P.M

726-1670




UNITY...


Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. 6:00 PM Bible Study
Children's Church School
Weekly
ALL ARE WELCOME


S"









VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PX. to 3:30 P.M Sat.
orByAppointnent


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
.catholicweb.com .:


0^0



All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


0 Hwy. 44 E@
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services *
Traditional
S8 AM and 11:00 AM m
: Contemporary
S 9:30AM
* 11:00 AM Service
" Tapes & CD's Available

Sunday School for all ages
9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group .
5 to 7 PM 0
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org 0
" Podcast: FPC inv.com
SChurchOffice 637-0770
S Pastor Crai Da
0 Pastor Craig Davies m


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH








'i/w/y WnFecomes.

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday

Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


First Baptist Church
of Beverly Hills
Marple Lewis,III Jeff Owen
Pastor Minister of Worship
and Youth
Sunday Services:
Bible Study 9:15 A.M.
Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Services:
Prayer and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
Located at the intersection of
Hwy. 491 (Lecanto Hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours 9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com


Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com


Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday CoffeelConversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Mission Possible
MINISERIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
9 Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ...................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
SWednesdays
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am








A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service

Bible Study & Prayer


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.


76 .7


F 45 Years of
SIRST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
A Christ Centered Family Church
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 A.M.
726-1637
S Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Independent
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 445-9013


aWture Cos

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BOOKS
Continued from Page C1

first 15 years of its exis-
tence, the festival coincided
with Lag B'Omer, which is a
holiday that, fittingly, hon-
ors scholars. In 1940, the
event date was changed to
the days and weeks preced-
ing Chanukah so that people
would be encouraged to buy
books as gifts for the holi-
day Jewish Book Week be-
came so popular that in
1943, the event was length-
ened to a whole month in-
stead of just one week.
Today, the popular event
is celebrated with book
readings and signing by au-
thors, "meet the author
teas," and other events ded-
icated to books and Jewish
scholarship. The festival is
sponsored by the Jewish
Book Council (wwwjewish-
bookcouncil.org). The exact
date varies because of the
nature of the Jewish calen-
dar, but it is always the
month before Chanukah,
typically mid-November or
so until the middle of De-
cember
There are many Jewish
books and authors to choose
from, and I offer a few that
are classic in nature: Chaim
Potok (The Chosen), Elie
Wiesel (Night), Arthur
Miller (Death of a Sales-
man), Betty Friedan (The
Feminine Mystique), Abra-
ham Sacher (History of the
Jews), Theodore White (won
a Pulitzer for general non-
fiction), Dennis Prager
(Nine Questions People Ask
About Judaism), Herman
Wouk (This Is My God),
Philip Roth (Goodbye,
Columbus) Leon Uris (Exo-
dus), and I.B. Singer and
Saul Bellow, who both won
Nobel prizes.
More recent novelists in-
clude Michael Chabon,
Nicole Krauss, Naomi
Ragen and Dara Horn,
whose novel "All Other
Nights" concerned a Jewish
soldier during the Civil War.
The themes of Jewish
novels are varied. Many rail
against their Jewish back-
ground, such as in Marjorie
Morningstar, while others
give us a glimpse into the
life of the very observant,
such as in Naomi Ragen's
works. Still others tell of the
days of the European shtetls
and the life of the Jews in
Eastern Europe pre-World
War II. And the topic of the
Holocaust is well repre-
sented, with the novels and
fiction cum real-life experi-
ences of Elie Wiesel.
Other topics include as-
similation into the Ameri-
can milieu, Zionism,
religion, politics and social
issues. And of course, there
are many books written on
Jewish history, peoplehood
and traditions from the most
observant to the very lib-
eral.
Whether you go online,
visit the library or use an
electronic reader, you are
bound to find a Jewish book
to spark your interest. And
you have a whole month to
enjoy!
Jewish Book Month is ob-
served in 2011 from Nov 21
to Dec. 21.

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. cornm.

MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to
submit information
about regular meet-
ings for publication
on the Community
page each weekday.
Include the name of
the organization, the
time, day and place
of the meeting,
whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or
monthly, and whom
to call for details.


* Send in information
attn: Community
Page Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to
(352) 563-3280,
attention: Club
meetings.
* E-mail to commu-
nity@ chronicleon-
line.com. Include
"Club Meetings" in
the subject line.
* For special events or
fund-raisers, submit a
separate news
release.


RELIGION


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

my lesson: Not to push my
luck when I get the sense
that if I eat one more bite
I'll get sick. I can't handle a
plate that's too full.
Lest you think this is all
about training for marathon
holiday eating extravagan-
zas, it's not. This column is
about the weeklong stay-at-
home vacation I took this
past summer and the day it
rained, and what I got out of
it
That day, I woke up with
my bum knee swollen and
puffy, so I knew it would be
a couch day not that I had
anything planned. So I
popped some ibuprofens,
brewed a huge mug of tea
and sat down on the couch
to listen to the rain.
There's something sooth-
ing about the sound of rain,
especially when the TV is
off and there are no other


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

First Baptist Church of
Floral City invites everyone to
Sunday worship at the 8:30
a.m. blended service and the 11
a.m. traditional service. Coffee
and doughnuts are served in
the fellowship hall from 9 to
9:45 a.m. Sunday school
classes for all ages begin at
9:45 a.m. Wednesday evening
suppers begin at 5. Cost is $3
for adults, $2 for youths, $1 for
children 12 and younger, or a
maximum of $10 per family. Fol-
lowing supper, services begin at
6:30 p.m. and include children's
ministry (Awana), youth ministry
(grades 6 through 12), and
adult Bible study and prayer
meeting. Sanctuary choir prac-
tice follows at 8 p.m. The
church is at 8545 E. Magnolia
St. Call (352) 726-4296 or visit
www.fbcfloralcity.org.


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
X Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


distractions. Just a steady,
irregular pounding of water
from the sky and the occa-
sional whistle of the wind.
Several times a year, I
have a day like this where
it's quiet and I'm still and
content. It's often quiet, and
I'm occasionally still, but I
rarely remain still. So for it
to be quiet, for me to be
quiet and still and to be
content is to be an occasion
to mark on the calendar
It was Thursday and Day
4 of my vacation from work,
yet probably the first day
that I was able to not think
of what needs to be done
when I got back to the news-
room on Monday
I had promised my boss I
wouldn't do any homework,
but I had. However, on
Thursday I didn't Instead, I
sat on my couch resting my
bum knee and listened to
the rain on the other side of
the big back window.
Several hours went by
and I just sat and listened
and looked at my walls and

First Christian Church of
Inverness invites everyone to
worship and fellowship. Sun-
day school is at 9 a.m. and the
worship service is at 10:15
a.m. Wednesday evening
meals, beginning at 4:45 p.m.,
are followed by choir practice
at 5 and prayer and Bible study
at 6 p.m. The meals are $3 for
adults and $1.50 for children
under age 12. Call the church
at (352) 344-1908, email fc-
cinv@yahoo.com or visit
www.fccinv.com. The church is
at 2018 Colonnade St.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and for
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups also meet at 9 a.m. Sun-
day and 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. All residents of the
area are welcome. Sunday
morning worship service is at
10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is five
miles north of Dunnellon at the
junction of U.S. 41 and State


"o PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoracion y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711






Vic ory

in


Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship
Sinid.1, Evening
Wednesday
Choir Practice


10:45 AM
6:00 PM
7:00 PM
8:00 PM


Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
. I ,,,,i t, belong.A place to become."


thanked God that I have
walls and A/C and mugs of
tea and a big window where
I can watch the squirrels
and the birds and the rain.
I felt my chest rise and
fall with my breathing and
felt my heart beat. I think I
may have even felt my hair
and my fingernails grow-
ing, but maybe not. The
point is, I felt 100 percent
at rest mind, body, soul
and spirit.
Leonardo DaVinci once
said, "Every now and then,
go away, have a little relax-
ation, for when you come
back to your work your
judgment will be surer,
since to remain constantly
at work will cause you to
lose power of judgment So,
go some distance away be-
cause then the work ap-
pears smaller, and more of
it can be taken in at a
glance, and lack of harmony
or proportion is more read-
ily seen."
DaVinci, as you know,
was no slacker. Not only

Road 40. Call the church office
at (352) 489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school
classes begin at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowing fellowship, coffee and
goodies. The morning service
begins at 10:45. The Sunday
evening service begins at 6.
Midweek service is at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The church is on
East Parsons Point Road in
Hernando (directly across from
the Hernando Post Office).
At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms is
preaching verse by verse
through the Book of Revelation
during the morning service.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m.
with classes for all ages. Sun-
day church services are at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. with special
children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is
provided for all services. Every-
one is welcome to attend. The
church is at 9850 S. Parkside


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


First
Baptist
Church of
Inverness
550 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida
(352) 726-1252

SUNDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
7:45 a.m.
Bible Study
9:00 a.m.
Worship
10:30 a.m.
Bible Study for all
4:00 p.m.
Worship Choir Practice
5:15 p.m.
Awana
5:45 p.m.
Connection Classes

WEDNESDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
4:30pm Bread Basket Cafe
6:00pm Praise Kids
6:00pm Youth Ignite
6:00pm Mid-Week Worhsip
7:30pm Praise Team & Praise Band
Nursery Provided All Services
Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor
wwwfbinvIernesIls.co


was he an artist, but an en-
gineer and city planner, a
scientist, inventor and
architect.
I think most people be-
lieve the Christian life is
about working for God,
doing good and building
God's kingdom on earth,
and it is. But first it's about
rest.
Thousands of years ago,
the Lord, speaking through
the prophet Isaiah, told the
Israelites, "In repentance
and rest is your salvation; in
quietness and trust is your
strength" (Isaiah 30:15).
Jesus told the people of
his day, "Are you tired?
Worn out? Burned out on
religion? Come to me. Get
away with me and you'll re-
cover your life. I'll show you
how to take a real rest. Walk
with me and work with me
- watch how I do it. Learn
the unforced rhythms of
grace. I won't lay anything
heavy or ill-fitting on you.
Keep company with me and
you'll learn to live freely

Ave. in Floral City, just south of
Floral Park. Call (352) 726-
0360 for more information.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918
S. Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the
deaf. Sunday school classes at
9:45 a.m. with Sunday worship
at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's
Kids" and "Flyers" for K-5
grades from 6 to 7:15 p.m.
Sunday. Wednesday Bible
study and prayer meeting at 7
p.m. with "Warriors" for grades
6 through 12 from 6:30 to 8
p.m. Call (352) 628-4793.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church, 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, welcomes everyone
to worship at Divine Liturgy on
Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers
at 5. A coffee hour/fellowship
gathering takes place after Di-
vine Liturgy every Sunday. The
church appreciates donations


II "First For Christ"...John 1:41
0006T9U

CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS 1
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study







'First United


Methodist


(-Church
of Inverness

3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C5

and lightly" (Matthew 11:28,
The Message).
Rest isn't an American
virtue. Even our vacations
are stuffed with activity and
busyness. However, it's
something God tells us we
need.
It's food for our souls. I
hadn't realized how full my
plate had been until I sat
down and did nothing.
As Christians, our resting
is in the work that Christ
did for us, in his keeping of
the Law and his dying in
our place. It's in knowing
that we are much loved and
that God is, indeed, well-
pleased.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a Swing,"
and her latest book, "Lip-
stick Grace." She can be
reached at (352) 564-2927,
Monday through Thursday,
or via email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.

of canned goods and other
nonperishable items, which are
donated regularly to the Citrus
County Resource Center. Visit
www.straphaelchurch.org.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State
Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
(352) 794-3372 or (352) 795-
8883, or email georgehick-
man@yahoo.com.
Church of Christ serv-
ices at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday

See NOTES/Page C6


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship .....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School..............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon



^ First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


9:45 AM
Sunday School W
11:00 AM

ContemporaryIAv
U Praise & Worship
_R IOFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


INVERNESS
(j CHURCH
VOF GOD
R .. l.,irr P., r-
.unda r i i:

,E ,1 n .1I i'
\\, dnlda Nighl_
,Ju hl l I, , f ll
h ,,.. l i I i

i.. l ,,, iiI ,, .ii





C6 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C5

and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call (352)
795-4943 or (352) 563-0056.
First Church of God (a
nondenominational congrega-
tion) worships at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday and includes a chil-
dren's church service. Evening
service at 6. Choir practice at 5
p.m. Wednesday followed by
prayer time and Bible study.
JoyBelles ladies meet the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly. Men's
breakfast the last Saturday
monthly. Theme-planned fel-
lowship supper once monthly.
The "Saturday Night Gospel
Singing Jubilee" at 6 p.m. the
last Saturday monthly is open
to all. Refreshments and fellow-
ship follow. Church is at 5510
Jasmine Lane, Inverness. Call
(352) 726-8986.
Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
family life center, at 2018
Colonade Street. Sunday serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and
Beverly Hills on Tuesdays. Call
the church at (352) 637-0923.
New Beginnings Fellow-
ship, 2577 N. Florida Highway
in Hernando, invites the com-
munity to spirit-led revival serv-
ices during the week and
Sunday worship services.
NBF's weekly schedule in-
cludes "Wednesday Night in the
River" and "Friday Night Fire"
services at 7 p.m. A fellowship
dinner precedes both meetings
at 6 p.m. Dinner guests are
asked to bring a dish to share.
Special guest ministers are in-
vited often. Child care provided.
Sunday celebration services at
8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
worship, Bible-based word
teachings and prophetic prayer
ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m.
service. Child care provided for
the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call
(352) 726-8333.
Episcopal Church of the
Advent Christmas services:
Christmas Eve 5 p.m. family
service with Holy Eucharist,
and 10 p.m. Solemn High Can-
dlelight Mass. Christmas Day
- 8 and 10 a.m. Holy Eu-
charist services. New Year's
Day Sunday Holy Eucharist
services at 8 and 10 a.m. The
church is at 11251 S.W. High-
way 484, Dunnellon, (1.2 miles
west of State Road 200,
Ocala). Call (352) 465-7272.
The community is invited
to a Christmas Eve service at 6
p.m. at North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs at the
corner of N. Elkcam Blvd. and
N. Citrus Springs Blvd. in Citrus
Springs. Call (352) 489-1688
for more information.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W.
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call (352) 628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call (352) 382-2557.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children's/youth program for


ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call (352) 489-7515.
Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at (352) 212-4320.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Call
(352) 746-3620.


RELIGION


All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
days at The Little House, 4929
ShadyAcres Drive, Inverness.
All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick
at (352) 726-9998.
House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. at North Lecanto Highway
and North Dawson Drive, Her-
nando. Wednesday Bible studies
and youth meeting at 7 p.m.
Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Everyone
is welcome. Jessie Lolley is the
pastor. Call (352) 621-7260..
Mt. Zion Christian
Church has a new home at
6570 W. Ost West St., Ho-
mosassa. All welcome. Come
as you are. "Worship and
Word" is at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's "God Squad" meets
at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For infor-
mation or directions, call Pastor
John at (352) 573-7198.
House of Peace, a nonde-
nominational full-gospel church
and a division of House of
Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service. All are
welcome.
Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
North Avenue West, Brooksville.
Call (352) 796-8331.
Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call (352) 746-1270.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit, Hernando, is a tra-
ditional Anglican mission with
ancient roots. The 1928 Prayer
Book is used. The church is at
1023 E. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando. Call (352) 637-5922.
Grupo MisioneroAdven-
tista del 7mo. Dia de Citrus
County. Horario de Reuniones.
Miercoles 7 p.m. Sabados 11 a.m.
Address: 1880 N. TrucksAve.,
Hemando. Call (352) 535-7141.
Just for kids
"Saturday Night KIDZ,"
for children 5 years old through
the third grade, is now available
on Saturday nights while par-
ents and teenagers are in-
volved in "Praise, Prayer and
Power" at North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs. Bible
stories and activities for chil-
dren are led by a team of work-
ers. Childcare is also available
for babies through 4 years of
age. Saturday night services
begin at 6 and everyone is wel-
come. The church is at the in-
tersection of N. Elkcam Blvd.
and N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Call
(352) 489-1688.
Grace Bible Church in Ho-
mosassa invites all children in
preschool through eighth grade
to Awana Club from 6 to 8:15
p.m. Tuesday through April.
Awana is an acronym -'Ap-
proved Workmen Are Not
Ashamed' from 2 Timothy 2:15
in the Bible. Awana is one of
the largest nondenominational
children's and youth ministries
in the world. The church is at
6382 W. Green Acres St. in Ho-
mosassa. Call (352) 628-5631
The Episcopal Church of
the Advent offers Sunday
school classes for children
ages 3 through 12 from 10 to
10:45 a.m. Sunday. Immedi-
ately following Sunday school,
children may participate in the
celebration of Holy Eucharist
with the congregation. The
class is open to all area chil-
dren; they don't need to be
members of the church. The
curriculum is called "Godly
Play," and is taught by Maryann
Brennan and her helpers. The
church is 1.2 miles west of
State Road 200 on County
Road 484, across from the fire-
house. Call (352) 465-7272.
Little Friends Learning


Center, a ministry of Inverness
Church of God, is enrolling chil-
dren for this fall for K3/K4. Little
Friends Learning Center is at
416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
Call (352) 344-5487.
First Baptist Church of In-
verness has AWANA from 5:15
to 7:15 p.m. Sunday. The pro-
gram is for children 2 years
through fifth grade. "Adult Con-
nection Classes" are during the
AWANA session. Call the
church at (352) 726-1252 for in-
formation and registration. The
church is at 550 Pleasant
Grove Road.


