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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02606
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-26-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02606

Full Text



Tigers roll: LSU pulls away to rout Arkansas


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy and
79 pleasant.
LOW PAGE A4
54
NOVEMBER 26, 2011


I-. / I1R


SERPENT TALE:


Relocation
Child finds rattlesnake;
resident relocates it to
state forest./Page A2

THE JOURNEY SOUTH:
On hold
Whoopers wait for
worthier weekday
weather./Page A3

JOINING FORCES:


Anti-terror
China, Pakistan boost
cooperation with
drill./Page AlO

OPINION:
Good
things
have come out
of the marriage
between the
EDC and the
Chamber of
Commerce.


BLACK FRIDAY:
HE -^ "


Posse Patrol
Volunteers help with se-
curity on Black
Friday/Page A2

STOCKS:
Sinking
Stocks slip to
end roughest
week since
September.
/Page A6

WORLD ECONOMY:
Borrowing
Italy's rates
skyrocket./Page A10

COUNTY FINANCES:
Budget 2.0
Adopted budget
available for viewing on
website./Page A3


Comics . . . . .C9
Community ...... .C7
Crossword ....... .C8
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .B4
Horoscope ........ B4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . .B4
Movies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds .... .. .C13
TV Listings ....... C8


6 18ll41820 ill 2 0 5


Shoppers scuffle across U.S.


Emma
Howe, left,
looks up at
her mother,
Laurie
Howe, as
they wait
in line at
Kohl's on
Black Fri-
day in
Owens-
boro, Ky.
Associated
Press


Associated Press
NEW YORK A shop-
per in Los Angeles pepper-
sprayed her competition
for an Xbox and scuffles
broke out elsewhere
around the U.S. as bargain-
hunters crowded malls and
megastores in an earlier-
than-usual start to the
madness known as Black
Friday, the day that marks
the start of holiday shop-
ping.


SO YOU KNOW
See local Black Friday
coverage on Page A3.

For the first time, chains
such as Target, Best Buy and
Kohl's opened their doors at
midnight on the most antici-
pated shopping day of the
year. Toys R Us opened for
the second straight
year on Thanksgiving
See .Page A4


Report:

Chamber

'bigwigs'

pushing

opposition

to rule


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer


Mr. Green Thumb


Resident celebrates

20years of being

master gardener

SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
In Jim Bruno's world, nothing
beats plucking an ear of sweet
corn from his garden, removing
the husk and then dropping it im-
mediately into a ready pot of boil-
ing water so he can eat it. .
"You can't get any fresher than .
that," he said. 'f.I "
This year, Bruno is celebrating ... ..,
his 20th year as a master gardener "
with the Citrus County Extension
Service. Only Bruno and two other
men John Liken and Chet Ol-
shewsky- have the local distinc-
tion of having such a title for 207
years.
But Bruno's love for gardening
started way before becoming a mas-
ter gardener Having been raised in,
Illinois on a farm that always had a
big garden, gardening was a skill he
learned at an early age.
"I had it in my blood," he said...
His green thumb, however, didn't
take him into agriculture. Instead, ,
he worked for 40 years in the Air
Force. His career eventually
brought him to Miami, where he
continued working with plants as a
hobby in his spare time.
"Even when I was working in the MATTHEW BECKChronicle
Miami area I would come home ABOVE: Master gardener Jim Bruno works on pulling weeds from his garden
and go in my garden," he said. "It behind his home north of Crystal River. BELOW: Bruno scatters fertilizer
was therapy, I guess you call it." along a row where he is preparing to plant cloves of garlic.
After retirement, he moved to
Citrus County in 1990. Not even a
year later in 1991 when he was still
new to Citrus County, he contacted
the local University of Florida ex-
tension agent who was giving mas-
ter gardener classes. It was there
he learned more about gardening
than he could ever imagine. -
With his newfound knowledge, *"" ", -.
he quickly went to work cultivating
a nice-sized garden at his resi-
dence just north of Crystal River .
He grows an assortment of dif- .
ferent fruits and vegetables -
throughout the year He loves grow- "
ing the produce for one good, solid .. .
reason.
"I like to eat," he said with a
laugh.
See .Page A2




Board looks to cut pay rather than teachers


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS Citrus
County is considered a
high-performing school
district in the eyes of the
state and has earned an A
grade for six straight years.
School board members
say they want to focus on
maintaining the top per-
formance for their students
as they look for ways to
trim $5 million from next
year's budget.
While a district-wide
committee has recom-
mended a variety of budget
cuts, board members said
in a goal-setting workshop
this week that they won't
support anything that tears
into the academic fabric of


It's about the quality of
education. We're putting our
students first.

Pat Deutschman
school board member.


the school district
That means teachers and
other employees may see a
slight pay decrease, rather
than the district saving
money by reducing the
number of teachers.
And supplements -
bonuses paid to teachers
for extra duty work, such as
coaching are also being
targeted for budget reduc-
tions. District officials say


they want to eliminate
$250,000 from supple-
ments, but they haven't de-
cided yet how to do that
The board also is likely
to ask for voters' help next
year in keeping a quarter-
mill property tax they ap-
proved in 2010, or possibly
asking for a half-mill that
would raise $5 million.
Budget cuts are neces-
sary because the state is re-


during its share to school
districts, board members
said.
They said they would
rather have a reduction in
salary or a decrease of one
work day also known as
a furlough day to keep
the number of teachers
intact.
A 1 percent pay cut
across the board would
save about $700,000, assis-
tant superintendent of
schools Kenny Blocker
said. Eliminating one work
day would save about
$400,000.
The discussion on keep-
ing teachers was tied to
one proposal to save $1.5
million by eliminating one
See Page A2


CRYSTAL RIVER -
Someone not familiar with
the ongoing debate over
manatee protection in
King's Bay could look at this
month's Sierra Club maga-
zine and think the locals
have lost their minds.
An item in the Grapple
section of the Novem-
ber/December issue blames
the county's Tea Party Pa-
triots and chamber of com-
merce for opposing what is
portrayed as obvious con-
cern by the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service in its pro-
posed rule that would make
King's Bay a slow-speed,
year-round manatee refuge.
Titled "Thou Shalt Not
Smite Thy Manatee," the
short article also erro-
neously states the proposed
rule is the result of two
manatee deaths last year.
The rule, expected to be-
come final in December,
has been in the works for
several years, federal offi-
cials said, who added they
do not believe two mana-
tees died in the bay in 2010.
And the magazine attrib-
utes an unflattering por-
trayal of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce to
Patrick Rose, executive di-
rector of the Save the Man-
atee Club.
"Up to 500 of the gentle,
vegetarian 'sea cows' over-
winter in Citrus County's
warm Kings Bay, drawing
thousands of visitors but
often getting run over by
speedboats," the article
states.
The proposed rule set off
the county Tea Party Patri-
ots and the article mentions
chairwoman Edna Mattos'
quote to the St. Petersburg
Times: "We cannot elevate
nature above people. That's
against the Bible and the
Bill of Rights."
It also says that, accord-
ing to Rose, "a number of
local bigwigs, including the
chairman of the local
Chamber of Commerce,
have houses on the bay and
don't want to be prohibited
from water-skiing."
Rose said Friday he re-
calls telling a Sierra Club
writer something to that ef-
fect, but he doesn't think he
said it was the chamber
president.
However, he stands by the
accusation.
"I said something similar
to that," Rose said. "I per-
sonally believe some of this
involves fairly influential
people not wanting anyone
to stop them from water ski-
ing in their backyard."
Rose would not name
names.
"There are people associ-
ated with the hierarchy of
the chamber who live on
King's Bay," he said.
Josh Wooten, president
and chief executive officer
of the chamber of com-
merce, said he knows only
of one chamber director
with a home on King's Bay
- Chronicle Publisher
Gerry Mulligan.
"His statements are not
factual," Wooten said, refer-
ring to Rose.
Mulligan added a com-
ment to the online Sierra
story
"For the record, I think I
am the bigwig with the
chamber of commerce who
has the house on King's Bay
For the record, I have five
See .Page A4


C ITR oC IoU .N TY




)NI L ~~ L
Pk -. I


www.chronicleonline.com .
Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 117 ISSUE 111





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Posse Patrol helps on Black Friday


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Two volunteers with the Sheriff's Posse Patrol ride through the parking lot at the Inver-
ness Walmart Friday afternoon as an extra layer of security. Jeannette Trombley and
Cheryll Sedlock Brown took a few moments out to talk to shoppers while Raven, the dark
horse and 4-year-old Alex, lighter brown, got their own share of the attention, especially
from the young children. They patrolled the parking lot as shoppers loaded their cars with
holiday bargains. The two women are volunteers with the Citrus County Sheriff's Posse
Patrol.


GREEN
Continued from Page Al

With winter approaching,
Bruno is currently tending to
his cold weather crop of
onions, carrots, cabbage, let-
tuce, greens and other veg-
etables that fare well in more
frigid temperatures.
When he's not in his gar-
den pulling weeds, harvest-
ing or checking for bugs and
diseases that could harm his
crop, people can find him
doing community outreach.
Every Tuesday afternoon
at the Lakes Region Library
in Inverness, Bruno and his
good friend and fellow mas-
ter gardener, Casey Wiz-
gowski, hold a workshop
where people can come and
ask horticultural questions
about anything.
He also often speaks at
garden clubs and home-
owner association meetings.
He was named Master Gard-
ner of the Year in Florida in
2005. He works at the exten-
sion office Tuesday mornings
answering phoned-in ques-
tions about gardening, but
people also stop by to talk to
him in person.
People can also some-
times find Bruno at Home
Depot in the Garden section
answering questions.
"He does a lot of commu-
nity outreach," Wizgowski
said.
Though a lot of his out-
reach involves sharing his
expertise with others, Bruno
said he also tends to learn a
great deal from others along
the way
"You learn something new
all the time. We talk about
personal experiences," he
said. "I enjoy talking to
people."
Outside the enjoyment
Bruno gets from seeing his
garden flourish, he also loves
how his freshly grown pro-
duce tastes. While he admits
one may not taste a differ-
ence between greens from
the grocery store and greens
picked right out of the gar-
den, he said there is a defi-
nite difference when it
comes to tomatoes.
Tomatoes at the store, he
said, have usually been
picked while still green and
then sprayed with a type of
gas that ripens the tomatoes
quicker so they are red when
they reach the grocery store.
In his vegetable garden,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Colorful heads of lettuce are potted in Bruno's garden.


Bruno uses no chemicals.
"Homegrown, vine-
ripened tomatoes taste bet-
ter," he said
And the same goes with
fruit.
"There's no comparison to
going out in the backyard
and pulling a piece of fruit
off the tree," he said. "It's so
much fresher"
But if Bruno had to
choose his favorite food to
eat fresh from the garden,
sweet corn wins hands
down. He explained how
sweet corn immediately
starts losing its sugar once it
is picked, so he oftentimes
has a pot of water boiling in-
side the house before he
picks the corn so he can
have it as fresh and sweet as


possible.
Over the years, Bruno has
helped a number of people
become successful garden-
ers in Florida, though he is
quite humble when it comes
to any type of recognition.
He doesn't take himself too
seriously because for him,
gardening is as natural as
breathing air It's what he
loves to do.
"It's just a way to relax," he
said.
If you have any plant ques-
tions or gardening concerns,
call the local extension office
at (352) 527-5700.
Chronicle reporterShemir
Wiles can be reached at (352)
564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline.com.


Rattlesnake relocation


I -. .'-....,,, -. ,. .. ,
MICHELLE WETTENGELI/Special to the Chronicle
Neighbor Marsha Cosner watches as Jim Bierly eases the Eastern Diamondback rat-
tlesnake into a bucket, sparing its life on Thanksgiving Day. The snake was relocated to
the Withlacoochee State Forest.


Child discovered serpent while playing


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer

HOMOSASSA Jim
Bierly did his good deed on
Thanksgiving Day.
Six-year-old Jessica Wet-
tengel was enjoying the
sunshine when she saw a
snake on the side of the
house.
Thinking it was a typical
garden variety snake,
Bierly got a big surprise
when he saw what it was.
"It was an Eastern Dia-
mondback rattlesnake," he
said Friday afternoon.
Growing up and living
in Florida his entire life,
Bierly was not phased by
the fact it was a danger-
ous snake. He knew the
breed was not aggressive
and would try and keep its
distance from humans un-
less provoked.
He decided he didn't
want to harm or kill the
snake, instead he chose to
relocate it to the Withla-
coochee State Forest



PAY
Continued from Page Al

planning period from
high school teachers.
High schools are on a
block schedule four
classes a day By requiring
teachers to give up one
planning period the sec-
ond semester, it would
eliminate the need for 22
teachers who now fill in
the gaps during those


This snake, discovered near Jim Bierly's home, was relo-
cated to the Withlacoochee State Forest.


So he gently urged the 4-
foot snake toward a recycled
bucket, keeping a safe dis-
tance from it the entire time.
Once he had the rat-
tlesnake fully inside, he im-
mediately put the lid on the
bucket and said he could
hear the snake shaking its
rattlers.
Once it was released, it
just sat there for 10 minutes
before it slithered away
into the wild, he said.
Jessica, the granddaugh-


planning times.
Board members said
they don't want to lose 22
teachers at a time when
their focus is on stronger
academics in high school.
They also said they've
heard from teachers who
are concerned about their
pay and benefits.
"I'm getting a lot of
emails saying, 'don't take
my 1 percent,"' board
member Ginger Bryant
said.
Board member Pat


9-M


INSIDE

4. Crystal River Mall
795-1484
Inside WAL*MART
Hwy. 200, Ocala
I 2Q1-14A7


ter of Pam Ricker, Bierly's
girlfriend, didn't seem
phased by the close en-
counter with the snake.
"It was right on (the) path
alongside of the house,"
Bierly said. "It has been a
few years since I have seen
a rattlesnake in the yard."
Chronicle managing edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can
be reached (352) 564-2930
or sfrederick@chronicle
online, com.


Deutschman said teachers
and support employees
should understand the
board's philosophy is to
protect the academic in-
terests first.
"It's about the quality of
education," she said.
"We're putting our stu-
dents first. We've got to put
our students first"
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or
wright@ chronicle
online. com.


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Old Florida Kitchen at Izaak Walton Lodge
From the same great staff that brought you Neon Leon's

Featuring

Certified Angus Steaks

Seafood with a Flare

and a very Special Old Florida Game Menu

6301 Riverside Drive, Yankeetown
352-447-4899
www.izaakwaltonlodge.com
Open Wednesday Sunday 11am-9pm


Miracle-Eare I


A2 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


LOCAL







Page A3 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Whoopers wait for worthier weekday weather


MATTHEW BECK
Chronicle

The progress of the group
of aircraft-led, endangered
whooping cranes has been
stunted by poor weather
conditions for the fourth day
in a row. The birds and the
crew assisting in the migra-
tion are grounded in Piatt


County, IL.
According to the Opera-
tion Migration website, the
poor weather conditions are
expected to continue
through the weekend and
the outlook for improved
weather remains poor, mak-
ing Monday the earliest the
crew hopes to continue
their flight.


ON THE NET
www.operation
migration.org

A total of 18 cranes are
making their way south,
with 10 of those being led by
aircraft. The other eight
birds are flying with older


cranes that have made the
trek previously
The migration of both
groups of birds began in
Wisconsin, at the Horicon
National Wildlife Refuge
and the White River Marsh
State Wildlife Area in
October
The migration covers
nearly 1,300 miles and will


end at the Chassahowitzka
and St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuges where
the birds will spend the
winter months before
heading north again on
their own.
A public fly-over will
take place at the Dunnellon
Airport in Marion County
as the migration nears


its end.
For more information on
the migration or to follow
the progress of the flight, go
to www.operationmigra-
tion.org.
Chronicle reporter
Matthew Beck can be
reached at mbeck@
chronicleonline. com or
(352) 564-2919.


Black Friday brings bargains


Shoppers up early

for big sales
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER For
cousins Betty Brown and
Shirley Mooney, day-
after-Thanksgiving shopping is
part of a long-standing tradition.
Brown lives in Niceville in
the Panhandle, Mooney lives in
St. Pete and they meet in Crys-
tal River for four days.
"We always eat at Charlie's
(Fish House), and we ate at
Cody's for Thanksgiving,"
Mooney said.
On Friday, they began their
shopping marathon, starting at
3 a.m. By 10:30 a.m. they were
leaving the Crystal River Mall
and on their way to Beall's.
"We got some excellent bar-
gains," Brown said. "We found a
lot of things at Belk, like a mo-
torized car and shoes for my
granddaughter"
"Tomorrow we hit the craft
show in Ozello," Mooney said.
Unlike Brown and Mooney,
who had made Black Friday
shopping a tradition for more
than 20 years, this year was
Frances Dunchock's first time.
"I'm not usually a Black Fri-
day shopper, but this year I am
because of the economy," she
said. She has grandchildren in
Ocala, Michigan and Oklahoma
and was out shopping for things
like a screened canopy, weed-
eater, a car battery, socks and a
lawn mower
"I got lots of good deals," she
said.
Mall stores opened at various
times throughout the early morn-
ing hours and by 5 a.m., 475 peo-
ple were waiting outside Kmart
"That was pretty exciting,"
said store manager David Kell-
ner "We're doing great today
Lots of TVs, comforters, lots of
toys. Layaway has been astro-
nomical, and we've done a lot of
online, ship-to-home orders."
Across the mall at Belk, the
trend was ladies boots and


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Shoppers hit the stores locally for Black Friday sales, kicking off the Christmas retail season. At the Inverness Bealls, people lined up in
large numbers at midnight for a chance to win gift cards. During daylight hours shoppers braved the parking lot congestion while loading
their packages, and some showed the Christmas spirit, sharing a polite thank-you and waving to motorists who yielded so they could walk
safely to their cars.


single-cup coffee
makers.
However, despite
being open at 3 a.m.,
store manager Chuck
McSweeney said as of 1
p.m. Friday, sales were
down about 12 percent
from last year
Over in Inverness,
about 400 people lined
up outside of Beall's for
the store's midnight


Fran
Dunc
first for
Black I
shop


opening.
"We had no idea what to ex-
pect," said store manager Bev
Lingerfelt. "We had scratch-off
cards for the first 100 people for
an iPad and $250 (gift card) and
the rest were $5."
She said sales were pretty
good, although it's hard to tell
without crunching the numbers.


Although the Walmart
Superstore in Inverness
didn't close for Thanks-
giving, the store's major
sales started at 10 p.m.
, Thursday
"People started really
coming in around 9:30
ices (p.m.) and it stayed
hock steady until around 1:30
ay into (a.m.)," said store co-
Friday manager Karen Stark.
ping. "TVs and computer deals
started at midnight."
As for trends, Stark said she
didn't see anything in particu-
lar, although she noticed a lot of
people buying towels, sheets,
toys and appliances.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
nkenn edy@chronicle
online, corn or (352) 564-2927.


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Out-of-town cousins Betty Brown and Shirley Mooney have met in
Crystal River for a four-day Thanksgiving vacation every year for more
than 20 years. Part of their tradition involves shopping on Black
Friday.


State BRIEF

Eglin Air Base
Airman's death
leads to trial for 3
Three Air Force sergeants
face courts-martial for safety
violations involving the death
of a Florida-based airman
killed while helping dispose
of bombs at an air base in
Iraq.
The Pentagon said 25-
year-old Senior Airman
James A. Hansen of Athens,
Michigan, died Sept. 15,
2010, during a "controlled
demolition" at Joint Base
Balad. Hansen was from the
46th Operations Support
Section at Elgin Air Force
Base in the Florida
Panhandle.
-From wire reports


Correction

Because of a reporter's
error, a story on page Al of
the Nov. 19 edition, "Farmers
sowing a message," incor-
rectly identified state Rep.
Jimmie T. Smith, R-Inver-
ness. The Chronicle regrets
the error..
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling (352)
563-5660.


County budget up slightly; posted on website


Changes include staff reduction


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

The budget adopted in
September by the Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners (BOCC) has
been posted on the county's
website.
"Using our Strategic Plan
as a guide, each office and
program focused on pre-
serving core essential serv-
ices to our community and
lowering or deferring asso-
ciated costs to achieve the
desired target of a balanced


budget. In many programs,
this was only achieved
through reduction or elimi-
nation of programs that fell
outside the core essential
tests," CountyAdministrator
Brad Thorpe wrote in an in-
troduction to the budget.
The preliminary budget
for fiscal year 2012 was
$225,262,189 or a 2.4-percent
decrease from $230,722,772
for fiscal year 2011. The
final adopted budget for fis-
cal year 2012 is $234,126,585
or a 1.5-percent increase
from fiscal year 2011


ON THE NET
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us

because of the inclusion of
carry-forward projects.
Major changes in the total
budget include a General
Fund reduction of $4.3 mil-
lion, $1.8 million increase in
Fire Rescue and $5.5 mil-
lion increase in the
Enterprise Funds.
Staff has been reduced by
another nine positions,
Thorpe wrote. The reduc-
tions save about $420,000 and
continue the trend of reduc-
ing the size of government to
reflect the reduced economic


conditions of the county.
Twelve positions were
eliminated from library
services by consolidating
services, streamlining
processes and reducing
hours, saving about
$450,000.
The final budget was
adopted in September on a
4-1 vote, with Commissioner
Winn Webb opposing it as he
raised questions about
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy's budget.
Commissioners unani-
mously adopted the follow-
ing millage rates: total
countywide 5.7299 mills;
Citrus County Fire Protec-
tion Taxing District -


Ozello Arts & Crafts is Saturday


CLAIRE PHILLIPS
LAXTON
Chronicle
OZELLO Come see
another part of "Old
Florida" today when the
Ozello Civic Club hosts its
annual Ozello Arts and
Crafts show from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
The event will feature
artists showing their lat-
est paintings, photo art
and pottery There will be
a variety of crafters on


hand selling wooden toys,
sea glass jewelry, fleece
blankets and other hand-
crafted items. Live or-
chids will also be
available.
"We'll have close to 50
artists and crafters," said
Jane Beller, chairwoman
of this year's show.
Scrumptious seafood
will be sold as well as hot
dogs and burgers off the
grill.
The club will be raising
funds by selling chances


to win a 14-foot Phoenix
kayak. Tickets are $5 or
five tickets for $20 for a
chance to win the kayak.
The raffle tickets will
also be available during
the civic club's Chili Fest
on Feb. 18, 2012. All pro-
ceeds from the kayak raf-
fle will benefit CASA,
Toys for Tots, the Ozello
Scholarship Fund and
the Food Bank.
They are also accept-
ing nonperishable food
items and unwrapped


new toys during the
show.
This is a free festival
with free parking.
"Come and enjoy our
festival and bring your
guest with you," Beller
said.
The festival is on
Ozello Trail, 6.5 miles
west of U. S. 19. For more
information, call (353)
634- 0563.
Claire Phillips Laxton
is the editor of the
Crystal River Current


0.7682 mills; and Citrus
County Special Library Dis-
trict- 0.3102 mills.
An increase in the fire
rescue rate from 0.4566
mills to 0.7682 mills raised
the countywide tax rate of
5.7299 mills to 6.8083 mills.
One mill equals $1 for
every $1,000 of taxable prop-
erty value. Thus, the owner
of a home with a taxable
value of $100,000 will pay
$680 in county property
taxes in 2012, about $30 more
than he paid the year before.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online, corn or (352) 564-2916.


Gingrich draws crowd
Associated Press

NAPLES Hundreds of people
turned out to hear presidential can-
didate Newt Gingrich speak at a
Naples hotel.
Gingrich's event Friday at the
Naples Hilton drew a standing
room-only-crowd. They applauded
wildly at several points in his
speech.
The former House speaker spent
several minutes outlining his views
on immigration reform. If elected,
Gingrich proposes a multi-pronged
approach that includes controlling
the border






A4 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


Woman saved after
car sinks in muck
PAHOKEE -A Palm Beach
County Sheriff's deputy res-
cued a woman who called 911
after she lost control of her car
and landed in a canal.
Sheriff's spokeswoman Teri
Barbera said the woman told the
dispatcher her car was slowly
sinking into the muck shortly be-
fore 8 a.m. Friday. She was un-
able to get out of the vehicle.
Deputy Frank Mayo arrived
at the scene and jumped into
the muck. He got the woman
out of the vehicle.
Barbera said the woman was
taken to a hospital. The deputy
was not injured.




RULE
Continued from Page Al

kayaks and no speed boat,"
Mulligan wrote. "Be careful
about stereotyping folks. My
family has great apprecia-
tion for the manatees and so
do most of the people in Cit-
rus County"
Rose said he wasn't re-
ferring to Mulligan. He
said chamber directors
with political connections
are opposing the rule be-
cause it interferes with
their summer boating in
King's Bay, and not be-
cause the rule would hurt
the economy.
"The chamber's decision
to support the county on this
clearly flies in the face of
what's best for the local
economy," Rose said. "Most
businesses that make
money off manatees stand to
thrive substantially There is
no demonstrated point to
any adverse effect on this
proposed rule whatsoever."


Walmart, the nation's biggest

retailer, has taken steps in recent

years to control Black Friday crowds.


Reward offered in
missing person case
ORLANDO -A $50,000 re-
ward is being offered for informa-
tion that leads to the safe return
of a missing Orlando woman.
Michelle Parker went missing
Nov. 17 after she appeared on
a taped episode of "The Peo-
ple's Court" with her ex-fiance.
Her family believes the 33-
year-old mother of three was
carjacked shortly after her ap-
pearance on the show. The Or-
lando Police Department has
not named any suspects. Po-
lice urge anyone with informa-
tion about Parker's
whereabouts to call (800) 423-
8477.



ON THE NET
www.sierraclub.org


Wooten said Rose is miss-
ing the point.
"The people who pay the
property taxes in our county
should have a say," he said.
"That doesn't make them
bigwigs, that makes them
stakeholders."
And he believes Rose is
stirring the controversy
"He's using this inflam-
matory rhetoric to divide
the community," Wooten
said.
Rose said he has the facts
on his side.
"I've been as patient as I
can with everybody on this,"
he said. "I'm more than
bending over backwards
with what's going on in this
area."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicle
online.com.


State BRIEFS


SHOP
Continued from Page Al

itself, the traditional har-
vest holiday. And some
shoppers arrived with
sharp elbows.
On Thanksgiving night, a
Walmart in Los Angeles
brought out a crate of dis-
counted Xboxes, and as a
crowd waited for the video
game players to be un-
wrapped, a woman fired
pepper spray at the other
shoppers "in order to get an
advantage," police said.
Ten people suffered cuts
and bruises in the chaos,
and 10 others had minor in-
juries from the spray, au-
thorities said. The woman
got away in the confusion,
and it was not immediately
clear whether she got an
Xbox.
Protests were held Fri-
day in places like Chicago
and Washington to get peo-
ple to reconsider shopping
at national chains on what
is known as Black Friday, so
called because of the ac-
counting practice of record-
ing losses in red and profits
in black. Protesters say the


shops' earlier opening
hours have ruined the
Thanksgiving holiday,
which is meant to bring
families together.
On Friday morning, po-
lice said, two women were
injured and a man was
charged after a fight broke
out at an upstate New York
Walmart. And a man was ar-
rested in a scuffle at a jew-
elry counter at a Walmart in
Kissimmee, Florida.
Walmart, the nation's
biggest retailer, has taken
steps in recent years to con-
trol its Black Friday crowds
following the 2008 death of
one of its workers in a stam-
pede of shoppers. This year,
it staggered its door-buster
deals instead of offering
them all at once.
Walmart spokesman Greg
Rossiter said Black Friday
was safe at most of its
nearly 4,000 U.S. stores, but
there were "a few unfortu-
nate incidents."
The incidents were at-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

percent from last year, ac-
cording to the National Re-
tail Federation.
Thanksgiving weekend is
huge for retailers.
Over the past six years,
Black Friday was the
biggest sales day of the year,
and it is expected to keep
that crown this year, though
shoppers seem to be pro-
crastinating more every
year, and the fate of the hol-
iday season is increasingly
coming down to the last few
days.
Last year, the Thanksgiv-
ing shopping weekend ac-
counted for 12.1 percent of
overall holiday revenue, ac-
cording to ShopperTrak, a
research firm. Black Friday
made up about half of that.
ShopperTrak is expected
to release sales data on Sat-
urday on how Black Friday
fared, but a better picture
will emerge when major re-
tailers report their Novem-
ber sales figures next
Thursday
In addition to opening
earlier than usual this year,
some stores offered to match
their competitors' prices,
rolled out layaway programs
or offered more door-buster
deals than last year.


tegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




SN..' :.2

-Meeting

4 .


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Fast
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
PC
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 15 knots. Seas 2 to
4 feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Partly sunny skies
and warm today


P77 50 NA -'1NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK elusive daily
forecast by:-
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING EL
High: 79 Low: 54
Partly cloudy and pleasant

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
w- High! 82 Low: 54
increasing clouds; 40% chance of night showers

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 64 Low: 39
_- wmo Early AM showers exit; clearing and cooler

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 76/51
Record 89/22
Normal 76/55
Mean temp. 64
Oepariure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.40 in.
Total for the year 55.24 in
Normal for the year 49.72 in
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.18 in.


DATE DAY
11/26 SATLIRDA
11/27 SUNDAY




i 0
DEC2! R 10


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 52
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 45%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Composites, grasses, palm
Today's count: 3.8/12
Sunday's count: 3.9
Monday's count: 3.0
AIR QUALITY


Friday was good with pollute
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MI
,MORNING,
5:56 11:37 6
7:02 12:47 7


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
6:27
7:31


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUIMET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONHISE TODAY
S17 24 MONHSET TOlAY .........

BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: HIGH. There Is no burn ban
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of For
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness/Crystal River Lawn watering is limited to twice per week.
doareses ,as -Aer on Tr.ur j.a ana.,' Sundes, ,rolre Io a.m. or after 4 p.m. O
.'des.a, ,- o walr r.ir, eln-i l diL..r S.turn3, neirH 10 -a.m. or after 4 p.m
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352
4488.
L ans3c.3De 'aIering S: ne.uljl anr Tin, Hadf.d %alnrn and icro-irrigation of pl
InTher rhan Ilawr Ican r&, n ,n on ,y da3fi ana ar any ]IaTR_


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers *At -(,r.gs Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 5:08 a/1:20 a 7:10 p12:17 p
Crystal River" 3:29 a/11:39 a 5:31 p/11:27 p
Withlacoochee' 1:16 a/9:27 a 3:18 p/9:15 p
Homosassa" 4:18 a/12:19 a 6:20 pl:16 p


***At Mason's
Sunday
High/Low HIg
5:53 a/2:05 a 7:54
4:14 a/12:24 p 6:15
2.01 a/1ll:12 a i'.
5:03 a/1:04a 7:04


P'cast
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


Gulf water
temperature

74

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.12 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.26 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.37 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.32 n/a 42.40
Levels repo In feet above sea leve. Flood stage lor lakes an based oi 2.33-year flood. the men-
annual hood which has a 43-precenl chance of being equaled of exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest lorida Water Management Disttit and is subject Io revision. In no event
W ll th D .r. ,i n," Lt I- .1 .1 lr'. c ':,.Cl ...Ji ",u- ..-:, 1, I'lb Ju' ,_ .1.=,h u -' .'.'"J ...ul i 1.= u. ..f
this dala I. L'.. .- l L -Id L'3 11, I'' 'I U -'_la ll. -P i ,'.

THE NATION


30s *~a
iU u


f Ba -
,* a'37 7
1 -t I



. n..- -..



4 / s o


Friday Saturday


ants City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
A..lj,. 53 26 pc 58 43
Albuquerque 55 44 .04 s 52 28
Asheville 67 27 pc 62 43
Atlanta 68 39 c 65 46
AJOR Atlantic City 66 44 s 60 51
)N) Austin 79 47 sh 67 39
12:11 Baltimore 70 36 s 64 49
1:16 Billings 49 34 s 45 32
Birmingham 69 30 c 68 48
Boise 50 40 pc 48 32
Boston 61 36 pc 62 47
Buffalo 59 42 pc 56 50
.533 P.M. Burlington, VT 65 27 c 50 38
.7:03 AM. Charleston. SC 72 33 pc 72 55
8 2P A 1 Charleston, WV 66 30 s 67 48
.7:08 RM Charlotte 67 28 pc 65 52
SChicago 57 42 r 52 36
Cincinnati 63 34 pc 64 45
Cleveland 61 42 pc 62 46
Columbia. SC 69 32 pc 69 55
. Columbus, OH 60 37 pc 62 48
Concord. N.H. 55 24 pc 56 34
7. For Dallas 72 51 sh 60 35
estry's Derivet 56 45 s 49 30
Des Momes 53 45 c 43 26
Detroit 61 41 sh 56 44
El Paso 60 48 s 57 37
Evansville, IN 63 36 r 64 35
Harrisburg 64 33 pc 61 43
Even Hartford 59 28 s 64 40
dd Houston 76 48 ts 72 38
SIndianapoltis 62 38 r 60 34
)726- Jackson 73 38 ts 75 41
LasVegas 71 45 s 67 45
ants Little Rock 67 39 ts 64 34
LosAngeles 65 41 s 74 50
Louisville 65 37 sh 67 43
Memphis 68 42 Its 69 3/
Milwaukee 53 43 r 50 35
Minneapolis 54 44 sn 39 28
Creek Mobile 74 46 ts 75 56
Montgomery 73 36 pc 72 53
gh/Low Nashville 67 33 c 69 40
p,3:02 p KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; =drdrile;
pi/- Iafair, hahaziy: pcpartly cloudy r=raln
r 1H i. I vs-rainusnow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
snomawi ts=thumfdeitosrmi w=wlndy.
4 2:01 p 02011 Weather Central, Madiuson, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H L Pep. Fcst H L
New Orleans 75 51 ts 16 48
New York City 61 46 s 64 49
Norfolk 71 39 s 69 51
Oklahoma City 59 50 w 55 32
Omaha 58 42 w 43 22
Palm Springs 79 44 s 77 52
Philadelphia 64 40 pc 61 46
Phoenix 72 55 s 75 50
Pittsburgh 58 37 pc 62 46
Portland, ME 54 24 pc 50 40
Partland, Ore 50 38 .21 c 54 45
Providence. R I 61 30 s 64 42
Raleigh 70 35 s 68 51
Rapid City 56 35 8 39 26
Reno 59 35 pc 58 30
Rochester, NY 62 37 pc 59 48
Sacramento 59 43 tg 63 42
St. Louis 67 42 r 57 34
St. Ste. Marie 51 47 r 45 39
Sat Lake City 5? 37 pc 42 31
San Antonio 79 57 sh 69 36
San Diego 64 50 s 78 55
San Francisco 57 48 pc 64 49
Savannah 73 37 pc 74 57
Seattle 48 36 ,12 sh 53 47
Spokane 39 31 .16 c 43 31
Syracuse 64 29 pc 61 44
Topeka 59 46 w 46 27
Washington 63 38 s 65 49
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH A LOW
HIGH 87 Harlingen, Texas LOW 11 Big Piney,
Wyo
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY HA/JSKY
Acapulco 87/76/pc
Amsterdam 50/44/c
Athens 55/46/pc
Beijing 47/28/pc
Berlin 43/38/c
Bermuda 74/66/pc
Cairo 68/51/s
:,l.).pr; 40/29/pc
-'i.nna 81/61/pc
Hong Kong 76170/c
Jerusalem 56/41/s


Lisbon 68/52/s
London 56/50/pc
Madrid 62/39/s
Mexico City 74/48/pc
Montreal 50/39/c
Moscow 34/31/i
Paris 49/40/c
Rio 81/71/ts
Rome 64/45/s
Sydney 79/64/ts
Tokyo 57/46/pc
Toronto 53/52/pc
Warsaw 38/30/pc


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY -


tribute to two converging
Black Friday trends:
Crowds are getting bigger
as stores open earlier and
stay open later At the same
time, cash-strapped shop-
pers are competing for
deals on a small number of
gifts that everybody wants
- tablet computers, TVs
and game consoles like
Xbox, Nintendo 3S and Wii.
That's a shift from years
past, when there was a
wider range of must-have
items.
"The more the people,
the more the occurrences,"
said Marshal Cohen, chief
industry analyst with mar-
ket research firm The NPD
Group.
A record number of shop-
pers were expected to head
out to stores across the U.S.
this weekend to take advan-
tage of discounts of up to 70
percent. For three days
starting on Black Friday,
152 million people are ex-
pected to shop, up about 10


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I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Shirley
Ahearn, 63
CITRUS SPRINGS
Shirley Ann Ahearn, age
63, of Citrus Springs, FL,
passed away Thursday, Nov.
23, 2011, as a result of an
automobile accident.
She was born March 1,
1948, in Trenton, MI. to Buel
and Mary Lois (Smith)
Hope. She came here 15
years ago from Ypsilanti,
MI, where she retired from
General Motors Corp. She
was a member of the Crystal
River Church of God and
lived for her children and
Grandchildren.
She is survived by six
sons, James Reed (Angela)
of Dunnellon, FL, Brian
Reed (Sharon) of Inverness,
FL, Mark and Todd Reed
both of Citrus Springs, FL,
Kevin Reed (Kathleen) of
Lecanto, FL and Rodger
Ahearn (Crystal) of Citrus
Springs, FL; four brothers,
Wayne Hope (Eleanor) of
Belleville, MI, Robert Hope
of Jackson, MI, Gary Hope
(Sue) and Jerry Hope
(Janet) all of Augusta, GA;
one sister, Terri Streid
(Kenny), of Crystal River;
FL; 13 grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will
be held on Monday, Novem-
ber 28, 2011, at 11 a.m. at the
Strickland Funeral Home
Chapel in Crystal River, FL,
with the Rev Ronnie Reid,
pastor of the Crystal River
Church of God, officiating.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Burdell
Brackett, 89
BUSHNELL
Burdell Brackett, 89,
Bushnell, died Thursday,
Nov 24, in Sumterville.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory




Weldon "Rusty"
Burrier, 97
HOMOSASSA
Weldon B. "Rusty"
Burrier, 97, Homosassa,
died Nov 24, 2011. Burial
will be at a later date in
Ohio. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home With
Crematory

Virginia
Gilson, 91
INVERNESS
Graveside services for
Mrs. Virginia Taylor Jones
Gilson, age 91, of Inverness,
Florida, will be held 11 a.m.,
Monday, November 28, 2011,
at the Newnansville Ceme-
tery, Alachua, FL. The fam-
ily will receive friends from
2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.
Sunday at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com.
Surviving are her son,
Randall R. Jones (Fran Can-
non) of Inverness, FL;
daughters, Lana S. Jones of
Alachua, FL and Tamara
Jones Hines of Littleton,
CO; six grandchildren; 10
great-grandchildren; two
great-great grandchildren;
13 step-grandchildren; 16
step-great grandchildren;
six step-great-great grand-
children; niece, Kay Ellen
Farison of Illinois; and
nephew, Craig Taylor Fari-
son (Amanda) of South
Carolina.
Preceding Virginia in
death were her parents Ray
and Imo Cheney Taylor of
Napoleon, OH; twin sister,
Marjorie Taylor Farison
(Glenn Farison) of Roswell,
GA; and husbands, Paul L
Jones, Gainesville FL, and
William E. Gilson of
Napoleon, OH.


Ina
Thornton, 86
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ina Elsie Thornton, 86 of
Crystal River, FL passed
away Tuesday, Nov 22, 2011,
at Health Center of Brent-
wood in Lecanto, FL.
She was a beloved wife,
mother and great-grand-
mother.
A native of Hurricane,
WV, she came to this area in
1992.
She is survived by her lov-
ing husband of 70 years,
Leonard Thornton; daugh-
ters Diann Cyrus and hus-
band Ernest of Groveport,
OH, and Paula Bias of Crys-
tal River; son Jeffrey Thorn-
ton and wife Donna of
Lecanto, FL; brother
William Johnson of Hurri-
cane, WV; numerous grand-
children, great-grand-
children and great-great-
grandchildren. She was a
member of Hopewell Primi-
tive Baptist Church.
Memorial service and in-
terment will be at Florida
National Cemetery, Bush-
nell, FL, 2 p m, Monday, Nov
28, 2011.
Wilder Funeral Home as-
sisting the family with
arrangements. The family
request donations in Ina's
name be made to Hospice of
Citrus County, P 0 Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464, in lieu of flowers.
Condolences may be given
at www.wilderfuneral.com.

Anthony
Zawadski, 55
INVERNESS
Anthony D. Zawadski, 55,
Inverness, died Thursday,
Nov 24, in Inverness.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory

Death
ELSEWHERE


Olga Bloom, 92
FOUNDER OF
FLOATING
CONCERT VENUE
NEW YORK The
founder of a floating concert
venue that has been part of
New York City's music
scene since 1977 has died.
Olga Bloom, the founder
of Bargemusic, died Thurs-
day at age 92.
Her death was confirmed
Friday by Bargemusic direc-
tor Mark Peskanov.
Bloom was 57 years old in
1976 when she gave up her
career as a violinist and vio-
list to create Bargemusic.
She converted an old cof-
fee barge into a concert hall
moored to the Fulton Ferry
Landing in Brooklyn. She
once said she wanted to cre-
ate a place for musicians to
perform in an environment
that would nurture their
creativity
Bloom pulled back from
administrative duties in
2005 and retired from
Bargemusic in 2008. She
died at a nursing home in
Manhattan.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or
societies.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com.
Phone (352) 563-5660
for details.


("In Memory" ad,
"Your Trusted Family-Owned Call Mike Snyder at 563-327
Funeral Home Since 1962 C ik d a


Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


3


msnyder@chronicleonline com
or
Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
amiller@chronicleonline.com
Coing iteopainga-
is4daspiort rndae


Obituaries


Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS The
little planes that connect
America's small cities to
the rest of the world are
slowly being phased out
Airlines are getting rid of
these planes their least-
efficient in response to
the high cost of fuel. Delta,
United, Continental, and
other big airlines are ex-
pected to park, scrap or sell
hundreds of jets with 50
seats or fewer in coming
years. Small propeller
planes are meeting the
same fate.
The loss of those planes
is leaving some little cities
with fewer flights or no
flights at all.
The Airports Council In-
ternational says 27 small
airports in the continental
U.S., including St. Cloud,
Minn., and Oxnard, Calif.,
have lost service from well-
known commercial airlines
over the last two years.
More shutdowns are
planned.
Travelers in cities that
have lost service now must
drive or take buses to larger
airports. That adds time
and stress to travel. St.
Cloud lost air service at the
end of 2009 after Delta
eliminated flights on 34-
seat turboprops. Now, pas-
sengers from the city of
66,000 have a 90-minute
drive to the Minneapolis
airport 65 miles to the
southeast.
Roger Geraets, who
works for an online educa-
tion company based near
St. Cloud., flies at least
twice a month from Min-
neapolis. He used to con-
nect from St Cloud. Now he
drives, leaving an extra half
hour for bad traffic. There
are other headaches. Park-
ing at St. Cloud was free,
but in Minneapolis it costs
$14 per day And getting
through airport security in
Minneapolis takes longer
Another city without serv-
ice is Oxnard, 60 miles
northwest of Los Angeles,
which lost three daily tur-
boprop flights operated on
behalf of United. The air-
port's website advises trav-
elers to catch a bus to Los
Angeles International
Airport
Atilla Taluy, a tax pre-


parer who lives in Oxnard,
ends up driving or taking
the shuttle to Los Angeles.
"In morning traffic, it be-
comes quite a burdensome
trip," he says.
Pierre, S.D., will lose
Delta flights to Minneapolis
in mid-January Pierre offi-
cials are waiting to find out
whether those flights will
be replaced or whether the
city will be left with only
Great Lakes Airlines flights
to Denver. The Denver
flights add almost 600 miles
in the wrong direction for
people who want to fly from
South Dakota's capital to
Washington, D.C.
"I don't know if they re-
ally care about (passengers)
in the small markets," says
Rick Steece, a consultant
for the Centers for Disease
Control who travels over-
seas from Pierre two to
three times a year
In the late 1990s, when jet
fuel cost one-fourth of
today's prices, the small jets
and turboprops were a
profitable way for airlines
to connect people in small
cities to the rest in the
world. The flights attracted
business travelers who
tended to pay more for
tickets.
Airlines loved the planes.
Bombardier and Embraer
sold more than 1,900 50-seat
jets during the late 1990s
and early 2000s.
"We all got carried away
with it," says Glen W Hauen-
stein, Delta's executive vice
president for network plan-
ning, revenue management
and marketing.
Then jet fuel prices
soared. They're at $3.16 per
gallon today, up from 78
cents in 2000. That's
changed the economics of
small planes.
For airlines, it all comes
down to spreading fuel
costs among passengers. A
Delta 50-seat CRJ-200 made
by Bombardier takes 19 gal-
lons of fuel to fly each pas-
senger 500 miles. Fuel
usage drops to just 7.5 gal-
lons per passenger on
Delta's 160-seat MD-90s
over the same distance.
So while the bigger jet
burns more fuel overall, it's
more efficient
Delta is moving away
from small jets more aggres-
sively than other airlines. It


Associated Press
Two Continental Express airplanes taxi toward the runway
recently as a baggage handler moves baggage, in Cleve-
land, Ohio. The aircraft in the foreground is an Embraer ERJ
135. To fight high fuel prices, airlines are getting rid of their
least-efficient planes, the small jets that connect
America's smaller cities to the rest of the world.


will eliminate 121 50-seat
jets during the time period
from October 2008 through
the end of next year That
will leave it with 324.
Lynchburg, Va., lost
Delta's three daily flights
on 50-seat jets earlier this
year, although US Airways
still flies similar jets there.
Airport manager Mark
Courtney says Delta also
served nearby Roanoke
and Charlottesville, Va.,
each about 60 miles away,
so it may have figured its
Lynchburg customers will
drive to those cities to catch
a flight.
Lynchburg is the home of
the 2,000 workers for
French nuclear services
company Areva, and its
largest international desti-
nation had been Paris by
way of Delta's Atlanta hub,
Courtney says.
Some Delta routes served
by 50-seaters are getting
bigger planes instead.
Delta's Atlanta-Des Moines
flights are on larger MD-
88s, which seat 142, and it
has shifted the mix toward
larger planes between At-
lanta and Birmingham,


Ala., Nashville, and Savan-
nah, Ga., too.
Many travelers won't
miss the small jets.
One of them, Tony Diaz, is
a technology support man-
ager from Dallas. He was
changing planes in Min-
neapolis on his way to Mo-
line, Ill. The second leg was
a small Delta jet.
"The larger planes are
definitely better to ride in,"
he said, glancing down at
his larger-than-average
frame.
There's still a market for
larger jets, which allow air-
lines to spread out fuel
costs.
Nearly all so-called re-
gional jets sold between
2010 and 2019 are expected
to have 51 seats or more -
with the biggest category
being jets with 76 to 130
seats, according to Forecast
International.
"More of those are going
to see the skies," said avia-
tion consultant Mike Boyd.
But those aluminum-
skinned 50-seaters will be
scrapped for parts.
"They're on their way to the
Budweiser display"


Attorney says suit planned in FAMU band death


Associated Press

MIAMI The family of a
Florida A&M University
drum major who died in
what authorities suspect
was a hazing incident will
sue the school, an attorney
said Friday
The family of Robert
Champion, 26, is spending
the holiday weekend plan-
ning Champion's funeral,
attorney Christopher Chest-
nut said.
The Atlanta resident was
found on a bus parked out-
side an Orlando hotel Sat-
urday night after the
school's football team lost
to rival Bethune-Cookman.


Police said Champion, a
clarinet player who re-
cently was named drum
major, had been vomiting
and complained he couldn't
breathe shortly before he
collapsed.
The cause of Champion's
death hasn't been deter-
mined. Preliminary au-
topsy results were
inconclusive, and a spokes-
woman with the Orange
County medical examiner's
office said it could take up
to three months to learn ex-
actly what killed him.
Law enforcement offi-
cials have said they believe
some form of hazing took
place before 911 was called.


Chestnut said he also be-
lieves the injuries Cham-
pion sustained were
consistent with hazing.
A spokesman for the
school, which was closed
for the Thanksgiving holi-
day, could not be reached
for comment Friday
In Florida, any death in-
volving hazing is a third-de-
gree felony
The attorney said Cham-
pion's family hopes a law-
suit against the school will
help raise awareness
about the issue of band
hazing.
The fallout from Cham-
pion's death was immedi-
ate. On Tuesday, the school


shuttered the famed march-
ing band and the rest of the
music department's per-
formances. The next day,
longtime band director
Julian White was fired.

