Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02463
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 07-04-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02463

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Eugene Katie
Guyette Melidosian


TJ
Amato


Tammie Bridget Dalton Zailee
Cherryhomes Enstrom Felthoff Robison


Grads serve their country


Editor'snote:As the nation cel-
ebrates the Fourth of July some
local men and women are taking
important steps toward becoming
freedom fighters by joining the
military Here are their stories.


UGANDA ADOPTIONS:


BROOKE PERRY
Chronicle Intern
The completion of high school
brings graduates face to face with
reality and many different career


path choices - college, work,
travel, marriage and family -
which cause worrisome feelings
of stress and doubt.
Six Citrus High School gradu-
ates have chosen paths sure to in-


tensify those emotions: enlisting
in the military
Reasons for joining differ for
these graduates who have made
these life-changing decisions.
"The reasons for more people


Patriotic display


Happy family
Abandoned children
get a new home in
Citrus Springs./Page A3
DRIVE SAFELY:
Teen deaths
According to AAA, today
is one of the deadliest
days for teen drivers in
the U.S./Page A2

LOCAL EFFORTS:
Give blood
Find out where the
LifeSouth
Bloodmobile
will be
parked for
donations
during
upcoming
weeks./Page A2
Get food
Area groups offer
low-cost food options
and free meals each
week./Page A7


ONLINE POLL:
Your choice?
Do you think the federal
government should
move forward
@with a pro-
posed rule to
restrict boat
traffic in
King's Bay to
slow speed year round?
A. Yes. Not enough is
being done to protect
endangered manatees
from the increasing
number of boats in the
bay.
B. No. Doing this would
hinder recreational ac-
tivities in King's Bay.
C. Undecided. I don't
know enough about the
proposed regulations
and/or the current con-
ditions in King's Bay to
form an opinion.
To vote, visit
www.chronicleonline.
com. Click on the word
"Opinion" in the menu
to see the poll.
Results will appear
next Monday. Find last
week's online poll
results./Page A4


C om ics ....................B7
Crossword ................B6
Editorial..................... A8
Entertainment ..........B5
Horoscope ...............B5
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B5
M ovies ................ ......B7
Obituaries ................A6
TV Listings .......B6
Classifieds ................B8


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Fireworks filled the skies over Inverness as the Patriotic Evening came to a close for another Independence Day
celebration. This is the view from Wallace Brooks Park over Lake Henderson.

Thousandspickperfectparks for pyrotechnic presentation


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
INVERNESS - Patriotic people
rolled out with their coolers Sun-
day for a warm afternoon of family
fun.
Almost two years ago, Inverness
won an award as the most patriotic
city in the United States, and it
wasn't letting its pride slide.
"The fireworks show is even bet-
5 ter this year," said Dave Pieklik, as-


sistant director of events. "We
upped the budget to increase the
display and give it an extra kick."
The budget of $13,000 should
guarantee the city's boast of "one of
the finest fireworks displays in Cit-
rus County"
Vendors were serving the public
at 5 p.m. This year, 25 vendors took
part, the most so far in the history
of the event, Pieklik said.
"I've already signed up three or
four pages of names," said Rachel


Vazquez after an hour at the tent of
Great American Realty, which will
sponsor a breast cancer walk in Oc-
tober "when it is cooler"
At the tent for Operation Wel-
come Home, Barbara Mills said,
"I'm out begging for money for wel-
come home baskets."
It was the perfect event for Mills'
work, which is helping military
personnel return to civilian life
See Page A7


going in right after high school
has a lot to do with the economy,"
said Sergeant First Class Eugene
Guyette, who has seen 58 people
See Page A5



Anthony


trial


nears


finish


Casey weeps as

prosecutor calls

her a liar

Associated Press
ORLANDO - Casey An-
thony briefly wept Sunday
as prosecutors told jurors
during closing arguments
that she murdered her 2-
year-old daughter Caylee to
reclaim the carefree life she
had before the girl was
born.
Prosecu-
tors por-
trayed
Anthony as
a young
mother who
killed her
daughter
becauseshe Casey
got in the Anthony
way of her has pleaded
love life. not guilty to
" So m e - first-degree
thing murder.
needed to
be sacrificed, that some-
thing was either the life she
wanted or the life thrust
upon her. She chose to sac-
rifice her child," prosecutor
Jeff Ashton said during his
90-minute argument.
Defense attorney Jose
Baez said the prosecutors'
case was so weak they tried
to portray Anthony as "a
lying, no-good slut" and that
their forensic evidence was
based on a "fantasy" He
said Caylee's death was "an
accident that snowballed
out of control."
Prosecutors contend
Caylee was suffocated with
duct tape by her mother, who
then crafted elaborate lies to
mislead investigators and
her parents. Defense attor-
neys countered that the tod-
dler accidentally drowned in
the family swimming pool,
and that Casey in fact was
hiding emotional distress
caused by alleged sexual
abuse from her father. Her
father has denied that claim.
Judge Belvin Perry ruled
Sunday morning that there
was no evidence of such
abuse and that the defense
could not allude to it in clos-
ing arguments. Jury deliber-
ations are now expected to
begin Monday after the
prosecution gives its rebut-
tal arguments.
Baez began his closing ar-
gument by telling jurors
they have more questions
than answers, including the
biggest: How did Caylee
die? Neither prosecutors
nor the defense have of-
fered firm proof of how
See Page A7


Happy Independence Day

CITRUS COUNT Y



TODAY & Tuesday morning
HIGH Mostly sunny, then
96 partly cloudy with
LOW isolated showers. w V, Ici e '
J Y69 PAGE A4 0WVJW.Cilronicleonli0re.qrlbm
JULY 4, 2011 Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 116 ISSUE 331


F









AAA: Teen traffic deaths increase during summer


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
It's summer time and that
means teens need to be extra cau-
tious on the road.
According to an analysis of
crash data completed by the Auto-
mobile Association of America
(AAA), summer is the deadliest
time of year for teen drivers and
passengers with seven of the top
10 deadliest days of the year oc-
curring between Memorial Day
and Labor Day
More than 7,300 teen drivers
and passengers between the ages
of 13 and 19 died in traffic crashes
between Memorial Day and Labor
Day during the five-year period of
2005-2009. In addition, an average
of 422 teens die in traffic crashes
during the summer months com-
pared to a monthly average of 363
teen deaths during the non-sum-
mer months, AAA reported.
According to John Pecchio, traf-
fic safety manager for AAA Auto
Club South, the deadliest days of
the year for teens are June 10, July


2, July 4, July 9, July 15 and July 23.
Most of the dates fall on a week-
end day
"Unfortunately, a large percent-
age of teens do die on the week-
ends," Pecchio said.
So with school being out and
curfews being relaxed, Pecchio
said the increase in traffic fatali-
ties involving adolescents isn't
surprising but he urges parents to
increase their focus on traffic
safety during summer
One program offered in Citrus
County that teaches teens about
driving safely is the Teen Driver
Challenge.
The Teen Driver Challenge is a
program developed by a Florida
Sheriffs Association committee to
reduce the number of traffic
crashes and fatalities involving
teens. During the school year, in-
structors visit each local high
school on a weekly schedule. The
program is a 12-hour course, in-
cluding four hours of classroom
work and eight hours of hands-on
instruction on a driving course.
Mitch Kilpatrick, a 17-year-old


Citrus High School student, said
he went through the program last
year so he could get his school
parking pass.
Among the several exercises he
had to complete, he said the cone
course where he was required to
switch lanes without hitting a
cone proved to be helpful when he
was in car crash months later. Be-
cause he changed lanes before im-
pact, he saved his truck from
being totaled.
"It wasn't as bad as it could have
been," Kilpatrick said.
After going through the pro-
gram, he said he feels better pre-
pared and safer behind the wheel.
He encourages other teens to take
the Teen Driver Challenge.
"I think everybody getting a li-
cense or getting a parking permit
should take it," he said. "It just
helps. It really does and it's not
super boring."
For parents looking to keep
their teen drivers safe, AAA offers
these tips:
* Restrict driving and eliminate
trips without purpose. Teens have


three times as many fatal crashes
as all other drivers, because of the
amount of miles driven and a
teen's crash risk is highest during
the first year of solo driving. Par-
ents should limit teens' driving to
essential trips and only with
parental permission for at least
the first year of driving.
* Become an effective driving
coach. The best way for new teen
drivers to gain experience is
through parent-supervised prac-
tice driving.
Even after a teen has a license
that allows solo driving, parents
and teens should continue to prac-
tice driving together to help the
teen manage increasingly more
complex and challenging driving
conditions.
* Limit the number of teen pas-
sengers and time as a passenger.
Teen crash rates increase with
each teen passenger in the vehi-
cle. Fatal crash rates for 16- to 19-
year-olds increase fivefold when
two or more teen passengers are
present versus when teens drive
alone.


Also, riding in a vehicle with a
teen driver can be risky for teen
passengers. Parents should set
firm rules against driving with
teen passengers and restrict their
teens from riding as a passenger
with a teen driver.
* Restrict night driving. A teen
driver's chances of being involved
in a deadly crash doubles when
driving at night. Many parents
rightly limit driving during the
highest-risk late night hours, yet
they should limit evening driving
as well, as more than half of night-
time crashes occur between 9 p.m.
and midnight.
* Establish a parent-teen driv-
ing agreement Many parents and
teens find written agreements
help set and enforce clear rules
about night driving, passengers,
access to the car and more. AAA
offers a parent-teen driving agree-
ment on its teen driver safety web-
site, www.teendriving.aaa.com.
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at (352) 564-
2924 or swiles@chronicleonline.
con.


Rainbow connection


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Into every life a little rain must fall, and as the past few days have proven, a great deal of rain can fall during a hot Florida summer. During the storms of last week, the moisture and
light conditions were just right to create a rainbow spanning the pond in the park on North Meadowcrest Boulevard in Crystal River.


Fallen Hero plaque


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Sue Peney, right, embraces tax collector Janice Warren on Tuesday morning as a plaque
honoring her son, Army Sgt. Jonathan Peney, is hung in the government office in Inverness.
Sgt. Peney was killed last year in Afghanistan. Members of the Military Order of the Purple
Heart, Aaron Weaver Chapter 776, presented the plaque. At left is chapter Sergeant at
Arms Richard Allen. Plaques are displayed in the tax collector's offices in Crystal River at
801 S.E. U.S. 19 and Inverness at the Courthouse Annex, 210 N. Apopka Ave., Suite 100.
For more information about the MOPH chapter, visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or call (352)
382-3847. According to the tax collector's website, citizens can purchase specialty license
plates for individual branches of the Armed Forces, U.S. Paratrooper plate, or the "Florida
Salutes Veterans" Specialty plate. The fee charged for each plate goes into the Veterans
Trust Fund for the operation and maintenance of critically needed veterans' homes in
Florida. From the home page, www.tc.citrus.fl.us, click on "Motor Vehicles" and choose
"Specialty Plates" to view and read information about these license plates. Call (352)
341-6500 for more information about specialty license plates.


Blood DRIVES


LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers is in emergency need
for type O-negative, and has a
critical need for all blood types
To find a donor center or a
blood drive near you, call (352)
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a mini-
mum of 110 pounds and
be in good health to be
eligible to donate. A
photo ID is also required.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
day, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays,
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday
and closed Sundays. Visit
www.lifesouth.org for details.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day, July 4, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to noon Tues-
day, July 5, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, July
5, Cypress Cove Care Cen-
ter, 700 S.E. Eighth Ave.,
Crystal River.
* 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday,
July 6, VFW Post 10087, off
County Road 491, behind Su-
perior Bank, Beverly Hills.
E 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday, July 6, Walmart
Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
0 1:30 to 5 p.m. Friday,
July 8, Homosassa Library,
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
* 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Friday, July 8, Walmart, 3826


S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
E 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Satur-
day, July 9, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday,
July 10, First Christian
Church, 2018 A Colonade
St., Inverness.
0 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday, July 11, Eagles
Aerie 4272, 5340 W.
Grover Cleveland Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday,
July 12, Citrus County Tax Col-
lector's Office, 210 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness.
* 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, July
12, Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
* 2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday,
July 13, Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest


Blvd., Crystal River.
S10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Wednesday, July 13, Walmart,
3826 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday,
July 14, Nick Nicholas Ford,
2901 State Road 44 W.,
Inverness.
* 2 to 8 p.m. Friday, July
15, Regal Cinemas, 2635 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
July 16, Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
0 8:30 to 11 a.m. Sunday,
July 17, St. Scholastica
Catholic Church, 4301 W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto.
* Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday,
July 17, VFW Post 7122, 8191
S. Florida Ave., Floral City.


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A2 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 - MONDAY, JULY 4 2011



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Offices closed to
observe holiday
* Government offices and
postal facilities are closed
Monday, July 4, in obser-
vance of the Fourth of July
holiday.
* F.D.S. Disposal Inc. will
be closed Monday. All Mon-
day customers' refuse will be
picked up Thursday, July 7,
with the exception of Monday
recycling customers whose
refuse will be picked up Tues-
day, July 5. All other cus-
tomers will be picked up on
their regularly scheduled day.
* Beverly Hills Waste
Management (Rolling Oaks
Utilities Inc.) will be closed
Monday. There will be no
garbage or yard waste pick
up on this day. All of our Mon-
day customers will be picked
up the following Thursday,
July 7. We will be collecting
both garbage and yard waste
on this day.
* The Citrus County
Chronicle's Meadowcrest of-
fice will be partially staffed
Monday.

Orlando
Worker dies after fall
from thrill ride
ORLANDO -An amuse-
ment park worker has died
after falling from a thrill ride at
a small central Florida
amusement park.
Orange County Fire Res-
cue said 30-year-old Justin
Honeycutt was working about
90 feet off the ground Satur-
day afternoon when he fell
from the Starflyer ride at the
Magical Midway Thrill Park in
Orlando.
Battalion Chief Mark
Smothers said Honeycutt fell
about 6 feet before being
caught by his harness.
Honeycutt died at the
scene.
The Orange County Sher-
iff's Office has shut down the
park pending an investiga-
tion. The state Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services will also investigate.

Tampa
Man charged after
crash kills 1, injures 5
ATampa man was charged
with driving under the influ-
ence following a five-vehicle
crash that killed a 5-year-old
girl and injured three other
children and two other adults.
The Florida Highway Patrol
reported that 52-year-old
Rolando Rojas tried to drive
his Ford pickup between two
stopped vehicles Friday, side-
swiping them both. His truck
then hit a van and another
vehicle before overturning.
All six people inside the
van were injured. A 7-year-
old girl sustained serious in-
juries, and two other girls
suffered minor injuries. The
25-year-old driver had minor
injuries, and a 29-year-old
passenger was seriously in-
jured.
FHP said Rojas received
minor injuries and faces
charges of DUI with serious
bodily injury.

Miami

Cruise ship rescues
rafters in ocean
A Royal Caribbean cruise
ship rescued seven people
on a raft in the middle of the
ocean on its way back to Port
Everglades.
The cruise line reports that
passengers on the Oasis of
the Seas spotted the small
blue raft Friday afternoon,
and the captain turned
around the 220,000-ton ship
to rescue the rafters.
Royal Caribbean notified
the U.S. Coast Guard, and
the six men and one woman


were transferred to their cus-
tody.
The cruise line described
the rafters as Cubans, but the
Coast Guard said the nation-
ality of the group could not be
immediately confirmed.
-From staff and wire reports


Schools to charge for adult ed


Starting in

August, adult

education no

longer ree
CHERI HARRIS
Staff Writer
State law changes mean
those seeking adult educa-
tion such as a general edu-
cation diploma (GED) will
have to pay for services.
Judy Johnson, assistant
director of Withlacoochee


Technical Institute, said
starting in August, adult ed
students will pay $30 per
term. Programs affected are
GED, Adult Basic Education
(ABE), Vocational Prepara-
tory Instruction (VPI)/Ap-
plied Academics and Adult
English for Students of
Other Languages (ESOL).
"All of those have always
been free," Johnson said.
"They're grant-funded. But
as of this first term in August,
that's as ofJuly 1, we are now
required by statute to charge
fees for those classes."
In order to make it easier
for students, Johnson said
students will be able to pay


$30. Students who took a full
year to complete a program
would pay a total of $90 for
the fall, spring and summer
terms.
"That way, if they only
need to attend one term, they
only pay $30," Johnson said.
Bill Murray, chairman of
the Citrus County School
Board, said the board ap-
proved the recommended
fee structure at a special
meeting on Tuesday
Last school year, a total of
820 students were enrolled
in adult education programs
at WTI.
While adult ed students in
the future will pay for


courses, Johnson said they
also have access to other
services free of charge such
as child care during class,
counseling, workshops on
topics such as study and
test-taking skills, financial
literacy, and career pathway
choices.
"We help them figure out
what they're really suited
for, help them set attainable
goals for education and for
employment," Johnsons
said, "and we help them
make it happen."
Chronicle reporter Cheri
Harris can be reached at
(352) 564-2926 or charris
@chronicleonline. com.


A brand new life


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER - In-
specting the curious sur-
roundings of the Creative
Community Playground,
16-month old Mercy
moves about cautiously
with a serious expression
on her tiny face.
Her mother abused her
She was extremely mal-
nourished.
And when her mother
was arrested for the neg-
lect and later released,
she never came back to
claim her baby girl.
Six-month-old Lillian,
sitting contently with
pouted lips and an
adorable button nose, was
left on someone's veranda
by a mother who couldn't
care for her
Both girls were living in
foster care in their native
country of Uganda with
other children who, for
whatever reasons, were
abandoned, also.
At that same time thou-
sands of miles away in Cit-
rus Springs, Sarah and
Ryan Ferguson began the
long process of interna-
tional adoption. Sarah
said she and her husband,
who are devout Chris-
tians, already had their
two biological children -
14-month-old Juliet and 2
1/2-year-old Marian -
and they always knew
they wanted to adopt.
Ryan said they wanted
to go where the need was
the greatest and through
their research, they dis-
covered Uganda, which
has a fairly new adoption
program.
Sarah said the paper-
work seemed endless and
the process was grueling,
but the couple did their
homework. Though coun-
tries discourage child se-
lection, Sarah said they
did indicate they wanted
one, but preferably two
children, under the age of
2. They thought they would
get boys since girls are in
high demand, but when
they first received photos
of Mercy and Lillian, they
instantly fell in love.
"It was amazing," Sarah
said.
Up until it was time to
bring the girls home, the
couple would send pic-
tures and clothes to Mercy
to get her used to having a
family structure. With her
harrowing background,
Sarah said being loved
was going to be something
foreign to Mercy
She was even told
Mercy may never smile.
Before bringing the
girls home, the couple
spent three weeks in
Uganda hammering out
the legal necessities be-
fore returning home
Easter weekend with the
newest additions to their
family
The meeting between
new siblings was far from
awkward.
"Marian knocked Mercy
flat with a hug," Sarah
said. "Juliet was a little
needier at first, but now
she runs around with
Mercy They do everything
together They really are
like twins."
In the few months the
children have been home,


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Sarah and Ryan Ferguson pose for a family photo with their adopted children - 6-
month-old Lillian and 16-month-old Mercy - and their biological children - 14-
month-old Juliet and 2 1/2-year-old Marian- at the Creative Community Playground
in Crystal River. The Citrus Springs couple recently adopted Lillian and Mercy from


Uganda.
Sarah said Mercy is pick-
ing up a lot of English and
a lot of weight.
"She was so malnour-
ished. She was skin and
bones when we brought
her home," she said.
And she also smiles.
"She can pick us out of a
crowd and she runs to us
with a smile," she said.
Lillian, who never used
to cry, now makes a racket.
"I'm happy to hear her
cry," Sarah said.
When it comes to public
outings like to the play-
ground or the grocery
store, Ryan admits he and
his wife notice people
staring.
"But I can ignore it
more than Sarah can ig-
nore it," he said.
However, Sarah said
she just wishes people
would ask questions
rather than stare.
"I don't know if their
staring because we have
so many young children or
because of their skin
color," Sarah said.
To them, the color of
Mercy and Lillian's skin
doesn't matter one bit.
They hardly ever think
about it.
"We never consider
these girls anything but
our daughters," Ryan said.
The children don't see it
either
"Seeing them love each
other is amazing," Sarah
said after watching Juliet
give Mercy a sloppy kiss
on the cheek. "They don't
see skin color"
Looking toward the fu-
ture, Sarah said she prays
her children never hear
racial comments. If they
do, she said she will teach


Sarah Ferguson said she and her husband always knew
they wanted to adopt children and they fell in love with
Lillian and Mercy when they first saw their pictures.


them to respond with love,
not anger
"It takes time to change
people," she said. "Seeing
our family can change at-
titudes."
She also said she wants
to make sure Mercy and
Lillian grow up loving
themselves and know not
to take the ignorance of
others personally How-
ever, teaching black
American history and dis-
cussing the harsh realities
of racism will be a topic in
the future Sarah and
Ryan both agreed they
would address.
Right now, the big topic
in the house is hair Lil-
lian has soft, curly hair
and Mercy has thicker,
coarser hair
"I love their hair," Sarah
beams. "I watch a lot of
YouTube videos to get tips."


Also in the future, edu-
cating Mercy and Lillian
about their native country
will be a part of rearing
the girls. Ultimately,
Sarah said she would love
to see them grow up and
return to Uganda to con-
tribute to their country
Taking a moment to re-
flect, Sarah explains how
caring for four little ones
can sometimes be an ex-
hausting job. During the
day, she said she does a lot
of praying.
But with the support of
her church and friends,
she said she makes the
greatest effort to do the
best she can every day
"I think of this as my
ministry," she said.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924
or swiles@chronicle
onlinecom.


Deputy


dies


after


pursuit,


crash


Driver leads

deputies

through four

counties

Associated Press
BROOKSVILLE - A
Hernando County sher-
iff's deputy has died after
crashing in pursuit of a
reckless
driver
who fled
through
four
counties.
A c-
cording
t o
Deputy John Florida
Mecklenburg Highway
Patrol, a
Brooksville police officer
spotted the driver early
Sunday. Authorities say
35-year-old Michael James
Anthony of Silver Springs
fled when the officer tried
to conduct a traffic stop.
Hernando County Sher-
iff's deputies joined the
pursuit. One deputy suf-
fered minor injuries when
he lost control and col-
lided with a pickup truck
and utility pole.
As the chase extended
into Pasco County, Her-
nando sheriff's Deputy
John Mecklenburg lost
control of his vehicle and
collided with a tree. The
patrol car caught fire. The
sheriff's office said the 35-
year-old deputy died at a
Tampa hospital.
FHP said Anthony even-
tually surrendered in
Pinellas County. He faces
multiple charges.



New hours

set for

Workforce

Connection

Chronicle
Workforce Connection
has announced new hours
of operation for its service
centers beginning Friday
The centers will be
open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
The change cuts back
on hours but does not af-
fect days of operation.
Workforce Connection
Centers, often referred to
as "one stops," provide
employment and training
services at no charge to
career seekers and busi-
nesses in Citrus, Levy
and Marion counties.
Workforce Connection
CEO Rusty Skinner said the
reduction in hours is both a
cost-saving measure as well
as a reflection of when the
centers are most used.
"In evaluating how best
to serve our customers, we
determined that it is im-
portant to ensure staff is
available to handle de-
mand during peak service
hours," Skinner said. "Our
review of traffic at the
centers tells us that traffic
after 5 p.m. is minimal."
Workforce Connection
Center locations/contacts:
* Citrus County 1103 E.
Inverness Blvd., in Inver-
ness, (352) 637-2223.
* Levy County 9030 N.E.


U.S. 27A, in Bronson, (352)
486-5580.
* Marion County 2703
N.E. 14th St., in Ocala,
(352) 840-5700.
Centers may also be
reached by calling (800)
434-JOBS (5627). For more
information, visit
www.clmworkforce.com.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUESTION: Should county government hire a
consultant to market business and recreational
opportunities?
* Yes. We need a unified voice if we are to
compete. 9 percent (5 votes)
* No. The county has a funding stream for the
Tourist Development Council and Economic
Development Council - plus Chamber of
Commerce. 47 percent (27 votes)
* Yes. But only if it's an existing county-based
consultant. 4 percent (2 votes)
* No. My taxes should not fund marketing.
40 percent (23 votes)
Total votes: 57.



HOW YOUR LAWMAKERS VOTED
Key votes for the week ending: July 1
By Voterama in Congress
* Senate-Confirmation Reforms: Senators voted, 79-
20, to reduce from about 1,200 to about 1,000 the
number of presidential appointees other than judicial
nominees who require Senate approval. A yes vote
was to pass a bill (S 679) that would streamline sev-
eral aspects of the Senate's cumbersome confirma-
tion process. Bill Nelson, Yes; Marco Rubio, No.
* International Monetary Fund: Senators refused, 44-
55, to cut off a special $100 billion U.S. line of credit
to the International Monetary Fund. Congress ap-
proved the loan in 2009 to help stabilize the global
economy, joining 19 other nations in that IMF rescue
effort. A yes vote was to end the line of credit. (S 679)
Nelson, No; Rubio, Yes.
* Duplicative Programs: Senators failed, 63-34, to
reach a two-thirds majority needed to change Senate
rules. A yes vote backed a rule under which the Con-
gressional Research Service would examine the hun-
dreds of bills set for floor debate each year and flag
any that would duplicate existing federal programs. (S
Res 116) Nelson, Yes; Rubio, Yes.
* CIA Director Petraeus: The Senate confirmed, 94-0,
Gen. David H. Petraeus, 58, as Central Intelligence
Agency director. He was commander of U.S. and
NATO forces in Afghanistan, and before that he led the
U.S. Central Command and directed the 2007 U.S.
troop surge in Iraq. Nelson, Yes; Rubio, Yes.
* Key votes ahead: In the week of July 4, the House will
resume work on the fiscal year 2012 defense budget,
while the Senate may debate U.S. involvement in the
air war over Libya. The Senate cancelled its Independ-
ence Day recess in deference to ongoing White House-
GOP talks on raising the national-debt ceiling.
� 2011 Thomas Reports Inc. Call: (202) 667-9760.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
* Cassandra Christine Pa-
quette, 26, of 5505 S. Bablan
Terrace, Homosassa, at 1:28
a.m. Sunday on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under the influ-
ence, following a traffic stop for
driving erratically. According to
the arrest report, Paquette had
a strong odor of alcohol emitting
from her breath. Paquette said
she had lost her driver's license
a couple of days earlier, but she
was driving a taxi. She said a
male passenger who wanted to
be released smashed the win-
dow of her vehicle. She stated
she had stopped and let him out.
The deputy reported her speech
was slurred and her eyes were
glassy and bloodshot. Paquette
was reported to have been un-
able to complete field sobriety
tasks as demonstrated. Breath
test results were 0.161 percent
and 0.158 percent. Florida law
presumes impairment at 0.080
percent. Bond $500.
* Dana M. Taylor, 26, of 740
N.E. Fifth Ave., No. 9, Crystal
River, at 7:30 a.m. Sunday on
misdemeanor charges of driv-
ing under the influence and
knowingly driving while license
suspended as a first conviction,
following a traffic stop. Accord-
ing to the arrest report, Taylor
almost ran the vehicle into a
ditch while turning onto West
Charlynn Lane from County
Road 495. According to the re-
port, Taylor's eyes were watery
and glassy, her eyelids drooped
and her speech was slurred
and mumbled. She provided
vehicle registration, but not a
driver's license and proof of in-
surance. Taylor was unable to
complete field sobriety tasks as
demonstrated. As the breath
test machine was broken, she
provided a blood sample. Bond
$1,000.
Other arrests
* Jamie Lee Garland, 18,
address unknown, Floral City, at


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


7:37 p.m. Friday on a felony
charge of willfully and mali-
ciously injures, destroys, re-
moves or in any manner
interferes with the use of any ve-
hicle, tools, equipment or facili-
ties used in the suppression of
fire. According to the report, Gar-
land alleged tampered with the
sprinkler system in his cell at the
Citrus County Detention Facility.
Bond $2,000.
* Richard F. Zizza, 26, of 73
S. Adams St., Beverly Hills, at
11:53 p.m. Thursday on a felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance or five 10-mil-
ligram pills of Methdone. Bond
$5,000.
* Jamie Michelle Jacob-
son, 29, of 9233 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness, at 10:17
a.m. Friday on two felony counts
of grand theft, giving false infor-
mation to a pawnbroker and traf-
ficking in stolen property.
According to the report, Jacob-
son stole jewelry from a resi-
dence and proceeded to pawn
the said jewelry by giving false
information about ownership of
the jewelry. Defendant was re-
leased on her recognizance.
* Gayla Mae Wilson, 60, of
6374 S. Lanceleaf Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 2 a.m. Saturday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for violation of probation in refer-
ence to a misdemeanor charge
of possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and an origi-
nal misdemeanor charge of pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
No bond.
* William James Reed Jr.,
25, of 5598 N.W. 216th St.,
Lawtey, at 2:54 a.m. Saturday
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for failure to appear in refer-
ence to an original felony charge
of burglary of an unoccupied


residence and grand theft. No
bond.
* Scott Keith Brower, 43, of
2633 E. Mars St., Invemess, at
7:25 a.m. Saturday on a misde-
meanor charge of possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis
and issued a notice to appear
citation.
* Thomas William DeJam-
ico, 32, of 317 S. Adams St.,
Beverly Hills, at 12:38 p.m. Sat-
urday on an active Citrus County
warrant for a felony charge of
felony battery with a previous
conviction. No bail. On a second
active Citrus County warrant,
DeJamico was arrested on a
felony charge of failing to stop or
fleeing a law enforcement officer
after being ordered to stop, a
misdemeanor charge of know-
ingly driving while license sus-
pended as a second conviction
and a misdemeanor charge of
resisting an officer without vio-
lence. Bond $6,000.
* Michael A. Ralston, 52, of
4424 N. Pine Drive, Hernando,
at 12:17 a.m. Sunday on a
charge of felony battery with a
previous conviction, in reference
to a person being struck in the
back of the head. Bond $2,000.
* Steven Matthew Buteau,
31, of 1758 S. Mooring Drive, In-
vemess, at 3:11 a.m. Sunday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for violation of probation in refer-
ence to a felony charge of grand


theft. No bond.
* Samantha Ealaine Stan-
ford, 36, of 406Y2 Houston St.,
Portland, Texas, at 3:42 a.m.
Sunday on a misdemeanor
charge of possession of drug
paraphernalia, following a traffic
stop for broken tag light. Acanine
alerted on the vehicle for the odor
of narcotics. A search revealed
two glass smoking pipes con-
taining residue that field tested
positive for cannabis. White pow-
der residue in a silver case
yielded a positive result for the
presence of cocaine. Bond $500.
Burglaries
* A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred on May
1 in the 12500 block of E. Big
Buck Trail, Invemess.
* A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at
about 7 a.m. June 29 in the 30
block of Pine St., Homosassa.
Thefts
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 8 a.m.
June 23 in the 3300 block of E.
Squirrel Court, Invemess.
* A petit theft of medication
occurred at about 5 p.m. June
28 in the 8400 block of E.
Daniels Road, Floral City.
* A petit theft occurred at
about 6 p.m. June 28 in the 700
block of E. LaSalle St.,
Hemando.
* A grand theft ($300 or
more) occurred at about 11:30
a.m. June 29 in the 2000 block
of State Road 44 W., Invemess.
* A petit theft occurred at
about 4 p.m. June 29 in the
5200 block of S. Cherokee Way,
Homosassa.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

i 7 Meeting Notices...............................B11

H jP Miscellaneous Notices.......................... B11

Surplus Property.....................................

1 iclaeusNtcs........:.....1


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
PC
ts
PC
PC
PC
sh
ts
PC
pc
pc
pc
sh
ts
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Northeast winds around 10 knots. Gu
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will tel
have a light chop. Partly cloudy, slight
chance of scattered showers and
thunderstorms today.


