Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02464
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-05-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02464

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Bright at night: LEDs aid bicycle visibility /Cl


TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy, with
93 isolated showers and
LOW thunderstorms.
72 PAGE A4
JULY 5, 2011


CITRI.US CO UNT Y





N IC .chroniconlin
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 116 ISSUE 332


LOCAL GRADUATE:


Anthony jurors begin deliberating


Researcher
Lecanto High School
alum and Flagler
College grad Kyle
Jennette, 21, is learning
the ins and outs of
Alzheimer's disease
while working toward
becoming a clinical
psychologist./Page A3
THANKS FOR SERVING:


Guilty verdict

could bring

deathpenalty

Associated Press
ORLANDO - Jurors did
not reach a verdict Monday
in the Casey Anthony mur-
der trial after deliberating
for almost six hours on the
prosecution's claim that the
woman killed her 2-year-old
daughter Caylee because
the toddler interrupted her
carefree partying and love
life.


The jury began consider-
ing the case around noon
after prosecutors gave a re-
buttal closing argument and
said the defense's assertion
that Caylee's death was an
accident made no sense.
Anthony is charged with
first-degree murder and six
other charges. If convicted
of first-degree murder, she
could be sentenced to death
or life in prison.
The sequestered jury of
seven women and five men
was scheduled to resume
deliberating Tuesday at 8:30
a.m. They were chosen from
the Tampa Bay area be-
cause of exhaustive pretrial
media coverage in the Or-


lando area and have been
sequestered in an Orlando
hotel. They have listened to
33 days of testimony and an-
other two days of closing ar-
guments.
All the evidence has been
sent back to the jury room,
but jurors will be brought
into open court if they want
to watch any of the video ev-
idence. Equipment for
video viewing is not avail-
able in the deliberation
room.
Anthony's attorneys say
the girl drowned in the fam- Associated Press
ily's pool. They have said Cindy Anthony, wearing bracelets in tribute to her grand-
Anthony panicked and that daughter Caylee Anthony, listens Monday during the final day
of arguments in the trial of her daughter, Casey Anthony, at
See Page A5 the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando.


Fourth brings food, fun


Welcomed
Several servicemen have
been welcomed home
recently/Page A7
TURNING POINT:
Up in the air
Revolutionary new air
traffic control system
reaches crossroads.
/Page A10
RECOVERING:


He's back
Following cancer sur-
gery in Cuba, Venezue-
lan leader Hugo Chavez
surprises country with
early return./Page A10
BOX OFFICE:
Prime spot
"Transformers" pulls in
huge numbers during
first week./Page B3
SOBERING UP:


On the wagon
Daniel Radcliffe says
he's decided to quit
drinking./Page B3
START YOUR ENGINES:


Sunny day

welcomes

crowds
CHERI HARRIS
Staff Writer
- CRYSTAL RIVER
For Cindy Juanez
and her family,
picnicking on
the Fourth of July at
Hunter Springs Park is
a tradition.
"We got to know a lot
of people," Juanez said
of last year's celebra-
tion at the park.
Before noon, Juanez
and her sister, Norma
Encinia, and Encinia's
daughters, 14-year-old
Ernestina Rodriguez
and 3-year-old Jordin
Encinia, waited for the
rest of the party, includ-
ing Juanez's husband,
to arrive.
Encinia, who has
lived in Crystal River
See . Page A2


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Tricia and Nikki Riggs enjoy sitting by the shore of Hunter Springs Park on Monday celebrating the Fourth of July while
C.J. Riggs tries to get some money for the ice cream truck.


Residents pause to reflect on

meaning ofday's festivities


SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
-HERNANDO
The Fourth of July
means a lot to Peggy
Buetti.
The first-generation
American was raised by
her French Canadian fa-
ther to love his new coun-
try.
"When he came here,
foreigners were bad," the
57-year-old Summerfield
woman said while picnick-
ing in Hernando. "He
taught us to be American.
He wouldn't teach us his
native language because


we needed to speak only
English."
Buetti, along with her
significant other, Norman
VanDoren, and her three
grandchildren, set up
camp at the Hernando
Beach and Community
Park on Monday morning.
There were four gas grills,
beach chairs, coolers, ears
of corn, hamburgers, hot
dogs, chicken, spare ribs,
potato salad and plenty of
cold drinks.
The Marion County fam-
ily was joined by close
friend Debi Boles and her
See Page A4


Race is on
Action set to heat up at
Citrus Speedway.
/Page B4

No stocks
U.S. markets observed
the Independence Day
holiday Monday.


Comics ..........C7
Community .......C5
Crossword ........C6
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ... . B3
Horoscope ........B3
Lottery Numbers . . .B2
Lottery Payouts . . . .B3
Movies .......... .C7
Obituaries ........ A6
Classifieds ........ C8
TV Listings .......C6


I6 111781121 II 2002


Sisters Dominique, 5, and Angelina Buetti, 7, spent Mon-
day fishing with their cousin at Hernando Beach and Com-
munity Park. There were no takers for the bait, but a few
fish gave a jumping performance for the youngsters.
RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle


Americans mark country's 235th birthday


Fireworks, ags, barbecue grills rolled out


Associated Press
NEW YORK - The U.S. marked
the 235th anniversary of the signing
of the Declaration of Independence
with parades, fireworks, barbecues
-plus presidential campaigning, a
White House birthday and compet-
itive eating.
Thousands were showing up near
the Washington Monument to ea-
gerly await the annual fireworks
show on the National Mall, while
others were throwing on Hawaiian


shirts and shorts to ski the still-
snowy slopes at resorts from Cali-
fornia to Colorado.
In Boston, the annual Boston
Pops concert was a must. In Akron,
Ohio, the Rib, White & Blue Food
Festival was enticing. And then,
there were Nevada's casinos, which
promised a pyrotechnics extrava-
ganza that could be a gambler's best
bet.
On New York's Coney Island, the
annual Nathan's Famous July
Fourth hot dog-eating contest


brought out the biggest names in
competitive eating for a clash that
was short in timespan but high in
calories.
Joey "Jaws" Chestnut, of San Jose,
Calif., wolfed down 62 hot dogs and
buns during the 10-minute contest,
winning his fifth straight title.
Sonya "The Black Widow" Thomas
chowed her way to victory in the
first-ever women-only contest, eat-
ing 40 hot dogs, one shy of her 2009
total.
For 28-year-old New Yorker
Matthew Penberg, the holiday is a
day off from his job as a bus boy
"I get to take a break and go to the


beach," he said. "And today is the
day people, Americans, demanded
their rights. I don't think we're there
yet. I think we should have a right to
a job, but a lot of people have to look
for it."
At the mountaintop home to
Thomas Jefferson in Char-
lottesville, Va., officials continued a
nearly five-decade-old tradition of
swearing in new U.S. citizens. Sev-
enty-seven people took their oaths
during a naturalization ceremony at
Monticello.
The holiday is celebrated as the


Page A5


I TLi EIS D]





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Sergio Arrita, Alberto Barriendos, Dinorah Pou and Xavier Villachica take care of
the grilling Monday at Fort Island Gulf Beach. George Moon feeds the ducks at
Hunter Springs Park while waiting for the rest of his picnicking friends to arrive.


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
A Citrus County fire truck from Kensington Fire Station honors the nation by flying Old Glory
from an aerial ladder near Lecanto.


FOURTH
Continued from Page Al

for 10 years, said they came
early in order to get a table.
She said her husband had
jokingly told Norma to
spend the night at the park
in order to claim a spot.
The lunch menu included
potato salad, banana pud-
ding, baked beans, ham-
burgers and bratwurst
One of the biggest attrac-
tions at the park is the op-
portunity to splash around
in the springs.
"We like it because it's not
salty water," Juanez said.
"It's fresh water"
In addition to swimming,
Juanez said they also
brought volleyballs and
games. Jordin had her own
sand bucket that she had al-
ready started putting to
work in the sandy area by
the volleyball net.
When asked what cele-
brating the Fourth of July
meant, Norma replied,
"Food."
"Fun," Ernestina chimed
in.
"Freedom for everybody,"
Juanez added.
At a picnic shelter over-
looking the water, Tyler
Rumpf of Beverly Hills
waited while his neighbors
Jeff and Shelby Cooper un-
loaded more food. The pic-
nic meal included
hamburgers, watermelon
and apple pie.
Rumpf, 17, said they come
to the park almost every
weekend. He enjoys relax-
ing, swimming and tanning.
He said the Fourth ofJuly
is all about "sticking to-
gether" and celebrating the
United States.
Tricia Riggs of Crystal
River came to the park with
her daughter-in-law Nikki
Riggs of Clearwater and her
son, C.J.
Tricia Riggs said she
packed their picnic lunch
of hard-boiled eggs,
peaches, cheese, bananas,
graham crackers, juice and
water in a picnic basket
that had been a gift from
Nikki Riggs and her hus-
band, Jason.
"It's the coolest thing,"
Tricia Riggs said of the
plaid fabric-lined basket
that came complete with
utensils, a blanket, thermos
and wine bottle opener. "So
we just love to come and
have picnics and bring the
basket," she said. "It really
is fun."
Tricia Riggs said they had
already been swimming in
the springs. Then C.J. be-
came more fascinated by
the shower nearby
"Bring them to a river,"
Nikki Riggs said, "and they
just have to play in the
shower."
Victor Padilla of Ho-
mosassa celebrated the
Fourth of July with a church
group cookout at Fort Island
Gulf Beach.
Padilla said the members
of the House of Prayer, a
Spanish-speaking church
on State Road 200 in Her-
nando, liked to get together
from time to time, especially
for holidays.
Under a Gator-embla-
zoned shelter, the church
group had a table laden


with baked eggplant, rice
and other treats. They also
brought a grill to cook hot
dogs, hamburgers, sausage
and peppers.
But the real purpose of the
gathering, Padilla said, was
togetherness and fellowship.


"Like in church you have
to behave," he said. "This
they can see how you really
are."
Chronicle reporter Cheri
Harris can be reached at
(352) 564-2926 or charris@
chronicleonline. com.


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A2 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011







Page A3 - TUESDAY, JULY 5,2011



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Public comments sought


Special to the Chronicle
County Planning officials are
inviting the public to review and
comment on the rewriting of the
county's Land Development Code.
The LDC, as it is called, is the
book of rules that govern develop-
ment in the county When Devel-
opment Services Department
Director Vince Cautero took over
the department late last year,
County Commission Chairman
Dennis Damato and County Ad-
ministrator charged him with
rewriting the code. Rewritten por-
tions are now beginning their pub-


lic review, and Cautero is inviting
interested citizens to take part
So far, almost half the rewriting
has been done, and Cautero's goal
is to have the rewriting done and
the new code in place by the New
Year
His daunting mission was to
streamline the 1,200 page code by
getting rid of accumulated add-
ons and complicating qualifica-
tions appended to the code over
the years that bog down the devel-
opment permitting system down
to the point of, in some cases, mak-
ing it burdensome.
He was directed to simplify and


clarify the code and remove jar-
gon so that ordinary residents
have no problem following it and
knowing what it requires in any
given case. He was directed to
take duplication, ambiguity and
unnecessary requirements out
and replace it with clear and di-
rect requirements - explained
and illustrated with photos and
graphics so there is no doubt
about what is being described or
required.
The staff will combine wherever
possible, and the 1,200-page docu-
ment will probably lose as much
as 300 pages when it's done, even
with the addition of the photos
and graphics, and it will be much
more customer and reader
friendly, Cautero promised. The
online version will also have many
hyperlinks, referring the reader to


related information to ensure a
complete understanding.
Though it's no easy task, he said,
the job is a necessary one and is
overdue. It will create a better,
more streamlined document to
make the development process
easier while continuing to meet
the comprehensive plan's goals
and objectives with the controls in
place where needed.
The first group of five rewritten
chapters will go to the Planning
and Development Review Board
(PDRB) for workshops on July 7
and 21, and Cautero said as the re-
view process continues, interested
citizens won't be limited to dis-
cussing only the newly rewritten
material.
He will welcome discussion of
any part at any time during the re-
views because he wants the final


document to be the best it can.
After going through workshops
with the PDRB (it reviews devel-
opment proposals and makes rec-
ommendation to the county
commission), the revisions will go
to the commission, which will give
final approval after a series of
public hearings, in which, Cautero
said, citizens can again offer their
opinions to help shape the final
version.
The PDRB meets at 9 a.m.
Thursday, July 7 and 21, at the
Lecanto Government Building.
Call (352) 527-5239 for more infor-
mation. To see draft revisions, go
to the county's website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and click
"Departments" at the top, then
"Development Services" and then
"Land Development Code
rewrite."


Around
THE STATE

Hernando
Battery suspect bitten
by police dog
A48-year-old Hernando
man was arrested at 4:25
p.m. June 24 on charges of
domestic battery and resist-
ing an officer with violence.
According to an arrest re-
port, during an argument with
a 48-year-old woman, Scott
Allen Ziemendorf is accused
of hitting her on the left side
of her face, throwing her to
the floor and pinning her to
the floor to prevent her from
getting up.
When a deputy attempted
to apprehend Ziemendorf, he
did not stop several times
after being ordered to do so
and after being warned, "K-9"
Kong was released. Ziemen-
dorf was airlifted to St.
Joseph's Hospital in Tampa
due to a bite he had received
from the police dog, accord-
ing to the report.
No bond was set.

Lauderdale-by-
the-Sea
Boy, 7, drowns off
South Florida beach
A 7-year-old boy has
drowned while swimming in
the Atlantic Ocean off a
South Florida beach.
Broward Sheriff's Office
spokeswoman Dani
Moschella said lifeguards,
volunteer firefighters and
American Medical Response
workers were already on the
Lauderdale-by-the-Sea
beach for a planned rescue
demonstration Monday when
they noticed several children
in distress in the water. They
rescued the children and then
realized one boy was still
missing.
A sheriff's office helicopter
pilot spotted the boy in the
water. He was pronounced
dead at a hospital.
No additional information
was immediately available.

Riverview
Teen camper found
safe after swimming
A teenager who swam
away from a Panhandle
campsite was found safe.
The Okaloosa County
Sheriff's Office told the North-
west Florida Daily News the
16-year-old boy swam away
from Spectre Island in the
Santa Rosa Sound around 2
a.m. Monday. He was re-
ported missing when his fam-
ily couldn't contact him later.
The teen was found at a
friend's home. He told author-
ities he swam across the
sound, hitchhiked to a friend's
home and fell asleep on the
porch.
* Meanwhile, the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission identified a
body found in the Alafia River
as 44-year-old Frankie Diaz
of Valrico. Authorities said
Diaz fell from an 18-foot boat
Sunday evening.
-From staff, wire reports


Scholarly middleman


Local LHSgrad

working to research

Alzheimer's disease. . ..
NANCY KENNEDY I
Staff Writer
- BEVERLY HILLS
inspired by the words of Albert Einstein,
"Only a life lived for others is a life
worthwhile," Kyle Jennette is seeking
to make his mark in the world.
As a research scholar with the Mayo
Clinic in Jacksonville, the 2008 Lecanto
High School alum and Flagler College grad, /
is learning the ins and outs of Alzheimer's
disease while working toward his goal of be-
coming a clinical psychologist.


My goal is
to get my
PhD by age
28. The field
of clinical
psychology
is hard to
get into and
one of the
most difficult
PhDs you
can get be-
cause with a
degree you
can practice
and do
research.

Kyle Jennette
LHS graduate.


"Specifically, I
want to be a neu-
ropsychologist,
someone who sees
somebody for psy-
chological issues,
but I would test
them to see what
problems corre-
late in the brain,"
he said during a
visit home to Cit-
rus County to see
his parents.
In January, Jen-
nette, 21, began
the program as a
research assistant
and has since
moved up to clini-
cal research
scholar His role is
to work with clini-
cal psychologists
who see patients
with dementia or
memory disorders
in the hospital and
also with geneti-
cists, neuroscien-
tists and
neurologists in
neuroscience re-
search trying to
understand the bi-


ology of the disorders and diseases.
"So, you've got these two big fields study-
ing essentially the same thing from different
sides," he said. "I'm the guy in the middle
saying, 'OK, this is how it comes together."'
He said on an average day he might sit
with his advisor, a clinical neuropsycholo-
gist, seeing a patient who has come in with
memory problems and they would assess
him or her Later, he might sit at a computer
working with numbers, reading about re-
search from other groups doing the same
thing or even looking at slides of brain
samples.
"My goal is to get my PhD by age 28," he
said. "The field of clinical psychology is
hard to get into and one of the most difficult
PhDs you can get because with a degree you
can practice and do research. Out of 400
who apply, only six to 10 get in because it's a
one-on-one mentor model."
This current appointment at the Mayo


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lecanto High School 2008 graduate Kyle Jennette, who also graduated from Flagler College in the
spring, is a research scholar at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Jennette is learning the ins and
outs of Alzheimer's disease while working toward his goal of becoming a clinical psychologist.


Clinic ends in August. From there, Jennette
hopes to move on to another research firm
at a university He's looking at the Univer-
sity of Florida or the University of Califor-
nia at San Diego.
"They're doing the exact same things I'm
doing at Mayo, only in universities - I can't
get a PhD through Mayo," he said.
Jennette's dad, Clarence Jennette, said
he's immensely proud of his son.
"When he got to college, we didn't know
what to expect," he said. "When he was
younger, his grades were all over the place
and his teachers all said the same thing,
'He's a smart kid, but..'. So, we'd take away
his skates or his bike until he brought up his
grades."
His dad said he always thought his son
would be a lawyer, because he loves to
argue. Two of his passions are philosophy
and politics.


But, as his dad said, he's also been the
one people go to with their problems, so
psychology is a natural fit. While in college
he volunteered at an autistic center
"He's always wanted to help people," his
dad said.
Jennette said working with people with
Alzheimer's disease has touched something
in him. He wants to help those who cannot
help themselves.
"Between contributing to research and
helping people clinically, just knowing that
I'm helping those (who) need it most is the
most rewarding part of my work," he said.
"Knowing I've helped someone in their
most difficult time, it's enough of a mark for
me."
Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can
be reached at (352) 564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline. com.


Ocala man charged with armed robbery, battery


CHERI HARRIS
Staff Writer
An Ocala man was arrested Mon-
day on charges of armed robbery
and aggravated battery using a
deadly weapon.
According to an arrest report, this
is what happened: Gerritt Burns,
18, of 2603 S.W 152nd Lane, was at a
home in Beverly Hills when a 20-
year-old man from Bayville, N.J.,


pulled out a wad of money to pay
$100 to someone who lived at the
home.
The man with the cash told au-
thorities that, as he left the home,
Burns sucker-punched him. As the
20-year-old started to run away,
Burns knocked him to the ground.
That's when Burns pulled out a pis-
tol and told the 20-year-old he was
going to kill him.
Burns started hitting the man in


the head and face, demanded the
man's money and then hit him again
in the head and face with the gun.
At one point, Burns pointed the bar-
rel of the gun between the man's
eyes and told him he was going to
hurt him, then took the money from
the man's right rear pants pocket
and ran away
A deputy responding to the 2400
block of Trample Terrace in Bev-
erly Hills saw a man run into the


woods and after a short chase, the
deputy was able to capture Burns.
The man who identified Burns as
the suspect who had robbed him
had abrasions on his head and face.
Burns' bond was set at $60,000
and he is being charged with armed
robbery and aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon.
Chronicle reporter Cheri Harris
can be reached at (352) 564-2926 or
charris@chronicleonline. com.


County invites residents to join

development code rewrite review


*






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: A family enjoys a Fourth of July picnic Monday in Hernando. BELOW: Paula and
Gerry Saul had a difficult time deciding on which fireworks to buy Monday in Hernando.
One Stop Fireworks Manager Steven Goforth helped the couple pick the perfect fit for
their display.


Robert and Darling Reagle, from Floral City, packed their canoe with bait and food and headed
out for a day of fishing on the Withlacoochee River in Inverness.


REFLECT
Continued from Page Al

grandchildren. While the
adults cooked, the little ones
playfully dropped lines into
the lake in hopes of catching
the elusive fish swimming by
-'- An occasional "ooh" and
"aah" could be heard as a
mullet jumped out of the
,- q,. water
"This is the definition of
the Fourth," Buetti said,
spreading her arms in a
sweeping motion. "It is
spending time with the fam-
ily It is about nature, our fam-
ily and our country"
Just up the street, Paula
and Jerry Saul sought a more
vocal way to celebrate Inde-
pendence Day - fireworks.
Walking the aisles packed
with fireworks - Thunder
Bombs, It's 5 O'Clock Some-
where, Slightly Sinful and
Make It Rain, to name a few
- making a decision was
pretty challenging.
Steven Goforth, manager of
One Stop Fireworks, made it

FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


easy. He suggested they buy a
kit filled with a variety of
ground and aerial displays.
"We are looking more for
showy fireworks than loud
fireworks," Paula Saul said.
Goforth said sales have
been hurt by the burn ban -
which was lifted on Thursday
- and the slow economy
However, people were still
drifting in for last-minute
buys.
At a boat ramp on East
Turner Camp Road in Inver-
ness, Robert and Darling
Reagle decided to spend
their day fishing.
Armed with bait, fishing
poles, floppy hats and plenty
of fluids, the Floral City cou-
ple headed out into the With-
lacoochee River in their
canoe. They planned to re-
turn near sunset.


1..a


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Partly cloudy,
chance of scattered thunderstorms
today.


95 72 0.00 95 71 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Eclusiedaily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 93 Low: 72
40% chance of thunderstorms in
the afternoon and evening hours.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 72
Scattered thunderstorms near the coast with an
east wind. Rain chance 50%.
STTHURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 71
Numerous storms will pop by late day and push
Toward the coast. Rain chance 60%.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 98/76
Record 99/63
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 87
Departure from mean +6
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.12 in.
Total for the year 29.97 in.
Normal for the year 24.96 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 379
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, Grasses, Palm
Today's Count: 4.0/12
Wednesday's Count: 4.9
Thursday's Count: 3.6
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly na.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/5 TUESDAY 9:52 3:40 10:17 4:05
7/6 WEDNESDAY 10:47 4:35 11:12 5:00


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:33 P.M .
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:37 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.........................11:01 A.M.
JULY 23 JULY 30 MOONSET TODAY .......................... 11:35 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:35 a/5:03 a 9:13 p/5:14 p
Crystal River"* 7:56 a/2:25 a 7:34 p/2:36 p
Withlacoochee* 5:43 a/12:13 a 5:21 p/12:24 p
Homosassa*** 8:45 a/4:02 a 8:23 p/4:13 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
10:12 a/5:43 a 10:13 p/6:09 p
8:33 a/3:05 a 8:34 p/3:31 p
6:20 a/12:53 a 6:21 p/1:19p
9:22 a/4:42 a 9:23 p/5:08 p


Gulf water
temperature



90�
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.84 27.77 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.80 35.77 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.16 37.14 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.73 37.72 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


86 64
96 68
86 64 .49
95 73
90 72
99 69
89 70
83 61
95 73 1.71
94 57
90 70
80 62
87 64
92 74
84 71
93 70 .13
89 65
84 70 .26
84 68
97 75
87 72
90 62
10078
99 59
86 67
85 68
99 76
84 69 .28
85 70
88 67
97 78
85 71 .01
99 77
93 80
94 74
75 63
86 71
95 77
84 61
90 68
92 74 .04
94 74
89 71


87 62
94 70
87 64
93 72
86 68
98 72
90 69
89 59
92 73
93 58
85 70
76 64
80 64
92 72
87 62
92 71
87 72
86 66
80 67
94 71
85 63
89 55
99 76
87 62
88 68
86 69
98 74
87 70
88 63
88 64
97 77
87 67
95 72
103 88
96 72
75 67
89 71
96 75
82 64
84 65
92 75
94 71
92 71


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tlesday
H LPcp. Fcst H L


New Orleans 94 77 ts 92 78
New York City 86 70 s 88 71
Norfolk 96 71 1.50 ts 85 73
Oklahoma City 102 73 pc 102 74
Omaha 86 67 ts 89 69
Palm Springs 10585 pc 103 82
Philadelphia 90 72 s 90 70
Phoenix 10483 pc 108 88
Pittsburgh 84 65 s 85 61
Portland, ME 81 63 .26 s 84 58
Portland, Ore 81 53 s 84 62
Providence, R.I. 87 67 s 89 66
Raleigh 99 71 1.02 ts 92 73
Rapid City 88 65 pc 82 63
Reno 98 60 ts 97 64
Rochester, NY 84 59 s 83 63
Sacramento 10064 s 103 69
St. Louis 85 71 .06 pc 90 71
St. Ste. Marie 82 52 ts 75 59
Salt Lake City 88 75 ts 90 69
San Antonio 96 76 pc 96 74
San Diego 77 66 pc 74 65
San Francisco 69 55 s 77 55
Savannah 93 72 s 92 73
Seattle 78 51 s 76 55
Spokane 82 53 s 85 52
Syracuse 84 64 s 86 62
Topeka 90 69 pc 95 72
Washington 91 73 ts 88 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 108 Duncan, Okla. LOW34 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/77/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 75/58/pc Mexico City
Athens 89/70/s Montreal
Beijing 91/74/pc Moscow
Berlin 74/56/pc Paris
Bermuda 84/77/ts Rio
Cairo 92/69/s Rome
Calgary 77/52/s Sydney
Havana 90/74/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 91/82/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 85/62/s Warsaw


76/61/s
75/58/sh
96/68/s
74/55/ts
85/64/s
74/62/ts
82/55/pc
72/62/pc
83/71/ts
62/45/s
87/75/ts
84/66/pc
69/54/sh


"We want to catch bass,
they are good eating," Dar-
ling Reagle said with a big
smile. "We roast the mud fish
for our dogs and hogs. They
love it!"
Larry Van Etten, of Inver-
ness, stood alongside the
wooden dock as the couple
put their canoe in the water,
pointing at the turtles climb-
ing on a log on the other side
of the shore.
For him, it was not only cel-
ebrating "our great nation." It
was also about appreciating
life and making memories.
"I am a veteran," he said.
"(and this day) to me, is about
freedoms and about fighting
for them."
Chronicle ManagingEditor
Sandra Frederick can be
reached at (352) 564-2930 or
sfrederick@ymail. com.


Legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Miscellaneous Notices.......................C11
Notice to Creditors/Administration...C11

Surplus Property................................Cl1


C I T R U S


COUNTY T


LHKON1CLt
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Blvd.
Crystal River,
FL 34429


Inverness
office

106 W. Main
St.,
Inverness, FL
34450


Gerry M ulligan ....................................................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
Charlie Brennan................................. ..................................... Editor, 563-3225
Tom Feeney ........................................................ Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stew art .................................................... Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ................................................................ Online M manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan .... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Doug Yates .............................................................. Classified M manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon ....................... ............................. Business M manager, 564-2908
Mike Arnold.......................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions........................................ Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...................................................John Coscia, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff .............................................................. ......... . . . ................. . 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9

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44.
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Dunlentield
Dn ven -- Cannondale Dr
A IMeadowcrest
N - :

I I. Courthouse
To pkins St. ! square



W ' A

Who's in charge:


JULY 8


0
JULY 15


A4 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

her father, a former police
officer, decided to make the
death look like a homicide
by placing duct tape over
the child's mouth and
dumping the body in some
nearby woods. George An-
thony has denied that.
Prosecutor Jeff Ashton
told the jurors no one makes
an innocent accident look
like murder
"That's absurd. Nothing
has been presented to you to
make that any less absurd,"
Ashton said. He also spent
significant time reminding
jurors about forensic evi-
dence that he said links An-
thony to her daughter's
death, including the smell
and chemical signature of
decomposition in her car.
Lead prosecutor Linda
Drane Burdick followed
Ashton, telling the jurors
that prosecutors presented
every piece of evidence they
promised in May during
opening statements. With-
out saying it, she was point-
ing out that defense
attorneys never presented
direct evidence backing up
their contentions that the
child drowned.
She then hammered on
the lies Casey Anthony, then
22, told from June 16, 2008,
when her daughter was last
seen, and a month later
when sheriff's investigators
were notified. Those in-
clude the single mother


BIRTHDAY
Continued from Page Al

nation's birthday, but it also
was Malia Obama's 13th
birthday. The president's
eldest daughter had to
share her parents with hun-
dreds of others as Barack
Obama and first lady
Michelle Obama invited
troops and their families to
attend a special barbecue
and USO concert on the
South Lawn.
Some of the Republicans
hoping to replace Obama in
the White House spent part
of the day campaigning in
states where presidential
politics are as much a part
of the holiday as fireworks
and barbecues
U.S. Rep. Michelle Bach-
mann, of Minnesota,
marched in a parade in
Clear Lake, Iowa. In New
Hampshire, former Massa-
chusetts Gov Mitt Romney
and former Utah Gov Jon
Huntsman both marched in
the Amherst parade. Busi-
nessman and GOP hopeful
Herman Cain skipped the
parades but threw out the
first pitch at a minor league
baseball game in Manches-
ter, N.H.


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TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 A5


Associated Press
Casey Anthony sits with her attorney Dorothy Clay Sims on Monday, the last day of arguments in Anthony's murder trial
at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando. Anthony has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of her
daughter, Caylee, and could face the death penalty if convicted of that charge.


telling her parents that she
couldn't produce Caylee be-
cause the girl was with a
nanny named Zanny, a
woman who doesn't exist;
that she and her daughter
were spending time in Jack-
sonville with a rich
boyfriend who doesn't exist;
and that Zanny had been
hospitalized after an out-of-
town traffic crash and that
they were spending time
with her.
"Responses to grief are as
varied as the day is long, but
responses to guilt are oh, so
predictable," Drane Bur-


dick said. "What do guilty
people do? They lie. They
avoid. They run. They mis-
lead, not just to their family,
but the police. They divert
attention away from them-
selves and they act like
nothing is wrong. That's why
you heard about what hap-
pened in those 31 days."
Burdick concluded the
state's case by showing the
jury two side-by-side im-
ages. One showed CaseyAn-
thony smiling and partying
in a nightclub during the
month Caylee was missing.
The other was of the "beau-


tiful life" tattoo she got a day
before her family and law
enforcement first learned of
the child's disappearance.
"At the end of this case, all
you have to ask yourself is
whose life was better with-
out Caylee?" Burdick asked.
"This is your answer."
Anthony sat stone-faced
during much of the prosecu-
tors' arguments, but occa-
sionally shook her head in
disagreement and spoke
under her breath.
Defense attorneys con-
tend Anthony's lies and er-
ratic behavior were brought


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama welcome military families to an In-
dependence Day celebration Monday on the South Lawn of the White House.


"Aside from the politick-
ing and the handshaking
and the enthusiasm that our
campaign is determined to
generate in this state, we're
going to reflect on what it
means to be an American,"
Huntsman told reporters.
"To share inalienable rights,
to share our Constitutional
privileges."
In New York, where fire-
works are banned on city
streets, residents were wait-


ing for a massive display
over the Hudson River set to
music.
Resident Karina Suriano,
23, wore patriotic colors and
bright red feather earrings
as she sold beach supplies
in Brooklyn. For her, the
holiday is a cash cow.
"It means money to me,"
she said with a grin.
She sold a water gun to the
mother of 8-year-old De-
jairah Mooreland. What does


Happy Anniversary! j

Thank You Citrus County for 17 Years.


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CITRUS MEMORIAL
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the holiday signify to her?
"Indepencendy!" the little
girl exclaimed, not quite
getting the holiday's name
right. "Freedom! America!"


