Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02457
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 06-28-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02457

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text


Gators, Gamecocks square off in Game 1 of CWS finals 4


TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Mostly cloudy with
90 scattered storms. Chance
LOW of rain 50 percent.
72 PAGE A4
JUNE 28, 2011


CITRRJS COU NTY





HRONICLti


www.chronicleonline.com


VOLUME 116


ISSUE 325


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


Chronicle file photo
Progress:
Nuclear
plant will
be repaired
CRYSTAL RIVER
- Progress Energy
Florida plans to re-
pair the contain-
ment structure at
the Crystal River nu-
clear plant and
hopes to have the
plant in service by
2014, company offi-
cials said Monday.
Company officials
estimate the repair
cost at between
$900 million and
$1.3 billion. The
company meets
with the Public
Service Commission
July 14 to discuss
the company's plans
in detail and deter-
mine a timeline for
moving forward.
The plant shut
down in September
2009 for refueling
and routine mainte-
nance. During that
shutdown, workers
created an opening
in the structure to
replace the steam
generators inside.
Initial damage to
the plant's contain-
ment building oc-
curred during that
work. The company
spent about $117
million to repair the
damage.
In mid-March,
during the final stages
of returning the
plant to service, en-
gineers discovered
another crack in the
containment wall.
The second sepa-
ration occurred
about 9 inches from
the outer surface of
the concrete. The
containment structure
is 42 inches thick.
The plant remains
shut down and is in
safe condition, a
company news re-
lease stated.
The company is
insured for property
damage and incre-
mental costs of re-
placement power
resulting from pro-
longed accidental
outages. Progress is
insured for up to
$2.25 billion per
event for property
damage and up to
$490 million for re-
placement power,
the company said.
Meanwhile, the
Nuclear Regulatory
Commission meets
Tuesday at Planta-
tion Inn in Crystal
River to hear com-
ments for the com-
pany's request to
extend its nuclear
plant license by 20
years. The meetings
are at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
The NRC has con-
cluded there are no
environmental im-
pacts precluding
the extension.
Progress' current
operating license
expires in 2016.


Comics .......... C8
Community .......C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ........ A10O
Entertainment ..... B3
Lottery Numbers .. B4
Lottery Payouts . ... B2
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ........ C9


6 84178 2002! U 51


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Debbie Ressler, left, a member of the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees and Vickie LaMarche, hospital board
chief operating officer, discuss the bill that was signed into law Friday by Gov. Scott regarding hospital oversight.




CMH foundation




sues to stop new law


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer


T
Legisla
Rick Scot
late Fri(
being ch
constitute
to a lawsu
filed firs
Monday m
The 1
which as]
temporary
junction
sure the l
not take
July 1 and


-INVERNESS
he Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation will not go quietly
into the night.
tion that Gov. The legislation, sponsored
tt signed into law bystateRep.JimmieT Smith,
day is already R-Inverness, gives the board
alleged as un- of trustees oversight.
onal, according The foundation argues it
it the foundation has a 43-year lease to op-
t thing erate the hospi-
norning. 0 What's in the tal, agreed to by
lawsuit, new law,and both the founda-
ks for a a timeline of tion and board of
y in- a timeline of trustees in 1990
to en- dispu the and that only the
aw does /Page A7 foundation can
effect break the lease.
d a per- The special law,


manent injunction over-
turning the law, was filed
in Leon County Circuit Court
in Tallahassee because the
legislation originated and
became law there.
A hearing is set for 6
a.m. Wednesday before
Circuit Court Judge Jackie
Fulford, who said the foun-
dation must show cause
why the case should not be
transferred to Citrus County
The lawsuit is the latest
in a two-year battle for con-
trol of Citrus County's public
hospital between the foun-
dation and Citrus County
Hospital Board of Trustees.


it states in the injunction
lawsuit, effectively voids
that contract.
Ryan Beaty, hospital chief
executive officer, said Mon-
day the board of trustees
forced the foundation's hand
bypushing forthe legislation
"It's really dishearten-
ing that it's come to this,
but we have to do every-
thing we can to protect the
hospital and our patients,"
he said.
Trustees attorney Bill
Grant predicted the foun-
dation will not win.


Trustees learn impact

of injunction lawsuit
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
T he lawsuit seeking a temporary injunction
against a new law has some pros and cons.
As only one section is challenged, the rest of the
law can do its work, including clearing up some
pending lawsuits. But whether the challenge suc-
ceeds or fails, more legal work will stretch into the
future.
This was the analysis Bill Grant, general coun-
sel for the Citrus County Hospital Board, pre-
sented Monday at a meeting of the board of
trustees. The Citrus Memorial Health Foundation
earlier that day filed a request for a temporary in-
junction in Leon County Circuit Court against the
new law signed Friday by Gov Rick Scott to give
the trustees more oversight of the hospital.
"The portions of the bill that they are seeking
not to enjoin and find unconstitutional basically
See Page A5


I --


The two-year dispute for control of Citrus Memorial
See Page A7 hospital is headed to court.


THE PEOPLE AND THE POLITICS:


HOSPITAL BOARD
OF TRUSTEES
Citrus Memorial Hospital was
founded in 1957. It is a 501 (C) 3
charitable organization. It became
known as Citrus Memorial Health
System in 2005 as it added spe-
cialized and freestanding services.
It is a not-for-profit community hos-
pital chartered by the state with ad
valorem taxing authority. The five
members of the board of trustees
are appointed by the governor and
have the authority to levy ad val-
orem taxes up to 3 mills per calen-
dar year without voter referendum
or county commission approval. The
board of trustees leases the hospi-
tal to the foundation to operate it.

CITRUS MEMORIAL
HEALTH FOUNDATION
Citrus Memorial Health Foundation
is described as the fundraising arm
of CMHS and has operational au-
thority for the hospital. It is a not-
for-profit, private corporation. It was
established in 1987 by the board of
trustees to save the hospital about
$300,000 a year in retirement con-
tributions by being able to use a pri-
vate pension fund and streamline


future joint business arrangements
with health care providers. It is
comprised of the five members of
the board of trustees and eight
other members. The foundation
leases the hospital from the board of
trustees and manages the fundraising
and charitable giving for the hospital.
It also issues investment bonds to
raise funds for hospital improvements.
A $10 million bond was issued in
September 2008 for expansion and
upgrading of the emergency de-
partment and the construction of
the recently opened health care fa-
cility near Sugarmill Woods.

ADMINISTRATION
Hospital officers have been employed
by the foundation for their educa-
tion and experience in operating the
hospital. These officers maintain
the day-to-day functions of the hos-
pital and advise the board of
trustees and the foundation about
providing present and future care.

WHERE TAX MONEY GOES
CMHS provides care to patients who
meet the criteria of its charity care
policy without charge or at amounts
less than its established rates. The


administrators do not pursue col-
lection of amounts determined to
qualify as charity care, and these
amounts are not reported as net pa-
tient service. The board of trustees
hired the foundation to assist with
funding for uncompensated care.

WHAT CAUSED
THE CONFLICT
In 2006, CMHS was granted sover-
eign immunity status, which caps
the liability of its doctors at
$200,000. However, the question
raised by the board of trustees is
whether the foundation should
enjoy sovereign immunity if it does
not answer to the board of trustees.
The benefit of sovereign immunity
is awarded by government to public
bodies and means a public body is
immune to lawsuits unless it gives
its consent. Therefore, the trustees
want greater oversight of the foun-
dation's operations, because if the
foundation can enjoy the benefit of
sovereign immunity, it should com-
ply with the Sunshine Law, as does
the board of trustees. The founda-
tion directors believe the current
structure maintains an independent
hospital free of political influences
and agendas.


NEWS
BRIEF ]


Associated Press
Former Illinois Gov. Rod
Blagojevich speaks to the
media Monday at the Federal
Courthouse in Chicago.
Blagojevich was convicted of
17 of the 20 charges against
him, including all 11 charges
related to his attempt to sell
or trade President Barack
Obama's vacated Senate seat.


I T U E S D] v


Council


draws


line in


the bay


City office ,

citizens voice

opposition to

federalplans

SANDRA FREDERICK
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER - The
battle lines have been drawn.
The sentiment at Monday
night's special council
meeting concerning federal
regulations by the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Services was
that the city has been a
faithful advocate for mana-
tees, yet it has to defend it-
self in order to maintain the
quality of life and property
values around King's Bay
Mayor Jim Farley warned
the nearly 75 people in at-
tendance that if the federal
regulations are adopted, it
is just the beginning.
"Federal fingers are in
everything, ladies and gen-
tleman," he said. "This is
not only about reducing the
speed limit on King's Bay"
The USFWS stated in its
13-page proposal that all of
King's Bay proper is a
See Page A4



Blago


guilty


on 17


counts
Associated Press
CHICAGO - Rod Blago-
jevich, who rode his talka-
tive everyman image to two
terms as Illinois governor
before scandal made him a
national punch line, was
convicted Monday of a wide
range of corruption charges,
including the incendiary al-
legation that he tried to sell
or trade President Barack
Obama's Senate seat.
The verdict was a bitter
defeat for Blagojevich, who
spent 2 1/2 years professing
his innocence on reality TV
shows and later on the wit-
ness stand. His defense
team had insisted that
hours of FBI wiretap
recordings were just the
ramblings of a politician
who liked to think out loud.
See Page A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


State BRIEFS


Under bill, jobless
benefits scaled back
TALLAHASSEE - Gov. Rick
Scott has signed bills that will
cut Florida unemployment com-
pensation benefits and make it
harder for patients to win med-
ical malpractice lawsuits.
Scott on Monday also vetoed
three bills including one (HB
4045) that would have scaled
back state regulation of as-
sisted living facilities.
The unemployment bill (HB
7005) is intended to cut taxes
paid by employers. It will re-
duce maximum state benefits
for jobless workers from 26 to
23 weeks. The cap would drop
even lower if Florida's unem-
ployment rate is below 10.5
percent.
The medical malpractice law
(HB 479) was the Florida Med-
ical Association's top legislative
priority this year.
It includes provisions de-
signed to curtail testimony by
out-of-state experts. The law
also provides immunity to doc-
tors who volunteer their serv-
ices to college and prep sports
teams.
Woman charged with
stealing from graves
TAMPA - A Tampa woman
has been charged with stealing
mementos worth hundreds of
dollars from grave sites.
A passer-by watched 50-
year-old Fawn Charbonier Loyd


taking stuffed animals, Ameri-
can flags, solar lights and other
items from grave sites Thurs-
day and place them in her car.
When an officer questioned
Loyd she told them she was at
the cemetery praying and de-
nied stealing anything.
Police asked for ID, but Loyd
told them she didn't have one
and gave a fake name. She
faces several charges including
disturbing contents of a grave
or tomb, grand theft, loitering or
prowling.
Police said a car parked
nearby was filled with the grave
decorations. Loyd said the car
did not belong to her.
Molotov cocktail
lobbed in dispute
MIAMI - Police have ar-
rested a Miami man they said
lobbed a Molotov cocktail
through his neighbor's window
after a fight.
Miami Fire Rescue
spokesman Lt. Ignatius Carroll
said the suspect broke a win-
dow in the victim's residence
Sunday and threw a flaming
container inside. The victim,
who is in a wheelchair,
screamed for help. His family
was able to wheel him outside
to safety.
Witnesses corroborated the
victim's story.
Authorities charged the sus-
pect, whose name has not
been released, with arson.
-From wire reports


TSA orders ill woman, 95, to remove diaper


Associated Press


DESTIN -A gravely ill 95-year-old
woman had to remove her wet diaper
at an airport so that she could be pat-
ted down by security screeners and
nearly missed her flight, her daughter
said Monday
During the pat-down, Transporta-
tion Security Administration inspec-
tors found a mass on Lena Reppert's
upper thigh, her daughter Jean
Weber said. The mass was a hard spot
on the diaper that had become heavy
and concentrated in that place be-
cause it was wet. Reppert, who is in a
wheelchair, had to be patted down be-
cause she couldn't go through a scan-
ning machine, and the TSA agents
thought it would be too personal to
search the diaper
Reppert couldn't board a June 18
flight from Northwest Florida Re-
gional Airport in Fort Walton Beach
to Detroit until she was cleared by se-
curity, Weber said. Reppert, who has
leukemia and had been living in the
Florida Panhandle, was returning to
her native Hastings, Mich., where she
wants to be buried.
Weber, a waitress, said she was told
the diaper would have to be removed


so agents could finish their pat-down.
They had not packed extra diapers in
their carry-on because her mother
has never needed backups before.
"She had to remove them," Weber
said. "She would not be cleared with
those Depends on."
TSA officials said the agency's in-
spectors did nothing wrong and fol-
lowed proper procedure. Spokesman
Nick Kimball also said the officers
did not force Reppert to remove the
diaper.
"While every person and item must
be screened before entering the se-
cure boarding area, TSA works with
passengers to resolve security alarms
in a respectful and sensitive manner,"
Kimball said.
Officials offered to pull their lug-
gage off the plane so Reppert could
change into a clean diaper, but Weber
said she feared her mother, a retired
nurse, would miss her flight.
"She is frail. I had arranged for
these times because it's the time she
was the strongest every day," Weber
said. "I just did not want to put her
through some kind of wait."
However, Weber said the agents
would not allow her to remove the di-
aper in the screening room - so she


had to take her mother to a restroom
outside the security area, and then
wait in line to be screened again. The
second time, Weber said she triggered
an alarm herself because she was
upset and crying.
They tested her purse for chemicals
while her mother finished her pat-
down in private, she said. By then, she
had lost her pass allowing her to es-
cort her mother to her gate and asked
airport workers to take the woman.
"It was a traumatic moment for me
because I know my mother is very ill
and hopefully I can get up to see her
before anything happens," Weber said.
TSA has tightened security after a
Nigerian man was charged with try-
ing to ignite explosives he had hidden
in his underwear on a flight to Detroit
from Europe on Christmas Day 2009.
However, the full-body scans and
pat-downs have been criticized by
travelers.
Earlier this year, for example, the
agency was criticized for patting
down a 6-year-old girl at the New Or-
leans airport Last week, TSA officials
said that security workers would now
be told to make repeated attempts to
screen young children without re-
sorting to the pat-downs.


Digital Conversation
ACCURACY



t HEARING

Technology aioa1ble only hiom Audibel

Itis REMARKABLE!


* DO YOU HEAR, BUT MISS SOME OF THE WORDS?
* DOES YOUR FAMILY COMPLAIN THAT YOU PLAY THE TV TOO LOUD?
* DO YOU ASK OTHERS TO REPEAT WHAT THEY'VE SAID?


DON'T MISS THIS EVENT!



FREE DEMONSTRATIONS SET FOR

Today through next Friday,

July 8, 2011


Call now for appointment

at any of our locations.


aqd Road Rally

JULY 2, SATURDAY ~ 4-11 P.M.
NW 3rd Street, Kings Bay Park, Crystal River


TO REGISTER FOR THE ROAD RALLY
OR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
352-613-6851
CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


Live music, food, fresh
scallops, beer & wine, arts
& crafts

Ciii^L


Sponsored by
Rotary of Crystal River


9,


I v v o


"I was wearing a different brand.
One day I tried on my brother's
Audibel " hearing aids.
WOW!! The difference was night
and day. I came straight over here
and got a pair."
-GARY, age 61, Registered Nurse


"In the courtroom when you have
to ask a witness two or three times
what they have said, it doesn't
impress the jury. With my Audibel"
hearing aids, I am razor sharp."
-LINDA, age 63, Attorney


FREE VIDEO EAR
INSPECTION
Did you Inow thaT wat can
block your eardrum and make
word sound muffled' Us ng
a small fiber-optic camera we
will examine your ear drum
and determine i your hearing
problem is being caused by
wax build-up. And if it is, we
can easy remove it


FREE HEARING
EVALUATION'
A licensed hearing
professional will check your
hearing acuity in each speech
octave and discuss the results
ofyouraudiogram The
results of this evaluation can
be used to program digital
hearing aids specifically for
you.


EXPERIENCE
20M~ HEARING
TOCY
You'll know the moment
your hearing "pops" into
focus...
During this event we will
program our Audibel
Hearing Aid simulator
to match your loss.


* Unnoticeable when worn
* Patented speech clarification
technology
* Crystal-clear digital sound


+ Dollar Conversahon
ACCUIRCY


SPECIAL manufacturer incentives offered during this 4-day eventil


'4
.1/
p


SAVE

41000
on a pair of
Audibel
Anthem
Platinum
hearing aids


SAVE

'800
on a pair of
Audibel
Anthem
Gold
hearing aids


AUDIBEL.
Inverness
2036 Hwy. 44 West
352-586-7599
Homosassa
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.


Receive a
TRADE-IN
CREDIT
ON YOUR OLD
HEARING AIDS
TOWARD ANY
STYLE NEW
HEARING AIDS


FREE
AUDIOMETRIC
HEARING
EVALUATION
FRDOUTWHAT
YOU ARE
HEARING
AND WHAT YOU
ARE NOT


FREE
EAR
INSPECTION
FOR WAX
WAX BUILD-UP
CAN MAKE
SPEECH MUFFLED.


www.audibel.corn


72RWE',LL MEET OR BET ANY
72 HOUR R COMPET11TORS PRICE*


BLIND FACOTRY FREE
LECANTO~ TREETOPS PLAZA ins aaon
1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY BB In Home Consulting
527-0012 -7747 www.72-hourblinds.com !
5 2 I 1-877-746-0017 *Mustpresentwnttenestimatefromcompetitorforthispnce
- e o . - e - - * 0


HERE IS WHAT YOU WILL RECEIVE


HEARING AID
BATTERIES

990
PACK OF 4
LIMIT 2 PKGS
#10#13
#312 #675
CASH & CARRY


FREE
CLEAN &
CHECK
OF YOUR
HEARING
AIDS
ALL MAKES AND
umm~


A2 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


STATE


PRICS5VAID2DRIN THI EVET UPTO RIDA, Juy 8,201
^^BIa na 6T*11i^fSJ'ami^^r'S^"^����







Page A3 -TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SManslaughter defendant sentenced


Twenty-two-year-old man to spend two

years in prison for shooting Inverness teen


Associated Press
Judge Belvin Perry reads a
ruling Monday on a motion
before the start of the day
in the murder trial of Casey
Anthony at Orange County
Courthouse in Orlando.
Judge Perry said three
psychologists ordered by
the court to examine
Casey Anthony said she is
competent to proceed.


Casey

Anthony

competent

for trial

Trial resumes

for day 29 of

testimony
Associated Press
ORLANDO - A judge
ruled Monday that Casey
Anthony is competent to
remain on trial for mur-
der in the death of her 2-
year-old daughter after
her own lawyers ques-
tioned her mental health.
Anthony's attorneys told
the judge they did not be-
lieve she was competent.
They said that assessment
was based on their privi-
leged communication
with her, but did not elab-
orate in a motion filed Sat-
urday and sealed until the
judge ruled Monday
The motion halted what
had been expected to be a
full day of testimony Sat-
urday by witnesses. After
meeting with attorneys,
Judge Belvin Perry told
courtroom attorneys and
spectators a "legal mat-
ter" had come up that
would delay proceedings.
Perry asked for a review
of whether Anthony could
comprehend the charges
against her and the possible
penalties, and if she could
testify relevantly if called to
the stand. Anthony was ex-
amined by three psycholo-
gists over the weekend.
After reading their reports,
Perry ruled Monday the
trial should continue.
"Based upon the re-
ports that the court has re-
viewed, the court will find
that the defendant is com-
petent to proceed," Perry
said at the start of Mon-
day's hearing, the 29th day
of testimony
In a separate motion,
Anthony's attorneys asked
the judge to declare a mis-
trial and select a new jury
New jurors would not be
asked before being se-
lected whether they
would be qualified to con-
sider the death penalty.
Attorneys sought the mo-
tion based on a ruling by a
federal judge in Miami last
week It declared Florida's
death penalty unconstitu-
tional because jurors are
not required to say what
aggravating factor or fac-
tors led them to recom-
mend death.
Judges, though, are re-
quired to explain why they
impose death sentences.
They aren't required to
follow jury recommenda-
tions but must give them
great weight.
The ruling does not au-
tomatically void Florida's
death penalty law. An-
thony's attorneys have
asked for a hearing on the
motion, but it had not
been scheduled as of Mon-
day afternoon.
Anthony has pleaded
not guilty to first-degree
murder and could face the
death penalty if convicted
of that charge. Her defense
attorneys claim her daugh-
ter Caylee Anthony acci-
dentally drowned in the
family's swimming pool.


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
INVERNESS - A 22-year-old
man accused of shooting and killing
his friend was sentenced to two
years in prison Monday afternoon.
Kenneth Clyde Bartels was
charged with manslaughter in con-
nection to an investigation that
began June 9, 2010, when dispatch-
ers received a call at 1 a.m. about
the death of a teenager
Austin Porter, 18, of Inverness, re-
portedly was at a friend's house at


7089 N. Palmer Way, Hernando,
when he and some acquaintances
started passing around a shotgun.
At the time, Assistant State Attorney
Rich Buxman said Monday in court
that Bartels was using Xanax.
At some point, the gun fired, au-
thorities said, and Porter suffered a
fatal head wound.
Porter's body was taken to the
District 5 Medical Examiner's Of-
fice in Leesburg for an autopsy and
the sheriff's office opened an un-
known-death investigation.
According to officials, detectives


County's stakeholders group
to meet Friday, July 8
The county commission's Stakehold-
ers Advisory Group will meet at 1:30
p.m. Friday, July 8, in the Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building in Room 166.
Included on the agenda is the status
of recent SAG actions, including Impact
Fee Administrative Regulation 13.04-4
(approved May 24) and the alcoholic
beverage Ordinance amendment (ap-
proved June 14).


Another agenda for the July 8 meet-
ing is the Land Development Code Up-
date review - part 2.
The meeting is open to the public and
residents are given a chance to speak.
For information, call (352) 527-5362.
Democratic Club to meet
July 9 at library
The Central Citrus Democratic Club
will meet at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 9, at
Central Ridge Library on the corners of
Forest Ridge and Roosevelt boulevards


were receiving conflicting sto-
ries from people at the scene
and their associates. Sheriff's
spokeswoman Gail Tierney --
told a Chronicle reporter in
August the results of the au-
topsy coupled with the inves- --"
tigation led to Bartels' arrest
"This was not a self-in- Ken
flicted gunshot wound," she Bar
said. sentei
Bartels, whose address two y,
was listed as "at large" in his prison
arrest report, was taken into dea
custody Aug. 20 and trans- Austin
ported to the Citrus County
Detention Facility, where his bond
was set at $10,000. Bartels reportedly
bonded out the day of his arrest.
During Monday's hearing, Bar-
tels, dressed in a black shirt and


in Beverly Hills. All Democrats are in-
vited to attend. For information, call Otis
Brown at (352) 522-1859.
Forum at Ronald Reagan
Assembly on July 9
A Forum on Truth on the Environ-
ment/Public Government will be 1 p.m.
Saturday, July 9, at the meeting of the
Ronald Reagan Republican Assembly
Inc. - including Citrus, Hernando, Levy,
Marion, Pasco and Sumter counties -
at 938 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19),


in
r

e
atl
Fl


baggy jeans, spoke very lit-
tle, generally only to answer
Circuit Judge Ric Howard's
questions.
Porter's mother ad-
dressed the court, speaking
. on behalf of her family and
Porter's friends. She ques-
eth tioned why Bartels allowed
tels her son to lay bleeding for
ced to more than an hour before
ars in calling for help. She also re-
for the futed Bartels' claims that he
h of was her son's friend.
Porter. "Austin was a true
friend," she said as she
listed her son's qualities. "He will
forever be loved and missed."
Chronicle reporter Shemir Wiles
can be reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles@chronicleonline. com.


Building up, tearing down


Construction

moving at Crystal

River High School

CHERI HARRIS
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER - What had
been the largest classroom build-
ing at Crystal River High School
is now part of the school's past.
Last week, construction crews
used heavy equipment to knock
down the 500 Building to make
room for the school's renovation
and expansion - a project that
has been ongoing for a year now.
Clyde Douglas, project man-
ager for the Citrus County School
district, said the building was be-
tween 50,000 to 75,000 square feet
in size.
The new two-story administra-
tion and classroom buildings are
slated to be finished Aug. 1, ac-
cording to Gary Goodman, a con-
struction project manager for
ACA Construction Group LLC,
the building contractor doing the
work at the high school. Students
return to school Aug. 8.
Also set for completion as part
of Phase 1A of the construction
project: a new chiller building
and a baseball field complete
with a new concession stand.
In the main lobby of the ad-
ministration building, the floor-
ing is stained and highly polished
concrete, dark gray with a wavy
design of dark blue in the middle
to represent a river
"There's a lot of finishes going
on here now," Douglas said, re-
ferring to the work going on in
the final weeks before the two
buildings are complete, from in-
stalling flooring to placing ceiling
tiles.
Once the concrete slab from
the old 500 Building is removed
for recycling, a new courtyard in
the shape of a half-circle will be
installed in part of the footprint
of the old building. The complete
circular courtyard will be com-
pleted later. For now, the other
half will be part of a staging area
for construction crews to con-
tinue their work.
In mid-November, construction
is slated to start on the new fresh-
man academy, which will connect
to the new administration build-
ing via a covered walkway This is
part of Phase 2B.
The next step in the process
also includes gutting the old ad-
ministration building at the end
of August to house the school's
health academy Crews will also
renovate Building 300 to house
the new agriculture shop, relo-
cate the fish hatchery, wood-
working and welding lab and
FFA into the repurposed space.
This process should be com-
pleted before the end of this
year
The total cost of both stages of
Phase 1 is less than $21 million.
Phase 2 includes a new, larger


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: Work crews use heavy equipment to demolish parts of Crystal River High School in order to rebuild
a new school. This phase of the construction is expected to be ready for students when they return to
school the second week of August. BELOW: This is the new front entrance to the school.


media center Douglas said the
current media center is less than
8,000 square feet and the new
building will have about 27,000
square feet
Goodman estimated the cost of
Phase 2 at around $12 million.
He praised the cooperative at-
titude at the school.
"The administration has been
wonderful to work with," Good-
man said. "We're disrupting their
entire world right now and
they've been super."
Chronicle reporter Cheri
Harris can be reached at (352)
564-2926 or charris@chronicle
online.com.


Crystal River in the South Square Plaza.
Sandra Brasmeister, Advocate for
Truth In Government, will talk about the
topic "What Is The Real Cause Of Pollu-
tion In King's Bay." Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, candidate for District 1 of
Citrus County Commission, will speak
on "The Quasi-Environmental Sewer
Hoax."
For information and to RSVP, call
(352) 257-5381. Refreshments provided
and CASA donations accepted.
-From staff reports


him


Around the COUNTY






A4 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


COUNCIL Commissioner Joe Meek said he
Continued from personally has already approached
Continued from Page A state and federal lawmakers.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
* Cayla Jeanne Coile, 19, of
5923 W. Vikre Path, Ho-
mosassa, at 4:22 p.m. Friday on
a violation of probation for origi-
nal felony and misdemeanor
charges of burglary of an unoc-
cupied structure and petit theft.
No bond.
* Elizabeth Ann Rogers, 29,
of 315 S. Indian Rocks Road,
Belleair Bluffs, at 1 a.m. Saturday
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for a violation of probation on
an original felony charge of
worthless check. No bond.
* Jorge A. Espinosa, 47, of
223 Montclair Ave., Newark,
N.J., at 1:15 a.m. Saturday on an
active Citrus County warrant for
a violation of probation on an
original felony charge of fraud.
No bond.
* Jerod D. Shay, 28, of 121
Talmage Ave., Inverness, at
10:16 a.m. Saturday on a felony
charge of aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon without in-
tent to kill. Bond $28,000.
* Joshua James Lee
Brosey, 25, of 45 S. Monroe St.,
Beverly Hills, at 4:36 p.m. Satur-
day on active Citrus County war-
rants for a violation of probation
on an original misdemeanor
charge of driving with a sus-
pended license and a failure to
appear on an original misde-
meanor charge of driving with a
suspended license and a new
misdemeanor charge of resisting
an officer without violence. No
bond.
* Andrew James Bower, 23,
of 701 Glasgow Court, Winter
Springs, at 10:24 p.m. Saturday
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for a violation of probation on
original felony charges of bur-
glary of a structure and grand
theft. No bond.
* Carlos Boquin, 21, of 110
Hofstra St., Inverness, at 10:25
p.m. Saturday on an active Cit-
rus County warrant for a violation
of probation on an original felony


charge of child abuse/neglect.
No bond.
* Joseph Roy Briggs, 27, of
8500 E. Settle Court, Inverness,
at 11:18 p.m. Saturday on felony
and misdemeanor charges of as-
sault/battery on a law enforce-
ment officer, resisting an officer
with violence and disorderly con-
duct. Bond $10,500.
* Keith Jervis, 47, of 3075 E.
Glenn St., Inverness, at 11:44
p.m. Saturday on a felony charge
of aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon without intent to
kill. Bond $5,000.
* Ryan T. Payne, 18, of
10195 E. Trails End Road, Floral
City, at 2:40 a.m. Sunday on a
felony charge of grand theft.
Bond $10,000.
* Cody Scott Halstead, 21,
of an unknown address, at 3:18
a.m. Sunday on a felony charge
of burglary of an unoccupied res-
idence. Bond $15,000.
* Tawny Marie Reedy, 21, of
an unknown address, at 4:54
a.m. Sunday on an active Citrus
County warrant for failures to
appear on original felony
charges of providing false infor-
mation to a pawnbroker. No
bond.
* Anthony Lamont Schu-
bert, 22, of 2320 N. York Road,
Crystal River, at 9:51 a.m. Sun-
day on an active Citrus County
warrant for misdemeanor and
felony charges of battery and ag-
gravated battery on a pregnant
victim. No bond.
* Claudia Nicole Gibson,
30, of 11424 E. Bard Court, In-
verness, at 8:44 a.m. Sunday on
felony and misdemeanor
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance (methamphet-
amine), possession of drug
paraphernalia an possession of
a medication without a prescrip-
tion. Bond $6,000.
* Justin A. Ray, 24, and
Tabitha Wade Martin, 29, both
of 3901 E. Jessie Lane, Inver-
ness, at 2:36 p.m. Sunday both
on misdemeanor charges of re-
tail petit theft. Bond $250.


manatee refuge. It wants a
year-round slow speed,
which would eliminate the
current summer 35 mph
"sport zone" around Buz-
zard Island. Other points of
the ruling are snorkeling is
OK in Three Sisters
Springs, but scuba diving is
not; federal officials could
create no-entry zones in
smaller springs if weather
is cold enough; federal offi-
cials could close access to
Three Sisters and other
springs for no more than 14
days if a cold front hits ei-
ther before or after mana-
tee season; and Three
Sisters Springs would be
closed from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m.
during manatee season,
from Nov 15 to March 15.
"How much of our water-
way can you control?"
Councilman Mike Gudis
asked David Hankla, field
supervisor with USFWC,
who answered questions.
Hankla said the federal
government has to make
changes when even one
death of a manatee occurs


because it is on the endan-
gered species list.
"Zero is the number we
have to have," he told the
council. "There has been
seven manatee fatalities in
King's Bay since 2009 and
that is unacceptable."
But fighting government
is not going to be easy
City Manager Andy Hous-
ton told the council it had to
take serious steps when at-
tempting to prevent the fed-
eral agency from enacting
the ruling.
"To be for or against (this
ruling) for emotional rea-
sons isn't going to carry us
far in this debate," he said.
"We need to have scientific
or commercial reasons."
Councilwoman Paula
Wheeler said the increase
in numbers of manatees
living in the area shows
Crystal River is doing
something right. However,
by the government pushing
for these regulations, it is
overstepping its authority
with no consideration of
residents or businesses,


she said.
"We are good stewards of
the river," she said. "We live
this river. We don't need
someone from Jacksonville
to come down here and tell
us what is best for us."
Support was also given by
the county's five commis-
sioners, who attended the
meeting. Each spoke and
said it is important to fight
the move to control what
takes place on King's Bay
The commission will have
its own discussion Tuesday
during its meeting.
Josh Wooten, director of
the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, said it also
passed a resolution and
drafted a letter of support
because of the tourism and
economic impact on the
county.
Commissioner Joe Meek
said he personally has al-
ready approached state and
federal lawmakers about
supporting both the city of
Crystal River and the
county in the matter
"They are putting mana-


For the RECORD


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




S. Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices......C12



Surplus Property................................C12


City of Crystal River .............................A7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PRt HI LOPR HHI LO PR
91 72 trace NA NA NA k J93 71 0.30


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds from 5 to 10 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Mostly cloudy,
chance of scattered thunderstorms
today.


HI LO PR |_ HI LO PH
91 74 0.30 89 74 0.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 72
Thunderstorms will move northeast
through the day. Rain chance 70%.
P pi WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 71
60% rain chances with on and off storms
throughout the day.
.W M. THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73
"" 50% chance of scattered thunderstorms with a
west 6-12 mph wind.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 93/78
Record 98/64
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 86
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.08 in.
Total for the month 5.53 in.
Total for the year 29.51 in.
Normal for the year 23.24 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 30.09 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 7C
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 87�/
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.0/12
Wednesday's count: 4.4
Thursday's count: 4.3
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants


mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
6/28 TUESDAY 3:32 9:45 3
6/29 WEDNESDAY 4:20 10:33 4


JIIItI jL y


NOR M
(AFTERNO
3:58
4:47


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
c SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW
MOONRISE TODAY.
J.Y 15 JliY 23 MOONSET TODAY.........


IAJOR
)ON)
10:11
11:00


....8:33 P.M.
...6:35 AM.
4:04A.M.
6:19 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
-C,...rn ,, i l;.i.-", Cir.u County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-

Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka" 5:14 a/12:26 a 3:57 p/11:52 a
Crystal River* 3:35 a/9:14 a 2:18 p/10:34 p
Withlacoochee* 1:22 a/7:02 a 12:05 p/8:22 p
Homosassa"* 4:24 a/10:51 a 3:07 p/--


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
6:02 a/1:12 a 4:41 p/12:42 p
4:23 a/10:04 a 3:02 p/11:15 p
2:10 a/7:52 a 12:49 p/9:03 p
5:12 a/12:11 a 3:51 p/11:41 a


Gulf water
temperature



88�
Taken at Arlpeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.81 27.75 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.74 35.74 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.94 36.92 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.77 37.74 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


Es I -


oEl Ps3lu "-

n \ 10n-


Os


Monday Tuesday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H,
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


83 60
98 70
86 64
93 69
83 68
10078
82 69
76 46
94 71
95 56
78 66
81 58
84 57
94 74
86 60
93 67
81 65
84 58
82 55
96 75
83 58
84 55
99 79
82 55
81 64
80 60
10876
83 71
79 61
86 62
97 79
83 65
95 76
10779
10078
73 61
85 68
92 77
83 61
77 67
95 74
96 73
91 66


ts
pc
ts
.65 ts
ts
pc
.01 ts
s
ts
pc
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
.03 s
.14 ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc
.24 pc
s
PC
s
.11 s
ts
pc
pc
.34 s
ts
s
pc
s
.17 pc
pc
s
s
.11 ts
ts
ts


86 64
98 69
87 64
93 73
87 71
97 73
90 68
91 60
93 71
90 59
81 68
72 60
85 66
92 74
85 63
94 70
78 63
83 58
78 57
97 74
83 61
83 63
99 75
92 61
83 65
80 59
103 77
85 62
86 65
86 66
97 77
83 60
95 74
105 84
95 74
71 62
87 63
90 71
76 58
78 61
87 76
95 73
90 67


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY

Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 94 78 .02 pc 93 78
New York City 82 66 ts 84 71
Norfolk 88 73 .49 ts 92 75
Oklahoma City 10383 pc 95 74
Omaha 79 62 s 83 64
Palm Springs 11373 s 105 75
Philadelphia 81 70 ts 89 72
Phoenix 11485 pc 116 86
,'n:t.ur.jr 81 57 ts 82 58
Portland, ME 82 59 s 72 60
Portland, Ore 75 59 sh 72 60
Providence, R.I. 82 67 pc 83 66
Raleigh 93 73 .03 ts 94 71
Rapid City 72 47 pc 87 65
Reno 91 59 pc 82 57
Rochester, NY 81 58 ts 81 61
Sacramento 86 58 sh 72 56
St. Louis 83 66 1.02 s 85 64
St. Ste. Marie 73 54 pc 66 45
Salt Lake City 90 55 s 95 69
San Antonio 97 78 pc 95 74
San Diego 72 62 s 74 63
San Francisco 64 53 sh 62 52
Savannah 98 72 trace ts 93 74
Seattle 69 58 sh 70 57
Spokane 80 54 pc 86 58
Syracuse 82 58 ts 83 62
Topeka 86 66 .18 s 83 67
Washington 84 70 .01 ts 92 69
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 117 Mesa, Ariz. LOW 28 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY HIL/SKY
Acapulco 86/77/ts
Amsterdam 84/65/ts
Athens 84/71/s
Beijing 90/71/pc
Berlin 81/60/s
Bermuda 83/76/ts
Cairo 88/69/s
Calgary 80/56/pc
Havana 90/74/ts
Hong Kong 85/79/ts
Jerusalem 80/61/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


87/65/pc
73/53/ts
101/67/s
72/59/ts
83/62/sh
81/65/ts
88/60/ts
75/59/s
88/70/pc
64/52/sh
86/74/ts
75/59/sh
75/58/pc


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY -


LHIKON1CLL
Florida's Best Communlty Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: (352) 563-5655
Marion County: (888) 852-2340 or visit us on the Web
at www.shop.naturecoastcentral.com/chronicle.html
13 wks.: $36.65* - 6 mos.: $64.63*
- 1 year: $116.07*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call (352) 563-6363 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

(352) 563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday
Questions: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County - (352) 563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at (888) 852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus - (352) 563-5966
Marion - (888) 852-2340
To place a display ad: (352) 563-5592
Online display ad: (352) 563-3206 or e-mail us at
nccsales@chronicleonline.com
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising - 563-5665, Newsroom - 563-3280
E-MAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Where to find us:


Meadowcrest
office
1624 N.
Meadowcrest
Blvd.
Crystal River,
FL 34429


Inverness
office

106 W. Main
St.,
Inverness, FL
34450


G erry M ulligan ...................................................................... . P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ....................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
C harlie B rennan ................................ ............. ......................... .. Editor, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 5
Tom Feeney ..................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
Kathie Stewart ..........................................Circulation Director, 563-5655
John M urphy ................................................................ Online M manager, 563-3255
Neale Brennan .... Promotions/Community Affairs Manager, 563-6363
Doug Yates ................... ............................... Classified Manager, 564-2917
Jeff Gordon .............................................................. Business M manager, 564-29 08
Mike Arnold..................................... Human Resources Director, 564-2910
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
To have a photo taken .............................................. Darlene Mann, 563-5660
News and feature stories ............................. Sandra Frederick, 564-2930
Community/wire service content.......................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Sports event coverage .....................................................John Coscia, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9

The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing, Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone (352) 563-6363
g P POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
106 W. MAIN ST., INVERNESS, FL 34450
PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


'44.
' *-e Norvell Brant Hwi
Dunen r ,_ Cannondale Dr
A Meadowcresl
N I' '- :1i

IE I | Courthouse
To mpkins St. T square





Who's in charge:


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

tees ahead of humans," he
said.
County officials agreed to
work in "partnership" and
provide a united front when
both sides present their
case at the July 7 meeting
with USFWS in Lecanto.
More than a dozen residents
in the audience also spoke.
Rod Shidler has lived on
the water since 1985 and
said he has seen a 450 per-
cent increase in the num-
ber of manatees.
"How many manatees
can be allowed in the bay in
a given day?" he said. "Do
we manage the manatees or
do they manage us?"
The council unanimously
voted to support a resolu-
tion to ask the federal
agency not to place further
restrictions and controls on
King's Bay
In other business, the
council passed an ordinance
banning sales of alcohol
after midnight at stores
selling packaged alcohol
and one allowing 7 a.m.
sales of alcohol on Sundays.
Chronicle Managing Edi-
tor Sandra Frederick can
be reached at (352) 564-2930
or sfrederick@chronicle
online.com.


..............


I ........... I


.-An ag . .
- n"-'- -


F





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRIAL
Continued from Page Al

He faces up to 300 years
in prison, although federal
sentencing guidelines are
sure to significantly reduce
his time behind bars.
After hearing the verdict,
Blagojevich turned to de-
fense attorney Sheldon
Sorosky and asked "What
happened?" His wife, Patti,
slumped against her
brother, then rushed into
her husband's arms.
The former governor spoke
only briefly with reporters
as he left the courthouse,
saying he was disappointed
and stunned by the verdict.
"The conduct would make
Lincoln roll over in his
grave," U.S. Attorney
Patrick Fitzgerald said be-
fore a bank of television
cameras after the arrest.
He pledged to retry the
governor after the first jury
deadlocked on all but the
least serious of 24 charges
against him.
This time, the 12 jurors
voted to convict the 54-year-
old Blagojevich on 17 of 20
counts after deliberating
nine days. He also faces up
to five additional years in
prison for his previous con-
viction of lying to the FBI.
Blagojevich was acquitted
of soliciting bribes in the al-
leged shakedown of a road-
building executive. The jury
deadlocked on two charges
of attempted extortion re-
lated to that executive and
funding for a school.
Judge James Zagel has
barred Blagojevich from
traveling outside the area
without permission. A status
hearing for sentencing was
set for Aug. 1.
After his arrest, Blagoje-
vich called federal prosecu-
tors "cowards and liars" and
challenged Fitzgerald to
face him in court if he was
"man enough."
In what many saw as em-
barrassing indignities for a
former governor, he sent his
wife to the jungle for a real-
ity television show, "I'm a
Celebrity, Get Me Out of
Here," where she had to eat
a tarantula. He later showed
his own ineptitude at simple
office skills before being
fired on Donald Trump's
"Celebrity Apprentice."
For the second trial, pros-
ecutors streamlined their
case, and attorneys for the
former governor put on a
defense highlighted by a
chatty Blagojevich taking
the witness stand for seven
days to portray himself as a
big talker but not a criminal.
Blagojevich seemed to be-
lieve he could talk his way
out of trouble from the wit-
ness stand. Indignant one
minute, laughing the next,
seemingly in tears once, he
endeavored to counteract
the blunt, greedy man he ap-
peared to be on FBI wire-
taps. He apologized to jurors
for the four-letter words that
peppered the recordings.
He clearly sought to so-
licit sympathy He spoke
about his working-class par-
ents and choked up re-
counting the day he met his
wife, the daughter of a pow-
erful Chicago alderman. He
reflected on his feelings of
inferiority at college, where
other students wore preppy
"alligator" shirts. Touching
on his political life, he por-
trayed himself as a friend of
working people, the poor
and elderly
He told jurors his talk on
the wiretaps merely dis-
played his approach to deci-
sion-making: to invite a
whirlwind of ideas - "good
ones, bad ones, stupid ones"
- then toss the ill-con-
ceived ones out. To demon-
strate the absurdities such
brainstorming could gener-
ate, he said he once consid-
ered appointing himself to
the Senate seat so he could
travel to Afghanistan and help
hunt down Osama bin Laden.
Other times, when a pros-
ecutor read wiretap tran-


scripts where Blagojevich
seems to speak clearly of
trading the Senate seat for a
job, Blagojevich told jurors,
"I see what I say here, but
that's not what I meant."
The government offered a
starkly different assessment
to jurors: Blagojevich was a
liar, and had continued to lie,
over and over, to their faces.
Lead prosecutor Reid
Schar started his question-
ing of Blagojevich with a
quick verbal punch: "Mr.
Blagojevich, you are a con-
victed liar, correct?"
"Yes," Blagojevich even-
tually answered after the
judge overruled a flurry of
defense objections.


IMPACT
Continued from Page Al

will rid the taxpayers of the
burden of having to litigate
many portions of the law-
suits the foundation has al-
ready filed," Grant said.
Grant called parts of the
lawsuit frivolous.
"On the lawsuit that they
filed today, the frivolity of
what's going on is readily
apparent," he said. "What
they've done here is they
have thrown in some frivo-
lous claims to get a venue in
Leon County, but your lawyers
will handle that. Those are
frivolous and really kind of
ridiculous and they don't
really have a date for it. So,
some of those things will go
by the wayside because
they're not going to be able
to substantiate them."
Trustee Debbie Ressler
asked Grant to clarify those
claims. He said the lawsuit
contained an allegation of a
Sunshine Law violation


> FULL BINGO 4
TILL



SINGLE BINGO
AND
DOUBLE BINGO

WINNER
JEWEL
DUNAWAY


some time in April, mean-
ing a complaint about the
trustees conforming to open
meeting requirements, but
it was not specific, he said.
Another outcome of going
to court could be the two
boards having to mediate to
settle their differences.
"It's been my experience
with these colleagues that we
tried to approach them 17
times in the last 18 months
to resolve this," Grant said.
"So we may see court inter-
vention to compel them to
get a status conference in
front of the court to do away
with some of this litigation."
Trustee Michael Small-
ridge questioned why the
board of trustees was
named in the lawsuit when
the Florida Legislature ap-
proved the law.
The offices of the Florida
Governor and the Florida
Attorney General would be
joining the trustees in the
case, Grant said.
The Leon County Circuit
Court could take evidence
and decide within two


TODAY'S




NUMBER




128


564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO


Another outcome of going to court
could be the two boards having to
mediate to settle their differences.


weeks if the case had merit,
Grant said. It could grant an
injunction in its entirety, as
requested. Or, it could grant
an injunction in part. Or it
could deny the request.
Grant said he did not ex-
pect an injunction to be
granted, and he did antici-
pate the foundation attor-
neys appealing it.
"If they don't like it, they


can seek a stay in the ap-
pellate court," he said.
"This is how they are going
to play this out."
Getting a temporary in-
junction would lead to re-
questing a permanent
injunction against the new
law, he said. But if the court
were to dismiss the request
for an injunction, it would
not put an end to legal ac-


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 A5

tion as the foundation could
sue as the leaseholder of
the hospital.
"If it's denied, then there
will be no permanent in-
junction hearing," Grant
said. "But then we just go to
the lawsuit. That will take
many, many months."
Grant asked the trustees
to set shade meetings for at-
torneys to discuss strategies
with them and to keep the
trustees apprised of the costs
that would be incurred.
Chronicle reporter Chris
Van Ormercan bereachedat
(352) 564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


S ' If you have a blocked artery, the sooner you
Shave an angioplasty the better.
8 = At Citrus Memorial's Heart Center, we
V:, A ,7 5 average 42 minutes from the time you reach
- � our door to the angioplasty procedure.

THAT'S 30% FASTER THAN THE
NATIONAL AVERAGE OF 60 MINUTES. CITRUS MEMORY AL
Time Saved is Muscle Saved. r U
With rapid response, more heart muscle can be saved and oxygen-rich blood can
once again flow freely to the heart. The longer the blockage remains in place the more
muscle dies in the area fed by that artery. The result is a weakened heart muscle not able to
move blood throughout the body. With delay, the patient's stamina declines and the
quality and length of life are compromised.


Qualified. Experienced. Nearby.
Since 2004, advanced heart care has
been available right here in Citrus
County. There's no need to drive long
distances to other counties and lose
valuable time.
00081CO


Value Come Together


Anderson nn
HARDWOOD OliUg
FLOORING Only .
INSTALLED Sq. ft.
MOLDINGS & TRIM EXTRA


Lifetime Stain &
Odor Warranty $l i T 1
STARTING AT sq. ft.
IN STOCK ONLY Taxlncluded


LAMINATE 9
INSTALLED
w/Lifetime Warranty sq.f
7 COLORS TO CHOOSE Only Stock On. ,.
MOLDINGS & TRIM EXTRA n Sok

PORCHILIGHT
COMMERCIAL
CARPET 12
CARPETsq. ft.
INCLUDES INSTALLATION
AND TAX I


INC.
341-0813
, www.michaelsfloorcoveringinc.net
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
0 (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44)
Open Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5, Sat. 9-4 Evenings by api: :


Has your bank taken the "R" out of


AT CAPITAL CITY BANK, we think free checking should be free. That's why we offer a range of account
options to meet your needs and all with the same price tag - nothing.

Advantages of Absolutely Free Checking*
* No monthly service fees * Free check card
* No minimum balance requirements * Free online banking with Bill Pay
* No per-check charges * Free Mobile BankingA

Open an account today and learn why free checking is just one more way we're more than your bank.
We're your bankers.


5 area locations to serve you.
795.6100
www.ccbg.com


--
SCapital City

Bank


More than your bank. Your banker.
MEMBER FDIC
*Client purchases checks. Account subject to fees if overdrawn. Ask a banker for details. ^Fees charged by mobile service provider are the responsibility of the user.


,


-


[.',Tr ,InvIerneIss, :L[34452

Ma" ' [^"^^rin Hospi(tal:j(35]2),726 -,1551


Carry-out only. Plus tax. Crystal River location only
Gulf to Lake Hwy
--- ^^'"^w n-p

19 0
Venable-St





CITRUS COUNTi (FL) CHRONICLE


Blood drive boosts self-esteem


Documentary

on annual event

draws notice to

Vermont town

Associated Press

RUTLAND, Vt. - When
documentary filmmaker
Art Jones and his five-man
crew set out from New York
to shoot footage of a blood
drive in a small Vermont
city, he did it to satisfy an
old friend, one of the or-
ganizers. Jones figured it
might make a nice four-
minute film.
What he found in hard-
scrabble Rutland was
something more: A hard-
luck city whose annual Gift-
of-Life Marathon was but
one of the homegrown ini-
tiatives being spearheaded
by energetic volunteers and
creative community mem-
bers determined to turn
things around.
The 80-minute documen-
tary he ended up making -
"The Blood in This Town"
- is now getting notice
from community leaders
and rural development
groups who hope to repli-
cate Rutland's self-reliance
instead of waiting for Wash-
ington or corporate Amer-
ica to deliver them from
hard times.
"The movie does a good
job of exploring some
themes that I think are very
common in rural areas:
How to deal with a chang-
ing economy, how to de-
velop your own leadership,
how to do something sus-
tainable and truly based on
the assets of the commu-
nity, as opposed to trying to
find your salvation in some
outside company you're
going to bring in," said Tim
Marema, vice president of
the Center for Rural Strate-
gies, in Knoxville, Tenn.
"It's about building from
within."
One town's story
Like many small Ameri-


Associated Press
ABOVE: People give blood Dec. 21, 2010, in Rutland, Vt. What started as a documentary
film about a struggling Vermont city's annual blood drive has become a rallying point for
community pride that's spreading.