95 71 0.00 . NA

n ITI nnv Exclusive daily


UU I LUUr forecast by:

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 96 Low: 69
Mostly sunny. A 20% chance of
afternoon and evening thunderstorms.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 95 Low: 70
Mostly sunny to partly sunny. A 30% chance of
a thunderstorms in the afternoon.


r WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 94 Low: 72
Partly sunny, higher humidity. A 40% chance of
Showers and thunderstorms.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday 93/70
Record 100/61
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.12 in.
Total for the year 29.97 in.
Normal for the year 24.72 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Sunday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 41%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, palm
Today's Count: 4.1/12
Tuesday's Count: 5.1
Wednesday's Count: 4.8
AIR QUALITY
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
7/4 MONDAY 8:56 2:43
7/5 TUESDAY 9:52 3:40


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
9:21 3:08
10:17 4:05


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


JULY 23 JULY 30
JULY23 JULY30


SUNSET TONIGHT...................... 8:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW...............6:37 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY.....................9:58 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY..................... 10:58 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may water on
Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and/or
Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to once per week, before
8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants (other than
lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


High/Low
9:02 a/4:25
7:23 a/1:47
5:10 a/11:35
8:12 a/3:24


**At King's Bay
Monday
High/Low
a 8:21 p/4:25 p
a 6:42 p/1:47p
5a 4:29 p/-
a 7:31 p/3:24 p


***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday
High/Low High/Low
9:35 a/5:03 a 9:13 p/5:14 p
7:56 a/2:25 a 7:34 p/2:36 p
5:43 a/12:13 a 5:21 p/12:24 p
8:45 a/4:02 a 8:23 p/4:13 p


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc


ulf water
nperature



89�
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.00 27.84 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.82 35.80 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.17 37.16 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.75 37.73 42.40
Levels reported In feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


g-" 6 '-, " "- .
,.... , " H olulu.-

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
MONDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Sunday Monday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


77 66 .60
94 69
89 65
94 72 trace
87 71 .72
10068
93 69 .55
96 59
98 72
91 61
82 67 .03
81 69
80 66 .40
90 72
91 68
93 72
84 69
91 70
83 66 .21
95 74
91 71
73 62 .06
101 77
96 57
77 70
90 71
97 72
92 70
89 68 .14
77 66 .05
98 76
89 72
101 74
10884
98 72
71 63
91 75
98 77
81 69
86 64
94 78
95 72
94 71


87 61
95 68
87 64
93 72
91 69
98 73
92 68
88 58
94 73
92 61
84 70
80 60
86 59
90 72
89 62
93 71
79 67
86 65
79 63
96 71
84 63
87 59
100 77
97 64
87 70
82 64
98 75
88 68
88 63
89 65
98 76
85 66
97 72
103 86
97 72
77 65
88 69
95 76
79 60
89 71
96 74
95 72
92 72


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drzzle; f=fair; h=hazy;
pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny;
sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
�2011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Sunday Monday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 96 78 .48 ts 95 76
New York City 74 69 .84 pc 89 70
Norfolk 94 75 ts 91 74
Oklahoma City 10474 pc 100 74
Omaha 79 70 .28 pc 90 71
Palm Springs 101 86 pc 104 82
Philadelphia 90 73 .02 pc 91 71
Phoenix 11291 ts 109 90
Pittsburgh 89 66 .03 pc 85 59
Portland, ME 72 62 pc 77 59
Portland, Ore 74 56 s 80 55
Providence, R.I. 80 66 .16 pc 87 67
Raleigh 97 72 ts 95 70
Rapid City 86 57 pc 89 65
Reno 98 59 pc 96 63
Rochester, NY 86 72 s 84 60
Sacramento 102 64 s 100 63
St. Louis 91 70 .98 ts 88 72
St. Ste. Marie 78 53 pc 80 57
Salt Lake City 101 74 pc 91 69
San Antonio 98 75 pc 97 72
San Diego 71 65 pc 75 67
San Francisco 84 56 s 71 54
Savannah 91 72 pc 91 71
Seattle 72 57 pc 74 54
Spokane 81 60 .01 s 80 52
Syracuse 86 73 s 84 59
Topeka 84 73 .27 pc 93 73
Washington 94 70 .87 ts 92 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Phoenix, Ariz. LOW 34 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


MONDAY Lisbon
CITY H//SKY London
Acapulco 89/79/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 68/50/s Mexico City
Athens 82/70/s Montreal
Beijing 92/74/pc Moscow
Berlin 75/61/sh Paris
Bermuda 86/75/ts Rio
Cairo 89/65/s Rome
Calgary 75/55/s Sydney
Havana 90/73/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 91/83/pc Toronto
Jerusalem 84/62/s Warsaw


77/63/s
77/54/pc
90/64/s
70/56/ts
84/66/pc
82/66/ts
79/55/s
68/64/sh
86/72/c
68/50/sh
88/77/pc
82/63/s
68/48/pc


C I T R U S


COUNTY T


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44.
- ' Norvell Brant Hwi
Dunend _ Cannondale Dr
A Meadowcresl
N - I

I I | Courthouse
To pkins St. T square



W a N

Who's in charge:


THREE DAY


JULY 8


0
JULY 15


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


A4 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


f





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Property appraiser releases 2011 preliminary taxable values


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Property Ap-
praiser Geoffrey Greene an-
nounced, "This year's preliminary
certification of taxable value have
just been provided as prescribed
by law to all Citrus County taxing
authorities as of July 1, 2011."
Mr. Greene went on to explain,
"As part of the certification of the
preliminary tax roll process, this
tax roll has also been submitted si-
multaneously to the Florida De-
partment of Revenue (DOR) for
review and approval." This pre-
liminary certification of taxable
value establishes the basis of
budget preparations and 2011 tax
levy proposals by local taxing au-
thorities. This is the first of three
certifications of value required of
the Property Appraiser's Office
each tax year
This year's preliminary tax roll
reflects a total county Taxable
Value of $9.3 Billion reflecting
current market conditions. This
represents a 2.6 percent decrease
in values from 2010, as compared


to 4.1 percent last year. This year have been offset once again by sig-
continues a downward trend from nificant new investments at
the peak of 2007, when values Progress Energy's Crystal River
topped out at $12.3 billion. The Power Generation Complex.
2011 taxable value for schools is Progress Energy's local invest-
$10.1 billion, down 2.7 ments play a critical role
percent compared to the for those taxing authorities
2010 decrease of 3.9 per- affected.
cent. "These numbers "Both my office and
suggest a slowing in the Progress Energy under-
decline in values experi- stand the critical role the
enced over the last sev- company plays in our
eral years," said Greene. county's revenue forecasts
Greene said, "This is and budgeting process.
supported by additional Each year company repre-
analysis of the change in Geoffrey sentatives voluntarily seek
real property taxable val- Greene the earliest possible reso-
ues alone. Real property property lution to their valuation to
declined 5.9 percent in appraiser, avoid impacts to our citi-
2011 compared to 8.6 per- zens and budget process. I
cent in 2010. am pleased to confirm completion
"Real property taxable values of this year's process with the co-
provide a more representative operation of representatives of
picture of our county's values, by the Progress Energy This agree-
removing the contribution of tan- ment will allow taxing authorities
gible taxable values, the vast ma- to move forward more confidently
jority of which is attributable to with their budget processes"
Progress Energy" Greene said.
In 2011, declines in Citrus Greene also reported on the two
County's real property values cities and one other smaller tax-


ing authority here in Citrus
County Both cities of Crystal
River and Inverness are seeing
similar declines to the county this
year
Crystal River is down 3.3 per-
cent and Inverness is down 3.4
percent, while Homosassa Special
Water District experienced a de-
cline of 4.0 percent.
The $9.3 billion taxable value
reported above for the county is
also the base for the Citrus County
Library District, Mosquito Control
District, Hospital Board and
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District (SWFWMD).
Greene concluded his release of
annual values with the observa-
tion, "If there is something to be
optimistic about, all values are
down less this year, than last."
New construction this year con-
tinued to languish at historically
low levels as reflected in only
$55.9 million of taxable value.
This is a 40 percent drop from
2010 and far below pre-boom an-
nual levels.
Greene reported: "For the last


15 years, we have only seen one
year when new construction fell
below $100 million, and that last
happened in 1997. By comparison,
the height took place in 2007,
when new construction values
peaked at $547 million."
Greene said: "Value refinement
is virtually a year round process
and values are not finalized any
year until the completion of the
25-day TRIM (Truth in Millage)
process in August, when citizens
are provided their estimates of
value and proposed millage rates
and taxes for this year."
This is the appointed time each
year during TRIM, when residents
have the opportunity to challenge
values. Even then, the Value Ad-
justment Board appeal period will
continue to affect values.
Property Appraiser Geoffrey
Greene concluded by saying, "I
look forward to continuing my pol-
icy of resolving the majority of val-
uation questions or issues through
direct informal discussions with
my staff and any concerned
citizen."


SERVE
Continued from Page Al

join the Army during or soon
after high school in the past
three years since he has been
a recruiter in Inverness.
"The basic necessities for a
single soldier are met by pro-
viding a room in the barracks
with running water and elec-
tric free to the soldier, as well
as providing three meals a
day seven days a week for
them at the dining facility
And there's the job security
and college opportunity," he
said.
Guyette joined the Army at
17. A few years after basic
and Advanced Individual
Training, he was sent to Iraq,
and later Afghanistan. He
volunteered to be a recruiter
and was sent to Citrus County
and has been here for three
years. Guyette often travels to
all three high schools in the
county to tell students about
joining the service.
He said it is absolutely a
good decision for people to
join during or right after high
school.
"The training ability is
higher and it's easier for
them to learn, because
they've come right from
school," he said.
MEu
For 18-year-old Katie Meli-
dosian, joining the military
was about stepping up her
game.
After her basic training in
Oklahoma, Melidosian trav-
eled to Fort Campbell, Ky.,
and from there was deployed
in December 2010.
"As soon as I went to Fort
Campbell and told them my
unit number they said, 'pack
your bags, you're going to
Afghanistan,' and my heart
just dropped."
After spending five months
there, Melidosian came back
safely in May, although her
unit was attacked three
times.
"It was always the same
time, around 11 p.m.," she
said about the bombings.
"There were a bunch of ex-
plosions, you'd just run for
the bunker and hope they
wouldn't hurt you."
Luckily, Melidosian was
never injured and she isn't
"too worried" to deploy again
in 2013.
Melidosian is currently
working on base in Kentucky
where she is an E3 private
first class and likes the idea
of making others proud.
"It's just a good life and
there are so many benefits,"
she said. "When someone
shakes my hand and says
'thanks for serving,' I can't
help but smile for the rest of
the day"
MEu
TJ Amato's call to service
came while playing the pop-
ular video game "Call of
Duty" His epiphany came
during his senior year and he
couldn't be happier with his
choices.
"Honestly, there's more po-
tential for me in the Army
than there was in the civilian
world," the 20-year-old said.
"The benefits I can get from
the Army is a lot better than
those of the civilian world.
Everything I want is in the
Army"
Amato completed nine
weeks of basic training in
Missouri and 14 weeks of AIT
in Georgia and now resides
in Texas where he is an E2
Private and is working to be
a Multichannel Transmission
System Operator and Main-
tainer.
"Being in the Army im-


proves the quality of your life,
it really does just better your
life," Amato said.
He has nothing to com-
plain about besides being
separated from friends and
loved ones.
"You can't come home
whenever," Amato said. "You
fight for freedom, but that's
the one thing the Army takes
away is your freedom. You al-
ways have to remember why
you joined, you're there for a
reason whether you're liking
the current situation or not"
MEN
Tammie Cherryhomes
knew early on she would
choose serving her country
as a career path, and is con-
fident she has made the right
choice.
Cherryhomes has been ac-
tively involved in the Young
Marines and JROTC
throughout her middle
school and high school years
serving as a JROTC cadet for
three years and logging more
than 1,000 hours of commu-
nity service between the pro-
grams.
"The Young Marines was
the best time of my life,"
Cherryhomes said. "It really
opened my eyes to what the
future would be about and
that's when I realized I
wanted to join the service."
Cherryhomes has been
part of the Florida Army Na-
tional Guard since February
2010 and will switch to the
Georgia Army National
Guard in September 2011
when she attends school
there during the fall.
She left June 19 for a lead-
ership training camp that
only a select few get to at-
tend. Based on ACT scores,
interviews, teacher refer-
ences and potential to be a
leader, 20 to 30 cadets are
chosen. It combines basic
and AIT training and assists
its attendees to become an
officer in two years, rather
than four
"I hope for the best for
whoever else is serving our
country," she said. "I thank
everybody for serving our
country just as I am."
MEN
Bridget Enstrom, 18,
wanted to better her life. She
is well aware of the dangers
associated with being in the
service having an uncle who
died in Vietnam.
Military service is a part of
her heritage. With a grandfa-
ther retired from the Air
Force, an uncle who died in
Vietnam fighting with the



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Marines, one brother in the
Army and her dad and other
brother in the Navy, Enstrom
knows a thing or two about
the armed forces.
"I was raised with a mili-
tary background, I've always
kept it an option in my
mind," she said.
And she has decided that
the Coast Guard has what
she's looking for
"(Being in the Coast Guard
is) something that I can al-
ways fall back on and sets me
up for a secure future," she
said.
At the time of her inter-
view June 16, Enstrom said
she was extremely nervous
about boot camp.
"I have pre-jitters right
now," she said. "It's just
something I know I have to
do to make my life better"
Enstrom departed June 21
for eight weeks of basic train-
ing in Cape May, N.J.
mmm
Dalton Felthoff never
doubted his decision to join
the Coast Guard. The 18-
year-old's father spent 20
years in the Coast Guard and
his brother has been in for 2
1/2 years.
"I decided to join because
it runs in the family," Felthoff
said.
Felthoff explained that
school wasn't really a good
option for him, so rather than
waste his time, he'd be
proactive and get a jump
start on his future early
"My family is very support-
ive, my dad especially,
they're happy because I
know what I want to do now."
He played football
throughout high school so he
said he knows what the basic
workouts will entail; he
should be leaving in October
for Cape May, N.J.
"(I'm most excited) just to
be on my own, start my own
life, and go somewhere I've
never been before, be de-
pendent upon myself," he
said.
Felthoff plans on becom-
ing an Aviation Maintenance
Technician, working on the
outer bodies of helicopters
and airplanes. He said his
feelings after basic will be
dependent on where his or-
ders send him to be sta-
tioned.
"Ill be ready to get my ca-
reer started," he said.
MEu
Also ready to start her ca-
reer is Zailee Robison, who
hasn't let injury keep her
from a career in the Army


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The 18-year-old signed up
with the Army to be an intel-
ligence collector after a pres-
entation by Guyette in her
economics class.
She was preparing to leave
Aug. 1, until she tore her an-
terior cruciate ligament
going for a ball during soft-
ball practice and will now
have to wait until October
"Catchin' that ball almost
screwed up my career," Ro-
bison said.
Robison said she has been


ready to go to boot camp ever
since she enlisted.
"I'm always wanting to be
different than everyone else,
I want to be that standout
person that changes the
world," said Robison, who
was voted Most Spontaneous
by her Class of 2011 peers.
She is most excited to meet
her "battle buddy," which she
explained will be a partner
who goes everywhere with
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"I love friends; I'm most
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my battle buddy," she said. "I
hope they're nice."
When it comes to the fu-
ture, Robison is prepared for
anything.
"I hope I don't end up in
Afghanistan," Robison said.
"I'd be scared, but that's
just what the military is
about, being strong - Army
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries






Donald
Buckley, 67
INVERNESS
Donald Dennis Buckley,
67, Inver-
ness, died at
home on
July 2, 2011.
Born in
Springfield,
MA, on July
11, 1943, he
was the son
Donald of the late
Buckley Theodore
and Dorothy(Wood) Buckley
He retired from the nuclear
energy industry as an engi-
neer and served our country
in the U.S. Marine Corps.
Don especially enjoyed
woodworking, fishing and
hunting.
Survivors include his wife
of 43 years, Candace Jo-
darski Buckley; three broth-
ers, Theodore Buckley and
wife, Suzanne, Ronald
Buckley and wife, Joan,
Phillip Buckley and wife
Dorothy; and nieces and
nephews.
Friends may call at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home on Tuesday, July 5,
from 6 to 8 p.m. Military
graveside services will be
Wednesday, July 6, at 2:30
p.m. at Florida National
Cemetery with VFW Post
4337 in charge. In lieu of
flowers, memorials re-
quested to Michael J. Fox
Foundation-Parkinson's Re-
search, Attn: Tribute Gifts,
Church Street Station; PO
Box 780, New York, NY
10008-0780. Friends are in-
vited to meet at the funeral
home on Wednesday at 1:30
to form the procession to the
cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www.chronicleonline. com.

Cecil
Grantham, 63
CITRUS SPRINGS
Cecil M. Grantham, age
63, of Citrus Springs, died
Saturday, July 2, 2011, at
home. Funeral services will
be held Friday, July 8, 2011,
at 11 a.m. from the Roberts
Rineral Home of Dunnellon
Memorial Gardens. Friends
may call at the funeral home
Friday morning from 10 a.m.
until the hour of service.

Claire
Michaels, 77
HERNANDO
Claire M. Michaels, age
77, Hernando, died Satur-
day, July 2, 2011, under the
loving care of her family at
the HPH Hospice Unit at
Citrus Health and Rehabili-
tation Center.
Claire was born on Janu-
ary 9, 1934, in Camden, N.J.
to the late John and Sarah
(McCormick) Armstrong and
came to this area six years
ago from Westville Grove,
N.J. She enjoyed bird
watching, flowers and her
dog Penny She was an avid
bingo and Pogo player.
Survivors include two
daughters, Cathleen S.
Reed, Longview, Wash. and
Sara L. Holland, Fayet-
teville, N.C.; her sister Joan
Yerka, Floral City, Fla.;
grandchildren Danielle
Holland, Heather Holland
and James W Reed Jr; and
great-grandson Nicholas
Holland. She was preceded
in death by her husband,
Gerard Michaels, in 1993
and a sister, Jackie. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chron-
icle's policy permits
both free and paid obit-
uaries.
* Obituaries must be
submitted by the fu-
neral home or society


in charge of arrange-
ments.
* Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
* Email obits@
chronicleonline.com or
fax (352) 563-3280.


Declaration signers honored


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.H. - It's William
Whipple's turn to be recognized.
The New Hampshire merchant
is one of the lesser-known signers
of the Declaration of Independ-
ence. This year, there are plans for
Whipple and 11 others to be hon-
ored for their place in history with
a small bronze plaque at their
gravesites or homes, thanks to a
group of descendants of the Found-
ing Fathers.
Whipple, one of three men from
New Hampshire who signed the fa-
mous document -the others were
Josiah Bartlett and Matthew
Thornton - had no direct descen-
dants. His only child, a boy, died as
an infant and is buried near him at
the Old North Cemetery in
Portsmouth. Whipple, who also
commanded troops during the Rev-
olutionary War and served as a
state judge and legislator, died in
1785 at age 55.
It's about time he was honored,
said Blaine Whipple in Portland,
Ore., a distant relative who has re-
searched and published several
volumes on 15 generations of the
Whipple family in America.
"He was one of the workhorses of
the Continental Congress," Whip-
ple said. "He's never been given
the credits that he earned." Whip-
ple was chairman of the marine,
foreign relations and quartermas-
ter committees and served on an-
other committee that gathered


intelligence on the British, he said.
Whipple's gravesite mentions he
was a member of the Continental
Congress when America declared
its freedom from Great Britain, but
doesn't spell out his famous mo-
ment in time. The 104-year-old So-
ciety of the Descendants of the
Declaration of Independence
wants to change that for Whipple
and the other signers, "to honor
their memory and their great
deed."
"We try to do as many as we can,
but it's a long process," said Grace
Staller of West Chester, Pa., who
heads the project for the nonprofit
group. She's a ninth-generation de-
scendant of signer John Hart from
New Jersey, whose plaque is at the
Old Baptist Meeting House in
Hopewell.
The Portsmouth City Council re-
cently approved the request. The
city owns the cemetery
Other plaque recipients - some
better known than others - this
year are John Adams, Samuel
Adams, John Hancock, and Robert
Treat Paine, Massachusetts;
Charles Carroll, Maryland; Thomas
Jefferson and Thomas Nelson, Vir-
ginia; Thomas Lynch and Arthur
Middleton, South Carolina; James
Smith, Pennsylvania; and Richard
Stockton, New Jersey
Some of the 56 signers, like
Whipple, have no direct descen-
dants. For others, it's not clear
where they're buried. Some ceme-
teries don't allow the plaques. In


addition to the 45 who will end up
with plaques, there are 11 signers
who won't be getting them; they will
be honored at the historic Congres-
sional Cemetery in Washington.
The bronze plaque quotes from
the last sentence of the 1776 docu-
ment, saying for the support of the
declaration, "we mutually pledge
to each other our lives, our fortunes
and our sacred honor."
"I've always been proud to be re-
lated to a signer of the Declaration
of Independence. It's almost like a
royal family," said Jeffrey Saurman
of Portsmouth, a direct descendant
of Thornton, whose memorial in
Merrimack received one of the
plaques lastAugust He said he was
happy to share the moment with
his children.
His son Josh, he said, recently
completed a report on Thornton, a
doctor, state representative and
judge, for his sixth-grade class. The
youngster took a photo of himself in
period clothes next to a portrait of
Thornton. "You could see some re-
semblance," his father said.
Saurman, who works at a family
plumbing and heating business,
said he was shocked and surprised
that the plaques hadn't been made
years earlier. "You would think
something like that would've al-
ready been done."
William Whipple, who was born
in Kittery, Maine, was a merchant
in Portsmouth, a busy seaport and
shipbuilding city During the Revo-
lutionary War, he was brigadier


general of the New Hampshire
Militia and was one of the negotia-
tors of the surrender of British Gen.
John Burgoyne at the Battle of
Saratoga, a major turning point in
the war.
Whipple kept a diary from that
time, musing about how long it took
for preparations to bring back Bur-
goyne so he could be sent back to
Britain.
"He talks about Burgoyne hold-
ing them all up, and he wouldn't
leave because he had to get his
whole entourage together," said
Barbara McLean Ward, curator of
the Moffatt-Ladd House in
Portsmouth, Whipple's home. The
weather was fine, but when they fi-
nally left Saratoga, "it rained the
entire time back... It's all about sort
of being miserable," she said.
Whipple freed his slave, Prince
Whipple, who had fought with him
in the war and was one of a group
of slaves who had petitioned the
Legislature for their freedom.
Prince Whipple also is buried in
the Old North Cemetery
The Moffatt-Ladd House, a Geor-
gian mansion built in 1763, is a na-
tional historic landmark that's
open to the public. It has a portrait
of Whipple, as well as some per-
sonal items, such as a sword. Out-
side the house is a 235-year-old
horse chestnut tree, which he had
planted after signing the Declara-
tion of Independence, Ward said.
The seeds were brought back from
Philadelphia.


Wolf debate unfolds in Pacific Northwest


Associated Press

SEATTLE - The wolves
came within howling dis-
tance of the house, but were
gone by the time Kim Ja-
cobs found dead lambs on
her family's eastern Oregon
ranch that spring morning.
While many conserva-
tionists welcome the return
of gray wolves into the Pa-
cific Northwest, Jacobs
wants to shoot them if they
harm her livestock. "A lot of
(people) can't wrap their
mind around what wolves
are capable of," said the
fourth-generation rancher
from Baker City, Ore.,
whose family lost at least 26
sheep to wolves in 2009.
As gray wolves have
moved into the valleys and
forests of Oregon and Wash-
ington in recent years, the
conflicts that marked wolf
debates in Montana, Idaho
and Wyoming are unfolding
here.
Congress in April
stripped federal endan-
gered-species protections
from wolves in Montana,
Idaho and the eastern one-
third of Washington and
Oregon. Wolves are still on
the federal list of endan-
gered species in the west-
ern two-thirds of
Washington and Oregon,
but the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service is review-
ing whether that protection
should continue. Public
comments on that review
are due Tuesday
This summer, Washington
wildlife officials are finaliz-
ing a draft wolf manage-
ment plan that has been so
heated that an advisory
group can't agree on some
of the basics. The state has
gotten 65,000 comments,
ranging from advocates
who say wolves play a vital
role in the ecosystem to
hunters and ranchers who
fear they will eat too many
elk, deer and livestock.
Meanwhile, conservation
groups are urging Oregon
wildlife officials to stop
killing wolves. Wildlife
managers killed two wolves
in May and said in June
they may kill another to
prevent more livestock
losses.
"It's looking more like it's
not conservation, it's look-
ing like retribution," said
Oregon Wild's Rob Klavins.
"Nobody envisioned a sit-
uation where we'd be
killing 20 percent of the
wolf pups in two weeks to
assuage the loss of four
cows."
He said about 55,000

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Associated Press
Ray Robertson, who is both a volunteer for Conservation Northwest and a contractor for the U.S. Forest Service, sets
up a remote camera that he hopes will photograph wolves near Twisp, Wash. Bitter controversy has surrounded gray
wolves since they were reintroduced to the Northern Rockies in 1995, but the animals have thrived and traveled to new
territory, including Washington and Oregon.


livestock animals were
killed by disease and other
causes in 2010, compared to
about a dozen cows killed
by wolves.
"Wolves are endangered
and we don't take this
lightly, but we do need to
move to lethal control when
other measures don't
work," said Michelle Den-
nehy, a spokeswoman with
the Oregon Department of
Fish and Wildlife. The state
has issued 24 permits al-
lowing ranchers and others
to shoot and kill wolves if
they catch them in the act of
biting or killing.
Wolves roamed the West
before they were hunted,
trapped for their fur and
killed to virtual extinction
in the lower 48 states
decades ago. Since they
were reintroduced into
Idaho and Yellowstone Na-
tional Park in the mid-
1990s, the predators have
thrived and an estimated
1,600 roam the Northern
Rockies. Wolves have dis-
persed into Oregon and
Washington from Idaho
and British Columbia.
There are about 17 con-
firmed wolves in Oregon
and about two dozen in


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"There is a sincere fear
people have about wolves
and I think it's because they
don't understand the ani-
mals," said Carter
Niemeyer, a retired federal
wolf trapper.
Wolves tend to avoid peo-
ple and only a few human
deaths have been attributed
to wolves in North America
in nearly 100 years,
Niemeyer said. They're op-
portunistic predators that
tend to feed on old, weak,
sick or young prey
"There's plenty of room
for wolves. The issue is: are
humans going to let them
come back to the land-
scape?" said Jasmine Min-
bashian, who manages the
wolf program for Conserva-


tion Northwest.
A father and son from the
Methow Valley in central
Washington were charged
in June with illegally killing
at least two wolves and con-
spiring with another family
member to smuggle a wolf
pelt to Canada. A shipping
agent alerted police in 2008
after blood leaked from a
package. William White,
Tom White and Erin White
pleaded not guilty to nu-
merous charges in federal
court in Spokane last
Wednesday
William White and Tom
White are accused of killing
or attempting to trap and
poison as many as five
wolves near their Twisp
home in 2008 and 2009.
State biologists confirmed


Washington's first wild wolf
pack since the 1930s near
Twisp in 2008, the Methow
Valley's Lookout Pack.
"When you're trying to re-
cover a population, every an-
imal counts and we know
that poaching has played a
factor in recovering wolf pop-
ulations in Washington
state," said Mike Cenci,
Washington Department of
Fish and Wildlife's deputy
chief of wildlife enforcement
The pack which had
numbered 10 in 2008 is now
reduced to two males. The
pack's breeding female wolf
disappeared, and "it seems
likely that she was poached
last year," said Scott Fitkin,
a wildlife biologist with
WDFW


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DISPLAY
Continued from Page Al

after they have been fighting
the war on terrorism. Mills
said people were very recep-
tive to her mission and were
donating.
Also trying to do good work
was College of Central
Florida Citrus Campus
Provost Vernon Lawter Jr,
who was selling tickets for a
drawing for a Corvette to
raise funds for United Way of
Citrus County
"I haven't sold any and
may not," Lawter said. "They
are $100 tickets."
Citrus High School Band
Boosters sold refreshments,
as did many other commu-
nity groups. Many people
had a picnic after they lined
up their chairs for a view of
the fireworks. Some settled
under shady oak trees where
it was cool. Others were lake-
side in the sun, where they
would have the best view
after nightfall.
Youngsters likely wore
themselves out before the
fireworks began, as tots
bounced in inflatables to
their hearts' content. They



TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

Caylee died.
"It can never be proven,"
he said.
Baez spent most of his four-
hour argument attacking the
prosecution's forensic evi-
dence. He said the prosecu-
tion's air analysis of the trunk
of Anthony's car, which al-
legedly showed air molecules
consistent with decomposi-
tion, could not be duplicated.
He said no one could prove a
stain found in the trunk was
caused by Caylee's body de-
composing there. And wit-
nesses showed maggots
found in the trunk came from
a bag of trash that was found
there, he said.
"They throw enough
against the wall and see
what sticks. That is what
they're doing... right down to
the cause of death," Baez
said. He later conceded his
client had told elaborate lies
and invented imaginary
friends and even a fake fa-
ther for Caylee, but he said
that doesn't mean she killed
her daughter
He also attacked An-
thony's father, George An-
thony, as unreliable. He said
that a suicide note that
George Anthony wrote in
January 2009 that claimed
no knowledge of what hap-
pened to Caylee was self-
serving and that the attempt
was a fraud. He said George
Anthony claimed he was


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had a climbing wall, pony
rides and a petting zoo with a
llama, a donkey and two
goats. Competitions like a
hula hoop contest kept them
active.
At 7 p.m., a presentation of
colors flag ceremony hon-
ored military personnel and
veterans and opened the
event
Adults were entertained
with music. A band, Neon
Truckers, played, including
Ricky Mitchell, the 2009 win-
ner of Cooter Idol.
As in previous years, the
fireworks were launched
after 9 p.m. from private
property on the other side of
the lake, safely away from
the two parks. It is an orange
grove owned by Olivia Mills,
and the grand finale of fire-
works was dedicated to her
late husband.
People had their choice of
two parks for great views of
the nighttime celestial explo-
sions, and as many as 8,000
people were expected to
crowd around the shoreline.
"What is this? The shut-
tle?" one latecomer joked.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormer can bereachedat
(352) 564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline.com.


going to kill himself with a
six-pack of beer and some
high-blood pressure
medicine.
Earlier during prosecu-
tion's closing argument,
Casey Anthony appeared
mostly stone-faced for about
the first 45 minutes, but she
began to cry when Ashton
said the story that Caylee
drowned was also false.
Ashton, the prosecutor,
said Caylee's death wasn't an
accident because three
pieces of duct tape were
placed on her face - one on
the mouth, one on the nose
and one over those to be
"thorough."
The case has played out on
national TV since Caylee's
disappearance in the sum-
mer of 2008 and continued
through her mother's trial,
with spectators traveling
from all over the U.S. to
jockey for coveted seats in
the courtroom gallery An-
thony, a single mother, was 22
when her daughter died. No
one has come forward as the
father of Caylee.
Casey Anthony has
pleaded not guilty to first-de-
gree murder She could face
a possible death sentence or
life in prison if convicted of
that charge.
Anthony also is charged
with aggravated child abuse,
aggravated manslaughter of a
child and four counts of pro-
viding false information to
law enforcement The child
abuse and manslaughter
charges each carry a 30-year
prison term if convicted.


