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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02599
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 11-19-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02599

Full Text




Stillwater mourning: Okla. St. coaches die in plane crash /813

:****e IT RI .Jl S CO U N T


CUStOmerS
experiencing
delay S
Due to production
problems related to
the installation of
new press equip-
ment, many Chroni-
cle customers have
had late delivery of
their newspaper. We
hope to have the
technical issues re-
solved in the near fu-
ture but ask for your
patience and
apologize for the
inconvenience.



CITRUS STAMPEDE:


.e d


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500 VOLUME 117 ISSUE 104


Solo trek
British woman attempts
historic Antarctic
crossing./Page A10


Comics .. .. .. ..C9
Community ...C7
Crossword . ...C8
Editorial .. .. .. ..A8
Entertainment. .. .B6
Horoscope .. .. ..B6
Lottery Numbers ..B4
Lottery Payouts . ..B6
Movies .. .. .. .. ..C9
Obituaries .. .. .. .A5
Classifieds. .. .. .C10
TV Listings .. .. ..C8



Illlll|1|lil II84 78 1211002 5 .


TODAY & Sunday morning
""" Partly cloudy and
82 breezy. PAE4
61


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
After a breakfast that
would fill up a farmhand,
members of the agricul-
tural community of Citrus
and Hernando counties
kicked off Farm City Week
Friday in Floral City by
considering the chal-
lenges they must work
through.
"Every year, the world's
farmers must feed 78 mil-
lion more people with 27
billion fewer tons of top-
soil," said guest speaker
Dr. J. Stacy Strickland,


Hernando County Exten-
sion Director.
Farm City Week will be
observed from Nov. 18
through Nov 24 to promote
abetter understanding
about agriculture as a way
of life. The breakfast menu
used home-grown ingredi-
ents, as did the table cen-
terpieces of locally grown
vegetables.
"It's a way to get the
urban and non-farm fami-
lies connected with the
farm families," said Billy
Sellers of the Hernando-
Citrus County Farm Bu-
reau. "We're all


interdependent on each
Other."
Both Citrus and Her-
nando counties' commis-


State Sen. Charles Dean,
R-Inverness, and state
Rep. Jimmie T. Brooks, R-
Inverness, also were guests
at the breakfast.
Dale McClellan, presi-
dent of the Agricultural Al-
liance of Citrus County,
said the Farm Bureau
helped him when he
started M&B Dairy in
Lecanto, when some of his
neighbors did not find the
move popular. Not every-
one's a farmer anymore, as
they were when George
Washington was president,
McClellan said.
See Page A4


si owners
executed
proclama-
tions for
Farm City
Wee k
Hernando
County
Commis -
si oner
James Ad-
kins, who
is also a


J. Stacy
Strickland
guest speaker.


farmer, read the proclama-
tions from both boards.


Local rodeo
Event continues Satur-
day in Inverness./
Page A2

IN WASHINGTON:
IAr -


Budget cuts
Congressional panel
tasked with serving up
1. trlin in sending

/Page A10
OPINION:

Harold

Seckinger's

youth orches-
tra idea is a

great initiative
that will invest

in te grow h
Of Culture and

quality of life
for citruS

Count "


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Turner Fish Camp owner Lillian Holt peaks through broken windows of her restaurant and bar Thursday morning.
She plans on rebuilding the landmark fish camp.


Turner Fisb Camp bar owner hopes to rebuikla jier fre


MATTHEW BECK
Chronicle

INVERNESS Lillian Holt has
been on an emotional roller
coaster lately
A fire destroyed her restaurant
and bar at Turner Fish Camp on
Aug. 15, and things have been up
and down since then.
"We're hoping to be able to re-
build," she said Thursday morning
as a light rain tapped on the metal
roof covering her head.
Holt said she was saddened
when she learned how much it
would cost to rebuild her estab-
lishment with a new, metal build-
ing. She estimates it will take
nearly 10 times the cost to build
new versus rebuilding what is left.
"I think we can rebuild what we
have here for around $30,000 or
so."
The existing bar area suffered
mostly smoke damage from the
early morning fire that started in
an electrical box near the storage
area. Recently, Deborah Cox,
spokeswoman with the State Fire
Marshal's office, said investigators
found the fire was accidental and


ICY ADVENTURES:


Charlie Ritter has been working around the fish camp any way he can to
help Lillian Holt get things back to normal.


started at an electrical outlet in the
northeast corner of the building be-
hind the refrigerator.
Since the fire, Holt has made
some progress on getting things to-
gether and her customers have
responded.
"We moved the pool table from
inside the bar area to outside near
the Tiki bar which has opened for


business. That has lifted my spir-
its," Holt said.
This Sunday, Holt is preparing
for a benefit to help offset rebuild-
ing costs.
"We're going to have a live band.
Steve Champaign will be playing
classic rock and we'll have food

See Page A4


sHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
For Deputy Joe Faherty,
it is all about the smiles.
Every year, the school re-
source officer with the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office
coordinates the annual
Shop with a Cop event. And
every year, he pushes him-
self harder to raise even
more funds so he can give
local schoolchildren in
need a great Christmas.
This year, High Octane
Saloon in Homosassa will
again be hosting a benefit
concert for Shop with a
Cop. Headlining the event
is Citrus County native and
regional performer Ryan
Weaver. The event begins


at 7 p.m. today, Nov. 19.
Tickets are $15 at the gate.
There is also a chnc to 11
win a 2012 Harley David- .$
son Fat Boy Lo motorcycle.
The price is $20 per entry. Ba ~~PS
On Sunday, there will be *
a poker run starting at 10
a.m. at High Octane
Saloon.
Last year, Faherty said ..
they were able to raise
more than $5,000 from the 1
concert. Nevertheless, he ,
added the need for more .
donations from the com-
munity is still there as he
hopes to help nearly 90
children this year. DAVE SIGLER/Chroniclefile
Each year, the sheriff's Deputy Joe Faherty, right, looks at a video game with a
office Juvenile Affairs Unit child during Shop with a Cop in 2009. The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office is looking for donations for its annual Shop
See >/Page A4 with a Cop program.


Farmers sowing a message


2 arrests


made mn

Crisls








Associated Press

CALDWELL, Ohio-
When a South Carolina man
answered a Craigslist ad
seeking a farmhand in Ohio,
there was no job waiting for
him. There was a freshly
dug grave.
The man was shot and
wounded in what investiga-
tors say was a murderous
robbery scheme that used
bogus help-wanted ads to
lure victims. He escaped,
but another job-seeker was
later found dead in a shal-
low grave nearby. And two
suspects a man and a 16-
year-old boy are under
arrest.
Neighbors living near the
property where the graves
were dug were shocked by
the bloodshed. Some fig-
ured the arrests had closed
the case, while others, like
Angie Noll, put credence in
rumors of more bodies to be
found.
"We're a rural commu-
nity, maybe there's 15
houses up here, and right in
our backyard this stuff is
going on," said Noll, a 28-
year-old maintenance pro-
duction clerk who lives just
a few houses away from the
neighbor whose door the
South Carolina man
knocked on after escaping.
"I feel kind of dumb-
founded about it."
The sheriff said it is un-
clear how long the ad had
been online or whether
there are other victims.
The wooded piece of land
sits on the former site of a
strip mine and is owned by
a coal company and rented
out to hunters. It is isolated,
with no lights and only one-
lane gravel roads running
in and out.
"It's an ideal place to get
rid of a body," said Don
Warner, rancher who lives
nearby.
A judge issued a gag
order in the case Friday,
and the names of the two
victims and the adult sus-
pect were not released.
Before the order was im-
posed, Sheriff Stephen
Hannum said that the South
Carolina victim was taken
Nov 6 to the desolate area,
where he managed to de-
flect a gun cocked at the
back of his head and ran.
Wounded in the arm, he hid
in the woods for hours, then
showed up covered in blood
at the first well-lighted
place he could see, a farm-
house outside Caldwell,
about 80 miles east of
Columbus.
This week, cadaver dogs
were brought in, and au-
thorities found one hand-
dug grave they believe was
intended for the South Car-
olina man and a second
gr e tha eddthe body of
The Akron Beacon Jour-
nal identified the suspects
as a 52-year-old man from
Akron, about 90 miles away,
and a high school student
from the Akron area. The
teenager was charged Fri-
day with attempted murder.
While his name appears in
court documents, The Asso-
ciated Press generally does
not report the names of mi-
nors charged with crimes.
No charges were immedi-
ately brought against the
man.
The South Carolina man
who escaped to neighbor's
house told the homeowner,
ROse Schockling, that he
had answered an ad on
Craigslist for a job and was

See .Page A4


Life I 1 1


Sheriff's office raising funds for Shop with a Cop










































Ocala newspapers.
"He helped the newspa-
per grow and helped the
newspaper connect with ', ~ f
the community," Mulligan
sauring his tenure, the
Chronicle expanded to a I~
six-day daily newspaper in
1986 and then to seven days
a week in 1989.
Mr. Manning also was co-
owner of WTRS radio sta-
tin adcwasmpbasrtspr siden! ___ ___
merce in Inverness and
Dunnellon. He served on .,
the Citrus Memorial Hospi-
was prsdi nd-lc df VALU S OFFPilA
Florida Press Association. $ 0 5 % $ 5
'Garry was a very smart ~ 0 5% t1
du, ed ulperaomotional -- --
He was also an avid mu-
sician and songwriter
Survivors include tWO
daughters, Maureen Page
of Chula Vista, Calif and
Kelleen Duncan of Inver-
ness, n onesn ar


-r ..- . .-- e
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D Y\I;U~(
Laa'n WD'I\IC~II~I C! E ~rl~'~rl\U~C ED:


C~i~Sll;re~u


ALL THE LOCAL NrEWIS PLUS



HOLIDAY CO D Mc SPECIAL
ADS SECTIONS

C~u. 563-3295 Beo'"L v 2a, 1
(New subscribers can not have subscribed within the past 60 days) a r cu **" ~ rr
New or Additional Subscriptions Only.
Not good with any other offers.
Subscription price includes a separate charge for transportation and ~L
3009LMw applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. rwwwmchronicleonline.com


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A2 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


LOCAL


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus i

TheR16t A Fu S tam ed
night in Inverness at the
Citrus County Fairgrounds
and continues Saturday as
cowboys and girls com-
pete for prizes in the an-
nual event. The rodeo
gates open at 5:30 p.m. It
features some of the best
riders across the country
competing in the Ram
Rodeo Series and it is the
Citrus County 4-H Founda-
tion's biggest and most
founpdaon u rpone rdu~ch
tional material, awards and
financial aid to local
youths. Tickets are $18 for
adults and $5 for children
ages 4 through 11. The
Kiddy Corral is open at
5:30 p.m. each day until
the rodeo starts, and again
at intermission.
For more information,
call the Rodeo hotline
at (352) 564-4525.


Mond~
INVERNESS Services Funer
for former Chronicle Pub- ness. i
lisher Garry Manning are begin
4:30 p.m. Monday at Heinz Rev. J~
Funeral Home in ineb
Inverness. Chre
Mr. Manning, of Ocala, Wrigh
died Tuesday, Nov 15, 2011, (352)
at age 59. m wr
He was the first pub- online
lisher to succeed former
newspaper owner David SI
Arthurs, who brought him
on board as general man- 11 Se
ager in 1980. Mr. Manning full
became publisher in 1984 Pa~
and served in that role until
leaving the Chronicle in
1990.
Current Publisher Gerry
Mulligan, who served as ed- I
itor under Mr. Manning,
sad Mr. Mann e tblroou hh
tremendous growth during
a time when the Chronicle
competed locally with
Tampa, St. Petersburg and


ay, Nov. 21, at Heinz
al Home in Inver-
A chapel service will
at 4:30 p.m. with the
ames Johnson presid-
onicle reporter M~ike
t can be reached at
563-3228 or
igh bt@ chronicle
.com.
O YOU KNOW
:e Garry Manning's
obituary on
ge A5.


OOOgTm


COM


eal Ends Midnight Sunday Nov. 20


Posilx ,. Bt3


Celebrity bruises* 2 0ad mrca~e


All 5 Citrus Counzty Publix Stores

b~lbeerre~c~e hrdounahonose tbeterenth
Publix Otbr2n hog oebr2t
Turkeys will be distributed Saturday November 19th,
beginning at 9 am at the Inverness Walmart


0009VYK


Former Chronicle



pbl shP TH1



MIKE WRIGHT MaHning Of InVerneSS.
fStaff Writer Visitation is 3 to 4:30 p.m.


Stamlpede Rodeo continues Today


SAVE VVITH THIS


~4\~`~k5


3'P
Per Week
Prepaid


CITRUS COUNTY


SOR AF R


LITTLE AS


You Can Help Us Feed The Needy Of Citrus County By Donating A Thanksgiving Turkey

CITR US CO UNTY THANKSGIVING
FEEDING ALLI~A NCE
30 Non-profits Working Together to Make This Holiday a Little Better for Everyone


Ask anzy Cashier to make your Donation














CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




,fro T T COunty settles public records lawsuit


cHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Wr-itr

INVERNESS The county set-
tled a legal action concerning a
public records request out of court
for $1,450.
Inverness resident Robert A.
Schweickert Jr., who awaits a
judge's decision on an Oct. 13
hearing about whether he can
pursue a claim the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
(BOCC) violated the Sunshine Law
when retaining a law firm to lobby
the Florida Legislature to add
Port Citrus to the list of the state's
seaports, filed the petition of a
writ of mandamus earlier this
month.
A writ of mandamus asks a court
to order a government body to per-


form its mandatory duties.
Schweickert's petition accuses
the county of violating the public
records law by ignoring his attor-
ney's request for email messages
between an outside law firm and
two employees of the county attor-
ney's office.
Schweickert's attorney, Marcy La-
Hart, said in a statement issued ear-
lier this month she asked on Aug. 19
for emails Citrus County Attorney
Richard Wesch or Richard Aare,
the assistant county attorney at that
time, received or sent to two attor-
neys at a Tampa law firm that rep-
resented Citrus Mining and Timber.
Schweickert previously ques-
tioned the propriety of a change to
the Citrus County Comprehensive
Plan in regard to Citrus Mining and
Timber. LaHart said Wesch and


Aare attended a final hearing re-
garding attorney's fees to be
awarded to Citrus Mining and Tim-
ber.
LaHart questioned the propriety
of the presence of two county attor-
neys when the county no longer had
any stake in the case. She said the
county had not claimed the emails
she requested were exempt. It just
had not bothered to respond to the
request.
According to a copy of an email
supplied by LaHart that she sent to
Wesch in reply to a response from
him, she said attorneys for Citrus
Mining and Timber suggested the
emails were covered by attorney-
client confidentiality, but that was
"imaginary."
"I certainly found the complete
silence regarding my request suspi-


cious," LaHart wrote to Wesch.
At its meeting Tuesday, BOCC ap-
proved a settlement amount of
$1,450. The sum represents a $400
filing fee and $1,050 in attorney's
fees,
"This stems from a public records
issue and represents the fees and
costs which are due and payable to
Mr. Schweickert's attorney under
the provisions of Chapter 119,"
Wesch told the BOCC.
Commissioner Dennis Damato
made the motion to approve as pre-
sented. It was seconded by Com-
missioner Joe Meek. There was no
discussion. The motion passed
unanimously.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at
cvanormer~chronicleonline. com
or (352) 564-2916.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Workers from D.A.B. Constructors of Inglis continue work Friday on the new Crystal River High School entrance off Turkey Oak Drive, slow-
ing down traffic to one lane. On Friday paying crews worked on resurfacing the road. New heavy duty poles to hold traffc signals are in place;
however, the power company has to complete its installation before the project can be finished.


CATHY J(PULKA
Staff Wr-iter
YANKEETOWN Yan-
keetown has declared No-
vember as "Elvis Presley
Month." And as part of the
celebration, the city is dedi-
cating its Follow That
Dream Parkway, which now
extends to the gulf.
"Follow That Dream" is a
1962 Elvis movie. Parts of
the movie were filmed in
Citrus and Levy counties in
1961. .
The celebration, which
includes a seafood festival,
is a three-day event that is


organized by n WHAT:
the Withla- Anul
coochee Gulf AtC
Area Chamber Seafood
of Commerce.
"The festival WHEN:
is pretty big anSu
and runs three a WHERE
blocks long," Drive in
Celeste Wid- Yankeete
man, adminis- m CONTAI
trative assistant (352) 50
for the cham- for infor
ber, said. "And
the seafood is
great."
The first day of the festi-
val, which began Friday, fea-
tured a showing of the


movie "Follow
That Dream."
On Saturday
at 10 a.m. at the
Old Courthouse
in Inverness,
the Elvis Pres-
ley Continen-
tals' Fan Club
will meet and
conduct a free
"Follow That
Dream" tour of
historic places
where Elvis and


tact Nancy Tint at (407) 344-
3299.
Also on Saturday, the
parkway dedication takes
place at the Yankeetown
sign on State Road 40 West,
just past the Yankeetown
School, at 4 p.m.
On Saturday and Sunday
the 30th Annual Yankee-
town Arts, Crafts & Seafood
Festival, which is sponsored
by the Inglis Yankeetown
Florida Lions Club, kicks off
at 9 a.m. and runs until 5
p.m. both days on Riverside
Drive in Yankeetown.
The event benefits Lions
Club charities supporting


activities related to sight,
hearing diabetes and other
community needs.
There will be games and
more than 100 arts and
crafts vendors.
The Chris Diamond Elvis
show will perform on the fes-
tival stage and there will be
more Elvis music at the Izaak
Walton Lodge both days.
For more information,
call (352) 505-7936 or email
yan keeto wnsea food
festival~gmail.com.
Chronicle reporter Cathy
Kapulka can be reached at
(352) 564-2922 or ckapulka@
chronicleonline. com.


30th
Yankeetown
afts &
Festival.
Saturday
day.
:: Riverside

own..
CT: Call
)5-7936
mation.


his crew filmed parts of the
movie. The tour will end in
Yankeetown and is free. For
more tour information, con-


State BRIE FS


Scott says health
law won't prevail
WEST PALM BEACH -
Gov. Rick Scott said he's con-
vinced the landmark federal
health care law will not prevail
at the U.S. Supreme Court.
In an editorial board inter-
view Thursday with The Palm
Beach Post, the Republican
said he believes the chal-
len es of Florida and other
states will win at the high
court.
He said, "It's not the law of
the land. I don't believe it will
ever be the law of the land."
Panhandle soldier
Afghan casualty
NAVARRE A 22-year-
old soldier from the Florida
Panhandle has died in

AfThan Us. anDartment of
Deense Mep rtd Tu dy

was killed Nov. 16 when his
unit was hit with an impro-
vised explosive device in
Kandahar.


Jourhneal rote tha lin's
parents were at Dover Air
Force Base in Delaware
when their son's body arrived
Thursday.
The newspaper reports
that Colin was scheduled
to come home for a two-
week leave in January. He
was on a year-long
deployment.
NOW 1-595 turnpike
rap open
FORT LAUDERDALE -
The daily commute for some
South Florida motorists just
got a little easier.
A new ramp on Interstate
595 opened Thursday after-
noon, providing westbound
motorists an easier route to
Florida's Turnpike.
The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reported transporta-
tion officials will keep the old
entrance to the turnpike open
for a litelnger just in
case drivers accidentally
pass the new one.
-From wire reports


County Economic Develop-
ment Council, said Friday af-
ternoon. 'It's a major
improvement, better than
surrounding counties."
Across the entire state, un-
employment fell to 10.3 per-
cent in October, the lowest in
28 months. The state eco-
nomic agency also reported
Florida added a net total of
9,500 new jobs since Septem-
ber 2011 and a net total of
106,900 jobs since January
2011.
In Workforce Connection's
three-county region, re-
gional unemployment was
11.5 percent in October,
down from September's 12.1
percent and significantly,
down 1.8 percent over the
year.
That's the third consecu-
tive drop in unemployment
and the lowest regional rate
since May's 11.5 percent, ac-
cording to Workforce
Connection.
"This is very good news.
We're not only seeing posi-


tive, strong growth but we're
seeing a trend, and that is
very positive," said Work-
force's CEO Rusty Skinner in
a press release. "Where we
had experienced almost a
yo-yo effect, up slightly one
month, down the next, our
unemployment has steadily
trended downward.
Siefert said this news
shows the EDC, the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce and its partners are
working hard to make things
happen.
"We can be proud of the
work the EDC and the Cham-
ber is doing," he said. "We're
doing everything we can."
Josh Wooten, president
and chief executive officer of
the chamber, also expressed
delight over the numbers
stating, "It proves the al-
liance is starting to work."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles @chronicle
online, com.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Wr-itr

The Florida Department
of Economic Opportunity
has delivered news to be
thankful for: lower unem-
ployment in Citrus County.
The state economic
agency reported Friday that
the October unemployment
rate for Citrus County was 11
percent, dropping 0.6 per-
cent from September's 11.6
percent.
Though Citrus County's
labor force shrank slightly
from 58,390 to 58,215 in Octo-
ber, the number of employed
rose by 214 to 51,813 and the
number of those without jobs
was 6,402, a drop of 369 in a
month's time.
"That was outstanding
news," John Siefert, execu-
tive director of the Citrus


Page A3 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


LOCAL


Citrus County

Electric co-op refunds
$14 million to users
Withlacoochee River Elec-
tric Cooperative's Board of
Trustees authorized a $14
million dollar capital credit re-
fund to its members. The
credit will appear on WREC's
December statement and ap-
plies to members who have
had service with the coopera-
tive for more than one year.
Capital Credits are the ac-
cumulation of all prior year's
revenue after the co-op's ex-
penses have been paid.
These credits are applied on
a pro-rata basis to each
WREC member's account
and represent a portion of the
total monies paid to the co-op
by each member.
'While WREC faces many
of the same economic chal-
lenges our members face, we
are very pleased to be able to
return 14 million in capital
credits to our members this
year," said Billy Brown,
WREC'S General Manager.
Capital Credits are unique
to the cooperative business
model. Counting this year's
refund, WREC members
have received more than
$237 million capital credits
since 1990.
Habitat to raise walls
for house No. 73
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County will raise the walls
on house No. 73 for the
Brenes family on Saturday,
Nov. 19, at 8 a.m. The house
is at 9630 N. Buscetta Loop,
Crystal River. Habitat volun-
teers, friends, family and
everyone interested in Habi-
tat for Humanity's work are
invited to attend and help.
For driving directions, call the
Habitat office at (352) 563-
2744, or go to the website
www.habitatcc.org.
Habitat for Humanity is a
nonprofit ecumenical Chris-
tian housing ministry seeking
to eliminate poverty housing
and to make decent shelter a
matter of conscience and ac-
tion. Habitat volunteers build
simple houses in partnership
with low-income families, who
qualify to own a Habitat home
based on income, current liv-
ing conditions and a willing-
russ to ines prona i=?

est mortgage payments. To
volunteer, call (352)
563-2744 -
Teacher files to run for
school superintendent
Sandy Balfour, a teacher at
the Academy of Environmen-
tal Science and a member of
the College of Central Florida
Board of Trustees, filed paper-
work Friday to run for superin-
tendent of schools in 2012.
Balfour, a Republican,
would face incumbent Demo-
crat Sandra "Sam" Himmel in
the November 2012 election
if both win their primaries or
have no primary opposition.
Balfour's paperwork with
the Supervisor of Elections
office allows her to collect
and spend money on the
campaign.

Port Charlotte

Dead cats found on
SW Fla. golf course
Authorities in Southwest
Florida are investigating after
dismembered cats were left
on the fairways at a golf club.
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office said the latest
incident happened Thursday
when a maintenance worker
found a dead cat at the Port
Charlotte Golf Club. Deputies
said the cat was cut from the
throat to its belly.
The worker called authori-
ties. When deputies arrived,
they were told it was the third
time a dead cat had been left
on the fairways.
Golf course officials said
they found two dismembered
cats in October.
Authorities said they be-
lieve the cats were killed


elsewhere and brou ht to the
gol course.
-From staff and wire reports


Workers pave the way for a new high school entrance


Seafood festival highlights Elvis month in Yankeetown


COunty jobless rate drops

















































































CH CL t
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a a Inverness
a: iCourthouSC office
T~pisSt. square
5 SL 19 E 106 W. Main
nverness, FL



Who's in charge:
Gerry M ulligan ........................ ................................. Publisher, 563-3222
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Charlie Brennan................................ .................. Editor, 563-3225
Tom Feeney ........................ ........ ............ Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart ........................ .................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John Murphy .................................................... Online M/anager, 563-3255
Nea le Brennan .... Pr-omotions/Community Affairs M/anager, 563-6363
John Murphy.............................................. Classified M/anager, 564-3255
Jeff Gordon ....................... .. ...... ............. Business M/anager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold...................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken ........................................... Darlene M/ann, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................ ...... .... ............... 563-3261
Sound Off .......................... ................... 563-0579

The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
uec eje cyou newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone (352) 563-6363
f POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011



PLOT
Continued from Page Al


told he would be erecting
fences for a cattle farm.
B Sh cklin sd
there is nofam othe ss e
the man described nearby,
with most of the surround-
ing countryside either
woods or strip mines.
The man had been told to
bring his belongings with him
to Ohio because he would be
living at the farm, the sheriff
said. Investigators believe
robbery was the motive.
A few days after the man
went to the police, authori-




CA MP
Continued from Page Al

that can be taken for a do-
nation. We'll have a 50/50
and blind raffle," she said.
"We will begin at 2 p.m.
and last till 6 p.m. or so."
On Dec. 8, another bene-
fit will be held at The
Grove in Inverness. Holt
says the martini bar will
have a celebrity bartender
event with tips going to the
reconstruction fund.
She says the building
that was damaged in the
fire was insured and the
money is being used to
pay her $4,600 mortgage
while things slowly re-




FRM
Continued from Page Al

Strickland talked about
getting out the message about
agriculture.
"We've got 713 farm opera-
tors in Citrus County and
141,000 residents," Strickland


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


ties received a call from the
Florida man's sister, con-
cerned that her brother
had not been heard from
for weeks. The sister said
her brother had responded
to what she believed was
the same Craigslist ad, for a
caretaker for cattle on a
688-acre farm.
"We brought in cadaver


turn to normal.
Holt says there has also
been a fund established at
Brannen Bank for those
who would like to con-
tribute.
The owner of the land-
mark fish camp on the
banks of the Withla-
coochee River near Inver-
ness said the outpouring
of support has been amaz-
ing. Recently she said she
was moved to tears when
one customer gave her a
$1,000 check to assist in
the rebuilding
effort.
"I am just very thankful
for the support our cus-
tomers have shown.
They're wonderful!" she
said. "Before the fire I



said. "That is why Farm City
Week is going to be so crucial
to educate the residents.
We've got a very important
message to send. We've been
in livestock production longer
than any other state in the
union."
The number of farms has
increased in the two counties
during the past 60 years. The


dogs thinking that a possi-
bility that the person that
was advertising on Craigslist
and lured this guy down
here may very well have
lured someone else to the
same area," the sheriff said.
"IOur hunch was correct."
Investigators have not
disclosed the cause of the
Florida man's death.



never thought we would
have had this much sup-
port. Just like our regular
customers feel, I want this
to be back open like it used
Charliee.) Ritter, a fish

camp resident for 10 years,
paused as he swept leaves
and debris from the out-
door Tiki bar and said Holt
has been hard at work to
get things back to where
they once were.
"She's trying her darnd-
est to get it back the way it
was. She's working her fin-
gers to the bone."
Chronicle staff writer
M~atthew Beck can be
reached at (352)564-2919or
mbeck~chronicleonline.
com.


trend is for farms to increase
with the growth of popula-
tion. Also, Strickland said the
value of products continues to
rise.
"Agriculture is being
looked at to feed not only the
United States, we're feeding
the world," Strickland said.
"When I talked to a 4H
group, I told them to be ex-


But this year, Faherty
said there are a few
changes. Instead of having
all the children arrive at
the same time to shop, dif-
ferent schools will come at
staggered times so the vol-
unteers who wrap the chil-
dren's gifts are not
overwhelmed, and the
store does not become too
overcrowded.
run addition, now that Ciits
Sprt of the sh ff 's offic
family, theessheer ff's office
has invited firefighters to
partici ate this year.
Though the actually
shopping sprees are weeks
away, Faherty's level of en-
thusiasm and excitement is
already through the roof.
"It's what I'm about," he
said passionately.
He stays inspired by how
selfless the children are
and how appreciative the
parents are once the event
is over.
One year, he received a
two-page letter from a
woman who was a victim of
domestic violence. She
said the experience helped
change her child's view of


middle of3,000 acres harvest-
ing wheat in the Midwest.
"That's not the type of agri-
culture we do in Florida,"
Strickland said. "We have
some of the most innovative
farms in the
nation."
Strickland showed a photo-
graph of teosinte, a wild grass
with small, black, hard ker-


law enforcement.
Another year, he wit-
nessed a child buy his first
pair of brand new
sneakers.
"It really has made a dif-
ference," he said. "It's a
wonderful evening to be
had by all."
For more information,
call Faherty or Jessica
Lane at (352) 726-4488 dur-
ing le larebusoineess hoi sd

go directly to the children.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924
or swiles@chronicle
online. com.




SO YOU KNOW

inMake checks paable
to "Shop with Cop"
and rnai then to
Deputy Joe Faherty, c/o
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, 1 Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Ave., In-
verness, FL, 34450.





nels. Native Americans, he
said, selectively produced itto
turn it into the plant known
today as corn. This was an ex-
ample of agriculture working
with the products to feed
people.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can be reached at
c va norm er@chronicle
online. com or (352) 564-2916.


/qc:RauS


cuNr y


Dat na Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers

Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast

pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


C t

Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Ta lahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Pa m Beh.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


East winds around 15 knots. Seas 3
hoa5 e et Bdaerandcihlnd wtec .:Il
skies today.


IHI LO PRI IHI LO PR
177 50 NA 1 79 49 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK< E c'us've a"y

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 61 e
..~ Partly cloudy and breezy.

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
n,- High: 83 Low: 61
-trir Il,) cloudy and warmer,

1MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
..High: 82 Low: 5;9
_~; -- Variable clouds.


LAKIE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Ho der 28.18 28.25 35.52
Tsa a Apopka-Hernando 35.26 35.32 39.25
Tsa a Apopka-Inverness 37.39 37.41 40.60
Teel areop~opit in abv ses lvel Flood stage9 0o iakes are based o 3-year ilood. the 2.40
aninual floodl whichl has a 43-precentl chance of being equaled or exceeded ini anly onie year, Thlis data is
obtained from the Southwest Hlonda Water Management District and is subject to revision. in nlo event
wyil l te Disltact or the Untied States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of thre use of
this data If you have any questions youl should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (3b2) 796-7211

THE NATION

so 1 40s

20s: 4 '.
'"".. 30 -- sos y as 3b C ~Fl.
40 ."" .?


as 50 e 0


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 82/54
Record 89/33
Normal 78/56
Mean temp, 68
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION* 0.0n

Total for the month 0.39 in


'As at e arn at inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate

BA OIhMTRI 3 ESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.17 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m.


~Ps -r

.r. *~';'''
I -
20s
806


... l
a*


10o ''
:"


ens


PoLLEN CoUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Grasses, Composites, Palms
Today's count: 4.6/12
Sunday's count: 5.4
Monday's count: 5.4
symptoms
AIR QUALITY


Friday Saturday
City H L Pop.Fost H L
Aibany 42 30 s 51 34
Aibuquerque 63 35 pc 58 37
Asheville 48 25 pc 55 38
Atlanlta 54 32 pc 60 47
Atlantic City 47 32 s 52 49
Austin 72 36 c 79 70
Baltimore 46 30 s 53 40
Biiiings 38 14 sn 17 12
Bilmingham 60 31 pc 66 56
Boise 45 32 .02 c 36 22
Boston 45 36 s 55 43
Buffalo 43 30 pc 50 47
Burlington, VT 41 33 s 49 39
Charieston, SC 56 36 pc 65 55
Charleston. WV 49 24 s 60 44
Chlariotte 51 26 pc 55 44
Chicago 51 25 sh 54 42
Cincinnati 49 24 pc 58 51
Cleveland 46 27 pc 54 48
Columbia. SC 54 30 pc 61 44
Columbus, DH 46 25 pc 55 49
Concord. NHn 44 27 s 51 38
Dallas 65 43 c 78 64
Denver 67 28 pc 52 23
Des Moinies 57 36 c 59 25
Detroit 50 24 sh 50 47
El Paso 72 40 pc 70 45
Evansville. IN 53 26 pc 62 53
Harrisburg 44 29 s 52 35
Hartford 45 33 s 51 38
Hn inaolis 5 c 574
Jackson 61 31 c 71 62
Las Vegas 70 46 pc 58 44
Little Rock 59 33 c 68 60
Los Angeles 61 57 pc 62 51
Louisville 52 27 pc 62 54
Memphis 59 35 c 67 59
Minvauke 5 s 3
Mobile 62 36 pc 70 62
Montgomery 63 35 pc 68 54
Nashville 56 25 pc 63 52
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc~partly cloudy; r=aran;
rs-rairthmow mix; se=sunny sh-sho es;
@2011 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


Friday Saturday
City H L Pop. Fost H L
New Orleans 64 49 c 77 66
New York City 46 36 s 52 47
Norfolk 48 40 s 58 46
Oklahoma City 61 41 pc 73 46
Omaha 57 35 c 51 19
Palm Springs 74 52 pc 64 49
Philadelphla 46 35 s 52 42
Phoenix 76 53 pc 72 54
Pittsburgh 42 25 pc 54 43
Portland. ME 45 33 s 50 41
Portland. Ore MM MM na sh 41 33
Providence, R.1 45 33 s 54 44
Raleigh 51 27 s 61 41
Rapid City 40 25 .03 sn 18 2
Reno 53 42 pc 40 20
Rochester, NY 42 30 pc 52 44
Sacramenlo 59 46 .03 pc 55 38
St Loujs 58 34 sh 63 52
St. Ste. Male 41 21 rs 42 29
Salt Lake City 53 37 pc 38 22
San Antonio 70 44 c 80 70
San Diego 62 57 pc 63 53
San Francisco 58 50 pc 56 46
Savannah 58 43 pc 68 54
Seattle 39 35 30 pc 39 30
Spokane 33 32 15 c 25 11
Syracuse 43 32 03 s 51 41
Topeka 61 40 pc 69 28
Washington 48 34 s 53 42
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Hadiingen. Texas LOW 1 Cut Bank
Mont.
WNORILD CITIES


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
1:01-0'Ark(AFTERNOON)
11/19 SATURDAY --- 6:01 12:13 6:25
11/20 SUNDAY 12:34 6:47 12:59 7:12

CELESTIAL. OUTLOOK
OOSUNSET TONIGHT ............. ............ 5:35 PM
SSUNRISE TOMORROW "
'MOONRISE TODAY.... .. ..... ...........,12:45 A M.
mlil.5 IEERL 2 t D10 IIEC.24 MOONSET TODAY ...............1:25 PM.

B3URN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Invemness/Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even
adrsse may water on Theu dad andnor Sodany before 10ealm. or after 4 p.m. Odd

Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543: Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


SATURDALY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/76/pc
Am teidam 4431

Beijing 45/26/s
Berlin 42/30/pc
Bermuda 72/67/pc
Cair-o 66/53/s
Caigary 13/1/pc
Hn ong 814s
Jerusalem 56/47/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mxco Oty
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Sooto
Warsaw


61/51/sh
53/44/pc
57/43/sh

33/30/sn
54/38/s
76/67/pc
63/43/s
85/69/pc
5816 i
38/31/pc


'From mouths of rivers "At K~ing~s Bay
Saturday
City HighlLow HighlLow
Chassahowitzka' 11 41 a/7:34 a --------7:58 p
Crystal River" 10 02 a/4:56 a 10:57 p/S:20 p
Witlilaccochee' 7:49 a/2:44 a 8:44 p!3:08 p
Homiosassa"' 10 51 a/6:33 a 11.46 p/6:57 p


*"At Mason s Creek
Sunday
HighlLow Highl~ow
12:36 a/8:51 a 1:12 p/9:04 p
11:33 a/6:13 a 11:47 p/6:26 p
9:20 a/4:01 a 9:34 p!4:14 p
12:22 pl7:50 a -18:03 p


SHOP
Continued from Page Al

solicits names from the
county's elementary school
guidance counselors of dis-
advantaged children who
deserve a free-of-cost
shopping spree. Faherty
also receives names from
CREST school and awards
gift cards to the Renais-
sance Center, where he
once worked as a school
resource officer.
He already has his list of
names. Now it is just a mat-
ter of figuring out how
many kids he can help.
As usual, Shop with a
Cop will be held at both
Iocal TWahnart location s

deputies will escort the
lucky youngsters, armed
with their $125 gift cards,
through the Walmart in
Homosassa to help them
pick out gifts for them-
selves, their parents, sib-
lings and other family
members,.
The same festivities will
be repeated Thursday,
Dec. 15, at the Walmart Su-
percenter in Inverness.
In addition to shopping,
Faherty said each child
would receive a T-shirt for
participating and a door
prize. The families of chil-
dren will also receive a 12-
to 15-pound turkey with all
the trimmings for a holiday
feast.


tremely happy you live in
the United States. In travel-
ling to the different parts of
the world, people wonder
where their food is going to
come from for that day. Do
we ever worry about that
here? No."
Strickland said the general
view of agriculture was a line
of combine harvesters in the


The man had been told to bring his

belongings with him to Ohio

because he would be I~ving at

the farm. Investigators believe

robbery was the motive.


It really has made a

difference. It's a wonderful

evening to be had by all"


Joe Faherty
sheriff's deputy who coordinates Shop with a Cop.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


MARINE OUTLOOK


Gulf water
temperature


73O
Taken at Aripeka


55


ALMANAC


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY





11\'1


L1


INVE RN ESS
Clara Allen, 88, of Inver-
ness, passed away unex-
pectedly on November 15,
2011. She
was a
belo ved
mothe r,
grand I,
mother and
great-grand- -
mother. .
S h eCl Al
resided in Cara len
Inverness for the last 38
years. She worked at First
Federal Savings and Loan
until her retirement as as-
sistant VP She was a found-
ing member of the Spanish
American Club, worked at
Whispering Pines Park
Pool, Spanish teacher at
CFCC in Lecanto, and then
devoted her free time as a
volunteer at Pleasant Grove
Elementary and Citrus
Memorial Hospital.
She is survived by four
children: daughters Stella
Cruz, of Bay Harbor Island,
FL, and Dolly Mayes, of In-
verness; sons George L.
Navas of Chanhassen, Min-
nesota, and Camilo Navas of
Delaware, Ohio, fourteen
grandchildren, Susan
Roarabaugh, Milton Ives, Jr,
Melissa Cowen, Gloria
Gness, Vancessa Mattesich,
Nathan Navas, Corianna An-
drews, Jennifer Navas, Car-
men Navas, Camilo Navas II,
Michael Jones, Brian Jones,
Jason Jones, Amanda Schaak
and 36 great-grandchildren.
Private services. Interment
Monday, November 21, 2011,
at noon at Oak Ridge
Cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

JOhn
Chesnovitz, 68

John E Chesnovitz, 68, of
Hernando, FL, died on No-
vember 17, 2011, at the Hos-
pice of Citrus County Care
Unit.
John was born on March
10, 1943, in Jersey City, NJ,
the son of Peter and Helen
Chesnovitz. He was a re-
tired operating engineer for
a gas utility company. John
moved to Hernando in 1995
from Bethpage, Long Island,
NY. He attended St.
Scholastica Catholic
Church. John was a member
of the Art Center Theater at
Citrus Hills.
Survivors include his
wife, Wendy Chesnovitz of
Hernando, FL; daughters,
Kathy Perotto and husband
Todd of Babylon, NY, and
Susan Grillo and husband
Joseph, of Oradell, NJ; and
four grandchildren
Zachary, Lilly Jane, John
and Lila.
The family will receive
friends on Sunday, Novem-
ber 20, 2011, between the
h~oe s of 3rand o6 pm. I

veuns sA Mbass of Chri ti n
a.m. on Monday, November
21, 2011, at the St. Scholas-
tica Catholic Church in
Lecanto. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation,
SIn rne eFguest book at
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Burial

Crr atong

Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland &r Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfu neralhome.com




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Call Mike Snyder at 563-323
msnyder @chronicleonline com


Annemarie Miller at 564-2917
miller@ chronicleonline.com


HOMO SAS SA
Louise S. Cohn, age 86, of
Homosassa, passed away
November 17, 2011.
Louise moved to the Ho-
mosassa area six years ago
from Pembroke Pines to be
with her
loving fam-
11y..
Prede -
ceased by *
her hus-
band Her-
bert, she is
survived by Louise
her beloved Cohn
son Gene
and his wife Sally. Louise is
a cherished soul loved by all
who knew her. A memorial
service will be held Sunday
at 1 p.m. at 6 Poppy Ct., Ho-
mosassa. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to
hospice in Louise's name.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.






S ntaley
Henminger Jr., 69
LECANTO
Stanley Henninger Jr, age
69, of Lecanto, passed away
on Wednesday, November
16, 2011, with his wife Cathy'
his mother Florence and
several family members by
his side.
Always willing to lend a
hand, Stan had an active
life. He was a Navy veteran'
ran a business and fulfilled
leadership roles in many or-
ganizations including The
Boy Scouts of America and
High School Band Boosters.
His recent civic involve-
ment incel ed being an a

president of his local Italian
American Social Club in In-
verness, VFW Post 10209 in
Spring Hill and the Stur-
geon Base Submarine
Group, Crystal River
Stan is survived by chil-
dren: son, Lance (Mary)'
grandchildren, Sara and
Kyle, daughter Dawn'
grandchildren, Amanda &
Jarrod (Sarah); son, Stanley
(Stacey), grandchildren'
Matthew and Ashley; son
Chris (Jennifer), grandchil-
dren, Andrew and Analiese;
sisters, Florence (Lou),
Diane, Jean, Val (Bruce);
and many nieces and
nephews.
Visitation will be Sunday'
November 20, 2011, from 2
to 5 p.m. at Merritt Funeral
Home, Mariner Blvd. at
Northcliffe in Spring Hill.
Service will be at Merritt
Funeral Home on Monday,
November 21, 2011, at 11
a.m., followed by interment
at Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, FL. In lieu of
flowers the family requests
d~onationsstoo ihe Ameri an

A eiann Diabetes
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES


a Dhi uare sapa in


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Services: Tues. 3:00pm
Cornerstone Baptist Church
BARBARA HANNETT
Visitation: Sun.3-5pm
Mass: Mono CLARA ALLEN
Private Services
ERLINDA GONZALEz
Private Cremation Arrangements
KENNETH KNIGHT
Service: Mo 1 0 pm3 Chapelmo


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CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 A5


Obituaries


A native
of Elm

he was bm
on July 18,
1919, to the
late James
E and
Bertha
( Otte )
Knight. Ken


of the VFW, TALLAHASSEE The
ion, Moose state Supreme Court re-
moved a central Florida
Iby his wife, judge from the bench on
Wilson; two Friday, ruling that he was
'Rusty" Wil- unfit to hold office because
Lindsey, of of a pattern of unethical
and Penny and illegal conduct.
erness; his One of the high court's
Ice Wilson, findings was that Circuit
r brothers, Judge N. James Turner, of
,rence, SC, Osceola County, repeat-
rey, both of edly hugged and kissed a
Marshal of female court worker,
rs, Christine Heather Shelby, without
ta, GA, and her permission.
om, Inver- Turner also became in-
grandchil- volved in her personal life
Dunn and by asking to visit her home
and her son in the hospi-
Ices will be tal, as well as inviting her
Friday, Nov to lunch and to his office
om Chas. E. for a personal discussion
Home, with while he was dressed in a
xander offi- T-shirt and shorts, the jus-
iill follow in tices said in an unsigned
al Cemetery unanimous opinion.
honors. "Judge Turner refused
received at to take no for an answer
re on Friday on several occasions," the
l the hour of justices wrote. "Moreover,
Judge Turner's interest in
~st book at Ms. Shelby was well
,nline.com. known throughout the
court, causing Ms. Shelby
th extreme embarrassment
HERE Cd rof iring lhleges to
The high court also
found Turner violated ju-
l dicial ethics by represent-
;s, 87 ing his mother in a
foreclosure case while a
RITER sitting judge, and the
Conn. state's campaign finance
,who wrote law by accepting and fail-
s "Itsy Bitsy ing to report a $30,000
yellow Polka campaign loan from her.
r an eager, In another instance,
orld War II Turner unlawfully or-
died in Con- dered the seizure of an
long illness. earring from a child to
ja Pockriss, help offset court costs
death. She owed by the juvenile, the
at home in justices wrote.
Monday. They also found the in-
rote several dividual violations consti-
l Vance, in- tuted a pattern of
"Catch a misbehavior that itself
was another reason for re-
-From wire reports moving him.


served our country in the
United States Army. He was
the owner/operator of his
own radio and TV repair
shop. Ken was a member of
Fort Cooper Baptist Church.
Survivors include his
grandchildren, James Ed-
ward Knight, Jr. (Susan),
Kenneth George Knight
(Tracy), Sheila Knight
Palumbo (Paul), Christine
Denise Carlson (Rick)
Bobby Knight (Michelle)
Casey Knight (Rhonda) and
David Knight; 15 great-
grandchildren and one
great-great grandchild; his
devoted friend, Diane Mat-
tern, and two daughters-in-
law, Christina Knight and
Rosemarie Knight. He was
preceded in death by his
first wife, Devella in 1983, a
companion Lawanda Starr,
his sons, Kenneth C. Knight
and James E. Knight, Sr ,
daughter-in-law Katharine
Knight, and grandson, J.D.
Knight.
mAmbuneral sericeh ofdre-

Mtonday, NovemhbeerC2h1,01 ,
Davis Funeral Home. Burial
will follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 11 a.m. until the hour
of service. The family re-
quests donations in Ken's
name to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev-
erly Hills, FL 34464 in lieu
of flowers
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com '

Er linda
Gonzalez, 74
INVERNEss
Erlinda I. Gonzalez, 74
Inverness, died Nov. 16 at
he rsdene Chas E
D visr Fn rale.Homas with
Crematory, Inverness is in
charge of private
arrangements.


JOhn Wils
INVERN
John Russell
Inverness, died
Nov. 15, 2011. un
ing care of fami
pice of Citrus Cc
A native of 0
was born Aug :
Neil and Florer
Wilson, and ca
area in 1970. He
subcontractor :
telephone com
served in the U.
was a member (
American Legi
Lodge and DAY
He issurvived
Judi (Jarrett) T
children, John "
son and wife,
Shalimar, FL,
Wilson, of Invl
mother, Floren
Inverness; foul
Dennis, of Flo
David and Jeffi
Inverness, and
Ocala; two sister
Gangler, Valdos
Virginia Bawc
ness; and two
dren, Chloe
Natalie Wilson.
Funeral servi
conducted on i
18, at 9:30 a.m. fr
Davis Funeral i
Pastor Doug Ale
citing. Burial w
Florida Nation~
with military
Friends will be
the funeral hom
from 9 a.m. until
service.
Sign the g~ue
wwwchronicleo

Deal
ELS EWN


Lee
POckris
SON GWF
HARTFORD,
Lee Pockriss, 87
pop hits such a~
Teenie Weenie YI
Dot Bikini" for
youthful post-W
generation, has
necticut after a
His wife, Son
confirmed his
says he died ~
Bridgewater on
Pockriss co-w
songs with Pau:
eluding 1957's
Falling Star"


OBITUARIES
SEmail obits@chroni-
cleonline.com or fax
(352) 563-3280.


Ti~:~im r;s~ I ~ ~a~ rm r~ F~n m


L2 1IL~


(352) 489-3579


Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology ~
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


State


11 reme





removes

*ug


Clara Allen, 88 Louise Cohn, 86


Kenneth
Kmight, 92
INVERNEss
Kenneth Carter Knight,
Sr., age 92, Inverness, for-
merly of Floral City, died
Thursday, November 17,
2011, at Crown Court


Garry
Manning, 59
OCALA
Garry L. Manning, 59, of
Ocala, passed away on No-
vember 15, 2011. Garry was
born on December 1, 1951,
in Ocala, Florida, a twin son
of Thurman and Mae Man-
ning. Mr. Manning served
as publisher for the Citrus
County Chronicle. He also
was a co-owner of WTRS
Radio Station in Citrus
County. He was the presi-
dent of the Chamber of
Commerce for the cities
of Inverness and Dunnellon.
He served on the board of
directors for Citrus Memo-
rial. He also served as pres-
ident-elect of the Florida
Press Association. He was
an avid musician and
songwriter.
Survivors include: daugh-
ters, Maureen Page, of
Chula Vista, CA, and
Kelleen Duncan of Inver-
ness, FL; son, Garrett Man-
ning (Katie), of Inverness,
FL; sister, Patsy Williamson
(David) and brother, Larry
Manning (Earlene), all of
Ocala, FL; grandchildren,
Kyle, Savannah, Joe, Baylor
Gracie, and Shelby; and
nieces and nephews.
A visitation for Mr. Man-
ning will be held Monday
November 21, 2011, from 3
p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Heinz
Funeral Home. A Chapel
Service will begin at 4:30
p.m., with Father James
Johnson presiding. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, FL.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.

Purita
Trompeta, 84
INVERNESS

Init s. iT om eta, 84,
18. Visitation is Monday,
Nov. 21, from 5 to 8 p.m. and
Tuesday, Nov. 22, from 5 to 8
p.m. at Fero Funeral Home.
The funeral mass is
Wednesday, Nov. 23, at 9 a.m.
at our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church. Entomb-
ment to follow at Fero Me-
morial Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted to
Fero Funeral Home.

