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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02604
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-24-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02604

Full Text


4Get ready to shop

/ 1.H.:Inside


TODAY & Friday morning
HIGH Sunny, breezy and cool
75 with winds at 10to 15
LOW mph.
46 PAGE A4
NOVEMBER 24, 2011


CITRUS


COUNTY


Saved from the dinner table


Woman dies
from crash
injuries
HOMOSASSA-
A woman who was
critically injured in a
Nov. 13 crash that
claimed the life of
her husband has
also died.
Betty Kuhns, 84,
of Homosassa, a
passenger in the car,
was flown to St.
Joseph's Hospital
following the
accident.
According to a
Florida Highway Pa-
trol report, the fatal
accident occurred at
11:28 a.m. on the
corner of U.S. 98
and Lone Pine Street
in Homosassa.
Delbert Kuhns, 88,
was fatally injured as
he drove a 2012
Chevy Cruze south
on Lone Pine Street
and attempted to
cross the westbound
lanes of U.S. 98.
Thomas Stevens,
31, of Gulfport,
Miss., was driving a
2000 Ford F-350
west on U.S. 98 and
struck the driver's
side of Kuhns' vehi-
cle. Stevens was not
hurt.
The report stated
both vehicles landed
in the median. Kuhns
died at the scene.
FHP is still investi-
gating the crash.
FHP gears up
for holiday
weekend
TALLAHASSEE
-The Florida High-
way Patrol is gearing
up for the five-day
Thanksgiving holiday
with extra patrols on
the state's highways.
Troopers say they
will be targeting im-
paired drivers and
speeders starting
Wednesday and
continuing through
Sunday. They will
also be watching
drivers who follow
too closely and other
aggressive driving
behaviors.
FHP Director
David Brierton urged
people to drive
safely and to make
sure they use seat
belts.
Brierton said peo-
ple should make
sure they get plenty
of rest before hitting
the road. And they
should avoid distrac-
tions such as texting,
talking on the phone
and eating. It's also
important to have
your vehicle checked
for proper fluid levels
and adequate tire
pressure.
Call *FHP or
*347 to report
aggressive drivers
or if you need assis-
tance along the
highway.

-From staff and wire reports



Comics . . . . .C5
Community . . . .C4
Crossword . . . .C6
Editorial . . . .A14
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope . . . .B6
Lottery Numbers . .B4
Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies . . . . . .C5
Obituaries . . . .A6
Classifieds . . . .C10
TV Listings . . . .C6


6 1 lUl4578 2007. o


Lucky turkeys get pardon in

Crystal River and Washington


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
What do Pumpkin and
Pecan, Wish and Bone and
Dawn and Early Light have
in common?
They were all suggested
names for national turkeys
pardoned by former Presi-
dents during ceremonies
in the Rose Garden the day
before Thanksgiving.
As tradition goes, Presi-
dent Obama pardoned Lib-
erty and its alternate, Peace,
both 19-week old, 45-pound
turkeys, Wednesday morn-
ing at the White House to


signify the start of the na-
tion's Thanksgiving holiday
After the pardoning, the
turkeys will be driven to
George Washington's Mount
Vernon Estate and Gardens
to live out their lives in a
custom-made enclosure.
The National Thanksgiving
Turkey will be on display
for visitors during "Christ-
mas at Mount Vernon," a
special program through
January 6.
Here at home, Citrus
County has its own par-
doned bird: Dumb and
Dumber


.Page A2


Dumb and
Dumber
struts his
feathers at a
Crystal River
farm. The
2-year-old
Bourbon Red
calls a
6-acre
ranchette
his home
after he was
raised from
an incubated
egg by Lisa
Lawson. She
said the fam-
ily would
never con-
sider eating
him for
Thanksgiv-
ing.
RIC BUSH/Special
to the Chronicle


Raising cane


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Larry Rooks, his family and friends will come together this week to make cane syrup on their farm south of Inver-
ness. The family tradition has been one that his family has taken part in for generations. This Chattanooga power
cane mill will be used today and tomorrow to squeeze the contents from lone sugar cane stalks.

Syrup-making family tradition continues on local farm


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
INVERNESS When the whole
family gets together for Thanksgiv-
ing Day, it's a great time to make
sugar cane syrup if the family is
Southern.
"We do it at Thanksgiving be-
cause all the family's around," said
Larry Rooks, a rancher in Inver-
ness. "Even my youngest daughter
and her husband are here right now
from South Carolina. He pushed to


get Thanksgiving off just for the
syrup making. He's a Marine in
Beaufort, S.C. He said he didn't
mind working Christmas and New
Year's. He said he'd rather get
Thanksgiving off."
Another Marine who hails from
Oklahoma will join Rooks' son-in-
law and daughter with the family
for Thanksgiving. He's reported to
be excited about syrup making.
Rooks' niece, who is a student at
Texas A&M, also will fly in to help
make syrup. Along with family,


many friends will drop by, too, for
the traditional annual event.
"There for a while, it was like
Mom and Dad's class reunion,"
Rooks said. "They would call all of
them because they all grew up
around here. Every year, they've
helped somebody make syrup."
Rooks has made syrup since he
was a child, when his family went to
his aunt's house. Syrup making goes
back a long time, as syrup was a
See Page A2


There's 'no place like Hernando'


^ : Group plans Thanksgiving feast


-- ~h


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Community members gather Wednesday to clean up the
area, set a fire in the grill and organize in preparation for
the Hernando Thanksgiving. Pictured are Luke Simmons,
Kye Edwards, Joyce Lynn Ford, Elonza Hendred, Ted
Smith, Sonny Wright and Desmond Simmons. During the
event, tables in the park in the center of town will be
straining from the weight of the food everyone is
bringing.


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HERNANDO Back in
the day, all the families of
the tight-knit community of
Hernando got together to
share a meal.
They'd make an event out
of it. Every May 20 (Emanci-
pation Proclamation Day),
July 4 and Labor Day, the
men would go out fishing in
the morning, then set up the
big three-legged wash pot
they used as a fryer
Prior to that they would
go door to door collecting $2
from everyone to pay for the
lard and everything else -
they always fried the fish in
lard back then. Later, every-
one would meet in the park
under the trees and bring
their side dishes -rice and


greens, potato salads and
Ernestine Presley's apple
turnovers.
"Some of us were talking
on Facebook and we were
talking about 'remember
when,"' said Luke Sim-
mons.
Then somebody started a
"You're from Hernando, FL
if" Facebook page and peo-
ple started posting memo-
ries about growing up in
Hernando and the commu-
nity dinners.
They had an idea:
Thanksgiving is coming up,
what if we get together like
in the old days? Then some-
one said, "What if we had T-
shirts made for everyone to
wear?"
As of last week, more than
See .Page A5


Surviving


a killer


cancer


Beverly Hills

woman beats

the odds

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
BEVERLY HILLS -
Caryn Harmon knows the
statistics by heart.
Lung cancer is the
leading death of cancer in
both men and women.
It kills more than three
times as many men as
prostate cancer and twice
as many women as breast
cancer.
It claims more than 400
lives each day
Then, though, there is
this:
According to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, there
are 400,000 lung cancer sur-
vivors in the United States
today
And Harmon is one of
them.
Most people not associ-
ated with lung cancer
wouldn't know this, but No-
vember is Lung Cancer
Awareness Month. Harmon,
who lives in Beverly Hills,
has copies of proclamations
from Gov Rick Scott and the
Citrus County Commission.
She will also sit down to
Thanksgiving dinner with
her family, knowing that
nothing short of faith has
kept her alive.
"The only thing I can say
is I had a lot of people pray-
ing for me," Harmon said.
Harmon, 60, was diag-
nosed with lung cancer 10
years ago while living in
Philadelphia. Unlike other
forms of cancer, it has no
symptoms, so diagnosis oc-
curs when a doctor is trying
to find the cause for an-
other ailment.
In Harmon's' case, she
was experiencing pain in
her lower back and then her
shoulder
Coincidentally, Harmon
was working at the time in
data processing at the Fox
Chase Cancer Center in
Philadelphia, and worked
for the doctor who would
treat her cancer
The doctor found stage
four lung cancer that had
spread to her spine. Her
chances for survival were
very minimal.
"When I was diagnosed I
shouldn't have made it
through the year," she said.
About 87 percent of lung
cancer cases are caused by
smoking, according to the
governor's proclamation.
Harmon said she had
smoked but kicked the habit
10 years earlier.
"I should have known bet-
ter," she said. "My father
died of lung cancer I was so
glad I wasn't smoking any-
more."
Harmon didn't ask the
doctor how long she had to
live, but her sister asked.
The answer: three to six
months.
She started radiation
treatments on her spine and
then chemotherapy Three
months passed, then six
months, then more time.
The threat faded.
Doctors told her the can-
cer could return and it did
- to her brain and both
lungs. Each time, treatment
killed the cancer cells.
Harmon sees a doctor at
Moffitt Cancer Center in
Tampa every six months for
tests and she is always wary
of those results. Harmon
knows the battle may be
lifelong.
It's a life she shares with
her husband of three years,
Gary
"It sure makes you enjoy


Page A5





A2 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Larry Rooks explains the process how the cane is cut and replanted for next year.


CANE
Continued from Page Al

staple of the frontier pantry
The Rooks' are one of sev-
eral Citrus County families
that make syrup each year.
"During the Depression,
there were rations on salt,
sugar and different things,"
Rooks said. "Folks who had
sugar cane did not need the
sugar ration. They could
trade it for


something
they didn't
For more have."
photos, click T h e
on this story at Rooks fam-
www.chronicle ily and
online.com. friends will
spend Fri-
day and Saturday and maybe
even Monday cutting sugar
cane stalks from a one-acre
field on their farm, stripping
leaves from the stalks, push-
ing them into a mill to
squeeze out the juice and
then spending a few hours
boiling the juice to syrup.
Then gallons of syrup will be
poured into Mason jars for
family members to use.
They are a large family
descended from three
brothers who arrived in Cit-
rus County from Georgia in
the 1870s.
The old sugar cane mill
the family uses has a long
history itself.
"When you use it only
once a year, it's kind of a
work in progress," Rooks
said.
Each year, family mem-
bers put the syrup-making
operation back together and
get it running again for the
weekend. The cane mill,
manufactured in Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., once be-
longed to Rooks'
grandfather, Fred Spooner.
"Grandma Spooner was a
Croft," Rooks said. "Mom
grew up in Hernando. When
I was little, the mill and the
tank were at John Croft's
and he made syrup. We
made the syrup over there
and later on we moved it to
Grandpa's (Spooner's). He
told my uncle he would give
this to Valentine, that's my
dad. He said he seems to be
the only one to care any-
thing about it because it is a
lot of work."
The machine looks a good
size in the open shed where
it is now installed. Rooks de-
scribed it as a small version
of the Yulee sugar mill. He
described how it worked.
"We run the stalks of cane
through here," Rooks said.
"We catch it in this trough.
We run a PVC pipe from
here over to the tank. The
tank sets over that furnace."
When Rooks was a child,
his job was to gather the
wood, lighter knots that are
resinous and burn hot, for
the furnace. But these days
the furnace is fueled with
liquid propane.
The tank the liquid was
once boiled in was a long
wooden vat lined with tin.


Larry Rooks, pictured here, and his family and friends will
spend Friday and Saturday and maybe even Monday cutting
sugar cane stalks from a one-acre field on their farm, strip-
ping leaves from the stalks, pushing them into a mill to
squeeze out the juice and then spending a few hours boiling
the juice to syrup.


The Rooks family replaced
it with a stainless steel vat
that holds about 150 gallons.
It takes about six rows of
sugar cane and about two
hours of grinding to fill a vat
with sugar cane juice.
Powering the mill has
been ingenious.
"All these years, we actu-
ally have run it off this 1942
two-cylinder John Deere
tractor," Rooks said.
The old tractor held up
well until last year.
"The fan came off and got
in the radiator the first day
and we had to shut down,"
Rooks said. "Fortunately, I
was able to go and borrow a
tractor from Jerry Perry-
man that's got all the John
Deere in Lecanto and
brought it out here."
This year, the family will
use an electric motor.
"I'm a pretty old tradi-
tionalist, so I'll still be work-
ing on the tractor," Rooks
said. "I got to where it'll
crank and I like to hear it
running."
In all, it takes about eight
and a half hours for a day of
syrup making, with the
hardest tasks coming first -
stripping leaves, cutting
stalks, carrying them to the
mill and putting them
through the mill.
"It's about six hours actu-
ally of cooking and two
hours grinding," Rooks said.
The cooking is easier, if
hot. As the juice cooks and
thickens, it has to be
skimmed because "impuri-
ties" or non-syrup materials


Just like gen-
erations
back the
dark, sweet
cane syrup is
stored in
Mason jars
for future
use. The
syrup is used
for making
barbecue
sauce, baked
. beans and
gingerbread.
True country
people eat it
spread on
biscuits for
breakfast.
Some people
spread it on
biscuits for
breakfast.


rise to the top. To make it
more pure, the syrup is also
filtered.
When the syrup has
cooked long enough, a chain
raises one end of the vat and
the syrup flows through a
spigot into washtubs. That's
when the helpers start
ladling the dark amber liq-
uid into Mason jars and put-
ting on the lids that self-seal
a vacuum as the syrup cools.
"You can hear the lids
pop, pop, pop," Rooks said.
The syrup is ready for
making barbecue sauce,
baked beans and ginger-
bread. True country people
eat it spread on biscuits for
breakfast.
All that sweetness draws
yellowjackets and other in-
sects, so syrup makers get
rid of the "pummings," the
crushed and drained sugar
cane. It can be fed to cattle
or tilled back into the soil.
Rooks also planted a few
more rows of cane this year
The acre contains eight va-
rieties that are mixed in the
cooking.
"My favorite is the old
green," Rooks said. "Dad
calls it Government Green.
Everybody hates it because
when you're feeding the
mill, it wants to break off at
the joint. So it's aggravating
to grind. But it makes my fa-
vorite syrup, if we had
enough to make all one
kind."
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached
at cvanormer@chronicle
online.corn or (352) 564-2916.


TURKEY
Continued from Page Al

The 2-year-old Bourbon
Red calls a 6-acre Crystal
River ranchette his home
after he was raised from
an incubated egg by Lisa
Lawson. She said the fam-
ily would never consider
eating him for Thanksgiv-
ing. Instead, they look at
him as a "breeder" and
producer of future genera-
tions.
"He is very friendly,"
Lisa Lawson said as she
held the 25-pound bird in
her arms Sunday after-
noon. "We have held him
from day one so he is used
to people."
Dumb and Dumber
blends in well with the
four hen turkeys, chickens,
a 300-pound pig, goat,
guinea hens and four
horses, some of which are
rescue animals. There's no
special enclosure for this
Tom turkey, he is a free
range bird and struts his
feathers in the penned-in
yard.
Life is good for Dumb
and Dumber. And, like the
presidential birds, he
knows he will never end up
in the turkey roaster. In-
stead, his only concern for
the future is getting to
know the hen turkeys.
Presidents have ac-
cepted Thanksgiving
turkeys since 1947 and
began pardoning the fair
feathered friends in1989.
This year, Liberty, cho-
sen from 100 submitted
names, hails from Min-
nesota.
"It is a huge honor for
the National Thanksgiving
Turkey and its alternate to
come from Minnesota this
year," said Steve Olson,
MTGA Executive Director.
"The White House Thanks-
giving event has been a tra-
dition since President
Truman, so our turkey
farmers in Minnesota feel
blessed to be part of such
an amazing history"
The 2011 National
Thanksgiving Turkey eggs
were laid at a Willmar
Poultry Company farm in
early June and they
hatched on July 7. In Sep-
tember, a small number of
male turkeys from that
hatch were selected and
moved to a facility spe-
cially designed for them.
But the turkeys were not
treated like royalty In-
stead, they were like all the
others in the bunch. The
one exception is the birds
had increased interaction
with people so that they
were prepared for the
White House Ceremony
During the ceremony, the
President reflected upon
the time-honored tradi-
tions of Thanksgiving.
'A great writer once
called Thanksgiving the
"one day that is ours ...the
one day that is purely
American," the President
said. "When we gather
around our tables to share
the fruits of our blessings,
let's remember what that
means... And let's think
about those who can't
spend the holiday with
their loved ones, especially
the members of our mili-


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Associated Press
President Barack Obama, with daughters Sasha and Malia,
pardons Liberty, a 19-week old, 45-pound turkey, on the
occasion of Thanksgiving, Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011, on
the North Portico of the White House in Washington. At
left is National Turkey Federation Chairman Richard
Huisinga.


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Lisa Lawson holds Dumb and Dumber, her pet turkey she
raised from an incubated egg. He doesn't have to worry
about being part of the family's Thanksgiving Day feast -
he has been pardoned for life.


tary serving overseas."
He added, "And that's
what being an American is
all about. Even when
times are tough, we look
out for each other. We lift
each other up. And we re-
mind ourselves just how


lucky we are here, to-
gether, in the greatest
country on Earth."
Chronicle managing edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can
be reached at 564-2930 or
sfrederick@chronicle
online.com


* According to the U. S.
Department of Agricul-
ture, more than 45 mil-
lion turkeys are cooked
and eaten in the U.S. at
Thanksgiving-that's
one sixth of all turkeys
sold in the U.S. each
year. American per
capital consumption of
turkeys has soared from
8.3 pounds in 1975 to
18.5 pounds in 1997. In
2007, it dropped to
13.8 pounds.
* In 2011, more than
248 million turkeys
were expected to be
raised with an average
live weight per bird of
28 pounds with nearly
6 billion pounds of
turkey processed. The
turkeys produced in
2010 together weighed
7.11 billion pounds and
were valued at $4.37
billion.
* A turkey under sixteen
weeks of age is called a
fryer, while a young
roaster is five to seven
months old.
* Turkeys are the only


breed of poultry native
to the Western Hemi-
sphere.
* Turkeys have great hear-
ing, but no external
ears. They can also see
in color, and have excel-
lent visual acuity and a
wide field of vision
(about 270 degrees),
which makes sneaking
up on them difficult.
However, turkeys have a
poor sense of smell but
an excellent sense of
taste.
* Domesticated turkeys
cannot fly. Wild turkeys,
however, can fly for
short distances at
speeds up to 55 miles
per hour. They can also
reach speeds of 25
miles per hour on the
ground.
* The ballroom dance
known as the Turkey
Trot was named for the
short, jerky steps a
turkey makes.
Information compiled from info
please.com


.COM




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-7


j







Page A3 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THAroundTE Couple donates $50,000 to food pantry
THE STATE


Citrus County
Habitat stores closed
for Thanksgiving
Habitat for Humanity Re-
Stores in Inverness and Crys-
tal River will be closed
Thursday through Friday,
Nov. 24-25, and will open on
Saturday, Nov. 26, from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.
Habitat's Crystal River Re-
Store is located at 7800 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, (352)
564-2300. Habitat's Inver-
ness ReStore is located at
3685 E. Forest Drive, (352)
341-1800.
Government offices
closed for holiday
All county government of-
fices will be closed on Thurs-
day, Nov. 24 and Friday, Nov.
25, in observance of
Thanksgiving.
Citrus County Central
Landfill will be closed on
Thursday, Nov. 24 and close
early on Friday, Nov. 25 at
2:30 p.m.
The county libraries will be
closed Nov. 24 and 25 and
will reopen with regular hours
on Saturday, Nov. 26.
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices will be closed on Nov. 24
and 25 and will reopen with
regular hours on Saturday,
Nov. 26.
BOCC declares Civil
Air Patrol Week
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners de-
clared the week of Dec. 1
through Dec. 7, as "Civil Air
Patrol Week" in Citrus County.
The Civil Air Patrol was es-
tablished on Dec. 1, 1941, by
executive order of the Direc-
tor of Civilian Defense as an
emergency measure to make
civilian aviation resources
available to the national de-
fense effort during World War
II, and following its wartime
service, it was chartered by
Congress in 1946 as a volun-
teer, nonprofit corporation.
The Citrus County Compos-
ite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol,
comprised of Senior (adult)
and Cadet (ages 12-18) mem-
bers, was founded in 1976.
FDS Disposal closed
for Thanksgiving
In observance of Thanks-
giving, FDS Disposal will be
closed Thursday, Nov. 24.
All Thursday customers will
be picked up on Monday,
Nov. 28.
All other customers will be
picked up on their regularly
scheduled day.

Sanford

Large oak tree falls on
house, kills woman
Police said a large oak
tree fell on a central Florida
house, killing a woman who
was asleep in the bedroom.
Sanford police said the
tree fell around 2:30 a.m.
Wednesday.
Orlando television station
13 News reported the
woman's fiance was in an-
other part of the house and
escaped without injury. Res-
cue crews were also able to
rescue the couple's cat.
Police say it took several
hours for crews to make their
way into the house because
the tree was so large.
Investigators say they don't
know what caused the tree to
fall.
The name of the woman
has not been released.
-From wire and staff reports

Correction

Due to a reporter's error, a
story on Page Al of Wednes-
day's Chronicle, "Public
learns about port," contained
incorrect information. The
Cross Florida Barge Canal is
6.5 miles long.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling (352)
563-5660.


CATHY KAPULKA
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA In the
spirit of giving, Herb and
Mary Stenger have donated
$50,000 for the building
fund for the new Feed Cit-
rus County Distribution
Center and the We Care
Food Pantry in
Homosassa.
They challenged any per-
son, group or business in the
community to match their
donation.
"I know a lot of working
people, but I need to meet
money people," Herb said.
"The people who have
money don't want to give it,
and the people who want to
give money don't have it."
The United Way of Citrus
County met that challenge
and has also donated
$50,000.
Diane Toto, president of
the We Care Food Pantry,
said the two new 7,200-
square-foot buildings would
cost an estimated $1.2 million
dollars. To finish both proj-
ects, about $350,000 is
needed, so with the recent
$100,000 donation, their goal
is one step closer to being
met
"We don't need millions,


CATHY KAPULKA/Chronicle
Diane Toto, president of the We Care Food Pantry, left, and
Herb and Mary Stenger talk about progress on the con-
struction of the new Feed Citrus County distribution center
and the We Care Food Pantry as they sit outside of the build-
ings in Homosassa. The Stengers donated $50,000 to the
organizations.


we need crumbs," Toto said.
"This is about people step-
ping up to the plate and
sharing our vision of a
hunger-free Citrus."
Toto said the two projects
were totally funded through
grants, fundraisers and from
contributions from people
like the Stengers and organ-
izations like the United Way
of Citrus County.
'A $50,000 match, when is


the last time you saw that?"
Toto said. "Everything that's
happened on this property
has been through the gen-
erosity of local people and
local businesses."
Toto said the Feed Citrus
County Distribution Center
is a food bank that will serve
more than 50 county agen-
cies and offer food to them
at no cost. The organization
is working with "Feeding


America Tampa" to better
learn about practices in
ending hunger and obtain-
ing national resources for
local food distribution. Its
goal is to partner with local
farmers, supermarkets,
businesses and contributors
to secure an adequate sup-
ply of food and to advocate
for the hungry.
The We Care Food Pantry
is presently inside the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club and
serves the southwest part of
Citrus County Last year, the
pantry distributed 1.4 million
pounds of food. They will be
one of the agencies that will
get food from the Feed Citrus
County food bank.
Toto said the We Care
Food Pantry was the benefi-
ciary of a 5-acre piece of
land on Cardinal Street in
Homosassa that was do-
nated by an anonymous
supporter
"If we're going to build one
building, we might as well
build two," she said as she
explained how both facilities
are under construction at the
same time on the same piece
of property. "All with no
(county) money and no paid
employees whatsoever"
Toto said that people are
more aware of Citrus


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Jimbo Campbell, left, and Erick Tribble unpack a turkey fryer Tuesday afternoon that was given to them. They
plan to cook several turkeys today for themselves and other homeless in the Hernando area.



Holiday for homeless


Donations

help those less

fortunate

MATTHEW BECK
Chronicle

HERNANDO All
Jimbo Campbell and
Erick Tribble wanted for
Thanksgiving were a cou-
ple of turkeys to cook for
themselves.
When the homeless men
approached Doug Alexan-
der, the pastor of The New
Church Without Walls, ear-
lier this week with the re-
quest, Alexander knew
just whom to call.
"I called Larry Gamble
at Walmart and he really
took care of these guys,"
Alexander said Tuesday
afternoon.


When Campbell and
Tribble came to see
Alexander Tuesday for
their birds, they found
much more than turkey.
The men found four 10 to
12-pound birds, a large
turkey fryer, six gallons of
peanut oil to cook their
birds and a propane tank
laid out for the taking.
"I didn't mean for all
this to happen. I just
asked for a turkey,"
Campbell said with a
wide smile on his face.
Tribble, a Hernando
native, has been home-
less since his home
burned down three years
ago. "I'm speechless," he
said. "I thought stuff like
this was all gone. I'm
speechless right now."
Larry Gamble, store
manager of the Inverness
Walmart Supercenter,
said he has a special place
in his heart for those who


are in a tough spot.
"I really care about
helping our children, vets
and the homeless who
are in need," he said from
his office Wednesday
morning.
"We have certain
groups that serve this
community that I know
we can trust them. And
when somebody like
Doug calls me with a
need, we just do it. We
want to be a good commu-
nity partner."
Gamble said it's not
only the Thanksgiving
time of year that they
help provide food and
supplies for the home-
less, but rather it's a year-
round effort.
"It's the right thing to
do," he said.
Alexander and his
church, along with others
around the county, provide
countless meals through-


out the year for those less
fortunate. The former law
enforcement officer-
turned-minister said this
community is special.
"The spirit of giving is
alive in this community,"
Alexander said. "We have
many business owners
who know the impor-
tance of helping others
and they step up. This is
the most giving county
that I have ever been in."
As Campbell unpacked
his new turkey fryer and
surveyed the goods, he
said he was going to take
the new cooking supplies
and help feed his friends
who live with him in the
woods.
"I'm gonna help all my
friends on Thanksgiving.
There's about 20-25 of
them in all," he said. 'And
Pastor Doug, I love him to
death. He really hooked
us up!"


County's hunger problem
during the holidays and
tend to donate food or
money at that time.
"People need to eat 365
days a year, not just now,"
she said.
Mary Stenger said she
and her husband were
happy to make the donation
to the building fund and she
is hoping the community
will follow. She said no do-
nation is too small.
"I think that people who
are truly concerned with
their fellow man will reach
out," Mary said. "You have
to take care of the needy
here. We can reach out and
help other people, but we
have to build our base.
"Live, love and share,"
she said and smiled. "We've
been blessed, so we give
back."
The two new buildings
are at 5259 W Cardinal St in
Homosassa. For more infor-
mation, or to donate call
(352) 628-0445 or mail dona-
tions to We Care Food
Pantry, PO. Box 331, Ho-
mosassa, FL 34487.
Chronicle reporter Cathy
Kapulka can be reached at
(352) 564-2922 or
ckapulka @chronicle
online, corn.




FAMU


death


inquiry


could


take


months

Associated Press

ORLANDO It could
take up to three months
to learn exactly what
caused the death of a
Florida A&M University
band member who was
suspected of being hazed,
an official said
Wednesday
Robert Champion, 26,
was found unresponsive
on a bus parked outside
an Orlando hotel on Sat-
urday night after the
school's football team lost
to rival Bethune-Cook-
man. Investigators be-
lieve hazing occurred
before 911 was called.
Hazing cases in march-
ing bands have cropped
up over the years, partic-
ularly at historically
black colleges, where a
spot in the marching
band is coveted and the
bands are revered almost
as much as the sports
teams for which they play
In 2008, two first-year
French horn players in
Southern University's
marching band were
beaten so hard they had
to be hospitalized. A year
later, 20 members of Jack-
son State University's
band were suspended
after being accused of
hazing.
One of the worst cases
involved a former band
member at Florida A&M
University who suffered
kidney damage because
of a beating with a paddle.


Inmates at county jail eating turkey for special holiday lunch


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
LECANTO It may not
be mom's special turkey
stuffing or grandma's pump-
kin pie, but when inmates at
the Citrus County jail sit for
lunch today, it will be to eat
food they only get on special
occasions.
While sitting around a
family table will still be out
of reach for them, jail offi-
cials will continue their
annual Thanksgiving tradi-


tion of making the day spe-
cial for people who find
themselves behind bars on
this day Americans use to
give thanks for the boun-
ties in their lives. And the
feast is not the normal
chow residents of the
lockup get.
Inmates will get the tradi-
tional holiday fare: roasted
turkey breast, mashed pota-
toes, corn bread, cranber-
ries, dinner roll and a salad.
For dessert, pumpkin pie
and a punch drink, accord-


ing to Assistant Warden
Chris Howard.
"We understand this a
stressful time of the year
for many of the inmates.
They are away from their
families, and I know they
are in jail for a reason, but
we try to make it as com-
fortable as possible for
them," Howard said.
He said it can be espe-
cially special for homeless
inmates who otherwise may
not have a place to experi-
ence a holiday feast.


Howard added that for
dinner, the inmates get a
brown bag of a cold sand-
wich, candy and a soda.
"We only do this on
Thanksgiving, Christmas
and New Year's," he said.
Howard noted that an-
other perk inmates get on
special holidays includes
a chance to watch their fa-
vorite football teams bat-
tle it out on television.
However, visiting hours
stay the same and employ-
ees who are scheduled to


work, stick to the usual
routine.
"But our work shifts are 6
to 6. So, employees at least
get to spend part of the day
at home with their fami-
lies," Howard said.
"We have a lot of team
players around here. It is
not uncommon to have an
employee bring in food to
share with other members
of the staff."
At last count, Howard said
there were 545 inmates at
the facility.






A4 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


Court: Nursing home


agreements invalid


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Nurs-
ing home arbitration agree-
ments that limit remedies
allowed by state law are in-
valid, the Florida Supreme
Court said in two separate
cases Wednesday
The 5-2 opinions said
lower courts erred by re-
quiring arbitration on alle-
gations of negligence
against nursing homes in-
stead of letting them go to
court
The ruling will have a
widespread effect as virtu-
ally all nursing homes re-
quire residents to sign
arbitration agreements
when they enter, said James
Wilkes, whose law firm rep-
resented the plaintiffs in
both cases.
"They are going to be
spending a lot of time in
court," Wilkes said. "This is
going to end a lot of ap-
peals."
Arbitration agreements
in both cases included bans
on punitive damages, which
are allowed by state law.
One agreement also capped
non-economic damages at
$250,000.
The majority in each case
said those limits are con-
trary to public policy and
undermine remedies set by
the Legislature.
"We have always encour-
aged our members to follow
guidance provided by the
courts related to arbitration
agreements and these deci-
sions will enable us to con-
tinue doing so," said Kristen
Knapp, a spokeswoman for
the Florida Health Care As-
sociation in an email. The
association represents


nursing home- and other
long-term care providers.
Both cases were ap-
pealed from the 2nd District
Court of Appeal in Lake-
land, which had affirmed
decisions by trial judges to
compel arbitration.
Gayle Shotts sued OP
Winter Haven Inc., as per-
sonal representative of the
estate of Edward Henry
Clark, her uncle, following
his death in 2003. The com-
plaint filed in Polk County
alleged negligence and a
breach of legal duties to
Clark.
In the other case, Angela
Gessa accused Manor Care
of Florida Inc., of negli-
gence, violation of resi-
dent's rights and breach of
legal duties during a stay at
its Carrollwood facility in
Hillsborough County.
Justice James Perry
wrote both opinions. In
each he noted that state law
has specific remedies in-
cluding damages and in-
junctive relief for
negligence of nursing home
residents or the violation of
their rights. The law out-
lines various residents'
rights including a guarantee
of private communications
and the ability to examine
the results of nursing home
inspections.
"In light of the recognized
need for these remedies
and the salutary purpose
they serve, we conclude that
any arbitration agreement
that substantially dimin-
ishes or circumvents these
remedies stands in violation
of public policy of the state
of Florida and is unenforce-
able," Perry wrote in the
Shotts opinion.


a


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
David Lance Bentz, 46,
3714 Belgrave Drive, Inverness,
2:41 a.m. Wednesday of driving
under the influence. According to
the report, Bentz ran a stop sign
and was stopped and the deputy
smelled a strong odor of alcohol.
He subsequently failed field so-
briety tests and was arrested.
Bond $500.
Other arrests
Joseph Rivera, 22, U.S.
Virgin Islands, 4:41 p.m. on Mon-
day of arson for setting a fire at
the jail. Bond $10,000.
Kerry Colleen Scanlon,
34, 5582 W. Justin Court, Ho-
mosassa, 7:25 p.m. Monday of
disorderly intoxication and resist-
ing an officer without violence.
Bond $650.
John Anthony Dellatorre,
22,10499 N. SpenceAve., Dun-
nellon, 11:04 p.m. Monday of
grand theft, burglary and traffick-
ing in stolen property. Dellatorre
also allegedly violated probation
for previous charge of felony bat-
tery. Bond $24,000.
Donald P. Knowlton, 34,
5209 Riverside Drive, Yankee-
town, 8:00 a.m. Tuesday of traf-


ON THE NET

* For the Record reports are archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


sticking in stolen property and giv-
ing false information to a pawn-
broker. Bond $7,000.
Lela Marie Coons, 45,
8148 S. Kimberly Circle, Floral
City, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday of theft
of auto. Bond $2,000.
Taylor Daniel Gillsims, 19,
24 S. Hawthorne Drive, Inglis,
1:32 p.m. Tuesday of burglary,
grand theft and trafficking in
stolen property. Bond $31,000.
Debra M. Gatz, 52, 15400
S.W. Highway 484, Dunnellon,
6:43 p.m. Tuesday of burglary
and stealing from a person 65
and older. Bond $7,000.
Shianne Gobin, 20, 5642
Glencrest Blvd., Tampa, 12:23
a.m. Wednesday of possession
of cannabis and drug parapher-
nalia. Bond $750.
Burglaries
A burglary to a dwelling oc-
curred at about 4 p.m. Nov. 15 in
the 10200 block of E. Trails End
Road, Inverness.
A burglary to an unoccupied
residence occurred at about 2


p.m. Nov. 18 in the 2100 block of
S. Stonebrook Drive, Ho-
mosassa.
A burglary to an unoccupied
structure occurred at about 5
p.m. Nov. 18 in the 200 block of
S. Pine Ave., Inverness.
A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at about 5 p.m. Nov. 20
in the 1900 block of N.W. U.S.
Highway 19, Crystal River.
A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at about 7 p.m. Nov. 20
in the 3800 block of E. Bennett
St., Inverness.
A burglary to an unoccupied
structure and a petit theft oc-
curred on Nov. 21 in the 5500
block of W. Homosassa Trail,
Lecanto.
A burglary to an occupied
residence occurred at about 3:09
a.m. Nov. 21 in the 2600 block of
E. Mary Lue St., Inverness.
Thefts
A grand theft ($300 or more)
occurred on Sept. 11 in the 5300
block of E. Granger St.,
Inverness.


A petit theft occurred at
about 9 a.m. Oct. 31 in the 5700
block of S. Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness.
A petit theft occurred at
about noon, Nov. 18 in the 3200
block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills.
A petit theft occurred Nov.
21 in the 2200 block of N.
McGee Drive, Hemando.
An auto theft and petit theft
occurred at about 6:30 a.m. Nov.
21 in the 12000 block of E. Trails
End Road, Inverness.
A petit theft occurred at about
noon Nov. 21 in the 400 block of
N.E. 1st Terrace, Crystal River.
A retail petit theft occurred
at about 1 p.m. Nov. 21 in the
300 block of N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River.
A petit theft occurred at
about 7:30 p.m. Nov. 21 in the
1100 block of W. Hampshire
Blvd., Citrus Springs.
A grand theft ($300 or more)
occurred at about 2 a.m. Nov. 22
in the 4000 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
Vandalism
Avandalism ($200 or more)
occurred at about 11:59 p.m.
Nov. 20 in the 3800 block of S.
Missouri Drive, Homosassa.


Meeting Notices...............................C.........14



Miscellaneous Notices............................. C14


S Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices............C12



N- Notice to Creditors/Administration.........C12
A4,,-


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Ci Jlln ': '..i I
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
s


S
pc
s
pc
s
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast


s
s
s
s
s
S
s

PC


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds from 15 to 20 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters ..ill have a moderate chop.
Mostly sunny today.


HI LO PR HI LO PR
77 64 trace 78 65 0 10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excsive aily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 75 Low: 46
Sunny, cool, breezy

FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 49
,,, .- Mostly :ijiiir, breezy

---------- SAT ltURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 53
.1r... .-- cloudy


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Wednesday 83/67
Record 85/30
Normal 77/55
Mean temp. 75
Departure from mean +9
PRECIPITATION*
Wednesday trace
Total for the month 0.39 in.
Total for the year 55.23 in.
Normal for the year 49.56 in.
-As of 6 prn. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in.


DATE DAY

11/24 THURSDAY
11/25 FRIDAY




N* O
NOV. 25 BEL 2


DEW POINT
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 68
HUMIDITY
Wednesday at 3 p.m. 71%/
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Composites, grasses, palm
Today's count: 5.0/12
Friday's count: 4.7
Saturday's count: 4.9
AIR QUALITY
Wednesday was good with pollut-


ants mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MIN

3:51 10:06 4
4:52 11:07 5


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
:22 1
:23 1


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
3 SUNSET TONIGHT.....
SUNRISE TOMORROW
0 MOONRISE TODAY.
DEC. 10 DEC. 17 MOONSET TODAY ..


LJOR
)N)
10:37
11:39


.5:33 P.
.7:01 A.
.6:17 A.
. 5:06 P


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness/Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even
addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd
addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543: Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time,

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Thursday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka' 3:40 a/12:42 p 5:33 p---
Crystal River" 2:01 a/10:04 a 3:54 p/9:58 p
Withlacoochee' 1:41 p/7:52 a -- 7:46 p
Homosassa'" 2:50 a/11:41 a 4:43 p/11:35 p


High/I
4:24 a/1
2:45 a/1
12:32 a/
3:34 a/1


*'At Mason s Creek
Friday
Low High/Low
2:36 a 6:23 p/1:30
0:52 a 4:44 p110:42
8:40 a 2:31 p/8:30
2:29 p 5:33 p/-


Gulf water
temperature


76
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Tues. Wed. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.12 28.12 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.28 35.26 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 37.37 37.37 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.34 39.32 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood. the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision in no event
will the DistrlcI o the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (3b2) 796-7211

THE NATION


.-30s
DO '-



505
A -M

S 70S E PaM

B el
L- An ag Honolu
782/69
-. 1os .
30ss


Wednesday Thursday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
RM Burlington. VT
M. Charleston. SC
M Charleston. WV
M Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
w Nashville


p
p
p


32 1 11 s
33 pc
47 02 s
50 s
49 .34 s
46 s
48 .16 s
40 pc
49 s
46 c
36 147 s
34 56 s
28 .72 pc
62 .12 s
42 19 s
52 .14 s
34 s
43 s
39 38 s
59 69 s
40 s
32 1 13 s
43 S
29 s
39 s
37 28 s
33 pc
44 s
46 59 s
38 97 s
51 s
42 s
51 s
44 c
48 s
48 C
46 s
52 s
32 s
35 s
58 $
54 .01 s
46 s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
201 1 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


41 4 Ms I.I 4 sit vr.





O ,K -na -_,
Milp? i Ane nt


70s
Houston 7 s
75/60


.40s
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
THURSDAY

Wednesday Thursday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 71 61 s 71 54
New York City 54 41 .48 s 52 40
Norfolk 74 53 .21 s 57 41
Oklahoma City 69 33 s 70 48
Omaha 47 30 s 64 43
Palm Springs 77 48 c 66 49
Philadelphia 62 46 .77 s 54 40
Phoenix 82 52 c 74 53
Pittsburgh 60 39 .04 s 52 38
Portland. ME 42 31 1.17 s 41 29
Portland. Ore 58 47 1.00 r 47 42
Providence, R1 47 36 1 39 s 48 37
Raleigh 74 53 .12 s 62 34
Rapid City 53 26 s 60 33
Reno 67 32 c 51 31
Rochester, NY 41 34 69 s 53 38
Sacramento 57 40 sh 58 42
St Louis 48 44 s 65 44
St. Ste. Marie 40 24 s 48 39
Salt Lake City 62 38 c 55 35
San Antonio 74 49 s 74 57
San Diego 64 50 c 60 51
San Francisco 61 48 sh 56 47
Savannah 76 61 .17 s 66 43
Seattle 53 41 1.28 r 45 37
Spokane 56 46 08 c 45 32
Syracuse 43 35 .61 s 50 38
Topeka 62 28 s 67 46
Washington 64 49 28 s 56 42
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 86 Marathon, Fla. LOW -4 Fraser, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


THURSDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 86/75/pc
Amsterdam 49/411c
Athens 55/42/pc
Beijing 43/25/c
Berlin 43/31/pc
Bermuda 72/64/sh
Cairo 73/54/s
Calgary 37/25/pc
Havana 84/64/pc
Hong Kong 75/67/pc
Jerusalem 61/45/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


65/50/s
55/47/pc
58/42/s
73/47/pc
41/37/pc
28/23/pc
53/40/c
84/71/sh
63/47/pc
66/58/sh
56/45/s
50/43/pc
37/26/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY -


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rk<
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8





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The psychology




of saying thanks


Giving thanks gives positive

boost to your mental outlook


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Count
your blessings this Thanks-
giving. It's good for you.
While it seems pretty obvi-
ous that gratitude is a posi-
tive emotion, psychologists
for decades rarely delved
into the science of giving
thanks. But in the last several
years they have, learning in
many experiments that it is
one of humanity's most pow-
erful emotions. It makes you
happier and can change your
attitude about life, like an
emotional reset button.
Beyond proving that being
grateful helps you, psycholo-
gists also are trying to figure
out the brain chemistry be-
hind gratitude and the best
ways of showing it
"Oprah was right," said
University of Miami psychol-
ogy professor Michael Mc-
Cullough, who has studied
people who are asked to be
regularly thankful. "When
you are stopping and count-
ing your blessings, you are
sort of hijacking your emo-
tional system."
And he means hijacking it
from out of a funk into a good
place. A very good place. Re-
search by McCullough and
others finds that giving
thanks is a potent emotion
that feeds on itself, almost
the equivalent of being victo-
rious. It could be called a vi-
cious circle, but it's anything
but vicious.
He said psychologists used
to underestimate the
strength of simple gratitude:
"It does make people hap-
pier ... It's that incredible
feeling."
One of the reasons why
gratitude works so well is that
it connects us with others,
McCullough said. That's why
when you give thanks it
should be more heartfelt and
personal instead of a terse
thank you note for a gift or a
hastily run-through grace be-
fore dinner, psychologists say
Chicago area psychologist
and self-help book author
Maryann Troiani said she
starts getting clients on grat-


itude gradually, sometimes
just by limiting their com-
plaints to two whines a ses-
sion. Then she eventually
gets them to log good things
that happened to them in
gratitude journals: "Grati-
tude really changes your at-
titude and your outlook on
life."
Gratitude journals or di-
aries, in which people list
weekly or nightly what they
are thankful for, are becom-
ing regular therapy tools.
And in those journals, it is
important to focus more on
the people you are grateful
for, said Robert Emmons, a
psychology professor at the
University of California,
Davis. Concentrate on what
life would be without the
good things especially
people such as spouses in
your life and how you are
grateful they are there, he
said.
Grateful people "feel more
alert, alive, interested, en-
thusiastic. They also feel
more connected to others,"
said Emmons, who has writ-
ten two books on the science
of gratitude and often studies
the effects of those gratitude
diaries.
"Gratitude also serves as a
stress buffer," Emmons said
in an e-mail interview.
"Grateful people are less
likely to experience envy,
anger, resentment, regret
and other unpleasant states
that produce stress."
Scientists are not just look-
ing at the emotions behind
gratitude but the nuts-and-
bolts physiology as well.
Preliminary theories look
at the brain chemistry and
hormones in the blood and
neurotransmitters in the
brain that are connected to
feelings of gratitude, Em-
mons said. And the left pre-
frontal cortex of the brain,
which is also associated with
positive emotions like love
and compassion, seems to be
a key spot, especially in Bud-
dhist monks, Emmons said.
However it works in the
brain, Emmons said there is
little doubt that it works.


How to help

yourself by

thanking

others

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Psychologists who
have studied gratitude
give the following tips
for giving thanks in a
way that improves your
emotional well-being:
Keep a gratitude
journal. Regularly
write down at night the
good things that hap-
pened to you that day
or that week. Don't let
this become rote; but
put a lot of thought into
being grateful when
you count your bless-
ings. If it gets to be too
routine, vary your
schedule and do it only
a few times a week.
Put the "you" in
"thank you." The per-
sonal part of gratitude
is what works well. So
be more thankful for
people and how they
help instead of things.
When thanking some-
one, emphasize the
person instead of the
action.
Think about how you
would be without the
people close to you and
remember that when
you are thankful.
Find something that
may have gone wrong
in your day or your life
and think of something
good from that time
that helped you. Re-
member how that
helped you survive the
bad times.
Don't minimize the
power of "you're wel-
come." It is important
to acknowledge some-
one thanking you and
not slough it off by say-
ing it's nothing. It is
something- that's why
someone thanked you.


Court to rule on school funding suit


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
sharply divided appellate
court on Wednesday re-
jected a request from state
officials to block a lawsuit
alleging public school
funding and policies fail to
meet quality requirements
set by the Florida
Constitution.
The 1st District Court of
appeal, in a rare ruling by all


15 judges, also asked the
Florida Supreme Court to
decide if the constitution
provides sufficient standards
for a court to decide those is-
sues and provide relief.
The majority certified
that question as a matter of
"great public importance."
The 8-7 ruling came in a
lawsuit by four parents or
guardians and two students
from Duval and Pasco coun-
ties as well as two advocacy


groups: Citizens for Strong
Schools and Fund Educa-
tion Now.
Former House Speaker
Jon Mills, one of the plain-
tiffs' lawyers, was pleased
although it was a close call.
"As I think some football
coaches say, it's still a win,"
Mills said. "It needs to get to
the Supreme Court and
that's good."
Mills was optimistic the
justices will take the case.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Community members are reviving the tradition of meeting together to
share a meal as they did in past generations. Participants pictured
from left are Matt Strange, Adrienne Barfield, Todd Strange, Elonza
Hendred, Sharon Bostic, Luke Simmons, Dennis Houston, Melanie Sim-
mons, Sandra Maxwell, Desmond Simmons, Ruth Twiggs, Alfred
Twiggs Lisa Smith, Florece Dixon.


FEAST
Continued from Page Al

100 people signed up for a
shirt, maroon and gray just
like the colors of the old
Booker T. Washington
school where the older gen-
eration went before Citrus
County was desegregated.
"We joke about it, but we
say that everybody comes
back to Hernando," Sim-
mons said.
He had left in 1990 after
graduating from Citrus
High School to attend col-
lege in Iowa on a basketball
scholarship. He returned
in 1996. Today, Simmons
works at The Centers and
lives in Hernando where
he's raising his 15-year-old
twins.
"One of the reasons we
want to do this community
dinner is for the kids here,
so they could have what we
had," he said. "Back then,
people just made stuff up to
keep the kids active and
doing things. They gave
them work to do, and they
always recognized the kids
for doing things."
For this community, feed-
ing hordes of people is just
what they do.
"At my house, all my
friends know that if you
smell smoke, just come and


eat," Simmons said. "You
don't have to pay for a
plate. You just come."
His grandmother, Joyce
Alexander, would feed a
rattlesnake if it looked hun-
gry His mother, Lynda Sim-
mons, feeds the homeless
every Monday night in the
park.
It's more than just food.
Along with eating comes
telling stories. When
Robert Simmons, Luke's
uncle, was younger, the old
men would sit out on a
bench under the tree and
talk. They would tell of the
phosphate mines and
they'd keep watch and
keep the neighborhood
safe.
"The saying, 'It takes a
village to raise a child,' that
saying comes from the
black neighborhoods, be-
cause everybody was your
parent," Robert Simmons
said.
He added that he's espe-
cially happy that the
younger generation has
taken it upon themselves to
help their children connect
with the elders of the
community
"That's part of what
we're doing," Luke Sim-
mons said. "It's not just the
food, but we've asked a cou-
ple of the older people to
tell the history, what Her-
nando was."


Today, sometime around
noon, the tables in the park
in the center of town will be
straining from the weight of
the food everyone's bring-
ing. There will be turkey, of
course fried, baked,
jerked and "secret recipe."
Ribs and fish, ham, greens,
dirty rice, mac and cheese
and conch peas.
Brenda Thomas insists
on having "real" dressing,
not that stuff from a box.
Freddie Simmons signed
up to bring sweet potato
pie and Melanie Simmons
is bringing her famous fruit
pizza with a cookie crust, a
cream cheese topping and
fruit placed artistically on
top.
They'll be eating right in
the center of town, just like
they did in years past
"We hope this will be a
yearly tradition," said
Lisa Smith. "We hope this
will continue. We've had
such a good response. It's
wonderful that something
like this can happen. So,
we'll see."
Robert Simmons added
that anyone is welcome to
join them. Just come on out
and grab a plate.
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com or (352)
564-2927.


Ga. gov. backs Gingrich


despite immigration split


Associated Press

ATLANTA Georgia
Gov. Nathan Deal remains
supportive of Newt Gin-
grich's presidential bid but
disagrees with the former
House speaker on allowing
some illegal immigrants to
remain in the country
"Gov Deal would oppose
any amnesty for those who
have been in the country
illegally, regardless of how
long they have been here,"
Deal spokesman Brian
Robinson told The Associ-


ated Press on Wednesday
In a GOP debate Tuesday
night, Gingrich said illegal
immigrants who've been in
the country for decades and
established deep family
and community ties should-
n't automatically be kicked
out of the country The for-
mer Georgia congressman
said they should be pro-
vided a pathway to legal sta-
tus, but not citizenship.


Some conservatives have
assailed Gingrich for being
soft on the issue, while
other Republicans have
praised him for staking out
a middle ground on what
has been a polarizing and
emotionally charged topic.
Deal was an early backer
of Gingrich's White House
bid. The two served to-
gether in the U.S. House
from Georgia.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Caryn Harmon of Beverly Hills was diagnosed with lung can-
cer 10 years ago.


CANCER
Continued from Page Al

life more," Caryn Harmon
said. "I used to get upset so
easily Now I don't worry


INSIDE
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about those things. It's a live
in the moment kind of
thing."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicle
online.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Car buyers think small


Associated Hress
Workers give the final checkup on a 2012 Honda Accord Tourer at Honda Motor Co.'s
Saitama Factory in Sayama, north of Tokyo. More Americans are choosing small cars like
the Chevrolet Cruze and even smaller subcompacts like the Honda Fit because they're
worried about high gas prices and big car payments. They're also finding that small cars
have many of the same features as larger ones, and are much improved from the
cramped, chintzy econoboxes of the 1980s and 1990s.


Sales ofsubcompact cars rising

with gas climbing prices


Associated Press

DETROIT You can't
drive far in the U.S. with-
out seeing a Toyota Camry,
Honda Accord or Ford
Fusion.
Midsize sedans have
been America's favorite
cars for decades.
That's changing.
More people are choos-
ing small cars like the
Chevrolet Cruze and even
smaller ones like the
Honda Fit because they're
worried about gas prices
and car payments.
There's another reason,
too: Small cars are no
longer the cramped
econoboxes of the 1980s
and 1990s, and they have
many of the same features
as larger cars.
Compact cars will outsell
midsize ones as early as
this year, forecasts J.D.
Power and Associates, a
marketing information
firm. That hasn't happened
in at least two decades.
Just five years ago, au-
tomakers sold nearly
250,000


more
midsize
cars than
compact
cars in
the U.S.
Gas was
cheaper
then, and


models, like leather seats,
satellite radio and keyless
entry Buyers can get a Nis-
san Versa hatchback with a
navigation system for a lit-
tle more than $15,000.
Downsizing Baby Boomers,
as the more than 76 million
Americans born from 1946
to 1964 are known, and
tech-savvy young drivers
don't want to compromise
on features when they get a
smaller car, so automakers
are responding.
Mara Landers, 35, an as-
sistant professor of mathe-
matics at Los Medanos
College in Pittsburg, Cali-
fornia, drove a 1998 Civic
that was so spare it didn't
have a radio. She traded it
in for a 2009 Civic with
power windows, keyless
entry and a digital dash-
board display
"The new Civic really
feels like a luxury update
of the old one," Landers
says.
Small cars are
cheaper. An Elantra starts
at $16,445, but can be
loaded up with leather


I forget how
put gas in the ca
because I do it
so rarely.

Melanie Jackson. Hond


a u -
tomakers
had fewer small models to
sell. But by 2015, J.D. Power
expects compact and sub-
compact cars to command
20 percent of sales, while
midsize cars will account
for only 14 percent
For most of the past 15
years, the Camry has been
America's best-selling car.
And Toyota wants it to stay
that way This fall, the
Japanese company re-
leased a new version that
increases fuel economy to
35 miles per gallon and
sells for even less than the
old model.
But it's facing tough com-
petition from smaller cars
such as the Hyundai
Elantra, which gets 40 mpg
and costs $5,000 less.
Elantra sales surged 46
percent to 161,000 through
October, while Camry sales
fell 9 percent to 251,000.
The Elantra isn't the only
competition. For a brief pe-
riod this year after the
Japanese earthquake, the
Chevrolet Cruze unseated
the Camry as the best-sell-
ing car in the country
Melanie Jackson, 29, a
paramedic, went shopping
for a midsize car last sum-
mer but wound up with a
two-door Honda Civic
coupe because she was
wowed by its fuel economy
She says the Civic can eas-
ily fit her three sons, their
backpacks, football equip-
ment and groceries. And
she averages 38 mpg and
spends only $30 a week on
gas.
"I forget how to put gas in
the car because I do it so
rarely," Jackson says.
Here are some reasons
for the growing appeal of
small cars:
Today's small cars
have all the bells and whis-
tles. Unlike the stripped-
down models of earlier
decades, small cars offer
all the amenities of bigger


seats, a
to naviga-
tion sys-
3r tem, a
rearview
camera
a n d
other
features
a Civic t h a t
owner raise the
price tag


to $23,305. To get a midsize
Hyundai Sonata with those
same features, buyers have
to pay $6,000 more.
Small cars are roomier.
The 2012 Ford Focus com-
pact is nearly 8 inches
longer and 5 inches wider
than the Ford Escort- the
car it replaced was a
decade ago. That means
buyers don't need to move
up to a midsize just to
stretch their legs. Adding
inches here and there is an
easy way for carmakers to
increase a vehicle's per-
ceived value.
The difference between
compact and midsize cars
also is narrowing. In 1992,
the compact Corolla was
nearly 17 inches shorter
than the Camry But the
Corolla has stretched, and
is now just 10 inches
shorter.
The Environmental Pro-
tection Agency defines
compact cars as having 100
to 109 cubic feet of passen-
ger and cargo space, while
midsize cars have 110 to
119 cubic feet. That gives
automakers plenty of room
to play with.
One reason companies
are racing to improve their
small car offerings is an up-
coming increase in fuel ef-
ficiency standards.
Carmakers have agreed
to double the average fuel
economy of their fleets to
54.5 miles per gallon by
2025.
Companies will have to
meet that goal with more
efficient gas engines, hy-
brid technology and other
methods. But they'll also
meet it by selling more
small cars. The Ford Focus,
for example, gets 5 more
miles per gallon than the
Fusion.
That difference is impor-
tant to many cars buyers
because gasoline prices re-
main high. At an average of


Associated Press
A 2012 Chevrolet Cruze is
displayed at a car dealership
in San Jose, Calif.
$3.34 a gallon nationwide,
regular gasoline costs 16
percent more than a year
ago.
And it could reach $4
next spring, a level it al-
most touched earlier this
year
Of course, it's too early to
declare the death of the
midsize car. Sales have
dropped before, most re-
cently with the rise of
crossover wagons such as
the Toyota RAV4 and Ford
Edge in the last decade.
Those vehicles combine
the roominess of SUVs with
the nimbler handling and
higher gas mileage of cars.
And midsize cars remain
very popular in the U.S.
Five of the 10 top-selling
vehicles in October were
midsize sedans, and sales
actually grew during the
recession as people down-
sized from even larger cars,
such as the Toyota Avalon
and Chrysler 300. However,
small car sales grew faster.
Toyota, for one, isn't pre-
dicting a big drop in sales
of midsize cars over the
next five years.
One factor: As women
make more money, they're
expected to move from
small cars up to midsize
ones, says Gregg Benk-
endorfer, Toyota's national
manager for product
marketing.
People also may move
back into midsize cars if
gas prices stay relatively
low and stable, says Jeff
Schuster, senior vice presi-
dent of forecasting for LMC
Automotive, a consulting
firm.
But for now, small cars
have the momentum. They
are on dealer lots for less
than a month before being
sold, compared with more
than six weeks for midsize
cars, according to car infor-
mation site Edmunds.com.
Jackson says two of her
friends have downsized to
small cars since she bought
her Civic, and they're as
happy as she is.
"I don't think I'll ever go
back up to a larger car," she
said.


Obituaries


Lois Brock, 84
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Lois J.
Brock, age 84, of Ho-
mosassa, Florida, will be at
11 a.m. Friday, November
25,2011, at Suncoast Baptist
Church with Pastor John of-
ficiating. Cremation will be
under the direction of the
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness, Florida. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Brock was born July
14, 1927, in Georgia, daugh-
ter of the late Malcolm and
Jeannie (May) Harper. She
died November 22, 2011, in
Homosassa, FL. She worked
as a hairdresser Mrs. Brock
was a member of Suncoast
Baptist Church, Homosassa.
Mrs. Brock was preceded
in death by a son, Larry
Brock. Survivors include
son, Lester Ray Brock;
daughter, Cheryl Cooley;
brother, Winston Brock;
stepbrother, Buddy Harper;
and stepsister, Mattie
Lussien.

Leo "Lee"
Sears, 60
HOMOSASSA
Leo S. "Lee" Sears, 60, of
Homosassa, passed away on
Nov 21, 2011, at his home. A
native of Boston, Massachu-
setts, he was born to
Richard and Hildegard
(Kailecwert) Sears on Sept
10, 1951, and came to Citrus
County 39 years ago from
Bradenton.
During his working life,
Lee was a paramedic in Cit-
rus, Sumter and Seminole
counties, but was also
known as a local entrepre-
neur in a number of busi-
nesses here, including
Spotted Dog Realty, Can Do
Answering Service, An-
thony's Chemical Toilets,
Sammy D's Gym and Al
Yards Unlimited. Lee was a
member of Homosassa
Church of God and is sur-
vived by sons Keith Pullias
(Doris), Dewayne Watson,
Anthony Watson (Deanna)
and Chris Watson (Michele),
all of Homosassa and son
Patrick Sears, Lakeland;
grandchildren Keith, Jen-
nifer, Melissa, Dolan, Dal-
ton, Belinda, Caitlyn,
Marissa, Tiffany and Tony
Jr
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by
his beloved dog, Sammy
A Celebration of Life
Service will take place at
11:30 a.m. Friday, Nov 25, at
VFW Post 8189, 8856 W Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa, FL
34446, with Pastor Greg
Richie officiating. Memorial
contributions are requested
in Lee's memory to VFW
Post 8189, Homosassa. A
fundraiser in Lee Sears'
memory will be held at High
Octane Saloon on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa from 1 to 6 p.m.
Saturday Nov. 26. Wilder
Funeral Home, Homosassa
Springs. wwwwilder
funeral.com


Dorothy "Dolly"
Dougan, 89
Dorothy "Dolly" Duncker
Dougan, 89, born on Staten
Island, New York, on Janu-
ary 17, 1922, passed away at
home under the care of
HPH Hos-
pice on No-
vember 22,
2011.
Married
g -g for 69 years,
Sshe is sur-
ivived by
husband
Dorothy Dou glass
"Dolly" and an ex-
Dougan tended fam-
ily, Brian
Dougan and Karen Doe, six
grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
Dolly enjoyed an active,
giving life. She was a Pow-
ers model, New York City, in
the late '30s, was educated
as an architect and worked
in her father's NYC office
designing homes. She was
President Officers of the
Wives Club, USAAC George
Field, IL; volunteered with
the Red Cross, USAAC Al-
liance, NE; taught the Far
Hills Country Day School,
NJ; volunteered at Morris-
town, NJ hospital. She was
also active as a member of
Junior League, Morristown,
NJ; was an actress and
board member with the Vil-
lage Players of
Bernardsville, NJ; a board
member of King's Daugh-
ters, Somerville. NJ; board
member of Visiting Nurse
Association, Somerset
County, NJ; was a Couples
Golf Champion of Spring
Lake Country Club, NJ; a
Brick NJ Hospital volun-
teer; a home spec builder in
Brick, NJ; and acquired mil-
lion-dollar real estate sales
in Ocean County, NJ.
In Florida, where she
lived in Riverhaven Village
for 25 years, after moving
from New Jersey, was a
Seven Rivers Hospital Vol-
unteer; Citrus County Me-
morial Hospital volunteer;
Riverhaven Community
Club Board President;
Riverhaven Garden Club
member; Habitat for Hu-
manity, Citrus County, board
member; Florida Sheriff's
Youth Camp Board of Asso-
ciates; Seven Rivers Coun-
try Club member; Super
Senior Golf Champion of
Black Diamond Ranch CC;
Hospice House Thrift Shop
volunteer; Meals On Wheels
volunteer, driver and deliv-
erer; and St. Timothy's
Lutheran Church member,
office volunteer and mem-
ber of the Church Council.
A funeral service will be
held at 10 a.m. Monday, No-
vember 28, 2011, at Wilder
Funeral Home. Family and
friends will be received
from 9:30 until the hour of
service. Burial will follow at
Florida National Cemetery
Condolences maybe offered
at www.wilderfuneral.com.



a


SO YOU KNOW o Tr 7
I --v^,d T ^. ;> >ITr, o^ I


* The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
(352) 563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
* Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
* Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or
societies.


Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours
from Bay Area Air Conditioning & Heating
As we approach the end of this year, we want to thank our
customers for their continuing business. We know there
are many choices and we are grateful that
you have chosen us to serve
your air conditioning and
heating needs. We will
--- always treat you like family
Sand give you the best
.. r- -. service in town.


Funeral Home Since 1962"




Burial
Cremation
Pre-Planning
Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com








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Ana Hassan, 76
INVERNESS
Ana D. Hassan, age 76, In-
verness, died Tuesday, No-
vember 22, 2011, at Munroe
Regional
Medical
Center in
Ocala.
A grave-
side com-
mittal
service will
be held at
Ana 10 a.m.
Hassan Monday,
November
28, 2011, at Oak Ridge
Cemetery in Inverness. The
family will receive friends
in visitation from 4 to 6 p.m.
Sunday, November 27, 2011,
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home.
Ana was born in Puerto
Rico on September 2, 1935.
She was employed by
Coaches Handbag Factory
as a line worker. She en-
joyed spending time and
taking care of her only
granddaughter. Survivors
include her husband of 53
years, Abdul Hassan, her
daughter Norma Hassan
Farrell and granddaughter
Tiffany Nicole Farrell, all of
Inverness. She was pre-
ceded in death by an infant
daughter, Marianne Hassan,
and her son, Abraham
Hassan.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
Paid obituaries may in-
clude the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if pre-
deceased by spouse);
religious affiliation; bi-
ographical information,
including education,
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/in-
urnment; and memorial
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.



To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Call Mike Snyder at 563-3273
msnyder@chronicleonline .om
or
Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
amiller@chronicleonline .om


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A6 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Expensive to 'Occupy'


Associated Press
An Occupy Boston protester shakes hands with a police officer after a rally Oct. 5 in
Boston's financial district. In the first two months of the nationwide Occupy Wall Street
protests, the movement has cost local taxpayers at least $13 million in police overtime and
other municipal services, according to a survey conducted by The Associated Press.