Is a Continuous Glucose

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Glucose Monitoring System can be used by type 1 and
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control to improve the health and quality of their lives.
The Glucose monitor should be a part of managing
your diabetes and protecting your health. Once you
decide it is right for you, your doctor will need to write
a prescription for it. Contact your insurance provider
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on by her grief over her dead
child and the sexual abuse
she suffered as a child from
her father. George Anthony
has denied that allegation,
and the judge said no evi-
dence has been presented to
support it.
Defense attorney Jose
Baez said during his closing
argument Sunday that the
prosecutors' case was so
weak they tried to portray
Anthony as "a lying, no-good
slut" and that their forensic
evidence was based on a
"fantasy" He said Caylee's
death was "an accident that


snowballed out of control."
Baez began his closing ar-
gument Sunday with his
biggest question: How did
Caylee die? Neither prose-
cutors nor the defense have
offered firm proof.
He attacked the prosecu-
tion's forensic evidence. He
said air analysis of the trunk
of Anthony's car, which al-
legedly showed air mole-
cules consistent with
decomposition, could not be
duplicated. No one could
prove a stain found in the
trunk was caused by
Caylee's body decomposing
there. And witnesses
showed maggots found in
the trunk came from a bag
of trash that was found
there, he said.
"They throw enough
against the wall and see
what sticks. That is what
they're doing ... right down
to the cause of death," Baez
said. He conceded his client
had told elaborate lies and
invented imaginary friends
and even a fake father for
Caylee, but he said that
doesn't mean she killed her
daughter.
Baez also attacked
George Anthony as unreli-
able. He said a suicide note
that George Anthony wrote
in January 2009 that
claimed no knowledge of
what happened to Caylee
was self-serving and the at-
tempt was a fraud. He said
George Anthony claimed he
was going to kill himself
with a six-pack of beer and
some high-blood pressure
medicine.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


European emperor's son dies


Otto von

Habsburg dies

at age 98

Associated Press

BERLIN - Otto von Hab-
sburg saw the crumbling of
the empire his family had
ruled for centuries and
emerged from its ashes as a
champion of a united and
democratic Europe.
The oldest son of Austria-
Hungary's last emperor
fought Nazism and Soviet
communism
during his
1 o n g
decades of
> exile from
his home-
S land, and
was lionized
by leaders
Otto von across the
Otto von
Habsburg continent as
is seen "a great Eu-
in 2007. ropean."
Habsburg
died Monday at age 98 in his
villa in Poecking in south-
ern Germany, where he had
lived since the 1950s, with
his seven children nearby,
his spokeswoman Eva Dem-
merle told The Associated
Press.
Habsburg used his influ-
ence in a vain struggle to
keep the Nazis from annex-
ing Austria before World
War II, then campaigned for
the opening of the Iron Cur-
tain in the decades after the
war
With the fall of the Berlin
Wall, he used his seat in Eu-
ropean Parliament to lobby
for expanding the European
Union to include former
Eastern bloc nations.
"My father was a towering
personality," Habsburg's old-
est son Karl Habsburg-
Lothringen told the Austria
Press Agency "With him we
lose a great European who
has influenced everything we
do today beyond measure."
A leader
Born in 1912 in Austria,
Habsburg witnessed the
family's decline after the
empire was dismantled and
Austria became a republic
following World War I. He
became head of the family
at his father's death in 1922
and continued to claim the
throne until the 1960s.
He was a member of the
European Parliament for
the conservative Bavarian
Christian Social Union in
southern Germany and
served as president of the
Pan-European League from
1979 to 1999.
In that role, he was in-
strumental in helping or-
ganize the Pan-European
Picnic peace demonstration
in 1989 on the border ofAus-
tria and Hungary The bor-
der was briefly opened in a
symbolic gesture, which cre-
ated the opportunity for 600
East Germans to flee com-
munism months before the
fall of the Berlin Wall.
It was the first time an
Eastern European nation
had opened its borders, and
is widely seen as the start of
the fall of communism.
An honoree
European Commission
President Jose Manuel Bar-
roso mourned the passing of
"a great European ... who
gave an important impetus
to the European project
throughout his rich life".
"He made a central con-


Associated Press
Archduke Otto von Habsburg poses in the uniform of a
captain of the Tyrolean rifleman's regiment Dec. 3, 1936, in
Austria. A spokeswoman for von Habsburg says the oldest
son of Austria-Hungary's last emperor and longtime head of
one of Europe's most influential families has died at age 98.


tribution to the opening of
the Iron Curtain and the
peaceful reunification of
our continent that had been
divided for too long," Bar-
roso said in a statement. "I
will particularly remember
his strong stance against all
forms of totalitarianism and
on Europe's fundamental
values."
Hungarian lawmakers
held a minute of silence in
parliament honoring Habs-
burg's memory, where he
was remembered for his
support through speeches
given around the world of
Hungary's failed 1956 revo-
lution against Soviet occu-
pation and for his backing of
the country's efforts to join
the European Union.
"His life and fate carried
with it the history of the
20th century," parliamen-
tary speaker Laszlo Kover
said. After the fall of com-
munism, "he personally did
much to strengthen the
process of our European in-
tegration."
Many in Hungary also re-
spected Habsburg because
of his ability to speak the fa-
mously difficult native
language.
Family ties
The House of Habsburg
rose to power in Europe at
the end of the 13th Century
and at its height ruled much
of the continent.
Born in 1912 in Re-
ichenau, Austria, Otto von
Habsburg became crown
prince when his father,
Charles I, was crowned em-
peror in 1916, during World
War I.
But after Austria and Ger-
many lost World War I, the
Austria-Hungarian Empire
was dismantled, Charles I
had to abdicate and Austria


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went on to become a republic.
In 1919, Charles and his
family had to leave the
country for what turned out
to be permanent exile in
several different countries,
including Switzerland, Bel-
gium, and France.
After his father's death in
1922, the nine-year-old Otto
officially took over as the
head of the House of
Habsburg.
Otto tried to negotiate his
return to Austria in 1935
and again in 1938 when he
even sought to become
chancellor to fight the ex-
pected invasion by Hitler's
troops, but could not gather
enough support
Credentials
Instead, he found a chan-
nel through the U.S. em-
bassy in Paris to contact
President Franklin D. Roo-
sevelt and later claimed to
have prevented Allied
bombings of a number of
Austrian cities by pleading
with the U.S. military
He was also credited with
having helped about 15,000
Austrians, including many
Jews, escape the Nazis. At
the same time, as he told the
Austrian paper Die Presse
in 2007, he negotiated Aus-
tria's postwar fate with Roo-
sevelt, Winston Churchill
and Charles de Gaulle.
"Otto von Habsburg was
one of the great personali-
ties of modern European
history," said Karl Hafen,


head of the German chap-
ter of the International
Society for Human Rights.
"Habsburg was a great
defender of freedom rights,
a defender of minorities
and ethnic groups and an
influential statesman. His
resistance to the Nazis, like
his commitment to recon-
ciliation and the unifica-
tion of Europe influenced
and inspired people."
In exile
From early in World
War II in 1940 to after the
Allied invasion of France
in 1944, Habsburg lived in
Washington D.C., before
returning to Europe to
live in France, and then in
Poecking, Germany after
1954.
Still, he was not allowed
to return to Austria until
1966, five years after he of-
ficially renounced the
crown. He later claimed to
be baffled by the hostility
and criticism he faced in
his home country
Despite his opposition to
the Nazis, Habsburg was at
times faulted at home for
being too right-wing.
In 1961, Spanish dictator
Francisco Franco offered
to make him king of Spain
after his own death. Habs-
burg declined, but later
praised the fascist leader
for helping refugees, call-
ing him a "dictator of the
south American type... not
totalitarian like Hitler or
Stalin."
More recently he was
criticized for remarks in
2008 in which he insisted
Austrians were the vic-
tims of Hitler - who was
Austrian born - rather
than accomplices.
Legacy
Habsburg's wife,
Regina, died last year. The
couple had seven chil-
dren. Their eldest son,
Karl, now runs the family's
affairs and has been the
official head of the House
of Habsburg since 2007.
Habsburg will be buried
July 16 in the Emperor
Tomb in Vienna, below
the Austrian capital's Ca-
puchin Church.
Before then, his body
will be held in the St. Ul-
rich church in Poecking
for three days for people
to pay their respects.
Requiems are also
planned for Poecking, Mu-
nich, Mariazell, Vienna
and Budapest, Demmerle
said.




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Obituaries


James
Carter, 61
CITRUS HILLS
James Calvin Carter, D.C.,
63, Citrus Hills, died sud-
denly July 3,
4' 2011. A na-
, tive of
Canons-
Sburg, PA, he
was born
Jan. 22,
1948, to the
late Glenn
James and Mari-
Carter etta (Patter-
son) Carter
and came to this area in
1984 from Winter Haven,
FL. He was a chiropractic
physician and founder of In-
verness Chiropractic Clinic
27 years ago. Dr. Carter was
a U.S. naval veteran and
graduate of California State
University in Pennsylvania
followed by a degree from
Palmer Chiropractic Col-
lege of Davenport, Iowa.
Survivors include his wife
of 27 years, Linda Botkin
Carter, Citrus Hills; his
daughter, Sarah Carter, Cit-
rus Hills; two brothers,
Vance Carter of Orlando
and Wayne Carter of North
Ridgeville, OH; one sister,
Patricia Marcuri and her
husband, Russ of Citrus
Hills; and many nieces and
nephews.
At Dr. Carter's request,
there will be no services.
His family will plan a Cele-
bration of Life at a later
date. Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is as-
sisting the family
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials requested to the Self
Realization Fellowship,


3880 San Rafael Avenue,
Los Angeles, CA 90065-3298.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Ann
Cieciorka, 88
BEVERLY HILLS
Ann T Cieciorka, 88, of
Beverly Hills, died June 29,
2011. Visitation will be from
3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 5,
2011, at Fero Funeral Home.
Funeral Mass will be at 11
a.m. Wednesday, July 6,
2011, at Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church with burial
to follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.

Patricia
Robinson, 81
HOMOSASSA
Patricia C. Robinson, 81,
of Homosassa, died Satur-
day, July 2, 2011.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Thursday, July 7.
at Wilder Funeral Home,
Homosassa.




Edward
Sweeney, 83
FLORAL CITY
Edward Earl Sweeney,
83, Floral City, died June 7,
2011, under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County. A
Celebration of Life Memor-
ial Service will be at 1 p.m.
Saturday, July 9,2011, at his
residence. Inurnment was
at the Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory was
in charge of arrangements.


SO YOU KNOW
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits free and
paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicleonline.com or
phone (352) 563-5660 for details and price options.
* Paid obituaries are printed as submitted by funeral
homes.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Program welcomes home service members


Back from Iraq to visit


Special to the Chronicle

It has been a busy month
for Operation Welcome
Home, Citrus County's vol-
unteer organization devoted
to welcoming and honoring
local veterans returning
from the war on terrorism.
On June 14, Air Force's
A1C Eric Baum, a C-130 air-
craft crew chief, was pre-
sented a welcome home
basket during the Inverness
Flag Day ceremony Baum
is a 2008 graduate of Citrus
High School.
On June 17, Marine Corps
LCPL Jacob Moshier, a Cen-
tral Operations Center
radio operator and 2008
graduate of Lecanto High
School, was presented a
welcome home basket dur-
ing a dinner hosted by
American Legion Post 155.
On June 21, Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 4337
hosted an Operation Wel-
come Home ceremony and
dinner honoring Navy LS3
Michael Richardson, a 2008
graduate of Lecanto High
School and presently a lo-
gistics specialist who re-
cently returned from the
USS Vinson. Also present
was A1C Baum and PVT
Christopher Grau, a mili-
tary police officer from the
690th Military Police Com-
pany in Crystal River.
These individuals had been
honored at past Operation
Welcome Home cere-
monies for their service.
Air Force CMSgt (retired)
John Stewart, secretary of
Citrus County's Operation
Welcome Home program,
presented each with a cer-
tificate of appreciation for
his military service. Bar-
bara Mills, president of Op-
eration Welcome Home,
presented a gift basket to
LS3 Richardson filled with
items donated by local busi-
nesses and private citizens
supporting the effort
During the presentation,
Stewart said it was heart-
warming to see local veter-
ans' groups gather to
welcome home Citrus
County's veterans.
"I am a Vietnam veteran,
as are many here tonight,
and clearly remember the
unfortunate welcome home
we received when return-
ing from war. If anything, it
should be our era of mili-
tary service smartly step-


Special to the Chronicle


June 14: Air Force's A1C Eric Baum.


June 17: Marine Corps LCPL Jacob Moshier.


Special to the Chronicle
U.S. Army SPC Thomas Maher of B Company 3-7 Infantry,
4th Brigade, returned Saturday, July 2, from deployment in
Iraq. His parents and neighbors welcomed home. Residents
of Citrus County for more than 20 years, Parents Thomas
and Josephine Maher and his brother Daniel live in Oak Vil-
lage, part of Sugarmill Woods. Both Maher brothers at-
tended Lecanto Primary, Middle and High schools.


ABOVE and
LEFT:
Neighbors
in Sugarmill
Woods set
up flags
and signs
to welcome
SPC Maher
back home.


une 21: Navy LS3 Michael Richardson with A1C Baum and PVT Christopher Grau.
June 21: Navy LS3 Michael Richardson with AIC Baum and PVT Christopher Grau.


ping forward and warmly
welcoming the young men
and women in uniform
today returning from the
horrors of fighting for free-
dom," he said. "We were
badly treated and should


never, ever, allow it to hap-
pen again."
Operation Welcome
Home always needs sup-
port from local residents
and businesses and their
donations will allow the or-


ganization to continue the
program. To learn more
about Operation Welcome
Home, call Barbara Mills at
(352) 422-6236, or visit
www.operationwelcome
homeveterans.org.


SPC Maher graduated from Saint Leo University with a de-
gree in criminal justice, went to the police academy and
then joined the Army.


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592-0705 TUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River,
Florida that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held relative to Ordinance No. 11-0-
05, regarding the Gardner Voluntary Annexation of 233 Acres into the municipal
boundaries of the City of Crystal River, Florida. The Public Hearing is scheduled
for Monday, July 11, 2011 during the Regular Council Meetings starting @
7:00 pm. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 123 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal
River, Florida.
ORDINANCE NO. 11-0-05
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA,
AUTHORIZING THE VOLUNTARY ANNEXATION OF 23293
ACRES (MOL) OF PROPERTY OWNED BY RAY STEVENSON &
LON GARDNER, ET AL, INTO THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF
THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, PURSUANT TO
SECTION 171.044, FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING A LEGAL
DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE
VOLUNTARY ANNEXATION; PROVIDING FOR PUBLICATION;
PROVIDING FOR FILINGS WITH THE APPROPRIATE
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.







r--mr-- - -

7-



















ThI ..t 1., ntarily annexed into the corporate limits of the City of
( . I I . - I. I . as follows:
THE NORTHWEST � AND THE NORTHWEST V OF THE NORTHEAST V
AND PART OF THE SOUTHWEST V NORTH OF STATE ROAD NO 494,ALL
IN SECTION 4 TOWNSHIP 19S RANGE 17E PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PARCEL: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 494 AND THE EAST LINE OF THE
NORTHWEST % OF THE SOUTHWEST 4 SECTION 4 TOWNSHIP 19S
RANGE 17E, THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST LINE 200 FEET, THENCE
WEST PERPENDICULAR TO THE EAST LINE 200 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
PARALLEL TO THE EAST LINE 225 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 494, THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY 202 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
This ordinance in its entirety, may be inspected at the office of the City Clerk
during regular working hours. Any and all interested parties may appear at the
hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the
proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105 Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City
Manager's Office, 123 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428,
(352) 795-4216, at least two (2) days before the meeting.
By: Carol Harrington, CMC
City Clerk
DD00GON 0008GON


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LOCAL


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 A7







Page A8 TUESDAY, JULY5, 2011



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .................. ....................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz......................................citizen mem ber
Founded Mac Harris .................... ............ citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CLOSED FOR BUSINESS?





Rules create




confusion




for owners


When commissioners
voted 4-1 last Tuesday
to deny a permit for a
proposed limerock mine near
the historic Red Level Ceme-
tery, were they sending the sig-
nal that Citrus County is closed
to mining business?
Developers and businesses
until recently have viewed Cit-
rus County as a difficult place
to do business.
That seemingly THE I
changed with the
addition of new BOCC
commissioners mining p
who adopted the
mantra: "Citrus OUR 01
County is open for
business." Does th
Those words that Citr
turned to action as open tc
commissioners in- busi
structed planning
and development staff to ease
some of the barriers busi-
nesses and developers might
face while doing business in
Citrus County. The commission
also voted to reorganize the
Economic Development Coun-
cil in a way that put businesses
first.
However, the latest vote
seems to move away from that
philosophy as commissioners
bowed to emotional outcries
against the mine and decided
not to approve Nature Coast
Mine LLC's master plan for a
150-acre mine north of Crystal
River.
One reason for this decision
commissioners might offer is
they denied the plan because it
called for a change in the 1,000-


GOP's fault
A recent poll showed 26 per-
cent of Americans blame the
Bush administration and the Re-
publicans for the economic trou-
ble we are now in, and only 8
percent put blame on President
Obama. I guess the Republicans
feel if they yell a lie loud
and long enough, people 0
will believe it. Ain't going
to work, GOP Americans
are smarter now than
ever before. They see you
for what you are.
Long tradition
Ever since Eleanor Roo-
sevelt, first ladies have CALL
made political trips rep- 5 -
resenting their husbands. 5
None were attacked for
doing so until Mrs. Obama. I'd
ask those attacking this first lady
to examine their motives.
Chicken feed
I'm calling in reference to Capt.
Schmidt's article about scallop in-
nards when he's cleaning scal-
lops. Another use for them that a
lot of people here in Citrus
County can use if they keep back-
yard chickens: The chickens love
the inside of the shellfish. Just a
thought.
Sick society
To the person who is all excited
about being able to see Channel 9
bring the Casey Anthony case on
TV: That is about the grossest
thing I've heard. If there's nothing
better in one's life to do but watch


S

3

P

li

n


I


foot setback, and they do not
want to start down that road.
But isn't that what removing
the barriers to business
means?
The land in question is al-
ready zoned extractive, but
with such a distant setback,
one wonders how a mining
company could ever use their
property to mine.
We understand
SUE how commission-
S ers would not
rejects want mining to
proposal. take place so
close to a ceme-
'INION: tery or a residen-
tial area, but
s signal understand the
us is not frustration of
mining property owners
ess? when land they
own is zoned ex-
tractive and they are not al-
lowed to mine because of other
barriers put into place by
commissioners.
If commissioners are open
for some types of businesses
and not others, then express
that openly. They should also
amend their zoning map to
eliminate extractive areas that
can never be used to mine
under current setback rules.
This would eliminate future
confusion for those with min-
ing interests.
Meanwhile, we wonder if
there will be mining in the fu-
ture for Citrus County, and if
not, will taxpayers be footing
the bill as property owners file
claims under the Bert Harris
Act?


others who are in grief and tur-
moil ... So ridiculous that this is
the type of thing that people like
to see - other people in pain and
suffering. What a sick society.
Made in China
This is so ironic. I received from
the Disabled Veterans a T-shirt
that states, "Freedom is
JND not free." Upon closer in-
Sspection, I noticed that
Sthe T-shirt was made in
China. Isn't that ironic?
Automatic doors
All supermarkets have
electric sliding doors that
Open automatically. Why
is it department stores,
)579 other large stores and
mall entrances don't
have them?
There are a lot of handicapped,
particularly seniors, in this county
who find it almost impossible to
get to open those heavy doors
when they're using walkers, canes
and wheelchairs. We would appre-
ciate some consideration for our
handicaps.
Bring back SS office
I was a construction worker on
that building we have here in Cit-
rus County in Inverness, the gov-
ernment building. Why can't they
put the Social Security (office)
there? It's costing the taxpayers
money to have it sit there and do
nothing.
Come on, people. Get off your
backside and let's get Social Se-
curity down here and let's not let
the government run our lives.


"Private property began the instant
somebody had a mind of his own."
e. e. cummings, 1894-1962


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


'No' to more restrictions!


JACK REYNOLDS
Special to the Chronicle
As a native Floridian with
multi-generational roots, I
love the opportunity to ex-
perience the outdoors and the
native wildlife and understand
conservation needs, but when is
enough ENOUGH?!? I moved
into Citrus in the '80s largely due
to the outdoor opportunities and
I specifically selected property
outside of the "no wake" zone so
I could access the gulf quickly,
enjoy the pristine, crystal clear
water and ski from just outside
my back porch.
Since that time, the no wake
zones and no entry zones have ex-
panded/extended and the addi-
tional regulations and
restrictions have grown. While I
still enjoy Crystal River, where
"man and manatee play" (if it is
still permissible under current
regulations), it is no longer crys-
tal clear or pristine. We should be
focusing our efforts on cleaning
the bay, not instilling further reg-
ulations for the manatee. It is
time to say NO MORE RESTRIC-
TIONS!
These new proposed regula-
tions became public in the past
few days. We, the people, who will
be affected have had no input. To
call a public meeting two weeks
later during a holiday week is
certainly not the democratic
process I would expect.
My 9-year-old son at his birth-
day last week asked me if I could
teach him to ski. When I moved to
Citrus, every afternoon after
work, I would ski in King's Bay I
taught both of my daughters to ski
here and can't begin to count the
hours we spent boating, skiing,
tubing, and enjoying the natural
beauty of King's Bay. I certainly
do take it personally when the
Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)
has plans that would stop this for
future generations.
The premise that FWS uses to
enact this is preposterous:
"There is substantial evidence
showing such establishment is
necessary to prevent the taking of
one or more manatees." Clearly,
any reasonable person could con-
clude that we should prevent all
boating in Florida, because a
boat anywhere in Florida might
TAKE a manatee. There has to be
a balance!
Based on the FWS data, we
must be doing a great job cur-
rently, as we have increased the
population from 100 manatees in
the 1980s to more than 550 mana-
tees now, and by their own testi-
mony we have gone from 30,000 to


40,000 manatee viewers annually
to more than 100,000 annually
They also stated that 13 of the 16
watercraft-related manatee
deaths have occurred in the past
10 years. Well, unfortunately, if
you increase the population from
100 to 550, more will die from
some cause. Also, with more ob-
servers, you are more apt to know
that a death has occurred than
you would have been in the past
It should also be noted that a
manatee injured elsewhere
might die from its injuries here,
and it would be reported as a fa-
tality for Crystal River Clearly,
none of us desire to see any harm
to the manatee - even if not eth-
ically, think what an economic
impact they have, with more than
100,000 people annually viewing
them according to FWS.
Clearly the water quality has
deteriorated over the years, no
doubt from many factors, but if it
impacts the manatees, maybe this
is what FWS should concentrate
their efforts on. Has the water
quality impacted the aquatic veg-
etation? How many manatees can
be supported in our area based
on the food supply? Is a large
concentration of a species more
susceptible to disease, starvation,
predation? Maybe FWS should
be working to diversify the loca-
tion of manatees instead of addi-
tional regulations that impact our
lives, our finances and those of
our children.
Looking further at the proposal
making some temporary guide-
lines permanent causes me even
further concern. All laws and reg-
ulations are subject to interpre-
tation; however, as written, the
interpretation is left wide open:
* "Chasing or pursuing mana-
teei." - when we or a tourist
wishes to swim with a manatee,
are we not by definition pursuing
them?
* "Disturbing or touching rest-
ing or feeding manatee(s)" - Can
we document that manatees do
anything other than feed, rest,
swim and breed?
* "Poking, prodding or stab-
bing, or attempting to poke, prod
or stab a manatee(s) with any-
thing, including hands and feet"
- So if we gently touch a mana-
tee with a hand, could someone
interpret that as a poke?
* "Separating a mother and
calf or attempting to separate a
mother and calf" - So if I am
standing in the bay and the
mother swims on one side of me
and the calf on the other, have I
separated the mother and calf?


10 _


LETTER to the Editor


Property rights
Mr Mulligan, you again have
editorialized on the topic of
speed on the bay, an emotional
issue. You are not alone: Bay
News 9 did a survey asking
whether the manatees should be
protected - of course they
should, but within reason. It is im-
portant to note that the devil is in
the details; the much larger ques-
tion is: Are you willing to give up
your property and water rights to
a federal bureaucracy (The U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service)?
Quoting from the management
plan printed in the Chronicle:
"Manatee protection areas are
designated in the water and do


not include land acquisition or
land parcels. Public and private
waterfront property owners and
their designees retain riparian
access to their properties and
can maintain property and wa-
terways when their property ad-
joins or is located in a manatee
refuge. Public and private water-
front property owners WOULD
BE REQUIRED TO OBTAIN A
LETTER OF AUTHORIZATION
ALLOWING THEM TO OPER-
ATE THEIR BOATS AND CON-
DUCT PROPERTY AND
WATERWAY MAINTENANCE
ACTIVITIES IN A MANNER
CONSISTENT WITH THE
REFUGE OR SANCTUARY
MEASURES THAT ARE IN EF-


FECT ADJACENT TO THEIR
PROPERTY"
It does not take a constitutional
lawyer to figure this out!!! Sec-
ondly, inasmuch as this is a "PER-
MANENT RULE," once enacted,
the rules remain in force even if
the manatee goes off the endan-
gered list. They will tell you that
they will not overreach, but do
you trust an agency whose rule-
making process is by design less
than transparent? You as editors
should always err on the side of
protecting property rights, as well
as transparency in government,
which in most cases you do.
C. Robert Mercer
Crystal River


* "Using mooring and float
lines that can entangle mana-
tees" - So I can idle a boat, but
not moor because a manatee
could become entangled? I can
drive my boat (with a sticker!!!) to
my house, but can't tie to the dock
because a manatee could get tan-
gled? Are we now closing the bay
to all crabbers because a mana-
tee could become entangled?
You cannot legislate common
sense. Let's educate, not litigate.
The waterways are one of the
things that make our community
unique. I, for one, do not wish to
"be required to obtain a sticker
and letter of authorization allow-
ing them to operate their boats
and conduct property and water-
way maintenance activities in a
manner consistent with the refuge
or sanctuary measures that are in
effect adjacent to their property."
This year, FWS wants to make
King's Bay slow speed year-round
because "the number of mana-
tees using King's Bay throughout
the year has simply outgrown the
capacity of existing protected
areas." Let's see, the more suc-
cessful we are in growing the
manatee population, the more
protected area we can create.
The bay is already closed when
the majority of the manatees are
here. We have done an outstand-
ing job (from 100 to more than
550), but this becomes a self-ful-
filling prophecy: The better we
do, the more we close to human
activity. FWS has already indi-
cated that they may look to
change the manatee from an en-
dangered species to a threatened
species in the near future. We do
not need further restrictions.
Those in place are working.
We need to oppose these fur-
ther restrictions both individu-
ally and as a group. I know that
my opinions may not be the same
as yours, but in America, govern-
ment should be by the people. We
should have our individual and
collective voices heard. We
should never be put in a position
where we hear about a final rule
allowing us two weeks prior to a
public hearing on a holiday
week! America should be by the
people, FOR the people. Let our
voices be heard. Please plan to
attend the public hearing on July
7, or write opposing these pro-
posed FWS rules.
--In--
Jack Reynolds works for Bran-
nen Banks of Florida and is a
director of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Guest COLUMN





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Give Scott a shot
I totally agree with the
gentlemen who requested
we give Governor Scott a
chance. I believe he is
doing a good job and it
amazes me the majority of
the population wants
change as long as it doesn't
affect them. They want
their life to remain like it
is, however, it is OK to
change things in other peo-
ple's lives. I will con-
tinue to support Gov Scott
and give him the chance he
deserves.
Jeannine Robertson
Citrus Springs

Manatee refuge
Do you understand the
"logic" of spending the
time and treasure the vot-
ers of this county have so
far decided to, on an ani-
mal whose value to us
is largely emotional?
Except for the tour-boat
operators, nobody depends
on them for anything.
They are "cute" by some
standards, certainly not
threatening. They are
peaceful, and much like
water-based cows, fun to
hang around with and show
visitors and grandchildren.
Having said that, and as-
suming the accepted num-
ber of manatee residents to
be 300, I wanted to point
out in land resources
alone, the local residents,
and some likely unwitting
residents of places like
Wyoming or Nevada
(through government
grants) have spent a re-
ported $10,500,000 on a fa-
cility that is 99 percent
reclaimed land with some
springs that the manatees
frequent, mostly in the win-
ter months.
Simple math would indi-
cate each of the counted
300 residents have been
blessed by our friends and
neighbors with subsidized
quarters, to the tune of
$35,000 each!
If the Fish and Wildlife
department uses, let us say,
10 employees to care, man-
age and enforce their regu-
lations, and each employee
costs us a measly annual
$100,000 including salaries,
their health care, pension,
vehicle costs and expenses,
simple math tells us we are
accepting the expense of
$3,333 per year on each and
every one of our manatee
buddies.
Think about that for a
minute.
According to the Citrus
County school data, the
budget per human stu-
dent for 2009 was $3,971!
Wonder why we
are broke?
Robin Humphrey
Crystal River

Medicare and fraud
Several weeks ago, CNN
had an unusual expose - it
was on Medicare prescrip-
tion fraud. It is estimated
to run in the billions of dol-
lars each year. It is done in
several ways.
Some seniors on low So-
cial Security benefits, who
cannot make it on the
amount of benefits they re-
ceive, will sell their medica-
tions such as pain killers,
tranquilizers, sleeping pills,
muscle relaxants, etc., for a
much higher price than they
paid at the pharmacy These
seniors will suffer pain and
sell their legitimately pre-
scribed medications be-
cause they are too poor
TO SUBMIT
LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their
opinions in a letter to the
editor.
* All letters must be signed
and include a phone num-
ber and hometown, includ-
ing letters sent via email.
Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers


will not be published or
given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fair-
ness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer
than 350 words, and writ-
ers will be limited to three
letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The
Editor, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429. Or, fax to (352)
563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


There are also some very
desperate and poor seniors
with Medicare prescription
plans who will loan or sell
their cards to drug dealers,
who will then send seniors
in their "employ" to physi-
cians and pain clinics with
"made-up" symptoms of
pain, insomnia, etc. They
will then take their prescrip-
tions to pharmacies to have
them filled and turn over the
medications to drug dealers.
They will, in turn, sell these
pills to addicts at a hugely
inflated price.
Unfortunately, there are


some physicians and pain
clinics who do not insist on
a thorough exam and test
results to verify a patient's
claim for the need of cer-
tain drugs.
Poverty and inability to
exist on extremely low So-
cial Security benefits is
what drives some seniors to
participate in this type of
Medicare fraud.
There is no end to ways
Medicare and health insur-
ers are defrauded.
Margo Blum
Homosassa


IS


4U


' /


.


LONGEST HOURS * LEGENDARY


Selling information
I want to make the read-
ers of the Chronicle aware
of the fact that the state of
Florida is, and has been,
selling their complete
driver's license information
of the drivers in this state.
They have sold it to, and are
selling to such companies
as Soft Touch, Line Barge,
Lexis/Nexis, Explorer Infor-
mation Services, Choice
Point and E-funds. Why are
they continuing to sell all of
our information to these
companies, and for what
purpose? I think everyone
should stop that
information.


Alligator rights
This morning's paper
(June 20) had an article
about alligators in Her-
nando. That
woman (who)
keeps calling the
sheriff's depart-
ment because
she's seen a 5-foot
alligator, people
like that shouldn't
even be allowed to
live in Florida. The
alligators have got CAL
more rights than
the humans do - 56
they ought to
have, anyway. It's
a shame to put them to


A-


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TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 A9

death. They ain't doing no-
body any harm.
Nonsmoking room?
The Homosassa
Lions Club says
UND they have a non-
smoking room.
lWell, the people
that work there,
they stand and
hold the door
open and are con-
stantly in and out,
Sso that nonsmok-
S ing room has got
as much smoke in
)579 it as the rest of
the place. I would
not call that a
nonsmoking room.


-e

111


I 000805L


IIIi P











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Chavez returns to Venezuela after surgery


President arrives in middle ofnight

following cancer treatment in Cuba


Associated Press
CARACAS, Venezuela -
President Hugo Chavez made
a stunning middle-of-the-night
return home to Venezuela after
three weeks of cancer treat-
ment in Cuba, appearing de-
termined to dispel doubts
about his political future.
He projected a strong, vi-
brant image when he stepped
off the plane smiling early
Monday He hugged his vice
president, broke into song and
later raised a fist in triumph.
"It's the beginning of my re-
turn!" he declared on the
runway
But he also suggested he still
isn't ready for a full comeback,


Nation BRIEF

Wins again


Associated Press
Four-time reigning champ
Joey Chestnut, center,
raises his arm in victory as
he wins his fifth Nathan's
Famous Hot Dog Eating
World Championship with a
total of 62 hot dogs and
buns Monday at Coney
Island in the Brooklyn
borough of New York.