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Funeral Home With Crematory
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Service: Tues. 11:00am- Chapel
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Viewing: Sun. 4:00-6:00pm
Graveside Service: Mon. 10:00am
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Arrangements Pending
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Airlines cut small jets




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One Year....................2.25%*

Three Year.....................3.0%

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 A5







AG SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I HowTKs *R 'RIDHE T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1344734 5.17 +.03 NwGoldg 21291 9.57 -.23 Intel 261958 22.73 +.03 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF878749 116.34 -.22 GoldStr g 20233 1.78 -.13 SiriusXM 247566 1.75 +.01 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 313065 11.78 +.03 CheniereEn 18581 10.21 -.06 Microsoft 242515 24.30 -.17 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShEMkts 291114 36.10 -.12 Rentech 10866 1.44 -.03 Cisco 233715 17.50 +.10 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
Citigrprs 275948 23.63 +.12 NovaGldg 10837 9.67 -.15 PwShs QQQ216637 52.88 -.41 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d -New 52-week
low. dd -Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amenrican Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
CSVs2xlnPal55.31 +6.63 +13.6 LucasEngy 2.20 +.35 +18.9 Pozen 3.62 +1.12 +44.8 ing qualification. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
ETracBDC 20.99 +1.74 +9.0 AvalonHId 2.89 +.27 +10.3 Amertns pf 3.99 +.79 +24.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
SunTrwtA 3.10 +.25 +8.8 QuestRM g 2.70 +.19 +7.6 Gyrody 105.00 +19.40 +22.7 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
PhxNMdan 5.44 +.43 +8.6 PyramidOil 3.90 +.27 +7.4 RoyaleEn 4.64 +.78 +20.2 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi- Trades will be settled when the
MGIC 2.58 +.18 +7.5 ATS Corp 3.38 +.20 +6.3 PhysnsFm 3.34 +.45 +15.6 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock.u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
ETr2xSSD 23.97 -3.00 -11.1 SagaComm29.25 -3.72 -11.3 CIFCCorp 3.06 -.90 -22.7
JinkoSolar 5.22 -.54 -9.4 InvCapHId 3.80 -.23 -5.7 Sevcon 4.15 -.90 -17.8 i| 'J_ r_
ChinaMM 2.16 -.20 -8.5 AbdnChile 14.71 -.81 -5.2 BGMedn 3.25 -.50 -13.3


Starret 11.45 -1.06 -8.5 NHItcre 35.31 -1.79 -4.8 EssexRent 2.60 -.34 -11.6
TempurP 48.93 -4.24 -8.0 Augustag 2.92 -.14 -4.6 AsiaPWire 2.60 -.28 -9.7


1,277 Advanced
1,656 Declined
120 Unchanged
3,053 Total issues
43 New Highs
128 New Lows
1,614,925,440 Volume


DIARY


183 Advanced
216 Declined
36 Unchanged
435 Total issues
7 New Highs
20 New Lows
35,385,315 Volume


693
1,651
150
2,494
5
164
704,813,940


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
459.94 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


Last
11,231.78
4,533.44
426.01
6,898.18
2,105.33
2,441.51
1,158.67
12,158.94
666.16


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
-25.77 -.23 -2.99 +1.26
-30.76 -.67-11.23 -7.09
+2.05 +.48 +5.19 +8.50
-21.74 -.31 -13.38 -8.03
-13.97 -.66 -4.67 +1.47
-18.57 -.75 -7.97 -3.67
-3.12 -.27 -7.87 -2.58
-41.54 -.34 -8.99 -3.78
-8.18 -1.21 -14.99 -9.09


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BomBrades 15.04 +.03
BoSantSA 6.80 -.05
BoSBrasil 6.90
BkofAm 5.17 +.03
ABBLtd 16.68 -.02 BkMontg 53.22 -.40
ACELtd 64.93 +.36 BkNYMel 17.70 -.10
AESCorp 11.09 -.03 Barday 9.62 +.38
AFLAC 39.05 -.44 BariPVix 49.20 +.60
AGCO 41.29 -.34 BarnesNob 16.06 -.06
AGL Res 38.84 -.08 BarrickG 47.59 -.37
AKSteel 7.04 -.11 Baxter 47.72 -.11
AMR 1.61 Beam Inc 48.53 -.24
ASAGold 27.43 -.26 BeazerHm 1.88 -.06
AT&TInc 27.41 -.14 BectDck 71.11 +.34
AUOptron 4.23 +.16 Berkley 33.05 +.71
AbtLab 52.05 -.30 BerkHa All1300.00+775.00
AberFitc 44.65 -.23 BerkH B 72.89 +.14
Accenture 53.70 +.07 BestBuy 25.63 -.08
AdamsEx 9.02 -.03 BigLots 36.82 -.01
AMD 4.99 -.06 BIkHillsCp 30.01 -.30
Aegon 3.67 -.07 BlkDebtStr 3.77 +.04
Aeroposfi 14.88 -.13 BlkEnhC&l 11.89 +.01
Aetna 37.89 -.25 BlkGlbOp 13.29 +.11
Agilent 33.83 +.23 Blackstone 12.44 -.17
Agniomg 41.52 -.65 BlockHR 14.41 -.15
Agrium g 65.87 -1.27 Boeing 62.78 +.42
AlcatelLuc 1.54 +.06 BostBeer 95.01 -.95
Alcoa 8.95 +.07 BostProp 89.15 +.33
AllegTch 43.33 +.37 BostonSci 5.27 -.05
Allete 37.45 -.25 BoydGm 5.49 -.14
AlliBGIbHi 14.10 +01 BrMySq 30.16 +.01
AlliBInco 8.04 -.02 BrkfidAsg 25.99 +.12
AlliBern 12.75 +.11 Brunswick 15.28 -.43
Allstate 24.70 +.20 Buckeye 62.45 -.31
AlphaNRs 18.81 -.46 CBLAsc 12.62 -.14
Altria 27.25 +.13 CBREGrp 14.62 +.14
AmBevs 31.51 -.02 CBSB 23.55 +.11
Ameren 31.51 +.13 CF Inds 139.75 -5.05
AMovilLs 22.17 -.61 CH Engy 52.38 -.23
AmAxle 7.51 -.14 CITGrp 30.27 +.07
AEagleOut 12.89 -.04 CMS Eng 19.71 +.08
AEP 37.20 +10 CNOFind 5.62 -.12
AmEp 45.00 -.10 CSSInds 18.53 -.11
AmlntGrp 20.07 -.03 CSXs 20.00 -.23
AmSIP3 6.53 +.03 CVREngy 17.00 -.08
AmTower 55.72 +.30 CVSCare 36.85 -.19
Amerigas 42.88 -.42 CblvsNYs 14.48 +.26
Ameriprise 41.51 +.20 CabotO&G 76.69 +1.41
AmeriBrgn 35.98 -.39 CallGolf 5.00 -.11
Amphenol 41.58 -.13 Calpine 14.47 -.07
Anadarko 71.84 -.11 Camecog 16.66 -.20
AnalogDev 32.28 -.23 Cameitlnfo 1.95 +.17
AnglogldA 42.98 -.32 CampSp 31.85 +.60
Ann Inc 21.74 -.54 CdnNRs gs 32.64 -.67
Annaly 15.94 +.26 CapOne 40.02 +.17
Aon Corp 44.23 +.55 CapifiSrce 5.91 -.05
Apache 86.83 -1.31 CapMpl B 14.30 +.10
AquaAm 20.96 -.04 CardnlHIth 40.29 -.56
ArcelorMit 15.43 +.23 CarMax 27.02 +.21
ArhiCoal 13.63 -.30 Carnival 30.47
ArdichDan 27.90 +11 Caterpillar 86.72 -1.04
ArcosDorn 19.55 -.41 Celanese 40.47 +.43
Ashland 48.20 -.54 Cemex 3.48 -.28
AsdEstat 15.20 +.02 Cemig pf 15.77 -.28
AssuredG 9.17 -.13 CenovusE 28.78 -.21
AstraZen 42.53 -.32 CenterPnt 18.59 -.09
ATMOS 32.48 -.06 Cntyink 35.70 +.20
AuRicog 9.14 -.22 Checkpnt 10.90 -.19
AutoNatn 34.06 ... Chemtura 9.96 -.18
Avon 16.09 -.27 ChesEng 22.42 -.29
BB&TCp 21.17 +.13 ChesUfi 40.64 -.02
BHP BiILt 66.32 -.61 Chevron 92.29 -1.46
BHPBil plc 53.93 -.08 Chicos 10.11 -.04
BP PLC 39.41 -.27 Chimera 2.60 +.03
BRFBrasil 18.83 +.49 Chubb 63.82 +.18
BRT 6.25 ... Cigna 40.92 +.14
BakrHu 48.87 -.11 CindBell 2.80 -.01
BailCps 33.18 +.13 Cifgrprs 23.63 +.12
BcBilVArg 7.39 +.07 CleanH s 53.88 -.47


CliffsNRs 59.72 -.24
Clorox 63.97 +.26
Coach 58.25 -.45
CCFemsa 83.34 -1.17
CocaCola 64.74 -.13
CocaCE 24.22 -.13
Coeur 25.65 -.26
CohStlnfra 15.32 -.03
CollctvBrd 12.52 +.01
Comerica 23.02 +.15
CmwREIT 16.00 +.05
CmtyHIt 17.41 -.04
CompSci 22.93 -.07
Con-Way 24.62 -.33
ConAgra 23.95 +.09
ConocPhil 66.14 -.79
ConsolEngy 35.29 -.09
ConEd 57.16 +.71
ConstellA 17.98 -.04
ConstellEn 37.97 +.05
Cnvrgys 11.52 -.05
Cooper Ind 51.96 -.33
Corning 13.95 -.10
CottCp 5.95 -.08
CovenbyH 29.29 +.08
Covidien 42.87 -.50
Crane 43.41 -.11
CSVS2xVxS 63.98 +1.77
CSVellVSts 4.91 -.08
CredSuiss 21.20 -.05
CrwnCsfie 39.44 +.09
Cummins 86.04 -.80
CurEuro 131.90 -.97

DCT Indl 4.40 -.02
DDR Corp 10.47 +.02
DNPSelct 10.59 -.02
DPL 30.19 +.02
DR Horton 10.86 +.03
DSW Inc 42.97 -.87
DTE 49.43 +.10
DanaHldg 11.38 -.27
Danaher 44.56 -.10
Darden 44.60 -.07
DeanFds 9.28 +.04
Deere 73.64 -1.08
DeltaAir 7.12
DenburyR 14.32 -.11
DeutschBk 32.34 -.12
DBGoldDS 4.84 +.08
DevonE 58.58 -.94
DicksSptg 37.30 -.52
DxEMBIIrs 65.55 -.44
DxFnBull rs 49.38 +.69
DrSCBr rs 39.66 +1.46
DirFnBrrs 54.10 -.73
DirLCBrrs 39.15 +.25
DrxEnBear 15.95 +.37
DirEMBear 25.53 +.17
DirxSCBull 33.67 -1.32
DirxLCBull 48.51 -.28
DirxEnBull 36.69 -.93
Discover 22.96 +.05
Disney 33.51 +.11
DomRescs 49.51 +.20
DowChm 24.47 -.13
DuPont 43.86 -.22
DukeEngy 19.79 +.16
DukeRlty 10.50
ECDangn 4.62 +.19
EMCCp 21.88 -.18
EOG Res 90.87 -.74
EastChm s 35.47 -.20
EKodak 1.10 -.05
Eaton s 40.55 -.32
EatnVan 21.77 -.10
EV EnEq 9.71 +.01
Ecolab 53.51 +.83


Edisonlnt 37.85
BPasoCp 24.84
BdorGldg 16.36
EmersonEl 47.11
EmpDist 19.69
EnbrEPts 30.10
EnCanag 17.80
EndvSilvg 9.97
EnPro 31.12
ENSCO 47.56
Entergy 66.54
EntPrPt 44.12
EqtyRsd 52.63


EvergEn h .21 +.07
ExomRes 10.15 -.23
Exedisn 9.06
Exelon 41.93 +.04
ExxonMbl 73.90 -.68
FMCTchs 46.37 +.71
FedExCp 76.08 -.48
FedSignl 3.50 -.12
Fedlnvst 15.12 +.01
Ferrellgs 22.31 +.16
Ferro 4.82 -.18
FibriaCelu 6.73 -.03
FidNatlnfo 22.58 -.20
FstHorizon 6.79 +.11
FTActDiv 8.03 +.01
FtTrEnEq 10.39 -.02
FirstEngy 41.94 +.08
Rotek 8.08 +.05
Huor 49.51 -.82
FootLockr 21.12 -.23
FordM 9.75 -.08
FordMwt 2.08 -.01
ForestLab 28.63 -.14
ForestOil s 13.30 -.53
FranceTel 15.37 -.13
FMCG s 33.82 -.56
FronferCm 5.39 +.04
Fronfline 2.76 -.06
Fusion-io n 29.33 +.22

GATX 37.19 -.13
GNCn 27.35 +.32


GabelliET 4.86
GabHIthW 6.59 +.01
GabUl 7.12 -.12
GafisaSA 5.65
GameStop 21.51 -.60
Gannett 10.50 +.06
Gap 17.62 -.18
GenDynam 61.13 +.49
GenElec 14.70 -.03
GenGrPrp 12.99 +.17
GenMills 38.23 +.27
GenMotors 20.34 +.10
GenOn En 2.54 -.03


Genworth 5.39 +.04
Gerdau 7.04 -.21
GlaxoSKIn 41.50 -.53
GolLinhas 6.59 -.15
GoldFLtd 15.16 -.23
Goldcrpg 47.84 -.57
GoldmanS 88.75 +.86
Goodridich 122.50 -.05
Goodyear 11.93 -.08
GtPlainEn 19.70 +.11
Griffon 8.00 -.19
GpTelevisa 18.70 -.27
GuangRy 17.51 +.44
HCP Inc 36.09 +.16
HDFCBks 25.79 +.61
HSBC 35.92 +.09
HSBC Cap 25.51
Hallibrtn 31.80 -.40
HanJS 14.52 -.10
HanPrmDv 12.47 +.19
Hanesbrds 23.01 -.41
Hanoverlns 34.32 +.43
HarleyD 34.80 +.21
HarmonyG 12.51 -.09
HartfdFn 15.46 -.20
HawaiiEl 24.25 +.05
HItCrREIT 47.81 +.65
HItMgmt 7.46 -.16
HlthcrRlty 16.29 -.07
HlthSprg 54.43 -.10
HeclaM 5.30 -.07
Heinz 49.99 +.08
HeimPayne 50.70 +.16


Herbalifes 53.18
Hertz 9.99
Hess 54.33
HewlettP 25.39
HighwdPrp 26.55
HollyFrts 21.74
HomeDp 36.47
Honwlllni 49.14
Hormel s 28.69
HospPT 19.80
HostHofis 12.81
Humana 80.89
Huntsmn 9.43


Hyperdyn 2.85
IAMGIdg 18.14
ICICIBk 27.56
ING 6.26
ION Geoph 5.23
iShGold 16.39
iSAsfia 20.70
iShBraz 54.30
iSCan 24.96
iShGer 18.14
iSh HK 15.01
iShJapn 8.84
iShKor 49.52
iSMalas 12.96
iShMex 49.64
iShSing 10.85
iSTaiwn 11.51
iShSilver 30.20
iShDJDv 49.43
iShChina25 33.33
iShDJTr 80.84
iSSP500 116.64
iShBAgB 109.63
iShEMkts 36.10
iShiBxB 110.39
iShSPLatA 39.92
iShB20T 120.80
iS Eafe 46.45
iShiBxHYB 82.75
iSR1KV 58.09
iSR1KG 54.24
iSR2KV 59.01
iSR2KG 76.38


iShR2K 66.62
iShREst 51.60
iStar 5.09
ITTCps 19.07
Idacorp 38.27
ITW 42.58
Imafon 5.40
IngerRd 29.17
IntegrysE 49.09
IntcnfEx 113.78
IBM 177.06
InfiGame 16.31
IntPap 25.89


Interpublic 8.41 +.09
Invesco 17.91 +.11
InvMtgCap 14.64 -.11
IronMtn 28.57
ItauUnibH 15.74 -.10


JPMorgCh 28.48 +.10
Jabil 18.34 -.02
JacobsEng 38.51 +.02
Jaguar g 6.81 -.22
JanusCap 5.86 +.01
Jefferies 10.65 +.14
JohnJn 61.27 -.15
JohnsnCfi 27.59 -.18
JonesGrp 9.57 -.19
JnprNtwk 20.17 -.38
KB Home 6.71 +.02
KBR Inc 25.02 -.36
KCSouthn 62.81 -.62
Kaydon 28.62 -.15
KA EngTR 22.81 -.24
Kelbgg 48.75 +.50
KeyEngy 12.33 -.21
Keycorp 6.67 +.03
KimbClk 68.69 +.17
Kimco 14.72 +.12
KindME 75.48 +.56
KindMorn 29.00 +.98
Kinrossg 12.74 -.21
KodiakOg 7.74 -.01
Kohls 51.81 -.33


KoreaElc 10.43 +.62 Moodys 31.63 -.05 PinWst 44.57
Kraft 34.32 +.09 MorgStan 13.26 +.23 PitnyBw 17.35
KrispKrm 6.32 -.07 MSEmMkt 12.45 -.10 PlainsEx 31.89
Kroger 22.16 +.34 Mosaic 49.30 -.71 PlumCrk 34.64
LDKSolar 3.12 -.04 MotrlaSoln 43.70 +.08 Polariss 56.10
LG Display 9.83 -.12 MotrlaMon 38.60 +.07 PostPrp 37.08
LSICorp 5.10 -.08 MurphO 49.44 -.55 Potash s 40.67
LTCPrp 26.88 -.07 NCRCorp 16.26 -.09 PSUSDBull 22.42
LaZBoy 9.32 -.07 NRG Egy 18.71 -.06 Praxair 93.51
Ladede 38.51 -.21 NV Energy 14.51 +.06 PrecDrill 9.84
LVSands 42.40 -.13 NYSE Eur 25.76 -.21 PrinFnd 21.43
LearCorps 40.19 +.17 Nabors 15.98 -.24 ProLogis 25.21
LeggMason 23.31 +.15 NBkGreece .43 -.01 ProShtQQQ 33.37
LennarA 16.44 ... NatFuGas 53.66 -.08 ProShtS&P 44.21
LeucNafI 20.54 +.12 NatGrid 48.71 -.41 PrUShS&P 23.19
Level3rs 18.78 +.45 NOilVarco 64.52 +.76 PrUIShDow 18.45
Lexmark 31.17 -.32 NewAmHi 10.05 +.03 ProUltQQQ 73.03
LbtyASG 3.67 ... NJRscs 44.71 -.16 PrUShQQQrs51.59
LillyEli 35.58 -.07 NYCmtyB 11.38 +.06 ProUltSP 39.53
Limited 38.33 -.41 NewellRub 14.25 -.02 PrUShtFnrs 75.61
LincNat 17.58 -.05 NewfidExp 38.54 -.31 ProUShL20 18.66
Lindsay 49.53 -1.10 NewmtM 63.77 -.44 ProUltSBM 22.48
Linkedlnn 63.08 -2.92 NewpkRes 7.85 -.11 ProUltFin 36.34
LizClaib 7.46 -.10 Nexeng 14.33 -.49 PrUPShR2K 19.66
LloydBkg 1.40 +.06 NextEraEn 52.57 +19 ProUBasM 28.07
LockhdM 75.39 +1.44 NiSource 21.35 +.12 ProShtR2K 33.44
Loews 35.85 +.10 Nicor 53.57 -.22 ProUltR2K 28.50
LaPac 6.42 -.04 NikeB 90.28 -.65 ProUSSP50017.50
Lowes 22.68 +.20 99 Cents 21.66 PrUltSP500 s 47.61
L BAs 865 +32 NobleCorp 32.46 -.24 ProUSSIvrs 13.76
NokiaCp 5.29 -.18 PrUltCrde rs 39.41
Nordstrm 44.29 -.45 ProUltSIvs 54.17
M&TBk 67.70 +.27 NorfikSo 70.44 +.09 ProUShEuro 19.50
MDU Res 19.81 +.08 NoestUt 33.18 +.23 ProctGam 61.00
MEMC 3.92 -.04 NorthropG 53.42 +.45 ProgrssEn 51.54
MFAFnd 6.41 +.16 Novaris 51.65 -1.12 ProgsvCp 17.58
MCR 8.76 ... NSTAR 44.04 +94 ProUSR2Krs 49.64
MGIC 2.58 +.18 Nucor 35.57 +09 ProvEng 8.94
MGM Rsts 9.27 -.03 NvlMO 14.43 Prudentl 44.91
Macquarie 25.56 -.06 NvMulSl&G 7.63 +.02 PSEG 31.21
Macys 29.45 -.11 NuvQPf2 7.67 +.01 PubSrg 122.30
MageiMPtr 63.90 +.45 OGE Engy 49.36 +.05 PulteGrp 5.22
Magnalgs 32.63 -65 OasisPet 25.74 -.88 PPrIT 5.08
MagHRes 3.78 -.30 OcciPet 86.69 -1.08 QEP Res 28.79
Manitowoc 8.88 -.26 Och-Ziff 7.49 +.01 QuanexBld 12.99
Manulifeg 10.32 +.04 OfficeDpt 1.96 -.07 QuantaSvc 18.87
MarathnOs 24.66 -.18 OfficeMax 4.09 -.16 QntmDSS 2.24
MarathPn 32.27 -.56 OilSvHT 112.85 -.39 Questar 18.47
MktVGold 54.79 -.70 OldRepub 7.29 +.11 QksilvRes 6.88
MktVRus 27.54 +.14 Olin 17.84 -.05 RPM 21.45
MktVJrGId 26.97 -.29 OmegaHIt 16.16 +.06 RadianGrp 2.19
MarlntA 27.92 +.04 Omnicom 40.02 +13 Rohk 1066
MarshM 28.47 +.26 ONEOK 77.73 +.34 RamesFn 26.20
MStewrt 2.77 -.13 OneokPts 49.35 +.18 RJamesFn 2620
Masco 8.42 k C 1813 Rayonier 38.25
M tec 1565 2 sRayTheon 43.12
McClatchy 1.12 +.02 RtylnYo 32.50
McDrmlnt 10.10 -.13 PG&ECp 37.21 +.35 RedHat 44.93
McDnlds 92.10 +.23 PNC 49.07 +.19 RegionsFn 3.69
McGrwH 40.54 -.16 PNM Res 17.89 -.07 Renrenn 3.71
McMoRn 13.56 -.37 PPG 79.45 -.12 RepubSvc 25.82
MeadWvco 27.22 +.16 PPL Corp 28.57 +.16 Revlon 13.74
Mechel 8.97 -.13 PallCorp 49.92 -.23 ReynAmer 39.99
MedoHIth 53.74 -.34 PatriotCoal 8.11 +.01 RioTintD 46.34
Medtrnic 33.68 -.27 PeabdyE 32.78 -.48 RiteAid 1.10
Merck 33.16 -.03 Pengrthg 9.38 -.08 RolAu 6.91
Meritor 4.90 -.12 PennVaRs 23.34 -.01 Bocklut 66.91
MetLife 27.91 +.05 PennWstg 16.05 -.12 Rko 1
MetroPCS 7.51 -.06 Penney 29.61 -.26
MetroHlth 6.62 -.26 PepBoy 10.22 -.23
MidAApt 55.35 -.15 PepcoHold 18.71 +.07 '
Midas 8.55 +.01 PepsiCo 62.49 +.09
MitsuUFJ 4.06 +.02 Prmian 19.82 -.04 Th r r
MizuhoFn 2.45 ... PetrbrsA 22.64 -.71 The rem
MobileTele 15.47 +.81 Petrobras 24.41 -.58 N S
Molycorp 26.98 -.71 Pfizer 18.45 NYSE I
MoneyGrs 16.90 +.22 PhilipMor 71.31 +.29 found o
Monsanto 67.71 -.26 PiedNG 29.92 -.14 un
MonstrWw 6.59 -.30 PimcoStrat 11.17 -.10


-.10 Rowan 31.29 -.04
-.01 RBScofind 5.74 +.38
+.02 RylCarb 23.19 -.47
+.33 RoyDShllA 64.77 -.59
-.79 Royce 11.41 -.11
-.20 Royce pfB 25.56 -.10
-.98 RdxSPEW 42.96 -.09
+.13
-.44
-.16 SAIC 11.41 +.15
-.24 SAPAG 55.14 -.68
+.29 SCANA 40.97 +.27
+.25 SKTIcm 14.41 +.23
+.11 SLMCp 11.99 -.03
+.08 SpdrDJIA 112.14 -.19
+.06 SpdrGold 163.40 -1.43
-107 SPMid 147.81 -.70
+.74 S&P500ETF116.34 -.22
-.20 SpdrHome 14.96 -.11
-.67 SpdrS&PBk 17.63 +.07
+51 SpdrLehHY 36.43
+.20 SpdrS&P RB 21.44 -.03
+.28 SpdrRefi 48.50 -.48
+74 SpdrOGEx 48.14 -.80
-.32 SpdrMetM 46.63 -.43
+.39 STMicro 5.64 -.08
-.73 Safeway 18.83 +.46
+.13 StJoe 12.91 -.16
-.50 SJude 34.78 -.25
+.62 Saks 8.49 -.06
+.20 Salesforce 104.93 -.86
-2.63 SJuanB 23.54 -.12
+.28 SandRdge 6.35 +.08
-.06 Sanofi 31.72 -.49
+.48 SaraLee 17.74 +.03
-.14 Schlmbrg 66.37 -.13
+1.17 Schwab 10.77 +.02
-.10 SeadrillLtd 31.14 -.17
-.26 SemiHTr 28.25 -.22
+.03 Sensient 33.62 -.34
+.40 ShipFin 10.00 -.45
+.07 SiderurNac 7.55 -.21
+.05 SilvWhtng 30.91 -.19
-.63 SilvrcpMg 6.98 -.15
-.49 SimonProp 116.33 +55
+.12 Skechers 12.18 -.15
-.11 SmithAO 35.22 -.18
+.19 Smucker 73.03 +.55
-.20 SonyCp 16.96 +.69
+.12 SoJerInd 52.42 -.12
+.06 SouthnCo 42.47 +.27
-.09 SthnCopper 27.64 -.17
-.17 SwstAirl 7.50 +.10
+.18 SwstnErgy 35.03 -.60
-.12 SpectraEn 28.23 +.19
+.50 SprintNex 2.38 -.09
+.09 SprottSilv 13.38 -.82
-.58 SprottGold 14.66 -.10
+.01 SP Mais 31.41 -.16
-.04 SP HIthC 31.71 -.12
-.06 SP CnSt 30.37 +.11
+.12 SPConsum 36.33 -.20
-.08 SP Engy 63.83 -.46
+.02 SPDRFncI 11.78 +.03
-.02 SP Inds 31.16 -.05
-.19 SPTech 24.01 -.13
-.26 SP UDI 33.43 +.17
+.39 StdPac 2.81 -.04




nainder of the

listings can be

n the next page.


IA EIA N 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 6.75 -.02
AbdnChile 14.71 -.81
AbdnEMTel 17.34 -.02
AdmRsc 25.95 +.70
AdeonaPh .92 -.03
Adventrx .59 -.01
AlexomRg 6.23 -.02
AlldNevG 31.86 -.23
AlmadnMg 2.45 -.09
Anooraq g .52 +.04
AntaresP 2.54 +.01
Augustag 2.92 -.14


Aurizong 5.17
AvalRaren 2.63
Bacterin 2.17
Banks.com .04
Banrog 3.34
BarcGSOil 24.50
BrclndiaTR 48.69
Brigusgrs 1.19
BritATob 87.20
CAMAC En .87
CanoPet .12
CardiumTh .33
CelSd .32
CFCdag 21.42
CheniereEn 10.21


-.10 CheniereE 16.20 -.08
-.05 ChiArmM .34 +.06
-.09 ChinNEPet 2.26 -.09
+.01 ClaudeRg 1.68 -.02
-.14 ClghGlbOp 10.25 .01
+.05 ComstkMn 1.76 -.14
+.32 CrSuiHiY 2.85 -02
+.02
-.40 DenisnM g 1.22
-.02 EVLtdDur 14.71 +.03
-.00 EVMuni2 13.37 +.08
-.00 EllswthFd 6.36 +.02
-.01 EntGaming .23 -.02
-.38 EnteeGold 1.24 -.09
-.06 EvolPetol 6.94 -.05


ExeterRgs 2.94 -.05
ExtorreGg 8.06 +.04
FrkStPr 9.94 -.01

GabGldNR 15.07 -.25
GascoEngy .18
Gastargrs 2.82 -.13
GenMoly 2.75 -.07
GoldResrc 18.19 +.17
GoldenMin 6.06 -.25
GoldStrg 1.78 -.13
GranTrrag 5.38 -.15
GrtBasGg 1.01 -.01
GtPanSilvg 2.17 -.03
HKN 2.86 -.06


Hemisphrx .18 -.01
HstnAEn 12.68 -.44
ImpOilgs 37.85 -.35
IntellgSys 1.82 +.04


KeeganRg 3.80 -.15
LadThalFn 2.12 -.04
LkShrGld g 1.30 -.03
LucaisEn2.20 +.35

MadCatzg .59 +.00
Metalico 3.05 -.02
MdwGoldg 2.17 -.08


Minefndg 10.95
MinesMgt 1.81
NeoStem .51
Neoprobe 2.05
NBRESec 3.56
Nevsung 5.10
NewEnSys .65
NwGoldg 9.57
NA Pall g 2.76
NDynMng 6.31
NthnO&G 20.54
NovaGldg 9.67


ParaG&S 2.22


-.08 PhrmAth 1.21 ... SeabGldg 20.52
-.05 PinndDt 2.35 -.01 SilverBull .49
-.01 PbnDrill 9.02 -.24 SprottRLg 1.31
-.05 PolyMetg 1.13 -.03 TanzRyg 2.53
+.03 Procerars 14.44 -.37 Taseko 2.76
-.13 PyramidOil 3.90 +.27 Taseko 2.7
-.02 Quepasa 3.46 -.04 Tengsco .74
-.23 QuestRMg 2.70 +.19 TianyinPh .75
-.04 RareEleg 4.88 -.03 TimberlnR .62
+.15 Rentech 1.44 -.03 TrnsafiPet 1.17
-.67 RexahnPh .50 ... TriValley .20
-.15 Richmntg 10.37 -.08 TriangPet 4.89
% Ur-Energy .86
Uranerz 1.53
-.03 SamsO&G 2.06 +.05 UraniumEn 2.68


VangTotW 41.02 -.13
VantageDrl 1.12 +.07
VirnetX 18.29 -.77
VistaGold 3.12 -.10
VoyagerOG 2.11 -.05
Walterlnv 20.89 -.10
WFAdvlnco 9.52 +.07
WstC&G gs 1.56 -.09
YMBiog 1.35 +.03
ZBB Engy .53 -.01


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


ACMoorelf 1.59
AMCNetn 33.60 -1.00
ASML HId 36.21 -.51
ATP O&G 6.67 -.03
AVI Bio .68 -.02
AXT Inc 3.74 -.06
Abiomed 17.35 -.24
Abraxas 2.96 -.11
AcadaTc 28.76 -.39
Accuray 3.60 -.02
Achillion 5.60 -.09
AcmePkt 33.35 +.39
AomrdaTh 20.90 -.62
AcfvsBliz 11.75
Actuate 5.82 +.04
Acxiom 11.20 -.14
AdobeSy 25.83 -.11
AdolorCp 4.71 +.03
Adtran 29.80 -.05
AdvATch If 4.42 +.11
AdvEnld 8.38 -.22
Aegion 13.31 -.37
AEternag 1.63 -.03
Affymax 5.10 -.22
Affymetrix 4.29 -.08
AgFeedh .53 -.05
AirTrnsp 4.50 -.07
AkamaiT 26.31 +.03
Akorn 9.30 -.13
AlaskCom 5.14 -.17
Alexions 63.87 -1.00
Alexza .99 +.01
AlignTech 21.23 -.32
AlimeraSci 1.19 +.02
Alkermes 13.88 -.44
AllotComm 14.65 -.02
AllscriptH 18.49 -.26
AlnylamP 6.50
Alphatec 1.80 -.04
AlteraCplf 34.12 -.54
AlterraCap 21.04 +.04
AltraHIdgs 15.41 -.09
Amarin 7.10 +.43
Amazon 182.40 -6.59
Amedisys 9.78 -.38
ACapAgy 27.76 -.02
AmCapLd 6.54 -.01
AmSupr 3.84 -.19
AmCasino 16.50 -.31
Amgen 54.65 -.29
AmkorTIf 4.15 -.04
Amylin 9.93 -.07
Anadigc 2.01 -.02
Anlogic 49.94 -1.20
Analystlnt 4.74 -.11
Ancesty 22.36 +.18
Andatee 3.83 +.39
AngiesLn 13.50 -1.27
Ansys 56.93 +.08
A123Sys 2.05 +.03
ApolloGrp 44.75 -.21
Apollolnv 6.66 -.16
Apple Inc 363.57 -3.42
ApldMati 10.16 -.05
AMCC 6.59 -.13
Approach 26.93 -.07
ArchCap s 36.22 +1.36
ArenaPhm 1.27 -.01
AresCap 14.25 -.01
AriadP 10.83
Aribalnc 27.05 -.12
ArkBest 16.90 -.36
ArmHId 25.74 -.32
Arris 10.01 -.01
ArubaNet 19.20 -.19
AscenaRi 25.39 -.35
AsialnfoL 7.63 -.05
AspenTech 15.85 -.19
AssodBanc 9.65 -.04
Astotch h .85 +.06
athenahlth 53.00 -.37
Atmel 8.31 -.13
Audvox 6.55 -.11
Autodesk 29.80 -.24


AutoData 47.93
AvagoTch 28.44
AvanirPhm 2.00
AvidTch 6.71
AvisBudg 11.26
Aware h 3.05
Axcelis 1.13
BEAero 35.37
BGC Ptrs 5.71
BMC Sft 33.28
Baidu 119.91
BkOzarkss 26.25
BeacnRfg 18.15
BeasleyB 3.89
BebeStrs 6.77
BedBath 57.90
BioRetLab 12.03
BioFuelEh .76
Biogenldc 109.20
BioLase 2.60
BioMarin 32.25
BioSante 2.22
BioScrip 5.23
BIkRKelso 7.82
BlueCoat 16.86
BlueNile 33.51
BobEvans 30.50
BonTon 2.37
BostPrv 6.72
BrigExp 36.39
Brightpnt 8.81
Broadcom 29.58
BroadSoft 33.35
Broadwd h .61
BrcdeCm 5.11
BrklneB 7.39
BrooksAuto 8.51
BrukerCp 11.51
BuffabWW 59.86
CAInc 19.80
CBOE 25.75
CH Robins 63.63
CME Grp 237.89
CNinsure 5.85
CTCMedia 9.15
CVB Fnd 9.08
CadencePh 4.08
Cadence 10.18
Callidus 4.48
CdnSolar 2.26
CapCtyBk 9.65
CapFdFrs 10.87
CpstnTrbh .91
CareerEd 6.91
Carrizo 23.88
CarverB rs 2.80
Caseys 47.73
CasualMal 3.11
CatalystH 48.12
CathayGen 11.90
Cavium 29.05
Celgene 60.24
CellTherrsh 1.03
CentEuro 3.06
CEurMed 7.37
CenGrdA If 7.91
CentAI 7.89
Cepheid 31.48
Cerners 57.02
CerusCp 2.77
Changyou 20.97
ChrmSh 3.30
Chartlnds 53.92
CharterCm 51.85
ChkPoint 53.40
Cheesecake 26.04
ChildPlace 51.87
ChinaMed 3.79
ChinPSi h .36
ChinaRE 4.65
ChiValve 2.18
ChrchllD 44.20
CienaCorp 10.97
CinnFin 27.48
Cintas 27.63
Cirrus 14.33
Cisco 17.50
CitrixSys 64.47


+.07 CleanEngy 11.10 -.26
-.53 Clearwire 1.54
-.07 CoffeeH 8.41 +.02
-.04 CognizTech 62.48 +.53
-.19 CogoGrp 1.71 +.01
+.02 Coinstar 39.56 -.96
+.03 ColdwtrCrk .82 -.07
+.04 ColumLabs 2.12 -.07
-.08 Comcast 21.00 -.07
-.19 Comcspd 20.81 -.08
+.36 CmcBMO 36.78 +.29
-.16 CommSys 12.75 -.01
-.04 Compuwre 7.61 -.03
Comtech 29.28 -.36
-.17 Concepts 10.15 -.26
-.29 ConcurTch 43.09 -.26
-.12 Conmed 24.43 -.30
+.02 ConstantC 19.99 -.08
-.73 Copart 42.31 +.21
-.13 CorinthC 2.28 -.08
-.16 Costom 80.82 +.06
-.03 CowenGp 2.41
-.21 Creelnc 23.85 +.10
-.19 Crocs 14.64 -.19
+.07 CrosstexE 10.92 -.30
-.25 Ctrip.omm 26.00 +.22
-.22 CubistPh 34.76 -.39
-.16 CumMed 2.84 +.01
-.06 Curis 3.08 -.08
Cyclacelh .52 -.05
-.01 CypSemi 17.03 -.11
-.85 Cytoldnet .97 -.01
-.59 C ori 2.42 -.13
-.03
+.15
-.05 DFCGbIs 16.60 +.10
-.39 DeckrlsOut 97.58 -2.39
-.35 DeerConsu 5.33 +.21
-1.42 Delcath 2.30 -.07
Dell Inc 14.22 -.08
+.34 DeltaPtrrs .56 -.02
-.11 Dndreon 7.85 +.06
-1.14 Dennys 3.10 -.05
+.04 Dentsply 32.80 -.06
+.03 Depomed 4.27 +.01
-.04 DexCom 6.93 -.02
-.08 DiamondF 27.04 -.76
-.11 DigitalGen 11.69 -.29
-.16 DirecTVA 45.08 +.29
-.09 DiscCmA 39.22 +.18
-.01 DiscCmC 36.05 -.14
+.06 DishNetwk 23.84 +.57
-.02 DollarTree 76.61
-.04 DonlleyRR 13.48 -.12
-.87 DorchMin 22.12 -.70
DrmWksA 16.84 -.07
-1.08 DryShips 2.15 -.03
+.06 Dunkin n 24.64 -.08
+.10 DyaxCp 1.25
-.24 Dynavax 2.91 -.02
-.69 E-Trade 8.14 +.10
-.19 eBay 28.23 -.32
+.02 eResrch 3.88 -.02
+.01 EVEngy 63.22 +.16
-.08 EagleBulk 1.12 +.02
-.11 ErthLink 5.97 -.14
-.28 EstWstBcp 17.87 +.02
-.07 Ebixlnc 19.05 -.13
-.50 EducDevh 5.20
-.10 8x8 Inc 3.40 +.04
-.35 ElectSd 11.54 -.25
-.02 ElectArts 20.83 -.11
+.31 Emorelf .90
+.87 EndoPhrm 32.51 -.05
-.28 EngyCnvh .31 -.02
-.10 EnrgyRec 2.27
-.86 EngyXXI 26.64 -.90
+.23 Entegris 7.61 -.11
-.04 EntropCom 4.35 -.12
-.09 Equinix 95.99 -.27
-.05 EricsnTel 9.17 -.34
+.39 ExactScih 7.53 -.13
-.06 Exar 5.87 -.01
+.19 Exelids 3.95 -.05
-.29 EddeTc 2.42 +.02
-.06 Expedia 26.11 +.26
+.10 Expdlni 40.00 -.11
-1.01 ExpScripts 42.15 -.34


ExtrmNet 2.79 -.05 iShEurFn 13.82 -.07
Ezorp 26.49 -.80 iShACWX 34.57 -.22
F5Netwks 97.62 -1.91 iShACWI 39.45 -.19
FEICo 36.32 -.58 IonixBr 15.25 -.36
FLIRSys 24.20 +.04 IdenixPh 6.77 -.52
FXEner 4.35 -.14 Idenfive 1.78 +.02
Fastenals 38.42 -.21 Illumina 27.30 +.15
FiberTwr If .29 -.01 ImunoGn 10.69 -.37
FifthThird 10.97 +.03 Imunmd 2.94 -.02
FindEngin 19.45 +.25 ImpaxLabs 17.51 -.26
Fndlnst 15.00 -.20 ImperlSgr 5.48 +.07
Finisar 16.73 -.14 Incyte 11.78 -.02
FinLine 18.84 +.13 Infinera 6.12 -.12
FstBusey 4.73 +.02 Informat 42.11 -.31
FstCashFn 34.47 -.61 Infosys 49.97 +.34
FMidBc 8.16 -.10 Inhibitex 11.15 -.62
FstNiagara 8.24 ... Insulet 17.36 +.09
FstSolar 40.32 -1.26 IntegLfSci 28.97 -.42
FstMerit 12.96 -.08 IntgDv 5.17 -.14
Fiserv 54.12 +.04 Intel 22.73 +.03
Flextn 5.46 -.09 InteractBrk 14.17 -.03
FocusMda 17.70 +.09 interClick 9.05 +.04
ForcePro 5.48 ... InterDig 40.70 -.83
FormFac 5.39 -.12 InterMune 17.52 -.01
Fortnets 22.79 -.03 InterNAP 4.71 +.05
Fossil Inc 81.26 -1.25 InfiSpdw 21.93 -.19
FosterWhl 17.50 -.37 Intersil 9.82 -.23
FredsInc 12.19 -.37 Intuit 49.27 -.02
FreshMkt 36.49 -.48 IntSurg 413.26 -3.67
FuelCell .84 ... InvBncp 12.93 +.07
FultonFncl 8.58 +.05 InvRIEst 6.89 -.03
FushiCo 736 -02 IridiumCm 6.62 -.05
i Isis 6.47
Itron 32.20 +.14
GTAdvTc 7.30 +.05 IvanhoeEn .96 -.02
GTxlnc 2.36 -.15
GalenaBh 51 -.05


Garmin 34.53
Gentex 26.12
Genfivah 5.17
GeoEye 18.89
GeronCp 1.50
GileadSd 39.28
GladerBc 10.70
Gleacher 1.04
GloblInd 7.98
Globalstrh .42
GIbSpcMet 13.12
GluMobile 2.71
GolarLNG 38.77
Google 563.00
GrLkDrge 5.36
GreenMtC 49.66
GrifolsSA n 4.98
Groupon n 16.75
GulfportE 29.68
HMNFn 1.94
HMS Hd s 27.82
HSN Inc 32.96
HainCel 35.24
Halozyme 8.10
HancHId 27.58
HanmiFnd .82
HansenMed 2.41
HansenNat 85.02
HanwhaSol 1.25
Harmonic 4.63
Hasbro 34.15
HawHold 5.22
HrfindEx 12.84
Heelys 1.79
HelenTroy 26.96
HSchein 59.99
HercOffsh 3.31
Hibbett 41.64
HimaxTch 1.04
Hologic 16.00
HorsehdH 7.06
HotTopic 6.65
HubGroup 28.29
HudsCity 5.13
HumGen 7.03
HuntJB 42.75
HuntBnk 4.72
IAC Inter 38.98
II-VI s 16.64
IPG Photon 38.97
iShGTimb 34.34


-.05 j2Global 26.48 -.69
-.11 JASolar 1.58 -.03
-.15 JDASoft 28.66 -.30
-1.11 JDS Uniph 9.56 -.32
+.04 JackHenry 30.45 -.09
-.36 JacklnBox 18.67 -.54
-.08 Jamba 1.44 +.15
-.03 JamesRiv 6.38 -.15
+.01 JazzPhrm 35.77 -1.16
JetBlue 3.48 +.08
-.33 JosABank 50.17 -.07
-.07 JoyGIbl 78.78 -.49
+.07 KIT Digift 8.90 -.28
-7.11 KLATnc 42.08 -.43
-.18 KeryxBio 2.54 -.09
-.47 Keynote 15.89 -.78
-.10 KopinCp 3.14 -.22
-.21 KratosDef 4.65 -.13
-.67 Kulicke 8.29 -.39
LKQCorp 27.56 -.13
-.42 LSIlndlf 5.78 -.21
-1.23 LTX-Cred 4.91 -.20
-.03 LamResrch 36.76 -.21
+.09 LamarAdv 22.41 +.36
-.04 Landstar 43.55 -.29
-.01 Lattice 6.18 +.07
-.01 LeapWirlss 6.97 -.23
-.80 LedPhrm 1.03 -.02
-.04 LibGlobA 39.05 -.24
-.09 LibGlobC 37.32 -.20
-.11 LibCapA 74.59 +.76
-.03 LibStarzA 65.71 +.72
-.06 LibtlntAh 15.16 -.05
-.01 LifeTech 36.08 -.60
-.32 LimelghtN 2.51 -.04
-.47 Lincare 22.12 -.18
-.02 LinearTch 28.39 -.21
-.74 LinnEngy 35.19 -.31
+.02 Lionbrdg 2.03 +.01
-.21 LivePrsn 10.77 -.49
-.10 LodgeNet 2.05 -.03
-.10 Logitech 7.42 +.18
-.40 LookSmart 1.31 +.01
+.04 Lulkin 59.50 -.45
-.05 lululemnas 4626 44
-.20 f
+.03
-.21 MCG Cap 3.96 -.05
-.39 MGE 42.01 -.17
-.27 MIPSTech 4.45 -.14
-.04 MKS Inst 22.60 -.85


MTS 35.60 -1.60 PSSWrld 22.30 -.10
MagicSft 4.92 -.03 Paccar 37.28 +.23
Magma 5.27 -.05 PacEth rsh 1.26 +.05
MaidenH 7.97 +.09 PacSunwr 1.32 -.01
Majesco 2.63 +.00 PaciraPh n 7.15 -.26
MAKOSrg 28.16 -.55 PaetecHId 5.10 +.02
ManhAssc 41.74 -.32 PanASIv 23.56 +.10
MannKd 2.95 -.23 PaneraBrd 133.08 -.04
MarinaBio .13 -.00 ParamTch 18.63 -.38
MarvelT 13.14 -.25 Parexel 18.26 -.32
Masimo 18.40 +.56 PrtnrCm 9.21 -.08
Mattel 27.55 +.14 Patterson 28.09 +.01
Maximlntg 23.92 -.24 PattUTI 19.11 +.15
MaxwIlT 15.15 -.50 Paychex 27.33 +.10
McC&Sch 8.68 +.01 Pendrell 2.29 +.09
MedAssets 8.99 -.26 PnnNGm 33.96 +.02
MedicAcIn 4.41 -.01 PennantPk 9.56 -.26
Medivafon 41.35 -.75 PeopUtdF 11.82 +.24
MelomCrwn 8.43 +.02 PeregrineP .89 +.01
MentorGr 11.94 -.02 PerfectWd 9.87 +.65
MercadoL 80.46 -.10 Perrigo 89.57 -.40
MergeHIth 4.41 +.01 PerryEllis 13.15 +.30
Micrel 9.21 -.17 PetSmart 45.33 -.48
Microchp 32.30 -.25 PetMed 8.96 -.11
Micromet 5.09 -.16 PetroDev 29.01 -1.02
MicronT 5.50 -.21 PharmPdt 33.11 -.02
MicroSemi 15.59 -.37 Pharmssts 133.17 +.17
Microsoft 24.30 -.17 PhotrIn 4.95 -.15
Micrvisnh .46 +.02 Polyomms 15.67 -.06
MillerHer 18.28 -.38 Popular 1.43 +.03
Mindspeed 4.49 -.25 Potlatch 29.86
Misonix 2.03 -.01 Power-One 4.26 -.24
Molex 22.16 -.15 PwShs QQQ 52.88 -.41
Momenta 14.57 -.21 Powrwvrs 2.02 -.03
Motricity 1.23 +.01 Pozen 3.62 +1.12
Mylan 17.41 -.21 Presstekh .69 +.03
MyriadG 19.52 -.31 PriceTR 49.61 +.17
NICESys 32.02 +.05 priceline 459.18 -5.35
NIl HIdg 21.25 -.24 PrimoWtr 2.79 -.11
NPS Phm 4.97 -.06 PrinctnRh .11 -.00
NXP Semi 15.00 -.21 PrivateB 8.50 -.23
Nanomtr 15.08 -.50 PrUPShQQQ24.25 +.55
NaraBncp 8.41 +.01 PrUltPQQQs 58.20 -1.35
NasdOMX 24.55 -.06 PrognicsPh 5.03 -.25
NatCineM 11.92 -.05 ProspctCap 8.95 -.12
NatPenn 7.39 ... ProspBcsh 35.86 -.18
NektarTh 4.23 -.02 PureCycle 1.96 +.02
NetLogicM 49.31 +.04 QIAGEN 13.44 -.06
NetApp 34.25 -.41 QlikTech 24.52 -.70
Netease 41.50 -.28 Qlogic 13.57 -.06
Netfiix 63.86 -4.64 Qualomm 51.86 -.17
Neflist 2.61 -.11 QualityS s 33.90 -.50
NtScout 15.86 -.22 QuestSft 16.85 -.19
NewsCpA 15.97 -.06 Questor 41.38 -.03
NewsCpB 16.27 -.03 RFMicD 5.63 -.13
NobltyHIf 6.15 +.15 Rambus 7.54 -.06
Nordsons 42.21 +.13 Randgold 103.88 -2.05
NorTrst 35.08 -.02 RaptorPhm 4.80 -.10
NwstBcsh 11.44 +.06 Regenrn 53.78 -1.31
Novavax 1.26 +.01 RentACt 32.47 -.86
Novlus 31.57 -.31 RepubAir 3.83 +.06
NuVasive 12.27 -.19 RschMotn 16.00 -.20
NuanceCm 22.26 -.72 RexEnergy 14.22 -.33
NutriSyst 10.81 ... RightNow 42.86
Nvidia 14.04 -.40 RiverbedT 23.90 +.27
OCZTech 5.67 -.14 RosttaGrs .22 +.01
OReillyAu 75.51 +1.09 RosettaR 45.29 -.27
Oclaro 2.69 -.17 RossStrs 85.43 +.31
OdysMar 2.50 +.01 Rovi Corp 26.00 -.05
OmniVisn 10.41 -.50 RoyGId 74.44 -.96
OnAssign 9.35 -.59 RoyaleEn 4.64 +.78
OnSmcnd 6.92 -.15 RubiomnTc 8.25 -.39
Onoothyr 6.66 -.27 Ranair 28.61 -.21
OnyxPh 37.68 -.29
OpenTable 32.39 -1.34
OpnwvSy 1.46 -.03 Sl Corp 9.45 -.05
OpbmerPh 10.53 -.07 SBACom 37.37 -.03
Oracle 28.74 -.26 SEI Inv 15.21 +.02
OraSure 7.72 -.21 SORL 2.77 -.14
Orbcomm 3.06 +.09 STEC 8.66 -.16
Oritani 12.13 -.01 SVB FnGp 41.94 +.63
Orthfx 30.84 -.84 SXC HIth 54.31 +.16
OtterTail 19.67 -.30 SalixPhm 35.14 -.37
Overstk 7.75 -.20 SanDisk 45.56 -.23
SangBio 2.36 -.10
Sanmina 7.06 -.20
PDL Bio 6.03 -.02 Sanofi rt 1.28 +.00
PMCSra 5.44 -.03 Sapient 10.80 -.22


Satomn h .70
SavientPh 2.29
Schnitzer 41.06
SchoolSp 4.05
SciGames 7.72
SeacoastBk 1.34
SeagateT 15.16
SearsHldgs 58.40
SeattGen 15.02
SelCmfrt 17.81
Selectvlns 15.03
Semtech 20.95
Sequenom 4.02
SvcSourcn 12.83
SvArtsrsh .34
ShandaGm 4.00
Shire 92.12
ShoreTe 5.60
Shutterfly 31.28
SifyTech 4.09
SigaTech h 1.91
SigmaAld 58.89
SignatBk 51.54
SilicGrln 13.42
Silicnlmg 4.56
SilicnMotn 17.36
Slcnware 4.26
SilvStdg 13.52
Sina 63.15
Sindair 8.94
SiriusXM 1.75
SironaDent 41.34
SkywksSol 14.13
SmartBal 4.81
SmartTcg 4.51
SmtHeath .44
SmithWes 2.72
SmithMicro .98
SodaStrm 28.53
Sohu.cm 48.10
SolarCap 21.91
Solazymen 12.08
SoltaMed 2.16
SonicCorp 6.53
Sonus 2.22
SouMoBc 21.69
Sourcefire 30.41
Spectranet 6.39
SpectPh 12.76
SpiritAirn 16.31
Spreadtrm 24.75
Stamps.cm 25.39
Staples 13.68
StarBulk 1.22
StarSdent 2.55
Starbucks 40.84
SiDynam 11.33
StemCell rs 1.83
Stericyde 77.07
SMaddens 31.50
StewEnt 5.69
SunPower 6.61
SusqBnc 7.06
SwisherHy 3.69
SykesEnt 14.10
Symantec 15.33
Symetricm 4.75
Synopsys 26.68
Synovis 16.48
Syntrolm h .90
TC PpLn 46.50
TDAmeritr 15.19
THQ 1.73
TTMTch 9.90
twteleomm 17.33
TakeTwo 13.27
TaleoA 28.92
Targacept 6.89
TASER 5.57
TechData 45.71
Tekelec 10.95
Tellabs 3.85
TeslaMot 31.66
TesseraTch 15.59
TevaPhrm 36.91
TexRdhse 12.39
Thoratec 28.25
TibcoSft 25.75