CHURCH
Continued from Page C1

More than 4,200 people
recently attended services
at four campuses of Apple
Valley-based River Valley
Church. It is the 17th-
fastest-growing church in
the nation, according to
rankings compiled by Out-
reach Magazine.
Roseville-based Sub-
stance Church, started with
help from River Valley, has
gone from 30 college stu-
dents in 2006 to almost
2,500 people attending wor-
ship services. And 70 per-
cent of those people are
younger than 30.
The churches are de-
signed to reach the next gen-
eration, but their success is
what's getting the attention
of some more traditional
church leadership.
"Religious leaders are
very worried about how
they're going to attract that
generation," said Penny
Edgell, sociology professor
at the University of Min-
nesota. "Any group that gets
that generation will have
done something that will
have transformed the
American religious scene."
One in four members of
the "millennial" genera-
tion, which includes people
born after 1980, are unaffil-
iated with any particular
faith, according to a 2010
Pew Research Center study
That compares with 20
percent of Generation X
members at the same age.
The percentages were
much lower for previous
generations.
However, millennials still
pray, possibly even at a
higher rate than the previ-
ous generation. Forty-five
percent of those under 30
surveyed by Pew said they
prayed daily, compared
with 40 percent of the same
age range in the 1990s.
"Research shows this
generation is interested in
spiritual things," Edgell
said. "They just don't seem
to like organized religion."
That's why 11 years ago,
six pastors in the southeast
United States decided to
help other, like-minded
clergy start Christian
churches that could draw a
new generation. Since then,
the group has helped
"plant" more than 200
churches in the U.S., in-
cluding High Point and
Substance.
The churches generally
follow a formula for serv-
ice, which includes a con-
temporary rock band and a
sermon that feels more like
chatting with a buddy The
churches meet anywhere,
usually leasing auditoriums
or theaters from local per-
forming-arts groups or col-
leges. They have slick
websites, complete with
highly produced videos,
often set to rock music.
"One of our basic mis-
sions is attracting the un-
churched," said Michael W
Smith, executive director of
the Association of Related
Churches. "We are creating
a service where the un-
churched can feel comfort-
able and hear a message
they can relate to. Weekend
messages are often cen-
tered on a topic rather than


averse of the Bible."
There's a buzzword
among ARC members:
"Relevant."
Their service is relevant,
pastors say, referring to rock
music. The message is rele-
vant, with sermons that are
peppered with funny videos,
often made by an in-house
creative arts team. Pastors
preach about marriages,
raising young children and
the power of positive think-
ing, and young, energetic
clergy use examples from
their own lives.
Even the dress code is
relevant Worshippers show
up in shorts, flip-flops, even
ball caps.
But, ARC officials are
quick to point out, their
pastors are ordained with
the Assemblies of God, a
more traditional Pente-
costal denomination.
The message still focuses
on Christ.
"The doctrine is the
same, but the method has
changed," Substance
church Pastor Peter Haas
said. Substance has grown
so quickly, its Saturday
night service is basically
Haas, 36, recording a video
message to play at four of
seven Sunday services.
"I physically could not
preach at all the cam-
puses," Haas said. "But the
funny thing is, people love
it. It's church outside of the
box."
About a half-dozen ARC
churches are now among
the fastest-growing and
largest congregations in the
country, members say
On a recent Sunday in the
Inver Grove Heights AMC
movie theater, Terry and
Jessica Pearson welcome
worshippers at High Point
Church with handshakes
and smiles.
The couple, aged 30 and
29 respectively, are sta-
tioned in front of three tall,
tastefully designed screens
that read "Find Your Place,"
"Develop Your Faith," and
"Live Your Potential."
Farina, the pastor, mills
around the doughnut-
munching, Caribou coffee-
sipping crowd, outfitted
with a slim, white micro-
phone that fits behind his
ear Dressed in an untucked
cowboy shirt with pearly
buttons, carefully faded
jeans and slick leather
shoes, Farina is relaxed,
making small-talk and min-
gling like he's at a house
party.
His wife, Elizabeth Fa-
rina, a petite brunette,
wears skinny jeans, brown
knee-high boots, a teal
cowl-neck top and gold
medallion earrings. She,
too, bustles from group to
group, flashing a toothy
smile.
A few minutes after the
appointed start time of the
service, the pair enters the
auditorium filled with
members standing, dancing
and crooning along with the
band.
The Farinas take their
place in the front row,
punching the air with their
fists and singing along as a
guitarist plucks a
turquoise-and-white Strato-
caster alongside two key-
boardists, another guitarist,
a bassist and a drummer.
The stage is outfitted with
10-foot white polka-dot


screens. Not a crucifix or
candle is in sight.
A few songs later, band
members take their seats in
the audience and an-
nouncements are made.
Elizabeth Farina implores
the crowd to help support
the church's move to a new
building in Eagan, likening
giving to bargain shopping.
After a comedic video in-
troduction, Tory Farina
takes the stage and
launches into a talk about
toxic thoughts. He uses the
popular book, "Eat This,
Not That," to make his
point, imploring his flock to
"think this, not that."
About 125 audience
members chuckle along,
rapt with attention. He
keeps it short, about 20
minutes, then encourages
guests to pray with pastors
stationed in the aisles. A
few do.
Tearful members return
to their seats, the band
plays another song and
that's it. The service is over.
"It means a lot more than
going to anyplace we went
before," Nancy Olson-Enge-
breth said, wiping tears
from her eyes. "I just feel
freer in service to really
worship. It's a unique and
refreshing outlook as to
what church can be."
Olson-Engebreth said she
and her husband, John En-
gebreth, previously at-
tended traditional
Christian churches. She ex-
plained why talking about
High Point makes her so
emotional:
"It's just, having always
gone to church, but never
having this feeling," she
said. "It's different"
"But good different," her
husband added.
Church "planting" isn't
new. Baptists have been
starting new, small local
churches and letting them
grow for decades.
In addition, the Emer-
gent church movement
began practicing alterna-
tive worship methods, in-
cluding contemporary
music and video sermons,
before ARC came along.
ARC churches marry the
two ideas, adding their own
spin aimed specifically at
millennials. But the group
provides something more
important than guidance:
cash.
"We say, 'Let us help you
on the front end,' the
ARC's Smith said. "It costs
anywhere from $80,000 to
$100,000 to start a church.
We help them with the goal
of becoming a self-sustain-

Follow these guidelines
to help ensure timely
publication of submit-
ted material. The ear-
lier Chronicle editors
receive submissions,
the better chance of
notes running more
than once.
Community notes: At
least one week in ad-
vance of the event.
Veterans Notes: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
Together page: 4 p.m.
Wednesday for publica-
tion Sunday.
Business Digest: 4
p.m. Wednesday for


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ing church. We resource
them so they are not alone.
They start off stronger."
About 93 percent of ARC
churches are going strong
five years after they began.
Smith said the national av-
erage for a new church last-
ing five years is between 20
percent and 40 percent
Once a church is self-sus-
taining, it is expected to
give back to the organiza-
tion to help start more
churches.
Pastor Rob Ketterling
started River Valley Church
in Apple Valley 16 years ago
with a Bible study group in
his living room.
Ketterling, 46, joined ARC
shortly after its inception.
"It was one of those
things that guys like myself
around the nation said: 'We
were doing it the hard way
Let's give them a financial
start,"' Ketterling said.
River Valley now has four
campuses, and more than
4,000 people attend Sunday
services.
Their rock band writes its
own music and recently re-
leased a CD that hit the
Billboard chart.
The church's growth, Ket-
terling said, is boundless.
Ketterling has guided
Substance and High Point,
giving them a solid start
and remaining as an ad-
viser He recently helped
two pastors start a church
in Northfield, called
Canvas.
But he's looking even fur-
ther A couple of pastors in
Valencia, Spain, have been
replicating the River Valley
model for three years.
River Valley, he said, re-
cently made the decision to
help fund the church.
"There will be a River
Valley in Valencia, Spain,"
Ketterling said.
Two of River Valley's
campuses are church build-
ings given to them by dying
traditional congregations.
One, in Faribault, had 40
members when the church
gave its million-dollar
building to River Valley.
The building now swells
with 400 guests on Sunday
mornings.
In Minnetrista, the
church was down to 12 peo-
ple. Now, 200 attend.
Ketterling said it wasn't
surprising that the
churches decided to give
away their infrastructure.
"It's like, you're an organ
donor," he said. "In the
event that you're dying,
you're willing to give every-
thing you have so someone
else can live."

publication Sunday.
Chalk Talk: 4 p.m.
Monday for publication
Wednesday.
Health Notes: 4 p.m.
Friday for publication
Tuesday.
Religious events : 4
p.m. Tuesday for publi-
cation Saturday.
Real Estate Digest: 4
p.m. Thursday for pub-
lication Sunday.
Photos and stories are
published as space is
available. The Chronicle
cannot guarantee
placement on color
pages.







Page C7 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NewsNOTES Have some spare time NNOTES
Novel society Have fun with


to hear doll talk
The Florida Chapter of the
Historical Novel Society
meets at 1 p.m. the first Sat-
urday of each month in the
Community Room of the
Central Ridge Library in Bev-
erly Hills.
On Dec. 3, Ben Edney will
display and discuss many of
the historical dolls from his
extensive collection, some
dating from the 1830s. All of
the dolls are dressed in au-
thentic period costumes.
Edney has been collecting
and studying antique dolls
since 1966.
Everyone is welcome to at-
tend. For information, call
Marian Fox at (352) 726-
0162.
Jersey folks,
friends to gather
New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County will
meet at 1 p.m. Monday, Dec.
5, at VFW Post 4252 on
State Road 200 in Hernando.
Being from New Jersey is not
a requirement to join.
The club will wrap Christ-
mas gifts for distribution by
the Family Resource Center.
All are asked to bring scis-
sors, tape and any extra holi-
day paper. For more
information, call (352)
527-3568.
Reservations are being
taken for the annual bus trip
to Biloxi from Jan. 29 to Feb.
1. The club will attend the
Christmas show Dec. 10 at
the Show Palace in Hudson.
Also scheduled is a day trip
to Tampa Bay Downs on Feb.
29.
For more information about
trips, call MaryAnne at (352)
746-3386. Trips are open to
the public.
The club bowls at 10 a.m.
Thursday at Beverly Hills
Bowl; all are welcome.
Railroad club
plans 'un-contest'
The Citrus Model Railroad
Club will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 6, at the
Robinson Horticultural Build-
ing at the Citrus County Fair-
grounds.
The program is what has
been called an "un-contest."
Replacing the model contest,
the show-and-tell evening will
let members share their cur-
rent or past projects, inter-
ests, photos or collections,
favorite cars and locos, or
anything else they wish to
share with the rest of the
members.
For more information, call
Denis Riley, program director,
at (352) 835-3656.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Echelon


KI~~


Special to the Chronicle
Echelon is looking for his
very own family for Christ-
mas. He is a sweet 4-
month-old orange tabby
with two adorable siblings
who also need homes. Ech-
elon is just one of the many
sweet and playful kittens
and cats that remain at the
Hardin Haven while waiting
for a forever home. Visitors
are welcome from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
ians' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at
(352) 613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines on-
line at www.hofspha.org.


Learn where to volunteer at Dec. forum


Special to the Chronicle

Learn where you can make a differ-
ce and discover your niche in com-
inity service. The Nature Coast
lunteer Center and Retired and
nior Volunteer Program hosts a
rum for people to link up with vol-
teer opportunities.


This is an opportunity to meet with
NCVC/RSVP staff and volunteer man-
agers throughout the county and learn
about their programs. The next Op-
portunity Links will be 3 to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 7, at the Citrus
County Resource Center Caf6, 2804 W
Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Volunteer Center


and RSVP are the engine through
which several local organizations con-
nect hundreds of volunteers to mean-
ingful service opportunities through-
out Citrus County NCVC/RSVP works
on a communitywide basis across var-
ious issues to develop high-impact vol-
unteer programming.
For information, call (352) 527-5950
or email ncvc@bocc.citrus.fl.us, or
visit the Web at www.naturecoast
volunteercenter org.


Help make holidays brighter


Ornament tree locations are:
* Melodies Body Image Gym,
1101 Middle School Road, Inverness.
* Michael's Floor Covering,
685 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
* Department of Community Support Services,
2804 Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Quality Cleaners,
2601 N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando.
* G&R Health Mart Pharmacy,
3791 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.
* Home Instead Senior Care,
4224 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
* Mama's Kuntry Kafe, 1787 W. Main St., Inverness.


Special to the Chronicle

Be a Santa to a Senior, the
campaign that has delivered
more than 1,200 gifts to local
needy seniors, is being
planned again this holiday
season as older adults con-
tinue to struggle during
tough economic times.
The area office of the
Home Instead Senior Care
network, the world's largest
provider of non-medical in-
home care and companion-
ship services for older
adults, has joined Lecanto
Levi's 4-H Club, Ease's
Rough Rider's 4-H Club,
Crystal River Rotary and the
Department of Community
Support Services to provide
gifts and companionship to
seniors who otherwise might
not receive either this holi-
day season.
"Many older adults con-


tinue to face a difficult eco-
nomic climate, particularly
those who live alone with no
family nearby to help pro-
vide resources," said Carolyn
Quintanilla, owner of the
Home Instead Senior Care
office serving Citrus and sur-
rounding counties.
Seniors have faced a trying
year amid the threat of So-
cial Security payment delays
as part of the debt-ceiling de-
bate. What's more, seniors
have lost almost one-third (32
percent) of their buying
power since 2000, according
to the Annual Survey of Sen-
ior Costs from The Senior
Citizens League (TSCL).
That's where Be a Santa to
a Senior can help. Before the
holiday season, the partici-
pating local nonprofit organ-
izations will identify needy
and isolated seniors in the
community and provide


Santas sought for seniors


those names to the local
Home Instead Senior Care
office. Christmas trees,
which will feature orna-
ments with the first names
only of the seniors and their
gift requests, will be put up at
several locations around the
county through Dec. 7.
Holiday shoppers can pick
up an ornament, buy items


on the list and return them
unwrapped to the store,
along with the ornament
"We hope holiday shop-
pers will open their hearts to
those seniors who have given
so much to make our com-
munity a better place," Quin-
tanilla said.
Call (352) 249-1257 for
more information.


Children's Grief Awareness Day


Special to the Chronicle
As children and adults look on, Hospice of Citrus County's director of pediatric services, Marylin Bloom, moderates Cit-
rus County's first Children's Grief Awareness Day Candlelight Ceremony on Nov. 17 at the Children's Remembrance Gar-
den on the campus of Hospice House on Audubon Park Path in Lecanto. The candlelight ceremony acknowledged and
supported local children who have experienced a loss, and remembered children and adults who have died.




United Way helps clubs help our kids


Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County has been a United Way
of Citrus County agency for
many, many years. The United Way
does much good in our community and
does much for Boys & Girls Clubs'
children and their fami-
lies. The clubs receive a
grant from United Way s
that helps to support the .
Power Hour, Target Prac-
tice and SMART Moves
programs.
Power Hour occurs after
school, Monday through
Thursday The children
come in from school, have
a snack and with the help Lane
of the club staff, begin
homework and other BOY,
school assignments. The GIRLS (
technology labs are there
if computers are needed
for research or for typing and printing
of reports. Most parents are relieved
to find homework already completed
when they pick up their child from the
club and it's time to go home.
Target Practice is practice of skills
in reading and math as the kids get
ready for the FCAT (Florida Compre-
hensive Assessment Test) that's given


every spring. As I am sure you are
aware, the FCAT is that test given to
our children beginning in third grade
and administered to them yearly
thereafter, into high school. The re-
sults of the FCAT can be important in
a child's life. Decisions
about grade retention and
. even graduation may depend
; on FCAT results.
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County created Target Prac-
S tice several years ago when so
many of our children were
7 not showing adequate
progress in their results and
we wanted to help them im-
Vick prove. Our efforts have paid
off. In 2011,72 percent of Boys
& G& Girls Clubs of Citrus County
LUBS members scored on level 3 or
S above in reading as compared
to 52 percent in 2009 when
our program was just getting started.
Level 3 is considered adequate aca-
demic progress, with levels 4 and 5
considered increased (possibly above
grade level) achievement. In 2011, 78
percent of members scored on levels 3
or above in math, as compared to 60
percent in 2009.
SMART Moves is a Boys & Girls


Clubs of America program that,
through age-appropriate sessions,
promotes abstinence from substance
abuse and adolescent sexual involve-
ment through the practice of respon-
sible behavior. Kids are taught to
resist and handle peer pressure and
discuss bullying, impulse control and
many other topics appropriate to their
ages.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County appreciates the support of the
United Way of Citrus County. The
United Way is presently into its annual
funding campaign. There is also a gor-
geous Corvette that is being given
away by United Way for $100 per
ticket. The United Way of Citrus
County needs your support and your
donations. It's a super way to help the
many deserving agencies that serve
Citrus County. At the same time, your
donation paves the way for our kids to
begin great futures.
Great futures start at the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Thank
you, United Way, for being there to
help.