WorldBRIEF


Associated Press
Dominique Strauss-Kahn
leaves New York State
Supreme court with his
wife, Anne Sinclair, on
Friday in New York.
Strauss-Kahn faces
new complaint
PARIS - Dominique
Strauss-Kahn faced a potential
new sexual assault investiga-
tion Monday after a young
French writer said she would
formally accuse him of trying
to rape her during a 2002 book
interview - a dizzying turn of
events just as the former IMF
chief's fortunes seemed to be
growing brighter.
With France debating his
possible return to presidential
politics, Strauss-Kahn swiftly
hit back at author Tristane
Banon's plans to take him to
court over the attempted rape
accusations, labeling her ac-
count "imaginary" and counter-
ing with his own plans to file a
criminal complaint of slander.
The sordid exchange may
have deep ramifications for the
2012 presidential race in
France, where the surprise
weakening of the sexual assault
case against Strauss-Kahn in
New York last week sparked a
fierce debate about whether he
should return to politics if the
American case against him col-
lapses completely.
-From wire reports


saying he doesn't expect to at-
tend celebrations Tuesday
marking the 200th anniversary
of Venezuela's declaration of
independence from Spain.
For a president who excels
at showmanship, his tri-
umphant return was classic
Chavez and sent a powerful
message that he remains very
much in control. During
nearly a month in Cuba, un-
certainty has swirled in
Venezuela, both about how
sick he is and about what
could happen if cancer were
to force him from power
The long-term political im-
pact of fighting cancer for a
leader who thrives on the spot-
light remains unclear But


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Federal
Aviation Administration is creating
a new air traffic system that offi-
cials say will be as revolutionary for
civil aviation as was the advent of
radar six decades ago. But the pro-
gram is at a crossroads.
It's getting harder to pry money
out of Congress. The airline indus-
try is hesitating over the cost of
equipping its planes with new tech-
nology necessary to use the system.
And some experts say the U.S. could
lose its lead in the manufacture of
high tech aviation equipment to Eu-
ropean competitors because the
FAA is moving too slowly
Seventy-five years ago this week,
the federal government, spurred by
the nascent airline industry, began
tracking planes at the nation's first
air traffic control centers in Newark,
N.J., Chicago and Cleveland.
The original group of 15 con-
trollers, relying on radioed position


Associated Press
In this undated photo provided by
CFM International, the newly
designed LEAP turbofan engine is
being tested.


Chavez will likely play up his
return to the fullest to rally
supporters and strengthen his
movement as he looks ahead to
2012 elections in which his al-
lies say they are convinced he
will still be their candidate.
Unanswered questions
about Chavez's health abound.
He has said he underwent sur-
gery to remove a cancerous
tumor, and his foreign minister
said it was extracted from the
same part of the "pelvic re-
gion" where Chavez had an ab-
scess removed in an initial
operation in Cuba. But Chavez
hasn't said what type of cancer
is involved or whether he is re-
ceiving chemotherapy, radia-
tion or some other treatment.
Medical experts have said
based on Chavez's account, it's
most likely he has colorectal
cancer, but Chavez has not con-
firmed that.
Many Chavez supporters


reports from pilots, plotted the
progress of flights using blackboards,
maps and boat-shaped weights. Air
traffic control took a technological
leap forward in the 1950s with the in-
troduction of radar That's still the
basis of the technology used today by
more than 15,000 controllers to guide
50,000 flights a day
Under FAA's Next Generation Air
Transportation System program,
known as NextGen, ground radar
stations will be replaced by satel-
lite-based technology Instead of fly-
ing indirect routes to stay within the
range of ground stations, as planes
do today, pilots will use GPS tech-
nology to fly directly to their
destinations.
Planes will continually broadcast
their exact positions, not only to air
traffic controllers, but to other sim-
ilarly equipped aircraft within hun-
dreds of miles. For the first time,
pilots will be able to see on cockpit
displays where they are in relation
to other planes and what the flight


Associated Press
Planes are being built out of the
same lightweight materials used for
Formula 1 race cars. Their engines
are being redesigned to squeeze
more thrust out of every gallon of
fuel. And governments are develop-
ing air-traffic systems that will
allow airlines to fly shorter routes.
Those and other advances have
positioned airlines for the biggest
gains in fuel efficiency since the
dawn of the jet age in 1958. For air-
lines, more efficient jets will reduce
their biggest expense. For passen-
gers, it means fares won't jump
around as much with the price of oil.
"We're seeing 25 years of im-
provements compressed into 10
years," said Hans Weber, president
of TECOP International, an avia-
tion consulting firm.


were thrilled just to have him
back. Hundreds celebrated in
Plaza Bolivar in downtown
Caracas, holding pictures of
him and chanting "Viva
Chavez!" and "He's back!"
Elsa Gonzalez, a 61-year-old
building maintenance worker,
said she had stopped cooking
breakfast when she saw
Chavez on TV at the Caracas
airport
"I shouted with excitement,"
she said, teary-eyed as she
joined the revelers in the
plaza. "God is going to lay his
hands on his body and is going
to heal him completely"
Chavez returned to a city
dressed up with freshly
painted murals bearing his
face and those of independ-
ence heroes. Yellow, blue and
red Venezuelan flags were
everywhere downtown, flutter-
ing from lamp posts and over
doorways under sunny skies.


plans are for those other aircraft.
That will enable planes to safely fly
closer together
When planes approach airports,
precise GPS navigation will allow
them to use more efficient landing
and takeoff procedures. Instead of
time-consuming, fuel-burning stair-
step descents, planes will be able to
glide in more steeply with their en-
gines idling. Aircraft will be able to
land and take off closer together
and more frequently, even in poor
weather, because pilots will know
the precise location of other air-
craft and obstacles on the ground.
Fewer planes will be diverted.
Pilots and airline dispatchers
will be able get real-time weather
information. Computers will spot
potential weather conflicts well in
advance so planes can be rerouted.
And, controllers will do a lot less
talking to pilots. Many instructions
now transmitted by radio will in-
stead be sent digitally to cockpits,
reducing the chance of errors.


Airlines' urgency to reduce fuel
use is being driven by two trends:
soaring oil prices and tougher envi-
ronmental regulations.
Pressured by airline executives
for improvements, manufacturers
have pushed the frontiers of tech-
nology by building lighter planes and
borrowing essential engine-design
advances from the auto industry
Airplane manufacturers have al-
ready reduced fuel consumption
twice as much as car and train man-
ufacturers have. In 1980, it took an
average of 46 gallons of fuel to fly a
passenger 1,000 miles. Today, it
takes 22, according to an AP analy-
sis of Department of Transportation
data. Experts say the improvements
could bring that number below 18.
That can't come soon enough for
airlines struggling with the rising
price of oil.


Associated Press
Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez raises a fist
as he holds a copy of a Venezuelan newspaper at
the Maiquetia Airport near Caracas, Venezuela.
Chavez returned to Venezuela on Monday.


Mladic


ejected


from


court

Former Serb

generalfaces

war crimes
Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Nether-
lands - He put on a cap,
defying the rules of the
courtroom. He gestured to
the packed public gallery
despite a judge ordering
him not to. He threatened
a boycott because his cho-
sen lawyers weren't there.
A belligerent Ratko
Mladic repeatedly dis-
obeyed and shouted at
judges Monday during an
arraignment at the Yu-
goslav war crimes tribu-
nal. Finally, the former
Serb general was thrown
out of the hearing and the
court entered not guilty
pleas on his behalf to 11
charges of masterminding
the worst atrocities of the
Bosnian war
The 69-year-old's court-
room theatrics came at
the start of a solemn week
for survivors of the mas-
sacre he is accused of or-
chestrating - the killing
of 8,000 Muslim men and
boys in 1995 in the Bosn-
ian town of Srebrenica.
Officials are preparing
to rebury 600 people
whose remains were dug
out of mass graves in the
past year and identified
using DNA tests.
Mladic's actions in court
drew anger from survivors
of the 1992-95 Bosnian war
and raised the prospect of
another turbulent trial at
the U.N. court.
Mladic had threatened
to boycott Monday's hear-
ing, only his second public
appearance since Serbia
extradited him to The
Hague in May, because the
court had not appointed
Belgrade attorney Milos
Saljic and a Russian
lawyer to represent him.


Associated Press
Former Bosnian Serb
military chief Ratko Mladic
sits in the courtroom
Monday during his initial
appearance at the U.N.'s
Yugoslav war crimes
tribunal in The Hague,
Netherlands.


Flying with GPS


Associated Press
Air traffic controller Karl Haynes Jr. stands beneath a radar screen in the control tower Sept. 18, 2008, at
Washington's Reagan National Airport. Industry officials say the federal program to create a new air traffic
control system is at a crossroads, making delays possible.

Planes to fly directly to destinations under new control system


Airlinespositionedfor big gains in efficiency












SPORTS


* The action is starting
to heat up as season
reaches halfway point
at Citrus Speedway/B4


,I"'.� `~I tY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


BRITISH OPEN
Simpson among 5
alternates in Open
SANDWICH, England -Webb
Simpson, J.B. Holmes and Steve
Marino are among five alternates who
can book a trip to the British Open.
Tournament organizers set aside five
extra spots to make sure they didn't go
over the 156-man limit for the field at
Royal St. George's next week. Now that
there are only two exemptions remain-
ing - one each at the Scottish Open
and John Deere Classic - they have
offered spots to five alternates.
BASEBALL
Washington stands by
criticism of umpire
ARLINGTON, Texas- Rangers
manager Ron Washington isn't backing
down from his criticism of umpire Angel
Hernandez even though the AL All-Star
manager already expects to be fined
for an on-field confrontation and
postgame comments about the ump.
After Washington and first-base
coach Gary Pettis were both ejected
Sunday by Hernandez, the Rangers
skipper said, "Angel is bad. That's all
there is to it."
When asked those comments
Monday, Washington responded,
"Hey, the truth is the truth."
Jones, Gonzalez
regret ripping ump
ATLANTA - Braves third baseman
Chipper Jones and manager Fredi
Gonzalez said Monday they regretted
their sharpest criticisms of umpire
Mark Ripperger.
Ripperger rang Jones up on two
called strikes to end Sunday's 5-4 loss
to the Baltimore Orioles. Jones starting
walking to first base before Ripperger
called a 3-1 pitch a strike. Jones re-
turned to watch another called strike
before flipping his bat in disgust.
After the game, Jones said both
pitches were balls.
On Monday, Jones said he regret-
ted saying work by umpires overall "is
substandard." He said Monday um-
pires "do as good a job as they can."
Pujols could return to
Cardinals on Tuesday
ST. LOUIS- Albert Pujols could be
back in the St. Louis Cardinals' lineup as
early as Tuesday night, beating the initial
timetable for his return from a broken left
wrist by a month.
After taking indoor batting practice
and fielding grounders outside on
Monday, Pujols said there was no
pain and added that he felt great. He's
scheduled to be examined by team
physician Dr. George Paletta on Tues-
day morning.
Clemens' prosecutors
want players' testimony
WASHINGTON - Prosecutors say
several Major League Baseball play-
ers should be allowed to testify at
Roger Clemens' impending criminal
trial about their own drug use.
Clemens wants the judge to pre-
vent his former New YorkYankee
teammates from testifying they got
performance-enhancing drugs from
team trainer Brian McNamee. Mc-
Namee says he also gave steroids
and human growth hormone to
Clemens, but the former pitching star
denies the allegation.
Clemens argued in court filings
that testimony from other players that
they got drugs from McNamee could
lead to "guilt by association'."
Class A Dayton packs
'em in at record rate
DAYTON, Ohio - The Class A
Dayton Dragons have used an old-
fashioned business model to set a
modern-day record.
The Cincinnati Reds'farm club has
packed its 7,230-seat stadium since it
opened in 2000. When they return
from a road trip next Saturday, the
Dragons will set a record with their
815th consecutive sellout.
It'll pass the Portland Trail Blazers'
mark for a sports franchise in North
America.
The mark is a matter of pride in the
southwest Ohio city, which has gone
through tough economic times. The
club's executives have kept the streak
going by being passionate about their
fans and their employees.
TENNIS
Djokovic's welcomed
home after Wimbledon
BELGRADE, Serbia - Novak
Djokovic received an adoring wel-
come in Serbia on Monday after his
championship at Wimbledon and on
his first day as the world's top-ranked
tennis player.
Tens of thousands of fans chanted
Djokovic's nickname, "Nole, Nole,"as
they gathered in front of the national as-


sembly building in downtown Belgrade
at a boisterous welcoming ceremony.
'You made this day the best day of
my life' Djokovic told the screaming
crowd as he held a replica of the Wim-
bledon trophy that is given to the winner.


TOUR de FRANCE

Farrar

gives U.S.

a Tour win

on July 4


Associated Press
United States' Abby Wambach celebrates during their match against Colombia at the Women's World Cup.






No freebies allowed


U.S. women looking for win vs. Sweden


Associated Press

WOLFSBURG, Germany- Rest
is nice, winning is better
The United States plays Sweden
in the group stage finale at the
Women's World Cup on Wednes-
day, a game that would seem to
have little importance with both
teams already
through to the It'
quarterfinals.
But there is a
plenty still at
stake for the game W(
Americans, start-
ing with the
bragging rights
- and every-
thing that comes with them - for
winning the group.
"We go for a win," U.S. coach Pia
Sundhage said Monday "Ab-
solutely"
The two-time World Cup cham-
pions need only a tie against Swe-
den to win Group C and likely
avoid a quarterfinal matchup with
Brazil. The Group C winner plays
the second-place team in Group D,
likely Australia or Norway, while
the Group C runner-up gets the
Group D winner
Brazil needs only a draw against
World Cup newcomer Equatorial
Guinea to win Group D.
"I can safely say that there's not


going to be one player or person or
staff member from the United
States that's going to say, 'We want
a tie,"' Abby Wambach said. "We
want to win this game because we
want to keep the momentum going
forward. Obviously, you have to be
smart. We want to get some of
those 90-minute players some rest

s not just that hard-fough
nd guts glorified' game.
e love.


Though Wambach and fellow
forward Amy Rodriguez have yet
to score, the U.S. is getting pro-
duction from an abundance of
players and places. Five different
players have scored, including de-
fender Rachel Buehler
"We know that we're entertain-
ing people," goalkeeper Hope Solo
said. "We're not
it, 'blood just winning
games. You can
It's the see that swagger
back in the U.S.
team whether it's


Hope Solo the way we cele-
is the United States starting goalie. brate goals,
whether it's the
way you can see we're enjoying the
if we can do that. But first and game again. It's not just that hard-
foremost, we want to make sure fought, 'blood and guts glorified'
and secure the first place out of game. Is the game we love."
this group." "We don't have to force anything
The United States is 18-4-7 which is good," Sundhage said. We
against Sweden, including a 3-0 have a chance to play probably
record in the World Cup. But Swe- some different players."
den beat the U.S. 2-1 in January, As long as it doesn't get in the
one of three losses in a five-month way of the main objective, that is.
span after the Americans had gone "We want to get a good result
more than two years without a loss. against Sweden, we want to play
Since arriving in Germany, how- well," Wambach said. "That's the
ever, the U.S. has had little resem- thing. We want to keep playing well,
balance to the team that struggled performing to ourpotential because
just to get there. Only Japan (six) we're going to continue to get better
has scored more than the five as the tournament goes on and,
goals the Americans had in their hopefully, we'll come into the cham-
first two games. pionship game playing our best"


Duensing, Valencia lead Twins over Rays


Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS - As
Danny Valencia's three-
run homer barely reached
the seats in left field to
give the Minnesota Twins
a 7-0 lead in the eighth in-
ning, Brian Duensing was
worried his chances for a
second career shutout left
the ballpark with it.
He lobbied briefly to
stay in the game, and that
was enough for Ron Gar-
denhire.
Duensing overcame a
shaky start to throw a six-
hitter and Valencia had
three hits and three RBIs
to help the Twins beat the
Tampa Bay Rays 7-0 on
Monday
"He said, 'I'm going back
out there,"' Gardenhire
said. "There was no ques-
tion about it. He was going
back out, which was kind
of neat. And we were going
to let him."
Duensing (6-7) struck
out seven and walked four
for his second career
shutout, throwing a ca-
reer-high 119 pitches to
give struggling closer Matt
Capps the day off.
David Price (8-7) gave
up four runs on five hits
with six strikeouts in six
innings for the Rays.
Michael Cuddyer added


...
.1 .- - . *: ..
;i;. , -. .. .........--..... " ,- . ..l- .
Associated Press
The Minnesota Twins shortstop Tsuyoshi Nishioka forces
out Tampa Bay Rays' B.J. Upton as part of the front end
of a double play during their game Monday afternoon.


a solo homer and Tsuyoshi
Nishioka had a two-run
double for the Twins.
Capps blew a three-run
lead on Saturday and had
to be pulled from the game
in the ninth on Sunday
Casey Kotchman and
Sean Rodriguez each had
two hits for Tampa.
Duensing walked a
tightrope early in the


game, getting hit hard by
the Rays but taking advan-
tage of some good defense
keep Tampa Bay off the
board.
"Sometimes it's better to
be lucky than good," he
said.
Tampa loaded the bases
in the first inning before
Justin Ruggiano bounced
into an inning-ending dou-


ble play Kelly Shoppach
did the same after a lead-
off single from Kotchman
in the second and Cuddyer
and Alexi Casilla both
made nifty plays in the
fourth inning.
Cuddyer, who is headed
to his first All-Star game,
made a leaping catch at
the right field wall to take
away an extra-base hit
from Ruggiano and Casilla
made a diving stop to get
Matt Joyce and strand two
runners on base.
Tampa Bay Minnesota
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Damondh 4 0 10 Reverecf 4 0 0 1
SRdrgz2b4 0 20 ACasill2b 4 0 0 0
Longori3b4 0 00 Mauerc 3 1 0 0
BUptoncf 3 0 10 Cuddyrrf 3 2 1 1
Rugginlf 4 0 00 Valencidh 4 2 3 3
Ktchmlb 4 0 20 LHughslb 4 0 0 0
Shppchc 3 0 0 0 Repkolf 4 1 2 0
Joycerf 2 0 00 Tolbert3b 3 1 0 0
EJhnsnss2 0 00 Nishiokss 3 0 1 2
Totals 30 0 60 Totals 32 7 7 7
Tampa Bay000000000 - 0
Minnesota03100003x - 7
E-E.Johnson (1). DP-Minnesota 2. LOB-
Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 4. 2B--Valencia
(16), Nishioka (4). HR-Cuddyer (12), Va-
lencia (10). CS-B.Upton (6).
IP H RER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Price L,8-76 5 44 1 6
C.Ramos 11-301 1 0 0
A.Russell2-3 2 22 1 0
Minnesota
DuensingW,6-796 0 0 4 7
HBP-by C.Ramos (Mauer).
Umpires-Home, Paul Emmel; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Bruce
Dreckman.
T-2:24. A-39,528 (39,500).


Associated Press

REDON, France - Two
months ago, Tyler Farrar was
demoralized, sleeping 20 hours
a day He had even stopped rid-
ing, overcome by sorrow after
his best friend died in a crash
at the Giro d'Italia.
On Monday,
Farrar be-
came the first
American to
win a stage of
the Tour de
France on the
Fourth ofJuly.
It was the first
time he had Tyler Farrar
won a stage in wins fourth
cycling's stageofTour.
showcase
race, and he dedicated the
victory to the late Wouter Wey-
landt of Belgium.
"It's a little bit unbelievable
to me at the moment that it ac-
tually happened," said Farrar,
who pulled out of the Giro
after the accident
After crossing the finish
line, Farrar held up his
hands to form a "W" with his
fingers and thumbs in tribute
to Weylandt.
"This has been a horrible
last two months with every-
thing that happened in the
Giro," Farrar said. "I've had a
lot of ups and downs. But in
the end, I wanted to be able to
come back, and do something
special to pay tribute, and this
is certainly the biggest stage
in the world to do that."
Farrar, a sprint specialist
from Wenatchee, Wash., who

sped ahead in the last few hun-
dred yards of the 123-mile
course from Olonne-sur-Mer to
Redon to win the third stage.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Auburn


oaks still


hanging on

Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. - The ailing
oaks at Toomer's Corner are a
mottled mix of yellow and
brown these days, but experts
say there's still a chance the
trees will be in good enough
shape for Auburn football fans
to roll them with toilet paper
after wins this fall.
It's been
about five
months / , ,_
s i n c e ':
school offi -, ,
cials con-
firmed that
the famous trees had been
poisoned, and fan ofarchrival
Alabama is now awaiting trial
in the attack. Emergency pro-
cedures that included remov-
ing poisoned dirt around the
trees' roots have helped them
survive this long.
Auburn University horticul-
turist Gary Keever said no one
is sure yet whether the trees
will live or die. Fans have cel-
ebrated wins under the trees
since at least the early 1970s.
"I don't want to give a sense of
false hope, but we're not ready
to say they're definitely not
going to make it," said Keever,
part of a team of experts moni-
toring the health of the trees
and trying to save them.
It was in February - not
long after Auburn won the na-
tional championship - that
university officials said some-
one deliberately poisoned the
stately oaks at an entrance to
campus. They took soil sam-
ples after a man called into a
radio show in late January to
say he had used herbicide on
the trees that flank red-brick
pillars topped by stone eagles.
Harvey Updyke Jr - a 62-
year-old 'Bama fan with chil-
dren named Bear and
Crimson Tyde - was indicted
on charges including criminal
mischief and desecration of a
venerated object. Updyke
pleaded not guilty, and his
trial isn't likely to begin before
football season.


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B2
0 Sports briefs/B2
0 Lottery, TV/B2
0 Entertainment/B3
0 Citrus Speedway/B4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida LOTTERY O n the AIRWAVES


New York
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore




Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
New York
Florida


East Division
GB WCGB

12 -
4 2/2
9/2 8
13 11Y2


East Division
GB WCGB

4 -
11 7
11 7
15Y2 11/2


Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City




St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB

1 4/2
3/2 7
8 11Y2
12 15'2


Central Division
GB WCGB

1 5
1/2 5/2
3 7
11 15
17 21


MINNEAPOLIS -While NFL own-
ers and players appear to be inching
toward a resolution of the league's long
lockout, a group of retired players is
clamoring to be more involved in the
discussions.
The group filed a class-action com-
plaint against the owners and current
players in federal court Monday, saying
they have been excluded from the me-
diation sessions taking place in an at-
tempt to end the lockout.
Named plaintiffs including Hall of
Famers Carl Eller, Franco Harris, Mar-
cus Allen and Paul Krause are asking


Los Angeles
Texas
Seattle
Oakland





San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nel-
son to put a halt to the mediation she
ordered and declare that the current
players cannot negotiate on behalf of
those who are retired.
Owners and current players have
met five times over the last few weeks
as they work to put together a new col-
lective bargaining agreement in time to
avoid the loss of training camps and
games. They met with U.S. Magistrate
Judge Arthur J. Boylan in Minneapolis
last week, including for more than 15
hours on Thursday, and will resume
meetings on Tuesday in New York.


West Division
GB WCGB
- 52
- 52
2 7/2
6'2 12



West Division
GB WCGB
- - 1
2 4
6'2 8/2
9 11
10/2 12/2


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Toronto 9, Boston 7
Minnesota 7, Tampa Bay 0
Seattle 2, Oakland 1
Cleveland 6, N.Y. Yankees 3
Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 4
Baltimore at Texas (LATE)
Detroit at L.A. Angels, (LATE)
Tuesday's Games
N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 11-4) at Cleveland
(C.Carrasco 8-4), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 1-3) at Boston (Lester 10-4), 7:10
p.m.
Baltimore (Undecided) at Texas (M.Harrison 6-
7), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (FPaulino 0-2) at Chicago White
Sox (Peavy 4-1), 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-5) at Minnesota (S.Baker
6-5), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 11-3) at L.A. Angels (Haren
8-5), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (FHernandez 8-7) at Oakland (Cahill 8-
6), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Washington 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 3
Arizona 8, Milwaukee 6
San Diego 5, San Francisco 3
Philadelphia 1, Florida 0
St. Louis 1, Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 4, Colorado 1
N.Y Mets at L.A. Dodgers, (LATE)
Tuesday's Games
Chicago Cubs (Ortiz 0-0) at Washington (De-
twiler 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 6-4) at Pittsburgh
(Karstens 6-4), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 5-3) at St. Louis (J.Garcia
7-3), 7:09 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 8-5) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 4-6),
7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 9-4) at Florida (Volstad 4-
7), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (Duke 1-3) at Milwaukee (Wolf 6-5),
8:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Pelfrey 4-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 5-
8), 10:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 4-5) at San Francisco (Cain
7-4), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Arizona at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
N.Y Mets at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


Phillies 1, Marlins 0
MIAMI - Vance Worley pitched
seven shutout innings and the
Philadelphia Phillies scored the only
run on a close play in the seventh in-
ning to beat the Florida Marlins 1-0
Monday night.
Michael Martinez, playing for an in-
jured Shane Victorino, earned his fifth
RBI of the year with a single to center.
A sliding Domonic Brown barely beat
the throw home, although a TV replay
appeared to show he was tagged out
before touching the plate.
The Marlins argued only briefly, but
twice had a player ejected for disputing
other calls.
Worley (4-1) allowed two hits -
both singles - and walked two while
lowering his ERA to 2.21 in 10 games.
Antonio Bastardo pitched a hitless
ninth for his fifth save in as many
chances to complete a two-hitter for
the Phillies.
Philadelphia Florida
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollinsss 4 0 1 0 Bonifac 3b 3 0 1 0
Polanc3b 3 00 0 Dobbs3b 1 0 0 0
Utley2b 4 0 1 0 Infante2b 4 0 0 0
Howardlb 4 00 0 GSnchzlb 2 00 0
Ibanezlf 4 0 0 0 HRmrzss 4 0 1 0
DBrwn rf 3 1 2 0 Morrsn If 4 0 0 0
Schndrc 2 01 0 Stantonrf 3 0 0 0
Ruiz c 0 0 0 0 Petersn cf 3 0 0 0
Mrtnzcf 4 0 1 1 J.Buckc 2 0 0 0
Worleyp 3 00 0 Hayesc 0 00 0
Stutes p 0 00 0 Nolascop 1 0 0 0
BFrncs ph 0 00 0 Choate p 0 00 0
Gloadph 1 00 0 Wiseph 1 00 0
Bastrdp 0 00 0 MDunnp 0 00 0
Mujicap 0 00 0
Totals 32 16 1 Totals 28 0 2 0
Philadelphia 000 000 100 - 1
Florida 000 000 000 - 0
E-Do.Brown (3). LOB-Philadelphia 8, Florida
5. SB-Rollins (18), Bonifacio (11), Stanton (3).
S-Ruiz, Nolasco.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
WorleyW,4-1 7 2 0 0 2 6
StutesH,6 1 0 0 0 0 1
BastardoS,5-5 1 0 0 0 1 1
Florida
Nolasco L,5-5 7 6 1 1 2 4
Choate 1 0 0 0 0 2
M.Dunn 2-30 0 0 1 0
Mujica 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Vic
Carapazza; Second, Doug Eddings; Third,
Dana DeMuth.
T-2:50. A-27,103 (38,560).


Indians 6, Yankees 3
CLEVELAND - Austin Kearns hit
his first homer in 105 at-bats this sea-
son, a stunning three-run shot in the
seventh inning off NewYork's A.J. Bur-
nett, to send the Cleveland Indians to a
6-3 win and spoil Derek Jeter's return
to the Yankees' lineup Monday night.
Jeter was back at shortstop and
again atop the batting order for the first
time since June 13, when he went on
the disabled list with a calf injury. New
York's captain went 0 for 4 and re-
mained six shy of becoming the first
Yankees player to reach 3,000 hits.
Josh Tomlin (10-4), who carried a
no-hitter into the seventh, allowed
two runs and three hits. The Indians'
right-hander also became the first
pitcher since 1919 to go at least five
innings in each of his first 29 career
appearances.
With two on and the Indians trailing
2-1, Kearns, who has been in a slump
all season, hit a 1-0 pitch from Burnett
(8-7) the opposite way to right for his
first homer since Aug. 22, when he
wore Yankee pinstripes.


New York

Jeter ss
Grndrs cf
Teixeir lb
AIRdrg 3b
Cano 2b
Swisher rf
Posada dh
Martin c
Gardnr If


Cleveland
rh bi ab rh bi
00 0 Brantlylf 4 0 0 0
1 1 1 ACarerss 4 0 2 0
1 1 0 Hafnerdh 3 1 1 0
0 0 0 CSantnc-lb 4 1 1 2
1 1 0 GSizmrcf 2 1 0 0
0 1 2OCarer2b 4 0 0 0
00 0 Chsnhll3b 2 1 0 0
0 0 0 Marson c 0 00 0
0 0 0 Duncanlb 3 1 1 1
Hannhnlb-3b0 0 0 0
Kearns rf 3 1 1 3


Totals 32 34 3 Totals 296 6 6
NewYork 000 000 210 - 3
Cleveland 000 000 42x - 6
E-Chisenhall (2). LOB-New York 3, Cleve-
land 3.2B-Swisher (16), A.Cabrera (22). HR-
Granderson (23), C.Santana (13), Kearns (1).
IP H RERBBSO


New York
A.J.Burnett L,8-7
Wade
Cleveland
TomlinW,10-4
Sipp H,17
Pestano H,12
C.Perez S,20-21
WP-A.J.Burnett.


7 4 4 4 4 6
1 2 2 2 0 1
744446
122201


Umpires-Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Jeff
Nelson; Second, Marty Foster; Third, BillWelke.
T-2:36. A-40,676 (43,441).


Cardinals 1, Reds 0
ST. LOUIS - Chris Carpenter hit
another high note in his midseason
surge. The St. Louis Cardinals' pitcher
insisted getting the better of Johnny
Cueto provided no extra incentive.
"I've said it all along," Carpenter said
after working eight scoreless innings in
a 1-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds
on Monday night."I mean, it's history
and we're professionals.You move on."
Carpenter watched from the dugout
as pinch-hitter Mark Hamilton drove in
the lone run with an infield hit with two
outs in the eighth, the rookie's first RBI
in 26 pinch at-bats.
"Honestly, my first thought when I
got to the bag was we need to get this
game shut down because he deserves
this win," Hamilton said. "It's big for us
because we had heard the Brewers
lost and that we can take sole posses-
sion of first place.'
Cueto (5-3) allowed six hits in eight
innings in his first appearance against
the Cardinals since he spiked Carpen-
ter on the back and dealt Jason LaRue
a career-ending concussion with kicks
during a brawl in Cincinnati Aug. 11.
Cueto and Brandon Phillips were both
booed at every opportunity.
"How long can you hold stuff, you
know what I mean?" Dusty Baker said.


Cincinnati
ab
FLewis If 4
BPhllps 2b 4
Votto b 4
Rolen 3b 4
Bruce rf 4
RHrndzc 3
Stubbs cf 4
Renteri ss 3
Cueto p 3


St. Louis
r h bi
0 0 0 Theriot ss
0 0 0 Jay rf
0 3 0 Hollidy If
01 0 Brkmnlb
0 0 0 Freese 3b
0 1 0 Rasms cf
0 1 0 YMolinc
0 0 0 Schmkr 2b
00 0 Crpntrp
MHmltph
Salas p


Totals 33 06 0 Totals
Cincinnati 000 000 000
St. Louis 000 000 01x


ab rh bi
4 0 1 0
2 0 1 0
2000
2000
3000
3 1 2 0
2 0 1 0
3000
1 0 0 0
1011
0000
231 6 1
- 0
- 1


DP-Cincinnati 3. LOB-Cincinnati 7, St. Louis
3. CS-ay (3). S-Y.Molina, C.Carpenter.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Cueto L,5-3 8 6 1 1 3 0
St. Louis
C.CarpenterW,4-7 8 6 0 0 1 3
SalasS,15-17 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, Dale Scott;
Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Dan lassogna.
T-2:25. A-40,551 (43,975).


Blue Jays 9, Red Sox 7
BOSTON - Travis Snider had three
doubles and drove in a pair of runs and
Aaron Hill homered as the Toronto
Blue Jays became the latest team to
rough up John Lackey, beating the
Boston Red Sox 9-7 on Monday.
Hill also had an RBI single and
Rajai Davis added two doubles for the
Blue Jays, who had lost nine of 14.
Jacoby Ellsbury had a two-run triple
and tied his career best with four hits
for Boston, which had its four-game
winning streak halted.
The Blue Jays scored a run in the
first, two in the second and chased
Lackey (5-8) with four in the third.
Toronto starter Brandon Morrow (5-
4), allowed four runs on five hits, walk-
ing three and striking out five over
five-plus innings.


Toronto


Boston


ab rh bi ab rh bi
RDaviscf 5 1 2 1 Ellsurycf 5 1 4 2
EThmslf 4 1 1 0 Pedroia2b 4 1 1 0
Bautist3b 5 1 1 0 AdGnzllb 5 0 1 1
Lindlb 3 21 1 Youkils3b 1 0 0 0
Encrncdh 5 00 0 YNavrrpr-3b 3 1 1 0
A.Hill2b 5 2 3 2 D.Ortizdh 3 1 1 0
Sniderrf 5 1 3 2 Reddcklf 2 0 0 0
JMolinc 3 0 0 0 DMcDnph-lf 2 0 0 0
JMcDnlss 4 1 2 1 Sltlmchc 4 1 1 2
J.Drew rf 3 1 1 1
Scutaross 3 1 1 0
Totals 39 9137 Totals 35711 6
Toronto 124 000 110 - 9
Boston 000 040 030 - 7
E-Youkilis (6), Y.Navarro (1). DP-Toronto 2.
LOB-Toronto 7, Boston 6.2B-R.Davis 2 (15),
Snider 3 (7), Ad.Gonzalez (28), D.Ortiz (21).
3B-Ellsbury (1), Saltalamacchia (2). HR-
A.Hill (4). SB-R.Davis (22), Ellsbury (27). CS-
Pedroia (3). S-J.Molina. SF-J.Drew.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
MorrowW,5-4 5 5 4 4 3 5
L.PerezH,2 2 2 0 0 0 2
Frasor 1 3 3 3 0 2
FFranciscoS,10-14 1 1 0 0 0 3
Boston
LackeyL,5-8 21-39 7 7 0 2
Wheeler 22-30 0 0 0 0
Aceves 22-33 2 1 1 1
FMorales 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Albers 1 1 0 0 1 0
Morrow pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Morrow (Youkilis).WP-Morrow. PB-
J.Molina.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Tim McClelland; Third, Bob
Davidson.
T-3:37. A-38,072 (37,065).