TlVo Inc 9.13 -.25
TowerGrp 20.00 +.17
TowerSm h .63 -.02
Towerstm 1.81 +.02
TractSupp 67.68 -2.57
TransceptP 6.95 -.39
Travelzoo 25.95 -.01
TridentM h .21 -.01
TrimbleN 38.41 -.58
TriQuint 4.09 +.06
TrueRelig 32.21 -.14
TrstNY 4.74 -.02
Trustmk 20.14 -.14
21Vianetn 9.37 +.36
USATwt11 .04
USATechh 1.16
UTStarcm 1.36 +.02
UTiWrldwd 13.89 +.07
UltaSalon 64.60 -1.37
Umpqua 11.44 +.06
Unilife 3.82 +.22
UBWV 23.79 -.13
UtdNtrIF 32.91 -.26
UtdOnln 4.87 -.09
US Enr 2.45 -.05
UtdStatns 29.66 +.05
UtdTherap 39.33 -.29
UnivDisp 39.30 -1.45
UnivFor 24.31 -.58
UranmRs .80
UrbanOut 25.19 -.07


VCAAnt 18.12 -.23
ValVis A 1.69 +.02
ValueClick 14.87 -.51
Veeomlnst 22.04 -.62
Velin 7.29 -.19
VBradley 34.67 -1.48
Verisign 31.48 -.02
Verisk 37.15 +.35
VertxPh 26.60 -.34
ViaSat 42.83 +.29
Vical 3.51 +.04
VirgnMdah 22.24 -.05
ViroPhrm 21.95 -.60
VisnChina 1.10 -.10
VistaPrt 31.00 +.04
Vivus 9.34 -.35
Vodafone 25.63 -.24
Volcano 22.76 -.21
WarnerCh 14.44 -.33
WarrenRs 2.40 -.05
WashFed 12.52 +.13
WaveSys 2.10 -.06
Web.com 9.06 +.02
WernerEnt 22.16 -.20
Westmrld 8.80 -.41
Wstptlnng 25.86 -.25
WetSeal 3.10 -.10
WholeFd 63.55 +.32
Windstrm 11.13 +.05
Winn-Dixie 5.22 -.21
Wintrust 25.78 +.04
Woodward 35.93 -.65
Wynn 107.02 -.97
XOMA 1.54 +.16
Xilinx 30.07 -.24
Xyratex 12.72 -.28
YRC rsh .04
Yahoo 15.10 +.16
Yandexn 19.75 -.30
Zagg 11.23 +.42
Zalicus .97 +.07
ZonBcp 14.74 +.04
Zopharm 4.58 -.07
ZxCorp 2.49 -.01
ZoomTech .89 -.05
Zumiez 21.00 -.22


DIARY


DIARY


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*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.2680 4.2630
Australia 1.0311 1.0293
Bahrain .3770 .3771
Brazil 1.8880 1.8764
Britain 1.5433 1.5489
Canada 1.0503 1.0468
Chile 527.43 522.95
China 6.3832 6.3635
Colombia 1950.50 1937.50
Czech Rep 19.70 19.31
Denmark 5.6215 5.5770
Dominican Rep 38.37 38.40
Egypt 6.0107 6.0010
Euro .7558 .7500
Hong Kong 7.7966 7.7959
Hungary 237.85 234.34
India 52.250 52.074
Indnsia 9205.00 8985.00
Israel 3.7951 3.7930
Japan 77.76 77.15
Jordan .7105 .7105
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.1960 3.1835
Mexico 14.2375 14.2100
N. Zealand 1.3534 1.3499
Norway 5.9337 5.8863
Peru 2.714 2.708
Poland 3.44 3.37
Russia 31.5695 31.4785
Singapore 1.3140 1.3085
So. Africa 8.5332 8.4915
So. Korea 1163.75 1156.05
Sweden 7.0149 6.9523
Switzerlnd .9318 .9199
Taiwan 30.46 30.47
Thailand 31.40 31.30
Turkey 1.8868 1.8723
U.A.E. 3.6730 3.6735
Uruguay 20.1499 19.8999
Venzuel 4.2950 4.2925


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



li- Yesterday PvsDay

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.01
6-month 0.07 0.04
5-year 0.93 0.92
10-year 1.96 2.01
30-year 2.92 2.99



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jan 12 96.77 +.60
Corn CBOT Mar 12 590 -5V2
Wheat CBOT Mar 12 589 -514
Soybeans CBOT Jan 12 110612 -16
Cattle CME Feb 12 122.30 -.45
Sugar (world) ICE Mar12 22.90 -.19
Orange Juice ICE Jan 12 177.60 +.75



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1685.50 $1723.70
Silver (troy oz., spot) $31.012 $32.413
Copper (pound) $3.2680 $3.402
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1b33.10 $1b88./O

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.8 ... 7.04 -.11 -57.0 McDnlds 2.80 3.0 18 92.10 +.23 +20.0
AT&Tlnc 1.72 6.3 14 27.41 -.14 -6.7 Microsoft .80 3.3 9 24.30 -.17 -12.9
Ameteks .24 .6 17 37.88 -.38 -3.5 MotrlaSoln .88 2.0 15 43.70 +.08 +14.8
BkofAm .04 .8 ... 5.17 +.03 -61.2 MotrlaMo n ... ... ... 38.60 +.07 +32.6
CapCtyBk .40 4.1 22 9.65 -.01 -23.4 NextEraEn 2.20 4.2 13 52.57 +.19 +1.1
CntryLink 2.90 8.1 16 35.70 +.20-22.7 Penney .80 2.7 18 29.61 -.26 -8.4
Citigrprs .04 .2 6 23.63 +.12-50.0 PiedmOfc 1.26 7.9 21 16.01 -.01-20.5
CmwREIT 2.00 12.5 22 16.00 +.05-37.3 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.8 20 51.54 +.48 +18.5
Disney .40 1.2 13 33.51 +.11 -10.7 RegionsFn .04 1.1 22 3.69 +.01 -47.3
EKodak ... ... ... 1.10 -.05 -79.5 SearsHIdgs ... ... ... 58.40 -.75 -20.8
EnterPT 2.80 6.8 24 41.13 -.37-11.1 Smucker 1.92 2.6 18 73.03 +.55 +11.2
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.5 9 73.90 -.68 +1.1 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.38 -.09 -43.7
FordM ...... 5 9.75 -.08 -41.9 TimeWarn .94 2.9 12 32.36 +.19 +.6
GenElec .60 4.1 12 14.70 -.03 -19.6 UniFirst .15 .3 14 52.25 -.35 -5.1
HomeDp 1.16 3.2 16 36.47 -.05 +4.0 VerizonCm 2.00 5.7 14 35.35 ... -1.2
Intel .84 3.7 10 22.73 +.03 +8.1 Vodafone 2.10 8.2 ... 25.63 -.24 -3.1
IBM 3.00 1.7 14177.06 -.89+20.6 WalMart 1.46 2.6 13 56.89 +.25 +5.5
Lowes .56 2.5 16 22.68 +.20 -9.6 Walgrn .90 2.8 11 32.47 +.38 -16.7


m







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 A7


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 15.09 -.05
Retlnc 8.60 -.03
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 5.69 -.06
AllianceBern A:
BalanAp 14.58 -.03
GlbThGrAp 57.04 -.42
SmCpGrA 31.38 -.39
AllianceBern Adv:
LgCpGrAd 24.18 -.13
AllianceBern B:
GIbThGrBt 48.90 -.36
GrowthBt 22.87 -.12
SCpGrBt 25.06 -.31
AllianceBern C:
SCpGrCt 25.23 -.31
Allianz Fds Insti:
NFJDvVI 10.47 -.01
SmCpVl 28.02 -.21
Allianz Funds A:
SmCpVA 26.67 -.21
Allianz Funds C:
AGICGrthC 21.82 -.15
TargetCt 13.07 -.11
AmanaGrwn22.93 -.11
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 17.41 -.03
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 16.49 -.03
Amer Century Adv:
EqGroAp 19.71 -.09
EqlncAp 6.77
Amer Century Inv:
AIICapGr 25.72 -.12
Balanced 15.18 -.05
DivBnd 11.07 -.04
Eqlnc 6.78 +.01
Growth 23.98 -.15
Heritagel 18.58 -.08
IncGro 22.37 -.10
InfAdjBd 13.09 -.05
IntDisc 8.42 -.04
InfiGrol 9.09 -.03
New Opp 6.67 -.09
OneChAg 11.16 -.05
OneChMd 10.96 -.04
RealEstl 18.30 +.09
Ultra 21.63 -.15
Valuelnv 5.15
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 17.67 -.06
AMuiAp 24.02 -.04
BalAp 17.24 -.05
BondAp 12.46 -.04
CaplBAp 46.96 -.15
CapWGAp 30.24 -.12
CapWAp 20.33 -.16
EupacA p 33.90 -.07
FdlnvAp 32.93 -.10
GovtAp 14.64 -.03
GwthAp 27.25 -.12
HI TrAp 10.44 -.01
IncoAp 15.80 -.02
IntBdAp 13.58 -.02
InfiGrlncAp 26.38 -.07
ICAAp 25.23 -.07
LtTEBAp 15.94
NEcoAp 22.60 -.10
N PerAp 24.95 -.07
NwWrldA 44.88 -.18
STBFAp 10.07
SmCpAp 31.67 -.10
TxExAp 12.34
WshAp 26.11 -.06
Ariel Investments:
Apprec 35.30 -.08
Ariel 38.55 -.20
Artio Global Funds:
InfiEqlr 22.40 -.10
IntEqll I r 9.38 -.03
Artisan Funds:
Intf 18.98
InfiVal r 23.45
MidCap 31.92 -.18
MidCapVal 19.90 +.03
SCapVal 14.97 -.18
BNY Mellon Funds:
EmgMkts 8.91 -.03
Baron Funds:
Asset 50.88 -.14
Growth 48.27 -.17
SmallCap 21.79 -.12
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 14.13 -.04
DivMu 14.62
TxMgdlnf 11.95 -.07
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv 16.74 -.04
GIAIAr 17.88 -.08
HiYlnvA 7.24 -.01
InfiOpA p 26.87 -.09
BlackRock B&C:
GIAIC t 16.64 -.07
BlackRock Instl:
BaVlI 22.85 -.04
EquityDv 16.77 -.04
GIbAllocr 17.98 -.08
HiYldBd 7.24 -.01
Brinson Funds Y:
HiYldl Y 5.79
BruceFund 375.29 -1.82
Buffalo Funds:
SmCapn 22.84 -.24
CGM Funds:
Focusn 24.21 -.05
MutI n 23.52 -.07
Realtyn 24.13 +.12
CRM Funds:
MdCpVll 24.90 -.01
Calamos Funds:
GrwthAp 46.50 -.41
Calvert Invest:
Inco p 15.68 -.05
InfiEqAp 11.63 -.02
SocialAp 26.80 -.10
SocBdp 15.82 -.07
SocEqAp 33.18 -.13
TxFLgp 15.58 +.01
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 54.97 +.23
Columbia Class A:
Acorn t 25.49 -.14
DivEqlnc 8.72 -.02
DivrBd 5.11 -.02
DivOpptyA 7.39 -.03
LgCapGrAt21.26 -.12
LgCorQAp 5.23 -.01
MdCpGrOp 9.05 -.05
MidCVlOp p 6.70 -.02
PBModAp 10.07 -.04
TxEAp 13.46
SelComm A 40.24 -.28
FrontierA 8.70 -.09
GlobTech 18.37 -.11
Columbia Cl 1,T&G:
EmMktOp In 7.73 -.01
Columbia Class Z:
Acorn Z 26.34 -.14
AcornlntZ 32.88 -.14
DivlncoZ 12.53 -.01
lntBdZ 9.21 -.03
lntTEBd 10.62
LgCapGr 11.58 -.06
LgCpldxZ 22.70 -.06
MdCpldxZ 10.16 -.05
MdCpVIZp 11.82 +.01
ValRestr 41.67 -.26
Credit Suisse Comm:
ComRett 8.25 -.04
DFA Funds:
InfiCorEq n 8.73 -.05
USCorEql n 9.92 -.05
USCorEq2n 9.71 -.05
DWS Invest A:
CommAp 16.11 .14
DWS Invest S:
CorPlslnc 10.62 -.03
EmMkGrr 14.04 -.09
EnhEmMk 9.95 -.06
EnhGlbBdr 9.84 -.10
GIbSmCGr 34.07 -.30
GIbliTem 19.11 -.05
Gold&Pro 19.36 -.22
GrolncS 15.01 -.07
HiYldTx 12.01 +.01
IntTxAMT 11.63
InfI FdS 35.24 -.26
LgCpFoGr 27.03 -.14
LatAmrEq 38.77 -.58
MgdMuniS 8.95 +.01
MATFS 14.33 +.01
SP500S 15.46 -.04
WorldDiv 21.02 -.16
Davis Funds A:
NYVenA 30.33 -.11
Davis Funds B:
NYVen B 28.88 -.11
Davis Funds C:
NYVenC 29.13 -.11
Davis Funds Y:
NYVenY 30.72 -.10
Delaware Invest A:
Diver Inc p 9.31 -.04
SMIDCapG 21.85 -.20
TxUSAp 11.39
Delaware Invest B:
SelGrBt 29.14 -.18
Dimensional Fds:
EmMCrEqn16.66 -.05
EmMktV 25.48 -.10
IntSmVan 13.17 -.08
LargeCo 9.17 -.02
TAUSCorE2 n7.91 -.03
USLgVan 17.58 -.04
USMicron 11.89 -.18


USTgdVal 13.96 -.12
US Small n 18.54 -.23
USSmVa 21.08 -.26
InfiSmCon 13.57 -.09
EmgMktn 23.85 -.11
Fixd n 10.34
IntGFxlnn 13.05 -.05
IntVa n 13.82 -.06
Glb5Fxlncnll.19 -.03
TM USTgtV18.17 -.16
2YGIFxdn 10.22
DFARIEn 20.90 +.08
Dodge&Cox:
Balanced 63.07 -.23
Income 13.25 -.03
IntStk 27.85 -.23
Stock 92.90 -.38
DoubleUne Funds:
TRBdIn 11.14
TRBdNpn 11.13 -.01
Dreyfus:
Aprec 37.82 -.15
CTA 11.81
CorVA 22.47
Dreyf 7.85 -.04


Name NAV Chg
DryMidr 25.15 -.11
Dr5001nt 32.32 -.08
GNMA 16.22 -.01
GrChinaAr 31.21 -.03
HiYIdA p 6.05 -.01
StratValA 24.38 -.02
TechGroA 29.12 -.23
DreihsAclnc 9.93 +.03
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 26.36 -.09
EVPTxMEmI 40.60 -.24
Eaton Vance A:
ChinaAp 15.98 -.05
AMTFMuInc 9.44 +.01
MuIlCGrA 7.15 -.03
InBosA 5.54 -.01
LgCpVal 15.74 -.02
NatlMunlnc 9.21 +.03
SpEqtA 14.46 -.08
TradGvA 7.46
Eaton Vance B:
HlthSBt 9.20 -.06
NatlMulnc 9.21 +.03
Eaton Vance C:
GovtC p 7.44 -.01
NatMunlnc 9.21 +.03
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt 8.79 -.01
GblMacAbR 9.89 -.02
LgCapVal 15.78 -.03
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv tn 47.54 +.05
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 14.35 -.03
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 10.74
FPACresn 26.07 -.06
Fairholme 23.15 +.01
Federated A:
MidGrStA 31.70 -.13
MuSecA 10.11
Federated Instl:
KaufmnR 4.38 -.04
TotRetBd 11.28 -.03
SrValDvIS 4.50 -.01
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 32.21 -.30
HItCarT 19.11 -.17
Fidelity Advisor A:
Nwlnsghp 18.63 -.10
StrlnA 12.20 -.04
Fidelity Advisor C:
Nwlnsghtn 17.68 -.09
Fidelity Advisor I:
EqGrln 54.12 -.27
EqlnIn 21.23 -.04
IntBdl n 11.39 -.03
NwlnsgtIn 18.85 -.10
Fidelity AdvisorT:
BalancT 14.32 -.05
DivGrTp 10.47 -.05
EqGrTp 50.42 -.26
EqInT 20.90 -.04
GrOppT 32.94 -.26
HilnAdTp 9.17 -.01
IntBdT 11.37 -.03
MulncTp 13.04
OvrseaT 14.47 -.06
STFiT 9.24
StSelAIICp 16.29 -.08
Fidelity Freedom:
FF2010n 13.00 -.04
FF2010K 12.02 -.03
FF2015n 10.84 -.03
FF2015K 12.03 -.04
FF2020n 12.97 -.05
FF2020K 12.27 -.04
FF2025n 10.63 -.04
FF2025K 12.21 -.04
FF2030n 12.60 -.05
FF2030K 12.28 -.05
FF2035n 10.28 -.05
FF2035K 12.18 -.06
FF2040n 7.17 -.03
FF2040K 12.21 -.06
FF2045 n 8.45 -.03
Income 11.18 -.01
Fidelity Invest:
AIISectEq 11.15 -.04
AMgr50n 14.48 -.05
AMgr70rn 14.88 -.06
AMgr20rn 12.66 -.03
Balancn 17.38 -.06
BalancedK 17.38 -.06
BlueChGr n 39.90 -.30
CAMunn 12.22
Canada n 47.62 -.49
CapAp n 22.88 -.08
CapDevOn 9.58 -.07
Cplncrn 8.54 -.01
ChinaRgr 24.86 -.18
CngS 465.09
CTMunrn 11.78 +.01
Contra n 63.73 -.31
ContraK 63.77 -.31
CnvSc n 22.07 -.06
DisEqn 20.04 -.10
DiscEqF 20.05 -.11
Divlntln 24.59 -.16
DivrslntKr 24.61 -.15
DivStOn 13.68 -.07
DivGth n 23.83 -.11
EmergAs r n24.89 -.09
EmrMkn 20.17 -.12
Eq Incn 37.87 -.06
EQII n 15.88 -.03
ECapAp 14.65 -.05
Europe 24.14 -.08
Exch 323.88
Export n 19.18 -.08
Fideln 29.16 -.16
Fifty rn 16.16 -.08
FItRateHi r n 9.61
FrlnOnen 24.84 -.09
GNMAn 11.84 -.01
GovtInc 10.85 -.03
GroCo n 78.96 -.58
Grolncn 16.64 -.05
GrowCoF 79.02 -.59
GrowthCoK 79.01 -.59
GrStratrn 17.36 -.18
Highlncrn 8.45 -.01
Indepnn 20.52 -.13
InProBdn 12.99 -.03
IntBdn 10.82 -.02
IntGov n 11.03 -.02
IntmMu n 10.33
InfiDiscn 26.39 -.14
InfiSCprn 17.20 -.06
InvGrBdk n 11.68 -.03
InvGBn 7.66 -.02
Japan r 8.97 -.01
JpnSmn 8.17 -.07
LgCapVal 9.77 -.01
LatAm 46.27 -.57
LevCoStkn 23.24 -.10
LowPrn 33.51 -.17
LowPriKr 33.49 -.17
Magelln n 58.67 -.32
MagellanK 58.67 -.31
MDMurn 11.22
MAMunn 12.18
MegaCpStkn9.25 -.03
MIMunn 12.09
MidCapn 24.93 -.15
MN Munn 11.69
MtgSecn 11.10 -.01
Munilnc n 12.87
NJMunrn 11.73
NwMktrn 15.75 -.01
NwMilln 27.49 -.14
NYMunn 13.15
OTCn 51.89 -.49
OhMunn 11.85
0l0Index 8.22 -.02
Ovrsea n 25.79 -.09
PcBasn 21.17 -.10
PAMunrn 10.96
Purihin 16.88 -.05
PuritanK 16.88 -.05
RealEn 24.79 +.10
SAIISecEqF 11.17 -.04
SCmdtyStrtn 9.03 -.05
SCmdtyStrF n9.04 -.05
SrEmrgMkt 14.35 -.07
SrslntGrw 9.56 -.07
SerlnflGrF 9.60 -.06
SrslntVal 7.68 -.06
SrlnvGrdF 11.68 -.03
StlntMu n 10.74
STBF n 8.48
SmllCpSrn 15.02 -.15
SCpValu r 12.64 -.08
StkSelLCVr n9.54 -.02
SllSlcACap n22.61 -.11
SllSelSmCp 16.41 -.16
Sfratlncn 10.91 -.04
SfrReRtr 9.37 -.01
TotalBdn 10.88 -.03
Trend n 62.87 -.52
USBI n 11.72 -.04
Utilityn 16.02 +.03
ValStratn 23.29 -.12
Value n 58.90 -.14
Wrldwn 16.29 -.08
Fidelity Selects:
Air n 33.53 +.02
Banking n 14.08 +.02
Blotch n 77.38 -.88
Brokr n 36.64 +.09
Chem n 87.73 -.21
ComEquipn21.18 -.06
Comp n 50.86 -.57
ConDisn 21.64 -.14
ConsuFnn 10.27 +.02
ConStapn 68.25 -.06
CstHo n 32.04 -.04
DfAern 71.97 +.12


ElecI n 41.60 .60
Enrgy n 46.04 -.43
EngSvn 61.41 -.16
EnvAltEn r n14.40 -.05
FinSv n 44.23 +.07
Goldrn 45.00 -.54
Healthin 121.87 -1.07
Insurn 41.23 +.03
Leisrn 88.38 -.45
Material n 58.04 -.14
MedDI n 50.55 -.35
MdEqSysn 24.55 -.16
Multmdn 39.83 +.06
NtGasn 28.72 -.10
Pharmn 12.28 -.10
Retail n 50.98 -.46
Softwr n 79.04 -.58
Tech n 82.73 -.85
Telcm n 40.71 -.11
Trans n 47.21 -.28
UtilGrn 50.45 +.15
Wireless n 7.12 -.05
Fidelity Spartan:
ExtMklnn 33.28 -.21


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAVY
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxlnvn 41.14 -.10
Infillnxlnvn 28.73 -.13
TotMktlnvn 33.71 -.11
USBondl 11.72 -.04
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdvn41.14 -.11
IntAdrn 28.74 -.13
TotMktAd r n33.72 -.11
First Eagle:
GIbIA 43.96 -.30
OverseasA 20.70 -.26
First Investors A
BIChpAp 19.62 -.05
GloblAp 5.61 -.01
GovtAp 11.55 -.01
GrolnAp 13.39 -.05
IncoAp 2.39 -.01
MATFAp 11.86
MITFAp 12.25
NJTFA p 13.13
NYTFA p 14.60
OppAp 25.13 -.13
PATFAp 13.12
SpSitAp 22.67 -.16
TxExAp 9.81
TotRtAp 14.51 -.05
ValueBp 6.44 -.01
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 11.10 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.84
ALTFAp 11.34
AZTFAp 10.88
CallnsAp 12.16
CAIntAp 11.62
CalTFAp 7.02
COTFAp 11.78
CTTFAp 11.03
CvtScAp 13.37
DbITFA 11.84
DynTchA 28.09-.20
EqlncAp 15.43
Fedlntp 11.99
FedTFAp 12.02
FLTFAp 11.56
FoundA p 9.43 -.01
GATFA p 12.09
GoldPrMA 39.08 -.48
GrwthAp 41.75 -.12
HYTFAp 10.15
HilncA 1.89
IncomAp 1.99
InsTFAp 11.99
NYITFp 11.47
LATFAp 11.53
LMGvScA 10.41
MDTFAp 11.55
MATFAp 11.64
MITFAp 11.99
MNInsA 12.42 -.01
MOTFAp 12.21
NJTFAp 12.16
NYTFAp 11.73 +.01
NCTFA p 12.36
OhiolAp 12.53
ORTFAp 12.04
PATFAp 10.44
ReEScAp 13.25 +.06
RisDvAp 32.44 -.04
SMCpGrA 33.41 -.23
Stratlnc p 10.03
TtlRtnAp 10.20
USGovAp 6.90
UIsAp 12.43 +.05
VATFAp 11.76
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.37 -.09
IncmeAd 1.98
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.01
USGvCt 6.86
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 18.63
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 20.42 -.14
ForgnAp 5.74 -.02
GIBdAp 12.41 -.08
GrwthAp 15.43 -.05
WorldAp 13.02 -.06
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 15.46 -.05
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 19.81 -.13
ForgnC p 5.58 -.02
GIBdCp 12.43 -.09
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 15.92 -.01
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 11.67 -.04
S&SPM 36.55 -.11
GMOTrust Ill:
Quality 20.51 -.09
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 19.75 -.10
InfilntrVl 17.87 -.11
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 10.84 -.08
InfiCorEq 24.19 -.15
Quality 20.52 -.09
StrFxIlnc 17.10 -.05
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 45.10 -.17
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 25.51 +.03
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 31.23 -.01
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 21.67 -.08
HiYield 6.73 -.01
HYMuni n 8.46
MidCapV 31.56 -.01
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.03 -.04
CapAplnst 35.09 -.20
Intflnvt 49.31 -.21
Inftl r 49.93 -.21
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 26.96 -.13
DivGthAp 17.25 -.04
IntOpAp 12.19 -.03
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppIn 27.02 -.13
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 34.70 -.17
Div&Gr 17.91 -.04
Advisers 18.30 -.06
TotRetBd 11.52 -.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.35 -.04
StrGrowh 12.94 -.03
ICON Fds:
Energy S 17.59 -.16
HlthcareS 13.56 -.06
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.85 -.03
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 15.74 -.03
WdwideI r 15.78 -.02
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 11.14 +.02
Invesco Funds:
Energy 35.65 -.18
UtiDies 16.03 +.04
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 15.24 -.05
CmstkA 13.89 -.02
Constp 20.21 -.12
DivrsDivp 11.15 +.02
EqIncA 7.79 -.01
GrIncAp 16.94 -.01
HilncMu p 7.63
HiYldp 3.91 -.02
HYMuA 9.30
IntfiGrow 24.15 .21
MunilnA 13.14
PATFA 15.99
USMortgA 12.93 -.02
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 12.23 -.07
MunilnB 13.12
US Mortg 12.87 -.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 20.98 -.11
AssetStAp 21.73 .11
AssetSblr 21.95 -.12
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.85 -.03
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 22.19 +.04
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.85 -.03
ShtDurBd 10.98
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 9.26 -.03
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBd n 11.84 -.03
HighYld n 7.63
lntmTFBdn 11.14
ShtDurBd n 10.98
USLCCrPIsn18.57 -.06
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 23.83 -.08
Contrarn T 11.53
EnterprT 54.35 -.11
FIxBndT 10.60 -.04
GlUfeSciTr 22.87 -.17
GIbSel T 8.90 -.01
GITechTr 15.04 -.12
Grw&lncT 27.65 -.09
Janus T 25.80 -.14
OvrseasTr 32.70 +.03
PrkMCValT 20.72 -.03
ResearchT 26.51 -.11
ShTmBdT 3.05


Twenty T 56.58 -.35
VentureT 51.62 -.47
WrldWTr 37.63 -.20
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn24.79
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.34 -.03
RgBkA 11.41 -.02
SrlMnAp 6.32 -.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.32 -.01
John Hancock CI1:
LSAggr 10.74 -.05


Name NAV Chg
LSBalanc 11.90 -.04
LSConsrv 12.53 -.03
LSGrwh 11.53 -.04
LSModer 12.08 -.04
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp21.16 -.24
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 17.19 -.03
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 17.52 -.03
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 104.55 -.34
CBApprp 12.89 -.02
CBLCGrp 22.38 -.15
GCIAIICOp 7.21 -.04
WAHilncAt 5.66
WAMgMup 16.00 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.75 -.14
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 23.76 -.17
CMValTrp 34.15 -.12
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 24.53 -.09
SmCap 23.17 +.18
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 13.70 -.08
StrlncC 14.11 -.08
LSBondR 13.65 -.08
StrlncA 14.03 -.08
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 11.97 -.06
lnvGrBdCp 11.88 -.06
InvGrBdY 11.98 -.06
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 9.64 -.01
FundlEq 11.17 -.04
BdDebAp 7.45 -.01
ShDurlncAp 4.52
MidCpAp 14.65 -.03
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.55
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.51 -.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 17.52 -.05
MIGA 14.66 -.06
EmGA 39.44 -.19
HilnA 3.27
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 13.42 -.02
UtilA 15.95 -.04
ValueA 20.82 -.01
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 13.13 -.06
GvScBn 10.54 -.02
HilnBn 3.28
MulnBn 8.38
TotRB n 13.42 -.02
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 13.10 -.13
Valuel 20.92 -.01
MFS Funds Instl:
InfilEqn 15.12 -.14
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.72
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.23 -.06
GovtBt 8.85 -.02
HYIdBBt 5.69
IncmBldr 15.24 -.05
InfiEqB 8.84 -.14
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 31.03 -.07
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 66.77 -.10
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 6.83 -.03
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.40 -.13
Indialnvr 14.64 +.19
PacTgrlnv 19.94 -.05
MergerFdn 15.89 +.01
Meridian Funds:
Growth 41.79 -.19
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.38 -.03
TotRtBdl 10.38 -.03
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.89
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 12.96 -.09
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.86 -.04
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 11.73
MCapGrl 33.66 -.15
MCapGrPp 32.55 -.14
Muhlenkn 48.08 -.20
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 25.12 -.19
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn26.49 -.07
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 11.11 -.01
GblDiscA 25.74
GIbDiscC 25.38
GIbDiscZ 26.13 +.01
QuestZ 16.08 -.01
SharesZ 18.82
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 17.55 -.06
Genesis 32.44 -.21
Geneslnst 44.94 -.30
Int r 14.37 -.14
Partner 22.78 -.08
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 46.47 -.31
Nicholas Group:
HilncIn 9.15
Nichn 42.21 -.06
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 6.88
MMEmMktr 18.06
MMIntEqr 8.03
SmCpldx 7.47
Stkldx 14.43
Technly 13.80
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.06
Nuveen Cl R:
IntDMBd 9.07
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstn 17.21 +.06
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 35.16 -.22
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 26.46 -.06
Global 18.81 -.17
Int I r 15.44 -.05
Oakmark 39.01 -.07
Select 26.15 -.08
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.87 -.02
GIbSMdCap 13.14 -.04
RealRet 9.41 -.07
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.35
AMTFrNY 11.25
CAMuniAp 7.85
CapApAp 40.43 -.24
CaplncAp 8.49 -.01
ChmplncAp 1.72
DvMktAp 28.84 -.14
Discp 53.35 -.49
EquityA 8.01 -.04
GlobAp 51.71 -.32
GIbOppA 24.99 -.25
GblStrlncA 4.01 -.02
Gold p 38.62 -.58
IntBdAp 6.19 -.05
LtdTmMu 14.52
MnStFdA 29.54 -.13
PAMuniAp 10.66
SenFltRtA 8.03 -.01
USGv p 9.67 -.03
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.32
AMTFrNY 11.25
CplncB t 8.31 -.02
ChmplncBt 1.73
EquityB 7.36 -.03
GblSMrlncB 4.03 -.02
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.29
RoMuAp 15.78
RcNtMuA 6.79
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 28.61 -.14
IntfiBdY 6.19 -.05
IntGrowY 24.10 -.19
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.75
TotRtAd 10.73 -.04
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.22 -.06
AIIAsset 11.69
ComodRR 7.56 -.06
Divlnc 11.11 -.04
EmgMkCur 9.83 -.07
EmMkBd 11.09 -.03
Fltlncr 8.18 +.01
ForBdUnr 10.88 -.15
FrgnBd 10.55 -.09
HiYld 8.75 -.02
InvGrCp 10.48 -.06
LowDu 10.25 -.01
ModDur 10.64 -.03
RealRet 13.04 -.11
RealRhil 12.17 -.06
ShortT 9.75
TotRt 10.73 -.04
TRII 10.44 -.03
TRIll 9.46 -.02
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.15 -.07


ComRRp 7.43 -.05
LwDurA 10.25 -.01
RealRtAp 12.17 -.06
TotRtA 10.73 -.04
PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAutt 10.05 -.06
RealRtCp 12.17 -.06
TotRtCt 10.73 -.04
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.73 -.04
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.21 -.06
TotRtnP 10.73 -.04


Name NAV Chg
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 24.60 -.05
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 46.43 -.27
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.60 -.02
InfilValA 16.43 -.11
PionFdAp 36.09 -.08
ValueAp 9.99 -.02
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYIdBt 9.24 -.03
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 9.34 -.02
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 16.03 -.06
Price Funds:
Balancen 18.19 -.07
BIChip n 36.27 -.24
CABond n 10.85
CapAppn 19.88 -.03
DivGron 21.69 -.02
EmMktBn 12.69 -.02
EmEurp 15.70 -.08
EmMktSn 27.58 -.15
Eqlncn 21.23 -.02
Eqlndexn 31.31 -.08
Europe n 12.56 -.09
GNMAn 10.10 -.01
Growth n 29.82 -.20
Gr&ln n 18.59 -.05
HIlthSci n 30.64 -.27
HiYield n 6.30 -.01
InsfiCpG 15.15 -.12
InfiBondn 9.80 -.10
IntDisn 36.16 -.12
Intl G&l 11.02 -.06
InfiStkn 11.85 -.05
Japann 7.10 -.04
LatAm n 40.23 -.57
MDShrtn 5.22
MDBondn 10.58
MidCapn 54.21 -.22
MCapVal n 20.95 -.02
NAmer n 30.99 -.20
N Asian 16.33 -.05
NewEran 41.78 -.36
N Horiz n 32.99 -.26
N Incon 9.65 -.03
NYBondn 11.28
OverS SF r n 6.98 -.05
PSIncn 15.29 -.05
RealEstn 16.72 +.06
R2010n 14.72 -.06
R2015 n 11.25 -.04
R2020n 15.34 -.06
R2025n 11.10 -.05
R2030n 15.77 -.07
R2035n 11.07 -.05
R2040 n 15.71 -.07
R2045n 10.48 -.05
SciTecn 24.64 -.26
ShtBdn 4.81
SmCpStkn 31.21 -.34
SmCapVal n32.37 -.38
SpecGrn 15.89 -.07
Speclnn 12.05 -.04
TFInc n 9.98
TxFrHn 10.83
TxFrSIn 5.63
USTIntn 6.26 -.03
USTLgn 14.06 -.17
VABondn 11.72
Value n 20.96 -.03
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 8.70 -.05
LT20201n 10.92 -.03
LT20301n 10.66 -.03
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 15.44 -.10
HiYIdAp 5.22
MuHilncA 9.56
NatResA 44.16 -.37
UblityA 10.04 -.01
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 15.15 -.09
HiYldBt 5.21 -.01
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.69 -.03
AZTE 9.07
ConvSec 17.71 -.08
DvrlnAp 7.25 -.02
EqnA p 13.84 -.02
EuEq 15.99 -.09
GeoBalA 11.42 -.02
GIbEqtyp 7.75 -.06
GrInAp 11.64 -.02
GIbHIthA 40.63 -.30
HiYdAp 7.12 -.01
HiYld In 5.57 -.01
IncmAp 6.72 -.02
IntGrlnp 8.01 -.05
InvAp 11.75 -.03
NJTxAp 9.39
MulICpGr 45.00 -.21
PATE 9.12
TxExA p 8.58
TFInAp 14.93
TFHYA 11.74
USGvAp 14.00 +.01
GIblUtilA 9.60 -.04
VoyAp 18.35 -.14
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 14.94
DvrlnBt 7.19 -.02
Eqlnct 13.71 -.02
EuEq 15.23 -.09
GeoBaIB 11.28 -.03
GIbEq t 6.97 -.05
GINtRst 15.99 -.11
GrlnBt 11.43 -.01
GIblHIthB 33.21 -.24
HiYldBt 7.12
HYAdBt 5.47 -.01
IncmBt 6.67 -.01
IntGrln t 7.88 -.05
InfiNopt 11.90 -.08
InvBt 10.53 -.03
NJTxBt 9.37
MulICpGr 38.65 -.19
TxExB t 8.58
TFHYBt 11.76
USGvBt 13.93 +.01
GlblUtilB 9.56 -.05
VoyBt 15.49 -.12
RS Funds:
IntGrA 14.47 -.10
LgCAIphaA 36.18 -.15
Value 21.61 -.05
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 9.44 -.06
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 14.56 -.14
MicroCapl 14.42 -.19
PennMul r 10.26 -.08
Premier r 18.89 -.13
TotRetlr 11.84 -.07
ValSvct 10.89 -.07
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.93 -.04
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 13.09 -.10
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 17.26 -.11
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 16.07 -.10
0OOOInvr 34.65 -.09
S&P Sel 18.37 -.05
SmCpSl 18.62 -.21
TSMSelr 21.19 -.07
Scout Funds:
Intl 26.42 -.28
Selected Funds:
AmShD 36.89 -.11
AmShSp 36.80 -.12
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 29.16 -.09
Sequoian 136.31 +18
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 39.67 -.22
SoSunSClnvtnl9.34-.17
St FarmAessoc:
Gwal 48.34 -.16
Stratton Funds:
MulI-Cap 30.63 -.19
RealEstate 24.63 +.04
SmCap 45.54 -.30
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.22 -.03
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.74 -.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 16.69 .08
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 13.67 +.01
REVallnstr 19.25 +.02
Valuelnst 38.84 -.39
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 22.85 -.25
IncBuildAt 16.93 -.09
IncBuildC p 16.93 -.09
IntValue I 23.36 -.26
LtTMul 14.36
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.54
Incom 8.64 -.04
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 74.23 -.74
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 8.55
Flexlncp 8.68 -.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 29.11 -.31
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 21.23 -.06
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 21.37 -.06


ChinaReg 6.77 -.09
GIbRs 9.27 -.05
Gld&Mtls 15.91 -.07
WdPrcMn 15.66 -.16
USAA Group:
AgvGt 30.39 -.18
CA Bd 10.26
CrnstSr 21.01 -.05
GNMA 10.37 -.01
GrTxStr 12.84 -.01
Growth 13.51 -.08
Gr&lnc 13.46 -.04
IncStk 11.34 -.02
Inco 13.08 -.03


Name NAV Chg
Intf 20.52 -.05
NYBd 11.82
PrecMM 36.28 -.49
SciTech 11.78 -.10
ShtTBnd 9.13
SmCpStk 12.07 -.15
TxElt 13.14
TxELT 13.05
TxESh 10.75
VABd 11.09
WldGr 16.77 -.01
VALIC:
MdCpldx 18.55 -.08
Stkldx 23.21 -.07
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 16.34 -.09
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmI n 20.77 -.06
CAITAdmn 11.19
CALTAdm n 11.26
CpOpAdln 67.12 -.46
EMAdmrrn 30.93 -.16
Energyn 110.41 -1.07
EqlnAdmnn41.89 -.06
EuroAdml n 49.73 -.33
ExplAdmI n 61.05 -.57
ExtdAdmn 36.47 -.25
500Adml n 107.08 -.27
GNMAAdn11.13 -.01
GrwAdmn 29.88 -.11
HlthCr n 52.42 -.33
HiYldCp n 5.55 -.01
InfProAdn 28.09 -.11
ITBdAdml n 11.80 -.06
ITsryAdmln 12.11 -.04
IntGrAdm n 49.86 -.37
ITAdmln 13.81
ITGrAdmn 10.01 -.04
LtdTrAdn 11.10
LTGrAdmln 10.25 -.12
LTAdmln 11.17
MCpAdml n 83.90 -.13
MorgAdmn 51.39 -.30
MuHYAdm nlO.57
NYLTAdn 11.26
PrmCap r n 62.53 -.43
PALTAdmnn11.21
ReitAdmrn 74.13 +.31
STsyAdml n 10.82 -.01
STBdAdmlnlO.64 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.90
STFdAdn 10.91
STIGrAdn 10.62 -.01
SmCAdm n 30.72 -.29
TxMCaprn 58.44 -.15
TfBAdmln 10.99 -.04
TSkAdmn 28.92 -.10
ValAdmln 18.67 -.02
WellslAdm n53.52 -.19
WelltnAdm n51.07 -.17
Windsorn 39.86 -.13
WdsrllAdn 42.37 -.08
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 22.94 -.08
CALTn 11.26
CapOppn 29.04 -.20
Convrtn 11.71 -.05
DivdGron 14.33 -.03
Energy n 58.77 -.58
Eqlncn 19.98 -.03
Explr n 65.52 -.61
FLLTn 11.62
GNMAn 11.13 -.01
GlobEqn 15.24 -.08
Grolnc n 24.53 -.06
GrthEqn 10.19 -.05
HYCorpn 5.55 -.01
HlthCren 124.18 -.79
InflaPron 14.30 -.06
InfiExplrn 12.70 -.09
IntlGr n 15.66 -.11
InfilVaIln 25.81 -.15
ITIGraden 10.01 -.04
ITTsryn 12.11 -.04
LifeConn 15.82 -.05
LifeGro n 20.09 -.08
Lifelncn 14.03 -.04
LifeModn 18.51 -.07
LTIGraden 10.25 -.12
LTTsryn 13.75 -.18
Morg n 16.56 -.09
MuHYn 10.57
Mulntn 13.81
MuLtdn 11.10
MuLongnn 11.17
MuShrtn 15.90
NJLTn 11.74
NYLTn 11.26
OHLTTEn 12.10
PALTn 11.21
PrecMtls r n 21.04 -.33
PrmcpCorn 12.66 -.06
Prmcp r n 60.22 -.42
SelValu r n 17.47 -.02
STARn 18.13 -.08
STIGraden 10.62 -.01
STFedn 10.91
STTsryn 10.82 -.01
StratEqn 17.09 -.11
TgtRe2005nl 1.98 -.04
TgtRetlncn 11.35 -.04
TgRe2010n22.18 -.08
TgtRe2015 nl2.04 -.05
TgRe2020n21.07 -.08
TgtRe2025nl 1.85 -.05
TgRe2030 n20.07 -.08
TgtRe2035nl 1.93 -.05
TgtRe2040 nl9.51 -.09
TgtRe2050 nl9.43 -.08
TgtRe2045 nl2.26 -.05
USGron 16.98 -.09
USValue n 9.44 -.02
Wellsly n 22.09 -.08
Welltnn 29.56 -.10
Wndsr n 11.81 -.04
Wndsll n 23.87 -.04
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n84.83 -.57
MidCplstPln91.43 -.14
TotlntAdm r r21.14 -.14
Totlntllnstr n84.58 -.59
TotlntllP r n 84.60 -.59
500 n 107.06 -.27
Balancedn 20.76 -.07
DevMktn 8.20 -.05
EMktn 23.51 -.12
Europen 21.32 -.14
Extend n 36.41 -.25
Growth n 29.87 -.12
ITBndn 11.80 -.06
LgCaplxn 21.44 -.05
LTBndtn 13.91 -.16
MidCapn 18.46 -.03
Pacific n 8.90 -.06
REITr n 17.37 +.07
SmCap n 30.66 -.29
SmlCpGthn 19.69 -.22
SmlCpVln 13.86 -.10
STBndn 10.64 -.01
TotBndn 10.99 -.04
Totllntl n 12.63 -.09
TotStkSn 28.91 -.10
Value n 18.67 -.01
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 20.77 -.06
DevMklnstn 8.14 -.05
Extln n 36.47 -.25
FTAIIWIdl r n75.45 -.51
Grwltlstn 29.87 -.12
InfProlnstn 11.44 -.05
Instldxn 106.37 -.27
InsPIn 106.37 -.28
InstTStldx n 26.17 -.08
InsTStPlus r6.17 -.09
MidCplstn 18.54 -.03
SCInstn 30.73 -.28
TBIstn 10.99 -.04
TSInstn 28.93 -.09
Valuelstn 18.67 .02
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 88.45 -.23
GroSign 27.66 -.11
ITBdSig n 11.80 -.06
MidCpldx n 26.48 -.04
STBdldxn 10.64 -.01
SmCpSig n 27.68 -.26
TotBdSgl n 10.99 -.04
TotStkSgl n 27.92 -.09
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.69
Waddell & Reed Adv:
Assets p 8.26 -.05
CorelnvA 5.62 -.02
DivOppAp 12.90 -.02
DivOppC t 12.75 -.02
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 36.78 -.20
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 11.71
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.30
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 18.36 -.10
Opptylnv 33.75 -.06
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.81
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.81
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.00 -.04
William Blair N:
GrowthN 10.37 -.05
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 16.52 -.03
Focusedn 17.73 -.02


Slip ends roughest





week since Sept.


Market watch
Nov. 25, 2011

Dow Jones -25.77
industrials 11,231.78

Nasdaq -18.57
composite 2,441.51


Standard &
Poor's 500

Russell
2000


-3.12

1,158.67

-8.18

666.16


Associated Press


NEW YORK The worst
week for the stock market in
two months ended with a
whimper in thin trading
Friday
The Dow Jones industrial
average lost 4.8 percent this
week, while the broader
Standard & Poor's 500 index
fell 4.7 percent. Both had
their worst weeks since
Sept. 23.
Major indexes wavered
throughout Friday's session,
which was shortened be-
cause it's the day after
Thanksgiving. Worries
about Europe's debt crisis
flared up again after Italy
had to pay 7.8 percent to
borrow for two years at a
debt auction. It's another
sign that investors are in-
creasingly hesitant to lend
to European countries.
The euro slipped to $1.32,
losing 2 percent this week
against the dollar The drop
puts the euro at its lowest
level since Oct. 4.
Higher interest rates on
government debt of Italy,
Spain and other European
countries have rattled stock
markets in recent weeks.
When borrowing costs climb
above the 7 percent thresh-
old, it deepens investor fears
about a government's ability
to manage its debts. Greece,
Ireland and Portugal had to
seek financial lifelines when


daily average.
Markets were battered
this week as governments in
Europe and the U.S. strug-
gle to tackle their debts. The
Dow lost 248 points on Mon-
day as a Congressional com-
mittee failed to reach a deal
to cut federal budget
deficits. It plunged 236
points Wednesday after in-
vestors balked at buying
German government debt.
Retailers traded mixed on
the Friday after Thanksgiv-
ing, the traditional start of
the holiday shopping season
and usually the busiest day
of the year for retailers.
Amazon.com Inc. dropped
3.5 percent Wal-Mart Stores
Inc. inched up 0.4 percent.
A record number of peo-
ple were expected to show
up at stores this weekend to
take advantage of deep dis-
counts. The National Retail
Federation estimates that
152 million people will go
shopping over the three
days starting on Friday That
would be an increase of 10
percent from last year.
AT&T's stock dipped less
than 1 percent. The com-
pany said Thursday that it is
budgeting to pay $4 billion
in break-up fees if its at-
tempted $39 billion
takeover of T-Mobile USA
from Deutsche Telekom
falls apart.
Four stocks fell for every
three that rose on the New
York Stock Exchange.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Hungary berates

'financial attack'

BUDAPEST, Hungary-
Hungary has slammed Moody's
decision to downgrade its credit
rating to junk status, describing
it Friday as another unjustified
financial attack against the
country. Moody's cut its view on
Hungary's government bonds
by one notch, from Baa3 to Bal
and maintained its negative
outlook.

Dutch, Finns back

stronger IMF role

BERLIN The Dutch and
Finnish finance ministers advo-
cated a stronger role for the In-
ternational Monetary Fund in
helping stem Europe's debt cri-
sis as they met Friday with their
German counterpart.
They stressed the need to
press ahead with implementing
month-old decisions by Euro-
pean leaders aimed at shoring
up the eurozone.


India's retail policy

has safeguards

NEW DELHI (AP) India's
commerce minister said Friday
that the decision to open the
country's $400 billion retail sec-
tor to global chains such as
Wal-Mart has a built-in safety
net for small shops and farmers.
Anand Sharma told reporters
that the Indian cabinet's deci-
sion late Thursday to allow 51
percent foreign ownership of
supermarkets would vastly im-
prove decrepit infrastructure
that causes massive food
waste in a country plagued by
malnutrition and high inflation.
Sharma said the new rule
would only apply in cities with
more than 1 million residents.
The minimum investment would
be $100 million and half of this
would have to be invested in
rural infrastructure and refriger-
ated transport and storage.


From wire reports


NEKWYORK STOCjECHNGE


Name Last Chg
Standex 28.95 -.44
StarwdHf 43.41 -.73
StateStr 36.24 -.09
Statil ASA 23.31 -.14
Steris 27.46 +.08
Sterlite 7.68 -.05
SRIwrM 9.44 -.11
SratHotels 4.40 +.03
Stryker 45.52 +.05
SturmRug 29.13 -1.79
SubPpne 46.12 -.23
SunCmts 33.50 -.07
Suncorgs 27.06 -.61
Sunoco 36.26 +.48
Suntech 2.29 -.14
SunTrst 16.53 +.09
SupEnrgy 25.34 -.25
Supvalu 7.03 -.20
Synovus 1.41 -.03
Sysoo 27.07 +.18
TCF Fncl 9.64 +.05
TE Connect 30.11 -.22
TECO 17.51 +.08
TJX 58.75 -.05
TRWAuto 29.79 -.36
TaiwSemi 12.07 -.13
Talbots 1.88 -.10
TalismEg 12.01 -.18
Target 51.21 -.32
TataMotors 16.04 +.51


TeckRes g
TelcmNZs
TelefBrasil
TelefEsp s
TelMexL
Templelnld
TempurP
Tenaris
TenetHlth
Teradyn
Terex
Ternium
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TetraTech
Texlnst
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThmBet
ThomCrkg
3MCo
Tiffany
TWCable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy
Trdichmrk s
TorDBkg
Total SA


TotalSys
Transom
Travelers
Tredgar
TriConfi
TrinaSolar
Tycolnfi
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
USAirwy
US Gold
USG
UltraPtg
UniSrcEn
UniFirst
UnilevNV
Unilever
UnionPac
UIdConfi
UtdMicro
UPSB
US Bancrp
USNGsrs
US OilFd
USSteel
UBTedi
UIhllthGp
UnumGrp


ValeSA 21.90 -.76
ValeSApf 20.58 -.67
ValeantPh 41.84 +.03
ValeroE 20.23 -.17
VangTotBd 83.66 -.12
VangTSM 59.46 -.19
VangREIT 52.35 +.23
VangEmg 37.01 -.17
VangEur 39.70 -.20
VangEAFE 29.38 -.11
VarianMed 56.87 +.34
Vectren 27.17
Ventas 49.57 +.37
VeoliaEnv 11.02 +.10
VerizonCm 35.35
ViacomB 41.61 -.15
VimpelCm 11.23 -.02
Visa 89.02 -.27
Vornado 70.73 +.53
WGL Hold 40.30 +.09
Wabash 6.13 -.20
WalMart 56.89 +.25
Walgrn 32.47 +.38
WalterEn 63.13 -.74
WsteMInc 30.31 +.06
WatsnPh 63.42 -1.13
Weathflnfi 13.16 -.02
WeinRIt 19.50 +.15
WellPoint 63.70 -.53
WellsFargo 23.51 +.30


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,277

Declined: 1,656

Unchanged: 120

Volume: 1.6 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 693

Declined: 1,651

Unchanged: 150

Volume: 0.7 b
AP

their interest rates crossed
the same mark. The Dow fell
25.77 points, or 0.2 percent,
to close at 11,231.78. Of the
Dow's 30 stocks, Chevron
Corp. lost 1.6 percent Friday,
the biggest drop. Travelers
Cos. Inc. added 1.2 percent,
the largest gain.
The S&P 500 lost 3.12
points, or 0.3 percent, to
1,158.67. The Nasdaq com-
posite dropped 18.57, or 0.8
percent, to close at 2,441.51.
Trading volume was 1.6
billion, less than half the


Second Chevy Volt

battery fire

WASHINGTON Federal
officials say they are investigating
the safety of the lithium-ion bat-
tery in General Motors Co.'s
Chevrolet Volt after a second
battery fire following crash-testing
of the electric car. The National
Highway Traffic Safety Adminis-
tration said Friday that three Volt
battery packs were crash-tested
last week. In one instance, the
battery caught fire afterward, and
in another the battery emitted
smoke and sparks.