Occupy protests

Associated Press
NEW YORK During
the first two months of the
nationwide Occupy protests,
the movement that is de-
manding more out of the
wealthiest Americans cost
local taxpayers at least $13
million in police overtime
and other municipal serv-
ices, according to a survey
by The Associated Press.
The heaviest financial
burden has fallen upon law
enforcement agencies
tasked with monitoring
marches and evicting pro-
testers from outdoor camps.
And the steepest costs by far
piled up in New York City
and Oakland, Calif., where
police clashed with protest-
ers on several occasions.
The AP gathered figures
from government agencies
in 18 cities with active
protests and focused on
costs through Nov 15, the
day protesters were evicted
from New York City's Zuc-
cotti Park, where the
protests began Sept. 17 be-
fore spreading nationwide.
Broken down city by city,
the numbers are more or less
in line with the cost of polic-
ing major public events and
emergencies. In Los Angeles,
for example, the Michael
Jackson memorial concert
cost the city $1.4 million. And
Atlanta spent several million
dollars after a major snow


cost nation's cities at least $13M


and ice storm this year
But the price of the
protests is rising by the day
- along with taxpayer ire in
some places.
"What is their real
agenda?" asked Rodger
Mawhinney as he watched
police remove an encamp-
ment outside his apartment
complex in downtown Oak-
land. "I've gone up and
asked them, 'What are you
truly trying to accomplish?'
I'm still waiting for an
answer."
The Occupy movement
has intentionally never clar-
ified its policy objectives,
relying instead on a broad
message opposing corpo-
rate excess and income in-
equality. Aside from
policing, cleaning and re-
pairing property at dozens
of 24-hour encampments,
cities have had to monitor
frequent rallies and
protests.
The spending comes as
cash-strapped police de-
partments have cut over-
time budgets, travel and
training to respond to the
recession. Nonetheless, city
officials say they have no
choice but to bring in extra
officers or hold officers past
their shifts to handle gath-
erings and marches in a way
that protects free speech
rights and public safety. In
some cities, officials say the
spending is eating into their


overtime budgets and leav-
ing less money for other
public services.
Protesters blame exces-
sive police presence for the
high costs in some places.
And they note the cost has
been minimal in other cities,
and worth the spending be-
cause they have raised
awareness about what they
call corporate greed and the
growing inequality between
rich and poor.
"We're here fighting cor-
porate greed and they're
worried about a lawn?" said
Clark Davis of Occupy Los
Angeles, where the city esti-
mates that property damage
to a park has been $200,000.
In Oakland, where protest-
ers temporarily forced the
shutdown of a major port, the
city has spent more than $2.4
million responding to the
protests. The cash-strapped
city, which had to close a $58
million budget gap this year,
was already facing an uphill
battle when Occupy Oakland
began Oct 10.
"The cost of the encamp-
ments is growing and put-
ting a strain on our already
fragile resources police,
public works, and other city
staff," said Mayor Jean
Quan. "We will continue to
be vigilant and ensure that
public safety remains our
first priority and that our
downtown businesses are
protected from vandalism".


lQ oe 's Carpel


4oo&day Ccdebkation

Giving Our Thanks BackI Sh.!

December, 201on W-


Think small for Black Friday


Occupy

protests: Shop

mom-and-pop

Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. Oc-
cupy protesters want shop-
pers to occupy something
besides door-buster sales
and crowded mall parking
lots on Black Friday
Some don't want people
to shop at all. Others just
want to divert shoppers
from big chains and giant
shopping malls to local
mom-and-pops. And while
the actions don't appear co-
ordinated, they have simi-
lar themes: supporting
small businesses while crit-
icizing the day's dedication
to conspicuous consump-
tion and the shopping
frenzy that fuels big
corporations.
Nearly each one prom-
ises some kind of surprise
action on the day after
Thanksgiving, the tradi-
tional start of the holiday
shopping season.
In Seattle, protesters are
carpooling to Wal-Mart
stores to protest with other
Occupy groups from
around Washington state.
Washington, D.C., is offer-
ing a "really, really free
market," where people can
donate items they don't
want so others can go gift
shopping for free.
Others plan to hit the
mall, but not for shopping.
The 75-person encamp-
ment in Boise, Idaho, will
send "consumer zombies"
to wander around in silent
protest of what they view as
unnecessary spending. In
Chicago, protesters will
serenade shoppers with re-
vamped Christmas carols
about buying local.
The Des Moines, Iowa,
group plans flash mobs at
three malls in an attempt to
get people to think about
what they're buying.
"We didn't want to guilt-
trip people at a mall," said
Occupy Des Moines organ-
izer Ed Fallon. "We wanted
to get at them in a playful,
friendly way, to support
local businesses."
Protesters say the move-


p
.

ConfititU-
. S hoppit3


Associated Press
A joke sign is seen Tuesday at one of several entrances to
the Occupy Portland camp in Portland, Ore. Occupy pro-
testers want shoppers to occupy something besides door-
buster sales and crowded aisles of big-box stores on Black
Friday.


ment shouldn't take away
money and seasonal jobs
from the working-class ma-
jority it purports to repre-
sent. The corporations, not
the shoppers, are the focus
of any protests, they say.
But organizers do hope
their actions drive people
to reconsider shopping at
national chains and direct
their attention to small, lo-
cally owned stores.
That may not fly with
small businesses wary of
any association with the
movement, which presents
itself as pushing back
against corporate power
"If you ask, a lot of small
business owners identify as
business owners, not specif-
ically small business," said
Jean Card, spokeswoman
for the National Federation
of Independent Business. "I
would like to believe there
is a silver lining, but I don't
picture a frustrated con-
sumer that can't get into a
box store turning around
and going to a small busi-
ness. I see that person going
home."
Trying to shop exclu-
sively local neglects
economies of scale, job spe-
cialization and other bene-
fits that big, multi-state
corporations can bring,
said George Mason Univer-
sity economist Russ
Roberts.
"Don't punish yourself by
not shopping where you
can get the best deal; that's
foolish," Roberts said.
Besides, small businesses
aren't necessarily better
employers in terms of
wages, benefits, opportuni-


ties for advancement and
other measures, said John
Quinterno, principal at the
public policy research firm
South by North Strategies
in Chapel Hill, N.C.
He calculates that small
mom-and-pops, which he
defines as businesses with
fewer than 10 employees,
account for nearly 80 per-
cent of employer firms in
the U.S., but only about 11
percent of the jobs.
"Sometimes we romanti-
cize small business and I
say this as a small business
owner myself so that it
skews some of our debates
about economic and labor
policy," Quinterno said. "It
doesn't mean they aren't
important. It just means
that larger businesses tend
to create a lot more value-
added per job."
The protests are largely
focused on shopping areas
in affluent suburbs home to
big chain stores. As with the
entire movement, the
protests bring with them a
litany of causes. In addition
to protests of big chains,
causes include clothes
made from animal fur, Mc-
Donald's, homelessness
and, in Las Vegas, the low
gambling taxes paid by
casinos.
The formula is ideal for
the Occupy protests, many
of which faced evictions
from large-scale encamp-
ments in recent weeks. With
a large number of people in
a confined space, the Black
Friday protests present one
of the earliest tests for the
movement in its new, frag-
mented iteration.


Finally, answers


to your Medicaid and


Nursing Home questions.

Free Medicaid Information Seminar
Monday, November 28th, 2-4 pm

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Please call Rachel to register at 1-800-823-5571
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Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.
Also visit us at FLMedicaid.com.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 A9


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Tablet goes mainstream this holiday season


Electronic

devices most

desired gift

Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO 'Tis
the season of the tablet
Despite the gloomy econ-
omy, shoppers are expected
to shell out for tablet com-
puters this December, mak-
ing them about as popular
as candy canes and
twinkling lights.
The glossy-screened gadg-
ets are the most-desired
electronic devices this holi-
day season. And, of all the
gifts people are craving,
tablets are second only to
clothing, according to the
Consumer Electronics Asso-
ciation. The industry group
expects U.S. consumers to
spend an average of $246 on
electronic gifts.
With help from his three
siblings, Bob Cardina, 26,
plans to purchase an iPad
for his parents for Christ-
mas. Cardina and his sister
live in Washington. His


parents live in Tampa,
Florida. So he's excited to
be able to video chat with
his parents them on the
new iPad, him on his
iPhone.
To be sure, tablets were
on some wish lists last year,
but they were mostly prized
by gadget geeks. In the past
year, they have become
more mainstream. Con-
sumers have become com-
fortable using touch
screens, especially as smart-
phones continue to prolifer-
ate. Tablets are popping up
in unexpected places, too.
Apple Inc.'s iPad in particu-
lar is being used as a learn-
ing tool in schools, a digital
cash register in shops and a
menu at restaurants.
In 2010, people were "try-
ing to figure out what the
whole tablet thing was
about," says Gartner analyst
Carolina Milanesi. "Now,
people know what to do
with a tablet"
For some people, the de-
vice has become indispensa-
ble for playing and working.
While you can surf the Web,
send emails and watch
movies on a laptop or smart-
phone, consumers are gravi-


stating to tablets because they
can be more convenient.
The iPad is still expected
to far outsell other tablets
this year. So far, in fact,
Apple has captured about
75 to 85 percent of the U.S.
market, according to tech-
nology analyst Rob Enderle.
But while many think of
the iPad as synonymous
with the word "tablet,"
plenty of shoppers will be
looking for a more afford-
able tablet to give this year
Two of the most promising
competitors come from on-
line retailer Amazon.com
Inc. and book seller Barnes
& Noble Inc. The compa-
nies, major players in the e-
reader market, recently
released tablets of their own
that undercut the iPad's
$499 base price: Amazon's
Kindle Fire, which costs
$199, and Barnes & Noble's
Nook Tablet, which costs
$249. The Fire, which uses a
heavily modified version of
Google Inc.'s Android tablet
software, is expected to be
particularly popular with
gift givers in part because of
its low price.
"When you get below
$200, sales go up dramati-


cally," says Enderle.
Enderle thinks the Fire
will be a popular gift, espe-
cially for kids. To him, it
seems sturdier than the
iPad with a display built
from scratch- and crack-re-
sistant Gorilla Glass, and it's
cheap enough that parents
won't be upset if a child
manages to break it.
Tom Mainelli, an analyst
at research group IDC, ex-
pects the Fire and Nook
Tablets to take the second-
and third-place spots, re-
spectively, behind the iPad
during the last three months
of the year.
Rather than hurting
Apple, he believes the suc-
cess of newer tablets will
help grow the entire tablet
market.
"I don't think Apple loses
just because Amazon wins,"
he says.
One of these Kindle Fire
buyers is 24-year-old Xi-
mena Beltran Quan Kiu,
who purchased the device
for her mother as a Christ-
mas gift. Beltran Quan Kiu
says her mom bought a Sam-
sung Galaxy Tab for herself
about a month ago, but did-
n't like it and returned it.


Associated Press
Tablets, like the Apple iPad 2, are the most-desired elec-
tronic device this holiday shopping season, second only to
clothing as the gift people are craving most.


Retailers on edge as biggest shopping day of year approaches


Associated Press

NEW YORK Retailers
awaiting the arrival of Black
Friday are on edge. How
well they do during the
biggest shopping season of
the year will have lasting
consequences not just on
them, but the still-fragile
economic recovery
This weekend, many
stores will for the first time
use midnight openings along
with the usual bevy of deals
as they try to lure consumers,
whose appetite for good-buys
has been increasing since
the Great Recession.
Economists and business
executives will be watching
closely
"A bad holiday season
would raise recession fears
again, whereas a strong one
would start to dispel those
fears," said Scott Hoyt, senior
director of consumer eco-
nomics for Moody's Analytics.


That would give compa-
nies more impetus to step
up hiring, he added.
As usual, success will de-
pend largely on consumer
spending, which accounts
for about 70 percent of U.S.
economic activity. Their
spending can impact stores'
expansion plans and inven-
tory decisions into the new
year
And that trickles through
the rest of the economy,
from suppliers to jobs.
The November-December
period accounts for 25-40
percent of annual sales and
profits. For 2011, that's al-
most half a trillion dollars in
revenue from spending on
everything from tablets to
toys. The industry accounts
for nearly a quarter of U.S.
jobs.
As the critical sales time
begins, economists and mer-
chants are wondering
whether shoppers will stick


to their lists or pick up some
extras for themselves not
only on Black Friday but
over the rest of the season.
Or will shoppers do what
they've been doing for sev-
eral years now jump on
the deals and retreat until
the season's final days when
they think the bargains will
be better?
Just as in the past few
years, merchants have tried
discounts on holiday mer-
chandise as early as
October.
And those 4 a.m. openings
on Black Friday are now
outdated. The new trend is
midnight openings, with
many stores like Target,
Best Buy and Kohl's em-
bracing them as they try to
be the first to pull in
shoppers.
Given this year's chal-
lenging environment, online
jewelry site Blue Nile is
making a bigger push in


marketing, launching its
first online sale on Black
Friday to snag more female
customers.
"It's going to be competi-
tive. I want to get our brand
out there in the mix," said
CEO Vijay Talwar, who esti-
mates that 30-35 percent of
annual sales come from the
November and December
period.
Earlier openings and a
dramatic increase in early
morning specials have
helped make the day after
Thanksgiving the biggest day
of the year for the past six
years in a row. It's predicted
to keep that crown again this
year, according to Shopper-
Trak, a research firm.
Just because stores have a
decent start doesn't mean
the overall holiday period
will be good. Merchants had
a good Black Friday in 2008,
as shoppers showed up for
the enticing deals, but the


season was a bust.
The impact of that period
still lingers, from shrunken
orders to the demise of
some suppliers, experts say
That was when spending
plunged so much that many
retailers were caught with
too much product in the
pipeline. As a result, they
slashed prices up to 80 per-
cent to draw shoppers and
raise cash.
Retail hiring for the season
hasn't rebounded to its 2006
peak of 54.8 million workers.
About 49.5 million workers
are expected to be hired this
season, up 1 percent from last
year, according to the Inter-
national Council of Shopping
Centers.
Stores, scared they'll be
stuck again with too much
holiday leftovers, have also
kept their inventories lean.
And they're still being
forced to push big discounts
as shoppers contend with a


9 percent jobless rate and
gloomy confidence.
The National Retail Fed-
eration expects total holi-
day sales to be up 2.8
percent to $465.6 billion,
less than the 5.2 percent in-
crease a year ago but
slightly more than the 2.6
percent average increase
over the past decade.
Among those watching
nervously are Pamela Kebe,
a partner at Piccolo Piggies
of Georgetown, an upscale
children's clothing store in
Washington, D.C., that de-
rives 40 percent of its an-
nual sales from November
and December
Her business is down from
40-50 percent from its 2007
peak At one point, she liked
the challenge of getting
shoppers with discounts. But
it's not fun anymore
"I am very nervous," she
said. "This is the first time I
feel like that."


Black Friday top sales day of year


Associated Press

NEW YORK Ready
Set. Shop.
The day after Thanksgiv-
ing, or Black Friday, kicks
off the holiday shopping
season. Each year, retailers
open their doors early and
offer shoppers deals of up to
70 percent off on everything
from electronics to clothes.
And shoppers typically turn
out in droves.
Before you head out to the
stores this year, there a few
things you should know
about Black Friday:
Q: How did the day get its
name?
A: Accounts differ on the
origin of the term. One the-
ory is that it had roots in the
1960s in Philadelphia
where it was used to de-
scribe the heavy pedestrian
and car traffic on the day
after Thanksgiving. The
most common theory,
though, is that the day got its
name because it's usually
when retailers turn a profit
for the year, or operate in
the "black."
Q. Is Black Friday the
biggest shopping day of the
year?


A. ShopperTrak, which
monitors customer traffic
and sales at 25,000 stores na-
tionwide, says that Black
Friday has been the top
sales day every year but one
since it started monitoring
holiday data in 2002; the
only exception was in 2004,
when the busiest day was
the Saturday before
Christmas.
Q. What's new this year?
A Black Friday mania is
seeping into Thanksgiving
Day. Gap will be opening at
11 a.m. on Thanksgiving. Wal-
mart is opening at 10 p.m.
Toys R Us will open at 9 p.m.
Q. Will you get the best
deals of the season on Black
Friday?
A. Not necessarily Stores
have discounts that are just
as good throughout the holi-
day season. And there are
even better deals to be had
after Christmas Day But the
problem is if you wait too
long, you might not get ex-
actly what you want since
stores have kept their in-
ventories lean this year.
Q: Do I have to stand in a
long line to get good deals?
A: No, many Black Friday
deals are available online


as well.
Q. What are some of the
best deals stores will be of-
fering on Black Friday?
A. Wal-Mart will have Bar-
bie, Disney Princess and
Bratz dolls for $5 each.
Macy's is offering $65 Justin
Bieber limited-edition holi-
day fragrance gift sets,
which include the singer's
new holiday CD and an ex-
clusive downloadable track.
Toys R Us will be discount-
ing many toys up to 50
percent
Q. What's the best strategy
to get those deals?
A Plan, plan, plan. Most
stores already have their
hours and Black Friday
deals posted on their web-
site, so you can figure out
where you want to go and
what you want to buy Wal-
Mart's website even has
maps of each of its stores
and highlights where the
advertised specials will be
located. If you can't make it
to every retailer, you can
also ask family and friends
to go to stores for you. Addi-
tionally, follow your favorite
stores on Twitter and Face-
book to get any alerts on
shortages or special offers.


fo6r Life's Psecious Moments


Joanna Miller, HPH Hospice patient Homosassa
Everyone I have come into contact with in caring for my
husband as well as me now, have been the most caring, loving
people I've ever been around.

Addie Hackney, HPH Hospice patient Cypress Cove
I am so grateful that God has sent me the Angels from
Hospice even if it is late in my life. I love each of them.

John Hill, HPH Hospice patient Lecanto
I'm thankful for the way I'm treated at the Hospice House. I'm
thankful for everything that life has to offer I have learned that
you shouldn't take anything for granted.


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I


A10 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


07Z;





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 All


Thank-you letters TO THE EDITOR


Successful
Blues 'n Bar-B-Que
The Nature Coast Friends
of Blues sends a big thank
you out to Citrus County and
the many fine small busi-
nesses that supported Blues
'n Bar-B-Que this year
We celebrated our fifth
event in fine style. Atten-
dance set a new record,
and in spite of a down
economy, support from the
community was better than
ever Our musical enter-
tainment was perhaps the
best to date; the weather
was perfect; and our volun-
teers were incredibly help-
ful taking care of our fans.
We look forward to donat-
ing to Hospice of Citrus
County's Camp Good Hope
and Teen Encounter soon.
Special thanks go out to
Gibson Tree Service and
their team of professionals
who annually donate a day
of their time to "dress and
undress" the property with
the sponsor's banners. Ron
and Zayne Strmiska annu-
ally donate two tents, pick
up, set up, tear down and
return tables. Waste Pro's
Marci Spivey donated
waste receptacles, portable
toilets and a hand wash sta-
tion.
Jim Davis of Woodview
Coffee House was stellar as
our emcee for the day Neil
and Eve Shaw donated two
tents, Camp E Nini Hassee
donated the tent for our
Silent Auction, and of
course, Jim Anderson do-
nates the use of his prop-
erty to hold the event
The Chronicle also de-
serves big thanks for ads
and articles printed to help
promote the event, and for
its annual support of all the
events, we host.
We unveiled a new logo
for Blues 'n Bar-B-Que this
year that honors Jim (Boe)
Anderson as the event
founder and thank Mike
Mauldin of Nature Coast
Screen Printing and Em-
broidery for creating the
design and T-shirts this
year Every year, Sheldon
Palmes Insurance gener-
ously provides our liability
insurance protecting our
interests for the day
Our generous sponsors
this year include Citrus
Care Dental Association;
Mike Scott Plumbing; The
Screen Monkey; Suncoast
Plumbing and Electric;
Tammy Young, EA; River-
sport Kayak; Kane's Ace
Hardware; Comfort Keep-
ers; MacRae's of Ho-
mosassa; Tally-Ho
Vacations; Educational
Tours; Gibson Tree Serv-
ice; Crowley & Company
Advertising; The Cellular
and Satellite Depot; Tropi-
cal Windows; Tobacco
Depot; Smiles on Citrus;
Neck & Back Care Center;
Gulf to Lake Marine &
Trailers; Ed Serra, CPA;
Candy Murphy of Investors
Choice Financial; Hudson
Tire; Aardvarks Florida
Kayak; Le Page Carpet and
Tile; R&L Mobile Service;
Midway Animal Hospital;
Shelly's Seafood; Bay Area
AC; Publix of Homosassa;
Great Sounds Music and
Recording Studio; New
Concepts International
Hair Salon; The Column
Shop; Cattle Dog Coffee
Roasters; Gulf Coast Ma-
rine Service; Clardy Law
Firm; Robin Woodbury,
CPA; Southern Sun Title;
Michael Stokley of Exit Re-
alty; John Shelton of My
Corner Ministry; and Amer-
ican Auto Service.
Our silent auction set a
record this year for both
the number of items and
the amount collected.
Thanks to River Safari's,
Linda's Grooming, Bo-
haine's Flame Painted
Copper Art, Woodview Cof-
fee House, Mez Mer Eyes,
CCS Healthy Feet Shoe
Store, Citrus Hills Skyview
Golf and Country Club,
Chocolates by Vanessa,
Shelly's Seafood, Neon
Leon's Zydeco Steakhouse,


Attorney Lora Wilson,
Chuck's Complete Car
Care, New Concepts Inter-
national Hair Salon,
Ohana's, Homosassa River-
side Resort, Paula Hub-
bard's Cleaning Service,
Captain William Toney, To-
bacco Depot, Homosassa
Butterfly, Homosassa
Springs State Wildlife Park,
Military Outlet, Manatee
Toy Company, Yai Yai's
Hair Design, All About Na-
ture, Manatee Lanes, Bay


Area AC, Karisma, Suga
Bug Kids, Accents by
Grace, Helens Consign-
ments, Country at Home,
Little Italy, Angle's An-
tiques, Connie's Kickstand,
Old Homosassa Smoke
House, Designs Signs and
Lines, American Auto Serv-
ice, Forgotten Treasures,
The Frugal Frog, El Diablo
Golf and Country Club,
Jewels by Park Lane,
Michael Paul Hair Salon,
L.A. Wraps, Private Quar-
ters and Frog Holler
Membership grew and
many new people attended


gOilh
U.on


this year We hope we made
many new fans in the
process.
Our Live Music Series is
booked January through
June on the third Saturday
each month with a variety
of music styles to entertain
your love of music. You can
pick up free magnets that
have our 2012 Live Music
Series schedule at Museum
Caf6, Great Sounds Music
in Homosassa and more lo-
cations added each week.
Please visit our website to
learn more about the Na-
ture Coast Friends of Blues


at www.ncfblues and we
hope to see you soon!
Susan Mitchell, President
Nature Coast Friends of
Blues, Inc

Light Up the Night
Sunflower Springs As-
sisted Living Community
would like to thank the fol-
lowing persons, organiza-
tions and businesses for
helping to make the first
annual Citrus Light Up the
Night for Alzheimer's
Awareness possible: Col-
lege of Central Florida -


Citrus Campus; College of
Central Florida Rotoract
Club; Agriculture Alliance
of Citrus County; Citrus
County Senior Services
Program; Superior Resi-
dences of Lecanto; HPH
Hospice; Nurse OnCall;
Granny Nannies; United
Healthcare Community
Plan; Mederi Caretenders;
Comfort Keepers; Omni
Home Care; Carol Condif,
beautician from Sunflower
Springs; Canadian Meds;
Home Advantage Home
Care; Hospice of Citrus
County; Citrus County


Sheriff's Office; Vitamin
Because; Pilot Club of Cit-
rus County; Chocolates by
Vanessa; and New Con-
cepts Hair Salon.
All monies raised during
this event will go to the Cit-
rus County Senior Services
Program to provide respite
and daycare services to
those affected with
Alzheimer's and dementia.
Theressa Foster
executive director
Sunflower Springs Assisted
Living Community
Homosassa


MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.






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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


OPINION







A12 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TH ARK TI R VEU


IHowTosRA HEMR "TINEI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2592305 5.14 -.23 CheniereEn 76602 10.27 -1.07 SiriusXM 811319 1.74 -.13 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1978583116.56 -2.63 GrtBasGg 37670 1.02 -.06 Intel 518316 22.70 -.54 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 803154 11.75 -.33 NwGoldg 37480 9.80 -.55 Microsoft 476591 24.47 -.32 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
GenElec 658072 14.73 -.26 NovaGldg 31586 9.82 -.52 Cisco 466363 17.41 -.52 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
iShEMkts 626329 36.22 -1.21 GoldStrg 30393 1.91 -.03 PwShs QQQ460731 53.29 -1.23 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld Issue has been called for redempbon by company, d- New 52-week
low. dd Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Cho %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
BkADJ5-1510.49 +1.26 +13.7 HKN 2.92 +.27 +10.2 Amertnspf 3.20 +.70 +28.0 ingqualification. n Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
YingliGrn 3.96 +.42 +11.9 EngySvcs 3.03 +.23 +8.2 PrincNtl 2.12 +.32 +17.8 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
DrxHcrBear 44.19 +4.22 +10.6 HalhwdGp 12.40 +.64 +5.4 RoyaleEn 3.86 +.57 +17.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
XuedaEd 3.54 +.33 +10.3 WellsGard 2.15 +.11 +5.4 NSecGrp 9.00 +1.24 +16.0 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the
DirLatBear 21.50 +1.94 +9.9 AmBiltrt 4.85 +.21 +4.5 CTI Inds 5.03 +.54 +12.0 stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u New
52-week high. un Unit, including more than one security. vj Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Naviosun 2.80 -.65 -18.8 Bacterin 2.26 -.39 -14.7 DiamondF 27.80 -7.17 -20.5
CtrySCkg 9.50 -1.90 -16.7 CheniereEn 10.27 -1.07 -9.4 SchoolSp 4.17 -1.00 -19.3
ChinaDigtl 3.61 -.63 -14.9 Medgenicn 3.17 -.30 -8.6 Selectica 3.25 -.64 -16.4
PhxNMdan 5.01 -.87 -14.8 GenMoly 2.82 -.25 -8.1 Grouponn 16.96 -3.11 -15.5 52-Week Net % YT[
InterOilg 52.38 -8.80 -14.4 MdwGoldg 2.25 -.18 -7.4 Wintrustwt 10.97 -1.85 -14.4 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


382 Advanced
2,700 Declined
55 Unchanged
3,137 Total issues
33 New Highs
168 New Lows
3,733,985,040 Volume


DIARY


116 Advanced
342 Declined
24 Unchanged
482 Total issues
4 New Highs
27 New Lows
85,218,280 Volume


379
2,161
103
2,643
6
200
1,688,406,614


12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
459.94 381.99Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amex Index
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P 500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71 Russell 2000


11,257.55
4,564.20
423.96
6,919.92
2,119.30
2,460.08
1,161.79
12,200.48
674.34


I NYSE


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


-236.17 -2.05 -2.76 +.63
-113.09 -2.42-10.62 -7.07
-6.49 -1.51 +4.68 +7.26
-174.97 -2.47-13.11 -8.70
-58.58 -2.69 -4.03 +1.42
-61.20 -2.43 -7.27 -3.27
-26.25 -2.21 -7.62 -3.05
-288.15 -2.31 -8.68 -4.09
-21.92 -3.15-13.95 -8.44


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BariPVix 48.60 +2.18
BarnesNob 16.12 -1.98
BarrickG 47.96 -1.10
Baxter 47.83 -.86
ABBLtd 16.70 -.38 Beam Inc 48.77 -.93
ACE Ltd 64.57 -1.23 BeazerHm 1.94 -.01
AESCorp 11.12 -.13 BectDck 70.77 -1.35
AFLAC 39.49 -1.52 BerkHaAl110525.00-1675.00
AGCO 41.63 -.53 BerkH B 72.75 -1.61
AGL Res 38.92 -.59 BestBuy 25.71 -.47
AK Steel 7.15 -.70 BigLots 36.83 -1.94
AMR 1.61 -.04 BIkHillsCp 30.31 -.59
ASA Gold 27.69 -.86 BlkDebtStr 3.73 -.04
AT&TInc 27.55 -.53 BlkEnhC&l 11.88 -.17
AUOptron 4.07 -.35 BlkGlbOp 13.18 -.27
AbtLab 52.35 -.34 Blackstone 12.61 -.32
AberFitc 44.88 -.79 BlockHR 14.56 -.58
Accenture 53.63 -1.20 Boeing 62.36 -1.99
AdamsEx 9.05 -.19 BostBeer 95.96 +.02
AMD 5.05 -.25 BostProp 88.82 -3.31
Aeropostf 15.01 -.45 BostonSci 5.32 +.01
Aetna 38.14 -1.02 BoydGm 5.63 -.27
Agilent 33.60 -1.98 Brandyw 8.07 -.24
Agnieog 42.17 -1.18 BrMySq 30.15 -.36
AlcatelLuc 1.48 -.11 BrkfldOfPr 14.13 -.50
Alcoa 8.88 -.38 Brunswick 15.71 -.47
AllegTch 42.96 -2.41 Buckeye 62.76 -.05
Allergan 78.84 -.85 CBLAsc 12.76 -.62
Allete 37.70 -.36 CBREGrp 14.48 -.32
AlliBGIbHi 14.09 -.15 CBSB 23.44 -.82
AlliBInco 8.06 -.03 OFInds 144.80 -6.22
AlliBern 12.64 -.28 OH Engy 52.61 -.90
Allstate 24.50 -.72 CMS Eng 19.63 -.39
AlphaNRs 19.27 -1.38 CNO Find 5.74 -.26
Altria 27.12 -.25 CSSInds 18.64 -1.01
AmBevs 31.53 -.38 CSXs 20.23 -.71
Ameren 31.38 -.41 CVREngy 17.08 -.07
AMovilLs 22.78 -.51 CVS Care 37.04 -.56
AEagleOut 12.93 -.28 CblvsNYs 14.22 -.42
AEP 37.10 -.45 CabotO&G 75.28 -4.81
AmExp 45.10 -.90 CallGolf 5.11 -.08
AmlntGrp 20.10 -.91 alpine 14.54 -.47
AmSIP3 6.50 -.03 Camecog 16.86 -.77
AmTower 55.42 -.58 Cameron 46.25 -1.54
Amerigas 43.30 -.41 CampSp 31.25 -.59
Ameriprise 41.31 -1.42 CdnNRsgs 33.31 -1.52
Anadarko 71.95 -2.58 CapOne 39.85 -.92
AnalogDev 32.51 -.81 CapifSrce 5.96 -.12
Annaly 15.68 -.28 CapM pfB 14.20 +.08
Anworth 6.04 -.12 CardnlHIth 40.85 +.32
Aon Corp 43.68 -.33 CareFusion 23.11 -.41
Apache 88.14 -4.33 CarMax 26.81 -.72
Aptlnv 20.49 -.45 Carnival 30.47 -1.07
AquaAm 21.00 -.20 Caterpillar 87.76 -2.23
ArcelorMit 15.20 -1.00 Celanese 40.04 -1.36
ArchCoal 13.93 -.51 Cemex 3.76 -.35
ArchDan 27.79 -.62 Cemigpf 16.05 -.59
ArmosDorn 19.96 -.43 CenovusE 28.99 -1.46
Ashland 48.74 -1.72 CenterPnt 18.68 -.22
AsdEstat 15.18 -.59 CntryLink 35.50 -.94
AssuredG 9.30 -.28 Checkpnt 11.09 -.52
AstraZen 42.85 -.89 ChesEng 22.71 -.95
ATMOS 32.54 -.57 ChesUfi 40.66 -1.10
AuRicog 9.36 -.26 Chevron 93.75 -2.67
Avon 16.36 -.23 Chieos 10.15 +.21
BB&TCp 21.04 -.86 Chimera 2.57 -.07
BHP BilLt 66.93 -2.44 Chubb 63.64 -.86
BP PLC 39.68 -1.44 Cigna 40.78 -1.20
BRT 6.25 +.03 CindBell 2.81 -.05
BakrHu 48.98 -2.31 Cifgrp rs 23.51 -.95
BailCps 33.05 -.22 CleanHs 54.35 -1.25
BcBilVArg 7.32 -.36 CliffsNRs 59.96 -3.94
BeoBrades 15.01 -.65 Clorox 63.71 -.54
BeoSantSA 6.85 -.23 Coach 58.70 -1.18
BeoSBrasil 6.90 -.18 CCFemsa 84.51 -2.11
BkofAm 5.14 -.23 CocaCola 64.87 -1.10
BkMontg 53.62 -.67 CocaCE 24.35 -.58
BkNYMel 17.80 -.22 Coeur 25.91 -1.20
Barclay 9.24 -.37 CohStlnfra 15.35 -.25


ColgPal 86.48 -1.72 Embraer 22.97 -1.70 GMACCpT 19.05 -.20 Hertz 10.08 -.52 iShREst 51.42 -1.56
CollctvBrd 12.51 +.80 EmersonEl 47.06 -1.25 GabelliET 4.86 -.04 Hess 55.01 -3.02 iStar 5.29 -.46
Comerica 22.87 -1.01 EmpDist 19.89 -.21 GabHIthW 6.58 -.04 HewlettP 25.78 -.87 Idacorp 38.59 -.36
CmwREIT 15.95 -.05 EnbrEPts 30.02 -.47 GabUbI 7.24 +.04 HighwdPrp 26.58 -1.02 ITW 42.50 -1.55
CmtyHIt 17.45 -.59 EnCanag 18.03 -.81 GafisaSA 5.65 -.19 HollyFrts 22.40 -1.64 Imafon 5.46 -.20
CompSci 23.00 -1.49 EndvSilvg 10.24 -.71 GameStop 22.11 -.32 HomeDp 36.52 -.58 IngerRd 29.33 -1.44
Con-Way 24.95 -1.08 EnPro 31.77 -.81 Gannett 10.44 -.12 HonwIllnfi 49.19 -1.77 IntegrysE 48.72 -.75
ConAgra 23.86 -.32 ENSCO 47.59 -2.19 Gap 17.80 -.33 HospPT 19.82 -.58 IntcnfEx 113.31 -2.60
ConocPhil 66.93 -1.21 Entergy 66.30 -1.06 GenDynam 60.64 -2.98 HostHofis 12.63 -.51 IBM 177.95 -3.36
ConsolEngy 35.38 -1.78 EntPrPt 44.57 -.86 GenElec 14.73 -.26 Humana 82.01 -2.43 InfiGame 16.21 -.39
ConEd 56.45 -.45 EqtyRsd 52.56 -1.25 GenGrPrp 12.82 -.56 Huntsmn 9.56 -.49 IntPap 25.58 -1.05
ConstellA 18.02 -.33 EvergEnh .14 -.10 GenMills 37.96 -.51 Hyperdyn 3.04 -.22 Interpublic 8.32 -.43
ConstellEn 37.92 -.61
Cnvrgys 11.57 -.23
Cooper Ind 52.29 -1.36
Corning 14.05 -.40
CottCp 6.03 -.15
Codien 43.37 -.98 j ial Invitation f
Crane 43.52 -1.26 Youare
CSVS2xVxS 62.21 5.21
CSVellVSts 4.99 -.22CO a l
CredSuiss 21.25 -.55 Invted
Cummins 86.84 -2.74
CurEuro 132.87 -1.72

DCTIndl 4.42 -.15 e H use
DDR Corp 10.45 -.45
DNP Selt 10.61 -.09
DPL 30.17 +.03en Mouse p/O
DRHorton 10.83-.47 Tues., Nov. 29th 2011*. :30pm-7:OOpm
DSW Inc 43.84 -1.38 0
DTE 49.33 -.71 Door Prizes* H'ordourves & Refreshments wilbe si.- r- 0
DanaHIdg 11.65 -.39 .
Danaher 44.66 -1.38 t
Darden 44.67 -.38 l) -' .g
DeanFds 9.24 -.29 3 M 1
Deere 74.72 +2.80 w a w
DeltoAir 7.12 -.16
DenburyR 14.43 :59 MASTER1' JEWELERS
DeutschBk 32.46 -1.13 255 E.ifGHLANDBLVD., INVERNESS, FL34452
DBGoIdDS 4.76 +.02
DevonE 59.52 -2.18 W inn Dixie Center 726-4709
ikss 582 1-.970 www.whaleniewelers.com -.


DxEMBIIrs 65.99 -6.95
DxFnBull rs 48.69 -4.43
DrSCBr rs 38.20 +3.25
DirFnBrrs 54.83 +4.10
DirLCBrrs 38.90 +2.44
DrxEnBear 15.58 +1.23
DirEMBear 25.36 +2.20
DirxSCBull 34.99 -3.58
DirxLCBull 48.79 -3.54
DirxEnBull 37.62 -3.51
Discover 22.91 -.30
Disney 33.40 -.62
DomRescs 49.31 -.73
Dover 50.40 -1.47
DowChm 24.60 -.55
DrPepSnap 34.78 -.90
DuPont 44.08 -1.32
DukeEngy 19.63 -.29
DukeRlty 10.50 -.22
Dynegy 2.29 -.11
ECDangn 4.43 -.13
EMCCp 22.06 -.41
EOG Res 91.61 -3.37
EQT Corp 55.80 -1.48
EastChm s 35.67 -1.32
EKodak 1.15 -.01
Eaton s 40.87 -1.69
EatnVan 21.87 -.71
EVEnEq 9.70 -.13
Ecolab 52.68 -.33
Edisonlnt 37.77 -.66
EIPasoCp 24.54 -.36
Elan 9.92 -.50
EldorGidg 16.75 -.62


ExeoRes 10.38 -.25 GenMotors 20.24
Exedisn 9.06 -.40 GenOn En 2.57
Exelon 41.89 -.66 Genworth 5.35
ExxonMbl 74.58 -1.45 Gerdau 7.25
FMCTchs 45.66 -1.64 GlaxoSKIn 42.03
FedExCp 76.56 -1.65 GoldFLtd 15.39
FedSignl 3.62 -.15 Goldcrpg 48.41
Fedlnvst 15.11 -.25 GoldmanS 87.89
FelCor 2.43 -.25 Goodrich 122.55
Ferrellgs 22.15 -.11 Goodyear 12.01
Ferro 5.00 -.28 GtPlainEn 19.81
RbriaCelu 6.76 -.47 Griffon 8.21
RdNatlnfo 22.78 -.05 GuangRy 17.07
FstHorizon 6.68 -.18 HCAHIdn 23.58
FTActDiv 8.02 -.16 HCP Inc 35.93
FtTrEnEq 10.41 -.12 HSBC 35.83
FirstEngy 41.86 -.83 HSBC Cap 25.51
RagstBch .61 -.06 Hallibrtn 32.20
Rotek 8.03 -.70 HanJS 14.62
Fluor 50.33 -2.15 HanPrmDv 12.28
FootLockr 21.35 -.55 Hanesbrds 23.42
FbrdM 9.83 -.26 Hanoverlns 34.19
FbrdMwt 2.09 -.10 HarleyD 34.59
ForestLab 28.77 -.46 HarmonyG 12.60
ForestOil s 13.83 -.70 HartfdFn 15.66
FMCG s 34.38 -1.26 HawaiiEl 24.20
FronfterOm 5.35 -.14 HItCrREIT 47.16
Fronfline 2.82 -.24 HItMgmt 7.62
Fusion-ion 29.11 -2.54 HIthcrRIty 16.36
GA -'.I2 HeclaM 5.37
Heinz 49.91
GATX 37.32 -1.72 HeimPayne 50.54


-.49 IAMGIdg 18.79 -.07
+.02 ICICI Bk 27.44 -.94
-.34 ING 6.31 -.31
-.40 ION Geoph 5.32 -.43
-.43 iShGold 16.54 -.04
-.36 iSAsfia 20.82 -.76
-2.12 iShBraz 54.99 -2.16
-1.51 iSCan 25.26 -.75
-.21 iShGer 18.28 -.58
-.34 iSh HK 15.01 -.21
-.45 iShJapn 8.84 -.21
-.38 iSh Kor 49.77 -1.98
-.11 iShMex 50.88 -1.60
-.37 iShSing 10.96 -.26
-.88 iSTaiwn 11.54 -.43
-.99 iShSilver 30.93 -.96
-.13 iShDJDv 49.47 -.90
-1.50 iShChina25 33.38 -.94
-.06 iSSP500 116.93 -2.64
-.15 iShEMkts 36.22 -1.21
-.29 iShiBxB 110.83 -.57
-1.08 iShB20T 122.58 +1.19
-.57 iShB7-1OT 105.37 +.36
-.42 iShBl-3T 84.52 +.01
-.70 iS Eafe 46.69 -1.32
-.56 iShiBxHYB 82.75 -1.52
-1.00 iSR1KV 58.10 -1.36
-.07 iSR1KG 54.50 -1.23
-.35 iSR2KV 59.88 -1.72
-.33 iShBarcl-3103.58 -.32
-.81 iSR2KG 77.34 -2.58
-3.12 iShR2K 67.48 -2.19


Invesco 17.80 -.43
InvMtgCap 14.75 -.26
IronMtn 28.57 -.32
ItauUnibH 15.84 -.57
IvanhMg 17.90 -1.29

JPMorgCh 28.38 -1.03
Jabil 18.36 -1.72
JacobsEng 38.49 -1.11
Jaguar g 7.03 -.27
JanusCap 5.85 -.27
Jefferies 10.51 +.45
JohnJn 61.99 -.91
JohnsnCOi 27.77 -.86
JonesGrp 9.76 -.33
JnprNtwk 20.55 -.86
KB Home 6.69 -.39
KCSouthn 63.43 -1.57
Kaydon 28.77 -.40
KA EngTR 23.05 -.35
Kelbgg 48.25 -.59
KeyEngy 12.54 -1.20
Keycorp 6.67 -.10
KimbClk 68.52 -.88
Kimco 14.60 -.66
KindME 74.92 -.54
KindMorn 28.02 -.59
Kinrossg 12.95 -.15
KodiakOg 7.75 -.24
Kohls 52.14 -1.64
Kraft 34.23 -.32


KrispKrm 6.39 -.30 Mosaic 50.01 -1.86 Petrobras 24.99 -.91 RegionsFn 3.68 -.22
Kroger 21.82 -.05 MotrlaSoln 43.62 -.93 Pfizer 18.45 -.45 ReneSola 1.86 +.12
LDKSolar 3.16 +.16 MotrlaMon 38.53 -.04 PhilipMor 71.02 -.99 Renrenn 3.75 -.23
LSICorp 5.18 -.19 MurphO 49.99 -1.04 PhilipsEl 17.91 -.53 RepubSvc 25.88 -.36
LTCPrp 26.95 -.71 NCRCorp 16.35 -.58 PiedNG 30.06 -.72 Revlon 13.62 -.32
LaZBoy 9.39 -.59 NRG Egy 18.77 -1.09 Pier 1 12.08 -.63 ReynAmer 40.07 -.18
Ladede 38.72 -.67 NV Energy 14.45 -.04 PimoStrat 11.27 -.02 Riointo 46.32 -1.94
LVSands 42.53 -1.71 NYSEEur 25.97 -.75 PinWst 44.67 -.70 RiteAid 1.12 -.04
LearCorps 40.02 -.06 Nabors 16.22 -1.22 PioNtrl 84.07 -3.44 RockwAut 67.17 -2.02
LeggMason 23.16 -.39 NalcoHId 37.26 -.17 PitnyBw 17.36 -.50 RockColl 51.16 -1.21
LennarA 16.44 -.65 NBkGreece .44 -.01 PlainsEx 31.87 -1.14 Rowan 31.33 -1.46
LeucNatf 20.42 -.80 NatFuGas 53.74 -2.18 PlumCrk 34.31 -.66 RylCarb 23.66 -2.09
Level3rs 18.33 -1.31 NatGrid 49.12 -.46 Polariss 56.89 -1.54 RoyDShllA 65.36 -1.69
LbtyASG 3.67 -.08 NOilVarco 63.76 -.85 PostPrp 37.28 -1.54 Royce 11.52 -.39
LillyEli 35.65 -.49 NewAmHi 10.02 -.13 Potashs 41.65 -.57 RoycepfB 25.66
Limited 38.74 -1.22 NJRscs 44.87 -1.32 PwshDB 26.86 -.41 RdxSPEW 43.05 -1.05
LincNat 17.63 -.86 NwOriEds 22.86 -.78 PSUSDBull 22.29 +.25
Lindsay 50.63 -1.94 NYCmlyB 11.32 -.25 PwSlntDv 13.76 -.41
Linkedlnn 66.00 -2.69 NewellRub 14.27 -.41 Praxair 93.95 -1.39 SAIC 11.26 -.26
LizClaib 7.56 -.21 NewfidExp 38.85 -1.14 PrecDrill 10.00 -.55 SAPAG 55.82 -1.59
LloydBkg 1.34 -.05 NewmtM 64.21 -1.58 PrinFnd 21.67 -1.03 SCANA 40.70 -.42
LockhdM 73.95 -.52 NewpkRes 7.96 -.45 ProLogis 24.92 -.76 SKTIcm 14.18 -.10
Loews 35.82 -1.09 Nexeng 14.82 +.12 ProShtS&P 44.10 +.91 SLMCp 12.02 -.49
LaPac 6.46 -.36 NextEraEn 52.38 -1.08 PrUShS&P 23.11 +.97 SpdrDJIA 112.33 -2.41
Lowes 22.48 -.33 NiSource 21.23 -.30 PrUIShDow 18.39 +.70 SpdrGold 164.83 -.48
LnBaA 2833 144 Nicor 53.79 57 ProUltQQQ 74.10 -3.51 SpdrlniSC 24.57 -.70
NikeB 90.93 .70 PrUShQQQrs50.85 +2.22 SPMid 148.51 -4.23
99Cents 21.66 -.05 ProUltSP 39.73 -1.81 S&P500ETF116.56 -2.63
M&TBk 67.43 -2.15 NobleCorp 32.70 -1.82 PrUShtFnrs 76.28 +4.08 SpdrDiv 50.47 -1.06
MBIA 7.46 +.20 NobleEn 86.99 -3.38 ProUShL20 18.15 -.38 SpdrHome 15.07 -.49
MDU Res 19.73 -.34 NokiaCp 5.47 -09 ProUltFin 36.06 -2.12 SpdrS&PBk 17.56 -.57
MEMC 3.96 -.16 Nordstrm 44.74 -.99 PrUPShR2K 18.92 +1.59 SpdrLehHY 36.43 -.57
MFAFnd 6.25 -.22 NorfikSo 70.35 -1.30 ProShtR2K 33.05 +1.01 SpdrLel-3bl 45.85 +.01
MCR 8.76 -.06 NoestUt 32.95 -.66 ProUltR2K 29.23 -1.95 SpdrS&P RB 21.47 -.80
MGIC 2.40 -.11 NorthropG 52.97 .93 ProUSSP50017.37 +1.08 SpdrRefI 48.98 -1.30
MGM Rsts 9.30 -.43 Novarts 52.77 -.91 PrUltSP500s 48.11 -3.33 SpdrOGEx 48.94 -2.35
MackCali 24.37 -.64 NSTAR 4.10 1.01 ProUSSIvrs 13.14 +.80 SpdrMetM 47.06 -2.42
Macquarie 25.62 -.43 Nucor 35.48 -1.72 PrUltorders 39.21 -1.39 STMiero 5.72 -.25
Macys 29.56 -.92 NvMO 14.43 -.04 PrUShCrders41.67 +1.38 Safeway 18.37 -.17
MageiMPtr 63.45 -.94 NvMuISI&G 7.61 -.12 ProUltSIvs 56.80 -3.71 StJoe 13.07 -.74
Magnalgs 33.28 -.37 NuvQPf2 7.66 -.12 ProUShEuro 19.22 +50 SJude 35.03 -.40
MagHRes 4.08 -.31 OGEEngy 49.31 1.10 ProctGam 61.06 -.63 Saks 8.55 -.28
Manitowoc 9.14 -.55 asisPet 26.62 2.01 ProgrssEn 51.06 -.65 Saesforce 105.79 -2.46
Manulifeg 10.28 -.39 OcciPet 87.77 -3.86 ProgsvCp 17.72 -.32 SJuanB 23.66 -.29
MarathnOs 24.84 -1.17 Och-Zif 7.48 -.15 ProUSR2Krs48.47 +2.89 SandRdge 6.27 -.53
MarathPn 32.83 -.69 OfficeDpt 2.03 -.09 Prudent 45.17 -1.78 Sanoi 32.21 -.51
MktVGold 55.49 1.55 OfficeMax 4.25 -.24 PSEG 31.18 -.54 SaraL-ee 17.71 -.17
MktRus 27.40 -.66 OilSvHT 113.24 -4.51 PubStrg 121.90 -2.02 Schlmbrg 66.50 -2.45
MktVJrGld 27.26 -1.00 OdRepub 7.18 .15 PulteGrp 5.15 -.27 Schwab 10.75 -.04
MalnA 2798 89 Olin 17.89 19 PPrIT 5.03 -.03 SeadrillLtd 31.31 -1.30
MarrVacn 17.95 -.14 OmegaHIt 16.10 -.51 QEPRes 29.42 -1.21 SemiHTr 28.47 -.84
MarshM 28.21 -.33 Omncre 29.80 +.09 QuanexBld 13.48 -.54 SenHous 20.57 -.22
MStewrt 2.90 10 Omnicom 39.89 1.05 QuantaSvc 18.75 -.41 Sensient 33.96 -.77
Mas 8.42 -.34 ONEOK 77.39 .89 -1.0542 QntmDSS 2.35 -.22 ShipFin 10.45 -.23
McDrmlnt 10.23 .33 OnekPts 49.17 40 QstDiag 55.24 -.57 SiderurNac 7.76 -.46
McDrmlnt nlds 91.8723 -.3378 OneokPts 49.17 -.40 11 Questr 18.28 -.44 SilvWhtng 31.10 -1.22
McDnldsH 40.70 -2.74 OpkoHth 4.88 -.1 QksilvRes 7.08 -.35 SilvrcpMg 7.13 -.16
McoRn 1340.70 -2.768 OshkoshCp 18.34 -1.09 RPCs 17.73 -1.02 SimonProp 115.78 -3.32
McMoRn 13.93 -.68 Oensll 17.27 -.92 RPM 21.33 -.99 Skechers 12.33 +.32
MeadW 27.06 -1.17 RadianGrp 2.13 -.04 SmithAO 35.40 +.04
Mechel 9.10 -.54 10.75 -.29 Smucker 72.48 -1.11
MedcoHIth 54.08 +.12 PG&ECp 36.86 -.66 RadioShk 10.75 .29 Smuoder 72.48 -1.11
Medids 30.25 -.83 PNC 48.88 -1.33 Ralcorp 79.21 -1.48 SoJerlnd 52.54 -1.21
Medtnic 33.95 -.80 PNM Res 17.96 .18 RangeRs 64.55 -2.42 SouthnCo 42.20 -.42
Merck 33.19 -.62 PPG 79.57 -1.70 RJamesFn 26.02 -1.08 SthnCopper 27.81 -1.05
Meritor 5.02 -.24 PPLCorp 28.41 -.67 Rayoniers 38.37 -1.02 SwstAirl 7.40 -.25
MetLife 27.86 -1.55 PallCorp 50.15 -1.46 Raytheon 42.62 -.84 SwstnEngy 35.63 -1.50
MetroPSLife 27.5786 -1.5517 Pallndorap 50.15 -1.46 Rltylno 32.41 -.73 SpectraEn 28.04 -.32
MeroHlt 6.88 -Re.63 ParkDrl 5.82 -.64 RedHat 45.51 -1.96 SprintNex 2.47 -.15
MidAApt 55.50 -1.76 PatriotCoal 8.10 -.72
Mias 8.54 +.03 PeabdyE 33.26 -1.36
MitsuUFJ 4.04 -.08 Pengrth g 9.46 -.29 l S
MobileTele 14.66 -.52 PennVaRs 23.35 +07
Molyeorp 27.69 -2.10 PennWstg 16.17 -.78ainder of th
MoneyGrs 16.68 +.38 Penney 29.87 -.75 The remainder of the
Monsanto 67.97 -1.41 PepBoy 10.45 -.42 NY listings can
MonstrWw 6.89 -.40 PepcoHold 18.64 -.29 NYSE listings can be
Modys 31.6 -1.06 PepsiCo 62.40 -.78 found on th next page.
MorgStan 13.03 -.49 Prmian 19.86 -.09 n the next page.
MSEmMkt 12.55 -.25 PetrbrsA 23.35 -.73


IA EIA N SOC5 CANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 6.77 -.16
AbdAustEq 9.07 -.36
AbdnEMTel 17.36 -.02
AdmRsc 25.25 +.12
AdeonaPh .95 +.05
Advenbx .60 -.02
AlexeoRg 6.25 -.28
AlldNevG 32.09 -1.58
AmAppared .62 -.02
AntaresP 2.53 -.03
Augustag 3.06 -.14
Aurizong 5.27 -.27


AvalRaren 2.68
Bacterin 2.26
Baldw .50
Banks.com .04
Banrog 3.48
BarcUBS36 42.56
BarcGSOil 24.45
BrclndiaTR 48.37
Brigusgrs 1.17
BritATob 87.60
CAMAC En .89
CanoPet .12
CardiumTh .33
CelSd .33
CFCdag 21.80


-.08 CheniereEn 10.27 -1.07
-.39 CheniereE 16.28 -.15
-.06 ChiMarFd 1.34 -.02
-.00 ChinaShen 1.88 -.26
-.13 ClghGlbOp 10.26 -.13
-.48 CrSuiHiY 2.87 -.07
-.45 -
-1.01 DejourEg .35 -.01
-.08 DenisnMg 1.22 -.12
-2.01 EVLtdDur 14.68 -.03
-.04 EVMuniBd 12.15 -.07
EVMuni2 13.29 +.04
-.02 EllswthFd 6.34 -.04
-.01 eMagin 3.78 -.25
-.28 EntreeGold 1.33 -.28


ExeterRgs 2.99 -.14
ExtorreG g 8.02 -.41
FrkStPrp 9.95 -.49

GabGldNR 15.32 -.13
GascoEngy .18 -.00
Gastargrs 2.95 -.13
GenMoly 2.82 -.25
GoldResrc 18.02 -.78
GoldenMin 6.31 -.18
GoldStrg 1.91 -.03
GranTrrag 5.53 -.17
GrtBasGg 1.02 -.06
GtPanSilvg 2.20 -.11
HKN 2.92 +.27


Hemisphrx .19
HooperH .64 -.04
HstnAEn 13.12 -.63
ImpOilgs 38.20 -1.48
IntellgSys 1.78 -.02
IntTowerg 4.61 -.25
IsoRay .89 -.01


KeeganRg 3.95 -.20
KimberRg .99 -.05
LadThalFn 2.16 -.11
LkShrGldg 1.33 -.11
LucasEngy 1.85 -.04


Richmntg 10.45 -.48

MadCatzg .59 ParaG&S 2.25 -.15 37
Metalimo 3.07 -.23 PhrmAth 1.21 -.03
MdwGoldg 2.25 -.18 PinndDt 2.36 -.01 SamsO&G 2.01 -.07
MineSfg 11.03 -.31 PinDrill 9.26 -.73 SeG g 20.99 .46
NeoStem .52 -.03 PlatGpMet 1.09 -.05 Tayseko 2.77 -.12+
Neoprobe 2.10 .05 PolyMetg 1.16 -.04 Tengseo .71 -.03
Nevsung 5.23 -.10 Procerars 14.81 -.57 Timminsg 2.03 .01
NwGoldg 9.80 -.55 PyramidOil 3.63 -.24 TrnsafiPet 1.24 -.04
NAPallg 2.80 -.07 Quepasa 3.50 -.10 TravelCOrs 4.23 -.11
NDynMng 6.16 -.19 QuestRMg 2.51 +.04 TriValley .19 +.01
NthnO&G 21.21 -1.48 RareEleg 4.91 -.20 TriangPet 4.95 -.30
NovaGldg 9.82 -.52 Rentech 1.47 -.13 UQMTech 1.74 +.05
Oilsandsg .17 -.02 RexahnPh .50 -.01 USGeoth .46 -.02


Ur-Energy .88 -.06
Uranerz 1.60 -.18
UraniumEn 2.76 -.01


VangTot 41.15 -1.11
VantageDrl 1.05 -.07
VirnetX 19.06 -.79
VistaGold 3.22 -.20
VoyagerOG 2.16 -.16
Walterlnv 20.99 -.41
WFAdvlnco 9.45 -.15
YMBiog 1.32 -.03
ZBB Engy .54 -.03


I ASDQ AION AL AKT1


Name Last Chg


ACMoorelf 1.59
AMCNetn 34.60 -1.27
ASML HId 36.72 -.35
ATP O&G 6.70 -.36
AVI Bio .70 -.07
Abraxas 3.07 -.22
AcadaTc 29.15 -1.41
Accuray 3.62 -.21
Achillion 5.69 -.19
AcmePkt 32.96 -2.28
AeordaTh 21.52 +.07
AcfvePwr .66 -.03
AcfvsBliz 11.75 -.15
Actuate 5.78 -.09
Acxiom 11.34 -.65
AdobeSy 25.94 -.39
Adtran 29.85 -1.10
AdvEnld 8.60 -.15
Aegion 13.68 -.65
AEternag 1.66 +.04
Affymax 5.32 +.18
Affymetrix 4.37 -.16
AgFeed h .58 +.06
AirMedia 2.97 +.28
Aixtron 11.26 -.50
AkamaiT 26.28 -.79
Akorn 9.43 -.20
AlaskCom 5.31 +.30
Alexions 64.87 -1.31
Alexza .98 -.07
AlignTech 21.55 -.71
Alkermes 14.32 -.65
AllosThera 1.29 -.04
AllotComm 14.67 -.74
AllscriptH 18.75 -.41
AlnylamP 6.50 -.26
AlteraCp If 34.66 -.80
AlterraCap 21.00 -.61
Amarin 6.67 -.34
Amazon 188.99 -3.35
Amedisys 10.16 -.21
ACapAgy 27.78 -.36
AmCapLd 6.55 -.11
AmDental 18.65 -.04
AmPubEd 36.99 -.25
AmSupr 4.03 +.01
Amrign 15.11 -.23
AmCasino 16.81 -.44
Amgen 54.94 -.72
AmkorTIf 4.19 -.20
Amyin 10.00 -.11
Anadigc 2.03 -.12
Anlogic 51.14 -1.22
Analystlnt 4.85 -.05
Ancestry 22.18 -.20
AngiesLn 14.77 -1.35
A123Sys 2.02 -.14
ApolloGrp 44.96 +.07
Apollolnv 6.82 -.28
Apple Inc 366.99 -9.52
ApldEner h .09 -.00
ApldMati 10.21 -.36
AMCC 6.72 -.38
Approach 27.00 -1.84
ArchCap s 34.86 -.93
ArenaPhm 1.28 -.05
AresCap 14.26 -.51
AriadP 10.83 -.30
Ariba Inc 27.17 -1.06
ArkBest 17.26 -.62
ArmHId 26.06 -.89
Arris 10.02 -.12
ArubaNet 19.39 +.21
AscenaRi 25.74 -.55
AsialnfoL 7.68 -.35
AspenTech 16.04 -.43
AssodBanc 9.69 -.46
athenahlth 53.37 -.63
Atmel 8.44 -.38
Audvox 6.66 -.31
Autodesk 30.04 -1.34
AutoData 47.86 -.91
Auxilium 16.13 -.84
AvagoTch 28.97 -.44


AvanirPhm 2.07
AvidTch 6.75
AvisBudg 11.45
Aware h 3.03
Axcelis 1.10
BEAero 35.33
BGC Ptrs 5.79
BMC Sft 33.46
Baidu 119.55
BkOzarkss 26.41
BeacnRfg 18.19
BeasleyB 3.89
BebeStrs 6.94
BedBath 58.19
BioRetLab 12.15
BioFuelEh .74
Biogenldc 109.93
BioMarin 32.41
BioSante 2.25
BIkRKelso 8.01
BlueCoat 16.79
BobEvans 30.72
BostPrv 6.78
BrigExp 36.39
Brightpnt 8.82
Broadcom 30.43
BroadSoft 33.94
Broadwd h .64
BrcdeCm 4.96
BrooksAuto 8.90
BrukerCp 11.86
BuffabWW 61.28
CAInc 19.80
CBOE 25.41
CH Robins 63.74
CME Grp 239.03
CNinsure 5.81
CTC Media 9.12
CVBFnd 9.12
CadencePh 4.16
Cadence 10.29
Callidus 4.64
CalumetSp 18.43
CdnSolar 2.35
CapCtyBk 9.66
CapProd 5.71
CapFdFrs 10.81
CpstnTrb h .93
Cardtronic 23.51
CareerEd 6.95
Carrizo 24.75
CarverB rs 2.80
CasualMal 3.05
CatalystH 48.02
CathayGen 12.14
Cavium 29.74
Beyond 6.40
Celgene 60.43
CellTherrsh 1.01
CelldexTh 2.39
CentEuro 3.05
CEurMed 7.45
CentAI 8.17
Cepheid 31.55
Cerners 57.52
CerusCp 2.87
ChrmSh 3.32
Chartlnds 53.61
CharterCm 50.98
ChkPoint 53.68
Cheesecake 26.14
ChelseaTh 4.43
ChildPlace 52.73
ChinaLodg 13.82
ChinaMed 3.56
ChiValve 2.23
ChXDPlas 5.17
ChrchllD 43.81
CienaCorp 11.03
CinnFin 27.29
Cintas 27.92
Cirrus 14.39
Cisco 17.41
CitrixSys 65.48
CleanEngy 11.36
Clearwire 1.54
Codexis 4.54
CognizTech 61.95


-.19 Cogo Grp 1.70 -.05
-.13 Coinstar 40.52 -.90
-.65 ColdwtrCrk .88 -.02
+.09 ColumLabs 2.19 -.01
-.03 Comcast 21.07 -.32
-1.29 Comcspd 20.89 -.30
-.03 CmcBMO 36.49 -1.21
-1.25 CommSys 12.76 -.58
-4.73 Compuwre 7.64 -.28
-.09 Comtech 29.64 -.85
-.09 Comverse 6.60 +.10
-.03 ConcurTch 43.35 -2.16
-.27 Conmed 24.73 -.70
-.43 Conns 10.54 -.13
-.54 ConsolWtr 7.51 -.74
-.06 ConstantC 20.07 -.62
-3.57 CorinthC 2.36 -.06
-.02 Costeo 80.76 -1.05
-.09 CowenGp 2.41 -.06
-.44 Cree Inc 23.75 -1.50
-.60 Crocs 14.83 -.69
-.64 CrosstexE 11.22 -.53
-.37 Ctrip.eom 25.78 -1.14
+.05 CubistPh 35.15 -1.07
-.53 CumMed 2.83 +.02
-1.19 Curis 3.16 -.16
-2.88 CypSemi 17.14 -.68
-.07 CytRxh .36 +.01
-.11 Cori 2.55 -.11
-.45
-.09
-.82 DFCGbIs 16.50 +.36
-.21 DayStarh .35 +.10
-.56 DeckrsOut 99.97 -.44
-.99 Delcath 2.37 -.25
-1.54 Dell Inc 14.30 -.53
-.24 DeltaPtrrs .58 +.02
-.11 Dndreon 7.79 -.56
-.34 Dentsply 32.86 -.43
-.40 Depomed 4.26 -.29
-.30 DexCom 6.95 +.04
-.33 DiamondF 27.80 -7.17
-.53 DigitalGen 11.98 -.96
-.13 DigRiver 15.54 -.70
-.25 Diodes 18.95 -.70
-.28 DirecTVA 44.79 -1.56
-.09 DiscCmA 39.04 -1.54
-.06 DiscCmC 36.19 -1.24
-.81 DishNetwk 23.27 -.49
-.09 DollarTree 76.61 -.48
-.71 DonlleyRR 13.60 -.65
-.19 DragonWg 3.99 -.32
-.11 DrmWksA 16.91 +.08
+.03 DryShips 2.18 -.13
-.36 Dunkin n 24.72 -.54
-1.44 DyaxCp 1.25 -.05
-.13 Dynavax 2.93 -.01
-1.26 E-Trade 8.04 -.22
-.02 eBay 28.55 -.49
-.20 EagleBulk 1.10
-.17 EaglRkEn 9.78 -.12
-.19 ErthLink 6.11 -.19
-.64 EstWstBcp 17.85 -.74
-.60 Ebixlnc 19.18 +.07
+.21 EchdeonC 4.74 -.28
-.12 EducDevh 5.20 +.06
-.16 8x8 Inc 3.36 -.20
-2.61 ElectSd 11.79 -.21
-1.48 ElectArts 20.94 -.92
+.06 Emeorelf .90 -.09
-.56 EmmisC h .91 +.11
-.14 EncoreCap 20.05 -.39
-.81 EndoPhrm 32.56 +.03
-.22 EngyCnvh .33 -.01
-.24 EngyXXI 27.54 -1.76
-.16 Entegris 7.72 -.34
+.43 EntropCom 4.47 -.21
-.19 EnzonPhar 6.37 +.09
-.53 Equinix 96.26 -2.82
-.73 EricsnTel 9.51 -.19
-.55 ExactSci h 7.66 -.42
-.77 Exelids 4.00 -.13
-.52 EddeTc 2.40 +.08
-2.69 Expedia 25.85 -.95
-.51 Expdlnfi 40.11 -1.08
+.02 ExpScripts 42.49 +.08
-.14 ExtrmNet 2.84 -.14
-3.22 Ezcorp 27.29 -.01