Lane Vickis executive director of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County


I


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Senior Friends
On Monday, Dec. 5, Senior
Friends for Life will meet at
Inverness Golf & Country
Club for a program and
luncheon. All who attend
should bring a wrapped gift,
marked for man or woman,
and they will be delivered to a
nursing home.
The Christmas potluck will
be at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 20. Bring a covered
dish. This will be a tree-trim-
ming party. Bring an orna-
ment either handmade or
one that you aren't using.
This will be at 6435 W. Pine
Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Reservations must be
made for these activities by
calling Myrna Hocking at
(352) 860-0819, Teddie Holler
at (352) 746-6518, Astrid
Grant at (352) 341-0346, or
Jackie Bouyea at (352)
527-6929.
'BIG' breakfast set
for college Dec. 7
Big Brothers Big Sisters in-
vites the public to its "Start
Something BIG Breakfast"
from 8 to 9 a.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 7, at the College of Cen-
tral Florida Citrus Campus
Conference Center, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
What if every child fulfilled
his or her potential? What
could that start? It could be
the start of something big. All
are welcome to come learn
about the club's achieve-
ments and the goals it hopes
many will want to be part of.
Help Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters change the lives of chil-
dren and learn how you can
make a difference by going to
www.bbbspc.org or by calling
(352) 344-0400 or (352)
422-1329.
Book now for
New York lunch
The New York Club will
meet at noon Thursday, Dec.
15, at Inverness Golf & Coun-
try Club. Fred Campbell will
play holiday music. The
meeting was changed to the
third Thursday, just for
December.
Menu will be baked salmon
or chicken cordon bleu with
rice pilaf and buttered corn,
dinner rolls and rice pudding
with raisins and apples, cof-
fee, tea or nonalcoholic bev-
erage. Cost is $12, which
includes tax and tip. Bring a
$5 gift for an exchange if you
wish; mark the gift for a
woman or man.
Write your menu choice on
your check. Lunch reserva-
tions must be made by
Wednesday, Dec. 7. Mail
check to: New York Club,
P.O. Box 641261, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464.
All are welcome; being
from New York is not a re-
quirement to join. Dues are
$6 per season and meetings
are usually at noon the sec-
ond Thursday each month.
Call Dot or Ed for more infor-
mation at (352) 527-2332.
Women's group to
celebrate holiday
Dunnellon Christian
Women's Connection will cel-
ebrate the miracle of Christ-
mas at its next luncheon at
noon Wednesday, Dec. 14, at
Springs Banquet Hall
(Springs Presbyterian
Church), 1060 W. Withla-
coochee Trail (County Road
39) Dunnellon.
The luncheon is a week
early due to the Christmas
holiday. Janet Tombow of
Clearwater, author and
speaker, will speak about her
life's story. Her book, "Stolen
but not Lost," will be available
to purchase.
Special features will in-
clude singing Christmas
carols and learning about
"Decorating with Blessings
for All."
All women are welcome.
Tickets are $12 and deadline
for reservations is Dec. 8.
Call Dot at (352) 465-1150 or
Maggie at (352) 465-6153.


ia~
?hr. '








SATURDAY EVENING DECEMBER 3, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon 1 Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C BD I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
(WESH) NBC 0 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Tonight (N) 'PG' **** "It'sa Wonderful Life"(1946, Comedy-Drama) James Stewart, Donna Reed.'NR' News Sat. Night Live
Victor Borge: Comedy in Music! A The Lawrence Welk Show "On the 60s Pop, Rock & Soul (My Music) Artists and groups from the 1960s. (In Rock, Rhythm and Doo Wop Frankie Valli hosts performances by Little
w PBSI 3 3 14 6 collection of Victor Borge skits.'G' Street Where You Live."'G' c Stereo)G' c Richard, Jay & the Americans, and others. (In Stereo) 'G' s
WUFT PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 Health-Joel Victor Borge: Comedy in Music! (In Stereo)'G' c 60s Pop, Rock & Soul (My Music) (In Stereo) 'G' c Paul Simon: Live at Webster Hall, NewYork (In Stereo) 'G'
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 NewsChannel 8 NBC Niqhtly Entertainment Tonight (N) (In **** "It's a Wonderful Life"(1946, Comedy-Drama) James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore. A News Channel 8 Saturday Night
A NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 at 6 (N) News (N)'G' Stereo)'PG' guardian angel strengthens a man ruined by a miser.'NR' at 11PM (N) Live'14 E
WFTV AC 20 20 20 20 College Football Teams TBA. (N) Eewitness News Wheel of Fortune College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Eewitness News
(ABC B 20 20 20 20 (Live) Weekend 'G'cc Weekend
SCollege Football SEC Championship: Teams TBA. From The Young Icons Rules of Mike& Molly 48Hours Mystery (In Stereo)'PG' 48 Hours Mystery (In Stereo)'PG' c 10 News, 11pm Paid Program
IwP CBS ( 10 10 10 10 10 10 the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. (N) (Live) xG'X Engagement'14' '14'X (N)
WTVTI FOX m 13 13 3 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) King of the Hill BigTen Championship College Football Big Ten Championship: Teams TBA. From Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. (N) (In Stereo Live) ca FOX1310:00
FOX 13 13 13 13 'PGc ccPregame News (N) c
WCJ ABC j E 11 11 4 15 College Football Teams TBA. (N) Entertainment Tonight (N) 'PG' College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News
C IND 2 2 2 2 22 22 Cornerstone With John Hagee JackVan Impe Great Awakening AllOverthe Freedom Today Great Awakening
C t IND W 2 2 2 2 22 22iJ HacPresents 'G' rea AaegWorld G'
IWFI ABC 11 11 11 1 College Football Teams TBA. (N) ABC Action News Wheel of Fortune College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) ABC Action News
WFT ABC ) 1 11 ^(Live) G'cc at 11 PM
WMOND 12 12 Family Guy'14' c Family Guy'14' s The Big Bang The Big Bang House House interviews for new House "97 Seconds" The final 10 **Y "Willard" (2003, Horror) Crispin Glover, R. Lee Ermey, Jackie
i ) IND E 12 12 Theory 'PG' Theory'PG' team members.'14' E fellowship candidates.'14' c Burroughs. A reclusive man commands an army of rats.'PG-13' c
(WTTAI MNT D 6 6 6 6 9 Hollyscoop'PG' Paid Program Ring of Honor Wrestling '14' That'70s Show That'70s Show Futurama'PG' Futurama'PG' Ring of Honor Wrestling'14' s Bones "The Hero in the Hold"'14'
WACl TBN EB 21 21 21 The Faith Show Summit Bible M & J Koulionos Life Center Church Hal Lindsey'G' Variety Claud Bowers Tims Ministries |Spencer Wisdom Keys |St. Luke Lead
The King of 'Til Death'14's Two and a Half Two and a Half Criminal Minds The team interviews Cold Case "Yo Adrian" Boxer dies NUMB3RS "Burn Rate" A serial let- The Unit "Hill 60" Community cut off
G cW Q) 4 4 4 4 12 12Queens'PG' Men'PG'E Men'PG'E serial killers.'PG' during match. '14' ter-bomber.'PG' by poison gas. '14'
WY FAM 16 16 16 16 Ford in the Fast To Be Announced I Spy'Y' ColdSquad (In Stereo) '14' (DVS) Da Vincis Inquest (In Stereo) '14' Movie'MA'
FAM M 16 16 16 16 Lane
[WGx) FOX Q 13 13 7 7 TMZ (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' s Big Bang Theory |Big Ten Preg College Football Big Ten Championship: Teams TBA. From Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. (N) (In Stereo Live) ca News
IWVEI UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 FamiliadeDiez |Noticiero Protagonistas'PG'(SS) Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) 13 Miedos'14' Noticiero
WXPX) ION ( 17 ***h "The Fugitive"(1993, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Psych "Dis-Lodged"'PG' s Psych (In Stereo)'PG' s Psych (In Stereo)'PG' s
AE) 54 48 54 54 25 27 To Be Announced Storage Wars Storage Wars IStorage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars
(AfC) 55 64 55 55 *** "El Dorado"(1967) John Wayne.'NR' s *** "Pale Rider"(1985, Western) Clint Eastwood, Michael Moriarty 'R' s Hell on Wheels a **, "The Shadow Riders"
(Ni 52 35 52 52 19 21 Hercules Saves Christmas (N) (In Stereo)'PG' Pit Boss (N)'PG' Too Cute! (In Stereo) 'PG' s Too Cute! (In Stereo) 'PG' s Pit Bulls and Parolees (N)'PG' Too Cute! (In Stereo)'PG' s
(ET) 96 19 96 96 *** "New Jack City"(1991) Wesley Snipes.'R' 2011 Soul Train Awards Host Cedric "The Entertainer."'PG' '"Things FallApart" (2011, Drama) Ray Liotta, 50 Cent. Premiere.'NR'
(BRAVO 254 51 254 254 Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly |Real Housewives/Beverly *** "State of Play"(2009, Crime Drama) Russell Crowe. Premiere.'PG-13' State of Play
CC 27 61 27 27 33 *' "A Night at the Roxbury" *** "Scary Movie" (2000, Comedy) Shawn Wayans.'R' c ** "Dance Flick" (2009) Shoshana Bush. Premiere.'PG-13' s | "Scary Movie 2"(2001) 'R'
(WCI 98 45 98 98 28 37 *Y "Son-in-Law"(1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Lane Smith.'PG-13' ** "Sweet Home Alabama" (2002, Romance-Comedy) Reese Witherspoon. 'PG-13' "Broken Bridges"(2006) Toby Keith.'PG-13'
C 43 42 43 43 Paid Program Paid Program Money in Motion IHow I, Millions American Greed Richard Scrushy The Suze Orman Show (N) a Debt Do Us Part Debt Do Us Part American Greed
CI 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents'PG' c
(DISN) 46 40 46 46 6 5 So Random!'G' Shake It Up! A.N.T Farm'G' |AN.T Farm'G' Jessie'G' e |Jessie'G' Jessie'G' E |Jessie'G' a PrankStars'G' |Phineas, Ferb A.N.T Farm'G' |A.N.T Farm'G'
ESP 33 27 33 33 21 17 College Basketball 2011 ACC Championship Pregame College Football ACC Championship: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) a
ESPSIZ 34 28 34 34 43 49 College Basketball TBA |College Football BYU at Hawaii. (N) (Live) |College Football Scoreboard (N) |E:60
EW 95 70 95 95 48 Worth Living EWTN Book. Mother Angelica-Classic The Way to Life Alter Christus Holy Rosary Web of Faith'G' s |The Journey Home'G'
FAI) 29 52 29 29 20 28 *** "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire"(2005, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint.'PG-13' *** "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix"(2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint.'PG-13'
FCI 44 37 44 44 32 America's News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) The Five Journal Editorial |FOX News
[F M 26 56 26 26 Chef Hunter Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars "Work of Art" Cupcake Wars "Tree Lighting" Iron Chef America
(FSFLI 35 39 35 35 Billy's Bunch |Marlins Live! MLB Baseball'G' Marlins Live! |The Final Score Marlins Live! |The Final Score
FX 30 60 30 30 51 *** "Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa" (2008) Voices of Ben Stiller. ** "lce Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009, Comedy)'PG' *** "Role Models"(2008, Comedy) Seann William Scott.'R'
GOLF 67 PGA Tour Golf |Golf Central (N) Masters Highlights U.S. Open Golf Highlights |Golf Chevron World Challenge, Third Round. (In Stereo) a |Golf Central (N)
(HALLJ 39 68 39 39 45 54 "Farewell Mr. Kringle" (2010, Comedy) Christine Taylor. a "A Princess for Christmas" (2011) Katie McGrath. Premiere. a "A Princess for Christmas" (2011, Comedy) Katie McGrath. a
** "The Saint" (1997, Suspense) Val Kilmer. A master of disguise finds **, "The Adjustment Bureau" (2011) Matt Damon. A man battles the Boardwalk Empire Nucky gets a new Cathouse: Frisky "The Adjustment
S 302 201 302 302 2 2 romance and danger in England. (n Stereo) 'PG-13' a agents of Fate to be with the woman he loves. 'PG-13' c lawyer. (In Stereo)'MA' cc Business Bureau
H V 23 57 23 23 42 52 House Hunters |House Hunters HuntersInt'l |House Hunters Design/Dime |High LowProj. |High Low Proj. Color Splash'G' Dinas Party'G' DonnaDec House Hunters Hunters nt'l
HISD 51 25 51 51 32 42 Time Machine 'PG' Modern Marvels PG s History 360 Scammed! Schemes that have been around for years.
LIFE 24 38 24 24 31 *** "A Christmas Proposal"(2008) Nicole Eggert. 'PG' ** "Nothing Like the Holidays" (2008) John Leguizamo.'PG-13' "A Boyfriend for Christmas" (2004) Kelli Williams. a
*h "Glass House: The Good Mother" (2006) Angie Harmon. Orphans ** "Trapped" (2002, Crime Drama) Charlize Theron, Courtney Love. A "Deadly Sibling Rivalry" (2011, Suspense) Charisma Carpenter. A
50 fall into the clutches of unhinged adoptive parents. 'R' mother fights back after kidnappers take her child. 'R' woman steals the identify of her comatose twin sister.'NR' s
A ** "The BookofEli" (2010, Action Denzel *** "Mad Max"(1979) Mel Gibson. Terrorist cycle Strike Back Stonebridqe and *** "Cedar Rapids" (2011) Ed Helms. A naive insur- StrikeBack
l 320 221 320 320 3 3 Washington, Gary Oldman. (In Stereo) 'R' s gangs take on a hardened highway patrolman. 'R' Crawford find Clare. 'MA' ance agent has a wild time at a convention.'R' 'MA'
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary
(MTV} 97 66 97 97 39 Made (In Stereo) 'PG' Made (In Stereo) 'PG' Ridiculousness |Ridiculousness **Y "Starsky& Hutch"(2004) Ben Stiller. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Beavis Beavis
NGC65 44 53 Alaska State Troopers '14' Alaska State Troopers'14' Alaska State Troopers'14' Alaska State Troopers'14' Alaska State Troopers'14' Alaska State Troopers'14'
NK 28 36 28 28 35 25 SpongeBob |SpongeBob iCarly'G' c |iCarly'G' c Victorious'G' |iCarly'G' c Victorious'G' |iCarly'G' c That '70s Show That '70s Show Friends'PG' |Friends'PG'
[OXYl 44 America's Next Top Model'14' America's Next Top Model'PG' America's Next Top Model'PG' America's Next Top Model'PG' America's Next Top Model s Tori & Dean-Sweet Hollywood
Homeland "Crossfire" (iTV) Brody ** "lAm Number Four" (2011, Action Alex Pettfer. iTV.An alien teen- Boxing Joseph Agbeko vs. Abner Mares. (iTV) Agbeko takes on Mares. From Anaheim, Calif. Staredown: Ward
[SHW) 340 241 340 340 relives his captivity M ' ager must evade those sent to kill him. (n Stereo) PG-13' (N) (Live) 'P L vs. Froch
SPEED 122 112 122 122 Guys Garage Guys Garage Guys Garage |Guys Garage Gearz'G' |Gearz'G' Gearz'PG' Gearz'G' IGearz'PG' |Gearz'G' Gearz'G' Gearz'G'
SPIKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V The Ultimate Fighter'14, L,V The Ultimate Fighter Fighters battle it out for the UFC contract. (N) (In Stereo Live)'14, L,V Blue Mountain State'MA'
SU36 31 36 36 Inside the Rays Rays Live! MLB Baseball'G' |Rays Live! Inside the Rays Fight Sports MMA: KOTC c
SYFY 31 59 31 31 26 29 ***h "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade"(1989, Adventure) Harrison Ford.'PG-13' c **, "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008, Adventure) Harrison Ford.'PG-13'
TBS 49 23 49 49 16 19 Friends'PG' |Friends'14' Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory *** "The Hangover" (2009, Comedy) Bradley Cooper. Premiere.'R' *** "The Hangover" (2009)'R'
T*** "Rio Bravo"(1959 Western) John Wayne, Dean Martin. Sheriff and **** "Outof the Past"(1947, Crime Drama) Robert Mitchum. A "Instant Love"(1964, Drama) Rhonda Fleming. Premiere. Boredom and
I 169 53 169 169 30 35 deputies try to hold rancher's brother in jail. 'R'c gambler's no-good girlfriend crosses a private eye.'NR' s (DVS) jealousy affect a married couple.'NR'
(TDCI 53 34 53 53 24 26 Sons of Guns '14' s Sons of Guns '14' s Sons of Guns '14' s Sons of Guns'14' c Sons of Guns'14' s Sons of Guns '14' c
C 50 46 50 50 29 30 Lottery Changed My Life'PG' Crazy Christmas Lights'G' Invasion of the Christmas Lights 2 Invasion of the Christmas Lights 3 More Crazy Christmas Lights G' Invasion of the Christmas Lights 2
(NTI 48 33 48 48 31 34 ** "Van Helsing"(2004, Fantasy) Hugh Jackman.'PG-13' s **, "Terminator Salvation" (2009, Science Fiction) Christian Bale.'PG-13' |**, "Shooter"(2007) Mark Wahlberg.'R' c
TRAV 9 54 9 9 44 Steak Paradise'G' c Deep Fried Paradise 2 Ghost Adventures'PG' Ghost Adventures'PG' Ghost Adventures'PG' c Ghost Adventures'PG' c
(ituTV 25 55 25 25 98 98 Most Shocking '14' Top 20 Most Shocking'14' Top 20 Most Shocking'14' Top 20 Most Shocking'14' TruTV Presents...'14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
( 32 49 32 32 34 24 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Hot in Cleveland |Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland |Hot in Cleveland The Exes'PG' ILove-Raymond Love-Raymond ILove-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens
USA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit ** "The Break-Up" (2006) c
(WEJ 117 69 117 117 Ghost Whisperer'PG' c Ghost Whisperer 'PG' Ghost Whisperer 'PG' s Ghost Whisperer'PG' c Ghost Whisperer'PG' x Ghost Whisperer'PG' c
(WGiLAI 18 18 18 18 18 20 Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14' America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos 30 Rock'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Most of us learn bridge at the
table. But what do you do when you
cannot find three other players?
One possibility is to read "A First
Book of Bridge Problems" by
Patrick O'Connor (Master Point
Press).
The author assumes little knowl-
edge. He gives instruction about
basic declarer-play and defense
techniques while posing 50 de-
clarer-play and defense problems.
They start at an elementary level
and progress to today's deal, the
last in the book.
How should East plan the de-
fense against five clubs after West
leads the spade king?
The bidding is questionable. Al-
though it is not without risk, North
ought to make a negative double,
not bid two clubs. (Yes, that is out-


Bridge

North 12-3-11


+ 8 5
4 Q 9 8
4986



West East
SKQ J10 4 A 7 5 3
SQ109 V 5 3
*J104 4KQ976
% 65 *A7
South
S2
VA76
+A32
K J 10 4 3 2
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
14 1 24 4%
5 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: K


side the parameters of this book;
the author should have made
South's long suit hearts.)
Five clubs is also debatable, but
understandable. Now let's move to
the play
East, assuming declarer is not
void in spades, can see two tricks:
one in spades and one in clubs. The
third winner will have to come
from diamonds. And there isn't a
moment to lose.
East should overtake partner's
king with his ace and shift to the di-
amond king.
With this layout, South has no
chance.
Each problem ends with a tip,
this one being: Take charge of the
defense when you can see the way
home.
The book also includes a little
about bidding, a short glossary and
a list of the deals' themes.
SK


o THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, w...,a -
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. ..lo .-, r- I


Qw
0 L
D uJ
LU L-


0(

x 2
X"i
W
Lu




cLU




-2
o


I


THFE POC.UMENTARY
ABOUT THE HISTORY OF
CAMPING FEATURE- ---


%J/ I
D Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: L T" 1IT
(Answers Monday)


ACROSS
Tool with jaws
Aussie
rockers
Just as I
thought!
Novelist -
Ferber
Mumble
Sleep briefly
Ore-smelting
waste
House
Skillet coating
Lies by the
pool
Wept over
NASA
destination
Like some
showers
Grades 1-12
Beaver
project
Mrs. Charles
Bread buy
Singer -
Adams
Molokai
neighbor


Sweater sizes
Bucket handle
Floor
Charge
Faculty
honcho
Bobwhite
Gunpowder
ingredient
Tidal waves
Green fruit
Is, to Fritz
Not cluttered
Planets, to
poets
NFL player
Rather and
Marino
Occident


Answer to Previous Puzzle


TERM GIN BAR
ABOUT YOU EMU
TBONE MUD LED
CPAS ERASE
USHER PSI N
ABE ECHO BASH
COD SHAD SPCA
MAAM ELIA A ARI
ETNA ROUT REIL
MU YI MONTE
WHEAT OSLO
HISSING LOPES