Lydia Dion, 74
HOMOSASSA
Lydia J. Dion, 74, Ho-
mosassa, died Nov. 17, 2011,
at Crystal Gem Manor in
Crystal River, FL. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation.


ion, 55
IESS
Wilson, 55
at home on
Rider the lov-
ly and Hos-
ounty.
1ney, IL, he
22, 1956, to
nce (Porter)
Ime to this
was a cable
for several
panies and
S$Army He


ca

F '''



Kenneth
Knight


GY13~


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Yesterday Pvs Day

Argent 4.2570 4.2560
Australia .9987 1.0012
Bahrain .3770 .3770
Brazil 1.7813 1.7680
Britain 1.5787 1.5758
Canada 1.0266 1.0280
Chile 511.25 510.05
China 6.3586 6.3519
Colombia 1918.50 1914.50
Czech Rep 18.83 18.99
Denmark 5.5061 5.5270
Dominican Rep 38.35 38.35
Egypt 5.9841 6.0048
Euro .7398 .7426
Hong Kong 7.7889 7.7860
Hungr 224.67 229.27
India 51.235 50.955
Indnsia 9053.00 9000.00
|srael 3.7228 3.7279
Japan 76.97 76.95
Jordan .7105 .7105
Lebanon 1505.50 1505.00
Malaysia 3.1625 3.1570
Mexico 13.7365 13.7191
N. Zealand 1.3222 1.3196
Norway 5.7926 5.8164
Peru 2.703 2.704
Poland 3.28 3.30
Russia 30.8666 30.8715
Singapore 1.2986 1.2984
So. Africa 8.2148 8.2263
So.Korea 1137.80 1137.25
Sweden 6.7878 6.8086
Switzerlnd .9177 .9198
Taiwan 30.28 30.20
Thailand 31.01 30.89
Turkey 1.8289 1.8185
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6732
Uruguay 19.7999 19.7999
Venzuel 4.2925 4.2925


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.2b .00-.2b
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.01
6-month 0.04 0.03
5-year 0.92 0.91
10-year 2.01 2.06
30-year 2.99 3.11



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

LtSweetCrudeNYMXJanl2 97.67-1.26
Corn CBOT Dec il 610V/4 -4V/4
Wheat CBOT Dec il 598V/4 +53/4
Soybeans CBOT Jan l2 1168V/4 .
Cattle CME Feb 12 121.77 -1.83
Sugar(world) ICE Marl2 23.97 -.07
Orange Juice ICE Jan 12 176.90 +5.05



SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gol (ro o..sot) $1724.70 $1787.50
Silver(trovoz.. spot) a32.413 a34.6/1
Copper(pound) $3.4020 $3.4620
Platinum trovev oz., spot)$1b88./U $1b4b./U

NMER =New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT-=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER =Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN =New York Cotton Exchange.


C~t~


YTD YTD
Name Div Yld PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div Yld PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 2.4 ... 8.41 -.10 -48.6 McDnlds 2.80 3.0 18 92.74 +.45 +20.8
AT&Telknc 1.7 6.1 86 0 -5 Mirrsf In 16 ~ +1530 -~4 -

BkofAm .04 .7 ... 5.78 -.02 -56.7 MotrlaMo n ... ... ... 38.76 -.18 +33.2
CapCtyBk .40 3.9 23 10.14 +.14 -19.5 NextEraEn 2.20 4.0 14 55.53 +.15 +6.8
CntlyLink 2.90 7.8 17 37.25 +.30 -19.3 Penney .80 2.5 19 31.57 -.10 -2.3


Disney .40 1.1 14 35.63 +.48 -5.0 RegionsFn .04 1.0 24 4.10 +.16 -41.4
EKodak ... ... ... 1.21 +.02 -77.4 SearsHldgs .......... 64.27 -.92 -12.9
EnterPT 2.80 6.3 26 44.67 +.44 -3.4 Smucker 1.92 2.6 18 74.29 +2.44 +13.2
ExxonMb| 1.88 2.4 9 77.90 +.04 +6.5 SprintNex ... ... ... 2.62 -.08 -38.1
FordM ... ... 5 10.10 -.07 -39.8 TimeWarn .94 2.8 13 33.61 +.29 +4.5
GenElec .60 3.8 13 15.65 +.01 -14.4 UniFirst .15 .3 14 54.58 +.52 -.9
HomeDp 1.16 3.1 16 37.88 +.26 +8.0 VerizonCm 2.00 5.5 15 36.46 -.24 +1.9
Intel .84 3.5 10 24.29 -.05 +15.5 Vodafone 2.10 7.8 ... 26.96 -.35 +2.0
IBM 3.00 1.6 14 185.24 -.49 +26.2 WalMart 1.46 2.6 13 57.23 +.50 +6.1
Lowes .56 2.4 17 23.31 -.07 -7.1 Walgrn .90 2.8 11 32.63 +.35 -16.2


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


Kohls 55.34 +.37 MoneyG rs 16.25 -.78 PerktElm 18.84 +.05 RedHat 49.04 -.54
Kraft 34.77 -.19 Monsanio 71.39 +.90 Prmian 20.18 -.06 RegionsFn 4.10 +.16
KrispKrm 7.00 -.06 MonstrWw 7.77 -.01 PetrbrsA 24.72 +.24 Renrenn 4.28 -.04
Kroger 22.33 +.22 Moodys 32.80 +.25 Petrobras 26.65 +.24 RepubSvc 26.76 +.13
KronosWs 19.15 -1.71 MorgStan 14.21 +.08 Pfizer 19.53 +.06 Revlon 14.46 +.05
LDKSolar 2.90 -.11 MSEmMkt 13.25 +.03 PhilipMor 73.09 +1.01 ReynAmer 40.11 -.12
LSICorp 5.66 -.03 Mosaic 52.86 +2.10 PiedNG 31.76 +.29 Riollnio 51.63 -.14
LTCPrp 28.56 +.46 MotrlaSoln 45.57 -.50 PimuStrat 11.35 -.14 RiteAid 1.17 +.01
LaZBoy 10.26 +.09 MotrlaMon 38.76 -.18 PinWst 46.33 +.57 RobtHalf 25.56 -.36
Ladede 40.61 +.43 MurphO 52.61 +.13 PioNtrl 89.82 -1.25 RockwlAut 71.25 +.76
LVSands 45.27 -.55 NCRCorp 17.09 -.22 PitnyBw 18.48 +.02 RockColl 53.71 +.57
LearCorps 40.49 -.60 NRGEgy 20.52 -.22 PlainsEx 33.61 +.39 Rowan 33.35 +.14
LeggMason 25.03 +.20 NVEnergy 15.01 +.12 PlumCrkt 36.15 +.22 RylCarb 26.08 +.54
LennarA 17.67 -.45 NYSEEur 27.08 +.50 Polariss 60.78 -.07 RoyDShllA 69.60 +.14
LeucNatl 22.28 +.47 Nabors 18.59 -.31 PostPrp 39.89 +.57 Royce 12.22 +.04


LillyEli 36.89 +.08 NatGrid 50.79 +.56 PSAgri 29.30 -.18
Limited 40.86 -.74 NOilVarco 67.50 -.37 PS USDBull 22.01 -.06 SAIC 11.90 -.09
LincNat 19.45 +.14 Navistar 37.17 -1.27 Praxair 97.00 +.27 SCANA 42.52 +.16
Lindsay 56.04 +.75 NewAmHi 10.24 +.05 PrecDrill 11.27 +.16 SKTlcm 14.22 -.01
Linktedlnn 72.00 -2.92 NJRscs 47.48 +.21 PrinFnd 23.75 +.88 SLMCp 13.07 -.03
LiveNatn 9.18 +.60 NwOri~ds 22.78 -2.11 ProLogis 27.54 +.09 SpdrDJIIA 117.73 +.19
LizClaib 8.15 -.01 NYCmlyB 11.93 +.02 ProShtS&P 42.19 +.05 SpdrGold 167.62 +.52
LloydBktg 1.58 .. NewellRub 15.15 -12 PrUShS&P 21.15 +.05 SPMid 156.62 -.36
LockhdM 75.10 -.06 NewidExp, 40.87 +.27 PrUIShDow 16.82 -.09 S&P500ETFl21.98 -.13
Loews 38.18 +.45 NewmtM 65.46 -.78 ProUltQQQ 80.26 -1.39 SpdrHome 15.99 -.08
Lorillard 109.49 -.19 NewpktRes 8.78 -.15 PrUShQQC~Crs47.15 +.77 SpdrS&PBkt 18.86 +.08
LaPac 7.21 +.03 Nexeng 15.38 -.23 ProUltSP 43.56 -.07 SpdrLehHY 37.66 +.03
Lowes 23.31 -.07 NextEraEn 55.53 +.15 PrUShtFnrs 67.93 -.58 SpdrRed 51.34 -.09
L ~nBasA 3453 -66 NiSource 22.0 +.01 ProUShL20 19.16 -.01 SpdrOGEx 52.75 -.08
Nicor 55.79 +.14 ProUltFin 40.77 +.42 SpdrMetM 51.33 -18
Nike 9275 .86 PrUPShR2K 15.75 +.01 STMicro 6.70 -.04
M&TBkt 71.76 +.68 Nol~r 50 .6 ProUBasM 32.01 +.06 Safeway 19.12 +.14
MDC: 18.30 -.10 Nkap 65 +.1 ProShtR2K 31.05 ... St~oe 14.62 -.19
MDURes 20.64 +.08 Nordstrm 46.98 -.03 ProUltR2K 33.28 ... St~ude 36.53 -.52
MM C nd r G.0 P Ut S 50 52 t0 4 sa rce 91 -1 2

MGIC 2.83 +.08 Nvrs 56 +.3 PrUltCrders 40.63 -.92 SJuanB 24.34 -.12

ENval 54.R + o a R

Mag~e 44 -10 GEngyA 51.35 +.49 Pos5 85 1 Sarl8d 3.7 +4
Manqaiooc 10872 +.418 a 90 ProUtSR2Ks 5.50 -28 Trof 3.3 -.l

Marahns 26.13 -3 c-if 7 -.-.0 PubSt~rg 18.251 +1.6 Sidrurac 18.81 -.16
MktGold~ 57.06 -.81 Ofc x 46 0 PrlcT~ 53.19 -.01 Sihlvmhtg 32.32 +.05
MktValus 29.29 +.31 OlCvHT 12.60-.6 E5s 17 -.20Pors~ 2.6t1 Sivcpwg 71.90 -10
MktVJe Gd 24 3.0 nGepub 51. t4 Qihoo~6 38 +80 Skmnp 1238 .1 21diL +1.7 .10
MarshMwo 29.8 -038 Omet 7 uatSv 1936 -t08 Smali8A 3633 1)0
Masm 9.0 -.1 ONOKsse 79660 13 Qslve .2 1 mukr 7.2 24

Mcnesson 80.01 rdn 85 -.42 Rs +1 ng 3 .4 -.3


Medidsfe 31.84 -.83 PPLEor 29.53 +.33eset 548 t1
Merior 521 -46 eabdE 364.06 -.01
CaanS 6.3 -.3 sc-Zf The remainb 15.1 t166 derura of 8 the
MkiAopt 58306 061 nn~stg NYSE lising can~hh be3 t
MitsuUFJ .19 +.01 ep oy 11.21 +.04 1n n th e t p g
Mobil~ele13.9 +.1 PepHol 192.43 1.27*

MolyurpC~unt~v 28.36 -19 Ppio 389 -2


1.20 +.02


~ )I~(I L' I~ 1(~11 I~ I LI1 II


TeslaMot 32.60 -1.08
TesseraTch 16.25 -.28
TevaPhrm 39.67 +.45
TexRdhse 13.34 -.12
Theravnce 22.34 -1.08
Thoratec 28.27 -1.28
TIbuSft 27.74 -1.13
TItanMach 20.14 -.78
TlVolnc 10.00 -.12
Towerstm 1.88 -.11
TractSupp 72.27 -.33
Travdlzoo 27.06 -.10
TrkientM h .25 -.03
TrimbleN 42.60 -.39
TriC~uint 4.59 -.17
TrueRdlig 33.03 -.19
TrstNY 5.05 ..
Trustmke 22.03 +.47
21Vianetn 10.06 +.06
UTStarcm 1.39 -.11
UltaSalon 67.54 -1.48
Umpqua 11.90 -.05
Unilife 4.16 +.03
UBWV 24.37 +.62
UidOnIn 528 11l
USEnr 2.85
UidTherap 41.00 +.04
UnivDisp 48.19 -2.79
UnivFor 26.23 +.14
UranmRs .90 +.02
UrbanOut 25.96 -.22


VCAAnt 19.16 +.10
ValueClicke 16.07 +.33
Veemlnst 24.37 +.09
Velln 8.51 -.30
VBradley 38.01 -.90
Verisign 32.31 +.07
Veriske 36.19 -.26
VerbtPh 28.29 -.72
ViaSat 45.47 -.24
Vical 3.46 -.02
VirgnMdah 22.99 -.17
ViroPhrm 22.58 +.74
VistaPrt 33.50 +.05
gy gvus 9.4 +.07
Vodafone 26.96 -.35
Volcano 23.10 -.05
WarnerCh 15.11 -.38
WashFed 13.11 +.02
WebMD 32.30 +.31
Websense 17.68 -.01
WernerEnt 23.61 -.08
Westmrki 10.48 +.27
Wstptlnng 28.94 -.26
WetSeal 3.26 +.18
WholeFd 65.42 -.44
WilshBcp 3.05 -.04
Windstrm 11.64 -.04
Winn-Dixie 6.30 -.03
Wintust 27.83 +1.12
WisdomTr 6.22 -.40
WrightM 14.44 -.56
Wnn 121.76 +.98
XenoPort 4.55 -.30
)Glinx 31.47 -.29
Xyratex 14.15 -.14
YRCrsh .04 -.00
Yahoo 15.38 +.04
Yandexn 21.65 -.34
Zagg 11.15 -.17
Zalicus 1.02 +.03
aonBcp 16.26 +.07
aopharm 4.49 -.08
aply 1.30 -18
axCorp 2.75 +.03
2bllMed 42.83 -1.01
2bomTech 1.20 -.08
Zumiez 23.00 +.42


A6 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MosT ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(00) Last Chq Name Vol(00) Last Chq most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 2193712 5.78 -.02 GrtBasG g 73257 1.19 -.08 SiriusXM 820344 1.78 +.04 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1959338121 .98 -.13 CheniereEn 49877 11.70 +.47 PwShs QQQ558912 55.40 -.43 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDR Fncl 826644 12.50 +.04 NovaGld g 48688 10.95 +.07 Intel 449227 24.29 -05 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter s list.
SprintNex 545550 2.62 -.08 NwGold g 42261 10.31 -.28 MicronT 421775 6.29 -.04 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day
iShEMkts 484753 38.54 +.15 AntaresP 38225 2.61 -.07 Microsoft 414735 25.30 -.24 Ch:LsorgifrtedaNocneidctdby..

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) StocdkdFootnoes: dd -21ssue ha been caa ed for rdemtpbon by compeanyad -ENew 5-week
Name Last Chq %Chq Name Last Chq %Chq Name Last Chq %Chq Emerging Company Marketplace. h temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus Ilst-
Inve~enn 1.35 1.6 +1.5 eroctry 6.3 +.9 +1.3 lblduc 5.37+1.6 +7.6 Ing qualification. n Stock was a new Issue In the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
PrisaB n 4.90 +.73 +17.5 Innsuites 22 +.7 +8.3 HansenMed2.55 +.40 +18.6 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock Issue. pr Preferences. pp -
PrisaA n 4.65 +.66 +16.5 EstnLtCap 2.50 +.17 +7.3 HghwyH 2.85 +.39 +15.9 Holder owes Installments of purchase price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s -
BiP GCrb 17.85 +1.85 +11.6 Aerosonic 2.95 +.19 +6.7 MentorGr 13.02 +1.61 +14.1 Stock has spilt by at least 20 percent wthin the last year. wl Trades wll be settled when the
OmegaP 7.73 +.77 +11.1 EngySvcs 3.06 +.18 +6.3 MartenT 18.74 +2.25 +13.6 stock Is Issued. wd When distributed.wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New
52-week high, un Unit, Including more than one security. v] Company In bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) celvership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears In front of the name.
Name Last Cha %Cha Name Last Cha %Cha Name Last Cha %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
TorchEngy 2.55 -.59 -18.8 CornstTR 7.29 -.83 -10.2 CentEuro 3.08 -.74 -19.4


DoleFood 9.33 -.91 -8.9 Dreams 2.03 -.14 -6.5 Perfumanlfl6.47 -3.07 -15.7
Nw~riEds 22.78 -2.11 -8.5 CornerstStr8.01 -.53 -6.2 RecovErs 5.32 -.83 -13.5


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 10,404.49Dow Jones Industrials
5,627.85 3,950.66Dow Jones Transportation
459.94 381.99DowJones Utilities
8,718.25 6,414.89NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,941.99Amexlndex
2,887.75 2,298.89Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,074.77S&P500
14,562.01 11,208.42Wilshire 5000
868.57 601.71Russell20000


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+25.43 +.22 +1.89 +5.29
+29.58 +.61 -5.20 -.66
+2.20 +.50 +9.14+11.06
+8.32 +.11 -8.56 -4.69
+4.31 +.19 +1.47 +6.48
-15.49 -.60 -3.03 +2.16
-48 -.04 -3.34 +1.33
-5.87 -.05 -4.30 +.69
+.68 +.09 -8.20 -.68


Last
11,796.16
4,841.04
442.01
7,282.47
2,240.87
2,572.50
1,215.65
12,785.45
719.42


DIARY


DIARY


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


1,734 Advanced
1,287 Declined
105 Unchanged
3,126 Total issues
26 New Highs
42 New Lows
3,688,057,997 Volume


242 Advanced
207 Declined
40 Unchanged
489 Total issues
8 New Highs
10 New Lows
85,669,810 Volume


1,236
1,258
136
2,630
14
86
1,698,896,868


Name Last Chg Bk~ofAm 5.78 -.02
Bkd~ontg 55.51 -.04
BkN~YMel 18.92 -.02
Barday 10.52 +.20
ABB~i 17.7 -.06 BariPVix 46.89 -1.55
ACE~i 67.8 +.79 BarnesNob 16.58 -.42
AESCorp 11.75 +.26 BarrickG 48.84 -.44
AFLAC 41.98 +.02 BasicEnSv 20.37 -.51
AGCO 44.57 +.14 Baxter 50.42 -.94
AGL Res 41.01 +.10 Beam Inc 49.72 -.36
AKSteel 8.41 -.10 BeazerHm 2.12 +.03
AMR 1.80 +.08 BectDcke 73.15 -.58
ASAGold 29.03 -.14 BerktHa A112890.00+1 190.00
AT&Tlnc 28.64 +.03 BerktHB 75.37+t1.07
AUOptron 4.46 -.24 BestBuy 27.06 -.46
tbr itc 4.3 -21 Rltilsp 3. t0
Accenture 55.10 -.60 BlktDebtStr 3.78 -.01
AdamsEx 9.45 BlktEnhC&I 12.17 -.07
AMD 5.47 +.03 Blk~lbOp 13.68 -.01
Aegon 4.16 +.01 Black~sione 13.33 +.02
Aeropost 16.46 -.14 BlocktHR 15.47 +.06
Aetna 39.69 +.23 Boding 67.46 +1.37
Agilent 36.81 -.40 BorgWarn 63.86 -.71
Agning 44.90 -.10 BostBeer 95.81 -1.36
Agriumg 70.58 +.23 BostProp 95.13 +1.36
AlcatdlLuc 1.90 +.05 BosionSci 5.42 -.04
Alma 9.69 +.07 BoydGm 6.27 +.02
Allergan 82.40 +.53 BrMySq 30.81 +.18
Allete 38.75 +.15 Brki~dOfPr 15.22 -.04
AlliBGlbHi 14.28 -.03 Brunswick 16.57 +.06
AlliBlnco 7.98 -.04 Buckeye 63.81 +.04
AlliBern 13.36 +.14 CBREGrp 15.11 -.15
Allstate 25.98 +.37 CBSB 24.78 +.03
AlphaNRs 22.23 -.63 CFlnds 151.68 +3.49
Altria 27.64 +.10 CHEngy 55.17 +.39

Amee ss .2 MI3 CN nd 6.2 t0
AmA e 8.13 -.26 CSXs 21.64 +.19



Grp~9 488 +.18 C GotO&G 82.14 +1 2
AmSIP3 6.55 -.04 Calpine 15.31 +.35
Am power 56.76 17 Camecog 1 .4 -08

Ameriprise 44.21 +.04 CampSp 33.65 +.24
AmeriBrgn 37.28 -.24 CdnNRsgs 36.05 -.16
Anadark~o 76.70 +.26 CapOne 41.64 +.43
AnalogDev 35.30 -.20 CapilSrce 6.16 +.01
Annlnc 23.53 -1.78 CapMpfB 14.20 -.03
""itrp 6.1 -1 Crn Hlh 4 .88 -3

Apche -85 t5 arnia 322 1
AquaAm 21.69 -.01 Celanese 40.83 +.65




Ashland 52.44 -.55 ChesEng 24.33 -.39




Avon 16.84 -.23 Chubb 65.70 +.64
BB&f~u 226 ,0 inis 420 -4
BPPLC 42.48 -.15 Cilgrprs 26.28 +.28
BR raill 191 t 8m lenNHR 5. t
BRT' 6 :il -. "2 CiN 6. t1

BuBrades 16.49 -.52 CCFemsa 89.65 +1.06
BuSantSA 7.45 +.11 CocaCola 67.39 +.77
BuSBrasil 7.49 -.26 CocaCE 25.97 +.20


Coeur 27.68 +.01
CohStlnfra 15.81 -.04
ColgPal 88.61 +.57
CollcWvBrd 13.79 +.26
Comerica 24.90 -.18
CmwREIT 16.51 +.07
CmlyHlt 19.35 -.07
CompSci 25.21 +.06
Con-Way 27.47 -.34
ConAgra 24.28 -.03
Cono~cPhil 69.27 -.29
ConsolEngy 38.27 +.19
ConEd 58.14 +.34
ConstellA 19.35 -.15
ConstellEn 39.65 +.35
Cnvngs :20 t0
CottCp 6.24 +.06
Covidien 45.61 -.73
Crane 45.62 +.18
CSVS~xVxS 58.50 -3.81
CSVellVSts 5.17 +.14
CredSuiss 22.36 -.05
CrwnCsie 40.21 -.55
Cummins 94.02 -.76
CurEuro 134.62 +.47


DDRCorp 11.31 +.04
DNPSelet 10.75 +.08
DPL 30.20
DR Horion 11.25 -.08
DSWlnc 44.80 +.09
DTE 51.21 +.29
DanaHldg 12.37 -.23
Danaher 47.32 +.28


Dads 97
Deere 74.27 -.75

n liu~n 2. -3

DeutsnchBke 3. t5

DiaOff 62.79 +.05
DiD~dMn 6 +.
DxEMBllrs 79.84 +.84
DxFnBullrs 58.49 +.89
DrSCBrrs 31.77 -.01
DirFnBrrs 46.33 -.74
DirLCBrrs 34.22 +.17
DrEE ear 3 25 t1

DixCB~ull 4. -
DirxEnBull 44.70 -.62



DlaGen 3. t6
DomRescs 51.04 +.20


DukeRlt 1130.11 -3
aeCngn 259 -2
EOR~eps9a 67.8 +.82

daskn 464 t3

Eatn~a 23.53 -.301
EVX~nrq 10.14 -.03


Ecolab 54.22 +.05


Edisonlnt 39.61
EdwLfSci 63.02
BPasoCp 24.80
BdorGldg 17.19
EmersonEl 49.71
EmpDist 20.74
EnbrEPts 30.38
EnCanag 19.45
EndvSilvg 11.00
EnPro 33.24
ENSCO 49.95
Entergy 68.77


GabelliET 5.01 +.09
GabHlthW 6.75 -.05
GabUIl 7.18 -.10
GaisaSA 5.73 -.08
GameSlop 22.46 +.53
Gannett 10.99 +.02
Gap 18.76 -.49
GenDynam 63.84 +.42
GenElec 15.65 +.01
GenGrPrp 13.70 +.02
GenMills 38.55 -.07
GenMolors 21.68 -.11


Heinz 51.07 -1.75
HelmPayne 54.50 +.37
Herbalifes 57.11 +1.12
Hertz 10.85 -.10
Hess 59.73 -.64
HevdlettP 27.99 +.70
HighwdPrp 28.90 -.01
HollyFrts 24.38 +.45
HomeDp 37.88 +.26
Honwlllnl 52.75 +.15
HospPT 21.33 +.28
HostHots 13.79 +.25


iShR2K 71.98 -.02
iShREst 54.57 +.39
iStar 6.25 -.11
ITTCps 19.71 ..
Idacorp 40.29 +.12
ITW 44.94 +.56
Imaton 5.89 ..
IngerRd 31.20 +1.06
IntegrysE 51.52 +.45
IntenlEx 117.21 -.96
IBM 185.24 -.49
InlGame 16.71 +.12


EntPrPt 45.72 +.35
EqtyRsd 54.70 +.34
ExuRes 10.81 -.62
Exdlon 43.68 +.28
ExterranH 10.92 +.33
ExxonMbl 77.90 +.04
FC Tch s +88 t4




Tnrcld 18.1 01



Foednsta 29285 -.08
SG rlls +25 t3

Fruos n-on3 1


GTATXi 839.1 +.04


GMXds 10.53 -.09


GenOnEn 2.78 +.04
Genworth 6.09 -.01
Gerdau 8.04 -.14
GlaxoSKln 43.29 -.21
GlobalCash 4.00 +.26
GoldFLid 15.97 -.42

GodmaS 9. -4
eodric 1231 t0






H~ainoerns 37.03 +.84

Huanrtfy 17.27 +.06




HtSouthp 16.80 +.21
HeclaMr 35.97 -1.05


Humana 85.12
Huntsmn 10.76
Hyperdyn 3.46
IAMGldg 19.30
ICICIBke 29.92
ING 7.18
ihoad 168
ihBraz 590






iShB20T 119.34

iS~afe 49.40
ish E 5 .6


iSR2KV 63.78
iSR2KGn 82.33


IntPap 28.02 +.19
Interpublic 8.96 -.24
Invesco 19.39 +.09
InvMigCap 15.20 +.10
IronMtn 29.60 -.07
ItauUnibH 16.99 -.39


JPMorgCh 30.62 +.13
Jail 20.32 +.09





JnprNtwke 22.56 -.17




KAEngTR 24.07 -.32

IbyEngy 1. t0
Keycorp 7.08 -.06


Eid~ rn 282 .78
Kinrossg 12.83 -.25
Kodiak~Og 7.75 -.13


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.00 +.05
AbdnEMTel 17.95 +.05
AdmRsc 25.08 -.41
Advnx .6
AlldNevG 33.94 -34
AlmadnMg 2.57 -.04
AntaresP 2.61 -.07
Aurizong 5.63 -.01
AvalRaren 2.96 -.06
Bacterin 2.88 -.12
Bank~s.com .04 +.00


Banrog 3.89
BarcUBS36 43.34
BarcGSOil 24.90
BrclndiaTR 51.73
Brigusgrs 1.31
BritATob 91.72
nAM En 9
CardiumTh .38
CelSd .36
CFCdag 22.25
CheniereEn 11.70
ChenlereE 16.82
ChinaShen 2.36
ClaudeRg 1.76


VirnetX 21.05
VistaGold 3.43

VoyagerOG 2.39
Walterlny 21.68
WFAdvlnco 9.68
WFAdMSec 14.36
WirelessT 1.15
WizzardSft .15
YMBiog 1.65
ZBBEngy .63


-.03 ClghGlbOp 10.63 -.04
-.09 CornstProg 6.48 -.06
-.27 CornerstStr 8.01 -.53
-.21 CrSuislnu 3.62 -.00
+.03 CrSuiHiY 2.87 -.06
- 27 Crossh rs .38 -.02


-.01 Deing 1.5 +.06
+.01 EVLtdDur 14.76 -.12
+.29 EVMuniBd 12.36 +.15
+.47 EVMuni2 13.47 +.01
+.58 EllswthFd 6.52 +.04
+.02 ExeterRgs 3.36 -.08
+.11 ExiorreGg 8.53 -.07


IntdllgSys 1.75 +.05
IntTowerg 4.85 -.05
IsoRay .87 +.06

KeeganRg 4.53 -.05
LadThalFn 2.30 +.07
Lucas~n 1.90 .02

MadCatzg .62 -.01
Metalico 3.47 -.03
MetroHlth 7.26 +.04
MdwGoldg 2.32 +.11
MincoGg .95 +.04
Minefndg 11.37 -.36


Name Last Chg


ACMoorelf 1.59 -.01
ARCAbio 1.30 -.10
ASMLHld 38.07 -.29
ATPO&G 6.90 -.30

AX lc 4.2 -1
Aastrom 2.23 -.15
Abraxas 3.49 -.02
AcadaTc 326 t0
Acuay 4.5 t0
A nekt 35.8 +.
AurdaTh 22.03 +.11
AclivePwr .75 -04
AclivsBliz 12.05 -.08
Acbuate 5.99 -.46
A bim 1. 2
Adtran 32.21 -47
AdvATech 4.20 -.02
AdvEnld 8 94 -.0

Affym aag 4.93 .4
Affymetrix 4.75 -.10
AgFeedh .50 +.00
Aixrbon 12.66 +.12
Ak~amaiT 27.97 -.16
Ak~orn 9.02 -.17
Alask(Com 5.19 +.21
AlbnyMlc 2.37 +.03
Alexions 64.12 -.57
Alexza 1.23 +.05
AlignTech 22.43 +.18
AlimeraSci 1.29 -.02
Alk~ermes 15.00 -.21
AllosThera 1.35 -.04
AllotComm 15.06 -.60
AllscriptH 19.14 -.47
AlnylamP 7.21 +.25
AlteraCplf 35.21 -.14
AlterraCap 21.76 -.07
Amarin 6.75 -.02
Amazon 197.14 -7.38
Amedisys 11.88 +.29
ACapAgy 28.06 +.11
AmCapLid 7.19 -.02
AmDental 18.69
AmSupr 4.39 +.10
AmCasino 17.79 +.21
Amgen 55.57 -.34
Amk~orTlf 4.63 +.01
Amylin 9.96 -.38
Anadigc 2.26 -.19
AnadysPh 3.69 +.01
Anlogic 53.58 -.01
Analystlnt 5.05 -.16
Ancestry 23.35 +.43
AncBcWlh .22 -.27
AngiesLn 15.80 -.46
Ansys 58.71 +.46
A123Sys 2.32 -.07
ApolloGrp 44.98 -.26
Apollolny 7.34 +.12
Applelnc 374.94 -2.47
ApldEnerh .12 +.01
ApldMal 11.23 -.30
AMCC 7.36 -.47
Approach 28.39 +.52
ArchCaps 36.45 +.51
ArenaPhm 1.37 ..
AresCap 15.15 +.20
AriadP 10.21 +.03
Aribalnc 29.39 -2.10
Ark~est 19.34 +.59
ArmHld 27.66 -1.21
Arris 10.80 -.07
ArubaNet 22.04 +.25
AscenaRI 27.61 -.30
AsialnfoL 8.54 -.33
AspenTech 17.17 -.25
AssdlBanc 10.85 +.12
athenahlth 52.61 -1.65
Atmel 9.11 -.30
Audvox 7.07 +.12


Auiodeske 33.50 -.95 Cleawiire 1.47 -.39
AuioData 49.89 -.14 CognizTech 66.23 -.91
Autlium 17.04 +.07 CogoGrp 1.80 ..
AvagoTch 29.86 -1.34 Coinstar 43.48 +.31
AvanirPhm 2.51 -.06 ColdwtrCrke 1.02 +.02
AvisBudg 12.59 -.18 ColumLabs 2.21 -.04
Awareh 2.97 +.03 Comcast 21.43 +.18
BEAero 37.28 +.32 Comcspd 21.21 +.13
BGCPtrs 6.12 -.10 CmcBMO 38.61 +.65
BJsRest 47.65 -.79 CommSys 13.52 -.11
BMCSft 35.52 -.74 CommVlt 45.67 -1.68
Baidu 126.93 -4.17 CmptrPr 45.35 -4.01
BeasleyB 3.92 ... Compuwre 8.33 -.06
BebeStrs 7.44 -.04 Comtech 33.08 -.84
BedBath 59.99 -.18 ConcurTch 47.03 +.61
BigBandN 2.24 ... Conmed 25.97 -.09
BioRetab 12.76 -.07 ConstantC 21.45 -1.43
BioFuelEh .98 +.01 CorinthC 2.67 -.04
Biogenldc 107.65 -1.98 Costa 81.72 -.26
BioMarin 30.62 +.26 CowenGp 2.48 -.01
BioMimeic 3.13 +.14 Creelnc 26.87 +.15
BioSante 2.35 -.15 Crocs 16.12 +.07
BioScrip 5.62 +.10 Crossrdsrs 5.70 +.46
BlktRKelso 8.56 +.05 Ctrip.mm 25.71 -.96
BlueCoat 17.10 +.19 CubistPh 36.35 +.38
BlueNile 32.48 +.47 CumMed 2.84 +.04
BobEvans 31.61 +.24 Cyberonics 30.21 +.83
BonTon 2.83 -.27 CypSemi 18.75 -.36
BostPrv 7.42 -.01 CytRxh .38 -.01
BreitBurn 17.07 +.15 Cytlodnet 1.00 -.13
BigExp 36.40 +.01 C ori 2.3 +29
Brighipnt 9.89 -.05 5
Broadcom 32.77 -16
BroadSoft 38.87 -.43 DFCGbls 17.50 +.37
Broadwdh .45 -.07 Datalinke 7.83 -.18
BrcdeCm 4.64 -.06 DealrTrke 24.58 -.30
Brook~sAuio10.01 -.02 DeckrsOut100.14 -.88
Bruk~erCp 11.99 -.64 Ddlcath 2.55 -.37
BuffaboWW 63.61 +.41 Ddlllnc 14.90 -.02
CAlInc 20.44 -.04 DdltaPtrrs .59 -.05
CBOE 26.34 +.23 Dndreon 8.34 +.23
CH Robins 66.01 +.36 Dennys 3.42 +.03
CMEGrp 248.89 +10.84 Dentsply 33.59 -.79
CNinsure 7.55 +.10 Depomed 4.77 +.04
CTCMedia 9.62 -.15 DexCom 7.10 +.10
CVBFnd 9.87 +.16 DiamondF 35.86 -.76
CadencePh 4.17 +.19 DigitalGen 14.39 -.22
Cadence 11.04 -.06 DigRiver 17.02 +.13
CdnSolar 2.38 +.09 DirecTVA 46.62 +.17
CapCtyBke 10.14 +.14 DiscCmA 40.62 -.10
CapFdFrs 10.99 -.06 DiscCmC 37.50 -.01
CpstnTrbh 1.11 -.06 DishNetwke 24.73 +.11
Cardiomg 2.03 -.05 DollarTree 75.96 -.31
CareerEd 7.69 -.01 DonlleyRR 14.91 -.04
Carrizo 25.70 -.51 DragonWg 4.52 -.33
CarverBrs 2.99 -.63 DrmVVksA 17.14 -.26
CasualMal 3.19 -.07 DryShips 2.54 -.02
CatalystPh 1.13 +.12 Dunktinn 25.24 -.33
CathayGen 12.89 +.08 Dynavax 2.83 -.09
Cavium 33.04 -.29 E-Trade 8.23 +.05
Cbeyond 6.60 +.18 eBay 29.81 +.16
Celgene 63.04 -1.62 EVEngy 65.27 -.85
CellTherrsh 1.06 +.02 EagleBulke 1.27 -.03
CentEuro 3.08 -.74 ErthLinke 6.65 -.03
CEurMed 8.66 -.54 EstW~sBcp 19.14 +.04
Centhl 9.52 -.14 Ebixlnc 18.10 -.31
Cepheid 31.62 -1.48 EchdlonC 5.49 -.16
Cerners 57.95 -2.04 EducDevh 5.09 -.11
CerusCp 2.99 +.04 8x81nc 3.67 -.07
Changyou 23.58 -2.02 ElectSd 12.31 -.20
ChrmSh 3.49 -.04 ElectArts 21.99 -.33
Chartlnds 57.50 +.62 Emurelf 1.02 ..
CharterCm 52.91 +.71 EndoPhrm 32.40 -.34
ChktPoint 53.92 -.15 Endocyten 9.71 -.07
Cheesecakte26.75 +.31 Endobogix 10.36 -.49
ChildPlace 53.30 +1.49 EngyCnvh .35 -.03
ChinaCEd 5.11 +.09 EngyXXI 30.25 +.05
ChinGerui 3.88 +.29 Entegris 8.43 -.07
ChinaMed 4.29 +.44 EntropCom 4.83 +.01
ChrchllD 43.78 +.31 EnzonPhar 6.37 ..
Cienacorp 12.86 -.17 Equinix 99.66 -.11
CinnFin 28.72 +.29 EricsnTel 9.92 -.19
Cintas 29.69 +.53 ExactScih 7.79 -.03
Cirrus 16.00 -.25 Exeliks 4.08 -.07
Cism 18.42 -.06 E~deTc 2.54 -.04
CitzRpB rs 10.13 +.31 Exp~edia 27.46 +.45
CitrixSys 70.54 -1.91 Exp~dlnl 42.82 +.07
CleanEngy 12.53 -.21 Ep~Scripts 43.97 +.20


ExrbmNet 3.04 +.09 IPGPholon 43.06 -.57
Ezarp 27.44 -.41 iRobot 29.74 -.33
F5Netwk~s106.19 -.91 iShACWX 36.93 +.08
FEICo 37.94 -.66 iShACWI 41.71 +.06
FLlRSys 25.37 -.14 iShDevRE 25.40 +.05
FSllnl 2.61 -.04 iShNsdqBio92.33 -.65
FXEner 5.13 +.01 lunPLC 16.60 -.03
Fastenals 40.04 +.04 lunix~r 15.74 +.05
FiberTwr .35 +.09 IdenixPh 7.41 +.23
FifIthTird 11.89 +.08 Idenive 2.11 +.16
Fndlnst 16.74 +.04 Illumina 29.14 -.94
Finisar 18.69 -1.48 Imuno~Gn 11.54 -.25
FinLine 20.48 +.54 Imunmd 3.04 -.04
FstCashFn 37.01 -.67 ImpaxLabs 17.16 +.29
FFnclOH 16.05 +.18 Incyte 12.21 -.33
FstlntBcA 11.50 +.05 Infinera 6.96 -.08
FMidBc 9.08 +.17 Informat 46.86 -.86
FstNiagara 8.68 -.03 Infosys 53.09 -.33
FstSolar 45.44 -.17 Inhibitex 8.93 +.25
Fstl~erit 14.27 +.16 Insulet 17.40 -.31
Fiserv 56.53 +.05 IntgDv 5.80 -.07
Flexrbn 5.80 -.08 Intdl 24.29 -.05
FocusMda 25.50 +.22 InteractBrke 14.63 +.21
ForcePro 5.50 -.01 interClick 9.06 -.01
FormFac 6.09 -.14 InterDig 47.37 -.81
Forinets 24.28 -.20 Intermoln 9.50 ..
Fossillnc 86.95 -2.98 InterMune 18.44 -.68
FosterWhl 19.31 -.40 InterNAP 4.89 -.02
FreshMkt 38.63 -1.42 IntlSpdw 23.75 +.34
Fudelel .91 -.02 Intersil 10.90 -.02
FulionFncl 9.27 +.05 Intuit 52.04 +.29
Fusihi~o 7.75 -.05 InSurg 423.06 -5.83
IridiumCm 7.37 +.14
Isis 6.68 -.16
GTAdvTc 7.67 -.39 Itron 35.01 -.87
G-lll 19.66 -1.04 IvanhoeEn 1.02 -.01
Garmin 35.13 -.07
GenProbe 5845 -03


Magma 5.71
Majesco 3.06
MAKOSrg 28.87
MannKd 3.04
MarinaBio .16
MarvdllT 14.65
Masimo 19.34
Mattel 28.39
MattrssFn 22.00
Maximlnig 25.89
MaxvdllT 17.24
McC&Sch 8.66
MedCath 7.17
MedAssets 9.59
MedicAcbn 4.98
Medivaton 41.90
MeluCrwn 8.90
Mellano~x 34.48
MeniorGr 13.02
MercadoL 83.15
Mercerlnl 5.84
MergeHlth 4.81
Methanx 23.49
Microchp 34.58
Micromet 5.66
MicronT 6.29
MicrosSys 45.41
MicroSemi 17.61
Microsoft 25.30
Micnvisnh .45
Mindspeed 5.36
Misonix 2.03
MitektSys 7.93
Molex 23.70
Momenta 15.16
Motricity 1.33
Movelnc 1.54
Mylan 17.86
MyriadG 19.98
NABIBio 1.92
NIlHI$ 23.41
NPS Phm 5.41
NXPSemi 16.27
Nano shet 1.72
Nara np ee8.74
NasdO X 25.67
Natlnstrs 26.82
NatPenn 7.96
NektarTh 4.32
NetogicM 49.37
Netp 34.74
Netease 46.03
Ne~r 78.06
Nls .50
Nw ortA 13
NewsC~pB 1 .8

NorTrst 36.94
NwstBcsh l2.06
Novlus 34.63

Nan em 238
NutriSyst 11.31
Nvidia 13.93
ertaeMd 1 .1
OReillyAu 75.47
Oclaro 3.23
OdysMar 2.53
OldDomFrt 37.73
OmniVisn 12.33
OnAssign 10.75
OnSmend 7.42
Onuthyr 7.14
OnyxPh 37.23
OpenTxt 56.66
OpenTable 36.90
OpnwynSy 1.60
OpntTch 36.02
OpbmerPh 10.54
Oracle 30.60
Orexigen 2.00
Oritani 13.02
Orthfx 32.58
OtterTail 20.59
Overstk 8.02


PDLBio 5.99 +.09
PFChng 30.06 +.20
PMCSra 5.85 -.08
PSSWrld 22.93 +.39
Paccar 39.16 -.25
PacBbosd 2.79 -.19
PacEthrsh 1.27 -.13
PacSunwr 1.30 +.01
PaetecHld 5.31 -.04
PanASly 24.01 -.12
ParamTch 20.53 +.04
Parexel 19.87 -.34
Patterson 29.02 -.37
PattUTI 21.37 -.50
Paychex 28.22 -.10
Pegasyslf 29.50 -.18
PnnNGm 35.19 +.87
PennantPke 10.29 +.26
PeopUidF 12.18 -.14
PeregrineP .91 -.02
PerfectWld 12.44 +.14
Perrigo 91.45 +1.19
PerryEllis 12.54 -1.16
Pet~mart 47.44 +.21
PetroDev 33.38 +.28
PharmPdt 33.15 -.04
Pharmacy 12.01 +.09
Pharmssts 72.67 -.16
Photrln 5.50 -.12
Polymms 16.93 -.67
Poniardh .26 +.13
Popular 1.45 -.02
Power-One 5.04 -.15
PwShsQQQ55.40 -.43
Powrwvrs 2.40 -.13
Pozen 2.51 +.16
Presstekth .70 -.04
PriceTR 52.50 -.02
PrSmrt 63.97 -3.01
priceline 496.92 -16.48
PrinctnRh .12 -.01
PrivateB 9.93 +.25
PrUPShQQQ21.21 +.51
PrUltPQQC~Cs67.14 -1.6
PrognicsPh 6.09 -.03
ProgrsSfts 20.79 -.04
ProspctCap 9.36 +.11
ProspBcsh 37.92 +.81
PureCycle 1.86 -.05
QIAGEN 13.73 +.02
QllikTech 27.20 -1.99
Qlogic 14.66 -.11
Qualum 55.67 -.71
QualitySs 36.25 -1.51
QuestSft 18.22 -.25
Questur 42.50 +1.28
Quidel 16.96 +.01
RFMicD 6.58 -.09
RTIBiolog 4.30 +.09
Rambus 8.41 -.37
Randgold 111.01 -3.18
RapiorPhm 5.01 +.14
Regenrn 49.81 -1.32
RentACt 35.19 +.17
RepubAir 4.30 -.07
RschMotn 18.19 -.46
Respnsysn 9.13 +.16
Retail~pp 11.64 +.03
RexEnergy 16.20 +.10
RigelPh 7.38 +.28
Right~ow 42.85 +.05
RiverbedT 26.07 -.60
RodmanR .49 -.11
RosettaR 47.71 -.23
RossStrs 86.10 -.85
Rovicorp 27.59 +.03
RoyGld 76.43 -1.41
RubianTc 10.43 -.31
Rudolph 7.99 -.28
rue21~s 2488 -.4

S1Corp 9.71 -.04
SBA Com 38.89 -.42
SEllny 15.82 -.15
SORL 2.98 -.10


STEC 10.12
SXCHlth 53.16
SabraHltc 10.28
SagentPhn 21.64
SalixPhm 35.38
SanDiske 48.72
SangBio 2.72
Sanmina 8.40
Sano~irt 1.34
Sapient 11.99
Satanh .78
SavientPh 2.35
Sci~lone 4.42
SeagateT 16.01
SearsHldgs 64.27
Seatt~en 15.27
SelCmfrt 19.77
Selectylns 16.01
Semtech 22.62
Sequeno~m 4.17
SvcSourcn 14.24
SvArtsrsh .41
ShandaGm 4.41
Shire 95.01
Shutteriy 33.98
SifyTech 4.75
SigaTechh 2.52
SigmaAld 60.00
SilicGrln 14.62
Silienlmg 5.29
SilenLab 42.77
SilienMotn 18.58
Slcnware 4.45
SilvSidg 13.68
Sina 74.12
SinoClnEn 1.53
SiriusXM 1.78
SironaDent 40.79
Sktulledyn 16.77
Skywk~sSol l6.99
SmartBa 5.17
SmithMicro 1.11
SodaStrm 32.45
Sohu.cm 52.54
SolarCap 22.91
Solazymen 11.61
Sono~Site 41.38
Sonus 2.59
SouMoBc 20.85
Sourcefire 31.89
SpectPh 12.17
Spreadtrm 27.21
StaarSur 9.15
Staples 14.10
StarSdent 2.52
Starbuck~s 42.02
StateBktFn 15.21
SIDynam 12.54
StemCdllrs 1.83
Stericyde 77.87
SMaddens 33.76
StewEnt 6.09
SunOpta 5.73
SunPower 6.87
SusqBnc 7.67
SwisherHy 4.05
Symantec 16.19
Symetricm 5.12
Synaplcs 33.29
Synchron 29.98
Syno~psys 27.22
Synodvs 18.42
Syntrolmh 1.07
TDAmeritr 16.15
THQ~ 2.00
TICCCap 8.96
TTMTch 10.81
twtdelem 17.43
Tak~eTwo 13.58
TaleoA 32.45
Targacept 7.30
TASER 5.85
TechData 47.90
Tek~elec 11.08
Telesione 4.70
TeleTech 17.72
Telikth .28
Tellabs 4.01


Gentex 27.19 -.30
Genivah 5.99 +.35
GeronCp 1.50 -.08
GileadSd 39.88 +.27
GladerBc 11.70 -.11
GlblEduc 5.37 +1.16
Globllnd 7.97 -.03
Globalsth .39 -.01
GlbSpcMet 13.96 -.03
GluMobile 3.06 +.05
GolarLNG 41.99 -.10
Google 594.88 -5.99
GrLktDrge 6.01 -.05
GreenMtC 50.45 -1.24
GrifolsSAn 5.38 +.01
Grouponn 26.19 +1.42
Grpo~in 7.01 +.03
GuidSofth 6.07 +.04
GulfRes 2.23 +.13
GulfportE 34.16 +.02
HMNFn 1.84 -.02
HMSHkis 28.75 -.06
HSNlnc 35.97 +.16
HainCel 35.34 +.37
Halozyme 8.27 -.18
HancHld 29.96 +.21
HanmiFnd .86 +.02
HansenMed 2.55 +.40
HansenNat 91.01 -.39
HanwhaSol 1.30 -.05
Harmonic 5.32 -.09
Hasbro 36.03 +.61
HawHold 5.63 -.12
HlthCSvc 17.86 +.22
HlthStrm 17.76 +1.03
HrindEx 13.62 +.05
HSchein 60.97 -.76
HercOffh 3.75 +.05
Hibbett 43.30 +.16
HimaxTch 1.06 ..
Hologic 16.83 -.13
Homelnns 31.03 -1.63
HotTopic 6.89 +.22
HubGroup 31.12 +.34
HudsCity 5.48 -.03
HumGen 8.11 -.05
HuntJB 43.52 -.06
HuntBnke 5.16 +.08
IAClnter 41.38 -.01
IdexxLabs 72.19 -2.12


j2Global 29.22 +.41
JASolar 1.57 -.06
JDSUniph 10.99 -.34
JackHenry 32.27 -.17
JacklnBox 20.65 +.36
Jamba 1.57 -.01
JamesRiv 7.40 -.03
JazzPhrm 37.30 -.58
JetBlue 3.70
JoyGlbl 85.88 +.07
KITDigil 10.40 -.31
KLATnc 44.39 -1.10
Keryx~io 2.97 +.06
Keyno~te 18.70 -.93
Kulick~e 9.80 -.12
LKQ~orp 28.64 -.23
LSllndlf 6.53 -.15
LamResrch 40.48 -1.12
LamarAdv 23.84 -.29
Landstar 45.75 +.06
Latice 6.67 +.17
LeapWirlss 8.47 -.03
LekPhrm .00 -.01
LibGlobA 41.18 +.18
LibCapA 78.40 +.21
LibStarzA 68.94 +.12
LibtlntAh 15.93 -.01
LifeTech 37.60 -.69
LifePtH 37.53 -.11
Lihualnl 6.23 +.21
LimelghtN 3.02 -.03
Lincare 23.25 +.07
LincElecs 37.82 +.53
LinearTch 30.54 -.12
LinnEngy 36.91 -.05
LodgeNet 2.23 +.08
Logitech 7.82
LookSmart 1.34
Lulkin 68.41 -.22
lululemn 8 49.06 -1.26

MBFncl 16.27 +.07
MCGCap 4.36 -.02
MELASci 5.02 -.16
MGE 43.26 +.38
MIPSTech 5.00 -.06
MKS Inst 25.48 -.64
MTS 39.42 +3.81
MSG 25.15 -.47


GabGldNR 15.90 -.10
GascoEngy .19 -.01
Gastargrs 3.42 +.08
GenMoly 3.33
GoldResrc 20.01 -.36
Go den~in 7.11 +1d

GranTrrag 6.07 +.12
Grt~asGg 1.19 -.08
GtPanSilvg 2.29 -.02
Hemisphrx .20 ..
Imp0ilgs 41.62 +.69
InfuSystem 1.85 +.51


NeoStem .58 -.03 PbonDrill 11.07 +.05 TanzRyg
Neoprobe 2.26 ... PolyMetg 1.22 -.03 Tasek~o
NBRESec 3.71 +.01 Procerars 16.00 -.51 Tengso
Nevsung 5.38 -.29 PyramidOil 4.19 +.03 TianyinPh
NewEnSys .78 +.05 Q~uepasa 3.89 +.06 TrnsatPet
NwGoldg 10.31 -.28 RareEleg 5.55 -.05 TravelCrs
NAPallg 3.02 -.06 Rentech 1.65 +.07 TriValley
NDynMng 6.96 -.25 RevettMrs 4.86 -.25 TriangPet

Nthna d~g +09 .0 Rihntgh 10.8 -.2 nv~leo1r
NuvREst 9.54 -.01 Rubiman 3.58 -.07 Ur-Energy

UraniumEn
SamsO&G 2.15 +.03
ParaG&S 2.42 -.13 SeabGldg 20.71 +.51
PhrmAth 1.35 ... SprottRLg 1.36 -.04 VantageDrl




























































































































































INSURANCE RESOURCES
& RISK MANAGEMENT, INC


IOS Mlissa Sea

Rebecca BaystC Kristin Roberts




OWE




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l~B~~ll~l~ll1lI


CITRUS COLWTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 A7


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: DryMidr 26.65 -.03

At cc Funds B: GC~h aAr 32 3
SmCapGr 6.08 -.04 HiYldA p 6.15 -.01
AllianceBern5AO4 ... ~loAA2 0

GlbThGrAp60.74 -.67 DreihsAclnc 10.04 -.04
SmCpGrA 33.57 -.23 Driehaus Funds:
AllianceBern Adv: EMktGr 27.83 -.22
agpn eAder25B37 -.17 EVP xMEnmle42.92 -.24
GlbThGrBt52.08 -.58 ChinaAp 16.80 -.17
GrowthBt 23.94 -.03 AMTFMulnc 9.43 +.02
SCpGrBt 26.81 -.19 Mul1CGrA 7.49 -.03
AllianiceBern6C99-1 I~nB~os al 1 +.