China launches

probe of U.S. policy

BEIJING China's govern-
ment announced a trade probe
Friday of whether U.S. support
for renewable energy compa-
nies improperly hurts foreign
suppliers, adding to tensions
over an industry seen as an im-
portant source of jobs and eco-
nomic growth.


JUNIORS FASHION FOR LESS

Buying Junior Clothing & Accessories
Nov. 26 Dec. 17, 2011
Tues. Sat. loam to 6pm
Sun. Noon to 5pm


Looking to buy hoodies, jackets, graphic tees, tanks, dresses, jeans,
skirts, shoes, jewelry, boots, and purses for girls and guys! Items need
to be current styles that have been in the mall stores within the last year
to year and a half. Labels will buy gently used (no stains, holes, or
fading) premium brand names, current basics, and one-of-kind items.
Sizes to be bought range from 00 to 15/16 (women) and 26-38 waist
(men) and XS to XL for shirts and other items. Clothing name brands
wanted include Abercrombie and Fitch, American Eagle, Aeropostale,
Billabong, Charlotte Russe, Citizens for Humanity, Forever 21, Express, i
Hollister, Lucky Brand, Roxy, Seven, True Religion, and many more.

WE PAY CA$H OR STORE CREDIT ON THE SPOT!
208 Tompkins St., Inverness Connors Shopping Center
(352) 419-7591 facebook.com/labelscitruscounty


Wendys Co 4.87
WestarEn 25.99
WAstEMkt 13.31
WstAMgdHi 5.86
WAstlnfOpp 12.74
WDigital 25.00
WstnRefin 11.20
WstnUnion 16.30
Weyerh 15.48
Whrlpl 46.05
WhitngPts 41.27
WmsCos 29.70
WmsPtrs 56.14
Winnbgo 6.07
WiscEns 31.91
WT India 16.50
Worthgtn 14.56
Wyndham 32.90
XLGrp 18.92
XcelEngy 25.20
Xerox 7.57
Xylem n 23.00
Yamanag 14.65
YingliGrn 3.81
Youkun 15.72
YumBrnds 52.72
Zimmer 47.41
ZweigTI 3.01


I


A


F


- .







Page A8 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011



PINION


"The real division in the world today
is not between socialism and
capitalism, it's between freedom and
totalitarianism."
Frank H. Underhill, 1889-1971


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ................. ............. editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ........... ................. HR director
Sandra Frederick...................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz.... .........................citizen m em ber
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


EDC AND CHAMBER





Don't reject




valuable




expertise


At the end of a recent
Economic Development
Council meeting, Execu-
tive Director John Siefert pre-
sented a last-minute proposal
to the board that was not listed
on the agenda and
ruffled some
feathers. THE I1
He suggested Possible c
his hours be re- the
duced by half and
that a portion of OUR 01
the workload be
handed over to Consi(
the Citrus County prop
Chamber of Com-
merce. During the
proposal he also stated he
would reduce his pay by 50
percent, which in turn could be
used to compensate the Cham-
ber of Commerce for extra sup-
port services.
The result was unease
among some members of the
board and the idea was tabled.
Siefert was willingly coaxed
out of retirement to take the
position and has done an ex-
cellent job. The two entities
have worked very well of late
and have accomplished some
major projects, like the incu-
bator in Homosassa and help-


Puzzled by reverence
I just don't understand this per-
sistent "reverence" of former
President Ronald
Reagan. 0
Is the public so unin-
formed that people are
not aware his fast-talk-
ing tax plan made the
rich richer and the rest
poorer? And then George
W. Bush expanded that
even more.
They say 'please' 563-
Wall Street is where
they say "please" before
they steal your money.
Something wrong
The government used to give
away powdered milk with com-
modity food to low-income peo-
ple, but now it is more expensive
than liquid milk. There is some-
thing wrong with this picture.
Unemployment
I contacted a young man about
helping me put some siding re-
placement on my home. He told
me, "I can't work. It doesn't pay
for me unless I get $25 an hour."
This struck me as being odd until
I found out he was on unemploy-
ment insurance.


S

E

P
d
po


0
3o


ing several new businesses
set roots in the county,
spurring economic
development.
This needs to continue and
there is no reason why it can-
not, even if John
Siefert is involved
;SUE: in a limited capac-
hanges at ity. The salary for
DC. the position is rel-
atively low and
INION: the hours are long.
He has been dedi-
er the cated to the cause,
osal. but it is time for
him to focus on
other parts of his
life if he so chooses.
Partnerships have been
formed and good things have
come out of the marriage be-
tween the EDC and the Cham-
ber of Commerce. Embracing
Siefert's expertise to whatever
degree is agreeable will help
to keep things on a positive
path.
John Siefert is a valuable
asset to the team and has great
contributions to offer. Change
is inevitable and those with dif-
fering opinions about the best
course for the future are en-
couraged to seek compromise.


Banks getting money
I believe that the banks must
have made some bad investments
and now we have to pay a
JND fee for this and fee for
that so they can get their
DE money back.
SRidicule
The word "ridicule"
means to make fun of, de-
rision, mockery, make
B one an object of laughter.
The victims are frequently
579 Qthe elderly, crippled, deaf,
)5 7 disfigured, mentally ill,
mentally retarded, home-
less, meek.
Litter Lane
Join me for a ride down "Litter
Lane." Driving south on (U.S.) 41,
there's a Styrofoam cooler, a Red
Bull bottle, there's a McDonald's
cup, there are two plastic bags
from one of the local grocery
stores, there's another McDon-
ald's cup, plastic bag, there's a
Clorox bottle, two planters, two
empty planters, there's a pizza
box, there is a another white
trash bag, there's a McDonald's
cup and a Burger King cup, two
more planters, empty planters
and there's a top of a 5-gallon
drum.


The United Way of Citrus County is trying to help feed the hungry
this year and you can help. If each family in Citrus County con-
tributed $30 (or more), the fundraising organization could meet its
goal for 2012. The United Way just gave
$50,000 to match a private $50,000
grant to push for the completion of the
food pantry in Homosassa Springs.
Once completed, this pantry will pro-
vide food supplies to 51 nonprofit and
church groups in our community that feed the hungry.
Do your part and mail a contribution to The United Way, c/o Gerry
Mulligan, The Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429.


Thanks for your help.


- Gerry Mulligan


One governor's power grab


If you want to know why the each party for a degree of purity or
congressional debt reduction inflexibility that was not there be-
commission failed so miser- fore."
ably, one reason (among Back to Arizona. After
many) is clearly visible the 2010 census, the in-
in Arizona, where Gov dependent commission,
Jan Brewer is trying to p headed by civic leader
torpedo one of the few Colleen Mathis, set to
efforts anywhere in the work redrawing con-
country that might gressional lines. But
modulate the holy war Gov Brewer was out-
now ravaging Capitol raged that Mathis and
Hill. her panel actually did
Eleven years ago, in a what they were sup-
spasm of good sense, Cokie and posed to do create
the voters of Arizona Steven Roberts districts that did not
decided that politicians OTHER favor one party over the
should no longer con- other In a breathtaking
trol the boundaries for VOICES power grab, Brewer
legislative and congres- fired Mathis, and all 21
sional districts. Instead, they gave Republican state senators backed
that power to a five-member com- her up. (The governor also wanted
mission composed of two Democ- to bounce both Democrats from
rats, two Republicans and an the commission, but the lawmak-
independent chairman, ers choked on that bone.)
The innovation was important Immediately, Mathis challenged
for two reasons. First, politicians her ouster In a hearing before the
always draw lines that protect state Supreme Court, the gover-
themselves and their parties, while nor's lawyer, Lisa Hauser, set a
depriving most citizens of any real new standard for arrogance, argu-
choice in who represents them. ing that the governor had unlim-
They even admit their goal is to ited power to remove the
pick their voters instead of having commission's chairman. A justice
the voters pick them. And second, asked Hauser if that meant the
lawmakers from safe districts have governor could jettison Mathis if
little incentive to listen to, or work she didn't like the chairman's dress
with, members from the other or haircut. Yes, answered the
party In fact, their only real fear is lawyer The court took less than
a primary challenge from a rival three hours to give Mathis her job
accusing them of insufficient or- back
thodoxy But this fight is far from over
This helps explain why the debt Brewer is still filing lawsuits
reduction panel was so paralyzed. against Mathis, and even if Brewer
For most House members today, loses, most other states still play by
reasonableness is far riskier than the old rules, allowing politicians
rigidity The same virus has in- to draw district lines that reinforce
fected senators as well, even the "purity" and "inflexibility" that
though they run statewide. In 2010, Danforth laments. And while
three sitting senators lost their pri- there's nothing new or inher-
maries, almost as many as in the ently wrong about a healthy de-
previous 26 years combined, re- gree of partisanship, Congress is
ports the National Journal. As for- far more divided along ideological
mer Sen. Jack Danforth, a Missouri lines than it was just 30 years ago.
Republican, told the Journal, A National Journal study in 1982
"There is more of a demand in measured the most liberal Repub-


lican (Claudine Schneider of
Rhode Island) and the most con-
servative Democrat (Larry Mc-
Donald of Georgia) in the House.
That year, fully 344 House mem-
bers had voting records that fell be-
tween those two poles, mainly
progressive Republican "gypsy
moths" from the Northeast and
conservative Democratic "boll
weevils" from the South.
They were the centrists, the
pragmatists, the deal makers, and
today they have virtually disap-
peared. In the last Congress, only
nine House members strayed from
their own party line, and only one
of them, Republican Walter Jones
of North Carolina, still serves in
Washington.
As we say, there are many rea-
sons for this polarization, but most
of them cannot be fixed and
should not be fixed by public
policy Special interest groups, for
example, pour money into cam-
paigns and demand strict alle-
giance in return, and virtually any
attempt to rein them in would vio-
late the First Amendment Purist
pontificators on talk radio, cable
TV and rabble-rousing websites re-
inforce ideological canons and
threaten reprisals against heretics
- and they have every right to do
so.
One area that can be reformed,
however, is the way district lines
are drawn. If more states followed
Arizona's example and turned the
job over to independent commis-
sions, lawmakers would no longer
be insulated from the very people
they profess to represent They
might even be forced to listen oc-
casionally- to their voters across
town and their colleagues across
the aisle. And they might actually
do something about the national
debt

Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at steve
cokie@gmail. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


'Blue 'laws' punish
Mayor Bob Plaisted and Marti
Consuegra, both members of a
local Baptist church, are against
change regarding "blue laws" at
Inverness. Both use Christianity
as the basis for their refusal to
consider allowing the sale of alco-
hol before 1 p.m. on Sunday
Ms. Consuegra states "we've
held a standard here" and "they
knew this was a Christian commu-
nity," whereby she believes the
current liquor ordinance presents
integrity for Inverness.
Having been raised in a Chris-
tian family and studying the Bible
since the age of 4, I question argu-
ments offered by these two indi-
viduals. Thoroughly searching, I
cannot find one Bible passage
that says it is sinful to have or
drink alcohol on what many refer
to as "the Lord's day" In fact,
wine is mentioned frequently, was
an every day beverage, and Jesus
shared His cup ("My blood") at the
Last Supper Religious beliefs
should not be forced on others.
In reality, "blue laws" went fur-
ther than forbidding the sale of al-
cohol. Businesses were closed.
This would include grocery
stores, restaurants, gas stations,
malls, and, of course, bars. Sun-
day was deemed the day of rest
Correctly, Saturday (not Sunday)
is the seventh day, the day to rest
ordered by God (Exodus 20:8-11).
No lawn-mowing, laundry or yard
sales. Certainly none of those bar-
bequed pork ribs and sausage.
(Lev 11:1-8).
We cannot regulate those who
over-indulge or are addicted to al-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

cohol. Their needs are met by
stocking up before Sunday arrives
and they are most likely not the
customers at our struggling local
restaurants who want to enjoy an
alcoholic beverage with their
meal.
Inverness is not setting an ex-
ample or holding onto so-called
integrity Rather, city officials are
hurting our own citizens and busi-
ness establishments because of
personal religious beliefs. I prefer
to help our own community every
way possible. If this means a two-
hour change permitting the sale
of alcohol at 11 a.m. instead of
1 p.m., Mayor Plaistead should
stop grandstanding by putting his
personal feelings aside.
Mayor Plaistead and council-
woman Consuegra, you are pun-
ishing the very people you
represent and work for
Joanie Welch
Inverness


Obama's disasters
The Chronicle today (Friday,
Nov 18) carried another rant
by the easily recognized sour-
puss who blames Bush for
everything wrong with the
country
Today, however, he is also
blaming Cheney and Karl Rove.
There are a couple things this
guy needs to realize.
First, gas prices have dou-
bled since Obama took office;
unemployment has soared; he
has indebted this country more
deeply than all the former
presidents combined; Ameri-
can respect in the world has
dropped to a new low as has
our leadership role.
The list could go on and on of
the disasters that Obama has
brought and is bringing to the
United States.
Maybe this guy could find a
way to blame Bush (or anyone
but Obama) for the Civil War?
Maybe the plagues of medieval
Europe? How about the floods in
the time of Moses Moses was
probably a Bush supporter in
this guy's mind.
Second, if you feel that
strongly about a topic, have the
backbone to write a letter and
state your name. You really lose
credibility when you constantly
grouse about the same topic over
and over again while sniping
from the shadows of a nameless
call-in.


Harry Cooper
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gullah-language Bible now on audio CDs


Associated Press

ST HELENA ISLAND,
S.C. More than three
decades after translators
began putting the words of
the New Testament into
Gullah, everyone can now
hear those words in the cre-
ole language spoken by
slaves and their descen-
dants along the sea islands
of the nation's Southeast
coast.
"Healin fa de Soul," -
"Healing for the Soul" a
five-CD set of readings from
the Gullah Bible, including
a dramatized version of the
Gospel of John, was re-
leased this month at the
Penn Center, founded in
1862 as one of the nation's
first freedmen's schools
after Union troops captured
the area during the Civil
War.
The sea island culture -
called Gullah in the Caroli-
nas and Geechee in Florida
and Georgia remained in-
tact with descendants of
slaves because of the isola-
tion of the area.
Although numbers are
uncertain, there are thought
to be 250,000 Gullah in the
four-state coastal area and
thousands are thought to
speak Gullah as their main


language.
The CDs are the largest
collection of Gullah record-
ings ever made available to
the public and rival those
that noted linguist Lorenzo
Dow Turner made on sea is-
lands during the 1930s, said
Emory Campbell, a former
director of the Penn Center
who performs on the
recordings and worked on
the Bible translation.
Some of Turner's record-
ings are part of the Smith-
sonian Institution traveling
exhibit "Word, Shout, Song"
on display currently at
South Carolina State Uni-
versity in Orangeburg.
"I would say this is as ex-
tensive," Campbell said.
"They are very accessible.
People can buy them and
personally own them and I
think they have a much bet-
ter opportunity to study the
language."
The readings are based
on the Gullah Bible, "De
Nyew Testament." Transla-
tion into Gullah began in
1979 and the full testament
was published by the Amer-
ican Bible Society in 2005.
Campbell said the record-
ings, made earlier this year,
show an important step in
acceptance of Gullah, which
native speakers tried to


abandon for decades be-
cause they were taught to be
ashamed of their heritage.
"Those of us involved in
this project are overwhelm-
ingly of the culture. Hereto-
fore it has always been
outsiders coming in record-
ing us, sometimes reluc-
tantly on our part," he said.
"This was done willingly by
us."
The CDs will help spread
Gullah beyond the moss-
shrouded lanes and marshy
ocean inlets along the coast,
said Ron Daise, a native of
St. Helena Island who also
performs on the CDs and is
best known as a host, with
his wife Natalie, of the chil-
dren's television show "Gul-
lah Gullah Island" in the
1990s.
"Since the publication of
the Gullah Bible there has
been tremendous interest
from non-Gullah speakers
who would read but if they
tried to pronounce it, would
not know if they were doing
it correctly," said Daise, who
also wrote several songs in-
cluded in the collection.
The recordings, he added,
may help older Gullah
speakers interpret the writ-
ten words of the Gullah
Bible while youngsters will
be able to follow passages as


Associated Press
Ron Daise, once host of the children's television show "Gullah Gullah Island," reads from a
Gullah translation of the Bible, at the Penn Center on St. Helena Island, S.C. Daise also
holds a new five-CD set of audio recordings from the Gullah translation.


they hear the audio. financial matters. The other
Two of the CDs are enti- three discs are the dramati-
tled "Scipcha Wa De Bring zation of the Gospel of John
Healing" Scripture that "De Good Nyews Bout
Heals and includes 196 Jedus Christ Wa John
passages on topics such as Write."
marriage, peace and In all, 24 Gullah readers,


most of them from the South
Carolina coast, perform on
the recordings.
The set is available
through the Penn Center
Web site (http://www.penn-
center.com ) for $20.


Oil rises $17 a barrel,


but U.S. gas prices fall


Gas still higher

than last year

at this time

Associated Press

Saving 7 cents on a gallon
of gas sounds like small
change compared with $200
off the price of a flat-screen
TV But drivers will take it
this holiday season.
The average price for a
gallon of gas has fallen to
$3.31 from $3.38 in just a
week. The discount is an
even heftier 20 cents a gal-
lon compared with two
months ago. In fact, shop-
pers driving from store to
store on the first weekend of
the holiday shopping season
are paying some of the low-
est prices for gas since late
winter.
Even with the recent de-
clines, however, the price of
gas is 44 cents a gallon
higher than on Black Friday
a year ago. Tom Kloza, chief
oil analyst at Oil Price In-
formation Service, says
Americans are on track to
spend $488 billion on gas
this year. That will eclipse
the record set in 2008 by $40
billion. OPIS said last week
that U.S. households have
spent 8.4 percent of their in-
come on gasoline this year,
up from 6.7 percent in 2010
and 7.9 percent in 2008.
That may be one reason
that malls are bustling this
year with shoppers looking
at marked-down cashmere
sweaters, videogame con-
soles, tablet computers and
flat-screen televisions.
Kloza estimates that, at cur-
rent demand, for every 10
cent decline in the price of
gas, Americans save a total
of $36 million to spend else-


where. Retailers hope shop-
pers reinvest at least part of
their recent savings in gifts
for friends and family
Kloza says current de-
mand for gas in the U.S. re-
mains "extraordinarily
poor." That's the main rea-
son why gas prices are drop-
ping even though oil has
risen about $17 a barrel, or
21 percent, in the last two
months.
Oil rose Friday, but was
down slightly for the week.
The benchmark for crude
oil in the U.S. rose 60 cents
to $96.77. It dropped $1.84
on Wednesday, before mar-
kets in the U.S. were closed
for the Thanksgiving
holiday
In London, Brent crude
for January delivery fell
$1.54 to $105.76 a barrel on
the ICE Futures exchange.
In other Nymex trading,
heating oil dropped 3.1
cents to $2.94 per gallon and
gasoline futures lost 6.63
cents to $2.4542 per gallon.
Natural gas added 5.7 cents
to $3.665 per 1,000 cubic
feet.
The national average for
gasoline peaked just below
$4 a gallon in May. Kloza
says there are now 23 states
where drivers can find gas
below $3 per gallon. He cau-
tions drivers to enjoy the
relatively cheap prices
while they can.
Gas prices tend to bottom
out in mid-winter, and then
begin to climb through the
spring. By Kloza's calcula-
tions, if prices bottom out at
$3.10 to $3.20 a gallon then,
based on historical trends,
drivers could see gas rang-
ing from $3.75 to as high as
$4.50 in the spring.
"The trend on Black Fri-
day will be different from
what you see on Good Fri-
day," he says.


CIA officers mark death

of spy with rare request


Associated Press

WASHINGTON CIA of-
ficers are asking people to
mark the 10th anniversary
of the death of the first
American killed in the
Afghan war by donating to
help the children of their
fellow fallen.
Since the death in 2001 of
CIA officer Mike Spann, a
total of 23 stars have been
added to the wall at the
CIA's Langley, Va., head-
quarters that honors CIA
operatives lost. Many were
killed in the wars in
Afghanistan and Iraq.
The clandestine world
rarely breaks its silence, es-
pecially when it comes to
family, but the CIA Officers
Memorial Foundation notes
about 56 children of those
killed in the line of duty will


need educational support
over the next 17 years.
Spann was part of a small
group of CIA paramilitary
officers who went into
Afghanistan just 16 days
after the al-Qaida attacks of
Sept. 11, 2001. Less than
two months later, the CIA,
along with U.S. Special
Forces Green Berets and a
massive aerial bombing
campaign, helped Afghan
militias drive out the ruling
Taliban.
Spann was killed when
hundreds of Taliban and al-
Qaida prisoners, guarded by
just a handful of Afghans,
tried to escape from a
fortress jail in Mazar-e-
Sharif in northern
Afghanistan.
Spann is survived by his
wife, Shannon, a retired CIA
officer, and three children.


For more information on how to reach
S Citrus County readers cafi
352-563-5592.


OOO8XHD 0


C CITRUS COUNTY


www.chronicleonline.com
Florida sh and Wldlife Conservation Comission;
http://tlnyurl.com/htp-mylwc-custhelp-com-app


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 A9











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Icy outline Italy's borrowing rates skyrocket
Icy outline


New premier tries to reassure

antsy investors amid debt crisis


Associated Press
Frost coats leaves on a
crisp autumn morning Fri-
day in Marlborough, Mass.


Biden plans 2012
campaign tack
WASHINGTON -A year
from Election Day, Democrats
are crafting a campaign strat-
egy for Vice President Joe
Biden that targets the big
three political battlegrounds:
Ohio, Pennsylvania and
Florida, states where Biden
might be more of an asset to
President Barack Obama's
re-election campaign than the
president himself.
A shaky economy and
sagging enthusiasm among
Democrats could shrink the
electoral map for Obama in
2012, forcing his campaign to
depend on carrying the 67
electoral votes up for grabs in
the three swing states.
Obama won all three
states in 2008. But this time
he faces challenges in each,
particularly in Ohio and
Florida, where voters elected
Republican governors in the
2010 midterm elections.

World BRIEFS

Released


Associated Press
Three American students
are photographed by Egypt-
ian authorities following
their arrest during protests
in Cairo, where an Egyptian
official said they were
throwing firebombs at se-
curity forces. A spokes-
woman for the American
University in Cairo identi-
fied the students as Luke
Gates, a 21-year-old Indi-
ana University student from
Bloomington, Ind.; Derrik
Sweeney, a 19-year-old
Georgetown University stu-
dent from Jefferson City,
Mo.; and Gregory Porter, a
19 year-old Drexel Univer-
sity student from Glenside,
Pa.

3 U.S. students to
begin trips home
PHILADELPHIA- Three
American students arrested
during a protest in Egypt were
released Friday and planned
to catch flights out of Cairo to
begin their trips home, an at-
torney and family said.
An Egyptian court had or-
dered the release of Ameri-
can University in Cairo
students Derrik Sweeney,
Luke Gates and Gregory
Porter a day earlier. The three
were arrested Sunday. Offi-
cials accused them of throw-
ing firebombs at security
forces fighting with protesters.
Australia to create
marine reserve
CANBERRA, Australia -
Australia says it will create
the world's largest marine re-
serve in the Coral Sea.
The Environment Ministry
says the area has shallow
reefs that support tropical
ecosystems with sharks,
coral, sponges and many fish
species. The proposal in-
cludes seas beyond the al-
ready protected Great Barrier
Reef Marine Park off north-
east Australia. The reserve
would cover almost 400,000
square miles. Fishing would
be allowed in parts of it.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
ROME -A week into his
new job, Premier Mario
Monti is running out of time
to reassure nervous in-
vestors that his government
has a strategy to deal with
Italy's crippling debts.
The nation's borrowing
rates skyrocketed Friday
after a grim set of bond auc-
tions, with a new auction
looming Tuesday Another
borrowing debacle could
ratchet up fears that Italy
has entered a debt spiral
driving it toward bank-
ruptcy and the 17-nation eu-


rozone into its most acute
crisis yet.
Monti's government of so-
called "technocrats" is bat-
tling to convince investors
that it has a successful strat-
egy to reduce the country's
$2.6 trillion debt. But Fri-
day's dismal bond auction
results for the eurozone's
third largest economy tem-
porarily battered Europe's
stock markets.
The auction outcome also
is likely to fuel calls for Eu-
ropean Union officials to do
more to jump-start eco-
nomic growth and the Euro-
pean Central Bank to use


more firepower to cool
down a rapidly escalating
debt crisis.
"We still haven't found a
response that reassures in-
vestors," said Jose Manuel
Barroso, head of the Euro-
pean Commission. "As long
as we're unable to do that,
we'll have very serious
problems and discussions in
Europe." He spoke during a
visit to Portugal, which, like
eurozone members Greece
and Ireland, has taken an
EU bailout to avoid bank-
ruptcy
Stephen Lewis, an analyst
at Monument Securities,
agreed with that outlook.
"The signs are that the
euro will need a highly
skilled financial engineer at
the controls if it is to with-


stand the strains it is likely
to face in the five remaining
weeks of this year," he said.
Driving market fears is
the knowledge that Italy is
too big for Europe to bail
out.
Given the size of its debts
- Italy must refinance 200
billion by the end of April
alone the government is
depending on investors for
money But when borrowing
rates get too high that can
fuel a potentially devastat-
ing debt spiral which could
bankrupt the country
Friday's auctions showed
that investors see Italian
debt as increasingly risky.
The country had to pay an
average yield of 7.814 per-
cent to raise $2.7 billion in
two-year bills sharply


Joining forces


Associated Press
Pakistan and Chinese soldiers take part Thursday in a joint exercise in Jhelum, Pakistan. At the conclusion of
the joint exercise, Pakistan army chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani said that elements of East Turkestan Islamic
Movement (ETIM) are operating in the border area of Pakistan and Afghanistan, where Pakistan has an ex-
change of intelligence and has done its utmost to eliminate this threat of ETIM and other extremists for China.

China, Pakistan boost anti-terror cooperation with drill


Associated Press
JHELUM, Pakistan The Pak-
istani and Chinese attack choppers
swoop low across the valley, straf-
ing a mock terrorist hideout and a
bomb-making factory Then a joint
commando team storms the camp
- to the gentle applause of top
brass from both nations watching
from the stands.
The fact that such a drill is
needed reflects a new concern
troubling their long-standing al-
liance: Chinese militants along the
Afghan border allegedly aiding
separatism in China and plotting
terrorist attacks there
Countries around the world, es-
pecially the U.S., share Chinese
concerns about Pakistan's militant-
infested tribal regions, but few get
the same kind of public commit-
ment of help as Beijing. It's a
legacy of China's oft-hailed "all-
weather friendship" with Pakistan.
Anti-terror cooperation is the
latest example of the special rela-
tionship between the neighboring
countries.
China's good will is vital to Pak-
istan: China is its largest defense


supplier, and it has helped con-
struct two nuclear reactors. Chi-
nese investments help keep the
Pakistani economy afloat
Chinese economic interests are
also threatened because militants
have made parts of the country no-
go areas. Chinese companies are
investing in oil, gas and coal ex-
traction to fuel their country's rap-
idly expanding economy There are
hundreds of Chinese citizens work-
ing in Pakistan, and some have oc-
casionally been attacked or
kidnapped.
Its main interest in Pakistan is
countering rising Indian power in
the region, a goal that is shared by
Islamabad, which views India as
an enemy
As ties with Washington have de-
teriorated this year, some Pakistani
leaders have suggested China
could fill the economic, diplomatic
and military void if America scales
back its commitment.
Part of the concern centers on
the bitter aftermath of the May 2
U.S. raid that killed al-Qaida
founder Osama bin Laden in Pak-
istan, including reports that Pak-
istan gave China access to the


damaged high-tech stealth heli-
copter left behind by U.S. com-
mandos when they killed bin
Laden. China denied that.
Despite the tensions following
the raid, some American counter-
terror cooperation with Pakistan
has continued. The Pakistani army
still allows Washington to fire mis-
siles at militants in its northwest
regions. That also cuts into the
ability of Chinese militants to train
and forge links with other extrem-
ists there.
Thursday's dramatic war games
in the dusty, hilly Punjab country-
side were the kind of Pakistani
public display of international
anti-terror cooperation that Wash-
ington could only dream of, given
the environment of mistrust and
suspicion with Pakistan.
"Terrorism is something which is
a threat to China, in some ways, and
to other countries in the world as
well," Pakistani Gen. Ashfaq Pervez
Kayani told journalists alongside
China's deputy chief of general
staff, Gen. Hou Shusen. "There is a
need to share our experiences with
our Chinese friends," the Pakistani
army chief said.


FBI: Body in Ohio may be 2nd Craigslist ad victim


Associated Press


CLEVELAND A body
found Friday in a shallow
grave near a mall in Akron,
Ohio, may be a second
killing connected to a phony
Craigslist job listing that
lured victims into a deadly
robbery scheme, according
to the FBI.
The body was found Friday
within sight of the Rolling
Acres shopping mall, agency
spokeswoman Vicki Ander-
son told The
Associated Press. The cause
of death and identity are


under investigation,
but the FBI is work-
ing on the supposi-
tion that the body
may be that of Timo-
thy Kern, 47, of Mas-
sillon, who hasn't
been seen in more
than a week, Ander- Tim
son said. Ke
"Do we think it
might be? Maybe," Ander-
son said. "He's missing. We
haven't been able to find
him. It could possibly be,
but we just don't know that
yet."
Anderson declined to


specify how author-
ities discovered the
body, saying only it
was through
"information."
Kern answered
the same ad for a
farm hand that au-
oth thorities say led to
.rn the shooting death
of Norfolk, Va., resi-
dent David Pauley A South
Carolina man reported an-
swering the ad but managed
to escape after being shot
Nov. 6. Two people from the
Akron area are in custody: a
high school student who has


been charged with at-
tempted murder and 52-
year-old Richard Beasley,
who is in jail on unrelated
charges. Agents have con-
tacted individuals to check
on their well-being, FBI
spokesman Harry Trombitas
said Friday in an email.
One was Heather Tuttle,
of Ravenna, who applied
for the job Oct. 7 but never
got a response.
"It could have been me,"
said Tuttle, 27, who has
since taken work as an as-
sistant manager at a gas
station.


I
I


higher than the 4.628 per-
cent it paid in the previous
auction in October And
even raising $10.7 billion
for six months proved exor-
bitantly expensive, as the
yield for that spiked to 6.504
percent, nearly double the
3.535 percent rate last
month.
Following the grim auc-
tion news, Italy's borrowing
rates in the markets shot
higher, with the 10-year
yield spiking 0.34 percent-
age point to 7.30 percent -
above the 7 percent thresh-
old that forced other euro
nations into bailouts.
Solid returns on Wall
Street helped European
markets recover from ear-
lier losses Friday fueled by
fears over Italy



S&P's


lowers

Belgian


credit


rating

Associated Press
BRUSSELS Standard
& Poor's downgraded Bel-
gium's financial standing Fri-
day, citing the country's
government stalemate and a
looming European recession.
Spurred on by the ratings
agency's cut, six leading par-
ties hurriedly resumed talks
to agree on a 2012 budget to
contain Belgium's high debt
and deficit, two more rea-
sons why the country has
come under increasing pres-
sure from financial markets
this week. In a sign that fi-
nancial contagion is spread-
ing across Europe, the
agency cut Belgium's credit
rating from AA+ to AA, a
move coming two days after
Germany fared surprisingly
poorly at a bond auction.
Belgium has been without
a permanent government for
530 days, as a series of nego-
tiators has struggled without
success to bridge the coun-
try's divide between its
French and Dutch speakers.
"In our opinion, pro-
tracted political uncertainty
remains a risk to its credit-
worthiness," the ratings
agency said.
Caretaker Prime Minister
Yves Leterme said "we re-
ally need strong signals
now" from the six political
parties trying to resolve the
2012 budget. He said the six
parties needed a deal
"tonight, the coming days -
but preferably before we hit
the market again" Monday
After negotiators reached
a constitutional deal two
months ago giving regions
more autonomy, talks are
now stuck over how much
austerity measures and in-
creased taxes should be part
of an $14.8 billion package to
keep spending within limits.
"Now the time has really
come for parties to take up
their responsibility and
form a government with full
powers," Leterme said.
In a statement, Standard
& Poor's said Leterme's
caretaker government
"lacks a mandate to imple-
ment deeper fiscal and
structural reforms."
The country's yields on
long-term bonds are closing
in on 6 percent getting
closer to the 7 percent fi-
nancial danger zone that
has pushed other European
nations into international
bailouts.
"If we have to go to the
markets next week to refi-
nance our debt, the down-
grading could make sure
that we have to pay an even
higher price," Leterme said
on VTM network.
Leterme aims to get the
budget deficit down to 2.8
percent of gross domestic
product in 2012, but the Eu-


ropean Union is far from
convinced, forecasting a
wider shortfall of 4.6 percent











PORTS


Louisville
runs away
from Bulls in
Tampa/B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


* Basketball/B2
* Hockey/B2
* Scoreboard/B3
* Entertainment/B4


No. 3 Razorbacks no problem for No. 1 Tigers


LSU 12-0 for the first time; willplay Georgia next
Associated Press A win over the Bulldogs would Cannon also made a gai
assure the Tigers their third trip ing tackle on defense lat
ON ROUGE, La. Tyrann to the BCS title game in nine sea- game. Mathieu, who was
u channeled his best Billy sons. Though at this point, LSU safety instead of con
i and No. 1 LSU was on its might be able to get there even if much of the game becausE
another run-away victory it loses. Reid's injury the previous
biggest game at Tiger Sta- Arkansas took a surprising 14-0 had defensive highlight
n half a century lead on Tyler Wilson's TD pass to own, forcing two turnov
ieu returned a punt 92 Jarius Wright and Alonzo High- strips, one of which he re(
or a score and the Tigers smith's 47-yard fumble return, but He now has six forced
ed third-ranked Arkansas LSU stormed back by scoring 41 this season. His fifth was
86 yards rushing, wiping of the next 44 points in the game. of running back Dennis i
4-point deficit with a 41-17 The rivalry game known as the in LSU territory late in 1
day that secured a spot in battle for "The Boot," a trophy in half. That set up a tou
C championship. the shape of Arkansas and drive that put the Tigers a
Ly Hilliard, Spencer Ware Louisiana, marked the first time stay
rdan Jefferson all scored two teams ranked in the top three LSU trailed 14-7 when
ground for LSU (12-0, 8-0 had met in Death Valley since fielded Dylan Breeding
which is 12-0 for the first 1959, when Cannon's 89-yard punt over-end kick at his own 8
id will play No. 13 Georgia return lifted No. 1 LSU to a 7-3
weekend in Atlanta. win over No. 3 Mississippi. See


UCF


stuns


No. 4


UConn

Knights win

68-63, snap

Huskies'streak
Associated Press
PARADISE ISLAND, Ba-
hamas Marcus Jordan
was headed to the foul line for
two big shots Friday when a
teammate passed along an
encouraging message.
"He told me this shot is in
my blood," Jordan said.
Yup, like father, like son.
Jordan, the son of Hall of
Famer Michael Jordan,
made two big free throws to
give Central Florida the
lead with 3:11 left and the
Knights upset No. 4 Con-
necticut 68-63 in the semifi-
nals of the Battle 4 Atlantis,
snapping the Huskies' 16-
game winning streak.
Jordan and Keith Clanton
each scored 20 points for the
Knights (4-1), who trailed by
17 early in the second half.
Jordan also had seven re-
bounds and seven assists.
Jeremy Lamb had 15
points for the defending na-
tional champion Huskies (5-
1), who lost for the first time
since March 5 against Notre
Dame. Alex Oriakhi added
14 points and 10 rebounds.
"I can't be more disap-
pointed in how we played,"
Connecticut coach Jim Cal-
houn said. "We just stopped
playing. We couldn't even
get the ball inbounded near
the end. Nobody stepped up
and it was a complete disas-
ter for us."
Calhoun was particularly
disappointed in the last four
minutes.
"That wasn't a run, it was
an avalanche," he said.
Connecticut put together
a 10-0 run to take a 50-33
lead with 16 minutes left.
Lamb sparked the run with
a 3-pointer and also hit two
free throws during the surge.
Central Florida then
scored 17 of the next 19
points to pull within two.
Clanton kicked off the rally
with a 3-pointer and Jordan
finished the spurt with a 3.
Lamb made another 3 to
stretch the Huskies' lead to
five, but they couldn't hold
off the pesky Knights. Jor-
dan converted a layup, then
made the two free throws to
give Central Florida a 58-57
advantage. Jordan added four
more foul shots down the
stretch to preserve the big win
Jordan was whistled for a
technical with 16 minutes
left in the game, fueling his
big final surge.
"I still don't know why I
got the technical," he said.
"But I do know I wanted to
come out and be more ag-
gressive."
Connecticut will play No.
20 Florida State in the con-
solation game on Saturday


me-seal-
e in that
playing
nerback
e of Eric
is week,
s of his
ers with
covered.
fumbles
s a strip
Johnson
the first
chdown
ahead to


Mathieu -d
c's end- Associated Press
, started LSU running back Michael Ford carries as Arkansas safety Elton Ford
and linebacker Alonzo Highsmith pursue Friday on a 49-yard run during
Page B2 the third quarter in Baton Rouge, La. LSU won 41-17.


Dr. Ron Joseph
DOCTOR'S
ORDERS


KIM TWISS/Special to the Chronicle
Florida State University punter Shawn Powell poses with his grandmother, Glenda Allen. Allen lives in Citrus
County, and Powell attended Citrus Middle School. Powell whose average of 47.1 yards per punt is the
highest in the nation will make his final regular-season start today in Gainesville as the Seminoles play
the Florida Gators.




Grandma's





favorite punter


Seminoles'starting punter hasfamily,


MICHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent
A group of Citrus County
football fans will have an
extra interest in today's
FSU/Florida contest.
Family and friends of senior
Florida State punter Shawn
Powell will either be making the
trip to Gainesville or watching
intently on TV as Powell wraps
up his regular-season career
against his team's archrival.
Powell's 47.1-yard punting av-
erage is the highest in the nation,
but because the Seminole offense
has been so efficient this year, he
was left off the semifinalist list
for the Ray Guy Award, which
honors the nation's top punter. A
punter must average 3.6 punts to
be nominated for the award;
Powell averages only 3.4.


At 6'5" and 235 pounds, he has
developed great poise and accu-
racy in his position. Powell has
twice won ACC Player of the
Week honors, most recently for
his performance against Miami,
in which he averaged 54.8 yards
on five punts in FSU's 23-19 win.
However, Powell's family
members respect him for more
than his booming leg.
"The one thing that has im-
pressed me is how he treats little
children," Powell's grandmother
Glenda Allen said. "At home games
at Doak Campbell Stadium we
sit in the ninth row, and at the
conclusion of the game, Shawn
will climb the six-foot wall and
greet me with a hug.
"There are usually many
young fans around him with
their hands up, and Shawn will
high-five each and every one.


history in Citrus

Now that is real class," the In-
verness native added.
Powell's roots run deep in Cit-
rus County. He was born 23
years ago in Moultrie, Ga., the
youngest of Kellie and Larry
Powell's three children. After a
period of time, the family moved
to Rome, Ga. While growing up
in Rome, Shawn's older brother
Stephen became his role model.
They both were involved in soc-
cer at an early age.
When Powell was 12 years old,
the family moved to Inverness.
Shawn's sister and the eldest of
the three children, Lincee Pow-
ell, was in college at the time
and remained in Rome. While
attending Citrus Middle School,
Shawn was the kicker for the
football team. A short period of
See Page B3


Attitude is

everything
Thanksgiving week is
always a nice time to
do special things with
your family We went to Uni-
versal Studios, and on our
way out, a young man was
"planking" on the escalator
You may ask what plank-
ing is, let alone what it has
to do with sports medicine.
The only way to describe
planking, aside from having
you Google it, is visualize
people laying in a weird po-
sition stretched out flat in
weird places and trying to
look like a wooden plank.
Well, that is old news; now
there is the phenomenon
called "Tebowing."
Tebowing is the new sen-
sation where people bow
down in Tebow's famed
praying position after he
scores a touchdown. Ran-
dom people and children do
this praying position in var-
ious locations from our
troops in Afghanistan to
dudes (my 6-year-old's term)
on the top of Camelback
Mountain in Arizona.
What this has to do with
sports and health is all
about one's frame of mind!
"Attitude is everything" is a
motto I have lived by all my
life, and that has impressed
me with many of my pa-
tients. This applies to life,
sports and health.
Tim Tebow is a perfect ex-
ample in not only sports-
manship, but most
importantly as a person
with great attitude. He has
been successful due to hard
work, training and faith
throughout his career be-
fore college and during his
time at the University of
Florida. My daughter knew
what the "chomp" was by
the time she was 3.
As an Olympic competi-
tor, I always knew failing
was part of any sport. It is
very easy to give up and
quit when things don't go
your way The truly great
athletes hang in there and
keep on trying. Tim Tebow
has been told by the press
that he will never make it in
the NFL. He could have
quit when they refused to
play him, but he kept on
practicing and becoming
better
Tebow is quoted as saying,
"I never thought I was a fin-
ished product. ... I'm going
to work everyday as hard as
I can ... one day at a time."
One of his fans, a cancer
survivor, is quoted in a
Sports Illustrated article as
saying, "I'm Tebowing while
chemoing ... I'm a cancer
survivor who's trusting."
This is not another article
about Tim Tebow; it applies
to all of us! If you are having
See Page B3


BAT(
Mathie
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


= College Football PREVIEWS =

No. 2 Alabama (10-1, No. 12 Oklahoma (8-2,
6-1) at Auburn (7-4, 4-3) 5-2 Big 12) vs. Iowa
&**J. I^ M- 12-A\


3:30 p.m. (CBS)
Line: Alabama by 21.
Series record: Alabama leads
40-34-1.
KEY MATCHUP
Gus Malzahn's offense vs.
Alabama's defense. This sea-
son has been a struggle for
Malzahn with a youthful team
and inconsistent quarterback
and line play. The Tide leads
the nation in the four major de-
fensive statistical categories.
No. 4 Stanford (10-1) vs.
No. 22 Notre Dame (8-3)
8 p.m. (ABC)
Line: Stanford by 7. Series
record: Notre Dame leads 17-8.
KEY MATCHUP
Notre Dame's run offense vs.
Stanford's run defense. Senior
running back Jonas Gray is out
with a knee injury. He and
Cierre Wood gave the Fighting
Irish a potent one-two punch,
with Wood providing the power
and Gray the speed, combining
for 1,800 yards rushing. Wood
will have to carry the load
against a Stanford run defense
that ranks fifth in the country.
No. 6 Virginia Tech (10-1)
at No. 24 Virginia (8-3)
3:30 p.m. (ABC/ESPN2)
Line: Virginia Tech by 4
1/2. Series record: Virginia
Tech leads 50-37-5.
KEY MATCHUP
Hokies WRs Jarrett Boykin
and Danny Coale against the
Virginia secondary. The Cava-
liers have the nation's 49th-
ranked pass defense, and have
allowed receivers to break into
the clear from time to time, and
have been saved by some
poorly thrown balls that might
have been touchdowns during
their four-game winning streak.
No. 7 Boise State
(9-1, 4-1) vs. Wyoming
(7-3, 4-1)
2 p.m. (The Mtn.)
Line: Boise State by 32 1/2.
Series record: Boise State 5-0.
KEY MATCHUP
Wyoming QB Brett Smith vs.
Boise State secondary. Smith
has shown smarts and accu-
racy all season and is averag-
ing 222 passing yards. He
squares off against a Broncos
secondary dealing with the loss
of veterans and the inexperi-
ence of underclassman. Fresh-
man cornerback Lee Hightower
is making his second start and
sophomore Quaylon Ewing-
Burton may trade off with another
freshman, Bryan Douglas.
No. 9 Oregon (9-2,
7-1) vs. Oregon State
(3-8,3-5)
3:30 p.m. (ABC/ESPN)
Line: Oregon by 28. Series
record: Oregon leads 58-46-10.
KEY MATCHUP
Oregon's banged-up defense
against Oregon State's nothing-
to-lose offense. Ducks linebacker
Dewitt Stuckey (shoulder) and
end Dion Jordan (ankle) left
early in the loss to the Trojans.
Cornerback Anthony Gildon
(neck) did not play at all. USC
quarterback Matt Barkley finished
with four touchdowns. Mean-
while, the Beavers are essen-
tially playing their bowl game.
No. 10 USC (9-2, 6-2)
vs. UCLA (6-5,5-3)
10 p.m. (FSN)
Line: USC by 14. Series
record: USC leads 45-28-7.
KEY MATCHUP
Barkley vs. UCLA's second-
ary. The junior quarterback has
been spectacular down the
stretch, throwing 23 touchdown
passes in the past seven
games with just four intercep-
tions while showing a poise he
often lacked in his first two sea-
sons. UCLA's pass defense has
been quietly effective, yielding
just one 300-yard passing per-
formance in 10 games since
the season opener against
Case Keenum and unbeaten
Houston.
No. 11 Michigan
State (9-2, 6-1) at
Northwestern (6-5, 34)
Noon
Line: Michigan State by 6
1/2. Series record: Michigan
State leads 35-16.
KEY MATCHUP


Michigan State's league-
leading defense, which features
32 sacks and 16 interceptions,
against Northwestern's big-play
offense led by QB Dan Persa
and speedy, sure-handed WR
Jeremy Ebert. Spartans
safeties Isaiah Lewis and Tren-
ton Robinson have four picks
apiece. MSU is allowing only
257 yards per game in total
offense.


state (o-4, 3-4)
Noon (FX)
Line: Oklahoma by 28. Se-
ries record: Oklahoma leads
68-5-2.
KEY MATCHUP
Iowa State QB Jared Barnett
vs. Oklahoma defense. Barnett
is 3-0 as the Cyclones starter
and threw for 376 yards the
most for Iowa State this season
- to beat Oklahoma State. The
Sooners allowed a school-
record 616 yards in a loss at
Baylor last week, including 479
yards through the air.
No. 13 Georgia (9-2) at
No. 25 Georgia Tech (8-3)
Noon (ESPN)
Line: Georgia by 6. Series
record: Georgia leads 61-39-5.
KEY MATCHUP
Georgia Tech's triple-option
vs. Georgia's run defense. The
Yellow Jackets are No. 2 na-
tionally in rushing yards per game
(323.6), trailing only Army. Their
philosophy is to control the
clock with extended drives and
keep opposing defenses on the
field for long periods, with an
eye toward wearing them down
by the fourth quarter. But they'll
face a stiff test against the Bull-
dogs, who rank second in yards
allowed on the ground (81.3).
Massive nose tackles John
Jenkins and Kwame Geathers
free up others in the 3-4
scheme to make plays, and the
team is clearly more comfort-
able in its second season under
coordinator Todd Grantham.
No. 14 South Carolina,
(9-2) vs. No. 18
Clemson (9-2)
7:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Line: South Carolina by 4.
Series record: Clemson leads
65-39-4.
KEY MATCHUP
Clemson WR Sammy
Watkins against South Carolina's
defense. Watkins sat out last
week's 37-13 loss at North Car-
olina State with a shoulder injury
but is expected to be full go for
the Gamecocks. Watkins, a
freshman, leads the ACC with
10 TD catches and is second in
the league with 1,034 receiving
yards. South Carolina's sec-
ondary ranks second in the
SEC to Alabama, giving up
137.5 yards a game through
the air this season.
No. 15 Wisconsin (9-2,
5-2) at No. 20 Penn
State (9-2, 6-1)
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Line: Wisconsin by 14 1/2.
Series record: Wisconsin
leads 8-6.
KEY MATCHUP
Penn State DT Devon Still
vs. Wisconsin's interior line. At
6-foot-5 and 310 pounds, Still is
tied for third in the Big Ten with
16.5 tackles for loss this sea-
son. He didn't have a huge im-
pact in last week's victory at
Ohio State and said this week
that he had been slowed by an
illness. The Badgers' interior
line is unsettled by an injury to
starting center Peter Konz.
No. 17 Michigan (9-2, 5-2)
vs. Ohio State (6-5, 3-4)
Noon (ABC)
Line: Michigan by 7. Series
record: Michigan leads 57-44-6.
KEY MATCHUP
Ohio State QB Braxton Miller
vs. Michigan defense. The
freshman has failed to connect
on half of his passes in three
straight games and is connect-
ing on 48.6 percent overall this
season, getting pushed into a
starting role to replace the de-
parted Terrelle Pryor. If the
Buckeyes are going to pull off
an upset, Miller will likely have
to be accurate on his throws
and surpass his career high of
132 yards passing.
No. 21 Baylor (7-3, 4-3)
vs. Texas Tech (5-6, 2-6)
7 p.m. (FSN)
Line: Baylor by 12 1/2. Se-
ries record: Texas Tech leads
23-14-1.
KEY MATCHUP
Baylor QB Robert Griffin and
RB Terrance Ganaway vs.
Texas Tech run defense. While
Griffin has thrown for 3,572
yards and 33 touchdowns, he is
also quite a runner. Griffin is the


national leader in total offense
(412 yards per game) and Gan-
away is often overlooked de-
spite being fourth in the Big 12
with 95 yards rushing per
game. The Red Raiders are
second in the Big 12 in pass
defense, allowing 224 yards per
game, but part of that is be-
cause opponents are gaining
an average of 250 yards rush-
ing the worst in the league.


Louisville tops USF at home


Associated Press

TAMPA Louisville got
three touchdown passes
from freshman quarterback
Teddy Bridgewater to de-
feat South Florida 34-24
Friday and clinch a share of
the Big East championship.
Louisville (7-5, 5-2), which
rallied from a two-touch-
down deficit in the first
half, took the lead for good
on Bridgewater's 10-yard
pass to DeVante Parker
with 9:38 remaining.
The Cardinals can cap-
ture the Big East's berth in
a Bowl Championship Se-
ries game if Cincinnati
loses once more and Friday
night's Pittsburgh-West Vir-
ginia winner loses next
week.
South Florida (5-6, 1-5),
which needs a victory in
Thursday's regular-season
finale against West Virginia
to qualify for its seventh
consecutive bowl appear-
ance, played the entire
game with sophomore
quarterback Bobby Eveld, a
former walk-on, because of
a shoulder injury to starter
B.J. Daniels.
The Bulls took a 24-20
lead on a 37-yard halfback
option pass from Demetris
Murray to Deonte Welch,
following Lindsey Lamar's
62-yard kickoff return.