DOWN I D S IC U:
1 Unisex I EEIATI
garment 6 Actor-
2 Time waster Gulager
3 Foul-up 7 Lead balloon
4 Young bird of 8 Cattle stalls
prey 9 Sothern and
5 Mighty -- Blyth
oak 10 Cabby


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


E lS KAT E
E ISL E
11 Orangutans
17 Flip-chart
stand
19 Wednesday's
god
22 Baking potato
24 Slack
25 Was, to Ovid
27 Deli salmon
28 "2001"
computer
29 Uncertainties
30 New socialite
31 Town in
Oklahoma
32 Twice DI
36 Dainty
38 Language of
Pakistan
42 Egg yolk
44 African
antelope
46 Blazing
47 Deadens
48 Handy swab
(hyph.)
49 Former world
power, for
short
50 Honda, e.g.
51 Former JFK
arrivals
52 Remainder
54 Give -
break
55 John, in
Glasgow


Dear Annie: I have a 35-
year-old daughter with
two children (ages 13 and
2), and they all are liv-
ing with us. "Micki"
moved in after leaving
her common-law hus-
band a few months
ago. He was the third
man in her life.
Since Micki has
been home, she has
been going out every
weekend. I am "old
school" and believe
she should come home
from work and take ANN
care of my grandchil- MAII
dren. But if I open my
mouth, my wife will
toss me out. It has already hap-
pened once before.
This situation is slowly killing
me. My wife tells me Micki is still
young. I say, so what? That does-
n't mean she can go to bed with
every Tom, Dick and Harry. I
don't know what to do next. Any
suggestions? One Step from
Leaving
Dear One Step: Micki is not as
young as your wife thinks. At 35,
she is closer to middle-aged. Un-
less your wife wishes to enable
her daughter to remain irrespon-
sible, the two of you need to set
some ground rules regarding
Micki's behavior. A social night
out once a week is fine. A week-
end sleeping around is not. En-
courage your wife to put her
grandchildren's welfare first and
see if you can come to an agree-
ment regarding Micki's responsi-
bilities at home.
Dear Annie: My family is deal-
ing with a sad and disturbing sit-
uation. My mother died a few


years ago, and a mentally ill sib-
ling is still living with Dad.
"Joyce" is financially and emo-
tionally exploiting him
and is isolating Dad
from the rest of the
r family. The house is
full of garbage and is
overrun with mice and
bugs, and yet my fa-
ther says if it weren't
for Joyce, he would be
in a nursing home.
(She threatens him
with this every day)
I don't understand
IE'S how he can abandon
BOX his children to live in
this filth, especially
when my mother kept
that house spotless. Please tell us
what our options are. -
Desperate
Dear Desperate: Your father
hasn't abandoned you. He is
frightened and has become de-
pendent on Joyce. Would you or
another sibling be willing to take
Dad in, at least temporarily, until
you can straighten this out? If you
want to wean him away from
Joyce's care, you will need to be
more directly involved. Call the
Eldercare Locator
(eldercare.gov) at 1-800-677-1116.
Explain the situation and see
what services are available in
Dad's area.
Dear Annie: I am now a
mother-in-law and have a won-
derful relationship with my chil-
dren and their spouses. I am also
a daughter-in-law and can tell
"Michigan" that the best way
NOT to lose her son is to always
include the wife as part of the
family
My husband and I have been


married for many years, and I
have always felt like an outsider
in his family
When we married, my mother-
in-law tried to undermine our re-
lationship. According to her,
everything in our home is "his,"
nothing is "ours." When she calls
our house, she barely speaks to
me. She immediately asks to talk
to my husband. She makes it
clear that he is her priority and
the children and I are just bag-
gage. But the good part is, she has
taught me what not to do as a
mother-in-law. I never drop in on
my children. I always call first. I
spend the same amount of money
on my kids as I do on their
spouses for birthdays, Christmas,
etc. I never ask personal ques-
tions about their marriages or fi-
nances. If they are not able to
come for a function, I don't get
upset or make them feel guilty. I
try to be supportive and loving.
It is the small, everyday ges-
tures that will make your chil-
dren's spouses feel like part of
the family and that will help you
maintain a great relationship not
only with your own child, but
with all the new children that
come along through marriage. -
Loving All My Children in
Virginia


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column.
To find out more aboutAnnie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SI I < ^ ^

CNTAIT


I r," rvI-M I


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Pickles


Sally Forth


WE JUST RAN


WE JUST RAN
OUT OF SNOWFLAKES..





,Ijcis'aca


COMICS


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C9


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


SWEETIE, THERE'S NO NEED TO TRUST ME, NO MATTER s IS THAT THE SORT WITH A WHITE-
WORRY ABOUT WHAT TO GET WHAT YOU GET HIM ; OF ABSURD BELIEF KNUCKLED
YOUR BOYFRIEND FOR i' HE'LL LOVE IT BECAUSE | YOU HOLD ON TO GRIP, DEAR.
CHRISTMAS... IT CAME FROM YOU. WHENEVER YOU BUY
s N I i MOM A GIFT?


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

LOVE WATCl-UNGAM FA\ORI~ T RE FOOD LOOK 50 60D, iT'5
COOKING SROW ON OUR NEW ALMOST LUKE \T'S RIGRT RE\RE.
IGR-D-F\\MIOR TELEIIOR,. i TRE ROOM(WITI- E!
1' ^< 8 ,L


aNOW, IF TRE. COULCONLY
INVE.RT SIAELL-AV\S(ON

lrT --r


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Ya darn crazy fool. I warned ya not to ride
into hostile territory. Now look what
happened....Y'all went and got
yourself scalloped."


Blondie


BUT BY THEN I MIGHT FORGET ALL
THE GOOD POINTS I WANT TO MAKE
I GUESS .
I MIGHT TOO -
DEAR, BUT
THAT'S THE I

- C " "

Ill*^' i .-


( SOMETIMES, I SUPPOSE...
THERE JUST \ IT AMAZES
AREN'T ENOUGH -- ME THAT
HOURS IN (ANYTHING EVER
THE DAY, GETS DONE
SWEETHEART THESE DAYS




-I
<-.T ,
i) -- 3 -J~~r


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


12-'f
D lst by Kieature s yn d
wamyrcus c
"I'd feel a lot better 'bout taking baths
if I had one of those."


Doonesbury


SO, SORKH RAZIL, IF
THAT REALLY IS YOUR
NAME YOU'RE APPEAR-
IN ON FOXIN TAUB4N







Big Nate

Big Nate


UH, PUPE, THIS 15
WHATEVERYONE IN
AF6HANISTAN WEARS,
NOT JUSTTHETAU-


0" '- ,




n Il


Betty


Frank & Ernest


YOU bON'Tr
NEED NO
STINKIN'
WATER
BRP.EAK!N


PID WE MENTION
HOW GLAD WE ARE
TO SEE YOU?

WERE _
ECsTATi


:-\ Ft


6RNIE, YOUR ONLINE DATING PROFILE
SAYS YOU'RE /v- /
TAI.L, ATHILfTI cP'
ANtP v1ALTITY. \ J
TH-S IT TNtfr
F166 T /

jo^P jv?! (/ ^^^TA ^


6Ot POINT,
FRANK. I NED TO
APb 5 OMETHIN6
/ ABOUT MY
R> (/6PAT
II SE OF
1- HUMOR!


Today MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 7:25
p.m. No passes.
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) 4:35 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Muppets" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:05 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:45 p.m., 7:15
p.m. No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:30 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-
13) 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 2 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Hugo" (PG) In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Hugo" (PG) 4 p.m.


"The Muppets" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) 4:30 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m. No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:05
p.m. No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:05 p.m., 9:30 p.m.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-
13) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Immortals" (R) In Real 3D. ID required. 10:05 p.m.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 2p.m., 7:55p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:25 p.m., 4:25
p.m., 7:45 p.m. No passes.
"Ides of March" and "Moneyball" (R) Double fea-
ture. ID required. 1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp.
WXOF-FM96.3 Adult Mix
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious


Local RADIO

WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk
WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


RATS! I KNEW THIS
WAS GOIN6 TO HAPPEN..




12-
-----M -


SWHATS WRON6





U -'--u^.


ME I WE'REHERE,SIR, \ THINK 'M
EPICAL OYOUNEED OLDENOUGH
GROUP ANYHELP TOCHECKIN
CHECKING IN?/\ MYSELF



H I
I L)


I'M JUST TOO OLDTO
REMEMBER WHO I'M
CHECKING IN WITH rEc 'roo
DR. RANA I
DR. ZWAG I
DR. NOCEK I
PR.ABBEP 2
DR. RUSK 2
DR. MICKEY 2
DR. BURDEN a
PR BROWN 3
OR BRUNETT' 3
ks -Cr ---


- HONEY, DO YOU MIND IF WE Z_
POSTPONE OUR ARGUMENT UNTIL
AFTER THE GAME?
NO GOOD!
I'M LEAVING
FOR THE r-~\ !
MALL IN l.
AFEW<' -
HOURS' .-.---.

1-' ,
( lJ


Arlo and Janis


- I


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODAY'S CLUE: S equals V


"FTY V YVNF YX EVSXR VP W LVOX YFXP


EWYN YXGX PTL PXJXNNWGM LT


NWCXUKWGR KN CGTO RVNJGVOVP-


WLVTP." HWGHGW NLGXVNWPR

Previous Solution: "Don't forget the Earth's about five thousand million years old, at
least. Who can afford to live in the past?" Harold Pinter
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-3


I







C10 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


C CITRUS COUNTY





HRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

vi 35 sS.Q


9 Drawer Dresser
Walnut
$175.
(352) 419-6811
BAR dark gray marble
top, brass foot rest me-
dium color wood/ match-
ing cushioned stools
700.00 phone 249-7492
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm. CHA $525.
mo. + Sec. 87 RegIna
Blvd. (352) 422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
53 S J Kellner Blvd
Fri-Sat 8-2
Lift Chair $300, sofa $65,
wheelchairs, walkers,
canes,bedside pots,
shower bench, 1982
Goldwing 1100 **$1,200,
fishing, golf, boating, tools

YARDSALE

Beverly Hills
Saturday 8am-2pm
Something for
everyone!
206 S Jackson Street


YARDSALE

CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 8-2 & Sun. 8-1
Tools, Air compressor
excer. bike & More
1051 E. Hobart Lane

COMMERCIAL
APPRAISER
Obtain an application at
www.citruspa.org. Click
on the employment tab.
Salary is commensu-
rate with qualifications


YARD SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 3, 9a-4p
MULTI FAMILY SALE
Christmas Items,
Boating Equip, Golf
Clubs AND MORE
11190 W. Thoreau PI.
FORD
'66, F100 Camper
special ,351 eng. all
org. runs good, $4,800
obo (352) 726-6864
GOT my Black DOG
WHO Has HIM?
$$SS CASHSSS
Is he Dead? Get Hit?
Euthanized?
Someone think he was
Stray?
Green Acr./ Hom.Trl/
Gro.Cleve area
Black Lab Mix 50 lbs.
Male, fixed
Pointer head,Short
Hair,Raisin bumps on
skin. Since 11/5
(352)-220-3890 503-6494

YARDSALE
HERNANDO
Sat. & Sun. 7a-3p
No Junk,
Nice Christmas Items
1900 N SHIREY PT


HOMOSASSA
Saturday 3, 8a-?
Furniture, indoor/
outdoor, some
Christmas, pictures &
collectible models
5782 W. Nobis Circle
I Need A Ride From
Lecanto to
National Cemetery
in Bushnelle Dec. 24th.
I will buy gas
(352) 527-2852
LECANTO
2/1/1 C/H/A, H2o,
IncI'd, W/D Hkup, $500.
CR 3/1, CHA W/D Hkup,
$525. mo 352-382-1344
MUSICAL INSTRU-
MENTS Fender Squire
electric guitar $50.00,
Violin 3/4 & case 100.00,
Daisy rock pink
guitar/case 50.00,
Karokee machine 40.00
phone 249-7492
Sea Eagle
2 Man Kayak, brand
new, sill in original
package, never used
$200 (352) 489-6068
Sofa & Love Seat
Light Beige Pattern,
good cond.
$300 for Both
(352) 344-1608
STINGRAY 19ft
deep Vee, alum trlr. w/
elec. wench,bimini
3.0, I/O $1,475
(352) 586-9498
Taupe Microsuade sofa
may be configured
with or w/out adapta-
ble 63" chase, factory
treated fabric mint
cond. paid $1,450
first $350. (352)634-3806
Weights and 2 heavy
benches, 720 lbs excel.
$250 or trade
(352) 637-6000

- - -

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



2 Dogs Free
To Good Home
(352) 726-0064
Blue Bengal Cats
free to good home,
1 male marbled, 1
female spotted, with
vet approval and
confirmation of
spay/neutering. Loving
and caring cats to a
good home only.
352-601-5362
fertilizer, Horse manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens,bare
soil or as mulch. U load
and haul 352-628-9624
Free 2 Five Month
Pet Rats Not for Feed
and 3 Story
Cage/Home
(352) 726-2986
352-726-0373


[o)N l'J;THIIollM : rllHS^






YR S 1 1 i11 1 11 I I R T



:L ,MMl rfrT-7J L mX -1-m.rv d III W. q


2 IVlle Guineu aPgs
cage, water bottle food
dish, and house
(352) 341-2612
Free Dog, intelligent,
sweet and energetic,
female shepard
mixspayed, Needs
room to run, good with
kids, (352) 613-5336
free firewood, several
hardwood trees small to
large U cut and haul
away. 352-628-9624
Free Male Cat
Black bob tail, too
good home
(352) 228-1789
Hound m ix
4 yo. nuet UTD shots
housebroken, should
have fenced yard
dog comes with life
time training w/BARK
BUSTERS(352) 503-2840
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Male Dachshund
Good with Kids and
Dogs, up to date on
shots (352) 341-2612
Male Kitten, Black
11 weeks old
American Pitt, Female
3 mo. old white &
Brindle (352) 634-2781
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
Oak Fire Wood
8501 E Muir PI.
(352) 341-2624

V THIS OUT!
Open House STAR-K Al-
paca Ranch. Saturday
and Sunday, December
3rd and 4th 10 AM to 3
PM. FREE Admission.
6500 W Country Club
Drive, Homosassa, FL
34448. "Our Alpacas Will
Melt Your Heart".
Pit/Boxer mix
3 yo. nuet UTD shots
Comes with Life Time
training with Bark
Busters(352) 503-2840




FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inverness Gift shipping
MUSTARD & COLLARD
GREENS, CLOSED SUN
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.( $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



GOT my Black DOG
WHO Has HIM?
$$SS CASH$$SSS
Is he Dead? Get Hit?
Euthanized?
Someone think he was
Stray?
Green Acr./ Hom.Trl/
Gro.Cleve area
Black Lab Mix 50 lbs.
Male, fixed
Pointer head,Short
Hair,Raisin bumps on
skin. Since 11/5
(352)-220-3890 503-6494
Lost Blue & White Pit
bull, male, not
neutered, lost 11/23
near G Martinelli/bike
path,Citrus Springs near
Charlene St, name is
Mofussa, please call
my kids really miss their
dog (352) 642-5099
Orange Pom
male 2 yrs old last 12/2
in Citrus Springs &
Dunnellon
(352) 613-6247


0009XRK

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


98





2


1


8


8 3 9 46





5 4 2 9 3


7 2 9


5


6 4 18is

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
- Laptop / GPS Cordless Power Tools
- Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
- Camera / Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
Watch / Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
Wheelchair / Scooter _ii
- Rechargeables / Chargers i attel"1 A
-AirsoftRC LetC.

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Closed Saturday & Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Bring this coupon get a free pack of batteries.


in Blue Velvet Box
(352) 628-7022






REWARD $1000. No
Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
REWARD
Lost Cat-"Buddy" white
with black and gray
patches, neutered
male, blue eyes, has
microchiplast seen in
Arbor Lakes, please call
352-637-7258



Beautiful large orange cat
hanging in woods behind
our home off Anna
Jo.Won't come for
food.Call Bill 637 5499 for
directions.
found gold wedding band
day after thanksgiving in
three sisters springs..let
me know initials on ring
and date on ring and will
get back to you
steve 941-780-6171
Found large male cat
in Sugarmill Woods
black & gray tabby,
white chest and paws,
maybe blind
(352) 228-0799
Found men's wedding
band, CR post office
11/25, claim by asking
for Richard at the
counter.



Advertising that Works.
Put your ad in Over
100 Papers throughout
Florida for one
LOW RATE! Call
(866)742-1373
or visit: www.florida
-classifieds.com
HAPPY'S KIDS CHRIST-
MAS COLORING
CONTEST-"Navidad Col-
orear Concurso"
Go to
www.Happ/TalesPublishing.c
om,downbad
pictures, color, mail by
December 10th. Three
prizes per age group.
Enter today.



FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.( $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



I Need A Ride From
Lecanto to
National Cemetery
in Bushnelle Dec. 24th.
I will buy gas
(352) 527-2852
WANTED TO RENT
Lady from the North
would like to find an
older retired lady that
would share her
home for the winter.
(330) 231-1316




LOCAL
CONTRACTOR
Seeking
Office Assistant
to fleet manager w/
Excel and Mircrosoft
computer skills, for
Fulltime position. Fleet
exp. helpful but not
necessary.
Experienced
office applicants
Fax Resume to:
352-795-3064










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CHIRO ASST.
PTexp.preferred
mail resume:6166
W.Hwy44,C.R.34429


Classifieds



Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines


Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily

Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday

Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday

South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday

West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Nursing
Instructors
needed
Active FL license
and BSN required,
MSN preferred
Taylor College
Belleview
Send resumes to
bursar@
taylorcollege.edu

Receptionist
F/T, P/T some flex. hrs.
billing,insurance,
computer skills, busy
office with great
people dedicated to
outstanding medical
care. Email resume
medicaljobinverness
@yahoo.com

SOCIAL SERVICE
ASSISTANT
To assist the Social
Service department
with providing
medically -related
social services.
Qualifications:
Must be able to read,
write and communi-
cate in English. Must
be knowledgeable
of Micro-soft word,
Excel, and Outlook.
Must have Hight
School Diploma.
Must have at least
3 years experience
in related field.
Long term care
preferred.
Job Discription:
Assist with discharge
planning Along with
ICP Medicaid
process. Coordinate
and assist with all
departmental
referrals. Please
apply on line at www
.avantecenters.com




COMMERCIAL
APPRAISER
Obtain an application at
www.citruspa.org. Click
on the employment tab.
Salary is commensu-
rate with qualifications




Servers, line cooks
& Chef

Top pay for experi-
enced help.Chef with
min w/3 yrs fine dining
exp. Fax resume to
352-447-5087







Accepting
applications for


Advertising
Sales Reps

Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Focusing on
Crystal River and
Homosassa Areas.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers
QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.
preferred.
* Computer
proficiency
* Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
* Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
* Strong presentation
skills preferred.
* Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.

Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
HR@
chronicleonline.com
EOE, drug screen
required for final
applicant.




Auto Body Tech

352-613-2630
Driver-Dry & Refriger-
ated. Single source
dispatch.No tractor
older than 3 years.
Daily Pay! Various
hometime options!
CDL-A, 3 months cur-
rentOTR experience
800-414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS,
& TN & FL
HOME WEEKENDS,
earn Up to 39 cents a
mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed
Exp. Call: SUNBELT
TRANSPORTLLC
(800)572-5489 EXT 227
Regional
Opportunity
100% Owner Opera-
tor Reefer Company.
$1,000 SIGN-ON BO-
NUS! Home Weekly.
Call (800)237-8288
or visit www.
suncocarriers.com


$$ WANTED PROCESS
mail from home! Pay
weekly Free supplies!
Bonuses! Genuine op-
portunity! Helping
homeworkers for 20
years!
Call 1-888-302-1512
www.howtowork-from
home.com

APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
NEEDED
No nights, No
weekends. Apply at
6421 W. Homosassa
Trail, Homosassa FI

Freight Up
= More $ 2 Mos.

CD Class A
Driving Exp
(877)258-8782
meltontruck.com





Part Time Help
Needed
Fero Funeral Home in
Beverly Hills is seeking
compassionate,
energetic people to
join our staff. This posi-
tion is an on call basis
only. Must have a
valid driver's license.
Applications may be
picked up at
5955 N. Lecanto Hwy
in Beverly Hills,
ask for Faye.
EOE, M/F/D/V Drug
and smoke free
workplace





www.ferofuneral
home.com




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341 -PREP (7737)
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 359-1690




MORTGAGE
ELIMINATION
No up front Fees
Completed in 4 wks
bdebtfreenow.com
352-422-7887





ALLIED HEALTH
Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.com

EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE
Online from Home
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid If qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call
877-206-5165
www.CenturaOnllne
.com




TAYLOROLLEGE





2 Week Courses!
*PHYSICAL REHAB
TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
SEKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


NOW
ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
COSMETOLOGY
FULL SPECIALTY
INSTRUCTOR
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.


BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
727-848-8415
352-263-2744
Inlll mlll


98 5 7 4 3261
3612 2e749




8 1 3_7c95 7-49 C52
1427 639851
813795462
792463 185
S5 48 2 19 7 3
578312694
1 4 95 86237
2 3 6974518


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)



SAWMILLS from only
$3997.
MAKE MONEY& SAVE
MONEY. with your own
bandmill. Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info.
& DVD
www. NorwoodSawmills.
com
800-578-1363 X 300N.



"OWN THE SUCCESSFUL
MERLE NORMAN
COSMETICS & UPSCALE
RESALE! Turnkey;
immediate income!
Waybright Real Estate
352.795.1600



METAL-TOPPED TABLE
Approx.30x40" White
w/red trim.
$75.00 352-364-2508
PRETTY ANTIQUE DBL
WROUGHT IRON BED
& MATCHING CHAIR
Cream $65/both
352-897-4154
VERY OLD ATLAS
ACCORDION ANTIQUE
ATLAS ACCORDION
WITH ORIGINAL CASE
352-464-1005



40+YEARS COLLEC-
TION OF SANTAS Buy
one or buy them all.
$1.00+ 352-382-4911
CAMPBELL KIDS
CHRISTMAS ORNA-
MENTS Set of 15 from
1980 to 1994. $50.00 Call
(352)382-3196
ELECTRIC TRAINS
Rail King engine and
tender, 6 Classic Madi-
son Style Pass. cars,
Shell 3 dome tanker
cars, All new in box, All
for $225
(352) 341-1617
SILVER BULLET
COORS BEER SIGN
WITH LIGHT black, ob-
long nice shape $50
352-897-4154
SILVER BULLET
COORS BEER SIGN
WITH moving light, black,
rectangle good shape
$50 352-8974154












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




HOT TUB (5X7)
220V, Cedar Cabenet,
cover, exc. cond, all
chemicals incl. $2,900
(352) 726-9066
Nordic Health Spa
34"Wx83" 2 seater,
Teakwood $1500
(352)621-3034
(352)212-7273




A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit

Lic.&lns. CAC 057914
Dryer, good
condition, large
capacity, $75
(352) 419-6719
ELECT. DRYER
Kenmore, super cap.
white, exc. cond $100.
(352) 746-0232
FREEZER MEDIUM
SIZE 28"wide 58"tall
works great but has
some surface rust only
65.00 352 637 5171
FREEZER UPRIGHT
MEDIUM SIZE 28" by 58"
high works great has sur-
face rust on door needs
paint $65.352 637 5171
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore, side x side
25.4 cu ft. bisque with ice
maker, in door Clean,
good condition. Energy
Star $250.(352)419-5605
Samsung 26 cubic ft
refrigerator, french
doors, 33 in wide,
only used 3 mos. like
new, black $1000
(352) 613-0788
SIDE BY SIDE REFRIG-
ERATOR. KENMORE
COLDSPOT. COLOR IS
BISQUE $195. 527-1239


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent condition.
Can deliver
352 263-7398
Whirlpool
Dishwasher
& Micro wave $100.
good cond
(352) 795-9664
Whirlpool Elec Range
2006 Slide in SS model,
Self cleanglass top,
$1300 new, sell for $450
(352) 746-9889
WHIRLPOOL
Washer & Dryer
white, exc. cond.
$200.(352) 621-7505



2 DRAWER FILE CABI-
NET Metal Commercial
Lateral Graphite Color
28"x30"x18" $45
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR Ergonomic
Adjustable PreOwned
Fabric Covered $85
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIRS 2
PreOwned Commercial
Adjustable Fabric Cov-
ered $45 727463-4411
ERGONOMIC DESK
CHAIR Commercial
PreOwned Fully Adjusta-
ble Fabric Covered $95
727-463-4411
LATERAL FILE CABINET
3 Drawer Commercial
Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-463-4411



2 AUCTIONS
THURS. DEC.1
Estate Auction
Prev:12 Auction 3pm
till we're done. Appli-
ances, Furniture, Tools,
Row after Row of fun
and surprises
SUN. DEC. 4
Antique &
Collectible Auction
Prev:10 Auction Ipm
1800's Mason & Hamlin
Parlor Grand, Dresden,
Waterford, Shelly,
Antique Toys, Primitives,
Furniture, postcards,
coins, firearms,
Oriental carpets,
Jewlery, Porc & Glass
Watch website
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc



Air Compressor
comm. grade, good
cond. 20 gal runs
on 220 $100.
(352) 628-6886
CRAFTSMAN 10"
Radial Arm Saw $200
Craftsman 7 drawer
cabinet incls some
tools $225.
(352) 382-1885
Leaf blower Craftsman,
Gas, 25cc, 200mph, 430
cfm, used 3 times, like
new.-$65
Call Joe @ 352-270-8475



25 INCH TV Sharp color
tv great picture $50.00
obo 352-746-4060
36 INCH TV 36 inch
Sharp color TV
great picture $75.00 obo
352-746-4060
55" Toshiba TV
projection television,
Excel cond. looks new
Orig $1,300. only $65.
352-795-8016
TV 20"screen 20"D 2yrs
old with remote $20
Homosassa
727-207-1207



DOOR WHITE INTE-
RIOR NEW $15
352-777-1256



COMPUTER STAND
28Dx28Wx51H shelves
for everything $30
Homosassa
727-207-1207
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
MONITOR 15" (not slim)
$10 Homosassa
727-207-1207


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


P3 3G COMPUTER With
crt monitor.
$50.00 352-382-0947



CHAISE LOUNGES (2) &
SIDE TABLE Chaise
lounges& side
table-moving-$150.-excell
352-382-0220 pm
PATIO SET 4 chairs,
glass topped table, dark
green, mint condition.
$80.352-527-4846
UNIQUE SIDE TABLE
WROUGHT IRON SEW
MACHINE BASE with
smoked glass top $50
352-897-4154



I Coffee table
2 matching end tables
Belvielded Glass
wrought iron base
$225
(352) 563-1185
3 pc. Plaid Sectional
w/ ottoman
1 Navy wing back chair
w/ ottoman
$390 obo
(352) 382-2935
6 PREOWNED DESK
CHAIRS Mauve Color
FabricArmless $10 Each
727-463-4411
9 Drawer Dresser
Walnut
$175.
(352) 419-6811
36" ROUND CAFETERIA
TABLE Like New Rugged
Formica Top Sturdy Steel
Base Misc Colors $65
727-463-4411
ANTIQUE WROUGHT
IRON 3/4 BED SMALL
MATCHING CHAIR
painted cream $65/both
352-897-4154
BAR dark gray marble
top, brass foot rest me-
dium color wood/ match-
ing cushioned stools
700.00 phone 249-7492
Cars toddle bed and mat-
tress brand new 60.00
35299-628-4447
CHAISE ANTIQUE BUR-
GUNDY $70 Lamp Apple
Candle $25
352-777-1256
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE www.
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com. 795-0121
COUCH 84" Multi color
burnt orange/green (nice)
$100 Homosassa
727-207-1207
CROWN FOR BED AC-
CENT ANTIQUE
$80,SET ANGEL WALL
$30 EXCELLENT CON-
DITION 352-777-1256
DESK CHAIR 4 Commer-
cial PreOwned Dark Gray
Fabric $25 Each
727-463-4411
Dinette Table
w/4 chairs $45.
night stand $25.
storage unit $25.
(352) 794-3672
Dining room buffet 30"
H, 48"W, 18" D, $40,
could be used for TV
stand, 352-419-4066
(352) 228-7670
DINING ROOM SET
solid oak table/2 leaves
4 chairs, made by
Amish New $1800 sell
$950.(352) 465-2088
DINING ROOM TABLE
w/6 padded chairs,
matching lighted hutch
$100. Ive message.
(352) 563-6327
END TABLE 23"x28"
Dark Wood $10
Homosassa
727-207-1207
END TABLES, SQUARE
COFFEE TABLE
Broyhill,whitewash,nice,
$95. 352-419-6307 or
908-328-7516
Entertainment Center
Broyhill, dark wood,
holds 37" TV, w/
component cabinets
4ft x 6ft $300
(352) 560-3519
Entertainment Center
solid oak 59" H. 58" W.
21" dp. 3 shelves
w/glass doors, cabinet
w/2doors & 2 drawers
pull out TV shelf &
receiver shelf, 2 re
trackable doors, exc
cond $1500 new
sell $250. can not del.
(352) 794-0414
FLORAL SOFA Good
condition. Very clean.
Non-smoker. $100.00
352-257-5722
FORMICA TOP COM-
PUTER DESK with 2
Drawer File Cabinet At-
tached 4 ft x 24" $25
727-463-4411
KITCHEN CART
24Dx36Lx36H casters
light Oak $40
Homosassa
727-207-1207
Kitchen table, 4 roll
around chairs, good
condition, $60
(352) 419-6719
LADDERBACK CHAIRS
Four chairs, rush seats.
Excellent condition.
$50.00 352-382-0947






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


recliner/rocker, mauve
excellent cond, $200
(352) 746-4570
LOVESEATS CLOTH
FABRIC brown/beige in
mint condition $80.
Light color twin sleeper
$50. 352-621-0175
MODERN BROYHILL
COTTON LOVESEAT
clean, comfy overstuffed
light peach
$100 352-897-4154
OAK TABLE with 8
CHAIRS/2-LEAVES Cit-
rus Hills352-464-1005
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
PRETTY ANTIQUE
WROUGHT IRON DBL
BED SMALL MATCHING
CHAIR Cream $65
352-897-4154
QUEEN SLEEPER
SOFA Non-smoker, very
clean. $100.00
352-257-5722
RECLINER Green
Corduroy (nice-still has
arm& head pads) $40
Homosassa
727-207-1207
Sleeper sofa, light blue
tap.$175, recliner $75,
excel cond leave mess
(352) 249-7638
SLEEPER TWIN SIZE
Loveseat light cloth
CLEAN/COMFY/GOOD
CONDITION $50.00
352-621-0175
Sofa & Love Seat
Light Beige Pattern,
good cond.
$300 for Both
(352) 344-1608
SOLID OAK ROUND
PEDESTAL TABLE 48"
wide lovely grain $75 firm
352-897-4154
SOLID WOOD HUTCH
White/stained dining
room hutch. $60.00
excellent shape
352-382-0947
SOLID WOOD PEDES-
TAL TABLE Med-dark
stain good shape $75
352-897-4154
STACKABLE CHAIRS
PreOwned Commercial
Metal Frame with Arms
Blue Fabric Covered 2 for
$35 727-463-4411
Taupe Microsuade sofa
may be configured
with or w/out adapta-
ble 63" chase, factory
treated fabric mint
cond. paid $1,450
first $350. (352)634-3806
TOWER RACK CD/DVD
MEDIA WOOD $50,Top
Cristal $25,Desk Chair
$20 352-777-1256
UNIQUE SIDE TABLE-
WROUGHT IRON SEW
MACHINE BASE Glass
Top $65 firm
352-897-4154
UNIQUE SIDE TABLE
WROUGHT IRON SEW
MACHINE BASE WITH
Small Glass Top $65
352-897-4154
WALNUT LATERAL FILE
CABINET Wooden 2
Drawer 34"x31"x21" $65
727-463-4411
WHITE PAINTED WOOD
BOOKCASE 40"x32"
x12". 3 Shelves. Organ-
izer for a Childs Room.
$30 727-463-4411


2008 Snapper 0 turn
mower 24 HP,50 inch
deck, 3 blades, 140
non comm. hours,
$1780 obo 352-678-0642
21" Craftsman Mower
w/ 6.75 Briggs & Straton
Eng. Self primed Sel
propelled, variable
spd. used 1 /2 yrs.
excel. cond. $200. obo
(352) 465-3260
'99, Ford New Holland
1720 4 x 4, Deisel,
690 Hrs. 72" Mower, runs
good needs Minor TLC
$5,500 obo, possible
trade. (352) 726-6864
ANTIQUE SINGER
WROUGHT IRON BASE
WITH SMALL GLASS
TOP Pretty inside or out
$65 352-897-4154
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
The time is NOW!!!!
20 lb bag $4.00
352-563-1519
Chipper/Shredder,
Craftsman commercial
duty 3" cap. 7.5 HP
little use, excel, cond.
$500. obo
(352) 489-2011

V THIS OUT!
JOHN DEERE D140
LAWN TRACTOR JD
D140, Brand new, 5
hours on engine, comes
with mulcher & pull be-
hind trailer, cover. $2500.
Runs like a Deere.
Phone, 352-637-2226
Tractor, Iseki 4 x 4,
Diesel, 3 point hitch box
blade, loader, low hrs.
$7,500 obo possible
trade. (352) 726-6864



Bonsai plants
very reasonable
(352) 560-3611




ALL CHRISTMAS
ITEMS
4
/ /r ..


Crystal River
Fri Sat. 9-4p
334 N.Pompeo Av



SALE

PRE-MOVIN
G
HOMOSASSA
Fri Sat 7:30- 4pm
Collectible Roosters
sm appls. canoe, fish-
ing poles, Compound
Bow, red hat Items
Yard Ornaments, etc
5510 W. Nobis Cir
off Rock Crusher

BEVERLY HILLS
53 S J Kellner Blvd
Fri-Sat 8-2
Lift Chair $300, sofa $65,
wheelchairs, walkers,
canes,bedside pots,
shower bench, 1982
Goldwing 1100 **$1,200,
fishing, golf, boating, tools


-r" ..........'ri
aae





BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. & Sat. 8a-3p
Furniture and Lots
of Misc. Items
17 S. Lincoln Ave.


YARD SALE

BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 2, &Sat. 3,8a-2p
Something for
Everyone!
215 S. Lincoln Ave.


YARDSALE
Beverly Hills
Saturday 8am-2pm
Something for
everyone!
206 S Jackson Street
CHURCH YARD
SALE

Sat 8-12:30
Lots of Toys & Clothes
Christms Decorations
Jewelry. much more!
960 S. US Hwy 41
Calvary Chapel


YARD SALE
CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 8-2 Sun.8-1
Tools Air compressor
excer. bike & More
1051 E. Hobart Lane
CITRUS SPRINGS
2904 W. Gardenia Dr.
Dec. 2 & 3. 8A-2P.
Dining table and
lots of misc.
Big multi-family sale.

NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE

CRYSTAL
RIVER
Fri Sat 8 am -?
Lots of everything!!
N. Amphibian Point







CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. Sat Sun 8-4p
jewerly, new clothes
collectibles & misc.
239 SE Kings Bay Dr








Crystal River
Sat&Sun 9AM-5PM
Collectables, ladies
clothes, marine equip.,
few tools, Chevie en-
gine parts,1955/68 vin-
tage, home accesso-
ries, picture frames &
much more.Do your
Christmas shopping
right!
1027 SE 3rd Ave


CRYSTAL RIVER
MULTI FAM.
943 N. Appalachian
Terr., off Ft. Island just
past Plantation. SAT
12/3, 8A 2P. Baby
items galore! Furniture,
clothes, toys, HH items,
gym equip., MORE!


YARDSALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. Dec 3 7A-1:30P
Spaces for Rent
$10 ea. Benefit the
First Pres. Church of
Crsy. Riv Food Pantry
1501 SE US 19
(352) 746-7585


YARD SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 3, 9a-4p
MULTI FAMILY SALE
Christmas Items,
Boating Equip, Golf
Clubs AND MORE
11190 W. Thoreau PI.


NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE

EL DORA-
DO
ESTATES/LecantoFri
Sat 8a-?
To Much too list
2510 W. Olivia Ln
see signs
OFF CARDINAL LN








FLORAL
CITY
Fri. & Sat. 8:30-3pm
12081 S. RAY POINT
Near 480/581




Fri & Sat
9-4
furn. treadmirPEmglo
Air Compressor, misc.
tools, Large variety
of Items
132 S. Oak Village
Blvd. S. of Rt 98


YARD SALE

HERNANDO
Fri Sat 9-3p
To much too list
5930 N. Irving Park
Ave








HERNANDO
Fri. Sat. &Sun. 9a-lp
6861 N. Palmer Way
Tires, furniture, hsehld
tools & much more!


CLASSIFIED





Hernando
Frl. & Sat 8AM-2PM
In/outdoor furn, tools,
grand piano,89 Harley,
antiques & More!
51 E. Joshua Court



S ALE

HERNANDO
Lake Park
Sat 8-4p. washer
Large dog cages
Hsehld, much morel!
3908 N. Ranch Pass
Terrace


YARDSALE
HERNANDO
Sat. &Sun. 7a-3p
No Junk,
Nice Christmas Items
1900 N SHIREY PT



HERNANDO
Sat. Dec. 3, 8am
Huge Christmas Sale
New Gifts and More
779 E. Connecticut Ln.



S EALE

HILLS OF
AVALON
Lecanto
Fri Sat 8-2p
New and Old
Something for every-
one. Come do your
Christmas Shopping
2001 S. Overview Dr


YARD SALE

HOMOSAS-
SA
Fri. Sat .8a-3p
Little of Everything
Too much to list
6150 W. Fiken Ct.
off Cardinal behind
Kangaroo.Gross St
go to Fiken. see Signs





Homosassa
Sat 8-3p
Too Much To ListllI
6710 & 6674
W. Crosbeck Ct




HOMOSAS-
SA
Sat. Dec. 3, 8am
8196 W. Cecil Lane
6 pc. bdrm set, king
bd. breakfast set, lazy
boy chair, electric
range, freezer,
Fl. water works sys.,
leather love seat,
jade tree, twin beds,
many asian pcs.,
linens, nice big clean
one day sale!


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 CLIL


HOMOSASSA
6430 S Lewdingar Dr
Saturday Dec. 3 8am-??


INVERNESS
Fri Sat 8-1p
Too Much to list!!
116 N Independence
Hwy

a a. a"a .I

.IkEAiUjr


INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat 9-3PM
Hummels, Kincard
houses, tools, many
Items etc.
9767 E. Goldfinch Lane

INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8a,-1pm
If you LOVE decorat-
ing for the holidays.
You will not want to
miss this aaraae sale.
Hall mark Dept 56,
Christopher Redko,
puzzles from 40's &
50's, collectibles,
1920's purses. outdoor
life,life mag's 60's 70's
store front displays
1950's cooking jars
To much to list
6080 E. Tudor Street

NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE
INVERNESS
Fri. 2 & Sat. 3
THE MOORINGS
9861 E. Pebble creek ct
Dinette Set, sofa &
chair, sofa bed., excer.
bike, charcol grill,
kitchen items & More!
//( 1 /


Inverness
Friday and Sat 9-?
Christmas decor, sad-
dle,horse items, toys &
more Heatherwood
Flint lane-Follow signs


Inverness
Sat & Sun 8AM-3PM
Golf,fishing,small appl.,
antiques, furn. & more
1116 Woodcrest Ave


-Nc


12-3 0 LaughingStock International Inc,Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS, 2011

"I'm not having you fall asleep
at the wheel."








JOHN GORDON ROOFING

V & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269 W |


99fn~i#C1359 Hom Inspcto5,. 236


YARD SALE


Inverness
Saturday 8-1
Household goods,
12x11 6'2"high tent, XM
radio car set, 60x40
glass top table, soft BB
pistols,music cassettes,
Everlast standing pun-
ching bag and more
315 Camellia
Ave(behind Votech)



INVERNESS
Saturday Only, 8a-3p
Benefit For
Multiple Myeloma
Awareness
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
ALL MUST GO!
6001 E. Marble Lane








CITRUS
HILLS
Fri. 2 & Sat. 3, 9a-3p
335 W. Pearson St.
Highview Estates


INVERNESS
Saturday 3, 8A-3P.
Something for
Everyone!
685 N. Independence
Hwy




LECANTO
Sat. 3, 7:30-3p
Folding Ladder,
Nails, Beer Signs,
Lots Misc. of Items
515 E Lancaster St.
Kennsington Estates



/I h

INVERNESS
Inverness Mobile Park
Community Yard Sale
Sat. Dec. 3, 8a-?
550 N. Independence

YARDSALE

PINE RIDGE
FRI. & SAT. 8AM.-2PM.
Antiques, collectibles,
tools, books, old clocks
& Misc., DOWN SIZING
5395 N. Red Ribbon Pt.


INVERNESS
Downsized 927 Cedar
Ave Saturday 12/3 ONLY
8am-2pm
INVERNESS
Sat 3 & Sun. 4, 9a-3p
311 S. Seminole Ave.
Household, clothing,
jewelry, stuffed animals,
notions, Danielle Steele
Books, over 500 VHS
& DVD's, incl. Frank
Sinatra, Disney &
Collections
INVERNESS
Sat ONLY 8a-12
5435 S. Barco Ter.



INVERNESS
Sat. & Sun. 8a-Until
Tools, Furniture
Everything Must Go!
1594 S. Skylark Terr.








INVERNESS
Sat. 3 & Sun. 4, 8a-4p
*Garage & Craft Sale*
very nice All Occassion
Handcrafted Gifts
10022 E. Newport Lane
(352) 726-9429


ot


AM


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla. rms.,
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)


-U
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903

V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs .352 613-2518


all1 11 [-l S t' .
utII \\tI Ild lIrst.

Lbi) Da)



( 1V


Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic 364-2120/593-8806
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
reoair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
k 352 422-7279 k




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $75 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352
SEASONED FIREWOOD
FOR SALE
$40 a Face Cord
(352) 465-5445




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



1 CALL & RELAX 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Lie. 37658. & Ins. Steve
& Scott 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
FAST
e AFFORDABLE
seRELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 A
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V O RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handvman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
S352-257-9508 k
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292



NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




Looking For a Pro
Guitar Instructor?
10 yrs teaching exp.
all ages & skill levels
for info. 352-620-5310



Complete Renovation
Cabinets, counter tops,
tile, etc.tub/shower
conversion quality work
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR

H-75-5
S -, ,, I : :
352-795-5755


DODGE DIESEL & JEEP CONNECTION
(fr Complete Mopar
-. Repair & Maintenance
Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
Transmissions Brake Service
WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS
inline-.4 -i

performance-
Inc.
680 E. Southland Ave.
CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell
352-568-7591


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374




CLEAN UP, Hedge
Trim, haul, press wash,
20 yrs experience
(352) 220-6761
CLEAN UP, Hedge
Trim, haul, press wash,
20 yrs experience
(352) 220-6761
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
WE BAG LEAVES
and clean gutters!
50% OFF thru holidays.
COASTAL LAWN CARE
(352) 601-1447




AT YOUR HOME
Mower Generator Serv-
ice & Repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273


Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



EDDIE JONES
PLUMBING REPAIR
30 yrs. experience
Cell (859) 987-5624
Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300


*Exposed
Aggregate
.T__ hotcrete $45(yd.
r- i o* Decks Tile
FREE Pavers /^
ESTIMATES
GREG'S COMPLETE
GREG REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
IENSED 352-746-5200


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.

#1 Employment source s


ww.chroniicleonIin e.con


AAA ROOFING
Call the aktstea"
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 0009TL3


Crsa6ie t nens


Bahia Pallets
400sq.ft. $60- pick-up.
Pasture Seeding avail
352-400-2221




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
352-400-3188


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, lic/ins 302-8852


GRIFFINS TREE SERV
Competitive Rates
lic/ins Free Est
352-249-6495
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est..Fire
wood avail.. 628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069


& SUPPLY INC.

County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
$100 OFF

'ANY RE-ROOF:
I One coupon per household I
"_ FREE ESTIMATES
(352) 628-5079




Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
/ All Home

Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
CLean Dryer
L" Vents
Affordable & Dependable
Expenence lifelong
352.344-0905
cel 400-1722


a moak,6


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0009Q84







C12 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011




Huffy bike. Brand new.
$40.00 Call 352 726 5753
Pine Ridge COMPOUND BOW,
Dryer,furn, Jewelry, kids OUTERS ASTRO AR-
clothes and toys and CHERY BLAZER- RH.,
much more! 45-601bs, viking sight,
2197 W Ivywood Dr $25. 628-0033
COMPUTER DESK
51"D X 26"W With pullout
S" keyboard tray and pullout
file storage $35.
352-382-7329
DISNEY-"FLATTERY"-PRINT-
iJJJno. 838 of
2000-size 18"by 24"
PINE RIDGE $100.00 more info call
Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8am 352-527-9982
Table saw, AC, DISNEY(9)DVDS special
clothing, books, toys, & collector editions-sell
Kitchen ware, etc. separate or all for $45.00
2568 W. Mesa Verde Dr. more info call
352-527-9982
RAINBOW Eddie Bauer Tent
SPRINGS 12x12 New $80.
Friday 2 & Sat. 3, 7' cast net $75.
8am-4pm 10 cargo roller $80.
BIG! (352) 220-4638
GARAGE SALE EYEGLASS FRAMES
8855 SW 194th Court New from optometrist,
Fairway Estates grey $25 860-2475
Foot Bath plus
i ~ massager-heated, like
new $23.
Microsoft Scanner, new
Lry w/PS & CD$20.
New white golf shoes
Riv/Dunnell size 10 440
Christmas Tree 7 ft
On w/lights & trimmings
Fri Sat 7:30a-3p $22.(352) 382-3357
Lots of every thing FULL CAGE WATER
Furn is gone. HOLDER ,WHEEL BIG
6439 W Riverbend Rd HOUSE FOOD HOLDER
$70 352-777-1256
A D CAI HOUSEHOLD 7' sara-
YA, j toga spurce christmas
tree 2 years old 25.00,
CRYSTAL honey well air purifier new
CRYSTAL 20.00, tent and screen
RIV\E porch, rain cover for tent
40.00, kids puzzels .25,
Fri./Sat. til 5p, Sun. til 1 p books .50, small black
Tons of Clothes all sizes, and white tv 3.00 or
Lots of Kids Stuff! 90.00 takes all
6548 N. Bugbee Pt. 352-634-1852
KODAK EASY SHARE
CAMERA M532, 4G SD
card, accessories, man-
ual, box, used once. $75
352-601-0067
j; 1 l J Jr Link manufactured
Alum TrifoldCargo
IC/TAI ramp, mount in van
CRYSTAL truck or trailer, 12001b
cap.$550 obo$1200
RIVER new 352-257-3625
Sat Sun 8-1p MONGOOSE 20 Boy's
Lots of Misc. Items Bike-blue very good con-
10045 W Riverwood edition $25.00 527-1399
Drive PATHFINDER BICYCLE
TRAILER FOR CHILD-
YARD Air P20", air tire, fits all bikes,
YAK LE quick release, blue, Ex.,
$55. 628-0033

C CRYSTAL PYREX GLASS BEAK-
C YTAL ERS NEW in the box 20
RIVER total 1000ml down to
RIVER xv50ml 100.00
Middle School 352 637 5171
Sat dEC. 3 8a-3p ROCKWELL SCOUT-
HUGE Rummage Sale ROCKWELL SCOUT-
Tons to choose from. ING-"1979"- 50 first day
344 N.E. Crystal St. covers-matching gov.
stamps $100.00
B352-527-9982
SALMON NATURAL
SKIN FISH MOUNT- 31
inches long, ex. condition,
Lm. 1 vn $55. 352-628-0033
SAW TOOTH POWER
High end antiques SETTER Foley. Auto-
cash & carry only, by matic $25 563-1073
appointment only Sears Kenmore Zig
352-201-9898 Zagsewing machine,
-model 20, early 70's, all
steel, in cabinet, $100
obo (352) 249-4483
SILVER BULLET
2 ROBERTA DRESSER COORS BEER SIGN
SILVER $30 EACH size WITH MOVING LIGHT
10,14, Dresser Burgundy black, rectangular good
size 2 excellent condition shape $50 352-897-4154


352-777-1256
DRESSEs VICTORY
COLOR CHAMPS $60
SIZE 2XL Dresser Wedd-
ing Victorian size 20.
352-777-1256
Motorcycle jacket
size 42, $50
352-419-4066
(352) 228-7670



SAMSUNG KNACK
VERIZON CELL PHONE
Easy flip phone, all ac-
cessories, manual, box.
$20 352-601-0067
VERIZON LG VOYAGER
CELL PHONE Touch
screen, QWERTY, all ac-
cessories, manual, box.
$30 352-601-0067
VERIZON LG VOYAGER
CELL PHONE Touch
screen, QWERTY, all ac-
cessories, manual, box.
$30 352-601-0067



!!!!!ST225/75 R15!!!!!
Pair of trailer tires. Like
new!! High tread!! Only
asking $60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
235/75 R15*
Nice high tread!!! Like
new!! Only asking $70 for
the pair.
(352)551-551-1810
-----235/55 R17-----
Nice tread!! High tread!
Only asking $70 for the
pair. (352)551-1810
3 WHEEL WALKER-
hand brakes, basket/tray,
8" soft tires, fold to store,
Ex., 352-628-0033
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes, fold to store, Ex+,
$45, 352-628-0033
24 DUCK DECOYS-
mallards, black &
whites,tippers,some
weights, $4 ea., $75 for
all 352-628-0033
3/4 HP Blower Housing
& Motor, $85 obo
1/4 HP Fan& Motor
$40. obo
Both for 3 ton AC Unit
(352)422-2113
AIRBED raised queen
size navy blue w/flock
top, electric pump, & stor-
age bag. $40. 527-8276
AUSSIE CHARCOAL
GRILL never used, on
wheels, $25
352-419-6307 or
908-328-7516
BAR STOOLS, 2 Wind-
sor 30" beechwood high
back swivel stools. $35
each. 527-8276
Barbie & Kelly dolls
never remove from box
10 barb in Cmas, VTime
& Halloween. 3 Kelly
dolls. All $100. 422-1309
BEAR WHITETAIL
HUNTER COMPOUND
BOW- RH., Quiversight,
451bs, Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
BEAUTIFUL Broyhill
round coffee table
w/drawers $95
(352) 489-1486
Black Leather office
Desk Chair $50.
32" Sony TV
$95.
(352) 419-7224
Build A Bear
Clothes, 30 pieces,
outfits, tops, bottoms,
PJS $100 for all
(352) 422-1309


VACUUM FORM SIGN
MACHINE Makes
24"x36" signs 240volt 3
sets of letters plus extras
asking $500
352-464-1597




3 wheel elec.
scooter, like new,
$550
(352) 341-4008
Jazzy Electric Chair
model 1113, nice,
clean car cover, sad-
dlebag, cup holder,
needs, batteries $350
obo(352) 637-1992
Jazzy Wheel Chair
614HD topof the line
model w/wide chair,
looks & runs like new,
dual battery Charger
$1350(352) 344-9618
Standard Chair
Invacare $40
(352) 637-1992
WHEELCHAIR $50.00
AND WALKER WITH
WHEELS $15.00
they both fold up
727 868-7368










WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



ACOUSTIC B20 BASS
AMP EXCELLENT CON-
DITION, LIGHT
WEIGHT&POWERFUL!
$95 352-601-6625
DEAN VENDETTA
ELECTRIC GUITAR W/
GIGBAGCORD,STRAP&
STRINGS $85
352-601-6625
FENDER CHAMPION
AMP DSP 30 WATT
W/EFFECTS & GREAT
"OVERDRIVE" $100
352-601-6625
FENDER SPEAKERS
(2) 15" $175.
(2) Dual 18" Very Large
Pro Sound Speakers
$400(352) 563-5533
GUITARS
Buying Old Gibson,
Fender& Martin
(443) 463-3421
MITCHELL MD 100
DREDNAUGHT ACOUS-
TIC GUITAR PLAYS &
LOOKS NEW $85
352-601-6625
MUSICAL INSTRU-
MENTS Fender Squire
electric guitar $50.00,
Violin 3/4 & case 100.00,
Daisy rock pink
guitar/case 50.00,
Kareoke machine 40.00
phone 249-7492
Steinway grand piano,
7 foot Model B, Ebony,
purchased 10 yrs ago.
Housed in a home and
played only by an
amateur elderly man.
Asking $55,000, which
is $35,000 less than a
new one at this time.
(352) 341-3037 or
cell 400-8177


nonexos


DECLASSIFIED


Granelle Brothers,
great condition
console model $350
Call (352) 527-3509 or
352-287-0755
VOCO PRO Amplifier
$125.
GTD Audio Amplifier
w/8 plugs for micro
$150
(352) 563-5533
YAMAHA Digital Piano
Keyboard DGX520 Like
new, portable 88 key, in-
clude stand, bench,
pedal, USB,
manual/DVD $400.00
352-726-9797
YAMAHA KEYBOARD
YPT-310 keyboard, own-
ers manual, three
books,stand.
$40.00 352-364-2508



CERAMIC HEATER
Counter top twin oscillat-
ing ceramic heater. Dual
speed Temp. con-
trolled.$15 352-746-4160
ELECTRIC RADIATOR
Oil filled,temp. controlled
on rollers. Exc. cond. $20
352-746-4160
HOOVER FLOOR MATE
TILE CLEANER great
condition-moving-$30
352-382-0220 evenings
VACUUM, 81b Upright,
New in box $75.00 firm.
Brian 352 270 9254



BRAND NEW! INSANITY
60 DAY WORKOUT DVD
PROGRAM 10 DVD'S,
GUIDES, CALENDAR.
$89 (352)949-1340
BRAND NEW! P90X
DVD WORKOUT PRO-
GRAM INCLUDES ALL
DVDS AND GUIDES $89
(352)949-1340
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
All electronics
incline, space saver, folds
up, great shape $165
(352) 464-0316
NORDIC TRACK EASY
SKI Good condition $25
352-419-6307 or
908-328-7516
RECUMBENT EXER-
CISE BIKE all electronics
great shape 100.00
352 637 5171
TREAD MILL Nordic
TrackA2105
Folds for smaller footprint
$350.00 352-364-2508
WEIGHT BENCH Weider
club Olympic bench with
leg extension and 300
pound olympic weight
set.Excellent condition.
$175 or best offer
352-302-3305
Weights and 2 heavy
benches, 720 lbs excel.
$250 or trade
(352) 637-6000



10ft SMOKER
on 16ft trailer
2 doors w/firebox
$850.00 or O.B.O.
344-5746 or 201-8158
AK- 47 762x39
Century Arms, beautiful
wood, scope, bytod,
rifle bag $500. also
ammino 360 rounds
.223 55gr. FMJ-3241 FPS
$100.new production
(352) 527-8950
API Tree Stand
sold by Bass Pro. weight
221bs new $180 sell $99.
(352) 464-1537
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ GO Electric
Golf cart $1200
complete windshield
charger, great tires, full
canvas cover, Good
to GOK(352) 400-0763
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. Dec 3rd 9a-5p
Sun. Dec 4th 9a-4p
HERNANDO COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
Man's Bike
Cruiser, fenders,
coaster brake, wide
tires, must see $75.
(352) 873-2505
MARLIN 3030
Lever Action Carbine
$325.
(352) 746-0100
PISTOL
WW2, Webley 38/200
w/proper Bristish Army
belt and holster $400.
obo (352) 270-8903
SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,

Utility & Enclosed
BUY, SELL, TRADE
Custom Built, Parts,
Tires, Whis, Repairs,
Trailer Hitches

16' Car Trailer, Reg.
$1765 CASH $1695.