Allianz Fds Instl: NatlMunlnc 9.23 +.04
NFJDpyVI 11.03 +.01 SpEqtAA 15.21 -.04
Allianz Funds A: Eaton Vance B:
SmCpVA 28.27 +.05 HlthSBt 9.41 +.01
Allianz Funds C: NatlMulnc 9.23 +.04
AGIC rthC 22.90 -.14 Ea oVance75 -01
AmanaGrwn23.97 -.05 NatMunlnc 9.23 +.04
Amer Bneacon Insti: Eaton Vance 84

Amer Beacon Iny: GblMacAbR 9.93 -.03

AmerCea tuir A~dv:+.01 F nds:165 .2
EqGroAp 20.73 -.01 Focuslnytn48.90 -.02
EqlncAp 7.01 ... FMIFunds:
Amer Century Iny: LgCap pn 14.96
AICapGr 2 .0 -.20 FPA Funds:1.4
DivBnd 11.10 -.02 FPACresn 26.88 -.06
trohl 251 -.10 Feea dA4.1-.4
Heritagel u95 .4 MdrSG A 3. -0
InfAdjBd 13.08 +.01 Federated Instl:
ltIs 9.0 +.0 tuhnR t .6 1 0
NewOpp 7.17 -.03 StrValDvlS 4.66
dn~ ~ 1. -02 Fidelit Adv3 cT:
RaaEstl -93 F.1 Htyr Adv6r6A:-.07
Valuelny 5.39 ... Nwlnsghp 19.44 -.10
Am rican Fund A:-0 ItnAd 123r4C-.02

AMulAp 24.96 +.01 Nwlnsghtnl8.45 -.09
naAp 1. -01 Fid liltyAdv sor91:-.6
CaplBAp 48.50 ... Eqlnln 22.35 +.02
CapW~p 0.69 -.1 Nwlnstln 1. -0
EpacApp 35.7 -.03 Fi elit AdvisorT:-.2
GovtAp 14.63 -.01 DivGrTp 11.15 -.01
GwT p 284 EGnTTp 5. -3
In oAp 1 .31 t01 GrOppT 34.03 -.37
InlGrlncAp27.76 -.01 Bnt~dTp 113 -0
ILCT p 2 .47 -01 MulncT~p 1. t0
NEcoAp 23.59 -.08 STFiT 9.25
N~e~ 21 -05 S MeAIlCp 724 -.05

SBFApp 1008 .. FF2010n 13.33 -.02
TxExAp 12.33 +.02 F21 1. -0
AelAmes s:34-.02 F2015K 12.35 -02
Apprec 37.57 -.10 FF2020K 12.64 -.02
Artit Global Fds: .07 25 1. -0
InlEqlr 23.74 -.11 FF2030n 13.07 -.03
Funqll 9.4 -.05 F23 1. 0


M V~al 33.1 -45 F20 K 12 74 0
SCapVal 16.15 +.04 Incomen 11.30 -.01
BNY M lln Funds:-0 Fieit Envest:

^""thFnds AM rSn 1. -0
SmallCain F :05 -.01 eaannd 1. -0
lntDu 14.13 -03 leMChGrn41 -2

axMgdn k.74 -.02 Canan 5. -1
EqtyDiv 17.47 +.02 CapDevOnl0.13 -.06
GAIAr 185 -.0 Cpnr 2.7 -.

Inl0pAp 28.48 -.04 CngS 465.09
BlackRock B7 -.0 CTnMunrn 1. t0
BlackRock Instl: +.01 a 6. -3

bqu oyDcj 1. 02 EiEqnF 21.10 -.01
HiddBd 7.34 -.01 Dvnlnr 2. -0
nodl Fun9Y ... DivStkOn 14.46 -.02
Brceun~d 83.3 -.58 D vt sn 2. -0
SmCapn 24.17 -.07 Em~n nn .3 -1
CGM Funds: 5.88c -.071 nA
Mutln 24.77 -.11 Euroep 25.74 +.07
CR Funds25.54 +.21 Excp tn 3.7 -.06

C~ sFu~n6 Fideln 30.65 -.08
GrwthAp 49.21 -.51 atefirn 70 -. 7
Calvert Invest: Flnnn2.8 ..
Incop 15.75 -.04 GN n 1.8 -01
injaA~pp -.06 Govtlnc 10.84 -.01
SocBdp 15.86 -.03 Gmo 821
&polnt 175 K -M
SCR ~ 3siaC 4A:.47 ni r 2. -
v ~ ~ ~ rwo In 3-1 n d 2.3 -8

Lg~a~r~t236 14 IowiCn 82807 -01

oVbar pppi0 v n
S C~o mA Jncmn 8.56 +.06
Columbia CllT&GA: vpokn 02

A onI tZ .0 -.1 MagellanK 6183 -317
Divqlnco 9130 .0 D
BE~ntd d08 1 ap-k97 01
Lgvrap Midap 2612-07
dC~~~pldxZv 10772 -0 MN0ecnn

s.NY Mnun n13.132 .01
Int~or~n 9.29+.01 OCn 54.83 -.59
USCorCA Eq 5.47 -.01 h Mun 11.84 +.01

D estlS690 -.01 B6ausnnn
Corsnc 0.9 -01 PuitnvGn 1741 -.04
imhMkmG 1. -.10 u nK
TEnhpb d10.08 +.02 SAllaerqF1.75 -.02
Gelold&Pc20.35 -.26 Srmgk152 -.1
GroncS 1578 .0 Si~nGrw~a 10.129 t
IrntexAM 11.62 +.02 i8 ta 81 .1
In1FdSc 193760 -...Slv F 17 .1
LdC Fo~r 28 -07 St Fkn 104.6 +.01
CdTMunbia S 1,&G 9 2 SllwpSn 16.26 -.07
SP500S nB16 .22 So~r~ VI in 0538



Ia onlundZ30.63 +.02 9 n 7 2
NY~eY 3229 .02 alura n 24.76 +.07
DelaarenvesA: aluen 62.40 +.20

ItDelawr InvetlB-.01 kngn 5
Em IVqn j qup~tn9198 2.1
IntTmEan 14.01 +.01 Cop 542 -.5
TAUSorE~.3 ...Conu~nn 10.807 .05
ULg~an~ 18.57 +.03 Cntan7.6 .9
US~icrnl2.8 +.03 Cstpn 33.67 -.03


USTgdVal 14.99 +.05 DfAern 76.47 +.53
USSmalln 19.97 +.02 Electrn 45.34 -.07
UnSSmmVoan 22 84 +.07 1 nrn 4.6 -. 5
EmgMktn 25.34 -.22 EnvAltEnrnl5.27 +.02
Fixd n 10.34 ... FinSyn 47.49 +.32
IntGFxlnn 13.02 -.04 Goldrn 47.29 -.67
IntVan 14.76 +.02 Healthn 125.35 -.47
Glb5Fxlnc n 1.28 -.02 Insur n 43.23 +.25
TUFSTgiV 19 53 +.06 L al n 9.0 t.
DAID n g 2.16 +.20 se~n 5.9 -. 7
Balanced 65.81 Multmdn 41.65 +.12
Income 13.34 -.02 NtGasn 30.71 +.03
Stoc n81 .3 Rtin 5. 2-.
Double~ine Funds: Softwr n 83.72 -.61
TRBd In 11.15 -.01 Tech n 88.86 -1.38
TRBdNpnl1.14 -.02 Telcmn 42.63 -.13
Dreyfus: Transn 50.32 +.27
Ape F94 .5 p l~n 5. t3

Dreyf 8.27 -.04 ExtMklnn 35.35 -.02


HeI are theA1,000 biggeestmutualdfud lstled on N sdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell

Name: Name of mutual fund and family
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Associated Press

Stocks finished about
where they started Er~iday as
inVestors balanced positive
Signs for the U.S. economy
with a looming deadline for
a deficit-cutting committee
ill COngress. Steep declines
earlier in the week left the
market with its worst
weekly loss since
September
The Dow Jones industrial
aVerage gained 25.43 points,
Or 0.2 percent, to close at
11,796.16. The Dow traded
in a relatively narrow range,
ri Sing as many as 84 points
and falling as many as 15.
Hewlett-Packard Co.
jumped 2.6 percent, the
most of the 30 stocks in the
index, on an analyst
upgrade.
The Conference Board's
index of leading economic
indicators rose more than
Wall Street analysts were
eXpecting, a sign that the
OCOnomy may pick up in the
COming months. But many
inVestors were cautious as a
key Congressional commit-
tee remained deadlocked
On ways to cut the U.S.
budget deficit.
A bipartisan panel must
agree On making at least
$1.2 trillion in deficit cuts by
Thanksgiving. If the com-
mittee fails and Congress
takes no other action, auto-
matic spending cuts will
take effect beginning in
2013. Economists worry that
a deadlocked Congress will
eoTde business confidence


and Thursday on worries
that Euro e's debt crisis
could spread and hurt U.S.
banks.
Encouraging economic
reports this week -includ-
.n drop in unemployment
applications and an in-
crease in industrial prodc
tion did little to help the
market because a European
meltdown would easily drag
down the U.S. economy, said
Kim Caughey Forrest, eq-
uity research analyst at Fort
Pitt Capital Group.
"Our economy might be
improving, but the fixation
is on what's going to happen
with the world banking sys-
tem if defaults happen in
Europe," she said. She said
investors are reluctant to
take big positions because
no one knows how Europe's
problems will be resolved,
or how U.S. companies' fu-
ture profits will be affected.
In corporate news:
SH.J. Heinz Co. fell 3.3
percent after the ketchup
maker's income fell almost
6 percent.
SGap Inc. slid 2.5 percent
after its revenue came in
slightly below Wall Street's
forecasts. The company said
materials costs are continu-
ing to eat into profit
margins.
SClearwire Corp.
dropped dropped 21 per-
cent after a report quoted
its chief executive as saying
that the wireless broadband
network operator may not
make a big debt payment
due in two weeks.


Name NAV Chg
5001dxtlnvn 43.15 -.01
Inilnxlnvn 30.51 +.03
TotMktlnvn35.45 -.01

Fidlt BIpairt dv:-.2
5001dx~Adyn43.15 -.02
TnotAdrn 3. t04
First Eagle:
GlblA 45.75 -.01
OverseasA 21.51 -.03
First Investor~s5A -.1

GloblAp 5.93 -.01
GvAp p .5 0
IncoAp 2.43
MT App 1. t0
NJTFAp 13.11 +.01
NYTFAp 14.58 +.01
OppA p 26.49 -.09
PAFApp 1. t0
TxExAp 9.80 +.01
TotRtAp 149 -0

Frsuml'unTO4 ...
Frankff~emp Frnk A:
ATUFSAp 1 .3 +.01
AZTFApx 10.87 +.01
~lntp 1. t0

COFpx 117 t0
CTTFAp 11.02 +.01
bTcFApx 1. t0
DynTchA 29.59 -.37

FoundAlp 98.3 -.02
G Mlnpx 12086 t01
HYTcFA~p 120 t0
NYITF~p 11.45 +.02
LAMTFAlpA 1151 .01
MITFApx 11908 .01

NJTFAp 12.15 +.02

INT mp 20
InsFApx 1. t0
PATFApx 10431 +01
SMpGV~A 3526-23

UllsAp 12 8 +t.07
MAFk px k7A6 t01
GhTdAddv 119 7nkC.0
-~n~ 24 .01


FognAp 62.10 -.05
NJFp 1. t0
YF~akmp mpA-0 .09
GrthAv 16.33 -.09

dnCFpp 15903 --05
Frankln~uAl9e 040 2


SpGMOrusl .35.2 -01
GMOrut lV:p 1. -0

nmgtsrV~ 11.2 11
Quality 21.36 t0
icTF~un1 00 -.07
Asset 4n27.30 -.04
GatmewaA 25.95
IdmanS h~es4A:+.10
Gnol~ anS hs.ns


drn(Tep 3.l +.6
SHarborsu :10. -.02

C ~kAptls 2. -7
Iorntr 5311 .03
HardApop 12ds8 -.07
GlthAp 1. -0
Hatorldp FdsY: -0

rpvprpd 20859 -.07
pArGpp 3670 -.10



GEE Funds .
SSln ote11.7 -0




d ~rst: 1
Wdid~eq I1.281 +.02
I~n plnV 6190 +.03


Con~kstp 2130 -.14

HiIdp~r 3976 -.01
n~lty 2 .3
MunilnA 13.13 +.02

Capsevt 12.90 -.05

A setSyt 22.20-.6

CPo gman SAclass:-.1
JP organ Instl: ~

MidCpVal 23.21 +.07


JPrborgaun SlCs:
eBodd 121 -- 2
IntmTFvdn11.12 +.01
USLCrP snl.56 -.03

Bpalpand 24.47 -.01
Contrpapn 12.10 -.02

Glb~pelT 9.58 -.06
Gechp~p 15.89 -.19
DvGr&nc 28.791 .2
OdviseasT 1 3.00 +.02
Tteks d 1 TT -.14


Tet 5 .4 -.36
VentureT 54.82 -.04
WrldWTr 40.02 -.05

Cuna nt nn2d 82 -.08
John Hancock A:
BondA p 15.43 -.02
RgBkA 12.28 +.10
StilnAp 6.39 -.01
Sblc 6kB9 .01

LSAggr 11.31 -.02


Name NAV Chg
LSBalanc 12.31 -.01
LSConsrv 12.72 -.01
LSGrwth 12.05 -.02
lSoer Fun37 -.01
SmCpValAp22.85 +.04
LazaMdkntl 18.29 -.13
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp l8.64 -.14
Legg Mason A:
CAGrpp 109.2 -.61
CBLCGr p 23.48 -.10
WA Clc t 5.7 -. 1
WAMgMu p15.99 +.02
CBLSgMt 21 8 -.10
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 25.46 +.01
CMValTi p 36.09 -.05
Longleaf Partners:+.1
SmCap 24.25 -.03
B slisSayI 8 .02

LondR 1.0 -. 2
StilncA 14.51 -.01
Lo~mi Sae 15ny:-.2
InvGrBd~p l2.05 -.02

I.r A bett A:1 -.2

IudEq 121
BdDebAp 7.57 -.02
MdD Ap 1.4 -.01
Lord Abbett C:
Sur bct 456 ..
ShtDurlnco 4.53 ..
MFS Funds 39-.2
MGGA 15.3 04
HilnA 3.32 ..
MoFA 1965 ..
etiA 16.66 +.05
MFS Funds B.
MGn 1. -0
HilnBn 3.32 -.01
Motn 1382+.1

enT ud13.93 -.01
Valuel 21.91
MFSFnunds1 +.04
MainStay Funds A:

daiS ay Fund B*-01
ConvBt 14.73 +.02
HlB t 5.4-.02
In ~B 9.4 t0

MIVI~a ay Funds 1:-.3
Mairs& Power:

MdnninA&Npi~er F s
Mt wspA 9.2 -.08


r Fu~lnv 5d95 -.01
Totiaetvd 10.43 -.02
I s undis 0.43 -.02
MidasrFdt 45.13 -.07
Mronear 438 -.10

Motrgana a 41B:-.03

Motap~dl 35.50 -.026

Munder FundsY:
Mudsd r 93 -.06
BoeanZ 11.54 -.103


GoShates 19.59 -.02
Neubrgantner&Brmnt:
Focusl 18.52 -.04
sta~r 37.5 -05


NichoasGrop3u23 -.01
crdernFu44 +.10


Iwh~p CI .48 -.21

NMB~pCI Fil7.06 +.01
NW nnlY18.22 +.14
ht ~icA 96 -.38

arkicC263 -. 5
Select 27.48 +.05


Op~uesnBheim6.5 +.01
SAMTr NY 11.23 +.01

FCapps 42.50 -.13
C nAsip 3.3 -.01

GEquilty 87.42 -.01


Ltdrmeu 14.51 +.01

Seneltit 89.07 -...
USlnvp 9.67 -.01

Ncn~nc 44.0 t1
b T~xncB 773 -.01

Mltdpenhemr Roch.01
MuMAb p 1 77 02

IecntloY 25.65 -03


UMAllse 11.93 t0

EmtMkBd 11.24 -.02
FReadsnt 11.18 t1


WiokS 371 -.3

Reoaltn 12.18
Short 96.78 -.01
TotmRt 10.80 -.01
TR llc 10.48 -.01

O Wsbr d :


Cm p .6 -.03

LuAlls~t 10.35
RealRtC p 12.18
TotRtAt 10.80 -.01
PIMCO FundsD C

Meltp -01 8
TotRtnP 10.80 -.01


Name NAV Chg
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylnco 25.90
Perm Port Funds:

Pineaen Fu s A:+.1
BondAp 9.63 -.01
bInValAp 1.4 -. 6

ValueAp 10.50 ..
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 9.50 -.01
Pindee Funds C:-.2
Pioneer Fds Y:
Prce Fundd690+.2
Balancen 18.87 -.02
C ondn +08 t0
CapAppn 20.51 +.01
DivGron 22.58 ..
EmMktB n 12.91 -.02
Emk n 2. -. 5
Eqlncn 22.29 +.05
E lndexn 32.8 -01

GNM~n 1. -.6
Gr&In n 19.52 ..
tlhSdin 3 j2 -. 4

InslCpG 16.06 -.11
IntBondn 1. -09

nStkn 1.5 -.0
Japann 7.35 -.01
D inmn 44.04 -.26
MDBondn 10.57 +.01

M apVpann 19 +.
NAn in 32.48 -.05
NewEran 44.98
NHorizn 343 -2
NYBondn 11.27 +.01
OverS SF rn 7 4

R 11E~stn 1. t4
R2015n 11.67 -.02
R22n 1.9 0
R205 1656 2
R2040n 16.55 -.02


ShtBdn 4.82 ..
Sm p~knn 3. -

npcnn 1.2 0
TFlncn 9.97 +.01
Ixrin 10.82 +.01
USTlntn 6.26 -.01
U ~odn n 17 t0
Prialue I2.15 +.06

LTC 2n 1 .3 0
Pru2 ntal Fs : 6

HY dApA 5.29 02
N t~sA 4. -1

P~ru etial Eds B:-.3
HiYldBt 5.29 -.01
Putnam Funds7A:-.3

Cn ~ec 183 -.06
DvrlnAp 7.34 -.02
IEqnAp 14.5 +.01

Gboqayp 1 .2 -.02
GbHM 4.3 -.09
HiYdAp 7.28 -.02
Ind ~x 6.7 -.04
Int~i lnp 1 -.01
NJTW~p 9.38 +.01
I llpGr 4 .79
TxExAp 8.57 +.01
TFl~nA~p 14.91 +.01
b ttAp 1.0 +. 2
Voynp 19.79
Putnam Funds B:
TaxFrlns 14.93 +.02
IvrnBt 1.2 + 0

EuEq 16.29 -.01

GoBal 16 -. 1
YGdBqt 7279 -.01

GIntopt 17267 -.03

xilBt 112 -.01
Muldt p 5r 06


Ghl~otil 102.6 +.05

IValetrt u10 ds.03
LCJfe~tk 9.94-.8
Pxx~ kF i.80 -.04
MicroVap 15.59 -.03

RMl~i II Fund S: .02

Nasdaqtdvi.72-11
S~g Funds:
Sn~cra Fu s7 -.14
H le --.7 t0

LrS&kPe 19.26 -.01

SocutFunds:
eected Fu n7380 +.02
AmichDa 38.69 +.01
Armiehlp 38.604 .01
ComSetp 30.50 -.03
VaSequia 1.397 +.13
RSit lFunds: 4174 -.9
Sobunt ln t n0.962+.04

Stattonpdu s137 -.07

SuSnA erian nds01
TChWa Funds:
Tot~et~l 9.74 -.03
TMeomp ton11n -.09
hcu Fue s:

Thornburg Fuds.

dm~hp 3. t0
ThientindsAou:
Icom~ 80.70 -.02
Tocqueville1ds.7 t1

STureFunds:
SlrCpGin 31.26 -.14



Ml-a 2230 --02


Chn Reg 7.2-1
GlbRs 9.94 +.01
Gld&Mtls 16.53 -.13
WdPrcMn 16.65 -.12
AgyGt 31.92 -.23
CA Bd 10.24 +.01
CrnstSt 21.59 -.01
GNMA 10.38



Inco 13.09 -.01


Name NAV Chg
Inl 21.68 +.06
NYBd 11.81 +.01
PrecMM 38.42 -.54
ScTecnhd 12.4 -.12
SmCpStk 12.99 +.02

TxESh 10.75
VABd 11.08 +.01
WldGr 17.56 +.02

dLC Idx 19.66 -.02
Stklcd 24.35 -.01
Value I.ine F1 -01

Vanguard Admiral:
BaldA n 2.3 +. 2
CALTAdmn11.25 +.01
CpOpAdln 70.24 -.23
EMAdmiin 32.92 -.32

r lndm ni 3.7 t
EuroAdmln53.40 +.11
Exp ~dmln 6. -3

50NOAdmldn112.31 -.04
GrwAdm n 31 25 -.07
d h~n 543 -0
InfProAdn 28.04 +.01
ITBd dmll\18 -0
Ini~ mn 531 -1
ITGrAdmn 10.06 -.04
LT Imn O.E -.04
LTAdmln 11.16 +.02

MHYAdmnl10.5 t0

PrmCapt n 65.68 -.15
PAiLTMmn112 t0
STsyAdmln10.82 -.01
SB ~mlnl06 -.02
Gh~rdni 15
SmCAdm n32.86
TIAd Inn 1. -0
Tt~kAdabn 3. -0
WellslAdmn54.52 -.08
rdhlbdnmn527 -0
WdsrllAdn 44.40 +.07
VanguardF 63 .02

pALn 1.5 t0
Convrtn 12.07
DivdGronn 1. t0

Eqlncn 20.87 +.01



Indplrn 6. -3

eNM n 111

GLfeqon 26097 -.02
Gr ncn 256
LGadeqn 1. 0
MYorgn 1741 -.10
Mlhrn nn .7 -1

M ong~pn 1.5 +.02
uLS~rtn 15.9 1 0
NYTIrdn 11.25 +.01
OHTTsl n 1. -0
ecf tlson 209 0
Prmelcpn 63268 -.14
Aialur n 1. -0
STIGraden 1065 -.01
T dlyn 1. 0
t OrnO~ 17.1 -. 0
TgtutHnn 11.53 t0
Tgle2010n2.72 -.01
Tgltde20152.41-.1
RMe20020ngn 32.1 -.
Tg~Re23n205.95-02
NL 1.3 t0
TgHt~e24n 12837 -.09
USakien 1120 -:i
Irc~llrnn 3 -.03

Vrndsllndld2x5 +.04
drcpr st3n2623 -.1

SA n 087 -0

DTevdkn 8739 +.01
pesrn 1. -0
Exate n 081 -- 1
ITtnd0n 12183 -.04

d petncn 1 .5
TgREI0 n 18.41 +.016
CaGe22nthn.8 -. 1

Totll03ntl 1.45 -.02
Totetk4n 30.40 -.01

B Mst05n203 -0
TgH24 dn10 8
Inf~rolnst11.42 -0
Instldxn 9.3t0

Midllstyn 1947 -.02
Telnstn 30.41 -.02
Vadlulsn 19.64 +.02
Van uard Sig ml: -0
Gr onig n 0.289 -.07
MiC dt~nn60 -.
Smoptin 29re.60 -.01
SkSStl~r I00 1
rtn Funds4A7 -.01
Waddll & eed Adv:9 -
Ase~tnp 8.74 -.02


Cxed 38.90 -.19

Ast~nIt 11.61 -0

Cmidtkny 19.48 -.03

Op~pyny 35.45 -.017
UStMu~lnc 4.81 t...
Wellsnargo6nstl:

Cote~lus 11.06 -.02
WitllamlaiN 1. -0
GrowthN 10.89 -.07
Yacktmar nstunds:
Futnd n 187.1 -.03

Focsed n 181.32 -.03


Standard &
Poor's 500


-0.48

'1 215.65


ValeSA 24.80 -.03
ValeSApf 23.08 -.02
ValeantPh 42.48 +.49
InleroEM 2.8 0
Van REIT 55.39 +.35

VangEur 42.64 +.20
VangEAFE 31.20 +.09
VarianMed 58.05 -.53
Vectren 28.95 -.10
Ventas 52.41 +.95
V rznm 3. -2

Visa 90.81 -.59


VlaM 3. t9
WGL Hoki 42.02 +.05
Wabash 7.02 +.02
WalMart 57.23 +.50
Wakjlne 32.63 +.35


WeinRlt 21.02 +.18


Russell +0.68
2000 719.42

NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,734

Declined: 1,287

Unchanged: 105

Volume: 3.6 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced- 1,236

Declined. 1,258

Unchanged: 136

Volume: 1.7 b
AP


and slow the already-
fragile economy.
The Standard and Poor's
500 lost 0.48 point, or less
than 0.1 percent, to 1,215.65.
Telecommunications and
technology stocks fell broadly
The Nasdaq composite slid
15.49, or 0.6 percent, to
2,572.50. Salesforce.com
plunged 10 percent after its
quarterly results came in
below estimates.
The Dow is down 2.9 per-
cent for the week. Broader
indexes fell even more. The
S&P 500 lost 3.8 percent, the
Nasdaq percent. The mar-
ket fell sharply Wednesday


Economic gauge

Seems brighter

WASHINGTON The latest
eVidence that the economy is
making steady gains emerged
Friday from a gauge of future
eCOnomic activity, which rose in
October at the fastest pace in
eight months.
A string of better-than-ex-
pected economic reports this
month has led some analysts to
revise up their forecasts for
growth. Still, they caution that
their brighter outlook remains
under threat from Europe's fi-
080Cial CriSis.

The most recent sign was
Friday's report by the Confer-
ence Board that its index of
leading economic indicators
Surged 0.9 percent last month.
11 W8S the index's best showing
Since February.

Heinz adaptmng to

new realities

PORTLAND, Ore. H.J.
Heinz Co knows that every
penny COunts in this economy.
The world's biggest ketchup
maker's second-quarter profit
fell yet naffowly beat expecta-
tions on an adjusted basis Fri-
day as it focused on
faSt-growing emerging markets.
But in struggling developed
markets such as the U.S. and
Europe, the company is shrink-
ing product sizes and selling
lOwer-priced products such as
ketchup for 99 cents.


Deutsche Boerse,

NYSE tackle merger

BERLIN Deutsche Boerse
AG and NYSE Euronext are of-
fering concessions on their de-
rivatives businesses in a bid to
overcome objections to their
planned merger.
The two companies said Fri-
day that they have sent a pro-
posal to the EU agency that .
aims at "eliminating the existing
overlap in European single eq-
uity derivatives and ensures
continued competition in Euro-
pean interest rate and equity
index derivatives.
Deutsche Boerse, which op-
erates the Frankfurt stock ex-
change, said in February that it
would buy NS uronext or
$10 billion, creating the world's
largest exchange operator.

Amazon sells $199

tablet at a loss

NEW YORK -
Amazon.com Inc.'s Kindle Fire
tablet, which started shipping
this week, costs $201.70 to
make, a research firm said Fri-
day. That's $2.70 more than
Amazon charges for it. The
analysis by IHS indicates that
Amazon is, at least initially, sell-
ing the tablet at a loss that it
hopes to cover through sales of
books and movies for the de-
vice. The manufacturing cost of
a new gadget usually comes
down over time as chips be-
come cheaper.


Name Last Chg
SPCnSt 31.06 +.09
SPConsum 37.88 -.02
SPEngy 68.15 -.41
SPDRFncl 12.50 +.04
SPlnds 32.92 +.08
SPTech 25.21 -.21

StanBlktDk 63.66 -.86
SaeSdtH 3. -0
Steris 28.58 -22
SillwtrM 10.43 -14
StratHotlds 5.04 +.05
Sbr Rug 3. t0
b ncseF 254 11
SunCmts 36.19 +.08
Suncorgs 30.66 -.32
Sunonm 36.1 t5


Supng 28.56 -76
S rvau 8.11 t29
Synovus 1.66 +.11


TECO 18.28 +.15


TJX 59.54
TRWAuto 32.33
TaiwSemi 12.66
TalismEg 13.15
Target 53.00
Ta l~oors 163
TdlcmNZ 9.39
T lfEs~ps 187
Templelnld 31.84
TempurP 61.09
Tenaris 34.38
TenetHlth 4.50
Teradata 52.77

TerraNitro 1 90
TetraTech 8.85
Tebn 185

Throis 459
ThmBet 51.10
ThomCrkg 6.19
3MCo 80.54
Tiffany 75.44



TorchEngy 2.55


Trchmrkts
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travdlers
TrCon
TrinaSolla

Tyalnt
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold



UniSrcEn
UniFirst
UnonPac
UidMicro
UPS B
USBanc p
US OilFd


UnumGrp


WdllPoint 68.52
WdllsFargo 24.69
WendysCo 5.22
WestarEn 27.17
WAstEMkt 13.36
WstAMgdHi 5.81
WAstlnfOpp 12.69
Wsht fin 1.5
WstnUnion 16.20
Weyerh 16.41
Whrlpl 50.68
WhitngPts 47.00
WmsCos 30.45

W s~o 367
WTlndia 17.30
Wortihgi 16.37
Wyn~dham 39
XcdlEngy 25.92
Xerox 7.88



ZwingTIm 3.07


Stocks end little changed,




Europe wor ries ease


Market watch
Nov. 18, 2011

Dow Jones +25.43
industrials
11,796.16

Nasdaq -15.49
composite 2,572.50


Business H1G HLIG HTS


McDonald's drops

egg supplier
MINNEAPOLIS McDon-
ald's Corp. said Friday it has
dropped a Minnesota-based
egg supplier after an animal
rights group released an under-
cover video of operations at the
egg producer's farms in three
states.

The video by Mercy for Ani-
mals shows what the group
calls animal cruelty at five
Sparboe Farms facilities in
lowa, Minnesota and Colorado.
Its ima es include a worker
swinging a bird around by its
feet, hens packed into cramped
cages, male chicks being
tossed into plastic bags to suf-
focate and workers cutting off
the tips of chick's beaks.

wThe mv eals folpo ed a

Farms dated Wednesday from
the U.S. Food and Drug Admin-
istration that said inspectors
found "serious violations" at five

Sparboe facilities of federal reg-
ulations meant to prevent
salmonella.

The warning said eggs from
those facilities "have been pre-
pared, packed, or held under
insanitary conditions whereby
they may have become con-
taminated with filth, or whereby
they may have been rendered
injurious to health."

-- From wire reports





"ThJe certainties of one age are thJe

problems ofthe next. "
R.H. Tawney, 1880-1962


CITRus CouNTY CHRONICIT


Ronald Reagan's favorite
sayings: There they go
again.
The Gipper used the remark to
twit his Democratic opponents
for twisting the truth,
and that's exactly what
the Republican candi-
dates for president are
doing. They are trying
to blame the media for I~
all their problems,
when journalists are ,
just doing their j ob a j
job so vital to democ-
racy that it's outlined
in the First Amend- Cokil
ment. Steven
Perhaps those candi- OTH
dates are so concerned
with revering the Con- VOI(
stitution they haven't
bothered to read it.
There's Newt Gingrich, who as-
saults and insults the moderators
in every debate as a deliberate
part of his campaign strategy. (He
boasted to the Washington Post's
Karen Tumulty that his attacks
had "galvanized people across
the country" to back his bid.)
Michele Bachmann accused "the
liberal mainstream media elites"
of undermining her candidacy by
"purposely suppressing our con-
servative message."
And Herman Cain, staggering
under accusations of sexual ha-
rassment, says the "nitplckiness
of the media" was his biggest sur-
prise as a candidate: "I did not
realize the 'flyspecking' nature of
the media when you are running
for president ... as a result too
many people get misinformation
and disinformation."
There's nothing new about this.
Media-bashing is one of the fa-
vorite calls in the GOP playbook,
and the strategy always has two
parts: Rally the conservative
base by demonizing the "liberal
media elites," and insulate your-
self against press scrutiny by un-
dermining the credibility of your
critics.
Long before Sarah Palin made


a career of lambasting the
"lamestream media," Reagan
sprinted to victory in the 1980
New Hampshire primary after
telling off a newspaper editor
who was moderating a debate:
"I'm paying for this mi-
.--crophone, Mr: Breen."
Forty years ago Vice
SPresident Spiro
Agnew made head-
Slines denouncing the
press as "nattering
nabobs of negativism."
Well, Agnew was just
as wrong then as Cain
and Gingrich are
:and today. Remember what
Roberts the "nattering nabobs"
ERrevealed: Watergate,
the most dangerous as-
CES sault on the rule of law
ever perpetrated by a
president. And don't forget
Agnew's own sins: taking more
than $100,000 in bribes, pleading
no contest to tax evasion and re-
signing in disgrace.
Did the voting public need to
know these things about their
leaders? Absolutely. Just like they
needed to know about Bill Clin-
ton's transgressions 15 years ago.
Just like they need to know about
Cain and Gingrich today.
Four women two of them
publicly have now come for-
ward to accuse Cain of sexual im-
propriety. This is hardly
"flyspecking" or "nitplckiness." It
is revealing information about
how he treats subordinates, par-
ticularly women.
Just as important was Cain's
reaction to the charges first
published by Politico: He
dithered for days, crumbling
under pressure that represents
a tiny taste of what he would
face every day as president. Do
Americans need to know this
about someone who is appeal-
ing for their confidence? With-
out question.
Then there was the editorial
board of the M~ilwaukee Journal
Sentinel, which was hardly ask-
ing an unfair "gotcha" question


when it elicited Cain's views on
Libya. The video is damning.
Cain stumbles around, starting
and stopping his answer, and fi-
nally admitting, "I got all this stuff
twirling around in my head."
Should anyone who considers
voting for Cain, and entrusting
him with our foreign policy, see
this video? Of course. Would it
exist without the "flyspeckers" of
the Journal Sentinel doing their
job? No.
As for Gingrich, he knows that
as he rises in the polls, the media
will look into his past. And he
knows what they will find. He's
had three wives and two very
messy divorces, hardly the por-
trait he wants to present to reli-
gious conservatives. In 1997,
when he was serving as speaker,
the House of Representatives
voted overwhelmingly to repri-
mand him for violating federal
tax law and lying to investigators
from the House Ethics Commit-
tee.
Those are facts, not opinions,
and the public deserves to know
them about someone who wants
to be president. But Gingrich is
trying to discredit the media re-
ports before they even emerge.
We know the media are far
from perfect. They can devote
far too much time and space to
trivial issues and outsized per-
sonalities that attract eyeballs
(and ad revenue) but obscure the
serious questions facing the
country.
Still, the basic truth remains:
Candidates will tell you, the vot-
ers, only what they want you to
know about them. The media's
job is to tell you the rest of the
story. That's not flyspecking or
nitpicking. That's holding power-
ful leaders accountable. That's
what separates democracy from
tyranny. That's America at its
best.


Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at steve
cokie~gmail.com.


CITRUS COUENDT CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan .................. ................... ..publisher
Charlie Brennan ............... ... ................... ...editor
Neale Brennan ....... .promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold .................. ................... ..HR director
~p--~" Sandra Frederick. ................... ........ managing editor
Curt Ebitz ......... ......... .citizen member
ert M.d Mac Harris .................. ...................citizen member
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................... .............guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


H 1G H NOTE




0 ch st




inC OS fa




ha m e i


e


orchestra idea is a great
initiative that will in-
vest in the growth of culture
and quality of life for Citrus
County and deserves the com-
munity's backing.
Seekinger is a self-pro-
claimed farm boy who was of-
fered free music
lessons as a child.
He recognized the THE I!
opportunities
those lessons Yoto
opened up for him nt
in life and hopes
to provide the OUR O1
same exposure for Thurnbs I
Citrus youths that prog
he received years
ago.
Seekinger's proposal is dif-
ferent from other symphony
orchestras that recruit music
students and train them for a
career in the orchestra. The
Citrus Youth Educational
Symphonic (YES) Orchestra
will train students on the
basics.
This is a positive program
that will promote youth liter-
acy, social skills and add to the


cultural saturation within the
community. The idea has al-
ready gained some traction as
Progress Energy donated
$2,000 to the endeavor.
Going forward, the program
needs to attract a solid base of
support to ensure its longevity.
Seekinger has created the or-
ganization as a
nonprofit, which
CSUE: raises its profile
and provides an
chestraindication of his
tive. seriousness about
bringing this idea
'INION: to fruition '
p for YES As local govern-
arn. ment budget cuts
increase, there is
a chance arts pro-
grams including music in
the schools could eventually
fall to the wayside. This pro-
gram would provide an alter-
native.
We feel this program's suc-
cess is dependent upon broad
community support and is de-
serving of that support. We ap-
plaud Mr. Seekinger for his
efforts and look forward to
YES taking wing.


Cold dogs
OK, listen up, people, all you
people that have dogs out there
that let them almost die in the
heat. Well, guess what? Wake up.
Winter's here and now you're going
to let them freeze to death. I guess
I'll have to be on patrol again. At
least I saved three dogs this sum-
mer. Eight did die in the heat, ac-
cording to the animal control
women that I deal with. So every-
body better get their blankets out
and get their dogs warm because
I'm going to be out looking.
Additional tax
This message is for the guy
who's in love with the 9-9-9 fed-
eral tax. Citizens of Florida pay
state, county and city sales tax on
purchases. Keep in mind that 9-9-
9 is a federal tax and will
NDbe added to the existing
I sales tax we are alrea dy yng
paing. Oa tm
GiveI Oba main time nw
All Ih Reucan fidon thnews
isthe Republican debates. s
egfar, and they can't seem to
find one person that stands
i7( out. Rick Perry's brain freeze
S1 is played over and over. Also,
Herman Cain's sexual allega.
tions. I'm wondering why President
Obama doesn't get equal time. No
Democrat is running against him,
but he deserves equal airtime.
Christian nation
To the person who sounded off,
"This nation is not a Christian na-
tion:" You can believe this is not a
Christian nation. But as far as I'm
concerned, it is truly a Christian na-
tion. All the colonists were Chris-
tian, believed in faith and God. So
did George Washington and
Thomas Jefferson and 90 percent
of America. If this was not a Chris-
tian nation, you would not be able
to worship your own religion or be
an atheist.


Pow-nows
ARE WAN
Too
SMA\LL!


LETTERS 0~ to the Editor


vided the many items for auction
and contributed financial dona-
tions made this event so exciting
and productive.
Everyone's heartfelt support
of this fundraiser is deeply ap-
preciated, and the resulting
funds will go a long way to help-
ing the pets we re-home. Obvi-
ously, all of you who helped and
generously made donations -
either by giving directly to our
rescue or by giving our rescued
pets a forever home are truly
deserving of many thanks, and
make it possible to continue
with the pleasure of another suc-
cessful adoption year.
Donna Scott
AHSCFPR Inc.

Where's the money?
Since its inception in 1937, the
Social Security retirement sys-
tem has taken in $13.8 trillion
with total payouts of $11.3 tril-
lion leaving a $2.5 trillion sur-
plus through 2009, excluding
interest which would probably
have been almost $100 trillion
more. Where did all our money
go?
Claude Strass
Homosassa


oplulous INvgymn
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
a viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
oiin otes edoisaenbtotahred.
Groups or ind vidui is are na Ited
ter txo the editor.op
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
eairlinNaead adnhu wsw will
not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
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Letters must be no longer than
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limited to three letters per month.
m sEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
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:t52 s5 3- 8i0eoornemil .in.


Matt Fox, who brought out their
many friends. Dickie Nackman
added a generous portion of pro-
ceeds from pet lifesaver sales. Of
course, so many people who pro-


Unfair plan
Headline "9-9-9 is not a fair tax
and neither is the flat tax." "Nein,
nein, nein" in German means "no,
no, no." The caller in Tuesday's
Sound Off (Nov. 1) did not under-
stand the 9 percent sales tax is
not instead of the local and state
sales tax; it is in addition to it. So
does he want to pay 16 percent
sales tax? 999, like the flat tax, is
a trick to help the wealthy at the
expense of those with moderate

tx I o ul o db faireto >r sei
of us who are not making
millions.

Republicans forget
This is in response to Satur.
day's call-in (Nov. 12)
titled "Middle class O
crisis." Boy, how you
Republicans forget.
Let's go back to the
year 2000. We just en-
joyed eight years of
Bill Clinton in office. '
Unemployment was at )
an all-time low and we /
had no budget deficit. CL
Then came the
dreaded Bush-Cheney 00- 0
years. We got attacked
under their watch.
Then we went to war in Iraq be-
cause Bush swore to us that they
had weapons of mass destruc-
hoen.bTe te twenty rtdohriunh f
$1.4 trillion and everything else
crashed while unemployment
soared along with his budget
deficit. So then Bush started his
stimulus packages. What a mess
they left. Then came President
Obama. He's tried so many dif-
ferent things, only to be shot
down by the Republicans just to
make him look bad in the name
of politics. That's all they care
about, not us. Let's just be
honest.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
CONINENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Page A8 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


There they go again


S
rl
a

P

:r


Thanks for help
A Humane Society of Central
Florida Pet Rescue Inc. wishes
to thank all of you who gave of
your time and resources to assist
Diane DeSantis with the out-
standing production of the sec-
ond annual fundraiser "Hope
For The Homeless Animals."
She is owner ofA'Nue Salon in
Crystal River, who again envi-
sioned, collaborated, sponsored
and produced our second an-
nual fundraiser, along with
GulfWest Surveying and Planta-
tion Animal Clinic, which pre-
sented auction donations,
services and flea products to the
rescued pets.
As in the past, Hope for the
Homeless Animals was held at
Burkes of Ireland, Crystal River.
The hair designer girls, Tara
Matallen and Krystin Langley of
A'Nue Salon, gave free haircuts;
Doug Nicholson, singer/musi-
cian, provided fabulous free
mnudsicaand a ge folof Ing,
wrapped the donated items and
helped organize the auction ac-
tivity
We are extremely grateful to
our celebrity veterinarian bar
tenders, Drs. Tammy Barron and


t.

















Federal agency predicts colder than




normal winter and higher heating bills




Famous EdenPURE' keeps you tasty warm


while drastically cutting your heating bills


Unpaid testimonials
We live in an area which is known for very cold winters. Our facility is
nearly 7000 square feet in area. When we began to utilize the first unit we
were amazed to see how even the heat was for the entire living room area.
4 We ordered a second and a third unit which now warms the entire home.
1 -JrMuch to our surprise we are savings over $250 a month and had the lowest
a expense for heating we have ever experienced here. I would heartily rec-
Sommend your products to anybody who is interested in really nice, even
heat in their home and also interested in saving on their utility expenses.
SDennis Crystal, Troy, JiT (RefiredAirline Pilot)

Enclosed you wili find printouts of our electric bill and gas/heating/cooking
bills for 2007 2008.0Our gas company, AmeriGas, stated that more money
was saved than would show up because of the cost going up. We would tum
the gas on early in the morning and tum it down to 60 degrees; We would use
the EdenPURE heaters from then on and they provided such warmth and cozy
heat. We, also, had fewer colds last winter than in previous years, before we
purchased the EdenPURE heaters. Many of our friends have informed me re-
cently that they are going to purchase these heaters for their homes this win-
ter. Gloria D Smil, Boydian, fA {RefredaernentaryPincipal)

My experience with the EdenPURE has been quite a challenge just to use
being that I'm visually impaired. I've learned how to coordinate the beeps
and know where the buttons are. We keep it going pretty much 24/7.
SWe've saved about $90 in 4 months of bills so I appreciate that greatly. My
guide dog, Pontiac, it took approximately $84,000 for us two to get togeth-
er. And, I've noticed with EdenPURE, he thoroughly enjoys sleeping in that
spot in front of it. He's a comfort hog. He loves that heat. But there's no
worry of him getting too close or sniffing or touching something hot that's
going to burn him. Dale Jidd, Rawlins, WY(Businessman)
Average homeowner saves 10% to 25% monthly. This is an advertisement for the EdenPURE" Heater. All of
the testimonials are by actual EdenPURE" customers who volunteered their stories, and were given another
EdenPURE" heater as thanks for their participation.


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 A9


I rank EdenPURE* as the best heater and firemen and safety
pfofeSSIOnalS Choose EdenPURE*. Space heaters are a top
cause of house fires. The EdenPURE* has no exposed heating
elements that can cause a fire. And your pet may be just like
my dog that has reserved a favorite spot near the Eden-
PURE*. Bob Ilila


NOeVef 6 COId ag 810


Other heat sources use, caus-
es the heat to instantly rise to
the ceiling. Therefore, the
heat is not evenly distrib-
uted, causing a very ineffi-
cient and uncomfortable heat
source.
Your EdenPURE" easily
moves from room to room.
Using zone heating (heating
the area you live in) keeps
you comfortable and reduces
your heating bills. Therefore,
you can turn the heat down
in your house to as low as 50
degrees, but the room you
are occupying, which has the
EdenPURE", will be warm
and comfortable. This can
drastically cut heating bills;
in some instances, the say-
ings may be substantial.
The EdenPURE~ will pay
for itself in weeks. It will
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oil, propane, and other energy
costs, the EdenPURE@ will
provide even greater savings
as the time goes by.
Super -Safe infrared
heat
The EdenPURE" Person-
al Heater does not use burn-
ing heat. This heat actually
floats out into the living area
and is carried by the existing
humidity in the air. This
causes the heat to travel
rapidly and evenly through-
out a room.
Photos using infrared
lighting demonstrated that


the heat was almost perfectly
even from floor-to-ceiling
and wall-to-wall. The Eden-
PURE@ advanced infrared
efficiency is based on the
distribution of energized air,
not on just fan movement.
This heat is called "soft heat"
due to how comfortable it is.
Children or pets can come
up to the EdenPURE" cabinet
and touch it and not be
harmed. Pets like my dog are
actually drawn to this heat
because it is a natural source
of heat, just like the sun heats
the earth. Animals are much
more instinctive than hu-
mans. This heat not only
heats the air, but it also heats
the objects in the room. It is a
perfectly balanced heat.
The EdenPUREQ has a
specially calibrated digital
thermostat to continually
maintain balanced comfort-
able heat, eliminating the in-
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Our Personal Heater com-
fortably heats an area up to
350 square feet. And its light
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move the Personal Heater
from room to room. In other
words; you can take the heat
where you need it most.
This product has been
listed by Underwriters Labo-
ratories. It is simple to oper-
ate and comes with well writ-
ten and illustrated operating
instructions.


The EdenPURE@ Person-
al Heater comes with a com-
prehensive three year war-
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tions asked satisfaction guar-
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even pay for the return ship-
ping. There is absolutely no
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National Service Network.
How to order:
During this special 10 day
offer we can deliver to your
home our Personal Heater
which comfortably covers an
area up to 350 square feet.
During our special you
are eligible for a $175 DIS-
COUNT PLUS FREE SHIP-
PING AND HANDLING
FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS
OF UP TO $192 on the
EdenPURE@ Personal Heater,
Our largest discount ever.
This special offer expires in
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that, we reserve the right to
either accept or reject order
requests at the discounted
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take advantage of this savings
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also a 3 year warranty on all
parts and labor for the Per-
sonal Heater.


are burning up oxygen.
The advanced space-age
EdenPURE@ Portable Heater
also heats the room evenly,
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heat rooms unevenly with
most of the heat concentrated
high in the room and to the
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you know, portable heaters
only heat an area a few feet
around the heater.
EdenPURE@'s Eden-
FLOW" technology uses
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And again, our new im-
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With EdenPURE" th tm
perature will not vary in any
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How can I cut rny heating
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The 2012 EdenPURE*
has a new thermostat and a
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This enables you to "turn
down" the power on warmer
days saving you even more
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In the EdenPURE@
process, electricity is used to
generate a type of infrared
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very safe heat. Infrared is one


of the safest forms of heat be-
cause it does not create car-
bon monoxide or harmful ra-
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ly, the infrared heat will not
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The EdenPURE@'s in-
frared heating source uses
less energy to create heat
than other sources for many
reasons. One of the primary
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bustion level, which is what


SYI.VANIA is registered trademark of OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc. used under license.

BOB VILA'S AUTHORIZED DISCOUNT COUPON
The price of the EdenPURE" Personal Heater is $372 plus $17 shipping and handling but, with this Authorized Discount
Coupon, you will receive a $175 discount, free shipping and handling and be able to get the EdenPURE" Personal Heater
for only $197 delivered. The personal heater has an optional remote for only $12. After 10 days we reserve the right to
either accept or reject order requests at the discounted price.
Check below the number you want (limit 3 per customer) To claim your discount and order by mail: fill out and mail
SPer oal Heatr nmbe in this Authorized Discount Coupon.