F5 Netwks 99.53 -3.61 iShACWX 34.79 -1.04
FEICo 36.90 -.08 iShACWI 39.64 -.95
FLIRSys 24.16 -.45 iShNsdqBio 96.57 -1.49
FX Ener 4.49 -.34 lIonPLC 16.79 +.28
Fastenals 38.63 -.76 lIonixBr 15.61 +.13
FedMogul 13.26 -.33 IdenixPh 7.29 -.18
FifthThird 10.94 -.41 Illumina 27.15 -.56
FindEngin 19.20 -.78 ImunoGn 11.06 -.22
Fndlnst 15.20 -.63 Imunmd 2.96 -.09
Finisar 16.87 -1.08 ImpaxLabs 17.77 -.27
FinLine 18.71 -.50 Incyte 11.80 -.49
FstCashFn 35.08 -.42 Infinera 6.24 -.18
FMidBc 8.26 -.31 Informat 42.42 -1.97
FstNiagara 8.24 -.24 Infosys 49.63 -1.37
FstSolar 41.58 +.78 Inhibitex 11.77 +.99
FstMerit 13.04 -.47 Insulet 17.27 -.26
Fiserv 54.08 -1.06 IntgDv 5.31 -.21
Flextrn 5.55 -.13 Intel 22.70 -.54
FocusMda 17.61 -.09 InteractBrk 14.20 -.08
ForcePro 5.48 -.01 interClick 9.01 -.01
FormFac 5.51 -.19 InterDig 41.53 -1.35
Forfnets 22.82 -.78 InterMune 17.53 -.68
Fossil Inc 82.51 -.54 InfSpdw 22.12 -.73
FosterWhl 17.87 -.99 Intersil 10.05 -.28
FreshMkt 36.97 -.70 Intuit 49.29 -1.10
FuelCell .84 -.02 InvRIEst 6.92 -.13
FultonFncl 8.53 -.32 IridiumCm 6.67 -.33
FushiCo 7.38 +10 Isis 6.47 -.17
i Itron 32.06 -1.31
IvanhoeEn .98 -.03
GTAdvTc 7.25 -.22 Iboa 9.59 -.56
G-ll 18.26 -.29
GTx Inc 2.51 -91


Garmin 34.58
Gentex 26.23
Genfivah 5.32
GeoEye 20.00
GeronCp 1.46
GileadSd 39.64
GladerBc 10.78
GIblEduc 10.79
Globllnd 7.97
Globalstrh .42
GIbSpcMet 13.45
GluMobile 2.78
GolarLNG 38.70
Google 570.11
GrLkDrge 5.54
GreenMtC 50.13
GrifolsSA n 5.08
Groupon n 16.96
GrpoRn 6.69
GulfportE 30.35
HMNFn 1.94
HMS Hi s 28.24
HSNInc 34.19
HainCel 35.27
Halozyme 8.01
HancHId 27.62
HanmiFnd .83
HansenMed 2.42
HansenNat 85.82
HanwhaSol 1.29
Harmonic 4.72
Hasbro 34.26
HawHold 5.25
HIthStrm 16.77
HrfindEx 12.90
Heelys 1.80
HelenTroy 27.28
HSchein 60.46
HercOffsh 3.33
Hologic 16.21
HmFedDE 9.62
Home Inns 28.98
HomeAw n 27.63
HorsehdH 7.16
HotTopic 6.75
HubGroup 28.69
HudsCity 5.09
HumGen 7.08
HuntJB 42.95
HuntBnk 4.69
IAC Inter 39.19
II-VI s 17.03
IPG Photon 39.24
iShEurFn 13.89
iShAsiaexJ 48.14


j2Global 27.17 -.38
JA Solar 1.61 +.01
JDASoft 28.96 -.36
JDS Uniph 9.88 -.48
JackHenry 30.54 -.86
JacklnBox 19.21 -.40
Jamba 1.29 -.26
JamesRiv 6.53 -.36
JazzPhrm 36.93 -.50
JetBlue 3.40 -.09
JosABank 50.24 -.27
JoyGlbl 79.27 -1.94
KIT Digift 9.18 -.34
KLATnc 42.51 -.80
KeryxBio 2.63 -.13
Keynote 16.67 -1.11
KratosDef 4.78 -.38
Kulicke 8.68 -.43
LKQ Corp 27.69 -.56
LSI Indl If 5.99 -.41
LTX-Cred 5.11 -.26
LamResrch 36.97 -1.06
LamarAdv 22.05 -.79
Landstar 43.84 -.79
Lattce 6.11 -.31
LeapWirlss 7.20 -.34
LedPhrm 1.05 +.03
LibGlobA 39.29 -1.35
LibCapA 73.83 -.60
LibStarzA 64.99 -.41
LibtlntAh 15.21 -.19
LifeTech 36.68 -.60
LifePtH 36.17 -.69
LimelghtN 2.55 -.15
Lincare 22.30 -.26
LinearTch 28.60 -.74
LinnEngy 35.50 -.60
Lionbrdg 2.02 -.09
LivePrsn 11.26 -.42
LodgeNet 2.08 -.03
Logitech 7.24 -.27
LookSmart 1.30
Lulkin 59.95 -5.81
lululemns 46.70 .31

MCGCap 4.01 -.19
MELASci 4.70 -.18
MGE 42.18 -.35
MIPSTech 4.59 -.21
MTS 37.20 -1.08
MSG 25.34 -.23
MagicSft 4.95 -.29
Magma 5.32 -.26
Majeseo 2.63 -.25


MAKO Srg 28.71
ManTech 31.11
MannKd 3.18
MarchxB 5.91
MarinaBio .14
MarvelT 13.39
Masimo 17.84
Mattel 27.41
Maximlntg 24.16
MaxwlT 15.65
MedAssets 9.25
MedicAcIn 4.42
MediCo 17.59
Medidata 18.98
Medivafon 42.10
MeleoCrwn 8.41
MentorGr 11.96
MercadoL 80.56
Mercerlnfi 5.63
MergeHIth 4.40
Micrel 9.38
Microchp 32.55
Micromet 5.25
MicronT 5.71
MicrosSys 43.23
MicroSemi 15.96
Microsoft 24.47
Micrvisn h .44
MillerHer 18.66
Mindspeed 4.74
Misonix 2.04
MitekSys 7.47
Molex 22.31
MolexA 18.62
Momenta 14.78
Motricity 1.22
Mylan 17.62
MyriadG 19.83
NABI Bio 1.84
NETgear 33.54
NIl Hldg 21.49
NPS Phm 5.03
NXP Semi 15.21
NaraBncp 8.40
NasdOMX 24.61
Natlnstrs 24.28
NatPenn 7.39
NektarTh 4.25
Neogen 33.70
NetLogicM 49.27
NetApp 34.66
Netease 41.78
Netflix 68.50
Neflist 2.72
NewLinkn 7.00
Newport 11.98
NewsCpA 16.03
NewsCpB 16.30
NobltyH If 6.00
NorTrst 35.10
NwstBcsh 11.38
Novavax 1.25
Novlus 31.88
NuVasive 12.46
NuanceCm 22.98
Nvidia 14.44
NxStageMd 19.17
OCZTech 5.81
OReillyAu 74.42
Oclaro 2.86
OdysMar 2.49
OldDomFrt 35.51
OmniVisn 10.91
OnAssign 9.94
OnSmcnd 7.07
Oneothyr 6.93
OnyxPh 37.97
OpenTable 33.73
OpnwvSy 1.49
OpntTch 33.68
Opnext .95
OpbmerPh 10.60
Oracle 29.00
Orexigen 1.71
Orthfx 31.68
OtterTail 19.97
Overstk 7.95


PDL Bio 6.05 +.01
PFChng 28.55 -.62
PMCSra 5.47 -.16
PSS Wrld 22.40 -.50
Paccar 37.05 -.82
PacBbsd 2.46 -.11
PacEth rsh 1.21 -.02
PacSunwr 1.33 +.04
PaetecHId 5.08 -.07
PanASIv 23.46 -.57
PaneraBrd 133.12 -2.28
ParamTch 19.01 -.58
Parexel 18.58 -.45
ParkStrlg 3.53 -.17
PrtnrCm 9.29 -.19
Patterson 28.08 -.29
PattUTI 18.96 -.93
Paychex 27.23 -.52
Pendrell 2.20 -.20
PnnNGm 33.94 -.87
PennantPk 9.83 -.29
PensonWw 1.25 +.15
PeopUtdF 11.58 -.39
PeregrineP .88 -.06
PerfectWd 9.22 -.51
Perrigo 89.97 -.03
PerryEllis 12.85 +.42
PetSmart 45.81 -1.03
PetroDev 30.03 -2.21
PharmPdt 33.13 -.01
Pharmacyc 12.78 -.23
Pharmssts 133.00 -.43
Photrln 5.10 -.14
Plexus 23.76 -.40
Polyeoms 15.73 -.78
Popular 1.40 -.01
PorterBcp 2.03 -.28
Potlatch 29.86 -.40
Power-One 4.50 -.24
PwShs QQQ 53.29 -1.23
Powrwvrs 2.05 -.10
Presstekh .66 -.04
PriceTR 49.44 -1.53
priceline 464.53 -16.54
PrimoWtr 2.90 +.10
PrivateB 8.73 -.65
PrUPShQQQ 23.70 +1.50
PrUItPQQQ s 59.55 -4.24
PrognicsPh 5.28 -.19
ProgrsSfts 18.66 -.89
ProspctCap 9.07 -.14
ProspBcsh 36.04 -1.12
PureCycle 1.94 -.04
QIAGEN 13.50 -.09
QlikTech 25.22 -.94
Qlogic 13.63 -.40
Qualeom 52.03 -2.45
QualityS S 34.40 -.24
QuestSft 17.04 -.60
Questeor 41.41 -.58
RFMicD 5.76 -.36
Rambus 7.60 -.45
Randgold 105.93 -3.11
RaptorPhm 4.90 -.29
ReachLoc 7.75 -.60
Regenrn 55.09 -1.64
RentACt 33.33 -.87
RepubAir 3.77 -.37
RschMotn 16.20 -.67
RexEnergy 14.55 -1.32
RightNow 42.86 -.05
RiverbedT 23.63 -1.71
RosttaGrs .21 -.16
RosettaR 45.56 -2.03
RossStrs 85.34 -1.07
Rovi Corp 26.05 -1.20
RoyGId 75.40 -1.57
RoyaleEn 3.86 +.57
RubieonTc 8.64 -.41
Ranair 2882 -.17

Sl Corp 9.50 -.16
SBA Com 37.40 -.64
SEIlInv 15.19 -.11
STEC 8.82 -.53


SVB FnGp 41.31
SXCHIth 54.15
SalixPhm 35.51
SanDisk 45.79
SangBio 2.46
Sanmina 7.26
Sanofirt 1.28
Santarus 2.74
Sapient 11.02
Sateon h .73
SavientPh 2.29
SchoolSp 4.17
SciGames 7.76
SeagateT 15.43
SearsHldgs 59.15
SeattGen 15.02
SelCmfrt 18.74
Selectvlns 15.16
Semtech 21.05
Sequenom 4.07
SvcSourcn 12.99
SvArtsrsh .37
ShandaGm 3.96
Shanda 40.27
Shire 93.62
ShoreTe 5.47
Shutterfly 32.02
SifyTech 4.17
SigaTech h 1.97
SigmaAld 59.01
SignatBk 51.88
SilicGrln 13.69
Silinmlmg 4.64
SilcnLab 40.66
SilicnMotn 17.54
Slcnware 4.19
SilvStdg 13.29
Sina 63.51
Sindair 8.89
SiriusXM 1.74
SironaDent 39.89
SkywksSol 14.54
SmartBal 4.87
SmithWes 2.90
SmithMicro .98
SodaStrm 28.62
Sohu.cm 48.31
SolarCap 21.99
Somaxon .73
SonicCorp 6.70
Sonus 2.20
SouMoBc 21.24
Sourcefire 29.59
SpectPh 12.74
SpiritAirn 16.36
Spreadtrm 23.17
StaarSur 8.51
Staples 13.85
StarBulk 1.29
StarSdent 2.40
Starbucks 41.25
SiDynam 11.50
StemCell rs 1.69
Stericyde 76.49
SMaddens 31.93
StewEnt 5.82
SunBcpNJ 2.32
SunHIth 3.00
SunPower 6.85
SusqBnc 7.15
SwisherHy 3.87
Symantec 15.54
Symetricm 4.71
Synaptfcs 31.11
Synopsys 26.31
Synovis 17.27
SyntaPhm 3.99
Syntrolm h .95
TDAmeritr 15.14
THQ 1.88
TTMTch 9.97
twteleeom 17.25
TakeTwo 13.27
TaleoA 29.26
Targacept 6.98
TASER 5.66
TechData 46.04
Tekelec 10.95


-1.74 Tellabs 3.88 -.08
-.95 TescoCp 11.51 -.52
-.34 TeslaMot 31.45 -.62
-2.02 TesseraTch 15.96 +.37
-.11 TevaPhrm 37.50 -1.11
TexRdhse 12.56 -.43
Theravnce 20.31 -1.47
_53 Thoratec 28.16 -.62
-.01 TibeoSft 26.07 -.84
-.06 TlVo Inc 9.38 -.19
-1.00 TowerGrp 19.83 -.46
-.21 TowerSm h .65 -.01
-.56 Towerstm 1.79 -.10
-3.08 TractSupp 70.25 -1.40
-.66 TransceptP 7.34 +.73
-.63 Travelzoo 25.96 -.82
-.34
+.02 TridentM h .22 -.01
-.07 TrimbleN 38.99 -1.45
-.27 TriQuint 4.03 -.18
-.01 TrstNY 4.76 -.17
-.39 Trustmk 20.28 -.92
-.01 21Vianetn 9.01 -.19
-.77 UTStarcm 1.34 -.03
-.42 UltaSalon 65.97 -.52
-.02 Umpqua 11.38 -.20
-.17 Unilife 3.60 -.32
-.88 UBWV 23.92 -.73
-1.41 UtdOnln 4.96 -.18
-.38 US Enr 2.50 -.17
-.41 UtdStatns 29.61 -.36
-.75 UtdTherap 39.62 -1.09
-.77 UnivDisp 40.75 -1.93
-.19 UnivFor 24.89 -.75
-.51 UranmRs .80 -.07
-2.32
-.24 UrbanOut 25.26 -.42
-.13
-.14
-1.36 VCAAnt 18.35 -.48
-.15 ValVisA 1.67 -.10
-.06 ValueClick 15.38 -.47
-.04 VaseoDta 7.22 -.09
-.92 Veeeolnst 22.66 -.64
-2.08 VBradley 36.15 -1.35
-.43 Verisign 31.50 -.44
-.08 Verisk 36.80 -.09
-.19 VertxPh 26.94 -.98
-.14
-.36 ViaSat 42.54 -1.70
-1.26 Vical 3.47 -.19
-.49 VirgnMdah 22.29 -.41
-.18 ViroPhrm 22.55 +.19
-.84 VistaPrt 30.96 -1.36
-.32 Vivus 9.69 -.26
-.27 Vodafone 25.87 -.54
+.05 Volcano 22.97 -.10
+.04 WarnerCh 14.77 -.09
-.61.03 WarrenRs 2.45 -.15
-.03 WashFed 12.39 -.39
-.84 WaveSys 2.16 -.13
-.50 WebMD 31.22 -.47
-.18 WernerEnt 22.36 -.34
+.04 Westmri 9.21 -.46
-.07 Wstptlnng 26.11 -1.35
-.09 WetSeal 3.20 +.02
-.28 WholeFd 63.23 -1.87
-.09 Wndstrm 11.08 -.17
-.3018 Winn-Dixie 5.43 -.38
-.96 Woodward 36.58 -1.45
-.39 Wynn 107.99 -4.91
-.46 Xilinx 30.31 -.78
-.22 YRC rsh .04 -.00
-.09 Yahoo 14.94 -.03
-.47 Yandexn 20.05 -.01
-.10 Yongye 4.29 -.11
-.30 Zagg 10.81 -.46
-.57 Zalicus .90 -.07
-.20
-1.22 Zhongpin 9.60 -.15
-.21 ZonBcp 14.70 -.64
-.31 Zopharm 4.65 -.15
-1.04 Zpcarn 17.00 -.58
-.05 ZxCorp 2.50 -.15


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.2610 4.2600
Australia 1.0330 1.0160
Bahrain .3769 .3770
Brazil 1.8578 1.8106
Britain 1.5506 1.5628
Canada 1.0485 1.0372
Chile 525.20 518.78
China 6.3616 6.3627
Colombia 1933.50 1921.80
Czech Rep 19.28 18.85
Denmark 5.5794 5.5088
Dominican Rep 38.37 38.37
Egypt 6.0032 5.9879
Euro .7504 .7402
Hong Kong 7.7931 7.7917
Hungary 232.76 225.74
India 52.335 52.491
Indnsia 9136.00 9101.00
Israel 3.7738 3.7471
Japan 77.35 76.97
Jordan .7099 .7105
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.50
Malaysia 3.1795 3.1775
Mexico 14.1740 13.9505
N. Zealand 1.3528 1.3376
Norway 5.8697 5.7760
Peru 2.708 2.703
Poland 3.37 3.30
Russia 31.5246 31.0766
Singapore 1.3123 1.3009
So. Africa 8.5889 8.3937
So. Korea 1159.18 1145.70
Sweden 6.9282 6.8201
Switzerlnd .9207 .9147
Taiwan 30.43 30.33
Thailand 31.38 31.21
Turkey 1.8753 1.8505
U.A.E. 3.6725 3.6732
Uruguay 19.8999 19.8999
Venzuel 4.2949 4.2949


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday PvsDay

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.01
6-month 0.06 0.04
5-year 0.88 0.87
10-year 1.89 2.00
30-year 2.84 3.03



S FUTURES

Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Jan 12 96.17 -1.84
Corn CBOT Dec 11 5883/4 -1014
Wheat CBOT Mar 12 59414 -83/4
Soybeans CBOT Jan 12 112212 -301/2
Cattle CME Feb 12 122.75 -.55
Sugar (world) ICE Mar12 23.09 -.35
Orange Juice ICE Jan 12 176.85 -2.95



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1695.70 $1773.80
Silver (troy oz., spot) $31.882 $33.814
Copper (pound) $3.2//b $3.4820
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1 bb8.30 $1631 .2

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 2.8 ... 7.15 -.70 -56.3 Microsoft .80 3.3 9 24.47 -.32 -12.3
AT&Tlnc 1.72 6.2 14 27.55 -.53 -6.2 MotrlaSol n .88 2.0 15 43.62 -.93 +14.6
Ameteks .24 .6 17 38.26 -1.23 -2.5 MotrlaMon ... ... ... 38.53 -.04 +32.4
BkofAm .04 .8 ... 5.14 -.23-61.5 NextEraEn 2.20 4.2 13 52.38 -1.08 +.8
CapCtyBk .40 4.1 22 9.66 -.25-23.3 Penne 80 2.7 18 29.87 75 -7.6
CntryLink 2.90 8.2 16 35.50 -.94-23.1 Penney .80 27 18 29.87 -75 7.6
Citigrprs .04 .2 6 23.51 -.95-50.3 PiedmOfc 1.26 7.9 21 16.02 -.45 -20.5
CmwREIT 2.00 12.5 22 15.95 -.05-37.5 ProgrssEn 2.48 4.9 19 51.06 -.65 +17.4
Disney .40 1.2 13 33.40 -.62-11.0 RegionsFn .04 1.1 22 3.68 -.22 -47.4
EKodak ... ... ... 1.15 -.01 -78.5 SearsHIdgs ... ... ... 59.15 -3.08 -19.8
EnterPT 2.80 6.7 24 41.50 -1.78-10.3 Smucker 1.92 2.6 18 72.48 -1.11 +10.4
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.5 9 74.58 -1.45 +2.0 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.47 -.15 -41.6
FordM ... ... 5 9.83 -.26 -41.5
GenElec .60 4.1 12 14.73 -.26-19.5 TimeWarn .94 2.9 12 32.17 -.56
HomeDp 1.16 3.2 16 36.52 -.58 +4.2 UniFirst .15 .3 14 52.60 -.62 -4.5
Intel .84 3.7 10 22.70 -.54 +7.9 VerizonCm 2.00 5.7 14 35.35 -.84 -1.2
IBM 3.00 1.7 14177.95 -3.36 +21.3 Vodafone 2.10 8.1 ... 25.87 -.54 -2.2
Lowes .56 2.5 16 22.48 -.33-10.4 WalMart 1.46 2.6 13 56.64 -.21 +5.0
McDnlds 2.80 3.0 18 91.87 -.78 +19.7 Walgrn .90 2.8 11 32.09 +1.35-17.6







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 A13


I MUTUALFUDSA I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital I: DryMid r 25.26 -.70
Balancp 15.14 -.18 Dr5001nt 32.40 -.73
RetInc 8.63 ... GNMA 16.23
Alger Funds B: GrChinaAr 31.24 -1.10
SmCapGr 5.75 -.17 HiYIdAp 6.06 -.02
AllianceBern A: StratValA 24.40 -.71
BalanAp 14.61 -.20 TechGroA 29.35 -.96
GIbThGrAp57.46 -1.70 DreihsAcInc 9.90 -.04
SmCpGrA 31.77 -.92 Driehaus Funds:
AllianceBern Adv: EMktGr 26.45 -.70
LgCpGrAd 24.31 -.55 EVPTxMEmIl40.84 -.93
AllianceBern B: Eaton Vance A:
GIbThGrBt 49.26 -1.46 ChinaAp 16.03 -.34
GrowthBt 22.99 -.52 AMTFMulnc 9.43 -.01
SCpGrBt 25.37 -.74 MulICGrA 7.18 -.19
AllianceBern C: InBosA 5.55 -.02
SCpGrCt 25.54 -.74 LgCpVal 15.76 -.38
Allianz Fds Insti: NatlMunInc 9.18 -.03
NFJDvVI 10.48 -.26 SpEqtA 14.54 -.35
SmCpVi 28.23 -.72 TradGvA 7.46
Allianz Funds A: Eaton Vance B:
SmCpVA 26.88 -.68 HIthSBt 9.26 -.16
Allianz Funds C: NatlMuInc 9.18 -.03
AGICGrthC 21.97 -.48 Eaton Vance C:
TargetC t 13.18 -.37 GovtC p 7.45 +.01
AmanaGrwn23.04 -.46 NatMunlnc 9.18 -.03
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 17.44 -.42 FItgRt 8.80
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 9.92
LgCaplnv 16.52 -.40 LgCapVal 15.81 -.38
Amer Century Adv: FBR Funds:
EqGroAp 19.80 -.46 Focuslnvtn47.49 -.81
EqlncAp 6.77 -.11 FMI Funds:
Amer Century lnv: LgCappn 14.38 -.29
AIICapGr 26.42 ... FPA Funds:
Balanced 15.43 ... NwIlnc 10.74
DivBnd 11.11 +.01 FPACresn 26.13 -.34
Eqlnc 6.77 -.11 Fairholme 23.14 -.72
Growthl 24.67 ... Federated A:
Heritagel 19.10 ... MidGrStA 31.83 -.84
IncGro 22.47 -.51 MuSecA 10.11
InfAdjBd 13.08 Federated Insti:
IntDisc 8.46 -.25 KaufmnR 4.42 -.11
InfiGrol 9.12 -.24 TotRetBd 11.31
NewOpp 6.97 ... StrValDvIS 4.51 -.07
OneChAg 11.21 -.22 Fidelity Adv Foc T:
OneChMd 11.00 -.17 EnergyT 32.51 -1.24
RealEstl 18.21 -.54 HItCarT 19.28 -.29
Ultra 22.26 ... Fidelity Advisor A:
Valuelnv 5.15 -.11 Nwlnsghp 18.73 -.42
American Funds A: StrlnA 12.24 -.04
AmcpAp 17.73 -.35 Fidelity Advisor C:
AMuiAp 24.06 -.43 Nwlnsghtn 17.77 -.40
BalAp 17.29 -.25 Fidelity Advisor I:
BondA p 12.50 EqGrl n 54.39 -1.32
CaplBAp 47.11 -.67 Eqlnin 21.27 -.51
CapWGA p 30.36 -.70 IntBd In 11.42 +.01
CapWAp 20.49 -.13 NwlnsgtIn 18.95 -.42
EupacAp 33.97 -.90 Fidelity AdvisorT:
FdlnvAp 33.03 -.73 BalancT 14.37 -.21
GovtAp 14.67 +.01 DivGrTp 10.52 -.31
GwthAp 27.37 -.61 EqGrTp 50.68 -1.23
HI TrAp 10.45 -.05 EqInT 20.94 -.50
IncoAp 15.82 -.23 GrOppT 33.20 -.89
IntBdAp 13.60 +.01 HilnAdTp 9.18 -.05
InfiGrlncAp 26.45 -.65 IntBdT 11.40 +.01
ICAAp 25.30 -.54 MulncTp 13.04 +.01
LtTEBAp 15.94 ... OvrseaT 14.53 -.40
NEcoAp 22.70 -.53 STFiT 9.24
N PerAp 25.02 -.59 StkSelAIICp 16.37 -.43
NwWrldA 45.06 -1.12 Fidelity Freedom:
STBFAp 10.07 ... FF2010n 13.04 -.15
SmCpAp 31.77 -.85 FF2010K 12.05 -.14
TxExAp 12.34 +01 FF2015n 10.87 -.13
WshAp 26.17 -.54 FF2015K 12.07 -.14
Ariel Investments: FF2020n 13.02 -.17
Apprec 35.38 -.99 FF2020K 12.31 -.17
Ariel 38.75 -1.13 FF2025n 10.67 -.17
Artio Global Funds: FF2025K 12.25 -.20
InfiEqlIr 22.50 -.56 FF2030n 12.65 -.21
IntEqlllr 9.41 -.24 FF2030K 12.33 -.21
Artisan Funds: FF2035n 10.33 -.20
Inf 19.40 ... FF2035K 12.24 -.23
InfiValr 23.98 ... FF2040n 7.20 -.14
MidCap 32.84 ... FF2040K 12.27 -.24
MidCapVal 20.35 ... FF2045n 8.48 -.17
SCapVal 15.60 ... Incomen 11.19 -.05
BNY Mellon Funds: Fidelity Invest:
EmgMkts 8.94 -.29 AIISectEq 11.19 -.28
Baron Funds: AMgr50On 14.53 -.18
Asset 51.02 -1.24 AMgr70rn 14.94 -.26
Growth 48.44 -1.23 AMgr20rn 12.69 -.05
SmallCap 21.91 -.51 Balancn 17.44 -.25
Bernstein Fds: BalancedK 17.44 -.25
IntDur 14.17 +.03 BlueChGrn 40.20 -1.06
DivMu 14.62 CAMunn 12.22
TxMgdlni 12.02 -.33 Canadan 48.11 -1.36
BlackRock A: CapAp n 22.96 -.56
EqtyDiv 16.78 -.33 CapDevOn 9.65 -.24
GIAIAr 17.96 -.30 Cplncrn 8.55 -.04
HiYnvA 7.25 -.03 ChinaRg r 25.04 -.56
InfiOpA p 26.96 -.73 CngS 465.09
BlackRock B&C: CTMunrn 11.77
GIAICt 16.71 -.28 Contran 64.04 -1.47
BlackRock Insti: ConraK 64.08 -1.47
BaVIl 22.89 -.62 CnvScn 22.13 -.36
EquityDv 16.81 -.33 DisEqn 20.14 -.49
GlbAllocr 18.06 -.30 DiscEqF 20.16 -.49
HiYldBd 7.25 -.03 Divlntl n 24.75 -.68
Brinson FundsY: DivrslntKr 24.76 -.69
HiYldlYx 5.81 DivStkOn 13.75 -.35
BruceFund 377.11 -3.39 DivGth n 23.94 -.70
Buffalo Funds: EmergAs r n24.98 -.68
SmCapn 23.08 -.51 EmrMkn 20.29 -.53
CGM Funds: Eqlncn 37.93 -.88
Focus n 24.26 -.72 EQIIn 15.91 -.32
Muti n 23.59 -.51 ECapAp 14.70 -.37
Realtyn 24.01 -.73 Europe 24.22 -.62
CRM Funds: Exch 323.88
MdCpVll 24.91 -.60 Exportn 19.26-.47
Calamos Funds: Fidel n 29.32 -.68
GrwthAp 46.91 -1.26 Fiftyrn 16.24 -.39
Cavenvest FItRateHi r n 9.61 -.02
IA Ip1es: FrlnOnen 24.93 -.50
InfiEqAp 11.65 -.26 GNMAn 11.85
GroCon 79.54 -2. +11
SocBdp 15.89 +.05 rolncn 16.69 41
SocEqAp 33.31 -.83 G nc 16.69 .41
TxF Lg p 15.57 +.01 GowCoK 79.6 21.1
Cohen& Steers: + GrowthCoK 79.60 -2.10
Cohen & Steers: GrStratrn 17.54 -.54
RltyShrs 54.74 -1.67 Highlncr n 8.46 -.03
ColumbiaClass A: Indepnn 2065 -63
Acorn t 25.63 -.73 nProBdn 1302 +05
DivEqlnc 8.74 -.20 InBdn 102 +84 05
DivrBd 5.13 +.01 IntGovn 1105 +.02
DivOpptyA 7.42 .15 ntGoMun 10.33 +.01
LgCapGrAt2.38 -.51 InfiDiscn 26.53 -.69
LgCorQAp 5.24 -.12 InfiSCprn 17.26 -.42
MdCpGrOp 9.10 .22 InvGrBdn 11.71 +.01
MidCVIOpp 6.72 -.17 InvGBn 7.68 +.01
PBModAp 10.11 -.10 Japanr 8.98 -.19
TxEA p 13.46 JpnSmn 84 -20
SelComm A 40.52 -.98 JpnSm n 8.24 -.20
IAh 8 LgCapVal 9.78 -.23
FrontierA 8.79 -.29 LatAm 46.84 -1.56
GlobTech 18.48 -.45 LevCoStkn 23.34 -.69
Columbia Cl I,T&G: LowPrn 33.68 -.73
EmMktOp I n 7.74 -.20 LowPriKr 33.66 -.74
Columbia Class Z: Magelln n 58.99 -1.53
AcornZ 26.48 -.76 MagellanK 58.98 -1.54
AcornlntZ 33.02 -.78 MDMurn 11.22
DivlncoZ 12.54 -.25 MAMunn 12.18
IntBdZ 9.24 +.01 MegaCpStkn9.28 -.23
IntTEBd 10.62 MIMunn 12.09
LgCapGr 11.64 -.33 MidCap n 25.08 .58
LgCpldxZ 22.76 -.51 MNMunn 11.69
MdCpldxZ 10.21 -.28 MtgSecn 11.11
MdCpVIZp 11.81 -.31 Munilncn 12.87 +.01
ValRestr 41.93 -1.13 NJMunrn 11.73
Credit SuisseComm: NwMktrn 15.76 -.07
ComRett 8.29 -.11 NwMilln 27.63 -.61
DFA Funds: NYMunn 13.15 +.01
InfiCorEqn 8.78 -.25 OTC n 52.38 -1.61
USCorEql n 9.97 -.25 OhMunn 11.85
USCorEq2n 9.76 -.26 l100ndex 8.24 .18
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 25.88 -.69
CommAp 16.25 -.38 PcBasn 21.27 -.57
DWS Invests : PAMunr n 10.96
CorPlslnc 10.65 ... Purihin 16.93 -.25
EmMkGrr 14.13 -.41 PuritanK 16.93 .25
EnhEmMk 10.01 -.06 RealEn 24.69 -.76
EnhGlbBdr 9.94 -.09 SAIISecEqF 11.21 -.28
GIbSmCGr 34.37 -.87 SCmdtyStrtn9.08 -.11
GIblThem 19.16 -.53 SCmdtyStrFn9.09 -.11
Gold&Prc 19.58 -.59 SrEmrgMkt 14.42 -.42
GrolncS 15.08 -.38 SrslntGrw 9.63 -.22
HiYldTx 12.00 ... SerlnfiGrF 9.66 -.23
IntTxAMT 11.63 ... SrslntVal 7.74 -.20
InfilFdS 35.50 -1.08 SrlnvGrdF 11.71 +.01
LgCpFoGr 27.17 -.64 StlntMun 10.74
LatAmrEq 39.35 -1.37 STBFn 8.48 -.01
MgdMuniS 8.94 -.01 SmllCpSrn 15.17 -.46
MATFS 14.32 ... SCpValur 12.72 -.40
SP500S 15.50 -.35 StkSelLCVrn9.56 -.24
WorldDiv 21.18 -.49 SlSlcACapn22.72 -.59
Davis Funds A: SllSelSmCp 16.57 -.51
NYVenA 30.44 -.66 Stratlncn 10.95 -.03
Davis Funds B: SfrReRtr 9.38 -.06
NYVenB 28.99 -.63 TotalBdn 10.91 +01
Davis Funds C: Trend n 63.39 -1.69
NYVenC 29.24 -.63 USBI n 11.76 +.02
Davis FundsY: Utilityn 15.99 -.30
NYVenY 30.82 -.67 ValStratn 23.41 .70
Delaware Invest A: Value n 59.04 -1.57
Diverlncp 9.35 +.02 Wrldwn 16.37 -.38
SMIDCapG 22.05 .43 Fidelity Selects:
TxUSAp 11.39 ... Aimr 33.51 -.83
Delaware Invest B: Banking n 14.06 -.48
SelGrBt 29.32 -.59 Biotchn 78.26 -1.48
Dimensional Fds: Brokr n 36.55 -1.22
EmMCrEqnl6.71 -.49 Chemn 87.94 -1.94
EmMktV 25.58 -.81 ComEquipn21.24 -.74
IntSmVan 13.25 -.34 Compn 51.43-1.61
LargeCo 9.19 -.21 ConDisn 21.78 -.50
TAUSCorE2n7.94 -.21 ConsuFnn 10.25 -.27


USLgVan 17.62 -.47 ConStapn 68.31 -1.03
US Micron 12.07 -.39 CstHo n 32.08 -.88
USTgdVal 14.08 -.45 DfAern 71.85 -2.17
US Small n 18.77 -.58 Electrn 42.20 -1.60
USSmVa 21.34 -.73 Enrgyn 46.47 -1.77
IntfSmCon 13.66 -.35 EngSvn 61.57 -2.37
EmgMktn 23.96 -.67 EnvAltEnrnl4.45 -.39
Fixdn 10.34 FinSvn 44.16 -1.46
IntGFxlnn 13.10 +.04 Goldrn 45.54 -1.38
IntVan 13.88 -.42 Healthin 122.94 -1.84
Glb5Fxlncn11.22 +.01 Insurn 41.20 -1.05
TM USTgtV 18.33 -.59 Leisr n 88.83 -2.19
2YGIFxdn 10.22 Materialn 58.18 -1.54
DFARIEn 20.82 -.63 MedDI n 50.90 -.99
Dodge&Cox: MdEqSysn 24.71 -.42
Balanced 63.30 -1.07 Multmdn 39.77 -1.06
Income 13.28 +.01 NtGasn 28.82 -1.04
InfiStk 28.85 Pharm n 12.38 -.21
Stock 93.28 -2.16 Retail n 51.44 -.90
DoubleUne Funds: Softwr n 79.62 -2.05
TRBdl 11.16 Techn 83.58 -2.62
TRBd Np 11.15 Telcm n 40.82 -1.01
Dreyfus: Trans n 47.49 -1.26
Aprec 37.97 .72 UtilGr n 50.30 -.81
CTA 11.81 Wirelessn 7.17 -.19
CorVA 22.47 Fidelity Spartan:
Dreyf 7.89 -.19 ExtMklnn 33.49 -.97


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxlnvn 41.24 -.93
InfllnxInvn 28.86 -.76
TotMktlnv n 33.82 -.81
USBondl 11.76 +.02
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdvn41.25 -.92
IntAd r n 28.87 -.75
TotMktAd r n33.83 -.80
First Eagle:
GIbIA 44.26 -.65
OverseasA 20.96 -.23
First Investors A
BIChpAp 19.67 -.41
GloblAp 5.62 -.15
GovtAp 11.56
GrolnAp 13.44 -.32
IncoAp 2.40
MATFAp 11.86
MITFAp 12.25
NJTFAp 13.13 +.01
NYTFA p 14.60
OppAp 25.26 -.61
PATFAp 13.12
SpSitAp 22.83 -.55
TxExAp 9.81
TotRtAp 14.56 -.21
ValueBp 6.45 -.15
Forum Funds:
AbsSrl r 11.09 +.03
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUS p 8.84
ALTFAp 11.34
AZTFAp 10.88
CallnsAp 12.16
CAIntAp 11.62 +.01
CaITFAp 7.02
COTFAp 11.78
CTTFAp 11.03
CvtScAp 13.37 -.20
Dbl TFA 11.84
DynTchA 28.29 -.66
EqlncAp 15.43 -.33
Fedlntp 11.99 +.01
FedTFAp 12.02
FLTFAp 11.56
FoundAlp 9.44 -.18
GATFA p 12.09
GoldPrMA 39.56 -1.20
GrwthAp 41.87 -.96
HYTFA p 10.15
HilncA 1.89 -.01
IncomA p 1.99 -.03
InsTFAp 11.99
NYITFp 11.47 +.01
LATFAp 11.53 +.01
LMGvScA 10.41
MDTFAp 11.55
MATFAp 11.64 +.01
MITFAp 11.99 +.01
MNInsA 12.43 +.01
MOTFAp 12.21
NJTFAp 12.16
NYTFA p 11.72
NCTFA p 12.36
OhiolAp 12.53
ORTFA p 12.04
PATFAp 10.44
ReEScAp 13.19 -.38
RisDvAp 32.48 -.65
SMCpGrA 33.64 -.83
Stratlnc p 10.03 -.05
TtlRtnAp 10.20 -.01
USGovAp 6.90
UDIsAp 12.38 -.18
VATFAp 11.76 -.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 12.46 -.13
IncmeAd 1.98 -.03
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.01 -.03
USGvCt 6.86
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 18.63 -.33
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 20.56 -.42
ForgnAp 5.76 -.15
GIBdAp 12.49 -.14
GrwthAp 15.48 -.36
WorldAp 13.08 -.32
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 15.51 -.36
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 19.94 -.41
ForgnC p 5.60 -.15
GIBdCp 12.52 -.13
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 15.93 -.19
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 11.71 +.02
S&S PM 36.66 -.86
GMOTrust Ill:
Quality 20.60 -.37
GMOTrust IV:
InfiGrEq 19.85 -.45
InfilntrVI 17.98 -.45
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 10.92 -.29
IntfCorEq 24.34 -.61
Quality 20.61 -.37
StrFxIlnc 17.07
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 45.27 -1.07
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 25.48 -.28
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 31.24 -.86
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 21.75 -.55
HiYield 6.78
HYMuni n 8.46 -.01
MidCapV 31.57 -.87
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.07 -.01
CapAplnst 35.29 -.82
Inftllnvt 49.52 -1.39
Intfir 50.14 -1.40
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 27.09 -.71
DivGthAp 17.29 -.39
IntOpAp 12.22 -.33
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppln 27.15 -.72
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 34.87 -.93
Div&Gr 17.95 -.41
Advisers 18.36 -.28
TotRetBd 11.55 +.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.39 -.04
StrGrowth 12.97 +.10
ICON Fds:
Energy S 17.75 -.62
HIthcareS 13.62 -.20
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.88 -.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 15.77 -.24
WldwideIr 15.80 -.25
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 11.12 -.24
Invesco Funds:
Energy 35.83 -1.34
Utiliies 15.99 -.26
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 15.29 -.31
CmstkA 13.91 -.35
Const p 20.33 -.54
DivrsDivp 11.13 -.23
EqlncA 7.80 -.12
GrIncAp 16.95 -.36
HilncMu p 7.63
HiYd p 3.93 -.01
HYMuA 9.30
InfiGrow 24.36 -.58
MunilnA 13.14
PATFA 15.99
USMortgA 12.95 .01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 12.30 -.33
MunilnB 13.12
USMortg 12.88 -.02
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 21.09 -.55
AssetStAp 21.84 .57
AssetSbl r 22.07 -.57
JPMorgan AClass:
CoreBdA 11.88 +.02
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpValn 22.15 -.53
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.88 +.02
ShtDurBd 10.98
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 9.29 .23
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.87 +02
HighYld n 7.63 -.03
lntmTFBdn 11.14 +.01
ShtDurBdn 10.98
USLCCrPIsnl8.63 -.47
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 23.91 .29
Contrarn T 11.53 -.24
EnterprT 54.46 -1.13
FIxBndT 10.64 +.02
GIUfeSciTr 23.04 -.33
GIbSelT 8.91 -.36
GITechTr 15.16 -.35
Grw&lncT 27.74 -.63
Janus T 25.94 -.54
OvrseasTr 32.67 -1.10
PrkMCVal T20.75 -.43
ResearchT 26.62 -.63
ShTmBdT 3.05


TwentyT 56.93 -1.31
VentureT 52.09 -1.28
WrldWTr 37.83 -1.05
Jensen Funds:
QualGrthJn24.79 -.52
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.37 -.01
RgBkA 11.84
StrlnAp 6.33 -.02
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.33 -.02
John Hancock CIl1:
LSAggr 11.05


Name NAV Chg
LSBalanc 12.12
LSConsrv 12.63
LSGrwth 11.81
LSModer 12.24
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValA p21.40 -.72
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 17.22 -.54
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 17.55 -.55
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 104.89 -2.92
CBApprp 12.91 -.27
CBLCGrp 22.53 -.47
GCIAIICOp 7.25 -.18
WAHilncAt 5.66 -.02
WAMgMup 15.99 -.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 20.89 -.45
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 23.93 -.77
CMValTrp 34.27 -.88
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 24.62 -.73
SmCap 22.99 -.64
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 13.78 -.12
StrlncCx 14.35
LSBondR 13.73 -.11
StrlncAx 14.26
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.08
lnvGrBdCp 11.99
InvGrBdY 12.09
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 9.65 -.26
FundlEq 11.21 -.31
BdDebAp 7.46 -.04
ShDurlncAp 4.52
MidCpAp 14.68 -.40
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.55
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.52
MFS Funds A:
MITA 17.97
MIGA 14.72 -.33
EmGA 39.63 -.95
HilnA 3.27 -.02
MFLA 9.65
TotRA 13.44 -.18
UtilA 15.99 -.32
ValueA 21.31
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 13.19 -.29
GvScBn 10.56 +.01
HilnBn 3.28 -.01
MulnBn 8.38
TotRB n 13.44 -.18
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 13.55
Valuel 21.40
MFS Funds Instl:
InfiEqn 15.26 -.38
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.72 -.01
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 14.29 -.22
GovtBt 8.87 +.01
HYIdBBt 5.69 -.02
IncmBldr 15.29 -.18
InfiEqB 8.98 -.19
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 31.10 -.76
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 66.87 -1.73
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 6.86 -.20
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 15.53 -.20
Indialnvr 14.45 -.34
PacTgrlnv 19.99 -.35
MergerFdn 15.88 -.04
Meridian Funds:
Growth 41.98 -.99
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.41
TotRtBdl 10.41 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 3.89 -.14
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 13.05 -.38
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 14.90 -.27
MorganStanley Inst:
InfiEql 11.73 -.28
MCapGrl 33.81 -.84
MCapGrPp 32.69 -.81
Muhlenkn 48.28 -1.08
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 25.31 -.61
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn26.56 -.65
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 11.12 -.19
GblDiscA 25.74 -.41
GlbDiscC 25.38 -.40
GIbDiscZ 26.12 -.42
QuestZ 16.09 -.20
SharesZ 18.82 -.33
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 17.61 -.42
Genesis 33.50
Geneslnst 46.41
Intfir 14.79
Partner 23.48
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 47.99
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.15 -.03
Nichn 42.27 -.74
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 6.88 -.02
MMEmMktr 18.06 -.51
MMIntEqr 8.03 -.21
SmCpldx 7.47 -.24
Stkldx 14.43 -.33
Technly 13.80 -.36
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 11.06
Nuveen Cl R:
lntDMBd 9.07
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 17.15 -.51
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 35.38 -.90
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylnc r 26.96
Globall 19.32
Intl I r 15.78
Oakmark 40.00
Select 26.91
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.89 -.05
GIbSMdCap 13.18 -.28
RealRet 9.48 -.16
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.35
AMTFrNY 11.25 +.01
CAMuniAp 7.85
CapApAp 40.67 -.89
CaplncAp 8.50 -.06
ChmplncAp 1.72 -.01
DvMktAp 28.98 -.76
Discp 53.84 -1.46
EquityA 8.05 -.18
GlobAp 52.03 -1.41
GIbOppA 25.24 -.66
GblStrlncA 4.03 -.02
Gold p 39.20 -1.34
IntBdA p 6.24 -.06
LtdTmMu 14.52 +.01
MnStFdA 29.67 -.69
PAMuniAp 10.66
SenFltRtA 8.04
USGvp 9.70 +02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.32
AMTFrNY 11.25
CplncB t 8.33 -.05
ChmplncBt 1.73
EquityB 7.39 -.17
GblStrlncB 4.05 .02
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.29
RoMuAp 15.78 +.01
RcNtMuA 6.79 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 28.75 -.74
InfiBdY 6.24 -.06
IntGrowY 24.29 -.61
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.76
TotRtAd 10.77 -.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.39
AIIAsset 11.79
ComodRR 7.70
Divlnc 11.15 -.03
EmgMkCur 9.90 -.11
EmMkBd 11.12 -.05
Fltlnc r 8.22
ForBdUnr 11.03 -.12
FrgnBd 10.64 -.03
HiYId 8.77 -.04
InvGrCp 10.54 -.01
LowDu 10.26 -.02
ModDur 10.67
RealRet 13.03
RealRtnIl 12.17
ShortT 9.76
TotRt 10.77 -.01
TRII 10.47
TRIll 9.48 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.32


ComRRp 7.57
LwDurA 10.26 -.02
RealRtAp 12.17
TotRtA 10.77 -.01
PIMCO Funds C:
AllAstAut t 10.21
RealRtCp 12.17
TotRtC t 10.77 -.01
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.77 -.01
PIMCO Funds P:
AstAIIAuthP 10.38
TotRtnP 10.77 -.01


Name NAV Chg
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 24.65 -.38
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 46.70 -.54
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.62
InfiValA 16.54 -.42
PionFdAp 36.17 -.83
ValueAp 10.01 -.24
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.27 -.10
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 9.36 -.10
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 16.09 -.39
Price Funds:
Balance n 18.26 -.29
BIChipn 36.51 -.89
CABondn 10.85 +.01
CapAppn 19.91 -.30
DivGron 21.71 -.45
EmMktBn 12.71 -.08
EmEurp 15.78 -.26
EmMktSn 27.73 -.85
Eqlncn 21.25 -.50
Eqlndexn 31.39 -.71
Europen 12.65 -.31
GNMAn 10.11
Growth n 30.02 -.76
Gr&lnn 18.64 -.42
HIthSci n 30.91 -.64
HiYieldn 6.31 -.03
InsfiCpG 15.27 -.41
InfiBondn 9.90 -.13
IntDis n 36.28 -.79
Intl G&l 11.08 -.29
InflStkn 11.90 -.31
Japann 7.14 -.14
LatAm n 40.80 -1.54
MDShrtn 5.22
MDBondn 10.58 +.01
MidCapn 54.43 -1.36
MCapVal n 20.97 -.46
NAmern 31.19 -.64
N Asian 16.38 -.45
NewEran 42.14 -1.38
N Horiz n 33.25 -.87
N Incn 9.68
NYBondn 11.28
OverSSFrn 7.03 -.19
PSIncn 15.34 -.20
RealEstn 16.66 -.49
R2010n 14.78 -.21
R2015n 11.29 -.19
R2020n 15.40 -.30
R2025n 11.15 -.23
R2030n 15.84 -.35
R2035n 11.12 -.26
R2040n 15.78 -.38
R2045 n 10.53 -.25
SciTecn 24.90 -.74
ShtBdn 4.81 -.01
SmCpStkn 31.55 -.97
SmCapVal n32.75 -1.08
SpecGrn 15.96 -.40
Speclnn 12.09 -.07
TFInc n 9.98
TxFrHn 10.83
TxFrSIn 5.63
USTIntn 6.29 +.02
USTLgn 14.23 +.12
VABondn 11.72
Value n 20.99 -.54
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 8.75 -.21
LT20201n 10.95 -.19
LT20301n 10.69 -.20
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 15.54 -.39
HiYldAp 5.22 -.03
MuHilncA 9.56
NatResA 44.53 -1.74
UlIityA 10.05 -.19
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 15.24 -.35
HiYIdBt 5.22 -.02
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.72 +.01
AZTE 9.07
ConvSec 17.79 -.27
DvrlnAp 7.24 -.04
EqnA p 13.86 -.35
EuEq 16.08 -.41
GeoBalA 11.44 -.15
GIbEqty p 7.81 -.19
GrlnAp 11.66 -.31
GIblHIthA 40.93 -.92
HiYdAp 7.13 -.03
HiYld In 5.58 -.02
IncmAp 6.74
IntGrln p 8.06 -.21
InvAp 11.78 -.28
NJTxA p 9.39 +.01
MultCpGr 45.21 -1.24
PATE 9.12
TxExA p 8.58
TFInAp 14.93 +.01
TFHYA 11.74
USGvAp 13.99 -.04
GIblUtilA 9.64 -.19
VoyAp 18.49 -.57
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 14.94
DvrlnBt 7.18 -.04
Eqlnct 13.73 -.35
EuEq 15.32 -.40
GeoBalB 11.31 -.15
GIbEqt 7.02 -.17
GINtRst 16.10 -.50
GrlnBt 11.44 -.31
GIblHIthB 33.45 -.75
HiYldBt 7.12 -.04
HYAdBt 5.48 -.02
IncmBt 6.68
IntGrln t 7.93 -.21
InfiNopt 11.98 -.32
InvBt 10.56 -.24
NJTxBt 9.37
MulTCpGr 38.84 -1.07
TxExBt 8.58
TFHYBt 11.76
USGvBt 13.92 -.05
GlblUtilB 9.61 -.18
VoyBt 15.61 -.48
RS Funds:
IntGrA 14.57 -.45
LgCAIphaA 36.33 -.90
Value 21.66 -.51
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 9.50 -.24
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 14.70 -.51
MicroCapl 14.61 -.46
PennMul r 10.34 -.31
Premierl r 19.02 -.47
TotRetlr 11.91 -.30
ValSvct 10.96 -.33
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.97 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 13.19 -.30
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 17.37 -.54
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 16.17 -.25
100Onvr 34.74 -.80
S&PSel 18.42 -.41
SmCpSI 18.83 -.58
TSMSelr 21.26 -.49
Scout Funds:
Inftl 26.70 -.67
Selected Funds:
AmShD 37.00 -.79
AmShSp 36.92 -.78
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 29.25 -.62
Sequoian 136.13 -1.93
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 39.89 -.93
SoSunSCInv t20.03 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 48.50 -1.04
Stratton Funds:
MulI-Cap 30.82 -.80
RealEstate 24.59 -.73
SmCap 45.84 -1.28
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 10.25 +.03
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.75
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 16.77 -.42
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 13.66 -.31
REVallnstr 19.23 -.48
Valuelnst 39.23 -.96
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 23.10 -.48
IncBuildAt 17.02 -.26
IncBuildCp 17.02 -.26
IntValuel I 23.62 -.49
LtTMul 14.36
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYId 4.54 -.02
Income 8.68 +.01
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 74.97 -2.26
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 8.55 -.05
Flexlncp 8.69 -.02
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 29.42 .92
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 21.29 -.23
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 21.43 -.43


Name NAV Chg
Intf 20.57 -.56
NYBd 11.82
PrecMM 36.77 -1.16
SciTech 11.88 -.30
ShtTBnd 9.13
SmCpStk 12.22 -.36
TxElt 13.14 +.01
TxELT 13.05
TxESh 10.75
VABd 11.09
WldGr 16.78 -.38
VALIC :
MdCpldx 18.63 -.52
Stkldx 23.28 -.52
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 16.43 -.39
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 20.83 -.28
CAITAdmrnn 11.19 +.01
CALTAdm nn11.26
CpOpAdl n 67.58 -1.61
EMAdmr r n 31.09 -.91
Energyn 111.48 -3.78
EqlnAdm n n41.95 -.83
EuroAdml n 50.06 -1.46
ExplAdmlIn 61.62 -1.78
ExtdAdm n 36.72 -1.06
500Adml n 107.35 -2.42
GNMAAd n 11.14
GrwAdrnm n 29.99 -.67
HlthCr n 52.75 -.73
HiYldCp n 5.56 -.02
InfProAdn 28.20 +.14
ITBdAdml n 11.86 +.02
ITsryAdml n 12.15 +.02
IntGrAdm n 50.23 -1.45
ITAdmlIn 13.81 +.01
ITGrAdmrn 10.05
LtdTrAdn 11.10 +.01
LTGrAdmlIn 10.37 +.04
LTAdmln 11.17
MCpAdml n 84.03 -2.21
MorgAdmrn 51.69 -1.23
MuHYAdm nlO.57
NYLTAdn 11.26
PrmCap r n 62.96 -1.43
PALTAdrn 11.21
ReitAdm r rn 73.82 -2.23
STsyAdml n 10.83
STBdAdmlnlO.65
ShtTrAdn 15.90
STFdAdn 10.91
STIGrAdn 10.63 -.01
SmCAdmn 31.01 -.93
TxMCap r n 58.59 -1.36
TflBAdml n 11.03 +.01
TStkAdm n 29.02 -.68
ValAdmlIn 18.69 -.43
WellslAdrnm n53.71 -.36
WelltnAdnm n51.24 -.72
Windsor n 39.99 -1.01
WdsrllAdn 42.45 -.98
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 23.02 -.30
CALTn 11.26
CapOppn 29.24 -.70
Convrtn 11.76 -.15
DivdGron 14.36 -.25
Energy n 59.35 -2.01
Eqlnc n 20.01 -.40
Explr n 66.13 -1.91
FLLTn 11.62
GNMAn 11.14
GlobEqn 15.32 -.37
Grolnc n 24.59 -.55
GrthEqn 10.24 -.22
HYCorpn 5.56 -.02
HlthCren 124.97 -1.72
InfaPron 14.36 +.07
InflExplrn 12.79 -.36
IntlGrn 15.77 -.46
InfiVal n 25.96 -.71
ITIGraden 10.05
ITTsryn 12.15 +.02
LifeConn 15.87 -.15
LifeGron 20.17 -.40
Lifelnc n 14.07 -.06
LifeModn 18.58 -.26
LTIGraden 10.37 +.04
LTTsryn 13.93 +.13
Morg n 16.65 -.40
MuHYn 10.57
Mulntn 13.81 +.01
MuLtdn 11.10 +.01
MuLongn 11.17
MuShrtn 15.90
NJLTn 11.74
NYLTn 11.26
OHLTTEn 12.10
PALTn 11.21
PrecMtls r n 21.37 -.78
PrmcpCorn 12.72 -.29
Prmcp r n 60.64 -1.37
SelValurn 17.49 -.44
STARn 18.21 -.28
STIGraden 10.63 -.01
STFedn 10.91
STTsryn 10.83
StratEqn 17.20 -.47
TgtRe2005 nl2.02 -.08
TgtRetlncn 11.39 -.06
TgRe2010n22.26 -.22
TgtRe2015nl2.09 -.16
TgRe2020On21.15 -.33
TgtRe2025nl 1.90 -.21
TgRe2030 n20.15 -.40
TgtRe2035nl 1.98 -.26
TgtRe204O nl9.60 -.43
TgtRe205 ni9.51 -.43
TgtRe2045 nl2.31 -.27
USGron 17.07 -.41
USValue n 9.46 -.22
Wellslyn 22.17 -.15
Welltn n 29.66 -.42
Wndsrn 11.85 -.30
Wndsll n 23.91 -.55
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n85.40 -2.32
MidCplstPl n91.57 -2.41
TotlntAdm r rn21.28 -.59
Totlntllnstr n85.17 -2.37
TotlntllPrn 85.19 -2.37
500 n 107.33 -2.42
Balancedn 20.83 -.28
DevMktn 8.25 -.23
EMktn 23.63 -.70
Europe n 21.46 -.63
Extend n 36.66 -1.06
Growth n 29.99 -.67
ITBndgn 11.86 +.02
LgCaplxn 21.49 -.49
LTBndn 14.07 +.08
MidCapn 18.49 -.49
Pacific n 8.96 -.21
REITr n 17.30 -.52
SmCap n 30.95 -.92
SmlCpGth nl9.91 -.59
SmlCpVin 13.96 -.42
STBnd n 10.65
TotBndn 11.03 +.01
TotllntIn 12.72 -.36
TotStk n 29.01 -.68
Value n 18.68 -.44
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 20.83 -.28
DevMklnstn 8.19 -.23
Extln n 36.72 -1.06
FTAIIWIdl r n75.96 -2.12
Grwllilstn 29.99 -.67
InfProlnstn 11.49 +.06
Instldxn 106.64 -2.40
InsPIn 106.65 -2.40
InstTStldxn 26.25 -.62
lnsTStPlus r26.26 -.62
MidCplstn 18.57 -.48
SCInstn 31.01 -.93
TBIstn 11.03 +.01
TSInstn 29.02 -.69
Valuelstn 18.69 -.43
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n 88.68 -2.00
GroSig n 27.77 -.62
ITBdSign 11.86 +.02
MidCpldx n 26.52 -.70
STBdldxn 10.65
SmCpSig n 27.94 -.83
TotBdSgl n 11.03 +.01
TotStkSgl n 28.01 -.66
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.69 -.02
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 8.31 -.21
CorelnvA 5.64 -.12
DivOppAp 12.92 -.29
DivOppCt 12.77 -.29
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 36.98 -.95
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 11.85
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.43
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSlllnv 19.00
Opptylnv 34.62
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.81
Wells Fargo Insth:
UItSTMuA 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.04 +.01
William Blair N:
GrowihN 10.42 -.24
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 16.55 -.28
Focusedn 17.75 -.29


ChinaReg 6.86 -.17
GIbRs 9.32 -.30
Gld&Mtls 15.98 -.49
WdPrcMn 15.82 -.53
USAA Group:
AgvGt 30.57 -.73
CABd 10.26
CrnstStr 21.34
GNMA 10.38
GrTxStr 12.85 -.12
Grwth 13.59 -.30
Gr&lnc 13.50 -.33
IncStk 11.36 -.23
Inco 13.11 +.02


Euro headaches






pummel stocks


Associated Press

Fear that Europe's debt
crisis is infecting Germany,
the strongest economy in
the region, sent stocks reel-
ing Wednesday
The Dow Jones industrial
average dropped 236 points,
leaving it down 4.6 percent
over the past three days.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index fell for the sixth day
in a row, its worst losing
streak since August.
Traders were spooked by
the poor results at an auc-
tion of German debt, which
drew too few bids to sell all
of the 10-year notes being of-
fered. Germany has Eu-
rope's strongest economy,
and traders have bought its
debt as a safe place to store
value during turbulent
times.
The weak buying suggests
that Europe's crisis might
be infecting strong nations
that are crucial to keeping
the euro currency afloat.
Germany bears much of the
burden of bailing out
weaker neighbors such as
Greece and Portugal.
Borrowing costs for Italy
and Spain rose from levels
that already were consid-
ered dangerously high. Eu-
rope lacks the resources to
bail out those countries,
which have its third- and


ft


p
c
s

c
a
a
D
n
tc
p


biggest gain since 2002.
Market watch The Standard & Poor's
Nov. 23, 2011 500 index fell 26.25, or 2.2
percent, to 1,161.79. All 10
Dow Jones -236.17 industry groups fell sharply,
industrials 11,257.55 led by energy companies,
materials makers and
Nasdaq -61.20 banks. The index is headed
composite 2,460.08 for its sixth straight decline,

Standard & -26.25 the longest losing streak
Poor's 500 since August.
1,161.79 The Nasdaq fell 61.20, or

Russell -21.92 2.4 percent, to 2,460.08.
2000 674.34 The dollar rose sharply
against the euro as investors
NYSE diary moved money into assets
Advanced: 382 considered to be relatively

Declined: 2,700 safe. The euro fell to near
$1.33, from $1.35 late Tues-
Unchanged: 55 day The yield on the 10-year

Volume: 3.7 b Treasury note fell to 1.89 per-

Nasdaq diary cent from 1.94 percent late
Advanced: 379 Tuesday, signaling higher de-
------mand for Treasurys.
Declined: 2,161 Fears about Europe also

Unchanged: 103 dragged U.S. bank stocks
lower. Investors were un-
AP nerved by the Federal Re-

serve's announcement late
burth-biggest economies. Tuesday of a fresh round of
The Dow fell 236.17 stress tests of the biggest
points or 2.1 percent, to banks, said Peter Tchir, who
lose at 11,257.55. It has runs the hedge fund TF
lumped this week as Con- Market Advisors.
ress neared a deadlock on The Fed said 31 banks
cutting the budget deficit will be tested to see how
nd as Europe's debt woes they would withstand a re-
ppeared to worsen. The cession that would push un-
)ow has now given back employment above 13
nore than half of its big Oc- percent by early 2013. The
ober rally. It jumped 9.5 jobless rate now stands at
percentt last month, the about 9 percent.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Unemployment

benefits up slightly

WASHINGTON The num-
ber of people seeking unem-
ployment benefits ticked up
slightly last week after two
months of steady declines.
But the increase isn't enough
to reverse the downward trend.
The four-week average of appli-
cations, a less volatile meas-
ure, fell to its lowest level since
April. The decline in the aver-
age signals that companies are
laying off fewer workers.
Weekly applications for un-
employment aid rose 2,000 to a
seasonally adjusted 393,000,
the Labor Department said
Wednesday. It's only the sec-
ond increase in six weeks. The
four-week average fell to
394,250. That's the eighth drop
in the past nine weeks.

Consumer spending

up 0.1 percent

WASHINGTON Con-
sumers barely increased their
spending in October but their
incomes rose by the most in
seven months. The rise in take-
home pay could boost spend-
ing during the upcoming holiday
shopping season.
The Commerce Department
said Wednesday that spending
increased 0.1 percent last
month, the poorest gain in four
months. But incomes increased
0.4 percent, the best showing
since March.
Private wages and salaries
drove the income gain.
The slight October gain in
consumer spending repre-
sented a big slowdown from a
0.7 percent September in-
crease. Spending on durable
goods such as autos showed a
solid increase but spending on
nondurable goods such as food
and clothing fell.

October durable

goods orders fall

WASHINGTON Business
orders for long-lasting manufac-
tured goods fell for a second
straight month in October.
While much of the weakness
came from a big drop in de-
mand for commercial aircraft, a
key category that tracks busi-


ness investment spending fell
by the largest amount since
January.
The Commerce Department
reported Wednesday that orders
for durable goods fell 0.7 percent
following a September decline of
1.5 percent. Orders for core cap-
ital goods, considered a good
proxy for business investment
spending, dropped 1.8 percent,
the biggest decline since a 4.8
percent fall in January.
Manufacturing has been one
of the strongest sectors in the
economy in this sub-par recov-
ery, but this sector slowed this
year as consumer demand fal-
tered and auto factories had
trouble getting parts following
the March natural disasters in
Japan.