Associated Press
Louisville quarterback Dominique Brown runs away from
South Florida linebacker Sam Barrington during the third
quarter in Tampa.


No. 8 Houston 48,
Tulsa 16
Case Keenum threw for 457
yards and five touchdowns,
Patrick Edwards had 181 yards
receiving and four scores and
Houston earned a spot in the
Conference USA champi-
onship.
The Cougars (12-0, 8-0) set
a school season record by win-
ning their 12th game. The 12
straight wins also match the
school's longest winning
streak, set over the 1990 and
'91 seasons.
One more victory in the C-
USA championship game on
Dec. 3 at home against either


Southern Mississippi or Mar-
shall and the Cougars will earn
their first BCS bid.
No. 22 Nebraska 20,
Iowa 7
LINCOLN, Neb. Rex
Burkhead, who started the
week with his right foot in a
walking boot, ran for 160 yards
and a touchdown on a Ne-
braska-record 38 carries.
Burkhead pounded away at
Iowa's defense 4 and 5 yards
at a time and looked like his
old self after being held to a
season-low 36 yards in last
week's loss at Michigan.
He had eight carries for 39
yards on a 10-play drive that


ended with his 2-yard run and
a 20-0 lead early in the fourth
quarter.
The Hawkeyes (7-5, 4-4)
avoided getting shut out for the
first time in 11 years when Mar-
cus Coker scored on a 2-yard
run with 3:26 left.
Nebraska (9-3, 5-3) is hop-
ing to land a berth in the Capi-
tal One Bowl, if two Big Ten
teams are invited to BCS
games, or the Outback Bowl.
Central Florida 31,
Texas-El Paso 14
ORLANDO Latavius Mur-
ray rushed for a career-high
233 yards and scored three
times to help Central Florida
rout Texas-El Paso 31-14 on
Friday night in the season fi-
nale for both teams.
Murray, a junior tailback,
scored on runs of 38 and 40
yards and caught a 6-yard pass
from freshman quarterback Blake
Bortles as the Knights (5-7, 3-5
Conference USA) stopped a
three-game losing streak.
UTEP avoided a shutout
with two fourth-quarter touch-
downs. Jordan Leslie caught a
2-yard pass from Nick Lamai-
son on a fourth-and-goal play
and Joe Banyard added a 7-
yard scoring run.
The Miners (5-7, 2-6)
needed a win to become bowl
eligible.


Ohio St. over Valparaiso; FSU falls


Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio -
William Buford scored 17 of
his 25 points in the second
half and the Buckeyes
cruised past the Crusaders.
Aaron Craft added 15
points and eight assists for
Ohio State (6-0), which
tuned up for a big home
showdown against No. 6
Duke on Tuesday. Jared
Sullinger had 14 points and
13 rebounds and Deshaun
Thomas chipped in with 12
points.
Jay Harris had 18 points
for Valparaiso (5-2).

No. 5 Syracuse 69,
Stanford 63
NEW YORK Kris Joseph
had 18 points and eight re-
bounds and the fifth-ranked
Orange closed the game on a
15-3 run to win the NIT Season
Tip-Off at Madison Square
Garden.
Syracuse (6-0) was never
able to make a run against
Stanford until the game's final
4 minutes, when they made all
five of their shots from the field
and five of seven free throws.
They forced the Cardinal (5-1)
into 24 turnovers during the
game, including three in the
closing stretch.
Joseph had 38 points and
19 rebounds in the two games
and was selected the MVP.
Aaron Bright had 13 points
for Stanford, which led 60-54
with 4:27 to go on two free


Ohio State's Aaron Craft drives to the basket between Val-
paraiso's Kevin Van Wijk, Erik Buggs and Richie Edwards
Friday during the first half in Columbus, Ohio.


throws by Chasson Randle.
Brandon Triche, who fin-
ished with 11 points, started
the Orange's big run with a
drive.
No. 7 Louisville 59,
Ohio 54
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Kyle
Kuric scored 16 points and
Gorgui Dieng grabbed a ca-
reer-high 16 rebounds to give
Rick Pitino his 250th victory as
the Cardinals' coach.
Ohio held a six-point lead
with under 4 minutes to play
before Louisville (5-0) rallied.
Kuric hit a 3 in the corner,
made a key steal and found
Chris Smith for a layup on the
fast break to give Louisville a
53-51 lead with 1:49 left.
After a dunk by Chane Be-
hanan, Ohio's D.J. Cooper hit
a 3-pointer to cut it to 55-54,


but T.J. Hall and Cooper
missed 3s in the closing sec-
onds that would've tied the
game.
Cooper led Ohio (3-1) with
16 points.
No. 10 Florida 107,
Jacksonville 62
GAINESVILLE, Fla. -
Kenny Boynton scored 22
points, Erving Walker added 21
and the Gators used one of
their best shooting perform-
ances to handle the Dolphins.
Florida (4-1) dominated from
the opening tip, allowing little
chance for a repeat of what
happened last year in
Gainesville. Jacksonville upset
Florida 71-69 in overtime,
knocking the Gators out of the
rankings.
Russell Powell led Jack-
sonville (2-3) with 15 points.


No. 17 Pittsburgh 78,
Penn 58
PHILADELPHIA- Khem
Birch had 15 points and 10 re-
bounds, Ashton Gibbs added
16 points and the Panthers
pulled away from the Quakers
to win the Philly Hoop Group
Classic.
Pittsburgh (4-1) got the 20-
point victory over inferior com-
petition it badly needed after
struggling the last three games.
Zack Rosen led Penn (3-3)
with 22 points on 6 of 10 3-
pointers. Tyler Bernardini
scored 14 points.
Harvard 46, No. 22
Florida State 41
PARADISE ISLAND, Ba-
hamas Brandyn Curry had
six points, five assists, and five
steals to help the Crimson
upset the Seminoles in a game
that matched the lowest half-
time Division I scoring total
since 1986.
Oliver McNally and Wesley
Saunders had seven points
apiece for Harvard (5-0), which
will face Central Florida in the
championship on Saturday.
Michael Snaer scored 10
points for Florida State (5-1),
which missed its first 15 shots.
The 14-14 halftime score
matched the output of Ole Miss
(15) and South Carolina (13) in
the first half of their game on
Jan. 8, 2003. The Seminoles
were 5 for 24 from the field in
the first half, and Harvard went
3 for 23.


Red Wings end Bruins' streak LSU
Continued from Page B1


Associated Press

BOSTON Pavel Dat-
syuk and Todd Bertuzzi
scored in the shootout to lift
the Detroit Red Wings to a
3-2 win over Boston on Fri-
day, snapping the Bruins'
10-game win streak.
Datsyuk and Valtteri
Filppula scored in regula-
tion to help the Red Wings
win their fourth straight
and eighth in 10 games.
Daniel Paille and Patrice
Bergeron had Boston's reg-
ulation goals. Nathan Hor-
ton scored in the shootout
for the Bruins, who hadn't
lost since a 4-2 setback in
Montreal on Oct. 29.
Jimmy Howard stopped
41 shots in regulation for
Detroit. Boston's Tuukka
Rask had 29 saves but gave
up two goals in three
shootout chances.

Lightning 2, Panthers 1
SUNRISE, Fla. Steven
Stamkos scored a power-play
goal 2:29 into overtime, lifting
the Tampa Bay Lightning past
the Florida Panthers 2-1 on Fri-
day night.
Florida's Tomas Fleischmann
and Tampa Bay's Vincent
Lecavalier scored in regulation.
Mathieu Garon stopped 23
shots for Tampa, which snapped
a two-game losing streak.


Devils 1, Islanders 0
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Petr
Sykora scored and Johan Hed-
berg made 23 saves to earn
his second shutout of the sea-
son and the 19th of his NHL
career, leading New Jersey
over the Islanders.
Sykora scored with a snap
shot during a power play with
5:47 remaining in the second
period.
New Jersey has won four of
its last six games. New York
has lost four in a row. In that
stretch, the Islanders have
been outscored 16-3.
Flyers 3, Canadiens 1
PHILADELPHIA- Claude
Giroux had two goals and
backup Sergei Bobrovsky
made 23 saves for the Flyers.
Jakub Voracek also scored
for Philadelphia, which got all of
its offense in the second period.
Bobrovsky improved to 5-1-1.
Giroux now has 29 points
(13 goals, 16 assists) on the
season. He entered the game
second in the league behind
Toronto's Phil Kessel.
Petteri Nokelainen scored
and Carey Price made 33
saves for Montreal.
Blackhawks 6, Ducks 5
ANAHEIM, Calif. Patrick
Sharp scored the tying and go-


ahead goals in a 2:01 span
early in the third period to com-
plete his second career hat trick,
and Chicago rallied for a victory
over the foundering Ducks.
Blackhawks captain
Jonathan Toews had two goals
and three assists, helping
Chicago end a three-game
skid and send the demoralized
Ducks to their sixth straight
loss. Dave Bolland also scored,
and Duncan Keith and Viktor
Stalberg each had two assists.
Rangers 6, Capitals 3
WASHINGTON Ruslan
Fedotenko scored twice and
Ryan Callahan had three as-
sists as the Rangers set a sea-
son high for goals in a win over
the erratic Capitals.
After a scoreless first period,
the Rangers scored three times
in a 4:18 span in the second.
Artem Anisimov and Brad
Richards had a goal and an as-
sist each and Dan Girardi had
two assists for New York, which
had lost two straight after a
seven-game winning streak.
Alex Ovechkin broke a six-
game streak without a goal
with his eighth of the season
- his first at home. It came in
the third period, with the Capi-
tals trailing 5-2.
Marian Gaborik scored his
10th goal of the season at 3:37
to give New York a 1-0 lead.


left, made a hard cut
straight up field, then an-
gled left again to break
into the clear.
It was Mathieu's third
touchdown of the season,
his second on special
teams, the other coming
on a fumble return.
LSU's defense sacked
Wilson five times (twice by
Barkevious Mingo) and
picked him off once on
Morris Claiborne's team-
leading fifth interception
of the season.
Two plays later, Jeffer-
son ran 48 yards for his
score on a quarterback
draw that was wide open,
making it 38-17.
Wilson completed 14 of
22 passes for 207 yards,
with 60 yards on a short
pass that Cobi Hamilton
turned into a long gain. The
play put Arkansas in posi-
tion to tie the game at 21,
but LSU's defense forced a
field goal that made it 21-
17, and the Razorbacks never
got closer than that again.
Arkansas has had the
better of its end-of-season
rivalry with LSU in recent
years, having won three of
the previous four meetings,
including a 2007 triple-
overtime upset in Tiger
Stadium when LSU was
No. 1.


B2 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Friday's College Basketball Scores
EAST
Albany (NY) 69, Navy 62
Bucknell 62, Princeton 56
Cleveland St. 63, Boston U. 62
James Madison 86, Rider 69
Morehead St. 61, West Alabama 52
Pittsburgh 78, Penn 58
Rhode Island 85, Hofstra 73
Robert Morris 51, La Salle 44
SOUTH
Auburn 78, Nicholls St. 57
Barry 67, Pfeiffer 57
Chattanooga 65, Savannah St. 63
Clemson 59, Furman 49
Florida 107, Jacksonville 62
Lamar 85, Tennessee Tech 65
Lindsey Wilson 99, Life 83
Louisville 59, Ohio 54
Maryland 73, Florida Gulf Coast 67
Mississippi 64, Miami 61, OT
Mississippi St. 76, UT-Martin 50
NC A&T 88, Barber-Scotia 53
NC State 82, Elon 67
North Florida 69, Jackson St. 60
SC-Upstate 78, Texas-Pan American 63
San Diego 64, New Orleans 56
Tulane 83, Alcorn St. 41
Union (Ky.) 87, Berea 80
Virginia 68, Green Bay 42
MIDWEST
Avila 80, Park 49
BYU 76, Nevada 55
Creighton 104, Campbell 81
Emporia St. 71, Cent. Oklahoma 70
Lake Superior St. 64, Indianapolis 62
Longwood 70, Prairie View 67
Marshall 73, Cincinnati 69, OT
Northwestern 63, Stony Brook 58
Oakland 89, Utah Valley 83
Ohio St. 80, Valparaiso 47
S. Illinois 73, Chicago St. 57
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 81, N. Michigan 76
UMKC 64, Wofford 58, OT
Washburn 88, Newman 63
Wichita St. 68, UAB 46
Wis.-Eau Claire 67, Rockford 62
Wis.-Oshkosh 91, St. Mary's (Minn.) 79
Wisconsin 66, Bradley 43
Xavier 70, Georgia 56
SOUTHWEST
Iowa St. 64, Providence 54
N. Colorado 74, W. Carolina 57
N. Iowa 64, Rice 60
Southern U. 64, Florida A&M 61
FAR WEST
Cal Poly 62, Morgan St. 61
Louisiana Tech 73, Md.-Eastern Shore 54
MVSU 90, Tennessee St. 89, 20T
UNLV 66, Southern Cal 55
Washington 88, Houston Baptist 65
TOURNAMENT
76 Classic
Semifinals
Boston College 66, UC Riverside 62, OT
Saint Louis 80, Villanova 68
Battle 4 Atlantis
Semifinals
Harvard 46, Florida St. 41
UCF 68, UConn 63
Consolation Bracket
Coll. of Charleston 68, UNC Asheville 66
Dick's Sporting Goods NIT Season Tip
Championship
Syracuse 69, Stanford 63
Third Place
Virginia Tech 59, Oklahoma St. 57
EA Sports Maui Invitational
First Round
Cent. Michigan 82, UC Irvine 72
Dartmouth 64, Alaska-Anchorage 52
InnKeepers Beaver Classic
First Round
Bemidji St. 74, Minot St. 45
Michigan Tech 68, SW Minnesota St. 61
Old Spice Classic
Semifinals
Dayton 56, Fairfield 49
Minnesota 76, Indiana St. 69
Consolation Bracket
Arizona St. 84, Wake Forest 56
DePaul 76, Texas Tech 70
Owensboro Classic
First Round
Kentucky Wesleyan 98, Clark Atlanta 57
Rhodes College Thanksgiving Classic
First Round
Ohio Wesleyan 70, Washington (Mo.) 67
Rhodes 77, Principia 43
Union Thanksgiving Classic
First Round
Tougaloo 97, Freed-Hardeman 68
Union (Tenn.) 74, McKendree 65



Friday's Women's Basketball Scores
EAST
Army 71, Manhattanville 40
E. Michigan 54, Cornell 52
Florida 85, La Salle 74
Hartford 64, TCU 60
Hofstra 70, Drake 60
LIU 81, Charlotte 72
Lafayette 66, Wagner 55
Long Beach St. 70, Columbia 61
Monmouth (NJ) 75, Lehigh 73
Princeton 53, Davidson 44
UConn 74, Fairleigh Dickinson 28
SOUTH
Alabama 62, Seton Hall 56, OT
Appalachian St. 64, E. Kentucky 62
Cent. Arkansas 73, Louisiana-Monroe 55
Cumberlands 77, Columbia (Mo.) 64
Florida Gulf Coast 81, Richmond 67
Fordham 70, UCF 57
Georgia St. 70, Campbell 56
Kentucky 73, Sam Houston St. 52
Louisiana Tech 84, Old Dominion 71
Louisville 85, Florida St. 76
Loyola NO 84, Northwestern St. 80
Maryland 84, FlU 52
Mercer 75, High Point 67
NC A&T 67, Siena 53
Nebraska 72, Florida A&M 64
Rutgers 59, Georgia Tech 40
Stetson 71, Miami (Ohio) 62
Texas 79, Virginia 53
UAB 64, SE Missouri 41
W. Kentucky 58, Samford 57
Wake Forest 83, Jacksonville 54
MIDWEST
Calvin 77, Iowa Weslyn 65
Cincinnati 51, Chattanooga 50
Cleveland St. 72, W. Michigan 66, OT
Dayton 94, Buffalo 74
IUPUI 74, FAU 64
Kansas 90, Lamar 40
Marist 57, S. Dakota St. 49
Marquette 71, Prairie View 51
Ohio St. 84, Stony Brook 37
Siena Heights 68, Marygrove 58
Stanford 80, Xavier 64
Toledo 69, Indiana 58
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 69, Grambling St. 49
McNeese St. 67, Texas-Pan American 46
North Texas 61, Texas St. 43
Texas Southern 63, Texas A&M-CC 54


FAR WEST
Arizona St. 51, Illinois 50
Michigan 69, Washington St. 39
N. Colorado 71, Air Force 51
Nicholls St. 83, Weber St. 56
North Dakota 62, S. Utah 61
Oregon 89, UC Irvine 77
Portland 62, Portland St. 54
St. Mary (Neb.) 79, Menlo 76
Tulane 45, Idaho St. 37
Utah 64, Detroit 55
Utah Valley 46, Kent St. 45
TOURNAMENT
Dead River Company Classic
First Round
Brown 55, Evansville 47
Maine 66, Troy 53


For the record


= Flo/rida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected Friday
in the Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
0-5-4
CASH 3 (late)
1-9-0

PLAY 4 (early)
4-1-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)
6-1-8-0

FANTASY 5
3-7-13-23-24

MEGA MONEY
8 34-39-43
MEGA BALL
11


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing From Las Vegas.
(Taped)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (VERSUS) Battle 4 Atlantis, Consolation Game: Teams TBA.
4:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Battle 4 Atlantis, Championship Game:
Teams TBA.
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Las Vegas Invitational: Teams TBA.
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (HBO) Saul Alvarez vs. Kermit Cintron, Super
Welterweights.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6:30 a.m. (ESPN2) California at Arizona State. (Taped)
12 p.m. (ABC) Ohio State at Michigan.
12 p.m. (MNT) Tennessee at Kentucky.
12 p.m. (FOX) Mississippi at Mississippi State.
12 p.m. (ESPN) Georgia at Georgia Tech.
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Rutgers at Connecticut.
12 p.m. (FX) Iowa State at Oklahoma.
12 p.m. (SUN) Rice at Southern Methodist.
12:30 p.m. (CW) Maryland at North Carolina State.
2:30 p.m. (NBC) Grambling State vs. Southern.
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Alabama at Auburn.
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Virginia Tech at Virginia.
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Penn State at Wisconsin.
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Oregon State at Oregon or Virginia Tech
at Virginia.
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Duke at North Carolina.
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Kansas vs. Missouri.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida State at Florida.
7:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Washington State at Washington.
7:45 p.m. (ESPN) Clemson at South Carolina.
8 p.m. (ABC) Notre Dame at Stanford.
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UCLA at USC. (Joined in Progress)
12 a.m. (VERSUS) Grambling State vs. Southern. (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf South African Open,
Third Round. (Same-day Tape)
12 p.m. (GOLF) Australian PGA Championship, Third Round.
(Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) American Century Championship, Second
Round. (Taped)
10:30 p.m. (GOLF) Omega Mission Hills World Cup, Day 4.
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (FSNFL) (SUN) Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning.
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League Soccer Manchester
United vs. Newcastle.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. Thanksgiving Shootout: Lecanto at Dunnellon
BOYS BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. Crystal River at Zephyrhills Tournament


DoubleTree LAWestside Classic
First Round
N. Iowa 60, Wyoming 46
Youngstown St. 64, Loyola Marymount 50
Hoops for the Cure
First Round
Fresno St. 83, Tennessee St. 66
SMU 75, Cal St.-Fullerton 63
Junkanoo Jam-Freeport
First Round
Duke 97, Gardner-Webb 31
Notre Dame 80, Southern Cal 58
Junkanoo Jam-Lucaya
First Round
Iowa 60, St. John's 52
Texas A&M 71, Temple 59
Lady Eagles Thanksgiving Classic
First Round
Southern Miss. 75, Jacksonville St. 58
Stephen F Austin 49, Georgia Southern 40
Nugget Classic
First Round
Nevada 71, Butler 69
Penn St. 66, Iowa St. 59
Omni Hotels Classic
First Round
Wisconsin 71, Montana St. 61
SMC Concord Hilton Tournament
First Round
Quinnipiac 64, Minnesota 62
UNM Thanksgiving Tournament
First Round
Pepperdine 57, Idaho 48
Union Thanksgiving Classic
First Round
Tougaloo 97, Freed-Hardeman 68
Vanderbilt Tournament
First Round
Oklahoma 76, Liberty 45
Vanderbilt 81, Lipscomb 39
Woodland Hills Holiday Inn Classic
First Round
West Virginia 63, UCLA 54
Xavier Classic
Second Round
Langston 55, Dillard 42
Rust 62, Mobile 61
Tuskegee 66, Texas College 52
Xavier (NO) 73, Holy Names 49


Pittsburc
Philadelp
N.Y. Ran
New Jers
N.Y. Island


Boston
Toronto
Buffalo
Montreal
Ottawa

Florida
Washington
Tampa Bay
Winnipeg
Carolina


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
gh 23 13 6 4 30 73
)hia 22 13 6 3 29 80
tigers 19 11 5 3 25 54
sey 21 12 8 1 25 55
nders 20 511 4 14 38


Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
21 13 7 1 27 71
22 12 8 2 26 70
22 12 9 1 25 62
23 1010 3 23 58
22 1010 2 22 65
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF
22 12 6 4 28 63
21 12 8 1 25 69
21 10 9 2 22 57
22 9 9 4 22 64
24 812 4 20 57


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Chicago 23 13 7 3 29 77 73
Detroit 21 13 7 1 27 61 48
St. Louis 21 11 8 2 24 53 48
Nashville 21 10 7 4 24 57 57
Columbus 22 613 3 15 53 73
Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Minnesota 22 13 6 3 29 52 47
Edmonton 22 12 8 2 26 62 53
Vancouver 21 11 9 1 23 61 57
Colorado 22 912 1 19 56 68
Calgary 20 811 1 17 45 56
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 19 13 5 1 27 58 43
Dallas 21 13 8 0 26 56 57
Los Angeles 22 11 7 4 26 54 53
Phoenix 20 11 6 3 25 58 51
Anaheim 22 612 4 16 48 71
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
Friday's Games
Detroit 3, Boston 2, SO
New Jersey 1, N.Y. Islanders 0
Philadelphia 3, Montreal 1
Edmonton 5, Minnesota 2
N.Y. Rangers 6, Washington 3
Chicago 6, Anaheim 5
Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 3
Winnipeg 3, Carolina 1
Columbus 5, Buffalo 1
Tampa Bay 2, Florida 1, OT
Calgary at St. Louis, late
Toronto at Dallas, late
Vancouver at Phoenix, late
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y Rangers, 2 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


Australian PGA
Championship Scores
Friday at Hyatt Regency Coolum Resort
Coolum, Australia
Purse: $1.48 million, Yardage: 6,686; Par: 72
a-amateur
Second Round
Marcus Fraser, Australia 68-65-133
Bubba Watson, United States 67-68-135
K.T Kim, South Korea 69-67-136
Y.E. Yang, South Korea 69-68-137
John Senden, Australia 73-64-137
Adam Scott, Australia 70-67-137
Robert Allenby, Australia 69-68-137
Leigh McKechnie, Australia 68-70-138
Chan Shih-chang, Taiwan 69-69-138
Kieran Pratt, Australia 68-70-138
Stuart Appleby, Australia 70-68-138
Jason Day, Australia 69-69-138


Johnson, Craver named



Bowlers of the Week


Special to the Chronicle

THURSDAY NIGHT 12-
WEEK LEAGUE: The
league meeting of the
Holder Hotshots will be
Dec. 15 at 7 p.m., and bowl-
ing will begin Dec. 22. The
teams are four-persons, all
men, all women or mixed.
Call Peggy Nevels, secre-
tary, at (352) 465-0757 to pre-
register, either as a team or
individuals.
League and tournament
scores for the week ending
Nov. 20:
MONDAY NIGHT SPE-
CIAL: Handicap: Matt O'Brien
271,729; Brendan Dooley 270;
Mike Dudziak 703; Melissa
Burgoyne 280,738; Judy
Timmons 264; Dorine Rigere
724. Scratch: Matt O'Brien
258,690; Wes Foley 249; Phil
Ciquera 664; Dorine FRigere
233,673; Judy Timmons 264;
Lori Ciquera 596.
PRESERVE PIN-
BUSTERS: Handicap:
Clarence Pelkie 261,682;
Peck Noland 242,678; Lucy
Smallwood 240,643; Linda
Sprague 237; Bonnie Bishop
641. Scratch: Larry Kirk
213,597; Emile Guay 208;
Bob Swarm 574; Linda
Sprague 182; Lucy Small-
wood 178; Wanda Schroeder
464; Betty Noland 457.
SUNCOAST SENIORS:


Handicap: Frank Reesby
262; Jack Connell 256,682;
Art Trebon 669; Marylou
Halovich 251; Joyce Cusi-
mano 249,701; Pat Combs
659. Scratch: Frank Reesby
237,535; Jerry Ness 215,614;
Marylou Halovich 194,466;
Barb Steffen 175; Pat Combs
485.
LADIES' CLASSIC:
Handicap: Pat Ouellette
264,728; Peg Hess 262,707.
Scratch: Myla Wexler 199,526;
Pat Ouellette 191,509.
LATE STARTERS: Hand-
icap: Ron Gable 248,669;
Bob Biggs 230; Art Trebon
626; Millie George 233;
Helen Herr231; Ruth Ann
Radford 647; Kathy Hession
237. Scratch: Bob Biggs
205,548; John Marcucci 190;
Ron Gable 190; Frank
Reesby 512; Millie George
194; Kathy Hession 178,508;
Rosemarie Marcucci 491.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
MEN: Handicap: Bobby
Finch 301; Tim Lawrence
297,790; Eric Glowacki 297;
Richie Adams 757. Scratch:
Tim Lawrence 297,790; Eric
Glowacki 278; David Black
658.
PARKVIEW LANES
WOMEN'S TRIO: Handi-
cap: Liz Huxley 246; Dianna
Kirk 236; Carolyn Wood-
ward 661; Terry Moorbeck
659. Scratch: Liz Huxley


214,538; Jane Terrell
192,502.
GOOD TIME BOWLERS:
Handicap: Bob Craver
263,736; Alan Murray 253;
Rocky Sincore 635; Debbie
Littlefield 235; Mary Ellen
Craver 231,685; Mary Jo
Johnson 672. Scratch: Alan
Murray 210; ob Craver
195,523; Rocky Sincore 515;
Barb McNally 188,488;
Laura Bonadonna 164,424;
Mary Ellen Craver 424.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS:
Handicap: Eddie Corbitt
282,742; Frank Papa 571;
Norm Wiest 708; Tammy
McLain 255,704; Jen Sim-
mons 255; Betty Joyce 252;
Betty Rauch 703. Scratch:
Eddie Corbitt 253,655; Jim
Van Gilder 217; Chuck Hind-
baugh 550; Betty Rauch
170,460; Kathy Calcagni 166;
Diane Mauck 456.
PARKVIEW OWLS:
Handicap: Gordon Fay 286;
Ives Chavez 281,800; Marc
Grasso 782; Susan Jones
286,765; Debbie Mills 277,806;
Carolyn Woodward 765.
Scratch: Marc Grasso 242,695;
John Saltmarsh 239,666;
Myla Wexler 187,506; Deb-
bie Mills 186,533.
BOWLERS OF THE
WEEK: Mary Jo Johnson,
120 pins over her average,
and Bob Craver, 160 pins
over his average.


Prep BRIEF


Pirates victorious in first round
of June Reed Memorial
The Crystal River High School boys basketball
team defeated Sunrise Christian 64-16 Friday in
the first round of the June Reed Memorial Tour-
nament in Zephyrhills.


NBA,

Associate


NEW YORK NBA own-
ers and players resumed
talks Friday aimed at end-
ing the 148-day lockout in
time to save the league's
Christmas Day schedule.
That deadline has created
a sense of urgency because
the Dec. 25 schedule is tra-
ditionally a showcase for
the league. This season's
three-game slate was to in-
clude Miami at Dallas in an
NBA finals rematch, plus
MVP Derrick Rose leading
Chicago into Los Angeles to
face Kobe Bryant and the
Lakers.
After a secret meeting
earlier this week, the sides
returned to the table for
more than 10 hours of dis-
cussions. Commissioner
David Stern has said the
league needs about 30 days
from an agreement to when
games could be played.



POWELL
Continued from Page B1

time later, Shawn and his
brother moved back to Rome.
When Shawn entered
Darlington Prep School,
there was no soccer team at
his level, so both Powell
brothers took the knowl-
edge and kicking experi-
ence they accumulated on
the pitch and turned to foot-
ball. Stephen initially be-
came a kicker, and Shawn
followed suit.
"They used to practice to-
gether at home in the yard
with Stephen coaching
Shawn," Kellie Powell said.
"When FSU came to Dar-
lington to have a look at
Ryan McMann, who was a
senior, they noticed Shawn
punting. They said they
would come back at a later
date and talk to Shawn
about FSU.
"In Shawn's senior year,
he received invitations to
visit several universities,



ORDERS
Continued from Page B1

a hard time working out be-
cause of too much Thanks-
giving dinner, illness or just
too worn out, put on the
sports shoes of your choice
go outside and start walking,
then running. Use a cane,
crutch or walker if need be,
but get up and move.
Football coach and TV
commentator Tony Dungy


Top scorers for the Pirates were Sean Hall
with 12 points, Will Cleveland with 10 points and
Damien Westfall, also with 10 points.
The win brings the Pirates' record to 1-1.
CRHS will play host team Zephyrhills in the
championship game of the tournament at 7:30
p.m. Saturday.


rs meeting i

Participating in the talks
for the league were Stern,
deputy commissioner
Adam Silver, Spurs owner
Peter Holt, the chairman of
the labor relations commit-
tee, and attorneys Rick
Buchanan and Dan Rube.
The players were repre-
sented by executive direc-
tor Billy Hunter, president
Derek Fisher, vice presi-
dent Maurice Evans, attor-
ney Ron Klempner and
economist Kevin Murphy.
The discussions between
representatives of the own-
ers and players are now
centered on settling their
lawsuits: The players filed
an antitrust lawsuit against
the league in Minnesota,
and the league filed a pre-
emptive suit in New York,
seeking to prove the lock-
out was legal.
Because the union dis-
banded, it cannot negotiate
a new collective bargaining


but in the end, he chose
FSU, who had shown a great
interest in him," Kellie said.
"The whole family was very
ecstatic, since the bulk of
them lived in the state of
Florida."
When he entered the FSU
football program, Shawn
started as Graham Gano's
holder, but when Gano de-
veloped a knee injury and
required surgery, Shawn as-
sumed his position for the
next seven games. When
Gano returned into the
lineup, Shawn assumed his
original position as Gano's
holder. The following sea-
son Shawn became the
team's punter, and in the fol-
lowing three years estab-
lished himself in the FSU
record books.
Stephen, who was a
standout baseball player at
Citrus High School, is now
in the business world in
Tampa. Sister Lincee com-
pleted college and resides
in Rome, where she is the
program director of the
Floyd County Parks and


notes this about Tebow:
"Winners win; they have a way
of making things happen."
Start by re-evaluating
your golf stroke, your shoes,
your form, your diet and your
attitude. Set a goal for your-
self. It does not have to be
great or long-term. Start one
day at a time and then make
a plan for a week. Start by
making a small difference
maybe getting down on one
good knee and Tebowing.
Getting injured and not
being able to participate in


n New York

agreement, but the settle-
ment talks could lead to
that. The CBA can only be
completed once the union
has reformed.
There are still a handful
of issues relating to spend-
ing rules for teams that
must be worked out is-
sues that have been an ob-
stacle to a new deal since
the lockout began July 1.
Players fear that owners'
desires to curb spending by
the big-market teams
would limit their options as
free agents.
Talks last broke down
Nov. 14 when players re-
jected the owners' pro-
posal that included
opening a 72-game sched-
ule on Dec. 15, instead an-
nouncing instead they were
disbanding the union, giv-
ing them a chance to win
several billion dollars in
triple damages in an an-
titrust lawsuit.


Recreation Dept. Each
Thanksgiving all family
members gather at Glenda's
home in Inverness.
Kellie said Shawn has al-
ways been upbeat and sen-
sitive to others' feelings. She
said his grandmother
played a big role in develop-
ing his character.
"Shawn has always been a
hard worker, and I always
told him he has a heart the
size of Texas," Kellie said.
"He has always been
thoughtful and considerate,
and to be given the opportu-
nity to one, play football at a
college level, and two, to
walk away with only two
classes short of a master's
degree at a great university
like FSU has to be a dream
come true."
With two aunts, one uncle
and four cousins still resid-
ing in the county, the annual
celebration will be at a
fevered pitch today as many
of those relatives travel to
Gainesville to watch Shawn
play in his final regular-
season contest


sport can be really difficult.
You may be told to give up
golf, tennis, paddleball
swimming or worse. There
are ways around most in-
juries. The true survivors
find the way
Above all, have faith. Atti-
tude is everything ask
Tim Tebow.


Ron Joseph, M.D.,
orthopedic specialist, can
be reached at (352) 212-
5359 or rbjhand@cox.net.


played

,d Press


SCOREBOARD


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 B3












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Dance champ
headed to D.C.
WASHINGTON-De-
fense Secretary Leon
Panetta invited soldier-
turned-actorJ.R Mar-

winner of
this sea-
son's
"Dancing
with the
Stars"
competi-
tion, to
J.R. meet him
Martinez at the
Pentagon,
a spokesman said Friday.
During a 10-minute
telephone call Friday,
Panetta told the dance
champion he demon-
strated the strength and
resilience of wounded
veterans, Pentagon
spokesman Capt John
Kirby said.
Martinez credited his
military training for his
performance on the ABC
show, Kirby said. Mar-
tinez and professional
partner Karina Smirnoff
bested fellow finalists
Rob Kardashian and
Ricki Lake in the finale
broadcast Tuesday
Martinez, 28, was se-
verely burned over more
than 40 percent of his
body when the Humvee
he was driving for the
U.S. Army in Iraq struck
a land mine in 2003. After
dozens of operations dur-
ing a nearly three-year
recovery, Martinez be-
came a motivational
speaker and in 2008 won
a role on the now-retired
ABC soap opera "'All My
Children."

Jamaica reggae
founder dies
KINGSTON, Jamaica
- One of the founders of
a leading Jamaican reg-
gae and rock-steady trio
from the 1960s has died.
A bandmate says Barry
Llewellyn of the Hep-
tones died Wednesday at
age 64. Lead singer Leroy
Sibbles said Friday that
Llewellyn died of un-
known causes at King-
ston Public Hospital.
Llewellyn founded the
Heptones with Earl Mor-
gan in the late 1950s. The
Heptones reunited in the
1990s after a nearly 20-
year absence during a
worldwide ska and rock-
steady revival. Llewellyn
is survived by his wife,
Monica, and several
children.


Series ce]
Pittsbur
PITTSBUR(
new online vi(
about a stereo
Pittsburgh fat]
tracting tens o
of viewers.
"Pittsburgh
brates and ma
the unique spi
working-class
"yinz" means
"nebby" mean
"redd up" me;
up. The series
able on YouTu
successful tha
and director C
sta plans mor
dozen new epi
ring his actor
Wootton as the
Preksta is ki
the SyFy chan
"The Mercury
filming "Pittsb
on an iPhone.


Author's musical Muse


Charles Frazier

tunes to the sounds

ofhis childhood

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Growing
up deep in the mountains of west-
ern North Carolina in the 1950s and
1960s, a young Charles Frazier
couldn't wait for the sun to go down.
That's when the WLAC signal
would suddenly come clear out of
the night sky and things would get
really interesting on his radio.
"We had a little radio station that
went off at dark," Frazier recalls.
"So all during the day, one radio sta-
tion, country music. When school
was out there was two hours of
teenage music. And then the sun
goes down and all the sudden
there's this station from Nashville
pouring in. And I liked that really
raw rockabilly stuff that's so hard to
classify It's definitely rawer... than
even country at the time, but it was
way more country sounding than
most rock 'n' roll from places out-
side The South."
James Brown came wailing from
the speaker That spooky voice of
Howlin' Wolf added an uneasy edge
to the night. Guys like Charlie
Feathers and Gene Vincent would
rock his world.
Those sound memories populate
the pages of the author's new best-
seller "Nightwoods," whose quiet,
reflective moments play out to a
soundtrack of rhythm and blues,
early rock 'n' roll and melancholy
jazz.
"Nightwoods" is the story of
Luce, a disconnected young woman
who is left to take care of a nearly
feral set of twins after her sister is
murdered by her husband. As the
book opens, she has sequestered
herself in an abandoned lodge far
from the nearest people or town.
She spends her nights listening to
WLAC and waiting for life to pass
her by before the children and
eventually a love interest named
Stubblefield somehow find her in
her self-imposed exile.
Frazier assigns each of the book's
main figures music that sheds light
on their personalities.
"It always helps me connect with
characters, to think about what
music they respond to," Frazier
said. "So Luce has her WLAC. She
is such a closed-up inner person
who is holding the world at arm's
length and things like that, yet she


Associated Press
Charles Frazier, the author of "Nightwoods" and "Cold Mountain," is pho-
tographed Oct. 14 in Nashville, Tenn. Like the written word, music is a big
part of Frazier's life.


stays up late at night listening to
this really intense, energetic, pas-
sionate music and she sees them
like prayers.
"Or Stubblefield with his record
collection and the reference that
(Miles Davis') 'Kind of Blue' is the
thing that makes him think about
his inability to sustain a relation-
ship. All he can do is listen to 'Kind
of Blue' and get sad."
Frazier talked about "Night-
woods" during a stop last month for
a book festival in, appropriately
enough, Music City. He was some-
thing of a literary rock star while in
town, filling Tennessee's legislative
chamber with admirers for a read-
ing from "Nightwoods." He stopped
by Third Man Records, owned by
"Cold Mountain" film friend Jack
White, for a look around.
Much of the time Frazier sits re-
served behind a salt-and-pepper
beard on a serious face. Ask him
about music, though, and his eyes
light. He becomes animated as if
from some unseen energy source and
his hands begin to move as he talks.
He's been listening to jazz saxo-


phonist Lee Konitz and Tom Waits
in heavy rotation this fall and he's
been listening to new recordings
from Norwegian jazz pianist Tord
Gustavsen, Saharan guitar heroes
Tinariwen and Nick Lowe. Until
record stores began to disappear,
he could be found leaning on the
stacks three or four days a week.
Music is as much a part of his life
as the words with which he fills his
books. The two are intertwined.
The stone walls in his office are
lined with shelves full of CDs, vinyl
and stereo equipment, and some-
thing is always playing as he taps
out his books. His breakthrough
debut, "Cold Mountain," in 1997,
had music at its heart and has
spurred a whirl of creativity as oth-
ers responded strongly to the
sounds in his books.
Bluegrass and roots player Tim
O'Brien and friends recorded an
album of music inspired by that Na-
tional Book Award winner, and
Pulitzer Prize-winning composer
Jennifer Higdon is working on an
opera based on the book, set to
debut in 2015.


Stockard Channing eyes 'Other Desert' return


Associated Press


NEW YORK Stockard
t'1 -- *- -- -1 .... ,., 4-l 4- ---


Channing planned LUto return
to a Broadway stage this
lebrates past Friday night for the
gh dad first time since undergoing
arthroscopic surgery on her
GH A right knee just five days ago.
deo series The 67-year-old Tony
typical Award-winning actress said
her is at- in an interview at the Booth
f thousands Theatre a few hours before
Friday's show time that she
Dad" cele- hopes she can reclaim her
kes fun of part in "Other Desert Cities"
eech of the despite swelling and pain.
city, where Recovery time after surgery
you all, for such injuries is usually at
is nosy and least two weeks and that's
ans clean for professional athletes.
is avail- "Obviously, I'm not out
[be. It's so here playing football. I'm
t creator just out here walking
hris Prek- around in high heels. So
e than a blame it on the Manolos,"
isodes, star- Channing joked.
friend Curt Dressed in a black shirt
e dad. and sneakers, the actress
known for rolled up the leg on her
nel series sweat pants to reveal two
Men." He's small bandages around her
)urgh Dad" right knee and very little
swelling. She's been using
-From wire reports crutches and a wheelchair


Birthday: Chances are the year ahead will quickly prove
whether the path you're on is the correct one. Do not make
any unnecessary changes until you know for sure which
way the worm is turning.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)--Avoid partaking with peo-
ple who previously have been unlucky for you materially.
Chances are nothing has changed, and such folk will con-
tinue to be ill-fated for you in money matters.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -As long as you are making
your own decisions, things are likely to go quite well. Let
someone else call the shots, and it could be another story.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Take some time to help in-
struct those who can't seem to grasp new ideas in a timely
fashion, especially if it means the difference between suc-
cess and failure for you and/or them.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) You might have a bit of trou-
ble understanding what could get you in jeopardy, so don't


"This is maybe stupid. I
don't know. But if it doesn't
blow up or get painful, I'm
doing the right thing," she
says. "I think I will be OK. I
hope it will be OK."
The Jon Robin Baitz play,
about a wealthy, dysfunc-
tional family wrestling with
a deep secret, opened Nov.
3. Channing felt her knee
collapse backstage after the
Nov 18 evening show and
missed seven performances.
She underwent surgery on
Monday afternoon and is
taking an anti-inflammatory
drug. She is also routinely
icing the injury and sitting
with her legs elevated.
Producers are trying to
accommodate Channing by
supplying her with shoes
with a smaller heel on stage,
slightly changing some
scenes so she won't have to
move around as much, and
ferrying her between acts in
a wheelchair She hopes
those measures will only
last a few weeks but expects
to miss some matinees be-
cause she doesn't want to
perform twice in one day
The play also features


Stacy Keach, Judith Light,
Thomas Sadoski and
Rachel Griffiths in her
Broadway debut. It is di-
rected by Joe Mantello. Dur-
ing the performances she
missed, Channing was re-
placed by an understudy
Channing has been a fix-
ture on stage, TV and film
since making her debut as an
undergrad in a Harvard Uni-
versity production of "The
Threepenny Opera." She
first hit Broadway in 1971 in
"Two Gentlemen of Verona"
and her early film credits in-
clude the 1978 movie version
of "Grease," in which she
played bad girl Rizzo.
She won the 1985 Tony for
her role in "Joe Egg," and
went on to act in "Six De-
grees of Separation" on
stage and in the film version,
which earned her an Oscar
nomination. She is perhaps
best known for her role as
the first lady on the former
NBC series "The West
Wing," where she spent time
in a wheelchair after break-
ing her left ankle.
She was last on Broadway
in the 2008 update of the


Today's HOROSCOPE
engage in anything that might cause problems if things
don't go exactly right.
Aries (March 21-April 19) --There are plenty of good buys
out there without you having to think about which one is
better; they'll all be great. Select the one that pleases you
the most.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Get your most difficult tasks
out of the way early while you have plenty of energy to take
on those tough jobs. If you wait too long to do so, you won't
have the fortitude to finish.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't fret if you're better at
making money for someone else than you are for yourself.
The rewards for doing so will come your way sooner than
you think.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Do your homework if you
want to make a good presentation about promoting some-
thing big. The more you know about your product, the eas-


Associated Press
Actress Stockard Channing
arrives June 7, 2009, at the
63rd Annual Tony Awards in
New York.
Richard Rogers-Lorenz
Hart musical "Pal Joey" and
sang a beautiful rendition of
"Bewitched, Bothered and
Bewildered."
"Other Desert Cities" won
rave reviews this fall when it
was off-Broadway at Lincoln
Center Theater It won the
Outer Critics Circle Award
for outstanding off-Broad-
way play and was nominated
for multiple Drama Desk
and Lucille Lortel Awards.


ier it will be to sell.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Although you may be in a good
material cycle, don't discuss your financial situation with
anyone. Someone with devious plans may bogart what you
have in the hopper.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Having a friend who does
things in novel ways can be interesting, but don't try to
mimic their techniques. This person may be exaggerating
what is really going on, anyway.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Be energetic and go after only
big and potentially profitable targets, but be realistic about
your means and ability to do so. You may collapse if you
take on more than you can handle.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) By being so intense about
everything, you will have a tendency to take something that
is meant to be merely interesting far too seriously. Hang on
to your sense of perspective.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

THURSDAY, NOV. 17
Fantasy 5: 3-9 -11 28-33
5-of-5 1 winner $170,052.36
4-of-5 286 $95.50
3-of-5 8,587 $8.50
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23
Powerball: 4 30 35 57 59
Powerball: 25
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 1 winner $200,000
Lotto: 3- 10- 11 -20-42-43
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 50 $4,399
4-of-6 2,757 $61
3-of-6 55,109 $5
Fantasy 5:7 13 21 26 28
5-of-5 1 winner $259,534.17
4-of-5 410 $102
3-of-5 12,702 $9
TUESDAY, NOV. 22
Mega Money: 15 18 22 43
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB 1 $500,000
4-of-4 11 $603

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, Nov.
26, the 330th day of 2011.
There are 35 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 26, 1941, U.S.
Secretary of State Cordell
Hull delivered a note to
Japan's ambassador to the
United States, Kichisaburo
Nomura, proposing an agree-
ment for "lasting and exten-
sive peace throughout the
Pacific area." The same day,
a Japanese naval task force
consisting of six aircraft carri-
ers left the Kuril Islands,
headed toward Hawaii.
On this date:
In 1789, this was a day of
thanksgiving set aside by
President George Washing-
ton to observe the adoption
of the Constitution of the
United States.
In 1933, a judge in New
York decided the James
Joyce book "Ulysses" was
not obscene and could be
published in the United
States.
In 1973, President Richard
Nixon's personal secretary,
Rose Mary Woods, told a
federal court that she'd acci-
dentally caused part of the
18-1/2-minute gap in a key
Watergate tape.
Ten years ago: The Na-
tional Bureau of Economic
Research, the recognized ar-
biter of when recessions
begin and end in the United
States, declared that the
country had entered a down-
turn in March 2001.
Five years ago: In New
York City, an angry crowd de-
manded to know why police
officers killed Sean Bell, an
unarmed man, on the day of
his wedding by firing dozens
of shots that also wounded
two of Bell's friends.
One year ago: Nineteen-
year-old Somali-born Mo-
hamed Osman Mohamud
was arrested by federal
agents during a sting in Port-
land, Ore., accused of plan-
ning to detonate van of
explosives during Christmas
tree lighting ceremony.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Ellen Albertini Dow is
98. Impressionist Rich Little is
73. Singer Tina Turner is 72.
Pop musician John McVie is
66. Actress Marianne
Muellerleile is 63. Actor Scott
Jacoby is 55. Actress Jamie
Rose is 52. Country singer
Linda Davis is 49. Country


singer-musician Steve
Grisaffe is 46. Actress Kristin
Bauer is 38. Pop singer
Natasha Bedingfield is 30.
Thought for Today: "Put
something off for one day,
and 10 days will pass." -
Korean proverb.











CITRUSELIGION COUNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hoping for recognition


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


JOHN SHISHMANIAN/Norwich Bulletin
Donna Jacobson, town council chairman, poses Feb. 9 at a sign marking the foundation site of the Chesterfield Synagogue in Montville, Conn.
For more than half a century, the site of Connecticut's first rural synagogue and Jewish farming community has sat in relative obscurity, but it
could become a national landmark in 2012.

Supporters want site of historic synagogue to be declared national landmark


ADAM BENSON
The Norwich Bulletin
MONTVILLE, Conn. For
more than half a century, the site
of Connecticut's first rural syna-
gogue and Jewish farming com-
munity has sat in relative
obscurity, denoted only by a plain
granite marker
But by next year, the location at
routes 85 and 161 in Chesterfield
could become a national land-
mark, after the state Historic
Preservation Council earlier this
month nominated it for the Na-
tional Trust for Historic Preser-
vation's registry
The community was estab-
lished with a $4,900 investment in
1892 by the Baron Maurice de
Hirsch Fund to build a synagogue
and cooperative creamery to pro-
duce butter, milk and cream.
Revenue from the operation
helped cover maintenance and
overhead costs for the synagogue.
After finding success with the


Montville colony, the Hirsch
Fund set up similar communities
across the state, including one in
Colchester.
According to the website for
the New England Hebrew Farm-
ers of the Emmanuel Society,
whose members are mostly de-
scendants of Hirsch colonies, the


site flourished into the 1930s,
with as many as 50 Jewish fami-
lies living there.
Norwich resident Susan Fried-
land's grandmother, Bessie
Savin, was born on the Chester-
field farm, and she has a cousin
who milks cows at the remnants
of a similar colony in Columbia.


"It's a very interesting piece of
both larger history and American
Jewish history," Friedland said.
"You'd be amazed at how few
people know about it, unless they
have a connection to the place."
Friedland is a member of the
Emmanuel Society
In 2007, the 2-acre site in
Montville was the 24th added to
Connecticut's archaeological
preserve one of just 31 across
the state.
Officials should learn within 60
days whether national recogni-
tion will follow.
Nancy Savin, president of the
Emmanuel Society, said protecting
the site is important to those who
have roots in the area. But it also
highlights a unique and largely un-
known sliver of Jewish history that
needs to be remembered.
"The point is to preserve the
site to make sure it doesn't be-
come a McDonald's," she said.
"This was a little shtetl (town) re-
created in Connecticut."


Behold,


the


Lion
Early one Saturday
morning I was on
the treadmill at the
gym watching "The Lion,
the Witch, and the
Wardrobe" on the TV in
front of me.
TLWW is the first of C.S.
Lewis' Chronicles of Nar-
nia allegorical series
about a wonderland that's
taken hostage by an evil
witch.
In the part of the movie
that caught my attention,
the boy Edmund finds
himself in Narnia, in the
snow, shivering in his pj's,
robe and slippers.
Along comes the White
Witch in her carriage. She
stops and the gnome-like
driver pounces on Ed-
mund and draws his knife,
but the witch tells him to
put the knife down.
She gets out of the car-
riage she's beautiful
and ethereal and she
invites him to sit with her
where it's warm.
He gets in the carriage
and she wraps him in her
fur stole and tells him,
"Anything you want I will
give you."
"Can you make me


Page C6


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Christmas
Advent season starts to-
morrow at Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway. Pastor
Tyler Montgomery is beginning
the season with an Advent
study on Wednesdays called
"Christmas Gifts That Won't
Break," an Advent study for
adults by James W. Moore. In
keeping with the theme of gifts,
during Sunday services at 10
a.m., the topics include: Tomor-
row "The Gift of Hope." Dec.
4 "The Gift of Love." Dec. 11
- "The Gift of Joy." Dec. 18 -
"The Gift of Peace." Also on
Sunday, Dec. 18, the choir will
present its cantata, "Child of
Hope," directed by Debbie
Thompson, accompanied by
John Petro, organist, and Anita
Jackson on the keyboard. On
Christmas Eve at 6 p.m., there
will be a candlelight ceremony
proceeding outside to the
manger with children participat-
ing. Christmas Day service is at
10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 25. Call
(352) 726-7245.
Shepherd of the Hills Epis-
copal Church will present the
14th Annual Father Christ-
mas Ball at 6 p.m. Friday at the
Beverly Hills Recreation Associ-
ation Clubhouse. Silent auction,
and a 50/50 raffle. Appetizers,
cocktails and dinner catered by
John Mason Catering. Dinner
music by Paul Brundage and
accompaniment. Dance music
from the '40 through the '80s
played by deejay Bob Arthur.
Proceeds to benefit Serving
Our Savior "SOS" Food Pantry.
For tickets ($35 each) call (352)


527-0052 or visit the church at
2540 Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto.
Arbor Lakes Chorus, di-
rected by Cory Stroup and ac-
companied by Harry Hershey,
will present "The Many Moods
of Christmas" at 7 p.m. Friday
at Hernando United Methodist
Church, 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. A freewill
offering will be collected.
Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness will host its seventh an-
nual free dinner theater at 7
p.m. Friday through Sunday,
Dec. 2-4. Doors open at 6 p.m.
The event is free; reservations
are required. Welcome back to
"Cricket County," where those
crazy cousins are up to it again.
Last year they were trying to
have a nice Christmas combin-
ing two very different cultures
- country and classy. This
year the cousins reunite to read
an amendment to Uncle Zeke's
will. The rich are hoping to get
richer and the country folks are
just trying to find themselves.
Through a lot of laughter, they
once again find the real mean-
ing of Christmas the birth of
Jesus Christ. Come watch the
hilarity as two worlds collide
and chickens fly.
The drama and music min-
istries of First United Methodist
Church in Inverness will pres-
ent an annual Christmas musi-
cal drama titled, "First
N-O-E-L," at 7 p.m. Friday and
4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3. The
church is at 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road (two miles south of
Applebee's). Call (352)
726-2522.