D'Backs 8, Brewers 6
MILWAUKEE - Bench coach Alan
Trammell reminded manager Kirk Gib-
son and the rest of the Diamondbacks
that just because Milwaukee led 6-1 on
an unlikely grand slam by pitcher Shaun
Marcum, the game was far from over.
After all, Trammell reasoned, the
Brewers squandered a five-run lead in
Minnesota on Sunday so he wondered
aloud why it couldn't happen again.
"That's what you have to do to your
mind in those situations.You have to
say stupid stuff like that," Gibson said.
"It doesn't happen very often, but why
not believe it? I know I heard it."
Arizona Milwaukee


ab r h bi
KJhnsn2b 4 1 2 0
S.Drewss 5 01 1
J.Uptonrf 5 1 1 0
CYoungcf 4 1 1 1
Monterc 5 1 3 2
Brrghs3b 5 23 1
Mirandlb 4 02 2
GParralf 5 0 2 0
DHdsn p 1 00 0
W.Penaph 1 1 1 1
ACastllp 0 00 0
Owingsp 0 00 0
RRortsph 1 1 1 0
Patersnp 0 00 0
Nady ph 1 00 0
Demelp 0 00 0
DHrndzp 0 000
Totals 41 8178
Arizona 000
Milwaukee 001


ab r h bi
RWeks2b 5 0 1 0
Morgan cf-lf-cf5 0 2 0
C.Hartrf 5 1 1 1
Fielder lb 4 1 2 0
YBtncrss 4 0 0 0
KotsayIf 4 0 1 0
Axford p 0 00 0
Gamel If 0 0 0 0
McGeh3b 4 22 0
Lucroyc 3 1 1 0
Marcm p 2 1 1 4
Counsllph 0 0 0 0
Hwknsp 0 00 0
Loep 0 00 0
CGomzcf 1 00 0
Estradp 0 00 0

Totals 37611 5
112 112 - 8
500 000 - 6


E-K.Johnson (5), Miranda (4), Fielder (8),
R.Weeks (10), Lucroy (4). DP-Arizona 3, Mil-
waukee 1. LOB-Arizona 9, Milwaukee 6.2B-
K.Johnson (16), Miranda 2 (8), McGehee (15).
HR-Montero (10), W.Pena (5), C.Hart (9), Mar-
cum (1). SB-C.Young (11).
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
D.Hudson 4 8 6 5 1 3
A.Castillo 1 1 0 0 0 1
Owings 1 1 0 0 0 1
Paterson 1 1 0 0 0 0
DemelW,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0
Da.HernandezS,4-6 1 0 0 0 0 3
Milwaukee
Marcum 6 7 4 4 2 5
HawkinsH,9 1 2 1 1 0 1
LoeBS,6-7 2-3 4 1 1 0 0
Axford L,2-2 1 4 2 2 0 1
Estrada 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Owings (Counsell). WP-Axford,
Estrada.
Umpires-Home, Brian Gorman; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Larry Vanover; Third,
Manny Gonzalez.
T-3:17. A-41,622 (41,900).


White Sox 5, Royals 4
CHICAGO - A.J. Pierzynski scored
the winning run on a balk called on
Aaron Crow in the ninth inning and the
Chicago White Sox beat Kansas City
5-4 on Monday night after the Royals
had tied it on a homer first ruled a triple
in the top of the inning.
With the Royals trailing 4-3 in the
ninth, Eric Hosmer led off with what
appeared to be a homer off White Sox
closer Sergio Santos (3-3). Second
base umpire Alfonso Marquez signaled
the ball was in play as Hosmer ad-
vanced to third. Royals manager Ned
Yost contested the call, and the umpire
reviewed it. Moments after the review,
Marquez signaled a homer.
Adam Dunn hit a two-run homer in
the eighth inning for Chicago, and
Ramon Castro hit a solo shot in the faith.
Pierzynski led off the ninth with a
pinch-hit single off Crow (2-2) in the ninth.
Kansas City Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Maier If 5 1 1 0 Lillirdglf 4 0 2 0
MeCarrcf 4 1 2 0 Teahenph 1 0 0 0
Butlerdh 4 01 1 Morel3b 4 1 1 0
Francrrf 4 1 1 2 Pierreph 0 00 0
Hosmerlb 4 1 2 1 A.Dunndh 4 2 2 2
B.Penac 3 02 0 Konerklb 4 0 2 0
Mostks3b 4 00 0 Quentinrf 4 0 1 0
AEscorss 4 0 0 0 AIRmrzss 3 0 0 0
Getz 2b 4 0 1 0 Rios cf 4 0 0 0
RCastrc 3 1 1 1
Przynsph 1 1 1 0
Bckhm2b 3 00 0
Totals 36 4104 Totals 35510 3
Kansas City 201 000 001 - 4
Chicago 000 110 021 - 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Moustakas (3). DP-Kansas City 1,
Chicago 1. LOB-Kansas City 6, Chicago 7.
2B-Maier (4), Me.Cabrera (21), Konerko
(13). HR-Francoeur (12), Hosmer (7),
A.Dunn (8), R.Castro (4). SB-Lillibridge 2 (8).
S-Beckham.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Francis 6 7 2 2 0 4
G.HollandH,5 1 0 0 0 0 1
CrowL,2-2BS,3-3 12-33 3 3 2 2
Chicago
Buehrle 7 7 3 3 1 4
Crain 1 0 0 0 0 0
S.SantW,3-3BS,3-21 1 3 1 1 0 1
WP-Crow. Balk-Crow.
Umpires-Home, Ed Rapuano; First, Brian
O'Nora; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Ed
Hickox.
T-2:36. A-31,077 (40,615).


Braves 4, Rockies 1
ATLANTA - Freddie Freeman
homered twice to drive in three runs,
Tommy Hanson combined with two re-
lievers on a four-hitter and the Atlanta
Braves beat the Colorado Rockies 4-1
on Monday night.
Freeman's two-run shot in the first
inning drove in Brian McCann, who
singled with two outs off Ubaldo
Jimenez (3-8). The rookie first base-
man hit his 11th homer in the eighth off
Matt Reynolds.
Jimenez was facing the Braves for
the first time since throwing a no-hitter
at Turner Field on April 17, 2010. It was
the first no-hitter in Rockies history.
Hanson (10-4) gave up one run on
four hits and one walk in seven in-
nings. He had six strikeouts while
lowering his ERA to 2.52. He ranks
among the league leaders in wins
and ERA but wasn't selected to the
NL All-Star team.


Rockies


Braves


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Blckmn If 4 0 0 0 Schafercf 4 0 0 0
M.Ellis2b 3 1 0 0 AIGnzlzss 4 0 0 0
Heltonlb 4 01 1 McCnnc 4 2 2 0
Tlwtzkss 2 00 0 Fremnlb 3 22 3
JHerrrss 2 0 1 0 Heywrdrf 4 0 1 0
S.Smithrf 3 01 0 Uggla2b 3 0 0 0
Wggntn 3b 3 0 0 0 Conrad 3b 3 0 1 0
Splrghs cf 3 00 0 Lugo 3b 1 0 0 0
lannettc 2 0 0 0 McLothlf 2 0 1 0
Jimenzp 2 0 1 0 Hansonp 2 00 0
Brothrsp 0 00 0 Ventersp 0 0 0 0
RBtncrp 0 00 0 Kimrelp 0 00 0
Garnerph 1 0 00
MtRynlp 0 0 00
Totals 29 141 Totals 304 7 3
Colorado 000 100 000 - 1
Atlanta 200 001 01x - 4
E-J.Herrera (3). DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Col-
orado 3, Atlanta 6. 2B-S.Smith (23), Heyward
(10). HR-Freeman 2 (11). SB-M.Ellis (1). S-
Hanson.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Jimenez L,3-8 51-36 3 3 1 9
Brothers 2-3 0 0 0 2 2
R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 1
Mat.Reynolds 1 1 1 1 0 1
Atlanta
HansonW,10-4 7 4 1 1 1 6
VentersH,17 1 0 0 0 1 0
KimbrelS,25-30 1 0 0 0 0 0
PB-lannetta.
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Laz Diaz;
Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Scott Barry.
T-2:54. A-36,137 (49,586).


Padres 5, Giants 3
SAN FRANCISCO - The San
Diego Padres returned to the place
where last season's collapse was com-
pleted. This time, they found a way to
avoid another meltdown.
Will Venable hit his second home
run of the season and the Padres
pounced on Tim Lincecum in a 5-3 vic-
tory over the San Francisco Giants on
Monday.
San Diego San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Venalerf 5 2 2 1 Rowndcf-lf 5 00 0
Bartlett ss 5 2 2 0 Burriss 2b 3 1 0 0
Headly3b 4 0 1 1 PSndvl3b 4 1 3 2
H.Bellp 0 00 0 Motap 0 00 0
Ludwcklf 5 0 1 1 Huffb 4 00 0
OHudsn2b 4 0 1 1 C.Rosslf 1 01 0
Maybincf 4 1 1 0 Vglsngpr 0 00 0
Rizzolb 20 1 0 RRmrzp 0 00 0
Hundlyc 4 01 1 JaLopzp 0 00 0
Richrdp 2 01 0 Romop 0 00 0
KPhlpsph 1 0 0 0 MTejad3b 1 1 1 0
Frieri p 0 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0
Spencep 0 00 0 CStwrtc 2 00 0
Quallsp 0 0 0 0 Burrellph 0 0 0 0
Guzmnph 1 00 0 Cainpr 0 00 0
MAdmsp 0 0 0 0 BCrwfrss 3 01 1
AIGnzlz 3b 0 00 0 Linccm p 0 00 0
Hallph 1 0 0 0
SCasillp 0 0 0 0
Torrescf 2 0 0 0
Totals 37 5115 Totals 303 6 3
San Diego 200 010 011 - 5
San Francisco 000 002 001 - 3
E-Burriss (5). DP-San Diego 2, San Fran-
cisco 1. LOB-San Diego 8, San Francisco 7.
2B-Bartlett (9), Maybin (10), Rizzo (7), Richard
(1), RSandoval (11), M.Tejada (15). HR-Ven-
able (2), RSandoval (8). SB-Venable (14),
Bartlett (16), Maybin (12), Rizzo (2). S-Lince-
cum. SF-Headley
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
RichardW,5-9 5 2 0 0 3 2
Frieri H,3 1-3 1 2 2 0 0
Spence H,2 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Qualls H,6 1 0 0 0 0 0
M.AdamsH,17 1 1 0 0 0 0
H.BellS,25-26 1 2 1 1 1 0
San Francisco
Lincecum L,6-7 5 7 3 3 1 4
S.Casilla 1 1 0 0 0 0
R.Ramirez 11-31 1 1 0 1
Ja.Lopez 0 0 0 0 0 0
Romo 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Mota 1 1 1 1 0 1
Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by Frieri (Burriss), by Ja.Lopez (Rizzo).
WP-H.Bell. PB-C.Stewart.
Umpires-Home, Tim Timmons; First, Eric
Cooper; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, D.J. Rey-
burn.
T-3:00. A-42,300 (41,915).


Nationals 5, Cubs 4, (10) Pirates 5, Astros 3 Mariners 2, Athletics 1


WASHINGTON - This is the sort of
return the Washington Nationals are
expecting for their huge investment in
Jayson Werth: the moxie to pull off a
steal of third in the 10th inning at a
time when his every mistake has been
generating a round of boos.
Moments after he stunned the ball-
park by swiping the bag, Werth was
crossing home plate with arms raised,
his teammates headed his way to cele-
brate. Werth scored on a wild pitch in
the Fourth of July matinee win.
Chicago Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Fukdmrf 4 00 0 Berndncf-lf 5 1 0 0
K.Woodp 0 00 0 Cora3b 3 00 0
JRussllp 0 00 0 Zmrmnph 0 00 0
DeWittph 1 00 0 Bixlerpr-3b 1 00 0
Mateop 0 00 0 Espinos2b 4 1 1 0
Marmlp 0 0 0 0 L.Nixlf-lb 4 1 2 2
Barney 2b 5 00 0 Werth rf 3 1 1 2
SCastross 5 0 0 0 Stairs lb 2 0 0 0
ArRmr3b 4 22 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
C.Penalb 4 1 3 0 Clipprdp 0 0 0 0
Byrd cf 3 1 2 1 Marqusph 1 0 0 0
ASorinlf 3 01 2 Storenp 0 00 0
Smrdzjp 0 00 0 HRdrgzp 0 0 0 0
Marshllp 0 00 0 LHrndzph 0 00 0
Campnlf 1 00 0 IRdrgzc 3 00 0
Sotoc 4 02 1 Dsmndss 4 1 1 0
CColmnp 2 00 0 Zmrmnp 2 01 0
RJhnsn If-rf 2 0 0 0 Ankielcf 1 0 1 0
Totals 38 4104 Totals 335 7 4
Chicago 010 201 000 0 - 4
Washington200 001 100 1 - 5
One out when winning run scored.
E-C.Pena (3). DP-Chicago 1, Washington
1. LOB-Chicago 5, Washington 9. 2B-
Ar.Ramirez (21), Espinosa (15). 3B-C.Pena
(1), L.Nix (1). SB-Bixler (4), Werth (11). CS-
Werth (3). S-L.Hernandez, Ankiel.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
C.Coleman 51-35 3 2 1 5
Samardzija H,3 2-30 0 0 1 0
MarshallH,15 2-3 1 1 1 0 1
K.WoodBS,4-4 1 0 0 0 3 3
J.Russell 11-31 0 0 0 0
MateoL,1-2 1-30 1 1 1 0
Marmol 0 0 0 0 0 0
Washington
Zimmermann 6 8 4 4 1 5
Mattheus 1 0 0 0 0 0
Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 2
Storen 1 2 0 0 0 0
H.RodriguezW,3-1 1 0 0 0 0 1


HBP-by K.Wood (Espinosa). WP-
Marmol.


-K.Wood,


Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, Mike
Everitt; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Mike
Muchlinski.
T-3:31. A-32,937 (41,506).


PITTSBURGH - Pirates fans
aren't used to watching relevant base-
ball in July. They've responded favor-
ably to it.
Rookie Alex Presley had three of
the Pirates' 14 hits and Pittsburgh
moved three games over .500 this late
in the season for the first time in 12
years with a 5-3 win over the Houston
Astros on Monday.
Chase d'Arnaud, Garrett Jones,
Neil Walker and Lyle Overbay each
had two hits for Pittsburgh, which
played in front of its fourth consecutive
home sellout crowd - another sign of
how rare it is for the Pirates to be in
contention.
Paul Maholm (5-9) allowed one
earned run in six innings for the Pi-
rates, who entered the day 112 games
behind Milwaukee and St. Louis.
Houston Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab r h bi
Bourncf 5 00 0 Presleylf 4 0 3 1
Kppngr2b 5 22 0 dArnadss 5 2 2 0
Pence rf 3 1 2 0 GJones rf 4 0 2 0
Ca.Leelb 3 01 2 Verasp 0 0 0 0
Michalslf 3 00 0 Hanrhnp 0 00 0
MDwns3b 4 0 1 0 AMcCtcf 4 1 1 1
Barmesss 2 00 0 Walker2b 4 0 2 1
Corprnc 3 00 0 Overaylb 4 1 2 1
Myers p 3 00 0 JHrrsn 3b 2 0 1 0
SEsclnp 0 00 0 BrWod3b 1 1 0 0
DelRsrp 0 00 0 McKnrc 3 0 1 1
Wallacph 1 00 0 Mahlmp 2 00 0
DMcCt p 0 00 0
Paulrf 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 36 2 Totals 34514 5
Houston 102 000 000 - 3
Pittsburgh 012 011 00x - 5
E-M.Downs (4), Overbay (8), J.Harrison 2 (4).
DP-Houston 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Houston
8, Pittsburgh 9.2B-Pence (24), d'Arnaud (3),
G.Jones (14), A.McCutchen (22). 3B-Presley
(2). SB-Presley (2), Walker (5). S-Corporan,
McKenry, Maholm. SF-Ca.Lee.


IPH R
Houston
MyersL,3-8 6 13 5
S.Escalona 1 1 0
DelRosario 1 0 0
Pittsburgh


OAKLAND, Calif.- Josh Bard got
his first chance to catch Michael
Pineda since spring training and saw
what the rest of baseball has been
seeing from Seattle's overpowering
rookie the first half of the year.
Pineda and three relievers com-
bined on a three-hitter and Bard hit his
first home run of the season to lead the
Mariners to a 2-1 victory over the Ath-
letics on Monday.
"He's really maturing," said Bard,
who came up from the minors last
week. "He's becoming that big horse,
inning-eater guy that we need him to
be.We talked to him hard today, mak-
ing sure he came out ready to pitch in
the first inning. Sometimes he gets
caught pacing himself a little bit. He did
a great job doing that."
Justin Smoak added a tiebreaking
RBI double in the seventh inning for
the Mariners, who got their first back-
to-back wins since June 2-3 against
Tampa Bay.

Mariners 2, Athletics 1
Seattle Oakland
ab rh bi ab rh bi


ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 0
Ryan ss 4 1 1 0
AKndy3b 3 0 0 0
Smoaklb 3 0 2 1
Ackley2b 4 0 0 0
Custdh 3 0 0 0
Halmn cf-lf 4 0 0 0
Peguerlf 2 0 0 0
FGtrrz ph-cf 1 0 0 0
J.Bardc 3 1 1 1
Totals 31 26 2
Seattle 000
Oakland 010


JWeeks 2b
SSizmr 3b
Crisp cf
Matsui dh
Carter 1b
DeJess rf
CJcksn If
KSuzukc
Pnngtn ss

Totals
001 100
000 000


DP-Seattle 1, Oakland 2. LOB-Seattle 5,


ERBB SO Oakland 4. 2B-Smoak (20). HR-J.Bard (1).
SB-Crisp (25).
4 0 1 IP H RERBBSO


0 0 1
0 2 0
020


MaholmW,5-9 6 5 3 1 3 3
D.McCutchen H,5 1 1 0 0 0 0
VerasH,17 1 0 0 0 0 1
HanrahanS,25-25 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Maholm (Pence).
Umpires-Home, Jim Wolf; First, John
Tumpane; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Derryl
Cousins.
T-2:45. A-36,942 (38,362).


Seattle
PinedaW,8-5 6 2
Laffey H,4 1 0
Pauley H,7 1 1
League S,23-26 1 0
Oakland
McCarthy L,1-5 62-34
Ziegler 1-3 0
Breslow 1 1
Fuentes 2-3 1
De Los Santos 1-3 0
T-2:29. A-15,566 (35,067).


CASH 3 (early)
8-2-5
CASH 3 (late)
7-4-7
PLAY 4 (early)
0-1-6-6
Florda Lottery PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 1-9-4-2
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Mondayin the 4 - 8 - 31 - 32 - 33
Florida Lottery:


Retired NFL players being excluded


BASEBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN) Cincinnati Reds at St. Louis Cardinals
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Phillies at Florida Marlins
8 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Minnesota Twins
WNBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Sparks at Phoenix Mercury
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (VERSUS) 2011 Tour de France Stage 4
WORLD CUP SOCCER
12 p.m. (ESPN) England vs. Japan
12 p.m. (ESPN2) New Zealand vs. Mexico
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) France vs. Germany
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Canada vs. Nigeria


B2 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


SPORTS


v







E Page B3 -TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011




ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Audiences go for 'Dark'


Associated Press
In this March 17 file photo,
actor Daniel Radcliffe
poses for a portrait in New
York. Harry Potter star Rad-
cliffe says he has given up
drinking alcohol after real-
izing he was partying too
hard. The 21-year-old actor
says he began to drink too
much while filming "Harry
Potter and the Half Blood
Prince," the sixth movie in
the Harry Potter series, in
2009. Radcliffe was speak-
ing to GQ magazine in an in-
terview released Monday.


Harry

Potter

star quits

alcohol


21-year-old

stops drinking

Associated Press

LONDON - Harry Pot-
ter star Daniel Radcliffe
said he has given up
drinking alcohol after re-
alizing he was partying too
hard.
The 21-year-old actor
says he began to drink too
much while filming
"Harry Potter and the Half
Blood Prince," the sixth
movie in the Harry Potter
series, in 2009.
He said; "I became so
reliant on (alcohol) to
enjoy stuff. There were a
few years there when I
was just so enamored with
the idea of living some sort
of famous person's
lifestyle that really isn't
suited to me."
He added he decided to
cut out drinking alto-
gether, instead of simply
cutting down.
"As much as I would
love to be a person that
goes to parties and has a
couple of drinks and has a
nice time - that doesn't
work for me. I do that very
unsuccessfully," he said.
"I'd just rather sit at
home and read, or go out
to dinner with someone, or
talk to someone I love, or
talk to somebody that
makes me laugh."
Radcliffe was speaking
to GQ magazine in an in-
terview released Monday
Radcliffe shot to fame at
age 11 after he was cast as
Harry Potter for the movie
adaptations ofJ.K. Rowl-
ing's popular books about
a teenage wizard.
Many child actors have
struggled to cope with
adulthood, but Radcliffe
said he was determined to
prove child actors could
go on to build long careers.
"If I can make a career
for myself after Potter, and
it goes well, and is varied
and with longevity, then
that puts to bed the 'child
actors argument,"' he said.
The last movie in the se-
ries "Harry Potter And
The Deathly Hallows: Part
II" premieres Thursday in
London.


MW � a z ":, . "-1
Associated Press
In this photo provided by StarPix, Shia LaBeouf poses for photographs at the premiere of "Transformers: Dark of the Moon"
on June 28 in New York's Times Square.

3-D helps lift 'Transformers'to $400 million global haul


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES - The "Transform-
ers" robots have put their 3-D ticket-
price advantage to good use.
Distributor Paramount Pictures esti-
mated Monday that "Transformers:
Dark of the Moon" pulled in $116.4 mil-
lion domestically over the four-day
Fourth ofJuly weekend and $181.1 mil-
lion since opening Tuesday night.
Director Michael Bay's third install-
ment in the sci-fi franchise has added
$217 million overseas, bringing its
worldwide total to nearly $400 million.
The studio says 60 percent of domes-
tic business came from premium-
priced 3-D admissions, which cost a
few dollars more than 2-D screenings.
Overseas, 3-D admissions accounted
for 70 percent of ticket sales.
That's a good sign for Hollywood's 3-
D business, which had waned as 3-D
revenues dipped to 50 percent or less
of the total for some recent releases.
"It proves that for 3-D to be success-
ful, it has to be attached to the right
kind of movie. This was this monu-
mental Michael Bay blockbuster, and
for something like that, people felt it's
worth the money," said Paul Der-
garabedian, analyst for box-office
tracker Hollywood.com. "It's all about
maintaining good quality. If they see
three 3-D movies in a row that look ter-
rible, they're not going to put the
money down again."
The previous weekend's No. 1 movie,
the animated adventure "Cars 2,"
slipped steeply in its second weekend
with $32.1 million domestically, the
movie losing steam more quickly than
past features from Disney's Pixar Ani-
mation outfit
"Cars 2" raised its domestic total to


BOX OFFICE
1. "Transformers: Dark of the
Moon," $116.4 million ($217
million international).
2. "Cars 2," $32.1 million ($24.4
million international).
3. "Bad Teacher," $17.6 million.
4. "Larry Crowne," $15.7 million.
5. "Super 8," $9.5 million.
6. "Monte Carlo," $8.8 million.
7. "Green Lantern," $8 million.
8. "Mr. Popper's Penguins," $6.9
million.
9. "Bridesmaids," $4.4 million
($7.2 million international).
10. "Midnight in Paris," $4.3
million.


$123 million and topped $200 million
worldwide.
The weekend's other new wide re-
leases opened back in the pack. Uni-
versal Pictures' recession romance
"Larry Crowne" opened quietly at No.
4 with $15.7 million despite the star
power of writer-director Tom Hanks
and co-star Julia Roberts. The movie
stars Hanks as a downsized retail
worker who heads back to school,
where he falls for his public-speaking
teacher (Roberts).
While "Transformers" and "Cars 2"
played to young audiences, the over-35
crowd accounted for 81 percent of the
audience for "Larry Crowne." Movies
appealing to older audiences tend to
stick around longer in theaters, and
Universal executives hope fans will
seek out the movie once Fourth of July
festivities are behind them.
"For adults who are always preoc-


cupied with barbecues and entertain-
ing and family, my expectations were
never greater than this," said Nikki
Rocco, the studio's head of
distribution.
The 20th Century Fox romantic romp
"Monte Carlo" opened a weak No. 6
with $8.8 million. The movie stars Se-
lena Gomez, Katie Cassidy and
Leighton Meester as American travel-
ers who get the princess treatment in
Monaco after Gomez impersonates a
European heiress.
Despite a big start for "Dark of the
Moon," overall business slipped com-
pared to last Fourth of July weekend.
According to Hollywood.com, domestic
revenues Friday to Monday came in at
$239 million, down 4.5 percent from a
year ago, when "The Twilight Saga:
Eclipse" opened with $83.6 million and
"The Last Airbender" debuted with
$51.8 million.
Skeptics felt the "Transformers"
franchise had lost much of its luster
after the new sequel pulled in far less
money on opening day than its prede-
cessor "Dark of the Moon" launched
with $37.7 million domestically
Wednesday, down 39 percent from the
first day gross of $62 million for 2009's
"Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen."
But "Dark of the Moon" has held up
better day by day than "Revenge of the
Fallen," closing the revenue gap be-
tween the two.
After just over six days in theaters,
the new movie still is well behind the
$200.1 million domestic haul that "Re-
venge of the Fallen" managed in only
five days.
Estimated ticket sales for Friday
through Monday at U.S. and Canadian
theaters, according to Hollywood.com.
Where available, latest international
numbers are also included.


Soap box derby film to

debut in Akron, Ohio


Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio - A film
about a soap box derby
racer is set to premiere in
Akron, where it was in-
spired two years ago when
the financial woes of the All-
American Soap Box Derby
caught the attention of for-
mer "L.A. Law" star Corbin
Bernsen.
Bernsen wrote the script
for "25 Hill," directed it and

In this Nov. 20, 2009,
photo, Corbin Bernsen re-
acts after crossing the fin-
ish line at Derby Downs in
Akron, Ohio.
KAREN SCHIELY/Akron Beacon Journal


stars as a former racer who
bonds with a young derby
participant whose father
dies in the war in
Afghanistan. The film
raised about $875,000 for
production, and portions
were shot in Akron and
Cleveland, including scenes
from the 2010 derby in
Akron.
Bernsen plans to attend
the Saturday debut at the
Akron Civic Theatre.
The nonprofit derby
founded in 1933 had lost
corporate sponsorship and
was sued in 2009 by a ban
seeking repayment of a loan
of about $600,000. The loan
has since been restructured.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: Even if some years haven't been as good to you
as they should have been, they did teach you some valu-
able lessons. You'll finally put them all to work for you in the
coming months; enjoy the fruits of experience.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Don't toot your own horn
about how well you handled a difficult development in the
past. If you think you can do a better job than another, sim-
ply volunteer.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Your loyalty to a friend is a noble
quality, but only as long as you can express it under sour
circumstances. It won't look too good if you turn your back
when you think your image is at stake.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - If this is one of those days
when your blossoms are late in blooming, be prepared for
your initial efforts to fizzle. Try again later when you know
you can achieve positive effects.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Just because something has


always come easy for you in the past doesn't mean every-
thing will run smoothly now. Take things slowly, covering
your bases as you go.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -An important objective can
be achieved, but only if you are prepared to use some al-
ternate routes when and if you run into a roadblock. Prob-
lems could pop out of nowhere.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Seek strong, competent
allies rather than trying to go it alone. This is one of those
days when acting in unison with another can produce divi-
dends you never thought possible.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Take command of your life
when circumstances call for it, such as being willing to
make changes when necessary, regardless of how much
you liked doing it the old way.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're someone who likes
being an extremist at times, but it behooves you to practice


moderation in all you do, right now. Go with the flow instead
of against the grain.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Although you'll be imbued
with an abundance of great ideas, you might waste all of
them because of an uncertainty regarding their worth, just
because they come from you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Do something nice for an-
other out of the goodness of your heart and not because
you want a favor from this person. She or he will comply
with what you want, but you could be labeled a "user."
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - If you're truly interested in
making some folding money, you won't stick your nose up
at doing a dirty job. It could be the very one that will provide
the cabbage you crave.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Your hunches regarding
ways to advance your self-interest may not be as good as
some suggestions made by a well-intentioned friend.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B2.

SUNDAY, JULY 3
Fantasy 5:2 - 16 - 21 - 23 - 29
5-of-5 1 winner $178,593.17
4-of-5 252 $114
3-of-5 7,360 $10.50
SATURDAY, JULY 2
Powerball: 1 -11 -18 -29 -51
Powerball: 32
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 winners $200,000
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 15 - 35-41- 45 -46- 48
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 37 $4,766
4-of-6 2,098 $68
3-of-6 43,417 $5
Fantasy 5:2 - 7 - 8 - 15 - 34
5-of-5 2 winners $132,663.88
4-of-5 374 $114
3-of-5 12,458 $9.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, July 5,
the 186th day of 2011. There
are 179 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On July 5, 1811,
Venezuela became the first
South American country to
declare independence from
Spain.
On this date:
In 1865, William Booth
founded the Salvation Army
in London.
In 1935, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt signed
the National Labor Relations
Act.
In 1946, the bikini, created
by Louis Rear, was worn by
Micheline Bernardini during a
poolside fashion show in
Paris.
In 1947, Larry Doby made
his debut with the Cleveland
Indians, becoming the first
black player in the American
League.
In 1948, Britain's National
Health Service Act went into
effect, providing government-
financed medical and dental
care.
In 1971, President Richard
Nixon certified the 26th
Amendment to the U.S. Con-
stitution, which lowered the
minimum voting age from 21
to 18.
In 1975, Arthur Ashe be-
came the first black man to
win a Wimbledon singles title
as he defeated Jimmy Con-
nors.
In 1991, a worldwide fi-
nancial scandal erupted as
regulators in eight countries
shut down the Bank of Credit
and Commerce International.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush named vet-
eran prosecutor Robert
Mueller to take over the FBI.
Five years ago: North
Korea test-fired seven mis-
siles into the Sea of Japan,
including at least one be-
lieved capable of reaching
the U.S. mainland.
One year ago: Israel
eased its blockade of
Hamas-ruled Gaza to allow
virtually all consumer goods.
Today's Birthdays: Ac-
tress Katherine Helmond is
82. Actress Shirley Knight is
75. Singer-musician Robbie
Robertson is 68. Julie Nixon
Eisenhower is 63. Rock star
Huey Lewis is 61. Singer-
songwriter Marc Cohn is 52.
Actor Dorien Wilson is 49.
Actress Edie Falco is 48. Ac-
tress Kathryn Erbe is 46.
Actor Michael Stuhlbarg is
43. Rock musician Bengt
Lagerberg (The Cardigans)
is 38. Actor Dale Godboldo is
36. Rapper Bizarre is 35.


Rock singer Jason Wade
(Lifehouse) is 31. Actor Ryan
Hansen is 30. Actor Jason
Dolley is 20.
Thought for Today: "Aim
above morality. Be not sim-
ply good, be good for some-
thing." - Henry David
Thoreau (1817-1862).






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY



uL6
= I

z z

o 0
o aL.