O I am ordering within 10 days, therefore I get a $175 7
discount, free shipping and handling and my price is NM
only $197 for the Personal Heater delivered. ADDRESS
O I am ordering past 10 days, therefore I pay full price CITY STATE ZIP CODE
of $372 plus $17 shipping &~ handling for the Person- Enlsdi$i: Chc MoeOrr
al Heater.
(Make check payable to EdenPURE) or charge my:
O Optional Remote $12, number- o VISA 0 MasterCard 0 Am.Exp./Optima
* To claim your discount and order by phone: call toll- O Discover/Novus
free 1-800-366-1315. Operators are on duty Monday -
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this coupon. MAIL TO: EdenPURE@
* To claim your discount and order online: visit Offer Code EHS5047
www.edenpure.com and enter Offer Code EHS5047. 7800 Whipple Ave. N.W.
Canton, OH 44767


0009V132


Save $192


- biggest savings ever


Bob Vile, America's Favorite
Home Improvement Expert,
North Canton, Ohio
The U.S. Climate Predic-
tion Center and AccuWeath-
er have predicted a colder
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of the nation and an increase
in heating bills.
But, you can drastically
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And, I'm proud to add, the
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Now heat a larger room

inras i s luawe foat
from 300 to 350 square feet.
Plus the safest heater in the
world became even safer
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the good folks at Eden-
PURE@ even reopened an
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For over 30 years as your
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PURE@ in my home and
found it to be a very safe and
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heat. This is one of those few
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that will truly pay dividends.
We all know heating costs
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tinue to be a significant bur-
den on the family budget.
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then start putting a great deal
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the new EdenPURE" heats
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# 1 Choice for Fire and
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A major cause of residen-
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is portable heaters. The
choice of fire and safety pro-
fessionals everywhere, the
EdenPURE" has no exposed
heating elements that can
cause a fire.
The outside of the Eden-
PURE* only gets warm to
the touch so that it will not
burn children or pets. And
your pet may be just like my
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vorite spot near the Eden-
PURE@.
Accept no imitations
The EdenPURE" can al-
so help you feel better. Un-
like other EdenPURE* imi-
tators, it will not reduce hu-
midity or oxygen in the
room. These imitators use
ceramic plates instead of our
patented copper. These in-
expensive ceramic plates re-
duce humidity, dry out your
sinuses, make you more sus-
ceptible to illness, and make
your skin dry. With other
heating sources, you'llnotice
that you get sleepy when the
heat comes on because they


88HHOt start a fire, safe

for children and pets
Piclurred above is Bob Vila demonstrating the famous EdenPURE*
heater with a family. It saves big money on your heating bill while
keeping you tasty warm with "heavenly heat".













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NI:tiOn BR~IEFS;R~in CutS a new threat to U.S. economy


tax cuts and unemployment
benefits would be part of a
supercommittee deal. Con-
gress could extend those
benefits separately. But it
:sul dbe un tr pro sdur i
ing the deficit.
The Social Security tax
cut gave most Americans an
extra $1,000 to $2,000 this
year. Unemployment bene-
fits provide about $300 a
week. Most of that money
quickly and directly boosts
consumer spending, which
drives the economy.
By contrast, an expiration
of those benefits could cut
growth by about three-quar-
ters of a percentage point,
economists say. Throw in
other cuts, like those passed
in the August debt deal, and
all told, federal budget poli-
cies could subtract 1.7 per-
centage points from growth in
2012, according to JPMorgan
Chase and Moody's Analytics.
Given the tepid economy,
such a hit could be
damaging.



I ~Says




"Avamstne


lor or east



Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
government delivered
blow to some desperate pa-
tients Friday as it ruled the
blockbuster drug Avastin
should no longer be used to
treat advanced breast
cancer.
Avastin is hailed for treat-
ing colon cancer and certain
other malignancies. But the
Food and Drug Administra-
tion said it appeared to be a
false hope for breast cancer:
Studies haven't found that it
helps those patients live
longer or brings enough
other benefit to outweigh its
dangerous side effects.
"I did not come to this de-
cision lightly," said the
FDA's commissioner, Dr.
Margaret Hamburg. But she
said, "Sometimes despite
the hopes of investigators,
patients, industry and even
the FDA itself, the results of
rigorous testing can be
disappointing."
Avastin remains on the
market to treat certain
colon, lung, kidney and
brain cancers. Doctors are
free to prescribe any mar-
keted drug as they see fit. So
even though the FDA for-
mally revoked Avastin's ap-
proval as a breast cancer
treatment, women could
still receive it but their
insurers may not pay for it.
Some insurers already have
quit in anticipation of FDA's
long-expected ruling.

cont:::et: :di Aatin,"
said Brian Cook, spokesman
for the Centers for Medicare
& Medicaid Services. The
agency "will monitor the
issue and evaluate coverage
options as a result of action
by the FDA but has no im-
mediate plans to change
coverage policies."
Including infusion fees, a
year's treatment with
Avastin can reach $100,000.
The ruling disappointed pa-
tients who believe Avastin is
helping to curb their incur-
able cancer:
"It's saved my life," said a
tearful Sue Boyce, 54, of
Chicago. She's taken Avastin
in addition to chemotherapy
since joining a research
study in 2003. Her breast
cancer eventually spread to
her lungs, liver and brain,
but Boyce says she is stable
and faring well.
The Avastin saga began in
2008, when an initial study
suggested the drug could
delay tumor growth for a
few months in women
whose breast cancer had


spread to other parts of the
body.


COngeSSIOnal panel tasked with

SITvzng up $1.2 trillion in

spending cuts by Thadnksgiving


Associated Press
A Reno firefighter tries to
save an outbuilding as a
house burns in a 400-acre
brush fire Friday in south
Reno, Nev. The fire claimed
at least one life, injured
several others, destroyed
dozens of homes and blan-
keted Reno and its subur-
ban enclaves in a fiery
curtain as violent winds
sidelined firefighters and
rescue helicopters.


Fine: AllegationS
are 'patently false'
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Syra-
cuse assistant basketball
coach Bernie Fine says alle-
gations that he molested two
former ball boys for years are
"patently false."
The school placed Fine on
administrative leave Thurs-
day "in light of the new allega-
tions" and an investigation by



tiesi h rleaine adhve
been thoroughly investigated
and he has fully cooperated
with past inquiries.
'Sadly, we live in an allega-
tion-based society and an in-
ternet age where in a matter
of minutes one's lifelong rep-
utation can be severely dam-
aged. I am confident that, as
in the past, a review of these
allegations will be discredited
and restore my reputation. I
hope the latest review of
these allegations will be con-
ducted expeditiously.
"Finally, I appreciate
(Chancellor Nancy Cantor's)
statement that I should be ac-
corded a fair opportunity to
defend myself against these
accusations. I fully intend to
do so. There should never be
a rush to judgment when
sorneone's persona rltegrity
and career are on th ine.
Cantor vowed Friday that
the school will not turn a blind
eye to child molesting allega-
tions that resurfaced just two
weeks after the Penn State
scandal. ESPN reported the
accusations were made by
two former ball boys.

W 1Orla BRI EFS


Pa pal visit


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Just as
the U.S. economy is making
progress despite Europe's
turmoil, here come two new
threats.
A congressional panel is
supposed to agree by
Thanksgiving on a deficit-
reduction package of at
least $1.2 trillion. If it fails,
federal spending would au-
tomatically be cut by that
amount starting in 2013.
Congress may also let
emergency unemployment
aid and a Social Security tax
cut expire at year's end.
Either outcome could
slow growth and spook mar-
kets. Analysts are con-
cerned, but most aren't
panicking.








On


Britihh



bhstoric

Antarctic

CTOSSlyn.

Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Ar-
gentina Reaching the
end of the Earth has be-
come almost routine
these days: One hundred
years after Norway's
Roald Amundsen beat
Britain's R.E Scott to the
South Pole, more than 30
teams are trying fon t this
year
Some will kite-sail over
the vast Antarctic ice and
snow. Others will drive in
from the coast. A wealthy
handful will be dropped
off at one-degree north
latitude, for relatively
leisurely guided treks to
the pole.
But Felicity Aston has
been there, done that.
Weather and her own
considerable stamina
permitting, the 33-year-
old British adventurer
will only pause at the pole
long enough to pick up
more food and fuel. Her
plan is to keep on skiing,
by herself, all the way to
the other side of the
frozen continent and


Many say the economy
and markets will likely
muddle through. It's possi-
ble that the supercommittee
will reach partial deal that
might limit the impact of the
automatic cuts in 2013. Con-
gress could also pass legis-
lation next year to ease the
scope or timing of the
spending cuts.
And investors expect so
little from the congressional
panel that they're unlikely
to overreact whatever it
does,
"There's no doomsday
scenario in reducing gov-
ernment spending," said
David Kelly of JP Morgan
Funds.
The 12-member biparti-
san panel, or supercommit-
tee, was created in August to


Associated Press
From left, Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C.; Rep. Fred Upton, R-
Mich.; Rep. Xavier Becerra, D-Calif.; and Rep. Jeb Hensar-
ling, R-Texas, of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit
Reduction, attend the panel's last public hearing Tuesday
on Capitol Hill in Washington. The congressional supercom-
mittee is trying to come up with a package by Thanksgiving
that trims the federal deficit by at least $1.2 trillion over 10
years.


defuse a political standoff
over raising the federal bor-
rowing limit. If it can't agree
on a deficit-reduction plan,
automatic spending cuts
would hit programs prized
by both parties: social serv-


ices such as Medicare for
Democrats, defense for
Republicans.
The panel appears to be
deadlocked. Many econo-
mists hoped that an exten-
sion of the Social Security


British adventurer Felicity Aston skis Sept. 24, 2010, across Iceland dursn oea press
expedition training trip. Aston plans to ski by herself across Antarctica, all the way
to the other side of the frozen continent. If she manages to complete this journey
of more than 1,000 miles in late January, she'll become the first person to cross
Antarctica alone under her own power. She would also set a record for the longest
solo polar expedition by a woman, at about 70 days.


become the first person
using only muscle power
to cross Antarctica alone.
If she manages to com-
plete this journey of more
than 1,000 miles in late
January, she would also
set a record for the
longest solo polar expedi-
tion by a woman, at about
70 days.
"This is my first solo ex-
pedition, the first time I
will have spent this
length of time without
company," she said in a
phone interview with the
Associated Press. "It's


part of the challenge of
the expedition, to see
how I'll cope with it."
Aston spoke from
Punta Arenas, Chile,
where she was boarding a
charter flight Friday after
losing a precious week
waiting for weather to
break. From a base in
Antarctica, she'll then
take a second plane to
her starting point at the
foot of the Leverett Gla-
cier, where the Ross Ice
Shelf meets the rocky
coast.
Already, she was "chan-


neling down," getting her
mind set on what would
be a grueling routine.
"Your life reduces to
eating, sleeping and ski-
ing. It's a form of medita-
tion. You get into a
rhythm, and all you can
hear is your own breath-
ing, your own heartbeat,
the sound of your clothes
and your skis. It's kind of
an altered state," she
said. "A trip like this is all
about keeping going -
the stamina, endurance,
keeping going day after
day after day."


ctssoX ated Pe:
upon arriving
otre Dame
Cotonou,


Pope Benedi(
forms a ritual i
Friday at N
Cathedral in
Benin. Catho
colorful dresl
with his image
as he embarke
ond trip to Afric
plans to o
church's futu
continent.


Myanmar
to Ob;
WASH INGTO
Myanmar has bt
first international
clench its fist in I
President Barac
year-old offer of
Secretary of I
Rodham Clinton
the Southeast A
next month in re
signs of reform i
that was long ru
sive military regi
will be the first to
also known as B
secretary of stat


Associated Press


Such a community hotspot
so to speak, it's just gone."
The owners are thinking
about a seasonal restaurant
in the same spot, and ex-
pect they'll have to tear
down most of the current
historic building because of
flood damage.
So much of the center of
the small town is boarded
up that the chamber is try-
ing to figure out how to
spruce the place up before
winter, maybe with a mural
painting contest.
"The biggest thing about
Wilmington is the fact that
our entire business commu-
nity was gone," said Roth-
man, of the Aug. 28 storm
that turned streams and
rivers into raging water-
ways and carried away
bridges and large segments
of roads around Vermont,
cutting off at least a dozen
communities and damaging
or destroying at least 840
homes.
The slopes and buildings
at Mount Snow, however,
were unharmed.


lics wearing MONTPELIER, Vt. -
ses printed Visitors to Vermont's ski
greeted him country may be surprised to
id on his sec- find some restaurants and
ca, where he stores boarded up in the
,utline the valley town near Mount
Ire for the Snow one of the commu-
nities hardest hit by Tropi-
cal Storm Irene-- but the
skiing and riding should be
respondS the same depending on the
snow.
ama Many Wilmington busi-
,N Isolated nesses have already re-
ecome the opened or vow to do so -
l pariah to un- it's just a matter of when.
response to iIt's mind-boggling to
k Obama's 3- think what I have to do tB
engagement. think about reopening,
State Hillary said Lori Downey, who with
will travel to her husband hopes to re-
sian nation open Bean Head's coffee
sponse to shop, after losing every-
thing in the flood from
n the country coffee grinders, a cappuc-
n by a repres- cino maker, refrigerators
me. The trip and freezers to panini
'Myanmar, grills, meats, cream cheeses
lurma, by a and coffee. "I think what
e in 56 years. we're going to have to do is
-From wlre reports Start small and build our


r~ -

John McHale works Wednesday on repairs tos oa t ess s
Books in downtown Wilmington, Vt. The bookstore was one
of many Wilmington businesses hard hit by flooding from
Tropical Storm Irene this summer, and is trying to reopen
for the coming holiday season.


stuff back up."
Other businesses are going
full bore hoping to reopen by
Thanksgiving when sec-
ond homeowners come up
hoping for early season ski-
ing or Christmas. But the
owners of the buildings that
got the brunt of the flooding
- like beloved Dot's restau-
rant, which often had a line


outside on the weekends -
don't yet know if they'll re-
open and certainly not this
year
"We just don't have things
like Dot's," said Cheryl
Rothman, president of the
Mount Snow Chamber of
Commerce. "You know
there's no place to go for
breakfast. It's awful, really.


NATION


~TORLD


OFO oWH


Vt. ski town rebuilding after Irene damage







I




PORTS


DAVE SIGLEPJChronicle
Crystal River forward Jimmy Tully gains control of the ball from Umatilla High school's Ben Knowles on the
flank during first half action Friday at Pirates field in Crystal River.





Pirates thankful


C ytLRwver notches rsJt district win over Umatdla


Former Olympian
Walt Hazzard dies
LOS ANGELES Walt
Hazzard, the former UCLA
and NBA star who played on
the Bruins' first NCAA cham-
pionship basketball team in
1964 and later coached the
team for four seasons in the
1980s, has died. He was 69
The school says Hazzard
died Friday at UCLA Ronald
Reagan Medical Center after
a long illness.
Hazzard was co-captain of
the 1964 national title team
under coach John Wooden.
Hazzard helped the U.S.
win a gold medal at the 1964
Tokyo Olympics and played
10 years in the NBA, includ-
ing stints with the Los Ange-
les Lakers, who made him a
first-round selection.
During his four years as
UCLA coach, the Bruins had
a 77-47 record. Following his
coaching career, Hazzard
worked as a West Coast ad-
vance scout for the Lakers
and served as a special con-
sultant to the team.
NFL issues
$100,000 in fines
NEW YORK Four Detroit
Lions, including quarterback
Matthew Stafford, and two
Chicago Bears were fined
Friday by the NFLfor incidents
in their game last Sunday.
Stafford instigated a scuffle
when he grabbed the helmet
of Bears defensive back D. J.
Moore and threw him to the
ground. Stafford was fined
$7,500, while Moore was hit
for $15,000 for striking back
at Stafford and being ejected.
Also docked $15,000 was
Lions rookie DT Nick Fairley
for driving Bears QB Jay Cut-
ler into the ground.
Chicago receiver Earl Ben-
nett was fined $10,000 for
wearing orange shoes, his
second uniform violation.
Detroit DE Kyle Vanden
Bosch was docked $7,500 for
unnecessary roughness: Van-
den Bosch threw Bears RB
Matt Forte to the ground late.
Detroit guard Rob Sims
also was hit for $7,500 for a
late tackle.
Baltimore quarterback Joe
Flacco was fined $7,500 for a
horse-collar tackle on Seattle
linebacker David Hawthorne,
who had intercepted a pass.
Ravens defensive tackle
Atu oes was fned $h7,5

violation following an exchange

Cundff kicked fel Bold

nessee-Carolina game, all for
striking an opponent in the
face or facemask. Fined were
Panthers tackles Byron Bell
and Jordan Gross and defen-
sive end Charles Johnson.
Gross' hit was on William
Hayes, while Johnson fouled
Titans tackle David Stewart.
Titans safety Michael Grif-
fin was fined the same
amount for a late hit in the
head area with his helmet.
Browns guard Shawn Lau-
vao also received a $7,500
fine for unnecessary rough-
ness in a loss to Houston on
Nov. 6. He head-butted
Houston LB Brian Cushing.
MLB players, ownerS
reach verbal deal


Get in the Game/B2
College football/B3
H Scoreboard/B4
Golf/B5
H Entertainment/B6


HPaterno
diagnosed
with lung
cancer/B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press

A1VES, Iowa Jeff
Woody scored on a 4-yard
run in the second overtime
and Iowa State stunned sec-
ond-ranked Oklahoma State
37-31 on Friday night, de-
railing the Cowboys' na-
tional title hopes.
The Cyclones (6-4, 3-4 Big
12) overcame a 17-point
deficit to beat the Cowboys
(10-1, 7-1 Big 12), who were


just a win away from a
showdown with rival Okla-
homa for a likely spot in the
BCS title game.
Oklahoma State quarter-
back Brandon Weeden's
first pass in the second
overtime was intercepted
by Leonard Johnson. Woody
then bullied his way into
the end zone to give the Cy-
clones their first victory
over a top-five opponent in
school history


Weeden threw for 476
yards, but had three inter-
ceptions as the Cowboys
turned it over five times.
It was the first time the
Cyclones had ever beaten
such a highly ranked oppo-
nent.
The loss by the CowboyS
leaves LSU as the only un-
beaten team in college foot-
ball.
The Cowboys next play
No. 5 Oklahoma.


CIC ~ 1.1%7 W~ Ip
Associated Press
Oklahoma State running back Joseph Randle fumbles
the ball as he is hit by lowa State defensive back
Jacques Washington, linebacker C.J. Morgan and de-
fensive end Jake Lattimer on Friday during the first half
in Ames, iowa.


Dr. Ron Joseph
DOCTOR'S
ORDERS


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The Crystal River boys
attacked the Umatilla
goal early and often in
Friday's district soccer
match at Earl Bramlett
Stadium.
But they had nothing
to show for their efforts
at the half, with the
scored knotted at zero.
That all changed


when the Pirates (4-2, 1-
1) scored a pair of goals
in the first 12 minutes
after the break and
added one more in the
65th minute to earn
their first district victory
in a 3-1 win over the
Bulldogs (0-5, 0-2).
Crystal River coach
Bobby Verlato was espe-
cially pleased with the
timing of the triumph.
"That was big," he
said. "We really needed


that one going into
Thanksgiving break. It
ended our losing streak
and got us a district
win."
Senior forward Don-
nie Dewees, junior mid-
fielder Travis Swanson,
and senior forward
Jimmy Tully were
among those Pirates
making their presence
felt deep in Bulldog ter-
ritory much of the night.
Their aggression didn't


pay off, however, until
they were able to better
employ their passing
game and team offense.
"In the first half, we
controlled the game for
the most part, but it
looked like we were try-
ing to jam the ball in the
middle too much, and
Donnie was trying to do
too much," Crystal River
coach Bobby Verlato

See Page B4


reBvaseballl

five-year labor
px owheaev a
reached an
ihen they met


rehd a tetal
agreement on a
2,nntract ndbhol
Negotiators rt
understanding w
late Thursday at
Continental O'H
mont, Ill., a pers
with the negotia~
Associated Pres
The last item
was the luxury t;
payroll teams.
Under the agr
will be a new re~
amount of money
each year to sig
from the amateur
teams going ovt
being penalized
luxury tax.


O~k dh nchState

right, stands
next to assis-
tant coach Mi-
randa Serna on
Nov. 9 during
an exhibition
game against
Fort Hays State
in stillwater,
Okla., Budke
and Serna were
killed in a plane
crash Thursday
in Arkansas.
Budke was3560,

Th n we cached
together for a
decade.
Associated Press


Budke, Serna coached together for a decade


Behind a scintillating
45-point game from An-
drea Riley, the Cowgirls
upset the sixth-ranked
Sooners for the first time
in nine years.
Wherever Budke went,
he won.
The charismatic coach
who turned the Cowgirls
into an NCAA tourna-
ment regular was killed
along with assistant
coach Miranda Serna
and two other people in a
plane crash in Arkansas
late Thursday. The two
coaches, who first united
as player and coach 16
years ago, had been on a


Associated Press


recruiting trip.
Budke, 56, frequently
offered his players en-
couragement from the
sidelines, but he also
could be firm, raising his
deep voice. And on more
than one occasion, he
grabbed a microphone to
speak to the Gallagher-
Iba Arena crowd after a
win.
"Coach Budke was a
ball coach. What he did
to turn this program
around was unbelievable
but that's not important
right now," said Jim Littell,


the Inter- STILLWATER, Okla. -
are in Rose- Kurt Budke believed in
on familiar Oklahoma State when no
tions told The one else did, and he was-
;s. n't afraid to show it.
to fall in place Less than two years
ax on high- after his Cowgirls failed
to win any of their 16 con-
eement, there ference games, Budke
straint on the led them up against pow-
a team spends erhouse Oklahoma and
n selections reigning national player
Ir draft, with of the year Courtney
er a threshold Paris. He supported his
with a type of upstart team with quite
the fashion statement:
-From wire reports the brightest orange
blazer he could find.


Rage B5


No. 2 Okla. State upset


lowa State wins dobzkle-overtime thriller 37-31


Tread




here dos lif o
treadmill" fit?
While a treadmill
seems like it would be bene-
ficial, there is a lurking risk
to be aware. There are
many reasons why people
may need to work out on a
treadmill. It's hot and buggy,
too cold and dry, they're in a
hurry to play bridge or go to
work, they're coddling an in-
jury or putting a baby in a
swing for a nap.
Time is precious, and the
treadmill is convenient. It is
a quick, handy tool to be
able to get in your daily
workout.
Treadmills follow the
laws of physics. The No. 1
law is that once a body is in
motion and is launched
from the treadmill, it is
going to impact something
behind or on the side.
There are standards for
treadmills, and the simplest
is the safe clear distance of
5 feet behind the treadmill.
The most common injury is
not being able to keep up
with the tr ck ortripn
ad being th own ff bhn
the machine, colliding with




People with balance prob-cl
lem sforatny reaso Ishol
avoidth oluse of a treadmil

Anyone i unablien to san on

Ponlefo with eynes closed


should avoid use of this
form of exercise. This is not
a sobriety test, but a great
way to avoid a disaster:
In my orthopedic surgery
experience, I have seen sev-
eral terrible accidents and
severe injuries. Several
were due to reading or
watching TV while on the
treadmill. One patient was
trying to change the channel
See Page B4


Oklahoma State coaches killed in plane crash
























































.. -F' -


.: -rl
"


--- --_ - -
-- -
' _


-


Special to the Chaonicle
Flag football players from the Blue
and Pink team await the snap Thursday
night during adult flag football action.
JOE KORNECKI III/For the Chaonicle
Flatliners pitcher Tammy Adams
delivers a pitch Thursday during their
bachS aainasmsThea SeahmingdaSo tal
in the Citrus County Parks Coed Adult
Softball League at Bicentennial Park. In
Game 1, Just Us defeated Plain White
T's 13-12 in a competitive game. Elite
Roofing defeated The Stingers 21-8 in
the second game, and in the third con-
test, The Screaming Softball Club de-
feated the Flatliners 22-5.


Men's Softball
standings
(Through Nov. 16)
Reflections Church
Mike Scott Plumbing
TEAM EXTREME
Couch Potatoes
R.C. Lawn Care
Windshield Man
The Screaming Softball Club
The 01' Guys


bow 300

Special to the Chronicle

CongratulationS
Lori Ciquera rolled a per-
fect game in the second
game of the Monday Night
Special league on Nov 7, be-
coming the second woman
to roll a 300 at Parkview
Lanes. Her first game was a
242, and the third was a 163,
giving her a 705 series.
League and tournament
scores for the week ending
Nov. 13:
Monday Night Special
Handicap: Todd Cridland
287; Eric Glowacki 268,731;
Dennis Iverson 747; Robert
Smith 731; Lori Ciquera
328,789; Terry Brown 263;
Melissa Burgoyne 742.


Girls' volleyball club
forming for teens
A new volleyball club, Reflect
Sports Volleyball Club, is
forming for girls ages 14 to 17
from any school.
Tryouts will be from 2 to 4:30
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, at Crystal
River High School.
For more information, call
Coach Mike Ridley at (352)
897-4368 or email ridleym@
citrus.kl 2.fl.us.
'Kicks For Kids' kickball
coming up in Dec.
Were you picked last for kick-
ball in grammar school? Were


Scratch: Todd Cridland
279,694; Eric Glowacki
268,731; Lori Ciquera
300,705; Terry Brown 227;
Dorine Fugere 580.
Preserve PinbusterS
Handicap: Bob Swarm
252,684; Larry Kirk 251,699;
Bessie Skill 254,665; Joyce
Swarm 230,649. Scratch:
Bob Swarm 225,603; Larry
Kirk 224,618; Joyce Swarm
170,469; Sharon Mason 163;
Jan Miller 440.
Suncoast Seniors
Handicap: Murphy
Combs 282; Ernie Wiemann
255,708; Julie Nagengast
264,704; Pat Combs 249,639.
Scratch: Murphy Combs
268,582; Marty Suchowicz
203,555; Pat Combs 190;
Julie Nagengast 186,470;
Barb Steffen 463.
Ladi s' Cla si
Handicap: Melissa Sim-
mons 266,714; Judy Hind-
baugh 257,703. Scratch:
Melissa Simmons 199,513;


you ever referred to as the
"easy out" in dodge ball? Well,
now that you've finally grown
and have spent some time in a
gym or learned that fun is how
you make it, here's your chance
to redeem yourself.
Boys & Girls Club of Citrus
County will host its first "Kicks
for Kids" kickball tournament
fundraiser, presented by Dillons
Irish Pub, on Saturday, Dec. 3,
at Whispering Pines Park in In-
verness. This tournament is for
adults 18 and older.
It's time to reinvent your
childhood; to change the
course of those bad playground
memories. Gather your cowork-


Judy Hindbaugh 184,484.
Late Starters
Handicap: Bob
Desmeules 274,659; Art Tre-
bon 253; Marty Suchowicz
658; Rosemarie Marcucci
246,630; Debbe Chung 237;
Trina Paliwoda 615; Joan
Cothern 615. Scratch: Ted
Rafanan 220,561; Art Tre-
bon 214; Marty Suchowicz
562; Rosemarie Marcucci
201,495; Fran Barlow
180,486.
Wednesday Night Men
Handicap: Chuck Hind-
baugh 318; Lenny Oakeson
285; Larry Fritz 764; Tim
Lawrence 759. Scratch:
Chuck Hindbaugh 588; Tim
Lawrence 279,759; Larry
Fritz 722.
Parkview Lanes
Women's Trio
Handicap: Mae Johns 238;
Carolyn Woodward 229,676;
Marlene Brown 632.
Scratch: Mae Johns 187;
Fran Barlow 181,496; Jane


Terrell 464.
Good Time Bowlers
Handicap: Dave Messen-
ger 223,652; Mike Hughes
216,594; Dorothy Larson
349; Jan Harvey 233,660;
Debbie Littlefield 631;
Laura Bonadonna 631.
Scratch: Dave Messenger
188,547; Ken McNally 167;
Rocky Sincore 457; Janet
Murray 181,491; Laura
Bonadonna 173,472.
Holder Hotshots
Handicap: Lyle Ternes
275,698; Norm Wiest 265;
Larry Clark 718; Tammy
Woodburn 277; Tina Good-
man 266; Phyllis Ternes 770;
Diane Mauck 699. Scratch:
Lyle Ternes 220,557; Jim
Van Gilder 216; Eddie Cor-
bitt 576; Tammy Woodburn
185; Judy Hindbaugh
180,499; Diane Mauck 471.
Parkview Owls
Handicap: Bob
Desmeules 322; Ives
Chavez306; George Munzing


Special to the Chronicle
The Twisted Oaks Bandits (Saturday morning league) de-
cided to try their skills at bowling last Sunday. Pictured, in
no order: Bob and Pat Doerr, Jack and Mary Grisbeck, Vinny
and Carol George, and Bob and Joan Ruggere.


818; Jim Randle 810; Bar-
bara Rennekamp 308,787;
Bridget Foley 295,808.
Scratch: Ives Chavez 248;
Ted Rafanan 228,660;
George Munzing 641; Lisa
Morgan 222,506; Debbe


Pepper Creek Trail on Saturday,
Nov. 26. There will be seven
bird walks offered at the wildlife
park this season running
through April 2012.
Experienced birders will lead
the walk on this trail, one of 19
birding trails in Citrus County
that are part of the West Sec-
tion of the Great Florida Birding
Trail. Participants should meet
at 7:45 a.m. at the entrance to
the park's visitor center and the
bird walk will begin at 8 a.m.
Binoculars and a field guide are
recommended.
For more information, call
(352) 628-5343, ext. 1002 or
visit www.floridastateparks.org.


Chung 208; Myla Wexler 523.
Bowlers of the Week
Lori Ciquera, 141 pins
over her average, and Ernie
Wiemann, 108 pins over his
average.


Fishing club heading to
St. Augustine
The Beverly Hills Fishing
Club is preparing to visit the na-
tion's oldest city St. Augus-
tine for a "Holly Jolly
Christmas" on Dec. 15 and 16.
The trip includes an
overnight stay in a ocean-front
hotel, four meals, a narrated
Jolly Trolly ride, lunch at the
Columbia restaurant and a
Christmas lighting display.
For more information, call
Pat at (352) 257-9328.
The club is also planning a
trip to the Show Palace Dinner
Theater in Hudson on Dec. 18.


Recreation IEVIENTS5


ers, friends, family, whatever it
takes to form a team of 11 to 15
players. Teams must be co-ed,
with a minimum of four women
per team. Don't have enough
for a team? Register and we
will form a team of "free agents"
who are eager to play.
Corporate sponsorships are
available for teams, as well. Is
your team better than that of
your fellow businessmen? Is
your organization up for chal-
lenging another? Call them out
and we will help. Challenges
will be posted on the website
and on the Boys & Girls Clubs'
Facebook page.
Detailed information and reg-


istration forms can be found on
the website at
www.citrusbgc.com, or call
Suzanne Clemente at (352)
621-9225. Registration forms
are also available at Dillons
Irish Pub in downtown Inver-
ness or at Whispering Pines
Park.
Homosassa wildlife
park to host bird walk
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park, in coopera-
tion with Citrus County Audubon
Society, will host the first of the
season's monthly bird walks on


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO ADULT SPORTS





CITRUS~u CONYSEDA ITN H I1 UDOSYU


GE


HI3E


IN


ME


Flag football, softball in high gear


Adurlt kickball

bas~ketbatll sty-up

deadline Monday
JENNIFER WORTHINGTON
Special to the Chronicle


Field 4 Rcp
Mike Scott Plumbing 21, Windshield
Man 1
Team Extreme 17, The Screaming Soft-
ball Club 8
Field 5
R.C. Lawn Care 12, The Ol' Guys 11 -
Mario Jenkins hit a solo home run for The
Ol' Guys.
Reflections Church 14, Couch Potatos 13
- Reflections Church used major-league
strategy intentionally walking Couch Po-
tatoes' Kyle Metz, who had already home-
red twice, in the bottom of the seventh
inning with men on second and third.
The next batter grounded out presery-
ing the one-run victory for Reflections
Church.
Deadline looms for Men's
Adult Basketball
The deadline to sign up for a Men's
Adult Basketball team is Monday, Nov. 21.
Games will be played Monday and
Wednesday nights at local school gyms.
Players must be 18 and older:
The first scheduled game will be 6:30
p.m. Monday, Nov. 28. Call Jennifer Wor-
thington at (352) 527-7547.
Sign up for Co-ed Kickball league
The deadline to sign up for Coed Adult
Kickball is Monday, Nov 21. Games will be
played at 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. Wednes-
day nights at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River.
Players must be 18 and older. Teams are
comprised of 11players with three-female
minimum in kicking lineup and on the
field.
The first scheduled game will be on
Wednesday, Nov. 30. Call Jennifer
Worthington at (352) 527-7547.


-. LI


Perfect game for Ciquera at Parkview Lanes






CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 B3


No. 1LSU ( 0, 6-) vs. o 12LM ian state
Mississippi (2-8, 0-6) (8-2, 51) vs. Indiana
7 p.m.(ESPN) (1-9, 0-6)


Associated Press

TAMPA When Skip
Holtz took over one of col-
lege football's fastest grow-
ing programs at South

tea with knaco st ma
bling in the Big East while
shining against marquee
non-conference opponents.
ho 1tmnucehdin tha r grd
who face Miami on Satur-
day with a chance to slap a
happy face on a season
that's gone downhill after
an attention-grabbing vic-
tory over Notre Dame fu-
eled a steady climb to a No.
15 national ranking in Sep-
tember.
Four straight losses to
begin league play ruined
the prospect of USF (5-4)
challenging for its first Big
East title, although beating
the tradition-rich Hurricanes
for the second time in four
meetings not only would re-
store some luster but make
the Bulls bowl eligible for the
seventh consecutive season.
"It's big from a national
image standpoint," Holtz
said. "It's a great opportu-
nity for us to make a splash,
playing programs like this
that have won national
championships, and show-
ing progress and what this
program is doing."
In addition to beating
Notre Dame on the road to
begin this season, the Bulls
have signature wins in re-
cent years over a number of
big-name BCS programs,
including Florida State,
Auburn and Clemson. Last
year's 23-20 overtime win at
Miami cost former Hurri-
canes coach Randy Shan-
non his job.
Miami (5-5) has had a
rollercoaster season in its
first year under Shannon's
replacement, Al Golden.


Line: LSU by 30%2. Series: LSU leads 56-39-4.
KEY MATCHUP
LSU s defense vs. Mississippi's depleted of-
fense. The Tigers' defense already was ex-

petd to atveaea ai ay agaes tkiss nag r her

Jeff Scott will be suspended for Saturday's
game. Now LSU really has the upper hand.
No. 3 Alabama (9-1,


12:01 p.m. (Big Ten Network)
Line: Michigan State by 28. Series:
Michigan State leads 40-15-2.
KEY MATCHUP

Stalr'sdifne oesni h s dnue f esh-

might be his biggest test yet when he goes up
against the Spartans, whose defense is ranked
fourth in the nation against the pass.


2 p.m.(PPV)
Line: N/A. Series: First meeting.
KEY MATCHUP
Alabama s defense vs. triple option. Tide
coach Nick Saban said he and his staff started
studying how to defend this offense in the off-
season. The nation's top defense faces a team
that has scored 37 rushing touchdowns, is av-
enaging 320.4 yards a game on the ground and
has nine players with at least 100 rushing
yards.
No. 4 Oreg~on (9-1, 7-0)
vs. No. 18 USC (8-2, 52)
8 p.m.(ABC)
Line:0Oregon byl4%/. Series:
USC leads 37-18-2.
KEY MATCHUP
Oregon's rushing offense vs. USC's rushing
defense. The Ducks are averaging just under
292 yards on the ground per game, best in the
Pac-12 and fifth in the nation. They're paced by
the nation's leading rusher, LaMichael James,
who is averaging nearly 151 yards a game.
USC is allowing only about 100 yards rushing

Te Trjn cel Wsigo to o6 yad h-
ing last week.
No. 5 Oklahoma (8-1 '
51) at No. 25 Baylor
(6-3, 3-3)
8 p.m.(ABC)
Line:0Oklahoma by l5%/. Series:
Oklahoma leads 20-0.
KEY MATCHUP
Oklahoma QB Landry Jones vs. Baylor QB
Robert Griffin. The duo are the Big 12's most
prolii offense ep ayers Griffin issecond in the
while Jones is third with 375 yards. Jones leads
the Big 12 with 372 yards passing a game (third
with 28 TDs), while Griffin is the best in pass ef-
ficiency with 3,093 yards, 29 touchdowns and
only five interceptions.
No. 6 Arkansas (9-1,
&1) vs. Mississippi
State (5-5, 1-5)
3:30 p.m.(CBS)
Line: Arkansas by 13. Series:
KYMAr~kansas leads 14-6-1.
Arkansas' receives vs. Mississippi State s
secondary. Johnthan Banks is second on the
Bulldogs' career charts with 12 interceptions, in-
cluding fie this season, and fellow comneltack
Corey Broomfield has nine career picks of his
own. The duo will face one of the top receiving
corps in the country, including SEC-leader Jar-
ius Wright, who is averaging 100.7 yards recev-
ing per game.
No. 7 Clemson (9-1, 6-1)
at North Carolina State
(&-5, 2-4)
3:30 p.m.(CBS)
Line: Clemson by 7/2. Series:
Clemson leads 51-27-1.
KEY MATCHUP
paClemsones Tds ffe evs. N.CnState's
Watkins connection has been the ACC's most
dangerous big-play combination, but Boyd was
intercepted twice by Georgia Tech in the Tigers
only loss. That could play into the hands of N.C.
State's David Amerson, who has 10 intercep-
tions three more than any other player in the
nation, and more than 66 other FBS teams.
No. 8 Stanford (9-1, 7-1)
vs. California (6-4, 3-4)
10:15 pm(ESPN)
Line: Stanfor byl8%/. Series:
Stanford leads 56-46-11.
KEY MATCHUP
Cal RB Isi Sofele vs. Stanford front seven.
Sofele has rushed for 328 yards the past two
weeks against Washington State and Oregon
State to pace a running attack that averaged
294 yards per game in the two wins. The task
will be much tougher against a Cardinal team
that leads the Pac-12 in run defense at 94.2
yards per game despite allowing 277 yards
rushing in the loss to Oregon.
No. 10 Boise State
(8-1, 3-1) at San DiegIo
State (6-3, 3-2)
8 p.m.(CBS Sports Network)
Line: Boise State by 18. Series: First meeting.
KEY MATCHUP
Boise State QB Kellen Moore vs. San
Diego State's fast, blitzing 3-3-5 defense.
More whoha been s cked just fi times
against TCU, will face an Aztecs defense that
leads the Mountain West in pass defense at
174.2 yards per game.
No. 11 Houston (10-0 ?
6-0) vs. SMU (6-4, 4-2)
3:30 p.m.(FSN)
Line: Houston by 20. Series Record:
Houston leads 16-9-1.
KEY MATCHUP
Houston QB Case Keenum vs. SMU de-
feanse. Keu mha thrown 23 tochhe m-
pleted 74 percent of his throws this season. But
SMU's defense is a cut above the ones Keenum
has been dissecting over the past month, rank-
ingth3rdp ntioal ow3d45 yards pr game) and

No. 13 Georgia
(8-2, 6-1) vs. Kentucky
(4-5, 1-5)
12:20 p.m.(SEC Network)
Line: Geo gia sy3 '/.1 Sies:
KEY MATCHUP
Georgia RB Isaiah Crowell vs. Kentucky
linebackers Danny Trevathan and Winston Guy
Trevathan has 118 tackles to lead the SEC, plus
four interceptions and three forced fumbles.
Guy, listed as a linebacker/safety, has 102
201ps a owe l, ares man,t ueacdhd G rg wII
and Carlton Thomas each rushed for more than
100 yards in last week's 45-7 win over No. 24
Auburn.


Noon (Pay-perview)
Line: None. Series:
South Carolina leads 39-7-3.
KEY MATCHUP
South Carolina's defense vs. the Citadel's
triple-option attack. The Gamecocks were stung
for 274 yards rushing and trailed Navy 21-17 in
the second half before pulling out a 24-21 vic-
tory. The Citadel is third in the Football Subdivi-
sion at 291 yards rushing a game.
No. 15 Wisconsin (8-2 '
4-2) vs. Illinois (6-4, 2-4)
Noon (ESPN2)
Line:Wisconsin by l4%/. Series:
Illinois leads, 36-34-7.
KEY MATCHUP
Wisconsin linebackers Mike Taylor and
Chris Borland vs. Illinois quarterback Nathan
Scheelhaase. Taylor and Borland are Nos. 1
and 2 in tackles in the Big Ten with 108 and
102, respectively. They're two of the primary
reasons the Badgers allow just 15.8 points a
game. Score that many, and the Illini actual y
would improve on their average 11.2 over

tS hehae r hs srruagle I ve etched
those of the offense, to breathe a little fire into
Illinois. Zook said this week he d like him to
spread the ball around to more receivers and
Illinois is still waiting for a big rushing game from
its sophomore quarterback.
No. 16 Kansas State (8-2,
52) at Texas (6-3, 3-3)
8 p.m.(Fx)
Line:Texas by 8%/. Series:
Kansas State leads 6-5

Kn~sA S~tt PB Collin Klein vs. Texas LB
Emmanuel Acho. Klein has been a touchdown
machine using his legs to power Kansas State's
rushing attack. Acho is Texas' leading tackle and
is coming off a dominant performance against
Missourl. Klein and Acho figure to meet often,
andd wther' at te ie ofsac baoge orhc
team wins. The Long horns rank 10th nationally
against the run.
No. 17 Nebraska (8-2,
4-2) at No. 20 MichigIan
(8-2, 4-2)
Noon (ESPN)
Line: Michigan by 3%/. Series:
Michigan leads 3-2-1.
KEY MATCHUP
Michigan QB Denard Robinson vs. Ne-
braska s defense. The Cornhuskers have
struggled against mobile quarterbacks and
no one who takes snaps is more elusive than
Robinson. He, however, has struggled to
hv cnist ntses thi I tao ru her

Rich Rodriguez. Robinson has lost three fum-
tb os and trown two interceptions the past

No. 19 TCU (8-2, 50) vs.
Colorado St. (3-6, 1-3)
3:30 p.m.(Vemsus)
Line:TCU by 33%/.Series:TCU leads 7-1.
KEY MATCHUP
Colorado State RB Chris Nwoke vs. TCU
defense. Nwoke has rushed for 481 yards (7.1

snc b cmng tohveesrstepr The eoeph aor ran
for 232 yards last week against San Diego
State. TCU is the league's top rushing defense,

noedthre indidua 10-d Oerydmr s thsha-
season,
No. 21 Penn State
(8-2, 51) at Ohio State
(6-4, 3-3)
3:30 p.m.(ABC)
Line:0Ohio State by 7. Series:0Ohio State
leads 13-12.
KEY MATCHUP
Ohio State QB Braxton Miller vs. Penn
State s defense. A week ago, Purdue
crowded the line of scrimmage to shut down
the run and dared Miller to pass in the Boiler-
makers' 26-23 overtime win. For the most
part, the Buckeyes could t throw the ball,
wk2 Mi es. If Bed ik Aard jto dfensiesor
player) semifinalist DT Devon Still and Co.
can put the clamps on Miller and Dan "Boom
Herron running the ball, the Buckeyes could
be in trouble.
No. 23 Florida State
(7-3, 52) vs. Virginia
(7-3, 4-2)
7:30 p.m.(ESPN 2)
Line: Florida State by 17%/. Series:
Florida State leads 14-2.
KEY MATCHUP
Virginia's offensive line vs. the Florida State
pasruh wiih hoanns vi0t en tonal yw tho y
eight sacks this season to rank 10th in protect-
ing its quarterback. The Cavaliers have not sur-
rendered a sack in their last 86 pass attempts. A
trio of Seminole ends -Cornelius Carradine,
Brandon Jenkins and Bjoern Werner have
eombie fr l4. if he Iaka sophomore
State's defense ranks fourth in rushing defense
fifth in total defense and sixth in scoring de-
fense.
No. 24 Notre Dame (7-3)
vs. Boston CollegIe (3-7)
4 p.m.(NBC)
Line: Notre Dame by 24%/. Series:
Notre Dame leads 11-9.
KEY MATCHUP

Dam L Mat Teeo. OK tst e vsya Nte
matchup since they won t be on the field at the
same time. But Kuechly and Te o have similar
ferocious styles and might be the two best line-
backers in the country. Kuechly leads the nation
in both tackles (168) and solo tackles (89), and
needs only 15 more to reach Boston College's
caree reecordeofe v2.eTo d caddat hfo pee
slowed much of the last month with an ankle in-
jury, yet still leads the Irish with 91 tackles and 4
1/2 sacks.


Associated Press
Miami quarterback Jacory Harris runs past Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan
for a 28-yard gain Nov. 12 in Tallahassee.


with the exception of con-
secutive wins over North
Carolina and Georgia Tech
in mid-October, the Hurri-
canes have followed a con-
sistent pattern of lose one
game, win the next.
The 'Canes, coming off a
23-19 loss at Florida State,
will become bowl-eligible if
the trend continues against
USE The Bulls snapped
their four-game losing
streak by beating Big East
foe Syracuse 37-17.
Even with a loss, Miami
can become bowl eligible
by winning its regular-sea-
son finale at home against
Boston College. USF would
have two more cracks at it,
facing Louisville and West
Virginia at home.
Holtz said Miami's de-
fense, led by linebacker


Sean Spence, will test B.J.
Daniels and the rest of the
USF offense.
"A lot of these players
played together. A lot of
them played against each
Other. A lot of them played
on All-Star teams together.
There are a lot of relation-
ships that go back and forth
on each team," Holtz said.
"So I'm sure the cell
phones will be burning up
back and forth. There will
be a lot of trash-talking
going on back and forth,
That's kind of what a rivalry
game and geographical ri-
valry game creates for the
players. The fan base, the
bragging rights, recruiting,
all those things makes it ex-
citing. We're excited to have
the opportunity"
So are the Hurricanes.


"we kmow we re playing a
great team that has a lot of
talent, lot of athletes. They're
basically a lot like us, have
a lot of speed, a very mobile
quarterback and they have
one of the best defensive lines
in the country," Spence said.
Receiver LaRon Byrd
conceded payback is a mo-
tivation, too.
"It's tough to avoid, but
you've definitely got to stay
focused. They were a team
that came in here last year
and changed our whole
program around," Byrd
said. "The university made
a lot of changes. So it's time
for us to go in there, go to
their hometown and come
out with a victory. We can't
blame this season on any-
thing. We've got to go in
there and play ball."




With F SU


100mill,





muSt-W111


for Gators

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE This is
what is has come to at
Florida: The Gators proba-
bly need to beat lower divi-
sion Furman to guarantee
making a 21st consecutive
bowl game.
Sure, Florida (5-5) still

aainst No. 2wN Flda Statte
to get that all-important
sixth victory. But consider-
ing the Gators haven't
beaten a team with a win-
ning record all season, fac-
ing a must-win against the
streaking Seminoles would-
n't be the ideal situation.
So Saturday's game
against the Paladins (6-4) is
somewhat important, cer-
tainly more so than anyone
would have expected be-
fore the season.
Although the Gators
haven't talked about bowl
eligibility, they realize what
it would mean to keep the
streak intact, get extra
practice time in December
and maybe salvage the pro-
gram's worst season in
more than 20 years.
The Gators haven't had to
worry about bowl eligibility
this late in the season since
1978.
"For me, it's about play-
ing better, it's about coach-
ing better," Muschamp said.
"And if you do that, then
things will take care of
themselves. We've had our
opportunities in the past
four weeks to do that and
we haven't exactly closed it
out. But I don't know that
bowl eligibility should be a
motivating factor for you as

he' Paladins don't seem
intimidated about playing
the Gators, who have strug-
gled to score points and
stop the run much of the
season.
"I feel like it isn't any-
thing I haven't played
against before," Furman
offensive tackle Ryan Lee
said. "They are good foot-
ball players, but they lace
up their cleats just like we
do. They're 20-, 21-, 22-
year-old guys just like all
of us.")


Vir iniaiqucar rbac MIc Ie Rocco looks for a receiver in the first half against Maryland
Nov* *n Colg ak



For~~~~~~ Vigna etn

means~~~~ so tC il


ranked 23rd, has long for-
gotten about an early-season,
three-game losing streak.
"We put it to rest a long
time ago," Fisher said.
Florida State's chances
for an ACC title were pretty
well snuffed out by early
October following back-to-
back losses to Atlantic Di-
vision rivals Clemson and
Wake Forest.
The Cavaliers, mean-
while, still have a shot at
the ACC title.
Virginia (7-3, 4-2 ACC)
needs to win Saturday and
then defeat Virginia Tech
to reach the ACC title game
for the first time.
Both the Seminoles and
Cavaliers come into the game
with modest win streaks.
The Seminoles (7-3, 5-2)
own a five-game winning
streak while Virginia has
won three straight.
Virginia will have to con-


tend with one of the na-
tion's stingiest defenses if
it hopes to upset the Semi-
noles, who come into their
homecoming game nearly
a three touchdown favorite
among bettors.
The Cavs' Perry Jones is
144 yards shy of reaching
1,000 in his junior campaign
while freshman teammate
Kevin Parks has tacked on
another 616 yards rushing.
But they'll have todo itagainst
the fourth best defense na-
tionally against the run.
In addition to blocking
for the running backs, Vir-
ginia's offensive line has
done an equally fine job
protecting quarterback
Michael Rocco. The Cava-
liers have surrendered
only eight sacks all season
and none in their last 86
pass attempts. But they'll
be going against one of the
country's best pass rushes.


