Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02470
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-11-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02470

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All-American girls: USA pulls off World Cup sho<


I MI Ni D I


TODAY & Tuesday morning
HIGH Becoming mostly cloudy
89 with scattered showers
LOW and thunderstorms.
73 PAGE A4
JULY 11, 2011


HRONICL
CITRUS COUNTY






B t CCNe er erleNeer erin lori e Co ni
Best CommunityI Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


vJ




ISSUE 338


NEWS OF THE WORLD:




HAl


All gone
The scrapping of the
News of the World has
not tempered British
anger over improprieties
by journalists working
for billionaire Rupert
Murdoch./Page A12


SUMMER SCHOOL:
mq-x pp - 7"q


Science class
Inverness Middle School
teacher Steve Crandall
will have a good report
about what he did this
summer/Page A3

LOCAL EFFORTS:
Give blood
Find out where the
LifeSouth
Bloodmobile
will be
parked for
donations
during
upcoming
weeks./Page A8
Get food
Area groups offer
low-cost food options
and free meals each
week./Page A8


Alcatraz tour
Tour lets visitors
experience Alcatraz
Island at night./A9
ONLINE POLL:
Your choice?


Should the U.S. space
program
@ continue?
A. Yes. If we
don't keep
up, other
countries will
take over space.
B. No. It's a waste of
resources better spent
here on Earth.
C. Not yet. Let's get the
economy back on track
first.
D. We should not have
retired the shuttles
without a replacement.
To vote, visit www
.chronicleonline.com.
Click on the word "Opin-
ion" in the menu to see
the poll.
Results will appear
next Monday. Find last
week's online poll
results./Page A4


Com ics ....................B7
Crossword ................B6
Editorial..........A.....A10
Entertainment ..........B5
Horoscope ................B5
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B5
Movies .............. .... B7
TV Listings .......B6
Classifieds ................B8


6 118571 118 111200


Bridge dedication slated


NationalAssociation ofRetired Law

Enforcement Officers ceremony July 19


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
At the youthful age of 28, Ronald
Gordon Smith was killed in the line
of duty at the beginning of what


could have been a long and promis-
ing career as a state trooper.
And while Smith lost his life on a
cool winter night 37 years ago, his
heroic actions have not been
forgotten.


To honor him, members of the
local National Association of Re-
tired Law Enforcement Officers
(NARLEO) will conduct a ceremony
Tuesday, July 19, to dedicate the
new Cross Florida Barge Canal
Bridge to the memory of Smith.
On Dec. 23, 1973, Smith was on
patrol late at night heading south on
U.S. 19, when he came across a car
parked on the side of the road.


ILL�O WI l'nLY
0JWsmo


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MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
According to a recent study, life expectancy for women has declined in 313 U.S. counties, but for Citrus County
life expectancy for women has increased. At 100, Lecanto resident Mattie Gibbs still mows her own grass.

Residents attribute their longevity to hard work, clean living


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
t 100, Mattie Gibbs mows
Usher own grass.
She hauls her laundry
out to her washer and
dryer in the shed be-
hind her house.
Although she has family around,
the Lecanto native does every-
thing that needs doing herself.
For her birthday this past June
22, her church put up a big sign
and the county commission recog-
nized her with a certificate.
She never thought she'd live to
be 100.
"I was raised on a farm and was
taught to work, so I always took
care of myself," she said.
Ella Jones, a resident at Brent-
wood Retirement Community,
turned 101 on June 21.
"I don't have a secret," she said
when asked about her long life.
"About 98 years ago, I started eat-
ing chocolate. I lived on a farm
and an Italian family always came
to pick tomatoes and they'd bring
chocolate.
"I remember one time it was re-


Special to the Chronicle
Ella Jones turned 101 on June 21. She said she thinks eating chocolate
has played a part in her longevity. At least she likes to think so.


ally hot out and the chocolate
melted. It looked horrible, but I
still ate it," she said.
She keeps a stash of dark choco-
late in her room and a bottle of


port wine.
"I have a small glass of wine
every night before I go to bed,"
See Page A5


Blind Americans regrouping and retooling


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HERNANDO - Ad-
dressing the rumors of his
recent death, Bob Krokker,
founder and president of
Blind Americans, said he
is, in fact, not dead and nei-
ther is Blind Americans
shutting down.
He did, however, spend
nearly seven months in
rehab after an accident at
the Hernando facility he
runs for the blind and visu-
ally-impaired.
"We had a visually-im-
paired person who had put
two walls together with a
clamp, which we never do,
5 so he didn't learn that from


me," Krokker said.
"I got up on a ladder
and hit the clamp. It
fell off and the two
walls collapsed and
my leg was in be-
tween.
"I fell about nine
feet and tore all the
muscle and skin off Kroi
the back part of my found
right foot and was preside
on my back for six Bli
months," he said. Amer
Prior to that, his
wife, Evelyn, died June 2,
2010, leaving him devas-
tated. On top of that, while
he was in the hospital, a for-
mer employee caused a bat-
tery of problems and
contention, driving clients


e
e
Ie
n
ic


and volunteers away.
Recently, the
United Way dropped
1 Blind Americans as
one of their agen-
cies, which Krokker
S1 said was a mutual
S decision.
b "Still, that hurt us,
ker but we're going to
r and rejuvenate and get
ent of ourselves squared
id away," Krokker said.
cans. According to
Marie Straight,
president of Citrus County
United Way, "The Board of
Directors made a decision
to invest United Way dol-
lars in other agencies that
are better able to demon-
strate and document the


positive impact they are
having on solving problems
in our community."
A fighter, Krokker said
Blind Americans will seek
new ways to fund its
services.
"We have enough prop-
erty here - three and a
half acres - and we should
be able to rent out enough
space to get back what the
United Way was giving us,"
Krokker said. "We have a
trailer with 2,000 square
feet, 3,000 in the back area
for storage and 500 square
feet of office space that we
can rent for $350 a month,
and that includes utilities
See Page A5


The men in the car - Carl Ray
Songer and Ronald Jones - were
felons who had escaped from a
work release program in Oklahoma.
Smith approached the vehicle,
first tapping on the driver's side
window. Jones, who was behind the
wheel, stepped out and handed
Smith papers. Then Smith walked
back to the car where Songer lay in
See .Page A2



Shuttle's


final


hookup


Space junk

could come too

close to station
MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL -As
the miles melted between
Atlantis and the Interna-
tional Space Station, the
emotions grew - in orbit
and on the ground.
At Mission Control on
Sunday, lead flight director
Kwatsi Alibaruho declared
"this is it" as he gave the OK
for the final docking in
space shuttle history Flash-
backs to the shuttle's very
first space station docking
- with Russia's Mir in 1995
- flooded his mind as
viewed the shuttle on the
screens. He was a NASA
trainee back then.
About 240 miles above the
Pacific, the station's naval
bell chimed a salute - one
of many landmarks, or
rather spacemarks, of this
final two-week shuttle mis-
sion that are being savored
one by one.
"Atlantis arriving," called
out space station astronaut
Ronald Garan Jr "Welcome
to the International Space
Station for the last time."
"And it's great to be here,"
replied shuttle commander
Christopher Ferguson.
Cries of joy and laughter
filled the connected vessels
once the hatches swung
open and the two crews -
10 space fliers altogether
representing three coun-
tries - exchanged hugs,
handshakes and kisses on
the cheek. Cameras floated
everywhere, recording
every moment of the last-of-
its-kind festivities.
Atlantis, carrying a year's
worth of supplies, is being
retired after this flight, the
last of the 30-year shuttle
program.
"I won't say that I got
close to welling up in the
See Page A2

I


Associated Press
This frame grab from NASA-
TV shows space shuttle At-
lantis performing a pitch
maneuver Sunday as it
closes in for one last docking
at the International Space
Station. Atlantis is delivering
more than 5 tons of food,
clothes and other space sta-
tion provisions - an entire
year's worth, in fact, to keep
the complex going in the
looming post-shuttle era.


I IN S 11BIDE I


I





A2 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


SHUTTLE
Continued from P 30 years of shuttle exploration


eyes, but I will say that it
was a powerful moment for
me," Alibaruho later told re-
porters.
He tried to keep his feel-
ings discreet so as not to dis-
tract his team of flight
controllers, but said, "I
know they were all feeling
very similar emotions,
thinking about where we've
come from, how much we've
accomplished... what's com-
ing next."
Alibaruho said the mo-
ment was also powerful for
the 10 people in space for
the docking: six Americans,
three Russians and one
Japanese.
"You could sense a palpa-
ble increase in emotion
from all of the crew mem-
bers, not just our U.S. astro-
nauts," he said. "They were
extremely happy and really
elated to see their visitors,
and I know that they really
recognize and appreciate
the significance of these
moments."
Within a few hours,
though, news came that
NASA was monitoring a
piece of space junk that
could come dangerously
close to the orbiting shuttle-
station complex Tuesday -
right in the middle of a
spacewalk.
Mission management
team chairman LeRoy Cain




BRIDGE
Continued from Page Al

the backseat.
The trooper opened the
back door and began shak-
ing Songer to wake him.
Songer sat up and fired the
first shot of five that fatally
wounded Smith. Smith
grabbed his gun and re-
turned fire before falling to
the ground.
Hunters, who witnessed
the encounter, sprang into
action as one shot Jones in
the leg as he tried to flee.
Then the men engaged in a
short gunfight with Songer
until he surrendered.
Smith had been with the
Florida Highway Patrol for
eight months. He left be-
hind his wife and daughter.
Songer was convicted and
sentenced to death. Later, a
federal appeals court over-
turned the death sentence;
Songer is serving life in
prison.
Chris Talar, NARLEO
committee chairman, said
the dedication has been
more than three years in the
making and everyone is ex-
cited to finally unveil the
new sign naming the twin
span structure after Smith.
In October, NARLEO also
erected a monument in
Smith's honor at the inter-
section of U.S. 19 and Bass-
wood Drive in Crystal River,
the location of where the
fatal shooting took place.
During the July 19 cere-
mony, Talar said family
members of Smith, includ-


Following the moon landing, NASA was charged with developing
a spacecraft that could fly to space and return to Earth. The

Orbiter overview


nent Pilot
ol system
es that Commander
biter;
he rear
Flight
deck *Qw
f B i d Air lock
7 Beds
Sioage - # tGalley
Storage --
Mid
deck


Crew compartn
Reaction contr
40 rocket engine
maneuver the or
also located in th
of the orbiter


Lower
deck


External


Boosters -
The orbiter
is launched
by two solid
rocket
boosters


122 feet


shuttle program has realized this mission. July 8, 2011 will mark the
last scheduled shuttle launch.


Orbital maneuvering system engine
power the spacecraft while entering and leaving orbit


Engines are
powered by a mix
of monomethyl
hydrazine and
nitrogen tetroxide


The payload bay
used for storing and launching sat
Escape with its 50 foot robot arm and
halch conducting experiments

60 tee
Doors are
,:, :.: , Air lock


6,000
pounds


Fuel tank ofthrust

Reaction
Control
: , system
engines


Fuel tank Engine


ellites


57 feet


SOURCE. NASA
stressed it was still too soon
to know whether the
unidentified object would
truly pose a threat, and that
a decision would be made


Monday as to whether the
linked spacecraft would
have to move out of harm's
way The size of the object
was not immediately known.


This was the 46th docking
by a space shuttle to a space
station.
Nine of those were to Mir
back in the 1990s, with At-


lantis making the very first.
The U.S. and Russia built on
that sometimes precarious
experience to create, along
with a dozen other nations,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

the world's largest space-
craft ever: the permanently
inhabited, finally com-
pleted, 12 1/2-year-old Inter-
national Space Station.
This time, Atlantis is de-
livering more than 5 tons of
food, clothes and other
space station provisions -
an entire year's worth, in
fact, to keep the complex
going in the looming post-
shuttle era. A computer fail-
ure aboard Atlantis took
away some of the redun-
dancy desired for the ren-
dezvous, but did not hamper
the operation.
Ferguson was at the con-
trols as Atlantis drew closer,
leading the smallest astro-
naut crew in decades.
Only four are flying
aboard Atlantis, as NASA
kept the crew to a minimum
in case of an emergency In
the unlikely event that At-
lantis was seriously dam-
aged, the shuttle astronauts
would need to move into the
space station for months
and rely on Russian Soyuz
capsules to get back home. A
shuttle always was on
standby before for a possi-
ble rescue, but that's no
longer feasible with Discov-
ery and Endeavour offi-
cially retired now.
Two days into this historic
voyage - the 135th in 30
years of shuttle flight - At-
lantis was said by NASA to
be sailing smoothly, free of
notable damage. Sunday's
docking proved to be as
flawless as Friday's liftoff.


To watch the motorcade, people
will have a view from the parking lot
of the Cross-Florida Greenway
headquarters.


ing his daughter who was 2
years old at the time of the
murder, will be in atten-
dance along with some of
the hunters who assisted in
capturing Songer, several
law enforcement officers
and local dignitaries.
"We should have a pretty
good showing," he said.
Those interested in at-
tending the ceremony are
asked to meet at the Cross-
Florida Greenway head-
quarters near the bridge off
U.S. 19 close to the Nature
Coast RV Park.
A motorcade will formally
open the bridge at noon.
Talar stated traffic will be
momentarily stopped to
allow the cars to cross over


the bridge and break
through a banner. To watch
the motorcade, Talar said
people will have a view
from the parking lot of the
Cross-Florida Greenway
headquarters. No one will
be permitted to stand on the
highway
There will also be a bal-
loon release in Smith's
honor. Food and refresh-
ments will be available be-
fore and after the motorcade.
For more information
about the dedication, call
Talar at (352) 746-1866.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline.
comn.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle file
The dedication ceremony to formally open the Trooper Ronald Gordon Smith Memorial
Bridge will be conducted later this month north of Crystal River.


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Page A3 -MONDAY, JULY 1, 2011



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Locals learn about disaster preparedness


Seniors, disabled residents face unique challenges


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer

LECANTO - Attention
seniors and people with dis-
abilities: Are you prepared
for an emergency?
Being prepared is more
than just having canned
food and a can opener on
hand, said Cathy Jackson,
Center for Independent Liv-
ing program director
The Center offers free
monthly workshops to edu-
cate those who are the most
vulnerable in an emergency



Around
THE STATE

Marion County
FHP seeks witnesses
to 1-75 crash
The Florida Highway Patrol
would like anyone who saw
an accident early Saturday
morning on Interstate 75 in
Marion County to get in
touch, as the driver was
thrown from his car and run
over by an unknown vehicle
that did not stop.
The driver, William Daniel
Mirabal, 23, of Spring Hill,
died.
Mirabal's light blue Pontiac
G-6 was traveling south-
bound on 1-75 in the left travel
lane near marker 344 at 2:45
a.m. Saturday when it ran off
the road into the center me-
dian. Although Mirabal
steered back, he was unable
to regain control, according to
the FHP, and his car went
onto the median again. The
Pontiac slid sideways through
the median, collided with a
raised culvert, became air-
borne and overturned.
Mirabal was thrown from
the Pontiac and came to rest
on the east northbound
shoulder with his head on the
white fog line. Another vehi-
cle ran over him.
Anyone with information is
asked to call Corporal
Jonathan Young at (352)
732-1260 ext. 235.

Citrus County

Winn Webb earns
ACC designation
The Florida Association of
Counties (FAC) presented
Citrus County Commissioner
Winn Webb with the Ad-
vanced County Commis-
sioner (ACC) designation
following his completion of a
comprehensive study pro-
gram developed by the asso-
ciation.
Webb received the desig-
nation along with 29 other
county commissioners during
an awards ceremony at the
FAC Annual Conference in
Orange County on June 22.
Launched by FAC in 2006,
"The Florida Forum for
County Leaders," is an ad-
vanced leadership program
designed for graduates of the
certified county commission-
ers program.
For information about the
ACC program and courses,
visit the FAC website at
www.fl-counties.com.

Inverness

City council to look at
water, sewer rates
The Inverness City Council
will meet in a workshop ses-
sion at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 12, at 212 W. Main St.,
Inverness, for the purpose of
discussing a water and sewer
rate study.
Per Florida statute, any
person who decides to ap-
peal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to
any matter considered at this
meeting will need a record of
the proceedings and for such
purpose may need to provide
that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which
record includes testimony
and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.


-From staff reports


on how to be prepared.
The next workshop is 10
a.m. to noon, Monday, Aug.
15, at the Center for Inde-
pendent Living (CIL), 3774
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto. No pre-registra-
tion necessary
Those who participate will
receive a File of Life folder
and emergency manual,
which includes a magnetic
emergency information
packet that can go on the re-
frigerator so first responders
can easily find it.
"What happens in an emer-


agency, elderly people and
people with diversities are
comfortable at home. They've
got their grab bars and things
that they're used to," Jackson
said. "What happens if you go
someplace without grab bars
- what do you do? How do
you getup from the toilet or in
and out of the shower?
"We teach them to look at
their home and think about
what they (rely) on and what
they would need. So, if you
need grab bars, we teach
them to incorporate a
walker into their emergency


kit," she said.
She said there's also a wa-
terproof, electronic identifi-
cation device that holds
personal emergency infor-
mation they can wear and
emergency personnel can
scan to retrieve.
"Also, we tell them to keep
written instructions on
equipment, like oxygen, so
first responders know what
to do," Jackson said.
The Center for Independ-
ent Living began offering
the Emergency Prepared-
ness Readiness Outreach
(EPRO) program in 2005, the
year after four hurricanes
wreaked havoc across


Florida.
Jackson, herself disabled,
lives west of U.S. 19 in a
mandatory evacuation area
and did not evacuate.
"I was scared, too," she
said. "I didn't want to leave
my dogs. I thought I was pre-
pared, but I learned it takes
a lot more than a can opener
and a lantern.
"Most of the trauma
comes post-storm," she said.
"I was OK until I went out to
do clean up. I got dehy-
drated and I got sick."
People get into trouble
when they try to do things
beyond their limitations.
"It's important to under-


Magnetic mentor


DAVE BARFIELD/Special to the Chronicle
Inverness Middle School science teacher Steve Crandall poses next to a molecular beam epitaxy at the
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee. The machine takes up most of the space in the lab of
Maitri Warusawithana, the scientist serving as Crandall's mentor. Crandall is one of 15 teachers nationwide
selected to participate in a residential summer program at the Mag Lab at Florida State University.


Scientist, machine educate Inverness teacher this summer


CHERI HARRIS
Staff Writer
TALLAHASSEE - If Inverness
Middle School students ask science
teacher Steve Crandall what he did
over summer vacation, the answer
might seem more like a lesson than
a story
He is one of 15 teachers nation-
wide doing extreme science at the
National High Magnetic Field Lab-
oratory
In a recent phone interview,
Crandall said during the six-week
residential program at Florida
State University, he is paired with a
scientist at the lab. The mentor
Crandall works with uses an ad-
vanced machine called molecular
beam epitaxy
Crandall explained the machine
superheats metals in an ultrahigh
vacuum chamber As a piece of
metal is heated, eventually atoms
are released from the surface and
in that vacuum chamber, those


metal atoms are directed to an-
other surface "that they get sort of
painted on," Crandall said.
The metal atoms arrange them-
selves into an incredibly thin crys-
talline film. In the molecular beam
epitaxy, the process is repeated
with different kinds of metal. Cran-
dall compared it to painting on a
canvas and letting one layer dry be-
fore adding another, "but they use
electricity and magnetism forces to
draw the materials," he said,
"rather than a brush."
"The film itself is what's useful,"
Crandall said. "It could be used for
molecular transistors, resistors,
semiconductors, perhaps for mag-
netic superconductors as well.
Crandall said different metals
have different properties when put
together in the crystal structures.
As technology has moved from
vacuum tubes and room-sized com-
puters to integrated circuits and
now ubiquitous laptops, Crandall
said in the future, microscopic


nano-computers could be created
using this technology
"It blows your mind, but kind of
in a neat way, in a good way, I
think," he said. "You think of any-
thing that can be built on a large
scale and now working to build it
on a nano-scale."
When he returns to teach seventh-
grade science students in the fall, he
said he will have more robust in-
quiry methods of teaching science to
share, as well as a vacuum demon-
strator for the classroom, which
makes it easier to demonstrate
properties of a vacuum.
"It's amazing and wonderful and
edifying," said Crandall, who has
been teaching at IMS since 1987.
"I'm really getting recharged this
summer, ready to come back and
try to share with other teachers
and students - anyone who will
listen to me, really"
Chronicle reporter Cheri Harris
can be reached at (352) 564-2926 or
charris@chronicleonline. com.


Council aiming for directional signs


City hopes to catch visitors'

eyes, guide them to waterfronts


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer

CRYSTAL RIVER - City
officials have long said
there are plenty of parks
and waterfront in their city,
but visitors do not know
where they are.
The council on Monday is
expected to approve the
purchase of directional
signs for U.S. 19, Citrus Av-
enue and other segments of
the downtown area that of-
ficials hope will catch visi-
tors' attention.
The project cost is
$23,330. Signs will direct


motorists to Hunters Spring
Park, the Riverwalk, Her-
itage Village, Historic
Downtown, King's Bay Park
and area parking.
Council members meet
as the community redevel-
opment agency at 6:30 p.m.
at city hall. The regular
council meeting follows at
7p.m.
City Manager Andy Hous-
ton also is preparing an up-
date on improvements to
King's Bay Park. They in-
clude:
* Estimated cost for a
kayak launch is $54,000.
Houston said in an agenda


* WHAT: Crystal River
City Council meeting.
* WHEN: 6:30 p.m.
today CRA; 7 p.m.
regular meeting.
* WHERE: City Hall on
U.S. 19.
* ON THE WEB: www.
crystalriverfl.org.

memo the staff may bid out
the project in hopes of re-
ducing the cost to a bud-
geted $47,000.
* Bids are expected
sometime this month for
restrooms at the park.
* Estimates for a prefab-
ricated bandstand range
from $30,000 to $40,000, plus
$20,000 to $25,000 for assem-
bly Houston said the staff is
looking at other options.


The regular council
agenda includes:
* Setting the tentative
tax rate at 3.8 mills, which
is the current rate.
* Approving a devel-
oper's agreement for town-
houses and apartments at
Hidden Lakes Preserves, a
development near the Crys-
tal River Mall.
* Final reading of an or-
dinance to allow alcohol
sales before 1 p.m. Sunday
* Final reading of an or-
dinance annexing 233 acres
near Home Depot. The
property owners plan on
bringing a development
proposal to the council at a
later date.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 ormwright@
chronicleonline. com.


stand our own disabilities,
before a real emergency oc-
curs," Jackson said. "If
we're prepared, such as an
extra supply of medications,
additional oxygen tanks or
access to a walker, evacua-
tion experiences are easier
to handle. We can all be safe
if we have a plan, and being
a senior or having a disabil-
ity doesn't have to make you
the next victim."
For information, call the
Center for Independent Liv-
ing at (352) 527-8399.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at
(352) 564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.



Two new


online


services


available

Programs to save

time, money
BETTY STRIFLER
Special to the Chronicle
Betty Strifler, Clerk of the
Circuit Court, is pleased to
announce two new online
services, GovPayNet and
RealTaxDeed.
The clerk's mission to ex-
pand and improve online
services is an ongoing pur-
suit These latest additions
are two more ways to save
time and money and are ac-
cessible from your home or
office computer
GovPayNet is a time-saving
online venue for residents on
a payment plan for court-re-
lated fines and fees. Gov-
PayNet accepts major
credit/debit cards for pay-
ments and is accessible on
the clerk's website. This con-
venient option is available
rather than making payments
over the phone or waiting in
line.
Coming in August, the ad-
ditional services of accepting
payments for Value Adjust-
ment Board petitions, sub-
scription service and escrow
payments through Gov-
PayNet will be available.
GovPayNet assesses a serv-
ice charge of 3.5 percent per
transaction with a minimum
of $2, and the clerk does not
receive any portion of this fee.
The clerk's office has also
launched RealTaxDeed, a
web-based auction service for
the sale of tax deeds. The
service will be live Aug. 1,
with the first auction slated
for mid-August This feature
is at www.citrus.realtax
deed.com and is accessible
via a link on the clerk's
website.
In partnership with Real
Auction.com, the Clerk's of-
fice will offer two bidder
training classes in the jury as-
sembly room at the new
courthouse in Inverness:
S1 p.m. Aug. 1.
* 9:30 a.m. Aug. 2.
To register, call (877)
361-7325 or email customer
service@realauction. com.
In addition to the new serv-
ices announced above, the
clerk's website, www clerk.
citrus.fl.us, offers online pass-
port information and applica-
tions, marriage license
requirements, jury duty in-
formation, court dockets and
records, official public
records and searches, fee
schedules, Value Adjustment
Board procedures, online
employment applications,
county commission meetings
in live streaming video with
current and archived minutes
and agendas and much more.
For information, call An-
gela Vick, chief deputy clerk,
at (352) 341-6482 for questions
relating to the new services.
The clerk's call center at
(352) 341-6424 or one of our
customer service counters in
the new courthouse or Crys-
tal River satellite office is al-


ways available to assist. It is
open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday, except
holidays.


I


I






A4 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


QUESTION: Should the federal government move
forward with a rule to restrict boat traffic in
King's Bay to slow speed year round?
* Yes. Not enough is being done to protect endan-
gered manatees from the increasing number of
boats in the bay. 95 percent (623 votes)
* No. Doing this would hinder recreational activi-
ties in King's Bay. 4 percent (27 votes)
* Undecided. I don't know enough about the pro-
posed regulations and/or the current conditions
in King's Bay to form an opinion. 1 percent (6
votes)
Total votes: 656.


HOW YOUR LAWMAKERS VOTED
Key votes for the week ending: July 8
By Voterama in Congress
* Bold title of bill here: 2012 Military Budget: Mem-
bers approved, 336-87, $649 billion in military appro-
priations for fiscal 2012, up 2.7 per cent from 2011.
A yes vote backed HR 2219, which sets a 1.6 percent
military pay raise while providing $119 billion for war
in Iraq-Afghanistan and $32 billion for health care.
Rich Nugent, Yes.
* Military Spending Slowdown: Voting 181-244, mem-
bers refused to cut the rate of growth of military
spending from nearly 2.7 percent to about 1.3 per-
cent between 2011 and 2012. A yes vote backed an
increase of $8.5 billion instead of $17 billion in 2012
military spending. (HR 2219) Nugent, No.
* Libya Funding Ban: Voting 199-229, members de-
feated an amendment to prohibit funding in HR 2219
(above) for continued U.S. participation in the NATO
coalition that is supporting rebel forces in Libya's on-
going civil war. A yes vote was to stop funding U.S. ac-
tions in the Libyan theater. Nugent, Yes.
* Contractors' Political Donations: Members prohib-
ited, 256-170, funding for a pending White House
order that firms bidding for U.S. contracts disclose
political donations made secretly as permitted by the
Supreme Court's "Citizens United" ruling. A yes vote
backed the prohibition. (HR 2219) Nugent, Yes.
* Taxes on Millionaires: Senators voted, 74-22, to
begin debate on a non-binding bill urging that in-
creased tax revenues from millionaires be part of any
bill to raise the national-debt ceiling and curb the
growth of annual budget deficits. A yes vote was to
advance the advisory bill (S 1323). Bill Nelson, Yes;
Marco Rubio, No.
* Key votes ahead: In the week of July 11, the House
will debate energy and water appropriations and an
extension of National Flood Insurance, while the Sen-
ate will resume work on a non-binding measure call-
ing for higher taxes on millionaires as part of any
deficit-reduction agreement reached this summer.
�2011 Thomas Reports Inc. Call: (202) 667-9760.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
* Kevin John Sweade, 37,
of Hernando, at 4:31 a.m. July
2, on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery, in reference
to a 28-year-old Hernando
woman who alleged she had
been pushed to the ground
causing abrasions. No bond.
* Christel Ann Sherouse,
28, of Dunnellon, at 9:26 p.m.
July 2, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery, in
reference to a 28-year-old
Dunnellon man alleging injury
from being hit and scratched
multiple times. No bond.
* Mark Steven Tessmer,
50, of Inverness, at 10:42 p.m.
July 2, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery, in
reference to a 52-year-old In-
verness woman alleging injury
when punched by a closed fist
on the right side of the face. A
deputy observed a red, raised
area and a small cut on the in-
side lip. No bond.
* Ronald L. Evans, 35, of
Beverly Hills, at 3:18 a.m. July
3, on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery, in reference
to a 27-year-old Beverly Hills
woman alleging injury when hit
with an open hand on the right
side of the face. No bond.
* John A. Walmer, 27,
Crystal River, at 10:30 a.m. July
3, on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery in reference to
a 24-year-old Crystal River
woman who alleged that during
a fight over a cellular telephone,
the phone was forcefully re-
moved from her hand causing
her to hit the floor, and she was
punched and thrown to the
ground. No bond.
DUI arrest
* Robert J. McGonigal, 40,
of 13089 Marsh Hawk Rd.,
Brooksville, at 2:29 a.m. Satur-
day, on a misdemeanor charge


For the RECORD

ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


of driving under the influence,
after a traffic stop on U.S. 19
north of the intersection with
West Venable Street in Crystal
River for traveling at more than
60 mph in a 45-mph zone. Ac-
cording to the arrest report, the
deputy detected a strong odor
of alcoholic beverage emitting
from the driver. The deputy ob-
served his eyes were bloodshot
and glassy. He said he had
drunk a couple of beers. McGo-
nigal did not complete field so-
briety tasks as demonstrated.
Breath tests were 0.030 percent
and 0.029 percent. Florida law
presumes impairment at 0.080
percent. The report noted a
one-hour delay in testing Mc-
Gonigal because a new officer
was in training. Bond $500.

Other arrests
* Kevin James Axelson,
18, of 3730 N. Stirrup Drive,
Beverly Hills, at 12:51 p.m.
July 1, on a felony charge of
lewd and lascivious battery on
a person aged between 12 and
16, in reference to a Dunnellon
girl aged 13. According to both
Axelson and the girl, Axelson
had consumed beer. The girl
said he attempted penetration.
The girl's mother discovered
the incident when she logged
into her daughter's Facebook
account. Other witnesses con-
firmed the two people being to-
gether, but no one witnessed
sexual activity, according to the
report. Bond $5,000.
* Christopher Alan
Pavone, 26, of 6737 W. Park
Drive, Homosassa, at 5:17
a.m. July 2, on a felony charge
of leaving the scene of an acci-
dent with injury, in reference to


a 27-year-old Homosassa man
who alleged he had been
Pavone's passenger, but was
hit after he exited the car. A de-
tective found no evidence to
support a charge of aggra-
vated battery with a deadly
weapon. Bond $5,000.
* Steven Matthew Buteau,
22, of 1758 S. Mooring Drive,
Inverness, at 3:11 a.m. July 3,
on an active Citrus County
warrant for violation of proba-
tion in reference to an original
felony charge of aggravated
battery with a deadly weapon.
No bond.
* Barry Edward Granger,
52, of 12900 E. Trail's End
Road, Lot 47, Floral City, at
7:12 p.m. Friday, on an active
Citrus County warrant for viola-
tion of probation, in reference
to an original charge of pos-
session of more than 20 grams
of cannabis to sell, manufac-
ture or deliver. No bond.
* Derek Lawrence Kohut,
26, of 2737 Wild Plum,
Woodridge, Ill., at 9:11 p.m. Fri-
day, on an active Citrus County
warrant for violation of proba-
tion, in reference to an original
felony charges of unarmed
burglary of a dwelling, giving
false information to a pawnbro-
ker and grand theft. No bond.
* Michael C. Weckesser,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

28, of 3250 E. Kennedy St., In-
verness, at 6:09 a.m. Saturday,
on misdemeanor charges of
possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia
and issued a notice to appear
citation.
* Jeffrey Allen Miller, 56,
of 1764 S. Colonial Ave., Ho-
mosassa, at 2:04 p.m. Satur-
day, on a felony charge of
violation of probation, in refer-
ence to an original charge of
battery on a person aged 65 or
older. Miller was reported to
have violated a condition of his
probation regarding the con-
sumption of alcohol. According
to the report, Miller admitted
drinking a 12-ounce can of
beer. At least five empty cans
were found in his possession,
but he said he was recycling
them. No bond.
* Cecil Allen Naylor, 40, of
2687 W. Scurano Court,
Lecanto, at 3:36 p.m. Saturday,
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for violation of probation, in
reference to an original misde-
meanor charge of driving while
license suspended, with no
bond; and for knowingly driving
while license cancelled for fail-
ure to pay financial obligation,
after a traffic stop for not wear-
ing a seat belt. Bond $500.
* Shawna Marie Lindall,
26, of 20 S. Adams St., Beverly
Hills, at 3:40 p.m. Saturday, on
a felony charge of retail theft,
in reference to clothing valued
at $325 removed without pay-
ment from Beall's department
store in Crystal River. Bond
$2,000.


legal notices in. today's Citrus County Chronicle

Notice to Creditors/Administration......B11

A Self Storage Notices..........................B.11

Surplus Property...............................B11


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
West winds around 10 knots. Seas Gu
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will tel
have a light chop. Mostly cloudy with
a chance of scattered showers and
thunderstorms today.


90 75 trace ..I.89

SOUTLOOK Exclusive daily
UILUUOK forecast by:


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73
Scattered thunderstorms, rain
chance 50%.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73
Scattered thunderstorms, rain chance 50%.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Scattered thunderstorms, rain chance 40%.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday 92/73
Record 97/68
Normal 91/72
Mean temp. 83
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday 0.21 in.
Total for the month 2.37 in.
Total for the year 32.22 in.
Normal for the year 26.35 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Sunday at 3 p.m. 30.06 in.


DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 75
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 74%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's Count: 1.3/12
Tuesday's Count: 4.7
Wednesday's Count: 5.4
AIR QUALITY
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
7/11 MONDAY 2:39 8:54
7/12 TUESDAY 3:31 9:46


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
3:08 9:23
4:00 10:15


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


JULY23 JULY30 AUG 6


SUNSET TONIGHT ...................... 8:32 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW...............6:40 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY..................... 5:26 PM.
MOONSET TODAY.......................3:05 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may water on
Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and/or
Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to once per week, before
8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants (other than
lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers
MO
ity High/Low
hassahowitzka* 4:04 a/10:28 a
crystal River" 2:25 a7:50 a
'ithlacoochee* 12:12 a/5:38 a
omosassa*** 3:14 a/9:27 a


**At King's Bay
onday
High/Low
2:41 p/-
1:02 p/9:34 p
10:49 a7:22 p
1:51 p/11:11 p


***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday
High/Low High/Low
5:12 a/12:12 a 3:41 p/11:37 a
3:33 a/8:59 a 2:02 p/10:28 p
1:20 a/6:47 a 11:49 a/8:16 p
4:22 a/10:36 a 2:51 p/-


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


ulf water
nperature



89�
Taken atAripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.82 27.87 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.78 35.79 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.19 37.18 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.79 37.79 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


5r_," , ;---^,Hosio :
*Iora unu " onooblulu
. . - * B , ' .

S FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
MONDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Sunday Monday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


85 60
96 68
84 71
91 73
90 64
101 75
90 68
88 58
96 77
92 58
86 66
84 66
83 57
90 73
93 63
91 72
91 74
90 66
90 67
96 73
92 65
85 50
10082
87 61
89 73
91 70
101 75
91 69
89 62
85 62
97 76
90 69
10277
99 84
10382
74 64
92 71
98 81
91 73
92 72
96 78
98 76
96 71


ts
ts
ts
.15 ts
s
pc
pc
ts
.71 ts
s
s
ts
ts
ts
ts
.03 pc
ts
.01 pc
pc

ts
PCts
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc
s
s
.07 pc
pc
ts
.01 pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
ts
.08 ts
ts
.05 ts
pc


93 69
92 68
92 66
93 75
90 73
98 75
94 73
88 60
98 77
92 60
89 73
82 71
87 68
90 75
93 69
94 73
91 73
96 76
89 74
95 74
92 74
92 65
101 79
90 63
90 72
91 74
96 75
95 77
93 73
90 69
97 78
93 76
100 78
98 81
100 77
71 62
96 79
101 82
84 69
87 64
95 79
98 77
97 77


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drzzle; f=fair; h=hazy;
pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mx; ssunny;
sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy
�2011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Sunday Monday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 95 77 ts 93 79
New York City 86 68 pc 90 74
Norfolk 88 72 s 90 73
Oklahoma City 105 81 pc 104 77
Omaha 92 76 ts 95 73
Palm Springs 111 81 s 102 74
Philadelphia 101 69 pc 92 74
Phoenix 10582 ts 100 85
Pittsburgh 89 62 pc 91 73
Portland, ME 82 59 s 82 65
Portland, Ore 79 55 c 75 58
Providence, R.I. 82 60 s 88 69
Raleigh 92 69 s 94 72
Rapid City 86 58 ts 80 65
Reno 93 57 s 86 56
Rochester, NY 89 60 ts 91 68
Sacramento 87 56 s 83 55
St. Louis 97 77 pc 99 78
St. Ste. Marie 86 64 ts 80 59
Salt Lake City 90 65 .02 ts 90 72
San Antonio 98 78 .01 pc 96 74
San Diego 71 66 pc 73 66
San Francisco 69 54 pc 62 51
Savannah 91 76trace ts 95 75
Seattle 76 55 c 72 55
Spokane 80 51 pc 84 54
Syracuse 88 59 ts 92 68
Topeka 10277 pc 101 77
Washington 92 73 pc 93 75
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Hutchinson, Kan. LOW 31 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


MONDAY Lisbon
CITY H//SKY London
Acapulco 84/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 70/55/pc Mexico City
Athens 88/75/s Montreal
Beijing 91/73/ts Moscow
Berlin 75/57/pc Paris
Bermuda 84/77/ts Rio
Cairo 91/70/s Rome
Calgary 68/54/sh Sydney
Havana 90/73/pc Tokyo
Hong Kong 87/83/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 87/67/s Warsaw


77/63/c
77/56/sh
95/68/s
70/57/ts
90/72/pc
82/59/s
77/59/pc
76/64/pc
95/72/s
61/41/s
86/76/ts
91/72/ts
82/57/ts


C I T R U S


C U N T Y-


(CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: (352) 563-5655
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at www.shop.naturecoastcentralcom/chronicle.html
13 wks.: $36.65* - 6 mos.: $64.63*
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*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call (352) 563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

(352) 563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County - (352) 563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at (888) 852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus - (352) 563-5966
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To place a display ad: (352) 563-5592
Online display ad: (352) 563-3206 or e-mail us at
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FAX: Advertising - 563-5665, Newsroom - 563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Where to find us:


Meadowcrest
office
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd.
Crystal River,
FL 34429


Inverness
office

106 W. Main
St.,
Inverness, FL
34450


Gerry M ulligan ....................................................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan................................. ..................................... Editor, 563-3225
Tom Feeney ......................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ................................................................ Online M manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan .... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Doug Yates .............................................................. Classified M manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon ....................... ........................ Business Manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Idled Minn. public employees holding on - for now


Associated Press

ST PAUL, Minn. - Kent
Mechels spent the last three
Christmases away from his family
plowing snow off Minnesota roads
so people could drive safely It was
a hardship he accepted as part of
the job, he said.
But Mechels' latest sacrifice -
getting laid off during a state gov-
ernment shutdown now entering
its second week - has him think-
ing about quitting.
"I'm looking at other state agen-
cies in different states right now.
I've lived in Minnesota my entire
life. I may be leaving," said
Mechels, a single father from
Rochester.
"When the state government
treats their employees like this, I
don't need to be part of it."
Many of the 22,000 public em-
ployees out of work in Minnesota's


budget impasse say they will get
through the extended layoff by
tapping into personal savings, re-
lying on a spouse's income or un-
employment checks, and making
household spending cuts.
But others are looking for new
jobs, creating the potential for a
brain drain that would be one
more negative from the nation's
longest state government shut-
down in a decade.
Erik Pakieser, an emergency
planner for the state transporta-
tion department, took to Twitter
soon after the shutdown to shop
his services for what he hopes
could be a better-paying job in the
private sector
The state stands to lose an em-
ployee it spent a lot of money
training, the St. Anthony Village
man said.
"If I get a better job, great. If I
don't, I'm going to get my state job


back eventually," he said. "Who
knows? Maybe there's a silver lin-
ing in all this."
Isaias Petros, of Minneapolis,
works in land management with
the Department of Transportation
and said he doesn't have much
money saved to get through the
shutdown.
Though he is single with no chil-
dren, Petros said he needs at least
a temporary job to pay back some
student loans.
"I was not ready for this," he
said, adding he was actively look-
ing for "anything" that could help
him support himself.
Not everyone is job hunting.
Brent Anderson, who manages
Whitewater State Park in south-
eastern Minnesota, has a wife who
works and said he simply plans to
cut back on expenses. Anderson is
spending more time volunteering
at the Goodview Fire Department,


catching up on paperwork and
thinking about painting his house
trim.
One of the biggest shutdown ca-
sualties in Anderson's family is his
teenage daughter. She was sched-
uled to take her driver's license
test last Tuesday and was excited
about getting behind the wheel.
Now she'll have to wait, because
the state is not offering driving
tests during the shutdown.
"It's a little disappointment for
a 16-year-old," Anderson said.
Jim Ullmer, of Crystal, a com-
mercial vehicle inspector for the
Department of Public Safety, has
been babysitting his 18-month-old
granddaughter, who he took to an
anti-shutdown union rally at the
Capitol last week.
"We've cut back and skipped a
lot of things just in preparation,"
Ullmer said. "Right now I'm just
babysitting little Anna. ... She's a


full-time job and I love doing it,
but I'd much rather be out doing
my job."
Ullmer also has been spending
time on the phone. He's the chief
steward statewide for members in
his agency who belong to the
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employees.
He tells members curious about
how long the shutdown will last to
call their legislators.
"Ask them. They're the ones
who are keeping us out here,"
Ullmer said.
The workers' money woes con-
trast sharply with the position of
state lawmakers, who are still eli-
gible for their salaries during the
shutdown - although some have
chosen not to take them. And
while their unions are a tradi-
tional power base for Democrats
and support for Dayton remains
strong, it's not universal.


WOMEN
Continued from Page Al

she said.
According to a recent
study conducted by the In-
stitute for Health Metrics
and Evaluation at the Uni-
versity of Washington, life
expectancy for women has
actually declined in 313 U.S.
counties, most in the South-
east, Southern Midwest and
Appalachia, but for Citrus
County life expectancy for
women has increased -
and for men, too.
Of the 67 counties in
Florida, women live the
longest in Collier County -
86 years on average. That's
longer than the average in
France, Switzerland and
Spain.
Women are also living
long lives in Teton, Wyo.,
San Mateo and Marin, Calif,
and Montgomery, Md.
Five counties in Missis-
sippi have the lowest life ex-
pectancies for women, all
below 74.5 years, which is
even lower than nations
such as Honduras, El Sal-
vador and Peru.
Researchers found
women in 1,373 counties -
about 40 percent of U.S.
counties - fell more than
five years behind the na-
tions with the best life ex-
pectancies.
They also found change in
life expectancy is so uneven
that within some states
there can be up to a 10-year
difference between the
counties with the longest
lives and those with the
shortest.
States such as Arizona,
Florida, Virginia and Geor-
gia have seen counties leap
forward more than five
years from 1987 to 2007
while nearby counties stag-
nate or even lose years of


CAUSES OF DEATH FOR MEN AND WOMEN
The top four causes of death for Citrus County residents have remained consistent
from 1987 to 2007 - cardiovascular disease, cancer, lower respiratory disease and
stroke. However, there is a significant change in the proportion of deaths related to
each cause by gender.


Cause


1987
(men)


Cardio- 50.6%
vascular
disease
Cancer 23.7%
Chronic 5.2%
lower
respiratory
disease
Stroke 6.3%


2007 change
(men)
31.9% -18.7


27.8% +4.1%
7.2% +2%


4.3%


1987


2007


(women) (women)


52.8%


24%
4.6%


9.6%


37%


24%
9.0%


5.7%


- Information from Citrus County Health


life expectancy
Nationally, women have
not fared as well as men.
Life expectancy increased
4.3 years for men and 2.4
years for women between
1987 and 2007.
In Citrus County, the in-
crease was about 1.25 years
during that period. The
study did not give an aver-
age age.
Of the four leading causes
of death in women - car-
diovascular disease, cancer,
chronic lower respiratory
disease and stroke - deaths
from stroke decreased by 3.9
percent and cardiovascular
disease decreased by 15.8
percent. (See fact box for
more information.)
"I believe the lower death
rates related to cardiovas-
cular disease and stroke can
be attributed to both the
medical advances made in
the area of the treatment
and management of cardio-
vascular disease and stroke
along with the increased ac-
cess of specialty care in the
county," said Teresa Good-


man, Citrus County Health
Department administrator
"At the same time there
has been a significant in-
crease in deaths related to
respiratory disease, espe-
cially in women," she
added.
Goodman attributed this
to an increase in smoking by
adult women, up 2 percent
from 2002 to 2007 (24 to 26.7
percent). The percentage of
male smokers in the county
decreased from 30.1 to 24.5
percent during the same
time period.
"The incidence of deaths
related to diabetes has also
increased since 1987 - dou-
bled for women - which
can be attributed to the in-
creased incidence of over-
weight and obesity in adult
Citrus residents," Goodman
said.
"Lastly we know that
there is a direct relation-
ship between education and
health - better educated
individuals have more posi-
tive health outcomes," she
said. "It should also be


noted the number
residents living
has increased si
...and also the
uninsured h
creased. We k
poverty negative
ences health sta
this trend contain
begin to see in
mortality and
rates for Citrus r
For Gibbs and
attribute their l
hard work and cl
Gibbs said s
smoked or drain
and has always
tive doing her o
She's always e,


change

-15.8%


A friend said,
'Ella won't die;
she's too
stubborn.'

Ella Jones
about a recent
bout of swine flu.


vegetables than meat.
She had a mastectomy in
_-- 1992 and has had a hys-
+4.4% terectomy and back surgery
4 She takes only two pills a
day, one for blood pressure
and one for her irregular
heartbeat.
"You just have to take
-3.9% care of yourself," she said.
Jones smoked briefly in
Department the 1930s when it was popu-
lar, but other than that she,
too, has lived clean.
er of Citrus "Last year, I had two bouts
in poverty when I was unconscious,"
gnificantly she said. "One was when I
number of had swine flu. A friend said,
ias in- 'Ella won't die; she's too
now that stubborn.'
rely influ- "I used to get exercise be-
itus, and if fore I came here just by liv-
ues we may ing, but I need a wheelchair
creases in or a walker to go out now.
morbidity Someone said, 'You're the
residents " going outset person I ever
Jones, they met,' because I have a lot of
longevity to friends who take me out I'm
lean living, lucky," she said. "Every day
he never I wake up is a good day"
nk alcohol Chronicle reporterNancy
stayed ac- Kennedy can be reached at
wn chores. (352) 564-2927 or nkennedy
aten more @chronicleonline.com.


BLIND
Continued from Page Al

- and we already have
the building next door
rented out."
The cabinet shop is put
on hold, but the blind will
continue to build furni-
ture and other projects,
and the Country Store will
continue selling the hand-
made items. They also
want to stock such items
as talking watches and
clocks, magnifying glasses,
canes and other low-vi-
sion items, plus a lending
library of taped books.
Right now, Krokker is
looking for volunteers and
community or church
groups who are willing to
host fundraisers for Blind
Americans. He needs peo-
ple who can help with
Braille and computer
classes.
"What I'd like to see us
do is what we started 20
years ago," he said.
"We want to build a
good program with a nice
building, and we've got
that now. Once that pro-
gram is running, I'm hop-
ing to retire. I'll still be
here, but let someone else
be president."
Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy can be
reached at (352) 564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Memorialized in two states


Southern Calif.

to honor her,

Mich. to bury

Betty Ford
Associated Press
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif.
- Before she is laid to rest,
Betty Ford will be memorial-
ized in the Southern Califor-
nia desert region she and her
rehab center made famous
by treating troubled Holly-
wood stars battling alco-
holism and other addictions.
Rancho Mirage was al-
ready a billionaires' play-
ground, but Ford's center
made it a household name as
it provided help to luminar-
ies ranging from Elizabeth
Taylor to Lindsay Lohan.
Tributes poured in Satur-
day from A-listers and aver-
age residents alike in the
desert golf community where
Ford settled with her hus-
band, former President Ger-
ald Ford, after he left office
more than three decades ago.
She died of natural
causes at Eisenhower Med-
ical Center in Rancho Mi-
rage on Friday at 93, family
attorney and spokesman
Greg Willard said.
She will be memorialized
Tuesday in California's
Coachella Valley, which in-
cludes Rancho Mirage, be-
fore her casket travels by
motorcade and military
transport for a private bur-
ial Thursday alongside her
husband in Grand Rapids,
Mich., at the Gerald R. Ford
Museum.
Revealing addiction
In Rancho Mirage, resi-
dents were saddened by her
death even as they praised
her devotion to removing
the stigma from addiction.
The Betty Ford Center
treated more than 90,000
people since its beginnings
in 1982 and although it was
most famous for a string of
celebrity patients, it kept its
rates relatively affordable
and provided a model for ef-
fective addiction treatment.
She revealed her own
longtime addiction to
painkillers and alcohol 15
months after leaving the
White House, and regularly
welcomed new groups of pa-
tients to rehab with a
speech that started, "Hello,
my name's Betty Ford, and
I'm an alcoholic and drug
addict."
Carol Pruter, 67, said she
was proud Betty Ford chose
to set up her rehab center in
Rancho Mirage and admired
Ford for making a point of
reaching out to average peo-
ple too, Pruter said.
"She let people know that
people who aren't well-
known can get addictions
too. It's not something for a
certain part of society, it's not
something to hide," Pruter


Associated Press
ABOVE: Sparta, Mich.
residents Nikki Cole, and her
children Makenzie, 6, and
Nathan, 15, place candles
outside the reserved burial
spot for Betty Ford, next to
former President Gerald R.
Ford on Friday. Betty Ford,
the former first lady died
Friday. She was 93. RIGHT:
President Gerald Ford holds
the hand of First Lady Betty
Ford in this Oct. 3, 1974,
photo taken during their visit
at Bethesda Naval Hospital
near Washington, D.C.
said as she stopped by a local
coffee shop in Saturday's
104-degree desert heat.
Pruter's family attends St
Margaret's Episcopal
Church in nearby Palm
Desert, where the Fords also
worshipped. The church will
host a tribute service Tues-
day to Mrs. Ford for friends
and family, and a public visi-
tation Tuesday evening.
Ford chose her close
friend and fellow former
First Lady Rosalynn Carter
to eulogize her in Califor-
nia, along with journalist
Cokie Roberts and a Uni-
versity of Michigan dean,
Jeffrey MacKie-Mason.
Reminiscing
Willard, who has served
the family since 1975, re-
called when the outspoken
bosom buddies Ford and
Carter went to Capitol Hill
to lobby for mental health
legislation.
"Several Senators and Con-
gressmen have since ob-
served that they have not
seen a political force of na-
ture as they did that day when
they saw those women arm-
in-arm in the halls of Con-
gress," Willard said Saturday
Other residents of the
desert town reminisced
about the celebrity cache
the Betty Ford Center
brought to Rancho Mirage
and the other desert cities
in the Coachella Valley -
but without the frenzy that
so often accompanies the
comings and goings of
today's troubled stars.
"It's probably shallow to
say, but I think it's really
cool she was able to get
celebrities here," said Pat


Kellogg, who has lived in the
area for 22 years.
Florist John Ballow for
years has catered to Rancho
Mirage's wealthy and fa-
mous, but there were few
with whom he developed as
close a relationship as the
woman he reverentially
calls "Mrs. Ford."
"I took this almost as bad
as a member of my family
dying - the world does not
make Mrs. Fords anymore,"
said Ballow
Treating celebrities
The city's annual Betty
Ford Pro-Am Golf Tourna-
ment draws on the lush fair-
ways to raise money for
people who cannot afford
addiction treatment.
The rest of the world,
however, knew the rehab
center's hometown prima-
rily for its ties to Holly-
wood's elite, so much so that
it became the punch line in
discussions of celebrity
overindulgence.
In 1996, Kelsey Grammer
described to Jay Leno how
his treatment at Betty Ford
helped restore his joy of liv-
ing. The comedian also
quipped about the center's
stature and its famous
patients.
"When I was on my way to
the Betty Ford Center, I
turned to one of my friends
and said, 'You know, I've fi-
nally made it. I'm going to
the Betty Ford Center,"' he
said.
Grammer, however, also
credited the center with
saving his life as did many of
the celebrities who honored
Ford on Friday as news of
her death spread, from


Oscar-winner Marlee Matlin
to "One Day at a Time" ac-
tress Mackenzie Phillips to
Ali McGraw, who was
treated at the center in 1986.
"She changed so many of
our lives with her courage
and intelligence, her honesty
and humility, and her deep
grace," McGraw said. "Her
vision impacted my own life
as few people have."
Being humble
But Ford herself would
have rejected the praise as
she did in life, preferring in-
stead to turn the attention
back to the person who was
struggling with the demons
of addiction.
"People who get well
often say, 'You saved my
life,' and 'You've turned my
life around,"' Ford once
said. "They don't realize we
merely provided the means
for them to do it themselves,
and that's all."
After the Tuesday service
in California, Ford's casket
will travel Wednesday to
Gerald R. Ford Interna-
tional Airport in Grand
Rapids, where she grew up,
and where she met her hus-
band of 58 years.

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Hypnotist principal


faces questions after


2 students' suicides


Tragic deaths

happened one

month apart

Associated Press
NORTH PORT - High
school principal George
Kenney acknowledged
using hypnosis to help peo-
ple: students who needed to
relax before tests, a basket-
ball player having trouble
making free throws and
even school secretaries who
wanted to quit smoking.
But now the popular 51-
year-old principal's future
at North Port High School
is in question since it came
to light he had hypnotized
two students before their
separate suicides this
spring. There is no indica-
tion their deaths were any
more than a tragic coinci-
dence. However, Kenney
acknowledged conducting
the sessions after being
warned by his boss to stop
such one-on-one hypnosis
with students at school.
Most students, teachers
and fellow administrators
at the southwest Florida
school were aware Kenney
was a trained hypnotist
who would eagerly help
those who sought him out
for sessions, according to a
school district report. Stu-
dents looked forward to his
demonstrations in a psy-
chology class and at other
school events.
In April, according to the
Sarasota County School
District report, he hypno-
tized a 16-year-old student
to help him better focus on
a test. The next day, the boy
committed suicide. Kenney
was put on leave in May
when the boy's parents,
who had given their per-
mission for the sessions,


raised concerns after his
death.
The administrator's situ-
ation then got stickier
when an investigation
showed he had also hypno-
tized another student five
months before her May 4
suicide, initially lied about
it and had defied three
separate verbal warnings
to stop the sessions with
students.
A 134-page independent
investigative report re-
leased by the district last
week includes an inter-
view with Kenney, who ac-
knowledged defying the
orders and then lying.
"I'm not saying I used
great judgment all the time
here," he told an investiga-
tor. "I think I used poor
judgment several times."
But the report also reflects
the support and affection
Kenney enjoys at the 2,300-
student high school, about 90
miles south of Tampa. Two
Facebook pages, one with
more than 1,600 fans, have
been created to support
Kenney, principal of North
Port High since its opening
in 2001. Some students who
were hypnotized say it
helped them with sports and
academics.
Many students and staff
credit him with guiding the
school through a time of
grief. In March, before the
two suicides, a 16-year-old
football player was killed
in a car crash, which fol-
lowed the traffic death of a
teacher killed driving to
school in November.
Kenney is the "glue that
just holds the school to-
gether," said his adminis-
trative assistant, Dianna
McLaren.
Kenney declined to com-
ment through his attorney,
Mark Zimmerman, who said
there is no "causal connec-
tion" between the hypnosis
sessions and the suicides.


SO YOU KNOW
* The Chronicle did not receive any obituaries for the
Monday edition.


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A6 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


STATE/NATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Women draw line at losing dog


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
A woman stopped her friend's
boyfriend from taking their dog
when he vacated their home by
telling sheriff's deputies he had
drugs in his pocket.
Deputies earlier received a
complaint from Kelly Barter of
Lecanto that her boyfriend got
into a fight with her and her friend
at Club Atmosphere on U.S. 19 in
Homosassa.
Barter told deputies her


boyfriend, Edward Potter Jr, 21, of
Lecanto, became upset at the club
and left it even though, she said,
he was intoxicated. Barter and her
friend, who was not named in the
arrest report, told deputies they
feared Potter would go to the res-
idence they share at 6635 S. Coro-
nado Terrace, Lecanto, and
possibly destroy property because
of his intoxicated state.
When deputies arrived, they
found Potter outside the resi-
dence in a pickup truck. He was
asked to get out of the truck.


According to the arrest report,
Potter had difficulty standing and
performing field sobriety tasks.
He had not been observed driving,
but deputies wanted to make sure
he was capable of moving the
truck.
As deputies were speaking with
Potter, Barter and her friend
pulled up. They noticed Potter
had packed some items and
loaded them on the front seat of
the truck.
Then they noticed the dog.
Barter became upset that Potter


was taking the dog, according to
the report. As the deputies tried to
calm her down, her friend asked
them if they had searched Potter
because she thought he had hy-
drocodone and cannabis on his
person.
A deputy asked Potter to search
his pockets and was given consent,
as he said he had nothing on him.
However, the deputy found 11 hy-
drocodone derivative pills and
some cannabis.
According to the report, Potter
stated he used the pills for pain in


his shoulder, and he had no insur-
ance and could not get a prescrip-
tion for them.
He was advised he was under
arrest on a felony charge of traf-
ficking in illegal drugs and a mis-
demeanor charge of possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis.
His bond was set at $50,500.
The report did not mention the
status of the dog.
Chronicle reporter Chris Van
Ormer can be reached at (352)
564-2916 or cvanormer@chronicle
online, com.


Homeowners, boaters Verdict brought few answers


clash over secluded waters in Caylee Anthony death case


DAVID SMILEY
The Miami Herald


MIAMI - Boaters, be-
ware: Fred Karlton pays a
hefty price for his slice of
paradise. And armed with a
floodlight and stereo, he
will defend it.
A well-heeled property
investor who dabbles in
local politics, Karlton lives
on the east bank of Miami
Beach's idyllic Sunset
Lake, a secluded section of
Biscayne Bay wedged be-
tween the main island and
four small residential is-
lands just south of the Julia
Tuttle Causeway The quiet
body of water is sur-
rounded by some of South
Florida's more lavish
homes - such as Karlton's
$6.8 million abode and the
house Anna Kournikova
listed on the market for $9.4
million - and at sunset is
the type of backdrop that
graces postcards and lures
gawkers to splurge on $30
boat tours.
Not surprisingly, the
placid waters have gained
a cult reputation among the
international boating com-
munity as one of the
sweeter locations to drop
anchor for a few days, or
heck, even weeks.
"Very nice spot," Dave
Campbell, of Plymouth,
Mass., wrote last year on
the boating forum Active
Captain.com. "Except for
the homeowners."
Thing is, while recent
changes to state law almost
entirely stripped local gov-
ernments of their ability to
regulate the navigation of
waterways within their ju-
risdiction - rendering
moot laws like the Miami
Beach ordinance that caps
a boater's stay in the city's
waters to one week -
homeowners on Sunset
Lake are making it clear
their waterfront backyards
are not a Holiday Inn.
"I've been a boater for 35
years and I certainly un-
derstand what it is to want
to camp out," Karlton said.
"But there are lots of other
places to do it than by sit-
ting in peoples' backyards.
There are times that liter-
ally it's a shantytown out
here."
Karlton says boaters are
invading his privacy, that
they can see into his win-
dows and sometimes try to
come onto his property. He
has devised a system when
it comes to dealing with
pesky cruisers who come
into Sunset Lake, as On-
tario's Al Holden, his girl-
friend and their
Dachshund Bridget experi-
enced in May before head-
ing south to the Florida
Keys.


On their cruising blog,
the couple said Karlton
asked them to move from
behind his house after they
dropped anchor and ate a
dinner of chicken and
dumplings. When they re-
fused, they said Karlton
turned on a hip-hop song,
cranking up the volume to
deafening levels and then
placed the song on repeat
for hours. When the sun set,
Karlton hit them with his
floodlight - all night.
Karlton admits he some-
times plays music and uses
the floodlight, and it seems
he has a reputation.
"These were all things
we heard he would do," the
couple wrote on their blog.
Karlton is not alone.
His neighbor, Bunny
Patchen, said she was the
first in the neighborhood to
employ guerrilla tactics
with Sunset Lake cruisers
because she was fed up
with boaters docking be-
hind her house. She set her
floodlight on a timer so that
it shines out into boaters'
eyes from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m.
"I don't feel secure in my
house with them back
there," said Patchen, who
claims boaters once came
onto her property and
broke her light.
She noted while the
boaters get to drop anchor
for free, some of her neigh-
bors pay more than
$100,000 in property taxes.
(Karlton dropped a cool
$116,000 last year)
But boaters see things
differently
Stories of "bullying on
the waterway," as Holden
called it, have now circu-
lated on blogs and Internet
message boards. And after
a Memorial Day weekend
run-in with Karlton that in-
volved Miami Beach police,
retired Canadian boater
and sailing instructor Wally
Moran began sending
emails to city officials and
started organizing what he
calls "Anchor Fest." Moran
hopes dozens of boaters
will drop anchor behind
Karlton's house in protest.
"The thing with people
who buy waterfront homes,
they have to expect people
will anchor behind them,"
said Moran. "Perhaps Mr.
Karlton should be a hermit
and move to the desert
somewhere."
Moran said he has
boated the Atlantic Intra-
coastal Waterway from
Norfolk, Va., to Key Westl7
times. He said anchoring
isn't an issue - until
boaters hit Florida.
"We don't get this kind of
crap in states north of
Florida," he said. "People
in Florida seem to have an
attitude of 'I've got my


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piece of paradise and
everybody else can piss
off.'?"
A number of cities, in-
cluding Sarasota, Marco Is-
land and Miami Beach,
passed laws during the last
decade aimed at limiting
the time in which a vessel
can be anchored in public
waters.
Then, according to Boat-
US, a boating association
based in Virginia, Florida
changed the law in 2009 so
local governments only
have authority over an-
choring in mooring fields
and with boats called "live-
aboards," those that are
homes or places of busi-
ness, and not used for
navigation.
Last month, however, the
Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission
approved a trial program
that allows five local gov-
ernments to regulate an-
choring in their waterways,
according to The Stuart
News. None is in Miami-
Dade or Broward.
Jose Smith, Miami
Beach's city attorney and a
former commissioner who
sponsored the 2005 law that
limited anchoring to one
week, said the change in
state law has created a situ-
ation where "the cities can't
do much" about problems
with anchored vessels.
"What we would like to
see as a city is some kind of
reasonable setback from
single-family neighbor-
hoods," he said. "We're not
against responsible boat
owners, we're just con-
cerned that there are some
that abuse their rights to
navigate by invading oth-
ers' privacy"
Until then, Karlton, who
says boaters have recently
threatened to cut holes in
his boat or load it with tuna
fish, may have to continue
dealing with his backyard
cruisers.
"Why they want to tee it
up, I don't know," he said. "I
live in a world of being re-
spectful of other people."
But he still has his
floodlights.


TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG -
Many of the thousands who
followed the Casey Anthony
trial did not get the guilty
verdict they wanted, nor did
they learn the truth about
what happened to the 2-
year-old daughter she was
accused of murdering.
And for the public, that
may be one of the most frus-
trating parts of the case: De-
spite all the speculation and
theories, they will never
know how or why Caylee
Anthony died.
"I think we know as much
as we ever will know," said
Beth Hough, a 27-year-old
administrative assistant
from Chicago who followed
the trial. "We don't know ex-
actly what happened, but if
we did, it would help people
to finally just move on and
to end the story"
That's what's missing: an
ending. And because we're
so used to neatly packaged,
hourlong TV crime dramas
where the bad guy is usually
put behind bars, the fact An-
thony could be convicted
only of lying to police has
left people unsatisfied. And
they have been vocal about
their dismay, turning to
Twitter and Facebook to
vent their frustration.
So what's left? Some fuzzy
defense claims that little
Caylee drowned and her
grandfather tried to make an
accident look like homicide.
"One of the quite healthy
and appropriate satisfac-
tions we get out of a well-
functioning justice system is
the belief that the justice
system will give us the best
answers to questions," said
Doug Berman, a law profes-
sor at Ohio State University
A little girl ended up dead
in the woods near her
grandparents' home with
duct tape over her mouth,
and her mother didn't re-
port her disappearance for
more than a month. But how
did Caylee die?
That's where it gets
complicated.


B.K. Patel, M.D., Internal Medicine

H. Khan, M.D., Family Practice

Awilda Pena, M.D., Internal Medicine









Walk-Ins Welcome
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Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-ll:00am
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3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
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(352) 746-0600


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4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


Associated Press
Local residents and visitors watch Judge Belvin Perry on tel-
evision Thursday during the Casey Anthony sentencing in a
cafeteria next to the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando.


The defense said Caylee
drowned in the family's
swimming pool. Prosecutors
couldn't say how Caylee
died because the girl's body
was too decomposed to har-
vest DNA or other forensic
evidence. So the state relied
on circumstantial evidence:
the trunk of Casey's car
smelled like a dead body to
some witnesses; someone
did an Internet search for
chloroform - a chemical
that can be used to knock
someone unconscious - at
the Anthony home; and
there was duct tape on
Caylee's skull when it was
found six months after she
was last seen in June 2008.
"If we don't know how
Caylee died, we can't assign
responsibility for the factors
that led to her death. So
there's no justice," said
Maryann Gajos, a 51-year-
old mother of two and a


sixth-grade reading teacher
in Inverness. "Watching all
of these crime shows has
spoiled all of us. In TV
shows, the coroner always
has the answer"
But in this case, the coro-
ner didn't have the answer.
Dr. Jan Garavaglia told the
jury Caylee had been mur-
dered, but she couldn't es-
tablish exactly how she died
from only a skeleton.
And in the life-imitates-
TV irony of this case, Gar-
avaglia is also the star of her
own reality TV show on Dis-
covery Health Channel
called "Dr G: Medical Ex-
aminer," in which she solves
cases through autopsies.
How Casey Anthony acted
in the weeks and months
after Caylee's disappear-
ance also contribute to the
perception of whether the
jury ultimately delivered
justice.


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MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Blood DRIVES


Food PROGRAMS


LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is in emergency need
for type O-negative, and has a
critical need for all blood
types.
To find a donor center or a
blood drive near you, call
(352) 527-3061. Donors must
be at least 17, or 16 with
parental permission, weigh a
minimum of 110 pounds and
be in good health to be eligible
to donate. A photo ID is also
required.
The Lecanto branch office
is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
day, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday,
closed Sundays.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day, July 11, Eagles Aerie
4272, 5340 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Ho-
mosassa.
S9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday, July 12,
Citrus County Tax
Collector's Of-
fice, 210 N.
Apopka Donors mus
Ave., In- 17, or 16 v
verness. permission,
* 2 to mum of 11(
5 p.m. be in good
Tuesday, eligible t(
July 12, photo ID isa
Lowe's,
2301 E. Gulf-
to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
S2 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 13, Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.
* 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Wednesday, July 13, Walmart,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
M 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 14, Nick Nicholas
Ford, 2901 State Road 44 W.,
Inverness.
* 2 to 8 p.m. Friday, July
15, Regal Cinemas, 2635 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.


