Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02468
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-09-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02468

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Betty Ford: Former first lady dies at age 93 /B5


CITRiUS COUNT Y





www.chronicleonNICine.com
N www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


4k


VOLUME 116 ISSUE 336


[ -I / II I


TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Mostly cloudy with a
90 good chance of showers
LOW and thunderstorms.
74 PAGE A4
JULY 9, 2011


Opinions vary on possible manatee rules


RELIGION:


Miraculous
Italian woman says
praying to Pope Pius
XII helped cure her
cancer./Page Cl
STOCKS:
Declines
An unexpected
drop in hiring put
an end to the
excitement that
had been bub-
bling up on Wall
Street over the
past two
weeks./Page A7

LOCAL NEWS:






1 �






Brittle bones
Born with osteogenesis
imperfecta, brittle bone
disease, David Gregory's
had more than 80
broken bones in his
61 years./Page A3

FRENCH CONNECTION:
Live & learn
Two students from
France intern at wildlife
state park./Page A7


New country
South Sudan became
the world's newest
nation early Saturday.
/Page A10

NATIONAL:
The
military budget
is not on the
table. The
military is at
the table, and
it is eating
everybody
else's
lunch.



Com ics ..........C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ........C7
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ..... B5
Horoscope ........B5
Lottery Numbers . . .B4
Lottery Payouts . . . .B5
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ....... .C9
TV Listings .......C7


I6 11 Uu17811211002I I


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
More than 200 Citrus
County residents converged
Thursday evening to weigh
in on proposed rules for
King's Bay.
The majority of those who
spoke took issue with the
proposed rules and accused


the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service of overreaching and
potentially stifling business.
Those in favor of the rules
said maybe it was time for
changes in what to do for
fun in the bay
On June 21, the federal
government unveiled rules
it says will protect manatees
by restricting King's Bay to


slow-speed boating year-
round, thus eliminating the
35 mph "sport zone" that ex-
ists between May 1 and Aug.
31.
The proposed rules will
make King's Bay a perma-
nent manatee refuge, which
had been the case on an
emergency basis from No-
vember to March.


km.
**


The space shuttle Atlantis lifts off Friday from the Kennedy Space Center
Atlantis is the 135th and final space shuttle launch for NASA.


Associated Press
in Cape Canaveral.


Mary Lamb,
left, of Ocala,
points out the
space shuttle
Atlantis to
granddaughters
Delaney Reed,
7, Sabrina
Sena, 10, and
Simone Sena,
12, as they
watch the last
shuttle launch
Friday from
Daytona Beach.
Atlantis and its
four astronauts
blasted off
practically on
schedule at
11:29 a.m.


"Don't shove it down our
throats," Deanna Roderick
pleaded with the panel so-
liciting input about the pro-
posed rules.
"The people here always
loved the manatees. I hope
by making them (manatees)
the focus will not begin to
change peoples' attitudes
about manatees. Please


don't ruin your best asset,"
she said.
Roderick was among a
solid chorus of people op-
posed to the rule changes,
including the entire county
political establishment, sev-
eral of whom came to regis-
ter their opposition.


Page A9


I


Page A2


Teenager enters plea in mud bog death


Lou ELLIOTT JONES
Special to the Chronicle
BRONSON - A 15-year-
old New Port Richey teen
pleaded not guilty to
manslaughter charges in
the death of a 24-year-old
Citrus County man at a Levy


County mud bog.
Chris Sutherlin Jr, who is
in juvenile detention and
did not appear in court, en-
tered a written plea Friday
at an arraignment before
Levy County Judge James
"Tim" Browning. Sutherlin
Jr is charged with


manslaughter in the stab-
bing of Roderic "Rod"
Sparks at Horse Hole Mud
Bog near Inglis on May 28.
The stabbing occurred
during a verbal and physi-
cal altercation initiated by
the teen's father Chris
Sutherlin Sr.


About 30 members of
Sparks' family and friends
attended the short hearing
wearing red T-shirts and
wristbands proclaiming
"Justice for Rod." They
were advised by court offi-
cials they cannot wear the
shirts in the court. Several


persons wore their shirts in-
side out while others put on
shirts to conceal most of the
T-shirts' message.
"I am disappointed," said
Anna Sparks, the victim's
mother. She said the shirts
See NVPage A9


i .i


'Light





this





fire'


Shuttle lifts off for last time
MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL - With a cry from its
commander to "light this fire one more time,"
the last shuttle thundered into orbit Friday on
a cargo run that will close out three decades
of both triumph and tragedy for NASA and
usher in a period of uncertainty for America's
space program.
After some last-minute
suspense over the weather ON THE
and a piece of launch-pad NET
equipment, Atlantis and its NASA:
four astronauts blasted off http://usa
practically on schedule at gov/9JytXv
11:29 a.m., pierced a
shroud of clouds and set- MORE
tled flawlessly into orbit in INSIDE
front of a crowd estimated
at close to 1 million, the U Q&A about
size of the throng that the space
watched Apollo 11 shoot program.
the moon in 1969. /Page A2
It was the 135th shuttle 0 See more
flight since the inaugural photos from
mission in 1981. the launch.
"Let's light this fire one /Page A2
more time, Mike, and wit-
ness this great nation at its
best," Atlantis commander Christopher Fer-
guson told launch director Mike Leinbach just
before liftoff.
Atlantis' crew will dock with the Interna-
tional Space Station on Sunday, deliver a
year's worth of critical supplies to the orbiting
outpost and bring the trash home. The shuttle
is scheduled to land back on Earth on July 20
after 12 days in orbit, though the flight is likely
to be extended to a 13th day
After Atlantis' return, it will be lights out for
the shuttle program. Thousands of workers will
be laid off within days. The spaceship will be-
come a museum piece like the two other surviv-
ing shuttles, Discovery and Endeavour And
NASA will leave the business of building and fly-
ing rockets to private companies while it turns
its attention to sending humans to an asteroid by
about 2025 and to Mars a decade after that
It will be at least three years - possibly five
or more - before astronauts are launched
again from U.S. soil.
Leinbach said as Atlantis disappeared in the
clouds, he and a friend in the control center
put their arms around each other and said:
"We'll never see that again."
Inside the room, "it seemed like we didn't
want to leave," Leinbach said. "It was like the
end of a party, and you just don't want to go,
you just want to hang around a little bit longer
and relish our friends and what we've accom-
plished. So it was very special, lots of pats on
the back today."
The space shuttle was conceived even as the
moon landings were under way, deemed es-
sential for building a permanent space station.


qMW


I INS IDE II


ii "









Why shuttles are being retired, what's next


Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL - Thirty
years of flight by NASAs space
shuttles will end once Atlantis re-
turns home from this last mission.
The space agency will be looking
to deeper space exploration, but
the future is still somewhat un-
clear
NASA is looking to private com-
panies to develop a new space ve-
hicle and it will be at least three
years, maybe longer, before one is
ready Some basics about the shut-
tle program and why it is ending:
. Why are the shuttles retir-
. ing?
A . The shuttles are aging and
. expensive and their chief
task of building the International
Space Station is essentially done.
Now NASA wants to do something
new.


. Who decided to stop flying
Sthe shuttles?
A. President George W Bush
. made the decision in 2004.
He wanted astronauts to go back
to the moon, and eventually to
Mars. But President Barack
Obama dropped the moon mis-
sion. His plan has NASA building
a giant rocket to send astronauts
to an asteroid, and eventually
Mars, while turning over to pri-
vate companies the job of carrying
cargo and astronauts to the space
station.
. Why were the space shuttles
. built?
A . It was supposed to make get-
. ting into space cheap, sim-
ple and safe, flying into low orbit
virtually every week. It didn't ac-
complish that. But it was the best
way to get big items - such as
satellites and the Hubble Space


ON THE NET
* NASA: www.nasa.gov/shuttle

Telescope - into orbit and fix
them if needed. For the space sta-
tion, it was a combination moving
van and construction crane. What
made the shuttle unique was its
ability to do all kinds of things.
Q. What happens to the space
shuttles?
A They'll be on display across
. the country
Endeavour goes to the Califor-
nia Science Center in Los Angeles
and Atlantis will stay at Kennedy
Space Center for its visitor
complex.
Discovery's new home will be
the Smithsonian Institution's
hangar near Washington Dulles
International Airport.


Enterprise, a shuttle prototype
used for test flights, goes to New
York City's Intrepid Sea, Air and
Space Museum.
. What about the space
Station?
A. The life of the space station
. has been extended to at
least 2020 and it could continue on
even longer. It's now big enough
for six people. They conduct sci-
ence research, from astronomy to
zoology, and help scientists under-
stand the effects of people spend-
ing long periods of time in space.
Q. What about the astronauts?
SDo they still have jobs?
A . Some will. More than a
S dozen astronauts will still go
to space and live on the space sta-
tion. Others will wait around for
slots on still-to-be-built space-
ships, including the ride to an as-
teroid. Others will leave the


program. The same thing hap-
pened after the Apollo program
ended nearly 40 years ago.
Q How will astronauts get to
Sthe space station?
A. NASA will continue to buy
. seats on Russian Soyuz cap-
sules to ferry space station resi-
dents. The $56 million price per
head will go up to $63 million,
which is still cheaper per person
than the space shuttle.
. Is there any other way to get
. into space?
A . Not from U.S. soil once the
. shuttles retire. NASA could
eventually use the commercial
rockets and capsules being devel-
oped by private companies. Two
companies predict they could fly
astronauts to the space station
within three years. NASA is under
orders to build a giant rocket to go
beyond Earth orbit.


SHUTTLE
Continued from Page Al

NASA brashly promised
50 flights a year - in other
words, routine trips into
space - and affordable
service.
Shuttle crews built the In-
ternational Space Station,
repaired several satellites
in orbit and, in a feat that
captured the public's imagi-
nation, fixed the Hubble
Space Telescope's blurry vi-
sion, enabling it to see
deeper into the cosmos than
ever before.
But the program suffered
two tragic accidents that
killed 14 astronauts and de-
stroyed two shuttles, Chal-
lenger in 1986 and
Columbia in 2003. NASA
never managed more than
nine flights in a single year.
And the total tab was $196
billion, or $1.45 billion a
flight.
This day of reckoning has
been coming since 2004, a
year after the Columbia
tragedy, when President
George W Bush announced
the retirement of the shuttle
and put NASA on a course
back to the moon. President
Barack Obama canceled the
moon project in favor of
trips to an asteroid and
Mars.
But NASA has yet to work
out the details of how it in-
tends to get there, and has
not even settled on a space-
craft design. The lull the
end of the shuttle program
will bring is unsettling to
many space-watchers.
The space shuttle demon-
strates America's leader-
ship in space, and "for us to
abandon that in favor of
nothing is a mistake of
strategic proportions,"
lamented former NASA Ad-
ministrator Michael Griffin,
who led the agency from
2005 to 2008.
In a pep talk Friday to his
launch control team, the
current NASA chief, former
shuttle commander Charles
Bolden, said: "We know
what we're doing. We know
how to get there. We've just
got to convince everybody
else that we know what
we're doing."
After days of gloomy fore-
casts full of rain, lightning
and heavy cloud cover, At-
lantis lifted off just 212 min-
utes late but was visible for
only 42 seconds before van-
ishing into the clouds.
In the final minutes of the
countdown, NASA bent its
own rules regarding rain in
the vicinity to allow the
launch to go forward. In the
end, the liftoff was delayed
not by the weather but by the
need to verify that a piece of
launch pad equipment was
retracted all the way
Spectators jammed Cape
Canaveral and surrounding
towns for the emotional
farewell. Kennedy Space
Center itself was packed
with shuttle workers, astro-
nauts and 45,000 invited
guests. Among the notables
on the guest list: a dozen
members of Congress, Cabi-
net members, the chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
four Kennedy family mem-
bers, singers Jimmy Buffett
and Gloria Estefan, and two
former NASA chiefs.
"I'm a little bit sad about
it and a little bit wistful,"
said Jennifer Cardwell, 38,
who came with her hus-
band, John, and two young
sons from Fairhope, Ala.
"I've grown up with it"
From now on, private
rocket companies will take
over the job of hauling sup-
plies and astronauts to the
space station. Until those
flights are up and running a


Spectators watch the space shuttle Atlantis lift off Friday morning from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral.


Space shuttle Atlantis astronauts - from left, mission specialists Rex Walheim, Sandy
Magnus, pilot Doug Hurley and commander Chris Ferguson - leave the operations and
check-out building Friday on the way to the pad.


few years from now, Ameri-
can astronauts will be hitch-
ing rides to and from the
space station via Russian
Soyuz capsules.
With Atlantis settled in
orbit, NASA expressed grat-
itude to its employees by
giving some of them mission
flags and held a big barbe-
cue in the cavernous but


empty Vehicle Assembly
Building at the Kennedy
Space Center.
Joan Kranz - whose fa-
ther is legendary Apollo 13
flight director Gene Kranz,
now a critic of NASAs cur-
rent direction -was laid off
last year from United Space
Alliance, NASA's prime
shuttle contractor, after 25


TO ENTER:
Fill out this form, mail or bring to
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429 or apply online at
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Anytime before Noon on July 29.


years of working for the pro-
gram in Houston. She cried
during Friday's launch,
which she watched from the
visitors center next door to
Houston's Johnson Space
Center, home to Mission
Control.
"Every time the commen-
tator said 'final' that pretty
much did me in," she said.


Bob Cabana, director of the Kennedy Space Center, left, and
Mike Moses, launch integration manager, react to a ques-
tion regarding the future of NASA's space program.





r7 UR ~ COMPElITORS PEICE*


Name.........................................
Phone........................................
Em ail........................................


0__ Thankstoour
U;Tr 16


A2 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 - SATURDAY, JULY9,2011



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EroSTE Learning from nature


Citrus County
Animal rescue
event this Saturday
The 1st Annual Rescue
Center Fundraiser and Adop-
tion Event will be at 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m., Saturday, July 9, at
Village Cadillac Toyota Scion
on U.S. 19 in Homosassa.
The public is invited to attend
and bring a helpful pet supply
or monetary donation as well
as consider adopting a pet.
There will be a variety of
pet services on hand for cur-
rent pet owners and potential
adoption candidates. The fol-
lowing will attend to extend
information or services:
C.A.R.E.S.
The public is urged to con-
sider dropping off any of the
following items to assist the
animal rescue centers, and of
course come to see the many
pets available for adoption:
dog and cat food and treats;
harnesses (all sizes); toys;
beds; laundry detergent;
paper towels; Frontline; Ad-
vantix; and Advantage.
For more information con-
tact Charlie at Village Cadil-
lac Toyota Scion at (352)
621-7115.
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy
seeking re-election
Citrus County Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy filed paperwork Friday
with the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office to seek re-election.
Dawsy, a Democrat from
Pine Ridge, has been in of-
fice since 1997.
Filing for the 2012 election
allows Dawsy to collect and
spend money on his
campaign.
Republican group to
meet Saturday
The Ronald Reagan Re-
publican Assembly meeting
at 1 p.m. Saturday will fea-
ture a discussion on the envi-
ronment and King's Bay.
Speakers include Sandra
Brasmeister, advocate for
Truth in Government, dis-
cussing the "real cause of
pollution in King's Bay."
The meeting is at 938 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19),
Crystal River, in the South
Square Plaza. For more infor-
mation or RSVP, call (352)
257-5381. Refreshments are
provided and CASA dona-
tions are accepted.

Spring Hill
Deputy killed in car
chase memorialized
A Hernando County deputy
killed in pursuit of a reckless
driver is being memorialized
at a funeral.
The funeral for 35-year-old
Deputy John Mecklenburg
was held Friday morning in
Spring Hill.
Mecklenburg died Sunday
after losing control of his ve-
hicle and crashing into a tree
while pursuing a reckless
driver. The car burst into
flames.
The chase eventually
spanned four counties. The
driver has been charged with
felony murder, violating pro-
bation and fleeing and at-
tempting to elude a law
enforcement officer.
Mecklenburg joined the
sheriff's office two years ago.
He is survived by his wife and
two young children.
-From staff and wire reports

Corrections
* An incorrect phone num-
ber appeared in a column,
"Theater Spotlight" on Page
C6 of Friday's edition. Encore
Ensemble Theater's box of-
fice number is (352) 212-
5417.
* Because of a reporter's
error, a story on Page C1 of
Friday's edition, "'Mame' mu-
sical appears at Art Center,"
contained incorrect informa-
tion. The play will open to the
public Friday, July 15. The
Chronicle regrets the errors.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to


any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling (352)
563-5660.


French interns get

lesson in Fla. wildlife
SAMANTHA KENNEDY
Chronicle Intern
After three weeks interning at the
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park, 19-year old French university
students Matthew Wozniak and Julia
Thierry got the chance to reflect on
their experience.
"They were really excited their first
day," said Park Ranger Tricia Fowler
"They mainly cleaned the animal
cages, fed them and made diets for
them."
Thierry came to the park "open-
minded," not thinking too much about
what to expect Now that she is leav-
ing, she is taking with her lots of expe-
rience with animals.
"I wouldn't ever have gotten to see
bears and panthers except on televi-
sion," she said.
From just simply touching animals
foreign to her, to "the gross stuff," like
cleaning up after them, Thierry said
she would not have been able to
experience any of this at home.
For Wozniak, it was the "special an-
imals, like bears and panthers" that
captured his heart. Because they
were in a captive setting, he could
walk up to the panthers and "hear
them purr"
"I loved seeing animals that I wasn't
familiar with," Wozniak said.
Fowler also saw this amazement, as
she described the smiles on their


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
French students Matthew Wozniak and Julia Thierry recently completed an in-
ternship at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park.


faces when seeing the different ani-
mals that were foreign to them.
Wozniak explained that there was
never a "normal, scheduled day," and
that they usually went through their
day first cleaning cages and feeding
animals, then preparing all the diets
for the next day
"Every day was a new surprise
around here," added Thierry
Though being a volunteer was
something that both students were
here to do, they also had other


things planned while visiting
Florida.
"We've gone kayaking, shopping and
we're going fishing for the first time to-
morrow!" said Thierry
Animal care wasn't the only skill
they were working on while volun-
teering at the wildlife park.
"I want to be in Human Resources,"
explained Thierry Wozniak added,
"We're also here to work on our
English skills."


Help to overcome


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
David Gregory has a condition that causes him to need a van equipped with a chair lift so he can access it from
the driver's seat of his vehicle. The van he currently uses is in poor shape, so he is in need of a new van. Friends
have opened a bank account to help him get the equipment he needs.

Friends hoping to help resident buy wheelchair-accessible van


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA - David Gregory
knows that life is precarious.
Born with osteogenesis imper-
fecta, brittle bone disease, he's had
more than 80 broken bones in his 61
years, has spent weeks in traction
and has undergone surgeries to
have steel rods implanted in his
legs.
In 2004, Gregory had heart bypass
and aortic valve replacement sur-
gery- serious enough for someone
with normal bones, but for him, the
risks were multiplied.
But he recovered and returned to
work at the county property ap-
praiser's office in Crystal River 10
weeks later
"With this disease, it's bad when
you're young," Gregory said. "In
middle age you get better - your
bones harden. Then when you get
older, you go downhill again."
When he was younger, in his 30s,
he worked as a garage mechanic.
He lifted machinery; he dug
ditches. Throughout his adult years
he has operated boats at the Marine
Science Station, managed a Wil-
son's Leather store and worked as a
substitute teacher
He could walk.
"I walked with a limp, but I was
normal - in my opinion," he said.


Gregory said he tries to
stay hopeful and
positive, but is
struggling to do so.

When he could no longer walk, he
began using a motorized scooter To
get it onto the rack on the back of
his car he would prop himself
against the car and "drive" the
scooter onto the rack using his
hands, secure the gate behind it,
then slowly make his way into the
car
When he got to work, he would
reverse the process and do it again
to go home.
He's never been one to give up.
Five years ago, he got a van, a
1993 Ford E-150, with a lift. Even
then it was old, but it lifted his
chair, which lifted his spirits.
But now, the van keeps breaking
down and the lift broke. A friend
loaned him a lift that hooks on the
back, which means he has to walk
from the back to get into the dri-
ver's seat, and he can't walk well
anymore.
"I call it my'McGuyver van,"' Gre-
gory said. "I keep a roll of duct tape,
nylon string and a tool kit handy"
The list of what's wrong with it is
longer than what works.
His friends have opened up an


account for him at TD Bank, 1000
S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River, to help
him purchase a wheelchair-acces-
sible van.
He found a van with a lift and a
chair included on Craigslist for
$3,000, although he said he hasn't
looked at it yet or even knows if it's
still available. The owner lives in
Sanford.
"For the past five years I've lived
on a contingency basis, fixing things
as they break," he said. "Even my
chair I'd think, 'Which one will go
first?' I was able to get a chair at the
Sheriff's store for $200 the day be-
fore my other chair gave out."
Gregory said he tries to stay
hopeful and positive, but is strug-
gling to do so. He's not one to com-
plain, and said he knows other
people have it much worse than he
does.
"He tries so hard," said his su-
pervisor, Sandy Garrison. "He's al-
ways here, he's a hard worker He's
a thinker and so intelligent. It's a
shame, though. He just can't seem
to catch a break."
For information, call David Gre-
gory at (352) 228-3230.
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at (352)
564-2927 or nkennedy@chronicle
online com.


deficits in the pharmacy
program, some services
will be discontinued."
Tear said it's a difficult
time for their agency and
they appreciate the pub-
lic's understanding.
As information is avail-
able, updates will follow.


Man


charged


in death
SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
A Floral City man in-
volved in a DUI crash in
May was arrested for DUI
manslaughter Thursday
Steven Dickson, 62, was
booked at the Citrus
County Detention Facility
in Lecanto on the Citrus
County warrant charge.
His bond was set at
$50,000.
The charge stems from a
crash that occurred May 12.
According to Florida High-
way Patrol, a 2004 Chevro-
let SSR truck driven by
Steven Dickson was travel-
ing east on County Road 48
at around 10:22 p.m. He re-
portedly swerved to avoid
hitting an animal and lost
control ofthe vehicle, caus-
ing it to overturn.
Both Steven Dickson
and his passenger, Debo-
rah A. Dickson, 62, of Flo-
ral City, were ejected
from the vehicle.
Deborah Dickson died
the next day at Tampa
General Hospital.
Steven Dickson was ar-
rested on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under
the influence with seri-
ous bodily injury. He re-
portedly failed all field
sobriety tasks he was
asked to perform and his
blood alcohol concentra-
tions were 0.155 percent
and 0.149 percent. The
legal limit in Florida is
0.08 percent.
According to an arrest
report, Steven Dickson told
a trooper he shouldn't have
been driving and was wor-
ried about the condition of
his wife. Witnesses report-
edly said he tried to flee
the scene before law en-
forcement arrived, stating
"he would rather be ar-
rested than go to the
hospital."

Health dept.

submits

reduction

plan
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
Last month, the Florida
Department of Health an-
nounced an upcoming lay-
off of staff, which included
an expected downsizing of
15 percent of personnel at
the Citrus County Health
Department.
On Friday, June 10,
Teresa Goodman, Citrus
County Health Depart-
ment administrator, broke
the news to her staff, re-
gretfully informing them
of the upcoming layoffs.
According to Judy Tear,
public information officer
and emergency coordina-
tor for the Citrus County
Health Department, a
workforce reduction plan
has been submitted to the
state health office for
approval.
"At this time, we have
not heard back from
them," she said. "This
process can take up to
four to six weeks. Re-
member 67 counties are
submitting a workforce
reduction plan."
She added, "Until it is
approved, we cannot re-
lease any information re-
lated to potential affected
positions or programs."
Approximately $1.3 mil-
lion dollars has been cut
from the local agency
Tear said in anticipation
of a workforce reduction,
they have consolidated
some services.
"We are no longer seeing
urgent care clients at the
Lecanto North location, but
we still are seeing those
clients at Inverness and
Crystal River," she said.
"Due to severe revenue






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Habitat house goes up today


Special to the Chronicle

Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County
will raise the walls on house No. 72 for the
Gulledge family at 8 a.m. Saturday, July 9,
at 9624 N. Feigel Terrace, Crystal River.
Habitat volunteers, friends, family and
everyone interested in Habitat for Human-
ity's work are invited to attend and help.
For driving directions, call the office at


(352) 563-2744, or visit www.habitatcc.org.
Habitat for Humanity, a nonprofit, ecu-
menical Christian housing ministry seeking
to eliminate poverty housing, seeks quali-
fied families for its program. The program
will be explained at an orientation from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday, July 30, at Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church, Lecanto. At-
tendance is mandatory for those who wish
to use the program. Call (352) 563-2744.


LOU ELLIOTT JONES/Special to the Chronicle
Anna Sparks, left, mother of stabbing victim Roderic Sparks, is pinned with a button bear-
ing her son's photograph by a supporter outside the Levy County courtroom where a 15-year-
old teen was to be arraigned in Sparks' death.


PLEA
Continued from Page Al

and wristbands were made
by family members and
friends as were the buttons
with photos of Rod Sparks
at a detention hearing for
Sparks last month.
The family had pushed
for Sutherlin Jr to be
charged as an adult but the
State Attorney's Office,


which has refused to com-
ment on the case citing state
confidentiality law on juve-
nile cases, is apparently
going ahead with plans to
try the teen as a juvenile.
The Sparks family has also
questioned why Sutherlin Sr
has not faced any charges in
connection with the fight
and his son's actions.
According to a Levy
County Sheriff's news re-
lease, the altercation
started when Sutherlin Sr.


threw a can at Sparks' truck
and yelled at him about
making noise. Sparks got
out of the truck and con-
fronted Sutherlin Sr. and
verbal altercation evolved
into a fight. When Sparks
started to overwhelm the fa-
ther, the son stepped in and
stabbed Sparks, according
to the sheriff's release.
Sutherlin's family did not
attend Friday's proceeding.
The next hearing in the
case is July 22.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Russell Baines Jackson, 25,
of 958 E. Bismark St., Hemando,
at 5:21 p.m. Wednesday on an
active Hillsborough County war-
rant for a felony charge of armed
burglary. No bond.
* Eric V. Christiansen, 41, of
201 E. Hill St., Inverness, at
10:09 p.m. Wednesday on a
misdemeanor charge of battery.
Bond $500.
SApril Dawn Hoffman, 36, of
52 S. Fillmore St., Beverly Hills,
at 12:56 a.m. Thursday on a
misdemeanor charge of battery.
Bond $500.
Burglaries
* A burglary to an occupied
residence occurred at about 2
a.m. July 5 at Nemesia Court E.,
Homosassa.
* A burglary to an occupied
residence occurred at about 4
a.m. July 5 in the 40 block of S.
Jefferson Street, Beverly Hills.
* A burglary to an unoccu-
pied structure occurred at about
6 a.m. July 5 in the 70 block of
N. Florida Avenue, Invemess.
* A burglary to an occupied
residence and a grand theft of a
firearm occurred at about 1:30
a.m. July 6 in the 200 block of
South Boulevard, Invemess.
* A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at
about 10 a.m. July 3 in the 4700
block of S. Robert Blake Ave.,
Invemess.
* A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at
about 3 p.m. July 6 in the 6500
block of E. Lakato Lane,
Invemess.
* A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at
about 7:30 a.m. July 7 in the
5600 block of E. Tenison St.,
Invemess.
Thefts
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about noon
May 15 in the 100 block of N.W.


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* Also under Public Information on the CCSO website,
click on Crime Mapping for a view of where each
type of crime occurs in Citrus County. Click on
Offense Reports to see lists of burglary, theft and
vandalism.


U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred on June 1 in the
8400 block of W. Park Springs
Place, Homosassa.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 8 a.m.
June 4 in the 90 block of Grass
Street, Homosassa.
SA theft of utility services oc-
curred at about noon June 22 in
the 10700 block of N. Autumn
Oak Point, Crystal River.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 1 p.m.
June 26 in the 3800 block of W.
Grover Cleveland Boulevard,
Homosassa.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 9 a.m.
July 1 in the 8500 block of Miss
Maggie Drive, Crystal River.
* A petit theft occurred at
about 8 a.m. July 4 in the 2400
block of N. Pennsylvania Av-
enue, Crystal River.
* A petit theft occurred at
about 4:30 a.m. July 5 in the
7100 block of W. Grover Cleve-
land Boulevard, Homosassa
Springs.
SA theft of a vehicle and boat
trailer occurred at about 7 a.m.
July 5 in the 8000 block of W.


Miss Maggie Drive, Crystal River.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 1 p.m.
June 24 in the 900 block of Con-
stitution Blvd., Invemess.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 3 p.m.
July 6 in the 1000 block of S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 10 p.m.
July 6 in the 50 block of S. Fill-
more St., Beverly Hills.
* A petit theft occurred at
about 7:45 p.m. July 7 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
Vandalisms
SA vandalism ($200 or less)
occurred at about 2:30 p.m.
June 30 in the 1000 block of W.
Main Street, Invemess.
SA vandalism ($200 or more)
occurred at about 3 a.m. July 2
in the 2600 block of N. Rutgers
Terrace, Hernando.
*A vandalism ($200 or more)
occurred at about 4 p.m. July 6
in the 4200 block of S. Rainbow
Drive, Invemess.
SA vandalism ($200 or less)
occurred at about 5:30 p.m. July
6 in the 4600 block of S. Florida
Ave., Inverness.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Surplus Property

C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly to mostly cloudy with scattered
showers and thunderstorms today.


77 75 1.60 76 74 0.80

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 74
Tropical low moves northward toward
the Panhandle. Rain chance 60%.
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 73
Scattered thunderstorms return with the normal
summer pattern. Rain chance 50%.
p MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Scattered storms during the afternoon away
From the beaches. Rain chance 50%.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 82/80
Record 99/63
Normal 90/72
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.47 in.
Total for the month 1.25 in.
Total for the year 31.10 in.
Normal for the year 25.89 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 13
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.93 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 73
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 90%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's Count: 2.4/12
Sunday's Count: 4.9
Monday's Count: 4.9
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/9 SATURDAY 12:58 7:11 1:25 7:39
7/10 SUNDAY 1:48 8:02 2:16 8:31


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:32 P.M .
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:39 AM.
MOONRISE TODAY...........................3:17 PM.
JULY 23 JULY 30 AUG. 6 MOONSET TODAY 1:31 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:53 a/8:07 a 12:35 p/9:47 p
Crystal River** 10:56 a/5:29 a - /7:09 p
Withlacoochee* 8:43 a/3:17 a 10:40 p/4:57 p
Homosassa*** 12:03 a/7:06 a 11:45 a/8:46 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
2:32 a/9:15 a 1:37 p/11:06 p
12:53 a/6:37 a 11:58 a/8:28 p
9:45 a/4:25 a -- /6:16p
1:42 a/8:14 a 12:47 p/10:05 p


Gulf water
temperature



87�
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.72 27.79 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.69 35.72 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.09 37.11 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.71 37.73 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data Is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L City


81 63 .06
97 70
83 68 1.81
94 74
86 72 .33
99 71
87 71 .83
87 64 .02
92 73
82 58
75 68 .19
81 62
83 57
89 75 .11
75 70 .47
89 70 .52
86 61
85 68 1.14
81 69
92 75 .86
85 70 .06
76 58
10583
90 61 .01
89 69
86 66
10277
88 71 1.07
76 68 1.44
82 70 .56
97 77
88 70 .08
99 77
10084
96 77
74 65
84 73 .45
92 77 .70
81 59
91 71
97 77
97 73
84 71 .15


84 56
96 70
85 65
92 75
83 67
99 75
88 70
85 56
96 77
84 54
82 65
74 68
80 55
89 77
87 63
90 70
84 69
86 64
83 64
94 75
87 66
86 52
102 79
91 63
89 73
85 69
100 79
90 68
88 63
86 60
94 76
88 66
99 76
100 83
96 76
74 65
90 70
95 77
79 68
86 74
96 76
98 76
91 73


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 94 77 .38 ts 93 80
New York City 85 70 .26 s 87 67
Norfolk 89 74 ts 86 70
Oklahoma City 10079 pc 104 75
Omaha 88 69 pc 89 73
Palm Springs 11084 s 108 80
Philadelphia 86 72 1.44 s 89 68
Phoenix 11089 .02 pc 108 88
Pittsburgh 76 66 .54 s 86 61
Portland, ME 72 58 s 80 57
Portland, Ore 70 57 s 77 55
Providence, R.I. 77 70 .29 s 86 63
Raleigh 92 74 .41 ts 88 71
Rapid City 91 61 ts 83 65
Reno 93 56 s 94 59
Rochester, NY 82 60 s 78 60
Sacramento 95 61 s 92 60
St. Louis 87 69 s 90 73
St. Ste. Marie 77 58 pc 76 59
Salt Lake City 86 67 pc 88 66
San Antonio 98 76 pc 96 75
San Diego 77 69 s 76 66
San Francisco 72 54 s 68 53
Savannah 95 78 ts 90 75
Seattle 71 51 .01 pc 72 52
Spokane 71 48 s 74 50
Syracuse 85 61 1.34 s 83 58
Topeka 89 68 pc 92 75
Washington 88 75 .60 s 88 69
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 111 Imperial, Calif. LOW 33 Meacham, Ore.

WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/76/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 71/56/sh Mexico City
Athens 91/73/s Montreal
Beijing 92/70/pc Moscow
Berlin 81/63/pc Paris
Bermuda 86/77/pc Rio
Cairo 97/74/s Rome
Calgary 67/45/pc Sydney
Havana 89/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 91/82/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 95/69/s Warsaw


75/61/s
70/56/pc
92/64/s
76/54/ts
77/57/s
76/64/ts
74/57/sh
71/58/s
88/69/s
62/42/s
88/77/ts
81/61/s
81/61/s


C I T R U S


C 0 U N T


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office

106 W. Main
St.,
Inverness, FL
34450


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Neale Brennan .... Promotions/CommunityAffairs Manager, 563-6363
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Mike Arnold.......................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
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S ou nd O ff .............................................................. ......... . . . ................. . 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9

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144
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L.nkentleld
D .nken ed f Cannondale Dr
Ave ,-
S '. Me, dowvresl
N I.

- I. Courthouse
Tompkins St. [ M square

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Who's in charge:


O
JULY 15


A4 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011





CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Andrew
Alesi, 73
LECANTO
Andrew J. Alesi, age 73,
Lecanto, died Wednesday,
July 6, 2011,
under the
loving care
of his family
and Hos-
pice of Cit-
rus County.
A Funeral
Service of
Andrew Remem-
Alesi branch will
be held
Monday, July 11, 2011, at 1
p.m. at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home.
Pastor Clarence Helms,
Douglas Dodd, and others
will speak. Burial will fol-
low at the Florida National
Cemetery. The family will
receive friends in visitation
on Sunday, July 10, 2011,
from 4 to 6 p.m. at the fu-
neral home.
Andrew was born on April
19, 1938, in Brooklyn, N.Y.,
to the late Joseph and Mae
Alesi and came to this area
in 1991 from New Jersey. He
served our country in the
United States Army. Andrew
was employed as a manager
for New York Telephone
(now Verizon.)
He enjoyed playing classi-
cal and popular piano, trav-
eling, dancing and bowling
and was an avid baseball
history fan. In recent years,
he enjoyed working as a
crossing guard at Inverness
Primary and Citrus High
schools. He tutored at
Lecanto Primary School as
a volunteer for the past ten
years. He was a member of
the Spanish-American Club
of Citrus County.
Survivors include his wife
Denise and her son,
Spencer Travis; his four
children, Ronald (Suzanne)
Alesi, IL; Marie (John) Ma-
chovsky, TX; Michael (Mil-
lie) Alesi, VA; and Janine
Alesi, FL; four grandchil-
dren. In lieu of flowers, do-
nations may be made to
Hospice of Citrus County,
The Spanish-American Club
of Citrus County, Citrus
County Scholarship Fund or
a charity of your choice.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





Jerry
Howells, 72
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Jerry How-
ells, 72, of Homosassa,
Florida, will be held at 10
a.m. Monday, July 11, 2011,
at the Ho-
mosassa
Chapel of
Hooper Fu-
neral
Homes with
military
honors af-
forded by
American
Jerry Legion Post
Howells No. 155.
Mr. How-
ells was born June 22, 1939,
in Cleveland, Ohio, to
Charles and Neva Howells.
He passed away on Sunday,
July 3, 2011, in San Antonio,
TX. He was a U.S. Army vet-
eran, a retired policeman
and security officer He was
a member of the Moose
Lodge in Homosassa,
Florida. Mr. Howells en-
joyed American history,
fishing and being the neigh-
borhood handyman.
Mr. Howells is survived by
5 sons, Richard Wikel, Keith
Howells, David Howells,
Kevan Howells and Brett
Howells; 2 daughters, Janet
Changthoralek and Neva
VanDerSchaegen; 7 grand-
children; and 4 great-grand-
children. The family
requests expressions of
sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to the
Disabled Veterans ofAmer-


ica.
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Carmel
Ingemi, 78
HOMOSASSA
Carmel Ann Ingemi, age
78, of Homosassa, FL,
passed away on Friday, July
08, 2011, at HPH Hospice
House in Lecanto, Fla.
Services and burial will
take place in Farmingdale


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
* Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society
in charge of arrange-
ments.
* Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are in-
cluded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es-
timate provided to the
sender.
* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mili-
tary. (Please note this
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
* Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleonline
.com.
* Paid obituaries are
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eties.
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LI, N.Y Local arrangements
are under the care of Strick-
land Funeral Home Crystal
River, Fla.


Norma Jean
Murphy
Norma Jean Murphy, 81,
Hernando, died July 7,2011.
Private cremation arrange-
ments with Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home With Crema-
tory

Thomas





Pritchard, 73
HERNANDO
Thomas John Pritchard,
73, of Hernando, passed
away on June 30, 2011. Fero
Funeral Home, Beverly
Hills.

Bessie Spitza,
83
Bessie Spitza, 83, died
July 1. Gathering will be at
Roberts Funeral Home,
downtown chapel, 606 S.W
2nd Ave., Ocala, from 12 p.m.
to 1 p.m. on Monday, July 11.
Committal will follow at 1
p.m. at Good Shepherd Me-
morial Gardens, Ocala.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Robert
Thurston, 80
HOMOSASSA
Robert Leslie Thurston,
80, of Homosassa, FL
passed away July 5, 2011.
Private cremation will take
place under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, FL.


GCLa. &. Tav
Funeral Home With Crematory
NORMA MURPHY
Private Cremation Arrangements
RICHARD W. TOLAND
Private Cremation Arrangements
ANDREW J.ALESI
Viewing: Sun. 4-6pm
Service: Mon. 1pm
VIRGINIA WALLER
Pending
726-8323 MNa


Cuban guitarist dies


Buena Vista

Social Club

guitarist

Manuel

Galban was

80years old

Associated Press

HAVANA - Manuel
Galban, a Grammy-win-
ning Cuban guitarist who
rose to international fame
as a member of the Buena
Vista Social Club, has died
of a heart attack in Ha-
vana. He was 80.
An article in Communist
Party newspaper Granma
on Friday noted Galban's
passing the previous day
and called him a "master
of the guitar."
"It is a very sad day for
Cuban music and fans of
Cuban Music," said Daniel
Florestano, longtime man-
ager of both Galban and the
Buena Vista Social Club, in
a statement issued by Gal-
ban's publicist. "Galban's
enormous impact world-
wide with his unique guitar
sound and warm smile will
be missed by many"
Born in 1931 in Gibara, in
the eastern province of
Holguin, Galban made his
professional debut in 1944,


In this Oct. 2010 photo released by Montuno Productions America, Manuel Galban poses
n a promotional photograph in Havana, Cuba. Galban, a Grammy-winning Cuban guitarist
who rose to international fame as a member of the Buena Vista Social Club, died of a heart
attack in Havana on Thursday. He was 80.


according to the statement
In 1963 he joined Los
Zafiros, Spanish for "Sap-
phires," which fused styles
as varied as bolero, calypso
and rock with Cuban "filin"
music, which comes from
the word "feeling."
The group became one of
the island's most popular
until it disbanded in 1972.
Galban spent the next
three years as head of Cuba's
national music ensemble.
He then formed a group
known as Batey, which per-


formed throughout the
world "representing Cuba
in numerous acts of soli-
darity," Granma said.
In the 1990s he became
part of the Buena Vista So-
cial Club project, a group of
elderly, sometimes retired,
musicians who were living
quietly in Cuba before U.S.
guitarist and producer Ry
Cooder brought them to-
gether
The album was an inter-
national smash hit and
later the subject of a docu-


mentary by filmmaker Wim
Wenders.
In 2003, Galban teamed
up with Cooder to record
Mambo Sinuendo. It won a
Grammy the following year
for best pop instrumental
album.
Galban follows others
from the Buena Vista Social
Club who have already
died, including Compay Se-
gundo, Ibrahim Ferrer,
Ruben Gonzalez, Cachaito
Lopez and vocalist Pio
Leyva.


Associated Press

BEIJING - An outspo-
ken Chinese writer and
government critic has left
his homeland for Germany
after police repeatedly
threatened him with im-
prisonment to prevent him
from publishing any more
of his controversial works
overseas.
Liao Yiwu arrived in
Berlin two days ago at the
end of a secretive journey
that included transfers in
the Vietnamese capital of
Hanoi and Warsaw, Poland,
the writer said in a phone
interview with The Associ-
ated Press.
"I feel so much more re-
laxed now that I am in a
place where I can speak
freely and publish freely,"
Liao said. "I am in a very
good mood now."
The writer said police in
China had visited him often


To Place Your

"In Memory"ad,

Call Mike Snyder

at 563.3273 or 564.2943
or email
msnyder@chronicleonline.com


in recent months to deliver
veiled threats that if he
published any more works
abroad, he would be jailed.
The Sichuan-based writer
was also banned from leav-
ing China to attend a liter-
ary festival in Australia in
March and removed from a
plane in the southwestern
city of Chengdu in Febru-
ary on his way to Germany
for Europe's largest literary
festival.
The police intimidation
of Liao appeared to be part
of one of the Chinese gov-
ernment's broadest cam-
paigns of repression in
years, which started in Feb-
ruary as dozens of activists,
lawyers and intellectuals
were detained, arrested or
disappeared in Beijing's
bid to prevent the growth
of an Arab-style protest
movement.
Calls to the press office
of the Sichuan province


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public security bureau rang
unanswered Friday
Liao and his work have
been under government
scrutiny ever since he pub-
licly mourned those killed
during a military crack-
down on pro-democracy
protests in Tiananmen
Square in 1989. Recordings
he made of himself wailing
and reading his poem about
the deaths, "Massacre," be-
came popular and he was
sent to prison for four
years.
The writer said he had no
immediate plans to return
to China and would focus
on getting new books pub-
lished - including a mem-
oir of his experience as a


(352) 489-3579


political prisoner
"Before I came out, the
police talked to me many
times, saying that I am not
allowed to publish," Liao
said. "My publisher was
worried I would be taken
away, so due to considera-
tions for my safety, they
postponed (the memoir)
three times. Now that I
have arrived here, they can
publish it."
The author is most
known for "The Corpse
Walker," a series of inter-
views with people living in
the margins of Chinese so-
ciety, including a profes-
sional mourner, a political
prisoner and a public toilet
manager.


�ard

Eye Center
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa

(352) 628-0123


Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


Obituaries


Author leaves homeland for Germany


In this 2008 photo, Chinese poet and novelist Liao Yiwu, left, talks with a temple keeper at the earthquake-damaged
Gu Temple in Jiezi town of China's Sichuan Province. An outspoken writer and government critic, Liao has left his home-
land for Germany after police repeatedly threatened him with imprisonment to prevent him from publishing any more of
his controversial works overseas.


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 A5












TH AA 01KCTYINR)VCHROIC


I HwTosREHEMR "TINREI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
S&P500ETF1495120134.40 -.96 NAPallg 39018 4.18 -.14 Microsoft 563634 26.92 +.15 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 1245699 10.70 -.22 KodiakOg 31878 6.40 -.11 Cisco 481908 15.74 -.16 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
FordM 672174 13.88 -.24 Adventrx 31010 3.56 +.15 PwShsQQQ473095 59.03 -.16 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDRFncl 594707 15.46 -.20 VirnetX 26556 38.89 +2.90 NewsCpA 387562 16.75 -.68 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
GenElec 531896 18.99 -.31 CrystalRk 24146 1.20 +.42 SiriusXM 352646 2.22 +.00 Chg: Loss or gain for theday. No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: ld - Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd - Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
NoahEduc 2.38 +.36 +17.8 GSESy 2.36 +.21 +9.8 SkyPFrtJ 3.20 +.55 +20.8 ingqualificaton n- Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
ArchCh 42.17 +4.27 +11.3 VirnetX 38.89 +2.90 +8.1 CoffeeH 26.75 +4.40 +19.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock Issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
BkADJ4-1511.30 +.84 +8.0 VistaGold 3.32 +.19 +6.1 ChinaSky 3.12 +.50 +19.1 Holder owes Installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security ata specified price. s-
Nautilus h 2.19 +.15 +7.4 StreamGSv 3.56 +.19 +5.6 StemCell rs 6.08 +.95 +18.5 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the
CSGIobWm 9.12 +.58 +6.8 Express-1 3.78 +.19 +5.3 FriendFd n 4.54 +.64 +16.4 stock is issued. wd - When distributed, wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New
52-week high. un - Unit, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Aeroflexn 15.40 -3.29 -17.6 ChaseCorp 15.45 -1.35 -8.0 Ixia 9.90 -3.11 -23.9
Autoliv 71.14 -8.63 -10.8 iBio 2.69 -.16 -5.6 EncoreCap 26.53 -4.65 -14.9
AutolivpfC 96.74 -10.93 -10.2 FlexSolu 3.10 -.16 -4.9 TransceptP 7.98 -1.10 -12.1


Lentuon 3.42 -.36 -9.5 Bacterin 2.60 -.12 -4.4 57StGenwt 2.30 -.30 -11.5
Hilllntl 5.78 -.46 -7.4 PhrmAth 3.04 -.14 -4.4 NwLead rs 2.31 -.29 -11.2


898 Advanced
2,103 Declined
119 Unchanged
3,120 Total issues
56 New Highs
14 New Lows
3,171,760,151 Volume


DIARY


204 Advanced
255 Declined
28 Unchanged
487 Total issues
10 New Highs
4 New Lows
90,467,444 Volume


844
1,723
109
2,676
77
25
1,563,796,458


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 9,659.01DowJones Industrials
5,627.85 3,872.64Dow Jones Transportation
441.86 356.32Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,428.24NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,789.54AmexIndex
2,887.75 2,077.77Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,018.35S&P500
14,562.01 10,657.57Wilshire 5000
868.57 587.66Russell 2000


Last
12,657.20
5,548.66
436.75
8,410.19
2,422.20
2,859.81
1,343.80
14,306.54
852.57


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
-62.29 -.49 +9.33+24.11
-69.59 -1.24 +8.65+33.35
-2.05 -.47 +7.84+15.55
-65.94 -.78 +5.60 +23.52
+10.48 +.43 +9.68+31.05
-12.85 -.45 +7.80+30.20
-9.42 -.70 +6.85+24.66
-92.74 -.64 +7.08+26.65
-5.54 -.65 +8.79+35.45


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BoBrades 20.00 -.35
BoSantSA 10.78 -.50
BmSBrasil 11.13 -.22
BkofAm 10.70 -.22
ABBLtd 26.34 -.27 Bklrdnd 1.06 +01
AES Corp 1306 -07 BkNYMel 25.80 -.59
AFLAC 46.51 -.89 Barday 15.80 -.39
AGCO 52.88 +1.50 BariPVixrs 20.35 +.24
AGLRes 42.23 . BarrickG 46.24 +.05
AKSteel 16.22 -.39 Baxter 60.92 -.14
AMR 5.50 +.12 BeazerHm 3.52 -.12
ASA Gold 28.91 -.24 BectDck 89.30 -.44
AT&Tlnc 31.14 -.09 BerkHaA115050.00-1590.00
AUOptron 6.37 -.11 BerkH B 76.90 -.87
AbtLab 53.33 -.21 BestBuy 31.82 -.46
AberFitc 73.07 -1.29 BIkHillsCp 30.25 -.27
Accenture 63.43 -.01 BkDebtStr 4.31 +.01
AdamsEx 11.32 -.07 BlkEnhC&l 14.57 -.01
AMD 6.95 -.20 BIkGlbOp 18.35 -.16
AdvSemi 5.67 -.08 Blackstone 17.01 -.19
Aerofexn 15.40 -3.29 BlockHR 16.12 -.25
Aeropost 18.34 -.22 Boeing 75.07 -.92
Aetna 44.30 -.10 BostBeer 90.39 -.11
Agilent 50.23 -2.15 BostProp 110.75 -.73
Agniomg 62.90 -.05 BostnSci 7.17 -.07
Agriumg 89.80 +1.17 BoydGm 9.31 +.05
AlcatelLuc 5.88 -.16 Brandyw 12.08 +.11
Alma 16.38 -.11 BrMySq 29.12 -.25
AllegTch 61.61 -.62 Brunswick 20.70 -.51
Allete 41.76 -.18 Buckeye 65.15 +.06
AlliBGIbHi 15.32 +.03 Buenavent 37.16 +.73
AlliBlnco 7.91 +.01 CB REllis 25.28 -.78
AlliBern 20.02 +.03 CBSB 28.67 -.31
Allstate 30.54 -.38 CFInds 149.01 +3.32
AlphaNRs 45.29 -1.28 CHEngy 53.63 -.48
Altria 26.89 -.11 CIGNA 51.85 -.01
AmBevs 33.05 -.84 CMSEng 20.06
Ameren 29.04 -.11 CNO Find 7.79 -.09
AMovilLs 26.42 -.31 CSS Inds 20.98 -.07
AmAxe 11.60 -.36 CSXs 26.62 -.39
AEagleOut 13.88 -.07 CVREngy 26.66 +.17
AEP 38.35 -.17 CVSCare 38.10 -.44
AmExp 53.07 -.52 CblvsNYs 27.22 -.26
AmlnlGrp 29.94 -.27 CabotO&G 66.48 -.11
AmSIP3 7.83 +.01 CallGolf 6.58 -.10
AmTower 53.48 -.20 Calpine 16.44 +.10
Amerigas 45.68 -.34 Camecog 26.47 -.11
Ameriprise 58.14 -1.08 Cameron 51.15 -.72
AmeriBrgn 42.65 -.40 CampSp 34.17 +.09
Anadarko 79.34 -.88 CdnNRsgs 42.03 -1.41
AnalogDev 39.62 -.57 CapOne 53.71 -.60
Ann Inc 27.56 -.16 CapifSrce 6.18 -.12
Annaly 18.52 -.01 CapMpfB 14.78 +.04
Anworth 7.47 -.02 CardnlHIth 46.45 -.38
Apache 125.13 -1.25 CareFusion 28.10 -.02
AquaAm 22.49 -.10 CarMax 34.43 -.31
ArcelorMit 34.40 -.87 Carnival 37.38 -.72
ArchCoa 26.69 -.65 Caterpillar 110.41 -1.22
ArchDan 31.04 +.59 Celanese 54.61 -.92
ArmourRsd 7.67 +.04 Cemex 8.37 -.14
ArrowB 39.19 -2.06 Cemigpf 20.18 -.13
Ashland 65.42 -1.00 CenovusE 38.07 -.05
AsdEstat 17.14 -.05 CenterPnt 19.75 -.05
ATMOS 33.95 -.05 Cnb4yink 40.31 -.40
AtwoodOcn 45.03 -.08 Checkpnt 17.80 -.22
Autoliv 71.14 -8.63 ChesEng 30.58 +.07
Avnet 32.21 -.65 ChesUf 39.82 -.30
Avon 28.53 -.21 Chevron 105.89 -.70
BB&TCp 26.09 -.90 Chios 16.12 -.06
BHP BilLt 95.84 -.96 Chimera 3.52 +.06
BHPBil plc 79.80 -.89 ChinaMble 47.08 +.20
BJsWhls 50.43 +.06 Chubb 62.75 -.29
BP PLC 44.51 -.03 Cimarex 89.07 +.50
BPZ Res 4.05 ... CindBell 3.29 -.01
BRFBrasil 16.53 -.17 Cifgrprs 42.03 -.60
BRT 6.40 ... CleanH 109.05 +.93
BakrHu 75.07 -.31 CliffsNRs 97.42 +.90
BallCps 40.36 +.29 Clorox 68.12 -.24
BcBilVArg 10.74 -.48 Coach 66.82 -.06


CCFemsa 93.69 +.22
CocaCola 68.68 -.07
CocaCE 28.99 -.24
Coeur 25.62 -.12
CohStlnfra 17.93 -.14
ColgPal 88.42 -.36
CollctvBrd 14.98 -.04
Comerica 33.79 -.91
CmwREIT 25.84 -.07
CompPrdS 35.87 +.12
Con-Way 41.56 -.17
ConAgra 26.31 +.06
ConocPhil 75.91 -.84
ConsolEngy 50.25 -.65
ConEd 53.56 -.48
ConstellA 21.38 -.38
ConstellEn 38.82 -.11
Cnvrgys 13.78 -.19
CooperTire 19.57 -.98
Corning 17.86 -.33
CosanLtd 12.22 +.09
CottCp 8.41 -.04
Covidien 54.07 -.20
Crane 50.93 -.13
CSVS2xVxS 16.37 +.39
CSVellVSts 18.89 -.28
CredSuiss 38.07 -.46
Cummins 106.77 -2.05
C 3Shar 1 03

DCT Indl 5.49
DNPSelct 10.09 +.07
DPL 30.39 +.02
DR Horton 11.98 +.05
DSWlnc 54.74 +.15
DTE 50.37 -.27
DanaHldg 18.72 -.18
Danaher 54.54 -.51
Darden 53.22 -.41
Darling 17.48 +.48
DeanFds 12.09 -.34
Deere 86.11 -.33
DeltaAir 9.35 -.06
DenburyR 19.86 -.55
DeutschBk 57.13 -1.52
DevelDiv 14.82 -.06
DevonE 80.32 -1.23
DiamRk 11.14 -.20
DicksSptg 38.01 -2.60
Dillards 58.73 -.86
DrSCBrrs 31.49 +.54
DirFnBrrs 43.05 +1.41
DirLCBrrs 32.50 +.68
DrxEMBull 38.65 -1.48
DrxEnBear 13.69 +.28
DirEMBear 17.00 +.55
DrxFnBull 26.39 -.92
DirxSCBull 89.44 -1.58
DirxEnBull 77.83 -1.78
Discover 27.12 -.40
Disney 39.91 +.17
DomRescs 48.63 -.33
DoralFnd 2.60 +.08
DEmmett 20.51 -.18
DowChm 36.38 -.79
DrPepSnap 41.92 +.27
DuPont 55.42 -.42
DukeEngy 19.09
DukeRlty 14.69 -.02
Dynegy 6.62 +.38
ECDangn 13.67 -.55
EMCCp 27.87 -.02
EOGRes 101.92 -1.63
EQTCorp 54.51 +.06
EastChm 104.66 -1.01
EKodak 2.83 -.02
Eatons 52.53 -.35
EVEnEq 12.26 -.02