ONLINE
"The Blood in This Town":
http://bloodinthistown.com

can towns and cities, Rut-
land - a former quarry,
manufacturing and rail-
road center now home to
16,630 people - is way past
its prime.
Long-dormant manufac-
turing facilities with bro-
ken windows, deteriorating
old homes and empty store-
fronts have combined to
create an urban landscape
in sharp contrast to Ver-
mont's picturesque village
squares. It is, as a local hos-
pital executive says in the
movie, recalling a magazine
article's description: "the
only ugly town in Vermont."
On Dec. 22, 2009, Jones
and his crew camped out at
Paramount Theatre, an 850-
seat Victorian opera house
whose stage, seats and lob-
bies swarm for one day a
year with volunteers,
nurses, American Red
Cross phlebotomists and
donors laid out on cots,
with red tubes snaking out
of their arms into plastic
bags.
Organizers had set what
some considered an unat-
tainable goal - 1,000 pints


of blood. A white eraser
board kept a running tally
as the hours ticked down.
By the time the Para-
mount's doors shut, 1,024
pints had been collecting,
breaking a New England
record for a one-day drive
that had been set by Boston,
a city of 645,000.
The cameras caught it all
- and more.
"Throughout that day, I
heard more stories about
other things going on in
town," said Jones, whose
stock-in-trade is normally
corporate films. "The idea
was if this town could do
this in one day, come to-
gether that way and redis-
cover its ability to
accomplish things, what
else could it do in the other
364 days of the year?" he
said.
Achievements
He found out, taking cam-
eras to Pine Hill Park, a for-
mer wino haven on the
outskirts of town that was
turned into a mountain bik-
ing haven; to the Rutland
Farmers Market, which
took up residence in an un-
heated building and be-
came a roaring year-round
success; to Friday Night
Live, a volunteer-run cele-
bration of downtown that


blocks off Center Street
five or six nights a year in
summer; creation of the
Rutland Area Farm and
Food Link, which is help-
ing connect farms with
new markets, including
individual customers who
buy shares in farms
and get weekly food
deliveries.
"It really took Art
Jones, an outsider, to
come in and say to the
community at large
'You've got something
special here" for a lot of
people to understand
that,' said Randal Smath-
ers, editor of the Rutland
Herald newspaper "It's
made people proud to say
'I'm from Rutland,' when
before it was like 'Oh, I'm
from Vermont."'
Not that all is rosy now.
"Sure, we still have our
problems," said blood
drive organizer Steve
Costello, who lured Jones
to Rutland. "They're not
being solved overnight.
But the blood drive and a
lot of these other things
the film touches on are
giving people here a self-
esteem that wasn't here
before, and a sense that
they can solve these prob-
lems if they stick to it."


New standards urged for blood transfusions


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Check
into the hospital and you
may get a blood transfusion
you didn't really need.
There's a lot of variation
around the country in how
quick doctors are to order
up a few pints - not in
cases of trauma or hemor-
rhage where infusing blood
fast can be life-saving, but
for a range of other reasons.
Anemia is common in
older patients, for example,
who may get a transfusion
as an easy boost even when
the anemia's too mild to
matter or instead of treating
the underlying problem.
Need open-heart surgery or
another complex opera-
tion? There are steps sur-
geons could take to
minimize blood loss instead
of trying to replace it later
Now a government advi-
sory committee is calling for
national standards on when
a transfusion is needed -
and how to conserve this
precious resource.
All the variability shows
"there is both excessive and
inappropriate use of blood
transfusions in the U.S.," ad-
visers to Health and Human
Services Secretary Kath-
leen Sebelius said earlier
this month. "Improvements
in rational use of blood have
lagged."
Blood banks welcome the
idea, important as they try
to balance how to keep just
enough blood on the shelves
without it going bad or run-
ning short.
"Better patient care is
what's being advocated
here," said Dr Richard Ben-
jamin, chief medical officer
of the American Red Cross.
"If a transfusion is not neces-
sary, all you can do is harm."
The U.S. uses a lot of
blood, more than 14 million
units of red blood cells a
year Between 1994 and
2008, blood use climbed 40
percent, Benjamin told the
HHS Advisory Committee
on Blood Safety and Avail-
ability. In many years, parts
of the country experienced
spot shortages as blood
banks struggled to bring in
enough donors to keep up.


Surprisingly, blood use
dropped a bit with the re-
cession, roughly 6 percent
over two years, Benjamin
says. He couldn't say why
That dip has leveled off, but
specialists say demand is
sure to rise again in coming
years as the population rap-
idly grays and people who
once were prime donors be-
come more ill and frail.
Right now, overall dona-
tion levels are good with one
exception, Benjamin said:
There's a big need for more
Type 0-negative blood, espe-
cially as banks prepare for


BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
5430 W Gulf to LakeHwy.
Lecanto, Florida34451
(352)
795-0111
r^-- w �


CELEBRATE

HUGE |
SUMMER
SAVINGS .







For a limited time only!
Call today for your
appointment!

11:1ia

Fiancn


the usual summertime donor
drop. Few donors are Type 0-
negative, but it's compatible
with all other blood types and
hospitals have begun using
more of it in recent years.
What's the evidence for
avoidable transfusions?
One study published last
fall tracked more than
100,000 people who under-

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Call Gale Randall

at 563-3266
or email
grandall@chronicleonline.com


Lis aspior torun dte. A


went open-heart surgery, a
transfusion-heavy opera-
tion. Just 8 percent of those
patients received transfu-
sions at some hospitals,
while a startling 93 percent
did at other hospitals. But
survival wasn't signifi-
cantly different at hospitals
that used more blood than
at hospitals that used less.


0 ON PREMIUM

SOFF* HEARING AID
MODELS


ONLY to the first 50 Hearii


Newest Premier Top Technology


TOUCH 17
17 Digital Channels
* Wind Noise Suppression
* Silencer
* Multichannel MPO
* Smart Gain
SSound Cleaner
Noise Reduction
SAutophone


6-

TRUE 62D
* Rapid 17 Curvilinear compressor
* Smart Beem Steering
*Speech Spotter
* Sound Cleaner
*Wind Noise Suppression
Special Directionality
Whistle Stop
*Silencer
Improved Adaptive active
feedback control


LECANTO
2708 W. Woodview Land
1-888-799-0017


Your Ear Canal
Inspection May
Reveal Such
*k Common
Problems As:
* Excessive wax buildup
* Damage to the
- ear drum
* Other conditions that may make
it difficult to hear clearly.
See For Yourself! - Receive a
Video Otoscopy & Hearing Test FREE!


BROOKSVILLE
1126 W. Jefferson St.
1-888-799-0017


Alfred Benard
Sr., 81
Alfred Delphas Benard
Sr, 81, died Monday, June
27, 2011, at Arbor Trail
Rehab and Nursing Center
A graveside service will
be at 11 a.m. Wednesday,
June 29,2011, at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery A funeral
procession will leave from
Heinz Funeral Home & Cre-
mation at 10 a.m. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.

Edna
Clement, 93
CRYSTAL RIVER
Mrs. Edna Simmons
Clement, 93, of Crystal
River, died Wednesday,
June 22, 2011, in Crystal
River Arrangements are
under the direction of the
Inverness Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Home & Crematory

Betty
Kaufman, 86
HOLDER
Betty Anne Kaufman, 86,
of Holder, FL, died Thurs-
day, June 23, 2011, in Her-
nando, FL. Betty was born
August 4, 1924, in Baltimore,
MD, daughter of Millard and
Augusta (Rohr) Sewell. She
graduated from Eastern
High School in 1941 and at-
tended Strayer Business


College. She worked for the
U.S. Civil Service Commis-
sion Headquarters Second
Army as a personal secre-
tary In 1989, she relocated
to Hernando, FL. Betty was
a gentle woman and a won-
derful example of Christian
love shown by her faith in
God and dedication to her
family
Surviving family mem-
bers include son, David and
daughter-in-law Rosemarie
Kaufman of Homosassa, FL;
son, Steven and daughter-
in-law Diane Kaufman of
Baltimore, MD; son, John
Kaufman of Newport
Beach, CA; and grandsons,
Brent and Todd Kaufman.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www.HooperFuneralHome.
com.




Juan Tejera
Jr., 57
INVERNESS
Mr. Juan Alberto Tejera
Jr, 57, of Inverness, died
Saturday, June 25, 2011, in
Inverness.
The family will receive
friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 29,
at the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes. Mili-
tary honors with presentation
of colors will begin at 3 p.m.
Cremation will be under
the direction of Hooper Cre-
matory, Inverness.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* A flag will be included for free for those who served in
the U.S. military. Additionally, all obituaries will be
posted online at www.chronicleonline.com.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* Email obits@chronicleonline.com or fax (352)
563-3280. Call (352) 563-5660 for details.


6A4. E. g afi.
FuneralHome With Crematory
NORMA ALLARD
Service: Friday, 11am
Floral City Baptist Chruch
JAMES H. JOHNSON
Graveside: Friday, 2:30pm
Florida National Cemetery
MARILYN DICKINSON
Private: Florida National Cemetery
JENNY SIMS
Private Cremation Arrangements
EDWARD ESQUIBEL
Arrangements Pending
726-8323 MoDQI


lwES I
U.S 1, Hmoass 68-01


9v
ACCESS OPTIMA
* 6 Channel Digital Signal
Processing
* Multi-memory
* Volume Control
* Directional Microphone
*Tel-Coil
FOR ONLY!
$1390 ea.
SAVE $1210


TURN 75
* High precisonal Digital Signal
Processing
* 6 Channel RAPID Curvilinear WDRC
* Noise Reduction
* Volume Control * Telecoil
*Silencer * Program Switch
FOR ONLY!
$1349 ea.
SAVE $1647


SPRING HILL
7243 Forest Oaks Blvd.
1-888-799-0017


EED!


SObituaries


- Bob Brown's
JFence &

SLandscaping

All Types of Fencing
FREE Estimates

(352) 795-0188 * (352) 220-3194





EThanks for
. ST voting us

VR6 Best of the Best

Vertical Blinds of Homosassa
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
(352) 628-7888. .


ng Aids Sold! I

*Buy I Get 2nd Side 50% OFF
TRUE, REACH, or TOUCH MODELS.
Call your local office for complete details.
No other offers or discounts apply. Discount doesn't apply to
prior sales. Expires 7/15/11.
New Economy Technology


A6 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A LONG DISPUTE:

T he two boards at Citrus Memorial Health System have been in conflict for more than two years about hospital control and
how taxpayer money has been spent. The signing of the new law is the latest effort by Citrus County Hospital Board to
resolve the dispute with Citrus Memorial Health Foundation. The following dates highlight the history of the dispute:


March 2009 - The Citrus County
Medical Society petitions state
Sen. Charles Dean, R-Inverness, to
ask the state to audit the hospital.
Sept. 15, 2009 - Many taxpayers
attended the budget public hear-
ings to raise questions about the
hospital's accountability.
Sept. 21, 2009 - Ryan Beaty,
hospital chief executive officer,
laid out a three-year plan to lower
the hospital's reliance on taxpay-
ers' dollars.
Sept. 22, 2009 - At the second
tax public hearing, the trustees
lowered the millage rate from the
proposed rate of 1.01510 mills to
1.000 mills. They set conditions
for the release of funds and they
refused to allow Beaty to make a
presentation.
Sept. 29, 2009 - The foundation
and the trustees disagreed about
who should make up the shortfall
from the millage reduction to re-
place hospital equipment.
Oct. 12, 2009 - Attorney Bill
Grant was contracted as general
counsel to the trustees. The
trustees passed a resolution in-
structing its attorneys to seek to
remove the sovereign immunity
status from the foundation be-
cause it was "not acting consistent
with the requirements of law of at-
taining and maintaining sovereign
immunity status as a non-govern-
mental entity." Sovereign immu-


nity is a legal privilege that would
protect the foundation from being
sued for more than $200,000 be-
cause it is an agent of the board
of trustees who are appointed by
the governor.
Oct. 26, 2009 - Trustees resigned
from the foundation board of di-
rectors in objection to their "inabil-
ity to exercise any meaningful control
or oversight of the foundation."
Nov. 23, 2009 - Making good the
condition set at September's
budget meeting, the trustees voted
to withhold tax funding for the
foundation pending submission of
its final budget for approval. The
foundation maintained it was not
required to do so.
Nov. 30, 2009 -John Upchurch
was chosen as special master to
mediate between the two sides on
their issues of governance, budget
oversight and sovereign immunity.
Sessions were set for Dec. 16 and
Jan. 11. These sessions failed.
Dec. 5, 2009 - A seven-page leg-
islative initiative was sent to the
three state lawmakers who
planned to conduct a legislative
delegation meeting Dec. 17 at Cit-
rus County Courthouse. The pro-
posed legislation would shift
hospital control to the trustees.
Dec. 14, 2009- The hospital's
bond rating drops. "Moody's rat-
ing was BAA3 stable last year, but
it's down to BAA3 negative be-


cause of governance issues," said
Emery Hensley, Citrus Memorial's
chief financial officer at the time.
Dec. 18, 2009 - Auditor Gen-
eral's initial findings report was re-
leased. It said additional
accountability measures were
needed to ensure prudent use of
public funds.
Jan. 8, 2010 - Several county
residents request the trustees to
seek the intervention of a
statewide grand jury.
Feb. 22, 2010- The legislative
delegation held a special hearing
in Inverness to consider revisions
of the local bill. State Rep. Ron
Schultz said he had difficulty ac-
cepting some of the language.
March 3, 2010 - The trustees
agree to withhold tax funding until
they see the foundation's strategic
plan. The foundation refuses to
share the plan. The trustees file a
lawsuit in April 2011 seeking the
strategic plan.
April 5, 2010 - Schultz tells the
Chronicle's editorial board that the
hospital legislation would die. The
bill passed in the Senate, but ran
out of time in the House.
June 28, 2010 - Ryan Beaty re-
signs as chief executive officer of
the board of trustees. He retains
his position as president and CEO
of the foundation.
July 6, 2010 - Trustees release
their revised charity care policy.


July 27, 2010 - Foundation is-
sues a notice of default against
the trustees for not releasing tax
funding to it.
Aug. 30, 2010 -Trustees issue a
notice of default against the foun-
dation and a civil lawsuit to recover
$5.5 million in tax money for 2008.
Sept. 14, 2010 - Charity groups
and agencies form a group to con-
sider the hospital's indigent care
policy regarding the amount of
federal poverty level required.
Sept. 17, 2010 - Foundation cuts
its budget as it can't rely on get-
ting tax funds.
Sept. 21, 2010 - Both boards
issue notices of default against
each other, both claim they are
owed money by the other.
Sept. 29, 2010- Foundation an-
nounces some staff will be laid off,
but a 2 percent raise will be given
in January.
Oct. 1, 2010 - Trustees slash
millage rate to 0.25 mills; founda-
tion announces it has a balanced
budget.
Oct. 8, 2010 - Pink slips go out.
Management bonuses withheld.
Oct 15, 2010 - The medical exec-
utive committee passes a vote of
no confidence in the chief execu-
tive officer.


Dec. 2, 2010 - Trustee Deborah
Osmond Frankel resigns, saying
she hopes it will lead to a compro-
mise between the boards. Susan
Kirk appointed to board of
trustees.
Jan. 14, 2011 - Foundation an-
nounces its cost-cutting measures
have improved its finances.
Jan. 25, 2011 - Last time media-
tion is considered, but it does not
happen.
Feb. 1, 2011 - Trustees hire
forensic auditors.
Feb. 19, 2011 - Moody's down-
grades hospital's bonds.
March 3, 2011 - Trustees file law-
suit against Ryan Beaty, the chief
executive officer.
March 8, 2011 - First reading of
hospital bill in the Florida Legisla-
ture.
April 14, 2011 - Foundation files
lawsuit against trustees.
May 2, 2011 - Hospital Bill
passes the House and is sent to
the Senate.
May 3, 2011 - Hospital Bill
passes the Senate and is ordered
enrolled.
May 26, 2011 - Fitch drops hos-
pital's bond rating to speculative.


Dec. 1, 2010 - Lawmakers revive June 24, 2011 - Hospital bill
hospital bill. signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott.


SUIT
Continued from Page Al

"You need to have a full
injunction with witnesses,"
Grant said. "You just don't
pop up and say you want an
injunction on a new law that
the governor just signed."
Smith said he doesn't
know what the foundation is
trying to achieve.
"It will provide trans-
parency and accountability
of the taxpayers' money," he
said of the law. "I under-
stand that the foundation
would seek a lawsuit to stop
the law. What part of trans-
parency and accountability
would they want to stop?"
The lawsuit alleges the new
law not only voids a legal
contract between the foun-
dation and board of trustees,
it violates the lease by hand-
ing oversight to the trustees.
It says the new law effec-
tively kills lawsuits both
sides have against each
other because once trustees
seek control of the founda-
tion, they will vote to end
the legal cases.
The lawsuit also accuses
members of the board of
trustees of violating the
Sunshine Law by meeting
privately with a legislator in
2010, and then a lobbyist in
2011, in Tallahassee.
Also named as a defendant
is the state of Florida, a fact
Judge Fulford noted in set-
ting the hearing date. In her
show-cause order, Fulford
said the first issue to be set-
tled during Wednesday's
dawn hearing is whether
the case should be in Leon
or Citrus County circuit court
Foundation attorney Clark
Stillwell told foundation
members Monday the in-
junction is mirrored after a
similar case involving a
Longwood health care facil-
ity He said that case turned
out in the private nonprofit
facility's favor after being
heard by the district court of
appeal based in Tallahassee.
The foundation is gearing
up for a lengthy legal battle.
The foundation board on
Monday authorized Beaty to
secure up to $1 million to pay
for legal fees exclusively on
the constitutional issue.
Beaty said the fees will
not come from taxes used to
support the hospital; in fact,
he said, the board of trustees
has not turned over tax rev-
enue since March 2010.
The foundation also
agreed to set aside $1.4 mil-
lion in a trust that could be
used for severance pay for
four vice presidents who
work for Beaty should the
foundation lose the legal
battle and the trustees gain
control of the hospital.
Beaty said the severance
could kick in if the trustees
fire the hospital administra-
tion, or if vice presidents re-
sign due to pay cuts or
changes in job status.
Chronicle staff writer
Chris Van Ormer con-
tributed to this report.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


WHAT'S IN THE NEW LAW

T he new law amends the powers of the Citrus Memorial I
powers of the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees.


The law:
* codifies all special acts re-
lating to the trustees into a
single act;
* revises the investment and
financial reporting require-


www.prestigehomes.net


Health Foundation, increasing the oversight


* provides that the
additional lease
obligations are to be
retroactive;
* provides for severability of
the act's provisions in the


ments of the trustees;
m imposes additional require-
ments to be applied to any
lease agreements for the
operation of Citrus County
Memorial hospital;


IIf you have taken advantage of one of the
government programs and have cash, don't rent



,LLLLL.LLtLJLLL
'LL a L 7 7u i tt-77 77CE b u
q LLLLLLLLL- L --- ####$f#$
Lm LL L-L nL[ff niELLLLL LLL LriiiiHtii
LLLLLLLLLL=L:L fL C Foreclosures
t L LL L 1r rLLLLLLL LL L
',, " REFLLLLL .L: L
| li R E1F b Ehi-^ L ESL
I- iisri LL L In Yoir/IregsI
I L'fh: 4- l I . LL L~^^- �-N -! IIfIl L


- Dare To Compare -
OurFactory Pricing!!!
Our price includes: setup
blocking of the home, hurricane
anchoring, central heat and air
conditioning, wooden steps, and
vertical vinyl skirting.


PRESTIGE HOME CENTERS
1825 Hwy. 41 North, Inverness, FL 34450 1-800-841-0592
.. *A *IIIIJIII


Advertise 7 days .................................. 31.50

Advertise 14 days ................................ $43.50
Advertise 14 days .. 43.50

Advertise 90 days................................69.50

Ads include a header and 4 lines of descriptive copy.
*Private party specials. 1 vehicle per ad. Specials are non-refundable.


CiHOS x . 352 -563-5966
g -08S ......
M E


case of judicial review;
* directs courts to construe
this as a remedial act; and
* provides an effective date
of July 1, 2011.


527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES
44 W. Gulf To Lake Hwy. - Lecanto (next to landfill)



592-0705 TUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City Council of the City of Crystal River,
Florida that a PUBLIC HEARING will be held relative to Ordinance No. 11-0-
05, regarding the Gardner Voluntary Annexation of 233 Acres into the municipal
boundaries of the City of Crystal River, Florida. The Public Hearing is scheduled
for Monday, July 11, 2011 during the Regular Council Meetings starting @
7:00 pm. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 123 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal
River, Florida.
ORDINANCE NO. 11-0-05
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA,
AUTHORIZING THE VOLUNTARY ANNEXATION OF 23293
ACRES (MOL) OF PROPERTY OWNED BY RAY STEVENSON &
LON GARDNER, ET AL, INTO THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF
THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, PURSUANT TO
SECTION 171.044, FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING A LEGAL
DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY SUBJECT TO THE
VOLUNTARY ANNEXATION; PROVIDING FOR PUBLICATION;
PROVIDING FOR FILINGS WITH THE APPROPRIATE
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.



L Et






1tl 4
SiiI







- - . , . _ .








C. .. ...
THE NORTHWEST 4 AND THE NORTHWEST 4 OF THE NORTHEAST '/4
AND PART OF THE SOUTHWEST V NORTH OF STATE ROAD NO 494,ALL
IN SECTION 4 TOWNSHIP 19S RANGE 17E PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PARCEL: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 494 AND THE EAST LINE OF THE
NORTHWEST % OF THE SOUTHWEST % SECTION 4 TOWNSHIP 19S
RANGE 17E, THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST LINE 200 FEET, THENCE
WEST PERPENDICULAR TO THE EAST LINE 200 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
PARALLEL TO THE EAST LINE 225 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 494, THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY 202 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
This ordinance in its entirety, may be inspected at the office of the City Clerk
during regular working hours. Any and all interested parties may appear at the
hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the
proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105 Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, City
Manager's Office, 123 N.W. Highway 19, Crystal River, FL 34428,
(352) 795-4216, at least two (2) days before the meeting.
By: Carol Harrington, CMC
City Clerk
0008GON 0008GON


' ' Ad was written up perfectly
6 with no mistakes. Placed ad in
paper and it was sold on the
second day. very happy with the
Chronicle.

Frank Raffa


p~r


Sc99]Hk9
$19899


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 A7







A8 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


I HowTo"S *ED'THE RTIN EI


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
BkofAm 1993193 10.85 +.33 Hyperdyn 40616 4.03 -.29 Microsoft 759362 25.20 +.90 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
S&P500ETF1490944127.94 +1.13 NovaGldg 34391 8.90 +.28 Cisco 747583 15.05 +.12 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
iShEMkts 513007 46.03 +.53 KodiakOg 27322 5.48 +.13 PwShsQQQ455855 55.25 +.87 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
FordM 493362 13.46 +.22 GtPanSilvg 23266 3.06 -.31 Intel 443128 21.34 +.14 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SPDR Fncl 483472 14.91 +.15 GrtBasGg 23171 2.04 +.07 SiriusXM 433116 2.00 +.01 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld - Issue has been called for redempton by company, d -New 52-week
low. dd -Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
Continucre 6.25 +1.48 +31.0 CKX Lands 13.97 +1.47 +11.8 Icagen rs 6.33 +3.93 +163.8 ing qualification. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
Fusion-io n 33.70 +4.97 +17.3 SwGAFn 10.00 +.97 +10.7 Servidyne 3.45 +1.19 +52.5 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferredstockissue.pr- Preferences.pp-
NetQin n 5.12 +.67 +15.1 Procerars 10.90 +.86 +8.6 GSV Cap n 14.57 +4.30 +41.9 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified price. s-
PhxNMdan 9.10 +1.10 +13.8 Cover-All 2.51 +.16 +6.8 RepubAir 5.67 +1.01 +21.7 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the
Renren n 7.00 +.77 +12.4 HstnAEn 16.94 +1.01 +6.3 Seanrgy rs 6.00 +1.01 +20.1 stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u - New
52-week high. un - Unit, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
BlueLinx 2.43 -.32 -11.6 B&HO 3.17 -.64 -16.8 PainTher 3.93 -1.37 -25.8
Syswin n 3.25 -.35 -9.7 Accelr8 4.48 -.77 -14.7 HampRB rs 10.85 -2.59 -19.3
Trex 23.48 -2.37 -9.2 GtPanSilvg 3.06 -.31 -9.2 SGOCOn 2.67 -.63 -19.1 .


FtBcppfE 14.02 -1.13 -7.5 ChinaShen 3.28 -.32 -8.9 ChinaNRes 8.83 -1.88 -17.6
PitnBpr 365.00 -29.62 -7.5 ConmedH 3.65 -.30 -7.6 Lantronk 2.67 -.53 -16.6


DIARY


2,083 Advanced
960 Declined
102 Unchanged
3,145 Total issues
50 New Highs
38 New Lows
3,231,422,364 Volume


DIARY


230 Advanced
233 Declined
35 Unchanged
498 Total issues
6 New Highs
7 New Lows
88,430,375 Volume


1,711
904
104
2,719
64
49
1,679,551,428


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 9,614.32Dow Jones Industrials
5,565.78 3,872.64Dow Jones Transportation
441.86 353.53Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,355.83NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,770.05Amex Index
2,887.75 2,061.14Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500
14,562.01 10,596.20Wilshire 5000
868.57 587.66Russell 2000


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Last Chg Chg Chg %Chg
12,043.56 +108.98 +.91 +4.03+18.79
5,259.19 +45.04 +.86 +2.99+24.89
427.08 +3.09 +.73 +5.45 +16.08
8,031.08 +56.36 +.71 +.84+19.22
2,270.87 +10.21 +.45 +2.83+22.18
2,688.28 +35.39 +1.33 +1.33+21.06
1,280.10 +11.65 +.92 +1.79+19.13
13,597.70 +117.14 +.87 +1.78+20.38
805.14 +7.35 +.92 +2.74 +25.50


I NYSE


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BRT 6.42 -.08
BakrHu 68.14 +.87
BallCp s 37.80 +.31
BcBilVArg 10.84 +.22
ABBLtd 25.01 +.30 BoBrades 19.47 +.15
ACELtd 64.73 +.78 BeoSantSA 10.86 +.20
AESCorp 12.21 +.09 BoSBrasil 10.91 -.01
AFLAC 44.95 +.65 BkofAm 10.85 +.33
AGL Res 39.92 +.26 Bklreind 1.05 -.06
AKSteel 14.30 +.08 BkNYMel 24.65 +.01
AMR 5.64 Barday 15.39 +.06
AOL 19.61 +.06 BariPVixrs 24.17 -.36
ASAGold 27.28 +.03 BarnesNob 16.94 -.32
AT&TInc 30.76 +.32 BarrickG 43.16 +.12
AU Optron 6.72 Baxter 58.93 +.43
AbtLab 51.90 +.15 BectDck 85.25 +.41
AberFitc 65.24 +.62 BerkHaAl113600.00 +500.00
Accenture 57.79 +.77 BerkH B 75.63 +.01
AccretivH 26.70 +2.11 BestBuy 31.32 -1.16
AdamsEx 10.79 +.10 BIkHillsCp 29.99 +.07
AMD 6.92 +.02 BlkDebtStr 4.23 -.06
Aeropostf 17.26 +.11 BlkEnhC&l 13.96 +.18
Aetna 43.30 +.02 Blackstone 16.25 +.23
Agilent 48.85 +.36 BlockHR 15.94 +.09
Agnieog 65.01 +1.06 Boeing 71.62 +.36
Agriumg 85.34 +1.76 Boiselnc 7.25 +.17
AirProd 93.01 +.02 BorgWarn 78.54 +.38
AlcatelLuc 5.44 +.25 BostBeer 89.83 +1.04
Alcoa 15.28 +.05 BostProp 103.86 +1.25
AllegTch 59.11 -.90 BostonSci 6.87 -.02
Allete 40.56 +.15 BoydGm 8.25 +.01
AlliBGIbHi 15.17 +.07 BrMySq 28.47 -.46
AlliBInco 7.99 -.01 Brunswick 19.07 +.06
AlliBern 18.82 +.02 Buckeye 63.92 -.03
Allstate 29.62 +.19 CBREIlis 23.95 +.66
AlphaNRs 43.17 +.46 CBSB 27.35 +56
Altria 26.77 -.02 CFInds 143.98 +3.33
AmBevs 32.30 +.51 OH Engy 52.69 +.58
Ameren 28.52 +.26 CIGNA 49.41 +.99
Amerigrp 66.83 +2.49 CMS Eng 19.57 +.07
AMovilL 51.31 +.53 CNO Find 7.27 +.03
AmAdxle 10.91 -.02 CSS Inds 20.50 +.42
AEagleOut 12.50 -.09 CSXs 25.12 +.13
AEP 37.30 +.20 CVREngy 22.91 +.12
AmExp 49.54 +1.20 CVSCare 36.52 +.10
AmlntGrp 28.81 +.36 CablvsnNY 34.57 +.04
AmSIP3 7.83 +.04 CabotO&G 62.61 +1.16
AmTower 51.86 +.11 CallGolf 6.30 +.15
Amerigas 44.46 ... Alpine 15.81 +.09
Ameriprise 55.81 +.41 Camecog 24.87 +.06
AmeriBrgn 40.65 +.51 Cameron 45.68 -.02
Anadarko 72.01 -.45 CampSp 34.02 +.12
AnalogDev 37.84 +.52 CdnNRsgs 38.81 +.05
AnglogldA 39.91 -.21 CapOne 50.76 +1.25
ABInBev 56.18 +.53 CapifiSrce 5.98 -.04
Ann Inc 26.26 +.23 CapM pB 14.66 -.04
Annaly 18.67 -.03 CapsteadM 13.77
Anworth 7.39 -.05 CardnlHIth 43.94 -.06
AonCorp 49.29 +.17 CareFusion 26.78 +.38
Apache 116.24 +.26 CarMax 32.19 +.26
AquaAm 21.46 +.03 Carnival 37.45 +.15
ArcelorMit 32.37 +.35 Caterpillar 100.80 +.79
ArchCoal 25.07 -.23 Celanese 50.36 -.15
ArchDan 29.62 +.32 Cemex 8.15 +.15
ArmourRsd 7.36 +.08 CenovusE 33.82 -.01
ArrowB 37.78 +1.11 CenterPnt 19.12 +.17
Ashland 62.06 -.23 CntyEink 39.63 +.47
AsdEstat 16.15 +10 Checkpnt 17.36 +.05
AssuredG 15.29 +.01 ChesEng 28.00 -.01
ATMOS 32.35 +.05 ChesUt 39.86 +.13
Autliv 75.80 +1.29 Chevron 98.90 +1.00
Avnet 30.58 +.42 Chieos 15.07 +.05
Avon 27.45 -.08 Chimera 3.53 +.01
BB&T Cp 25.89 +.44 ChinaMble 46.37 -.66
BHP BilLt 89.28 +.67 Chubb 61.85 +.92
BHPBil plc 73.83 +.62 CindBell 3.17 +.07
BP PLC 42.25 +.35 Cifgrp rs 39.99 +.40
BPZ Res 3.28 -.01 CleanH 99.84 +.55
BRFBrasil 16.65 +.25 CliffsNRs 87.38 +.76


Clorox 66.25 -.04
Coach 59.20 +.54
CCFemsa 92.73 +1.91
CocaCola 65.21 +.28
CocaCE 28.70 +.36
Coeur 23.54 +.15
CohStlnfra 17.12 +.29
ColgPal 85.41 -.05
CollctvBrd 14.26 -.46
Comerica 33.98 +.24
CmwReitrs 25.58 +.44
CmtyHIt 24.48 +.21
CompPrdS 29.92 -.30
CompSci 37.18 +.09
ComstkRs 26.92 -.41
Con-Way 37.18 +.43
ConAgra 25.39 +.19
ConocPhil 71.78 +.35
ConsolEngy 47.13 +.26
ConEd 52.69 +.29
ConstellA 20.78 -.04
ConstellEn 37.46 +.32
Continucre 6.25 +1.48
Cnvrgys 13.30 -.07
Corning 17.37 -.18
CosanLtd 11.69 -.16
CottCp 8.13 -.16
Covidien 52.98 +.65
Crane 46.97 +.08
CSVS2xVxS 23.30 -.75
CSVellVSts 16.11 +.26
CreXus 10.85 +.15
Cummins 97.39 +.72


DCTIndl 5.12 +.01
DNP Selct 9.98 +.05
DPL 30.15 +.04
DR Horton 11.64 +.22
DSW Inc 49.47 -.02
DTE 49.48 +.44
DanaHldg 17.58 +.38
Danaher 51.14 -.17
Darden 48.22 -.29
DeanFds 12.04 +.04
Deere 80.69 +.71
DeltaAir 9.66 +.23
DenburyR 18.75 +.05
DeutschBk 56.02 +.16
DBGoldDS 6.94 +.05
DevelDiv 13.52 +.16
DevonE 76.02 -.59
DiaOffs 67.49 -.22
DrSCBr rs 37.77 -.93
DirFnBrrs 49.17 -1.43
DirLCBrrs 38.02 -.98
DrxEMBull 34.41 +1.16
DrxEBearrs 17.25 -.24
DirEMBear 19.33 -.69
DrxFnBull 23.44 +.65
DirxSCBull 75.31 +1.76
DirxEnBull 62.81 +.91
Discover 25.21 +.42
Disney 38.07 +.49
DollarGen 33.09 -.35
DomRescs 47.70 +.45
DoralFnd 1.94 +.08
DowOhm 35.11 -.12
DrPepSnap 40.55 +.66
DuPont 51.75 -.21
DukeEngy 18.62 +.11
DukeRlty 13.49 +.08
ECDangn 10.39 -.05
EMC Cp 26.50 +.86
EOG Res 100.33 +2.06
EastChm 98.86 +.28
EKodak 3.43 +.01
Eaton s 48.23 +.04


EV EnEq 11.66
Edisonlnt 38.90
BPasoCp 19.71
Ban 10.85
BdorGldg 14.11
Embraer 29.94
EmersonEl 53.87
EmpDist 18.73
EnbrEPts 30.89
EnCanag 29.17
EndvSilvg 7.83
EnPro 45.35


ENSCO 51.52 +.08
Entergy 69.24 +1.07
EqtyRsd 58.71 +.35
ExeoRes 17.44 -1.34
Exelon 42.25 +.23
ExterranH 19.52 -.51
ExxonMbl 77.92 +1.14
FMCTchs 40.37 +.60
FNBCp PA 10.35 +.25
FairchldS 16.67 +.16
FedExCp 92.85 +.98
FedSignl 6.43 +.11
Ferrellgs 22.47 -.11
Ferro 12.72 +.41
FibriaCelu 13.00 +.04
FidNatlnfo 30.21 +.14
FstHorizon 9.52 -.02
FTActDiv 10.65 -.07
FtTrEnEq 11.96 +.06
FirstEngy 43.25 +.20
RagstBcp 1.23 -.06
Ruor 61.66 +.54
FootLockr 23.90 -.34
FordM 13.46 +.22
ForestLab 39.30 -.03
ForestOil 24.93 -.52
Fortress 4.62 +.05
FortuneBr 62.70 +.19
FMCG s 48.69 +.26
FronferCm 7.87
FronterOil 29.80 +1.12
Fusion-io n 33.70 +4.97


GATX 36.12 -.13
GabelliET 5.97 +.07
GabHIthW 7.54 +.08
GabUlI 7.15 +.04
GafisaSA 9.25 +.06
GameSbtp 25.79 -.33
Gannett 13.71 +.18
Gap 17.74 +.08
GenDynam 73.26 +.97
GenElec 18.28 +.31


GenGrPrn 16.26 +.15
GenMills 37.25 +.40
GenMotn 30.26 +.34
GMotwtA 21.29 +.39
GenOn En 3.72 -.02
Genworth 9.98 +.03
Gerdau 9.79 +.11
GlaxoSKIn 41.18 -.16
GlimchRt 9.28 +.03
GoldFLtd 13.80 -.12
Goldcrpg 46.74 -.10
GoldmanS 130.71 -.20
Goodrich 93.28 +.89
Goodyear 16.04 +.16
GrafTech 19.00 -.03
GtPlainEn 20.59 +.10
Griffon 9.88 +.11
GuangRy 20.69 +.19
HCA HId n 32.48 +.23
HCP Inc 36.63 +.08
HSBC 48.47 +.23
HSBCCap 26.91 -.07
Hallibrtn 46.23 +.36
HanJS 15.42 +.19
HanPrmDv 12.64 +.32
Hanesbrds 28.00 +.16
Hanoverlns 36.74 +.31
HarleyD 38.34 +.27
HarmonyG 12.52 +.18
HartfdFn 24.75 +.03
HatterasF 27.56 +.04
HawaiiEl 23.57 +.02


HItCrREIT 52.21 -.06
HItMgmt 10.35 +.01
HIthcrRlty 20.42 -.05
Heckmann 6.20 +.10
HeclaM 7.25 -.04
Heinz 53.13 +.12
HelixEn 15.74 -.23
HedmPayne 60.95 +.27
Hertz 15.22 +.03
Hess 69.19 +.15
HewlettP 34.98 +.08
HighwdPrp 32.54 +.11


HollyCp 62.00 +2.19
HomeDp 35.20 +.12
HonwIllnfi 56.79 +.44
HorizLns 1.38 +.28
Hospira 55.43 +.67
HospPT 23.77 -.02
HostHofis 16.26 +.12
HovnanE 2.08 +.08
Humana 80.92 +.54
Huntsmn 17.89 +.40
IAMGIdg 17.94 -.02
ICICI Bk 47.84 +1.50
ING 11.24 +.12
ION Geoph 8.20 +.02
iShGold 14.61 -.05
iSAsfia 24.60 -.04
iShBraz 70.43 +.86
iSCan 30.15 +.15
iShGer 25.63 +.27
iShHK 18.10 +.16
iShJapn 10.07 -.05
iSh Kor 62.90 +.39
iSMalas 14.85 +.10
iShMex 59.75 +.44
iShSing 13.26 +.03
iSTaiwn 14.71 +.11
iShSilver 32.63 -.73
iShChina25 42.35 +.71
iSSP500 128.36 +1.07
iShEMkts 46.03 +.53
iShB20T 95.65 -1.33
iShBl1-3T 84.46 -.08


iS Eafe 57.57
iSR1KV 66.31
iSR1KG 58.89
iSR2KV 71.58
iSR2KG 91.88
iShR2K 80.56
iShUSPfd 39.19
iShREst 59.07
iShSPSm 71.06
iStar 7.52
ITT Corp 56.64
Idacorp 39.07


ITW 54.75 +.40
Imafon 9.19 +.08
Imax Corp 29.75 -.58
IngerRd 43.53 +.40
IntegrysE 51.27 +.45
IntcnfiEx 120.52 +1.96
IBM 167.62 +2.55
InfiGame 17.12 +.39
IntPap 29.16 +.38
Interpublic 11.66 +.20
Invesco 22.32 +.40
InvMtgCap 20.90 -.19
IronMtn 33.04 +.21
ItauUnibH 22.18 +.18

JPMorgCh 39.88 +.39
JPMChwt 12.90 +.25
Jabil 19.35 +.21
JanusCap 9.08 +.29
Jefferies 20.20 +.08
JohnJn 65.25 +.19
JohnsnCOf 39.52 +.35
JnprNtwk 30.50 +.48
KB Home 11.79 +.03
KCSouthn 55.91 +.32
Kaydon 36.25 +.03
KA EngTR 28.76 +.51
Kelbgg 54.82 +.06
KeyEngy 16.36 -.19
Keycorp 8.08 +.15
KimbClk 65.42 +.06


Kimco 18.26 +.18 Mosaic 64.80 +1.20 PiedNG 29.59 +.21 Revlon 15.91 +.24
KindME 71.37 -.04 MotrlaSoln 45.76 +.36 Pier1 11.16 -.23 ReynAms 37.22 +.16
KindMorn 28.26 -.34 MotrlaMo n 22.82 -.29 PimoStrat 11.33 +.06 Riolnto 68.52 +.89
Kinrossg 15.24 +.10 MurphO 62.53 -.28 PinWst 44.15 +.43 RiteAid 1.24 +.04
Kohls 50.22 +.77 NCRCorp 18.24 +.01 PitnyBw 22.22 +.10 RobtHalf 26.24 +.24
Kraft 34.50 -.10 NRG Egy 23.06 +.26 PlainsEx 34.91 +.10 RockTen 63.47 -.76
KrispKrm 9.52 +.39 NVEnergy 15.23 +.13 PlumCrk 39.47 +.27 RockwAut 81.14 +.52
Kroger 24.28 -.22 NYSEEur 32.65 +.78 Polaris 108.68 +1.95 RockColl 59.92 -.27
LDK Solar 7.14 +.33 Nabors 22.81 -.23 PostPrp 39.65 +.32 RockwdH 52.93 +1.12
LSICorp 6.89 +.06 NBkGreece 1.36 +05 Potashs 54.16 +1.62 Rowan 36.09 +.17
LTC Prp 27.09 +.09 NatFuGas 69.90 -.06 PwshDB 28.25 -.01 RylCarb 36.77 +.56
LaZBoy 9.71 +.34 NatGrid 48.01 +.46 PSAgri 31.79 -.14 RoyDShllA 68.11 +.75
Laclede 37.63 +.32 NOilVarco 70.70 +.60 PSUSDBull 21.53 -.10 Royce 14.37 +.11
LVSands 40.19 +1.00 NatSemi 24.60 -.04 Praxair 103.83 +.54 Roce B 2540 -.09
LeapFrog 4.22 +.03 NewAmHi 10.93 +.04 PrecDrill 13.47 +.02
LeggMason 31.78 +.53 NJRscs 43.71 +.32 PrinFnd 29.40 +.39
LennarA 18.44 +.40 NYCmlyB 14.89 -.05 ProLogis 34.37 +.21 SAIC 16.71 +.16
LbtyASG 4.35 NYTimes 8.29 +.31 ProShtS&P 42.25 -.36 SCANA 38.91 +.25
LillyEli 36.83 +.07 NewellRub 15.49 -.17 PrUShS&P 21.98 -.40 SKTIcm 17.91 +.08
Limited 37.39 +.22 NewfidExp 64.97 +.15 PrUIShDow 18.25 -.31 SLMCp 16.79 +.13
LincNat 27.00 +.24 NewmtM 52.32 +.05 ProUltQQQ 83.06 +2.61 SpdrDJIA 120.20 +1.00
Lindsay 63.34 +1.18 NewpkRes 8.61 -.21 PrUShQQQrs53.82 -1.79 SpdrGold 145.73 -.53
Linkedlnn 76.38 +6.44 Nexeng 20.08 +.33 ProUltSP 49.68 +.79 SPMid 172.43 +.72
Lizlaib 5.24 -.10 NextEraEn 56.98 +.37 PrUShtFnrs 65.54 -1.21 S&P500ETF127.94 +1.13
LloydBkg 2.75 +.02 NiSource 19.73 +25 ProUShL20 33.36 +.86 SpdrHome 17.92 +.03
LockhdM 79.67 +.47 Nicor 54.42 +.17 ProUltFin 59.64 +1.08 SpdrKbwBk 23.32 +.33
Lorillard 111.19 +.70 NikeB 81.62 +.44 ProUBasM 47.97 +.20 SpdrLehHY 39.47 +.02
LaPac 8.02 -.12 NobleCorp 37.71 ProShtR2K 30.38 -.28 SpdrKbwRB 24.88 +.29
Lowes 23.15 -.10 NokiaCp 6.04 +.16 ProUltR2K 44.61 +.66 SpdrRefI 52.36 +.40
Lubrizol 134.23 +.02 Nordstrm 45.49 +.59 ProUSSP50017.09 -.45 SpdrOGEx 55.08 -.04
onBasA 37.26 -.32 NorfikSo 72.12 +.45 ProUSSlvrs 20.47 +.89 SpdrMetM 65.29 -.01
E NoestUt 35.02 +.38 PrUltCrders 38.68 -.36 SRAlInt 31.07 -.06
M&TBk 8672 +140 NorthropG 66.97 +.62 PrUShCrders53.45 +.48 STMicro 9.37 +.14
MBk 86.72 +1.40 2 Novas 59.63 +.32 ProSUtSilv 153.50 -7.08 STRHIdgs 14.20 -.13
MDU Res 22.09 +BIA 8.17 -.12 05 NSTAR 45.63 +.38 ProUShEuro 17.28 -.25 Safeway 22.51 -.04
MDURes 22.09 +.05 Nucor 39.48 -.08 ProctGam 62.82 +.23 StJoe 20.21 +.41
MEM Global 78.04 -.048 NvMO 13.51 -.01 ProgrssEn 47.38 +.20 Sude 46.35 +.05
MFAFncl 8.08 +04 NvMulSI&G 8.77 ProgsvCp 20.85 +.29 Saks 10.99 +.02
MCR 9.39 NuvQPf2 8.30 +. ProUSR2Krs44.21 -.71 Salesforce 145.09 +2.05
MCR 9.39 . OGEE 49.18 +.21 Prudenti 60.80 +1.09 SallyBty 17.01 +.16
MGIC 5.75 -.29 OGE Ery 49.18 +21 PSEG 31.91 +.83 SuanB 23.73 +.1
MGM Rsts 12.52 +.32 OasisPet 27.91 +.97 PSEG 31.91 +83 SJuanB 23.73 +11
Macquarie 25.90 -.31 OcciPet 98.93 +.47 PubStrg 111.09 +.36 SandRdge 10.20 -.17
Macys 28.15 +.13 OfficeDpt 412 -05 PPrlT 6.48 +.07 SaraLee 18.82 +.22
MagePMP6 58.84 +.13 Offic.Max 7.63 -.06
MagelMPtr 58.84 +.13 OicMT 141.32 +.41 QuanexBld 15.58 -.32 Schlmbrg 80.64 -.28
Magnalgs 50.62 +.69 Oin 22.00T +.25 QuantaSvc 19.71 +.25 Schwab 15.81 +.03
MagHRes 6.09 -.06 OmegaHIt 20.50 +.1125 QntmDSS 3.17 +.01 SealAir 22.83 +.32
Manitowoc 15.40 +.06 OmreaHt 20.50 +.11 Questars 17.68 +.09 SemiHTr 33.00 +.34
Manulifeg 16.41 +.21 Omnom 46.08 +47 QksilvRes 14.44 -.16 SenHous 23.16 -.32
MarathonO 49.06 -.49 o 46.08 +.47 RAIT Fin 2.04 -.05 Sensient 36.44 +.09
MktVGold 52.52 -.06 ONEOK Pt 7349 +.22 RPM 22.49 +.17 Sherwin 82.88 -1.25
MktVRus 37.36 +.48 ONEOKsht 84. 2725 +.3817 RSCHldgs 10.93 +.04 SiderurNac 11.92 +.11
MktVJrGd 32.28 -.71 OshkoshCp 27.92 +.17 Rackspace 41.98 +1.50 SilvWhtng 31.58 -.17
MarlntA 34.08 +.12 Oenslll 25.19 -.37 RadianGrp 3.81 -.11 SilvrcpMg 8.75 -.07
MarshM 29.94 +.02 RadioShk 12.77 -.08 SimonProp 113.76 +1.32
Marshlls 7.65 +.08 PG&ECp 41.65 -.16 Ralcorp 86.61 +.11 Skechers 13.88 +.23
MStewrt 4.16 -.04 PMIGrp 1.16 -.06 RangeRs 52.06 -.22 SmithAOs 40.93 +.11
MascDrmlnts 12.08 +.07 45 58 PNC 57.85 +1.24 RJamesFn 31.29 -.03 SmithfF 21.84 -.03
McDrmlnts 18.45 -.58 PNM Res 16.54 +.20 Rayonier 63.51 +.50 Smucker 75.48 +.58
McDnlds 82.32 +.48 PPG 86.96 -.20 Raytheon 48.40 +.47 Soluta 21.10 +.09
McGH 40.12 +.61 rRealDn 23.16 -1.45 SoJerInd 52.69 +.65
McKesson 81.98 +.43 PaCorp 2742 +.24 Rltylneo 33.16 +.07 SouthnCo 39.79 +.36
MedHIth 5442 +1.11 Pandoran 16.52 +1.15 RedHat 45.19 +.16 SthnCopper 31.00 -.42
MedcHic 38.58 +.18 Pariotoal 21.44 +.19 RegalEnt 11.81 +.03 SoUnCo 39.63 -.22
Merck 34.538 +.02 PeabdyE 56.61 +.19 RegionsFn 5.94 ... SwstAirl 11.39 +.03
ReneSola 4.88 -.16 SwstnEngy 40.69 -.15
MetLife 41.36 +.37 Pengrthg 12.02 -.18 Renrenn 7.00 +.77 SpectraEn 26.59 +.14
MetroPCS 16.87 +.21 PennVaRs 26.17 +.17
MedAApt 65.79 +.31 PennWstg 22.17 .05 ResrceCap 6.61 +.03 SpiritAero 20.65 -.03
Mdas 6.13 -.02 Penney 34.31 +.07
MitsuUFJ 4.64 +.04 PepBoy 10.92 +14
MobileTele 18.96 +28 PepoHold 19.31 +.13
Molyeorp n 56.07 +.31 PepsiCo 69.05 +.60
MoneyGrm 3.37 +.05 Prmian 21.27 -.04 The remainder of the
Monsanto 65.72 -.24 Petrohawk 23.52 +.28 The remainder of the
MonstrWw 13.57 +.07 PetrbrsA 29.32 +.40 NYSE listings can be
Moodys 37.16 +.11 Petrobras 32.25 +.38 NYSE be
MorgStan 22.54 +.33 Pfizer 20.17 +.09 found on the next page
MSEmMkt 15.38 +.14 PhilipMor 65.92 +.82 n the next page.
PhilipsEl 24.13 +.37


IA EIA N - 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.30 +.07
AbdnEMTel 18.42 +.06
Accelr8 4.48 -.77
AdmRsc 24.79 -.32
Advenlx 2.86 +.01
AlexeoRg 6.68 -.20
AlldNevG 33.23 -.07
AmApparel .86 +.02
AmDGEn 1.59 -.03
Anooraqg .78 -.01
AntaresP 2.10 -.07
ArcadiaRs .08 -.00


Augustag 4.06
Aurizong 5.24
AvalRaren 6.56
Bacterin n 2.87
BarcUBS36 46.58
BarcGSOil 23.36
Brigusgrs 1.57
CAMAC En 1.27
CanoPet .32
CardiumTh .28
CelSd .51
CFCdag 20.02
CheniereEn 8.01
ChiGengM 1.82
ChinaShen 3.28


-.16 ClghGlbOp 13.15 +.21
-.14 CrSuiHiY 3.21
-.10
-.17
-.19 DenisnMg 1.75 -.05
-.10 EVLtdDur 16.34 -.02
-.06 EVMuni2 12.53 -.03
+.08 EllswthFd 7.45 +.02
+.01 eMagin 5.68 +.15
+.0 EntGaming .28 -.04
+ EntreeGold 1.93 -.02
-.03 ExeterRgs 4.14 -.06
-.12 Express-1 3.23 +.10
-.32 FrTmpLtd 14.35 +.15


GabGldNR 17.10 -.15
GascoEngy .24 +.01
Gastar grs 3.35 -.04
GenMoly 4.21 -.12
GeoGloblR .50 +.00
GoldResrc 23.90 -.91
GoldStrg 2.25
GranTrrag 6.10 -.12
GrtBasGg 2.04 +.07
GtPanSilvg 3.06 -.31
HooperH .93 +.02
HstnAEn 16.94 +1.01
Hyperdyn 4.03 -.29