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State wraps up the
home portion of its schedule
Saturday against Virginia
in what many of its fans are
likely to remember as the
season that got away.
The 23rd-ranked Semi-
noles started the year as a
heavy favorite to win the
Atlantic Coast Conference,
but fell out of contention
for all practical purposes
in the first five weeks of the
season.
Virginia, on the other
hand, wasn't picked to go
anywhere and still has
hopes of winning the ACC
Coastal Division.
Coaches for both schools
claim they're not thinking
about anything else but
Saturday's game.
Florida State's Jimbo
Fisher says his team, now


Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Texas
already knew what the rest
of the Big 12 had to find
out: Kansas State quarter-
back Collin Klein is tough
to tackle and nearly impos-
sible to keep out of the end
zone.
Klein got a surprise
starting call shortly before
Longhorns and Wildcats
met last season and rushed


for 127 yards and two
touchdowns in a 39-14
Kansas State romp.
The teams meet again
Saturday night and Texas
(6-3, 3-3 Big 12) certainly
remembers last season's
loss to Klein and the No. 16
Wildcats (8-2, 5-2).
Klein averages 101
yards rushing, ranking
second in the conference.
He ran for five touch-
downs and passed for an-


other last week in a
thrilling overtime win
over Texas A&M.
Several Texas players
compared Klein to former
Florida quarterback Tim
Tebow, yet all Longhorns
linebacker Jordan Hicks
sees is a quarterback he
can hit.
"We've got to hammer
him," Hicks said. "We al-
ways want to hit the quar-
terback."


USF looks to make splash against UM


6-1) vs. Ga. Southern No. 14 South Carolina
(9-1,7-1)(8-2) vs. Citadel (4-6)


K~ State looks to repeat against Texas






B4 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011



Crystal River 3,
Umatilla 1
Bulldogs 0 1 1
rcotr g: UB -Whitte3 (Mendez assist) 67:35.
CR -- Dewees (Crawford Assist) 45:15; Tully
(Dewees assist) 51:30; Moschello (Swanson
assist) 64:15 Shots: CR 24, UB 20. Saves: UB
1,C1Rd. records: UB (0-5, 0-2 district); CR (4-

Locanto 6, Gainesville 0
GainesvilleO 0 0
Lecanto 3 3 6
Scoring: Lecanto Jacob Sims (unassisted)
6:48. Hunter Brower (unassisted-free kick)
10:20. Fernandez-Davila (Sims assist) 35:15.
Sims (Cortalano assist) 47:20. Michael Schenck
(unassisted) 54:50. Schenck (Fernandez-Davila
assist)70.40. Gainesvine nsov 5.Svs:
Lecanto- 3, Gainesville- 5. Records :Lecanto
(3-0-1), Gainesville (1-6)


Eustis 4, Citrus 2
Eustis 2 2 4
Citrus 1 1 2
Scoring: Eustis -Lauren Smith (Brooke Smith
asst) 1 :-04;ikLaauree Smith sAia Keen: a
Brooke Smith (unassisted) 25:00; Citrus Jes-
sc Lammer (eyah eMille~r asSist)os 1:9
stis 35, Citrus 15. Saves: Eustis 6, Citrus 13.
Recodis: iustis (6-0, 2-0 district); Citrus (2-2,



Le ato 86, Suth

Sumter 54
LHS 15 20 19 13
SS 18 11 11 14
Lecanto top scorers: Marie Buckley 6 2-5 17;
Paige Richards 6 1-3 16; Miranda Barber 4 3-
4 12 Megan7Straight 3 2-3 8; AnnaMaria Di-
South Sumter top scorers: Kirsti Merritt 74-7
20; Alayna Sumner 6 0-1 13; Nina Flores 3 0-0
8; K'yal Bannister 1 4-6 6

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Philadelphia 18 11 4 3 25 67 52
Pittsburgh 19 11 5 3 25 58 47
N.Y Rangers 16 10 3 3 23 47 34
New Jersey 17 9 7 1 19 45 48
N.Y Islanders 16 5 8 3 13 35 50
Northeast Divison PsG A
Buffalo 19 12 7 0 24 56 47
T rnto 1907 2 22 4 6
Boston 17 10 7 0 20 58 39
Montreal 19 8 8 3 19 49 49
Southeast Divis Tn PsG A

Washington 17 10 6 1 21 57 49
Florida 18 9 6 3 21 53 46
Tampa Bay 18 9 7 2 20 52 56
Winnipeg 19 7 9 3 17 52 61
Carolina WETE C6N11ER3NC1E5 46 68
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 19 12 4 3 27 67 53
tshov Ise 18 10 2 4
Detroit 17 9 7 1 19 45 40
Columbus 18 313 2 8 39 66
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Mnnesoto 191 2 3
Vancouver 19 9 9 1 19 56 56
Colorado 20 9 10 1 19 55 61
Calgary 17 7 9 1 15 36 45
Pacif ic Division

Los Angeles (BP }NL 03 P3 GA 4
Dallas 18 11 7 0 22 48 50
San Jose 16 10 5 1 21 49 41
Phoenix 17 9 5 3 21 47 43
Ana m: Two points for a win,40nle p nt f507
overtime loss.
Bufl ,CFril ay's Games
Colorado 3, Dallas 0
Chicago at Calgary, late
PhldlhSaturday's Ga3 sp-
Detroit at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
BtneraseN. Isaanpdaers m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m.


SCOREBOARD


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


ulCHAEL MAKSYMICZ
Correspondent

The Crystal River Lady
Pirates made easy work of
the Umatilla Bulldogs on
Friday night. Within the first
two minutes, Brooke Levins
scored the first goal, as-
sisted by Cheyenna LyonS.
Twelve minutes later,
Levins scored again, as-
sisted by L ons. Eight min-
utes later Clarissa Consol,
with the assistance of Haley
Doeawhourst katdhdeed another

From that point on it waS
downhill for the Bulldogs.
Dewhurst, unassisted,
scored two more goals, both
under the 20-minute mark.
Lyons, assisted by De-
whurst, added another goal
with ease at 35 minutes. In
the 39th minute of the first


With the end of the first
period, the Bulldogs tried to
regroup as they only crossed
midfield three times in
order to score. At the start of
the second period, De-
whurst, with only 20 seconds
off of the clock, used her
skill to score the eighth goal,
which ended the match via
mercy rule.
The i ie the Pi-
rates a 4-2-1 season. "I was
not thrilled in the first 20
minutes, as we should
have scored another goal"
head coach Bill Reyes
said. "The next 20 minutes
they gave me the four that
I wanted. I moved up my
All-County defender Jes-
Sica Reynolds and my
starting sweeper Natalie
Ezzell and in the first
minute of the second half
and you saw the result."




past Citrus
Eustis's Lauren Smith
added the final goal with
20:55 left in the game.
"It's a pleasure to play
with your team (Eustis)," said
Citrus coach Steve Ekeli. "I
think we did well. Eustis is
a tremendous team. Their
coach does a tremendous
job with them. That team
there is a Final Four team.
Second half; they took ad-
vantage of a few miscues on
our part. We did a tremendous
job staying in the game. Vic-
toria (Ekeli, the goalkeeper)
did a tremendous job.
Meghan Flaherty did a
tremendous job communi-
cating with the defense."


TEAM STATISTIcs
CRHS UMA
13 2
2 8


RECORDS
Bulldogs (0-2 District, 0-4 overall)
Pirates (0-1 District, 4-2-1 overall)

half, Cassidy Newcomer,
unassisted, raised the score
to 7-0.


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent

Eustis High forward Lau-
ren Smith scored a pair of
goals leading Eustis to a 4-2
victory over Citrus High Fri-
day night at the Citrus Bowl.
Eustis is ranked sixth
among high school girls soc-
cer teams of all classes in
Florida.
Eustis is now 6-0 overall
and 2-0 in district play. Cit-
rus is 2-2 overall and 2-1 in
the district.
Smith scored the first Eu-
stis goal at 13:04. Her sister
Brooke assisted.
Lauren Smith then added


a second goal she booted in
with two minutes left in the
first half. Alika Keene as-
sisted.
Citrus's Jesse Lammer
found the ball bounced off
the Citrus goalies hands and
booted it in. She was as-
sisted by Deycasha Miller.
The goal came at 15:19 in
the first half.
It was 2-1 Eustis at half-
time.
Keene scored two min-
utes into the second half.
She booted it in from five
yards out.
Citrus's Miller booted the
ball in from 25 yards out at
22:24.


STEVE McGUNNIGLE
Correspondent

Going into the Thanksgiv-
ing break, Lecanto boys'
soccer coach Doug Warren
will certainly hope his team
remembers how they per-
formed Friday night when
they return from the layoff.
The Panthers blanked visit-
ing Gainesville 6-0 as Jacob
Sims and Michael Schenck
scored two goals each to
lead the way.
The eyes of the Lecanto
CTOwd were certainly fixed
in the direction of the
Gainesville net for much of
the match, as Lecanto con-
trolled possession en route
to outshooting the Hurri-
canes 19-5.




SOCCER
Continued from Page B1

said.
"So I told the guys we
needed to get back to our
game in the second half. We
were playing their game,
and we needed to under-
stand we're a possession
team. We were forcing it in-
stead of creating shots."
Dewees put his team on
the board first in minute 46
with a long power shot from
the left of the goal off an as-
sist by senior defender Jerry
Crawford, who is in his first
year with the program.
"Jerry had a nice assist



SR DE RS
Continued from Page B1

without a remote control
and lost her balance, falling
off backwards and striking
her head, tearing her rota-
tor cuff and fracturing her
hand.
Several months later
when out of her coma, she
elected to walk outside in
the Florida sun and heat.
On the treadmill, there is
a distinct change in biome-
chanics, including stride
length change and the
length of time spent on the
support leg compared with
running or walking on the
ground. This can aggravate
or cause injury.
Have you ever thought
how different treadmill run-
ning or walking is than run-
ning or walking on Mother
Earth? The function of your
feet, legs and joints change
from creating a propulsive
force to simply reposition-
ing your center of mass.
This places stress on your
hips, knees and legs.
During "normal" gait, the
ground does not move; you


Sims struck first in just the
seventh minute for Lecanto
(3-0-1), streaking toward the
goal to chase a deep send.
Gainesville keeper Thomas
Moseley came out to play the
pass, but the ball deflected
off a Hurricane defender back
to Sims for the easy goal as
Moseley slid to the ground.
Less than three minutes
later, Panther Hunter
Brower's free kick from 45
yards out sailed perfectly to
the far corner and tucked in
just under the crossbar to
the back of the net for a 2-0
edge. Sims (two goals, assist)
set up Chris Fernandez-
Davila for a score with under
five minutes left in the first
half to put the match in con-
trol for Lecanto.



and ep'a 1 treaHl good de-
Six minutes later, Tully
found the net when he took
control of a Dewees pass
and raced a defender before
punching it in off the dribble,
giving his club a 2-0 lead.
Pirates senior defensive
sweeper Charley Moschello
added the third goal after
making a promise to his
coach.
"He told me, 'Put me in at
forward and I'll get you a
goal,'" Verlato said.
The play drew added cel-
ebration from teammates
for it being only the de-
fender's second goal, and
for Swanson's long set-up
assist that was launched


do. On a treadmill, it is the
opposite. When the tread-
mill belt moves, it causes
the push-off foot to "drag"
backward with the belt. This
is not a"normal" push-offas
on the stationary ground.
The result is that the body
and legs have to keep up or
be dragged with the pull of
the treadmill belt in the op-
posite direction, resulting in
increased stress on the foot,
knee and hip.
When walking, the nor-
mal number of steps per
minute is 90 to 120, or 5,400
to 7,200 steps an hour. It is
substantially higher on the
treadmill.
The increased number of
foot strikes and the forces
on the foot from the tread-
mill can aggravate or cause
back pain, plantar fasciitis,
Achilles tendinitis, ham-
string injuries, knee liga-
ment strains or meniscus
tears and hip tendinitis or
bursitis.
Pain noted at the side of
the hip at the attachment
point of several hip tendons
is hip bursitis or IT band
tendinitis. The prime cul-
prit is the lower extremity
having to pull forward the


Sims' second goal came in
the 48th minute, as John
Cortalano took the ball from
midfield middle, and made
a nice touch pass to a
streaking Sims into the box
for an easy strike in close
past the keeper.
Fernandez-Davila added
an assist to his scoresheet
on the final goal of the night,
as his free kick from near
the sideline served as a
cross to a header by
Schenck for the goal in the
71st minute. Schenck's first
goal came unassisted in the
55th minute when he picked
up a loose ball in the box on
a deflection off a
Gainesville defender.
Lecanto returns to the
pitch Nov. 28 at Hernando.




oTmP B Idog ieef ed to
back down, accumulating
shots and a few near-misses,
including a pair off the
crossbar, late in the contest
against the Pirates' formi-
dable depth.
Eventually, in minute 68,
Bulldog forward Chris Whit-
ten broke through off an as-
sist from teammate Jesus
Mendez's corner kick to
make it 3-1.
Senior goalkeeper Aaron
Bolles made five saves for
Crystal River, and Pirates
freshman Kyle Kidd added
two more saves in the final
two minutes.
Crystal plays at The Vil-
lages on Nov. 29.


center mass of the body to
keep up with the treadmill.
If you already have a
back, knee or hip problem,
avoiding the treadmill is
best. The use of the ellipti-
cal trainer or stationary
bike is preferable. Decreas-
ing the incline and adjust-
ing the speed will help with
back pain IT band aggrava-
tion, hip tendon and knee
problems.
The treadmill is a reason-
able way to work out when
time is limited, there's a
hurricane outside, the no-
see-ums are biting or King's
Bay is frozen.
Make sure you know how
to work the equipment.
Never stand on the track
when you turn it on, start
slowly and increase the
speed and warm up.
Most importantly, pay at-
tention; use the workout as
a mental time out the TV
news shows will have the
same gore, violence and
mayhem 30 minutes later.


Ron Joseph, M.D.,
orthopedic specialist, can
be reached at (352) 212-
5359 or rbjhand@cox.net.


F~r lthe record


Phori LOTTERY

Here are the
W1DDI CASH 3 (early)
brnng 5 -7 7
num ersCASH 3 (late)

S~ I~yn the a-o-7
Fl rda PLAY 4 (early)
Loo ery -s-7
PLAY 4 (late)
MEGA MONEY 1 1-7 2
11 -12 28 39 FANTASY 5
MEGA BALL 1 4 -16 29 So
12


On2 the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Ford 300.
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (HBO) Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Peter Manfredo
Jr., Middleweights.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NOon (38 MNT) Kentucky at Georgia.
NOon (51 FOX) Furman at Florida.
NOon (ESPN) Nebraska at Michigan.
NOon (SPN2) Wisconsin at Ill tos.xa &.

Noon (VERSUS) Harvard at Yale.
12:30 p.m. (20 ABC) (44 CW) Georgia Tech at Duke.
3:30 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Mississippi State at Arkansas.
3:30 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) Clemson at North Car-
olina state.
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Clemson at North Carolina State or Penn
Statet at Ohio State
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) (SUN) Southern Methodist at Houston.
3:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Colorado State at Texas Christian.
4 p.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) Boston College at Notre Dame.
7 p.m. (ESPN) LSU at Mississippi.
7 p~m. (FSNFL) (SUN) Central Florida at East Carolina.
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Virginia at Florida State.
7:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Colorado at UCLA.
8 p.m. (9 ABC) (20 ABC) (28 ABC) USC at Oregon.
8 p.m. (FX) Kansas State at Texas.
10:15 p.m. (ESPN) California at Stanford.
GOLF
8 a.m. (2 NBC) (8 NBC) 2011 Presidents Cup Day 3. Four-
Somes and four-ball matches. (Same-day Tape)
8 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf Iskandar Johor
Open, Third Round. (Taped)
10:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour Golf Alfred Dunhill

Ch30 nm iOLFhi LPG Tr aol MaE Gop Titleholders,
Third Round.
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) 2011 Presidents Cup Final Day. Singles
ma OhS.
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (44 CW) New Jersey Devils at Tampa Bay Lightning.
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Norwich City vs. Arsenal.
6 p~m. (62 UNI) Futbol de la Liga Mexicana Torneo de Aper-
tura 2011: Queretaro vs. Guadalajara.
MISCELLANEOUS
2 p.m. (6 CBS) (10 CBS) Epic Poker Eight-Max Main Event.
(Taped)
8 p.m. (SPIKE) UFC 139 Prelims


PreD CALENDAR

TODAY'S SPORTS
CROSS COUNTRY
State meet (TBA)
BOYS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. Crystal River at The Villages Preseason tournament
WRESTLING
9 a.m. Rob Herrmann Duals at Citrus High


SnL Jse at oals 8mp.m.
Chicago at Edmonton, 10 p.m.

BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Selected the con-
tract of RHP Oliver Drake from Norfolk (lL).
BOSTON RED SOX Selected the con-
tyracts f LP Ddrake Britton OF Che-Hsuan Uin
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Selected the con-
tracts of RHP Deunte Heath from Charlotte (lL)


and LHP Charlie Leesman from Birmingham
CLEVELAND INDIANS Selected the con-
tracts of LHP Scott Barnes and INF Juan Diaz
arom C mbus (I)adRHP Danny Salazar
DETROIT TIGERS Agreed to terms with
C Gerald Laird on a one-year contract. Selected
the contracts of LHP Matt Hoff man from Toledo
(lL), RHP Tyler Stohr and LHP Casey Crosby
from Eri ( L), (WAvisaileGeazrdrafrom Lakela
gan (MWL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS -Selected the con-


Prep Bask~etball B RIE F
Lady Warriors fall to Bronson the floor. Alexis Zachar had 16 points in the con-
test, and Kayleigh Kiernan managed 4 points
The Seven Rivers Christian School Lady W~ar- and 7 assists.
riors basketball team dropped its second game ThlosbigSenRvrsrcrdt1-.
of the season 46-40 to non-district foe Bronson ThWaroswlnetpyNv.2,hntey
on Frday nght.host Ocala Christian Academy.


As a team, the Warriors shot 16 percent from


-From staff reports


JUSTINE PLANTE
Correspondent


But even with those two
playing as well as they were,
Lecanto's offense basically
equalized them in the sec-
ond.
Lecanto junior Marie
Buckley came out on fire,
helping the Lady Panthers
go on a 10 0 run to start the
second quarter. South
Sumter would rally back,
though, behind the efforts of
Sumner and Merritt, who
combined for 25 of the 29
first-half points for the Lady
Raiders.
Lecanto coach Brittany
Szunkom commented on
their halftime adjustments.
"Two of their players had
75 percent of their points",
she said. "You had Sumner
and Merritt, who was ab-
solutely lighting us up. We
kept our normal coverage,
but started keeping fresh
legs in there, putting pres-
sure on her (Merritt) to deny
her the ball. If she can't get
the ball, then we're OK"
That plan worked out, for
the most part. After scoring
14 first-half points, Merritt
saw her point total drop to
just 6 in the second half.


And Sumner was made a
non-factor, bringing only 2
points in the second half.
But the Lady Panthers had
no intention of slowing
down offensively, as Buck-
ley added another 7 points
to finish off her night with a
team-high 17.
Coach Szunko com-
mented on the team's suc-
cess.
"I was really impressed
with the girls tonight," she
said. "You know, it's early in
the season, so we don't know
what other teams run, on of-
fense or defense. So I was
impressed on how well they
took adjustments on the
run. We brought them in and
made plays on the board,
and they adjusted really
well."
After taking a 15 point-
lead in the third, the Lady
Panthers didn't let it squan-
der, as they kept up with
South Sumter throughout
the fourth to finish ahead by
14.
Lecanto takes the week
off before driving out to
Dunnellon for a tournament
on Friday and Saturday.


After starting out slow
this season, the Lady Pan-
thers turned up the heat,
beating South Sumter 68-54
and improving to 2-1 on the
season.
Right from tip-off, both
teams came out playing
hard. South Sumter's Kirsti
Merritt started the game off
with a big 3-point shot that
set the tone. After that, it
was back and forth for the
majority of the first quarter.
Lecanto sophomore Paige
Richards tuned up the
South Sumter defense from
long range, scoring 9 of her
total 16 points in the first, 6
of which came from behind
the are.
But Kirsti Merritt wasn't
the Lady Panthers' only
problem in the first half;
Lady Raiders senior Alayna
Sumner was also causing
them trouble. Sumner and
Merritt combined to score
14 of South Sumter's 18 first-
quarter points, and come
the second, would be the
Lady Raider's only offense.


Lady Pirates shut out Umatilla


Crystal River 8,
Umatilla 0
Pirates 7-1 8
Bulldogs 0 0- 0
Scoring summary:
Brooke Levins (Cheyenna Lyons assist) -
1:so

ClrsL Cnso (ae De w5urst assist)
-20:20
Dewhurst 25:45
Dewhurst -27:50
Lyons (Dewhurst assist)- 34:35;
Casidy Newcomer- 38:35
Jessica Reynolds (Natalie Ezzell assist)
- 40:20


Smith leads Eustis girls


P MilBTS 01MnK Gaxc'llll6SV1


Lady Panthers beat South Sumter






CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 B5


Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia Two
perfect teams and a point for Tiger
Woods.
That was all the Americans
needed Saturday in the rain at
Royal Melbourne to build a 11-6
lead in the Presidents Cup and put
the International team in danger of
falling too far behind to win on
home soil.
The Americans went 4-1 in the
foursomes session, with five four-
balls matches scheduled for the af-
ternoon.
Phil Mickelson and Jim Fl~ryk
won four out of five holes on the
back nine, and Mickelson polished
off Aaron Baddeley and Jason Day
by holing a 50-foot birdie putt on
the 17th hole. Mickelson and Furyk
won all three matches they played
together. Bubba Watson and Webb
Simpson, in the leadoff match all
week, also went to 3-0 by beating
Melbourne's own Geoff Ogilvy and
Robert Allenby
Woods played again with Dustin
Johnson, and while it wasn't pretty
it was finally a point.
They trailed early in the match
until winning consecutive holes
with pars as Adam Scott and K.J.
Choi struggled. Woods and Johnson

weernatinl ta 13 cwnee bhe o
reaching the green, and the Ameri-
cans went 2 up on the next hole
after Scott and Choi made another
bogey.
Woods closed out the match with
a 20-foot birdie putt on the 16th.
The International team picked
up its only point behind Ernie Els
and Ryo Ishikawa. They went 1 up
on the 16th when Bill Haas missed
a par putt on the 16th. Matt Kuchar
hit his approach on the 17th within
a foot for a conceded birdie, but
Ishikawa halved the hole with an
18-foot birdie putt. Ishikawa holed
a 6-foot par putt on the last to se-
cure the 1-up win.
David Toms and Hunter Mahan
again proved to be the most formi-
dable alternate-shot tandem. They
beat Retief Goosen and Charl
Schwartzel, 5 and 4. In the two four-
somes matches they played, Toms
and Mahan played only 27 holes
and were behind on only one of
those holes.

TITLE HOLDERS
ORLANDO, Fla. Na Yeon Choi
shot a 1-under 71 in swirling wind Fri-
day to take a one-stroke lead over San-
dra Gal after the first round of the LPGA
Tour's season-ending Titleholders.
Choi, the LPGA Malaysia winner last
month, had a 7-under 137 total at


Associated Press
Then-Penn State coach Joe
Paterno stands on the field
Oct. 22 before his team's
game against Northwestern,
in Evanston, III.







Son says
Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Days after losing the job he
held for nearly a half cen-
tury, former Penn State
coach Joe Paterno was diag-
110sed with a treatable form
of lung cancer
Scott Paterno, the Hall of
Fame coach's son, said in a
satmn 0 ovie eFritdh
his father's doctors are opti-
mistic the 84-year-old Pa-
terno will make a full
recovery.
The news came shortly
after Penn State said the
NCAA would look into the
school's handling of a child
sex abuse scandal involv-
ing former assistant coach
Jerry Sandusky. Paterno
was fired by the board of
trustees Nov. 9 for failing
to do more about an abuse
allegation against San-
dusky than report it to his
superiors.
"Last weekend, my father
was diagnosed with a treat-
able form of lung cancer
during a follow-up visit for a
bronchial illness," Scott Pa-
terno said in the brief state-
ment. The doctor's visit
came the same weekend the
school played its first game
since the 1960s without Pa-
terno leading the Nittany
Lions Penn State lost, 17-
14 to Nebraska.
"As everyone can appreci-
ate, this is a deeply personal
matter for my parents, and
we simply ask that his pri-
vacy be respected as he pro-
ceeds with treatment," Scott
Paterno said.
Earlier Friday, The Citi-
zens Voice of Wilkes-Barre

renWedd sda oiih~tin n
Mount Nittany Medical Cen-
ter and was treated for an
undisclosed ailment and re-
leased.
Lung cancer kills 1.4 mil-
lion people around the
world each year. In the
United States, 221,130 new
cases and 156,940 deaths
are expected this year. The
disease is typically diag-
nosed in older people.
About 2 out of 3 people di-
agnosed with lung cancer
are over age 65.
"There's a significant
number of people who are
diagnosed in their 70s and
80s," said chief medical offi-
cer Dr. Otis Brawley of the
American Cancer Society.
He has no involvement in
Paterno's treatment.
"Generally when I hear
that a person has a treatable
form of lung cancer, it
means the person may very
well benefit from surgery to
remove a part of the lung,"
Brawley said.


Associated Press
International team's Aaron Baddeley of Australia hits out of a bunker of the 16th hole on Saturday during the
Presidents Cup golf tournament at Royal Melbourne Golf Course in Melbourne, Australia.


Grand Cypress. The South Korean
player also topped the leaderboard
Thursday after an opening 66.
Choi opened with a four-putt double
bogey on the first hole and was 2 over
through 6 holes. She rallied with three
birdies in a four-hole stretch.
Gal, the German star who won the
Kia Classic in March for her first LPGA
Tour title, had her second straight 69.
Hee Young Park (69) and Paula
Creamer (71) were 4 under.
Michelle Wie was even par after a
73, and top-ranked Yani Tseng was 2
over after a 76.
CHAMPIONS TOUR NATIONAL
QUALIFYING TOURNAMENT
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Jeff Free-
man won the Champions Tour National
Qualifying Tournament on Friday,
shooting his fourth straight 5-under 66
for a four-stroke victory on TPC Scotts-
dale's Champions Course
Freeman, a 49-year-old club profes-
sional at the Country Club of Orlando
and the 1999 PGA Professional Plaer
of the Year, birdied Nos. 4-8 and shot a
6-under 29 on the front nine.
Freeman won't be eligible to com-
pete on the Champions Tour until mid-
April when he turns 50.
Gary Hallberg and Canadian Jim
Rutledge tied for second at 16 under.
Hallberg closed with a 68, and Rut-
ledge finished with a 68. Jeff Hart (67)
was fourth at 15 under, and P.H. Hor-


gan Ill (68) was another stroke back to
take the final exempt position before
the reorder for the 2012 season.
The next seven players are condi-
tionally exempt. In addition, the top 30
finishers and are eligible to compete for
spots in open qualifiers at all co-spon-
sored events.
PEBBLE BEACH INVITATIONAL
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. Jason
Kokrak, set to join the PGA Tour for the
first time next season, shot a 3-under
69 on Friday at Spyglass for a share of
the lead with Kyle Thompson after the
second round of the Callaway Golf
Pebble Beach Invitational.
Thompson followed his opening 64
with a 70 at Del Monte to match Kokrak
at 10-under 134.
PGA Tour veteran Cameron Tringale,
who carded a 67 at Del Monte, and
Matt Battencourt, a two-time PGA Tour
winner who shot 68 at Spyglass Hill,
were tied for third at 8 under. Harrison
Frazar was another stroke back after a
68 at Pebble Beach.
ALFRED DUNHILL
CHAMPIONSHIP
MALELANE, South Africa South
Africa's Jbe Kruger shot a 5-under 67
on Friday at Leopard Creek to take a
four-stroke lead in the Alfred Dunhill
Championship.
Kruger was 13 under in the event
sanctioned by the European and Sun-


shine tours. Seeking his first European
tour title, Kruger had an eagle, five
birdies and two bogeys. Chile's Felipe
Aguilar (64), Scotland's George Murray
(69) and England's Seve Benson (71)
were tied for second.
Two-time defending champion Pablo
Martin of Spain missed the cut with
rounds of 81 and 82. He was trying to
become the fifth player in European
Tour history to win an event three times
in a row.
DUNLOP PHOENIX
MIYAZAKl, Japan Spain's Gon-
zalo Fernandez-Castano made four
straight birdies on the back nine in a 5-
under 66 to take a one-stroke lead Fri-
day in the Japan Tour's Dunlop
Phoenix.
Fernandez-Castano won the rain-de-
layed Singapore Open on Monday in a
playoff.
Japan's Hideto Tanihara was second
after a 69.

JOHOR OPEN
JOHOR BAHRU, Malaysia Swe-
den's Daniel Chopra shot a 6-under 65
on Friday to take the lead in the sus-
pended second round of the Johor
Open.
Chopra, the 1993 winner, was 13
under on the Horizon Hills course in the
event sanctioned by the European and
Asian tours. Seventy-two players were
unable to finish because of darkness.


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Eliza-
beth Williams had 18 points
and 13 rebounds, powering
No. 8 Duke to a 73-50 victory
over Auburn on Friday
Chloe Wells added 14 points
for the Blue Devils (2-0), who
have won their last 13 home
openers. Haley Peters scored
all 10 of her points in the sec-
ond half.
Duke shot 38 percent and
missed all 12 of its 3-point at-
tempts, but managed to ex-
tend its winning streak at
Cameron Indoor Stadium to a
school-record 26 games.
Camille Glymph scored 12
points on 4-of-8 3-point shoot-
ing for Auburn (2-1), which is
winless in five career meet-
ings with Duke. Hasina
Muhammad added 10 points.

Nebraska 68,
No. 23 USC 50
LINCOLN, Neb. Lindsey
Moore scored 15 of her 22 points


in the second half to help the
Cornhuskers protect a 13-point
halftime lead and hold off South-
ern California.
Jessica Hooper scored 16
points in the first half for Ne-
braska (2-0) and finished with 22.
Briana Gilbreath had 18 points
for USC (1-1).
No. 24 Ohio State 70,
Temple 66
COLUMBUS, Ohio Tayler
Hill scored 24 points, Samantha
Prahalis had 20 and Amber
Stokes added 11 as the Buck-
eyes withstood a late rally by the
Owls.
Temple trailed by 11 with 3
minutes left but pulled within 66-
63 on a 3-pointer by Brittany
Lewis with 32.3 seconds to go.
Hill then made two foul shots to
increase the lead to five for Ohio
State (2-0). Temple's Shey Peddy
made a 3, but Prahalis made a
pair of free throws with 9.8 sec-
onds left to close the scoring.
Kristen McCarthy led Temple
(2-1) with 14 points.


Associated Press

NEW YORK Sean Miller thought
the scoreboard was playing tricks on him.
No matter how often the Arizona
coach looked up it seemed as though his
team was in the same situation against
Mississippi State.
"It was a four-point deficit for what
seemed like 20 minutes. We just could-
n't make that defensive or offensive play
that would have gotten us into a tie or
the lead," he said. "I credit Mississippi
State for that."
The Bulldogs closed the game on a 10-
2 run and beat the 15th-ranked Wildcats
67-57 on Friday night to win the 2K
Sports Classic benefiting Coaches vs.
Cancer at Madison Square Garden.
"We got down 7-0 at the start of the
game and we didn't really seize control
at the start of the second half, either,"
Miller said. "The fact we had the
deeper team didn't help us tonight."


Arizona had used its depth to control
its semifinal win over St. John's, a game
the Wildcats closed with a 23-6 run.
Miller had said since the preseason
polls came out that he didn't think the
Wildcats deserved to be ranked so high,
but he also makes sure everybody knows
he feels they could be there at the end
of the season,
"We've seen a lot in an early month
and I'm very happy with four wins,"
Miller said. "We played 40 minutes
against zone and pressure against St.
John's and then you go from a 9 o'clock
start to playing the next day against a
very different style with Mississippi
State's size, with only a shootaround to
prepare."
Arnett Moultrie, a 6-foot-11 junior for-
ward, had 19 points and 10 rebounds to
lead the Bulldogs (4-1), who won an in-
season tournament for the first time
since beating host Arizona 75-74 in the
2000 Bank One Fiesta Bowl Classic.


native was his recruiting co-
ordinator at Oklahoma
State, which has been to the
postseason the past five
years. University President
Burns Hargis said Serna
was the first in her family to
go to college.
"I loved her energy for the
game," Oklahoma State
men's basketball coach
Travis Ford said. "She had a
great enthusiasm for the
game. She enjoyed recruit-
ing and she enjoyed the
process of that and just had
a warm heart."
When Budke took over
the program, the Cowgirls
had finished with a losing
record in five of their previ-
ous seven seasons and
never finished more than a
game over .500 during that
span.
The Cowgirls went 0-16 in
Big 12 play in his first sea-
son, then secured their first
bid to the NCAA tourna-
ment in 11 years. The next


year brought a trip to the
round of 16.
"You learn how to lose,
and that's a bad habit," he
once said of those early
struggles. "Sometimes, it's
easier to lose than to fight
back, so we had to change
habits and expectations."
Budke had little to sell
but a dream, but it was
enough to convince the
WNBA-bound Riley to come
make her mark. She left as
the program's career scor-
ing leader.
"I came to this league be-
cause I wanted to coach
against the best, night in
and night out," he once said.
"These players that want to
come play for us want to
play against the best. That's
how we go out and recruit."
A Salina, Kan., native,
Budke was a married father
of three, including a daugh-
ter currently at Oklahoma
State.
"I looked at him almost as


a mentor," Ford said. "I can't
tell you how many times I
would pick up the phone
and ask him how he ran his
zone offense. He'd come
down to the office or I'd go
up to his and we would sit
and talk.
"Just somebody who Ihad
the utmost respect for as a
person and a husband and
father and obviously as a
coach. In this profession,
the way it gets crazy at
times, he had everything in
perspective."
Ford called Budke "a
complete father figure" for
his team.
Budke played basketball
for Barton County (Kan.)
Junior College and gradu-
ated from Washburn in 1984
with a bachelor's degree in
physical education. After
some early small-college
jobs, he built the JUCO pow-
erhouse at Trinity Valley be-
fore hooking up with
Louisiana Tech, once one of


the top programs in the
women's game.
After playing for Budke,
Serna went on to finish her
playing career at Houston
before returning to Trinity
Valley to start her coaching
career under Budke. They
won another JUCO national
title together in 1999 before
Serna gained more experi-
ence as an assistant at three
other schools.
Budke hired her again for
his final year at Louisiana
Tech, then brought her
along to Stillwater.
"Miranda was a really
great person," said Carlene
Mitchell, another of Budke's
former players from Trinity
Valley who's now the coach
at UC Santa Barbara.
"She worked hard. She
believed in him. That's why
she stayed. ... She had some
opportunities to look at
some other jobs, but she
wanted to bring in players
and help him win at Okla-


homa State."
Budke moved to
Louisiana Tech when Kim
Mulkey left to become the
coach at Baylor, where she
has won a national champi-
onship and currently has
the No. 1 team in the coun-
try.
"It just hits home with all
of us in this profession that
truly we just coach a game,"
Mulkey said, adding that she
turned to her son and
started crying when she
heard the news.
"There's a bigger picture
out there and it's not a bas-
ketball game, it puts life in
perspective. I feel for the
Oklahoma State community,
how many more tragedies
can they endure?"
The crash is the second
major tragedy for the sports
program in about a decade.
In January 2001, 10 men af-
filiated with the university's
men's basketball team died
in a Colorado plane crash.


GolfCAPSULES



U.S. takes control at Presidents Cup


NCAA YBaketballCeAPSULES :


Miss1SSippi State beats


*o 0 OR5 Aio 67 57


CO CSAHE
Continued from Page B1

tell, Budke's assistant who
will replace him on an in-
terim basis.
"What's important is he
was a father figure for these
kids. He had a tremendous
knack of taking kids that
maybe were struggling in
some part of their life and
making it better for them.
That was his strongest
trait."
Serna, 36, was one of his
top helpers along the way.
Before spending the last
seven seasons at OSU, she
played on one of his four
teams that won the junior-
college national title at
Trinity Valley (Texas) and
was his assistant at
Louisiana Tech for the last
of three straight trips to the
NCAA tournament.
The Guadalupita, N.M.,














CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SO YOU KNOW
aLast night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, NOV. 17
Fantasy 5: 9 11 24 26 28
5-of-5 2 winners $105,561.51
4-of-5 326 $104
3-of-5 10,297 $9
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16
Powerball: 13 -22 -25 -39 -51
Powerball: 28
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 4 winners $200,000
Lotto: 10 -24 -34 -37 -39 -45
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 31 $5,988
4-of-6 2,176 $71.50
3-of-6 41,281 $5
Fantasy 5: 8 22 27 32 33
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 322 $555
3-of-5 9,893 $21
TUESDAY, NOV. 15
Mega Money: 3 4 12 35
Mega Ball: 13
4-of-4 MB 1 $550,000
4-of-4 6 $1,126

INSIDE THE NUMBERS

HTo verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida

Lot Iaot roy.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


TOdazy in


Todayi Saturday Nov
19, th 3 3rd dayo 2011
There are 42 days left in the
year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 19, 1863, Presi-
dent Abraham Lincoln deliv-
ered the Gettysburg Address
as he dedicated a national
cemetery at the site of the
Civil War battlefield in
Pennsylvania.
On this date:
In 1600, King Charles I of
England was born in Dun-
fermline, Fife, Scotland.
In 1969, Apollo 12 astro-
nauts Charles Conrad and
Alan Bean made the second
manned landing on the
moon.
In 1977, Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadatbecame
the first Arab leader to visit
Israel .
In 1985, President Ronald
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail S. Gorbachev met for
the first time as they began
their summit in Geneva.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush signed leg-
islation to put airport bag-

Five dyceanesaoontBhrtish au-
thorities said they were in-
vestigating the a parent
poisoning of Alexpander Litvi-
nenko, a former KGB agent
who had been critical of the
Russian government.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama, attending a
NATO summit in Lisbon, Por-
tugal, won an agreement to
build a missile shield over
Europe, a victory that risked
further aggravating Russia.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Alan Young is 92. Talk show
host Larry King is 78. Former
General Electric chief execu-
tive Jack Welch is 76. Talk
show host Dick Cavett is 75.
Broadcasting and sports
mogul Ted Turner is 73. TV
journalist Garrick Utley is 72.
Actor Dan Haggerly is 70.
Fashion designer Calvin
Klein is 69. Sportscaster
Ahmad Rashad is 62. Actor
Robert Beltran is 58. Actress
Kathleen Quinlan is 57. Ac-
tress Glynnis O'Connor is 56.
Newscaster Ann Curry is 55.
Former NASA astronaut
Eileen Collins is 55. Actress
Allison Janney is 52. Actress
Meg Ryan is 50. Actress-di-
rector Jodie Foster is 49. Ac-
tress Terry Farrell is 48. TV
chef Rocco DiSpirito is 45.


Olympic gold medal runner
Gail Devers is 45. Actress
Erika Alexander is 42.
Thought for Today: "It is al-
ways brave to say what
everyone thinks." George
Duhamel, French author
(1884-1966).


Associated Press
Co-hosts Regis Philbin, left, and Kelly Ripa pose with a key to the city, bestowed to Philbin by New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg, on "Live! with Regis and Kelly," Friday in New York. Friday was Philbin's last day on the pop-
ular morning show.


Ajier28-years, Regk Philbinz~ makes exitfrom morning TV


Associated Press

NEW YORK Regis Philbin
couldn't leave without a joke.
Signing off from morning televi-
sion after more than 28 years, he
brought to a close his final hour
hosting "Live! With Regis and
Kelly" by telling viewers, "I'll al-
ways remember spending these
mornings with all of you."
Then, as the studio audience's
ovation subsided after the program's
fade-out, he voiced a kidding post-
script to that crowd in attendance.
"I just thought of something I
SHOULD have said," he quipped, "I
really want to stay!"
No such luck.
Philbin, who at 80 years old has
logged more than 16,000 hours on
television in a career that dates
back to the 1950s, was making good
on his decision to leave the daily TV
grind, an announcement he deliv-
ered on his show last January
And Friday's tribute conclud-
ing weeks of Philbin farewell mania
- was good for instant TV history,
both on- and off-the-air.
The show had opened with cam-
eras following Philbin's walk from
his dressing room to the stage,
knocking on Kelly Ripa's door along
the way.
"I love you," she said softly as
they stepped before the cameras.


Then Philbin barked out the
question his fans have been asking
for months.
"Where's Regis going?" he
erupted with a shrug. "Regis don't
know. Stop asking me!"
During the hour, past guests such
as Justin Timberlake and Anne Hath-
away offered brief filmed tributes.
The show was otherwise devoted
to emotion-filled clip sequences of
high jinks with Ripa, and such stars
as Dana Carvey and Ben Affleck
demonstrating their Regis
impersonations.
Philbin's parting gifts included a
key and a plaque. New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg paid a
visit to thank Philbin for making the
city a big part of his show, and pre-
sented him with a symbolic key.
Walt Disney Co. chief executive Bob
Iger showed a plaque honoring
Philbin that's newly installed on the
outside ofABC's Manhattan facility
from which the show originates.
But the morning's festivities had
started an hour before the 9 a.m.
EST airtime with a coffee-and-
pastries reception for the studio au-
dience. This was a hand-picked -
and se ati ng-chart-arranged -
group of family, friends, past and
present colleagues, and celebrities
including Diane Sawyer, Bryant
Gumbel, Donald Trump, Meredith
Vieira, Tony Danza, Dr. Ruth West-


heimer and Ripa's co-host prede-
cessor, Kathie Lee Gifford.
"The world adores Regis," said
Judge Judy Sheindlin, "but his
friends adore him even more -
enough to get up early in the morn-
ing, put on some makeup, come out
and give him a cheer: Because, he's
just a special, sweet man."
A decade ago, Philbin gained
prime-time fame as the quizmaster
of ABC's "Who Wants to Be a Mil-
lionaire." But his enduring impact
has been as a morning show host,
and a raconteur adept at weaving
something from nothing in the so-
called "host chat," turning stories
about a night on the town or his
frustration with a household prod-
uct into compelling TV
Alan Alda described Philbin as
"unique in all of broadcasting. He
invented a form: going on the air
and just telling stories about the
day before, for 20 minutes."
"He has such an ease in front of
the camera," said "30 Rock" star
Jane Krakowski, an occasional guest
host. "He's such an everyman. He
makes us feel like he's one of us."
And Katie Couric hailed him as
"completely upfront. You never get
the sense that he's editing himself.
And on television, where people
are so manufactured and packaged,
you rarely see that kind of thing."
Philbin's unsurpassed quantity of


Associated Press


renewed attention on the
case as the anniversary
neared. The case's re-open-
ing and a public call for in-
formation are the first hint
that the official account may
need revision.
Within hours of the an-
nouncement, Corina said,
several people emerged of-
fering their recollections of
what happened in the wa-
ters off Southern Califor-
nia's Santa Catalina Island.
But he quickly noted that
nothing the agency has re-
ceived so far has prompted
it to change the view that
there was no foul play.
The boat's captain, Den-
nis Davern, said Friday on
NBC's "Today" show that he
lied to investigators about
events on the yacht Splen-
dour when he was inter-
viewed after Wood's death.


Davern accused Wagner
of having a fight with Wood
before she went missing and
delaying the search for her
after she disappeared.
Wagner's family released
statement through a
spokesman that said they
trusted detectives to evalu-
ate any new information
and determine whether it
came from "a credible
source or sources other
than those simply trying to
profit from the 30-year an-
niversary of her tragic
death."
It did not mention Davern
by name, and noted that de-
tectives hadn't contacted
Wagner or his family. On the
show, Davern mentioned a
book he co-wrote last year on
Wood's death, but refused to
say precisely why he blamed
Wagner for the three-time


Muppets heading
to White House
WASHINGTON -The
Mduppets are heading to
the White House.
Ahead of Thanksgiving,
the White
House
pr P will host
a special
screening
for mili-
tary fami-
lies of
"The,,
Kermit Muppets
the Frog movie.
Guests
at Tuesday's screening
will also include Kermit
the Ecog and Jason Segel,
one of the stars of the
movie.
The screening is the
latest in a series of spe-
cial invitations the White
House has given to mili-
tary families. President
Barack Obama hosted
military fathers and their
children for a movie
screening ahead of Fa-
ther's Day, and military
families were invited to
the White House for the
annual Halloween
celebration.

Liam Neeson to
narrate musical
LONDON --Liam
Neeson is to have an out-
of-body experience in an
out-of-this world tale.
The actor is slated to
narrate ea
touring
musical
version of
"War of
.the
Worlds,"
appear-
ing on-
Liamt stage as a
Neeson hologram.
The
musical is adapted from
composer JeffWayne's
1978 album, which fea-
tured the late Richard
Burton narrating the tale
of a Martian invasion
based on H.G. Wells'
novel.
Wayne plans to release
a new version with up-
dated music next year,
followed by a British
arena tour starting in De-
cember 2012.
Neeson said Er~iday he
was flattered to be of-
fered the role, because "I
loved Richard Burtoni
and I loved his voice' -
but said he wouldn't be
imitating the Welsh star's
tones.
He said, "I had to put
that aside and focus on
the text."

Obama note for
Heavy D funeral
MOUNT VERNON,
N.Y. Heavy D was re-
membered with laughter
and tears at his funeral
on Er~iday. The Rev. Al
Sharpton delivered a
message for his young
daughter, which he said
was directly from Presi-
dent Barack Obama.
Sharpton read briefly
from the note for 11-year-
old Xea Myers; it offered
the young girl words of
encouragement. She also
spoke, and told the
packed church that her
father was "still here, not
in the flesh, but in the
spirit.
Heavy D died last week
in Los Angeles at the age
of 44, due to complica-
tions from pneumonia.
-From wire reports


LOS ANGELES Actor
Robert Wagner is not a sus-
pect in the 30-year-old
drowning of his actress wife,
Natalie Wood, and there is
nothing to indicate a crime,
even though the investiga-
tion has been reopened, a
sheriff's detective said
Friday.
"Her death was an acci-
dent, an accidental drown-
ing," said Sheriff 's Lt. John
Corina.
Officials would not say
why they were taking an-
other look at the case, al-
though the captain of the
boat where the couple had
stayed blamed Wagner for
Wood's death.
There have always been
questions about Wood's
death on Nov. 29, 1981, with


Associated Press
A 1981 photo shows actress
Natalie Wood.

Oscar nominee's death. Day-
ern also denied that he was
seeking to profit from inter-
est in the case.
Vanity Fair and the televi-
sion program "48 Hours
Mystery" have teamed up
and are including Wood's
case for a television special
airing this weekend. Corina
said his agency would talk
to Davern at some point and
other witnesses would likely
be interviewed.


Birthday: Overall conditions that surround you are likely to
show marked improvements in the year ahead, especially
where your work or career is concerned. Both a promotion
and increased earnings are possibilities.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) There is justification for you
to have high expectations today, so instead of subduing
your feelings, do what you can to express them through

Sgi uairu rNkov d3p- c. 21) Handling a critical situa-
tion requires being both philosophical and realistic about
things at the same time. Taking on a proper frame of mind
assures victory.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Clearly defining both your
aims and purposes in competitive developments will give
you an edge over others. You'll feel the need to succeed.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If possible avoid spending
time with aimless people who are going no place in the


Today's HORsOSCPE
world. Pals who have both ambition and purpose will be the
ones who will light a fire under you.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Having both just the right
amount of solitude and harmony enhances your chances
for efficacy and can make this quite a productive day for
you. Seek those conditions if you can find them.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Simply by being pragmatic
ebu al tigsd al s ho ogi the hpe rrhta wC he
shots as you see them.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you are methodical and cog-
nizant of all details, regardless of how small they are, this
can be an extremely productive day for you. Everything will
fall into place when you don't miss a beat.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -A couple of situations you've
been unable to complete to your satisfaction can be con-
cluded today if you're willing to start over and completely


redo them. Give it a try.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Devote the greater part of
your efforts to projects or situations that require mental ef-
fort rather than muscular output. You're far more adept at
using your mind than you are your muscles.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you'd like to engage in some-
thing social today, you'd be happier limiting your involve-
ment to a small group of friends where each person will
have a chance to express himself or herself.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Simply looking out for yourself
today will prove to be quite boring, so instead, utilize your
time and talent to get others to socialize with you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Collective benefits can be de-
rived from relationships with people who are willing to share
what they have with one another. The more each person
gives, the more everybody gets.