Edisonlnt 39.05
BPasoCp 20.21
Ban 11.99
BdorGldg 16.01
EmersonEl 57.19
EmpDist 19.51
EnbrEPts 30.00
EnCanag 30.52
EndvSilvg 10.00
EnPro 49.20
ENSCO 53.13
Entergy 67.94


EqtyRsd 62.83 +.01
ExoRes 15.85 -.79
Exelon 43.63 -.11
ExxonMbl 82.42 +.06
FMCTchs 45.07 -.80
FairchldS 17.46 -.05
FedExCp 97.56 -.94
FedSignl 6.62 -.10
Ferrellgs 23.11 +.06
Ferro 13.83 -.32
FibriaCelu 12.94 -.53
RdNatlnfo 30.96 -.36
FstHorizon 9.42 -.16
FMajSilvg 20.79 +.17
FTActDiv 11.17 +.07
FtTrEnEq 12.57 -.02
irstEngy 44.64 -.02
RagstBcp 1.25
Ruor 66.99 +.21
FootLockr 23.99 +.04
FordM 13.88 -.24
ForestLab 39.37 -.55
ForestOil 23.74 -.50
FortuneBr 64.64 -.35
FMCGs 55.12 -.37
FronberCm 8.20 +.02
Fronline 13.33 -.69

GATX 38.48 -.37
GMXRs 4.95 -.18
GabelliET 6.18 -.01


GabHIthW 7.85
GabUlI 7.35
GaisaSA 8.88
GameStop 26.85
Gannett 14.18
Gap 18.98
GenDynam 74.66
GenElec 18.99
GenGrPrn 17.27
GenMarit 1.05
GenMills 36.81
GenMotn 31.58


GenOnEn 4.13
Genworth 10.48
Gerdau 10.63
GlaxoSKln 44.21
GlimchRt 10.15
GolLinhas 12.87
GoldFLd 14.63
Goldarpg 50.49
GoldmanS 134.08
Goodrich 95.59
Goodyear 17.23
GtPlainEn 21.19
GreenbCos 21.71
Griffon 9.98
GpTelevisa 23.58
GuangRy 21.03
Guess 43.95
HCP Inc 38.20
HSBC 49.83
HSBCCap 26.74
Hallibrtn 54.04
HanJS 15.33
HanPrmDv 12.62
Hanesbrds 31.00
Hanoverlns 37.60
HarleyD 42.94
HarmonyG 13.24
HarrisCorp 44.55
HartfdFn 26.27
HawaiiEl 24.71
HItCrREIT 53.49
HItMgmt 10.96


HlthcrRlty 21.26
HeclaM 8.00
Heinz 53.47
HelixEn 17.20
Hertz 16.27
Hess 74.68
HewlettP 36.43
HighwdPrp 35.04
HollyFront 73.93
HomeDp 36.62
Honwlllni 59.54
Hormels 29.92


Hospira 53.69
HospPT 25.04
HostHofs 17.45
HovnanE 2.50
Humana 80.82
Huntsmn 19.86
IAMGIdg 19.41
ICICI Bk 48.00
ING 12.01
IONGeoph 10.26
iShGold 15.07
iSAsfia 25.95
iShBraz 72.15
iSCan 31.94
iShGer 26.64
iShHK 18.60
iShltaly 16.43
iShJapn 10.58
iSh Kor 67.47
iSMalas 15.40
iShMex 62.78
iShSing 13.91
iSSwitz 26.49
iSTaiwn 15.18
iSh UK 17.94
iShSilver 35.75
iShBTips 110.91
iShChina25 42.27
iSSP500 134.85
iShEMkts 47.93
iShSPLatA 51.23
iShB20T 95.37


iS Eafe 59.83
iShiBxHYB 91.48
iSR1KV 68.72
iSR1KG 62.35
iSR2KG 98.03
iShR2K 85.13
iShREst 62.70
iShSPSm 75.52
iStar 8.23
ITTCorp 58.84
Idacorp 40.21
ITW 58.91


Imafon 9.74 -.18
ImaxCorp 28.42 -.71
IngerRd 46.02 -.75
IngrmM 18.30 -.22
IntegrysE 52.59 -.11
IntcnlEx 128.40 -1.12
IBM 176.49 +.01
InlGame 18.27 +.13
IntPap 30.26 -.30
Interpublic 12.72 -.12
Invesco 23.57 -.33
IronMtn 35.39 -.01
ItauUnibH 22.56 -.44

JPMorgCh 40.74 -.58
Jabil 21.35 +.03
JanusCap 9.83 -.29
JohnJn 67.57 -.35
JohnsnCi 42.47 -.24
JnprNtwk 32.06 -.74
KB Home 9.76 -.04
KKRn 15.63 -.25
KTCorp 18.77 -.36
KCSouthn 59.54 -2.44
Kaydon 38.31 -.23
KAEngTR 29.48 +.14
Kelbgg 55.17 -.56
KeyEngy 19.44
Keycorp 8.26 -.12
KimbClk 66.62 -.09
Kimco 19.50 +.13


KindME 73.88 +.22 Molyorpn 56.55 -.84 PetrbrsA 30.53
KinefcC 64.99 +.46 MoneyGrm 3.57 -.05 Petrobras 33.73
Kinrossg 16.67 +.08 Monsanto 75.17 +.42 Pfizer 20.16
Kohls 55.18 -.60 MonstrWw 14.65 -.48 PhilipMor 69.41
Kraft 35.71 -.22 Moodys 39.40 -.38 PhilipsEl 25.41
KrispKrm 9.55 -.15 MorgStan 22.30 -.70 PiedNG 30.77
Kroger 25.32 -.14 MSEmMkt 15.93 -.14 Pier1 12.25
L-1 dent 11.75 ... Mosaic 70.58 +1.70 PimoStrat 11.66
LDKSolar 6.71 -.17 MotrlaSoln 45.08 -.64 PinWst 44.78
LGDisplay 14.28 -.10 MotrlaMon 21.64 -1.00 PioNtrl 91.14
LSICorp 7.27 -.16 MurphO 65.55 -.40 PitnyBw 22.90
LTCPrp 28.51 -.16 NCRCorp 19.45 -.07 PlainsEx 38.55
LaZBoy 10.01 -.13 NRGEgy 24.20 -.03 PlumCrk 41.15
Laclede 38.34 -.25 NVEnergy 15.51 -.10 Polaris 119.31
LVSands 46.01 +.71 NYSEEur 35.44 +.04 PostPrp 43.17
LearCorps 54.21 -.40 Nabors 24.43 -.49 Potash s 59.19
LeggMason 3333 -.89 NBkGreece 1.30 -.04 PwshDB 29.97
LeggPlat 24.23 -.57 NatFuGas 71.93 -1.07 PS USDBull 21.42
LenderPS 20.23 +.45 NatGrid 49.53 -.12 Praxair 110.47
LennarA 18.85 -.05 NOilVarco 80.21 -.74 PrecDrill 14.47
LbtyASG 4.58 -.04 NatSemi 24.78 +.06 PrinFnd 30.15
LillyEli 37.71 -.14 NewAmHi 10.98 +.09 ProLogis 36.78
Limited 40.62 +.26 NJRscs 45.79 -.46 ProShtS&P 40.15
LincNat 28.53 -.86 NYCmtyB 15.39 -.25 PrUShS&P 19.86
Lindsay 72.57 -.25 NYTimes 8.98 -.23 PrUShDow 16.44
Linkedlnn 99.60 +5.62 NewellRub 15.96 -.11 ProUltQQQ 94.61
LiveNatn 12.03 -.23 NewmtM 54.76 -.21 PrUShQQQ rs46.99
LizClaib 5.19 -.05 NewpkRes 9.39 +.11 ProUItSP 54.84
LloydBkg 2.95 -.10 Nexeng 22.83 -.21 PrUShtFnrs 59.79
LockhdM 80.51 -.85 NextEraEn 57.70 -.35 ProUShL20 33.38
LaPac 8.50 NiSource 20.60 +.02 ProShtR2K 28.64
Lowes 23.61 -.38 Nicor 56.28 +.16 ProUltR2K 50.12
LumberLiq 18.60 +.28 NikeB 93.24 -42 ProUSSP50014.65
L nBA 40.88 35 NobleCorp 37.34 -.35 PrUltSP500s 82.80
S NoiaCp 6.22 -.24 ProUSSlvrs 16.85
k 8756 68 Nordstrm 50.25 -.31 PrUltrders 43.34
M&TBk 87.56 -1.68 PrUShCrders47.18
MBIA 8.97 -.25 Norfk 75.68 -1.31 ProUShrEuro 17.30
MDU Res 22.95 -.25 NoestUt 35.31 .05 ProctGamUShEuro 17.30
MEMC 8.04 .17 NorthropG 67.96 -.54 ProctGam 64.93
MFGlob 7.72 -.12 Novars 62.15 +.35 ProgrssEn 48.08
MFA Fncl 8.34 +.05 NSTAR 46.20 .15 Progsvp rs39.20
MCR 9.45 -.05 Nuor 40.93 .58 Prudenl 64.38
MGIC 6.61 -.20 NvMO 13.69 +1132.54
MGMRsts 14.96 +.23 NvMulSI&G 8.86 -.04 PSEG 3.54
Macquarie 26.65 -.23 NuvQPf2 8.42 +.02 PubSfg 119.40
Macys 30.42 -.04 OGEEngy 51.36 -.26 PPrlteGrp 6.6277
MagelMPtr 60.26 -.06 OcciPet 106.27 -1.33 QuanexBld 16.68
Magnalgs 52.00 -.90 Oceaneers 42.90 -.03 Questar 18.03
Manitowoc 17.42 -.66 OfficeDpt 4.24 -.18 QsilvRes 14.14
ManpwrGp 56.13 -2.49 OfficeMax 7.55 -.34 Quiksilvr 5.12
Manulifeg 17.56 -.23 OilSvHT 154.52 -1.24 RPM 23.55
MarathnOs 32.67 -.43 Olin 23.74 -.17 Rackspace 45.17
MarathPn 41.41 -.37 OmegaHIt 22.00 +.27 RdianGrp 4.72
MktVGold 56.29 +.04 Omncre 32.05 -.93 RadioShk 13.61
MktVRus 39.37 -.45 ONEOK 75.25 -.13 Racorp 87.56
MktVJrGld 36.42 +.12 ONEOK Pt 86.00 -.30 angeRs 5615
MktVAgri 54.96 +.37 OshkoshCp 32.23 -.29 RJamesFn 33.22
MarkWest 48.30 -1.37 OwensCorn37.29 -.30 Rayonier 6759
MarlntA 37.17 -.38 Owenslll 26.43 -.33 Raytheon 48.62
MarshM 31.25 -.21 Rltylno 34.94
MStewrt 4.46 -.04 RegalEnt 11.74
Maso 11.92 -.12 PG&ECp 42.43 -.10
McDrmlnts 21.00 -.07 PMIGrp 1.51 -.01 RegionsFn 6.15
McDnlds 85.60 -.46 PNC 59.83 -.76 Renrennola 4.77
McGrwH 42.38 -.66 PNM Res 17.00 -.06 Reren 10.91
McMoRn 18.14 -.29 PPG 92.12 -1.25 RepubSvc 31.28
Revlon 18.74
MeadWvco 33.88 -.17 PPLCorp 28.02 -.07 ReynAms 38.06
Mechel 24.13 -.49 PallCorp 57.17 -.45 Ry 38.06
MedoHlth 55.26 -.60 ParkDrl 6.53 +.37
Medrnic 38.00 -.20 PariotCoal 22.98 -.22
Merck 36.12 +.39 PeabdyE 59.95 -1.29
MetLife 43.52 -.75 Pengrthg 12.89 -.11
MetroPCS 17.40 +.05 PennVaRs 27.45 The re
MidAApt 71.14 +.07 PennWstg 23.39 -.23
Mias 6.12 +.02 Penney 32.96 -.77 NYSE I
MitsuUFJ 5.05 -.08 PepBoy 11.56 +.29
MobileTele 18.65 -.26 PepsiCo 69.93 -.59 f und o
Mohawk 56.32 -1.34 Prmian 22.44 +.02
Petrohawk 24.57 -.55


-.39 Riolinto 72.72 -.91
-.41 RiteAid 1.30 -.03
-.07 RobtHalf 26.68 -1.12
+.27 RockwAut 87.66 -1.67
-.07 Rockoll 61.87 -.70
-.54 Rowan 38.47 -.35
RylCarb 37.83 -.65
+.11 RoyDShllB 73.70 +.20
-.18 RoyDShllA 73.03 -.13
-1.37 Royce 15.39 -.03

-.51
-.24
-1.93 SAIC 16.71 -.07
-.15 SAPAG 61.62 -1.26
+1.36 SCANA 39.55 -.18
-03 SKTIcm 15.97 -1.07
+.05 SLM Cp 16.70 -.23
-.83 SpdrDJIA 126.39 -.71
-.02 SpdrGold 150.25 +1.10
-.71 SPMid 182.29 -1.42
-.48 S&P500ETF134.40 -.96
+28 SpdrHome 18.30 -.21
+28 SpdrKbwBk 24.03 -.37
+.16 SpdrLehHY 40.35 -.04
-.59 SpdrKbwRB 25.72 -.42
+.27 SpdrRefi 55.91 -.43
-.83 SpdrOGEx 60.68 -.60
+1.30 SpdrMetM 70.42 -.71
-.93 STMicro 9.89 -.42
+.18 Safeway 23.46 -.21
-.55 SJoe 19.06 -.20
+.31 SJude 47.49 -.33
-1.87 Saks 11.56 -.14
-.26 Salesforce 156.67 -1.46
-1.94 SJuanB 25.42 +.23
+1.93 SandRdge 10.83 -.36
+.22 Sanofi 39.77 +.13
-.02 SaraLee 19.62 -.06
-.06 Schlmbrg 89.96 -.44
-.20 Schwab 15.60 -.52
+.45 SippsNet 47.39 -1.70
-.88 SeadrillLd 35.48 -.48
-.29 SemiHTr 34.65 -.52
+.49 Sensient 38.76 +.02
-.07 ShawGrp 28.34 -.09
-.02 SiderurNac 12.41 -.21
-.16 SilvWhtng 36.25 +.18
-.17 SilvrcpMg 10.77 +.11
-.35 SimonProp 121.17 -.41
-.12 Skechers 14.80 -.25
-.15 SmithAOs 42.97 -.89
-.61 SmithfF 22.32 -.29
-.09 Smucker 76.25 -.83
-.18 Soluta 22.59 -.59
-.20 Sothebys 47.43 -.37
-.93 SoJerlnd 54.79 -.54
-.30 SouthnCo 40.31 -.17
-.16 SthnCopper 35.05 +1.96
-.96 SoUnCo 42.15 -.12
-.07 SwstAirl 11.38 -.23
-.11 SwstnEngy 43.91 -.60
-.02 SpectaEn 27.66 -.27
-.19 SprintNex 5.49 -.16
-.42 SP Mas 40.23 -.31
-.37 SP HIthC 35.78 -.16
+.70 SPCnSt 31.74 -.11
-.07 SPConsum 41.37 -.25




nainder of the

listings can be

n the next page.


IA EIA N SOC5 CANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.45 -.02
AbdnEMTel 19.09 -.20
AdmRsc 25.67 +.44
AdcareHwt 3.75
Advenbx 3.56 +.15
AlexooRg 8.06 -.08
AlldNevG 38.11 -.46
AlmadnMg 3.80 +.19
AmApparel 1.07 +.02
AntaresP 2.39 -.01
ArcadiaRs .07 +.01
Augustag 4.97 -.04


Aurizong 5.77 -.04 ClaudeRg 2.18 -.03
AvalRaren 6.62 +.08 ClghGlbOp 13.56 -.09
Ballanty 4.49 -.17 CornstProg 7.40 +.05
BarcUBS36 48.42 -.11 CrSuiHiY 3.19 -.08
BarcGSOil 24.84 -.59 CstalRk 1.20 +42
BrclndiaTR 70.62 -1.16
Brigusgrs 1.77 D ourEg 31
BritATob 91.79 +1.18 DenisnMg 1.96 .07
CAMACEn 1.27 -.04 EVLtdDur 16.52 -.03
CanoPet .34 -.01 EVMuni2 12.78 +.08
CardiumTh .28 +.01 EllswthFd 7.66 -.05
CelSd .50 ... ExeterRgs 4.38 -.04
CFCdag 21.54 +.23 Express-1 3.78 +.19
CheniereEn 9.55 -.22 ExtorreGg 14.12 -.25
ChinaShen 3.25 -.04 FrkStPrp 13.57 -.27


GSESy 2.36 +.21
GabGldNR 18.24 +.04
GascoEngy .24 -.00
Gastargrs 3.54 -.11
GenMoly 4.51 -.08
GeoGloblR .40 -.03
GoldResrc 22.98 -.09
GoldStrg 2.42 -.08
GranTrrag 6.70
GrtBasGg 2.02 +.01
GtPanSilvg 3.73 +.10
GugFront 23.38 -.05
HooperH .91 -.04


HstnAEn 19.27 -.58
Hyperdyn 4.30 +.08
ImpOilgs 47.58 -.19
InovioPhm .82 +.03
IntellgSys 1.64 +.04
IntTowerg 7.82 +.01

i I 1R 0 1 0 + 2 0
KodiakOg 6.40 -.11
LadThalFn 1.57 +.11
Lannett 5.02 -.09

MaLCao g 1.48 -.07
MadCatzg 1.48 -.07


Metalim 5.97
MetoHlth 4.65
MdwGoldg 2.06
MincoGg 1.89
Minefhdg 13.73
Neoprobe 3.44
Nevsung 6.37
NewEnSys 2.04
NwGoldg 10.64
NAPallg 4.18
NDynMng 10.24
NthnO&G 23.41
NthgtMg 2.76
NovaGldg 9.93
Oilsandsg .29


O k ~oHlth4.06 +.10 Rubion 343 -.09


Palatnrs 1.09
ParaG&S 3.37
PhrmAth 3.04
PbnDrill 15.84
PlatGpMet 1.82
PolyMetg 1.88
PyramidOil 5.03
Quepasa 7.43
QuestRMg 6.10
RareEleg 10.45
Rentech 1.09
RexahnPh 1.22
Richmntg 7.76


+.02 SamsO&G 2.92
+.04 SeabGldg 28.84
-.14 Senesco .31
-.16 SteamGSv 3.56
+.02 TanzRyg 6.27
+.06 Taseko 4.91
-.16 Tengsco .95
-.27 TimberlnR .81
-.18 TrnsailPet 1.67
-.17 TriValley .61
-.01 TriangPet 7.14
-.01 Ur-Energy 1.64
Uranerz 3.00


UraniumEn 3.48 -.01


VantageDrl 1.83 -.05
VirnetX 38.89 +2.90
VistaGold 3.32 +.19
Walterlnv 24.30 +.36
WidePoint .92 -.01
WTDrfChn 25.43 +.01
WTDrfBz 29.18 -.11
WizzardSft .22 -.01
YMBiog 2.74 -.03


I NASDAQ NI AL MARKET 11


Name Last Chg


ACMoorelf 2.44 -.01
AMCNetn 38.54 -.98
APACC 8.44 -.01
ASMLHId 37.44 -1.20
ATP O&G 15.81 -.04
AVIBio 1.65 +.01
AXTInc 8.13
Abraxas 4.49 -.06
Accuray 8.54 +.24
Achillion 8.08 -.13
AcmePkt 72.27 -1.26
AoordaTh 32.45 +.18
AcivsBliz 12.07 +.03
Actuate 6.35 +.03
Acxiom 12.85 -.21
AdobeSy 31.54 -.53
AdolorCp 2.63 +.31
Adtan 41.95 -.60
AdvBattery 1.09 +.02
AdvEnld 13.50 +.28
AeroViron 36.24 -.04
AEternag 2.31 -.03
Affymax 7.11 -.12
Affymetix 6.79 +.20
AgFeed 1.22 -.06
Aixron 30.55 -1.47
AkamaiT 31.66 +.12
Akorn 7.19 -.01
AlaskCom 8.75 -.06
Alexions 50.30 +1.84
Alexza 1.81 -.01
Alkerm 19.52 +.29
AllosThera 2.14
AllscriptH 20.23 -.27
AlteraCplf 46.84 -1.28
AlterraCap 22.71 -.04
Amarin 14.81 -.01
Amazon 218.28 +1.54
ACapAgy 30.20 +.14
AmCapLd 10.10 -.15
AmSupr 9.03 +.15
AmCasino 24.06 +.06
Amgen 57.64 -.27
AmkorTIf 6.31 -.22
Amtech 20.42 +.33
Amyin 14.22 +.51
Anadigc 3.05 -.13
Anlogic 54.11 +.12
Analystlnt 3.24 -.26
Ancesry 42.53 +.47
A123Sys 5.54 +.17
ApolloGrp 48.88 -.01
Apollolnv 10.54 -.06
Apple Inc 359.71 +2.51
ApldMat 13.10 -.34
AMCC 8.68 -.04
Approach 24.13 -.15
ArchCap s 33.04 -.03
ArenaPhm 1.51 +.08
AresCap 16.13 -.11
AriadP 12.16 +.18
AribaInc 36.72 +.95
ArkBest 26.43 -.39
ArmHId 29.78 -.71
Arris 11.81 -.06
ArrwhRshh .49 -.07
ArubaNet 30.54 -.46
AscenaRb 34.98 -.13
AspenTech 17.13 -.02
AssodBanc 13.88 -.13
Atmel 14.45 -.17
Audvox 7.65 -.09
Autodesk 40.12 -.27
AutoData 54.50 -.52
Auxilium 20.36 -.08
AvagoTch 37.96 -.70
AvanirPhm 3.53 +.05
AvisBudg 17.50 -.23
Awareh 3.20 -.13
Axcelis 1.80 -.07
BEAero 41.75 -.11
BGCPts 8.03 -.05
BMCSft 56.17 -.33
Baidu 147.78 +.77


BeacnRfg 22.33 -.75 CommVlt 46.04 -1.02
BeasleyB 4.08 +.01 Compuwre 10.16 +.01
BebeStrs 7.68 -.07 Comtech 29.55 +.03
BedBath 60.14 -.17 Comverge 3.37 +.36
Biogenldc 107.39 +.87 ConcurTch 51.70 -.42
BioMarin 28.88 +.16 Conmed 28.79 -.23
Bionovorsh .83 +.04 Conns 9.13 -.04
BioSante 3.60 +.42 ConstantC 24.71 -.54
BlkRKelso 9.41 +.02 CorinthC 4.52 -.10
Blkboard 44.25 +.02 Costoo 81.41 -.65
BlueCoat 22.33 +.52 CowenGp 3.78
BlueNile 48.47 +1.83 Creelnc 32.23 -1.25
BobEvans 36.00 -.13 Crocs 27.47 -.24
BonTon 10.63 +.26 CrosstexE 12.74 +.03
BreitBurn 19.83 +.04 Ctrip.oom 44.91 -.49
BrigExp 31.18 -.03 CubistPh 36.60 -.32
Brighpnt 8.71 -.04 Curis 3.99 +.29
Broadcom 34.62 -.41 Cyberonics 29.53 +.68
Broadwind 1.49 +.01 Cyclacel 1.23 -.02
BrcdeCm 6.75 -.01 Cymer 50.91 -.72
BrklneB 9.37 ... CypSemi 23.23 -.11
BrooksAuto 11.21 -.14 CtRxh .78 -.00
BrukerCp 20.78 -.06
Bucyrus 92.00 +.15
BuffabWW 67.91 +1.23 DUSA 5.91 +.21
CAlnc 23.18 -.24 DecklsOut 95.18 +1.20
CDCCprs 2.30 +.16 Delcath 6.34 +.66
CH Robins 81.48 -.62 Dell Inc 17.14 -.01
CMEGrp 294.50 -4.49 DeltaPtrh .47 -.01
CNinsure 15.42 +.47 Dndreon 40.67 -.52
CVB Fnd 9.38 -.22 Dennys 3.90
Cadence 10.58 -.14 Dentsply 39.23 +.07
CaliperLSc 8.44 +.12 Depomed 8.74 +.11
CdnSolar 10.47 -.48 DirecTVA 53.08 +.28
CapCtyBk 10.37 -.09 DiscCmA 41.93 -.57
CapFdFrs 11.83 -.05 DiscCmC 37.54 -.66
CpstnTrbh 1.64 +.02 DishNetwk 31.78 +.03
Cardica 2.83 +.33 DollarFns 22.94 +.09
CareerEd 22.72 -.26 DollarTree 69.88 -.33
CaribouC 13.60 -.14 DonlleyRR 20.19 -.25
Carrizo 42.36 -.59 DotHillSy 3.12 -.02
CarverBch .88 +.05 DblEgl 10.48 +.77
CatalystH 59.53 +1.64 DragonWg 5.80 +.04
Cavium 44.43 -.77 DrmWksA 20.98 -.35
Celgene 61.99 +.31 DryShips 4.14 -.06
CellTherrsh 1.48 -.02 DurectCp 2.03 -.01
Celsion 3.46 -.02 DyaxCp 2.06 -.04
CenterFnd 6.55 -.08 Dynavax 2.89 -.06
CentEuro 11.44 -.11 E-Trade 13.80 -.36
CentAI 15.81 -.53 eBay 33.42 +.09
Cephln 80.18 +.08 EVEngy 58.81 +.07
Cepheid 32.40 -.94 EagleBulk 2.38 -.10
Cerners 64.06 -.23 EaglRkEn 10.75 -.29
Changyou 43.89 -1.29 ErthLink 7.86 -.05
ChrmSh 4.47 -.03 EstWstBcp 20.47 -.01
Chartlnds 59.32 +1.19 Ebixlnc 20.64 -.29
CharterCm 57.80 -.74 EchelonC 9.97 +.42
ChkPoint 58.44 +.36 EducMgmt 25.35 +.40
Cheesecake 33.50 -.33 EducDevh 5.45 -.05
ChelseaTh 5.81 +.28 8x8 Inc 5.21 +.03
ChildPlace 47.46 +.51 ElectSd 19.36
ChinaAutL 2.06 -.01 ElectArts 25.05 +.22
ChinaBAK 1.15 +.07 Emoorelf 3.07 +.02
ChinGerui 4.00 -.31 EmpirRsth 1.15 +.02
Chinalnfo 2.62 -.20 EncoreCap 26.53 -4.65
ChinaPSf 1.12 -.02 EndoPhrm 41.47 -.06
ChinaSky 3.12 +.50 Enerl .97 -.05
ChinaTcF 4.30 -.12 EngyConv 1.19 -.04
ChrchllD 46.17 +.01 EngyXXI 34.72 +.06
CienaCorp 17.51 -.43 Entegris 9.75 -.26
CinnFin 29.02 -.37 EntropCom 9.28 -.05
Cintas 33.56 -.56 Equinix 104.61 +1.45
Cirrus 16.09 -.60 EricsnTel 14.21 -.59
Cisco 15.74 -.16 EvrgrSlrrs .55 +.01
CitrixSys 82.98 +.29 ExactScih 9.18 -.02
CleanEngy 13.29 -.07 Exelids 9.12 -.10
Clearwire 3.80 -.07 EddeTc 7.60 -.12
CoffeeH 26.75 +4.40 Expedia 30.68 +.43
CognizTech 76.38 -1.24 Expdlnf 52.34 -.54
CogoGrp 5.20 -.01 ExpScripts 54.57 -.26
Coinstar 56.80 +.42 ExrmNet 3.47 +.11
ColdwtrCrk 1.42 -.10 Ezcorp 37.62 -.45
ColemanC 16.73 -.10 F5Netwks 116.42 -1.22
ColumLabs 3.39 +.19 FEI Co 38.99 -1.34
Comcast 25.51 -.07 FLIRSys 34.22 -.46
Comcspcl 24.48 -.03 FSIlln 3.14 -.01
CmcBMO 43.57 -.24 FXEner 9.66 -.03
CommSys 20.60 +.37 Fastenals 36.63 +.08


FiberTwr 1.46 -.09 IdenixPh 5.40 +.24
FifthThird 12.56 -.34 Illumina 76.12 +.08
Fndlnst 17.43 +.22 Immuoor 26.93 -.05
Finisar 18.34 -.85 ImunoGn 14.15 +.37
FinLine 23.14 -.24 Imunmd 4.18 -.03
FstCashFn 43.67 -.44 Incyte 19.82
FtConnBcn 11.12 -.04 Infinera 7.28 -.32
FstNiagara 13.48 -.05 Informat 60.91 -.15
FstSolar 132.60 -.27 Infosys 67.21 -1.04
FTCloudn 20.42 -.09 Inhibitex 3.93 -.10
FstMerit 16.89 -.23 InnerWkgs 8.99 +.10
Fiserv 64.61 -.61 InsitTc 22.23 -.28
Flextrn 6.59 -.10 Insulet 22.94 -.10
FocusMda 31.75 -.74 IntegLfSci 47.38 -.18
ForcePro 5.02 +.03 IntgDv 7.89 -.16
FormFac 9.35 +.20 Intel 23.09 -.14
ForrestR 33.33 +.05 InterDig 45.58 -1.59
Fortnets 28.05 +.46 InterMune 36.74 +.30
Fossil Inc 124.65 +1.49 InlSpdw 30.49 -.28
FosterWhl 29.31 -.77 Intersil 12.92 -.11
FreshMktn 38.85 -.97 Intuit 51.69 -.56
FriendFdn 4.54 +.64 IntSurg 368.70 +.45
FuelCell 1.42 -.04 InvRIEst 8.34 -.01
FultonFncl 10.78 -.33 IridiumCm 8.84 -.05
hi 1 vanhoeEn 1.90
bIa 9.90 -3.11
GSVCapn 16.20 +1.50
GTSolar 16.51 -.60 JASolar 4.91 -.10
GTx Inc 4.80 ... JDASoft 32.71 +.17
Garmin 33.60 -.14 JDSUniph 15.94 -.76
GenProbe 67.89 -.92 JackHenry 30.86 -.19
GenetcTh 8.78 +.83 JacklnBox 23.50 +.14
Gentex 31.31 -.31 JkksPac 18.90 +.23
Genfvah 21.05 +.03 Jamba 2.21 -.01
Geores 25.50 -.14 JamesRiv 20.61 +.35
GeronCp 4.39 +.39 JazzPhrm 35.57 +.40
GileadSd 42.44 -.25 JetBlue 6.05 -.07
Gleacher 2.01 +.01 JoyGlbl 97.25 -1.66
GlobCrsg 40.94 -.36 KLATnc 42.25 -.28
Globllnd 5.58 +.02 KeryxBio 4.94 +.05
Globalstar 1.17 -.05 KirMlands 12.18 -.24
GlbSpcMet 24.38 -.05 Kulicke 11.34 -.41
GluMobile 5.57 +.11 L&LEngy 5.45 +.11
GolarLNG 38.98 +1.02 LKQCorp 27.41 -.25
Google 531.99 -14.61 LPLlnvn 33.90 -.75
GrLkDrge 6.06 -.09 LSIIndlf 7.91 -.04
GrWfRes 3.23 -.07 LTXCrdrs 8.92 -.37
GreenMtC 96.20 +1.06 LamResrch 44.17 -.57
GrifolsSAn 7.65 +.15 LamarAdv 27.54 -.81
Grpoin 14.57 +.03 Landstar 47.88 -.31
GulfRes 3.04 +.01 Lattce 6.57 -.11
GulfportE 31.64 -.01 LeapWirlss 15.93 -.58
HMNFn 2.51 +.11 Level3 2.59 -.03
HSNInc 34.57 -.43 LedPhrm 1.67 -.08
HancHId 31.07 -.42 LibGlobA 45.48 -.37
HanmiFnd 1.24 ... LibGlobC 43.22 -.17
HansenMed 4.59 +.46 LibtyMlntA 17.74 +.05
HansenNat 81.00 -.75 LibStarzA 74.51 -.09
HanwhaSol 5.90 -.04 LifeTech 51.30 -.50
HarbinElec 16.91 +.07 LifePtH 40.00 -.43
Harmonic 7.10 -.15 LimelghtN 4.88 -.13
HrvrdBb 6.00 +.27 Lincare 30.13 -.17
Hasbro 44.65 -1.03 LincEdSv 19.43 -.03
HawHold 5.94 -.01 LincElecs 37.44 -.32
HelenTroy 34.97 -1.61 LinearTch 33.08 -.44
HSchein 74.32 -.59 LinnEngy 39.50
HercOffsh 5.48 -.07 LivePrsn 14.38 -.12
HiTchPhm 30.35 +1.06 Local.com 3.79 +.42
Hologic 20.52 -.05 LodgeNet 3.12 -.07
Homelnns 38.39 -1.37 Logitech 10.68 -.21
HomeAwn 42.12 +1.11 LookSmart 1.47 +.02
HotTopic 8.12 -.29 LoopNet 18.37 -.03
HudsCity 8.28 -.25 lululemn 120.25 -1.45
HumGen 24.52 -.36
HuntJB 48.62 -.48
HuntBnk 6.53 -.21 MELASci 2.53 +.29
HutchT 3.07 +.20 MGE 41.44 +.01
IAC Inter 38.55 -.03 MIPSTech 7.07 -.17
IdexxLabs 79.51 -.89 MKSInst 26.15 -.24
IFBncpn 11.67 ... MTS 43.69 -.79
iGateCorp 16.50 -.28 MagicSft 6.20 -.06
IPGPhoton 74.49 -.07 Magma 8.42 -.03
iPass 1.90 -.05 MadenH 9.71 -.02
iShAsiaexJ 62.83 -.50 Majesoo 3.20 -.13
iShACWI 48.62 -.43 MAKOSrg 32.75 -.57
Icagenrs 5.86 +.03 MannKd 3.86 -.04
IconixBr 24.55 -.50 MarinaBrs .23 +.05


MarvellT 15.41 +.02 Paccar 52.25 -1.14
Mattel 27.65 -.35 Pacerlnf 5.08 +.01
Maximlnig 25.81 -.14 PacEthrs 1.04 -.07
MaxwllT 16.30 -.18 PacSunwr 2.76 -.15
MedAssets 13.99 +.63 PaetecHId 4.71 +.01
MedicAcbn 8.48 -.02 PainTher 4.64 +.03
MelcoCrwn 13.98 +.51 PanASIv 31.67 -.06
MentorGr 12.88 -.05 PaneraBrd 131.94 -.02
MercadoL 83.04 -2.02 ParamTch 23.73 -.07
Mercerlnf 10.41 -.54 PrtnrCm 15.90 -.11
MeritMeds 18.40 -.33 Patterson 33.55 -.49
Micrel 10.60 -.19 PattUTI 32.37 -.24
Microchp 37.87 -.52 Paychex 31.33 -.30
Micromet 5.76 -.23 PnnNGm 41.68 -.03
MicronT 7.68 -.14 PennantPk 11.34 -.18
MicrosSys 51.66 -.35 PeopUdF 13.66 -.11
MicroSemi 20.87 -.08 PerfectWd 21.05 +.72
Microsoft 26.92 +.15 Perrigo 91.15 +.13
Micrvisn 1.16 -.05 PetroDev 33.68 +.49
MillerHer 28.51 ... PetsMart 46.08 -.08
Misonix 2.40 ... PharmPdt 27.87 -.30
Molex 26.42 -.08 Pharmacyc 11.54 +.99
Momenta 20.68 -.24 Pharmasset127.91 +2.84
Motricity 8.30 -.18 Photrln 8.23 -.21
Move Inc 2.29 -.06 PluristemT 3.33 +.21
Mylan 24.98 +.08 Polyomms 32.39 -.45
MyriadG 23.26 -.26 Popular 2.76 -.08
NETgear 44.34 -.77 Power-One 7.91 -.06
NICInc 13.69 -.01 PwShsQQQ 59.03 -.16
NIlHIdg 43.58 -.28 Powrwav 2.85 -.11
NPSPhm 10.18 +.02 Presstek 1.61 -.01
NXPSemn 26.07 -.47 PriceTR 60.91 -.96
Nanomtr 20.41 -.35 PrSmrt 59.20 -1.00
Nanosphere 1.87 +.02 priceline 552.15 +4.81
NasdOMX 25.37 -.41 Primoris 14.06 -.13
NatCineM 16.26 -.24 PrUPShQQQ22.31 +.20
NatPenn 8.04 -.16 PrUltPQQQs91.02 -.76
NatusMed 13.91 -.07 PrognicsPh 7.63 -.04
NektarTh 7.52 -.12 ProgrsSfts 26.20 +.05
NetLogicM 40.49 +.26 ProspctCap 10.17 -.01
NetApp 53.48 -.42 PureCycle 3.20 -.14
Netease 47.36 -.08 QIAGEN 19.17 -.07
Netiix 295.14 +2.72 QiaoXing 1.08
NtScout 16.78 -.09 QlikTechn 35.43 +1.29
NetSolTch 1.75 -.03 Qlogic 16.51 +.02
NetSpendn 9.50 -.34 Qualoom 59.36 +.10
Newport 19.15 +.24 QualitySys 91.48 +.32
NewsCpA 16.75 -.68 QuantFurs 4.76 +.21
NewsCpB 17.33 -.60 QuestSft 23.03 -.17
NobilityH 7.84 ... Questoor 27.71 +.70
Nordsons 58.65 -.36 QuickLog 3.87 -.17
NorTrst 45.87 -.73 QuinStreet 13.12 -.49
NwstBcsh 12.97 -.21 RFMicD 6.60 -.01
NovaMeas 10.55 -.50 RTIBiolog 3.07 +.08
Novavax 1.96 +.03 RXiPhrm 1.22 +.02
Novlus 35.97 -.84 RadntSys 21.95 +.18
NuVasive 34.01 -.41 Radware 36.11 +1.19
NuanceCm 22.37 +.16 Rambus 14.61 -.32
Nvidia 15.43 -.29 Randgold 83.76 -.35
NxStageMd 21.06 +.27 Rdiff.cm 12.02 -.02
OCZTech 9.67 +.01 RegncyEn 26.60 -.20
OReillyAu 65.42 -.35 Regenrn 59.64 -1.07
Oclaro 6.79 -.47 ReprosTrs 6.07 +.53
OdysMar 3.14 -.14 RepubAir 5.30 -.06
OmegNavh .17 -.14 RschMotn 28.98 -.05
OmniVisn 33.64 -.04 RexEnergy 10.54 -.09
OnAssign 10.42 -.37 RigelPh 9.90 +.03
OnSmcnd 10.50 -.10 Riverbeds 41.13 -.29
Onothyr 8.54 -.37 RosettaR 53.94 -.68
OnlineRes 3.35 +.11 RossStrs 80.08 -1.19
OnyxPh 36.58 -.22 RoviCorp 58.59 -.26
OpenTable 87.09 -.09 RoyGId 60.22 -.58
OpnwvSy 2.47 -.02 RubioonTc 16.92 -.25
Opnext 2.29 -.10 rue21 36.98 +.10
OpbmerPh 12.04 -.02 Rana 28.50 43
optXprs 15.84 -.52
Oracle 33.94 -.15
OraSure 9.93 -.06 S1Corp 7.39 -.01
Oritani 13.05 +.05 SBACom 39.61 -.27
Orthfx 43.18 -.28 SEIlnv 22.76 -.14
OtterTail 21.72 -.07 STEC 18.00 -.13
Overstk 15.64 -.20 SVB FnGp 61.05 -.12
Oxianersh 254 11 SaixPhm 39.50 -.57
SanderFm 46.30 -1.00
SanDisk 43.04 -.58
PDLBio 5.75 -.03 SangBio 6.26 -.26
PFChng 41.79 -.17 Sanmina 9.87 -.25
PMCSra 7.63 -.16 Sanofirt 2.54 -.02


+.01 TiboSft 30.78 -.42
+.05 TitanMach 29.02 -.08
-.16 TiVoInc 10.78 +.06
+.04 TowerSemi 1.14 -.05
-.72 Towersbt 5.09 -.16
+.01
-.08 TownSports 8.20 -.24
+.29 TractSups 71.71 -.55
+.46 TransceptP 7.98 -1.10
+.45 Travelzoo 76.00 +2.18
-.26 TrdentMh .79 +.04
-.15 TrimbleN 40.98 -.55
+.53 TriQuint 10.31 -.29
+.01 TrueRelig 30.08 +.28
-.08
-.30 TrstNY 4.91 -.07
1.02 Trusbmk 23.70 -.30
+1.02
+.14 UTStarcm 1.37 -.05
-.30 UTiWrldwd 19.48 -.40
+.25 UltaSalon 68.70 +2.01
-.12 UltraClean 9.20 -.56
+.10 Ultratech 28.12 -.53
-.23 Umpqua 11.91 -.11
-.76 UdOnln 6.41 +.08
-.31
-21 USEnr 4.57 +.05
-.07 UtdTherap 55.33 -.39
-.02 UnivDisp 36.35 -.82
+.05 UnivFor 24.38 -.30
+.00 UranmRs 1.76 -.04
+.35 UrbanOut 32.03 -.55
-.12
+.55

+.01 ValenceTh 1.21
.04 ValVisA 8.25 +.24
+.04
+3.81 ValueClick 18.02 +.05
+.99 VanSTCpB 78.72 +.41
-.12 VarianSemi 61.53 +.04
-.16 Veeolnst 44.84 -.14
VBradleyn 38.42 -1.23
Verisign 34.42 -.20
.14 VertxPh 50.67 +.54
+.17
+.7 Vical 4.42 -.03
+.03
+.81 irgnMdah 29.00 -1.14
-.21 ViroPhrm 19.99 -.28
-.33 VistaPrt 48.65 -.81
-.07 Vivus 8.41 -.05
+.03 Vodafone 26.75 -.09
-.21 Volcano 32.64 -.19
+.95 WD40 44.43 +2.75
-.22 WarnerChs 24.62 +.04
-.17
+53 WashFed 16.77 -.14
-.34 WebMD 48.06 -.37
-.20 WernerEnt 25.97 -.49
-.40 WestellT 3.57 -.02
-.10 Wesbtmr 18.10 -.01
-.27 Wstptlnng 25.25 -.34
-.13 WetSeal 4.96 -.01
-.09 WholeFd 64.36 -.35
+.20
.15 WilshBcp 3.28 +.02
+.1 Windstrm 13.13 -.04
-.28 Winn-Dixie 8.64 -.15
-.03 Wintrust 32.92 -.06
-.40 Wynn 161.15 +3.66
-.02 XenoPort 7.65 +.04
-.16 Xilinx 36.24 -.87
-.49 Xyratex 10.06 +.06
+.01 YRCWwrs 1.15 -.01
-.22
-.27 Yahoo 15.61 -.20
-.02 Yandexn 35.95 +1.80
-.24 Yongye 5.06 -.10
-.02 Zagg 12.71 -.12
+.19 Zalicus 2.76 -.13
-.07 Zhongpin 11.23 -.23
+.02 ZonO&G 4.35 -.22
-.92 ZonBcp 24.42 -.06
-.17
+.30 Zopharm 5.95 -.04
+.13 Zpcarn 22.51 +.87
+.03 ZxCorp 4.08 -.10
-.17 Zoran 8.57 -.01
-.02 Zumiez 28.17 -.79


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Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.1041 4.1031
Australia .9305 .9282
Bahrain .3769 .3770
Brazil 1.5642 1.5601
Britain 1.6031 1.5963
Canada .9614 .9591
Chile 462.49 461.95
China 6.4696 6.4671
Colombia 1760.50 1763.50
Czech Rep 16.98 16.89
Denmark 5.2345 5.1980
Dominican Rep 38.05 38.05
Egypt 5.9584 5.9577
Euro .7019 .6968
Hong Kong 7.7821 7.7827
Hungary 185.53 183.15
India 44.366 44.464
Indnsia 8515.00 8515.00
Israel 3.4091 3.3986
Japan 80.71 81.30
Jordan .7078 .7083
Lebanon 1512.45 1512.45
Malaysia 2.9930 3.0095
Mexico 11.6189 11.5559
N. Zealand 1.1961 1.2026
Norway 5.4183 5.3859
Peru 2.747 2.750
Poland 2.77 2.74
Russia 28.2008 27.9252
Singapore 1.2217 1.2222
So. Africa 6.7213 6.6711
So. Korea 1057.15 1064.04
Sweden 6.3939 6.3251
Switzerlnd .8367 .8452
Taiwan 28.80 28.85
Thailand 30.23 30.29
Turkey 1.6282 1.6179
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6732
Uruguay 18.4502 18.3520
Venzuel 4.2926 4.2926


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.03 0.02
6-month 0.06 0.09
5-year 1.56 1.79
10-year 3.01 3.19
30-year 4.27 4.40



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug 11 96.20 -2.47
Corn CBOT Dec 11 637 +2112
Wheat CBOT Sep11 6511/4 +163/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov11 134612 +8/4
Cattle CME Aug11 114.65 -.07
Pork Bellies CME Jul11 121.00
Sugar(world) ICE Oct11 29.36 -.16
Orange Juice ICE Sep11 191.15 +.55

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz.. spot) $1541.20 $1482.30
Silver (troy oz., spot) $36.b36 $33.694
Copper (pound) $4.402b $4.2920
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$1l/31.40 $1/16.80

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


Sapient 15.56
Satoon h 2.03
SavientPh 7.47
Sawis 39.81
Schulmn 24.88
SciClone 6.21
SciGames 10.27
SeagateT 16.93
SearsHldgs 74.68
SeattGen 21.08
SelCmfrt 18.60
Selectvlns 16.70
SemiLedsn 6.73
Semtech 27.91
Sequenom 7.82
ShandaGm 6.47
Shutterfly 63.10
SifyTech 5.37
SigaTechh 9.26
SigmaDsg 8.63
SigmaAld 75.69
SilganHId 41.61
Silicnlmg 6.99
SilcnLab 42.01
Slcnware 5.70
SilvStdg 27.16
Sina 113.58
Sindair 10.78
SinoClnEn 1.37
SiriusXM 2.22
SironaDent 56.00
Sky-mobin 10.43
SkyPFrU 3.20
SkywksSol 24.72
SmartM 9.18
SmithWes 3.59
SmithMicro 4.20
SodaStrmn 75.68
Sohu.cm 78.23
Somaxon 1.85
SonicCorp 10.80
Sonus 3.38
SouMoBc 20.60
Sourcefire 30.67
Spectranet 6.73
SpectPh 10.05
SpiritAirn 13.71
Spreadtrm 16.64
Staples 15.57
StarSdent 4.36
Starbucks 40.35
SfDynam 16.23
StemCell rs 6.08
SterlBcsh 7.98
StewEnt 7.61
SuccessF 30.85
SunHlthn 8.25
SunPowerA 19.86
SunPwrB 16.64
SusqBnc 8.08
SwisherHn 5.33
Symantec 19.73
Symetricm 6.11
Synaptcs 25.61
Synopsys 26.03
Synovis 18.91
SynthEngy 2.24
Syntoleum 1.36
TDAmeritr 18.93
TFSFncl 10.01
THQ 3.35
TTMTCh 16.21
tw teleom 21.49
TakeTwo 15.36
TaleoA 36.52
TASER 4.50
TechData 49.36
Tekelec 9.19
TeleNav 20.16
Tellabs 4.45
Telvent 39.85
TeslaMot 28.81
TesseraTh 16.07
TetraTc 23.57
TevaPhrm 49.47
TexRdhse 18.28
Theravnce 24.23
Thoratec 35.42