HITTING THE LINKS


OUTDOORS


iET IN THE iAMET








Turnin up the Heat 8
70


Speedway prepares

for championship

battles down stretch

JOHN CHANCE
Special to the Chronicle
his Saturday night the Citrus
County Speedway begins the
second half of the 2011 racing
season. There will be no rest for the
championship contenders, as the
speedway will race every Saturday
night, from now till the season finale
on November 12.
This year the Speedway has seen
over 300 individual drivers and cars
come to compete at the "friendliest
track in the south." Of those 300
drivers, over 50 different drivers
have come away with feature wins,
which leaves the other 250 still hun-
gry for a victory In today's column,
we'll take a look at the champi-
onship battles in each division, as
we prepare for the speedway's own
race to the championship.
Over 45 Super Late Model drivers
have tried to take home a victory
this season. Of those 45, only four
have been able to get the job done.
Five-time champion Herb Neu-
mann Jr sits on top of the point
standings once again, holding an 11
point lead over Scott Grosenbacher,
and a 13 point lead over Danny Mad-
dox in third. Neumann has put one
feature win under his belt this year,
as well as a strong second place fin-
ish in the non-points UPS 100 lapper
back on June 4. Joining Neumann in
victory lane this year have been
Danny Maddox, Darryl Shelnut, and
Tim Russell in the UPS 100.
The Open Wheel Modified divi-
sion has seen some competitive rac-
ing this season. Of the 35 drivers
who have registered to race this
year, five drivers have taken home
feature wins. Bobby Ervien has led
the points since the second race of
the season, and just took home his
first feature win at the last race.
Ervien has been Mr Consistency,
finishing near the front almost every
night. Chasing Ervien in second
place is Richie Smith, who leads all
drivers in the division with three
feature wins. Smith has really got
his program together at the mid
point of the season, after a tough
start which saw two DNF's.
Following them in the third posi-
tion is Doug Miller who has logged
one feature win this year, and is put-
ting all his focus on the chase for the
championship. Defending cham-
pion Jeremy Gerstner sits fourth
with one feature win, and Robbie
Cooper is fifth with two feature vic-
tories this year.
There was great anticipation in
the off season for the Sportsman di-
vision. Rumors circulated of many
drivers building new sportsman
cars, which set the division up to be
the biggest all year. Unlike many
racing rumors, this one was true as
48 drivers have challenged the V4 as-
phalt oval this year Despite fielding
the largest field this year only six
have pulled there cars into victory
lane. Ernie Reed sits on top of the
division with two feature wins and
holds a 33 point lead over Cody
Stickler in second and a 35 point
lead over Brandon Morris in third.
Reed is a speedway veteran, and
you can see his years of experience
working to his advantage this year,
taking what his car gives him on
each night. Behind him two young
guns in Stickler and Morris are
chasing after him. Stickler has one
feature win with Morris bringing
home two checkered flags. Both of
these young drivers have seen their
youthful aggression cost them as
they try to chase down Reed for the
points championship. Other feature
winners this year have been Aaron
Williamson (1), Richie Smith (2), and
Brett Jenkins (1).
The Street Stock division has seen
40 different drivers try to achieve
their goal of victory this year There
have been eight different drivers
take home a checkered flag, which
ties them with the Mini Stocks for
most different winners this year.
Curtis Flanagan is on top of the
mountain holding a 68 point lead
over Bill Ryan in second and an 86
point margin over Bubba Martone.
Flanagan has taken home two fea-
ture victories, and has been the car
to beat all season. But as we ap-
proached the mid-season break, the


Ir,


'� -�-
I-. -.


Photos by R.E. Wing/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Neil Herne (13) and Michael Appleby (69) make hard contact earlier this season in the SS/PS figure 8's race.
BELOW: Steve Dorer (10) and points leader Herb Neumann (98) battle for the lead in the Super Late Model division.


other drivers are starting to get their
cars dialed in, and challenging his
grip on the division. Other feature
winners this year are: Bill Ryan (1),
Kyle Peters (3), Tim Wilson (1), John
Makula (1), Michael Stalnaker (1),
Jeff Stalnaker Jr (2), and Mike Wil-
son (1).
The Taylor Made Homes Pure
Stocks started the season off strong
with 47 drivers competing this year
Seven drivers have been able to take
home victories this year.
Defending champion David Walls
took over the point lead early in
March, and has continued to stretch
that lead out to a 158 point margin,
which is the largest in any division
at the speedway Walls just recently
debut a new car, and drove it to his
second feature win of the year in the
last night of racing before the break.
Glenn Colyer sits second in the
points standings and holds a 41
point gap over Tyler Stickler. Levi
Roberts has been the man to beat,
leading the division with five fea-
ture wins. Roberts is running a lim-
ited schedule this year, which leaves
him fourth in the points standings.
Other feature winners this year
have been: Tyler Stickler (2), Carl
Peters (2), Sheri Makula (1), Steve
Stineduf (1), and James Peters (1).
The Modified Mini Stocks has
been a three-man show this year.
Only Chris Allen (2), Jesse Henley
(1), and defending champion Clint
Foley (3), have taken home feature
wins over the 27 other drivers. Allen
sits on top of the points with a 14
point lead over Henley in second.
Making a challenge from the third
spot just 21 points back is Foley who
debut a new car last race putting
him in position to make a run for the
crown. Henley is looking for the lit-
tle extra to put him over the top and
challenge for the points lead.
The Sheldon Palmes Insurance
Mini Stocks have only had 25 differ-
ent drivers register to compete this
year. But almost 1/3 of those drivers
have been able to take home a fea-


.~-
- -


ture win, which makes it the most
competitive division at the speedway
Sonya Heater has put together a
string of great finishes to take the
points lead at the half way point of
the season. Heater holds a slim six
point lead over second place Jeremy
Sharrone, and a seven point lead
over third place Kevin Stone. This is
the closest points battle at the speed-
way, and has gone back and forth all
season between Heater and Stone.
Sharrone is trying to shake the
gremlins out of his racer, and have
some more consistency for the sec-
ond half of the year. Jeff Eberly got a
late start to the season, but has put
six feature wins in the books in short
time, which leads all drivers at the
speedway Other feature winners
this year are: Jeremy Sharrone (1),
Chris Snow (1), Kevin Stone (1),
Shannon Kennedy, (1), Ashlee
Williamson (1), and defending cham-
pion Rick Kuhn (1).
Pro Figure 8's have had 22 drivers
try to avoid the intersection may-
hem with seven drivers taking home
victories. Wayne Calkins sits on top
of the points with a six point lead
over Joey Catarelli in second and a
32 point lead over Cliff Rousseau in
third. Calkins and Catarelli seem to
be the two drivers that will battle to
the championship trophy But a lit-
tle bad luck on their parts, could
bring the rest of the field into con-


tention. Feature winners this year
have been: Calkins (2), Catarelli (1),
Rousseau (1), Neil Herne (1), Mason
Love (1), James Crawford (2), and
Robbie Hage (1)
The Street Stock/Pure Stock figure
8's have quickly become a crowd fa-
vorite with 27 drivers competing and
three of them taking home feature
wins. Eric Sharrone holds a 12 point
lead over former figure 8-time cham-
pion Ronnie Schrefiels in second
and a 46 point lead over Thomas
Peet in third. This division has pro-
vided some of the most excitement
all year, as well as some of the
biggest wrecks also. Only the top
three drivers have been able to take
feature wins this year with Sharrone
have 2, Schrefiels 2, and Peet 1.
This Saturday night Citrus County
Speedway begins the 2nd half of the
2011 season with the Open Wheel
Modifieds, Sportsman, Sheldon
Palmes Insurance Mini Stocks, Tay-
lor Made Homes Pure Stocks, Pro
Figure 8's, and the Outlaw Modified
Mini's. The last race saw sparks fly
as tempers got the best of a few driv-
ers, which makes for great anticipa-
tion for this Saturday night. Gates
open at 4 p.m. and racing starts at 6
p.m., visit the track website at
www.citruscountyspeedwaycom for
complete details, or call the speed-
way office at (352)726-9339.
See you at the races!


CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY
POINTS STANDINGS
SUPER LATE MODEL
# Drivers Name Poini
Herb Neumann Jr. 317
Scott Grossenbacher 306
Danny Maddox 304
Talon Craft 289
Jeremy Gerstner 286
Perry Lovelady 280
Andy Anderson 256
Randy Plantz 245
Cody Lane 243
Kenny Kuhn 238
Open Wheeled Modifieds
# Drivers Name Poini
Bobby Ervien 801
Richie Smith 782
Doug Miller 780
Jeremy Gerstner 773
Robbie Cooper 768
Billy Bechtelheimer 736
(Johnny) L. J. Grimm 671
Dalton Nelson 637
Michael Stalnaker 607
Ricky Coffin 529
MODIFIED MINI STOCKS
# Drivers Name Poini
Chris Allen 632
Jesse Henley 618
Clint Foley 611
Phil Edwards 563
Michael Lawhorn 502
Nathan Florian 480
Richard Kuhn 454
James Ellis 395
Jeremy Gerstner 284
Richard Heath 279
SPORTSMAN
# Drivers Name Poini
Ernie Reed 882
Cody Stickler 859
Brandon Morris 857
Aaron Williamson 740
Tom Posavec 721
Richie Smith 697
Dennise Neighbor Sr. 600
David White 567
Christopher Harvey 525
Lance Daubach 456
STREET STOCKS
# Drivers Name Poini
Curtis Flanagan 1254
Bill Ryan 1186
Tom Bubba Martone 1168
Kenny May 1093
Austin Hughes 1038
Bradley Lyon 876
Kyle Peters 827
Tim Wilson 770
Jonna Hughes 602
John Makula 592
PURE STOCKS
# Drivers Name Poini
David Walls 1421
Glen Colyer 1263
Tyler Stickler 1222
Levi Roberts 1022
Carl Peters 1000
Happy Florian 920
Sheri Makula 889
Nicholas Malverty 861
Chris Ickes 789
Arden Franklin 773
MINI STOCKS
# Drivers Name Poini
Sonya Heater 1199
Jeremy Sharrone 1193
Kevin Stone 1192
Kenneth Watkins 1111
Chris Snow 1084
Kevin Knox 848
Jessey Mallory 829
Shawn Jenkins 799
Shannon Kennedy 781
Ashlee Williamson 738
PRO FIGURE-8s
# Drivers Name Poini
Wayne Calkins 848
Joey Catarelli 842
Cliff Rousseau 816
Charlie Meyer 804
Neil Herne 758
Robbie Powell 706
Thomas Peet 700
Mason Love 474
T. J. Sharrone 448
James Crawford 372
PS/SS FIG-8s
# Drivers Name Poini
Eric Sharrone 490
Ronnie Schrefiels 478
Thomas Peet 444
Neil Herne 428
Jimmy Kruse 358
LarryTriana 338
Charles Herne 272
Del Beckner 258
Wallace (Gator) Jones 258
David Ross 256


E/ECKI TEHE WINNER

EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST

David Ragan produces his own fireworks at Daytona

Out of 121 entries submitted this pastweek only one picked David Ragan as the winner of the Coke Zero400 in Daytona on Saturday and that was Nick Slonaker who also won
the contest last week Slonaker earns $25 dollars for guessing Ragan correctly.
r*------------------------------------------------------*---


NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM

for the Quaker State 400 on Saturday, July 9 at Kentucky Speedway.
II


DRIVER'S NAME
DRIVER'S NAME


YOUR NAME


PHONE NUMBER


TIEBREAKER: (Guess the average speed of the race to three decimal places:)

Mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. on July 8.
L ---------------------------------------------------------- A


~I- . - - --


- -- - - - "

- ^~ -- -


m






Section C TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ut


O0


The $2,000 Video Pro Wheel Screen displays up
to 1,000 images, or 90 seconds of video, pow-
ered by a rechargeable lithium battery.

Bicycles more animated
with color display wheels
CHERYL JACOB
Staff Writer
E specially at night, visibility is key for
bicyclists. A California company,
MonkeyLectric LLC, offers a bright
solution with the Monkey Light
M133s, an LED gadget that attaches to a
wheel.
Powered by three AAA batteries for up to 30
hours per charge, the $59 device offers nine
displays of spiraling colors via
32 full-color, weatherproof
lights.
I The Monkey Light notches
into the spokes of most any
standard wheel, secured with
For more zip ties.
photos, click The patterns animate best
on this story at when the bike is moving be-
www.chronicle tween 8 mph and 30 mph. Put
online.com. two Monkey Lights on a wheel
for more effects.
Ask about it at your local bike shop, or
order online via Amazon.com or the company
at www.MonkeyLectric.com. The gadget can
mount to wheelchairs or strollers, but is not
designed for motorcycles or cars.
Commercial applications
If one line of LEDs can produce attractive
patterns, four spokes of 256 total lights can an-
imate a wheel.
MonkeyLectric's Video Pro Wheel Screen
gives companies an innovative way to promote
their business. The $2,000 device displays up
to 1,000 images, or 90 seconds of video, pow-
ered by a rechargeable lithium battery
This larger product requires a larger wheel


Missed medication an expensive
problem with inexpensive solution
Studies done by the U.S. Gov- they interview patients, people feel
ernment as well as universi- they are taking their medicines
ties and private drug properly even when they are not.
companies and prescrip- In some of the surveys,
tion-filling entities have the respondents were
suggested Americans more than 50 percent of
waste anywhere from the time convinced they
$260 billion to $290 bil- P _ were taking medications
lion a year by missing properly and they were
doses of medication. . proven wrong.
These missed doses - Factors that can influ-
can lead to infections ence this can be as sim-
and problems dragging ple as laziness and too
on longer than they Dr. Denis Grillo casual of an attitude to
should, the need for ad- problems with reading
ditional medications EAR, NOSE and vision problems or
and even, in some seri- & THROAT the patient feeling he
ous instances, leadingto just does not need the
emergency room visits and hospi- medications anymore or
talizations that result in more he is well enough that he can stop
lengthy and expensive care. his or her prescription. Sometimes


Researchers have found when


See . Page C4


Special to the Chronicle
The Monkey Light M133s LED gadget attaches to the spokes of a standard bicycle wheel; it is de-
signed to keep cyclists safe and visible at night. The consumer-level device retails for $64.99.


than the Monkey Light, fitting a minimum 26-
inch base. The double-sided displays animate
when the wheel spins at 9 mph to 30 mph.
The Video Pro connects to a Mac computer
via a USB adapter All popular image and
video formats can be used - scan in a logo,
customer drawings or animated text. The ef-
fective resolution is 70 by 70 pixels.
While best at night, the ultra-bright LEDs
can be seen in daylight. Don't have a bike-ac-
cessible business? Set up a rotating wheel in
a window display
Bright ideas
MonkeyLectric founder Dan Goldwater


opea tle ltgihs: The product image shows the Monkey Light
See Page C4 M133s, which mounts to wheel spokes.



Dentist's son pens essay

about 'Americanism'


W ith it being the
week of the
Fourth of July, I
thought I would print a
speech my son, Frankie,
prepared for his partici-
pation in Boy's State this
week in Tallahassee. I
hope you enjoy it - I
did. Good job, Frankie!
Americanism Dr. F
According to the Mer- Vasc
riam-Webster Diction- SOUNI
ary, Americanism
means, "an attachment or alle-
giance to the traditions, interests or
ideals of the United States." But
just what are these traditions, in-
terests or ideals? What is it about
America that we are so loyal to,
that we love so much, that we feel is


ir
iI
D


such a vital way of life,
that we attach ourselves
to it? What is it about
America that makes
Americans feel this way,
that makes us pledge al-
legiance to her that
causes this attachment?
Americanism - what
makes us feel it?
rank An important state-
mini ment in the Declaration
BITES of Independence and the
statement upon which
the principles of the
Constitution were written, is that
"..all men are created equal, that
they are endowed by their Creator
with certain unalienable rights..'
That our forefathers believed that


Page C4


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Breast


cancer

death

rates

readers remember
the controversy
over the public health rec-
ommendation that screen-
ing mammograms for
younger women do not re-
ally save many lives. This
statistical calculation of
importance of the mam-
mogram brought about an
uproar heard around the
world.
Those of us who actu-
ally treat cancer patients
realized something that
the pencil-pushing statis-
ticians working for the
government don't see:


Page C4


IlW I
Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Keep


hopes


alive
I saw a 70-year-old pa-
tient who was diag-
nosed with lung
cancer It was non small
cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Unfortunately at diagno-
sis, her cancer had al-
ready spread outside the
lung and so this is consid-
ered stage 4 lung cancer
Many times patients or
even some doctors, when
they hear the words "stage
4 lung cancer," they feel
like it is a death sentence
and nothing can be done
about this. Yes, we cannot
cure lung cancer at this
stage, but many things can
be done to improve not
only survival but also
See Page C4


"- Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in
' _ 7" -. the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to:

S- * Failed Laser Spine Surgery
* Spinal Stenosis
r' * Herniated Disc
* Degenerative Disc Disease s
S* Scoliosis


* Spinal Fractures due to
Trauma or Osteoporosis
Little to no out of pocket expense
for most Medicare Patients with
secondary insurances.


James J. Ronzo, D.O.
Frank S. Bono, D.O.


I


writes about how he d l


Pt'


e erpr


f


.-Al t





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Health NOTES


* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule: To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive, call (352)
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to donate.
A photo ID is also required. Visit
www.lifesouth.org for details.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
day, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, 8
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday,
closed Sundays.
* 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday,
July 5, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, July
5, Cypress Cove Care Center,
700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal
River.
0 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday,
July 6, VFW Post 10087, off
County Road 491, behind Su-
perior Bank, Beverly Hills.
* 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day, July 6, Walmart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
0 1:30 to 5 p.m. Friday, July
8, Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.
* 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Friday, July 8, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday,
July 9, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
0 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday,
July 10, First Christian Church,
2018 A Colonade St., Inver-
ness.
0 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
July 11, Eagles Aerie 4272,
5340 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday,
July 12, Citrus County Tax Col-
lector's Office, 210 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness.
0 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, July
12, Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
* Join the free LifeSharers
program to donate your organs.
Everyone is welcome to join
LifeSharers. There is neither
age requirement nor limit and
parents can enroll their minor
children as well. Pre-existing
medical conditions do not ex-
clude you from becoming a
member. Even if you are al-
ready a registered organ donor,
you can improve your chances
of getting an organ if you ever
need one.
Visit the website to join online
at www.lifesharers.org.
From 5 to 8 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly, Applebee's at
1901 Main St. in Inverness has
"Dining to Donate" - 10 per-
cent of the guests' bill will be
sent to the corporate office of
LifeSharers. A flier must be pre-
sented: email Anna DiPleco at
floridiananna@aol.com (with
the subject Re: LifeSharers) for
a copy of the flier for presenta-
tion. Call DiPleco at (352) 726-
8489 to answer any questions.
* Catholic Charities DOSP
has openings in its respite pro-
gram that meets from 12:30 to
4:30 p.m. Wednesday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in
Beverly Hills.
The program is for people
with early stage Alzheimer's
disease and other memory loss
illnesses including stroke,
Parkinson's disease or senile
dementia. It offers caregivers
short-term, dependable relief
from day-to-day responsibilities,
while providing loved ones the
opportunity to participate in
planned activities and loving
relationships.
For more information or to
make an appointment to ob-
serve the program, call Marie
Monahan at (800) 242-9012,
ext 22.
* The George A. Dame
Community Health Center
Board Meetings are at 3 p.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
the Citrus County Health De-
partment, 3700 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, in the first floor
conference room.
* HOMOSASSA- Hospice


of Citrus County will provide
Orientation Training for those
interested in learning more
about Hospice and Hospice
volunteer opportunities. The
class will be from 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 7, at the Ho-
mosassa Public Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave, Ho-
mosassa.
The class provides an
overview of Hospice philosophy
and history. Participants will be-
come acquainted with services
provided by Hospice of Citrus


County for patients and their
families. They will also become
familiar with the concept of pal-
liative care and learn the impor-
tance of confidentiality.
Volunteers are needed at the
Hospice of Citrus County Ho-
mosassa Thrift Shoppe. Teens
and high school students are
encouraged to attend. Volun-
teering for Hospice of Citrus
County will provide community
service hours for the Bright Fu-
tures Scholarship and other ac-
ademic needs.
To register for this class or to
request training for your group,
call Dianna Boggs, Hospice of
Citrus County Volunteer Serv-
ices Manager, at (352) 621-
1500, ext. 1706, or email
DBoggs@hospiceofcitrus
county.org.
* SPRING HILL - Oak Hill
Hospital Partner's Club
events:
* Thursday, July 7, at 2:30
p.m., the Alzheimer's support
group will meet for Alzheimer's
patients' caregivers.
* Friday, July 22, ice cream
social at noon, guest speaker
from Silver Sneakers Inc.
* Daily games: Kings in the
Corner, Scrabble, dominoes,
Pinochle, Mahjong.
* Other activities: painting,
yoga, line dance, rug hooking,
physical exercise, Walk n' Talk,
music with Beverly; a variety of
movies.
Partner's Club events and
activities are open to members
only. Membership in Oak Hill
Hospital's Partner's Club is
open to Hernando, Pasco and
Citrus county residents for $20
a year, which includes member-
ship in the HCA national H2U
program.
* Free cholesterol and dia-
betes screenings from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. July 8 at Winn-Dixie
Pharmacy, 333 Highland Ave.
Space 600, Inverness. Call
Cholestcheck at (800) 713-
3301, no appointments.
* Diabetes classes are of-
fered from 9 to 10 a.m. Mon-
days at the Citrus County
Health Department in Lecanto.
Classes are free. No registra-
tion is required. Blood sugar
testing is no longer available
prior to class.
* What is diabetes? - July
11.
* Meal planning - July 18.
* Sick days - July 25.
* Medications and monitor-
ing -Aug. 1.
* More about meal plans -
Aug. 8.
* Avoiding complications -
Aug. 15.
Call (352) 527-0068 or Carol
Burke, R.D., at (352) 726-5222,
or visit www.citruscountyhealth.
org.
* Free cooking course for
diabetics. noon to 2 p.m.
Wednesday, July 27, in Citrus
Memorial Auditorium, hosted by
Citrus Memorial Health System
and Publix. "Cool Treats and
Healthy Sweets" will teach par-
ticipants about blood sugar and
how to incorporate frozen
desserts into a regular diabetic
menu. The dietitian will offer a
cooking demonstration, ideas
and recipes on healthy and
tasty frozen treats for summer.
Seating is limited, so reser-
vations are required: Call (352)
560-6266.
* Free diabetes education
classes, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Friday, at the Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center, 7493 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River, given by Patti Keller,
R.N., BSN, certified diabetes
educator. Limited seating avail-
able; call (352) 564-0444.
* SPRING HILL - The
Heart Institute at Oak Hill Hos-
pital offers a monthly Healthy
Hearts education series from
4 to 5:30 p.m. Monday, July 11,
in the cafeteria conference
room at Oak Hill Hospital,
11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill.
Admission is free and com-
plimentary refreshments will be
served. Seating is limited and
reservations are required; go to
www.OakHillHospital.com or
call (352) 628-6060 in Citrus or
(352) 597-6333 in Hernando.
* The Citrus Alliance
Against Adult Abuse (C4A)
monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m.


the second Wednesday
monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545
N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills.
For information, call Judy
Stauffer at (352) 303-2620.
Your help is needed to protect
our vulnerable against abuse,
neglect and exploitation.
* Partners for a Sub-
stance-Free Citrus Inc. will
meet the second Thursday
monthly in the basement of the
Citrus County School Board of-
fice in Inverness, 1007 W. Main


Program to focus on

weight control issues
Special to the Chronicle

"Walk-A-Weigh," an award-winning weight-control
program emphasizing the importance of physical activ-
ity and healthy eating will be offered by the University
of Florida/IFAS, Citrus County Extension office.
"The Dietary Guidelines emphasize that long-term
weight loss is a combination of healthy eating AND reg-
ular physical activity," said Connie Crawley, nutrition
and health specialist with the University of Georgia Col-
lege of Family and Consumer Sciences. "Also, risk for
chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease are re-
duced when people are physically active most days of
the week. Even those who already have chronic diseases
like high blood pressure and diabetes control them bet-
ter when they eat healthy foods and get active."
The Walk-A-Weigh Program will run from 9 to 11 a.m.
beginning Tuesday, Sept. 6, at the Citrus County Exten-
sion office, 3650 W Sovereign Path, Suite 1, Lecanto.
Classes will meet weekly for eight weeks, through Tues-
day, Oct. 25.
Although the majority of each session will focus on
participants actually exercising, there will also be brief
presentations on such topics as cutting extra calories,
reducing fat intake, substituting herbs and spices for
salt, understanding nutrition labels and maintaining
weight loss. If it is too hot to walk outside, we will do in-
door physical activities. Participants will also be en-
couraged to meet informally between the weekly
sessions and walk together.
The cost of the class is $15 (check or money order, no
cash) per participant and is limited to 40 people. Pre-
paid registration is required and no refunds or transfers
to other classes will be given. Medical releases and lia-
bility forms plus payments must be turned in by Aug. 16.
To register, call Monica Bonsett at (352) 527-5713. Regis-
tration for the class begins July 11 and ends at 5 p.m.
Aug. 16, 2011.
All programs and related activities sponsored for, or
assisted by, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences are open to all persons with non-discrimination
with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disabil-
ity, sex or sexual orientation, marital status, national ori-
gin, political opinions or affiliations.
For persons with disabilities requiring special ac-
commodations, contact the office at least five working
days prior to the program so proper consideration may
be given to the request. The phone number is (352) 527-
5700. For the hearing impaired, contact the Florida
Relay Service at (800) 955-8771.


St. Use the elevator to go to the
basement.
* 8 to 9 a.m. board meeting.
0 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee,
doughnuts, networking.
0 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. mem-
bership meeting.
For information, call the office
at (352) 389-0472 or email sub-
stancefree.citrus@yahoo.com.
* In Autism seminar - car-
ing for children with autism
spectrum disorder - 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, July 16, at the
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Seating is limited, call
(352) 447-1775 (ask for Bar-
bara) or email IsaiahFoundation
@ymail.com with questions or
to register. Presented by Isaiah
Foundation Inc., Sponsored by
United Way of Citrus County.
* Our Lady Of Grace Church


A


and The Knights of Columbus
Abbot Francis Sadlier Council
6168 will co-host a "Helping
One Another" Summertime
Blood Drive from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday, July 16, in the
Parish Life Center of Our Lady
of Grace.
Enjoy a complimentary conti-
nental breakfast with us and re-
ceive a souvenir T-shirt as well
as a free cholesterol reading.
Another 52 pints will give us a
total for the six drives of 1,002
lives saved!
Donors must be 17 years of
age, weigh at least 110 pounds
and have a picture ID with you.
Should you have any ques-
tions, call Don Irwin at (352)
527-8450.
* PORTLAND, Ore. - Proj-
ect Helping Hands (PHH) is
recruiting volunteers to join


Everything you
want in a doctor.

When you need
medical care or have
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medical and health education
teams serving economically
disadvantaged people in Bo-
livia, Haiti, Kenya, Liberia, the
Philippines, Sudan and
Uganda. The following trips are
open for application:
1. Kampala, Uganda,
January 2012.
2. Haiti, February 2012.
3. Bolivia Highlands, "Uyuni
Salt Flats" - March 2012.
4. Liberia, April 2012.
5. Ilagan, Philippines, May
2012.
To apply for a trip and learn
more about Project Helping
Hands, visit the website
www.projecthelpinghands.org.
Team members are primarily
nurses, doctors, physicians and
other care providers, but any-
one older than 18 can apply to
join a team. Non-medical volun-
teers help with setting up clinics
and managing lines, running
between providers and the
pharmacy, handing out glasses,
helping with health education,
playing with kids and taking
photos.
Project Helping Hands, a
non-affiliated nonprofit organi-
zation, sends volunteer medical
and health education teams to
developing nations to provide
medical clinics and health edu-
cation for those who lack ac-
cess to care.
Support GROUPS

* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
support group: Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church, 550 U.S.
41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first
Tuesday monthly. Call Anne
Black at (352) 527-4600.
* BROOKSVILLE -
Women's breast cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
first Tuesday monthly at Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo at (352) 592-8128.
* HUDSON - Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point
Alzheimer's support group
meetings 10 a.m. to noon the
first Tuesday monthly in the
second-floor conference room.
The meeting is open to care-
givers and other interested peo-
ple to discuss and exchange
ideas as well as help and en-
courage those who are in-
volved in the care for
Alzheimer's patients. Call Maria


Curley at (727) 992-1358 or
Kathy Montero at the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion at (727) 848-8888. Re-
gional Medical Center Bayonet
Point is at 14000 Fivay Road in
Hudson. Visit
www.rmchealth.com or
www.heartoftampa.com.
* SPRING HILL - Care-
giver Support Group, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday
monthly, at the Florida Cancer
Institute-New Hope's Spring Hill
Center, 10441 Quality Drive,
Suite 203 in the Medical Arts
Building next to Spring Hill Hos-
pital. Call Pamela McGee, facil-
itator, at (352) 688-7744.
* Friends of the Blind, 9
a.m. to noon the second Friday
monthly. Call Butch Shultz at
(352) 344-2693 for location.
* FFRA (Families and
Friends Reaching for the Abili-
ties), second Friday monthly at
the Key Training Center in In-
verness at 130 Heights Ave.
Social time and business meet-
ing at 9 a.m. is followed by a
speaker at 10 a.m. who will ad-
dress issues pertaining to the
developmentally disabled. Call
Ron Phillips at (352) 382-7819.
* Women's Breast Cancer
Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the
second Friday monthly, Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute
in the Allen Ridge Medical Cen-
ter, County Road 491, Lecanto.
Light lunch served. Call Judy
Bonard at (352) 527-4389.
* Epilepsy support group,
starting at the Lakes Region Li-
brary, Inverness. Call Lili Jane
at (352) 344-8765.
* Mended Hearts of Citrus
County, for individuals who
have had or have cardiovascu-
lar disease, as well as care-
givers and family members, 10
a.m. the second Friday monthly
at the Red Brick School House,
across from the Citrus Memo-
rial Health System Medical
Plaza Building; parking and
transportation available from
CMHS parking lot "A." Open to
the public. Call Millie King,
president, at (352) 637-5525; or
Cardio Vascular Services at
(352) 344-6416.
* The Post-Polio Support
Group will not meet during
June and July. The next meet-
ing is scheduled for Aug. 20.
Call Carolyn Raville at (352)
489-1731.
See GROUPS/Page C3


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C2 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


HEALTH & LIFE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Actos can increase risk of bladder cancer


Can the dia- a planned five-year in-
* betes medica- terim analysis of an on-
* tion Actos going, 10-year epidemi-
increase the risk of logical study
bladder cancer? The five-year results
A: Yes, the use of . . showed that although
Actos (pioglitazone) for there was no overall in-
more than one year creased risk of bladder
may increase the risk of cancer with pioglita-
bladder cancer and the zone use, an increased
U.S. Food and DrugAd- Richard Hoffmann risk of bladder cancer
ministration (FDA) has ASK THE was noted among pa-
issued a safety an- PHARMACIST tients with the longest
nouncement regarding exposure to pioglita-
this risk. zone, and in those ex-
This safety information is based posed to the highest cumulative
on the FDAs review of data from dose of pioglitazone.


The FDA is also aware of a re-
cent epidemiological study con-
ducted in France, which suggests
an increased risk of bladder can-
cer with pioglitazone.
Based on the results of this study,
France has suspended the use of
pioglitazone and Germany has rec-
ommended not to start pioglita-
zone in new patients. The FDA will
continue to evaluate data from the
ongoing 10-year epidemiological
study as well as conduct a compre-
hensive review of the results from
the French study As more infor-
mation becomes available, the
FDA will update the public.


Additional information:
* There may be an increased
chance of having bladder cancer
when you take pioglitazone.
* You should not take pioglita-
zone if you are receiving treat-
ment for bladder cancer
* Tell your doctor right away if
you have any of the following
symptoms of bladder cancer:
blood or red color in urine; urgent
need to urinate or pain while uri-
nating; pain in back or lower ab-
domen.
* Read the Medication Guide
you get along with your pioglita-
zone medicine. It explains the


risks associated with the use ofpi-
oglitazone.
* Talk to your health care pro-
fessional if you have questions or
concerns about pioglitazone med-
icines.
* Report side effects from the
use of pioglitazone medicines to
the FDA MedWatch program: (800)
332-1088.