ImpOilgs 44.02 +.13
IndiaGC .31 -.07
InovioPhm .62 +.03
IntellgSys 1.32


KodiakOg 5.48 +.13
LadThalFn 1.46 +.06
Lannett 5.06 -.29
LucasEn i72.7504

MadCatzg 1.33 -.02
Metalico 5.77 +.15
MetroHIth 4.75 -.13


MdwGoldg 2.01
Minefndg 11.96
NeoStem 1.57
Neoprobe 3.62
NBRESec 4.16
Neuralstem 1.57
Nevsung 5.65
NewEnSys 2.30
NwGoldg 9.47
NA Pall g 3.73
NDynMng 9.16
NthnO&G 20.05
NthgtMg 2.61
NovaBayP 1.11
NovaGldg 8.90


Oilsands g .33 +.00 Rubion 4.52 -.02
OpkoHIth 3.60 +.15
OrsusXelrs 4.64 -.23
SamsO&G 2.87 +.04
SilverBull .58 -.03
ParaG&S 3.30 -.20 TanzRyg 6.44 +.13
PhrmAth 3.22 +.02 Taseko 4.36 -.06
PbinDrill 13.60 +.12 TiensBio 1.70 +.67
PlatGpMet 1.95 -.01 TrnsafiPet 1.72 -.08
PolyMetg 1.32 -.07 TravelCts 5.02 +.03
PyramidOil 4.51 -.05 TriValley .60 -.01
Quepasa 6.36 -.29 TriangPet 5.99 +.01
QuestRMg 6.78 +.25 Tueowsg .87 +.06
RareEleg 10.80 +.13 UQMTech 2.27 -.02
Rentech 1.03 +.02 US Geoth .80 +.01
RexahnPh 1.21 -.03 Uluru .04 -.00


Univlnsur 4.77 -.12
Ur-Energy 1.60 -.02
Uranerz 2.95 -.09
UraniumEn 3.03 -.06


VantageDrl 1.81 -.03
VirnetX 28.50 +26
VistaGold 2.82 +.05
VoyagerOG 2.54 -.09
Walterlnv 19.40 +.29
WT DrfChn 25.37 -.03
WizzardSft .17 +.01
YM Biog 2.70 +.03


IASD AQ AINL5AKT1


Name Last Chg


ACMoore If 2.45 -.04
ASMLHId 36.29 +1.31
ATP O&G 14.75 +.08
AVI Bio 1.39 -.01
AXT Inc 7.94 -.05
Abraxas 3.04 -.19
Accuray 7.73 +.06
Achillion 7.30 +.07
AcmePkt 67.92 +2.76
AeordaTh 32.42 -.39
AcfvePwr 2.30 -.11
AcfvsBliz 11.38 +.09
AcuraPh 4.02 -.08
Acxiom 12.45 +.43
AdobeSy 30.89 +.92
Adtran 38.46 +.29
AdvBattery 1.07
AdvEnld 13.89 +.04
AEternag 2.19 -.02
Affymax 6.93 -.03
Afymetrix 7.69 +.23
AgFeed 1.15 -.05
AirTrnsp 6.51 +.21
AkamaiT 29.50 +.25
Akorn 6.90 +.05
AlaskCom 8.95 -.03
Alexion s 45.59 +.77
Alexza 1.61 -.04
AlignTech 22.00 -.09
Alkerm 17.77 +.46
AllegiantT 48.34 +1.67
AlldHIther 2.51 +.04
AllosThera 2.15 +.05
AllscriptH 18.94 +.24
AlteraCp If 44.58 +.95
AlterraCap 22.01 +.28
Amarin 14.39 -.05
Amazon 201.25 +8.70
ACapAgy 28.81 +.08
AmCapLd 9.24 +.10
AmSupr 8.49 +.38
Amgen 57.88 +.84
AmkorTIf 5.98 +.01
Amtech 19.65 +1.06
Amylin 12.68 +.85
Anadigc 3.20 +.08
Anlogic 52.57 +.61
Analystlnt 3.12 -.03
Ancestry 40.84 +.92
A123Sys 5.14 +.20
ApolloGrp 41.88 -.06
Apollolnv 9.86 +.15
Apple Inc 332.04 +5.69
ApldEner h .40 +.08
ApldMab 12.66 +.26
AMCC 8.64 +.08
ApricusBio 5.09 -.17
ArchCap s 32.64 +.65
ArenaPhm 1.32 +.01
AresCap 15.93 +.07
AriadP 10.95 +.32
Aribalnc 33.29 +.17
ArkBest 23.15 +.24
ArmHId 28.41 +.34
Arris 10.87 -.08
ArubaNet 27.59 +.89
AscenaRb 33.48 +.26
AscentSol 1.37 -.05
AsialnfoL 14.93 +.32
AspenTech 16.02 +.57
AssodBanc 13.38 +.13
Atmel 13.06
Audvox 7.57 +.22
Autodesk 37.43 +.74
AutoData 51.62 +.40
Auxilium 18.92 -.20
AvagoTch 35.45 -.07
AvanirPhm 3.71 +.25
AVEO Ph 20.04 +.49
AvisBudg 16.53 +.73
Awareh 3.15 +.17
Axcelis 1.70 -.05
BEAero 39.48 +.55
BGC Ptrs 7.60 +.09


BMC Sft 52.58 +.94 Compuwre 9.55 +.15
BSDMed 4.00 +.05 Comtech 27.17 +.44
Baidu 133.17 +4.49 Concepts 11.13 +.44
BeaconPrs 1.24 -.04 ConcurTch 48.80 +.34
BeacnRfg 22.24 +.03 Conmed 27.44 +.28
BeasleyB 4.12 +.02 Conns 8.64 -.19
BedBath 56.46 -.13 ConstantC 24.89 +.52
Biogenldc 104.65 +1.23 ConvOrgh .08 -.01
BioLase 5.29 -.23 Copart 45.43 +.47
BioMarin 25.64 +.09 CorinthC 4.06 -.08
BioMimetc 5.39 -.16 Costeo 79.85 +.72
BioSante 2.75 -.05 CowenGp 3.84 +.04
BlkRKelso 9.02 +.07 Cree Inc 33.53 -.43
Blkboard 43.56 -.38 Crocs 25.33 +.52
BlueCoat 21.41 -.05 Ctrip.eom 39.30 -.01
BobEvans 34.27 +.24 CubistPh 35.67 -.04
BostPrv 6.23 +.15 Curis 3.59 +.01
BrigExp 27.99 +1.10 Cyberonics 25.57 -.10
Brightpnt 7.99 -.08 CypSemi 20.10 +.20
Broadcom 31.53 -.69 CytRxh .72 -.02
BroadSoft 36.24 +.12 Cytolnet 1.21 -.01
Broadwind 1.44 +01 'CAt i 4.81-04
BrcdeOm 6.25 +.06
BrklneB 9.13 -.03
BrukerCp 18.95 +.36 DUSA 6.22 +.29
Bucyrus 91.63 -.01 DeckOuts 84.77 +1.73
BuffabWW 65.27 +1.75 DeerConsu 6.91 +.01
CA Inc 22.13 +.22 Delcath 5.20 +.03
CBOE 23.72 -.38 Dell Inc 15.94 +.01
CH Robins 76.95 +.86 DeltaPtrh .48 -.03
CVBFnd 8.94 +.24 Dndreon 39.10 +.45
Cadence 10.24 +.04 Dennys 3.88 +.06
CalifPizza 18.47 +.03 Dentsply 37.21 -.18
CaliperLSc 7.91 +.11 Depomed 8.10
CdnSolar 11.34 +.24 DexCom 14.79 +.19
CapCtyBk 10.81 -.16 DirecTVA 49.20 +1.45
CapFdFrs 11.68 -.11 DiscCOmA 40.36 +.14
CpstnTrbh 1.38 -.06 DiscCmC 36.00 +.08
CardiovSys 14.01 +.38 DishNetwk 28.74 +.74
CareerEd 19.95 +.11 DollarFns 20.93 +.32
CaribouC 13.84 +.87 DollarTree 66.08 +.82
Carrizo 36.40 -.09 DonlleyRR 19.20 +.28
CarverBch .54 -.01 DotHillSy 2.63 +.03
CatalystH 53.79 +.85 DrmWksA 20.08 -.88
CathayGen 16.09 +.32 DryShips 3.96
Cavium 41.86 +1.26 DurectCp 1.94 -.19
Celgene 59.39 +.62 DyaxCp 2.11 -.02
CellTherrsh 1.97 -.02 Dynavax 2.74 +.01
CelldexTh 3.60 +.02 E-Trade 13.39 +.01
Celsion 2.98 -.12 eBay 28.71 +.36
CentEuro 11.21 +.07 EagleBulk 2.43 +.13
CEurMed 19.11 -.05 ErthLink 7.69 +.04
CentAI 14.51 +.29 EstWstBcp 19.60 +.35
Cephln 79.84 -.05 EasyLkSInt 5.52 +.32
Cepheid 32.80 +.53 Ebixlnc 20.15 -.10
Corner s 58.98 +.96 EchdeonC 9.22 +.24
ChrmSh 3.88 -.06 EducDevh 5.43 +.06
CharterCm 54.09 -.32 8x8 Inc 4.33 +.31
ChkPoint 54.98 +.53 ElectSd 18.07 +.29
Cheesecake 31.28 +.37 ElectArts 21.71 -.06
ChelseaTh 5.12 ... Emeorelf 2.34 +.15
ChildPlace 44.40 +.22 EmpirRsth 1.07 +.01
ChinAutol If 9.20 +.52 EndoPhrm 39.74 +1.11
ChinaTcF 3.73 +.24 Endobgix 9.08 -.07
ChrchllD 43.73 +.78 Enerl 1.20 +.05
CienaCorp 17.82 +.06 EngyConv 1.25 +.10
CinnFin 28.35 +.22 EngyXXI 30.64 -.85
Cintas 31.96 +.21 Entegris 9.98 +.20
Cirrus 14.59 +.40 EntropCom 8.68 +.07
Cisco 15.05 +.12 EnzonPhar 10.25 +.24
CitzRepBh .63 -.01 Equinix 98.85 -.07
CitrixSys 78.94 +2.70 EricsnTel 13.76 +.60
CleanDslrs 4.39 -.79 EvrgrSlrrs .60 +.11
CleanEngy 12.40 -.14 ExactScih 8.18 -.02
Clearwire 3.86 -.12 Exelids 9.00 +.26
ClevBioL h 3.31 -.08 ExddeTc 7.34 +.27
CoStar 57.06 +1.20 Expedia 27.89 -.07
CoffeeH 14.81 -.88 Expdlni 49.26 +1.68
CogentC 16.79 +.57 ExpScripts 53.39 +.45
CognizTech 71.88 +.74 Ezcorp 34.32 +2.25
CogoGrp 5.36 +.09 F5Netwks 109.54 +3.44
Coinstar 50.92 +.31 FEICo 36.65 +.29
ColdwtrCrk 1.33 +.02 FLIRSys 32.14 +.11
ColumLabs 3.06 -.17 FSI Int 2.88 +.07
Comcast 24.27 +.69 Fastenal s 34.25 +.83
Comcspcl 23.02 +.52 FiberTwr 1.20 -.10
CommSys 17.70 +1.31 FifthThird 12.28 +.10
CommVlt 42.27 +1.04 Fncllnst 16.28 +.18


Finisar 16.80 +.74 Innospec 32.25 +1.39
FinLine 21.41 +.07 InsitTc 19.65 +.40
FstCashFn 40.11 +1.20 Insulet 21.09 +.49
FMidBc 12.00 +.28 IntgDv 7.54 +.04
FstNiagara 13.07 -.04 Intel 21.34 +.14
FstSolar 116.68 +.12 InteractBrk 15.41 +.24
FstMerit 16.26 +.22 InterDig 39.42 +1.11
Fiserv 61.20 +.49 InterMune 35.25 +.23
Flextrn 6.36 -.04 InterNAP 7.31 +.21
Flowlnt 3.22 -.02 InftSpdw 27.11 +.28
FocusMda 29.51 +.50 Intersil 12.58 +.08
ForcePro 4.83 +.18 Intuit 50.82 +.32
Forfnets 26.01 +.16 InvRIEst 8.61 +.12
Fossil Inc 114.04 +.63 IridiumCm 8.30 +.11
FosterWhl 29.05 +.08 IronwdPh 16.20 +.17
FreshMktn 39.32 +.49 Isis 9.12 +.19
FuelCell 1.39 -.07 IstaPh 6.88 -.19
FulbtnFncl 10.66 +.03 IvanhoeEn 1.83 -.06
Fundtch 19.54 -.04 IMa 12.46 +.27
iFuhCo 571 +06 -
w l JA Solar 5.73 +.16
GSVCapn 14.57 +4.30 JDASoft 30.21 +.26
GTSolar 15.52 +.22 JDSUniph 16.36 +.35
GTx Inc 4.53 -.24 JackHenry 29.58 +.29
Garmin 32.22 -1.23 JacklnBox 22.32 -.04
GenProbe 67.68 -1.83 JamesRiv 19.89 +.03
Gentex 29.45 -.03 JazzPhrm 32.18 +.36
GeronCp 3.93 +.01 JetBlue 6.13 +.07
GileadSd 40.18 +.47 JoeJeansh .77 -.03
GladerBc 13.08 +.11 JoyGIbl 87.11 +.46
Gleacher 2.11 -.01 KLATnc 39.80 +.77
GloblInd 5.09 +.07 Kenexa 24.73 +1.45
GIbSpcMet 20.80 +.21 KeryxBio 4.53 -.09
GluMobile 4.48 -.22 KirgldJrs 1.43 -.13
Google 482.80 +7.92 KiORn 15.03 +.03
GrCanyEd 13.59 +.05 KopinCp 4.75 -.10
GrLkDrge 5.33 +.11 Kulicke 10.81 -.20
GreenMtC 84.94 +1.51 L&L Engy 5.15 -.41
GrifolsSA n 7.01 +.09 LKQ Corp 25.60 +.20
GulfportE 26.56 +.09 LML Pay 3.56 +.09
HMN Fn 2.46 +.01 LPL Invn 33.76 +.61
HSN Inc 30.62 -.02 LSI Ind If 8.27 +.13
HampRBrs 10.85 -2.59 LTXCrdrs 8.75 -.08
HancHId 31.06 +.23 Labophgh .13 -.03
HanmiFnd .83 -.06 LamResrch 43.33 +.11
HansenMed 3.07 -.04 LamarAdv 26.31 +.22
HansenNat 79.11 +1.06 Landstar 45.15 +.16
HanwhaSol 6.20 +.30 Lattce 6.40 +.03
HarbinElec 14.99 +.04 LawsnSft 11.20 -.01
Harmonic 7.06 ... LeapWirlss 16.62 +.16
Hasbro 43.75 +.40 Level3 2.28 +.01
HawHold 5.99 +.25 LedPhrm 1.69 -.10
HrfindEx 16.15 +.13 LibGlobA 42.65 +.38
HSchein 69.93 +.41 LibtyMlntA 15.99 +.02
HercOffsh 5.06 -.01 LibMCapA 80.49 +.57
Hologic 19.89 -.05 LibStarzA 69.11 +.11
Home Inns 37.69 +1.77 LifeTech 52.68 +.79
HorsehdH 11.85 -.01 LifePtH 38.22 +.34
HotTopic 7.45 +.17 LimelghtN 4.56 -.05
HudsCity 8.09 +.15 Lincare 28.72 -.22
HumGen 24.71 -.20 LincElecs 33.76 +.49
HuntJB 45.94 +.23 LinearTch 32.11 +.33
HuntBnk 6.32 +.22 LinnEngy 38.42 +.42
HutchT 2.21 -.12 LivePrsn 12.95 +.18
IAC Inter 36.55 +.06 Local.com 3.28 -.07
ICOGIbA 2.78 -.45 LodgeNet 3.20 -.08
II-VI s 24.78 +.40 Logitech 10.51 -.16
IPG Photon 68.70 +2.53 LookSmart 1.51 -.02
iShAsiaexJ 60.16 +.59 LoopNet 18.44 +.01
iShNsdqBio 104.25 +.92 lululemn 10858 +4.20
Icagenrs 6.33 +3.93 ItI
IconixBr 23.18 +.11
IdenixPh 5.30 +.05 MCGCap 6.11 +.16
Idenive 2.46 +.02 MGE 40.66 +.47
iGoInc 1.70 -.15 MIPSTech 6.72 +.09
Illumina 74.15 +1.15 MTS 40.59 +1.29
Immersion 8.58 +.18 Magma 7.73 -.10
Immucor 19.59 +.22 MadenH 9.16 -.11
ImunoGn 11.87 +.23 Majeseo 2.67 -.29
Imunmd 3.78 -.04 MAKOSrg 28.82 +1.03
ImpaxLabs 20.66 +.45 MannKd 4.15 +.16
inContact 4.86 +.47 MarinaBrs .25 -.00
Incyte 18.58 +.21 MarvellT 14.14 +.08
Infinera 6.84 +.26 Masimo 29.45 -.26
Informat 57.45 +.64 Mattel 26.88 +.13
InfosysT 63.42 +1.06 Mattson 1.82 +.03
Inhibitex 3.77 -.16 Madmlntg 24.65 +.55


MaxwlT 15.85 +.33 Pacerlnfi 4.85 +.10
MedAssets 13.23 +.09 PacBbsdn 11.64 +.32
MediaMdn 21.92 ... PacSunwr 2.57 +.03
MedicAcIn 8.25 +.02 PaetecHId 4.47 +.03
MediCo 16.37 -.05 PainTher 3.93 -1.37
MedQuistn 11.73 -.28 PanASIv 29.30 -.36
MeleoCrwn 11.63 +.18 PaneraBrd 126.25 +.59
MentorGr 12.27 -.03 ParamTch 23.20 +.39
Micrel 10.13 +.08 PrtnrCm 15.06 -.16
Microchp 36.93 +.38 Patterson 32.07 +.43
Micromet 5.54 +.02 PattUTI 27.72 -.60
MicronT 7.34 +.13 Paychex 30.12 +.13
MicroSemi 19.67 -.05 PennantPk 10.97 -.17
Microsoft 25.20 +.90 PensonWw 3.81 +.16
MillerHer 27.24 +.78 PeopUtdF 12.86
Misonix 2.42 -.07 PeregrineP 1.82 +.02
Molex 24.89 -1.02 PerfectWd 17.97 -.33
Momenta 19.67 +.34 Perrigo 85.60 -.26
Motricity 8.37 -.12 PetroDev 29.14 -.53
Move Inc 2.09 +.09 PetsMart 44.82 +.01
Mylan 23.23 +.12 PharmPdt 25.95 -.19
MyriadG 22.85 +.33 Pharmacyc 10.63 +.52
NABIBio 5.35 +.29 Pharmasset 107.01 +.03
NETgear 42.25 +.66 PhotrIn 8.02 -.05
NIC Inc 13.67 +.61 Polymom 62.80 +2.04
NIl HIdg 40.92 +.52 Popular 2.63 -.03
NPS Phm 9.36 +.11 Power-One 8.01 +.21
NXPSemn 23.67 +.21 PwShs QQQ 55.25 +.87
Nanomtr 18.31 +1.45 Powrwav 2.88 +.04
Nanosphere 1.68 +.04 Presstek 1.48 -.08
NaraBncp 7.78 +.06 PriceTR 57.68 +1.17
NasdOMX 23.67 +.28 PrSmrt 48.53 +1.28
Natlnstrs 28.20 -.12 priceline 487.10 +4.13
NatPenn 7.76 +.13 Primoris 13.34 +.73
NektarTh 7.35 -.05 PrivateB 13.85 +.60
NessTech 7.60 -.01 PrUPShQQQ27.37 -1.38
NetLogicM 39.07 +.04 PrUItPQQQs 74.88 +3.47
NetApp 50.42 +1.20 PrognicsPh 7.46 +.53
Netease 43.29 -.01 ProgrsSfts 23.24 -.10
Netfiix 260.12 +3.16 ProspctCap 10.06 -.04
NtScout 20.50 +.58 PureCycle 3.06 -.04
NetSolTch 1.69 +.15 QIAGEN 18.63 -.16
NetSpendn 9.37 +.17 QlikTechn 33.33 -.06
NetwkEng 1.11 -.05 Qlogic 15.50 +.04
NewsCpA 16.92 +.19 Qualeom 54.75 +.56
NewsCpB 17.44 +.17 QuestSft 22.37 +.17
NobilityH 7.63 -.44 Questeor 23.70 +.25
Nordsons 51.61 +.27 QuinStreet 12.30 -.16
NorTrst 45.28 +.30 RFMicD 5.84 -.07
NwstBcsh 12.19 +.05 RTI Biolog 2.88 +.01
NovfiWrls 5.38 +.12 RX Phrm 1.01
Novavax 2.00 +.03 RadOneD 1.80 -.06
Novlus 34.40 +.03 RAMEngy 1.22 -.11
NuVasive 31.70 -.31 Rambus 14.07 -.14
NuanceCm 20.55 +.08 Randgold 79.61 +.95
Nvidia 15.41 -.33 RaptorPhm 6.40 +.08
NxStageMd 20.29 +.29 ReachLoc 19.74 +1.14
OCZTech 8.15 -.20 RealPagen 26.14 +1.22
OReillyAu 64.40 +.40 Rdiff.cm 8.77 -.13
OceanFrt .33 +.01 Regenrn 53.06 +.17
Oclaro 6.32 +.28 RentACt 29.39 +.17
OdysMar 2.95 -.01 RepubAir 5.67 +1.01
OmniVisn 30.75 -.32 RschMotn 28.17 -.40
OnAssign 9.75 +.50 RexEnergy 9.96 +.03
OnSmcnd 10.23 +.06 RigelPh 8.74 +.38
Oneothyr 9.19 +.24 Riverbeds 36.59 +1.71
OnyxPh 35.29 +.40 RckwllM 13.76 +.12
OpenTable 78.49 +.82 RosettaR 46.53 +.39
OpnwvSy 2.36 +.08 RossStrs 78.18 +.58
Opnext 2.28 -.13 RoviCorp 55.90 +.91
OpbmerPh 12.10 +.08 RubieonTc 16.59 +.05
optXprs 16.06 +.05 Rural/Met 17.24 -.01
Oracle 31.58 +.44 RuthsHos 5.60 +.17
Orexigen 1.59 -.12
OriginAg 3.75 -.18
Oritani 12.75 +.10 S1Corp 7.26 -.28
Orthfx 41.94 +.17 SBACom 38.50 +.16
Orthovta 3.89 +.06 SEI Inv 21.40 +.06
OtterTail 21.03 +.21 STEC 16.60 -.74
Overstk 14.80 +.10 SVB FnGp 57.77 +.47
Oxnersh 2.46 07 SalixPhm 38.42 +.33
.- . SanDisk 40.36 +1.42
SangBio 6.35 +.33
PDLBio 5.91 +.16 Sanmina 9.66 +.40
PFChng 39.77 -.17 Sapient 15.04 +.93
PMCSra 7.17 +.01 Satconh 2.22 +.07
PSSWrld 27.32 +.56 SavientPh 6.66 -.08
Paccar 48.92 +.46 Savis 39.59 +.05


SciClone 6.08 +.12 TlVo Inc 9.86 -.07
SciGames 9.71 +.01 TowerSemi 1.14
SeacoastBk 1.50 +.01 Towerstm 5.15 +.21
SeagateT 15.22 -.13 TownSports 7.00
SearsHIdgs 70.35 +.84 TractSups 66.04 +1.13
SeattGen 20.55 -.15
SelOmfrt 17.02 -.02 Travdzoo 61.12 +.53
Selectvlns 15.94 +.10 TrdentM h .68 +.01
Semtech 25.75 +.03 TrimbleN 37.02 -.04
Sequenom 7.43 +.18 TriQuint 10.53 +.01
SvcSourcn 20.17 -.19 TrueRelig 28.12 +.34
ShandaGm 6.08 -.03 TrstNY 5.13 +.15
ShoreTel 9.98 -.43 Trusbtk 22.98 +.28
Shutterfly 54.15 +1.90 UTStarcm 1.51 +.01
SifyTedh 4.24 -.15 U iWrIdwd 19.17 -.15
SigaTechh 10.87 +.07 UIWrldwd 19.17 -.15
SigmaDsg 8.07 +.06 UltaSalon 63.17 +.35
SigmaAld 69.33 +.57 Ultratech 29.05 -.45
SilganHId 39.98 -.08 Umpqua 11.25 +.13
SilicGrln 15.85 +.46 Unilife 4.70 +.24
Silicnlmg 6.51 +.17 UtdOnln 6.07 +.26
SilcnLab 38.69 -.37 USEnr 4.21 +.02
Slmcnware 6.05 -.03 UtdTherap 53.49 -.57
SilStdg 24.88 0 +5.23 UnivDisp 34.12 +1.21
Sindair 10.72 +.29 UnivFor 23.80 -2.56
SinoClnEn 1.22 -.10 UranmRs 1.59 -.05
SiriusXM 2.00 +.01 UrbanOut 28.45 +.02
SironaDent 52.28 +.19
Sky-mobi n 7.28 -.60
SkyWest 15.06 +.20 VCAAnt 20.35 +.12
SkywksSol 22.92 +.05 ValenceT h 1.20 -.01
SmartM 9.16 -.03 ValVisA 7.58 -.35
SmartTgn 5.82 -.03 ValueClick 16.53 +.24
SmithWes 2.77 -.05 VarianSemi 61.34
SmithMicro 3.98 -.03 Veeolnst 46.79 -.22
SnydLance 21.23 +.22 -2
SodaStrmn 57.27 +3.51 Velin 15.26 +.12
Sohu.cm 68.27 -.20 VBradleyn 38.16 +.28
SolarCap 24.60 -.08 VerintSys 36.00 +1.37
Somaxon 2.05 -.04 Verisign 32.75 +.01
SonicCorp 10.16 -.26 Verisk 33.97 -.02
Sonus 3.17 ... VertxPh 48.72 +.13
SouMoBc 20.79 +.26 Vical 4.11 +.08
SpectPh 8.85 +.40 rgnMdah 31.56 +.71
SpiritAirn 12.00 gn 31.56 +71
Spreadtrm 12.95 -1.15 ViroPhrm 17.38 -.33
Staples 15.34 +.03 VisnChina 2.57 +.02
StarSdent 4.61 -.35 Vitacosth 4.64 +.03
Starbucks 37.99 +.64 Vivus 7.64 +.03
SfDynam 15.70 +.04 Vodafone 26.46 +.26
StemCOells .52 -.02 Volcano 30.53 +.03
Stereotads 3.54 -.06 WarnerCh s 23.43 +.03
Stericyde 86.83 +1.22 WarrenRs 3.40 -.14
SterlBcsh 8.04 +.07
SMaddens 35.59 +.49 WashFed 15.58 +.08
StewEnt 6.76 -.01 WaveSys 2.62 -.07
Stayer 121.78 -1.61 Web.com 11.56 +.36
SuccessF 29.69 +.11 WebMD 46.68 -.02
SunBcpNJ 3.38 +.13 WernerEnt 24.51 +.27
SunOpta 6.80 -.02 WestellT 3.58 +.15
SunPowerA 17.17 +.22 Westmrd 18.02 +.15
SunPwrB 16.23 +.02 Wstptlnng 21.51 +.02
SuperGen 2.95 +.05 WetSeal 4.44 -.01
SusqBnc 7.73 +.08 WetSeal 4.44 .01
SwisherH n 5.51 -.11 WholeFd 61.42 +.90
Symantec 19.04 +.29 WilshBcp 2.93 -.15
Symetricm 5.75 +.27 Windstrm 13.10 +.06
Synaptfcs 24.80 -.22 Winn-Dixie 8.12
Syneron 12.14 +.18 Wynn 134.30 +2.97
Synopsys 25.42 +.07 XOMArs 2.59 +.35
Synois 17.66 +.42 XenoPort 6.93 +.19
TDAmeritr 18.73 +.07 Xlinx 35.17 +.53
THQ 3.49 +.01
TTMTCh 15.08 +.03 YRCWwrs 1.60 +.48
twteleeom 20.17 +.15 Yahoo 14.88 -.01
TakeTwo 15.14 +.34 Yandexn 32.50 +.95
TASER 4.40 +.14 Yongye 5.13 -.12
TechData 46.44 +.34 Zagg 14.01 -.31
Tekelec 8.88 +.07 Zalicus 2.45 +.03
Tellabs 4.41 -.04 Zhongpin 10.70 -.28
Telvent 39.85 -.02 ZonO&G 5.39 -.17
TeslaMotn 27.46 -.11 ZonBc 22.76 +.37
TesseraTh 15.94 -.22 onBp 2276 +37
TevaPhrm 47.12 -.03 Zopharm 6.00 -.02
TexRdhse 17.48 +.12 Zpcarn 20.32 -.17
Thoratec 30.93 +.12 ZxCorp 3.81 +.06
TibcoSft 27.59 +1.27 Zoran 8.40 -.09


DIARY


Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Make your life a bit



EASIER!!


and get ONE MONTH FREE



Ciii4ONILE er
www.c.r e ocatiiIhlci ,llin.coonm "$4 IS



]EZ Pay





563-5655 It's EZ ! i
*Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start. �


Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.0970 4.1000
Australia .9593 .9526
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 1.5958 1.6003
Britain 1.5979 1.5974
Canada .9868 .9880
Chile 471.92 473.98
China 6.4838 6.4763
Colombia 1776.59 1786.50
Czech Rep 17.12 17.21
Denmark 5.2274 5.2634
Dominican Rep 38.08 38.04
Egypt 5.9634 5.9605
Euro .7010 .7057
Hong Kong 7.7876 7.7894
Hungary 188.32 190.48
India 44.984 44.984
Indnsia 8617.50 8605.00
Israel 3.4454 3.4419
Japan 80.97 80.52
Jordan .7105 .7105
Lebanon 1512.45 1512.45
Malaysia 3.0575 3.0401
Mexico 11.8981 11.8949
N. Zealand 1.2416 1.2341
Norway 5.4705 5.4900
Peru 2.761 2.760
Poland 2.80 2.81
Russia 28.2965 28.2167
Singapore 1.2424 1.2390
So. Africa 6.8700 6.9042
So. Korea 1086.54 1080.04
Sweden 6.4433 6.4935
Switzerlnd .8365 .8377
Taiwan 28.94 28.93
Thailand 30.94 30.69
Turkey 1.6377 1.6346
U.A.E. 3.6734 3.6732
Uruguay 18.5014 18.5014
Venzuel 4.2952 4.2952


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.025 0.035
6-month 0.095 0.10
5-year 1.44 1.53
10-year 2.92 2.96
30-year 4.28 4.20



* FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug 11 90.61 -.55
Corn CBOT Dec11 6263/4 -5V4
Wheat CBOT Sep 11 6503/4 -10/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov11 1315 +53/4
Cattle CME Aug 11 111.37 -2.13
Pork Bellies CME Jul 11 121.00
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 11 25.91 -.09
Orange Juice ICE Sep 11 191.55 -1.10

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1496.00 $1541.50
Silver (troy oz., spot) $33.b80 $36.Obb
Copper (pound) $4.0515b $4./bo
Platinum (troy oz., spot)t16/3.00 $1/30.bO
NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


I AMEX


I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 1.4 ... 14.30 +.08 -12.6 McDnlds 2.44 3.0 17 82.32 +.48 +7.2
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.6 9 30.76 +.32 +4.7 Microsoft .64 2.5 6 25.20 +.90 -9.7
Ameteks .24 .6 22 42.36 -.16 +7.9 MotrlaSoln ... ... ... 45.76 +.36 +20.3
BkofAm .04 .4 20 10.85 +.33 -18.7 MotrlaMo n ... ... ... 22.82 -.29 -21.6
CapCtyBk .40 3.7 42 10.81 -.16 -14.2 NextEraEn 2.20 3.9 14 56.98 +.37 +9.6
CntryLink 2.90 7.3 12 39.63 +.47 -14.2 Penney .80 2.3 20 34.31 +.07 +6.2
Citigrprs .04 .1 13 39.99 +.40-15.5 PiedmOfc 1.26 6.3 26 20.12 +.02 -.1
CmwReitrs 2.00 7.8 20 25.58 +.44 +.3 ProgrssEn 2.48 5.2 16 47.38 +.20 +9.0
Disney .40 1.1 17 38.07 +.49 +1.5 RegionsFn .04 .7 ... 5.94 ... -15.1
EKodak ... ... 16 3.43 +.01 -36.0 SearsHIdgs ... ... ... 70.35 +.84 -4.6
EnterPT 2.80 6.1 22 46.28 +.31 +.1 Smucker 1.76 2.3 19 75.48 +.58 +15.0
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.4 11 77.92 +1.14 +6.6 SprintNex ... ... ... 5.15 +.15 +21.7
FordM ...... 6 13.46 +.22 -19.8 TimeWarn .94 2.7 15 34.92 +.46 +8.5
GenElec .60 3.3 16 18.28 +.31 -.1 UniFirst .15 .3 13 51.97 +1.07 -5.6
HomeDp 1.00 2.8 17 35.20 +.12 +.4 VerizonCm 1.95 5.4 22 36.40 +.40 +1.7
Intel .84 3.9 10 21.34 +.14 +1.5 Vodafone 1.44 5.4 ... 26.46 +.26 +.1
IBM 3.00 1.8 14167.62 +2.55 +14.2 WalMart 1.46 2.8 12 52.29 -.12 -3.0
Lowes .56 2.4 16 23.15 -.10 -7.7 Walgrn .70 1.7 16 41.72 +.33 +7.1


m







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 A9


I MUTUiijAL DS I


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: EmgLd
Balancp 16.34 +.06 GNMA 15.90 -.02
RetInc 8.64 -.02 GrChinaAr 44.72 +.06
Alger Funds B: HiYIdA p 6.60 -.02
SmCapGr 6.85 +.06 StratValA 28.95 +.20
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 32.68 +.49
BalanAp 15.47 +.08 DreihsAcInc 11.03 +.01
GIbThGrAp73.44 +.43 Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 36.05 +.32 EMktGr 31.62 +.11
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEml50.30 +.17
LgCpGrAd 26.67 +.30 Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 20.23 +.09
GIbThGrBt 63.18 +.37 AMTFMuInc 9.34 +.01
GrowthBt 24.88 +.22 MuIlCGrA 8.12 +.08
SCpGrBt 28.88 +.25 InBosA 5.85 -.01
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 18.04 +.16
SCpGrC t 29.08 +.26 NatlMunlnc 9.14 +.01
Allianz Fds Insti: SpEqtA 16.47 +.09
NFJDvVI 11.74 +08 TradGvA 7.48 -.01
SmCpVi 31.22 +.12 EatonVance B:
Allianz Funds A: HIthSBt 10.60 +.04
SmCpVA 29.77 +.11 NatlMulnc 9.14 +.01
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 23.94 +.32 GovtC p 7.47
TargetC t 15.20 +.16 NatMunlnc 9.14 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 19.77 +18 FItgRt 9.02
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 10.12 -.01
LgCaplnv 18.75 +.17 LgCapVal 18.09 +.17
Amer Century Adv: FBR Funds:
EqGroAp 21.65 +.22 Focuslnv 49.77 +.25
EqlncAp 7.29 +.03 FMI Funds:
Amer Century lnv: LgCappn 16.17 +.11
Balanced 15.88 +08 FPA Funds:
DivBnd 10.91 -.03 Nwlnc 10.92
Eqlnc 7.29 +.03 FPACresn 27.62 +.07
Gift 29.20 +.33 Fairholme 31.55 +.33
Growth 26.36 +.26 Federated A:
Heritagel 21.98 +.22 MidGrStA 36.99 +.38
IncGro 24.76 +.21 KaufmAp 5.50 +.05
InfAdjBd 12.29 -.02 MuSecA 9.91
IntDisc 10.59 +.02 Federated Insti:
InfitlGrol 11.21 +.10 KaufmnR 5.50 +.04
NewOpp 8.07 +.08 TotRetBd 11.26 -.03
OneChAg 12.40 +.09 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChMd 11.85 +.06 EnergyT 38.08 +.22
RealEstl 20.03 +.11 HItCarT 24.94 +.23
Ultra 23.43 +.26 Fidelity Advisor A:
Valuelnv 5.75 +.04 Nwlnsghp 20.06 +.17
American Funds A: StrnA 12.57 -.01
AmcpAp 19.33 +.16 Fidelity Advisor C:
AMutlAp 25.96 +.17 Nwlnsghtn 19.10 +.17
BalAp 18.29 +.09 Fidelity Advisor I:
BondAp 12.38 -.04 EqGrIn 60.16 +.53
CaplBAp 50.75 +.18 Eqlnin 24.29 +.19
CapWGAp 35.91 +.29 FItRatel n 9.79
CapWApx 20.90 -.21 IntBdln 11.37 -.02
EupacAp 41.76 +.31 Nwlnsgtln 20.28 +.18
FdlnvAp 37.40 +.27 Fidelity AdvisorT:
GovtAp 14.15 -.04 BalancT 15.35 +.07
GwthAp 30.76 +.28 DivGrTp 12.54 +.09
HI TrAp 11.33 -.02 EqGrTp 56.17 +.49
IncoAp 16.92 +.06 EqInT 23.90 +.19
IntBdAp 13.58 -.02 GrOppT 36.55 +.39
InflGrIncAp31.35 +.22 HilnAdTp 10.17
ICAAp 28.16 +.24 IntBdT 11.35 -.02
NEcoAp 26.12 +.22 MulncTp 12.75
NPerAp 28.81 +.26 OvrseaT 18.70 +.10
NwWrldA 53.97 +.23 STFiT 9.29 -.01
STBFAp 10.10 -.01 SkSeIAIICp 18.89 +.15
SmCpAp 38.54 +.14 Fidelity Freedom:
TxExAp 12.11 ... FF2010n 13.85 +.04
WshAp 28.22 +18 FF2010K 12.80 +.04
American Funds B: FF2015n 11.56 +.03
BalBp 18.23 +.08 FF2015K 12.84 +.04
CaplBBp 50.80 +18 FF2020n 14.03 +.04
CpWGrBt 35.73 +.28 FF2020K 13.27 +.04
GrwthBt 29.75 +.27 FF2025n 11.69 +.04
Ariel Investments: FF2025K 13.43 +.05
Apprec 44.32 +.40 FF2030n 13.96 +.06
Ariel 50.01 +.45 FF2030K 13.61 +.06
Artio Global Funds: FF2035n 11.59 +.05
IntlEqlr 29.54 +.17 FF2035K 13.73 +.06
IntlEqA 28.80 +.16 FF2040n 8.10 +.04
IntEqlllr 12.23 +.07 FF2040K 13.80 +.07
Artisan Funds: FF2045n 9.59 +.05
Intl 22.05 ... Incomen 11.48 +.01
InfVal r 27.41 ... Fidelity Invest:
MidCap 35.37 ... AIISectEq 12.54 +.12
MidCapVal 21.43 ... AMgr50n 15.70 +.04
SCapVal 17.49 ... AMgr70rn 16.60 +.07
BNY Mellon Funds: AMgr20rn 12.99 +.01
EmgMkts 11.43 +.04 Balancn 18.64 +.09
Baron Funds: BalancedK 18.65 +.09
Asset 57.52 +.47 BlueChGr n 46.44 +.54
Growth 54.71 +.35 CAMunn 11.94
SmallCap 25.74 +.18 Canadan 56.85 +.39
Bernstein Fds: CapApn 26.06 +.25
IntDur 13.97 -.05 CapDevOn 11.08 +.07
DivMu 14.51 +.01 Cplncrn 9.49
TxMgdlnt 15.21 +.08 ChinaRgr 31.16 +.07
BlackRock A: CngS 465.09
EqtyDiv 18.14 +.14 CTMunrn 11.53
GIAIAr 19.66 +06 Contran 68.28 +.61
HiYlnvA 7.68 -.02 ContraK 68.29 +.61
IntlOpAp 33.41 +.22 CnvScn 26.15 +.15
BlackRock B&C: DisEqn 23.17 +.19
GIAICt 18.30 +05 DiscEqF 23.17 +.19
BlackRock Insti: Divlnti n 29.93 +.14
USOpps 42.00 +.22 DivrslntKr 29.92 +.13
BaVIl 25.89 ... DivStkOn 15.18 +.11
EquityDv 18.18 +.14 DivGthn 28.55 +.21
GIbAllocr 19.77 +.06 EmergAsrn30.62 -.11
Brinson FundsY: EmrMkn 25.50 -.08
HiYldl Y n 6.23 Eq Incln 44.84 +.39
BruceFundn398.21 -.30 EQIIn 18.51 +.16
Buffalo Funds: EqlncK 44.84 +.38
SmCapn 26.44 +.16 ECapAp 19.03 +12
CGM Funds: Europe 31.38 +.21
Focus n 30.44 +.25 Exch 323.88 .
Mut n 26.67 +.14 Exportn 21.96 +.20
Realtyn 28.39 +.19 Fideln 33.13 +.31
CRM Funds: Fiftyrn 18.34 +.20
MdCpVII 30.03 +.18 FItRateHirn 9.80
FrlnOnen 27.65 +.15
Calamos Funds: 7 GNMAn 11.72 -.02
veGrwtp 54.07 +.67 Govtnc 10.63 -.03
Calvert Group: GroCon 88.44 +.98
Incop 16.20 -.06 Grolncn 18.47 +.15
InlEAp 14.3088 +308 GrowthCoK88.45 +.99
SocialAp 27.88 +13 GrStratrn 20.73 +.17
SocBd p 15.76 .05 Highlncrn 8.98 -.02
SocEqlAp 37.63 +43 ndepnn 24.78 +.27
TxF Lgp 15.49 . ntBdn 10.78 .02
Cohen & Steers: ntGovn 10.94 -.02
RltyShrs 63.00 +.40 IntmMun 10.19
Columbia Class A: InflDiscn 32.40 +.10
Acornt 29.91 +.26 IntSCprn 21.54 -.03
DivEqlnc 10.18 +.08 nvGrBdn 11.64 -.03
DivrBd 5.07 -.02 nvGBn 7.57 -.01
DivOpptyA 8.09 +05 Japanr 10.16 -.05
LgCorQAp 5.66 +.06 JpnSmn 8.87 -.07
MdCpGrOp 11.31 +.10 LgCapVal 11.69 +.08
MidCVlOpp 8.10 +.05 LCpVrn 10.77 +.08
PBModAp 10.77 +.02 LatAm 56.73 +.43
SelCommA 44.88 +.57 LevCoStkn 29.10 +.18
FrontierA 10.84 +.07 LowPrn 40.48 +.15
GlobTech 20.67 +.22 LowPriKr 40.48 +.15
Columbia Cl 1,T&G: Magellnn 70.57 +51
EmMktOp In 9.88 +.05 MagellanK 70.53 +.52
Columbia Class Z: MDMurn 11.00
AcornZ 30.87 +.27 MAMunn 11.93 +.01
AcornlntZ 39.48 -.02 MegaCpStknlO.09 +.09
IntBdZ 9.14 -.03 MIMunn 11.87
LgCapGr 13.43 +.26 MidCapn 28.37 +.19
LgCpldxZ 24.87 +.23 MNMunn 11.51
MdCpldxZ 11.83 +.06 MtgSecn 11.03 -.02
MdCpVIZp 13.91 +.07 Munilncn 12.59
ValRestr 49.61 +.28 NJMunrn 11.49
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 15.84 +.03
ComRett 9.02 -.05 NwMilln 30.23 +.27
DFA Funds: NYMunn 12.90
IntlCorEqn 11.05 +.04 OTCn 57.69 +.85
USCorEqlnll.30 +.10 OhMunn 11.66
USCorEq2nll.24 +.09 100oolndex 8.87 +.08
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 32.44 +.23
CommAp 18.10 +.25 PcBasn 25.43 -.02
DWS InvestS: PAMunrn 10.74
CorPlslnc 10.71 -.03 Purihin 18.34 +.10
EmMkGrr 18.25 +.09 PuritanK 18.34 +.09
EnhEmMk 10.55 +.01 RealEn 27.65 +.18
EnhGlbBdr 10.35 +.01 SAIISecEqF 12.56 +.12
GIbSmCGr 40.26 +.32 SCmdtyStrtnl2.02 -.05
GlblThem 23.91 +.17 SrEmrgMkt 18.10
Gold&Prc 20.04 -.10 SrslntGrw 11.24 +.05
GrolncS 17.05 +.16 SrslntVal 9.95 +.05
HiYldTx 11.92 ... SrInvGrdF 11.65 -.03
IntTxAMT 11.46 ... StlntMun 10.72
IntlFdS 44.42 +.24 STBFn 8.53 -.01
LgCpFoGr 30.04 +.31 SmllCpSrn 19.78 +.18
LatAmrEq 48.08 +.35 SCpValur 15.58 +.11
MgdMuniS 8.89 ... StkSlcACapn26.12 +.22
MATFS 14.22 ... SllSelSmCp 19.38 +.14
SP500SS 17.01 +.15 Sratlncn 11.25 .01
WorldDiv 23.64 +.13 StrReRtr 9.78
Davis Funds A: TotalBdn 10.94 -.02
NYVenA 34.02 +.23 Trendn 70.39 +.75
Davis Funds B: USBI n 11.53 .04
NYVenB 32.52 +.22 Utilityn 17.13 +.15
Davis Funds C&Y: ValStratn 28.65 +.13
NYVenY 34.41 +.23 Valuen 69.79 +.43
NYVenC 32.78 +.22 Wrldwn 19.08 +.13
Delaware Invest A: Fidelity Selects:
Diverlncp 9.35 -.03 Aim 39.13 +.39
SMIDCapG 24.57 +.27 Bankingn 17.01 +.21
TxUSAp 11.21 ... Biotchn 84.83 +.92
Delaware Invest B: Brokr n 47.27 +.32
SelGrBt 30.87 +.26 Chemn 103.16 +.40
Dimensional Fds: ComEquipn26.47 +.43
EmMCrEqn21.45 +.12 Compn 57.43 +.62
EmMktV 34.28 +.21 ConDisn 23.95 +.25
IntSmVan 16.92 ... ConsuFnn 11.69 +.08
LargeCo 10.09 +.09 ConStapn 70.90 +.38
TAUSCorE2nr9.16 +08 CstHon 35.17 +.15
USLgVan 20.93 +.18 DfAern 79.66 +.67
USMicron 14.14 +.17 Elecfrn 48.35 +.19


USTgdVal 16.90 +.14 Enrgyn 54.26 +.31
US Small n 22.20 +.22 EngSv n 76.32 +.16
USSmVa 25.93 +.25 EnvAltEnrnl8.76 +.05
IntlSmCon 16.91 +.01 FinSvn 56.59 +.42
EmgMktn 29.95 +.18 Goldrn 44.84 -.15
Fixdn 10.36 Healthn 140.44 +1.27
IntVan 18.00 +.09 Insurn 46.16 +.35
Glb5Fxlnc n11.28 -.02 Leisr n 93.96 +.91
TMUSTgtV21.84 +.19 Materialn 68.70 +.10
TMMktwV 15.57 +.14 MedDIn 58.21 +.67
2YGIFxdn 10.22 MdEqSysn 30.45 +.20
DFARIEn 23.29 +.13 Multmdn 46.22 +.71
Dodge&Cox: NtGas n 32.76 +.08
Balancedx 71.52 -.01 Pharmn 13.45 +.08
Incomex 13.40 -.17 Retail n 53.07 +.50
IntflStk 35.28 +.26 Softwrn 84.07 +1.36
Stockx 109.70 +.47 Techn 95.01 +1.31
DoubleUne Funds: Telcmn 49.42 +.34
TRBd I 11.16 ... Trans n 55.73 +.58
Dreyfus: UtilGrn 51.78 +.37
Aprec 39.89 +.31 Wirelessn 8.02 +.08
CTA 11.60 Fidelity Spartan:
CorVA 24.81 +.17 ExtMkInn 39.19 +.27
Dreyf 9.21 +.09 5001dxlnvn 45.50 +.41
DryMidr 29.31 +.13 Inftlnlnvn 35.34 +.11
Dr5001n t 35.44 +.32 TotMktlnv n 37.42 +.32


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdvn45.51 +.42
IntAdrn 35.34 +.10
TotMktAd r n37.42 +.32
First Eagle:
GIbIA 47.35 -.07
OverseasA 22.93 -.17
First Investors A
BIChpAp 21.60 +.17
GloblAp 6.63 +.05
GovtAp 11.48 -.01
GrolnAp 15.06 +.11
IncoAp 2.50 -.01
MATFAp 11.64
MITFAp 12.02
NJTFAp 12.86
NYTFA p 14.38
OppAp 28.93 +.18
PATFAp 12.91
SpSitAp 25.05 +.10
TxExAp 9.67
TotRtA p 15.56 +.05
ValueBp 7.17 +.04
Forum Funds:
AbsStfrlr 10.92
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.85
ALTFAp 11.04
AZTFAp 10.61
CallnsAp 11.84 -.01
CAIntAp 11.35 -.01
CalTFAp 6.90
COTFAp 11.51
CTTFAp 10.80 -.01
CvtScAp 15.56 +.07
DblTFA 11.56 +.01
DynTchA 31.31 +.38
EqlncAp 16.92 +.13
Fedlntp 11.69
FedTFAp 11.75 +.01
FLTFAp 11.36
FoundAlp 10.87 +.06
GATFAp 11.82
GoldPrMA 42.53 -.35
GrwthAp 45.89 +.34
HYTFA p 9.96
HilncA 2.00 -.01
IncomAp 2.20 +.01
InsTFAp 11.73
NYITF p 11.20
LATFAp 11.24
LMGvScA 10.45
MDTFAp 11.20
MATFAp 11.42 +.01
MITFAp 11.79
MNInsA 12.19
MOTFAp 11.91
NJTFAp 11.85
NYTFAp 11.50
NCTFA p 12.08
OhiolAp 12.31
ORTFAp 11.81
PATFAp 10.18
ReEScAp 14.67 +.08
RisDvAp 34.43 +.22
SMCpGrA 38.69 +.26
Stratlncp 10.56 -.01
USGovAp 6.84
UDIsAp 12.33 +.09
VATFAp 11.55
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.71 -.02
IncmeAd 2.19 +.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.22 +.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.26 +.13
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktA p 24.94 +.04
ForgnAp 7.22
GIBdAp 13.75 -.02
GrwthAp 18.64 +.12
WorldAp 15.26 +.08
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.66 +.13
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 24.26 +.03
ForgnC p 7.05 +.01
GIBdCp 13.78 -.02
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 18.00 +.10
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 11.49 -.05
S&S PM 40.66 +.35
GE Instl Funds:
IntlEq 11.48 +.04
GMOTrust Ill:
Quality 20.85 +.18
GMOTrust IV:
IntlGrEq 23.79 +.14
InfllntrMV 22.40 +.11
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 13.57 +.03
IntlCorEq 29.90 +.15
Quality 20.86 +.18
StrFxlnc 15.98 +.04
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 50.74 +.34
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.26 +.07
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.92 +.30
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.60 +.13
HiYield 7.25 -.01
HYMuni n 8.40
MidCapV 37.25 +.30
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.36 -.02
CapAplnst 38.28 +.45
Intllnvt 61.23 +.60
InflAdm p 61.43 +.60
Intl r 61.90 +.61
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 33.20 +.27
DivGthApx 19.30 +.09
FItRateApx 8.84 -.01
IntOpAp 14.91 +.13
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 29.36 +.24
FItRateCtx 8.83 -.01
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 28.11 +.27
Hartford FdsY:
CapAppYn 36.09 +.29
CapAppl n 33.24 +.27
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 41.91 +.35
Div&Gr 19.98 +.17
Advisers 19.65 +.09
TotRetBd 11.25 -.03
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig n16.10 +.19
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.19 -.02
StrGrowth 12.44 -.03
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 20.62 +.16
HIllicareS 15.13 +.08
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.85 -.01
IVA Funds:
WCdwideAt 17.02 +.01
Wldwide I r 17.04 +.02
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.58 +.10
Invesco Funds:
Energy 41.69 +.08
Utlibes 16.20 +.10
Invesco Funds A:
Chartp 16.82 +.10
CmstkA 15.98 +.14
Constp 23.41 +.28
EqlncA 8.68 +.05
GrlncAp 19.38 +14
HilncMu p 7.44
HiYldp 4.21 -.01
HYMuA 9.10
IntlGrow 28.29 +.11
MunilnA 12.87
PATFA 15.68
USMortgA 13.16 .02
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.74 +.14
DivGtSecB 13.36 +.11
MunilnB 12.85
USMortg 13.08 -.02
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 24.14 +.21
AssetStAp 24.93 +.22
AssetSbi r 25.16 +.22
GINatRsAp 20.71 +07
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.68 -.02
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpValIn 24.55 +.14
JPMorganRC C:
CoreBond n11.68 -.02
ShtDurBd 11.04 -.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.35 +.11
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBd n 11.67 -.03
HighYldn 8.19 -.01
IntmTFBd n 11.02
ShtDurBd n 11.03 -.01
USLCCrPIsn20.74 +.19
Janus S Shrs:
Forty 32.50 +.35
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.78 +.10
ContrarnT 13.78 +.08
EnterprT 61.25 +.42
FIxBndT 10.60 -.04
GlUfeSciTr 25.80 +.16
GIbSelT 11.40 +.06