ANGEL FOOD
The Angel Food Ministries
program enables families to
stretch their food budget by
providing quality food at half or
less of the retail price. For
exact menus, order dates and
times and pickup dates and
times view online at: Angel
FoodMinstries.com. You may
also place an online order with
a credit card or a debit card.
* North Oak Baptist
Church, 9324 N. Elkcam
Blvd., Citrus Springs. For infor-
mation, call the church office
between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Monday through Friday at
(352) 489-1688 or (352)
746-1500.
* Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486),
Hernando. Payment is re-
quired at time of order, by
check, cash or food stamps
(EBT). For information, call
the church office at (352)
726-7245 or Grant Schlenker
at (352) 419-4028.
* Redeemer Presbyterian
Church of Inverness, 1005
Hillside Court and Washington
Street (behind Central Motel),
Inverness. Payment online or
at church office. Call (352)
726-0077.
* Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 9425 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. To sign up for Angel
Food, order food and learn of
pick-up date and time, call the
church office at (352) 489-5511
or Victor Kahler at (352) 465-
4182. All orders are prepaid by
check, cash or money order.
* Homosassa Knights of
Columbus 6954, at 9020 W.
Atlas Drive, Homosassa (off
U.S.19 across from Love Mo-
torsports), or call Joann at
(352) 382-2129 or (352) 586-
6698. Payment is required at
the time the order is placed.
Payment online is debit or
credit card only. Payment at
the K of C is cash, check,
money orders or food stamps
(EBT).
* First Assembly of God
of Dunnellon, 2872 W. Dunnel-
Ion Road, one mile west of
U.S. 41 (across from Nichol's
Lumber). Call (352) 489-8455.
HUNGRY?
* St. Anne's Anglican
Church food pantry opens
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. daily
in the administration building.
* Daystar Life Center
gives out food to all needy in-
dividuals and families
throughout Citrus County.
Doors are open from 9 a.m.
until 2 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Picture ID and inter-
view required. Daystar is at
6751 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011 A7


way, Crystal River, across from
the Publix Shopping Center.
Call (352) 795-8668.
* Citrus United Basket
(CUB) food pantry is open to
all underserved Citrus County
residents from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday
at 103 Mill Ave, Inverness (east
of the new courthouse). Partici-
pants must provide proof of in-
come, photo ID and Social
Security numbers for each
family member. Contact CUB
at (352) 344-2242 or
cublisa@embarqmail.com.
* First Baptist Church of
Crystal River has its food
pantry open from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday. The church is at 700
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
For information, call (352)
795-3367.
* Our Lady of Fatima's
Food Pantry, at 604 U.S. 41 S.,
is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday to Friday. Proper
photo ID, proof of residence
and interview are required for
assistance to needy residents
of Floral City, Hernando and In-
verness. Call (352) 726-1707.
* First United Methodist
Church of Inverness God's
Kitchen serves from 11:30 a.m.
to noon Mondays in the fellow-
ship hall, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road. A bus is available
for transportation to the church
on Monday.
Call (352) 726-2522.
* The New Church With-
out Walls gives free food
boxes away at 5 p.m. Monday
at the neighborhood park in
Hernando off Railroad Drive
where feeding the homeless
takes place.
Call (352) 344-2425.
* Floral City United
Methodist Church offers free
breakfast to those who need it
from 7 to 9 a.m. Tuesday in
Hilton Hall, 8478 E. Marvin St.
Call (352) 344-1771.
* Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church food pantry
is open from 9 to 10 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at 6
Roosevelt Blvd. Food is distrib-
uted on right side of parish of-
fice garage area. Parking is
available in right parking field
next to garage area. Pantry is
open to those who truly qualify
for this program. No vouchers
or financial aid given. Call
Anna at (352) 527-2381 or the
church at (352) 746-2144.
* Nature Coast Ministries'


food pantry is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday. The
office is at 1592 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River. Call
(352) 400-2689.
* The Hernando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, at
1880 N. Trucks Ave., Her-
nando, provides food distribu-
tion for needy families through
its Food Pantry, which is open
the second and fourth Tuesday
monthly from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Please have proper photo I.D.
available at the time of the re-
quest for food. For information,
call (352) 212-5159.
* EI-Shaddai food min-
istries "brown bag of food" dis-
tribution takes place from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday at
Crystal River Church of God,
2180 W. 12th Ave., behind the
former Lincoln Mercury dealer-
ship. Although food is distrib-
uted once a week, families are
only eligible for food once a
month. For information, call
(352) 628-9087 or (352) 302-
9925. The USDA is an equal-
opportunity provider.
* We Care Food Pantry
gives out food to needy peo-
ple. Initial registrations are ac-
cepted from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays. To
qualify for assistance, partici-
pants must be a Homosassa
or Homosassa Springs resi-
dent with identification. For
more information and dates for
food distributions, call (352)
628-0445.
* Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church's Food Pantry, 82
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, dis-
tributes food from 11 a.m. to
noon and 6 to 7 p.m. the last
Tuesday monthly. To qualify for
assistance, you must be
a Beverly Hills resident with
identification. Call the church
office at (352) 746-3620 to
make a reservation. There will
be an initial registration for
each recipient, then you will
need to call the office at least a
week ahead of time to let us
know you will require food.
* The food pantry of First
Presbyterian Church of Crys-
tal River is open from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Tuesday. The pantry
is open to meet the emergency
needs of people in the commu-
nity. Everyone is invited to par-
ticipate once a week as
needed. Bring a photo ID and
the date of birth for each mem-
ber of your household. The
church is at 1501 S.E. U.S.19,


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north of Sweetbay.
Call (352) 795-2259.
* Suncoast Baptist
Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs,
has its food pantry open from 8
a.m. to noon the second
Wednesday monthly for pre-
bagged food. Free bread is
available from 8 a.m. to noon
Wednesday.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Feed My Sheep out-
reach provides a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday. The
food pantry is open from 9:30
to 11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday. The pantry is no
longer open on Wednesday
evenings or Fridays. For infor-
mation, call (352) 726-3153.
* Food pantry of Floral City
First Baptist Church Emer-
gency Feeding Program is
open from 1 to 3 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly.
* Dunnellon Presbyterian
and Holy Faith Episcopal
food pantry opens from 9 a.m.
to noon Thursdays at 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
* SOS Ministry food pantry
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
for those in need at the Key
Center in Lecanto. If new to
the program, bring driver's li-
cense and Social Security
cards for all family members
for initial registration.
* Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness "Feed the Hungry" free
lunch is served from noon to 1
p.m. Thursday in the fellow-
ship hall, 960 S. U.S. 41. Food
pantry is open from 1 to 2 p.m.
Thursday only. Call (352)
726-1480.
* Our Father's Table
serves free Saturday lunches
from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
at St. Anne's Anglican Church,
one mile west of the Plantation
Inn on West Fort Island Trail.
Call (352) 795-2176.
* St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs serves those in need
with free boxes of food from its
food pantry the third Saturday
morning monthly. Call (352)
465-6613 on the preceding
Tuesday to sign up for the
distribution.
* Inverness Church of
God hosts a soup kitchen the
first and third Sunday monthly
following the 10:30 a.m. wor-
ship service in the Family Life
Center. Inverness Church of
God is at 416 U.S. 41 S., In-
verness. Call (352) 726-4524.


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Page A8 MONDAY, JULY 4,2011



PINION


"The fact, in short, is that freedom to
be meaningful in an organized
society must consist ofan amalgam of
heirarchy offreedoms and restraints."
Samuel Hendel, 1909-1984


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................... ..................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... ......................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
M ike Arnold ................... ..................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz........................................citizen m em ber
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


INDEPENDENCE DAY




Celebration built on


accomplishments


Today is a day of celebra-
tions - a day of glorious
fanfare and symbolic
trimmings as Citrus County
joins with millions across the
nation to say "Happy Birthday,
America!"
On July 4, 2011, time-honored
traditions of speeches, fire-
works, entertainment, amuse-
ments, activities,
music and back-
yard barbecues THE I
will bring families Celebratir
and friends to- birtt
gether to enjoy
the annual festivi- OUR 01
ties marked with a
flourish of red, Shov
white and blue. patriot
It's all because pride
on July 4, 1776, a confide
small band of rad- with
ical English
colonists expressed an idea of
liberty that shook the political
foundation of the world. A so-
ciety built upon that defiant
proposition that each individ-
ual - regardless of religion or
national origin - was to be
treated with the same rules,
the same opportunities and the
same freedoms.
So today, we celebrate the
awesomeness of that historic
accomplishment on July 4 be-
cause it goes to the core of
what we are and what we still
believe and protect today as
Americans. It's a birthday un-
like any other and should be
treated as such. As we partici-
pate in three-legged races, eat
our congealed salads deco-
rated like American flags and
get goose bumps as we hear
one more rendition of "God
Bless America," we should also
be mindful of the reason these
traditions are part of our soci-
ety and our American culture.
While it is the Constitution
that provides the framework for
the United States, it is the Dec-


S
n1
h1

P




s
n
5i


laration, with its bold proclama-
tion that "all men are created
equal" that has become the
heart of this nation's courageous
beginning and continues today
to unite the American people.
History reminds us the
process for building that envi-
sioned democracy was never
easy and is never complete. The
challenge to bal-
ance respect for
fSUE: the will of the ma-
g another jority with the re-
day. sponsibility to
protect the rights
INION: of minorities is a
constant struggle.
your Other nations
im with share a race, a reli-
with gion, a color, a lan-
ice and guage; but this
safety. collection of peo-
ple was to be
united in a creed that not only
acknowledged an overwhelming
diversity but said we could be a
stronger nation because of it.
And so it is that our patriot-
ism, today and all other days, is
not diminished by any political
failure, shortcoming of govern-
mental policy or a slump in the
economy Rather, it is a bold re-
minder of the bravery of our
forefathers and the courage
that is often needed in times
when our freedoms are threat-
ened.
As this patriotism gives hom-
age to those who have paid its
price, we owe it to ourselves
and to future generation to be-
come educated voters, to be
critical thinkers, to share our
views with those who repre-
sent us and to seek change
when we are in the wrong. We
need to continuously be in rev-
erence of those who sacrificed
their lives in battle so that our
freedoms were gained and re-
main in full respect of those
who continue that fight on a
daily basis.


Letter to the EDITOR


Postseasons past
Your June 28 statement that
this year's Inverness Senior All
Stars district championship is
the first in more than a decade is
incorrect. In 2003, the Inverness
Senior All Stars won not only the
district championship, but the
sectional championship as well.
They were eventually defeated in
the state championship tourna-
ment in Windermere. Good luck
to this year's team!
Nick Fray
Floral City

OPINIONS INVITED
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


Hot Corner: JOBS


All talk, no jobs
Can anyone name one thing
that the Republican-controlled
House has done in six months to
help create jobs? The Republicans
have, since day one, done every-
thing in their power to attack the
president and have done nothing
to help the country. The politi-
cians, especially the Republicans,
do not care about the middle
class and the poor. All they care
about is lining the pockets of the
wealthy.
Where are the jobs?
If you're a state worker, teacher,
unemployed or just poor, Florida


is not the state for you. Where are
the jobs, Gov. Rick Scott? We're
waiting.

Nix the buttons
There's a way to create both
public- and private-sector jobs. If
you ever had a problem with ei-
ther the government or the corpo-
rate bureaucracy, you'd call the
number, then press button after
button - none of which describe
your problem - and you never got
a live person. Chances are, you
gave up without a solution. Elimi-
nating the buttons and hiring
some real people would make cus-
tomers happy while creating jobs.


Bin Laden's re-branding of al-Qaida


One thinks of that scene
from "The Wizard of Oz"
where Toto pulls back the
curtain and the "great and pow-
erful Oz" is revealed to be only an
old man manipulating a smoke
and fire machine. "Pay no atten-
tion to that man be-
hind the curtain!"
bellows the Wizard as
the man tries to pull
the covering back into
place.
One suspects that if
he were not reposing
in a watery grave just
now, Osama bin Laden
would be doing some- Leona
thing very similar eona
After all, in the two OTI
months since Navy VOI
SEALS killed him in a
raid, American offi-
cials have released a series of rev-
elations deeply unflattering to his
image as a terrorist mastermind.
There's the unseemly vanity of
him dyeing his beard when he
recorded the video manifestoes
through which he spoke to the
world.
There's the captured video in
which he comes across as an old
man - though he was only 54 -
huddled beneath a blanket
watching himself on television.
There's the report that the raid
on the home of this supposedly as-
cetic, strictly observant Muslim
turned up a cache of pornography
But in some ways, arguably the
most telling revelation is the most
recent. U.S. officials poring over
bin Laden's writings say the


r
H
�c


world's No. 1 terrorist had con-
cluded that he - or, more accu-
rately, al-Qaida - had an image
problem.
Having killed too many Mus-
lims, the group had, he thought,
alienated much of the Muslim
world. Murdering your
customer base will
tend to have that effect
So bin Laden, who
it loudly scorned Ameri-
S can ideals, proposed a
,- i very American solu-
tion. Call it an extrem-
ist makeover
Like Philip Morris
and ValuJet when
SPitts those names became
IER tarnished, like Ken-
DES tucky Fried Chicken
and Gatorade when
they wanted to add
some pizazz to ancient corporate
logos, bin Laden wanted to re-
name al-Qaida. Something like
Taifat al-Tawhed Wal-Jihad, he
wrote. Or Jama'at I'Adat al-Khi-
lafat al-Rashida. Something
snazzy like that.
It suggests the United States
was doing better in the battle for
Muslim hearts and minds than
most of us thought And taken to-
gether, the revelations also sug-
gest a rather Don Draper-like
cynicism lurking at the heart of
religious extremism.
The reference is to the trou-
bled 1960s advertising exec who
is the protagonist ofAMC's popu-
lar drama, "Mad Men." You get
the flavor of him from something
he told a woman in an early


ON VACATION
* Syndicated columnist
Leonard Pitts will resume his
columns after July 18.

episode: "What you call love was
invented by guys like me to sell
nylons." Similarly, what some
frustrated Muslims call devotion
to faith was invented by guys like
bin Laden to sell mass murder. If
we are lucky, that lesson will not
be lost on them.
There are two particularly ef-
fective methods for manipulating
people.
The first is to create fear. Fear-
ful people - the last decade of
American history proves this -
are easily stampeded. The sec-
ond method is to create an image
that moves people to act in a de-
sired way
Bin Laden had mastered both.
In a sense, he put on a show, one
that enjoyed a regrettably long
run before the SEALs closed it
for good. If we of the Western
world were the intended audi-
ence for his performance, one
hopes, now that the curtain has
been pulled back and the wizard
revealed, the disaffected Mus-
lims he used as cannon fodder
and pawns will see the obvious:
They were, too.
--*--A
Leonard Pitts is a columnist for
the Miami Herald, 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132;
lpitts@miamiherald. com.


Sound OFF


Seniors' budgets
About 25 years ago, there was a
lot of publicity about the fact that
seniors were buying dog food for
their own consumption because
they couldn't afford to eat on what
Social Security benefits were. If
Congress cuts Social Se-
curity benefits as they are
attempting to, seniors L
won't even be able to af-
ford dog food. It's about
time these tax loopholes
were closed for multimil- f
lionaires and mega-corpo-
rations when they pay no
tax or next to nothing. CAL
Maybe then the deficit 563
would be under control. 563-
The loud crowd
It's amazing to me that some
of the loudest complainers of the
King's Bay becoming a refuge, so
someone can actually manage it
and get our water quality back,
are some of the biggest violators
out there when they're fishing
and boating. Some of the biggest
violators are the biggest voices at
these meetings. They never come
out for anything to help clean the
bay or take care of the water
quality. But take away their little
speed zone and, oh, my gosh!
Who's to say that if they got out
there and got some tickets,
they'd move away anyway?
Same old issues
Every four years, the Republi-
cans drag out the gays and the
abortion issues. I just can't get
over it. Don't some of the Repub-
licans think that maybe they're
voting against their own self-inter-
ests, primarily because of these
two issues? I mean it's not even,
you don't have to be too terribly
brilliant to realize that every four
years, they drag out those same
two issues. And then everything
else, like Medicare and all things
that are important to these peo-


I


pie, are slipped in there and so
the people vote against their own
selves.
Socialized health care
Hospitalization insurance. Why
does hospitals and doctor cover-
age in England, Canada and Aus-
tria, etc. work? Why does
JND it work there? Why can't
S that work here? Basic cov-
erage could be for all with
a small payment for first
visit to doctors and the
hospital. If you wish to
pick up your own doctor,
you would be charged a
fair fee, an extra fee. We
579 need some kind of hospi-
talization, but having
everybody buy their own
hospitalization is not really legal.
I can't see how that would ever
pass the Supreme Court.
Water and waste
The late Dr. Jessie White stated
that if a manatee crawls up on
your lawn and defecates, the
manatee would be polluting your
lawn. If you dive into King's Bay
and release your bodily waste, or
allow your waterside septic tank
not to function properly or put
your lawn fertilizer where it can
run into the waters, you are pol-
luting the waters of Crystal River.
Flag flagged
I'd just like to make mention
here of the flag at the Lecanto
Post Office. It's fading and it's tat-
tered and it's been like that for a
couple of weeks now. I think that
the postmaster should get out
there and put up a new flag, es-
pecially with the Fourth of July
coming up.
Untenable position
Regarding the Citrus Memorial
Hospital Foundation Board's posi-
tion: I think it's untenable. The
law that was recently passed and
signed by the governor was re-


viewed by four committees before
it went to a vote. In the House, it
passed 115-1 and in the Senate,
38-1. So I don't think that the
hospital's position is really ten-
able. And the fact that Mr. Beaty
is setting aside over $600,000-
some-odd in severance, I think, is
unconscionable. I don't think the
regular employees get that same
benefit.
GOP's goal
Once the budget talks got to
within a 2 percent difference and
the tax increase figure the Repub-
licans wanted and an agreement
looked like it might be possible,
Republicans got up and walked
out of the meeting, proving once
again they had no desire to save
the country. Their only raging de-
sire is to continue childish behav-
ior against a president who is
trying, trying to bring us back.
Keep feds out
Well, I figured you people on
King's Bay would know by now
that anything and everything that
the federal government touches,
it ruins, as it will King's Bay.
Good luck.
Fuzzy math
The White House, our govern-
ment has overspent its budget by
$1.5 million this year alone and
the White House wants to cut
$1.3 trillion in spending over the
next 10 years. You know what?
That ain't very good math. That
don't sound good for us. It might
be good for them, but it ain't
good for us.
Funding fire services
Have you noticed the sheriff
wants to build two new fire sta-
tions but he doesn't even have
any fire trucks to go in them? Of
course, that will come later when
he goes back and asks for several
million dollars. These things are
not cheap.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your
name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and
good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the opin-
ion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a letter
to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will not
be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and good
taste.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Space Coast feels pain of shuttle's end


MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL - Workers at
Kennedy Space Center always knew
the end of the shuttle program would
bring hard times to Florida's Space
Coast.
They just couldn't predict how much
pain.
Some 7,000 jobs are being cut, and
potential replacement positions evap-
orated last year when President
Barack Obama scrapped plans to re-
turn astronauts to the moon.
Soon-to-be-jobless space workers
and those who've already lost their
jobs are now competing for work in a
labor market where more than one in
10 is unemployed.
And the Space Coast is still reeling
from the housing crisis, making it
tougher for workers to sell their homes
and move elsewhere for a job.
"Everything is taking a turn for the
worst, it seems like," said Kevin Smith,
local president of the union for space
center firefighters, paramedics and
workers at emergency landing sites.
"What little is out there, everybody is
competing for."
The Space Coast has faced dire
times before: There was a gap between
the end of NASA's Apollo program in
the mid-1970s and the first shuttle
launch in 1981. But at least space
workers and businesses had the shut-
tle to look forward to at the end of the
six-year hiatus.
No such program exists for workers
like engineer Tony Crisafulli, who will
be laid off two days after Atlantis re-
turns from the last shuttle mission in
July
"We're all out here working, know-
ing that we're losing our jobs in a few
days," said Crisafulli, who has been at
the space center for nearly 23 years.
Space workers had been looking to
the Constellation moon program to
cushion the blow from the shuttle pro-
gram's end. The cancellation of that
project eliminated 2,000 jobs.
"We were all counting on that to take
us through the transition," Crisafulli
said. "At least, that was something."
The Obama administration's space
plan has NASA building a new capsule
and giant rocket to take astronauts to
an asteroid, and eventually Mars. It re-
lies on private companies to build
their own spacecraft to fly cargo and
astronauts to the International Space
Station.
The local jobs agency estimates that
NASA infuses $1.2 billion into
Florida's economy, and that two jobs
are lost for each aerospace job that is
eliminated.
At the height of the shuttle program,
Kennedy Space Center had 17,000 em-
ployees who mostly worked for private


Associated Press
This June 28 picture shows a nearly empty parking lot outside the Rockledge
Mall in Rockledge. An uncertain future faces cities in Florida's "Space Coast" as
the space shuttle program comes to an end.


contractors. After the shuttles retire,
there will be a little over 8,500. They'll
wrap up the shuttle program and pre-
pare the orbiters for museums, work
on unmanned launches and develop
and test the new space capsule.
The space program has a hold on the
area that goes beyond jobs and strikes
at the identity of this region stretching
along Florida's central Atlantic Coast
This was a sleepy coastal area known
for citrus and resort hotels before it
was picked in the late 1950s to be the
site for the United States' blasts into
the space age.
With the launches of Saturn rockets,
the communities of Titusville, Cape
Canaveral, Merritt Island and Cocoa
Beach gained an influx of highly edu-
cated engineers, project managers and
technicians, and aerospace became
the Space Coast's dominant industry
Even the area code is 3-2-1. Elemen-
tary schools are named for the shuttles
and there's Astronaut High School and
Satellite High School. Locals ate at the
Moon Hut restaurant before it closed,
and visitors can sleep in a bed shaped
like a space shuttle at the Best Western
Space Shuttle Inn in Titusville.
Restaurants and businesses already
are feeling the belt-tightening as resi-
dents stay home to save money After
July, it will be a long while before ho-
tels are booked up like they usually
are for shuttle launches. Hundreds of
thousands of spectators pour into Bre-
vard County, which ordinarily is home
to a half million residents.
"Everyone is starting to feel the
pinch. People are not working.
They're economizing," said Donna
Thrash, who runs a jobs workshop for
space workers at Brevard Workforce,
the county's career center. "Every
launch, this area is full of people and


everyone benefits from that. Once
that's gone, it's going to really hit peo-
ple that that isn't coming anymore."
The Space Coast had years to pre-
pare for the end of the space shuttle.
But the announcement in 2004 oc-
curred in a different era - a time
when Florida's unemployment rate
was 3.5 percent, the housing boom was
fueling construction growth and the
Space Coast had the highest property
values in central Florida. Now, unem-
ployment is at 10.6 percent, growth has
disappeared and for-sale signs dot
neighborhoods.
"The number of folks who have
found other work is negligible. You al-
most have to leave the area to find
other work," said Lew Jamieson, local
president of the union for workers
who provide support for shuttle
launches.
The aerospace jobs that would be
natural fits for the laid-off space work-
ers are in places like South Carolina,
Oklahoma and the Pacific Northwest
The Boeing Co. and other aerospace
companies with workers at the space
center are hiring some of their shuttle
workers at airplane factories.
"We don't need rocket scientists to
build commercial aircraft but we need
smart people," said Stephen Davis, a
Boeing spokesman.
But those jobs only number in the
dozens, possibly hundreds at best. And
even if space workers get hired out of
state, they would have to sell their
homes in the worst housing collapse in
decades.
The median value of a home in Cape
Canaveral, the nearest city to the
space center, went from under
$250,000 in 2007 to around $110,000 in
May, according to the real estate web-
site Zillow.


Warming ocean could melt ice faster than thought


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Warm-
ing air from climate change
isn't the only thing that will
speed ice melting near the
poles - so will the warming
water beneath the ice, a new
study points out
Increased melting of ice in
Greenland and parts of
Antarctica has been re-
ported as a consequence of
global warming, potentially
raising sea levels. But little
attention has been paid to
the impact of warmer water
beneath the ice.
Now, Jianjun Yin of the
University of Arizona and
colleagues report the warm-
ing water could mean polar
ice melting faster than had


been expected. Their report
was published Sunday in the
journal Nature Geoscience.
While melting floating ice
won't raise sea level, ice
flowing into the sea from gla-
ciers often reaches the bot-
tom, and grounded ice
melted by warm water
around it can produce added
water to the sea.
"Ocean warming is very
important compared to at-
mospheric warming because
water has a much larger heat
capacity than air," Yin ex-
plained. "If you put an ice
cube in a warm room, it will
melt in several hours. But if
you put an ice cube in a cup
of warm water, it will disap-
pear in just minutes."
In addition, Yin ex-


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plained, if floating ice along
the coastal areas melts it
will allow the flow of gla-
ciers to accelerate, bringing
more ice into the seas.
"This means that both
Greenland and Antarctica
are probably going to melt
faster than the scientific
community previously
thought," co-author Jon-
athan T Overpeck said in a
statement.
Overpeck, co-director of
the University of Arizona's
Institute of the Environ-


ment, said: "This paper adds
to the evidence that we
could have sea level rise by
the end of this century of
around 1 meter and a good
deal more in succeeding
centuries."
The subsurface ocean
along the Greenland coast
could warm as much as 3.6
degrees Fahrenheit by 2100,
the researchers reported.
The warming along the coast
of Antarctica would be
somewhat less, they calcu-
lated, at 0.9 degree F


Study: Oldest

FOIA request dates

back 20 years


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Fed-
eral agencies are still tak-
ing too long to open
records to the public, with
the oldest requests at eight
agencies now dating back
over a decade, a new study
finds.
A report by the National
Security Archive found
continued backlogs and lit-
tle progress more than two
years after President
Barack Obama ordered the
government to respond
more quickly to public re-
quests for records. The
findings were released on
Monday, which is the 45th
anniversary of the U.S.
Freedom of Information
Act.
A public interest group
determined the long-stand-
ing requests for govern-
ment documents were
typically victims of a
lengthy referral process in
which any agency that
claims an ownership stake
in the material can seek to
prevent the release. As a
result, many of the most-
delayed documents involve
the interests of several
agencies.
For instance, the single
oldest FOIA request - one
made to the National
Archives 20 years ago for
various State Department
files about nuclear re-
search from the 1950s - is
likely being held up by a
referral to the Energy De-
partment, said Nate Jones,
the FOIA coordinator at
the National Security
Archive.
The Freedom of Infor-
mation Act requires agen-
cies to respond to a
request within 20 business
days, with the possibility
of a 10-day extension only
under "unusual circum-
stances."
"To really bring the gov-
ernment into a new era of
open government, Presi-
dent Obama needs to force
agencies to deal with their
FOIA problems and tackle
their decrepit requests,"
Jones said.
Other long-standing re-

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quests include those to
presidential libraries,
which typically need clear-
ance from federal agen-
cies. They include a 1995
request to the Reagan
Presidential Library for
documents about "whether
American POWs and MIAs
were left in Southeast
Asia"; a 1998 request to the
George H.W Bush Library
for documents pertaining
to the December 1988
bombing of Pan Am flight
103; and a 2000 request to
the Kennedy Presidential
Library for documents re-
lating to "politics and the
Internal Revenue
Service."
A 1995 request to the Air
Force for documents relat-
ing to Pakistani surface-to-
air missiles also remains
on hold, as well as a 2005
"urgent request" to the
Transportation Depart-
ment for whistleblower
complaints to be used in an
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration
hearing.
The day after his inaugu-
ration in January 2009,
Obama reversed a Bush-
era policy of defending any
legal reason to withhold in-
formation and directed
agencies to release records
whose disclosure wasn't
barred by law or wouldn't
cause foreseeable harm.
Still, open-government ad-
vocates have said that sig-
nificant obstacles remain
to getting access to
information.




























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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Fatal shooting Greek outlook fragie


Associated Press
A police officer heads into
the woods with a police
dog during an investigation
on Renninger Road in Dou-
glass Township, Pa., near
the scene of a fatal shoot-
ing Sunday. A shooting at a
rural home in suburban
Philadelphia killed two peo-
ple, including a child, and
injured three others, au-
thorities said. A manhunt
was under way for the
shooter.

Teams gauge oil
spill damage
LAUREL, Mont. - Teams
of federal and state workers
fanned out along Montana's
Yellowstone River to gauge
the environmental damage
from a ruptured ExxonMobil
pipeline that spewed tens of
thousands of gallons of crude
into the famous waterway.
An Environmental Protec-
tion Agency representative
said Sunday only a small
fraction of the spilled oil is
likely to be recovered.
Agency on-scene coordi-
nator Steve Way said fast
flows along the flooding river
are spreading the oil over a
large area, making it harder
to capture. He said that also
could reduce damage to
wildlife and cropland along
the river.

WorldBRIEFS

Deadly storm


Associated Press
A city worker walks in flood
waters at the Iztapalapa
neighborhood in Mexico
City on Friday. Heavy rains
caused by the remnants of
tropical storm Arlene have
flooded several neighbor-
hoods in Mexico City and
its metropolitan area.
Mexico confirms
11 storm deaths
MEXICO CITY - Mexican
authorities confirmed 11
deaths from Tropical Storm
Arlene and the aftermath of
floods, mudslides and over-
flowing rivers in central Mex-
ico and Gulf Coast states.
State civil protection offi-
cials said five people in Hi-
dalgo, two young children in
Mexico state and a rescue
worker and woman in Ver-
acruz were killed. Most died
after being buried alive in
their homes by mudslides or
drowning in heavy currents
while trying to cross swollen
streams.
Nigeria official:
sect kills five
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria -A
Nigerian official says sus-
pected members of a radical
Muslim sect have killed five
people in the country's restive
northeast.
Three gunmen from the
Boko Haram sect reportedly
shot and killed four people in
the city of Maiduguri late
Saturday. A fifth person was
shot dead Sunday.
Boko Haram, whose name
means "Western education is
sacrilege" in the local Hausa
language, is responsible for a
rash of killings which have
targeted police officers, sol-
diers, politicians and clerics.

-From wire reports


Associated Press
BRUSSELS - Greece was
pulled back from impending
default Saturday, when euro-
zone finance ministers
signed off on a vital loan in-
stallment. But the country's
international creditors are
showing more concern over
whether it can service its
debt in the long run.
Athens will get a $17.39
tranche of its existing res-
cue package by July 15, in
time to meet several bond
repayment deadlines this
month and next, the finance
ministers of the 17 countries
that share the euro said in a
statement Saturday
evening. The eurozone and


the International Monetary
Fund will also continue to
prop up Greece's struggling
economy in the coming
years, with a second pack-
age of aid loans to be final-
ized by September.
While the renewed com-
mitments save Greece from
immediate collapse, even its
international creditors -
long the biggest optimists on
the country's prospects -
are warning that getting
down a debt of 160 percent
of economic output will be a
difficult balancing act.
"The Greek government
debt will remain for many
years at a high level and,
therefore, subject to possi-
ble adverse developments


that cannot be predicted,"
the European Commission,
the EU's executive and one
of the three institutions in
charge of Greece's bailout,
said in a report published
Saturday
Especially lower than ex-
pected economic growth
"would put the debt trajec-
tory on a clearly unsustain-
able upward path," the
commission said.
In an illustration showing
several scenarios for
Greece's debt load, growth
of just 1 percentage point
below expectations would
leave Greece's debt around
170 percent of gross domes-
tic product past 2020, with
the graph pointing firmly


upward.
The report, the basis for
the ministers' decision to re-
lease the July aid installment
and prepare a new bailout, is
the most pessimistic assess-
ment from the commission
yet. Private analysts and
economists have long ques-
tioned the sustainability of
Greece's debt. However, the
European Union, the Euro-
pean Central Bank and the
IMF have so far, at least pub-
licly, upheld their belief that
Greece's situation is
manageable.
The Commission still
maintains it is "not unreal-
istic to assume" that Greece
can cut its deficits to the tar-
gets set out in its bailout


Associated Press
Firefighter Eugene Pino walks away after watching Los Alamos Canyon filled with smoke from the Las Conchas
fire near Los Alamos, N.M., Friday. Authorities allowed about 12,000 Los Alamos fire evacuees to return home
for the first time in nearly a week.





12,000 go home


Los Alamos evacuation order lifted as rain hits wildfire


Associated Press
LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - A smat-
tering of summer rain gave a boost
to firefighters battling a huge for-
est fire near Los Alamos, giving
authorities enough confidence to
allow about 12,000 people to re-
turn home for the first time in
nearly a week.
Residents rolled into town Sun-
day morning, honking their horns
and waving to firefighters as the
word got out that the roadblocks
were lifted and the narrow two
lane highway cut into the side of a
mesa leading to Los Alamos was
open. They had fled en masse on
Monday as the fast-moving fire ap-
proached the city and its nuclear
laboratory
"Thank, you! Thank, You!
Thank, you!," yelled Amy Riehl, an
assistant manager at the Smith's
grocery store as she arrived in Los
Alamos to help keep the store
open for returning residents.
"It's scary, but all of the re-
sources here this time, they were
ready They did a magnificent job,"
said Michael Shields, eyes tearing
up as he returned home to his
apartment in the heart of the town.
The town was last evacuated be-
cause of the 2000 Cerro Grande
fire. That time, residents returned
to a town that had lost 200 homes,
several businesses and had to
cope with damaged utilities and
other county enterprises. This
time around, residents were re-
turning to a town that is com-
pletely intact, although the fire
destroyed 63 homes west of town.
Although the threat to Los
Alamos and the nation's premier
nuclear research lab had passed,
the mammoth wildfire raging in
northern New Mexico was still
threatening sacred sites ofAmeri-
can Indian tribes.
Hundreds of firefighters were
working Sunday to contain the
189-square-mile fire as it burned
through a canyon on the Santa
Clara Pueblo reservation and
threatened other pueblos on the
Pajarito Plateau.
The area, a stretch of mesas that


run more than 15 miles west of
Santa Fe, N.M., includes Los
Alamos and the Los Alamos Na-
tional Laboratory
Authorities said the fire, burn-
ing for eight days Sunday, has been
fueled by an exceptionally dry sea-
son in the Southwest and erratic
winds.
Crews have managed to keep
the fire in Los Alamos Canyon sev-
eral miles upslope from the fed-
eral laboratory, boosting
confidence that it no longer posed
an immediate threat to the facility
or the nearby town. Crews were
helped by rain on Saturday after-
noon that slowed the fire.
"Hopefully we'll get two to three
more days like this and we'll be
fine," operations chiefJayson Coil
said.
The blaze, the largest ever in
New Mexico, reached the Santa
Clara Pueblo's watershed in the
canyon this week, damaging the
area that the tribe considers its
birthplace and scorching 20
square miles of tribal forest. Fire
operations chief Jerome Macdon-
ald said it was within miles of the
centuries-old Puye Cliff
Dwellings, a national historic
landmark.
Tribes were worried that cabins,
pueblos and watersheds could be
destroyed.
"We were also praying on our
knees, we were asking the Creator
in our cultural way to please for-
give us, 'What have we done?"'
Santa Clara Pueblo Gov Walter
Dasheno said. "Bring moisture so
that the Mother Fire can be
stopped. But that was not meant to
be."
About 2,800 tribe members live
in a dusty village nestled in New
Mexico's high desert, near the
mouth of Santa Clara Canyon
where aspen and blue spruce
forests provide relief from the dry
desert and ponds provide water
for irrigation. The canyon is north
of the town of Los Alamos.
Pueblo Fire Chief Mel Tafoya
said it was unclear whether cabins
in the canyon or the ponds sur-
vived the blaze. Members of the


state's congressional delegation
have promised federal help for the
tribe pending a damage assess-
ment.
The tribe also worried that 1.5
million trees planted after the
2000 fire have been destroyed, as
well as work to restore the Rio
Grande cutthroat trout to the
upper headwaters of the Santa
Clara Creek. The tribe called for
emergency federal relief.
To Santa Clara's south, Cochiti
Pueblo was also worried about
damage to ground cover affecting
its watershed.
Archaeological sites at the
northern end of the blaze at Ban-
delier National Monument hold
great significance to area tribes.
About half of the park has burned,
Bandelier superintendent Jason
Lott said.
Meanwhile, hundreds of lab em-
ployees were returning to prepare
operations and thousands of ex-
periments for the scientists and
technicians who were forced to
evacuate days ago. Among the
work put on hold were experi-
ments using two supercomputers
and studies on extending the life
of 1960s-era nuclear bombs.
Employees were checking fil-
ters in air handling systems to en-
sure they weren't affected by
smoke and restarting computer
systems shut down when the lab
closed.
"Once we start operation phases
for the laboratory, it will take
about two days to bring everyone
back and have the laboratory fully
operational," Lab Director
Charles McMillan said.
The blaze remained in Los
Alamos Canyon, which runs past
the old Manhattan Project site and
a 1940s-era dump site of low-level
radioactive waste, as well as the
site of a nuclear reactor that was
demolished in 2003.
Firefighters had planned to
burn out areas near homes west of
the town to remove combustible
material and ensure the fire does-
n't creep through an area burned
in a 2000 blaze, but the rain kept
the fire away, Coil said.


program, and thereby
slowly chip away at its debt.
But the report puts a sizable
question mark over the
country's ability - and will-
ingness - to implement the
reforms its creditors say are
necessary to get the econ-
omy growing again.
"Solvency depends on the
political and social condi-
tions which allow or not the
implementation of the re-
quired policies," the report
cautions.
Eurozone finance min-
istries are trying to come up
with a way of getting banks
and other private creditors
to contribute to a new aid
program.