Deere Q4 profit

up 46 percent

Deere & Co. says strong
sales of its farm equipment
helped boost its fourth-quarter
profit by 46 percent and says it
expects robust demand will
lead to further growth next year.
The quarterly results beat
Wall Street expectations, and
Deere shares rose more than 3
percent in afternoon trading.
The Moline, Ill., company
said Wednesday that equip-
ment sales were up 20 percent
in the quarter. That included 14
percent sales growth in the
United States and Canada, and
31 percent growth in the rest of
the world outside those two
countries.
The sales growth helped
Deere generate net income of
$670 million, or $1.62 per
share, for the three months
ended Oct. 31, up from $457
million, or $1.07 per share, a
year ago.
Revenue grew 20 percent to
$8.6 billion from $7.2 billion a
year ago. Both sales volume
and equipment prices in-
creased.

KKR to buy oil

company for $7.2B

NEW YORK The energy
resources trapped in shale for-
mations across the U.S. con-
tinue to attract investors. But
now investors are after oil, not
natural gas.


Private equity firm KKR &
Co. LP and three partners an-
nounced Wednesday say they
have agreed to buy the pri-
vately held oil and gas com-
pany Samson Investment Co.
for $7.2 billion.
KKR's partners include the
investment firms Natural Gas
Partners and Crestview Part-
ners and the Japanese trading
company Itochu Corp. Financial
details, including how much
each partner is paying and
whether they are borrowing
money or paying in cash, stock,
or some combination, were not
disclosed.

PMI Group files

for bankruptcy

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. -
Private mortgage insurer PMI
Group Inc. is seeking shelter
from creditors under the Chap-
ter 11 bankruptcy code after the
seizure of two of its subsidiaries
by regulators in Arizona.
The company said Wednes-
day that it filed a petition for re-
lief with the U.S. Bankruptcy
Court in Delaware, but will con-
tinue operating as usual.
PMI intends to use bank-
ruptcy protection to assess its
options in light of the action
taken by the Arizona Depart-
ment of Insurance.

Nokia Siemens

to lay off 17,000

HELSINKI Wireless equip-
ment maker Nokia Siemens
Networks will slash 17,000 jobs
- almost one-quarter of its
work force in a move to cut
annual costs by $1.35 billion by
2013, company officials said
Wednesday.
The joint venture between
Finland's Nokia Corp. and
Siemens AG of Germany said it
would focus on mobile broad-
band networks and services as
it slims down with a view to be-
coming an independent
company.
Nokia Siemens has struggled
to make a profit amid stiff com-
petition in the global market for
network infrastructure the
technology and services
needed to run mobile and fixed-
line networks.
From wire reports


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg
SprottGold 14.76 -.01
SP Matis 31.57 -.86
SP HIthC 31.83 -.47
SP CnSt 30.26 -.33
SP Consume 36.53 -.74
SP Engy 64.29 -2.01
SPDRFncl 11.75 -.33
SP Inds 31.21 -.74
SPTech 24.14 -.59
SP UIl 33.26 -.53
Standex 29.39 -2.04
StarwdHfl 44.14 -1.25
StateStr 36.33 -.92
StatoilASA 23.45 -1.17
Steris 27.38 -.42
SillwtrM 9.55 -.66
StratHotels 4.37 -.34
Styker 45.47 -.89
SturmRug 30.92 -.65
SubPpne 46.35 -.65
SunCmts 33.57 -1.08
Suncorgs 27.67 -1.64
Sunoco 35.78 +.10
Suntech 2.43 -.19
SunTrst 16.44 -.97
SupEnrgy 25.59 -1.13
Supvalu 7.23 -.29
Synovus 1.44 -.08
Sysco 26.89 -.53
TCF Fncl 9.59 -.39
TEConnect 30.33 -1.00


TECO
TJX
ThawSemi
TalismEg
Target
TeckRes g
TelcmNZs
TelefEsp s
TelMexL
Templelnld
TempurP
Tenaris
TenetHIth
Teradyn
Terex
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TetraTech
Texlnst
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThmBet
ThomCrkg
3MCo
Tiffany
TW Cable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy


Trchmrkks
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers
Tredgar
TriContf
TrinaSolar
Tycolnfi
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
USAirwy
US Gold
USEC
USG
UltraPtg
UniSrcEn
UniFirst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
UtdContf
UtdMicro
UPSB
UtdRentals
US Bancrp
US NGs rs
US OilFd
USSteel
UtTedi


UtdhlthGp 43.56 -.86 Weathflntl 13.18
UnumGr 20.73 -.64 WtWatch 58.31
WeinRIt 19.35
WellPoint 64.23
Valassis 19.02 -.48 WellsFargo 23.21
ValeSA 22.66 -1.27 Wendys Co 4.89
ValeSApf 21.25 -1.21 WestarEn 25.97
ValeantPh 41.81 -1.01 WAstEMkt 13.14
ValeroE 20.40 -.48 WstAMgdHi 5.82
VangTotBd 83.78 +.09 stA d 5.82
VangTSM 59.65 1.36 WAstlnfOpp 12.80
VangREIT 52.12 -1.62 WDigital 25.59
VangREIT 52.12 -1.62 WstnRefin 11.35
VangDivAp 50.94 -1.00 WstnUnbn 16.20
VangEmur 39.90 -1.26 Weyerh 15.49
VangEAFE 29.49 -.86 Whrlpl 46.36
VarianMed 56.53 -1.12 WhifngPts 41.96
Vectren 27.17 -.44 WmsCos 29.2137
Ventas 49.20 -1.43 Wmstrs 56.21
VeoliaEnv 10.92 -.23 Winnbgo 6.09
VerizonCm 35.35 -.84 WiscEns 31.50
ViacomB 41.76 -1.27 WT India 16.29
VimpelCm 11.25 -.12 Worthgin 14.71
Visa 89.29 -1.55 Wyndham 32.70
Vishaylnt 8.74 -.34 XL Grp 18.78
Vonage 2.26 -.14 XcelEngy 24.94
Vornado 70.20 -2.42 Xerox 7.55
WGL Hold 40.21 -1.05 Yamanag 15.01
Wabash 6.33 -.35 YingliGrn 3.96
WalMart 56.64 -.21 Youkun 14.67
Walgrn 32.09 +1.35 YumBrnds 53.18
WalterEn 63.87 -3.42 Zimmer 47.57
WsteMInc 30.25 -.29 ZweigTI 3.01







Page A14. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011



PINION


"Gratitude is the most exquisite form
of courtesy."
Jacques Maritain, 1958


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan................. .................. publisher
a Charlie Brennan .................... ................. editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ................. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick......................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz......... ................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................. .............. citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ............................. guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


A thanks-giving message


A s we celebrate Thanksgiv-
ing, let's remember that the
holiday's name is a com-
pound word "thanks" and
"giving."
Each of us has much to be
thankful for our
lives, families, friend-
ships and hopefully,
work that fulfills us.
Thanking those whom
we love, admire, de- ,
pend upon, and have -
work relationships t
with is important, but k
too infrequently
expressed. Jack:
Here are "Ten GU
Thanks-Giving
Thoughts" to share as COL
gifts from the heart.
1. Let's share our bounty with
those with less. Consider the gift
of one week's grocery bill donated
to a community food bank, domes-
tic violence or homeless shelter, a
child health charity or foster par-
ent association, hospice, veterans
support organization or your
United Way as a token of appreci-
ation for what we have, and what
others do for the less fortunate.
2. Express our gratitude to those
who care for others as a profes-
sion or as volunteers. Give com-
pliment for the good works of
caregivers for our children and
frail elders those caring indi-
viduals deserve the kindnesses of
family members and neighbors all
through the year, but especially at
holiday time.
3. Respect our elected officials
for their service. We don't have to
agree with all of their policies, but
we should respect their service,
and hold them accountable for
their actions or lack of action.
4. Give time to a worthy cause.
Our volunteer investments for
the benefit of others build com-
munity and create a great exam-
ple for our children. Whether we
choose to sing in a chorus, read
to a toddler, mentor a youth, or
visit a lonely elder, our time is a
priceless gift that appreciates in
value.
5. Conserve resources by con-
suming less, reusing, and recy-
cling. Native American culture
considers our planet as a parent,
worthy of respect and protection.
Preserving our environment is
self-preservation and a life-saving
gift to wildlife, plant life, and
generations to come.
6. Slow down. Whether behind
the steering wheel or in conversa-
tion with others, speed is not a


L
E
I.


good thing. Being in a perpetual
hurry endangers lives on the road,
and cuts short our relationships
with others. Actively listen and
show others that positive atten-
tion is a gift worth giving.
7. Put technology in
its place. We live in a
high-tech, low-touch
culture, governed by
the beeps, buzzes, and
blinking lights of tech-
nology. Take a
breather from all the
numbing numbers.
Cell phones, pagers,
ievine and email should not
EST keep our loved ones on
hold.
UMN 8. Advocate with as-
sertion, not aggres-
sion. Free speech is not an
invitation to be offensive. Respon-
sible advocacy requires thought-
ful strategy, practical solutions,
and effective conversation. Advo-
cacy is the heart-felt expression of
a wrong to be righted, with com-
posure and grace.
9. Health is a form of wealth.
Making sure we eat right, exer-
cise, and take time to rest and
relax are the keys to clear think-
ing and long-term effectiveness.
Our bodies cannot support us un-
less our minds resolve to take care
and be careful.
10. Take optimism pills every
morning the time-release kind.
Negativity is contagious. Those
who believe they will make a dif-
ference can achieve their goals.
Pessimism is the mind's way of
giving up before the first step is
taken. The power of one, multi-
plied and magnified, is the only
correct formula for progress.
As we enter the holiday season,
let's realize that there are neigh-
bors, young and elder,
whose weeks ahead are not brim-
ming with joy For whatever rea-
son, in whatever circumstance, we
know that people in need can be
helped if we choose to do so. As
the Talmud asks of us, "If not you,
who? If not now, when?"
In honor and remembrance of a
family member who was there for
you when you needed them most,
please thank and support those
who illuminate our paths, exem-
plify kindness, teach justice, and
nurture our futures. What a fitting
tribute to the legacy of our
ancestors.
Jack Levine is founder of the
Tallahassee-based 4Generations
Institute. He can be emailed at
jack@4Gen. org.


Florida forever
Surely this is not happening to
us! I've lived in Florida for only
36 years and believe one of the
most attractive features of our
state government was citizen and
government involvement in the
acquisition and use of lands to be
publicly owned and to remain
forever available to future
generations.
Now to have our governor and
legislators, including Sen. Char-
lie Dean and Rep. Jimmie Smith,
sell it as surplus? The lands have
been paid for, so why should we
permit its sale for any purpose?
It's a scheme to raise money for


government operations that
should be paid for by tax rev-
enues lost when they cut capital
gains taxes for the rich and other
taxes, and failure to accept a fed-
eral government economic sub-
sidy solely to assure being
elected. They legislated a cut in
taxes; they can legislate an in-
crease. A tax increase in capital
gains and other taxes is sorely
needed to reduce our high unem-
ployment expected to worsen
with the permanent return of our
military personnel from Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Frances Harbin
Homosassa


T he United Way of Citrus County is trying to help feed the
hungry this year and you can help. If each family in Citrus
County contributed $30 (or more), the fundraising organiza-
tion could meet its goal for 2012. The United Way just gave
$50,000 to match a private $50,000 grant to push for the
completion of the food pantry in Homosassa Springs. Once
completed, this pantry will pro-
vide food supplies to 51 nonprofit
and church groups in our com-
eW munity that feed the hungry.
Do your part and mail a contri-
bution to The United Way, c/o Gerry Mulligan, The Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
Thanks for your help.
Gerry Mulligan


WARM WISHES





Thanks abound





on this holiday


T oday, as family and
friends and sometimes
even strangers gather to
break bread, give thanks and
be thankful, this community
stubbornly hangs onto those
American values that puts
character, faith and charity
above titles and bank accounts.
The people of Citrus County
have never taken their eyes off
the needs in their own neigh-
borhoods. And through this
generosity, compassion and
unselfishness emerges the
spirit that becomes the foun-
dation for a time of true
thanksgiving.
As meaningful as the
prayers of the pilgrims, as
forceful as the speeches of
politicians and as gentle as the
songs of our children, we are
blessed to be surrounded by
those who show us how to
reach higher than we thought
possible, to appreciate what
others might take for granted,
to be strong for those who
need our help, and to unite in
support of what we know we
are and what we must never
forget to be.
Each day of the year the
Chronicle's Editorial Board
brings you its ideas and view-
points as a unified voice.
Today, however, because of the
uniqueness of each member
and their personal thoughts on
Thanksgiving, each will offer
his or her own reflection on
this day.
Join us in observing this hol-
iday in appreciation of all that
our community gives and re-
ceives and in sincere appreci-
ation of each and every
blessing.
We wish you a truly happy
Thanksgiving

While we struggle as a na-
tion to climb out of this diffi-
cult recession, I am thankful
that in Citrus County I come
upon people all the time who
still have the spirit and re-
sourcefulness to do what
Americans have always done
- attack problems head on.
When there are hungry peo-
ple, volunteers come together
to collect food. When there
are homeless, there are folks
who search out shelter. When
there is crime, there are some
who reply with justice. And
when there is joblessness,
there are entrepreneurs who
respond by taking risk, creat-
ing new businesses and mak-
ing jobs.
I am thankful we work to-
gether despite philosophi-
cal or political differences -


to make things better.
It's what Americans do.
Gerry Mulligan

The name "Thanksgiving"
sets the tone for what it's all
about. There can never be
thanks enough, but there's
time to ponder personal bless-
ings on a lazy Thursday while
watching football and
smelling turkey cooking. Life
delivers its share of hardships,
challenges and disappoint-
ments but one should be
mindful to count their bless-
ings. Topping my list of bless-
ings are: Growing up in a
loving, supportive family; hav-
ing a happy home even if the
roof leaks and the cats can get
on my nerves; and, looking for-
ward to having two grandsons
born in the month of
December.
Happy Thanksgiving to all.
Charlie Brennan

On this Thanksgiving Day, I
am thankful for the more than
50 years my wife and I have
had together, and for our fam-
ily. I am thankful for the op-
portunities that were
available to me in this great
country, and for the many
wonderful people who work as
volunteers to make Citrus
County a better place. I am
also thankful for those public
servants who will be working
over the holiday weekend to
protect our safety and to pro-
vide support for those in need.
Mac Harris

Thanksgiving means family
and traditions. Growing up, it
was a time when my grand-
mother and I made pumpkin,
apple and lemon meringue
pies from scratch. It was a day
when my father would not go
to work; instead, he would
watch the Pittsburgh Steelers.
It was a day when my mother
wore her apron and made the
most incredible feast. But
mostly, it was a special day
when we would all be together
to share a meal prepared in
some way or another by all
members of the family.
Times have changed, and
today my children are making
their own traditions, not in the
same town, but spread across
the Northeast and as far away
as London. Although I will not
be with them, I will be sur-
rounded by a new-found fam-
ily. I am volunteering at a
church on Thanksgiving. How-
ever, in spirit, I will be with my
real family.
-Sandra Frederick


As I await the birth of our
family's first two grandsons, I
find myself in awe of basically
everything that I can touch
and see and hear and all
that I can't but still believe in.
I find myself in constant grati-
tude of all that has happened
before and all that will hap-
pen tomorrow. Whether it is
those challenges that I must
find the strength and wisdom
to endure and respect or sim-
ply the absolute thrill of intro-
ducing myself to new
additions to my family with a
promise to show them the love
and joy that lies ahead, it is in-
deed the right time and place
to be thankful.
-Neale Brennan

Every day is Thanksgiving
Day when you enjoy an atti-
tude of gratitude. Life is a se-
ries of little miracles, from the
ever-changing starry sky on
pre-dawn walks to the glorious
comfort of a good bed after a
tiring day I am particularly
thankful for my husband my
best friend and always an
inspiration.
-Rebecca Martin

From our very beginning as
a nation, gratitude has been a
core part of our national char-
acter. As such, whether in
times of prosperity or hard-
ship, it is an American tradi-
tion that families gather on
Thanksgiving Day in the spirit
of giving thanks for the many
blessings that we share as
Americans. Chief among these
blessings are the unalienable
rights of Life, Liberty and the
Pursuit of Happiness en-
dowed by our Creator. There-
fore, on this Thanksgiving Day
as we offer eternal thanks to
our Creator and those who de-
fend our unalienable rights,
may we never lose sight of the
freedoms we cherish, the peo-
ple we love and the blessings
we enjoy
Curt Ebitz

I am thankful for my family,
especially this year as my wife
and I are blessed to have our
first grandchild. I am thankful
to live in a community that
prides itself in taking care of
its own. Despite the financial
woes that have gripped this
county for the last three to
four years, we have a dedi-
cated group of citizens who
continue to work hard every
day for the less fortunate and
that is something to be
thankful for.
Mike Arnold


Hospital CEO thankful for good health


Thanksgiving is
a shared op-
portunity to re-
flect on the things
for which we are
grateful. Distinct
from the New Year,
where we reflect on
the past and vow to
go forward, Thanks-
giving is a holiday of
sharing.
So, at this is a
time of thanks, I'll


Ryan Beaty
GUEST
COLUMN


save the reflection on litiga-
tion and expenses and win-
ning and losing for the New
Year.
For now, let us be thank-
ful that overall, Citrus Memo-
rial Health System is in good
health. This year we have
made a difference.
We have treated 262 chil-
dren who returned to their
families.
We have treated 2,734
heart patients who lived to go


home to their
families.
In the last
year, moms gave
birth to 525 babies
that created or
added to families
in our community.
Not every
story has a happy
ending, but every
patient is treated
with the same re-
spect and care, ir-


respective of their age or
condition.
This year the care pro-
vided by Citrus Memorial has
been recognized by the
Florida Hospital Association,
HealthGrades and the Ameri-
can College of Cardiology.
That's something to be
proud of, but we don't plan to
rest on our success. We have
plans to improve service and
care while we reduce the tax
burden.


Our plans include the
creation of a facility that will
focus on health education and
navigation, the creation of a
chest pain center of excel-
lence and an expansion of
surgical services offered on
our hospital campus.
We are a community hos-
pital and we have to recognize
and be thankful for the men
and women who have
achieved the things we've al-
ready done and who will lead
the way for an even better
future.
This year, for now, let us
focus on the good that has been
done and the things that have
been achieved. For now, let us
all be thankful for the nurses,
techs, physicians and staff and
for the patients who have ben-
efitted from their care.
Ryan Beaty is the presi-
dent and chief executive offi-
cer of Citrus Memorial Health
System.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTER to the Editor




THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 A15


4


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White or Yellow Corn;
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Only in Hillsborough, Pasco, Pinellas, Highlands, Hernando, Citrus, Manatee, Sarasota,
Charlotte, Lee, Collier, Lake, Sumter, Polk and Osceola Counties. Including Publix at
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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


BRIES Missiles spur Russian saber rattling

Home


Associated Press
Valerie McElwaney, 51,
hugs her son Spc. Miles
Crook, 22, on Wednesday
as members of the Georgia
Army National Guard
Dragon Masters (1-171st
Aviation Regiment) arrive
home from a year in Iraq at
the Clay National Guard
Center at Dobbins Air Base
in Marietta, Ga.

Judge tosses
city's bankruptcy
HARRISBURG, Pa. -A
federal bankruptcy judge on
Wednesday threw out a peti-
tion by the city council of
Pennsylvania's debt-choked
capital of Harrisburg, saying it
had been legally barred by
state law from seeking bank-
ruptcy protection and, in any
case, had no authority to file it.
Judge Mary D. France is-
sued the ruling after hearing
more than two hours of argu-
ments by lawyers as to
whether the bankruptcy peti-
tion, filed last month by a di-
vided city council, satisfied
various legal issues and
could move forward despite
the objections of the city's
mayor, Pennsylvania Gov.
Tom Corbett, Dauphin
County, bond insurers and
others.
City council members said
the group will decide whether
or not to appeal. In the mean-
time, the Corbett administra-
tion is moving forward with an
unprecedented takeover of
the city's financial operations
in a bid to force it to pay down
about $300 million in debt
tied to the city's ill-starred
trash incinerator.

World BRIEFS

Ready


Associated Press
An Egyptian protester
wears a cardboard egg car-
ton as protection while
using scrap metal as a
shield during clashes with
security forces Wednesday
near Tahrir Square in Cairo,
Egypt. Tens of thousands
of protesters in Tahrir
Square have rejected a
promise by Egypt's military
ruler to speed up a presi-
dential election to the first
half of next year.

Belgian king urges
end to stalemate
BRUSSELS King Albert
II on Wednesday rejected a
resignation offer by the nego-
tiator seeking to end Bel-
gium's world-record
government stalemate and
urged all six parties seeking a
coalition to speed up work to
conclude talks.
Early this week, Elio Di
Rupo's request to resign had
plunged talks between the
nation's Dutch and French
speakers to new depths.
Belgium's major parties
have been trying to form a
government since the June
13, 2010 election but fears
are growing that the 528-day-
long impasse needs to end
soon to keep financial mar-
kets at bay.
From wire reports


U.S. officials

stress that Russia

isn't targeted

Associated Press
MOSCOW Russia threatened
on Wednesday to deploy missiles to
target the U.S. missile shield in Eu-
rope if Washington fails to assuage
Moscow's concerns about its plans,
a harsh warning that reflected deep
cracks in U.S.-Russian ties despite
President Barack Obama's efforts to
"reset" relations with the Kremlin.
President Dmitry Medvedev said


he still hopes for a deal with the
U.S. on missile defense, but he
strongly accused Washington and its
NATO allies of ignoring Russia's
worries. He said Russia will have to
take military countermeasures if
the U.S. continues to build the
shield without legal guarantees that
it will not be aimed against Russia.
The U.S. has repeatedly assured
Russia that its proposed missile de-
fense system wouldn't be directed
against Russia's nuclear forces, and
it did that again Wednesday
"I do think it's worth reiterating
that the European missile defense
system that we've been working
very hard on with our allies and
with Russia over the last few years
is not aimed at Russia," said Capt.


John Kirby, a Pentagon spokesman.
"It is ... designed to help deter and
defeat the ballistic missile threat to
Europe and to our allies from Iran."
White House spokesman Tommy
Victor said the United States will
continue to seek Moscow's coopera-
tion, but it must realize "that the
missile defense systems planned for
deployment in Europe do not and
cannot threaten Russia's strategic
deterrent."
But Medvedev said Moscow will
not be satisfied by simple declara-
tions and wants a binding agree-
ment. He said, "When we propose
to put in on paper in the form of
precise and clear legal obligations,
we hear a strong refusal."
Medvedev warned that Russia


Travel rush begins


Associated Press
Travelers arrive Wednesday at Cleveland Hopkins Airport in Cleveland, Ohio.

Higher costs not deterring Americans this holiday season


Associated Press
CHICAGO Undeterred by cost-
lier gas and airfare, millions of
Americans set out Wednesday to
see friends and family in what is
expected to be the nation's busiest
Thanksgiving weekend since the fi-
nancial meltdown more than three
years ago.
The rough economy led people
to find ways to save money, but
many refused to scrap their travel
plans.
"We wouldn't think of missing it,"
said Bill Curtis, a retiree from Los
Angeles who was with his wife at
Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, Calif.
"Family is important and we love
the holiday. So we cut corners other
places so we can afford to travel."
About 42.5 million people are ex-
pected to hit the road or take to the
skies for Thanksgiving this year, ac-
cording to travel tracker AAA.
That's the highest number of trav-
elers since the start of the reces-
sion at the end of 2007.
Heavy rain slowed down early
travelers along the East Coast.
Snow across parts of New England
and upstate New York made for
treacherous driving and thousands
of power outages. And a mudslide
covered train tracks in the Pacific
Northwest. But most of the country
is expected to have clear weather
Thursday


Travelers wait in line for security
screening Wedneday at Denver In-
ternational Airport.
For many travelers, it was a
smooth, if more expensive, trip.
The average round-trip airfare
for the top 40 U.S. routes is $212, up
20 percent from last year. Tickets
on most Amtrak one-way routes
have climbed slightly, and drivers
are paying an average $3.33 a gal-
lon, or 16 percent more than last
year, according to AAA.
Jake Pagel, a waiter from Denver,
was flying to see his girlfriend's


family in San Jose, Calif. Pagel said
had to give up working during one
of the restaurant industry's busiest
and most profitable times.
"I think it's something you can't
quantify in terms of monetary
cost," he said. "I mean, being able
to spend quality time with your
family is fairly significant."
Most travelers about 90 per-
cent, according to AAA were ex-
pected to hit the road.
John Mahoney acknowledged
the economy has changed the way
he travels, which is why he and his
girlfriend slept in their car instead
of getting a motel room when a
heavy, wet snowstorm flared up
along the New York State Thruway
during their 20-hour drive from
New Hampshire to St. Louis.
"Americans will still do what
Americans do. We travel the
roads," he said.
Investment manager Matt Right-
mire and his family typically fly on
Thanksgiving. This year, they are
making the holiday pilgrimage by
car from New Hampshire to his in-
laws in Youngstown, Ohio. He fig-
ured he is saving $1,000.
"It's family," he said. "That's
what the holidays are about:
Spending time with family I don't
really think it's optional. You may
try to find the least expensive way
to get there, but you've got to see
your family"


will station missiles in its western-
most Kaliningrad region and other
areas, if the U.S. continues its plans
without offering firm and specific
pledges that the shield isn't directed
at its nuclear forces. He didn't say
whether the missiles would carry
conventional or nuclear warheads.
In Brussels, NATO Secretary-
General Anders Fogh Rasmussen
said he was "very disappointed"
with Russia's threat to deploy mis-
siles near alliance nations, adding
that "would be reminiscent of the
past and ... inconsistent with the
strategic relations NATO and Rus-
sia have agreed they seek."
"Cooperation, not confrontation,
is the way ahead," Rasmussen said
in a statement



7 charged


inAmish


haircut


attacks

Associated Press
MILLERSBURG, Ohio -
The leader of a breakaway
Amish group allowed the
beatings of those who dis-
obeyed him, made some
members sleep in a chicken
coop and had sexual rela-
tions with married women
to "cleanse them," federal
authorities said as they
charged him and six others
with hate crimes in hair-cut-
ting attacks against other
Amish.
Authorities raided the
group's compound in east-
ern Ohio on Wednesday
morning and arrested seven
men, including group leader
Sam Mullet and three of his
sons.
Several members of the
group carried out the at-
tacks in September, October
and November by forcefully
cutting the beards and hair
of Amish men and women
and then taking photos of
them, authorities said.
Cutting the hair is a highly
offensive act to the Amish,
who believe the Bible in-
structs women to let their
hair grow long and men to
grow beards and stop shav-
ing once they marry One
victim told the FBI he
would rather have been
"beaten black and blue than
to suffer the disfigurement
and humiliation of having
his hair removed," accord-
ing to court papers.
The attacks had terror-
ized Amish communities,
Jefferson County Sheriff
Fred Abdalla said at a news
conference Wednesday
"You've gotAmish all over
the state of Ohio and Penn-
sylvania and Indiana that
are concerned. We've re-
ceived hundreds and hun-
dreds of calls from people
living in fear," he said.
"They are buying Mace,
some are sitting with shot-
guns, getting locks on their
doors because of Sam Mul-
let."
The sheriff added, "Sam
Mullet is evil."
Mullet told The Associ-
ated Press in October that
he didn't order the hair-cut-
ting but didn't stop his sons
and others from carrying it
out.
He said the goal was to
send a message to other
Amish that they should be
ashamed of themselves for
the way they were treating
Mullet and his community.


Yemen leader agrees to relinquish power


Latest casualty
Associated Press
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -
Yemen's authoritarian Pres-
ident Ali Abdullah Saleh
agreed Wednesday to step
down amid a fierce uprising
to oust him after 33 years in
power. The U.S. and its pow-


ofArab Spring
erful Gulf allies pressed for
the deal, concerned that a
security collapse in the im-
poverished Arab nation was
allowing an active al-Qaida
franchise to gain a firmer
foothold.
Saleh is the fourth Arab
leader toppled in the wave


of Arab Spring uprisings
this year, after longtime dic-
tators fell in Tunisia, Egypt
and Libya. The deal gives
Saleh immunity from prose-
cution contradicting a
key demand of Yemen's op-
position protesters.
Seated beside Saudi King
Abdullah in the Saudi capi-
tal Riyadh, Saleh signed the
U.S.-backed deal hammered


out by his country's powerful
Gulf Arab neighbors to trans-
fer power within 30 days to
his vice president, Abed
Rabbo Mansour Hadi. That
will be followed by presiden-
tial elections within 90 days.
He was dressed smartly in
a dark business suit with a
matching striped tie and
handkerchief, and he smiled
as he signed the deal, then


clapped his hands a few
times. He promised his rul-
ing party "will be coopera-
tive" in working with a new
unity government
Protesters camped out in
a public square near
Sanaa's university immedi-
ately rejected the deal,
chanting, "No immunity for
the killer." They vowed to
continue their protests.











SPORTS


Teen girl
gets her
first elk./B5




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Pigskin predictions/B2
* NFL previews/B3
* Scoreboard/B4
* Outdoors/B5
* Entertainment/B6


LHS standout pursues national title


Sources: Talks
resume toward
ending NBA lockout
NEW YORK Two people
with knowledge of the situation
say talks aimed at ending the
NBA lockout have resumed, with
a quick settlement necessary to
start the season by Christmas.
The people spoke to The As-
sociated Press on the condition
of anonymity Wednesday be-
cause the talks are supposed to
remain confidential.
The discussions began quietly
Tuesday and are expected to
continue through the Thanksgiving
holiday. The two sides' talks are
now centered on settling their
lawsuits the players filed an
antitrust lawsuit against the league
in Minnesota and the league filed
a pre-emptive suit in New York.
Because the union disbanded,
it cannot negotiate a new collec-
tive bargaining agreement. That
can only be done once the union
has reformed.
Neither side commented on
the talks, first reported by Yahoo
Sports, though the league says it
remains in favor of a "negotiated
resolution" to the lockout.
AP source:
Chiefs claim
Orton off waivers
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Kyle
Orton has a new home in the
AFC West.
Orton was claimed off waivers
Wednesday by the Kansas City
Chiefs, who were searching for a
veteran quarterback after losing
Matt Cassel to a season-ending
injury, a person familiar with the
situation told The Associated
Press on condition of anonymity
because the team had not an-
nounced the move.
Orton was released by the
Denver Broncos on Tuesday, six
weeks after he was benched fol-
lowing a 1-4 start. The former
Chicago Bears starter, who
passed for 3,000 yards each of
his first two seasons in Denver,
became expendable when the
Broncos opted to go with Tim
Tebow as their starter.
The Chiefs will be responsible
for approximately $2.5 million re-
maining on Orton's nearly $8.9
million salary this season, but
they had plenty of space under
the salary cap to make the move.
Orton can become a free agent
after this season.
Several other teams were re-
portedly interested in Orton, in-
cluding the Bears, but the Chiefs
were No. 9 in the order of waiver
priority and were able to land him.
It's unclear when he will report to
the Chiefs, though he almost cer-
tainly won't be available for Sun-
day's game against Pittsburgh.
That means Kansas City will
again start Tyler Palko, who was
serviceable in his first NFL start
Monday night at New England. He
finished 24 of 37 for 230 yards, but
his three interceptions contributed
to what turned into a 34-3 rout.
Orton, a former Purdue star,
was a fourth-round draft pick and
appeared on the way to stardom
when he assumed the Bears'
starting job for 15 games as a
rookie, winning 10 of them.
Orton was demoted his second
season in favor of veteran Brian
Griese. He earned the starting job
back late in 2007 and started 15
games for the Bears in 2008,
passing for 2,972 yards with 18
touchdowns and 10 interceptions.
Phillies offer Rollins,
Madson, Ibanez
arbitration


PHILADELPHIA-
Philadelphia Phillies
arbitration to free ag
Rollins, Ryan Madso
Ibanez.
The players have u
accept. If they sign e
Phillies would be entitle
story picks in next J
The Phillies are hi
tain Rollins, the shor
won the 2007 NL M'
signed Jonathan Pa
place Madson as the
Ibanez, the starting
the last three years,
million this year. It's
could return on a on
for less money.
Starter Roy Oswa
liever Brad Lidge we
fered arbitration.


- The
have offered


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
Some people work hard to
make a dream come true.
Carleigh Williams may see a
dream come true this year
Williams, a former standout
on the Lecanto High School
girls soccer team, is now a
starting defender on the Uni-
versity of Central Florida
women's soccer team.
The UCF team beat the Uni-
versity of North Carolina Sun-
day 2-1 on a penalty kick at the
University of Florida.
Central Florida will go into
the Elite 8 of the NCAA tourna-
ment Friday at Wake Forest
University They will face Wake
Forest
The dream come true may be
a collegiate national champi-
onship.
Williams is a true freshman,


and the Pine Ridge resident is
thrilled to be on a very success-
ful women's college soccer
team.
"I absolutely love being a
freshman and knowing our sea-
son is not done yet," she said.
Things are a little different
than they were at Lecanto
High.
"They hold you at a much
higher standard in college,"
she said. "You need to be able
to take anybody's spot and to be
ready for anything that comes
your way
"I love the travel. I never
have traveled this much. We
went to San Diego. It's been
amazing.
"I am living the dream. It's
more than I expected. I am ad-
justing well."
Williams was named Citrus
Chronicle Athlete of Year in
2010. She was also a defender


at Lecanto. She was also
named Chronicle Girls Soccer
Player of the Year in 2009 and
2010. Now at the collegiate
level, Williams has already
been named to the Conference
USA All Freshman team.
A health administration
major, Williams is on a partial .
athletic scholarship at Central
Florida.
"She is having a wonderful
time," said her fatherJim. "She
loves the travel and cama-
raderie. It's a rigorous sched-
ule. She is an A-B student so
far ... She loves the college. She ,,
hasn't had the chance to enjoy
campus life. She has been in- iJ
volved in soccer since late July"
Williams, 18, was born in
Fairfax, Virginia. She was 10 Special to the Chronicle
years old when the family Carleigh Williams, former Lecanto High
moved to Pine Ridge. School athlete, now plays soccer for
the UCF Knights, and was named to the
See Page B4 Conference USA All Freshman team.


Panthers pounce


Lecanto High School defeats South Sumter 68-48


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lecanto High School's Clayton Roessler battles South Sumter High School's Brice Mobley and K.K. Neal
to go up and score for the panthers in first period action Wednesday at the Lecanto gym. For full coverage
of the game, see Friday's edition.


Tebow


the real


deal, say


Broncos
ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
By now, everybody knows
Tim Tebow, the quirky quar-
terback. Hardworking work
in progress, imperfect
passer getting by on more
will than skill, bigger on
moxie than mechanics.
Then there's Tim Tebow,
the person. Popular and po-
larizing, more like a politi-
cian than NFL player
Galvanizes backers and
backbiters alike. People
love him or loathe him.
There he is on TV pro-
fessing his faith and talking
about how he was more ex-
cited to build a children's
hospital in the Philippines
than he was in leading the
Denver Broncos to an im-
probable last-minute win
over the New York Jets.
Even though the Broncos
were 1-4 without him and 4-
1 with him, including two
fourth-quarter comebacks,
Tebow's detractors call him
a phony, fake and scripted, a
goody two-shoes. This, de-
spite guiding the Broncos
back to relevancy at 5-5, a
game behind front-running
Oakland in the AFC West.
Yet his teammates and
coaches, who see him when
the cameras and recorders
aren't around, say he's a sin-
cere, aw-shucks, praise-the-
Lord-and-pass-the-football
(at least try) kind of guy, with
the world at his feet and his
head nowhere near the
clouds.
"He really is genuine and
the emotion and the passion
that you see him out there
playing with, he has the
same passion off the field
with those type of things, the
charity things and the mis-
sionary things," receiver
See Page B4


Meyer: No truth to Ohio State rumors


Associated Press


ents Jimmy COLUMBUS, Ohio Despite nu-
on and Raul merous reports saying he's all but set to
become Ohio State's next football
until Nov. 30 to coach, Urban Meyer said Wednesday
elsewhere, the that is not the case.
ed to compen- "I have not been offered any job nor
ed to compen- is there a deal in place," the former
June's draft. Florida coach said in a statement re-
oping to re- leased through ESPN, where he is a col-
rtstop who lege football analyst "I plan on spending
VP. The team Thanksgiving with my family and will
pelbon to re- not comment on this any further"
e closer. Several websites, TV stations and The
ig left fielder Columbus Dispatch have reported Meyer
made $12 has reached an agreement in principle
possible he with Ohio State and, barring any last-
e-year deal minute problems, will be introduced as
the Buckeyes' coach next week.
lit and re- People within the athletic depart-
*re not of- ment and close to the team told The As-
sociated Press the job has not been
-From wire reports offered to Meyer and nothing has been
completed. They spoke on condition of


anonymity because the coaching
search is supposed to be confidential.
Athletic director Gene Smith declined
to comment Wednesday
Ohio State, under interim coach
Luke Fickell, plays at No. 17 Michigan
on Saturday. Fickell, who some reports
have said will be retained on Meyer's4
staff, declined to address the story,
which has been percolating for days.
"No, I won't," he said Wednesday "It's
not about that. I'm going to have enough
respect for this football game to make
sure it's about this football game. I don't
think this is the time and the place."
Speaking briefly to reporters, he was
asked if he knew whether a decision on
a new coach had been reached.
"I know there's a game at noon on
Saturday," he said.
Meyer is from Ashtabula and was a Associated Press
graduate assistant at Ohio State under Then-Florida head coach Urban Meyer puts his arm around
Earle Bruce in the 1980s. He grew up his wife Shelley Jan. 1 after Florida defeated Penn State 37-
24 in the Outback Bowl in Tampa, Fla. Meyer continues to
See Page B4 deny reports he will be the next coach at Ohio State.





B2 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


Follow the
Chronicle's "experts"
all season long as they
pick the biggest
games of the week.


Sean
Arnold


r


PREfCTIO/oS


Jeff
Gordon


A.B. Sidibe


Brad
Bautista


Steve
Lamb


Taylor
Provost


Mighty
Coin


Last week's results 19-9 17-11 16-12 16-12 15-13 15-13 15-13
Season total 235-103 232-106 226-112 224-114 222-116 212-126 172-166

Texas @ Texas A&M A&M A&M A&M A&M A&M A&M Texas
Louisville @ USF USF USF Louisville USF USF Louisville USF
Iowa @ Nebraska Nebraska Nebraska Nebraska Iowa Nebraska Iowa Iowa
Arkansas @ LSU LSU LSU LSU Arkansas LSU LSU Arkansas
Boston College @ Miami Miami Miami Miami Miami Miami Miami B.C.
Pittsburgh @ W. Virginia W. Virginia W. Virginia W. Virginia W. Virginia W. Virginia W. Virginia Pittsburgh
UTEP @ UCF UCF UCF UCF UTEP UTEP UCF UTEP
Cal @ Arizona State ASU ASU ASU ASU ASU ASU ASU
Iowa State @ Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Oklahoma Iowa State
Georgia @ Georgia Tech Ga. Tech Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Ga. Tech
Ohio State @ Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan
Alabama @ Auburn Alabama Alabama Alabama Alabama Alabama Alabama Auburn
Virginia Tech @ Virginia Va. Tech Va. Tech Va. Tech Va. Tech Va. Tech Va. Tech Va. Tech
Penn State @ Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Penn State Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin
Clemson @ South Carolina Clemson S. Carolina S. Carolina S. Carolina Clemson Clemson S. Carolina
Notre Dame @ Stanford Stanford Stanford Stanford Stanford Notre Dame Stanford Stanford
Florida State @ Florida FSU FSU FSU FSU Florida FSU FSU

Green Bay @ Detroit Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Detroit Green Bay Detroit
Miami @ Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Miami Dallas Dallas Miami
San Francisco @ Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore San Fran Baltimore Baltimore San Fran
Houston @ Jacksonville Houston Houston Houston J'ville Houston Houston J'ville
Buffalo @ N.Y. Jets NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ Buffalo NYJ
Cleveland @ Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinnati Cleveland Cincinnati Cincinnati Cincinatti
Minnesota @ Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta
Arizona @ St. Louis St. Louis St. Louis Arizona St. Louis St. Louis Arizona St. Louis
Carolina @ Indianapolis Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Indianapolis Carolina Indianapolis
Tampa Bay @ Tennessee Tennessee Tampa Bay Tampa Bay Tennessee Tampa Bay Tennessee Tennessee
Chicago @ Oakland Oakland Oakland Oakland Chicago Oakland Oakland Chicago
Washington @ Seattle Wash. Seattle Seattle Seattle Seattle Seattle Seattle
Denver @ San Diego San Diego San Diego Denver Denver San Diego Denver Denver
New England @ Philadelphia Philly N.E. N.E. N.E. N.E. N.E. Philly
Pittsburgh @ Kansas City Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh K.C.
N.Y. Giants @ New Orleans N. Orleans N. Orleans N. Orleans NYG N. Orleans N. Orleans NYG


San Francisco-Baltimore: Harbaugh vs]
Associated Press the 49ers (9-1) in the NFC West. at this level on this stage." Giants give best efforts against top
San Francisco has won eight in a San Francisco has been the competition. Saints fit that bill.
Oh, brother row, but Baltimore is a 3 1/2-point league's most balanced team, with SAINTS, 27-24
No, not Jim Harbaugh against favorite, a defense that, at least this year, Chicago (plus 3 1/2) at Oakland
John Harbaugh in the first NFL The Ravens haven't lost at home can rival Baltimore's. Don't discount Bears without Cutler.
head coaching matchup of broth- in five outings, while the Niners UPSET SPECIAL: 49ERS, 19-16 Defense and special teams are tough.
ers, a Thanksgiving night treat in haven't lost in four road games BEARS, 16-14
Baltimore. We mean the slump all in the Eastern time zone. Cleveland (plus 7 1/2) at Cincinnati Pittsburgh (minus 10) at Kansas City
Pro Picks has hit, including its The NFL couldn't ask for a bet- Bengals must beat the dregs to Tyler Palko played for Pitt Panthers.
worst mark against the spread last ter primetime showcase at least keep playoff hopes alive. Not quite like playing for or against
weekend 4-8-1. for fans who have NFL Network BEST BET: BENGALS, 20-6 Steelers.
Maybe the cure will come with or live in the Baltimore and San Miami (plus 7) at Dallas, Thursday STEELERS, 24-9
some of the enticing games on this Francisco areas. Not the dud it looked like a month ago. Buffalo (plus 8) at New York Jets
week's schedule. "We know it's going to be emo- COWBOYS, 24-14 Both teams left in Patriots'wake.
Most enticing, of course, is rookie tional, we're just not sure what Green Bay (minus 6) at Detroit, Both teams left in Patriots wake.
coach Jim Harbaugh's 49ers visit- emotions we're going to experi- Thursday JETS, 20-13
ing his older sibling's Ravens. ence," said Jack Harbaugh, the fa- Lots of people think Packers' run Houstot Leinart getus 3) ashacksonvit. Look for
"It's an amazing thing. To say their and a longtime football coach. stops here. We don't. Matt Leinart gets his shot. Look for
that you're not thinking about it "It's such uncharted waters. We've PACKERS, 37-27 lots of handoffs.
probably wouldn't be real," John experienced it in this business Carolina (minus 4) at Indianapolis TEXANS, 20-13
said. "It's a historic thing, it's very being married for 50 years and We didn't have the guts to pick Pack Minnesota (plus 9 1/2) at Atlanta
special. I couldn't be more proud coaching 43 years myself And e Time for Falcons to make a statement.
for our parents or for Jim. I just football and basketball and all the to lose. We will go out on this limb. FALCONS, 31-13
think it's really neat." other things we've had in our fam- COLTS, 13-10 Tampa Bay (plus 3) at Tennessee
Both teams lead their divisions, ily This is such uncharted waters New York Giants (plus 7) at New Time for Chris Johnson to make a
the Ravens (7-3) in the AFC North, to see two in our family competing Orleans statement.


Harbaugh
TITANS, 20-14
Washington (plus 4 1/2) at Seattle
Seahawks seem to have found
something, albeit much too late.
SEAHAWKS, 17-14
Denver (plus 6 1/2) at San Diego
Tebow bandwagon heads to Mis-
sion Bay. We're on it sort of.
CHARGERS, 19-16
New England (OFF) at Philadelphia
Toughest remaining opponent for
Patriots, and Eagles aren't that tough.
PATRIOTS, 27-20
Arizona (OFF) at St. Louis
A good game to have no line on.
But we must make a pick.
RAMS, 13-10
RECORD:
Against spread: 4-8-1 (overall 81-
67-4); straight up 9-5 (overall 104-56).
Best Bet: 2-9 against spread, 6-5
straight up.
Upset Special: 8-3 against spread,
6-5 straight up.


uEARS /U1U *U uOu IES


NFL FOOTBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


plg*44r1W





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Packers O-line out to redeem 2010 loss to Lions


Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. Green Bay
Packers right tackle Bryan Bulaga
didn't necessarily need a reminder
of just how badly he and his team-
mates got tossed around the last time
they played the Lions in Detroit.
He got one anyway
This week, Packers linemen got
together on their own to watch film
of last year's miserable 7-3 loss at
Ford Field an early step in their
preparation for Thursday's much-
hyped game in Detroit.
The reigning Super Bowl cham-
pions are 10-0 going into a big
Thanksgiving Day showcase and
have been unstoppable at times
on offense, but watching last
year's film was humbling.
"We were actually just watching
that game, and we did not play
well," Bulaga said. "Didn't do any-
thing well, really It was just a
poorly played game. That may be a
nice way of putting it, too."
The Packers were forced to shuf-
fle their offensive line on the fly in
that game after an early knee injury
to then-left guard Daryn Colledge.
Jason Spitz replaced him, strug-
gled, and was replaced by TJ. Lang.


The Packers couldn't get anything
going on offense, and the Lions
knocked Aaron Rodgers out of the
game near the end of the first half
with a concussion. Backup Matt
Flynn struggled, too, and a late at-
tempt at a rally came up short.
The Packers allowed four sacks
and several more quarterback hits
that day while gaining only 66
yards on 20 rushes and 25 of
those yards came on a pair of runs
by Rodgers.
"Let's not take anything away
from them," Bulaga said. "They
beat us, they were more physical
than us. They deserved to win. We
just didn't play well enough to win
that day"
But right guard Josh Sitton dis-
missed suggestions that the Packers
struggled because the Lions' de-
fensive line was superior that day
"That's not about them, neces-
sarily," Sitton said. "I'd say our
fundamentals, as an offensive
line, weren't great in that game.
We've got to start from within."
But what about the player Sitton
will line up against Thursday, de-
fensive tackle Ndamukong Suh?
"Good football player," Sitton
said. "But like I said, it's about us."


Associated Press
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers is hit by Detroit Lions
linebacker Landon Johnson Dec. 12, 2010, in Detroit. The Packers might
be a perfect 10-0, but their offensive linemen haven't forgotten what hap-


opened in their last game at Detroit.
Packers coach Mike McCarthy
acknowledged watching film of
last year's game in Detroit is part
of their preparation this week, but
said they are far more concerned
with studying what the Lions are
doing on defense this year
Detroit has 27 sacks this season,
tying them for eighth-most in the
NFL. While the Lions have been
vulnerable to the run, they're al-


lowing 192.8 yards passing per
game fifth-best in the league.
From a technique standpoint,
Detroit tries to challenge oppos-
ing offensive lines by using what is
referred to as a "wide nine" align-
ment, where the defensive end
lines up outside the tight end or
several feet wide of the offensive
tackle if there isn't a tight end on
his side of the formation.


Lining up wider than usual
gives a quick defensive end more
options in pass rush situations,
and Bulaga said the Packers have
to be ready for it
"You've got to be able to get out
and get some depth so he doesn't
have an easy edge to get around,"
Bulaga said. "It gives that defen-
sive end a good opportunity to do
a three-way go on you If you
under-set him, he's going to go
around you; if you over-set him, he
can go inside real quick; or, he can
get a full head of steam and bull-
rush you. So you really have to be
sound with your sets and funda-
mentals when you're playing that
type of technique because they ap-
proach it in a different way"
Then there's the crowd factor;
given the Lions' recent resurgence
and the hype going into Thursday's
game, the Packers expect to play in
a louder-than-usual environment
"It's going to be a pretty crazy
environment," Sitton said.
"Thanksgiving, Packers coming to
town, it's going to be wild. I've
played there three times and it
hasn't been like that. So I'm ex-
pecting kind of the Minnesota,
Metrodome-type atmosphere."


University of San Francisco coach


donates a kidney to ailing father


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -
Mickey Giarratano never
would have asked one of his
children for a kidney That's
not his nature, and Nino Gi-
arratano knew it.
That's why the son
stepped in and made the de-
cision for his ailing father,
offering up one of his
healthy kidneys so his 80-
year-old dad could live a
longer, more normal life.
Giarratano makes tough
calls all the time as a college
baseball coach at the Uni-
versity of San Francisco.
When it involved putting his
own life on the line, his wife
and grown daughter ini-
tially couldn't understand
making such a sacrifice. Es-
pecially doing so for some-
one who already had lived a
full life, even if it was his fa-
ther. Still, it's a something
Giarratano would do all
over again.
"If it didn't work out
health-wise for me, I could
live with that," Giarratano
said. "It's kind of that ath-
letic mentality ... I've just
been lucky to be around
sports my whole life. I've
been lucky with the deci-
sions I've made to do what I
do. I was healthy So, I al-
ways knew if anyone could
recover, I would be the
quickest recovery in the
family based on age,
based on my lifestyle. So it
worked out pretty good."
He is doing great relying
on one kidney Giarratano
returned to running on the
treadmill six weeks post-op
to make sure he was
"healthy for fall practice
and ready to go" at the start
of his 14th season at USE
"I'm up to about 15 miles
per week, and feeling
great," Giarratano, the
reigning West Coast Confer-
ence coach of the year, said
this week. "I am so lucky to
have this opportunity to give
back to my dad."
The 49-year-old Giar-
ratano decided he wanted
to provide this gift not only
to his father but also to his
mother, Josephine, who had
handled the bulk of the care
for her ill husband. They
had given up so much for Gi-
arratano and his three older
siblings along the way
"I wasn't surprised at all.
That's just the type of per-
son he is," said former USF
outfielder Jonnie Knoble.
"His dad had given him so
much, he felt he owed it to
him. Not a lot of kids would
do that"
While Giarratano didn't
know everything the dona-
tion would entail, he under-
stood the transplant would
improve his father's life. At
the time he made the deci-
sion a year ago, Mickey
needed dialysis for five hours
a day three times a week.
"We're still kind of angry
at him," joked Giarratano's
wife, Brenda. "I'm kidding.
We're happy We're all doing
much better now that every-
body's healthy It was scary"
Mickey Giarratano had
gone in for what was ex-
pected to be a routine gall-
bladder surgery last year
and ended up staying in the
hospital for 45 days because


Nostalgia takes a back seat


in Cowboys-Dolphins game

Associated Press into a tie for first place in "he stinks."
the NFC East, and a Cowboys defensive coor-
ARLINGTON, Texas chance to take over sole dinator Rob Ryan said he
The Cowboys and Dolphins possession at least until thinks the difference in
playing on Thanksgiving the Giants play Monday production stems from
will forever conjure memo- night. For the Dolphins, it's Miami offensive coordina-
ries of the 1993 game. Dal- flushed away the dread tor Brian Daboll increasing
las defensive lineman Leon from an 0-7 start and re- Bush's workload. He
Lett adding to his blunder- placed it with the invalu- reached 13 carries only
ful reputation by sliding able commodity of hope. once the first six games;
across ice and snow to Matt Moore has shown he he's had at least that many
bring alive a dead ball, set- could be the club's long- the last four games. He's
ting up Miami for the win- sought solution at quarter- also had at least three re-
ning kick as time ran out. back and the defense has ceptions in each of those
With Lett now part of the gone 12 straight quarters games after a long stretch
Cowboys' coaching staff, without giving up a touch- of one or two per game.
and Snickers pushing a down. "He's featuring a way to
lighthearted "Forgive No wonder there's so get this guy the ball to do
Leon" campaign, that tale much dancing on the the things that he does best
seemed likely to be the Miami sideline, and to get him out in
most exciting storyline for Miami's running game is space," Ryan said. "He's
another holiday meeting getting cranked up, too, (tough) out there, every-
between the clubs, thanks to Reggie Bush. He body knows it."
Nope. Nostalgia has been has four touchdowns the Only one team will leave
shoved to the sideline be- last three games; it was Cowboys Stadium on Sun-
cause the game itself is four games ago, when the day with a four-game win-
shaping up as a good one. Dolphins were 0-6, that he ning streak. That team also
Both teams go in having proclaimed "this team will have three wins in 12
won three straight. For the stinks," and safety days, and no more games
Cowboys, it's meant a rise Yeremiah Bell shot back for 10 days.


Associated Press
Nino Giarratano, left, head baseball coach at the University
of San Francisco, joins hands with his father, Mickey
Giarratano, right, after their July 11 kidney transplant
surgery at Porter Adventist Hospital in Denver.


of kidney failure. In October
2010, Giarratano first men-
tioned to his mother the
idea of donating his kidney
"It was a matter of two
months, you take this man
who has lived his life and all
of a sudden it has changed
considerably It was differ-
ent to see that," Giarratano
said. "That's when I started
stepping in. I just started
thinking, if he needs my
help, I'm the guy"
Everything aligned to
make it a go, starting with
their matching blood types.
Giarratano began re-
searching the entire proce-
dure and process, educating
himself on kidney disease
and what his life might look
like 30 years down the road
with only one kidney He
learned that his lifestyle
wouldn't necessarily be al-
tered at all. He went through
a battery of tests to first
make sure father and son
were a match. Eventually it
came time to discuss when
they could actually make it
happen, which was after the
WCC champion Dons' season
finished in a loss to UCLA in
the NCAA Regionals.
The exact day ended up
being picked for them. The
transplant center had a can-
cellation and an open date
on July 11.
"There are steps along
the way where you just kind
of have your fingers crossed
and say 'Boy, I hope it works,
I hope I'm the person,"' said
Giarratano, who soon will
become USF's all-time win-
ningest baseball coach.
Paul Meyer, one of Giar-
ratano's close friends and a
longtime USF supporter, has
known the coach for 15 years
and was moved to hear
about the kidney donation.
"There's no greater ges-
ture of love than when you
give a kidney to your 80-
year-old father so he can
live 10 more years and see
his grandkids and great-
grandkids," Meyer said.
"That's the amazing part"


Mickey had become dis-
couraged during his dialysis
sessions and began to fight
the idea of it, considering
the treatment controlled his
schedule and affected his
psyche and even his rela-
tionships.
Despite that, he told his
wife he wasn't going to ask a
family member to donate.
"Low and behold, my son
and my wife had talked about
it before I knew about it. As
many friends who have talked
to me, they all say, 'You have
a wonderful son and there
aren't many people who do
that,"' Mickey Giarratano said.
"It doesn't happen daily"
Mickey Giarratano, now
81, has been healthy ever
since. No setbacks. He could
live 10 to 15 years longer
with the new kidney
He is so much improved
that his doctor said, "Next
time you talk to your son,
tell him he gave you one hell
of a kidney"
"If he had gone on a donor
list, he never would have
gotten it. He never would
have been high enough on
the list. He wasn't going to
go ahead of 20-year-old kids.
He wasn't going to go ahead
of people who were sick and
needed it to live," said Giar-
ratano, who told his father
of his plan last Christmas.
"It was emotional. He was
scared. He didn't know how
to react. I didn't say much
after that except, 'It's a done
deal, I'm the guy"'
Not a day goes by that his
father isn't appreciative of
the strong bond this experi-
ence created between them.
"If it wasn't for Nino, none
of this would have happened,"
said Mickey Giarratano, cry-
ing. '"As my doctor in Denver
said, 'You tell Nino he was
the man.' And it's true. I'm
sure other people feel the same
way when they get a donor.
"So, I appreciate it every
day and every day I will pray
for my son, Nino, that he turns
out OK. He went through
more than his dad did."


RDAv SUNDAY!


* Vn01S IC ;
AEWITH 1PURCiAS

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 B3






B4 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011



Hurricanes 58,
Pirates 55
Hurricanes 12 12 16 18 -58
Pirates 12 12 16 16 -55
CHS (58)- Ryan Labrador 9 5-11 23; Leroy An-
derson 4 3-3 11; Devin Pryor 2 4-7 8; Randy
Lynn 3 0-0 6; Jeloni Sammy 2 0-0 4; Kyle Pres-
nick 1 2-2 4; Spencer Howard 1 0-0 2. TOTALS:
2223-1458.
CRHS (55) -Ty Reynolds 5 13-18 25; Kaleb
McColley 3 5-6 13; Sam Franklin 4 0-2 8; Will
Cleveland 2 0-0 4; Sean Hall 2 0-0 4; Robert
Speakman 1 0-6 2; Damien Westfall 0 1-2 1;
Trevor Phipps 0 0-1 0. TOTALS: 17 19-35 55.
3-Point Goals: CR 4 (McColley 2, Reynolds 2).
Fouled Out: Devin Pryor (CH). Records: Citrus
(1 -0, 0-0 district); Crystal River (0-1,0-0 district).

FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
at TexasA&M 7Y2 8 (532) Texas
Tomorrow


at Buffalo 1 2
Green


(5312) Bowling


at N. Illinois 1912 1912 (64) E. Michigan
at Temple 1712 17 (4012) Kent St.
at W. Michigan 28 28 (60) Akron
Toledo 13Y2 13Y2 (70) at Ball St.
at South Florida 3 3(431/2) Louisville
Houston 3 3 (75) at Tulsa
at Nebraska 9 912 (54) Iowa
at West Virginia 8 7 (57) Pittsburgh
at LSU 14 1212 (5212) Arkansas
at Utah 19V2 21V2 (4812) Colorado
at Miami 14 14Y2 (44) Boston College
at UCF 10 10 (53Y2) UTEP
at Arizona St. 4 512 (54) California
Saturday
at Michigan 712 7 (4412) Ohio St.
Missouri-x 24Y2 23Y2 (61) Kansas
Rutgers 3 3 (4012) at UConn
Cincinnati 3 212 (4912) at Syracuse
Michigan St. 7 612 (5112) at N'western
Purdue 712 712 (56) at Indiana
Illinois 1012 1012 (44) at Minnesota
Georgia 6 6 (54Y2) at Ga.Tech
Vanderbilt 1 11/2 (49) at Wake Forest
at South Carolina 3 4(4912) Clemson
at NC State 13 12Y2 (49Y2) Maryland
at N. Carolina 13 13 (54) Duke
Tennessee 9 712 (43/2) at Kentucky
at Boise St. 31 32Y2 (61) Wyoming
at Utah St. 112 11/2 (6412) Nevada
atSMU 14 13Y2 (54Y2) Rice
Alabama 2112 21 (47) at Auburn
at Oregon 28 28 (631/2) Oregon St.
Virginia Tech 6 4Y2 (45Y2) at Virginia
at Wisconsin 16 14Y2 (49) Penn St.
Baylor-y 12 13 (78) Texas Tech
Florida St. 2 212 (45) at Florida
East Carolina 3 1 (53) at Marshall
atLa. Tech 19 19Y2 (58Y2) N.M. St.
at S. Miss. 36 3512 (56) Memphis
Air Force 16Y2 16Y2 (54Y2) at Colo. St.
Washington-z 6Y2 9 (65) Washington St.
at Miss. St. 17Y2 17Y2 (46Y2) Mississippi
at Stanford 612 7 (58) Notre Dame
at Fresno St. 6Y2 612 (6412) San Jose St.
at Oklahoma 28 28 (61Y2) Iowa St.
San Diego St. 14 15 (54Y2) at UNLV
at Southern Cal 152 14 (58Y2) UCLA
at Hawaii 17Y2 17 (55) Tulane
at W. Kentucky 7 6 (51) Troy
at Arizona 13Y/214 (61Y2) La.-Lafayette
FlU 9 812 (5312) at M.Tenn.
UAB 5 5 (50) at FAU
x-at Arrowhead Stadium
y-at Arlington, Texas
z-at CenturyLink Field

Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY 0/U UNDERDOG
Green Bay 6Y2 6 (55Y2) at Detroit
at Dallas 7 7 (44) Miami
at Baltimore 3Y2 3/2 (3812) San Fran.
Sunday
at St. Louis OFF OFF (OFF) Arizona
at N.Y. Jets 8V2 9 (42) Buffalo
at Cincinnati 7Y2 7 (37Y2) Cleveland
Houston 312 312 (3712) at J'ville
Carolina 4 3Y2 (45) at Indianapolis
atTennessee 3Y2 3 (43) Tampa Bay
at Atlanta 9 9Y2 (44Y2) Minnesota
at Oakland +1 Y2 4Y2 (41Y2) Chicago
at Seattle 412 312 (37) Washington
at Philadelphia OFF OFF (OFF) New England
at San Diego 7 6 (42) Denver
Pittsburgh 10 2 10Y2 (40) at Kansas City
Monday
at New Orleans 62 7 (5012) N.Y. Giants
Off Key
Arizona QB questionable
Philadelphia QB questionable



Wednesday's College Basketball Scores
EAST
Colgate 74, St. Francis (Pa.) 66
Niagara 59, Sam Houston St. 52
SOUTH
Bethune-Cookman 71, Webber 64


SCOREBOARD


For the r cord


Florida LOTTERY

jHere are the CASH 3 (early)
winningnum- 2-0-9
bers selected CASH 3 (late)
Wednesdayin 5-6-5
the Florida PLAY 4 (early)
S Lottery: 2-6-1-3
Editor's note: Due to early PLAY 4 (late)
deadlines, Fantasy5, Lotto and 7 2-4-5
Powerball numbers were not
available. Please see Friday's
edition for those numbers.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Old Spice Classic Indiana State vs. Texas
Tech. First quarterfinal.
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Old Spice Classic DePaul vs. Minnesota.
Second quarterfinal.
2 p.m. (VERSUS) Battle 4 Atlantis Central Florida vs. Col-
lege of Charleston.
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) 76 Classic UC Riverside vs. Villanova.
Second quarterfinal.
4:30 (VERSUS) Battle 4 Atlantis Florida State vs. Massa-
chusetts.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Old Spice Classic Dayton vs. Wake Forest.
Third quarterfinal.
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Old Spice Classic-Arizona State vs. Fair-
field. Fourth quarterfinal.
11:30 p.m. (ESPN2) 76 Classic Oklahoma vs. Washington
State. Fourth quarterfinal.
NFL FOOTBALL
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Green Bay Packers at Detroit Lions.
4 p.m. (CBS) Miami Dolphins at Dallas Cowboys.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) Texas at Texas A&M.
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf South African Open,
First Round. (Same-day Tape)
12 p.m. (GOLF) Golf Australian PGA Championship, First
Round. (Same-day Tape)
10:30 p.m. (GOLF) Golf Omega Mission Hills World Cup, Day 2.


MIDWEST
Detroit 94, Austin Peay 93, OT
SOUTHWEST
Hampton 68, SIU-Edwardsville 64
Lipscomb 79, Sacred Heart 77
FAR WEST
BYU 90, Prairie View 51
Colorado St. 91, Manhattan 86, OT
E. Washington 89, Hawaii 72
Long Beach St. 72, Boise St. 62
Nevada 80, Longwood 78
Sacramento St. 69, UC Davis 61
San Jose St. 109, Holy Names 71
Seattle 85, Montana St. 73
Southern Cal 65, Morgan St. 62
UC Santa Barbara 83, Portland 69
UNLV 75, Cal Poly 52
Wyoming 67, South Dakota 56
TOURNAMENT
EA Sports Maui Invitational
Fifth Place
Georgetown 91, Memphis 88, OT
Seventh Place
Tennessee 86, Chaminade 60



Wednesday's Women's Scores
EAST
Army 58, Manhattan 43
Stony Brook 42, Robert Morris 40
SOUTH
Kentucky 81, Nebraska-Omaha 48
Marshall 83, Morehead St. 66
Mississippi St. 64, MVSU 47
NC Central 66, Morris 58
NJIT 65, Delaware St. 49
Wake Forest 90, Mercer 44
Wofford 60, Bluefield 40

BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Agreed to terms
with OF Grady Sizemore on a one-year con-
tract.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS- Agreed to terms
with assistant general manager Matt Klentak on
a multiyear contract.
MINNESOTA TWINS-Agreed to terms with


C Ryan Doumit on a one-year contract.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Claimed C Brian
Jeroloman off waivers from Pittsburgh.
National League
PITTSBURGH PIRATES- Agreed to terms
with OF Brandon Boggs, RHP Kyle Cofield,
RHP Jose Diaz, C Jake Fox, RHP Shairon Mar-
tis and INF Stefan Welch on minor league con-
tracts.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Placed RB Fred Jackson
on injured reserve. Signed RBTashard Choice.
CINCINNATI BENGALS- Signed LB Bruce
Davis to the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Waived S
RossVentrone. Signed OL Donald Thomas. Re-
signed CB Josh Victorian to the practice squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS Signed CB Will
Blackmon. Placed CB Michael Coe on injured
reserve. Re-signed DT Dwayne Hendricks to
the practice squad. Terminated the practice
squad contract of DE Craig Marshall.
ST. LOUIS RAMS Signed OT Thomas
Welch from Buffalo's practice squad. Placed CB
Marquis Johnson on injured reserve. Signed CB
Kendric Burney to the practice squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Fined Los Angeles D Drew Doughty
$2,500 for cross-checking St. Louis FT.J. Oshie
into the boards during Tuesday's game.
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Assigned F
Niclas Bergfors to Milwaukee (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Recalled C Tim
Sestito from Albany (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Recalled F
Dana Tyrell from Norfolk (AHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION -Waived F
Alan Koger, D Otto Loewy and M Andrew
Sousa.
PHILADELPHIA UNION -Waived G Thorne
Holder and D Juan Diego Gonzalez.
SPORTING KANSAS CITY Waived D
Scott Lorenz, M Jeferson, M Milos Stojcev and
M Craig Rocastle.