Stehl Tow Dollies
$895 (limited supply)
w/brks $1195

Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564-1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x 12 w/new spare
$995.
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


TraTilt ers
5 x 8, $400 firm
Call after 7pm
(352) 726-8720



2 CAR SEAT WINNIE
POOH $35 AND APPLE
$40 Bouncer Hug me
Bear $20 Excellent
Condition 352-777-1256
DELUXE JUMPER
$40,BOUNCER SAFARI
$35,GYM FISH ACTIVITY
$20 Excellent Condition
352-777-1256
PLAY HOUSE, SLIDE,
TODDLER BED house
$75, slide $45, car bed
$15 nice shape, great for
xmas 352-364-1771
PLAY YARD Eight
panels, like new.
$30.00 352-382-0947
SWING MUSICAL
DELUXE $55 Mobile Crib
MUSICAL Butterfly $15
EXCELLENT CONDI-
TION 352-777-1256
WALKER $20,2 SET
CRIB BEDDING 2 PIECE
Precious m $10, 3 Piece
Mickey $15 Excelent
Condition 352-777-1256



MEANS CITIZEN WATCH
Slim classy look, chrome,
worn only a few times.
$70 860-2475
Rolex Sub Mariner
Stainless Steel and
Gold, custom face with
Diamonds & rubies
50% of retail $6,500
(352) 419-7224



t ,il \\ ild lIrst.

L i} LDa)


CHnoNiiE


*V-





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
# # A-






CASH FOR CARS!
All Cars/Trucks Wanted!
Top Dollar Paid! We
come to you! Any
make/model.Call for
Instant Offer:
1-888-420-3807









JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369


ACA Shih-Tzu Pups,
Lots of colors, average
$450-$600 + Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net

Beautiful Young
Sun Conjure & White
Cockatiel, w/ large
cage & food $275.
for all, No Checks
(352) 422-5622

BLUE PITBULL
Puppies,
UKC reg., health cert.,
all shots. must sale $300
(352) 287-0530

CKC Yorkie Poo's
paper trained, very in-
telligent, H/C, 8 weeks,
black & gold 1 M $425
1 F $450.(352) 489-6675

Full Blooded Jack Rus-
sell Terrier puppies
Health Certificates,
3 males $350
(352) 949-0131




Mini Dachshunds
Puppies






Only 3 left!
Reduced to $150
family raised, great
with kids and other pets,
very lovable 2 tan
1 blk/brn short hair
Please Call Doug
352-794-3463



Miniature Schnauzer
Pups! AKC, Health Cert,
Shots,, 2 males, $475.
352-419-4723, PM.
IYIVy VI


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


400 Pound Sow
Yorkshire duroc,good
breeder. 2 year old.
parents show quality
$300 obo
(352) 446-6295
049 4


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


WANTED
Mature New Zealand
male Rabbitt
(352) 489-5861




CR./ HOMSASSA
SEE AD UNDER
WORDY GURDY
PUZZLE .
DUNNELLON
2/2, New AC, Lrg. Lot
$450. Mo. +$450 Sec.
(727) 480-5512


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2/1, $400 Mo. No Pets.
(352) 344-1476
HOMOSASSA 2/1
1 AC fencd, shed, deck
$525.mo/dp. 628-5244
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH furn., priv. ranch
No pets. (386)871-5506
HOMOSASSA
2/1/2 +carport Lg. Fl.
Rm. Fireplace $425mo
+ sec. 352-503-6747
352-628-1928
HOMOSASSA
3/2, D/W, 2 AC, $700.
1st Ist sec 207-651-0923
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964



3/2 Mobile Home
Remodeled, In park
Ig., scrn. por. & carport
minutes from water &
progress energy,
furniture included
$14,000 (352) 302-8797
FOR SALE $19,000
3/2 Like new. new
paint, new carpet,
new tile flooring.
A/C under warranty.
Must See! Call to View
352-621-9181
HOLDER
3/2, fenced yard
$600/mo 10% down
Owner Financ Avail
(352) 302-9217


INVERNESS
55+ Comm. 2/1.5,
carport, screen rm.
shed $6900
(352) 586-7962

INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK.!
I finance anybody,
good rates. Use your
land or anything of
value. Trade in cars,
boats, jewelry, guns,
etc. 352-621-3807

USED HOMES
REPOSS
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183





Lake Rousseau
3/3 Lakefront, dock,
boat ramp, furnished
inc W/D,FPShort or
long terms avail, call
407-302-1768 or
321-377-1926




2/2 Doublewide
porches,
4043 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando
$44,500
(352) 270-8310


CI TRUST COUNTY



CHwKONIClLE
wwwschronicleonline.com


*(Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/AlligatorincidentsFactsSheet.htm) Scarborough 2010












WORDY uRD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Cow product sort (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Bumpkin's thrills or punts (1) they will fit in the letter
i squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Tardy spouse or Aussie pal (1) syllables in each word.


4. Not the right multitude (1)


02011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


5. Singing brothers' salary add-ons (3)


6. Singer Swift's Navy men (2)

I I I I I I I I I
7. Raunchiness squeamishness (3)


SS3NISV fl SSHNIZVTIS *L SHO'IIVS SHIOTVI '9 SsnINOa SSVNOP '9
DM3- 1NOTI ONOHM0 a IV LItI "i* S3DI S3IH T mHTI 1IW 'IN
12-3-11 SHIMSNV


FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assumable Mort. $16K
2 Master Suites, Newer
appliance $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-634-6340
Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON '2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,100 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-401-2979
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$45,900. Poss. Finan.
(352) 527-3204
Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over 1 acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-613-0587




For Sale 56 Ft.
MOBILE HOME
in quite, established
Mobile Home Park Very
good cond. Must be
55+ AFFORDABLE
(352) 793-7675
Furnished 14 x 50 w/
added enclosure, vinyl
& scrn. rm., SS appl's
New Washer/Dryer,
workshop w/ power
Remodeled inside/out
$12,500 (352) 418-5926
Homosassa 55+ Comm
DWMH 2/2 REPO MUST
SELL. scr.porch, carport,
club hse/pool,$6700
obo (Lien Holder)Halls
River Rd(352) 628-3019
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 bed-
room. 1-/2 bath $2.000.
Must be approved
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
ome nt, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 3 bed-
room. 1-/2 bath S3.000.
(cash only) must be ap-
proved 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com
CHASSAHOWITZKA
3/2 House, $600.
3/2 Furnished DW., $600
Agent (352) 382-1000
Pool 3/2 private,
671 Olympia St
$1050 mo. 352-637-1173



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $550 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 Br, fullyfurn W/D,
DW, big screen TV,
water, sewer, trash
lawn $595. mo
(352) 212-9205
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
IBR $125 Wk Incls all
1st & Lst (352) 382-5661


-I
Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500


-I1
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Laundry on site, no pets.
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Newly Renovated
Appliances furnished
1137 N.E. 3rd. Ave.
Near CR Primary,
Middle, High School
& Library 352-795-3006
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 BR I BA W/D hook
up, dishwasher, lawn
water & sewer $450 mo
(352) 212-9205
FLORAL CITY
1BD $400/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp no
pets 352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $500. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D hkup., incls. H20,
trash, lawn, storage rm.
$450. + sec. 634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo $300. Sec.
352-341-1847
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/1 $500 352-422-2393

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341




CRYSTAL RIVER 2/2
Furn. Turn key, In Islands
wtr. front Villa, dock
great view pool, tennis
Long or Short Term
352-382-1422




CITRUS HILLS 2/2/1
Beautiful $775 Maint
Free(352) 613-5655
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex, nice private
area, near shopping &
schools. Wtr, sewer incl
$600mo 352-558-4477


Leeak
FLORAL CITY
Lg 2/1, $550 1st & sec
clean, pet ok.
(352) 603-0345

HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, 2/1% SWMH
$500ea, 3/2/2 Cit. Sprgs
$800. 352- 628-0731
HOMOSASSA 2/2
2 yr old W/D hookups
1300 sf LA $650/mo
(352) 592-0893
Inverness
2/1 triplex screenporch,
open planrenovated,
$650/1st/last/sec
352-586-6646
LECANTO
2/1/1 C/H/A, H2o,
IncI'd, W/D Hkup, $500.
CR 3/1, CHA W/D Hkup,
$525. mo 352-382-1344




HERNANDO 1/1
Furnished $100/wk.,
$300 Sec., $400 moves
in. 352-465-0871

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

LECANTO 1/1
Includes electric, water
septic. $525 1st/last
(352) 220-2958




BEVERLY HILLS
20 S. Osceola,
2/1, $545 352-697-1907
HOMOSASSA
2/1 Duplex, 2/11/2 SWMH
$500ea, 3/2/2 Cit. Sprgs
$800. 352- 628-0731
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.


MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maint free living,
fireplace in liv rm.
$850/mo + utilities
352-746-4116













Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www. plantation
rentals
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784




A nice 3/2/2 SMW
Home, Heat. Pool, FP
maint. free. sm. pet ok
$1,000 (352) 422-1933
BEVERLY HILLS
ISt Mo. FREE IBed w/fla
rm. + bonus room
$550/m (352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm., CHA, $525.
mo. + Sec. 87 Regina
Blvd. (352) 422-0139
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, FIRm, 41 S. Lee St
$550 mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1'2/I big garage, Lrg.
Inground Pool, New
Central Air& Carpet,
Wash/Dryer,Fla Room
$700/mo 954-294-0531
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/1, 3/2/2+Carport
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
38 S. Jeffery, nice 2/1
fam rm $550.+ 628-0033
BEVERLY HILLS,
2/1/2+den.GREAT
area.CHA.Clean.$650
mo.+iast+sec.
352-489-1239
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1, $500. mo. + $500
sec. (352) 527-3559
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/152, $675. mo.
(352) 613-3678
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352- 341-4178
CITRUS SPRINGS
Never 3/2/2, Ig. mast.
sute. $800 mo. 3/2/1
$695 352-697-3133
Crystal River
2/1 $565 mo+ dep.
semi furn.Call Mike W.
352-400-1387
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1/1, Furn.Opt., central
loc. $675. 352-563-0166
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1 + Family Room
$675 + dep 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
HERNANDO
Lg. 2/1 block, on water
Apachee Shores
w/Mother N- Law Suite
Estate Sale! Must Sell!
$90K (229) 246-8008
INV.HIGHLANDS W.
3/2/2, Ig fam rm. $800.
352-697-5384
INVERNESS
2/1/1, $675 mo., Ist,
& sec., (352) 746-9436
INVERNESS
3/2/2 Pool Home $775.
2/1+Carport $545.
(352) 228-1542
INVERNESS
Available Large 2/2/1
fenced yard, 1st & sec
$700 mo.352-422-5482
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1 scr
porch fenced yd
$600 mo.lst & Sec
(352) 344-2560






CRYSTAL

RIVER
3/1, Old Fashion Charm
located near down-
town Crys. River $650.
Offered by Waybright
Real Estate Inc. Nancy
J. Wilson 352-422-4137
Sugarmill Woods
Upscale Ctry Club
Brand New Deluxe
Villa 2/2/2 Fam Rm +
Lanai, most util's paid.
Just $875/mo Owner:
352-382-1132


Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2 +Lanai,1600 sq.ft.
$800.mo + util.
(727) 804-9772




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1.5, Floating Dock
/deep water/Gulf Ac-
cess. upscale, secure
area, no smoking,
1st/last $850. -$1,000
depending on terms
352-795-0102
Crystal River/Ozello
2+2/2 sale/rent,open
floor plan,Hardwood
floors,28x14 lanai,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2 bed cottage on
canal to lake. furnish.
$850.m775-230-2240




CRYSTAL RIVER
Share my home
$85/wk. Moves -U-N
.Incls elect, sat dish
352-563-1465/212-1960




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




Bankruptcy Auction,
Dec. 8: Residential &
Commercial Properties
in Osceola, Polk, Or-
ange, Seminole, & Cit-
rus Counties. Ewald
Auction & Realty, Lic.
RE Broker
AB2473/AU 1340, 10%
BP. (407)275-6853www.
EwaldAuctions.com



Beverly Hills. Sun 12-3.
14 New Florida.
2br/2ba/2car. New roof &
NEW INTERIOR.
$65,900 352- 527-1239



FOR LEASE
Lecanto Hwy 44,
200' front, 3350 sf,
bldg.Sales, Repair. Free
mos $900. 352 302-9013



2br/2ba/2car.
14 New Florida Av New
roof, baths, appliances,
paint, flooring, Newer A/C
$65,900. 352- 527-1239
2/1/2+den+FL room,
GREAT area,new
CHA,excellent
cond.$64,500.Call
352-489-1239.



2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on I acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000



Arbor Lakes, Gated
Community 3/2/2 Split
Fir plan Lots of ceramic,
Fl. Rm. great patio &
landscaping $129,900
3757 Arbor Lakes Dr.
352-344-3700


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comrn
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.






"I'VE MOVED!"

Sellers Homes
are Selling!

CALL ME!


FREE List of
Foreclosures
SAVE thousands$$$$$
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.


Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


CLASSIFIED




3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652


For Sale %0

Have it all!
Inverness Highlands,
Huge I Family. Major
updates you'll enjoy
only in a new home.
Owner down sized
due to health rea-
sons, will negotiate. In
nature's paradise this
4 bedroom 3 bath on
2.8 acres fits a family
with children who
love to play explorer.
Deep well (no water
bills!), plus new
whole-house water
treatment system,
16x34 in-ground
screened pool with
fountain and lights.
New 2-zone energy
efficient heat/cool;
new full attic R-30
insulation; new attic
solar fan; new
ducts/vents; updated
bathrooms, 2 new
AirMaster air cleaning
units to remove dust,
pollen, mold spores.
Majestic trees. Extra
long concrete drive-
way. Watch the deer
from the lanai. Newer
(2002) Timberline
roof, ridge vents, 7 so-
lar tubs thru out the
house. Two 50 gallon
hot water heaters.
Wired for generator.
Completely chain link
fenced. Corral your
horses, park your
boat or RV. Occu-
pancy at funding.
Approx. 2700 sq ft
under air. $209,900.
Contact owner,
352-556-1510,
352-238-6274 email:
rosepub@excite.com

For Sale 3/3/2 Home,
2,000 sq.ft. 518
Poinsettia, Reduced.
Come take a look
(352) 860-0878

HIGHLANDS,
Remodeled 2/1/1,
w/ 2 additional lots,
Nice quiet Area
$58,900.
(352) 697-2884




GREAT LOCATION
3/2/2 Water access.
Updated roof/ac/ap-
pliances. Corner lot
w/beautiful adjacent
lot. $99k 352-422-2970


S=11^ t


2 WILDERNESS KAYAKS
12' Pungo 13' Pimlico
all equip, paddles
jacket, Thule roof racks
$1700 both 503-6414
'06 ProKat 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4 stk low
hours, very clean, alum
tandem trailer, VHF,,
twin hull t-top Depth,
GPS, Windless anchor
$18k obo(352) 464-4877
'07 Proline 17 ft
4 stroke 90 HP Suzuki,
very low hours, ready
to fish trailer & more
$13,500 352-795-3894
Dock space for rent,
deep water canal in
Crystal River, Water &
Electric inc Call
(352) 228-1209
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500


FOR SALE BY
OWNER
Dunnellon Area, 2 story
4BR 3BA above ground
pool.8x10 utility bldg.
financing avail $100
closing cost.Low Down
Call Dan 800-285-4414
NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!

Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685




BANK ORDERED AUC-
TION-174+/- Bank
Owned Assets-AL, GA,
NC & TN. December
6th, 7th & 8th-Homes,
acreage, residential
lots & commercial
properties-
(800)323-8388 or
RowellAuctions.com




Wyndham/RCI
Points Plus, Time Share
Pd. $40K Asking $20K
Selling Due to Injury
Call for Details
(352) 563-0328




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2
boat slips near Kings
Bay $519,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857
Crystal River/Ozello
2+2/2 sale/rent,open
floor plan,Hardwood
floors,28x14 lanai,
www.waterfrontozello.co
m or 352-563-5527

GIVE IT ALL TO
GOD & ALWAYS
BE THANKFUL










Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129

GOSPEL ISLAND
Lakefront Home
3/2/2.scr porch
Irg oak trees
$125K by owner
908-322-6529
Homosassa
Awesome location! Quick
access to gulf, deep
canal minutes to springs,
2/2 hted pool/ spa
$154,500 (863) 698-0020




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




5 acres high & dry
off Cardinal on
Georgeina $32,500.
obo
813-426-6078
LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse. water
and sewer are avail.$25K
352-382-0535




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




Lakefront Sale! Sat Dec
3rd only! 2+ acres, 227
ft direct lake frontage
only $34,9001 Gorgeous
wooded setting with
deep dockable water
frontage out your back
door! Paved roads,
power, phone, more.
Excellent financing.
Call now 866)952-5302,
ext 108




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT on canal
fenced $15K
352-613-4673




"T" Hanger for sale
Located at Inv. AP
352-446-0461




2011 175 MERCURY
Opti-max-ProXS, 4 year
transferable warranty
$9200 obo
(352) 422-4141
EVINRUDE 120HP
1988 oil injected, power
tilt, strong motor, runs
great, must see! $1000
(352) 795-4240


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C13



aroon ap 2aX


PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
Sea Eagle
2 Man Kayak, brand
new, sill in original
package, never used
$200 (352) 489-6068
SOUTHBAY '08
Pontoon, 20ft 75HP eng.
loaded, hardly used 21
hrs. on boat & mtr, $19K
or take over payments
352-341-3305
STINGRAY 19ft
deep Vee, alum trIr. w/
elec. wench,bimini
3.0, I/O, $1,475
(352) 586-9498
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
























1998 Budget Toy
Hauler/camper 6x12
Wells Cargo, Insulated,
AC Elec brakes $2500
obo 352-563-6327 or
352-860-3481
'96 Fourwind 29 ft
on Ford chassis, good
condition, $20,000 neg.
352-628-0812
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
Infinity 1999
Motorhome,4-Wlnds
35 foot, Triton V-10 gas,
43k miles. 2 acOnan
gen, back-up camera,
fully equlppedtow bars

manuals for coach &
app.All serve hook-up
equlp. See at Oak Bend
Village Rt 40 West lot70
Dunnellon. Call for tour
352-465-6335 asking
$22,500. Will neg.