* 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
July 16, Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* 8:30 to 11 a.m. Sunday,
July 17, St. Scholastica
Catholic Church, 4301 W.
Homosassa Trail, Lecanto.
* Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday,
July 17, VFW Post 7122, 8191
S. Florida Ave., Floral City.
* 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
July 18, Cypress Creek Acad-


st
w
S.1


I)
a
a


emy, 2855 W. Woodland
Ridge Drive, Lecanto.
0 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 19, Citrus
County Government Building,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto.
* 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday, July 20, Subway,
4089 N. Lecanto Highway
(C.R. 491), Beverly Hills.
* 3 to 7 p.m. Wednesday,
July 20, Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
* 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 21, American Legion
Post 77 at Sweetbay, 1202 W.
Main St., Inverness.
* 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, July
21, Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W, Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
* 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,
July 22, Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center, 6201
N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Satur-
day, July 23, Bealls, 2851 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to4 p.m.
Sunday, July 24,
Lowe's, 2301 E.
Gulf-to-Lake
Highway,
Inverness.
t be at least 110
ith parental a.m. to 5
veigh a mini- p.m. Mon-
pounds and day, July
health to be 25, Wal-
donate. A mart,
Iso required. 3826 S.
Suncoast
Blvd.,
Homosassa.
S10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Tuesday, July 26, Wal-
mart Supercenter, 2461 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* 4 to 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, July 27, First Baptist
Church, 700 Citrus Ave., Crys-
tal River.
* 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, July 27, Walmart,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 28, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
July 29, Subway, 2639 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, July
29, Bealls, 2851 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday,
July 30, Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
* 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday,
July 31, Dairy Queen, 727 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.


WEEKLY LINEUP
* Nearly a dozen medical professionals share their ex-
pertise with columns in Health & Life./Tuesdays
* Read up on all things education-related in the Chron-
icle's Summer Break section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the recipes in the
Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the sto-
ries in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do in the
Religion section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses in the Business section.
/Sundays
* Pick up tips for home improvement, saving money
and cashing in on antiques in HomeFront./Sundays
* Find out what your neighbors have to say in the
Sound Off and letters to the editor in the Commen-
tary section./Sundays


Tkctk Ynm, Cimua Cmudqy

F i ULatiag Ub Beat t4 ke Beft!


ANGEL FOOD
The Angel Food Ministries
program enables families to
stretch their food budget by
providing quality food at half or
less of the retail price. For exact
menus, order dates and times
and pickup dates and times
view online at: AngelFood
Minstries.com. You may also
place an online order with a
credit card or a debit card.
* North Oak Baptist
Church, 9324 N. Elkcam Blvd.,
Citrus Springs. For information,
call the church office between 9
a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday
through Friday at (352) 489-
1688 or (352) 746-1500.
* Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Payment is required at time of
order, by check, cash or food
stamps (EBT). For information,
call the church office at (352)
726-7245 or Grant Schlenker at
(352)419-4028.
* Redeemer Presbyterian
Church of Inverness, 1005 Hill-
side Court and Washington
Street (behind Central Motel),
Inverness. Payment online or at
church office. Call (352)
726-0077.
* Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 9425 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. To sign up for Angel
Food, order food and learn of
pick-up date and time, call the
church office at (352) 489-5511
or Victor Kahler at (352) 465-
4182. All orders are prepaid by
check, cash or money order.
* Homosassa Knights of
Columbus 6954, at 9020 W.
Atlas Drive, Homosassa (off
U.S.19 across from Love Mo-
torsports), or call Joann at (352)
382-2129 or (352) 586-6698.
Payment is required at the time
the order is placed. Payment
online is debit or credit card
only. Payment at the K of C is
cash, check, money orders or
food stamps (EBT).
* First Assembly of God of
Dunnellon, 2872 W. Dunnellon
Road, one mile west of U.S. 41
(across from Nichol's Lumber).
Call (352) 489-8455.
HUNGRY?
* St. Anne's Anglican
Church food pantry opens from
9:30 to 10:30 a.m. daily in the
administration building.
* Daystar Life Center gives
out food to all needy individuals
and families throughout Citrus
County. Doors are open from 9
a.m. until 2 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Picture ID and
interview required. Daystar is at
6751 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River, across from the
Publix Shopping Center. Call
(352) 795-8668.
* Citrus United Basket
(CUB) food pantry is open to all
underserved Citrus County resi-
dents from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday
at 103 Mill Ave, Inverness (east
of the new courthouse). Partici-
pants must provide proof of in-
come, photo ID and Social
Security numbers for each fam-
ily member. Contact CUB
at (352) 344-2242 or
cublisa@embarqmail.com.
* First Baptist Church of
Crystal River has its food
pantry open from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday. The church is at 700
N. CitrusAve., Crystal River.
For information, call (352)
795-3367.
* Our Lady of Fatima's
Food Pantry, at 604 U.S. 41 S.,


' -
W~Ij1
"'gay~ |


SO YOU KNOW
* Submit information or changes for this feature via
email to community@chronicleonline.com or fax to
563-3280, attention "Food Programs."
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.


is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday to Friday. Proper photo
ID, proof of residence and inter-
view are required for assistance
to needy residents of Floral
City, Hernando and Inverness.
Call (352) 726-1707.
* First United Methodist
Church of Inverness God's
Kitchen serves from 11:30 a.m.
to noon Mondays in the fellow-
ship hall, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road. A bus is available
for transportation to the church
on Monday. Call (352)
726-2522.
* The New Church Without
Walls gives free food boxes
away at 5 p.m. Monday at the
neighborhood park in Hernando
off Railroad Drive where feed-
ing the homeless takes place.
Call (352) 344-2425.
* Floral City United
Methodist Church offers free
breakfast to those who need it
from 7 to 9 a.m. Tuesday in
Hilton Hall, 8478 E. Marvin St.
Call (352) 344-1771.
* Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church food pantry is
open from 9 to 10 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd. Food is distributed
on right side of parish office
garage area. Parking is avail-
able in right parking field next to
garage area. Pantry is open to
those who truly qualify for this
program. No vouchers or finan-
cial aid given. Call Anna at
(352) 527-2381 or the church at
(352) 746-2144.
* Nature Coast Ministries'
food pantry is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday. The
office is at 1592 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River. Call
(352) 400-2689.
* The Hernando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, at
1880 N. Trucks Ave., Her-
nando, provides food distribu-
tion for needy families through
its Food Pantry, which is open
the second and fourth Tuesday
monthly from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Please have proper photo ID


available at the time of the re-
quest for food. For information,
call (352) 212-5159.
* EI-Shaddai food ministries
"brown bag of food" distribution
takes place from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday at Crystal River
Church of God, 2180 W. 12th
Ave., behind the former Lincoln
Mercury dealership. Families
are only eligible for food once a
month. For information, call
(352) 628-9087 or (352)
302-9925.
* We Care Food Pantry
gives out food to needy people.
Initial registrations are accepted
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays. To qualify
for assistance, participants
must be a Homosassa or Ho-
mosassa Springs resident with
identification. For more informa-
tion and dates for food distribu-
tions, call (352) 628-0445.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church's Food Pantry, 82 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, distributes
food from 11 a.m. to noon and
6 to 7 p.m. the last Tuesday
monthly. To qualify for assis-
tance, you must be a Beverly
Hills resident with identifi-
cation. Call the church office at
(352) 746-3620 to make a
reservation. There will be an ini-
tial registration for each recipi-
ent, then you will need to call
the office at least a week ahead
of time to let us know you will
be requiring food.
* The food pantry of First
Presbyterian Church of Crys-
tal River is open from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Tuesday. The pantry
is open to meet the emergency
needs of people in the commu-
nity. Everyone is invited to par-
ticipate once a week as
needed. Bring a photo ID and
the date of birth for each mem-
ber of your household. The
church is at 1501 S.E. U.S.19,
north of Sweetbay. Call (352)
795-2259.
* Suncoast Baptist
Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs, has


its food pantry open from 8 a.m.
to noon the second Wednesday
monthly for pre-bagged food.
Free bread is available from 8
a.m. to noon Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Feed My Sheep out-
reach provides a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday. The
food pantry is open from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday. The pantry is no
longer open on Wednesday
evenings or Fridays. For infor-
mation, call (352) 726-3153.
* Food pantry of Floral City
First Baptist Church Emer-
gency Feeding Program is
open from 1 to 3 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly.
* Dunnellon Presbyterian
and Holy Faith Episcopal food
pantry opens from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursdays at 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
* SOS Ministry food pantry
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
for those in need at the Key
Center in Lecanto. Bring
driver's license and Social Se-
curity cards for all family mem-
bers for initial registration. Food
distributed by family size.
* Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness "Feed the Hungry" free
lunch is served from noon to 1
p.m. Thursday in the fellow-
ship hall, 960 S. U.S. 41. Food
pantry is open from 1 to 2 p.m.
Thursday only. Call (352)
726-1480.
* Our Father's Table serves
free Saturday lunches from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at St.
Anne's Anglican Church, one
mile west of the Plantation Inn
on West Fort Island Trail. Call
(352) 795-2176.
* St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs serves those in need
with free boxes of food from its
food pantry the third Saturday
morning monthly. Call (352)
465-6613 on the preceding
Tuesday to sign up for the
distribution.
* Inverness Church of God
hosts a soup kitchen the first
and third Sunday monthly fol-
lowing the 10:30 a.m. worship
service in the Family Life Cen-
ter. Inverness Church of God is
at 416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Call (352) 726-4524.


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A8 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weird WIRE


'Odd Day'
SAN FRANCISCO - Ron
Gordon would like you to take a
moment or three to think about
what an odd day Saturday was.
Why? Because 7/9/11 is one
of only six dates this century
that features three consecutive
odd numbers. Next up, 9/11/13.
Gordon, a retired teacher
from Redwood City, Calif., set
up a website to celebrate "Odd
Day," and offered some ways to
celebrate: Do odds 'n' ends,
root for the odds-on-favorite or
watch the "Odd Couple."
Gordon has been fascinated
with curious dates since some
30 years ago when he noticed
the upcoming date 9/9/81 while
writing a check. That, Gordon
saw, was a Square Root Day
- one in which the day and the
month are the same number
and, when multiplied, yield the
year as it's expressed in one or
two digits.
It led Gordon to begin think-
ing about Odd Days, which he
has continued to do through the
years.
"Like a kid, if you find a lady
bug on your arm, you run
around and show everyone at
the picnic until the lady bug flies
away," Gordon said. "This is my
lady bug, and it's not gone yet."
After 9/11/13, the next Odd
Day will be 11/13/15 -and that
will be it until next century.
(Though we still have 4/4/16 to
look forward to - the next
Square Root Day.)
Magnetic boy
SAO PAULO -An 11-year-
old boy in Brazil's northeastern
city of Mossoro is drawing at-
tention with his purportedly
magnet-like qualities.
The Globo TV network has
broadcast images of Paulo
David Amorim demonstrating
how forks, knives, scissors,
cooking pans, cameras and
other metal objects seem
drawn to his body and remain
stuck on his chest, stomach
and back.
The boy's father told Globo
he decided to test his son after
learning of a boy in Croatia with
a similar ability. Junior Amorim
said he was surprised to find "a
fork and knife stuck to his body."
The youth said classmates
call him "magnet boy."
Dr. Dix-Sept Rosado So-
brinho told Globo it is the first
time in his 30-year career that
he has seen a case like this.
Banana attack
STRONGSVILLE, Ohio -
The manager of a cell phone
store in Ohio called 911 to re-
port a gorilla had been attacked
by a banana.
The Wireless Center in
Strongsville, near Cleveland,
advertises at curbside with a
man in a gorilla suit. Manager
Brandon Parham said he was
watching last week as a kid
dressed as a banana emerged
from some bushes and took a
flying leap at the store mascot.
Parham said the attacker
looked like a Spartan from the
movie "300" - except he was a
banana.
The gorilla was knocked
down, but got back up, adjusted
his head and went back to
work.
WJW-TV reports the banana
split - running down the street
with other teens.
Police think it was a prank.
They weren't able to find the of-
fending fruit.
Alternative energy
GILBERT, Ariz. - Officials in
a Phoenix suburb are consider-


ing a plan that would turn dog
waste collected from an area
park into an energy source.
Don't pooh-pooh the idea be-
fore you hear it out.
The Arizona Republic re-
ported students from Arizona
State University would design
and create a "dog waste di-
gester" that the city of Gilbert
could use to turn pet leavings
into methane gas that in turn
generates power.
The proposed project would
use the new energy source to
run a street lamp first, and pos-
sibly other uses later.
Drunken joyride
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
Anchorage police said a city
van used to pick up drunken
people was taken on a joyride
by a man suspected of drunken
driving.
The Anchorage Daily News
reported 35-year-old Donny H.
Weston was arrested late
Thursday after police said he
got into a Community Service
Patrol van parked with the keys
in the engine. Police said social
workers were attending inebri-
ated people when Weston got
into the van.
Police said Weston drove the
van for significant distance, in-
cluding driving against traffic,
and he eventually crashed the
van into a bus and ditched it.
The van is part of a city pro-
gram that picks up inebriated
people and shuttles them to a
sleeping center.
Police said the inebriated
men in the back of the van
didn't notice the joyride.
Costly hot dogs
INDIANAPOLIS - The Indi-
ana Court of Appeals says a
department store wasn't justi-
fied in firing a worker who took
two leftover hot dogs from a
company picnic, so it must pay
him unemployment benefits.
The court ruled Thursday in
the case of Nolan Koewler, who
was fired from a Dillard's store
in Evansville a year ago.
Dillard's hosted a Fourth of
July cookout for employees. Af-
terward, a manager ordered the
leftovers stored in a break room
freezer until Labor Day.
The next day, Koewler took
two hot dogs and ate them, an
act caught on surveillance
video. He claimed he never
heard the instruction to save
the hot dogs, and the three-
judge panel sided unanimously
with him.
The opinion didn't reveal the
amount of unemployment ben-
efits at stake.
Hot church
MESA, Ariz. - Parishioners
at a suburban Phoenix church
had to sweat through a service
after thieves stole two of the
church's three air conditioners.
Authorities said the units
weighed 5 tons each.
Pastor Tommy Foster told
The Arizona Republic the theft
from Mesa's Harmony Commu-
nity Baptist Church happened
sometime last weekend.
The church's third unit did lit-
tle to cool the building Sunday,
which saw temperatures
around 100 degrees at mid-day.
Parishioners had to try and stay
cool at Sunday services by fan-
ning themselves with Bibles
and morning programs.
Mesa police said air condi-
tioner thieves typically will tear
up the units and sell off copper
parts and compressors, some-
times selling the parts over the
Internet.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
In this photo taken Thursday, a man walks past the remains of the warden's house during a night tour on Alcatraz Is-
land in San Francisco. Most of the more than one million tourists who visit the famous former prison never get to ex-
perience Alcatraz at night or see its spooky, decrepit hospital unique to the night tour.

Alcatraz at night offers eerie experience


Associated Press

ALCATRAZ ISLAND,
Calif. - When night fell on
The Rock in San Francisco
Bay, visitors moved
shadow-like through the
former prison's lantern-lit
hospital rooms, a gloaming
against dingy walls with
peeling blue paint
A hard wind whooshed
and rattled a window in the
hospital cell where Robert
Stroud, "The Birdman of
Alcatraz," spent 11 of his 17
years when this was the
dankest, hardest federal
prison in the U.S.
Yet, most of the more
than one million tourists
who visit the famous former
prison never get to experi-
ence Alcatraz Island at
night or see its spooky, de-
crepit hospital - experi-
ences unique to the night
tour. At dusk the island
prison that housed some of
the nation's most notorious
criminals - including Al
Capone and the recently re-
arrested James "Whitey"
Bulger, who was on The
Rock for bank robbery from
1959 to 1963 - is often en-
shrouded by fog, and the
lamps on the grounds emit
a ghostly glow.
The difference from the
daytime tour is apparent
from the start. The ferry
from San Francisco motors
slowly around the west side
of the isle, passing decrepit
buildings surrounded by
Alcatraz new residents:
black Brandt's cormorants,
Western gulls and the other
birds that have made their
home there since U.S. At-
torney General Robert
Kennedy shuttered the
prison in 1963.
"This is a little eerie,"
said Gerard Lang, 28, who
was visiting from Coving-


Visitors read about Robert "The Birdman" Stroud, while
touring his cell in the hospital during a night tour on Alca-
traz Island in San Francisco.


ton, Kentucky. "You kind of
feel like you're heading to
prison yourself."
After leaving the boat,
visitors begin a winding as-
cent past the prison's offi-
cial sign, where a faded
"Indians Welcome" written
in red paint is still visible,
remnants of the Native
American occupation of the
island from 1969 to 1971.
The island became a na-
tional park in 1972.
"You're following in the
footsteps of every federal
prisoner who ever came
here," said Eric Knack-
muhs, a Golden Gate Na-
tional Parks Conservancy
guide.
Passing the guano and
rust covered buildings that
once housed the families of
prison guards, the park's
employees tell of a failed
Friday the 13th 1939 escape
attempt - one of many es-
cape attempts recited in
gripping detail that are not
included on the daytime
tour


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Once inside the prison
the audio tour features sto-
ries from ex-inmates and
former prison guards in
their own voices.
The tour leads visitors
through D Block, or solitary
confinement, where you
can stand inside a dark cell
and listen to the voices of
inmates who spent time
there. Close your eyes and
you can sense the isolation,
the desperation.
If you're lucky and find a
guide who isn't too busy,
you can also ask to take a
quick detour into "The
Dungeon," another of the
usually off-limits areas of
the prison that can be ac-
cessed at night
The dungeon is left over
from when Alcatraz was a
military prison, and has a
series of small alcoves
where Civil War and World
War I-era prisoners were
held, said Jim Bradon, a
guide. Shining a flashlight
on the wall of one dark al-
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numbers of former dun-
geon denizens can be seen
carved into the bricks.
As the sun sets and the
lights inside the peniten-
tiary dim, the employees
open up the hospital at 8
p.m. Visitors walk through
the dark rooms past old
metal operating tables, the
former X-ray room with
windows painted black and
the psych ward.
The hospital visit is
unique to the night tour,
and for lovers of prison's
history it is a significant ad-
dition to Alcatraz' story
"You ever see ghosts
here?" a tourist asked an
employee in the hospital's
hallway, shadows dancing
on the walls as tourists
passed before lanterns.
After a brief pause, she
said no.
On the ride back to shore,
San Francisco's skyline
glowed through the evening
fog and many remarked on
the unique evening spent
on Alcatraz.
"At night, it was kind of
eerie with the fog and the
lights. That was really
cool," said Steven
Winslade, 26, from London,
England.








































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MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011 A9







Page A10 MONDAY, JULY 11,2011



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
a Charlie Brennan .................. ....................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz......................................citizen mem ber
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


VULNERABLE SUFFER




Closing Social



Security office



a bad decision


he Social Security office
at the Citrus County Re-
source Center is now
closed, meaning that to speak
face-to-face with a representa-
tive of the agency, local resi-
dents must make a trip to
Ocala.
While for many this would
not be a major burden, for
some recipients this is a con-
siderable problem, because
some do not drive
and/or do not have THE I
access to a car.
Of course, ac- SocialS
cording to a Admini
spokesperson for closes lo
the agency, resi-
dents can go on- OUR 01
line, telephone or Short
use the mail. or
measu
This statement eas
suggests a rather ur
cavalier disregard
for the people who actually use
the Citrus County site, since
some who drive to the site ei-
ther do not own a computer or
do not know how to use it to
communicate.
Further, calling Social Secu-
rity has its own challenges.
Calls to the agency go first to an
automated voice response,
which advises going online be-
fore asking the caller to push
buttons or ask questions before
being directed to a real person.
As for using the mail, if a per-
son needs an answer very soon,
this is not an efficient option,
and it requires a level of liter-
acy and ability to pose the right
question that some residents
will find challenging.
In reality, while some issues
can be resolved online or by
phone or by mail, many people
need to talk face-to-face to
clarify and understand the


Soldiers over seniors
Oh boy, Republicans are coming
after Medicare big time.
They won't raise the debt 0
limit unless Medicare is
slashed. What about get-
ting all the guys out of
Afghanistan and Iraq to
the tune of hundreds of
billions of dollars? No,
they'd much rather take
money away from senior CA
citizens and keep the
wars going around the 563-
world. Oh, this is going to
be terrible.
Presidential speeches
It is quite clear to me that our
arrogant president doesn't really
care at all about senior citizens,
with his little twittering and his lit-
tle Facebook speeches. You know,
not all of us senior citizens have
computers. We weren't raised
with them. We don't know a lot
about them. And, yeah, we're dis-
criminated against in this country
if we don't have a computer.
Please, President Obama, why
don't you just make speeches like
an ordinary person? Lord knows
you've done enough in the past on
the TV. Why stop now? You don't
care anything about us senior
citizens.
Rear-wheel inquiry
I have a question. I'm watching
the Tour de France race. During


sometimes complex issues.
The reason for closing the of-
fice is apparently to save the
cost for two Social Security em-
ployees to travel from Ocala to
Citrus County two days a week.
Office space was provided free
at the Citrus County Resource
Center.
While we recognize in tight
budget times, some cuts are
necessary, the benefits of this


SSUE:
Security
station
cal office.

PINION:
sighted
ire that
locals.


one seem mighty
small considering
the inconvenience
it places on some
of the most vul-
nerable in the
county.
With 31 percent
of our residents
above age 65, Cit-
rus County is
among the five
oldest counties in


the nation demographically. In
Florida, 17 percent of resi-
dents are older than 65, while
in the nation as a whole, the
number is 13 percent.
Given these demographics, it
seems the Social Security Ad-
ministration would recognize
Citrus County needs the physi-
cal presence of a representa-
tive of the agency at least part
of the time.
However, in an all too famil-
iar pattern, when government
bureaucrats are forced to cut
spending, the needs of the most
vulnerable citizens seem to be
on the chopping block.
This is a decision that can be
changed. While the office is
now closed, we can hope the
agency will reconsider and re-
verse this short-sighted meas-
ure that hurts locals by
re-opening a satellite office in
the county.


the regular race, they have nothing
on the rear wheels - just the
same as the front wheel.
D Why do they have a disk
D on the rear wheel when
They are in the timed
rr trial? Does that make
S them run faster or
straighter or what? I was
curious for many years
on this situation. Why do
they have that disk on the
rear wheel? Hope some-
0579 body can tell me why.
579 Closing office
Could someone please
tell me what was the advantage of
the Social Security (office) moving
to Ocala? We, the people, could
give you a long list of advantages
for keeping it here in Citrus
County. We sure need it. We can't
afford to travel back and forth.
Who's liable?
If a renter's pit bulls come on
my property and cause harm to
me, who is liable for a lawsuit -
the renter or the owner of the
property?
Dangerous job
I watch the crab fishermen on
TV. They work incredible hours in
the worst weather imaginable.
They have few breaks and operate
dangerous equipment in ex-
tremely hazardous conditions. I
think they need a union and OSHA
should look into this.


"When a finger points at the moon,
the imbecile looks at the finger."
Chinese proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Cops, robbers and politics


ever played cops
and robbers
knows the good guys try
to keep guns away from a
the bad guys.
The last thing you'd
do is sit around and
watch crooks sell each
other weapons, let
them walk off with hun- Mary S
dreds ofAK-47s, sniper OTI
rifles and revolvers, VOI
then sit back and wait
for the carnage.
But that's exactly what leader-
ship within the Department of
Justice and the Bureau of Alco-
hol, Tobacco and Firearms are
charged with doing, in an appar-
ently harebrained ploy to get
close to Mexico's drug cartels.
The plan was dubbed Operation
Fast and Furious. Foolish and
Fatal might be more accurate.
In 14 months, agents in
Phoenix tracked the sales of
more than 1,700 guns, mostly pur-
chased by "straw" buyers - i.e.,
buyers procuring them for crimi-
nals. The goal was to then see
where the guns turned up, in an
attempt to bust drug kingpins.
Many ATF agents complained
bitterly about the operation, frus-
trated they were not allowed in
many cases to make busts and
seize weapons they knew were
destined for cartel gunmen. They
say they were told to go against
all training and sense of human-
ity, to watch as guns were sold to
straw buyers of suspected cartels,
then let guns and the traffickers
"walk." All in the interest of
catching bigger fish.
One ATF agent testified: I can-
not see anyone who has one iota
of concern for human life being
OK with this."
Another agent charged, "It's
like they grabbed the ATF rule-
book and threw it out the win-
dow."
And ATF agents dreaded the
inevitable.
When Arizona Rep. Gabrielle


Giffords was shot and
six others killed by a
gunman, Phoenix
agents braced. They
feared the gun would
S, be one they'd let walk.
Finally, tragedy oc-
curred. In December
2010, U.S. border
agents pursued a
5anchez small group of armed
IER criminals they be-
CES lived were preying
on undocumented im-
migrants crossing the
border. In a shootout, Agent Brian
A. Terry was murdered. Two AK-
47s were found by the 40-year-old
ex-Marine's body in the Arizona
desert. The initial sales of both
guns from a Phoenix-area gun
shop, along with serial numbers,
had been careful tracked by ATF
agents.
Only with Terry's murder did
the heated concerns of ATF
agents find any traction. Sen.
Charles E. Grassley of Iowa and
Rep. Darrell Issa of California,
both Republicans, have issued a
report charging Operation Fast
and Furious has "contributed to
the increasing violence and
deaths in Mexico," a result that
was "regarded with giddy opti-
mism by ATF supervisors." More
than 38,000 have died in drug vi-
olence in Mexico since 2006.
The government says neither
weapon found at the scene fired
the fatal shot. But they don't be-
lieve they have the gunman who
did either, as one suspect re-
mains at large.
Some suggest if a kingpin had
been toppled during Fast and Fu-
rious, the outcome would be eas-
ier to stomach. Tell that to Terry's
grieving family
And that's not what happened.
A mere 20 straw buyers have
been indicted for lying on forms
they filled out to buy the guns.
With the vast majority of those
charged, ATF agents knew about
their dealings before the opera-
tion began. Many agents argue


ON VACATION
* Syndicated
columnist
Leonard Pitts
will resume his
columns after
July 18.


that other, less deadly police
methods like the use of inform-
ants could have been used.
Issa, chairman of the House
Committee on Oversight and Gov-
ernment Reform, began hearings
on the ATF operation this month.
It is worth asking whether the
ATF officials are following best
practices in their current Project
Gunrunner operations - indeed,
whether they would have been so
eager to press on with them if it
wasn't mostly Mexicans who were
dying from the trafficked guns.
But it is also imperative to ask
whether Issa's and Grassley's in-
quisitions aren't motivated -or at
the very least tainted - by politics.
Issa began his hearings by warning
no testimony would be admitted
that commented on gun control
laws or legislation. That's a tell.
Oversight Ranking Member
Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.)
countered "no legitimate exami-
nation of this issue will be com-
plete without analyzing our
nation's gun laws, which allow
tens of thousands of assault
weapons to flood into Mexico
from the United States every
year, including .50-caliber sniper
rifles, multiple AK variants, and
scores of others."
How much you want to bet
that's a thread that won't be al-
lowed to unravel in this or any
hearing in the near future?
--*--A
Mary Sanchez is an opinion-
page columnist for The Kansas
City Star Readers may write to
her at Kansas City Star 1729
Grand Blvd., Kansas City MO
64108-1413, or via email at
msanchez@kcstarcom.


SLETTERS > to the Editor


Sad state of affairs
At the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
meeting last night, a request was
made to say the Pledge of Alle-
giance before the public portion
of the meeting.
(We start our Planning Com-
mission meeting with this proto-
col.)
The moderator an attorney
representing our Department of
the Interior said, and I para-
phrase, I know it is important to
this area, but we do not start our
public federal meetings with the
pledge!
The audience responded by
standing up and saying the
pledge.
This is a clear indication as to
how our federal government and
bureaucracy view their fellow
citizens, and us little people
here in Crystal River, Florida.
Robert Mercer
Crystal River

Risking seniors' health
Once again, political philoso-
phy has taken precedent over
common sense when it comes to
Florida's lawmakers.
If a senior in your family had
the choice between being in a
nursing home and being cared
for at home, most would choose
the latter as long as the


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

care meets the senior's needs.
That's the purpose of a federal
program known as the "Money
Follows the Person" grant estab-
lished under the Bush adminis-
tration. It provides for home
health aides and other neces-
sary at-home services. But since
the program became part of the


Affordable Care Act, a small
group of lawmakers making up
the state's legislative
budget commission has rejected
the money, which totals $35.7
million.
House Speaker Dean Cannon
has confirmed he simply doesn't
want to implement any part of
the federal health care law here
in Florida. Reps. Robert
Schenck and Denise Grimsley
say the state already makes suffi-
cient efforts to keep people out
of nursing homes.
Sufficient? Really? Waiting
lists for home- and community-
based services are now in the
tens of thousands. I don't call
that sufficient by any stretch
of the imagination.
This year, Florida passed a
sweeping Medicaid Reform law
designed to encourage care at
home. There is no logical reason
to vote in favor of encouraging
care at home while rejecting
tens of millions of dollars to
help at-risk seniors pay for that
care.
Why, then, are our legislators
rejecting federal dollars to help
them achieve this? It seems the
only logical answer is it's more
important to reject the Afford-
able Care Act, even if means re-
jecting our seniors as well.
John Clardy
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


s
H
14


(
-.(





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hot Corner: CASEY ANTHONY


Money wasted
July 5 - again, my tax
dollars wasted. If Casey An-
thony didn't kill that little
girl, question: who did?
Examining evidence
I just saw the verdict in
the Casey Anthony trial that
she was found not guilty.
Well, I'm glad for once in a
jury trial that the jurors had
an open mind and looked at
the evidence and didn't
care about what the media
had to say. In this country,
you're innocent until proven
guilty and therefore you
have to be proven guilty be-
yond a reasonable doubt by
concrete evidence. I've been
following this case for six
weeks and all the evidence
I've seen was circumstantial
evidence. The only proof
I've seen in the case is the
fact that Casey Anthony is a
liar. But just because you're
a liar, doesn't mean that
you're a murderer. If you
have a propensity for lying,
that's just a different issue.
The news media and the
public had this girl con-
victed of murder even be-
fore the trial began without
looking at all the facts and
looking at what the proof is.
Language barrier
After the case was over
today of Casey (Anthony), I
was very disappointed the
lead (lawyer) on the defense
team had to use a swear
word to impress people of
how tough he is. And then
the second one up made a
good speech, but then he
went ahead and spoke in a
language that I couldn't un-
derstand. I live in America
and I feel like the people
(who) live here that come
from another country need
to learn our language. We
shouldn't have to share
when we can't understand
what they're talking about.
Walking free
Reasonable doubt? Rea-
sonable doubt? Let's see,
means, motive, opportunity;
reasonable doubt that
Casey killed Caylee. The ju-
rors' disappointing verdict
speaks volumes in defense
of her while no one de-
fended the baby who will
forever be 2 1/2 and suf-


Scapegoats
President Bush said we
can fight a war and
lower taxes at the
same time. And that
started the downhill
slide. The Republi-
cans now want to
stop the slide by
cutting social and
educational budg-
ets. The seniors and
children will be their CA
scapegoats while 56
their friends in high
places get richer by
the minute. Be careful who
you vote for. 2012 is just
around the corner.
Coyote dangers
This is for George Boyd-
ston, who was attacked twice
by pit-bull dogs while bicy-
cling. The advice that the
sheriff gave you was good
advice. I also bicycle and I
also have been attacked by
dogs. But there is something
more dangerous - coyotes.
Citrus County has coyotes,
foxes and raccoons. Coyotes
are most susceptible to hav-
ing rabies. A rabid coyote
could attack you. There are
coyotes where you live. If a
dog bites you, you would
only be scarred for life. If a
rabid coyote bites you, you
could die. This is why I carry
a gun while I'm bicycling. I
want to protect myself and
other people.
Tax cuts
It has been years since
the very wealthy have been
given very generous tax
cuts. During this time, how
many jobs did they create?
Or did they just line their
own pockets? Think about
it. Should we continue to
give these tax cuts to the


very wealthy at the expense
of senior citizens, working-
class people and the poor?
Doctor's time
I'm calling in about the
person who's calling in and
complaining about onsite
medical clinics for Citrus
County employees. She's
saying why should they not
have to leave their job. Well,
they would leave their job. If
they're going to go to the
doctor, they're going to have


I

0


fered a terrible death. This
tells the world it's OK to kill
your child, cost the taxpay-
ers a fortune. The killers
walk free, then become rich
by selling their stories to
the news media. Bella vita,
Casey. And bella vita to the
jurors, as well. Bella vita.
God help us all.
Missing information
I have a question about
the Casey Anthony trial. If
the jury had heard all of the
evidence like we heard on
TV, without being hustled
out of the room every time
a good point was made, I
wonder if their decision
would have been exactly the
same. Personally, I think
she did it.
Doing their duty
Relative to the Casey An-
thony verdict: The jury had to
decide guilt or innocence
based on the evidence pre-
sented by the prosecution,
not whether the defendant
was likeable or not. The pros-
ecution needed to prove the
case beyond a shadow of a
reasonable doubt. The jury
did their duty and should be
commended. The reaction of
the public to the verdict is
reminiscent of the hysteria
of the Salem witch trials. The
members of the general pub-
lic were not in the courtroom
to hear the evidence on
which the verdict had to be
based. They were not to de-
cide the verdict on the basis
of the defendant's personal-
ity, honesty, likeability or on
speculation.
Karma
There's no justice for
Caylee Anthony. I just can't
believe that she got off
scott-free. Another O.J.
Simpson. What is the mat-
ter with these jurors? I just
can't believe this. It's injus-
tice. But like O.J., she will
soon, I am sure, with her
actions, wind up like he did.
I'm so sorry for the little girl
and their family.
Unknown assailant
Who killed Caylee? Did
the murderer go free, like
O.J.? Was it the mother, fa-
ther, brother, meter reader
or a transient? I don't know
how that jury will be able to
sleep at night.


to take sick time and hours
off. They're not going to be
allowed to go, you know, sit
in there and wait for
JND a doctor for five
hours and get paid
OFF for it. They're going
to have to take sick
time or personal
leave off while
they're going to the
doctor's appoint-
ment from 4:30 to
6:30. Just means
)579 that they only have
to miss two hours
of work and not get
paid for it or use their vaca-
tion time or personal leave
rather than taking the whole
day off from their job. So,
you know, and the doctor's
getting paid either way,
whether you go to their clinic
or they're coming to you.
Big on baseball
NFL lockout. I don't care
if they ever play another
football game. Baseball is
America's No. 1 sport. Of
course, there's not enough
Americans in this country
anymore to support this
baseball.