Farewell to the king


Official says Wagner not a suspect in Wood's death














CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nn KA ndy

NOTES


Tireless servant honor ed


PaEstor who

"retired" in ~e


1987sti2 )


g0/#{StrOHg 'l~r *~ .
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Wr-iter ...
CHASSAHOWITZKA

Rev. Warren Hart
w s udaa hay walked into
First Baptist Church of
Chassahowitzka, it was
hugs all around for the
Energizer Bunny of or-
dained ministers, who
turned 90 this week. \
On Sunday, the church
surprised him with War-
ren Hartway Day, cele-
brating decades of
faithful ministry to the
congregation as interim .
and fill-in pastor off and
on since 1987 the year .
he supposedly retired
from the ministry -
Members of his family
from as far away as New
Jersey came to surprise I" 1
him, too, including his
son, the Rev. Gene Hart- ;;i
way, pastor of The New ..=
Life Fellowship Church 17 .,
in Bordentown,N.J, who .
preached the sermon in ,; = :
honor of his dad. I~EE i ~c~;~F...:,4,,
"How do you talk
about your dad without
crying?" he said, ad-
dressing the congrega- NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
tion. "I feel honored to Warren Hartway, who turned 90 this week, has been a faithful fill-in pastor at First Baptist Church of Chas-
be a second-generation sahowitzka for many years. He's seen here (seated) being greeted by fellow minister Lucien Radd as Joe Maddox,
pastor in this family, to director of missions for Nature Coast Baptist Association, looks on. : On Sunday, First Baptist Church of
continue on the heritage Chassahowitzka celebrated Warren Hartway Day.
of my dad ... He's the ,
greatest dad because he 1.
gave me Jesus."
The Rev Lindsay Bled- .
soe, former pastor of
First Christian Church in .-
Chassahowitzka, called ,.
Hartway "the bravest -
preacher I ever met."
"I think it was back in
the 1980s when we had a
joint Easter sunrise serv-
ice," he said. "Bless your
heart, I prayed for you
that day, Brother. Every
no-see-um in Chassa-
howitzka was out that,
day, and he was preach- '.', .-
ing about the risen
Christ while wiping bugs
off his forehead and not
missing a beat."
Hartway said he was
"flabbergasted" and
amazed that so many
people were able to keep
evething a secret from

"It proves that they're I'
all good liars," he said, I . P IP J ~
laughing. "I will never ,
trust anyone again." *

See Page C6


W...F y

Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL











Pilgrims


Time of the year. It
brings out the Yan-
kee in me. It has me deco-
rating my home with
pumpkins, leaves, mums
and all manner of harvest
motifs. It has me baking
pumpkin bread, cooking
up cranberry sauce and
hunting up my favorite
apple pie recipe. It causes
me to hum "We Gather To-
gether" and "Over the
River and Through the
Woods." And yes, that cool
air we get around this

wth e oy dnadows ae
open to the full blast of
that delicious air. Thanks-
giving is just around the
corner and I couldn't be
happier.
If we look at the
Thanksgiving story from a
historical perspective,
there are many things that
Jews and the Pilgrims
share. This could be why I
like Thanksgiving; it lets
me be part of the Ameri-
can culture while retain-
ing my Jewish heritage.
The Pilgrims were great
Bible readers. They were
snlena dd rditstmem
ings. Now, this sounds
very much like the Jewish
take on the Torah. For


:Religion NOTES
p.m. Wednesday at Joy
Lutheran Church, 7045 S.W.
83rd Place at State Road 200
in Ocala. Pastor Edward Hol-
loway, Jr., senior pastor, will
provide the message, "Just
Thanks." Communion will be
served and music provided by
the Joy Choir. Bring canned
goods to donate to Interfaith. All
are welcome. Call (352) 854-
4509, ext. 221.
I Join Faith Lutheran
Church for its Thanksgiving
Day service at 10 a.m. Thurs-
day. The church is in Crystal
Glen Subdivision off State
Road 44 and County Road 490
in Lecanto. The church is
wheelchair accessible, and
hearing assistance and a cry
room are available. Call (352)
527-3325 or visit
faithlecanto.com.
I Thanksgiving Day serv-
ice is at 10 a.m. Thursday at
Episcopal Church of the Ad-
vent, 11251 S.W. Highway 484,
Dunnellon, (1.2 miles west of
State Road 200, Ocala). Call
(352)465-7272.
Christmas
H Shepherd of the Hills Epis-
copal Church will present the
14th Annual Father Christ-
mas Ball at 6 p.m. Friday, Dec.
2, at the Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Association Clubhouse.


Silent auction and a 50/50 raf-
fle. Appetizers, cocktails and
dinner catered by John Mason
Catering. Dinner music by Paul
Brundage and accompaniment.
Dance music from the '40s
through the '80s played by dee-
jay Bob Arthur. Proceeds to
benefit Serving Our Savior
"SOS" Food Pantry. For tickets
($35 each), call (352) 527-0052
or visit the church at 2540
Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto.
H Arbor Lakes Chorus, di-
rected by Cory Stroup and ac-
companied by Harry Hershey,
will present "The Many Moods
of Christmas" at 7 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 2, at Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. A freewill offering will be
collected .
H The drama and music min-
istries of First United Methodist
Church in Inverness will pres-
ent an annual Christmas musi-
cal drama titled, "First
N-0-E-L," at 7 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 2, and 4 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 3. The church is at 3896
S. Pleasant Grove Road (two
miles south ofApplebee's). Call
(352) 726-2522.
I The Central Florida Master
Choir, conducted by Dr. Harold
WV. McSwain, Jr., will perform a
Christmas concert at 3 p.m.


Sunday, Dec. 4, at First United
Methodist Church, at 1126 E.
Silver Springs Blvd. (State
Road 40), diagonally across the
street from the old Ritz Hotel.
The program, titled "Carols
from arou nd the World," will
include the Poulenc Christmas
Motet(s), the premiere of two
original works) and carols from
the Huron Nation, Russia,
Ukraine, France, Germany,
Britain, America and others.
Free admission. An offering will
be collected. Call (352)
537-0207.
M The Dunnellon Chorale,
under the direction of Jeanne
Wolfanger and accompanied by
Nicole Miglis, will present a
sing-along Handel's "Mes-
siah" at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4,
at Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Dunnellon. Aside from the
solos, all audience members
are invited to sing along with
the choir members on selected
Christmas section pieces.
Members of the choir will be in
the audience to assist. If you
have your own copy, please
bring it. A limited number of
copies will be available. Singing
is optional. A freewill offering
will be collected at the conclu-
sion of the concert.

See Page C2


Thanksgiving worship serv-
ice at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Call the
church for more information at
(352) 746-7161.The church is
on County Road 486, opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando.
H St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Thanksgiving Eve
dinner at 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
day will be followed by the
Thanksgiving Eve Holy Eu-
charist service at 7 p.m. Visit
stmaggie.org. The church is an
equal opportunity provider. The
church is at 114 N. Osceola
Ave., Inverness.
I Everyone is invited to a
special Thanksgiving Eve
service at 6 p.m. Wednesday
at North Oak Baptist Church at
the corner of N. Elkcam Blvd.
and N. Citrus Springs Blvd. in
Citrus Springs. Special music,
drama and a special message
from the Word of God. Child-
care provided. Call (352) 489-
1688 for more information. The
community is welcome.
H St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, will conduct
a Thanksgiving Eve service
at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, fol-
lowed by a pie and ice cream
social. Call (352) 489-3027.
I A contemporary worship
service to celebrate Thanks-
giving will take place at 6:45


Page C5


Editor's note: This is
Nancy Kennedy's annual
Thanksgiving psalm.

AM," the Puri-
T o t a n s w ro te gr a in I
"The Valley of Vision," "I
acknowledge and confess
that all things come of
Thee life, breath, hap-
piness, advancement,
sight, touch, hearing,
goodness, truth, beauty -
all that makes existence
amiable."
Thou truly are a great
and gracious God who has
been truly good to me.
Thank you, Lord, for the
pleasures of life, for work
and sleep, for irritants
that refine my rough
edges, for hard times that
make me tough and good
times that make me smile.
Thank you for grace and
mercy for mercy, Lord!
For mercy and a bottom-
leSS Well Of forgiVenOSS
that is a continual source
of blessing to my sin-
tainted soul.
Thank you, Lord, for
your constant care and
your consistent faithful-
ness, for butternut squash
soup and tomato sand-
wiches. Thank you for
smart phones and infant
great-nieces, the soft sub-
tle beauty of the color
see Page C6


Thanksgiving

I NorthRidge Church invites
the public to a special Thanks-
giving observance service at
9 a.m. Sunday. Come as you
are and experience a friendly
and loving community atmos
phere. Following the service is
a time of coffee and fellowship.
The church meets at the Inver-
ness Woman's Club, 1715 For-
est Ridge Drive, across from
the Whispering Pines Park en-
trance. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at (352) 302-5813 for
more information.
I St. Anne's Anglican
Church, at 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, will host an
Ecumenical Thanksgiving
Bluegrass Gospel sing-along
service at 6 p.m. Sunday.
Annie and Tim's United Blue-
grass Gospel Band will per-
form. All are welcome.
I Floral City residents are in-
vited to a free communitywide
Thanksgiving dinner from 5 to
7 p.m. Monday in the fellowship
hall at First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St. The public is invited to a
community Thanksgiving serv-
ice at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
church. Area churches are par-
ticipating in this special service.
I Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church invites the public to its






































































Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

SCome on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !


Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www~stannescr.or




CitflS

Church of Christ

9592 W.Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www~westeitruscoc~com
W. Deep Woods Dr






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday A1M
Bible Study 9:30
Wors ip .030
Sunday P1M
Worship 6:00
We dnes day

Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST j
Bob Dickey


EE1 Crystal
$50~I River

Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
F E ALLOWS HIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday00"Christian Ed"

Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



THE
SALVATION
ARCITRUS0 "


Sunday SSh~o~o 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M*

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
.. ..


M ASSES. *

atrday 4:30 P.M.
un day 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M

*11111 r 1 H ~


ICrystal Diver
Chiurch of God

Cht/TCh PhOlle
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & CNIldre sA Worship
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jarn session Youth I inistrie~sM& Teen

2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


SSt. Timonthy
L~uthe an CChurch

1 070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,


Saturdaylnformal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Blueqrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
8:00am & 10:30am
Sunday School
AII Ages & Adults 9:30am
NurservA Povded

Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive* Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Rev. Steve Gerhart, Assoc. Pastor
Sunday.
9:00 am Sunday School (nIlAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children s Awanas Group
www2 schoA esassorg


Sunday Services
10:00 A.Mr. 11:00 A.Mr.* 6:00 P.r.
Wednesday
7:00 P.r.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickma
795-8883 46-1239





H cit, YoU'LL FIND
A CALLING FM ILY



C AYSTAL
RIVE A


91 ETH D15T
CHV U CH

4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3 1 48
\www.crumtc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8-00 Ealye Cmmu n o
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00aFor all ages.
Nursery available at al/services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. -Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
.p AStephen M~inistry Provide :


Schedule of Services:

9:00 a.m
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
10:00am.
Spirit Filled Worship Service

Ministries
6:00 p.m .
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise andWorship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service


C2 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


0 N TE
Continued from Page C1

I World-renowned solo
handbell artist Christine D. An-
derson will present a free local
Christmas concert. "Christmas
in Bronze," at 4 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 4, at Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave., Crystal River. Ander-
son rang her first handbell solo
in 1980, discovering the gift that
would define her life's work and
produced a video called "Voices
in Bronze." She writes for sev-
eral music journals, is on the
editorial board for "Creator
Magazine," and serves the
Southern Baptist Convention as
editor for "Handbells" maga-
zine. She has published more
than 85 solo handbell arrange-
ments, all reflecting her com-
mitment to excellence in
handbell ringing. She has been
an annual recipient of the
ASCAP Standards Award for
compositions and perform-
ances for many years. Spon-
sored by Crystal River United
Methodist Church and Citr-
usCountyFL.com, the free con-
cert, "Christmas in Bronze", is
open to all and an optional love
offering will be collected. Visit
citruscountyfl.com, email con-
cert@citruscou ntyfl.com or call
(352) 564-2020.
H First Baptist Church of
Inverness welcomes back
Bryan Popin for another concert
to "kick off" the Christmas sea-
son at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec.
7.Popin will be joined by the
church's Worship Team and
Praise Kids. The church is at
550 Pleasant Grove Road. A
love offering will be collected.
Call the church at (352)
726-1252.
I Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church's Grace Handbell Choir
and a group of eight singers
from the Presbyterian Church
and the Dunnellon Methodist
Church have been invited to
participate in the Nature Coast


RELIGION


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 South. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store
is accepting donations of
household items, clothing and
small appliances. Estate dona-
tions are also accepted. Pick-
up is available for larger
donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is
provided from Helping Hands.
Call (352) 726-1707.
MUSIC & more
I The Sonshine Quartet
will perform at 6 p.m. today at
First Christian Church of Inver-
ness, 2018 Colonade St., be-
hind the RaceTrac gas station
on State Road 44. Call (352)
344-1908. The community is in-
vited to attend this musical
event.
I The Proclaimers Quartet
will be at Hernando Church of
the Nazarene, 2101 N Florida
Ave, Hernando, on Sunday,
Dec. 4. The Hernando
Nazarene Celebration Sounds
choir and orchestra will open
the concert at 5:45 p.m. The
Proclaimers will perform at 6
p.m. The public is invited to this
free concert. A love offering will
be collected.
H International concert or-
ganist David Hart will present
a recital at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
8, at First United Methodist
Church in Ocala, at 1126 E. Sil-
ver Springs Blvd. (State Road
40), diagonally across the
street from the old Ritz Hotel.
Hart has performed at Carnegie
Hall, numerous churches, and
universities in America, Ger-
many, Holland Great Britain,
Canada, and Australia. The
program will include Bach's
renowned "St. Anne Fugue,"
Mozart's "Fantasia in F-minor"
and works by Franck, Thalben-
Ball, Daniel-Lesur, and Vierne.
Admission is free; a freewill of-
fering will be collected. Call
(352) 537-0207.

See NOTES/Page C3


Community Band's Christ-
mas concerts at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10, at Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1100
Highland Ave., Inverness, and
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11,
at First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. All seats are
freewill offering.
I The Sugarmill Chorale re-
hearses from 7 to 9 p.m. Thurs-
days in the choir room of First
Baptist Church in Crystal River.
New and returning members
are invited to sing with chorale
in the Dec. 11 Christmas con-
cert. The chorus is open to any
resident living in Citrus County.
Chorale members must learn
their music, have a sense of
humor and be committed to re-
hearsals. Visit www.facebook.
com/sugarmillchorale, call
Ginny at (352) 746-6829 or
email sugarmillchoraledirector
@yahoo.com.
I First Baptist Church of In-
verness will present the musi-
cal, "The Night Before
Christmas" at 6 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday, Dec. 17 and 18.
Join us as we retell the true
story of Christmas and cele-
brate the birth of our Savior.
The church is at 550 Pleasant
Grove Road. Call the church at
(352) 726-1252.
H Want to participate in a
great singing experience?
Come and join us in presenting
the "Festival of Nine Lessons
& Carols" on Sunday after-
noon, Dec. 18. This Christmas
program is the story of the Na-
tivity told in Scripture and song
and will be presented by the
choir at First Lutheran Church
in Inverness as a service to the
community. Singers in all voice
parts, high-school age and
older, are invited to augment
the choir for this program. Re-
hearsals are at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, and Saturday
mornings, today, Dec. 10, and
Dec. 17. Call Sue Bjorkman,
choir director, at (352) 540-
9610, or email sbjorkman
@1stlutheran.net.


Orange Ave. (County Road 48),
Floral City, three blocks east of
U.S. 41, on the south side of
the street.
Members have donated
items from moving sales and
many other interesting items.
Find good values. Proceeds will
benefit the Shriners Children's
Hospital .
I Annual yard and bake
sale at 8 a.m. today at Yankee-
town Community Church, two
miles west of the traffic light in
Inglis on U.S. 19. Same week-
end as the Yankeetown
Seafood Festival.
H The men's and women's
organizations of First United
Methodist Church of Inverness
will have their annual yard and
bake sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today at the church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road (two
miles south of Applebee's). Call
(352) 726-2522.
M Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills
will host its monthly outdoor
flea market from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26, on the
church property at 6 Roosevelt
Boulevard in Beverly Hills, off
North Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Shoppers
are welcome. Up to 50 com-
mercial and private vendors are
expected to display their wares.
Commercial vendors and pri-
vate individuals are welcome to
bring and sell goods. Spaces
are available for $10. "Cookin'
Good" will be on hand to serve
a variety of breakfast and lunch
items. For more information or
to reserve a space, call Rose
Mary at (352) 527-6459 or
email wjeselso@tampabay
.rr.com.
I A yard sale to benefit its
food pantry will open for the first
time in the parking lot of First
Presbyterian Church of Crystal
River from 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 3. The church is
at 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 adjacent
to the Sweetbay plaza. Approxi-
mately 40 sales sites are avail-
able for rent to sellers at $10
per space. Sellers will keep


their own profits with proceeds
from space rentals going to
support the church's weekly
food pantry. The sites are large
enough to accommodate the
seller's car and a table. Sellers
must bring their own tables and
other needed equipment. Food
will be for sale on site by Oys-
ter's restaurant. A community
table will be available to accept
donations of items (with the ex-
ception of clothing ) from
church members and friends
brought on the day of the sale.
Proceeds from this table will
benefit the pantry. The church's
food pantry, open from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Tuesday, is being
stretched to its limits by the in-
creasing needs of the commu-
nity during the current
economic downturn and if suc-
cessful, the yard sale may be
repeated on a regular schedule
to help provide additional funds
needed for this ministry. For
more information or to rent a
space at the sale, call (352)
746-7585.
I "'Snowman Bazaar" from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
3, hosted by the Women of
First Lutheran Church, 1900
State Road 44 West, Inverness.
Arts and crafts/vendor fair with
a bake sale, lunch, coffee and
cold drinks available for pur-
chase.
A portion of the proceeds will
go to help support HOME, a
Christian home for pregnant
and unwed teenage mothers
and their babies. Call (352)
726-1637.
H A bake sale sponsored by
the Holy Myrrhbearers of St.
Raphael Orthodox Church will
take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 4, and from
noon until sold out on Sunday,
Dec. 5. Purchase ethnic and
traditional pastries and breads
early for the holidays. Come
early for the best selection. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness. Visit www.straphael
church.org for directions.
H Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of


I The Central Florida Master
Choir will be at Dunnellon Pres-
byterian Church at 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Dec. 18, as part of their
concert series. They will pres-
ent their seasonal concert,
"Carols from Around the
World," with a freewill offering
taken at the end of the concert
with all proceeds going to the
Master Choir. The church is at
20641 Chestnut St., Dunnellon.
H Cornerstone Christian
Supply, a ministry of Inverness
Church of God, will have a
Christmas sale through Dec.
24. Stop in and pick up a copy
of our Christmas catalog for
coupons and sale details. Nov.
25 and 26 will be a special sale
with huge savings throughout
the store. There will be extra
savings from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday. The bookstore is an ex-
cellent source for all your Chris-
tian needs: Bibles, music,
greeting cards, books, T-shirls,
gifts, etc. Cornerstone Christian
Supply is at 416 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness. Call the bookstore at
(352) 344-2470.
Sale aw ay
H Half-price sale of Christ-
mas items Tuesday and
Wednesday at the Living Water
Ministries Thrift Store at 1 Bev-
erly Hills Blvd. (County Road
491) in Beverly Hills. Regular
hours are from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday through Satur-
day. Also during those hours,
the store is accepting clean,
saleable donations of jewelry,
clothing, household items, furni-
ture, appliances, etc. Pick-up is
available for larger donations.
Tax deductible forms are avail-
able on request. Call (352)
270-8886.
I Yard sale from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. today at Parsons Memorial
Presbyterian Church, 5850 River-
side Drive, Yankeetown. Yard
sale, bake sale and hotdog's for
lunch. Lots of great deals, clean
items and low prices.
I Nobles Ladies of the Citrus
Shrine Club continue its yard
sale at 8 a.m. today at 8710 E.


ST. UN E'SH Temple Crystal River

A Parish. in the Beth David CHURCH OF
Anglican Communion 13158 Antelope St. CHRISF
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple Spring Hill, FL 34609 A Friendly Church
SCelebrating 50 Years of 358-686-7034 With A Bible Message.
SServing God and the Community Corner of U.S. 19 &r 44 East


Rabbi
LeRnny Sarko
Services
F'ridays 8PM 1
Saturdayrs 10AM i
Reigious School
SundayS
9AM-Noon


CoeIMSEMBUE50F GODI
grow C
with us! 4

The Fir tFA sembly

WELCOMES YOU!


Special
Event or

Weekly
Se rvices

PleaSO Call

Bevrl a
564-2912



Advertising
I nfo rm~at io n


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
LI.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00 m
Sun.: 8:30 &r 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am

HOLY DAYS
As Announced

CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm .
795-4479


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA



























Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all. i~

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! ! ~

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


come as you are!
GEMESIS
COMMUNITY CHURCH







PASTOR BRIANI ANID
KALTHY BALGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg* 0
County Rdl. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253




Dsectim PJ1
Grace Bible
Church





Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM.................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM...................~Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM........Awana (Sept. Apr.)
WednesdaV
7:00 PM...................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1%/ mi, east of U.S. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St. I
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www. graceb bible ho mosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com



9~~Hernando
FC The NaZa tent~uc o
Ac- Place to He~long

0210 IN FIl rid A e
H rado FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided



*YOUTH

SEN IO RS

Sunday School
9:45 A. M.
PraiSe & Worship
10:40 A.M.
PraiSO SefVICO
6:00 P.M,
PraiSe & Prayef
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Parstor
www.hernandonazarene.org


MOral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


F TSt Baptist
Churrch
of Floral City

8545 Magnolia
726-4296


9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church,,Y"'
www.fbefloralcity.org


.


Good

Shepherd
Lutheran

Church










Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
*Fellowship After Worship
*Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45am
Nursery Provided


KeneteeC reBdlyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

)A It


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 N TE
Continued from Page C2

Special eventS
I Citrus County has a non-
profit organization known as
"Family & Friends Reaching
for the Abilities." FFRA is a
support program comprised of
caregivers and their loved ones
who get together frequently for
activities, informative discus-
sions on government programs,
social activities and more re-
garding our situations. Call Ron
Philips at (352) 382-7819
andlor attend one of our meet-


RELIGION


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 C3

Call (352) 854-4509, ext. 221.
I Have you always wanted
to write a child's picture book?
Artist Jan Hitchcock of Beverly
Hills will publicly demonstrate
the process from concept to
production. Hitchcock wrote
and illustrated "Rosie's Flight"
and will be available to sign
copies and answer questions
about putting together such a
project from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 2, at the Unitarian Univer-
salist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S.41). All are in-
vited. Call (352) 465-4225 or
visit naturecoastuu.0rg.
See NOTES/Page C4


ings which are held regularly at
the Key Center location in In-
verness at 130 Heights Ave.
The meetings take place the
second Friday monthly starting
at 9 a.m. with coffee and re-
freshments. Public is invited.
I First Baptist Church of
Rutland will host a free food
and clothing giveaway from 9
a.m. to noon today. This give-
away program is planned for
the third Saturday monthly. We
would like to help those in the
community who are having a
hard time making ends meet.
We ask that no vendors take
part in this. The church is east
of the Withlacoochee River


bridge on State Road 44 west
of 1-75. Call (352) 793-3340.
I Calvary Chapel Inverness
hosts its monthly "Ladies Tea
and Brunch" at 11 a.m. today.
Food hosted by Russ Newman,
the Muffin Man. A new face will
share her life story and a good
time is expected for all. Call
(352) 726-1480.
I "Third Saturday Supper"
from 4:30 to 6 p.m. today in the
Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes meat
loaf, mashed potatoes, carrots
and peas, coffee, tea and pie


for $10 for adults and $5 for
children. Call (352) 489-1 260.
H The Legacy League of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church on U.S. 41 in Dunnellon
will host a "Gator-Seminole
Rib Dinner" on Saturday, Nov.
26. Dine in and watch the
Florida-Florida State game on a
big screen in Father Stegeman
hall. Serving starts at 11:30 a.m.
Dinner includes ribs and sauce,
coleslaw, baked bean and rolls.
Desserts, funnel cakes and
drinks are extra. Tickets are a
$15 donation and can be ob-
tained by any Legacy League
member or in the church office.
Takeouts available. Show your


team spirit by wearing team col-
ors, hats and shirts.
I For the first Sunday ofAd-
vent, Nov. 27, the women of
Joy Lutheran Church will have
their "ThankOffering Sun-
day," in which they conduct the
entire service at 8:15 and 11
a.m. The offerings collection will
be sent to the ELCA headquar-
ters for national church pro-
grams. The Rev. Edward
Holloway, Jr., senior pastor, will
conduct services at 6:45 p.m.
Wed nesdays d during Advent,
providing the message on the
"Star Story." All are welcome.
The church is on S.W. State
Road 200 at 83rd Place, Ocala.


1.omosassa Springs
sc v~Hrbumwmarkanstac"


Goe i I owhip ss

Hom5 sWsaS irngs F4446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Juesdak
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www. homosassaadventist. com

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


ws, -






r...uyorchildrenandramilies"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant llwy.(486)
(1% miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www~hernandoumcfl org
Reverend
Tyler Montgomery
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
In "ili nu H rng Dev m


lMasses:
SATURXDAY VIGIL
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.
4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352) 746-9422
WWW.StScholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


O


Worship pW th The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:0a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed.IEve. Bible Study

Steve H noegh n, minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
._Floral City, FL.


935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy 4 just E of 490


COME
WO RS H I P
WVITH US

Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M -

Fellows ip fer runraun noship
Cal ndar ef eaeni b tdo

www.faithlecanto.com


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9am
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm
3962 N. Roscoe Rd. 2
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
wwwaecmhushwihbhut alsun

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Special
Event or

9 W ekI
Se rvi ces
Please Call

Beverly at
564-2912
Fo r

Advertising
I nf0 r mn at i o n


Special

Event or

We ekly

St. Scholasticai services
Roman Cathohc
Please Call


Beverly at
564 2912




For

I nfO rm atio n

On You r

Rel ig ious

Advertising


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
NOn-Denomninational
congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders








































































Places of worship that ..


offer love, peace and .





00188 017 077 10 HS" 10use, your spirits will be lifted! !!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVLLlE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Mission Possible
MINIST~RIES
V.vdrLuct rJr.

9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
| Sunday
Worship ...................1 0:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nurrsery Care& Childrens Church Provided)
SWednesdays ?
Youth Group, Bible Study & 1
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
A MS dF IEC IO PTY
8:00 am-11:00 am










SHwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness
mSunday Services
S Traditional .
8 AM and 11:00 AM m
SContemporary .
= 9:30 AM m
a 11:00 AM Service =
Tapes & CD's Available
SSunday School for all ages a
so 30 AoMe

" Fellowship &, Youth Group "
S5 to 7 PM m
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 5
n 563-3639
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org "
Podcast: FPC inv.com
I Church Office 637-0770
Pastor Craig Davies a


SOME THINGS SHOULDN'T CHANGE!


G RACE
BAPTIST CHURCH


Do you miss su Bbe teaching, the
beloved hymns & gospel songs, an Eve-
ning Service, and being part of a caring,
Christian family? Find them at Grace!
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Cits Springs, FL
S.S. 9:45 am, Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Bible Study&8Prayer 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Directions, mp3 sermons & more at
www.gracebapchurch.org
Phone (352) 445-9013


commVUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH










SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. itrus Spr ng Blvd.






UNITY...


..


Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. 6:00 PM Bible Study
Children's Church School
Weekly
ALL ARE WELCOME ~



Redemtion

(bristian'Qburch
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
Worship..................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
currentiv meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call /
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd .
Langdon


Hope Evangehical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Cis Spri gs Blvd.

Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .COmE


C4 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


0 N TE
Continued from Page C3

H St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will meet at
10:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 8.
Christmas luncheon at the Boat
House after the meeting. The
form for reservations and pay-
ment is available in the office.
St. Benedict Council of Catholic
Women will put on a play on
Jan. 15. Cost is $10 per per-
son. Light refreshments will be
served.
I St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River will host
free 15- minute memory
screenings for adults 50 and
older from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 13. Appoint-
ments required. Call (352) 795-
5325. Participants will meet
privately with Jerry Fisher
MSW, program specialist for
the Alzheimer's Association,
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter.
While the screening is not con-
sidered a diagnostic tool and is
not intended for those who
have dementia or Alzheimer's,
it is extremely helpful when it
comes to determining if there is
a memory problem.
Worship
H Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church will cele-
brate the last after Pentecost
with Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and 10:30
a.m. tomorrow with Christian
Formation at 9:15, Sunday
school at 10 a.m. and nursery
at 10:30 a.m. Healing service
and Eucharist at 10 a.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study and sack lunch. SOS at
Key Training Center from 9
a.m. to noon Thursday. Evening
Bible study in parish hall at 7
p.m. Thursday.
I St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will have a Bluegrass
"come as you are" service fea-
turing River Blue at 5 p.m.
today. Sunday worship services
begin with early service with


RELIGION


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

I Citrus Vineyard Commu-
nity Church meets in the First
Christian Church of Inverness
family life center, at 2018
Colonade Street. Sunday serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and
Beverly Hills on Tuesdays. Call
the church at (352) 637-0923.
I Floral City United
Methodist Church invites the
public to the 8 a.m. service in
the 1884 church and the 10:30
a.m. service in the main sanctu-
ary. Sunday school for all ages
meets at 9 a.m. Bible studies
are at 10 a.m. Tuesday at in
Burkett Hall and 6 p.m.
Wednesday in the 1884 build-
ing. Boy Scouts meet at 7 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays.
Girl Scouts meet at 6 p.m.
Tuesday. Choir practices at 2
p.m. Wednesday. "Team
Sword" youth group meets from
4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday. All
teens in sixth grade and up are
invited. "Community Harvest
Festival" from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today featuring free music, food
and fun for all.
I Regular Sunday worship
services are at 8:15 and 11
a.m. at Joy Lutheran Church
on S.W. State Road 2100 at
83rd Place, Ocala. Sunday
school classes are at 9:45 a.m.
The German language worship
service is at 3 p.m. the first
Sunday monthly. The Wednes-
day evening worship service is
at 6:45. Pastor Ed Holloway
leads Bible study in the Gospel
of Luke at 3 p.m. Thursday.
The community is welcome.
Call (352) 854-4509, Ext. 221.
I First Christian Church of
Inverness invites everyone to
worship and fellowship. Sunday
school is at 9 a.m. and the wor-
ship service is at 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday evening meals, be-
ginning at 4:45 p.m., are fol-
lowed by choir practice at 5 and
prayer and Bible study at 6 p.m.
The meals are $3 for adults and

See NOTES/Page C5


Communion at 8 a.m., Sunday
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m., coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with Communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services are
announced. Nursery provided.
The church is at 1070 N. Sun-
coast Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal
River. Call (352) 795-5325 or
visit www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
I Join Faith Lutheran
Church today at 6 p.m. or Sun-
day at 9:30 a.m. to hear part 2
of "Hidden Talents," from
Matthew 25:14-31, by Pastor
Stephen Lane. The church is in
Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto. The
church is wheelchair accessi-
ble, and hearing assistance and
a cry room is available. Follow-
ing the Sunday service is a time
of fellowship, then Sunday
school and adult Bible study at
11 a.m. Call (352) 527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
I Compassion is one of our
strongest emotions and when
wielded correctly, it has the
power to create positive social
change. Jennifer Hancock will
provide a Humanist perspective
on the role compassion plays in
our lives Sunday at the Nature
Coast Unitarian Universalists
fellowship at 7633 N. Florida
Ave., Citrus Springs. Call (352)
465-4225 or visit nature
coastuu.org.
H First Baptist Church of
Inverness offers the following
Sunday activities: SONrise
Sunday school class at 7:45
a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., "Kid's Church" for
ages 4 through fourth grade
during the 9 a.m. service featur-
ing Bible stories, skits, music
and group activities; Sunday
school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except the
7:45 a.m. class. Evening fellow-
ship is at 6 with various serv-
ices during summer months.
On Wednesday at 6 p.m. is a
prayer meeting, "W~omen in the


Life Of Jesus" study, "Youth Ig-
nite," "Praise Kids" and a nurs-
ery for age 3 and younger. Call
the office at (352) 726-1252.
The church is at 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness. Web-
site is www.fbcinverness.com.
I St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, conducts
worship at 8 and 10:30 a.m.,
celebrating Friendship Sunday
in which we invite the commu-
nity, friends and neighbors to
worship. Sunday school in Pre-
cious Lambs Preschool class-
rooms begins at 9:15 a.m. Bible
class is at 9:15 a.m. in the fel-
lowship room continuing with a
study on relationships, their im-
portance for the body of Christ
and for carrying out the
church's mission; each week is
an independent lesson. Tues-
day night is choir rehearsal at
6:30. Ladies Guild has quality
Christmas cards available for
sale. Call (352) 489-3027.
I St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Sunday services in-
clude the Holy Eucharist Rite 1
service at 8 a.m. and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 service at 10:30
a.m. Adult Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. Family Eu-
charist service and children's
church are both at 10:30 a.m.
Youth Sunday school and
young adult forum with lunch
follows the 10:30 a.m. family
Eucharist service. Fun activities
and fellowship are planned.
Feed My Sheep feeding pro-
gram for people in need is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service at 12:30 p.m.
Visit stmaggie.org. The church
is an equal opportunity
provider. The church is at 114
N. Osceola Ave., Inverness.
H First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness is at 206
Washington Ave. Fall worship
schedule: Traditional service at
8 a.m., contemporary service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school from
9:30 to 10:30 a.m., traditional
service at 11 a.m. For Conse-
cration Sunday, the Rev. Craig


S. Davies will preach on "Gen-
erous Giving" with readings
from 1 Timothy 6:17-19.
I St. Anne's Anglican
Church, at 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, will cele-
brate the last Sunday after Pen-
tecost at the 8 and 10:15 a.m.
services. St. Anne's hosts Our
Father's Table from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. today. Overeaters
Anonymous meets Wednes-
days from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in
the sanctuary and 7 to 8 p.m. in
the parish library. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m.
Friday and Mondays in the
parish library.
H Inverness Church of God
Sunday worship services are at
8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
the Children's Ministries Build-
ing. Sunday school begins at
9:30 a.m. with classes for
everyone The church has many
Christian education opportuni-
ties for all ages at 7 p.m.
Wednesday. Missionettes and
Royal Rangers Clubs meet for
children from the age of 3. All
teenagers are invited to the
youth group, "Gravity," with
Youth Pastor Jon Uncle. At the
present time, the adult class
meets in rooms 105 and 106 at
7 p.m. Wednesday. The church
is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Call the church at (352)
726-4524.
I Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and 11
a.m. Sunday. Sunday school is
at 9:45 a.m. Coffee hour follows
both services. The church is
barrier free and offers a free
tape ministry and large-print
service helps and hearing de-
vices. A nursery attendant is
available for children ages 3
and younger. All are welcome.
Advent worship service at 7
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30. Call
the church for more information
at (352) 746-7161.The church
is on County Road 486, oppo-
site Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando.


H First Baptist Church of
Floral City invites everyone to
Sunday worship at the 8:30
a.m. blended service and the
11 a.m. traditional service. Cof-
fee and doughnuts are served
in the fellowship hall from 9 to
9:45 a.m. Sunday school
classes for all ages begin at
9:45 a.m. Wednesday evening
suppers begin at 5. Cost is $3
for adults, $2 for youths, $1 for
children 12 and younger, or a
maximum of $10 per family.
Following supper, services
begin at 6:30 p.m. and include
children's ministry (Awana),
youth ministry (grades 6
through 12), and adult Bible
study and prayer meeting.
Sanctuary choir practice follows
at 8 p.m. The church is at 8545
E. Magnolia St. Call (352) 726-
4296 or visit www.fbcfloral
city.org.
H NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to worship
services at 9 a.m. Sunday.
Pastor Berger will continue a
series on "Body, Soul and
Spirit." Come as you are and
experience a friendly and loving
atmosphere. Following the
service is a time of coffee and
fellowship. The church meets at
the Inverness Woman's Club,
1715 Forest Ridge Drive,
across from the Whispering
Pines Park entrance. Call Ken-
nie Berger at (352) 302-5813
for more information.
I Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study at
10 a.m. Sunday, worship at 11,
and evening service at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Bible study is at 7
p.m. Everyone is welcome. We
speak where the Bible speaks
and we are silent where the
Bible is silent (1 Peter 4:11). The
church has a radio program on
WEKJ 96.7 FM at 11 a.m. Satur-
days. The church is at the inter-
section of State Road 44 and
U.S. 19. Call Evangelist George
Hickman at (352) 794-3372 or
(352) 795-8883, or email
georgehickman@yahoo.com.


I t,1170 CO I


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service

Bible Study & Prayer


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.


Email: bhcchurch~embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion -1Ist Sunday, Month y
Where Christ is Proclaimed!













IGIL MASSES:
4*00 P.M. g *00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. L10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
1:30 P.M~ to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppoitnment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
:Cww~urlaw y o~amenl


All are invited to our

Healmng


First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
WedS d ioly Metin 5 OM PM
352-726-4033




SFirst

Assembly

Of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, R.34452

Pastor,
S Dair0 ,


Rushrig


1,


Creating a world
that works for all
ry.. 1*,. ..I.:ra~.. ..


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
/2 Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
10 Our ServiCcs
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM

Independent
Fun dam entfal
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


SOFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.MI.

W


wHERE REASON & RELIGIONMET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG









































































PIRCOS of worship that


Of fer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


liI PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS-
9:30 AM -Escuela Biblica
Dorninical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Predica
MARTES:
7:00 PM -Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
David Pnro Pstor
137 O Coft *Se I vre s, 73 451



Fi 'St


Church of
I HVe F HSS
550 PleeasantsGrooj Road

(352) 726-1252

SUNDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
7:45 a.m.
Bible Study
9:00 a.m.
Worship
10:30 a.m.
Bible Study for all
4:00 p.m.
Worship Choir Practice
5:15 p.m.
Awana
5:45 p.m.
Connection Classes

WEDNESDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
4:30pm Bread Basket Cafe
6:00pm Praise Kids
6:00pm Youth Ignite
6:00pm Mid-Week Worhsip
7:30pm Praise Teall & Praise Band
Nursery Provided All Services
Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor


FIRST B-it 'es

LUTHERAN
CHURCH
A Christ Centered Family Church
Holy ommumion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 A.M.


iww I tltiher net -
1900 W. Hwy. 44,BlnvernerSS

Th Re.Toa Jvro











Of IRVernOSS

3896 5. Pleasant Grove Rd.
lnVerneSS'FL 34452
(2 miso, ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Palstor


FIRST
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS t
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study


CITRUS COLWTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0 N TE
Continued from Page C4

$1.50 for children ude a
12. Call the chruerc t (5a2T
344-1908, email facinv@
yahoo.com or visit www.fccinv.
com. The church is at 2018
Colonnade St.
I Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and for
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups also meet at 9 a.m.
Sunday and 10 a.m. and 6:30
p.m. Wednesday. All residents
of the area are welcome. Sun-
day morning worship service is
at 10. Peace Lutheran Church
"The Church On The Hill," is '
five miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the church
office at (352) 489-5881 or visit
www.Peace Lu thera nO nline.0rg.
I First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school
classes begin at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowing fellowship, coffee and
goodies. The morning service
begins at 10:45. The Sunday
evening service begins at 6.
Midweek service is at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The church is on
East Parsons Point Road in
Hernando (directly across from
the Hernando Post Office).
I At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms is

tphrroauc ntgh B ok ofy lation
during those mooonin t :r4 !m

with classes for all ages. Sun-
day church services are at 11

o~ nd 6 s~m uit rpsec s

provided for all services. Every-
one is welcome to attend. The
church is at 9850 S. Parkside
Ave. in Floral City, just south of
Floral Park. Call (352) 726-
0360 for more information.
H Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave. (one mile from
U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street).
Visit comeandseefbc.org. Serv-
ices are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a~m .ard 6sm. "Kingrs Kis"

from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sunday.
Wednesday Bible study and

'1::ios-t" :rrde R hrogh
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call
(352St Rp7e IOrthodox
Church, 1277 N. Paul Drive,
Inverneis, wteiommi evr ne

Sunday mornings at 10 and
Saturday evening for Vespers
at 5. A coffee hourlfellowship
gathering takes place after Di-
vine Liturgy every Sunday. The
church appreciates donations
of canned goods and other
renpenishabl its ,thich r e

County Resource Center. Visit
www.straphaelchu rch.org.
H Church of Christ services
at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call (352)
795-4943 or (352) 563-0056 for
information.
I First Church of God (a
nondenominational congrega-

tu das hcpdh iludes ac i-ng

service at 6. Choir practice at 5
p.m. Wednesday followed by
prayer time and Bible study.
JoyBelles ladies meet the sec-
ond Tuesday monthly. Men's

othy. T ame plaae ddfel-
lowship supper once monthly.
The "Saturday Night Gospel
Singing Jubilee" at 6 p.m. the
last Saturday monthly is open
to all. Refreshments and fellow-
ship follow. Church is at 5510
Jasmine Lane, Inverness. Call
(352) 726-8986.
H Living Water Ministries in
Beverly Hills offers Sunday
services that start with contem-
porary Christian music by the
church band at 5 p.m., followed
by a Bible-based message at


5:30 and a hymn sing at 6 p.m.
The youth area is open 1 to 3
p.m. Sunday with supervised
activities including games,
movies or music, billiards and
basketball. Adult breakfast and
Bible study is at 8:30 a.m. Sat-
urday. Wednesday evening
Bible study begins at 7:30. Wit-
ness Fitness exercise club
meets at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
Thrift Store is open 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday through Friday,
and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
Call Pastor Wayne Wilkinson at
(352) 270-8886 or email
waynezmail@gmail.com.
I New Beginnings Fellow-
ship, 2577 N. Florida Highway


RELIGION


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 05

uitous sight throughout the
center greens in New Eng-
land towns. Jewish syna-
gogues, especially in the
major cities where most
Jews settled, are testaments
to the permanency these
peol lwishhed tko convey.
presses oneanf sg vgmext
Jewish of sentiments, that
of gratefulness. The whole
concept of giving thanks is
one that observant Jews do
from the moment of arising
in the morning. Through-
out the day, there are addi-
tional opportunities to say
thank you to God for God's
many blessings. These are
uttered over bread, food,
special occasions and the
like. The Pilgrims' grati-
tude was born of a desire to
survive in a hostile and
harsh environment. They
were grateful to be alive,
those that had survived,
and this gratefulness gave
them courage to persevere.
Whether we are Jews or
Christians, another religion
or none at all, we can all re-
late to the Pilgrims and
their journey to the New
World. Their story is a uni-
versal story of the right to
be free and worship or not,
as one sees fit. It is every-
body's story of being grate-
ful for the basics of life:
home, food and family. It is
everybody's human need to
say thank you and to take
stock of the things for
which there are no price
tags: health, life and love.
As for me, I used to re-
mind my children that we

aews tv ee 1 rods el

atives, the Siegals, (seag-
ulls) came over with the
M~aytlower
Happy Thanksgiving!


Judi SiegalIis a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She
can be reached at niejudis
@yahoo. com.


in Hernando, invites the com-
munity to spirit-led revival serv-
ices during the week and
Sunday worship services.
NBF's weekly schedule in-
cludes "Wednesday Night in the
River" and "Friday Night Fire"
services at 7 p.m. Afellowship
dinner precedes both meetings
at 6 p.m. Dinner guests are
asked to bring a dish to share.
Special guest ministers are in-
vited often.Child care provided.
Sunday celebration services at
8 and 10 a.m. include anointed
worship, Bible-based word
teachings and prophetic prayer
ministry. Children's ministry
takes place during the 10 a.m.
service. Child care provided for
the 10 a.m. service only. Visit
www.nbfhernando.com or call
(352) 726-8333.
I First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids worship
dismisses from service. Youth
Bible study at 4:30 p.m. in fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study at 6. Lifecare center
is open (food and clothing) from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday
and Thursdays. The church is
in Old Homosassa at 10540 W.
Yulee Drive. Turn onto Yulee
Drive from U.S. 19 at Burger
King, follow to stop sign, turn
left, church is about one mile on
left. Call (352) 628-3858.
I First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for morn-
ing worship. The church is non-

bsd, nl r aacnh nB ee Word
as it is in the Bible. All are wel-
come. Call (352) 382-2557.
I Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services
under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children'slyouth program for
ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult) Bbl 7s~t yat 7p.m.
I Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
meni tiy drm 1d0a .m. hy? p
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave. Ho osws.a Food a i
Sipes at (352) 212-4320.

Ch rc rs nHoC anmunain l
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call (352)
746-3620.
I All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an

dy The Lttle mous~eu 929
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
All welcome. Call Joe Hupchick
at (352) 726-9998.
H House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m. and
6 p.m. at North Lecanto Highway
and North Dawson Drive, Her-
nando. Wednesday Bible studies
and youth meeting at 7 p.m.
H Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday

evaemnc .rshi 2t6 Ev25yne

information.
H Mt. Zion Christian
Church has a new home at
6570 W. Ost West St., Ho-
mosassa. All welcome. Come
a ou uare.1'VV sip a nda.
Children's "God Squad" meets
at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For infor-
mation or directions, call Pastor
John at (352) 573-7198.
H House of Peace, a nonde-
nominational full-gospel church
and a division of House of
Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
I First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, worships
Sunday mornings at 10:30 and
Wednesday evenings at 5 at
224 N. Osceola Ave. Sunday
school class is the same time


as the church service. All are
welcome.
I Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul R.
Meseke, senior pastor, at 475
North Avenue West,
Brooksville. Call (352)
796-8331.
H Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call (352) 746-1270.
H Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit, Hernando, is a tra-


ditional Anglican mission with
ancient roots. The 1928 Prayer
Book is used. The church is at
1023 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way, Hernando. Call (352)
637-5922.
A Grupo Misionero Adven-
tista del 7mo. Dia de Citrus
County. Horario de Reuniones.
Miercoles 7 p.m. Sabados 11
a.m. Address: 1880 N. Trucks
Ave., Hernando. Call (352)
535-7141.
Live & learn
I Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala offers open registra-
tion of its religious school, Con-
gregation Beth Israel School
of Jewish Education. The
school meets Sunday mornings
at various places in the commu-
nity. The curriculum consists of
Jewish lifecycle and history, He-
brew, Bible, holidays and tradi-
tions, as well as courses on
Israel and pre-bar and bat mitz-
vah and confirmation classes.
The school caters to the individ-
ual needs of the students and
parent participation is encour-
aged. The staff consists of car-
ing, experienced teachers.
Suzanne Boetger is educa-
tional director. For more infor-
mation and enrollment, contact
Suzanne at theboetgers@
yahoo.com or Judi at (352)
237-8277.
I FreshStart DivorceCare
is a 13-week video-based pro-
gram Bible-based program of-
fered from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Monday through Jan. 30 in
Room 1 of Inverness First
United Methodist Church. The
program is led by Grace Car-
dona ardhcuhrcdhc e is pr vdd.
726-2522 to sign up, or for
more information, call Grace
Cardona at (352) 634-1837.
H Abundant Blessings
Messianic Congregation
hosts a teaching series titled,
"Prayers: The Keys To the
Kingdom (The Greatest Force
on Earth)" at 5 p.m. Thursday
at the Homosassa Springs
Public Library. Learn how the
Lord's Prayer is a Kaddish, the


vehicle or Merkabah (chariot) to
traverse the five realms of
being and the 10 dimensions of
quantum physics. Come and
experience Jewish Christianity
and the way Yeshua (Jesus)
worshiped. Call (352)
544-5700.
I Peace Lutheran Church
offers Wednesday evening
Bible study, preceded by a
potluck meal, at 6:30 p.m.
Other opportunities for Bible
study are at 10 a.m. Wednes-
days and 9 a.m. Sunday. Sun-
day morning worship service is
at 10. All residents of Dunnellon
and surrounding communities
for dinner, fellowship and Bible
study on Wednesdays. "The
Church On The Hill" is at 7201
S. U.S. 41, five miles north of
Dunnellon. Call (352) 489-5881
or visit www.PeaceLutheran
Online.0rg.
Terrific tnipS
I Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church "Brothers In
Christ Annual Fundraisin 9
Cruise" on the Norwegian Star
on Jan. 15-22, 2012, sailing
roundtrip from Tampa. Ports of
call include Roatan, Belize,
Costa Maya and Cozumel. For
rate information, call Accent
Travel at (352) 726-6623 or
email Kathy@accenttravel
group.com.
I A five-night Carnival
cruise to benefit Serving Our
Savior (SOS) Food Pantry will
travel to Cozumel and Grand
Cayman on the Carnival Para-
dise on April 30, 2012. Funds
raised will benefit the needy in
Citrus County. All categories of

clud sc usapr .ha ,sal
taxes and fees, donations to
Serving Our Savior pantry,
round-trip bus to Tampa, round-
trip bus driver tips and one-way
porter tips. Cancellation insur-
ance available. All monies need
to be in by Feb. 15, 2012. Call
Lenore Deck at (352) 270-8658
or fax her at 352-270-8665 or
e-mail her at cruiselady@tam-
pabay~rr.com, or call Barbara
Johnson at (352) 270-3391.


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD




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Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship
Sainths1, Evening
Wednesday
Choir Practice


10:45 AM
6:00 PM
7:00 PM
8:00 PM


Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt
- !1 prlac to belong. A place to become."


8:00 AM
Holy Communion

9:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship

10:45 AM
Traditional
SWo rsh ip a


Continued from Page C1

Jews, the Torah is the guid-
ing force in their lives as
was the Bible for the

Wimesin England, the Pil-
grims were persecuted for
their religious beliefs. Jews
can certainly relate to this
aspect, for we have been the
objects of persecution for
centuries. It should be
noted that while Jews have
always worked for the rights
of others; when the Pilgrims
and other Christian groups
came to America, they did
not always give full rights to
those who were not of their
faith. Fortunately, this
changed as time went on.
The Pilgrims came here
seeking freedom to live and
worship as they pleased.
The Jews came here for the
same reasons. In the shtetls
of Europe, they were subject
to conscription by the Rus-
sian army or discriminated
against in government or in
business. In the New World,
they could be free from the
Inquisition and practice Ju-
daism openly
Both the Pilgrims and
the Jews viewed America
as the Promised Land.
Here, both groups could
obtain the opportunities
denied them under the old
regimes in Europe. Here
they could start fresh and
plot their own destinies,
When the Pilgrims came
to Massachusetts, they built



community is a very integral
part ofJudaism. Rituals and
prayers are done as a group,
and certain prayers can only
be done in the presence of a
minyan, a religious quorum
of 10 Jews. Building commu-
nities and establishing
houses of worship are im-
portant goals for any group.
The white clapboard Con-
gregational church is a ubiq-
































































DECEMBER 3, 2011
Saturday Evening Doors Open for Social Hour at 6:00 pm
Concert begins at 6:30 pm
One Performance Only!
$20. 00 per person for General Admission
Keller Auditorium
101 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
Refreshments Available
By Reservation Only, Please Call

(352) 212-5417




*: : : *




YOU COULD WIN!