GITechTr 17.16 +.13
Grw&lncT 31.52 +.28
JanusT 29.17 +.28
OvrseasTr 45.86 +.62
PrkMCVal T 23.11 +.09
ResearchT 29.82 +.25
ShTmBdT 3.09 -.01
TwentyT 63.58 +.59
VentureT 59.69 +.46
WrldWTr 45.71 +.36
JensenJn 27.81 +.28
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.70 -.03


Name NAV Chg
RgBkA 13.94 +.16
StrInAp 6.75
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.75
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.45 +.09
LSBalanc 13.14 +.05
LSConsrv 13.05
LSGrwth 13.06 +.08
LSModer 12.90 +.03
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp 25.51 +.19
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 21.06 +.07
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 21.42 +.07
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 119.24 +.85
CBApprp 13.98 +.12
CBLCGrp 24.23 +.23
GCIAIICOp 8.75 +.03
WAHilncAt 6.12 -.01
WAMgMu p 15.59
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 22.57 +.22
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 31.36 +.25
CMValTrp 38.40 +.42
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 30.00 +.20
SmCap 29.48 +.20
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.67 -.02
StrlncC 15.30 -.02
LSBondR 14.62 -.02
StrIncA 15.22 -.02
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.42 -.04
InvGrBdY 12.42 -.05
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.49 +.10
FundlEq 13.18 +.08
BdDebAp 7.92
ShDurlncAp 4.60 -.01
MidCpAp 17.14 +.08
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncCt 4.63 -.01
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.48 +.17
MIGA 15.65 +.13
HilnA 3.47 -.01
MFLA 9.52
TotRA 14.35 +.05
UtilA 17.59 +.10
ValueA 23.26 +.18
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.06 +.12
GvScBn 10.27 -.03
HilnBn 3.48
MulnBn 8.21 +.01
TotRBn 14.34 +.04
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 16.10 +.07
Valuel 23.36 +.18
MFS Funds Insti:
IntlEqn 18.48 +.09
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.93
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 16.32 +.03
GovtBt 8.78 -.01
HYIdBBt 5.90
IncmBldr 16.55 +.03
IntlEqB 10.88 -.06
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 35.59 +.27
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 74.36 +.60
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 8.80 +.03
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.68 +.01
China Inv 28.63 +.20
Indialnv r 20.05 +.28
PacTgrlnv 23.43 +.03
MergerFdn 16.16
Meridian Funds:
Growth 46.22 +.32
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.49 -.03
TotRtBdl 10.49 -.02
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 4.27 -.01
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.56 +.22
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.46 +.04
MorganStanley Inst:
IntlEql 13.89 +.03
MCapGrl 40.25 +.46
MCapGrPp 38.96 +.44
Muhlenkn 54.51 +.51
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.36 +.35
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn30.01 +.21
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.73 +.07
GblDiscA 29.84 +.16
GIbDiscC 29.51 +.15
GIbDiscZ 30.23 +.16
QuestZ 18.16 +.10
SharesZ 21.45 +.13
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 19.84 +.14
Genesis 35.14 +.22
Geneslnst 48.66 +.30
Intl r 17.54 +.03
Partner 27.61 +.18
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.36 +.31
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.67 -.01
Nichn 45.88 +.37
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 7.34
MMEmMktr 22.14
MMIntEqr 9.69
SmCpldx 8.79
Stkldx 15.70
Technly 15.06
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 10.98
Nuveen Cl YV:
RealEstn 19.53 +.11
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 39.81 +.49
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.71 +.10
Globall 22.13 -.03
Intl I r 19.54 -.02
Oakmark r 42.67 +.33
Selectr 28.71 +.13
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.91 +.01
GIbSMdCap 15.64 +.07
NonUSLgCp 10.44 +.04
RealRet 10.66 -.01
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.19
AMTFrN 10.90 -.01
CAMuniAp 7.71
CapApAp 44.12 +.38
CaplncAp 8.79 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.94 -.01
DvMktAp 34.96 +.24
Discp 63.19 +.75
EquityA 9.03 +.08
GlobAp 62.44 +.58
GIbOppA 29.97 +.20
GblStrIncA 4.34
Gold p 42.67 -.41
IntBdA p 6.66 +.01
MnStFdA 32.21 +.31
PAMuniAp 10.60 -.01
SenFltRtA 8.34
USGvp 9.47 -.02
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.16
AMTFrNY 10.91
CplncB t 8.62
ChmplncBt 1.94 -.01
EquityB 8.33 +.07
GblSftrlncB 4.35
Oppenheimer C&M:
DevMktCt 33.52 +.23
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.25
RoMuAp 15.50 +.01
RcNtMuA 6.85 -.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.63 +.24
IntlBdY 6.66 +.02
IntGrowY 28.76 +.16
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.89 -.01
TotRtAd 10.98 -.03
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.81 .03
AIIAsset 12.35 -.01
ComodRR 8.58 -.05
DevLcMkr 10.93 +.01
Divlnc 11.51 -.03
EmMkBd 11.20
Fltlncr 8.86
ForBdUnr 10.97 -.03
FrgnBd 10.50 -.03
HiYId 9.29 -.02
InvGrCp 10.67 -.04
LowDu 10.47 -.01
ModDur 10.79 -.01
RealRet 11.72 .05
RealRtnl 11.70 -.03
ShortT 9.89 -.01


TotRt 10.98 -.03
TRII 10.51 -.02
TRIIIl 9.72 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AllAstAutt 10.75 -.03
ComRRp 8.44 -.05
LwDurA 10.47 -.01
RealRtAp 11.70 -.03
TotRtA 10.98 -.03
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.70 -.03
TotRtCt 10.98 -.03


Name NAV Chg
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 10.98 -.03
PIMCO Funds P:
TotRtnP 10.98 -.03
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.54 +.12
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 47.69 -.03
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.70 -.02
IntValA 19.93 +.07
PionFdAp 41.25 +.35
ValueAp 11.30 +.09
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.40
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.50
Pioneer FdsY:
CullenVY 18.50 +.15
Price Funds:
Balance 19.76 +.10
BIChip n 39.02 +.44
CABondn 10.63 -.01
CapAppn 21.02 +.12
DivGron 23.69 +.19
EmMktBn 13.34 +.01
EmEurp 22.21 -.05
EmMktSn 34.21 +.24
Eqlncn 24.00 +.19
Eqlndexn 34.62 +.32
Europen 15.73 +.12
GNMAn 10.05 -.01
Growth n 32.54 +.35
Gr&lnn 20.61 +.16
HIthSci n 35.01 +.32
HiYieldn 6.79
InstlCpG 16.62 +.17
IntlBondn 10.28
IntDis n 44.27 +.07
Intl G& 13.67 +.06
IntflStkn 14.32 +.11
Japan n 7.86 -.02
LatAmn 51.67 +.37
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 10.37
MidCapn 60.88 +.29
MCapVal n 24.42 +.11
NAmern 33.74 +.29
NAsiatn 19.20 +.10
New Era n 50.62 +.21
N Horizn 36.31 +.33
N Incn 9.59 -.03
NYBondn 11.08
OverS SF r n 8.54 +.05
PSIncn 16.39 +.05
RealEstn 18.85 +.10
R2010 n 15.75 +.06
R2015n 12.20 +.06
R2020n 16.84 +.09
R2025n 12.32 +.08
R2030n 17.66 +.12
R2035n 12.49 +.09
R2040U n 17.78 +.14
SciTecn 27.32 +.26
ShtBd n 4.87
SmCpStkn 36.21 +.27
SmCapVal n36.97 +.33
SpecGrn 18.06 +.16
Speclnn 12.51
TFIncn 9.78 -.01
TxFrHn 10.61
TxFrSIn 5.62
USTIntn 6.04 -.01
USTLgn 11.59 -.14
VABondn 11.52 -.01
Value n 23.89 +.21
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.49 +.09
LT20201n 11.99 +.06
LT20301n 11.88 +.06
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.77 +.16
HiYIdAp 5.51 -.01
MuHilncA 9.48
NatResA 53.05 +.15
UVlityA 10.79 +.08
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.62 +.20
HiYIdBt 5.51
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.71 -.01
AZ TE 8.88
ConvSec 20.55
DvrlnArp 8.02 -.02
EqInAp 15.58
EuEq 20.28
GeoBalA 12.22 +.05
GIbEqtyp 9.28
GrInAp 13.47
GIbIHIthA 48.98
HiYdAp 7.72 -.01
HiYld In 5.96
IncmAp 6.91
IntGrln p 10.03
InvAp 13.08 +.12
NJTxAp 9.17
MulCpGr 51.74 +.51
PATE 8.93
TxExA p 8.40
TFInAp 14.58
TFHYA 11.47
USGvAsp 14.34
GIblUtilA 10.58
VoyAp 22.52 +.22
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnBt 7.96 -.01
Eqlnct 15.43
EuEq 19.38
GeoBaIB 12.09 +.05
GIbEqt 8.37
GINtRst 19.94 +.13
GrInBt 13.24
GIblHIthB 40.15
HiYldBt 7.71 -.01
HYAdBt 5.85 -.01
IncmBt 6.85
IntGrlnt 9.91
InitNopt 15.27 +.09
InvBt 11.75 +.11
NJTxBt 9.16
MuldCpGr 44.59 +.44
TxExB t 8.40
TFHYBt 11.48
USGvBt 14.27 -.01
GlblUtilB 10.53
VoyBt 19.07 +.18
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.81 +.16
LgCAIphaA 41.75 +.28
Value 25.49 +.08
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.38 +.12
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 18.16 +.06
MicroCapl 17.56 +.09
PennMul r 12.09 +.10
Premierlr 21.44 +.08
TotRetlr 13.49 +.11
ValSvct 12.97 +.05
VlPISvc 13.46 +.08
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.98 -.02
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 13.73 +.21
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 22.08 +.08
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 17.87 +.10
lOOOInvr 38.22 +.32
S&PSel 20.10 +.18
SmCpSl 22.03 +.20
TSMSelr 23.46 +.20
Scout Funds:
Intl 32.29 +.20
Selected Funds:
AmShD 41.14 +.27
AmShSp 41.11 +.27
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 32.23 +.26
Sequoian 140.36 +.85
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.49 +.40
SoSunSCInv tn21.31+.14
St FarmAssoc:
Gwll 54.04 +.38
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap x 36.26 +.23
RealEstate x 27.69 -.22
SmCap 52.14 +.36
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvB t 9.68 -.05
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.94 -.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 20.41 +.09
Third Avenue Fds:
IntlValnstr 16.97 +.01
REVallnstr 23.76 +.13
Valuelnst 50.29 +.26
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 28.36 +.07
IncBuildAt 19.11 +.01
IncBuildCp 19.11 +.01
IntValue I 28.98 +.07
Valuel 35.16 +.18
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.83
Income 8.78 -.03
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 78.15 -.68
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.18 -.01
Flexlncp 9.05 -.01
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 36.27 +.38
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.99


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 23.25 +.17
ChinaReg 8.60 +.01
GIbRs 11.09
Gld&Mtls 16.01 -.12
WdPrcMn 17.66 -.32
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.75 +.39
CA Bd 9.87
CrnstStr 23.25 +.08
GNMA 10.30 -.01
GrTxStr 13.22 +06


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 14.89 +.16
Gr&lnc 15.29 +.14
IncStk 12.52 +.10
Inco 13.02 -.03
Intl 25.00 +.17
NYBd 11.53
PrecMM 37.42 -.07
SciTech 13.31 +.15
ShtTBnd 9.20 -.01
SmCpStk 14.18 +.12
TxElt 12.94
TxELT 12.71 -.01
TxESh 10.73
VABd 10.91
WldGr 19.41 +.13
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.60 +.10
Stkldx 25.45 +.24
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 18.39 +.17
Van Eck Funds:
GIHardA 50.40 +.26
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdml n 21.96 +.09
CAITAdmn 11.02
CpOpAdl n 77.08 +.56
EMAdmr rn 39.01 +.25
Energy 126.35 +.84
EqlnAdm n n44.94 +.33
EuroAdml n 63.47 +.66
ExplAdmln 71.99 +.55
ExtdAdm n 43.03 +.28
500Adml n 117.87 +1.07
GNMAAdn 10.97 -.02
GrwAdmn 32.15 +.31
HlthCrn 58.01 +.18
HiYldCp n 5.74 -.01
InfProAdnn 26.86 -.02
ITBdAdml n 11.51 -.04
ITsryAdml n 11.69 -.03
IntGrAdm n 61.68 +51
ITAdmln 13.60 -.01
ITGrAdmnn 10.04 -.03
LtdTrAdn 11.09
LTGrAdmln 9.48 -.10
LTAdml n 10.96
MCpAdml n 96.58 +.60
MorgAdrnm n 57.52 +.62
MuHYAdn nlO.36
NYLTAdn 11.07 -.01
PrmCap r n 69.84 +.75
PALTAdrnn11.01
ReitAdm r n 83.42 +.46
STsyAdml n 10.79 -.01
STBdAdmlnlO.66 -.01
ShtTrAdn 15.91
STFdAdn 10.87 -.01
STIGrAdn 10.78 -.01
SmCAdm n 36.31 +.29
TxMCap r n 64.50 +.55
TUBAdml n 10.77 -.03
TSkAdm n 32.26 +.27
ValAdmlIn 21.26 +.16
WellslAdm n54.50
WelltnAdm n55.05 +.25
Windsor n 46.03 +.34
WdsrllAdn 47.35 +.42
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 25.00 +.23
CALTn 11.03
CapOppn 33.36 +.24
Convrtn 13.52 +.02
DivdGron 15.13 +.11
Energy n 67.27 +.44
Eqlncn 21.44 +.16
Explr n 77.31 +.60
FLLT n 11.39
GNMAn 10.97-.02
GlobEqn 18.32 +.12
Grolncn 27.16 +.26
GrthEqn 11.17 +.12
HYCorpn 5.74 -.01
HlthCren 137.44 +.42
InflaPron 13.67 -.01
IntlExplrn 16.36 +.03
IntlGrn 19.38 +.16
InfiValn 31.64 +.15
ITIGraden 10.04 -.03
ITTsryn 11.69 -.03
LifeConn 16.68 +.05
LifeGron 22.52 +.15
Lifelncn 14.35 +.02
LifeMod n 20.04 +.09
LTIGraden 9.48 -.10
LTTsryn 11.30 -.13
Morg n 18.54 +.20
MuHYn 10.36
Mulntn 13.60 -.01
MuLtdn 11.09
MuLongn 10.96
MuShrtn 15.91
NJLTn 11.51 +.01
NYLTn 11.07 -.01
OHLTTEn 11.88 -.01
PALTn 11.01
PrecMtls r n 24.04 -.12
PrmcpCorn 14.16 +.14
Prmcp r n 67.29 +.73
SelValurn 19.55 +.12
STARn 19.57 +.07
STIGraden 10.78 -.01
STFed n 10.87 -.01
STTsryn 10.79 -.01
StratEqn 19.83 +.19
TgtRe2005 nl2.12 +.02
TgtRetlncn 11.59 +.01
TgRe2010On22.99 +.06
TgtRe2015nl2.76 +.05
TgRe2020 n22.66 +.09
TgtRe2025 nl2.93 +.07
TgRe2030On22.18 +.12
TgtRe203505nl3.38 +.09
TgtRe2040 n21.96 +.14
TgtRe2050 n21.86 +.14
TgtRe2045 nl3.79 +.09
USGron 18.73 +.19
USValuen 10.66 +.09
Wellsly n 22.49
Welltnn 31.87 +.15
Wndsrrn 13.64 +.10
Wndsll n 26.67 +.24
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n104.74 +.58
MidCplstPl nl 05.23 +.65
TotlntAdm r r26.23 +.13
Totlntllnstr n104.96 +.53
500 n 117.87 +1.07
Balancedn 21.95 +.09
DevMktn 10.13 +.06
EMktn 29.67 +.19
Europe n 27.23 +.29
Extend n 42.99 +.29
Growthn 32.15 +.31
LgCaplxn 23.72 +.21
MidCapn 21.27 +.14
Pacific n 10.33 -.03
REITrn 19.55 +.11
SmCap n 36.26 +.29
SmlCpGth n23.35 +.21
SmlCpVin 16.34 +.11
STBndn 10.66 -.01
TotBndn 10.77 -.03
Totllntl n 15.68 +.08
TotStkn 32.26 +.28
Valuen 21.26 +.16
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 21.96 +.09
DevMklnstnlO.05 +.05
Extln n 43.03 +.29
FTAIIWIdl r n93.75 +.58
Grwthlstn 32.15 +.31
InfProlnstn 10.94 -.01
Instldxn 117.62 +1.07
InsPIn 117.63 +1.07
InstTStldxn 29.30 +.25
InsTStPlus rn29.31 +.26
MidCplstn 21.34 +.14
SCInstn 36.31 +.29
TBIstn 10.77 -.03
TSInstn 32.27 +.28
Valuelstn 21.26 +.17
Vanguard Signal:
ExtSgl n 36.97 +.25
500Sgl n 97.37 +.89
ITBdSig n 11.51 -.04
MidCpldxn 30.48 +.19
STBdldxn 10.66 -.01
SmCpSig n 32.72 +.26
TotBdSgl n 10.77 -.03
TotStkSgln31.14 +.27
Victory Funds:
DvsStAx 15.16 +.07
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.86
WM Blair Mtl Fds:
IntfGlthl r 21.98 -.01
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.53 +.09
CorelnvA 6.23 +.05
DivOppAp 14.78 +.12
DivOppCt 14.63 +.11
ScTechA 10.61 +.10
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 41.40 +.28
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.30
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.91
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 21.44 +.09
Opptylnv 40.00 +.25
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Instl:
UlStMuln p 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 10.97 -.03


William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.49 +.08
InftlGthN 21.46 -.02
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 17.49 +.14
Focused n 18.64 +.15


Euro debt lifts stocks


Associated Press


NEW YORK - Signs that
a widespread European
debt crisis could be averted
helped send stocks up
Monday
French banks agreed to
accept slower repayment of
Greece's debt, giving Greece
more time to meet its other
financial obligations. French
banks hold $21.3 billion in
Greek government debt
Greek lawmakers also began
debate on more budget-cut-
ting measures. Greece's par-
liament needs to pass the
new austerity plan this week
before the country can re-
ceive a $17 billion install-
ment from a rescue package
arranged last year.
The U.S. government,
meanwhile, said spending
by consumers decreased in
May, after adjusting for in-
flation. April's figures were
also revised downward, re-
vealing the first decline
since January 2010. Con-
sumer spending accounts
for 70 percent of economic
activity.


Market watch
June 27, 2011

Dow Jones +108.98
industrials 12,043.56


Nasdaq +35.39
composite 2,688.28

Standard & +11.65
Poor's 500
1,280.10

Russell +7.35
2000
805.14

NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,083
Declined: 960
Unchanged: 102
Volume: 3.2 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,711
Declined: 904
Unchanged: 104
Volume: 1.7 b
AP


Analysts said the rally was
stronger than the economic
news would suggest in part
because many traders invest
when indices hit certain
predetermined price levels.


In this case, the key num-
ber is 1,257 - the S&P's
break-even figure for the
year, said Todd Salamone,
director of research at Scha-
effer's Investment Research.
The S&P approached that
level in March and again
earlier this month. Both
times, the market rallied as
so-called technical traders
poured into the market.
The Monday-morning rally
was driven by "a combina-
tion of trading on that (break-
even) level and a catalyst, the
situation in Europe," Sala-
mone said. "Whether we sus-
tain it is another question."
Stocks rose broadly All 10
industry groups in the S&P
were higher, with financial,
information technology and
retail stocks showing the
strongest gains.
Broad markets have
dropped for seven of the
past eight weeks as traders
received a string of dismal
economic data showing the
recovery is slowing. The Dow
sank 1 percent Friday, and
the S&P 1.2 percent. The
Nasdaq lost 1.3 percent.


T-bill yields rise as fears ease


Associated Press economic growth and lead
to a banking crisis in Europe.
NEW YORK - Govern- "Some of the fear over
ment bond prices fell Mon- Greece abated a little bit,"
day, sending their yields said Kim Rupert, managing
higher, following encourag- director of global fixed in-
ing news on the European come analysis at Action
debt crisis. Economics.
French banks agreed to The yield on the 10-year
let Greece repay some of its Treasury note rose to 2.93
debt more slowly That will percent from 2.87 percent
help give the country time to late Friday Its price fell 63
manage its heavy debt load cents for every $100 in-
and pass necessary budget vested. Bond yields rise
cuts to help repair its econ- when their prices fall.
omy Investors have been The price of the 30-year
worried debt problems in Treasury note fell $1.91 for
Greece could slow global every $100 invested. That


sent its yield up to 4.30 per-
cent from 4.18 percent.
The two-year Treasury yield
rose to 0.40 percent from
0.32 percent. The price fell
after a relatively week auc-
tion of two-year Treasuries,
Rupert said. A measure of
demand was below the av-
erage for the previous auc-
tions. There were 3.08 bids
submitted for each one that
was accepted. That "bid-to-
cover" ratio was below the
fourth-month average of 3.18.
The three-month T-bill
paid a yield of 0.01 percent,
at a discount of 0.02 percent.


SBusiness HIGHLIGHTS


SCOTUS to rule on

FCC indecency policy

WASHINGTON - The
Supreme Court will take up the
First Amendment fight over
what broadcasters can put on
the airwaves when young chil-
dren may be watching television.
The justices said Monday
they will review appeals court
rulings that threw out the Fed-
eral Communications Commis-
sion's rules against the isolated
use of expletives as well as
fines against broadcasters who
showed a woman's nude but-
tocks on a 2003 episode of
ABC's "NYPD Blue."
The Obama administration
objected the appeals court
stripped the FCC of its ability to
police the airwaves.
The U.S. television networks
argue the policy is outdated,
applying only to broadcast tele-
vision and leaving unregulated
the same content if transmitted
on cable TV or over the Internet.
In a landmark 1978 decision,
the court upheld the FCC's au-
thority to regulate radio and tel-
evision content, at least during
the hours when children are
likely to be watching or listen-
ing. That period includes the
prime-time hours before 10 p.m.

Consumer spending in

May weakest in a year

WASHINGTON - For the
first time in a year, Americans
have stopped spending more.
Consumer spending failed to
budge from April to May, evi-
dence gas prices and unem-
ployment are squeezing
households. When adjusted for
inflation, spending actually
dropped 0.1 percent last month,
the Commerce Department re-
ported Monday.
April's consumer spending
figures were revised to show a
similar decline when adjusting
for inflation. It marked the first
two-month decline in inflation-
adjusted spending since April
2009.


Fitch downgrades

Best Buy credit rating

NEW YORK - Fitch Ratings
on Monday cut its long-term de-
fault rating on electronics retailer
Best Buy Co. by two notches to
the lowest investment-grade
rating. The agency cited weak
sales trends at established
stores, tough competition and a


battle for market share as more
shoppers buy electronics online
or at discount retailers.
Fitch also noted Best Buy is
facing a consumer pressured
by high unemployment and
housing costs and rising gas
prices. The agency lowered the
rating to "BBB-" from "BBB+"
with a stable outlook.
-From wire reports


I NEWYORKSTOCK EXCHANGE I


Name Last Chg
SprintNex 5.15 +.15
SprottGold 13.00 -.17
SP Matls 37.55 +.08
SP HIthC 34.86 +.18
SPCnSt 30.75 +.14
SP Consum 38.97 +.47
SP Engy 71.31 +.38
SPDR Fncl 14.91 +.15
SP Inds 35.91 +.28
SPTech 24.87 +.33
SP UDI 33.04 +.24
StdPac 3.38 -.02
Standex 29.82 +.96
StanBlkDk 69.50 +.22
StarwdHtl 53.62 +.37
StateSt 44.22 +.91
Statoil ASA 23.71 +.27
Steris 34.48 +.48
SuIIwrM 20.93 +.41
Sbyker 57.94 +.56
SturmRug 20.87 +.32
SubPpne 51.94 +.23
SunCmts 36.95 +.19
Suncor gs 37.43 -.01
Sunoco 39.39 +.24
Suntedich 7.58 -.02
SunTrst 25.14 +.14
Supvalu 8.63 +.06
SwiftTrnsn 13.22 +.43
Synovus 2.05 -.07
Sysco 30.83 +.07


TCF Fncl 13.58
TE Connect 34.61
TECO 18.54
TJX 50.03
TRWAuto 57.78
ThawSemi 12.53
Talbots 3.65
TalismEg 18.69
Target 46.46
TataMotors 21.61
TeckRes g 46.50
TelNorL 15.29
TelcmNZ 9.91
TelSPaulo 29.19
TelefEsps 23.16
TelMexL 15.95
TenetHlth 6.05
Teradyn 14.32
TerraNitro 136.95
Tesoro 21.17
TetraTech 11.96
Texlnst 31.74
Textron 22.44
Theragen 1.83
ThermoFis 63.32
ThmBet 50.90
3M Co 92.25
Tiffany 76.38
TWCable 76.31
TimeWarn 34.92
Timken 47.41
TitanMet 17.31
TollBros 20.78


TorchEngy
Trchmrk
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transom
Travelers
Tredgar
TriContf
TwoHrblnv
Tycolnt
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
URS
US Airwy
US Gold
USEC
UndrArmr
UniSrcEn
UniFirst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
UtdContI
UtdMicro
UPSB
US Bancrp
US NGs rs
US OilFd
USSteel
UtbTedich
UtdhlthGp


UnivHIthS 50.53 -.60 WellPoint 77.77
u G 2467 15 WellsFargo 27.45
ikk i& WendyArby 4.99
Vale SA 30.68 +.02 WestarEn 26.45
ValeSApf 27.85 +.07 WAstEMkt 14.04
ValeantPh 51.01 +1.26 WstAMgdHi 6.14
ValeroE 23.70 +.52 WAstlnfOpp 12.52
VangTSM 66.28 +.56 WDigital 34.90
VangREIT 58.83 +.25 WstnRefin 16.60
VangEmg 47.06 +.42 WstnUnion 19.35
VangEAFE 36.42 +.31 Weyerh 20.63
VarianMed 68.56 +.92 Whrlpl 77.00
Vectren 27.52 +.21 WhitngPts 52.69
VeoliaEnv 27.10 +.33 WmsCos 28.80
VeriFone 42.12 +.88 WmCos 2
VerizonCm 36.40 +.40 Wmsrs 52.71
ViacomB 48.74 +.82 WmsSon 36.50
VimpelCm 12.98 +.31 Winnbgo 9.36
Visa 73.89 +52 WiscEn s 30.96
Vishaylnt 14.49 +.20 WT India 23.25
VMware 97.60 +3.36 WorTgtn 20.10
Vonage 4.44 +.02 Wyndham 32.16
Vornado 91.57 +.90 XLCoEqU 29.12
WGL Hold 37.90 +.25 XL Grp 21.42
Wabash 9.04 +.16 XcelEngy 24.21
WaddellR 34.78 -.15 XcEngy 242
WalMart 52.29 -.12 Xerox 9.91
Walgrn 41.72 +.33 Yamanag 11.33
WalterEn 111.93 -.29 YingliGrn 8.55
WsteMInc 36.82 +.02 Youku n 27.34
Weathflnfi 17.59 -.13 YumBrnds 54.40
WeinRIt 24.70 +.01 ZweigTI 3.38


Seven Days A Week


Rain or Shine







..























The #1 Provider of News and

Advertising Information in

Citrus County





Call to see how you can receive


2 Weeks Free


352.563.5655



Swwwchnlonln Eco
! i www.chronlcIeonline.com







Page A10 - TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011



PINION


"It's the admirer and the watcher who provoke
us to all the insanities we commit."
Seneca, "Letters to Lucilius," 1st c.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....... ....................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ................... .............. editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick............................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz......... .................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ...................................... citizen mem ber
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

GLOBAL MARKETING




Government




should focus




on priorities
m mtm


County leaders may have
jumped to the chorus
without finishing the
verse when discussion at last
week's commission meeting re-
vealed they were considering
taking money from a soon-to-be
vacated county position and
placing it in the hands of a con-
sultant because "we need to be
all singing the same tune."
The retirement of county
public information officer Jim
Hunter will "free
up" close to THE I
$60,000, it was
announced. The County g
destiny of this wants ever
available money the sar
sparked a discus-
sion among com- OUR O
missioners about
the possibility of Music les
not filling the to begin
public informa-
tion position as it is currently
defined and hiring a marketing
consultant to, according to
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe, "market Citrus County
from a global perspective."
A clear concern about such a
shift of resources centers on
the need for managing public
communication. County offi-
cials should not inappropri-
ately downgrade the need for
public communication within
the county. A quick review of is-
sues that have provided stum-
bling blocks for county
government can be tied to com-
munication processes.
While the public information
officer has done a good job of
sharing information, county
commissioners and officials
need to be mindful that trans-
parency is the best avenue for
gaining public trust.
When that tenuous interac-
tion between elected officials
and those they represent is
plunked by a lack of confi-
dence, no global marketing
plan is going to make every-
thing OK. Unless wishing to
have department heads and
other top officials serve as the
custodians of information -


Too many tests
It's true what was said on the
Opinion page, that far too many
public schools are sucking the joy
and life out of learning in school
by viewing education solely through
tests. I hope Citrus County schools
will listen to this message. It was
in the June 23 paper by
Nat Hentoff. i 11


Beggars about
Is anyone else having
problems with people
begging for a few dollars
for gas or food? This is
happening to me more
often in ... parking lots. CAL
The latest was a woman C
with a small child. She 563-
needed money for food
for him. I offered her a
bag of groceries I had just pur-
chased. She declined, saying she
needed the money since her son
was on a special diet. It's getting
so I hate to shop. I feel bad. Some
of them have probably real needs,
but I feel many are just scamming.


o


F
;S


I


I

(


and accept that providing the
information in a timely fashion
is a legal requirement - a
well-trained public informa-
tional specialist is critical to the
well-being of our community.
What is presently needed is
not more attention to new mar-
keting initiatives, but more at-
tention to fixing what is broken
so Citrus County is in a better
position to market itself.
The next key change that
found discord
SSUE: was the sugges-
tion that this
vernment newfound
one singing money would
ie tune. likely go into the
pockets of an
'INION: out-of-county
public relations
sons need firm already re-
at home. ceiving $74,000 a
year from the
Tourist Development Council.
If there is no melodious three-
part harmony to be found
among the image-building ef-
forts from the Tourism Devel-
opment Council, the Economic
Development Council and the
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, it doesn't take a
Bach or Beethoven to deter-
mine there is some basic tun-
ing up that needs to take place
on the local stage before we
start paying out any big bucks
to hear a symphony
The final note to this jam ses-
sion is that this community just
simply cannot currently afford
to send any of its much-needed
dollars outside of the county
just to have someone tell us if
everyone here is singing the
same song, whether it is for
marketing to future businesses
or communicating to its citi-
zens. If we are not pleased with
the song we are currently hear-
ing, paying money for yet an-
other sheet of music won't do a
bit of good until we find out who
among us is singing off key, who
has lost the beat, who is simply
not capable of carrying a tune,
and who needs to be playing a
clarinet instead of a bass drum.


Change up calls
To the person who said
umpires are the human element
to baseball: This is true. But also,
human elements make mistakes
and when they make a mistake,
they should admit it and change
their call.

JND Safe to sip?
We have just received
1" the Citrus Springs-Pine
Ridge Water System
2010 Annual Quality
Water Report. I feel that I
am fairly educated, but
after reading this report,
I think it needs a rocket
scientist to tell you what
)579 it all means. What I
would really like to know
is, is the water in Citrus
Springs and Pine Ridge OK to drink?
Gen. Election
Just in case you're wondering
why we're the world's patsy any-
more, the main reason is because
our generals are now politicians.


Liberal states


something astonishing hap-
pened in New Jersey last
week. A majority Demo-
cratic legislature and a Republi-
can governor agreed on a
measure that will cut
benefits for the state's
750,000 employees
and retirees.
Like Wisconsin and
other states being
forced to deal with
large budget deficits
caused mostly by
sweetheart deals
struck in more pros- Cal T
perous times between OTI
politicians who need
votes and labor VOI
unions who deliver
them, New Jersey couldn't afford
to go on like this.
The new law "will sharply in-
crease what state and local work-
ers must contribute for their
health insurance and pensions."
And in a major whack at rising
costs, will also suspend "cost-of-
living increases ... raise retire-
ment ages and curb the unions'
contract bargaining rights,"
writes Richard Perez-Pena in the
June 23 issue of The New York
Times.
Gov Chris Christie's adminis-
tration estimates the deal will
save New Jersey $132 billion over
the next 30 years.
Predictably, labor unions are
excoriating Democrats who
joined Republicans to pass the
law, but even "tax and spend" De-
mocrats are beginning to realize
we can't go on like this and the fu-
ture of the country is more im-
portant than seeking short-term
partisan political advantage.
A new study co-authored by
Joshua Rauh of Northwestern
University and Robert Novy-


h
I
Ic


Marx of t
Rochester, b
sors, has con
a change in
teams, federal
er
to
pe
ye
ye
fu
si(
st
N
to
lomas en
ER m
DES ho
- T
hadn't passed
Last week
Congressional
(CBO) release
port that con
debt to grosE
(GDP) this ye
cent. That's
higher than 1,
CBO predicts
ous recalibra
rity, Medic
spending, del
76 percent of
lic debt will
GDP 10 years
on the debt is
entire GDP o
The Federz
issued a gloo
U.S. economy
than-expecte
warned of "h
anyone say "J
and many ott
to the Oban
claims about
of recovery"
narios about
growth and "j


LETTERS


Funny business
The Chronicle headline Sun-
day, June 19, read, "County pon-
ders its image." I was mildly
amused. But after a few moments
perusing this article, I couldn't
control myself and started laugh-
ing hysterically, especially when
I read, "Commissioners consider
hiring marketing consultancy to
attract global attention."
"Global attention," I gasped! I
chortled and clutched my throat,
endeavoring to catch my breath
before fainting. My snorting and
snickering subsided after a few
brief moments. I wiped the tor-
rent of tears flowing from my
eyes. Am I hallucinating? Can
this be true?
Further into the commentary,
the enormous sum of $60,000
surfaced! Once again, my cack-
ling and giggling resumed. I fell
down, doubled up and began
screaming aloud! It is for real!
The commissioners will actually
deliberate and consider this
foolish fiasco!
Miami! Tampa! Orlando! Those
were the first of three significantly,
busy populated municipalities -
far in excess of millions of people
- that immediately came to mind.
Here is where vacationers fre-
quent when they consider excit-
ing and wonderful tourist places!
These dramatic and breath-
taking areas are the "Las Vegas"
sites of Florida! The many stun-
ning, marvelous hotels and mo-
tels; extravagant restaurants,
amazing attractions spread


leading the way

he University of Do I hear the echo of Ronald
oth finance profes- Reagan, who said during his 1980
eluded that without campaign for president, "'A reces-
their pension sys- sion is when your neighbor loses
, state and local gov- his job; a depression is when you
nments "will need lose yours. And recovery is when
raise taxes by $1,398 Jimmy Carter loses his?"
er household every The Obama administration,
*ar for the next 30 which now "owns" the economy,
*ars if they are to as acknowledged by Democratic
lly fund their pen- National Committee Chair-
on systems." The woman Debbie Wasserman
udy also found that Schultz, is incapable of turning
ewJersey "will need things around as long as it re-
increase its rev- mains mired in its Keynesian, re-
iue by the largest distributionist, punish-the-
argin, requiring successful-and-subsidize-the-
;,475 more from each unsuccessful mentality.
)usehold per year." In justifying his vote for mean-
hat's if the new law ingful entitlement reform in New
d. Jersey, Assemblyman Angel
k, the nonpartisan Fuentes, a Democrat from Cam-
al Budget Office den, told Times, "These reforms
ed a frightening re- are unquestionably bitter pills for
icluded the ratio of us to swallow, but they are rea-
s domestic product sonable and they are necessary"
*ar would be 69 per- Are there enough "reasonable"
7 percentage points Democrats in Congress who will
ast year By 2021, the join with reasonable Republi-
that without a seri- cans and do what is necessary to
ition in Social Secu- repair what out-of-control spend-
care and other ing, unlimited benefits and enti-
bt will quickly reach tlements are doing to the federal
f GDP and "the pub- government and to the other 49
be 101 percent of states? If not, in the coming elec-
s from now." Interest tion, voters will have another op-
s now more than the portunity to increase reasonable
f some nations. representation in Congress and
al Reserve last week in the White House.
)my forecast for the Who ever thought traditionally
y. It noted "slower- liberal states like New Jersey and
�d growth" and Wisconsin would lead the way?
higher inflation." Can
Jimmy Carter?" This
her signs give the lie Direct all mail for Cal Thomas
na administration's to: Tribune Media Services,
last year's "summer 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114,
and other rosy sce- Buffalo, N. Y 14207. Readers
sluggish economic may also e-mail Cal Thomas at
job creation." tmseditors@tribune.com.


STAHLER
M^ w-fa U)PS Ilsvpnzr
S011























to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including emailed letters.
* We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

throughout the area. Citrus
County will never, by a hair's
breadth, be considered!
I cannot fathom any astonish-
ing attraction here that would
possibly demand "global atten-
tion" other than perhaps those
humdrum, unsightly, huge, hefty,
considerable-sized, magnificent
manatees slipping silently
through the crystal-clear waters
of the Three Sisters Springs.
That's about it! And that is about
all it should be!
We were immediately drawn
to Citrus County 20 years ago be-
cause of its pastoral, laid-back,
incredible countrified area. It was
pristine, quiet and bucolic: a rural
place to spend our remaining re-
tirement years after hectically
residing and working so many
years in the inner city of New York
Save the money! This is the
message at this time! Leave Citrus
County alone! Forget boosting


economic development! Close
the Citrus County Visitors and
Convention Bureau! Eliminate
all such foolish funding! Instead,
recognize its staid, overwhelm-
ing natural brilliant beauty.
Peter Monteleone
Pine Ridge

Citrus first
Even though I am totally
against the "Interlocal Central-
ized Sewer Agreement" between
the Citrus County Commission
and the Crystal River City Coun-
cil, and will do everything within
my power to prevent what I feel
is a planned violation of my
property rights, I noticed that at
the Crystal River City Council
meeting of June 13 the council
awarded a sewer contract worth
more than $3 million to Westra
Construction - a company from
outside of Citrus County!
The Chronicle article of June
19 ("City ponders its image, Page
Al) mentions another company
from outside of Citrus County
has been under contract with
our county since 2002 for $74,400
per year! This doesn't even make
sense - how could this company
from Ponte Vedra Beach sell Cit-
rus County more than the citi-
zens of Citrus County?
Commissioners: Give us a
break! Forget about a "global
perspective" and let's get on
with a "Citrus perspective!"
Renee Christopher-McPheeters
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


, -% %F%





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


As seen in ' ' ' -


Paid Advertisement


The Right Vehicle for



Weight Loss

Getting one's weight and diabetes under control is an achievable goal through
prescribed medical options, healthy food choices, and caring support.


R ichard Bixler's health
problems began about ten
years ago.
"My health was ter-
rible. However, I couldn't figure out
what was wrong with me."
His doctor couldn't find anything
medically that was causing the rapid
weight gain. However, soon after
moving to Citrus County, Richard's
new physician unraveled the mystery.
Richard was diabetic.
"Part of being diabetic is that
your body doesn't get any nutrients
because there's no insulin," shares
Richard. "So you feel hungry all
the time."
In a year's time, he gained
175 pounds.
This past January, Richard
decided it was time to do something
about the 44o pounds he was carrying
around before his health worsened.
"I am fourty-six years old," offers
Richard. "Do I want to be dead at
fifty-six? I don't think so."
Richard consulted his cur-
rent physician, Dr. Tawfik, for
help in losing weight.


Tailored treatments
A board-certified internist, Eihab
H. Tawfik, MD, has made both dia-
betes management and weight loss
core components of his practice.
""Approximately fifty percent of our
weight loss patients are diabetic," the
doctor reports. "Our program not
only changes our patients' eating
habits, but it also supports the devel-
opment of a better, healthier life."
At Citrus Diabetes Treatment
Center, weight loss programs are
tailored to diabetic patients and non-
diabetic patients.
Non-diabetic weight loss patients
see Dr. Tawfik's registered nurse on a
weekly basis. She gives them vitamin
injections, takes their vital signs, and
ensures that they are losing weight. The
doctor sees his non-diabetic weight loss
patients once every four weeks.
For diabetic weight loss
patients, Dr. Tawfik says treatment
typically necessitates a visit to the
office every week. "As patients lose
weight, their insulin requirements
decrease, so it becomes critical to
make adjustments."


Creating a plan
Dr. Tawfik presented Richard with three weight loss
options: the Lap-Band, bariatric bypass surgery, and
the doctor's tailored weight loss program.
"I felt his weight loss program was the least inva-
sive and probably the easiest to do," explains Richard.
"That was the plan for me."
According to Dr. Tawfik, the eating portion of
the program begins with five days of very lean protein
followed by five days of higher-calorie protein - lean
as opposed to very lean - giving patients more menu
options from which to choose.
Richard shares that his program consists of low-
fat protein for each meal like chicken, meat, and fish.
He also has one vegetable with lunch and two for
dinner. "I stay away from carbohydrates as much as
possible. And, no fried foods."



CitrusD BETES
Treatment Center
CITRUS PHYSICIANS WEIGHT LOSS
EIHAB H.TAWFIK, MD, PA

Medical management and care
Another crucial component of his practice, Dr.
Tawfik notes, is that patients receive medical
monitoring each week.
For Richard, that monitoring has played a crucial
role in managing his diabetes.
"When I first went to Dr. Tawfik to lose weight, I
was taking enormous amounts of insulin each day to
try and keep my blood sugar in line," explains Richard.
"As I began to eat a lot less, my body had to
readjust, especially because of all the insulin I was
taking," he recalls. "So I could have bottomed out or
not taken enough insulin."

Shedding pounds
Three months after starting Dr. Tawfik's tailored
weight loss program, Richard has lost 69 pounds.
"The program is going very well."
According to Richard, the doctor recommends
patients stay on the program for six months. "At that
mark, I need to be where I want to be, weight-wise."


DIABETES CARE FOR
TYPE I AND TYPE II
Insulin Pump Management *
Continuous Glucose Monitoring
(CGM) * Treatment & Screening
for Diabetes * Vascular
Complications & Nerve
Damage * Hypertension &
Cholesterol Treatment *
Effective Medical Weight Loss
Program * Wound Care
& Much More


i


Which for him is around 240 to 250 pounds.
The program is working so well for Richard
that during a recent vacation to Georgia,
instead of eating tempting foods and gaining
weight, his healthy diet remained intact.
"My wife and I went to visit family. It was
like a mini reunion with my kids and their fami-
lies, plus my sister and my parents. However, I
was concerned to go on vacation and end up
gaining a few pounds.
"I worked it out so if there was something served
like ham, potato salad, and a vegetable, I just didn't
eat the potato salad.
"Now, I didn't lose any weight that week, but I
didn't gain any either."
Richard's success in losing weight also .-.
impressed his family members.
"My sister had bariatric surgery and z , .
though she lost a lot of weight at first, she's
gained a few pounds back.
"She asked me about my program
because she wants to get more in line 8o
with what my wife and I are eating so that
maybe she can keep the weight off."
Another person who noticed g
Richard's weight loss was his mother. "My .
mom saw a change right off in my face
and around my stomach."
He reports that although he doesn't
look skinny yet, he has gone down two
pant sizes and one shirt size.
Besides losing almost 70 pounds,
Richard's diabetes is under control
and he no longer requires high doses


of daily insulin.
"The only dia-
betic medicine I'm
taking right now is
Metformin."
Though he has
a ways to go in his
weight loss, Richard
is very grateful for the
results he's achieved
so far, thanks in part
to Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center.


ADDITIONAL SERVICES
OFFERED AT
CITRUS DIABETES
TREATMENT CENTER
Physicians Medical Weight Loss
Program * Hypertension &
Cholesterol Management * Heart
Attack/Stroke/Cancer Prevention
& Screening * Physical Exams
and Routine Care for Men and
Women * Pap Smears and Breast
Exams forWomen * SickVisits
& Much More


"Some doctors I'd been to for years, before
Dr. Tawfik, might have been concerned about my
diabetes not doing well, but they didn't really offer
me a solution to the problem. Instead, they would
have me come in every few months, give me some
pills, and send me out the door.
"Those same doctors would also tell me to lose
weight but not really give me a vehicle to do that.
"Dr. Tawfik gave me that vehicle."
Richard's also pleased with the personal care he
receives from the doctor.
"I know he's genuinely concerned with my
health. His goal is to make me healthier and I appre-
ciate him for that." FHCN-Lynn York


it efoi .
i v l'


Ike IJ


Is It Time for Medical Weight Loss?
FIor diabetics and non-diabetics alike, achieving a
I healthy weight can be a truly life-changing experi-
ence. In addition to improved physical strength and
well-being, medical weight loss patients find greater
self-esteem, confidence, and energy through participa-
tion in the program. At Citrus Diabetes Treatment
. . Center & Citrus Physicians Weight Loss, patients
| . *, also have access to medical spa treatment and
": ', medical aesthetics to help them sculpt the fit,
, , . healthy bodies they have always imagined.
\ . "4'hWith a unique combination of medica-
1 ^tions, vitamin injections, customized diet
S 1 programs, weekly health and weight loss
monitoring, staff support, and aesthetic pro-
cedures, patients battling weight issues find the
key to true transformation. Why not put an end
Agto the struggle today?


HEALTHY RESULTS
Good health care can be a phone call
away, and the staff of Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center warmly invites
readers to call for more information or
to schedule an appointment. Please
call (352) 564-0444 for the office at
7394 West Gulf to Lake Highway in
Crystal River or (352) 397-2099 for the
office at 10089 Cortez Blvd., Suite 91,


Eihab H. Tawfik, MD,
is board certified by the
American Board of Internal
Medicine. Beginning his
undergraduate work at
St. Peter's College, Jersey
City, NJ, he earned his BA
in Biology from Rutgers
University, Newark, NJ. Dr.
Tawfik was awarded his medi-
cal degree from Ross University, School of
Medicine in Roseau, Dominica and served his
residency at Drexel University Veteran Affairs


IIin Brooksville. Medical Center in Wilkes-Barre, PA.


COPYRIGHT 2011 FLORIDA HEALTH CARE NEWS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
ARTICLE AND PHOTOS USED WITH PERMISSION OF FLORIDA HEALTH CARE NEWS, INC.


0008KRW


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 All


r DIABETEs TREATMENT/WEIG











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ENation aR Russian guilty of
Evacuating


Moscow military

judge convicts man

ofhigh treason

Associated Press
MOSCOW - The cover of the
highly placed U.S. mole in the Russ-
ian intelligence service was blown.
Col. Alexander Poteyev had be-
trayed his ring of 10 sleeper spies
- including Anna Chapman, the
red-haired agent with the lin-
gerie-model looks - and the FBI
was about to nab them. Now he
was at risk of being arrested by


Russian authorities.
Poteyev's plight last sum-
mer was so precarious he
had to rush from a meeting
in his office for a train sta-
tion to flee the country He
later texted his wife by cell-
phone he was "leaving not
for some time, but forever" A
Details of Poteyev's es- Chap
cape and farewell message a fo
were included in a sum- Russia
mary of evidence read in
the Moscow District Military Court
by a judge who convicted him in ab-
sentia Monday of high treason and
desertion, and sentenced him to 25
years in prison. The 59-year-old
colonel also was stripped of his
rank and state medals.


betraying
Chapman, one of the 10
agents deported from the
U.S. in July 2010, testified at
the closed trial only Poteyev
could have provided the in-
formation that led to their ar-
rests, Russian news agencies
reported, citing a summary
of the evidence read by the
mrnan judge as he issued his ruling.
rmer Chapman testified she
an spy was caught after an under-
cover U.S. agent contacted
her using a code only Poteyev and
her personal handler knew, the re-
ports said. She said she immedi-
ately felt something was wrong and
called her handler in Moscow, who
confirmed her suspicions. Chapman
and others were arrested not long


spy ring
after that, on June 27, 2010 - a year
ago Monday.
The agents were deported in ex-
change for four suspected Western
agents who had been imprisoned in
Russia. It was the biggest spy swap
since the Cold War
The court said Poteyev appar-
ently got word the agents were
being rounded up in the U.S. and
had to hurry out of Russia, the In-
terfax news agency reported. It said
Poteyev fled to Belarus, crossed the
border into Ukraine and then
moved west to Germany and, finally,
on to the United States using a pass-
port in a different name.
Poteyev's grown son and daugh-
ter reportedly have been living in
the United States for years.