You will get:
* 58,000 readers
* An Attention Getter
* 6 lines of copy
* Results


Letters to THE EDITOR


Where were they?
A few comments about
the Casey Anthony case:
1. Why did the prosecu-
tion not present an exact
timeline for George,
Cindy, Lee, Casey and
Caylee Anthony for June
15,16,17,18 of 2008, be-
cause:
A) Caylee Anthony was
seen in a family video
taken on June 15 with her
grandfather;
B) June 16, the day
Caylee most probably
drowned and the second
date Casey claimed she
last saw Caylee with
"Zanny";
C) no proofs were re-
vealed about the location
of Cindy, George, Casey,
Lee and Caylee for that
period.
Police know for certain
that in 95 percent of child
kidnapping and killings
somebody in the family
or well known to the fam-
ily are involved.
2. This case should
prove again that massive
pretrial publicity does
not mean a jury cannot
render a verdict, in par-
ticular a verdict at odds
with the thrust of the pre-
trial publicity
3. Lastly, members of
the public should know
they have no active role
in the proceeding beyond
being allowed to witness
the proceeding, the de-
fendant is not guilty until
and unless a jury con-
victs, and in the United
States violence or threats
of violence toward defen-
dants, their families, de-
fense attorneys and
prosecutors are crimes.
All that was missing
from the crowds and
chanting outside the Or-
ange County courthouse
immediately after the
verdicts were announced
was a lady knitting and
shouting "Guillotine,
Guillotine."
Robert P Curran
Beverly Hills

Crowded ramp
Scallop season brings a
lot of individuals from
out of county here to
enjoy scalloping in our
gulf waters.
These people also con-
tribute to our economy
during these hard times.
So why would our county
close one of our well-
known boat ramps (Fort


il


Island Gulf Beach boat
ramp) during the busiest
boating days of the year on
Saturday, July 2?
No prior notice the day
before, just forced boaters
to turn around at the last
minute. (There) was much
confusion and congestion
at the Gulf Island
Park ramp.
Someone needs to do a
better job in planning.
Steven Cataldi
Lecanto

Time for Tricare
People, I am tired of
being ignored.
According to the Office of
the Secretary of Defense,
there are over 6,300 Tri-
care-eligible beneficiaries
in Citrus County For some
reason, our largest hospital
- the one we fund with our
tax dollars - does not have
a contract with Tricare. Be-
cause they do not have a
contract with Tricare,
many of us Tricare benefi-
ciaries must travel outside
Citrus County for specialty
care. This is costing Citrus
Memorial and all of us a lot
of money This means we
must travel outside Citrus
County to seek medical
care that is available right
here.
I brought this to the at-
tention of Citrus Memorial
hospital and was told, last
year, they were going to try
and get a contract with Tri-
care. Nothing has hap-
pened to date and no one
will return my emails re-
questing an update.
Tricare officials told me
all they have to do is to con-
tact them to get things
started.


You would think
county commission
would want to do s
thing about this. I
one in February a
told, "I'll get back
that." I guess they
If any of you hav
gestion on how to
tention of someone
help solve this pro
please let me knov
our elected leader
are over 6,300 pote
ers out there who
preciate your sup]
Richa


No private
Citrus County is
with some of the n
beautiful natural:
in the state of Flo
Scott's plans to pr
services at many I
areas throughout
(are) a disaster in
ing. If not stopped
be on our doorste]
This plan will und
local campsite ope
and businesses, w
many cases local
owners.
Contracts for se
these parks would
be awarded to out
corporate interest
dermine local hot
campsites and bus
People need to vo
opposition to Rep
T Smith, who doe
pose this plan.
The state making


kour
ners
some-
contacted
nd was
to you on
forgot
7e a sug-


bucks off state park camp-
ing is short-sighted and a
terrible idea for everyone
who lives here.
Wayne B. Pass
Homosassa


get the at- Patriotic gesture
e who can I moved here from Miami
)blem, April 2010. And on July 2 or
w. And to 3 of 2010, we were de-
rs, there lighted to see someone had
ential vot- taken the time and money
would ap- to provide two U.S. flags to
port all those living on West
ird R. Law Olympia Street in Citrus
Hernando Hills, occupied or non-oc-
cupied homes.
parks Again this year, I found
Pars two nice flags at the edge of
Blessed our driveway and all the
most way up and down West
resources Olympia Street.
rida. Gov What a nice patriotic ges-
ivatize ture. Your kindness warms
park my heart and brings the
the state feeling of pride to live in
the mak- the U.S. With all the ugli-
I, it will ness going on in our world,
p shortly this type of gesture is a wel-
lermine come heartfelt act Thank
erators you so much.


ho are in
Floridian

rvices in
I no doubt
t-of-state
ts and un-
els,
sinesses.
ice their
. Jimmie
s not op-

ig a few


Carol Herndon
Hernando

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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


WorlBRIEFS Murdoch swoops in, closes UK tabloid

Tragedy


Associated Press
A girl, left, breaks down
Sunday after seeing her
mother's body at the scene
where the Kalka Mail
passenger train derailed
near the town of Fatehpur in
Uttar Pradesh state, India.
31 dead, 100 hurt
as train derails
FATEHPUR, India - Res-
cuers searched through the
wreckage of a packed ex-
press train for people trapped
inside after it derailed in north-
ern India on Sunday, killing at
least 31 people and injuring
100 others, officials said.
The Kalka Mail train was
on its way to Kalka, in the
foothills of the Himalayas,
from Howrah, a station near
Kolkata in eastern India,
when 12 coaches and the en-
gine jumped the tracks at
Malwan station, near the
town of Fatehpur in Uttar
Pradesh state, senior railway
official A.K. Jain said.
The cause of the derail-
ment was not immediately
clear but it appeared the
driver applied the emergency
brakes, Jain said.
At least 31 people were
killed and rescue workers
pulled at least 100 injured
passengers out of the wreck-
age, said Brij Lal, a state po-
lice official.


Associated Press
A relative, right, and a
survivor embrace each
other Sunday upon the
arrival of the Arabella
riverboat with dozens of
survivors of a shipwreck in
Kazan on the Volga River,
in central Russia.
Russia: 102 missing
after boat sinks
MOSCOW - Emergency
officials say 102 people, in-
cluding dozens of children,
are missing and at least one
is dead after a passenger
boat with more than 180 peo-
ple onboard sank in the Volga
River on Sunday.
The double-decker vessel
went down some 2 miles
away from the nearest bank in
the giant Kuibyshev reservoir
on the Volga River some 450
miles east of Moscow, the
Tatarstan region emergency
ministry said. The depth at the
site was 20 meters, it said.
The spokeswoman for
Emergencies Ministry in
Moscow, Irina Andrianova
said 135 passengers and 47
crew were onboard when the
double-decker went down.
Authorities say a riverboat
rescued some 75 passen-
gers, while a lifeless body of
an unidentified woman and
one injured man were sent to
a hospital.
Other ships did not stop to
pick up people, a survivor said.
"Two ships did not stop, al-
though we waved our hands,"
the survivor, a man in his 40s
who arrived on the riverboat
told Russia's Vesti 24 televi-
sion as he stood amid weep-
ing passengers, some of
them wrapped in blankets.
Vesti 24 quoted another
survivor as saying the boat
"tilted to the right and sank
within minutes."
Some 30 children gathered
in one of the cockpits minutes
before the sinking, another
survivor told the Interfax
news agency.
-From wire reports


News of the World

prints final edition

Associated Press
LONDON - Rupert Murdoch
touched down in London on Sunday
to take charge of his media empire's
phone-hacking crisis as his best-
selling Sunday tabloid, the News of
the World, published its last. The
scandal lives on despite his sacri-
fice of the 168-year-old paper at the
heart of it.
The scrapping of the News of the
World has not tempered British
anger over improprieties by jour-
nalists working for Murdoch, and
his $19 billion deal to take full con-
trol of satellite broadcaster British
Sky Broadcasting remains in
jeopardy
The 80-year-old News Corp. CEO
was seen reading the paper's last
issue in a red Range Rover as he
was driven to the east London of-


Associated Press
A stack of the last edition of News of the World is placed at a newspaper
vendor Sunday in central London.


fices of his U.K. newspaper divi-
sion, News International. Later, at
his London apartment, he met with
News International's chief execu-
tive, Rebekah Brooks, who led


News of the World when its re-
porters committed some of the most
egregrious ethical lapses.
Murdoch has publicly backed
Brooks, who insists she had no


War of old, new


Associated Pr
Two men work at a blacksmith shop July 6 in an alley in the crowded neighborhood of Mit Oqba in Cairo. All ov
Egypt, dozens of Popular Committees have sprouted, each dedicated to bringing the can-do spirit of Egypt
revolution to a neighborhood.

Egypt activists face Old Guard on local levels, street by street


Associated Press
CAIRO -After the fall of
President Hosni Mubarak,
a group of young activists
quickly moved to bring the
can-do spirit of Egypt's rev-
olution down to the level of
their neighborhood.
They began installing
electricity poles in Mit
Oqba's dim streets. They got
gas pipes extended to the
area. They did what local
officials had long promised
but never done, with the
aim of showing 300,000 low-
income residents the bene-
fits of an uprising meant to
end the corruption and
stagnation under Mubarak.
Then the activists' par-
ents started getting intimi-
dating warnings: Your
children are going to get
beaten up by thugs. An offi-
cial who helped them get
papers signed for extending
the gas pipes was suddenly
transferred to another post
Activists had run into a
collision course with pow-
erful local members of the
former ruling party. It was a
lesson about the new Egypt:
The old regime is still in
place and fighting change.
"The regime is not just
Mubarak and his ministers.
There are thousands still
benefiting," said Mo-
hammed Magdy, one of the
activists in Mit Oqba.
Mubarak was ousted five
months ago, along with top
figures from his nearly 30-
year regime. But the mili-
tary generals who now rule
have been slow in - or
have outright resisted -
dismantling the grip that
members of his former rul-
ing party hold on every
level of the state, from sen-


ior government positions
down to local administra-
tions. In the meantime,
public anger that real
change has not come is
growing explosive.
The experience in Mit
Oqba illustrates the con-
flict between old and new
being waged street by
street and neighborhood by
neighborhood.
Under Mubarak's
regime, more than 1,700
Local Councils nationwide,
with more than 50,000
members, were elected in
theory to represent their
neighborhoods. In prac-
tice, they were a cog in the
patronage and corruption
machine of Mubarak's Na-
tional Democratic Party.
Election rigging ensured
nearly all council members
belonged to the party.
Often they would push
projects that lined their
own pockets or those of
friends. For example, a
street would get a new
sidewalk if a firm close to
the council or ruling party
profited. Council members
steered services to resi-
dents willing to do them a
favor later.
The system helped en-
sure the regime's hold.
Come election time, offi-
cials used their patronage
to drum out voters for party
candidates or to hire thugs
to beat up opponents.
Late last month, a court
ordered all Local Councils
dissolved, potentially a sig-
nificant step toward reform.
But former members retain
their connections, backed
with cash, giving them a
strong tool for regaining
seats when new municipal
elections are held.


Associated Press
An Egyptian man dances with a national flag
Saturday as he protests for a second day in Tahrir
Square in Cairo, Egypt.
Clashes erupt in Suez to urge reforms
CAIRO -Army troops firing in the air clashed Sunday
with stone-throwing protesters in the strategic city of Suez
after crowds blocked a key highway to push for faster re-
form efforts, including probes of alleged abuses during the
uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak.
The crackdown by security forces threatened to
sharply escalate tensions in Suez, a city alongside the
famous canal about 80 miles east of Cairo, which has
been hit by days of unrest over calls for swifter action
against Mubarak-era officials.
In Cairo, meanwhile, protesters blocked access to the
Egyptian capital's largest government building and
threatened to expand sit-ins to other sites.
Confrontations underscore the growing frustration tha
political momentum has stalled since Mubarak's downfa
in February. Protesters want justice for the nearly 900
protesters killed by security forces during the uprising
and seek a faster pace for trials of allegedly corrupt fig-
ures from Mubarak's regime.
In Suez, protesters blocked the coastal road linking
the city to the Red Sea ports of Safagah and Hurghada,
disrupting maritime trade by trapping hundreds of cars
and trucks. Military forces - firing in the air and carrying
electric stun batons - tried to clear the highway but pro
testers responded by hurling stones and setting ablaze
tire barricades, said witnesses.


knowledge of wrongdoing. He put
his hand on her shoulder as they
left the residence about an hour
after she arrived; they smiled for
the pack of photographers and cam-
era crews gathered outside before
walking to a nearby hotel for a meal.
The drama gripping media
watchers in Britain and beyond has
expanded at breakneck pace fol-
lowing allegations News of the
World journalists paid police for in-
formation and hacked into the
voicemails of young murder victims
and the grieving families of dead
soldiers. Three people have been
arrested, including Prime Minister
David Cameron's former communi-
cations chief.
In its last edition Sunday, the
paper issued a full-page apology.
"We praised high standards, we
demanded high standards but, as
we are now only too painfully
aware, for a period of a few years up
to 2006 some who worked for us, or
in our name, fell shamefully short of
those standards," the editorial read.
"Quite simply, we lost our way"



Insurers:


FEMA


creating


confusion

Insurance groups

sayfedspushing

them to sell more
Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - In-
surance agents in states
along the swollen Missouri
River basin say federal offi-
cials are causing wide-
spread confusion among
property owners by pushing
the sale of flood insurance
policies that might not cover
damage from the river flood-
ing that began this month.
The insurance companies
say officials with the Fed-
eral Emergency Manage-
ment Agency, which
administers the national
ess flood insurance program,
,er are urging private agents to
's sell the insurance even
though the policies contain
deadlines that appear to ex-
,4t clude the Missouri River
flood damage. The federal
officials explain some of the
damage along the river
might still be covered under
the program's highly com-
plicated rules, but how
much won't be known until
after the flooding is over
"They won't give you a
clear answer," said Larry
Case, executive vice presi-
dent of the Missouri Associ-
ation of Insurance Agents.
"It causes issues for agents
because they get frustrated
when they can't give policy-
holders a definitive answer"
Questions primarily affect
property owners who
waited until recently to de-
cide on flood insurance be-
S cause their property usually
doesn't flood. The extensive
S flooding this year - the
worst since 1993 - is threat-
ening thousands of acres
s that normally remain dry
"We've got to communi-
cate with people that you
can't wait until the last
minute to buy flood insur-
e ance," said Brad Kieser-
man, FEMA's chief counsel.
The number of landown-
ers who bought policies that
may or may not cover the
Missouri flooding is not
known. Towns, homes and
farmland in North Dakota,
South Dakota, Nebraska,
Iowa, Kansas and Missouri
are under water or threat-
ened by the flooding, which
began earlier this month
and is expected to continue
for another two months.
The confusion about cover-
age mostly stems from a 30-
day waiting period in flood
insurance policies. Accord-
ing to FEMA, the Missouri
flood officially began June 1,
- so only policies bought by
May 2 would have gone into


effect and therefore would
cover the resulting damage.


I










R ED


't.i


7


A O WHE!


USA WINS OVERTIME THRILLER
Associated Press
S DRESDEN, Germany- Running low on hope and almost out of time, the
SAmericans were surely beat, about to make their earliest exit from the
Women's World Cup.
And then, with one of the most thrilling goals in U.S. history, they weren't.
Showing a dramatic burst sure to captivate the folks back home, the Americans
packed an entire World Cup's worth of theatrics into a 15-minute span by beating Brazil
5-3 on penalty kicks after a 2-2 tie Sunday night.
Abby Wambach tied it with a magnificent leaping header in the 122nd minute, and Hope
i. Page B4


* -*-I


DOWN TO THE WIRE


District 15 Tournament
Major Baseball
POOL A(Crystal River) POOL B (West Hernando)
W L W L
Crystal River 3 0 Inverness 3 0
Dunnellon 2 1 West Hernando 1 2
Central Citrus 1 2 Shady Hills 1 2
Lady Lake 0 3 Greater Hudson 1 2
TUESDAY'SGAMES
West Hernando 12, Greater Hudson 1
Inverness 10, Shady Hills 4
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus 17, Lady Lake 0
Crystal River 13, Dunnellon 10
Shady Hills 15, West Hernando 5
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 14, Central Citrus 2
Crystal River 13, Lady Lake 0
Inverness 3, Greater Hudson 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 11, Central Citrus 3
Dunnellon 20, Lady Lake 3
Inverness 9, West Hernando 0
Greater Hudson 9, Shady Hills 8
MONDAY'SGAMES
Semifinals
6:30 p.m. Crystal Rivervs. Shady Hills
Inverness vs. Dunnellon
TUESDAY'SGAME
Championship Game (Crystal River)
6:30 p.m. Winner of semi. 1 vs. Winner of semi. 2
Junior Baseball
POOL A(Crystal River) POOL B (West Hernando)
W L W L
CrystalRiver 3 0 Inverness 3 0
Central Citrus 2 1 West Hernando 1 2
Dunnellon 1 2 Shady Hills 2 1
Lady Lake 0 3 Greater Hudson 0 3
TUESDAY'SGAMES
Shady Hills 8, West Hernando 5
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 7, Dunnellon 5
Inverness 13, Greater Hudson 5
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus 8, Lady Lake 3
Inverness 14, West Hernando 0
TODAY'S GAMES
10 a.m. Crystal River 16, Lady Lake 2
10 a.m. Greater Hudson 5 Shady Hills 18
Central Citrus 4, Dunnellon 3 (8 innings)
MONDAY'SGAMES
Semifinals
6:30 p.m.Winner Pool A vs. Runner-up Pool B
6:30 p.m. Inverness vs. Central Citrus
TUESDAY'SGAME
Championship Game (Crystal River)
6:30 p.m.Winner semifinal 1 vs. Winner semifinal 2

SUMMER SHOWDOWN

Webb, Rozario

run to 5K

road victories

Pair win

Chronicle race
BY LARRY BUGG
Sports correspondent
INVERNESS - Tori Webb
has often raced down these
paths before but the sand al-
ways stayed beneath his feet.
All at once, Webb is several
stories high, knowing he's
the Summer Showdown win-
ner
Webb returned to one of
his familiar courses and won
the Citrus Summer Show-
down. A former Lecanto
High cross-country runner,
he ran a 16:54. He now runs
cross country at the Univer-
sity of Tampa. He beat Crys-
tal River High distance
standout Geremy DeWitt. De-
Witt had a 16:56.
"(The run) was not too
bad," said Webb. "I'm still not
in 100 percent shape. I'm just
training with the notes my
coach gave me. It (the tem-
perature) felt pretty nice. I
took the lead maybe 50 to 100
meters from the end. I had a
pretty good kick at the end."
Nicole Rozario won the
See Page B4


P'N - JJ�

L;~a
- r . .-
- . - --
- -~~


C-.


Photos by BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Crystal River shortstop Jayson Haufler tags out Central Citrus' Robert Green at second base Sun-
day in the third inning of Major All-Stars play at Bicentennial Park. Crystal River won 11-3. Central
Citrus first baseman Zach Bonick tags out Dunnellon's Justin Hamm Sunday during a pick-off attempt in the
first inning of Junior. All-Stars play at Bicentennial Park. Central Citrus won 4-3 in eight innings.

Central Citrus defeats Dunnellon in extra innings


Crystal River

finishes pool with

decisive win
JOHN COSCIA
Sports editor
CRYSTAL RIVER - The game
with the most on the line on Sun-
day also took thee longest to
complete... eight hours to be
exact.
The Junior All-Stars teams of
Dunnellon and Central Citrus
knew that a playoff berth rested
on the outcome of their contest
- and both teams played like it
In fact after five innings of
play the game was tied 3-3.. and
that's when Mother Nature in-
tervened. The heavens opened
up and drenched Bicentennial
Field to the point that it was ren-
dered unplayable.
But that's when the County
Parks and Recreational Depart-
ment stepped up to the plate. As
is often the case, rain in one part
of our county doesn't mean a
washout everywhere. And that
was the case on Sunday as well.
The Central Ridge Park, al-
though not ready for play,
was dry. So after some work
by the parties that needed to
spring into action, the two
teams resumed play some
four hours after the game
had been suspended.
The two teams remained tied


Crystal River All-Stars to hold fundraiser
* With the 9-10 baseball team along with the 9-10 and
Senior softball teams having already clinched a spot in
next week's sectional tournaments, and the Majors and
Juniors trying to do the same, the Crystal River All-Stars
will be hosting a car wash at Wendy's on Highway 19 in
Crystal River from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Thursday.


until the eighth inning when
Ashton Honeggar plated the
winning run for Central Citrus.
In fact it was Honeggar that
scored the game's first run with
he scored in the top of the sec-
ond inning.
But the lead for Honeggar's
team's was short-lived as Hunter
Ingalls and Christopher Perez
gave Dunnellon a 2-1 lead in the
bottom of the third. Dunnellon
added a run in the fourth when
Sean Anderson scored.
However, Central Citrus tied
the game just in time when Josh
Tricomi scored in the fourth and
Zach Bonick tied it in the fifth,
just before the rain. Had Central
Citrus not scored in the fifth and


it rained the game would have
been ruled official and Dunnel-
lon would have advanced. In-
stead Central Citrus lives to fight
another day and they will travel
to West Hernando tonight to face
Inverness in the semifinals.
Junior All-Stars
Crystal River 16,
Lady Lake 2
Crystal River ended pool play
undefeated with a 16-2 win over
Lady Lake. The game's big hit
came off the bat of Jordan
Humphreys who crushed a two-
run homer into the trees in the
third inning.
Crystal River took a 1-0 lead in
See ALL- Page B4


Barroso,

Howard lead

Inverness

Majors to win

LARRY BUGG
Sports correspondent
SPRING HILL - Mitchell
Barroso and Sam Howard
provided the offense as the In-
verness Majors All Stars
downed West Hernando 9-0 in
a rain-delayed game Sunday
at Freedom Field.
Barroso was 4-for-4 with
three runs and Howard blasted
a two-run home run and was 2-
for-3 for the Inverness squad in
the Little League District 15
tournament
Inverness pitcher James
Smith held West Hernando to
three hits and struck out
seven in four innings to pick
up the victory
Inverness will play Dun-
nellon at 6:30 p.m. at the
West Hernando complex in
the semifinals with the win-
ner advancing to the Dis-
trict 15 championship game
on Tuesday night at Bicen-
tennial Park.
"Barroso is hitting real
good," said Inverness coach
Ben Crofchick. "Sammy led
our league in home runs. He
is doing that again. The last
couple of ball games, we
haven't been hitting the ball.
"Our pitching has been
great. Our defense has been
great. Our kids hit the ball
against a very good team. We
never worry about our pitch-
ing our or defense. We knew
our hitting had to come alive
for Dunnellon. We know it is
going to be a good game."
Howard now has two home
runs in the tournament.
Majors Baseball
Greater Hudson 9,
Shady Hills 8, (8)
Georgie Febus hit a bases-
loaded, two-run single in the
eighth inning to win this game
for Greater Hudson.
Jay Shellem was the win-
ning pitcher for Greater Hud-
son and Shady Hills hurler
Brayden Lyman took the
pitching loss.
Nick France Jr belted a two-
run home run for Greater Hud-
son. Both teams had 16 hits.
Shady Hills' Bradley Wells
hammered a triple and scored
two runs.
The game was rain-delayed
and was spread out over five
and a half hours.
Greater Hudson ended the
pool play with a 1-2 mark.
Junior Baseball
Shady Hills 18,
Greater Hudson 5, (4)
Jonah Izquierdo was the
winning pitcher and Joey
Learned took the hurling loss
for Greater Hudson.


Sabathia outduels Shields to capture series


Yankees score on

2 errors in 1-0

win over Rays

Associated Press
NEW YORK- James Shields,
B.J. Upton and CC Sabathia
threw the Yankees into the All-
Star break on quite the roll.
Shields and Upton made egre-
gious throwing errors that let
Robinson Cano score the only
run, sending New York to a 1-0
victory over the Tampa Bay Rays


MLB BASEBALL
on Sunday
"You usually don't win a 1-0
game like that," Yankees man-
ager Joe Girardi said.
A day after Derek Jeter got five
hits, including No. 3,000, All-Stars
Shields and Sabathia (13-4)
staged a classic pitchers' duel,
matching zeros until the bottom
of the seventh inning.
Cano led off with a single, and
Jorge Posada's popup to shallow
center was gloved on the run by
Upton, who wound up and rock-


eted a throw well over first base-
man Casey Kotchman's head.
Cano moved to third on the
error. Shields (8-7), one of the
toughest pitchers to run against
in the game, then tried to pick
him off. He fired wide into the
tarp, and Cano trotted home.
"I had him picked off," Shields
said. "He was walking down to-
wards home plate. All I had to do
was lob the ball over there and I
ended up airmailing the play"
Sabathia finished a four-hitter
See Page B3


Tampa Bay's James Shields laments over his throwing error in the seventh in-
ning that would eventually cost his team the game against the Yankees.
Associated Press


d
/1










Eight more players bow out of All-Star game, 16 in all


Associated Press

PHOENIX - Baseball
could field an All-Star team
just from the players who
will be missing from Tues-
day's game.
Philadelphia third base-
man Placido Polanco and
Tampa Bay pitcher David
Price became the latest
stars to withdraw, and six
starting pitchers were de-
clared ineligible because
they played Sunday Sixteen
All-Stars won't appear in the
game, including 13 of the 68
originally chosen.
The Los Angeles Angels'
Jered Weaver will pitch. He
said he's been told he'll start
for the AL.
"It's very exciting,"
Weaver said. "Never in my
life would I think that I'd
even be in an All-Star game,
let alone starting."
Polanco missed the
Phillies' final six games
heading into the All-Star


break because of a bad
back. Major League Base-
ball cited turf toe as the rea-
son for Price's withdrawal.
"He's been battling a toe
problem that's been exacer-
bated the last couple of
days, so going into the
break, we wanted to make
sure he would not aggravate
(it) any more by pitching on
Tuesday," Rays manager Joe
Maddon said. "We really
haven't decided if he'll pitch
Friday or Saturday"
The missing include the
Yankees' trio of DerekJeter,
Alex Rodriguez and Mari-
ano Rivera. Rodriguez will
have right knee surgery
Monday and be sidelined
four to six weeks.
The Yankees' CC
Sabathia, the Rays' James
Shields, the Detroit Tigers'
Justin Verlander, the Seattle
Mariners' Felix Hernandez,
the Philadelphia Phillies'
Cole Hamels and the San
Francisco Giants' Matt Cain


all were knocked out be-
cause of their starts.
Sabathia had been by-
passed when rosters were
announced a week ago, but
replaced Shields when the
Tampa Bay pitcher ap-
peared Sunday
Added as All-Stars Sunday
were the Yankees' David
Robertson, the Texas Rangers'
Alexi Ogando, the Seattle
Mariners' Michael Pineda, the
Toronto Blue Jays' Ricky
Romero, the Arizona Diamon-
backs' Miguel Montero, the
Pittsburgh Pirates' Kevin Cor-
reia and the Atlanta Braves'
Craig Kimbrel.
Boston's Jon Lester had
been in line to replace Her-
nandez and became anAll-Star
on Sunday, but he will miss the
game because of a strained
back muscle that landed him
on the disabled list
Montero will get to ap-
pear before his hometown
fans at Chase Field.
"I felt like when I got


called up (from the mi-
nors)," he said. "I wanted to
cry, I was so excited. It's a
great moment. It's going to
pretty special, especially be-
cause it's going to be at
home."
Cincinnati's Scott Rolen
will start at third for the NL
in place of Polanco. Rolen
was added to the roster Sat-
urday when Atlanta's Chip-
per Jones withdrew.
San Francisco infielder
Pablo Sandoval replaced
the Mets' Jose Reyes, on the
DL with a hamstring injury
The All-Star selection was
validation for Sandoval,
who lost nearly 40 pounds
this offseason after he strug-
gled with his weight and hit-
ting in 2010.
"That was one of the goals
we were talking about when
I was working out," San-
doval said. "We talked about
All-Star game and MVP"
Sandoval just missed out
on the All-Star game in 2009


despite having a .333 aver-
age with 15 homers and 55
RBIs at the break. Philadel-
phia manager Charlie
Manuel picked his own
player, Shane Victorino, in-
stead of Sandoval that year.
With San Francisco man-
ager Bruce Bochy making
picks, Sandoval got his
chance despite missing 40
games with an injured right
wrist
"It was a couple of years
ago where he had the num-
bers to go and it didn't quite
happen for him," Bochy
said. "I couldn't feel better
to tell someone they were
going to the All-Star game....
I really wanted to get him on
the club. With what hap-
pened, it just made sense.
His numbers are deserving
to be on the All-Star team."
Robertson will be joined on
the AL by Yankees teammates
Curtis Granderson, Robinson
Cano and Russell Martin.
"I was just going to go to


Connecticut with the wife,
maybe go fishing," Robertson
said. "I'm just happy to go."
Sabathia didn't fret over
not going to Phoenix with
his pinstriped mates.
"I've seen these guys
every day since February
I'll see them on Thursday,"
he said.
Ogando, 9-3 with a 2.92
ERA, will be making his first
All-Star appearance. He
will be joined by Rangers
teammates Josh Hamilton,
Adrian Beltre, C.J. Wilson
and Michael Young.
Romero learned of his se-
lection after throwing a late-
inning bullpen session and
returning to the dugout in
Cleveland.
"It's very exciting,"
Romero said. "I'm at a loss
for words right now. My fam-
ily's excited that I'm repre-
senting East Los Angeles
(where he lives) and most
importantly, the country of
Canada."


Stricker wins Deere ,



for 3rd straight year K


Seo leads US.

Open; Sluman

wins Tour

Championship

Associated Press

SILVIS, Ill. - Steve
Stricker's third straight vic-
tory in the John Deere Clas-
sic certainly was the most
challenging - and by far the
most dramatic.
With nine holes to play,
Stricker led by five strokes.
With two holes left, he was
two shots down.
Twice, Stricker buried
shots deep in bunkers, one
so far under the sand he had
a hard time finding the ball.
At a third bunker, he had to
take an awkward stance just
to give himself a chance to
swing.
But he won nevertheless,
sinking a 25-foot putt from
off the 18th green Sunday to
beat rookie Kyle Stanley by
one stroke.
"It became hard, real
hard," said Stricker, who
was grateful for the encour-
aging words from caddie
Jimmy Johnson.
"Jimmy was right there
telling me the whole time,
you know, it's not over yet,
just keep plugging, you
never know what's going to
happen," Stricker said.
"And sure enough, he was


right. Just play it all the way
out and see what happens."
Stricker's clutch putt
capped a roller coaster
round on a steamy after-
noon and gave him a 2-
under par 69, good enough
to make him the 10th golfer
since World War II to win a
tournament three straight
times.
Despite a double-bogey
on No. 5, when he needed
two shots to get out of a
greenside bunker, and bo-
geys on 15 and 16, Stricker
finished at 22-under 262.
Stanley, 23, whose best fin-
ish previously had been a
tie for 12th at the Arnold
Palmer Invitational in late
March, closed with a 66.
"It was an unbelievable
week and an unbelievable
finish," Stricker said. "I still
can't believe I'm sitting
here."
Matt McQuillan, who had
missed the cut in his previ-
ous 10 tournaments, shot a
64 to tie Zach Johnson (65)
for third at 17 under.
Charles Howell III (64) and
Chez Reavie (72) were an-
other stroke back.
Stanley zoomed in front
with birdies on five of the
first six holes on the back
nine, and kept the lead by
salvaging par on 17 after
sending his tee shot into a
grove of trees. But he
missed a 9-foot par putt on
18 to open the door for
Stricker, who took advan-
tage.
Stricker had fallen two


behind with those back-to-
back bogeys, which seem-
ingly ended his hopes of a
threepeat.
"I really did feel like the
momentum was gone for a
while," he said. "Those
holes kind of derailed me
there."
But he regrouped quickly
Stricker knocked in a 15-
foot putt for birdie on 17 to
cut Stanley's lead to one
stroke, then made what
turned out to be a tourna-
ment-saving shot from a
bunker on the left side of
the fairway on 18.
Standing with his left foot
in the bunker and his right
foot on the lip, Stricker hit
the ball solidly and left it on
the fringe of the green be-
hind the pin, drawing a
huge roar from the crowd.
The next roar was even
louder. Using his putter,
Stricker sent the ball toward
the cup and watched it curl
in from the left side. The 44-
year-old from Madison, Wis.,
a crowd favorite at this tour-
nament, backed away as the
ball neared the hole, then
raised his arms and
pumped his fist to celebrate
the moment.
"It's weird," Stricker said.
"When I get into a situation
where I have to make a putt,
I feel like my nerves kind of
go away and I focus ex-
tremely hard on trying to
make that putt. And that's
kind of like the little zone I
got into on 17 and 18, I
guess."


Associated Press
Steve Stricker reacts after making a birdie putt on the 18th green to win the John Deere
Classic golf tournament on Sunday.


Seo on the verge of
victory at U.S. Open
COLORADO SPRINGS,
Colorado - Hee Kyung Seo
of South Korea moved to the
verge of winning the U.S.
Women's Open on Sunday
when she finished with a
one-shot lead over So Yeon
Ryu, who had three holes
left when play was sus-
pended due to darkness.
On a grueling 36-hole day
at the Broadmoor, Seo shot
a pair of 3-under 68s to fin-
ish at 3-under 281 and close
in on her first major cham-
pionship.


Returning along with Ryu
on Monday are Cristie Kerr,
who is two shots behind
with two holes to play and
Angela Stanford, who is
three behind with four
holes left.
Barring a playoff, Seo
won't have to hit a shot Mon-
day If nobody catches her,
she'll collect her first major
victory and only her second
on the LPGA Tour.
Sluman rallies to win
First Tee for 3rd time
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif.
- Jeff Sluman shot a 2-


under 70 and overcame a
pair of bogeys on the back
nine Sunday, holding on to
win the First Tee Open for
the third time.
On a day when most of the
leaders struggled just to
break even, Sluman had five
bogeys and closed with
three straight pars to finish
at 10-under 206 and seal his
first victory since winning
here in 2009. He also took
the title at Pebble Beach in
2008, making Sluman the
only three-time winner of
this event.