CO sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


GCR ACE
Continued from Page C1

gray, for crisp Honeycrisp
apples, Bear cats and
Bearcaves, for goofy 9-year-
old granddaughters and
honorable war veterans
now bowed with age.
Thank you for making the
world for us to enjoy for
the ability to smell jasmine,
lemon oil and cinnamon; for
the taste of gingerbread and
maple, sweet corn, sweet
tea, savory garlic knots and
tart communion wine.
Thank you for the com-
forting coziness of a fleece
blanket or a smushy feather
pillow, a fluffy, furry cat or
the hand of a friend. Thank
you for the music of ocean
waves, of violins and oboes,
mandolins, French horns,
acoustic guitars and my
daughters' voices on the
phone.
Thank you for letting me
see daily the works of your
hands: the stars and planets
at night, and in the morning
the sunrise over the lake
and the pastel apricot,
mauve and golden amber
sky. It takes my breath away
and all I can say is, "My Fa-
ther, which art in heaven,
hallowed be your name!"
Lord, every year at this
time I stop and confess that
I am prone to wander from
you. It's my default mode.
Yet even so, even in my wan-


RELIGION


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE

right way, the wrong way
and the Hartway."
"The 'Hartway' is the
heart way," he said. "To
find out what the heart of
God is really like, look to
Jesus. If you know Jesus,
you know the heart of God."
At the end of Sunday's
service, Pauley introduced
a new ministry in Hart-
way's honor. White wooden
crosses, made by members
of the congregation, were
given out for people to take
home and put in their front
yards as a quiet witness of
their faith,
That made Hartway smile.
"I've never been in a
church with so much love,"
he said. "It's just like what
God is like God is love."
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at nkennedy
@chronicleonline.com or
(352) 564-2927.


during, I plead to you, "Don't
let me go!"
Thank you, Lord, that you
never have and never will.
Thank you, thank you, thank
you!
As the psalmist said,
"Where can I go from your
Spirit? Where can I flee
from your presence?" You
are everywhere, which both
comforts and terrifies me.
But it's your abundant mercy
that keeps drawing me back
It's your patience and kind-
ness that eases my fear.
"I need faith," I cry out
with the Puritans. "Work it
in me now that I may never
doubt Thee... May I love
Thee with a passion that can
never cool, believe in Thee
with a confidence that never
staggers, hope in Thee with
an expectation that can
never be dim, delight in
Thee with a rejoicing that
cannot be stifled, glorify
Thee with the highest of my
powers."
Thank you, Lord, for the
gift of faith!
Thank you for the wind,
which reminds me that the
wind of your Spirit blows in
and through the lives of
those you love (and those I
love) winds of healing
and restoration.
Thank you for the rain
that falls, reminding me that
you're faithful to wash me
clean,
Thank you for sunshine
and thunder, for curiosity
and wonder, for creativity


and awe, pizza and oranges,
fresh-from-the-chicken eggs
and my $5 wok from IKEA.
Thank you for wise teach-
ers, gentle mentors, for
faithful pastors and for
Harry and Charlotte who sit
behind me at church.
In this world of upside-
down madness, of fighting
and factions, of poverty and
disparity, where evil and un-
rest seem to be winning, you
are still God. You are still
the Rock, still the Refuge,
still the Redeemer and Re-
storer, the Seeker and Saver,
the Savior and Friend of all
who run to you.
Father, Son and Holy
Ghost, Giver of life and life
itself: I stand amazed in
your presence, humbly
grateful that you stoop to
call me your own.
To the God who welcomes
sinners, loves losers, heals
the broken-hearted, gives
hope to the hopeless and
fills life with meaning and
delight, with a heart filled
with gratitude, today and
every day I give you thanks.
Amen.


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over Victoria
--IKnow the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace. "She can be reached
at (352) 564-2927, M~onday
through Thursday or via
email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


been there ever since, ex-
cept for two short interim
pastorates in Vermont and
New York.
The Rev. Tim Pauley, cur-
rent interim pastor at the
church, said, "Most young
people talk about the fu-
ture because they have no
past, and most old people
talk about the past because
they have no future, but
Warren Hartway lives
every day for Jesus."
The Rev John Fizer, for-
mer Chassahowitzka pastor
and current pastor at Sun-
coast Baptist Church in Ho-
mosassa, recalled meeting a
man who, at 86, was still
preaching and thought, "If
thatguy can do it, I can do it."
"Then I found out that
Warren, who's 90 years old,
is still preaching -what an
inspiration," he said.
One of Hartway's favorite
sayings is: "There's the


ega ren a nucemm s ,a n vr aris bithds
and first birthdays. Email community@chronicle
online.com or call (352) 563-5660.


1.


A Beautiful

Thanksgiving

Centerpiece

from



\a 302 NE 3rd St., Crystal River

795-1424

TO ElWER:
Enter online @ chronicleonline.com,
click on "Features", enter contest or
fill out this form, mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
Anytime before Noon on November 21.

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Says Thanks to our
fa ithfulI su bscribers


For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


0008XHB


Continued from Page C1

The choir sang his fa-
vorite songs "Come Thou
Fount of Every Blessing,"
"Let's Talk About Jesus,"
"At Calvary," "He Hideth
My Soul" and "The Wonder
of it All" sung by his niece,
Mary Eckstein.
Hartway, who calls himself
a simple hayseed, began his
life of ministry as a teenager
in western New York
When Pearl Harbor was
attacked, he enlisted in the
Navy Seabees and served
until l943, when he resumed
his role as church pastor
For the next four decades,
he and his wife, Annabelle,
went all over New York and
Pennsylvania ministering in
churches.
Around his birthday in
1973, he traveled to India
and went door to door in a
small village, sharing the
gospel through an
interpreter
"I believe I saw a vision
of Christ standing high over
the whole village, asking
me to claim it in his name,"
Hartway wrote in his bio.
"Needless to say, this was
one of the most moving ex-
periences of my life."
He retired in 1987 and
came to Chassahowitzka,
where he took the position
as interim pastor at his
present church. He has


CITRUS COUNTY


www.chronicleonline.corn
Clarmas 2010: Pimelocallon: Floda / Scarborough 2010








Page C7 -SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011





CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





"....En'lb' Sharing Thanksgiving Coret" ""in
card party is today benefits charities


offc at (352 9-37
f erea 2)lbe pr ration work on
Wednesday, Nov 23, and many volun-
teers will be needed on Thanksgiving

DEach year, volunteers from across
the community have turned out to
help make this event happen. This
year will be no different.
Join the effort at 700 N. Citrus Ave.
on Nov. 24 for the meal and fellowship.
The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
and football will be on the big screen.
No ticket is required and there is no
charge.


Church to serve f~ee community med l


teThe public is in ited to at-
on Saturday, Nov. 19, at the
First Presbyterian Church in
Inverness, hosted by the
GFWC Woman's Club
of Inverness.
Participants usually get to-
gether their own group and
bring their own cards or
board games; however, sin-
gles who wish to participate
are welcome.
A buffet salad luncheon
with a variety of desserts is
included. Tickets are $10

Ia mrn Pierce at (352)

Orchid auction
inBr oksville
BROOKSVILLE The Or-
chid Lovers' Club of Spring
Hill will host an orchid plant
auction at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 19, at Partners Club of
Oak Hill Hospital, 11375
Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50),
Brooksville. Doors open at
12:30 p.m.
A wide variety of orchids,
including cattleyas, dendrobi-
ums, oncidiums, phalaenop-
sis, species and vandas and
orchid-related materials will
be auctioned off. Checks and
cash accepted. No credit
cards.
For information, call (352)
683-2767or 727-856-3485.
Fowl play could
mean money
If you're serious about hav-
ing fun, come to the Withla-
coochee Rubber Duck Race
at noon Sunday, Nov. 20,
during the Yankeetown
Seafood Festival by the With-
Iacoochee River at Winding
River Park.
The race is approximately
100 yards. Be there when the
rubber meets the water. Race
winner receives $300. The
lazy duck (last to finish) re-
ceives $100.
Cost is $5 per duck, or $25
for a "Sixquack," $50 for a
"Quacker's Dozen" (13
ducks), and $100 for a "Flock
of Ducks" (26 ducks). You do
not have to be present to win.
Make sure all your ducks
are in a row by calling (352)
447-6152, or email
friendswgp@bellsouth .net.
The event is sponsored
by Friends of the Withla-
coochee Gulf Preserve.
CASA volunteers
meet monthly
CASA Citrus Abuse
Shelter Association volun-
teers meet at 10:30 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly at
CASA's outreach center
1100 Turner Camp Road, In-
verness.
Those interested in volun-
teering are welcome. Call
in~da Femnandez at (352)

HumnitantrianS
OF FLORIDA


erdystal Ch2rolethhas dot-
Corvette to United Way of
Citrus County and Black
Diamond Foundation.
Both groups are working
together for the benefit of
local charities they support.
Donation is $100.
The drawing will be at 2
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at
Crystal Chevrolet, 1035 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
Order tickets online at
www.citrusunitedway.org or
call (352) 795-5483.


to *l.'phHoosopce
Pets Plus, 20372 E. Penn-
sylvania Ave., Suite G, Dun-
nellon, will present "Pet
Photos with Santa" from 2 to
5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20.
There is a suggested do-
nation of $5 per photo. All
pets must be on a leash. All
donations will benefit patients
and families served by Hos-
pice of Citrus County.
For more information, call
Hospice of Citrus County De-
velopment Manager Linda
Baker at (352) 527-2020.
Rose Society
mOetS in Ocala
OCALA- Marion County
Rose Society meets at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20, at the
Marion Cou nty Ag Center Au-
ditorium, 2232 N.E. Jack-
sonville Road (County Road
200A), Ocala.
Meetings are open to all
who want to have fun learn-
ing about and sharing their
love of roses. Visit www.
marioncountyroses.org or
call (352) 341-0564.
IMaSORS to fry fish
in FlOr81 City
Floral City Masonic Lodge
No. 133, adjacent to the Flo-
ral City Library, will have a
fish fry from 4 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 26.
On the menu are fish,
fries, coleslaw, beans, hush
puppies, grits, beverage and
dessert. Cost is $8.50.
Lodge communications
are at 7:30 p.m. the first and
third Thursdays. Dinner is at
6 p.m.
For information, call (352)
673-4331.
Library hosts
Tinkers Nov. 2
New Age Thinkers will
meet at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 26, at Homosassa
library.
The topic this month will
be interpreting dreams and
knowing and understanding
your gu des. Guest seaker
will be the Rev. Janetp
Reynolds, who conducts
popular workshops all over
the United States and United

KinA omeinvited; space is
limited. For more information,
email miss-donna@
tampabay.rr.com or call
Donna at (352) 628-3253.
Jerseyans, friends
get together
New Jersey and Friends
Club of Citrus County will
meet at 1 p.m. Monday, Dec.
5, at VFW Post 4252 on
State Road 200 in Hernando.
Being from New Jersey is not
a requirement to join.
The club will wrap Christ-
mas gifts for distribution by
the Family Resource Center.
All are asked to bring scis-
sors, tape and any extra holi-
day paper. Call (352)
527-3568.
As for activities, Thanks-
giving Day dinner, Nov. 24,
will be at The Rustic Ranch
in Inverness, and reserva-
tions are being taken for the
annual bus trip to Biloxi from
Jan. 29 to Feb. 1. The club
will attend the Christmas
show Dec. 10 at the Show
Palace in Hudson. Also
scheduled is a day trip to
Tampa Bay Downs Feb. 29.
Call Mary Anne at (352)
746-3386.


Special to the Chronicle

Five years ago, someone at First
Baptist Church of Crystal River of-
fered a donation to promote a com-
munity Thanksgiving dinner. For the
dinner to serve the community, church
members determined they needed to
prepare a free meal to all.
The meal is offered to those who
may be alone that day, those who can-
not afford to prepare a special meal


and anyone else who would like to
enjoy heir meal in a friendly social

Food for 500 is prepared in the
kitchen and served from noon to 3
p.m. Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 24. Many
have enjoyed the fellowship, and food
preparers and servers enjoy partici-
pating in the ministry.
A project of this size requires many
volunteers. Those who want to help in
some way are asked to call the church


Opportunity Links is Dec. 7


The next Opportunity Links
will be 3 to 4:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, Dec. 7, at the Citrus
County Resource Center
Caf4, 2804 WT Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center and RSVP are
the engine through which
several local organizations
connect hundreds of volun-


teers to meaningful service
opportunities throughout Cit-
rus County NCVC/RSVP
works on a community-wide
basis across various issues to
develop high-impact volun-
teer programming.
Call(352) 527-5950 or email
ncyc~bocc.citrus.fl.us, or
visit the Web at www.nature
coastvolunteercenterorg.


Special to the Chronicle

Learn where you can make
a difference and discover
your niche in community
service. The Nature Coast
Volunteer Center and Re-
tired and Senior Volunteer


Program hosts a forum for
people to link up with volun-
teer opportunities.
This is an opportunity to
meet with NCVC/RSVP staff
and volunteer managers
throughout the county and
learn about their programs.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners presented a proclamation at the County Commission meeting Nov. 8 de-
claring the week of Dec. 1 to 7 as "Civil Air Patrol Week" in Citrus County. The Civil Air Patrol was established Dec. 1,
1941, by executive order of the director of Civilian Defense as an emergency measure to make civilian aviation resources
available to the national defense effort during World War II and following its wartime service, it was chartered by Congress
in 1946 as a volunteer, nonprofit corporation. In 1948, Civil Air Patrol was granted status as the civilian auxiliary of the
United States Air Force. Front, from left, are: Capt. Charles Scott Anderson, commander, Citrus County Composite
Squadron (FL-315); Lt. Col. Edward M. Voelker, CAP, finance offcer, Citrus County Composite Squadron (FL-315); Com-
missioner Rebecca Bays; Cadet Sr. M. Sgt. John M. Korycki, Citrus County Composite Squadron (FL-315); Maj. Keith M.
Shewbart, CAP, commander, West Citrus Cadet Squadron (FL445); and BOCC Chairman Dennis Damato. In back, from
left, are commissioners John "JJ" Kenney, Joe Meek, CAP Maj. Bill Sumner (former commander of the Citrus County Com-
posite Squadron and current professional development officer) and Commissioner Winn Webb. The Citrus County Com-
posite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol, comprised of senior (adult) and cadet (ages 12 to 18) members, was founded in 1976
and has worked with disaster preparedness and other local emergency agencies during drills and actual emergency situ-
ations for more than three decades.




Wildlife park to host Nov. 26 bird walk


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection's Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park, in cooperation with Citrus
County Audubon Society, will host the
first of the season's monthly bird walks
on Pepper Creek Trail on Saturday,
Nov. 26. There will be seven bird walks
offered at the wildlife park this season
running through April 2012.
Experienced birders will lead the


walk on this trail, one of 19 birding
trails in Citrus County that are part of
the West Section of the Great Florida
Birding Trail.
Participants should meet at 7:45
a.m. at the entrance to the park's Visi-
tor Center and the bird walk will begin
at 8 a.m. Binoculars and a field guide
are recommended.
Pepper Creek Trail is approxi-
mately 3/4 mile in length and follows
along the park's tram road connecting
the Visitor Center on U.S. 19 and the


west entrance on Fishbowl Drive. Par-
ticipants can either walk back or wait
and take the first returning boat after
the park opens.
There is no charge to use the Pep-
per Creek trail or for the return boat
trip. Monthly bird walks will be sched-
uled throughout the year, except the
months of December, and May through
August.
For more information, call (352)
628-5343, ext. 1002 or visit www.florida
stateparks.org.


Special to the Chronicle
Entice is a 15-week-old
purring charmer with a tor-
toiseshell coat and friendli-
ness to share. Entice is
just one of the many sweet
and playful kittens and
cats that remain at the
Hardin Haven while waiting
for a forever home. Visitors
are welcome from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
in~s'cManchste aHous o
44 and Conant Avenue
east of Crystal River. Cali
(352) 613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines on-
line at www.hofspha.org.


IR-RU plans
holiday to run
The IR-RU Family Social
Club will have its annual Christ-
mas Toy Run on Saturday, Nov.
26. Signup will begin at 9 a.m.;
riders will leave the clubhouse
at 11 a.m. sharp. Stops are yet
to be determined, but will be in
Citrus County.
Everyone is welcome. Partic-
ipants are asked to bring a new,
unwrapped toy to be donated to
needy children in the county. All
proceeds will benefit deserving
Citrus County children and their
families.


The last stop will be at the
clubhouse, 922 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Food and entertain-
ment will be provided.
For more information, call
(352) 637-5118.

'Cut-A-Thon' set
for Nov. 27
The Quick Stop Barber Shop
Cut-A-Thon will take place from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov.
27, at the Winn-Dixie Plaza at
3541 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills and the Hernando
Plaza at 2780 N. Florida Ave. in
Hernando.


Donations will benefit the
Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club.
Free hot dogs will be served.
There will be a live deejay from
M&M Entertainment at the Bev-
erly Hills location.
The event is sponsored by
the Chronicle and the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.

Extravaganza set
for NAWCC
OCALA Chapter 156 of
the National Association of
Watch and Clock Collectors
(NAWVCC) meets at 8 a.m. the


fourth Sunday monthly at VFW
Post 4781 at 9401 S.WV. 110
St., Ocala.
The Nov. 27 meeting is the
fall extravaganza, which con-
sists of many members parting
with everything from clock-re-
pair books to antique clocks
and watches. There will be
tools, parts and camaraderie.
Members will answer questions
and discuss clock or watch in-
terests with all who attend.
Sorry, no appraisals.
Set-up time is 7 a.m. Admis-
sion is free. All are welcome.
Free coffee and doughnuts
available.


m Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
a Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


mSubmit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
community@ch ron icleon line.com.


a Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
Expect notes to run no more than once.


Learn where to volunteer at forum


Civil Air Patrol Wleek


Entice


News N OT ES








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AaEE 54 48 54 154 25 127 To Be Announced To Be Announced |oBe Announced |oBe Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
(AMI) 55 64 55 55 *** "Rio Bravo"(1959) NR' *++1 "True Grit"(1969) John Wayne. A one-eyed marshal and a Texas Ranger aid a vengef ul teen. Hell on Wheels **++ "True Grit"(1969) 'G
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(ETI 96 19 96 96 ***h "Eve's Bayou"(1997, Drama) Jurnee Smollett, Meagan Good. R' |+++ "Ray"(2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx. Ray Charles overcomes hardships to become a legend. PG-13'
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(ESPNIi 33 27 33 33 21 17 lCollege Football |olg Football |College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) o
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(FAMI) 29 52 29 129 20 128 ** "Evan Almighty"(2007, Comedy) Steve Carell. PG + "Paul Blart:MIvall Cop"(2009, Comedy) Kevin James. PG' "Pul Blart:MIvall Cop"(2009, Comedy) Kevin James. PG'
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CIRO HIOSE E EVIE
WA Y S YUIK S LIED
EIRIAIS D IR IPP ING
SIEIN IO1RISI IRAITIE
FIL O HE Y
DAIR Y L MAASOINIS
RIHOI ABEIS R IAIT S
YEILIL OIOHS MII
MIEIAID O W O VERT
PIUNI RUIN
Q U EISTT I T RIEEINIS
UINIVIE LIEID CILOT
AIDIE E l RIE K LEE
YOINI SPIAR SIAL


CS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


PHILLIP ALDE R
Newspaper Enterpr-ise Assn.
Graeme Le Saux, a for mer Eng-
lish national soccer player, said:
"Digital (photography) has obvi-
ously changed things a Ict, but not
all for the better as far at; I'm con-
cerned. Of course it's much more
convenient and you're getting in-
stant results, but to me it iust lacks
the finesse of a roll of film, and it
has a slightly superimposed feel."
There is something appealing
about finesse doing things with-
out brute force. However, at the
bridge table, occasionally we must
bully our way to a contract with a fi-
nesse or two as in this deal.
South is in four hearts. West
leads the spade king. What should
declarer do?
North's raise to four hearts was a
tad optimistic, pre-emptive open-
ings not being as sound as they
used to be, even vulnerable. How-


B ee
North 11-19-11

S2
+ Q J 10 9
4 AK 7 4
West East
AKQJ 10 1 4 3

+A 7 643 + K 8 52
SJ 8 i Q 10 9 3
South
4g7 4
V K Q J 10 9 7 6


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West N rth 1 ass


Opening lead: K

ever, note that he did not bid three
no-trump, aware that he might


never see his partner's hand.
South has four losers: two
spades, one heart and one club. If
he wins the first (or second) spade
and immediately plays a trump, he
should concede those tricks. De-
clarer must reduce that loser
count.
The right play is to take a ruffing
finesse immediately by running
dummy's diamond queen and dis-
carding a spade from his hand, as-
suming East does not cover with his
king.
West takes the trick, cashes a
spade and shifts to a club.
South wins that on the board and
continues with another diamond,
discarding his club loser if East
does not play his king. Now it is
time to touch trumps. (If East does
cover the second diamond, South
ruffs and leads a trump. His last
club disappears when he is back on
the board in clubs.)


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
toform four ordinary words.d~
TOMHU -

Z .E
@2011 Tnibune Media Services, Inc v r
All Rights Reserved.
TIWYT w


NIAIGM -
u. Irm



3 a~I



CONST~(AnOswr Monday)


cerned about the state of
education, specifically as
it relates to the elimi-
nation of services.
I am a high school
counselor who is pas-
sionate about helping
students and their
families navigate
through some of life's
most difficult obsta-
cles, including drug
and alcohol abuse, bul-
lying, teen pregnancy,
divorce, peer-pres-
sure, self-esteem is- ANN
sues and academic
LAI
struggles, to name a MA
few.
Just as you often indicate in
your column, sometimes school
counselors are the only safe, reli-
able, resourceful adults with
whom students can share their
problems. However, in an at-
tempt to save money, some
schools are eliminating coun-
selors, and the academic sched-
uling portion of our job is being
delegated to clerical staff.
I am not blaming anyone. I un-
derstand the dilemma, but I am
heartsick at the thought that stu-
dents in need of emotional sup-
port are being abandoned. I
admire our teachers and believe
they make every effort to play a
supporting role in the healthy de-
velopment of our students. But
with increased class sizes, that
option of intervention and sup-
port is unrealistic.
It is my hope that this letter
will help make our communities
aware of the services available
through their school counselors,
as well as the need to keep these


services intact. -J.
Dear J.: Budget cuts in nearly
every state affect the public
school system in ways
that communities
don't always grasp
Until it's too late. Kids
today are faced with
social and academic
issues that their par-
ents never contem-
plated. Often, school
Counselors are the
only thing standing be-
tween our children
and utter collapse. We
IE'S hope this letter helps.
.BOXDear Annie: My son
B X and daughter-in-law
live a few hours away,
and I can't get them to come and
visit. We get to see my two grand-
sons only if we drive to their
house, and yet they have no prob-
lem driving twice that far to see
her parents and spend the week-
end with them. On the rare occa-
sions when they come by, my
daughter-in-law barely spends
any time with us.
When they need a babysitter, I
am expected to drop everything.
Don't get me wrong. I love spend-
ing time with the grandkids. But
sometimes I get so frustrated at
being taken advantage of that I
want to say no. I have always
been there for my son, but now it
seems we only talk when they
need something.
Am I selfish to want them to
visit more, or should I just be
happy that we get to see them
every few months when they
need a babysitter? Frustrated
Grandma
Dear Grandma: You aren't
being selfish, but sometimes


there isn't much you can do. The
wives often run the social life of
the family. Your daughter-in-law
wants to be with her parents
more than her in-laws, and your
son has given up, doesn't care
enough to remedy the situation
or agrees with her. If you want to
see your son more often, you will
need to make the greater effort,
and it will help if you can
chummy up to his wife.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Strong but Broken," who
wanted to confront the bully she
knew in high school 40 years ago.
Her therapist was probably right
that the bully won't remember.
I found out at my 20th class re-
union that the bully in my life had
no recollection of making one
solid year of high school a living
hell for me. What a waste of my
energy to hate her for 20 years.
A friend told me to write down
everything I'd ever wanted to say
to her, read it, tear it up and bury
the pieces in the backyard. I did
that and then washed my hands
of the dirt, as well as the entire
experience. Feel Better Now


Annie's M~ailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and M~arcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please email your
questions to
anniesmailbox~comcast~net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W Cen-
turyBlvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles,
CA 90045. To find out more
aboutrlnnie's Iailbox and read
fea tures by other Crea tors Syn-
dicate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at wwwcreators~com.


ACROSS
Lavish party
Thieve
Icicle locale
cFronway
Mother lode
material
Potato buds

Spring fest
sites
Mia y-eyed
Foot part
Mlimic

nickname
"Shane" star
Camel's back
Hreaugh
Chorus
platform
Sunflower
Faa liar auth.


Bing Crosby
tune
Sft drnk
(2 wds.)
Pleasure
Mr. Chaney
Boom box issue

S otyetrucks
for short '
Thin Man's
Ct rn gin
name
Mlounties' org.
Spring
Leg ppart
DOWN
Rulm-soaakd


Answer to Previous Puzzle


kiolnist 6 Gve an
Leopold address
Bachelor's 7 Over and above
party 8 Want-ad letters
enser 9 Jean Auel


st ndin
Latin I verb
Animal friend
Type of
ech pe
Avoid
Taj Mlahal site
Bankrutu ,
(2 wds.)
Bear
constellation
companion
Furtive

Burr or
Copland
"Keystone"
Dawtnan
Kind of folder
"Grand -
Opry"
Radns cats
Remarkable
deed
txs pernpower
Have arash
Freight hauler
Cable channel
Brikwonf d


11-19


@ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I





TELL ME AGAIN WHY T'M DOING
VO U'RE H ER E I NSTEAD H IS LAUNDRY
OF BEETLE? FOR A VEAR!


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public L clR D O WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODA Y'S CLUE: Z equals V


CITRUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


COMICS


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 09


Peanuts


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


WRAY ARE
90 oo OK( 10
AT, A\ELGoNl?
Y' oclR '

O~R GARS.







Sally Forth -


\U 000 Vo 90
7cik\K \ AM,
MR. ofATo
READ?
YoU TAKE
YOORTEETH


Beetle Bailey


IT'S THE WORST DECIS ON I COULD
MAKE SINCE I DECIDED
TO KEEP NETRLIX. YA, 0TY

LASTED ONE MORE
WEEK. SAME APPLIES


YOU'RE SO LUCKY I'DDOANYTHIINGTO
TO 80OUT WITH GO OUT WITH HER
Miss BUXLEY A ~-


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


I WANT TO FIRE
WALLY, B3UT I
CAN'T RISK IT.









The Born Loser


ARE
YOU IT MUST BE.
SURE NO ONE ELSE
THAT'S HAS EVEN
TRUE? HEARD OF IT.









I LtCHE. CRKINGT TO
SEE ROW R\GKT TC\E
GOT IT i


SHE SAYS HE'S
STHE ONLY ONE WHO
SCAN PROGRAM THE
ZEBERPUPIN SYSTEM.


Blondie


I'M GONNA THIANKCS, ELMO,
PRETEND I ISOMEfiMES WHEN
DIDN'T I CHEW FAST IT
H~EAR TH~AT MESSES UP MV
SMR~e -- TH-INKICIC


-~eC-


WRAT DOI jlT 00ESN'T MATTER
VO IE TO ME, ELMO! VOU
MR. B., YOU'VE TASTED
GREEN -THEM ALL ;1
ouva o@


~s~5~':



i=-1L~j


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Sally doesn't have any brothers or
Sisters. That makes her
a |Onely child."


"I'm speechless, too, Teddy. I just can't
believe Tommy left the baby and me. He
said what we had wasn't real and that he
was tired of pretending."


Doonesbury


Betty


1,ASTLY, I CANIT THANK
Al-1 OF YOUI ENOUGH FOR
CO/WINCI OUT. 11/ASK A
LOT FRObt OUR YOL.
UNT56RS..











MY GRANDPARENTS!
SOTH OF THEM!
SO r INTERVIEWED
TWICE AS MANY
PEOPLE AS YOU
ASkED US TO I


Big Nate


Frank & Ernest


Arlo and Janis


Today's M MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D 1:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No
passes.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-
13) 1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Immortals" (R) In Real 3D. ID required. 1 p.m., 3:50
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) In Real 3D 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m.


No passes.
"Happy Feet 2" (PG) 4:40 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
The Twilight Saga: "Breaking Dawn Part I" (PG-
13) 1:20 p.m., 1:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 5:10
p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.,
10:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jack and Jill" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10 p.m.
"Immortals" (R) In Real 3D. ID required. 1:10 p.m., 5
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Tower Heist" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:35
p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"In Time" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) 2 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Puss in Boots" (PG) In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m.


Ilmes subject to change; call ahead.


Garfield


IJN T TC1\$ YESjTERDAY 5P
WEATHER FORECAST T


YE.AR-1RECORDED T~ I


WRIY tDO YOU WANT TO
Wt'~ATCIR YESTE.RDAY/
FORECA5T TODAYYOU rl
~j\ALREADY( KNOW WRAT'5
C\APPEREDI


BUITI HOPE YOU ALL A6RE6
THE 97AK69 HAVE N5V5R
RO~HTER 1,K5 51ZABETH IN
THE 66NAT THE COUNTRY


" NPTE V


SDJ LDG W DH NPRX LDDG


CRWK, TEG WD H LR ZK J X RW B KG DEDN


CD ZK RN K EDJ LP. LTH HRXDE V KRCCD H

Previous Solution: "Talking about dreams is like talking about movies, since the cin-
ema uses the language of dreams." Federico Fellini
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc., 11-19























* ~ l L- 1









I I-rl~n.


I


I


r~ttnusvarn lan I Lnnn


BUSINESS HOURS**

MON DAY- FRI DAY

8:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily...................................... PM, Daily
Homef ront / Sunday.................................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday................................... PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday..................................4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday...............l 1 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.......................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday....................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Meadowerest Blvd.
Er lyelw faretlove tyou
Life Care Nursing
Home.
At hospital the first
move was make, it was
bh dsrrah mve ,itht
bu nsw e ra h rt asned
contact me at 3780
Forest Dr. Inverness
34453 or call
1(352) 341-1138
I love you Emily
Rod ie
Young thinking 82 year
old guy 5 7" 1601bs, ac-
tive ISO similar slim lady
rani nsh isporneh m
light of our years. Photo
if possible. Mail to: F.
Paul, R.O Bo 282

HennoF 344


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm., CHA, $525.
mo. + Sec. 87 Regina
Blvd. (352) 422-0139
BLUE PITBULL

UKCa re. eh Orert.'
(352) 287-0530







CITRUS
SPRINGS
Sat Sun 8-4p

golfclus bks r

(352) 322-5648
CRYSTAL. RIVER

CMhu tfaily; cuh dhjn
Longaberger
DUNNELLON
SCENTSY Open House
Cash & Carry Items
Sat Only
10981 N. Circle M Ave
off 4 8DL n elon Rd


2002 Taur s.a few
dens bt r~u s2 lea


Golf cart, excellent
condition, Charger, rain
cover, windshield,
$700. (352) 726-3351
HIGHLANDS,
Remodeled 2/1/1,
w/ 2 adqd ional ots,

(352)5 9970- 884


S d kU AAAAAA 4puz. com






3


8 75 2


5 27 8


Remode ing Addit ons,

Eok.L c#RC 2 0 8

Sofa Table,
Oak, Mission Style
$75.
(352) 382-5486



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASkHyP ID $$
35-634-5389s.
A FREE...FREE..sFREE...
metal alc, appls. auto s
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
*Running or Not *
CASH PAID -$200 & UP
(352) 771-6191




T2 Dgds eree

Be 17fulf r-ale cat,
stray, white & tabby
very friendly, free

fertilizer hrsel manure
mixed with pine shavings,
orr ucrh 326n -62
Fr..
Complete Santa claus
Suite 8 rs.aCaus Dres
(352) 382-2864


Fdow wn hau a
352-628-9624
Free Goat
Nig rin 2mae Pe7 ase

FREE HORSE MANURE
No shavings easy
access, I will pay $10.
for you to take a truck
full 5846 N.Buffalo Dr.
Pine Ridge
352-270-3109
FREE TO GOOD HOME


KeG awadand oM t r
3. Dell P iter6 pier

KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Special home needed
for ashy rescue
d lk s-aglse mxt
(35 a7s2e6c4678


Granite Fabricator

Experienced only
352-34-2160

POOL CAGE

INSTALLERS, OWN
STeOL e&E UtPMcNt
county ChronicleBlind
Box 1744-P 1624 N1
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
crystal River, FL 34429


ouropl Ir ne wrks.~I~r


POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Servers &
Bartenders
Experience Required
Applications
available at
Humannl2 sources
9860 SW 84th Court
Ste E Oca FLE34481








Advertising
SaIOS
Assistant

The Citrus county
Chronicle
is now accepting
P rt Tm oio of

Assist sales depart-
ment, manage work
flow crae fi sertion

Excel,& Word.
Ability to work well in
a deadline driven
environment.
Excellent customer
Service Skills.

Computer
prof tiency a rnust.
ahcacuray IMust



Fax or mail cover
letter and resume
to HR at:
352-564-2935




B v. Crsa Riweep F
34429
Qualified
applications must
undergo drug
screening, EOE

Application
Deadline
November 25th



RES DENT CARE


Vt aNewaH er on
residential care facil-



tprovieoqu ts d re.

se nar ecur ent hft
professional to
provide care and
training to these
individuals through
direct care. Hours


*HS diploma or
equivalency.
*Ability to pass a
po tofr thial
mandatory criminal
invb igtin dnd
reference inquiry.
*Demonstrated oral
communications
skills.
*Ability to lift up to
50 lbs.
New Horizons Village
offers:
*Competitive wages
and a tobacco-free
campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at 1275 N.
Lec oow LL4 61.
(352) 746-3262.


edger 3.8H nes carb
work -352-270-9021




pasture Tau giving
hre -nes crakne bono
ics, family raised. Whole
$3/Ib 352-746-1999
AT HARRISON GROVE
Grapefruit, Navels, etc.
Hwy. 48, closed Sun.
Floral City 726-1154
FRESH CITRUS @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E. on
Ed n sr frsh ply 4
MUSTARD & COLLARD
GREENS,CLOSED SUN
9A-5P, 352-726-6378
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
1c. pr ,,


Crystal River V Igreens
Posteoffk e or Sevenb Rv
on Monday 11/14
352-422-6945



FOUND
Military Service Ring
Inverness Area
Call to ID 637-6250
FouND Sat at
Homosassa Seafood
Festival, Item in small
white box. call to ID
(352) 746-3662
Lab mix Puppy

SprigBv D tna
call to ID
(352) 422-7536
Male Dog, found near
McKinley St
Bud awth cor sack
russell (352) 302-6968




raI SHOoT

Brooksill tEk Lomge
14494 cortez Blvd St




FRESHc JMBO SHRIMP

stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500



Fl Pt x Rq



TODAY'S CHILD
Equal Op Em loyer
(352) 44-9 44




Pool Attendant
P/T a
Housekeeping/
Locker Attendant
P/T Of F/T

FoitUnpscal p &


Crossing Hernando










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes
OnIy $28.50
inclu es a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


********


#1 Affordable

Am & PM classes
aefvourcna~com
352-341-PREP (7737)
DIETARY AIDE

PRN/PT posltlon for
our skilled nursing
facility. We offer a
good salary & work


Rehabllltailon Center
701 Medlcal CourtE
Inverness

Notf~or proflt

Medical Assistant
Needed for
c rdiloan pract ce.
proficient in manual
vital signs and ECG
collection. This is a
full-time position with
competitive wage
and benefits. Appli-
cant will be required
to work independ-
ently with additional
duties including front
office responsibilities.
Please send resume

resume4879t~ampaba
y.rr.com


Fill in the squares so that each row, column, an
3-bv-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


$300 is a bad
day! Fortune 500

Security @ l. ist.
aasl or et yliv to
mgmt. Great pay /
full bedeis eWe train.

oppy's. co. trans.
avail. H.S. Diploma or
GED req'd.
No Felonies.
352-597-2227

EXP. LANDSCAPE


Trimmin Elp ONaEMust
A9p20 E.i rA n .
HERNANDO
Telemarketing
Mg'-
Must be exp. Please
hspondhat it tke u
Base pay + bonus
Call Salina
1-877-828-2662
TOWER HAND
St lina at S9 1-1 n


352-694-8017 Mon.-Fri.
WATEBDAC M UITY

We are looking for indi-
viduals to represent the
Chronicle in their com-
munities. These are
non-paid positions that
can reap benefits for
the individual and their
community. Interested
in findings It more.
kstewa ~hrnicleo




Music/choir director
w/piano capabilities,
pt, salary neg, send
resume(by Dec 3rd)
to:F.C.U.M.C, PO Box
47, Floral City, FL 34436
ifbhicekd rnustdagre to

P/T Cleaners Exp.
BH, Lecanto, & CR
637-0585, 476-4202



Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistancel

T 877 359-16 E

352 23CPR2 2, 861-2715




SENeACYR AR
SBENE'S Inter flional I
S7027 US Hwyl9 34652 1


MASSAGE THERAPY


SNew Port Richey ol
SDoaySsholno 218
Mon.-Fhrl. 8-2pm

aX R MEDHOG CH

(Pr im vil t'



I

( tr.-rl .-p I


NE W~b~!

2 Week Courses!
*PHYSICAL REHAB
TEH 450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
EMKEGIC4 .ASSISTANT
*L ADMINISTRATOR







SEWING MACHINE with
treadle. Beautifue o k

great shape. $100.
352-746-1486
SOLID WROUGHT IRON
SEWING MACHINE
BASE Mke~s nieble


S'I ''

S0' P AOCdKe InEs
clean smoke-free $150
352-897-41 54
AUDUBON BOOK:
Birds of America
1966 edition
$100
352-795-9819
SCHLITZ ICE COLD
CBOR. LG TS Good
Shape $50 352-897-4154











AAAAAAAA~
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Ca|| our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





H30WGallonan


(3 2) 32-45d 1
A/C + HEAT PUMP
SYSTEMS
starting at seao
Instal ato 8 / ermit

Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
CHEST FREEZER


REFRIGERATOR, MI-
CROWAVE, STOVE,
DISHWASHER White
Kmret rs e yside reer
and water, electric stove,
w de i unter micr 10
years old and working.
Sel all for$ 0.00
352-897-4361
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD
OR ALIVE
Washers & Dryers
Working or not.
(352) 209-5135
Washer & D ry
Whirlpool~white. lke
new, S neca city
352-465-5382


SOFTWARE
ENGINEERS/
PROGRAMMERS
CHAMPS Software,
Inc. in cooperation
with Cirscounty

btr n xper r e
and aspiring software
engineers/programrmis,
beadingtofull
time positions in
CHAMPS enterprise
software develop-
ment team. The
training will focus on
Microsoft Visual

WS dp t deo-
ment metodrlo ges.

please submit your
resumet training@






EXP. LINE COOK

AGo Benefins,at

1360 SdW 15te A enue
(on 14w2. 20601n fl484)


LINE COOKS

Experience On~ly!
No Phone Calls
1960 US Hwy 19N
Across from Mall








Accepting
applications for


Advertising
Sa|GS Reps

Sell print and online
avrisin nr


Service established
customers and
prospect for new
advertising customers

* Two years sales exp.


+ uthv initiative,
be self-motivated.
+ Strong skills in
planning/oganizing,
listening, written and
verbal communica-
tion, problem solving
and decision
-making aptitude.
+ Strong presentation
skills preferred.
+ Reliable transporta-
tion to make local
and regional sales
calls.
Send Re ue tand

chronicleonline.com
EOE~ drug screen
require cfor final


TELE MARKETERS
5 Needed Now
9-4pm week days
only! No weekends
Hourly + bonus
Call Salina
877-828-2662





Exp. Cabinet Shop


Building am atim Rply to
Blind Box 1743 P
Cit~ru Coun dCohronce
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida. 34429


F/T Receptionist
Must be pleasant,
well versed on the
phone, good
customer serylce,
multl-tasker medical
exp a plus, for busy
MFeadx:c Rs m

MEDICAL CLASSES
r X-RAY e MED TECH
CPR & *HIV
352-235-9222, 586-2715
MEDICAL
RECORDS CLERK
AND SECRETARY
Wanted for busy
medical practice, or-
ganized and efficient
indivisdua)1s neededdto
medical records.2
positions available
F/T with benefits
Email resume
citruspractice609@
yahoo.com

NEEDED
Experie c d,



flexH 1cedl ofed

(352) 860-0885

NOW HIRING

RN'S
All Unitxswit Hospltal

Apply on Line: www
nurse-temps.com *
(352) 344-9828

Nur e~s TAl Sfs

Apply In person
Mon FrI 9nF oo 4m.

2333 N Brentwood Clr
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free FacilltY

RN Supervisor

3 l shift Mdnaday
Ple se Appl Otn ne

mdcwasa nte
centers.com.


RN/LPN
Nurse Analyst
Permanent Part Time
p tecinai onomf 2
henwirom ntr to
standing over your
shoulder requiring a
self-starting, task ori-
ented Nurse. The po-
sition will be part of a
team-oriented solu-
tion to loss revenue
prevention and re-
covery. Excellent op-
portunity for perma-
nent part-time
hours~no weekends,
no overtime,
no patient care

Buny iaramitoo at

bunny~mvpg.com.

Social Services
Director

Apply In person
Mon- Frlday 9 4pm.
Health center at
2333 Brnt odod Clf
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D/V/M/F
Drug Free Facillty




Executive
Director
Local Charity
Job Description
Overe ecoa fu actions;

accept challenges
and cle~mads of the

Technical Skills
Familiar with Outlook,
Word and Excel,
history with dbases
Access, or Donor
Express Lite a plus.
Respond via:
cubexecdirectork
embarqmall.com or
fax 352.344.2146

(Please, no calls
or walk-ins)


'Ie ~ I V I II I '


010 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


CITRUS COLWTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


45
76
1 3
5 2
8


6 7
2 9
3 8


21637
98 4 21
87 5 92
73 1 6
6 9 4

,5 8 4
54 185
4 67854


Sugarril W ds, Cy
prssh tld.ml F ekt
feline friendblseuncon-

3 23 2-497
P Bl(mix)

white with brindle
oame clarFie dlya
well behaved. Last
seen Nov 1 Ith on
Parson Pt in
l-ernando. I-is name



spots of his back.
REWARD

904-2 3- 782 my cell
or 35 2n4227274







I EW41D $1000. No
Min Pi ornales l0bs

ms last see Snu 87
Oak Crystal River
(352) 257-9546
352-400-1519
REWARD
Two 8 Week Old
Pomeranian Puppies
Male silver/black
Bla Oais 0 1 l
Downt60wr HO~m assa


cI


mm m m m m m m m m
BATTERIES: BATTERY REBUILD SERVICES:
Laptop I GPS Laptop Battery ,
S- Cell/Cordless Phone U.P.S. Backup "
CameralCamcorder Cordless Vacuums
I-WatchlElectronic Custom Battery Rebuild
-Wheelchair/Scooter I

rg rgeRecha gables/Cha grs I rieS
AirsoftRC et.

I Askab~out our monthly specials!
3850 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness I
SNew Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Closed Saturday & Sunday
(352) 344- 1962 Bring this coupon geta free pack of batteries. I


00011


Classifieds


OSSlcrfeCS In Print arnd Online A// The Time!


CIT RUS COUNTY






CH ONICL
www. ch ronicleonline. com


~18


There are immediate opportunities for independent contractors to manage


and grow single copy newspaper routes in Citrus and Marion Counties


*Be at least 18 years of age. Possess a valid driver's license.
*Possess proof of liability insurance. Have 2 dependable vehicles.

Routes are 7 days a week, early morning hours.



CCITRUS COUNTY,,.1. .~,.,....,. .,.,, ...





11-19 @ LaughingStock International Inc,Dist by Universal Uclck for UFS, 2011

"Daddy, this is my new husband, Bernie.
He's a veterinarian."









JOHN GORDON ROOFING


HOme Inspections
(352) 302-9269


Shotcrete 545iyd.
Decks Tile
FREE *Z Pavers
ESTIMATES

GRE 6'S COMPLETEREOE



&LINSURED 3 2- 4- 2 &





BATH FITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In lUSt One Day,
We Will installA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your OMd One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATH FITTER.COM


WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
like new, excellent condi-
tion. Can deliver
352 263-7398
Whirlpool Side by side
w/ ice & water on door
glass top range,
dishwash, & above
range microwave,
Excel. cond. $650.
(352) 382-2743



Electric Pressure
Washer Karcher K 3.97
high pressure $100.
Craftman 16" elect
scroll saw
$100.Craffman 10"
band saw $100
(352) 746-6369
MITER SAW benchtop
10" miter saw works fine
$35.00 352-794-3020
PORTER-CABLE
10" Table Saw with
wheels, $200
(352) 410-1392
RADIAL ARM SAW
cr fsc n 50 oa ia 0


S e aS eC BNsDd
352 637 5171



SONY 13 INCH T.V.
WITH REMOTE GREAT
FOR KID'S ROOM.
GOOD CONDITION.
$20.00 352-726-0686
TV 25" color tv with
stand. Great picture.
$40.00V352-344-1692

color 19" $20
13" color TV.$15.

5 ''


INTERIOR DOOR $15
352-777-1 256



DIESTLER COMPUTER



VHS movies/100+
Drama,war,travel,classics
$30 for all
352-795-9819

mI I I *

PATIO TABLE Glass top
patio table and 4 chairs
for $99.00 and includes
extra glass top.
352-382-0741


Im r
2 LEATHER RECLINERS
Dark Brown,
nearly new,
$500 Both
352-465-4966


Bed, mattress, box spring
and two night stands
$600 Phone: 726-8931 or
201-7518
Queen Bedroom Set
Mattress ,Box springs
2 night stands, chest of
drawers, dresser
w/mirror, $700 (352)
746-2710/726-7104
Queen Hide A Bed
Oa cffe t bl
352-564-8915
QUEEN TEMPURPEDIC
Cashmere Memory
Foam Mattress
Good cond Paid $4500
sell$ 1200 obo
(352)419-436
Round Oak Table and
4 chairs $125
352-586-8576
sofa & Love seat
$300. 2 wall mirrors
60x3" & 37x28.5" $50
ea. cedar chest $50.
352 746-2710/746-7104
Sofa Table,
Oak Mission Style
(352) 3 2-5486
TOWER ACK OCODIDD
352-777-1256
wATERBED,hw/r stress

ca4 et, soage un r
5:30 p.m. 563-1241


CIASSIFIEDS



~mT171

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 19th, 8lam-Until
Lots of omens clothes
Sz.14-Lg., what knots
dishes, furn. & More
961 N. Rhyme Point


YARD SLE

C RYSTA L
RIVER
Saturday, 8a -2p
Too Much to List!
2595 N. Crede Ave


IRQV.1NG

(AI l E
DUNNELLON
Fri. 18th &Sat. 19th
SrENTIRE HOUSEHOLD
4195 E. Riverside Drive
DUNNELLON
SCENTSY Open House
Cash & Carry Items
10981 N il eM Ave
off 438 D 2elo~n Rd




FLORAL CITY
Fri & Sat 8AM-5PM
2 b s e ln 5 siz uin c





FLORAL CITY
Fri Sat. 9am-2pm
antique quilt frames
h ch d itmwindo
7538 E. Camellia ct.







FLORAL CITY
Sat. only. 8IAM-3PM
Major clean out. Every-
thing has to go Lots for
$1 or less.
8247 Molly Lane.



FLORAL CITY
Thurs. 17, Friday 18
& Saturday 19,
BIG YARD SALE
8278 s. Bedford Road




GOSPEL
ISLAND


box w/2 tier, antiques
collectibles, hsehld
items & more
7907 E Gospel Island
Road


sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 C11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


picewi e s
good cond. $120 De-
signer beige couch,
new cond. $200
(352) 382-3892
6 STACKING DINER
CHAIRS metal commer-
cial stacking chairs with
brown vinyl.
$50. 726-4517
BEAUTIFUL CHAISE
ANTIQUE ACCENT


Beauiul 1hr y Wood
Entertainment center
with Drawers
Plus TV,
$150.
(352) 382-3892
BEAUTIFUL CROWN
FORACCENTANTIQUE
WALL FOR BED $90
SET ANGEL WALL $30
352-777-1256
CHINA HUTCH
curved glass, dark
wood, exc. cond. very
old $400(352) 287-9830
COUCH
Love Seat, over size
chair w/ottoman, glass
tcb sete table wh/e W

(32 5-11128050
Dining Room Set
5 pcs. Ok exc

352-257-3625
DINING ROOM SET cre-

de abchin r a i t dta-
nice, $1,200. Call after
5:30 p.m. 563-1241
Dining room set, table,
2 leafs, 6 chairs, china
closet, $300.
(352) 637-3041
DINING ROOM TABLE


(352) 563-6327
Entertainmenteenter,

shod X2 a bn s o


Fre 5223 TI BOX
SRNGSe Clean,
352-897-4154
King Size Bed
w/metal frame, mat-
tress on solid platform
pd $1100 new asking

LAMP AP2LE lu4 N-
DLE $25 TOP CRYSTAL
$20 Desk Chair Black
$20 352-777-1256
Lane ROcliner
caber clor vr
old. $100(352) 628-7224

and foundation,dual
controls. Similar to
Sleep Number. $850

PAU'S5F2U7- TRE
Llmlted hrs. Nov.15-19
Closed Nov. 15 Open
Wed-Sat, 9am-noon
(352) 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808


saUS}ll.S ~

Hsehold Items. wood
chipper
669W. National St




=- "'



CITRUS
SPRINGS
Sat sun 8-4
golf clubs, bikes, pro
karoke equip
w/music& med equip
8171 N Primrose Dr
(352) 322-5648


NEIGHBORHOOD


CRYSTAL
GLEN
HF ia~t48ae ono


HERNANDO
sat Sun 7a-3p. tools
fishing gear ,crafts,
antiques,
2727 N. Florida Av
at US 41 & Hwy 200



Mobile Home Park Yard
Sale
Fri 18th and Sat 19th
8AM -3PM


IRQ V lNG:
5 _A 1..
Homosassa
Fri & Sat 8AM-4PM
Fishing equip~dishes,
and more(Sasser Oaks)
501I S Craig Point





HOMO S 3S
Everything must go,
Ch~rismao tes fren





Fri & Sat 8AM-noon
Good gift items
321 N Osceola St











INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-unil
4401 S. CoeLarke Terr.





INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat., 9am-6R i
ItHUGE Mult FamlY
onlet us N. Cofe KmakTrt
boebhindrs t: les




INVERNESS
Fri.8 & Sat. 19, a-4p

bike, TblestNo~aw,
Weeid Peatier, ewy
somieHmeantiqes,



422E ing. Eagle ct .

off independence


CRYSTAL RIVER
6515 W Robin Lane
Fri,Sat&Sun-Nov.25-27
10am-6pm
Collectibles,housewares,
Xmas items,some
furniture.


75 ye Sa .
Christmas, household,
Longaberger





CRYSTAL
RIVER
Fri Sat Sun 8-2pm
A little bit of
every thinall
Stt on. ofwy 19





Crystal River
Sat 8a-1p
7012 Pinebrook St






CRYSTAL

Sat 8a-4p X-C/mas
decorations, books,
tools, clothes etc.
CornerCitrus Av.& 488


G raeaamAnou Sae




INVERNESS
Sat 8-2


3777 E..Foxwood Lane



5 ALE

satura RN9, 9AM
CARPORT SALE
Furniture & Misc Items
9060 Cashiers Court




INVERNESS
Saturday Nov 19 8a-2p
HUGE MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
2105 Hwy 44 W


INVERN ESS
Sat Sun 8a-5p
5549 E. Tenison St







Pine Ridge
Frisat 8a-5p, pictures
wall decor, tools,
hundreds of crochet
patterns.hbdig
5592 Bedstrow Blvd.