Associated Press
Los Alamos Fire Chief Doug
Tucker points on a map to
the area burned by the Las
Conchas fire following a
news conference Monday
in Los Alamos, N.M.
Los Alamos orders
evacuation
LOS ALAMOS, N.M. -
Authorities ordered Los
Alamos evacuated Monday
as a fast-growing and unpre-
dictable wildfire bore down on
the northern New Mexico
town and its sprawling nu-
clear laboratory.
The blaze that began Sun-
day already had destroyed a
number of homes south of
the town, which is home to
some 12,000 residents. It
also forced closure of the na-
tion's pre-eminent nuclear lab
while stirring memories of a
devastating blaze more than
a decade ago that destroyed
hundreds of homes and build-
ings in the area.

World BRIEF

Happy Feet


Associated Press
An Antarctic penguin
pauses after its treatment
Monday at Wellington Zoo
in Wellington, New Zealand.
Lost penguin eats
fish post-surgery
WELLINGTON, New
Zealand - New Zealand's fa-
vorite penguin visitor is more
lively and eating fish after un-
dergoing endoscopic surgery
Monday to remove some of
the beach sand and twigs it
swallowed, apparently mis-
taking it for snow.
Full recovery for the young
emperor penguin - affection-
ately dubbed Happy Feet -
may take months, and offi-
cials are unsure when or how
it could return home to the
Antarctic, about 2,000 miles
away.
The bird was recovering
well after an endoscopy per-
formed by one of New
Zealand's leading surgeons
- for human patients.
Doctors at the Wellington
Zoo guided a camera on a
tube through the penguin's
swollen intestines and
flushed its stomach to re-
move the swallowed sand
and pieces of driftwood. Pen-
guins eat snow to hydrate
themselves during the harsh
Antarctic winter.
To ensure the health of its
newest star, the zoo brought
in Wellington Hospital special-
ist John Wyeth to help with
the procedure, New Zealand
Press Association reported.
-From wire reports


U.S. ECONOMY AND DEBT WORRIES




Better outlook?


Associated Press
Carmel Cine fills her tank up at a local gas station June 22 in Miami. Lower gasoline prices should help consumers
spend more. And a resumption of Japanese supply production should let U.S. factories resume normal output.

Why economists see a stronger second half for 2011


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Farewell and
good riddance to the first half of 2011
- six months that are ending as sour
for the economy as they began.
Most analysts say economic
growth will perk up in the second
half of the year. The reason is the
main causes of the slowdown -
high oil prices and manufacturing
delays because of the disaster in
Japan - have started to fade.
"Some of the headwinds that
caused us to slow are turning into
tail winds," said Mark Zandi, chief
economist at Moody's Analytics.
For an economy barely inching
ahead two years after the Great Re-
cession ended, the first half of 2011
can't end soon enough. Severe
storms and rising gasoline prices
held growth in January, February
and March to a glacial annual rate
of 1.9 percent.
The current quarter isn't shaping
up much better The average growth
forecast of 38 top economists sur-
veyed by The Associated Press is 2.3
percent.
The economy has to grow 3 per-
cent a year just to hold the unem-
ployment rate steady and keep up
with population growth. And it has
to average about 5 percent growth
for a year to lower the unemploy-
ment rate by a full percentage
point. It is 9.1 percent today
As welcome as the stronger
growth envisioned in the second
half is, the improvement should be
modest. For the final six months of
the year, the AP economists forecast
a growth rate of 3.2 percent.
So far this year, high gas and food
prices have discouraged people
from spending much on other things
- from furniture and appliances to
dinners out and vacations. That
spending fuels economic growth.
And some U.S. auto factories had
to suspend or trim production after
the March earthquake in Japan in-
terrupted supplies of parts and
electronics. American dealerships
have had fewer cars to sell.
The latest dose of glum news: The
government reported Monday con-
sumer spending was about the
same in May as in April, the first
time in a year that spending hasn't


White House: 'Significant'

deal on debt possible


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President
Barack Obama plunged into dead-
locked negotiations to cut govern-
ment deficits and raise the
nation's debt limit Monday, and
the White House expressed confi-
dence a "significant" deal with
Republicans could be reached.
But both sides only seemed to
harden their positions as the day
wore on, the administration insist-
ing on higher taxes as part of the
package but Republican leaders
flatly rejecting the idea.
Obama and Vice President Joe
Biden met with Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev, for
about 30 minutes at the White
House, setting the stage for an
evening meeting with Republican
Senate leader Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky.
White House spokesman Jay
Carney said Obama reported after
the morning session "everyone in
the room believes that a significant
deal remains possible." But Car-
ney also affirmed Obama would
only go for a deficit-reduction plan
that included both spending cuts
and increased tax revenue, an ap-
proach that Republicans say
would never get through Congress.

increased from the previous month.
The report confirmed the toll
high gas prices, Japan-related dis-
ruptions and high unemployment
have taken on personal spending in
the second quarter.
"Here's to a better third," said
Jennifer Lee, senior economist at
BMO Capital Markets.
Relief is in sight, economists say
Oil prices have been falling since
Memorial Day The drop has low-
ered the price of regular unleaded
gasoline by 23 cents in the past
month, to a national average of
$3.57 a gallon, according to AAA.
The timing of the drop in gas


Associated Press
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor
of Virginia, right, stands with House
Speaker John Boehner of Ohio on
Capitol Hill in Washington. Cantor,
who was participating in bipartisan
budget talks headed by Vice
President Joe Biden, pulled out
Thursday citing an impasse over
taxes that required intervention by
President Barack Obama and
House Speaker John Boehner.
Said Carney: "It's the only way
to get it done if you want to do it
right."
McConnell was seen speaking
with White House Chief of Staff
Bill Daley moments before his
scheduled meeting with Obama
and Biden.

prices is especially fortunate be-
cause they usually rise during sum-
mer driving season, said Robert
DiClemente, chief U.S. economist at
Citigroup.
And the kinks in the global man-
ufacturing chain are starting to be
smoothed out as the Japanese fac-
tories that make cars and electron-
ics resume production.
Diane Swonk, chief economist at
Mesirow Financial, said auto sales
should improve "quite substan-
tially" later this year because the
lost production from the earth-
quake is coming back faster than
had been expected.


Asteroid


swings


past


Earth

Tour-bus sized

space rock zips

within 7,600

miles of planet

Associated Press
LOS ANGELES -
Whew, that was close.
An asteroid the size of a
tour bus streaked harm-
lessly past Earth on Mon-
day, passing within 7,600
miles.
Discovered only last
week, the relatively small
space rock made a hairpin
turn around the planet at
about 10 a.m. PDT, sailing
high over the southern At-
lantic Ocean.
In truth, there was
never any doubt it would
miss. But given the vast-
ness of the universe, 7,600
miles is practically a
stone's throw away, at
about three times the dis-
tance between New York
and Los Angeles.
The asteroid, dubbed
2011 MD, was initially
mistaken by astronomers
for a piece of space junk
because it was so small, at
15 to 60 feet wide. Later,
observations confirmed it
was an asteroid that had
no chance of hitting Earth.
Asteroids of this size
typically brush by Earth
every six years. In fact,
earlier this year, a smaller
one came even closer to
our planet, passing within
3,500 miles.
Even if the latest one
had aimed straight for us,
it would have burned up
in the atmosphere and not
caused any damage on the
ground.
"We're just waking up to
the fact that Mother Na-
ture has been shooting
these things across the
bow for millennia," said
Don Yeomans, who heads
the program that tracks
potentially dangerous
space rocks at NASAs Jet
Propulsion Laboratory in
Pasadena.
It was expected to be
bright enough that some-
one might be able to see it
with a medium-sized
telescope.
Asteroids are leftovers
from the formation of the
solar system some 4.5 bil-
lion years ago. Pieces of
asteroids - meteorites -
constantly break away and
make fiery plunges
through the atmosphere.
Objects bigger than two-
thirds of a mile are major
killers and hit Earth every
several hundred thousand
years. Scientists believe it
was a six-mile-wide aster-
oid that wiped out the di-
nosaurs 65 million years
ago.
Scientists frequently
monitor these potential
threats to get better data
on their paths and likeli-
hood of hitting Earth.


1
|












SPORTS


* Rays host
Cincinnati Reds in
St. Petersburg on
Monday./B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


S* MLB/B2
* Sports briefs/B2
* TV, lottery/B2
* Entertainment/B3
* Recreation - racing/B4


Inverness takes Major softball win


District 15 Tournament
9-10 Baseball
POOL A (Crystal River) POOL B (West Hernando)
W L W L
Crystal River 3 0 Shady Hills 2 0
Lady Lake 2 1 West Hernando 2 1
Dunnellon 2 1 Inverness 1 2
Central Citrus 1 2 Greater Hudson 0 2
Dixie County 1 3
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Lady Lake 15, Dixie County 14
Crystal River 11, Dunnellon 4
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 16, Dixie County 6
Lady Lake 6, Central Citrus 2
Inverness 6, Greater Hudson 5
Shady Hills 12, West Hernando 7
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus 15, Dixie County 3
Crystal River 12, Lady Lake 1
Shady Hills 12, Inverness 2
West Hernando 10, Greater Hudson 0
MONDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 12, Dixie County 2
Dunnellon 17, Central Citrus 11
West Hernando 9, Inverness 7
TODAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus vs. Crystal River, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Dunnellon vs. Lady Lake, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Greater Hudson vs. Shady Hills, 6:30 p.m. (WH)
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner Pool Avs. Runner-up Pool B, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Winner Pool Bvs. Runner-up Pool A, 6:30 p.m. (WH)
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner Pool Avs. Runner-up Pool B, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Winner CR Semi vs.WinnerWH Semi, 6:30 p.m. (CR)

10-11 Baseball
(West Hernando)
W L
Dunnellon 2 0
West Hernando 1 1
Shady Hills 1 1
Inverness 0 2
FRIDAY'S GAMES
West Hernando 4, Shady Hills 2
Dunnellon 22, Inverness 2
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 11, West Hernando 0
Shady Hills 13, Inverness 9
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Shady Hills 2 Dunnellon 7
West Hernando 12, Inverness 25

Senior Baseball
(West Hernando)
W L
Inverness 2 0
West Hernando 0 2
SATURDAY'S GAME
Inverness 7, West Hernando 6
MONDAY'S GAME
Inverness 5, West Hernando 4
9-10 Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Crystal River 3 0
Dunnellon 2 1
South Sumter 2 1
Central Citrus 1 2
Inverness 1 2
Dixie County 0 3
FRIDAY'S GAMES
South Sumter 13, Inverness 5
Crystal River 13, Central Citrus 10
Dunnellon 16, Dixie County 6
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 13, South Sumter 8
Dunnellon 13, Central Citrus 1
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 5, Dunnellon vs. 1
South Sumter 16, Dixie County 6
Inverness 17, Dixie County 7 (Resumed game)
Central Citrus 12, Inverness 8
TODAY'S GAMES
Crystal River vs. Central Citrus, 6:30 p.m.
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner No. 1 Semi vs. No. 2 Semi, 6:30 p.m.
Major Softball
POOL A (Crystal River) POOL B (Crystal River)
W L W L
Crystal River 1 0 Dunnellon 3 0
Dixie County 1 1 Inverness 2 1
Central Citrus 0 1 Shady Hills 1 2
South Sumter 0 3
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 5, Inverness 4
Shady Hills 13, South Sumter 1
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus 25, Dixie County 8
Crystal River 18, Dixie County 0
Inverness 9, Shady Hills 7
Dunnellon 20, South Sumter 4
MONDAY'S GAMES
Inverness 7, South Sumter 6
Dunnellon 11, Shady Hills 2
TODAY'S GAME
Central Citrus vs. Crystal River, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner Pool A vs. Winner Pool B, 6:30 p.m.
Junior Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Dunnellon 1 1
South Sumter 1 1
SATURDAY'S GAME
Dunnellon 9,. South Sumter 1
SUNDAY'S GAME
South Sumter 9, Dunnellon 1
TODAY'S GAME
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 6:30 p.m.
Senior Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Crystal River 2 0
Shady Hills 1 1
Inverness 0 2
SATURDAY'S GAME
Crystal River 12, Inverness 2
TODAY'S GAME
Crystal River 10, Shady Hills 0
MONDAY'S GAME
Shady Hills 10, Inverness 6
WEDNESDAY'S GAME
Crystal River vs. Shady Hills
THURSDAY'S GAME
Crystal RWver vs. Shady Hills (if necessary)


Inverness seniors

suffer 10-6 setback

infinalgame

LARRY BUGG
Sports correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER - Inverness
pitcher Madison Hoefler picked
up the victory and the Inverness 11
and 12 All Stars beat South Sumter
7-6 on Monday night in the Little
League District 15 All Star Tour-
nament at Harley Levins Softball
Complex.
Inverness had 11 hits. Chase
Davis singled in a run.
Inverness finished the tourna-
ment with a 2-1 record.
The manager had mixed feelings
about the game.
"They played better," said Inver-
ness manager Nikki Meadow.
"They didn't play to their potential.
We had one or two defensive errors
but other than that, we played well.
It works for us. It's not bad but just

Inverness Major All-Stars pitcher
Madison Hoefler, seen here in ac-
tion Saturday, picked up the victory
in Monday night's game against
South Sumter.
BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle file photo


Tight contest


Associated Press
Florida starting pitcher Hudson Randall delivers to a South Carolina batter in the first inning of the
opening game of the best-of-three finals in the College World Series on Monday in Omaha, Neb. Randall
allowed a single run over eight innings but left with the game tied 1-1. South Carolina won 2-1 in 11
innings. Please see www.chronicleonline.com or Wednesday's sports section for the complete story.




Former NC State star Charles dies


Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. - Former
North Carolina State basketball
star Lorenzo Charles, the muscu-
lar forward whose last-second
dunk gave the underdog Wolfpack
the 1983 national collegiate cham-
pionship, was killed Monday when
a bus he was driving crashed, a
company official said Monday.
Elite Coach general manager
Brad Jackson said Charles, 47,
worked for the company and was
driving one of its buses on Inter-
state 40.
Raleigh police spokesman Jim
Sughrue said no passengers


were aboard.
Charles secured his spot in N.C.
State lore 28 years ago in the final
moments of the Wolfpack's
matchup with Houston in the na-
tional championship game.
He grabbed Dereck Whitten-
burg's 30-foot shot and dunked it
at the buzzer to give N.C. State a
54-52 win and its second national
title, sending coach Jim Valvano
spilling onto the court, scrambling
for someone to hug in what has be-
come one of the lasting images of
the NCAA tournament
"It's still kind of amazing to me
that ... people are still talking
about it," Charles said in an ex-


cerpt from his comments about
the championship game on his
N.C. State Web page. "I remember
when (it) first happened, I figured
I would have my 15 minutes of
fame and that would be it. Here
we are and it is still a conversa-
tional piece. I don't really think
that was the only great Final Fbur
finish that has been played since
then, but for some reason people
just single out that game and talk
about it Maybe because it was
such a David and Goliath thing."
N.C. State entered the NCAAtour-
nament with a 17-10 record, having
beaten Virginia to win the Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament


not what our potential is."
South Sumter had three triples
in a row in one inning. Rashonan
Badal, the losing pitcher, Emily
Hough and Kaitlyn Van Buren all
tripled.
South Sumter finished with an 0-
3 mark in the tournament.
Senior Softball
Shady Hills/Greater Hudson 10,
Inverness 6
Shady Hills/Greater Hudson
hurler Melissa Schlough had 11
strikeouts and her team had 16 hits
as they beat Inverness 10-6.
For the Pasco Countians, Is-
abella Borges had a two-run triple
and Tiffany O'Brien scored two
runs. Bailea Robinson had two
runs and two doubles.
Shady Hills/Greater Hudson is 1-
1 and will face Crystal River
Wednesday
Chelby Lawlor was the losing
pitcher for Inverness. Amber
Atkinson doubled and singled and
drove in a run. She also scored on
an error.
Inverness had a five-run rally in
the seventh inning.
Inverness was 0-2.
"We had an awesome rally," said
Inverness manager Mike Myers.
"We have a tendency to start out
slow. The Shady Hills pitcher was
consistent. (We had) lots of errors. It
See Page B4




Williams


sisters


out at


Wimbledon


Wozniacki

bounced; Rafa

hurt but wins

Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England -
Walking away from Centre
Court, Oracene Price -
mother and sometimes-coach
to Serena and Venus Williams
- shook her head after
watching one daughter lose at
Wimbledon, then the other.
Undeniably great as she is,
even defending champion
Serena found it too tough to
make a deep run at her first
Grand Slam
tournament
ina year after
a series of
health scares.
And as suc-
cessful as
Venus has
been at the
All England Serena
Club, even Williams
she couldn't
muster her
best after
missing
nearly five
months with a
hip injury.
"I don't
think their
layoffs helped Venus
their rhythm," Williams
Price said.
"They both seemed to be mak-
ing the same kinds of mis-
takes. They were hit-and-miss,
here and there."
They're both headed home
after straight-set exits in the
fourth round against far-less-
accomplished opponents
Monday. First, 13-time major
champion Serena lost 6-3, 7-6
(6) to ninth-seeded Marion
Bartoli on Court 1. Then, less
than two hours later and be-
fore a Centre Court crowd that


Wimbledon champion Venus
was beaten 6-2, 6-3 by 32nd-
seeded Tsvetana Pironkova.
Adding to the chaotic na-
ture of the afternoon, top-
seeded Caroline Wozniacki
lost, too, although she's still
searching for her first Grand
Slam singles trophy, whereas
the Williams sisters own a
total of 20.
"Definitely not our best
day," Venus said. "I think we
both envisioned seeing this
day going a little bit different"


And why shouldn't they
have? After all, Venus and her


Page B4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida LOTTERY On the AIRWAVES=


New York
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore



Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
New York
Florida


East Division
GB WCGB
Y2 -
21/2 2
71/2 7
91/2 9

East Division
GB WCGB

5 -
8Y2 3Y2
9Y2 4Y2
14Y2 9Y2


Away
20-13
23-16
26-16
22-22
13-21


Away
19-17
22-18
18-25
21-19
17-18


Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota



Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB

1Y2 4Y2
5 8
9Y2 12Y2
10 13

Central Division
GB WCGB

3 3
3Y2 3Y2
4 4
11Y2 11Y2
16 16


MIAMI - Miami Dolphins
linebacker Channing Crowder
says college players should be
able to sell their game jerseys
- something he "hypotheti-
cally" did when he played for
the Florida Gators.
Crowder discussed the sub-
ject Sunday during the debut of
his new two-hour weekly talk
show on WQAM radio in Miami.
He said hypothetically he didn't
have any of his Florida jerseys,
because some Jacksonville


Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Oakland




San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego


W L
41 38
39 39
39 40
35 44


businessmen really liked his
play.
Crowder expressed support
for quarterback Terrelle Pryor in
connection with the scandal at
Ohio State. Pryor left the pro-
gram and coach Jim Tressel re-
signed amid an NCAA
investigation into players' trad-
ing of signed equipment, cham-
pionship rings and other
memorabilia to a tattoo-parlor
owner for cash and discounted
tattoos.


West Division
GB WCGB

1Y2 6Y2
2 7
6 11


West Division
GB WCGB

11/2 1
6 5/2
9 8/2
1012 10


INTERLEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Detroit 8, Arizona 3
Boston 4, Pittsburgh 2
Baltimore 7, Cincinnati 5
Philadelphia 3, Oakland 1
N.Y Yankees 6, Colorado 4
Tampa Bay 14, Houston 10
Kansas City 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Milwaukee 6, Minnesota 2
Washington 2, Chicago White Sox 1
Toronto 5, St. Louis 0
N.Y Mets 8, Texas 5
L.A. Dodgers 3, L.A. Angels 2
San Francisco 3, Cleveland 1
Seattle 2, Florida 1, 10 innings
Monday's Games
Cincinnati 5, Tampa Bay 0
L.A. Dodgers 15, Minnesota 0
Cleveland at Arizona, late
Kansas City at San Diego, late
Washington at L.A. Angels, late
Atlanta at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Boston (Beckett 6-2) at Philadelphia (CI.Lee 8-
5), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Greinke 7-2) at N.Y Yankees (FGar-
cia 6-6), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Dickey 3-7) at Detroit (Porcello 6-5),
7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 7-4) at Baltimore (Britton 6-5),
7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 9-6) at Toronto (Jo-.Reyes
3-6), 7:07 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-2) at Tampa Bay (Price 8-6),
7:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 7-3) at Houston (Lyles 0-2),
8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 5-7) at Minnesota (Duensing
4-7), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 6-7) at Colorado
(Hammel 4-7), 8:40 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin 9-4) at Arizona (D.Hudson 9-
5), 9:40 p.m.
Florida (Vazquez 4-7) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez
6-5), 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City (FPaulino 0-1) at San Diego
(Richard 3-9), 10:05 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 7-2) at L.A. Angels
(Pineiro 3-3), 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 8-4) at Seattle (Pineda 7-4),
10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay 12:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 3:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Florida at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Game
Detroit 4, Toronto 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
San Diego 4, Atlanta 1
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs 7, Colorado 3
Tuesday's Games
San Francisco (Vogelsong 5-1) at Chicago
Cubs (D.Davis 1-6), 2:20 p.m., 1st game
San Francisco (Zito 0-1) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Lopez 0-1), 8:05 p.m., 2nd game
Wednesday's Games
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.



WILLIAMS
Continued from Page B1

younger sister combined to
win nine of the past 11 Wim-
bledon titles, including Ser-
ena's victories in 2009 and
2010. They even played each
other in four of the finals in
that span.
"Well, I never came here
thinking I would lose," said
Serena, a former No. 1
whose ranking now will
plummet to about 175th.
"That's my attitude."
It's the first time since
2006 that neither Williams is
in the Wimbledon quarterfi-
nals; Venus lost in the third
round that year, while Ser-
ena skipped that tourna-
ment because of a left knee
injury Of the 12 years that
both entered the field at the
All England Club, this is the
first neither one made it past
the fourth round.
"Obviously, it's not some-
thing planned," Venus said.
"We rarely lose on the same
day"
That's true: They last lost
on the same day at a Grand
Slam tournament on May 30,
2008, in the French Open's
third round.
All in all, it was a topsy-
turvy day at the All England
Club. Set aside, for a mo-
ment, what went on with the
Williams sisters, and digest
Monday's various other hap-
penings:


AoatuemdPu rces
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson delivers
a first inning pitch to the Cincinnati Reds on Monday in St.
Petersburg. The Rays lost 5-0.


Reds 5, Rays 0
ST. PETERSBURG - Jonny
Gomes hit a towering homer, Mike
Leake pitched six strong innings and
the Cincinnati Reds beat the Tampa
Bay Rays 5-0 on Monday night.
Gomes, the former Rays' outfielder
playing at Tropicana Field for the first
time since becoming a free agent after
the 2008 season, hit a solo shot off an
overhanging catwalk during a two-run
fourth that made it 4-0. Brandon
Phillips, who had four hits and two
RBIs, added a run-scoring single off Je-
remy Hellickson (7-7) later in the inning.
Gomes has hit nine fair balls off the
catwalks, the most at the St. Peters-
burg ballpark since it opened in 1998.
Leake (7-4) scattered four hits, walked
two and had three strikeouts in ending a
personal two-start losing streak.
Sam LeCure worked two innings
before Nick Masset pitched the ninth to
complete the six-hitter.
Hellickson lost his fourth consecu-
tive start, giving up four runs and eight
hits in six innings. Over the right-han-
der's skid, Tampa Bay has been
outscored 20-1.
The Rays were coming off a three-
game sweep at Houston where they
scored 26 times. Tampa Bay (44-35)
dropped to 18-19 at home.
Cincinnati went up 2-0 in the first
when Phillips drove in a run with a dou-
ble and Jay Bruce hit an RBI single.
The Reds had lost six of nine.
Bruce, who missed Sunday's game
with flulike symptoms, was back in the
lineup and went 1 for 4.

- Wozniacki still has yet
to make it past the fourth
round at Wimbledon after a
1-6, 7-6 (5), 7-5 defeat against
No. 24 Dominika Cibulkova;
- defending champion
and top-seeded Rafael
Nadal initially thought he
broke his left foot and might
have to quit late in the first
set, then lost the second set,
but eventually beat 2009
U.S. Open champion Juan
Martin del Potro 7-6 (6), 3-6,
7-6 (4), 6-4;
- six-time Wimbledon
champion Roger Federer
dropped his first set of the
fortnight - against a man he
was 10-0 against, no less -
before righting himself to
reach a 29th consecutive
Grand Slam quarterfinal;
- 18-year-old Bernard
Tomic of Australia became
the youngest man in the
Wimbledon quarterfinals
since 1986, when Boris
Becker went on to win his
second title in a row;
- 2010 runner-up Tomas
Berdych went out in straight
sets against 10th-seeded
Mardy Fish, who never be-
fore reached the quarterfi-
nals at the All England Club
but now is the last American,
man or woman, left in the
tournament.
"Last. ... Not what you set
out to do," said Fish, who is
0-5 against Nadal heading
into their quarterfinal. "It
was, I guess, bad luck for the
Williams sisters to lose. Un-
fortunate, I guess. They'll be


Tampa Bay ran itself out of a
promising inning in the sixth.With two
on and no outs, Matt Joyce hit a fly-
ball to left that turned into double play
when Evan Longoria, the baserunner
at first, ran past the lead Ben Zobrist
for an automatic out. Casey Kotch-
man then had an inning-ending
grounder.
NOTES: It was the first time Reds
manager Dusty Baker was involved in
a game at Tropicana Field."Quite new
for me," he said. "Quite new for a lot of
us."... Longoria also was charged with
an error at third for misplaying Paul
Janish's fourth-inning grounder.
Cincinnati Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
FLewis If 4 1 2 0 Damondh 4 0 0 0
Heisey If 0 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b 4 0 2 0
BPhllps 2b 5 2 4 2 Longori 3b 3 0 0 0
Votto lb 5 0 1 0 Joyce rf 4 0 2 0
Rolen3b 5 0 0 0 Ktchmlb 3 0 0 0
Bruce rf 4 0 1 1 BUpton cf 4 0 0 0
JGomsdh 3 1 1 1 Jasoc 4 0 1 0
RHrndz c 4 0 0 0 Fuld If 3 0 0 0
Stubbs cf 3 0 1 0 Brignc ss 3 0 1 0
Janishss 4 1 1 0
Totals 37 5114 Totals 320 6 0
Cincinnati 200 200 100 - 5
Tampa Bay 000 000 000 - 0
E-Zobrist (5), Longoria (6). DP-Tampa Bay
3. LOB-Cincinnati 8, Tampa Bay 7. 2B-
B.Phillips (18), Zobrist 2 (27), Joyce 2 (19), Jaso
(10). HR-J.Gomes (11). SB-Stubbs (23).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
LeakeW,7-4 6 4 0 0 2 3
LeCure 2 1 0 0 0 1
Masset 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson L,7-7 6 8 4 3 1 9
C.Ramos 1-3 2 1 0 0 0
A.Russell 12-30 0 0 1 0
Sonnanstine 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by A.Russell (J.Gomes).
T-2:52. A-19,891 (34,078).

back, I'm sure."
They won't be around for
the women's quarterfinals
Tuesday, which are:
Cibulkova of Slovakia vs. No.
5 Maria Sharapova of Rus-
sia; Bartoli of France vs.
wild-card entry Sabine
Lisicki of Germany; No. 8
Petra Kvitova of the Czech
Republic vs. Pironkova of
Bulgaria; and No. 4 Victoria
Azarenka of Belarus vs.
Tamira Paszek ofAustria. It's
the first time since 1913 that
the last eight women at Wim-
bledon are from Europe -
and, as it happens, eight
countries are represented.
Sharapova is the only
quarterfinalist who's won a
Grand Slam title; her three
major championships in-
clude Wimbledon in 2004.
After a day off, the men
play their quarterfinals
Wednesday In addition to
Nadal vs. Fish - assuming
Nadal decides to play after
getting an MRI exam on his
foot-the matchups are No.
2 Novak Djokovic vs. Tomic;
No. 3 Federer vs. No. 12 Jo-
Wilfried Tsonga; and No. 4
Murray vs. unseeded Feli-
ciano Lopez.
"I'm worried, for sure,"
Nadal said.
Neither of the women who
beat the Williams sisters
Monday has won a Grand
Slam title, although Bartoli
did reach the Wimbledon
final in 2007 - before losing
to Venus. Pironkova, mean-
while, produced her best


Cubs 7, Rockies 3
CHICAGO - Carlos Pena and
Aramis Ramirez each homered twice
to lead the Chicago Cubs to a 7-3 win
over the Colorado Rockies on Monday.
Ramirez hit a two-run homer in the
first, doubled and scored in the fifth
and homered again to lead off the sev-
enth. It was his 24th career multi-
homer gamer.
Pena homered leading off the fourth
and added a two-run shot in the fifth for
his 20th career multi-homer game. Pena
and Ramirez each drove in three runs.
The longball barrage backed a
strong outing by Cubs starter Matt
Garza (4-6), who threw 71-3 innings,
allowing three runs on five hits. He
struck out six and did not issue a walk.
Rockies starter Jhoulys Chacin (8-5)
struggled with his command and lost
for the first time in four decisions, al-
lowing season highs with six runs, nine
hits, three homers and seven extra-
base hits. He departed after throwing
107 pitches in five innings.
Carlos Gonzalez homered twice for
the Rockies and Todd Helton added a
run-scoring single.
Chacin hadn't allowed more than
one run in any of his four June starts,
but allowed two runs in the first Mon-
day. Starlin Castro tripled off the ivy in
center field with two outs, then
Ramirez homered to left-center on a 1-
2 pitch.


Colorado


Chicago (N)


ab rh bi ab rh bi
CGnzlz cf 4 22 2 Fukdm rf 4 0 1 0
JHerrr2b 3 1 1 0 Campncf 3 0 1 0
Heltonlb 4 0 1 1 SCastross 4 1 1 0
Tlwtzkss 4 02 0 ArRmr3b 4 3 3 3
S.Smithrf 3 00 0 C.Penalb 4 2 2 3
Wggntn 3b 4 0 0 0 ASorin If 3 0 1 0
Blckmn If 3 0 0 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0
Mrtnsn p 0 00 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0
Giambi ph 1 00 0 DeWitt 2b 4 0 0 0
lannett c 4 0 0 0 LeMahi 2b 0 0 0 0
Chacin p 2 0 0 0 Soto c 3 1 1 0
Brothrs p 0 00 0 Garza p 2 0 0 0
Splrghs If 1 0 0 0 RJhnsn If 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 36 3 Totals 32710 6
Colorado 100 001 010 - 3
Chicago 200 220 10x - 7
E-Soto (5), Garza (4). DP-Colorado 2,
Chicago 1. LOB-Colorado 5, Chicago 6. 2B-
Ar.Ramirez (20), A.Soriano (10), Soto (14).
3B-S.Castro (6). HR-C.Gonzalez 2 (12),
Ar.Ramirez 2 (8), C.Pena 2 (16). SB-Campana
(8).
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Chacin L,8-5 5 9 6 6 3 4
Brothers 1 0 0 0 1 2
Mortensen 2 1 1 1 1 1
Chicago
Garza W,4-6 71-35 3 3 0 6
Marshall 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Marmol 1 1 0 0 1 2
HBP-by Garza (J.Herrera). WP-Chacin,
Garza.
T-3:03. A-40,854 (41,159).

Grand Slam showing at the
All England Club a year ago,
when she made it to the
semifinals by beating Venus
- coincidentally, also by the
score of 6-2, 6-3.
Pironkova also beat Venus
at the 2006 Australian Open,
yet somehow she clearly did-
n't make much of an impres-
sion on Mom.
"I don't even remember
her playing her before. They
said she lost to her here a
year ago," Price said. "I did-
n't remember the girl. I'll re-
member her this time."
As well she should, be-
cause Pironkova befuddles
the older Williams sister. On
Monday, Pironkova played
steadily, making only 10 un-
forced errors, half as many
as Venus.
"Today's match probably
looked easier on the outside,
but it took me enormous
amount of power to beat
her," Pironkova said. "I kept
pushing her As I said, I
played well. So she probably
got a little shaky, and I took
over."
Pironkova was 4-14 at tour-
level events before her 4-0
run so far at Wimbledon.
Apparently, her game
takes on a whole new depth
on grass courts - and
against Venus.
"It's kind of inexplicable
why I manage to play some
of my worst tennis against
her," Venus said. "It's not like
I'm intimidated at all by any-
body on tour."


Tigers 4, Blue Jays 2
DETROIT - Jhonny Peralta hit a
tiebreaking triple in the eighth inning
and Victor Martinez drove in two runs,
leading the Detroit Tigers past the
Toronto Blue Jays 4-2 on Monday night.
Max Scherzer struck out nine over
seven strong innings and the AL Cen-
tral leaders won their third straight,
snapping Toronto's three-game win-
ning streak.
In the makeup of a May 17 rainout,
Tigers manager Jim Leyland was
ejected in the seventh after a long argu-
ment that included a mocking imperson-
ation of first base umpire Ed Rapuano
changing his call on a close play.
Adam Lind hit his 16th homer for
the Blue Jays.
With one out in the eighth, Magglio
Ordonez singled off Marc Rzepczynski
(2-2). Austin Jackson entered as a
pinch-runner, and Shawn Camp came
in to relieve Rzepczynski.
Peralta sliced a liner into the right-
center gap and Jose Bautista missed
an attempt at a sliding catch. The ball
rolled to the wall before center fielder
Rajai Davis could retrieve it, giving Per-
alta a standup triple.
After the Blue Jays intentionally
walked Alex Avila, Ryan Raburn beat
out a double-play ball to drive in the
fourth run.
Joaquin Benoit (2-3) picked up the
win with a scoreless inning.


Toronto Detroit
ab rh bi


YEscor ss
EThms If
Bautist rf
Lind lb
A.Hill 2b
CPttrsn dh
JMolin c
JMcDnI pr
J.Nix 3b
JRiver ph
RDavis cf

Totals
Toronto
Detroit


4 0 1 0 Dirks cf-lf
4 1 1 0 Kelly3b-rf
4 0 2 1 BoeschlIf
3 1 1 1 Inge3b
4 0 1 0 MiCarrlb
4 0 1 0 VMrtnzdh
3 0 1 0 Ordonz rf
0 0 0 0 AJcksn pr-cf
3 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss
1 0 0 0 Avila c
3 0 0 0 Raburn 2b
RSantg 2b
33 28 2 Totals
000 200 000


E-Jh.Peralta (4). D
LOB-Toronto 6, Detr
Bautista (12), Boesc
3B-Jh.Peralta (3). H
(10), A.Jackson (13).

Toronto
Z.Stewart
Frasor
Rzepczynski L,2-2
Camp
L.Perez
Detroit
Scherzer
BenoitW,2-3
ValverdeS,18-18
WP-Scherzer.


ab r h bi
3 00 0
3 00 0
4 1 2 0
0 00 0
4 1 2 0
4 02 2
4 02 0
0 1 0 0
4 1 2 1
3 0 1 0
4 0 1 1
0 00 0
33412 4
- 2


011 000 02x - 4


P-Toronto 2, Detroit 2.
roit 9. 2B-E.Thames (5),


Dodgers 15, Twins 0
Matt Kemp powers
Dodgers to 15-0 rout of Twins
MINNEAPOLIS - Matt
Kemp had four hits, including
his NL-leading 22nd home run,
and the Los Angeles Dodgers
had a little fun after a tough day
by routing the skidding Min-
nesota Twins 15-0 Monday
night.
Chad Billingsley cruised
through six innings, combining
with three relievers on Los An-
geles' seventh shutout of the
season. Casey Blake had a
home run among his three hits
for the Dodgers, who filed for
bankruptcy protection in a
Delaware court earlier in the
day.
Billingsley (7-6) allowed four
hits and struck out four to win
his second straight interleague
start, backed by an offense that
set season highs for runs and
hits (24).

Los Angeles (N) Minnesota
ab rhbi ab rh bi
GwynJ If-cf 6 2 4 1 Revere cf 4 0 00
Blake 3b-lf 5 1 3 2 ACasill 2b 3 0 0 0
Ethierdh 4 2 1 1 Mauerc 3 0 1 0
Navarrph-dhl 0 0 1 RRiverc 1 0 0 0
Kemp cf 5 2 4 2 Cuddyr rf 2 0 0 0
Miles 3b 1 00 0 Repko ph-rf 2 0 0 0
Loneylb 6 1 2 1 Thomedh 2 0 0 0
Uribe 2b 6 1 2 1 Valenci3b 3 0 1 0
Oeltjen rf 4 3 4 2 Tosoni If 3 0 0 0
A.Ellisc 5 2 2 1 LHughslb 3 0 0 0
DGordn ss 6 1 2 2 Nishiokss 3 0 2 0
Totals 49152414 Totals 290 4 0
Los Angeles 201 232 230 - 15
Minnesota 000 000 000 - 0
E-D.Gordon (3), Cuddyer (5), Nishioka 2 (7).
DP-Los Angeles 2, Minnesota 1. LOB-Los
Angeles 12, Minnesota 4. 2B-Kemp (16),
D.Gordon (2), Mauer (3). 3B-Oeltjen (1). HR-
Blake (4), Kemp (22), Oeltjen (1). SB-Gwynn
Jr. 2 (8). SF-Navarro, Oeltjen.
IP H RERBBSO


ch (19), V.Martinez (20). Los Angeles
R-Lind (16). SB-A.Hill Billingsley W,7-6
S-J.Molina, Dirks. Hawksworth
IP H R ER BB SO
Kuo
6 9 2 2 1 4 Elbert


7 6 2 2 1 9
1 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 0 0


T-3:01. A-25,181 (41,255).


Minnesota
Blackburn L,6-6
Swarzak
Dumatrait
Mijares
Capps


41-312 8
12-35 2
1 2 2
1 3 3
1 2 0


WP-Swarzak.
T-3:05. A-39,487 (39,500).


Dodgers file for bankruptcy protection


LOS ANGELES - One of
baseball's proudest franchises is
in tatters, its future to be decided
more in the courtroom than on
the field.
The Los Angeles Dodgers filed
for bankruptcy protection in a
Delaware court Monday, blaming
Major League Baseball for refus-
ing to approve a multibillion-dollar
TV deal that owner Frank Mc-
Court was counting on to keep
the troubled franchise afloat.
McCourt, upset that baseball
Commissioner Bud Selig re-
jected the proposed TV deal last
week, hopes a federal judge will



SOFTBALL
Continued from Page BI

is a shame it took so long to
come back. They played
their hearts out."
"Melissa had a real tough
game yesterday," said Shady
Hills/Greater Hudson man-
ager Dave Borges. "She
came back strong today.
They put it together and had
a good effort."
11 and 12 Softball
Dunnellon 11, Greater
Hudson/Shady Hills 2
Dunnellon pitcher Gillian
Heinritz tossed a one-hitter
with 11 strikeouts and Dun-
nellon had eight hits to take
the victory
Dunnellon is now 3-0.


approve $150 million in financ-
ing to be used for daily opera-
tions, which would give him
more time to seek a more favor-
able media contract. A hearing is
set for today.
'The action taken today by Mr.
McCourt does nothing but inflict
further harm to this historic fran-
chise," Selig said in a statement.
The team is bleeding red ink
instead of Dodger blue, with for-
mer players owed millions. Even
beloved Hall of Fame announcer
Vin Scully is owed more than
$150,000 as part of his contract,
court documents show.


Cassandra Lawler had a
bases-loaded triple, three
hits and two runs for the
Marion Countians. Cassan-
dra Chesnut was 3-for-3 with
a run. Casey Bernstein sin-
gled and scored two runs.
Tessa Shade took the
pitching defeat for Greater
Hudson/Shady Hills.
"We had great pitching,"
said manager Pat Heinritz.
"Gillian was hitting her
spots. We made the plays
most of the time. We had a
lot of hits."
9 and 10 baseball scores
Crystal River 12,
Dixie County 2

Dunnellon 17,
Central Citrus 11

West Hernando 9,
Inverness 7


CASH 3 (early)
4-9-9
CASH 3 (late)
7-9-1
PLAY 4 (early)
rd - 9-3-3-4
Florida Lottery PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 1-7-9-6
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Monday in the 16 - 22 - 25 - 29 - 36
Florida Lottery:


Crowder hints he sold game jerseys


COLLEGE BASEBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) CWS Championship, Game 2 - UF vs. USC
BASEBALL
2 p.m. (WGN-A) San Francisco Giants at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m. (SUN) Cincinnati Reds at Tampa Bay Rays
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at Oakland Athletics
WOMEN'S SOCCER
8:45 a.m. (ESPN) FIFA World Cup: Colombia vs. Sweden
11:45 a.m. (ESPN) FIFA World Cup: U.S. vs. North Korea
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) Wimbledon Women's Quarterfinals
10 a.m. (8 NBC) Wimbledon Women's Quarterfinals
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Wimbledon Women's Quarterfinals


B2 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


SPORTS








E Page B3-TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE -

Keys to produce
Broadway play
NEW YORK-Alicia
Keys is following Jay-Z
and Will Smith into the
world of
Broadway
produc-
ers.
Keys,
whose
Shits in-
clude

Alicia Keys and "A
Woman's
Worth," will help pro-
duce the play "Stick Fly."
The Lydia R. Diamond
work is described as a
contemporary comedy of
manners revolving
around an affluent black
family Keys says it's a
story that everyone can
relate to.
The piece has been
performed in Boston,
Chicago and Washington,
D.C. It begins perform-
ances at the Lyceum The-
atre on 45th Street on
Nov 18 and officially
opens Dec. 8.

Billy Ray Cyrus
releases album
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Billy Ray Cyrus' life has
seen a lot of upheaval in
the past year He nearly
got di-
vorced,
endured


Billy Ray
Cyrus

over his parei
saw the end o
Montana," the
phenomenon
changed the C
lives forever
Cyrus salute
of the military
album, "I'm A
out Tuesday I
seven new soi
Buddy Cannoi
"I'm Americar
make of"Som
the title track
multi-platinui
album that als
his breakthro
Breaky Heart

Lady Gal
over fun
DETROIT-
filed in Detro:
music star La
misleading he








Lady Gaga

selling $5 wrist
say, "We Pray
The website a
people to mak
tional donation
"all proceeds
to Japan relie
But the law;
that sales tax
shipping char
added. Detroi
ney Alyson Ol
lives not all
going to help 1
ese. She want
counting.
An email se
ment was left
with a spokes:
Lady Gaga.


public WASHINGTON - The Supreme
scrutiny Court ruled Monday that it is unconsti-
of his tutional to bar children from buying or
daughter renting violent video games, saying gov-
Miley's ernment doesn't have the authority to
behavior "restrict the ideas to which children
and a re- may be exposed" despite complaints
sulting that the popular and fast-changing
backlash technology allows the young to simulate
nting, and acts of brutality.
f "Hannah On a 7-2 vote, the high court upheld a
Disney federal appeals court decision to throw
that out California's ban on the sale or
'yruses' rental ofviolent video games to minors.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in
es members Sacramento had ruled that the law vio-
y on his new lated minors' rights under the First
merican," Amendment, and the high court agreed.
He offers "No doubt a state possesses legiti-
ngs on the mate power to protect children from
n-produced harm," said Justice Antonin Scalia, who
n" and a re- wrote the majority opinion. "But that
.e Gave All," does not include a free-floating power
to his to restrict the ideas to which children
m debut may be exposed."
so included Video game makers and sellers cele-
ugh, "Achy brated their victory, saying the decision
." puts them on the same legal footing as
other forms of entertainment. "There
ga sued now can be no argument whether video
ga ue games are entitled to the same protec-
draising tion as books, movies, music, and other
- A lawsuit expressive entertainment," said Bo An-
it claims dersen, president and CEO of the En-
dy Gaga is tertainment Merchants Association.
r fans with More than 46 million American
an online households have at least one video-
pitch for game system, with the industry bring-
donations ing in at least $18 billion in 2010. The
for vic- video game industry has its own rating
tims of labeling system intended to warn par-
the Japan ents, with the rating "M" placed on
earth- games that are considered to be espe-
quake. cially violent
Lady But at least two justices, Chief Justice
Gaga's John Roberts and Justice SamuelAlito,
website is indicated they would be willing to re-
stbands that consider their votes throwing out the
For Japan." law, taking issue with the sweep of the
ilso allows court's holding.
ke addi- "I would not squelch legislative ef-
ns and says forts to deal with what is perceived by
go directly some to be a significant and developing
f efforts." social problem," Alito said, suggesting
suit notes that a narrower state law might be up-
and a $3.99 held.
,ge are And an unlikely duo, conservative-
t-area attor- leaning Clarence Thomas and liberal-
iver be- leaning Stephen Breyer, agreed that the
money is California video game ban should have
the Japan- been upheld, but for different reasons.
s an ac- Breyer said the court's decision cre-
ates an insurmountable conflict in the
eking com- First Amendment, especially consider-
Monday ing that justices have upheld bans on
man for the sale of pornography to children.
"What sense does it make to forbid
selling to a 13-year-old boy a magazine
-From wire reports with an image of a nude woman, while


Calif. ban on video game sales to kids


In this June 24 photo, "Grand Theft
Auto: Episodes From Liberty City" for
PlayStation 3 is displayed at Best Buy
in Mountain View, Calif.

protecting the sale to that 13-year-old of
an interactive video game in which he
actively, but virtually, binds and gags the
woman, then tortures and kills her?"
Breyer said. "What kind of First
Amendment would permit the govern-
ment to protect children by restricting
sales of that extremely violent video
game only when the woman - bound,
gagged, tortured and killed - is also
topless?"
And Thomas said the majority read
something into the First Amendment
that isn't there.
"The practices and beliefs of the
founding generation establish that "the
freedom of speech," as originally un-
derstood, does not include a right to
speak to minors (or a right of minors to
access speech) without going through
the minors' parents or guardians,"
Thomas wrote.
Leland Yee, a child psychologist and
California state senator who wrote the
video game ban, told The Associated
Press Monday that he was reading the
dissents in hope of finding a way to
reintroduce the law in a way it would
be constitutional.
"It's disappointing the court didn't
understand just how violent these
games are," Yee told The AP
California's 2005 law would have pro-
hibited anyone under 18 from buying or
renting games that give players the op-
tion of "killing, maiming, dismember-
ing, or sexually assaulting an image of a
human being." Parents would have
been able to buy the games for their
children, but retailers who sell directly
to minors would have faced fines of up
to $1,000 for each game sold.


That means that children would have
needed an adult to get games like
"Postal 2," the first-person shooter by
developer Running With Scissors that
features the ability to light unarmed by-
standers on fire. It would also apply to
the popular "Grand Theft Auto IV" a
third-person shoot-'em-up from Rock-
star Games that allows gamers to por-
tray carjacking, gun-toting gangsters.
The California law never took effect
Lower courts have said the law violates
minors' constitutional rights, and that
California lacked enough evidence to
prove thatviolent games cause physical
and psychological harm to minors.
Courts in six other states, including
Michigan and Illinois, reached similar
conclusions, striking down similar
bans.
Unlike depictions of "sexual con-
duct," Scalia said, there is no tradition
in the United States of restricting chil-
dren's access to depictions of violence,
pointing out the violence in the original
depiction of many popular children's
fairy tales like Hansel and Gretel, Cin-
derella and Snow White.
Hansel and Gretel kill their captor by
baking her in an oven, Cinderella's evil
stepsisters have their eyes pecked out
by doves and the evil queen in Snow
White is forced to wear red hot slippers
and dance until she is dead, Scalia said.
"Certainly the books we give children
to read - or read to them when they
are younger - contain no shortage of
gore," Scalia added.
And there is no definitive proof that
violent video games cause harm to chil-
dren, or any more harm than another
other form of entertainment, he said.
One doctor "admits that the same ef-
fects have been found when children
watch cartoons starring Bugs Bunny or
the Road Runner or when they play
video games like Sonic the Hedgehog
that are rated 'E' or even when they
'view a picture of a gun," Scalia said.
"Of course, California has (wisely) de-
clined to restrict Saturday-morning car-
toon, the sale of games rated for young
children, or the distribution of pictures
of guns."
Tim Winter, president of the Parents
Television Council, said the decision
created "a constitutional authorized
end-run on parental authority."
"I wonder what other First Amend-
ment right does a child have against
their parents' wishes?" he said. "Does
a child now have a constitutional right
to bear arms if their parent doesn't
want them to buy a gun? How far does
this extend? It's certainly concerning to
us that something as simple as requir-
ing a parental oversight to purchase an
adult product has been undermined by
the court"
The case is Brown v Entertainment
Merchants Association, 08-1448.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: The aspects indicate you could begin to profit
handsomely in the year ahead from an arrangement you
made with others some time ago. Keep it to yourself, how-
ever, because talking to the wrong people might spoil
things for you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - Someone you respect and
admire might come to you about doing something you think
would be a kindness to him or her, but, in reality, it'll turn out
to be a favor for you.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Your thinking is usually such that
it produces ideas that are both practical and progressive,
which is likely to happen currently. This time it might involve
one of your club or social activities.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Be alert and on your toes so
you don't miss something extremely unusual concerning an
opportunity that could be meaningful to you materially. It
won't linger long.


Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Include others when broaden-
ing your range of objectives, because you'll have a better
chance at success with more people involved. It'll cause
you to do the greatest good for the greatest number.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - A promising endeavor is
likely to be put together through a chain of unique circum-
stances involving several other people. These co-contribu-
tors will supply what you lacked.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You couldn't find a better
day to iron out a misunderstanding you recently had with
someone dear to you. That other person is equally eager to
clear the air.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Take those positive meas-
ures to enhance your material well-being, because it's a
day where you can move things along to your satisfaction.
Do what needs doing now.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --There is an excellent possi-


ability two new people from distant places might enter your
life. Both will have a strong, constructive influence on your
important affairs.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - You should fare much better
in an arrangement you initiated, but now leave up to others.
They're finally getting the hang of things and producing
what they should have done all along.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Don't doubt the wisdom of
your decisions, even those you might have to make under
pressure at a moment's notice. Your judgment is keen.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - No, money isn't likely to be
simply dropped in your lap. However, you will get an oppor-
tunity to take advantage of a very lucrative opportunity, giv-
ing you a much heavier billfold.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -Your charm, warmth and
congeniality comes naturally to you, making you a welcome
person to be around. Friends will seek your company.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B2.