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 1.2 ... 16.22 -.39 -.9 McDnlds 2.44 2.9 18 85.60 -.46 +11.5
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.5 9 31.14 -.09 +6.0 Microsoft .64 2.4 7 26.92 +.15 -3.5
Ameteks .24 .5 23 45.64 -.51 +16.3 MotrlaSoln ......... 45.08 -.64 +18.5
BkofAm .04 .4 19 10.70 -.22-19.8 MotrlaMon ......... 21.64 -1.00-25.6
CapCtyBk .40 3.9 40 10.37 -.09-17.7 NextEraEn 2.20 3.8 15 57.70 -.35 +11.0
CntryLink 2.90 7.2 12 40.31 -.40-12.7 Penney .80 2.4 19 32.96 -.77 +2.0
Citigrprs .04 .1 14 42.03 -.60-11.1 PiedmOfc 1.26 5.9 28 21.25 +.04 +5.5
CmwREIT 2.00 7.7 20 25.84 -.07 +1.3 ProgrssEn 2.48 5.2 16 48.08 -.06+10.6
Disney .40 1.0 18 39.91 +.17 +6.4 RegionsFn .04 .7 ... 6.15 -.02 -12.1
EKodak ... ... 13 2.83 -.02 -47.2 SearsHldgs ... ... ... 74.68 +.46 +1.3
EnterPT 2.80 5.7 24 49.45 +.09 +6.9 Smucker 1.76 2.3 19 76.25 -.83 +16.1
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.3 12 82.42 +.06 +12.7 SprintNex ... ... ... 5.49 -.16 +29.8
FordM ...... 7 13.88 -.24-17.3 TimeWarn .94 2.6 15 36.64 -.42 +13.9
GenElec .60 3.2 17 18.99 -.31 +3.8 UniFirst .15 .3 16 59.69 -.80 +8.4
HomeDp 1.00 2.7 18 36.62 -.43 +4.4 VerizonCm 1.95 5.2 22 37.48 +.06 +4.8
Intel .84 3.6 11 23.09 -.14 +9.8 Vodafone 1.44 5.4 ... 26.75 -.09 +1.2
IBM 3.00 1.75176.49 +.01+20.3 WalMart 1.46 2.713 54.08 -.41 +.3
Lowes .56 2.4 17 23.61 -.38 -5.9 Walgrn .70 1.6 17 44.07 -.07 +13.1


m


A6 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 A7


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: Dr5001n t 37.24 -.26
Balancp 16.84 -.05 EmgLd
Retlnc 8.68 +.05 GNMA 15.88 +.08
Alger Funds B: GrChinaAr 46.84 -.28
SmCapGr 7.32 -.04 HiYIdA p 6.69 +.01
AllianceBern A: StratValA 30.43 -.27
BalanAp 15.97 -.03 TechGroA 35.04 -.20
GlbThGrAp77.83 -.31 DreihsAclnc 11.14 -.01
SmCpGrA 38.30 -.26 Driehaus Funds:
AllianceBern Adv: EMktGr 33.24 -.17
LgCpGrAd 28.37 -.18 EVPTxMEml52.13 -.34
AllianceBern B: Eaton Vance A:
GIbThGrBt 66.94 -.27 ChinaAp 20.97 -.15
GrowthBt 26.53 -.13 AMTFMulnc 9.28 -.01
SCpGrBt 30.69 -.21 MuINCGrA 8.67 -.05
AllianceBern C: InBosA 5.92 +.01
SCpGrCt 30.88 -.22 LgCpVal 18.86 -.15
Allianz Fds Instl: NatlMunlnc 9.08 -.01
NFJDvVI 12.22 -.08 SpEqtA 17.38 -.10
SmCpV 32.94 -.17 TradGvA 7.46 +.01
Allianz Funds A: Eaton Vance B:
SmCpVA 31.40 -.17 HlthSBt 10.96 -.01
Allianz Funds C: NatlMulnc 9.08 -.01
AGlCGrthC 25.43 -.12 Eaton Vance C:
TargetCt 16.11 -.18 GovtCp 7.45 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: NatMunlnc 9.08 -.01
LgCaplnst 20.56 -.16 Eaton Vance I:
Amer Beacon Inv: FltgRt 9.03
LgCaplnv 19.50 -.16 GblMacAbR 10.20
Amer Century Adv: LgCapVal 18.92 -.14
EqGroAp 22.80 -.16 FBR Funds:
EqlncAp 7.54 -.04 Focuslnv 51.30 -.48
Amer Century Inv: FMI Funds:
Balanced 16.39 -.04 LgCappn 16.90 -.13
DivBnd 10.91 +.06 FPA Funds:
Eqlnc 7.54 -.04 Nwlnc 10.80
Gift 31.30 -.12 FPACresn 28.03 -.11
Growthl 27.94 -.17 Fairholme 32.49 -.19
Heritagel 23.52 -.13 Federated A:
IncGro 26.00 -.17 MidGrStA 39.51 -.14
InfAdjBd 12.35 +.06 KaufmAp 5.73 -.04
IntDisc 11.33 -.10 MuSecA 9.86 +.01
IntfGrol 11.69 -.13 Federated Instl:
NewOpp 8.69 -.06 KaufmnR 5.73 -.04
OneChAg 12.94 -.07 TotRetBd 11.22
OneChMd 12.26 -.04 Fidelity Adv FocT:
RealEstl 21.32 -.07 EnergyT 41.49 -.28
Ultra 25.02 -.13 HItCarT 25.90 -.09
Valuelnv 5.96 -.04 Fidelity Advisor A:
American Funds A: Nwlnsghp 21.28 -.13
AmcpAp 20.28 -.14 StrlnA 12.66 +.02
AMuiAp 27.01 -.17 Fidelity Advisor C:
BalAp 18.92 -.06 Nwlnsghtn 20.25 -.12
BondAp 12.39 +.06 Fidelity Advisor I:
CaplBAp 51.95 -.15 EqGrln 64.21 -.30
CapWGAp 37.10 -.31 Eqlnlxn 25.03 -.34
CapWAp 21.04 +.06 FItRateln 9.82
EupacAp 43.31 -.37 IntBdln 11.34 +.06
FdlnvAp 39.21 -.30 Nwlnsgtln 21.51 -.13
GovtAp 14.12 +.07 Fidelity AdvisorT:
GwthAp 32.39 -.20 BalancTx 15.81 -.09
HITrAp 11.45 ... DivGrTp 13.26 -.11
IncoAp 17.37 -.05 EqGrTp 59.95 -.28
IntBdAp 13.56 +.04 EqlnTx 24.65 -.31
InftGrlncAp32.50 -.17 GrOppT 39.16 -.14
ICAAp 29.39 -.23 HilnAdTp 10.40 -.02
NEcoAp 27.38 -.16 IntBdT 11.32 +.06
NPerAp 30.16 -.20 MulncTp 12.70 +.02
NwWrldA 56.11 -.36 OvrseaT 19.62 -.24
STBFAp 10.10 +.01 STFiT 9.29 +.02
SmCpAp 40.62 -.21 StkSelAIIlCp 19.87 -.15
TxExAp 12.07 +.02 Fidelity Freedom:
WshAp 29.54 -.18 FF2010n 14.21 -.03
American Funds B: FF2010K 13.13 -.03
CaplBBp 51.99 -.15 FF2015n 11.88 -.02
CpWGrBt 36.90 -.32 FF2015K 13.18 -.03
GrwthBt 31.32 -.19 FF2020n 14.48 -.04
Ariel Investments: FF2020K 13.69 -.04
Apprec 46.67 -.45 FF2025n 12.12 -.05
Ariel 52.32 -.57 FF2025K 13.92 -.06
Artio Global Funds: FF2030n 14.50 -.06
IntflEqlr 30.88 -.31 FF2030K 14.13 -.06
IntDEqA 30.10 -.30 FF2035n 12.10 -.06
IntEqll r 12.79 -.14 FF2035K 14.33 -.07
Artisan Funds: FF2040n 8.45 -.05
Intl 23.24 -.20 FF2040K 14.40 -.08
InfiVal r 28.62 -.20 FF2045n 10.02 -.05
MidCap 38.08 -.26 Incomexn 11.60
MidCapVal 22.24 -.22 Fidelity Invest:
SCapVal 18.39 -.10 AIISectEq 13.23 -.09
BNY Mellon Funds: AMgr50xn 16.02 -.12
EmgMkts 11.97 -.07 AMgr70rn 17.19 -.08
Baron Funds: AMgr20rxnl3.11 -.01
Asset 61.26 -.46 Balancxn 19.17 -.14
Growth 57.64 -.31 BalancedKx 19.17 -.15
SmallCap 27.30 -.12 BlueChGrn 49.67 -.27
Bernstein Fds: CAMunn 11.89 +.01
IntDur 13.98 +.08 Canada n 60.65 -.26
DivMu 14.47 +.02 CapApn 27.31 -.14
TxMgdlnt 15.84 -.16 CapDevOn 11.74 -.07
BlackRock A: Cplncrn 9.70 -.01
EqtyDiv 18.93 -.11 ChinaRgr 32.48 -.01
GIAIAr 20.28 -.07 CngS 465.09
HiYlnvA 7.79 CTMunrn 11.48 +.02
InftOpAp 35.10 -.37 Contran 72.50 -.45
BlackRock B&C: ContraK 72.51 -.45
GIAICt 18.87 -.07 CnvScxn 26.88 -.33
BlackRock Instl: DisEq n 24.32 -.18
USOpps 44.52 -.40 DiscEqF 24.32 -.18
BaVI 27.15 -.21 Divlntln 31.26 -.27
EquityDv 1898 -.11 DivrslntKr 31.26 -.26
GIbAllocr 20.39 -.08 DivStkOn 15.92 -.13
Brinson FundsY: DivGthn 30.19 -.24
HiYldlYn 6.32 EmergAsrn32.18 +.07
BruceFundn409.77+1.87 EmrMkn 26.92 -.09
Buffalo Funds: Eqlncxn 46.42 -.66
SmCapn 28.13 -.18 EQllxn 19.17 -.27
CGM Funds: EqlncKx 46.40 -.69
Focusn 33.04 -.17 ECapAp 19.91 -.25
MutIn 28.32 -.10 Europe 32.83 -.41
Realtyn 30.36 -.17 Exch 323.88
CRM Funds: Exportn 23.12 -.13
MdCpVII 31.22 -.33 Fideln 35.10 -.22
Calamos Funds: Fiftyn 19.51 .07
Cha. mos 57 . . -.24 FItRateHi r n 9.83
GrwthAp 57.84 .24 FrlnOnen 28.82 .16
Calvert Group: GNMAn 11.72 +.06
Incop 16.14 +.05 Govtlnc 10.61 +.06
InEqAp 1488 -.13 GroCon 94.54 -.31
SocialAp 28.74 .07 Grolncxn 19.25 -.22
SocBdqAp 15.72 +05 Grow06hCoK 94.55 -.31
SocEAp 40.06 -.19 GrSfratrn 22.15 -.12
TxF Lg p 15.39 +.02 Highlncrrn 9.10
Cohen & Steers: idgH ncn 2. -.14
RltyShrs 66.99 -.21 lndepnn 26.44 .14
RnProBdn 12.27 +.06
Columbia Class A: IntBdn 10.75 +05
Acornt 31.81 -.24 IntGovn 10.90 +05
DivEqlnc 10.65 -.09 InmMun 10.16 +.01
DivrBd 5.08 +.02 IntflDiscn 34.05 -.25
DivOpptyA 8.40 -.05 InfSCprn 22.62 -.07
LgCorQAp 5.96 -.04 lnvGrBdn 11.64 +.06
MdCpGrOp 11.87 -.13 InvGBn 7.57 +.04
MidCVlOpp 8.47 -.09 Japanr 10.65 -.07
PBModAp 11.13 JpnSmn 9.27 -.05
TxEAp 13.13 +.02 LgCapVal 12.21 -.11
SelCommA47.34 -.26 LCpVlrn 11.22 -.11
FrontierA 11.41 -.09 LatAm 58.48 -.59
GlobTech 21.75 -.10 LevCoStkn 30.65 -.29
Columbia Cl 1,T&G: LowPrn 42.33 -.21
EmMktOpIln10.35 -.10 LowPriKr 42.34 -.21
Columbia Class Z: Magelln n 74.30 -.63
AcornZ 32.83 -.25 MagellanK 74.25 -.63
AcornlntZ 41.39 -.30 MDMurn 10.95 +.01
lntBdZ 9.16 +.04 MAMunn 11.86 +.01
LgCapGr 14.37 -.06 MegaCpStknlO.60 -.07
LgCpldxZ 26.13 -.18 MlMunn 11.84 +.02
MdCpldxZ 12.52 -.08 MidCapn 29.99 -.19
MdCpVIZp 14.62 -.14 MNMunn 11.46 +.01
ValRestr 52.39 -.39 MtgSecn 11.03 +.05
Credit Suisse Comm: Munilncn 12.54 +.02
ComRet t 9.37 -.02 NJMunrn 11.45 +.02
DFA Funds: NwMktri n 15.99 +.02
lntfCorEqn 11.57 -.11 NwMilln 31.80 -.18
USCorEqlnl1.90 -.09 NYMunn 12.83 +.01
USCorEq2nll.83 -.10 OTCn 61.57 -.36
DWS Invest A: Oh Munn 11.60 +.02
CommAp 18.72 -.17 looIndex 9.33 -.06
DWS InvestS: Ovrsean 34.15 -.36
CorPlslnc 10.73 +.03 PcBasn 26.80 -.04
EmMkGrr 18.87 -.17 PAMunrn 10.70 +.01
EnhEmMk 10.74 -.03 Puriitxn 18.91 -.15
EnhGlbBdr 10.48 -.03 PuritanKx 18.91 -.15
GIbSmCGr 42.66 -.19 RealEn 29.47 -.08
GIblihem 24.93 -.21 SAIISecEqF 13.25 -.08
Gold&Prc 21.49 -.05 SCmdtyStrtnl2.48 -.02
GrolncS 17.98 -.13 SrEmrgMkt 18.91 -.13
HiYldTx 11.88 +.01 SrslntGrw 11.80 -.10
IntTxAMT 11.41 +.02 SrslntVal 10.35 -.12
Intl FdS 46.47 -.50 SrlnvGrdF 11.64 +.06
LgCpFoGr 31.98 -.21 StlntMun 10.70
LatAmrEq 49.73 -.58 STBFn 8.53 +02
MgdMuniS 8.85 ... SmllCpSrn 20.80 -.21
MATFS 14.13 ... SCpValur 16.41 -.12
SP500S 17.88 -.12 SlSlcACapn27.49 -.20
WorldDiv 24.38 -.20 SSelSmCp 20.50 -.16
Davis Funds A: Sfratlncn 11.33 +.02
NYVenA 35.61 -.31 SFrReRtrx 9.88 -.08
Davis Funds B: TotalBdn 10.95 +.05
NYVen B 34.03 -.29 Trend n 75.03 -.44
Davis Funds C &Y: USBI n 11.53 +.07
NYVenY 36.03 -.31 Utilityxn 17.43 -.23
NYVenC 34.31 -.29 ValStratn 30.22 -.30
Delaware Invest A: Value n 72.82 -.75
Diverlncp 9.38 +.05 Wrldwn 20.11 -.10
SMIDCapG 26.03 -.15 Fidelity Selects:
TxUSAp 11.17 +.02 Aim 40.15 -.31
Delaware Invest B: Banking n 17.72 -.22
SelGrBt 33.24 -.17 Biotchn 88.73 +.26
Dimensional Fds: Brokrn 49.18 -.63
EmMCrEqn22.40 -.16 Chemn 109.73 -.55
EmMktV 35.77 -.27 ComEquipn27.87 -.50
IntSmVan 17.78 -.17 Compn 61.44 -.07
LargeCo 10.60 -.08 ConDisn 25.30 -.20
TAUSCorE2n9.64 -.08 ConsuFnn 12.45 -.12
USLgVan 21.84 -.24 ConStapn 73.59 -.21
USMicron 14.98 -.10 CstHon 36.75 -.28


USTgdVal 17.89 -.15 DfAern 83.57 -.78
USSmalln 23.58 -.17 Electrn 51.19 -.68
USSmVa 27.58 -.22 Enrgyn 59.13 -.39
IntlSmCon 17.78 -.11 EngSvn 85.34 -.65
EmgMktn 31.28 -.23 EnvAltEnrnl9.45 -.23
Fixdxn 10.36 +.01 FinSvn 58.43 -.72
IntVan 18.74 -.23 Goldrn 48.26 -.03
Glb5Fxlncnll1.26 +.07 Healthn 145.87 -.50
TM USTgtV23.15 -.20 Insurn 47.81 -.49
TMMktwV 16.29 -.17 Leisrn 100.40 -.17
2YGIFxdn 10.22 +.01 Materialn 73.05 -.45
DFARIE n 24.83 -.06 MedDIln 60.23 -.49
Dodge&Cox: MdEqSysn 31.75 -.13
Balanced 74.00 -.43 Multndn 48.46 -.36
Income 13.44 +.03 NtGasn 34.99 -.33
IntlStk 36.68 -.31 Pharm n 14.09 +.01
Stock 114.75 -.98 Retailn 56.90 -.19
DoubleUne Funds: Softwrn 90.05 -.46
TRBdI 11.01 Techn 101.19 -.64
TRBdNp 11.01 ... Telcmn 51.23 -.32
Dreyfus: Transn 57.66 -.62
Aprec 41.85 -.19 UtilGrn 53.24 -.12
CTA 11.54 +.02 Wirelessn 8.30 -.09
CorVA 26.05 -.24 Fidelity Spartan:
Dreyf 9.66 -.06 ExtMklnn 41.52 -.24
DryMidr 31.02 -.20 5001dxlnvxn47.58 -.57


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Intllnxlnvn 36.87 -.35
TotMktlnvn 39.39 -.27
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdv xn47.58 -.57
IntAdrn 36.87 -.35
TotMktAd r n39.39 -.27
First Eagle:
GlblA 49.22 -.20
OverseasA 23.76 -.06
First Investors A
BlChpAp 22.56 -.15
GloblAp 6.93 -.07
GovtAp 11.48 +.05
GrolnAp 15.80 -.12
IncoAp 2.54
MATFAp 11.57 +.02
MITFAp 11.95 +.02
NJTFAp 12.80 +.02
NYTFAp 14.30 +.02
OppAp 30.61 -.29
PATFAp 12.84 +.01
SpSitAp 26.29 -.20
TxExAp 9.62 +.02
TotRtAp 15.95 -.04
ValueBp 7.44 -.05
Forum Funds:
AbsSbl r 10.88 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.85
ALTFAp 10.96 +.03
AZTFAp 10.55 +.02
CallnsAp 11.75 +.02
CAIntAp 11.30 +.01
CalTFAp 6.84 +.01
COTFAp 11.43 +.02
CTTFAp 10.74 +.02
CvtScAp 16.12 -.08
Dbl TFA 11.44 +.04
DynTchA 33.53 -.16
EqlncAp 17.70 -.12
Fedlntp 11.64 +.02
FedTFAp 11.65 +.02
FLTFAp 11.31 +.02
FoundAlp 11.03 -.06
GATFAp 11.75 +.03
GoldPrMA 45.63 -.22
GrwthAp 48.12 -.29
HYTFAp 9.92 +.02
HilncA 2.03
IncomAp 2.24 -.01
InsTFAp 11.66 +.02
NYITFp 11.13 +.02
LATFAp 11.22 +.03
LMGvScA 10.44 +.01
MDTFAp 11.14 +.02
MATFAp 11.33 +.01
MITFAp 11.74 +.02
MNInsA 12.12 +.02
MOTFAp 11.85 +.03
NJTFAp 11.78 +.03
NYTFAp 11.41 +.02
NCTFAp 12.01 +.03
OhiolAp 12.20 +.02
ORTFAp 11.75 +.03
PATFAp 10.11 +.02
ReEScAp 15.62 -.04
RisDvAp 35.87 -.22
SMCpGrA 41.05 -.38
Sratlncp 10.65 +.02
USGovAp 6.82 +.03
UFIsAp 12.59 -.04
VATFAp 11.49 +.02
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 14.00
IncmeAd 2.23
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.26 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.87 -.15
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 26.28 -.19
ForgnAp 7.47 -.06
GIBdAp 14.03 -.01
GrwthAp 19.34 -.16
WorldAp 15.86 -.11
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 19.36 -.15
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 25.57 -.17
ForgnCp 7.29 -.06
GIBdCp 14.06 -.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 18.49 -.11
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.51 +.06
S&S PM 42.83 -.29
GE Instl Funds:
IntEq 11.97 -.09
GMOTrust III:
Quality 21.70 -.06
GMOTrust IV:
IntlGrEq 24.92 -.15
IntllntrVI 23.29 -.28
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 14.23 -.07
InflCorEq 31.19 -.32
Quality 21.70 -.07
SbrFxlnc 15.74 +.02
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 53.17 -.40
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.60 -.01
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 38.62 -.38
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 25.88 -.25
HiYield 7.36
HYMunin 8.38 +.01
MidCapV 38.98 -.38
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.37 +.03
CapAplnst 40.96 -.20
Inllnv t 63.98 -.72
InfAdm p 64.20 -.72
Inl r 64.69 -.73
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 34.67 -.39
DivGthAp 20.10 -.15
FItRateApx 8.87
IntOpAp 15.42 -.18
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 30.66 -.34
FItRateCtx 8.86
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 29.88 -.21
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppln 34.73 -.38
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 43.84 -.43
Div&Gr 20.82 -.16
Advisers 20.29 -.07
TotRetBd 11.27 +.05
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig n17.09 -.12
Hussman Funds:
SbTotRetr 12.26 +.04
SbrGrowth 12.22 +.05
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 22.13 -.13
HIlhcareS 15.59 -.07
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.86 +.04
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 17.60 -.10
Wldwidelr 17.62 -.10
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 13.03 -.12
Invesco Funds:
Energy 45.55 -.41
Utlibes 16.58 -.05
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 17.45 -.13
CmstkA 16.71 -.13
Constp 25.06 -.13
EqlncA 8.95 -.05
GrlncAp 20.19 -.17
HilncMup 7.43 +.01
HiYldp 4.26
HYMuA 9.07 +.01
IntlGrow 29.42 -.13
MunilnA 12.81 +.02
PATFA 15.60 +.02
USMortgA 13.15 +.04
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 15.67 -.17
DivGtSecB 13.88 -.12
MunilnB 12.79 +.02
USMortg 13.08 +.04
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 26.06 -.08
AssetStAp 26.91 -.09
AssetSblr 27.17 -.08
GINatRsAp22.14 -.24
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.64 +.06
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n 25.62 -.20
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBondnll.64 +.06
ShtDurBd 11.02 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.86 -.07
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.63 +.06
HighYldn 8.26
InfnTFBdn 10.96 +.01
ShtDurBd n 11.02 +.02
USLCCrPlsn21.82 -.15
Janus S Shrs:
Forty 34.70 -.13
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 26.54 -.06
ContrarnT 14.34 -.15
EnterprT 64.07 -.40
FIxBndT 10.62 +.06
GllUfeSciTr 26.85 -.05


GIbSelT 11.97 -.04
GITechTr 18.21 -.05
Grw&lncT 33.39 -.25
Janus T 30.92 -.14
OvrseasTr 47.21 -.38
PrkMCValT 24.04 -.18
ResearchT 31.56 -.20
ShTmBdT 3.10 +.01
Twenty T 67.92 -.29
VentureT 62.94 -.28
WrldWTr 47.78 -.33
JensenJn 29.10 -.23


Name NAV Chg
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.75 +.06
RgBkA 14.33 -.18
StlnAp 6.83 -.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.84
John Hancock CI 1:
LSAggr 13.08 -.09
LSBalanc 13.54 -.05
LSConsrv 13.14 +.01
LSGrwth 13.62 -.08
LSModer 13.12 -.02
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp 27.25 -.21
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 21.92 -.12
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 22.29 -.13
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 125.53 -.75
CBApprp 14.64 -.09
CBLCGrp 25.77 -.18
GCIAIICOp 9.10 -.08
WAHilncAt 6.19
WAMgMup 15.50 +.03
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 23.98 -.18
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 32.67 -.22
CMValTrp 40.15 -.26
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 31.54 -.20
SmCap 30.90 -.27
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.90 +.01
StrlncC 15.57 +.01
LSBondR 14.85 +.02
StrncA 15.49 +.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.49 +.06
InvGrBdY 12.49 +.05
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.98 -.11
FundlEq 13.85 -.10
BdDebAp 8.03 +.01
ShDurlncAp 4.61 +.01
MidCpAp 18.08 -.15
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.64 +.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60 +.01
MFS Funds A:
MITA 20.57 -.14
MIGA 16.65 -.11
HilnA 3.51
MFLA 9.49 +.01
TotRA 14.70 -.03
UtilA 17.96 -.12
ValueA 24.20 -.17
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.96 -.09
GvScBn 10.25 +.05
HilnBn 3.52
MulnBn 8.17 +.01
TotRBn 14.70 -.03
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 16.69 -.14
Valuel 24.31 -.17
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEqn 19.20 -.12
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.96
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 17.02 -.07
GovtBt 8.75 +.03
HYIdBBt 5.94 +.01
IncmBldr 16.83 -.05
IntlEqB 11.26 -.03
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 36.74 -.27
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 77.14 -.69
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 9.14 -.08
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 18.18 -.06
China Inv 29.62 -.25
Indialnv r 20.86 -.29
PacTgrlnv 24.71 -.09
MergerFdn 16.20 -.05
Meridian Funds:
Growth 48.51 -.35
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.48 +.03
TotRtBdl 10.48 +.04
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 4.62 -.04
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 16.76 -.07
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 17.00 -.06
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEql 14.50 -.08
MCapGrl 42.61 -.08
MCapGrPp41.24 -.08
Muhlenkn 56.39 -.37
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 30.39 -.18
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn31.85 -.26
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 13.08 -.08
GblDiscA 30.67 -.20
GIbDiscC 30.32 -.20
GIbDiscZ 31.07 -.21
QuestZ 18.66 -.10
SharesZ 22.07 -.15
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 20.89 -.19
Genesis 37.39 -.23
Geneslnst 51.78 -.30
Intl r 18.33 -.10
Partner 28.93 -.28
Neuberger&BermTr:
Genesis 53.59 -.32
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc n 9.82 +.01
Nichn 48.49 -.25
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 7.42
MMEmMktr 23.50
MMIntEqr 10.27
SmCpldx 9.47
Stkldx 16.76
Technly 16.28
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 10.96 +.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 41.82 -.37
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 29.63 -.18
Global 23.26 -.20
Intllr 20.21 -.13
Oakmark 44.94 -.28
Select 30.49 -.22
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 8.16 -.02
GIbSMdCap 16.44 -.10
NonUSLgC p 10.98 -.09
RealRet 10.86 -.02
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.18 +.02
AMTFrNY 10.86 +.03
CAMuniAp 7.69 +.02
CapApAp 47.02 -.28
CaplncAp 8.94 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.97
DvMktAp 36.06 -.31
Discp 68.17 -.15
EquityA 9.49 -.06
GlobAp 65.10 -.74
GIbOppA 31.20 -.26
GblStblncA 4.38
Goldp 46.82 -.15
IntBdAp 6.72 -.02
MnStFdA 33.90 -.21
PAMuniAp 10.57 +.02
SenFltRtA 8.35
USGvp 9.46 +.05
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.15 +.02
AMTFrNY 10.86 +.02
CplncBt 8.77 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.97
EquityB 8.75 -.06
GblSbrlncB 4.39
Oppenheimer C&M:
DevMktC t 34.57 -.29
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.25 +.01
RoMuAp 15.43 +.03
RcNtMuA 6.84 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 35.73 -.30
IntlBdY 6.72 -.01
IntGrowY 30.19 -.18
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.90
TotRtAd 11.04 +.03
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.94 +.02
AIIAsset 12.54 +.01
ComodRR 8.96
DevLcMkr 11.09 -.04
Divine 11.64 +.01
EmMkBd 11.29 +.01
Fltlncr 9.00 -.04
ForBdUnr 11.03 +.08
FrgnBd 10.52 +.06
HiYld 9.42
InvGrCp 10.74 +.06
LowDu 10.51
ModDur 10.83 +.04
RealRet 11.79 +.08
RealRtnl 11.75 +.04
ShortT 9.90


TotRt 11.04 +.03
TRII 10.55 +.04
TRIII 9.78 +.02
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.87 +.01
ComRRp 8.82 +.01
LwDurA 10.51
RealRtAp 11.75 +.04
TotRtA 11.04 +.03
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.75 +.04
TotRtCt 11.04 +.03


Name NAV Chg
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.04 +.03
PIMCO Funds P:
TotRtnP 11.04 +.03
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 27.98 -.21
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 49.06 +.08
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.70 +.03
IntfValA 20.69 -.18
PionFdAp 43.31 -.37
ValueAp 11.83 -.10
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.64 -.03
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdCt 10.74 -.03
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 19.20 -.14
Price Funds:
Balancen 20.32 -.07
BIChipn 41.90 -.24
CABondn 10.59 +.01
CapAppn 21.69 -.14
DivGron 24.67 -.18
EmMktBn 13.47
EmEurp 23.40 -.26
EmMktS n 35.85 -.37
Eqlncn 24.85 -.19
Eqlndexn 36.22 -.25
Europen 16.49 -.19
GNMAn 10.04 +.04
Growth n 34.91 -.18
Gr&lnn 21.64 -.13
HltSci n 36.93
HiYieldn 6.88
InsflCpG 17.73 -.11
IntlBondn 10.33 +.02
IntDis n 46.43 -.33
Intl G&l 14.26 -.14
IntlStkn 14.90 -.12
Japan n 8.23 -.08
LatAmn 53.35 -.71
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 10.33 +.02
MidCapn 63.98 -.50
MCapValn 25.40 -.23
NAmern 35.85 -.17
NAsian 20.06 -.09
NewEran 54.17 -.51
NHorizn 38.88 -.20
NlIncn 9.60 +.04
NYBondn 11.04 +.02
OverS SFrn 8.92 -.08
PSIncn 16.72 -.04
RealEstn 20.00 -.05
R2010n 16.22 -.05
R2015n 12.62 -.05
R2020n 17.50 -.08
R2025n 12.85 -.06
R2030n 18.48 -.11
R2035n 13.10 -.08
R2040n 18.65 -.12
SciTecn 29.18 -.18
ShtBdn 4.86
SmCpStkn 38.51 -.23
SmCapVal n39.09 -.29
SpecGrn 19.02 -.14
Speclnn 12.62 +.01
TFlncn 9.75 +.01
TxFrHn 10.58 +.02
TxFrSIn 5.61
USTIntn 6.00 +.05
USTLgn 11.57 +.15
VABondn 11.47 +.01
Value n 24.88 -.22
Principal Inv:
LgCGIIn 10.13 -.08
LT20201n 12.46 -.05
LT20301n 12.40 -.06
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 18.89 -.12
HiYldAp 5.59 +.01
MuHilncA 9.45 +.01
NatResA 57.51 -.43
UblityA 11.11 -.08
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 17.78 -.09
HiYldBt 5.58
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.69 +.05
AZ TE 8.83 +.02
ConvSec 21.14 -.08
DvrlnAp 8.03 -.01
EqlnAp 16.33 -.14
EuEq 21.37 -.20
GeoBalA 12.53 -.03
GIbEqtyp 9.91
GrlnAp 14.18 -.12
GIblHIthA 50.69 -.14
HiYdAp 7.86
HiYld In 6.05
IncmAp 6.89 +.02
IntGrlnp 10.60
InvAp 13.72 -.10
NJTxAp 9.13 +.01
MulCpGr 55.49
PATE 8.89 +.01
TxExAp 8.37 +.01
TFInAp 14.53 .02
TFHYA 11.46 +.02
USGvAp 14.33 +.05
GIblUtilA 10.78 -.09
VoyAp 24.08 -.25
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnBt 7.97
Eqlnct 16.19 -.14
EuEq 20.42 -.19
GeoBalB 12.39 -.03
GIbEqt 8.94
GINtRst 21.50 -.19
GrlnBt 13.93 -.12
GIblHthB 41.55 -.11
HiYldBt 7.85
HYAdBt 5.94
IncmBt 6.83 +.02
IntGrlnt 10.46
IntNopt 15.96 -.14
InvBt 12.33 -.09
NJTxBt 9.12 +.01
MulCpGr 47.81
TxExBt 8.37 +.01
TFHYBt 11.47 +.01
USGvBt 14.26 +.04
GlblUtilB 10.75 -.09
VoyBt 20.39 -.21

RS Funds:
IntGrA 18.75 -.12
LgCAIphaA 43.90 -.38
Value 26.69 -.26
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkApll.15 -.07
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 19.31 -.12
MicroCapl 18.65 -.08
PennMulr 12.82 -.10
Premierlr 22.67 -.13
TotRetlr 14.16 -.07
ValSvct 13.72 -.10
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.98 +.05
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 14.66 -.05
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 23.17 -.13
Schwab Funds:
HIlhCare 18.52 -.06
l0001nvr 40.20 -.28
S&PSel 21.12 -.14
SmCpSI 23.39 -.16
TSMSer 24.69 -.17
Scout Funds:
Inl 33.71 -.34
Selected Funds:
AmShD 43.01 -.36
AmShSp 42.97 -.36
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 33.76 -.23
Sequoian 146.13 -.83
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 45.17 -.26
SoSunSClnv t22.87 ...
St FarmAssoc:
Gwlh 55.92 -.29
Stratton Funds:
MuIl-Cap 38.46 -.31
RealEstate 29.46 -.08
SmCap 55.55 -.33
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.69 +.06
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.90 +.02
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 21.09 -.24
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 17.80 -.02
REVallnstr 24.43 +.03
Valuelnst 52.38 +.14
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 29.53 -.18
IncBuildAt 19.59 -.05
IncBuildCp 19.59 -.05
IntValuel 30.18 -.19
Valuel 36.92 -.38
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.90
Income 8.77
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 84.60 -.18
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.32
Flexlncp 9.10
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 38.67 -.34
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.77 -.11


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 24.37 -.22
ChinaReg 9.12 +.01
GIbRs 12.00 -.12
Gld&Mtls 17.37 -.02
WdPrcMn 19.01 -.05
USAA Group:
AgvGt 35.99 -.20
CABd 9.81 +.02
CrnstStr 23.90 -.06
GNMA 10.30 +.04
GrTxStr 13.40 -.03


Name NAV Chg
Grwh 15.83 -.11
Gr&lnc 16.03 -.12
IncSk 13.13 -.09
Inco 12.99 +.06
Inl 25.93 -.13
NYBd 11.46 +.02
PrecMM 40.14 -.11
SciTech 14.04 -.07
ShtTBnd 9.21 +.02
SmCpSk 15.10 -.08
TxElt 12.90 +.02
TxELT 12.66 +.02
TxESh 10.72
VABd 10.86 +.01
WldGr 20.34 -.12
VALIC:
MdCpldx 22.86 -.15
Skldxc 26.73 -.19
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 19.35 -.12
Van Eck Funds:
GIHardA 54.22 -.41
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 22.52 -.04
CAITAdmn 10.98 +.01
CpOpAdln 80.72 -.59
EMAdmr r n 40.69 -.33
Energyn 134.87-1.14
EqlnAdm n n46.51 -.26
EuroAdml n 65.91 -.81
ExplAdmln 76.70 -.42
ExtdAdm n 45.60 -.28
500Admln 123.85 -.87
GNMAAdn 10.95 +.05
GrwAdmn 34.14 -.21
HlthCrn 59.55 -.20
HiYldCp n 5.81
InfProAdn 26.59 +.12
ITBdAdml n 11.46 +.09
ITsryAdml n 11.62 +.09
IntGrAdm n 65.00 -.53
ITAdmlIn 13.55 +.01
ITGrAdm n 10.03 +.07
LtdTrAdn 11.08 +.01
LTGrAdmln 9.54 +.11
LTAdmlIn 10.91 +.01
MCpAdmlnl0l.63 -.84
MorgAdmn 61.10 -.39
MuHYAdmn10l.32 +.02
NYLTAdn 11.03 +.01
PrmCaprn 73.13 -.44
PALTAdmnn 10.97 +.02
ReitAdm rn 88.90 -.23
STsyAdml n 10.78 +.02
STBdAdmlnlO.65 +.04
ShtTrAdn 15.91
STFdAdn 10.87 +.03
STIGrAdn 10.77 +.02
SmCAdm n 38.55 -.25
TxMCapr n 67.85 -.48
TtBAdml n 10.75 +.05
TStkAdm n 33.97 -.23
ValAdmln 22.14 -.16
WellslAdm n54.88 +.12
WellnAdm n56.23 -.16
Windsor n 47.45 -.50
WdsrllAdn 48.86 -.37
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 26.11 -.19
CALTn 10.99 +.02
CapOppn 34.93 -.26
Convrtn 13.83 -.02
DivdGron 15.60 -.11
Energyn 71.81 -.61
Eqlncn 22.19-.12
Explr n 82.36 -.45
FLLTn 11.34 +.02
GNMAn 10.95 +.05
GlobEqn 19.16 -.15
Grolncn 28.33 -.21
GrthEqn 11.87 -.06
HYCorpn 5.81
HlthCren 141.10 -.47
InflaPron 13.54 +.06
InlExplrn 17.02 -.11
IntlGrn 20.42 -.17
InfiVal n 33.08 -.33
ITIGraden 10.03 +.07
ITTsryn 11.62 +.09
LifeConn 16.97 -.03
LifeGron 23.36 -.14
Lifelncn 14.44 +.01
LifeMod n 20.55 -.07
LTIGraden 9.54 +.11
LTTsryn 11.26 +.14
Morg n 19.70 -.12
MuHYn 10.32 +.02
Mulntn 13.55 +.01
MuLtdn 11.08 +.01
MuLongn 10.91 +.01
MuShrtn 15.91
NJLTn 11.48 +.02
NYLTn 11.03 +.01
OHLTTEn 11.83 +.02
PALTn 10.97 +.02
PrecMtlsr n 26.11 -.05
PrmcpCorn 14.85 -.11
Prmcp r n 70.45 -.42
SelValurn 20.37 -.15
STARn 20.03 -.05
STIGraden 10.77 +.02
STFedn 10.87 +.03
STTsryn 10.78 +.02
StratEqn 20.99 -.16
TgtRe2005nl2.32
TgtRetlncn 11.69 +.01
TgRe2010n23.54 -.02
TgtRe2015nl3.13 -.03
TgRe2020n23.41 -.07
TgtRe2025 n3.40 -.06
TgRe2030 n23.09 -.11
TgtRe2035 n13.98 -.08
TgtRe2040n22.96 -.14
TgtRe2050n22.85 -.14
TgtRe2045 n14.42 -.09
USGron 20.14 -.13
USValuen 11.12 -.09
Wellslyn 22.65 +.05
Well n 32.56 -.09
Wndsrn 14.06 -.15
Wndslln 27.53 -.21
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n109.17-1.09
MidCplstPI nl 10.74 -.91
TotlntAdm r r7.41 -.24
Totlntllnstrn109.67 -.96
TotlntllP r n 09.68 -.97
500n 123.85 -.87
Balanced n 22.51 -.05
DevMktn 10.56 -.10
EMktn 30.95 -.25
Europe n 28.27 -.35
Extend n 45.55 -.28
Growth n 34.14 -.22
LgCaplxn 24.94 -.18
MidCapn 22.38 -.18
Pacific n 10.84 -.06
REITrn 20.83 -.06
SmCap n 38.50 -.24
SmlCpGthn24.93 -.15
SmlCpVln 17.25 -.12
STBndn 10.65 +.04
TotBndn 10.75 +.05
Totllntlin 16.39 -.14
TotStk n 33.96 -.23
Valuen 22.13 -.17
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 22.52 -.04
DevMklnstnl0.48 -.10
Extln n 45.60 -.28
FTAIIWIdl r n97.82 -.91
Grwthlstn 34.14 -.21
InfProlnstn 10.83 +.05
Instldxn 123.02 -.86
InsPIn 123.02 -.86
InstTStldxn 30.72 -.21
lnsTStPlus n30.73 -.21
MidCplstn 22.45 -.19
SClnstn 38.55 -.25
TBlstn 10.75 +.05
TSlnstn 33.97 -.23
Valuelstn 22.13 -.17
Vanguard Signal:
ExtSgl n 39.18 -.23
500Sgln 102.31 -.71
ITBdSign 11.46 +.09
MidCplcbdx n 32.07 -.27
STBdlcbdxn 10.65 +.04
SmCpSig n 34.74 -.22
TotBdSgl n 10.75 +.05
TotStkSgl n 32.79 -.22
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 15.97 -.14
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.88 +.01
WM Blair Mtl Fds:
IntlGthlr 23.05 -.10
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetSp 10.30 -.03
CorelnvA 6.62 -.04
DivOppAp 15.82 -.10
DivOppCt 15.66 -.10
ScTechA 11.30 -.04
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 43.95 -.25
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIIAp 12.68
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 12.27
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSkZ 22.62 -.19
Opptylnv 42.15 -.44
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Instl:
UIStMulnp 4.82
Western Asset:


CorePlusl 11.00 +.03
William Blair N:
GrowthN 12.25 -.09
IntfGthN 22.51 -.10
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 18.04 -.14
Focusedn 19.20 -.15


Stocks sink on jobs report


Market watch
July 8, 2011

Dow Jones -62.29
industrials 12,657.20


Nasdaq -12.85
composite 2,859.81


Associated Press


An unexpected drop in
hiring put an end to the ex-
citement that had been bub-
bling up on Wall Street over
the past two weeks.
Stock indexes fell sharply
Friday, erasing most of the
week's gains, after the gov-
ernment reported that U.S.
employers created the
fewest number of jobs in
nine months. The 18,000 net
jobs created in June were a
fraction of what many econ-
omists expected, and damp-
ened hopes that the
economy was improving.
Private companies added
jobs at the slowest pace in
more than a year. The un-
employment rate edged up
to 9.2 percent, its highest
level this year.
A broader measure of
weakness in the labor mar-
ket was even worse. Among
Americans who want to
work, 16.2 percent are either
unemployed or unable to
find full-time jobs. That was
up from 15.8 percent in May
"There's just a lot more


-9.42

1,343.80


Russell -5.54
2000
852.57

NYSE diary
Advanced: 898

Declined: 2,103

Unchanged: 119
Volume: 3.2 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 844
Declined: 1,722

Unchanged: 109
Volume: 1.6 b
AP

evidence than before that
we're in an extended weak
patch," said Brian Gen-
dreau, market strategist for
Cetera Financial Group. He
said private economists will


likely reduce their projec-
tions for overall economic
growth this year.
The Standard and Poor's
500 index fell 9.42 points, or
0.7 percent, to 1,343.80. That
eliminated the index's gains
from Thursday and left it
with a 0.3 percent gain for
the week.
The Dow Jones industrial
average lost 62.29, or 0.5 per-
cent, to 12,657.20. The Dow,
which had been down by as
much as 150 points Friday,
had only its second down
day over the past nine. The
Nasdaq composite dropped
12.85, or 0.4 percent, to
2,859.81. It was its first loss
in two weeks.
Companies whose busi-
ness would be most affected
by a weakening economy
were hit hardest. Bank of
America Corp., General
Electric Co. and Boeing Co.
were among the biggest de-
cliners in the Dow average.
Two stocks fell for every
one that rose on the New
York Stock Exchange. Vol-
ume was lighter than aver-
age at 3.1 billion shares.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Obama: Uncertainty over debt

limit impacts hiring

WASHINGTON - Facing a dismal jobs re-
port, President Barack Obama called on Con-
gress Friday to end uncertainty over their debt
standoff and pass a litany of administration-
backed proposals, including a payroll tax cut ex-
tension and three free trade agreements.
Obama's top economist said implementing those
policies would reduce the jobless rate a full point
by the time Obama faces re-election in the fall of
2012.
But Republican opposition and Washington's
heated partisan atmosphere would likely make
passing the full slate of administration proposals
a political pipe dream.
Obama spoke from the Rose Garden shortly
after the release of fresh figures that showed
employers added just 18,000 jobs in June, the
fewest in nine months, and the unemployment
rate rose to 9.2 percent. The president said the
numbers were yet another sign that a full eco-
nomic recovery is still elusive.
"Our economy as a whole just isn't producing
nearly enough jobs for everybody who is look-
ing," Obama said.
The jobs report comes against the backdrop
of negotiations on cutting government spending
and increasing the nation's borrowing limit in
order to prevent the U.S. from defaulting on its
debt. Obama said the new jobs report adds fresh
urgency to the talks, saying an agreement would
end uncertainty that is keeping businesses from
hiring.

Grim jobs report casts shadow

over debt talks

WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama
used a bleak jobs report Friday to prod Con-
gress toward a swift agreement on deficits and
the national debt. The higher unemployment
numbers hardened partisan views that a weak
economy can't tolerate added taxes or cuts in
spending, both key to the grand deal Obama
seeks.


White House, congressional negotiators and
their aides worked to bridge differences over
how to reduce long-term deficits by as much as
$4 trillion over 10 years. Obama plans to call the
eight top leaders of Congress to the White
House on Sunday to assess progress.
Summing up the difficulties facing them,
House Speaker John Boehner likened the task
to a notoriously confounding puzzle. "This is a
Rubik's Cube that we haven't quite worked out
yet," he said.
A budget agreement is central to increasing
the nation's borrowing limit, currently capped at
$14.3 trillion, by Aug. 2 to avoid a potentially cat-
astrophic government default. That looming
deadline and a new unemployment rate of 9.2
percent heightened the pressure for a deal, unit-
ing the two highest-profile challenges now facing
Obama's presidency.

Consumers borrowed more for

eighth month in May

WASHINGTON -Americans took on more
debt in May and used their credit cards more for
only the second time in nearly three years. Con-
sumers stepped up their borrowing just as the
economy began to slump and hiring slowed.
The Federal Reserve said Friday that con-
sumer borrowing rose by $5.1 billion in May, the
eighth straight monthly increase. It followed a re-
vised gain of $5.7 billion in April. Borrowing in the
category that covers credit cards increased, as
did borrowing in the category for auto and stu-
dent loans.
The overall increase pushed consumer bor-
rowing to a seasonally adjusted annual level of
$2.43 trillion in May. That was just 1.7 percent
higher than the nearly four-year low of $2.39 tril-
lion hit in September.
Borrowing is a sign of confidence in the econ-
omy. Consumers tend to take on more debt
when they feel wealthier. That boosts consumer
spending. Ultimately, it gives businesses more
faith to expand and hire. An increase in credit
card debt can also be a sign of people falling on
harder times.


Cars * Trucks * Vans Motorcycles'


RV's * ATV's Boats * Planes


Your ad will run in the Chronicle and will appear online too.

*Vehicles for $2,000 and under can be sold at
no charge through www.chronicleonline.com


Advertise 7 days .................. 31.50 i


Advertise 14 days ................ 43.50



Advertise 90 days................ 69.50 ..


- p , Ivl ' .11 1 v I , . I L' L -' ,

C4,16031 316 1t il-I . 1 21 3,


I NEWYORK SPTOCK EXCHANGEI


Name Last Chg
SP Engy 76.89 -.65
SPDRFncl 15.46 -.20
SP Inds 37.82 -.48
SPTech 26.47 -.13
SPUI 33.76 -.13
StdPac 3.56 -.01
Standex 32.55 +.19
StarwdHtl 58.13 -.52
StateStr 46.34 -.50
Statoil ASA 25.11 -.67
Steris 36.09 -.26
Sterlite 14.93 -.28
SbfelFn s 37.46 +.68
SbIIwtrM 23.72 +.16
Sbyker 60.14 -.46
SturmRug 23.37 -.24
SubPpne 52.83 -.27
SunCmts 38.45 -.07
Suncorgs 40.89 +.01
Sunoco 42.86 -.02
Suntech 7.98 +.08
SunTrst 25.67 -.59
Supvalu 9.50 -.17
Synovus 2.07 -.06
Sysco 31.30 -.25
TCFFncl 13.85 -.35
TE Connect 37.73 -.50
TECO 19.17 -.05
TJX 55.16 +.17
TRWAuto 55.85 -3.62
TaiwSemi 12.62 -.14


Talbots 3.60
TalismEg 20.14
Target 51.14
TataMotors 23.70
TeckResg 52.28
TelNorL 15.14
TelcmNZ 10.35
TelefEsps 23.12
TelMexL 16.41
Templelnld 30.99
TenetHIth 6.30
Teradata 61.17
Teradyn 14.91
Terex 27.74
TerraNitro 142.02
Tesoro 24.44
TetaTech 13.05
Texlnst 32.88
Textron 23.30
Theragen 1.78
ThermoFis 64.78
ThmBet 55.25
ThomCrkg 10.26
3MCo 97.62
Tiffany 82.30
Timberlnd 42.98
TWCable 79.24
TimeWarn 36.64
Timken 51.92
TitanMet 18.29
TollBros 21.27
TorchEngy 2.51


Trchmrks 43.17
TorDBkg 83.80
TotalSA 57.25
TotalSys 18.65
Transoc 62.01
Travelers 58.66
Tredgar 19.38
TriContf 15.22
TrinaSolar 20.51
TwoHrblnv 10.93
Tyolni 49.74
Tyson 18.65
UBSAG 17.64
UDR 25.58
UIL Hold 32.81
USAirwy 8.21
US Gold 6.11
USEC 3.27
USG 13.87
UniSrcEn 38.25
UniFirst 59.69
UnilevNV 33.47
UnionPac 104.30
UtdContl 22.86
UtdMicro 2.53
UPSB 74.57
UtdRentals 25.93
US Bancrp 25.35
USNGsrs 10.61
USOilFd 37.80
USSteel 45.06
UdTech 90.35


UtdhlthGp 52.08 -.55 Weathflnt 18.73
numGr 5 WenRIt 26.61
WellPoint 78.00
WellsFargo 28.30
ValeSA 33.13 -.22 WendyArby 5.51
ValeSApf 29.92 -.33 WestarEn 27.07
ValeroE 26.18 -.14 WAstEMkt 13.90
VangTSM 69.76 -.50 WstAMgdHi 6.25
VangREIT 62.76 -.08 WAstlnfOpp 12.48
S 4900 WAstlnfOpp 12.48
VangEmg 49.00 -.51
VangEur 52.74 .89 WDigital 38.520.61
VarianMed 70.77 -.59 Wstnnin 26177
Vectren 28.37 .12 WshUnion 19.7
Ventas 54.32 -.18 Weyerh 22.10
VeoliaEnv 26.77 -1.04 Whrlpl 81.06
VeriFone 45.87 +.38 WhilngPts 58.37
Verizoncm 37.48 +.06 WmsCos 29.58
ViaomB 52.15 -.15 WmsPts 55.08
VimpelCm 12.85 -.13 WmsSon 38.09
Visa 89.73 -.42 Winnbgo 9.45
Vishaylnt 15.82 -.38 WiscEns 31.63
Visteonn 69.09 -.33 WTIndia 24.06
VMware 105.00 +2.02 Worthgt 23.12
Vonage 4.78 +.11 Wyndham 34.76
Vornado 96.59 -.36 XL Grp 22.11
VulcanM 38.03 -1.66 XcelEngy 24.49
WGL Hol 39.29 -.01 Xerox 10.66
WMS 29.04 +.93 Yamanag 12.40
Wabash 9.45 -.15 YingliGrn 7.92
WaddellR 39.51 -.29 Youku n 38.59
WalMart 54.08 -.41 YumBrnds 55.61
Wagrn 44.07 -.07 Zimmer 64.52
WsteMlnc 37.74 -.26 ZweigTI 3.41


Standard &
Poor's 500







Page A8 SATURDAY, JULY9, 2011



PINION


"Justice is impartiality. Only
strangers are impartial."
George Bernard Shaw,
"Back to Methuselah" 1921


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .................. ....................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GUILTY OR INNOCENT





Trial by jury




is right of




all residents


No matter whether you
believe Casey Anthony
is guilty of murder,
child abuse or child neglect,
you have to realize our Consti-
tution has set up a system of
checks and balances that really
works.
How, you might
ask, can justice be
served when a lit- THE I
tie girl's murder CaseyA
goes unsolved? acqL
The system of
justice in the OUR O
United States is
designed to pro- U.S. Justi,
tect its citizenry wo
from the runaway
power of govern-
ment. The Constitution guar-
antees a trial by a jury of one's
peers. Casey Anthony received
that trial and her peers felt the
evidence was insufficient to
adjudge her as guilty of the
crimes she was charged.
Like it or not, we have a sys-
tem that does not jump to con-
clusions.
No doubt if you had been
watching the storm of media
coverage of the event, your
mind was made up well before
the verdict came in from the
jury Tuesday
The rampant media coverage
peppered with so-called ex-
perts who go about throwing
grenades and inflaming public


S
A
ii

P
C
c
r


sentiment in one direction or
another is a form of entertain-
ment that we as viewers want
to see. The state of the econ-
omy and the mood of the pub-
lic have led us down this path.
Many people no longer value
solid investigative news as a
priority. Couple
this with a declin-
;SUE: ing economy, and
nthony one can under-
ttal. stand why hours
and hours of An-
INION: thony trial cover-
age clogged the
e System news airways the
ks. past month. It is
much cheaper for
news channels to
send reporters to sensational-
ize a trial than it is to send re-
porters to investigate
wrongdoing.
Fortunately, we are not tried
by public sentiment or media
entertainers who make up our
minds for us. We are judged by
a jury that analyzes the evi-
dence of the case and makes
their call according to the laws
of our country.
The main thing to remember
is it is better to let a guilty per-
son go free than to allow an in-
nocent person rot in jail or be
put to death. We may not al-
ways agree with how a jury de-
cides a case; we must agree the
system works.


SHot Corner: CASEY ANTHONY


Who's the killer?
I'm just calling in reference to
the verdict that was on the radio
tonight. I do think she is guilty,
Casey, for killing that little girl. I
don't know how those jurors are
going to be sleeping tonight.
And who did kill the little girl -
the mystery babysitter? I think it
was all wrong. She should really
pay for hurting that little girl.
Talk of the town
Unbelievable that (Casey) An-
thony, she got off. She got off.
Nothing. Well, let me tell you,
Florida is the laughing stock of
the nation right now. And you
know what? All the people in Ho-
mosassa - I just got back to Ho-
mosassa from the barber - and
everybody is talking about it.
They're all against her. What a
shame. Shocking, shocking,
shocking. It is so unbelievable.
Well, she thinks she got off? No-
body is going to talk to her or
like her.
Learning lesson
As a senior citizen, I congratu-
late the jury that followed the
law and Constitution of the
United States in their verdict of
not guilty on murder, but guilty
of lying. And, hopefully, Casey
Anthony, in watching her past
being unveiled in front of her,
has learned a hard lesson about
lying to the police, but will be
freed on time served, and that
her lawyers will help her start a
new life. I thank you, members
of the jury, for a well-deserved
end.
No justice
Today our country started its
236th year on a very sour note.


After spending millions of dol-
lars, hundreds of people and
thousands of hours of television
later, our justice system could
not find justice for a 2-year-old.
And yet, our airwaves are full of
people touting that "our justice
system works." I find that hard
to believe, because we have no
justice for a 2-year-old today.
The whole story
This is for the person calling in
about a "Sick society," saying
that we're watching the Anthony
case on trial on Channel 9. Well,
if they didn't cover it in full, then
the news would be giving you in-
formation on bits and pieces.
They could give you the informa-
tion for "all for" or even "all
against." You don't know be-
cause you don't see the whole
story. But since they're broad-
casting it on TV, you actually get
to sit down and see the whole
story. And one other thing about
being a sick society: It's also a
free society. If they didn't want
to watch it on TV, then maybe
they can watch Oprah.
Hypocrite
I would like to make a com-
ment about the Casey Anthony
trial. Cheney Mason, before he
went on the defense team, said
Casey or her family had no cred-
ibility and she would be found
guilty. Now he's slamming the
media and everyone who dis-
cussed the case. What a hyp-
ocrite he is. Also, this jury had
their minds made up way before
the trial was over. They were not
taking notes. They were not in-
terested and some of the news
media said they had no educa-
tion. Well, they have no common
sense, either.


Lessons from 'DSK moment'


maid who ac-
cused a
powerful French
politician of attempted
rape in a New York
hotel last May turns 4
out to be a liar. As her
credibility crumbles, 0
so does the legal case
against the man, Do- Cokie
minique Strauss- Steven ]
Kahn. His supporters OTH
are already dismissing
the whole affair as a VOI4
witch hunt and hinting
he could still run for president of
France.
What is the lesson here? Did
the district attorney act too
hastily? Probably, yes. But the
maid told a compelling story re-
inforced by forensic evidence
and officials were under enor-
mous time pressure, seizing
Strauss-Kahn only minutes be-
fore he flew back to Paris.
The more important point is
this: Women should be encour-
aged, not discouraged, by this
whole sordid story The judicial
system responded to the com-
plaint of a poor immigrant
woman when she charged a
wealthy, influential man with sex-
ual assault. And the result has
emboldened other women to end
their silence and speak out -
against DSK (as Strauss-Kahn is
known) and men like him who
treat women as disposable play-
things.
Sylvie Kauffmann, the first fe-
male editor of the Paris daily Le
Monde, told The New York Times
this "DSK moment" will have a
lasting effect on French politics
and culture. Helen Perivier, a
French academic who studies
gender issues, agreed the
episode "raised questions that
went well beyond his particular
case and that of his guilt. People
have started raising questions











3 a
IIn
a


and
Roberts
IER
CES


about the relations be-
tween men and women
in France, and those
questions won't go
away"
They won't go away
in this country, either.
Not after Arnold
Schwarzenegger and
John Edwards both ad-
mitted fathering chil-
dren with female
subordinates - a fam-
ily nanny and a cam-
paign aide. Not after a
governor, Eliot Spitzer


of New York, and a U.S. senator,
John Ensign of Nevada, were
forced to resign after their lurid
sex lives came to light. Not after
another governor, Mark Sanford
of South Carolina, served out his
term ignominiously after his af-
fair went public.
These cases are all different
but one thread runs through
them: men treating women badly,
their wives or girlfriends or both.
And many of those women have
had enough. Take Tristane
Banon, a young writer who inter-
viewed DSK eight years ago. His
former wife is her godmother; his
daughter is her close friend. Yet,
she alleges, DSK started ripping
off her clothes and wrestling her
to the floor
"When I realized that he really
wanted to rape me, I started kick-
ing him with my boots," she told
the French weekly L'Express. "I
was terrified."
At the time, she declined to
press her case because "every-
one told me it would never suc-
ceed," including her own mother,
an official in DSK's Socialist
Party. Her career would be ru-
ined, her reputation stained as
the "girl who had a problem with
a politician."
But now it's DSK who has the
problem, and Banon has filed a
formal complaint accusing him of


- - I


Be a guardian
The cruel and callous death of
2-year-old Caylee Anthony
shocked and horrified central
Floridians and the nation. The
death of 10-year-old Nubia Bara-
hona, who was tortured and al-
legedly killed by Jorge and
Carmen Barahona, her adoptive
father and mother, left most of
us outraged.
In response to increased
media coverage of such cases,
the number of calls to the
Florida Department of Children
and Families state abuse hotline
has skyrocketed and the number
of children entering the child
welfare system is edging up-
ward. Here in the 5th Judicial
Circuit, which includes Marion,
Lake, Citrus, Sumter and Her-
nando counties, more than 1,500
children, most of whom are
below 10 years of age, are in-
volved with the dependency
court system. Nearly all of these
children have been removed
from their homes and placed in
foster care or with relatives.
State and national statistics
show such children are at higher
risk for depression and anxiety,
school failure and impaired so-
cial relationships. Many are in
danger of becoming involved
with the juvenile justice system.
The Guardian ad Litem Pro-
gram, a predominantly volun-


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

teer-based organization, advo-
cates on behalf of abused and
neglected children whose cases
are in the court system. Trained
volunteers, who are focused on
interrupting the cycle of abuse
one case at a time, take the ac-
tions necessary to ensure "their"
kids are safe, protected and


given every opportunity for fu-
ture success.
For readers who had a vis-
ceral reaction to the aforemen-
tioned cases and wish to do
something to stem the tide of
abuse and neglect, I suggest they
call Lynn Sennett, Guardian ad
Litem Volunteer Recruiter, at
(352) 369-2525 or email her at
Lynn. Sennett@GAL.FL.gov
Free volunteer pre-service
training is scheduled to occur
beginning Aug. 8. For access to
an online application and more
information on the Guardian ad
Litem Program, visit
www.guardianadlitem.org.
Marcia Hilty
Circuit Director 5th Judicial
Circuit Guardian ad Litem
Program, Ocala

Inspiring story
I really loved the story about
Sarah and Ryan Ferguson and
their beautiful family It was so
inspiring and it's stories like
these that really shows how
great the Citrus County Chroni-
cleis!
This heartwarming story re-
ally made my day The Fergu-
son's are a special couple and
they deserve many good things
to come their way! Thank you.
E.G. Yerian
Homosassa z


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


attempted rape.
"If I want one day to put an end
to this hell that has lasted eight
years, it needs to be tried in
court," she said. "There is no
good solution, only one that
means I can finally look at myself
in the mirror. For once, I want to
be in control of what happens. I
want people to listen to me, be-
cause I have, perhaps, finally a
chance to be heard."
Kauffmann said Banon is not
alone.
"There's an awareness and a
willingness to speak out that was-
n't there before," she told the
Times. "Even if DSK manages to
come back and run, it will be part
of the discussion. He's still a guy
who had a sexual encounter with
a maid at noon in a luxury suite
before having lunch with his
daughter and flying back to his
wife."
How men treat women should
be "part of the discussion" in
American politics as well. Do
male candidates regard women
as equals or inferiors? Do they
seek their advice as well as their
affection? Do they behave
morally as well as legally?
DSK probably broke no law
when he pressured an economist
who worked for him at the Inter-
national Monetary Fund into a
brief affair. But she felt too vul-
nerable to resist
"I was damned if I did and
damned if I didn't," she said.
We don't know exactly what
happened in that hotel room last
May But we do know DSK has a
long record of abusing women.
And we know such a record
should disqualify a man from
holding public office, in Paris or
Washington or anywhere else.
--*--A
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be
contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail. com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Worth NOTING


Vote online to
support shelter
Mission in Citrus homeless
shelter has joined the 2011
Pepsi Challenge. Facebook
members can vote online at
the special Pepsi website to
help the shelter win $50,000
for veterans, or set up a Pepsi
account: www.refreshevery
thing.com/helpourhomeless
vets.
The site includes notes by
Mission in Citrus leader Jim
Sleighter, and a detailed
budget chart. Members may
vote for up to five ideas every
day - the idea with the most
votes by the July 31 deadline
will win a grant from PepsiCo
organizers, announced Aug. 1.
Port Authority sets
inaugural meeting
The Citrus County Port Au-
thority will conduct an inaugu-
ral meeting at 9 a.m. Tuesday,


July 12, at the Citrus County
Courthouse, at 110 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness.
The Port Authority will elect
officers, develop a meeting
schedule, designate interim
staff and begin discussion on
the next steps toward devel-
opment of a port on the Cross
Florida Barge Canal.
For information about the
port meeting, call Gary Maid-
hof, operations and projects
officer, at (352) 527-5202.
Citrus 20/20 board
to convene
Citrus 20/20 Board of Direc-
tors will meet at 5:30 p.m.,
Monday, July 18, in Room
117, Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path.
All directors are urged to at-
tend. Interested persons are
invited. For more information,
visit www.citrus2020.com or
call (352) 344-5955.