Richard P Hoffmann, PharmD,
has been a pharmacist for more
than 40years. Send questions to
him at 2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442


GROUPS
Continued from Page C2

* The Area 13 Family Care
Council, 10 a.m. to noon the
second Monday monthly at the
Wildwood DCF/APD office,
1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway
(State Road 44). Call Karen
Huscher at (352) 726-1445 or
isabelfccl3@yahoo.com. Area
13 covers Citrus, Hernando,
Lake, Marion and Sumter coun-
ties. There are 15 Family Care
Councils with governor-ap-
pointed volunteer members,
who are individuals with a de-
velopmental disability or are a
family member.
* NAMI-Citrus, locally char-
tered group of the National Al-
liance on Mental Illness, meets
the second Monday monthly at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, on County Road 486 in
Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30
p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All
those with an interest in mental
health issues are welcome. Call
(352) 341-2273.
* SPRING HILL - Healthy
Hearts support group open to
anyone looking for information
on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30
p.m. the second Monday
monthly in the cafeteria confer-
ence room at Oak Hill Hospital,
11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville.
Admission is free and compli-
mentary refreshments will be
served. Seating is limited and
reservations are required, call
(352) 628-6060 in Citrus, (352)
597-6333 in Hernando or visit
www.OakHillHospital.com.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, hosts a
volunteer meeting at 10:30 a.m.
the second Tuesday monthly.
Call (352) 344-8111.
* Bereaved Parents of the
USA (BP/USA) grief support
group for parents and grand-
parents who have experienced
the death of a child, 7 p.m. the
second Wednesday monthly at
the First Presbyterian Church,
1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. Call Bernadette Pas-
salacqua at (352) 746-4664 or
visit www.bereavedparents
usa.org.
Weekly meetings
* Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road,
Ilnverness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at
(352) 503-3961.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
0 Awareness Lunch
Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fri-
days, St. Margaret Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
* Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at (352)
621-0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
* AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-


days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at (352)
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian support
group meets at 6 p.m. every
Wednesday at Living Waters
Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St.,
Beverly Hills. Call Meg at (352)
527-2443. Free and open to the
public.
* DUNNELLON - Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist Church
of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call the church at (352)
489-2730.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,


U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
C.R. 491 and S.R. 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: (352) 382-0851.


007W9A


* Overeaters Anonymous:
* Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the Sen-
ior Center (V.A. building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Dolores at (352) 746-5019.
* Solution, 3 to 4 p.m. Tues-
days at the Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness. Call Marilyn at (352)
726-9112.
* The Refuge, 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at St. Anne's
Church, 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, in the Mary
Chapel. Call Peg at (352) 447-
5080.
* The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call


Carolyn at (352) 341-0777.
* The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
(352) 341-0777.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years. Weekly
meeting. Call (352) 637-3196.
* Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at (352) 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-


eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy Jackson at (352) 527-
8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program, 6
p.m. Tuesday in the fellowship
hall, 88 Civic Circle. Free. Call
the church at (352) 746-3620 or
Meg at (352) 527-2443.
* HPH Hospice presents
free grief support programs,
2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
for anyone who has experi-
enced the sudden loss of a
See GROUPS/Page C4


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CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
Delfin, Luis MD FACC
Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC
Govindarajan, Balachander MD FACC
Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
Savage, Kenneth L. MD
Sieving, Richard R. MD FACC
Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
Upadya, Shrikanth P.Y. MD FACC
Walker, Dennis J. MD
Yelamanchi, Vishnu P. MD FACC
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
........................................ ............... 7 9 5 -4 16 5
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
...................... .............................. 7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
... . ... . .... .... ... ........ .... .. .. ...... . 72 6-8 35 3
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............... .. ...... .............................7 2 6 -8 3 5 3
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................................................ 352-31 5-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter
Professional Plaza, The Villages
.......................................... 352-751-3356
CHIROPRACTIC
INVERNESS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Carter, James C. DC PA
2202 State Road 44 W., Inverness
........................................................ 726-4441
DENTAL
CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS
Holland, Edwin DDS
Pichardo, Edgar L. DMD
2231 State Road 44 W., Unit 101, Inverness
...................................... . .... ......726-5854
CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES
Christian, III, Cephas N. DDS PA
2460 N. EssexAve., Hernando
...................................... ..........527-1614
LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.........................................................628-3443
MEADOWCREST PERSONALIZED
DENTAL CARE
Linda Witherow, DDS
Patel, Jayraj J. DMD
6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
........... ... ............ ............. ......79 5-5 93 5


DENTAL

SMILES AT CITRUS & 5TH
Dahman Mouhammad, DDS
535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
........................................ ..... ..... 795-1881

TIMBERLANE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
1972 N. Future Terrace, Lecanto
...................................... . ....... ....7 4 6 -9 111

Hany Williams, DMD, PA
4361 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..........................................................628-7788

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

PET/CT SERVICES OF FLORIDA
Beverly Hills Medical Park
3404 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
..................................... . ....... ... 74 6 -68 88

FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE
INVERNESS FAMILY PRACTICE
Figueroa, Pablo MD
2222 State Road 44 W., Inverness
...................................... . ..... ..... 860-0633

SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD
Navarro, Catherine MD
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
Villacastin, Alexandrea T.ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
........................................... 352-489-2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..........................................................382-8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
........... ............. ................ ....... .... 3 4 1 -5 5 2 0

HEARING EXAMS/HEARING AIDS

AUDIBEL HEARING AID CENTERS
Pruett, Daniel HAS
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
......................................... 352-621-8000
2036 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness
.................................................352-586-7599
2400 S.W. College Rd., Suite 206, West
Ocala
........................................ 352-873-0034
918 Rolling Acres Rd., #3, Lady Lake
.......................................... 352-750-2005
910 Old Camp Road, #182, The Villages
.................................................352-259-5234

FATHER & SONS HEARING AID CENTERS
Jason Thorneburg
Roger Thorneburg
2240 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
.................................... .... .....352-860-1100
3944 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Springs
........................................ 352-628-9909
Crystal River Mall, (Next to JC Penny)
.................................................352-564-8000

PROFESSIONAL HEARING CENTER
Dingier, Denny M. DIV. BC-HIS ACA
211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
...... ....................... ........... ... 726-4327

HOME HEALTH SERVICES

COMFORT KEEPERS
2244 State Road 44 W., Inverness
..................................... ....... ... 7 26 -4 54 7

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
................................ ........... ... 249-1257

S.E.T. HOME HEALTH
8016 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
.........................................................564-2738
SENIOR HOME CARE
494 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
..................................... . ....... ... 3 4 4 -0 15 0

HOSPITALS

BROOKSVILLE REGIONAL HOSPITAL
17240 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
......................................... ......35 2-7 96 -5 111


HOSPITALS

CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.................................... ...........7 2 6 -15 5 1

MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala
........................................ 352-351-7200
OAK HILL HOSPITAL
11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
.................... ..................... 352-628-644 1
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
...................................... . ...... ....79 5-6 56 0

INDEPENDENT LIVING

INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR APARTMENTS
518 Ella Ave., Inverness
.................................... ....... ....34 4 -84 7 7

MASTECTOMY APPAREL

Connie's Mastectomy Boutique
430 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River
................ . ......................... ......7 9 5 -5 2 2 3

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING

Purdy, Cyndie Ford LMHC NCC
MAC SAP SAE
470 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
........................................ ...............34 1-0 4 3 5

NURSING HOMES

DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH
& REHABILITATION
2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
........................................ ...............74 6-9 50 0

WOODLAND TERRACE OF CITRUS
COUNTY INC.
124 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
................................................ ......24 9 -3 10 0

ONCOLOGY-HEMATOLOGY

ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett, C. Joseph MD
Brant, TimothyA. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
605 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.... .... .......................... ...... 726-3400
522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
................................................ ......5 2 7 -0 10 6

OPHTHALMOLOGY

WARD EYE CENTER & OPTICAL
Ward, H. Christopher DO
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa
.................................... . ....... ....62 8-0 12 3

OPTICAL/OPTICAL GOODS

MEZMEREYES AT OPTICAL EXPRESS
Fosen, Bruce OD
Fialko, Hilda LDO
631 N. Citrus Ave, Ste. C, Crystal River
......................... ................. ... .. 795-2020

OPTOMETRY

CITRUS VISION CLINIC - CITRUS OPTICAL
Harless, Heather A. OD
Nothnagel, Victor T OD
2332 State Road 44 W., Inverness
....................... ................. ... .. 726-2085

SUNCOAST EYE CENTER
Kaplan, George H. OD
221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River
................. .... ........... ....... ....... 795-2526

WEST COAST EYE INSTITUTE
Coppedge, Amanda OD
Howard, Julie B. OD
240 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
.................................... . ....... ....74 6-2 24 6


ORTHOPEDIC/SPORTS MEDICINE

THE CENTER FOR BONE
AND JOINT DISEASE
11307 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
........................................ (352) 596-0900

GULFCOAST SPINE INSTITUTE
Bono, Frank S. DO
Ronzo, James J. DO
2300 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Hernando
.................. ..... ..... .................. .. 34 1-4 778

NATURE COAST ORTHOPAEDICS &
SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC
Choung, Walter I. MD
Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO
2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills
.................................... ........ ...74 6 -5 7 0 7
520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River
.......................................................5 6 4 -2 6 6 3
2236 State Road 44 W., Inverness
.......................................................34 4 -2 6 6 3

SEVEN RIVERS ORTHOPAEDICS
AND SPORTS MEDICINE, PA
10495 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................... ...................... 352-465-5663

PEDIATRICS

ALL CHILDREN'S SERTOMA THERAPY
CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY-
PEDIATRIC CARE
538 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
........................................................74 6 -3 3 0 0

PHARMACIES

B&W REXALL DRUGS
214 WS Hwy. 41 S., Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -1 0 2 1

PODIATRY

ADVANCED ANKLE AND
FOOT CENTERS OF FLORIDA
Raynor, David B. DPM
490 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
.................................... ........ ..7 2 6 -3 6 6 8

REHABILITATION HOSPITALS

HEALTHSOUTH REHABILITATION
HOSPITAL OF SPRING HILL
12440 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................352-592-4250

SUPPORT GROUPS

HPH HOSPICE
Adult Bereavement
Caregiver Support Groups
Children Bereavement
......................................................... 527 4 600
SURGERY
Mohammadbhoy, Adnan DO PA
11535 W. Emerald Oaks Drive, Crystal River
..........................................................79 4 -6 0 5 6

PREMIER VEIN CENTER
Sharma, Ravi MD
7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
....................................................... 6 2 1-0 7 7 7
UROLOGY
ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett, C. Joseph MD
Brant, Timothy A. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
605 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.... ............................ ......... .... 726-3400
522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
..................................... ....... ....5 2 7 -0 10 6

WHEELCHAIRS/SCOOTERS

MR. MOBILITY/MRS. MOBILITY
3221 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
.................................... ........ ..6 3 7 -6 0 8 8
11163 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill
...............................................352-666-3006


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPIN
Continued from Page Cl

"Way back in 1994, I built a frisbee
with integrated LED persistence of
vision (POV) display - at the time it
was cutting edge! There have also
been commercial implementations of
POV in clocks, fans, frisbees and
wheels - almost all of them more
toys and gadgets than practical, pro-
fessional lighting systems.
"I was inspired by the earlier de-
vices, and saw that the technologies
had advanced a lot so it was possible
to build a quality device with far better
lighting and graphics effectiveness
than anything that had come before -
a device that would be practical for
daily bike commuters and others. Of
course, I also had several new ideas to
further enhance the device that no-
body had tried previously
"In 2005 I built my first prototype; it
was at that time intended only as a
one-off artwork.
"Riding it around the streets of Oak-
land and San Francisco, people would
literally run down the street after me
asking where they could buy it; some-
times crowds would just cheer unre-
served as I passed by"
Chronicle copy desk editor Cheryl
Jacob can be reached at (352) 563-5660
or cjacob@chronicleonline. com.


WATCH & ROLL
* Monkey Light M133s
* designed to keep cyclists safe
and visible at night.
* consumer level, priced at
$64.99.
* 9 pre-programmed display
options.
* 6.5 inches long, fits most all
standard wheels.
* 3 AAA batteries, up to 30-hour
life.
* 32 full-color LEDs.
* weatherproof and shock
resistant.
* Video Pro Wheel Screen
* commercial version, priced at
$2,000.
* displays up to 1,000 images,
or 90 seconds of video.
* fits 26-inch or larger wheel.
* rechargeable lithium battery, 3
to 12 hours, depending on use.
* 256 full-color, wide-angle,
ultra-bright LEDs.
* weatherproof and shock
resistant.
* video at
www. MonkeyLectric.com.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C3

loved one. Registration required.
Call (800) 486-8784.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter Asso-
ciation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers two
free weekly women's domestic
abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7
p.m. Tuesday and 10:30 a.m. to
noon Wednesdays. Child care
available.
Call CASA at (352) 344-8111.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus County
at 7 p.m. Thursday in Bailey Hall,
First Lutheran Church, 1900 State
Road 44 W., Inverness. Doors
open at 6 p.m.
Call (352) 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSAAssociation's number
is (800) 826-3632.
* Celebrate Recovery:
0 7 p.m. Wednesday and Fri-
days at the Christian Recovery Fel-
lowship Church, 2242 W. State
Road 44. Call (352) 726-2800.
0 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at Seven
Rivers Presbyterian Church's Stu-
dent Ministries Building. Dinner
available before the meeting from
6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation. Call


HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES
* Support group information will list monthly meetings first,
as space is available, then weekly meetings.
* It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the
Chronicle about changes to existing listings.
* To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-re-
lated events open to the public or support group meetings,
email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes;
fax (352) 563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429.
* Information relating to professional training or seminars at-
tended by those in the health care industries are considered
business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest
listings of Sunday's Business section.


(352) 746-6200.
* Gulf to Lake Church Ministry
Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake High-
way in Crystal River. Dinner at 6
p.m. Friday, followed by large-
and small-group time and a Coffee
Cafe at 9. Call (352) 586-4709.
* Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless and
hurting of Citrus County. We offer
referrals to Celebrate Recovery,
call (352) 563-1860.
* Overcomers Group for peo-
ple recovering from addictions to
drugs, alcohol or other out-of-con-
trol habits, 8 p.m. Monday at the
Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland


Blvd. Call Paul at (352) 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addiction,
compulsion and co-dependency is-
sues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mon-
days at Rainbow Springs Village
Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St.
Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at
(352) 465-1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* SPRING HILL - Parkinson's
Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the private dining
room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital of Spring Hill.
Call Charissa Haffner at (352)
346-8864.


BENNETT
Continued from Page Cl

Mammograms do, indeed,
save lives. Now more data is
available to refute the igno-
rant calculation of our pub-
lic health division of the
federal government. And
this data comes from
Sweden.
The answer from this re-
cent study is simple: Mam-
mography screening for
breast cancer reduces death
rates significantly in the
long-term, and this data was
recently published in the
journal Radiology A large-
scale Swedish trial found
for the benefits to be appre-
ciated, studies need to eval-
uate screening over the very



GANDHI
Continued from Page Cl

quality of life.
My patient started
chemotherapy She was
given weekly therapy; she
tolerated it well. I gave her
therapy for almost four
months and her cancer
shrunk in size by more than
half. Until recently, most



GRILLO
Continued from Page Cl

it is simply innocent, and
they just forget to take their
medication, but if it is some-
thing serious, missing one
dose could be quite a big
problem.
Sometimes the blame can
be placed on doctors and
pharmacists who may need
to take a little bit more time



VASCIMINI
Continued from Page C1

these rights are given to us by
our Creator and not by any
government or official, is an
ideal that is veryAmerican.
One of these rights, free-
dom of worship, is some-
thing that Americans have
always had, unlike many
countries. The ideal of reli-
gious tolerance is some-
thing all Americans benefit
from, so who wouldn't be at-
tached to it? Our forefathers
were wise enough to in-
clude this ideal in planning
the Declaration of Inde-
pendence and we, as Amer-
icans, are blessed that our
government has held fast to
this ideal. What better ex-
ample ofAmericanism?
Another of these unalien-
able rights is the freedom of
every American to work in
the occupation of his or her
choice and to enjoy the ben-
efits that come from that oc-
cupation, including a
paycheck and that which is
purchased from that pay-
check. Again, here in Amer-
ica, we are not told by
government what job we
must take. We are not lim-
ited by any dicta tor or ruler,
as in other countries. What
we choose to do with our
God-given talents is not con-
trolled by any man or
woman; we are only con-
trolled by our own limita-
tions. Our way of life here in
the United States ofAmer-


long term, something U.S.
government authorities did
not look at. This study found
that screening saves one life
for every 1,000 to 1,500
mammograms performed,
much better than the statis-
tics reported last year.
Authors explained this
study, called "The Swedish
Two-County Trial," was the
first study to demonstrate a
drop in breast cancer mor-
tality from just screening
with mammography
And in my opinion, this
was a very good, large trial,
involving 133,065 women
who were randomly se-
lected into two groups:
those who received a spe-
cific invitation for a screen-
ing mammogram, and
second, those who received
their usual medical care


such patients were given a
break from treatment and
when cancer progresses
again, they were given fur-
ther therapy
Recently, in an ASCO
(American Society of Clini-
cal Oncology) meeting - the
largest meeting of cancer
specialists in the world -
one large study was
presented.
The study consisted of 939
patients who were given


in explaining what the prob-
lem is and what the medica-
tion is for, but there is a
definite concerted effort by
doctors and pharmacists to
make sure information is re-
layed properly Printed out
literature is provided for in-
structions on how to take
the medications and what to
look out for if there are
problems or reactions with
the medication. Sometimes
this information is ignored.
It is very possible in the


ica, where we are responsi-
ble for our own choices, and
we have the freedom to
make those choices, is truly
Americanism.
What can be more ofan ex-
ample of Americanism than
the pursuit of happiness?
The ideal of the right to pur-
sue happiness, as long as no
harm is done to others in that
pursuit, is a basic principle
upon which our form ofgov-
ernment was structured. In
so many other countries, this
ideal is not in practice. Peo-
ple suffer in horrific condi-
tions with no option to
pursue their own happiness.


You will get:
* 58,000 readers
* An Attention Getter
* 6 lines of copy
* Results

Offer good through our call
Please call 563-5966 & pla
Ask about our Guarantee and our


without an invitation.
Researchers found there
were 30 percent fewer
deaths caused by breast
cancer in the invitation
group, compared to the
usual care group. The
screening phase of the study
lasted about seven years.
The female participants age
40 to 49 were screened
every two years, while those
age 50 to 74 underwent
screening every 33 months.
In this country, we recom-
mend screening every year
for women older than 50.
Researchers analyzed
data and follow-up data for
29 years after the beginning
of the trial to work out what
the long-term effect of mam-
mography screening on
breast cancer mortality
might be.


chemotherapy for roughly
three months. Those whose
cancer did not progress and
had a good performance sta-
tus were then randomized
to either maintenance Al-
imta (premetrexed) or
placebo. Alimta is a
chemotherapy which is
given over 10 minutes' infu-
sion in the vein in my office
as an outpatient procedure.
It is well tolerated and has
minimal side effects.


future that patients might
need to have a more one-on-
one help with regard to how
to take their medication.
This may seem like an addi-
tional step and could mean
more additional cost, but it
could circumvent a lengthy
and expensive hospital stay
in some instances. The rea-
son is some of the problems
that are incurred because of
not taking medications
properly include heart at-
tacks, strokes, deaths and


Tyrants, dictators, un-
scrupulous rulers all over
the world prevent their citi-
zens from seeking happi-
ness every day Yet, here in
America, our government is
an institution devised to se-
cure individual happiness.
Who wouldn't pledge alle-
giance to a country that of-
fers this freedom to its
citizens?
Americanism - "an at-
tachment or allegiance to
the traditions or ideals ofthe
United States." American-
ism - love of America, loy-
alty to America, a way of life.
Americanism. No matter


Thecostof ourad


This is remarkable, and is
by and far the longest
recorded follow-up period
ever for mammography
screening. The status of
each case, as well as cause
of death, was determined by
local trial end point com-
mittees, as well as an inde-
pendent external
committee.
The absolute benefit in
terms of lives saved in-
creased with longer follow-
up times. At 29 years of
follow-up, the estimated
number of women needed
to undergo screening every
two or three years over a
seven-year period to pre-
vent one breast cancer
death ranged from 414 to
519.
Scientists say follow-up
times need to be very long


Continuation mainte-
nance therapy with Alimta
resulted in a significant 38
percent reduction in the
risk for disease progression.
In an earlier study, it has
also shown it increased
overall survival.
My patient is receiving
maintenance Alimta, she is
tolerating it well and her
cancer is in remission.
This is soon becoming the
new standard of care in


serious infections that re-
quire more potent and ex-
pensive medications.
A recent study done in
Canada suggested there is
possibly even a savings if pa-
tients are properly in-
structed and understand
how to take their medica-
tions. Some experts feel
mail-order prescriptions in
part take care of some of the
problem because of the pa-
perwork they send, but
sometimes it is difficult to


what definition you find, it is
undeniable that it comes
down to this: Americanism is
a state of mind, a feeling, a
concept, a personal expres-
sion ofrespect and gratitude
for all of the blessings we re-
ceive by beingAmerican.
This expression of re-
spect and gratitude comes
in many forms. Whether it


term, at least 15 to 20 years.
Only then can real reduc-
tions in mortality rates be
observed.
Most of the deaths pre-
vented would have occurred
more than 10 years after the
screening started. This indi-
cates the long-term benefits
of screening in terms of
deaths prevented are more
than double those often
quoted for studies that only
look at short-term follow-
up.
So, in my opinion, we can
put this issue to rest -
mammograms do, indeed,
save lives. But, one debate
still lingers, and that is the
frequency that is needed.
Do we need to do this every
year? Would every other
year work just as well? A
study looking at yearly ver-


management of patients
with lung cancer.
In the past, lung cancer
patients at diagnosis were
just advised to go on hospice
and no therapy was offered.
That is not the standard of
care any longer in the
United States.
Now, there are many dif-
ferent options of treatment
and so it can be tailored to
each individual patient


get patients to fill out the pa-
perwork and/or read it. A
statistic from Physicians
Practice dated January 2006,
showed 32 percent of pa-
tients did not fill their pre-
scription their doctor gave
them at their visit because
they felt it was unnecessary
So, remember, next time
you get a prescription, think
twice before quitting the
medication when you start
feeling better. You may have
a relapse that could be dan-


be a soldier's willingness to
defend our countryin battle
against our enemies, a
school student's daily
pledge of allegiance, or any
citizen practicing the
virtues of honor peace, tol-
erance, courage, respect for
human life or patriotism -
all are examples ofAmeri-
canism at its finest. Aren't


sus every other year could
answer this question, but
until we have that, I con-
tinue to encourage all read-
ers to have their
mammograms according to
the current recommenda-
tion of your American Can-
cer Society.


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit of
the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board ofDirectors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society
Contact him at 522 N
Lecanto Highway Lecanto,
FL 34461 or email
cjbennett@rboi. com.


-
Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist. He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society
Send questions or
comments to 521 N
Lecanto Highway Lecanto,
FL 34461 or email to
sgandhi@tampabay.rrcom
or call (352) 746-0707.


gerous and costly
The preceding article was
put together with informa-
tion from the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human
Services and a recent publi-
cation in USA Today.


Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at (352) 795-0011
or visit CrystalCommunity
ENTcom.


you glad to feel it?


Dr Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist. Send
your questions to 4805 S.
Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446 or
email them to him at
info@MasterpieceDental
Studio.com.


IF Vehiice $0 a d [



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C4 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


HEALTH & LIFE







Page C5 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Amish Cook in
town Wednesday
The Amish Cook, Lovina
Eicher, whose column ap-
pears weekly in the Chroni-
cle's food section, will be in
Citrus County for a book sign-
ing event Wednesday, July 6,
at the Citrus County Commu-
nity Center, 5804 W. Mark
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
From 10 to10:30 a.m.,
there will be a question-and-
answer session with "Amish
Cook" editor Kevin Williams.
From 10:30 until noon,
guests will be able to have
any of her six cookbooks
signed by Eicher. There will
also be information centers
and displays throughout the
Sunshine Cafe and patio,
hosted by the county's Com-
munity Services Department,
Citrus County Libraries and
the Chronicle. Luncheon spe-
cials will be available at the
Sunshine Cafe.
For more information, call
(352) 527-5900.
Sons of Norway
meet July 8
SPRING HILL -The Sons
of Norway, Sun Viking Lodge
No. 607, will meet at 6:30
p.m. Friday, July 8, at Holy
Cross Lutheran Church, 6193
Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill.
All are welcome to the
Fourth of July indoor lodge pic-
nic. There will be games, hot
dogs, salads, baked beans,
desserts and more for $7.
Sons of Norway is an inter-
national fraternal society open
to persons of Scandinavian
background, affiliation by mar-
riage or anyone interested in
Nordic culture. For more infor-
mation, call Elsie at (352)
666-2220 or Nellie at (727)
846-1584. For reservations,
call Jan at (352) 686-6538 or
Gladys at (727) 868-6302.
CUB offers chance
for boat package
Citrus United Basket is
selling tickets for its inaugural
new boat drawing package
fundraiser sponsored by
Apopka Marine Boat Sales &
Service.
Drawing for the boat pack-
age will be 11 a.m. Saturday,
Aug. 27, at Apopka Marine,
3260 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
Tickets are $5 each or five
for $20. For information, call
CUB at (352) 344-2242.

Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE


Tabby kitty
mmarasl


Book sale at
Dunnellon Library
Beginning Friday, July 1, the
Friends Book Store will begin a
storewide, half-price book sale.
Regular prices of $2 hardcover,
$1 large paperback, and 50


Special to the Chronicle
Kittens and young adult
cats in a variety of colors
all sweet and socialized
are ready for a home of
their own. We also have
several adult cats that do
not like being in a cage at
adoptions, but they are
more than ready for a home
of their own. Please check
the website for pictures.
We also have one or two
special needs cats that
need to be the only cat. All
Precious Paws pets are vet
checked, up to date on vac-
cinations based on their
ages, spayed or neutered
and microchipped. Kittens
and cats are available for
adoption at the Pet Super-
market, State Road 44, In-
verness every day during
regularly scheduled store
hours. The Precious Paws
Adoption Center at the
Crystal River Mall is open
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat-
urdays and noon to 4 p.m.
Sunday. View pets at
www.preciouspawsflorida.
com or call (352) 7264700
to speak with a volunteer.


Seeking 'most admired' women


Nominations for

10 females must be

received by July 18

Special to the Chronicle

Ten women will receive the honor
and distinction of being the most ad-
mired in this community in the 15th
annual 10 Most Admired Women
section sponsored by Altrusa Inter-
national of Citrus County and the


Citrus County Chronicle. The public
is invited to submit nominations,
which will be the criteria for a com-
mittee selection process provided
by the members of Altrusa.
"The MostAdmired Women event
showcases women who go above
and beyond in both service and tal-
ent to enhance the lives of others,"
said Linda McCarthy, Altrusa pres-
ident. "The Women of Altrusa are
thrilled to take the lead once again
in honoring these special women of
our community."
This year's categories are:
Most Admired in Business, Most


Admired in Government, Most Ad-
mired in Education, Most Admired
in the Field of Health, Most Admired
Up and Coming Youth, Most Ad-
mired Mother, Most Admired in the
Arts, MostAdmired Leader, MostAd-
mired for Community Involvement
and Most Admired Athlete.
Nomination ballots will appear in
the paper on July 8, July 10 and July
14. Those making nominations are
also encouraged to submit brief
summaries of qualifications and
reasons they feel their nominee de-
serves this accolade. All nominees
must be residents of Citrus County


Winning tickets to a Daytona race


Quilt drawing
proceeds

Joe Foster and Linda Baker of Hospice of Ci
County were present to receive the recent
donation of the proceeds of Creative Quilter
2011 raffle quilt. Ronnie Butler presented a
check for $3,100; Baker offered a brief
description of hospice services and thanked
guild for its generosity. Creative Quilters ha
objectives, every two years during its quilt s
a quilt is made by the members, tickets are
and all the proceeds go to Hospice. The oth
members make lap-sized quilts and donate
to the Citrus County Sheriff's Office twice a
Special to the Chronicle


News NOTE


cents for paperbacks will all be
half-priced. The sale will con-
tinue all of July during regular
store hours, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
weekdays; 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
Thanks to huge donations
from the community, the


Friends Book Store is over-
stocked in all categories - fic-
tion novels; children's books,
mysteries, history, politics, war,
classics, computer, self-help,
sci-fi, religion/inspirational,
books-on-tape, videos, DVDs,
CDs, cassettes, reference, puz-


zles and games.
The Friends Book Stor
side the library), is at 203
Robinson Road (just behi
Sweetbay) in Dunnellon.
operated by an all-voluntE
staff, with proceeds bene
Dunnellon Public Library.


Summer fun on tap for July in Citn


The first Tuesday of the
month, we spotlight
community events.
The deadline for the August
Spotlight is July 15. Send
Spotlight news to PO. Box
803, Crystal River, FL 34423-
0803.
July Spotlight
of Events
* Crystal River Coastal
Region Library hosts sum-
mer fun storytime with
crafts, games and activities
for school-age children and
teens from 10:30 to 11:30
a.m. Monday and 2 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday for tweens and
teens. Call (352) 795-3716.
* Citrus County Chronicle
will host Amish Cook Lovina
Eicher from 10 to noon
Wednesday with Amish
Cook editor Kevin Williams
at the Citrus County Com-
munity Center, 5804 W Marc
Knighton Court in Lecanto.
* Hospice of Citrus County


will host an orientation from
1 to 3 p.m. Thursday at Ho-
mosassa Public
Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.
Call Dianna at
(352) 621-1500, ext
1706.
* Citrus
Springs Memorial
Library has story-
time at 11a.m. the
second Saturday Ruth:
of the month, July
9. Call (352) 489- AROUI
2313. COMM
* Crystal River
Kings Bay Lions Club's an-
nual summer pool party and
dinner is Monday, July 11, at
the home of Dugy Raymond.
All visiting Lions are invited
to attend. Call (352) 726-2484.
* St. Timothy Lutheran
Church is sponsoring a sum-
mer book club at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, July 12, in the fel-
lowship hall of the church.
Call Gail at (352) 795-1618.


L
N
atl


* Knights of Columbus
and Our Lady of

will have its
Helping One An-
other blood drive
from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday,
July 16, in the
Parish Life Cen-
ter of the church.
Call Don Irwin at
,evins (352) 527-8450.
0 Deadline for
ID THE the Crystal River
UNITY Woman's Club
- adult women ed-
ucation scholarships is
Monday, July 18. Call JoAnn
Ryan at (352) 382-1138.
SAltrusa of Citrus County
and the Citrus County
Chronicle's Most Admired
Women nominations dead-
line is at5 p.m. Monday, July
18. Faxed nominations can
be sent to the Chronicle at
(352) 563-5665.
* Key Training Center's


annual Run For The B
walk is Saturday, July
ginning at 8 a.m. Yo
choose a 1-, 2- or 3-milE
at the Lecanto camp
register, call Chris at
637-2475. The Key A
will be also on hand
Key's Imagination
shop from 8 a.m. to
and 1:30 to 4 p.m. witi
of-a-kind arts and
polymer clay bracelet
necklaces, T-shirts an
trinket boxes, magnet
ornaments. A tour o
workshop will be avai
The workshop is ii
Roger Weaver building:
(352) 527-8228.

Ruth Levins participa
a variety of projects a.
the community Let
know aboutyourgro
upcoming activities bj
ing to PO. Box 803, Ci
River FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Nominations must be received in
the Chronicle business office no later
than 5 p.m. Monday, July 18. These
may be delivered to the Meadowcrest
or Inverness offices or mailed to 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429. Envelopes must be marked
"10 Most Admired Women." Entries
may also be faxed to the Citrus
County Chronicle at (352) 563-5665.
Winners will be featured on the
Chronicle Most Admired Women
special section to be published
Wednesday, Sept. 7. They will also
be the honored guests at the Altrusa
dinner meeting Thursday, Oct. 6.