Policy


helps


abused


workers
Associated Press

SILVER SPRING, Md. -
Employed by a Kenyan
diplomat, Beatrice Oluoch
followed her boss to Amer-
ica expecting to continue
her comfortable nanny posi-
tion at reasonable pay In-
stead, Oluoch claims she
was made to work 13-hour
days, denied overtime pay
and barred from leaving the
house. She cooked and
cleaned during the day and
said she was on-call round-
the-clock for her employer's
two young children.
Her salary? $150 a month.
She felt isolated and
feared retaliation, anxious
if she publicly reported the
mistreatment she could be
fired, lose her visa and get
deported. So she ran off
with a friend and is now
suing her powerful boss for
human trafficking and labor
violations, hoping a new
federal policy will give her
time to remain in the coun-
try as she applies for a new
visa and pursues her abuse
claims in court
The policy change, an-
nounced by U.S. Citizenship
and Immigration Services
in March, permits former
employees of diplomats who
are suing their bosses to re-
main in the country and
legally work while their
cases are pending. Lawyers
and advocates say the
change, though unlikely to
result in a wave of new law-
suits, eases the deportation
threat for abused workers
who have fled their jobs and
lost their visas while en-
abling them to move out
from society's margins as
they report mistreatment.
"For us, it's exciting be-
cause it does remove barri-
ers to people coming
forward if they do have valid
allegations of this type of
abuse," said Luis CdeBaca,
a State Department ambas-
sador responsible for com-
bating human trafficking.
Oluoch arrived in
Bethesda, Md., on a visa in
July 2006 to serve as a nanny
to Stella Kerubo Orina, who
worked for the Kenya Mis-
sion to the United Nations.
Oluoch said she had worked
for her in Kenya without
problems, but the job in
America immediately dete-
riorated.
She said she was perpetu-
ally on call to her boss's two
young children, could not use
the telephone, suffered ver-
bal abuse and had her pass-
port confiscated. Though her
initial contract guaranteed
her $8 per hour, she said she
was paid just $150 one month
and $50 the next, with the re-
maining $100 sentto her fam-
ily in Kenya.
Oluoch's lawyer, Aaron
Uslan, likens his client's em-
ployment to slavery and said
Oluoch stands to directly


benefit from the new policy











SPORTS


* MLB All-Star rosters
announced/B2




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB All Stars/B2
. Golf/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Entertainment/B5
0 Classifieds/B8


Kniss pulls off Crystal River triathlon three-peat


LARRY BUGG
Sports correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER- Qui-
etly, Robert Kniss has
carved himself out a
triathlon dynasty.
Saturday morning, the
Zephyrhills resident won
his third straight Crystal
River Sprint Triathlon at
Fort Island Gulf Beach.
Kniss had a time of one
hour and 44 seconds. He
also won the Memorial Day
race and the 2010 Labor Day
race.


Three straight triumphs
are unusual since most
champs don't even repeat in
triathlon races.
"I got three in a row," said
Kniss. "It has been a bit of a
lucky streak. It was tough. I
had a tough week of training
this week. I was feeling good
during the race. I had side
stitches on the run. I'm
doing my best to try to win
the series. I really started
upping my training. I work
as an engineer in the city of
Lakeland.
"They always put on a


great race here. I am trying
to get more people from
Lakeland to come up here.
I'll get them up here. I want
to thank the race director
for putting on a great race."
Aaron Thomas of Semi-
nole overcame some sick-
ness to take second with a
time of 1:01:08.
Kids don't try this at
home.
Thomas, 21, had to be
helped into a chair and
water was poured on him
after he finished his race.
"I have been sick all


week," said Thomas. "I was
real sick this morning. I al-
most didn't do it. I was
throwing up. It felt good on
the bike. I couldn't eat any-
thing. I had no energy."
Celia Dubey of Tarpon
Springs brought 20 athletes
from her Total Fitness
Health Club and Spa and
showed them how to handle
a triathlon. The 39-year-old
took the woman's title with
a time of 1:09:04.
"I probably have won five
titles overall here," said
Dubey "The temperature


was easily 20 degrees
(lower) than we are used to
training in. It was in the 90s
for our training. It was beau-
tiful. Chris (race director
Moling) has done a lot of im-
provements. He really has
put on a great race. He has
put on flowers. He is a class
act. He is the reason this
sport has grown over the
years. I have probably won a
dozen (triathlon titles) over-
all. I won a national cham-
pionship in 2007. I am going
to the world championship
in September in Spain.


"We have over 30 athletes
but 20 are here today I was
a really strong runner and
got injured. I trained in the
bike. I started swimming
when I was 27. My bike is
very strong. There are a lot
of very strong athletes
here."
Citrus High cross country
standout Tim Wenger is
building up some en-
durance. He finished 31st
overall with a 1:09:14.
"It felt pretty good," said


Page B4


TOP OF THE WORLD


Associated Press
Serbia's Novak Djokovic lifts the trophy after defeating Spain's Rafael Nadal in the Wimbledon men's singles final in England on Sunday.


Djokovic defeats Nadal for Wimbledon title


Serb takes over No. 1 world ranking


Associated Press


WIMBLEDON, England -
Until Sunday, Novak Djokovic
never managed to win a grass-
court tournament of any sort, let
alone Wimbledon.
Until Sunday, Djokovic never
was able to beat Rafael Nadal in
a Grand Slam match, let alone a
final.
Until this marvelous - and
nearly perfect - year, Djokovic
was very good. Now he's great.
After outrunning, outswinging
and, for stretches, dominating de-
fending champion Nadal, win-
ning 6-4, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3 for his first
title at the All England Club and
third major championship over-
all, Djokovic crouched on Center
Court, reached down, plucked
some blades of grass and shoved
them in his mouth.
"I felt like an animal. I wanted


to see how it tastes. It tastes
good," Djokovic said later, his
eyes wide and his smile conta-
gious. "It came spontaneously, re-
ally I didn't plan to do it. I didn't
know what to do for my excite-
ment and joy"
Putting together one of the best
seasons by any athlete in any
sport in recent memory, Djokovic
is 48-1 with eight titles in 2011, in-
cluding major trophies from the
Australian Open and Wimbledon.
On Monday, he will rise from No.
2 to No. 1 in the ATP rankings,
overtaking Nadal, a switch that
was guaranteed by virtue of
Djokovic's victory in the semifi-
nals Friday
"I want to win more Grand
Slams," said Djokovic, the first
man since Andre Agassi in 1992
to win his first grass title at Wim-
bledon. "I will not definitely stop


The person spoke on condition of
anonymity because the deal was not
ready to be announced.
The switch was first reported by Sports-
Business Journal.
ESPN had owned the rights to extensively
televise early rounds of Wimbledon, with
NBC picking up coverage as the tournament
progressed, culminating with the "Breakfast
at Wimbledon" broadcasts of the finals.

manship - check out his spot-on
impersonations of other pros, in-
cluding Nadal, on YouTube -
and a hard-to-explain propensity
for losing, or even quitting during,
late-round matches at majors.
Right now, though, the 24-year-
old from Serbia is the total pack-
age, with the bona fides to prove it
He credits a handful of factors
with helping him truly excel re-
cently: more maturity; confi-
dence from helping Serbia win
See Page B4


NEWYORK -Wimbledon is leaving
NBC after 43 years and appears headed to
ESPN.
NBC said in a statement Sunday that
"while we would have liked to have contin-
ued our relationship, we were simply outbid."
A person with knowledge of the negoti-
ations confirms that ESPN is working on a
contract with the All England Club to tele-
vise all of the Grand Slam tournament.

here, even though I have
achieved (the) two biggest things
in my life in three days."
Which, perhaps, is why he en-
gaged in such a lengthy and orig-
inal celebration, even tossing
several rackets into the stands,
the sort of crowd-pleasing ges-
ture for which Djokovic (it's pro-
nounced JOE-ko-vich) long has
been known.
Indeed, early in his career,
Djokovic stood out less for his
shot-making than for his show-


Damon has four RBIs in


Rays' win over St. Louis


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG-Johnny Damon
had an All-Star caliber weekend.
Damon drove in four runs, Jeremy
Hellickson pitched into the eighth in-
ning to stop a personal four-game losing
streak and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the
St Louis Cardinals 8-3 on Sunday
"It's just everything that he does,"
Rays manager Joe Maddon said of
Damon, who was not named to the All-
Star team. "We need that kind of influ-
ence here. He just handles it as well as
Tampa Bay Rays Johnny Damon and Ben
Zobrist (18) celebrate during the sixth in-
ning of their game against the Cardinals
on Sunday.
Associated Press


it possibly can be handled. The way he
goes about his business."
The Rays designated hitter has 25 ca-
reer games with at least four RBIs.
"I've appreciated him for years," St.
Louis manager Tony La Russa said.
"He's had a great career"
Damon, who had four hits in Saturday
night's 5-1 win over the Cardinals, went
3 for 5 and moved past Harry Heilmann
and Lave Cross into 69th place on the
all-time hits list with 2,661. His three-
run triple in the eighth made it 8-3.
"Things just happened to go right
these past two games," Damon said. "We
beat a very good team. A team that will
possibly be playoff bound and World Se-
ries bound. It's good to beat a very good
See . Page B3


ON


Watney


flawless


at AT&T
Associated Press
NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. -
Nick Watney capped off an
amazing weekend at Aron-
imink to win the AT&T Na-
tional on Sunday, moving him
to No. 10 in the world and atop
the PGA Tour money list for the
first time in his career
Watney closed with a 4-under
66 on a steamy afternoon in the
Philadelphia suburbs, making
three big par saves and three
birdies on the
front nine to
seize control,
then holding Te
off a late
charge by K.J.
Choi for a two-
shot victory.
And to think Nick
that with only Whatney
27 holes left in wins the AT&T
the tourna- tournament.
ment, Watney
was trying to keep from getting
left behind. Ten birdies, an
eagle and no bogeys later, he
was posing with the silver tro-
phy of a Liberty Bell and won-
dering how much better he
could get.
"It's a very addictive feeling
to be out there and under the
gun," said Watney, who had a
62-66 weekend at Aronimink.
"To be able to hit good shots
and putts is why I play, really."
Watney finished on 13-under
267, tying the tournament
See /Page B4



Tired of


lockouts?

going on for months, and
the NBA lockout could
drag on even longer. The word
lockout itself is becoming an un-
welcome addition to bar room
debates across the country
But maybe lockouts aren't
such a bad idea after all. Imag-
ine what would happen if we
locked out some of these sports
figures:
BUBBA
WATSON: I
Take away
this guy's
passport
before he::
gives new
meaning
to the term
U g 1 y Tim Dahlberg
American. AP
Watson's
grand ad- COLUMNIST
venture in
France last week began with
him wondering out loud what
the Arc de Triomphe and the
Louvre were, then somehow
got worse. The golfer com-
plained about everything but
the food after missing the cut in
the French Open, and said it
might be his last time playing
in Europe. Watson later recon-
sidered after being told the
British Open - one of golf's
four majors - was in England.
DEREK JETER: I under-
stand the need to instinctively
bow to the greatness that is
Derek Jeter, but even he should
be embarrassed to be starting
at shortstop for the American
League in the All-Star game.
Hold a parade for him if you
want when he reaches 3,000
hits, but save the starting job
See Page B4


Wimbledon leaving NBC, appears headed to ESPN





B2 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


SPORTS


Associated Press


Toronto Blue Jays' Jose Bautista was the leading vote-getter for this year's All-Star game.


Smallmarket teams show well in AllStar voting


Associated Press


NEW YORK - A team known
for sausage races more than pen-
nant races made quite an All-Star
splash.
The Milwaukee trio of Ryan
Braun, Prince Fielder and Rickie
Weeks won fan elections to start in
the National League lineup, send-
ing a mini-Brew Crew to join the
usual slew of Yankees, Red Sox
and Phillies at baseball's glitter-
fest.
"It means the Milwaukee Brew-
ers have arrived on the national
scene," Braun, the top NL vote-
getter, said Sunday
Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez
are among six Yankees on the AL
roster for the All-Star game July 12
in Phoenix. Once again, New York
had the most players picked.
Philadelphia, having built the
best record in the majors on pitch-
ing, provided aces Roy Halladay,
Cliff Lee and Cole Hamels. Adrian
Gonzalez and David Ortiz led a
Boston quartet. The World Series
champion San Francisco Giants
added four arms.
The small-market Brewers cel-
ebrated their largest haul of All-
Star starters. Milwaukee often
draws a lot of attention for its in-
game dash of meat mascots - the
team, however, has made the play-
offs just once since 1982.
"A lot of times - and I know the
fans are a huge part of what we do
- but sometimes the fans vote for
who they like and the superstar
that's been there before and may
not even be having a good year,"
Brewers manager Ron Roenicke
said. "It's nice to see our guys
voted in and those are the top
three guys at their positions.
That's really cool."
Fielder and Weeks were among
several players who overcame vot-
ing deficits in the final week. Mets
shortstop Jose Reyes, Dodgers
outfielder Matt Kemp and Detroit
catcher Alex Avila also rallied late
to earn starting spots.
Toronto outfielder Jose
Bautista, the reigning home run
champion, drew a record 7.4 mil-
lion votes. He became the first
Blue Jays player elected to start
since Carlos Delgado in 2003.
Bautista homered Saturday
off Halladay, then hit his major
league-leading 27th homer
Sunday against Philadelphia's
Cliff Lee.
"People are recognizing that
you're doing well and for me it's
been in three different territories
- the United States and Canada
and the Dominican," Bautista
said. "I can't even describe how
good that feels."
The AL starting lineup: Gonza-
lez at first base, Robinson Cano at
second, Jeter at shortstop, Ro-
driguez at third base, with
Bautista, Josh Hamilton and Cur-
tis Granderson in the outfield,
Avila behind the plate and Ortiz at
designated hitter.
The NL starters: Fielder at first,
Weeks at second, Reyes at short,
Placido Polanco at third, with
Braun, Kemp and Lance Berkman
in the outfield and Brian McCann
catching. San Francisco manager
Bruce Bochy will choose the DH.
Fans can vote on MLB.com
through Thursday for the 34th
player on each side. Injuries are
sure to impact the final rosters,
too - three-time NL MVP Albert
Pujols was left off while recover-
ing from a broken left wrist and


Quotes from around the majors about the AL and NL rosters announced
Sunday for the All-Star game July 12 in Phoenix:
"It wasn't even on my mind. I was actually planning what I was going to do on the off-days. Probably was going to
stay in a condo on the beach that my buddy has. Maybe go out on the water in a boat. Just relax."
Tampa Bay outfielder Matt Joyce.

"It would have been a great honor to start, but they got it right and hopefully one of these years I am starting ...
The guy's leading the league in hitting, he can play great defense, he does so much for a team. We're different play-
ers. We both the same position but I'm a guy that has some power and drives in runs, he's a guy that gets on base
and scores runs. Very exciting player."
Colorado shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, overtaken by Jose Reyes of the Mets in the last week of fan voting.

"My dad usually can't shut up, but when I called him he had just seen it on TV and he was speechless. He couldn't
say anything. It was nice to see him react that way. My mom and dad and brother and sister are all going to make
the trip."
Kansas City reliever Aaron Crow, one of 24 first-timers picked.

"I thought we'd have a few more guys, yeah. I also know how it works. It's not a fair process. The process you do,
I've been through it. I would never criticize. ... The rules they have, there's good reasons, I understand them. But if
you're going to abide by those rules, guys are going to get left off. You just have to know that going in."
Boston manager Terry Francona.

"It would be very nice to get in the game. Last time I went in '09 and didn't get to play, it's kind of an empty feeling
a little bit."
Houston outfielder Hunter Pence.

"It will be new for me. You always want to shoot to start the game and now I'll finally have the chance to do that."
Atlanta catcher Brian McCann, the All-Star game MVP last year. This will be his sixth All-Star appearance and first start.

"It will be huge simply because Michael can handle every position on the infield, so that gives me versatility right
there and that's exactly what he's done for the Texas Rangers so far this year. He's handled many positions and it
hasn't affected the style of play Michael goes out there and plays with."
AL manager Ron Washington of Texas on reserve Michael Young of the Rangers.

"I know he's going to try to pick a bomb squad, you know what I'm saying?"
Boston DH David Ortiz, captain of the AL Home Run Derby team, on NL Derby captain Prince Fielder.

"Around last week my wife said we need to know if we should buy tickets. They're the ones that prepare everything
and do everything. I told her I didn't know. She's like, 'Well, it seems like you're going because you have a lot of votes.'"
NL starting third baseman Placido Polanco of Phillies.


Reyes is nursing a hamstring
problem.
Once again, the league that wins
will get home-field advantage in
the World Series. Led by McCann,
the NL won last year for the first
time since 1996.
The Giants put pitchers Tim
Lincecum, Matt Cain, Brian Wil-
son and Ryan Vogelsong on the 13-
man staff.
Vogelsong will certainly be
among the feel-good stories in Ari-
zona. At 33, he'd spent the previ-
ous four years in Japan and the
minors before getting called up
early this season.
"There's never been a time in
my career when this seemed like
even a realistic possibility," he
said, choking up while discussing
his selection. "A year ago, almost
to the day, I got released and did-
n't know if I would ever pitch
again."
Jeter, a 12-time All-Star set to
come off the disabled list Monday,
will be among the half-dozen Yan-
kees heading to the desert. Also
going are 14-time All-Star Ro-
driguez, Cano, Granderson, closer
Mariano Rivera and backup
catcher Russell Martin.
The 37-year-old Jeter always
seems to be a lightning rod when it
comes to awards and honors,
ratcheting up the debate of popu-
larity vs. production. He's in the
midst of another down year and
has been hurt - Cleveland short-
stop Asdrubal Cabrera is having a
breakout season and made the AL
team as a backup, deserving
Jhonny Peralta of Detroit was left
off.
The Yankees own the best
record in the AL, although two of
their stars were among the no-
table omissions: CC Sabathia, tied
for the major league high in wins,
and first baseman Mark Teixeira,
among the leaders in homers and
RBIs.


The rival Red Sox put four play-
ers on the team: Gonzalez, Ortiz,
pitcher Josh Beckett and out-
fielder Jacoby Ellsbury
"Seems like the Yankees always
take care of all the All-Star voting
every year, so it's just disappoint-
ing to not see more Red Sox on
that team," Boston ace Jon Lester
said.
Avila, however, overtook Martin
in the final week of balloting.
"He's got much better numbers
than I do. I'm glad he's going to get
the start," Martin said of Avila. "I
was kind of worried about that ac-
tually"
Texas manager Ron Washington
will guide the AL team. Rangers
pitcher C.J. Wilson made the club
over Sabathia.
"There wasn't a whole lot of
choices on left-handed relievers
and C.J. has the experience of
doing that," Washington said.
"He's deserving, as far as I'm con-
cerned, to be on the All-Star team,
so I chose him."
This year's squad includes 13
first-time All-Stars in the AL and
11 in the NL. Among them will be
closer Joel Hanrahan, Pittsburgh's
lone representative.
Hanrahan said he won't mind
changing his All-Star break vaca-
tion plans.
"I think it will be a lot more fun
than going to a furniture shop.
They say it takes three months to
get a couch - wanted to see one
and get it on order," he said.
On the ballot for the extra AL
player are outfielders Alex Gor-
don of Kansas City and Adam
Jones of Baltimore, White Sox first
baseman Paul Konerko, Detroit
DH Victor Martinez and Tampa
Bay second baseman Ben Zobrist.
"I've been around long enough
to know how it goes. This is a
tough process because you have
the fan vote, the player vote, every
team is going to be represented,"


Konerko said. "I know it's very
possible that when you play the
position I play there will be some-
body left without a chair."
Candidates for the final NL spot
are outfielders Andre Ethier of
the Dodgers, Mike Morse of the
Nationals and Shane Victorino of
the Phillies, first baseman Todd
Helton of Colorado and pitcher
Ian Kennedy of the Diamond-
backs.
Bochy said it wasn't easy to fill
out the rosters.
"It felt like bamboo being stuck
up my fingernails," he joked.
"Yeah, we enjoyed the process.
But we also are thoughtful of the
guys who were deserving that we
couldn't find a spot for. There's
quite a few good names out there,
but that's every year and that
never will change."
Among two themes sure to at-
tract interest at the All-Star game
are the heat - it was 118 degrees
in Phoenix this week and even
though the ballpark has a re-
tractable roof, some of the festivi-
ties are outdoors - and Arizona's
immigration law.
The law requires immigrants to
carry their registration documents
and police who are enforcing
other laws to question the immi-
gration status of those they sus-
pect are in the country illegally.
Last year, several All-Stars said
they would boycott the game if
picked.
Atlanta pitcher Jair Jurrjens, a
first-time All-Star and a native of
Curacao, said the Arizona politics
were not a concern to him.
"I don't try to think about stuff I
don't have control of. They need to
do what they need to do to make it
safe for the people. If they need to
do that under the law, everybody
knows a lot of people do bad stuff
and they're just trying to be safe,"
he said.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Garmin-


Cervelo


wins team


time trial


at Tour
Associated Press

LES ESSARTS, France (AP)
- He's a 30-something Ameri-
can, a retired former rider and
crowned with success at the
Tour de France.
And Jonathan Vaughters is
also a leading anti-doping cru-
sader in cycling.
Sunday afternoon, Garmin-
Cervelo riders hoisted Vaugh-
ters, their manager, in the air in
glory after the nine-man squad
won the Tour's team time trial
in Stage 2, a flat 14 miles in and
around Les Essarts in western
France.
Competing in its fourth Tour,
Garmin-Cervelo was popping
the champagne after its first-
ever stage win at cycling's great-
est race.
For Vaughters, the victory was
especially sweet because Thor
Hushovd of Norway - a
Garmin-Cervelo rider and for-
mer teammate years ago - took
the yellow jersey off Philippe
Gilbert, a Belgian who won the
first stage.
"This is an extraordinary
dream, I'm very proud, I'm very
happy to take the jersey - and
that the team won the stage,"
said Hushovd, who won the
team time trial at the 2001 Tour
with Vaughters when both rode
for now-defunct French squad
Credit Agricole. "This is a great
day, we did a really good team
effort, everything worked per-
fectly"
The Norwegian leads team-
mate David Millar in second,
with the same time. Cadel Evans
of Australia is third, 1 second
back.
Vaughters calls Garmin-
Cervelo "an anti-doping team.
We are not an anti-ex-doper
team," pointing to Millar, who
served a two-year doping ban.
The 38-year-old and former
teammate of seven-time Tour
champion Lance Armstrong is
one of the most vocal opponents
of doping in cycling and has
sought to build a clean team. He
said the sport has made impor-
tant strides to rid drug cheats
from the peloton, but the work
isn't yet complete.
Some in cycling, Vaughters
said, think "'if I talk about it, it's
just going to be in the newspa-
per more, then it's going to give
the public the idea that every-
one is doing it' - which in my
opinion, is the exact opposite of
what is true."
But when asked if he had
been involved in doping him-
self, Vaughters declined to an-
swer
"A lot of the energy and the
passion I have now that I put
into anti-doping is derived from
my past mistakes and my past
experiences," he told The Asso-
ciated Press. "Beyond that, I
don't want to get into it."
"I want the focus to be on the
riders who are racing today,"
Vaughters said.
Those riders, too, have a hard
time deflecting questions about
doping.
Defending champion Alberto
Contador has been riding amid
controversy. He tested positive
for the banned muscle builder
clenbuterol during the Tour last
year, but has denied any wrong-
doing. The Spanish three-time
Tour winner could be stripped
of his latest title if the Court of
Arbitration for Sport rules
against him next month.
Some Tour fans have been un-
forgiving: He again faced road-
side boos on Sunday Worse, he
lost even more time.
After losing time because of a
crash in Saturday's stage, Con-
tador lost even more Sunday as
his Saxo Bank team finished 28
seconds behind Garmin-
Cervelo. He is 75th overall, 1:42
behind Hushovd.
Cycling's image has been bat-
tered by multiple doping scan-
dals in recent years, and some
linger still.
U.S. federal authorities are
investigating whether Arm-
strong and his former U.S.


Postal team participated in a
systematic doping program.
Armstrong, who won the Tour
every year from 1999-2005, has
steadfastly denied doping and
has never failed a drug test.
Vaughters, a former member
of the U.S. Postal team, said he
has not been contacted by spe-
cial investigator Jeff Novitsky
but would abide by the law if
asked to testify
In recent years the Interna-
tional Cycling Union, respond-
ing to the ever present doping
scandals, has put in place some
of the most stringent anti-doping
measures in sport- in hopes of
both catching those who dope
now and dissuading young rid-
ers from doing so.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NewYork
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
A L Baltimore


NL


MLB BASEBALL


W L
50 32
49 34
47 37
41 44
36 45


Philadelphia
Atlanta
NewYork
Washington
Florida


East Division
GB WCGB

12 -
4 2/2
10/2 9
13/2 12


East Division
GB WCGB

4 -
10/2 6/2
11 7
15 11


Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City




Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011 B3


Central Division
GB WCGB

/2 5
3/2 8
8 12/2
11 15/2


Central Division
GB WCGB
- 4
- 4
1/2 5/2
2 6
10 14
16 20


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland





San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
GB WCGB

1 6/2
3 8/2
6'2 12



West Division
GB WCGB

3 4
6'2 7/2
10 11
10'2 11/2


INTERLEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 5, Toronto 3
Chicago White Sox 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Cleveland 3, Cincinnati 1
N.Y.Yankees 5, N.Y Mets 2
Boston 10, Houston 4
San Francisco 15, Detroit 3
Atlanta 5, Baltimore 4
Milwaukee 8, Minnesota 7
Tampa Bay 5, St. Louis 1
Florida 9, Texas 5
Colorado 9, Kansas City 6
Arizona 4, Oakland 2
L.A. Angels 7, L.A. Dodgers 1
San Diego 1, Seattle 0
Sunday's Games
Detroit 6, San Francisco 3
Toronto 7, Philadelphia 4
Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 5
N.Y Mets 3, N.Y Yankees 2, 10 innings
Baltimore 5, Atlanta 4
Tampa Bay 8, St. Louis 3
Boston 2, Houston 1
Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 7
Chicago Cubs 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Kansas City 16, Colorado 8
Oakland 7, Arizona 2
Seattle 3, San Diego 1
Florida at Texas, (LATE)
L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, (LATE)
Monday's Games
Toronto (Morrow 4-4) at Boston (Lackey 5-7),
1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 8-6) at Minnesota (Duensing
5-7), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 7-5) at Oakland (McCarthy 1-
4), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (A.J.Burnett 8-6) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 9-4), 6:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 3-9) at Chicago White Sox
(Buehrle 6-5), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Jakubauskas 2-1) at Texas (C.Lewis
7-7), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Furbush 1-1) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro 3-
3), 9:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh 10, Washington 2
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 2-4) at Washington
(Zimmermann 5-7), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-7) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 4-
9), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 9-5) at Milwaukee (Marcum
7-3), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 4-9) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 6-6), 5:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Worley 3-1) at Florida (Nolasco 5-
4), 6:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-2) at St. Louis (C.Carpen-
ter 3-7), 6:15 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 3-7) at Atlanta (Hanson 9-
4), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Capuano 7-7) at L.A. Dodgers (R.De
La Rosa 3-3), 9:10 p.m.




RAYS
Continued from Page B1


team, especially here at
home, where we haven't
been playing well."
Three of Damon's team-
mates, pitchers David Price
and James Shields, along
with outfielder Matt Joyce
were named before the
game to the 2011 AL All-Star
team.
"It's awesome," Maddon
said. "I had no idea how it
was going to shape up."
Hellickson (8-7) allowed
three runs and six hits in 7
1-3 innings. The Rays had
been outscored 20-1 during
the right-hander's skid.
Kyle Farnsworth pitched
the final 12-3 innings for his
17th save, entering with a
runner on second and one
out in the eighth. After re-
tiring Matt Holliday on a fly-
ball to right and walking
Lance Berkman, the closer
struck out David Freese.
Berkman and Yadier
Molina homered for the
Cardinals. Kyle Lohse (8-5)
gave up five runs and seven
hits over 5 1-3 innings.


St. Louis


Tampa Bay


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Theriotss 4 01 0 Damondh 5 1 3 4
Jay rf 4 0 1 0 Zobrist2b 5 0 0 0
Hollidylf 4 1 1 0 Joycerf 5 1 1 0
Brkmndh 3 1 1 2 BUptoncf 3 1 2 1
Freese3b 4 00 0 Ktchmlb 4 0 1 0
Rasmscf 4 00 0 Rugginlf 4 0 0 0
YMolinc 3 1 1 1 Jasoc 3 2 2 1
Descals ph 1 00 0 SRdrgz3b 4 1 1 0
MHmltlb 3 01 0 EJhnsnss 3 2 2 1
Schmkr2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 33 36 3 Totals 36812 7
St. Louis 010 002 000 - 3
Tampa Bay 001 022 03x - 8
E-Schumaker (1). LOB-St. Louis 6, Tampa
Bay 7. 2B-Theriot (14), M.Hamilton (3),
Damon (15), Joyce (20), B.Upton (13), Jaso 2
(12), S.Rodriguez (14), E.Johnson (4). 3B-
Damon (3). HR-Berkman (22), YMolina (5).
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
LohseL,8-5 51-37 5 4 0 2
Motte 2-33 0 0 0 1
Valdes 11-30 1 1 2 2
Tallet 2-3 2 2 2 1 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson W,8-7 71-36 3 3 1 2
FarnsworthS,17-19 12-30 0 0 2 1
Motte pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Kerwin
Danley; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Doug
Eddings.
T-2:45. A-26,819 (34,078).


Mets 3, Yankees 2, (10) Red Sox 2, Astros 1


NEW YORK- Pinch-hitter Ronny
Paulino came through with a tying sin-
gle off Mariano Rivera, Jason Bay
drove home the winning run in the 10th
inning and the feisty NewYork Mets
ended the Yankees'seven-game win-
ning streak with a 3-2 victory Sunday.
Playing without an ailing Jose
Reyes, the Mets were shut down by
Freddy Garcia for seven innings before
rallying against Rivera in the ninth to
avoid a Subway Series sweep at Citi
Field.
With two outs and nobody on in the
ninth, Bay walked on a full-count pitch.
He went to third on Lucas Duda's sin-
gle and scored the tying run when
Paulino punched a 1-2 delivery
through the right side.
Rivera, selected for his 12th All-Star
team earlier in the day, dropped his
head on the mound after his fourth
blown save in 25 chances this season.
New York (A) New York (N)
ab rhbi ab r h bi


Gardner If 4 120
Grand. cf 3 001
Teixeira lb 5 010
AI.Rod. 3b 5 0000
Cano2b 4 120
Swisherrf 4011
Robertson p0 000
Ma.Rivera p 0 000
Posadaph 0 000
Ayalap 00000
Loganp 000
Noesip 00000
Martin c 5 010
R.Penass 4 0000
FGarciap 2 000
Dickerson rf 1 0 10
Totals 37 2 82


Pagan cf 30 0
Turner 2b 40 0
Beltran rf 51 1
Dan.Murphy 3b5 0 3
Bay If 41 2
Dudalb 40 1
Thole c 30 0
R.Paulino ph-c 1 0 1
R.Tejada ss 40 0
Dickey p 10 1
Pridie ph 1 0 0
Beato p 00 0
Isringhausen p 0 0 0
Harris ph 00 0
Fr.Rodriguez p 00 0
Hairston ph 01 0
Totals 35 3 9


NewYork(A)000010 010 0 - 2
New York (N)100 000 001 1 - 3
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-R.Pena 2 (5), Turner (8). DP-New York
(A) 2. LOB-New York (A) 11, New York (N) 9.
2B-Teixeira (14), Cano (19), Martin (7), Bel-
tran (23). 3B-Gardner (5), Cano (5). SB-
Granderson (15). CS-Dan.Murphy (5).
S-F.Garcia, Pagan. SF-Granderson.