--





DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Chassahowitzka Wildlife Refuge Manager Michael Lusk talks to residents concerned about King's Bay being made to ad-
here to idle speed year round to protect manatees not migrating out of the area during the summer months. Wildlife offi-
cials met with residents and Citrus County officials during a public hearing Thursday at the Lecanto campus of College of


Central Florida.

MANATEE
Continued from Page Al

Crystal River City Coun-
cilman Mike Gudis offered
an olive branch, suggesting
setting up a citizens' com-
mission.
"Compromise is not such
a bad thing, but you never
gave us a chance to have
input before announcing
the rules," he said.
U.S. Rep. Rich Nugent, R-
Brooksville, issued a state-
ment expressing solidarity
with opponents of the plan.
"My job is to represent the
views of Citrus County resi-
dents on this and I'm anx-
ious to hear from folks, but
personally, for me, it's
ridiculous. Since they began
tracking the manatee popu-
lation in the '80s, it's grown
six-fold in this area. That
doesn't happen under ad-
verse conditions.
"The manatees seem to be
thriving, and that's a good
thing for the local environ-
ment and the tourist indus-


COMMENTS WELCOME
* People can continue to submit comments on the
proposed rules until the fourth week of August.
* Go to www.regulations.gov and follow the instructions
to Docket No. (FWS-R4-ES-2010-0079, or write to
Public Comments Processing, Attn: Docket No. (FWS-
R4-ES-2010-0079); Division of Policy and Directives
Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N.
Fairfax Drive, MS 2042-PDM; Arlington, VA 22203.
* To contact Rep. Rich Nugent, call (202) 225-1002 or
email Harrison.Lewis@mail.house.gov.


try that depends on it.
"The bottom line is that
the federal government
needs to respect the wishes
of the people in this com-
munity. I'm going to make
sure that happens," he said.
Lifelong Citrus resident
Tracy Colson, a manatee ad-
vocate and operator of Na-
ture Coast Kayak Tours, said
it is precisely because of the
increased numbers of man-
atees that makes it neces-
sary for change to occur.
She noted that unlike the
watercraft-related deaths of
manatees (13 in the past 10
years), what goes unre-


ported is the number of the
mammals being injured and
maimed in the bay
"I think many people will
not stand for it if they knew,"
Colson said.
She said boat traffic and
the number of manatees
have increased greatly since
her childhood, which makes
it important to have rules in
place to protect the sea
cows.
Capt. Mike Burns, speak-
ing on behalf of the Manatee
Tour Guide Association,
said his group also wel-
comes the new rules.
The Wildlife Service says


the manatees can't compete
with the increase in sum-
mer boat traffic without
measures to protect them.
Manatees attract an esti-
mated 100,000 visitors to Cit-
rus County every year They
are so central to the econ-
omy that manatees adorn
the sign at Crystal River city
limits. Every year they also
are celebrated with a Mana-
tee Festival.
Tourists began flocking to
Crystal River to see them
after a biologist named
Daniel "Woodie" Hartman,
who had spent years study-
ing the King's Bay mana-
tees, teamed up with
Jacques Cousteau on a 1972
documentary called "For-
gotten Mermaids."
The documentary, pre-
sented as an episode of the
critically acclaimed pro-
gram The Undersea World
of Jacques Cousteau, was
seen by millions of viewers
around the globe.
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
(352) 564-2925 or at asidibe
@chronicleonline. com.


c r r U S . - - Cou N y


www.chronicleonne~




g/u^w. ~p*o h


S _ I _ _ 1


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S CITTRUS COUNTY





v......o... CHIONIC
Th y - - -n -y -i 000-E

. - -__ -_ o__ -._ - - - - - - - ----


0709 SCRN

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETINGS
A Special Meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on
Thursday, July 14, 2011 at 8:30am in the Citrus County Hospital Board
offices located at 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. The Citrus County
Hospital Board offices are located within the building of the Law Office
of Grant & Dozier, LLC to discuss:
SAttorney Client Executive Session Meeting regarding:
- Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. vs Citrus County Hospital
Board, case # 2010-CA-5399.
- Citrus County Hospital Board vs Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc., case # 2010-CA-5702.
- Citrus County Hospital Board vs Ryan Beaty., case # 2011-CA-
809.
- Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. vs Trustees Rao, Ressler
and Smallridge, case # 2011-CA-1388.
- Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. vs Citrus County Hospital
Board and Trustees Rao, Ressler and Smallridge, case # 2011-
CA-1476.
- Joshua Struke vs Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc and
Citrus County Hospital Board, case # 2011-CA-1255.
- Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. vs Citrus County Hospital
Board and State of Florida, case # 2011-CA-1653.
* All Motions to be made pursuant to discussion in the attorney
client executive session meeting.
* Foundation Governance Issues.
NOTICE OF EXECUTIVE SESSION
MEETING DURING SPECIAL MEETING
The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will hold a Special
Meeting to have an Executive Session Meeting under the authority of
Section 286.011(8), Florida Statutes. The Executive Session will be
closed to the public to allow the Citrus County Hospital Board of
Trustees and their Chief Administrative Officer to meet with the board's
Attorney(s) to discuss the settlement negotiations or strategy related to
litigation expenditures in pending litigations: Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc. vs. Citrus County Hospital Board 2010 CA5399, Citrus
County Hospital Board vs. Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
2010 CA 5702, Citrus County Hospital Board vs Ryan Beaty 2011 CA
809, Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. vs. Trustees Rao,
Ressler, Smallridge 2011 CA 1388, Citrus Memorial Health Foundation,
Inc. vs. Citrus County Hospital Board and Trustees Rao, Ressler,
Smallridge 2011 CA 1476, Joshua Struke vs. Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation, Inc and Citrus County Hospital Board 2011 CA 1255,
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc. vs. Citrus County Hospital
Board and State of Florida 2011 CA 1653.
Present at the Executive Session will be Upender Rao, MD, Debbie
Ressler, Michael Smallridge, Vickie LaMarche - Chief Administrative
Officer, William Grant - General Counsel, Bruce Blackwell, Esquire,
Clifford Shepard, Esq., Barry Richard, Esq., Arthur England. Esq. and
Court Reporter Jennifer Rogers from Prestige Court Reporting.
Please note that Vickie LaMarche is the COO of the Citrus County
Hospital Board but is the highest ranking administrative officer of the
Citrus County Hospital Board.
The Executive Session will be held in the Conference Room at 123 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL. When the Executive Session commences
the door will be closed for approximately two and half (2 1/2) hours in
duration. At the conclusion of the Executive Session, the special
meeting of the Board will be reconvened and the public is invited to
rejoin.
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Law Office of Grant &
Dozier, LLC at 352-726-5111. Any person wishing to appeal any
decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with
Disabilities should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office,
123 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 419-6566. o008PM


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 A9


a dm-, WIMM











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Former PM aide arrested on hacking charge


News ofthe World editor to keep

her job while 200 staff laid of


Associated Press
LONDON - Prime Minis-
ter David Cameron's former
communications chief and
an ex-royal reporter were
arrested Friday in a phone
hacking and police corrup-
tion scandal that has already
toppled a major tabloid and
rattled the cozy relationship
between British politicians
and the powerful Murdoch
media empire.
The 168-year-old muck-
raking tabloid News of the
World was shut down Thurs-
day after being engulfed by


allegations its journalists
paid police for information
and hacked into the phone
messages of celebrities,
young murder victims and
even the grieving families of
dead soldiers. Its last publi-
cation day is Sunday
The hacking revelations
horrified the nation and ad-
vertisers, who pulled their
ads en masse. News Inter-
national, the British arm of
Rupert Murdoch's News
Corp., jettisoned the paper
in hopes of saving its $19 bil-
lion deal to take over satel-
lite broadcaster British Sky


Broadcasting. But the
British government on Fri-
day signaled the deal would
be delayed due to the crisis.
Many expressed astonish-
ment that 43-year-old Re-
bekah Brooks, who was
editor of News of the World
when some of the hacking
allegedly occurred, was
keeping her job while the
paper's 200 staff were laid
off.
The Murdoch group has
shown "an almost maniacal
desire to protect Ms. Brooks
at all costs," said industry
analyst Claire Enders.
Brooks told the paper's
soon-to-be-laid-off staff Fri-
day she was staying on as
chief executive of News In-
ternational, adding the


paper was "working hard to
put our own house in order
and do the right thing."
Brooks appeared to hint
at revelations to come,
telling the journalists "in a
year's time it'll become ap-
parent why we did this," ac-
cording to an audio
recording of the meeting
carried by Sky news.
However, News Interna-
tional announced after the
meeting Brooks had been
removed from the paper's
internal inquiry into the
wrongdoing. Instead, the
paper's standards commit-
tee will report to Joel Klein,
a former New York City
schools chancellor who now
heads News Corp.'s educa-
tion division.


Associated Press
Former Downing Street communications chief Andy Coulson
speaks to members of the media Friday as he leaves
Lewisham police station in south London, after being
arrested in a phone hacking and police corruption scandal.


Southern freedom


Associated Press
People celebrate late Friday ahead of independence in the center of Juba, southern Sudan. South Sudan became the world's newest nation
early Saturday, officially breaking away from Sudan after two civil wars over five decades that cost the lives of millions.

South Sudan becomes world's newest nation at midnight Saturday


Associated Press
JUBA, South Sudan - South
Sudan became the world's
newest nation early Saturday, of-
ficially breaking away from
Sudan after two civil wars over
five decades that cost the lives of
millions.
In the new country's capital,
Juba, streets pulsed with excite-
ment. Residents danced, banged
on jerry cans and chanted the
name of the world's newest pres-
ident, Salva Kiir One man
kneeled and kissed the ground
as a group ran through the
streets singing "We will never,
never, never surrender"
"Ah, I'm free," said Daniel
Deng, a 27-year-old police officer
and former soldier who broke
out in a wide grin.


The Republic of South Sudan
earned independence at 12:01
a.m. Saturday, breaking Africa's
largest country in two. It marked
the culmination of a January in-
dependence vote, which was
guaranteed in a 2005 peace deal
that ended the most recent
north-south war
After the celebrations die
down, residents of South Sudan
face an uphill climb. While the
new country is oil-rich, it is one
of the poorest and least-devel-
oped places on Earth. Unre-
solved problems between the
south and its former foe to the
north could mean new conflict
along the new international bor-
der, advocates and diplomats
warn.
Saturday's early morning cele-
brations were joyous for the free-


dom gained but tinged with the
memories of families lost. At
least 2 million people were
killed in Sudan's last civil war,
fought from 1983-2005.
"I came here for this moment,"
said Chol Allen, a 32-year-old
minister who escaped Sudan in
2003 and eventually settled in
Memphis, Tenn. He returned to
Juba two months ago for the mid-
night party, though he plans to go
back to the U.S., where he has a
4-year-old daughter
"We were all born into war All
of us," he said, then pointed at a
crowded pick-up truck of young-
sters. "This generation will see
the hope of the newborn nation."
John Kuach, a former child
soldier who joined the army
after his father died in fighting
with the north, first fought at age


A Southern Sudanese soldier
stands at attention honoring the
national anthem during an inde-
pendence rehearsal procession
Thursday in Juba, southern Sudan.
15. At dinner late Friday, he
draped the South Sudan flag
around his shoulders and called
Saturday "a big day"


Gunman often resorted to violence


poseful act," Police Chief Kevin
Belk said Friday, describing Dant-
zler as mentally unstable but saying
he knew of no clinical diagnosis or
motive for the killings.
Dantzler's rap sheet goes back to
1992, when he was charged as a ju-
venile with breaking and entering
and car theft. That was followed
over the next eight years by charges
of trespassing, domestic violence,
destruction of property, larceny
and assault.
Dantzler's mother, who said her
son set fire to her house when he
was 18, was among four women
who sought protective orders
against him in the mid- to late
1990s.
"Rodrick has a very explosive
temper and will act violently with-
out thinking," Victoria Dantzler
wrote in the petition filed in Kent
County Circuit Court. "I've lived in
fear of him hunting me down or
worse, forcing me to hurt him in
order to protect myself. I just wish
for him to leave me alone."
In May 2000, he was accused of
firing a gun at people in a car, then
firing four more shots when they at-


tempted to read the license plate of
the vehicle he was driving. He was
sentenced that year to three to 10
years in prison for assault and
paroled three years later
One woman filed a paternity suit
against Dantzler in 1995, and at
least three sought child support
from him. In each case, judges is-
sued warrants for his arrest for fail-
ing to pay
In a 1997 petition, Stacy Carter
said she tried to leave Dantzler
while she was five months' preg-
nant because of repeated abuse.
Dantzler tracked her down at a
friend's house and warned that she
could not leave him "with the baby
and myself still alive," Carter
wrote.
Dantzler, she said, once pushed
her into a bathroom mirror and
slammed her on the floor He
grabbed her jaw and told her he
would "kill it before he brings an-
other baby into this world."
That same year, Angela Merrill
filed a petition saying Dantzler
threatened her and "slapped me in
the face and then swore at me" over
a tape he claimed she had.


Associated Press
Family friend Dennis Rozanski re-
acts Friday at a memorial to three
victims in Thursday's shooting spree
in Grand Rapids, Mich., at the Plain-
field Ave., NE house.


getting into trouble

as juvenile in '92

Associated Press
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. -When
Rodrick Shonte Dantzler raised a
gun to his head after going on a
deadly shooting spree, the bullet
ended what those close to him de-
scribed as a troubled life in which
he frequently resorted to violence
and often made threats against
women and relatives.
Police say the 34-year-old ex-con
targeted two former girlfriends in
Thursday's rampage, fatally shooting
both of them and five members of
their families, including his own 12-
year-old daughter He also shot and
wounded two other people - one of
them another ex-girlfriend - while
leading officers on a chase through
Michigan's second-largest city
"He went out hunting these peo-
ple down. It was very much a pur-


House


boosts


military


budget

Defense dept.

to see increase

in double digits

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Money
for the Pentagon and the na-
tion's wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan is proving largely
immune from the budget-cut-
ting that's slamming other
government agencies in the
rush to bring down the deficit
On a 336-87 vote Friday, the
Republican-controlled
House overwhelmingly
backed a $649 billion defense
spending bill that boosts the
Defense Department budget
by $17 billion. The strong bi-
partisan embrace of the
measure came as White
House and congressional ne-
gotiators face an Aug. 2 dead-
line on agreeing to trillions of
dollars in federal spending
cuts and raising the borrow-
ing limit so the U.S. does not
default on debt payments.
While House Republican
leaders agreed to slash bil-
lions from the proposed budg-
ets for other agencies, hitting
food aid for low-income
women, health research, en-
ergy efficiency and much
more, the military budget is
the only one that would see a
double-digit increase in its ac-
count beginning Oct 1
Concerns about under-
mining national security,
cutting military dollars at a
time of war and losing de-
fense jobs back home
trumped fiscal discipline in
the House. Only 12 Republi-
cans and 75 Democrats op-
posed the overall bill.
"In the midst of a serious
discussion about our na-
tion's debt crisis, House Re-
publicans demonstrated
responsible leadership that
sets priorities and does not
jeopardize our national se-
curity interests and our na-
tion's ongoing military
efforts," Rep. Tom Price, R-
Ga., chairman of the House
Republican Policy Commit-
tee, said in a statement.
But Rep. Barney Frank,
D-Mass, scoffed at the sug-
gestion that "everything is
on the table" in budget ne-
gotiations.
"The military budget is
not on the table," he said.
"The military is at the table,
and it is eating everybody
else's lunch."
The bill would provide
$530 billion to the Pentagon
and $119 billion to cover the
costs of the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan. It would pro-
vide a 1.6 percent increase
in pay and buy various war-
ships, aircraft and weapons,
including a C-17 cargo plane
that the Pentagon did not re-
quest but is good news for
the Boeing production line
in Long Beach, Calif.


I Dantzler started











SPORTS


* Marlins one of the
teams not affected by
bad weather Friday
night./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


U Golf, Auto racing/B2
0 MLB/B3
0�U Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Entertainment/B5
0 Recreation - adult/B6


Arscott leaves CRHS, replacement upcoming


Football coach going to Orlando in

order to advance professional career


J.M. SORACCHI
Sports reporter
If the decision was based solely
upon football, George Arscott
wouldn't be going anywhere.
Yet, as any adult knows, most
choices in life are rarely made
based on a game when you have a
career and family involved.
In an attempt to advance his pro-
fessional career and one day land
an assistant principal job, Arscott
recently resigned as the dean of
students and head football coach of
Crystal River High School.
Arscott is in talks to begin


teaching at Lake Nona High
School in suburban Orlando,
where he will be reunited with
former Crystal River coach
Anthony Paradiso.
Paradise recently assumed the
head coaching duties at Lake
Nona and Arscott will serve as the
defensive coordinator as well as
work with the offensive line
"Contrary to popular belief, (the
decision) had nothing to do with
football," Arscott said. "It's a move
to a larger county where there will
be more career opportunities."
Arscott cited the want to be an
administrator and also wanting to


Rainfall limits Open


Women s golf

major can'tgetfar

into 2nd round

Associated Press
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.
- Around the time Stacy Lewis
was getting ready for her second
round of the day at the Broad-
moor, a brown bear shimmied up
a tree, wrapped himself around
a big branch and settled in for a
snooze.
For the players and everyone
else at the U.S. Women's Open,
Friday was, indeed, an energy
sapper
Lewis made it through 29 holes
on the mountain course before
Colorado's typical summer thun-
derstorms hit She walked off at
4-under par, with a one-shot lead
over I.K. Kim and Ryann
O'Toole.
Lewis, who won the Kraft
Nabisco earlier this year, shot 3-
under 68 in the first round, then
after a quick stop for lunch,
played the first 11 holes of the
second round in 1 under
With the black clouds moving
in and the wind gusting, she was-
n't all that crestfallen to hear the
siren sound.
"Part of me is definitely glad
we stopped," she said. "My legs
were getting a little heavy there."
There is never anything easy
about winning a U.S. Open, and
hitting good golf shots for 72
holes across the hilly Broadmoor,
elevation 6,700 feet, makes it that
much tougher, even under a nor-
mal schedule.
But this week's schedule will
be anything but normal.
Play was suspended Thursday
with 131 players still on the
course, or still waiting to hit their
first shots. That set it up for
Lewis and dozens more to play -
or at least try to play - 36 on Fri-
day They finished their first
rounds, ate lunch and quickly
headed back out to the course.
"I walked back out here and
the food hadn't kicked in and I
was really dragging," said
O'Toole, a qualifier whose
biggest pro check is the $17,500
she cashed at a Futures Tour
event earlier this season. "Once
it kicked in, I was fine. We played
28 holes today I can't really com-


Associated Press
Stacy Lewis tees off on the third hole during the second round of the Women's U.S. Open golf tournament
Friday at the Broadmoor Golf Club in Colorado Springs, Colo.


plain. This gives us some rest It's
not going anywhere."
Indeed, not a single player had
finished her second round when
the weather hit Friday, meaning
the weekend will be a long one
and a Monday finish is possible.
Nobody will kick that weekend
off in better position than Lewis,
whose first career major came
the hard way - a win at the
Nabisco in what was essentially


a head-to-head, final-day
matchup against the world's top
player, Yani Tseng.
Tseng, trying to complete the
career Grand Slam this week,
struggled early in this one and
walked off the course at 3 over,
seven shots out of the lead with
seven holes to play. She was
paired with defending champion
Paula Creamer, and a few min-
utes before weather stopped


play, both Creamer and Tseng,
playing downwind, drove the ball
over the 339-yard, par-4 second
hole. Creamer got up and down
for a birdie that put her at 1
under, one of only 10 players in
red numbers.
Lewis, meanwhile, was among
the few figuring out the greens
on a course where players have

See Page B4


be closer to his family in Orange
and Osceola Counties as the sole
motive for the move.
Crystal River posted the job
opening on the Florida High School
Athletic Association (FHSAA) web-
site on June 28 and, according to Pi-
rates activities director Tony
Stukes, the school is very close to
namingArscott's successor
Stukes expects an announce-
ment to come as early as Monday
Should that announcement be
made then, coverage will appear
in Tuesday's Chronicle sports
section.
With the first day of football less
than a month away, it's no surprise
the Pirates are trying to move
quickly
Although Crystal River hasn't
See Page B4



Will the

real athlete

please

stand up?

My difficult decision
this week was: what
exactly am I going to
write about? I was struck by
the Fox News report of
Nathan's July 4th hot dog eat-
ing contest and its relation-
ship to sports and athletes.
The preparation, training, the
lock out and ineligibility of
Takeru Kobayashi who re-
fused to sign an exclusive con-
tract with 'Major League
Eating' smacked of a sports
and medicine kind of article.
Speed eating and its inherent
lack of
athleti-
cism is
not the
subject
today.

article
follow-
ing the
celebra-
tion of Dr. Ron Joseph
our In- DOCTOR'S
depend- ORDERS
ence
Day re-
flects on the members of the
'Wounded Warrior Amputee
Softball Team" whose mem-
bers helped provide us that
freedom and independence.
Most importantly it is a re-
flection on those athletes who
have not only sacrificed a
piece of themselves in Iraq
and Afghanistan, but to all
para-athletes who are com-
peting and training regardless
of the cause of their limb loss
or perceived incapacity
Phil Taylor, in his Sports Il-
lustrated column, describes
best how these athletes
"fought through devastating
injuries and exhausting,
sometimes excruciating reha-
bilitation to make it back from
the battlefield to the ball field.
In the process they are prov-
ing to everyone, including
themselves, that despite miss-
ing limbs they are still the
same focused, physically ca-
pable men they have always
been."
I have previously written


See Page B4




Jeter's pursuit for 3,000 against Rays delayed


Game rained

out; replay on

Sept. 22

Associated Press

NEW YORK - Derek
Jeter arrived at his locker,
turned on the computer
touch screen and immedi-
ately checked the weather
radar
The forecast? Storms,
rather than hits.
Jeter's chances to get his
3,000th hit at Yankee Sta-
dium dwindled Friday night


when New York's game
against Tampa Bay was
rained out and the teams
tangled on a makeup date.
The postponement left him
two hits shy of the mile-
stone, with two games re-
maining on the homestand.
The Yankees said they did-
n't want to play a traditional
doubleheader Saturday Gen-
eral manager Brian Cashman
gave a succinct answer on
why not: "Gate," he said.
Instead, the Yankees pro-
posed a day-night double-
header The Rays voted that
down, and the sides finally
agreed on Sept. 22, a mutual
off day that followed a two-
game series between the


teams in New York.
"I don't think there's re-
ally a win," Rays star Evan
Longoria said. "I think we
all know why they'd like to
get these three games in and
obviously they're rooting for
Derek to get his 3,000th hit
here in this series. I mean,
we'd like to see him do it,
too. And he's got two more
days to do it."
After that, Jeter gets a
break. He pulled himself
from next week's All-Star
game to rest his injured calf.
"Unfortunately, I won't be
able to go," he said.
Later, as showers, light-
ning and thunder hovered
over the ballpark, two teams


that don't really like each
other too much bumped
again. Most of their scrapes
have come on the field. This 1
time, a scheduling conflict.
"Whether I'm frustrated or
not, it doesn't matter," Yan-
kees manager Joe Girardi
said. "It was important to us,
itwas important to our fans."
The sides will play after-
noon games on Saturday
and Sunday, with Rays aces
David Price and James
Shields starting. Jeter is at
2,998 hits and those are his
last tries at home before the
All-Star break. The Yankees
begin the second half with The
bet\
See Page B3 New


Associated Press
field is covered at Yankee Stadium for the game Friday
ween the New York Yankees and the Tampa Bay Rays in
SYork. The game was called due to rain.


Chronicle file photo
Crystal River football coach George Arscott has resigned after five years
(three as head coach) at the high school. Arscott is expected to go to
Lake Nona High School in suburban Orlando.


"






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keselowski coasts to win


Diver stretches


fIffiSt ffit

Nationwi win


Associated Press

SPARTA, Ky - Brad Ke-
selowski won the NASCAR
Nationwide race at Kentucky
Speedway on Friday night,
stretching his fuel over the
final 67 laps to pick up his
first win in the series this
year.
Kevin Harvick was second,
followed by Kyle Busch,
Kasey Kahne and Elliott
Sadler.
Keselowski, the 2010 Na- -
tionwide champion, led 132 r '
laps but needed to go light on
the gas pedal over the final
miles to win for the first time
since taking the checkered
flag at Gateway last fall.
Joey Logano, who was
looking for his fourth straight
win at Kentucky, ran out of
gas on the last lap and fin-
ished 10th.
Sadler took over the Na-
tionwide points lead after
Reed Sorenson ran into trou-
ble on pit road and finished
17th.
Keselowski dominated the
series a year ago, winning six
times while running away
with the championship. .
Things haven't been quite so
easy this season. His previ-
ous best finish this year was
second at Texas in April. A
He made it look easy at the
1.5-mile oval, avoiding what
little trouble was out there to
pull away from a field , , .
stacked with Cup regulars ..
who pulled double-duty with
the Cup Series scheduled to
make its debut at the speed-
way today.

Brad Keselowski celebrates
after winning the Nation-
wide Series auto race Friday
at the Kentucky Speedway
in Sparta, Ky.
Associated Press





Kyle Busch to start on Ky. pole


Associated Press

SPARTA, Ky - Kyle
Busch will be on the pole for
the inaugural NASCAR
Sprint Cup race at Kentucky
Speedway, grabbing the top
spot after rain washed out


qualifying and the starting
order was based on practice
times.
Juan Pablo Montoya will
start second in Saturday
night's 400-mile race and
Kurt Busch will be third.
Nearly half of the 48 cars


attempting to make the 43-
car field got in a qualifying
run before a thunderstorm
resulted in qualifying to be
based on the best laps during
Friday's practice session.
The storm kept Kentucky
native Michael Waltrip from


making the field. He was
fourth fastest of the 22 cars
that went through qualifying,
but those numbers were
wiped out and he will miss
the race because his top
practice speed wasn't among
the 43 fastest


Reavie's putter




snatches lead

Golp had Thursday, when he
Golfer goes up birdied his final five holes.
He finished with an even-
two strokes at par 71 to remain 8 under.
S I r-. First Tee Open


John Deere


Associated Press

SILVIS, Ill. -Chez Reavie
shot a 9-under 62 at the John
Deere Classic, relying on his
putter to claim a two-stroke
lead after two rounds.
Reavie found the greens
at TPC Deere Run to his
liking while making an
eagle and a string of birdie
putts, going 8 under during
one nine-hole stretch. He
went into the weekend at
14-under 128 in search of
his first victory since the
2008 Canadian Open.
Steve Stricker shot a 64
to finish at 12 under in his
bid for a third straight vic-
tory in the tournament.
Steve Marino (66) also
was 12 under Jhonattan
Vegas (64), Mark Wilson
(67), Brendon de Jonge (66)
and Kyle Stanley (67) were
four off the lead.
The last two British Open
champions, Louis Oost-
huizen (2010) and Stewart
Cink (2009), both were 3
under and missed the cut
by one stroke. Oosthuizen
shot a 68, Cink a 67. Paul
Goydos, last year's runner-
up, failed to reach the
weekend after going 66-75.
First-round leader Kris
Blanks drove his first shot
of the day into a bunker left
of the fairway on No. 1,
made double bogey and
never found the rhythm he


PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -
Russ Cochran made six con-
secutive birdies and shot a 7-
under 65 to take the first-round
lead at the First Tee Open.
Cochran had seven birdies
overall and played a bogey
free round in his return to the
Champions Tour after a two-
month layoff because of a wrist
injury. Cochran was only 1
under through 11 holes before
going on his run of birdies at
the Pebble Beach Golf Links.
David Eger was one shot
back at 66, followed by Brad
Bryant, Morris Hatalsky and
Jim Thorpe at 67. Ten others
were tied at 68.
Defending champion Ted
Schulz struggled to a 73.
Scottish Open
INVERNESS, Scotland -
U.S. Open champion Graeme
McDowell shot an 8-under 64
to grab a share of the lead at
the Scottish Open after storms
halted second-round play.
McDowell had perfect con-
ditions in the morning and was
tied at 11-under 133 with Scot-
tish pair Scott Jamieson and
Peter Whiteford, who had 66s.
Spain's Jose Manuel Lara
(66) was a shot behind, while
Argentina's Angel Cabrera
(64), Belgium's Nicolas Col-
saerts (66) and Paul Lawrie
(64) were two strokes back.
Phil Mickelson was projected
to make the cut after shooting a
67 that left him seven strokes
behind the leaders.


Associated Press
Chez Reavie hits out of the ninth hole bunker Friday during
the second round of the John Deere Classic golf tourna-
ment at TPC Deere Run in Silvis, III. Reavie finished the
second round at 14 under par.


Friday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


U.S. Women's Open
Scores
Friday
The Broadmoor, East Course, Colorado
Springs, Colo.
Purse: $3.25 million
Yardage: 7,047, Par 71
First Round
a-denotes amateur
Stacy Lewis 68
Ryann O'Toole 69
a-Amy Anderson 69
Lizette Salas 69
I.K. Kim 7C
a-Lindy Duncan 7C
Mika Miyazato 7C
Maria Hjorth 7C
Ai Miyazato 7C
Karrie Webb 7C
Chella Choi 71
Inbee Park 71
Cindy Lacrosse 71
Cristie Kerr 71
Suzann Pettersen 71
Paula Creamer 72
Sherri Steinhauer 72
Mi-Jeong Jeon 72
Angela Stanford 72
SakuraYokomine 72
Brittany Lang 72
a-Danielle Kang 72
Hee Kyung Seo 72
Karen Stupples 72
a-Xiyu Lin 72
YaniTseng 73
Jessica Korda 73
Song Hee Kim 73
WendyWard 73
Jiyai Shin 73
Kristy McPherson 73
Sue Kim 73
Paola Moreno 73
Natalie Gulbis 73
Leta Lindley 73
HeeYoung Park 73
Eun-Hee Ji 73
Teresa Lu 73
Anya Sarai Alvarez 73
a-Rachel Rohanna 73
Danah Bordner 73
Junthima Gulyanamitta 73
SoYeon Ryu 74
Shinae Ahn 74
Karin Sjodin 74
Aree Song 74
Juli Inkster 74
a-Kelly Shon 74
Se Ri Pak 74
Sun Young Yoo 74
Christina Kim 74
Alison Walshe 74
Mihyun Kim 74
Katherine Hull 74
M.J. Hur 74
Alena Sharp 74
Anna Nordqvist 74
Sarah-Jane Smith 74
Azahara Munoz 74
Yoo Kyeong Kim 74
Seon Hwa Lee 74
Sophie Gustafson 74
Pat Hurst 7E


Young-A Yang
Brittany Lincicome
a-Ariya Jutanugarn
Jimin Kang
Jee Young Lee
Michele Redman
Meena Lee
a-Emma Talley
Soojin Yang
Mariajo Uribe
Stacy Prammanasudh
Yukari Baba
Amy Yang
Mina Harigae
a-Kyung Kim
Belen Mozo
Becky Morgan
Lee-Anne Pace
Julieta Granada
Jennifer Johnson
Laura Diaz
Morgan Pressel
Shinobu Moromizato
Beatriz Recari
a-Moriya Jutanugarn
Catriona Matthew
Nicole Hage
Candle Kung
Heather Bowie Young
Jane Park
Amanda Blumenherst
a-Lisa McCloskey
Jennifer Rosales
Sun JuAhn
Saehee Son
Heewon Han
Vicky Hurst
Shanshan Feng
Hye Youn Kim
Meaghan Francella
Lindsey Wright
a-Christina Proteau
Anna Grzebien
Jean Chua
Jinyoung Pak
Mallory Blackwelder
Sandra Gal
Harukyo Nomura
Alexis Thompson
Dewi Claire Schreefel
a-Jennifer Kirby
Melissa Reid
Sarah Kemp
Bo Mee Lee
Naon Min
Christine Wolf
Amy Hung
Kyeong Bae
Momoko Ueda
Katie Futcher
Haeji Kang
Michelle Wie
Gwladys Nocera
a-Victoria Tanco
Jennifer Song
a-Stephanie Kono
a-Emily Collins
Na Yeon Choi
Katy Harris
Laura Davies
Silvia Cavalleri
Ashley Prange
Sofie Andersson


a-Mariah Stackhouse 79
Garrett Phillips 79
Reilley Rankin 80
Lauren Doughtie 80
Joanna Coe 80
Doris Chen 80
Whitney Wade 80
Whitney Neuhauser 80
a-Erynne Lee 80
a-Gabriella Then 80
Jaclyn Sweeney 80
Brittany Johnston 81
a-Brittany Marchand 81
Shi Hyun Ahn 81
a-Chelsea Mocio 81
Jessi Gebhardt 82
Birdie Kim 83
Betsy King 83
a-Margarita Ramos 85
a-Mariel Galdiano 85
PGA-John Deere Classic
Friday
AtTPC Deere Run, Silvis, Ill.
Purse: $4.5 million
Yardage: 7,268, Par: 71
Second Round
a-denotes amateur
Chez Reavie 66-62-128 -14
Steve Marino 64-66-130 -12
Steve Stricker 66-64-130 -12
Jhonattan Vegas 68-64-132 -10
MarkWilson 65-67-132 -10
Brendon de Jonge 66-66-132 -10
Kyle Stanley 65-67-132 -10
KirkTriplett 68-65-133 -9
ArjunAtwal 67-66-133 -9
Billy Mayfair 67-66-133 -9
John Mallinger 68-65-133 -9
David Mathis 68-65-133 -9
Nathan Green 69-64-133 -9
Chris Stroud 69-64-133 -9
Matt McQuillan 64-69-133 -9
Cameron Percy 66-67-133 -9
Kris Blanks 63-71 -134 -8
Jim Herman 66-68-134 -8
William McGirt 67-67-134 -8
Charles Howell III 66-68-134 -8
Lee Janzen 66-68-134 -8
D.A. Points 66-68-134 -8
Davis Love III 64-70-134 -8
DeanWilson 69-65-134 -8
Chris Couch 70-65-135 -7
Michael Letzig 70-65-135 -7
Zach Johnson 66-69-135 -7
Cameron Beckman 66-69-135 -7
Scott Stallings 69-66-135 -7
Aron Price 69-66-135 -7
Brian Gay 68-67-135 -7
Michael Connell 69-66-135 -7
Charles Warren 67-68-135 -7
Steven Bowditch 67-68 -135 -7
Joe Ogilvie 69-67-136 -6
Duffy Waldorf 67-69-136 -6
Woody Austin 69-67-136 -6
Heath Slocum 70-66 -136 -6
Jason Day 67-69 -136 -6
Todd Hamilton 70-66-136 -6
Andres Gonzales 68-68-136 -6
Chad Campbell 67-69-136 -6
Josh Teater 66-70 -136 -6
Troy Merritt 68-68 -136 -6
J.J. Henry 68-68-136 -6


Cameron Tringale 70-66
Troy Matteson 67-69
Brian Davis 70-66
David Hearn 67-69
Shane Bertsch 71-66
Alex Prugh 69-68
John Rollins 72-65
Michael Sim 67-70
Will MacKenzie 67-70
Bryce Molder 71-66
Marco Dawson 68-69
Craig Bowden 67-70
Brett Wetterich 69-68
Chris Kirk 68-69
D.J.Trahan 67-70.
Michael Thompson 71-66
Scott Piercy 70-67
Ben Martin 67-70
Sunghoon Kang 72-65
Frank Lickliter II 68-70
Tim Petrovic 69-69
Briny Baird 68-70
James Driscoll 71-67
Jason Bohn 72-66
John Merrick 67-71
Rod Pampling 69-69
Kent Jones 70-68
Michael Putnam 70-68
Failed to qualify
Ryuji Imada 70-69
Paul Stankowski 69-70
Louis Oosthuizen 71-68
Stewart Cink 72-67
Shaun Micheel 71-68
Marc Leishman 72-67
Blake Adams 72-67
Jim Renner 71-68
Daniel Summerhays 70-69
Joseph Bramlett 70-69
Garrett Willis 73-66
Mark Hensby 70-69.
Michael Bradley 68-71
VaughnTaylor 69-70.
Ricky Barnes 70-69
Chris Baryla 70-69
Jay Williamson 72-68
Pat Perez 69-71
Rich Beem 70-70
Brandt Jobe 70-70
Kevin Kisner 69-71
Justin Hicks 72-68
Alexandre Rocha 68-72
Robert Gamez 72-68
Chris DiMarco 69-71
Tommy Gainey 75-65
Greg Chalmers 67-73
D.J. Brigman 68-72
Nate Smith 69-71
Jeff Quinney 73-68
Richard S. Johnson 72-69
Andres Romero 71-70
Chad Proehl 70-71
Chris Riley 73-68
Kevin Stadler 72-69
Paul Goydos 66-75.
Jerry Kelly 71-70
Hunter Haas 71-70.
Chris Tidland 69-72
Tag Ridings 71-70
Jimmy Walker 71-70.
Morgan Hoffmann 72-69
Matt Jones 71-71
Jarrod Lyle 73-69
Dicky Pride 70-72


Charlie Wi 73-69 -142 E
J.P Hayes 68-74 -142 E
Brett Quigley 72-71 -143 +1
Mike Small 73-70-143 +1
Brian Maurer 72-71 -143 +1
MattWeibring 71-72-143 +1
Bio Kim 72-71 -143 +1
Fabian Gomez 73-70-143 +1
Leif Olson 68-75-143 +1
Zack Miller 72-71 -143 +1
Bob May 70-73-143 +1
Colt Knost 72-71 -143 +1
Jonathan Byrd 71-73-144 +2
Scott Gutschewski 72-72- 144 +2
Fran Quinn 73-71 -144 +2
Kevin Tway 72-72-144 +2
David Duval 75-70-145 +3
Scott McCarron 70-75-145 +3
BradySchnell 76-70-146 +4
Martin Piller 75-71 -146 +4
Jason Dufner 71-75-146 +4
Billy Horschel 73-73-146 +4
Will Strickler 73-73-146 +4
Bobby Gates 76-71 -147 +5
Kenny Perry 70-77-147 +5
Brad Faxon 77-71 -148 +6
Roland Thatcher 72-77-149 +7
Matt Bettencourt 78-72- 150 +8
Derek Lamely 74-76-150 +8
Mike Weir 75-76-151 +9
Scott Gordon 75-76-151 +9
John Daly 72-81 - 153 +11
Chris Smith 75-78 -153 +11
a-Scott Langley 76-83-159 +17
Barclays Scottish Open
Friday
At Castle Stuart Golf Links, Inverness,
Scotland
Purse: $4.82 million
Yardage: 7,050, Par: 72
Second Round
Scott Jamieson, Scotland 67-66 -133
Graeme McDowell, N. Ireland 69-64-133
Peter Whiteford, Scotland 67-66 -133
Jose Manuel Lara, Spain 68-66 -134
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 69-66-135
Angel Cabrera, Argentina 71-64-135
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 71-64 -135
Christian Nilsson, Sweden 68-68 -136
Justin Rose, England 69-67- 136
Padraig Harrington, Ireland 69-67 -136
Matt Kuchar, United States 70-66 -136
David Dixon, England 71-65 -136
Markus Brier, Austria 68-68 -136
Michael Jonzon, Sweden 69-68 -137
Ernie Els, South Africa 68-69 -137
David Lynn, England 70-67-137
Romain Wattel, France 70-67- 137
Also
Phil Mickelson, United States 73-67-140
Champions Tour
Friday
At p-Pebble Beach Golf Links, 6,837
yards, par 72, At d-Del Monte Golf Course,
6,357 yards, par 72
Pebble Beach, Calif.
Purse: $1.6 million
First Round
Russ Cochran 30-35- 65 -7p
David Eger 35-31 - 66 -6d
Brad Bryant 34-33- 67 -5d
Morris Hatalsky 36-31 - 67 -5d


Jim Thorpe
Mike Reid
Jeff Sluman
Steve Lowery
Jay Haas
Robin Freeman
Mark Calcavecchia
Bill Glasson
Jim Gallagher, Jr.
D.A. Weibring
Jay Don Blake
Steve Pate
Tom Pernice, Jr.
Bobby Clampett
Keith Clearwater
J.L. Lewis
Bob Gilder
Chien Soon Lu
Lee Rinker
Fred Funk
Bruce Fleisher
Peter Senior
Mark Brooks
Bobby Wadkins
John Cook
Roger Chapman
Mark Mouland
MarkWiebe
Jim Rutledge
Olin Browne
Jerry Pate
Ronnie Black
Tom Purtzer
Mark O'Meara
Hale Irwin
John Morse
Tom Kite
MarkW. Johnson
John Harris
Barry Jaeckel
Mike Hulbert
Gary Hallberg
Blaine McCallister
Robert Thompson
Chip Beck
Lonnie Nielsen
Tommy Armour III
Ted Schulz
Mike Goodes
Phil Blackmar
Scott Simpson
Hal Sutton
Peter Jacobsen
Don Pooley
Keith Fergus
Mark McNulty
David Peoples
Rod Spittle
Andy Bean
Larry Nelson
Joey Sindelar
Steve Jones
Wayne Levi
Tom Jenkins
John Huston
Greg Bruckner
Tim Simpson
John Jacobs
Dave Eichelberger
Craig Stadler
Ben Crenshaw
James Mason
Eduardo Romero
Fuzzy Zoeller


-68 -4d
-68 -4d
-68 -4d
-68 -4d
-69 -3p
-69 -3d
-69 -3p
-70 -2p
-70 -2p
-70 -2p
-70 -2d
-70 -2p
-70 -2p
-70 -2d
-71 -ld
-71 -1p
-71 -ld
-71 -ld
-71 -1p
-71 -1p
-71 -ld
-72 Ep
-72 Ed
-72 Ep
-72 Ep
-72 Ed
-72 Ed
-72 Ed
-72 Ep
-72 Ed
-72 Ed
-72 Ed
-72 Ed
-72 Ep
-72 Ed
-72 Ed
-73 +lp
-73 +ld
-73 +lp
-73 +ld
-73 +lp
-73 +ld
-73 +lp
-73 +lp
-73 +ld
-74 +2d
-74 +2p
-74 +2p
-74 +2p
-74 +2d
-74 +2p
-74 +2p
-74 +2d
-74 +2p
-75 +3p
-75 +3d
-75 +3d
-75 +3p
-75 +3d
-75 +3p
-76 +4p
-76 +4p
-76 +4p
-76 +4p
-76 +4p
-76 +4p
-77 +5p


B2 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Boston
NewYork
Tampa Bay
Toronto
A L Baltimore


NL


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


W L
53 35
51 35
49 39
43 47
36 50


Philadelphia
Atlanta
NewYork
Washington
Florida


East Division
GB WCGB

1 --
4 3
11 10
16 15

East Division
GB WCGB

22 -
10 7/2
11 8/2
14/2 12


Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City



Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 B3


Central Division
GB WCGB

1 5/2
5 9/2
7'2 12
11/2 16

Central Division
GB WCGB

/2 6/2
/2 6/2
3 9
11'/2 17'/2
171/2 23/2


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland




San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
GB WCGB

1'/2 51/2
5 9
10 14


West Division
GB WCGB

1'/2 4/2
8 11
10 13
12 15


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Toronto 11, Cleveland 7
Tampa Bay at New York, ppd., rain
Boston 10, Baltimore 3
Texas 8, Oakland 5
Detroit at Kansas City, late
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, late
Seattle at L.A. Angels, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Price 8-7) at N.Y Yankees (A.J.Bur-
nett 8-7), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 6-7) at Chicago White
Sox (Buehrle 6-5), 4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 5-4) at Cleveland (Tomlin 10-
4), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Simon 1-1) at Boston (Lackey 5-8),
7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Furbush 1-2) at Kansas City (Hochevar
5-8), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 1-5) atTexas (C.Lewis 8-7),
8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 8-5) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro 4-
3), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 7, Chicago Cubs 4
Colorado 3, Washington 2
Florida 6, Houston 3
Arizona 7, St. Louis 6
Atlanta at Philadelphia, late, rain delay
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, late
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, late
N.Y Mets at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
Atlanta (Hanson 10-4) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee
9-6), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 7-2) at L.A. Dodgers (R.De
La Rosa 3-4), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 5-6) at Pittsburgh
(Correia 11-6), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 3-8) at Washington (Marquis
7-3), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-3) at Milwaukee (Marcum
7-3), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-8) at Florida (Nolasco 5-5),
7:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 9-5) at St. Louis (C.Carpen-
ter 4-7), 7:15 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Capuano 8-7) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 6-7), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Houston at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
ALL-STAR GAME
Tuesday's Game
All-Star Game at Phoenix, AZ, 8:05 p.m.


E At.
Associated Press
Boston Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz takes a swing
at Baltimore Orioles relief pitcher Kevin Gregg (63) after
they exchanged words following an Ortiz fly out during the
eighth inning Friday at Fenway Park in Boston.


Red Sox 10, Orioles 3
BOSTON - David Ortiz homered
in Boston's eight-run first inning, then
got into a bench-clearing brawl with
Baltimore reliever Kevin Gregg as the
Red Sox routed the Orioles 10-3 on
Friday night.
Ortiz and Gregg exchanged a flurry
of punches in the eighth, but neither
connected before they were separated
as both benches and bullpens emptied
for the second time in the inning.
Moments before the fight, Ortiz
started toward the mound after taking a
second straight pitch inside from Gregg.
The benches and bullpens emptied, but
nothing developed and Ortiz stepped
back into the batter's box.
Gregg got him to pop out, then
shouted something as the Boston slug-
ger started down the first-base line.
Plate umpire Mike Estabrook immedi-
ately ejected Gregg - and Ortiz
quickly changed course, charging to-
ward the mound. Gregg and Ortiz each
threw a few haymakers, but the heavy-
weight bout was swallowed up by the
mass of players rushing onto the field.
It took more than 15 minutes to re-
store order and sort out the ejections.
Gregg and Ortiz were tossed, as well as
Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia
and Baltimore reliever Jim Johnson.
Estabrook couldn't quite reach Ortiz
in time to stop him from getting to
Gregg. The benches and bullpens
cleared again as Boston fans cheered
"Pa-pi! Pa-pi!"
The Orioles, who allowed 10 or more
runs for the fourth time in five games,


DA I h iIUT D-backs 7, Cardinals 6


I ml' lll �� I
Continued from Page B1

an eight-game road trip.
Jeter has a large throng of
family and friends in town
and desperately wants to
make history with them in
attendance. He's trying to
become the 28th major lea-
guer to reach the mark and
the first to do it with the
Yankees.
In mid-afternoon, Jeter
played amateur forecaster
while bad weather ap-
proached the area.
"Green is not as bad as
yellow," he said, looking at
the map.
The colors conspired
against him, however, just as
the strained right calf that
recently put him on the dis-
abled list will prevent him
from playing in Phoenix
next Tuesday
Teammate Alex Ro-
driguez also will be absent
from the All-Star game be-
cause of a sore knee, and
closer Mariano Rivera will
miss the showcase because
of a tender right triceps.
Jeter is a 12-time All-Star
and was elected by fans to
start at shortstop for the
American League. Girardi
said it was totally Jeter's de-
cision to skip the festivities.
Jeter said he talked it
over with Girardi, Cashman
and trainer Gene Monahan.
"It's probably best not to
push it because it's most im-
portant to be ready for the
second half. That's where
my focus has to be," Jeter
said. "It's unfortunate be-
cause you know how much I
enjoy going to All-Star
games."
"I'm trying to be smart
about it. I know I can be
stubborn a lot of times with
injuries," he said.
Jeter is in a 4-for-18 rut
since coming off the DL this
week. All of those at-bats
came with him at the top of
the batting order, and he
had been set to bat second
Friday night


ST. LOUIS - Leadoff man Kelly
Johnson broke a seventh-inning tie
with his second career grand slam and
the Arizona Diamondbacks' bullpen
barely hung on for a 7-6 victory over
the St. Louis Cardinals on Friday night.
Chris Young added a two-run triple
and David Hernandez earned his fifth
save in as many attempts as the stand-
in closer for the Diamondbacks, who
have won five of seven and were two
games behind NL West-leading San
Francisco.
lan Kennedy (9-3) allowed three
runs in six innings, matching his ca-
reer-best victory total from last season.
Lance Berkman hit his NL-leading
24th homer and Matt Holliday added
his fourth in four games to spark the
Cardinals'three-run eighth against
three relievers. Hernandez worked
around a leadoff walk to Albert Pujols
and a one-out fielding error by short-
stop Stephen Drew and is 7 for 8 in
save chances overall.
Johnson has 16 homers, most be-
fore the All-Star break in franchise his-
tory by a second baseman.


Arizona St. Louis
ab r h bi
KJhnsn2b 4 1 1 4 Schmkr2b
S.Drew ss 5 1 1 0 Freese 3b
J.Uptonrf 4 11 0 Pujolslb
CYoungcf 4 1 2 2 Hollidy If
Monterc 4 0 1 1 Brkmn rf
Brrghs3b 4 0 0 0 Rasmscf
Mirandlb 4 1 1 0 Lairdc
GParralf 3 1 1 0 Jayph
IKnndyp 2 00 0 Lohsep
RRortsph 1 1 1 0 Mottep
Patersnp 0 0 0 0 Valdesp
Heilmnp 0 000 Puntoph
ACastllp 0 0 0 Salasp
Demel p 0 0 0 0 Descals ss
W.Penaph 1 0 00
DHrndzp 0 00
Totals 36 79 7 Totals
Arizona 000 300 400
St. Louis 012 000 030


38610 6
- 7
- 6


E-Burroughs (1), S.Drew (7). LOB-Arizona 5,
St. Louis 10.2B-S.Drew (19), Schumaker (10),
Holliday (19), Descalso (16). 3B-C.Young (3).
HR-K.Johnson (16), Holliday (14), Berkman


(24). SF-Pujols.

Arizona
I.Kennedy W,9-3
Paterson
Heilman
A.Castillo H,2
Demel H,4
Da.Hernandez S,7-9
St. Louis
Lohse L,8-6
Motte
Valdes
Salas


IP H RERBBSO

6 5 3 3 2 3
653323
1-31 0 0 0 1
2-32 2 2 0 1
2-32 1 1 1 0
1-3 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 1

62-37 7 7 2 3
1-3 2 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
100010


Heilman pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
T-3:07. A-37,160 (43,975).


were flustered after the Red Sox sent 13
batters to the plate in the opening inning
and tagged starter Zach Britton for
seven earned runs on six hits and two
walks. Ortiz hit a three-run shot.
It was Boston's fourth straight win,
and it extended Baltimore's losing
streak to five.
Britton (6-7) didn't even make it
through the inning, getting pulled with
two outs after Jacoby Ellsbury blooped
an RBI single in his second at-bat.
Baltimore Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Hardyss 4 0 0 0 Ellsurycf 5 1 1
Markksrf 4 0 1 1 Pedroia2b 4 32 1
AdJonscf 4 0 2 1 AdGnzllb 2 1 2 1
Guerrrdh 4 0 1 0 Suttonph-lb 1 00 0
Wietersc 4 0 1 0 Youkils 3b 4 1 1 1
D.Leelb 4 1 2 1 Reddcklf 1 01 1
MrRynl3b 4 0 0 0 D.Ortizdh 4 1 2 3
Pie If 2 1 0 0 Varitekc 3 1 0 0
Andino2b 3 1 1 0 Scutaross 4 1 1 0
DMcDnrf 4 1 1 2
YNavrr lf-3b 3 00 0
Totals 33 38 3 Totals 35101110
Baltimore 000 030 000 - 3
Boston 800 001 01x - 10
E-Hardy (2). DP-Baltimore 1, Boston 2.
LOB-Baltimore 6, Boston 7.2B-Wieters (15),
D.Lee (11), D.McDonald (2). 3B-Reddick (3).
HR-D.Lee (8), Pedroia (10), D.Ortiz (19).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Britton L,6-7 2-3 6 8 7 2 1
Bergesen 3 2 0 0 1 3
Jakubauskas 11-31 1 1 1 1
M.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 1 1
Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gregg 1 1 1 1 1 1
Boston
BeckettW,8-3 5 7 3 3 2 3
Albers 2 0 0 0 0 4
Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 2
Atchison 1 1 0 0 1 0
Jakubauskas pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-M.Gonzalez.
T-3:16. A-37,729 (37,493).