'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler like new full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, like new Owan
Gen., gas tank, alum
wheels $18,500
352-795-2975
COUGAR
'01, 5th wheel 12ft slide,
14ft awning, 5th
airborne hitch & pin
(worth $1,500, can also
be used on 5.5 ft short-
bed truck, garaged
kept, all for $9,900
(352) 212-1704

FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
Hirch 15K 5th wheel
Hitch
4 way tilt, $250 obo
(352)422-2113
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
Jayco Designer 95
Series 5th Whl. 37T.10"
3 slides $1000 repairs
from local buz $8500
(352) 628-1126
Spirit of America
'07, 28 ft, Coachman,
4 new tires
2 new batteries, Ig. slide,
sleeps 5, like new
$11,900, 352-637-2735
TRAIL LITE
2006 travel trailer weighs
5002 lbs, 31 ft with slide
outgreat condition!
10,900 352-628-4729
WILDERNESS







Chevy Rear End

12 bolt $100
(352) 795-8846
DODGE
'04, Caravan, wrecked
$1,800. complete, 48K
mi., Mtr & trans for
$1,200 Negotiable &
Parts (352) 201-8796


Rear slide, locks & keys
exc cond. fiberglass
brke & inter lights off a
Dakota, New $1500 sell
$450. (352) 795-3920
TAILGATE
2011 Ford Ranger white,
unused, with hardware.
$300.352- 795-1608
388-1007
TOW BAR
Stowmaster $ 100.also
Tow brackets for S10
Chevy & Ford Bronco II
$25. ea. 352-341-0140



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
JUNK CARS
COMPLETE JUNK CARS
AND TRUCKS PAYING
FROM $200 AND UP
!!!DEPENDING ON
MAKE MODEL &YEAR.
NO TITLE NEEDED.
FREE TOWING. SAME
DAY REMOVAL OPEN 7
DAYS A WEEK CALL
TODAY FOR A FREE
QUOTE. WE PAY THE
MOST(352)301-8888
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
Paying up to$25,000
Any make, Any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794



'96 Toyota Corolla
Excellent condnew ra-
diator, battery &entire
brake system$2500
352-513-4517
BMW
'08, 528, Black/Black
27K mi. $29,500
(352) 419-7224
BUICK 02
LaSabre,V6, one
owner, garage kept,
72K Mi loaded. $6450.
(352) 746-9002
CRYSTAL RIVER
Great Commercial
location. 6545 W Gulf to
Lake Highway, next to
new County offices.
400 ft frontage.
Zoned GNC. 50 X 55 ft
two bay building with
office & storage. Avail.
Jan 1. Call W. Roche
(352) 563-0683

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
FORD
'02, Explorer, High miles,
great shape,
$4,000 firm
(352) 382-4377
FORD
'93, Escort, red, 5spd.
40mpg, am, fm, looks &
runs Great, $1,300 obo
(352) 212-4838
KIA 04
Optima EX V6, All
leather, fully loaded
One owner 87K mis.
$4800.(352) 422-4055
LINCOLN
1997 TownCar Runs
good 160k cracked wind-
shield,$800 call
352-287-3987
MERCEDES
2003, C240, Like new,
sliver, gray leather int.
43K mi. 4-Matic, 6 cyl.
org. owner, $12,500.
352-270-8734
865-300-1884
MERCURY
'99, Grand Marquis LS,
all options, perfect
cond. 65K mi., $6,000
(352) 503-2959
MUSTANG 03
Ford G.T. 55 K miles,
show car, lots of
goodies & chrome
$14,500(352) 795-3729
NISSAN '11
Altima 6800 k miles,
loaded, smells new.
Warranty until 2014.
Health forces sale
$18,950 (352) 513-4257
TOYOTA 05
Camry XLE 63K miles
excellent condition
new tires $12,000
(352) 302-6313
TOYOTA
'09, PRIUS,
Under 50K miles,
pkge 5 leather seats
$17,350 (352) 746-3663
TOYOTA
2008 Prius-Reliable 46
miles per gallon. Good ti-
res. 75,700 miles.
$14,000.00
352-422-2753


6^ 6
000Bevelyils Jeane Gaskll I



OPEN HOiUSE SAT., DEC.33,12AM-3PM


4465 N. WORLDWIDE DRIVE, INVERNESS, FL
A decorators dream. See this totally remodeled home that is move-in
condition. Better than new. Too many upgrades to name. MLS #352146.
Directions: Highway 44, South on Apopka. Left on Oneida. Right on
Worldwide. See sign.


CAR '06, exc cond.
95K miles, asking
$12,000. (352) 527-3276



'96 Audi Cabriolet
Convt, AT, 126k,Pearl
white w/bluetop
leather interior $3850
(352) 586-9498
AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
Dec. 4. 2011
1-800-438-8559
CORVETTE
2003 Z06, $29,000
21K mi., Quick silver
exterior/ black leather
interior. Showcar cond.,
Orig. paperwork
Fully loaded, heads up
display, brand new
tires. David
352-637-6443
FORD
'66, F100 Camper
special ,351 eng. all
org. runs good, $4,800
obo (352) 726-6864
LINCOLN
1961 Continental,
convertible, 4dr, orig.
leather upholstery,
sound all around,
$32,000 (352) 637-4642







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





'78 Ford F150
Long bed, 8 cyl,AT
121k, toppertow pack.
dependable work truck
$1850.(352) 586-9498
CHEVY
1988 Suburban, silverado
strong! must sell ill need
meds! $1550.obo
(352) 795-0898

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
FORD
1995 F-150, 8 cyl., AT,
170K, $2,000
(352) 527-3551



CHRYSLER 04
Pacifica 33K mi,
leather, loaded,senior
owned, Like new
$11,450(352) 634-3806



YAMAHA
'02, YZ80, runs great,
exec. cond.
$600 obo
(352) 302-6565



2005 HD Ultra
Classic w/Fat Bagger
kit, Custom seat,
wheels ect $15000 OBO
352-563-6327or 860-3481
'99 Suzuki 1500


13k miles, new tires and
battery, ready to go
$2995 352-628-6947
BACCIO
2011 Motor scooter
MD150T-6, elec. start,
new battery, 50mpg+
$1,300 (352) 726-5794
Harley Davidson
04 1200 Sportest turq &
silver, chromed out,
7K mi. $4700 Crystal
River cell 727 207-1619
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731
HONDA
'06, Silver Wing,
600CC, 26K mi.
$4,000.
(352) 489-2457
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492
KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,499. obo
over 1000's in options
(352) 697-2760




C14 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


$12,545 202
'11 MALIBU



l :ie :jb: eki .g


24HREODDMSAEWTINO EI A LPRI
1-8W-8"75 : xt668l


16, 775 270E


'11 CALIBER


F 2RCi MSITHINFO ASCL W
lbM:58":55 ExiA129


$16,797 E270 o14,921 $240 o


'11 LIBERTY
-dam.


PER
17,627 g28 4
'11 TRAVERSE


2 2155 ER
[22,155 oR357,o.j


16,675 R268a


'11 TACOMA


*= :i 71 AFL,:i' "Y Ii =rl 4.. 1 ..
$ P~ER~o
$18,745 30 20
'l1 TOWN & COUNTRY


22,496 362


N CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
NO^^ MATERWHERE YU PLANTO BU
^^^^B ~~~~ logo^^^ f1^^^^^^^^^


11


we


0


0


*,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TAT


kVJ




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 Mazda3i Sport


atI
6"ulih


2012


;:111


rw'


1+111 ii uI1T TW


Lease s10 36 Mo.
For 1 Leaset


I I




W.M&,c M M-- 1 -0,1MNI AM on
\iI pr-nc- ate 71. LiAS LitC i..] '.rc t-el re a11 Liealer .finltduec 'pLuOo' .5.1 in.. lde ill i'...jj jilt- mi..iL-r[Wtl rct'iki' .1 Il^cel~ire. I Le..'c dO.fl. pdr'. eQ[ rciuicmnct
Ei.2 E ~ ~li."- l^~ e \!! *n: .l: il. ..ppl.l*d .:r.dii m ni.- or-i c."iln' le i.c..Tih.r.cj1 *EtpR.liL **.i'gL ~. *- tJ. n >r c>-l i .iI .liir. Ic *cT. i ilxl:j Vtial trI. 1.fii- J> ki--Jri
x- It'. .1". .d lv.r* jJiLL~ini 3.4T .eti..le *Scc ... Il clcL...i Ptilx'i. ale 1,1 .LI..tl.imr. .ro>e?[i puX.l'e l r '\^ n-cx 'crui'ck' .big.c.l In pT'iI ..lle PifcI nr'1. T4ib i...tec


III


*k


ACURA

Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands

-dr t2012 TSX


TSX Lease: $299 mo x 60 months.
$1,999 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit
Safet Rating ..EASON. Safe
NHTSA REASON
SALES EVENr


* Star railings are part ol the U.S. Depanmeni ol Transporal.on's Safercar gov program (www.salfrcar.govi. Models allied will standard side-impaci airoags ISABsl. r Based
on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Residual Value Awards lor a Luxury Brand. Through January 03. 2012. Lo approved lessees by Acura Financial Services. DBA ol American Honda
Finance Corp Closed-end lease for 2012 rsx 5 Speed A.Loratlc IMonoe CU2F6BjW1 MSRP S30A95 Actual nel cap-iLaue cost S28 108 83 ToLal monLnly payments 110 764
Option lo purchase al lease end S18.297. Add-lional lease lerms for well-aualir-ed lessees Nol ail lasses will qualify. Higher lease rales apply to, lessess with lower credit
ratings or in different regions. Dealer partliciparlon may affect actual payment. MSRPs Include destinatlop taxes license. title tees options and Insurance extra. Security
deposit waived Lessee responsible 'or malperarce. excessive wear'tear and I5c'mi. over 10.000 milesoyear for vehicles whh MSRP less LhaPn 30 000 bl lfor vehicles wHln
MSRP ot 130 000 or more mileage cosl in 20umlr over 10 000 milesivear Sea aealer lor complete aetalils


In MII


rl


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C15




C16 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


Das Auto.


DuejT6omazi g cessWg..e vE)'ENDEDl.u


p
p


Come In Today,
This Is Your
LAST WEEKEND
To Save
Thousands!


HEREij BEFSOJ Tl~iNj'i IiONIEI4
201 HE REJ!U .. ..
MEWRI 6 N,-E 1


M1il


II I 1Fil:1


OMC


All prices plus tax, ag, title, registration and dederfees. Expires 12/3/11


Volkswagen


3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd.
Just West Of 1-75


of Ocala


352.861.0234


bc


'~ I 116'


111Pii I


775 OFI
y/sw


.AMMMMML -AMEMML AMMMMIL -AMMMML AMMMML AMMMML -AMMMMIL AMMMML -AMMM


MEMIL -AMMMMIL IAMMMML- -Ammmm AMMMML -AMMMMIL AMEMMIL -AMMMML ,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S 11 Il 11i l l i .


1V,




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 LINCOLN MKX FWD


$553


a month
for 36 months
Red Carpet Lease'


Cash due at signing
* Security deposit waived.
* Excludes tax, title and license fees.


* Best-in-class standard horsepower2 Best-in-class fuel economy2


2012 LINCOLN MKZ FWD Cash due at signing
a month .
for 36 months Securitydeposit waived.
SRed Carpet Lease' 1 Excludes tax, title and license fees.


* "Most Dependable Entry Premium Car" according to J.D. Power and Associates3
Voice-activated SYNC standard4


- LINCOLN


Nick


qicholas


Crystal River 795-7371
Visit us at www.nicknicho asfordlinco n.com


Get more than you wish for at the Lincoln Wishlist Event.
You'll find the current offers on LINCOLN.COM.


LINCOLN


136 Month, 10,000 mile lease. Dealer retains factory rebate. Optional features are not included in lease payment. 2EPA-estimated 19 city/26 hwy/21 combined mpg. Class is Midsize Crossovers, Non-Diesel. The Lincoln MKZ received the
lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles among entry premium cars in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 Vehicle Dependability Study.SM Study based on 43,779 consumer responses measuring problems consumers
experienced in the past 12 months with three-year-old vehicles (2008 model-year cars and trucks). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed October-December 2010. Your experiences may
vary. Visit jdpower.com. 'Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control. Only use mobile phones and other devices, even with voice commands, when it is safe to do so. See dealer for complete details. Dealer is not responsible
for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Offer ends 12/16/11.0009Z6R


Nicholas j
Ford S.R.44
Lincoln U.S.98
Fo ,-yGlkCatFr ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C17




C18 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


~Iuii,


/SED C&


10
KIA SOUL

s13,995


I-I I


GARY SWEIGART


IONY MEAUOU
12 YEARS


S1 YEARS


08 FORD ESCAPE

s10,99


07
KIA SPECTRA

'9,995


6 YEARS




KIRK SHIELDS
8 YEARS


P419-


.. .. .. .... ....


i "^ *Citru U:*^_ : Kin
'u mr "" ""'." The Power to Surprise"'
1850 S.E. Hwy. 19 Q Q
Crystal River, FL 352 564-8668
HOURS: Mon Fri: 9:00am 7:00pm Sat 9:00am 6:00pm Sunday Noon 5:00pm
Shop from Home 24-hours a day, view our inventory, make a service appointment or apply for pre-approval at
www.CitrusKia.com
*WITH APPROVED CREDIT AND 750 CREDIT SCORE. ALL PRICES AND DOWN PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAG AND $699.00 DEALER FEE.
PHOTOS ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY


24 YEARS


YEARS


27YEARS


15YEARS


SUZUKI RENO
I-- 1


TONY BOWER
27 YEARS


AL KHURV I
26 YEARS


NOW ON ALL USED VEHICLES SOLD
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a
Dealership promise... When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your
driving. If anything, and we are talking anything breaks* on your vehicle, from the headlights to the taillights we will fix it for you at NO
CITRUS KIA CHARGE. You have trusted us for all your NEW car needs and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we want to prove to
"PEACE OF MIND you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the state of Florida to buy a Used vehicle also.
WARRANTY" PROGRAM At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"


WE NEED EVERY TRADE
HIGHEST TRADE.IN ALLOWANCE
AND LOWEST PRICES IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA


JOE SLATER
5 YEARS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ArDS;





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OMY $9112
OW CRAVLX2WD .$12FI
NEW=2.










*1

ELLL








s-IL~ SF7L :L 2r: I~; 5~
U I I
NEW*2D12*EE
* C 19 /0HOND
HOND

-AM..
mm s .11ii. FINANCING u m a m m
$225391 -$ 52.

A CC CC C* C







$399.499 % 94 $69994*1 $8 9i9' 95 ,$9Y995, $9,99 $1995 $1998

.Bi. I i 9 191' '1i.9996 w 9 ii 99 ILIM


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 C19




C20 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011


S


*


YwvYYYYVY


'09 CRV


'08 RAM


'08 ESCAPE
.5i.IN


'08 PT CRUISER

T -IZ71,,1. ;t,-ii:g"


$14999 $11,999 $9,999 $6,999
PE241 193R .R P R161 113 "RPER
L..$24lMO.1 R$l93 MO.IOR$l6l MO.1 OR$l I MO.A


'07 SEBRING


'07 ODYSSEY



a I j^,I


'07 300
. .


'07 PRIUS
..''* e


-2HR AGO I


A A A A
s5,999 $15999 $11,999 $11,999
OR 97R 257 193 PER 193 ER
,OR $Mo.IOR 2570O! ORlMO. IOR$


'07 CIVIC


"'06 TOWN & COUNTRY'


'06 SILVERADO 2500


'06 ALTIMA


- .4RE CODDMM rJN.iDLI
1-80-5"75 Ex.6207


A A A A
$6,999 $6,999 $11,999 $6,999
OR$ M13 OR I o193 OR .OR$S 1 "E


'06 SCION XB


'06 MATRIX


'06 LIBERTY


'05 ESCAPE
/~ 1


A7AAA A
$7999 $7999 $6,999 $6,999
SE$19 P APER2I II APER
OR l29 MO. R$l29 MO. O~ Mo. OR~ I I ~Mo.


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800-440-9054


11


we


0


0


O*


M2RE CO!IMi S.'iM Sl KPICIN
1-80-58 755:^ di 440^


|^ !t2 HRi-ClMEDNBW WITHIN N SM MCN
lb10%.U87:5Ext70l


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRE 2 H RG.REDMJ E ITH INF DS AIPRC
1l800:58:55 EdJ706


FEE 4HR! COD I ESiIEWIHINOAMSECA MN
1-80 :58 755 xt.14l


FI 4H E MH MMESAE rrHN A) PEIA~L PRCIN
1-800:5"755 Fi.510 l


RIE 2 H!IECRi. MESAEWrHINO PEIA MC
1-800:58"75 E^d.6143


REE 4HR RMEDMESGE IT INO M UMPIRCl
I-.M8b75 FA.12l


RE 24HRFMDE MSSGEWrj NF MSPCIL IN
1-8M 8"75 Ex.6709


RUE24 REORED EJ U ITHIF N PC RCN
1-800-58"755B:^i^.62l


|IE R OMl=JSGEWIH INFOMD9M IN
1-800-58"755bExt.1 214


RU 4H MDDMSAEk !IrJ H INF MSPCIL IN
1-80-58 755 xt.203


TlAy


kVJ