WILLIAMS
Continued from Page B1

She lettered in five differ-
ent sports in high school.
She played volleyball, track,
softball, weightlifting and,
of course, soccer.
While at Lecanto High,
the girls soccer team
reached the Sweet 16 twice
and was defeated by St. Au-
gustine Nease and Pontre
Vedra high schools. Both
teams eventually won state
titles.



TEBOW
Continued from Page B1

Eddie Royal said. "He just
lives that way Like I said,
there's nothing fake about
Tim Tebow"
"He's real," coach John
Fox agreed. "He walks the
walk. A guy like that in
today's society, in my mind,
ought to be celebrated, not
scrutinized to the level that
he is."
Royal said Tebow should
be hailed a hero by more
than just the Tebowmaniacs
who have been in his corner
since he starred at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
"He represents the game
of football the right way, by
his play, by his emotion, by
his enthusiasm," Royal said.
"He's the perfect example
of the type of guy that you
want to be off the field."
Still, for a guy who was
raised on a farm, home-
schooled and listens to
Sinatra to pump himself up
before games, Tebow has
plenty of detractors.
"The only reason I would
think people wouldn't like him
is because they don't believe
that he's really all that he
is," Royal said. "But to tell
you the truth, he really is,
being around him every day
What you see is what you get
with him. There's nothing
fake about him."
Champ Bailey has the
same take on Tebow.
"You know the thing is,
there are reasons that peo-
ple could dislike other ath-
letes," Bailey said. "Like,
say for instance, a lot of peo-
ple could love TO. But there
are reasons for people not
to like him, and you can un-
derstand why people don't
like him. But when people
don't like Tim, you try to un-
derstand why, you don't."
Some people have a prob-
lem with Tebow wearing his
religion on his sleeve.
For example, former
Broncos quarterback Jake
Plummer told KGME-AM in
Phoenix this week: "I think
he's a winner and I respect
that about him. I think that
when he accepts the fact
that we know that he loves
Jesus Christ, then I think I'll
like him a little better. I
don't hate him because of
that. I just would rather not
have to hear that every time
he takes a good snap or
makes a good hand-off."
To which Tebow replies: a
man needn't express his
love for his wife only on
their wedding day, but all
the time. That's the way he
feels about his relationship
with his Lord.



MEYER
Continued from Page B1

an Ohio State fan and has
said he has a portrait of leg-
endary Buckeyes coach
Woody Hayes hanging
prominently in his home.
In addition to winning na-
tional titles in Florida in
2006 and 2008, he also has
been a head coach at Bowl-
ing Green and Utah and
worked as an assistant at
Notre Dame, Colorado State
and Illinois State.
He announced in Decem-
ber 2009 he was stepping
away from coaching be-
cause of health concerns,
but quickly changed his


mind. After taking a leave of
absence, he returned to the
sidelines for the 2010 season
and then retired again in
December.
Alabama coach Nick
Saban said he would wel-
come Meyer back into the
coaching fraternity.
"Urban Meyer is a very
good coach, he's a good
teacher. He's good for young
people," Saban said on the
Southeastern Conference
coaches conference call this
week. "If coaching is in his
heart, I think that's what he
should do."
One of Meyer's star play-


Williams also played for
the Florida Rush in the
Nike Premier League, a
travel team.
"There's no doubt in my
mind that she got the schol-
arship because of her play-
ing on that team," said her
father "Her team was in the
state championship two
years in a row. She had 20
offers for scholarships."
Williams did not play her
senior year at Lecanto High.
"She accepted the schol-
arship from UCF as a junior
and didn't want to risk in-
jury playing in high school


Tebow was born in the
Philippines, to parents who
were missionaries and taught
him never to shy away from
professing his faith. Like
Reggie White and Kurt
Warner before him, he feels
compelled to share his story
of salvation regardless of
the sensitivity of the subject.
"People may think he's
faking or he's not telling the
truth, but that man walks
the walk and talks the talk,"
Broncos safety Rahim Moore
said. "Look at the guy He's
not a guy who's out clubbing
and doing this and that"
In his autobiography,
"Through My Eyes," Tebow
wrote: "It's not always the
easiest thing to be the cen-
ter of attention of so much
spilled ink. You read glow-
ing things, and it doesn't feel
deserved. You read things
that are critical and it cuts
you to the bone."
He also talks about grow-
ing up "farmer strong" -
lifting hay bales, chopping
wood, chasing down cows -
and the lessons learned
from his mother, who home-
schooled her five children
in Jacksonville, Fla.
He writes about growing
up dyslexic and being a
kinesthetic learner, mean-
ing he learns best by doing,
not reading. He talks about
how his best sport was base-
ball, how he doesn't like soft
drinks or have time to date
and how religion was al-
ways a priority in his life.
"For as long as I can re-
member, this was instilled
in me: to have fun, love
Jesus and others, and tell
them about Him," he wrote.
Punter Britton Colquitt
suggested schadenfreude -
pleasure derived from the
misfortune of others -was at
work when it comes to Tebow
"It's a shame that all peo-
ple want to do is see people
screw up and not portray
good. But that's just the world
we live in, I feel like," Colquitt
said. "It's an evil world now,
but he's a good guy
"People like to see people
fail because it makes other
people feel good. He does a
really good job with that and
he keeps himself out of situ-
ations where he could stum-
ble," he said.
One surprising thing sev-
eral teammates mentioned
is Tebow's sense of humor,
something he doesn't usu-
ally share with the public.
"He knows a lot of jokes,"
Royal said, laughing.
None of them off-color, to
be sure.
"No, no, he always keeps
it clean but it's a good laugh,"
Royal said. "He has a lot of
funny stories and a lot of, like,


ers at Florida, Tim Tebow,
also said he was glad to hear
Meyer might be coming
back to coaching.
"Whatever he decides to
do, I'll be 100 percent be-
hind him," said the Denver
Broncos quarterback. "It
will be exciting to see what
happens. I know, more than
anything, he wants to be
right by his family and have
their support in anything he
does. Most of when we've
talked it's been about that.
When he comes back, he's
going to be a great coach,
and I'm excited to see what
happens."
Saban said he understood
why Meyer had apparently
changed his mind about re-
turning to coaching.


"As you go through life
and you do things and you
make choices and decisions
about what you do and I
know his involved circum-
stances around his health -
but still you learn about
yourself in everything you
do," Saban said. "As you
learn these things, some-
times things change in
terms of what his direction
is. I think everybody has to
do that, and I don't think
anybody should be criti-
cized for that."
Jim Tressel was pres-
sured to resign on May 30
after 10 years as the coach


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

because the level of compe-
tition is not that high," said
her father. "She was playing
on her travel ball team."
Williams said that two
Rush coaches, Kate Begley
and Allie Goff, prepared her
very well for college. A family
friend and personal coach,
Ron East, also helped her
prepare for the college game.
"We're extremely proud
of her," said her father "She
is doing extremely well with
her grades and soccer. She
has turned out to be a won-
derful daughter as well as
wonderful young lady"


jokes, like standup comedy-
type stuff. And that catches
you, but it's all in a playful
manner. It never catches you
the wrong way It's all in fun."
Said Colquitt: "He's got a
different sense of humor but
... you wouldn't say like, 'Oh,
that guy's kind of square'
and stuff like that. I mean,
he definitely wants to have
a good time."
For Tebow, that means
spending his day off taking
his year-old Rhodesian
Ridgeback, "Bronco," to the
dog park.
Talk about the dog and the
breed, which has roots in
South Africa, and Tebow's
eyes light up.
Though his type is known
for bravery, Bronco shies
away from others at the
park and plants himself be-
tween Tebow's legs. Other
times, he's on a leash and
accompanies Tebow while
he rides his bike in his
neighborhood.
Moore said he sometimes
senses that Tebow gets un-
comfortable with all the at-
tention.
"To be honest with you, he
doesn't like it sometimes,"
he said. "One time we were
talking and I went to the
grocery store and he said he
didn't remember the last
time he went to the grocery
store, you know? He can't
go. I mean that's not fun. He
can't go get his own cereal,
his favorite cereal."
Still, Royal says Tebow
does a good job of just being
himself.
"He doesn't try to be any-
thing more than what he is,"
he said. 'And he walks around
here and he's comfortable
in his own skin, and you can
tell that Like I said, there's
nothing fake about him."
Tebow says he tries to
keep it all in perspective -
taking all the applause and
boos in stride.
"You're going to have peo-
ple that praise you and peo-
ple that criticize you and
everything in between," he
said. "If I listened to every-
thing that you all say, my
world would be so up and
down. I'm grounded upon
my faith, my family Football
is what I do for a living and
what I do for fun. If I rode
the roller coaster of what
everybody says about me
then my life would be a lot
more hectic than what it is."
And with that approach,
he's free to focus on football.
"Ultimately, it's about
winning games," Tebow said.
"So, I don't really care how it
looks or what we do as long
as we win. Plain and simple,
whatever we have to do to
get into the end zone and
win football games."


of the Buckeyes. His down-
fall came about when it was
learned that he knew that
several of his players had
accepted cash and tattoos
from a tattoo parlor, the
focus of a federal drug-traf-
ficking investigation. Ohio
State is awaiting NCAA
penalties stemming from
several violations.
Fickell, a defensive assis-
tant coach for nine years,
was promoted to head
coach.
In a season with NCAA
sanctions looming, several
players suspended and in-
juries to important players,
the Buckeyes have gone 6-5
- their worst season since
Tressel went 7-5 in his first


season in 2001. Should the
Buckeyes lose at Michigan
on Saturday, the 6-6 mark
would be their worst since
John Cooper went 6-6 in 1999.
The speculation about
Meyer has been making the
rounds for weeks.
One of the top football re-
cruits in Ohio for next fall,
defensive end Adolphus
Washington from Cincin-
nati's Taft High School,
committed to Ohio State on
Tuesday Asked at his news
conference who he thought
would be coaching the
Buckeyes next season, he
said, "I believe Urban
Meyer I hope so."


Sharks cheerleaders compete for title


Special to the Chronicle
The Crystal River Sharks Junior Midget (pictured) and Pee Wee cheerleading
teams will compete this weekend in conjunction with the conference champi-
onships currently taking place in Central Florida. The Pee Wees compete at 2:40
p.m. Friday and the Midgets compete at 11 a.m. Sunday. Both competitions will
be at the Osceola Heritage Park Silver Spurs Arena, 1875 Silver Spur, in Kissim-
mee. The Sharks Junior Midget football team will compete for the Southeast Re-
gional Championship at 2 p.m. Friday at Hickory Tree Community Park, 2361
Old Hickory Tree Road in St. Cloud. Tickets are $8 for adults and $4 for kids.
Parking is free.






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO OUTDOORS


YOUTH SPORTS


GET


ADULT LEAGUE SPORTS


HITTING THE LINKS


IN THE


Thirteen-



year-old



takes her



first elk


Teen is the granddaughter

of Citrus Hills residents


Chronicle
At 13, Citrus Hills
residents Harry
and Shirley
Ruth's granddaughter
Kaylee Plunkett is al-
ready somewhat of a
seasoned hunter.
Kaylee, a resident of
Hopkins County, Ky.,
harvested a 6 X 6 bull
elk over the weekend of
Oct. 8-9 in Knott County
during the 2011 Ken-
tucky Quota Hunt. She
was one of 120 winners
selected to hunt from
the more than 40,000 in
the annual lottery draw.
Kaylee, who has
hunted deer in Hopkins
County, has always
wanted to hunt elk. This
was the first year she
entered the lottery for
the second bull rifle
season, which encom-
passes seven days. She
fired one shot using a 7
MM Magnum CZ bolt-ac-
tion rifle to take the elk
on the first day of the

Kaylee Plunkett poses
with the 6 X 6 bull elk
she harvested in October
during the 2011 Kentucky
Quota Hunt. Kaylee is
the granddaughter of
Citrus Hills residents
Harry and Shirley Ruth.
Special to the Chronicle


hunt. She was accompa-
nied by her father and
Dennis Clapp, who has
guided for elk hunts in
Colorado for 20 years.
Kaylee, who shot her
first deer a six-
pointer at the age of
10, was excited by her
latest feat and hopes to
keep expanding her
hunting horizons.
"This hunt was an ex-
perience I will never
forget," she said. "I am
still psyched that I shot
a bull elk. This makes
me want to keep on
hunting bigger game."
Kaylee is the daughter
of Bill and Kim Plun-
kett of Madisonville, Ky.
Winners of the annual
draw have the opportu-
nity to hunt Kentucky's
elk herd in a 16-county
area in the Daniel
Boone National Forest
in the Appalachian Re-
gion of eastern Ken-
tucky. The elk zone
encompasses 4.1 million
acres and is divided
into 10 elk hunting
units, which total 576,
994 acres open for pub-
lic hunting.
Kentucky's elk herd
boasts more than 10,000
free-ranging elk, which
are managed by the
Kentucky Department
of Fish and Wildlife.


Change is not always a bad thing


Have you ever made
the wrong decision
make that chosen
the wrong course on a
matter so trivial it should
have been forgotten the
next day, but instead stayed
with you for
decades? What
I'm talking about
is even more
minor than wish-
ing you'd chosen
a different color
on that first new
bike when you
were a kid.
I don't even re- R.G. S
member the TIG
year, it was so
long ago. I was LIN
testing a new
topwater plug for Heddon,
one that did not have a
bright future. It didn't even
have a name, and I just re-
membered the year I kept my
notes on developing prod-
ucts in a three-ring, loose-
leaf notebook, alphabetized
by name, and to distinguish
it from others, I called this
one simply T-79-05, as it was
the fifth topwater plug I'd
tested that year, 1979.
Cutting to the chase, I'd
gone to the beach on a per-
fect morning for tossing a
plug for snook in the surf,
but the snook appeared to
have taken the morning off,
ignoring the plug with great
enthusiasm. I sat on a piece
of driftwood and lit my pipe
to see if I could figure out
why the snook weren't here,


I
I


on a day of conditions that
were about as perfect for
snook in the surf as they get;
a breeze off the water just
barely strong enough to
keep the no-see-ums away,
high tide and just enough
cloud cover to
make a good sil-
houette of a top-
water plug,
when a man ap-
proached from
the south, also
throwing a lure.
I asked if he'd
had any luck,
chmidt and he said no,
I 1HT how about me. I
1HT told him I was
IES hitless as well,
and he joked
that in that case he wouldn't
try to get a refund on his
lure, as maybe that wasn't
the problem. I said the red-
and-white MirrOlure was
definitely not the problem,
but if he didn't mind a sug-
gestion, he was using it
wrong, and he said all sug-
gestions were welcome.
He'd been throwing the
plug straight out and re-
trieving it at a good speed,
but I explained the waves
that normally hit the beach
carve sloughs that run par-
allel to the shoreline, and he
should be working those
sloughs. "Cast against the
tide, but only about 10 or 15
feet out, and retrieve the
plug more or less parallel to
the shore, and it will be in
the zone where the snook


should be for the entire re-
trieve. The way you're work-
ing it, you're only in those
sloughs for the few feet it
takes to cross one."
He said he'd give it a try
and went on. Hadn't gotten
50 feet when he had a snook
on. That got me off the log,
and I resumed casting. In the
next 15 or 20 minutes, he put
five snook on the beach, while
I was still without a hit He
kept only one because of the
long walk back to his car,
thanked me for my suggestion,
and left. The smart thing to
do, of course, would have been
to switch to a MirrOlure, and
I had several in my wading
bag. I did not, because now
that I knew beyond any
doubt the snook were there,
I was determined to get one
on a topwater. I finally did,
just as the clouds parted,
shutting down the bite on
a Zara, proving the ineffec-
tiveness of the monstrosity
I'd been using, which had
all the action of a floating
coconut, and looked as ap-
petizing as Lyngbya.
I rationalized my decision
by saying I was supposed to
be testing this plug, and I
was too stubb ... too perse-
verant to take the easy way
out, but the fact is that
morning I persevered my
way out of about a half-
dozen snook, maybe more.
The lesson here is if you be-
lieve the fish are there, but
they aren't hitting, change
lures, change baits, change


the presentation, change
something, but change.
It's a lesson reader Tom
Barnum has learned some-
where along the way Barnum
and Paul Gassner worked the
grass flats around Gomez
Rock, then went south, pick-
ing up some trout. I'll let
Barnum take it from here.
"Suddenly, we came over
a school of large black
drum, at least 15 of them. We


were using popping corks
with live shrimp, but none
seemed interested." Rather
than persevere himself out
of a nice fish, Barnum
switched to a jig, and when
he dropped that in front of a
drum, the fight was on. The
school disappeared after
Barnum got that one to the
boat, so the two men went
up around Mangrove Point,
catching trout all the way, so


many they lost count. "You
know you've had a good day
fishing," said Gassner, "when
you can't rememberhow many
you caught" Yeah, if you're
smart enough to change lures.
Tight Lines to you.
-0
Chronicle outdoors colum-
nist R.G. Schmidt can be
reached at rgschmidt@
embarqmail. com.


CHPRONICLE


Tide charts
Chassahowitzka* Crystal River** Homosassa*** Withlacoochee*


HighWLow


THURS 3:40 a.m.
11/24 5:33 p.m.
FRI 4:24 a.m.
11/25 6:23 p.m.
SAT 5:08 a.m.
11/26 7:10 p.m.
SUN 5:53 a.m.
11/27 7:54 p.m.
MON 6:39 a.m.
11/28 8:37 p.m.
TUES 7:27 a.m.
11/29 9:18 p.m.
WED 8:19 a.m.
11/3o 9:59 p.m.


High/Low


12:42 p.m. 2:01 a.m
--------- 3:54 p.m.
12:36 a.m. 2:45 a.m.
1:30 p.m. 4:44 p.m.
1:20 a.m. 3:29 a.m.
2:17 p.m. 5:31 p.m.
2:05 a.m. 4:14 a.m.
3:02 p.m. 6:15 p.m.
2:50 a.m. 5:00 a.m.
3:46 p.m. 6:58 p.m.
3:36 a.m. 5:48 a.m.
4:29 p.m. 7:39 p.m.
4:26 a.m. 6:40 a.m.
5:12 p.m. 8:20 p.m.
*From mouths of rivers.


HighsLow


10:04 a.m. 2:50 a.m.
9:58 p.m. 4:43 p.m.
10:52 a.m. 3:34 a.m.
10:42 p.m. 5:33 p.m.
11:39 a.m. 4:18 a.m.
11:27 p.m. 6:20 p.m.
12:24 p.m. 5:03 p.m.
--------- 7:04 p.m.
1212 a.m. 5:49 a.m.
1:08 p.m. 7:47 p.m.
12:58 a.m. 6:37 a.m.
1:51 p.m. 8:28 p.m.
1:48 a.m. 7:29 a.m.
2:34 p.m. 9:09 p.m.


11:41 a.m. 1:41 a.m.
11:35 p.m. ---
12:29 a.m. 12:32a.m.
--- 2:31 p.m.
12:19 a.m. 1:16 a.m.
1:16 p.m. 3:18 p.m.
1:04 a.m. 2:01 a.m.
2:01 p.m. 4:02 p.m.
1:49 a.m. 2:47 a.m.
2:45 p.m. 4:45 p.m.
2:35 a.m. 3:35 a.m.
3:28 p.m. 5:26 p.m.
3:25 a.m. 4:27 a.m.
4:11 p.m. 6:07 p.m.


**At Kings Bay. ***At Mason's Creek.


~(C


GA


HigIVLow


7:52 a.m.
7:46 p.m.
8:40 a.m.
8:30 p.m.
9:27 a.m.
9:15 p.m.
10:12 a.m.
10:00 p.m.
10:56 a.m.
10:46 p.m.
11:39 a.m.
11:36 p.m.
12:22 p.m.












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Billboard to honor
Nicki Minaj
NEW YORK-Nicki
Minaj will have another
moment to savor from
her super
year: Bill-
am board is
honoring
her as its
rising star
of 2011.
Sheis
slated to
Nicki Minaj get the
honor at
Billboard's "Women in
Music" event on Dec. 2 in
New York City
Minaj said Wednesday
she was "deeply honored
to be recognized by Bill-
board." She said she and
her fans have come a
"mighty long way" but
are not close to where
"God will take us."
The rapper and singer
has emerged as one of
music's most popular en-
tertainers since releasing
her debut album "Pink
Friday" late last year Her
hits include "Super Bass"
and "Moment 4 Life."

Gomez asks for
restraining order
BURBANK, California
-A judge extended a
tempo-
rary re-
straining
order
Wednes-
day but
refused to
issue Se-
lena
Selena Gomez a
Gomez lengthier
order
against a man accused of
stalking the singer-actress.
Superior Court Judge
William Stewart said he
will not grant a three-
year restraining order
while Thomas Brodnicki
remains on a psychiatric
hold unless he has assur-
ances the man had an op-
portunity to be
represented at a hearing.
The temporary order
requires Brodnicki, 46, to
stay 100 yards from the
"Wizards of Waverly
Place" star until a Jan. 6
hearing.
Gomez, 19, did not at-
tend the hearing. She
wrote in a sworn declara-
tion that she was in ex-
treme fear after learning
that Brodnicki had
threatened to kill her
while he was on a previ-
ous psychiatric hold.

Willis selling
Idaho home
HAILEY, Idaho "Die
Hard" movie star Bruce
Willis is asking $15 mil-
lion for his Idaho home
complete with a guest-
house, gym and pool with
water
slides.
The
Idaho
Mountain
Express
reported
Willis'
property
Bruce in Hai-
Willis ley's Fly-
ing Heart
subdivision is up for sale
because he hasn't been
able to spend much time
in the area.
Willis and former wife,
Demi Moore, became
part of the celebrity
scene in the area during
the 1990s.
-From wire reports


Iraq vet wins 'Dancing'


Martinez

emerges from

early obscurity

to claim trophy

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES
.R. Martinez started out as the
least-known member of the
"Dancing With the Stars" cast,
but as the season went on, Amer-
ica fell in love with the 28-year-old
soldier-turned-soap opera star
"Dancing" draws 18 million
viewers a week who got a firsthand
look at the Iraq war veteran with
the infectious positive attitude.
They heard his story: How he was
severely burned over more than 40
percent of his body when the
Humvee he was driving for the
U.S. Army struck a land mine, how
he underwent numerous surgeries
over years of recovery then they
saw him dancing like that had hap-
pened to somebody else. The 28-
year-old actor and motivational
speaker radiates joy
"You've got such a sparkling per-
sonality, you just light up this
room," "Dancing" judge Len Good-
man said.
Earlier this month, Martinez was
chosen as grand marshal of the
123rd annual Tournament of Roses
parade. He was on the cover of
People magazine and named one
of its "sexiest men" a few weeks
later And on Tuesday, he became
the new "Dancing With the Stars"
champion.
Martinez and professional part-
ner Karina Smirnoff claimed the
mirrorball trophy over fellow fi-
nalists Rob Kardashian and Ricki
Lake.
"We've been able to create a lot
of magical moments on the show
and to top it off with this is amaz-
ing," Martinez said, holding the
glittery trophy
"And my friend, she deserves it,"
he continued, looking at Smirnoff.
"She's an amazing dancer and she
should be in that category with the
elite when it comes to this show
and hold her own trophy up. The
fact that I was able to be part of that
journey, I'm excited about that"
The dance partners (and neigh-
bors Smirnoff and Martinez live
near one another) already know
where they'll put the mirrorballs.
Smirnoff wants to keep hers at
her dance studio in "a space with a
spotlight and I'm going to polish it
every morning," she said.
Martinez will be keeping his tro-
phy even closer


third-place finisher, Lake was
eliminated part way through the
final episode.
"J.R. and Karina really deserved
to win," she said after the show.
"And Rob and Cheryl, I'm so im-
pressed with them both, so it's
great to be among the three best"
After a quick trip to New York
with his fellow finalists to make an
appearance on "Good Morning
America," and maybe some dance-
free downtime over Thanksgiving,
the former soldier and current
"Dancing With the Stars" champ
has a full roster of activities
planned.
"I want to focus on writing a
book. I want to tell people more in-
depth the story of who J.R. Mar-
tinez is and what I've been
through," he said. "And at the same
time, I want to continue acting, con-
tinue doing motivational speaking
and, from time to time, call Karina
and say, 'Let's go dance."'


America" in New York.
"Right now I'm going to put mine
in bed. I'm going to tuck it in, and
it's going to roll around with me,"
he beamed. "And then after that,
once we've kind of grown apart,
I'm going to glue it to the hood of
my car and drive around Los Ange-
les and honk my horn and it will
be my own parade."
Kardashian, who came into the
season finale in first place with
professional partner Cheryl
Burke, said he didn't mind finish-
ing as a runner-up.
"I feel great. I literally did every-
thing I could have asked myself to
do and more," the reality star said
after the show. Still, he said Mar-
tinez "deserves that trophy more
than anyone."
It appears fans had the final say
Viewer votes combined with
judges' scores determine the win-
ner, and Kardashian and Martinez
were just a point apart when all
the dancing was done. As the


'Fantastic Four' gets old lineup back


Marvel Comics/Associated Press
In this cover image released by
Marvel Comics, the 600th issue
of Fantastic Four is shown. The
comic that began publishing 50
years ago returns with a new
issue featuring The Human Torch,
who has returned from the dead
to rejoin the fabled super team.


Your Birthday: Because you'll likely be inspired to work
harder in order to take care of those you love, the year
ahead could turn out to be a far more prosperous one than
usual. In attempting to provide well for your kin, you'll do so
for yourself.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A strange set of circum-
stances could lead to you hearing from certain people
whom you haven't talked to for some time. It may be good
news that has them calling.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) From sunup to sundown,
be alert for great opportunities to better your life. Certain
good things that happen to you may occur just because
you're in the right spot at the right time.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you approach the objec-
tives you're seeking in a practical, realistic manner, your
hopes and expectations will have better-than-normal
chances of being fulfilled.


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Where's Johnny Storm? In
the latest issue of Marvel
Comics' "Fantastic Four"
Issue No. 600, out
Wednesday, marks the first
time since January the
classic team created by
Stan Lee and Jack Kirby is
back to its original roster:
Mr Fantastic, The Thing,
the Invisible Woman and
Johnny Storm, aka the
Human Torch, who was
last seen perishing in what
looked to be an all-out
brawl against the minions
of the Negative Zone.
Though it has only been
10 months since Marvel
killed the Human Torch,
death in the comics is
rarely, if ever, a permanent
condition.
How and why the Torch
- who, along with the rest
of the Fantastic Four


Today's HOROSCOPE
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) This is likely to be a day of
many achievements. Even if your success appears to oth-
ers to be rather easy in the making, you'll know differently.
Aries (March 21-April 19) One of the things you can do
well is deal with groups. You're especially well equipped to
handle bigwigs who could be in attendance.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Unfortunately, you might have
to deal with two individuals whom the world has treated
badly. However, if you follow your compassionate instincts,
you'll say all the right things to put them at ease.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It won't be from textbooks
that you'll learn some of the greatest lessons of your life. A
big one may come from a personal experience that'll prove
to be invaluable.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You're presently in a cycle
where some kind of service or expertise you've acquired
will be responsible for generating far more returns than you


launched Marvel's silver
age 50 years ago has re-
turned to the living is yet
to be told. But Tom
Breevort, senior vice pres-
ident for publishing at
Marvel, told The Associ-
ated Press it's a tale that
will be told in No. 600 and
future issues.
"There's about 100 pages
of story to tell just that,"
Brevoort said of Storm's
return in issue 600.
Death is no stranger to
the Fantastic Four Sue
Storm, the Invisible
Woman, supposedly died,
but that was just a ruse.
Similarly, her husband,
Reed Richards, aka Mr
Fantastic, was thought to
be dead after being caught
in a blast with his archen-
emy, Dr Doom. Instead of
death, however, Richards
and his nemesis were
snatched away to another
dimension.


Brevoort said the new
issue, which marks the
title's return since No. 588
was published, makes it
clear that Storm wasn't
just hibernating or being
held in a comatose state.
"Yes, he did die. He died
a couple oftimes," Brevoort
said, adding that writer
Jonathan Hickman had out-
lined the plans for a return
months ago so readers
won't "feel cheated or dis-
appointed in the slightest"
Hickman's plans will also
be unveiled in the ongoing
series "FF," which Marvel
launched after the death of
the Torch. It not only re-
placed the "Fantastic
Four" but told the story of
the surviving teammates,
plus Spider-Man, too.
"'FF' will also continue,
and Jon will be writing
both of them. They will
both function as sister ti-
tles," Brevoort said.


ever garnered previously.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you want to earn a "good
guy/gal" title, make an effort to treat others the way you
would like to be treated. The golden rule is still one of the
best edicts you can put into practice.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Just when you're not looking
for it, a solution to a problem nobody has been able to re-
solve may be found. It'll be something that affects every-
body, not just you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Even if you feel a great need to
be around people, you'll still be extremely selective in
choosing with whom you want to spend your time. Quality
will take precedence.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Although you're likely to be
luckier than usual in situations pertaining to your earnings,
you'll still need to be selective regarding what you get your-
self involved in. Keep a cool noggin.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

TUESDAY, NOV. 22
Mega Money: 15-18-22-43
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB 1 $500,000
4-of-4 11 $603
3-of-4 MB 20 $727
3-of-4 843 $51
2-of-4 MB 1,202 $25
1-of-4 MB 10,520 $2.50
2-of-4 25,823 $2
Fantasy 5: 2 9 28 29 35
5-of-5 1 winner $217,581.87
4-of-5 275 $127.50
3-of-5 8,621 $11
MONDAY, NOV. 21
Fantasy 5:3 4 17 27 29
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 307 $555
3-of-5 9,205 $17.50
SUNDAY, NOV. 20
Fantasy 5:10 21 27 28 29
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 261 $555
3-of-5 7,888 $17.50
SATURDAY, NOV. 19
Powerball: 9 16 17 28 30
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Nov.
24, the 328th day of 2011.
There are 37 days left in the
year. This is Thanksgiving
Day.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 24, 1971, a hi-
jacker calling himself "Dan
Cooper" (but who became
popularly known as "D.B.
Cooper") parachuted from a
Northwest Orient Airlines 727
somewhere over the Pacific
Northwest after receiving
$200,000 dollars in ransom
- his fate remains unknown.
On this date:
In 1859, British naturalist
Charles Darwin published
"On the Origin of Species,"
which explained his theory of
evolution by means of natural
selection.
In 1863, the Civil War Bat-
tle of Lookout Mountain
began in Tennessee; Union
forces succeeded in taking
the mountain from the Con-
federates.
In 1963, Jack Ruby shot
and mortally wounded Lee
Harvey Oswald, the accused
assassin of President John F.
Kennedy, in a scene cap-
tured on live television.
In 1991, rock singer Fred-
die Mercury died in London
at age 45 of AIDS-related
pneumonia.
Ten years ago: A Swiss
Crossair airliner carrying 33
people crashed near Zurich,
killing 24, including American
pop singer Melanie Thornton.
Five years ago: Shiite
militiamen in Iraq doused six
Sunni Arabs with kerosene
and burned them alive and
killed 19 other Sunnis, taking
revenge for the slaughter of
215 Shiites in Baghdad's
Sadr City the day before.
One year ago: Ajury in
Austin convicted former U.S.
House Majority Leader Tom
DeLay, R-Texas, on charges
he'd illegally funneled corpo-
rate money to Texas candi-
dates in 2002.
Today's Birthdays: Bas-
ketball Hall of Famer Oscar
Robertson is 73. Rock-and-
roll drummer Pete Best is 70.
Former White House news
secretary Marlin Fitzwater is
69. Actor Dwight Schultz is
64.Actress Denise Crosby is
54. Actor Garret Dillahunt is
47. Actor-comedian Scott
Krinsky is 43. Rock musician
Chad Taylor (Live) is 41.
Olympic bronze medal figure
skater Chen Lu is 35. Actor
Colin Hanks is 34. Actress


Katherine Heigl is 33.
Thought for Today:
"There is a great deal of dif-
ference in believing some-
thing still, and believing it
again." W.H. Auden,
British poet (1907-1973).


Associated Press
Karina Smirnoff, left, and J.R. Martinez, winners of the "Dancing with the
Stars" celebrity dance competition, appear Wednesday on "Good Morning










FLAIR FOR FOOD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


RFULRLD





WORLD


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Nature Coast Wings-N-Things has recently opened in Crystal River. Two of the signature dishes served by owners Cara and Vito Tuminello are
the Rancher Wrap, left, and cornchip nachos piled high with a mountain of ingredients. Both are served with homemade sauces.

Newly opened Nature Coast Wings-N-Things offer wide variety ofchicken
JULIANNE MUNNN u Co s
Chronicle food writer Nature Coast
Wings-N-Things .._ ,


Wings star on many menus in
the Citrus County area, but Cara
Tuminello says her 37 wet and 24
dry rub classics are unlike any
others on the restaurant scene.
And if you thought deep fried
Twinkies, Oreos and Ding Dongs
were only available at state fairs
and festivals, think again.
The above items are highlights
at the newly opened Nature
Coast Wings-N-Things in Notting-
ham Square on U.S. 19 between
Crystal River and Homosassa.
But that's not all. You can also
get a variety of appetizers includ-
ing fresh-cut french fries, corn
nuggets, onion rings, spicy green
beans, nachos and more, ranging
from $2.50 to $8.50. Plus, que-
sadillas, wraps of all kinds for
$8.50 each and over-the-top Angus
burgers (all fresh, never frozen).
For example, the Caboodle
burger at $8.50 is a layered tower
of burger, french fries, bacon,
onion rings, shredded cheddar
cheese, provolone cheese and a
splash of barbecue sauce. A
(chicken) buffalo burger at $6.50
is prepared to order: hot,
medium or mild with cheese.
Perhaps the largest salad on any
menu in the area is the branch
chicken salad for $7.50, a deep
bowl of lettuce pre-tossed in home-
made ranch dressing with grilled
chicken, bacon, tomatoes, onions,
black olives and shredded cheese.
You will likely ask for a to-go box.


* LOCATION: 1239 S. Sun-
coast Blvd. (U.S. 19) in Not-
tingham Square Plaza.
* HOURS: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday
and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday
and Monday (later during
football season).
* CALL: For carry-out and
information, call (352)
564-9464.


For more
photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.


"What makes our wings differ-
ent is that the chickens are so
fresh," Tuminello said. "I pick
them up at the supplier in Tampa
the day before they are prepared.
We serve only Florida farm-fresh
chicken."
She said only canola oil is used
for frying "and we change the oil
on a regular basis," making sure
the taste is fresh and clean.
Trying to name all 61 varieties
of the wings here would be a Her-
culean task, but they are all de-
scribed on the menu and include
such tempting dry rub choices as
The Jerk, chipotle chili pepper,
perfect cajun, red fajita, black-
ened garlic and a lot more.
Those with wet sauces include
honey habanera, cannonball


Cara and Vito Tuminello display a variety of freshly prepared dishes
offered as well as some of the craft beers sold in their eatery.
BBQ, Duck-O-Rama, hot cajun delicious as they look. You can
ranch, volcanic, Maui Powie, Bri- get them breaded by request or
anna (named for her daughter) have them boneless ($2 extra),
and on and on and on. and all are served with blue
Wings are large, meaty, attrac- cheese and ranch dipping sauce.
tively served on a long, divided
dish and are as toothsome and See Page C2


Julianne Munn
OVER EASY


Parading

around,

enjoying

a meal
Students at Crystal
River High School,
members of the
NJROTC Battalion, were
on parade Nov 16 follow-
ing a delicious supper
provided by the Culinary
Arts Department.
The NJROTC event also
included a "Salute to Vet-
erans" with many area
military veterans attend-
ing the dinner and parade.
It was a big day for the
cadets, with an annual full
dress inspection by visit-
ing Naval dignitaries re-
tired Rear Adm. CarltonJ.
McLeod, Dental Corps,
USN, retired Cmdr Dirk P
Hebert, USN and Area 7
Manager (NJROTC).
They were welcomed by
CRHS Lt. Cmdr. Wayne
Walker and Senior Chief
Ira G. Sparkman, both
naval science instructors.
McLeod served on ac-
tive duty from 1956 to 1983
on ships and duty stations
around the world. He re-
tired as chief of the Navy
Dental Corps and was the
first director of Health
Care Operations.
After the baked ziti din-
ner (that had guests re-
turning for seconds)
catered by Chef Laura
Shirley and her culinary
arts team, the cadets
showed their parade skills
on the football field.
During the event, Cmdr.
Walker noted the NJROTC
has now achieved battalion
strength and is involved in
"very competitive pro-
grams." He said the orien-
teering team participated
in national competition
this year.
He also noted the suc-
cess of the July 2011 Lead-
erSail program with
Crystal River cadets par-
ticipating in naval train-
ing and exercises in the
British Virgin Islands, a
program that will be ex-
panded in 2012.
"We want them to be
prepared both in the civil-
ian and military world,"
said Cmdr. Walker, de-
scribing the NJROTC pro-
gram during the event.
Definitely worth men-
tioning is Cadet Heather
Blauer was presented
with the meritorious
achievement award at the
parade ceremony for
being the only one present
to aid a customer in a life-
threatening situation at a
local restaurant recently
A fine supper, hundreds
See Page C3


TODD SISTO MD FACS
352.344.9400 1.877.377.4780 0
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PAGE C3


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eifruncuwsa oey <.







CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE'S


Thanksgiving side dish food ratings


Voter
On a scale of
1 to 5 spoons,
voters score
two recipes


Almond

cranberry

squash
bake


Bacon

potato
bake


Brad
Bautista


9IIITII


Brian
LaPeter


Darlene
Mann


Mike
Arnold


I 9


saran
Gatling


I don't Can't go Great flavor I normally Light, spicy,
Comments ordinarily like wrong with (for potatoes). don't eat just sweet
squash, but potato and I even like the squash or enough. Good
on the this is great. bacon, but extra crunch cranberry, but substitute for
side dishes something factor loved this. sweet
was missing. potatoes.


Total
With 8
Chronicle
staffers voting,
the average is:


*1*


4,0


3.7


Almond cranberry all good


WINGS
Continued from Page Cl

It's $8 for 10 jumbo wings,
$15 for 20 and $30 for 50. Ad-
venturers can mix and
match their orders.
Tuminello is a native of
Longville, Minn., a place she
describes as "the middle of
nowhere." Her husband
Vito is from California, but
he grew up in Cassadega,
Fla., where his mother op-
erated the Cassadega gen-
eral store in the small
spiritualist village in east
central Florida.
Before opening Nature
Coast Wings-N-Things, Tu-
minello was proprietor of
Cara Mia's Pizzeria in Bev-
erly Hills, recently sold to
Hungry Howies pizza chain.
"My customers pressured
me to open another restau-
rant," she said, so the search
was on to find the right spot.
Tuminello said she
started cooking in earnest at
age 11 under the tutelage of
her grandmother, who
hailed from Palermo, Italy
She said she loved to cook
and never stopped.
"Mine was always the
home where everybody
came to get good food," she
said with a laugh.
But she didn't rest on her
cooking laurels. She earned
a Master's in Business Ad-


MATT BECK/Chronicle
The Caboodle Burger is a mountain of meat, French fries,
onion rings, cheese and fresh vegetables.


ministration at the Univer-
sity of California at Los An-
geles. She later operated a
child day care for 10 years.
After selling the Beverly
Hills pizzeria, she was em-
ployed for a time at a local
radio station.
The restaurant serves beer
and wine. Anew twist is an of-
fering of specialty microbrews
such as the Dirty Hippie,
Stouts double chocolate and
banana bread beers along
with traditional favorites.
Cara Tuminello today
shares several of her fa-
vorite recipes, one for a


unique turkey brine she
suggested might be perfect
for a Christmas turkey din-
ner. She noted the restau-
rant will be open Feb. 6 for
Super Bowl Sunday with
both giant TV's tuned in.
Nature Coast Wings-N-
Things is at 1239 S. Suncoast
Boulevard (U.S. 19) in Not-
tingham Square Plaza.
Hours are 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday
and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday
and Monday (later during
football season).
For carry-out and infor-
mation, call (352) 564-9464.


Chronicle
In the spirit of fantasy foot-
ball fans and March Mad-
ness bracket contest players,
two staffers at the Citrus
County Chronicle have
dreamed up a holiday recipe
ratings with their fellow col-
leagues acting as judges.
Each holiday, two Chronicle
staffers will select recipes
within the same course -
for example, appetizers, side
dish or dessert to cook or
bake and allow their co-
workers to score. The win-

BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
The almond cranberry squash
bake won the ratings vote
with its mixture of squash,
cranberries and almonds.
Even Chronicle staffers who
don't eat squash liked it.


BRIANNA'S
FAVORITE
BANANA BREAD
E 1 1/2 cups sugar
3 eggs
3 cups all-purpose
flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup heavy
whipping cream
3/4 cup butter or
margarine
1 1/2 cups mashed
bananas
1/2 teaspoon baking
soda
3/4 cup pecans
(optional)
Mix all ingredients to-
gether Pour evenly into two
loaf pans that have been
greased. Bake in preheated
350 degree oven for 40 min-
utes.
NOTE: For a fun and de-
licious new taste, add 1/2
cup semi-sweet chocolate
chips to each loaf if desired.
Makes two loaves.
SWEET POTATO
SOUFFLE
3 cups mashed sweet
potatoes
1 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1/3 stick margarine


a*



I A

0 0s
E v e ry000 b


*..- a*,cS c.


ning recipe will be printed.
To celebrate Thanksgiv-
ing, side dishes were on the
judging table at the Chroni-
cle office Monday afternoon
as a precursor to the Ameri-
can holiday
The two side dishes were
almond cranberry squash
bake and bacon potato bake.
It was a close one this
week, but the almond cran-
berry won with a score of 4.0.
Here is the recipe:
4 cups mashed
cooked butternut
squash
4 tablespoons butter,
softened, divided
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground
cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground
allspice

1/2 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup flour
1 cup pecans
1/3 stick margarine
Mix potatoes, sugar, salt,
eggs, margarine, milk and
vanilla. Place in deep casse-
role dish. Mix together
brown sugar, flour, pecans
and remaining butter.
Spread over top of potato
mixture and bake in pre-
heated 350 degree oven for
35 minutes.
CARA'S HOLIDAY
CHEER TURKEY
Brine:
2 cups kosher salt
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 gallons apple
juice
1 pint Kentucky Re-
serve Whiskey


1/4 ground nutmeg
E 1 can (14 ounces)
whole-berry cranberry
sauce
1/2 cup sliced
almonds
1/4 cup packed brown
sugar
In a large bowl, combine
the squash, 2 tablespoons but-
ter, salt, cinnamon, allspice
and nutmeg. Transfer to a
greased 2-quart baking dish.
Stir cranberry sauce until
softened; spoon over squash.
Combine the almonds,
brown sugar and remaining
butter; sprinkle over cran-
berry sauce.
Bake, uncovered, at 350
degrees for 50 to 60 minutes
or until golden brown and
bubbly
It makes eight servings.
Taste of Home recipe

1 1/2 gallons water
1/4 cup cloves
1/4 cup cinnamon
1/8 cup nutmeg
2 oranges, sliced
Cooking bag large enough
to hold large turkey
Bring mixture (except
sugar and salt) to a boil.
After boil, add sugar and
salt. Cool, allowing to dis-
solve for 15 minutes. Then
place ice in a pan large
enough to hold the turkey.
Place turkey in cooking bag
or sealed Ziplock Bag,
breast down inside bag.
Pour brine over turkey and
add 2 scoops ice. Seal bag,
making sure to release a
much air as possible. Cover
bag with ice and brine
turkey for 1 hour per pound.
Remove turkey and roast
at 350 degrees until internal
temperature of the turkey is
165 degrees on cooking ther-
mometer.


IYu'e ain righta tit


So are

4 million

other

Floridians.


Happy Thanksgiving!
www.florida-classifieds.com


i


I -


C2 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


FLAIR FOR FOOD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


J41La
Your product, event, or job posting will be gobbled up
millions of Florida residents.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crafting wine barrels almost an art form


How many gentle
readers re-
member the
rollicking old song,
"Roll Out the Barrel,
we'll have a barrel of
fun?"
The thought leads
into today's topic oak
barrels, a bit of wine
detail we have not
touched on before. So
here's all you will ever
need to know about
wine barrels.


Ron Drin
WIN
& SI


Wooden casks made from oak are
used worldwide for creating fine
wine. These stout containers de-
spite high fabrication costs due to a
lack of skilled craftspeople, as well
as the time and effort needed to fill,
empty, and clean the units are
widely popular with wine makers
everywhere.
We begin with big, old oak trees
logged during cooler seasons
when sap is not likely to run. The
processed wood, once fashioned
as barrels, releases tannins into
the contents, lending wines a
creamy sort of vanilla character.


Limited exposure to
oxygen through the fine
pores in the staves acts
to aerate and age young
*-" wine. Baby wine is
often harsh and unde-
veloped. The fermented
wines from good har-
vest years need to settle
down and mature be-
ikhouse fore bottling.
|ES Many celebrated la-
bels need further aging
JCH in the bottle itself. Vin-
tage year ports, for ex-
ample, call for as much as 25 years
or more before they are old
enough to truly enjoy. No one
wants a $150 bottle of wine to taste
weedy or bitter.
"Cooperage" is the technique
(some consider it today as an art)
of building barrels. Wood barrels
date back as far as 2,000 years to
the era of Julius Caesar in the 50s
B.C., when they were used to
transport wine and other liquids
as well as goods such as salt. A
meal of freshly killed wild boar
begs for a pinch of salt.
To fabricate a watertight barrel


out of bent wood is a complicated
undertaking. Staves are sawed or
sometimes split, then dried.
French oak is air dried anywhere
from 18 to 36 months. The best
coopers prefer this method to kiln
drying which is much faster but
leaves the wood with fewer flavors.
Wine aged in this kind of barrel
smoothes out rough tannins. Once
they are dried, the staves can be
assembled. Each piece of wood is
shaped carefully, and then fin-
ished by firing with steam or natu-
ral gas. The idea is to avoid
blisters, and construct a barrel to
produce a dramatic effect on wine
savor Space limits further narra-
tive. But whether the barrel is
made from French or American
oak or lately Hungarian, the
process is a complicated business
requiring skill and patience.
All this work is reflected today
in today's pricey barrels. French
and American units run as high as
$900 while Hungarian wood is a
bit less costly Bear in mind wine
barrels are only used for a maxi-
mum of three years, after which
they are sold to the sherry and


port factories, or to American
bourbon makers, who fire them
with acetylene torches to further
add that distinctive charcoal tang.
Wine makers put their wines
through a combination of new and
old oak, as well as combining the
juice with French and American
woods. The diversity of choice for
barrel fermentation is up to wine
makers, who must decide how
much expense to put into a batch
to realize a profit, but more im-
portant to create a uniquely fla-
vored end product.
Barrel types vary with country
and even within regions. In
France, for example, the barrels
for Bordeaux hold 59.40 gallons
(225 liters), while those of Bur-
gundy's pinot noirs are slightly
bigger. American wine makers
employ both. The big "Hogshead"
size holds 79.25 gallons (300 liters).
Once the wine is "ready," it is
bottled and sealed with cork or
some other closure. Genuine corks
are made from actual oak tree bark
treated to kill bacteria. Nowadays
plastic composition closures corks
are regularly employed, and the in-


famous twist off cap is more and
more gaining acceptance even
among traditionalists. Pundits are
rolling around in their graves -
but time marches on.
I hope this piece was not more
than you ever needed to know
about oak barrels, and sometime
do stop by a good winery and view
hundreds of barrels stacked like
dominoes in warehouse cellars. It
is quite a sight.
Two consumer-friendly red
wines that have received the bene-
fits of four to 12 months of aging in
American and French oak are
Robert Mondavi Private Selections
Cabernet Sauvignon, and Robert
Mondavi Pinot Noir. Both are rea-
sonably priced at $10, and are rec-
ommended to pair well with
approaching cool weather fare.
--In--
Oak Ridge resident Ron
Drinkhouse was a buyer and
seller of wines in his native Con-
necticut. He welcomes inquiries,
and can be reached via email at
ronoct9@aol. com or via tele-
phone at (352) 445-0328.


A delicious duo


Doughnuts and

hot chocolate

finally together

J.M. HIRSCH
AP Food Editor

There is a crazy delicious
new trend in milkshakes. It
involves adding a slice of
pie to the blender along
with the milk and ice cream.
That's right a whole
slice of pie.
Which sounds simply too
delicious for its own good. I
wanted it, except the winter
holidays aren't exactly milk-
shake season. So I started
playing winter-friendly
ways to borrow this idea of
blending baked goods and
sweet drinks.
Hot chocolate was the
natural choice. But pie just
didn't seem right. Dough-
nuts, however, seemed per-
fect. Chocolate doughnuts,
to be precise.
The process was simple.
The results were spectacu-
lar. The hot chocolate was
richly chocolaty, but re-
tained a distinctly doughnut
flavor. The hot chocolate
also was wonderfully thick,
thanks to the thickening
properties of the flour in the
doughnut. If you prefer a
thinner hot chocolate, fol-
low the recipe as directed,
then thin with additional
milk at the end.
It also is important to use
a cake-style doughnut (not
yeast-raised), such as a
chocolate or old fashioned.
I used glazed or sugar-
coated doughnuts with great
results.
And for a wonderful vari-
ation, make the recipe as di-
rected, then thin it with a bit
of strong hot coffee. After


Associated Press
Combining a chocolate doughnut with hot chocolate creates
a wonderfully thick recipe for the winter season.


all, coffee and doughnuts
pair so well.

CHOCOLATE
DOUGHNUT HOT
CHOCOLATE
2 cups whole milk
1 glazed or sugar
coated chocolate
doughnut
1/2 cup semisweet
chocolate chips
Pinch salt
In a blender, combine the


milk and doughnut. Puree
until very smooth. This
could take a minute or
longer.
Transfer the mixture to a
medium saucepan. Whisk-
ing constantly, heat over
medium until it thickens,
about 3 to 4 minutes. Add
the chocolate chips and salt,
whisking until the chocolate
has melted and the cocoa is
smooth. Serve immediately
From start to finish, it
takes 10 minutes and serves
four


Hot lines available for cooking issues


Special to the Chronicle

Faced with a holiday
cooking conundrum?
There's undoubtedly an app
for that.
But if you're a little more
old school, there still are nu-
merous hot lines you can call
when a kitchen crisis hits.
Or do damage control be-
fore it reaches that stage.
Most companies now offer
tons of tips, advice and how-
to videos on their websites
and via Facebook and Twitter
Crisco Pie Hotline: (877)
367-7438.
Butterball Turkey Talk-
Line: (800) BUTTERBALL,


EASY
Continued from Page C1

of proud cadets, their rela-
tives and friends, and a pa-
rade to top off the evening.
What could be better on a
warm November evening.
Kudos to our NJROTC!
Something to truly give
thanks for on this holiday


Julianne Munn is the food
writer for the Citrus County
Chronicle. Email her at
jmunn2@tampabay.rrcom.


www.butterball.com or email
at talkline@butterball.com.
Empire Kosher poultry
customer hot line: (717) 436-
7055 or www.empire


koshercom/
Fleischmann's Yeast
Baker's Help Line: (800)
777-4959 or www.bread
world. com/default, aspx.


Caring for kids sick with flu


his is Saturday af-
ternoon. Our day is
going differently
than expected.
Five of our children are
down with the flu. Daugh-
ter Lovina was the first
one to get sick. She came
home from school Friday
not feeling well.
This morning four more
of the children woke up
with some sort of bug. It
seems to be like a stomach
flu. I do hope it leaves our
house soon as the rest of
us won't catch it.
A lot of my day has been
spent taking care of the
sick. I decided to sit down
and write my column in
between taking care of the
children. None of them
seems to want to eat, but I
have been giving them liq-
uids to keep them hy-
drated.
Meanwhile, husband
Joe is out deer hunting
with son Benjamin. Well,
Benjamin is really just
going along for the fun of
it. Joe and Benjamin left
early this morning before
daylight and while they
saw a deer they didn't get
it.
Some friends who live
nearby have allowed Joe
to hunt in their woods. Joe
doesn't have any work
next week so he should
have time to go deer hunt-
ing then also.
Most of the children
said they weren't hungry,
but I still made breakfast.
I made biscuits, sausage
gravy and fried eggs. Joe
and Benjamin were glad
to see the breakfast when
they came home around
9:30 a.m.
Daughter Loretta
washed dishes and swept
floors for me. So far, she is
not on the sick list and has
done a good job of helping
me around the house.
I brought all the laundry
up from the basement that
we had washed Friday.
Everything was dry, so we
folded it and put it away. I
hung a few pieces outside
Friday, but it was so cold
and windy it would have
been hard to keep all the
clothes on the wash line.
I sure do appreciate the


Lovina Eicher
THE AMISH COOK

lines put in the basement
to dry clothes in the win-
ter months. With the coal-
stove being down there, it
does not take long for
clothes to dry.
I am glad we did our
weekly cleaning Friday, so
that is off the list. Also
glad we did the laundry.
Daughter Elizabeth
baked some "outrageous
chocolate chip cookies"
Friday. They are delicious
but not going as fast as
they usually do with all
the sickness around.
Hopefully this flu will be
gone by Thanksgiving.
I bought a 24-pound
turkey and we plan to
have Jacob and Emma's
here for Thanksgiving din-
ner. This week will go fast
with Joe being home and
only a three-day school
week.
The first semester of
school is already over and
report cards were handed
out. Verena seems to be
doing well with her school
work despite all that has
gone on with her over the
past 1 1/2 years.
Kevin, 6, is always ex-
cited to come home from
school to let me know if he
has learned something
new.
One evening when we
were eating supper he
said "Mom, I know the
days of the week now."
I was amazed he knew
them.
Last night, he came
home and said "Mom I can
count to 100 by fives" and
he started counting. He
was oh-so-proud to come
home with a certificate
saying he could count to
100 and wanted me to
hang it on the refrigerator.
He said "now I need to
learn how to count to one
million."
Lovina, 7, is a good help


with Kevin. She is always
trying to teach him new
things that she is learning
in first grade.
Our thoughts and
prayers are with our
friend Linda and family as
she struggles with cancer.
May God be with them as
they go through this trial
of life. Linda's husband
and daughter are teachers
at our school and her son
has been our children's
bus driver for years. May
God bless them and all of
you wonderful readers.
I will share a new bis-
cuit recipe I tried this
morning. They turned out
nice and flaky. I like to try
different kinds of biscuits
instead of using the same
ones all the time.

SOUTHERN
BISCUITS
2 cups sifted flour
4 teaspoons baking
powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cream
of tartar
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 cup shortening
1 egg, beaten
2/3 cup milk
Preheat the oven to 450
degrees. In a large bowl,
mix flour, baking powder,
salt, sugar and cream of tar-
tar. Add shortening and
blend.
Pour the milk into the
mixture slowly Add egg
and stir until well blended.
More flour can be added if
needed.
Drop by tablespoon onto
cookie sheet and bake 12 to
15 minutes at 450 degrees.


Lovina Eicher and her
husband, Joe, are raising
eight children on their
rural Michigan homestead.
Lovina inherited the
Amish Cook column from
her mother, Elizabeth
Coblentz. For information
about the Amish Cook, or
to ask a question, write
The Amish Cook, PO. BOX
157, Middletown, OH 45042
or visit amishcook
online. com.


FLAIR FOR FOOD


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 C3







Page C4 -THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Recreation center
to host card party
Beverly Hills Recreation
Center, 77 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills, will host a Military
Card Party on Tuesday,
Dec. 6.
Doors open at 11 a.m. and
lunch will be served at noon.
Games will begin at 1 p.m.
Donation is $12. Reserva-
tions for tables of four players
are recommended. Singles
are welcome and tablemates
will be arranged, if possible.
Deadline for purchasing
tickets is Dec. 2. Early reser-
vations are encouraged. Tick-
ets are available at the office
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday, or at
the door.
For more information, call
(352) 746-4882 or (352)
746-3636.
Brits and friends
to gather Monday
The British American So-
cial Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 28, at Holiday
Inn Express, 903 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
Included on the agenda
this month are a slide show
and talk about a visit to China
and Tibet.
The club meets the fourth
Monday monthly and pro-
vides a venue for those of
British descent or interest at
which to socialize, exchange
experiences and discuss
items of common interest.
There is a wide range of
activities, visits and social
events, details and photo-
graphs of which are available
at www.britamclub.com, or
from Judi Matthews at (352)
527-2581 or Dave Jones at
(352) 382-3418.
Novel society
to hear doll talk
The Florida Chapter of the
Historical Novel Society
meets at 1 p.m. the first Sat-
urday of each month in the
Community Room of the
Central Ridge Library in Bev-
erly Hills.
On Dec. 3, Ben Edney will
display and discuss many of
the historical dolls from his
extensive collection, some
dating from the 1830s. All of
the dolls are dressed in au-
thentic period costumes.
Edney has been collecting
and studying antique dolls
since 1966.
Everyone is welcome to
attend. For information, call
Marian Fox at (352)
726-0162.
Country musicians
sought to play
Country musicians are
needed to volunteer their tal-
ents on Thursday mornings
to play at the West Coast
Community Center in Ho-
mosassa near the VFW on
Veterans Drive.
Call Jim at (352) 621-3588.

Animal Shelter
ADOPTABLES

Okemo


Special to the Chronicle
Okemo is a great 4-year-
old, neutered bulldog mix.
He is good with other dogs,
walks well on a leash and
is a calm, quiet, well-man-
nered boy. Okemo looks a
bit different when you first
see him, because he is
slightly cross-eyed. He
sees just fine and has no
trouble walking or playing
in the yard. Meet him at
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices, 4030 S. Airport Road,
Inverness, behind the fair-
grounds. View all adopt-
able pets at www.
citruscritters.com. Call
352-746-8400. Volunteers
are needed.


Hospice Tree of Life


Observance pays tribute to loved ones


Special to the Chronicle

HPH Hospice is getting into the
spirit as it celebrates its 17th annual
Tree of Life, a community event to re-
member and pay tribute to loved ones.
There will be three Trees of Life
ready for HPH ornaments beginning
Friday, Nov 25. Donations support the
not-for-profit agency's patient and


family care programs. HPH provides
care, comfort and support to individu-
als and families affected by a life-lim-
iting illness, regardless of their ability
to pay
People can place an order for the
ornaments of their choice by calling
the HPH Hospice Foundation at (800)
486-8784, by going online to www.hph-
hospice.org or visiting the tree loca-


tions. Eight different ornaments are
available based on the contribution
size.
Tree of Life locations:
Inverness Historic Courthouse
Heritage Museum, 1 Courthouse
Square.
HPH Hospice Care Center, Citrus
Health and Rehab, 701 Medical Court
East, Inverness.
HPH Hospice House, Emeritus at
Barrington, 2341 W Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486), Lecanto.


Audubon Societ

Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion's Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park, in cooperation
with Citrus County Audubon
Society, will host the first of
the season's monthly bird
walks on Pepper Creek


Streak Saturday

Trail on Saturday, Nov 26.
There will be seven bird
walks offered at the wildlife
park this season, running
through April 2012.
Experienced birders will
lead the walk on this trail,
one of 19 birding trails in
Citrus County that are part
of the West Section of the
Great Florida Birding Trail.


Participants should meet at
7:45 a.m. at the entrance to
the park's Visitor Center
and the bird walk will begin
at 8 a.m. Binoculars and a
field guide are recom-
mended.
Pepper Creek Trail is ap-
proximately 3/4 mile in
length and follows along the
park's tram road connecting
the Visitor Center on U.S. 19
and the west entrance on
Fishbowl Drive. Partici-


pants can either walk back
or wait and take the first re-
turning boat after the park
opens. There is no charge to
use the Pepper Creek trail
or for the return boat trip.
Monthly bird walks will be
scheduled throughout the
year, except the months of
December, and May through
August.
Call (352) 628-5343, ext.
1002 or visit www.florida
stateparks.org.


Make a difference to a child in Take Stock


Next mentor training coming up Dec. 6


Special to the Chronicle

Take Stock in Children is a mentor-
ing program that offers a college
scholarship and the promise of hope
to deserving youths in Citrus County.
Take Stock scholars join the pro-
gram in the sixth through eighth


grades. One of the benefits of being a
scholar is having the opportunity to
work with a mentor.
The mentor commitment involves
working with scholars each week dur-
ing regular school hours, believing in
the student, and helping the student
believe in themselves.


The program is actively seeking
male and female role models to help
support active student scholars as well
as new students who will soon be en-
tering the program.
Take Stock's next mentor training is
10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Dec. 6. Call
Pat Lancaster, program coordinator at
(352) 422-2348 or (352) 344-0855 for
more information about the program
and to sign up for the mentor training.


News NOTES


IR-RU plans
holiday toy run
The IR-RU Family Social
Club will have its annual Christ-
mas Toy Run on Saturday, Nov.
26. Signup will begin at 9 a.m.;
riders will leave the clubhouse
at 11 a.m. sharp. Stops are yet
to be determined, but will be in
Citrus County.
Everyone is welcome. Partic-
ipants are asked to bring a new,
unwrapped toy to be donated to
needy children in the county. All
proceeds will benefit deserving
Citrus County children and their
families.
The last stop will be at the
clubhouse, 922 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Food and entertain-
ment will be provided.
For more information, call
(352) 637-5118.

Masons to fry fish
in Floral City
Floral City Masonic Lodge
No. 133, adjacent to the Floral
City Library, will have a fish fry
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,


Nov. 26, from 4 to 7 p.m.
On the menu are fish, fries,
coleslaw, beans, hush puppies,
grits, beverage and dessert.
Cost is $8.50.
Lodge communications are
at 7:30 p.m. the first and third
Thursday. Dinner is at 6 p.m.
Our ladies always invited.
For information, call (352)
673-4331.
'Cut-A-Thon' set for
shops Sunday
The Quick Stop Barber Shop
Cut-A-Thon will take place from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov.
27, at the Winn-Dixie Plaza at
3541 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills and the Hernando
Plaza at 2780 N. Florida Ave. in
Hernando.
Donations will benefit the
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club.
Free hot dogs will be served.
There will be a live deejay from
M&M Entertainment at the Bev-
erly Hills location.
The event is sponsored by
the Citrus County Chronicle.


Buy tickets, help
NAMI raise funds
Mike Hampton's Country
Rocks the Canyon concert fea-
turing Eric Church and Justin
Moore is slated for Dec. 12 at
Rock Crusher Canyon.
In keeping with his "Pitching
In" slogan, LightHouse mem-
bers are selling fundraising tick-
ets benefiting the NAMI-
sponsored LightHouse.
Tickets are available for: $25,
$35 and $50. Get tickets early
and benefit LightHouse at the
same time: Call (352) 302-
0792. Tickets are also available
at Grannie's Restaurant,
Jagged Edge Barbershop, High
Octane club and Moschillo's
Italian Restaurant.
Eat breakfast with
B.H. Lions Club
Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72
Civic Circle Drive, will have its
pancake breakfast from 7:30
a.m. to noon Sunday, Nov. 27.
Cost is $4 for adults and $2
for children younger than 12.