Rockies 3, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON -Jason Hammel
pitched into the seventh inning for his
second win in 13 starts and the Col-
orado Rockies beat the Washington
Nationals 3-2 on Friday night to end a
five-game losing streak.
Hammel (5-8) allowed two runs and
five hits in 61-3 innings as Colorado
won for the first time in eight road
games. The right-hander was coming
off his shortest outing of the season,
when he gave up seven runs in 3 2-3
innings in a loss to Kansas City.
All three Rockies runs came in the
fourth. Todd Helton scored on a balk
and Ty Wigginton and Cole Garner
each had a run-scoring single. Nation-
als starter John Lannan (5-6) left the
game in that inning after Wigginton's
line drive hit him on the nose.
Wilson Ramos homered for Wash-
ington.
The Rockies' bullpen kept the Na-
tionals scoreless after Hammel gave
way to Matt Reynolds in the seventh.
Matt Belisle came on for the final out of
the eighth and Huston Street pitched
the ninth for his 25th save in 27
chances.
Colorado Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
CGnzlzcf 4 00 0 Berndnlf 4 1 1 0
JHerrrss 3 1 2 0 Espinos2b 2 0 0 0
Helton b 4 1 1 0 Zmrmn3b 4 0 1 0
Wggntnlf 2 0 1 1 Morselb 3 0 1 1
Splrghslf 0 00 0 Bixlerpr 0 00 0
M.Ellis2b 4 1 0 0 Werthrf 4 0 1 0
Garnerrf 3 01 1 Ankielcf 4 0 0 0
MtRynlp 0 00 0 WRamsc 3 1 1
Belislep 0 0 0 0 Dsmndss 3 0 1 0
Giambiph 1 00 0 Lannanp 1 00 0
Street p 0 00 0 Matthsp 0 0 0 0
IStewrt3b 3 00 0 Coraph 1 00 0
lannett c 3 0 0 0 SBurntt p 0 0 0 0
Hammlp 2 00 0 Stairsph 0 00 0
S.Smithrf 1 00 0 Floresph 1 00 0
Clipprdp 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 35 2 Totals 302 6 2
Colorado 000 300 000 - 3
Washington 100 100 000 - 2
DP-Colorado 1, Washington 1. LOB-Col-
orado 3, Washington 4. 2B-Bernadina (9).
HR-W.Ramos (8). SB-Wigginton (5), Es-
pinosa (12), Zimmerman (1). CS-Desmond
(4). SF-Morse.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
HammelW,5-8 61-35 2 2 2 3
Mat.Reynolds H,14 11-30 0 0 0 1
Belisle H,7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
StreetS,25-27 1 1 0 0 0 2
Washington
Lannan L,5-6 31-33 3 3 0 5
Mattheus 12-31 0 0 0 1
S.Burnett 2 1 0 0 1 1
Clippard 2 0 0 0 2 1
WP-Clippard. Balk-Mattheus.
T-2:48. A-19,046 (41,506).


Blue Jays 11, Indians 7
CLEVELAND - Travis Snider drove
in five runs and Rajai Davis knocked in
four as the Toronto Blue Jays re-
bounded a day after a stunning loss to
beat the Cleveland Indians 11-7 on Fri-
day night.
Jo-Jo Reyes (4-7) pitched 5 2-3
shaky innings for his first win in his last
four starts. He gave up three unearned
runs, eight hits and two walks without a
strikeout as Cleveland left 12 men on
base and couldn't build momentum off
its exciting win Thursday night on
Travis Hafner's walkoff grand slam.
Davis had a two-run single in the
second and singled home a run in the
fourth off Mitch Talbot (2-6). Snider's
two-run shot off Talbot in the sixth
made it 7-2. He added a two-run dou-
ble off the fence in center against Vin-
nie Pestano for an 11-6 lead.
Cleveland got within 9-6 in the
eighth. Asdrubal Cabrera hit the fourth
consecutive single off Shawn Camp to
make it 9-4.
Jason Frasor came on to strike out
Hafner on four pitches, dropping the
slugger to 0 for 7 lifetime against the
reliever. Travis Buck, however, lined a
two-run double before Frasor got two
outs to leave runners on second and
third.


Toronto Cleveland
ab r h bi
YEscorss 5 0 2 1 Brantlycf
EThmsrf 5 0 2 0 ACarerss
CPttrsn rf 0 0 0 0 Hafner dh
Bautist3b 3 1 0 0 Duncan If
Lindlb 5 1 1 0 TBuckph-lf
A.Hill2b 4 1 0 0 OCarer2b
Encrncdh 5 4 4 0 LaPortlb
Snider If 5 2 3 5 Kearns rf
Arencii c 5 0 1 0 GSizmr ph
RDavis cf 4 2 3 4 Hannhn 3b
Marson c
Totals 41111610 Totals
Toronto 030 203 012


Cleveland 020


ab rh bi
6242
4021
4 0 2 1
5000
3 0 1 0
2 0 1 2
3010
2012
4000
5 1 1 0
4 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
5 1 3 1
4 2 2 0
43715 6
5110
4110
1000
5131
4220
43 715 6
- 11


001 031 - 7


E-Bautista (4), Lind (3), Hannahan (5). DP-
Cleveland 1. LOB-Toronto 6, Cleveland 13.
2B-YEscobar (14), Encarnacion (19), Snider
(9), R.Davis (16), TBuck (9), LaPorta (12), Han-
nahan (12). HR-Snider (2). SB-R.Davis 2
(24). CS-R.Davis (9). S-Marson.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Jo-.ReyesW,4-7 52-38 3 0 3 0
Dotel 11-30 0 0 0 1
Camp 0 4 3 3 0 0
FrasorH,9 1 1 0 0 0 1
Rauch 1 2 1 1 0 2
Cleveland
TalbotL,2-6 51-311 8 8 2 2
Durbin 12-31 0 0 0 1
Herrmann 1 2 1 1 0 0
Pestano 1 2 2 2 1 1
Camp pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
T-3:19. A-25,835 (43,441).


Pirates 7, Cubs 4
PITTSBURGH - Mike McKenry's
first major league home run, a three-
run shot in the eighth inning, lifted Pitts-
burgh to a 7-4 victory over the Chicago
Cubs on Friday night and assured the
Pirates of a winning record at the All-
Star break for the first time in 19 years.
The rookie catcher's drive deep into
the left-field bleachers came off Cubs
closer Carlos Marmol, who blew his
sixth save in 24 opportunities one bat-
ter earlier when he relieved Sean Mar-
shall (5-3) and allowed Josh Harrison's
game-tying single.
McKenry's blast drove the crowd of
37,140 into a frenzy. It was the Pirates'
ninth sellout of the season as they con-
tinue to regain old fans and win new
ones throughout the Pittsburgh area
with their surprising season.
The Pirates are 46-42 with two
games left against Chicago before the
break. They have had 18 consecutive
losing seasons, the longest such
stretch of futility in major North Ameri-
can professional sports history.


Chicago


Pittsburgh


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Fukdmrf 4 0 1 0 Presleylf 3 1 2 0
SCastross 5 01 0 dArnadss 4 1 1 0
ArRmr3b 4 22 1 GJonesrf 3 00 0
C.Penalb 4 00 0 Resopp 0 00 0
Soto c 5 00 0 Watson p 0 00 0
Byrd cf 3 2 3 0 Verasp 0 00 0
ASorinlf 4 0 2 2 DMcCtp 0 00 0
Barney 2b 3 0 2 1 Diaz ph 0 00 0
RLopezp 3 00 0 Ciriacopr 0 00 0
JRussllp 0 00 0 Hanrhnp 0 00 0
K.Woodp 0 0 0 0 AMcCtcf 2 1 1
DeWittph 1 0 0 0 Walker2b 4 1 1 2
Marshllp 0 0 0 0 Overaylb 4 1 2 0
Marmlp 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn3b 4 1 3 1
McKnrc 4 1 1 3
JMcDnlp 2 00 0
Paul rf 2 0 1 0
Totals 36 4114 Totals 32712 7
Chicago 100 002 010 - 4
Pittsburgh 002 001 04x - 7
DP-Chicago 3, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Chicago
10, Pittsburgh 5. 2B-Byrd (9), A.Soriano 2
(13), d'Arnaud (4), J.Harrison (4). HR-
Ar.Ramirez (15), A.McCutchen (13), McKenry
(1). SB-Byrd (2). CS-Fukudome (2). S-
Presley
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
R.Lopez 6 8 3 3 1 3
J.Russell 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
K.Wood 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
MarshallL,5-3H,16 2-3 1 2 2 1 0
MarmolBS,6-24 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald 52-35 3 3 2 4
ResopBS,4-4 1 4 0 0 0 1
Watson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Veras 2-3 2 1 1 2 2
McCutchenW,3-1 1-30 0 0 0 0
HanrahanS,26-26 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP--by R.Lopez (A.McCutchen), by Ja.Mc-
Donald (Ar.Ramirez).
T-3:32. A-37,140 (38,362).


Rangers 8, Athletics 5
ARLINGTON, Texas - C.J.Wilson
pitched seven effective innings, Mike
Napoli hit a first-inning grand slam off
Gio Gonzalez, and the Texas Rangers
stretched their winning streak to five
games with an 8-5 victory over the
Oakland Athletics on Friday night a
night after a fan was killed in a fall
while catching a foul ball.
Josh Hamilton, who tossed the ball
to the fan on Thursday night, hit a fan
with a foul ball off his bat. The teenage
male fan had blood on his face and
was tended to by stadium personnel
before he walked away, smiling while
he held a compress to his head.
Rangers officials said the fan was
treated at the stadium and was OK.
They didn't identify him or provide ad-
ditional details.
Wilson (9-3) won his fifth straight
decision to tie Alexi Ogando for the
team lead in wins, allowing four runs
and five hits with eight strikeouts and
three walks.
lan Kinsler and Adrian Beltre also
homered off Gonzalez (8-6), Oakland's
lone All-Star.
Both teams were still dealing with
the aftermath of the death of the fan
from a 20-foot fall in the second inning
of Thursday night's 6-0 Texas victory.
Brownwood firefighter Shannon
Stone tumbled over a railing after
catching a foul ball tossed into the
stands by Hamilton.
Oakland Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
JWeeks2b 4 0 0 0 Kinsler2b 3 1 1 1
DeJessrf 4 1 1 0 Andrusss 5 1 2 0
Crisp cf 2 2 1 1 JHmltnIf 5 1 1 0
Wlnghdh 4 0 2 1 ABeltredh 4 21 1
SSizmr3b 3 1 1 1 MiYong3b 4 1 1 0
CJcksn b 3 1 0 0 N.Cruz rf 3 00 0
Sweenylf 4 0 1 0 Napolilb 4 23 4
KSuzukc 3 0 0 0 Torrealc 3 01 1
Rosales ss 3 0 0 0 Gentry cf 3 00 0
EnChvz ph-cf 1 00 0
Totals 30 56 3 Totals 35810 7
Oakland 010 102 001 - 5
Texas 520 010 00x - 8
E-Rosales 2 (4). DP-Oakland 1, Texas 3.
LOB-Oakland 4, Texas 7. 2B-Willingham
(12), Napoli 2 (10). HR-S.Sizemore (4), Kinsler
(13), A.Beltre (17), Napoli (12). SB-DeJesus
(3), Crisp (26), Andrus (26), N.Cruz (5).
IP H RERBB SO


Oakland
G.Gonzalez L,8-6
Ziegler
Wuertz
Breslow
Balfour
Texas
C.WilsonW,9-3
Tom.Hunter
Feliz


7 5 4 4 3 8
1 0 0 0 1 3
1 1 1 1 1 0
754438
100013
111110


HBP-by C.Wilson (Rosales). PB-Torrealba.
T-2:48. A-37,858 (49,170).


Rays' Hellickson misses
chance to dog Jeter
NEW YORK - Jeremy Hel-
lickson says he's never been
able to tame his dog.
He's talking about that scruffy
Yorkshire Terrier of his. The one
named Jeter.
A persistent downpour Friday
night prevented the Tampa Bay
Rays' rookie starter from getting
the chance to deny Derek Jeter
the two hits he needs to reach
3,000. The second game of a
four-game series against the
New York Yankees was rained
out, bumping Hellickson back in
the rotation.
"I don't really know if he
knows his name because he
never listens to me," Hellickson
said of his dog, not Derek.
Hellickson grew up a Yan-
kees fan in Iowa with his dad -
Reggie Jackson was his fa-
vorite player. The right-hander
got the dog in 2005, the year
Tampa Bay drafted him in the
fourth round.
A baseball fanatic, he did the
best he could in naming the
playful pup.
"I'm really not that good on
dog names, I guess," Hellick-
son said. "I just came up with
it."
It's hard to blame him. By
then, Jeter was already a four-
time World Series champion
and captain of the Yankees.
Hellickson, a 24-year-old
rookie, is 1-0 with a 4.91 ERA
in two relief appearances
against the Yankees. Jeter is 1
for 2 against him.
"It's kind of funny that it hap-
pened," Hellickson said of lining
up to face Jeter so close to the
milestone. "It's not like I ex-
pected this to happen when I
gave him this name."
Now, Hellickson will miss
Jeter and all the other Yankees
in this series. The teams play
15 more times this season,
though. Rays ace David Price
will face A.J. Burnett on Satur-
day, and James Shields will go
up against New York's best, CC
Sabathia, on Sunday, the final
game before the All-Star break.


Associated Press
Florida Marlins shortstop Hanley Ramirez prepares to field a
ground ball hit by Houston Astros' Jordan Lyles in the second
inning Friday in Miami. The Marlins won 6-3.


Marlins 6, Astros 3
MIAMI - Hanley Ramirez contin-
ued his recent torrid hitting with three
hits and three RBIs and Javier
Vazquez pitched seven solid innings as
the Florida Marlins defeated the Hous-
ton Astros 6-3 on Friday night.
Florida broke a 2-2 tie and took the
lead for good on Ramirez's run-scoring
single in the third inning. He drove in
Gaby Sanchez, who reached on a two-
out double.
Ramirez is hitting .448 with three
home runs and 11 RBIs in July.
The Marlins increased the lead to 5-
2 in the fifth on Logan Morrison's
bases-loaded walk and Mike Stanton's
sacrifice fly.
Vazquez (5-8) settled down after a
rough first inning and in one stretch, re-
tired 16 of 18 hitters. He allowed two
runs and six hits, struck out four and
walked none.
The Marlins won a third consecutive
game for the first time since a three-
game sweep of San Francisco in May.
The loss was the Astros' 12th in
their last 14 games.
Astros rookie Jordan Lyles re-
mained winless after his seventh major
league start. Lyles (0-4) pitched six in-
nings and allowed five runs, seven hits,
walked three and struck out three.
Stanton hit an RBI single off reliever
Fernando Rodriguez in the seventh
and increased Florida's lead to 6-2.
Carlos Corporan's one-out RBI sin-
gle off Florida reliever Burke Badenhop
in the ninth made it 6-3. Leo Nuiez re-
lieved Badenhop and retired pinch-hit-
ter Jason Michaels and Michael Bourn


for his 24th save in 26 opportunities.
Ramirez's two-run home run in the
bottom of the first erased a 2-0 deficit.
Ramirez drove Lyles' pitch over the
wall in right-center field for his eighth
home run of the season.
The Astros scored two runs in the
top of the first on RBI singles by Jeff
Keppinger and Brett Wallace.
Notes: Florida 3B Emilio Bonifacio
sat out the game to be his wife, who is
expecting a baby. Bourn had his NL-
leading 22nd infield hit in the first when
he beat Ramirez's throw on a routine
grounder to shortstop.


Houston

Bourn cf
AngSnc 3b
Pence rf
Ca.Lee If
Kppngr2b
Wallac lb
Barmes ss
Corprn c
Lyles p
Bogsvc ph
FRdrgz p
SEscln p


ab r h bi
5 1 2 0
4 0 1 0
4 1 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 1


4 0 1 1
5120
4010



4100
4010


1 0 0 0
4121
4010
4011

2000
1000
0000
0000


Florida

Petersn cf-lf
Infante 2b
GSnchzlb
HRmrz ss
Morrsn If
Badnhp p
LNunez p
Stanton rf
Dobbs 3b
J.Buckc
Vazquz p
Wise cf


ab rh bi


Michals ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 39 3 Totals 32610 6
Houston 200 000 001 - 3
Florida 201 020 10x - 6
DP-Houston 1. LOB-Houston 7, Florida 8.
2B-Ca.Lee (23), Wallace (21), Barmes (17),
G.Sanchez (21), Stanton (17). HR-H.Ramirez
(8). SB-Petersen (1). SF-Stanton.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
LylesL,0-4 6 7 5 5 3 3
Fe.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 1 0
S.Escalona 1 1 0 0 0 1
Florida
VazquezW,5-8 7 6 2 2 0 4
Badenhop 11-33 1 1 0 0
L.NunezS,24-27 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Lyles (Petersen). PB-J.Buck.
T-2:40. A-17,044 (38,560).


I






B4 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


Nationwide Series
Feed The Children 300
Friday
At Kentucky Speedway
Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (5) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 143.5
rating, 0 points, $74,100.
2. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 133.4, 0,
$55,325.
3. (41) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 106.5, 0,
$37,375.
4. (18) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 97.6, 0,
$27,925.
5. (1) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 108.5, 40,
$33,968.
6. (19) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 200, 84.5, 38,
$26,543.
7. (21) Michael Annett, Toyota, 200, 86.4, 37,
$24,668.
8. (2) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 118.6, 0,
$17,375.
9. (3) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 109, 35,
$24,818.
10. (4) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 102.3, 0,
$16,450.
11. (10) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 199, 101.5, 33,
$21,543.
12. (13) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 199, 74.8, 33,
$22,318.
13. (14) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 199, 91.4, 31,
$20,718.
14. (12) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 199, 90.2, 0,
$13,300.
15. (7) Brian Scott, Toyota, 199, 88.8, 29,
$20,068.
16. (17) MikeWallace, Chevrolet, 199, 68.9, 29,
$20,868.
17. (11) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 199, 81.4,
27, $19,193.
18. (26) David Reutimann, Toyota, 199, 73.5, 0,
$12,575.
19. (8) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 199, 88.6, 25,
$18,918.
20. (20) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 198,77.3, 24,
$19,293.
21. (9) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 198, 75.4, 23,
$18,893.
22. (27) Blake Koch, Dodge, 198, 64.3, 22,
$19,543.
23. (23) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 196, 64, 0,
$18,793.
24. (16) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 196, 69.1, 20,
$18,243.
25. (22) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 196, 54.7, 19,
$18,718.
26. (34) Timmy Hill, Ford, 195, 49.5, 18,
$17,973.
27. (32) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 194, 48.4, 17,
$18,243.
28. (39) Charles Lewandoski, Chevrolet, 193,
44.3, 16, $17,723.
29.(35) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 193, 47.4,15,
$17,588.
30. (38) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 193, 44.1, 0,
$11,310.
31. (42) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 176, 42,
13, $17,368.
32. (29) JenniferJo Cobb, Dodge, ignition, 169,
37.1, 12, $10,790.
33. (40) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, ac-
cident, 119, 36.2, 11, $17,148.
34. (30) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, accident,
104, 53.1,10, $17,038.
35. (15) Will Kimmel, Ford, accident, 62, 55.4, 9,
$16,928.
36. (28) Scott Riggs, Dodge, overheating, 20,
41.7, 0, $10,425.
37. (25) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, vibration, 18,
41.2, 7, $10,375.
38. (36) Tim Andrews, Chevrolet, transmission,
11, 36.1, 6, $10,330.
39. (37) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, ignition,
10, 35.5, 5, $10,295.
40.(43) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, brakes, 7, 32,
4, $10,210.
41. (33) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 3,
33.9, 3, $10,150.
42. (24) John Jackson, Toyota, electrical, 3,
32.4, 2, $10,120.
43. (31) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet, brakes, 2,
30.8, 1, $10,053.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 138.408 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 10 minutes, 3 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.180 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 24 laps.
Lead Changes: 8 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: E.Sadler 1-8; K.Harvick 9-43;
C.Edwards 44; K.Harvick 45-65; B.Keselowski
66; M.Wallace 67; B.Keselowski 68-134; J.Ne-
mechek 135-136; B.Keselowski 137-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): B.Keselowski, 3 times for 132 laps; K.Har-
vick, 2 times for 56 laps; E.Sadler, 1 time for 8
laps; J.Nemechek, 1 time for 2 laps; C.Edwards,
1 time for 1 lap; M.Wallace, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 641; 2. R.Soren-
son, 637; 3. R.Stenhouse Jr., 614; 4. J.Allgaier,
598; 5. J.Leffler, 568; 6. A.Almirola, 553; 7.
K.Wallace, 532; 8. S.Wallace, 490; 9. M.Annett,
483; 10. B.Scott, 483.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.
Sprint Cup
Quaker State 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Kentucky Speedway
Sparta, Ky.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
Eds: Note Lineup is based on practice times
1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota
2. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet
3. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge
4. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota
5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet
6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford
8. (6) David Ragan, Ford
9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet
10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet
11. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford
12. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet
13. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet
15. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota
16. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota
17. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet
20. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet
21. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet
23. (43) AJ Allmendinger, Ford
24. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota
25. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota
26. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota
27. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota
28. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet


29. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet
30. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet
31. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota
32. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet
33. (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota
34. (1)Jamie McMurray Chevrolet
35. (34) David Gilliland, Ford
36. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet
37. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford
38. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota
39. (71) Andy Lally, Ford
40. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet
41. (37)Tony Raines, Ford
42. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford
43. (7) Scott Wimmer, Dodge
Failed to Qualify
44. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.
45. (15) Michael Waltrip, Toyota.
46. (50) T.J. Bell, Toyota.
47. (95) David Starr, Ford.


SCOREBOARD


Flor the rO cord


= Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Friday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
3-1-1
CASH 3 (late)
2-6-7
PLAY 4 (early)
8-1-7-8
PLAY 4 (late)
0-0-1-9
FANTASY 5
6-14-17-22-29
MEGA MONEY
7-8-21-28
MEGA BALL
17


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5:30 p.m. (VERSUS) IndyCar: Honda Indy Toronto
qualifying race (Same-day Tape)
7:30 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup: Quaker State 400
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA O'ReillyAuto Parts Route 66
Nationals qualifying (Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
4 p.m. (13 FOX) Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Houston Astros at Florida Marlins
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (VERSUS) Tour de France Stage 8
BOXING
10:15 p.m. (HBO) Erislandy Lara vs. Paul Williams, Junior
Middleweights
GOLF
8:15 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Barclays Scottish
Open
3 p.m (8 NBC) U.S. Women's Open Championship
3 p.m. (10 CBS) PGA Tour: John Deere Classic
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Nature Valley First Tee
Open
LACROSSE
7 p.m. (ESPN2) MLLAll-Star Game
SOCCER
Women's FIFA World Cup quarterfinals
11:30 a.m. (ESPN) England vs. France
2:15 p.m. (ESPN) Germany vs. Japan


48.(77) Robby Gordon, Dodge.



All-Star Game Rosters
Tuesday, July 12
At Chase Field, Phoenix
(s-starter, elected by fans; m-managers pick;
p-players' selection; i-injured, will not play; r-in-
jury replacement; f-Final Vote selection)
American League
PITCHERS - p-Josh Beckett, Boston; m-
Aaron Crow, Kansas City; m-Gio Gonzalez,
Oakland; p-Felix Hernandez, Seattle; p-Bran-
don League, Seattle; p-Chris Perez, Cleveland;
m-David Price, Tampa Bay; pi-Mariano Rivera,
N.Y.Yankees; p-James Shields, Tampa Bay; m-
Jose Valverde, Detroit; p-Justin Verlander, De-
troit; r-Jordan Walden, L.A. Angeles; p-Jered
Weaver, L.A. Angels; m-C.J. Wilson, Texas.
CATCHERS - s-Alex Avila, Detroit; p-Rus-
sell Martin, N.Y. Yankees; m-Matt Wieters, Bal-
timore.
INFIELDERS- p-Adrian Beltre, Texas; p-As-
drubal Cabrera, Cleveland; p-Miguel Cabrera,
Detroit; s-Robinson Cano, N.Y Yankees; s-
Adrian Gonzalez, Boston; si-Derek Jeter, N.Y
Yankees; p-Howie Kendrick, L.A. Angels; f-Paul
Konerko, Chicago White Sox; r-Jhonny Peralta,
Detroit Tigers; si-Alex Rodriguez, N.Y. Yankees;
r-Kevin Youkilis, Boston Red Sox.
OUTFIELDERS - s-Jose Bautista, Toronto;
m-Michael Cuddyer, Minnesota; p-Jacoby Ells-
bury, Boston; s-Curtis Granderson, N.Y Yan-
kees; s-Josh Hamilton, Texas; p-Matt Joyce,
Tampa Bay; p-Carlos Quentin, Chicago White
Sox.
DESIGNATED HITTERS - s-David Ortiz,
Boston; p-Michael Young, Texas.
National League
PITCHERS - m-Heath Bell, San Diego
Padres; m-Matt Cain, San Francisco; m-Tyler
Clippard, Washington; p-Roy Halladay, Philadel-
phia; p-Cole Hamels, Philadelphia; p-Joel Han-
rahan, Pittsburgh; p-Jair Jurrjens, Atlanta;
p-Clayton Kershaw, L.A. Dodgers; p-Cliff Lee,
Philadelphia; m-Tim Lincecum, San Francisco;
p-Jonny Venters, Atlanta; m-Ryan Vogelsong,
San Francisco; p-Brian Wilson, San Francisco.
CATCHERS - s-Brian McCann, Atlanta; p-
Yadier Molina, St. Louis.
INFIELDERS - m-Starlin Castro, Chicago;
s-Prince Fielder, Milwaukee; p-Chipper Jones,
Atlanta; p-Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati; s-
Placido Polanco, Philadelphia; s-Jose Reyes,
N.Y Mets; m-Gaby Sanchez, Florida; p-Troy Tu-
lowitzki, Colorado; p-Joey Votto, Cincinnati; s-
Rickie Weeks, Milwaukee.
OUTFIELDERS - m-Carlos Beltran, N.Y
Mets; s-Lance Berkman, St. Louis; s-Ryan
Braun, Milwaukee; p-Jay Bruce, Cincinnati; r-
Andre Ethier, L.A. Dodgers; p-Matt Holliday, St.
Louis; s-Matt Kemp, L.A. Dodgers; p-Hunter
Pence, Houston; m-Justin Upton, Arizona; fi-
Shane Victorino, Philadelphia.
MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-AdGonzalez, Boston, .355;
Bautista, Toronto, .330; MiYoung, Texas, .327;
VMartinez, Detroit, .319; MiCabrera, Detroit,
.317; Konerko, Chicago, .316; JhPeralta, Detroit,
.310.
RUNS-Granderson, NewYork, 77; Bautista,
Toronto, 70; MiCabrera, Detroit, 62; Ellsbury,
Boston, 62; Kinsler, Texas, 62; AdGonzalez,
Boston, 61; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 58.
RBI-AdGonzalez, Boston, 77; Beltre, Texas,
68; Teixeira, New York, 65; Konerko, Chicago,
64; Granderson, New York, 62; Bautista,
Toronto, 61; Youkilis, Boston, 59; MiYoung,
Texas, 59.
HITS-AdGonzalez, Boston, 126; MiYoung,
Texas, 115; Ellsbury, Boston, 109; MeCabrera,
Kansas City, 106; Markakis, Baltimore, 105;
ACabrera, Cleveland, 104; AGordon, Kansas
City, 101.
DOUBLES-AdGonzalez, Boston, 28; Zo-
brist, Tampa Bay, 28; Ellsbury, Boston, 25; MiY-
oung, Texas, 25; Beltre, Texas, 24; AGordon,
Kansas City, 24; Quentin, Chicago, 24; Youkilis,
Boston, 24.
TRIPLES-Granderson, NewYork, 7;AJack-
son, Detroit, 7; Bourjos, Los Angeles, 6; RDavis,
Toronto, 6; Aybar, Los Angeles, 5; Cano, New
York, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 5; Gardner, New York,
5; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 5.
HOME RUNS-Bautista, Toronto, 29;
Granderson, New York, 25; Teixeira, New York,
25; Konerko, Chicago, 22; NCruz, Texas, 20;
MarReynolds, Baltimore, 20; DOrtiz, Boston,
19.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 28; An-
drus, Texas, 26; Crisp, Oakland, 26; RDavis,
Toronto, 24; Gardner, New York, 22; ISuzuki,
Seattle, 22; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 20.
PITCHING-Sabathia, New York, 12-4; Ver-


lander, Detroit, 11-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 11-
4; Scherzer, Detroit, 10-4; Tomlin, Cleveland,
10-4; Lester, Boston, 10-4; Ogando, Texas, 9-3;
CWilson, Texas, 9-3; Haren, Los Angeles, 9-5;
Arrieta, Baltimore, 9-6.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 138; FH-
ernandez, Seattle, 134; Shields, Tampa Bay,
132; Price, Tampa Bay, 122; Weaver, Los An-
geles, 120; Sabathia, New York, 117; CWilson,
Texas, 117.
SAVES-League, Seattle, 23; Valverde, De-
troit, 22; CPerez, Cleveland, 21; MaRivera, New
York, 21; Papelbon, Boston, 19; Walden, Los
Angeles, 19; SSantos, Chicago, 18.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-JosReyes, New York, .354;
Pence, Houston, .325; Kemp, Los Angeles,
.323; Braun, Milwaukee, .320;Votto, Cincinnati,
.319; McCann, Atlanta, .314; Helton, Colorado,
.314.
RUNS-JosReyes, New York, 65; RWeeks,
Milwaukee, 62; Bourn, Houston, 60; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 57; Votto, Cincinnati, 57; CYoung, Ari-
zona, 56; CGonzalez, Colorado, 55; Kemp, Los
Angeles, 55; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 55; Stubbs,
Cincinnati, 55.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 71; Howard,
Philadelphia, 71; Kemp, Los Angeles, 66; Berk-
man, St. Louis, 62; Braun, Milwaukee, 62;
Pence, Houston, 59; Beltran, New York, 57;Tu-
lowitzki, Colorado, 57; Walker, Pittsburgh, 57.
HITS-JosReyes, New York, 124; SCastro,
Chicago, 113; Pence, Houston, 112; Votto,
Cincinnati, 104; Bourn, Houston, 103; Kemp,
Los Angeles, 103; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 103.
DOUBLES-Beltran, New York, 26; Pence,
Houston, 24; CYoung, Arizona, 24; SCastro,
Chicago, 23; Ethier, Los Angeles, 23; Headley,
San Diego, 23; CaLee, Houston, 23; SSmith,
Colorado, 23.
TRIPLES-JosReyes, New York, 15; Vic-
torino, Philadelphia, 9; SCastro, Chicago, 8;
Bourn, Houston, 7; Maybin, San Diego, 6; Ras-
mus, St. Louis, 6; SDrew, Arizona, 5; Fowler,
Colorado, 5.
HOME RUNS-Berkman, St. Louis, 23;
Fielder, Milwaukee, 22; Kemp, Los Angeles, 22;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 19; CPena, Chicago, 19;
Howard, Philadelphia, 18; Stanton, Florida, 18.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 35; Jos-
Reyes, New York, 30; Kemp, Los Angeles, 26;
Stubbs, Cincinnati, 23; Desmond, Washington,
20; Braun, Milwaukee, 19; Rollins, Philadelphia,
19.
PITCHING-Jurrjens, Atlanta, 12-3; Halladay,
Philadelphia, 11-3; Correia, Pittsburgh, 11-6;
Hanson, Atlanta, 10-4; Hamels, Philadelphia,
10-4; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 10-5; Kershaw, Los
Angeles, 9-4; DHudson, Arizona, 9-5; CILee,
Philadelphia, 9-6.
STRIKEOUTS-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 147;
Halladay, Philadelphia, 131; CILee, Philadel-
phia, 128; Lincecum, San Francisco, 126; Ani-
Sanchez, Florida, 117; Hamels, Philadelphia,
115; Norris, Houston, 113.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 27; Hanrahan,
Pittsburgh, 26; HBell, San Diego, 26; BrWilson,
San Francisco, 25; Street, Colorado, 25;
LNunez, Florida, 24; Axford, Milwaukee, 23.


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Recalled RHP Kyle
Weiland from Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS- Called up INF Luis
Valbuena from Columbus (IL-). Optioned RHP
Zach McAllisterto Columbus.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS - Called up OF
Mike Trout from Arkansas (TL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Signed RHP Abrahan
Rodriguez.
TEXAS RANGERS-Placed INF Andres
Blanco on the 15-day DL. Purchased the con-
tract of INF Omar Quintanilla from Round Rock
(PCL). Transferred RHP Scott Feldman to the
60-day DL. Announced RHP Dave Bush cleared
unconditional release waivers and is a free
agent.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Released OF Fernando
Perez.
COLORADO ROCKIES - Placed OF Char-
lie Blackmon on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF
Cole Garner from Colorado Springs (PCL).
NEW YORK METS - Agreed to terms with
RHP Matthew Budgell.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES - Placed OF
Shane Victorino on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
July 4. Recalled INF Pete Orr from Lehigh Val-
ley (IL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS-Placed 2B Bill
Hall on the 15-day DL. Recalled SS Mike
Fontenot from Fresno (PCL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS - Placed C
Ivan Rodriguuez on the 15-day DL, retroactive
to July 7. Recalled X Jesus Flores from Syra-
cuse (IL).


Report: Yao Ming
decides to retire
HOUSTON - Houston Rock-
ets center Yao Ming is retiring,
according to a report by Yahoo!
Sports.
The 7-foot-6 Chinese star,
plagued by lower-body injuries in
the second half of his career,
has informed the league office
that his playing career is over,
the website reported on Friday.
The Rockets declined to com-
ment on the report because of
the lockout, and the NBA has not
received official retirement pa-
perwork from Yao.
Yao's contract expired after
last season, and the Rockets
said they were interested in re-
signing him if he came back
healthy. Yao said in April in
China that his professional future
depended on his recovery from
a stress fracture in his left ankle.
John Huizinga, one of Yao's
American agents, would not con-
firm the report during a phone in-
terview on Friday. He said Yao's
recovery was "on track," but
Yao's future with the Rockets
has been uncertain for some
time.
"He's really enjoyed his time in
Houston," Huizinga said. "If he
feels that he's recovered enough
to play, and if the lockout ever
ends, and if the Rockets are in-
terested in him, then there's cer-
tainly a good chance he'll stay in
Houston.
"But there are a whole lot of
'ifs' in that statement."
An eight-time All-Star selec-
tion, Yao averaged 19 points and
9.2 rebounds in his eight sea-
sons, but his impact on the
league goes far beyond the
numbers.




OPEN
Continued from Page B1

trouble believing what they
see; every putt, even the
uphill ones, speed away
from the Will Rogers Monu-
ment on nearby Cheyenne
Mountain.



ARSCOTT
Continued from Page B1

necessarily been known as a
state power in recent years,
the Pirates have been the
class of the county and in
playoff contention for the
past four years.
Arscott leaves with a head
coaching record of 20-12 (6-0
against Citrus and Lecanto).
Including his two years as an
assistant under Anthony Par-
adiso, Arscott is 32-23 and
has been a part of six players
being selected all-state.
"Football-wise, you can be
successful with X's and O's,"
Arscott said, "but you also
need kids who are hard
working and talented and
that's what we have in Crys-



DOCTOR
Continued from Page B1

about athletes' attitudes or
lack thereof, dedication,
training, competing, steroid
use, athletic injuries and
conditions that prevent
training or competing. This
article is not intended to be
'politically correct' or 'sen-
sitive', but to point out the
amazing athletes and sports
that are not televised, nor in
the sports section of our
newspapers.
Para-athletes come from
all walks of life. They have
lost limbs for a multitude of
reasons such as cancer, au-
tomobile or industrial acci-
dents and war. What they
have in common is a com-
petitive inner drive and
stubbornness to go forward
and look back infrequently.
Army Spc. Matt Kinsey, 26,
the shortstop for the
Wounded Warriors, places
traumatic amputations and
willingness for recovery like
this, "it was the competitor
within that motivated him to


see how much of his physi-
cal skill he could regain."
All these athletes know
that 'whatever part of your
body you lost, you're not
going to grow it back." For-
mer Spc. Kinsey further
states that, "we don't really
sit around feeling bad about
what happened to us. We
chose to just get on with it"
Disabled or para-athletes
have had to over come dev-
astating and life-altering
physical impairments to
participate in their sports. I
can't tell you how often I
have been left in the dust by


SSports BRIEFS

Ohio St. vacates 2010
wins, Sugar Bowl
COLUMBUS, Ohio- Ohio
State's 2010 Big Ten champi-
onship, its 12-1 season, its victo-
ries over rival Michigan and in
the Sugar Bowl - all gone.
Coach Jim Tressel is out and so
is star quarterback Terrelle Pryor.
Left behind: two years of self-
imposed probation.
The question now is whether it
will be enough to save Ohio
State football from more severe
penalties in an upcoming trip to
see the NCAA committee on in-
fractions.
In response to NCAA viola-
tions committed by football play-
ers who traded autographs and
memorabilia for cash and tattoos
- and by a coach who covered
it up - Ohio State issued its offi-
cial response on Friday. Athletic
director Gene Smith hoped it
would appease the NCAA ethics
police.
The measures taken by the
school included vacating all the
Buckeyes' wins from last sea-
son, a year in which Ohio State
captured a record-tying sixth
straight Big Ten title and won an
unprecedented seventh straight
game over Michigan.
"All I know is that this is signifi-
cant," Smith said. "A lot of people
may not view it that way exter-
nally, but this is significant. When
you think about all the other ath-
letes who participated in those
games, those records will be
gone. ...
"Might the NCAA do more? I
just can't speculate on that."
Lopez, Ferrer give
Spain 2-0 lead over US
AUSTIN, Texas - Andy
Roddick couldn't stem Spain's


"I'm just staying patient,
hitting a lot of good shots,"
Lewis said. "I've made a
couple mistakes but I'm
playing well. On the greens,
I'm seeing the lines really
well and my speed has been
good all week."
Two shots behind is ama-
teur Amy Anderson, who
played six holes early Fri-


tal River."
In 2007 and 2008, the Pi-
rates made the state play-
offs while narrowly missing
in 2009 in a three-way
shootout for the final spot.
In 2010, Arscott led Crys-
tal River to a 7-4 overall
record. While the Pirates
missed the playoffs, the
team won a bowl game over
West Port to end that year on
a positive note.
"He's been very good for
our program," Stukes said of
Arscott. "The kids and com-
munity have been behind
him.
"He's done everything
we've ever asked him to do
and I really wish him the
best."
Arscott also said he does-
n't expect the cupboard to
be bare. Although the Pi-

a wheelchair marathoner.
Over the years, I have met
and cared for dozens of
great athletes with impair-
ments and disabilities that
have competed at the inter-
national level ranging from
a completely blind downhill
ski racer to a spinal cord-in-
jured slalom water skier.
I first met Diana Golden
on a chair lift on Mt. Hood
in the mid 1980's at summer
ski race training that my
oldest son was attending.
Diana, at that point, was a
multiple Olympic gold
medalist and world-class ski
racer.
Subsequently, during the
next few years, I rode many
lifts with Diana and found
her to be one of the most
dedicated, hard-working
athletes with championship
ideals and goals.
Diana was once clocked
on a downhill course during
the World Ski Champi-
onships at 65 mph. The U.S.
Olympic Committee and Ski
Racing Magazine in 1988
chose her "female ski ath-
lete of the year'.
You have never heard of


Diana Golden and this is re-
ally not about her. She was a
member of the U.S. Dis-
abled Ski Team. Her
Olympic gold medal was in
the Winter Paralympics.
Her 65 mph downhill was
not on two skis, but on one
leg nor with outriggers but
with regular ski poles.
There is Tom Halden
whose forearm fractures I
repaired when he fell off
Camelback Mountain. Un-
fortunately, his spinal cord
could not be repaired. He
went on as a para-snow ski
racer and helped perfect


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




march to a 2-0 lead over the
United States in their Davis
Cup quarterfinal, losing 7-6
(11), 7-5, 6-3 to David Ferrer
after Feliciano Lopez dis-
patched Mardy Fish.
Ferrer rallied from 4-2 down
in the first set to win the
tiebreaker 11-9. He was down 3-
0 in the second before rallying
again to win. Roddick doubled-
faulted the final two points of the
match, bringing a groan from the
home crowd.
Playing as the No. 2 for
Spain, Lopez twice let Fish rally
back from match point in the fifth
set before winning 6-4, 3-6, 6-3,
6-7 (7), 8-6 in the first match.
Tour de France relieved
to reach mountains
CHATEAUROUX, France -
Finally, the mountains.
After seven days of narrow,
sinewy roads and sometimes
fierce rain, Alberto Contador and
Andy Schleck await a change of
scenery. They made it through
the crash-marred first week of
the Tour de France relatively un-
scathed. Although the hills iin
Saturday's eighth stage are far
less daunting than later climbs
in the Pyrenees and Alps, they
will be a welcome sight.
"It will be a relief after several
nervous and dangerous
stages," Schleck said.
British sprinter Mark
Cavendish won Friday's sev-
enth stage. He did so in the
same town - Chateauroux -
where he won the first of his 17
Tour de France stages in 2008.
Norway's Thor Hushovd kept
the yellow jersey.
Another British rider, Bradley
Wiggins, was knocked out of
the race after breaking his left
collarbone in a crash that took
down several riders.


day, then left the course,
knowing her second round
wouldn't begin until at least
Saturday morning.
"It's exciting; hasn't sunk
in," said Anderson, a sec-
ond-team All-American at
North Dakota State. "To
me, it's felt like another
tournament, just on the
tour."


rates will be young, he said
the team could easily win
between five to seven games
in 2011.
Never one to back down
from taking the occasional
jab at an opposing team, Ar-
scott laid down his expecta-
tions for Crystal River
"I did tell them I expect
them to dominate the
county like we've been
doing," Arscott said, "and
beat up on Citrus and
Lecanto like we've done the
last five years. Because
that's what we do at Crystal
River."
J.M. Soracchi is a sports
reporter for the Chronicle.
He can be e-mailed at
jmsoracchi@
chronicleonline.com or
reached by phone at (352)
563-3261.

the 'mono-ski' bucket so
para and quadraplegic peo-
ple could ski.
Another patient would re-
turn for a hand or shoulder
surgery every few years be-
cause of a different injury.
His wife was always exas-
perated by his antics. He
was one of the premier sen-
ior slalom water ski cham-
pions in the Southwest.
Being paralyzed from the
waist down, he depended on
his upper extremities to not
only transport him on a
daily basis, but to take the
brunt of his sport as well.
Erik Weihenmayer, who
had taught at the high
school in Arizona where two
of my sons attended, was the
first blind person to summit
Mt. Everest and one of the
youngest people to climb all
'Seven Summits'.
As I have written previ-
ously, what is common to all
athletes is injury and im-
pairment. How you struggle
to overcome these physical


obstacles to continue to play
helps shape who you are.
These athletes with impair-
ments did not focus on their
devastating problems, but
strove to go forward and to
achieve goals in a world that
really is not 'user friendly'
for them.
This should give many of
us more encouragement.
The next time you have an
'ouch' to deal with, don't
dwell on your problems, try
to accept them, put them in
your back pocket and 'get on
with it'.
Ron Joseph, M.D. and Or-
thopedic specialist, can be
reached at Gulfcoast Spine
Institute 855-485-3262, or
rbjhand@cox.net







E Page B5-SATURDAY, JULY9,2011




ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Katy Perry
postpones shows
MILWAUKEE-Katy
Perry has postponed con-
certs in St. Paul, Minn.,
and the Chicago area be-
cause she's suffering from
food poi-
soning.
A state-
ment re-
leased by
her publi-
cist said
the Friday
show at
Allstate
Katy Arena in
Rose-
mont, Ill.,
has been rescheduled to
Aug. 21 and her Saturday
show at St Paul's Xcel
Energy Center is now set
for Aug. 23.
The statement said the
food poisoning led to se-
vere dehydration. She
performed while ill at
Summerfest in Milwau-
kee Thursday
John Boler, vice presi-
dent of sales and market-
ing at Summerfest, said
Perry wasn't feeling well
when she arrived. He
said a doctor attended to
her during the day and
the performance.
He said she performed
beautifully despite being
sick.
Perry apologized but
said she plans to give
fans the best show ever
when she returns.

Crow fights U.S.
horse roundup
RENO, Nevada -
Singer-songwriter Sheryl
Crow said she'll donate
part of the profits from
an upcoming concert to a
wild horse protection
group that is suing the
government to try to stop
a big mustang roundup in
Nevada.
Crow said the Col-
orado-based Cloud Foun-
dation will get a share of
the gate from her show
with Kid Rock at
Cheyenne Frontier Days
on July 22 in the state of
Wyoming.
The Grammy Award
winner said she shares the
foundation's dedication to
the preservation of wild
horses on public lands.
The group's lawyers
are due in federal court
in Reno on Thursday
They're trying to win an
emergency injunction to
block the roundup of
1,700 mustangs sched-
uled to begin next week-
end along the
Nevada-Utah line.

Dancers' ex-lawyer
pleads guilty
NEW YORK -A union
lawyer who represented
dancers and stagehands
at the American Ballet
Theatre has pleaded
guilty to a charge of falsi-
fying reports.
U.S. Attorney Preet
Bharara announced the
plea Thursday by
Leonard Leibowitz.
He is the former attor-
ney for the Independent
Artists of America, a
union which represented
about 80 ABT dancers
and stagehands.
The prosecutor said
Leibowitz wrote union
checks to himself, his law
firm, and his former wife.
The 72-year-old resi-
dent of Highland Beach,
Fla., faces up to a year in
prison.Associated
-From wire reports


Associated rress
In this Jan. 19, 1977, file picture, President Gerald Ford and first lady Betty Ford pause for a moment as they
continue packing at the White House in Washington.



Betty Ford dies at 93


Associated Press

Betty Ford said things that first
ladies just don't say, even today And
1970s America loved her for it
According to Mrs. Ford, her young
adult children probably had smoked
marijuana - and if she were their
age, she'd try it, too. She told "60
Minutes" she wouldn't be surprised
to learn that her youngest, 18-year-
old Susan, was in a sexual relation-
ship (an embarrassed Susan issued
a denial).
She mused that living together be-
fore marriage might be wise, thought
women should be drafted into the
military if men were, and spoke up
unapologetically for abortion rights,
taking a position contrary to the
president's. "Having babies is a
blessing, not a duty," Mrs. Ford said.
The former first lady died at age
93, family friend Marty Allen said
Friday Details of Ford's death and
where she died were not immedi-
ately available, and Allen, chairman
emeritus of the Ford Foundation,
said he would not comment further
until he received instruction from
the family
He also said he expected the Ger-
ald R. Ford Presidential Library and
Museum would release information.
Betty Ford's comments weren't
the kind of genteel, innocuous talk
expected from a first lady, and a Re-
publican one no less. Her unscripted
comments sparked tempests in the
press and dismayed President Ger-
ald Ford's advisers, who were trying
to soothe the national psyche after
Watergate. But to the scandal-
scarred, Vietnam-wearied, hippie-
rattled nation, Mrs. Ford's openness
was refreshing.
Candor worked for Betty Ford,
again and again. She would build an
enduring legacy by opening up the
toughest times of her life as public
example.
In an era when cancer was dis-
cussed in hushed tones and mastec-
tomy was still a taboo subject, the
first lady shared the specifics of her
breast cancer surgery The publicity
helped bring the disease into the
open and inspired countless women
to seek breast examinations.
Her most painful revelation came
15 months after leaving the White
House, when Mrs. Ford announced
she was entering treatment for a
longtime addiction to painkillers
and alcohol.
She used the unvarnished story of
her own descent and recovery to
crusade for better addiction treat-
ment, especially for women. She co-
founded the nonprofit Betty Ford
Center near the Fords' home in Ran-
cho Mirage, Calif., in 1982. Mrs. Ford
raised millions of dollars for the cen-
ter, kept close watch over its opera-
tions, and regularly welcomed
groups of new patients with a speech
that started, "Hello, my name's Betty
Ford, and I'm an alcoholic and drug
addict"
Although most famous for a string


of celebrity patients over the years
- from Elizabeth Taylor and Johnny
Cash to Lindsay Lohan - the center
keeps its rates relatively affordable
and has served more than 90,000
people.
"People who get well often say,
'You saved my life,' and 'You've
turned my life around,"' Mrs. Ford
once said. "They don't realize we
merely provided the means for them
to do it themselves, and that's all."
She was a free spirit from the
start Elizabeth Bloomer, born April
8, 1918, fell in love with dance as a
girl in Grand Rapids, Mich., and de-
cided it would be her life. At 20, de-
spite her mother's misgivings, she
moved to New York to learn from
her idol Martha Graham. She lived
in Greenwich Village, worked as a
model, and performed at Carnegie
Hall in Graham's modern dance en-
semble. "I thought I had arrived,"
she later recalled.
But her mother coaxed her back
to Grand Rapids, where Betty
worked as a dance teacher and store
fashion coordinator and married
William Warren, a friend from
school days. He was a salesman who
traveled frequently; she was un-
happy They lasted five years.
While waiting for her divorce to
become final, she met and began
dating, as she put it in her memoir,
"probably the most eligible bachelor
in Grand Rapids" - former college
football star, Navy veteran and
lawyer Jerry Ford. They would be
married for 58 years, until his death
in December 2006.
When he proposed, she didn't
know about his political ambitions;
when he launched his bid for Con-
gress during their engagement, she
figured he couldn't win.
Two weeks after their October
1948 wedding, her husband was
elected to his first term in the House.
He would serve 25 years, rising to
minority leader
Mrs. Ford was thrust into a role
she found exhausting and unfulfill-
ing: political housewife. While her
husband campaigned for weeks at a
time or worked late on Capitol Hill,
she raised their four children:
Michael, Jack, Steven and Susan.
She arranged luncheons for con-
gressional wives, helped with her
husband's campaigns, became a Cub
Scout den mother, taught Sunday
school.
A pinched nerve in her neck in
1964, followed by the onset of severe
osteoarthritis, led her to an assort-
ment of prescription drugs that
never fully relieved the pain. For
years she had been what she later
called "a controlled drinker, no
binges." Now she began mixing pills
and alcohol. Feeling overwhelmed
and underappreciated, she suffered
an emotional breakdown that led to
weekly visits with a psychiatrist
It's debatable whether Mrs. Ford's
frank nature helped or hurt her hus-
band's 1976 campaign to win a full
term as president. Polls showed she


In this Nov. 9, 1978, file picture, for-
mer first lady Betty Ford holds her
newly-released book, "The Times of
My Life," in New York.
was widely admired. By taking posi-
tions more liberal than the presi-
dent's, she helped broaden his
appeal beyond traditional Republi-
can voters. But she also outraged
some conservatives, leaving the
president more vulnerable to a
strong GOP primary challenge by
Ronald Reagan. That battle weak-
ened Ford going into the general
election against Democrat Jimmy
Carter
Carter won by a slim margin. The
president had lost his voice in the
campaign's final days, and it was
Mrs. Ford who read his concession
speech to the nation.
The Fords retired to a Rancho Mi-
rage golf community, but he spent
much of his time away, giving
speeches and playing in golf tourna-
ments. Home alone, deprived of her
exciting and purposeful life in the
White House, Mrs. Ford drank.
By 1978 her secret was obvious to
those closest to her
"As I got sicker," she recalled, "I
gradually stopped going to lunch. I
wouldn't see friends. I was putting
everyone out of my life." Her chil-
dren recalled her living in a stupor,
shuffling around in her bathrobe, re-
fusing meals in favor of a drink
Her family finally confronted her
and insisted she seek treatment
"I was stunned at what they were
trying to tell me about how I disap-
pointed them and let them down,"
she said in a 1994 Associated Press
interview "I was terribly hurt -
after I had spent all those years try-
ing to be the best mother, wife I
could be. ... Luckily, I was able to
hear them saying that I needed help
and they cared too much about me
to let it go on."
She credited their "intervention"
with saving her life.
Mrs. Ford entered Long Beach
Naval Hospital and, alongside alco-
holic young sailors and officers, un-
derwent a grim detoxification that
became the model for therapy at the
Betty Ford Center In her book "A
Glad Awakening," she described her
recovery as a second chance at life.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Today's birthday: There is a good chance that, in coming
months, you could end up being part of three different groups
of friends for three different purposes or reasons. Each cluster
will be involved in something fun that you'll want to participate
in.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Keep outsiders out of your per-
sonal affairs, especially those that concern your mate. You'd
only make matters worse if you decide to talk things over with
your cronies.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - If they think they can get away with
it, a few malingerers might look to palm off their duties and re-
sponsibilities on you. They'd like to make it look like your good
work is theirs.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Don't make it one of those days
where, every time you take a strong position, it's one that's op-
posite to the popular view. If this is the case, keep your opin-
ions to yourself.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Regardless of how proud you are


of an accomplishment, keep it to yourself. Someone who is
jealous of you could try to get others to think of you as a mere
braggart.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - It might be smarter to let an un-
flattering comment that someone says about you go unan-
swered. You could make matters worse if you decide to make
it an issue that needs to be defended.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)- Trying to shore up a rela-
tionship with material things may momentarily work on the
surface, but it will be without substance. Strengthen bonds
with loving deeds of sincerity.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - If both you and a partner use
phony means to try to strengthen the arrangement you have
with each other, it could end up being a case of the blind lead-
ing the blind.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Only true humility is a virtue,
while humbling yourself in an unbecoming manner produces
nothing but a lack of respect. In reality, you'll be much more


respected by letting your ego emerge.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Be careful what you say to a
friend about someone whom you greatly dislike. If your re-
marks are uncomplimentary, your pal may think ill of you and
lose all interest.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Be realistic about how much
you can accomplish and take on only what you believe you
can finish. Anything you leave hanging might have to wait a
long time to be completed.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Don't trust to memory
any important information that you'll need to know
down the line. In fact, it might be smart to make writ-
ten notes.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -A friend might look to you to
help him or her sort out a complicated affair that he or she
finds insurmountable. Unless you've had experience in this
kind of problem, don't offer any advice.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JULY 7
Fantasy 5:4 - 6 -11 - 12 - 26
5-of-5 1 winner $200,661.14
4-of-5 418 $77
3-of-5 11,291 $8
WEDNESDAY, JULY 6
Powerball: 11- 15 -24- 50- 55
Powerball: 8
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners
Lotto: 3- 4 -6 -39-48-52
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 30 $4,738.50
4-of-6 1,773 $61.50
3-of-6 42,011 $5
Fantasy 5:15 - 16 - 24 - 30 - 36
5-of-5 5 winners $45,733.80
4-of-5 245 $150.50
3-of-5 8,600 $12

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY =

Today's Highlight:
On July 9, 1951, President
Harry S. Truman asked Con-
gress to formally end the state
of war between the United
States and Germany. (An offi-
cial end to the state of war
was declared in Oct. 1951.)
On this date:
In 1540, England's King
Henry VIII had his 6-month-
old marriage to his fourth
wife, Anne of Cleves, an-
nulled.
In 1776, the Declaration of
Independence was read
aloud to Gen. George Wash-
ington's troops in New York.
In 1816, Argentina de-
clared independence from
Spain.
In 1850, the 12th president
of the United States, Zachary
Taylor, died after serving only
16 months of his term. (He
was succeeded by Millard
Fillmore.)
In 1986, the Attorney Gen-
eral's Commission on
Pornography released the
final draft of its report, which
linked hard-core porn to sex
crimes.
Ten years ago: A divided
court in Chile ruled that Gen.
Augusto Pinochet could not
be tried on human rights
charges because of his dete-
riorating health and mental
condition, a ruling that effec-
tively brought the 85-year-old
former dictator's legal trou-
bles to an end.
Five years ago: A Rus-
sian Airbus A310 crashed in
the Siberian city of Irkutsk,
killing 124 of 203 people on
board.
One year ago: The
largest U.S.-Russia spy
swap since the Cold War
took place on a remote
stretch of Vienna airport tar-
mac as planes from New
York and Moscow arrived
within minutes of each other
with 10 Russian sleeper
agents and four prisoners
accused by Russia of spying
for the West.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Brian Dennehy is 73. Actor
Richard Roundtree is 69. Au-
thor Dean Koontz is 66.
Football Hall-of-Famer O.J.
Simpson is 64. Actor Chris
Cooper is 60. TV personality
John Tesh is 59. Actor Tom
Hanks is 55. Singer Marc Al-
mond is 54. Actress Kelly
McGillis is 54. Rock singer
Jim Kerr (Simple Minds) is
52. Actress-rock singer
Courtney Love is 47. Rock
musician Xavier Muriel
(Buckcherry) is 43. Actor
Scott Grimes is 40. Rock
musician Dan Estrin
(Hoobastank) is 35. Actor-di-
rector Fred Savage is 35.