Religion NOTES

Craft fair


Special to the Chronicle
The Altar and Rosary Society of St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church will host a craft fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 10, in Father Stegeman Hall. The church is on the cor-
ner of U.S. 41 and State Road 40 north of Dunnellon. More
than 30 crafters will be in attendance, along with several
new skilled artisans who will sell a wide variety of handmade
goods. Light refreshments will be available for a nominal fee.
For more information, call Pat at (352) 489-1984.


The Central Florida Master
Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold
W. McSwain, Jr., will perform a
Christmas concert at 3 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 4, at First United
Methodist Church, at 1126 E.
Silver Springs Blvd. (State
Road 40), diagonally across the
street from the old Ritz Hotel.
The program, titled "Carols
from around the World," will
include the Poulenc Christmas
Motet(s), the premiere of two
original works), and carols from
the Huron Nation, Russia,
Ukraine, France, Germany,
Britain, America and others.
Free admission. An offering will
be collected. Call (352)
537-0207.


The Dunnellon Chorale,
under the direction of Jeanne
Wolfanger and accompanied by
Nicole Miglis, will present a
sing-along Handel's "Mes-
siah" at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4,
at Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Dunnellon. Aside from the
solos, all audience members
are invited to sing along with
the choir members on selected
Christmas section pieces.
Members of the choir will be in
the audience to assist. If you
have your own copy, please
bring it. A limited number of
copies will be available.
Singing is optional. Afreewill of-
fering will be collected at the


conclusion of the concert.
World-renowned solo
handbell artist Christine D. An-
derson will present a free local
Christmas concert. "Christmas
in Bronze," at 4 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 4, at Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. Spon-
sored by Crystal River United
Methodist Church and Citr-
usCountyFL.com, the free con-
cert, "Christmas in Bronze," is
open to all and an optional love
offering will be collected. Visit
citruscountyfl.com, email
concert@citruscountyfl.com or
call (352) 564-2020.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness welcomes back
Bryan Popin for another concert
to "kick off' the Christmas sea-
son at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec.
7. Popin will be joined by the
church's Worship Team and
Praise Kids. The church is at
550 Pleasant Grove Road. A
love offering will be collected.
Call the church at (352)
726-1252.
Do you have a favorite
Christmas story? Is there a
special song you would like to
share? Perhaps you have a fa-
vorite Christmas poem. If so,
we want to hear about it. First
Presbyterian Church of Inver-
ness will have a special
evening with dinner at 6 and a
program at 6:45 p.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 7.
You are the program. Make
reservations now for this spe-
cial evening of food, fellowship,
fun and remembering. Call
(352) 637-0770.
See Page C2


D.C.'s


changing


'God


Lobby'

believe it or not,
politicians used to
be able to assume
that when the U.S.
Catholic bishops spoke on
an issue, that meant that
the nation's Catholics had
spoken.
That was so mid-20th
century
Before long, Catholic
liberals backed by Play-
boy's Hugh Hefner and
others would dare to
create a pro-abortion-
rights group called
Catholics for Free Choice.
Before long, American
Catholics would become
so divided that tradition-
alists felt the need to form
a group called Priests for
Life.
Catholics were not the
only believers rocked by
the earthquakes of the
1960s and '70s. Evangeli-
cals ventured out into the
public square, inspired
first by a born-again De-
mocrat from Georgia and
then by the Hollywood Re-
publican who promised to
defeat him. The Protes-
tant mainline declined
and then splintered. Plu-
ralism and globalization
tested old coalitions and
inspired new ones.
See Page C6





C2 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church's Grace Handbell Choir
and a group of eight singers
from the Presbyterian Church
and the Dunnellon Methodist
Church have been invited to
participate in the Nature Coast
Community Band's Christ-
mas concerts at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10, at Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1100
Highland Ave., Inverness, and
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11,
at First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. All seats are
freewill offering.
The Sugarmill Chorale re-
hearses from 7 to 9 p.m. Thurs-
days in the choir room of First
Baptist Church in Crystal River.
New and returning members
are invited to sing with the
chorale in the Dec. 11 Christ-
mas concert. The chorus is
open to any resident living in
Citrus County. Chorale mem-
bers must learn their music,
have a sense of humor and be
committed to rehearsals. Visit
www.facebook. com/sugarmill-
chorale, call Ginny at (352)
746-6829 or email sugarmill-
choraledirector@yahoo.com.
The chancel choir of Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church will
present its annual holiday con-
cert during the 11 a.m. worship
service Sunday, Dec. 11. The
children's Nativity play will be
performed during the 8:30 and
11 a.m. services Sunday, Dec.
18. All are invited to these spe-
cial events. Call the church for
more information at (352) 746-
7161.The church is on County
Road 486, opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando.
The Chorus of Beverly
Hills will celebrate the holidays
with the Christmas concert
"Angel's Song" at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 11, in the sanctuary
of the Beverly Hills Community
Church, 82 Civic Circle. The


RELIGION


first half of the program will con-
sist of secular Christmas songs,
such as "It's Beginning to Look
a Lot Like Christmas" and
"Sleigh Ride." The second half
of the concert will be a perform-
ance of special selections from
the Christmas cantata "Angel's
Song." The Choir of Beverly
Hills Community Church will
join the Chorus for this beautiful
tribute to the birth of Christ. In
addition, Chorus members will
join the church's Choir for its
presentation at the 10 a.m.
service that day. The public is
invited to attend. Tickets for the
afternoon performance ($5) are
available from all Chorus mem-
bers and through the church of-
fice. Director Renate Williams
and accompanist Ruth Car-
ruthers will lead the group,
which has grown in size with
the addition of voices joining
from all areas of the county.
Call the church office at (352)
746-3620 or Volena Van Gunst
at (352) 746-5680.
First Baptist Church of In-
verness will present the musi-
cal, "The Night Before
Christmas" at 6 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday, Dec. 17 and 18.
Join us as we retell the true
story of Christmas and cele-
brate the birth of our
Inverness Church of God
will present the Christmas mu-
sical, "Mary, Did You Know?"
in the 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
worship services Sunday, Dec.
18. Pastor Larry Powers invites
to the public to attend. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness. Call the church at
(352) 726-4524.
First Church of God, 5510
E. Jasmine Lane will present
"A Christmas Gift to Citrus
County" at 2 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 18. This gospel concert
will feature Phyllis Morgan, for-
mer pianist for the Lawrence
Welk Show and piano accom-
panist for Norma Zimmer for
more than 15 years. There is
no charge. A love offering for
Phyllis will be collected. Doors
open at 1 p.m. Public invited.


Festival of carols


Special to the Chronicle
First Lutheran Church will present "A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols," featuring music
and scripture readings to tell the story of the birth of Christ. This is a divine service to cel-
ebrate the Nativity, just as it is traditionally performed every Christmas Eve at Kings Col-
lege, Cambridge, England. This is an inspiring event which incorporates nine lessons from
Scripture with the singing of some of the most beloved Christmas carols and hymns of all
time. The service will be celebrated at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18, in the First Lutheran Church
sanctuary at 1900 W. State Road 44, Inverness. All are invited. There is no admission
charge. A freewill offering will be collected. For more information, call the church office at
(352) 726-1637.


The Central Florida Master
Choir will be at Dunnellon Pres-
byterian Church at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 18, as part of their
concert series. They will pres-
ent their seasonal concert,
"Carols from Around the
World," with a freewill offering
taken at the end of the concert
with all proceeds going to the
Master Choir. The church is at
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
Cornerstone Christian Sup-
ply, a ministry of Inverness
Church of God, is having a
Christmas sale through Dec.
24. Stop in and pick up a copy of
our Christmas catalog for
coupons and sale details. The
bookstore is an excellent source
for all your Christian needs:
Bibles, music, greeting cards,
books, T-shirts, gifts, etc. Corner-
stone Christian Supply is at 416
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Call the
bookstore at (352) 344-2470.
Episcopal Church of the
Advent Christmas services:
Christmas Eve 5 p.m. family


service with Holy Eucharist,
and 10 p.m. Solemn High Can-
dlelight Mass. Christmas Day
- 8 and 10 a.m. Holy Eu-
charist services. New Year's
Day Sunday Holy Eucharist
services at 8 and 10 a.m. The
church is at 11251 S.W. High-
way 484, Dunnellon, (1.2 miles
west of State Road 200,
Ocala). Call (352) 465-7272.
First Baptist Church of In-
verness will have a candlelight
service at 6 p.m. Christmas
Eve. The Christmas morning
service is at 10. All are invited
to join us in celebrating Christ-
mas. The church is at 550
Pleasant Grove Road. Call
(352) 726-1252.
Sale away
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills
will host its monthly outdoor
flea market from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. today on the church prop-
erty at 6 Roosevelt Boulevard
in Beverly Hills, off North


Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491). Shoppers are wel-
come. Up to 50 commercial
and private vendors will display
their wares. "Cookin' Good" is
on hand to serve a variety of
breakfast and lunch items.
A yard sale to benefit its
food pantry will open for the first
time in the parking lot of First
Presbyterian Church of Crystal
River from 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 3. The church is
at 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 adjacent to
the Sweetbay plaza. Approxi-
mately 40 sales sites are avail-
able for rent to sellers at $10
per space. Sellers will keep their
own profits with proceeds from
space rentals going to support
the church's weekly food pantry.
The sites are large enough to
accommodate the seller's car
and a table. Sellers must bring
their own tables and other
needed equipment. Food will be
for sale on site by Oyster's
restaurant. A community table
will be available to accept dona-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

tions of items (with the excep-
tion of clothing ) from church
members and friends brought
on the day of the sale. Pro-
ceeds from this table will benefit
the pantry. The church's food
pantry, open from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Tuesday, is being
stretched to its limits by the in-
creasing needs of the commu-
nity during the current economic
downturn and if successful, the
yard sale may be repeated on a
regular schedule to help provide
additional funds needed for this
ministry. For more information
or to rent a space at the sale,
call (352) 746-7585.
Flea market and bake
sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, Dec. 3, at St. Lawrence
Church, 320 Dade Ave., Bush-
nell (off Highway 301). Sloppy
Joe's, hot dogs and drinks
available. For reservations, call
Mrs. Petty at (352) 793-7773.
"Snowman Bazaar" from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
3, hosted by the Women of
First Lutheran Church, 1900
State Road 44 West, Inverness.
Arts and crafts/vendor fair with
a bake sale, lunch, coffee and
cold drinks available for pur-
chase. A portion of the pro-
ceeds will go to help support
HOME, a Christian home for
pregnant and unwed teenage
mothers and their babies. Call
(352) 726-1637.
A bake sale sponsored by
the Holy Myrrhbearers of St.
Raphael Orthodox Church will
take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Dec.3, and from noon
until sold out on Sunday, Dec.
4. Purchase ethnic and tradi-
tional pastries and breads early
for the holidays. Come early for
the best selection. The church
is at 1277 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness. Visit www.straphael
church.org for directions.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For

Advertising
Information



i Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon
9, ooo_ 00093QJ


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
LI I 1 l .. . .r t
i I l .i ,, , i ,


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
795-5325
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Blueqrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
8:00am & 10:30am
Sunday School
All Ages & Adults 9:30am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


- ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pmr
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm o
795-4479


CJr Crystal
05 River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6 pm
Pastor John Hager


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRISf
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE -
SALVATION
A M CITRUS COUNTY
AM Y CORPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
ii nesaMGer


62-53 ..

onoU omom


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music /"Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


SWest :0
Citrus
Church of Christ HCK, YOU'LL FIND
A CA ING FAMILY
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr. IN CH KIST
Crystal River, FL 34465-
352.564.8565 C -YSTXL
www.westcitruscoc.com R I VK
w.JNTED
W. Deep Woods Dr. 0 VNITED
; AETHODIST
tf 'B CH UCH

2 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
C (2 Mi. N Of US 19)


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey J


I9-314 10
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
* A Stephen Ministry Provider
ii ii


1


C Crytal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
s Provided



Come ,GO
grow [
with us!

The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!

I Pastor
Richard
Hart


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service
LocatBion:^^^^
CrystalI Riv r Foi da ;: [ij
(352)795-2594^B
htt:/wwwcystarierase blyog


US Hwy.19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call (352) 726-1707.
Special events
First Assembly of God will
host Grammy award tenor


RELIGION


singer Larry Ford in concert
during the 10:30 a.m. service
Sunday. Ford is often seen on
the Gaither Homecoming Se-
ries and has been singing since
the age of 5. He was trained in
classical music but his reper-
toire contains a variety: South-
ern Gospel, classical hymns,
patriotic, Christmas, and con-
temporary. The church is at
4201 S. Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness. Pastor Dairold
Rushing invites the public to at-
tend. Free admission. An offer-
ing will be received.
Citrus County has a non-
profit organization known as
"Family & Friends Reaching
for the Abilities." FFRA is a


support program comprised of
caregivers and their loved ones
who get together frequently for
activities, informative discus-
sions on government programs,
social activities and more re-
garding our situations. Call Ron
Philips at (352) 382-7819
and/or attend one of our meet-
ings which are held regularly at
the Key Center location in In-
verness at 130 Heights Ave.
The meetings take place the
second Friday monthly starting
at 9 a.m. with coffee and re-
freshments. Public is invited.
The Legacy League of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church on U.S. 41 in Dunnellon
will host a "Gator-Seminole


Rib Dinner" today. Dine in and
watch the Florida-Florida State
game on a big screen in Father
Stegeman hall. Serving starts
at 11:30 a.m. Game starts at 1
p.m. Dinner includes ribs and
sauce, coleslaw, baked bean
and rolls. Desserts, funnel
cakes and drinks are extra.
Tickets are a $15 donation and
can be obtained by any Legacy
League member or in the
church office. Takeouts will be
available. Show your team spirit
by wearing team colors, hats
and shirts.
For the first Sunday of Ad-
vent tomorrow, the women of
Joy Lutheran Church will have
their "ThankOffering Sun-


day," in which they conduct the
entire service at 8:15 and 11
a.m. The offerings collection will
be sent to the ELCA headquar-
ters for national church pro-
grams. The Rev. Edward
Holloway, Jr., senior pastor, will
conduct services at 6:45 p.m.
Wednesday during Advent,
providing the message on the
"Star Story." All are welcome.
The church is on S.W. State
Road 200 at 83rd Place, Ocala.
Call (352) 854-4509, ext. 221.
Have you always wanted
to write a child's picture book?
Artist Jan Hitchcock of Beverly
Hills will publicly demonstrate
the process from concept to
production. Hitchcock wrote


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C3

and illustrated "Rosie's Flight"
and will be available to sign
copies and answer questions
about putting together such a
project from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday
at the Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida
Ave. (U.S.41). All are invited.
Call (352) 465-4225 or visit
naturecoastuu.org.
The Proclaimers Quartet
will be at Hernando Church of
the Nazarene, 2101 N Florida
Ave, Hernando, on Sunday,
Dec. 4. The Hernando
Nazarene Celebration Sounds
choir and orchestra will open
the concert at 5:45 p.m. The
See NOTES/Page C4


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lit il ( Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912



For

Information

On Your

Religious

Advertising


St. Scholastica
Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
SATURDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9am
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
.. Floral City, FL.


gEMPI
P4 oACE City oad
Old Florl"
.3 of a mile north of SR 48
at 7431 Old Floral City Rd.
Come & Fellowship
Service Times:
Sunday School.........9:30 am
Sunday Worship.....11:00am
Wed-Night Awesome
Bible Study...............7:00 pm
Call 352-726-0501
it'here- Loce





HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


Heart,
OPM


VDoors

S .. .. ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E.Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1' miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages


1 Faith
Lutheran
Church(L.CMS.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


Come as you are!
EsIES.IS
COMMUNITY CHURCH
14 --'W -*


Henno F 44


F;


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253




l'- t /e n -* 4 I f
Grace Bible
Church





Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................ .Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM........Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1/ mi. east of U.S. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


,Hemnando
airchof
TheNazarene
I Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


jHomosassa Springs
A,, I .,'ErL.ni Th t'.nT.T'CHURCH

-N




Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org


3790 E. ParsGn's Point Rd.
Homendo, FL 34442
352-726-6734
Visit us Gn the Web at
www.fbchemmndo.cm
I





C4 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Proclaimers will perform at 6
p.m. The public is invited to this
free concert. A love offering will
be collected.
St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will meet at
10:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 8.
Christmas luncheon at the Boat
House after the meeting. The
form for reservations and pay-
ment is available in the office. St.
Benedict Council of Catholic
Women will put on a play on Jan.
15. Cost is $10 per person. Light
refreshments will be served.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River will host
free 15-minute memory
screenings for adults 50 and
older from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 13. Appoint-
ments required. Call (352) 795-
5325. Participants will meet
privately with Jerry Fisher,
MSW, program specialist for
the Alzheimer's Association,
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter.
While the screening is not con-
sidered a diagnostic tool and is
not intended for those who
have dementia orAlzheimer's,
it is extremely helpful when it
comes to determining if there is


INVERNESS
CHURCH
I OF GOD
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jo PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway

For more
information call
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon








A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service
-.I^AI


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.


Bible Study& Prayer 7:00 P.M.
ig o


RELIGION


a memory problem.
Citrus Zen Group, Bud-
dhist meditation, meets at 3
p.m. Sunday at the Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship, 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41 north of
the Holder intersection). Call
(352) 464-4955 for information.
Worship
Living Water Ministries is
open at its new location at 1
Beverly Hills Blvd., in Beverly
Hills at the corner of County
Road 491 .The thrift store is
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday. The
store is accepting clean,
saleable donations of jewelry,
clothing, household items, furni-
ture and appliances. Pick-ups
are available for larger dona-
tions, and tax deductible forms
are available on request. Call
(352) 270-8886. Services and
meetings also take place at the
new location. Sunday praise
and worship service is at 5 p.m.
with music, and a Bible-based
message by Pastor Wayne
Wilkinson. A Christian 12-step
support group meets at 6 p.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study at 7:30. Free breakfast
and Bible study is at 8:30 Sat-
urday mornings. The Christian
Youth Center will open soon.
Living Water Ministries is a non-
denominational church where


S45 Years of
FIRST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
A Christ Centered Family Church
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

SSunday School
& Bible Class


726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


nature Coas

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG


Creating a world
that works for all
GCod's 'hiidren.


everyone is welcome to all
events. The ministry's motto is
"come as you are ... but expect
to be changed."
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church will cele-
brate the first Sunday of Advent
with Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and 10:30
a.m. tomorrow with Christian
Formation at 9:15, Sunday
school at 10 a.m. and nursery
at 10:30 a.m. Healing service
and Eucharist at 10 a.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study and sack lunch. SOS at
Key Training Center from 9
a.m. to noon Thursday. Evening
Bible study in parish hall at 7
p.m. Thursday.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church has a "come as you
are" service with Communion at
5 p.m. Saturday. Sunday wor-
ship services begin with early
service with Communion at 8
a.m., Sunday school classes for
all ages at 9:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship hour at 9 a.m., and tra-
ditional service with
Communion at 10:30 a.m. Spe-
cial services are announced.
Nursery provided. The church
is at 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S.19), Crystal River. Call
(352) 795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutherancrystal
river.com.
Faith Lutheran Church in


Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. 6:00 PM Bible Study
Children's Church School
Weekly
ALL ARE WELCOME


SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE



BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
Do you miss sound Bible teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 445-9013













VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. &10:30 AM.

SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PrM..


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:30 P.. Sat
orByAppointmnent


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
U. .catholicweb.com *:


Crystal Glen Subdivision,
Lecanto, has services tonight at
6 and Sunday at 9:30 a.m. with
the sermon of "Life Without
Roosters," from Mark 13:24-37,
and Pastor Stephen Lane will
deliver the sermon. Fellowship
follows the Sunday service with
Bible study and Sunday school
for children at 11 a.m. Advent
services in preparation for
Christmas are at 5 p.m.
Wednesday through Dec. 14
with a covered-dish supper fol-
lowing. The church is handi-
capped accessible, has hearing
assistance and offers a cry
room for small children. For in-
formation, visit faithlecanto.com
or call (352) 527-3325.
Roy Bradley will talk about
"Joy and Happiness" on Sun-
day at the fellowship of the Na-
ture Coast Unitarian
Universalists (NCUU) at 7633
N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Bradley is an NCUU member
and he will speak about greet-
ing people and the value of
saying great, joy and happi-
ness, and the benefits the
church has provided. Call (352)
465-4225 or visit nature
coastuu.org.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise Sun-
day school class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033

First Baptist Church
of Beverly Hills y
Marple Lewis, III Jeff Owen
Pastor Minister of Worship
and Youth
Sunday Services:
Bible Study 9:15 A.M.
Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Services:
Prayer and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
Located at the intersection of
Hwy. 491 (Lecanto Hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours 9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com









0 Hwy. 44E@
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
1 Sunday Services
*8 Traditional
S8 AM and 11:00 AM
S Contemporary
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
Sunday School for all ages
9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group .
5 to 7 PM 0
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
" Podcast: FPC inv.com
" Church Office 637-0770
0 Pastor Craig Davies *


a.m., "Kid's Church" for ages 4
through fourth grade during the
9 a.m. service featuring Bible
stories, skits, music and group
activities; Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. A nursery is available for all
services except the 7:45 a.m.
class. Evening fellowship is at 6
with various services during
summer months. On Wednes-
days at 6 p.m. is a prayer meet-
ing, "Women in the Life Of
Jesus" study, "Youth Ignite,"
"Praise Kids" and a nursery for
age 3 and younger Call the of-
fice at (352) 726-1252). The
church is at 550 Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness. The website is
www.fbcinverness.com.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, will have
Sunday morning worship at 8
and 10:30. Sunday school for
ages 3 through eighth grade
begins at 9:15 a.m. Bible class
at 9:15 a.m. continues with the
topic, "Caring for Souls: People
Matter." Tuesday evening choir
rehearsal is at 6:30. Enjoy a
bonfire, sing-along, stargazing,
food and fellowship at 5:30 p.m.
Friday.
Decorating the sanctuary for
Christmas will take place at 9
a.m. Saturday, Dec. 3. St.
Paul's school has begun bas-
ketball season and cheerlead-


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
Senior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ................ 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday I
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


7/WI nrii 8elo mes

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260





SFirst

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ing practice. Any student still in-
terested in joining the teams,
should report this week. Call
(352) 489-3027.
St. Anne's Anglican
Church is on Fort Island Trail
West, Crystal River. St. Anne's
celebrates the first Sunday of
Advent at the 8 and 10:15 a.m.
services tomorrow. St. Anne's
will host "Our Fathers Table"
today from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Overeaters Anonymous
meets Wednesdays from 10 to
11:30 in the sanctuary and 7 to
8 p.m. in the parish library. Al-
coholics Anonymous meets at 8
p.m. Friday and Monday in the
parish library. St. Anne's will
host a Christmas sing-along at
6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18.
The first Sunday of the Ad-
vent season is the beginning of
a new seven-part series of ser-
mons, "The Journey to Bethle-
hem," by the Rev. David Rawls,
pastor of Crystal River United
Methodist Church. The title of
the sermon is "Mary of
Nazareth." Based on Luke 1
26-38, Rawls will use as his
theme, "Here I am, A Servant of
the Lord."
The church is at 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave. Services are at 8, 9:30
and 11 a.m. Call (352)
795-3148.

See NOTES/Page C5


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com








Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison, III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! I

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON,


ERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Sunday services in-
clude the Holy Eucharist Rite 1
service at 8 a.m. and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 service at 10:30
a.m. Adult Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eu-
charist service and children's
church are both at 10:30 a.m.
Youth Sunday school and
young adult forum with lunch
follows the 10:30 a.m. family
Eucharist service. Fun activities
and fellowship are planned.
Feed My Sheep feeding pro-
gram for people in need is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service at 12:30 p.m.
Visit stmaggie.org. The church
is an equal opportunity
provider. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Sunday wor-
ship schedule: Traditional serv-
ice at 8 and 11 a.m.,
contemporary service at 9:30
a.m., Sunday school hour at
9:30 and coffee hour from 9 to
11 a.m. The first Sunday of Ad-
vent will feature the dedication
of the greens and the Rev.
Craig Davies preaching. New-
member class is at 4 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 11; for class and
supper reservations, call (352)
637-0770 by Dec. 5.
Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
the Children's Ministries Build-
ing. Sunday school begins at
9:30 a.m. with classes for
everyone The church has many
Christian education opportuni-
ties for all ages at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Missionettes and
Royal Rangers Clubs meet for
children from the age of 3. All
teenagers are invited to the
youth group, "Gravity," with
Youth Pastor Jon Uncle. At the
present time, the adult class
meets in rooms 105 and 106 at
7 p.m. Wednesday. The church
is at416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Call the church at (352)
726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday in the newly reno-
vated sanctuary. The church is
barrier free and offers a free
tape ministry and large-print
service helps and hearing de-
vices. A nursery attendant is
available for children ages 3
and younger. All are welcome.
Advent worship service at 7
p.m. Wednesday preceded by
a potluck supper at 6 p.m. Call
the church for more information
at (352) 746-7161.The church
is on County Road 486, oppo-
site Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City invites everyone to
Sunday worship at the 8:30 a.m.
blended service and the 11 a.m.
traditional service. Coffee and
doughnuts are served in the fel-
lowship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. Wednes-
day evening suppers begin at 5.
Cost is $3 for adults, $2 for
youths, $1 for children 12 and
younger, or a maximum of $10
per family. Following supper,
services begin at 6:30 p.m. and
include children's ministry
(Awana), youth ministry (grades
6 through 12), and adult Bible
study and prayer meeting. Sanc-
tuary choir practice follows at 8
p.m. The church is at 8545 E.
Magnolia St. Call (352) 726-4296
or visit www.fbcfloralcity.org.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11).
The church has a radio pro-
gram on WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11
a.m. Saturday. The church is
at the intersection of State


Road 44 and U.S. 19. Call
Evangelist George Hickman at
(352) 794-3372 or (352) 795-
8883, or email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
family life center, at 2018
Colonade Street. Sunday serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and
Beverly Hills on Tuesdays. Call
the church at (352) 637-0923.
Floral City United
Methodist Church invites the
public to the 8 a.m. service in the
1884 church and the 10:30 a.m.
service in the main sanctuary.


RELIGION


Sunday school for all ages
meets at 9 a.m. Bible studies are
at 10 a.m. Tuesday at in Burkett
Hall and 6 p.m. Wednesday at
in the 1884 building. Boy Scouts
meet at 7 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday. Girl Scouts meet
at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Choir prac-
tices at 2 p.m. Wednesday.
"Team Sword" youth group
meets from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednes-
days. All teens in sixth grade and
up are invited.
Regular Sunday worship
services are at 8:15 and 11
a.m. at Joy Lutheran Church
on S.W. State Road 2100 at
83rd Place, Ocala. Sunday
school classes are at 9:45 a.m.
The German language worship
service is at 3 p.m. the first
Sunday monthly. The Wednes-
day evening worship service is
at 6:45. Pastor Ed Holloway
leads Bible study in the Gospel
of Luke at 3 p.m. Thursday.
The community is welcome.
Call (352) 854-4509, Ext. 221.
First Christian Church of
Inverness invites everyone to
worship and fellowship. Sunday
school is at 9 a.m. and the wor-
ship service is at 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday evening meals, be-
ginning at 4:45 p.m., are fol-
lowed by choir practice at 5 and
prayer and Bible study at 6 p.m.
The meals are $3 for adults and
$1.50 for children under age
12. Call the church at (352)
344-1908, email
fccinv@yahoo.com or visit
www.fccinv.com. The church is
at 2018 Colonade St.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and for
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups also meet at 9 a.m.
Sunday and 10 a.m. and 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. All residents
of the area are welcome. Sun-
day morning worship service is
at 10. Peace Lutheran Church,
"The Church On The Hill," is
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at (352) 489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school
classes begin at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowing fellowship, coffee and
goodies. The morning service
begins at 10:45. The Sunday
evening service begins at 6.
Midweek service is at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The church is on
East Parsons Point Road in
Hernando (directly across from
the Hernando Post Office).
At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms is
preaching verse by verse
through the Book of Revelation
during the morning service.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m.
with classes for all ages. Sun-
day church services are at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. with special
children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is
provided for all services. Every-
one is welcome to attend. The
church is at 9850 S. Parkside
Ave. in Floral City, just south of
Floral Park. Call (352) 726-
0360 for more information.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids"
and "Flyers" for K-5 grades
from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and
prayer meeting at 7 p.m. with
"Warriors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call
(352) 628-4793.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church, 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, welcomes everyone
to worship at Divine Liturgy on
Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers
at 5. A coffee hour/fellowship
gathering takes place after Di-
vine Liturgy every Sunday. The
church appreciates donations
of canned goods and other
nonperishable items, which are
donated regularly to the Citrus
County Resource Center. Visit
www.straphaelchurch.org.
Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday


and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call (352)
795-4943 or (352) 563-0056..
First Church of God (a
nondenominational congrega-
tion) worships at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday and includes a chil-
dren's church service. Evening
service at 6. Choir practice at 5
p.m. Wednesday followed by
prayer time and Bible study.
JoyBelles ladies meet the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly. Men's
breakfast the last Saturday
monthly. Theme-planned fel-
lowship supper once monthly.


St. Jude Medal


Special to the Chronicle
On Saturday afternoon, Nov. 19, during the celebration of
Holy Mass, a very special recognition was given to Loretta
Muller by Father Eric Peters, pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Catholic Church in Citrus Springs. Father Eric pre-
sented Mrs. Muller with the St. Jude Medal, the award
Bishop Lynch grants to a member of each parish annually
for distinguished service to the Church. Mrs. Muller has a
long list of accomplishments. She has served as president of
St. Elizabeth's Council of Catholic Women four times, during
which she worked diligently and enthusiastically on multi-
ple activities. Loretta organized the "Christmas Giving Tree"
for families in need at Christmastime. At Christmas and
Easter, Loretta has visited homebound parishioners and
those in nursing homes, many times bringing them flowers.
She has always "been there" when help was needed to or-
ganize a funeral brunch or if her garage was needed to store
articles for rummage sales or tricky trays. At the present
time, Loretta is a hospice volunteer.


The "Saturday Night Gospel
Singing Jubilee" at 6 p.m. the
last Saturday monthly is open
to all. Refreshments and fellow-
ship follow. Church is at 5510
Jasmine Lane, Inverness. Call
(352) 726-8986.
New Beginnings Fellow-
ship, 2577 N. Florida Highway
in Hernando, invites the com-
munity to spirit-led revival serv-
ices during the week and
Sunday worship services.
NBF's weekly schedule in-
cludes "Wednesday Night in the
River" and "Friday Night Fire"
services at 7 p.m. Afellowship
dinner precedes both meetings
at 6 p.m. Dinner guests are
asked to bring a dish to share.
Special guest ministers are in-
vited often. Child care provided.
Sunday celebration services at
8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
worship, Bible-based word
teachings and prophetic prayer
ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m.
service. Child care provided for
the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call
(352) 726-8333.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W.
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call (352) 628-3858.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-
denominational and Bible
based, only preaching the Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call (352) 382-2557.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children's/youth program for
ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call (352) 489-7515.
Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at (352) 212-4320.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call (352)
746-3620.
All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
days at The Little House, 4929
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick
at (352) 726-9998.
House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m. and


6 p.m. at North Lecanto Highway
and North Dawson Drive, Her-
nando. Wednesday Bible studies
and youth meeting at 7 p.m.
Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Everyone
is welcome. Jessie Lolley is the
pastor. Call (352) 621-7260.
Mt. Zion Christian
Church has a new home at
6570 W. Ost West St., Ho-
mosassa. All welcome. Come
as you are. "Worship and
Word" is at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
Children's "God Squad" meets
at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For infor-


t+cco
"First ForChrist ..John 1: 41
0006T9U
FIRST |
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study







V cory


in


Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Si,id., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor





First United

Methodist


tChurch
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion


9:45 AM
Sunday School

11:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship


mation or directions, call Pastor
John at (352) 573-7198.
House of Peace, a nonde-
nominational full-gospel church
and a division of House of
Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time
as the church service.
Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
North Avenue West, Brooksville.
Call (352) 796-8331.
Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call (352) 746-1270.
Just for kids
"Saturday Night KIDZ,"
for children 5 years old through
the third grade, is now available
on Saturday nights while par-
ents and teenagers are in-
volved in "Praise, Prayer and
Power" at North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs. Bible
stories and activities for chil-
dren are led by a team of work-
ers. Childcare is also available
for babies through 4 years of
age. Saturday night services
begin at 6 and everyone is wel-
come. The church is at the in-
tersection of N. Elkcam Blvd.
and N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Call
(352) 489-1688..
Grace Bible Church in Ho-
mosassa invites all children in
preschool through eighth grade
to Awana Club from 6 to 8:15
p.m. Tuesday through April.
Awana is an acronym -'Ap-
proved Workman Are Not
Ashamed' from 2 Timothy 2:15
in the Bible. Awana is one of
the largest nondenominational
children's and youth ministries
in the world. The church is at
6382 W. Green Acres St. in Ho-
mosassa. Call (352) 628-5631
First Baptist Church of In-


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida

Sunday Masses
7:30A.M., 9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M

726-1670


First 4
Baptist|_
Church of
Inverness
550 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida
(352) 726-1252

SUNDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
7:45 a.m.
Bible Study
9:00 a.m.
Worship
10:30 a.m.
Bible Study for all
4:00 p.m.
Worship Choir Practice
5:15 p.m.
Awana
5:45 p.m.
Connection Classes

WEDNESDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
4:30pm Bread Basket Cafe
6:00pm Praise Kids
6:00pm Youth Ignite
6:00pm Mid-Week Worhsip
7:30pm Praise Team & Praise Band
Nursery Provided All Services
Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor
wwwJfbinverness.comff


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and .


harmony to all. 'i.

Come on over to "His" house,) '-it spirits ill be Ip /!!! ::

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C5

verness has AWANA from 5:15
to 7:15 p.m. Sunday. The pro-
gram is for children 2 years
through fifth grade. "Adult Con-
nection Classes" are during the
AWANA session. Call the
church at (352) 726-1252 for in-
formation and registration. The
church is at 550 Pleasant
Grove Road.
AWANA Club for kids 2
years of age through the fifth
grade is at 6:10 p.m. Wednes-
days at North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs, 9324
N. Elkcam Blvd.. Each week
through the school year, club-
bers are involved in age-appro-
priate Bible study, games and
activities. Healthy competition
between teams adds to the
awards kids can earn and
AWANA bucks they can spend
in the AWANA store. Call (352)
489-1688 for more information.
Terrific trips
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church "Brothers In
Christ Annual Fundraising
Cruise" on the Norwegian Star
on Jan. 15-22, 2012, sailing
roundtrip from Tampa. Ports of
call include Roatan, Belize,
Costa Maya and Cozumel. For
rate information, call Accent
Travel at (352) 726-6623 or
email Kathy@accenttravel
group.com.
A five-night Carnival
cruise to benefit Serving Our
Savior (SOS) Food Pantry will
travel to Cozumel and Grand
Cayman on the Carnival Para-
dise on April 30, 2012. Funds
raised will benefit the needy in
Citrus County. All categories of
cabins are available. Prices in-
clude cruise, port charges, all
taxes and fees, donations to
Serving Our Savior pantry,
round-trip bus to Tampa, round-
trip bus driver tips and one-way
porter tips. Cancellation insur-
ance available.
All monies need to be in by
Feb. 15, 2012. Call Lenore
Deck at (352) 270-8658 or fax
her at 352-270-8665 or e-mail
her at cruiselady@ tam-
pabay.rr.com, or call Barbara
Johnson at (352) 270-3391.





C6 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

taller?" he asks and she
laughs.
Then she offers him Turk-
ish delight (candy), which
proves to be his downfall
into his bondage. It's his
equivalent to pornography,
alcoholism, drug addiction
or just plain trying to do life
without God.
At that point in the movie,
my time on the treadmill
was up, so I left, but I've
seen the movie a few times
and I've read the book so I
know the story
The story is about the
Lion.
One of my favorite parts of
the movie is the first glimpse
of the Lion they call Aslan.
It's Lion with a capital L be-
cause he's the allegorical
Christ figure. He's Jesus
with a mane and a tail.
When you first see the
Lion, you think, "How do
they do that? How do they
make him look so real?" It's
not Bert Lahr in the "Wizard
of Oz."
But then, as the story pro-
gresses you forget that he's
maybe computer-generated
or someone in an eerily au-
thentic costume and you
start to believe that this
Lion has truly come to res-
cue Edmund and his
brother and sisters and all
of the people of Narnia who
have fallen under the cruel
rule of the evil White Witch.
You look at the Lion and
you see a being that just
might devour you, but at the
same time you know that he
won't.
In "The Silver Chair," an-
other story in C.S. Lewis'
Chronicles, the Lion is
down by a stream when Ed-
mund's sister Jill comes for
a drink. She's terribly
thirsty, but when she sees
the Lion she's afraid and
asks him to go away while
she drinks.
The lion just growls. You
don't ask Jesus to go away
without consequence.


LOBBY
Continued from Page C1

All of this caused radical
changes in the nation's cap-
ital. The number of organi-
zations engaged in advocacy
work linked to religious is-
sues has increased fivefold
in four decades from 37
in 1970 to at least 211 today
"No matter how small the
group, everyone feels the
need to open an office in
Washington, D.C., so that
their voices can be heard,"
said political scientist Allen
D. Hertzke of the University
of Oklahoma, lead re-
searcher for a new study of
religious advocacy groups
conducted by the Pew Forum
for Religion and Public Life.
'All of this is evidence of the
growing pluralism on the
American scene and the fact
that religion is playing an
even more prominent role in
our politics."
According to this Pew sur-
vey, Catholics of one stripe
or another are behind one
out of five (19 percent) advo-
cacy groups with offices in
Washington, D.C., and evan-
gelical Protestants support
almost as many (18 percent).
While 12 percent of these
groups are Jewish, only 8
percent represent the old
Protestant mainline. In fact,
Muslims support 17 advo-
cacy groups, while the his-
toric mainline churches
now have 16.
Hertzke said it's signifi-
cant that the largest cate-
gory one quarter of the
groups studied consists
either of interfaith groups
or organizations that work
on religious issues that in-
volve believers in multiple
faith traditions. Nearly two-
thirds of these groups work
on both domestic and for-
eign issues.
While one church-state


lawyer's "advocacy" is often
another's "lobbying," 82 per-
cent of the groups in the Pew
Forum study operate as non-
profit, tax-exempt organiza-
tions. Thus, they focus most
of their work on public pol-
icy issues broadly defined,
as opposed to specific legis-
lation or candidates.
However, the survey's
broad definition of "reli-
gious advocacy" included
"attempts to influence, or
urge the public to influence,
specific legislation, whether
the legislation is before a
legislative body, such as the
U.S. Congress or any state
legislature, or before the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"Will you promise not to
do anything to me if I come
(to drink)?" Jill asks.
"I make no promise," says
the Lion.
"Do you eat girls?"
The Lion tells her, "I have
swallowed up girls and boys,
women and men, kings and
emperors, cities and
realms."
Lewis writes, "It didn't
say this as if it were boast-
ing, nor as if it were sorry,
nor as if it were angry It just
said it."
Jill replies, "I aren't
come and drink."
"Then you will die of
thirst," the Lion says.
"Oh dear!" Jill says, com-
ing another step closer. "I
suppose I must go and look
for another stream then."
Then the Lion tells her
(and us), "There is no other
stream."
In Narnia, the Lion is
mighty and powerful and
everyone is afraid of him.
But the Lion is also kind
and merciful. He lets the
children climb on top of him
and walk with him.
He loves those who love
him and then he dies for
them.
The only way that Narnia
can be free is if someone
sheds blood, so the Lion of-
fers himself as the sacrifice.
In that way, the Lion be-
comes a lamb, slaughtered
and slain.
Just like Jesus.
The Bible calls Jesus both
the "Lion of Judah" and the
"Lamb of God" who takes
away the sins of the world.
As the Lion, he is to be
feared. He is ferocious.
But as the Lamb, he is
gentle and those who are his
need never be afraid.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
-I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace." She can be reached
at (352) 564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.

public as a referendum, bal-
lot initiative, constitutional
amendment or similar meas-
ure." It also included "efforts
to affect public policy, such
as activities aimed at the
White House and federal
agencies, litigation designed
to advance policy goals, and
education or mobilization of
religious constituencies on
particular issues."
It was easy to describe the
groups doing this work in
the years after World War II.
They were "largely denomi-
national," explained
Hertzke, each representing
a specific body of believers
- Catholics, Jews, Baptists
or mainline Protestants,
such as Episcopalians,
Methodists, Presbyterians,
Lutherans and others.
By the start of the 1970s,
evangelicals were gaining
power through the growth of
nondenominational groups,
educational institutions and
media ministries. Then Roe
v Wade changed the shape
of American politics es-
pecially for evangelicals
and traditional Catholics.
Meanwhile, President
Jimmy Carter inspired some
Baptists and infuriated oth-
ers. The ground was moving.
Many of the advocacy
groups launched during this
period were ecumenical or
interfaith, uniting liberal
and conservative believers
on opposite sides of hot-but-
ton social issues. At the
same time, some historic
churches began to splinter.
In the '90s, religious ac-
tivism went global in a world
transformed by the fall of the
Soviet Union, the rise of dig-
ital communications and
growing Third World con-
cerns about poverty human
rights, AIDS and religious
liberty The face of religion
in America began to grow
more complex, both before
and after 9/11.
"There has definitely
been a globalization of reli-
gious advocacy work, with
all of these trends and issues


making their way back to
Washington," said Hertzke.
As a result, "ecumenical and
interfaith work is now nor-
mal. We all live and work in
the same world, now. Every-
thing is connected."


Terry Mattingly is the di-
rector of the Washington
Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Col-
leges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion
and the news.


Episcopal controversy ensnares


dissenting S. Carolina bishop


Associated Press

CHARLESTON, S.C. -
The conservative leader of
the Episcopal diocese of
South Carolina, which has
roots stretching to before
the American Revolution, is
the first bishop facing disci-
pline from the national
church over the ongoing
schism over the ordination
of gay ministers.
While some conservative
congregations left the na-
tional Episcopal church to
join a new Anglican denom-
ination over the issue, the
South Carolina diocese has
stayed in, while pushing
back on theological differ-
ences and what it calls the
increasing centralization of
the church.
Now Bishop Mark
Lawrence is facing disci-
pline under new national
church rules that took ef-
fect last summer rules
that give the national
church a greater role in dis-
ciplining of priests and
bishops. Depending on the
outcome, Lawrence could
be deposed as a spiritual
leader in a church to which
he has given his life.
"Personally, I'm not
afraid, I'm concerned for
the diocese," the 61-year-old
bishop told The Associated
Press in his first interview
since the allegations were
announced this fall. "What's
at stake here is the world-
wide Anglican community:
the third largest body in
Christendom."
Lawrence said the na-
tional Episcopal Church is
threatening the unity of the
Anglican communion. He
said in the diocese "while
we are in the vast minority
of the Episcopal Church,
we hold positions that An-
glicans have held for the
past 400 to 500 years."
The 2 million-member
Episcopal Church is the U.S.
branch of the Anglican Com-
munion, which has 77 mil-
lion members worldwide.
"I don't believe that the
founders of the Episcopal
Church ever envisioned a
day when issues of theology
and constitutionality would
have arisen as they have
arisen right now. I ask my-
self: 'What are we here in
the Diocese of South Car-
olina called to do?"' he
asked. "My gut reaction was
this day would come."
The Episcopal Church
consecrated its first openly
gay bishop in 2003 and,
three years later, the Dio-
cese of South Carolina and
two others opposing such
consecrations voted to re-
ject the authority of the na-
tional church's presiding
bishop, but stopped short of
a full break with the
church.
Many conservative Epis-
copalians believe Scripture
forbids same-sex relation-
ships. Two years ago, four
breakaway conservative
Episcopal dioceses formed
the Anglican Church in
North America, a rival na-
tional province to the Epis-
copal Church. Dozens of
individual parishes have


also joined.
The Diocese of South
Carolina did not leave, al-
though it did withdraw
from some councils of the
national church.
Lawrence has repeatedly
said he wants the diocese to
remain within the Episco-
pal Church. But he said the
challenge is two main is-
sues: theology and the in-
creasing centralization of
the church.
He's being investigated
by a national church com-
mittee on information from
parishioners in South Car-
olina. He has not been told
who filed the complaint,
but thinks it's probably the
Episcopal Forum of South
Carolina, a group working
to get the diocese to partic-
ipate fully with the national
church.
"We did not initiate this,"
said Barbara Mann, presi-
dent of the forum. Asked if
she felt the diocese had
abandoned the national
church, she said "we don't
make decisions like that.
What we do support is the
process that's going on right
now."
"We are working with cir-
cumstances that are very,
very sensitive about which
people have very, very
strong convictions," said
Bishop Dorsey Henderson,
who heads the national
church disciplinary board.
He said such investiga-
tions are rare and that as of
now, no formal charges
have been made.
But if the board certifies
Lawrence has abandoned
the church, the Episcopal
Presiding Bishop,
Katharine Jefferts Schori,
would suspend him from
the ministry while the mat-
ter is considered by the na-
tional House of Bishops. If
the bishops agree by a ma-
jority vote, Lawrence could
be deposed.
His diocese in eastern
South Carolina has 70 con-
gregations with about
29,000 parishioners. Dating
from the 1700s, it was one of
the original dioceses that
joined together to form the
Episcopal Church.
A letter from the discipli-
nary board said it has infor-
mation the diocese
eliminated mention of the
national church in the
diocesan charter purpose
statement and passed a res-
olution the diocese is a
"sovereign diocese."
It also alleged Lawrence
did not stop parishes in the
diocese from leaving the
Episcopal Church. Two
have done so, one since
Lawrence became bishop
in 2008.
That parish was St. An-
drews in nearby Mount
Pleasant, S.C., a congrega-
tion that joined the more
conservative Anglican
Church in North America.
Lawrence said he urged the
parish to stay He said the
reason he is now being ac-
cused of letting them leave
is because he didn't want to
sue them.
"We are talking about
people who had been faith-


Associated Press
Bishop Mark Lawrence of the Diocese of South Carolina
stands outside the Diocesan House in Charleston, S.C., on
Nov. 14. Lawrence is under investigation by the national
Episcopal Church as to whether he has abandoned the
church.


ful members of the Diocese
of South Carolina," he said.
"Their struggle wasn't with
the diocese. They had just
come to a place where they
would be losing many of
their members. I can't con-
demn them but I wish they
had stayed."
While Lawrence sees his
diocese's situation as one
more step in a longer, con-
tinuing struggle within the
church, one scholar thinks
the schism has played out.
"This is not the main
earthquake. What we are
seeing now are the after-
shocks" from the church's
policy of gay ordination,
said Frank Kilpatrick, a
professor of religion at
Trinity College in Hartford,
Conn., and author of "The
Episcopal Church in Crisis:
How Sex, the Bible and Au-
thority are Dividing the
Faithful."
"I don't know that there
are any churches in any
large numbers who are still
waiting to decide whether
they are going to leave the
Episcopal Church. Those
that were going to leave
have left," he added. "
Lawrence disagrees.
"I think earthquakes
come in geologically vast
time. The tectonic plates
are still moving. I don't
think this is behind us," he
said. "I think nobody knows
how many conservatives
are left in the church. I
hear all the time from peo-


ple all over the country who
tell me in emails and letters
that I and the Diocese of
South Carolina give them
hope to continue."
As to his future,
Lawrence said it's not
about him.
"If all the members of the
standing committee and the
Bishop of South Carolina
were in a bus that went over
a cliff, the problem of South
Carolina with the Episco-
pal Church and the prob-
lem of conservatives with
the Episcopal Church
would not go away"
David Tait, an associate
professor at Rodgers State
University in Oklahoma
who has written extensively
about the church, said Epis-
copal membership has been
declining for decades and
doesn't have a whole lot to
do with ordaining gays.
"That's not helping but it
also has to do with demo-
graphics: smaller families
and a disastrous failure to
retain the loyalty of young
people when they grow up,"
he said, adding the church
seems to be mainly focused
on social issues "and you
don't need to go to church to
get that."
Henderson said he didn't
know how long the board's
review might take.
"I want us to be prayerful
and careful and I don't want
any of the emotions that any
of us may be having to drive
this," he said.


American church split over

ordination of gay clergy


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An Evening With Florida's#1 Elvis, BILLY LINDSEV'
With Opening Comedian, "JERSEY MIKE!"
And Your Host, MIKE SHIER II!