HOUSTON - Boston ace Josh
Beckett and a trio of his teammates
learned before the game that they
were headed to the All-Star game.
Before they could celebrate the
honor, the Red Sox had to handle the
Houston Astros to end this nine-game
road trip with a winning record.
Beckett pitched a gem and the Red
Sox scored the go-ahead run on a
walk in the ninth inning for a 2-1 win
over the Astros on Sunday and the se-
ries sweep to accomplish that goal.
Beckett (7-3) allowed five hits, a run
and no walks while striking out a sea-
son-high 11 in eight innings.
"He was great," Red Sox manager
Terry Francona said of Beckett."He
had to be because we didn't have a
whole lot going either."
Beckett said he tried not to think
about his selection too much before
the game.
"It's one of those deals where you
don't want it to be a distraction," he
said.
Beckett will be joined by teammates
David Ortiz at designated hitter, Jacoby
Ellsbury in the outfield and Adrian
Gonzalez at first base.


Boston

Ellsury cf
Pedroia 2b
AdGnzl lb
Youkils 3b
J.Drew rf
DMcDnph-
Reddck If
YNavrr ss
D.Ortiz ph
Scutaro ss
Varitek c
Beckett p
Sutton ph
Papeln p


Totals
Boston


IP H R ER BB SO Houston


New York (A)
FGarcia 7 6 1 1 0 1
Robertson H,18 1 0 0 0 2 2
Ma.Rivera BS,4-251 2 1 1 1 1
AyalaL,1-2 1-3 0 1 0 1 0
Logan 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Noesi 0 1 0 0 0 0
New York (N)
Dickey 5 2 1 1 2 3
Beato 2 1 0 0 0 1
Isringhausen 1 2 1 1 1 0
Fr.RodriguezW,2-22 3 0 0 1 0
Noesi pitched to 1 batter in the 10th.
HBP-by Ayala (Turner).
Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First, Ted
Barrett; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Brian
Knight.
T-3:25. A-41,513 (41,800).



Tigers 6, Giants 3

DETROIT - The Detroit Tigers
capped a feel-good day with some
sadness.
Magglio Ordonez hit a go-ahead,
two-run single with two outs in the sev-
enth inning and Detroit went on to beat
the San Francisco Giants 6-3 Sunday.
The Tigers found out at least four of
them were All-Stars before the game,
but no one was in the mood to cele-
brate the win or the selections because
pitching coach Rick Knapp was fired
soon after the final out.
"Mixed emotions, obviously'" man-
ager Jim Leyland said.'We just felt like
it wasn't working."
Rick Porcello (7-6) gave up three
runs and five hits over seven innings in
a much-needed performance for De-
troit's suddenly shaky rotation. He be-
came the fifth pitcher since 1919 to
have three wild pitches and hit three
batters in a game.
"A little bit wild, but his stuff was
much better," Leyland said.
Joaquin Benoit pitched the eighth,
getting a lead-saving catch from left
fielder Ryan Raburn.
San Francisco Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Rownd cf
Burriss 2b
PSndvl lb
Huff dh
C.Ross If
Schrhlt rf
BCrwfr ss
MTejad 3b
CStwrt c
Burrell ph
Whitsd c


4 01 0 Dirkscf 3 0 0 0
2 1 0 0 JhPerltph-ss 0 1 0 0
5 1 1 0 Boeschlf-rf 4 2 2 1
3 1 1 0 C.Wells ph-rf 0 0 0 0
5 0 2 1 Ordonz rf 4 01 2
5 02 0 AJcksncf 1 0 0 0
4 00 1 MiCarrlb 4 0 1 0
3 01 0 VMrtnzdh 4 01 0
3 0 0 0 Avila c 1 1 0 0
1 00 0 Raburn2b-lf 3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 RSantgss-2b2 1 0 0
Inge3b 3 1 1 2
35 38 2 Totals 296 6 5


San Francisco 000 120 000 - 3
Detroit 000 101 22x - 6
E-M.Tejada (9), C.Ross (1), C.Stewart (2),
Mi.Cabrera (7). DP-San Francisco 1. LOB-
San Francisco 12, Detroit 9.2B-Rowand (17),
PSandoval (10), Boesch (22). 3B-Inge (2).
HR-Boesch (12). S-Burriss, Raburn.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
Vogelsong 62-34 3 2 4 5
AffeldtL,1-2 0 0 1 0 1 0
S.Casilla BS,1-1 1 2 2 2 3 0
Ja.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
PorcelloW,7-6 7 5 3 3 2 6
BenoitH,10 1 2 0 0 0 1
ValverdeS,20-20 1 1 0 0 1 1
Affeldt pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Ja.Lopez (C.Wells), by Porcello
(Rowand, M.Tejada, Burriss).WP-Affeldt, Por-
cello 3.
Umpires-Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Brian
Gorman; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Larry
Vanover.
T-3:08. A-31,904 (41,255).


Houston
ab r h bi
4 02 0 Bourncf
3 0 1 0 Barmes ss
3 0 0 0 Pence rf
4 1 1 1 Ca.Leelf
2 00 0 MDwns2b
-rf2 0 0 0 Wallaclb
3 00 0 Bogsvc pr
3 0 1 0 CJhnsn 3b
1 00 0 Corprn c
0 00 0 Lylesp
3 01 0 AngSncph
3 00 0 DCrpntp
0 1 0 0 SEsclnp
0 00 0 WLopezp
Kppngr ph
Melncn p
31 26 1 Totals
000 100 001
000 010 000


ab rh bi
3000
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4000
4000
4 1 2 0
0000
3000
3000
1 0 0 0
1 0 1 1
0000
0000
0000
1 0 1 0
0000
321 6 1
- 2
- 1


E-Wallace (6). DP-Houston 3. LOB-Boston
12, Houston 6. 2B-Varitek (6), Wallace (20).
SB-Ellsbury (26), Pedroia (16), Ang.Sanchez
(3). S-Bourn.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
BeckettW,7-3 8 5 1 1 0 11
PapelbonS,17-18 1 1 0 0 0 3
Houston
Lyles 5 3 1 0 5 4
Da.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 0 1
S.Escalona 11-31 0 0 2 0
W.Lopez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Melancon L,5-2 1 1 1 1 3 0
HBP-by Beckett (C.Johnson).
Umpires-Home, Scott Barry; First, Wally Bell;
Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Cory Blaser.
T-3:05. A-38,035 (40,963).


Blue Jays 7, Phillies 4
TORONTO - All but untouchable
in June, Cliff Lee's streak of success
came to a stunning halt in his first July
start.
Jose Bautista hit his major league-
leading 27th home run, one of three
Toronto homers in a four-run eighth,
and the Blue Jays snapped Lee's
scoreless innings streak at 34 with a 7-
4 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies
on Sunday to avoid a three-game
sweep.
"(Lee) had a clean seventh inning,"
Phillies manager Charlie Manuel said.
"All of a sudden in the eighth inning,
things kind of fell apart."
Edwin Encarnacion had a two-run
shot and rookie Eric Thames also con-
nected for the Blue Jays in the eighth
to chase Lee.
"For Eric to come out and start the
inning like that was huge:' Bautista
said. "I was able to follow up and
Edwin's blast just capped it off. It was a
good feeling in the dugout and we all
had high energy."
The Blue Jays also hit three homers
in an inning on April 25 victory at
Texas.
Lee, who had not allowed a home
run in 49 innings, disputed Manuel's
assertion that his pitches were up in
the pivotal eighth.


Philadelphia Toronto
ab r h bi


Rollinsss 5 0 1
Polanc dh 4 0 0
Utley 2b 4 01
Howard lb 4 0 1
Victorn cf 3 1 2
BFrncsIf 3 1 1
Ibanez ph-lf 1 0 1
DBrwn rf 4 1 1
Ruiz c 3 1 2
WValdz 3b 3 0 0


2 A.Hill2b
0 EThmsrf
0 Bautist 3b
0 Lind dh
0 JRiver If
1 CPttrsn If
0 Encrnclb
0 Arencii c
1 RDaviscf
0 JMcDnlss


Gloadph 1 000
Totals 35 4104 Totals
Philadelphia 040 000 000
Toronto 001 011 04x


ab r h bi
4 0 1 1
4 1 2 1
4 2 2 1
4 1 2 0
3 0 0 1
0 0 0 0
4 1 1 2
4 0 0 0
4 2 3 0
4 0 0 1
40117
4121
4221
4120
3001
0000
4112
4000
4230
4001

35711 7
- 4
7


E-B.Francisco (3), W.Valdez (5). DP-Toronto
1. LOB-Philadelphia 6, Toronto 5. 2B-Vic-
torino 2 (14), Ibanez (17), Ruiz (10), R.Davis


(13). 3B-R.Davis (
Bautista (27), Encarn
(21). CS-Victorino (


Philadelphia
CI.Lee L,9-6
Stutes
Toronto
Jo-.Reyes
Rzepczynski
DotelW,2-1


Orioles 5, Braves 4
ATLANTA - Mark Reynolds hit a
two-run homer in the seventh inning,
Nick Markakis had a career-high five
hits and the Baltimore Orioles beat the
Atlanta Braves 5-4 on Sunday to end
their five-game losing streak.
Zach Britton gave up three runs in
five-plus innings and hit his first career
homer. Jim Johnson (5-1) gave up one
run in two innings.
Markakis had a run-scoring double
in the sixth. Markakis had three hits in
Saturday night's loss after his 19-game
hitting streak ended Friday night.
Reynolds also drove in a run with a
sacrifice fly in the third. He had two
homers in the Orioles' 5-4 loss to the
Braves on Saturday night.
The Braves had their five-game win-
ning streak snapped and were denied
their third straight interleague sweep.
Kevin Gregg pitched a perfect ninth
for his 15th save.
Britton was pulled after giving up a
walk and two hits, including Freddie
Freeman's RBI single.
Baltimore Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi


Hardy ss 4 1 2 0 Schafer cf
Markksrf 5 1 5 1 Heywrdrf
AdJons cf 5 0 0 0 C.Jones3b
MrRynl3b 3 1 1 3 McCnnc
D.Leelb 5 00 0 Fremnlb
Scott If 3 0 0 0 Uggla 2b
Pie pr-lf 0 0 0 0 McLoth If
Tatum c 3 0 1 0 Lugo ss
BDavis 2b 3 0 0 0 Beachy p
Andino 2b 0 0 0 0 WRmrz ph
Britton p 3 2 2 1 Sherrill p
JiJhnsnp 0 0 0 0 Hinskeph
Guerrrph 1 0 0 0 Proctor p
Uehara p 0 0 0 0 Gearrin p
Greggp 0 00 0 Conradph
Linernk p
Totals 35 5115 Totals
Baltimore 002 010 200
Atlanta 000 004 000


5 020
5000
4110
4 1 1 0
4120
2 1 1 1
4000
4110
4 1 1 0
301 1
1 0 0 0
1 0 1 0
1000
1010
0000
1 0 1 2
1012
0000
0000
1 0 0 0
1000
0000
35410 4
- 5


DP-Baltimore 1, Atlanta 1. LOB-Baltimore 9,
Atlanta 8.2B-Markakis (11), Tatum (1). HR-
Mar.Reynolds (18), Britton (1). SB-Markakis
(7), Schafer (10). S-Tatum. SF-
Mar.Reynolds.


Baltimore
Britton
Ji.JohnsonW,5-1 BS,


6). HR-E.Thames (3), UeharaH,10
acion (6). SB-R.Davis 3 Gregg S,15-19
2). SF-J.Rivera. Atlanta
IP H R ERBBSO Beachy
Sherrill
71-310 7 6 0 9 Proctor L,1-2 BS,2-2
2-3 1 0 0 0 1 Gearrin
Linebrink


6 8 4 4 2 0
684420
11-31 0 0 0 0
12-31 0 0 0 2


Umpires-Home, Ed Hickox; First, Ed Rapuano;
Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Alfonso Marquez.
T-2:26. A-26,204 (49,260).


Mariners 3, Padres 1 Cubs 3, White Sox 1


SEATTLE - What the Seattle
Mariners starting pitchers accom-
plished against San Diego this season
was impressive.
Blake Beaven's major league debut
was a fitting capper.
Beaven threw seven strong innings
of one-run ball Sunday, Ichiro Suzuki
had two hits and scored twice and the
Mariners beat the Padres 3-1.
Seattle took five of six against San
Diego in interleague play and the
Mariners' pitching staff was at their best
versus the Padres. In the six games,
Seattle's starters were 5-1 with a 0.50
ERA in 54 innings, with 56 strikeouts
and just eight walks. The Padres hit
.162 against Felix Hernandez, Michael
Pineda, Doug Fister, Jason Vargas, Erik
Bedard and Beavan.
While he was the newest member
of that group on Sunday, Beavan (1-0)
fit right in.
"It was definitely a great feeling
being out there on that mound," said
the 22-year-old Beavan.
Starting in place of Bedard, who went
on the 15-day disabled list earlier this
week with a sprained left knee, Beaven
looked like he belonged in the majors.
Beavan allowed just three hits and
struck out four, becoming just the
eighth pitcher in club history to go at
least seven innings in his major league
debut.


San Diego
ab r h bi
Venalerf 4 02 1
Bartlett ss 3 0 0 0
Headly3b 4 01 0
Ludwckdh 3 00 0
Denorfilf 3 0 0 0
Maybincf 3 00 0
Rizzo b 4 00 0
Hundlyc 3 0 0 0
OHudsnph 1 00 0
AIGnzlz2b 2 1 1 0
KPhlpsph 1 000
Totals 31 14 1
San Diego 001
Seattle 102


Seattle

ISuzuki rf
Ryan ss
AKndy 3b
Smoaklb
Ackley 2b
Halmn If
Peguerdh
FGtrrz cf
J.Bard c


ab rh bi
3220
3 1 1 0
3 0 1 1
2 0 0 1
3 0 1 1
4000
3 0 1 0
3000
3000


Totals 273 6 3
000 000 - 1
000 00x - 3


LOB-San Diego 8, Seattle 6.2B-Venable (6).
SB-I.Suzuki (21). CS-Ryan (2). SF-Smoak,
Ackley
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
LatosL,5-9 6 4 3 3 3 5
Frieri 1 1 0 0 1 2
Spence 1 1 0 0 0 1
Seattle
BeavanW,1-0 7 3 1 1 2 4
PauleyH,6 1 1 0 0 1 1
LeagueS,22-25 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Pauley (Bartlett), by Beavan
(Alb.Gonzalez).
Umpires-Home, Bill Miller; First, Chris Conroy;
Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T-2:10. A-28,001 (47,878).


CHICAGO - Veteran Rodrigo
Lopez allowed two hits in seven
shutout innings and Aramis Ramirez
homered Sunday as the Chicago Cubs
beat the White Sox 3-1 to salvage the
finale of a three-game series at Wrigley
Field.
The White Sox captured the season
crosstown series 4-2 with both Cubs'
victories coming against Gavin Floyd.
Floyd (6-8) gave up five hits and six
runs over five innings in a June 20 loss
at U.S. Cellular Field. He yielded seven
hits in seven innings Sunday, three in
the Cubs'three-run fourth inning.
The 35-year-old Lopez (1-2), in his
third start for the Cubs since he was
acquired in a minor league deal from
the Braves in May, gave up a pair of in-
field singles, to Mark Teahen in the third
on a hard-hit ball that first baseman
Carlos Pena stopped and to Carlos
Quentin, who hit a ball to deep short in
the fourth. He struck out three with no
walks in an efficient 75-pitch outing.
The White Sox broke through in the
eighth against Kerry Wood when back-
to-back one-out singles by Teahen and
Gordon Beckham put runners at the
corners.
Chicago (A) Chicago (N)
ab rhbi ab r h bi


Pierre If 4000
AI.Ramirez ss4000
A.Dunnlb 4 000
Quentinrf 4 010


Fukudomerf 40 1 0
Barney 2b 41 1 0
S.Castro ss 41 2 1
Ar.Ramirez3b 31 1 2


Pierzynski c 4 000 C.Pena lb 40 1 0
Rioscf 3 000 Byrdcf 30 0 0
Teahen3b 3 1 20 A.Soriano If 30 1 0
Beckham 2b2 0 1 0 Campana pr-lf 00 0 0
Floydp 2 000 Sotoc 30 1 0
Konerkoph 0 000 R.Lopezp 20 0 0
LillibridgeprO 000 DeWittph 10 0 0
Bruneyp 0000 K.Woodp 00 0 0
Ohmanp 0000 Marshallp 00 0 0
Marmolp 00 0 0
Totals 30 1 40 Totals 31 3 8 3
Chicago (A) 000 000 010 - 1
Chicago (N) 000 300 00x - 3
E-Ar.Ramirez (6). DP-Chicago (N) 2.
LOB-Chicago (A) 4, Chicago (N) 6.2B-Fuku-
dome (13). 3B-S.Castro (8). HR-Ar.Ramirez
(12).


Chicago (A)
Floyd L,6-8
Bruney
Ohman
Chicago (N)
R.Lopez W,1-2
K.Wood H,10
Marshall H,14
Marmol S,17-22


IP H RERBBSO

7 7 3 3 1 8
1-3 1 0 0 1 1
2-3 0 0 0 0 1


7 2
1-3 2
1-3 0
1 1-3 0


HBP-by R.Lopez (Beckham). WP-Floyd,
K.Wood.
Umpires-Home, Bruce Dreckman; First,
Paul Emmel; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Gary
Darling.
T-2:23. A-42,311 (41,159).


IP H RERBBSO

5 6 3 3 3 4
3-3 2 3 1 1 0

1 1 0 0 1 2
1 0 0 0 0 1


Britton pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Beachy (Hardy).
Umpires-Home, Mark Ripperger; First, Marvin
Hudson; Second, Brian Runge; Third, Tim Mc-
Clelland.
T-3:09. A-23,492 (49,586).



Twins 9, Brewers 7
MINNEAPOLIS -With closer Joe
Nathan and Matt Capps on the roster,
Glen Perkins doesn't expect to get
many save opportunities for the Min-
nesota Twins.
He made the most of his chance
Sunday.
After Capps had a second straight
rough outing, Perkins ensured the
Twins' seventh-inning rally held up for a
9-7 win over the Milwaukee Brewers.
Danny Valencia delivered another
bases-loaded hit, a two-run single that
capped a four-run seventh and Rene
Tosoni homered and drove in three
runs for Minnesota, which trailed Zack
Greinke by 6-1 in the fourth inning. Jim
Thome hit his 595th career homer for
the Twins.
It was a reversal of about 19 hours
earlier for the Twins, who blew a 7-0
lead Saturday night and lost 8-7.
"If you're not able to put one particu-
lar game in your rearview mirror, you're
not going to have too much success,"
said Michael Cuddyer, Minnesota's
lone All-Star.
Capps, tagged for four earned runs
Saturday, gave up two hits in the ninth
before Perkins recorded his first career
save in two opportunities by striking out
Prince Fielder and Casey McGehee.


Milwaukee Minnesota
ab r h bi
RWeks dh 5 1 2 1 Revere cf
Morgan cf 5 1 1 0 ACasill 2b
C.Hartrf 4 0 2 0 Mauerc
Fielder lb 3 1 0 0 Cuddyrrf
Gamel3b 4 1 1 1 Thomedh
JoWilsn 3b 0 0 0 0 Valenci 3b
McGehph 1 0 0 0 Tosoni If
YBtncrss 3 1 1 1 RepkoIlf
Kotsaylf 4 2 2 3 LHughslb
Lucroyc 4 0 1 1 Nishiokss
Counsll 2b 4 0 0 0


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0
5 1 0 0
3 1 1 0
4 1 2 2
2 3 1 1
4 1 2 2
4 1 1 3
0 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
34110
5100
3110
4122
2311
4122
4113

4010
3000


Totals 37 7107 Totals 339 9 8
Milwaukee 001 501 000 - 7
Minnesota 010 310 40x - 9
E-Kotsay (2), Fielder (7), A.Casilla (9). LOB-
Milwaukee 7, Minnesota 5.2B-Gamel (1), Va-
lencia (15). 3B-Kotsay (1). HR-R.Weeks (15),
Kotsay (1), Thome (6), Tosoni (2). S-Nishioka.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Greinke 6 5 5 4 2 9
BraddockH,3 2-3 1 2 2 1 0
LoeL,2-7BS,5-6 11-33 2 1 1 1
Minnesota
Blackburn 4 6 6 6 1 2
Swarzak 2 2 1 1 2 1
DumatraitW,1-1 1 0 0 0 1 0
Nathan H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1
CappsH,3 1-32 0 0 0 0
PerkinsS,1-2 2-30 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Mike Es-
tabrook; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Marty Fos-
ter.
T-3:14. A-41,195 (39,500).


Reds 7, Indians 5
CINCINNATI - Edgar Renteria hit
his first homer since his World Series
MVP performance, helping the Cincin-
nati Reds break out of their offensive
slump and beat the Cleveland Indians
7-5 on Sunday, their only win of the
season against their intrastate rival.
The Indians took five of six in the
series, matching their best result. The
Reds went 5-1 in 2008.
Chris Heisey also homered off
Mitch Talbot (2-5), who has struggled
since returning from a sore elbow. The
Reds piled up six runs and 10 hits in
his four innings.
Mike Leake (8-4) became the Reds'
first eight-game winner, matching his
career high with eight strikeouts in six
innings.
Francisco Cordero pitched the ninth
for his 17th save in 19 chances.
Five players learned before the
game that they'll be headed to Arizona
for the All-Star game next week -
Cleveland's Asdrubal Cabrera and
Chris Perez, Cincinnati's Joey Votto,
Brandon Phillips and Jay Bruce. In-
stead of the stars, the reserves rallied
Cincinnati to its breakthrough win.


Cleveland Cincinnati
ab r h bi
Brantlylf 3 1 1 0 FLewislIf
Phelps2b 3 1 0 0 Corderp
ACarer ss 4 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b
CSantnlb 4 00 0 Vottolb
GSizmrcf 4 0 1 2 Bruce rf
Chsnhll3b 4 1 1 0 RHrndz c
Duncanrf 4 2 3 2 Heiseycf-lf
Marson c 4 0 0 0 Renteri ss
Talbotp 1 0 0 0 Chpmnp
Hannhn ph 1 0 0 0 Stubbscf
Judy p 0 0 0 0 Cairo 3b
Hafnerph 1 0 1 1 Leakep
Durbinp 0 0 0 0 Massetp
J.Smith p 0 0 0 0 Janish ss
Totals 33 57 5 Totals
Cleveland 020 002 100
Cincinnati 030 310 00x


ab rh bi
5 1 2 2
5122
0000
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 1
4010
3001
3000
301 1
4 1 2 1
4 2 2 1
4121
4221
0000
0000
3221
3 2 2 1
2 1 1 0
2110
0000
1000
1 0 0 0
32711 7
- 5
- 7


E-Chisenhall (1). DP-Cleveland 1, Cincinnati
1. LOB-Cleveland 3, Cincinnati 6.2B-Brant-
ley (14). HR-Duncan (3), Heisey (9), Renteria
(1). SB-Brantley (10). S-Leake. SF-Votto,
R.Hernandez.
IP H RERBBSO


Cleveland
Talbot L,2-5
Judy
Durbin
J.Smith
Cincinnati
LeakeW,8-4
Masset H,8


6 4 4 4 2 8
1 2 1 1 0 0
644428
121100


ChapmanH,5 1 0 0 0 0 2
CorderoS,17-19 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-Talbot.
Umpires-Home, Derryl Cousins; First, Jim
Wolf; Second, JohnTumpane; Third, Ron Kulpa.
T-2:41. A-34,948 (42,319).



Oakland 7, Arizona 2


Arizona


Oakland


ab r h bi ab r h bi
Blmqstlf 4 01 0 JWeeks2b 3 01 1
KJhnsn2b 5 0 0 0 SSizmr3b 4 1 3 2
J.Uptonrf 3 1 1 0 Crispcf 3 1 1 0
CYoungcf 3 1 1 0 Matsuilf 4 1 1 0
S.Drewss 3 0 1 0 Carterdh 4 11 0
W.Penadh 4 0 0 0 CJcksnlb 4 1 1 2
Nady b 3 0 1 1 DeJess rf 3 1 1 2
RRorts3b 3 0 0 0 Powellc 4 00 0
Brrghsph-3bl 0 1 1 Pnngtnss 4 1 1 0
HBlancc 3 0 1 0
Monterph 1 0 00
Totals 33 27 2 Totals 33710 7
Arizona 000 100 010 - 2
Oakland 000 205 00x - 7
LOB-Arizona 9, Oakland 5.2B-J.Upton (22),
C.Young (24), S.Drew (18), S.Sizemore (6), De-
Jesus (9). HR-S.Sizemore (2), C.Jackson (2).
SF-J.Weeks.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
I.Kennedy L,8-3 52-310 7 7 2 6
Owings 11-30 0 0 0 2
Paterson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Oakland
G.GonzalezW,8-5 7 5 1 1 3 7
Wuertz 0 1 1 1 2 0
Devine 1 1 0 0 0 1
A.Bailey 1 0 0 0 0 0
Wuertz pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
WP-I.Kennedy
T-2:48. A-13,822 (35,067).

Royals 16, Rockies 8


Kansas City Colorado
ab r h bi


Getz 2b
MeCarr cf
AGordn If
Maier pr-lf
Francr rf
Hosmerlb
Treanr c
BIWood p
Butler ph
Collins p
LColmn p
Mostks 3b
AEscorss
Hochvr p
B.Pena c


Totals


ab rh bi


5 2 2 2 CGnzlzcf 4 22 6
5 4 4 5 JHerrr3b-ss 1 00 0
3 0 0 0 M.Ellis2b 5 1 2 2
1 2 1 0 Heltonlb 2 00 0
6 2 3 3 Giambilb 1 00 0
6 1 4 4 Tlwtzkss 4 0 1 0
3 1 1 0 lannett3b 1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 S.Smith rf 3 00 0
1 01 0 Belislep 0 00 0
0 00 0 Mrtnsnp 1 00 0
1 0 0 0 Cookph 1 00 0
6 2 3 1 Wggntn3b-rf 2 20 0
6 2 2 1 Blckmnlf 4 01 0
2 0 0 0 Pagnzzc 3 1 1 0
2 00 0 Hammlp 1 00 0
Stultsp 0 00 0
Splrghs ph-rf-cfl 2 0 0
48162116 Totals 348 7 8


Kansas City 103 206 400 - 16
Colorado 000 053 000 - 8
E-Francoeur (4), Hosmer (7), Hammel (1).
DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-Kansas City 10, Col-
orado 6.2B-Me.Cabrera (20), Francoeur (19),
Hosmer (9), Treanor (5), Butler (20), Moustakas
2 (2), A.Escobar 2 (14), C.Gonzalez (18). HR-
Me.Cabrera 2 (11), Hosmer (6), C.Gonzalez
(13), M.Ellis (2). SB-A.Escobar (13). CS-
Francoeur (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Hochevar 41-35 5 5 3 3
BI.WoodW,4-0 12-31 3 3 2 4
Collins 1 0 0 0 1 0
L.Coleman 2 1 0 0 1 3
Colorado
HammelL,4-8 32-37 6 5 1 2
Stults 11-30 0 0 0 1
Belisle 2-37 6 6 0 1
Mortensen 31-37 4 4 1 2
HBP-by Hammel (Me.Cabrera), by Belisle
(A.Gordon), by Mortensen (B.Pena).
T-3:28. A-40,269 (50,490).


�i I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sunday, At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club, Wimbledon, England, Purse:
$23.6 million (Grand Slam), Surface: Grass-
Outdoor
Singles
Men Championship
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Rafael Nadal
(1), Spain, 6-4, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3.
Doubles
Mixed Championship
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Iveta Benesova
(9), Czech Republic, def. Mahesh Bhupathi,
India, and Elena Vesnina (4), Russia, 6-3, 6-2.
Invitational Doubles
Gentlemen Championship
Jacco Eltingh and Paul Haarhuis, Nether-
lands, def. Jonas Bjorkman, Sweden, and Todd
Woodbridge, Australia, 3-6, 6-3, 13-11 tiebreak.
Senior Gentlemen Championship
Pat Cash and MarkWoodforde, Australia, def.
Jeremy Bates, Britain, and Anders Jarryd, Swe-
den, 6-3, 5-7, 10-5 tiebreak.
Ladies Championship
Lindsay Davenport, United States, and Mar-
tina Hingis, Switzerland, def. Martina
Navratilova, United States, and Jana Novotna,
Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4.
Junior Singles
Girls Championship
Ashleigh Barty (12), Australia, def. Irina Khro-
macheva (3), Russia, 7-5, 7-6 (3).
Junior Doubles
Boys Championship
George Morgan, Britain, and Mate Pavic (2),
Croatia, def. Oliver Golding, Britain, and Jiri
Vesely (1), Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5.
Girls Championship
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Grace Min
(2), United States, def. Demi Schuurs, Nether-
lands, and Tang Hao Chen, China, 5-7, 6-2,7-5.
Wheelchair Doubles
Men Championship
Maikel Scheffers and Ronald Vink (1),
Netherlands, def. Stephane Houdet and
Michael Jeremiasz, France, 7-5, 6-2.
Third Place
Robin Ammerlaan, Netherlands, and Stefan
Olsson, Sweden, def. Tom Egberink, Nether-
lands, and Shingo Kunieda (2), Japan, 6-3, 6-3.
Women Championship
Esther Vergeer and Sharon Walraven (1),
Netherlands, def. Jiske Griffioen and Aniek van
Koot (2), Netherlands, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5.
Third Place
Marjolein Buis, Netherlands, and Annick Sev-
enans, Belgium, def. Lucy Shuker and Jordanne
While, Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (8).