PINE RIDGE
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
Saturday 19th 8I:30am-?
xmas, sports, fitness, &
home good, Chevron
& other collectibles,
toys & Much Morel
2233 W. Begonla Dr.


miT
Thomas Elecmri LLC

LeRair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377





Go5 Own FnCOingc
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
BOB BROWN'S
35ence 01 -cp~ing4
ROCKY'S FENCING



ree Et, Lic & In. Stc



Deliv~e d3& S aked.

Premium Seasoned split
Firewood $80 Per Stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352
SEASONED
SPLIT OAK FIREWOOD
4x8 $80
(352) 621-1656

SASl I D SPOD

(32 2 b5306




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
uoc a n. as2-62i-assi
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
HOM RP LIABLE
*1 /5 -27-90 S


5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977
ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL






#1AA+TECHN LGES

LiPI58m6a 327s4 d77
Andrew Joehi
Handyman,
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
t nsutrs. ueaNeo jb
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
FAST
JAFFO DALBLE
HOME REPAIRS
03/5 -7-9e08 PA


Affo able Handyman
AFFORDABLE
J RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
A 352-257-9508 A




Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803
Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, oddjobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Tile
work. Lic.#CRCl330081
Free Est. (352)949-2292




COEAN NE' HOcME


Li./Flns d352 7 583

V THIS OUT

Dean Fami /
Clean-

ing business
Since '96
813-787-2198
352-341-843
9 Office
EXPECT THE BEST
HOUSECLEANING.
Fantastic/Dependable
Free***t. 201-4141
NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-631 1



ART'S AFFORDABLE &
RELIABLE HANDYMAN
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803

CORRINE'S HOME


Li ./ns. 3 5 7 583


All AROUND TRAT R

352-795-5755






FloridaStscapes, LLC ng

FREE est: Yard Clean Up
Mowing, and MORE
Call 352.201.7374








FalClean up, bed,
bushe, haul, since 1991
(352) 7226-970



Mowerg Generator
Uc#l 9 22073 4


A-1 Hla ulin, Cleanp,
lawn m~auintfun&mic. 19
Mak(352) 72897-077


IHlliii l
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
Rob's Screening &
Re air Lic/ins, Free Est
sI nt en~t is 8 gae




windowsgarage scrns.
628-0562 (CBCl257141)


I I

S ITTAYS APPUIANCE
Dry rs2 Fre 8P k Up




Clay ool Wnow Film

(352) 794-3069




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998




Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903

u/ THIS OUT.
PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
Repairs & Consigment
30 yrs Cert. Best Prices
& Guar 352-220-9435




Loving Adult Care
Home (SL 6906450)
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem Nursing
homes do not need to
be your only alternative
352-503-7052




ROGERS Construction
sAm7 3 1 2n6385




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnlngs *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repalrs .352 613-2518




Clean Ups 8:
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190


nnimr
Looking For a Pro
Guitar Instructor?
10 yrs teaching exp.
all ages & skill levels
for info. 352-620-5210





AFFORD L BLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est
S352-257-9508 A

RLABET BAHOANDDMAEA
Discount for Sr.'s, ALL
kinds of repairs, FREE
Est., Lic/Ins. 795-8803



(352) 422-337

Bato re oel

handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



#1 BOBCAT FOR HIRE
Light land clearing, site
work, grading, hauling.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!!!
Lic. & Ins. 352-400-0528

se ilzi'gW rn ce u
ro.maint. 302-6955


mIe
Chris Satchell Painting
a walicovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting




Handyman Dave
Pressure Clean, Paint &
Repairs, odd jobs &
hauling (352) 726-9570


INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic.11ns.
(352) 726-9998




1Ti Herndon Plma ng

I insF142283395 o




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352- 41-3300



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705
DIESTLE CO TR






Bianchi Concrete
D ieas-il t s-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL


DFlcee a veR &ocnkee
arese ams par
Prices 35422-/527-1807
ROB'SR MASONRY
Driveways &ea Courts
Tracto wrkpi, sAll nids 8
Lric.s #176 26-6554 0



rdo CNRTop Solb,
Driveway / tactr w k
TAllo AROUND TACTO ki



SiePeDriveways.Taco wr


Lic. & Ins. 352- 795-5755




WOUN 5 rsEDeRx

FAL -r5a 6ear~s ep





#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed

LiTc.56 32 7 6357 7 7

EC-13002696




R h./omE. 0 1 Olns.
352-302-2366
DUN-RITE Elect
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
EFreOEs 2-e2 n7
Citrus Co. Since 1978



,,, ..*


mr~n
Affordable Handyman
I/FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guar. *Free Est

t~ na5 n25m-8 Jr

are uds r a lic ne

service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don t see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it


wantdsore eupciu hat

provide e proofthact
they are licensed t o
business. Foeirquestos
abouty busoiness
licntsig pleasue chall
your city ore oute gov-
ernrments officesla.


Be a hiofa6 y sk -up.
Pasvtu se nhag21avail


Wuintes Fr Spe tiaBaai
tar out & sinestal-
tienion352-302-6053


A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Shwes
Firs .Safetv Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.





Fee 3 e ts)80-45
All Tractor Work Serylce
specializing in clean up
Tree Removal, General
prop. maint. 302-6955
DOUBLE STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, liclins 302-8852


CRFN t REE Se

R RpeIG cae aes

352-341-6827


RON ROBBINS Tree Serv
Trim, Sh p& Remv
Lic/Insap Feee Estrn ie
wood avail.. 628-2825



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
mRe ars- all makes &




Clay Pool Window Film
Home Auto RV
Window Tininting
(352) 794-3069


Crpot *d Sfit o Fs i
*Decks Screen Rooms
* Windows Doors Murals


YR SA E
INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-?
I105 Woodcrest
Avenue



S'o v !No

INVERNESS
sat19 &Sun. 20 8a-3p
MOVING SALE Garden
items furn., clothing
and Much Morel
5671 S. Eaton Terr.








Sat. 8am-? Ent.
center, patio table,
misc. 1442 S. Ladera
Terrace, countryside
Estates


County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW RO_0[S ~_RE-_ROOFS ~ REPAl
| $100 Opp
. ANY RE-ROOp
S One coupon per household I
wsi FREE ESTIMATES
S(352) 628-5079


DDE DIESEL leEEP CONNECTION

Repair & Maintenan.
Engines Drivelines Oil Changes
Transmissions Brake Service
VME REPAIR ALL MAKES & IVODELS


3CrformanC.J
Inc.
680 E. Southland Ave.
CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell
352-568-7591


John Deer Riding
Mower with bagger. 32
inch cut, good cond.
$400 352-201-4300
Snapper 21,,
self propelled lawn
rnower us3 dr 2 nths












BOVerly Hills
Fri & Sat 9 M-4PM


c 2 New tlrd s




BEVERLY HILLS
Fri sat 8-4p Sun 8a-?
Fu n. Ishl 1 Is
Fishing Items
Forest Ridge Blvd to
Sugarmaple Court



BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 18, & Sat. 19 8a-lp
Household. goods,
exercise equip,
clothes & More
4085 N. Pink Poppy Dr.


doesb9iresor y~


g g


AAA ROOFING
Call~~~~ k a 6we J
Free Written Estimate
, I
**100 OF F
| Any Re-Roof
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I


I a
COPES POOL
AND PAVER LLC
YOUR IN7FRLOCATNGBRICKPAVER SPECIAL15T
Build your new pool now and
be ready for next summer!
Refinishyour pool during the cooler months.
352-400-3188


,;,,,,,,,







C12 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


Evar Bne Als e a coymnso
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Cairo river fashion (1) they will fit in the letter
II I I I squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Animator Disney's imperfections (1) syllables in each word.
I II I II I 1 2011 UFS Dist by Univ Ulickior UFS



5. Fuzzy-eyed Bill of "Groundhog Day" (2)





7. Quickly passing business gathering (2)




11-19-11 SBSMSNV


EZ PULL TRAILERS,
LLC.
Sales of Open utilities
& enclosed. We Buy,
Build, Repair, Custom-
ize. Sell Parts, Tires,
Wheels, Used Trailers.

w/rEm 8 7 .20.

CASH $735.

NEW Enclosed Cargo
w/Ramp
6 x 10 $1995
CASH $1895.
6 x 12 $2095
CASH $1995.
Hwy 44 Crystal River


GULF TO LAKE
TRAIL R SAo a

Lowest Prices.
Ofet','; -cw *, ,a:

Triple Crown Utility TRL
6 x12 w/9e spare
6 x 12 Enclosed w/
V nose, rear ramp
door, $1895.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

H352- 2-0555to







BOUNCER HU E T


BEAR $25 MOBILE CRIB
BUTTERFLY $15 Walker
Bnimal

Pine Ridge
sat 8a-3p No Eairly
Sales. Hsehld Misc.
5371 W. Cisco St

Sat., 8aN, Fur Misc.
5580 N. Tucson Terr.



Sat Dec 3 7AM-l:30PM
Spaces for rent $10 ea.
Benefit the First Pres.
Church of CR food
pantry(352)746-7585




Sugarmill Woods
AFr iq& Sto eAMot
patio set~fridge,& more
211 Pine street




United

Methodist
Church, Inverness

Yard & Bake Sale
Saturday, 8a-2p
3896 Pleasant
GrOVe, InV.



2 ROBERTA DRESSER
SILVER LITE $50 EACH
size 10, size 14 Burgundy
Dresser $30 size 4
352-777-1256
BEAUTIFUL WEDDING
DRESSES VICTORIAN
best offer 352-777-1256
DRESSES VICTORY
COLLECTION COLOR
CHAMP-ACHE $60
strapless 352-777-1256


Il l
1 HP STA RITE POOL
PUMP MAX-E PRO
pump 2006. 2" fittings.
MOD: P6RA6E-205L
$75.00 OBO. Call:
412-841-5437.
Above Ground Pool
15 x48", all inc. ladder,
pump, vac. You take
down. $325
352-419-5326
Affordable Top Soil,
Driv wa /~rcT o ork
341-20 19 or 302-7325
AIRCRAFT LAWN OR-
NAMENT crafted from
ceiling fan, wind pro-
pelled, 40" wing span.
$100. 352-382-3962
Attends
Adult Large Underware
18 Packs
$5 per pack
(352) 560-0367

P 2 25A U 17 3% to
40% tread left Hankook
tire $20.00
352 270 1775
Bike
folding type for camp-
ers, 3 spd good cond
$75. (352) 344-1348
CARD TABLE
Padded w/4 padded

ua sk Cir phh rtsre d
$45. Roll Top Desk oak,
$100 352-601-6064
CHRISTMAS DECORA-
TI NS Pli oo IBears

3 i-3 967

C6H tip~sMA18Oled ce '
lights, stand, used 1 yr
$12.00 352-527-0324
Cobra 1-Pod with sound
bubble, $30. Sony
Blu-Ray 3-D disc/DVD
$125. Logitech
Harmony ADV Univ.
remote 1000 $295.
(52 76-u0s8e3
Computer desk, light
wood, barely used,
corner style $35.00
352-613-0788
CORVETTE C5 EX-
HAUST PLATE: Polished
with C5 emblem. $30.
Emi j~nk244 8um org
CORVETTE C5 TAIL-
LIGHT LOUVERS: Black
ABS plastic from Ecklers.
$20. Email
jnk44@1umc.org
CRAFTSMAN
GENERATOR
10hp 5600 watts, 8600
surge wcuts, brard 5new
352-601-6064

El crlex Cleatner

(352) 613-0788


US 5O s6&URE7N7CY




3 BANJO PROJECTS!
TWO COMPLETE
BANJOS & MOST
PARTS FOR A THIRD
$75 352-601-6625
Baldwin Organ
ymaph~oxnce Moel o
$575.obo
(352) 527-8819
BEAUTIFUL BLONDE!
GAC DUGROCVG TAR
LECT SPRUCE TOP
$100 352-601-6625
ELECTRIC LAP STEEL
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT VERY EASY TO
LEARN ONLY $65!
352-601-6625
Kimball Organ
S ntha Swinager S ye,

key~boa3d an bench

MANADKOLIN SGTBA ER
BOOKS, ALL YOU
NEED! ALL NEW! $55
352-601-6625
MANDOLIN STARTER
PAK WIGIGBAQ,
BOOKS,EVERYTHING
YOU NEED! ALL NEW
$55! 352-601-6625
USED BLACK MANDO-
LIN PERFECT TO
LEARN ON! PLAYS AND
SOUNDS GOOD ONLY
$30 352-601-6625



8 X 6 AREA RUG 8x6
area rug. beige with bur-
gundy and green ac-
cents. $80.00 obo
352-270-8314
CIRCULON
8 pc. Cookware set.
Stainless Steel. $100
352-746-4542
Oriental Rug
excel. cond. 6x 7
100% wool $600.
Decorative Trees
10ft $60.
(352) 382-2743


CITRUS COLWTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


home fa 3580 obo


EUREKA BOSS-LITE
VACUUM fullsize,bag
model,1ight,newer
great shape. $40
(352) 746-1486
FARM FRESH EGGS
free range and organic
$2.00 a dozen
352-795-1 229
o avoe recov~e
new $60 352-212-7788
or 352-503-4646
FUZION YELLOW
4-WHEEL SCOOTER for
352-489-8633
GENERATOR
TROY-BILT ,7800 watts
never used runs great
pd351200 se01200.
GLASS TOP TABLE
1/2" 42x7rr.8 bievmred

dges u usah brig 5
obo(352) 637-7248
GUINEA PIG WITH FULL
CAGE WATER and food
HOLDER, WHEEL big
house, bedding $90 best
offer 352-777-1256
Gun cabinet, glass
front, holds 10 shotguns
or rifles, $100.
(352) 637-3041
HP TONER CAR-
TRIDGE: Remanufac-
tured HP C3903A
LD-03A. $15. Email
jnk44@1umc.org

kag dbRAMPLN .

springs 212-2846
MICHELIN TIRES 2
tires-LTX A/S Radial P
245/70R17 $100
less than 1k on tread.
352-726-2023
MICHELIN XZA2
RVI295.80R/22.5
TRUCK TIRE best
energy used less than
10K 90% tread left cost
$725.00 sell for $250.00
352 270 1775
Older 26" Man's Bike
chrome wheels, fend-
ers, & handle bars.
Headlights, good cond
$50.(352) 382-4651
PINES CONES -28 total
6-8" tall Variety-painted
either Silver, Gold, Wh,
Grn, Nat.Crafts/Decor
$10 for all 352-382-3650
Pressure Cleaner
4,000 PSI,
Honda engine
2 hoses, guns & tlps
$400. obo
(352) 746-3228
RECORD PLAER
cd s/radb/irrgaphone
$450.Broyhill round
coffee eab/ irwer

Red concrete step
stone, brick face, 16 x 16
inch square. Have 24, will
sell for $1.00 each. Call
after 5:30 p.m. 563-1241
RED curved scalloped
concrete edging approx
20 inches long. Have 80,
ail sell 10 e~ac~h .1 II
RED scalloped concrete
flower bed edging approx.
16 inch. Have 100, will
sell $1.00 each. Call after
5:30 p.m. 563-1241
REFRIGERATOR 34 x 9
good cond $40.
sa dsthes se60
(352) 489-1486
SAXON 600 MEDIUM
TURNOUT BLANKET
rmw,wa eprob$ Otbe, 180g
352-344-2321
TIRE NEW 255.70R/22.5
NREV-T rC eNever u~se

$30t$3 5.00 11175 f




3 WHEEL SCOOTER
holds up to 3001bs'
g ldn

BEDSIDE 01538DE&
ALUM WALKER portable
toilet and aluminum fold
up w~alke 7cl avid
Power Lift Chair
Recliner by Pride
deluxe model, plush,
Paid $5,0 Se7l 54

WHEELCHAIR,
Tracer EX2, new, never
used. $170.00 Call after
5:30 p.m.352- 563-1241


p ~C


DP 500 ROWING MA-
CHINE, INVERNESS
good condition asking
$35.00 call 352-560-7857
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
All electronics
manual incline, great
shape $165
(352) 464-0316

M odel 1100,TT G nerud

$175. 352-257-3625 e
UPGRADED BOFLEX f;,Z
XTL 410 lbs resistance, ";
many attachments, works :,ir
great, $500.00, will ac-
cept credit cards, Lecanto v~
(727)251-2747 .2.:;
Weights nd bench,
heavy duty, excellent,
$100 firm ..
(352) 637-6000 t:~?

lie
CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745
Canoe 16'
Kevlar/fib rglass
352-419-6028
COMPLETE SET ;
LADIES "Hippo Magia" .w"
Hobr Irornsd toea
ne521)89 se1$91750.

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DPMS PANTHER AR-15
New, never fired with a
Burris tactical scope,
original case. Extras,
$1,500 Photo ID re-
qu red 52-527-491MOP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500
Golf cart, excellent
condition, Charger, rain
cover, windshield,
$700. (352) 726-3351

RunsO.s~oC rus owoer
Wise charger T605
Matched, Trojan bat-
teries, $500. or will sell
separately, 352-795-5082
TREK BICYCLE 26" Trek
3-speed bicycle, female
type. Six years old. Excel-
lent condition. $425 new,
3as5 7g 620 rCal C
kostle@earthlink.net a

os SteB GuY SmtNng
(352) 726-5238 oooeXGY sxo


Get the Facts: Gators;


Seminoles; Hurricanes;


DullS; KiL11

COllege teams from coast to coast have a large Florida fan
base. 6.5 million Floridians consider themselves Florida

COllege football fans. Over 9.5 million Floridians
COnSIder themselves Florida newspaper readers.


FLORIDA NEWSPAPERS... GET THE FACTS
AND GET IN THE GAME.


For more information on how to reach

Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592.


CITRUS COUNTY




www.chronicleonline.com
Scarbomugh2010


HOW ABOUT SOME













CAS H !


,w*c*'"n\\eonunsi~ne~


Beverly Hills, Citrus Springs, Crystal River, Dunnellon,


Floral City, Inglis, Homosassa


V Able to work early morning hours before 6am

V IVust be 18 years old

V Florida driver's license and insurance


If interested come to the

Meadowcrest Plant between 1 and 2 am IT REALLY PAYS

drive around stoithembaacak nd ask for a TO WVORK FOR THE


www.chronicleonlin~e~om


1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd.,

Crystal River











CA SEAT4SAWET d

POOH CAR SEAT $40
Deluxe Jumperoo $ 45
352-777-1256
DELUXE BOUNCER
SAFARI $35 clothing girl
6,9 mo excellent condi-
tion 352-777-1256
SWING GRACO MUSI-
CAL FLOWER EXCEL-
LENT CONDITION $65
gym fish activity $ 20
352-777-1256


CRYSTAL RIVER
Crystal River 2/2,
$475+dep, 1/2 acre lot
(352)447-2980
crystal River
lovely 1/1 near water &
trails, 1 person $325/mo
incl electric, water
trash 352- 220-0480
HERNANDO
2 Mobiles for Rent on
Priv. Road, 1/1 fresh
remod. scrn. por $425.
2/1'/, scrn. por. rear
deck, $475. both clean
& quite (352) 400-2411
HOMOSASSA 1/1
furn~cable & utilities inc
No pets $125/wk, $50.
dp. (352) 563-2896
HOMOSASSA 2/1
1 AC fend, shed, deck
$525.mo/dp. 628-5244
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH furn., priv. ranch
No pets. (386)871-5506
INVERNESS
2/2, No Pets, $550 mo.
Ist last, sec. 726-6640
Inverness 55+
2/13q~ute2 ae 18450
INVERNESS
RENT SPECIAL: Sec. dep,

p rio In t~he IERN SS
w/5 plers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 1 BR home
535pllds. 2Rh~omets
considered Seectlon 8

(352) 476-4964
YANKEE TOWN
2/1 Furn., scrn porch
$450/mo 305-799-1177




3/2 Mobile Home
Remodeled, In park
Ig., scrn. por. & carport
minutes from water &
progress energy,
furniture included
$14,000 (352) 302-8797
FOR SM.En $9 00

paint, new carpet,
new fle flooring.
A/C under warranty.
Must See! Call to View
352-621-9181

Waterfron N5 PPark
w/5 plers for fishing &
enjoyment, clubhouse,
onslte shuffleboard
and much more.
Single wlde 1 & 2 BR,
str tng2 4$6m900. L~ot
Included. 3 mo. free
rent wlth purchase.
352-476-4964
NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK.!
I finance anybody,

vaue ud ae in ca ,r
boats, jewel guns,


New 2012 Town
Houses
28x44 3/2 only $37,900
32x80 4/2, just $69,900
Both incl del.& set up
A/C Skirting & steps.
No Games!
North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, FL
(352) 872-5566

Palm Beach Homes
""' vMoidela rHH mes
Savings Over 40K
Call Today!
800-622-2832

USED HOMES

Doubl wdestrom

Single i 0s from
$3,500
Bank authorized
liquidator.
New inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183




Lake Rousseau
3/3 Lakefront, dock,
boat ramp, furnished
inc W/DFPShort or
long terms avail. call
407-302-1768 or
321-377-1926


m
2/1 Doublewide
4043 N. orcsoe Rd
Hernando

(352)4 570 310

2B01 B ,dbl lot lg LR,
Ig scr rm, 2 decks, shed
& wkshop wlelec, WID
hkups, roofover,Cleans
seawall, appls. Cash
offers only. $42,500
OBO 904-887-8940




CRYSTAL RIVER
Foreclosure 3/2 on 1
acre TNT, pole barn
Owner Fin avail $49,900

Green A rs
Is The Place To Be


Net, ne a uiace .
Nice Home
$2,100 down P& I only
$369.84/mo. W.A.C.
Call to VieW
352-401-2979

2/2 SHWMo fe~n ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile flrs. Open plan,
$39, 000. 7Eba~n~cing

LECANTO


2 BR, SW on 1/2 acre
MUST SELL!!
$20K OBO
352-586-2976

Sugarmill Woods
Area
3/2, approx. 1500 sq.
ft. on over I acre.
a ite,d nic che on


appliance, under full
warranty. Ceramic
tile in master bath,
guest bath & kitchen.
New aggg~ cabinets,
new deck & driveway
This house has a
g eatrloore t
3 mi., from suncoast
Pkwy. 5 mi. from new
3aml. e ,00
to steal this house
352-613-0587


Chrysdtal River Are 2
$12,500 for mobile home
in very good condition
Has newer heat pump,
roof over, appliances in-
cluding w/d, large
all-season lanai, 3 stor-
age areas accessed from
outside, large carport and
corner lot. Basic furniture
is included if new owners
desire. Conveniently
locate r 55 andbewer

Home Park, with the low-
est monthly lot rent in Cit-
rus County at $230, that
includes water, sewer,
trash and active club-
house. 352-249-7177

For Sakagg fl
Crystal River Village
OPEN HOUSE
Fri Nov 25th Sat 8a-5p
25 Newly renovated 2/2
homes Cry.River Village.
$22,300. 256-347-0827
or (205)603-5658 appt
For sale 56 Ft.
MOBILE HOME
Mb qite e~st~abli ry
good cond. Must be
55+ +dF RDAB.E

INVERNESS

e/ pe fr lhln 6
onslte shuffleboard, and
much more! 2 bed-
room, ]1-% bath $2,000.
Must be approved
352-476-4964

Wa rron nN5E+ Park
e 5 pir to rlsbln s
onslte shuffleboard, and

room h1 o th 5300.
Mus 2Im ap~p ved
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090





1/ S45.AE T FA
Fl. Rm (352) 287-9175
(352) 746-1189














835 NE Hwy 19
crystal River, FI
Vie ou wbite
C21Naturecoast.com





SCrmYST RIoVAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HERNANDO
1/1,$400. Moves you in
(352) 206-49 3
(352) 465-0871




Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BED RM 1 BA $500.

CtRYSTAI.RIVER le
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
FLORAL CITY
1BD $400/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp no
pets 352-726-3699

INGLIS VILLAS
I33i FTrn da 44e9
'52''-447-010l~o 6 9
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8a-5p
Ask About Our
SrSPECIALS S
RENTAL ASSISTANT
AVAILABLE
Foreclosures
Welcome


Provider & Employer




INVERNESS 2/1

trah hawn stg 2r~m.
$450. +secS 634-5499

W/D Hook up, patio,
dishwasher.newer
clean unit, unfurn
$525(352) 422-3217
INVERNESS


r50. o $30 ec
352-341-1847
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/1 $500 352-422-2393

NEWER 2 IR 25Ba

352- 634-1341




Comm. Prop. Hwy 486
5 Acres, Citrus Hills
Paved parking lot,
6 ft. sec. fence & light
around property. Well,
septic, electric gate,
storage lot, RV, Boats,
Etc. $980. mo., Ist, last
& sec. (352) 341-0903
CRYSTAL RIVER
Great Commercial loca-
tion. 6545 W Gulf to Lake


Highway, nex to new
County of es. 400 ft
Zoned GNC. 50 X 55 ft
two bay building with of-
fice & storage. Avail.
Jan 1. Call W. Roche
(352) 563-0683
EMPTY ESTABLISHMENT
(w~as0 aar) 24d00 fqt

352 586-4168




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fur shed I/ w peoa

Flex Terms New couch,
flat scrn, ent. ontr. bed,

pomo 0a8f 92N0 4a0r
INVERNESS
2/2/1 Villa Wash/dry
pool $600.352-464-2731


BeUtiu u7 M int
[eeg(352) 613-5655
HOMOSASSA
2 /2/1 hkup $600/
mo (J53 53013-32912818 or

HOMOSASSA
New 1/1, H20/garb.
incl.d, non-smoker.
$425 Fst/Sec. pets ?
2/1 $500 (352) 795-0207
InVernOSS 2/1
W/D Hook up, patio,
dishwasher. Clean
newer unit, unfurn $525
(352) 422-3217
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Llke New no smok/pets
$700/mo. 1st, last & sec.
352-341-3562/400-0743
LECANTO
2/1/1 C/H/A, H2o,
Incl'd, W/D Hkup, $500.
CR 3/1, CHA W/D Hkup,
$525. mo 352-382-1344





AffordR Ae entals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Specializing in
Sugarmill Woods
amontnl


CIASSIFIEDS





3B/N2A R8NE Dck
Cove Path $725 mo
(352) 895-0744 cell
INVERNESS
Large 2/2/1 fenced
yard, 1 st security $700
mo.352-422-5482
LECANTO
LRG 3/3/2.5 on 3 acres,
scr lanaiS865/month
(352) 628-5272






/deep water/Gulf Ac-
cess. upscale, secure
1s ea, 5osmo 11ng00
depending on terms
352-795-0102
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 Unfurn. fenc d.
dock, appl s $1,200 mo.
Avail. now, 586-7128

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Wato' FihC~amp

Inverness
2/2 on 1 acre $650mo +
dep. 321-432-2410



Furnished Master suite
Private Entry~no pets
$450 mo 352-860-0427




FARMS, LAND,
COMMERCIAL
UNIQUE &
HISTORIC HOMES,

couNR IFSTYLE
OU SPCI L9TY


Remo-deled2/1/1,
w/ 2 additional lots,
Nice quiet Area
$58,900.
(352) 697-2884




GREAT LOCATION
3/2/2 Water access.
Updated roof/ac/ap-

lot. $99k 352-422-2970
Ownr Cr stal Ri e
9wnroos. y1 Batver
on large topic terra e
fenced lot, May trade
for Land or 1 or 2 Bdrm
or ?(352) 794-3013


2 Sto5RYS Vth 2
boat slips near Kings
Bay $519,000 Make
Offers 352-563-9857

GOSPEL ISLAND
Lakefront Home
3/2/2.scr porch
Irg oak trees
$125K by owner
908-322-6529

Homosassa
Awesome location! Quick
access to gulf, deep
canal minutes to springs,
2/2 hted pool spa
$154,500 (863) 698-0020




CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.
Area. $165,000 OBO
(352) 795-2027
(352) 634-4745




5 acres high & dry
off Cardinal on
Georgeina $32,500.

813-426-6078

Bi Owner 12 Acres
Lots of Possibilities
8 Mobiles Good In-
nome52ome owln87

LAND 1.5 acres fenced
partially cleared, on 480
in Homosassa across
from firehouse. water
and s er are avi.$25K





CABIN ON 40 ACRES
of Prime Hunting Land
Located in Gulf Ham-
mock Management.

Area b$16.0 U BO





CRYSTAL MINI
FARMS
2 1/2 acres + bring
horses gardens,mobile
home or build your home
as you like. $35k owner
pays closing. phone
352-746-7425




CHASSAHOWITZKA
DBL LOT or canal

352-613-4673






Op i-rma P~roS XCUYear
transerable warranty
$9200 obo
(352) 422-4141

EVINRUDE 120HP
1988 oil injected, power
tilt, strong motor, runs
great, must seel $1500
(352) 795-4240

OB 2.5, Suzuki
4 stroke,
under warranty

(352) 586-9498





2008. Ol T wn,1Loon
120 w/paddles color
orange, very good
cond $350 ea. will sell
separate 724-396-9983




BASSNTTRAOCKER
2003 901 CDX Dual
console/White
19'2"long-beam
96"l200HP Mercury XR61
101 lb. thrust MinnKota
trolling motor/stainless
steel proplAutomatic &
manual bilge pumps
(2000 GPH ea h) iotor
weathered-needs
carpet/usable as is/Trailer
& spare. $5,995 for
"du cdeal.allAws20atosn
Call Al 352/726-2201
Inverness


Squalre strn .2 les
(352 465-6187

COBIA 04
19~ ,115hp Ya ha 4
stroke 170 homra.GPS

VHO. 4rth ri i jck

FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@ $5 per lb
Stone Crab@ $6 per lb
delivered 727-771-7500


Ho~uOebo0tNS 00
(352) 527-1734


20 CC, -O~p NHF oet.,

new EZ Loadtrlr. $11,400
Extras (352) 257-1161

SOUTHBAY '08
Pontoon, 20ft 75HP eng.
Loaded, hardly used 21
hrs. on boat & mtr. $19K
or take over payments
352-341-3305

WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE


We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats (352)527-0555
boatsupercenter~com


19ft. deep Vee, alum
trlr. w/ elec. wench,
3.0, 1/O,$1,374
(352) 586-9498




Coachman 30'
Charrel 5th whl. big
slide perfect cond.
call for details
352-726-4325

I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875

Infinity 1999
Motorhome,4-Wlnds
35ro, Trto ,- naas,
gen, back-up camera,
fully equlpped,tow bars
& hltch + brake buddy
for towed vehlcle.All
manuals for coach &
app.All serve hook-up
equlp. See at Oak Bend
Village Rt 40 West lot70
D 2nln- 3C3lo Itnour
$22,500. Wlll neg.





Diesel Lara~tsuer duty
Iow miles, 05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
I BUY RV'S,


call me 352-201-6945
JAYCO
2005 Jay Feather
LGT 25Z
New tres/brakes; seeps

s owrltub; stzovevel

storage. Like new $9,500
priced below blue book
retail see in Inglis
352-447-5434
Jayc Desg 95
Seis ycth Wl 7 .10"
3erlides, $1000 rear
from loa u865a8

Spirit of America
'07, 28 ft, Coachman,
4 new tires
2 new batteries, Ig. slide,
sleeps 5, like new
$11,900, 352-637-2735
WILDERNESS
'06, 27 ft., (fiberglass)
1 slide out, Q.bed de-
luxe upgrades, slps 6
WELL MAINTAINED
$1 1,500 (352) 344-4087



KIA '08 FRONT END
MASK, (Bra)
2 piece black $30.
(352) 382-9052




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$

Unwa ted CasTukrs.
BUYING JUNK CARS
*Running or Not*
CASH PAID -$200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
a vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
CASH PAID FOR JUNK
CAR SAn ondcution

Towing 352-445-3909

EZ LOANS
COnig~nmentL!USA
BUY-SELL RENT-

CUTS FRO d150
US 19 BY AIR OT

A Low Payments A
461-4518 & 795-4440
consignmentusa.or9
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.

Svgea Pay top $
352-628-4144
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no pr blem.

An r ake, o 2r5 1e.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794




'01 Chrysler 300M
All factory options,
shoro mc2 dOenior


AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS


$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE .



(352) 56 3-1 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

LaSaB K.6 ne
owner, garage kept,
72K Mlad. 006450.


'72, Grand Sport, 350
rebuilt transmission,
Pyssi rear, great shape
$9,000. (352) 634-2221
CHEVY IMPALA
2007, V-6, loaded, mint
cond., grey mist, 55K
$15,500. (352) 601-4568
CHRYSLER
'06, 300, 35K miles, off
white, black cloth, SAT
radio, Nice, $12,600
firm, (352) 795-8792


EZ LOANS
Consignment USA
WE DOITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS~ FROM $1,500.
US 19 BY AIRPORT



consignmentusa.org
FORD
2002 Taurus, a few
dents, but runs like a
charm. $1,799
(35) 637.7285
HATCHBACK
1989. $700.
352-220-0480

Accord NXDA.906 Mi.
excel. cond. Silver,
below blue book
$9,500. 352-586-8928


sATURDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 2011 C13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14K mis. LTD 550
lots of extras
great cond $1900
(352) 228-1897
MERCEDES
2003, C240, Like new,
sliver, gray leather int.
43K mi. 4-Matic, 6 cyl.
org. owner, 12,500.
352-270-8734
865-300-1884
MUSTANG 03
Ford G.T. 55 K miles,
show car, lots of
goodies & chrome
$14,500(352) 795-3729
NISSAN 'll
Altima 6800 k miles,
loaded, smells new.
warranty until 2014.
Health forces sale
$18,950 (352) 513-4257
TOYOTA 01
MR2 Spider, convertible
silver,5 spd. a/c,
like new $8600.
352-634-1070
TOYOTA '09
PRIUS ,48,973K mi ,
green w/leather seats
$18,500 (352) 746-3663




Chevy l955
Sel 5i 3drn 2ea l

CORVETTE
2003 ZO6, $29,000
21K mi., Quick silver


Fully odpead hrasu
disply b ad new
352-637-6443
CORVETTE
o7 Covertil s

worth $25,000., sell for
$15,700 obo, email
eladscat~aol.com or
call 352-628-7315
MUSTANG
'68, convertible,
blue w/ strips, excel
cond. $22,500 obo
(352) 746-3228






SrAftAftfftA
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
OnIy $28.50
inclu es a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VW CONVERTIBLE
1987 Cabriolet Wolfsburg
edition 5-speed, 1 owner,
priced o Iel $1042510 obo





BIG, BIG, SALE!
Consignment USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
AUTOS~ FROM $1,995.
US 19 BY AIRPORT
US 44, BY NAPA
4 1o 1 &ym~e 4s4 0
consignmentusa.org
CHEVY 88
SILVERADO, King cab.


obo(352) 637-4011
DODGE '98

135 Kkor. CV tra t r's

8'cbaepd w ritdont tres
great work truck
$1500
(352) 410-1392
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
Io mies.0 lewo


(352) 341-1347
FORD 08
Diesel Lariat super duty
low miles, 05 fleetwood
5th whl. K bed. 4 slides,
firepl $45K obo
(352) 341-1347
HONDA 06
Ridgeline, 60K mi
great cond.
$12,500
(352) 274-1940




C-1 SI.ER 04

leather, loaded~senior
owned, Like new
$11, 950(352) 634-3806
TOYOTA 99
4 Runner, Sr Owned,

aaways 2aaed I kks





Chevy Astro

g 8d V6, $5 0oo
1352) 812-1026




Harley Davidson
02 Heritage soft tail
26K mis. Lots of extra s
Health Forces Sale
$9500 (352) 527-3024
Harley Davidson
04, 1200 Sportest, turq &
silver, chromed out,
7K mi. $4700 Crystal
River cell 727 207-1619
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
2002 Low Rider 14,000
miles, one owner, lots
of xrass 50.oo

JUNK MOTORCYCLES


WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492













KAWAK 2011
low miles, many extra s
50 mpg $7,995
(352) 697-2760


Buying or Selling

Let RE Lor F~or uo!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR '
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68

www btthmnts
homes.com.





"I'VE MOVED!"

Sellers Homes
are Selling!

CALL ME!










Deborah Infantine

ERA AMERICAN
REALTY
352-302-8046









FREE List of

SAVE thoh an $$$$




FOR SALE BY
OWNER
Dunnellon Area, 2 story
4BR 3BA above ground
pool.8x10 utility bldg.
financing avail $100
closing cost.Low Down
Call Dan 800-285-4414












Michele Rose. ealtor
Simply ut I 'll work
harde 3p52-212-5097
ise liruscountyt

craye Rat, Inc.
352-726-1515

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBCO59685










htnher Io nr
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell(386)562-6665
amonteo8



Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887




INGLls 3/2/2

oedn pltr Nel re
$114,500. Lease Opt.
352-697-1085




Wyndham/RCI
Points Plus, Time Share
Pd. $40K Asking $20K
Selling Due to Injury
Call for Details
(352) 563-0328


person
with~p a cas fi ad
under Happy

inclune a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











JUNK MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Are .

or(3272 -36
Wanted to buy
Portable Dishwasher
(352) 746-6687
(352) 302-1449


IC
ACA Shih-Tzu Pups,
Lots of colors, average
$450-$600 + Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
BLUE PITBULL
Puppies,
UKC reg., health cert.,
all shots. $500.
(352) 287-0530

9 wks He~mAleU Itmhots
wormed, H/Cfawn
black muzzle, playful


ae r train very in

1 F$450.(352) 489-6675
COTTON'S LITTER
HAS ARRIVED! AKC
POMERANIAN'S
1 Tea cup, I cream,
1 Silver/Black, 1 Silver/
Gray (352) 601-1991
Koi and Gold Fish
FOR SALE, Great Prices
ALL SIZES. Call Jean
(352) 634-1783

Leok
Lost Dog--Male Black
Lab mix-Reward
5c0 Is, wte patrn on
Cleveland to Rock


now skittish. Name is
"Cash". Has skin bumps
like raisins--needs meds.
352-220-3890,
352-503-6494,
813-220-1199



Mi i Dac shud
I Punnie


E Ir ' "

Debe Johns
Brkr/Assoc/PRM

Coldwell Banker Next
Generation Realty
Property Manager
(352) 382-2700 www.
coldwellbankernext
aeneration.com

PSeeewsa taa
Residential Manager
can do for you.




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 bedroom. 2 bath
Furnished pool home with
1,365 sf, fl room with hot
tub and a 2 car gar.
Short or long term lease.
Close to mall and marina/
boat la~unrh. $000 mo


"LIFE IS BETTER
WITH A PORCH'

www
cro sa d~r 16y c~om

Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal roadv~ertiisr t n
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,

tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes

of1 iindg wthh paa -e

ants st yegar eus n i

under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
ici lings advetirsarde
available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
nom ain Uf d srme aat

1 80-6-e77 ahe
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




frou wvu


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




Lot For Sale Pine Ridge
sub. 3620 N. Stirrup Dr.,
2.78 ac, horse trail on
back side, wooded, for
sale by owner. Google it!
$59,900. Won't last long.
bill@agairupdate.com
478.957.0211




2 Bedroom, 2 bath
house with heated pool
& fireplace on I acre

clet sod.,OneT
Excellent credit. Call


Reduce t 1900




ARBOR LAKES
55+ Comm. 3/2/2 +
Lg enclose a/c porch,

Umos ades $179.9O
(352) 726-7952
Arbor Lakes, Gated
community 3/2/2 Split
Flr plan Lots of ceramic,
Fl. Rm. great patio &
landscaping $129,900
3757 Arbor Lakes Dr.
352-344-3700




3/2/2, I.G. &C.C.
3k sf, e kit.I clos, s

for, norealtors 726-0652
For Sale 3/3/2 Home,
.2,000 sq.ft. 518
Poinsettia, Reduced.
Come take look
(352) 860.0878

For Sak'94 uc
Gospel Islandat2hBed-

Garage&Calprt Urd~sed FR.
SEE Large Yard.FSBO
79,900 CALL
352-344-9290


KrsiBortz

Let our property
management team
help you with your
short or long term
rentals.
See all our rentals in
Citrus Co.
www2-7a9nta8 menal
866-795-0784




BEVERLY HILLS
1BD.Flrm. + bonus rm

$1 500 Move -U-N
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, CHA, W/D, tile flrs. ,
Super Clean, $525. mo.
+ Sec. (352) 817-5017
(352) 489-2266
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, Fl. Rm., CHA, $525.

ml d. (3 2) 42- a
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 CHA $600.
2/1.5/1, fl rm. remodled
$650 no pet 1st Lst dp
P &R Realty
Gloria Bonner 697-0375
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/12, 32 N. Desoto
has LR + FR, new Carpt.
in Bd Rm. &tl edn LR +

352-249-3228m.

2/1+FIR.8 SH tr lore
$550 mo. 352-422-2798

26 NEVMe Your 2/2
clean riw p nt, both

power runs $150 +
Come Stay warm this
winter(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/1+FR, New Paint,
Car et, $650; 795-1722

3/2 21 USo H10 mo.
352-637-1 173
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 Nice Neighborhood
$675mo 352-895-2598

3/22 ,83540+ (dl osit

CITRUS SPRINGS



4/2 enclosed porch,
laundry room, nice
back yard fenced
$800(352)-489-01 17
CITRUS SPRINGS
Holiday Special
4/2/2, $875. Mo.
(352) 812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
Mint 2/2/1, W/D, Scrn
rm. appl s, quite, $700
Ist/ist/sec. 746-2957
CITRUS SPRINGS
Never 3/2/2, Ig. mast.
s te. 5$0 6r. I 2/

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1 + Family Room
$675 + dep 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2. .In0 m sec.

FLORAL CITY
Beautiful 3/2/2'/ w/
frplace on 1 gorgeous
wooded acre $925/mo
(941) 928-4235

IlS Highlan s
5942 pooha St
INVERNESS
2/1 Caged Pool Fl. Rm.
18m r3o5m) 34-41
INVERNESS
312, First/Last/Security
$700. 352-726-7692


Ready to go$200
family raised, great
with kids and other pets'

Sbkbm naheo har
parents onsite
Please Call4 Dug


Miniature Schnauzer
Pups! AKC, Health Cert,
Shots, 1 female, 2 males,
$550. 352-419-4723, PM.



Gre~autCh itma Gfts

(352) 564-0270
WANTED: COCKATIEL
SITTER, tyu h me
over Chrism, poemeer
near Citrus Hills. Phone
352-249-3221


Tell that special
us person ,
with~p a cas fi ad
under Happy
Notes
Only $28.50
includes a photo









CR./ HOMSASSA
SEE AD UNDER
WORDY GURDY
PUZZLE .

CRYSTAL RIVER

$5040 m~o No D~o s
(352) 795-9738































~I sw






~C~F~,i*

)I~l~tl~ ~iilr~YrC I*



:L1( ~~C L~ who


014 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE





~5


2012 FORD

FUSION SE

1MSRP....................$25,210
Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
Discount....................-310
Sale Price........... .$24,900
Retail
Customer Cash......-1,000
Promo Retail
G2CO22 Customer Cash......-1,000


I ,


cIfRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 015


murman


The holiday shopping season is here ~C
So are the best holiday offers at
Nick Nicholas Ford-Lincoln in Crystal River.
If you're looking for a new way to drive into the new year,
come on into Nick Nicholas Ford-Lincoln in Crystal River during
the Ford Year End Celebration. We invite you to see the newest
technolo y in our fuel-efficient cars, trucks, SUVs and crossovers.
Find out for yourself why Ford is the best-selling brand in America.'
So come on in today. Take a look and drive one.
We're sure you'll have a very happy new year.


MSRP..c las...................$19,975
Ford Lincoln Discount.....-750
Sale Price.......................$19,225
Retail Customer Cash....-1,000
Retail Bonus
Customer Cash................-1,000
Promo Retail Bonus
Customer Cash...................-500


1MSRP....................$29,250
Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
Discount............. ...-1,300
Sale Price........... .$27,950
Retail
Customer Cash......-1,000
Promo Retail
Customer Cash......-1,000


A/C, Automatic
N OW
ONLY


FORD E-350 CLUB WAGON 08 EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER '08 SHELBY GT 500
XLT, 12 passenger 1 owner, Loaded 44,000 miles, Ilke new, loaded
$22,950 $28,950 $32,950


$32,950


LINCOLN


C


H wy. I 9 N *795-7 37 1
'Based on CYTD sales 20ptional Feature Drivng while distracted can result In loss of vehicle control Only use
SYNC/My FordTouchlother devices, even with voice commands, when It Is safe to do so Some features may be
locked out while the vehicle Is In gear 'Based on RDA Group~s GQRS cumulatit- .r -- -t thr-- ; -rth- -f
service In three surveys of 2010 Ford and competitive owners conducted 9/09-5/10 1 --
all Incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit Plus tax, tag, title ar I 1 I I
Ford Credit Financing required Not all buyers will qualify See dealer for details Dealer Is not responsible for
typographical errors Pictures are for Illustration purposes only Prices and payments good through 11/30/111


__

i~i



lal


2011 FORZD

RtANGE R


2012 FORZD

TA~URtUS SEL


N OW
ONLY


2011 FORD

EDGE SE

MSRP....................$29,030
Bonus
Customer Cash.........-500
Promo Retail
Customer Cash......-1,000
FMCC ...1 000


N OW
ONLY


N OW
ONLY


'O8 LINCOLN MKZ 'O8 HONDA CRV '08 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
37,000 miles 1 owner, 38,000 miles All Wheel Drive, loaded.
$21 ,950 $22,950 $22,950


N~IC


NIC OlOS


RIVeF


['/SIC


Call Toll Free

877-79 5-737 1

www.nicknicholast ord LI NCOLN.com





C16 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


CITRUS COLWTY(FL) CHRONICLE


~P"io~o~ fPa[03~~PE~1
Mpa

4~ 'i~i~il'


WE NEED EVERY TRADE
HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE
AND LOWEST PRICES IN THE
STATE OF FLORIDA


The Power to SurpriseTM


HOURS: Mon Fri: 9:00am 7:00pm Sat 9:00am 6:00pm Sunclay Noon 5:0013
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, LICENSE AND $699 DEALER FEE, REBATE & INCENTIVES INCLUDED & RETAINED BY DEALER. MUST QUALIFY FOR KIA OWNER LOYALTY AND/OR COMPETITIVE BONUSES.1 *PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSE


~STAR~ilhlG3 PRLOI~s
....~~ m a


'85 SE


H y.


Cvsta faiv






















































































Ud~iT~i~i~i~'~


rt'K IVIUN In 11Csa AL PIALAND OSPMALL PRICES AND DOWN PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAG AND $699.00 DEALER FEE.
6013284BALL ARE AT 5.90 A. PR. FOR 72 MONTHS WITH APPROVED CREDIT
Tlai WM Onily tO Mkr MM e lMM FRM
wlth the Purchas of a Usedl CarI


CITRUS KIA
PEACEE OF MIND
WARRANTY" PROGRAM


CrrRUS COUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 017


NOWN ON AILL USED WEMIOLES SOLD
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a
Dealership promise... When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side for the 1st 90 days lor 3000 miles of your
driving. If anything, and we are talking anything breaks* on your vehicle, from the headlights to the taillights we will fix it for you at NO
CHARGE. You have trusted us for all your NEW car needs and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we want to prove to
you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the state of Florida to buy a Used vehicle also.
At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"


)R ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY


ev FL'

r 5:00pm


352 5 6 4 8 66 8
24-hours a day, view our inventory, make a service
appointment or apply for pre-approval at
WWW. C it rusK ia. com















































h.a n. tru d s ind min.1rilg \,.ur Iensci. (ZI u. ro. Al~li.I Pho;l;ic.. Ire ?!r!u.rror.l;.n purp.1 e <.rI\ 4dern-e whicle. LnneCi'l re. r or sa Program. uheeCi II'
r.nr *.rt.m..r.lr...r..a A I...rrer.n. Ira. ids...r.t.. Alar~;Fn.m.:tr i. of .~..mmr. l L.elak.ia ;ria (r .lI.i r .s;l...l.


C18 SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE


2011 Mazda3i Sport


MHlHR4WTFM





CrrRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 019


Das Auto.


131


~Y=


80 O


79 (


1 1 1 1


'n C


ron as


iIII1111ll


~oo (


I11llH 1m


Illull?,


All prices plus tax, tag, tille, registration and dealer fees. Exp~ires 1 1/25/1 1


3949 SWV College Rd. Ocala
On SWVCollege Rd.
Just W~est Of 1-75


Come odhvll~


We Don't Have Enough Room For The New Inve~ntory!


'A' 1' II L'


II it.


Vol kswa en


of Ocala


3 52. 8 61 .0 234



















I
r 1I1IL' rl
I


I
1
I


'06 SCION XB


I
I


C20 sATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


CITRUS COUvNT (FL) CHRONICLE





95,999^
.. 8 9 7^ PEM


I
r 1
I


111111~1 1
1 1
III1IY~II I


IIIIIIC~I I I
1 1
I:I IY~II I I


6L
r
- -


II


r


L'1


'09 CRV


'08 RAM


'08 ESCAPE


'08 PT CRUISER


$14,999^ 511,999

0, R 241 09 ORQ M9^EO


$9,999^ 96,999^

0 R $1 61^E m 0R 3EO


'07 SEBRING


'07 ODYSSEY


'07 300


'07 PRIUS


$15,999^| $11,999^1 | 11,999^
.. 8 2 5 7 mI .. 8 1 93,n mI .. $ 1 8 nR


'07 CIVIC


*06 TOWN & COUNTRY '06 SILVERADO 2500


'06 ALTIMA


$6,990 6,990

0, R139, MEOJ 0 PE


$11,99^ 6,999^

0, RlJo 0 0 R MEO:


'06 MATRIX


'06 LIBERTY


'05 E


SAPaE


$7,999
..8 128 m ~o


$6,999
.. $113M _


$6,999'
.. $1 13 mR


129 I


CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE*


1
1


3YI~: :1:1:~1 :11 :111: ~1111~11'111:1 i' :ll~i' 1~113C
1 I
I 1 IY~:l I I I