John Deere Classic
John Deere Classic Scores, Sunday, At TPC Deere Run, Silvis,
III., Purse: $4.5 million,Yardage: 7,268, Par: 71, Final Round:
Steve Stricker (500), $810,000 66-64-63-69 - 262
Kyle Stanley (300), $486,000 65-67-65-66 - 263
Matt McQuillan (163), $261,000 64-69-70-64 - 267
Zach Johnson (163), $261,000 66-69-67-65 - 267
Charles Howell III (105), $171,000 66-68-70-64 -268
Chez Reavie (105), $171,000 66-62-68-72 - 268
Cameron Percy (88), $145,125 66-67-67-69 -269
Brendon de Jonge (88), $145,125 66-66-63-74 - 269
Briny Baird (75), $121,500 68-70-68-64 - 270
Brian Gay (75), $121,500 68-67-69-66 - 270
Cameron Tringale (75), $121,500 70-66-65-69 - 270
Sunghoon Kang (58), $85,500 72-65-68-66 - 271
Michael Putnam (58), $85,500 70-68-67-66 - 271
Kris Blanks (58), $85,500 63-71-70-67- 271
Michael Thompson (58), $85,500 71-66-67-67 - 271
Davis Love III (58), $85,500 64-70-69-68 - 271
Aron Price (58), $85,500 69-66-67-69 - 271
Arjun Atwal (52), $60,750 67-66-70-69 - 272
Marco Dawson (52), $60,750 68-69-66-69- 272
Charles Warren (52), $60,750 67-68-67-70 - 272
Dean Wilson (52), $60,750 69-65-67-71 - 272
Chris Kirk (46), $39,488 68-69-70-66 - 273
Kirk Triplett (46), $39,488 68-65-73-67 - 273
Andres Gonzales (46), $39,488 68-68-69-68 - 273
Brett Wetterich (46), $39,488 69-68-67-69 - 273
Michael Letzig (46), $39,488 70-65-68-70 - 273
Scott Stallings (46), $39,488 69-66-68-70 - 273
Todd Hamilton (46), $39,488 70-66-67-70 - 273
David Mathis (46), $39,488 68-65-69-71 - 273
Tim Petrovic (38), $26,156 69-69-69-67 - 274
Jason Bohn (38), $26,156 72-66-68-68 - 274
Troy Merritt (38), $26,156 68-68-69-69- 274
Chris Couch (38), $26,156 70-65-69-70 - 274
Bryce Molder (38), $26,156 71-66-67-70- 274
Woody Austin (38), $26,156 69-67-67-71 - 274


Will MacKenzie (38), $26,156
Mark Wilson (38), $26,156
Steven Bowditch (30), $18,450
Kent Jones (30), $18,450
Heath Slocum (30), $18,450
Ben Martin (30), $18,450
Jim Herman (30), $18,450
D.A. Points (30), $18,450
Shane Bertsch (30), $18,450
D.J. Trahan (21), $11,864
Alex Prugh (21), $11,864
Rod Pampling (21), $11,864
Frank Lickliter ll (21), $11,864
Josh Teater (21), $11,864
Scott Piercy (21), $11,864
Craig Bowden (21), $11,864
John Mallinger (21), $11,864
Lee Janzen (21), $11,864
Cameron Beckman (21), $11,864
Brian Davis (21), $11,864
Chad Campbell (14), $10,170
Billy Mayfair (14), $10,170
J.J. Henry (14), $10,170
John Merrick (12), $9,990
Michael Connell (9), $9,720
James Driscoll (9), $9,720
Joe Ogilvie (9), $9,720
William McGirt (9), $9,720
Nathan Green (9), $9,720
Michael Sim (5), $9,360
John Rollins (5), $9,360
Steve Marino (5), $9,360
Jason Day (2), $9,090
Jhonattan Vegas (2), $9,090
David Hearn (2), $9,090
Chris Stroud (1), $8,865
Troy Matteson (1), $8,865
Duffy Waldorf (1), $8,730


67-70-66-71 -
65-67-68-74-
67-68-72-68-
70-68-69-68-
70-66-70-69-
67-70-68-70-
66-68-70-71 -
66-68-70-71 -
71-66-67-71 -
67-70-74-65-
69-68-72-67-
69-69-70-68-
68-70-69-69-
66-70-70-70-
70-67-69-70-
67-70-69-70-
68-65-70-73-
66-68-69-73-
66-69-68-73-
70-66-67-73-
67-69-70-71 -
67-66-72-72-
68-68-69-72-
67-71-67-73-
69-66-73-71 -
71-67-70-71 -
69-67-71-72-
67-67-71-74-
69-64-69-77-
67-70-70-74-
72-65-69-75-
64-66-73-78-
67-69-75-71 -
68-64-75-75-
67-69-71-75-
69-64-76-74-
67-69-72-75-
67-69-73-76-


Champions Tour
Final round played on Pebble Beach., Champions Tour Par
Scores, Sunday, At p-Pebble Beach Golf Links, 6,837 yards, par 72,
At d-Del Monte Golf Course, 6,357 yards, par 72, Pebble Beach,
Calif., Purse: $1.6 million, Final Round:
Jeff Sluman (240), $240,000 68d-68p-70 -206 -10
David Eger (117), $117,333 66d-70p-72- 208 -8
Brad Bryant (117), $117,333 67d-68p-73 -208 -8
Jay Haas (117), $117,333 68d-65p-75 -208 -8
Tom Pernice, Jr. (59), $58,880 69d-71p-69- 209 -7
MarkWiebe (59), $58,880 71d-68p-70--209 -7
Steve Lowery (59), $58,880 68d-68p-73 -209 -7
Mark Brooks (59), $58,880 71p-64d-74 -209 -7
Bobby Clampett (59), $58,880 69p-66d-74 - 209 -7
John Cook (38), $38,400 71d-72p-67-210 -6
Jay Don Blake (38), $38,400 68d-71p-71 - 210 -6
Russ Cochran (38), $38,400 65p-71d-74 -210 -6
Jim Gallagher, Jr., $30,400 68d-73p-70- 211 -5
Mark Calcavecchia, $30,400 68p-70d-73- 211 -5
Mark Mouland, $30,400 71p-67d-73-211 -5
Mark O'Meara, $24,096 72d-71p-69 -212 -4
Rod Spittle, $24,096 74p-69d-69- 212 -4
Fred Funk, $24,096 70p-70d-72 -212 -4
Steve Pate, $24,096 69p-70d-73 -212 -4
D.A. Weibring, $24,096 68d-69p-75 -212 -4
Bob Gilder, $19,200 70p-70d-73 - 213 -3
Jim Thorpe, $19,200 67p-69d-77 -213 -3
J.L. Lewis, $16,400 70p-75d-69 - 214 -2
Tom Kite, $16,400 72d-72p-70 - 214 -2
Bruce Fleisher, $16,400 70d-74p-70 -214 -2
Robin Freeman, $16,400 68d-76p-70 --214 -2
Jim Rutledge, $12,440 72p-72d-71 --215 -1
Lonnie Nielsen, $12,440 73p-71d-71 --215 -1
Joey Sindelar, $12,440 74p-69d-72 --215 -1
Olin Browne, $12,440 72d-69p-74 -215 -1
Bill Glasson, $12,440 68d-73p-74 - 215 -1
Ted Schulz, $12,440 73p-67d-75 -215 -1
Morris Hatalsky, $12,440 67d-73p-75- 215 -1
Mike Reid, $12,440 68d-71p-76 -215 -1
Tom Purtzer, $9,400 72d-73p-71 -216 E


Robert Thompson, $9,400
Phil Blackmar, $9,400
Lee Rinker, $9,400
Roger Chapman, $7,520
Peter Senior, $7,520
Mike Hulbert, $7,520
Chip Beck, $7,520
Andy Bean, $7,520
Mark McNulty, $7,520
Chien Soon Lu, $7,520
Craig Stadler, $4,848
Greg Bruckner, $4,848
Mark W. Johnson, $4,848
John Huston, $4,848
John Morse, $4,848
Bobby Wadkins, $4,848
Keith Fergus, $4,848
Mike Goodes, $4,848
Keith Clearwater, $4,848
Hale Irwin, $4,848
David Peoples, $3,200
Scott Simpson, $3,200
Wayne Levi, $3,200
Eduardo Romero, $3,200
Gary Hallberg, $3,200
Steve Jones, $2,560
Hal Sutton, $2,560
Blaine McCallister, $2,560
James Mason, $2,000
Larry Nelson, $2,000
Ben Crenshaw, $2,000
Ronnie Black, $2,000
Tommy Armour III, $1,504
Tim Simpson, $1,504
Don Pooley, $1,504
Tom Jenkins, $1,176
Jerry Pate, $1,176
John Harris, $1,176
Barry Jaeckel, $1,176
John Jacobs, $992
Fuzzy Zoeller, $928


Tour rest day welcome after crash carnage


Associated Press

SAINT-FLOUR, France -
Riders sprawled over the
course. One wound up in a
ditch, another with a busted
leg. Everyone, it seemed,
needed ice: A rest day
couldn't come soon enough.
The bleeding and bat-
tered Tour de France field
endured its worst day yet of
crashes, a strange and dan-
gerous ordeal in which even
a car took out riders.
When cyclists ease their
aching bones Monday on
their day off after nine fren-


zied and punishing stages,
Alexandre Vinokourov will
be waking up several hun-
dred miles away in a Paris
hospital after surgery on a
fractured thigh bone.
Defending champion Al-
berto Contador's right knee
will be bathed in ice, and
Juan Antonio Flecha's legs
will be bruised and scabbed
after he was slammed by a
car late in Sunday's stage.
"It is too bad to see riders
crashing out of the race like
this," two-time Tour runner-
up Andy Schleck said.


Spain's Luis Leon
Sanchez won the ninth stage
after a long breakaway in
the second day of moun-
tains, and France's Thomas
Voeckler took the yellow jer-
sey from Thor Hushovd. But
they left plenty of wreckage
behind them.
Cyclists anticipate all
number of obstacles during
this three-week showcase -
wet roads, extreme heat, de-
hydration, exhaustion,
crashes. Getting sent air-
borne by a Tour car is not
one of them.


COME VlST' �Ou NEW N ADELN OEINR

* Residential Re-Sod/New Construction
By The Pallet Or By The Piece , - ~-
*Shrubs * Mulch * Trees
_ n J J _ _.. ,. _ ._.~u _-^' *


73p-70d-73-
73p-69d-74-
70p-72d-74-
71p-76d-70-
71d-75p-71
72p-71d-74-
73d-69p-75-
74p-68d-75-
74p-66d-77-
70d-70p-77-
76p-72d-70-
75d-73p-70-
72d-75p-71
75p-70d-73-
72p-71d-75-
71d-72p-75-
74p-69d-75-
73d-70p-75-
70p-72d-76-
72d-69p-77-
74d-74p-71
73p-74d-72
75d-72p-72
76p-69d-74-
72d-72p-75-
75p-74d-71
73d-74p-73-
72d-74p-74-
76p-74d-71
74d-74p-73-
76p-70d-75-
72p-72d-77-
73d-74p-75-
75p-70d-77-
74p-69d-79-
75d-76p-72-
72p-73d-78-
72d-73p-78-
72d-72p-79-
76p-74d-76-
77p-76d-78-


-216 E
-216 E
-216 E
-217 +1
-217 +1
-217 +1
-217 +1
-217 +1
-217 +1
-217 +1
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-218 +2
-219 +3
-219 +3
-219 +3
-219 +3
-219 +3
-220 +4
-220 +4
-220 +4
-221 +5
-221 +5
-221 +5
-221 +5
-222 +6
-222 +6
-222 +6
-223 +7
-223 +7
-223 +7
-223 +7
-226 +10
-231 +15


B2 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Boston
NewYork
Tampa Bay
Toronto
A L Baltimore


NL


MLB BASEBALL


W L
55 35
53 35
49 41
45 47
36 52


Philadelphia
Atlanta
NewYork
Washington
Florida


East Division
GB WCGB

1 --
6 5
11 10
18 17


East Division
GB WCGB

32 -
10/2 7
11/2 8
14 10'2


Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City




Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011 B3


Central Division
GB WCGB

'/2 61/2
5 11
6'2 12/2
11/2 17/2


Central Division
GB WCGB
- 5
- 5
1 6
4 9
12 17
19 24


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland





San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego


West Division
GB WCGB

1 5
7'2 11/2
12 16



West Division
GB WCGB

2/2 5
8 10'2
101/2 13
11/2 14


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 4
Chicago White Sox 4, Minnesota 3
Toronto 5, Cleveland 4, 10 innings
Boston 4, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 13, Detroit 6
Texas 7, Oakland 6
L.A. Angels 9, Seattle 3
Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 1, Tampa Bay 0
Toronto 7, Cleveland 1
Boston 8, Baltimore 6
Detroit 2, Kansas City 1
Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 3
Texas 2, Oakland 0
L.A. Angels 4, Seattle 2
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at Phoenix, AZ, 8:05 p.m.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 4, Philadelphia 1, 11 innings
L.A. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0
Chicago Cubs 6, Pittsburgh 3
Colorado 2, Washington 1
Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 4, 10 innings
Florida 6, Houston 1
St. Louis 7, Arizona 6
San Francisco 3, N.Y Mets 1
Sunday's Games
Florida 5, Houston 4
Philadelphia 14, Atlanta 1
Pittsburgh 9, Chicago Cubs 1
Washington 2, Colorado 0
Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 3
St. Louis 4, Arizona 2
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 1
N.Y Mets at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at Phoenix, AZ, 8:05 p.m.


RAYS
Continued from Pag B1

for his 12th career shutout.
The big left-hander struck
out nine and walked one.
He was selected for the AL
All-Star team shortly after
the game, but won't be
going. He'll be replaced by
Texas Rangers starter Alexi
Ogando.
Sabathia was passed over
when the rosters were an-
nounced a week ago, but re-
placed Shields when the
right-hander appeared Sun-
day He said he wasn't upset
about being originally left
off the AL team.
"I was going to the Ba-
hamas the whole time be-
cause I was pitching today,"
Sabathia said.
The Yankees almost
grabbed the lead in the
third. Eduardo Nunez and
Jeter started the inning with
consecutive singles and
both runners moved up on
Curtis Granderson's sacri-
fice. But Nunez tried to tag
up on Mark Teixeira's fly
ball to center, and Upton cut
him down at the plate.
Upton himself was picked
off in the fourth, when he got
caught by Sabathia in a run-
down and was tagged out by
first baseman Teixeira.
That was before his throw
opened the door for the
Yankees.
"It's unfortunate that that
play ended up pretty much
deciding the game," Upton
said. "James pitched well all
game. I wouldn't change
anything I did but make a
better throw."
Sean Rodriguez led off
the second inning with a
double against Sabathia, but
was cut down by All-Star
catcher Russell Martin
when he attempted to steal
third.
Shields, who leads the
major leagues with 10 pick-
offs this season, got another
complete game, but his
third straight loss since win-
ning three complete games
in a row. He gave up four
hits, struck out five and
walked four.
Sabathia has won six
straight decisions. With fans
chanting "CC! CC! CC!" he
struck out Ben Zobrist in the
ninth, then retired Elliot
Johnson to finish the game.
Tampa Bay NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Zobrist2b 4 00 0 Jeterss 4 0 1 0
EJhnsn ss 4 0 1 0 Grndrscf 2 00 0
Longoridh 3 0 0 0 Teixeirlb 2 0 0 0
BUptoncf 3 02 0 Cano2b 3 1 1 0
SRdrgz3b 3 01 0 Posadadh 3 00 0
Shppchc 2 00 0 Martinc 3 00 0
Ktchmlb 3 00 0 Gardnrlf 3 0 1 0
Guyer rf 3 0 0 0 AnJons rf 3 0 0 0
Rugginlf 3 00 0 ENunez3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 28 04 0 Totals 26 1 4 0
Tampa Bay 000 000 000 - 0
NewYork 000 000 10x - 1
E-Shields (1), B.Upton (3). DP-Tampa Bay 1,
New York 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 2, New York 3.
2B-E.Johnson (5), S.Rodriguez (15). CS-
B.Upton (7), S.Rodriguez (3). S-Granderson.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Shields L,8-7 8 4 1 0 1 5
New York
SabathiaW,13-4 9 4 0 0 1 9
Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Gary Ced-


erstrom; Second, Derryl Cousins; Third, Jim
Wolf.
T-2:11. A-47,350 (50,291).


Red Sox 8, Orioles 6 Blue Jays 7, Indians 1


BOSTON - The Boston Red Sox
enter the All-Star break with a six-
game winning streak after starting the
season with six consecutive losses.
Quite a turnaround, but not a sur-
prising one for manager Terry Fran-
cona.
"I think we are where we deserve to
be:' he said after Sunday's 8-6 win over
the skidding Baltimore Orioles.
The AL East-leading Red Sox com-
pleted a four-game sweep and stayed
one game ahead of the Yankees, who
beat Tampa Bay 1-0 on Sunday. It's the
sixth time in seven seasons that
Boston has led the division at the All-
Star break.
The Red Sox have the second-best
record and the best batting average in
baseball. They're hitting .278 after
pounding out 13 hits against Baltimore,
including homers by Marco Scutaro,
Dustin Pedroia and Kevin Youkilis in the
second inning.
The Red Sox had 48 hits in the se-
ries.
"Hitting is contagious," said Jason
Varitek, who had two doubles Sunday.
"It gets the ball rolling."
Baltimore Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Hardy ss
Markks rf
AdJons cf
Guerrr dh
Pie ph-dh
Wieters c
D.Lee lb
MrRynl3b
BDavis 2b
Reimld If


4 0 0 0 Ellsury cf
5 1 1 1 Pedroia 2b
4 0 2 1 AdGnzllb
2 0 1 1 Youkils 3b
1 0 0 0 D.Ortizdh
3 1 0 0 Reddcklf
4 1 1 2 Varitekc
1 1 1 0 J.Drewrf
2 0 0 0 Scutaro ss
4 1 1 0


Andino 2b-3b31 1 1
Totals 33 68 6 Totals 36813 8
Baltimore 060 000 000 - 6
Boston 240 100 10x - 8
DP-Boston 1. LOB-Baltimore 5, Boston 9.
2B-Mar.Reynolds (16), Pedroia (19), Ad.Gon-
zalez (29), Varitek 2 (9). 3B-Ad.Jones (2).
HR-D.Lee (9), Pedroia (11), Youkilis (13), Scu-
taro (4). CS-Andino (2). SF-Reddick.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Atkins 12-37 6 6 1 0
GuthrieL,3-12 31-33 1 1 2 4
M.Gonzalez 2-30 0 0 0 2
Berken 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Ji.Johnson 1 3 1 1 0 2
Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1
Boston
Weiland 4 8 6 6 2 2
AcevesW,4-1 3 0 0 0 0 4
D.BardH,21 1 0 0 0 0 1
PapelbonS,20-21 1 0 0 0 1 2
Weiland pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Guthrie (Youkilis), by Weiland
(Mar.Reynolds, Guerrero).
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, BillWelke;
Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jeff Nelson.
T-3:26. A-37,688 (37,065).


CLEVELAND - Jose Bautista hit a
two-run double to help the Toronto Blue
Jays defeat the Cleveland Indians 7-1
on Sunday and head to the All-Star
break with a three-game winning streak.
Brett Cecil (2-4) gave up one un-
earned run over six innings for his first
win in three starts since being recalled
from the minors June 30. The left-han-
der allowed six hits and walked three.
He struck out six, got out of a bases-
loaded jam in the first inning, and
stranded nine runners overall.
Eric Thames'two-run homer in a
five-run third off Carlos Carrasco (8-6)
put the Blue Jays ahead.
Toronto moved within two games of
.500 and have Bautista going to the
All-Star Game as baseball's home run
leader with 31 - along with 65 RBIs
and a .334 average.
Cleveland has lost four of six and
despite a lineup hit hard by injuries, re-
main in a battle with Detroit for the AL
Central lead. They entered play Sun-
day a half game ahead of the Tigers.
The last time Cleveland was in first
place at the break was 1999, when
they went on to win their fifth straight
division title.
Thames followed a single by Yunel
Escobar with his fourth homer for a


2-0 lead.
Toronto

YEscor ss
EThms dh
Bautist 3b
JMcDnl3b
Lind lb
A.Hill 2b
Snider If
Arencii c
CPttrsn rf
RDavis cf
Totals
Toronto
Cleveland


Cleveland
r h bi
1 1 0 Brantly lf
2 3 2 OCarer ss
1 2 2 Hafnerdh
00 0 CSantnlb
00 0 GSizmrcf
0 0 0 Kearns rf
1 1 0 Marsonc
1 2 1 Valuen2b
0 1 2 Hannhn3b
110
7117 Totals
005 002 000
000 001 000


E-Lind (4). DP-Toronto 1. LOB-


ab rh bi
4 0 1 0
5000
4000
3020
5 1 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 1

351 8 1
- 7
- 1
-Toronto 7,


Cleveland 13. 2B-Bautista (15), Snider (10),
C.Patterson (16), Marson (5). HR-E.Thames


(4).
IP H RI
Toronto
CecilW,2-4 6 6 1
L.Perez 2 1 0
Frasor 1 1 0
Cleveland
C.Carrasco L,8-6 3 7 5
Herrmann 2 1 0
R.Perez 1 3 2
J.Smith 1 0 0
Pestano 1 0 0
Sipp 1 0 0
WP-C.Carrasco, R.Perez. Balk-


ERBB SO

0 3 6
0 2 2
0 1 1

5 2 4
0 0 1
2 0 2
0 1 1
0 0 3
0 0 2
-R.Perez.


Umpires-Home, Doug Eddings; First, Dana
DeMuth; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Vic
Carapazza.
T-3:04. A-21,148 (43,441).


Marlins 5, Astros 4 Cardinals 4, D'Backs 2


MIAMI - Mike Cameron belted a
tying two-run homer for his first hit
since joining the Florida Marlins, who
completed a four-game sweep of the
woeful Houston Astros with a 5-4 vic-
tory on Sunday.
Florida's Emilio Bonifacio had three
hits, extending his career-best hitting
streak to 12 games. He stole three
bases and scored twice.
All-Star Gaby Sanchez drove in two
runs for the rejuvenated Marlins, who
head into the break with a season-
best five-game winning streak. They're
only five games below .500 (43-48)
despite a streak last month of 19
losses in 20 games.
Houston All-Star Hunter Pence hit
his 11th homer.
Cameron's homer off Wandy Ro-
driguez (6-6) made the score 3-all in the
fourth.The Marlins are unbeaten since
he joined them Wednesday following a
trade with the Boston Red Sox.


Houston Florida
ab r h bi


Bourn cf 3 00
Barmesss 4 0 1
Pence rf 4 2 2
MDwns2b 4 1 1
Wallaclb 4 1 2
CJhnsn3b 4 0 1
Bogsvc If 2 0 0
AngSnc ph 1 0 0
WLopezp 0 00
Melncnp 0 00
Kppngrph 1 0 0
Corprnc 3 0 2
Ca.Leeph 1 0 0
WRdrg p 2 00
FRdrgzp 0 00
Michals ph-lf2 0 1


0 Bonifac 3b
0 Infante 2b
1 GSnchz lb
0 HRmrzss
2 Morrsn If
0 Wise pr-lf
0 Stanton rf
0 Camrn cf
0 J.Buck c
0 Volstad p
0 Helms ph
1 MDunnp
0 Cishekp
0 Choatep
0 Mujica p
0 Dobbs ph
LNunez p


Totals 35 4104 Totals
Houston 200 100 010
Florida 001 400 00x


ab r h bi
3230
3 0 0 1
4 0 1 2
3001
4012
2000
301 0
0000
3100
3 1 0 0
3 1 1 2
4 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
285 7 5
3112





4110
1000
1000
0000
0000
0000
0000
1000
0000
2857 5
4
-5


E-Corporan 2 (4), H.Ramirez (13). DP-Hous-
ton 1, Florida 2. LOB-Houston 5, Florida 7.
2B-Wallace (22), Corporan 2 (5), G.Sanchez
(22). HR-Pence (11), Cameron (1). SB-Boni-
facio 3 (16), H.Ramirez (15). S-Volstad. SF-


Infante.

Houston
W.Rodriguez L,6-6
Fe.Rodriguez
W.Lopez
Melancon
Florida


IP H RERBBSO


51-35 5
2-3 1 0
1 1 0
1 0 0


VolstadW,5-8 6 7 3 3 1 6
M.DunnH,8 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Cishek 0 1 0 0 0 0
ChoateH,12 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
MujicaH,7 11-31 1 1 0 2
L.NunezS,25-28 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cishek pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-byW.Rodriguez (Morrison).WP-W.Ro-
driguez.
Umpires-Home, CB Bucknor; First, Dan las-
sogna; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Jerry Meals.
T-2:43. A-17,123 (38,560).


ST. LOUIS - Jaime Garcia won for
the sixth time at home and David
Freese homered for the first time since
April 12, helping the St. Louis Cardi-
nals beat the Arizona Diamondbacks
4-2 on Sunday for a four-game split
heading into the All-Star break.
Albert Pujols had two hits and Matt
Holliday had an RBI single and a walk
for the Cardinals, who were tied for the
NL Central lead and have a roster fi-
nally healthy for the second half.
They're 3-3 since getting Pujols back
from the DL and Freese prospered bat-
ting fifth after going 2 for 12 the previ-
ous three games batting second.
Brian Roberts hit a two-run homer
for the Diamondbacks, who completed
a 5-5 trip and are in second place in
the NL West.
The Cardinals won with the 80th dif-
ferent lineup in 82 games under man-
ager Tony La Russa, who got away
with giving rookie backup catcher Tony
Cruz his first career start in right field.
Cruz made a nice sliding catch on a
short flyout by Henry Blanco in the
fourth and was replaced for defense in
the sixth, with Colby Rasmus going to
center and Jon Jay moving to right.
Roberts'two-run shot in the second
was the only damage against Garcia.

Arizona St. Louis
ab rh bi ab r h bi
Blmqstss 4 0 1 0 Theriotss 4 0 0 0
Monterph 1 00 0 T.Cruz rf 3 1 1 0
KJhnsn 2b 4 0 1 0 Rasms cf 1 0 0 0
J.Uptonrf 4 00 0 Pujolslb 4 1 2 0
CYoungcf 3 1 1 0 Hollidylf 3 1 1 1
W.Penalf 4 01 0 Freese3b 3 1 2 3
RRorts3b 4 1 1 2 Descalspr-3b0 0 0 0
Nadylb 4 02 0 YMolinc 4 0 2 0
HBlancc 3 01 0 Punto2b 4 0 0 0
GParra ph 1 0 0 0 Jay cf-rf 3 0 2 0
Dukep 1 01 0 JGarcip 1 00 0
Brrghsph 1 00 0 Brkmnph 1 00 0
Heilmnp 0 00 0 Lynnp 0 0 00
S.Drewph 1 01 0 Salasp 0 00 0
Totals 35 2102 Totals 31 410 4
Arizona 020 000 000 - 2
St. Louis 202 000 00x - 4
DP-St. Louis 2. LOB-Arizona 8, St. Louis 6.
2B-K.Johnson (18), Pujols (12), Y.Molina (19).
HR-R.Roberts (11), Freese (3). CS-Y.Molina
(5). S-J.Garcia. SF-Freese.
IP H RERBBSO


Arizona
Duke L,2-4
Heilman
St. Louis
J.Garcia W,9-3
Lynn H,1
SalasS,16-18
WP-Salas.


6 9 4 4 1 1
2 1 0 0 0 1

6 7 2 2 2 5
2 2 0 0 0 2
1 1 0 0 0 1
694411
210001

672225
220002
110001


Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ed
Hickox; Second, Ed Rapuano; Third, Brian
O'Nora.
T-2:28. A-35,299 (43,975).


Tigers 2, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo.- Justin Ver-
lander became the first Tigers pitcher
to earn his 12th win before the All-Star
break in 24 years and Detroit climbed
past Cleveland into first place in the AL
Central on Sunday with a 2-1 victory
over the Kansas City Royals.
Verlander (12-4) pitched 7 2-3
strong innings in the sweltering heat to
match Jack Morris' win total in 1987.
Striking out the side in the second and
sixth, he fanned nine altogether and
raised his league-leading strikeout total
to 147. He allowed six hits and did not
walk a batter while getting charged
with one unearned run. He has not al-
lowed more than two runs in nine
straight starts.
The 28-year-old right-hander threw
119 pitches, 82 strikes, as tempera-
tures got as high as 98 degrees. The
heat index on the concourse of the sta-
dium in the eighth inning was 113. Life-
time, Verlander improved to 12-2 in 18
starts against the Royals, who lost
three of the four games against their AL
Central rivals and went into the break
with a league-worst 37-54 record.
The Tigers, winners of four of their
last five, moved a half-game ahead of
Cleveland, which lost to Toronto 7-1.
Jeff Francis (3-10) took the loss
even though he had one of the his best
outings of the season.
Detroit Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
C.Wells cf-rf3 2 1 0 Getz2b 4 0 1 0
Boeschlf 4 0 1 1 MeCarrcf 4 0 1 0
AJcksncf 0 00 0 AGordnlf 4 0 0 0
Ordonzrf 3 0 1 1 Butlerdh 4 0 1 0
Kellyrf-lf 1 00 0 Hosmerlb 4 0 1 0
MiCarrdh 4 00 0 Francrrf 4 0 1 0
VMrtnzlb 4 01 0 Mostks3b 4 0 1 0
JhPerltss 4 0 1 0 B.Penac 3 0 0 0
Raburn2b 3 0 0 0 AEscorss 3 1 1 0
Worth2b 1 000
Avila c 2 0 0 0
Inge 3b 3 0 00
Totals 32 25 2 Totals 341 7 0
Detroit 000 101 000 - 2
Kansas City 000 000 010 - 1
E-Inge (8). LOB-Detroit 5, Kansas City 6.
2B-C.Wells (10), Hosmer (11). SB-C.Wells
(1), Getz (17). CS-Hosmer (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
VerlanderW,12-4 72-36 1 0 0 9
BenoitH,13 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
ValverdeS,24-24 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
FrancisL,3-10 6 4 2 2 1 6
L.Coleman 1 0 0 0 1 3
Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1
Soria 1 1 0 0 0 1
Francis pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Verlander 2, L.Coleman.
Umpires-Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Alan Porter;
Second, James Hoye; Third, Tom Hallion.
T-2:49. A-18,373 (37,903).



Angels 4, Mariners 2
Seattle Los Angeles
ab rh bi ab rh bi
ISuzukirf 4 00 0 Aybarss 4 01 0
Ryanss 4 1 1 0 TrHntrrf 4 1 2 0
Ackley2b 3 1 1 0 Abreudh 3 00 0
Smoaklb 4 00 0 V.Wellslf 4 00 0
AKndydh 4 0 1 2 HKndrc2b 3 1 0 0
FGtrrzcf 4 0 0 0 Callasp3b 4 1 3 2
J.Bardc 3 0 1 0 Trumo b 3 1 1 2
Seager3b 2 0 1 0 Mathisc 4 01 0
Halmn If 3 0 0 0 Troutcf 3 0 0 0
Totals 31 25 2 Totals 32 4 8 4
Seattle 200 000 000 - 2
Los Angeles 000 200 02x - 4
E-Trout (1). LOB-Seattle 4, Los Angeles 7.
2B-Ackley (3), J.Bard (2), Callaspo (12). HR-


Trumbo (17). SB-
A.Kennedy (2).

Seattle
FHernandez
Pauley L,5-3
J.Wright
Los Angeles
Haren W,10-5
Walden S,20-26


-Ryan (6), Aybar (18). CS-

IP H RERBBSO

7 6 2 2 1 6
2-3 2 2 2 2 1
1-3 0 0 0 0 0

82-35 2 2 2 8
1-3 0 0 0 0 1


Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Greg Gib-
son; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Todd
Tichenor.
T-2:34. A-39,505 (45,389).


Chicago


Pirates 9, Cubs 1
Pittsburgh


ab r h bi


RJhnsn rf 3 1 1 0 Presley If
SCastro ss 4 0 1 0 dArnad ss
ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 1 Walker 2b
JeBakrlb 4 00 0 AMcCtcf
Soto c 2 0 00 Overay lb
Byrd cf 3 0 0 0 Diaz rf
ASorin If 3 0 0 0 BrWod 3b
Barney 2b 3 0 2 0 JHrrsn 3b
R.Ortizp 1 0 0 0 Paulrf
Crpntrp 0 0 0 0 McKnrc
DeWittph 1 00 0 Mahlm p
JRussllp 0 00 0 Resopp
Campnph 1 00 0 GJonesph
Grabowp 0 00 0 Verasp
Totals 29 14 1 Totals
Chicago 000 100 000
Pittsburgh 104 010 03x


ab r h bi
5220
4000

2 1 1 5
4 1 1 0
3 0 0 0
0 1 0 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0

2 1 1 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 1 2
4231
2115
4110





3000





329 9 8
0100
3000
1000
3100
2110
0000
1012
0000
3299 8
-1
-9


E-S.Castro (18), d'Arnaud (5), J.Harrison (5).
DP-Pittsburgh 4. LOB-Chicago 3, Pittsburgh
4.2B-Re.Johnson (14), Barney (11), Walker 2
(16), G.Jones (15). 3B-Walker (2). HR-A.Mc-
Cutchen (14). SF-A.McCutchen 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
R.OrtizL,0-2 4 7 6 6 1 2
C.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 0
J.Russell 2 0 0 0 0 1
Grabow 1 2 3 3 2 2
Pittsburgh
MaholmW,6-9 72-34 1 1 0 8
Resop 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Veras 1 0 0 0 0 2
R.Ortiz pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
HBP-by Maholm (Re.Johnson, Soto). WP-
Grabow.
Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Scott
Barry; Second, Wally Bell; Third, Laz Diaz.
T-2:38. A-31,428 (38,362).