GOLF
Continued from Page B1

record by Tiger Woods in
2009 when it was played at
Congressional. The tourna-
ment is scheduled to return
to Congressional next year.
Charles Howell III
earned quite a consolation
prize. He played bogey-free
in the final round for a 6-
under 66 to tie for third with
Adam Scott (68) and Jeff
Overton (67). That made him
eligible for the British Open
in two weeks as the top fin-
isher from the top five who
wasn't already exempt.
Rickie Fowler, who
shared the lead with Watney
going into the final round,
had another learning expe-
rience. He fell out of the
hunt early with a double
bogey on the second hole
and closed with a 74 to tie
for 13th.
"I just couldn't get any-
thing going today," Fowler
said.
Watney didn't give anyone
much of a chance. He took
the outright lead with a
wedge into 10 feet for birdie
on No. 2, and holed a 20-foot
birdie putt on the par-5 fifth.
Despite leaving himself in a
tough spot in the bunker on
the par-5 ninth, he blasted
out to 2 feet for another
birdie.
Even so, his biggest putts
were for par.
Watney saved par from
bunkers on No. 4 with a 20-
foot putt, and from No. 7
with a putt from about 12
feet. His biggest par save
might have been the par-3
eighth, which yielded only
two birdies in the final
round.
Overton had reached 9
under and was making a
move, and Choi had birdied
the previous to also reach 9
under. Watney's shot went
over the green, and he
putted up the slope to 18
feet. He made the par putt
to keep his cushion.
"That was big not to drop
a shot after hitting a good


For the r caord


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On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Washington Nationals
2 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Minnesota Twins
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Phillies at Florida Marlins
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (VERSUS) 2011 Tour de France Stage 3
SOCCER
3:45 p.m. (ESPN2) Soccer FIFA U-17 World Cup (Tape)
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) New England Revolution at Real Salt Lake
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Seattle Sounders FC at L. A. Galaxy
VOLLEYBALL
5 p.m. (VERSUS) FIVB World League (Taped)


Wimbledon Champions
Men's Singles - Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia
Women's Singles - Petra Kvitova (8), Czech
Republic
Men's Doubles - Bob and Mike Bryan (1),
United States
Women's Doubles - Kveta Peschke, Czech
Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia
Mixed Doubles - Jurgen Melzer, Austria,
and Iveta Benesova (9), Czech Republic
Gentlemen's Invitational Doubles - Jacco
Eltingh and Paul Haarhuis, Netherlands
Senior Gentlemen's Invitational Doubles -
Pat Cash and Mark Woodforde, Australia


shot, and keep momentum
heading to the back nine,"
Watney said.
The final challenge came
from Choi, who trailed by
four shots at one point. He
slowly made up ground,
then closed in on Watney
after the turn with a bend-
ing, downhill birdie putt on
the 11th and a pair of long
birdie putts on the 12th and
14th holes, the last one tying
for the lead.
Momentum was with
Choi, only the South Korean
knew better. The par-4 15th
played at 503 yards into a
slight breeze, following by
the par-5 16th that was
reachable in two.
"When I tied him on the
14th hole, I knew that there
was still a lot of holes to go,
and I knew the remaining
holes were more favorable
to Nick Watney," Choi said.
"I knew the 15th hole would
be a turning point. That was
a key hole, and I missed it.
So I think that was the turn-
ing point of the match."
Choi pulled his shot into
the left rough, then tried to
hit 5-wood toward the green.
The thick grass shut his club
and sent the shot into a
bunker, some 60 yards from
the pin, and so close to the
side that his legs were
pressed against the edge of
the bunker. Choi hit a solid
shot, but it took one more
hop into the rough, he
chipped out to 12 feet and
missed the putt.
Watney was just short of
the green and lagged his
putt from 75 feet to 5 feet,
converting yet another im-
portant par
On the next hole, Watney
used his power to smash a
drive that left him only a 7-
iron to the green, and he
again hit a good lag for a
two-putt birdie. His seventh
and final par save came
from just behind the 17th
green, and his chip stopped
2 feet from the cup.
Watney earned $1.116 mil-
lion and became the first
player this year to top $4
million on tour. His other
win came at the World Golf
Championship at Doral, a


Ladies' Invitational Doubles - Lindsay Dav-
enport, United States, and Martina Hingis,
Switzerland
Boys' Singles - Luke Saville (16), Australia
Girls' Singles - Ashleigh Barty (12), Aus-
tralia
Boys' Doubles - George Morgan, Britain,
and Mate Pavic (2), Croatia
Girls' Doubles - Eugenie Bouchard,
Canada, and Grace Min (2), United States
Men's Wheelchair Doubles - Maikel Schef-
fers and Ronald Vink (1), Netherlands
Women's Wheelchair Doubles - Esther
Vergeer and Sharon Walraven (1), Netherlands


win defined by his clutch
tee shot on the 18th hole of
the famed Blue Monster.
That experience has served
him well.
"I'm overjoyed to be in
here as the winner," Watney
said. "It was a very difficult,
long day. K.J. played great
golf and he kept coming and
coming. And that makes it
even more rewarding."
Cook breaks course
record at Fontainebleau
BLAINVILLE, Quebec
(AP) - John Cook shot a 6-
under 66 on Sunday and set
a tournament course record
with a 21-under 195 to win
the Montreal Championship
by three strokes at the
Fontainebleau Golf Club.
Cook, the tournament
runner-up last year, erased
Chien-Soon Lu's one-stroke
lead and claimed the
$270,000 top prize at the
Champions Tour's sole
Canadian stop. Cook's third
win on the 50-and-over tour
this season came one year
after Larry Mize, last year's
champion, overtook him
with a 64 on the final day
Canada's Rod Spittle shot
a course one-day record 10-
under 62 to finish 15 under
The Ontario native broke
the mark of 63 held by four
players - including Cook--
and finished in a seventh-
place tie, up from a tie for
49th place after two rounds.
Local favorite Thomas
Levet wins French Open
SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-
YVELINES, France - Local
favorite Thomas Levet shot a
1-under 70 in windy condi-
tions to win the French Open,
beating Thorbjorn Olesen of
Denmark and Mark Foster of
England by a stroke.
Levet made four birdies
and three bogeys Sunday for
a 7-under total of 277 to cap-
ture his sixth career title.
Martin Kaymer was three
strokes back in fourth after
a closing 73. The PGA
Championship winner will
overtake U.S. Open cham-
pion Rory McIlroy for No. 3
when the world rankings
are published Monday


AT&T National Par Scores, Sunday, At Aronimink Golf Club, Newtown Square, Pa., Purse: $6.2 million, Yardage: 7,237, Par: 70, Final, a-amateur:


Nick Watney (500), $1,116,000
K.J. Choi (300), $669,600
Charles Howell III (145), $322,400
Jeff Overton (145), $322,400
Adam Scott (145), $322,400
Robert Allenby (95), $215,450
Chris Stroud (95), $215,450
Bryce Molder (80), $179,800
Chris Kirk (80), $179,800
Webb Simpson (80), $179,800
Bo Van Pelt (68), $148,800
Kevin Stadler (68), $148,800
Chris DiMarco (59), $124,000
Rickie Fowler (59), $124,000
Kevin Streelman (54), $99,200
Joe Ogilvie (54), $99,200
Justin Rose (54), $99,200
John Merrick (54), $99,200
Spencer Levin (54), $99,200
a-Patrick Cantlay
Robert Garrigus (49), $72,230
Michael Putnam (49), $72,230
Troy Matteson (49), $72,230
Steve Marino (49), $72,230
Charley Hoffman (44), $51,460
George McNeill (44), $51,460
Tom Gillis (44), $51,460
J.J. Henry (44), $51,460
Cameron Tringale (44), $51,460
Chris Riley (40), $41,230
Hunter Mahan (40), $41,230
Andres Romero (40), $41,230
Troy Merritt (40), $41,230
Ryuji Imada (36), $34,255
Kyle Stanley (36), $34,255
Carl Pettersson (36), $34,255
Bill Haas (36), $34,255
Trevor Immelman (29), $25,420


70-69-62-66
69-64-69-67
68-68-69-66
71-65-68-67
66-71-66-68
71-68-68-65
70-68-66-68
69-67-68-69
70-71-63-69
69-70-64-70
69-66-71-68
73-69-64-68
71-70-70-64
68-69-64-74
71-69-68-68
67-70-70-69
70-72-65-69
68-70-68-70
70-68-68-70
70-69-71-67
68-72-68-69
72-70-69-66
68-70-68-71
70-70-63-74
71-69-70-68
70-70-69-69
72-69-68-69
70-69-68-71
75-68-64-71
69-66-75-69
72-71-66-70
71-70-67-71
74-68-70-67
72-70-69-69
67-69-71 -73
73-70-70-67
68-70-66-76
69-70-70-72


Kent Jones (29), $25,420
Dean Wilson (29), $25,420
Michael Thompson (29), $25,420
Scott McCarron (29), $25,420
Pat Perez (29), $25,420
Cameron Beckman (29), $25,420
Justin Leonard (29), $25,420
Rod Pampling (29), $25,420
J.B. Holmes (23), $17,577
D.J. Trahan (23), $17,577
D.A. Points (23), $17,577
Gary Woodland (23), $17,577
Hunter Haas (18), $14,839
Stephen Ames (18), $14,839
Brian Davis (18), $14,839
Michael Connell (18), $14,839
Vaughn Taylor (18), $14,839
Charlie Wi (18), $14,839
Johnson Wagner (11), $13,764
Kevin Na (11), $13,764
Geoff Ogilvy (11), $13,764
David Hearn (11), $13,764
William McGirt (11), $13,764
Garrett Willis (11), $13,764
Tag Ridings (11), $13,764
Tim Herron (6), $13,082
Jhonattan Vegas (6), $13,082
Kris Blanks (6), $13,082
Ricky Barnes (6), $13,082
Ryan Moore (3), $12,710
Brendon de Jonge (3), $12,710
a-Peter Uihlein
Mike Weir (1), $12,524
Kevin Chappell (1), $12,338
Joe Durant (1), $12,338
Bill Lunde (1), $12,152
Steve Flesch (1), $12,028
Paul Goydos (1), $11,904


71-72-67-71 -
67-73-69-72-
70-69-71-71 -
70-73-65-73-
68-74-70-69-
73-69-70-69-
68-67-71-75-
74-69-72-66-
73-67-69-73-
70-72-66-74-
68-71-73-70-
69-71-74-68-
66-74-70-73-
72-71-68-72-
71-72-68-72-
74-69-68-72-
70-71-71-71 -
69-66-69-79-
71-68-70-75-
69-69-71-75-
71-71-69-73-
69-70-73-72
72-67-74-71 -
73-69-72-70-
70-72-73-69-
71-71-69-74-
67-71-69-78-
70-71-72-72-
70-73-72-70-
72-70-71-73-
70-71-72-73-
73-69-71-75-
71-70-73-74-
70-72-72-75-
72-71-76-70-
74-68-73-75-
73-70-74-75-
75-66-79-75-


TRIATHLON
Continued from Page B1

Wenger "I cut four minutes
from my race last time. The
biking is hard to improve. I
got a lot better in the swim.
I'm happy with my results. I
will be in better shape for
cross country"
Homosassa playwright
and actor Sam Nall finished
91st in the race. He had a
time of 1:18:05, not bad for a
68-year old triathlete.
"I did fine," said Nall, 68.
"Some young whippersnap-
per came in from Georgia. I
didn't have a real good week
of training."
Four-time world cham-
pion triathlete Wayne Mc-
Sheehy heard good things
about the Crystal River
triathlon and the 79-year-
old had to come on down
from Fort Walton Beach to
try it out.
He liked it
"I didn't see any races in
our local area so I wanted to
do a race before I headed to
Pennsylvania," he said. "My
son, Sean, did this last year I
stopped just before the end
and a 68-year-old beat me.
"I like the flat course,





TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

its first Davis Cup title in
December; and a gluten-
free diet he doesn't like to
discuss in any detail.
Djokovic's only loss all
season came against 16-time
major champion Roger Fed-
erer in the French Open
semifinals a month ago,
Djokovic's seventh exit from
a Grand Slam tournament
in the final four.
For so many years, Fed-
erer and Nadal ruled ten-
nis. One or the other was
No. 1 every week since Feb-
ruary 2004. One or the other
won 22 of the last 26 Grand
Slam tournaments, includ-
ing Nadal's 10 titles.
But now Djokovic owns
three of the other four tro-
phies in that span - 2009
U.S. Open champion Juan
Martin del Potro has the
other - and finally elbowed
his way past that pair in the
rankings.
"We all know the careers
of Nadal and Federer...
They have been the two
most dominant players in
the world the last five years.
They have won most of the
majors," Djokovic said. "So
sometimes it did feel a little
bit frustrating when you
kind of get to the later stages
of a Grand Slam - meaning
last four, last eight - and
then you have to meet them.
They always come up with
their best tennis when it
matters the most.... I always
believed that I have
(enough) quality to beat
those two guys."
Djokovic was 0-5 against
Nadal at Grand Slam tour-
naments entering Sunday -
including retirements from




DAHLBERG
Continued from Page B1

for someone really having
an All-Star season, like
Jhonny Peralta of the Tigers
or Asdrubal Cabrera of the
Indians.
GRUNTING WOMEN:
Wimbledon is usually such a
civilized place, with the
queen dropping by occa-
sionally and everyone slurp-
ing down strawberries and
cream. Then the women
take the court, and it starts
sounding like some de-
ranged animals have es-
caped from the London Zoo.
The beginning of the great
grunting craze is generally
credited to Monica Seles,
but players like Maria
Sharapova and Victoria
Azarenka have elevated it to
new decibel levels. Things
got so bad that the BBC in-
troduced a noise-reduction


tool online this year to tone
down the primeval sounds.
DAVID HAYE: A lot of
people thought Haye would
bring excitement back to
boxing's heavyweight divi-
sion. A lot of people were
wrong. Haye pulled off one
of the biggest frauds in box-
ing by hyping himself as the
next great heavyweight
champion to get a lucrative
fight against Wladimir Kl-
itschko, only to forget to fight
once he got there. If that
wasn't embarrassing
enough, Haye blamed it all
on a broken toe, leading to a


CRYSTAL RIVER FOURTH OF JULY SPRINT TRIATHLON 2011 RESULTS


Men's Overall winner
Robert Kniss, Zephyrhills,
1:00:44.2
Women's Overall winner
Celia Dubey, Tarpon Springs,
1:09:04
Men's Masters winner
Tom Lowery, Gainesville,
1:03:31.9
Women's Masters winner
Jennifer Hutchison,
St. Petersburg, 1:11:29
Relay team
Team Slow Gin Fizzle,
Gainesville, 1:08:46.6

Nice swim. Good weather
for it. It usually gets a little
hot. I am from Maine and
Massachusetts. I was princi-
pal of a mentally handi-
capped school. We had a
good time. We enjoyed it. It
was well-organized."
Sean McSheehy, his son,
was 15th overall.
Dunnellon's Danny
Stevens Jr was 16th with a
time of 1:06:04.
Lecanto resident Bob
Brocket was 54th with a
time of 1:12:54. Brockett was
one of the original founders
of the triathlon years ago.
Dunnellon's Courtney
White was 67th with a time
of 1:14:22.



a 2006 French Open quar-
terfinal and 2007 Wimble-
don semifinal.
A more significant head-
to-head record, though, is
one both men acknowl-
edged played a role Sunday:
Remarkably, Djokovic is 5-0
against Nadal this year, all
in tournament finals, two on
hard courts, two on clay
courts, and now one on
grass.
"When one player beat
you five times, (it's) because
today my game don't bother
him a lot," Nadal said after
his 20-match Wimbledon
winning streak ended.
"Probably, the mental part
is little bit dangerous for
me."
That showed at the first
key point, 40 minutes into
the final. Djokovic led 5-4,
but neither player was hav-
ing the least bit of trouble
holding serve. Nadal went
up 30-love in that 10th game,
but Djokovic then won four
consecutive points to claim
the first set.
"Rafael was too nervous
at that big moment," said
Toni Nadal, the player's
coach and uncle.
Djokovic ran away with
the second set, by doing pre-
cisely what Nadal has to so
many opponents: sprinting
to chase down apparent
winners and get them back
over the net, extending the
point. According to the AP's
tally, Djokovic won 18 of the
match's 28 points that lasted
10 strokes or more.
"When you play against
these players, and they are
playing unbelievable, the
normal thing is (to) lose,"
said Nadal, who punched
his racket after missing one
forehand in the last game.
Djokovic's forehand was
mostly on-target. He hit 22


bizarre scene at the news
conference afterward when
he took off his shoes and
stood on a table for all to see.
NIKE: Michael Vick,
signed to a new endorse-
ment contract. Enough said.
HOT DOGS: Here's a
lockout that needs to end.
Six-time champion Takeru
Kobayashi remains banned
from the Coney Island
Fourth of July hot dog eating
contest because he refuses
to sign a contract with Major
League Eating. Without
Kobayashi, big eating Joey
"Jaws" Chesnut is favored to
win a fifth straight champi-
onship, but surely eating afi-
cionados everywhere would
have relished the thought of
more mustard flying be-
tween these two icons.
SCOREBOARD OPERA-
TORS: They can figure out
time left to the tenth of a
second in the NBA, and
overturn a call by the length
of a fingernail in the NFL.
Yet the scoreboard operator


in Seattle has trouble count-
ing to four. The Mariners
lost a game Saturday when
San Diego's Cameron May-
bin drew a walk on what
was really only the third ball
and came around to score.
Which begs a question:
Don't umpires use clickers
anymore?
TIGER WOODS: Take
away his parking spot at the
British Open. Ban him from
the champion's locker room
at the PGA Championship.
Last seen Sunday with new
facial hair and without his


Top 10 Finishers
1. Robert Kniss, Zephyrhills
1:00:44.2; 2. Aaron Thomas,
Seminole 1:01:08.4; 3. Trav-
eller Hill, St. Petersburg
1:02:40; 4. Ryan Williams, Sa-
vannah, Ga. 1:03:17.8; 5. Tom
Lowery, Gainesville 1:03:31.9;
6. Anthony Bautch, Sarasota
1:03:43.6; 7. Ryan McCready,
Oxford, Miss. 1:03.44; 8. Lef
Stringer, Gainesville 1:03:45;
9. Jon Leino, Zephyrhills
1:04:02; 10. John Hovius,
Groveland 1:04:37.

There were 302 people
registered and the race di-
rector had plenty of reason
to smile.
"It's Sprint number two of
our three race series," said
Moling. "We have been in a
drought. We have been chas-
ing thundershowers the
past few days but today is a
beautiful day We are appre-
ciative. The athletes are
having fun. We had a great
turnout. You can see a lot of
our standard people. Kniss
is the man to beat. I am real
happy We have people from
12 different states in atten-
dance. We are looking for-
ward to a great Sprint
Three."



winners and only four un-
forced errors through two
sets, and never faced a
break point - or even was
taken to deuce - on his
serve during that span.
But there was no way it
could continue to be that
easy, both because Djokovic
simply couldn't sustain that
level of spectacular play for-
ever, and because the re-
silient Nadal wasn't likely to
pack it in.
As gray clouds began to
gather overhead, shutting
out the azure sky, Nadal
picked up his game, and
Djokovic finally faltered
somewhat, saying later: "I
relaxed a little bit too much
in the start of the third set. I
wasn't focused."
Nadal broke twice in that
set, the second time when
Djokovic contributed his
lone double-fault of the af-
ternoon, and suddenly it ap-
peared that things were
more competitive. As it
turned out, the third set was
merely a half-hour aberra-
tion during a 212-hour coro-
nation, because Djokovic
regained the upper hand.
He led 4-3 in the fourth
set when Nadal played a
shaky game, double-fault-
ing, pushing a backhand
wide, then slapping a fore-
hand into the net on an 11-
stroke point that Djokovic
kept alive by sliding into po-
sition and nearly doing the
splits while hitting a back-
hand.
That gave Djokovic three
break points, and on the sec-
ond, Nadal missed a back-
hand on the 15th stroke.
Now with a chance to
serve it out, Djokovic was
cool and composed - and
even a little crafty, playing
serve-and-volley for only the
third time all match.


clubs at the tournament his
foundation sponsors outside
of Philadelphia, it's time for
Woods to admit the obvious
and give up on yet another
lost season. Besides, after
what Rory McIlroy did in
the U.S. Open, who needs
him anyway?
CHIP KELLY: The Oregon
football coach should be
locked out of his office if he
doesn't come forward and
explain why the university
paid $25,000 to become the
first client of a Texas scout-
ing service run by a man who
was a mentor to a top run-
ning back recruit who, coin-
cidentally, signed just before
the payment was made.
LANCE ARMSTRONG:
Actually, he's already locked
out of the Tour de France,
the only bike race most
Americans care about That
leaves us free this year to
enjoy watching one rider
we've never heard of who
swears he's not doping
chase another rider we've


never heard of who swears
he's not doping through the
French countryside. Some-
how, I don't think Bubba
Watson will be tuning in.
And, finally, maybe it's
time to lock out Mr Lockout.
David Stern has now
presided over two lockouts
at the behest of owners who
pay him millions to make
them even more millions. If
this one costs the league a
full season as some fear,
then it should cost Stern his
legacy as the commissioner
who rescued the NBA.


B4 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


SCOREBOARD







E Page B5 -MONDAY, JULY 4,2011




ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Swift postpones
concert for illness
LOUISVILLE, Ken-
tucky - Taylor Swift is
postponing a show for the
first time in her career
Swift had to postpone

night's
sold-out
show at
the Yum
Center in
Louisville
under
doctor's
orders be-
Taylor cause of
Swift an illness.
She
tweeted the bad news to
fans: "This is my first
time having to do this.
I'm so, so sorry"
Within 20 minutes hun-
dreds of followers had re-
sponded with get-well
wishes, which were al-
ready among the most
popular international
trends on Twitter for the
day
Swift postponed the
show until Oct. 11. She's
due for a short break be-
fore returning to the road
in Charlotte, N.C., on Fri-
day in support of her
multi-platinum "Speak
Now" album.

Band into Chinese
social media
HONG KONG - Ra-
diohead has taken a ten-
tative step into censored
Chinese cyberspace even
though the British rock
band has been critical of
China's human rights
record.
Radiohead recently
launched a page on the
"weibo" site of leading
Chinese Internet portal
Sina.com. "Weibo," which
translates as "microblog,"
is the Chinese-equivalent
of Twitter
But the band has only
posted a single message
on Friday It says "testing
the weibo."
The Chinese govern-
ment screens Internet
content for material it
deems politically sensi-
tive. Microblogs are re-
quired to delete
questionable posts.

Veteran wins pit
spitting contest
EAU CLAIRE, Mich. -
A nine-time winner has
taken top honors in the
annual cherry pit spitting
contest in southwestern
Michigan.
Brian "Young Gun"
Krause ofDimondale spit
a pit 66 feet, 1 1/2 inches
Saturday for his second
consecutive win at the In-
ternational Cherry Pit
Spitting Championship.
Last year's winner was
initially Brian's father,
Rick "Pellet Gun"
Krause. He was later dis-
qualified for spitting
from his knees, and the
rules say spitters must be
on their feet.
Second-place went to
Niles resident Kevin
Bartz, and his children
Chloe and Zach won their
youth divisions.
The event is hosted by
Tree-Mendus Fruit Farm
near Eau Claire, just north
of the Indiana border
Owner Herb Teichman
launched the tourney as
a lark nearly four
decades ago. It now at-
tracts competitors from
the U.S. and beyond.

-From wire reports


Jim Morrison honored


The Doors

singer

remembered

on anniversary

ofhis death

Associated Press

PARIS - Former mem-
bers of The Doors have
marked the 40th anniver-
sary of the death of Jim Mor-
rison by lighting candles at
his grave in Paris.
Morrison, the lead singer
of the rock band known for
his partying lifestyle, died
on July 2, 1971, at age 27 of
heart failure in his bathtub
in Paris, and his grave at
Pere Lachaise cemetery re-
mains a pilgrimage site for
fans.
On Sunday, band mem-
bers Ray Manzarek, the key-
boardist, and guitarist
Robby Krieger, lit candles at
the grave of Morrison, who


Associated Press
Fans of The Doors rock band's lead singer Jim Morrison pay homage at his gravesite in the
Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris. Morrison, the legendary singer of the rock band, died in
Paris on July 2, 1971.


was known by the nickname
the "lizard king."
Fans of Morrison, who
some considered a poet,


also paid homage at his
grave by leaving flowers
there.
Some wore black T-shirts


containing a white drawing
of Morrison's face and the
words "40th
anniversary"


Associated Press


Chaka Khan performs at the 2011 Essence Music Festival in New Orleans on Saturday.


Artists rock music fest


Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Neo-soul artist Jill Scott
brought a sassy new look,
new music and a surprise
performance Saturday
night with soul-singer An-
thony Hamilton on the
second day of the Essence
Music Festival.
Scott performed some of
her timeless hits including
"A Long Walk," and "Is It
The Way" and drew heav-
ily from her latest release,
"The Light of the Sun."
She delighted fans when
Hamilton joined her on
stage to perform their cur-
rent hit, "So In Love,"
which helped push the
new album to No. 1 - her
first release to do so.
Applause rolled
through the packed
Louisiana Superdome
when the song's first bars
resonated in the arena.
"They have an amazing


chemistry," said Sakeena
Morgan, of Brooklyn, N.Y
"The performance was in-
spiring. I think they did
great and she looks great."
Hamilton, who's going
on tour with Scott and
Mint Condition later this
summer, said he was glad
to be a part of Scott's proj-
ect. "It's really been spe-
cial," he said. "It's our
first collaboration."
Not a stranger to
Essence, Hamilton said
he's in negotiations with
the festival to return, per-
haps to the main stage. "I
would love that," he said.
"I love that stage. There's
a lot of energy there."
Scott also let the audi-
ence hear "Rolling Hills,"
which she recently per-
formed on the BET Awards
show, with actor Idris Elba
portraying the love inter-
est, and "Shame," both off
the new album.
Shabreka Walter, of


Houston, said she ab-
solutely loves Scott's
music.
"I've loved her since
her first album. This one
reminds me of her first
one, it's just as mellow
and soulful."
At the festival, she
showed off her slimmed
down physique in a body-
hugging black-and-silver
sequined tunic and form-
fitting black leggings.
Asked what sparked the
weight loss and transfor-
mation in her look, Scott
said "I had a son."
"He demanded change,"
she said. "I was told I
would never have kids
consistently from doctor
after doctor from the age
of 15 to 37 and now I have
this incredible blessing, a
healthy, strong, fun, happy
and sweet son. I decided it
was now up to me to make
an effort to be the best that
I can be for him."


Scott was among the
headliners for Saturday's
festival, which also fea-
tured performances by El
Debarge, Chaka Khan and
the night's closer, rapper
Kanye West.
DeBarge opened the
night, giving fans a taste of
all of his classic hits such
as "There'll Never Be"
and "Rhythm of the Night"
as well as his latest release
"Second Chances."
Khan gave the audience
more than they hoped for
with a tear-stirring rendi-
tion of"Through the Fire"
and an uplifting perform-
ance of her classic "I'm
Every Woman," along with
a surprise appearance by
New Orleans' own, Ledisi.
Khan said she's cur-
rently in the studio work-
ing on new music but had
no date for the project's
release, saying it will be
released "when I'm fin-
ished."


Today's HOROSCOPE


Today's birthday: In the year ahead you'll find that it's time
for you to alleviate all self-imposed limitations or restrictions
you've placed on yourself. Several new experiences will
show you just how freedom of thought can enhance success.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you have a matter of signifi-
cance that you need to discuss with another, try to find the
time to get in touch with him or her. Don't put it off any longer,
and don't use any intermediaries.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Don't sell yourself short, because
your earning potential is better than usual at this time. If you
get out there and do what you can to make things happen,
something good will come along.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - In order to protect your interests
and those of any other people involved with you, use all your
powers and talents to bring things into being as promptly as
possible. Time is not on your side.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Get going on that project or job


assignment as soon as you can, while major accomplish-
ments are possible. The longer you put it off, the less your
chances are of finishing it in a timely manner.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Instead of wasting your time
hanging out with those who inhibit your vision, you should try
to associate with the doers of the world. They're the ones
who'll inspire you to explore new horizons.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - It's to your advantage to
establish lofty goals that can take you to new places with new
people who are trying to reach greater heights. It behooves
you to try harder to gratify your dreams.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Although others may be ob-
serving you closely to see what stuff you're made of, you can
use this to your advantage to get them to march in lockstep
with you on your way to reaching your goals.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Several opportunities may
come your way through the good offices of two friends who


care about your interests and welfare. It's not the first time
they've offered to help you out.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -As long as you continue to
proceed in a positive, cooperative manner, a partnership
arrangement you have with a good friend will work out to the
advantage of both of you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Tackle that work assignment
first thing. The longer you shilly-shally, the bigger the job will
get, eventually becoming overwhelming.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Although you could do rather
well for yourself with undertakings that have elements of
chance attached to them, don't carry this to the point of taking
any foolish risks.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Be on your toes in case those
circumstances you need in order to make your move sud-
denly manifest. They could occur when you least expect
them.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SATURDAY, JULY 2
Powerball: 1-11 -18 -29-51
Powerball: 32
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 3 winners $200,000
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 15-35-41-45-46-48
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 37 $4,766
4-of-6 2,098 $68
3-of-6 43,417 $5
Fantasy 5:2 - 7 - 8 - 15 - 34
5-of-5 2 winners $132,663.88
4-of-5 374 $114
3-of-5 12,458 $9.50
FRIDAY, JULY 1
Mega Money: 8 - 22 - 27 - 37
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 8 winners $1,615
3-of-4 MB 71 $397.50
3-of-4 1,194 $70.50
2-of-4 MB 1,680 $35
1-of-4 MB 14,503 $4
2-of-4 33,952 $2.50
Fantasy 5:11 - 15 - 22 - 26 - 29
5-of-5 5 winners $46,712.97
4-of-5 383 $98
3-of-5 11,098 $9.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Monday, July 4,
the 185th day of 2011. There
are 180 days left in the year.
This is Independence Day.
Today's Highlight:
On July 4, 1776, the Dec-
laration of Independence
was adopted by delegates to
the Second Continental Con-
gress in Philadelphia.
On this date:
In 1802, the United States
Military Academy officially
opened at West Point, N.Y
In 1831, the fifth president
of the United States, James
Monroe, died in New York
City at age 73.
In 1872, the 30th president
of the United States, Calvin
Coolidge, was born in Ply-
mouth, Vt.
In 1894, the Republic of
Hawaii was proclaimed.
(Hawaii was annexed by the
United States four years
later.)
In 1910, in what was billed
as "The Fight of the Century,"
black world heavyweight
boxing champion Jack John-
son defeated white former
champ James J. Jeffries in
Reno, Nev.
In 1911, pop music con-
ductor Mitch Miller was born
in Rochester, N.Y
In 1959, America's 49-star
flag, honoring Alaskan state-
hood, was officially unfurled.
Ten years ago: A Russian
airliner crashed in Siberia,
killing all 145 people aboard.
Five years ago: Discov-
ery lifted off in the first Inde-
pendence Day shuttle
launch.
One year ago: Gen.
David Petraeus formally as-
sumed command of the
130,000-strong international
force in Afghanistan, declar-
ing "we are in this to win."
Today's Birthdays: Advice
columnist Pauline Phillips
(the original "Dear Abby") is
93. Actress Eva Marie Saint
is 87. Playwright Neil Simon
is 84. Broadcast journalist
Geraldo Rivera is 68.
Rhythm-and-blues musician
Ralph Johnson (Earth, Wind
and Fire) is 60. Christian
rock singer Michael Sweet is
48. Actor Al Madrigal is 40.
Actress Jenica Bergere is
37. Actor-singer John Lloyd
Young is 36. Singer Stephen
"Ste" McNally (BBMak) is 33.
Actress Becki Newton (TV:


"Ugly Betty") is 33. Presidential
daughter Malia Obama is 13.
Thought for Today: "All
progress has resulted from
people who took unpopular
positions." -Adlai E.
Stevenson, American diplo-
mat and politician (1900-
1965).