DECEMBER 3, 2011
Saturday Evening Doors Open for Social Hour at 6:00 pm
Concert begins at 6:30 pm
One Performance Only!
$20.00 per person for General Admission
Keller Auditorium
101 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
Refreshments Available
By Reservation Only, Please Call
(352) 212-5417


RELIGION







Page C7 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Car drawing
benefits charities
Crystal Chevrolet has do-
nated a red 2012 Chevrolet
Corvette to United Way of
Citrus County and Black Dia-
mond Foundation.
Both groups are working
together for the benefit of
local charities they support.
Donation is $100.
The drawing will be at 2
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at
Crystal Chevrolet, 1035 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Order tickets online at
www.citrusunitedway.org or
call (352) 795-5483.
Chorus presents
concert Dec. 2
Arbor Lakes Chorus will
present its holiday concert,
"The Many Moods of Christ-
mas," at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec.
2, at Hernando Methodist
Church, County Road 486.
The chorus is directed by
Corey Stroup and accompa-
nist this year is past director
Harry Hershey. The concert
is free, but donations are
welcomed.
A portion of the donations
will be given to Hospice of
Citrus County, which the cho-
rus supports with its annual
holiday concert.
Coin Club to meet
in Beverly Hills
The Beverly Hills Coin
Club will meet at 5:30 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 28, at the Cen-
tral Ridge Library.
There are no dues. The
club's purpose is to bring
local coin collectors together
and provide numismatic edu-
cation. Next month's meeting
is at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Dec.
19. No meeting is scheduled
for January due to early vot-
ing.
For details, call Joe at
(352) 527-2868.
Transit retirees
plan party
New York City Transit Re-
tirees of Florida Chapter 9
will have its Christmas party
at 1 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at
the Mango Grill & Wine Bar,
at 1305 Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486).
For more information, call
Joan Kohler at (352)
527-2439 by Wednesday,


N


Santa to a Senior


Help make holiday
Special to the Chronicle

Be a Santa to a Senior, the campaign
that has delivered more than 1,200
gifts to local needy seniors, is being
planned again this holiday season as
older adults continue to struggle dur-
ing tough economic times.
The area office of the Home Instead
Senior Care network, the world's
largest provider of non-medical in-
home care and companionship serv-
ices for older adults, has joined
Lecanto Levi's 4-H Club, Ease's Rough
Rider's 4-H Club, Crystal River Rotary
and the Department of Community
Support Services to provide gifts and
companionship to seniors who other-
wise might not receive either this hol-
iday season.
"Many older adults continue to face
a difficult economic climate, particu-
larly those who live alone with no fam-
ily nearby to help provide resources,"
said Carolyn Quintanilla, owner of the
Home Instead Senior Care office serv-
ing Citrus and surrounding counties.
Seniors have faced a trying year


brighter for many


amid the threat of Social Security pay-
ment delays as part of the debt-ceiling
debate. What's more, seniors have lost
almost one-third (32 percent) of their
buying power since 2000, according to
the Annual Survey of Senior Costs
from The Senior Citizens League
(TSCL).
That's where Be a Santa to a Senior
can help. Before the holiday season,
the participating local nonprofit or-
ganizations will identify needy and
isolated seniors in the community and
provide those names to the local
Home Instead Senior Care office.
Christmas trees, which will feature or-
naments with the first names only of
the seniors and their gift requests, will
be put up at several locations around
the county through Dec. 7.
Holiday shoppers can pick up an or-
nament, buy items on the list and re-
turn them unwrapped to the store,
along with the ornament attached.
"We hope holiday shoppers will
open their hearts to those seniors who
have given so much to make our com-
munity a better place," Quintanilla
said.
Call (352) 249-1257 for more
information.


Accomplished accordionists and more


^ *

Special to the Chronicle
The Ocala Accordion Club will get together for an evening of music at the Cherrywood Club House, 6253 S.W. 100th
Loop, Ocala, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30. It's free and open to the public; many musicians attend each ses-
sion from Citrus County. Bring your own beverages and snacks; there will be a 50/50 drawing and door prize. You can come
just to enjoy the music, dance and have fun. For information and directions, call Dick Richards, club president, at (352)
854-6236. Visit the website at www.accordions.com/florida or email FLACCASSOC@bellsouth.net.


Jov. 30.
Final plans being Free Medicare counseling for seniors
made for parade


All those interested parties
for the Beverly Hills Parade
will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 29, at the Lions Den, 72
Civic Circle Drive.
Final preparations will be
made that day. For more in-
formation, call Tom at (352)
527-0962.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Envoy


New site slated to open Dec. 1


Special to the Chronicle

Elders, their caregivers
and family members who
have questions or concerns
about Medicare and related
health insurance topics
have a new place to turn to.
The state's SHINE program
(Serving Health Insurance
Needs of Elders) will be
opening a counseling site at
St. Anne's Church, 9870 W
Fort Island Trail, Crystal
River.
The new site is scheduled
to open Thursday, Dec. 1.
SHINE is a volunteer pro-


gram of the state Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs that
empowers elders to make
informed decisions about
their health care coverage.
Specially trained volun-
teer counselors provide in-
formation and assistance at
counseling sites statewide
and will now serve more in-
dividuals at the new Crystal
River location.
As part of the many pro-
grams offered locally
through Elder Options,
SHINE provides free unbi-
ased guidance through edu-
cational materials and


health insurance counsel-
ing. The new site at St.
Anne's Church will allow
the program to reach more
community members who
may benefit from the serv-
ices that many residents are
not currently aware of.
SHINE, through a net-
work of volunteer coun-
selors, strives to help
seniors understand and re-
ceive the health insurance
coverage they need.
Every day SHINE volun-
teers answer questions re-
garding topics such as
Medicare, Medicaid, pre-
scription assistance, long-
term care planning and
more.


SHINE volunteer coun-
selors can help people eligi-
ble for Medicare find
programs for which they
may qualify that can either
lower prescription drug
costs or provide prescrip-
tion drugs at no cost.
To make an appointment
for counseling at the new
SHINE counseling site, or to
receive other assistance by
phone, call (352) 527-5956.
Leave your name, tele-
phone number and city of
residence. A SHINE coun-
selor will return your call.
Additional assistance may
be obtained by calling the
Elder Helpline toll free at
(800) 963-5337.


CUB's Christmas registration is ongoing


Special to the Chronicle
Envoy is just 1 year old and
has already been a good
momma to three kittens.
Now she's ready to have a
human family. Envoy is just
one of the many sweet and
playful kittens and cats
that remain at the Hardin
Haven while waiting for a
forever home. Visitors are
welcome from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday, at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at
(352) 613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines on-
line at www.hofspha.org.


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus United Basket
(CUB) is accepting registra-
tion for its Christmas Food
Program for families and
Christmas Toy Program for
children up to and includ-
ing 15 years of age.
Registered names will be


cross-referenced with sister
agencies that also provide
Christmas toys, to ensure
fair distribution of toys to
every qualified child.
Proof of Citrus County
residency is required:
Adults and children:
Social Security card for
each person in household.


Adults: Photo identifi-
cation to validate residency
in Citrus County.
Children: Choice of
birth certificate, immuniza-
tion record, report card to
validate age and residency
in Citrus County.
Custodians: Court docu-
mentation to validate that


you have been awarded
legal custody of any child or
children.
Registration is now ongo-
ing from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. Monday through
Thursday at CUB, 103 Mill
Ave., Inverness.
For more information,
call (352) 344-2242.


Black Diamond to be venue for holiday party


Special to the Chronicle

The public is invited to Citrus Hills
Women's Club's holiday party beginning
at 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at Black Dia-
mond.
Tickets for the dance and buffet din-
ner are $43 each and tables for 10 are
available. Dress is cocktail attire for the


women, and jacket and tie for the men.
There will be a cash bar and cheese
tray, and a buffet dinner will be served
at 7 p.m. Menu will be carved London
broil au jus with horseradish sauce,
chicken marsala, roasted herb potatoes,
rice pilaf, green beans almondine and
salad with warm rolls. The special
dessert is a chocolate brownie with milk


chocolate mousse with raspberry couli.
A vegetarian plate will be available.
Door prizes will include two rounds
of golf at Black Diamond.
Seating is limited; reservations
should be made early Reservation re-
quirements and checks may be sent to:
Citrus Hills Women's Club, PO. Box
1494, Hernando, FL 34442.


BE A SANTA TO A SENIOR
Ornament tree locations are:
* Melodies Body Image Gym,
1101 Middle School Road,
Inverness.
* Michael's Floor Covering, 685 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
* Department of Community
Support Services, 2804 Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
* Quality Cleaners, 2601 N.
Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando.
* G&R Health Mart Pharmacy,
3791 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills.
* Home Instead Senior Care,
4224 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto.


p.m. Monday at the Calvary
Chapel Cafe on 900 U.S. 41
South in Inverness.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


News NOTES

Retired nurses to
have holiday lunch
Registered Nurses Re-
tired's Christmas luncheon
will be at 11 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 19, at Inverness Golf &
Country Club. Cost is $15.
Entertainment will be a
Barbershop group called The
Young & the Rest of Us. Be-
cause of the late date of the
luncheon, it is too late for The
Salvation Army to accept do-
nated toys. The group will in-
stead collect monetary
donations for The Salvation
Army.
For reservations or more
information, call Mary Jane at
(352) 726-6882 or Mandy at
(352) 861-0261. Deadline for
reservations is Dec. 15.
CASA needs
shelter supplies
Citrus Abuse Shelter Asso-
ciation (CASA) has been ex-
tremely busy for a very long
time. There has been a
tremendous increase in
women and children in need
of services, and supplies at
the shelter are constantly
being depleted.
It is becoming difficult to
replenish shelves with toilet
tissue, paper towels and dia-
pers, sizes 4 and 5.
All donations are appreci-
ated. For more information,
call (352) 344-8111.
Want a ready-to-go
tree this holiday?
Wouldn't you just love to
have a full-size Christmas
tree, fully decorated in Victo-
rian style, delivered to your
home in time for this year's
holiday? It could happen if
you are winner of the Women
of Sugarmill Woods' holiday
tree to be raffled off after the
Dec. 6 Christmas house
walk, "Nutcracker Stroll."
Tickets for the drawing are
on sale during regular busi-
ness hours at Sugarmill
Woods Country Club for $5
per entry. All proceeds from
the sale will be used to sup-
port the club's charitable
work throughout Citrus
County.
For more information, call
(352) 464-4380 or (352)
382-1508.
Donate to B&GC,
win tickets
Help the Boys and Girls
Clubs of Citrus County and
enter to win five tickets for
the Dec. 12 Country Rocks
the Canyon Concert featuring
Eric Church and Justin
Moore.
Visit the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County web-
site at www.citrusbgc.com
and click on the "Donate"
button to make donation of
$5 or more. Your name will
automatically be entered.
Contest is only valid when
making a donation online.
The winner will be selected
at noon Friday, Dec. 2, and
announced on the website
and Facebook page. Tickets
are valued at $150.
Funds will be used to help
provide Boys & Girls Clubs
scholarships for children dur-
ing the Christmas holidays.
For more information, email
suzanne@citrusbgc.com.
Come swing with
area band
Encore Swing Band will
perform at the Floral City
Heritage Days from 5:30 to 9
p.m. Friday, Dec. 2. The
event will take place on Or-
ange Avenue lined with lumi-
narias.
Stroll down to sing your fa-
vorite swinging Christmas
carols with Encore. For more
information, call band director
Chaz lannaci, at (352) 464-
4153 or co-director David
Morgan at (352) 302-3742 or
email encoreswingband
@embarqmail.com.
The event is free, with free
parking. Encore Swing Band
rehearses from 6 to 8:30








SATURDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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SGreat Performances Seasonal favor- Lawrence Welk: Precious Memories Hymns, inspiration, gospel. (In Behind the Britcom: From Script to Screen British comedies. (In Stereo) 3 Steps to Incredible Health! With
PBS B 3 3 14 6 ites. (In Stereo) 'G' s Stereo) 'G' *G'X Joel Fuhrman, M.D. 'G'
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( CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10(Live) X Weekend'PG' G' Engagement '14' Engagement '14' who saw a murder. '14' a (N)
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WVEI UNI B 15 15 15 15 15 15 Familia de Diez |Noticiero Protagonistas (SS) Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) 13 Miedos'14' Noticiero
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E 54 48 54 54 25 27 Hoggers IHoggers To Be Announced To Be Announced |To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
55 64 55 55 **Y2 "Broken Trail" (2006) *** "The Outlaw Josey Wales" (1976, Western) Clint Eastwood, Chief Dan George. 'PG' c Hell on Wheels xa "The Outlaw Josey Wales" (1976)
fANi 52 35 52 52 19 21 Too Cute! (In Stereo) 'PG'x America's Cutest Dog 2010 'PG' America's Cutest Cat 2010 'PG' America's Cutest Pet (N)'PG' Pit Bulls and Parolees (N)'PG' America's Cutest Pet 'PG'
[iET1 96 19 96 96 Hates Chris |Hates Chris ** "Not Easily Broken" (2009, Drama) Morris Chestnut, Taraji P Henson.'PG-13' |,**, "Notorious" (2009, Biography) Angela Bassett, Derek Luke, Jamal Woolard. 'R'
iBRAV0 254 51 254 254 Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14' Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14' Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14' Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14'
CC] 27 61 27 27 33 *,Y2 "Delta Farce" (2007) a Tosh.0'14' Tosh.0 14' Tosh.0 14' Tosh.0 14' Tosh.0 14' Tosh.0 14' Tosh.0 14' Tosh.0 14' ** "Fanboys"(2008) PG-13'
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43 42 43 43 Paid Program |Paid Program Money in Motion |American Greed |Debt Do Us Part The Suze Orman Show (N) xa Debt Do Us Part Debt Do Us Part American Greed
40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' sc Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents PG' c
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33 27 33 33 21 17 College Football College Football College Football |College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) xa
[ESPN2 34 28 34 34 43 49 College Football College Football College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) College Football College Basketball
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44 37 44 44 32 America's News Headquarters (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) The Five Journal Editorial FOX News
26 56 26 26 Chef Hunter "Les Halles" Wintertime Treats Unwrapped Unwrapped Holiday sweet treats. Unwrapped "Holiday Helpings" (N) Unwrapped "Holiday Favorites" Iron Chef America
EFS 35 39 35 35 College Football |Sports Stories NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) |Panthers Live! College Football UCLA at USC. (N) (Live)
EEX) 30 60 30 30 51 *,2 "Bride Wars"(2009, Comedy) Kate Hudson. 'PG' College Football Iowa State at Oklahoma. (N) (Live) |Always Sunny
67 Golf Central (N) |Morning Drive |Golf Now |Golf American Century Championship, Second Round. From Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course in Lake Tahoe. |Golf Omega Mission Hills World Cup, Day 4. (N)
3ilD 39 68 39 39 45 54 "Debbie Macomber's Call Me Mrs. Miracle" (2010) Doris Roberts. "Debbie Macomber's Trading Christmas" (2011) Tom Cavanagh. x "Debbie Macomber's Trading Christmas" (2011) Tom Cavanagh.,
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fH )VJ 23 57 23 23 42 52 House Hunters |Hunters Int'l House Hunters |Hunters Int'l Holiday Block Party 2011 (N)'G' Celebrity Holiday Homes Xa Hunters Int'l Hunters Int'l Hunters Int'l |Hunters Int'l
HIST 51 25 51 51 32 42 To Be Announced To Be Announced Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' |Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' Big Shrimpin'PG'x
(LFE 24 38 24 24 31 Movie 'MA' "Dear Santa" (2011, Drama) Amy Acker. Premiere. 'NR' sa Movie 'MA'
"Another Man's Wife" (2011, Suspense) Rena Sofer, Dylan Neal. A fam- ** "The Stepfather" (2009, Suspense) Dylan Walsh. A young man sus- **, "Untraceable" (2008, Suspense) Diane Lane, Billy Burke. A killer
_50 ily vacations in a remote cabin after a tragedy 'NR' a pects that his mother's new lover is up to no good. 'NR' a posts live feeds of his crimes on the Internet. 'R' x
MA *** "Thelma & Louise" (1991, Drama) Susan *, "Vampires Suck" (2010, Comedy) Matt Lanter, Strike Back The agents enter into a *, "Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son" (2011) Martin Lawrence.
320 221 320 320 3 3 Sarandon, Geena Davis. (In Stereo) 'R'x sJenn Proske. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' s shaky alliance. 'MA' s Malcolm and his stepson go under cover at a girls school. PG-13' s
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Documentary |MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary
ITV 97 66 97 97 39 "How High" (2001, Comedy) Method Man, Redman. (In Stereo)'R' ** "Get Rich or Die Tryin'" (2005) Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson. (In Stereo)'R' |Ridiculousness Ridiculousness IJackass 3.5
65 44 53 Inside the Vietnam War Covert operations and military strategies. '14, L,S,V' Restrepo: Afghan Outpost 'MA, L,V' Inside the Green Berets '14, L,V
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tiWI 340 241 340 340 Stereo) 'MA' x Stereo) 'MA' sc herself drawn into the world of werewolves. PG-13' s Bella must choose between Edward and Jacob. 'PG-13' s
tSPEEUJ 122 112 122 122 Am. Trucker |Am. Trucker Am. Trucker Am. Trucker Am. Trucker |Am. Trucker |Am. Trucker |Am. Trucker Am. Trucker |Am. Trucker Am. Trucker |Am. Trucker
[SPiKE] 37 43 37 37 27 36 "Star Wars: Episode lI -- Revenge of the Sith" **21 "Star Wars: Episode ll--Attack of the Clones" (2002, Science Fiction) Ewan McGregor. (In Stereo)'PG "Star Wars: Ep. Ill"
[iiS 36 31 36 36 College Football NHL Hockey Florida Panthers at Tampa Bay Lightning. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) |Lightning Live! |Lightning |Brawl Call Fight Sports MMA: KOTC sa
tmYEY 31 59 31 31 26 29 *** "Ice Twisters" (2009) a "Stonehenge Apocalypse" (2010) Misha Collins, Hill Harper. 'PG-13' "Weather Wars" (2011, Science Fiction) Stacy Keach. Premiere. 'NR' ** "Meteor Storm" (2010) NR'
49 23 49 49 16 19 Friends'14' |Friends'14' Seinfeld'G' Seinfeld'G' Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory *** "Pretty Woman"(1990) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. 'R' s
169 53 169169 30 35 "America, America"(1963, Drama) Stathis Giallelis, Frank Wolff. A **** "Dodsworth"(1936, Drama) Walter Huston, Ruth Chatterton. A **** "The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp"(1943, Drama) Roger
169 53 169 169 30 35 Greek boy struggles to get to the New World. NR' European voyage brings change to a retiree and his wife. NR' a Livesey The life and loves of a stoic British military man. NR'
53 34 53 53 24 26 Deadliest Catch "The Island" 'PG' Deadliest Catch 'PG' s Deadliest Catch PG' c Gold Rush "Slippery Slope"'PG' Gold Rush "Drill or Die" 'PG' Gold Rush "Slippery Slope" 'PG'
ciC) 50 46 50 50 29 30 48 Hours: Hard Evidence '14' 48 Hours: Hard Evidence '14' 48 Hours: Left for Dead '14' 1 48 Hours: Hard Evidence '14' 48 Hours: Hard Evidence '14' 48 Hours: Left for Dead '14' s
48 33 48 48 31 34 ***,2 "Forrest Gump" (1994, Drama) Tom Hanks. 'PG-13'x *** "A Time to Kill" (1996) Sandra Bullock. A lawyer's defense of a black man arouses the Klan's ire. **1, "The Da Vinci Code"
9TRA 9 54 9 9 44 Ult Trav: Florida Beach Weekend Family Travel (N) 'PG' s Ghost Adventures '14' sa Ghost Adventures '14' s~ Ghost Adventures 'PG' s Ghost Adventures '14' s
r25 55 25 25 98 98 Most Shocking '14' Top 20 Most Shocking '14' Top 20 Most Shocking '14' Top 20 Most Shocking '14' World's Dumbest... 14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
WLJ 32 49 32 32 34 24 Hot in Cleveland |Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland IHot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland |Hot in Cleveland Love-Raymond |Love-Raymond Love-Raymond [Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens
USA) 47 32 4747 17 18 *** "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989) 'PG-13' s *** "Elf" (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan. 'PG' */, "Land of the Lost" (2009) Will Ferrell. Premiere. 'PG-13'
tWE) 117 69 117 117 Ghost Whisperer "Voices" PG' Ghost Whisperer 'PG' s Ghost Whisperer Reunite. 'PG' Ghost Whisperer PG' c Ghost Whisperer 'PG' Ghost Whisperer PG' c
LWi.iAl 18 18 18 18 18 20 Law& Order: Criminal Intent'14' America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine (N) xa 30 Rock'14' |Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Traveling around the world, one
sees and learns many interesting
things. For example, in Norway,
despite North Sea oil, gas for a car
is about $12 per gallon except
on Sunday, when it is "only" $10.
This deal was played during last
summer's Norwegian Bridge Fes-
tival in Lillehammer. At both ta-
bles in a match, South was in four
hearts, North having cue-bid two
spades to show a good hand with
heart support.
The first West led the diamond
seven, third-highest from an even
number or lowest from an odd
number. East won with his ace
and returned a diamond. The de-
clarer, John Vegard Aa, ruffed and
cashed his heart ace to get the bad
news.
Now he seemed to have one
loser in each suit, but he spotted a


ACROSS
1 Grand Canyon
sight
5 Brick
bakers
10 Fix leftovers
12 Music
sources
13 Aviator -
Earhart
14 Coin-slot
word
15 Town with a
harbor
16 Hair-styling
goo
18 Stockholm
carrier
19 Pinstripe
wearers
23 Sci-fi's
Doctor -
26 Drone or
worker
27 PC operating
system
30 Dairy
product
32 Bought off


Bridge

North 11-26-11
4 AK5
V 8 7 2
+ J 9 6 4
4 A Q 9
West East
462 4 QJ 10 8 4
J 9 4 3 -
* K872 *AQ105
410 7 2 *K843
South
4973
V A K Q 10 65
S3
J 6 5
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1-%
2 V Pass 2 Dbl.
3 V Pass 4 V All pass

Opening lead: 7


Answer to Previous Puzzle


DOWN 4 Onassis
Message from nickname
the boss 5 Dodge City
Pitcher in a loc.
basin 6 Visa and
Like potato passport
chios 7 Reclines


Ibsen heroine
Fast jets of
yore
Knock
Lodestones
Annoy
Barely
manage
Wear away
Archimedes'
shout
Huff
Grand
Teton st.
Leaps
Curved
molding
Stork cousin
TV warrior
princess
Footed vases
Did ranch
work
Family man
Artist's paint
Marseilles Ms.
Cube inventor
Spring beer
Study late
Ms. Ferber
Business suit
color
Very, to Yvette
Approves
Bunny feature
Well-chosen
Fem. honorific


possible way to win 10 tricks.
South led a club to dummy's
queen. East won with his king and
shifted to the spade queen, but de-
clarer won in the dummy, ruffed a
diamond, cashed his three black-
suit winners ending in the dummy,
and ruffed another diamond. That
gave him two spades, three top
hearts, three diamond ruffs and
two clubs. East and West both had
winners at trick 13: East's spade
jack and West's heart jack.
At the other table, Karl Martin
Lunna, West, led his spade six.
South won in the dummy, played a
heart to his ace, and led a dia-
mond to dummy's nine. But East,
Ove Andersbakken, won with his
10 and returned the spade queen.
Declarer won on the board and
ruffed a diamond, but when he
next took the losing club finesse,
East cashed a spade trick, and the
contract had to go down one.


Dear Annie: My husband
and I have a small online
stock trading account.
Several months ago, he
mentioned that he was
thinking of giving our
son and daughter-in-
law money to open
their own stock ac-
count. I immediately
told him I was against
it. I then left to go to
the store and thought
that was the end of it.
When I arrived home,
I found my husband
signing a check for AN IN
$25,000 to our daugh- MAIL
ter-in-law. We have no
agreement that the
money will be repaid or that we
will be informed as to what hap-
pens to it. If I hadn't returned
home when I did, I never even
would have known about it.
My husband doesn't think he
did anything wrong. How am I
supposed to trust or respect him
when he does things like this?
Am I justified to feel resentful
and betrayed? Floored
Dear Floored: Your husband
should not be making unilateral
decisions that affect both of you.
But by telling him "no" and as-
suming the matter was settled,
you did the same thing. It sounds
like this is not so much about the
money as it is about who controls
it. Giving a large sum to anyone,
including a child, requires the co-
operation and agreement of all
involved parties.
You and your husband need to
stop the power plays and talk
about this calmly. Admit your
own part in creating the problem,
and explain how hurt you were


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


LARBRE



UETIMD

Ans r I I

Answer:


that he didn't take your feelings
into account. We don't know if
this money was a gift or a loan or
how you want to han-
dle it, but the discus-
sion should end with
the agreement that
neither of you will do
this again without the
consent of the other
DearAnnie: My wife
and I have no chil-
-. dren, so we try to
reach out to the nieces
and nephews on both
sides of the family We
IHE'S always make the effort
BOX to visit them when we
are in their area, and
for the most part, they
reciprocate the love we extend.
However, we are perplexed
about the total lack of social
graces of one nephew's wife. To
our knowledge, we have never
given this young woman any rea-
son to treat us in the manner she
does. We dread future visits for
fear one of us may be tempted to
say something to her about her
lack of civility What do we do
when she behaves like this
again? Confused in West Vir-
ginia
Dear Confused: Talk to the
nephew. Ask as sweetly as possi-
ble whether you have done some-
thing unintentionally offensive to
his wife, because she seems to
dislike you. Ask how to make the
relationship better. She simply
may be socially inept and cover-
ing it with what appears to be
rudeness but is in reality shyness
or discomfort. Give your nephew
the opportunity to address it with
his wife and work on it.
Dear Annie: I read the letter


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

S -: ,'n o.ck in
S" oDu.ness!
." .. ...
-







SYou seem like
your old self
again.
AFTER. THE MA55A&E
THERAPIST &OT OVE-R
HER C-OL-P, SHE --

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)


0
z
U c) z


~J0
Z 0)0
cc = 0


Z )o
D -
w q^
>
c u
-)
oU c 05
Co..-
81C)




C) *
C1

C)


from "Daughter-in-Law in Dis-
tress," whose husband is verbally
abused by his father and sisters.
This woman needs to give her
husband a great big hug! His fa-
ther is a mean and calculating
bully who enjoys watching oth-
ers, including his own grandchil-
dren, squirm.
When I was a child, I had adult
relatives who found pleasure and
power in making fun of us for
everything from the pimples on
our faces to whether or not we
could hit a ball. Our parents
taught us to be seen and not
heard, so we did not respond to
these thoughtless, painful re-
marks. Neither did our parents.
I am now 58 years old and a
strong individual. To this day,
however, when there is a family
gathering, I am so filled with anx-
iety that I have difficulty breath-
ing. I love these people, but they
have no idea at what cost.
I commend this dad for pro-
tecting his children and putting
them first. They are richly
blessed. Made it Through


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W Cen-
tury Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles,
CA 90045. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators Syn-
dicate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


Works by
Verdi
Eye part
Transmit
Acorn bearer
Crestfallen
Graduate
course
Prior to
yr. 1
DA's degree
Golden-rule
preposition
Trying
experience
Set sail
Appetizer
Takes the car
Retail giant
The the
limit!


ROBINS DEALER
RUSSET WATERS
TAE NTHME
COL KEENS LOW
ORE IDLE GAPE
SIAMESE CAVED
TONER CHASING
ALEX R T E S S E E
RED MUSIC HRS

BORING EDICTS
ABODES ETORT
IN IClE IR S EPI A


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11-26


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


C8 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


y





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles

WAY IRE 90,
IANMAI, M
AM AlPRoy









Sally Forth -


WE'RE RAV\IMGSAL6ETTi COOLPNT N00 ARE A0 KI1PIN?&'
OR SUPPER, AWP ~MMA 3UGT LWEARIA CAM ~O AAG~NE
IS TiREP OF CLEAMIme4 819 61&TAP? M HO SILLY I'P
TOMATO SAOCE STrAIk -- LOOK WEARIIMG
....OFFA ., .A ,? -
AA 609
S i


Dilbert


The Born Loser

F OKT-ORE. TROUS R, ONcE
IRUbRDRE TIA\TY-E\&IRT, ,


FOR'Y- ONE TROU5AK, ONE
I-\U^Rt'EDt>\TMA WTA-NI E..,


ONCE TI-ANK56GIVRNG 15 OVER,
^A05T KtS STM.AT COUNTING
TR E.tNxS 'TIL CARAST(Ak5,
MA- KM COUW._T5 TREABIFOTES!


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"We thank you, Lord, for we are truly
blessed to live in this great nation of
wasteful abundance."


The Grizzwells


Blondie


I KNOW YOU'RE ONLY PATRONIZING
M- ME, BUT THAT'S A PRETTY
-. AWESOME IDEA!






<4 .^.., -'.;,_


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


turn on."


Doonesbury


i.., , ., 9 PO YOU THINK FEMALE JEFF TRY I'M JUST ASKIN6.
S.,.,E," ,.: .." WFAN t tIb.BE SHOWING TO IMAGINE T LIK, WHAT 0
S,.. ; UPAT MY HOTEL? HOI TT YOU HEAR FROM
rf -f THIS WOUW P TH FII-P?

I eTH1 --- "&



i~ t h/-


Big Nate
HERE COMES MARCUS
AGAIN! 4THIS TIME
I'VE GOT THE
ULTIMATE COMEBACK-
READY TO GO'


Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m. No passes.
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) 4:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Muppets" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55
p.m. No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Immortals" (R) In Real 3D. ID required. 1 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
The Muppets" (PG) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,


7:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Arthur Christmas" (PG)4:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Arthur Christmas" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:10 p.m., 7:10
p.m. No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:50 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Immortals" (R) In Real 3D. ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) 4:05 p.m., 9:35 p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:35 p.m., 7:25 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S equals W

"VFGZOKDUF EWJE EWF WJVHFV RZM


SZVC JKH EWF AFEEFV


YVFYJVFH RZM


JVF, EWF LZVF NMGC RZM LDOWE WJXF."


FH AVJHNFR

Previous Solution: "Children are easily influenced, and I always want to do things I
can be proud to show my kids someday." Faith Hill
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-26


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


WHAT' THAT SARGE ASKEP ROCKY
NOISE TO FIX HIJEEP




^ ^ '7 ^1? -


(@ f^


NOW THAT WAS 1 WHY OON'T
ONE ENTERTAINING YOU GO NEXT'
FOOThALL GAME!' DOOR AND
KINOA SAD THAT (Tr SHARE YOUR
HAD 7-D 1-Il?. i- =;1-,l]S; WITH
TC- R?
;i "S-I: .7


YOU 5OTH PROBABLY NEED TO
UNWINO AND TALK IT OUT AFTER
SUCH AN EXHILARATING EXPERIENCE!


S, :

... '. :._. _,_


Betty


I B..BUT ON
CHOKED. THE BRIGHT
SIDE, YOU
MIGHT HAVE
A FUTURE
AS A MIME'

LL
Rr -1


<---, I


COMICS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C9




C10 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
.'. ..._ .I


As Low As


/0


0APR*


B APR*


All Ford Certified Pre-Owned
vehicles come with:
* 1 69-point inspection by
factory-trained technicians
* 6-year/100,000-mile powertrain
warranty coverage**
* 3-month/3,000-mile comprehensive
warranty coverage**
* Vehicle history report
* 24/7 Roadside Assistance
* Full tank of gas at no extra charge
* 3 months SiriusXM Satellite Radio' on
equipped vehicles at no extra charge


Certified Pre-Owned

-


ford.com/certified-used


2009 FORD FUSION SEL
Longer warranty than new. NP5626
$22,468


2010 FORD EDGE SEL
Look at the difference. NP5655
$23,478


2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED 2010 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED 2009 FORD EXPLORER E. BAUER
Save thousands over new. NP5605A Only 13k miles. N1T236A Local trade. N1T221A
$26,868 $279668 $279668






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 Cll




C12 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


s


*


iow


I YY1w
2 1TT


'09 CRV


'08 RAM


'08 ESCAPE
IIi ^T_


'08 PT CRUISER


M24H11 ssESPa
1-0058-75 E376


$14,999 $11,999
S$241 A 0R$193 o.PER
OR $241 PEROR 1913 Mo.


IME 24RMW A


MHa OANDSPEWM
1-80-84455EA423


$9,999 $6,999
OR $161 m o. d113Mo.


'07 SEBRING


'07 ODYSSEY


'07 300


'07 PRIUS


$59999

OR7R
OR$%O7 Mo.


:1807 A


:ii ;B!a iTT T


$15,999 $11,999A $11,999
OR. 25 o. OR 193 M IOR 193 S


'07 CIVIC


'06 TOWN & COUNTRY '06 SILVERADO 2500
ii ,-- B I .*K "aB


'06 ALTIMA


MM 24 MWS aM
140-84875EsA512


$6,999 $6,999
OR $113EO iOR$113MEO.


$11,999 $6,999
$ PER 1 1 ER
..$193mo. IR113A Mo.


'06 SCION XB


Bii8- E;A 614


129


'06 MATRIX


'06 LIBERTY


'05 E
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A:=,


$7,9999
S9129 PER
o.$ 12 MLo.


$6,9999
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..$113pf


$6,999
OR$113plo


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:
800440-9054


ki I


EE 2 HR WHINAN I
I-O-84875 A6207


B;ii ag g~~ ';
FM 2A HMO IESM WRINfFO N PM P


BMi 21 HR :a INAN
S1-800584475 EAr7098


ME? RMMMM OIF N MM WIN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


R


FM? R M E E MIF AND SS HM MCI
1400-M~584-8755 A412


FID U TEVAU OIOU RAE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY C la1 sf0 |



C h rine. Classifieds
Swww~chrnicleonmine~com C/assifieds In Print and Onhne A// The Time!


Meadowcrest Blvd.
Emily, I have loved you
since we first meet at
Life Care Nursing
Home.
At hospital the first
move was make, it was
the right move ,it
bonded us I thought
but now I am hurt and
unsure. Emily please
contact me at 3780
Forest Dr. Inverness
34453 or call
1(352) 341-1138
I love you Emily
Rodie



Homosassa
2/2 16x60 Stonebrook
$550 mo + dep.semi
furn.Call Mike W.
352-400-1387



60 YEAR OLD ELEC-
TRIC IRON. yes it heats
up. small childs iron
about 6"long must see
25.00 firm 352-382-1191
1995 BMW
525 runs good $3,000
obo 352-584-6433
'96 Fourwind 29 ft
on Ford chassis, good
condition, $20,000 neg.
352-628-0821
Air Compressor
Comm. grade, good
cond. 30 gal runs on
220, $125(352) 628-6886


YARD SALE

BIG YARD SALE TO
BENEFIT MISSION
TRIP

PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 9-1 porcelain
dolls, sports equip.
craft table & much
more.Don't miss!
4652 W. Osage PI
Crystal River
2/1 $565 mo+ dep.semi
furn.Call Mike W.
352-400-1387
ELECTRIC CAT LITTER
BOX littermaid elite mega
model.paid 195.00 has
an electrical problem now
35.00 352-382-1191
ELECTRIC TRAINS
Rail King engine and
tender, 6 Classic Madi-
son Style Pass. cars,
Shell 3 dome tanker
cars, All new in box,
From $100-$250
(352) 341-1617
HOMOSASSA 2/2
2 yr old W/D hookups
1300sf LA $650/mo
(352) 592-0893
Inverness
2/1 triplex screenporch,
open plan,renovated,
$650/1st/last/sec
352-586-6646

NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE
Inverness
SAT ONLY 8am-2pm
Something for all!
183 N Fitzpatrick
(off of Croft)
KARCHER ELECTRIC
POWER WASHER used
one time,now out of war-
ranty. has an electrical
problem 35.00
352-382-1191


Lazyboy
recliner/rocker, mauve
excellent cond, $200
(352) 746-4570
Link manufactured
Alum TrifoldCargo
ramp, mount in van
truck or trailer, 12001b
cap.$550 obo$1200
new 352-257-3625


-REWARD--LOST--BL
ACK LAB--11-5
YARD SALE on Grover
Cleveland
By TEXACO / DAN'S
CLAM'S

Male, Fixed, White Chest
spot(Lite)
50lbs,1" Fur,Bumps on
Skin(Raisins)
Pointer Head, Needs
Meds for Skin
Possibly thought Stray,
thank you

(352)-220-3890
503-6494


YARDSALE
Sat Dec 3 7AM-1:30PM
Spaces for rent $10 ea.
Benefit the First Pres.
Church of CR food
pantry(352)746-7585
Sleeper sofa, light blue
tap.$175, recliner $75,
excel cond leave mess
(352) 249-7638
Sunpro Tanning bed
2450RS, 15 hrs on new
bulb $450
(352)634-2570
WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
RANGE, White, Smooth
Top, Glass Door with Self
Cleaning Oven. Like
New. $135 352-860-2717




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




2 Dogs Free
To Good Home
(352) 726-0064
FREE CATS 3 yr old
tabby female fixed, 2 yr
old black/white calico
female fixed, 1 yr old
male orange cat not
fixed, up to date on
shots, house broke
352-364-3570
Free Dog, intelligent,
sweet and energetic,
female shepard
mix,spayed, Needs
room to run, good with
kids, (352) 613-5336
Free Drawing for
Country Rocks the
Canyon! Register at
Citrus Family Center at
719 S Otis Ave.
(352) 422-3043
Free Horse Manure
Great for Gardens
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
352-746-3545
Free Kittens
2 neutered males go
together,
(352) 228-1789
Free to loving home 1
year old Doberman
Pinscher, black with tan
markings. Very sweet
personality loves atten-
tion, has been raised
around small children and
other dogs. Needs some-
one who has time to
spend with her and train
her properly, we are too
busy and she deserves
much more attention.She
isAKC registered and up
to date on shots.Tail is
docked, ears are natural.
Serious inquiries only.
352-257-2345
Hound m ix
4 yo. nuet UTD shots
housebroken, should
have fenced yard
dog comes with life
time training w/BARK
BUSTERS(352) 503-2840
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144


Free Sony 46in projection
TV w/cabinet underneath.
Won't turn on. Want it
gone ASAP 302-8440
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
Pit/Boxer mix
3 yo. nuet UTD shots
Comes with Life Time
training with Bark
Busters(352) 503-2840



AT HARRISON GROVE
Grapefruit, Navels, etc.
Hwy. 48, closed Sun.
Floral City 726-1154
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inverness Gift shipping
MUSTARD & COLLARD
GREENS,CLOSED SUN
9A-5P, 352-726-6378




DEAR PEETIE, MOMMY
STILL HAS YOUR BED
RIGHT WHERE YOU
LEFT IT, YOUR FOOD
AND WATER ARE
BOTH FULL, AND THE
YARD IS FULL OF NEW
STICKS. I PICKED YOU
UP SOME FLEA MEDI-
CATION AND SOME
MORE DOG SHAMPOO,
BECAUSE YOU AL-
WAYS DID LOOK SO
HANDSOME AFTER A
BATH, I LOOK AT YOUR
PICTURE EVERYDAY,
AND MY HEART STILL
HURTS BECAUSE YOU
ARE NOT HOME.

Small Jack Russell
Missing.Mostly white
with brown spots on
both ears and over
eyes.Please call
352-503-2538 or
352-228-2825 if found.
LOST CAT Cuddle'
Domestic Short Hair,
7 years, Female,
Black with White chin,
belly and feet. Last seen
East Julia Street,
Floral City on Nov 17.
Call 352-400-5317
(business phone)
Lost men's black wallet
at Murphy's gas station
in Inv. Please call im-
portant papers inside,
no money, will pick up
(352) 560-0068
Lost Orange & White
Female Cat
Citrus Springs/
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 302-3456






REWARD $1000. No
Questions ask.
Min Pin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
REWARD
Lost Cat-"Buddy" white
with black and gray
patches, neutered
male, blue eyes, has
microchiplast seen in
Arbor Lakes, please call
352-637-7258


-REWARD--LOST--BL
ACK LAB--11-5
YARD SALE on Grover
Cleveland
By TEXACO / DAN'S
CLAM'S

Male, Fixed, White Chest
spot(Lite)
50lbs,1" Fur,Bumps on
Skin(Raisins)
Pointer Head, Needs
Meds for Skin
Possibly thought Stray,
thank you

(352)-220-3890
503-6494



Found large male cat
in Sugarmill Woods
black & gray tabby,
white chest and paws,
maybe blind
(352) 228-0799


Sudoku ****** 4puz.comrn


84 3


Fill in the squares so that each row. column, an
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9


1


8


7


6

Id


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop I GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera / Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
Watch / Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
Wheelchair / Scooter i
Rechargeables / Chargers attef
Airsoft/RC eIC

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness

New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Closed Saturday & Sunday

(352) 344-1962 Bring this coupon get a free pack of batteries.
mL --m m


Found men's wedding
band, CR post office
11/25, claim by asking
for Richard at the
counter.
Found: Small Dog
Brown and White.
Friendly & clean. Found
on Eden Dr.
352-406-0059




Advertising that Works.
Put your ad in Over
100 Papers throughout
Florida for one
LOW RATE! Call
(866)742-1373
or visit: www.florida
-classifieds.com
PRAYER TO THE BLESSED
VIRGIN
(Never known to fail)
O most beautiful flower
of Mt. Caramel, fruitful
vine, splendor of
heaven.
Blessed Mother of the
Son of God, Immacu-
late
Virgin, assist me in my
necessity. 0 Star of the
Sea, help me and show
me here you are my
mother. 0 Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen
of Heaven and Earth, I
humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my
heart to secure me in
my necessity. (Make re-
quest). There are are none
that can withstand
your power. 0 Mary,
conceived without sin,
pray for us who have
recourse to thee.
(3 times). Holy Mary, I
place this causein your
hands (3 times). Say this
prayer for 3 consecu-
tive days and then you
must publish and it will
be granted to you.MS.




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500




Live in my home care,
minor medical assist.
private room & bath
Call (352) 344-0123




CRYPT (Fl)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$3,000. 586-596-7580




Medical Assistant

Needed for
cardiology practice.
Applicant must be
proficient in manual
vital signs and ECG
collection. This is a
full-time position with
competitive wage
and benefits. Appli-
cant will be required
to work independ-
ently with additional
duties including front
office responsibilities.
Please send resume
to
resume4879@tampaba
y.rr.com

Network Engineer

Responsible for
server/work station/
network equipment,
end-user support at
multiple locations, IT
inventory, research &
recommendations on
new IT hardware/
software solutions,
web site programm-
ing. Must be detail
-oriented w/good
organizational skills,
self-motivated, team
player and have
good communica-
tion & excellent
customer service
skills, must be able to
manage time
efficiently. Minimum
of 5 yrs verifiable IT
network support ex-
perience. Experience
w/MS server & client
OS, SQL Server,
Exchange Server,
VMware, Citrix,
UNIX/Linux, web
programming, Mac,
mobile devices,
routers/switches,
firewalls, backup,
video conferencing,
and VolP required. BS
degree preferred
plus MCSA/MCSE/
MCTS/ MCITP CCNA,
A+ certifications
desired. Flexible
hours reliable trans-
portation and clean
driving record a must.
Email resumes to:
mhill@rboi.com.


Network
Technician P/T


Responsible for
supporting end-users,
LAN equipment, and
assisting with network
rranage-
rrent/rrnaintenance as
needed
at multiple locations.
Must be detail-
oriented w/good
organizational skills,
self-motivated, team
player and have
good communica-
tion & excellent cus-
tomer service skills.
Minimum of 2 yrs veri-
fiable IT support ex-
perience. Experience
w/MS server & client
OS, Citrix, Apple
products, mobile
devices necessary.
SQL Server, Exchange
Server, VMware,
routers/switches,
firewalls, backup,
video conferencing,
VolP, UNIX/Linux ex-
perience a plus.
Degree preferred.
MCSA/MCSE/MCTS/
MCITP, CCNA, A+
certifications desired.
Flexible hours, reliable
transportation and
clean driving record
a must.
Email resumes to:


CIASSIFIEDS



#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
getvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
MEDICAL CLASSES
w X-RAY A MED TECH
weCPR& eHIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience

Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

RN Supervisor

3-11 shift Monday
through Friday.
Please Apply Online
@www.avante
centers.corn
or email
mdaniels@avante
centers.com.





DISH WASHER

Needed For A
Private Country Club
Restaurant
Apply in Person @
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
505 E. Hartford St.
Wed. thru Sat. 9A./3P.

EXP. LINE COOKS

Banquet Exp. a plus.
F/T & P/T avail
Apply in Person @
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
505 E. Hartford St.
Wed. thru Sat.
from 9A./3P.

Experienced
Restaurant &
Banquet SERVERS
F/T & P/T Available
Apply In Person @
Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club
505 E. Hartford St.
9am-3pm





TELEMARKETERS

5 Needed Now
9-4pm week days
only! No weekends
Hourly + bonus
Call Salina
877-828-2662




A FEW PRO DRIVERS
NEEDED.
Top Pay &401Dk 2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving
Exp. 877-258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS,
& TN & FL
HOME WEEKENDS,
earn Up to 39 cents a
mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed
Exp. Call: SUNBELT
TRANSPORTLLC
(800)572-5489 EXT 227
Drivers-Build your own
hometime! Part-time,
Full-time, Express &
Casual lanes! Daily or
Weekly Pay! Modern
Equipment! CDL-A, 3
months recent experi-
ence required.
(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com
POOL CAGE
INSTALLERS, OWN
TOOLS &EQUIPMENT
Send resume to:Citrus
County Chronicle,Blind
Box 1744-P 1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429




$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip, dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-level to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

FRONT DESK

Hotel experience
required. Great benefits
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please!





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 359-1690
MEDICAL CLASSES
X-RAY MED TECH
CPR& eHIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715


AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
- Housing Available.
Call Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




ALLIED HEALTH

Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.corn


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE
Online from Home

*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid If qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnllne
.com

MEDICAL CLASSES
X-RAY e MED TECH
CPR& meHIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715



TATYICOLLEGE





2 Week Courses!
*PHYSICAL REHAB
TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300

tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

r" "737 I "0
NOW I
ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FACIAL
FULL SPECIALTY

TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/
Spring Hill
727-848-8415
352-263-2744





8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182

SAWMILLS from only
$3997.
MAKE MONEY& SAVE
MONEY. with your own
bandmill. Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info.
& DVD
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com
800-578-1363 X 300N.




$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOWH! $$$

As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcaoital.com



60 YEAR OLD ELEC-
TRIC IRON. yes it heats
up. small childs iron
about 6"long must see
25.00 firm 352-382-1191
70'S PEACOCK BLUE
SOFA sleek modern lines
clean smoke-free $150
352-897-4154
ELECTRIC TRAINS
Rail King engine and
tender, 6 Classic Madi-
son Style Pass. cars,
Shell 3 dome tanker
cars, All new in box,
From $100-$250
(352) 341-1617
RECORD ALBUMS For
sale-60s-70s-80s $1.00
each. Call for list of art-
ists. 352-344-1692




15 CU. FT. CHEST
FREEZER Kelvinator,
white with drain plug.
Good condition.
$40.00 352-601-4223
A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES ub tod32500

Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914

Electric Dryer
Kenmore,
Excellent cond.
$100
(352) 503-5034
Electric Range
GE white with black
glass door $95. exc
cond(352) 795-7813
Estate Washer by
Whirlpool, like new, top
load, white $200
(352) 628-2044
Frigidaire 11.3 cu ft.
auto defrost
$75.
(352) 465-2816
REFRIGERATOR, MI-
CROWAVE, STOVE,
DISHWASHER White
Kenmore side by side re-
frigerator with ice maker
and water, electric stove,
under counter micro-
wave, dishwasher. All 10
years old and working.
Sell all for $650.00
352-2700307 or


352-897-4361
SIDE BY SIDE REFRIG-
ERATOR. KENMORE
COLDSPOT. COLOR IS
BISQUE. NICE CONDI-
TION! $275. 527-1239
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new,excellent condition.
Can Deliver
352 263-7398
Whirlpool Side by side
white w/ ice & water
on door $300 dishwash,
White $100. Exc Cond
(352) 382-2743


Air Compressor
Comm. grade, good
cond. 30 gal runs on
220, $125(352) 628-6886
BAND SAW RYOBI
GREAT SHAPE hardly
used only $50.00
352-637- 5171
CRAFTSMAN TABLE
SAW EXTENSION WING
Restored 113 saw $28
352-860-2475
PORTER-CABLE
10" Table Saw with
wheels, $200
(352) 410-1392



SONY 13 INCH T.V.
WITH REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION. $20.00
352-726-0686
SPEAKERS TECHNICS
SB-T100 Rarely been
used, in great condition.
$89 Text/call
352-302-6517
TV Sylvania 20" screen,
remote, like new, 2 yrs
old, 20"D $ 50
Homosassa
727-207-1207



BASEBOARD 2 1/2 inch
used baseboard. Approx
200 ft $10. Some long
352-795-8002



COMPUTER STAND
28"Wx51"Hx28"D Grey
metal/blond wood
Homosassa $ 45
727-207-1207
DELL COMPUTER
WinXP 15" flat panel
monitor, keybd, mouse,
cdrom 150gb drive $100
352-746-4219
DELL COMPUTER XP
17" flat panel, keybd,
mouse, DVD drive, 60 gb
hard drive $100
352-746-4219
DESKTOP COMPUTER
SETUP $100. Dell 512
MB RAM, 60GB hard
drive, and 17" LCD moni-
tor. Works fine. 621-7892
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



2 CLOTH RECLINERS
-(1 ROCKER) Two cloth
recliners in excellent con-
dition. One is a rocker.
$200.00 for both or BO
Phone 352- 726-0492
2 Mediterranean style
metal end tables with
round glass tops, asking
$175.Phone
352-382-7082
4 piece wicker set,
good cond. $120 De-
signer beige couch,
new cond. $200
(352) 382-3892
BASSETT ACCENT
CHAIR Gold/beige uphol-
stery, carved arms and
legs, never used.
$100.00 352 341 3842
COFFEE & END TA-
BLES Marble,glass & iron
tables.Like new! Huge
sacrifice $100pc.
352-897-4678
COMPUTER DESK REA-
SONABLE 47" x 23" pipe
design, not bulky. good
cond$15.00 Inverness
560-7857
COUCH 84" multi color
4 pillows (burnt
orange/green)
Homosassa $ 250
727-207-1207
COUCH
Love Seat, over size
chair w/ottoman, glass
coffee table w/end
tables too match, New
$3500 sell $1200
(352) 563-1185
DINING ROOM SET cre-
denza, china cabinet, ta-
ble w/6 chairs. Solid
wood, dark color. Very
nice, $1,200. Call after
5:30 p.m. 563-1241
Dining room set, table,
2 leafs, 6 chairs, china
closet, $300.
(352) 637-3041
DINING ROOM TABLE
w/6 padded chairs,
matching lighted hutch
$300. Ive message.
(352) 563-6327
EntertainmentCenter,
holds 42" tvlots of
shelves, 2 side cabinets
with doors ,dark wood
5'X5'$350
(352) 341-1899
KITCHEN
BUTLER/CART light oak
on casters 36"L x 35"H x
24"D $45 Homosassa
Phone 727-207-1207
Lane Recliner
cranberry color, very
good cond. 6 months
old. $100(352) 628-7224
Lazyboy
recliner/rocker mauve
excellent cond, $200
(352) 746-4570
LEATHER RECLINER &
OTTOMAN LEATHER,
TAUPE, BIRCH HARD-
WOOD. EXCEL CON.
$99 352.503.5319
MARBLE & IRON WALL
MIRROR Like new. Paid
$350 asking $100.
352-897-4678
MATTRESS Queen
Comfort Air mattress
and foundationdual
controls. Similar to
Sleep Number. $850
obo 527-3589
MOVING SALE EVERY-
THING MUST GO
everything from couches
to tv, to grill most under
$100. 352-201-0136 or
352-249-6186
OCCASIONAL TABLES -
SET OF 3 $100 Sofa and
2 end tables, faux black
slate tops, like new. Call
621-7892 for photos
PAUL'S FURNITURE


Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen size Select Com-
fort (water bed style)
mattress with Oak water
bed frame and bookshelf
headboard, asking $750.
Phone 352-382-7082
Sleeper sofa, light blue
tap.$175, recliner $75,
excel cond leave mess
(352) 249-7638
Sofa Table,
Oak Mission Style
$75.
(352) 382-5486
WOOD 2 DOOR CABI-
NET holds 100 disks in
rack plus storage for
books etc.12/24"/28"
25.00 352-382-1191


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 Cj13

65 8 12143 11 7 9
473519862
91 26 7 84 3 5
564921783
137865294
289437651
321796548
8 4 63 529 1 7
7951 843 2 6


RECLINER green
corduroy Homosassa
727-207-1207



Bonsai plants
very reasonable
(352) 560-3611




$$ MOVING $$
EVERYTHING MUST GO
(352)220-1440



(CONTIN-

UED)
INVERNESS
Fri Sat 8a-4p
5549 E. Tenison St

BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET!
SAT. Nov. 26th
8AM to 2PM.
w/Cookin' Good
6 Roosevelt Blvd.