News NOTES


Summer day camp
offered in Citrus
The Citrus County YMCA
S officially opened for Summer
Day Camp on May 31. There
are two locations for summer
camp: Whispering Pines Park
in Inverness, and Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park.
Campers can just enroll for
certain weeks. Both locations
are offering the "Discovery
Kids" themed camp, where
each week follows its own
unique theme with corre-
sponding activities
Camp is open for ages 5 to
12. The Y's Summer Day
Camp main hours each day
are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
with extended care open at 7
a.m. and late pickup at 6
p.m., all at no extra charge.
Financial assistance is avail-
able to those who qualify.
To register, stop by the of-
fice in Inverness at 2805
State Road 44 W. Registra-
tion forms are available for
Chronicle
t onal download at www.ymca
itional
n also suncoast.org under the Sum-
s loyal mer Camp link. For more in-
formation regarding Summer
Camp, call the YMCA directly
at (352) 637-0132.
The YMCAof the Sun-
coast is a charitable, non-
profit health and human
service organization serving
more than 84,000 members
and participants through nine
facility locations in Citrus,
trus Hernando, Pasco and Pinel-
, las counties.
Women's golf
Sthe clinics coming up
s two Citrus County Parks &
show Recreation, in association
Sold with Pine Ridge Golf Course,
er is will offer a series of women-
them only golf clinics throughout
year. the summer.
Pine Ridge Golf Pro Randy
Robbins will be lead instruc-
tor and will have two sepa-
rate classes. Beginner
classes will begin at 5:30
p.m. Monday and intermedi-
re (in- ate classes will be at 5:30
51 p.m. Wednesday.
ind The clinics will be offered
It is as three one-hour weekly ses-
eer sions for $90 and there are
fitting three clinics to choose from.
The clinics will run in July
(July 11 for beginners and
July 13 for intermediate) and
August (Aug. 1 for beginners
and Aug. 3 for intermediate).
S Women who would like to
1SO participate in more than one
clinic can sign up for a sec-
/loney ond clinic at half price. Golf
23, be- clubs will be provided.
u can Pine Ridge Golf Course
e walk will also be starting a Satur-
us. To day morning Working
(352) Women's League. This
Artists league will play on the Little
at the Pines, which is a nine-hole,
Work- Par 3 course. The fee for Sat-
noon urday play will be $13 and
1 one- will include the cart fee.
ts and To find out more or to reg-
I hats, sister, call Randy Robbins at
ts and (352) 746-6177 or visit
)f the www.pineridgegolfcc.com.
liable. Club offers weekly
n theC Zumba lessons
g. Call
Yankeetown/Inglis
Woman's Club is offering
Zumba classes in air-condi-
ites in tioned comfort from 5:30 to
round 6:30 p.m. Monday and
her Wednesdays.
'up's Everyone is welcome.
V writ- For information, call (352)
crystal 447-2057.


Special to the (
Chronicle subscriber Don Miller of Beverly Hills won four tickets to the NASCAR Coke 400 race at Daytona Interna
Speedway on the July 4 weekend. Presented by Ed Morales, sales manager for the Citrus County Chronicle, Do
received a gift bag filled with racing goodies. The Chronicle has begun a monthly Appreciation Campaign for its
subscribers and will offer a special each month.








TUESDAY EVENING JULY 5, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon 1: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D IF H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
IWESHI NBC 0 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Access Hollyw'd America's Got Talent'PG' America's Got Talent Competing for a spot in the top 48. (N) 'PG' News Against Casey
BBC World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) x History Detectives Raid on federal Britain's Royal Weddings Traditions Frontline "Wikisecrets" Classified POV "Sweetgrass" Montana's
i PBS 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) x armory (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' of royal weddings. a documents on WikiLeaks.'PG' Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness. 'PG'
WUFT PBS 5 5 5 5 16 World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) x History Detectives (N)'PG' s Frontline "Wikisecrets"'PG' s POV Montana's Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness.'PG' Tavis Smiley
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 NewsChannel 8 NBC NB iqhtl Entertainment Extra (N) 'PG'x America's Got Talent Hopefuls audi- America's Got Talent Competing for a spot in the top 48. (N) (In Stereo NewsChannel 8 Tonight Show
NBC at 6PM (N) News(N)'G' Tonight (N)'PG' tion for the judges. 'PG' Live)'PG'x at 11PM (N) With Jay Leno
Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! "Kids Wheel of Fortune Wipeout Obstacle course with a 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hospital Simon reconnects Eyewitness News Nightline (N)
W ABC 20 20 20 20 at 6 (N) Week"() 'G' 'G' patriotic theme.'PG'c Players vie for a $50,000 prize. (N) with a former flame. (N) at11PM 'G '
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IWTSP CBS 10 10 10 10 101 (N) News/Pelley killer is revealed. (In Stereo)'14' searches for a terrorist group.'14' dispute gets complicated.'14' (N) David Letterman
WV Fox v 13 13 13 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) a TMZ (N)'PG'c The Insider (N) MasterChef Competing for a spot in Raising Hope Raising Hope FOX13 10:00 News (N) c FOX13 News The Insider
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WL D 2 2 2 2 22 The Place for Miracles: Your Hour of Praise W-Kenneth Great Awakening Life Today With Purpose for Life Great Awakening
IND E 2 2 2 2 22 Healing'G' c Hagin James Robison
ABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! "Kids Wipeout Obstacle course with a 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hospital Simon reconnects ABC Action News Nightline (N)
ABC at 6 PM 'G' Week" (N) G' patriotic theme. 'PG' Players vie for a $50,000 prize. (N) with a former flame. (N) at 11 PM 'GX'
M ND 12 12 Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' o How I Met Your The Office 'PG' Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Frasier'PG' Frasier "Mixed How I MetYour The Office'PG' South Park South Park'14'
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(WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias Noticiero Univ. Cuando Me Enamoro (N)'14' Teresa (N) '14'(SS) Triunfo del Amor (N) '14'(SS) Aqufy Ahora (SS) Noticias Noticiero Univ.
WXPX) ION 17 Without a Trace 'PG' Without a Trace '14' s Without a Trace '14' ~ Criminal Minds'14' c Criminal Minds'14' c Criminal Minds '14' c
A E 54 48 54 54 25 27 The First 48'14' The First 48'14' The First 48'14' Storage Wars Storage Wars eweFamily Jewels Family Jewels Family Jewels
fAMCi 55 64 55 55 ** "RockylV"(1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone.'PG' ***Hi "The Matrix"(1999, Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne.'R' ***Hi "The Matrix"(1999) 'R'
Ai 52 35 52 52 19 21 Untamed and Uncut '14' Yellowstone Bison 'G' Yellowstone: Battle For Life Animals living in Yellowstone.'G' s Wild Amazon 'PG' s Yellowstone: Battle For Life 'G'
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(CNBIj 43 42 43 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) CNBC Reports Executive Vision On the Money |Mad Money
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(GOLF 67 Golf Central (N) Quest-Card School of Golf Inside PGA Tour Big Break Indian Wells Feherty (N) Feherty School of Golf Haney Project Golf Central Inside PGA Tour
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**1 "Robin "The Betrayed" (2008) Melissa George. Kidnappers ** "The Relic" (1997, Horror) Penelope Ann Miller. A ravenous monster *** "The Nutty Professor"(1996, Comedy) Eddie Femme Fatales
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(MTV 97 66 97 97 39 Teen Mom'PG' Teen Mom "Lashing Out"'PG' Teen Mom (In Stereo)'PG' s Teen Mom Maci and Ryan battle.'PG' s Teen Mom (In Stereo)'PG' s Teen Mom (In Stereo) 'PG' s
NGC65 44 53 Lost Gold of the Dark Ages Alaska State Troopers'14' Hard Time "Prison City"'14' Hard Time'14' Hard Time (N) '14' Hard Time "Prison City"'14'
NK 28 36 28 28 35 25 iCarly 'G' s |iCarly'G' c BrainSurge'G' SpongeBob My Wife-Kids |My Wife-Kids Hates Chris |Hates Chris George Lopez |George Lopez The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PG'
(fvl 44 * "My Boss's Daughter" (2003) Ashton Kutcher.'PG-13' a ** "50 First Dates"(2004) Adam Sandier.'PG-13' s ** "50 First Dates" (2004) Adam Sandier.'PG-13' s
S**3h "Holy Rollers" (2010) Jesse Eisenberg. A Jewish ** "Adventures of Power"(2008, Adventure) Ari Weeds (iTV) The Bi C"Musical Weeds (iTV) The Big C "Musical Eisodes The Real LWord
S 340 241 340 340 youth becomes a drug mule.'R'x Gold, Michael McKean. iTV Premiere.'PG-13' 'MA'a Chairs 'MA' 'MA' a Chairs 'MA' "Episode 6"'MA' (iTV)'MA'
PEED 122112 122122 Pass Time 'PG' Pass Time 'PG' NASCAR Race Hub (N) Am. Trucker Pass Time 'PG' Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Speedmakers "Jaguar"'G' Am. Trucker Pass Time 'PG'
PE 37 43 37 3727 36 Ways to Die Ways to Die Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters
SU36 31 36 36 Rays Live! Sp. Olympics TBA Inside the Rays MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Minnesota Twins. From Target Field in Minneapolis. (Live) Rays Live! (Live) Powerboating
SYF) 31 59 31 31 26 29 Star Trek: Ent. *** "Star Trek l: The Wrath of Khan" (1982, Science Fiction) William Shatner.'PG' **Y "Star Trek Generations"(1994, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart.'PG' Star Trek lll
B 49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens Kingof Queens |Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' TheOffice'14' |The Office'14' The Office'PG' The Office'14' The Office'14' The Office'14' Conan'14'
***c "DoctorZhivago" (1965) Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. A Russian *** "The Sea Hawk"(1924, Adventure) Milton Sills, Enid Bennett, Lloyd Hughes. Silent. *** "The Thief of Bagdad" 1924, Fantasy) Douglas
(i ) 169 53 169 16930 35 doctor experiences the Bolshevik Revolution.'PG-13' 3 (DVS) English nobleman becomes pirate.'NR' Fairbanks, Julanne Johnston.R'
(TD53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash Cab'G' |Cash Cab'G' Deadliest Catch '14' s Deadliest Catch '14' s Deadliest Catch (N)'14' E After the Catch (N)'14' s Deadliest Catch '14' X
(TI 50 46 50 50 29 30Toddlers & Tiaras'PG' Fabulous Cakes'G' s IKid- Brad G. |I Kid- Brad G. 19 Kids-Count |19 Kids-Count Little Couple Little Couple I Kid- Brad G. |I Kid- Brad G.
iTNT) 48 33 48 48 31 34 Law & Order "Disciple"'14' Law & Order "Merger"'14' Law & Order '14' s (DVS) Memphis Beat (N) '14' sHawthoRNe (N)'14' c Memphis Beat '14' s
(TRA 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
truTii 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'14'_c Cops'14' World's Dumbest...'14' Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Storage Hunters Storage Hunters Police POV Police POV
(1VL 32 49 32 32 34 24 Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son AII in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Hap. Divorced
USA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar "Veiled Threat"'PG' Covert Affairs (N)'PG'x Necessary Roughness'PG'x
WE 117 69 117 7 Charmed "Marry-Go-Round"'PG' Charmed (In Stereo) 'PG' Staten Island Cakes 'PG' Staten Island Cakes (N)'PG' Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Staten Island Cakes 'PG'
(WGN-Al 18 18 18 18 18 20 Dharma&Greg Dharma&Greg America's Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) a Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Midori Koto said, "Honor isn't
about making the right choices. It's
about dealing with the conse-
quences."
At the bridge table, making the
right choices usually controls the
consequences - as in today's no-
trump game. What should South do
after West leads the spade seven
and East puts up the jack?
North's double over West's one-
spade overcall was negative, show-
ing four hearts and eight-plus
high-card points (or a splendid
seven or a super six!), or five or six
hearts and 6-9 points. The primary
job of the invaluable negative dou-
ble is to find a fit, usually 4-4, in an
unbid major.
South saw eight top tricks: one
spade (given trick one), two hearts,
one diamond and four clubs. Feel-


Bridge

North 07 0511
A 10 6
VAK43
* A Q 10 9
4 J 5 2
West East
SA Q 9 7 4 J 3
SQJ 6 V 10 875
*52 *K764
S843 I1096
South
S K 8 5 2
Y92
V 9 2
*J83
4AKQ7
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 14 Dbl. Pass
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 4 7


ing confident about the diamond fi-
nesse after West's vulnerable inter-
vention, declarer took the first trick
and ran the diamond jack. How-
ever, East happily won with his
king and returned his remaining
spade to defeat the contract.
South realized that he should
have ducked the first trick. From
the Rule of Eleven, East was known
to have only one high spade. (Seven
from 11 is four, and South had seen
all four of the spades higher than
West's seven: dummy's 10, East's
jack and his own king-eight.) East
would return a spade at trick two,
but South would cover cheaply and
retain a stopper. He could then
take the diamond finesse in safety
At trick one, South had two
choices: win or duck. He should
have considered both, not just as-
sumed that West had the diamond
king.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. @
HCTIK


�2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
ABEVR


� L0


L

E


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

/ The summer of '88. Now that
was a hot summer.
You guys are _i/ You're nuts! '88
both nuts. It was, / wasn't a hot
'90 that was summer. You're
so hot. (" thinking of '89.

J'r ) (
,,. " , ," '..-". |'7
tNJ- 1 ( I~,


DELDUC .. I

STHE PISC S51ON
S ABOUT THE WEATHER
TTETAS I WAS THIS
- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: L I I I
(Answers tomorrow)


LU >-
ZtII
..J oF--
/oc
t> QI
/>Q-<
-Io<
cii
n5


I- 2 "
ar -
o -o
mo-
5�|



-J a

III
CO. *



cecu
$Q


-05
ju
a,
o


ACROSS 39 Veep's boss
40 Listener's need
Caribou kin 41 Molecular biol-
Entranced ogy topic
Wide st. 43 Boot uppers
Luke, to Darth 46 Miffed, plus
Parka feature 50 Psyche's suitor
Feast with poi 51 Like many red-
Silhouettes heads
WWW address- 54 Its HQ is
es Brussels
Carter prede- 55 Forum site
cessor 56 - Diego
Euclid, e.g. Chargers
Part of LAX 57 Bit of news
CSA defender 58 "Annie Get -
Mountain- Gun"
dweller of Iraq 59 Mouths, in
Tel. or elec. zoology


28 Frozen
31 Spring bloom
32 Leo mo.
33 Haw opposite
34 Unnaturally
pale
35 - out (relax)
36 Type of cracker
37 Sort
38 - majeste


DOWN
1 Sports channel
2 Petty or
Loughlin
3 Kentucky fort
4 Jungle charger
5 Yahoo! rival
6 Edgar Allan -


Answer to Previous Puzzle
REM SLO G SIP
R EIMMS L 0 GMS I
ORO K EANU EVA
BASR ELIE F MANN
ESSA ED FLINT

SCALD TOIWNIES
P OL Y N AB SI L
AMI ADS ARE
N OJT I N B OWIE DE I
NOT IOIENS OW D
LOO Z ENE
RULED SORTERS
CPA LA W NMO WvER
MT N E RI E S E S T
POD SETS STA


7 Six-pointers
8 Book jacket ad
9 Fisher's fly
10 Glen
11 Nightfall
16 Dog-ears


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Hair goop
21 More unctu-
ous
22 Equipped
23 Fruit or bird
24 Russian range
25 Skater's haunt
27 Work da.
28 Operatic
prince
29 Grant
30 Roll-call votes
36 Kind of plug
38 Scale notes
40 - salts
42 More pleasant
43 "1 came," to
Caesar
44 Trapped like
45 Dust particle
47 Plus
48 Run like crazy
49 Novelist -
Ferber
51 Saute
52 Kanga's kid
53 "Down under"
bird


D earAnnie: I'm 22 years old
and recently needed an
operation in the only hos-
pital in our area. I am an ex-
tremely shy and
modest female and
would never go to a
male doctor except in
an emergency Luckily,
I was able to arrange
for a female surgeon
and an all-female sur-
gery team.
However, while I
was in the recovery
room, a young male
nurse - a guy with
whom I had gone to ANN
high school - came MAIL
into the room and told
me he was there to re-
move my catheter I was stunned.
I told him there was no way I
would allow him to do that. He
tried to convince me, saying, "I'm
a nurse. It's OK," but I wouldn't
back down. He finally found a fe-
male nurse after I threatened to
sue him if he came any closer
Am I wrong to feel that a young
male my age, especially someone
I know, should not have access to
the most intimate and private
parts of my body, especially since
removing a catheter is not an
emergency?
I made a pact with my boyfriend
that no male will see me un-
dressed until I marry, and then
only my husband. When I told my
boyfriend about this nurse, he was
ready to knock the guy's block off.
The idea that this nurse be-
lieves he has the right to violate
me in such a way is keeping me
from going back in for a follow-
up operation. Do I have the right
to forbid a male nurse from at-


tending me? I was told since fe-
male nurses can examine male
patients, a male nurse should be
able to do the same with females.
The anxiety is killing
me just thinking about
it What should I do? -
Modest in Iowa
Dear Modest: Most
health professionals
have no prurient inter-
est in their patients. A
nurse, male or female,
who removes a
catheter is acting solely
in a medical capacity
He was not "violating"
IE'S you. However, you are
BOX entitled to request only
female nurses if the
hospital can provide
them. Please don't let your anxi-
ety keep you from follow-up treat-
ment. Talk to your doctor about
your concerns.
Dear Annie: My husband is in
the hospital. When I called his
daughter in another state, she be-
came upset I hadn't phoned as
soon as he was admitted instead
of waiting 36 hours. I explained
I'd asked her father whether I
should call his adult children, but
he said he'd rather wait until he
knew his diagnosis.
She reminded me the last time
he was ill, I had promised to let
her know. Frankly, I had forgotten.
I was also exhausted and feel my
first loyalty is to my spouse. But I
apologized. She followed up with
a long e-mail detailing her future
notification requirements.
I've been married to her dad for
three years. Both of his daughters
have been kind and welcoming,
and I do not want to create a rift. At
the same time, I do not want to go


against my husband's wishes.
Please help me keep peace in the
family and do what is right for all
those I love.- Sleepless in Syosset
Dear Syosset- Your stepdaugh-
ters worry about their father and
don't want anyone withholding in-
formation. It frightens them. Talk
to your husband. Ask his permis-
sion to keep his girls up-to-date in
a timely manner. It will reassure
them.
DearAnnie: The other morning,
I woke up at 5 a.m. with the feeling
my husband was in the house. I
knew it wasn't true and burst into
tears. He died seven years ago.
When I opened up the newspa-
per, there was Norbert Tackman's
letter in your column. It was
meant for me that day I know the
sadness and loneliness will always
be a small part of my life. But now,
whenever it starts to overwhelm
me, I will reread his comforting
letter Thank you, Annie, for print-
ing it -L
Dear L: Norbert's piece has
comforted many people, and we
are grateful he allowed us to share
it


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please e-mail your
questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W
Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los
Angeles, CA 90045. To find out
more aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and cartoon-
ists, visit the Creators Syndicate
Web page at wwwcreators.com.


1
41
8
12 I
13 I
14 I
15
17
18
19 I
20 I
22
23 I
26


� 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


C6 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


41
Ll






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Doonesbury


Big Nate
COACH JOHN'
YOU'RE OUR JUNIOR
LIFESAVING
INSTRUCTOR?
WHAT
WERE YOU
EXPECTING,
JUNIOR?d



-Arlo and Janis
Arlo and Janis -


"For goodness' sake, this time remember
to hold your breath. The last thing we need
is another trip to the emergency room."


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie
O YOU DOES THE BREAK ARE THERE ANY RULES AGAINST ( AT D0 HE SURE ASKED THE
HAVE ANY ROOM HAVE A PLAYING ONLINE POKER? YOU THINK RIGHT QUESTIONS
QUESTIONS DECENT MICROWAVE OF THAT LAST
ABOUT THE AND COMFORTABLE APPLICANT?
COMPANY? CHAIRS? e h ai C


a - ' '" ' -.. r' . . .




Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


MTr HARP TO GEE THE SCENERY WITH ALL
THE MOUNTAINS AN'TREE5 IN THE WAY."
Betty


o 1- y Feature Syd
wwwfamilycircus cor
"Mommy, would PJ and I getting wet
be a GOOD idea or a BAD idea?"


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Invemess; 637-3377
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:35
p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In ReaDI 3D.
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m. No passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m. 7:50 p.m.,
10:45 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 4:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Green Lantem" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 3:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
No passes.
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 3:20 p.m., 5:40 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.


"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 7
p.m. No passes.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In RealD 3D.
12:45 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:45
p.m. No passes.
"Cars 2" (G) 3:50 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 12:25 a.m., 3:10 p.m., 5:25
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 12:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Green Lantem" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Green Lantem" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 2:35 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 12:35pa.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" (PG-13) 4
p.m., 10:25 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and enter-
tainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals B


"PZH ZCFZTCFZP AN RL WZCTOZAAO


YIM RIXCDF RL EBAPZHB TISFZ MA ZIBO


PZIP NAAO WIRH ASP AN ZCM DAMH."


- FIBBCMAD XHCTTAB


PREVIOUSSOLUTION: "Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish with my country was
my unalterable determination." -John Adams
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-5


He began to feel
uncomfortable with
others in the family.
v0 /


SOME BLOW-DRIED
COLLEGE KID WITH A
SPRAY TAN, RUNNING
DOWN THE BEACH IN
SLOW MOTION?





it-.


Frank & Ernest


Today' MOVIES


COMICS


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 C7






C8 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C CITRUS COUNTY





HKONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT
VISA.. ^H^


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............ 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Active young 70's gen-
tleman looking for at-
tractive outgoing lady
for travel & companion-
ship. Reply to Blind Box
1722-P
C/O Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450

White Widowed
Christian Female,
In search of Single
White Christian Male
For Friendship,
walking talking,
going places,
I'm a Non smoker,
non drinker, retired
nurse. Tired of cook-
ing for one. Dream
catcher, you know
who you are, with
a wee bit of
Irish Blarney
Call (352) 419-5757




LAWN TRACTOR - CUB
CADET LTX1040, 19hp,
42" deck, used 17hrs.
$1100. 352-249-7075
WATER CONDITIONER
like new, not used
much, bacterial static
water conditioning sys-
tem. $2,000
(352) 726-9858




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not*
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
CALL 352-476-8949



FREE BUILDING
INSULATION
(352) 422-2927
FREE KITTENS
Multi- Colors
(352) 270-4774


No shavings, aged, easy
access, bring shovel and
haul it away.
Lecanto...Leisure Acres
621-0175
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
PIT/CURR PUPS
8 wks. for good home
352-287-3384
Puppies
3 female 7 wks mixed
breed call for Info
(352) 634-2781



U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
Pesticide Free! $2.50/lb.
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm.
OPEN TUES. thru. Sun.
7a-7p (352) 726-7907



Shamrock Macaw
Description & Details
Necessary
(352) 544-0093
(352) 592-5959



LEARN TO SEW I
I furnish everything!
My home or yours
(352) 795-7206, Mary



SECRETARY
NEEDED

A- 1 & Pest Control
Good people skills,
excel, computer skills,
appointment setting.
(352) 726-5363, Marrle



Stylist, Esthetician &
Massage Therapist
(352) 628-2881









Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Sudoku


A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

DIETARY
DEPARTMENT
Is looking for a few
serious minded, hard
working, dependable
people. Must be able
to work flexible hrs.
Drug free facility,
prior criminal
background need
not apply
Apply in Person
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828




Busy Insurance
Office
Looking for an
Experienced Agent
with active 220 lic.
Salary commiserates
w/experience.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co Chronlcle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd Blind Box 1721p
Crystal River, Florida
34429

STORE/SALES
MANAGER

For established
Marine dealership,
Sales, management
and Marine knowl-
edge a must. DFWP/
EOE Email Resume
sharonnobles@nobles
marine.com




MARINE SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
For established
Marine Dealership,
Mercury/Yamaha
certification req.EOE/
DFWP Email Resume
sharonno-
bles@noblesmarine.co
m





F/T Housekeep-
ing/Assistant

Must love animals,
cooking, shopping,
cleaning & home
management
572 days wk. 8a-6pm
CALL 6P-9P ONLY
Position Becomes
Available August 1st
Citrus Springs Area
352-522-1109

* THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.


0008L6F

**- --r 4puz.com


FURNITURE
DELIVERY PERSON
NEEDED
Apply in person at:
150 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River
Work in busy shop per-
forming bench work
and operating
machinery.
Fax resume ASAP to:
352-344-8666



Part-time
Tow Truck Driver
Must live in the
Homosassa area.
Criminal Back
Ground Check and
vaild Florida Drivers
License required.
Dave's Body Shop.
Call: 628-4878

SHOP/YARD
WORK

P/T, CDL Llc. needed,
Apply In person
Job Site Services,
2240 N Skeeter Terr.
Hernanado




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)


Act Now_

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy
* NOW ENROLLING*

COSMO - Nights
Sept 19th
BARBERING - Niahts
Aug. 8,
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
FACIAL TECH -Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.
NAIL TECH - Days
Ist Mon. of ea. mo.
I 1(866) 724-2363
1486 Plnehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606
Li .- J
NE6 W

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119
TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105



BOYD'S BEARS (18)
Orig Bxs, 5 Special
Edition, 1998-03, 13
W/Auth, 5 W/O. EXC
Cond. $100 746-7355












Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VINTAGE COMIC BOOK
Dell #1195, National Vel-
vet, very good condition.
$50 obo 727-463-4411



DEEP CHEST FREEZER
Kenmore, works and
looks great. $50
795-6481


Fridgdaire Refrig.
w/ice maker 22 cu
ft. good cond
$120 352) 246-3500
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STOVE
Friigidaire back &
white, self cleaning like
new $250 obo
Washer/Dryer GE
whiteS/S tubs, like new
$480 obo352- 601-3656
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135
Washer & Dryer
Large capacity, Estate
by whirlpool purchased
new April 2010
$400. Set.
352-746-9108
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent condition.
Can deliver
352-263-7398
Whirlpool, white, 33"
refrigerator/freezer,
side by side, Ice/water
in door 2 yrs, 9 mo.
exc. shape, $500 firm
(352) 344-0928



BOOKCASE
Cherrywood, Adjustable
Shelves, 54"x32", Free
Standing. $65
727-463-4411
BOOKCASE
Lovely, Cherrywood, Free
Standing, 64"x32". $75
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL FILE
CABINET, Pre-Owned,
Lateral, Metal, 3 Drawer,
Graphite Color. $65
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIR
Commercial, Pre-owned,
Fabric Covered, Adjusta-
ble, $55. 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIR
Pre-Owned, Commercial,
Fabric Covered,
Adjustable, $45.
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
2 Drawer, Pre-Owned,
Commercial, Metal,
Lateral, Graphite Color.
$45 727-463-4411



2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JULY 7
Estate Buick, great for
starter or work car.
Contents of several
homes, balance of
antiques & collect.
Furn., tools, & more!
FRI. JULY 8- SPECIALTY
TRAIN AUCTION
Prey 6PM Auction 7PM
Lionel, Marx, American
Flyer, F gauge, 0 gauge
Standard & HO + houses
tracks & accessories
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc


BENCH GRINDER
5&1/2" industrial rated,
3450 rpm. $35.
352-527-7840
MEASURING WHEEL
Professional, STANLEY,
w/long handle,4 digit.$35.
352-527-7840



32" HDTV
flatscreen, tabletop
model, 8 months old,
$300 (352) 795-0018
TV 32" SYLVANIA
2005, $40, After 12PM
(352) 447-4380



CEILING FIXTURE
Round, 2 fluorescent
circline bulbs $25
352-201-0876
KITCHEN COUNTER-
TOP, Emerald
Green..apx.70sq.ft, for
island/counters + white
sink/sgl.fauscet..excellent
cond. $325.00
352-344-2500



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Patio Furniture
Metal, 7 pc. Rocker,
glass table, 6 upholder
chairs w/ cushions
$150.(352) 746-2414



CHAIRS (2)
Stackable, Commercial,
Metal Frame, Gray Fabric
2 for $25.
727-463-4411
CHAIRS
Metal frame, stackable,
pre-owned, commercial,
Blue fabric, 2 for $25.
727-463-4411
DINING ROOM TABLE
with 2 leaves and
chairs. $50
(352) 382-1000
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER $150.
small roll desk $50.
(352) 489-3511
Entertainment Center
Large off white
71"54'X21" 4 glass dis-
play doors, 2 Ig
cabinets, adj shelves
$125(352) 302-8797
King 3 Pc Set,
new twin platforms,
4 yr. old sealy mattress,
$250
(352) 795-8906
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
SOFA
Dark Blue, 84" Leather
Excellent Condition
$500
(352) 341-0366.
SOFA TABLE
Dark, w/glass inserts &
bottom shelf. $50
352-32-1000



CRAFTSMAN
YTS 3000,21 hp
46" deck, Hydro
used 4 times, like new
$1150
(352) 726-8273


Combo for lawn self
propelled, exc cond
$400(352) 628-2777
HONDA MOTOR
rear wheel drive, runs
good $125 "Ron"
(352) 344-5021
LAWN TRACTOR - CUB
CADET LTX1040, 19hp,
42" deck, used 17hrs.
$1100. 352-249-7075
Riding Mower
18HP Cub Cadet, 1000,
42" cut, auto trans, oil
filter, $750. obo
(352) 637-9268



LADIES CLOTHING
Some new, gently used,
12 items $5 each, 4 items
$10 each. Small & Med
8-10. 352-527-8159
MINK STOLE, VINTAGE
1950'S, Classy looking
pc of apparel for any
function. Exc Cond. $75
OBO 746-7355



5 - 4 ft. Fluorescent
Light Fixtures
with Bulbs
$8. ea all for $35.
(352) 746-5630
Automatic Pool
Cleaner
Navigator by Haywood
w/ hoses, excel cond.
$125. (352) 270-8475
BARBECUE GRILL, Out-
door propane grill, needs
burner and tank, other-
wise good shape. $20.00
352-527-3177
BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop Cordless
Phone- Cell Phone
SU.P.S and Rebuild
� Camera- Watch
� Hearing - Power Tool
SWheel Chair Alarm
SPower Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness
Golf Tires (4)
w/ Rims, like new
$140
352-270-8475



FREE!
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.
- Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
- 1 item per ad
-Ad must contain price
-$3.25 per additional line
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



SALMON FISH MOUNT
NATURAL SKIN, 31
inches long and Ex., $75
352-628-0033
TRAILER HITCH
Reese, weight dis-
turbed cost $500 new
sell $200 installed.
Black/Decker table
saw 10" curb tip blade
$100.(352) 382-0094
WATER CONDITIONER
like new, not used
much, bacterial static
water conditioning
system. $2,000
(352) 726-9858


PRODUCE SCALE
1940s, Vintage Counter
Scale,White Porcelain or
Enamel $75 obo
727-463-4411



Lift Chair & Wheelchair
lift chair-swing-away,
powered by key, slides
into hitch, both are like
new, Both for $750 OBO
352-228-7821
SCOOTER
Sonic, like new, in-
cludes accessories, lift,
and docking device.
$500 (352) 726-8139









BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



DRUMS, Gammon 7
piece drum kit.great be-
ginners set with upgraded
crash ride and high hat
Zildjian cymbals. $300.00
Call Jim 464-4490



BAR MIRRORS (3)
Various Beer and Liquor,
$30 each, 727-463-4411
Carpeting
13 x 16 carpet, Honey
Beige w/ quality thick
pad $200. firm (352)
419-4776 after 1la
TABLE, WOODEN
FOLDING, 1940's, Vin-
tage Wallpaper Pasting
Table Multi Purpose. $50
OBO 727-463-4411



GIFT CERTIFICATE
($165)
TO DYNABODY & 2 LES
MILLS WORKOUTS
$100. 586-7222



2 Bicycles
(1) 10 speed (1)3
speed $75. for both
bike rack for rear of car
$100.00(352) 382-0094
BICYCLE RACK
Nice, single bike rack for
compact car. $25.00
352-527-3177


Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Helmet
BHN, D.O.T. approved,
$25. 795-6481
RUGER MINI 14 RANCH
RIFLE, Ruger mini 14
Ranch Rifle, stainless, W/
Ammo, case and sling,
20 rd mag. 352-454-5906
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers
6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
Utility Trailer
4 x 7 Wire mesh trailer
w/ gate, purchased
new barley used, Sell
for $300 (352) 746-1017










ROTOTILLER
reasonable, in working
order. Please call:
(352) 794-3120
UTILITY TRAILER
affordable, enclosed
trailer for storage,
6' x10' or larger.
(352) 400-2066
Want to Buy
Nice Clean Dblewide
3 Bd, 2 Bth, on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 828-728-4834
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369



TRAVEL TRAILER
$500.00 price drop every
month until sold, 2009
Sunnybrooke by Brooks-
ide, 303SLS travel trailer,
$18900. Had a stroke af-
ter purchasing new, not
used, can be seen at
11465 W Priest Ln
Homosassa FL lot #43
352-346-1416


HOW ABOUT SOME




EXTRA




CASH!