SUNDAY, JUNE 26
Fantasy 5:4 - 6 - 17 - 19 - 32
5-of-5 2 winners $85,393.37
4-of-5 248 $111
3-of-5 7,553 $10
SATURDAY, JUNE 25
Powerball: 18 - 36 - 39 - 41 - 57
Powerball: 12
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 2 -27 -36 -43 -44 - 52
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 31 $5,220
4-of-6 1,933 $71.50
3-of-6 41,671 $5
Fantasy 5: 23 - 24 - 26 - 32 - 33
5-of-5 1 winner $258,450.10
4-of-5 325 $128
3-of-5 10,013 $11.50
FRIDAY, JUNE 24
Mega Money: 21 - 27 - 32 - 38
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 No winner
3-of-4 MB 35 $679.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY =

Today is Tuesday, June
28, the 179th day of 2010.
There are 186 days left in
the year.
Today's Highlights:
On June 28, 1914, Arch-
duke Franz Ferdinand of
Austria and his wife, Sophie,
were assassinated in Sara-
jevo by Serb nationalist
Gavrilo Princip - the event
which sparked World War I.
On this date:
In 1919, the Treaty of Ver-
sailles was signed in France,
ending the First World War.
In 1939, Pan American Air-
ways began regular trans-At-
lantic air service with a flight
that departed New York for
Marseilles, France.
In 1951, a TV version of
the radio comedy program
"Amos 'N'Andy" premiered
on CBS. (While criticized for
racial stereotyping, it was the
first network TV series to fea-
ture an all-black cast.)
In 2000, seven months
after he was cast adrift in the
Florida Straits, Elian Gonza-
lez was returned to his native
Cuba.
Ten years ago: A unani-
mous federal appeals court
reversed the court-ordered
breakup of Microsoft, but
ruled the software giant had
violated antitrust laws,
and appointed another
judge to determine a new
punishment.
Five years ago: Star
Jones Reynolds was booted
from "The View," one day
after surprising ABC and
Barbara Walters by saying
on the air that she wouldn't
be returning to the daytime
talk show in the fall.
One year ago: The
Supreme Court ruled, 5-4,
that Americans have the right
to own a gun for self-defense
anywhere they live.
Today's Birthdays: Blues
singer-musician David "Hon-
eyboy" Edwards is 96. Co-
median-movie director Mel
Brooks is 85. Comedian-im-
pressionist John Byner is 74.
CIA Director Leon Panetta is
73. Actor Bruce Davison is
65. Actress Kathy Bates is
63. Actress Alice Krige is 57.
Actress Mary Stuart Master-
son is 45. Actor John Cusack
is 45. Actor Gil Bellows is 44.
Actress-singer Danielle
Brisebois is 42. Actress
Tichina Arnold is 42. Actress
Camille Guaty is 35. Rock
musician Tim Nordwind (OK
Go) is 35. Rock musician


Mark Stoermer (The Killers)
is 34. Country singer Kellie
Pickler is 25.
Thought for Today: "The
glory of each generation is to
make its own precedents." -
Belva Ann Bennett Lock-
wood, American social re-
former (1830-1917).


Associated Press
Calif. State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, holds up three video games Monday after a news conference in San Fran-
cisco. The Supreme Court ruled Monday it is unconstitutional to bar children from buying or renting violent video games,
saying government doesn't have the authority to "restrict the ideas to which children may be exposed" despite com-
plaints that the popular and fast-changing technology allows the young to simulate acts of brutality. Yee, who wrote the
video game ban, told The Associated Press on Monday he was reading the dissents in hope of finding a way to reintro-
duce the law in a way it would be constitutional.


Supreme Court overturns

Associated Press \






CITRUS COUNTY's RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY


NL6
"a I '..
r01 ,


HITTING THE LINKS


OUTDOORS


iET IN THE iAME







Drivers give fans early fireworks 4
57


JOHN CHANCE
For the Chronicle

Mother Nature blessed us with
some much needed rainfall in the
Central Florida area for much of the
day Saturday. Early afternoon rain
showers had many of the state's race
tracks huddled around radar images
trying to find a way to get their rac-
ing programs in. Desoto Speedway,
New Smyrna Speedway, and Volusia
Speedway park all fell victims to the
rain and were forced to cancel their
shows. But once again, the friend-
liest track in the south found a way
to get it done.
Practice started right on time, but
a 5 p.m. rain shower sent the track
crew scrambling to dry the track for
the 6 p.m. start After pumping water
from the infield, and with the help of
the racers to get the track dry, racing
started only eight minutes late. Be-
cause of the chance of rain, several
drivers and fans chose to play it safe
and stay indoors. This resulted in a
few short classes and a less than ca-
pacity crowd.
It was a good thing the speedway
was damp, because the fireworks be-
tween the drivers on Saturday night
would have started a forest fire.
Eleven Sportsman cars took the
green for their 25 lap feature event.
Tom Posavec (01) brought the field to
the green with Cody Johnson (90)
along side. It wouldn't take long for
the fireworks to fly, a lap 2 incident
between Richie Smith (4) and
Patrick Mennenga (16) would pro-
vide one of the night's most talked
about moments.
Smith and Mennenga raced hard
for the first two laps and made con-
tact several times; finally it ended
with both cars in a tangled mess in
the turn 3 wall. Both drivers were
very unhappy with each other,
which resulted in Mennenga diving
across the roof of Smith's car, and
tackling Smith while he was exiting
his racer. Both drivers exchanged
punches for a brief moment before
being separated by track officials.
Both cars were done for the night,
and Mennenga was ordered to leave
the track immediately, suspended,
and fined for initiating the physical
confrontation.
Once back to racing, Lance
Dubach (77) made short work of
Posavec for the lead and pulled out
to a substantial lead from his third
starting position. Fifth starter Cody
Stickler (99) made his way through
the field and set his sights on the
leader Daubach. Stickler could not
make any ground on the leader, until
a lap 21 caution for debris would
bring him right to the leader's
bumper
Daubach would jump back out to a
small lead and looked to be headed
to his first feature win of the year.
But a bonsai move on the inside of
Daubach, by Stickler in turn three,
sent both cars spinning coming to
take the white flag. Stickler would
take blame for the incident, but
Daubach's racer suffered steering
damage in the incident, which sent
him to the pits on the hook
The 199 of Brett Jenkins suddenly
found himself the leader with two
laps to go on the restart Jenkins
would take off on the restart and go
on to take his first feature win of the
season. Following him to the stripe
were points leader Ernie Reed (55)
in second and last week's winner
Brandon Morris (56) in third. Richie
Smith and Cody Stickler were your
heat race winners.
Point leader Bobby Ervien took
advantage of the three-row inversion
to start on the pole for the 17 car
Open Wheel Modified 40 lap feature.
Ervien had the car to beat, and con-
sistently pulled away from the field
on four separate restarts.
Behind him, though, fireworks
were flying again. Sixth starter
Richie Smith (42) waged a heated
battle with Herb Neumann Jr (01)
for the second position. Smith tried
both the high and low groove, only to
have the door slammed in his face
each time.
Finally Smith found the traction
and room he needed to make the
move on the five- time Super Late
Model champion Neumann, driving
around the outside for second. After
Neumann fell back to third, he was
under heavy pressure from Timmy
Moore (57).


Photos by ROBERT JENKINS/Special to the Chronicle
Richie Smith (4) and Patrick Mennenga (16) crash in the turn 3 wall as T.J. Chambers (57) avoids the
accident. Tom Posavec (01), Cody Johnson (90), Lance Daubauch (77), and eventual winner Brett Jenk-
ins (199) battle for the lead early in the Sportsman feature.


Moore is a regular at Desoto
Speedway, but with his home track
raining out early in the day, he and
his crew thrashed to switch the set
up on his racer to come to Citrus. All
the work would pay off, as Moore
would find his way past Neumann
for third. Ervien took the wire-to-
wire victory, followed by the hard
charging Smith in second and Moore
in third. Smith and Neumann were
heat race winners.
Eight Street Stocks made quick
work of their 20 lap feature running
all 20 laps caution free. Kyle Peters
(53) launched from his outside front
row starting position to take his third
feature win of the year Behind Pe-
ters, Curtis Flanagan (3) and Kenny
May (10) had a hard fought battle for
second, with Flanagan coming out
on top and extending his point lead.
Tim Wilson (85) took the heat win.
Nine Taylor Made Homes Pure
Stocks came to the green with
Happy Florian (65) pacing the field.
Florian's lead would be short-lived
as point leader David Walls (35)
would take his new ride to the top
spot Tyler Stickler (9) would battle
for second with Michael Martin (76)
briefly, before setting his sights on
the leader
Walls would prove to tough to beat
in his new ride, taking his second
feature win of the year, and extend-
ing his large points lead. Stickler
would come in second with Martin,
who also took the heat race victory,
in third.
Eleven Sheldon Palmes Insurance
Mini Stocks challenged each other
for their 20 lap feature. Lap 1 saw
caution for a hard wreck on the
backstretch as Kenneth Watkins (35)
and Shannon Kennedy (46) both
ended up in the wall. Kennedy was
done for the night, and Watkins con-
tinued with heavy front-end damage.
Chris Snow (29) jumped out to the
early lead from his pole position,


.k..
-


and looked to be poised for a feature
win. Behind him, Sonya Heater (71),
Jeremy Sharrone (32) and Jeff
Eberly (01) were mixing it up for the
second position. Snow's night
started to head south when he de-
veloped an engine miss, which al-
lowed the trio behind to close in.
The top four cars would wage an
exciting battle with Eberly making a
three-wide inside move for the lead
with only two laps remaining. Eberly
would go on to take his sixth feature
win of the year, with Sharrone com-
ing home second and Snow holding
on for third with his sick power
plant Sharrone and Kevin Stone (98)
would take the heat wins.
Eleven Pro Figure 8's tested their
skills at dodging cars in the intersec-
tion for their 20 lap feature. Robbie
Powell (25) would jump out to the
early lead with point contender Joey
Catarelli (6) giving chase in second.
The race saw several cautions
which slowed the action, as well as a
few black flags for rough driving.
Powell and Catarelli battled for the
top position all the way to the end.
On the final lap, just yards from the
finish line, the two leaders would


make contact and spin. By rule, both
drivers were scored at the end of the
lead lap for being involved in a last
lap incident.
This would benefit the 27 of Neil
Herne, who was running a very
strong third position. Herne had just
purchased the car early in the week,
and spent all week thrashing to get it
race ready All the hard work would
pay off with his first feature win of
the year Wayne Calkins (14) would
come home second and Charlie
Meyer Sr (94) would come home
third after the dust had settled.
Citrus County Speedway will be
closed this Saturday night in obser-
vance of the July 4th holiday week-
end. But racing will crank back up
on July 9th with the Open Wheel
Modifieds, Sportsman, Taylor Made
Homes Pure Stocks, Sheldon Palmes
Insurance Mini Stocks, Pro figure
8's, and the Outlaw Modified Mini's.
This will be almost the same pro-
gram the speedway ran this past
weekend, so several of the battles
will pick right back up where they
left off. Everyone have a safe and
happy 4th, see you at the races!


Citrus County
Speedway results
June 25
Open Wheeled Modifieds Feature
Name Home Town
Bobby Ervien St. Pete
Richie Smith Hernando
Tim Moore St. Pete
Herb Neumann Jr. Inverness
Jeremy Gerstner Wesley Chapel
Tony Carreno Lutz
Tommy Schnader Largo
JoshTodd Polk City
(Johnny) L. J. Grimm Seffner
Doug Miller Largo
Mike Birk Pinellas Park
Dalton Nelson Pinellas Park
Michael Stalnaker Ocala
Ricky Coffin Lutz
Billy Bechtelheimer Dover
Robbie Cooper Bronson
Sportsman Feature
Name Home Town
Brett Jenkins Lakeland
Ernie Reed Crystal River
Brandon Morris Mulberry
Tom Posavec Dunnellon
Cody Johnson Ocala
Cody Stickler Pinellas Park
Lance Daubach Plant City
T.J. Chambers Brooksville
Marvin Davis Alachua
Richie Smith Hernando
Patrick Mennenga Ocala
Street Stocks Feature
Name Home Town
Kyle Peters Ferndale
Curtis Flanagan Inverness
Kenny May Spring Hill
Tim Wilson Floral City
Austin Hughes Hernando
Tom Bubba Martone Floral City
Bill Ryan Bushnell
DoraThorne Floral City
Jay Witfoth Beverly Hills
Pure Stocks Feature
Name Home Town
David Walls Summerfield
Tyler Stickler Pinellas Park
Michael Martin Citrus Springs
Carl Peters Winter Garden
Tom McKay Loxahatchee
Happy Florian Lecanto
Chris Ickes Brooksville
Glen Colyer Homosassa


Jeffery Byer
Mini Stocks


Jacksonville
Feature


# Name Home Town
01 Jeff Eberly Spring Hill
32 Jeremy Sharrone Floral City
29 Chris Snow Inverness
71 Sonya Heater Homosassa
43 Shawn Jenkins Lakeland
98 Kevin Stone Dade City
50 Jessey Mallory Summerfield
35 Kenneth Watkins Summerfield
77 Kevin Knox Wesley Chapel
13 Rick Heath Inverness
46 Shannon Kennedy Summerfield
11 Travis Daniels Ocala
22 Bobby Richardson Lecanto
PRO Figure Eights Feature
# Name Home Town
27 Neil Herne Homosassa
14 Wayne Calkins St. Pete
94 Charlie Meyer Pinellas Park
49 Jared Meyer Largo
86 Justin Meyer Largo
6 Joey Catarelli Pinellas Park
25 Robbie Powell St. Pete
85 Thomas Peet Floral City
3 Cliff Rousseau St. Pete
83 Charles Herne Homosassa
01 Mason Love Pinellas Park
Southeast Champ Kart Series Feature
# Name Home Town
31 Rusty Chancy Palm Bay
8 Doug Schmidt St. Pete
13 Romay Venta Tampa
33 Mitchell Stevens
98 Scott Halley Orlando
66 David Harp Clearwater
75 Jimmy Pope Brandon
77 Phil Harp Largo
2x Duane Coze
38 Trevor Wilson
43 Harold Roberts Tampa


EaECKt TEHE WrrINNER

EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST

Kurt Busch races way to first win of the season and first road race victory ever

Out of 94 entries submitted this past week, three picked Kurt Busch as the winner of the Toyota/Save Mart 350 in Sonoma, Cal., on Sunday. The contestant that was dosest to
Busch's actual speed of 75.411 mph was Nick Slonaker, who guessed the speed at 75.590 mph. Slonaker, who wins $25 as the contest winner this week, thanked his wife Beverly.
r-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM

for the Coke Zero 400 on Saturday, July 2 in Daytona Beach, Fla.


DRIVER'S NAME


YOUR NAME


PHONE NUMBER


TIEBREAKER: (Guess the average speed of the race to three decimal places:)

Mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. on July 1.
h----------------- -------------------- ------------------------


d







Section C TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011



H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Up past their bedtime?


Nighttime or

violent TV

tied to tots'

sleep woes
LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO - If your pre-
schooler can't sleep, turn
off the violence and night-
time TV
That's the message in a
new study that found sleep
problems are more com-
mon in 3- to 5-year-olds
who watch television after
7p.m.
Watching shows with vio-
lence - including kids'
cartoons - also was tied to
sleeping difficulties.
Watching nonviolent
shows during the day didn't
seem to have any connec-
tion with sleep problems in
the 617 youngsters studied.
The study builds on pre-
vious research linking
media use with kids' sleep
problems, and bolsters ar-
guments for limiting chil-
dren's screen time.
The American Academy
of Pediatrics recommends
no screen time for children
up to age 2, and no more
than 2 hours daily for older
children. It also urges pedi-
atricians to ask parents at
every checkup how much
their children watch televi-
sion, including whether
kids have TVs in their bed-
rooms, which the academy
discourages.
Previous studies have
found at least one in four
U.S. preschoolers have TVs
in their bedrooms, and
many families mistakenly
believe watching TV will
help their kids sleep, said
Dr Michelle Garrison, lead
author and a scientist at
Seattle Children's Hospital
Research Institute.
The government-funded
study was released online
Monday by the journal Pe-
diatrics.
Overall, about 112 kids
studied - nearly one in
five - had one or more fre-
quent sleep problems most


The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no
screen time for children up to age 2, and no more than 2
hours daily for older children. Also, take the TV out of chil-
dren's bedrooms.


days of the week. These in-
cluded difficulty falling
asleep, awakening repeat-
edly at night, nightmares or
daytime sleepiness.
Kids who watched the
most nighttime or violent
TV had the most sleep trou-
ble. TV was the main
source of screen time
rather than computers or
video games.
The study relied on par-
ents' reports of kids' sleep
difficulties and TV habits,
and wasn't rigorous enough
to tell whether TV caused


sleep problems.
It could be poor sleepers
might be more likely to
watch TV; or family factors
such as lax parenting could
have been involved.
Experts said the theory
that screen time causes
sleep problems makes
sense.
Dr Dennis Rosen, a sleep
medicine specialist at Chil-
dren's Hospital Boston,
said the research high-
lights a common problem.
"It certainly fits with
what I see" at his sleep dis-


Handle ears with care
Everyone has good intentions their way down the ear canal to the
to keep their ears clean, but eardrum and perforate and damage
certain practices could cause the eardrum as well as the little ear
risk of injury and affect your long- bones in the middle ear So, here are


term ability to hear


The ear is a very com-
plicated, delicate struc-
ture. The external ear is a
cartilage structure that is
covered with skin, and
the skin extends all the
way into the canal for sev-
eral centimeters until it
reaches the eardrum,
which is nearly round
and about 1 centimeter in
diameter and about 1 mil-
limeter in thickness.


Dr. Deni
EAR, I
& THI


The canal has a little
bit of an S-shape to it, a protection
mechanism so it is not easy to bump
the eardrum. But devices such as
toothpicks, paperclips, keys and cot-
ton-tipped applicators can make


some simple things that
can be done to remove
wax and protect your ears
from damage.
First of all, we have to
understand earwax is not
a bad thing. It is a natural
,,_ product of the body,
A Iwhich acts as a protec-
tion. Foreign objects that
s Grillo fly in the ear, such as
s rillo small insects, would at-
NOSE tach to the wax much like
ROAT fly paper It is self-clean-
ing and does not neces-
sarily need to be
regularly removed unless it is caus-
ing some sort of problem. Some peo-
ple inherently make a lot of wax and
See . Page C4


ON THE NET
U American Academy
of Pediatrics:
http://www.aap.org

orders clinic, Rosen said.
Young children go to
sleep best with nighttime
rituals that help calm them,
including bedtime stories
and cuddling with parents,
said Dr Marc Weissbluth, a
sleep disorders specialist
at Chicago's Children's Me-
morial Hospital and author
of several books on healthy
sleep habits.
TV can have the opposite
effect, stimulating children,
and if it's replacing that
down time with parents, it
can be unhealthy, Weiss-
bluth said.
While some preschoolers
still nap during the day,
sleepiness late in the day
or early evening at this age
is a sign children need to go
to bed earlier at night, he
said.
Lack of sleep "is as dan-
gerous as iron deficiency"
and can cause behavioral


difficulties, memory prob-
lems and academic strug-
gles, he said.
Some findings for the
children studied:
* Daily screen time aver-
aged about 73 minutes,
with 14 minutes after 7 p.m.
* Children with bedroom
TVs watched about 40 min-
utes more TV daily
* About 60 kids averaged
an hour or more daily of vi-
olent TV; 37 percent had
frequent sleep problems vs.
19 percent who saw little or
no violence.
* Almost 100 kids aver-
aged more than half an
hour of nighttime TV; 28
percent had frequent sleep
problems vs. 19 percent
who watched little or no
nighttime TV
Banning all screen time
for children may be unrea-
sonable, but the study sug-
gests eliminating nighttime
or violent TV might have an
impact, Garrison said.
AP Medical Writer Lind-
sey Tanner can be reached
at www.twitter.com/
LindseyTanner


Tori and circumvallate papilla

t the request of 2 patients Both of these tori are found more
this week, I wanted to dis- commonly as we age and are often
cuss two things found in the discovered accidentally It is be-
mouth that are often cause of this accidental
confused with oral can- discovery that they often
cer by a patient alarm a patient Most pa-
The first item is called tients are adamant they
a tori. A tori is found have never had it and it
most commonly on the is brand new.
inside of the lower jaw There is no need for
just below the teeth or in their removal unless
the center of the roof of they are in the way of a
the mouth. dentist fabricating a
In the case of the denture for the patient.
lower jaw, it is called a Dr. Frank Depending on how large
mandibular tori because Vascimini the tori is, it will either
the lower jaw is called SOUND BITES need to be removed or
the mandible. In the worked around.
case of the upper, jaw or roof of the The other item is
mouth, it is called a maxillary tori called the circumvallate papilla.
because the bone the upper teeth These can be found on the very
are joined to is called the maxilla. back of the tongue on its upper or
A tori is a variation of normal top surface.
and is simply an outgrowth of bone. See Page C4


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Healthy


summer


grilling

Grilling is as much a
part of summer as
fireworks on the
Fourth of July
According to estimates,
four out of five American
households will fire up
backyard grills this sum-
mer So let's take a look at
the art of grilling from a
standpoint of health.
The way you grill can
have an influence on your
risk of cancer, so let's
learn to grill correctly
This year, that advice is
even more important
based upon new evidence
in a just-published report
on the prevention of col-
orectal cancer
As part of an update, the
World Cancer Research


Page C4


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Prevent

breast

cancer
Breast cancer is the
most common can-
cer in women in the
United States. Approxi-
mately 207,000 women are
diagnosed with breast
cancer each year, and it is
estimated one in 11
women will develop
breast cancer in their life-
time. Of course, nobody
wants cancer, and so lots
of research is being done
to prevent breast cancer
Recently there was a
major meeting in Chicago
of more than 25,000 can-
cer specialists from al-
most 125 countries. In this
meeting, experts reported
lots of research from
around the world. In the
next few weeks, I will
share some important
See Page C4


WeeenMagic Tckelso

Visit us for details and
l 1i more prizes

C with

purchase. ?

I ,,r..56 Cn-,n, I

I Offer Expires 7/31/2011 I
I lav li not be Icombined i a th lan' olher 'tier. I
... ---------------. .......


Special to the Chronicle
If your preschooler can't sleep, turn off the violence and nighttime TV. That's the message in a new study that found
sleep problems are more common in 3- to 5-year-olds who watch television after 7 p.m.





C2 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule: To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive, call (352)
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to donate.
A photo ID is also required. Visit
www.lifesouth.org for details.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
(7 p.m. Wednesdays, 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
day, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, 8
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday,
closed Sundays.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
June 28, Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
6 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 29, Walmart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
* Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday,
June 30, Sumter Electric Coop-
erative, U.S. 301 and Sumter
C.R. 471, Sumterville, drawing
for a free $25 gift card.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,
July 1, Village Cadillac-Toyota,
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* 3 to 11 p.m. Saturday,
July 2, Stone Crab Jam, North
Citrus Avenue, Crystal River.
* 7:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 3, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
* 1:30 to 5 p.m. Sunday,
July 3, Bealls, 346 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
July 4, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday,
July 5, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
0 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, July
5, Cypress Cove Care Center,
700 S.E. Eighth Ave., Crystal
River.
* SPRING HILL - Oak Hill
Hospital Partner's Club
events:
* Friday, July 1, there will be
a musical concert by Louie For-
tunato at 11 a.m. as a celebra-
tion to kick off the July 4 holiday
weekend.
0 Thursday, July 7, at 2:30


p.m., the Alzheimer's support
group will meet for Alzheimer's
patients' caregivers.
* Friday, July 22, ice cream
social at noon, guest speaker
from Silver Sneakers Inc.
* Daily games: Kings in the


HEALTH & LIFE


Health NOTES
Corner, Scrabble, dominoes, music with Beverly; a variety of
Pinochle, Mahjong. movies.
* Other activities: painting, Partner's Club events and
yoga, line dance, rug hooking, activities are open to members
physical exercise, Walk n' Talk, only. Membership in Oak Hill


Hospital's Partner's Club is
open to Hernando, Pasco and
Citrus county residents for $20
a year, which includes member-
ship in the HCA national H2U
program.
0 HOMOSASSA-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

"Spouse Loss ... From This
Day Forward" is one program
of a new educational series of-
fered at 2 p.m. the fourth Tues-
day monthly at the Wings
Community Education Center,
See Page C3


The CenturyLink




PRICE-LOCK




GUARANTEE

5 YEARS. 1 PRICE. 0 CONTRACT




With High-Speed Internet + Unlimited Calling from
CenturyLink, your price will stay locked-in for 5 years -
at just $59.95 a month. No contracts. No gimmicks.
The price you sign up for really is the price you pay.
That's the CenturyLink Price-Lock Guarantee.





855.TRY.FIVE __


to take advantage of this great offer!
centurylink.com/pricelock
Stop by your CenturyLink Store
3101 SW 34 Ave., Ocala
684 US Hwy. 441 North, Lady Lake

Para ofr ofertas en espafiol marque al 855.879.3483.


TM
7 A CenturyLinkTM
Stronger ConnectedTM


*Offerend 09/2011. Nw residential High-Speed nternet customer only. Services and offer not illa everywhere.Price-LockGuarantee Offerappliesonlytothemonthlyrecurringchrgeforth.elisteed services; excludes elltemsfees, surchresend monthlyrecuningfeeformoden/Frouterend
professional installation.Listed bundlemonthlyreurring charge of $59.5 requiressubscription toaCenturyLinkUnlimited Calling plan and applies to CenturyLinkmHigh-Speed Iernetwithspeedsupto3Mbps. Oferrequiresnstomertoremain in goodstanding ndteminatesifcustomerchangestheir
accountinanymannerincluding any change to the required CanturyLink rvices(cancelled. upgraded,downgradedtelephonenumberchange,orchangeofphysical locationofanyinstalledservice(including customermovingfromresidenceofinstalled services).General-CnturyLinkmaychangecancel,or
substitute offers and services-including Locked-ln Offer -or varythem byservice area,at its solediscretionwithout notice Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply Txas,Feen,andSurcharges-Applicabletaxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge. National Access Fe
or Carrier Cost Recovery surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges Cost recovery fees are nttaxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates Call for a listing of applicable taxes.
fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate-Monthly rateapplies while customer subscribesto all qualifying services. If one(1)ormoreservicesare cancelled,thestandard monhlyfeewill applytoeach remaining service.High-Speed Internet(HSI)-Shippingndhandlingfeeswillapplytocustomers modemorrouter.Performancewillverydueto
conditions outside of network control and no speed isguaranteed Directconnectionand/orconsistencyclas)is based on providing High-Speed Internetcustomerswith a dedicated,virtual-circut connectionbetweentheir homes andtheCenturyLinkcentraofice.UnlimitedCalling-Mnthlyrecurringchargesapplytoone(1)residentialphone
line with direct-dial, nationwide local and long distance voice calling, including Alaska, PuertoRico, Guam, and U S Virgin Islands, excludes commercial use, call center, data and facsimile services (including dial-up Internet connections, data services, and facsimile, each billed at $0 1/minute), conference lines, directory and operator assistance.
chat lines, pay-per-call, calling card use, or multi-housing units International calling billed separately. �2011 CenturyLink, Inc All Rights Reserved The name CenturyLinkand the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink. Inc


Munroe Regional has been rated in the top 10%
in the nation and # 1 in our market for patient
safety in overall surgical care in 2011 by The
Delta Group, the nation's largest privately held
healthcare information services company.



Sign up for our monthly community
e-Newsletter. Click on the e-Newsletter
link at the bottom of our homepage,
www.MunroeRegional.com


It's probably nothing to worry about. You probably just over did it again. But that twinge of pain that you feel in your side


While the occasional side stitch is a common annoyance for active people, there are a number of more serious conditions
whose initial symptoms are very similar. Fortunately, Munroe Regional is one of the best community hospitals in the country.
Diagnosis to treatment to wellness, we approach every patient as an individual-with experienced care and individualized
attention. We are also one of the most experienced general surgery centers in North Central Florida with over 12,500 inpatient
and outpatient procedures in 2010. Just last year, Munroe Regional added three additional state-of-the-art operating
theaters-which expanded our surgical services program to 15 operating theaters.

Our comprehensive surgical services program includes: Cardiac Surgery, Pulmonary/Lung Surgery, Orthopedics, Podiatry,
Laparoscopic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Vascular/Endovascular, Maxillofacial Surgery, Trauma Surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery,
Robotics (Urology & Gynecology), Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bariatrics, Urological, Gynecology, Colorectal, Oncology,
Endoscopy, Oral Surgery and all General Surgery.

Maybe that's why Munroe Regional has been rated in the top 10% in the nation and #1 in our market for patient safety in overall
surgical care in 2011 by The Delta Group, the nation's largest privately held healthcare information services company.


Bottom line: When it's your health, you don't take chances. There is a real quality
difference in the care at Munroe Regional, and it matters. Insist on Munroe Regional.




To learn more about the surgical services we provide or to find a
physician close to home, call Munroe Regional's Health Resource
Line at 352-867-8181 or 800-575-3975.


10 Y/u01


Munroe
Regional
Medical Center


W treatfamilies like, well, family.

www.MunroeRegional.com

OCALA, FL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Osteoporosis drug can interact with foods, beverages


Q What can you
* tell me about
* taking Fos-
amax for osteoporosis? -
A: Fosamax (generic
name alendronate) is a f
type of drug known as a
"bisphosphonate."
Other bisphosphonates
include Actonel (rise-
dronate), Boniva (iban- Richard F
dronate) and Reclast ASK
(zoledronic acid). Bis- PHARI
phosphonates are used
to treat osteoporosis be-
cause they work to prevent the
breakdown of bone (bone resorp-
tion) by the osteoclast bone cells.
This helps to bring the mainte-
nance of bone by the body back
into balance.
Bisphosphonates such as Fos-


amax are useful drugs
for osteoporosis, but
their activity can be af-
fected by other drugs
and foods or drinks.
For example, Zantac
(ranitidine), which is
used for heartburn,
. may increase the activ-
ity of Fosamax, while
Hoffmann calcium supplements
t THE or antacids can inter-
MIACIST fere with the absorp-
tion of Fosamax when
taken together.
The use of Fosamax can also in-
crease the risk of gastrointestinal
problems when taken with as-
pirin. In addition food, coffee or
orange juice can significantly re-
duce the absorption and clinical
effects of Fosamax.


In view of these interactions,
Fosamax tablets should be taken
with a full glass of plain water first
thing in the morning and at least
30 minutes before any other bev-
erage or food. Patients taking Fos-
amax should also avoid lying
down for at least 30 minutes after
taking this medication to reduce
the chance of irritation to the
swallowing tube (esophagus).
If supplemental calcium and vi-
tamin D are being utilized with
Fosamax, they should not be taken
within 30 minutes of Fosamax so
they don't interfere with its ab-
sorption from the stomach.
A recent Johns Hopkins Health
Alert (wwwjohnshopkinshealth
alerts.com, 2011) also offers the
following strategies successful at
increasing adherence to bisphos-


phonate medications:
* Minimize the risk of side ef-
fects. To reduce the risk of gas-
trointestinal side effects with an
oral bisphosphonate, be sure you
take the bisphosphonate in the
morning on an empty stomach
with a 12-ounce glass of water
while standing or sitting in an up-
right position. For 30 minutes af-
terward, do not lie down or eat or
drink anything other than water
* Reduce the dosing frequency
Dosing regimens that are less fre-
quent can help with the inconven-
ience of once-a-day oral
bisphosphonates. Once-weekly
regimens of Fosamax or Actonel
appear to be just as effective and
may minimize the risk of gastroin-
testinal side effects. Actonel and
Boniva are available in a tablet


that can be taken once a month.
* Switch to another formula-
tion. If you still cannot tolerate
oral forms of bisphosphonates be-
cause of the side effects, two in-
travenous (IV) forms are available:
I.V Boniva, which is given every
three months, and I.V Reclast,
which is given once a year or once
every two years.
* Lower your costs. If cost is a
factor, there is an inexpensive,
generic form of Fosamax known
as alendronate. It is available in
the weekly dose.
--In--
Richard P Hoffmann, PharmD,
has been a pharmacist for more
than 40 years. Send questions to
him at 2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Ho-
mosassa. "Spouse Loss ... From
This Day Forward" will be at 2
p.m. Tuesday, June 28.
Coping with the loss of a
spouse is often one of the diffi-
cult challenges in life, whether
the spouse dies in middle age,
old age or somewhere in be-
tween. The surviving spouse,
now a widow or widower, faces
many challenges in coming to
terms with a life without their
friend and partner.
* July 26: "An Overview of
Grief and Loss."
* Aug. 23: "Pet Loss ... Say-
ing Goodbye."
The new Wings Education
Center, a program of Hospice
of Citrus County/Hospice of the
Nature Coast provides a variety
of educational programs and
grief support to anyone in the
community at no cost. Reserva-
tions are suggested. Call (352)
527-2020 for more information
or visit www.hospiceofcitrus
county.org.
* Join the free LifeSharers
program to donate your organs.
Visit the website to join online
at www.lifesharers.org.
From 5 to 8 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly, Applebee's at
1901 Main St. in Inverness has
"Dining to Donate" - 10 per-
cent of the guests' bill will be
sent to the corporate office of
LifeSharers. A flier must be pre-
sented: email Anna DiPleco at
floridiananna@aol.com (with
the subject Re: LifeSharers) for
a copy of the flier for presenta-
tion. Call DiPleco at (352)
726-8489.
* The George A. Dame
Community Health Center
Board Meetings are at 3 p.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
the Citrus County Health De-
partment, 3700 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, in the first floor
conference room.
* HOMOSASSA- Hospice
of Citrus County will provide
Orientation Training for those
interested in learning more
about Hospice and Hospice
volunteer opportunities. The
class will be from 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 7, at Ho-
mosassa Public Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave,
Homosassa.
The class provides an
overview of Hospice philosophy
and history. Participants will be-
come acquainted with services
provided by Hospice of Citrus
County for patients and their
families. They will also become
familiar with the concept of pal-
liative care and learn the impor-
tance of confidentiality.
Volunteers are needed at the
Hospice of Citrus County Ho-
mosassa Thrift Shoppe. Teens


and high school students are
encouraged to attend. Volun-
teering for Hospice of Citrus
County will provide community
service hours for the Bright Fu-
tures Scholarship and other ac-
ademic needs.
To register for this class or to
request training for your group,
call Dianna Boggs, Hospice of
Citrus County Volunteer Serv-
ices Manager, at (352) 621-
1500, ext. 1706, or email
DBoggs@hospiceofcitrus
county.org.
* Free cholesterol and dia-
betes screenings from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. July 8 at Winn-Dixie
Pharmacy, 333 Highland Ave.
Space 600, Inverness. Call
Cholestcheck at (800) 713-
3301, no appointments.
* In Autism seminar - car-
ing for children with autism
spectrum disorder - 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, July 16, at the
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Seating is limited, call
(352) 447-1775 (ask for Bar-
bara) or email IsaiahFoundation
@ymail.com with questions or
to register. Presented by Isaiah
Foundation Inc., Sponsored by
United Way of Citrus County.

Support GROUPS

* Caregivers' Support and
Information meeting, 1 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
St. Timothy Lutheran Church,
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River. Call Charlotte Downing
at (352) 422-7044 for direc-
tions/information. Refreshments
served.
* SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/ Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilita-
tor, at (352) 688-7744.
* PINELLAS PARK-
"Connections" fireside-discus-
sion-style support group for
cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly, WellSpring
Oncology, 6600 66th St. N.,
Pinellas Park, (727) 343-0600;
www.wellspringoncology.org.
* Families Against Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group, 11
a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at Sandy Oaks RV Resort,
6760 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, for families,
friends and anyone affected by
MS. Call (352) 422-5868.
* Ocala Peripheral Neu-
ropathy Support Group, 10
a.m. Saturday, July 2, at the
Marion County Sheriff's Brian
Litz Building, 9048 S.W. State
Road 200. Individuals afflicted
with this disease, their family
members and friends are en-
couraged to attend. Anyone in-
terested in learning about


peripheral neuropathy is invited
to attend. Call Jack Koehler at
(352) 861-1630.
* BROOKSVILLE - "Man
to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope's
Brooksville Center, 7154 Med-
ical Center Drive, behind
Johnny Carino's. Call Mary
Capo at (352) 596-1926.
* Grandparents and others
Raising Children, 10 a.m. to
noon the first Monday monthly
at the Citrus County Resource
Center. Call Amy Engelken at
(352) 527-5905.
* OCALA- The
Alzheimer's and Memory Dis-
orders support group of Ocala,
3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at the Medical Office
Building at West Marion Com-
munity Hospital, 4600 S.W.
46th Court, second-floor Com-
munity Room.
Call (352) 401-1453.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
support group: Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church, 550 U.S.
41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first
Tuesday monthly. Call Anne
Black at (352) 527-4600.
* BROOKSVILLE -
Women's breast cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the
first Tuesday monthly at Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill.
Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T.,
at (352) 592-8128.
* HUDSON - Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point
Alzheimer's support group
meetings 10 a.m. to noon the


Citrus County
Support Services


All proceeds from the Rays
Baseball Trips go to Citrus
County's Home Delivered Meal
Program for Seniors & the Senior
Foundation of Citrus County


Robert G. Corwin, M.D.
* Board Certified in Dermatology
* Private practice for 35 years
* Air Force Veteran


first Tuesday monthly in the
second-floor conference room.
Call Maria Curley at (727) 992-
1358 or Kathy Montero at the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion at (727) 848-8888. Re-
gional Medical Center Bayonet
Point is at 14000 Fivay Road in
Hudson. Visit
www.rmchealth.com or
www.heartoftampa.com.
Weekly meetings
* AI-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S.
Suncoast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at
(352) 503-3961.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Awareness Lunch
Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fri-
days, St. Margaret Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.


SPONSORED BY



Citrus cSI NIOR
County |FOUNDATION
A nonprofit organization dedicated to
generate funds to support the unmet needs
of Citrus County seniors


T a y * ys - . B - 6 l* p
All tickets $40 per person
(Checks payable to: Citrus County Senior Foundation)
Price Includes Admission
and Round-Trip Transportation via Chartered Bus
Pick up and drop off location for the bus will be:
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, FL 34461
All ticket sales are final
Note: Per the Tampa Bay Rays, game times are subject to change
For more information, please call 527-5975.
Tickets Available For:
Date Team Bus Departure
Wednesday, July 20th Rays vs.Yankees 3:30 pjn.
Future games (Tickets Not Yet Available)
Date Team Bus Departure
Friday, Sept.9th Rays vs. RedSox 3:30p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 28th Rays vs. Yankees 3:30 p.m.

FNM


_ M AA Welcomes Daphne Chester, PA-C


Mist I rUrI u /- Accepitinig
Insurance New
Accepted , 1Patients

NO REFERRAL NEEDED
"Where Experience Makes the Difference"
www.skincancersurgery.net


There's No Such


Thing as a
Healthy Tan! OCALA 873-

Near the Paddoc
3210 SW 33rd Rd.,,
SA6 Ocala, FL344


Mary F. Barber, M.D.
* Board Certified in Dermatology
*Skin Cancer Surgery
* Mohs Micrographic Surgery
*Air Force Veteran


Daphne Chester, PA-C
* Board Certified Physician
Assistant
* Specializing exclusively in
Dermatology since 2006.


Mary Jane Oates, ARNP
* Board Certified
Nurse Practitioner
* Specializing exclusively in
Dermatology since 2002.


Over 13,000 Mohs Surgery Cases performed


7788 VILLAGES 259-6553
:k Mall 1400 US Hwy. 441
Suite 101 Sharon Morse Bldg., Suite 537
,74 The Villages, FL 32159


* Beginners AI-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at (352)
621-0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
* AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at (352)
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
MA 12-step Christian support
group meets at 6 p.m. every
Wednesday at Living Waters
Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St.,
Beverly Hills. Call Meg at (352)
527-2443. Free and open to the
public.
* DUNNELLON - Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist Church
of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call the church at (352)
489-2730.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland


Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
C.R. 491 and S.R. 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: (352) 382-0851.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
* Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the Sen-
ior Center (V.A. building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Dolores at (352) 746-5019.
* Solution, 3 to 4 p.m. Tues-
days at Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Call (352) 726-9112.
* The Refuge, 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at St. Anne's
Church, 9870 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, in the Mary
Chapel. Call (352) 447-5080.
* The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call
Carolyn at (352) 341-0777.
* The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
(352) 341-0777.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years. Weekly
meeting. Call (352) 637-3196.


See GROUPS/Page C4


Whether you're
looking for a smile
makeover or a
cleaning our friendly
staff will make
you feel
comfortable
without the
sales tactics
- or the
lecture.


"l e C


... . " FREE
SECOND OPINION


after to Cowards!"

S Ledger Dentistry
SI ktFrn. A L t'f D g I D M D . P A

3644 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34448


(352) 628-3443
Ledgerdentistry.com I


RO-Y


. = . �


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 C3


Make an


!


'r. ,m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

FRind released a report May
23 that added recent re-
search findings to its grow-
ing database on the role of
diet, physical activity and
weight in colorectal cancer
risk. We have discussed the
link of obesity and inactivity
with regard to the risk of
cancer in many of my previ-
ous columns. The data to
support these findings con-
tinues to grow, as do the
waistlines of far too many
Americans.
But it is not just how
much you eat; it is also what
you eat. One finding of the
new report is diets high in
red meat and processed
meat clearly lead to an in-
creased risk of colorectal
cancer.
According to researchers,
two aspects of the tradi-
tional American cookout -
what you grill and how you
grill it - can have a role in
raising your risk for cancer.
Part of this is common
sense, but many of us might
not realize all of the risk.
For instance, large portions
of red meat and processed
meat are a well-known link
to an increase in the risk of
colorectal cancer. And,
while the evidence on the



GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

findings presented at this
meeting. One such finding is
for the prevention of breast
cancer.
The trial involved 4,560
postmenopausal women in
the U.S., Canada, Spain and
France who were consid-
ered to be at high risk for
breast cancer because they
had at least one of the fol-
lowing risk factors:
* 60 years of age or older
(49 percent of the enrolled
population)
* Gail five-year risk score
greater than 1.66 percent (40
percent met this threshold);
this is one way to estimate
the risk of developing breast
cancer for any woman.
* Prior atypical ductal,
lobular hyperplasia, lobular



VASCIMINI
Continued from Page C1

They present as relatively
large bumps in a v-shaped
arrangement.
There will be larger ones
in the middle of the tongue
that get smaller as they ap-
proach the sides of the



GROUPS
Continued from Page C3

* Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at (352) 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto.
Call Cathy Jackson at (352)
527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program, 6
p.m. Tuesday in the fellowship
hall, 88 Civic Circle. Free. Call
the church at (352) 746-3620 or
Meg at (352) 527-2443.


link between grilling itself
and cancer risk is less
strong, it only makes sense
to take some easy, cancer-
protective precautions.
Part of the problem is re-
lated to the technique of
cooking. Research has
shown when any kind of
meat, poultry or fish is
cooked at high tempera-
tures, especially when well-
done or charred,
cancer-causing compounds
called heterocyclic amines
(HCAs) and polycyclic aro-
matic hydrocarbons (PAHs)
are formed. These sub-
stances can theoretically
damage DNA in ways that
make cancer more likely
But there are ways to con-
tinue to enjoy the grill and
cook safely
First, add some color to
your cooking. Try grilling
some colorful vegetables
and fruits, and cut back on
the amount of red meat and
processed meat on your
cookout menu. Plant foods
contain a variety of natu-
rally occurring compounds
called phytochemicals,
many of which provide their
own anti-cancer protection.
Vegetables such as aspara-
gus, onions, mushrooms,
zucchini, eggplant and corn-
on-the cob are favorites, be-
cause grilling brings out
flavors that even the picki-
est eaters enjoy Even salad


carcinoma in-situ, or ductal
carcinoma in-situ (DCIS)
treated with mastectomy (11
percent); these are precan-
cerous conditions.
After a median follow-up
of three years, women in the
exemestane group showed a
65 percent reduction in in-
vasive breast cancer, com-
pared with those in the
placebo group (11 vs. 32
cases). There was also a 60
percent reduction in inva-
sive breast cancer plus pre-
invasive DCIS in the 66
cases found. In addition,
there were fewer cases of
cancer precursor lesions,
such as atypical ductal and
atypical lobular hyperpla-
sia, in the exemestane
group.
Symptoms such as hot
flashes, fatigue, sweating, in-
somnia and arthralgia were
reported by 88 percent of the
women in the exemestane


tongue. You will only be able
to see these if you stick your
tongue way out and look in a
mirror. Some people may
even need to grab their
tongue with a gauze pad and
pull it forward.
Simply stated, these
papilla are taste buds. They
are perfectly normal and
nothing to worry about.
It is important for you to


* HPH Hospice presents
free grief support programs,
2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
for anyone who has experi-
enced the sudden loss of a
loved one. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days. Child care available. Call
CASA at (352) 344-8111.
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call (352) 503-3262. The
National DBSAAssociation's
number is (800) 826-3632.
* Celebrate Recovery:
* 7 p.m. Wednesday and


can be grilled and the taste
completely changes, a great
addition to your meal. Cut
fruit before putting it on the
grill: apples, peaches and
pears can be halved and ba-
nanas split lengthwise.
Second, marinate the
meats you cook before cook-
ing them. And mix it up, grill
chicken, pork, fish and red
meat. Whatever meat you
choose, start by mixing up a
marinade with some of your
favorite herbs along with
vinegar or lemon juice. Mar-
inating meat has been
shown to reduce the forma-
tion of HCAs. Precisely why
marinades are protective is
still under investigation, but
there is some evidence
pointing to the acids (vine-
gar and citrus) or the an-
tioxidant content. Even just
30 minutes in the marinade
can help cut back on the for-
mation of HCSs.
Third, consider pre-cook-
ing the meat before grilling
it. You can do this in the mi-
crowave, oven or stove to
help reduce the amount of
time the meat sits on the
grill exposed to high heat.
To ensure safe food han-
dling, just be sure to put the
partially cooked meat on
the preheated grill immedi-
ately to complete the cook-
ing process.
Finally, if you can, cook
slowly and with a low tem-


group and 85 percent of
those in the placebo group.
More serious adverse
events, such as bone frac-
tures, osteoporosis, hyperc-
holesterolemia, adverse
cardiovascular events and
other non-breast cancers,
were reported by similar
numbers in each group.
Two other drugs, tamox-
ifen and Raloxifen, are ap-
proved for the same reason
but both are associated with
increased risk of cancer of
the uterus, clots in the leg
and occasionally in the lung
and, rarely, stroke. Obvi-
ously, the use of these drugs
for cancer prevention is very
low. Now exemestane has
come as a newer alternative
and it does not cause the
above-mentioned side ef-
fects. Also, it is generic and
very inexpensive and is
more effective than both
other drugs.


know that, though the above
items are normal, I would
encourage you to seek the
advice of your dentist if you
find something in your
mouth that is unusual to
you. Remember it is better
to be safe than sorry!
Thanks to the two pa-
tients who encouraged me
to write this column. It will
likely ease someone's worry


Friday at the Christian Recov-
ery Fellowship Church, 2242
W. State Road 44.
Call (352) 726-2800.
* 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Dinner available be-
fore the meeting from 6 to 7
p.m. for $4 donation and a cof-
fee house after.
Call (352) 746-6200.
* Gulf to Lake Church Min-
istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal River.
Dinner at 6 p.m. Friday, fol-
lowed by large- and small-
group time and a Coffee Cafe
at 9. Call 586-4709.
* Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless and
hurting of Citrus County. We
offer referrals to Celebrate Re-
covery, call (352) 563-1860.
* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.


perature and slowly Smok-
ers are great for this. To re-
duce the amount of HCAs
and PAHs that end up in
and on the meat, slow down
the cooking time with a low
flame,and keep burning and
charring to a minimum.
The charring can be very
bad for you, so make sure
you cut off any visible fat
prior to grilling, and this
will reduce flare-ups. You
can also cook the food in the
center of the grill and move
coals to the side to prevent
fat and juices from dripping
on them and leading to a
flare-up.
When the cooking is done,
cut off any charred portions
of the meat that will contain
the highest levels of harmful
contents.
Finally, have a great sum-
mer, and don't forget the sun
block!


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit of
the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board of Directors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society
Contact him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or email
cjbennett@rboi. com.


Andrea De Censi, M.D.,
from the Ente Ospedalerio
Ospedali Galliera in Genoa,
Italy, said, "There has been
an impressive decline in
heart disease in the last 25
years." He pointed out some
of this is related to the use
of drugs, such as stations and
antihypertensive agents, to
prevent cardiovascular
complications. We can do
the same in reducing can-
cer.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist. He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society
Send questions or
comments to 521 N
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or email to
sgandhi@tampabay.rrcom
or call (352) 746-0707.


about having oral cancer
until they can get to their
dentist to have it checked.


Dr Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist Send
your questions to 4805 S.
SuncoastBlvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446 or
email info@masterpiece
den talstudio. com.


Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at (352) 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults, at 7 p.m. Mon-
days at Rainbow Springs Vil-
lage Church, 20222 S.W.
102nd St. Road, Dunnellon.
Call Char at (352) 465-1644 or
Nancy at (352) 794-0017.
SPRING HILL-- Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill.
Call Charissa Haffner at
(352) 346-8864.
Organizations
* First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that run
on a monthly basis. All groups
are open to the public and free
of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in


See GROUPS/Page C5


GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

need regular cleaning, but
most of the time, it is a self-
clearing process by evapo-
ration.
Because the body temper-
ature is warm, the wax is
usually fairly moist or fluid
and can be removed with a
warm moist wash cloth to
clean the outside of your
ears. Also, you can use a few
drops of mineral oil, vitamin
E oil, baby oil, sweet oil or
olive oil.
Moisten the ear wax and
let it naturally work its way
out of the ear and evaporate.
There are commercial prod-
ucts available to moisten
and remove earwax. How-
ever, sometimes they can be
quite caustic and irritating
and can lead to ear pain and
ear infection. If you have a
chronic or recurrent prob-
lem with wax impaction,
you may need to see your
physician or ENT doctor to
make sure the wax is com-
pletely removed and avoid
instrumenting your ear if
possible.
If you have drainage or
discharge from the ear, ear
fullness, ear pain or re-
duced hearing or ear symp-
toms that just go on and on,
you might need to enlist the
help of your physician. Also,
you can ask your doctor
about other recommended
treatments from removal of
wax. Gentle irrigation with a
bulb syringe and rinsing the
ear while you are in the
shower are possibilities.
Typically, if you go to a
physician, you will find the
primary care doctors tend to
use a water irrigation sys-
tem to remove wax where as
the ENT doctor tends to use
a microscope and various
instruments, forceps,
curettes and even suction
apparatus to remove the
wax. Generally speaking, it
is a very simple process and
usually is very effective in
removing wax.
Don't be tempted to place
things in your ear Regard-
less of how secure you are in
doing this, you do not have
the ability to see where you
are going and, therefore, in-
strumenting the ear puts
you at risk for injury to the
canal or eardrum, which
can be temporary and may
resolve on its own or could


be permanent and as severe
as puncturing your eardrum
or disarticulating the little
ear bones in the middle ear
that are very important for
hearing properly
Never, never use an ear
candle to remove ear wax.
This is a structure that is a
cone-shaped, hollow candle
made of wax-impregnated
cloth used to remove wax.
The device is lit on fire and
the makers claim the
warmth created by the fire
draws the wax and so called
other impurities out of the
ear canal by suction. Injury
can include burning of the
face, ear, wax dripping into
the ear canal to mention a
few potential hazards. The
FDA and Canadian Health
Agencies have both put out
bulletins in 2010 because of
an uptick in emergency
room visits directly related
to this process.
Other devices that have
been tried to irrigate ear
canals include water picks,
which could be at the very
least uncomfortable, if not
damaging to the ear drum.
Try to remember things like
ear fullness and earache or
even just a sensation the ear
is plugged could be telling
you there is a problem. Par-
tial or complete hearing loss
is also something that must
not be ignored.
Wax can even sometimes
cause noises in the ear as
well as itching, and there is
sometimes a distinct odor to
the wax because of staph
bacteria. Make sure you
take care of your ears since
you're only issued two, and
follow some simple rules to
ensure you do not injure
your ears. And, as always,
seek out the opinion of your
doctor if you have any ques-
tions or issues.
The preceding informa-
tion for this article was com-
piled with information
available through the U.S.
Department of Health and
Human Services and the
American Academy of Oto-
laryngology Head and Neck
Surgery For more informa-
tion on ear wax and ENT
health conditions, you can
visit www.entnet org.


Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at (352) 795-0011
or visit CrystalComm unity
ENTcom.


Place your ad
between now and
June 30th and take
advantage of this
short term OFFER.

You will get:
* Your ad exposed to 60,000
. potential customers
* A Garage/Yard Sale
- Attention Getter
* 6 lines of copy
-* Results
The cost of your ad is as follows:
* $20 for 1 day
* $25 for 2 days
* $30 for 3 days

Offer good through ourcall c enter only.
Please call 563-5966
& place your order.
Ask about our Guarantee and our Leftovers Rate


o,



ridaedding


Suide


SCt
Publi




C I T R U .E -_ 0 u .

CHRONICLE


Advertise your wedding products
and services in the
chronicle's Bridal & Wedding Guide.
shing the first Sunday of each month on
the Together page.


CALL

563-5592
TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE


Wednesday, July 6
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Mark Knighton Ct.
Lecanto - 527-5900
10 to 10:30 a.m. - 0. and A. with the
Amish Cook Editor Kevin Williams
10:30 to noon - Book signing with
Lovina Eicher, author of "The Amish
Cook" weekly column and 6 best selling
cook books.



Bring this coupon for a free
dessert when you purchase a
luncheon special at the
Sunshine Cafe.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --_ e


GQSRiGE

or YTRD







s -
if *


I


C4 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


HEALTH & LIFE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Seeking back pain relief? Consider options carefully


DR. FRANK BONO, D.O.
Special to the Chronicle
Recent national news re-
ports have shed negative
light on surgical proce-
dures performed on some patients
to alleviate back and next pain.
More than 65 million Americans
suffer from low back pain each
year.
After the common cold, low
back pain is the next leading rea-
son for missed workdays for peo-
ple younger than 45.
When spine problems develop
due to injury, aging, wear and tear,
or deformity, treatment options
should focus on the actual source
of the problem with the least
amount of interruption to a pa-
tient's life.
Conservative treatment such as
medication, physical therapy, brac-
ing or lifestyle changes may suc-
cessfully treat problems caused by
slipped discs, slipped vertebrae or
curvature of the spine.


Guest COLUMN


However, for many people, sur-
gery may be the best option.
New, minimally invasive proce-
dures perfected within the last 10
years involve innovative muscle-
dilating approaches that allow
surgeons to locate, view, repair,
fuse and instrument the spine
through two 1-inch incisions.
These surgeries have treated back
pain and deformity with the least
amount of interruption while
achieving the same surgical ob-
jectives as open procedures.
According to the co-director of
the Division of Spine Surgery at
Johns Hopkins Orthopaedic Sur-
gery, minimally invasive proce-
dures have the potential to reduce
hospital stays, improve patient re-
covery and decrease risk to the
patient.
Typically, the procedure, which
is performed in a hospital setting,
lasts an hour with patients going
home the following day When per-


formed in a Medicare approved
facility, these surgeries involve lit-
tle or no out-of-pocket cost to the
patient who has Medicare with
secondary insurance.
However, due to the technical
demands of the minimally inva-
sive spine surgeries, significant
complication rates have been ob-
served in cases where surgeons
are still in the learning curve
stage for procedures.
Kim Mulligan, Ph.D. and direc-
tor of Abbason and Associates, a
medical review and quality assur-
ance firm, encourages patients
and families to ask pointed ques-
tions when considering minimally
invasive spine surgery for chronic
pain relief:
* Is your surgeon board certi-
fied in orthopedic surgery?
* Is your surgeon fellowship
trained, and if so in what
specialty?
* How long in practice?


* How many procedures of that
specific type does he/she perform
on a weekly basis?
* Do they have hospital privi-
leges and are they approved by
the Medical Staff Credentials
committee to perform the specific
procedure? This is important be-
cause surgeries performed at a
surgery center typically do not re-
quire the same level of credentials
as a hospital. If there are compli-
cations, your surgeon would not
be able to treat you at the nearby
hospital if they do not have
privileges.
* Is he/she a member of na-
tional or state associations/soci-
eties for the specialties?
Dr. Mulligan also recommends
patients vet their physicians by
visiting the license verification
website provided by the Florida
Department of Health.
Studies show minimally inva-
sive spine surgical procedures for


GROUPS
Continued from Page C4

Room 203 in the Administration
Building:
* First Monday: diabetic
support group.
* Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia care-
givers support group.
* Fourth Monday: stroke
survivors support group.
* Memory Lane Respite of-
fered weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia. Anyone
bringing a loved one for the first
time is encouraged to come
early to fill out information
forms. Call (352) 628-4083 for
meeting dates.
* Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. Sup-
port group meetings are in the
CMHS Administration Building
unless indicated.
* ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program, 11:30 a.m. the
first Wednesday monthly ex-
cept July, which will be July 13.
Meetings are in the conference
room at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute at
522 N. Lecanto Highway in the
Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Spouses and caregivers are
welcome. Call (352) 527-0106.
* Bariatric Support Group:
6:30 p.m. every three months,
Cypress Room. Call Claudia
Blotz at (352) 697-0051 or
Bette Clark at (352) 860-0383.
0 Breast Cancer Support
Group: noon the second Fri-
day, Robert Boissoneault Can-
cer Institute. Call Judy Bonard
at (352) 527-4389.
* Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at (352) 726-1551, ext.
6596 or ext. 3329.
* Cancer Support: Call
Jeannette at (352) 746-1100 for
date and time.
* Diabetes Support Group:
11:30 a.m. the fourth Wednes-
day, Lake Room. Call Carol
McHugh at (352) 341-6110.
* Head and Neck Cancer
Support: third Wednesday,
Robert Boissoneault Cancer In-
stitute. Call Patrick Meadors at
(352) 527-0106.
* Heart-Healthy Eating
Workshop: 2 to 3:30 p.m. third
Wednesday every other month,
Citrus Memorial Auditorium.
Call (352) 560-6266 for regis-
tration and Cardio Pulmonary
Rehab at (352) 344-6538 for
exact date.
* Ostomy Support: 2 p.m.
third Sunday, Cypress Room.
Call Steve at (352) 229-4202,
Sue at (352) 560-7918, Mel or
Betty at (352) 726-3802 or
Sharon or Gerry at (352)
382-4446.
* Stroke Support Group of
Citrus County: 3 to 4 p.m. third
Wednesday, Citrus Memorial
Annex Building, State Road 44
across from Walgreens; (352)
344-6596 or (352) 344-1646.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups. Free,
but reservations suggested.
Call Jonathan Beard at (352)
527-2020; website: www.
hospiceofcitruscounty.org.
0 Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave.,
Inverness.
* Grief support group, 11
a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m.


Tuesday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326
S. Line Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 10
a.m. Thursday at the Christian
Center Church, 7961 W. Green
Acres St. in Homosassa.
Call Marylin Watley at (352)
563-1898. Reservations are not
required.


* Grief support group, 10:30
a.m. Saturday at First United
Methodist Church, 831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
* Christian-based grief sup-
port group, 1:15 p.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Gulf To
Lake Ministry Complex, 1506
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River.


0007W9A--


* Social support group, 10
a.m. Tuesday at Cozy Country
Kitchen, 5705 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30
p.m. Friday at Joe's Family
Restaurant, 911 W. Main St.,
Inverness.
* Social support group, 1
p.m. the first Thursday monthly


at Sal's Restaurant, 4105 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills.
Lunch special $6.95. Call Irma
or Julian at (352) 527-0869.
* LIFT (Living Information
For Today) luncheon, 11:30
a.m. the third Tuesday monthly.
LIFT provides social support to
widows and widowers through
organized outings and lunch-


eons that are entertaining and
educational. Call (352) 527-
2348, ext. 1507, for reserva-
tions or location.
* Parents support group, a
chapter of Bereaved Parents of
the USA, 7 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at First
Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.


- PAID ADVERTISING -





IJsll


ARTIFICIAL LIMBS/BRACES


KIDDER ORTHOPEDIC LABORATORIES
5676 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
........................................................ 7 9 5 -5 5 5 6

ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES

CEDAR CREEK AT KINGS BAY
231 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River
.........................................................5 6 4-2 4 4 6

CYPRESS COVE CARE CENTER
700 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River
........................................................ 7 9 5 -8 8 3 2

EMERITUS AT BARRINGTON PLACE
2341 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Lecanto
........................................................ 7 4 6 -2 2 7 3

NATURE COAST LODGE
279 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
...................................................... 5 2 7 -9 7 2 0

NEW HORIZON ASSISTED LIVING
1745 Forest Drive, Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -5 4 6 6

SUNFLOWER SPRINGS
8733 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa
........................................................ 6 2 1 -8 0 1 7
AUDIOLOGY
GARDNER AUDIOLOGY
Gardner, Dan MS
Center, Jodi MS
Davis, Joanie AuD
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 11, Crystal River
......................................................... 7 9 5 -5 3 7 7
CARDIOLOGY
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
Delfin, Luis MD FACC
Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC
Govindarajan, Balachander MD FACC
Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
Savage, Kenneth L. MD
Sieving, Richard R. MD FACC
Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
Upadya, Shrikanth P.Y. MD FACC
Walker, Dennis J. MD
Yelamanchi, Vishnu P. MD FACC
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.................. .... ................................. 7 9 5 -4 16 5
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.795-4165
....................................................... 7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
... ........ .... ... .... .... ... .... .. ........... 7 2 6 -8 3 5 3
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
... .................................................... 7 2 6 -8 3 5 3
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................................................352-3 15-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter
Professional Plaza, The Villages
................................................. 35 2-7 5 1-3 35 6
CHIROPRACTIC
INVERNESS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Carter, James C. DC PA
2202 State Road 44 W., Inverness
.................. . .............................7 2 6 -4 4 4 1
DENTAL
CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS
Holland, Edwin DDS
Pichardo, Edgar L. DMD
2231 State Road 44 W., Unit 101, Inverness
......................................................... 7 2 6 -5 8 5 4
CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES
Christian, III, Cephas N. DDS PA
2460 N. EssexAve., Hernando
.........................................................5 2 7-16 14
LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.........................................................62 8 -3 4 4 3

MEADOWCREST PERSONALIZED
DENTAL CARE
Linda Witherow, DDS
Patel, Jayraj J. DMD
6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
....................................................... 7 9 5 -5 9 3 5


DENTAL

SMILES AT CITRUS & 5TH
Dahman Mouhammad, DDS
535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
......................................................... 7 9 5 -1 8 8 1

TIMBERLANE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
1972 N. Future Terrace, Lecanto
.........................................................74 6 -9 1 11

Hany Williams, DMD, PA
4361 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..........................................................62 8 -7 7 8 8

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

PET/CT SERVICES OF FLORIDA
Beverly Hills Medical Park
3404 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
........................................................ 7 4 6 -6 8 8 8

FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE
INVERNESS FAMILY PRACTICE
Figueroa, Pablo MD
2222 State Road 44 W., Inverness
..........................................................8 6 0-0 6 3 3

SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD
Navarro, Catherine MD
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
Villacastin, Alexandrea T. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
........... ................................ 352-489-2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................... .......................................3 8 2 -8 2 8 2
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness
........................................................ 3 4 1 -5 5 2 0

HEARING EXAMS/HEARING AIDS

AUDIBEL HEARING AID CENTERS
Pruett, Daniel HAS
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................. 3 52 -6 2 1-80 00
2036 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness
.................................................352-586-7599
2400 S.W. College Rd., Suite 206, West
Ocala
.................................................352-873-0034
918 Rolling Acres Rd., #3, Lady Lake
................................................. 352-750-2005
910 Old Camp Road, #182, The Villages
................................................. 352-259-5234

FATHER & SONS HEARING AID CENTERS
Jason Thorneburg
Roger Thorneburg
2240 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
.................................................. 35 2 -8 6 0-1100
3944 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Springs
................................................. 352-628-9909
Crystal River Mall, (Next to JC Penny)
................................................. 352-564 -8000

PROFESSIONAL HEARING CENTER
Dingier, Denny M. DIV. BC-HIS ACA
211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -4 3 2 7

HOME HEALTH SERVICES

COMFORT KEEPERS
2244 State Road 44 W., Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -4 5 4 7

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
........................................................ 2 4 9 -12 5 7

S.E.T. HOME HEALTH
8016 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
......................................................... 5 6 4 -2 7 3 8
SENIOR HOME CARE
494 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
........................................................ 3 4 4 -0 1 5 0

HOSPITALS
BROOKSVILLE REGIONAL HOSPITAL
17240 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................ .............................. 35 2-7 96 -5 111


HOSPITALS

CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
..................................................... 7 2 6 -15 5 1

MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala
................................................ 352-35 1-7200
OAK HILL HOSPITAL
11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................. 352-628-644 1
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
..........................................................7 9 5 -6 5 6 0

INDEPENDENT LIVING

INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR APARTMENTS
518 Ella Ave., Inverness
........................................................ 3 4 4 -8 4 7 7

MASTECTOMY APPAREL

Connie's Mastectomy Boutique
430 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River
............. ...... .. ............................... 7 9 5 -5 2 2 3

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING

Purdy, Cyndie Ford LMHC NCC
MAC SAP SAE
470 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
.........................................................3 4 1-0 4 3 5

NURSING HOMES

DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH
& REHABILITATION
2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
.........................................................74 6 -9 5 0 0

WOODLAND TERRACE OF CITRUS
COUNTY INC.
124 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
........................................................ 2 4 9 -3 10 0

ONCOLOGY-HEMATOLOGY

ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett, C. Joseph MD
Brant, Timothy A. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
605 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
....................................................... 7 2 6 -3 4 0 0
522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
.........................................................5 2 7 -0 10 6

OPHTHALMOLOGY

WARD EYE CENTER & OPTICAL
Ward, H. Christopher DO
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa
....................................................... 6 2 8 -0 12 3

OPTICAL/OPTICAL GOODS

MEZMEREYES AT OPTICAL EXPRESS
Fosen, Bruce OD
Fialko, Hilda LDO
631 N. Citrus Ave, Ste. C, Crystal River
........................................................7 9 5-2 0 2 0

OPTOMETRY

CITRUS VISION CLINIC - CITRUS OPTICAL
Harless, Heather A. OD
Nothnagel, Victor T. OD
2332 State Road 44 W., Inverness
................ . ............................... 7 2 6 -2 0 8 5

SUNCOAST EYE CENTER
Kaplan, George H. OD
221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River
................ ........ ............................... 7 9 5 -2 5 2 6

WEST COAST EYE INSTITUTE
Coppedge, Amanda OD
Howard, Julie B. OD
240 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
....................................................... 7 4 6 -2 2 4 6


ORTHOPEDIC/SPORTS MEDICINE

THE CENTER FOR BONE
AND JOINT DISEASE
11307 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
.............................................. (352 ) 596-0900

GULFCOAST SPINE INSTITUTE
Bono, Frank S. DO
Ronzo, James J. DO
2300 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
....................................................... 34 1-4 7 7 8

NATURE COAST ORTHOPAEDICS &
SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC
Choung, Walter I. MD
Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO
2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills
.........................................................74 6 -5 7 0 7
520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River
........................................................5 6 4 -2 6 6 3
2236 State Road 44 W., Inverness
....................................................... 3 4 4 -2 6 6 3

SEVEN RIVERS ORTHOPAEDICS
AND SPORTS MEDICINE, PA
10495 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352-4 65-5663

PEDIATRICS

ALL CHILDREN'S SERTOMA THERAPY
CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY-
PEDIATRIC CARE
538 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
......................................................... 7 4 6 -3 3 0 0

PHARMACIES

B&W REXALL DRUGS
214 WS Hwy. 41 S., Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -1 0 2 1

PODIATRY

ADVANCED ANKLE AND
FOOT CENTERS OF FLORIDA
Raynor, David B. DPM
490 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
...................................................... 7 2 6 -3 6 6 8

REHABILITATION HOSPITALS

HEALTHSOUTH REHABILITATION
HOSPITAL OF SPRING HILL
12440 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................352-592-4250

SUPPORT GROUPS

HPH HOSPICE
Adult Bereavement
Caregiver Support Groups
Children Bereavement
........................................................ 5 2 7-4 6 0 0
SURGERY
Mohammadbhoy,Adnan DO PA
11535 W. Emerald Oaks Drive, Crystal River
..........................................................79 4 -6 0 5 6

PREMIER VEIN CENTER
Sharma, Ravi MD
7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
....... ........... .............................6 2 1-0 7 7 7
UROLOGY
ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett, C. Joseph MD
Brant, Timothy A. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
605 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -3 4 0 0
522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
......................................................... 5 2 7 -0 10 6
WHEELCHAIRS/SCOOTERS

MR. MOBILITY/MRS. MOBILITY
3221 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
...................................................... 6 3 7 -6 0 8 8
11163 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill
...............................................352-666-3006


chronic back pain - even on the
elderly - result in most patients
enjoying significant improve-
ments in pain, mobility and qual-
ity of life.


Dr FrankBono, D.O., is a
board-certified, fellowship-
trained orthopedic surgeon
specializing in disorders of the
spine. Dr Bono is a graduate of
the University of Central Florida
with a B.S. in psychology and a
minor in biology and chemistry.
In 2000, he completed his
medical education at Nova
Southeastern University in Fort
Lauderdale, where he earned his
degree in osteopathic medicine.
He performed both his
internship and residency at
Botsford General Hospital in
Farmington Hills, Mich. Bono has
won numerous research awards
from the American College of
Osteopathic Surgeons and the
Michigan Osteopathic


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 CS







Page C6 - TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Friends to offer
discount books
Beginning Friday, July 1,
Friends Book Store at Dun-
nellon Public Library will
begin a storewide, half-price
book sale, to continue from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays
and from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday.
The bookstore is over-
stocked in all categories -
novels, fiction, children's
books, mysteries, history,
computer, classics and more
- as well as with books on
tape, videos, DVDs, CDs,
cassettes and puzzles and
games.
The library is at 20351
Robinson Road (behind
Sweetbay) in Dunnellon. It is
operated by an all-volunteer
staff with proceeds benefiting
the library. The Friends are
committed to providing a
monthly book endowment of
$2,500 for new books and
other library enhancements.
Rec center to host
July 4 party
The public is invited to a
Fourth of July party begin-
ning at noon Monday, July 4,
at Beverly Hills Recreation
Center, 77 Civic Circle.
Freshly grilled hamburgers
and hot dogs with all the fix-
ings will be served from noon
to 3 p.m. Deejay Benny Cruz
will entertain with music for
listening and dancing.
Tickets are $10 and will be
sold in advance only. Last
day to purchase tickets will
be by 5 p.m. Friday, July 1.
Purchase tickets at the Rec
Center from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays. For more informa-
tion, call (352) 746-4882.
Fireworks sales
help Spot
The Spot Family Center will
operate two fireworks tents at
Homosassa and Inverness
Walmart stores as a fundraiser
now through July 5.
Money raised from sales of
the fireworks will help fund
the food pantry and family
outreach programs.
Fireworks will have a "no
duds" guarantee and there
will be special deals as well.
For more information, call
(352) 794-3870.
VFW post to picnic
on Fourth of July
Edward W. Penno Post
4864 plans a July 4 picnic
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., serv-
ing hamburgers, hot dogs,
Italian sausage with peppers
and onions, potato salad and
baked beans. Public is in-
vited. Cost is $7.
The post is at 10199 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, (352) 465-4864.


Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE

Cuddles


Special to the Chronicle
Cuddles is almost 7 years
old. She is a spayed Japan-
ese Chinn, relatively quiet,
good with other pets but
would prefer an adult home
with lots of time to "cud-
dle" on the couch. She lost
an eye because of an acci-
dent but has adjusted very
well. All Precious Paws
pets are vet checked up to
date on vaccinations based
on their ages, spayed or
neutered and microchipped.
The Precious Paws
Adoption Center at Crystal
River Mall will be closed
Saturday and Sunday. It
will reopen July 9 from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday
from noon to 4 p.m. View
pets at www.precious
pawsflorida.com or call
(352) 726-4700 to speak
with a volunteer.


Plans in progress for ball Hit the road


Annual Cattle

Baron's Ball set

for Feb. 11

Special to the Chronicle

The Cattle Baron's Ball
Committee for the 2012
American Cancer Society
has announced its plans for
the annual fundraiser to take


place Feb. 11. This signature
gala continues to grow in
popularity as a fundraiser to
support the local ACS, as
well as contribute to re-
search and advocacy in the
fight against cancer
Co-chairmen Dianne Bras-
hear and Steve Latiff are
leading a team of experi-
enced and first-time mem-
bers who are already
preparing to make this festiv-
ity a one-of-a-kind, kick-up-
your heels evening that will


include musical entertain-
ment, games, activities and
auctions, all to bring aware-
ness to the mission of the
American Cancer Society
The theme for the 2012
festivities will be "Heart of
a Cowboy" There are many
areas where Citrus County
businesses and individuals
can be a part of this very
special ball.
* To reserve a table, seat-
ing eight, which includes
cocktails and dinner, call (352)


422-0356 or email dianne
brashear@gmail.com.
* For business and indi-
viduals wishing to become
sponsors of this event, call
(352) 464-0983 or email
kathybaggs@hotmail.com.
* To contribute items for
the live and silent auction,
call (352) 422-4438 or email
jen@citrusortho.net.
To find out how to become
involved in the ball, call (352)
422-0356 or email dianne
brashear@gmail.com.


Elder abuse awareness


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Commission recently proclaimed June 15 as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day in Citrus County. From left
are: Commissioner John "JJ" Kenney; Wendy Hall, HPH Hospice; Commissioner Joe Meek; Community and Recreation
Programs Operations Supervisor Pat Coles; Commissioner Rebecca Bays; Brandon Sheldon, Integrity Home Health Care;
Community and Recreation Programs Operations Manager Amy Engelkin; Judith Stauffer, Department of Children and
Families; Commissioner Winn Webb; Beth Thomas, Department of Children and Families; Commission Chairman Dennis
Damato; and Michael Flake, Family Life Care.


News NOTES


Nature Coast artists to convene
WEEKI WACHEE - Nature Coast Decorative
Artists Chapter of the Society of Decorative Artists will
meet at 9 a.m. July 2 at the Weeki Wachee Senior
Center (off U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail).
There will be a short meeting, show and tell and a
birthday drawing. The project for "Christmas in July" is
a snowman on a bowling pin, taught in acrylic by Pat
Estes. On July 30, another "Christmas in July" project
will be taught by Pat Otto; a candle and holly in oils.
For more information, visit www.ncda-artist.com or
call Andi at (352) 666-9091, Jeanette at (727)
857-1045 or Pat at (352) 249-7221.
Plant group gathers July 5
Citrus County Native Plant Society meet at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July 5, at Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic
Circle, in Beverly Hills.
Speaker for the July meeting will be Bobby Vigliotti of
Homosassa Butterfly. He will discuss the butterfly life
cycle in depth, including how to plant a butterfly garden
to attract butterflies and keep them in the yard. He will
have live displays of eggs, caterpillars an chrysalises.
In addition, he will talk about survival strategies and in-
teresting facts about each cycle of the butterfly.
For more information, call (352) 527-5202 between
9 a.m. and 5 p.m.


Helping CASA


The Ladies
Auxiliary VFW
Post 4252
recently made a
donation to
CASA to help
with its ongoing
needs and
projects. From
left are: Becky
Parker, Auxiliary
treasurer; Diana
Finegan, CASA
director; and
Judy Prive,
Auxiliary junior
vice president
and president-
elect.
Special to the Chronicle


on the road rally
The Rotary Club of Crystal
River and BSA Venturing
Crew 370 are inviting partici-
pants to compete for prizes in
the second annual Uncle
Sam Scallop Jam Road Rally
starting at noon Saturday,
July 2.
The rally is a navigational
challenge where participating
vehicles get course directions
in the form of clues. Each di-
rectional clue may be a rid-
dle, a picture or a rhyme.
Cost per vehicle is $25.
Each participating team will re-
ceive two tickets worth $5 each
for the Uncle Sam Scallop Jam
that evening. To sign up, or for
information go to ww.scallop
jam.com or call Marc Shapot at
(352) 613-6851.
Elks plan
hoedown, dinner
West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693 will celebrate Independ-
ence Day, Monday, July 4,
with a Country Hoedown din-
ner/dance. Entertainment will
be by Lee Ann Noel Band
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Menu will consist of grilled
steaks, grilled shrimp, au
gratin potatoes, corn on the
cob, fancy fruit cup dessert
and coffee for members and
guests at 6 p.m.
Cost for the special event
is $15. Tickets are available
in the lounge.
Uncle Sam Jam,
Rally on Saturday
The second annual Uncle
Sam Scallop Jam and Road
Rally, sponsored by the Ro-
tary Club of Crystal River, will
run from 4 to 11 p.m. Satur-
day, July 2, on Third Street
N.W., King's Bay Park, Crys-
tal River.
Admission is $5, with those
16 years and younger admit-
ted free. Proceeds will benefit
Rotary charities.
The Road Rally will begin
at 11:30 a.m. from Crystal
Chevrolet, U.S. 19, Ho-
mosassa. To participate or for
more information, call (352)
613-6851 or visit www.
scallopjam.com.
Club seeks
hearing aids
Inverness Sertoma Club Inc.
will collect donations of used
hearing aids at the Sertoma
food tent during the Independ-
ence Day celebration begin-
ning at 4 p.m. Sunday, July 3,
at Wallace Brooks Park.
Those who donate hearing
aids will receive a free hot
dog and soda.
For information about Ser-
toma's work to help the hear-
ing impaired, call Bud Osborn
at (352) 726-7805 or Susan
Healey at (352) 860-5834.


Reflections on service to local United Methodist Church


F ive years ago, the
Florida Confer-
ence of United
Methodists sent the Crys-
tal River United
Methodist Church con-
gregation a genuine
blessing: Pastor David
Gill and his wife, Susan.
As they prepare to take
up a new ministry at a Ruth
Seminole United AROUI
Methodist Church, I COMm
pause to reflect upon his
ministry here.
A popular hit-parade tune of the
1950s - which topped the charts for
several weeks - and was and is still
a favorite of mine was "Little
Things Mean A Lot." It best de-
scribes Pastor David.
Although he stands 6 foot 7
inches, he is by far the most gentle
pastor I have personally known in
my 51-year membership at Crystal
River United Methodist Church.
Recalling how he chose to offer
up his prayers and concerns of our
church and the community as he
knelt at the altar rather than from
the pulpit, I recall that come Sep-
tember, he placed on the altar the
names of all the children and
youths on slips of paper for us to
take home and pray for during their
school year He always invited us to


join him at the altar
He delighted in shar-
ing his banjo-playing tal-
ent with Annie and Tim's
Bluegrass Band along-
5:: ^ side pastors of St. Anne's
Episcopal Church and
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, entertaining the
Retired Educators at the
Levins Withlacoochee Techni-
ND THE cal Center, the Alpha
IUNITY Class at the Beverly Hills
Baptist Church and as a
fundraiser for this year's
combined Bible school for children
from St. Anne's, St. Timothy and
First Presbyterian churches. As he
helped promote the United
Methodist Women and United
Methodist Men, encouraging and af-
firming our mission-oriented proj-
ects alongside the community's
growing outreach needs, we knew
we had a compassionate, listening
ear in Pastor David and a strong
supporter
Several times a week you could
find Pastor David out at the Mission
in Citrus in Crystal River, encour-
aging the homeless under the guid-
ance of Jim Sleighter, providing our
church bus to transport those who
wished to attend Sunday morning
services.
With his leadership, we offered


an Alpha class to the community
and at its closing session, he and
Susan offered his home for a fel-
lowship dinner
The Bright Beginnings children
delighted in the weekly worship
services he held for them in the
sanctuary
Bringing the NOMADS to our
church was the beginning of a pos-
sible annual community outreach
program that will continue for years
to come.
Pastor David took a personal in-
terest in many individuals, working
with the Mercy Angels, the bereave-
ment committees, Serving Our Sen-
iors and the Stephen Ministries.
The youths had a friend in Pastor
David as they held breakfasts to
fund Mission in Citrus and as they
traveled to Arcadia and the Caroli-
nas on mission trips.
The Gills traveled with our
church volunteers to Honduras on
a mission trip as well.
We have implemented outstanding
leadership training opportunities
with Pastor David's guidance, in-
cluding the Wednesday evening ICS
(International Christian Studies).
Many who are called are astute
orators, astounding philosophers
and have theology to spare, but the
little things that Pastor David in-
stilled in us by example will serve


Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River United Methodist
Church pastor David Gill is leaving to
serve at Seminole UMC.
us well as we continue to mature in
our faith-based walk reaching out to
those in spiritual as well as physi-
cal need in our beloved Citrus
County

Ruth Levins participates in a vari-
ety of projects around the commu-
nity Let her know about your
group's upcoming activities by
writing to PO. Box 803, Crystal
River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Im IMS


I








TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 28, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
(WESil NBC 0 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Access Hollyw'd America's Got Talent (N) 'PG' The Voice "The Finals" The four remaining contestants perform. PG' News Against Casey
BBC World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) xc History Detectives U.S. World War II A Program About Unusual Buildings Frontline Child death cases; for-profit POV "My Perestroika" Growing up in
PBS B 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) xa propaganda leaflet. (N) 'G' a & Other Roadside Stuff 'G' colleges. (N) 'PG'E Russia. (N) 'PG'
WUFT PBS 5 5 5 5 16 World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) xc History Detectives (N) 'G' Frontline "The Child Cases"'PG' POV "My Perestroika" Growing up in Russia. 'PG' Tavis Smiley (N)
NewsChannel 8 NBC Nightly Entertainment Extra (N) 'PG' c America's Got Talent Hopefuls audi- The Voice "The Finals" The four remaining contestants perform. (N) (In NewsChannel 8 2011 Wimbledon
W ) NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8 at 6PM (N) News (N)G' Tonight (N) 'PG' tion for the judges. (N) PG' Stereo Live) 'PG' s at 11PM (N) Update (N)
Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! (N) Wheel of Fortune Wipeout A dean of students and a 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hos ital Marks must quar- Eyewitness News Nightline (N)
(WFTV) ABC B 20 20 20 20 at6 (N)e N 'G' philosopher. (N) (In Stereo) a "Get Him Away From Me!" 'PG' antine part ofRole 3. (N) E aN11PM 'GN'h
PCBSD 10 10 10 10 10 10n n 10 News, 6pm CBS Evening Dr. Phil (In Stereo) 'PG'x NCIS "Swan Song" Tracking the NCIS: Los Angeles Pentagon docu- The Good Wife Kalinda receives a 10 News, 11pm Late Show With
I CBS_ 3 10 1 0 10 10 10 100 (N) News/Pelley Port-to-Port killer. (In Stereo) '14' ments are stolen. (In Stereo)'14' grand jury subpoena. 14' s (N) David Letterman
(W V)T FOX 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Xc TMZ (N)'PG'x The insider (N) MasterChefCompetin for a spot in Raising Hope Raising Hope FOX13 10:00 News (N) x FOX13 News Thelnsider
FOX0 13 1313 'PG' x the next round. (N) '14x 'PG'c 'PG' cc Edge at 11pm 'PG'Ea
WCJB ABC EB 11 11 4 15 News |World News Entertainment Inside Edition Wipeout "Let's Make a Wipeout" 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hospital "Enemy Within" News Nightline (N) 'G'
The Place for Miracles: Your Hour of Praise W-Kenneth Great Awakening Life Today With Purpose for Life Great Awakening
IWCLF ND m 2 2 2 2 22 22 Healing'G',ccHagin James Robison
ABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) Wipeout A dean of students and a 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hospital Marks must quar- ABC Action News Nightline (N)
ABC 11 11 11 1at 6PM G' cG'_ philosopher. (N) (In Stereo) a "Get Him Away From Me!" 'PG' antine part ofRole 3. (N) E at 11 PM 'GX'
Family Guy Family Guy '14'x How I Met Your The Office "The Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Frasier "Whine Frasier"Love How I MetYour The Office'PG'E South Park South Park'14' E
IND B 12 12 PG' c Mother'14' Injury"'PG' "Disappearing Acts" '14' a Club" 'PG' E Bites Dog"'PG' Mother'PG' MA' E
(WTTA MNT D 6 6 6 6 9 Smarter Don't Forget Love-Raymond Old Christine Smarter Smarter Don't Forget Don't Forget Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'G' Entourage'MA' Enthusiasm
WACX TBN B 21 21 21 The Faith Show The 700 Club'PG'E Pastor Babers Power of Praise Manna-Fest'G' Jewish Voice Paid Program Claud Bowers Tims Ministries
The King of The King of Two and a Half Two and a Half One Tree Hill "Not Afraid" Brooke Hellcats"Ragged Old Flag" The According to Jim George Lopez Friends '14'x Friends 'PG' c
IG CW 4 4 4 4 12 12 Queens'PG' Queens PG' Men'14' E Men'14'E and Julian get a visitor. '14' sa Hellcats play ag football.'PG' PG PG'x
WY M F�M ci 16 16 16 16 JUNK'D'G'Ea CarTalk with Your Citrus Every Dayis a Every Minute Grandview Crook & Chase (In Stereo) ** "Pot o'Gold"(1941, Musical Comedy) James Stewart, Horace Heidt.
W AM b 16 16 16 16 Chad County Court Gift Loca health. Counts Church A radio sponsor's nephew wants him to air swing music. 'NR'
W OGXI FOX 13 13 7 7 TMZ (N)'PG' My Name Is Earl The Simpsons The Simpsons MasterChef (N) 14' X Raising Hope |Raising Hope FOX 35 News at 10 xa TMZ'PG' x King of the Hill
(WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias Noticiero Univ. Cuando Me Enamoro (N) '14' Teresa (N) '14' (SS) Triunfo del Amor (N) '14' (SS) Aqul y Ahora (SS) Noticias Noticiero Univ
WXPX ION m 17 Without a Trace 'PG' c Without a Trace 'PG' c Without a Trace 'PG' ~ Criminal Minds "Lucky" '14' E Criminal Minds "Penelope" 'PG' Criminal Minds "True Night" '14'
CAE) 54 48 54 54 25 27 The First 48'14' x The First 48'14'x The First 48"Alias; Duel"'14' Storage Wars IStorage Wars Gene Simmons Family Jewels (N) Gene Simmons Family Jewels
LAM) 55 64 55 55 *Y, "Texas Rangers" (2001) James Van Der Beek. 'PG-13' *** "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972, Adventure) Robert Redford, Will Geer. 'PG' |*** "Jeremiah Johnson" (1972) Robert Redford.
S 52 35 52 52 19 21 Untamed and Uncut 'G'x Natural World (In Stereo) 'G'Ec Wild Russia "Kamchatka"'PG' Wild Russia "Primorye" 'PG' Wild Russia "Siberia"'PG' cc Wild Russia "Primorye"'PG'
CET) 96 19 96 96 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live The BET Awards 2011 Music, entertainment and sports in LA. 'PG' Family Affair |Family Affair The Mo'Nique Show'14' ~
ELRAVO) 254 51 254 254 Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Million Dollar Decorators (N) '14' Million Dollar Decorators '14'
cm 27 61 27 27 33 Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14' Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama'14' |South Park'MA' Tosh.0 '14' |Tosh.O'14' Tosh.O0 (N)'14' |Workaholics'14' Daily Show Colbert Report
(Wil) 98 45 98 98 28 37 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition **Y "Hidalgo" (2004) Viggo Mortensen. A Westerner races a horse across the Arabian desert. PG-13' Trick My Truck Trick My Truck
(CM 43 42 43 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) CNBC Reports Executive Vision On the Money Mad Money
I ) 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) xc
(I ) 46 40 46 46 6 5 Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie My Babysitter My Babysitter Good-Charlie A.N.T Farm G' So Random! G' Shake It Up! G' Suite/Deck |Good-Charlie My Babysitter My Babysitter
ESP 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) xc College Baseball NCAA World Series Championship, Game 2: Teams TBA. From Omaha, Neb. (N) Xa SportsCenter (N) (Live) xc
�ESP2) 34 28 34 34 43 49 Around the Horn Interruption Football Live NFL Live (N) WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at Connecticut Sun. (N) Xc Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) xa Women's Soccer
EEWIJ 95 70 95 95 48 Vespers for the Solemnity Daily Mass: Our Lady Mother Angelica-Classic EWTN Religious |The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope 'G' Fulton Sheen |Women of
[FAM) 29 52 29 29 20 28 The Nine Lives of Chloe King 'PG' Pretty Little Liars 14' X Pretty Little Liars (N) 14' X The Nine Lives of Chloe King '14' Pretty Little Liars'14' c The 700 Club 'PG' c
[FC) 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baier (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) ca Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor cc
C l) 26 56 26 26 Iron Chef America 'G' Restaurant: Impossible Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped "Chopped Liver" Chopped "Thyme Flies" (N) 24 Hour Restaurant Battle
EFS$IFD 35 39 35 35 Sports Stories The Game 365 World Poker Tour: Season 9 Ins. the Marlins |Ins. the Marlins Ins. the Marlins |Marlins Live! MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at Oakland Athletics. (Live)
[FX) 30 60 30 30 51 Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men *** "Dodgeball:A True Underdog Story" (2004) Vince Vaughn. *** "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story" (2004) Vince Vaughn.
(GOL 67 Golf Central (N) Golfing World School of Golf Inside PGA Tour Big Break Indian Wells Feherty (N) Feherty School of Golf Haney Project Golf Central Inside PGA Tour
(fILLJ 39 68 39 39 45 54 Little House on the Prairie 'G' Little House on the Prairie 'G' Little House on the Prairie 'G' Frasier G'mc Frasier 'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier PG' Frasier 'PG' Frasier'PG'
S**Y, "Knight and *Y, "Swimfan" (2002) Jesse Bradford. A teenager REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ***Y, "Inception" (2010, Science Fiction) Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt. A thief True Blood
___ 302 201 302 302 2 Day"(2010) learns to regret his tryst with a new classmate. ca (In Stereo) 'PG' c enters people's dreams and steals their secrets. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' c 'MA' E
HGTV 23 57 23 23 42 52 PropertyVirgins Property Virgins Hunters Int'l |House Hunters My First Place |My First Place Real Estate |Property Virgins House Hunters |Hunters Int'l For Rent'G' Property Virgins
[IIfi1 51 25 51 51 32 42 Tech It to the Max Modern History Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy How the States Got Their Shapes How the Earth Was Made 'PG'
LIFE 24 38 24 24 31 Unsolved Mysteries '14' c Pawn Stars'PG' | Pawn Stars'PG' American Pickers 'PG' c Amer. Pickers |Amer. Pickers How I Met |Howl Met How I Met |Howl Met
"Maneater" (2009, Romance-Comedy) Sarah Chalke. A 32-year-old *Y, "Picture Perfect" (1997, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Aniston. A *** "Lying to Be Perfect" (2010, Drama) Poppy Montgomery A woman
50 Hollywood socialite hatches a plan to snare a filmmaker. NR Mn single gal pretends to be engaged to further her career. 'PG-13' E secretly works as an advice columnist at night. [
** "Love ** "Devil" (2010) Chris Messina. Elevator passengers **Y, "Terminator Salvation" (2009) Christian Bale. Humanity fights back **2, "Date Night" (2010) Steve Carell. A case of mis- Femme Fatales
EilX 320 221 320 320 3 3 Happens" (2009) become trapped with a demonic entity 'PG-13' against Skynet's machine army (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc taken identity eads to a wild adventure. 'PG-13' "Haunted" 'MA'
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Live (N) |Hardball With Chris Matthews The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) |The Last Word
iTV 97 66 97 97 39 That '70s Show Teen Wolf (In Stereo) |Teen Wolf (In Stereo) |16 and Pregnant (In Stereo) '14' 16 and Pregnant "Reunion" (N) (In Stereo) '14'
65 44 53 Amish on Break 'PG' Alaska State Troopers '14' Explorer '14' Explorer PG' Lost Gold of the Dark Ages Explorer '14'
28 36 28 28 35 25 iCarly'G'c |iCarly'G'Ba iCarly'G'c |SpongeBob My Wife-Kids |My Wife-Kids George Lopez |George Lopez That'70s Show |That '70s Show The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PG'
EOXY) 44 The Glee Project 'PG' The Glee Project 'PG' j**n, "A Lot Like Love" (2005) Ashton Kutcher. PG-13' n **, "A Lot Like Love" (2005) Ashton Kutcher. 'PG-13'
i*2 "The Janky Promoters" (2009) Ice Cube. Shady *, "Next Day Air" (2009, Comedy-Drama) Donald Weeds"Bags" The Big C (iTV) Weeds "Bags" The Big C (iTV) Episodes The Real L Word
340 241 340 340 concert promoters get in over their heads. 'R' Faison, Mike Epps. TV. (In Stereo' R' c (iTV)'MA'Ec 'MA' E (iTV)'MA'cI 'MA' E "Episode 5" 'MA' (iTV) 'MA'
1SPEEUJ 122 112 122 122 Pass Time 'PG' PassTime 'PG' NASCAR Race Hub (N) |Am. Trucker |Pass Time 'PG' Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Speedmakers'G' Pass Time 'PG' Ticket to Ride
(SPIKEM 37 43 37 37 27 36 **2, "Star Wars: Episode ll-- Attack of the Clones" (2002) Ewan McGregor. (In Stereo) 'PG' **2, "Star Wars: Episode ll-- Attack of the Clones" (2002) Ewan McGregor. (In Stereo) 'PG'
ON) 36 31 36 36 Rays Live! MLB Baseball'G' |Rays Live! Inside the Rays |To Be Announced College Football
SY) 31 59 31 31 26 29 Casino Royale **2, "The World Is Not Enough" (1999, Action) Pierce Brosnan. 'PG-13' *** "Tomorrow Never Dies" (1997, Action) Pierce Brosnan, Jonathan Pryce. 'PG-13' World Is Not
1 49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens King of Queens |Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' The Office'PG' |The Office'PG' The Office'PG' |The Office '14' The Office '14' TheOffice'14' Conan (N)'14'
T169 5I 3 169169 30 35 ** "Kiss Me Deadly" (1955, Crime Drama) Ralph Meeker. Private eye *** "Home Before Dark"(1958, Romance) Jean Simmons, Dan O'Herlihy, Rhonda **** "Elmer Gantry" (1960, Drama) Burt Lancaster,
169 53 169 169 30 35 Mike Hammer trails bad guys and blondes. 'NR' cc Fleming. A woman struggles to readjust following a nervous breakdown. 'N Jean Simmons, Dean Jagger. NR' cc
IM 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash Cab 'G' |Cash Cab 'G' Deadliest Catch 14'X Deadliest Catch 14' c Deadliest Catch (N) '14' c After the Catch "Save Me"'14' Deadliest Catch 14'X
[I1C 50 46 50 50 29 30 Toddlers & Tiaras'PG' _ 19 Kids: First Grandson I Kid - Brad G. I| Kid - Brad G. 19 Kids-Count |19 Kids-Count Little Couple |Little Couple I Kid - Brad G. I| Kid - Brad G.
fTNT) 48 33 48 48 31 34 Law & Order Extortion plot. '14' Law & Order "Zero" '14' Law & Order'14' c (DVS) Memphis Beat "Lost" (N) '14' HawthoRNe (N) '14'c Memphis Beat "Lost" '14'
TRAV 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
iiTVD 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'PG' c Cops'14'_c World's Dumbest... '14' Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Storage Hunters Storage Hunters Police POV Police POV
(T1 _ 32 49 32 32 34 24 Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son |AIl in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Hap. Divorced
USA) 47 32 47 47 17 18 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar (N)'PG' c Covert Affairs (N) 'PG' c Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14'
MWE) 117 69 117 117 Charmed "Bride and Gloom" 'PG' Charmed (In Stereo) 'PG' c Staten Island Cakes (N) (Live) 'PG' Staten Island Cakes (N) 'PG' Cupcake Girls |Cupcake Girls Staten Island Cakes 'PG' c
(WII . 18 18 18 18 18 20 Dharma & Greg Dharma&Greg America's Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine How I Met |Howl Met WGN News at Nine (N) cc Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Evan Esar, a humorist who died
in 1995, said, "The girl with a future
avoids a man with a past." That
made me wonder if a man with a
future avoids a girl with a past.
In bridge, we have an avoidance
play, which comes up in today's
deal. South is in three no-trump.
West leads the club six, and East
puts up his queen. How should
South plan the play?
North rebid three diamonds, not
with aspirations of making that suit
trumps, but in the hope that South
could show three-card spade sup-
port. Since South did not and had a
club stopper, he continued with
three no-trump.
South had seven top tricks: two
spades, two hearts, two diamonds
and one club. South played low at
trick one, played low again when
East returned the club four (the


ACROSS 36 Lady's address
38 Hen's lack
Apply makeup 39 Electrical unit
Form 1040 40 Sweater letter
sender 41 Window-shop
Itemize 44 Not plain
"- Buttermilk 48 Cliff dwelling,
Sky" now
Roulette color 49 Really enjoys
"Damn 51 Latin I verb
Yankees" 52 Bellow
vamp 53 Feedbag mor-
Intersection sel
Energy source 54 Dandelion, to
Brunch fare many
Harm 55 Toon Olive
Prior to 56 Vocalist
Friar's title - Sumac


23 Sofa
26 Iditarod locale
29 Work in the
newsroom
30 Strike ignorer
31 Cell habitant
33 "- Girls"
34 Town, infor-
mally
35 Monthly
expense


DOWN
Karate studio
Grad
Nota -
Future resident
Turnpike
Boot-camp
sentence ender
Pack animals


Bridge

North 06-28-11
A K 7 5 4 2
V 8 2
+ A 6 4 3
J 5
West East
* J 10 6 * Q 9 8
V J 10 5 V Q 9 7
* J8 * Q 10 9 2
* K 10 8 6 3 4 Q 4 2
South
A A 3
VAK643
K 7 5
A 9 7
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 V Pass 1 Pass
2 NT Pass 3 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: % 6



Answer to Previous Puzzle
F I I M D E SSN
E VER O VER LIE
NANO CABARETS
N A WA WE

GUSTY G I VEN|S
AT E JE NU E EMT
LAM MOLD COOS S
HIcCU IBINGE
I R P T I
NUEAR FUL

OUR N C I N E
SH E I SM CAR I


8 Smidgen
9 Plow through
10 Gentle
13 Warning sign (2
wds.)
16 Anti-slip device


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


20 Haik wearer
23 Md. neighbor
24 Footnote
word
25 Customs
request
26 Ranch mea-
sure
27 Elbow oppo-
site
28 Reunion
attendee
30 Warm
32 Extreme
degree
34 Scrooge
expletives
35 Bridle parts
37 Swallowed
38 Make ecstatic
40 Name for a
parrot
41 Make java
42 Trick
43 Belgian river
45 Sailor's cry
46 Ball club
47 This, in Toledo
50 Want-ad let-
ters


higher of two remaining cards), and
won the third club.
Now declarer knew that he had
to establish either spades or hearts
without letting West win a trick;
otherwise, he would cash two club
winners. That needed the major
suit to split 3-3.
In spades, though, surely West
would be able to take a trick in the
suit. But as long as East had exactly
queen-third in hearts, he could be
forced to win the defensive heart
trick.
South led a spade to dummy's
king and called for a heart. After
East played low, declarer won with
his ace, crossed to dummy's dia-
mond ace, and led the remaining
heart.
If East played low, South would
win and lead a third round. If East
put up his queen, he would be al-
lowed to take the trick.
Mission accomplished.


Dear Annie: I'm a young
woman who is living at
home for the summer be-
fore moving away in
the fall. Here's my
dilemma: Several
months ago, I excitedly
arranged for my long-
distance boyfriend to
live with my family
and get work nearby
Unfortunately, now
that he's here, I find
that I simply don't
want to be in a rela-
tionship with him any-
more. ANN
He hasn't done any- MAIL
thing wrong. I'm just a
different person from
who I was a couple of years ago
when we began dating. Now his
little flaws that I so desperately
convinced myself to overlook
seem increasingly like deal
breakers.
I'm planning to give the rela-
tionship a few more weeks to
make sure this isn't simply a
phase, but frankly, I don't expect
my feelings to change. How do I
handle this? I realize that hurting
him is inevitable, but breaking up
with him in the middle of the
summer and making him move
out of my parents' home could se-
riously undermine his efforts to
pay for his own education.
What's even worse is that my
friends and family are putting se-
rious effort into accepting him
into the family because they ex-
pect us to get married. I hate that
they may form an attachment to
someone I am now planning to
break up with. I want to do the
right thing and cause the least
possible amount of hurt. Please


yfl i ?T i THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, rwow! 50% off is
one letter to each square, such a good deal.


to form four ordinary words. @
TETFH


�2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
ORPGU



NEEEVL



KGTNIA

~T L II


I He's o cute. I
rI'lltake him. f
50%off is I
such a i-l i :- i ,
aooddeal. IlilI' , , , I


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: I I I I I I I I
(Answers tomorrow)


help me, Annie. - Hearts Don't
Break Even
Dear Hearts: Don't worry
about your friends and
relatives. They will
manage. But you do
r y need to talk to your
boyfriend as soon as
possible and explain
that the relationship
isn't going to work out.
Some pain cannot be
avoided, so better now
than later Be as gentle
as possible. Apologize
for uprooting him.
IE'S And, since his liveli-
BOX hood is currently de-
pendent on his living
arrangements, it
would be gracious if your parents
would allow him to stay tem-
porarily while he looks for a
place of his own. Offer to help
him search. The fact that you are
moving away in the fall will make
this easier on both of you.
Dear Annie: I hope you will
print my pet peeve so retailers
will take notice. No matter where
I shop, no one knows how to
properly give change. If I pay $20
for a $15.95 purchase, the change
is handed to me in a pile of coins,
bills and a receipt. I have to fum-
ble to count it.
I cashiered many years ago. I
would give the customer the
nickel, saying, "And five cents
makes 16," and then count out the
remaining four dollars, saying,
"Seventeen, 18, 19, 20." Most
cashiers today can't add or sub-
tract without the register to do
the thinking for them. In addi-
tion, when the transaction is
complete, I am told cheerfully,
"Have a good one." Have a good


wC)
cu
U)
�0
-5
-0
WCL
w

C)
w Ci) co~o




F-c
a)c
Eo



-2
ULC)>
Co^
C)S 0


what? Whatever happened to a
simple, "Thank you, and please
come again"?
And last but not least, why is
the receipt so long? Imagine how
much paper could be saved if
they skipped the surveys and ad-
vertising. - Inger from N.H. who
Hates To Shop
Dear Inger: One function of
this column is to allow the read-
ers to let off a little steam now
and then.
Hope you feel better.
Dear Annie: The letter from
"Disappointed Grandmother" re-
minded me of a story I heard
many years ago.
Two elderly ladies were talking
about gifts given to the grand-
children. Esther lamented that
she had sent money to each of
her grandchildren for Christmas
and didn't get a single thank-you
note.
Paula proudly said, "Every one
of my grandchildren came per-
sonally to thank me for their gift"
At the look on Esther's face,
Paula simply smiled and said, "I
didn't sign the checks." - Michi-
gan Grandma
--*--a
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 5777 W Century
Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA
90045. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read fea-
tures by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoonists,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators. com.