MONDAY EVENING JULY 4, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon 1 Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
IWESHI NBC 0 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Access Hollyw'd America's Got Talent 'PG' I Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Macy's 4th of July Fireworks News Against Casey
BBC World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) x A Capitol Fourth 2011 Concert celebrates America. (N) A Capitol Fourth 2011 Concert celebrates America. (In Pioneers of Television "Science
WEl PBS B 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) (In Stereo Live) 'G' Stereo) G'm Fiction" Futuristic storytellers. G'
WUFT PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) x A Capitol Fourth 2011 (N) (In Stereo Live) G' A A Capitol Fourth 2011 (In Stereo) 'G'E World News Tavis Smiley (N)
n N QNewsChannel 8 NBC Niqhtly Entertainment Extra (N) PG' x America's Got Talent Hopefuls audi- Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Macy's 4th of July Fireworks NewsChannel 8 Tonight Show
WF]) NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 at 6PM (N) News (N)G' Tonight (N) 'PGtion for the judges.'PG' Spectacular (N) 'PG' Spectacular (In tereo) 'PG' at 11PM (N) With Jay Leno
WFV ABC . n n n Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! "Kids Wheel of Fortune The Bachelorette (In Stereo) '14' Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Eyewitness News Nightline (N)
I ABC 20 20 20 Lat6 (N) Week" N)'G' 'G'cc Edition "James"'PG' s atf1PM 'G '
n 10 News, 6pm CBS Evening Dr. Phil (In Stereo)'PG' c Howl MetYour Mike& Molly Two anda Half Mike& Molly Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular 10 News, 11pm Late Show With
WTSP CBS 10 10 10 1010 1 (N) News/Pelley Mother'14' "First Kiss"'14' Men'14' '14' Annual ceremony (N) 'G' (N) David Letterman
FOX13 6:00 Surviving the TMZ (N) 'PG' c The Insider (N) MasterChef Competing for a spot in House "Small Sacrifices" A patient FOX13 10:00 News (N) X FOX13 News The Insider
[WTV] FOX 0 13 13 13 13News (N) Storm: hurricane PG' the next round. 14' s re-enacted the Crucifixion. 14' Edge at 11pm 'PG' E
WCJB ABC E 11 11 4 15 News World News Entertainment Inside Edition The Bachelorette (In Stereo) '14' Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss News Nightline (N) 'G'
The Place for Miracles: Your Hour of Zola Levitt Great Awakening Life Today With Kingdom Great Awakening
WC IND D 2 2 2 2 22 2Healing'G' Presents 'G' James Robison Connection a
ABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopard! "Kids The Bachelorette (In Stereo) '14' Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss ABC Action News Nightline (N)
WFSABC 11 11 11 11at 6PM G' Week" () 'G' Edition "James" 'PG' s at 11 PM 'G X
M ND F 12 12 Family Guy 14' Family Guy 14' How I Met Your The Office'PG' Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Frasier'PG' s Frasier'PG' H How IMetYour The Office "The South Park South Park'14'
WM IND EB 12 12 Mother14' "Resilience" (In Stereo)'14' c Mother'PG' Duel" PG' 'MA' c
(WTTAI MNT ED 6 6 6 9 Smarter Don't Forget Love-Raymond Old Christine Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14' Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14' Seinfeld PG Seinfeld'PG' Entourage'MA' Enthusiasm
WACXl TBN B 21 21 21 The Faith Show The 700 Club'PG' s Wisdom-Siddiki Love a Child |Give Me the Bible Paid Program Claud Bowers Tims Ministries
The King of The King of Two and a Half Twoanda Half 90210 "Mother Dearest" Dixon and Gossip Girl Nate and Serena plan According to Jim George Lopez Friends '14' Friends'14' s
WTOG CW M 4 4 4 4 12 12 Queens PG QueensPG' Men'14' E Men "Pilot"'PG' Annie visit their father.'14' an intervention.'14' 'PG' E 'PG'
FM c i 16 16 16 16 JUNK'D'G' D Chamber Chat YourCitrus Invemess Zorro x Straight Talk Med Moving On 'G' ** "StarbirdandSweet William"(1975, Drama) Skip Homier, A
County Court Spotlight Martinez. A youth crashes his plane and encounters a bear cub. 'G'
(WoGXJ FOX g 13 13 7 7 TMZ (N)'PG' My Name Is Earl The Simpsons The Simpsons MasterChef (In Stereo)'14' x House "Small Sacrifices"'14' FOX 35 News at 10 (N) x TMZ (N)'PG' King of the Hill
IWVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 1515Noticias Noticiero Univ Cuando Me Enamoro (N)'14' Teresa (N) '14' (SS) Triunfo del Amor (N) '14'(SS) Don Francisco Presenta'PG' Noticias Noticiero Univ
WXPX ION ( 17 Without a Trace "Endgame" '14' Without a Trace "Showdown" '14' Without a Trace "Safe"'14' E Criminal Minds'14' E Criminal Minds "Haunted"'14' Criminal Minds "Reckoner" '14'
ARE) 54 48 54 54 25 27 Hoarders'PG' |Hoarders PG' x Hoarders'PG' c Hoarders (N) PG' Intervention "Eddie" (N) 14' Intervention "Jimbo"'PG'
(CM 55 64 55 55 *** "Rocky " (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone. PG' *** "Rocky fll"(1982, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T,Talia Shire.'PG' I ** "Rocky IV"(1985) Sylvester Stallone.'PG' c
(NI 52 35 52 52 19 21 Finding Bigfoot'PG' |Swamp Wars "Killer Pythons" 'PG' Swamp Wars"Killer Pythons"'PG' SwampWars'PG' |Swamp Wars'PG' |Swamp Wars "Killer Pythons"'PG'
iETD 96 19 96 96 **, "Notorious"(2009, Biography) Angela Bassett.'R' The BET Awards 2011 Music, entertainment and sports in LA.'PG' Notorious (2009)
(iRAVOI 254 51 254 254 Housewives/NYC |Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ
(Ce 27 61 27 27 33 "Blue Collar Comedy Tour: One for the Road"(2006) 'NR' c Jeff Dunham: Arguing With Myself Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny |Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny
(CT) 98 45 98 98 28 37 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Country Fried |Country Fried Ron White's Celebrity Salute to the Troops PG' Ron White's Celebrity Salute to the Troops 'PG' Country Fried Country Fried
(C BC 43 42 43 43 The China Question Code Wars: America's Apocalypse 2012 Crime Inc. "Human Trafficking" Crime Inc."Stolen Goods" Crime Inc."Prescription Drugs"
[CM I 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room John King, USA (N) CNN Presents Wayne Williams in his first interview. x Anderson Cooper 360 (N) E
(DIS) 46 40 46 46 6 5 A.N.T Farm G' So Random! G' "My Babysitter'sa Vampire" (2010) Matthew Knight. IMy Babysitter My Babysitter My Babysitter "Lemonade Mouth"(2011, Musical) Bridgit Mendler.'NR' E
(ESP 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) E NFL Live (N) 2011 Hot Dog Eating Contest SportsNation x Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) E |SportsCenter (N) (Live)
(ESPN 2 34 28 34 34 43 49 SportsNation x Football Live SportsNation E |MLS Soccer New England Revolution at Real Salt Lake. (N) (Live) |MLS Soccer: Sounders at Galaxy
EEWTi) 95 70 95 95 48 Twelve |EWTN Gallery Daily Mass: Our Lady The Journey Home 'G' Lamb's Supper |The Holy Rosary The World Over Raymond Arroyo. Vaticano |Women of
(FC ) 29 52 29 29 20 28 Switched at Birth'14' Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Switched at Birth '14' Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club 'PG' E
CI 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baier (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) X Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor x
[FOO 26 56 26 26 Sunny's All American Celebration Chopped "Go for It!" Super Summer Snacks Unwra. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Meat- Potatoes Challenge "Star Wars Cakes"
[FSNFI 35 39 35 35 MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Florida Marlins. From Sun Life Stadium in Miami. (Live) Marlins Live! Sports Stories The Game 365 The Final Score Marlins Live! The Game 365
[FX) 30 60 30 30 51 ** "Ghost Rider" (2007, Action) Nicolas Cage, Eva Mendes. 'PG-13' **1 "Eagle Eye"(2008, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan. 'PG-13' **1 "Eagle Eye"(2008) Shia LaBeouf. 'PG-13'
GL 67 Golf Central (N) Playing Lessons The Golf Fix (N) (Live) Big Break Indian Wells Big Break Indian Wells (N) The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center
(HALL 39 68 39 39 45 54 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls
*** "Independence Day"(1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith. Earthlings Real Time With Bill Maher (In Citizen U.S.A.: A 50-State Road Trip *** "Splice"(2009, Science Fiction) Adrien Brody. Premiere. Scientists
302 201 302 302 2 2 vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. (In Stereo)PG-13 Stereo) 'MA' (N) (In Stereo)'PG' E use human DNA to create a new hybrid. (In Stereo)'R' E
H V 23 57 23 23 42 52 Hunters Int'l HuntersInt'l Hunters Int'l HuntersInt'l Yard -Disney House Hunters HGTVd (N)'G' House Hunters Hunters Int'l Hunters Int'l House Hunters House Hunters
HIST 51 25 51 51 32 42 To Be Announced To Be Announced Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' American Pickers PG' Pawn Stars'PG Pawn Stars'PG Larry the Cable Guy
LIFEC 24 38 24 24 31 "Ann Rule's Everything She Ever Wanted" (2009) Gina Gershon. EI "Ann Rule's Too Late to Say Goodbye"(2009) Rob Lowe. x Vanished With Beth Holloway PG How Met HowlMet
** "What Color Is Love?" (2009, Docudrama) Jennifer Finnigan. A ** "The Fantasia Barrino Story: Life Is Not a Fairy Tale" (2006, ** "Raising Helen" (2004, Comedy-Drama) Kate Hudson, John Corbett.
50 woman and an athlete fight over custody of their son. 'NR' x Biography) Fantasia Barrino, Loretta Devine, Viola Davis. NR ' A woman gains custody of her late sister's children. 'PG-13'
*A "Our Family Wedding" (2010) America Ferrera. Two overbearing men **** "Platoon" (1986, War) Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe. A soldier ** "A Nightmare on Elm Street"(2010, Horror) Co-Ed
( I 320 221 320 320 3 3 wreak havoc with their children's wedding plans. 'PG-13' E embarks on a yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam. (In Stereo) 'R' Jackie Earle Haley, Rooney Mara. (In Stereo) 'R' E Confidential MA'
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Live (N) Hardball With Chris Matthews The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word
(TV 97 66 97 97 39 "Bring It On: Fight to the Finish" "Bring It On: In It to Win It" (2007) Ashley Benson. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Teen Wolf (In Stereo) 'PG' Teen Wolf (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' Teen Wolf (In Stereo) 'PG'
NGI 65 44 53 Border Wars'PG' Border Wars'PG' Border Wars'PG' Border Wars 14' Border Wars'PG' Border Wars'PG'
(NICKI 28 36 28 28 35 25 iCarly'G'E |iCarly'G'E BrainSurge'G' SpongeBob My Wife-Kids |My Wife-Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez |George Lopez The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PG'
(XYl 44 Snapped "Karen Tobie"'PG' Snapped "Diane Fleming"'PG' Snapped "Amanda McGhee"'PG' Snapped A mother's 911 call.'PG' Snapped "Michelle Reynolds"'PG' Snapped "Wendi Andriano" 'PG'
i * "Push" ** "Letters to Juliet" (2010) Amanda Seyfried. A *, "The Back-up Plan"(2010) Jennifer Lopez. A single woman becomes Weeds (iTV) (N) The Big C "Musical Weeds (iTV) The Big C"Musical
S W 340 241 340340 (2009) 'PG-13' young woman finds an old note to someone's lover, pregnant, then meets her ideal man. 'PG-13' 'MA' E Chairs"MA' MA' E Chairs MA'
SPEEDI 122 112 122 122 Am. Trucker Am. Trucker |NASCAR Race Hub (N) The 10'PG' The 10'PG' Pinks--All Out'PG' The Day The 10'PG' The 10'PG'
SPIKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 *** "Training Day" (2001, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' ** "Walking Tall" (2004, Action) The Rock. (In Stereo) PG-13' ** "U.S. Marshals"(1998) Tommy Lee Jones.
SU36 31 36 36 Rays Live! MLB Baseball'PG' Rays Live! Inside the Rays TBA Jimbo Fisher
SYFE 31 59 31 31 26 29 Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Twilight Zone
TB 49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' FamilyGuy'14' Family Guy'14' FamilyGuy'14' Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' FamilyGuy'14' Conan'14'
1 ***1 0 "America, America"(1963, Drama) Stathis Giallelis, FrankWolff. A **** "Yankee Doodle Dandy" 1942, Musical) James Cagney Life of *** "The Roaring Twenties" 1939, Crime Drama) James Cagney
169 53 169 169 30 35 Greek boy struggles to get to the New World. 'NR' song-and-dance man George M. Cohan.'NR' E (DVS) Prohibition holds different fates or three war veterans. 'NR'
TC 53 34 53 53 24 26 American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr.
TCI 50 46 50 50 29 30 Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss PG Surprise Homecoming'PG' Cake Boss'PG' CakeBoss'PG'
(T 48 33 48 48 31 34 Law & Order "Hunters"'14' Law & Order "Patsy"'14' Law & Order "Tabula Rasa"'14' Law & Order "Entitled"'14' The Closer (Part 2 of 2) 14' X Rizzoli & Isles'14' E
FTRAV 9 54 9 9 44 Man v Food 'G' Man v Food'G' Man v. Food'G' Man v Food'G' Off Limits "Seattle"'G' Off Limits "San Francisco"'PG' Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations
(triif 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'PG' I Cops'14' c HardcorePawn Hardcore Pawn HardcorePawn HardcorePawn Hardcore Pawn HardcorePawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Storage Hunters Storage Hunters
TV3L 32 49 32 32 34 24 Bewitched'G' Bewitched'G' Bewitched'G' Bewitched'G' Hap. Divorced Hap. Divorced Hap. Divorced Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PG'
USA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Suspicion"'PG' NCIS "Sharif Returns"'PG' E NCIS "Dead Man Walking"'PG' WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (In Stereo Live)'PG, L,V V Suits "Errors and Omissions"'PG'
(WE) 117 69 117 117 Charmed (In Stereo)'14'x Charmed (In Stereo)'PG' E Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls
(WGIA 18 18 18 18 20 Dharma&Greg |Dharma &Greg America's Funniest HomeVideos Old Christine Old Christine America's Funniest Home Videos News at Nine Summer Blast Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Regular readers will know that
on July 4, 1776, four of the declara-
tion signatories played a game re-
markably similar to bridge. After
three rubbers, Thomas Jefferson
was well ahead. They agreed to
play one more rubber.
The first deal saw John Adams in
three no-trump. Benjamin
Franklin led his fourth-highest
spade. How should South have
planned the play?
Adams had only four top tricks
(two spades and two diamonds), but
hearts and clubs would each pro-
vide three more winners. Thinking
he was making the normal play, de-
clarer called for dummy's spade
jack. When John Hancock pro-
duced the queen, South won with
his ace and led a low club. West
grabbed the trick with his ace and
carefully led the spade 10, a croco-


Bridge

North 07-04-11
SKJ4
V K 7
+ 6 5 3 2
YK7
*6532
4 K J 10 2
West East
S108732 Q 9
SA6 9 8 5 3 2
*J98 *Q104
*A73 6964
South
S A 6 5
V Q J 10 4
*AK7
4 Q 8 5
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
Adams Franklin Jefferson Hancock
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 4 3


dile coup swallowing his partner's
nine. (If West had led a low spade,
declarer could have made his con-
tract by letting East's nine take the
trick.) South won with dummy's
king and called for the heart king,
but West took his ace and cashed
three spades for down one.
Adams was unlucky that East had
the spade queen, the spades were 5-
2, and West had both missing aces.
But Jefferson pointed out that at
trick one, his partner should have
played low from the dummy and
won with his ace. Adams started to
protest, but Jefferson continued
that when West took his club ace
and led a second spade, yes, de-
clarer would finesse dummy's jack.
However, when East won with his
queen, he would not have another
spade to lead (and if he did, spades
would be 4-3). South could drive out
the heart ace and end with an over-
trick, not an undertrick.


SgT i THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
J by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
C*^-^3 TH^y r^'fMBr- r"R - '*


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,


to form four ordinary words. @
LMYDA


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
CIHTD



RHHUST
] [] ^ 4-3


ELUOVM



Ans:L I I C


We can build a whole
new country if we get
he right components. Let me Cet ----




N -







WHEN THeY PFECIEPV TO
REAT r THE PE.L-ARATION
OF lNPPENDENCE0, THEY
PIP TH S.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)


ACROSS 39
40
1 Sleep-stage 41
acronym
4 Plod along 44
8 Nurse a drink 48
11 Juan's gold 49
12 Actor - Reeves
13 - Marie Saint 51
14 Frieze (hyph.) 52
16 Bridegroom 53
17 Attempted 54
18 Arrowhead 55
rock 56
20 Brown of
renown
21 -Zedong
22 Heat to boiling 1
25 Non-student 2
residents
29 Roly- - 3
30 Pinch, in a way
31 RSVP part 4
32 Left Bank pal 5
33 Magazine fill- 6
ers 7
34 Deli-scale word 8
35 Whims 9
38 Stooped 10


Old card game
Path to satori
Decided, as a
jury
Arrangers
Tax pro
Yard tool (2
wds.)
Geol. formation
Ohio Indians
Ballpark fig.
Okra morsel
Math groups
Depot (abbr.)
DOWN
Judge's garb
Important
decades
Fallen log cov-
erer


uapriati Toe
Put down 12 Typed in
1300 hours 15 Political bash
Horselaugh 19 Ban--
Big rig 21 Swarms around
"Terrible" tsar 22 Wingspread
Huff and puff 23 TV crooner of


yore
24 Touched down
25 Kids
26 Witness'
phrase (2
wds.)
27 Hibernia
28 Luge
30 Prefix for sec-
ond
34 Kemo Sabe's
friend
36 Dot in the
Seine
37 Lots and lots
38 Road shoul-
ders
40 Divides into
districts
41 Mounties' org.
42 Game for (2
wds.)
43 Real estate
44 "Hot Lips"
actress
45 Wool suppliers
46 Pause
47 Tijuana Ms.
50 - you with it?


Dear Readers: Happy
Fourth of July! We hope
you are enjoying your hol-
iday weekend with friends and
family, watching fire-
works and firing up
the grill. Here's some-
thing that was sent to
our mailbox a while
back, and we saved it
for today:
DearAnnie: Several
years ago, you printed
the words written on
the base of the Statue
of Liberty. A lot of peo-
ple seem to have for-
gotten they exist and ANN
what they mean. My MAIL
parents were immi-
grants, and because
they came to the U.S., their chil-
dren had the opportunity and
motivation to become doctors,
lawyers and artists who pay taxes
and contribute to American soci-
ety Could you please print those
inspiring words again? - Toler-
ant in Chicago
Dear Tolerant: Thank you for
asking. Here they are, and on the
most appropriate occasion we
could think of:
The New Colossus by Emma
Lazarus
Not like the brazen giant of
Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride
from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sun-
set gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch,
whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning,
and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her
beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome;


her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that
twin cities frame.
"Keep ancient lands, your sto-
ried pomp!" cries she
With silent lips.
"Give me your tired,
your poor,
Your huddled
masses yearning to
breathe free,
The wretched re-
fuse of your teeming
shore.
Send these, the
homeless, tempest-tost
to me,
IE'S I lift my lamp beside
BOX the golden door!"
Dear Annie: I am 13
years old and a twin.
My sister, "Trixie," is a popular,
funny girl like me. Everybody
loves her. She wins awards at
school and seems like the perfect
kid. I love her a lot, but I'm wor-
ried about her.
We are similar in all ways ex-
cept one. Trixie cannot take crit-
icism. She thinks everybody is
out to get her. Even if you speak
to her in civil tones, she blows up
and says you are yelling at her.
She's OK around her friends and
will make a joke out of anything
they say because she doesn't take
them seriously But with our par-
ents, coaches and teachers, it's
another matter. Trixie knows
everything and refuses to let any-
body tell her otherwise.
As an example, she's a decent
basketball player, but both her
coach and our parents made a
constructive suggestion (nicely)
about the way she handles free
throws. Last night, Dad said it
again, and instead of replying,


"I'll work on it," Trixie started
screeching and said my father
was being mean and horrible.
She became irritable, and when
Dad came to her room to talk to
her, she said, "Stop screaming at
me!" and ran off to sulk.
You might write this off as nor-
mal teenage behavior, but Trixie
takes that defiant attitude to an-
other level. The way she twists
everything into a personal attack
is disturbing, and when she
throws a fit, it's frightening. I
don't know anyone who behaves
as extremely as she does. Is there
something wrong with her? -
Worried in California
Dear Worried: Trixie sounds
like her hormones are in hyper-
drive, but it isn't necessarily any-
thing to worry about. Does she
maintain decent grades? Does
she get into trouble at school? Is
she still friendly with the same
group of girls? These are the
changes in behavior that can in-
dicate real trouble. You seem
like a caring sister. Please talk to
your parents about this, and let
them handle it.
--In--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Email
anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W
Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los
Angeles, CA 90045. To find out
more about Annie's Mailbox
and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www.creators.com.


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Answer to Previous Puzzle
CHRA B R|UM LAMAI
HULL EMO EGOS
PH L E MOS E G
II PRIE S S
CA B BEES MA C H
AMULE E UB I E


P ISS E D S
SP AIL PNINUD E
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IL LS R I A CROW0
P E EE KITR YIHE W N


� 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


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B6 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


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41
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


I'VE PLLLEP 0U L P BY
YVoR RooTi, IVE HACKE
AT 'OU WI\T A HOE, \IVE
EV3 o iE ST KOVEE,,
COMING BACK,


Dilbert


YOU'RE IGNORANT
AND RIDICULOUS.
I'M BORED. ARE WE
DONE HERE?







The Born Loser

"I CAN'T 5E.E TRE PKRA>E.


Kit 'N' Carlyle


fM BEGINNING TO
DEVELOP A GRO6 ING
RESPECT FoR YoO, o.
WWAT o
E CALL



� 'I' ..


I KNEW IT! YOUR
EARS ARE STILL
JUMPING!


( - N

'-(4


For Better or For Worse


I CAN'T TELL IF
I'\ A MANAGEMENT
GENIUS OR JUST
LAZY.


2I


Rubes


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


www famlycrrcus corn tt....^
"C'mon, Daddy! It's time to put up
the decorations of independence!"


Doonesbury


Big Nate


Arlo and Janis


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:35 p.m.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In RealD 3D.
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m. No passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m. 7:50
p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 4:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 3:45 p.m., 9:45
p.m. No passes.
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:40
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Monte Carlo" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Larry Crowne" (PG-13)1 p.m., 3:20 p.m., 5:40 p.m., 8
p.m., 10:30 p.m.


"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 7
p.m. No passes.
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) In RealD 3D.
12:45 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m.,
10:45 p.m. No passes.
"Cars 2" (G) 3:50 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 12:25 p.m., 3:10 p.m., 5:25
p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 12:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 2:35 p.m., 7:50
p.m. No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 12:35 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides" (PG-13)4
p.m., 10:25 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals V


"XUDR YM XOUC, EUNG YM HUG,


XJMNUNG YM TGMUXZ OULZ CI FYJDLMI


OKX CI JDKELGMKVEG


HGLGMCUDKLUYD."


- PYZD


KHKCX


PREVIOUSSOLUTION: "It is a tremendous act of violence to begin anything ... I simply
skip what should be the beginning." - Rainer Maria Rilke
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-4


Pickles

ALL MW LIE
PA VELOMS HAVE
BEENi WY ENEMIES.









Sally Forth -


VOU MI~SEP TELL US SOMETHING
THE STOP GIGN k WE PON'TALREADY
KNOW,
.. . ,,-1


YOU'RE HIRED. YOU
MUST HAVE AWESOME
TECHNICAL SKILLS OR
ELSE SOMEONE WOULD
HAVE KILLED
YOU BY NOW.


Sl


I CAN'T BELIEVE MY
PARENTS ARE MAKING
ME DO THIS.
MAYBE IT
WON'T BE 50
BAD, TEDDY'


Today' MOVIES


7-4


1, '.. . " . . '-
--r/<


COMICS


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011 B7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weird WRE


Billboard removed
COLUMBUS, Ohio -A bill-
board supporting atheism has
been taken down from property
owned by an Ohio church after
the pastor complained.
The ad put up in Columbus
by the Freedom From Religion
Foundation featured the beam-
ing face of a local nonbeliever
and the man's message: "I can
be good without God."
The sign had upset the Rev.
Waymon Malone of Christ
Cathedral Church. The church
owns the land where the bill-
board went up. Malone was un-
available for comment, but his
mother-in-law told The Colum-
bus Dispatch on Tuesday the
pastor ordered the ad removed.
Account executive Jay
Schmidt with Matrix Media
Services called the billboard's
placement "an unfortunate
oversight." The ad agency said
the sign came down days after
it was installed last week and is
back up at another site.

Follow that dent
NEW CASTLE, Pa.- Penn-
sylvania police say an 89-year-
old woman used her cane to
dent the car of two people who
stole her friend's purse, and au-
thorities were able to track
down the getaway car based in
part on the cane's imprint.
New Castle police Chief
Thomas Sansone said the
woman and her 82-year-old
friend were accosted outside a
pizza shop June 26. Police said
27-year-old Jerry Brown Jr.
grabbed the purse, but couldn't
peel away before the 89-year-
old banged the car's trunk with
her cane.


A June 21 photo shows a billboard at 417 N. James in Columbus, one of sever
Freedom From Religion Foundation around Columbus. The billboard supporting
been taken down from property owned by an Ohio church after the pastor con


Police found the car and,
based on the description of the
robber - and dents matching
the cane - arrested Brown
and 21-year-old Tatiana
Vargas.
The two are jailed in
Lawrence County on robbery
charges and on warrants for
unrelated crimes. Online court
records don't list attorneys for
them.
Long overdue
ORLANDO -A Michigan
man has paid a $1 Florida park-
ing ticket more than 35 years
overdue.
Orlando police said they re-
ceived Stanley Baker's pay-
ment for a Nov. 7, 1975,
parking ticket Tuesday. The 89-
year-old Pentwater, Mich., man
included a note reading, "Better


late than never!"
Baker's son, Fritz Baker, said
his father found the ticket in a
book bought at an Orlando
garage sale in 1995. He said
his father decided to pay the
fine as a lark, even though it
wasn't issued to him.
Baker sent the $1 payment in
the ticket's original envelope.
That got it delivered to a police
department auditorium that was
a night and traffic court in 1975.
Orlando's parking violations
from 1975 have been de-
stroyed.
A police spokesman said the
department thought Baker's
payment was funny.
Polite burglar
VINELAND, N.J. -Authori-
ties said a burglar offered to re-
pair the screen he damaged


atheism has
iplained.


breaking into a New Jersey
home after he was confronted
by the homeowner and told her
he meant to break into a neigh-
bor's home.
The homeowner, Maria Car-
dona, told The Press of Atlantic
City the man made her nervous
as he told her about his family
and kept a hand in his pocket.
She said he was "really polite,"
but she just wanted him to
leave.
Vineland police said nothing
was stolen during the en-
counter June 27.
Statehouse bar
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Ohio's
Capitol building in Columbus
will be a place for making laws
and making drinks.
The Columbus Dispatch re-
ported the Ohio Statehouse's


Angry bird
PENDLETON, Ore. - Bicy-
clists in eastern Oregon say
they're getting whacked on the
head by an angry bird.
Riders in Pendleton, Ore.,
told the East Oregonian a male
hawk is dive-bombing them be-
cause they're too close to a
nest he's guarding in an old cot-
tonwood tree.
Bicyclist Mack Temple said
the bird came in from behind
like a fighter plane and
whacked his helmet.
Another rider, Charlie New-
house, said the attack on his
helmet was "like getting hit with
a baseball bat." He said the
talons went in through the hel-
met.
Bird-watchers say the large
bird is a Swainson's hawk. The
riders say he's been vigilant for a
few nesting seasons, but hasn't
been as aggressive as this year.
Bird-watchers say the hawk


~31r~r~mn


C CITRUS COUNTY
H RONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT

i lTl BU -. "si


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday.................................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday...................................4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday.................................4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday............... 11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday...................... PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday.................... PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
hft*rftftArfAf


HANDSOME Widower in
decent shape seeks to
meet fun, loving,
intelligent, socially
extroverted woman in
her 60's or 70's with a
sweet, warm,
humorous personality
in good health,
petite or slim shape
for meaningful
conversation & other
social activities &
perhaps a personal
loving relationship
(352) 527-0591


White Widowed
Christian Female,
In search of Single
White Christian Male
For Friendship,
walking talking,
going places,
I'm a Non smoker,
non drinker, retired
nurse. Tired of cook-
ing for one. Dream
catcher,you know
who you are,with
a wee bit of
Irish Blarney
Call (352) 419-5757


#1 Employment source is



www.chronicleonline.com


Active young 70's gen-
tleman looking for at-
tractive outgoing lady
for travel & companion-
ship. Reply to Blind Box
1722-P
C/O Citrus County
Chronicle, 106 W. Main
St., Inverness, FL 34450



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c. appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
CALL 352-476-8949



Adorable Kittens
12 weeks old, yellow
tiger, bl&wh.
353-613-7117
FREE BUILDING
INSULATION
(352) 422-2927
FREE Fuzzy kittens
all colors 8 weeks old
Looking for new home
Also Mom's too
(352) 726-4135
FREE KITTENS
litter trained,
eat solid food.
(352) 447-0072
FREE KITTENS
Multi- Colors
(352) 270-4774
Horse Manure
You haul it.
352-513-4009
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Kittens (3)
free to good home, Litter
box trained and eating
cat food. (2) short-haired
and (1) long-haired.
Call (352) 563-0950
Lap Dog
Pug/Snauzer Mix
couple yrs. old well be-
haved. trained, cant
keep 352-527-2461
PIT/CURR PUPS
8 wks. for good home
352-287-3384
Puppies
3 female 7 wks mixed
breed call for Info
(352) 634-2781


SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E.
on Eden Dr from Hwy.
41, Inverness
WATERMELON,
OPE TII 4th JULY
8:30a-6pM, 726-6378
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
Pesticide Free! $2.50/lb.
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm.
OPEN TUES. thru. Sun.
7a-7p (352) 726-7907



Shamrock Macaw
Description & Details
Necessary
(352) 544-0093
(352) 592-5959



LEARN TO SEW I
I furnish everything!
My home or yours
(352) 795-7206, Mary



CRYPT (FI)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$4000. 586-596-7580



SECRETARY
NEEDED
A-1 & Pest Control
Good people skills,
excel, computer skills,
appointment setting.
(352) 726-5363, Marrle



Stylist, Esthetician &
Massage Therapist
(352) 628-2881









Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
irftft* r *tt


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)
CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
DIETARY
DEPARTMENT
Is looking for a few
serious minded, hard
working, dependable
people. Must be able
to work flexible hrs.
Drug free facility,
prior criminal
background need
not apply
Apply in Person
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE
NOW HIRING
RN'S
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828



Busy Insurance
Office
Looking for an
Experienced Agent
with active 220 lie.
Salary commiserates
w/experience.
Send Resume to:
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd Blind Box 1721p
Crystal River, Florida
34429


Firm
Administrator
/Office Manager
With a BS/BA in
business or
commensurate
experience;
must have an
understanding of
daily office opera-
tions and a working
knowledge of
Intuit and Microsoft
Office Products for
a Citrus County CPA
Firm. Candidate
must come highly
recommended.
Please reply to:
PO Box 895
Inverness, FL
34451-0895


STORE/SALES
MANAGER
For established
Marine dealership,
Sales, management
and Marine knowl-
edge a must. DFWP/
EOE Email Resume
sharonnobles@nobles
marine.com






MARINE SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
For established
Marine Dealership,
Mercury/Yamaha
certification req.EOE/
DFWP. Email Resume
sharonnobles@nobles-
marine.com






F/T Housekeep-
ing/Assistant
Must love animals,
cooking, shopping,
cleaning & home
management
5/2 days wk. 8a-6pm
CALL 6P-9p ONLY
Position Becomes
Available August 1st
Citrus Springs Area
352-522-1109


FURNITURE
DELIVERY PERSON
NEEDED
Apply in person at:
150 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Crystal River


V THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
Work in busy shop per-
forming bench work
and operating
machinery.
Fax resume ASAP to:
352-344-8666




Part-time
Tow Truck Driver
Must live in the
Homosassa area.
Criminal Back
Ground Check and
vaild Florida Drivers
License required.
Dave's Body Shop.
Call: 628-4878

SHOP/YARD
WORK
P/T, CDL Llc. needed,
Apply In person
Job Site Services,
2240 N Skeeteerr.
Hernanado




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)


Act Now-

I BENE'S
International I
School of Beauty
SBarber I
& Massage
Therapy
* NOW ENROLLING*
SPRING HILL
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Sept 19th
BARBERING - Niahts
Aug. 8,
I *** I
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
*** I
FACIAL TECH -Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.
I *** I
NAIL TECH - Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.
1 (866) 724-2363
1486 Plnehurst Dr
Spring Hill FI. 34606

NE EfW

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352)245-4119
TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105



BOYD'S BEARS (18)
Orig Bxs, 5 Special
Edition, 1998-03, 13
W/Auth, 5 WIO. EXC
Cond. $100 746-7355
LENNOX DISNEY
THIMBLE COLLECTION
with shelf, $100.00
352-527-1399


7 49 6 321 58
621485973
6 2 1 4 8 5 9 7 3
853 197642
1973 482 65
564729381
238 516497

4 829 7 15 36
975263814
316854729


0008L21
Sudoku * -nW-. 4puz.com

4 3 5

6 14 59 3

8 1 7 2

97 26

5 1

38 49

4 9 1 6

9 52 3 8 4

1 5 2
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


first full-service bar will open
next month within an existing
cafe. The bar on the building's
lower level will sell beer, wine
and liquor.
The Ohio agency that over-
sees the Statehouse said the
bar will have flat-screen televi-
sions and will be open to the
public at certain times. It also
will host special events and
what are described as "private
Happy hours."
One thing it won't allow:
,., guns.
A new Ohio law permits
some concealed weapons to be
carried into bars and other
places where alcohol is served.
But the public is prohibited from
Associated Press taking firearms into the State-
mrl nut unn hv house.


will ease up once his brood
learns to fly.
Cellphone charge
BANGOR, Maine - Police
have brought charges against a
homeless man in Maine who
helped himself to an outdoor
electrical outlet to charge a pair
of cellphones.
A Bangor police officer
checking downtown businesses
discovered 23-year-old Shaun
Fawster charging his cell-
phones in an outlet hidden be-
hind some flowers.
Fawster was charged last
weekend with theft of services,
as well as carrying a concealed
weapon after the officer found a
folding knife tucked underneath
his shirt.
The Bangor Daily News said
Fawster was later released
from jail. It's unknown if he has
an attorney.
Trapped in vent
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.-A
28-year-old Colorado man was
rescued dusty but alive after he
was trapped nearly 15 hours in
an air-conditioning vent.
Englewood police said they
responded to calls for help
Tuesday from the roof of an el-
ementary school, where they
discovered a man trapped 30
feet down the vent.
Firefighters had to cut open
the vent to pull the man out.
The Denver Post reported
the man, who wasn't identified,
told police he stole a friend's
purse Monday night and threw
it on the roof. When he climbed
onto the roof to get the purse,
he fell into the vent and be-
came stuck.