Country musician Pat Ailing-
ham is 33. Actress Georgie
Henley is 16.
Thought for Today: "A
good storyteller is a person
who has a good memory and
hopes other people haven't."
- Irvin S. Cobb, American
humorist (1876-1944).






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO OUTDOORS


LU
z
a

ICE
*z
i


CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY


HITTING THE LINKS


GET


IN


THE


jAME


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Cruisers hold Valve Cover races every third Saturday of the month in Crystal River in the Kings Bay Shopping Center next to Wendy's. The club's weekly cruise-in is
from approximately 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., with members & non-members welcome to come and share cake (second Sat. of the month) and enjoy music, 50/50 and check out the many
classic cars that roll in for a good time. The above photo is from a recent "competition" on the blacktop. Stop by the club's sound trailer to pick up information if you want to join in.



Citrus County's adult recreation scores and events


Manatee Lanes
Tuesday Night Odd Balls
League
MEN
John Walker 290, 237, 741
series
Tom Krug 255, 717 series
Eddie Dejesus 278, 672 se-
ries
Sam Bass 248, 668 series
Charlie Johnson 236, 656
series
Lenny Jones 235, 644 series
Dan Curry 232, 632 series
Ric Fritz 226, 611 series
WOMEN
Kim Mullis 238, 224, 675 se-
ries
Carolyn McNeil 233,
204, 624 series
Sandy Lepree 223, 571 se-
ries
Joan Muller 226, 558 series
Diane Stanley 208, 513 se-
ries
Thursday Afternoon
Senior Men's drop in league
Show up the weeks you
want, only pay the weeks you
bowl, weekly pay outs for high
games and high series. Thurs-
days at 12:30 pm.
Will Bemis 256, 693 series
Rick Rollason 254, 216, 662
series
Dutch Sweigert 256, 664 se-
ries
Robert Cole 243, 218, 618
series
George Cole 222, 213, 618
series
Mark Mixon 235, 604 series
Phil Mulrain 234, 215, 602
series
Manatee Match Play League
Thursday nights 7p.m.
Citrus County's Premier
bowling league
MEN
Mike Buchanan 256, 289,
770 series
Steve McCullough 236, 299,
763 series
Sam Bass 248, 257, 751 se-
ries
Craig Collins 257, 261, 749
series
Bob Locher 246, 250, 689
series
Dan Proctor 290, 684 series
Bobby Kempton 268, 675 se-
ries
Charles Hindbaugh 234, 235,
673 series
Murray Topol 227, 227, 667
series
Gordan Ashley 210, 258, 654
series
WOMEN
Crystal Yanko 220, 260, 681
Kim Mullis 244, 606 series


Jeanne Bell 175, 183, 520
series
Joan Muller 182, 507 series
Shirley Larkin 163, 207, 504
Coed Sand Volleyball
4 on 4 best of three, $50
sign-up fee - July 29.
Fees determined by the
number of teams joining, with
the fees due on August 20.
LEAGUE STARTS August 25
at the Bicentennial Park sand
court. Game times on Thursday
nights are at 6:30, 7:30 and
8:30 p.m. Players must be 18
and over and each team must
have one female on the court.
For more information, call
527-7540.
'For Ladies Only'
golf tourneys
Attention ladies, Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
in association with Pine Ridge
Golf Course will be starting a
series of ladies only golf clinics
throughout the summer. Pine
Ridge Golf Pro Randy Robbins
will be the lead instructor and
will be holding two separate
classes. Beginner classes will
be on Monday evenings start-
ing at 5:30 p.m. and intermedi-
ate classes will be held on
Wednesday at 5:30 p.m.
Whether you have played for
years or you're interested in
learning this great game, these
clinics are for you. The clinics
will be offered as three one
hour weekly sessions for only
$90 and there are three clinics
to choose from, so pick the one
that is best for your schedule.
There will also be clinics be-
ginning in July (July 11 for be-
ginners and July 13 for
intermediate) and August (Au-
gust 1 for beginners and August
3 for intermediate).
All classes will begin at 5:30
p.m. at Pine Ridge Golf Course.
If you would like to participate in
more then one clinic, you can
sign up for a second clinic at
half price. That's just $45. Golf
clubs will be provided if you do
not have your own.
Pine Ridge Golf Course will
also be starting a Saturday
morning Working Women's
League. This league will play
on the Little Pines which is a
nine-hole Par 3 course. The fee
for Saturday play will be $13
and will include the cart fee.
To find out more information
or to register for the clinics call
Randy Robbins at 352-746-
6177 or visit www.pineridge-
golfcc.com.


Parks & Rec
plan Jazzercise
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Jazzercise
classes at the Citrus County
Auditorium. The 60-minute
workout blends dance and
muscle-toning movements cho-
reographed to music. It is de-
signed to improve strength,
balance and flexibility.
Classes are: 6 p.m. Mon-
days, Tuesdays and Thursday.
Cost is $20 the first month for
new students.
Every class includes a gentle
warm-up, 30-minute aerobic
workout, muscle toning, and
strengthening segment with
weights and a final stretch.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com,
then the health and fitness tab,
or call (352) 465-7007.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation offers a new low-impact
stretching class. This on-going
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints.
Research suggests that moder-
ate-intensity, low-impact activity
is just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the risk
of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call (352) 465-7007.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club
plays at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday
and Fridays and at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at Floral Park in
Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to
meet people in the community,
and get some light exercise.
We welcome all newcomers.
Yearly dues are $3 per person,


and there is no need to pur-
chase any equipment.
Call the vice president of the
Floral City Shuffleboard Club,
Dana Bause, at (352) 726-0670.
B.H. Shuffleboard
seeks members
Beverly Hills Shuffleboard
Club seeks new members to
join to make it more fun. Dues
are $15 yearly and participants
must be 45 or older.
The club plays at 9 a.m.
Monday through Friday during
the summer and 2 p.m. during
the winter. The monthly meet-
ing is at 3 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Civic
Center Community Building.
Coffee and cake are served
after the meeting. All interested
persons are welcome.
For more information, call Val
Pierce, president, at (352) 746-
0657 or Sharon Pineda, vice
president, at (352) 527-8488.
Dragon boat
team practice
Nature Coast Dragon Boat
Racing Team practices at 9 a.m.
Monday and Wednesdays at
Riverside Resort in
Homosassa.
Males and females of all
ages are invited to participate.
No experience necessary; will
train. Equipment is provided.
Call Michael Mondrall at (352)
220-6024 or e-mail
mmondrall@tampabay.rr.com
Head outdoors with
Nature Coast Ramblers
Nature Coast Ramblers is an
outdoor activity club of friendly
people of all ages who enjoy
self-paced hiking or walking, bik-
ing and kayaking activities in the
Citrus County area. The club is
associated with the American
Volkssport Association (AVA), a
national walking association,
which in turn is affiliated with an
international group.
You can become a member
of Nature Coast Ramblers for
only $10 per year for a single or
$12 per couple. Visit the web-
site at www.naturecoastram-
blers.org or call Karl at (352)
344-1531.
Zumba at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-


ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call (352) 465-7007.
Paddlesports
America program
Canoeists and Kayakers are
boaters also. Now there is a
new program available to ad-
dress the unique needs of this
audience. Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 of the US Coast Guard
Auxiliary offers Paddlesports
America, an exciting safety pro-
gram designed to attract the
novice paddle enthusiasts. This
four-hour program presents five
chapters of safety information.
Topics include:
Know Your Paddlecraft -
parts of a canoe and kayak; un-
derstanding paddlecraft charac-
teristics such as basic types,
hull shapes hull materials,
lengths and widths and
weights; selecting your paddle
for both canoe and kayak.
Before You Get Underway -
knowing your paddlecraft's ca-
pacity and how to file a float
plan; transporting your paddle-
craft; conducting a pre-depar-
ture check; dressing for a safe
trip; loading gear in a canoe or
kayak; storing paddle craft; the
responsibilities when paddling
with others.
Operating Your Boat Safely
- how to enter and exit a
canoe or kayak safely; securing
the paddlecraft and sharing the
waterways with others; the U.
S. Aids to Navigation System
(ATONS); learning about local
hazards on waterways.
The Legal Requirements of
Boating - vessel registration,
hull identification numbers and
who may operate a paddlecraft;
unlawful operation of paddle-
craft; Homeland Security re-
strictions; policies on alcohol
and drugs. Life jackets; naviga-
tion lights; sound-producing de-
vices and visual distress
signals; protection of environ-
ment and what to do if in a
boating accident. State specific
information may be added at
the end of this chapter.
Boating emergencies: What
to Do - minimizing the risk of


drowning, capsizing, swamping
or falling overboard; emergency
techniques; how to deal with
cold water immersion and hy-
pothermia; understanding heat
related illness; dehydration;
handling weather emergencies.
The program will be from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday June
11, at the West Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 8940 W. Veterans
Drive, Homosassa. Afee of $20
for materials will be charged.
Call Elaine Miranda at (352)
564-2521 or Al Hepner at (352)
795-9875.
The Auxiliary can use men
and women of every age. We
are the volunteer arm of the US
Coast Guard. We are the Ho-
mosassa Flotilla 15-04. We'd
love to have you join us. Call
Rusty Hays at (352) 5984369
or email rhayslfla@aol.com.
Want some action?
Join Flotilla 15-04
Are you looking for something
interesting and exciting to do
while at the same time providing
a valuable service to your fellow
boaters as well? Then look no
further!
No matter what your area of
interest is, you will find it with
Homosassa Flotilla 15-04 of the
United States Coast Guard
Auxiliary. For those of you who
love boats (you don't have to
own one to be a member) and
being on the water, we have
room for you as a member of
one of our boat crews. You will
be participating in surface pa-
trols, exciting search and res-
cue operations as well as
interesting training missions
with the USCG.
These are just some of the in-
teresting and exciting areas of
Flotilla 15-04 that you can be-
come a part of and there are
many more. Fellowship also
plays a large role in our flotilla
and "Team Coast Guard." Here
you will meet new friends and
find a common bond with others
who enjoy the out of doors and
our waterways.
Men, women, young and
senior citizen alike, Flotilla 15-
04 invites you to join us and
wear our uniform proudly as
you become a part of the U.S.
Coast Guard family. For mem-
bership information, please feel
free to contact David "Rusty"
Hays at 352-598-4369.
Wilbur B. Scott may be
contacted at
seacapt34447@yahoo.com


OUTDOORS












CITRIG IS ONTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Pope's legacy in dispute


SALVATORE LAPORTA/Associated Press
In this photo taken in Castellammare di Stabia, near Naples, Italy, Maria Esposito sits in her home with some portraits of Pope Pius XII during
an interview with the Associated Press. Maria Esposito was ready to give up. Wasted away at 92 pounds, she couldn't bear another dose of
chemotherapy to fight the Stage IV Burkitt's lymphoma that had invaded her body while she was pregnant with her second child. But as she
and her family had done since she was diagnosed with the rare and aggressive form of cancer in July 2005, Esposito prayed to the man who
had appeared to her husband in a dream as the only person who could save her: Pope Pius XII. Esposito survived, cured after a single, six-week
cycle of chemotherapy - a recovery that, she says, stunned her doctors and convinced her that the World War II-era pope had intervened with
God to save her. Esposito's case has been proposed to the Vatican as the possible miracle needed to beatify Pius, one of the most contro-
versial popes, given that Jews say he failed to speak out enough to stop the Holocaust.

Pius XIIback in spotlight with woman's claim ofmiracle healing


chione, has championed Espos-
ito's miracle case and person-
ally presented it to the Vatican's
No. 2 official, Cardinal Tarcisio
Bertone.
Pope Benedict XVI moved
Pius one step closer to possible
sainthood in December 2009
when he confirmed that Pius
lived a life of "heroic" Christian
virtue. All that is needed now is
for the Vatican to determine a
"miracle" occurred.
"I'm certain that inside of me
there was the hand of God oper-
ating, thanks to the intercession
of Pope Pius XII," Esposito said
during a recent interview in her
cheery dining room in the sea-
side town of Castellammare di
Stabia on the Amalfi coast. "I'm
convinced of it."
Doctors and church officials
aren't so sure.
Esposito's local bishop, Monsi-
gnor Felice Cece, summoned Es-
posito earlier this year to testify
about her recovery to determine
if indeed it was medically inex-
plicable, one of the key thresh-
olds required by the Vatican to
determine if a miracle occurred.
After consulting two outside
doctors, Cece determined that
Esposito could have been cured
by even a single cycle of chemo
and essentially closed the case.
But Esposito's supporters, led
by Marchione, have gone over
the bishop's head and are send-
ing her full medical file directly


to the Vatican's saint-making of-
fice for review.
"I was saved. I thank the
Lord," said Esposito. "If he did
something for me, then I now
want to do something for him."
The Rev Peter Gumpel, the
Jesuit historian who has spear-
headed Pius' saint-making
cause for some two decades,
said the case was under consid-
eration, but was noncommittal.
"We are at the very first pre-
liminary stages of pre-investiga-
tion, and we are not even sure
whether it will go ahead," he
said, stressing that regardless,
the process is still years away
from fruition.
The Vatican's saint-making
process has long been subject to
skeptics' doubts.
Some question, for example,
whether the original diagnosis
was correct for the French nun
whose inexplicable cure of
Parkinson's disease paved the
way for Pope John Paul II's beat-
ification. Others have ques-
tioned whether the Jewish
convert Edith Stein should have
been canonized based on the
survival of a 2-year-old girl who
overdosed on Tylenol.
As such, the questions sur-
rounding Pius' possible miracle
are just further evidence of the
obstacles and deep theological,
historical and political divisions
that his cause has run into ever
since it was launched in 1965.


Pius was pope from 1939 to
1958. Before his election he
served as the Vatican's No. 2 and
before that, as papal nuncio to
Germany Given his deep in-
volvement in the Vatican's diplo-
matic affairs with the Nazis,
what Pius did or didn't do dur-
ing the war has become the sin-
gle most divisive issue in the
Vatican's relations with Jews.
More recently, his beatifica-
tion case has become the sym-
bolic battleground in the debate
over the future of the Catholic
Church. Progressives are op-
posed to it because to them, Pius
represents the church before
the modernizing reforms of the
Second Vatican Council. Tradi-
tionalists and conservatives are
in favor of it for precisely the
same reasons.
The Vatican insists Pius used
quiet diplomacy to save Jewish
lives and that speaking out more
forcefully against the Nazis
would have resulted in more
deaths. Critics argue he could
have and should have said and
done more.
"To talk about the pope as
anything other than a moral
coward as far as the murder of
Jews of Rome is concerned is
difficult for any of us who study
what actually happened to
take," said Brown University an-
thropologist and historian David
See Page C5


NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press

- CASTELLAMMARE
DI STABIA, Italy
Maria Esposito was ready
to give up. Wasted away
at 92 pounds, she
couldn't bear another dose of
chemotherapy to fight the Stage
IV Burkitt's lymphoma that had
invaded her body while she was
pregnant with her second child.
But as she and her family had
done since she was diagnosed
with the rare and aggressive
form of cancer in July 2005, Es-
posito prayed to the man who
had appeared to her husband in
a dream as the only person who
could save her: Pope Pius XII.
Esposito survived, cured after
a single, six-week cycle of
chemotherapy - a recovery
that, she says, stunned her doc-
tors and convinced her that the
World War II-era pope had inter-
vened with God to save her
Esposito's case, which the 42-
year-old teacher recounted to
The Associated Press in her first
media interview, has been pro-
posed to the Vatican as the pos-
sible miracle needed to beatify
Pius, one of the most controver-
sial sainthood causes under way,
given that many Jews say he
failed to speak out enough to
stop the Holocaust
Pius' main biographer, Ameri-
can Sister Margherita Mar-


Religion NOTES


VBS
* "PandaMania" is theme
of Vacation Bible School Mon-
day through Friday at Crystal
River United Methodist Church,
4801 N. Citrus Ave. The free
program is open to children
ages 5 through fifth grade. A
variety of fun is offered through
Bible study, arts and crafts,
music and games. Call (352)
795-3148.
* Inverness First United
Methodist Church's Vacation
Bible School theme this year
is "Big Apple Adventure." Grab
a cab and discover adventure
waiting at every corner. Amid the
sights and sounds of the city,
kids will connect faith and life
through our Crafts District, play
games at Playground 1017,
enjoy snacks at Midtown Cafe,
hear great Bible stories at Battery
Park, and more. Kids will have
lots of fun learning to connect
with others and with Jesus. This
free VBS adventure for ages 5
through completed fifth grade is
from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. The church


is at 3896 S. Pleasant Grove
Road in Inverness, approxi-
mately 2 1/2 miles south of Ap-
plebee's on the right. For more
information and to register, call
(352) 726-2522.
* Area children ages 5
through fifth grade are invited to
"Where God is Wild About
You VBS" from 9 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday at Crys-
tal River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Program includes Bible study,
crafts and music. No charge.
Pre-registration encouraged.
Call (352) 795-3148 for more
information.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church presents "PandaMania
Vacation Bible School" free of
charge for grades kindergarten
through sixth from 9 to 11:30
a.m. Monday through Friday
with the closing session at 4
p.m. Sunday, July 17, with
water play and parents/
guardians invited to attend to
review the children's accom-
plishments. The church is at 82
See .Page C2


Get on the bus!


Special to the Chronicle
The Independent House of God Church of The Living God offers a "Bus Ministry" for sight-
seeing, family reunions, shopping trips and church functions. Call Deacon Jarrod Campbell
for further details at (352) 2574348, or Deacon William Bunch at (352) 795-2633.


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Prayer


lesson


from a


wasp

T he other day I
walked into my
house and found an
intruder
He looked mean, too.
My husband calls crea-
tures like him "mud
daubers." They're a type
of wasp, with stingers
poised to pierce delicate
skin such as mine.
The intruder didn't
seem fazed that he was
somewhere he didn't be-
long and just buzzed
around, probably plotting
an attack on my bare
arms.
I ran into my bedroom
and peeked through the
door into the living room
and did some plotting my-
self. Since attacking him
wasn't high on my list of
strategic moves lest he get
mad and dive bomb
stinger first into my flesh
(laughing while I scream,
no doubt), I did the only
thing I knew to do - I
prayed.
But first, I opened the
sliding glass door to the
See Page C4


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


Threat


from


'secular'


America

When evangelical
leaders look at
the United States
of America, they do not
see a country defined by
the familiar Gallup Poll
statistic stating that 92
percent of its citizens pro-
fess some kind of belief in
God.
Nor do they see a land
that is only 1.6 percent
atheist and 2.4 percent ag-
nostic, according to the
U.S. Religious Landscape
Survey by the Pew Forum
on Religion and Public
Life. They do not see a
land in which another 12.1
percent of the people do
not embrace any one reli-
gion "in particular," but
insist that "spirituality"
plays some role in their
lives.
In other words, they do
not see a remarkably, if
somewhat vaguely, reli-
gious nation - especially
in comparison with other
modern industrialized
lands.
No, when elite evangel-
icals see America today,
the word that comes to
mind is "secular."
In fact, 92 percent of
evangelical leaders from
the United States who
See Page C5





C2 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call
(352) 746-3620 for information.
* "Son Surf VBS" for
grades 1 through 6 from 9 a.m.
to noon Monday through Friday
at Victory Baptist Church, 5040
E. ShadyAcres Drive, Inver-
ness. Church kick-off is tomor-
row in the morning service, with
a "Family Day, Surf's-Up" cook-
out and water fun for the whole
family Friday. VBS awards for
the children and family during
the morning service July 17.
Call (352) 726-9719 or (352)
465-8866.
* Blast-off to Space Station
Salvation VBS at St. Paul's
Lutheran Church & School and
Precious Lambs Preschool at
6150 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills. Have fun as we
learn that Jesus is our Sav-
ior. Children ages 3 through 12
are invited to join us from 9 to
11:45 a.m. Monday through Fri-
day, July 18- 22. This is a free
event at which everyone will
enjoy upbeat songs, Bible
study, games, crafts, snacks
and hear how precious all peo-
ple are to Jesus. This event is
sponsored by Thrivent Finan-
cial for Lutherans. Call the
church at (352) 489-3027.
* "Hometown Nazareth"
VBS for ages 5 years through
fifth grade is from 9 a.m. to
noon Monday through Friday,
July 18-22, at Joy Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd Place
(at State Road 200), Ocala.
This program will take children
back to the days when trans-
portation was by donkey and
water was drawn from a well.
They will meet Jesus' mother,
Mary, and hear stories of Jesus'
boyhood, how he grew and
lived. They will learn about
Jesus' life in Nazareth through
crafts, songs and games chil-
dren in ancient Nazareth


RELIGION


100th birthday


Special to the Chronicle
Father Eric Peters, pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus Springs, recently hosted a party
for Irene Rudolph Martin, who is celebrating her 100th birth-
day. The party was at the Madonna Cafe in Citrus Springs on
Sunday afternoon, July 3. Everyone was happy to visit with
the guest of honor, as well as Monsignor George Cummings,
Pastor Emeritus, who was happy to be present to congratu-
late Irene. Other guests included Kerri Adams, Loretta
Muller, Mickey LaRocque, Judy Denbow, Bea Mullins, and
Norma and Jack Rourke. Partygoers enjoyed a great time in
engaging conversation, followed by a delicious dinner pre-
pared and served by Trish Shult. After everyone enjoyed
watching Irene blow out the candles on her cake, as well as
helping her enjoy the cake, the group followed Father Eric
into the "music room" where he entertained the partygoers
with several "finger-snapping" and ear-catching tunes.


learned and played. Registra-
tion is available at the church
office. Call (352) 854-4509,
Ext. 221.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church and St. James AME, in
downtown Inverness, invites
children ages 3 years old
through adulthood to "Inside
Out & Upside Down on Main
Street VBS" from 5:30 to 8
p.m. Sunday through Thursday,
July 31 through Aug. 4. Supper
served at 5:30 each evening.
"Inside Out & Upside Down" is
a VBS experience designed to
show "Where Jesus makes a


difference every day!" For more
information and to register, call
(352) 726-3153.
* Church of the Advent,
11251 S.W. County Road 484,
Dunnellon will present its VBS
from Aug. 8-12. Children ages 4
to 11 are invited to attend this
free program. Kids will "Take
The Plunge And Make A Splash
With Jesus," where fearless
kids shine God's light. "Take
the Plunge VBS" is filled with
incredible Bible learning that
kids see, hear, touch and taste,
Bible Point crafts, team-building
games, cool Bible songs and


tasty treats. To register, call the
church at (352) 465-7272 or
Mrs. Florence at (352)
566-6934.
* Kids ages 2 through fifth
grade are invited to "Rock Out"
with Jesus. Rock Crusher Road
First Church of God will host a
summer children's program,
"Journey with Jesus," from
9:45 to 11:15 a.m. Sunday and
6:15 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
through Aug. 21. Kids enjoy
Bible lessons on the life of
Jesus, '50s-style music, games,
Bible memory work, sword
drills, and the Buzz Box. The
children are divided by grade
and prepare to participate in the
regional Bible Olympics Com-
petition. Children also work on
the musical, "Solid Rock Cafe,"
to be presented Sunday, Aug.
21. The church is at 419 N.
Rock Crusher Road, Crystal
River. Call the church office at
(352) 795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Worship
* Faith Lutheran Church,
in Crystal Glen Subdivision,
Lecanto, invites the public to
services at 6 p.m. Saturday
and 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Pastor
Stephen Lanes' sermon
this week is, "A Lesson from the
Farmer," with text from Matthew
13:1-9, 18-23. Following the
Sunday service is fellowship
time, followed by the adult Bible
class, which is studying the
Book of Galatians. The church
is handicapped accessible.
Help for the hearing impaired is
provided. A cry room for chil-
dren is available. For informa-
tion, visit faithlecanto.com or
call (352) 527-3325.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's men and women's
club breakfast and workday is
at 8:30 a.m. today. The church
will celebrate Holy Eucharist
Rite 1 service at 8 a.m. and
Holy Eucharist Rite 2 service at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Adult Sun-
day school begins at 9:30 a.m.


Family Eucharist service and
children's church is at 10:30
a.m. Feed My Sheep feeding
program for people in need is at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a Holy Eucharist and
healing service celebrating
Benedict of Nursia at 12:30
p.m. Summer Sunday school
and 'Young Adult Forum" with
lunch follows the 10:30 a.m.
family Eucharist service. Sum-
mer fun activities and fellowship
are planned. The church is at
114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
* Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church will cele-
brate the fourth Sunday after
Pentecost with Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. tomorrow with
nursery at 10:30 a.m. Healing
service and Eucharist at 10
a.m. Wednesday. SOS from 9
a.m. to noon Thursday at Key
Training Center. Thursday
evening Bible study at 7 in the
parish hall.
* St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will have a "come as
you are" service at 5 p.m.
today. Sunday worship services
begin with 7:30 a.m. spoken
Eucharist; 8:30 a.m. Folk Mass;
10 a.m. Sunday school classes
for all ages; coffee fellowship
hour at 9:30 a.m.; and 11 a.m.
traditional Eucharist. Special
services are announced. Nurs-
ery provided. The church is at
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S.19), Crystal River. Call
(352) 795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
* First Baptist Church of
Inverness Sunday activities:
SONrise Sunday school class
at 7:45 a.m., blended worship
service at 9 a.m., kid's church
for ages 4 through fourth grade
during 9 a.m. service featuring
Bible stories, skits, music and
group activities, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. Choir practice at4:15 p.m.
Nursery available during all


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

services. Sunday evening wor-
ship at 6 for adults, and Praise
Kids for kindergarten through
fifth grade. Bread Basket Cafe
is open from 4:30 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday. Youth worship,
Awana, Connection classes
and prayer meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday. Call the church at
(352) 726-1252. The church is
at 550 Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness.
* First Baptist Church of
Floral City is celebrating 123
years in the ministry with a
"Homecoming Day" service
Sunday. There will be no 8 a.m.
blended service. Coffee and
doughnuts will be served at 9
a.m. in the fellowship hall. Sun-
day school classes meet at
9:30 a.m. This Sunday's com-
bined worship service begins at
10:45 a.m. The Rev. Sandy
Colley is the guest speaker.
Lunch on the grounds will fol-
low the service. Everyone is
asked to bring meat, as well as
side dishes and desserts
enough for themselves and two
others. If anyone has old pic-
tures of the church, former pas-
tors or members, bring them to
share There will be no evening
service. The church is at 8545
E. Magnolia St. Call the office
at (352) 726-4296 or visit
www.fbcfc.org.
* St. Anne's Anglican
Church will celebrate the fourth
Sunday after Pentecost at the 8
and 10:15 a.m. services. Every-
one is welcome. St. Anne's will
host Our Father's Table from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
Wednesday from 10 to 11:30
a.m. in the sanctuary and 7 to 8
p.m. in the parish library. Alco-
holics Anonymous meets at 8
p.m. Friday and Mondays in
the parish library. The church is
at 9870 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River.
* Inverness Church of God
has Sunday worship services at

See NOTES/Page C3

SFirst Baptis
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship - iili Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive * Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AII Age Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
7 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities


S Crystal River
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided

t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
795-5325
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Bluearass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
7:30am, 8:30am & 11:00am
Sunday School
All Ages & Adults 10:00am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
unday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
L . I r Ii r
' -ii, II II . ls, , ,
-rn1~�1i -��11


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. - Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 - 4:30pm
795-4479


m . . .. -- ----
CITRUS COUNTY'S
COMMUNITY
CHURCH

"WE ARE
FAMILY"
Sunday Mornings
Contemporary
Praise/Worship
Services
9:00 & 10:30 AM
Son Studio
(Worship for Kids)
Evening Activities
5:00 PM
Adult Bible Study
BANG Student
Worship (Grades 6-12)


Eli 44


� ST. ANNE'S
S CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


Come
grow
with us!


ASEMFS FGOD


The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!

Pastor
Richard
Hart


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service
Location:
m VCrytal[ [�iver Foida31['
(352)795-2594p^B
hftlwww~cystarieraseblyog


THE I Crystal River B Crystal
SALVATION CHURCH OF River
CIARMY "oS CHRIST Foursquare
SUNDAY: A Friendly Churchl Ch h
With A Bible Message. Gospel Church
Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Morning Worship Hour 1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Services 795-6720


TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller
395 . roe


r West " I
Citrus


Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M. 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 * 746-1239


1


HEKR, YOU'LL FIND
A CPAIN FAM ILY
IN CHI ST!

C YSTXL
RIVER
UNITED
�A ETHODIST
CH U CH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Gill, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. - Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
* A Stephen Ministry Provider


A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor Brona Larder




VCokimn

Me 5ianic

Snagogu





Rabbi Phil Davis
Rabbi Tamah Davis - 352-302-8098
http://www.yahshuarevealed.org
rabbidavisn@netscape.net








Worship
Services:
Friday Night
7:30 pm
Saturday
10:00 am

Everyone is invited!
Worship as Yahshua
(Jesus) did!


Places of worship that



offer love, peace and



harmony to all,


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

8:30 and 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. worship service in
the Children's Ministries Build-
ing. Sunday school classes for
everyone are at 9:30 a.m. The
church offers many Christian
education opportunities for all
ages at 7 p.m. Wednesday:
Missionettes and Royal
Rangers Clubs meet for chil-
dren from the age of 3;
teenagers are invited to attend
"Frontline" Youth Church; and
the adult class meets in rooms


RELIGION


105 and 106. Church is at 416
U.S. 41 South, Inverness. Call
(352) 726-4524.
* First Christian Church of
Inverness welcomes all to at-
tend summer services with
Bible school classes at 9 a.m.
Sunday, followed by worship
services at 10:15 a.m., and
Wednesday services at 6 p.m.
(Wednesday night meals will
resume in September.) Call the
church at (352) 344-1908.
* Episcopal Church of the
Advent has Sunday services at
9 a.m. through August. Morning
prayer, Mass and healing is at 9
a.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
Cub Scout Pack 508 meets at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Alcoholics


Anonymous meets at noon
Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday. Fellowship breakfasts
are at 8 a.m. the second Satur-
day monthly at IHOP. The
church is at 11251 W. Highway
484, Dunnellon, 1.3 miles west
of State Road 200. Call (352)
465-7272 or visit www.advent
episcopal.net.
* First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school
classes begin at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowing fellowship, coffee and
goodies. The morning service
begins at 10:45. The Sunday
evening service begins at 6.
Midweek service is at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. The church is on
East Parsons Point Road in


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C3


Hernando (directly across from
the Hernando Post Office).
* Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church will observe
its summer worship schedule
with only one service at 9:30
a.m. Sunday during July and
August. Everyone is invited to
hear an inspirational message,
followed by a coffee hour in the
fellowship hall. The church is
barrier free, has a free tape
ministry and large-print service
helps and hearing devices are
available. WELCA sponsored
collection of school supplies is
July 17-31.The church is on
County Road 486, opposite Cit-
rus Hills Blvd., Hernando. Call
(352) 746-7161.


* First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness summer
worship schedule: Contempo-
rary service at 9:30 a.m., Sun-
day school from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m., and traditional service at
11 a.m. All men, women and
children are invited to go bowl-
ing at 10 a.m. Saturday, July
30, at Sportsmen's Bowl. Cost
is $2.50. Shoes are free.
* Grace Bible Church with
Pastor Ray Herriman invites
everyone for Sunday Discovery
Time at 9:30 a.m. and the wor-
ship service at 11 a.m. Choir
begins at 5 p.m. and the
evening service is at 6. Monday
evening is for the youths from
6:15 to 8:15. Tuesday AWANA


for children meets from 6 to
8:15 p.m. Wednesday Bible
study meets at 7 p.m. The
church is at 6283 W.
Greenacres St., Homosassa.
Call (352) 628-5631.
* At New Testament Bap-
tist Church, Pastor Helms is
preaching verse by verse
through the Book of Revelation
during the morning service.
Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m.
with classes for all ages.
Church services are at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Sunday with special
children's classes during the
morning service. A nursery is
provided for all services. Every-
See NOTES/Page C4


PASTOR BRIAN AND
KATHY BAGGS
Worship Service &
Children's Church 10:00 AM
Meeting at Knights of Columbus Bldg.
County Rd. 486, Lecanto
(352) 527-4253


SFloral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com

Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information



Glory to Glory

Ministries


A Family
United by
The Love Of Jesus!


Non-Denominational
Spirit Filled Worship
Family Friendly

Sunday
10:30 a.m.
(352) 566-6613
www.G2GCares.org

Pastor Brian Gulledge
1274 E.Norvell Bryant Hwy,
Hernando,FL


U Faith
Lutheran
Church (L.C.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
S Floral City, FL.


Come as you are!
COMMUNITY CE IS
COMMUNITY CHURCH


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Liftim! Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:00 AM Blended Worship Service
9:30 AM Sunday School
10:45 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


,Homosassa Springs
SSEVENHm-maADENniSfChURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


rE#MPI4
PRACE C Road
Old Florl"
.3 of a mile north of SR 48
at 7431 Old Floral City Rd.
Come & Fellowship
Service Times:
Sunday School.........9:30 am
Sunday Worship.....11:00am
Wed-Night Awesome
Bible Study...............7:00 pm
Call 352-726-0501
I Where Le

d U'^ aS


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! ! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


^_88 N.s Truck Av5Be.



I'^H~nrne, FeKllowship
^^^^H^* rTx~h Us In Jesus
Bfai; aBh rday ServicesB
SabKbat c�hool 9:30 a


FAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
Homosassa Springs
Pastor Chris Owens
SUNDAY
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:45 am
WORSHIP: 11:00 am & 6 pm
WEDNESDAY
WORSHIP: 7 pm
YOUTH: 6:30pm
Independent & Fundamental
On Spartan * 1/2 mile from U.S. 19
off Cardinal 628-4793



T Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
ofJesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School & Nursery
at 10:30 am
Christian Education
9:15 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W.Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
Sn .S()THEC.r' ,.





, Hgenmando
i.rrchof
TheNazarene
� I Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided


*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M,
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor


0


HERNANDO

United
Methodist
Church

0
OPert



Doors

S .... ryfor Children and Families"
2125 E,Norvell Bryant Hwy.(486)
(1I miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245

Reverend
Aelly Greenawald


Sunday School
8:45 AM - 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.


Good
Shepherd
Lutheran
Church
ELCA





Worship



Worship

9:30 am

July and August
SFellowship After Worship
* Weekly Communion
SNursery Provided


Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gslutheran.googlepages.com

2 I 4 7


-.





C4 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

one is welcome. The church is at 9850
South Parkside Ave. in Floral City, south of
Floral Park. Call (352) 726-0360 for more
information.
* Find a church home at Faith Baptist
Church, 6918 S. Spartan Ave. (one mile
from U.S. 19, off Cardinal Street). Visit
comeandseefbc.org. Services are inter-
preted for the deaf. Sunday school classes
at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday worship at 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. "King's Kids" and "Flyers"
for K-5 grades from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Sun-
days. Wednesday Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "Warriors" for
grades 6 through 12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Call (352) 628-4793.
* Calvary Chapel of Inverness has
regular Sunday services at 10 a.m. Come
early for Bible study classes. Prophecy
Bible study begins at 7 p.m. Sunday.
Come early for free coffee and dessert.
Visit www.calvarychapelinverness.com
for more activities and events including a
link to sermon.net for old and new ser-
mons from Pastor Kevin Ballard and other
guest speakers.
The church is at 960 S. U.S. 41. Call
726-1480.
* Church of Christ services at 304
N.E. 5th St., Crystal River. Bible classes at
10 a.m. Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday and
by appointment. Worship services at 11
a.m. Sunday. Everyone invited. Call (352)
795-4943 or (352) 563-0056 for
information.


Music & more
* Inverness Church of God will host a
gospel concert with "1 Voice" at 6 p.m.
Sunday. The public is invited to attend this
great time of praise and worship. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
Call the church at (352) 726-4524.
* New Day Ministries will be in concert
at 11 a.m. Sunday, July 17, at Suncoast
Baptist Church, 5310 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa Springs. All are welcome. A
freewill offering will be collected for the
group. Call (352) 621-3008 or visit
www.NewDayMusicMinistries.com.
* Bluegrass Gospel singing and bar-
becue dinner with The Marksmen Quartet
at 5 p.m. Saturday, July 23, at New Hope
Baptist Church. Following the concert, a
barbecue dinner will be served. Advanced
tickets for $5 can be purchased by calling
(352)795-5391. Cost at the door is $7.
Ages 10 and younger admitted free of
charge. Visit www.newhopebaptist
homosassa.com.
Special events
* Saturday night praise, prayer and
power services will begin today at 6 p.m.
at North Oak Baptist Church in Citrus
Springs. The goal of the service is to pro-
vide a focused time of prayer and contem-
porary-blended worship in a more casual
atmosphere that will appeal to families in
the community. A powerful message from
the Word will be given by Pastor Stan
Stewart and music will be provided by the
church's band and praise team. Everyone
is invited to attend. Childcare through 36
See NOTES/Page C9


RELIGION


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

patio, albeit wasting precious
a/c energy, and asked God to di-
rect the creature out the door
to keep him and me both safe. I
even placed higher importance
on his safety than mine and
didn't mention that if I were to
successfully smash him on the
ceiling or wall with a broom it
would mess up the paint job my
husband did last year.
No, instead I told God that I
cared about this little creature
that he made and probably
loves and I didn't want it to die,
so would he please, please,
pleeeeze guide the little critter
out the glass door? In Jesus
name, amen.
Then I waited for God to an-
swer my prayer.
But he didn't and I got mad.
Yes, I wanted the wasp gone,
but I also wanted God to an-
swer my prayer, and not just
that prayer but my deeper
prayers that sometimes seem
to rise not much farther than
the treetops, if that high.
I waited for a while longer as
the mud dauber found a spot on
the ceiling to camp out and
laugh at me. Finally, I left the
house to meet my husband for
dinner at Outback, ticked at the
stupid wasp that wouldn't coop-
erate with my prayer request.


Later, when we came home,
the wasp was still on the ceiling
- I think it was laughing - not
about to go anywhere. And God
obviously wasn't going to move
it either.
My husband took a broom
and swatted at it and it disap-
peared. However, we didn't see
it fly away or fall dead or in-
jured anywhere, and neither
did it squish all over the ceil-
ing. It wasn't stuck on the
broom or on top of the ceiling
fan - and we haven't seen it
since.
Although I was and am still
glad that the stinging intruder
is gone, I was and still am dis-
appointed that God didn't an-
swer my prayer the way I
thought he would - the way I
thought he should.
That's my problem. I tried to
use God as an errand boy or
magic genie, asking him to do
something for me right then
and there. It's not like I ex-
pected him to stand at atten-
tion, salute and say, "Yes,
Ma'am," but I had hoped he
would answer in the way I
imagined so I would know that
he loves me.
It reminded me of the time I
lived in Maine and needed a
winter parka. I prayed for one,
hoping it would appear on the
doorstep or next to my car with
a hand-addressed note so I
could "prove" to my neighbors
that God answers prayer.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

But that didn't happen. My
husband worked some over-
time and we went to Sears and
bought one. It was light blue
with fur around the hood.
My husband got rid of the
mud dauber, too. Both times my
husband was God's answer to
my prayers, which I'm not com-
plaining about.
Oh, right. I am complaining
about it
The fact is, I got the parka I
needed and the wasp is gone
and that's what I had wanted. I
wanted not to be stung. The
wasp went away - it just didn't
go out the patio door.
So now I'm left with a huge
question: Do I trust God with
my prayers - "Thy will be done
on earth as it is in heaven" - or
don't I? And if I do, do I trust
that, in his goodness, he will an-
swer as he sees fit and that he
will do what's in my and every-
one's best interest?
I want to answer yes, and I
pray that God will have mercy
on me until I can.
-
Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over Victoria -I
Know the Real Secret," "Girl
on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace." She
can be reached at (352)
564-2927, Monday through
Thursday or via e-mail at
nkennedy@chronicle
online, com.


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses
9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30- 3:30 P.M

726-1670








Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. - 6:00 PM Bible Study
Children's Church School
Weekly
ALLARE WELCOME





First United

Methodist


< Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:00 AM
Holy Communion

9:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & Worship

10:45 AM
Traditional
Worship


r 0



All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship..................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
For more
information call -42-
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd
Langdon


You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Mission Possible
MINISTRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
SSenior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
W orship ...................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am








A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service

Bible Study & Prayer


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.


^ First

Assembly

of God


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


The difference
is worth the distance!

GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
* Expositional Bible Teaching
* Conservative Music
For a map, schedule of services, and
sample messages check our website
www.gracebapchurch.org
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sun. Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Phone (352) 445-9013


nature Coa st | COMMUNITY
ar U Cias CONGREGATIONAL
Unitarian Universalists CHRISTIAN CHURCH


SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.




WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:00 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P.M.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:30 P .Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
. .catholicweb.com .=


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260












Contemporary
9:30 AM
* Sunday Services
* Traditional
11:00 AM
* 11:00 AM Service 0
* Tapes & CD's Available 0
* Sunday School for all ages 0
* 9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group .
5 to 7 PM
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
" Podcast: FPC inv.com
" Church Office 637-0770
S Pastor Craig Davies *


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com







Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


God Loves You Just
The Way You Are

You Were Created
For Greatness
Service 8:45 & 10:30
Sunday School 10:30



LNINl

LGBT - Welcome and loved
2628 W. Woodview -
Beverly Hills
746-1270
www.unityofcitrus.org
Knowing God,
Loving God, Serving God


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! ! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


First Baptist Church
of Beverly Hills *
Marple Lewis,III Jeff Owen
Pastor Minister of Worship
and Youth
Sunday Services:
Bible Study 9:15 A.M.
Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Services:
Prayer and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
Located at the intersection of
Hwy. 491 (Lecanto Hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours 9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com


7 I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Newest members


Special to the Chronicle
The following 10 new members joined the Nature Coast Unitarian Fellowship in a
welcoming ceremony Sunday, July 3. From left are: Janet and Bob Murray of Dun-
nellon; Kathleen Dacey, Citrus Springs; Jo Dee Adelung, Pine Ridge; Phyllis Maz-
zarella, Inverness; Jackie Bouyea. Pine Ridge; Carol and Therese Ascolillo, Pine
Ridge; Pat Callahan, Ocala; Elvree Dacey, Citrus Springs; and Nancy Turner, Cit-
rus Springs, membership chair.


SECULAR
Continued from Page C1

took part in a new Pew Forum survey
said they are convinced that secular-
ism is a "major threat" to the health of
evangelical Christianity in their land,
a threat even greater than material-
ism, consumerism and the rising tide
of sex and violence in popular culture.
In a related question, a majority of
U.S. evangelical leaders - 82 percent
- said they are convinced that their
churches are currently losing clout in
American life.
In this study, researchers surveyed
nearly 2,200 evangelical leaders from
around the world who were invited to
participate in last year's Lausanne
Congress on World Evangelization in
Cape Town, South Africa.
"This rising fear of secularism"
among top American evangelicals "re-
ally surprised us, especially when you
compared their feelings to the more
optimistic attitudes among evangeli-
cals in other parts the world," noted
John C. Green of the University of
Akron, a senior Pew Forum research
adviser.
So what is happening? For genera-
tions, he explained, evangelicals have
"primarily been defined in terms of
their conflicts with other religious
groups, with other faiths. ... But now, it
seems that they are increasingly start-
ing to see themselves in terms of con-
flicts with those who are either
indifferent to religion or who are
openly hostile to traditional forms of
religion."
Thus, it seemed that when these
evangelical leaders used the term
"secularism" they were not always re-
ferring to people and groups with no
religious convictions at all. Instead,
they were expressing their concerns
about the rising numbers of people in
America and around the world who
simply do not practice any one form of
faith, as traditionally defined.
"They don't seem to know what to call
the unorthodox expressions of faith
that you see among the so-called 'spiri-
tual, but not religious' people," said
Green. Thus, the frustrated evangelical


leaders may be "lumping them all to-
gether under the term 'secularism."'
In contrast to this surge of pes-
simism in North America, evangelicals
from other parts of the world were
more optimistic about the future.
This was especially true among
those from Africa, Asia, Latin America
and the rest of the so-called "Global
South." Other survey results included:
* While only 41 percent of northern
leaders believed the state of evangeli-
calism would improve in the next five
years, 71 percent of those in the Global
South were convinced things would be
"better than now" for their churches.
In the Global North, 33 percent of
those surveyed thought things would
soon get worse.
* While in overwhelming agree-
ment (96 percent) that "Christianity is
the one, true faith," these evangelical
leaders were somewhat divided on a
key authority issue, with 50 percent
saying the "Bible should be read liter-
ally, word for word" and 48 percent
saying "not everything in the Bible
should be taken literally"
* Not surprisingly, 90 percent of
evangelicals from Muslim-majority na-
tions said Islam poses a major threat
to their future work, compared with 41
percent from those living elsewhere.
However, survey participants from
Muslim lands held more favorable
views of Muslims and their faith than
did evangelical leaders from other
countries.
* The Lausanne Congress partici-
pants were convinced that evangeli-
cals in the Global South currently have
"too little influence" in the leadership
of world Christianity Researchers
found it particularly interesting that
leaders in the United States and other
parts of the Global North were even
more likely to hold this point of view
- 78 percent compared to 62 percent
- than their counterparts in the
Global South.


TerryMattingly is the director of the
Washington Journalism Center at the
Council for Christian Colleges and
Universities and leads the Get
Religion.org project to study religion
and the news.


POPE
Continued from Page C1

Kertzer, author of a forthcom-
ing book on Pius' predecessor,
Pope Pius XI.
Despite opposition, Pius'
cause is progressing at an im-
pressive clip amid an increas-
ingly concerted effort by
Benedict and Pius' supporters
to highlight his virtues and dis-
credit his naysayers. A mu-
seum is planned in his honor,
as are conferences and ex-
hibits.
The Vatican's newspaper,
Pius' chief cheerleader, re-
cently ran an article about how
Pius had Jews sheltered in
convents around Rome during
the Nazi occupation. A Vati-
can-sponsored film festival in
May screened three glowing
films about his papacy Bene-
dict himself recently extolled
Pius as a hero during the war,
saying he'd earned the "ever-
lasting gratitude" of its victims.
Jewish groups and histori-
ans have argued for years that
the Vatican had no business
moving forward with Pius' be-
atification cause until the Vat-
ican's full secret archive of his
papacy is opened to scholars
for independent research.
That process is expected to
take several more years.
"My position has always
been to say - and I've said it
to Pope Benedict XVI - that
this is a matter that should be
deferred until at least the gen-
eration of Holocaust survivors
is no longer with us, so it's not
as if rubbing the salt into their
wounds," said Rabbi David
Rosen, head of interfaith rela-
tions at the American Jewish
Committee.
Last year, 19 Catholic schol-
ars appealed to the academic
in Benedict to give re-
searchers more time to study
the full archives. "The ques-
tion isn't 'Did he do anything?'
but whether he might have
done more or sooner," said the
Rev John Pawlikowski, ethics
professor at the Catholic The-
ologcial Union who co-wrote
the letter.
Pius' supporters, however,
are getting impatient. They
charge that few scholars ever
consult the 11 volumes of
World War II archives that
have already been released
and put online, along with
thousands of other documents,
by a foundation headed by a
Long Island Jew who admires
Pius.
"It annoys me terribly that
such an injustice is being done
to such a great man, that he
should be treated the way he
is," said Marchione, the Pius
biographer who is promoting
Esposito's miracle case.
Sitting in her order's con-
vent a stone's throw from the


Vatican, Marchione said her
religious congregation alone,
on orders from Pius, sheltered
114 Jewish women at three
separate convents during the
Nazi occupation.
"I'm just tired of the whole
thing that people can't go back
to the documents that prove it
and accept it as historical
truth," she said in a recent in-
terview.
Marchione flips through one
of her nine books on Pius to
prove her point: a photo of
Jewish women and children
sheltered in the papal summer
residence at Castel Gandolfo;
a photo of a pro-pope rally
after Rome was liberated in
1944; a shot of the pope with
members of the Israeli Phil-
harmonic who in 1955 per-
formed a concert for Pius in
the Vatican in gratitude for
having saved Jews.
Marchione has been unflag-
ging in her support for Espos-
ito's case, presenting it first to
Bertone, the Vatican's secre-
tary of state, in 2009 and re-
cently sending her secretary to
Castellammare di Stabia to
gather Esposito's testimony
and medical file to send di-
rectly to the Vatican's saint-
making office.
For Pius' supporters, the
hunt for a miracle is all the
more urgent because he isn't a
household name like Mother
Teresa or Pope John Paul II.
Where he is known, it's most
often in the context of his con-
troversial record, not neces-
sarily because people would
think to pray to him for a med-
ical cure.
Esposito, in fact, said she
had never heard of Pius until
she fell ill.
Her husband, Umberto di
Maio, said the family had been
praying to John Paul II, who
had died just a few months be-
fore, when Esposito was diag-
nosed in July 2005. But as di
Maio recounts it, John Paul ap-
peared to him in a dream one
night and said he couldn't help
Esposito but showed a photo of
a slim, bespecled prelate who
could.
Di Maio said he wasn't able
to identify the priest until he
saw Pius on the cover of a
Catholic magazine a week
later. As soon as he did, the
family began fervently praying
to Pius.
The family became con-
vinced of Pius' intervention
when Esposito's case was re-
ferred to a cancer specialist in
Rome, an atheist who, after re-
viewing her charts, asked the
family if they believed in God.
When di Maio replied they
did, the doctor said: "Then
pray, because she needs it," di
Maio recounted.
Esposito, who still keeps the
same dog-eared photocopy of
Pius in her book of prayers,
says she and her doctors were


stunned when her PET scan,
which detects lingering traces
of cancer, came out clean after
her six-week chemo cycle at
the Umberto I hospital in the
southern city of Nocera, near
Salerno.
Her doctor, she said, was
flabbergasted: "'Do you see
this? It's clean! How is it possi-
ble?"' Esposito recalled Dr. Al-
fonso Maria D'Arco, head of
oncology and hematology at
Umberto I, as saying.
"And spontaneously I said to
him, 'Doctor, doctor, isn't it pos-
sible that it came from above?"
she said, pointing heaven-
ward.
"No, no, no. Don't say shock-
ing things," she said he re-
sponded.
"But for me it was a miracle,
because it wasn't possible,"
she said, fighting back tears.
"It wasn't possible. Not even
they believed it in that mo-
ment."
D'Arco didn't respond to
email requests for comment
and couldn't be reached by
telephone.
Dr. Ann S. LaCasce, an assis-
tant professor of medicine at
the Harvard Medical School's
lymphoma program and affili-
ated Dana Farber Cancer In-
stitute, said Esposito's speedy
recovery wasn't all that re-
markable.
"Not surprising at all," La-
Casce said after reviewing the
protocol Esposito received.
"The key is this aggressive,
multi-agent chemotherapy
regimen that she got. It doesn't
sound like a miracle at all. She
did great, as expected."
LaCasce, who said she treats
four to five cases of Burkitt's a
year, said the prognosis for the
rare subtype of non-Hodgkin
lymphoma is usually very
good, particularly for children
and young adults who can tol-
erate the high toxicity that the
aggressive chemo entails.
"Burkitt's is a disease we
like to treat because they do
really well, they feel better so
quickly," LaCasce said. "She
was cured of her disease with
the appropriate chemother-
apy"
Esposito and her support-
ers, however, are undeterred.
Just last week, she traveled to
Rome to take part in a cere-
mony outside St. Peter's
Square marking the anniver-
sary of the day the city of
Rome dedicated a piazza to
Pius to thank him for having
defended Rome from the
Nazis.
Esposito says she wants peo-
ple to know Pius not just for
what he did for Rome but for
her.
"I am here. I want to say I'm
alive. I know what I went
through and I assure you, it
was really serious, something
awful. Death was very close.
And I am here."


.unda% . qrr i . r,:


T i i . . s * Il '

E 1 t 111I n t
Al . 1 A1.J 11.
"\\fkdillll f H-lll"


I r







Pastor: --
Kevin & Ruth Ballard
Sunday
10 AM Worship
7 PM Bible Prophecy
Wednesday
Free Dessert & Coffee 6 PM
Bible Study 7 PM
960 S. Hwy 41, Inverness, FL
www.calvarychapelinverness.com
352-726-1480


F1 45 Years of
Bringing Christ
FIRST B to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor I


WHERE EVERYBODY IS SOMEBODY
AND JESUS Is LORD
MOUNTAIN ASSEMBLY
10117 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34450-5430
East Hwy. 44 -(352) 637-3110
Sunday School 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Worship 10:30 A.M.
Sunday Evening 6:30 P.M.
Thursday 7:00 P.M.

Rev. & MI- "
Junior Bo rn ,' r
(352) 341-2884 1





"FirstFor Christ"..ohn 1:41
0006T9U
FIRST
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study

i~mT^1!S


The little House

Fellowship
A Christian Ministry to enhance
believers by providing discipleship
training and counseling
Sunday Service
10am
Life Skills Bible Study
Tues. 7pm
Free Coffee & Prayer
M-F 6:30-8:00am
Outreach Events
Joe and Kathi Hupchick
Servants of Christ
4929 E. Shady Acres Drive
Inverness, FL
352-726-9998 Cell 352-613-5216
jkhupchick@tampabay.rr.com


E"ooo PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM - Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM - Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM - Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM - Estudios Biblicos
Lessperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. * Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711


First

Baptist
Church of
Inverness
550 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida
(352) 726-1252

SUNDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
7:45 a.m.
Bible Study
9:00 a.m.
Worship
10:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Worship
WEDNESDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Dinner
6:00 p.m.
AWANA for Children
6:00 p.m.
IGNITE for Youth
6:00 p.m.
Prayer & Bible Study
Classes
Nursery Provided All Services
Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor
wwm binverness.cImIw


Vic ory


in



Jesus

At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Simdi., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !! I

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS t


[NVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
. I. .. I ., . r.