YARDSAIE

BIG YARD SALE TO
BENEFIT MISSION
TRIP

PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 9-1 porcelain
dolls, sports equip.
craft table & much
more.Don't miss!
4652 W. Osage PI



CRYSTAL RIVER
6515 W Robin Lane
Fri, Sat &Sun 10am-6pm

Collectibles,housewareX
mas items,some
furniture.
Estate Sale!!
352-270-1295 or e-mail
janposey76@yahoo.com



Floral City
Fri & Sat 9AM-4PM
Christmas items,
No earlybirds
4800 E Stoer Lane


YARD SALE

FLoral City
Fri Sat 7:30 -3p
Out door Christamas
decorations, tools,
ladders & more
10610 E .Gobbler
Hernando
Sat 8AM-3PM
Potters House Church
Elec scooters and so
much more!
2459 Norvall Bryant Hwy



HOMOSASSA
Sat. 26th, 7:30A-2PM
MULTI FAMILY SALE
6042 S. Royal Drive



HOMOSASSA
Sugarmill Estate Sale.
Friday & Saturday
BUMELIA COURT
Antiques, collectibles,
musical instruments,
flat scrn TV, jewelry,
furniture, bose
speakers, Llardros &
weller pottery,
Pictures on craigslist


YARDSALE

INVERNESS
Huge Yard Sale*
Antiques, Furn. & MORE
201 N. Citrus Ave.

NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE
Inverness
SAT ONLY 8am-2pm
Something for all!
183 N Fitzpatrick
(off of Croft)


YARD SALE

INVERNESS
Saturday, 26, 8a-6p
1191 S. Estate Point
INVERNESS YARD
SALE
7775 E Ft Cooper Rd
2-Day Multi Family Sale:
Friday 10am-3pm
Saturday 9am- 3pm








Old

Homosassa
Sat&Sun 9-?No
earlybirds, Mason
Creek to Eldred(left), to
Bassett(left) turns into
Beagle-look for signs





PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 8a-4p
DOWN SIZING
Lots of household and
Chirstmas Decoration
too much to list
All must go!
4940 W. Horseshoe Dr
corner of Pink Poppy
& Horseshoe




Quail Run


Sat 8a to 3p
Hasehid Items C-Mas
Items + Dept 56
lighted houses,
Craftman's 10" radial
saw, edger trimmer
etc. 1210 E Silver
Thorn Lp off Hwy 491


YARD SALE
Sat Dec 3 7AM-1:30PM
Spaces for rent $10 ea.
Benefit the First Pres.
Church of CR food
pantry(352)746-7585


YARDSALE
Sat Dec 3 7AM-1:30PM
Spaces for rent $10 ea.
Benefit the First Pres.
Church of CR food
pantry(352)746-7585



VERIZON SAMSUNG
KNACK CELL PHONE
Easy flip phone, all ac-
cessories, manual, box.
$20 352-601-0067



(2) CHRISTMAS
WREATHS 28 inch
Christmas Wreath with
pine cones and large red
bow. $30 each (352)
746-2141
2 piece desk set, light
wood, good cond.
$75(352) 8974678
5.5 INCH color t.v &radio
& clock with adjustable
swivel brackets new in
box great Xmas gift 25.00
352 344 3485
80 QUART RUB-
BERMADE COOLER
great cond. used little
$50.00 352 637 5171
150 GALLON REEF
TANK Email for Details &
Photos
michellesgaragesale@a
ol.com
2003 TRAILBLAZER
CARGO SHADE In good
condition, medium dark
pewter gray. $ 79
352-302-6517
28"X34"STYAFOAM
WALL PICTURE 4"thick
3 pelicans carved beauti-
fully painted 25.00
3523821191
3/4 HP Blower Housing
& Motor, $85 obo
1/4 HP Fan & Motor
$40. obo
Both for 3 ton AC Unit
(352)422-2113
Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
ART BOOK LEARN TO
PAINT $3 563-1073
Attends
Adult Large Underware
18 Packs
$5 per pack
(352) 560-0367
BOAT MOTOR TESTING
ear muffs $10 563-1073
CAR SEAT COSCO.
GREAT
CONDITION/LIKE NEW.
$25.00 563-5206
CARD TABLE
Padded w/4 padded
upholstered chairs $75
Task Chair upholstered
$45. Roll Top Desk oak,
$100 352-601-6064
CEILING LIGHT FIX-
TURE Lithonia globe with
florecent bulb $5 in the
box 563-1073
CERAMIC BASE END
TABLE 26" glass top. $35
563-1073
CERAMIC BASE END
TABLE 26" square glass
top. $35 563-1073
Childs SAND BOX.Ask
$60.00.view@ huge sale
Sat 26th 1455
w.Japonica pl,Citrus
springs or 352-897-4678
CHINA MIKASA
91 pc set serves 12
CArlton pattern #L2803
mint cond in original
carton $150.
(352) 564-4245
CHRISTMAS TREE 7.5 ft
Green Maine Pine. 750
miniature lights. Sturdy
metal stand. $95
(352) 746-2141
COAT/HAT RACK
Unfinished pine 11"high
46"long Shelf and 7 pegs
$10 563-1073
CRAFTSMAN
GENERATOR
10hp 5600 watts, 8600
surge watts, brand new
never used. $550
352-601-6064
DEEP FRYER Delongi 9"
round 8" high $20
563-1073
DESK LAMP Stainless
steel adjustable $10
563-1073
ELECTRIC CAT LITTER
BOX littermaid elite mega
model.paid 195.00 has
an electrical problem now
35.00 352-382-1191
END TABLE Ceramic
base 26" square beveled
glass top. $35
352-563-1073
Endless breeze motor
home fan or boat $40
obo 352-212-7788 or
352-503-4646
FIBER OPTIC TREE 42
inch Green Fiber Optic
Tree. 50 multi-color light
string.Color changes con-
tinuously. $45 (352)
746-2141
FISHER great xmas gift
stereo-radio detachable
recorder with head-
phones included never
used 15.00 352 344 3485
FORD FOCUS COLD
AIR INTAKE AND
"CHIP" FITS 2000-2004
2.0 DOHC NEVER USED
$50 352-601-6625
FREE SONY46 INCH TV
projection screen
w/cabinet underneath.
Won't turn on. Need gone
ASAR FREE 302-8440
GEORGE FOREMAN
OVEN Not a grill. 8"x10"
oval 5" high $12
352-563-1073
GLASS SERVING TRAY
13" round cut glass 7
compartments and dip
bowl $10 563-1073
GLASS TOP TABLE
1/2" 42x72" 8" mitered
corners, beveled


edges, unusual bright
brass base. v. hvy.$225
obo(352) 637-7248
HILLS OF REST CEME-
TERY Floral City
2 Cemetery Plots
side by side$ 1200 for
both obo.call Doris
(352) 726-0571







NOVEMBER 26, 2011


CARPET slight damage OSTERMINI STEPPER Like GULF TO LAKE
$25 (352)465-1616 $6 563-1073 new, stair-stepper takes
HAIR DRYER Conair WINE SET 4 tulip glasses up little space,includes TRAILER SALES
1875 ION SHINE with at- and decanter, clear glass manual.$35
tachments. $10 563-1073 by Luminarc $5 in the box 352 -341-3842 Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
HOOVER WIND TUN- 563-1073 Nordic Trac C2255 Offering New & Used
NEL 15" Wide Path Mach WOLFGANG PUCK w/manuel $650. Cargo & utility trailers
2.4. Excellent cond., with "Bistro" 10x12 grill like Gold GYm Power spinn
manual & extra bags. George Foreman but 2230R, plug & play MP3 Triple Crown Utility TRL
Half price $90. 527-8276 stainless steel $20 extra's $150 6 x 12 w/new spare
Jack Lanne Power 352-563-1073 (352) 476-6896 $995.
Juicer, new $100, used WORK BENCH LITTLE Schwinn Force 6 x 12 Enclosed w/
twice sell for $50 TYKES W/ TOOLS Home Gym V nose, rear ramp
352-503-4646 or $30.00. 563-5206 Boflex style, with leg door, $1895.
352-212-7788 attach. Like New
JUSTICE GIRLS FAUX Merical $450. obo Trailer Tires
FUR BOOTS. GREY. (423) 404-5992-Cell starting at $69.95
NEVER WORN. SIZE 7 WEIGHT BENCH Welder 352-527-0555
$25.00 563-5206 3 wheel elec. club Olympic bench with Hwy 44, Lecanto
KODAK EASY SHARE scooter, like new, leg extension and 300 Hwy 44, Lec a2-
CAMERA Used once, $550 pound olympic weight Tilt Trailer
14MP, 2.7" LCD screen, set.Excellent condition. 5 x 8, $400 firm
4G SD card, all extras. (352) 341-4008 $175 or best offer Call after 7pm
Box. $80 352-601-0067 BEDSIDE COMMODE & 352-302-3305 (352) 726-8720
LEAP PAD Electronic ALUM. WALKER both in
pre-school learning book great shape 20.00 each -
$5 563-1073 352-637 -5171 1 1 i B Iteims
Link manufactured -
Alum TrifoldCargo 357 MAG AMMO Brand Comforter, pillow, cur-
ramp, mount in van new FMJ, one box $26 tains, brand new, paid -
truck or trailer, 12001b 352-860-2475 pastel $400 Sell $100
cap.$550 obo$1200 i BOYS 12" HUFFY (352) 897-4678
new 352-257-3625TH I. 1 fl i ROCK IT BIKE Single High chair.Ntrl color.6adj
MATTRESS TWIN WITH speed, coaster brake, seat pos.$65.View @
BOX SPRING. LIKE oversized pedals. $25. sale Sat26th. 1455
NEW. $75.00 563-5206 Text/Call (352)302-6517 W.Japonica pl,Cit.sprgs.
MINI DEEP FRYER Ham- CABIN ON 40 ACRES 352-897-4678
ilton Beach 6 1/2 x5- WE BUY of Prime Hunting Land NASHBAR KID
3-1/2 high $6 563-1073 US COINS & CURRENCY Located in Gulf Ham- KARRIAGE Holds 2 kids
MINI LOAF BREAD (352) 628-0477 mock Management. up to 100 lbs. Easily at-
PANS 4 loaves 6"x3 1/2" Area. $165,000 OBO teaches 2 most bikes. $80
New. $5 563-1073 (352) 795-2027 Text/call 352-302-6517
MR. COFFEE auto-drip (352) 634-4745 TANDUM STROLLER
coffee maker no timer $5 Canoe 16' Brwnisage.sacrfc$100.View
563-1073 "NEW" SD50 ACOUSTIC Keviar/fiberglass Sat26th.sale 1455 2
NATIVITY SET wooden GUITAR GOLD GRO- $500 W.Japonica PI,Citsprgs
creche, with figures, $20 VERS! HIGH QUALITY, 352-419-6028 352-897-4678
352-419-5549 PERFECT! $100
New Pet Pillows 8 352-601-6625 CLUB CAR
available $10 each EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC 06 $1,500
(352) 897-4678 ELECTRIC BLACK 352-344-8516
w/BAGCORD STRAP, FIREWOOD for sale.
New Toys, great for TUNER+MORRE!$100 Concealed Weapons I $100 per cord, delivery
Christmas, games, toys 352-601-6625 Permit Course possible.
ect, nothing over $100 DAN'S GUN ROOM 352-476-9563
(352) 897-4678 EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC (352) 726-5238
GUITAR AMPLIFIER
PINE WOOD SPICE 15W, W/CHORUS VIN- FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
RACK lazy susan fits 16 TAGE LOOK "NEW" $35 15ct.@ $5 per lb
spices $3 563-1073 352-601-6625 Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
PYREX BEAKERS new FENDER CHAMPION delivered 727-771-7500 CASH FOR CARS! 2
in box 1000ml 900ml DSP30 AMP, 6 GOLF CART, EZ Go All Cars/Trucks Wanted! 2,
800ml 2 400ml & smaller EFFECTS ,& "OVERRE" Runs, some rustPower Top Dollar Paid! We -
ones 30.00 352 637 5171 SOUNDS GREAT! Wise charger T605 come to youl Any
ROTISSERIE & BBQ $100 352-601-6625 Matched Trojan bat- make/model.Cal for
OVEN SHOWTIME MITCHELL MD300S teries, $500. or will sell Instant Offer:
@11x9 inside $35 ACOUSTIC GUITAR separately, 352-795-5082 1-888-420-3807
563-1073 $100 "NEW" SELLS REM model 750, 30-06, ,.
SOLDIII FOR$259 ONLINE! new, $450. REM O/U,
Complete Outdoor 352-601-6625 22/410, new $375. REM
Lighting, plus MITCHELL MO100S model 11, 20 ga. exc.
6 1/2 Christmas Tree "NEW" ACOUSTIC GUI- cond. $375. Stoeger
Best offer TAR W/ GIGBAG & DVD SXS, 28 ga. new, $350. -
STEAM VACCUM $100. $200+ ONLINE! Savage model 516,
ok condition $20 352-601-6625 223-new, $425. Call JUNK MOTORCYCLES
(352)465-1616 (352) 356-0124 WANTED
STOCKPOT Ceramic Wll Pay up to $200 for I:
coated steel 7"high x 12" WE BUY GUNS Unwaned Motorcycle
round $7 5631073 On Site Gun Smithing 352-942-3492
STROLLER EVENFLO Oriental Rug (352) 726-5238 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or o
W/CARSEAT.GREAT excel. cond. 6 x 9 MOBILE Any Area r
CONDITION $50.00 100% wool $600 ___ Condition or Situation.
COND-ION $50.00 Decorative Trees Coa (352) 726-9369
good cond $60.
Sunpro Tanning bed (352) 382-2743
2450RS, 15 hrs on new..._- EZ PULL TRAILERS,
bulb $450 EZ PULL TRAILERS,
(352)634-2570 LLC.
THE SHARPER SUPER- Sales of Open utilities ACA Shih-Tzu Pups,
WHE SAVPEROV PEN u B l& enclosed. We Buy, Lots of colors, average r
WAVE OVEN Bought Bow Flex 2, Extreme Build, Repair, Custom- $450-$600 + Beverly
new, still in box. $85. w/300 Ib retention bars ize. Sell Parts, Tires, Hills, FL (352)270-8827
352-344-3472 tall accessories Wheels, Used Trailers. www.aceofpups.net
Toys R UsTrain table like new BLUE PITBULL
with all accessories $400. obo BLUENEW Open Utility PITBULL
new $199 will sell $100 (352) 527-3982 w/ramp 5 x 8 $720.n Puppies,
(352) 897-4678 ELECTRIC TREADMILL CASH $684. UKC reg., health cert.,
TRAIN TABLE IMAGI- All electronics 5 x 10 $775. all shots. $500.
NARIUM WITH TRAINS incline, space saver, folds CASH $735. (352) 287-0530
& TRACKS. LIKE NEW up, great shape $165 CKC Yorkie Poo's -
$50.00 563-5206 (352) 464-0316 NEW Enclosed Cargo paper trained, very in-
TV WALL MOUNT Or- Elliptical Machine w/Ramp telligent, H/C, 8 weeks,
bital 21"-27" 1001b CD Orbitrak brand, like 6 x 10 $1995 black & gold 1 M $425
VCR shelf $60 563-1073 new, sacrifice at CASH $1895. 1 F $450.(352) 489-6675
TWIN BEDROOM SET. $95.00(352) 873-2505 6 x 12 $2095 Koi and Gold Fish
WHITEWASH. GOOD EXERCISE BIKE get fit CASH $1995. FOR SALE, Great Prices
COND. $100.00 for the holidays I have 2 Hwy 44 Crystal River ALL SIZES. Call Jean I
352-563-5206 90.00 each 637 5171 352-564-1299 (352) 634-1783


!

CLASSIFIED


Mini Dachshunds
PuDDies


Ready to go $200
family raised, great
with kids and other pets,
very lovable 2 tan
4 blk/brn short hair
parents onsite
Please Call Doug
352-794-3463


Miniature Schnauzer
Pups! AKC, Health Cert,
Shots,, 2 males, $475.
352-419-4723, PM.
IV 11i I "IlVV

Puggle Pups
Great Christmas Gifts
$300. HC & Shots
(352) 564-0270




CR./ HOMSASSA
SEE AD UNDER
WORDY GURDY
PUZZLE .
Crystal River
2/1 $565 mo+ dep.semi
furn.Call Mike W.
352-400-1387
HERNANDO
2 Mobiles for Rent on
Priv. Road, 1/1 fresh
remod. scrn. por $425.
2/1'/2, scrn. por. rear
deck, $475. both clean
& quite (352) 400-2411
HERNANDO
2/1 Newly Remodeled
$400 mo+dep 201-2428
HOMOSASSA
/1 MH furn., priv. ranch
No pets. (386)871-5506
Homosassa
2/2 16x60 Stonebrook


$550
fur
3,1
HC
4/2,
(3

RENT S
pro-r
period
WATE
w/5
enjoy
nsite
nuch
$325
450 In
1.5 b
$500.
Sect
(3



3/2
Remrr
g., sc
minute
pr(
furr
$14,0(

FOR
3/2
pall
ne
A/C
Must
3


C14 SATURDAY,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






4rTMEALS INK


HOLDER
3/2, fenced yard
$600/mo 10% down
Owner Financ Avail
(352) 302-9217
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK.!
I finance anybody,
good rates. Use your
land or anything of
value. Trade in cars,
boats, jewelry, guns,
etc. 352-621-3807

USED HOMES
REPOSS
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183




Lake Rousseau
3/3 Lakefront, dock,
boat ramp, furnished
inc W/D,FPShort or
long terms avail, call
407-302-1768 or
321-377-1926




2/2 Doublewide
porches,
4043 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando
$44,500
(352) 270-8310


l~[*1T^'l*B


HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing


D mo + dep.semi FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots, (352) 527-3204
n.Call Mike W. Assumable Mort. $16K
352-400-1387 2 Master Suites, Newer I1 Horfii
O MOSASSA appliance $33,900 In Park
MOSASSA Cridiand Real Living.
$600/mo. + until. J. Desha 352-634-6340 Crystal River Area 2
52) 503-7562 bedroom. 2 bath.
INVERNESS Green Acres $12,500 for mobile horr
PECIAL: Sec. dep, Is The Place To Be in very good condition
ated over 3 mo. 3/2 ON V2 ACRE Has newer heat pump
I In the INVERNESS New carpet through- roof over, appliances ir
RFRONT 55+ Park out, new appliances, cluding w/d, large
piers for fishing & Nice Home all-season lanai, 3 store
ment, clubhouse, $2,100 down P& I only age areas accessed fro
shuffleboard, and $369.84/mo. W.A.C. outside, large carport ar
more! 1 BR home Call to View corner lot. Basic furnitu
5 plus. 2BR home 352-401-2979 is included if new owne
includes H20.2 BR, 352-401-2979 desire. Conveniently
oath, Park Model located in 55 and ove
Pets considered. Sugarmill Woods Lecanto Hills Mobile
ion 8 accepted. Area Home Park, with the lo\
15)47-r eap x est monthly lot rent in C
52) 476-4964 3/2, approx. 1500 sq. rus County at $230, thp
ft. on over 1 acre, includes water, sewer,
Quite,, nice home on trash and activeclub-
paved road. Brand house. 352-249-7177
new A/C & heat &
2 Mobile Home appliance, under full For Sale 56 Ft.
odeled, In park warranty. Ceramic MOBILE HOME
rn. por. & carport tile in master bath, in quite, established
tes from water & guest bath & kitchen. Mobile Home Park Ve
egress energy, New wood cabinets, good cond. Must be
niture included new deck & driveway 55+ AFFORDABLE
00 (352) 302-8797 This house has a (352) 793-7675
great location, INVERNESS
SALE $19,000 32 mi. from Publix, Waterfront 55+ Park
SALE $19,000 3 mi., from Suncoast erfot
Like new. new Pkwy. 5 mi. from new w/5 piers for fishing
nt, new carpet, Walmart. $2,200. enjoyment, clubhouse,
w tile flooring, down $399.00/mo., onsite shuffleboard, ar
under warranty. P & I, W.A.C. Must See much more! 2 bed-
See! Call to View to steal this house room, 1 -/2 bath $2,00i
52-621-9181 352-613-0587 Must be approved
352-476-4964


ie

in-
)r-
m
nd
Jre
rs

r
w-
.it-
at

7



ery





e,
ind

O.


INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 3 bed-
room. 1-V/2 bath $3.000.
(cash only) must be ap-
proved 352-476-4964

WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com





CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 Br, fully furn
W/D,DW, big screen TV,
water, sewer, trash
lawn $595. mo
(352) 212-9205


2 Bdrm. $550 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

-I

Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Laundry on site, no pets.
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 BR 1 BA w/d hook
up, dishwasher, lawn
water & sewer $450 mo
(352) 212-9205
FLORAL CITY
1 BD $400/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp no
pets 352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $500. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D hkup., incls. H20,
trash, lawn, storage rm.
$450. + sec. 634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo $300. Sec.
352-341-1847
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/1 $500 352-422-2393


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
Rob's Screening &
Repair Lic/ins, Free Est.
Front entries & garage
sliders etc352-835-2020
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla. rms.,
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903

V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435



Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs .352 613-2518


A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic 364-2120/593-8806
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling &Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377


^^^ ^^


Clean Ups & A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
Clean Outs All Types. Free Est.
(352) 220-9190 Comm/Res. 628-4002


BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $80 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ins 352-621-0881
Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *A
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977
ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
& AFFORDABLE
HO RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292


/ THIS OUT!
Dean Family Cleaning
since '96.813-787-2198
or 352-341-8439 office

EXPECT THE BEST
HOUSECLEANING.
Fantastic/Dependable
Free est. (352) 201-4141

NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803




Looking For a Pro
Guitar Instructor?
10 yrs teaching exp.
all ages & skill levels
for info. 352-620-5310




Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803

Complete Renovation
Cabinets, counter tops,
tile, etc.tub/shower
conversion quality work
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584


#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
.' : : W :
352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374



CLEAN UP, Hedge
Trim, haul, press wash,
20 yrs experience
(352) 220-6761
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
WE BAG LEAVES
and clean gutters!
50% OFF thru holidays.
COASTAL LAWN CARE
(352) 601-1447


AT YOUR HOME
Mower Generator Serv-
ice & Repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273




HOLIDAY SPECIAL
BOGO 1/2 off/ 1 hour
sessions. Moblie
Therapist Lic MA58438
Gift Cert. available
(352) 897-4670




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570


INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.



Bahia Pallets
400sq.ft. $60- pick-up.
Pasture Seeding avail
352-400-2221


Affordable Handyman
Ve FAST
AFFORDABLE A Cutting Edge
V RELIABLE Tile Jobs Showers
HOME REPAIRS Flrs Safety Bars ETC
.100% Guar. *Free Est 352-422-2019
* 352-257-9508 Lic. #2713, Insured.


*Exposed
S Aggregate
,_; *.Shotcrete $45yd.
Decks Tile
FREE Pavers
ESTIMATES -

GREG'S COMPLETE
GR EG' REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
&,INSED 352-746-5200


OI.IJ REPAIR


4e t Structuwes, Inc.
* Siding Skirting Roofovers
* Carports Soffit & Fascia
Decks Screen Rooms
Windows Doors Murals


(352) 563-2977
#CBCA15418 Licensed & Insured


Boulerice..m S DODGE DIESEL & JEEP CONNECTION
n ( Complete Mopar Al
Srth H U N SM -Repair & Maintenance
& S u Y N c. Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
S' ' Transmissions Brake Service
County For 25 Years... WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS
We're Here To Stay! inline
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
, $oo OFF performance-I
' ANY RE-ROOF: Inc.
' One coupon per household I 680 E. Southland Ave.
=--- 80 S thadAe
L^ FREE ESTIMATES" CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell
S(352) 628-5079 352-568-7591


V THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352) 302-5641
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, lic/ins 302-8852


GRIFFINS TREE SERVE
Competitive Rates
lic/ins Free Est
352-249-6495
RWRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est..ire.
wood avail.. 628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069


AAA ROOFING
Call the Aak6uste."
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 0009TL3









BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0009Q84


11-26


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.
352-400-3188


LaughingStock International Inc ,Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS, 2011


"Sorry, pal, you can't come
in here with a tie."








JOHN GORDON ROOFING


g & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269


RooingLi #CC13542 -Hoe Ispeto HI36


5c^ = =DZF^^


I ROOFING I




SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C15


The Ultimate
bmwnocatiacam Driving Machine


Costs For Four Years...

If It's The Ultimate
Driving Machine...

Then it must be a BMW
from BMW of Ocala.

BMW Ultimate ServiceTM:
Pay Nothing 4 years or 50,000 Miles
Total Maintenance Charges: $0


New 2011 BMW 328i Sedan


Lease For
$349
Per Month
36 months with $2500 due at signing, including $0 security deposit.
10k miles per year, 200 per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and
$799 dealer fee. See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 11/30/11.
New 2012 BMW 1281 Convertible


36 months with $2500 due at signing, including $0 security deposit.
10k miles per year, 20 per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and
$799 dealer fee. See dealer for complete derails Offer expires 11/30/11.


New 201
with
Premium
Package I


Lease For
$649
Per Month


36 months with $2500 due at signing, including $0 security deposit.
10k miles per year, 20o per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title
and $799 dealer fee. See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 11/30/11.
New 2012 BMW 750Li


Lease For
$939
Per Month


36 months with $4000 due at signing, including $0 security deposit.
10k miles per year, 20c per mile thereafter. With approved credit, plus tax, tag, title and
$799 dealer fee. See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 11/30/11.
Check out our great selection of Certified Pre-owned BMWs

Certified Pre-Owned-
by BMW
Comprehensive Certification Process
UpTo 6 years/100,000 Mile Warranty
BMW Roadside Assistance
Finance & Special Offers


2008 BMW Z4 Roadster


s28,992


2011 BMW 3281 xDrive


Only 15k Miles, Steering Wheel Mounted
Audio Controls, Leather, Stk#M96301A


$35,991


Plus tax, tag, title, and $799 dealer fee with approved credit. Offers expire 11/30/11.




BMW

of Ocala
3949 College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
352.861.0234
BMWinOcala.com


If It Boasts
Zero Maintenance


Check out our great selection of Certified Pre-owned Vokswagens
Plus tax, tog, title, and $799 dealer fee with approved credit 36 month lease with $1999 due at signing.
12,000 mies per yea, 20 per mile thereafter. Spefications, equipment, options and prices ae subject
to change without notice Some items may be unvavlabe when vehide is buL.t MSRP exudes toxes,
destiktiond changes optioKal equipnt registrbon and dealer charges. Offers expe W/31Wn.


Volkswagen


of Ocala
3949 SW College Rd. Ocala
On SW College Rd. Just West Of 1-75
352.861.0234
VWofOcala.com


BMW in Ocala


0


m


Volkswagen
Certified Pre-Owned


German engineering
is better than ever.





Das Auto.

Did you know that the new
Volkswagen Jetta has...
*MORE HORSEPOWER than the
Civic and Corolla?
*MORE CARGO ROOM than the Camry?
*BETTER FUEL ECONOMY than the Fusion?


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0Fl


Kl


II


30


iu uv


L;aw


WE'RE GIVING


r


GALLONS


ENTER ONCE FOR A CHANCE TO WIN 1,000 GALLONS OF GAS WITH A TEST DRIVE!


ENTER THREE TIMES WITH A PURCHASE!


RECEIVE 3 GOLDEN COINS JUST FOR STOPPING BY!


4I Y NI^^M ^ '^.H\^y y *:|^i i


00


MANY HIGHLY


FUEL EFFICIENT


-IS


FINANCING RATES &
TERMS AVAILABLE
for well-qualified customers


STARTING FROM:


VEHICLES
AVAILABLE!


STARTING FROM:


011942A


)730A


P13102


BY MONTH END!


WE NEED EVERY TRADE


HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE
AND LOWEST PRICES IN THE (
STATE OF FLORIDA


I KiA 1850 S.E. Hwy. 19
KJ Crystal River, FL
The Power to Surprise'M
- Fri: 9:00am 7:00pm Sat 9:00am 6:00pm Sunday Noon 5:00pm


*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, LICENSE AND $699 DEALER FEE, REBATE & INCENTIVES INCLUDED & RETAINED BY DEALER. MUST QUALIFY FOR KIA OWNER LOYALTY AND/OR COMPETITIVE BONUSES.! *PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY.


*WITH APPROVED CREDIT AND 750 CREDIT SCORE. ALL PRICES AND DOWN mi
PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAG AND $699.00 DEALER FEE. I
PHOTOS ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY
NOW ON ALL USED VEHICLES SOLD
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a
Dealership promise... When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your
driving. If anything, and we are talking anything breaks* on your vehicle, from the headlights to the taillights we will fix it for you at NO
CITRUS KIA CHARGE. You have trusted us for all your NEW car needs and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we want to prove to
"PEACE OF MIND you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the state of Florida to buy a Used vehicle also.
WARRANTY" PROGRAM At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"


352-564-8668
24-hours a day, view our inventory, make a service
appointment or apply for pre-approval at
www.CitrusKia.com


IaI


I1


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P41971


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.vw A4y -yea .1111 0 -mie24 u s ra sid asitace


Cit


HOURS: Mon


OUR GOAL IS TO SELL

250


C16 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C17


Ol


UP TO


UP TO




C18 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


2012 Mazda3i Sport


ae %S
pyraid,


2012


Lease 1 36 Mo.
For Leaset


\II p arte .rur I \ Lat Li J .id ,ie h crr i!1 deler itr irlhed op '.. ai'1d .in-lude ll ,,.i,.Ie r ci'hL..rurrT leChdre. a. rali y.V. Le .. doter. piCneici rIii uueTiC0i
I1' PDIJ II ."1 1\ rc" 5r Year Ipproctd rear &dM .irsi car.oIl r..l FOneCCI r n r r 1 rl'.r. -elr t1Ll *'.eit ".'., dr p depedr.p or
O-. ,.u tdr.e ,ed Ir.ar.I.ur. oiur *rii>le See W rir dany2!' Piroa sare IdT *asusr.rstra purptC '! \dcil.ed .et.Iie. .uhieh[ i. p-.or de Pncea..ii-c ui io


I.'.'M-'


ACURA

Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands tqeQ !

2012 TSX


#CU2F6BJW
TSX Lease: $299 mo x 36 months.
$1,999 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit
Safety Rating ..EASON Safe
-NHTSA REASON


* Star railings are parl of Ihe U S. Deparlmeni o' Transportalion's Safercar.gov program lwww.safercar.gov). Models tested wilh standard sias-.mpact airnags ISABs). r Based
on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Residual Value Awards lor a Luxury Brand Tirough Novemoer 30 2011 lo approved lessees byAcura Financial Services. DBA ot American Honda
Finance Cop Closed-end lease for 2012 TSX 5 Speen Autorral.c (Model CU2F6BjWP MSRP S30 495 Actja, not capitalize coal 128 108 83 oltal monthly payments S10 76A
Opl-on 10o purchase al lease ena Sld.297. Addil-onal lease terms for weli-qualired lessees Nol all lasses will qual-fy. Higner lease rates apply for lessees with lower cred.I
ratings or in alfereni regions. Dealer parilcipalion may alrecl actual payment MSRPs Include deslinallon: Laxes. license. lille lees. options and insurance extra. Security
depos-l waived Lessee respons-ble lor ma.nlenance excessive wear'nea and 15am. over 10 000 milesyvear lor veh-cles will MSRP less Ihan S30 000 bal lor veh-.ces wdth


r-T


Iili''


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C1.9


WORDY GUARD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. A single thing completed (1) Every answers a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Approaches Kenmore products store (1) they will fit in the letter
....... ..... -h .-fl-t..


3. Somewhat wet building beam (1)

H I E H0 11


squares., ne number after thne
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word.

2011 UFS Dist by Univ Uclick forUFS


4. Unadorned bridle part (1)


5. Singer Underwood's fencing defenses (2)


6. (With 7) Opera house light fixtures' ...


7.... over-the-shoulder cartridge belts (3)


SWII IOUONV *L SHTIIThNNVHD '9 SIlIHVd STIHHIVO *
NIHI NIVaId "IT io ISIOITI SHVHS SHVK N* NOa NO "1
11-26-11 SHEaASNV


CRYSTAL RIVER
Great Commercial loca-
tion. 6545 W Gulf to Lake
Highway, next to new
frontage.
Zoned GNC. 50 X 55 ft
two bay building with of-

(352) 563-06834
EMPTY ESTABLISHMENT
(was a bar) 2400 sq ft
2402 N Florida Av
Hernando
352 586-4168






FLORAL CITY
Lg 2/1, $550 1st & sec
clean, pet ok.
(352) 603-0345
HOMOSASSA 2/2
2 yr old W/D hookups
1300sf LA $650/mo
(352) 592-0893
Inverness
2/1 triplex screenporch,
open plan,renovated,
$650/1st/last/sec
352-586-6646
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BEVERLY HILLS
20 S. Osceola,
2/1, $545 352-697-1907
INVERNESS
2/1 Large fenced lot min-
utes to Walmart. Large
steel building for boat,
trailer, etc. $580 includes
water and garbage. Pets
welcome. 352-216-7692
Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com
See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maint free living,
fireplace in liv rm.
$850/mo + utilities
352-746-4116











Kristi Bortz
Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantationrental
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784



BEVERLY HILLS
1Bed w/fla rm. + bonus
room C/H/A, W/D
MOVE IN $1100
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
Fl. Rm., 106 S. Fillmore.
$550 mo. 352-422-2798


2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,Shed,
$550. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1CG +FR, New Paint
Carpet, $650; 795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
26 N. Melbourne 2/2
clean, new paint, bath
& windows,C/H/A,
power runs $150 +
Come Stay Warm this
Winter(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/1
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
38 S. Jeffery, nice 2/1
fam rm $550.+ 628-0033
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352- 341-4178
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 enclosed porch,
laundry room, nice
backyard fenced
$800(352)-489-0117
CITRUS SPRINGS
Mint 2/2/1, W/D, Scrn
rm. appl's,quiet
$700 Ist/sec.inc H20
746-2957
CITRUS SPRINGS
Never 3/2/2, Ig. mast.
sute. $800 mo. 3/2/1
$695 352-697-3133
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
HERNANDO
Lg. 2/1 block, on water
Apachee Shores
w/Mother N- Law Suite
Estate Salel Must Sell!
$90K (229) 246-8008
INGLIS 3/2/2
Deed Rest.,Must see
Split/open plan, re-
modeled & Lease Op-
tion 352-697-1085
Inv.Highlands
3/2/Carport, $725.
5942 Aloha St
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411
INVERNESS
3/2, First/Last/Security
carport, fenced yard,
$700. 352-726-7692
INVERNESS
3/2-1/2/2. mini ranch
fenced 2+acres. horse ok
$975 1st&last 476-6463
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1 scr
porch fenced yd
$600 mo.lst & Sec
(352) 344-2560



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
Inverness
2/2 on 1 acre $650mo +
dep. 321-432-2410
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2 bed cottage on
canal to lake. furnish.
$850.m775-230-2240



Furnished Master Suite
Private Entry,no pets,
$450 mo 352-860-0427
INVERNESS
Rm w/Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352 586-9932



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing mpared is
1-800-927-9275.



1 l ,


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,
SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"


WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com



Beverly Hills. Sun 12-3.
14 New Florida.
2br/2ba/2car. New roof &
NEW INTERIOR.
$68,500. 527-1239



Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
$59,900. Won't last long.
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211



2br/2ba/2car.
14 New Florida Av New
roof, baths, appliances,
paint, flooring, Newer
A/C. Fenced, shed.
$68,500. 352- 527-1239



2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on I acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000



ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclose a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $179,900
(352) 726-7952
Arbor Lakes, Gated
Community 3/2/2 Split
Fir plan Lots of ceramic,
Fl. Rm. great patio &
landscaping $129,900
3757 Arbor Lakes Dr.
352-344-3700



3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
For Sale 3/3/2 Home,
2,000 sq.ft. 518
Poinsettia, Reduced.
Come take a look
(352) 860-0878

For Sale'4
Gospel Island 2 Bed-
room. 2 Bath.
Garage&CarportEnclosed FR.
Updated,MUST
SEE Large Yard.FSBO
79,900 CALL
352-344-9290



H\l. rid l III

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?

This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHMPNI
Classifieds
BC~JimBHBM98BE


Remodeled 2/I/1,
w/ 2 additional lots,
Nice quiet Area
$58,900.
(352) 697-2884



GREAT LOCATION
3/2/2 Water access.
Updated roof/ac/ap-
pliances. Corner lot
w/beautiful adjacent
lot. $99k 352-422-2970

^S=11 -1


"I'VE MOVED'!" I


Sellers Homes
are Selling!

CALL ME!


FREE List of
Foreclosures
SAVE thousands$$$$$
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
Dunnellon Area, 2 story
4BR 3BA above ground
pool.8x10 utility bldg.
financing avail $100
closing cost.Low Down
Call Dan 800-285-4414











Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy()
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBCO59685








Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887



INGLIS 3/2/2
Deed Restricted, Split/
open plan, Newly re-
modeled & new roof
$114,500. Lease Opt.
352-697-1085



BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS! Nov
19th-Dec 3rd AL, FL &
MS. Multiple Properties
Live Onsite & Live
Online
www.AuctionsUnited.
com
Proxibid.com/Auctionsun
ited (800)222-5003
BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS:
174+/- Bank Owned
Assets-AL, GA, NC, &
TN. December 6th, 7th,
& 8th-Homes, Acreage,
Residential Lots & Com-
mercial Proper-
ties-(800)323-8388 or
RowellAuctions.com
LAND LIQUIDATION 20
Acres $0 down,
$99/mo. Only $12,900
near growing El Paso,
TX, Owner financing,
NO CREDIT CHECKS!
money back Guaran-
tee FREE color bro-
chure (800)755-8953
www.sunsetranches.co
m



Wyndham/RCI
Points Plus, Time Share
Pd. $40K Asking $20K
Selling Due to Injury
Call for Details
(352) 563-0328


2012 NISSAN


FRONTIER


i


s14,351

With $2,999 Cash or Trade


1








*


FIND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE

NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY

CAL OWIYINSTJAPTfSRMLUNE 1-800-440-9054


CRYSTAL

N I S SA N


352-564-1971

937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL

CRYSTALNISSAN.COM




*Excludes tax, tag, title ano dealer lee $599.50 with approved
credit. ^39 month/39,000 miles lease, 15 cents per mile over.
Includes $2999 down cash or irade equity and all rebates and
incentives. Excludes Tax. lag. title and dealer lee $599.50 with
approved credit. Pictures are lor illustration purposes only.
Prior sales may restrict stock.
....


CLASSIFIED






C20 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2
boat slips near Kings
Bay $519,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857
GIVE IT ALL TO
GOD & ALWAYS
BE THANKFUL


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129

GOSPEL ISLAND
Lakefront Home
3/2/2.scr porch
Irg oak trees
$125K by owner
908-322-6529
Homosassa
Awesome location! Quick
access to gulf, deep
canal minutes to springs,
2/2 hted pool/ spa
$154,500 (863) 698-0020



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




5 acres high & dry
off Cardinal on
Georgeina $32,500.
obo
813-426-6078
LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse, water
and sewer are avail.$25K
352-382-0535



CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745



CRYSTAL MINI
FARMS
2 1/2 acres + bring
horses gardens,mobile
home or build your home
as you like. $35k owner
pays closing, phone
352-746-7425



CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT on canal
fenced $15K
352-613-4673



2011 175 MERCURY
Opti-max-ProXS, 4 year
transferable warranty
$9200 obo
(352) 422-4141
EVINRUDE 120HP
1988 oil injected, power
tilt, strong motor, runs
great, must see! $1500
(352) 795-4240



16 Ft. Fiberglass Canoe
w/ paddles
$150
(813) 361-4929



14 FT. Aluminum Boat
with trailer, bimini top,
fish finder, cushion
seats, rod holder
$675.
(352) 628-6585
'06 Procap 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
CANOE 16'
Square stern ,2 paddles
2 life jackets $350
(352) 465-6187
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500





PROLINE
1992 WA/Cuddy Cabin
w/trailer & 96' 250hp
Yamaha RUNS GREAT
$6900. 352-563-1518
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
SOUTHBAY '08
Pontoon, 20ft 75HP eng.
loaded, hardly used 21
hrs. on boat & mtr, $19K
or take over payments
352-341-3305
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
kv l = I1=11

:0.ug
*'e]l 1,. el e :


I*I I= t~~l


'96 Fourwind 29 ft
on Ford chassis, good
condition, $20,000 neg.
352-628-0821
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
Infinity 1999
Motorhome,4-winds
35 foot, Triton V-10 gas,
43k miles. 2 ac,Onan
gen, back-up camera,
fully equlpped,tow bars
& hitch + brake buddy
for towed vehlcle.All
manuals for coach &
app.All serve hook-up
equip. See at Oak Bend
Village Rt 40 West lot70
Dunnellon. Call for tour
352-465-6335 asking
$22,500. Will neg.



'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, like new Owan
Gen., gas tank, alum
wheels $18,500
352-795-2975
COUGAR
'01, 5th wheel 12ft slide,
14ft awning, 5th
airborne hitch & pin
(worth $1,500, can also
be used on 5.5 ft short-
bed truck, garaged
kept, all for $9,900
(352) 212-1704
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
Hirch 15K 5th wheel
Hitch
4 way tilt, $250 obo
(352) 422-2113
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
Jayco Designer 95
Series, 5th Whl. 37 .10"
3 slides, $1000 repairs
from local buz $8500
(352) 628-1126
Spirit of America
'07, 28 ft, Coachman,
4 new tires
2 new batteries, Ig. slide,
sleeps 5, like new
$11,900, 352-637-2735
TRAIL LITE
2006 travel trailer weighs
5002 Ibs, 31 ft with slide
out,great condition!
10,900 352-628-4729
WILDERNESS
'06, 27 ft., (fiberglass)
1 slide out, Q.bed de-
luxe upgrades, sips 6
WELL MAINTAINED
$11,500 (352) 344-4087



350 CHEVY Motor
less thn 2K mi.$600
Rear end Chevy
12 bolt $100
(352) 795-8846
Weather Tech, Digital
Fit Floor Mats, Honda
Odyssey, $50.
(352) 726-2283



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *k
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144


Running or Not
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
Paying up to$25,000
Any make, Any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794



1995 BMW
525 runs good $3,000
obo 352-584-6433
'94 Mercury Topaz
68K miles, clean, It blue
runs/looks great,excel
tires, 352-527-3509 or
352-287-0755
'98 Nissan ALTIMA
Limited edit., like new,
auto.a/c,red, $1800
352-746-0852
BUICK 02
LaSabre,V6, one
owner, garage kept,
72K Mi loaded. $6450.
(352) 746-9002
CHEVROLET
'99, Monte Carlo,
great running, good
looking Asking $1,975.
Cell, 845-701-6370
(352) 637-2588
CHEVY IMPALA
2007, V-6, loaded, mint
cond., grey mist, 55K
$15,500. (352) 601-4568
CHRYSLER
'06, 300, 35K miles, off
white, black cloth, SAT
radio, Nice, $12,600
firm, (352) 795-8792
EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
FORD 04
Taurus SES, Gold
88K mi. I owner
Nice cond.$5900
(352) 212-2277
HATCHBACK
1989. $700.
352-220-0480
KAWASAKI '82
14K mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1900
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
1997 TownCar Runs
good 160k cracked wind-
shield,$800 call
352-287-3987
MERCEDES
2003, C240, Like new,
sliver, gray leather int.
43K mi. 4-Matic, 6 cyl.
org. owner, $12,500.
352-270-8734
865-300-1884
MUSTANG 03
Ford G.T. 55 K miles,
show car, lots of
goodies & chrome
$14,500(352) 795-3729
NISSAN 'I11
Altima 6800 k miles,
loaded, smells new.
Warranty until 2014.
Health forces sale
$18,950 (352) 513-4257
TOYOTA 01
MR2 Spider, convertible
silver,5 spd. a/c,
like new $8600.
352-634-1070
TOYOTA 05
Camry XLE 63K miles
excellent condition
new tires $12,000
(352) 302-6313
TOYOTA '09
PRIUS 48,973K mi,
green w/leather seats
$18,500 (352) 746-3663



Chevy 1955
Bell Air 4 dr. sedan all
orginial and 106k mi
$15,000 (352) 621-1207
CORVETTE
2003 Z06, $29,000
21K mi., Quick silver
exterior/ black leather
interior. Showcar cond.,
Orig. paperwork
Fully loaded, heads up
display, brand new
tires. David
352-637-6443
CORVETTE
'75 Convertible 98K
orig. mi., Car is in orig.
cond. excel. shape,
worth $25,000., sell for
$15,700 obo, email
eladscat@aol.com or
Call 352-628-7315


VW CONVERTIBLE
1987 Cabriolet Wolfsburg
edition 5-speed, 1 owner,
priced to sell $1450 obo






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




CHEVY
1988 Suburban, silverado
strong! must sell ill need
meds! $1550.obo
(352) 795-0898
DODGE '98
Dakota, V6, 5 spd.
135 K mi. Contractor's
cap with 3 doors,
8' bed, new front tires
great work truck
$1500
(352) 410-1392

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *0
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
GMC
1994 Senoma V-6 Auto-
matic w/ topper, A/C
works Good Condition
Runs great $1500 obo
Call 352-697-3897



CHRYSLER 04
Pacifica 33K mi,
leather, loaded,senior
owned, Like new
$11, 950(352) 634-3806



Air Hockey Table
3ft x 6 ft.
$100 obo
(352) 302-6565
YAMAHA
'02, YZ80, runs great,
exec. cond.
$600 obo
(352) 302-6565



Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra's
Health Forces Sale
$9500 (352) 527-3024
Harley Davidson
04, 1200 Sportest, turq &
silver, chromed out,
7K mi. $4700 Crystal
River cell 727 207-1619
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492











KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,995
(352) 697-2760
KAAK 21


205-1126 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Directors of the Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not for profit corporation will meet in Special Meeting for the
purpose of conducting an ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION on December 2, 2011, at 2:15
o'clock PM, in Room 101-B of College of Central Florida, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FlI, for the purpose of commencing an attorney/client session pursuant to
Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The purpose of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION
will be to discuss settlement negotiations and litigation strategy including, but not
limited to, an action styled:
(1) BREACH OF CONTRACT CASE Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. v.
Citrus County Hospital Board, Case No. 10-5399 (Fla. 5th Cir. Ct.)
(2) STRATEGIC PLAN CASE Citrus County Hospital Board v. Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., Case No. 10-5702 (Fla. 5th Cir. Ct.)
(3) FIDUCIARY DUTY CASE Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. v. V. Upender
Rao, M.D. et al., Case No. 11-1388 (Fla. 5th Cir. Ct.)
(4) SUNSHINE LAW CASE Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. v. Citrus County
Hospital Board, Case No. 11-1476 (Fla. 5th Cir. Ct.)
(5) CONSTITUTIONAL CASE Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. v. Citrus
County Hospital Board, Case No. 11-1653 (Fla. 2d Cir. Ct.)
Pursuant to said statute, the Board will meet in open session and subsequently com-
mence the attorney/client session which is estimated to be approximately one (1)
hour in duration. At the conclusion of the ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION, the meeting
shall be reopened per public notice.
Those persons to be in attendance at this ATTORNEY/CLIENT SESSION are as follows:
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board Members:
Robert Henigar David Langer
James Sanders Joseph Brannen
Dr. Ralph Abadier Sandra Chadwick
V. Reddy, M.D. Robert Collins
Ryan Beaty, Chief Executive Officer
Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
James J. Kennedy, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
James B. Lake, Esquire, Attorney for Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
Court Reporter
November 26, 2011.

206-1126 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Executive/Finance Committee will hold a
meeting on Friday, December 2, 2011, at 10:30 A.M. in Room 101B, of the Citrus Con-
ference Center, College of Central Florida, located at 3900 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, Fl. The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors of the Citrus Me-
morial Health Foundation, Inc., will follow beginning at 1:00 p.m. Copies of the
Agenda are available in the Administration office. Any person wishing to appeal
any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such
meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which rec-
ord must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
In addition, a special meeting of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation Board of Di-
rectors will be held on Friday, December 2, 2011, at 3:15 pm, or immediately follow-
ing the regular monthly noticed Board meeting, whichever occurs first and also on
Saturday, December 3, 2011, at 8:30 a.m., in Room 101B, of the Citrus Conference
Center, College of Central Florida, located at 3900 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, Fl.
The following item will be on the agenda for these meetings: Strategic Planning Dis-
cussion (pursuant to Fla.Stat.395.3035(4). This agenda item will not be open to the
public.
November 26, 2011.


2012 CHEVROLET

SILVERADO

-A


BUY FOR"I


FIND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE

NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY

CALL TMWYINSTANTAPSPRAW LINE 1-800440-9054






_1 CRYSTAL I








crystalautos.com




i 352-564-1971

1035 S. Suncoast Blvd

2S Homosassa, FL 34448

'On select year, make and models, with approved credit. "Price includes all rebates and incentives.
Not all will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit Pictures are for
illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.
-


NOPYENSUMLMRH


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011 C21


FIND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY
CALML TWMYINSTAfAP S INE 1-800440-9054

CRYSTAL
N I SSAN N
352-564-1971
937 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL -A
CRYSTALNISSAN.COM

*Excludes tax, tag, title ana dealer lee $599.50 with approved
credit. A39 month/39,000 miles lease. 15 cents per mile over.
Includes $2999 down cash or brade equity and all rebates and
incentives. Excludes Tax, tag, tide and dealer tee $599.50 with
approved credit. Pictures are lor illusiraion purposes only.
s Prior sales may restrict stocK. .
__________,_____,__


2012 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO



BUY FOR


641"


FIND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY
CA TIWAYINSTANTAMW UNE 1-800440-9054

1 CRYSTAL
CHEVROLET

crystalautos.com


W352-564-1971
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd
_' Homosassa, FL 34448


"On select year, make and models, with approved credit. **Price includes all rebates and incentives.
Nol all will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit Pictures are for
illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.
_______ -_________.______":_ "*A.^^


0% APRFOR72MONHS


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




C22 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2011


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2012 200


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BRAND NEW 3001


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2012 TOWN & COUNTRY


2012 JOURNEY


BUYFOR
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24895

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