-From wire reports


" "T WolJ L l r
IOIIVR I S ErC LL

3I 25 . .5 9II6T
OR*PLACE YOUR ADONLINEAT
viwwATAchr J o1n* |1rc reo|1 || ine Tnco B



(ONNETIN HE RIHT

BUYERS WTH OU MSSG


Chronicle
Connection


B8 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


NATION







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VINTAGE COMIC BOOK
Dell #1195, National Vel-
vet, very good condition.
$50 obo 727-463-4411






DEEP CHEST FREEZER
Kenmore, works and
looks great. $50
795-6481

ELECTRIC STOVE
WHITE, GE PROFILE
W/CONVECTION OVEN
$325.00. MICROWAVE
CONVECTION ABOVE
THE RANGE OVEN
WHITE $125.00 OR
BOTH FOR $400.00
352-527-431 g


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.

Attention Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452


THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641

All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955

CAREY'S TREE SERVICE
Complete Tree Care
and MORE!
352-364-1309, lic./Ins

Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436


DISHWASHER
needs to be fixed, $1
352-465-1616

Fridgdaire Refrig.
w/ice maker 22 cu
ft. good cond
$120 352) 246-3500

HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914

KENMORE DRYER
Large capacity, electric.
Moving, must sell $75
Randy 352-746-6029


DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
T re removal & trimming.
Ins.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825

TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696





A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705

BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop Cordless
Phone. Cell Phone
U.P.S and Rebuild
* Camera- Watch
* Hearing. Power Tool
* Wheel Chair - Alarm
. Power Tool Etc.-
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness


Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

ABC Painting & Handy
man Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129

.3A Y


Al paeso hm
reais Ee wr


Kenmore Washer
Large capacity, Moving,
must sell. $75.
Randy 352-746-6029
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
STAND MIXER
WEST BEND, #41036,
2gl.bowls,beaters&dough
hooks,Like new, $45.
352-746-7232
STOVE
Friigidaire back &
white, self cleaning like
new $250 obo
Washer/Dryer GE
whiteS/S tubs, like new
$480 obo352- 601-3656
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135


INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/lIns.
#2441. 352-634-1584




Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Disabeled
Any Hrs., Exc. Ref's
352-341-0404
Cell 850-242-9343




NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311



Entertainment Centers
furn. vanities,cabinets
Top Quality reasonable
352 726-5832/212-3532



ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)


Washer & Dryer
Large capacity, Estate
by whirlpool purchased
new April 2010
$400. Set.
352-746-9108
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent condition.
Can deliver
352-263-7398
Whirlpool, white, 33"
refrigerator/freezer,
side by side, 2 yrs, 9
mo. exc. shape, $500
firm (352) 344-0928




BOOKCASE
Cherrywood, Adjustable
Shelves, 54"x32", Free
Standing. $65
727-463-4411


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300






Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 352-201-7451




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129
All Phase Handyman
all phases of home
improvement & repair
I beat any price
(352) 634-0019







L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777


CIASSIFIEDS




BOOKCASE
Lovely, Cherrywood, Free
Standing, 64"x32". $75
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL FILE
CABINET, Pre-Owned,
Lateral, Metal, 3 Drawer,
Graphite Color. $65
727-463-4411
DESK CHAIR
Commercial, Pre-owned,
Fabric Covered, Adjusta-
ble, $55. 727-463-4411
DESK CHAIR
Pre-Owned, Commercial,
Fabric Covered,
Adjustable, $45.
727-463-4411
FILE CABINET
2 Drawer, Pre-Owned,
Commercial, Metal,
Lateral, Graphite Color.
$45 727-463-4411


ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main &
repair Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




Tim Herndon Plumbing
$10. off w/fhis ad
10 yrs serving Citrus Co
lic/insCFC1428395
(352) 201-8237




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up,
hauling352 220-6761




A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 k




Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011 B9


2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JULY 7
Estate Buick, great for
starter or work car.
Contents of several
homes, balance of
antiques & collect.
Furn., tools, & more!
********
FRI. JULY 8- SPECIALTY
TRAIN AUCTION
Prey 6PM Auction 7PM
Lionel, Marx, American
Flyer, F gauge, 0 gauge
Standard & HO + houses
tracks & accessories
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
19% RP-?% ca disc


John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc 132549 302-9269




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325


)ji t' LLL


VACATION IN
v ,iermishing
YOUR OWN . "-0f1o
BACKYARD... *I k,,

"Weekly
P Pool Service
Lic. & Insured
CPC2-156565
B- III



= .. ue a q58


32" HDTV
flatscreen, tabletop
model, 8 months old,
$300 (352) 795-0018
SONY BIG SCREEN
REAR PROJECTION TV
well maintained, year
2000. $100.00.
352-637-4279 days.
TV 32" SYLVANIA
2005, $40, After 12PM
(352) 447-4380


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374




A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do If AllII
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal ,cleanuphaul.
(352) 726-9570
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935


AI LU M I


PeimitiFAnd
Engineering:
e * Roofovers* Carports
Up to Screen Rooms Decks
S$200value - *Windows-Doors-Additions

352-628-7519
8 www.Advancedaluminumofcitrus.com ss


BEAUTIFUL WOODEN
KITCHEN CABINET
DOORS, Assorted sizes
and woods $6.00 each
(12) 352-344-2321
CEILING FIXTURE
Round, 2 fluorescent
circline bulbs $25
352-201-0876
KITCHEN COUNTER-
TOP, Emerald
Green..apx.70sq.ft, for
island/counters + white
sink/sgl.fauscet..excellent
cond. $325.00
352-344-2500




DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190
CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522



SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions. com
Free Est 352-503-7464


Patio Furniture
Metal, 7 pc. Rocker,
glass table, 6 upholder
chairs w/ cushions
$150.(352) 746-2414




70" La-Z-Boy double
sofa sleeper, like new,
$175 obo 48" round
kitchen table, 4 chairs,
$100obo Call after 10a
344-4978, 400-8193
CHAIRS (2)
Stackable, Commercial,
Metal Frame, Gray Fabric
2 for $25.
727-463-4411
CHAIRS
Metal frame, stackable,
pre-owned, commercial,
Blue fabric, 2 for $25.
727-463-4411


ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ins 352-621-0881



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977







Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


Owner/Manager Name:
Philip Tomko |

Business Name:
Phil's Mobile Marine

How long has the business been in
operation in the Citrus County area?
7 years.

Describe the service/product you
offer?
We fix boats - New and Old.

What do your customers like best
about your business?
That I come to the boat! Only $60 hr. I
guarantee all my work. I'm honest, reliable
and dependable.

What is something your business
offers that people don't expect?
That we guarantee our work! We are the
most affordable!

Why did you choose this business?
Started my marine career in the Navy. I
was an engine-man on a ship. Been a
marine technician for 30 years.

What are your business hours,
address, phone number and e-mail?
Hours: 9 am - 8 pm, Monday-Friday
352-220-9435


-- � ~IT R " ..... ":c O a u YS
. ..om-s.e rl' c1i5 7i



chronicleonline.com


FOR MORE INFO CONTACT GALE RANDALL.352- 563-3266


0m1mt







BIO MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011




2 leaves, 6 fabric chairs generator, ne
and China Cabinet used, $4
dark wood (352) 400
$725. BARBECUE G
(352) 527-8766 door propane g
DINING ROOM TABLE burner and tai
Round, 45",Pedestal, wise good sha|
Beautiful warm dark wood 352-527-
w/4 chairs $75.00 Golf Tire
352-344-2321 w/ Rims, li,
DINING ROOM TABLE $140
with 2 leaves and 352-270-
chairs. $50
(352) 382-1000
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER $150. FREE
small roll desk $50. Place any G
(352) 489-3511 Merchandise
Entertainment Center FREE on oi
Large off white CLASSIFIE[
71"54'X21" 4 glass dis-
play doors, 2 Ig - Item mu
cabinets, adj shelves $100 or
$125(352) 302-8797 - 5 line
FLORIDA ROOM TABLE -5 day
WITH EXTENSION, only - 1 item P
$40.00 464-0316 - Ad must con
King 3 Pc Set, - $3.25 per adc
new twin platforms, Go to
4 yr. old sealy mattress, chronicleonl
$250 and click on t
(352) 795-8906 an Ad" i
LIFT CHAIR RECLINER
Brand new. Only used *, ,, **
two weeks. Perfect condi- - - -
tion. Purchased from
Quality Mobility in Crystal SALMON FISI
River. Cost $800, selling NATURAL S
for $350. Located in inches long an
Sugarmill Woods. Call 352-628-I
Jim at 410-504-2860 TRAILER H
Preowned Mattress Reese, wei
Sets from Twin $30; turbed cost$
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. sell $200 ins
352-628-0808 Black/Deck
saw 10" curb
SOFA $ 100.(352) 3
Dark Blue, 84" Leather
Excellent Condition :

(352) 341-0366.
SOFA TABLE PRODUCE
Dark, w/glass inserts & 1940s, Vintage
bottom shelf. $50 Scale,White P(
352-32-1000 Enamel $7


CRAFTSMAN
2.5 hp gas engine
Edger ,runs good $50.
(352) 465-0721
CRAFTSMAN
YTS 3000,21 hp
46" deck, Hydro
used 4 times, like new
$1150
(352) 726-8273
HONDA MOTOR
rear wheel drive, runs
good $125 "Ron"
(352) 344-5021
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, $2800.
352-527-4114
352-445-9901
LAWN TRACTOR
38" Yard Machine used
only 50 hours, looks like
new, must be seen
$550. Steve (352)
794-4118 Ive message
Riding Mower
18HP Cub Cadet, 1000,
42" cut, auto trans, oil
filter, $750. obo
(352) 637-9268
WEED EATER
TROYBUILT, STRAIGHT
SHAFT, STRING TRIM
HEAD, $90.00 464-0316







SUGARMILL

WOODS
Sat Sun Mon 8-4p
furniture tools, col-
lectibles etc more
4 SYCAMORE CT W.




MINK STOLE, VINTAGE
1950'S, Classy looking
pc of apparel for any
function. Exc Cond. $75
OBO 746-7355



5 - 4 ft. Fluorescent
Light Fixtures
with Bulbs
$8. ea all for $35.
(352) 746-5630
Automatic Pool
Cleaner
Navigator by Haywood
w/ hoses, excel. cond.
$125. (352) 270-8475
BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop . Cordless
Phone. Cell Phone
� U.P.S and Rebuild
� Camera- Watch
� Hearing - Power Tool
SWheel Chair Alarm
SPower Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness


727-463-


. emPan-
ew, never
450.
-8662
RILL, Out-
grill, needs
nk, other-
pe. $20.00
3177
*s (4)
ke new
8475



E !
General
e Ad for
ur EBiz
D SITE.
st be
less
es
ys
er ad
tain price
litional line

0:
ine.com
he "Place
con.



H MOUNT
KIN, 31
d Ex., $75
0033
HITCH
ght dis-
$500 new
stalled.
er table
tip blade
82-0094



SCALE
e Counter
porcelain or
75 obo
4411


ALUMINUM WALKER
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
TRANSPORT, Only
$20.00 464-0316
Lift Chair & Wheelchair
lift chair-swing-away,
powered by key, slides
into hitch, both are like
new, Both for $750 OBO
352-228-7821
SCOOTER
Sonic, like new, in-
cludes accessories, lift,
and docking device.
$500 (352) 726-8139
TOILET SEAT
EXTENSION
4", FITS ON TOILET
SEAT, $25.00 464-0316









BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



DRUMS, Gammon 7
piece drum kit.great be-
ginners set with upgraded
crash ride and high hat
Zildjian cymbals. $300.00
Call Jim 464-4490



BAR MIRRORS (3)
Various Beer and Liquor,
$30 each, 727-463-4411
Carpeting
13 x 16 carpet, Honey
Beige w/ quality thick
pad $200. firm (352)
419-4776 after 11 a
Chandelier
5 tier, all glass and
bulbs included,
beautiful! $100 OBO
(352) 637-4173
DISH SET, Mikasa Stu-
dio, Nova Cheyenne, 26
pieces, Ex.condOven,
Dishwasher & micro safe
$25 352-746-7232
TABLE, WOODEN
FOLDING, 1940's, Vin-
tage Wallpaper Pasting
Table Multi Purpose. $50
OBO 727-463-4411



GIFT CERTIFICATE
($165)
TO DYNABODY & 2 LES
MILLS WORKOUTS
$100. 586-7222


ELECTRONICS, LIGHTS
UP, 1 problem-needs
fuse or something else
$50.00 464-0316



2 Bicycles
(1) 10 speed (1) 3
speed $75. for both
bike rack for rear of car
$100.00(352) 382-0094
25 DUCK DECOYS &
ANCHORS, 17 Mal-
lards/4 Dippers/4 Green
heads, $5 ea. or $100 for
all. 628-0033
BICYCLE RACK
Nice, single bike rack for
compact car. $25.00
352-527-3177
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Helmet
BHN, D.OT. approved,
$25. 795-6481
KIDS BIKE
needs tire, $20
(352) 465-1616
RUGER MINI 14 RANCH
RIFLE, Ruger mini 14
Ranch Rifle, stainless, W/
Ammo, case and sling,
20 rd mag. 352-454-5906
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers
6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
HEAVY DUTY
UTITLIY TRAILER
Dual axle, diamond
platted metal.
$1300/obo. (352)
794-3081; 228-2324
Utility Trailer
4 x 7 Wire mesh trailer
w/ gate, purchased
new barley used, Sell
for $300 (352) 746-1017



BABY BOUNCER
hardly used, good
condition, $15.
352-465-1616


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










ROTOTILLER
reasonable, in working
order. Please call:
(352) 794-3120
UTILITY TRAILER
affordable, enclosed
trailer for storage,
6' x10' or larger.
(352) 400-2066
Want to Buy
Nice Clean Dblewide
3 Bd, 2 Bth, on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 828-728-4834
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369


TRAVEL TRAILER
$500.00 price drop every
month until sold, 2009
Sunnybrooke by Brooks-
ide, 303SLS travel trailer,
$18900. Had a stroke af-
ter purchasing new, not
used, can be seen at
11465 W Priest Ln
Homosassa FL lot #43
352-346-1416




1 MALTESE Male,
Snowball 10 wks old all
shots, health certs. &
CKC reg., $400
352-212-4504, 212-1258


kL fk
English Bull Dog
Puppies I male I
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com
MINI DACHSHUNDS
AKC/CKC,$375, Vet
certs, Males &
Females,black/tans,
choc/tans, dapples. Long,
wire, & smooth hair. visit
www.sweetnlodoxies.com
or call 352-634-3841
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
many avail, males & fe-
males starting @ $450.
Appoots avail 7 days a wk.
Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofpuos.net
Shi-A-Poo & Toy Poodle
Female $250 Male $200
CKC registered. 8 wks
HIth Cert., Paper
trained, great with kids
(352) 489-6675




MINI STALLION
very sweet 36"H. pinto
my pet needs a
padock/pasture, small
aea? Do u have anyth-
ing? (352) 527-3177




ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will email
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271
Looking for Fenced
Pasture for Goats
Call Mike
(352) 634-4237


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-8810
352-446-9701
DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo Ist & $200
Sec. 352-625-4339
Dunnellon Hwy 488
Clean 2/2, priv. lot,
fenc'd$475. mo. + dep
Hwy 488 (352) 795-6970
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HOMOSASSA
1/1, Ist/last/sec. $350.
mo. 352-634-2368
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
Very nice mobile home in
Homosassa. Please call
John at 352-503-5301 for
an appointment. $600.00


CLASSIFIED



INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1- 2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
Call 352-476-4964




AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 turn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040
FOR SALE BY OWNER
w/financing. 2/1 SW
$1500 dn. $635 inlc T & I
Floral City, nice Ig treed
lot, just remodeled.
AVAIL (352) 793-7223
PALM HARBOR
HOMES
has closed 2 model
centers Save up to
$60K on selectmodels
(813) 719-3335

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183





* THIS OUT!


Homosassa 3 bedroom.
2 bath. 1170 sq ft living
space on 3/4 acre, de-
tached, oversized 2 car
garage/workshop,with at-
tic. 450 sq ft wrap around
porch. Quiet, friendly
neighborhood on a dead
end street. For sale only.
Call 352 564 2423 or
352 601 0534

A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204


HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW, fecnced /2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms, nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411

LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807


HOW ABOUT SOME A




EXTRA





CA H!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2, furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
1st month lot rent
(352) 817-1987
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR, $350/up; 1BR, 1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR,
1-/2BA, $450 includes lot
rent; Call 352-476-4964
Opt For Owner Finance
2/1V2 Bath, 55+ Park
washer/Dryer, range
refrigerator, MUST SEE!
Lot Rent $249.
352-419-6825, 464-0590
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $600. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, turn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
until. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Large, clean, quiet,
$575. mo. incid water,
HOMOSASSA
2/2, Clean Quiet, CHA,
Scrn. Por. $550 mo.
352-257-6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all util. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
INVERNESS
Close to hosp 1/1 $450
2/2 w/scr porch $650
352-422-2393
Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
Ist MO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626




INGLIS
Close to Plant, 2/1,
with W/D, clean, quite.
$495/mo (352) 447-6016




THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000SQFT
Ideal location, corner
Hwy41 &48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391



HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$ 199mo.
$1000 dn+ lot rentoat
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, $595/mo 1st sec
(352) 697-0770.
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Newly Renovated
$450 + 1st, sec., No
pets. (352) 563-5004
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 laundry rm w/W/D
Kings Bay area. (352)
726-6515 407-791-2642
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, C/H/A $450 + dp
(352) 464-2716
INVERNESS


2/2/1 near Walmart,
lawn-care, water, gar-
bage included. $550/mo,
$500 deposit.
352.637.3734




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370



CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165


HOMOSASSA
Beautiful 2 BR, Seasonal
Avail. Nov. 1st., Can
See Now (641)660-3312
INGLIS 3/2
Furn, w/dock on River
near pwr. plant Incl util.
$1200/mo 352-267-4632




BEVERLY HILLS
1 bed/1 bath with Florida
room. Close to shopping.
Washer/dryer included.
$495/month.First/last/sec.
George 352-476-3570
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm. CHA,$500.
35 Golden 352.464.2701
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1, $595/mo @22N.
Davis 352-586-4474
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
3/3.5/2 Beautiful, Pine
Ridge area, full guest
house, shop/RV pad, 5
acres. No restricitons
$1500/m(954) 612-6779
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 2/2 w/
scrn. rm. great location
IncI water, sewer, lawn,
Fl. Pest & Soc mem.
$900. (352) 422-4086
Citrus Hills 3/2/2
1 Acre. $900/month.
(352) 586-6646
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1,000e MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITRUS HILLS
Beautiful Home/ loca-
tion 3/2/2 Pool, end.
AC Fl. Rm.. Must see!
$1,200mo 352-302-0431
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2 fncd bk yrd. $700 +
sec.746-9583, 302-8359
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer duplex. 3/2/1
w/newer appliances.
$800 mo. lease/l dep.
No pets. (352) 697-3133
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
FLORAL CITY
3/1, CHA $600 mo &
1/1, $390. Secluded,
Scenic (352) 586-1873
HOMOSASSA
2/2/1, Total Renov.,
Great Loc. No Pets Sr.
Disc., $725. 795-8963
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
lovely 3 or 4/2, white
picket fence, sunken
hot tub, E-Z Terms
352-228-2587

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relaxfl.com
INVERNESS
Highlands, 2/1.5/1
$590 mo. fenced yd
(352) 344-2560
RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM
SUBSIDIZED
RENTALS IN
Lecanto 3 bedrm
Starting At
$466/mo.




352-746-0373
TDD: 888-341-2355




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




BEVERLY HILLS
Renovated 2/1, $33K
cash or terms $365. or
Rent $425.352-422-2433




CRYSTAL RIVER
Rmw/priv bath. Pool
Upscale community
$125 wkly. 794-3042


CRYSTAL RIVER
SHARE MY HOME
$85/wk. Moves -U-N
.incls elect, sat dish
352-563-1465/212-1960




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077





For Salek
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester
407-761-0627

RB~p^M~-


FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE






GREAT DEALS
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
acceptany any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-997275.






Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





For Salek By
Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yd. new roof,
dble carport, poss. rent
to own. $59,900
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076


For Sale ,16
3/1, Tiled floors,
MUST SELL
Asking $39,000
22 N. Davis
352-586-4474

RENT TO OWN!!
3 bdrs., No credit
check. 352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM






CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440




2 BR, 1 BA, I car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see 59,000
(352) 419-6719
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.lnvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnanlll@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.




EXCELLENT
OWNER
FINANCING

$137K




.... . . . , . ,..

Sits high on a hill
w/great view 3/2/2
w/bonus rm. Approx
2650sf U.R. 2100 sf.
Real Mexican Tile.
Brand new Jaccuzzi,
raised oak cabinets,
kitchen island. Lrg
stone fireplace in
great room, 3 very
large bedrooms,
2 bigwalk in closets,
florida room.HOME
JUST totally UPDATED
Beautiful
landscaping and 800'
of vinyl, picket &
privacy fencin,
almost an acre
Owners Winter Home
FOR SALE or LEASE.
(352) 341-1334




6955 W. Macopin Ln
3Bdrm 2Ba Beautiful up-
dated ranch w/new roof
gutters siding a/c unit car-
pet & tile. A must see!
330-221-3996 $107,000



3/2 2200
sqft.
33' hted inground
pool w/sum kit.
near schools, hospital
$150K, 1350 NE 7th av
352-564-0001 day
352-794-6504 night




4/2 CEMENT HOME
1,200 SF on V4 acre
Remodeled, Clean
$65K.
(305) 619-0282





For Sale ,,,J






2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Fam rm. w/frpl.
2000+sf living + encl.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19Jungleplum Ct. E.


-LaughingStock International nc ,Dist by Universal Udick for UFS, 2011


"I'II wear it like this, so you won't have to
keep reminding me how much it costs."









JOHN GORDON ROOFING


r& Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269


I


7-4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

-U ,


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comr













Best Time to Buy
also have lease
options & owner
financing available.
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty

CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder



INVERNESS 3/2/2
pool home oversize
lanai on 1 acre
For Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529












Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv()
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Whethether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685



Homes^^^


- l
"Let's Go To The
Real Estate Auction"
Call Lisa for the
details
352-795-0784
Plantation Realty
plantationrealtvlisinas
.com
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner


For Sale%, Bl
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283
FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498

HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


,
Gitta Barth/Realtor
Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc

SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME Ozello Keys
private boat dock &
ramp. 1000sqft upstairs,
1000sqft screened
downstairs. 2/1.
Fenced yard, CHA
Owner Finance. 5%
down payment.
$174,900. Call Craig
352-422-1011




Crystal River Area
Professional business
person w/ excellent credit
looking to lease option,
rent to own or buy a
home w/ owner financing
in the CR Area. If
interested please call
352-388-1064 or email
home-
search352@gmail.com.




BY OWNER
Residential Building Lots
W. Highland & N. High-
land. Must buy both
$25,000/firm. Please no
agents. 617-471-7417


is County
omes


INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106 &
#40/112 S.Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033




2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000. obo
(352) 382-3202





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday's.
Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.
To place your free
ad, simply go to:
WWW.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.




'02, 23ft,
Magic Trailer
Dual Axle, 4 V-Hull
$1,200.
(352) 628-5008
BOAT TRAILER
18' + $200.
(352) 364-1309
Mariner 4 HP, Engine
runs great,
$450. obo
(352) 795-6870;
(352) 220-4792
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066




POLARIS JET SKI
2000, Genesis (3 seater)
Great shape with trailer.
This thing is fast.
$2,800.00 352-634-1044




14' JON BOAT
trailer, 25HP Yamaha,
trolling motor, battery,
extra tra iler $2,500
(352) 628-2766
15' TRI HULL
BAY RUN ABOUT
40hp Evin. trollig motor
new bimini top
F/F new whls & lights on
tril $1200(352) 637-4515
20' PONTOON
60 HP, 4 stoke,
Yamaha, low hours, 4
years young, loaded,
kept in dry storage,
$13,500(352) 382-8966


MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011 B11


'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019
BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272
CANOE 16'
OLD TOWN fiberglass
$350. steel wheel
canoe/kayak carrier
used once $35.
(352) 447-2330

/ THIS OUT!
C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22' out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
ice box,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
indcluded.Exc.ondifion,used app
50 hoursAsking
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.
HURRICANE
KAYAK, SANTEE 116
SPORT ,L11"6" W36LBS
USA MADE XCON $775
352.503.5319
STAMAS 26'
70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
























JAMBOREE 89
Class C, 24 59k Miles
exc cond $6500 obo
(352) 795-3729




HORNET 37'
2 slides awning wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8 very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27' 2005,
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper, Q bed, 2nd
dr. 20 awning $16k obo
(352) 527-9535


This page is a great opportunity to showcase


those special homes. The Open House


weekend page will be published July 9,2011.





CI iRoCLE Call Kim Thrombley
w563-3218 for more details


CIASSIFIEDS




06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797
VIKING
'89, Pop Up,
16ft, open, sleeps 4,
$750 obo
(352) 563-0788



!!!!!!!!245/70 R16!!!!!!!!
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
-195/65 R15-
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
----205/55 R16----
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
MUSTANG RIMS
Set of 4 18" x 18.5", fits
2005 - 2011, polished
alum., like new, asking
$1,000 OBO
(352) 795-0558



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
4 SALEI! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794






'00 KIA OPTIMA
'92, STEALTH
'91, STEALTH
'98, FIREBIRD
'73, MACH I
(352) 400-0105

s THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
'93 TOYOTA
Celica, Red, cold A/C, int.
great, good gas mileage,
5 speed, $1,900.
352-364-1771


2007 TL equipped w/
tech package, navi
a diamond $18,990
866-838-4376

BMW
2008, 328i leather
sunroof mint cond.
$21988
866-838-4376
SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376
HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376
JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376
HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

BUICK
'73, RIVIERA,
86K miles
$5,500 obo
(352) 400-0105
BUICK CENTURY '95
Cold A/C, 143K miles, 6
cyc., 3.0 L, runs great!
$900 Firm
(352) 228-1897
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded, AC, good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900(352) 503-7431
CHEVY 96
Camero, red w/ 2 tops
needs head gasket,
new tires, well maint
$1200(352) 302-8797
CHRYSLER
1980, LeBaron, Six cylin-
der, automatic. Very relia-
ble. Good body. No A/C.
$775 OBO 352-726-9416

CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring LXI
leather, power seats
69k orig miles $6990
866-838-4376

FORD 03
Taurus SES, V6 auto
loaded, 79K miles
exc shape $4500
(352) 697-2461

HONDA
2004 Accord LX
coupe 77k miles
$10990
866-838-4376

HONDA
2007 Civic hybrid
44k orig miles, mint
cond. 48 mpg better
hurry call for deal!
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
Elantra, 1999, 4-cyl.,
auto., air, good car, 1st
$1,550. (845) 707-5704


0008L27



ig
AT
), and
f-k.


squares., The number after thme
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word.

C 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Ucick for UFS


6. "Today" weatherman Al's stock buyers (2)


7. Bad-boy actor Sheen's motorcycles (2)
S | | I I I | | | | |


7-4-11


SAXHIVH SI'IHVIH3 DL SHXO1H SHfHOH *9 ONIIXS 0NIaaS "S
HOTO0 0H3ITIf 't SJNVHA SXNVA'X H3HVM H3XVNT' 1YI VI T
saaASNV


2000, excel. cond.,
new tires, all options
low mileage, only 51K,
garaged, Must see!
$9,995, (352) 344-5250
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625

4 SALEII MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376
TOYOTA
'04 Camary LE 82K mi.,
P/Win, Doors, New Tires
automatic. Very Clean
$9,900 (352) 628-6537
TOYOTA
2005 Camry LE
low miles, nicely
equipped $9988
866-838-4376




77 MGB
restored car, has front
end damage, runs
great comes with 2
parts cars $6000 OBO
(352) 628-5606
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
NO SHOWS
JULY OR AUGUST
SEE YOU SEPT. 4
1-800-438-8559







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
'03, Silverado, 64K org.
mi., Red, auto trans,
6 cyl. looks good, runs
good not rust. single
cab w/ overdrive &
672 ft. bed, $7,500
(352) 503-7328
CHEVY
1974, Silverado,
$500. Call for info.
352-364-1771

I 2003 Silverado 28k
orig miles, bedliner a
Must see pick up call




918-0715 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners


Mic.Noics-


DODGE RAM
1995, 3500, diesel, stick
shift, runs good, $3,000
(352) 726-3631
FORD
1986 F150 w/ 302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800 (404)416-9359
FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934

FORD
2003 F250 Lariat
super duty 6.0 diesel
lift kit stack exaust
chip, too much ride
call for deal!
866-838-4376


t THIS OUT!
FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920

FORD F 250
99 Lariat, 150k mi 4x4
Extented cab 4 dr.
$5,650 352-201-0177
NISSAN
05, TITAN SEking cab.
silver/gray, runs great,
106K mi $5900
352-746-5475/344-4505
* SALE!! MAKE OFFER
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADED!Tow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622




CADILLAC
2004 Escalade EXT
suv diamond white
pearl 58k orig miles
wheels all the ride
Call for deal!
866-838-4376
CHEVY 98
TAHOE 4x4 95K mi
loaded, leather int,
CD/DVD/Cass play
new tires $7250 obo
352-476-4941

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376




CHEVY
'95, Silverado 1500, ext.
cab, 194K mi., body lift,
33" tires, great cond.
$5,800. (352) 302-1033



'02 DODGE
Ram Van 1500, 5.9 Liter
eng. V8 leather 59,500K
mi $8,888. make offer
(352) 503-7577



will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June





431-0704 MCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE


FORD
1984, Econoline 150,
work van, runs, asking
$600.00 OBO. Call
352-341-5164 after 5:00
FORD
2003 E-250 econoline
cargo van 76k miles
showroom new $8990
builders welcome
866-838-4376
HANDICAP VAN
1989 full size GMC
Ricon Lift, runs great
$1950(352) 464-0316
HONDA
2010 Odyssey LX
low miles, 20,990
certified 100k
warranty must see!
866-838-4376
HONDA
Odyssey 08, EX-L, blue
ext. grey leather, 6 cd
moon roof, 82K,
$15,900.352-344-4505
352-746-5475
TOYOTA 98
Sienna XLE ,V6, 112k
mis. new tires & battery,
looks great, runs great
$4,500 (352) 465-7755



2003 Harley Wanna Be
149 cc 120mpg,looks
like a dressed Harley
$1700 cash
(352) 464-0316
2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576
FREEDOM
2011 ES3000 Electric
Scooter like new
street legal $1300
352 637 1814
Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,200
Cry River 727-207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
Harley Sportster
'99, 883, 5,700 mi.,
windshield, bags, lots of
chrome, Lots of extra
$5,500 (352) 489-5029
Honda Trike
'05 Goldwing,
20,000 mi. Black Cherry
$26,500.
(352) 465-6991
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995. 352-601-7460
LIBERTY
2010 098 city electric
moped like new $450
352 637 1814
Suzuki 2010
Boulevard C50
Less than 800 miles, my
loss, your gain! $6,500
firm. (352) 422-4528
WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492



15,2011 - July 15, 2011.
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15,2011.




^^^^^^


To Whom It May Concern:
You are hereby notified that the following described livestock, black and grey, in-
tact male goat, age undetermined, is now impounded with the Citrus County Ani-
mal Services, 4030 S. Airport Road, Inverness, FL 34450. This animal was picked up at
9510 E Lazy Oak Dr., Floral City. Unless redeemed with 3 days from date hereof, this
animal will be offered for sale at public auction to the highest and best bidder for
cash.
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 4,2011.


430-0704 MCRN
7/11 meeting Beverly Hills Advisory Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Beverly Hills Advisory Council will meet on Monday,
July 11, 2011 at 10:00 o'clock A.M. at the Beverly Hills Civic Center, One Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida, 34465, to conduct business of the Beverly Hills Municipal Service
Benefit Unit.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Advisory Council with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
By: Rosella Hale, Chairwoman
BEVERLY HILLS MSBU
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, July 4,2011.


3. Violently tugs old French money (1)


4. Not as sharp and bright hue (2)


5. Viewing slaloming (2)


WORDYGURDYBY TRICKY RICKY ANE
1. President William Howard sternward (1) Every answer is a rhymin
pair of words (like FAT C
and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. One rousing an LA NBAer from sleep (2) they will fit in the betterr


Metn


Metn


B




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE, COME SEE ALL OUR CARS, TRUCKS, VANS
AND SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES WITH ALL PRICES DRASTICALLY SLASHED!
THERE WILL BE
NO SALES PEOPLE
MANAGERS OR EMPLOYEES
ON THE PREMISES.
(NO ONE WILL EVEN BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER THE PHONES)


Because new models are arriving daily, managements has been ordered to eliminate excess
inventory. All Prices will be slashed and will be clearly posted on each vehicle. Bring a pen and
paper. Write down the stock number and price. Come in as early as possible on Tuesday, July 5th.
FIRST COME FIRST SERVED!

w I t'M;iA f ;7! pug


c Ex cD


A


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


0


1005 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


M


0


2077 Highway 44W
Inveress, FL


T I


14358 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville, FL


V


E


937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL


CRYSTALAUTOS.CO M


U T


B12 MONDAY, JULY 4, 2011


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