This includes all-you-can-eat
pancakes, choice of bacon or
sausage or combo, orange
juice and coffee or tea.
Call Lion Karen at (352)
746-2986.
Choir gears up
for holiday season
The Citrus Community Con-
cert Choir announces the pres-
entation of its 2011 holiday
concerts.
This year's performances will
include the Christmas portion of
G.F. Handel's classic oratorio,
"The Messiah," and a selection of
Christmas carols.
Sunday, Nov. 27, 2 p.m., St.
Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070
N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19),
Crystal River;
Friday, Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m.,
Faith Lutheran Church, 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive, Lecanto; and
Sunday, Dec. 4, 2 p.m., First
Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 West, Inverness.
Admission at the door is $10;
children younger than 12 will be
admitted for free.


Time for Remembrance


Joan Kohler at (352)
527-2439 by Wednesday,
Nov. 30.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


News NOTES

Celebrate season
with home tour
The Crystal River
Woman's Club wants the
public to celebrate the holi-
day season with them. Six
families will open their beauti-
fully decorated homes for the
"Silver Bells" annual Tour of
Homes on Sunday, Dec. 4.
The tour will be open from
noon to 5 p.m. Catch the hol-
iday spirit by joining mem-
bers at the club at 320 N.
Citrus Ave. for light refresh-
ments and the opportunity to
socialize. A variety of gifts will
be on sale by the Art Depart-
ment and the gifts at the pet
boutique are unique. For a
small donation, get a chance
to win a handmade butterfly
quilt. Tour of Homes tickets
are $10.
Purchase $5 tickets for a
$500 cash opportunity draw-
ing at 5 p.m. at the club. You
need not be present to win.
Tickets are on sale now; call
(352) 382-0777 or (352)
503-3237.
You and 'i' topic
at open house
Have you wondered what
the big deal is with iPhones,
iPads or Macintosh comput-
ers? Or, why Citrus Macin-
tosh Users Group is such a
popular club (more than 300
members)?
Come to the CMUG open
house from 1 to 5 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 1, classroom
103, building C4 at College
of Central Florida Lecanto
campus. The public is wel-
come. Refreshments will be
available.
Visit the website at cmug
online.com and click News
and Events for time, date and
place of regular meetings, or
email cmugpres@gmail.com.
Railroad club
plans 'un-contest'
The Citrus Model Railroad
Club will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 6, at the Robin-
son Horticultural Building at
Citrus County Fairgrounds.
The program is what has
been called an "un-contest."
Replacing the model contest,
the show-and-tell evening will
let members share their cur-
rent or past projects, inter-
ests, photos or collections,
favorite cars and locos and
more.
For more information, call
Denis Riley, program director,
at (352) 835-3656.
Women's group to
celebrate holiday
Dunnellon Christian
Women's Connection will cel-
ebrate the miracle of Christ-
mas at its next luncheon at
noon Wednesday, Dec. 14,
at Springs Banquet Hall
(Springs Presbyterian
Church), 1060 W. Withla-
coochee Trail (County Road
39) Dunnellon.
The luncheon is a week
early due to the Christmas
holiday. Janet Tombow of
Clearwater, author and
speaker, will talk about her
life's story. Her book, "Stolen
but not Lost," will be available.
Special features will in-
clude singing Christmas car-
ols and learning about
"Decorating with Blessings
for All." These are items that
can be purchased to give
anyone who needs cheer or
encouragement. All women
are welcome.
Tickets are $12 and dead-
line for reservations is Thurs-
day, Dec. 8. Call Dot at (352)
465-1150 or Maggie at (352)
465-6153.
Transit retirees
plan holiday party
New York City Transit Re-
tirees of Florida Chapter 9
will have its Christmas party
at 1 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at
the Mango Grill & Wine Bar,
at 1305 Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486).
For more information, call


KENNY CAVALIERI/Special to the Chronicle
Tom Beason, director of HPH Hospice Chaplain Services, releases doves with a few of the participants who participated
in the nondenominational service at the bi-annual Time for Remembrance ceremony Nov. 9. The service is celebrated
twice a year at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park to help anyone who has suffered a loss of a friend or
loved one, who would like to remember and memorialize them.



Wildlife park to host bird walk








THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 24, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
c B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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BBC World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) cc Gulf Cst Journal Suncoast Smart Health (In Antiques Roadshow Circa-1900 folk ***, "Touching the Void" (2003, Adventure) Brendan
PBS H 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) cc IBusiness Forum Stereo) cc art sculpture. 'G' c Mackey, Nicholas Aaron.'R'
(WU PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) a Antiques Roadshow'G'x cThe This Old House Hour (N) 'G' Independent Lens 'PG' c World News Tavis Smiley (N)
NewsChannel 8 NBC Nightly Entertainment Extra (N)'PG'c *** "Horton Hears a Who!" (2008, Adventure) Jim Carrey. Animated. The 85th Anniversary of the Macy's NewsChannel 8 Tonight Show
(WFA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 at 6PM (N) News (N)G' Tonight (N) 'PG' An elephant hears a cry for help on a dust mote. G cc Thanksgiving Day Parade (N) at 11PM (N) With Jay Leno
WF ABC 20 20 20 20 Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! (N) Wheel of Fortune A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (In The Middle A Very Gaga fe.Thanksgiving Lady Gaga shares details Eyewitness News Nightline (N)
SABC 20 20 20 2 6(N) _______*G'G (N)'G' Stereo) 'G'Ec 'PG' ccabout her ife. (N) (In Stereo) cc 21at1PM 'G cc
NFL Football Miami Dolphins at Dallas Cowboys. From Who Wants to Be The Big Bang Rules of Person of Interest Reese infiltrates a The Mentalist A young violinist is 10 News, 11pm Late Show With
WTSP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 l Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. (N) a Millionaire Theory'14' Engagement'14' gang. (In Stereo) 14' cc shot to death. '14' a(N) David Letterman
WV FOX 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) c TMZ (N)'PG'E The insider (N) IceAe: "Happiness Is a Warm Blanket The Simpsons (In FOX13 10:00 News (N) c FOX13 News Access Hollywood
FOX0 13 1313 'PG'Ec Christmas CharlieBrown"(2011) NR' Stereo) 'PG' Edge at 11pm (N) 'PG'
(WlJl ABC 11 11 4 15 News |World News Entertainment Inside Edition A Charlie Brown ThanksgivingG' |The Middle PG A Very Gaga Thanksgiving (N) (In Stereo) a News Nightline (N) 'G'
IWCL ND 2 2 2 2 22 22 The Place for Miracles 'G' Prophecy in the Great Awakening Life Today With International Great Awakening
IND 2 2 2 2 22 22News'G James Robison Fellowship
T AB 1 11 1 1 ABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (In The Middle A Very Gaga Thanksgiving Lady Gaga shares details ABC Action News Nightline (N)
(WF) ABCE 11 11 11 11at 6 PM (N) G' G'Gc Stereo) G'x cPG 'c about her fe. (N) (In tereo) c at 11 PM 'G X
IMR ND 12 12 Family Guy'14' c Family Guy '14' c The Big Bang The Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Intent "Stray" Law & Order: Criminal Intent "Astoria How I Met Your Howl Met Your The Office'14' c The Office"Local
(W__ IND_ B 12 12 Theory 14' Theory 'PG' (In Stereo) '14' c Helen" (In Stereo) 14' c Mother '14' Mother '14' Ad" 'PG'
WTTA MNT ED 6 6 6 6 9 Love-Raymond Seinfeld'PG' Family Feud (N) Family Feud (N) Without a Trace "22 X 42"'14' Without a Trace "True/False" 14' Excused 14' Seinfeld PG Excused'14' Scrubs'14'
WACX) TBN B 21 21 21 Faith Life Now The 700 Club'PG'x Faith Builders Life Faith |Love a Child Camp Meeting Variety Tims Ministries
T CW 4 4 4 4 12 12 The King of The King of Two and a Half Two and a Half The Vampire Diaries Damon and The Secret Circle "Bound" Cassie Friends'14' c Friends PG' The Simpsons According to Jim
W CW B 4 4 4 4 12 12 Queens'PG' Queens'PG' Men 'PG'E Men '14' c Elena search for Stefan. '14' cc tries to establish a normal life. 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
S ,FAM i 16 16 16 16 Patchwork I.N.N. News a Your Citrus Every DaVis a Pewter Power Planet's Funniest Nature Coast The American *** "Jungle Book" (1942, Fantasy) Sabu, Joseph Calleia, John Qualen.
S AM 16 16 16 6ICounty Court Gift Locar health. Animals Outdoors Outdoorsman Kipling's boy hero Mowgli can talk to animals. 'NR
WOGX FOX 91 13 13 7 7 The Simpsons The Simpsons Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Ice Age: Xmas "Happiness Is a Warm Blanket" The Simpsons FOX 35 News at 10 (N) ca TMZ (N)'PG' Access Hollyw'd
WVE) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias Noticiero Univ. Cuando Me Enamoro (N) 14' Una Familia con Suerte (N)'PG' La Fuerza del Destino (N)'14' Protagonistas (SS) Noticias Noticiero Univ.
(WXPX)ION 17 Outlaw Josey ** "The In-Laws" (2003) Michael Douglas. (In Stereo) PG-13' |**Y, "Starsky& Hutch" (2004) Ben Stiller. (In Stereo) PG-13' |** "LethalWeapon 4" (1998) Mel Gibson. 'R'
CAE) 54 48 54 54 25 27 The First 48 'PG' |The First 48 'PG' c The First 48'14' |The First 48 "Waterworld"'PG' The First 48 E |The First 48 'PG' c
[AM 55 64 55 55 **** "The Godfather, Part II" (1974) Al Pacino. 'R' **** "The Godfather"(1972, Crime Drama) Marion Brando, Al Pacino. A mafia patriarch tries to hold his empire together. 'R' c
52 35 52 52 19 21 Tanked (In Stereo) 'PG' c Tanked "Be Cool" 'PG' c Tanked A Feng Shui tank. 'PG' Tanked (In Stereo) 'PG' c Tanked "Tricks of the Trade"'PG' Tanked (In Stereo) 'PG' c
E 96 19 96 96 Reed Be.- Lines |Reed Be.- Lines Reed Be.- Lines |Reed Be.- Lines Reed Be.- Lines |Reed Be.- Lines Reed Be.- Lines |Reed Be.- Lines Reed Be.- Lines |Reed Be.- Lines Reed Be.- Lines |Reed Be.- Lines
E~iRAVO 254 51 254 254 The Real Housewives of Atlanta Top Chef: Texas '14' *** "Meet the Parents" (2000, Comedy) Robert De Niro. 'PG-13' *** "Meet the Parents" (2000, Comedy) Robert De Niro. PG-13'
cm 27 61 27 27 33 South Park'14' |South Park'14' 30 Rock'14' |30 Rock'14' Jeff Dunham Christmas Special Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos '14' c |The Comedy Central Roast Actor Charlie Sheen. '14'
(Wil 98 45 98 98 28 37 Top Secret Recipe 'PG' c Top Secret Recipe 'PG' c Sweet Home Alabama 'PG' c Sweet Home Alabama (N) PG Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders |Sweet Home Alabama 'PG'
[i) 43 42 43 43 Best Jobs Ever Pepsi's Challenge Walt: The Man Behind the Myth Walt Disney's life and achievements. The Wizarding | "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room" (2005) 'R'
40 29 40 40 41 46 John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) ca |Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 ca Erin Burnett OutFront
DISN 46 40 46 46 6 5 Good-Charlie |Wizards-Place Shake It Up!'G' |Jessie'G'Ec A.N.T Farm'G' |** "G-Force"(2009, Action) Bill Nighy'PG'E Jessie'G'Ec |A.N.T Farm 'G' Shake It Up! 'G' Wizards-Place
33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ca SportsCenter (N) (Live) ca College Football Texas at Texas A&M. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) a
ESPN2) 34 28 34 34 43 49 Basketball Scoreboard College Basketball Old Spice Classic -- Dayton vs. Wake Forest. (N) College Basketball Old Spice Classic -- Arizona State vs. Fairfield. (N) (Live) IBasketball
EWTN1 95 70 95 95 48 Vatican Report It's a Miracle Daily Mass: Our Lady IThe World Over Raymond Arroyo. Crossing/Goal |The Holy Rosary |Life on the Rock'G' Defending Life Women of
FAM) 29 52 29 29 20 28 "Charlie & Chocolate Factory" *** "Monsters, Inc." (2001, Comedy) Voices of John Goodman. 'G' **** "WALL-E" (2008, Adventure) Voices of Ben Burtt. 'G' The 700 Club 'PG' c
FM) 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baier (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) ca Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor cc
26 56 26 26 Chopped Chopped "Dr. Deckle & Mr. Fried" Chopped "Turbot Power" Chopped "Crunch Time" Chef Hunter Three chefs interview. Chef Hunter
E$FEL 35 39 35 35 Football Preview |Ship Shape TV ACC AII-Access |UEFA Champions League Soccer Leverkusen vs. Chelsea. The Dan Patrick Show The Game 365 |Runnin'-PAC
CX) 30 60 30 30 51 **, "Monsters vs. Aliens" (2009) Voices of Reese Witherspoon. |*** "Kung Fu Panda" (2008, Comedy) Voices of Jack Black. PG' *** "Kung Fu Panda" (2008, Comedy) Voices of Jack Black. PG
GO 67 Golf Central (N) |Masters Highlights (N) |U.S. Open Golf Highlights (N) |British Open Highlights (N) |PGA Championship Highlights (N) |Golf Omega Mission Hills World Cup, Day 2. (N)
[A 39 68 39 39 45 54 ** "A Family Thanksgiving" (2010, Drama) Daphne Zuniga.E X"Lucky Christmas" (2011, Romance-Comedy) Elizabeth Berkley. ** "Silver Bells" (2005, Drama) Anne Heche. 'NR'
** "Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief" (2010, **l "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" Bored to Death Hung (In Stereo) Real Sex Men and women enhance
302 201 302 302 2 2 Adventure) Logan Lerman. (In Stereo) PG c' (2010, Fantasy) Georgie Henley. (In Stereo)'PG'c MA' c MA' E their sex lives. MA' cE
HGTV 23 57 23 23 42 52 My First Place |My First Place Hunters Int'l House Hunters Home Strange Home (N) ca Radio City Holiday (N) 'G' Holiday, Inc. (N) ca Hunters Int'l |Hunters Int'l
(i5i) 51 25 51 51 32 42 IRT Deadliest Roads '14' c IRT Deadliest Roads '14' cc The Real Story of Thanksgiving Swampsgiving 'PG' c Big Shrimpin' (N) 'PG' c The Real Story of Christmas PG
LIFE) 24 38 24 24 31 Movie'MA' Movie 'MA' Movie 'MA'
"Like Dandelion Dust" (2009, Drama) Mira Sorvino, Barry Pepper. ** "A Walk to Remember" (2002, Romance) Shane West. A high-school *** "Listen to Your Heart" (2010, Drama) Cybill Shepherd, Shirley
50 Parents must fight a custody battle for their adopted son. PG-13 cc delinquent courts a minister's daughter. 'PG' c Knight. A songwriter falls in love with a girl who cannot hear. NR' x
iA*** "Avatar" (2009) Sam **** "Pulp Fiction" (1994, Crime Drama) John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman. Criminals cross ** "The Losers" (2010) Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Elite "Busty Coeds
320 221 320 320 3 3 Worthington. 'PG-13' cc paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. (In Stereo) 'R' c commandos hunt the man who betrayed them. vs. Lusty"
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball With Chris Matthews The Ed Show (N) The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show
MTV 97 66 97 97 39 Ridiculousness IRidiculousness Beavis |Beavis Beavis |Beavis *** "Scary Movie" (2000, Comedy) Shawn Wayans. (In Stereo) 'R' *, "Scary Movie 2" (2001) 'R'
65 44 53 Explorer Tallest living trees. 'G' Hoover Dam Reinvented 'PG' Grand Canyon Skywalk'PG' America Before Columbus 'PG, V' Grand Canyon Skywalk 'PG'
i 28 36 28 28 35 25 iCarly'G' c liCarly'G'x c BrainSurge IVictorious'G' SpongeBob |SpongeBob Friends'PG' |Friends'PG' Friends'PG' Friends'PG' Friends'PG' Friends'PG'
[OXY] 44 Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14' Law & Order: Criminal Intent 14 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 14 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 14 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 14 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 14
f "Push"(2009) Chris Evans. Rogue psychics battle "The Last Play at Shea" (2010) Narrated by Alec **l "The Switch"(2010) Jennifer Aniston. iTV. A woman uses a friend's Gigolos (iTV) (N) Dave's Old Porn
340 241 340 340 a covert government agency. PG-13' cc Baldwin. The history of two New York icons. 'R' sperm, unknowingly to get pregnant. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c 'MA' cc (iTV) (N) MA'
1SPEED] 122 112 122 122 Dumbest Stuff |Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff |Dumbest Stuff |Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff |Dumbest Stuff |Dumbest Stuff |Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff
(iSiKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 "Driven to Kill" (2009, Action) R' "The Keeper" (2009, Action) Steven Seagal, Luce Rains. (In Stereo) R' iMPACT Wrestling (N) (In Stereo) '14' MANswers'14' MANswers'14'
36 31 36 36 how to-florida HEAT Classics Magic Classics FIGHTZONE TV
F 31 59 31 31 26 29 Casino Royale **l "Quantum of Solace" (2008, Action) Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko. 'PG-13' E** "Die Another Day" (2002, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry Toby Stephens.'PG-13'
IS) 49 23 49 49 16 19 *** "Hitch" (2005, Romance-Comedy) Will Smith. 'PG-13' cc Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory |Big Bang Theory |Conan '14' c
T "Miracle on 34th Street"(1947, Fantasy) Maureen O'Hara. An *** "Anything Goes"(1956, Musical) Bing Crosby, Zizi Jeanmaire. **** "The Lady Eve" (1941, Romance-Comedy) "A Night at the
169 53 169 169 30 35 adwoman's boyfriend defends Macy's Santa in court. 'NR' c Premiere. Two producers travel to Europe to find a leading lady 'NR' Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda. 'NR' c Opera"(1935)
(iWC] 53 34 53 53 24 26 American Guns'14' c American Guns (In Stereo) cc Punkin Chunkin 2011 Teams compete in pumpkin launching. (N) cc American Guns (In Stereo) cc Punkin Chunkin 2011 c
[iC) 50 46 50 50 29 30 Cake Boss: Next Great Baker'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss: Thanksgiving Special Cake Boss: Dear Buddy cc Cake Boss: Thanksgiving Special
IM ) 48 33 48 48 31 34 Bones (In Stereo)'14' cc Bones"The X in the File"'14' CSI: NY "All in the Family"'14' CSI: NY Drowning victim. '14' CSI: NY"DOA for a Day"'14' CSI: NY "Right Next Door"'14'
(TRAI V 9 54 9 9 44 Man v Food Man v Food Man v Food |Man v Food Man v. Food'G' |Man v Food'G' Man v. FoodG' |Man v. Food'G' Man v. Food'G' |Man v. Food'G' Man v. Food's Greatest Moments
iCIV) 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops 'PG' c Cops PG 'c World's Dumbest...'14' World's Dumbest...'14' World's Dumbest... '14' World's Dumbest... '14' Most Shocking '14'
M 32 49 32 32 34 24 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Roseanne'PG' |Roseanne'PG' Roseanne'PG' Roseanne'PG' Love-Raymond |Love-Raymond Love-Raymond ILove-Raymond King of Queens |King of Queens
USA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Child's Play" 'PG' c NCIS "Silent Night"'14'E *** "Elf"(2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan. 'PG'E *** "Elf"(2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan. 'PG' c
(WE) 117 69 117 117 Braxton Family Values'14' c Braxton Family Values'14' c Braxton Family Values'14' c Braxton Family Values'PG'x Braxton Family Values'14' c Braxton Family Values'14' c
WGN-A 18 18 18 18 18 20 30Rock'14' 30Rock'14' America's Funniest Home Videos Howl Met Howl Met Howl Met Howl Met WGN News at Nine (N) ca 30Rock'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
First of all, I hope all of my
American readers have a very
happy time on Thanksgiving.
New Zealand Bridge is a maga-
zine in a small-page format that
appears six times a year. It pri-
marily talks about bridge tourna-
ments in New Zealand and that
country's international teams, but
editor Richard Solomon is happy
to show weird bidding and play,
unlike other magazines, which
concentrate on the good.
Take this deal as an example.
Look at the South hand. You deal
and open one heart, West over-
calls one spade, North passes,
and East raises to two spades.
What would you do now?
The deal occurred during the
2001 Oceania Championships. We
will never know why West failed
to make a takeout double over


Bridge

North 11-24-11
6 6 2
V 10 7
+ Q 5 3 2
9 8 7 6 4
West East
SA QJ 5 %10 943
V -- 9 5 4 2
*J1086 *AK94
4AKJ103 Q
South
K 8 7
VAKQJ863
+ 7
4 5 2
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 1 Pass 2


Opening lead: AA


one heart. And East's two-spade
raise was distinctly cautious, with
an ace-king, a singleton and four-
card support for what he ex-
pected to be a five-card suit. Note
that seven spades is makable by
West.
Holding the South cards was
Fred Whittaker, who is a fun guy
with a dangerously imaginative
streak to his bridge. In this in-
stance, anticipating a spade lead,
he rebid three no-trump!
West, though, had not read the
spade-lead script. He tabled the
club ace. He then cashed three
more club winners, East discard-
ing two hearts (good) and an en-
couraging diamond (bad). Now
his side could take only three dia-
mond tricks, followed by four
spades. Whittaker took the last
two tricks with dummy's diamond
queen and club nine for down
seven.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KTYCA


SULSME



EINAGD



Answer:


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Wow! And to think we
were just oingto
na e hl ey -_
d-n 'N '


k~'~ ~




?'f J


I,




; .'



" i


WHEN THE PIL-GP-IMS I
WEREP PRZE51NTFE WITH I
A FEA5T, THEY PIP THIS,

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS
1 -, amas,
amat
4 Recipe amt.
8 Obi
12 Sidekick
13 Waikiki's
island
14 Jazzy
Fitzgerald
15 Lunar events
17 Average
grades
18 Ghostly meet
19 Kind of
cuisine
21 Drowses off
23 Corner
24 Hobby
wood
27 Bird abode
29 Wear and tear
30 Run out of
energy
32 Teeming
36 Ankle-length
38 Magician's
prop
40 de plume


41 Village kin
43 Chalet
features
15 Kukla's friend
47 Dotty
49 Leaves at the
altar
51 Crystal-filled
rocks
55 Central points
56 Plant or
animal
58 Fierce whale
59 accompli
30 Good name
for a cook?
61 Thor's dad
32 "Rag Mop"
brothers
33 Family pet

DOWN


1 Gorillas or 6 "Murder, -
chimps Wrote"
2 Kitchen 7 Jostle
spice 8 Less at risk
3 Earthen pot 9 Prince
4 Fall garment Valiant's wife
5 Stationed 10 Hit the hay


Possesses
Quaint hotels
Munched
String of
pearls
Kind of steer?
Film speed
ind.
Villain -
Luthor
Cartoon
Chihuahua
Labor org.
Mdse. bill
Antagonist
911 responder
Fellini, e.g.
Vanquishes
Que. neighbor
This must
weigh -!
Viking's bay
Designer
Nina -
Prize marble
Living-room
piece
Half of DJ
This, to Pedro
Chimney dirt
Egg yung
Sheep


Dear Readers: Happy
Thanksgiving! We hope
you are fortunate
enough to be spend-
ing the holiday with
family and friends.
And an extra shout-
out to those readers
who are spending the
day volunteering at
shelters and soup
kitchens. Bless you
for your kind hearts
and generosity of
spirit.
Here is one of Ann
Landers' favorite es- ANNI
says, which we feel is MAIL
quite appropriate for
Thanksgiving:
I Asked God
(author unknown)
I asked God for strength, that
I might achieve.
I was made weak, that I might
learn to obey
I asked for health, that I
might do greater things.
I was given infirmity, that I
might do better things.
I asked for riches, that I
might be happy.
I was given poverty, that I
might be wise.
I asked for power, that I
might have the praise of men.
I was given weakness, that I
might feel the need of God.
I asked for all things, that I
might enjoy life.
I was given life, that I might
enjoy all things.
I got nothing that I asked for
- but everything I had hoped
for.
Almost despite myself, my
unspoken prayers were
answered.


I am, among all men, most
richly blessed.
Dear Readers: This was writ-
ten many years ago
by Judy Vekasy, a reg-
istered nurse and di-
rector of activities in
a nursing home in
Savannah, Tenn., and
it appeared several
times in Ann Lan-
ders' column. It orig-
|' finally appeared in
the Memphis Com-
mercial Appeal. For
those with some
IE'S spare time this week,
BOX please stop by any
nursing home and
volunteer:
You say you can't do any-
thing. Can you read? Good.
Read to me. My eyes aren't
what they used to be.
Can you write? Good. Write a
letter or a card for me. My
hands are shaky.
Can you sing? Good. Help me
with the words and I'll sing
along.
Can you tell me about your
job? I was a nurse once myself.
Can you listen? Wonderful.
I'm starved for conversation.
Can you bake a sponge cake
or zucchini bread or angel bis-
cuits or make fudge? They
aren't on the nursing home
menu, but I remember how
good they were and I would
like to taste them again.
Do you play checkers or
dominoes or rummy? Fine, so
do I, but there is never anyone
who has the time. They are un-
derstaffed around here, you
know.
Do you play the violin or the


flute or the piano? My hearing
is poor, but I can hear any kind
of music. Even if I fall asleep,
you'll know I enjoyed it.
Once we were somebodies,
just like you. We were farmers
and farmers' wives and teach-
ers, nurses, beauticians, stock-
brokers and electricians,
bankers and sheriffs and
maybe a few outlaws, too. We're
not all senile just old and
needing more help than our
families can give us. This
home, whatever its name, is
"home" to us and you're an in-
vited guest. Please come. The
welcome mat is always out and
not just on Thanksgiving. I
hope you will keep this and
read it again in January, Feb-
ruary, and every other month of
the year. We'll still be here and
our needs will be the same.
Annie's Snippet for Thanks-
giving (credit the late Irv
Kupcinet): An optimist is a per-
son who starts a new diet on
Thanksgiving Day.



Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777 W
Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los
Angeles, CA 90045. To find out
more about Annie's Mailbox
and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


z-g

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11

O
c 0
co
c~ CU



S aS )
z
o -


LL W 0~

E.
-1


Answer to Previous Puzzle


YUK ON PAWED
AMEBAS KIMONO
PANOUT OPPOSE
S ETE RES
AGA IVIES YDS
BRR LENA DEEP
RECOUNT HELLO



E VIA LET
EAS I ER ERASED
SWEETS DERIVE
CLAWS DOPEY


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11-24


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 CS


y






C6 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


AND I DON'T
HAVE A COMPELLING
REASON TO FIND OUT
BECAUSE I DON'T WORK
ON COMMISSION.


The Grizzwells


(AUST 5F- &CCk05C OF TIC. 251tCE- W REN 1AA5 IA& RC REDt?
ST.RYPTOPRk A FRO T.(PTOPAANTO D05E.
ILL TIR TURKCE' I OFF ATTI-E-rOP OF
I --^&o^ ^v-E. M.',i^--^^^.^^B kA ?!


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"We may be in real serious trouble, Edna.
This one definitely seems smarter than
the average bear!"


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Oh boy! My tummy's 'bout to be
very thankful!"


Doonesbury


HEY, BECCA! 15 IT TRUE
we'VE ONLY SHIPPEP
BOOKS, NOTACTUAL-Y
90LP ANY YET?
/ W61, EXCEPT
FOR THE
PRE-5SALS.






Big Nate

HEY, I'VE GOTAN IDEA'
NEXT TIME MARCUS
INSULTS YOU, JUST /
YO MAMA HIM!/
Y/OU CAN'T "JUST
SYO MAMA" PEOPLE,
FRANCIS!





Arlo and Janis -


PRE-95Al5? 5UR5 ON
THERE AR6 THE nEB!
PRE-9AL59? ABOUT
S 4,000
SSO FAR.


4 i

rL ii-<'


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15
p.m.
"The Muppets" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
No passes.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:00 p.m.
"Arthur Christmas" 3D (PG) 1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., No
passes.
"Arthur Christmas" 2D (PG) 4:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No


passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:00 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m. 1:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m. 4:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8
p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Immortals" (R) In Real 3D. ID required. 1:10 p.m., 5 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"In Time" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30
p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) 2 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45
p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODAY'S CLUE: A equals P


"FL BR H NBRL EHC NFJ TJLR CJP


DWBLSL OJW PFL PFBCDR NFBMF FL


FHR CJP, VYP WLXJBMLR OJW PFJRL


NFBMF FL FHR." LABMPLPYR

Previous Solution: "Don't you ever let a soul in the world tell you that you can't be ex-
actly who you are." Lady Gaga
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-24


Sally Forth


BEETLE SAYS HIS ASK HIM TO
G,P.S. PIEDANP DESCRIBE HIS
HE'S LOST SURROUNDINGS


UNMOTIVATED SALES GUY
MY SLIDES ARE BLANK
BECAUSE NO ONE TOLD
ME WHAT OUR PRODUCT
\ DOES.


IF ANYONE ASKS
WHY YOU DIDN'T
PLACE AN ORDER, WOULD
YOU MIND SAYING YOU
HAVE BUDGET ISSUES?


The Born Loser


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CIASSIFIEDS


C CITRUS COUNTY





H ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 C7


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


W34


Meadowcrest Blvd.
Emily, I have loved you
since we first meet at
Life Care Nursing
Home.
At hospital the first
move was make, it was
the right move ,it
bonded us I thought
but now I am hurt and
unsure. Emily please
contact me at 3780
Forest Dr. Inverness
34453 or call
1(352) 341-1138
I love you Emily
Rodie



Bonsai plants
(352) 560-3611



(2) CHRISTMAS
WREATHS 28 inch
Christmas Wreath with
pine cones and large red
bow. $30 each (352)
746-2141
Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
3/4 HP Blower Housing
& Motor, $85 obo
1/4 HP Fan & Motor
$40. obo
Both for 3 ton AC Unit
(352) 422-2113
'98 Nissan ALTIMA
Limited edit., like new,
auto.a/c,red, $1800
352-746-0852
CHRISTMAS TREE 7.5 ft
Green Maine Pine. 750
miniature lights. Sturdy
metal stand. $95
(352) 746-2141
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
All electronics
incline, space saver, folds
up, great shape $165
(352) 464-0316

YARD SALE

Floral City
Fri & Sat 9AM-4PM
Christmas items,
No earlybirds
4800 E Stoer Lane
Frigidaire 11.3 cu ft.
auto defrost
$75.
(352) 465-2816
GMC
1994 Senoma V-6 Auto-
matic w/ topper, A/C
works Good Condition
Runs great $1500 obo
Call 352-697-3897
Hirch 15K 5th wheel
Hitch
4 way tilt,
$250 obo
(352)422-2113
*


\V-




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


4/2, $600/mo. + util.
(352) 503-7562



HOMOSASSA
Sugarmill Estate Sale.
Friday & Saturday
BUMELIA COURT
Antiques, collectibles,
musical instruments,
flat scrn TV, jewelry,
furniture, bose
speakers, Llardros &
weller pottery,
Pictures on craigslist


YARD SALE
INVERNESS
Saturday, 26, 8a-6p
1191 S. Estate Point





PROLINE
1992 WA/Cuddy Cabin
w/trailer & 96' 250hp
Yamaha RUNS GREAT
$6900. 352-563-1518
TRAIL LITE
2006 travel trailer weighs
5002 Ibs, 31 ft with slide
out,great condition!
10,900 352-628-4729
YAMAHA
'02, YZ80, runs great,
exec. cond.
$600 obo
(352) 302-6565



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c. appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or NotK
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191



2 Dogs Free
To Good Home
(352) 726-0064
Free Kittens
2 neutered males go
together,
(352) 228-1789
Hound m ix
4 yo. nuet UTD shots
housebroken, should
have fenced yard
dog comes with life
time training w/BARK
BUSTERS(352) 503-2840
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
Pit/Boxer mix
3 yo. nuet UTD shots
Comes with Life Time
training with Bark
Busters(352) 503-2840
White Sheppard Fe-
male, 11 months old.
Born December 24,
2010. Current rabies
shot, spayed. Friendly
and loving. Great with
kids. Free to a good
home. Please call
Megan or John
(352)533-8952 or
(352)201-0038


(ONNE(TIGTHE^ RIGHT




^ ^ r A j i t a j1 1 ^1 1 1 re] j1 11 I I1 id i l T' ^





BiUYER WI THY OURMESSAGE
God hig eaoo MdialSr

to Eat


AT HARRISON GROVE
Grapefruit, Navels, etc.
Hwy. 48, closed Sun.
Floral City 726-1154
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Eden Dr. from Hwy. 41
Inverness Gift shipping
MUSTARD & COLLARD
GREENS,CLOSED SUN
9A-5P. 352-726-6378


IlacK & Whitle nuetl
male black triangle
over one eye, black,
smile, ski dished
last seen W. Charlynn
Ln Crystal River. Needs
Medicine REWARD
name spotie
(352) 795-0898
DEAR PEETIE, MOMMY
STILL HAS YOUR BED
RIGHT WHERE YOU
LEFT IT, YOUR FOOD
AND WATER ARE
BOTH FULL, AND THE
YARD IS FULL OF NEW
STICKS. I PICKED YOU
UP SOME FLEA MEDI-
CATION AND SOME
MORE DOG SHAMPOO,
BECAUSE YOU AL-
WAYS DID LOOK SO
HANDSOME AFTER A
BATH, I LOOK AT YOUR
PICTURE EVERYDAY,
AND MY HEART STILL
HURTS BECAUSE YOU
ARE NOT HOME.
Small Jack Russell
Missing.Mostly white
with brown spots on
both ears and over
eyes.Please call
352-503-2538 or
352-228-2825 if found.
Lost men's black wallet
at Murphy's gas station
in Inv. Please call im-
portant papers inside,
no money, will pick up
(352) 560-0068
Lost Orange & White
Female Cat
Citrus Springs/
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 302-3456






REWARD $1000. No
Questions ask.
MinPin Female 10 lbs
name Zoey, Needs
meds. last seen Sun 8/7
Holiday Dr off Turkey
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519


Found large r
in Sugarmill
black & gray
white chest ar
maybe b
(352) 228-U
Found: Sma
Brown and'
Friendly & clea
on Eden
352-406-0



Advertising tha
Put your ad i
100 Papers thr
Florida for
LOW RATE!
(866)742-1
or visit: www
-classifieds


S udoku *****- 4puz.c


69


4


9


5 6 1


6 3


41 2


8 3


62 97


2 3 6


FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per Ib
delivered 727-771-7500



Live in my home care,
minor medical assist.
private room & bath
Call (352) 344-0123



CRYPT (F 1)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$3,000. 586-596-7580




TEACHER

FT or Pt, Exp. Req.
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
Equal Opp. Employer
(352) 344-9444










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Medical Assistant
Needed for
cardiology practice.
Applicant must be
proficient in manual
vital signs and ECG
collection. This is a
full-time position with
competitive wage
and benefits. Appli-
cant will be required
to work independ-
ently with additional
duties including front
office responsibilities.
Please send resume
to
resume4879@tampaba
y.rr.com

Network Engineer


Responsible for
server/work station/
network equipment,
end-user support at
nale cat multiple locations, IT
Woods inventory, research &
tabby, recommendations on
id paws, new IT hardware/
And software solutions,
0799 web site programm-
ing. Must be detail
II1 Dog -oriented w/good
White. organizational skills,
n. Found self-motivated, team
Dr. player and have
3059 good communica-
tion & excellent
customer service
skills, must be able to
manage time
at Works. efficiently. Minimum
n Over of 5 yrs verifiable IT
oughout network support ex-
one perience. Experience
Call w/MS server & client
1373 OS, SQL Server,
.florida Exchange Server,
.com VMware, Citrix,
UNIX/Linux, web
programming, Mac,
mobile devices,
routers/switches,
Oml firewalls, backup,
video conferencing,
and VolP required. BS
degree preferred
plus MCSA/MCSE/
MCTS/ MCITP, CCNA,
A+ certifications
desired. Flexible
hours, reliable trans-
portation and clean
S driving record a must.
Email resumes to:
mhill@rboi.com.

9~ Network
Technician P/T


7








8


Fill in the squares so that each row. column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9


BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop I GPS Cordless Power Tools
Cell / Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup
Camera / Camcorder Cordless Vacuums
Watch / Electronics Custom Battery Rebuild
Wheelchair / Scooter _. H
Rechargeables / Chargers rte
-Airsoft/RC etC.

3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
I New Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Closed Saturday & Sunday
(352) 344-1962 Bring this coupon get a free pack of batteries.
L-i i i i i i i i i i


Responsible for
supporting end-users,
LAN equipment, and
assisting with network
rrnanage-
rrent/rnaintenance as
needed
at multiple locations.
Must be detail-
oriented w/good
organizational skills,
self-motivated, team
player and have
good communica-
tion & excellent cus-
tomer service skills.
Minimum of 2 yrs veri-
fiable IT support ex-
perience. Experience
w/MS server & client
OS, Citrix, Apple
products, mobile
devices necessary.
SQL Server, Exchange
Server, VMware,
routers/switches,
firewalls, backup,
video conferencing,
VolP, UNIX/Linux ex-
perience a plus.
Degree preferred.
MCSA/MCSE/MCTS/
MCITP, CCNA, A+
certifications desired.
Flexible hours, reliable
transportation and
clean driving record
a must.
Email resumes to:
mhill@rboi.com


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
MEDICAL CLASSES
* X-RAY wMED TECH
orCPR& oHIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

Nurses All Shifts
F/T, P/T & PRN
Apply In person
Mon Frl 9am to 4pm.
Health Center at
Brentwood
2333 N Brentwood Cir
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility

RECEPTIONIST
Needed for a busy
two physician office
Fax resume to
352-860-1918 or
email
droffice511@vahoo
.com

RN Supervisor
3-11 shift Monday
through Friday.
Please Apply Online
@www.avante
centers.com
or email
mdaniels@avante
centers.com.

Social Services
Director
Apply In person
Mon- Friday 9 4pm.
Health Center at
Brentwood
2333 N Brentwood Cir
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facility




DISH WASHER

Needed For A
Private Country Club
Restaurant
Apply in Person @
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
505 E. Hartford St.
Wed. thru Sat. 9A./3P.

EXP. LINE COOKS
Banquet Exp. a plus.
F/T & P/T avail
Apply in Person @
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
505 E. Hartford St.
Wed. thru Sat.
from 9A./3P.

Experienced
Restaurant &
Banquet SERVERS
F/T & P/T Avallable
Apply In Person @
Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club
505 E. Hartford St.
9am-3pm







Accepting
applications for

Advertising
Sales Reps

Sell print and online
advertising for
Citrus Publishing
Focusing on
Crystal River and
Homosassa Areas.
Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers
QUALIFICATIONS
* Two years sales exp.
preferred.
* Computer
proficiency
* Must have initiative,
be self-motivated.
* Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
* Strong presentation
skills preferred.
* Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.
Send Resume and
Cover Letter to:
HR@
chronicleonline.com
EOE drug screen
required for final
applicant.

TELEMARKETERS
5 Needed Now
9-4pm week days
only! No weekends
Hourly + bonus
Call Salina
877-828-2662


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


A FEW PRO DRIVERS
NEEDED.
Top Pay &401 k2 Mos.
CDL Class A Driving
Exp. 877-258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS,
& TN & FL
HOME WEEKENDS,
earn Up to 39 cents a
mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed
Exp. Call: SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC
(800)572-5489 EXT 227

Drivers-Build your own
hometime! Part-time,
Full-time, Express &
Casual lanes! Daily or
Weekly Pay! Modern
Equipment! CDL-A, 3
months recent experi-
ence required.
(800)414-9569
www.drivekniaht.com












POOL CAGE
INSTALLERS, OWN
TOOLS &EQUIPMENT
Send resume to:Citrus
County ChronicleBlind
Box 1744-P 1624 N
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River FL 34429


On lop of .he W..d.


POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Servers &
Bartenders
Experience Required
Applications
available at
Human Resources
Mon-Thurs
9860 SW 84th Court,
Ste E Ocala FL 34481
DFWP/EOE





$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500
Company.
Security equip, dist.
Several positions
avail. entry-leve to
mgmt. Great pay /
full benefits. We train.
Advancement
oppy's. Co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

EXP. LANDSCAPE
PERSONNEL
Trimming Exp. a Must
Apply in Person
920 E. RAY ST.
HERNANDO


FRONT DESK
Hotel experience
required. Great benefits
Apply in person:
BEST WESTERN
614 NW Hwy 19
Crystal River.
No calls please!

Telemarketing
Mgr.
Must be exp. Please
respond asap if you
have what it takes.
Base pay + bonus
Call Salina
1-877-828-2662


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877) 359-1690
MEDICAL CLASSES
2 X-RAY I MED TECH
or CPR & o HIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for hands on Avi-
ation Maintenance Ca-
reer. FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified
Housing Available.
Call Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetfvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

ALLIED HEALTH
Career training
-Attend college 100%
online. Job place-
ment assistance.
Computer available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV certified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.Centura
Online.comrn

EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE
Online from Home
*Medlcal, *Business,
*Crlmlnal Justice. Job
placement assis-
tance. Computer
available. Financial
Ald If qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnllne
.com I




TAYOI COLLEGEE


NE6RIW

2 Week Courses!
*PHYSICAL REHAB
TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
*ALF ADMINISTRATOR
$300
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

r "NF "0

ENROLLING
For January
2012 Classes
BARBER
COSMETOLOGY
FULL SPECIALTY
TRAINING
MANICURE/NAIL EXT.
MASSAGE THERAPY

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
New Port Richey/


L Ne__Hil


MEDICAL CLASSES
" X-RAY wI MED TECH
or CPR& "o HIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715




8 MOBILE HOMES
12 AC., Good Income
Lots of Possibilities
(352) 212-6182

SAWMILLS from only
$3997.
MAKE MONEY& SAVE
MONEY. with your own
bandmill. Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE Info.
& DVD
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com
800-578-1363 X 300N.




$$$ ACCESS
LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$
As seen on TV. Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hours? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com




70'S PEACOCK BLUE
SOFA sleek modern lines
clean smoke-free $150
352-897-4154
RECORD ALBUMS For
sale-60s-70s-80s $1.00
each. Call for list of art-
ists. 352-344-1692

A


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





15 CU. FT. CHEST
FREEZER Kelvinator,
white with drain plug.
Good condition.
$40.00 352-601-4223

A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
Starting at $880
13-18 Seer
Installation w/permit
REBATES u pto $2.500
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914


Electric Dryer
Kenmore,
Excellent cond.
$100
(352) 503-5034
Electric Range
GE white with black
glass door $95. exc
cond(352) 795-7813
REFRIGERATOR, MIl
CROWAVE, STOVE,
DISHWASHER White
Kenmore side by side re-
frigerator with ice maker
and water, electric stove,
under counter micro-
wave, dishwasher. All 10
years old and working.
Sell all for $650.00
352-2700307 or
352-897-4361
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
Washer & Dryer
Whirlpoolwhite, like
new, large capacity
$300 for set
352-465-5382
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new,excellent condition.
Can Deliver
352 263-7398
Whirlpool Side by side
white w/ ice & water
on door $300 dishwash,
White $100. Exc Cond
(352) 382-2743



Electric Pressure
Washer Karcher K 3.97
high pressure $100.
Craftman 16" elect
scroll saw
$100.Craftman 10"
band saw $100
(352) 746-6369
PORTER-CABLE
10" Table Saw with
wheels, $200
(352) 410-1392



SONY 13 INCH TV.
WITH REMOTE GOOD
CONDITION. $20.00
352-726-0686
SPEAKERS TECHNICS
SB-T100 Rarely been
used, in great condition.
$89 Text/call
352-302-6517
TV Sylvania 20" screen,
remote, like new, 2 yrs
old, 20"D $ 50
Homosassa
727-207-1207



COMPUTER STAND
28"Wx51"Hx28"D Grey
metal/blond wood
Homosassa $ 45
727-207-1207
DELL COMPUTER
WinXP 15" flat panel
monitor, keybd, mouse,
cdrom 150gb drive $100
352-746-4219
DELL COMPUTER XP
17" flat panel, keybd,
mouse, DVD drive, 60 gb
hard drive $100
352-746-4219


HOW ABOUT SOME i



EXTRA




CASH !








Beverly Hills, Citrus Springs, Crystal River, Dunnellon,

Floral City, Inglis, Homosassa

V Able to work early morning hours before 6am
V Must be 18 years old
V Florida driver's license and insurance


If interested come to the
Meadowcrest Plant between 1 and 2 am -
drive around to the back and ask for a
district manager.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


695 47823
23-4 9 5 1 76
1 8 76 32495
57 8 3 4 62 19
92618 735 4
4 1 32 9 5687
869724 531
351869742
742513968


IT REALLY PAYS
TO WORK FOR THE
A% C .I T U 5.'. C 0 U N T Y.


www.chronlconllna.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


m t4


Annual


Vt


ANY CAR SOLD
IN THIS 6 HOURS IS
ENTERED TO WIN A
46" FLAT SCREEN TV


- A


A


A


I i I


2431 SUNCOAST BLVD., US HWY 19, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448 35
0009V14


12-628-5100


2n


I I


C8 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 C9


L


P-1 t1 It--







C10 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


DESKTOP COMPUTER
SETUP $100. Dell 512
MB RAM, 60GB hard
drive, and 17" LCD moni-
tor. Works fine. 621-7892
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




2 CLOTH RECLINERS
-(1 ROCKER) Two cloth
recliners in excellent con-
dition. One is a rocker.
$200.00 for both or BO
Phone 352- 726-0492
2 Mediterranean style
metal end tables with
round glass tops, asking
$175. Phone
352-382-7082
4 piece wicker set,
good cond. $120 De-
signer beige couch,
new cond. $200
(352) 382-3892
Beautiful Cherry Wood
Entertainment Center
with Drawers
Plus TV,
$150.
(352) 382-3892
CHINA HUTCH
curved glass, dark
wood, exc. cond. very
old $400(352) 287-9830
COMPUTER DESK REA-
SONABLE 47" x 23" pipe
design, not bulky, good
cond$15.00 Inverness
560-7857
COUCH 84" multi color
4 pillows (burnt
orange/green)
Homosassa $ 250
727-207-1207
COUCH
Love Seat, over size
chair w/ottoman, glass
coffee table w/end
tables too match, New
$3500 sell $1200
(352) 563-1185
DINING ROOM SET cre-
denza, china cabinet, ta-
ble w/6 chairs. Solid
wood, dark color. Very
nice, $1,200. Call after
5:30 p.m. 563-1241
Dining room set, table,
2 leafs, 6 chairs, china
closet, $300.
(352) 637-3041
DINING ROOM TABLE
w/6 padded chairs,
matching lighted hutch
$300. Ive message.
(352) 563-6327
EntertainmentCenter,
holds 42" tv,lots of
shelves, 2 side cabinets
with doors ,dark wood
5'X5'$350
(352) 341-1899


Frigidaire 11.3 cu ft.
auto defrost
$75.
(352) 465-2816
KITCHEN
BUTLER/CART light oak
on casters 36"L x 35"H x
24"D $45 Homosassa
Phone 727-207-1207
Lane Recliner
cranberry color, very
good cond. 6 months
old. $100(352) 628-7224
LEATHER RECLINER &
OTTOMAN LEATHER,
TAUPE, BIRCH HARD-
WOOD. EXCEL CON.
$99 352.503.5319
MATTRESS Queen
Comfort Air mattress
and foundation,dual
controls. Similar to
Sleep Number. $850
obo 527-3589
MOVING SALE EVERY-
THING MUST GO
everything from couches
to tv, to grill most under
$100. 352-201-0136 or
352-249-6186
OCCASIONAL TABLES -
SET OF 3 $100 Sofa and
2 end tables, faux black
slate tops, like new. Call
621-7892 for photos
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Now open Tues-Sat.
352-628-2306
paulsfurnitureonline.com
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
Queen size Select Com-
fort (water bed style)
mattress with Oak water
bed frame and bookshelf
headboard, asking $750.
Phone 352-382-7082
RECLINER green
corduroy Homosassa
727-207-1207
Sofa Table,
Oak Mission Style
$75.
(352) 382-5486

SOLD
Dining Room Set
5 pcs. Oak, exc
cond. $250.




Snapper 21"
self propelled lawn
mower, used 6 months
like new cond$225.
(352) 382-9052




Bonsai plants
very reasonable
(352) 560-3611


BLACK FRIDAY
SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Friday 8AM-4PM
Avon Holiday 2011
Items make-up,
fragrance skin
carebath& body
AWESOME DEALS
271 S. Gardenia Terr
off Ozello Trail



CRYSTAL RIVER
6515 W Robin Lane
Fri, Sat &Sun 10am-6pm

Collectibles,housewareX
mas items,some
furniture.


YARDSALE

Floral City
Fri & Sat 9AM-4PM
Christmas items,
No earlybirds
4800 E Stoer Lane


MO VING
S ALE

HERNANDO
Lake Park
Sat 8-4p. washer
Large dog cages
Hsehld, much more!!
3908 N. Ranch Pass
Terrace




HOMOSASSA
Sugarmill Estate Sale.
Friday & Saturday
BUMELIA COURT
Antiques, collectibles,
musical instruments,
flat scrn TV, jewelry,
furniture, bose
speakers, Llardros &
weller pottery,
Pictures on craigslist

INVERNESS GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB

Fri Sat 9-2p
3 wheel trike, hsehld
items, Christmas
items & More
8610 E Cross Ln


YARDCALE


INVERNESS
Saturday, 26, 8a-6p
1191 S. Estate Point


INVERNESS
7350 E. Turner Camp
Road Friday, November
25, 9-3 Cleaning out!
Items from workshop,
garage and house.





PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 8a-4p
DOWN SIZING
Lots of household and
Chirstmas Decoration
too much to list
All must go!
4940 W. Horseshoe Dr
corner of Pink Poppy
& Horseshoe

REFUND RAISER TO
BENEFIT MISSION
TRIP

PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 9-3 porcelain
dolls, sports equip.
craft table & much
more.
4652 W. Osage PI




3X4X Pants Sybil,
I found more stuff!Liz &
Me 24WP,26 WP
3X(26/28)Capri's
(352) 634-2737



VERIZON SAMSUNG
KNACK CELL PHONE
Easy flip phone, all ac-
cessories, manual, box.
$20 352-601-0067



(2) CHRISTMAS
WREATHS 28 inch
Christmas Wreath with
pine cones and large red
bow. $30 each (352)
746-2141
2 piece desk set, light
wood, good cond.
$75(352) 897-4678
150 GALLON REEF
TANK Email for Details &
Photos
michelles garage sale@a
ol.com
2003 TRAILBLAZER
CARGO SHADE In good
condition, medium dark
pewter gray. $ 79
352-302-6517
3/4 HP Blower Housing
& Motor, $85 obo
1/4 HP Fan & Motor
$40. obo
Both for 3 ton AC Unit
(352) 422-2113


CLASSIFIED




Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
ART BOOK LEARN TO
PAINT $3 563-1073
Attends
Adult Large Underware
18 Packs
$5 per pack
(352) 560-0367
BOAT MOTOR TESTING
ear muffs $10 563-1073
CAN OPENER Presto
Above It All electric auto-
matic under cabinet
#05640 $5 in the box
563-1073
CAR SEAT COSCO.
GREAT
CONDITION/LIKE NEW.
$25.00 563-5206
CARD TABLE
Padded w/4 padded
upholstered chairs $75
Task Chair upholstered
$45. Roll Top Desk oak,
$100 352-601-6064
CEILING LIGHT FIX-
TURE Lithonia globe with
florecent bulb $5 in the
box 563-1073
CERAMIC BASE END
TABLE 26" glass top. $35
563-1073
CERAMIC BASE END
TABLE 26" square glass
top. $35 563-1073
CHINA MIKASA
91 pcset seerves 12
CArlton pattern #L2803
mint cond in original
carton $150.
(352) 564-4245
CHRISTMAS TREE 7.5 ft
Green Maine Pine. 750
miniature lights. Sturdy
metal stand. $95
(352) 746-2141
COAT/HAT RACK
Unfinished pine 11"high
46"long Shelf and 7 pegs
$10 563-1073
Complete Outdoor
Lighting, plus
6 1/2 Christmas Tree
Best offer
(352) 302-3467
CRAFTSMAN
GENERATOR
10hp 5600 watts, 8600
surge watts, brand new
never used. $550
352-601-6064
DEEP FRYER Delongi 9"
round 8" high $20
563-1073
DESK LAMP Stainless
steel adjustable $10
563-1073
DOUBLE BOILER 9"
round 9 1/2 high ce-
ramic coated steel $12
352-563-1073
END TABLE Ceramic
base 26" square beveled
glass top. $35
352-563-1073


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CARPET slight damage
$25 (352)465-1616
FIBER OPTIC TREE 42
inch Green Fiber Optic
Tree. 50 multi-color light
string.Color changes con-
tinuously. $45 (352)
746-2141
FORD FOCUS COLD
AIR INTAKE AND
"CHIP" FITS 2000-2004
2.0 DOHC NEVER USED
$50 352-601-6625
GEORGE FOREMAN
OVEN Not a grill. 8"x10"
oval 5" high $12
352-563-1073
GLASS SERVING TRAY
13" round cut glass 7
compartments and dip
bowl $10 563-1073
GLASS TOP TABLE
1/2" 42x72", 8" mitered
corners, beveled
edges, unusual bright
brass base. v. hvy.$225
obo(352) 637-7248
HAIR DRYER Conair
1875 ION SHINE with at-
tachments. $10 563-1073
HILLS OF REST CEME-
TERY Floral City
2 Cemetery Plots
side by side$1200 for
both obo.call Doris
(352) 726-0571
HOOVER WIND TUN-
NEL 15" Wide Path Mach
2.4. Excellent cond., with
manual & extra bags.
Half price $90. 527-8276
JUSTICE GIRLS FAUX
FUR BOOTS. GREY.
NEVER WORN. SIZE 7
$25.00 563-5206
KODAK EASY SHARE
CAMERA Used once,
14MP, 2.7" LCD screen,
4G SD card, all extras.
Box. $80 352-601-0067
LEAP PAD Electronic
pre-school learning book
$5 563-1073
MATTRESS TWIN WITH
BOX SPRING. LIKE
NEW. $75.00 563-5206
MICHELIN XZA2
RV/295.80R/22.5
TRUCK TIRE best
energy used less than
10K 90% tread left cost
$725.00 sell for $250.00
352 270 1775
MINI DEEP FRYER Ham-
ilton Beach 6 1/2 x 5-
3-1/2 high $6 563-1073
MINI LOAF BREAD
PANS 4 loaves 6"x3 1/2"
New. $5 563-1073
MR. COFFEE auto-drip
coffee maker no timer $5
563-1073
NATIVITY SET wooden
creche, with figures, $20
352-419-5549
New Toys, great for
Christmas, games, toys
ect, nothing over $100
(352) 897-4678


New Pet Pillows 8
available $10 each
(352) 897-4678
OSTER CITRUS JUICER
$6 563-1073
OSTER MINI DEEP
FRYER 6 1/2 square x 5
1/2 high $8 563-1073
RECORD PLAYER
new combo 33"
cd's/rodb/rregaphone
$450.Broyhill round
coffee table /drawers
(352) 489-1486
REFRIGERATOR 34 x19
good cond $40.
New flat screen TV
stand/shelf's $60.
(352) 489-1486


PINE WOOD SPICE
RACK lazy susan fits 16
spices $3 563-1073
ROTISSERIE & BBQ
OVEN SHOWTIME
@11x9 inside $35
563-1073
STEAM VACCUM
ok condition $20
(352)465-1616
STROLLER EVENFLO
W/ CARSEAT.GREAT
CONDITION $50.00
563-5206
TIRE NEW 255.70R/22.5
RV-TRUCK Never used
NEW Hercules S-208 tire
cost $395.00 sell for
$200.00 352 270 1775


STOCKPOT Ceramic
coated steel 7"high x 12"
round $7 563-1073
Toys R UsTrain table
with all accessories
new $199 will sell $100
(352) 897-4678
TRAIN TABLE IMAGI-
NARIUM WITH TRAINS
& TRACKS. LIKE NEW
$50.00 563-5206
TWIN BEDROOM SET.
WHITEWASH. GOOD
COND. $100.00
352-563-5206
WINE SET 4 tulip glasses
and decanter, clear glass
by Luminarc $5 in the box
563-1073


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage

and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


A* Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.

Possess proof of liability insurance. Have 2 dependable vehicles.

TH hOMo E *Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.



,000 -" ',,E Email: emorales@chronicleonline.com or bring resume to 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River








bo w hI,,


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881

Rob's Screening &
Repair Lic/ins, Free Est.
Front entries & garage
sliders etc352-835-2020

SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, Rescreens,
Siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla. rms.,
windows, garage scrns.
628-0562 (CBC1257141)




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903


V THIS OUT!
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435


Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem. Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052




ROGERS Construction
All Construction
sm jobs Free Est (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872





SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repalrs.352 613-2518





Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic 364-2120/593-8806
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. EC0001303
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0009Q84


Generator maint &
repair Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered & Stacked.
352-344-2696
Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $80 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ins 352-621-0881
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977
ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handvman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRC1330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




CORRINE'S HOME
CLEANING SERVICE
Affordable Rates
Free Estimates*
Lic./Ins. 352-795-8843

i THIS OUT!
Dean Family Cleaning
since '96.813-787-2198
or 352-341-8439 office
EXPECT THE BEST
HOUSECLEANING.
Fantastic/Dependable
Free est. (352) 201-4141


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eakh6ustefs"
Free Written Estimate

:$ 100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof
| Must present coupon at time contract is signed |
Lic./Ins. CCC O57537 0009TL3

N 67*.Z7C 11


NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803

CORRINE'S HOME
CLEANING SERVICE
Affordable Rates
Free Estimates *
Lic./Ins. 352-795-8843




Looking For a Pro
Guitar Instructor?
10 yrs teaching exp.
all ages & skill levels
for info. 352-620-5310




Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
.100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *

ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803

Complete Renovation
Cabinets, counter tops,
tile, etc.tub/shower
conversion quality work
(352) 422-3371

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584


#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528
All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
E- .,,_-, ,, ,, ,) I_,: h-,:
352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374



CLEAN UP, Hedge
Trim, haul, press wash,
20 yrs experience
(352) 220-6761
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374
LAWN CARE 'N" More
Fall Clean up, bed,
bushes, haul since 1991
(352) 726-9570
WE BAG LEAVES
and clean gutters!
50% OFF thru holidays.
COASTAL LAWN CARE
(352) 601-1447



AT YOUR HOME
Mower Generator Serv-
ice & Repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273




HOLIDAY SPECIAL
BOGO 1/2 off/ 1 hour
sessions. Moblie
Therapist Lic MA58438
Gift Cert. available
(352) 897-4670



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *




Bahia Pallets
400sq.ft. $60- pick-up.
Pasture Seeding avail
352-400-2221




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.





V THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352) 302-5641

All Tractor Work Service
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955

DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, lic/ins 302-8852



GRIFFINS TREE SERV
Competitive Rates
lic/ins Free Est
352-249-6495

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins. & Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Shape & Remove
Lic/Ins Free Est..Fire
wood avail.. 628-2825




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069


U q


LaughingStock International Inc,Dist by Universal Uclick ior UFS, 201


"Your doctor says the cast can come

off as soon as you've paid the bill."








JOHN GORDON ROOFING


f & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269


COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinish your pool during the cooler months.

352-400-3188


Exposed
Aggregate
*,- Shotcrete $451yd.
Decks Tile
FREE Pavers A.
ESTIMATES

PD P'C COMPLETE
UEUG S REMODEL

MARCITE, INC.
I NSURED 352-746-5200


11-25







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TV WALL MOUNT Or-
bital 21"-27" 1001b CD
VCR shelf $60 563-1073
WOLFGANG PUCK
"Bistro" 10x12 grill like
George Foreman but
stainless steel $20
352-563-1073
WORK BENCH LITTLE
TYKES W/ TOOLS
$30.00. 563-5206










WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" SD50 ACOUSTIC
GUITAR GOLD GRO-
VERS! HIGH QUALITY,
PERFECT! $100
352-601-6625
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC BLACK
w/BAGCORD,STRAP,
TUNER+MORE! $100
352-601-6625
EPIPHONE ACOUSTIC
GUITAR AMPLIFIER
15W, W/CHORUS VIN-
TAGE LOOK "NEW" $35
352-601-6625
Kimball Organ
Syntha Swinger Style,
The Entertainer II,2
keyboards and bench
$300 352-503-3472
MITCHELL MD300S
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
$100 "NEW" SELLS
FOR$259 ONLINE!
352-601-6625
MITCHELL M0100S
"NEW" ACOUSTIC GUI-
TAR W/ GIGBAG & DVD
$100. $200+ ONLINE!
352-601-6625



Oriental Rug
excel. cond. 6 x 9
100% wool $600.
Decorative Trees
good cond $60.
(352) 382-2743

wFitne b

Bow Flex 2, Extreme
w/300 Ib retention bars
all accessories,
like new
$400. obo
(352) 527-3982
Elliptical Machine
Orbitrak brand, like
new, sacrifice at
$95.00(352) 873-2505
Nordic Trac C2255
w/manuel $650.
Gold GYm Power spinn
2230R, plug & play MP3
extra's $150
(352) 476-6896
Schwinn Force
Home Gym
Boflex style, with leg
attach. Like New
$450. obo
(423) 404-5992-Cell


-I
BOYS 12" HUFFY
ROCK IT BIKE Single
speed, coaster brake,
oversized pedals. $25.
Text/Call (352)302-6517
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
Canoe 16'
Kevlar/fiberglass
$500
352-419-6028
CLUB CAR
'06 $1,500
352-344-8516
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DPMS PANTHER AR-15
New, never fired with a
Burris tactical scope,
original case. Extras,
$1,500 Photo ID re-
quired 352-527-4910
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
GOLF CART, EZ Go
Runs, some rustPower
Wise charger T605
Matched, Trojan bat-
teries, $500. or will sell
separately, 352-795-5082
SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




EZ PULL TRAILERS,
LLC.
Sales of Open utilities
& enclosed. We Buy,
Build, Repair, Custom-
ize. Sell Parts, Tires,
Wheels, Used Trailers.

NEW Open Utility
w/ramp 5 x 8 $720.
CASH $684.
5 x 10 $775.
CASH $735.

NEW Enclosed Cargo
w/Ramp
6 x 10 $1995
CASH $1895.
6 x 12 $2095
CASH $1995.
Hwy 44 Crystal River
352-564- 1299

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6x 12 w/new spare
$995.


6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
Tilt Trailer
5 x 8, $400 firm
Call after 7pm
(352) 726-8720



Comforter, pillow, cur-
tains, brand new, paid
pastel $400 Sell $100
(352) 897-4678
NASHBAR KID
KARRIAGE Holds 2 kids
up to 100 lbs. Easily at-
taches 2 most bikes. $80
Text/call 352-302-6517


FIREWOOD for sale.
$100 per cord, delivery
possible.
352476-9563
*


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CASH FOR CARS!
All Cars/Trucks Wanted!
Top Dollar Paid! We
come to you! Any
make/model.Call for
Instant Offer:
1-888-420-3807






JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369




ACA Shih-Tzu Pups,
Lots of colors, average
$450-$600 + Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
BLUE PITBULL
Puppies,
UKC reg., health cert.,
all shots. $500.
(352) 287-0530
CKC Yorkie Poo's
paper trained, very in-
telligent, H/C, 8 weeks,
black & gold 1 M $425
1 F $450.(352) 489-6675
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783


Lost Dog-Male Black
Lab mix-Reward
50 Ibs, white pattern on
chest. Area of Grover
Cleveland to Rock
Crusher to 491 to US19.
Jumped out of van un-
seen. Lost, hungry and
now skittish. Name is
"Cash". Has skin bumps
like raisins-needs meds.
352-220-3890,
352-503-6494,
813-220-1199

VY V v VV
Mini Dachshunds
Puppies


Ready to go $200
family raised, great
with kids and other pets,
very lovable 2 tan
4 blk/brn short hair
parents onsite
Please Call Doug
352-794-3463


Miniature Schnauzer
Pups! AKC, Health Cert,
Shots,, 2 males, $475.
352-419-4723, PM.