3 82 764


1__ 1


4 97 2


2 4 6


8 32 7


_8 _


731 64 _5


___4 _ 87Z1

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


TO ADVERTISE CALL:

352y563 *T596


OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE5AT
wwwchronicleo*li n* e r




(ONN(TIN THERIGH

BUYES WTH OURMESAG


S157 3G 429813


34 9 8375 7642


2 7 9 5-411 3 8 6
815632947
a I s G 3 2 s9.4 7
58 4 1 2 7 639

7 3 12 6453874 2 5
-9126I45s3 48-711


I


N. A I A







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



mu


1 MALTESE Male,
Snowball 10 wks old all
shots, health certs. &
CKC reg. $400
352-212-4504, 212-1258



Look

English Bull Dog
Puppies 1 male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com


MINI DACHSHUNDS
AKC/CKC,$375, Vet
certs, Males &
Females,black/tans,
choc/tans, dapples. Long,
wire, & smooth hair. visit
www.sweetnlodoxies.com
or call 352-634-3841


many avail, males & fe-
males starting @ $450
Aoots avail 7 days a wk.
Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofDups.net


Shi-A-Poo & Toy Poodle
Female $250 Male $200
CKC registered. 8 wks
Hlth Cert., Paper
trained, great with kids
(352) 489-6675






MINI STALLION
very sweet 36"H. pinto
my pet needs a
padock/pasture, small
aea? Do u have anyth-
ing? (352) 527-3177


ANGUS BULL
Red. 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will e-mail
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271
Looking for Fenced
Pasture for Goats
Call Mike
(352) 634-4237





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077

CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-8810
352-446-9701

DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo Ist & $200
Sec. 352-625-4339


Dunnellon Hwy 488
Clean 2/2, priv. lot,
fenc'd$475. mo. + dep
Hwy 488 (352) 795-6970
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
Very nice mobile home in
Homosassa. Please call
John at 352-503-5301 for
an appointment. $600.00
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-2BA $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
Call 352-476-4964


CLASSIFIED



HOMOSASSA
1/1, Ist/last/sec. $350.
mo. 352-634-2368




AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040


FOR SALE BY OWNER
w/financing. 2/1 SW
$1500 dn. $635 inlc T & I
Floral City, nice Ig treed
lot, just remodeled.
AVAIL (352) 793-7223

PALM HARBOR
HOMES
has closed 2 model
centers Save up to
$60K on selectmodels
(813) 719-3335


USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9.500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 C9


THIS OUT!


Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 1170 sq ft living
space on 3/4 acre, de-
tached, oversized 2 car
garage/workshop,with at-
tic. 450 sq ft wrap around
porch. Quiet, friendly
neighborhood on a dead
end street. For sale only.
Call 352 564 2423 or
352 601 0534


A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182


2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204



HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW, fecnced /2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms, nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411


1 #1 Employment source is


Iwww.chronicleonline.com


Attention Services
Industry!
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sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus. to introduce
yourself to our readers.
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
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mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
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Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
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quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

V THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Speclallzing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
CAREY'S TREE SERVICE
Complete Tree Care
and MORE!
352-364-1309, lic./Ins
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852


Tree removal & trimming.
Ins.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service TrimShape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825
TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696



A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705
BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop . Cordless
Phone- Cell Phone
* U.P.S and Rebuild
* Camera- Watch
* Hearing - Power Tool
* Wheel Chair - Alarm
. Power Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness

Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. LowRes
25 yrs exp lie/ins
Dale 352-586-8129








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./ins.
(352) 726-9998



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. LicIns.
#2441. 352-634-1584




Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Disabeled
Any Hrs., Exc. Ref's
352-341-0404
Cell 850-242-9343




NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




Entertainment Centers
furn. vanities,cabinets
Top Quality reasonable
352 726-5832/212-3532




ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)




ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129




Hoetreibego
pices


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300





Look
Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 352-201-7451



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
Affordable Handyman
FAST
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE
HOME REPAIRS
*100% Guarantee
*Low Flat Rate *Free Est
CALL NOW! SAVE $25
* 352-257-9508 *
Certified Handyman
All Phase Handyman
all phases of home
improvement & repair
I beat any price
(352) 634-0019






L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


m
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377



Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/fthis ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up.
hauling352 220-6761



A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *



Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc 132549 302-9269


Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling& Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In I x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955


-f - =i
'1 , "

VACATION IN - Poo
Serivlshing
YOUR OWN . Poo
BACKYARD... " oriveways
Order our Poo001Today Brick Pavers
Weekly
Pool Service
* Lic. & Insured
CPC 1456565


352-400-3188


zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374



A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do It All!!!
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal cleanuphaul.
(352) 726-9570
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Installations by Brian c9css




Peinit And
Engmeeiing
Fe * Roofovers *Carports
Up to Screen Rooms Decks
$200 value , Windows Doors Additions

352-62a-7519 3
Swww.Advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190

CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522





SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions. com
Free Est 352-503-7464


m
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ns 352-621-0881

ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977





Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998



I/-

TlH


Owner/Manager Name:
David Conner
Business Name:
D & R Tree Service
How long has the business been in
operation in the Citrus County area?
25 years of experience.
Describe the service/product you offer?
Tree Removal, Lawn Service with annual
contract, Shrub & Tree Trimming, Stump
Grinding, Topping, Moss Removal,
Landscaping, Mulching/Rock, Leaf Clean-up
& Removal, Mowing and Storm Preparation.
What do your customers like best
about your business?
We give the best service, neat and complete.
Our customers always come first!
What is something your business
offers that people don't expect?
Free estimates, extra clean-up, family
owned and operated. Our daughters help
design, manicure lawns and landscape.
Why did you choose this business?
My family, my employees and I are well
experienced in what we do and we enjoy seeing
satisfied customers with a smile on their faces.
What are your business hours, address,
phone number and e-mail?
24/7 - Emergency calls during storm times.
2555 East Harley Street
352-302-5641
email: DCONNOR14@tampabay.rr.com


._,.;=.u,14;~seI T R u .. ,..-C o au N
V- � 1.....r�us I .. c ouiE



chronicleonline.com


FOR MORE INFO CONTACT GALE RANDALL 352- 563-3266


�le ~81


00m1mtfl







C10 TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


II


7-5 , LaughingStoc International Inc Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS 2011

"You're eating too much sugar."


C ,,ti I fyS 'ateI o Fl orid




JOHN GORDON ROOFING

V- & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269 *1

Rooin * A' *#2592 om DInseto I26


LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807




2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2. furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
Ist month lot rent
(352) 817-1987

AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn.deck $12K
2/1 carportroof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park.
1BR $350/up; 1BR.1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR.
1-V1BA, $450 includes lot
rent; Call 352-476-4964
Opt For Owner Finance
2/1'/2 Bath, 55+ Park
washer/Dryer, range
refrigerator, MUST SEE!
Lot Rent $249.
352-419-6825, 464-0590
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com


Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $600. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, furn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
utll. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Large, clean, quiet,
$575. mo. incld water,
HOMOSASSA
2/2, Clean Quiet, CHA,
Scrn. Por. $550 mo.
352-257-6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all util. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 w/scr porch $650
352-422-2393

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352-634-1341

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
Ist MO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626





/ THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.




FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000SQFT
Ideal location corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391


HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000 dn + lot rentat
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, $595/mo Ist sec
(352) 697-0770.
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Newly Renovated
$450 + 1st, sec., No
pets. (352) 563-5004
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 laundry rm w/W/D
Kings Bay area. (352)
726-6515; 407-791-2642
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, C/H/A $450 + dp
(352) 464-2716
INVERNESS
2/2/1 near Walmart,
lawn-care, water, gar-
bage included. $550/mo,
$500 deposit.
352.637.3734




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165
HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 2 BR, Seasonal
Avail. Nov. 1st., Can
See Now (641)660-3312
INGLIS 3/2
Furn, w/dock on River
near pwr. plant Incl util.
$1200/mo 352-267-4632




BEVERLY HILLS
3/1, $595/mo@ 22N.
Davis 352-586-4474
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514
CITRUS HILLS
$1050/mo reduced
Beautiful Home3/2/2
Pool, end. AC Fl. Rm..
Must see! 352-302-0431


Home Finder

WWW. cIh'l r'l-, I," h-,.' l,,'finder.com


Find Your DreaMP how

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.chron iclehomefinder.com


1 Acre. $900/month.
(352) 586-6646
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1 000 @MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer duplex. 312/1
w/newer appliances.
$800 mo. lease dep.
No pets. (352) 697-3133
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
FLORAL CITY
3/1, CHA $600 mo &
1/1, $390. Secluded,
Scenic (352) 586-1873
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1. Total Renov..
Great Loc..No PetsSr.
Disc., $725. 795-8963
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
lovely 3 or 4/2, white
picket fence, sunken
hot tub, E-Z Terms
352-228-2587
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relaxfl.com
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1.5/1
$590 mo. fenced yd
(352) 344-2560
RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto 3 bedrm
Starting At
$466/mo.



OPPORTUNITY
352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
Rm w/priv bath. Pool
Upscale community
$125 wkly. 794-3042
CRYSTAL RIVER
SHARE MY HOME
$85/wk. Moves -U-N
.incls elect, sat dish
352-563-1465/212-1960



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




ForSale%*
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester


FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE






GREAT DEALS
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOVAMOVSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


CLASSIFIED




For Salel ymw
Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit.
fenced yd. new roof.
dble carport, poss. rent
to own. $59, 900
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076


For Saule ,,*
3/1, Tiled floors,
MUST SELL
Asking $39,000
22 N. Davis
352-586-4474

RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM





Citu Hillsa f
CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440




2 BR, 1 BA, 1 car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see $59,000
(352) 419-6719
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.lnvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnan111@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.





EXCELLENT
OWNER
FINANCING

$137K


Sits high on a hill
w/great view 3/2/2
w/bonus rm. Approx
2650sf U.R. 2100 sf.
Real Mexican Tile.
Brand new Jaccuzzi,
raised oak cabinets,
kitchen island. Lrg
stone fireplace in
great room, 3 very
large bedrooms,
2 bigwalk in closets,
florida room.HOME
JUST totally UPDATED
Beautiful
landscaping and 800'
of vinyl, picket &
privacy fencin,
almost an acre
Owners Winter Home
FOR SALE or LEASE.
(352) 341-1334




6955 W. Macopin Ln
3Bdrm 2Ba Beautiful up-
dated ranch w/new roof
gutters siding a/c unit car-
pet & tile. A must see!
330-221-3996 $107,000


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


0008167

-WORDY GUR VBYTRICKY RICKYKANE

3/2 2200 1.Young female's ringlets(1) Everyansweris a rhyming
Spair of words (like FAT CAT
s ft. I and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
33' htedinground 2. Flour factory expertise (1) theywill fitinthe letter
pool w/sum kit. squares. The number after the
nea schools, hospital [ II definitiontellsyouhowmany
$150K, 1350 NE 7th av definitiontellsyouhowmany
352-564-0001 day 3. More elevated aviator (2) syllables in each word,
352-794-6504 night I I I I II I I FSDst.ynivc-corU F


,I HI 4. "Calm down, Disney dwarf" (2)


4/2 CEMENT HOME
1,200 SF on V4 acre 5. Actress Meryl's jalopies (1)
Remodeled, Clean I I I I I
$65K.
(305) 619-0282 6. Less distinctly seen artist with oils (2)

7E Inrese I I surne (2
7. Increased law enforcement surrender (2)

For Sae _ _g


2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Fam rm. w/frpl.
2000+sf living + end.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19Jungleplum Ct. E.


m.EsUP


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com












Best Time to Buy
also have lease
options & owner
financing available.
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty
CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder

Loolc
INVERNESS 3/2/2
pool home oversize
lanai on 1 acre
For Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529












Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy(
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


NAXMO13VI NMOaUIIOVI IiiNIlVd a LNIV '9 SdV3H Sd~aaHIS'
AZ21NS ASV 't IIrA Id aHOIH 8 'IIS IM 'Z s'IflnO SrIH 9'1
7-5-11 SR3ASNV


NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


"Let's Go To The
Real Estate Auction"
Call Lisa for the
details
352-795-0784
Plantation Realty
plantationrealtvlisinas
.com
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner


For Saleo Bi
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283
FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498
HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc




Crystal River Area
Professional business
person w/ excellent credit
looking to lease option,
rent to own or buy a
home w/ owner financing
in the CR Area. If
interested please call
352-388-1064 or email
home-
search352@gmail.com.



BY OWNER
Residential Building Lots
W. Highland & N. High-
land. Must buy both
$25,000/firm. Please no
agents. 617-471-7417



INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots #39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033


2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000. obo
(352) 382-3202





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday's.
Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.
To place your free
ad, simply go to:
www.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.




'02, 23ft,
Magic Trailer
Dual Axle, 4 V-Hull
$1,200.
(352) 628-5008
BOAT TRAILER
18' + $200.
(352) 364-1309
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066




POLARIS JET SKI
2000, Genesis (3 seater)
Great shape with trailer.
This thing is fast.
$2,800.00 352-634-1044


Cry iver







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


14' JON BOAT
trailer, 25HP Yamaha.
trolling motor, battery,
extra trailer $2,500
(352) 628-2766
15' TRI HULL
BAY RUN ABOUT
40hp Evin. trollig motor
new bimini top
F/F new whls & lights on
tril $1200(352) 637-4515
20' PONTOON
60 HP, 4 stoke,
Yamaha, low hours, 4
years young, loaded.
kept in dry storage,
$13,500(352) 382-8966
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, 06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019
BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272
CANOE 16'
OLD TOWN fiberglass
$350. steel wheel
canoe/kayak carrier
used once $35.
(352) 447-2330

THIS OUT!

C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22'out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
ice box,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
induded.Excconditn,used app
50 hoursAsking
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.
HURRICANE
KAYAK, SANTEE 116
SPORT,L11"6" W36LBS
USA MADE XCON $775
352.503.5319
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658

























JAMBOREE 89
Class C, 24' 59k Miles
exc cond $6500 obo
(352) 795-3729




HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8, very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8 $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797
ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27' 2005.
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper, Q bed, 2nd
dr. 20 awning $16k obo
(352) 527-9535
VIKING
'89, Pop Up,
16ft, open, sleeps 4,
$750 obo
(352) 563-0788




!!!!!!!!245/70 R16!!!!!!!!
Nice tread. Only asking

195/65 R151*an
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
.--.205/55 R16---
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
* SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-


CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
k Low Payments *
352-461-4518
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794







'00 KIA OPTIMA
'92, STEALTH
'91, STEALTH
'98, FIREBIRD
'73, MACH I
(352) 400-0105


THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
'93 TOYOTA
Celica, Red, cold A/C, int.
great, good gas mileage,
5 speed, $1,900.
352-364-1771

ACURA
2007 TL equipped w/
tech package, navi
a diamond $18,990
866-838-4376

BMW
2008, 3281 leather
sunroof mint cond.
$21988
866-838-4376

SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

BUICK
'73, RIVIERA,
86K miles
$5,500 obo
(352) 400-0105
BUICK CENTURY '95
Cold A/C, 143K miles, 6
cyc., 3.0 L, runs great!
$900 Firm
(352) 228-1897
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded, AC, good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900(352) 503-7431
CHEVY 96
Camero, red w/ 2 tops
needs head gasket,
new tires, well maint
$1200(352) 302-8797
CHRYSLER
1980, LeBaron, Six cylin-
der, automatic. Very relia-
ble. Good body. No A/C.
$775 OBO 352-726-9416

CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring LXI
leather, power seats
69k orig miles $6990
866-838-4376

FORD 03
Taurus SES, V6 auto
loaded, 79K miles
exc shape $4500
(352) 697-2461

HONDA
2004 Accord LX
coupe 77k miles
$10990
866-838-4376

HONDA
2007 Civic hybrid
44k orig miles, mint
cond. 48 mpg better
hurry call for deal!
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
Elantra, 1999, 4-cyl.,
auto., air, good car, Ist
$1,550. (845) 707-5704
JAGUAR XJ8
2000, excel. cond.,
new tires, all options
low mileage, only 51K,
garaged. Must see!
$9,995, (352) 344-5250
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625

+ SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments ,*
352-461-4518

SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376

TOYOTA
'04 Camary LE, 82K mi.,
P/Win, Doors, New Tires
automatic. Very Clean
$9,900 (352) 628-6537

TOYOTA
2005 Camry LE
low miles, nicely
equipped $9988
866-838-4376




77 MGB
restored car, has front
end damage, runs
great comes with 2
parts cars $6000 OBO
(352) 628-5606
CHEVY 1970
Impala Convertible,
older restoration.needs
TLC $17.000
(352) 628-2777


Lincoln 1965
less than 65K org miles
4 dr convertible
w/parts car + extra
parts $6300
(352) 628-2777





-#"- #� "#" r


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
,,AAA ,i,#, ,


Sedan runs good,
bumpers re chromed
$3500(352) 628-2777
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
NO SHOWS
JULY OR AUGUST
SEE YOU SEPT. 4
1-800-438-8559


CHEVROLET
'03, Silverado, 64K org.
mi., Red, auto trans,
6 cyl. looks good, runs
good not rust. single
cab w/ overdrive &
6/2 ft. bed, $7,500
(352) 503-7328
CHEVY
1974, Silverado,
$500. Call for info.
352-364-1771
CHEVY
2003 Silverado 28k
orig miles, bedliner a
must see pick up call
fast! 866-838-4376
DODGE RAM
1995 3500, diesel, stick
shift, runs good, $3,000
(352) 726-3631
FORD
1986 F150 w/ 302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800 (404)416-9359
FORD
2003 F250 Lariat
super duty 6.0 diesel
lift kit stack exaust
chip, too much ride
call for deal!
866-838-4376


THIS OUT!

FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920
FORD 95
F150 6 cycle, auto high
mileage unbelievable
condition $3150
(352) 628-2777
FORD F 250
99 Lariat, 150k mi 4x4
Extented cab 4 dr.
$5,650 352-201-0177
NISSAN
05, TITAN SE, king cab.
silver/gray, runs great,
106K mi $5900
352-746-5475/344-4505
* SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO ITALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADED!Tow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622




CADILLAC
2004 Escalade EXT
suv diamond white
pearl 58k orig miles
wheels all the ride
Call for deal!
866-838-4376
CHEVY 98
TAHOE 4x4 95K mi
loaded, leather int,
CD/DVD/Cass play
new tires $7250 obo
352-476-4941

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376




CHEVY
'95, Silverado 1500. ext.
cab, 194K mi.. body lift.
33" tires, great cond.
$5,800. (352) 302-1033




'02 DODGE
Ram Van 1500, 5.9 Liter
eng. V8 leather 59.500K
mi $8,888. make offer
(352) 503-7577
FORD
1984, Econoline 150,
work van, runs, asking
$600.00 OBO. Call
352-341-5164 after 5:00
FORD
2003 E-250 econoline
cargo van 76k miles
showroom new $8990
builders welcome
866-838-4376
HANDICAP VAN
1989 full size GMC
Ricon Lift, runs great
$1950(352) 464-0316
HONDA
2010 Odyssey LX
low miles. 20.990
certified 100k
warranty must see!
866-838-4376
HONDA
Odyssey 08, EX-L, blue
ext. grey leather, 6 cd
moon roof, 82K,
$15.900.352-344-4505
352-746-5475
TOYOTA 98
Sienna XLE ,V6, 112k
mis. new tires & battery,
looks great, runs great
$4,500 (352) 465-7755




2003 Harley Wanna Be
149 cc 120mpg.looks
like a dressed Harley
$1700 cash
(352) 464-0316
2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576
FREEDOM
2011 ES3000 Electric
Scooter like new
street legal $1300
352 637 1814
Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,200
Cry River 727-207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8.400 mi.


selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
Harley Sportster
'99. 883. 5.700 mi..
windshield, bags, lots of
chrome, Lots of extra
$5,500 (352) 489-5029
Honda Trike
'05 Goldwing.
20,000 mi. Black Cherry
$26,500.
(352) 465-6991


CLASSIFIED




2006 Vulcan Nomad 2010 098 city electric
1600, Excellent condition, moped like new $450
well serviced. Full factory 352 637 1814
warranty til Jan 2012. WANTED
14k miles. Bike jack. JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Cycleshell. Newer tires Will Pay up to $200 for
and battery. Accessories. Unwanted Motorcycle
$7995. 352-601-7460 352-942-3492


#t1 rmlioymerint source is
%.' chronriicleo n il ne - com


TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 CIl


918-0715 DAILYCRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
15, 2011 -July 15, 2011.
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15, 2011.


Noice t*Cedtos


507-0712 TUCRN
Luhan, Evelyn 2011 CP214 Notice to Cred
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-214
IN RE: ESTATE OF EVELYN LUHAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of EVELYN LUHAN, deceased, whose date of
death was October 8, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 5, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ KENNETH LUHAN
PO Box 9908, Corpus Christi, TX 78409
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN Florida Bar No. 0075272 Attorney for Evelyn Luhan
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, Florida 34447 Ph: (352) 382-7934 Fax: (352) 382-7936
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5 & 12, 2011.


508-0712 TUCRN
Hetzel, George Joseph 2011-CP-381 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-381
IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE JOSEPH HETZEL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of George Joseph Hetzel, deceased, whose date
of death was May 5, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 5, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Bernadette Hetzel Harrlson
2761 West Edison Place, Citrus Springs, Florida 34433-6115
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/R. Shawn Fitzpatrick Florida Bar No. 40999 352-726-1821
FITZPATRICK & FITZPATRICK, P.A. 213 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida 34450-4239
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5 & 12,2011.


509-0712 TUCRN
Dimick, Norma A. 2011-CP-424 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-424
IN RE: ESTATE OF NORMA A. DIMICK
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Norma A. Dimick, deceased, whose date of
death was May 8, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 5, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ JUDY McCLAMROCK
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG & FRIEDRICH, PA 452 Pleasant
Grove Road, Ilnverness, FL 34452 Phone: (352) 726-0901 Fax: (352) 726-3345
Jeanette M. Haag, Florida Bar No.: 0196529, Attorney for Estate
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5 & July 12,2011.


510-0712 TUCRN
Bignon, Frieda 2011-CP-448 Notice To Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2011-CP-448
IN RE: ESTATE of FRIEDA BIGNON,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Frieda Bignon, deceased, whose date of death
was May 3, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 5, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Sean Bignon
164 West Staggerbush Path, Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, PA. /s/ Michael Mountjoy Esq. Fla. Bar Number: 157310
209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone:(352) 726-1211
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5&12, 2011.


511-0712 TUCRN
Reed, L. Helen. 2011-CP-480 Notice to Cred (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-480
IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN L. REED A/K/A HELEN REED A/K/A HELEN LUCILLE REED
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of Helen L. Reed a/k/a Helen Reed a/k/a Helen Lucille Reed, de-
ceased, File Number 2011-CP-480, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450; that the decedent's date of death was May 3, 2011; that the total value of
the estate is $37,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Denise Giuliani 1313 North Reed Terrace Inverness, FL 34453
David Reed 1313 North Reed Terrace Inverness, FL 34453
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is July 5, 2011.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ Denise Giuliani
1313 North Reed Terrace, Inverness, Florida 34453
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
/s/ John A. Nelson, Esq. Florida Bar No.: 0727032 Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.
2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL 34453 Telephone: (352) 726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223
E-Mail: john@slaymakerlaw.com
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5 & 12, 2011.


512-0712 TUCRN
McCabe, James Norris 2011-CP-445 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-445 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES NORRIS McCABE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JAMES NORRIS McCABE, deceased, whose date
of death was April 10, 2011, and whose social security number is 235-28-6709, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is July 5, 2011.


Personal Representative:
/s/ HESTER McCABE CLOW
1397 S. Ladera Terrace, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ MARIE T. BLUME, Florida Bar No. 0493181 Attny for HESTER McCABE CLOW


P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, FL 34451 Telephone: (352) 726-7778 Fax: (352) 726-7798
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5 & July 12,2011.


If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5, 2011.


N t d


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I Mis. Notc^es


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I Misc. Noti


Nodes o Cediors


501-0705 TUCRN 11-SE-01
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City of Inverness, Inverness, Florida, pursuant to
Chapter 163, Laws of Florida, for the following Public Hearing to consider and act
upon the following Special Exception.

The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a Public Hearing on the 6th day of
July, 2011 at 5:00 P.M. at City Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to act upon the
following case:
Case 11-SE-01- Applicant Todd Mathes, Agent for Benderson Development Co. LLC.
request a Special Exception use for a Shopping Center in the C-Commercial Zoning
District on the following described property:
1012 W. Main Street
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E, PINE HILL ADDITION TO INVER-
NESS ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DAVIDSON STREET (F.K.A. CLARK AVENUE), THENCE N.0 DE-
GREES 06'01"E, ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 166.89 FEET TO
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 41, THENCE N.45 DEGREES
25'51"W, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 438.76 FEET TO
THE CENTERLINE OF HENDRIX AVENUE (F.K.A. LEE STREET) THENCE S.0 DEGREES 35'51"W,
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 176.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE INTERSEC-
TION OF SAID HENDRIX AVENUE AND WEST DAMPIER STREET, THENCE S.89 DEGREES
42'47" W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID WEST DAMPIER STREET A DISTANCE OF
408.49 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORD
BOOK 1553, PAGE(S) 2203 THROUGH 2210, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE S.0 DEGREES 42'12"W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE A DISTANCE OF 29.83
FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 10, BLOCK E, OAK PARK ADDITION TO
INVERNESS ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING ON THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID WEST DAMPIER STREET, THENCE N.89 DEGREES
57'14"E, ALONG SAID LINE A DISTANCE OF 46.06 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT 10, BLOCK E, SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CLEVE-
LAND STREET, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 37'40"W, ALONG SAID CLEVELAND STREET A DIS-
TANCE OF 269.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E OF SAID OAK
PARK ADDITION TO INVERNESS, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE
OF TOMPKINS STREET (F.K.A. PEARCE STREET), THENCE N.89 DEGREES 41'11"E, ALONG
SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 24.98 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF
SAID CLEVELAND STREET, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 20'16"W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF
CLEVELAND STREET A DISTANCE OF 30.01 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID TOMPKINS
STREET, THENCE S.89 DEGREES 55'06"W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID TOMPKINS
STREET A DISTANCE OF 134.55 FEET TO A PROJECTION OF LOTS 11 THROUGH 15, BLOCK
E, PINE HILL ADDITION TO INVERNESS, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 45'19"W, ALONG THE PRO-
JECTION AND ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOTS 11 THROUGH 15, BLOCK E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 169.28 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 5, BLOCK E OF SAID PINE
HILL ADDITION TO INVERNESS, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH LINE OF A 10 ALLEY AS
SHOWN ON SAID PLAT, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 41'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 10.02 FEET TO
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5, BLOCK E, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 32'39" W,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 5, BLOCK E A DISTANCE OF 110.16 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 44, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 46'50"E,
ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 462.48 FEET TO THE CENTER-
LINE OF AFOREMENTIONED HENDRIX AVENUE, THENCE N.0�33'44"E, ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 309.47 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF AFORE-
MENTIONED TOMPKINS STREET, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 48'42"E, ALONG SAID NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 317.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CON-
TAINING 352,306 SQ.FT. (8.09 ACRES MORE OR LESS)
The Zoning Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on the 20th of July, 2011 at
5:00 P.M. at City Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to consider the recommenda-
tion of the Planning and Zoning Commission on the above referenced Case
11-SE-01.

Copies of the proposed application and plans are on file in the Department of De-
velopment Services at 212 West Main Street in the City Hall and may be reviewed
between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday of each
week.

All property owners and interested persons are invited to inspect such proposed reg-
ulation changes and to be present at and participate in the Public Hearings by the
Planning and Zoning Commission and Zoning Board of Adjustment.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Board with respect to any
matter considered at these hearings will need a record of proceedings, and for
such purposes, and need to ensure a verbatim record of proceedings is made,
which included the testimony and evidence upon this appeal is based (Section
286.010 F.S.)

Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually impaired, etc.) may be ar-
ranged, with advanced notification of 5 days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Pre-arrangements may be initiated by dialing (352) 726-3401 weekdays from 8:00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

Signed: /s/ Kenneth Koch
Director Development Services

Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21 & July 5, 2011.


505-0705 TUCRN 11-V-02
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Zoning Board of Adjustment for the City of Inverness,
Florida, pursuant to Chapter 2 and 3, of the City of Inverness Land Development
Regulations, that they will hold a Public Hearing on the 20th of July, 2011 at 5:00 P.M.
at City Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to act upon the following case:
Case 11-V-02- To act upon a Variance from Chapter 2, Section 2.10 Signs of the City
of Inverness Land Development Regulations on the following described property:
1012 W Main Street
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E, PINE HILL ADDITION TO INVER-
NESS ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DAVIDSON STREET (F.K.A. CLARK AVENUE), THENCE N.0 DE-
GREES 06'01"E, ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 166.89 FEET TO
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 41, THENCE N.45 DEGREES
25'51"W, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 438.76 FEET TO
THE CENTERLINE OF HENDRIX AVENUE (F.K.A. LEE STREET) THENCE S.0 DEGREES 35'51"W,
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 176.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE INTERSEC-
TION OF SAID HENDRIX AVENUE AND WEST DAMPIER STREET, THENCE S.89 DEGREES
42'47" W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID WEST DAMPIER STREET A DISTANCE OF
408.49 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORD
BOOK 1553, PAGE(S) 2203 THROUGH 2210, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE S.0 42'12"W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE A DISTANCE OF 29.83 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 10, BLOCK E, OAK PARK ADDITION TO INVERNESS
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING ON THE SOUTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID WEST DAMPIER STREET, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 57'14"E,
ALONG SAID LINE A DISTANCE OF 46.06 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT
10, BLOCK E, SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CLEVELAND
STREET, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 37'40"W, ALONG SAID CLEVELAND STREET A DISTANCE
OF 269.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E OF SAID OAK PARK AD-
DITION TO INVERNESS, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF TOMP-
KINS STREET (F.K.A. PEARCE STREET), THENCE N.89 DEGREES 41'11"E, ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 24.98 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID
CLEVELAND STREET, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 20'16"W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF
CLEVELAND STREET A DISTANCE OF 30.01 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID TOMPKINS
STREET, THENCE S.89 DEGREES 55'06"W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID TOMPKINS
STREET A DISTANCE OF 134.55 FEET TO A PROJECTION OF LOTS 11 THROUGH 15, BLOCK
E, PINE HILL ADDITION TO INVERNESS, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 45'19"W, ALONG THE PRO-
JECTION AND ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOTS 11 THROUGH 15, BLOCK E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 169.28 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 5, BLOCK E OF SAID PINE
HILL ADDITION TO INVERNESS, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH LINE OF A 10 ALLEY AS
SHOWN ON SAID PLAT, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 41'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 10.02 FEET TO
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5, BLOCK E, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 32'39" W,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 5, BLOCK E A DISTANCE OF 110.16 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 44, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 46'50"E,
ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 462.48 FEET TO THE CENTER-
LINE OF AFOREMENTIONED HENDRIX AVENUE, THENCE N.O DEGREES 33'44"E, ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 309.47 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
AFOREMENTIONED TOMPKINS STREET, THENCE N.89DEGREES 48'42"E, ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 317.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
CONTAINING 352,306 SQ.FT. (8.09 ACRES MORE OR LESS)

Applicant Todd Mathes, Agent (Benderson Development Co. LLC) request a vari-
ance from Section 2.10, I Freestanding (Ground) Signs in order to construct a second
on-premises identification sign consisting of 200 square feet. One (1) freestanding
sign is allowed on a lot in the C-Commercial District.
Copies of the full legal description and the proposed changes are on file in the Of-
fice of the Department of Development Services in City Hall, and may be reviewed
between the hours of 8 A.M. and 5 P.M., Monday through Friday of each week.

All property owners and interested persons are invited to inspect such proposed reg-
ulation changes and to be present at and participate in the Public Hearing by the
Zoning Board of Adjustment on the 20th of July 2011.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Board with respect to any
matter considered to these hearings will need a record of proceedings, and for such
purpose, may need to ensure a verbatim record of proceedings is made, which in-
cludes the testimony and evidence upon which this appeal is based. (Section
286.0101 F.S.)
Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually impaired, etc.) may be ar-
ranged with advanced notification of 5 day prior to the scheduled meeting.
Pre-arrangements may be initiated by dialing (352) 726-3401 weekdays from 8 A.M.
to5 P.M.

Signed: s/ Kenneth Koch
Director Development Services
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 5, 2011.


506-0705 TUCRN PV-11-02
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER A RESOLUTION TO ESTABLISH OR
CHANGE REGULATIONS AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) will conduct a
public hearing on July 21 2011 at 9:00 AM, at the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please note that the PDRB
meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a Darticular item is discussed will
vary dependina on how fast the PDRB moves through the aaenda.

PV-11-02- Department of Development Services is requesting a PLAT VACATION from
the Citrus County Land Development Code, to vacate the 50-foot planting ease-
ment lying in Beverly Hills Unit One, Block 1, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages
149-150, public records of Citrus County, Florida. (Section 11, Township 18 South,
Range 18 East). A complete legal description of the property is on file with the Land
Development Division.

Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the pro-
posed Resolution.

A copy of the proposed Resolution and supporting materials is available for public in-
spection and copying between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the Land De-
velopment Division, Suite 141, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more
information about this application please contact a Planner at the Department of
Development Services (352) 527-5239. Information regarding the Land Develop-
ment Code or Comprehensive Plan is available on the internet at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, Development Services, then the Land
Development link).




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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