Twins 6, White Sox 3 Phillies 14, Braves 1


CHICAGO - Anthony Swarzak
dominated over six innings, and the
Minnesota Twins got back to beating
the Chicago White Sox with a 6-3 vic-
tory on Sunday.
The Twins head into the All-Star
break with nine wins in 12 games after
taking three of four in this series. They
shook off a 4-3 loss on Saturday that
snapped a nine-game winning streak
against Chicago dating to last season,
getting an RBI single by Drew Butera
and run-scoring double by Jason
Repko in the fourth before tacking on
three more while knocking out Jake
Peavy (4-3) in the fifth.
That was more than enough for
Swarzak (2-2), who simply dominated
while filling in for the injured Scott Baker
(strained right flexor muscle).The 25-
year-old right-hander allowed just four
hits and one run while striking out five
and walking two as Minnesota beat
Chicago for the 29th time in 36 games.
Peavy ran into trouble with two outs
in the fourth when he walked Rene
Tosoni and Tsuyoshi Nishioka before
Butera and Repko came through, mak-
ing it 2-0, and he didn't make it out of
the fifth as the White Sox lost for the
fifth time in six games.
Alexi Casilla and Joe Mauer started
that rally with singles, putting runners
on first and third.
Minnesota Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Reverecf 5 02 0 Pierre If 4 1 2 0
ACasill2b 5 2 2 0 AIRmrzss 4 0 0 0
Mauerdh 4 1 1 0 Konerklb 4 0 2 1
Cuddyrlb 4 02 1 A.Dunndh 3 0 0 0
Valenci3b 4 1 1 0 Quentinrf 4 0 0 0
Tosoni If 3 1 2 1 Rioscf 3 1 1 0
Nishiokss 3 1 0 1 Przynsc 4 1 1 1
Buterac 4 01 1 Bckhm2b 4 0 2 1
Repko rf 4 02 1 Teahen 3b 3 0 0 0
Totals 36 6135 Totals 333 8 3
Minnesota 000 230 001 - 6
Chicago 000 001 200 - 3
DP-Minnesota 2, Chicago 2. LOB-Minnesota
7, Chicago 6. 2B-Repko (2), Pierzynski (16),
Beckham (11). 3B-A.Casilla (4). CS-Tosoni
(1). SF-Cuddyer.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
SwarzakW,2-2 6 4 1 1 2 5
AI.Burnett 1-3 2 2 2 1 1
Perkins H,12 12-31 0 0 0 2
CappsS,15-21 1 1 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Peavy L,4-3 41-310 5 5 2 2
Ohman 21-30 0 0 0 2
Crain 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Thornton 1 1 0 0 0 2
S.Santos 1 1 1 1 1 2
WP-S.Santos.
Umpires-Home, Larry Vanover; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Dan
Bellino.
T-3:00. A-30,042 (40,615).



Dodgers 4, Padres 1


San Diego
ab
Denorfi rf 5
AIGnzlz ss 4
Headly 3b 3
Ludwck If 4
Maybin cf 4
OHudsn2b 4
Rizzo 1b 3
RJhnsn c 2
Stauffr p 2
KPhlps ph 0
Guzmnph 1
Frieri p 0
Spence p 0
Qualls p 0
Venale ph 1
Totals 33
San Diego
Los Angeles


Los Angeles


r h bi
01 0 GwynJ If
0 0 0 Furcal ss
01 0 Ethierrf
00 0 Kemp cf
00 0 Loneylb
0 2 0 Uribe 3b
0 1 0 DNavrrc
1 1 1 Miles 2b
00 0 Lilly p
00 0 Jansenp
00 0 Kuo p
0 0 0 Guerrirp
0 0 0 Oeltjen ph
00 0 MacDglp
00 0 Guerrap
16 1 Totals
001 000 000
002 010 01x


E-Headley (11). DP-San Diego 1


ab r h bi
3 1 1 0
2 1 0 0
3 2 2 2
4 0 0 1
4 0 0 0
2 00 0
3 0 1 0
2 0 1 0
3110




2100




0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
264 5 3
3222







4001
-S4000
2000
3010
2010
2000
0000
0000
0000
1000
0000
0000
2645 3
-1
-4
LOB--San


Diego 9, Los Angeles 4. 2B-Headley (25),
D.Navarro (4), Miles (10). HR-Ro.Johnson (3),
Ethier 2 (9). SB-Denorfia (8), Gwynn Jr. (12),
Kemp (27). S-Furcal.
IP H R ER BB SO


San Diego
Stauffer L,5-6
Frieri
Spence
Quails
Los Angeles
Lilly W,6-9
Jansen H,3
Kuo H,2
Guerrier H,10
MacDougal H,6
Guerra S,4-4
Umpires-Home,


5 4 1
11-30 0
1-3 0 0
1-3 0 0
1 1 0
1 1 0
Cory Blaser;


Fairchild; Second, Angel Hernandez;
Angel Campos.
T-2:58. A-35,249 (56,000).

Rangers 2, Athletics 0


Oakland Texas
ab r h bi
JWeeks 2b 4 0 1 0 Kinsler 2b
DeJess rf 4 0 1 0 Andrus ss
Crisp cf 4 0 2 0 JHmltn cf
Wlngh If 4 0 1 0 ABeltre 3b
SSizmr 3b 4 0 0 0 MiYong dh
Carter dh 2 0 0 0 N.Cruz rf
Matsuiph 1 0 0 0 Morlndlb
KSuzukc 3 0 1 0 Napolic
Rosales lb 3 0 0 0 DvMrp If
Pnngtn ss 3 0 00
Totals 32 06 0 Totals
Oakland 000 000 000
Texas 000 002 OOx


ab r h bi
3 0 1 0
3010
3 0 1 0
3 1 0 0
3 1 1 2
3100

3 0 1 0
3112

3000
3010
3000
3 0 1 0
3000
3010

2725 2
- 0
- 2


E-M.Harrison (4). DP-Oakland 1, Texas 1.
LOB-Oakland 6, Texas 4. 2B-Andrus (12).
HR-A.Beltre (19). CS-Crisp (9). S-Andrus.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
CahillL,8-7 72-35 2 2 2 3
Fuentes 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Texas
M.HarrisonW,7-7 72-36 0 0 1 7
M.LoweH,8 1-30 0 0 0 0
FelizS,18-22 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, D.J. Rey-
burn; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Eric
Cooper.
T-2:21. A-33,834 (49,170).


PHILADELPHIA- The Phillies
ended the first half of the season with
another strong outing from a starting
pitcher, and a surprising outburst by
their inconsistent offense.
The latter might send alarm bells to
the opposition after the Phillies used a
season-high 20 hits, including a homer
and six RBIs from Raul Ibanez, in a 14-
1 rout of the Atlanta Braves on Sunday.
The Phillies took two of three in the
series to increase their lead to 3/2
games over Atlanta in the NL East.
Philadelphia (57-34) matched the club
record for wins in the first half, tying the
1993 team.
Cole Hamels did what Philadel-
phia's heralded starting staff has done
all year, making life difficult for batters.
Hamels (11-4) allowed three hits while
striking out six and walking two in eight
innings. The left-hander, who was se-
lected to his second All-Star team but
won't pitch due to Sunday's start, al-
lowed just one hit after the second in-
ning and retired his final 13 batters.
"He threw a heck of a game,"
Philadelphia manager Charlie Manuel
said.
Manuel has said that often about
his starters, led by All-Stars Hamels,
Roy Halladay and Cliff Lee who have
combined to go 31-13.
Atlanta Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Schafercf 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 5 1 3 1
AIGnzlzss 4 0 0 0 Mrtnz 3b 5 24 0
McCnnc 2 0 0 0 Utley2b 5 22 0
D.Rossph-cl 00 0 Howard1b 4 22 1
Fremnlb 4 0 1 0 Ibanezlf 5 22 6
Uggla2b 4 1 1 0 Ruizc 4 21 0
Heywrdrf 4 0 1 0 DBrwnrf 5 23 2
Lugo3b 4 0 0 1 Mayrrycf 5 1 3 4
McLothlf 2 00 0 Hamelsp 3 00 0
D.Lowep 2 01 0 Gloadph 1 00 0
Hicksph 1 0 0 0 Kndrckp 0 00 0
Gearrinp 0 000
Proctorp 0 0 00
Totals 32 141 Totals 421420
14


Atlanta


010 000 000 - 1


Philadelphia 012 100 64x - 14
E-Uggla (9), Howard (4). DP-Atlanta 2.
LOB-Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 7. 2B-Uggla
(14), Heyward (12), Ruiz (11), Mayberry3 (9).
HR-lbanez (12). SB-Utley 2 (8). S-Hamels.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
D.LoweL,5-7 6 10 4 4 0 1
Gearrin 1-3 4 6 6 2 0
Proctor 12-36 4 4 0 1
Philadelphia
HamelsW,11-4 8 3 1 1 2 6
K.Kendrick 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Gearrin, Proctor.
Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Mike
Muchlinski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mike
Everitt.
T-2:49. A-45,853 (43,651).



Nationals 2, Rockies 0
Colorado Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Splrghscf 3 00 0 Berndncf-lf 4 0 1 1
Giambiph 1 00 0 Espinos2b 3 0 0 0
Lndstrp 0 0 0 Zmrmn3b 3 0 1 0
MtRynlp 0 0 0 0 L.Nixlf 3 00 0
M.Ellis2b 4 00 0 Clipprdp 0 0 0 0
Heltonlb 4 02 0 Storenp 0 00 0
Tlwtzkss 4 00 0 Morselb 3 0 1 0
S.Smithrf 4 01 0 Werthrf 3 0 0 0
Garnerlf 400 0 WRamsc 3 00 0
IStewrt3b 3 02 0 Dsmndss 3 1 1 0
Pagnzzc 2 00 0 Zmrmnp 1 00 0
Chacinp 2 0 1 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Wggntn ph 0 0 0 0 Ankiel cf 1 1 1 1
CGnzlz cf 0 00 0
Totals 31 06 0 Totals 272 5 2
Colorado 000 000 000 - 0
Washington 000 001 01x - 2
DP-Washington 1. LOB-Colorado 6, Wash-
ington 3. 2B-S.Smith (24), Morse (17). HR-
Ankiel (3). CS-Bernadina (2). S-Pagnozzi,
Zimmermann.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Chacin L,8-7 7 4 1 1 1 4
Lindstrom 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Mat.Reynolds 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Washington
Zimmermann W,6-7 61-34 0 0 0 6
MattheusH,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
ClippardH,23 1 1 0 0 1 1
Storen S,23-26 1 1 0 0 0 1
T-2:22. A-21,186 (41,506).
Brewers 4, Reds 3
Cincinnati Milwaukee


ab r h bi
Stubbs cf 3 2 0 0 RWeks 2b
Cozart ss 5 0 1 0 CGomz cf
Vottolb 4 01 1 Counsllph
BPhllps 2b 3 0 0 0 C.Hart rf
Bruce rf 2 0 1 0 Fielder lb
Rolen3b 3 00 1 McGeh3b
JGomsIf 4 0 1 0 YBtncrss
Corder p 0 0 0 0 JoWilsn If
RHrndzc 4 1 2 0 Morgan ph
Willis p 2 0 1 0 Kottars c
Chpmnp 0 00 0 Wolfp
Heisey ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Lucroy ph
Brddck p
Loe p
Kotsay ph
Totals 31 37 2 Totals
Cincinnati 110 100 000
Milwaukee 110 000 002


ab r h bi
3 2 1 0
3 0 1 1
0 0 0 1
3 0 1 1
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
1 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
2 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
3210
3011






0001






1 0 1 1
304 6 4
3000
3000
4000
3010
1110
3100
2000
1000

0000
1011
3046 4
-3
-4


Two outs when winning run scored.
E-R.Weeks (12). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-
Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 8. 2B-Bruce (16),
Willis (1), R.Weeks (22). 3B-C.Gomez (3).
SB-Morgan (6). S-Willis, C.Gomez. SF-
Counsell.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Willis 6 4 2 2 4 4
Chapman H,6 2 0 0 0 0 4
Cordero L,3-3 BS,5-222-3 2 2 2 1 0
Milwaukee
Wolf 7 7 3 2 4 2
Braddock 0 0 0 0 1 0
LoeW,3-7 2 0 0 0 0 2
Braddock pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Cordero (R.Weeks), by Wolf (Rolen).
T-2:48. A-43,896 (41,900).


-


e





B4 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


All-Star Game Rosters
Tuesday, July 12
At Chase Field, Phoenix
(s-starter, elected by fans; m-managers pick;
p-players' selection; i-injured, will not play; r-in-
jury replacement; f-FinalVote selection; ss-Sun-
day starter, ineligible)
American League
PITCHERS - p-Josh Beckett, Boston; m-
Aaron Crow, Kansas City; m-Gio Gonzalez,
Oakland; p,ss-Felix Hernandez, Seattle; p-Bran-
don League, Seattle; p,i-Jon Lester, Boston; p-
Alexi Ogando, Texas; p-Chris Perez, Cleveland;
p-Michael Pineda, Seattle; m,i-David Price,
Tampa Bay; p,i-Mariano Rivera, N.Y. Yankees;
r-David Robertson, N.Y. Yankees; r-Ricky
Romero, Toronto; p,ss-C.C. Sabathia, N.Y.Yan-
kees; p,ss-James Shields, Tampa Bay; m-Jose
Valverde, Detroit; p,ss-Justin Verlander, Detroit;
r-Jordan Walden, L.A. Angels; p-Jered Weaver,
L.A. Angels; m-C.J. Wilson, Texas.
CATCHERS - s-Alex Avila, Detroit; p-Rus-
sell Martin, N.Y.Yankees; m-Matt Wieters, Bal-
timore.
INFIELDERS- p,s-Adrian Beltre, Texas; p,s-
Asdrubal Cabrera, Cleveland; p-Miguel Cabr-
era, Detroit; s-Robinson Cano, N.Y Yankees;
s-Adrian Gonzalez, Boston; s,i-Derek Jeter, N.Y
Yankees; p-Howie Kendrick, L.A. Angels; f-Paul
Konerko, Chicago White Sox; r-Jhonny Peralta,
DetroitTigers; s,i-Alex Rodriguez, N.Y.Yankees;
r-Kevin Youkilis, Boston.
OUTFIELDERS - s-Jose Bautista, Toronto;
m-Michael Cuddyer, Minnesota; p-Jacoby Ells-
bury Boston; s-Curtis Granderson, N.Y Yan-
kees; s-Josh Hamilton, Texas; p-Matt Joyce,
Tampa Bay; p-Carlos Quentin, Chicago White
Sox.
DESIGNATED HITTERS - s-David Ortiz,
Boston; p-Michael Young, Texas.
National League
PITCHERS - m-Heath Bell, San Diego
Padres; m,ss-Matt Cain, San Francisco; m-Tyler
Clippard, Washington; p-Kevin Correia, Pitts-
burgh; p-Roy Halladay, Philadelphia; p,ss-Cole
Hamels, Philadelphia; p-Joel Hanrahan, Pitts-
burgh; p-Jair Jurrjens, Atlanta; p-Clayton Ker-
shaw, L.A. Dodgers; p-Craig Kimbrel, Atlanta;


For the re cord

Florida LOTTERY

CASH 3 (early)
1-8-7
CASH 3 (late)
S0-1-1
PLAY 4 (early)
i 7-1-1-9
MorkdaLottery PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 6-0-7-0
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Sundayin the 6 - 7 - 9 - 27- 34
Florida Lottery:


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) 2011 Home Run Derby
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) 2011 Home Run Derby (Tape)
GOLF
10 a.m. (ESPN2) LPGA U.S. Open
SOFTBALL
10 p.m. (ESPN) 2011 Taco Bell All-Star Legends/Celebrity


p-Cliff Lee, Philadelphia; m-Tim Lincecum, San
Francisco; p-Jonny Venters, Atlanta; m-Ryan
Vogelsong, San Francisco; p-Brian Wilson, San
Francisco.
CATCHERS - s-Brian McCann, Atlanta; p-
Yadier Molina, St. Louis; m-Miguel Montero, Ari-
zona.
INFIELDERS - m-Starlin Castro, Chicago;
s-Prince Fielder, Milwaukee; p,i-Chipper Jones,
Atlanta; p-Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati; s,i-
Placido Polanco, Philadelphia; s,i-Jose Reyes,


N.Y Mets; r,s-Scott Rolen, Cincinnati; m-Gaby
Sanchez, Florida; m-Pablo Sandoval, San Fran-
cisco; p-TroyTulowitzki, Colorado; p-JoeyVotto,
Cincinnati; s-Rickie Weeks, Milwaukee.
OUTFIELDERS - m-Carlos Beltran, N.Y.
Mets; s-Lance Berkman, St. Louis; s,i-Ryan
Braun, Milwaukee; p-Jay Bruce, Cincinnati; r-
Andre Ethier, L.A. Dodgers; p-Matt Holliday, St.
Louis; s-Matt Kemp, L.A. Dodgers; r-Andrew
McCutchen, Pittsburgh; p-Hunter Pence, Hous-
ton; m-Justin Upton, Arizona; f,i-Shane Vic-
torino, Philadelphia.


Hundreds mourn Rangers


fan who fell to his death


Associated Press

BROWNWOOD, Texas -
For the last 18 years, fire-
fighter Shannon Stone's
family dreaded getting a
phone call telling them
something had gone horri-
bly wrong.
That call came Thursday
night. Only it had nothing to
do with his dangerous job -
it was from the simple
pleasure of taking his 6-
year-old son to a Texas
Rangers game, and trying to
catch a ball tossed his way
by the boy's favorite player,
Josh Hamilton.
The 39-year-old Stone lost
his balance and fell head-
first about 20 feet onto con-
crete with his son, Cooper,
watching. Witnesses said
Stone was conscious after
landing and spoke about
Cooper being left alone.
Stone was pronounced dead
within an hour; an autopsy
ruled the cause as blunt
force trauma from the fall.
The unfathomable cir-
cumstances behind Stone's
death has made his loss
even more difficult for fam-
ily, friends and fellow fire-
fighters. Hundreds
mourned him during a pub-
lic visitation Sunday, many
leaving the funeral home
with tissues in hand, tears in
their eyes, their voices
crackling with emotion.
"When you're married to
someone that's a first re-
sponder, you go into it know-
ing there's that possibility,"
said Trease Burke, whose
husband, Scotty, was a
Brownwood police officer


for 14 years and is now on
the Lake Patrol. "But you
don't expect it to be like this.
... You don't expect it to be a
freak accident."
Media was asked to stay
out of the funeral home.
Many of those leaving the
building declined to be in-
terviewed, citing the fam-
ily's wishes.
"It's still obviously a very
somber occasion," Brown-
wood Mayor Stephen
Haynes said. "The family of
course is honoring him ap-
propriately and celebrating
his life. But it's still difficult
to accept, obviously, the na-
ture of the death and the
timing of the death and the
way that it happened."
A funeral is scheduled for
Monday, followed by a pro-
cession to the cemetery that
was expected to include
more than 100 fire trucks
from across the region. Rep-
resentatives of the Texas
Rangers were planning to
attend, too.
Brownwood is a town of
about 20,000 residents in the
Hill Country of central
Texas, some 150 miles west
of the Rangers' stadium in
Arlington. Flags across the
area have been at half-staff
since Friday, with several
wreaths and a dozen yellow
roses left in his memory at a
monument outside the fire
department.
"We're a small town,"
Haynes said. "We're not
(small) enough that every-
one knows everyone, but we
are small enough that every-
one is impacted in some
way Everyone has a friend


or family member who was
close to that family"
Jarratt Lawler grew up
with Stone in Cleburne,
about 100 miles from
Brownwood. They weren't
especially close, but re-
newed acquaintances a year
ago at their 20-year high
school reunion. Lawler was
so moved by Stone's death
that he drove 312 hours from
McKinney with his pregnant
wife and young daughter
just to pay his respects.
"He was an all-around
good guy," Lawler said. "He
was just always trying to
help people, always did the
right things."
Stone was twice voted
firefighter of the year by his
peers, Haynes said. He
worked as a paramedic, and
as a rescue technician at
Texas Motor Speedway He
also was involved in disas-
ter relief following Hurri-
canes Katrina and Ike, and
fighting wildfires.
"He was a character,"
Scotty Burke said. "He was
a firefighter's firefighter.
You could see that in his
dedication to the job. He
was very professional on the
job. Off the job, he was light-
hearted and always had
something good to say"
Haynes said there already
has been discussion of a
permanent way of remem-
bering Stone.
"Certainly we're going to
do what we can to keep his
memory and the honor of
what he stands for alive for
as long as we can," Haynes
said.


Giants beat Mets 4-2 in final game before break


Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -
Pablo Sandoval celebrated
his first All-Star game selec-
tion by hitting an RBI dou-
ble to extend his hitting
streak to 21 games and fel-
low All-Star Matt Cain
pitched six scoreless in-
nings to lead the San Fran-
cisco Giants to a 4-2 victory
over the New York Mets on
Sunday night.
Nate Schierholtz added
four hits and an RBI after
being moved up to the
cleanup spot for the Giants,
who have won four of five to
take a three-game lead over
Arizona in the NL West
heading into the All-Star
break. This is the first time
since 2003 that San Fran-
cisco enters the break in



ALL STARS
Continued from Page B1

the first inning when Tyler
Voland scored. They then
added to it on Humphreys
third-inning blast that
scored Derrick Rogers. Also
scoring in the frame was
Casey Purnell.
Crystal River's Reese
Bresson scored in the fourth
and was joined by teammate
Dylan Rogers in the fifth
frame.
In the sixth Nick Hernan-
dez, Casey Purnell, Dylan


first place.
Cain (8-5) delivered the
latest strong pitching per-
formance for the World Se-
ries champions. He escaped
trouble all night, pitching
around four extra-base hits
and stranding six runners in
scoring position to win for
the fifth time in his last six
decisions. Cain allowed five
hits and three walks, lower-
ing his ERA to 2.06 over his
last eight starts.
Brian Wilson allowed an
RBI double to Justin Turner
in the ninth before record-
ing his 26th save in 30
chances.
Nick Evans also hit a
pinch-hit homer for the
Mets, who lost the final two
games here to drop their
first road series since losing
two of three to the Cubs in


and Derrick Rogers, Voland,
Ryan Johnson and Shaun
Johns all scored. The
rounded out the scoring
when Purnell and Dylan
Rogers scored in the sev-
enth.
Majors Baseball
Crystal River 11,
Central Citrus 3
Crystal River easily de-
feated Central Citrus with
an 11-3 win on Sunday
In the first inning Caleb
Purnell and Peyton
O'Callaghan scored. Tyler
Pollard then added a run in
the second and Purnell and


May They still finished the
first half at 46-45 despite
starting the season 5-13.
Sandoval got the news
earlier in the day that he
would be making his first
All-Star game appearance
as in injury replacement for
Mets shortstop Jose Reyes,
who is on the DL with a
hamstring injury The All-
Star selection was the latest
accolade in a turnaround
season for Sandoval, who
lost nearly 40 pounds this
offseason after he struggled
with his weight and hitting
in 2010.
Sandoval just missed out
on the All-Star game in 2009
despite having a .333 average
with 15 homers and 55 RBIs
at the break. Philadelphia
manager Charlie Manuel
picked his own player


O'Callaghan also plated
runs in the third.
Scoring in the fourth were
JJayson Haufler, Purnell,
Cole Mann and Logan
Lofley Lofley and pollard
added runs in the sixth.
Troy Singh scored twice in
the second and fourth innings,
for Central citrus and Noah
Carmon scored in the sixth.
Dunnellon 20,
Lady Lake 0
Dunnellon scored 16 runs
in the first inning and four
in the second to cruise to
the easy win.


USA
Continued from Page B1

Solo denied the Brazilians
- again - in one of the
most riveting games in the
history of the World Cup,
men's or women's.
"There is something special
about this group. That energy,
that vibe," Solo said. "Even in
overtime, you felt something
was going to happen."
The United States ad-
vanced to Wednesday's
semifinals against France,
which eliminated England
on penalty kicks Saturday
And while the Americans
will have to win twice more
to win the final, they are the
only one of the favorites left
after two-time defending
champ Germany was
stunned by Japan on Satur-
day night.
The U.S. victory came 12
years to the day the Ameri-
cans' last caught their coun-
try's attention in a big way
with their penalty-kick
shootout victory over China
at the Rose Bowl that gave
them their second World
Cup title. This one created
enough of a buzz that high-
lights were shown on the
Jumbotron at Yankee Sta-
dium, drawing big cheers.
For Brazil, it is yet an-
other disappointment at a
major tournament. And this
one is sure to sting more
than any others because
Marta had it won for the
Brazilians, scoring her sec-
ond goal of the game in the
second minute of overtime
for the 2-1 lead. But Erika
stalled when she went down
on a tackle, and the delay
added three minutes of
stoppage time to the game.
That was all the time
Wambach and the Ameri-
cans needed, after pushing
themselves to limit while
playing a woman short after
Rachel Buehler's 66th-
minute ejection.
"Not for one second,"
Wambach said when asked
if she ever felt the Ameri-
cans were beat. "I kept say-
ing, all it takes is one
chance. I kept holding up
one finger to the girls."
Two minutes into stop-
page time, Megan Rapinoe
blasted a left-footed cross
from 30 yards out on the left
side that Andreia didn't
come close to getting her
hands on. Wambach, one of
the best players in the world
in the air, made contact and
with one furious whip of her
head, buried it in the near
side of the net from about
five yards.
"I took a touch and
smoked it," Rapinoe said. "I
don't think I've ever hit a
cross with my left foot that
well. And then that beast in
the air got ahold of it."
Wambach let out a primal
scream and slid into the cor-
ner, pumping her fists and
quickly mobbed by team-



SHOWDOWN
Continued from Page B1

female portion for the sec-
ond time. She also won in
2009. She is formerly from
the Buffalo, N.Y area but
now claims Land O' Lakes
as home and runs cross
country for the University of
South Florida.
She recently competed
nationally in the steeple-
chase collegiate competi-
tion. She finished 21st in
national competition.
Rozario ran a 19:08.4. that
was three minutes better
than runner-up, Augusta
Punse of Ocala. Punse had a
time of 22:23.
"I work with (race direc-


tor) Milton Lyons (at Fit-
niche) and he told us about
it," said Rozario. "It was a
little wet. It goes by real
slow if you don't have any-
one to run with. I like
courses like this. I took two
weeks off to go to nationals
in Des Moines, Iowa."
The race was run in over-
cast conditions with the
clouds threatening to open
up at any time. However,
there was no downpour.
There were about 500
runners signed up for the
10th running but about 300


mates. No goal had ever
been scored that deep into a
World Cup game.
"Everything seemed to be
on the safe side, but it was-
n't," Brazil coach Kleiton
Lima said. "Unfortunately
there was the goal."
The Americans, shooting
first, made their three
penalty kicks only to have
Cristiane and Marta easily
match them. But then it was
Daiane's turn - the same
Daiane who'd given the U.S.
a 1-0 lead with an own goal
in the second minute of the
game. She took a hard shot,
but Solo stretched out and
batted it away Though the
U.S. still had to make two
more, the celebration was
already starting.
After Rapinoe blistered
the net with a blast and Ali
Krieger converted hers, the
Americans raced onto the
field, their joy only matched
by that of the pro-American
crowd of 25,598. Wambach
tackled Solo and U.S. coach
Pia Sundhage even broke
out her air guitar when
AC/DC's "You Shook Me All
Night Long" began to play
Shake the tournament,
the Americans did.
"It is a special moment for
me and for this team," Solo
said.
Four years ago, Solo
touched off a firestorm after
the Americans were humili-
ated 4-0 in the semifinals by
Brazil, criticizing then-
coach Greg Ryan's decision
to bench her. She has lost
only one game since, being
particularly tough on Brazil.
She's now 5-0, including a 1-
0 shutout in overtime in the
2008 Olympic final.
It's redemption for the
rest of the Americans, too,
who have been roundly crit-
icized and questioned for
their uncharacteristically
inconsistent play in recent
months. After going more
than two years without a
loss, they've been beaten
four times since November.
"It's like a storybook,"
Wambach said.
While the Americans par-
tied, Marta and the Brazil-
ians watched in silence.
Cristiane repeatedly wiped
away tears during postgame
interviews. Despite a star-
filled roster led by Marta,
the FIFA player of the year
five times running, Brazil
has never won a major tour-
nament. It lost to the Amer-
icans in the two Olympic
gold-medal games, and to
Germany in the 2007 World
Cup final.
"They fought, they did
everything," coach Kleiton
Lima said. "They threw their
hearts into it and, of course,
they were really sad."
The U.S. has now elimi-
nated Brazil at five of the
last seven major tourna-
ments. The lone consolation
was that Marta's goals, the
13th and 14th of her career,
tied her with Birgit Prinz

finished the race.
Former Citrus High
standout Brandi Nichols
was traveling down familiar
roads Saturday The 2010
Citrus graduate, now run-
ning cross country at Nova
Southeastern University,
finished 12th with a time of
24:43.
It was not her best time.
"I'm not sure what's caus-
ing it," she said. "I thought I
was getting over it. It was
not one of my better races,
not even close. I'm glad I ran
it. It's always fun."
The Showdown lucked
out on the weather.
"We had 500 people regis-
tered but I think the
weather scared some peo-
ple away," said Lyons. "It
was a record for people reg-


istered. It was great. We had
to set up the course in the
rain yesterday The weather
turned out to be the best out
of the 10 years we have had
it. It was relatively cool and
overcast. The sun was stay-
ing away It was humid but
we will take that over 90 de-
grees. Everything ran
smoothly. We are hoping to
pack up before the rain
comes.
10th Annual Citrus
Summer Showdown Results
Men's Overall winner
Tori Webb, Lecanto 16:54


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

atop the all-time World Cup
scoring list The Americans
also have won their last five
meetings against Brazil.
None, however, was more
memorable than this.
Brazil spotted the U.S. the
lead in the second minute
with an own goal by Daiane,
who misdirected a clear-
ance, then spent the next 63
trying furiously for the equal-
izer - and getting increas-
ingly frustrated with every
minute they didn't get it.
When they finally did, it
was clouded in controversy
Marta made a dangerous
run into the box in the 65th,
beating two U.S. defenders
and coming practically nose
to nose with Solo before
Buehler tracked back and
dragged her down. Aus-
tralian referee Jacqui Melk-
sham not only ruled it a
penalty but a red card as
well. Cristiane, who already
scored one goal off a
penalty, took the kick. Solo
made a perfect read and
smacked it away, pumping
her fists as Lloyd ran toward
her to grab her in a bearhug.
But Melksham ordered
the penalty retaken - and
gave Solo a yellow card, rul-
ing the American had left
her line or a teammate en-
croached the penalty area
before the kick was taken.
Replays clearly showed
Solo was on her line.
"I have no idea," Solo
said. "It is what it is."
As the crowd jeered,
Marta stepped up for the re-
take, staring down her old
foe. Solo cost Marta and the
Brazilians the gold medal in
Beijing, stopping a point-
blank blast from Marta in
the 72nd minute of the
Olympic final. This time,
however, Marta got the best
of the U.S. 'keeper, burying
the ball to pull the Brazil-
ians even.
As she walked away from
the spot, Marta slapped her
right arm.
Fired up, the Americans
repeatedly pushed forward
over the last 20 minutes but
couldn't get a decent shot.
The closest they came was a
blast from Rapinoe in sec-
ond-half stoppage time, but
it was from long range and it
was never a real threat to
Andreia.
Marta seemed to put the
game out of reach in the
92nd minute - though re-
plays seemed to show that
Maurine, the player who fed
her the ball, was offside.
But the Americans, criti-
cized after losing four
games in the last eight
months, have talked repeat-
edly about their resilience.
On this day, it was on full
display
"We're just fighting for
each other out there," said
captain Christie Rampone,
the last player left from the
1999 squad. "We were totally
believing the whole time."


Women's Overall winner:
Nicole Rozario, L.O. Lakes, 19:08
Men's College winner
Daniel Ludwig, Ocoee 17:30
Women's College winner
Mikayla Bogulski, Brooksville, 23:49
Men's High School winner
Geremy DeWitt, C. River 16:56
Women's High School winner
Elizabeth Mulford, Ocala 23:00
Boy's Middle School winner
Caleb Brady, Lakeland 20:19
Girls Middle School winner
Claire Famsworth, Lecanto 24:08
Top 10 Male Finishers
1. Tori Webb, Lecanto 16:54;
2. Geremy DeWitt, Crystal
River 16:56; 3. Daniel Ludwig,
Ocoee 16:56; 4. Greg Moore,
Hudson 17:40; 5. Emery Ra-
maswami, Ocala 17:45; 6. Sam
Hippely, San Antonio, FL 17:52;


7. Lewis Williams Ocala 18:24;
8. Tyler Moore, Brooksville
18:26; 9. Pedro Meraz, Wesley
Chapel 18:31; 10. David
Schafer, Ocala 18:42.
Top 10 Female Finishers
Nicole Rozario, Land O'
Lakes 19:08; 2. Augusta
Punse, Ocala 22:23; 3. Elisa-
beth Diamond, Bell 22:35; 4.
Ange Ave, Orlando 22:49; 5.
Elizabeth Mulford, 23:00; 6.
Mikayla Bogulski, Brooksville
23:49; 7. Claire Farnsworth,
Lecanto 24:08; 8. Natalie Dud-
ley, New Port Richey 24:19; 9.
Ty'rhonza Harris, Spring Hill
24:25; 10. Nancy Lay, Her-
nando 24:35.







E Page B5 - MONDAY, JULY 11,2011




ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE -


Associated Press
British soccer player David
Beckham pats the stomach
of his pregnant wife Victoria,
as they attend the wedding
of Britain's Prince William
and Kate Middleton on
April 29 at London's
Westminster Abbey.
Victoria has given birth to a
healthy baby girl at a
hospital in Los Angeles.