Puggle Pups
Great Christmas Gifts
$300. HC & Shots
(352) 564-0270

Livestock


7




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CR./ HOMSASSA
SEE AD UNDER
WORDY GURDY
PUZZLE .
HERNANDO
2 Mobiles for Rent on
Priv. Road, 1/1 fresh
remod. scrn. por $425.
2/1/V2, scrn. por. rear
deck, $475. both clean
& quite (352) 400-2411
HERNANDO
2/1 Newly Remodeled
$400 mo+dep 201-2428
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH furn., priv. ranch
No pets. (386)871-5506
HOMOSASSA
4/2, $600/mo. + until.
(352) 503-7562
Inverness 55+
2/1 quite area $450
(352) 201-9018
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,
pro-rated over 3 mo.
period In the INVERNESS
WATERFRONT 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
$325 plus. 2BR home
$450 Includes H20. 2 BR,
1.5 bath, Park Model
$500. Pets considered.
Section 8 accepted.
(352) 476-4964


3/2 Mobile Home
Remodeled, In park
Ig., scm. por. & carport
minutes from water &
progress energy,
furniture included
$14,000 (352) 302-8797

FOR SALE $19,000
3/2 Uke new. new
paint, new carpet,
new tile flooring.
A/C under warranty.
Must See! Call to View
352-621-9181

HOLDER
3/2, fenced yard
$600/mo 10% down
Owner Financ Avail
(352) 302-9217
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more!
Single wide 1 & 2 BR,
starting @ $6,900. Lot
rent $274/mo. H20
Included. 3 mo. free
rent with purchase.
352-476-4964

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK.!
I finance anybody,
good rates. Use your
land or anything of
value. Trade in cars,
boats, jewelry, guns,
etc. 352-621-3807

Palm Beach Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE
Savings Over 40K
Call Today!
800-622-2832

USED HOMES
REPOSS
Doublewides from
$8,500
Singlewides from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183




Lake Rousseau
3/3 Lakefront, dock,
boat ramp, furnished
inc W/D,FPShort or
long terms avail, call
407-302-1768 or
321-377-1926




2/1 Doublewide
porches,
4043 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando
$44,500
(352) 270-8310




CRYSTAL RIVER
Foreclosure 3/2 on 1
acre TNT, pole barn
Owner Fin avail $49,900
352-746-5912
FLORAL CITY on 3 Lots,
Assumable Mort. $16K
2 Master Suites, Newer
appliance $33,900
Cridland Real Living.
J. Desha 352-201-5201

Green Acres
Is The Place To Be
3/2 ON V2 ACRE
New carpet through-
out, new appliances.
Nice Home
$2,100 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to View
352-401-2979

HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204
LECANTO
2 BR, SW on 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!!
$20K OBO
352-586-2976

Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over I acre.
Quite,, nice home on
paved road. Brand
new A/C & heat &
appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New wggood cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
great location,
2 mi. from Publix,
3 mi., from Suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
Walmart. $2,200.
down $399.00/mo.,
P & I, W.A.C. Must See
to steal this house
352-613-0587




Crystal River Area 2
bedroom. 2 bath.
$12,500 for mobile home
in very good condition.
Has newer heat pump,
roof over, appliances in-
cluding w/d, large
all-season lanai, 3 stor-
age areas accessed from
outside, large carport and
corner lot. Basic furniture
is included if new owners
desire. Conveniently
located in 55 and over
Lecanto Hills Mobile
Home Park, with the low-
est monthly lot rent in Cit-
rus County at $230, that
includes water, sewer,
trash and active club-
house. 352-249-7177

For Sale
Crystal River Village
OPEN HOUSE
Fri Nov 25th Sat 8a-5p
25 Newly renovated 2/2
homes Cry.River Village.
$22,300. 256-347-0827


or (205)603-5658 appt
For Sale 56 Ft.
MOBILE HOME
in quite, established
Mobile Home Park Very
good cond. Must be
55+ AFFORDABLE
(352) 793-7675
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 bed-
room. 1-/2 bath $2.000.
Must be approved
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Waterfront 55+ Park
w/5 piers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 3 bed-
room. 1-/2 bath $3.000.
(cash only) must be ap-
proved 352-476-4964


WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090




LECANTO 55+
* FOR RENT OR SALE **
1/1, $475. Carport,
Fl. Rm (352) 287-9175
(352) 746-1189













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $550 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 Br, fully furn
W/D,DW, big screen TV,
water, sewer, trash
lawn $595. mo
(352) 212-9205
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BR/1 BA $375-$500

CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg 2 BR 1 BA w/d hook
up, dishwasher, lawn
water & sewer $450 mo
(352) 212-9205
FLORAL CITY
1BD $400/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp no
pets 352-726-3699
INVERNESS 2/1
W/D hkup., incls. H20,
trash, lawn, storage rm.
$450. + sec. 634-5499
Inverness 2/1
W/D Hook up, patio,
dishwasher.newer
clean unit, unfurn
$525(352) 422-3217
INVERNESS
2/1, Tri-plex, Great Loc.,
clean & roomy. no pets
$500.mo $300. Sec.
352-341-1847
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/1 $500 352-422-2393

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341




CRYSTAL RIVER
Great Commercial loca-
tion. 6545 W Gulf to Lake
Highway, next to new
County offices. 400 ft
frontage.
Zoned GNC. 50 X 55 ft
two bay building with of-
fice & storage. Avail.
Jan 1. Call W. Roche
(352) 563-0683
EMPTY ESTABLISHMENT
(was a bar) 2400 sq ft
2402 N Florida Av
Hernando
352 586-4168




Inverness 2/1
W/D Hook up, patio,
dishwasher. Clean
newer unit, unfurn $525
(352) 422-3217
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Like New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
Rentals


Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

See what a
Professional
Residential Manager
can do for you.




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
Furnished pool home with
1,365 sf, fl room with hot
tub and a 2 car gar.
Short or long term lease.
Close to mall and marina/
boat launch. $1,000 mo
352-454-7169


Kristi Bortz

Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www.plantationrental
352-795-0782 or
866-795-0784


CIASSIFIEDS




BEVERLY HILLS
1 Bed w/fla rm. + bonus
room C/H/A, W/D
MOVE IN $1100
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
Fl. Rm., 106 S. Fillmore.
$550 mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, CHA, W/D, tile firs. ,
Super Clean, $525. mo.
+ Sec. (352) 817-5017
(352) 489-2266
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,Shed,
$550. mo 352-795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/ CG +FR, New Paint
Carpet, $650; 795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
26 N. Melbourne 2/2
clean, new paint, bath
& windowsC/H/A,
power runs $150 +
Come Stay Warm this
Winter(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/1
352-464-2514
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 Nice Neighborhood
$675mo 352-895-2598
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352- 341-4178
CITRUS SPRINGS
4/2 enclosed porch,
laundry room, nice
back yard fenced
$800(352)-489-0117
CITRUS SPRINGS
Mint 2/2/1, W/D, Scrn
rm. appl's, quite, $700
Lst/last/sec. 746-2957
CITRUS SPRINGS
Never 3/2/2, Ig. mast.
sute. $800 mo. 3/2/1
$695 352-697-3133
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1 + Family Room
$675 + dep 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2 $750. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
HERNANDO
Lg. 2/1 block, on water
Apachee Shores
w/Mother N- Law Suite
Estate Sale! Must Sell!
$90K (229) 246-8008
INGLIS 3/2/2
Deed Restricted,
Split/open plan,
remodeled & Lease
Option 352-697-1085
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
1 mi. from Wal -Mart
$850 (352) 344-1411
INVERNESS
3/2, First/Last/Security
carport, fenced yard,
$700. 352-726-7692
INVERNESS
3/2-1/2/2. mini ranch
fenced 2+acres. horse ok
$975 lst&last 476-6463
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1/1 scr
porch fenced yd
$600 mo.lst & Sec
(352) 344-2560


3/2/Carport, $725.
5942 Aloha St
INVERNESS
Large 2/2/1 fenced
yard, 1 st & security $700
mo.352-422-5482




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Unfurn. fenced.
dock, appl's $1,200 mo.
Avail. now, 586-7128
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
Inverness
2/2 on 1 acre $650mo +
dep. 321-432-2410
LAKE ROUSSEAU
2 bed cottage on
canal to lake. furnish.
$850.m775-230-2240



Furnished Master Suite
Private Entry,no pets,
$450 mo 352-860-0427
INVERNESS
Rm w/ Priv. ba, $85. wk
no smoke 352 586-9932




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are here hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 CJLIL




WORDY GURDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Solomon-like double agents (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Hurled model airplane stickum (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. At no time ingenious (2) syllables in each word.
I @2011UFS, Dist.byUniv.UclickforUFS
4. Rocked actress Shields (1)


5. Old Egyptian ruler's quiver fillers (2)


6. Goofy "Brotherly Love" city NLer (2)


7. Searcher's sound system components (2)


813XVadS SH IaUS 'L HITId ATTIS '9 SAO VsW HOVIVHd 'S
ROOHl IOOHS A' a 3Aa K AN'T 3110 AMHHL g 3 SIdS H38I'I
1 -25-11 SHAISV


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,# , ,#,# # ,


FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL


SMALL TOWN
COUNTRY LIFESTYLE
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989







"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH"

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


16 r- 0 lm -

#1 #Employment source isI
CI ii NIC1,1.Cas ifid
Iwwvw.chronicleonlincmI


Real Estate
For Sale I







C12 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


Beverly Hills. Sun 12-3.
14 New Florida.
2br/2ba/2car. New roof &
NEW INTERIOR.
$68,500. 527-1239



Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
$59,900. Won't last long.
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211



2br/2ba/2car.
14 New Florida Av New
roof, baths, appliances,
paint, flooring, Newer
A/C. Fenced, shed.
$68,500. 352- 527-1239



2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on I acre
lot in Citrus Hills. In ex-
cellent cond., Owner
finance with D/P +
Excellent credit. Call
304-673-0110 or
304-673-5550.
Reduced to $139,000




ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclose a/c porch,
most pvt. location,
Upgrades $179,900
(352) 726-7952
Arbor Lakes, Gated
Community 3/2/2 Split
Fir plan Lots of ceramic,
Fl. Rm. great patio &
landscaping $129,900
3757 Arbor Lakes Dr.
352-344-3700




3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf. new kit. Ig closets,
CHA, firepl. on golf
course $139K make of-
fer, norealtors 726-0652
For Sale 3/3/2 Home,
2,000 sq.ft. 518
Poinsettia, Reduced.
Come take a look
(352) 860-0878

For Sale IoY
Gospel Island 2 Bed-
room. 2 Bath.
Garage&CarportEndosed FR.
Updated,MUST
SEE Large Yard.FSBO
79,900 CALL
352-344-9290
HIGHLANDS,
Remodeled 2/1/ 1,
w/ 2 additional lots,
Nice quiet Area
$58,900.
(352) 697-2884



GREAT LOCATION
3/2/2 Water access.
Updated roof/ac/ap-
pliances. Corner lot
w/beautiful adjacent
lot. $99k 352-422-2970














Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT,
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.cornm.


OWNER
Dunnellon Area, 2 story
4BR 3BA above ground
pool.8x1 0 utility bldg.
financing avail $100
closing cost.Low Down
Call Dan 800-285-4414


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvi()
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!

Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887




INGLIS 3/2/2
Deed Restricted, Split/
open plan, Newly re-
modeled & new roof
$114,500. Lease Opt.
352-697-1085




BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS! Nov
19th-Dec 3rd AL, FL &
MS. Multiple Properties
Live Onsite & Live
Online
www.AuctionsUnited.
corn
Proxibid.com/Auctionsun
ited (800)222-5003
BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS:
174+/- Bank Owned
Assets-AL, GA, NC, &
TN. December 6th, 7th,
& 8th-Homes, Acreage,
Residential Lots & Com-
mercial Proper-
ties-(800)323-8388 or
RowellAuctions.com
LAND LIQUIDATION 20
Acres $0 down,
$99/mo. Only $12,900
near growing El Paso,
TX, Owner financing,
NO CREDIT CHECKS!
money back Guaran-
tee FREE color bro-
chure (800)755-8953
www.sunsetranches.co
m




Wyndham/RCI
Points Plus, Time Share
Pd. $40K Asking $20K
Selling Due to Injury
Call for Details
(352) 563-0328




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2
boat slips near Kings
Bay $519,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857

GIVE IT ALL TO
GOD & ALWAYS
BE THANKFUL


Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129

GOSPEL ISLAND
Lakefront Home
3/2/2.scr porch
Irg oak trees
$125K by owner
908-322-6529
Homosassa
Awesome location! Quick
access to gulf, deep
canal minutes to springs,
2/2 hted pool/ spa
$154,500 (863) 698-0020




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




5 acres high & dry
off Cardinal on
Georgeina $32,500.
obo
813-426-6078
LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse. water
and sewer are avail.$25K
352-382-0535




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




CRYSTAL MINI
FARMS
2 1/2 acres + bring
horses gardens,mobile
home or build your home
as you like. $35k owner
pays closing, phone
352-746-7425




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL. LOT on canal
fenced $15K
352-613-4673




2011 175 MERCURY
Opti-max-ProXS, 4 year
transferable warranty
$9200 obo
(352) 422-4141
EVINRUDE 120HP
1988 oil injected, power
tilt, strong motor, runs
great, must see! $1500
(352) 795-4240




16 Ft. Fiberglass Canoe
w/ paddles
$150
(813) 361-4929


CirsCut


PROLINE
1992 WA/Cuddy Cabin
w/trailer & 96' 250hp
Yamaha RUNS GREAT
$6900. 352-563-1518
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$5,900. (352) 382-3298
SOUTHBAY '08
Pontoon, 20ft 75HP eng.
loaded, hardly used 21
hrs. on boat & mtr, $19K
or take over payments
352-341-3305
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

























Coachman 30'
Charrel 5th whl. big
slide perfect cond.
call for details
352-726-4325
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
Infinity 1999
Motorhome,4-Wlnds
35 foot, Triton V-10 gas,
43k miles. 2 acOnan
gen, back-up camera,
fully equlpped,tow bars
& hitch + brake buddy
for towed vehlcle.All
manuals for coach &
app.All serve hook-up
equip. See at Oak Bend
Village Rt 40 West lot70
Dunnellon. Call for tour
352-465-6335 asking
$22,500. Will neg.




'07 32 foot KZ toy
hauler, like new, full
slide out, sleeps 7, new
tires, like new Owan
Gen., gas tank, alum
wheels $18,500
352-795-2975
COUGAR
'01, 5th wheel 12ft slide,
14ft awning, 5th
airborne hitch & pin
(worth $1,500, can also
be used on 5.5 ft short-
bed truck, garaged
kept, all for $9,900
(352) 212-1704
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tires/brakes; sleeps
6;new queen mattress;
shower/tub; stove/oven;
refrig/sep freezer; lots of
storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
Jayco Designer 95
Series,5th Whl. 37'.10"
3 slides, $1000 repairs
from local buz $8500
(352) 628-1126
Spirit of America
'07, 28 ft, Coachman,
4 new tires
2 new batteries, Ig. slide,
sleeps 5, like new
$11,900, 352-637-2735
TRAIL LITE
2006 travel trailer weighs
5002 Ilbs, 31 ft with slide
out,great condition!
10,900 352-628-4729
WILDERNESS
'06, 27 ft., (fiberglass)
1 slide out, Q.bed de-
luxe upgrades, sips 6
WELL MAINTAINED
$11,500 (352) 344-4087



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not .
CASH PAID $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WEDO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org


14 FT. Aluminum Boat
with trailer, bimini top,
fish finder, cushion
seats, rod holder
$675.
(352) 628-6585
'06 Procap 20 ft
140 HP Suzuki 4
strokelow hours, very
clean, Magic alum tan-
dem trailer, VHF,
Depth, GPS, Windless
anchor $18k obo
(352) 464-4877
CANOE 16'
Square stern ,2 paddles
2 life jackets $350
(352) 465-6187
COBIA 04
19' ,115hp Yamaha 4
stroke 170 hours,GPS
VHF, depth, bimini, jack
plate, trailer $13,500
OBO (352) 447-1244
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
POONTON 32'
Houseboat, $5000
(352) 527-1734


CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
Paying up to$25,000
Any make, Any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794




'94 Mercury Topaz
68K miles, clean, It blue
runs/looks great,excel
tires, 352-527-3509 or
352-287-0755
'98 Nissan ALTIMA
Limited edit., like new,
auto.a/cred, $1800
352-746-0852
BUICK 02
LaSabre,V6, one
owner, garage kept,
72K Mi loaded. $6450.
(352) 746-9002
BUICK
'72, Grand Sport, 350
rebuilt transmission,
Pyssi rear, great shape
$9,000. (352) 634-2221
CHEVROLET
'99, Monte Carlo,
great running, good
looking Asking $1,975.
Cell, 845-701-6370
(352) 637-2588
CHEVY IMPALA
2007, V-6, loaded, mint
cond., grey mist, 55K
$15,500. (352) 601-4568
CHRYSLER
'06, 300, 35K miles, off
white, black cloth, SAT
radio, Nice, $12,600
firm, (352) 795-8792

EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

FORD 04
Taurus SES, Gold
88K mi. 1 owner
Nice cond.$5900
(352) 212-2277
FORD
2002 Taurus, a few
dents, but runs like a
charm. $1,799
(352) 637-7285
HATCHBACK
1989. $700.
352-220-0480
KAWASAKI '82
14K mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1900
(352) 228-1897
LINCOLN
1997 TownCar Runs
good 160k cracked wind-
shield,$800 call
352-287-3987


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



MERCEDES
2003, C240, Like new,
sliver, gray leather int.
43K mi. 4-Matic, 6 cyl.
org. owner, $12,500.
352-270-8734
865-300-1884
MUSTANG 03
Ford G.T. 55 K miles,
show car, lots of
goodies & chrome
$14,500(352) 795-3729
NISSAN '11
Altima 6800 k miles,
loaded, smells new.
Warranty until 2014.
Health forces sale
$18,950 (352) 513-4257
TOYOTA 01
MR2 Spider, convertible
silver,5 spd. a/c,
like new $8600.
352-634-1070
TOYOTA '09
PRIUS,48,973K mi,
green w/leather seats
$18,500 (352) 746-3663




Chevy 1955
Bell Air 4 dr. sedan all
orginial and 106k mi
$15,000 (352)621 -1207
CORVETTE
2003 Z06, $29,000
21K mi., Quick silver
exterior/ black leather
interior. Showcar cond.,
Orig. paperwork
Fully loaded, heads up
display, brand new
tires. David
352-637-6443
CORVETTE
'75 Convertible 98K
orig. mi., Car is in orig.
cond. excel, shape,
worth $25,000., sell for
$15,700 obo, email
eladscat@aol.com or
Call 352-628-7315







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VW CONVERTIBLE
1987 Cabriolet Wolfsburg
edition 5-speed, 1 owner,
priced to sell $1450 obo
352-270-9021




CHEVY
1988 Suburban, silverado
strong! must sell ill need
meds! $1550.obo
(352) 795-0898

DODGE '98
Dakota, V6, 5 spd.
135 K mi. Contractor's
cap with 3 doors,
8' bed, new front tires
great work truck
$1500
(352) 410-1392


1595-1201 THCRN
Simmerman, Quincy Lee 2011-CP-575 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-575
IN RE: ESTATE OF QUINCY LEE SIMMERMAN,
DECEASED.
NOTICE OF ACTION (formal notice by publication)
TO: Kevin Randall Simmerman
(address unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Summary Administration and Petition
to Determine Homestead Status of Real Property have been filed in this court. You
are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on petitioner's attorney,
whose name and address are:
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. Michael Mountjoy, Esquire
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
on or before December 10, 2011 and to file the original of the written defenses with
the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter. Failure to serve
and file written defenses are required may result in a judgment or order for the relief
demanded, without further notice.
Dated on November 3,2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Sonia Prylepa, As Deputy Clerk
November 10, 17, 24 and December 1, 2011.


1603-1124 THCRN
Gloria R. Adams 2011-CP-655 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION,
CASE NO. 201 1-CP-655
IN RE: ESTATE OF GLORIA R. ADAMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Gloria R. Adams, deceased, whose date of
death was July 10, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 17, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Judith M. Sciandra
11575 SW 75th Circle, Ocala, FL 34478
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Samantha Shealy Rauba, Attorney for Judith M. Sciandra Florida Bar No.: 59503
Colleen M. Duris, P.A., 500 NE 8th Avenue, Ocala, FL 34470 Telephone: 352-732-7020
Fax: 352-867-5111
November 17 and 24, 2011.


1606-1124 THCRN
Vs. Genkin, Alexander 2010-CA-3047 Clerk's Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2010-CA-3047
ROY A. GENNARO
Plaintiff
v.
ALEXANDER GENKIN AND YULIANA Y. GENKIN,
Defendant(s),
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Default Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated November 4, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Citrus
County, Florida, on December 8,2011, the following described property:
See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated by reference.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated: November 7, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of Court
(Court Seal)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
EXHIBIT "A"
Lot 5:
Commence at the Northwest corner of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 10, Township 20
South, Range 20 East, Citrus County, Florida; thence South 87 degrees, 46' 36" East
along the North line of said Southeast 1/4 a distance of 483.89 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning, said point being on the Easterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 41,
having a 100.00 foot wide right-of-way; thence continue South 87 degrees, 46' 36"
East along the said North line a distance of 75.17 feet to a point being on the Westerly
right-of-way line of Rails-to-Trails, having a 100.00 foot wide right-of-way and being
formerly known as the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, said point being on a curve con-
cave Westerly, having a radius of 2814.93 feet and a delta of 04 degrees, 22' 16";
thence Southerly along the arc of said curve and along said Westerly right-of-way
line a distance of 214.76 feet to the Point of Tangency (chord bearing and distance
between said point being South 06 degrees, 08' 54" West 214.70 feet); Thence South
08 degrees, 19' 15" West along said Westerly right-of-way line a distance of 6.35 feet;


EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS' FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
Low Payments *
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.org

FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, '05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
GMC
1994 Senoma V-6 Auto-
matic w/ topper, A/C
works Good Condition
Runs great $1500 obo
Call 352-697-3897




CHRYSLER 04
Pacifica 33K mi,
leather, loaded,senior
owned, Like new
$11, 950(352) 634-3806




Air Hockey Table
3ft x 6 ft.
$100 obo
(352) 302-6565
YAMAHA
'02, YZ80, runs great,
exec. cond.
$600 obo
(352) 302-6565




Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra's
Health Forces Sale
$9500 (352) 527-3024
Harley Davidson
04, 1200Sportest turq &
silver, chromed out,
7K mi. $4700 Crystal
River cell 727 207-1619
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of extras. $9500.00
352-560-3731
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492












KAWASKI 2011
Vulcan 900 LP
low miles, many extra's
50 mpg $7,995
(352) 697-2760


1611-1124 THCRN
Vs. Vallejos, Ramiro 09-2009-CA-000184 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2009-CA-000184
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND
SREVICING AGREEMENT RELATING TO IMPAC SECURED ASSETS CORP., MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4.
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAMIRO VALLEJOS; VALLEJOS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAMIRO VALLEJOS, IF
MARRIED; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACTING SOLELY AS
NOMINEE FOR IMPAC FUNDING CORPORATION DBA IMPAC LENDING GROUP; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE;
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
dated November 2, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-2009-CA-000184 of the Circuit
Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK


thence South 88 degrees, 18' 22" West a distance of 62.77 feet to a point being on
aforesaid Easterly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway No. 41, said point being on a
curve concave Westerly, having a radius of 3013.57 feet and a delta of 04 degrees,
16' 32"; thence Northerly along the arc of said curve and along said Easterly
right-of-way line a distance of 224.88 feet to the Point of Beginning (chord bearing
and distance between said point being North 02 degrees, 56' 35" East 224.82 feet).
November 17 and 24, 2011.



1607-1124 THCRN
Vs. Kramer, Roger P. 2009-CA-1859 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2009-CA-1859
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROGER P. KRAMER; MARGARET T. KRAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB, and any unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claim-
ing by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants,,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Citrus
County, Florida, will on the 1 day of December, 2011, at 10:00 A.M. at the In the In
the Jury Assembly Room in the new addition to the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness FL 34450 sale time is 10:00 a.m., offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described
property situate in Citrus County, Florida:

The West 1/2 of the North 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 3,
Township 18, Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida, subject to an easement over the
North 15 feet thereof.
pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the
foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure
sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 28 day of October, 2011.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
Court Administration at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, telephone
(352) 726-8500, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing im-
paired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Betty Strifler. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

November 17 and 24, 2011. 271514


1608-1124 THCRN
Vs, Holloway, Patricia F 2011-CA-2033 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2011-CA-2033
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATRICIA F. HOLLOWAY, PRECISION MARINE SERVICE AND SUPPLY, INC., and WILLIAM
A. HOLLOWAY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given, pursuant to the Uniform Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on
the 2nd day of November, 2011 in Civil Action No. 2011-CA-2033 of the Circuit Court
for Citrus County, Florida, in which Patricia F. Holloway, Precision Marine Service and
Supply, Inc., and William A. Holloway, are the Defendants and SunTrust Bank is the
Plaintiff, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, in accordance with S/S 45.031, Florida Stat-
utes, at 10:00 a.m. on the 1 day of December, 2011, the following described real
property set forth in the Uniform Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOTS 3, 4, 5 AND 6, FOREST PARK SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 148, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA;
AND THAT PART OF LOT 2 OF SAID FOREST PARK SUBDIVISION, LYING NORTH OF A 50
FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY, DEDICATED BY FLORIDA POWER COMPANY, JANUARY 2, 1973,
AND RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 226, PAGE 369, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF THE VACATED COUNTY
ROAD LYING WEST OF AND CONTIGUOUS TO SAID LOTS AND EAST OF THE CENTER LINE
OF SAID ROAD..
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(Court Seal)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk
Dated: November 3, 2011
November 17 and 24, 2011.


1609-1124 THCRN
Vs. Jenkins, William Anthony 2011-CA-001453 Notice of Judicial Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2011-CA-001453 DIVISION
21st MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., etc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM ANTHONY JENKINS, et al.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on Oct. 20,
2011, in Case No. 2011-CA-001453 of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida, in
which 21st Mortgage Corporation, etc., is Plaintiff and William Anthony Jenkins, et al,
are the defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property:
Lot 9, of Micks Shady Rest, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 3, Page 41, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida
Together with 44 x 28 Nobility, Kingswood manufactured home, Seriall No.:
N8-13182AB.
The sale will be held on December 1, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Flor-
ida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact ADA Coordinator, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired, call 711.
Dated this 3 day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF SAID COURT
BY: /s/ Robert Kirby, As Deputy Clerk
Lance P. Cohen, 1723 Blanding Blvd., Suite 102, Jacksonville, FL 32210 904-388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff
November 17 and 24, 2011.

1610-1125 THCRN
11-68566 Vs. Mitchell, James C. 2007 CA 005198 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2007 CA 005198 DIVISION
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY ABS
CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2006-NC5, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-NC5,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES C. MITCHELL, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
dated November 9, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2007 CA 005198 of the Circuit
Court of the Fifth Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida in which Deutsche
Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for Morgan Stanley ABS Capital I Inc. Trust
2006-NC5, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-NC5, is the Plaintiff and
James C. Mitchell, Tracy Mitchell, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash in/on the Jury Assembly Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, Citrus County, Florida at 10:00 a.m. on the
29th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LUCKY HILLS LOT 7, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 19
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, BEING FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES,
54 MINUTES, 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 162.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES, 54 MINUTES, 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH
LINE A DISTANCE OF 111.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 165.22 FEET; THENCE WEST 111.75 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 165.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 15 FOOT WIDE
EASEMENT ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY THEREOF FOR ROAD RIGHT OF WAY, SITU-
ATED AND LYING IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 6709 WEST RENEE LANE, HOMOSASSA, FL* 34446, HOMOSASSA, FL* 344
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated in Citrus County, Florida this 9th day of November, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff PO Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743
November 17 and 24, 2011. 11-68566


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 Cj13


NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT RELATING TO IMPAC SECURED ASSETS CORP., MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4, is Plaintiff and RAMIRO
VALLEJOS;_ VALLEJOS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAMIRO VALLEJOS, IF MARRIED;
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACT-
ING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR IMPAC FUNDING CORPORATION DBA IMPAC LENDING
GROUP; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE JURY
ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
AT 110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 10:00
a.m., on the 1 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment, to wit:

LOT 2, BLOCK 56, BEVERLY HILLS, UNIT NUMBER FOUR, AS PER PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 130-132, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 2 day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, As Deputy Clerk

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact
the Court Administrator at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4299, Phone
No. (352) 637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if
you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call
1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services)

November 17 and 24,2011. 10-10705



1612-1124 THCRN
Vs, Sala, Christopher Wayne 2070-CA-000937 Amended Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-000937

U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for BNC Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-2,
Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-2
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Christopher Wayne Sala a/k/a Christopher W. Sala
Defendants)
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated
November 2, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000937 of the Circuit Court of
the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank, National
Association, as Trustee for BNC Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-2, Mortgage Pass-Through
Certificates, Series 2007-2, Plaintiff and Christopher Wayne Sala a/k/a Christopher W.
Sala are defendantss, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDI-
TION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM, December 1, 2011, the
following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:

LOTS 1, 2, 3 AND THE WEST 6.67 FEET OF LOT 4, BLOCK 300, VILLA TERRACE, UNIT NO. 8,
OF HOMOSASSA, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 49, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THAT PORTION OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF VACATED
ALLEY LYING SOUTH OF AND ADJACENT TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY AS DE-
SCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN RESOLUTION, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK
1360, PAGE 1214, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATED at Inverness, Florida, this 2 day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888

November 17 and 24,2011. 10-165836 FC01


1613-1124 THCRN
Vs. Beyer, Michael Shane 207 -CA-001788 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case : 2011-CA-001788 Division #:

Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Michael Shane Beyer a/k/a Mike Beyer and Sandra Lee Beyer a/k/a Sandra Beyer,
Husband and Wife; Woodland Estates Homeowners Association, Inc.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated October 27, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-001788 of the Circuit
Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Regions
Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Plaintiff and Michael Shane Beyer a/k/a Mike Beyer
and Sandra Lee Beyer a/k/a Sandra Beyer, Husband and Wife are defendants) I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURT-
HOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM on December 1, 2011, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 4, BLOCK 5, OF WOODLAND ESTATES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800

November 17 and 24,2011. 11-216572 FC01


1614-1124 THCRN
Vs. Romney, Reuben 09-2010-CA-000778 Notice of Resched. Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-000778 DIVISION

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-18,
Plaintiff,
vs.
REUBEN ROMNEY, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
dated November 2, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-000778 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein THE BANK
OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TE HE CERTIFI-
CATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-18, is the Plain-
tiff and REUBEN ROMNEY; JESSICA LYNN ROMNEY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGIS-
TRATON SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, AS NOMINEE FOR LITTON LOAN SERVICING LP;
CITRUS HILLS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM
IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH
APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on the 1 day of
Dec., 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:

LOT 18, BLOCK 10, CITRUS HILLS FIRST ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 73 THROUGH 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 2602 N CLEMENTS AVENUE, HERNANDO, FL 34442

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 2,2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

"See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

November 17 and 24,2011. F09119843


1615-1124 THCRN
Vs. Dunagan, Derek 2009-CA-7066 Amended Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-CA-7066

WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
DEREK DUNAGAN, et al,
Defendant(s).
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Clerk's Order Rescheduling Foreclosure
Sale dated November 2, 2011 and entered in Case No. 2009-CA-7066 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff and DEREK DUNAGAN, et al,


are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the JURY
ASSEMBLY ROOM OF THENEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH APOPKA
AVENUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at 10:00 AM, on December 1, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure:

COMMENCE AT THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF LOT 1, ST. MARTINS ESTUARY RETREATS,
UNIT 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 87, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 1 A DISTANCE OF 86.67 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 46 DE-
GREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 107.87 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF A COUNTY ROAD, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE THE FOL-
LOWING COURSES AND DISTANCES: NORTH 21 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
457.79 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 187.55 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 292.51 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
54 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 930.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 54 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 60 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 35 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 125 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE
WATERS OF A CANAL, THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID WATERS A DISTANCE OF 60 FEET, TO A POINT THAT BEARS NORTH 35 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH
35 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST, 125 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, BEING LOT 93 OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION.

A/K/A 14249 WEST SHORECLIFF COUR CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429


Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 3, 2011.
Betty Strifler, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

November 17 and 24, 2011.



1616-1124 THCRN
Vs, Rivera, Heriberto 2010-CA-277113 Amended Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN T HE CIRCUIT COURT, FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-2113

AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC., a Delaware corporation, authorized to and
doing business in the State of Florida,now known as Springleaf Home Equity, Inc.
under name change amendment filed with the State of Florida on March 8, 2011,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HERIBERTO RIVERA and BEATRIZ RIVERA, husband and wife, individually and as
Trustees of The Heriberto Rivera and Beatriz Rivera Revocable Living Trust Agreement,
dated 20 day of April, 2006,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated August 19, 2010, and subsequent Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale, both
entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-2113 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida, wherein AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY,
INC. is Plaintiff and HERIBERTO RIVERA and BEATRIZ RIVERA, husband and wife, individ-
ually and as Trustees of The Heriberto Rivera and Beatriz Rivera Revocable Living Trust
Agreement, dated 20 day of April, 2006, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room, in the new addition to the new
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450 at 10:00
A.M. on December 1, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, being situate in CITRUS County, Florida,
to-wit:

LOTS 63 THROUGH 66, BLOCK 254, INVERNESS HIGHLAND SOUTH, ACCORDING TO THE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 51, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, LESS AND EXCEPT LOTS 63 AND 64, AS CONVEYED BY DEED
TO HENRY B. RIVERA, RECORDED IN OR BOOK 2163, PAGE 1858, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

DATED this 10th day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(Court Seal)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

November 17 and 24, 2011.


1622-1201 THCRN
Vs. Smith, Emily 2008 CA 5720 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2008 CA 5720

LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE C-BASS MORTGAGE
LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-CB7,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
EMILY SMITH, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
June 18, 2009 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Citrus,
Florida, on December 15, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., at Jury Assembly Room, Citrus County
Courthouse- 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450 for the following described
property:

Lot 30, Block 382 of CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT $, ACCORDING to the plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 133 through 152, of the Public Records of Citrus
County, Florida.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.
Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein.

DATED: November 15, 2011
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk of the Court

Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A., 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 300,
Boca Raton, FL 33486

"If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Mr. John D. Sullivan at 110
N. Apopka Street, Inverness, FL 34450; telephone number 352-341-6700 two (2)
working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); If you are voice impaired, call the
Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770."

November 24 and December 1, 2011. 10-001042


1623-1201 THCRN
Vs. Laub, Paul T. 2010 CA 003633 Notice of Judicial Sale By Clerk
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FL
CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2010 CA 003633

REGIONS BANK, an Alabama banking corp.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PAUL T. LAUB, an unmarried man, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAUL T. LAUB, and UN-
KNOWN TENANTS #1, UNKNOWN TENANTS #2,
Defendant(s),
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY CLERK

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to Plaintiff's Summary Final Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause now pending in said court,
that I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Citrus County Courthouse Jury
Assembly Room on the 15th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., in accordance
with Sec. 45.031 of the Florida Statutes, the following property:

Lot 9, Block 129, BEVERLY HILLS UNIT NUMBER SIX, SECTION ONE, according to the map
or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 11, Page 89, Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED November 10, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

Attorney: Caridad M. Garrido, Esq. 2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Ste 190, Coral Gables,
FL 33134 Tel: 305-447-0019 Email: cary@garridorundquist.com

November 24 and December 1, 2011.


1624-1201 THCRN
Vs. Echenique, Carlos 09-2010-CA-002330 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-002330

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL
MORTGAGE-BACKED TRUST, SERIES 2005-L3, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-L3
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLOS ECHENIQUE; MARISELLA ECHENIQUE A/K/A MARISELA ECHENIQUE; UN-
KNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Nov. 3,
2011, and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-002330, of the Circuit Court of the 5th
Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED TRUST, SERIES
2005-L3, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-L3 is Plaintiff and
CARLOS ECHENIQUE; MARISELLA ECHENIQUE A/K/A MARISELA ECHENIQUE;
UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE
NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, AT 110 NORTH APOPKA
AVENUE, INVERNESS IN CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA at 10:00 a.m. on the 8 day of Dec.,
2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

LOT 12, BLOCK 164, OF CRYSTAL MANOR, UNIT NO. 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 136 THROUGH 152, INCLUSIVE, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 4 day of November 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, As Deputy Clerk

This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact
the court Administrator at 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4299, Phone
No. (352) 637-9853 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if
you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call
1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services)

Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL
33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
November 24 and December 1, 2011. 10-02595


1625-1201 THCRN
Vs. Jacquard, Boe E. 09-2011-CA-002685 Notice of Sale


PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-002685
CAPITAL CITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BOE E. JACQUARD,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I, BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court of the Fifth
Judicial Circuit, in and for CITRUS County, Florida, pursuant to the Summary Final
Judgment in Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, will sell at public sale
the following described property situate in CITRUS County, Florida, to wit:

LOTS 17 and 19, BLOCK 60, BEVERLY HILLS UNIT 4, according to the plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 5, Pages 130 through 132, inclusive, public records of Citrus
County, Florida.

Said sale shall be made to the highest and best bidder for cash pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment entered in the above styled cause and will be held in the


Jury Assembly Room of the CITRUS County Courthouse in Inverness, Florida, on the
15th day of December, 2011, commencing at the hour of 10:00 A.M.

All interested parties shall be governed accordingly by this Notice.
DATED this 10th day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

Gregory V. Beauchamp, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff PO Box 1129, Chiefland, FL 32644
(352) 493-1458

November 24 and December 1, 2011.


1626-1201 THCRN
Vs. Ducharme, Benjamin D. 09-2011-CA-2262 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-2262
CAPITAL CITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BENJAMIN D. DUCHARME, a single man,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I, BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Circuit Court of the Fifth
Judicial Circuit, in and for CITRUS County, Florida, pursuant to the Summary Final
Judgment in Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, will sell at public sale
the following described property situate in CITRUS County, Florida, to wit:

LOT 16, CARDINAL HILLS ESTATES, an unrecorded subdivision, lying and being situate
in Section 33, Township 19 South, Range 18 East, Citrus County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows:
Commence at the NW corner of the SW 1/4, of Section 33, Township 19 South, Range
18 East, Citrus County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 36' 30" East along the 1/4
Section line, a distance of 625.42 feet; thence run S 0 degrees 17' 53" E, 1300.51 feet;
thence run N 89 degrees 34' 51" E, 600.55 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence con-
tinue N 89 degrees 34' 51" E, 200.18 feet; thence run S 0 degrees 17; 53" E 272.0 feet;
thence S 89 degrees 34' 51" W, 200.18 feet; thence run N 0 degrees 17' 53" W, 272.0
feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to an easement over and across the South
25.00 feet thereof for road right of way. Together with a 1992 Classic Mobile home
bearing ID#10L22571, Title #63631166..

Said sale shall be made to the highest and best bidder for cash pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment entered in the above styled cause and will be held in the
Jury Assembly Room of the CITRUS County Courthouse in Inverness, Florida, on the
15th day of December, 2011, commencing at the hour of 10:00 A.M.

All interested parties shall be governed accordingly by this Notice.
DATED this 10th day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk

Gregory V. Beauchamp, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff PO Box 1129, Chiefland, FL 32644
(352) 493-1458

November 24 and December 1, 2011.


1627-1201 THCRN
Vs. Kareti, Srinadh 09-2010-CA-004237 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 09-2010-CA-004237

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SRINADH KARETI; APARNA L. KARETI a.k.a. APARNA KARETI; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.;
JOHN TENANT (Unit 33) and JANE TENANT (Unit 33), and JANE TENANT #2 (Unit 29)
JOHN TENANT #3 (Unit 30) and JANE TENANT #3 Unit 30, JOHN TENANT #4 aka JOHN
WELLS (Unit 31) JOHN TENANT #5 aka DAVID GOODMAN Unit 32 JANE TENANT #6 aka
LISA RICHARDSON (Unit 34) JOHN TENANT #7 (Unit 35) JOHN TENANT #8 aka MATEE
RAHMAN (Unit 36) JOHN TENANT #9 aka ERNEST MARTIN (Unit 37) JOHN TENANT 10
(Unit 38),
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated November 10, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-004237 of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB n/k/a WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., is Plaintiff, and
SRINADH KARETI; APARNA L. KARETI a.k.a. APARNA KARETI; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.;
JOHN TENANT (Unit 33) and JANE TENANT (Unit 33), and JANE TENANT #2 (Unit 29)
JOHN TENANT #3 (Unit 30) and JANE TENANT #3 Unit 30, JOHN TENANT #4 aka JOHN
WELLS (Unit 31) JOHN TENANT #5 aka DAVID GOODMAN Unit 32 JANE TENANT #6 aka
LISA RICHARDSON (Unit 34) JOHN TENANT #7 (Unit 35) JOHN TENANT #8 aka MATEE
RAHMAN (Unit 36) JOHN TENANT #9 aka ERNEST MARTIN (Unit 37) JOHN TENANT #10
(Unit 38), are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash Citrus
County Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
33450 at 10:00 o'clock A.M. on December 15, 2011,, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit:

See Exhibit "A" attached hereto

and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included
as security in Plaintiff's mortgage..

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated at Inverness, Citrus County, Florida on November 10, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, As Deputy Clerk

WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB
EXHIBIT "A"
LEGAL DESCRIPTION LOAN NO. 0048315998

ALL THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF CITRUS STATE OF
FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS.

Parcel 1:
Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southeast corner of the South 1/2 of the North 1/2 of the Southeast
1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 27, Township 18 South, Range 17 East, thence N 89
degrees 34'14" West along the South line of said South 1/2 of the North 1/2 of the
Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, a distance of 433.30 feet, to the Point of Beginn-
ing, thence continue N 89 degrees 34'14" West along said South line, a distance of
110 feet, thence N 00 degrees 16'17" West 334.24 feet to a point on the South
right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide road, thence S 89 degrees 43'11" East along said
South right-of-way line, a distance of 110 feet, thence South 00 degrees 16'17" East
334.52 feet to the Point of Beginning.

TOGETHER with an easement dated June 10, 1975, filed June 11, 1975 and recorded
in Official Records Book 401, Page 255, of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.

Parcel 2:
Lot 4, unrecorded subdivision in Lot 45, unrecorded Greenleaf Forest, Section 32,
Township 18 South, Range 17 East, and more particularly described as follows:

Commence at the East '/2 corner of Section 32, Township 18 South, Range 17 East,
thence South 89 degrees 59'51" West, along the North line of the Southeast 1/4 of
said Section 32, 220.00 feet, thence South 0 degrees 07'43" West, 200.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence North 89 degrees 59'51" East, 110.00 feet; thence South 0
degrees 07'43" West, 100.61 feet to the Northerly right-of-way of a 50 foot wide
County Road; thence South 89 degrees 40'40" West, along said right-of-way, 110.00
feet; thence North 0 degrees 07'43" East, 101.22 feet to the Point of Beginning, Citrus
County, Florida.
Parcel 3:
Lot 9, being more particularly described as follows:

Commence at the East Quarter corner of Section 32, Township 18 South, Range 17
East, Citrus County, Florida, thence South 89 degrees 59'51" West, along the North
line of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 32, 330.00 feet; thence South 0 degrees
07'42" West, 200.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence North 89 degrees 59'51"
East, 110.00 feet; thence South 0 degrees 07'43" West, 101.22 feet to the Northerly
right-of-way of a 50 foot wide County Road, thence South 89 degrees 40'40" West,
along said right-of-way, 110.00 feet; thence North 0 degrees 07'43" East, 103.83 feet
to the Point of Beginning. (Being Lot 9, in Lot 45, of unrecorded Greenleaf Forest)
November 24 and December 1, 2011.


1628-1201 THCRN
Vs. Dondonan, Corazon C. 09-2010-CA-000722 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5 TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 09-2010-CA-000722

AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC,
Plaintiff,
Vs.
CORAZON C. DONDONAN MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCOR-
PORATED AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST MAGNUS FINANCIAL CORPORATION; THE UNKNOWN
HEIRS AND BENEFICIARIES OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING
TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007; DAVID DONDONAN; ERIC DONDONAN A/K/A
ERIC A. DONDONAN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIC DONDONAN A/K/A ERIC A.
DONDONAN UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID DONDONAN; ERIC DONDONAN, POSSI-
BLE HEIR OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY
OF SEPT. 2007 A/K/A ERIC A. DONDONAN; DAVID DONDONAN, POSSIBLE HEIR OF THE
CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007;
LYNN DZIEDZIC; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LYNN DZIEDZIC; LYNN DZIEDZIC, POSSIBLE HEIR
OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT.
2007; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIA LIZA STEEL; MARIA LIZA STEEL; MARIA LIZA STEEL AS
PLENARY GUARDIAN OF THE PERSON AND PROPERTY OF THE WARD; MARIA LIZA STEEL,
POSSIBLE HEIR OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14
DAY OF SEPT. 2007; THE UNKNOWN SUCCESS TRUSTEE OF THE CORAZON C.
DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 9
day of November, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-2010-CA-000722, of the Circuit
Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein AURORA
LOAN SERVICES LLC, is the Plaintiff and CORAZON C. DONDONAN; MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST MAGNUS
FINANCIAL CORPORATION; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND BENEFICIARIES OF THE
CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007;
DAVID DONDONAN; ERIC DONDONAN A/K/A ERIC A. DONDONAN; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ERIC DONDONAN A/K/A ERIC A. DONDONAN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DA-
VID DONDONAN; ERIC DONDONAN, POSSIBLE HEIR OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN
REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007 A/K/A ERIC A. DONDONAN;
DAVID DONDONAN, POSSIBLE HEIR OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE
LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007; LYNN DZIEDZIC; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
LYNN DZIEDZIC; LYNN DZIEDZIC, POSSIBLE HEIR OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REV-


CABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIA
LIZA STEEL; MARIA LIZA STEEL; MARIA LIZA STEEL AS PLENARY GUARDIAN OF THE PER-
SON AND PROPERTY OF THE WARD; MARIA LIZA STEEL, POSSIBLE HEIR OF THE
CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007;
THE UNKNOWN SUCCESS TRUSTEE OF THE CORAZON C. DONDONAN REVOCABLE LIV-
ING TRUST, DATED 14 DAY OF SEPT. 2007 and UNKNOWN TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the, JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION OF
THE CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
10:00 a.m. on the 8 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

LOT 8, BLOCK F, HILLSIDE SOUTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 16, PAGES 56 THROUGH 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

Dated this 10 day of November, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk

November 24 and December 1, 2011. 09-70959


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C14 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


1629-1201 THCRN
Vs. Tiffany, Michael R. 2011-CA-1452 Notice of Judicial Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2011-CA-1452 DIVISION
21st MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., etc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL R. TIFFANY, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on Nov. 10,
2011, in Case No. 2011-CA-1452 of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida, in which
21st Mortgage Corporation, etc., is Plaintiff and Michael R. Tiffany, et al, are the de-
fendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real
property:
The South 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 Section 5, Town-
ship 20 South, Range 20 East, except the East 25 feet thereof. Together with on exclu-
sive easement for ingress and egress over lands as described in O.R. Book 489, Page
304, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
Together with a 2006 Nobility 66 x 32 manufactured home, RMS model, Serial No:
NI-9501AB, located on said premises.
The sale will be held on December 15, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness,
Florida, in accordance with Chaper 45, Florida Statutes.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact ADA Coordinator, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than 7 days; if you are hearing impaired, call 711.
Dated this 10th day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF SAID COURT
BY: /s/ Amy Holmes, As Deputy Clerk

Lance P. Cohen, 1723 Blanding Blvd., Suite 102, Jacksonville, FL 32210 904-388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff

November 24 and December 1,2011.



1630-1201 THCRN
vs. Polion, Betty Ann 09-2010-CA-005360 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2010-CA-005360
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC F/K/A CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BETTY ANN POLION; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BETTY ANN POLION; LARK E. CLINE; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LARK E. CLINE; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; CAPITAL CITY BANK; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TO-
GETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus County, Florida, I will
sell the property situate in Citrus County, Florida, described as:
TRACT 122, OF SEVEN RIVERS HEIGHTS, AND UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION FURTHER DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A TRACT OF LAND LYING IN THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 15,
TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE WEST 1/4 CORNER OF
SAID SECTION 15, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42'19" EAST, 546.77 FEET, THENCE NORTH
00 DEGREES 35'27" EAST, 295.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 35'27" EAST, 228.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 24'33" EAST,
415.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 35'27" WEST, 228.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 24'33" WEST, 415.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO THE WEST
25 FEET THEREOF FOR ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY.

To include a:
1998 GREE VIN FLFLV70A25338GH21 0073753153
1998 GREE VIN FLFLV70B25338GH21 0073753160
A/K/A
9573 North Eventide Point, Crystal River, FL 34428
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Citrus County Courthouse,
The Jury Assembly Room, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450 at
10:00 AM, on December 8, 2011.
DATED THIS 4 DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2011.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Witness my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm
Drive,Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Phone: 813-915-8660 Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to partic-
ipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact John Sullivan, ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 work-
ing day of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at (352) 341-6700. You can
also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA Accommodation Request
Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in your
county.
November 24 and December 1,2011.



1631-1201 THCRN
Vs, Reyes, YamilA, 2070-CA-004963 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-004963 Division #:
Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Yamil A. Reyes and Kellye M. Reyes, His Wife; Citrus Springs Civic Association, Inc.
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 15, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-004963 of the Circuit
Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Regions
Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Plaintiff and Yamil A. Reyes and Kellye M. Reyes, His
Wife are defendants) I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDI-
TION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM on December 15, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 11, BLOCK 810, OF CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 8, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 43 THROUGH 49, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk of Court
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800

November 24 and December 1,2011. 10-193331 FC01


1632-1201 THCRN
Vs, Ferdinand, Dalton R 2009-CA-003973 Amended Notice ofSale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case : 2009-CA-003973 Division #

Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan
Trust 2006-11
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Dalton R. Ferdinand and Erica M. Ferdinand.
Defendant(s)
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated
November 9, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-003973 of the Circuit Court of
the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank
National Trust Company as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-11,
Plaintiff and Dalton R. Ferdinand and Erica M. Ferdinand are defendants) I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE TO
THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM, December 8, 2011, the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 56, WOODSIDE, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 17, PAGES 13, 14, AND 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated at Inverness, Florida, this 10 day of November, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Robert Krby, Deputy Clerk


ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800
November 24 and December 1,2011. 09-146171 FC01


1633-1201 THCRN
Vs, Judy L, Wilson 2010-CA-005068 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-005068 Division #:
Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Quest Trust 2005-X2, Asset
Backed Certificates, Series 2005-X2, Under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement
Dated September 1, 2005
Plaintiff,
-vs. -
Judy L. Wilson; FIA Card Services, N.A. f/k/a Bank of American; Asset Acceptance,
LLC
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE


CLASSIFIED


FrcoureSl/


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 10, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-005068 of the Circuit
Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Deutsche
Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Quest Trust 2005-X2, Asset Backed Certifi-
cates, Series 2005-X2, Under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement Dated September
1, 2005, Plaintiff and Judy L. Wilson are defendants) I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY
ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM
on December 15, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 12, BLOCK 125, TOWN OF HOMOSASSA, COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE "OLD MAP",
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 6, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk of Court
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800
November 24 and December 1,2011. 10-198426 FC01


1634-1201 THCRN
Vs, Rumson, Linda Ann 2010-CA-003206 Notice ofSale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case : 2010-CA-003206 Division #:

Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Linda Ann Rumson a/k/a Linda Rumson; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; If living,
and all Unknwon Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties
may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 10, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-003206 of the Circuit
Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein Regions
Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Plaintiff and Unda Ann Rumson a/k/a Linda Rumson
are defendants) I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE FRONT
STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO
THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM on December 15, 2011, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
THE SOUTH 82.50 FEET OF THE EAST 141.43 FEET OF LOT 14 OF R.G. HOBBS SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 22, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING PARCEL 7 OF AN UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION;
AND
LOT 7, BLOCK D, GOSPEL ISLAND HOMESITES, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 178, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH ALL GRANTOR'S INTEREST IN AND TO THE FOLLOWING:
THE UNDIVIDED 1/7TH INTEREST IN LOT 24, BLOCK C, OF GOSPEL ISLAND HOMESITES,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 178, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK
56, PAGE 223, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 110 North Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida 34450; (352) 341-6700 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk of Court

ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800
November 24 and December 1,2011. 10-178746 FC01


1635-1201 THCRN
Vs, Whitmeyer, Steve 2010-CA-005460 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR CITRUS
COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-005460 Division #:
American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Steve Whitmeyer and Stephanie A Rowe; Gospel Island Homeowners' Association,
Inc.; David Craig Stevens
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 15, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-005460 of the Circuit
Court of the 5th Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida, wherein American
Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc., Plaintiff and Steve Whitmeyer and Stephanie A.
Rowe are defendants) I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, ON THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE TO THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDI-
TION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 10:00 AM on December 15, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 5, GOSPEL ISLAND ESTATES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, DESCRIBED AS;
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 14, SECTION 9, TOWN-
SHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 03' 27" WEST ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 14 A DISTANCE OF 433.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0 DEGREES 03' 27" WEST ALONG SAID WEST LINE
A DISTANCE OF 103.37 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 19' 37" EAST 140.71 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY A 50 FOOT WIDE ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES
06' 27" EAST ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 103.37 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 19' 37" WEST 140.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BE-
ING LOT 5, OF GOSPEL ISLAND ESTATES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Citrus County, Florida
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk of Court
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800

November 24 and December 1,2011. 10-197007 FC01


1636-1201 THCRN
Vs. Martino, Irene T. 2008-CA-5564 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 2008-CA-5564
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
IRENE T. MARTINO, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF IRENE T. MARTINO, UNKNOWN TENANT 1l,
UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming interest by, through under
or against any Defendant, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject
property,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure en-
tered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court in and for Citrus County, Florida, I
will sell at public auction to the highest bidder in cash in the Jury Assembly Room at
the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6400, at 10:00 a.m. on December 15, 2011, that certain real property situated in
the County of Citrus, State of Florida, more particularly described as follows:
Lot 22, Block 345 of INVERNESS HIGHLANDS WEST as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 19,
of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 110 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness Florida 34450, telephone: (352) 341-6430 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this Notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, CALL
1-800-955-8771.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
November 24 and December 1,2011.


1637-1201 THCRN
Vs. Home, Howard D. 09-2009-CA-005884 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-2009-CA-005884
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
HOWARD D. HORNE; LINDA M. HORNE; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2;
and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named
Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown
parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees,
spouses, or other claimants; CITRUS SPRINGS CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
November 10, 2011, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in CITRUS County,
Florida, described as:


LOT 1, BLOCK 263, CITRUS SPRINGS, UNIT 3, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 116 THROUGH 129, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.

a/k/a 9929 N. STAFFORD DRIVE, CITRUS SPRINGS, FL 34433.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Jury Assembly Room in
the New Addition to the New Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness, FL 34450, at ten o'clock a.m., on Dec. 15, 2011.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated at Inverness, Florida, this 10th day of November, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINA-
TOR (352) 341-6400, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450 WITHIN TWO WORK-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771.
November 24 and December 1, 2011. 888091629


1638-1201 THCRN
Vs. Wilkinson, Paul 09-2008-CA-006622 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 09-2008-CA-006622
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN
MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST 2007-CH4 ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-CH4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PAUL WILKINSON; SUZANNE WILKINSON; UNKNOWN TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
(Please publish in CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date
dated the 10th day of November, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09-2008-CA-006622,
of the Circuit Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for Citrus County, Florida,
wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN
MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST 2007-CH4 ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-CH4 is the Plaintiff and PAUL WILKINSON, SUZANNE
WILKINSON, and UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at the IN THE JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION OF THE NEW CITRUS
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450, 10:00 a.m. on
the 15th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 3, BLOCK 782, CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 7, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 33 THROUGH 39, INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 14th day of November, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Amy Holmes, Deputy Clerk
November 24 and December 1, 2011. 08-61265


1639-1201 THCRN
Vs. Cobo, Brandon 09-2009-CA-004706 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 09-2009-CA-004706 DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF SASCO 2007-MLN1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRANDON COBO, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated November 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09-2009-CA-004706 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF SASCO 2007-MLN1 is the Plaintiff
and BRANDON COBO; JANIS COBO; TENANT #1 N/K/A STEPHANIE GERKENSMEYER are
the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at JURY ASSEMBLY ROOM IN THE NEW ADDITION TO THE NEW CITRUS COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA at
10:00 AM, on the 8 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
THE NORTH 1/2 OF LOT 2 IN BLOCK 425 B, A REPLAT OF A PORTION OF INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS WEST FIRST ADDITION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OF PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 116 THROUGH 122, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 5455 S BARCO TERRACE, INVERNESS, FL 34452
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 4, 2011.
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Robert Kirby, Deputy Clerk
*"See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. John D.
Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450-4231 Phone: 352-341-6700 Fax:
352-341-7008

November 24 and December 1, 2011. F09079853


1596-1201 THCRN
Board of Dentistry Mark Maggert, DDS
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF DENTISTRY
IN RE: The license to practice dentistry of
Mark Maggert, DDS
590 S. Main Street, Wildwood, Florida 34785
CASE NO.: 2010-05528
LICENSE NO.: 8216
The Department of Health has filed an Administrative Complaint against you, a copy
of which may be obtained by contacting, Jeff G. Peter, Assistant General Counsel,
Prosecution Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee Florida
32399-3265, (850) 245-4640

If no contact has been made by you concerning the above by December 21, 2011,
the matter of the Administrative Complaint will be presented at an ensuing meeting
of the Board of Dentistry in formal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the individual or
agency sending this notice not later than seven days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Telephone: (850) 245-4640, 1-800-955-8771(TDD) or
1-800-955-8770(V), via Florida Relay Service.
November 10, 17, 24 and December 1, 2011.


1621-1124 THCRN
Ordinance 11-0-19 City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Public Hearing
The City of Crystal River Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing, Thursday,
December 8, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, located at 123 NW
Hwy 19, Crystal River, Florida, to hear: PC#2011-004
ORDINANCE 11-0-19
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE CODE OF
ORDINANCES, ENTITLED APPENDIX A, LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE; PROVIDING FOR A
MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT IN SEC. 2.01.00 AND TABLE 2.01.00 AND DELETION
OF LAND USE CATEGORIES FROM TABLE 2.01.00 AS ADOPTED BY ORD. 11-0-06 IN THE
2025 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR "LIGHT ASSEMBLY" USES IN HIGH INTEN-
SITY COMMERCIAL (CH) ZONING DISTRICTS IN SECTION 2.01.09; PROVIDING A DEFINI-
TION AND PURPOSE FOR MXD IN SEC. 2.01.14; PROVIDING FOR REMOVAL OF DELETED
LAND USE CATEGORIES IN SECTION 2.01.00; PROVIDING FOR PERMITTED USES IN CH
AND MXD IN SEC. 2.03.02; PROVIDING FOR ACCESSORY USES IN MXD IN SEC. 2.03.03;
PROVIDING FOR DENSITY AND HOUSING TYPES IN SECTION 4.01.01 AND TABLE 4.01.01;
PROVIDING FOR MXD LOT STANDARDS IN SEC. 4.02.01 AND TABLE 4.02.01.G AND
BUILDING HEIGHTS AND SETBACKS IN TABLE 4.02.02.C; PROVIDING FOR BUFFER IN TA-
BLE 4.05.03.F AND TABLE 4.05.03.G; PROVIDING FOR MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT DIS-
TRICTS IN NEW SEC. 4.06.00; PROVIDING FOR ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS IN SEC.
5.01.11 IN THE GENERAL COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT; PROVIDING FOR ADMINIS-
TRATIVE PROCEDURES IN SEC. 10.00.02, SEC. 10.01.00 AND TABLE 10.01.00; PROVIDING
FOR SUBMITTAL REQUIREMENTS IN SEC. 10.01.03; PROVIDING FOR REZONING TO MXD
IN SEC. 10.01.06; PROVIDING FOR REVIEW OF MXD IN SEC. 10.03.02; PROVIDING FOR
AMENDMENTS TO DEVELOPMENT PERMITS IN SEC. 10.05.00; AND PROVIDING FOR
SIGNAGE IN CHAPTER 12, SECTION 12.00.13; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Statutes, Section 286.0105, if a per-
son decides to appeal any decision made by the Planning Commission with respect
to the matters considered at this public hearing, he/she will need a record of the
proceedings, at that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record may include the testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of disa-
bility or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building and
Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida 34428, (352) 795-4216 exten-
sion 306, at least two (2) days before the meeting.
The Commission invites comments from concerned citizens either in person or by
submitting written comments to the City of Crystal River. For more information call
(352) 795-4216 extension 306.
November 24, 2011.


1605-1124 THCRN
12/1 and 72/2 Special Magistrates hearings- VAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, in compliance with Sections 194 and 196 Florida Stat-
utes, the Citrus County Value Adjustment Board will commence hearings conducted
by special magistrates who will hear testimony and consider evidence on petitions
relating to valuation of real and tangible property, denials of homestead and other
exemptions, and ad valorem tax deferrals and classifications.
Additional Tentatively Scheduled Hearing Dates:
DECEMBER I & December 2, 2011
BEGINNING AT 9:30 A.M.
CITRUS COUNTY COURTHOUSE
110 NORTH APOPKA AVENUE
ROOM 2-326, 2nd FLOOR
INVERNESS, FLORIDA
In compliance with Florida Statute 196.194, a list of the following applicants is main-
tained for public view between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., in the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Office, Courthouse Annex, 210 North Apopka Avenue,
Suite 200, Inverness, Florida, and at the Property Appraiser's Crystal River Satellite Of-
fice, 801 SE Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida:

(a) Applicants for exemption who have had their applications for exemption
wholly
or partially approved
(b) Applicants for exemption who have had their applications for exemption
denied
Types of exemptions included in the lists are: Homestead; Widow/Widower; Disability;
Blind; Service connected 10% or more disability; Service connected total & perma-
nent disability; Civilian total & permanent disability; Veterans age 65 or older with
combat disability-Property Tax Discount; Transfer of homestead assessment differ-
ence; Agricultural classification of lands; Religious, Literary, Charitable, and Scientific.
DENNIS DAMATO, CHAIRMAN
2011 Value Adjustment Board
Citrus County, Florida
November 24, 2011.