RELIGION


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C5







Page C6 SATURDAY, JULY 9,2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES Church plans special blood drive


Key plans annual
entertaining event
The public is invited to
"Reach for the Stars" with the
Key Center during an
evening of entertainment fea-
turing the "176 Keys Dueling
Pianos" Show. Sing along
with songs of all styles, gen-
res and eras of music. Laugh
with the matchless musical
comedy. The 29th annual
Run for the Money Dinner
Auction will be Friday, July
15, at the Chet Cole Life En-
richment Center in Lecanto
and promises great food by
Outback Steakhouse of In-
verness, a dinner show and
unique live and silent auction
items.
Social hour and silent auc-
tion begins at 5:30 p.m., with
dinner starting at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are $50 per person
and proceeds provide schol-
arships to 60 individuals who
receive no state funding for
services and to deliver year-
round services to 300 devel-
opmentally disabled adults.
Call the Key Center Foun-
dation at (352)795-5541, ext.
311 or ext. 313 for tickets and
information.
Ladies Auxiliary to
change bylaws
Ladies Auxiliary 4272 of
the FOE will change its by-
laws. All changes have to be
in by the first meeting in July.
The first reading will be
July 19 at the auxiliary meet-
ing. The second reading will
be Aug. 2 at the auxiliary
meeting. The third reading
and discussion and voting on
the bylaw changes will be
Aug. 9.
Nurse scholarship
applications due
Deadline for applications
for the Penny Duteau Nursing
Scholarship is Friday, July 15.
Applicants must be Citrus
County residents and be ac-
cepted to a recognized nurs-
ing program.
Interested students should
call (352) 344-4460 for an
application.
Orchid Lovers to
meet July 16
BROOKSVILLE - Orchid
Lovers Club of Spring Hill will
meet at 1 p.m. Saturday, July
16, at the Partner's Club be-
hind Oak Hill Hospital, 11375
Cortez Blvd., Brooksville.
Bill Nunez will speak on or-
chid breeding and flasking.
Free refreshments; guests
welcome. Call Linda Roder-
ick (352) 597-3736.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Trio of cats


Knights of Columbus co-sponsor

event slated for Saturday, July 16


Special to the Chronicle

Our Lady of Grace Church
and Knights of Columbus
Abbot Francis Sadlier Coun-
cil No. 6168 will co-host a
"Helping One Another"
summertime blood drive
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, July 16, in the Parish
Life Center of Our Lady of
Grace.
Blood supplies are usu-
ally quite low at this time of


the year and are fast ap-
proaching the critical stage
due vacations, weather, lack
of winter visitors in the
county, etc. This is a good
opportunity for everyone to
help one another in this
time of need.
Regular and new blood
donors are welcome and ap-
preciated. The entire
process takes less than an
hour: check in, get a mini-
physical, give a pint of blood,


enjoy a complimentary con-
tinental breakfast and re-
ceive a complimentary
souvenir T-shirt, as well as a
free cholesterol reading.
There have been many
changes through the years
as to who can give blood and
who cannot.
LifeSouth Blood Center's
trained technicians will
never permit anyone to do-
nate who may have a health
problem or take medication
that would dictate other-
wise.
The drive marks the first
anniversary of the church
and Knights' combined


drives. They have collected
282 pints during the five
drives to date:an average of
56.4 pints per drive. The ac-
cepted standard by Life-
South and other groups is
that every pint of blood do-
nated helps to save three
lives; thus, the efforts have
already helped save 846
lives. Another 52 pints
would up that total to 334
pints, or 1,002 lives saved.
Donors must be at least 17
years of age, weigh at least
110 pounds and have pic-
ture identification. For in-
formation, call Don Irwin at
(352) 527-8450.


Service Above Self


The Rotary Club of Central
Citrus presented two "Ser-
vice Above Self" awards for
generosity and community
support. TOP LEFT: On be-
half of the Rotary Club of
Central Citrus, Ken Swade,
president-elect, presents
this Service Above Self
award to Evelyn and Ed-
mond Brannen, owners of
ED's Tackle Shop on U.S.
19 in Crystal River, for
blessing the children of a
needy local family with their
financial donation and fish-
ing equipment gifts. The Ro-
tary Club is a strong
supporter of many commu-
nity services and enjoys rec-
ognizing other Citrus County
citizens and local busi-
nesses that open their
hearts and give back to
their community by reaching
out to help others less fortu-
nate. BOTTOM LEFT: Linda
Cridland, a past president
and current fellowship direc-
tor of the Rotary Club of
Central Citrus, presented a
Service Above Self award re-
cently to Citrus Hills Publix
store manager Ray Parrish
for the store's generosity in
assisting with the Rotary
Club's donations to the Re-
source Center's food pantry.
Every few months, Cridland
commits to gathering cash
donations and nonperish-
able foods from club mem-
bers, and then works with
Publix to turn the cash into
as much food as possible to
help restock the food
pantry's shelves.
Special to the Chronicle


News NOTES


Free HAM radio class on tap New reading program begins


A free, beginning HAM radio class
course will be offered at the Citrus County
Emergency Operations Center, 3549 Saun-
ders Way, off County Road 491, in Lecanto.
The course consists of two Saturday ses-
sions from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 20 and 27.
Participants can learn the necessary
material to pass the FCC Technician Class
amateur radio exam. Textbook costs $26.
Class will be limited to 15 students.
To attend the course, attend a meeting
at 10 a.m. July 16 at the Emergency Oper-
ations Center. Information about the techni-
cian class license privileges and textbook
to be used will be presented.
Contact Joe Calzaretta at (352)
382-0809 or K4LL@EarthLink.net.


Join the excitement as the Homosassa
Public Library begins a new Celebrate
Reading program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
Celebrate Reading is a session consist-
ing of two programs geared toward helping
preschool and elementary school-age chil-
dren develop literacy skills, improve their
reading and gain a love of books.
The first program, PAWS to Read, gives
children the opportunity to build confidence
in their reading ability by reading aloud to a
certified therapist.
The second program, Reading Pals,
pairs teens and younger children together.
Teens read storybooks aloud to one or two
younger children at a time. Children may


wish to draw or write about a story they like.
For more information, call Kathy Wolf,
youth librarian, at (352) 628-5626.
Genealogy meets July 12
Citrus County Genealogical Society will
meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday, July 12, at the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, 3474 W. Southern St., Lecanto.
Members are asked to bring genealogy
questions to the informal meeting. Many
members of the genealogy society have
had years of experience in tracing their
family histories and will offer suggestions to
solve problems. Guests are welcome.
Call Mary Ann Machonkin at (352)
382-5515 or visit www.rootsweb.ancestry.
com/-flccgs2/.


7IWj PATH to start fish farm on small scale


Special to the Chronicle
Who wouldn't want to take
these adorable babies
home? Delaware, Con-
necticut and Colorado are
11 weeks old and ready to
go! These kittens are just
some of the many sweet
and playful kittens and
cats that remain at the
Hardin Haven while waiting
for a forever home. All are
neutered, micro-chipped,
vaccinated and free of fe-
line leukemia, AIDS and
heartworms. Visitors are
welcome from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humanitar-
ians' Manchester House on
the corner of State Road
44 and Conant Avenue,
east of Crystal River. Call
the Humanitarians at
(352) 613-1629 for
adoptions, or view most of
the Haven's felines online
at www.hofspha.org.


his past year or so
gave us a real chal-
lenge for one of our
projects.
About a year and a half
ago, we learned of the won-
derful synergy between fish
and vegetables.
Growing food has become
a passion of mine, a part of
my life calling. Before my DuWayn
dad passed away, we would THE I
have conversations about HO
how his family grew food in
upper Michigan during the
Depression and World War II. I was
concerned my generation had lost
knowledge of how to grow our own
food. Do I believe the current crisis
will cause food prices to rise? As my
dad used to say, "Yep." Do I think we
need to expand our 10 acres of food?
As soon as possible.
While going to school to learn how
to grow Tilapia and what is termed
"Aquaponics," we also learned this is
not new. It is possible people a thou-
sand years ago knew how to grow food


I
F
of


on ponds that fish grew in.
Fish give off nitrates and
ammonium that plant life
thrives on. Plants in turn
give off oxygen and other
> nutrients that fish thrive on.
I rediscovered that very
near to our current farm
was an old fish farm the
county owned, but it was sit-
e Sipper ting dormant and had been
PATH dormant for a few years. I
S started to ask questions
about the idea, and the
amazing part is almost
everyone I talked to saw the idea as
wonderful without much thought. It
was easy to see how to use the land,
make it productive and at the same
time, enhance our farming. And best of
all, it might even produce some jobs.
Long story short, we began a process
of forming a grant committee with a
few of my fellow Rotarians and my
wife, who is our development director,
to write a large USDA grant to help us
reopen the fish farm. We have recently
been informed we were denied fund-


ing on this particular grant. Although
we are disappointed, I think the idea
has merit and is still to be pursued.
We will start our fish operation on a
small scale at another property and
the good Lord willing and giving us the
strength, keep searching for funding.
In this economy, we have been of-
fered more land to farm to help us
support our shelter operations, but we
do not have the operational funding to
expand yet.
On a footnote, we also discovered
this fish farm might be a school for the
future fish farmers of America and a
possible tourist attraction. There are
few ideas in life that attract almost
nothing negative and, by God, this was
one of them. I am proud of all of the
citizens who tried and failed rather to
have not tried at all.

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus County
a faith-based homeless shelter.
Contact him at (352) 527-6500 or
sipperd@bellsouth.net


AL AL


Florida.
Call Clay Gratz at (352)
563-2156 for information.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Canine

birthday

celebration

on July 16
Special to the Chronicle

The public is welcome
to a first birthday celebra-
tion for puppy Mardene II,
a Canine Companion for
Independence Service
Dogs (CCI), from 2 to 4
p.m. Saturday, July 16, at
the GFWC Crystal River
Woman's Club, 320 N.
Citrus Ave.
Mardene, raised by Cyn-
thia Holden and spon-
sored by the Crystal River
Woman's Club, has invited
friends to share important
pet information with com-
munity guests. Some of
the special friends plan-
ning to attend are: Planta-
tion Animal Clinic in
Crystal River, Pet Por-
traits, Pawfection Ranch
in Homosassa, Precious
Paws (cat and dog rescue
and adoption), Home
Alone (cat rescue and
adoption), Citrus County
Animal Shelter, Canine
Companions for Inde-
pendence Service Dogs,
Complete Dog Training,
Citrus County Pet Meals,
Humanitarians and Citrus
County Animal Control.
The Woman's Club and
CCI can assist with the ap-
plication process for any-
one who needs a service
dog. All guests attending
the celebration will be en-
tered in drawings for door
prizes including $100 of
veterinary services at
Plantation Animal Clinic,
a canine "make-over" and
other items. Door prizes
will be drawn at the event
and you must be present
to win.


News NOTES

Habitat house
goes up Saturday
Habitat for Humanity of Cit-
rus County will raise the walls
on house No. 72 for the
Gulledge family at 8 a.m. Sat-
urday, July 9, at 9624 N.
Feigel Terrace, Crystal River.
Habitat volunteers, friends,
family and everyone inter-
ested in Habitat for Human-
ity's work are invited to attend
and help. For driving direc-
tions, call the Habitat office at
(352) 563-2744, or visit
www.habitatcc.org.
Habitat for Humanity, a non-
profit, ecumenical Christian
housing ministry seeking to
eliminate poverty housing,
seeks qualified families for its
program. The program will be
explained at an orientation from
10 a.m. to noon Saturday, July
30, at Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church, Lecanto. Atten-
dance is mandatory for those
who wish to use the program.
For details, call (352) 563-2744.
Lions to serve
breakfast Sunday
Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will host
its pancake breakfast on
Sunday, July10. New hours
will be 7:30 a.m. until noon.
Cost for adults is $4; chil-
dren younger than 12 eat for
$2. On the menu are all-you-
can-eat pancakes, choice of
bacon or sausage or combo,
orange juice and coffee or tea.
For information, call Lion
Karen at (352) 746-2986.
Bonsai club to
gather Saturday
Buttonwood Bonsai Club
will host Jim Van Landingham
as demonstrator at its July 9
meeting beginning at 9:30
a.m. at Key Training Center,
130 Heights St., Inverness.
Van Landingham is on the
Bonsai Societies of Florida's
list of speakers. He is well
known as a teacher and
demonstrator throughout







SATURDAY EVENING JULY 9, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D IF H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
WESH NBC O 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Tonight (N) 'PG' Minute to Win It'PG' E Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14' Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News Sat. Night Live
Priceless Great Romances The Lawrence Welk Show Are You Being Keeping Up Appearances As Time Goes By The Old Guys Worst Week of Globe Trekker War memorials in
L PBS 3 3 14 6 Antiques of 20th Century "Pennsylvania Polka."'G' Served?'G' "Christmas Special 1993"'PG' E 'PG' 'G' My Life'14' Kuwait; pearls.'G' s (DVS)
(WUFTf PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 Classic Gospel'G' E The Lawrence Welk Show'G' Being Served Keeping Up AfterYou Vicar of Dibley Austin City Limits'G' E Live From the Artists Den 'PG'
NewsChannel 8 NBC Nightly Entertainment Tonight (N) (In Minute to Win It A couple teams up Law & Order: Criminal Intent "The Law & Order: Special Victims Unit News Channel 8 Saturday Night
WFA NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8at 6(N) News (N)'G' Stereo) 'PG' E to play for the prize. 'PG' Last Street in Manhattan"'14' (In Stereo)'14' a at 11PM (N) Live'14 x
Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! 'G'x Wheel of Fortune 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Expedition Impossible The teams Rookie Blue Andy and Swarek Eyewitness News Hot Topics'PG'
W V ABC 20 20 20 20 weekend 'G' s Players vie for a $50,000 prize, face camels and a sandstorm. investigate a theft. (In Stereo) sa Weekend
TP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 1 10 News(N) CBS Evening Inside Edition TheYoung Icons CHAOS "Mincemeat" The agents 48Hours Mystery (In Stereo)'PG' 48 Hours Mystery (In Stereo)'PG' E 10 News, 11pm Armando
WTS CBS 10 10 101010 1News (N) xa Weekend'PG' 'G's visit a dying dictator. (N) (N) Montelongo'PG'
S1 1 MLB Baseball Regional Coverage. FOX13 News Saturday (N) x Cops In Stereo) Cops(In Stereo) Family Guy'14'm The Cleveland FOX13 10:00 News (N) X Fringe "Snakehead" Bodies host
SFOX ( 13 13 13 13 (N) (In Stereo Live) c (PA)'PG'EI (PA) 'PG'E Show'14' squidlike creatures. '14' s
WCJB ABC 11 11 4 15 News World News Entertainment Tonight (N) 'PG' 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Expedition Impossible a Rookie Blue "Bad Moon Rising" News Crook& Chase
WCF IND D. 2 2 2 2 22 2 Cornerstone With John Hagee'G' JackVan Impe Great Awakening AllOverthe citylife church Great Awakening
IND 2 2 2 22 22Presents'G' World 'G'
ABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy!'G' 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Expedition Impossible The teams Rookie Blue Andy and Swarek ABC Action News Grey's Anatomy
IS ABC 11 11 11 11at6 PM 'G' c Players vie for a $50,000 prize, face camels and a sandstorm. investigate a theft. (In Stereo) c at 11 PM 14' s
American Dad American Dad The Office The Office "The House "Hunting" House treats a gay Movie'PG' South Park South Park Casino
(Wr IND ED 12 12 '14'c '14'c "Cocktails"'14' Negotiation"'14' AIDS patient. A' 'MA' owners.'14'
WTTA MNT D 6 6 6 6 9 Scrubs'14' Paid Program That '70s Show That'70s Show Deadliest Catch PG' Elvira's Movie Macabre A man is haunted by his murdered lover.'14' Smash Cuts Smash Cuts
WACX TBN 21 21 21 The Faith Show Summit Bible Paid Program Life Center Church |Hal Lindsey'G' Ext. Prophetic Claud Bowers Tims Ministries |Spencer Wisdom Keys St. Luke Lead
O CW M 4 4 4 4 12 12 The King of The King of Two and a Half Two and a Half NUMB3RS "Blackout" Blackouts may Cold Case "Bullet" Apprehending a Criminal Minds"P911"A pornogra- The Unit"M.Ps" Keeping a pop diva
M CW _ 4 4 4 4 12 12 Queens PG' Queens PG' Men'14' c Men '14' be terrorism. 'PG' serial killer. (In Stereo) 14' s pher tries to auction a child. 14 safe. (In Stereo) '14' s
Bill Cosby Show County ISpy'Y' Cold Squad (In Stereo) '14' (DVS) Da Vinci's Inquest (In Stereo)'14' c ** "Up in the World"(1956, Comedy) Norman Wisdom, Maureen
M 16 16 16 16 '' commissioners Swanson. A window cleaner stumbles across a kidnapping plot.'NR'
(WGXI FOX D 13 13 7 7 MLB Baseball RegionalCoverage. FOX 35 News at 7 c Cops'PG'c ICops'PG' c Family Guy'14' Cleveland Show FOX 35 News at 10 Late (N) a Fringe "Snakehead"'14' s
WVEI UNI i 15 15 15 15 15 15 Cero Conducta Noticiero Como Dice el Dicho'PG'(SS) Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) Impacto Extra Noticiero
WXPl ION ( 17 Hart's War'R' **Y "The Bone Collector"(1999, Suspense) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' sc *** "Training Day"(2001, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' c **** Glory
AE 54 48 54 54 25 27 Hoarders"Gail and Warren"'PG' Hoarders"Claudie"'PG'c Hoarders'PG' Hoarders"BillyBob; Jean"'PG' Hoarders"Phyllis;Janet"'PG' Hoarders"Andrew; Shania"'PG'
LAMI 55 64 55 55 * "Death Wish 1" (1982, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson.'R' s * "Death Wish 3"(1985, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson.'R' c *h "Death Wish 4: The Crackdown"(1987) Charles Bronson.'R'
(AN} 52 35 52 52 19 21 Dogs 101 (In Stereo)'PG'c |Dogs 101 (In Stereo)'PG'c Dogs 101 (In Stereo)'PG' |Dogs 101 Irish Wolfhound.'PG' Dogs 101 (N) (In Stereo)'PG' Dogs 101 Irish Wolfhound.'PG'
(EET) 96 19 96 96 ** "Boomerang"(1992) Eddie Murphy 'R' IThe BET Awards 2011 Music, entertainment and sports in LA.'PG' I"Madea's Family Reunion" (2006)
(BRAVO 254 51 254 254 House "Ugly"'14'] |House (In Stereo)'14' |House "Games"'14' c House Paralysis.'14'c *| "Resident Evil" (2002, Horror) Milla Jovovich. Premiere.'R'
C 27 61 27 27 33 American Pie *|, "My Best Friend's Girl"(2008, Romance-Comedy) Dane Cook.'NR' s **Y "Just Friends" (2005) Ryan Reynolds.'PG-13' | *** "American Pie"(1999)
(CI) 98 45 98 98 28 37 **Y, "Blue Collar Comedy Tour: The Movie" (2003) 'PG-13' *, "Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector" (2006) 'PG-13' Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad '14' |True Blue: Ten
CNC 43 42 43 43 Paid Program Paid Program Money in Motion |Biography-CNBC American Greed The Suze Orman Show (N) a Princess"Princess Ashley" The Suze Orman Show'G'
CNNM 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room CNN Newsroom CNN Presents'PG'E Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom CNN Presents 'PG'
DISN 46 40 46 46 6 5 So Random!'G' Shake It Up!'G' My Babysitter |My Babysitter My Babysitter My Babysitter My Babysitter My Babysitter Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place
EPN 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) c Horse Racing NFLs Greatest Games From Jan. 20, 2008. a Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) a SportsCenter (N) (Live) a
ESPN2 34 28 34 34 43 49 2010 World Series of Poker c I MLL Lacrosse All-Star Game. From Boston. (N) (Live) NHRA Drag Racing O'Reilly Auto Parts Route 66 Nationals, Qualifying. E:60
EWTi 95 70 95 95 48 Worth Living God Weeps Mother Angelica-Classic EWTN Cinema Holy Rosary Our Father's Plan The Journey Home'G'
(FA ) 29 52 29 29 20 28 *** "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" *** "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire"(2005, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson.'PG-13' **Y "Jumanji"(1995) 'PG'
(FI 44 37 44 44 32 America's News HQ (N) FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Stossel War Stories With Oliver North'PG'
(Fl 26 56 26 26 Challenge "Star Wars Cakes" Bobby Flay |Bobby Flay Chopped "Have a Heart"'G' Chopped "Saying Sayonara"'G' Chopped 'G' Iron Chef America
EFSNF 35 39 35 35 Billy's Bunch Marlins Live! MLB Baseball Houston Astros at Florida Marlins. From Sun Life Stadium in Miami. (N Subject to Blackout) Marlins Live! The Final Score Marlins Live! The Final Score
cFX 30 60 30 30 51 Superbad (2007) 7** "Pineapple Express"(2008, Comedy) Seth Rogen, James Franco.'R' |Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer'MA' Archer'MA'
(GOF 67 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Champions: Nature Valley First Tee Open, Second Round. From Pebble Beach, Calif. (N) European PGA Tour Golf Barclays Scottish Open, Third Round. Golf Central (N)
(HALL 39 68 39 39 45 54 "Accidentally in Love" (2010)'NR' **| "The Engagement Ring"(2005) Patricia Heaton. cc **, "The Engagement Ring" (2005) Patricia Heaton. c |Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
*** "Ocean's Eleven" (2001) George Clooney. A suave ex-con assem- ** "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" (2010, Drama) Michael Boxing Erislandy Lara vs. Paul Williams, Junior Middleweights. (N) (In
I 302 201 302 30 2 2 bles a team to rob a casino vault. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Douglas, Shia LaBeouf, Josh Brolin. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Stereo Live) a
HGTV 23 57 23 23 42 52 My Favorite House Hunters Curb/Block |Candice Tells HGTV'd'G' |Secrets, Stylist Room Crashers Color Splash'G' House Hunters |House Hunters Hunterslnt'l Hunters Int'l
fiSTI 51 25 51 51 32 42 To Be Announced Modern Marvels'PG' c Apocalypse Island Island clue in Mayan predictions.'PG' c Seven Signs of the Apocalypse Prophecy of Armageddon.'PG' c
LIFE 24 38 24 24 31 "The Other Woman" ** "Mini's First Time" (2006, Comedy-Drama) Alec Baldwin.'R' *h, "Fool's Gold"(2008, Action) Matthew McConaughey Premiere.'PG-13' |The Protector
LMN 50 "Selling Innocence" (2005, Drama) Mimi Rogers, Sarah Lind. A man * "New Best Friend" (2002, Suspense) Mia Kirshner. A college student "Fatal Lessons: The Good Teacher" (2004, Drama) Erika Eleniak, Lori
( l50 exploits a young woman on the Internet. a leads a classmate down the road to ruin. 'R' sAnn Triolo. Mysterious events trouble a paranoid woman.'NR' s
**Y "Waterworld"(1995, Science Fiction) Kevin Costner, Dennis Hopper. ** "Happ Gilmore" (1996 Adam Sandler. A powerful swing convinces **, "Machete" (2010, Action) Danny Trejo. The victim Femme Fatales
J 320 221 320 320 3 3 A loner navigates a future world. (In Stereo)'PG-13' a hockey player he can join the PGA tour.'PG-13' a of a double-cross seeks revenge.'R' 'MA'
(SNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary
(MTV1 97 66 97 97 39 True Life (In Stereo) True Life (In Stereo) Teen Mom (In Stereo) 'PG' c The Challenge: Rivals'14' Teen Wolf (In Stereo)'PG' Silent Library Silent Library
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(IHCKI 28 36 28 28 35 25 Victorious'G' Victorious'G' iCarly'G' |iCarly'G' c "A Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy Turner!" (2011) Drake Bell. My Wife-Kids MyWife-Kids George Lopez George Lopez
(l44 To Be Announced To Be Announced ** "The Wedding Planner" (2001, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Lopez.'PG-13' cc** "The Wedding Planner" (2001) Jennifer Lopez.
A Shameless ** "Adventures of Power" (2008, Adventure) Ari ** "Knowing" (2009) Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne. iTV. A note found in a Boxing (iTV) (N) (Live) 'PG' s
S I 340 241 340 340 Summer Special Gold, Michael McKean, Jane Lynch. iTV 'PG-13' time capsule predicts disastrous events. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' s
(SPEEDI 122 112 122 122 RaceDay Lucas Oil Off Road Racing On the Edge (N) Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Barrett-Jackson Special Edition AMA Pro Racing Mid-Ohio. AMA Pro Racing Mid-Ohio.
(PIKEI 37 43 37 37 27 36 ** "The Punisher"(2004) Thomas Jane.'NR' ** "Alien vs. Predator"(2004) Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova.'PG-13' ** "Alien vs. Predator"(2004) Sanaa Lathan. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Planet Terror
SU 36 31 36 36 Insidethe Rays Rays Live! MLB Baseball'PG' Rays Live! Insidethe Rays Fight Sports MMA
(SYFY 31 59 31 31 26 29 ***Y "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade"(1989, Adventure) Harrison Ford.'PG-13' **Y "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008) Harrison Ford. Premiere.'PG-13'
(TSJ 49 23 49 49 16 19 Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' King of Queens |King of Queens Meet, Browns |Meet, Browns ** "Diary of a Mad Black Woman" (2005, Comedy-Drama) Kimberly Elise.'PG-13' Family Preys
**** "Red River" 1948, Western) John Wayne, Walter Brennan. A *** "Fail-Safe"(1964, Suspense) Henry Fonda, Walter Matthau. U.S. ** "The Bedford Incident" (1965, Adventure) Richard Widmark. World
S 169 53 169 169 30 35 cattle baron and his foster son argue on the Chisholm Trail.'NR' president cannot stop SAC plane cued to bomb Moscow'NR' peace is jeopardized when a foreign sub is sighted.'NR'
T 53 34 53 53 24 26 Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers Dino Gangs (N)'PG, V' MythBusters"Paper Armor"'PG' MythBusters (In Stereo) PG' MythBusters"Paper Armor"'PG'
T 50 46 50 50 29 30 Untold Stories of the E.R.'14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'14' Dateline: Real Life Mysteries'14'
T 48 33 48 48 31 34 Da Vinci Code Countdown to Green (N) c |NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Quaker State 400. From Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky (N) (Live) c *** "Twister"(1996) 'PG-13'
TRA 9 54 9 9 44 Most Terrifying-America 5 Most Terrifying Places Ghost Adventures'PG' c Ghost Adventures'PG' c Ghost Adventures'PG' c Ghost Adventures'14' c
ru25 55 25 25 98 98 Most Shocking'14' World's Dumbest...'14' Top 20 Most Shocking'14' World's Dumbest...'14' World's Dumbest...'14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
V 32 49 32 32 34 24 Sanford & Son Sanford& Son Sanford & Son AIl in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond ILove-Raymond Love-Raymond |Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond
) 47 32 47 47 17 18 ** "The Break-Up" (2006, Romance-Comedy) Vince Vaughn. 'PG-13' *Elh "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry" (2007) Adam Sandler.'PG-13' c In Plain Sight'PG' c
(WE 117 69 117 117 Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Staten Island Cakes'PG' I Staten Island Cakes'PG' I Staten Island Cakes'PG'E Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls upcake Girls
(WN-A 18 18 18 18 1 20 Funny Videos Lead-Off Man MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh Pirates. From PNC Park in Pittsburgh. (N) (In Stereo Live) c WGN News at Nine (N) c Scrubs'14' How I Met


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Richard M. DeVos, the owner of
the Orlando Magic basketball team,
said, "Few things in the world are
more powerful than a positive
push. A smile. A word of optimism
and hope. A 'you can do it' when
things are tough."
This week's deals have been
tough - except for someone used
to working everything out at trick
one before playing from the
dummy Many players would go
down in today's deal, complain
about bad luck, and not even real-
ize that they had erred.
South is in four spades. West
leads the heart queen. What is the
right line of play?
North responded with a transfer
bid. South jumped to four spades to
show a maximum with at least four-
card spade support.


ACROSS
1 Driver's fill-up
4 Wild and reck-
less
8 Rubbish
12 Stein filler
13 End of a threat
14 Newsman-
Abel
15 Monroe-
17 Governess in
Siam
18 Fix a gash
19 La Scala site
21 Forbids
23 All ears
24 Less green
27 Striped ante-
lope
29 Source of iron
30 Ms. Dinesen
32 Hourglass filler
36 Burrito alterna-
tive
38 Country addrs.
40 British inc.
41 Crusty cheese
43 Wood strips


45 Devious
47 Bead
49 Farewell
51 Vote against
55 Just for guys
56 Not certain
58 Feel sympathy
for
59 Norse god
60 Baby fox
61 Electrical units
62 Chinese ware-
house
63 Workout locale
DOWN
1 Roams around
2 Noted diamond
surname
3 Splinter group
4 Italian auto
5 UFO pilot
6 FICA number
7 Crawl with
8 Possessive
9 Radius neigh-
bors
10 Dingbat


Bridge

North 07-09-11
* 10 9 7 3 2
'54
4 7 4 2
* K 6 3
*742
*K63
West East
*QJ4 4-
V QJ 8 7 V 10 9 6 2
SA 5 3 QJ 10 9 8
S954 -QJ 10 8
South
*AK865
YAK3
+ K6
4 A 7 2
4A72
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
2 NT Pass 3 V Pass
4 A Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V Q


ATTN F OTIGEAR
Z NGERE INCH
AIR NEEE
HORNS HURRAH
EMIT CA DS VAT
PAC MILE MERV
oIT A EIBIUC


BAG UTTE TOOT
AMOSISAP ETNA
MESHIET SIDES


11 Large green par-
rot
16 Skimpy top
20 Not Dem. or
Rep.
22 Glided along


24 Spoil
25 401(k) cousin
26 Delt neighbor
28 Hula accom-
paniment
31 Mr. in Bombay
33 Elev.
34 Utmost
35 Tooth pro's
deg.
37 Does a favor
for
39 Not level
42 Deli bread
44 Client mtg.
45 Weather alert
46 Pocatello's
state
48 Gymnast's
stickum
50 Yikes! (hyph.)
52 Acorn drop-
pers
53 Beauty parlor
sound
54 Jazzy - James
55 Neill or Walton
57 Tokyo, once


7-9 @ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


There seem to be at most three
losers: two diamonds and one club.
But if South takes the first trick, he
should go down with this layout.
The key is to allow West to win
trick one, trading a club loser for a
heart loser and keeping East off
play so that he cannot lead the dia-
mond queen.
Suppose West continues hearts.
Declarer wins with his ace, draws
two rounds of trumps, cashes the
heart king (discarding a club from
the board), takes dummy's club
king and his club ace, ruffs his last
club on the board, and leads a
trump to West What can he do?
West is endplayed, forced either
to lead away from the diamond ace
or to concede a ruff-and-sluff (de-
clarer trumps in the dummy and
discards a diamond from his hand).
If you found the right play, smile
unashamedly


Dear Annie: I have been
married to my husband
for 20 years, and we have
two children in their teens. Over
the years, my husband
has purchased rental
property that will
hopefully turn out to
be a good investment.
Along with maintain-
ing those properties
and his full-time job,
he also participates in
sports and plays in a
band. This leaves me
home with the kids
four nights a week and
sometimes weekends. ANN
I also work full time MAIL
and come home to
laundry, supper and
whatever needs to be done
around the house and with the
kids. By the time I'm done, it's
9:30 and my husband is still not
home. It gets really lonely here. I
tried having my own after-hours
activities, but when I'd return,
there would still be dishes to
wash, laundry to do and things to
pick up. It was exhausting.
I feel like a single mother. It's
not as if his activities involve the
kids. He spends little time with
them. If I say anything or try to
derail his plans with some family
time, I am the bad guy, especially
if he believes I'm only doing it to
force him to spend time with his
children. It's frustrating, and I'm
not sure how to rectify the situa-
tion.
He's a great, hardworking guy,
but the kids are going to be grown


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. @

AHRBO


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. .
All Rights Reserved.
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and gone by the time he realizes
what he's missed. - Just Want
Some Family Time
Dear Family Time: While your
husband should cer-
tainly be spending
more time with his
family, you cannot
force him to appreci-
ate what he has at
home. He's too busy
running away from it.
Instead, concentrate
S on yourself. Your chil-
dren are old enough to
help with cooking,
cleaning and laundry,
IE'S and these are skills
BOX they should learn. Pick
an evening to do some-
thing you enjoy, and
tell your kids they are responsi-
ble for the household chores that
night Hire a sitter if you feel they
are not old enough to stay home
alone. And if the house isn't per-
fect, so what? You have been car-
rying a big load for a long time.
You deserve to decompress, too.
Dear Annie: My son fell out of
my life several years ago. I do not
know why, nor do I know where
he is. We used to talk every cou-
ple of weeks for years, but then I
didn't hear from him, and his
phone was disconnected.
When my mail was returned
unopened, I was so worried that I
had the police there check on
him.
I then got a call from my son
letting me know that when he
had something to say to me, he
would phone. The next year, I re-


ceived a Mother's Day card say-
ing he loved me and wished me
the best. That was several years
ago, and I have not heard from
him since. He was a wonderful
son until he vanished from my
life.
I have since remarried, but I
refuse to move because this is the
only place my son knows to con-
tact me. I am now 65 and have re-
signed myself to never seeing
him again.
Please, if you are estranged
from your parents, check in occa-
sionally You do not have to di-
vulge your whereabouts. Just a
postcard to say you are OK would
be enough. I will love my son for-
ever. I hope he knows that. - A
Lonely Mom
Dear Mom: Your letter broke
our hearts. We hope your son will
contact you soon. And for all
other distant and estranged chil-
dren out there - please send
word that you are OK. Your par-
ents love you and worry about
you.
Dear Annie: I read with inter-
est the letter from "Dismayed in
the Boston Area," whose daugh-
ter has been subjected to anti-Se-
mitic remarks at the company
where she works. Please tell this
young woman to contact the
Simon Wiesenthal Center/Mu-
seum of Tolerance. We have a di-
versity-training program as part
of our "Tools for Tolerance" and
can offer her some advice. -A.
Fox
Dear A. Fox: Thank you for
your assistance and suggestions.


(Answers Monday)


Answer to Previous Puzzle Husband too busy for family
ITIRIAIP Husband too busy for familyOEWA
IVI I SjEmF0 EmAL OIEI


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C7


1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


I'LL NEVER FORGET THE
EXPRESSION ON THE OTHER
ATTORNEY'S FACE...


Pickles


Sally Forth

WELL, IF T ISN'T FAYE. FAYE-STER. NOTHING. JUST WONDERING. NONA, TOO?! YOU OKAY?"
THE FAYER. NO BGGIE. BUT Dib YOU HOW DEEP DOES IS THIS WHAT
WHAT IS WRONG MEET SOME KID NAMED JON? THIS THING GO?! HAPPENS WHEN
WITH YOU? I ID YOU'RE OUT IN
NONA AND I bD W.THESUN TOO
,~. WHEN YOU WENT LON
. \ , \ FISHING. L


Dilbert


I'M SAVING THIS
COOKIE FOR LATER





0-For Better or For Worse



For Better or For Worse


BELIVE l- (C
AFTER ALLT-HE
HORROR SORiE .4
SHE-TELLS ME l
RBoUr-TED- -
out ciri iC ^
HIM 1





Beetle Bailey -


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
y-l FISHING DOESN'T) VEAH, VEAH, YEAH...)
SEEM QUITE THE H
SAME SINCE THEY . . H t
_STARTED FREE --- - _-
WI-FI HERE AT - - Be
STHE LAKE .- . ....

JnIf the M aT m C




Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Dit by King Features Synd
www familycircus corn
"It sure is easy to feed Sam since he
seems to like dog food so much."


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"The Zookeeper" (PG) 12:45 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45
p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Horrible Bosses" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In Real
3D. 12:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 7:20 p.m., 10:40
p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In Real 3D. 4 p.m., 9:35 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Zookeeper" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:40 p.m.


"Horrible Bosses" (R) 12:30 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:10
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 12:50 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:55
p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 2:35 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 4:15 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) 12:20
p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 12:40 p.m., 2:55
p.m., 5:15 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In Real
3D. 12:45 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,
10:20 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes.
"Cars 2" (G) In Real 3D. 1 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 2:30
p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


'THs1 Is5 TE O5ST PART..WHEN oNU WITRTE
BALL IN THE WOOPS,AN' WE GTO HUNT FOR IT


Doonesbury


600P MORMNG,IN
L34Y 6(RL!
5HH, PA PPY! 4
UNCLE RAYs
srIu. ASLEEp!







Big Nate

A JUNIOR LIFESAVER
NEEPD TO BE ABLE
TO TREAD WATER FOR
EXTENDED PERIODS OF
TIME' 50 STAY IN
THE POOL UNTIL I
TELL YOU TO COME OUT'

SAWwni


r an COLD!

Arlo and Janis -


NO COMPLAINING!
I DON'T WANT To
HEAR A PEEP OUT
OF 'OU UNLESS IT'S
AN EMERGENCY!
GOT IT?









HEY,'LOG&TIAME,
4OVW'60L'A2LO2


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Betty

SEE NOO S OU'RE RIGHT,
A$Vor YOU WEARING NOBODY GAVE
ANKLE SOCKS THEIM A SECOND
GLANCE


ANO I SAWJ
A BUNCH OF
SOtER GUYS
WI \ARING
THEM TOO



cj �


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public LocalRADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals B



"S WPJZ TYJJ JSULE AZG DZSEN TYJJY-


GIJD SGV KSAYZGAJD


CLE DLP, CLE AFZ


KEYHYJZIZ LC OYXOYGI DLP LGXZ." -


TYJJYSW CSPJOGZE

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We protect aspirin bottles in this country better than we pro-
tect guns from accidents by children." - Gloria Estefan
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-9


Ir s GRMEF PLRfING -lI
HRTE. GBME PLf- ING
I F HERE ONE THING-
t WONT DT- ITS PLRy



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Today's MOVIES


C8 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NOTES
Continued from Page C4


months will be available by
background screened children's
workers. Call (352) 489-1688 or
(352) 746-1500. The church is
at the corner of N. Elkcam Blvd.
and N. Citrus Springs Blvd. in
Citrus Springs.
* First Christian Church of
Inverness continues its special
two-part PowerPoint presen-
tation during the morning wor-
ship services at 10:15 a.m.
Sunday. The presentation is by
Mark and Elsa Huntly, titled "In-
telligent Design of the Uni-
verse." The Huntlys have spent
the last 23 years as missionar-
ies in Chile. They graduated
from Great Lakes Bible College
in 1960. They go to Chile in De-
cember and return to Leesburg
in May. Call FCCI at (352) 344-
1908 for more information.
* Join Pastor Al Hopkins for
the "2011 Summer Revival" at
7:30 nightly Tuesday through
Friday at Kingdom Empower-
ment Church, 557 N.E. 2nd
Ave., Crystal River.
* Heritage Baptist Church
will have a community com-
memoration of 9/11 to honor


RELIGION


the military and emergency re-
spondents of our community. A
community choir is being as-
sembled. Everyone is invited to
participate in the patriotic can-
tata. Community choir practice
begins at 7 p.m. Thursday at
the church.
* "The FresHope Place"
Women's Ministry Center will
host a "Creative Couponing
Class" from 7 to 9 p.m.
Friday at Inverness Family
Restaurant and Bakery, 727
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Come
join us. Bring your Sunday
newspapers and any other
coupons you may have and we
will show you how clipping
those coupons can help you
get the most for your money.
Space is limited, so registration
is required. For information or
to register, call "The FresHope
Place" at: (352) 637-0544.
* Third Saturday supper
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, July
16, in the Dewain Farris fellow-
ship hall at Community Congre-
gational Christian Church, 9220
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes beef
stroganoff with noodles, salad,
rolls, granny cake and cof-
fee. Cost is $10 for adults and
$5 for children.
* Habitat for Humanity of


Citrus County invites people
interested in becoming Habitat
partner families in 2011-12 to a
mandatory orientation from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday, July 30,
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church, 4221 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto. Attendance
is required to enter the Habitat
program and apply for a Habitat
home. Potential applicants will
receive a full explanation of the
program, timeline, income and
service requirements, and other
information. Children cannot be
accommodated at this meeting.
Call the Habitat office at (352)
563-2744. Habitat for Humanity
is a nonprofit, ecumenical
Christian housing ministry
seeking to eliminate poverty
housing and to make decent
shelter a matter of conscience
and action.
* Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church "Brothers In
Christ Annual Fundraising
Cruise" on the Norwegian Star
on Jan. 15-22, 2012, sailing
roundtrip from Tampa. Ports of
call include Roatan, Belize,
Costa Maya and Cozumel. For
rate information, call Accent
Travel at (352) 726-6623 or
email Kathy@accenttravel
group.com.
* Feb. 25, 2012 fundraiser


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C9


cruise to benefit SOS (Serving
Our Savior) Interfaith Food
Bank. Travel from Tampa on a
five-night cruise on the Carnival
Paradise to Cozumel and
Grand Cayman. Enjoy a
Caribbean cruise while support-
ing a local food pantry. Cost in-
cludes cruise, port charges, all
taxes and fees, donation to
SOS, round-trip bus to Tampa
from Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando, round-trip
bus driver tips and one-
way porter tips. Deposit is due
on June 20. For deposit and
cabin price quotes or other in-
formation, contact Lenore Deck
at cruiselady@tampabay.rr.com
or call (352) 270-8658.

Just for kids
* Little Friends Learning
Center, a ministry of the Inver-
ness Church of God, is en-
rolling children for this fall for
K3/K4. Little Friends Learning
Center is at 416 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Call (352) 344-5487.
* Free voluntary pre-
kindergarten (VPK) classes at
Crystal River United Methodist
Church's Bright Beginnings pre-
school will begin Monday, Aug.
8, in the church educational
building, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
The state-funded program is for


children who will turn 4 by Sept.
1. Classes are from 9 a.m. to
noon Monday through Friday. In
addition to following the Early
Literacy Learning Module and
Handwriting Without Tears pro-
grams used by most Citrus
County's public schools' VPK
classes, the school has a
hands-on Bible curriculum.
Bright Beginnings has been
one of the top five preschools in
Citrus County for the past four
years. All lead teachers at the
school have a college degree in
the field of education and all as-
sistant teachers and subs have
completed 45 hours of state-
mandated training. A before-
and after-school educational
program is also available for
children whose parents want
more school experience. Call
(352) 795-1240.
* Footsteps Preschool
Summer Camp for ages 5 to
12 is from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, at the
First United Methodist Church
of Inverness, 3896 S Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness. No
registration fee. Cost is $100 a
week. Field trips and activities
daily. Breakfast, lunch and an
afternoon snack are provided
daily. Call (352) 344-4331.
* Children of First Presbyte-


rian Church of Crystal River are
hunting for secret treasure as
they become Treasure Seekers
Sunday mornings as part of the
expanding GROW Children's
Ministry. Children ages 3 to 12
years (pre-K through fifth
grade) depart from the Wiggle
Room at 9 a.m. and depart on
a journey to the Holy Land as
they visit the places where
Jesus walked. The Wiggle
Room is near the front entrance
to the sanctuary. Nursery avail-
able for children ages birth
through 3 years in the same
room. Sunday morning sched-
ule: 9 a.m. - Children meet for
games, activities, snacks and
crafts; 10 a.m. - Children join
adults for song portion of wor-
ship service; 10:30 a.m. -
Children exit to Wiggle Room
for age-appropriate Bible les-
son. Call Kelly Lapp at (352)
795-2259. The church is at
1501 S.E. U.S. 19, north of
Sweetbay.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church's youth group meets
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday.
All youths ages 10 through 18
are welcome to join the youth-
administered, adult-supervised
involvement program to make a
difference in their communities.
Call (352) 216-2342.


CITRUS -COUNTY




CH ONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

W54 *�. �&


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily....................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday.................................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday...................................4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday.................................4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............... 1 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday...................... PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday....................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Elderly Christian lady
needs 3 Pinochle
partners Call
(352) 560-4202





I








How
To Make
Your
Dining
Room
Set
Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!

MI-

(352) 563-5966


www.chroncleonlne.com
www.chronideonline.com �


White Widowed
Christian Female,
In search of Single
White Christian Male
For Friendship,
walking talking,
going places,
I'm a Non smoker,
non drinker, retired
nurse. Tired of cook-
ing for one. Dream
catcher, you know
who you are, with
a wee bit of
Irish Blarney
Call (352) 419-5757



4 Pc. Leather Living
Room Set $400. Glass
table w/4 chairs $150.
2 end tables $50, cof-
fee table $50, Bakers
Rack $50, desk & chair
$75.(352) 746-2438
10 X 16 USED SHED
LARK, ACCUSTEEL
(352)860-0111
(352) 422-4065
20' PONTOON
75HP, trailer, custom-
ized, lots of extras, best
buy for the money!
$7,000. (352) 201-2656

-i(IQNII ,
BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday 9a-1 p
Lots of everything!
26 New Florida Aveune


CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 9th, 7am-12N
Baby& Todler, Furn.
ed. materials .Hshold.
485 W Massachusetts St


CADILLAC DEVILLE
'04, New Michelins Ultra
chrome pkg., carriage
top, gar. kept sr. own
33K $13,750. 634-3806

MOV 1_NG4
SALE
CITRUS SPRINGS
Saturday 9th
Lrg Oak Entertainment
Cntr./Antiques/Tools
2844 W. Santana Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528
LINCOLN
'95, Town Car, less than
150K mi., 2 nd owner,
$2,495.
(352) 634-4603
MERCEDES BENZ
2006, C280, Luxury, 28K
Pristine Cond. White w/
tan int. sr. owned
$21,500 obo. 634-3806
Metal Frame Pool
18' x 4', with Hayward
filters and pump, all ac-
cessories included,
$700 OBO.
(352) 489-2823
Refrigerated Sandwich
Board for Restaurant
w/ extra Pans
$250.
(352) 794-6410
Troy Bilt Roto Tiller -
Rear Tines w/ 2/2 yr.
warranty, used 2 times,
cost $750
Asking $375. Firm
(352) 794-6410
Washer & Dryer
Whirlpool
$200. Set
(352) 628-4766
No calls before 12N


2/1 and 1/1, no pets.
(352) 637-1142



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not �
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
CALL 352-476-8949



5 BLACK KITTENS
Up for adoptions,
Willing to pay for shots
(352) 527-3471
FREE Gerbles w/cage
Babies & Adults
1006 Princeton Lane
Inverness, 419-6320
FREE HAIR CUTS &
COLOR Call for details
(352) 637-2887
FREE HORSE MANURE
Great fertilizer/mulch.
Stored in trash cans -
easy to load onto your
truck or container Pine
Ridge (352) 270-7127
Ive mess if no answer
Free Kittens
(2)7 wk old females. In-
door raised, flea free,
dewormed, litter trained.
1 grey & white striped,
Other is brn, beige &
white striped. Very unique
colorings. Very loving.
To good homes only. Call
352-302-2004
FREE KITTENS
Multi- Colors
(352) 270-4774
Free Oak Firewood
5483 E. Arthur St
Inverness
I will have free kittens in
about 2 months. I have
one female cat for free.
She is black and white
and very friendly. All
free to a good home.
The black and white is
ready now.
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS
2 FEMALES LEFT
AT OUR
DOOR STEP, PLAYFUL
(352) 795-8800
KITTENS
2 litters, 6 weeks old
all colors, long & short
hair, huge selection
(352) 563-1454
KITTENS
8 & 10 weeks old
very cute
(352) 341-2219
Lost Black Mini Poodle
Crystal River behind
Key Traning Center
(352) 795-2565
(352) 257-8341
MACAW
Shamrock, looking for
a loving and
permanent home.
(352) 585-2323
Roll Top desk
dark wood good cond
it is a good size desk
oversized stuff chair
w/hassock fair cond
would like them to go
together if poss.
(352) 422-7274
352-422-5818


3 y.o female, spayed &
declawed, very sweet
(352) 613-5023



FARM RAISED
TAPALIA
(352)812-8020
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
Pesticide Free! $2.50/lb.
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm.
OPEN TUES. thru. Sun.


I pair or prescripTion
male eye glasses,
amber color frames,
Thursday, around Citrus
or Highland Plaza
(352) 746-3434
English Pointer
501b solid white,
Lost in
Country Side Estates
* REWARD*
(352) 634-2091
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
3 y.o. female last seen
7/4/11 fireworks scared
her off Stage Coach
Rd. 352-584-2927
Toy Boston Terrier
male, Lost near
Hwy 44 and Haggerty
Pt. Crystal River
(352) 220-6371
TOY POODLE
male, brown curly hair
last seen 7/3/11
Rosevelt & Harrison
Beverly Hills
Kids miss him.
(352) 601-8141



Med. Size
Black & White Dog
w/ 6 chain & collar
Crystal Manor
(352) 563-0756
Shamrock Macaw
Description & Details
Necessary
(352) 544-0093
(352) 592-5959
SMALL JACK RUSSELL
TERRIER MIX, must ID
Grover Cleveland area
Sat 7/2/11
352-287-2027









Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aevourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


A CNA PREP &
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
X-Ray Prep.
352-382-EASY (3279)

CNA/HHA's
Urgent Need Call or
Apply In Person
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
581 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy Lecanto 34461
(352) 637-3111
F/T P/T
AR/Patients
Collections
Busy Medical Clinic.
Fax: Resume
352-746-2236

NOW HIRING

RN'S
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828



Busy Insurance
Office
Looking for an
Experienced Agent
with active 220 lie.
Salary commiserates
w/experience.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd Blind Box 1721 p
Crystal River, Florida
34429



ALL POSITIONS
Experienced Only
Need Apply
PEPPERMINT PATTY'S
48 Hwy 19S. Inglis
Drug Free Work Place


CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
SALES
The Citrus County
Chronicle
Is seeking an
energetic Individual
to consult businesses
on the use of
classified advertising.
If you have the desire
to work In a fast
paced, fun,
environment please
apply today.
Essential Functions
* Develop classified
customers through
cold calling and
prospecting
* Strong rapport
bulldlng,professlonal
communication
and good listening
skills
* Develop new
opportunities for
customers to do
business with
Citrus Publishing
* Data entry of Legal
advertising
Quallflcatlons
* High School
diploma or
equivalent
* Prior telemarketing
experience a plus
Send resume to:
Citrus County
Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd.,
Crystal River, F1 34429
Fax: (352) 563-5665
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant


CDL DRIVER
Accepting applica-
tions for experienced
Class A driver. Full
Time employment
with benefit
package. Must
comply with
Background Testing.
Apply in person at:
Pave-Rite, Inc.
3411 W. Crigger Ct.
Lecanto, M-F, 7a - 5p.
DFWP, EOE











Choice


MECHANIC
Experienced,
5 yrs min active exp.
Tools a Plus.
ADDpp In Person:
WALLY'S
806 NE US19 Cry Riv.








Roofing Crews
Experienced Only
Also REPAIR MAN
POSITION
Must have tools &
Transportation Top
pay & plenty of work.
Curry's Roofing
Call 352-795-4444


The Time!


2 9 185 5 83 L7 6 4
63 lE4572-J 189
8719 4 6 253
3 6 9 72 4 8 115
7 5 2 8 9 1-4 3 6
75 19172
1 8b653972
98 3 267t 541 1
1 2 435 9 83
5 '4'6 1 8 93 2 7


0008L6F
Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

29 8

6 5 1

8 4

97 5

2 4

4 39

6 1

7 5 8

_ 1 27
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9-


BUYERSW-ITH.RMES
LV* Vl IIIkb


Trades







C10 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


g/


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.


en on consumers.
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


#1 Employment source is











www.chronicleonline.com







km -' _-----








Owner/Manager Name:
Thomas Zuppa Sr.

Business Name:
A Plus Home and Business Technologies, LLC

How long has the business been in operation
in the Citrus County area?
4 Years (Before that, we operated this company for
11 years in New Jersey)

Describe the service/product you offer?
Sales, service and installation of alarms, TV's,
sound systems, CCTV, intercom, central VAC,
phone, data access control and most low voltage
applications.

What do your customers like best about your
business?
The personal touch that I give to each and every
customer along with professional work and fast
service.

What is something your business offers that
people don't expect?
Great pricing and reliable equipment. We clean up
to where they do not know we were there except for
the enjoyment of their new products.

Why did you choose this business?
I have always enjoyed the high tech world that we
live in, so I went to college and received a degree
in electronics and the rest is history.

What are your business hours, address, phone
number and e-mail?
Business hours are normally 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
But we are always there to answer our customers
questions wheneverthey call.
Located at: RPO. Box 122
Lecanto, FL 34460
352-746-3777
Email: ztuppa@aol.com


Affordable Handvman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out -Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

v' THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
CAREY'S TREE SERVICE
Complete Tree Care
and MORE!
352-364-1309, lic./Ins
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825
TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic /insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696




A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705

BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop *Cordless
Phone. Cell Phone
SU.P.S and Rebuild
� Camera- Watch
� Hearing - Power Tool
� Wheel Chair - Alarm
SPower Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness

Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc . Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP painting/press.clean
Many, many refs. 18 yrs
in Inverness 637-3765








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998

Custom Painting Int/Ext
Trim/Molding Expert
(352) 302-8348




Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273




Affordable Handyman
V FAST
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out *Free Est
*100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services

* All Home
. Repairs
. Small Carpentry
* Fencing
* Screening

* i Affordoble & Dependable
Experience lifelong
S 352- 344-0905
cell: 400-1722


The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs .352 613-2518




Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Disabeled
Any Hrs., Exc. Ref's
352-341-0404
Cell 850-242-9343







SENIORS CHOICE
352-628-0719
Care In Your
Home,House Cleaning



NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311



ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!

Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0008PC0


Loek


Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 352-201-7451




1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
F AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate -Free Est
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
Affordable Handyman
V FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out *Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out *Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137
All Phase Handyman
all phases of home
improvement & repair
I beat any price
(352) 634-0019






L & J SERVICES INC.
Custom Painting Int/Ext
Trim/Molding Expert
(352) 302-8348
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292


Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/this ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC 1428395
(352) 201-8237




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up,
hauling352 220-6761




A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *




Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc 132549 302-9269


Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755



All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
L ,, - , ,.' H . .,
- i,, I--' ,, ,- ) . I_ : W -:
352-795-5755
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522


*sOOLS/


Installations by Brian -cisssa




Peimit And;
EngineeiIng:
F e Roofovers Carports
u p to Screen Rooms Decks
$200 value,' -Windows-Doors Additions

352-625-7519
S wwwAdvancedaluminumofcitrus.com


. . 9J d, -dj I ;J 9 ,2:LJL





BACKYARD... Dr.iUeJ s
Order "our Pool Today Brick Pavers


* Lic. & Insured
-C- - 56565


352-400-3188
J_ u', .- .J?. J .J ,_ i
... . .. . i - _E 3-[,por_. -




VACAION N "


TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374



A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do It AllI
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal,cleanup,haul.
(352) 726-9570
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190
CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522



SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions.corn
Free Est 352-503-7464



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*Free Call Out .Free Est
* 100% Guarantee
-Low Flat Rate
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
ACHP, ID: #201100137
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


Promote your


business for just:


$250 for 30 days


brIL


ne 55.0 c ~~I T In u S.� c0uNTY




chronicleonline.com

FOR MORE INFO CALL FINETTE 352- 564-2940


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Key Training
Center

has F/T and P/T
positions available in
group home setting.
Assist Developmen-
tally Disabled adults
with daily living skills.
HS Diploma/GED
required.
Apply in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 E.OE.O.EL


OFFICE
POSITION
Looking for the right
individual for main-
taining eBay and do-
ing some Photoshop
v7 design work - will
train. Great phone
skills, good typing
skills, must be organ-
ized. We will also train
you on our office pro-
grams including
FedEx shipping
online and Endicia
shipping. We are a
small company with 5
employees and have
been in business lo-
cally in Florida for
over 20 years.
Send email to:
yourjobchance@
yahoo.com


THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.





Part-time
Tow Truck Driver

Must live in the
Homosassa area.
Criminal Back
Ground Check and
vaild Florida Drivers
License required.
Dave's Body Shop.
Call: 628-4878





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
getvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
X-Ray Prep.
352-382-EASY (3279)





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
X-Ray Prep.
352-382-EASY (3279)

r------ q




BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy

* NOW ENROLLING*

COSMO - Nights
Sept 19th
***
BARBERING - Nlihts
Aug. 8,

MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th

FACIAL TECH -Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.

NAIL TECH - Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.

I (866) 724-2363
1486 Pinehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606

NE-I-W



2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT

TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105













HOMES LEFT
A Free $300. Home
Depot glft card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!


Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals

o Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park


1985 MAGIC MOVES
BARBIE, in original box-
box looks good but
shows a little wear - $25.
(352)-489-5245
BERENGER LOTS TO
LOVE DOLLS (2), Meas-
ure approximately 14" tall
- good condition, $10
each. (352)-489-5245
BOYD'S BEARS (18)
Orig Bxs, 5 Spcl Ed
1998-03, 13 W/Auth, 5
W/O. EXC Cond. $100
352-746-7355
GREAT ERAS
ELLIZABETHAN QUEEN
BARBIE, Mint in box -
box looks good - $20.
(352)-489-5245
JADE PICTURES, set of
wall pictures, one is 16",
and two are 12", asking
$100.00 352-897-4681
MASONIC HOLY BIBLE
RED LETTER EDITION,
1957 printing, by Hertel
good condition, $35.
(352)489-5245













Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VINTAGE COMIC BOOK
Dell #1195 "National Vel-
vet". Very Good
Condition. $50 OBO
727-463-4411



HOT TUB (5X7)
powerful spa,220V,
Cabinet: Cedar - oil
based stained, cover,
exc. cond, with original
warranty, all chemicals
incl. $2,800
(352)726-9066
SPA. Plysteel Seats 4
120 or 240V, 2HP,
2spd., pump motor,
excel. cond, $1,000
(352) 795-7520



CLOTHES STEAMER
tobi clothes, with all
attachments, new, still in
box, $100.00
352-897-4681
Electric Stove,
Frigidaire, professional
series, slide in glass top,
convection oven,
warming dr, pd. $1,200
Sell $600. 352-489-5086
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
REFRIGERATOR
16.5 cuft., Admiral, $50
352-621-0411
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
UPRIGHT FREEZER
11cuft, Kenmore.
No rust. Great shape.
$100 726-4480
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135
Washer & Dryer
Whirlpool
$200.Set
(352) 628-4766
No calls before 12N
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent cond. Can
deliver. 352-263-7398
Whirlpool, white, 33"
refrigerator/freezer,
side by side, Ice/water
in door 2 yrs, 9 mo.
exc. shape, $450 firm
(352) 344-0928
WHIRLPPOL DUET
wash/dry, dishwasher
over range micro wave
smooth top electric
range, Hot Pointe gar-
age Fridge. $1100
will sell separate
(352) 586-9614



BOOKCASE
Cherrywood, commercial,
Preowned, Lovely, Free
Standing, 40"x36", $100
727-463-4411
BOOKCASE
Commercial, PreOwned,
Adjustable Shelves,
85"x36", $85
727-463-4411
BOOKCASE
Commercial, PreOwned,
Cherrywood, Free Stand-
ing, 65"x32", $75
727-463-4411
CAFE OR CAFETERIA
TABLE, Commercial,
42", Formica Top,
Like New. $65
727-463-4411








YurWrld


mv l. /ir nlin





WW Ih[lirlljilir flIl' I (I


CHAIR, Preowned, Fabric
Covered, Adjustable, $55
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIR
PreOwned, Commercial,
Fabric Covered,
Adjustable, $45
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
2 Drawer, PreOwned,
Commercial, Metal, Lat-
eral, Graphite Color $45
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
Commercial, PreOwned,
Lateral, Metal, 3 Drawer,
Graphite Color, $65
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
PreOwned, Commercial,
Lateral, Gray, Metal, 4
Drawer, $75
727-463-4411
FORMICA TABLE, Gray,
Commercial Cafe Or Caf-
eteria, PreOwned, 37",
Square, $35
828-463-4411
FORMICA TOP BOOK-
CASE, 37"x30", Com-
mercial, PreOwned, Gray
and Black. $65
727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
Commercial, Metal
Frame, Gray Fabric, Pre
Owned. 2 for $25
727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
METAL FRAME, Com-
mercial, Pre-Owned,
Blue Fabric.
2 for $25. 727-463-4411



BENCH GRINDER
5&1/2" industrial rated,
3450 rpm. $35.
352-527-7840
Craftsman Band
Saw,decent condition,
$50. 352-613-3027
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL
SAW, Craftsman Radial
Arm Saw, 10inch, $90.
352-613-3027
MEASURING WHEEL
Professional, STANLEY,
w/long handle,4 digit.$35.
352-527-7840
POWER MITER SAW
Black and Decker, Power
Mitre Saw, in decent con-
dition, $40.00.
352-613-3027
RADIAL ARM SAW
Craftsman, w/numerous
blades, works great,
on stand. $50
527-1239



32" HDTV
flatscreen, tabletop
model, 8 months old,
$300 (352) 795-0018
35" Sony Trinitron
Color TV
screen size 26"
good sound,
$89. (352) 746-2929
DVD 5 DISC,
Panasonic, 1000 WATT
HOME THEATER SUR-
ROUND SOUND 1 YR
OLD, $100.00. 726-0686
ELEMENT 26" LCD TV
Beautiful picture. Asking
$100.00 firm. Call
352-650-0180
MEMOREX TV/DVD
PLAYER, 9". Perfect con-
dition, great for traveling.
Asking $50.00. Call
352-650-0180


-I -
CROWN MOLDING
*New*, Fancy Wide De-
sign, 25 Feet, $40, Can
e-mail pic. 352-382-3650



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
EPSON PRINTER INK
FOR SALE: R200 COM-
PATIBLE CARTRIDGES
6 COLORS WITH 7 PIN
CHIP RE-SETTER.
$25.00 Call
352-433-1800



CEMENT MIXER - 31/2
CF, 1/3 HP,15" DRUM
OPENING. LIKE NEW!
$300 352-563-1519



MODERN PVC PIPE
FURNITURE
48" round table,4
chairs-cushions $100.00
(352)637-5921
Patio Furniture
Metal, 7 pc. Rocker,
glass table 6 upholder
chairs w/ cushions
$150.(352) 746-2414



2 Dinette sets
off white 4 chairs &
table $125.
glass top w/ 4 chairs
$125.(352) 628-6143
2 Leather Executive
Type Desk Chairs,
2 Dining Side Chairs like
New cond.
$30 ea.
(352) 637-7248
4 Pc. Leather Living
Room Set $400. Glass
table w/4 chairs $150.
2 end tables $50, cof-
fee table $50, Bakers
Rack $50, desk & chair
$75.(352) 746-2438
BAMBOO TABLE, with
glass top, table is
36x20x16, table is in ex-
cellent shape, asking
$30.00 obo 352 897 4681
BECKLINE BIG MAN'S
RECLINER, brown, coil
springs, in excellent con-
dition, $100. Walter @
352-364-2583


Cherry wood
Coffee table, 2 end
tables, lamp table,
good cond. Matching
Set $275
(352) 228-1325
COFFEE AND END TA-
BLES SET, wood w/glass
inserts. Exc. cond.
$85.00 OBO
352-476-8613
CRYSTAL RIVER
INDOOR MINISTRY
SALE
GROWING & MOVED
OPEN at 999-Hwy 44 E
(Next to Race Trac)
Summer Hours
Fri. & Sat., 9am-3pm
"Caring & Sharing"
Volunteers &
Donations NEEDED
Call 352-563-1860
END TABLES (2)
Octagon, solid wood,
with glass inserts, $75
for set. (352) 726-9066


Entertainment Center
$150.
Small Roll Top Desk
$50.
(352) 489-3511
ENTERTAINMENT CEN-
TER, Oak, Lighted,
w/glass doors, three sec-
tions, nice condition. $85
527-1239
FLORIDA ROOM TABLE
W/EXTENSION, only
$40.00. 464-0316
GLASS TABLE
round, deco style base
with thick round glass,
removable top, $100.
352-613-3027
King 3 Pc Set,
new twin platforms,
4 yr. old sealy mattress,
$250
(352) 795-8906
KITCHEN TABLE
W/2 CHAIRS
Maple, Nice condition,
$50. 527-1239
OVAL CURIO CABINET
4 glass shelves,
w/internal light, Ex. Cond.
$325. obo 352-795-0841
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER
Flexsteele, extremely
clean-$75.00
352-257-5722
RECLINING SOFA AND
LOVESEAT, Lazboy,
clean. $250.00
352-257-5722
SLEEPER SOFA
Clean and color-
ful-$100.00
352-257-5722
SOFA
3 cushion, Blue & White
check w/Pink flowers,
$35.00 352-476-8613
Leave message
SOFA
Clean, used, floral
pattern-$75.00
352-257-5722
SOFA
Dark Blue, 84" Leather
Excellent Condition
$500
(352) 341-0366.
SOLD
Solid Oak Wood Dining
Room. Table,
6 chairs, 2 leaves,
$150 obo
SOLD!!
BOXSPRING & MATTRESS
Full size, with mattress
cover protector, new,
could not return. $100.
TABLE TOP LAMP, with
shade, tan, light tan
brown, excellent shape,
asking $25.00
352-897-4681
WHITE CHEST &
NIGHTSTAND,SINGLE
BED, w/matt & b/s
$60.00 all OBO
352-476-8613



CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Ready for you lawn, flow-
ers and garden! 201b. bag
$4.00 352-563-1519
CHIPPER/VACUUM
Combo for lawn self
propelled, exc cond
$400(352) 628-2777
CRAFTSMAN
YTS 3000,21 hp
46" deck, Hydro
used 4 times, like new
$1150
(352) 726-8273
GAS WEED EATER
Craftsman, Weedwacker,
32CC, Hastle Free III,
w/clutch. $50
352-382-1000
HONDA MOWER
rear wheel drive, runs
good $125 "Ron"
(352) 344-5021
LAWN TRACTOR - CUB
CADET LTX1040, 19hp,
42" deck, used 17hrs.
$1100. 352-249-7075
Riding Mower
18HP Cub Cadet, 1000,
42" cut, auto trans, oil
filter, $750. obo
(352) 637-9268
Sabre by John Deere
riding mower, 38" cut,
excellent cond.
$450
(352) 637-4718
Troy Bilt Roto Tiller -
Rear Tines w/ 2/2 yr.
warranty, used 2 times,
cost $750
Asking $375. Firm
(352) 794-6410






2 DAYS ONLY!!!
Under the Big Top, in
the open field -Across
from "Octane", next to
Midway Animal Hospi
tal. Guns, Collectibles,
Professional tools, Rid
ing lawn mower and
much much more!
Sat/Sun 9 & 10 July
7AM-5PM daily.



SALE

HOMOSASSA
Huge moving sale!
Thurs - Sun 8a-4p
6181 W. Wayward Wind
Loop (Off G. Cleveland)
BEVERLY HILLS /
PINE RIDGE
3071 W Brazilnut Road.
July 9, 8:00 -12:00. For
Sale: Bedroom furniture,
light fixtures, general
household items, and
clothing.




YARD SALE

BEVERLY

HILLS
Fi Sat 7a-?


dolls, baby items,
surround sound, etc
311 S. Barbour St



BEVERLY HILLS
Saturday 9a-1 p
Lots of everything!
26 New Florida Aveune



CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 9th, 7am-12N
Baby & Todler, Furn. ed
ucational Mat. hsehld
485 W Massachusetts St

YARDSALE

CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri. & Sat. 8a-12N
HUGE! Sale
Everything Must Go
6645 N. Waterman Dr.


CLASSIFIED





MO VIN G1
S A iL.E

CITRUS SPRINGS
Saturday 9th
Lrg Oak Entertainment
Cntr./Antiques/Tools
2844 W. Santana Drive



SALE

Crystal River
Fri Sat 7a-3p
indoor outdoor
RAIN OR SHINE
6961 W. Cyrus St

CRYSTAL RIVER
INDOOR MINISTRY
SALE
GROWING & MOVED
OPEN at 999-Hwy 44 E
(Next to Race Trac)
Summer Hours
Fri. & Sat., 9am-3pm
"Caring & Sharing"
Volunteers &
Donations NEEDED
Call 352-563-1860

HOMOSASSA
6844 W Hilger Ct Fri/Sat
8-12 Baby clothes etc


YARDSALE

HOMOSASSA
Fri. Sat. & Sun. 8a-2p
400 lb. Manitowak Ice
maker Sunquest Tann-
ing bed, Hshld & More
10464 W. New York St.




INVERNESS
Saturday 8a-4p
Furnclothes ,dishes ,etc.
3324 E. Crown Dr.
Off Croft Ave.


YARDSALE

KEEPIT SAFE
Fri. & Sat. 8-12 Furniture
5050 W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Crystal River


YARDSALE

LECANTO
Fri Sat 8-2p
Variety of Items!!
2052 W Shining Dawn
Lane

LECANTO
Gated Heather Ridge Es-
tate Sale Huge - ongoing
by appt 352-527-8159. 3
BR entire household +
clothing + collectibles. No
junk. 1000's items.
ron inmd@hotmail.com
PINE RIDGE -
BEVERLY HILLS
2867 WAleuts Dr.
Fri.-Sat. July 8-9. 9 am to
2 pm. Misc. items.


YARDSALE

PINE RIDGE
Fri Sat 8-2p
hsehld, ham radio,
scuba, home school
material, horse items
5074 Angus Dr








BRENT-

WOOD
Fri Sat Sun 8-4p
furn. appls, hsehld
garden tools
1840 WShanelle Path
Lecanto




LADIES CLOTHING
Some new, gently used,
12 items $5 each, 4 items
$10 each. Small & Med
8-10. 352-527-8159
MINK STOLE
VINTAGE 1950'S, Excel-
lent Condition. $75
OBO 352-746-7355




CALLER ID BLOCKER
this protects your
number from being
displayed on other
end. $25 (352) 637-1755




10 X 16 USED SHED
LARK, ACCUSTEEL
(352)860-0111
(352) 422-4065
Automatic Pool
Cleaner
Navigator by Haywood
w/ hoses, excel, cond.
$125. (352) 270-8475

BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop . Cordless
Phone- Cell Phone
. U.P.S and Rebuild
� Camera- Watch
� Hearing Power Tool
� Wheel Chair . Alarm
� Power Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness
Drink Venting Machine
6 chooses, cans or
bottles, very good
cond. money maker
$1500
(352) 628-5222
Golf Tires (4)
w/ Rims, like new
$140
352-270-8475
Large Aluminum Tool
Box for Pick Up
60" W x 42" L, x28" D
$700 obo
(352) 422-3544


LITTLE TYKES HUM-
MER, GOOD CONDI-
TION, NEEDS BATTERY
$45. 352-613-0529



FREE!
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.

- Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
- 1 item per ad
-Ad must contain price
- $3.25 per additional line

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 CIL


18' x 4', with Hayward
filters and pump, all ac-
cessories included,
$700 OBO.
(352) 489-2823
Music CDs, 125, in rotat-
ing storage case. Coun-
try, Big Band, Sinatra,
Dion, R&R, Classical &
more, $100. 746-4028
PLAYMATES DISNEY
TEA TIME BELLE DOLL,
15" tall, good condition,
original outfit - $8
(352)-489-5245
Refrigerated Sandwich
Board for Restaurant
w/ extra Pans
$250.
(352) 794-6410
SMOKERS, OUTDOOR
STATION (2), New,Self
Extinguishing,Sandless
Urn, 40"x16" $30 ea
727-463-4411



Acuvue Contact Lenses
+2.00,Dia 14.4 (6)
+5.00,Dia 14.4 (6)
$50.00 for all.
352-746-4028
Lift Chair & Wheelchair
lift chair-swing-away,
powered by key, slides
into hitch, both are like
new, Both for $750 OBO
352-228-7821
Power Wheel Chair Lift
by Cargo Mate
& class 2 Hitch
$600.
(352) 637-4640
WHEEL CHAIR
SMALLER, MANUAL
W/FOOTRESTS, For
small adult or child,
$95.00. 464-0316










BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"NEW" FULL
JUMBOSPRUCE TOP
FULL SOUND $90
352-601-6625
BANJO, BLUEGRASS 5
STRING OPENBACK
PLAYS & SOUNDS
GREAT $85
352-601-6625
BASS AMP, ACOUSTIC
B20 12" SPEAKER,
SOUNDS GREAT!
"ALMOST NEW" $100
352-601-6625
GUITAR
BLACK&WHITE STRAT
STYLE 3 PICKUPS,
W/STRAP&CORD $85
352-601-6625




Carpeting
13 x 16 carpet, Honey
Beige w/ quality thick
pad $200. firm (352)
419-4776 after 1la
CEILING FAN LIGHT
Brass, w/5 Designer
Glass Shades, Email pic,
$25, MUST SEE.
352-382-3650




Total Gym
$125.
(352) 746-2438
TREADMILL, HORIZON
T1200 2.75 CHP mo-
tor,20" x 55" two-ply
belt,4-zone variable cush-
ioning system,0 to12
mph,0-12 incline,13
programs,eTRAK Perfor-
mance Tracker technol-
ogy, iPod dock with con-
sole controls,375-lb user
capacity. $600.00
352-201-9409



3 Used Golf Cart Tires,
w/ rims & caps
$25.
(352) 628-9660
2011 New Superfast
White copy by PowerBilt.
RH 460cc GSX Uniflex
w/HC $99.obo Juliette
Falls. 465.8495
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
Callaway, Big Bertha War
Bird, 7 wood, $25.
352-527-8159
GUN SHOW
Ocala
National Guard Armory
July 16th Sat 9-5p July
17th Sun 9-4p
Concealed Weapons
Classes Daily, Bring
your GUNS to sell
or trade
auntraderaunshows
.corn 352-339-4780
KIDS BIKE
boys/17inches, girls/
19inches, needs tires,
$20 each. 352-465-1616
LEFTY GOLF CLUBS
Nike "Sasquatch" Sumo
Driver, 3 wood hybrid and
5 wood with Nike "Ignite"
irons 4 thru PW all with
head covers. Irons never
used $200.00 287-9163
RUGER MINI 14 RANCH
RIFLE, Ruger mini 14
Ranch Rifle, stainless, W/
Ammo, case and sling,
20 rd mag. 352-454-5906
TAURUS 9MM
satin nickel finish,
rose wood grips,
excellent condition,
$490.00.


382-1436 after 10am
SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto


BABY BOUNCER & TUB
boy, almost brand new,
battery operated+vibrator,
Both for $25,
352-465-1616

BABY STROLLER, with
hood, light green in color,
stroller is in excellent
shape, asking $30.00
obo 352-897-4681

BOUNCERS (2) 1-EDDIE
BAUER, very good cond,
Eddie Bauer $35.00 other
$25.00 OBO
352-476-8613 Iv mess

CRIB W/MATTRESS
Excellent cond. $65.00
obo 352-476-8613 no
ans Iv mess

MATCHING 3 PC. SET
STROLLER,CAR
SEAT,SWING, Pink and
Gray, VG cond. $100.00
352-476-8613 Lv.mess.



Sell r Swa


* w




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966













UTILITY TRAILER
affordable, enclosed
trailer for storage,
6' x10' or larger.
(352) 400-2066

WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369

WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492





TRAVEL TRAILER
$500.00 price drop every
month until sold, 2009
Sunnybrooke by Brooks-
ide, 303SLS travel trailer,
$18900. Had a stroke af-
ter purchasing new, not
used, can be seen at
11465 W Priest Ln
Homosassa FL lot #43
352-346-1416





1 MALTESE Male,
Snowball 10 wks old all
shots, health certs. &
CKC reg., $400
352-212-4504, 212-1258

CHIHUAHUA
Pure bred, female,
tan & white, 4 mo, all
shotspapers, w/ cage,
$250. 352-344-5283




English Bull Dog
Puppies I male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com

MINI DACHSHUNDS
AKC/CKC,$375, Vet
certs, Males &
Females,black/tans,
choc/tans, dapples. Long,
wire, & smooth hair. visit
www.sweetnlodoxies.com
or call 352-634-3841


Female Long Hair
bik & tan purebred,
very small $300
(352) 795-6870;
220-4792
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
M & F starts @ $350
Appoots avail 7 days a wk.
Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
SHIH-TZU
10 month old, spayed,
female, multi-colored,
one blue eye, most she
will ever weigh is 91bs.
$450 (352) 419-7335
WESTIES Pups
M&F, 5 wks taking dep.
$500. ready 7/29
Maltese-Schituz, 3 F's
&1 M, 5 wks old $400
after 12p 352-746-7802




2 Horse Bumper
Pull, new wiring,
floor excellent
shape $1000.
(352) 270-1444



ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will email
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271
,


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, fridge/stove, W/D,
incls. water & trash.
$700. 352-587-2555
DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo 1st & $200
Sec. 352-625-4339
Dunnellon Hwy 488
Clean 2/2, priv. lot,
fenc'd$475. mo. + dep
Hwy 488 (352) 795-6970
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO/INV.
2/1,Close, lease, no
pet $425+sec. 726-7319
HOMOSASSA
1/1, Ist/last/sec. $350.
mo. 352-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524








ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
, Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for jus $295. mo.

PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals
< Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park


HOMOSASSA
2/1.5, large fla room.
carport shed, $425.
352-503-6747 628-1928
HOMOSASSA
2BR, Slashpine Av. $425
/mo. Avail. Now, sec.
dep. ? 612-226-0091
HOMOSASSA
3 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
Very nice mobile home in
Homosassa. Please call
John at 352-503-5301 for
an appointment. $600.00
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
Call 352-476-4964






1991, 2/1 Mobile
Room Addition &
Carport $6,500 obo
Can be Moved
(352) 586-9615
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040
FOR SALE BY OWNER
w/financing. 2/1 SW
$1500 dn. $635 inlc T & I
Floral City, nice Ig treed
lot, just remodeled.
AVAIL (352) 793-7223
INVERENESS
Gospel Island, 2/2+
firm, carport, shed,
w/dryer, full furnished
very good cond. 55+
Comm. great park on
water, X-tra's ,$9K poss.
terms. 352-201-8720
INVERNESS
3 BR, 1-1/2BA In 55+
Park, Needs some work,
$4,000 cash and must
be approved. Call
352-476-4964
LECANTO

Lease Option w/$1 OK
down $54,900 Keystone
Arbor RIty 813 265-8833








ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
* Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals
w Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park

PALM HARBOR HOMES
Short Sale
Repo's/Used Homes
3 or 4 bdrm DWMH's
Won't Last!! $3,500 -
$40K 800-622-2832

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183
WANTED MOBILE HOME
I will pay cash for a
2000 or newer mobile
home. Looking for a 2/2
in excellent condition.
I will move.
(352) 621-9707


7-9 LaghingSock I nc Dist by Universal UcckforUFS,2011

"Be careful of those basement stairs."











JOHN GORDON ROOFING


V & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269


.9fn~i#C1359 - Home InsetoI2363







C12 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


i/THIS OUT!


Io2 S C, andlenut Aveo
Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 1170 sq ft living
space on 3/4 acre, de-
tached, oversized 2 car
garage/workshop,with at-
tic. 450 sq ft wrap around
porch. Quiet, friendly
neighborhood on a dead
end street. For sale only.
Call 352 564 2423 or
352 601 0534

A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204


HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW, fecnced /2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms, nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411

LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807




2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2, furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
Ist month lot rent
(352) 817-1987
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR, $350/up; 1BR, 1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR
1-ihBA, $450 includes lot
rent; Call 352-476-4964
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000


-I
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
2BR, turn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
util. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964


-I
Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River Apts
2 BED RM 1 BA $500.
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Laundry on site, no pets.
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Large, clean, quiet,
$575. mo. incid water,
HOMOSASSA
2/2, Clean Quiet, CHA,
Scrn. Por. $550 mo.
352-257-6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all util. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $500. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 w/scr porch $600


352-422-2393

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
I stMO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626


INVERNESS
2/1 Furn./Unfurn. $575.
Mo. No Pets. Fst.& Sec
(352) 212-4661




V THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.




CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF exc. loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528




HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own tfrom$199mo.
$1000 dn + lot rent,at
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Newly Renovated
$450 + 1st, sec., No
pets. (352) 563-5004
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, C/H/A $4501+ dp
(352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2 $500., 3/1 $550. mo
352-382-1344/423-0739




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
Lecanto
3 room eff. $300/mo+
elect or $85 wkly, no
sec. (352) 746-3073




Crystal River/B. H.
Rental Homes 1, 2 & 3
Bedrms 352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 2 BR, Seasonal
Avail. Nov. 1st., Can
See Now (641)660-3312
INGLIS 3/2
Furn, w/dock on River
near pwr. plant Incl util.
$1200/mo 352-267-4632




BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 lanai carport,new
carpet CHA $515
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm. CHA,$500.
35 Golden 352.464.2701
BEVERLY HILLS
2 BR 1.5 Ba. 1 Car avail
7/15 Wood floors, granite,
washer/dryer Pets OK.
$700/mo
445-3522/445-3493
BEVERLY HILLS
2/ 1/1 FI. Rm, CHA,
Shed, $575. mo.
(352) 795-9060
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1, $595/mo@ 22N.
Davis 352-586-4474
BEVERLY HILLS
3/I/Carport, $525. mo
2/1, $425., S. Barbour St.
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514


BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2, 1 car. large-
glassed in family rm.
$600/ sec. references
required 352 527-2279




BLACK DIAMOND
* 3/2/2 HOME *
Gated Community.
Designer kitchen w/
granite. $1,200 mo.
Call Leslie Landham,
Foxfire Realty, 422-2382
Citrus Hills 3/2/2
1 Acre. $900/month.
(352) 586-6646
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1,000 @ MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer duplex. 3/2/1
w/newer appliances.
$800 mo. lease/ dep.
No pets. (352) 697-3133
CRYSTAL RIVER
3 BR newly renovated,
near middle school,
fenced in back yard
$700/m Keystone Arbor
Rlty(813) 265-8833
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Rental Homes 1, 2 & 3
Bedrms 3502302-1370
FLORAL CITY
3/1, CHA $600 mo &
1/1, $390. Secluded,
Scenic (352) 586-1873
HOMOSASSA
2/1 and 1/1, no pets.
(352) 637-1142
HOMOSASSA
3/2 loft BR, den $675.
$500 sec. no pets
(352) 746-3073
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
INVERNESS
3/2, First/Last/Security
$650. 352-726-7692
Inverness 3/2/2
modern home fenced
w/appls $850. Lease
Option Avail. Keystone
Arbor RIty 813-265-8833
INVERNESS
3/2/2, 5 yrs. New, $750.
Mo. Ed, (352) 344-8366


encl.'d large pool $750
mo. (352) 476-2209

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relaxfl.com

INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1.5/1
$590 mo. fenced yd
(352) 344-2560

RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM

SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto 3 bedrm
Starting At
$466/mo.


EOVM HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355




For Sale or Rent
3/2, 2 mis from down-
town Inverness, 3506 S
Dover Terr. Contact
owner across the st.
from home.
(352) 726-3238








ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
" Free $300. Home
Depot gft card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

PROGRESS ENERGY

Discounted Housing

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals

o Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759

auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077





For SaNle
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Sta rter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer! " Deedra Hester








FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL

TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE


GREAT DEALS
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


ForSale %
Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161





INVERENESS
SACRIFICE 6 Rentals
2 Locations some
remodeled. AS IS
SALE any reasonable
offer excepted,
Great Opportunity III
813-286-4794






For Sale %,,t
3/1, Tiled floors,
MUST SELL
Asking $32,000
22 N. Davis
352-586-4474

RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM






CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440




2 BR, 1 BA, I car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see $59,000
(352) 419-6719

3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.InvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnanlll@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.




6955 W. Macopin Ln
3Bdrm 2Ba Beautiful up-
dated ranch w/new roof
gutters siding a/c unit car-
pet & tile. A must see!
330-221-3996 $107,000




4/2 CEMENT HOME
1,200 SF on V4 acre
Remodeled, Clean
$65K.
(305) 619-0282






For Sale % t






2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Fam rm. w/frpl.
2000+s living + encl.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19Jungleplum Ct. E.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comr














Best Time to Buy
also have lease
options & owner
financing available.
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty

CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'll work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy@
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


CLASSIFIED




NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!

Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBCO59685








ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
SFree $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals

a, Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park


Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


- m
"Let's Go To The
Real Estate Auction"
Call Lisa for the
details
352-795-0784
Plantation Realty
plantatfonrealtvlisinas
.com
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner


For Salek%*
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283

FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498

HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


Gitta Barth/Realtor

Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc




INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033




2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000. obo
(352) 382-3202

CITRUS COUNTY
SEVERAL AVAILABLE
LOTS IN SUGARMILL
WOODS AND OTHER
AREAS OF CITRUS
COUNTY. CHECK
WEBSITE
AT:WWW.LOTSOFLAND.U
SAPROPERTYWHOLE-
SALE.COM
813-267-5447 TERRY
OR 352-475-1923 WES.
OWNER FINANCING
AVAILABLE





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday's.

Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.
To place your free
ad simply go to:
www.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.


'02, 23ft,
Magic Trailer
Dual Axle, 4 V-Hull
$1,200.
(352) 628-5008

BOAT TRAILER
18' + $200.
(352) 364-1309

SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066





POLARIS JET SKI
2000, Genesis (3 seater)
Great shape with trailer.
This thing is fast.
$2,800.00 352-634-1044





14' JON BOAT
trailer, 25HP Yamaha,
trolling motor, battery,
extra trailer, $2,500
(352) 628-2766

15' TRI HULL
BAY RUN ABOUT
40hp Evin. trollig motor
new bimini top
F/F new whls & lights on
tril $1200(352) 637-4515

20' PONTOON
60 HP, 4 stoke,
Yamaha, low hours, 4
years young, loaded,
kept in dry storage,
$13,500(352) 382-8966

20' PONTOON
75HP, trailer, custom-
ized, lots of extras, best
buy for the money!
$7,000. (352) 201-2656

'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071

AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019

BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272

CANOE 16'
OLD TOWN fiberglass
$350. steel wheel
Canoe/Kayak Carrier
used once $75.
(352) 447-2330


' THIS OUT!
C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22' out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
icebox,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
induded.Exc.condifon,used app
50 hoursAslkng
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.

Grady White
20ft. w/225HP
$9,300.
(352) 400-6100

SOLD
14' JON BOAT,
2006 Extra wide, All
welded, Boat & Trailer
$1,595 obo

STAMAS 26'
70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658


























HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8 very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268

I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945

KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797








ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
* Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!


Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals

a, Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfli.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




WORDY GURD1Y TRICKYRICKYKANE....8L67
1. One's personal genetic double (1) Everyanswer is arhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Three-card monte helper's meds (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. "Alfie" star Michael's bridle straps (1) syllables in each word.
I 1 @ 2011 UFS, Dist by Univ Uclickfor UFS
4. Rambunctious Riyadh resident (2)


5. New Orleans French section redcap (2)


6. Dreading a fact-finding court session (2)


7. Chooser's titters or candy bar brand (2)


7-9-11


SHNOINS SH3HxOId 'L ONIHVH ONIHVVA '9 H IIOd HJiHVflb s9
IUflVS AIAUOH I' SNIH[ SNIV3 *' S'IId STIIHS g HNOI3 NMO I
SHIMSNV


" oGee! o Sodalo vilablefor ickupordeivry

" Oferig lw manteanc,*drugh0reistat *ass


ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27' 2005,
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper, Q bed, 2nd
dr. 20' awning $14kobo
(352) 527-9535




RAISED TOPPER
FOR TRUCK,
60"X89", White,
sacrifice for $45.00
352-344-2321




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144

4 SALEII MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794







04, Taurus, $3995
04, Chrysler300 $3995
01, Windstar $3995
00, Chev Prism $2500
95, Tahoe 4x4 $3995
96 Cad. Seville $3,995
06 Ford4x4 250ds$12k
98, GMC dually $5995
98, Volvo $3995
99, 2Dr Saturn $2995
MANY MORE DEALS!
CONSIGNMENT
USA
US19 BY AIRPORT
352-461-4518

1989 FIREBIRD
Doesn't run. Moving
north. $800 OBO. Cash
only. (352)560-7748
(leave message)

i/THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
'93 TOYOTA
Celica, Red, cold A/C, int.
great, good gas mileage,
5 speed, $1,900.
352-364-1771
BUICK
'95 LaSabre, runs great,
clean, Trans/Air com-
pressor just overhauled,
$2,495 obo 637-2632
(352) 223-9651
BUICK CENTURY '95
Cold A/C, 143K miles, 6
cyc., 3.0 L, runs great!
$900 Firm
(352) 228-1897
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded, AC, good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900(352) 503-7431
CIERRA 93
Exc cond. PB, PW, PS,
burgundy leather seats
49,500 org miles
michelle tires good
shape cal bet 4p-7p
ONLY $2500 obo
352-527-4942
FORD 03
Taurus SES, V6 auto
loaded, 79K miles
exc shape $4500
(352) 697-2461
HONDA 08
FIT SPORT, Blackberry
Pearl, Automatic, 33
MPG, 40K, Like New
$15,239. 352-634-4391
JAGUAR XJ8
2000, excel, cond.,
new tires all options
low mileage, only 51K,
garaged, Must see!
$9,995, (352) 344-5250


'95, Town Car, less than
150K mi., 2 nd owner,
$2,495.
(352) 634-4603
MERCEDES BENZ
2006, C280, Luxury, 28K
Pristine Cond. White w/
tan int. sr. owned
$21,500 obo. 634-3806
OLDS ALERO GTS
2001, every option,
great cond., 85K miles,
$5,150 (352) 628-5673
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625

* SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518




77 MGB
restored car, has front
end damage, runs
great comes with 2
parts cars $6000 OBO
(352) 628-5606
CHEVY 1970
Impala Convertible,
older restoration,needs
TLC $17,000
(352) 628-2777
CHRYSLER 1941
Sedan runs good,
bumpers re chromed
$3500(352) 628-2777
Lincoln 1965
less than 65K org miles
4 dr convertible
w/parts car + extra
parts $6300
(352) 628-2777







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
'03, Silverado, 64K org.
mi., Red, auto trans,
6 cyl. looks good, runs
good, no rust. single
cab w/ overdrive &
61/2 ft. bed, $7,500
(352) 503-7328
CHEVY
1974, Silverado,
$500. Call for info.
352-364-1771
CHEVY
'95, Silverado 1500, ext.
cab, 194K mi., body lift,
33" tires, great cond.
$4,800. (352) 302-1033

*' THIS OUT!
FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920

FORD 95
F150 6 cycle, auto high
mileage unbelievable
condition $3150
(352) 628-2777
FORD
'98, Ranger XLT, super
cab, V6, 5 spd., AC,
bedliner, topper, 115k
mi., 1 owner, $2,900
(352) 382-3502
NISSAN
05, TITAN SE, king cab.
silver/gray, runs great,
106K mi$5900
352-746-5475/344-4505

4 SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518




JEEP
2005, GRAND CHERO-
KEE, $8,500, Hemi
Engine, New Tires &
Brakes, Towing Package,
Sun Roof, Stereo, Great
Condition, with all service
records, 99,600 Miles.
(630)464-7372
jpacol@comcast.net


TAHOE 4x4 95K mi
loaded, leather int,
CD/DVD/Cass play
new tires $7250 obo
352-476-4941
JEEP
'98, Wrangler Sahara,
soft top, 67K mi., front
tow bar, 5spd. $9,750
(352) 527-9536
KIA SPORTAGE SUV
2001, A/T, A/C,4/D,
2WD, great condition,
79K miles, $4,500
(352) 795-7455




'02 DODGE
Ram Van 1500,5.9 Liter
eng. V8 leather 59,500K
mi $8,888. make offer
(352) 503-7577
HANDICAP VAN
1989 full size GMC
Ricon Lift, runs great
$1950(352) 464-0316
HONDA
Odyssey 08,EX-Lblue
ext. grey leather, 6 cd
moon roof, 82K,
$15,900.352-344-4505
352-746-5475
KIA SEDONA
2002 LX, dark blue, one
owner, like new 83K mi.
$5,000 (352) 201-6386
TOYOTA 98
Sienna XLE ,V6, 112k
mis. new tires & battery,
looks great, runs great
$4,500 (352) 465-7755




HONDA
'06, CRF 70F,
good cond.
$450. firm
(352) 628-1908



2003 Harley Wanna Be
149 cc 120mpg,looks
like a dressed Harley
$1700 cash
(352) 464-0316
2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576
FREEDOM
2011 ES3000 Electric
Scooter like new
street legal $1300
352 637 1814
Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,200
Cry River 727-207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'07, Dyna Wide Glide,
like new, 6k miles, some
extras Call for more info
$11,500 (352) 344-8794
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995. 352-601-7460
LIBERTY
2010 098 city electric
moped like new $450
352 637 1814
LIBERTY
2010, 098city, Electric
Moped, goes 40 miles,
like new. $450
352-637-1814
LINCOLN
'99 Town Car, 115K mi.,
mechanically sound,
needs paint $3,500
(352) 489-5086
STEALTH
2010, 415, Electric Mt.
Bike, Custom everything,
36V, 450 Watt, $850
352-637-1814
SWAN
2010, 629, electric, uni-
sex, 30 mi range, pedal
assist, custom built, $700
352-637-1814
WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492
YAMAHA
'07, V-Star, 650CC,
4K mi., pipes, extras,
excel cond. $4,900
(352) 634-5450



918-0715 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
15,2011 -July 15,2011.
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15,2011.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C13


,liI n .. . c l. . Ih, I, II.a*.a l..,r, 11 .l.l ' ., I1 J, ,I , .lr..~ ll ul,,I . rf, ... . 1... I,, h I III , ,,I...!] .,. s.a| .ra Ii a. . r.hM t,, .. ...I. ., I i,, . "1* . .' .r .I.1 r''l l'n i '"l.. 1
II ..'.. ... . '. . ' 1. . ' r . .1.... .. 1, . m.,... ,I , , 'I . ,1,...1 - ... .. . . ..11 :.. *... s l. 1 .l . � .1 i. , ir . .. ,s . . . .1 . 1. .* .1 ,,.1, Iu . i ln
aI 1... .. .. Hm .. The .tli n Ch c


TL Lease. $379 mo x 36 months.
$2,499 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment: Excludes Tax & Tag.
With Approved Credit


* SLa riungsj are p, l Iat he U S DOprartre..l .f Trdnsprtajl r.. .e Slerr, r gv logram trwn saleocar gys I Mode les ted A It staldadd ,d.e impacl a.ronag ISABui
B Basd on ALG s 200i and 2010 Reicil3l Vile Awards for a Lumur' Brand
" Subnlr. Io I . l IallDOiari t through Snpofr iDeb 2011 to ioprroved lErpp by Acbra Financi.l SeRance DBA ol American i a ld.a Finan;e Corp ClOsed-end lease
for ;i2]12 L S S pen Aul~[aiatl.< IMtJin alABFCJV MSRP 5649D 4 Acra~ l .el lcapitaleoa I4:os id 189 BA Tori w.mntir paymerm Se14 164 Ophon 1 purchase al lease
cno 521 ?02 25 Adotdlnal lease terms for aibll-aIlil iua loerSos Iot all lsso *) 1 ill quaI.P, Hghnr leairt rter jpply for L ste thr loarf credl ratings or in differanl
rlir.n D&al, Drtiiiailior ry iffnr.l a;zual ayv .t M.RPs include dcst'lu ina ion laaina li aeno tUi fPl opLon and nurln-;e .ol'a Secunlt deposl T an-ed Lesase
res.parl~slt loi rO, lalipennce eint-ear-e eanorear anO 5Imrr. o.ve 10 O) rr.ileprsyar lo vrln ie arni MSRP less I.ar. 53 000 but ..lo .r.icles c itn MSRPol ]d O5r] or orle
mleag cost is �20emi 3ir 10.O G milmityier See dealer for complelot dclail - AhSIjiiIe o0 2010 rL RL RDX ZDI mtn appi'veo credit


~~~~~~I u04 P W *




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


As Low As


APR*


All Ford Certified Pre-Owned
vehicles come with:
* 1 69-point inspection by
factory-trained technicians
* 6-year/100,000-mile powertrain
warranty coverage**
* 3-month/3,000-mile comprehensive
warranty coverage**
* Vehicle history report
* 24/7 Roadside Assistance
* Full tank of gas at no extra charge
* 3 months SiriusXM Satellite Radio' on
equipped vehicles at no extra charge


Certified Pre-Owned


ford.com/certified-used


Quality that is second to none. NP5594
*22,368


2011 FORD FUSION SE
This is one sharp car and a must have. NP5557
$23,178


This one has the look. NP5548
*26,468


AV0Y rVKU F LEAWKEK E. DAUEK
Only the best qualify to be certified. N1T221A
*27,668


Only 13k miles and a sun roof too. N1T236A
*27,668


2011 FORD TAURUS LIMITED
Ford's best kept secret but with a drive the secret is out. NPR622
$28,668


2010 FORD EDGE SEL
Cross over like no other. NP5564
$28.868


2011 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 2011 FORD FLEX SEL
Better than new and only 9k miles. N1C128D Atest drive is all it will take to make you want this one. NP5562.
$29.968 $29.968


2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Only 4k miles. N1T297A
$31 668


C14 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L


7


Citru5K:IA


From


High


Prices


Like New


03 FORD
MUSTANG
s9,995


09 KIA
BORREGO
21,995


09 TOYOTA
MATRIX
s15,295
Low Niles

06 HYUNDAI
AZERA
s14,495


Loaded
CITRUS KIA
"PEACE OF MIND 07HONDI
WARRANTY" RIDGELIN
PROGRAM $s22 99
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" _22_9_
Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a Dealership promise...
When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side
for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your driving. If anything, and we are
talking anything breaks' on your vehicle, from the headlights to the taillights we
will fix it for you at NO CHARGE. You have trusted us for all your NEW car
needs and and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we 06 KIA
want to prove to you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the state of Florida to SEDONA
buy a Used vehicle also. f
At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships"., P


WE NEED EVERY TRADE -
AND LOWEST PRICES


KI


v from Home @ www.citruslda.conm


HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOW/
IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA


V


08 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA
$13,995


05TOYOTA
PRIUS
'SAVE


,q4:
1 0
Nuo. LoMis


TlA~. otMfe IT!


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C15


- mof-


L)


jjqH HIF


F






CIB SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 Cimus Couivn' (FL) CHRONICLE


(c HONDA


L1! 1�1


T[W41


2011 HOND

PMTaDL


IF.


all'biL \4'ls


Come See What LOVE
Can Do For YouI!

, wftgwml Biii B iij


t Based on 2012 Civic Sedan & Civic Coupe EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary dependingonhow you drive and maintain your vehicle. * On approved credit. 1.2011 Civic VP: Lease for $99 plus tax for 36 months. MSRP $18,105 58% residual,
zero sec. deposit. $2,974 down, 35 payments left at pluss tax WAC or for well-qualified buyers. 2.2011 Accord LX: Lease for $149 plus tax for 36 months. MSRP$22,730,59% residual, zero sec.deposit $,974 down, 35 payments le at $149 plus tax. WAC or for well-qualified buyers. 3.2011 Pilot 5 Speed Automatic7 WD LX (Model
YF3H2BEW): Lease for $279.00 per month for 36 months with a $2,700 capitalized cost reduction available to customers who quali for the HFS Super Preferred or Preferred credit tier. Other ratestiers are available un der this offer $2,999 total due at lease signing (includes first month's payment and capitalized cost reduction with no security
deposit; total net capitalized cost and base monthly payment does not include tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Dealer installed options and accessories additional cost. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offer expires 7-14-11.


NEW 2011 a
CHEW CRUZE
Power
Windows
& Locks,
Tilt, CD,
OnStar
M SRP: ............................................................. $18,115
DEALER DISCOUNT: .................. $945
CASH OR TRADE EQU .......... $200


YOU
PAY


$14,670


NEW 2011
Nc1 CAMARO
LS,
5-Speed,
V8

M SRP: .............................................................. $23,590
DEALER DISCOUNT ...................- $300
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY.......... $2,500


YOU
PAY


20,790


NEW 2011
CHEVY TRAVERSE
Power
Windows
& Locks,
AM/FM CD,
OnStar, XM _ _ _ _ _
M SRP:............................................................ . $30,454
DEALER DISCOUNT: ................. $1,690
FACTORY REBATE: .................. $1,00
CASH OR TRADE EQUFFV ..........- $2,500


YOU
PAY


p24,764


NEW 2011 AVE
CHEVY AVEO LT


M SRP:................................................................... $16,520
REBATE & DISCOUNT ........- $2,620
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:............ $2,500


YOU
PAY


$11,480


NEW 2011 IM AIA
CHEW IMPALA
LS,
Auto,
OnStar,
Air
Conditining
M SRP: .......................................... .................... $25,505
DEALERDISCOUN .................. $905
FACTORY REBATE .... .... ...........$2,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUFITY......... $2,500


YOU
PAY


$19,600


NEW 2011 SILVERADO
CHE, SILVERADO


Auto,
Keyless
Crew Cab,
Power
Locks


S


M SRP: ................................................................ $29,219
DEALER DISCOUNT ............ $2,257
FACTORY REBAT ................... $4505
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:............ $2,500


YOU
PAY


$19,957


09 BUICK LACROSSE CXL
LEATHERPPL,LOADE1MOM
$13,899


08 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ
NAVIGAION, SUNROOFWD,#10w77
$29,995


07 CHEVY HHR LT
PW, PL, CRUISE CONTOL,IT,CD,109481M
$12,995


08 CHEVY COBALT LT
COU$11,77755
$11,777


PRE-LOVED
SUPERCENTER


07 CHEVY SILVERADO REG CAB
$14,M2W6D,957
$14,269


08CHEW COLORED, REG CAB
LTA1ILOWMILES!5IP103
$14,995


07 CHEVY COLORED EXT CAB 02 FORD F150 CREW CAB
Z71,AUliACW,PL1911 LUAT, LENEWl
$15,495 $9,995


06 CHEW MONTE CARLO SS
LEH ROOF, LOADED, LOW MILES! #10N
$16,995


Come See What
LOVE Can Do For You! -

LoveChevySales.com


10 CHEW CAMARO SS
TRANSFORMERS EDmON, LOW MILES!
$32,995


Ua


97PONIlACTRANSAM
BLACKOKIES , PEEDI
$9,995


08 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS
RIDE IN STYE! UKE NEW!LOW H!1M45
$14,488


05 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
LEMAELOEMDEGREMTCONDmONI lBm
$10,888


07 CHEVYTRAILBLAZER LT
LATER, LOADED!
$16,995


I = OnHwy. 44West
iJ in Inverness

352-341-0018


MUST QUALIFY FOR ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. 0% INTEREST WAC. ALL PRICES INCLUDE 2500 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUITY, ALL REBATES, OWNER LOYALTY, DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST INCLUDED
IN PRICES AND PAYMENTS, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST, PLUS ANY DEALER ADDED EQUIPMENT IF APPLICABLE. * 12 MONTHS OR 12,000 MILES ON MOST PRE-OWNED VEHICLES, POWERTRAIN ONLY. PHOTOS
FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY. VEHICLES SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. APPLIES TO IN STOCK UNITS. OFFER EXPIRES 7/14/11.


i�


C16 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CIRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTI AVLE1 I


HND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE!

NO MATTER WHERE YOU

PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:


'09 G6
RE 24 HR RECORD) MESSAGE WIF IN) AND SPECIAL PRMING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11314
$8,999^ o149AR
9 ORll4 Mo.


'08 PT CRUISER
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIIH INM AND SPECIAL PICKING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11303


PER


$5,999^ A


'08 ECLIPSE
FE 24 HR RECORD MESSM E WITH INM) AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext11050
*11,999o1 99PERMO.



'07 CHARGER
RE 24 HR RECORD) MIMESSE WmI IN) AND SPECIAL PRHING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16796
$7,999 O133 M



'06 SRX
RE 24 HI RECORDED MESSAGE H INMR AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11296
*11,999 OR 99 M.


_,- -t

'08 PT CRUISER
EE 24 M RECORD) MESSAGE WIMIH r AND SPECIAL PRICMG
1-800-584-8755 Ex.16840
5,999^R 9 ER
$5999 R MO.


'08 FOCUS
IEE 24 HR REMCOlD MESSAGE WIH o ANI SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext 11258
9,999 o 66PER
--


'07 COBALT
RE 24 HR RECORDED) MESSAGE WIIH IN AM D SPECIAL PRIC
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11195
*6,999^. 6116


'06 XB
MRIE 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE WIHN AI SPECIAL PR
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11115
6,999 ^ A 1 S


'08 EQUINOX
RE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE wMI INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-5848755 Ext.10426
11,999$1 99AER
OR Mo.


'08 ALTIMA
FREE 24 HR RECORDED M II SAGE WIH IM O AND SPECIAL PICHM G
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11262
9,999RP *1 66


'07 TOWN & COUNTRY
FRE 24 HR RECORDED ITSSAGE WIIH IMO AND SPECIAL PRCNM G
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11328
$7,999o ?133


'06 SENTRA
REE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAiE WNIIH IO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext 11317
$5999^ R 99 MO
r MO


'06 CTS
iE 24 HR RECORD SM IMSAE WIIH FO ANV SPECIAL PRIClG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11075
$7,999^9 133^.
OR MO.


AL


w.*}
i I
CHP


^All prices and payment exclude, tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. Prices and payments include $2999.00
down cash or trade equity. Payments are for 6 years at 5.99% APR with approved credit.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock


im


A


M I Lhi


ScP


'07 PACIFICA
FRE 24 HR RECORIM MESSAGE WIIH INM AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11141
11,999^1 99M^


lok


1 11


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C17


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a SPo$39,735. 36 othypamnt oal$7,4. pio*op uraemat eae ed fr-a a--n3tobe etrmied3t emase si.gning.
All Bnk .3s3aproe-las. Tak delver- by3 9-06201. Milagechage. f $. 25/ ieovr 1,00 mle s. Lesee--3. 6o
maiteancepirndexcsswer.ay ens maybeh3- her. Nt6 va.l.
Ta3 t ln daroio qi
- - - a-.- -- *ggMg I -g 3T �- A1 lg *I*-3.-gI .-.


C18 SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2011 DODGE
RAM


BUY$
FOR


2011 JEEP
WRANGLER


PER MONTH


2011 DODGE
CARAVAN


q


R 19,994
r*4 *(["0 -'[Xt([
* 040


2011 JEEP
CHEROKEE


F$27214
OR$ 299ER
O299 NMOTH
Fre040RReore 0ssg
wih nf ad peia Picn


2011 DODGE
CHARGER


FOR 22Y994

with Info and Special Pricin
1 00 0~


2011 CHRYSLER
200


$199NPER
MONM
Free2 4H eode
wS


2011 DODGE
CAUBER


R 14380
Free 2 4HRRecoredMe
wS pecial 0rcn


2011 CHRYSLER
300


s 23,170

A 00 - 6


Je CRYSTAL
mRAM CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL
14358 Cortez Blvd Brooksville, FL
2077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL A


crystalautos.com

1-352-564-1971
*ALL PRICES INCLUDE $2999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. INCLUDES ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND
DEALER FEE $599.50 WAC. +ALL LEASES INCLUDE $2999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. LEASES ARE 36 MONTHS,
36,000 MILES EXTRA FEES MAY APPLY AT LEASE END. WAC. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


1-0054-75 x.51
I li


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011 C19


Fre2 RRcre Msaemt noan pca rcn
1-0-54875EX52


ANPR




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


k J


P


1 1 l o


A D


Al ~~kV1I~I~


Il t'


I J;


#1 SELLING CAR IN AMERICA!
2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE


&


I1


wi t h Infoan -S e l Pricing
1-80-54-855 X~l10


EX. CAB


List Price .............$29,011
Write Down ...........$5,849
Additional Savings ...$652
APPROVED $5O 4
EVENT PRICE .W


WRITE DOWN AMOUNTS
2011 Chevrolet Malibu LT...........3,785 2011
2011 Chevrolet Impala LT............4,243 2011
2011 Chevrolet Impala LS .........3,164 2011
2011 Chevrolet HHR..................3,516 2011
2011 Chevrolet Traverse.............2,681 2011
2011 Chevrolet Silverado Ext. Cab ....$5,849 2011
2011 Chevrolet Silverado crew Cab ...*5,374 2011


2011 CHEVROLEF TAHOE


List Price .............$45,061
Write Down ...........$5,149
Additional Savings $2,319+
APPROVED $357 96t
EVENT PRICE 1 ,


ON OTHER MODELS
Chevrolet Avalanche .......... 4,473
Chevrolet Corvette .............3,333
Chevrolet Suburban ...........$4,564
Chevrolet Colorado Ext. Cab.....S3,622
Chevrolet 2500 HD ............ 4,318
Chevrolet 3500 HD ............ 4,429
Chevrolet Tahoe ...............5,146


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MPSANE 1-800-440-9054


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5 -71 crystalautos.com
35256419I1 I1035 S Suncoast Blud Homosassa, FL
*PRICES 39 MONTH LEASE. $2,019 DUE AT SIGNING PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE OF $599.50. BASED ON 12,000 MILES PER YEAR WAC. + EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50
WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


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