Beckham, wife
welcome baby girl
LONDON -David
Beckham's spokesman
said the soccer star's wife
Victoria has given birth to
a healthy baby girl Sunday
Simon Oliveira said the
celebrity couple are "de-
lighted to announce the
birth of their daughter"
"Happy and healthy
she arrived at 7:55 a.m.
this morning at Cedars
Sinai hospital in Los An-
geles and weighed 7
pounds, 10 ounces,"
Oliveira posted on Twit-
ter, adding the Beckhams'
three sons "are excited to
welcome their baby sister
to the family"
The Beckhams, who
married in 1999, already
have three boys: Brook-
lyn, 11, Romeo, 8, and
Cruz, 5. The family have
yet to announce a name
for the little girl.
The 36-year-old Beck-
ham captained England's
national team from 2000
to 2006. He played for
Manchester United and
Spain's Real Madrid be-
fore moving to L.A. to join
the Galaxy in 2007.
Thirty-six-year-old Vic-
toria Beckham found fame
as a singer for 1990s girl
band the Spice Girls and
has since become a fixture
of the fashion circuit

Singer's donation
criticized
RENO, Nev - Sheryl
Crow, hailed as a cham-
pion of wild horses that
roam the range in the
West, is being criticized
by a national animal
rights group.
The "All I Wanna Do"
singer plans to donate
some proceeds from her
July 22 concert at a
Wyoming rodeo to a wild-
horse protection group
that's suing the govern-
ment to halt a big mus-
tang roundup in Nevada.
But Illinois-based Show-
ing Animals Respect and
Kindness is calling on the
Colorado-based Cloud
Foundation to reject the
donation. It's accusing
Crow of hypocrisy for per-
forming at Cheyenne Fron-
tier Days where it claims
wild horses are abused.
Cloud Foundation offi-
cials say Crow is a true
champion of wild horses,
and the criticism is unjusti-
fied because rodeos are
prohibited from using mus-
tangs removed from the
range by the government
-From wire reports


Hanging at No. 1


Associated Press
Optimus Prime is seen in "Transformers: Dark of the Moon." The third sequel in the franchise topped the box office.

Third Transformers'film stays in shape with $47 million weekend


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES - "Transformers:
Dark of the Moon" now rules this
year's box office as the blockbuster se-
quel became 2011's top domestic hit
with $261 million, according to studio
estimates Sunday
Paramount Pictures' sci-fi smash
starring Shia LaBeouf remained No. 1
in its second weekend with $47 million
and shot past "The Hangover Part II"
to first-place on the domestic chart.
Debuting in second place with $28.1
million domestically was the Warner
Bros. comedy "Horrible Bosses," fea-
turing Jason Bateman, Charlie Day
and Jason Sudeikis as bumblers plot-
ting against their nasty supervisors.
Opening at No. 3 with $21 million
was Sony Pictures' family tale
"Zookeeper," with Kevin James as an
animal tender who gets romantic ad-
vice from the talking critters in his
care.
Domestic business dipped overall,
with revenues totaling $158 million,
down 18 percent from the same week-
end last year, when "Despicable Me"
led with a $56.4 million debut, accord-
ing to box-office tracker Hollywood.
com.
Despite predictions of a monster
summer that would easily surpass last
year's anemic one, revenues since the
first weekend in May have slipped
slightly behind those of summer 2010,
according to Hollywood.com. With
tickets costing more this year than
last, that means admissions are down
even further compared to summer
2010, when domestic attendance was
among the lowest in the past decade.
The third "Transformers" sequel is
climbing fast, but other familiar titles
such as "Cars 2," "X-Men: First Class,"
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On
Stranger Tides" and "Kung Fu Panda
2" are not living up to the domestic
earnings of their predecessors. Even
"The Hangover Part II," which had a
huge opening weekend, is coming in
below the original one domestically
"This is when we're supposed to be
pulling well ahead of one of the low-
est-attended summers of the last 10
years, which was last summer, and
we're not doing that," said Holly-
wood.com analyst Paul Dergarabe-
dian. "Given all their entertainment


Shia LaBeouf plays Sam Witwicky in the third installment of "Transformers."


options now, it really takes a lot for
people to see a trailer and say, 'Oh,
we've got to go out and see that."'
A familiar title that fans will be
rushing out to see arrives this coming
week with "Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 2," the finale of
one of Hollywood's biggest franchises.
Warner Bros. general sales manager
Jeff Goldstein said the studio expects
the eighth "Harry Potter" film to be
the top-grossing entry in the series.
Though summer revenues are lag-
ging, "'Potter' will change all of that
next week," Goldstein said. "Going
into this weekend, the industry was off
year over year, but I think now we're
going to close that gap."
For the year, domestic revenues are
at $5.5 billion, down 8.6 percent from
2010's, while attendance is off 10 per-
cent, according to Hollywood.com.
Yet international business has been
Hollywood's salvation, with overseas
fans turning out in huge numbers.
Disney's latest "Pirates of the
Caribbean" adventure remains the
year's top-grossing hit worldwide at
$1.02 billion. Overseas markets ac-
counted for $785 million, just over
three-fourths of that total, highlighting
how critical international business
has become for Hollywood, which
once depended largely on domestic
ticket sales.
The new "Transformers" sequel


BOS OFFICE RESULTS
1. "Transformers: Dark of the
Moon," $47 million ($93 million
international).
2. "Horrible Bosses," $28.1
million.
3. "Zookeeper," $21 million
($7.5 million international).
4. "Cars 2," $15.2 million
($26.9 million international).
5. "Bad Teacher," $9 million.
6. "Larry Crowne," $6.3 million.
7. "Super 8," $4.8 million
($2.5 million international).
8. "Monte Carlo," $3.8 million.
9. "Green Lantern," $3.1 million.
10. "Mr. Popper's Penguins,"
$2.9 million.

added $93 million this weekend over-
seas, bringing its international total to
$384 million and global haul to $645
million, No. 2 for the year behind "
Pirates."
"From the distributor standpoint,
people are looking at these movies as
world events much more than just do-
mestic events," said Rory Bruer, head
of distribution at Sony, whose
"Zookeeper" padded its domestic take
with a $7.5 million launch in 19 over-
seas markets.


Royal newlyweds leave U.S. after charming visit


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES - The Duke and
Duchess of Cambridge headed back to
the U.K. on Sunday, following a non-
stop weekend that included a few
chukkas of polo, time with Hollywood's
own version of royalty and several
events that raised millions for charity.
Their Southern Californian
stopover came at the end of a nine-day
visit to Canada, the first tour Prince
William and his bride Catherine have
made since getting married in April.
The U.S. portion of their travels was
a somewhat low-key affair compared
to their northern visit, where the duke
and duchess were greeted with rap-
turous welcomes as they crisscrossed


the Commonwealth country
Excitement in California was more
muted, though small crowds of well-
wishers waving British and American
flags lined up to catch a glimpse of the
newlyweds and fans paid thousands of
dollars to sip champagne in the cou-
ple's presence at a charity polo match
Saturday in Santa Barbara.
Disneyland, the Hollywood sign and
the beaches were not on the couple's
agenda, but the duke and duchess
managed to see a sweeping sampling
of the Los Angeles area.
They also attended a star-studded,
black-tie soiree to promote British
filmmaking talent where the guests in-
cluded Tom Hanks and Jennifer
Lopez. On Sunday, they paid a brief


visit to Skid Row, downtown's gritty
homeless core.
"Just seeing the smile on Catherine,
it was great," said 15-year-old Iliana
Samaniego, who along with other per-
formers danced for the couple at Skid
Row's Inner City Arts academy
Like many who saw the couple, the
performers were taken by their easy
charm. Jessica Cornejo, 19, said she
was thrilled when William gave a dou-
ble thumbs-up and told them "bril-
liant" at the end of their performance.
The trip also included a rare display
of public affection. After scoring four
goals at the polo game and stepping
onto a stage to collect the winner's tro-
phy from his wife, William gave her a
kiss on each cheek.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Today's Birthday: You are likely to pick up an interest for
several new avocations during the next year. One, or per-
haps even two, could generate a second source of income
that may be beyond what you ever thought possible.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - This should be a good day
for you, because overall conditions look pleasantly favor-
able whether you are involved in a material matter or in
something of a personal nature.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - The new week brings fresh think-
ing and a solution for something you couldn't figure out how
to do last week, and which might now become clear as a
bell to you. Act on it immediately.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - A happier and more success-
ful week could be in store for you if you plan something out
of the ordinary that doesn't include those who insist on run-
ning things. It'll be fun being your own person.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although sometimes you prefer


to act independently of others, you won't feel like that right
now. Greater benefits can be derived from activities you
share with friends or associates.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Your profitable possibilities
can be great if you have the good sense to strike while the
iron is hot. Don't let matters of financial significance drag on
any longer then they have to.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Regardless of where you
go and whomever you run into, your popularity is likely to
soar. It's your inner feelings of friendliness that people will
be drawn to.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - There is a strong likeli-
hood that chance will play a critical role in your financial af-
fairs. It behooves you to stay on your toes and watch for
money-making opportunities.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Some special information
to which you become privy could be exceptionally fortunate


when put to constructive use. It behooves you to act
promptly while these conditions prevail.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Although a matter of signifi-
cance is likely to be controlled by another, should you be
asked to help develop it, you'll have a chance to work your
way into sharing in its benefits.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Nothing will make you happier
than doing what you can for loved ones in order to fulfill their
needs. You'll do everything possible to make their lives easier.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Although you can tend to be
a loner at times, today it'll be some kind of partnership
arrangement that will bring you a sense of fulfillment. Team
up whenever you can.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Do not underestimate what
you do for others, whether it is performing some kind of
complicated task or simply doing someone a favor. Your tal-
ents and efforts will be greatly appreciated.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SATURDAY, JULY 9
Powerball: 1 - 9 - 11-23 -31
Powerball: 6
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 5 winners $200,000
No Florida winner
Lotto: 5-34-38-40-45-52
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 31 $5,373.50
4-of-6 2,176 $64.50
3-of-6 45,759 $5
Fantasy 5:2 - 18 - 25 - 26 - 28
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 324 $555
3-of-5 11,053 $21.50
FRIDAY, JULY 8
Mega Money: 7 - 8 - 21 - 28
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 13 winners $1,423.50
3-of-4 MB 81 $499.50
3-of-4 1,879 $64
2-of-4 MB 2,098 $40.50
1-of-4 MB 15,702 $5.50
2-of-4 42,558 $3
Fantasy 5:6 - 14 - 17 - 22 - 29
5-of-5 3 winners $74,478.84
4-of-5 357 $100.50
3-of-5 9,814 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY =

Today is Monday, July 11,
the 192nd day of 2011. There
are 173 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 11, 1798, the U.S.
Marine Corps was formally
re-established by a congres-
sional act that also created
the U.S. Marine Band.
On this date:
In 1804, Vice President
Aaron Burr mortally wounded
former Treasury Secretary
Alexander Hamilton during a
pistol duel in Weehawken, N.J.
In 1859, Big Ben, the great
bell inside the famous London
clock tower, chimed for the
first time. (The clock had been
keeping time since May 31.)
In 1934, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt became the
first incumbent chief execu-
tive to travel through the
Panama Canal.
In 1936, New York City's
Triborough Bridge (now offi-
cially known as the Robert F.
Kennedy Bridge) linking
Manhattan, Queens and The
Bronx was opened to traffic.
In 1960, the novel "To Kill
a Mockingbird" by Harper
Lee was first published by
J.B. Lippincott and Co.
In 1979, the abandoned
U.S. space station Skylab
made a spectacular return to
Earth, burning up in the at-
mosphere and showering de-
bris over the Indian Ocean
and Australia.
Ten years ago: The Sen-
ate joined the House in vot-
ing to bar coal mining and oil
and gas drilling on pristine
federally protected land in the
West, dealing a fresh blow to
President George W. Bush's
energy production plans.
Five years ago: Eight
bombs hit the commuter rail
network during evening rush
hour in Mumbai, India, killing
more than 200 people.
One year ago: Over the
din of vuvuzela horns in Jo-
hannesburg, South Africa,
Spain won soccer's World
Cup after an exhausting 1-0
victory in extra time over the
Netherlands.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Tab Hunter is 80. Ventrilo-
quist-actor Jay Johnson is
62. Rock guitarist Richie
Sambora (Bon Jovi) is 52.
Wildlife expert Jeff Corwin is
44. Actor Michael Rosen-
baum is 39. Rapper Lil' Kim


is 36. Rapper Lil' Zane is 29.
Pop-jazz singer-musician
Peter Cincotti is 28.
Thought for Today: "Edu-
cation is the ability to listen to
almost anything without los-
ing your temper or your self-
confidence." - Robert Frost,
American poet (1874-1963).








MONDAY EVENING JULY 11, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon 1: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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WEl PBS 1 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) sa hunting horn; cellarette. G' s St. Catherine. G' House Divided (N) PG' Stereo) 'G'
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(WF) NBC C 8 8 8 8 8 8at 6PM (N) News (N)'G' Tonight (N) 'PG' contestants are revealed.'PG' importer is found dead.'14' murder at UCLA. '14' at 11PM (N) With Jay Leno
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W FAM D 16 1616 16 County Court Spotlight Stereo) Based on the trial of Hungary's Cardinal Mindszenty. 'NR'
(WGx) FOX ) 13 13 7 7 TMZ(N)'PG' My Name Is Earl The Simpsons The Simpsons MasterChef (In Stereo) PG' c MasterChef (N)'PG' c FOX 35 News at 10 (N) c TMZ (N)'PG' King of the Hill
IWVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias Noticiero Univ. Cuando Me Enamoro (N) '14' Teresa (N)'14' (SS) Triunfo del Amor (N)'14' (SS) Don Francisco Presenta'PG' Noticias Noticiero Univ
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AE 54 48 54 54 25 27 The First 48 "Twistof Fate"14' The First 48 A triple shooting.14' Hoarders Adella;Teri"'PG' c Hoarders "Ray;Loretta"'PG' Intervention "Latisha" (N) 14' Intervention "Jimmy" '14'
(AfC) 55 64 55 55 *** "True Lies"(1994, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger.'R' c *** "Kill Bill: Vol. 1" (2003, Action) Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox. 'R' *** "Kill Bill: Vol. 2" (2004) Uma Thurman.'R'
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(BRAVO 254 51 254 254 The Millionaire Matchmaker'14' Inside the Actors Studio'14' Inside the Actors Studio (N)'14' Housewives/NJ Platinum Hit (N) Housewives/NJ
(m 27 61 27 27 33 Scrubs '14' Scrubs'14' * "Superhero Movie"(2008, Comedy) Drake Bell. 'PG-13' c Always Sunny |Always Sunny Always Sunny |Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report
(W I 98 45 98 98 28 37 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Country Fried Country Fried **Y "The Whole Nine Yards"(2000, Comedy) Bruce Willis.'R' Terry Fator Live From Las Vegas Country Fried CMT Music 'PG'
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(C 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room John King, USA (N) In the Arena Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) c
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SYF) 31 59 31 31 26 29 ** "National Treasure: Book of Secrets"(2007) Nicolas Cage. 'PG' Eureka "Liftoff" (N) a Warehouse 13 "The New Guy" Alphas "Pilot" (Series Premiere) (N) Alphas "Pilot"
TS 49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' FamilyGuy'14' FamilyGuy'14' FamilyGuy'14' Family Guy'14' FamilyGuy'14' Family Guy'14' Conan'14'
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_ 169 53 169 169 30 35 the Way (1934) reporter frames con man for murder. 'NR'cowboy develops a thirst for violence and gunplay 'NR' record-seeking surfers meet marriage-minded women. 'NR'
(TI 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash-Chicago Cash Cab'G' Man vs. Wild 'PG' c Man vs. Wild "Pacific Island"'PG' Man vs. Wild 'PG' c Surviving the Cut (In Stereo) a Man vs. Wild 'PG' c
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(TVL 32 49 32 32 34 24 Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PG'
USA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Family"'14' E NCIS "Ex-File" PG' c NCIS "Chimera"'14' WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (In Stereo Live)'PG, L,V c Suits"Inside Track"'PG' c
(WE _ 117 69 117 117 Charmed "Muse to My Ears" 'PG' Charmed (In Stereo)'PG' Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls
(WGN-Al 18 18 18 18 1 8 20Dharma&Greg Dharma&Greg America's Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine (N) a Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Several singers have released
versions of "The First Cut Is the
Deepest." Well, sometimes at the
bridge table, the first card is the
deepest. The right opening lead
can make the difference between
success and failure for the
defenders.
This week, let's look at the key
aspects of leading. The most im-
portant is to analyze the auction.
From that, you will have some
chance of calculating how the play
might go - as in this deal.
Look at the West hand and the
auction. What should West lead
against four spades?
Note that North must jump to
game on the second round; lower
spade bids would be nonforcing.
The club queen is a tempting
choice. But watch what happens.
Declarer takes the trick on the


Bridge

North 07-11-11
A A 6 5 2
eA652
K8 5 4
+ 7 6
*76
SA K3
West East
*987 J10
V 9 2 VQJ 107
+AQ108 *532
SQJ109 %7642
South
S K Q 4 3
VA63
SKJ 9 4
*85
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 Pass 1 V Pass
1 Pass 4 All pass

Opening lead: ??


board and plays a diamond to, say,
his nine. West can shift to a trump,
but South wins with dummy's ace
and plays another diamond. West
takes that trick and leads another
trump, but declarer wins the trick,
ruffs a diamond in the dummy,
crosses to his heart ace, trumps his
last diamond, cashes dummy's
heart king and remaining high
club, then ruffs the club three for
his contract South wins three high
spades, two hearts, two clubs, two
diamond ruffs on the board and
one club ruff in his hand.
Let's go back to trick one. With
such strong diamonds sitting over
South, West ought to lead a spade.
(If necessary, there will be time to
shift to a club later.) Declarer will
follow the same line of play, but
West will be able to lead three
rounds of trumps, restricting de-
clarer to one diamond ruff, not two,
and resulting in down one.


; TTHAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
J by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, .--- --


to form four ordinary words.

AAUGV


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
NGICI



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CYGAEN
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. . - .





st->

LOAPING THE LUGGAGE
FOR THEIR VACATION WAS
A CHORE BECAUSE OF
ALL THE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here: r m m I I I )
(Answers tomorrow)


ON
0 N
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ACROSS 37 - and yang
38 Haik wearer
Jetty 39 Mug with a lid
Monsieur's 41 Meditation
wine guide
"Ben-Hur" stu- 43 Potpieveggie
dio 44 Greeted warm-
Coat rack ly
Boulevard lin- 46 Scratchy
ers 49 Ms. Longoria
Job-ad letters 50 Cut, as logs
- Lee of cake- 52 Hull bottom
dom 54 Journey stage
Get dizzy 55 Horse's gait
Large vat 56 Thus
Parliament 57 - -game show
members 58 Afternoon
"Kubla Khan" social
locale 59 Hounds


22 Mauna-
23 Kinks' tune
24 Is on the team
27 Plow through
29 "2001" com-
puter
30 Roy G. Biv is
one
34 TV, slangily (2
wds.)


DOWN
1 Milk qtys.
2 Europe-Asia
range
3 Flight prefix
4 Annually
5 Vice-
6 Seine vista


Answer to Previous Puzzle
GAS FAST J UN K
ALE ELS E ELI E
DOCTRINE AN NA
SUTURE MEI LAN
BANS NOSY
R I PER KUDUI
O|R|E I S A K S A N|D
TACO RATES MLTD

BW I I D R LA T H S

ADIEU OPPOSE
STAG HESIT ANT
A c H EJO DT I NK I T


7 Taos loc.
8 Refinery output
9 Dutch cheese
10 Bill of fare
13 Zigzag course
19 Old PC acronym


21 Dud, to NASA
(hyph.)
24 Sweater letter
25 Fictional col-
lie
26 Ms. MacGraw
27 Uppity one
28 Superman foe
- Luthor
30 CEO degree
31 Louis or
Carrie
32 Grandson,
perhaps
33 News network
35 Thole fillers
36 Most accurate
39 Jell
40 Basted
41 Philanthropist
42 Custom
43 Ship of 1492
44 Edible sea-
weed
45 Pub missile
47 Medal recipi-
ent
48 Safecracker
51 Misfortune
53 Part of UCLA


DearAnnie: I have been mar-
ried to "Ryan" for three
years, and we dated for two
years before that It's a
second marriage for
both of us. My first mar-
riage was miserable and
lonely, and I wanted to
make sure to do it right
the next time. When I
met Ryan, he was sup-
portive and accepting of
my two sons. He made
the effort to spend time
with them. He was at-
tentive to me. I thought
he was perfect ANN
The problems started MAII
not long after we
moved in together. He
became distant and moody and
spent most of his day in front of the
TV Now, after five years, Ryan has
completely alienated my boys, his
co-workers and everyone else. No
matter what I ask of him, he blows
it off as if I'm crazy He doesn't
seem to care that he's pushing us
away Ryan's doctor put him on an
antidepressant to help him sleep,
but he refuses to take it. He does-
n't believe he has a problem.
I miss my husband, Annie. His
behavior has done such a com-
plete 180 that I don't want to be
with him anymore. I am tired of
making excuses for him. He won't
go to counseling. I'd go alone, but
I don't have the money Should I
cut my losses and walk away? -
Frustrated in Flint, Mich.
Dear Flint Some suitors put on
a good show during courtship,
and once the relationship is set,
they revert to form. If that's the
case, things are unlikely to
change, and you might be better
offleaving. However, a "complete


180" could also indicate Ryan is
depressed, overwhelmed by his
sudden family obligations or has
an underlying medical
problem. Suggest he
get a complete physi-
cal. You also can find
low-cost counseling for
yourself through your
church or United Way
Dear Annie: I think
my mother is verbally
abusive. I just finished
my last year of middle
school. I am now in
summer school in order
IE'S to prepare for a gruel-
BOX ing high-school course
load, and am involved
in many other activities.
The last thing I want is to come
home to a mother who will nag,
nag, nag and then yell, yell, yell.
My mother takes her anger out
on other people. If I try to discuss
this with her, she talks right over
me. She constantly compares me
to my older siblings, saying they
were better behaved and she
wishes I were more like them. She
has become more and more hurt-
ful, calling me horrible names like
"retard." If I cry, she says I'm a
"crybaby" When I ask why she
does this, she changes the subject
I feel taunted and bullied by
my own mother. How do I fix
this? - The Crybaby Daughter
Dear Daughter: Can you talk to
another relative - your father, a
grandparent, an aunt or uncle or
even one of your siblings - and
ask them to intercede on your be-
half? Your mother may not recog-
nize how negatively her behavior
affects you, and it might help for
someone else to point it out. And
when school starts in the fall,


please talk to the school coun-
selor or a favorite teacher who
can help on an ongoing basis.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Crazy," whose mentally ill
brother is making life difficult for
their father. Get him out now!
My parents allowed my older,
paranoid schizophrenic brother to
live with them. Their lives were
spent tiptoeing around him. When
they passed away, my brother was
60 years old and had never held a
proper job. It took us two lawyers, a
social worker, a crisis team and
more than a year to get him out of
the house so we could sell it All
along, he treated us with contempt
and disdain. He was capable of be-
having himself, however, so we
couldn't have him committed. He
ended up homeless, even though
we offered to pay his rent else-
where until he got his share of the
proceeds from the sale of the house.
We never realized how para-
noid and dangerous he was until
we read his years of daily journal
entries. It is a sad situation, but it
is also a relief that we no longer
have to deal with him. - Still
Looking Over My Shoulder
--In--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please e-mailyour
questions to anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate,
5777 W CenturyBlvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045. To find out
more aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


1
5
8'
11
12
14,
15-
16
17
18
20


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


B6 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth

5OOO...HOW OFTEN I DON'T "ONCE OR TWICE"? ALREADY
DID YOU HANG OUT KNOW. YOUR STORY SOUNDS SHAKY.
WITH THE NEW KID JON? ONCE OR HOW DO I KNOW YOU'RE NOT
TWICE. LYING TO ME?
) BECAUSE I'VE
,( NEVER LIED
-// " . TO YOU.


Dilbert


The Born Loser

WJT WOULUYOU KECOMME T ' 'W ITIAOUT QUESTION, OUR. KROUS WOULD I \VE- TO 5IRAEI 7'
- FORMETONIGRT SPe.CITY -C-R ,EU6
I _______ -^-t FORTWO! ____


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"You called about an ant problem, ma'am?"


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie
SrooA's SPECIAL I
VEGErARIAN CHILI


'-- -n




----7
- 'r- -;!


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


S 2011 I N
www famrlycrus com
"Is PJ wearing short pants that are
too long, or long pants that are
too short?"


Doonesbury

WHAT MUST
TIME HAVE
PIP RAY EFcE 'i



Ii I






Big Nate
TEDDY' GRAB YouR
STUFF' WE'VE GOT
TO GET TO THE POOL'

I'M NOT
GOING
TODAY.
SI'M


Ai


Arlo and Janis -


WHAT? BUT WE'RE
PARTNlERS! I CAN'T
PRACTICE LIFESAVING
TECHNIQUES BY
MY SELF'
YEAH, I KNOW.
SORRK. ABOUT I
THAT, DUDE./ I


I'M SURE COACH
JOHN WILL FIGURE
OUT A WAY To
KEEP YOU
B USY.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


SGVULP.


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"The Zookeeper" (PG) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:35 p.m.
"Horrible Bosses" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In Real 3D.
12:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 7:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In Real 3D. 4 p.m., 9:35 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Zookeeper" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:15
p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Horrible Bosses" (R) 12:30 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:10 p.m.,


7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 12:50 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 2:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 4:15 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 7
p.m.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 12:40 a.m., 2:55 p.m., 5:15
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In Real 3D.
12:45 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m.,
10:45 p.m. No passes.
"Cars 2" (G) In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 12:10 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:45
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Ciphor cryptogramI are created from quotations by famous people, past and present,
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,





"C DH AFZ NDSIFAZO JL AFZ TFDCOHDX


JL AFZ RJDON DXN AFSV UDV


UCAF IOZDA HSVCT."


- XDXTB


ODCVZN


VCXDAOD


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A mule will labor ten years willingly and patiently for you, for
the privilege of kicking you once." - William Faulkner
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-11


Peanuts


Pickles


OKAV, I'LL AN W HAT WOULD
GIVE IT - vOU LIKE
A *RY WITH
7HAT?



-jr - ...- 3

_-- - A. .__- ;


Todays MOVIES


COMICS


MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011 B7






B8 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


CITRUS COUNTY





HQ ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily.................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..............4...4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Elderly Christian lady
needs 3 Pinochle
partners Call
(352) 560-4202






U= .













How

To Make

Your

Washer

Disappear...


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966



www.chronicleonline.com


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not �
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
CALL 352-476-8949



5 BLACK KITTENS
Up for adoptions,
Willing to pay for shots
(352) 527-3471
FREE KITTENS
Multi- Colors
(352) 270-4774
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS
8 & 10 weeks old
very cute
(352) 341-2219
Lost Black Mini Poodle
Crystal River behind
Key Training Center
(352) 795-2565
(352) 257-8341
MACAW
Shamrock, looking for
a loving and
permanent home.
(352) 585-2323




FARM RAISED
TAPALIA
(352) 812-8020


1 pair of prescription
male eye glasses,
amber color frames,
Thursday, around Citrus
or Highland Plaza
(352) 746-3434
English Pointer
501b solid white,
Lost in
Country Side Estates
* REWARD*
(352) 634-2091
Toy Boston Terrier
male, Lost near
Hwy 44 and Haggerty
Pt. Crystal River
(352) 220-6371



CHIHUAHUA
female white & tan
8 y.o. last seen 7/7/11
Hamburg Terr
Homosassa
(352) 228-9272
Golden Retriever, older
dog, Highlands Area
Please call to describe
(352) 419-4213
Med. Size
Black & White Dog
w/ 6' chain & collar
Crystal Manor
(352) 563-0756
Shamrock Macaw
Description & Details
Necessary
(352) 544-0093
(352) 592-5959










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
SIA CNA PREP &
CPRAED Med. Tech
X-Ray Prep.
352-382-EASY (3279)

CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

3-by- bx tipens mrs CNA/HHA's
Urgent Need Call or
a f tApply In Person
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
581 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Lecanto 34461
(352) 637-3111

F/T, P/T
AR Itients
Collections
Busy Medical Clinic.
Fax: Resume
352-746-2236




Sudoku **** 4puz.com

7 93 41 8


8 3


43 2 5 96


47 13





59 28


32 4 7 89


1 4


5 86 32 7

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


Medical Office
Looking for part time
back office help &
assist with billing
Send Resume to:
Blind Box #1723P
Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crys. River, FL 34429

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

POSITIONS AVAILABLE
F/T LPN 5a1:30pm
P/T COOK
Paid by experience
Vac aft 1/1/12
Ins aft 60 Days
Apply In Person @
Brentwood
Retirement Com.
Commons Build
1900 W. Alpha Ct.
Lecanto 352-746-6611
DFWP/EOE




ALL POSITIONS
Experienced Only
Need Apply
PEPPERMINT PATTY'S
48Hwy19S. nglis
Drug Free Work Place







CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES
Tne CITruS Count
Cnronicle
" :"eleing on
energeTic ina.i laual
To consult oui nesies
on rTe u:E of
clo ifleia oo..e-rrising
If ',ou nao.e tre ae'ire
TO ori in a fot
pocea fun
en,.Ironmen? pleoiE
oppi, ToOO,
Es'�.EnTiai FuncTion
* DqeIop Clo-ifles
CuSTomer. Tnrougn
cola calling ona
pro'peCTing
* Strong rapporr
DulliIng priotfeionol
communICOTIon
ona gooa listening
* De.elop new
opporrunifTieT fo
CuSTomer. TO ao
Du'ines' :lTn
CITruS Puoii ning
* DoTO enTrv of Legal
oa.,erriling
QuoiificoTion"
* Hlgn Scnool
alplomo 01
equiolent
* Prior Telemmoii(eng
experience a pius
Seno resume TO
CiTruS CounT,
Cnronicle
1624 N r.,le0oooicrer.-
Cryirol Ri.r Fl 34429
Fo. 1352 1 563-5665

EOE arug screening
for final oppiiconr


CDL DRIVER
Accepting applica-
tions for experienced
Class A driver. Full
Time employment
with benefit
package. Must
comply with
Background Testing.
Apply in person at:
Pave-Rite, Inc.
3411 W. Crigger Ct.
Lecanto, M-F, 7a - 5p.
DFWP, EOE

MECHANIC
Experienced,
5 yrs min active exp.
Tools a Plus.
Apply In Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19 Cry Riv.