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C16 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




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A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


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F2 Thursday November 24, 2011



Senior5t le

Senior Style is a
monthly publication
of the Citrus County
Chronicle for and
about senior lifestyles
in Citrus County.
Publisher
Gerard Mulligan
grnulligan@
chronicleonline.comrn

Senior Style Editor
Ken Melton
Kmelton@
chronicleonline.com

Advertising Contact
Trista Stokes
tstokces@
chronicleonline.comr

Citrus County
Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 563-6363


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lost husband


sure to return
We learned that Clara Zitzil lost
her husband, Elmer, over the
weekend. We were relieved when
Clara told us that Elmer probably
got in the wrong car again at the
store.
She said whoever took him usu-
ally brings him home after a few
days. Clara said that this was the
only time she could clean Elmer's
closet. Clara said she hates to take
Elmer shopping because he has a
habit for putting stuff in other peo-
ple's shopping carts.
Speaking of shopping carts, it
seems these days that half the stuff
in our cart says, "For Fast Relief."
One of our residents commented
that it's scary when we start mak-
ing the same noise as our coffee
maker.
The Halloween party was a suc-
cess.
The costumes were very original
and imaginative. The problems oc-
curred afterwards when some of
us went home with the wrong per-


son. Wearing name tags was re-
jected because we wanted to guess
who the costume wearer was. We
will insist on name tags next year -
if someone remembers to remind


signup sheet is for mashed pota-
toes, cranberry sauce, biscuits, veg-
etables and pies for dessert.
Dwight mentioned that EMS
would appreciate it if no one at-
* , 1 r T T


us. tempts to use a turkey tryer. rie
There are some things we learn said one of our sister retirement
the hard way. parks still has a turkey embedde
For example, only one person in their clubhouse's ceiling after
per household should reset the frozen bird was shot out like a
clocks for the time change. Some of mortar round when it hit the boi
us set our clocks back an hour only ing oil.
to have our better halves set it back Fortunately, no one was injure
again. except for one of the
Or someone set their firefighters who fell
clocks back and then down laughing.
the other set it forward There is some confu
an hour. Then there are sion concerning the v
the people who set ous Medicare
their clocks two hours supplement plans.
ahead. This explains Unfortunately, the
why some of you speaker at one of our
showed up early or late Friday morning coffee
for the potlucks and Larry Elsenheimer only added to it.
bingo. WHATCHER Some of you have
Dwight Dicks, our POINT taken advantage of th
homeowners associa- free seminars being of
tion president, said he will supply fered.
the turkeys for the Thanksgiving When we asked what you got
Day dinner. Dwight has requested out of the meetings, many said
volunteers to cook the turkeys and "complimentary lunches."
to use the signup sheet posted on We studied some of the
the bulletin board. A separate brochures and concluded that


d
a

1-

d


1-
ari-



s


e
f-


whoever wrote them must have
gotten paid by the word. Senior cit-
izens are famous for their short at-
tention spans. Most of us fell
asleep while reading them. Those
of us who finished had no idea of
what they meant.
One gem stated, "In Order to
Qualify You Must Be Eligible.
The next paragraph said, You
Must Be Eligible to Qualify"
Can you say "Double Speak"?
Remember you don't stop
laughing because you grow old,
you grow old because you stop
laughing.
Until next month, stay healthy
and take your meds.

Larry Elsenheimer and his : 'bif' of
41 years, Kathleen, live in Homosassa.
Before moving here, they lived five
years in a retirement '.,,, IIIitit
where he served as vice president for a
year and president for two years of a
homeowners association. He also called
bingo and was I I; vhi g ,1 to host Fri-
day morning .Ft{1 It is from his ex-
periences and folks he met that he
draws the ideas for the' \i ilt, it r
Point C',,,,, I I iniit Newsletter." The
names have been changed to prevent
1,i : i/ t


HPH Hospice
Organization
their We Hon


America's
our country
home. Tha
in the We
of veterans
their family
We have e
saying thai


Citrus Office
3545 N. Lec
Beverly Hills
352-576-46(
www.HPH-H


HPH Hospice is a

/& 'ro e fnr Prog Pa.f.rtne .

Shas been accepted by the National Hospice and Palliative Care
(NHPCO) and Veteran's Administration (VA) as a partnering agency in
or Veterans Program.



veterans have done everything asked of them in their mission to serve
y and we believe it is never too late to give them a hero's welcome
t's why HPH Hospice is joining a national movement to take part
Honor Veterans program. Our staff understands the unique needs
s and are prepared to meet the specific challenges that veterans and
ies may face at the end of life.
embracedd our mission to serve our local veterans. It's our way of
nk you for the sacrifices they have made in serving us.


canto Hwy A -
,FL 34465 HPh
00 IWE HONOR VETERANS
ospice.org


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SENIOR STYLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Consider me the

Emily Post of

bathroom etiquette


I read a startling statistic the
other day.
Can you believe every 15
minutes someone turns 50?
I'm thinking everywhere we
go the overcrowded bathrooms
are going to be even more
crowded.
What will it be like in the fu-
ture what with our aging popu-
lation and all?
Since I'm in that way-over-50
crowd, I feel compelled to talk
about a subject that I think
needs to be addressed, but
heretofore have been hesitant
about. Maybe because we did
not realize until recently that
we would be spending so
much time in the bathroom.
Let's just face it, we do and
so we need to lay down some


guidelines etiquette for
those frequent visits.
By the time a person reaches
our age, they are usually famil-
iar with where the restrooms
are located in any building that
they have ever been in or will
be visiting in the future.
Really, before I plan activity, I
ask, "So, how far away are the
bathrooms?"
Likewise, I scope out every
building and mall as to where
the bathrooms are located in re-
lation to where I will be seated.
In locating those facilities, I first
have several choices to make -
especially in the large city ven-
ues.
There will be the usual
"Men" and "Women" signs.
That seems pretty clear cut. It


shouldn't be hard to choose the more people we know in any
one you need from those two given restroom at any given
choices. time. I think it is time that we
However, now it gets very address the social aspects of
confusing because you will see these occasions.
signs that read "Family." Fortunately for you I have
And here's one for you some tips.
there's one that reads, "Com- Here goes.
panion." First of all, if you feel the
Yes, "Companion." need to speak to the
I'm not making this person that you
up. know, make sure you
If I were you, I know for sure that
would stick with the person is who you
more clear-cut deci- think they are. Just
sion and just choose know that, even
the men or women though you might
options. I don't know think you recognize
about you, but where the shoes in the stall
bathrooms are con- Mary Alice next to you, those
cerned, now is not Tillman shoes may not be-
the time to chart un- LET'S TALK long to your best
known territory, friend.
OK, that's settled. News flash People buy
We've already established shoes every day that look just
that we will frequent public like your friends' shoes. Once,
restrooms more than ever, while in a restroom, I talked to
whether at church, department shoes for 15 minutes. I felt com-
stores, malls, work, movies and pulled to give my friend some
other places. advice. As it turned out, I rec-
This means that we see a lot ognized the shoes, but my


SENIOR STYLE


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Thursday, November 24, 2011 F3

friend was not in the shoes.
The lady, whom I do not
know 'til this day, commented
as she left the stall, "Lady, I
don't know who the h--- you
are, but that was good advice!"
I hid in the bathroom until
the store was closing for fear
that the stranger was waiting
outside to get a look at my face.
Rule 1 No talking stall to
stall unless you are spoken to
first.
If you are spoken to first, it is
perfectly OK to identify the
person to whom you are
talking "Hey Clara, is that
you?"
And when you have identi-
fied the talker then you must
give full disclosure. Let them
know who you are, before
going any further with the con-
versation. After all, they may
be talking to shoes that look
like their best friend's. I'm just
saying, there have been many a
faux pas committed (jobs lost,
see Talk Page 4







F4 Thursday November 24, 2011


Talk
from Page 3
friendships torn apart and other dis-
asters) that could have been pre-
vented had we just followed this
simple rule.
Rule 2 It is perfectly OK to speak
to people anywhere in the "wash-
ing/drying hands" area.
But, there it is advisable to stare
into the mirror as
Uh, I mean you speak, rather
S b than turn to face
it WOuld be them. Somehow, this
embarrassing seems to be more
ifA itl ppaene. ~civilized. Of course,
f t happened if you have to hear
to me. the roar of that dam
hand dryer, all the
rules change. I've
never completely dried my hands on
one of those things, have you?
Rule 3 There shall be no talking to
a stall person while washing your
hands. If you must speak to that per-
son, it is better to wait until they ar-
rive at the "washing hands" area of
the room. Likewise, the stall person
should not address the "washing
hands" person. Then proceed as in
Rule 2
Rule 4 It is perfectly OK to let a


person know if her dress is tucked
into her pantyhose. It is horrible to
walk around an entire mall and then
have someone tell you. It's so embar-
rassing!
Uh, I mean it would be embarrass-
ing if it happened to me.
OK, so I stayed out of a Belk's store
for an entire year for fear that I
would be recognized as "that per-
son." It was, indeed, a traumatic ex-
perience.
Rule 5 If you need toilet paper, for-
get about the other rules. It is OK to
talk to anyone who will listen. It is
advisable to forget about the "identi-
fying yourself" part in this case.
Hope these simple rules will help
you as you go through the restrooms
of life.
Happy Thanksgiving it's my fa-
vorite holiday, as we just have to eat
and be thankful, and I do both of
those very well and blessings to all.
Thank you, Lord, for laughter!
After all, laughter is the best
medicine.

Mary Alice Tillmal, executive
director at Brentwood Retirement
C,',,,iiati' in Lecanto, can be reached
at m tillh uai ''' tiiii 'iil1'ii rr.com .


How much do you

need to retire?

Dear Savvy Senior,
Is there an easy way to figure out
how much savings a person needs to
retire? I'm 52 years old about 10 years
from when I would like to retire and I
want to see where I stand.
Planning Ahead

Dear Planning
How much money you
need to retire comfortably is
a great question that all
working adults should ask I
themselves. Unfortunately,
far too few ever bother
thinking about it. Jim 1
But calculating an approx- SAV
imate number of how much SEN
you'll need to have saved
for retirement is actually pretty easy
and doesn't take long to do. Here's a
quick, simple three-step approach that
can help you find your magic retire-
ment number.
Estimate expenses
The first step is the trickiest esti-


I


mating your future retirement ex-
penses. If you want a quick ballpark es-
timate, figure around 75 to 85 percent
of your current gross income. That's
what most people find they need to
maintain their current lifestyle in retire-
ment.
If you want a more precise estimate,
track your current expenses on a work-
sheet and deduct any costs you expect
to go away or decline when you retire,

Syou anticipate.
Costs you can scratch off
your list include work re-
lated expenses like commut-
ing or lunches out, as well as
I the amount you're socking
away for retirement. You
may also be able to deduct
miller your mortgage if you expect
to have it paid off by retire-
VY ment and your kid's college
lOR expenses. Your income taxes
should also be less.
On the other hand, some costs will
probably go up when you retire, like
health care, and depending on your in-
terests you may spend a lot more on
travel, golf or other hobbies. And, if
see Savvy Page 5


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Each month, the PetMeals Program
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The PetMeals Program was started when it
was noticed that a very thin man was only tak-
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DAR has database
After nearly a decade of scanning,
indexing and other behind-the-scenes work
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members and employees, the DAR has a
DAR Genealogical Research System on its
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Here are the direct links:
* www.dar.org/library/online_research.cfm
* www.dar.org (and click on the Library but-
ton at the top, then the second tab
in the left-hand column).
The GRS is a growing collection of
databases that provide access to many
materials collected by the DAR throughout
the past 119 years.
Included in this collection of databases is
the GRC National Index, which has been
available to researchers for the past few
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Savvy
from Page 4
you're going to be retired for 20
or 30 years you also need to fac-
tor in the occasional big budget
items like a new roof, furnace
or car.
Tally income
Step two is to calculate your
retirement income. If you con-
tribute to Social Security, esti-
mate how much your monthly
benefit will be at the age you
want to retire. You can get a
personalized estimate at
www.ssa.gov/estimator. If
you're married, remember to
count your spouse's benefits
too.
In addition to Social Security,
if you have a traditional pen-
sion plan from an employer,
find out from the plan adminis-
trator how much you are likely
to get when you retire. And, fig-
ure in any other income from
other sources you expect to
have, such as rental properties,
part-time work, etc.
Calculate the difference
The final step is to do the


SENIOR STYLE


math. Subtract your annual ex-
penses from your annual in-
come. If your income alone can
cover your bills, you're all set. If
not, you'll need to tap your sav-
ings, including your 401(k)
plans, IRAs, or other invest-
ments to make up the differ-
ence.
So, let's say for example you
need around $45,000 a year for
retirement and you expect to re-
ceive $25,000 a year from Social
Security and other income. That
leaves a $20,000 shortfall that
you'll need to pull from your
nest egg each year ($45,000 -
$25,000 $20,000). Multiple your
shortfall by 25, and that's how
much you'll need to have
saved.
In the case above, you would
multiply $20,000 by 25 and
come up with $500,000.
Why 25? Because that would
allow you to pull 4 percent a
year from your savings, which
is a safe withdrawal strategy
that in most cases will let your
money last as long as you do -
at least 30 years.
If you find that your savings


are lacking, you might want to
go back to your worksheet and
cut some costs. Or, you may
need to consider part-time
work during retirement or post-
poning retirement so you can
boost your savings

Dear Savvy Senior,
What resources are available
to help seniors locate and re-
search Medicare doctors? My
husband and I are approaching
age 65 and need to find a new
internist or primary care doctor
who accepts Medicare. Our cur-
rent doctor is not enrolled with
Medicare and will not continue
seeing us as Medicare patients.
Looking For Care

Dear Looking,
Depending on where you
live, finding a new primary care
doctor or specialist that accepts
Medicare patients can be chal-
lenging. Because of low reim-
bursement rates and greater
paperwork hassles, many doc-
tors today have opted out of
Medicare or they're not accept-
ing new patients with Medicare


coverage.
With that said, Medicare is
now offering a service that
makes finding Medicare-ap-
proved doctors a little easier.
Here's what you should
know.
Medicare doctors
The government's new online
"Physician Compare" tool is
one of the easiest ways to locate
doctors in your area that accept
traditional Medicare. Just go to
www.medicare.gov/find-a-
doctor where you can do a
search by physician's name,
medical specialty or by geo-
graphic location. Or, if you
don't have Internet access you
can also get this information by
calling 800-633-4227.
Doctor's check up
After you've found a few
Medicare-approved doctors
that are accepting new patients,
there are plenty of resources
available today that can help
you research them. Some of the
best include HealthGrades, Vi-
tals and RateMDs. These are
free doctor-rating websites that
provide important background


Thursday, November 24, 2011 F5

information as well as con-
sumer comments and ratings
from past patients. Here's a
breakdown of what each site of-
fers:
Healthgrades.com pro-
vides in-depth profiles on
around 750,000 U.S. physicians
including their education and
training, hospital affiliations,
board certification, awards and
recognition, professional mis-
conduct, disciplinary action and
malpractice records.
Vitals.com provides some
basic background information
on around 720,000 U.S. doctors
along with unedited comments
from past patients and ratings
on things like promptness, bed-
side manner, accurate diagnosis
and more.
Ratemds.com primarily of-
fers ratings and anonymous
comments from past patients.

Send your senior questions to:
Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443,
Norman, OK 73070, or visit Sawvvy-
Senior.org. Jim -\ li i i-.i '..nti, d',-
tor to the NBC' T.:, 1, iy" show and
author of' T1he Savvy Senior" book.


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F6 Thursday November 24, 2011


SENIOR STYLE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

By Anna Sachse
CTW Features
When people are
young, it's easy
to view oneself
as the star of the show.
But as the years pass by,
people begin to realize
that the character being
played continually
changes. So how do you
become the best fifty-plus
you?
Here, a slew of experts
weight in on how to be a
better...
Parent
The single best way to
teach adult children how
to lead successful, fulfill-
ing lives is to model for
them the characteristics
that parents hope they ac-
quire, says Kathi Casey,
founder of Healthy-
BoomerBody.com. Dedi-
cate quality time to both
family and work, be finan-
cially responsible, culti-
see Wiser Page 7


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
Wiser
from Page 6
vate meaningful friend-
ships, avoid addictive be-
havior, face problems
head-on, prioritize per-
sonal growth and talk to
and about others with re-
spect. Just as when they
were younger, adult chil-
dren will learn more by
watching than they will
from lectures or threats.
Of course, it's certainly
okay to offer advice. "But
keep in mind that they get
to make their own deci-
sions and mistakes," says
Pat Nunan, a director for
Boomer-Living.com and
owner of Lifestyles De-
sign, a Pennsylvania-
based firm specializing in
independent living solu-
tions for seniors. "Let
them know you're there
for them if they need you,
but give them their
space."
In addition, even
though a parent's role will
always be one of guid-
ance, as children age par-
ents get more
opportunities to be
friends. Schedule movie,
golf, book club, walk or
coffee dates and show a
genuine interest in their
lives.

Grandparent
Depending on a family's
needs, grandparents can
take on many different


SENIOR STYLE


roles, says Nancy K.
Schlossberg, a professor
emerita in counseling at
the University of Mary-
land, College Park and au-
thor of "Revitalizing
Retirement: Reshaping
Your Identity, Relation-
ships, and Purpose"
(APA, 2009). If a grand-
child lives close by, a
grandparent might serve


as a babysitter or play-
mate, but it's also possible
to play the part of a
teacher and historian
when family lives far
away, thanks to tele-
phones, email, Skype and
good old-fashioned cards.
But being the best
grandparent also means
taking care of personal
needs. "If you're helping


out with childcare, create
a clear schedule that al-
lows you time with the
grandchildren AND time
away," Nunan says.
Grandparents are more
likely to be pleasant and
present with the little ones
when also nurturing their
own marriage, friendships
and hobbies.
In addition, in order to


keep up with all those
tykes, stay on top of
health. This means eating
well, not missing medical
appointments and getting
at least 30 minutes of exer-
cise daily. Casey suggests
making fitness fun (and a
fantastic life lesson) by in-
corporating grandchildren
- shoot hoops, dance
around the living room or


Thursday, November 24, 2011 F7

play a game of hide-and-
seek.

Spouse
One of the gifts of a
long-term marriage is fi-
nally realizing it's impos-
sible to change one
another, says Mary Eileen
Williams, founder of the
Feisty Side of Fifty blog
and radio program. "My
suggestion after 36 years
of marriage is to become
more accepting of each
other's differences and
support your spouse's
new interests and oppor-
tunities for growth."
It's also vital to embrace
moments to grow and try
new things together, adds
Marjorie Hope Rothstein,
a boomer consumer ex-
pert and columnist for
Boomer-Living.com.
Travel, for example from
a wine country weekend
to that African safari
you've always talked
about, just DO it. Prefer
something longer term?
Sign up for a basic yoga
class, study gourmet
cooking, take tango les-
sons or go skydiving.
"Anything that's new
and exciting for you both
you will evoke a sense of
connection," Rothstein
says.
Speaking of connection,
don't forget to touch each
other, says Nunan, who's
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Wiser
from Page 7
been married for 38 years.
This means maintaining in-
timacy in the bedroom, but
also finding smaller ways
to show affection, such as
taking showers together,
stopping for a hug as pass-
ing in the kitchen and al-
ways kissing each other
goodbye when leaving the
house.

Employee
Living in a roller-coaster
economy and facing
younger competition -
how does an aging worker
determine what his or her
role is in a tumultuous
workplace?
"First off and I'm
adamant about this do
not feel 'less than' because
of your age," says
Williams, author of "Land
the Job You Love: 10 Sure-
fire Strategies for Jobseek-
ers Over 50" (CreateSpace,
2010). "You don't want to
act like a know-it-all, but
you have every right to
take pride in the skill set,
market knowledge and
professional network
you've built up over a life-
time."
This attitude is especially
important right now, she
says, as the media has fo-
cused much of its work-
place bad news around
boomers, suggesting that
they'll have greater diffi-
culty finding a new posi-
tion if they lose their job.
But buying into these dis-
couraging headlines will
only make it more difficult
to present yourself as a
confident, quick-witted,
can-do current employee
or job candidate.
That said, never demean
younger coworkers, notes
Schlossberg. Not only
could a person lose out on
learning from the unique
perspectives or skills they
bring to the table, he or she
will likely be perceived as
dated and someone who
doesn't work well with
teams.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Instead, present yourself
as a seasoned
employee/job applicant
who is eager to mentor
younger workers and
teach them the ropes, says
Williams. "This is good for
the organization and a
great selling point in a re-
view or interview."
And if approaching re-
tirement or financial stabil-
ity has made interest in
traditional employment
wane, Williams also
recommends looking into
part-time work or
consulting.

Community Member
For the fifty-plus crowd,
finding ways to volunteer
or participate in civic-
minded activities is criti-
cally important, says
Schlossberg, who founded
the website Transition-
sThroughLife.com.
"There's lots of evidence to
show that those who con-
tribute live healthier, hap-
pier lives and perform
better cognitively."
There are plenty of chari-
table organizations in need
out there so take the time
to find an area that truly
taps into personal interests,
utilizes your skills and nat-
ural talents, fulfills you and
enables you to serve others
in ways that give you en-
ergy, Williams says. You
might also consider help-
ing out at a hospital, sitting
on a panel to improve local
parks, advocating for sen-
iors' issues, walking dogs
for the Humane Society,
painting a mural in a low-
income area or volunteer-
ing in a grandchild's
classrooms Find more op-
portunities through the Re-
fired and Senior Volunteer
Program (RSVP), a division
of SeniorCorps.org.
"Many boomers have
spent years in unfulfilling
jobs," Williams says. "So
community service can
truly become the gold of
your golden years."

CTW Features


Support for
Stroke survivors and caregivers
are invited to a holiday celebration
on Dec. 15 at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center. The hospital's
monthly stroke support group, Dif-
ferent Strokes for Different Folks,
hosts the event from 10:30 a.m. to
noon.
The open house celebration gives
new guests the chance to meet fel-
low stroke survivors as well as the
associates and clinical professionals
that facilitate the support group.
Light refreshments will be served.
Please call (352) 795-1234 for details
and registration information.

Living with stroke
Stroke survivors and their families
often have to adjust to physical diffi-
culties and emotional problems that
negatively affect their relationship.
For the survivor, day-to-day activ-
ities like shopping or driving may
become major obstacles. This may
cause both the survivor and the
family to feel confused, frustrated or
isolated.
Connecting stroke survivors with


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stroke survivors, caregivers
others who have similar challenges erly educated on the symptoms of
and experiences creates a founda- stroke and how to respond to those
tion for mutually positive support, symptoms.
The warmth, acceptance and emo- They are equally passionate about
tional support that a stroke support providing the finest level of care,
group offers can be the key which is why stroke vic-
to uncovering hidden times in Citrus County
strengths in many sur- and its surrounding com-
vivors. munities now have ac-
Stroke support groups cess to state-of-the-art
provide the information emergency services
survivors need to adjust to through an alliance with
changes in their lives. Be- ... University of Florida
yond emotional support, i .r (UF) and Shands Health-
support groups provide Care one of the coun-
accurate educational infor- Amy Kingery try's top 50 hospitals.
nation on topics ranging NEWS FROM The alliance strength-
from nutrition and exer- SRRMC ens the level of stroke
cise to medication and pre- services offered at Seven
vention of another stroke. Rivers Regional by linking our top
Different Strokes for Different professionals with UF physicians at
Folks support group meets the third Shands and further developing a
Thursday of each month from 10:30 comprehensive care plan with trans-
a.m. to noon at Seven Rivers Re- fer benefits to Shands at UF when
gional Medical Center. Call 352)795- necessary. To learn more about
1234.In addition to stroke survivor stroke symptoms, important actions
support, the stroke care team at and the new alliance at Seven Rivers
Seven Rivers Regional wants to Regional, visit SevenRiversRegional
make sure the community is prop- .com.


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SENIOR STYLE






Thursday, November 24, 2011 F9


.Sty le


Senior are on the move
"Seniors on the Move" offers trips to
the community centers, movies, flea
markets, libraries, parks, beach, the-
ater, shopping trips and more.
Recent surveys have shown that
seniors in the county listed socialization
as something they lacked Seniors on
the Move hopes to change this. For fur-
ther information, call Sue Carscadden
at (352) 527-5959.
Seniors on the Move is a program of
the Nature Coast Volunteer Center and
is sponsored by the Citrus County Sen-
ior Foundation.


Shuffleboarders invited
Floral City Shuffleboard Club plays at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Fridays and at
1 p.m. Wednesday at Floral Park in
Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet peo-
ple in the community, and get some
light exercise. We welcome all
newcomers.
Yearly dues are $3 per person, and
there is no need to purchase any equip-
ment.
Call the vice president of the Floral
City Shuffleboard Club, Dana Bause, at
(352) 726-0670.


Dance classes offered
The public is welcome to Ballroom
Dance Classes at the Beverly Hills
Recreation Center, 77 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, every Thursday at
6:30 p.m.
You do not need a partner to
participate.
Classes are free for members of the
association; nonmembers pay $3 per
class.
There is no need to preregister.
Call the office at (352) 746-4882 from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to
Friday.


Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks & Recreation of-
fers Zumba classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Zumba is a fitness program de-
signed with exciting Latin and interna-
tional dance rhythms. No membership
or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday; 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday; and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or call (352)
465-7007.


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F10 Thursday, November 24, 2011


Longevity Project

co-author advises

on how to live long


By Ola Diab
CTW Features

Everybody wants a long,
healthy and happy life. But
what's the secret? Common
knowledge says don't stress or
worry too much, be happy and
positive, exercise regularly and
maybe even get married, but
what does science say? In 1921,
Stanford University psycholo-
gist Lewis Terman began a
study where he tracked the lives
of 1,500 Americans from child-
hood to death. The two-decade
study is now a book called "The
Longevity Project" (Hudson,
2011) where Howard S. Fried-
man and Leslie Martin, re-
searchers and psychology
professors at the University of
California, Riverside, establish


what it is about these 1,500 indi-
viduals that led some to stay
well and others to fall ill or die
early.
"It was especially fascinating
to understand that health was
not random and that those indi-
viduals who became involved
with others in a consequential
life were improving their own
health and longevity as an unan-
ticipated bonus," Friedman says.
"The Longevity Project shows
why many people became both
happy and healthy by living a
good, dedicated, involved life."
Here, Friedman discusses the
"secrets" she and her co-author
discovered.
The 1,500 people studied for
the book were tracked decades
ago. How are their health prob-
lems still relevant today? Do


SENIOR STYLE


people still suffer from the
same unhealthy practices peo-
ple suffered from decades ago?
We spent a lot of time looking
at the generality of the findings.
In the research, we focused on
things that are distributed simi-
larly to the general population
of Americans today, such as per-
sonality traits, key social vari-
ables like marriage and divorce,
and lots of career and work vari-
ables. When needed, we also
conducted comparison analyses
with valid contemporary meas-
ures in contemporary (modem
day) samples. The results hold
up well and are very relevant.
And of course, people still die
today from cancer, heart disease,
injuries, and so on.
What are these unhealthy
practices? How do people
change them?
There are self-quizzes and
case histories in "The Longevity
Project" that you can use to un-
derstand your own long-term
patterns, and trajectories rele-
vant to health. These focus on
your personality and your social


interactions. Then, the best way
to get yourself on a healthy
pathway, one of healthy long-
term patterns, is to associate
with other healthy, active, in-
volved individuals, especially
those relevant to your desired
healthy lifestyle. As our exam-
ples and studies revealed, each
individual needs to understand
his or her own life trajectory and
engage in the things that fit best
for that individual.
In the book, one of the things
you discussed to keep people
healthy is stress. Many people
find that shocking because
they're told to take it easy to
live longer. How is stressing
and worrying healthy?
Our results clearly showed
that those who were highly mo-
tivated, worked the hardest,
steadily advanced in their ca-
reers and achieved the most ca-
reer success lived the longest.
They didn't work themselves to
death, they worked themselves
to life. Ambition was not a prob-
lem and taking it easy was not
healthy. In fact, those who were


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

carefree, undependable,and un-
ambitious in childhood, and
who were unsuccessful in their
careers, had a whopping in-
crease in their mortality risk.
One of the interesting things
the book points out about liv-
ing a long and healthy life is
career accomplishments. How
does a person approach or
choose a career and avoid
stressing or shortening his or
her own life?
One of the tips we present in
"The Longevity Project" (which
we both use ourselves) is to wel-
come new work assignments.
That is, rather than thinking "Oh
no, more work, I'm stressed" in-
stead think, "Oh good; increased
opportunity to accomplish
something worthwhile!" And
then here's the key start on
that task right away. This is not
"positive thinking." Rather, this
is a behavioral approach to the
workday. You do it knowing
that it will bring even more
work. We present many exam-
ples showing that this is how the
long-lived participants lived.


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New line dance class offered at East Citrus Community Center


Kathy Reynolds, local line
dance teacher, will be starting
a Line Dance Class at East
Citrus Community Center on
Tuesday at 1 p.m.
The cost of the class is $5.
For more information, please
contact Shasta at East Citrus.

Computer Classes
will resume in January
These are conducted using
the Microsoft Operating Sys-
tem, call the center to register
and next class date.
If you have a laptop, you may
use it for the class, please let
us know when you are
registering.

Introduction to
the Computer
A class for the beginner that
will take you through the Win-
dows Operating System,
word processing, Internet ac-
tivity and mailing. The cost
is $25 for a six-week session.
WCCC: Mondays at 2 p.m.
Instructor is Dick Bromley
CCCC: Fridays 2 p.m. In-
structor is Dick Bromley.
Advanced Computer:
CCCC: Wednesdays at 2
p.m. Instructor is Dick
Bromley. The cost is $25 for
five-week session.

Sign Language
Classes
Instructor for all classes is
Sue Paulus. Cost is $35 for 8
weeks.
Call East Citrus, West Cit-
rus or Central Centers to reg-
ister. The classes are
Introduction to American Sign
Language, Basic Sign Lan-
guage, and American Sign
Language I and II. Home-
school students class at
Central Citrus.
For information, call Sue at
(352) 527-8479 or email
handjivesue@yahoo.com.


Games
Bingo: Call centers for days
and times


EAST CITRUS WEST CITRUS INVERNESS
COMMUNITY CENTER COMMUNITY CENTER COMMUNITY
(ECCC) (WCCC) CENTER (ICC)


9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness,
FL 34450
(352) 344-9666


Duplicate Bridge Groups
CCCC: Wednesdays 1 p.m.
and Thursdays at noon
ECCC: Thursdays and
Friday at noon
Bridge Lessons: Sandy
Brown $5 per lesson
CCCC: Wednesdays
2:30 p.m.
Mah-Jongg Lessons: San-
dra Brown $5 per lesson
CCCC: Tuesdays 12:30 p.m.
Mah Jongg Players at CCCC,
ECCC and WCCCC, call for
times and days
Billiards: offered at Central
Citrus, East Citrus and West
Citrus
WCCC: Pool lessons with
Ron at 2 p.m. on Mondays.
Women's pool lessons at
12:30 p.m. Thursday


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Table Tennis: offered at Cen-
tral Citrus, East Citrus, and
West Citrus
Pinochle: at WCCC and
CCCC
Cribbage and Canasta:
CCCC
Wii Games: Sports at Central
Citrus, East Citrus and West
Citrus Community Centers
Join the fun with the latest
games, great exercise and
entertainment.
Wii Bowling Leagues: at
Central Citrus
Skipbo: at WCCC, CCCC,
and ECCC
Hand and Foot Card Game:
at CCCC on Wednesdays at
1 p.m. and Fridays at 1 p.m.
Rummikub: at CCCC
Monday through Friday,


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Tournaments are held on
Monday at noon.


Dancing and music
Social Tea Ballroom Dance
Hosted by DJ Sapphire, $5
per person, light refresh-
ments
WCCC: No dance in
December due to the
holidays.
CCCC: 1:30 p.m. second
Wednesday of the month

Karaoke
ECCC: Wednesdays at 10
a.m.
WCC: Mondays at noon with
Walt and Kay


CENTRAL
CITRUS COMMUNITY
CENTER (CCCC)
2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court,
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 527-5993


Musical Entertainment
and Social Dances
WCCC: Social Dance
Tuesday at 1:30 p.m.
Thursday Walt and Kay at
10 a.m.
Back Porch Band third
Thursday at noon.
ECCC: Country Sunshine
Classic Country Band on Fri-
days at 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Jaime Roldan Entertains -
First Monday at 10 a.m.
Guy and Pam Smith Coun-
try and Western Music first
and third Wednesdays at 10
a.m.
CCCC: Jaime Rolan enter-
tains last Thursday.


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Ballroom
Dance Lessons
June Queripel instructor
CCCC: Wednesdays 1:30
p.m. Beginners and 2:45 p.m.
Advanced. $5 per person
per class.
WCCC: Fridays at 1:30 p.m.
Beginners Class $5 per
person per class

Line Dancing
ECCC: Beginners and Inter-
mediate classes $3 a class.
WCCC: Beginners and Inter-
mediate classes $3 a class.
Tuesday and Thursdays -
Instructor, Linn,
CCCC: True Beginners Step
by Step $3. Instructor Sandy
Brown
True Beginners, Beginners
and Intermediate classes, $5
Instructor Linda Heebner -
Mondays and Thursdays

Couples
Country Doubles
Dance Lessons
ECCC: Tuesdays at 5:30
p.m. $3 per lesson, Instructor
Kathy Reynolds


See Centers Page 12


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SENIOR STYLE






F12 Thursday, November 24, 2011


*

I


SENIOR STYLE


Zero.



Zip.



Zilch. "A

Nothing.
Yes, nothing. Humana's 2012
Medicare plan premium is $0.


Get the benefits you want with Humana Reader's Digest Healthy Living plan (RPPO):


1 $0 monthly plan premium
0 Doctor's office visits and hospital coverage
I Prescription drug coverage
0 Convenient mail-order delivery of prescriptions
1 SilverSneakers Fitness Program gym membership
at no additional cost
I Preventive coverage


1 24-hour nurse hotline
1 Wellness program
0 Emergency coverage at home and when you travel
Plus, tools for better health from Reader's Digest
1 A comprehensive Healthy Living Kit
0 Quarterly Healthy Living Bulletins
1 Choice of free book from the Reader's Digest library


8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week


New Medicare enrollment dates! The dates to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan
for 2012 have changed. The new dates are October 15th December 7th.*


HUMANA.


A Health plan with a Medicare contract. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. If you are a member of a qualified State
Pharmaceutical Assistance Program, please contact the Program to verify that the mail-order pharmacy will coordinate with that Program. The benefit information provided herein is a brief summary,
but not a comprehensive description of available benefits. For more information contact the plan. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with
special needs at sales meetings, call 1-866-824-5679, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., 7 days a week. Applicable to Humana Reader's Digest Healthy Living RPPO R5826 074. *Some exceptions may apply.
R5826_GHHH520HH CMSApprovd 10012011 TMP 11/11
0009CIN


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Centers
from Page 11

Tap Dancing Lessons
Sandra Brown instructs
all ages
CCCC: Tuesdays at
11:30 a.m. $5 per class
Fun Klogging Class
Marcy Male instructs
WCCC: Beginners,
intermediate. $2 per class
Tap and
Jazz Dance Class
WCCC: Joyce Lane teaches
all types of dance. $4 per
class
Exercise Programs
Yoga for seniors
WCCC: Tuesdays, Thursdays.
$7 per class.
Chair Exercises
WCCC: Wednesdays and
Friday at 10:45 a.m.
CCCC: Monday through
Friday at 10:15 a.m.
ECCC: Mondays and
Wednesday at 10 a.m.
Walking Program
ECCC: Mondays and
Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
Tai Chi
CCCC: Tuesdays at 10 a.m.
with Connie
WCCC: Mondays at
10:30 a.m. with Nancy
Aerobics
WCCC: Power Hour Aerobic
Video Monday, Wednesday
and Friday
CCCC: Aerobics with Ann
Monday through Friday at
8 a.m. (videos)
Indoor Walking Video
Monday, Wednesdays, 3 p.m.
Arts and Crafts
ECCC: Ceramic Painting,
Crocheting, Quilting, Knitting
CCCC: Stamping Class -
Mondays at 9 a.m. $3, card
making with stamping classes.
Nature Coast Carvers Meet
Thursday at 12:30 p.m.
Art Classes Thursdays at 10
a.m. call to register
WCCC: Craft Time
Wednesday at 1 p.m.
Art Classes all kinds
Wednesday 10:30 a.m. $10
Call Centers for more
information


No other Medicare plan can offer the unique value of the Humana Reader's Digest
Healthy Living plan. Call to schedule an in-home appointment or to find a seminar
near you.

1-866-824-5679 (TTY: 711)








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G2 Thursday, November 24, 2011


What's inside

2011 top gam es ................................................ Page 3
Season best toys ..............................................Page 4
Jewelry makes a comeback ..............................Page 6
Top DV Ds ........................................................ Page 10
Youth in a jar.................................................... Page 11
E-Readers made easy ....................................Page 12
iG ifts ................................................................ P a g e 14
The hottest cameras........................................Page 15


!I-


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher
Ken Melton
Community Affairs Editor
Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling
Community Editor


". .o- '" . -Trista Stoke
e sJ aeweiouins s l'g.-. Advertising Sales A


Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 563-6363
www.chronicleonline.com


S
manager


GIFT GUIDE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Thursday November 24, 2011 G3


BEST OF SHOW
BEST ORIGINAL GAME
BEST PC GAME
BEST ACTION-ADVENTURE GAME
BioShock Infinite
(Irratonal Games/2K Games for
PC. PS3, Xbox 360)
BEST CONSOLE GAME
BEST ROLE PLAYING GAME
The Elder ScrollsV:
Skyrim
(Bethesda Game Studios/
Bethesda for PS3, Xbox 360)
BEST HANDHELD GAME
Sound Shapes
(Queasy Games/SCEA for PSVita)
BEST HARDWARE
PlayStationVita
(Sony Computer Entertainment)
BBEST DOWNLOADABLE
GAME
. . .................. ..... ............... .........
Bastion
(Supergianl Games/WB
Games for PC, Xbox 360)
BEST ACTION GAME
BEST ONLINE MULTIPLAYER
Battlefield 3
(DICE/EA Games for PC)
BEST FIGHTING GAME
Street Fighter XTekken
(Capcom/Capcom for PS3, Xbox 360,
PSVita)


BEST RACING GAME
Forza 4
Turn 10 Studios/Microsoft Studios for Xbox
36o)


BEST SPORTS GAME
FIFA Soccer 12
(EA Carada/EA Sports for PC, PS3, Xbox
36o)
BEST STRATEGY GAME
From Dust
(Ubisoft MontpellierJUbisoft for PC, PS3,
Xbox360)
BEST SOCIALICASUAL GAME
Sound Shapes
(Queasy Games/SCEA for PSVita)
BEST MOTION SIMULATION GAME
The Legend of Zelda: Skyward
Sword
(Nintendo EAD/Nintendo tor Wii)


Free $20*

Gift Certificate
*With $100 purchase. ,3


Open Black Friday from 6am-6pm
Free Gift To The First 50 People On Black Friday


CTW Features


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIFT GUIDE







G4 Thursday, November 24, 2011


Dutiful but dull, toys intended to enrich a child once sat at
the top of adults' shopping lists and the bottom of the toy
box. No more. Creativity, play value and green credentials
combine in some of the season's best bets


By Taniesha Robinson
CTW Features
Somewhere on the spec-
trum between techno-dazzle
(iPad apps for toddlers, any-
one?) and fuzzy-wuzzy
bears there's a sweet spot:
toys that inspire kids to have
fun, stretch their creativity
and learn while
they play. With a
little effort and
some guidance
from savvy toy
shop owners -
any attentive
shopper can hit
the mark.
Toys that en-
courage the most
beneficial play
may not be the
biggest spotlight-


grabbers. Their attractions are
often more subtle and require
a shopper to search past the
dancing dolls massed out in
aisle one.
"Toys today, especially toys
in the mass market, you push
a button and it does some-
thing it lights up or it sings
or it turns around and does all
kinds of things. But they're
not toys that allow a child to
be imaginative and creative,"
says Jennic Law, owner of
KangarooBoo toy store, West
Des Moines, Iowa. "The child
is playing and having a good
time, but the toy is doing most
of the actions or thinking for
him or her."
see Toys Page 5


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GIFT GUIDE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










Toys
from Page 4
Law says classic problem-
solving toys like puzzles
and blocks are
much better for
children.
She likes
"- boldly
col-
anored
Green
i4Toys
Blocks
($25, 6
months
and up),
which are made
from recycled plastic milk
containers and come in many
shapes.
Wendy Lippman, owner of
Tlaquepaque Toy Town in
Sedona, Ariz., seeks out toys
that spur open-ended play. "I
like toys where kids are en-
couraged to use their imagi-
nation," she says.
Lippman recommends toys
that can serve as the focus
for role-playing, where kids
can act as cashiers or shop-


pers with a toy cash register,
for example. Such toys also
set up scenarios to educate
children, she says.
Science-related toys are no
longer aimed at little Leonar-
dos and can be packed with
fun, says Jim Davis, owner
of Kid's Center toy store in
Tucson, Ariz.
Toys with magnets easily
combine science learning
with fun. The popular Dis-
covery Set of magnetic
blocks from Tegu ($70, age 3
and up) snap together and
hang in balance, a perfect
gift to spark the imagination
of young children.
Science kits from Thames
& Kosmos are perennial
award-winners. The Remote-
Control Machines set ($70,
age 8 and up) lets kids build
10 different motorized vehi-
cles (including bulldozer,
crane, Formula One racer,
three-blade dozer, robotic
arm) and then guide them
with a remote control unit.
After following the instruc-
tions to construct the stan-
dard vehicles, kids can


invent their own.
Try re-imagining books as
toys. "There's a jillion differ-
ent topics for books," Davis
says. "You just need to know
a little bit about the child and
then pick out the appropriate
story book." "Press Here" is
the title and also the instruc-
tion for the new book by
Herv6 Tullet that launches
young readers on a charming
adventure.
Watch them blow, tilt,
shake, rub and tap colorful
dots printed on the page to
make them multiply, grow
and rearrange themselves
(Chronicle, $15, ages 4-8).
KangarooBoo's Law ad-
vises avoiding electronic ed-
ucational and leisure toys for
age 5 and under. "If [chil-
dren] are able to sit down
and solve a problem or a
puzzle or build something, it
makes the foundation for
them as a person," she says.
She also says toys that in-
volve physical play help
children develop fine motor
skills, gross motor skills, pa-
tience and other mental ca-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIFT GUIDE


Thursday November 24, 2011 G5

pacities. Fastrack, a new
board game by Blue Orange,
pits opponents who twang
elastic cords to send wooden
disks shooting across the
board and through a narrow
slot. The first to get all 10 to
the other side wins ($20, age
5 and up).
To get kids up off the
couch and develop their
physical well-being, Davis
suggests new classic toys for
outdoors, such as jump ropes
and sports balls, and new
throw toys, including Rhino
Toys' SkyO, a flexible flying
ring that's easy to catch and
throw ($8, age 3 and up).
The Z-Curve Bow from Zing
Toys launches foam arrows a
satisfyingly long way ($20,
age 8 and up).
Whatever route you take to
finding the best toy for a spe-
cial boy or girl, Davis says,
stop, think and proceed with
inspiration.
"You really need to know
the child and try to engage
the child in the purchase you
make."
CTWFeatures







G6 Thursday, November 24, 2011


After a few seasons of sack cloth and
ashes, where practicality trumped
indulgence, jewelry, the quintessential gift of
luxury, love and passion, has come roaring
back as the season's best gift



Alpaca

OPEN HOUSE
-1 1-1]


GIFT GUIDE


By Nola Sarkisian-Miller
CTW Features

ilJ may be hovering at stratos-
plidi ic levels and the economy is
nill .cesawing, but that's not
,sh pping well-heeled shoppers
1ih, n indulging their jewelry
I Ii.lbits. Retailers and de-
i gners say they've noticed
ln uptick in interest and
t sales for baubles, which
bodes well for the holi-
day season.
"There's a demand for
I.itement pieces, whether
it an oversized cocktail
iii i- or a dramatic cuff
hi.ijcelet," says Los Angeles
J'.ewelry designer, C.C.
Skye, whose showy ac-
cessories have curried
favor with boldfaced
names like Halle
Berry, Gwen Stefani
and Kristin Cavallari.
"They feel that we've
been through the re-
cession. We've lived it.
We don't want to live that
lifestyle anymore. There's


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

still room for more celebration."
Customers may also justify the
expense since jewelry can be re-
worked with a variety of wardrobe
pieces, say retailers.
"People may not be in the mood
to buy shoes or clothes, but they
know a fun piece of jewelry can
make an outfit pop and can be worn
again and again," says Melissa
Akkaway, owner of Beckley Bou-
tique, which has locations in Los
Angeles and Las Vegas.
When it comes to fashion jew-
elry, which usually tops out at
$1,000, clean and spare necklaces
sporting initials and quirky pen-
dants are a key trend for the holi-
days. Alex Woo's dainty charms,
such as initials and zodiac signs,
can sell for $148 in sterling silver,
$548 in 14 karat gold and $798
with pav6 diamonds. A new holiday
addition to Beckley is Maya Bren-
ner's pendants in the shape of states
(seen on the likes of Katy Perry,
Eva Longoria and Jessica Simpson)
in gold and silver, with easy-on-the-
wallet prices of $130 to $300.
see Jewelry Page 7


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UNIQUE HOLIDAY GIFTS!
* Shawls Hats Yarns Toys Scarves
* Throws Garden Decor Accessories
Something for everyone on your list!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jewelry
from Page 6

Those rimmed with diamonds
will fetch $1,040.
Another approachable line is
New York-based Erica Weiner
Jewelry, whose vintage-inspired
creations conjure up whimsy and
nostalgia with prices averaging
under $300
At the company's store in New
York City, manager Emily Ruane
steers clients away from solitaire
diamonds unless the present is
supposed to be the real deal a
proposal or anniversary gift.
"It's just not appropriate to give
big diamonds unless you're en-
gaged or married," Ruane says.
Instead, for the holidays, she
suggests the double letterpress
necklace, which actually incorpo-
rates old moveable type as the
pendants and is personalized with


GIFT GUIDE


initials, or the Civil War-era tin-
type necklaces, which feature
photographs printed on iron
sheets hanging from brass chains.
Men may appreciate the penknife
necklace on a brass chain or a cast
fossil nautilus necklace, items that
aren't highly embellished or too
overwrought.
Los Angeles-based Lord Grif-
fon, known for its chunky oxi-
dized silver jewelry and a fan
base that includes Randy Jackson
from "American Idol," has also
noticed a shift in male tastes to
less in-your-face skull ware.
What's more in demand these
days are sleeker looks, such as ID
bracelets and fleur-de-lis neck-
laces, said Suzie Lederer, founder
and creative director of Lord Grif-
fon.
"More than something really
hard-edged, they want something
they can wear not when they're


Stackable pearl wrap bracelets by Jordan Alexander, a favorite of first lady
\Michelle Obama's


just going to the club or riding
motorcycles on weekends," Led-
erer says.
C.C. Skye also projects a heavy
metal holiday of sorts, glittering
with multiple diamonds, such as
the Wish List Necklace, compris-


ing of heavy bronze chains woven
with white stones. Her retailers
are also beginning to stock the
pav6 punk princess bracelet in
gun metal for the holidays. Skye
says it caters to that "luxe, funk
princess" trend.


Thursday November 24, 2011 G7


"It's got an edge with ele-
gance," she says. "There's irony
and balance. Women of all ages
are wearing pav6, not just
younger girls."
Fine jewelry is also in demand
for those aspirational buyers, ac-
cording to Janet Goldman,
founder and chief executive offi-
cer of Fragments showroom in
New York, which represents about
35 fashion and fine jewelry col-
lections.
Her suggestions for holiday
gifts include layered looks, such
as necklaces that are "feminine,
soft and drapey," and bracelets
that combine textures such as
wooden beads paired with a dia-
mond bangle.
Long, dramatic earrings are in
for those seeking gifts infused
with glam and sparkle.

C CTWFeatures






G8 Thursday, November 24, 2011


Jor niEquie ? a/dlkay 'lC? fs
Gloves Mittens Fingerless Gloves
Shawls Hats Yarns
Toys Scarves Throws
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Accessories
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Thursday November 24, 2011 G9


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIFT GUIDE


.






G10 Thursday November 24, 2011


Take 10: Top DVDs for the Cable-Free



Catching Up With Cable

_V Don't let those who've cut the cable miss out on their favorite shows. Holiday downtime is per-
fect for catching up on some of cables' most popular and critically acclaimed shows. Here are a
-. VA* few of last season's biggest titles, available on DVD and Blu-ray.
Lindsey Romain


1 Mad Men, Season Four (AMC/
Liornisgale) $49.99, DVD and Blu-ray

2 Rizzoli and Isles, Season One
(TNT/Warner Home Video) $39.98,
DVD

3 True Blood, Season Three
(HBO Home Video) $59.99,
DVD/$79.98 Blu-ray

4 Dexter, Season Five (Showtime
Enlerlarinmerni) $3' 99, DVD and Blu-ray


5 The Walk-
ing Dead,
Season One
(AMC/Lions-
gate) $39.99,
DVD/$49.99,
Blu-ray


6 Entourage, Season Seven
(HBO Home Video) $39.98,
DVD/$49.99 Blu-ray

7 Nurse Jackie, Season Two


(Showtime Entertainment) $39.98,
DVD and Blu-ray

8 Louie, Season One (FX Net-
work) $39.99, DVD and Blu-ray

9 Weeds, Season Six (Showtime
Entertainment) $39.98, DVD and Blu-
ray

10 Breaking Bad, Season Three
(AMC/Lionsgate) $39.99, DVD


CTW Features


GIFT GUIDE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





Youth



Movement

Give Youth in a Jar. Or tube.
Or bottle, box, vial, stick or
compact. Wildly popular, anti-aging
products make a perfect gift.


BY LAUREN PARRAN
CTWFeatures

This season, select a gift that will make
your friend or loved one glow with
more than gratitude. Feel-good creams,
serums, lotions and toners that promise
to soften the ravages of time are hot,
not just for women of a certain age (Hi,
Grammie!) but for the younger set,men
and women alike.
Anti-aging products once purchased and
used discreetly now sit boldly atop many gift
lists."These products have become really
eloquently packaged and extremely desir-
able.Like It handbags,there are It creams;'
says Erin Flahertyexecutive beauty editor
at Marie Claire."You can even call some of
these status symbols."
Baby boomers account for some
of the surge."The boomers are much
more embracing of health and extend-
ing their youth and being very upfront
about wanting to stay young and young-
looking," says Mark Lees, skin care spe-
cialist and author of "Skin Care: Beyond
the Basics" (Milady, 2011).
But a younger crowd also increas-
ingly uses anti-aging products, seeking
to forestall signs of aging, says Paula
Begoun, author and creator ofThe Cos-
metics Cop line of skin care products.
"Couple this with an economy where
we're more cautious about spending,"
Begoun says,"and anti-aging products,
especially the pricier ones, make ideal
gifts."
Prices for anti-aging concoctions


GIFT GUIDE


No lie:
anti-aging treat-
ments come out
of the shadows
to the top of gift o
lists. Here, Truth
Serum from Ole
Henriksen .



can be sky high. But the lineup of
moderately priced treatment products
is growing rapidly at drugstores and
mass merchants. Bethenny Frankel, of
"Real Housewives of NewYork" and
low-calorie margarita fame, is launch-
ing Skinnygirl Face & Body solutions in
selectWalmarts this fall. Prices will be
less than $15."A $150 eye cream is ridic-
ulous and absurd,"Frankel toldWomen's
Wear Daily.


Wrinkle-busters
No one wants wrinkles, so give the gift
of wrinkle prevention. Seeping deep
into the skin and high in vitamin C,
Ole HenriksenTruth Serum Collagen
Booster ($48, department and specialty
stores) purports to prevent aging and
brighten,firm and smooth the skin."It's
a safe bet for someone special regard-
less of their skin type," says Dr. Debra
Jaliman, a board-certified dermatologist
in NewYork City.
Give a face mask product for spa
day at home. It's an especially nice gift
see Youth Page 12


Thursday, November 24, 2011 Gil


Wk 4. PANDORA"
7.. UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS


255 E. Highland Blvd
Inverness, Florida 34452
352.726.4709


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Receive a free PANDORA holiday ornament (a $30 US retail value)
with your purchase of $125 or more of PANDORA jewelry.*
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u- SO N- -*o2o1 JMay1 ut *I Wh,.d .P=-W AN NEr







G12 Thursday November 24, 2011


Kindle Fire & Kindle Touch
The Amazon Kindle is like the iPod of the e-
reader category there are a lot, none are the
same, and there always is something new. The
latest model, the Kindle Fire ($199) is the first
color Kindle, with a 7-inch multitouch display,
and it's a lot more than an e-reader. The Wi-Fi
device treads into tablet territory with apps,
games, music and the new cloud-accelerated
Amazon Silk browser. Its 8GB of memory is
enough for 80 apps plus either 10 movies or
800 songs or 6,000 books, and Amazon Cloud
storage is free for all Amazon content. The
Kindle Touch (Wi-Fi, $99) and Kindle Touch 3G
($149) debuted alongside the Fire, offering the
same 6-inch display as classic Kindles while
eschewing the keyboard for a multitouch inter-
face.


Nothing soothes quite like curling
up with a good book. But with the
booming e-reader market, the
avid readers on your gift list might soon
be curling up with thousands at once. As
the popularity of e-readers continues to
soar reports show that 12 percent of
adults in the United States own one, up 6
percent from last fall they're sure to be
a hit this holiday season. And with plenty
of models on the market, choosing the
best can be a challenge. Knowing the fea-
tures and fine-tuning them to what fits
their potential owner is the best way to
choose. Here are some of the most popu-


E Readers






9)de a i.


Youth
from Page 11
gift if a special occasion is
coming up, Lees says. "It re-
ally does perk up your skin
for about 12 hours," he says.
Moisturizers
Nivea, the iconic skin care
company that celebrates its
100th anniversary this year, is
reaching out to the next gener-


ation of customers, signing
the singer Rihanna as the face
and voice of its year-long 100
Years of Skin Care global
party. Her face is on a limited
edition tin bestowed only on
lucky winners of online pro-
motions. A classic blue jar of
Nivea Creme, for use all over
the body, is easy enough to
pick up just about everywhere
($6, drugstores).


* BUYERS OF PRECIOUS


1665 US Hwy 19 South Crystal River Shopping Ctr. (Next to Sweet Bay)
.6I03


lar devices on the market and the features
that make them stand out.

NOOK Color
Barnes & Noble has updated the classic
NOOK with the NOOK Color ($249), the
market's first full-color e-reader. The 7-
inch touch screen allows users to "itrn"'
the pages of their e-book with a swish
and a flick, and with 8GB of storage the
NOOK Color holds up to 6,000 books at
a time, as well as downloadable apps and
even magazine subscriptions (all avail-
able through the online NOOK store). It
also comes equipped with built-in Wi-Fi,
meaning readers can buy books straight
from the NOOK itself, no wires required.
And with a 2-month battery life, there are
no abrupt blackouts in sight.

Sony Reader
Sony's latest e-reader, the Reader Wi-
Fi ($149), also is the lightest on the mar-
ket, weighing just 168 grams. It has a
6-inch screen, holds up to 1,200 titles and
has a battery life of three weeks. The
Sony Reader Wi-Fi also offers wireless
public library access to allow users to
borrow books directly to the device Harry
Potter fans will be especially interested:
see Readers Page 13


GIFT GUIDE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



How to
Gift an E-Reader
Choosing an e-reader is the tricky
part. Giving it is the fun part. Here
are some reminders and tips to help
make the gifting process hassle-free
and interesting.

Be Sure to'Gift Wrap'
If you're buying an e-reader on-
line, look for the gift-wrap option
when you check out your items for
purchase. Don't skip this step gift-
wrapping means the e-reader won't
get automatically linked to your on-
line account and the prices won't
show up on the packaging.

Fill It Up
An e-reader without e-books is
like a record player without vinyl.
Luckily, gifting an e-book is as easy
as clicking a mouse literally. Ama-
zon's Kindle Store allows gift givers
to send e-books as presents
through e-mail. Or let them choose
for themselves most e-reader
providers offer gift cards for their on-
line e-book stores. Choose a dollar
amount and let recipients shop
around for whatever entices them
most.

Accessorize
Online e-reader stores usually
offer protective skins and covers to
keep touch screens clean and
scratch-free. If choosing colors
makes you nervous, try a power
adapter or headphones to complete
an e-reader gift bundle.


GIFT GUIDE


Thursday, November 24, 2011 G13


NOOK Color Sony Reader


Readers
from Page 12
Sony is offering a promotion
with the Wi-Fi that allows buyers
one free download of the first
"Harry Potter" book in the series
via Pottermore, the exclusive on-
line retailer of the "Harry Potter" e-
books.
Sony's Pocket Edition ($179) is
the most portable of its e-reader of-
ferings. The Pocket's 5-inch touch
screen may be small, but this 5.47-


ounce e-reader packs a serious
punch, carrying up to 1,200 titles
and high-speed USB connection
capabilities.
It's available in both a fun pink
color and classic silver.

Kobo e-reader Touch
The Kobo e-reader Touch ($139)
is another crisp, simple e-reader,
holding up to 30,000 books with
expandable microSD memory
(1,000-plus without).
It comes with a unique soft-


quilted back for added comfort
while reading and is equipped with
built-in Wi-Fi and a USB connec-
tion. Available in colors like lilac
and blue, and weighing in at 6.5
ounces, the 6-inch display screen
and monthlong battery life keep the
Kobo Touch in line with its compe-
tition. Kobo also offers the Kobo
Wireless e-reader that comes pre-
loaded with 100 classic reads.

river Story HD
The river Story HD ($139) is


J.nr K 5 eBooks .
GooIe books -
C u L itnd ReadmQe 0


u *

ikai-, - -
" U. .














river Story HD

Google's contribution to the e-
reading craze.
Known for its crisp image qual-
ity, the Story can load up to 1,500
books at a time and weighs just 7.3
ounces.
It has a 6-inch, high-res display,
which boasts 63 percent more pix-
els than the original Story model.
The Story also comes with a full-
functioning keyboard and has six
weeks' worth of battery life after a
single charge.
CTWFeatures


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238'


Apple aficionados always are hungry for an upgrade. Here's a rundown on
all the latest 'Pads, 'Pods and 'Phones they're craving this season


You might be a PC, but there's no
doubt that they're a Mac and
nothing else with suffice. If you
need the perfect and newest -
peripheral to plug into their fruitful
life, look no further. Here are the lat-
est Apple gadgets they're pining for.

iPhone 4S
The new iPhone 4S takes every-
thing to the next level. A 1 GHz
dual-core processor delivers speedier
browsing and gaming, and the up-
graded camera captures 8-MP stills
and full 1080p high-def video. But
the coolest feature is the introduction
of Siri, the intelligent assistant that
will set reminders, check the
weather and proffer dining sugges-
tions, all via voice commands. Of
course, there is access to more than
425,000 apps in the App Store, right
from the palm of their hand.Oh,
don't forget that the iPhone 4S can
simply make calls, too! The iPhone
4S is available in black or white.
16GB- $199


32GB $299
64GB $399


iPad 2
The second-generation iPad is
everything great about the original -
but even better. First, Apple says the
9.7-inch tablet is a 33 percent thin-
ner and 15 percent lighter than the
original iPad, but it still offers a
super-long 10-hour battery life. An
upgrade to a 1 GHz dual-core
processor allows for faster browsing
on the web and smoother multitask-
ing on apps.
The biggest change, though, is the
introduction of a front- and rear-fac-
ing cameras for Face Time chatting
and capturing stills and high-def
video. New Smart Covers magneti-
cally clip to the edge to serve as a
screen protector and angled-viewing
stand. The iPad 2 is available in
black or white.
16GB $499 Wi-Fi, $629 3G
32GB $599 Wi-Fi, $729 3G
64GB $699 Wi-Fi, $829 3G


iPod Touch
The latest-gen iPod Touch brings
along a Face Time camera for video
chatting or capturing 720p high-def
video and a high-res Retina Display
touch screen all at only 0.28
inches thick. With all that and apps,
one could say the iPod Touch truly is
an iPhone without the phone, but up
to 40 hours of audio playback leave
no doubts that this is one standout
iPod. The iPod Touch is available in
black or white.
8GB $199
32GB $299
64GB $399

iPod nano
The 0.74-ounce nano packs touch-
screen controls and up to 24 hours of
audio playback into its roughly 1.5-
inch square design. In addition to
their mp3 collection, users can tune


into FM radio or track their daily
steps on a pedometer. A clip makes it
easy to take on-the-go for a com-
mute or for a workout, as it also
syncs with the Nike+ iPod Sport Kit.
The nano is available in seven col-
ors.
8GB $129
16GB $149

iPod Shuffle
One could almost call the iPod
Shuffle a trial version. It offers
plenty of space (2GB) and playback
(15 hours) in a tiny package (1.24
inches wide, 0.44 ounces). Plus, it
has clickable buttons, unlike previ-
ous Shuffles, and a clip for keeping
it contained. Best of all, it's dirt
cheap ($49).
2GB $49

iPod Classic
There are no frills with the origi-


nal iPod. Click wheel. A 2.5-inch
LCD display. And more space than
they have music. Available in black
or gray.
160GB $249

Apple TV
If you know someone who's cut
their cable TV in the past year, an
Apple TV might be the gift for them.
This half-pound, 4-inch square de-
vice lets them stream movies and
shows from iTunes on their home
computer right to their HDTV Net-
flix streaming, naturally, is built in,
and the Apple TV also lets them rent
movies directly from their TV.
Sports fans with MLB.tv or
NBA.com League Pass subscrip-
tions also can stream games live on
the device. And all can be controlled
from iPad, iPod or iPhone via the
Remote app.
Apple TV $99


You Can

Create

Beautiftd Gift S





BEADS
Enjoy the art of creating custom jewelry...
*Accessories Classes* Pearl Stringing available
352-563-1766
8024 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River


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GIFT GUIDE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Thursday, November 24, 2011 G15


t\.-iLCu F liofoo'


ro


Nikon D3100


Cameras


The season's hottest cameras for aspiring


By Greg Scoblete
CTW Features
There's an old saying
among photographers that the
best camera is the one you
have with you. For many of
us, that's increasingly a smart-
phone. But if someone on
your list relies only on a mo-
bile phone for photography,
they're missing out. From
blazing-fast shooting speeds to
exquisite detail and creative
options, nothing can top an in-
terchangeable-lens camera.
Nikon D3100
This is a perfect stepping
stone into the world of ad-
vanced photography for some-
one who'd prefer a sturdy,
full-sized d-SLR model. The
camera's "Guide Mode" gives
a user on-screen tutorials, sug-
gesting camera settings to help
achieve the desired results. If
they want to simply "set and
forget" the camera, they can
choose the Scene Auto Selec-
tor mode and the Nikon
D3100 ($699) will automati-
cally pick a scene mode opti-
mized for the environment.
It's possible to capture high
definition (1920 x 1080) video
on the D3100 with full-time
autofocus available while you
shoot (many d-SLRs disen-
gage autofocus during movie
filming, which often results in
a blurred mess). The D3100
includes an 18-55mm lens
with Nikon's Vibration Reduc-


tion technology to reduce
image blur. The D3100 offers
a 14-megapixel sensor and a
burst mode to capture action.
Canon EOS T3i
For those with a little more
to spend, Canon's EOS T3i
($899) packs an 18-megapixel
CMOS image sensor and can
fire off a burst of 3.7fps for up
to 34 photos. It also can record
high-definition movies. Its
high-resolution 3-inch LCD
flips out from the camera's
body so photogs can frame
hard-to-reach shots. The T3i
has most of the manual con-
trols you'd expect in a digital
SLR (shutter, aperture, white
balance, etc.) with a "Scene
Intelligent Auto" mode that
analyzes the scene in front of
you and selects the optimal


settings -just point and shoot.
The T3i camera kit includes
an 18-55mm image stabilized
lens and the camera is compat-
ible with Canon's full line of
EF and EF-S lenses.
Olympus Pen Mini E-PM1
The Olympus Pen series of
cameras offer the interchange-
able lenses of a digital SLR
camera in a body that's closer
in size to a point-and-shoot.
The Pen Mini E-PM1 ($499)
features a 12-megapixel image
sensor and 1080p HD video
recording with stereo micro-
phone for high-quality audio
capture. They'll frame shots
through a bright, 3-inch dis-
play and can apply one of six
art filters to give images some
creative pop. The PM1 is
among the first high-end digi-


shutterbugs
tal cameras to include a 3D
mode for shooting stills with
greater depth. Available in
purple, pink, brown, white, sil-
ver or black, the Pen Mini is
just 1.3 inches thick and in-
cludes a 14-42mm lens (3x
magnification) and works with
a growing family of ZUIKO
Digital/Micro 4/3 lenses from
Olympus and Panasonic.


INC.


Olympus Pen Mini E-PM1


341-0813 ins
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
(1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44)
Open Mon.-FH. 8:30-5, Sat. 9-4 Evenings by appointment.
www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net I


Happy Tbanks vi ng
MTo A All OLs.t


iLM 'NATE
INTLE /ieieW rat


All Area Rugs 70% OFF
Where Quality & Value Come Together


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIFT GUIDE


m




G16 Thursday November 24, 2011


GIFT GUIDE


214 US Hwy. 41 S., Inverness, Fl 34450 Phone 726-1021


UGS
* Fax 726-0164


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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