Pospiech
Contracting, Inc.
Transport & Lube
Truck Driver Mechan-
ic's helper wanted.
Needs to be organ-
ized, motivated and
must have a clean
Class A driver's lic.
Apply at
201 S. Apopka Ave,
Inverness, FL 34452






Roofing Crews
Experienced Only
Also REPAIR MAN
POSITION
Must have tools &
Transportation Top
pay & plenty of work.
Curry's Roofing
Call 352-795-4444




OFFICE
POSITION
Looking for the right
individual for main-
taining eBay and do-
ing some Photoshop
v7 design work - will
train. Great phone
skills, good typing
skills, must be organ-
ized. We will also train
you on our office pro-
grams including
FedEx shipping
online and Endicia
shipping. We are a
small company with 5
employees and have
been in business lo-
cally in Florida for
over 20 years.
Send email to:
yourjobchance@
yahoo.com










Employment

source is...







www.chronicleonline.com


THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



Part-time

Tow Truck Driver
Must live in the
Homosassa area.
Criminal Back
Ground Check and
vaild Florida Drivers
License required.
Dave's Body Shop.
Call: 628-4878




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
X-Ray Prep.
352-382-EASY (3279)




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
X-Ray Prep.
352-382-EASY (3279)



SpAct2Nowt
i--llll ll




I BENE'S
International
ISchool of Beauty m
Barber
& Massage
S Therapy
I* NOW ENROLLING* I
SPRING HILL
COSMO - Nights
Sept 19th

Aug. 8,
S ***
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
m FACIAL TECH -Days

NAIL TECH - Days
I1st Mon. ofea. mo.
1 (866) 724-2363
1486 PInehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606

NE fI%.W

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105



BERENGER LOTS TO
LOVE DOLLS (2), Meas-
ure approximately 14" tall
- good condition, $10
each. (352)-489-5245

A










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VINTAGE COMIC BOOK
Dell #1195 "National Vel-
vet". Very Good
Condition. $50 OBO
727-463-4411



SPA. Plysteel Seats 4
120 or 240V, 2HP,
2spd., pump motor,
excel. cond, $1,000
(352) 795-7520



Electric Stove,
Frigidaire, professional
series, slide in glass top,
convection oven,
warming dr, pd. $1,200
Sell $600. 352-489-5086
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
REFRIGERATOR
16.5 cu.ft., Admiral, $50
352-621-0411
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135
Washer & Dryer
Whirlpool
$200.Set
(352) 628-4766
No calls before 12N
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent cond. Can
deliver. 352-263-7398
WHIRLPPOL DUET
wash/dry, dishwasher
over range micro wave
smooth top electric
range, Hot Pointe gar-
age Fridge. $1100
will sell separate
(352) 586-9614



BOOKCASE
Cherrywood, commercial,
Preowned, Lovely, Free
Standing, 40"x36", $100
727-463-4411


BOOKCASE
Commercial, PreOwned,
Adjustable Shelves,
85"x36", $85
727-463-4411
BOOKCASE
Commercial, PreOwned,
Cherrywood, Free Stand-
ing, 65"x32", $75
727-463-4411
CAFE OR CAFETERIA
TABLE, Commercial,
42", Formica Top,
Like New. $65
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIR, Preowned, Fabric
Covered, Adjustable, $55
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIR
PreOwned, Commercial,
Fabric Covered,
Adjustable, $45
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
2 Drawer, PreOwned,
Commercial, Metal, Lat-
eral, Graphite Color $45
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
Commercial, PreOwned,
Lateral, Metal, 3 Drawer,
Graphite Color, $65
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
PreOwned, Commercial,
Lateral, Gray, Metal, 4
Drawer, $75
727-463-4411
FORMICA TABLE, Gray,
Commercial Cafe Or Caf-
eteria, PreOwned, 37",
Square, $35
828-463-4411
FORMICA TOP BOOK-
CASE, 37"x30", Com-
mercial, PreOwned, Gray
and Black. $65
727-463-4411
HON FILE CABINET Ver-
tical 5 Drawer. Lock/Key.
Heavy Duty. Black. Ex
Cond. Moving Must Sell
$75 OBO 352-465-1319
STACKABLE CHAIRS
Commercial, Metal
Frame, Gray Fabric, Pre
Owned. 2 for $25
727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
METAL FRAME, Com-
mercial, Pre-Owned,
Blue Fabric.
2 for $25. 727-463-4411



Craftsman Band
Saw,decent condition,
$50. 352-613-3027
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL
SAW, Craftsman Radial
Arm Saw, 10inch, $90.
352-613-3027
POWER MITER SAW
Black and Decker, Power
Mitre Saw, in decent con-
dition, $40.00.
352-613-3027
RADIAL ARM SAW
Craftsman, w/numerous
blades, works great,
on stand. $50
527-1239
TABLE SAW, Sears
Craftsman table saw,
good condition,
extra blades, $75.00.
352-344-5323


35" Sony Trinitron
Color TV
screen size 26"
good sound,
$89. (352) 746-2929
DVD 5 DISC,
Panasonic, 1000 WATT
HOME THEATER SUR-
ROUND SOUND 1 YR
OLD, $100.00. 726-0686



CROWN MOLDING
*New*, Fancy Wide De-
sign, 25 Feet, $40, Can
email pic. 352-382-3650
SLIDING GLASS DOOR
W/SCREEN
DOOR/VERTICAL BLIND
Approx 95"x78". $10.00
352-212-2051



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON PRINTER INK
FOR SALE: R200 COM-
PATIBLE CARTRIDGES
6 COLORS WITH 7 PIN
CHIP RE-SETTER.
$25.00 Call
352-433-1800



CEMENT MIXER - 31/2
CF, 1/3 HP,15" DRUM
OPENING. LIKE NEW!
$300 352-563-1519



Patio Furniture
Metal, 7 pc. Rocker,
glass table, 6 upholder
chairs w/ cushions
$150.(352) 746-2414



2 Dinette sets
off white 4 chairs &
table $125.
glass top w/4 chairs
$125.(352) 628-6143
2 Leather Executive
Type Desk Chairs,
2 Dining Side Chairs like
New cond.
$30 ea.
(352) 637-7248
4 Pc. Leather Living
Room Set $400. Glass
table w/4 chairs $150.
2 end tables $50, cof-
fee table $50, Bakers
Rack $50, desk & chair
$75.(352) 746-2438
BECKLINE BIG MAN'S
RECLINER, brown, coil
springs, in excellent con-
dition, $100. Walter@
352-364-2583
Cherry wood
Coffee table, 2 end
tables, lamp table,
good cond. Matching
Set $275
(352) 228-1325
COMPUTER HUTCH
Wood Desk with
File/Shelves/Storage, Ex
Cond. $85 OBO. Moving,
Must Sell 352-465-1319


HOW ABOUT SOME


'7 5 9136I-41 1 2 8I

862179-453
4 431285 796
9847 5 13 6 2
2138-4 69 7 5
67593 268 41
326b417589
19752 86 3 4
54869 3217


ia~aBUYERS ITH ORMESG


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011 B9


iW, Mt


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
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V RELIABLE
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* 100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137
Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

V THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
CAREY'S TREE SERVICE
Complete Tree Care
and MORE!
352-364-1309, lic./Ins
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852


Service Trim, Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825
TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696



A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705
BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop Cordless
Phone. Cell Phone
SU.P.S and Rebuild
* Camera- Watch
* Hearing - Power Tool
* Wheel Chair - Alarm
. Power Tool Etc.-
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness

Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 18 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./ns.
(352) 726-9998

Custom Painting Int/Ext
Trim/Molding Expert
(352) 302-8348



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273


Affordable Handyman
FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out *Free Est
*100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Disabeled
Any Hrs., Exc. Ref's
352-341-0404
Cell 850-242-9343







SENIORS CHOICE
352-628-0719
Care In Your
Home,House Cleaning




NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300





Leek
Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 352-201-7451




1 CALL & RELAX 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
se FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate *Free Est
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
a RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out -Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
-Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
O008PCO


V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out -Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
-Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137
All Phase Handyman
all phases of home
improvement & repair
I beat any price
(352) 634-0019






L & J SERVICES INC.
Custom Painting Int/Ext
Trim/Molding Expert
(352) 302-8348
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up,
hauling352 220-6761




A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *




Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc 132549 302-9269




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


Installations by Brian cBcH 2



FREEE' -
Peimit And:
Engineering
Fees RoofoversCarports
Up to ' Screen Rooms Decks
$200 value -Windows Doors Additions

S352-628-7519
g www.Advancedaluminumofcitrus.com __I�


A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers,
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755



All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
-' I . _-' - -, , ') . I _ : I , :
352-795-5755
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120



A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421


VACATION IN o ising
YOUR OWN i PtUo &
BACKYARD... * Drievays
Order 'tour Pool Today Bridck Pvers
Weekly
S Pool Service
Lic.& Insured
CPCl456565

352-400-3188


AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
WeDofItAll!!
CALL 352-228-7320
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal,cleanup,haul.
(352) 726-9570
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./ns. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190
CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522


SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions.com
Free Est 352-503-7464



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out .Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
-Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


Owner/Manager Name:
Philip Tomko


Business Name:
Phil's Mobile Marine

How long has the business been in
operation in the Citrus County area?
7 years.

Describe the service/product you
offer?
We fix boats - New and Old.

What do your customers like best
about your business?
That I come to the boat! Only $60 hr. I
guarantee all my work. I'm honest, reliable
and dependable.

What is something your business
offers that people don't expect?
That we guarantee our work! We are the
most affordable!

Why did you choose this business?
Started my marine career in the Navy. I
was an engine-man on a ship. Been a
marine technician for 30 years.

What are your business hours,
address, phone number and e-mail?
Hours: 9 am - 8 pm, Monday-Friday
352-220-9435


REINNETTE 352- hronicleonline.com

FOR MORE INFO CALL FINETTE 352- 564-2940


CLASSIFIED


oil


0m1mt






BIO MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
wglass drs, three se




tions, nice condition. $85
FLORIDA ROOM TABLEs
EXTENSION, only
$40.00. 464-0316
GLASS TABLE
round, deco style base
with thick round glass,
removable top, $100.
352-613-3027
KITCHEN TABLE
W/2 CHAIRS
Maple, Nice condition,
$50. 527-1239
OVAL CURIO CABINET
4 glass shelves,
w/internal light, Ex. Cond.
$325. obo 352-795-0841
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINING SOFAAND
LOVESEAT, Lazboy,
clean. $250.00
352-257-5722
SOLD
Solid Oak Wood Dining
Room. Table,
6 chairs, 2 leaves,
$150 obo



CHIPPER/VACUUM
Combo for lawn self
propelled, exc cond
$400(352) 628-2777
HONDA MOWER
rear wheel drive, runs
good $125 "Ron"
(352) 344-5021
LAWN TRACTOR - CUB
CADET LTX1040, 19hp,
42" deck, used 17hrs.
$1100. 352-249-7075
Sabre by John Deere
riding mower, 38" cut,
excellent cond.
$450
(352) 637-4718
Troy Bilt Roto Tiller -
Rear Tines w/ 21/2 yr.
warranty, used 2 times,
cost $750
Asking $375. Firm
(352) 794-6410




BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop . Cordless
Phone. Cell Phone
SU.P.S and Rebuild
� Camera- Watch
� Hearing. Power Tool
SWheel Chair Alarm
SPower Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness
CAT TREES, Display
Models, Never Used, Be-
low Cost. 1 @ $9 & 2
@ $23 OBO. Moving
Must Sell. 352-465-1319
Drink Venting Machine
6 chooses, cans or
bottles, very good
cond. money maker
$1500
(352) 628-5222
Large Aluminum Tool
Box for Pick Up
60" W x 42" L, x 28" D
$700 obo
(352) 422-3544


LITTLE TYKES HUM-
MER, GOOD CONDI-
TION, NEEDS BATTERY
$45. 352-613-0529
Metal Frame Pool
18' x 4', with Hayward
filters and pump, all ac-
cessories included,
$700 OBO.
(352) 489-2823
Music CDs, 125, in rotat-
ing storage case. Coun-
try, Big Band, Sinatra,
Dion, R&R, Classical &
more, $100. 746-4028



FREE!
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.
- Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
-1 item per ad
- Ad must contain price
- $3.25 per additional line
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



Refrigerated Sandwich
Board for Restaurant
w/ extra Pans
$250.
(352) 794-6410
SMOKERS, OUTDOOR
STATION (2), New,Self
Extinguishing,Sandless
Urn, 40"x16" $30 ea
727-463-4411



COPIER, TOSHIBA
2060, Ex. Condition,
Needs Toner & Tune Up,
Moving, Must Sell, $100
OBO. 352-465-1319



Acuvue Contact Lenses
+2.00,Dia 14.4 (6)
+5.00,Dia 14.4 (6)
$50.00 for all.
352-746-4028
Power Wheel Chair Lift
by Cargo Mate
& class 2 Hitch
$600.
(352) 637-4640
WHEEL CHAIR
SMALLER, MANUAL
W/FOOTRESTS, For
small adult or child,
$95.00. 464-0316









BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477


CEILING FAN LIGHT
Brass, w/5 Designer
Glass Shades, Email pic,
$25, MUST SEE.
352-382-3650
Christmas Items
box of decorations,lights
glass,stockings $10
2 sets of dishes $10
445-1161




Total Gym
$125.
(352) 746-2438
TREADMILL, HORIZON
T1200 2.75 CHP mo-
tor,20" x 55" two-ply
belt,4-zone variable cush-
ioning system,0 to12
mph,0-12% incline,13
programs,eTRAK Perfor-
mance Tracker technol-
ogy, iPod dock with con-
sole controls,375-lb user
capacity. $600.00
352-201-9409



3 Used Golf Cart Tires,
w/ rims & caps
$25.
(352) 628-9660
2011 New Superfast
White copy by PowerBilt.
RH 460cc GSX Uniflex
w/HC $99.obo Juliette
Falls. 465.8495
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Callaway, Big Bertha War
Bird, 7 wood, $25.
352-527-8159
GUN SHOW
Ocala
National Guard Armory
July 16th Sat 9-5p July
17th Sun 9-4p
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily, Bring
your GUNS to sell
or trade
auntraderaunshows
.com 352-339-4780
KIDS BIKE
boys/17inches, girls/
19inches, needs tires,
$20 each. 352-465-1616
LEFTY GOLF CLUBS
Nike "Sasquatch" Sumo
Driver, 3 wood hybrid and
5 wood with Nike "Ignite"
irons 4 thru PW all with
head covers. Irons never
used $200.00 287-9163
MI- Military
Garande
good condition
30 cal made by marlin
$350.
(352) 212-7899
RUGER MINI 14 RANCH
RIFLE, Ruger mini 14
Ranch Rifle, stainless, W/
Ammo, case and sling,
20 rd mag. 352-454-5906
TAURUS 9MM
satin nickel finish,
rose wood grips,
excellent condition,
$490.00.
382-1436 after 10am

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238


GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers
6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto

HEAVY DUTY UTITLIY
TRAILER/CAR HAULER
Dual axle, diamond
platted metal.
$1200/obo. (352)
794-3081; 228-2324




BABY BOUNCER & TUB
boy, almost brand new,
battery operated+vibrator,
Both for $25,
352-465-1616
SOFT ROCKING
HORSE, pink, Radio
Flyer, removable seat,
9mo-3yr, $35.
445-1161


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











UTILITY TRAILER
affordable, enclosed
trailer for storage,
6' x10' or larger.
(352) 400-2066
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492


CLASSIFIED



1 MALTESE Male,
Snowball 10 wks old all
shots, health certs. &
CKC reg., $400
352-212-4504, 212-1258
CHIHUAHUA
Pure bred, female,
tan & white, 4 moall
shotspapers, w/ cage,
$250. 352-344-5283



English Bull Dog
Puppies I male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com
Mini Dachshund Puppy
Female Long Hair
blk & tan purebred,
very small $300
(352) 795-6870;
220-4792
MINI DACHSHUNDS
AKC/CKC,$375, Vet
certs, Males &
Females,black/tans,
choc/tans, dapples. Long,
wire, & smooth hair. visit
www.sweetnlodoxies.com
or call 352-634-3841
Multi-Poo, 10 weeks old
Mother & father on
premises, mother
6V21bs, father 81bs $550.
(352) 794-3081
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
M & F starts @ $350
Aoots avail 7 days a wk.
Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofouos.net
SHIH-TZU
10 month old, spayed,
female, multi-colored,
one blue eye, most she
will ever weigh is 91bs.
$450 (352) 419-7335
WESTIES Pups
M&F, 5 wks taking dep.
$500. ready 7/29
Maltese-Schituz, 3 F 's
&1 M, 5 wks old $400
after 12p 352-746-7802



2 Horse Bumper
Pull, new wiring,
floor excellent
shape $1000.
(352) 270-1444

Li^^^to^B


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAArA k i f i -


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will email
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $450. mo. + Dep.
RV, $325 + electric
352-795-0061
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, fridge/stove, W/D,
incls. water & trash.
$700. 352-587-2555
DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo Ist & $200
Sec. 352-625-4339
Dunnellon Hwy 488
Clean 2/2, priv. lot,
fenc'd$475. mo. + dep
Hwy 488 (352) 795-6970
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close, lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319
HOMOSASSA
1/1, Ist/last/sec. $350.
mo. 352-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5, large fla room.
carport shed, $425.
352-503-6747 628-1928
HOMOSASSA
2BR, Slashpine Av. $425
/mo. Avail. Now, sec.
dep. ? 612-226-0091
HOMOSASSA
3 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
Very nice mobile home in
Homosassa. Please call
John at 352-503-5301 for
an appointment. $600.00
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
Call 352-476-4964





1991, 2/1 Mobile
Room Addition &
Carport $6,500 obo
Can be Moved
(352) 586-9615
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040


FOR SALE BY OWNER
w/financing. 2/1 SW
$1500 dn. $635 inlc T & I
Floral City, nice Ig treed
lot, just remodeled.
AVAIL (352) 793-7223
INVERENESS
Gospel Island, 2/2+
firm, carport, shed,
w/dryer, full furnished
very good cond. 55+
Comm. great park on
water, X-tra's ,$9K poss.
terms. 352-201-8720
INVERNESS
3BR, 1-1/2BA In 55+
Park, Needs some work,
$4,000 cash and must
be approved. Call
352-476-4964
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Short Sale
Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 bdrm DWMH's
Won't Last!! $3,500 -
$40K 800-622-2832

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183


LECANTO
3/2 w/garge/wkshop
Lease Option w/$1 OK
down $54,900 Keystone
Arbor RIty 813 265-8833
WANTED MOBILE HOME
I will pay cash for a
2000 or newer mobile
home. Looking for a 2/2
in excellent condition.
I will move.
(352) 621-9707




*/THIS OUT!


1288 LCandlenut Ave
Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 1170 sq ft living
space on 3/4 acre, de-
tached, oversized 2 car
garage/workshop,with at-
tic. 450 sq ft wrap around
porch. Quiet, friendly
neighborhood on a dead
end street. For sale only.
Call 352 564 2423 or
352 601 0534


Y* sl-I ^h


A New 2010
Home on I acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182



Your World

yea 'zae 4a/e


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online


CHRONICLE







(352) 563-59E


7-11 � LaughingStock International Inc ,Dis1. by Universal Uclickior UFS, 2011

"'American Idol' being watched

by American Idle.'"








JOHN GORDON ROOFING

S, & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269
* * ,81


4


ii


iGF


Ti


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


--1-

HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fencl/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204


HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW, fecnced 1/2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms, nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411

LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807




2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2, furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
1st month lot rent
(352) 817-1987
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 turn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR, $350/up; 1BR 1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR
1-72BA, $450 includes lot
rent; Call 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

LECANTO
2 BR, DW MHSeniors
Welcome $500/mo
(352) 628-2312
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
2BR,T urn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
util. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964


M
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Large, clean, quiet,
$575. mo. incld water,
HOMOSASSA
2/2, Clean Quiet, CHA,
Scrn. Por. $550 mo.
352-257-6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all util. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
until. Include. $500. mo.+-
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 w/scr porch $600
352-422-2393

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595





INVERNESS
2/1 Furn./Unfurn. $575.
Mo. No Pets. Fst.& Sec
(352) 212-4661




*t THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.


- i^^^


CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528




HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000 dn + lot rent,at
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Newly Renovated
$450 + 1st, sec., No
pets. (352) 563-5004


Lecanto
3 room eff. $300/mo+
elect or $85 wkly, no
sec. (352) 746-3073




Crystal River/B. H.
Rental Homes 1, 2 & 3
Bedrms 352-302-1370




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 lanai carport,new
carpet CHA $515
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm. CHA,$500.
35 Golden 352.464.2701
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 Fl. Rm, CHA,
Shed, $575. mo.
(352) 795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1/Carport, $525. mo
2/1, $425., S. Barbour St.
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514









BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2, 1 car. large-
glassed in family rm.
$600/ sec. references
required 352 527-2279



Leek
BLACK DIAMOND
* 3/2/2 HOME *
Gated Community.
Designer kitchen w/
granite. $1,200 mo.
Call Leslie Landham,
Foxfire Realty, 422-2382
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1,000 @ MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer duplex. 3/2/1
w/newer appliances.
$800 mo. lease/l dep.
No pets. (352) 697-3133
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 BR newly renovated,
near middle school,
fenced in back yard
$700/m Keystone Arbor
Rlty(813) 265-8833
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Rental Homes 1, 2 & 3
Bedrms 352-302-1370
HOMOSASSA
3/2 loft BR, den $675.
$500 sec. no pets
(352) 746-3073
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
INVERNESS
3/2, First/Last/Security
$650. 352-726-7692
Inverness 3/2/2
modern home fenced
w/appls $850. Lease
Option Avail. Keystone
Arbor RIty 813-265-8833
INVERNESS
3/2/2, 5 yrs. New, $750.
Mo. Ed, (352) 344-8366
Inverness Hghlands
2/2/1 fenced yard,
encl.'d large pool $750
mo. (352) 476-2209
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relaxfl.com
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1.5/1
$590 mo. fenced yd
(352) 344-2560
RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto 3 bedrm
Starting At
$466/mo.


EOwVA HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355




For Sale or Rent
3/2, 2 mis from down-
town Inverness, 3506 S
Dover Terr. Contact
owner across the st.
from home.
(352) 726-3238



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it lle-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-


ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



, R ,


For Sale
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester
407-761-06927


FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE


GREAT DEALS

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





For Sakle '
Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161




INVERENESS
SA CE 6 Rentals
2 Locations some
remodeled. AS IS
SALE any reasonable
offer excepted,
Great Opportunity i!i
813-286-4794






For Salek .
3/1, Tiled floors,
MUST SELL
Asking $32,000
22 N. Davis
352-586-4474

RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM






CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440




2 BR, 1 BA, 1 car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see $59,000
(352) 419-6719



2 homes.. 1 pool
1 lakefront 3/2/2
For Rent or Sale $800
(908) 322-6529

High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnan111@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.




6955 W. Macopin Ln
3Bdrm 2Ba Beautiful up-
dated ranch w/new roof
gutters siding a/c unit car-
pet & tile. A must see!
330-221-3996 $107,000




4/2 CEMENT HOME
1,200 SF on '4 acre
Remodeled, Clean
$65K.
(305) 619-0282





For Sale .1"






2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Fam rm. w/frpl.
2000+sf living + encl.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19 Jungleplum Ct. E.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com


Best Time to Buy
also have lease
options & owner
financing available.
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty

CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder












Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvi(
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!

Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685









Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887

Watedront
Homes^J


"Let's Go To The
Real Estate Auction"
Call Lisa for the
details
352-795-0784
Plantation Realty
plantationrealtvlisinas
.com
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner

For SaleIY
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283
FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498

HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc




INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033




2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000. obo
(352) 382-3202
CITRUS COUNTY
SEVERAL AVAILABLE
LOTS IN SUGARMILL
WOODS AND OTHER
AREAS OF CITRUS
COUNTY. CHECK
WEBSITE
AT: WWW.LOTSOFLAND.U
SAPROPERTYWHOLE-
SALE.COM
813-267-5447 TERRY
OR 352-475-1923 WES.
OWNER FINANCING
AVAILABLE





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday's.

Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.

To place your free
ad, simply go to:
www.
chronicleonline.comr
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.


Citru Co


unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909

BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191

CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

* SALEI! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518


MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011 BII


CIASSIFIEDS




'02, 23ft,
Magic Trailer
Dual Axle, 4 V-Hull
$1,200.
(352) 628-5008

SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066




POLARIS JET SKI
2000, Genesis (3 seater)
Great shape with trailer.
This thing is fast.
$2,800.00 352-634-1044




14' JON BOAT
trailer, 25HP Yamaha,
trolling motor, battery,
extra trailer, $2,500
(352) 628-2766

15' TRI HULL
BAY RUN ABOUT
40hp Evin. trollig motor
new bimini top
F/F new whls & lights on
tril $1200(352) 637-4515

19FT BOAT
made by Lake wells Fl.
Evinrude w/kicker
mount $800 obo (352)
794-3081 352-228-2324

20' PONTOON
60 HP, 4 stoke,
Yamaha, low hours, 4
years young, loaded,
kept in dry storage,
$13,500(352) 382-8966

20' PONTOON
75HP, trailer, custom-
ized, lots of extras, best
buy for the money!
$7,000. (352) 201-2656

'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071

AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019

BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272

CANOE 16'
OLD TOWN fiberglass
$350. steel wheel
Canoe/Kayak Carrier
used once $75.
(352) 447-2330

V THIS OUT!
C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22' out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
icebox,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
included.Exc.condifion,used app
50 hoursAslkng
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.

Grady White
20ft. w/225HP
$9,300.
(352) 400-6100

SOLD
14' JON BOAT,
2006 Extra wide, All
welded, Boat & Trailer
$1,595 obo

STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs. full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658


























HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8, very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945

KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797

ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27 2005,
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper Q bedw 2nd
dr. 20 awning $14k obo
(352) 527-9535




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or


04, Taurus, $3995
04, Chrysler300 $3995
01, Windstar $3995
00, Chev Prism $2500
95, Tahoe 4x4 $3995
96 Cad. Seville $3,995
06 Ford4x4 250ds$12k
98, GMC dually $5995
98, Volvo $3995
99, 2Dr Saturn $2995
MANY MORE DEALS!

USA
US19 BY AIRPORT
352-461-4518

1989 FIREBIRD
Doesn't run. Moving
north. $800 OBO. Cash
only. (352)560-7748
(leave message)

' THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
'93 TOYOTA
Celica, Red, cold A/C, int.
great, good gas mileage,
5 speed, $1,900.
352-364-1771
BUICK
'95 LaSabre, runs great,
clean, Trans/Air com-
pressor just overhauled,
$2,495 obo 637-2632
(352) 223-9651
BUICK CENTURY '95
Cold A/C, 143K miles, 6
cyc., 3.0 L, runs great!
$900 Firm
(352) 228-1897
CADILLAC
'03, CTS, Sedan, 4 Dr.
excel. cond., all new
tires $9,500 Cash or cert
check (352) 382-1422
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded, AC, good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900(352) 503-7431
CIERRA 93
Exc cond. PB, PW, PS,
burgundy leather seats
49,500 org miles
michelle tires good
shape cal bet 4p-7p
ONLY $2500 obo
352-527-4942
FORD 03
Taurus SES, V6 auto
loaded, 79K miles
exc shape $4500
(352) 697-2461
HONDA 08
FIT SPORT, Blackberry
Pearl, Automatic, 33
MPG, 40K, Like New
$15,239. 352-634-4391
JAGUAR XJ8
2000, excel. cond.,
new tires, all options
low mileage, only 51K,
garaged, Must see!
$9,995, (352) 344-5250
LINCOLN
'95, Town Car, less than
150K mi., 2 nd owner,
$2,495.
(352) 634-4603
MERCEDES BENZ
2006, C280, Luxury, 28K
Pristine Cond. White w/
tan int. sr. owned
$21,500 obo. 634-3806
OLDS ALERO GTS
2001, every option,
great cond., 85K miles,
$5,150 (352) 628-5673
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625

* SALEII MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518




77 MGB
restored car, has front
end damage, runs
great comes with 2
parts cars $6000 OBO
(352) 628-5606
CHEVY 1970
Impala Convertible,
older restoration,needs
TLC $17,000
(352) 628-2777
CHRYSLER 1941
Sedan runs good,
bumpers re chromed
$3500(352) 628-2777
Lincoln 1965
less than 65K org miles
4 dr convertible
w/parts car + extra
parts $6300
(352) 628-2777







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
'03, Silverado, 64K org.
mi., Red, auto trans,
6 cyl. looks good, runs
good, no rust. single
cab w/ overdrive &
672 ft. bed, $7,500
(352) 503-7328
CHEVY
1974, Silverado,
$500. Call for info.
352-364-1771

V THIS OUT!
FORD


2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920


Vehc


KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794


4. Sports group's aspirations (1)


5. Almost at an awful cost (2)


6. Respectfully behaving Kmart customer (2)


7. Missouri port's people-eating people (3)


ST'VHaNNVO S'IVINNVH ' I HddOHS HdOHcd 9 I9YM(IA'tHVN's
SWV(I( SIVAI3 I' SIJV'IS S3VYZ' iSV (IaSSVd '2 1 A lAn 'I
7-11-11 SHaMSNV


"G Gre! -Sdasavialfor *ick-upgor deliverg .
S fei-g low mintenanedro*htIreistntgrss
" -Prtallaw restrain rI w oleyad" istalaton..3 *sdoit-l


CHEVY
'95, Silverado 1500, ext.
cab, 194K mi., body lift,
33" tires, great cond.
$4,800. (352) 302-1033
FORD 95
F150 6 cycle, auto high
mileage unbelievable
condition $3150
(352) 628-2777
FORD
'98, Ranger XLT, super
cab, V6, 5 spd., AC,
bedliner, topper, 115k
mi., 1 owner, $2,900
(352) 382-3502
NISSAN
05, TITAN SE, king cab.
silver/gray, runs great,
106K mi$5900
352-746-5475/344-4505
+ SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518




JEEP
2005, GRAND CHERO-
KEE, $8,500, Hemi
Engine, New Tires &
Brakes, Towing Package,
Sun Roof, Stereo, Great
Condition, with all service
records, 99,600 Miles.
(630)464-7372
jpacol@comcast.net
JEEP
'98, Wrangler Sahara,
soft top, 67K mi., front
tow bar, 5spd. $9,750
(352) 527-9536
KIA SPORTAGE SUV
2001, A/T, A/C,4/D,
2WD, great condition,
79K miles, $4,500
(352) 795-7455



918-0715 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners


'02 DODGE
Ram Van 1500, 5.9 Liter
eng. V8 leather 59,500K
mi $8,888. make offer
(352) 503-7577
HANDICAP VAN
1989 full size GMC
Ricon Lift, runs great
$1950(352) 464-0316
HONDA
Odyssey 08, EX-L, blue
ext. grey leather, 6 cd
moon roof, 82K,
$15,900.352-344-4505
352-746-5475
KIA SEDONA
2002 LX, dark blue, one
owner, like new 83K mi.
$5,000 (352) 201-6386
TOYOTA 98
Sienna XLE ,V6 112k
mis. new tires & battery,
looks great, runs great
$4,500 (352) 465-7755




HONDA
'06, CRF 70F,
good cond.
$450. firm
(352) 628-1908




2003 Harley Wanna Be
149 cc 120mpg,looks
like a dressed Harley
$1700 cash
(352) 464-0316
2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576
FREEDOM
2011 ES3000 Electric
Scooter like new
street legal $1300
352 637 1814




will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
15,2011 -July 15,2011.


Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,200
Cry River 727-207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Dyna Wide Glide,
like new, 6k miles, some
extras Call for more info
$11,500 (352) 344-8794
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
LIBERTY
2010 098 city electric
moped like new $450
3526371814
LIBERTY
2010, 098city, Electric
Moped, goes 40 miles,
like new. $450
352-637-1814
LINCOLN
'99 Town Car, 115K mi.,
mechanically sound,
needs paint $3,500
(352) 489-5086
STEALTH
2010, 415, Electric Mt.
Bike, Custom everything,
36V, 450 Watt, $850
352-637-1814
SWAN
2010, 629, electric, uni-
sex, 30 mi range, pedal
assist, custom built, $700
352-637-1814
WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492

YAMAHA
'07, V-Star, 650CC,
4K mi., pipes, extras,
excel cond. $4,900
(352) 634-5450




Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15,2011.


432-0718 MCRN 7/29sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Citrus Mini Storage is wishing to avail itself of the provisions of applicable laws of this
state, Civil Code Section 83.801 - 83.809, hereby gives notice of sale under said law,
to wit: On July 28 2011. Citrus Mini Storage is located at 124 N Florida Avenue Inver-
ness, FL 34453, phone 352-860-2883, at 2:00 pm of the day. Citrus Mini Storage will
conduct a public sale to the highest bidder, for cash, of household goods, business
property, and misc. items, etc.
Tenant Name Unit # Contents
Cory Frazee 03 & 10 Household Goods
Robert B Alexander 15 Household Goods
Rafael Morales 50 Household Goods
Floyd Lambright BI Household Goods
Wavecrest Masonry CC Household Goods
Candace Jurban FF Household Goods
Eagle Ironworks GG Household Goods
Tom Smith HH Household Goods
The sale is being made to satisfy an owner's lien. The public is invited to attend. Units
will be open for visual inspection at time of sale. Owner reserves the right to bid and
refuse and reject any and all bids. A $100 (cash) refundable cleaning deposit is re-
quired to bid.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 11 & 18,2011.


433-0718 MCRN
McClure, Olivene B. 2070-CP-876 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 2010-CP-816 Probate Division
In Re: Estate of OLIVENE B. McCLURE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Olivene B. McClure, deceased, File Number
2010-CP-816, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required to file with this court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, any claims against the estate. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address
of the creditor or his agent or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent
or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver a copy of the claim to the
clerk who shall serve a copy on the personal representative. All claims not so filed
will be forever barred
Publication of this Notice has begun on July 11, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Shirley M. Jones
2321 Lakeside Drive, Hernando, FL 34442
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ J. Patrick McElroy Florida Bar No.: 052712
PC Box 1511, Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 637-2303
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 11 & 18,2011.


434-0718 MCRN
Surber, Charles Dunkley2010-CP-815 Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
File No. 2010-CP-815 Probate Division
In Re: Estate of CHARLES DUNKLEY SURBER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Charles Dunkley Surber, deceased, File Number
2010-CP-815, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names
and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required to file with this court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, any claims against the estate. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address
of the creditor or his agent or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent
or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver a copy of the claim to the
clerk who shall serve a copy on the personal representative. All claims not so filed
will be forever barred
Publication of this Notice has begun on July 11, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Shirley M. Jones
2321 Lakeside Drive, Hernando, FL 34442
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ J. Patrick McElroy Florida Bar No.: 052712
PO Box 1511, Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 637-2303
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 11 & 18,2011.


2011 UFS, Dist by Univ Uclickfor UFS


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Purchase a deli bread grain (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Went by quickly (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Actor Efron's chinos (1) syllables in each word.


I I l l l l l l l


Nodces to Creditors/
Administradon
I :nom/l


Notices to Credit FS/
Administration
I Em/l


Notices to Creditors/
Administration I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE!

NO MATTER WHERE YOU

PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


'11 CRUZE
RE 24 HI RECORDED MESSAGE WIm INFO AND SPECIAL PICKING
1-800-584-8755 Ext 11113
*15,999. 265^



'10 SENTRA
RE 24 I REiCORE MEMSSAE WIIH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext16839
*12,999^21 5o.


'10 TOWN & COUNTRY
ME 24 HI REORDD MESSAGE MIm INFO AN SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext16848
'15,999o?265



'10 IMPALA
RE 24 I RECORDED MESSAGE WII INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16722
212,999^o21 5^


'11 MALIBU
FE 24 HI RECORDED MESSAGE WIrH F AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16811
*15,999.2650



'10 ELANTRA
RUE 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE Wl ITH AND SPECIAL PRICE G
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16841
'12,999^215 M.




'10 AVENGER
REE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE Wilr 10o AND SPECIAL PRIEC
1-800-584-8755 Ext. 1157
PER
$9,999 OR 166.



'10 HHR
IREE 24 HR RECORDED IMSAGE WITll IO AD SPECIAL PRICMG
1-800-584-8755 Ext16797
$11,999101 99OR


'10 CHARGER
REE 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE Wit IM1) AND SPECIAL PRICE
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16821
16, 999^ 282 .


'10 SONATA
FME 24 HI RECORDED MESSAGE iWIH INFO AND SPECIAL PICKING
1-800-584-8755 Ext16823
313,999o. 232RM


'10 ACCENT
RE 24 HR RECORDED IMSSAGE wmll IWO NMD SPECA PRICES
1-800-584-8755 Ext16855
9, 999^R1 166 OR
O


'10 RAM
EE 24 HR RECORD ISMSAGE WitH IFO AD SPECIAL PRIG
1-800-584-8755 Ext 11147
*11,999O1 99A^
.O .^ la. ^


'10 SEBRING
RE 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE VHI I10 AND SPECIAL PRMIE
1-800-584-8755 Ext16798
A13,999232A
113,999 R232MO.


'10 EQUINOX
FRE 24 HR RBECORIE MESSAGE WITH NO MD SPECIAL PRING
1-800-584-8755 Ext10267
*18,999V R315 M


I :


:J1[Oi


^All prices and payment exclude, tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. Prices and payments include $2999.00
down cash or trade equity. Payments are for 6 years at 5.99% APR with approved credit.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock


h9


Al


GiYSALAUrUiiUM
* 9171


'10 EXPLORER
RE 24m HiECORDE MESSAGE WMm INFO AND SPECIAL PICKING
1-800-584-8755 Ext16717
1 4,999^ 248 M


A;W


B12 MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011


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