1 )
4
7 1
11'
12 I
14'

151
17
18
19 1
21 F
22 F


6-28 � 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 C7


y





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


I PAVE THREE I HAVE TlWO
QUEEN5,TWO JACKS, ACES, FOUR
FOUR TEN5, ANPD KIN65,THREE
ONE EIe6T.. TWO5, AMP
ONE NINE..






Pickles


TIE GAME!

O-a=


For Better or For Worse


S YOO�R GRA 'PA
REALLY IE9 5


* , I AGE, I I'll



N ' T


wpm, 5VV
GRAMMAA 9IE OF0
OLP AGE AN9 -fTHE
MY GRANVA E9
o-. 0OLP A6E..




- ,,Ii5


, 0 FA\Ol S ER C
1 \F HECALIG



^ ><
- .^. t


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Why must it always take a tragedy to
bring us together ... for lunch?"


Doonesbury Flashback


Big Nate


AO, I'M HOT 6WV-
NO IA6 AWAY HALF
WHAT? MY FORTUNE TO
eRAPICATE 50ME
RANPOOM PISeASe
II AFRICA!









I KNOW EVERY
AlSWER! I MEAN,
I DON'T THINK i
KNOW... I KNOW
T KNOW! I'M ONE
HUNDRED PERCENT
POSITIVE!


ERAPICATE A WdfHOLE OKAY
P1EAS6? MY 600P- EXAMP . GREAT
ANS5, i6NHY OULUPNA'T I MEANT '-
YOU WIANT TO PO SOMETHING I
THA Tv POINTLE55.
M-! !




7 1


Arlo and Janis


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie
SUMSTEAD! DIDN'T YOU / WAS
HEAR ME YELLING POR THAT
YOU TO GET INTO Du
S-MY OFFICE? --




/ : ' .* "


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


I e-o - _ --
'PIPNFT YOUR MOM EVERTEACH YOU
ASOUT'INSIPE VOICES,' MR.WILSONI?"
Betty


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 4:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 4 p.m., 10
p.m. No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:25, 7:20, 9:55 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Transformers 3D: Dark of the Moon" (PG-13) 9
p.m., 12:15 a.m. No passes.


"Cars 2" (G) 2 p.m., 4:45, 7:30, 10:15. No passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 4:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No
passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:50, 7:50,10:35 p.m.
"X-MEN: First Class" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals Y


"ALVY HPJKAON LSY USO CPOX


IOPDGXCY ALSK VA WXYXOEXY SKW USO


CPOX YPGJAVPKY ALSK VA SIIGVXY."


- OSGIL KSWXO


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "One man never laughed. He was a giant among men. He was
Bobby Darin and he was my friend." - Wayne Newton
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-28


"But I thought I COULD throw the
ball over the house."


Today's MOVIES


C8 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


COMICS






CIASSIFIEDS


C CITRUS COUNTY




HRONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT

W14T ^^8.Q


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 C9


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


HANDSOME Widower in
decent shape seeks to
meet fun , loving,
intelligent, socially
extroverted woman in
her 60's or 70's with a
sweet, warm,
humorous personality
in good health,
petite or slim shape
for meaningful
conversation & other
social activities &
perhaps a personal
loving relationship
(352) 527-0591






I


w

* M





















How


To Make


Your


Washer


Disappear...



Simply advertise

inthe Classifieds

and get results

quickly!


(352) 563-5966



Ci ii 0,o id

wwwchronicleonlinecom


2 MALTESES
Snowball & Tiny sister
Sugar, 10 wks old all
shots, health certs. &
CKC reg., $400 & $500
352-212-4504, 212-1258
ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & ins 352-621-0881
BEVERLY HILLS
1 bed/1 bath with Florida
room. Close to shopping.
Washer/dryer included.
$550/mo nth.First/last/sec.
George 352-476-3570
Men's NEW & Nearly
new, leans, slacks
walking shorts, sport
shirts, 3 items for $20.
size. 38 & 40, 249-9275
VIKING
'89, Pop Up,
16ft, open, sleeps 4,
$750 obo
(352) 563-0788



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
CALL 352-476-8949
SERVICE (YOUR DOG)
EVALUATION - FREE
Veteran discount
352-464-0779



8 month old female
King Cavalier pup,
purebred, call for info
Male cat nuet 2 y.o
with all his stuff. We are
moving(352) 634-2781
FIREWOOD
U-Cut & Haul
(352) 628-9566
FREE CAT TO GOOD
HOME.CAT IS FEMALE
ABOUT 4 YEARS OLD.
LITTER TRAINED IF IN-
TERESTED PLEASE
CALL 352-422-4602 OR
352-5864424
FREE KITTENS
3 females, 1 male
litter trained,
eat solid food.
(352) 447-0072
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KING MATTRESS/BOX
SPRINGS, FREE!,
Mattress fair, Box
Springs good cond.
U pick up. 352-503-7450
TV 56"
Projection RCA, works
(352) 382-0475
WEIGHT BENCH
No weights
(352) 621-4795
WHITE FEMALE
cat spayed declawed
shots UTD under 2 yr old
owner illness forces
finding a home
(352) 209-5593


U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
$2.75/Ilb. Pesticide Free!
Ooen Saturday Only
7a-7p (352) 746-2511
4752 W. Abeline Dr.
Citrus Springs
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
Pesticide Free! $2.50/lb.
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm.
(352) 726-7907



Black & White Cat
Male, unentered
on 6/23, area N.
Filmore, Beverly Hills
(352) 527-8723
Cat male
nuet. area of Pine
Ridge. REWARD
(352) 746-2746



19FT Skiff style boat
found by boatramp at
Days Inn canal, Crystal
River, on Sept. 18, 2010,
If this is yours please
contact 352-447-2692,
ext. 304.
Young Cat
very friendly, loves to be
held, if this your kitten,
please call to identify, he
misses you terribly.
352-503-6505


--- --- q
S BANKRUPTCY
DIVORCES
CHILD SUPPORT
* 352-613-3674 *

LEARN TO SEW I
I furnish everything!
My home or yours
(352) 795-7206, Mary



CRYPT (Fl)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$4000. 586-596-7580




CARDIOLOGY
PRACTICE
Exp. Receptionist
Mon-Thurs 9-4
Fri 9-12
Email resume to:
cvsllc 10@gmall.com




Sincere, loving, caring
woman needed to care
for children & elderly
woman, app. 4 to 5
hours a week to start
References Required
Linda at 352-400-9416
or Maria at 400-9417.






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAAA O A Or'# r


Sudoku **A 4puz.com


87 34


51 73


3 8 1_ 9


7 3 6 8


2 7


2 1 3 7


1 4


96


29 517

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


6


81


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-34 1-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Crystal River Health
& Rehab Center
136 NO.E. 12th Ave
352-795-5044
accepting
applications for
R.N. & L.P.N.
Full-time and
Part-time for
3pm-1 1pm &
1 1lpm-7am
If you are a team
playerhave
Experience in Long
Term Care,
Short - Term Care
COME BY FOR A TOUR
Excellent pay, benefit
package.....

DIETARY
DEPARTMENT
Is looking for a few
serious minded, hard
working, dependable
people. Must be able
to work flexible hrs.
Drug free facility,
prior criminal
background need
not apply
Apply in Person
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE

INVERNESS MEDICAL
FT Positions
Available!
Full-time positions
available in busy,
growing cardiology
practice for
EXPERIENCED billing/
collections, front desk
and MA's. Profes-
sional attitude and
appearance is a
must. Excellent
compensation
package including
full benefit pack-
age-cardiac experi-
ence commands a
premium wage!
No weekends!
Apply in person only
to Citrus Cardiology:
308 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness.
References required,
DFWP, and
applications without
verifiable experience
will not be accepted.

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828


CLUB DIRECTOR
BOYS & GIRLS
INVERNESS CLUB.
Strong
communication
skills, as well as
leadership and
supervisory
experience.
Experience working
w/ school age youth
or comparable
setting. Full time
position w/ benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 621-4679

P/T COMPUTER
TEACHER
1st-8th grd, 25 hrs wkly.
Must be able to teach
basic computer skills,
key boarding, Microsoft
Office Word, Power
Point & Excel. Send
resume to: mspeters@
pjp2.net or fax to:
352-746-3448




BARTENDER
Who makes a good
bloody mary
early Sun am
(352) 465-7707




Avante
At Inverness
is seeking a qualified
individual for our
Maintenance/
Environment
Supervisor.
Must have a
minimum of 2 years
experience in Long
Term Care.
Electrical, Heating,
Air conditioning ex-
perience along with
knowledge of build-
ing and fire codes.
Send resume to
Mark Daniels
Administator
304 South Citrus Ave.
Inverness Fl. 34452
Or Email: mdaniels
@avantecenters.com

PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL wants
exp. tech $9hr.+comm
Apply 5882 Hwy 200




FRONT DESK CLERK
3p - 12:30am Sat & Sun
Central Motel
721 Hwy 41S. DFWP

Maintenance
Technician
Immediate opening
for a full time
Maintenance Tech
at a local apartment
community. Need
motivated individual
with previous
experience in
general mainte-
nance- plumbing,
sheetrock, electrical
and carpentry. Must
have valid drivers
license.
Drug free workplace
and EOE
Competitive salary
and benefits package
offered Send resumes
to:humanresources@
roval-american.com or
fax (850) 914-8410


V THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
SECURITY
OFFICER, P/T

All Shifts, Class D
security lic. required.
Tobacco free /
professional workplace
CALL M - F, 10a-2p.
352-257-0780

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential for
the right person to
manage a route of
newspaper racks and
stores. Must have two
vehicles and be able
to work early morning
hours.
Email
emorales@chronicleonl
ne.com or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/ svc, will train,
cond apply, all ages
17+, Call ASAP!
352-364-4121




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)



r--- -- - Eu

Act Now-

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy
I* NOW ENROLLING*
SPRING HILL
COSMO - Days
June 27th
COSMO - Nights
June 27th, Sept 19th
BARBERING - Nights
Aug. 8,
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
FACIAL TECH -Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.
NAIL TECH - Days
1st Mon. ofea. mo.
1 (866) 724-2363
1486 Pinehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606
L- - . J


CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)


NE IoW

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105




Make Money
From Home
PT or FT 10 yrs in busi-
ness & stock traded.
Over 3,000 contractual
agreements w/ biggest
retailers, turn $50 mo.
into Thousands Call for
Appt. 1-800-603-9840




BOYD'S BEARS
18 TTL, Orig Bxs, 5
Spcl Ed 1998-03, 13
W/Auth, 5 W/O. EXC
Cond. $100 746-7355

DALE EARNHARDT
Authentic 124 scale
cars, 164 scale cars.
$80/obo. (352)
503-7131; 212-6627


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





2 Window
Air Conditioners
12,000 BTU, $75.
$7,000 BTU $50.
(352) 726-9647

AIR CONDITIONER
Maytag, Window Unit,
Digital, $50
352-302-4433


DEEP FRYER
double basket, used
very little, like new,
very nice! $75
(352) 503-7084
ELECTRIC DRYER
Hotpoint, works great.
$80 527-1239
ELECTRIC STOVE
WHITE, GE PROFILE
W/CONVECTION OVEN
$325.00. MICROWAVE
CONVECTION ABOVE
THE RANGE OVEN
WHITE $125.00 OR
BOTH FOR $400.00
352-527-4319
Fridgdaire Refrig.
w/ice maker 22 cu
ft. good cond
$120 352) 246-3500
FRIGIDAIRE
Refrig. side by side
Ice & water in door
Black & stainless steel
$350 obo352- 794-3685
352-228-1445
GE 22 Cu. Ft.
Upright Freezer
white, excel. cond.
$250.
(352) 382-4615
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Eauipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
KENMORE WASHER
white, good cond.
works great 100.00
o.b.o call dennis @
352-503-7365
Maytag Kitchen
Appliances, 6 years old
Refrig. side by side,
glass top self cleaning
Stove, under counter
Dish Wash., Microwave
Almond $825. or will
separate (646)584-2740
PRESSURE COOKER
Mirro, clean, used once,
taking up storage, $11.00
270-8783
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
SOLD
KENMORE Elite
White Washer &
White Whirlpool
dryer $300.
STOVE
Friigidaire back &
white, self cleaning like
new $250 obo
Washer/Dryer GE
white ,S/S tubs, like new
$480 obo352- 601-3656
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent condition.
Can deliver
352-263-7398


2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JUNE 30
Outside- Adventure
12 Prev: 12 Auction 3PM
Tools, household,
furniture, boxes of fun
SUN.JULY 3
Antlaue & Collectible
Auction 1998 Jaguar,
1971 Mercedes, Many
Clocks, Art from world
traveler, Estate firearms,
Lladros, Antique to Mid
Century Furniture Inc full
rattan set, Great
assort, See webslte:
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc



STIHL CHAIN SAW
14" model MS180C.
New condition, used
once. $175
(352) 270-1366



32" TV
Sanyo, $75.00
352-228-1325
PANASONIC 5 DVD
DISC HOME THEATER
1000 WATT SURROUND
SOUND, 1 YEAR OLD
$100.00 352-726-0686
Sharp 32" tube TV with
stand, $85 or best offer
(352) 344-4978
400-8193
Call after 10am



Florida WINDOWS
(2)6X6 sq. windows
(3) 4x5 sq windows,
(1)38x80 $800 OBO
(352) 794-3081



APPLE IPOD
CLASSIC 160GB
Exc condition, $90
http://www.saacek.com
(352) 464-4400
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
NETGEAR ROUTER
RangeMax Wireless,
WPN824 v3 $20
http://www.saacek.com
(352) 464-4400
WIRELESS ROUTER, by
D-link Like New Includes
stand & install CD $15
Great for home or office
352-382-3650



Jon Deere Tractor
Brand New, 15hrs.
JDLA115 19.5HP,
42 Hyrdo $1,600.
352-382-3663


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


628793415
I 519 4 2 6 7 3
14 3 7 8 5 1 2 S9 5
74 3 51962 8
856237 1.49
29164 83 5 7
375 18 4962
964372581
182965734


[O^rA ljl:[l j l1 ^ 11 1 r l r', r 1 1 1 -i r T' i ^
TOADVER TIS IIA
KI5aaaM * *

ORPLC YU A OLNEA

ww~croiceolie o







C10 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


42" ROUND SOLID Oak
Table. Natural finish.
Like new. $200
(352) 382-5883



70" La-Z-Boy double
sofa sleeper, like new,
$175 obo48" round
kitchen table, 4 chairs,
$100obo Call after 10a
344-4978, 400-8193



Armoir
(Drexel Studio)
Excellent condition,
$400 (352) 364-1725

aM


Bar Stools
PLUSH, BAMBOO,
SALMON COLORED
CUSHIONED, 2 for
$80.00 464-0316
BED
king sized, bed mattress
and box springs, $75
352-364-1771
College Deal
country plaid, sleeper
sofa matching love
seat, dining rm table
78" L 6 chairs 42" w.
entertainment center
$375(352) 270-3613
COMPUTER DESK good
condition, cabinet and
drawer, $35
(404)416-9362


CHAIR Burgundy with
gold diamonds, comfy,
$50 (404)416-9362
Dining Room Set
Henredon, solid ash,
clean lines, beautiful,
large table w/6 chairs,
and China cab. $1,500
(352) 304-6293
Dining Room Table
2 leaves, 6 fabric chairs
and China Cabinet
dark wood
$725.
(352) 527-8766
DINING TABLE W/4
CHAIRS & BENCH
Cherry top & seats
w/black legs, Exc. cond.
$100 firm 563-1615


DUTAILIER GLIDER
CHAIR/FOOTSTOOL,
Excellent Condition, $75
352-201-2665
Entertainment Center
Large off white
71"54'X21" 4 glass dis-
play doors, 2 Ig
cabinets, adj shelves
$125(352) 302-8797
Entertainment Center
with 36" TV
2 glass doors, both
in excellent cond. $400
(352) 364-1725
FLORIDA ROOM TABLE
& 4 ROLLING,
CUSHIONED CHAIRS
$75.00 464-0316


CLASSIFIED




LAZYBOY RECLINER
Blue, like new,
$50.00 422-2025

LIFT CHAIR RECLINER
Brand new. Only used
two weeks. Perfect condi-
tion. Purchased from
Quality Mobility in Crystal
River. Cost $800, selling
for $350. Located in
Sugarmill Woods. Call
Jim at 410-504-2860

OAK HUTCH
w/matching dinette
tab,4 chs. $350.
Q. hdbd solid oak,
mattress/frame $75.
(352) 220-8211


Pinewood table
w/ 4 chairs $85.
dark hard wood tabl
w/6 barrels chairs $115
no call before noon
(352) 628-4766

Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808

RATTAN TABLE, Glass
top, with 4 chairs,
Great for Lanai,
$100.00 527-8663

RECLINER
clean, used, Green in
color-$50.00
352-257-5722 for details


LOVESEAT
wingback, fair condition,
$50.00 352-228-1325
RECLINER
light green cloth, very
good condition, $75.00
352-382-1972
SOFA Burgundy and
gold, very comfortable w/
throw pillows, great condi-
tion, $100 (404)416-9362
SOFA
clean, used, traditional
style-$100.00
352-257-5722 for details
SOLD
2 WHITE WASHED
BOOKCASES
12' Deep, 80" High,
24" wide. $30. ea.


50OLD^
3 Piece Light Wood
Glass Top Tables. 2 end
and I coffee. $150
SOLD
4 PIECE light blue floral
king hide-a-bed sofa,
loveseat, chair,
hassock & 4 pillows.
$400
SOLD
White King size bed
headboard footbd
mattress box springs
like new $400. pd new
$1700
TWIN XL MATTRESS
SET, Very clean-$75.00
352-257-5722 for details.


VANITY
70's, small, $55.00
352-228-1325
WATERBED
New, Queen sized,all
accessories included,
no frame, paid $169,
asking $100.
(352) 746-4874



AGRI-FAB 42' LAWN
SWEEPER -Tow behind.
Great condition.
$175. (352) 270-1366
CRAFTSMAN
2.5 hp gas engine
Edger ,runs good $50.
(352) 465-0721


nvik= ,es Dn f; 'y


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.


Attention Consumers
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Owner/Manager Name:
Eddie Taliaferro

Business Name:
Real Tree Service

How long has the business been in
operation in the Citrus County area?
21 years

Describe the service/product you offer?
We supply Citrus County with quality
service at reasonably affordable prices.

What do your customers like best
about your business?
We're on time, we do what we say we're
going to do and we back up our work 100%.

What is something your business
offers that people don't expect?
One thing is that the owner is on site and
is one of the most knowledgeable
professionals here in Citrus County.

Why did you choose this business?
The tree business has chosen me and my
prior generations.

What are your business hours,
address, phone number and e-mail?
We may be contacted 24/7 at 352-220-7418.
Leave a message and you will be
contacted within 30 minutes!


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452


*' THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641

All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955

CAREY'S TREE SERVICE
Complete Tree Care
and MORE!
352-364-1309, lic./Ins

Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436

DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825

TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696




A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705

BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop - Cordless
Phone- Cell Phone
* U.P.S and Rebuild
Camera. Watch
SHearing Power Tool
SWheel Chair . Alarm
* Power Tool Etc.-
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness


Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273


A L. - IN


I Siding* Soffit* Fascia* Skirting* Roofovers* Carports [
*Screen Rooms* Decks* Windows* Doors* Additions
352-62-7519 I
www.Advancedaluminumofcits..cor .


Ba
*******-
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Disabeled
Any Hrs., Exc. Ref's
352-341-0404
Cell 850-242-9343




ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174
NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311



Entertainment Centers
furn. vanities,cabinets
Top Quality reasonable
352 726-5832/212-3532



ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300





Leek
Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 850-201-7451




1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129







L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up,
hauling352 220-6761




A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *




Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935


I) *J . I ,


VACATION IN P I fishing
YOUR OWN 'Pat &o
BACKYARD... Drievways
I* Inerlocking
Order Nour Pool Today Bnck vers
* Weekly
Pool Service
* Lic. & insured
CPC1456565

352-400-3188


John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc132549 302-9269




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733


Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374




A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do It AllI!
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
L &J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal,cleanup,haul.
(352) 726-9570
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190
CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522




SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions.comrn
Free Est 352-503-7464




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
6" Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 352-621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


chronicleonline.com


FOR MORE INFO CONTACT GALE RANDALL.352- 563-3266


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


6-28 � LaughingStock Internalional Inc, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS, 2011

"Mildew, don't think I haven't noticed

your little trips to the flea market."









JOHN GORDON ROOFING


0 & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269 0


Rooin *i CC359 HoeInspetrH26


Craftsman Riding
Lawn mower
42" deck
15.5 hp $400
(352) 746-7357.
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, $2800.
352-527-4114
352-445-9901
LAWN TOOLS
Blower, Spreader, Chain
Saw, $30 each
http://www.saacek.com
(352) 464-4400
LAWN TRACTOR
38" Yard Machine used
only 50 hours, looks like
new, must be seen
$550. Steve (352)
794-4118 lye message



WOMEN'S RUNNING
TOPS (10),Variety of
name brands, Nike,
Adidas brand new. L or
XL $10 (352) 464-4400



(2) VERY NICE
SUITCASES - 1 LARGE - 1
MEDIUM. $20
(352) 628-1723
5,000 watt Coleman
generator, new, never
used, $450.
(352) 400-8662

BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop Cordless
Phone. Cell Phone
. U.P.S and Rebuild
. Camera- Watch
. Hearing. Power Tool
. Wheel Chair - Alarm
. Power Tool Etc.-
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness
BATTERY OPERATED
HUMMER, LITTLE
TIKES, HAS CHARGER,
NEEDS BATTERY $50.
1-352-613-0529
CARDS (100)
Sports and non-sports
cards. $1.00 each.
352-453-6668
COMFORTER, w/skirt,
2 shams,3 throw
pillows.King,dark sage
w/multi patches. Exc
cond $50 563-1615
DOG CARRIER
SHERPA CLASSIC,
Brand new, $35
http://www.saacek.com
(352) 464-4400
Dress Form
$25.
(352) 637-2254
Grandfather Clocks
For Sale
$250.
(352) 726-3217
KING COMFORTER
w/2 shams & skirt.
BH&G white w/lt sage
skirt &trim w/pink flowers.
New $60 563-1615
KING PATCH WORK
QUILT, JCP, beige
w/multi pattern,It weight.
Never used $40
563-1615
LONGABERGER BAS-
KET, 1985 Christmas
cookie edition, $100.00
637-6967 leave message
if no answer
Men's NEW & Nearly
new, jeans, slacks
walking shorts, sport
shirts, 3 items for $20.
size. 38 & 40, 249-9275
POOL/MULTI
GAME TABLE
Sears, $60
352.637.3196
PROPANE FURNACE
MOBILE HOME
Exc Cond 45000BTU
Model #migh05ga aw
$300(352) 563-1855



FREE!
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.
- Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
- 1 item per ad
- Ad must contain price
- $3.25 per additional line

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.







ALUMINUM WALKER
FOLDS UP FOR
TRANSPORT, $20.00
464-0316


SION, 4" HIGHER
$25.00 464-0316









BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



DRUMS, Gammon 7
piece drum kit.great be-
ginners set with upgraded
crash ride and high hat
Zildjian cymbals. $300.00
Call Jim 464-4490
SOLD
Banjo
$40.




CARPET CLEANER
Bissell, Proheat
$45.00
352-527-4319
CROWN MOLDING
*New* Fancy Wide De-
sign, 25 ft & 2 corners
$40 352-382-3650
LIGHT FOR CEILING
FAN Designer Brass and
Glass, 5 bulb Email pic
$30 MUST SEE
352-382-3650
PRO STEAM CLEANER
Commercial grade steam
cleaner with attachments
$100 http://www.saacek.
corn (352) 464-4400



Gym Quality Exercise
Bike, hard or easy work
out programs, all digital
even works the arms
$175(352) 464-0316
SOLD!!!
Schwinn Airdyne
$120 cash
TREADMILL, ALL ELEC-
TRONICS LIGHT UP 1
problem needs fuse or
something else $50.00
OBO 464-0316



BIKE (KIDS)
needs tire, $20
352-465-1616
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FEG PA-63 (9X18) PIS-
TOL, This is a complete
package deal: Pistol, Hol-
ster, 2 extra Mags and 3
bxs of Russian Ammo,
$300 FIRM, Ask for
Randy :563-1509, A great
Concealed carry Pistol
Olympic Arms
AR15.. $733.00
Shiappa Rhino 357
mag $719.00
(352) 447-5595
SMITH & WESSON
Body Guard 380
w/trac $390.00
(352) 447-5595
SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
HEAVY DUTY
UTITLIY TRAILER
Dual axle, diamond
plattffed metal.
$1300/obo. (352)
794-3081; 228-2324



BABY ITEMS baby swing
$10, girl baby bouncer $
5, girl baby clothes
nb-3mo $.25-$3,
352-364-1771


hardly used, $15
352-465-1616
BABY TUB
good condition, $5.00
352-465-1616
TODDLER PLAY-
HOUSE, STEP 2, BEIGE,
GREEN ROOF, SHUT-
TERS, GREAT SHAPE
$75 352-364-1771

Sel r wa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










Want to Buy
Nice Clean Dblewide
3 Bd, 2 Bth, on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 828-728-4834
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED VIDEO
GAMES COLLECTION.
LRG OR SMALL. FOR


2 MALTESES
Snowball & Tiny sister
Sugar, 10 wks old all
shots, health certs. &
CKC reg., $400 & $500
352-212-4504, 212-1258
BIRDS One Scarlett Ma-
Caw and One Congo Af-
rican Gray. 800.00 each
with cages 352-464-3314
Breeding Pair
Rottweilers
Female in Heat
$400 pair
(352) 341-0934

LeQQk
English Bull Dog
Puppies I male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com
Mini Dachshund
Long Hair Pup
Champion blood lines
Female blk & tan $400
(352) 795-6870;
220-4792
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
many avail, males & fe-
males starting @ $450.
Appoots avail 7 days a wk.
Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Shi-A-Poo & Toy Poodle
Female $250 Male $200
CKC registered. 8 wks
Hlth Cert., Paper
trained, great with kids
(352) 489-6675

Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAAA-Tr^AA-^


ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will email
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $450. mo. + Dep.
RV, $325 + electric
352-795-0061
Crystal River
2/1, $515 incls W/Sew/
trash 352-584-3348
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, DW, Remodeled,
$550. mo 352-795-0898
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/I, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-8810
352-446-9701
DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo Ist & $200
Sec. 352-625-4339
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO/INV.
Nice 2/1, lease, no pets
Water. lncl'd.$425.mo
$425 sec. 352-726-7319
HOMOSASSA 1/2
Bd $330mo. 2bd $450
Crystal RIv. waterirt 3bd
$680.352-422-1932
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524

HOMOSASSA
3/2 DW $650 + sec 352
503-6747(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA 3/2
DWMH No pets $625 mo
$600.sec. 352-613-1921
HOMOSASSA
3/2, DWMH, FP, $675
2/2, $550, Homosassa
3/1'2, $575. Hernando
352-628-0913
INVERNESS 2/1
Plus in-law apt. $400.
1st/Ist/sec . No pets
(352) 419-7228
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-/2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964






3/2, 2 Acres, fenced,
Homosassa
Owner Financing
(352) 302-9217

AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 turn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077

DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040

PALM HARBOR
HOMES
has closed 2 model
centers Save up to
$60K on selectmodels
(813) 719-3335

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183





A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182

HERNANDO/Ap. Shores
4552 N. Pine Dr., Handy
person special 75x 100
lot, on dead-end quiet
street, $8,000 Appt.
only (502) 330-0260
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204



HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW fecnced 2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms nearly
new a/c unit X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411


LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 /2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807


CLASSIFIEDS




MORRISTON
READ THIS ONLY
If you are you
interested in 2.67 acres,
keep horses, fenced,
spotless 3/2 furn'd 2001
MH, out bldg w/elect.
$80K, Owner financing.
Dale Ravens Rainbow
Springs Community
Realty Inc.
352-489-1486


-E.
2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2, furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
1st month lot rent
(352) 817-1987
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR, $350/up; 1BR, 1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR,
1-/2BA, $450 includes lot
rent; 12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964

YOU'LL THIS!
MAKE OFFER
Inverness
2 lots/ 3 Mobile
Homes off Turner
Camp Rd
813-545-3457
Opt For Owner Finance
2/1'2 Bath, 55+ Park
washer/Dryer, range
refrigerator, MUST SEE!
Lot Rent $249.
352-419-6825, 464-0590
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090





(See MeNowr)

Homosassa

3/2, DW

Move In

cond. River

view minsto

Gulf

$29K or rent

$675.

(352)

212-7272













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FlI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000


-IE
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
until. Includ. $600. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, furn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
utll. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964



CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all until. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699

SGREA PRICE"
GREAT VALUE
Move-In Special
S*******
SKNOLLWOOD
Townhouses I
$565.00
2BR - 1'h BATHS
Sec. Deposit $250. I
I 1st Mnths Rent $250.
No Pets CALL
352-344-1010
MON. WED. THURS.
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED

INVERNESS
2/2 Pool. tennis + facili-
ties, H20, W/D+ appl's
incl. Scr. patio, 2nd Fl.
$645. (973) 222-1100

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341


MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
IstMO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626





*/THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000SQFT
Ideal location, corner
Hwy41 &48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391
INVERNESS
Salon, 160 N. Fla. Ave.
352-201-2958


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 CIL


BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 Sun rm. Den,
55+comm 352-746-2621
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000 dn + lot rent,at
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, $595/mo Ist sec
(352) 697-0770.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 laundry rm w/W/D
Kings Bay area. (352)
726-6515; 407-791-2642
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/ 1,C/H/A $450 + dp
(352) 464-2716
INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. 786-999-2365




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/3, Pool Home, w/
office, Util. incl'd, $1,900
mo.+dep 352-621-4600




BEVERLY HILLS
1 bed/1 bath with Florida
room. Close to shopping.
Washer/dryer included.
$550/month.First/last/sec.
George 352-476-3570
BEVERLY HILLS
2 or 3/1.5/1 garage
57 S. Harrison $600
(352) 697-1907
Beverly Hills 2/1/1
Nice Fen'd yd $495. EZ
Terms (352) 410-6699
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
3/3.5/2 Beautiful, Pine
Ridge area, full guest
house, shop/RV pad, 5
acres. No restricitons
$1500/m(954) 612-6779
BLACK DIAMOND
Lecanto Gated Comm.
3/2/2/2, SS kit. appls,
custom flooring. W/D.
Free cable & lawn care
$1,100. (352) 527-0456
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 2/2 w/
scrn. rm. great location
IncI water, sewer, lawn,
Fl. Pest & Soc mem.
$900. (352) 422-4086
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1,000 @ MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITY OF
HERNANDO
1 bedroom. 1 bath. 1,300
sq ft house. Over an
acre of property.
Call 813-277-4045
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
lovely 3 or 4/2, white
picket fence, sunken
hot tub, E-Z Terms
352-228-2587
INVERNESS
2/2/2, Great Location
Fl. Rm., Appl's Incl'd
$750.mo (352) 637-0894
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relax.com


BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 1 or 2 Bd. Rm.,
EZ- TERMS $485.,




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

INGLIS 3/2
furn, w/dock on With.
River on stilts. Incl until.
$1400/mo 352-267-4632




CRYSTAL RIVER
$100 a wk. incLs
everything 352-634-0708




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/carport. CHA
Remodeled, $600 or
$58k (352) 897-4447
(352) 697-1384




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




Crystal River RV Lot
For Sale
Snowbird/Investor/Visitor
star gated com-
munity. Must sell.
Will take $39,900 if
close quickly.
GREAT LOT!!! Con-
tact at 860-841-8419
leave message or text

For Sale ,
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester
4A7-76R1-n97


FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE






GREAT DEALS
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



<, " T


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





For Sale B,,1
Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161




OWNER FINANCING
Fabulous 3/2 Like new.
SS appliances, custom
flooring, 2 car garage +
golf cart/2 lanai's
Price to sell. $195K.
(352) 527-3501




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yd. new roof,
dble carport, poss. rent
to own. $59,900
(352)464-0641
(239) 298-0076




Cit. Spas. & Homosassa
Homes for Sale or Rent
Will Finance * Also
RMS. FOR RENT $135 wk
(352) 422-1284


CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440




2 BR, 1 BA, I car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see 59,000
(352) 419-6719
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.lnvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnanlll@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.




EXCELLENT
OWNER
FINANCING

$137K






Sits high on a hill
w/great view 3/2/2
w/bonus rm. Approx
2650sf U.R. 2100 sf.
Real Mexican Tile.
Brand new Jaccuzzi,
raised oak cabinets,
kitchen island. Lrg
stone fireplace in
great room, 3 very
large bedrooms,
2 bigwalk in closets,
florida room.HOME
JUST totally UPDATED
Beautiful
landscaping and 800'
of vinyl, picket &
privacy fencin,
almost an acre
Owners Winter Home
FOR SALE or LEASE.
(352) 341-1334


3/2 2200

sq ft.
33' htedinground
pool w/sum kit.
near schools, hospital
$150K, 1350 NE 7th av
352-564-0001 day
352-794-6504 night





For Sale ,A






2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Fan rm. w/frpl.
2000+sf living + encl.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19 Jungleplum Ct. E.

I )MJ1ZI I


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com


This page is a great opportunity to showcase

those special homes. The Open House

weekend page will be published July 9, 2011.


i -O -.Ni E 5Call Kim Thrombley

w.chronflne.om 565-5218 for more details










WORDY GURDi Y TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Atop a mafia chief (1) Every answer is a rhymi
pair of words (like FAT (
| 1and DOUBLE TROUBLE
2. Imprison NASCAR star Earnhardt (1) theywill fit in the letter
squares. The number afti
definition tells you howi
3. Tactlessly frank actress Helen (1) syllables in each word.

�I ICo u2011 UFS, Dist. by Unv. Uclic(
4. Computer nerd's seven-day spans (1)


0008C18



ng
CAT
E),and

ter the
many


k for UFS


5. Cosmetics drastic reorganization (2)


6. More miserly snoozer (2)


7. Being suspicious of recon work (2)


9NIlflOOS DNI lO 'L HadUdMS HRdV3HD *9 dflIXVHS dll dIVN "
S1IA~M SXMD ' INflH i NfHINI ' U TV( liIVP " NO( NO I
6-28-11 SH MSNV


... ................................................. ..





2419. .9. ...............


"Let's Go To The
Real Estate Auction"
Call Lisa for the
details
352-795-0784
Plantation Realty
plantationrealtylisinas
.com
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner


For SaleA
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283

FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498

HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


Gitta Barth/Realtor

Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc


SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME Ozello Keys
private boat dock &
ramp. 1000sqff upstairs,
1000sqff screened
downstairs. 2/1.
Fenced yard, CHA
Owner Finance. 5%
down payment.
$174,900. Call Craig
352-422-1011





Crystal River Area
Professional business
person w/ excellent credit
looking to lease option,
rent to own or buy a
home w/ owner financing
in the CR Area. If
interested please call
352-388-1064 or email
home-
search352@gmail.com.





BY OWNER
Residential Building Lots
W. Highland & N. High-
land. Must buy both
$25,000/firm. Please no
agents. 617-471-7417





HERNADO .88 acres
with well, septic and
power all in place.
For more details call
Kristin Holland at
Plantation Realty
352-220-1186.

INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033


m-I

2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000
(352) 382-3202





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday s.

Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.

To place your free
ad, simply go to:
WWW.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.




JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
ALUMINUM
PROPELLER, V-4, Fits
60-115HP, $80.00
464-0316
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
PROPELLER, FITS V-6,
140 ON UP, Aluminum
$80.00 464-0316
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
STAINLESS STEEL
PROPELLER, off of 200,
V-6, $85.00 464-0316


Mariner 4 HP, Engine
runs great,
$450. obo
(352) 795-6870;
(352) 220-4792
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066
STAINLESS STEEL
PROPELLER, 13.5x18
$80.00 464-0316




19 Flare made by
Lake wells Fl.
Evinrude w/kicker
$800 obo(352)
794-3081 352-228-2324
'08 SEA PRO
176CC, 90 Merc. Opti-
Max. 24V Minnkota
w/autopilot trolling mtr.
2 fish finders - 1 w/GPS
On brd batt charger.
$13,000 (352) 552-2950
12'ALUMACRAFT
2008, Jon Boat, Nice,
with Tilt Trailer, 2006-9.8
Nissan motor. $1,300
OBO Call 352-634-4421
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019
BASS TRACKER 3
1979, Bass Boats Inc.,
16ft W/ Trailer. Many new
items. $2,000 Firm.
352-634-2791
BASS TRACKER 3
50hp Mercury, with trailer.
Too many new parts to
list. $2,000.00 FIRM
352-634-2791

se THIS OUT!
C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22' out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
ice box,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
induded.Exc.condion,used app
50 hoursAsking
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.
CRESTLINER
Pontoon boat, fresh
water, 2085 CFI 1996
customized and refur-
bished, fiberglassed
deck, 75HP motor re-
done, bimini top &
other seat covers, new
trolling motor & battery
(MinnKota) perfect for
fishing, cruising or scal-
loping, $8,000 Call for
particulars, (941)
662-9077 cell or
(352) 201-2656



SOLDAT N FE

WOL WD
INT~ERE

EXPOSUR


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272
HURRICANE
KAYAK, SANTEE 116
SPORT ,L11"6" W36LBS
USA MADE XCON $775
352.503.5319
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658




JAMBOREE 89
Class C, 24' 59k Miles
exc cond $6500 obo
(352) 795-3729




8FT SLIDE IN
CAMPER
for pickup, good cond.
$1,200 obo
(352) 860-1055
HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8, very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797
ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27' 2005,
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper, Q bed, 2nd
dr. 20' awning $16k obo
(352) 527-9535
VIKING
'89, Pop Up,
16ft, open, sleeps 4,
$750 obo
(352) 563-0788
WILDERNESS
19 FT.
$1,500 obo
(352) 860-1151




MUSTANG RIMS
Set of 4, 18" x 18.5", fits
2005 - 2011, polished
alum., like new, asking
$1,000 OBO
(352) 795-0558
NEW GOODYEAR TIRE
& WHEEL 245/75/22.5
on 10 lug wheel.
$100 firm 563-1615




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909

4 BIG SALEII +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments A*
352-461-4518
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not �
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144


We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, Titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794




2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JUNE 30
Outside- Adventure
12 Prev: 12 Auction 3PM
Tools, household,
furniture, boxes of fun
***** **
SUN, JULY 3
Antlaue & Collectible
Auction 1998 Jaguar,
1971 Mercedes, Many
Clocks, Art from world
traveler, Estate firearms,
Lladros, Antique to Mid
Century Furniture Inc full
rattan set, Great
assort, See webslte:
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc

' THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.

ACURA
2007 TL equipped w/
tech package, navi
a diamond $18,990
866-838-4376

* BIG SALEII !!
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

BMW
2006 750 BMW 750LI
2006 black mint 52000 mi
19.6/25 mpg $34,000
OBO 352-382-7489

BMW
2008, 328i leather
sunroof mint cond.
$21988
866-838-4376

SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

BUICK CENTURY '95
Cold A/C, 143K miles, 6
cyc.,3.0 L, runs great!
$900 Firm
(352) 228-1897
CADILLAC
1995, sedan, Deville
Cadillac, 132,000 miles,
runs good, $1250. Call
Bob @ 813-469-2392
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded, AC, good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900 (352) 503-6431


Camero, red w/ 2 tops
needs head gasket,
new tires, well maint
$1200(352) 302-8797
CHRYSLER
1980, LeBaron, Six cylin-
der, automatic. Very relia-
ble. Good body. No A/C.
$775 OBO 352-726-9416

CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring LXI
leather, power seats
69k orig miles $6990
866-838-4376

FORD
2000 Escort SE
60K org. mi.,32 mpg
$5,500
(352) 382-7783

HONDA
2004 Accord LX
coupe 77k miles
$10990
866-838-4376

HONDA
2007 Civic hybrid
44k orig miles, mint
cond. 48 mpg better
hurry call for deal!
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2007 Elantra 27,000
miles, Great
Condition/Great on Gas
$10,500 352-212-7454
LINCOLN
2000 Lincoln Town Car
Executive L
Black on black $2500
OBO (352) 422-7755
LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL
1998 Good cond. Runs
well. LOADED! $2000
(352) 794-3134
MONTE CARLO
'05, great cond., runs
great 1 owner 73K mi.
$6,800
352-613-4071
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625

SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376

TOYOTA
2005 Camry LE
low miles, nicely
equipped $9988
866-838-4376











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
i # , # ,# ,A ,


FORD
'74, Fl00, 360/C6, LB
w/ extra rebuilt 360
$1,400
(352) 564-4598




88 FORD
Square bed w/topper
runs great, great farm
truck etc.$999.00
(352) 795-0088

4 BIG SALEII +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

CHEVY
2003 Silverado 28k
orig miles, bedliner a
must see pick up call
fast! 866-838-4376

CHEVY
'95, Sl10, V6, 5spd. 152k
mi, good cond. new
tires, runs excel.. $2,500.
(352) 382-2199

FORD
1986 F150 w/ 302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800 (404)416-9359

FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934

FORD
2003 F250 Lariat
super duty 6.0 diesel
lift kit stack exaust
chip, too much ride
call for deal!
866-838-4376


* THIS OUT!
FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920

FORD F 250
99 Lariat, 150k mi 4x4
Extented cab 4 dr.
$5,650 352-201-0177

GMC
'03, Sonoma 65K mi., 6
cyl. Clean, excel, cond
Red w/ silver $7,000
obo 352 382-3663

TOYOTA 05
Tundra Max low mis.
X warrty tool box tow
pkg new tires $12,500
cell(727) 644-0157

TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADEDITow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622





CADILLAC
2004 Escalade EXT
suv diamond white
pearl 58k orig miles
wheels all the ride
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

GMC
1995, Suburban,
4WD,3rd row seat, runs
excellent,$2000 obo call
(352)201-0374

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376


CIMUT1111U7


Home * Finder


www.chroniclehor-efinder.com


Faut Your Dream*u Home


Search Hundreds of Local Listings


www.ch ron iclehomefinder.com


502-0628 TUCRN
Vs. Lexington Homes, Inc. 51-2009-CA-6456WS Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR PASCO COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: Case No.: 51-2009-CA-6456WS
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, successor by merger to First South Bank,
Plaintiff,
v.
LEXINGTON HOMES, INC., a Florida corporation; CRAIG J. FIEBE, individually; LAURIE A.
GRIFFIN-DYL; CYPRESS VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; GLEN HOBBS,
INC.; C. STERLING QUALITY ROOFING, INC.; L&S SUPPLIES LLC; MONTROSE SHELVING,
INC.; CEMEX CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS OF FLORIDA LLC; OVERHEAD DOOR COM-
PANY OF CLEARWATER, INC.; BLAIR' S AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING; C&C WINDOW
& DOOR CO. INC.; ANTHONY T. SAVARESE; MADEWELL KITCHENS INC.; SOUTHWEST
LAWN SPRINKLERS INC.; SPRINGWOOD ESTATES UNIT 4 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.; VALLEYCREST LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE, INC.; SPYGLASS AT RIVERBEND
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; REUNION RESORT & CLUB OF ORLANDO MASTER
ASSOCIATION, INC.; LAKE JOVITA HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SERENGETI
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.; PAVIMENTO, INC.; DENNIS ROSASCO; RIVER BEND
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; JOHN/JANE DOE I, as unknown tenants in posses-
sion; JOHN/JANE DOE II, as unknown tenants in possession; JOHN/JANE DOE III, as
unknown tenants in possession; and JOHN/JANE DOE IV, as unknown tenants in pos-
session;
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 13,
2011, entered in Case No. 2009-CA-6459-WS pending in the Sixth Judicial Circuit
Court in and for Pasco County, Florida, in which Branch Banking and Trust Company
is the Plaintiff and Lexington Homes, a Florida corporation, Craig J. Fiebe, individu-
ally, Laurie A. Griffin-Dyl, Cypress Village Property Owners Association, Inc., Glen
Hobbs, Inc., C. Sterling Quality Roofing, Inc., L&S Supplies LLC, Montrose Shelving,
Inc., Cemex Construction Materials of Florida LLC, Overhead Door Company of
Clearwater, Inc., Blair's Air Conditioning & Heating, C&C Window & Door Co., Inc.,
Anthony T. Savarese, Madewell Kitchens, Inc., Southwest Lawn Sprinklers Inc., Spring-
wood Estates Unit 4 Homeowners Association, Inc., Valleycrest Landscape Mainte-
nance, Inc., Spyglass at Riverbend Homeowners Association, Inc., Reunion Resort &
Club of Orlando Master Association, Inc., Lake Jovita Homeowners Association, Inc.,
Serengeti Homeowners' Association, Inc., Pavimento, Inc., Dennis Rosasco, River
Bend Homeowners Association, Inc., John/Jane Doe I as unknown tenants in posses-
sion, John/Jane Doe II as unknown tenants in possession, John/Jane Doe III as un-
known tenants in possession,, John/Jane Doe IV as unknown tenants in possession,
are the Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder via online Inter-
net at www.pasco.realforeclose.com at 11:00 a.m. on July 12, 2011, the
following-described property set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
PASCO COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOT 745, LAKE JOVITA GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB PHASE FOUR-A, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 54, PAGE(S) 10 THROUGH 16, INCLUSIVE,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND
LOTS 63, 64, 65 AND 66, SERENGETI UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 59, PAGES 9 THROUGH 16, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
HERNANDO COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOTS 3, 7, 8, 10, 13, 16, 17 AND 20, SPRINGWOOD ESTATES, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 37 PAGES 25 AND 26, INCLUSIVE, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HERNANDO COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOT 49 BLOCK 13, AND LOTS 3 AND 13 BLOCK 15, SPYGLASS AT RIVER BEND, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 106 PAGES 206 THROUGH 219,
INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
CITRUS COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOT 6, BLOCK B-90, LOT 6, BLOCK B-97, AND LOT 21, BLOCK B-91, SUGARMILL WOODS,
CYPRESS VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,
PAGES 86 THROUGH 150, INCLUSIVE; PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, INCLU-
SIVE; AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, INCLUSIVE; AND AS AMENDED IN
PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A; ALL AMONG THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
AND
OSCEOLA COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOTS 301 AND 303, REUNION WEST VILLAGE 3A, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 16 PAGES 136 THROUGH 141, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Dated this 15 day of June, 2011
GRAY ROBINSON, P.A.
/s/ David S. Hendrix, Esquire Florida Bar No. 827053
/s/ Alexandra de Alejo, Esquire Florida Bar No. 43108
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite 2200, Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 273-5000 (813) 273-5145 (fax)
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21 & 28, 2011.


'02 DODGE
Ram Van 1500, 5.9 Liter
eng. V8 leather 59,500K
mi $8,888. make offer
(352) 503-7577
CHEVROLET
'02. Venture, 7 passen-
ger cold air, runs &
looks good $2 475.
(352) 201-9035
DODGE
96 Caravan 5 doors, 4
cylinder, automatic
very good cond $1500
obo(352) 476-1113
FORD
1984, Econoline 150,
work van, runs, asking
$600.00 OBO. Call
352-341-5164 after 5:00

FORD
2003 E-250 econoline
cargo van 76k miles
showroom new $8990
builders welcome
866-838-4376

HONDA
2010 Odyssey LX
low miles, 20,990
certified 100k
warranty must see!
866-838-4376




2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576
Harley Davidson
'05, 1200 Sportster
very clean, lots of
chrome & extras $5,000
(352) 344-3081
Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,200
Cry River 727-207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
HONDA HELIX
(2) 93-96 low miles
250cc 70mpg $2400 for
both (352) 697-5530
Honda Trike
'05 Goldwing,
20,000 mi. Black Cherry
$26,500.
(352) 465-6991
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995.352-601-7460
Moped
50CC, Tank,
needs repair 379mi.
$400 cash
(352) 382-7037
Suzuki 2010
Boulevard C50
Less than 800 miles, my
loss, your gain! $6,500
firm. (352) 422-4528
WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492




918-0715 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
15,2011 -July 15,2011.
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15,2011.

I I .I .


WaerB33Ent
Homes ^^I







TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


INSIDE


* ,I-~ i''I-~ I'
* I I I -~ I ~ii 'I'
* I iii I I I


I _ .I I,, I ',,,, ,
* -,,1 I hI.i -l '-I,.. II, ,,I,
* I , 1 , I I I - . I ,-I


Y O U R S O U R C E F O R A L L T H I N G S A U T O M O TI V E



Rugged and


Refined




















Ford's F-150 FX4 4x4 SuperCab with the 5.0-liter V-8 engine offers the advantages of an off-road-ready workhorse, and a practical daily driver with refined ride and handling. Its maximum towing is 9,400 pounds and payload ca-
pacity is 1,680 pounds. PHOTOS COURTESY TIM SPELL



2011 FORD F-150 FX4 SUPERCAB


TRUCK TALK
BY TIM SPELL, Motor Matters
With "FX4 OFFROAD" emblazoned on
its bed sides and the new 5.0-liter V-
8 sitting beneath the domed hood,
you might expect the Ford F-150's character to be lim-
ited to a rugged, mud-slinging brute. That's true, in part,
but the 4x4 SuperCab test truck also has a notably re-
fined driving character, upscale interior and sophisti-
cated electronics to make it a civilized workhorse.
Base priced at $36,625, the 2011 FX4 SuperCab
pickup is upgraded with a $2,950 FX Luxury Package,
giving the F-150 a drive-out price of
$40,550 after tacking on $975 desti-
nation charge.
This 144.5-inch-wheelbase model
has a 6.5-foot cargo box -- one of
three box lengths that also include 5.5- -
and 8-foot sizes. The imposing-looking
test truck is painted in Blue Flame
Metallic, which is one of seven color
choices. The greatest visual pop comes
with a special Red Candy Metallic,
which adds $250 to the price tag.
Tuxedo Black Metallic is another fitting
color for the F-150's refined and


macho character blend. Coupled with the FX4-standard
tall, gray billet-style grille with body-color surround, the
cool factor is pushed a notch higher.
FX4 models are poised on P275/65R-18 Goodyear
Wrangler all-season tires, wrapping machined-alu-
minum six-spoke wheels with painted inserts. Twenty-
inch premium painted six-spoke aluminum wheels are
a $755 option.
Power to these wheels is via Ford's 5.0-liter V-8 --
one of four new powertrains -- that is a version of the
5.0 planted in the 2011 Mustangs. Mated to a six-speed
automatic transmission, it cranks out 360 horsepower at
5,500 rpm and 380 Ib.-ft. of torque at 4,250 rpm.


Fuel economy for 4x4 models is 14 miles per gallon
city and 19 mpg highway. Fitted with a standard 3.73
rear axle, maximum towing is 9,400 pounds and pay-
load capacity is 1,680 pounds.
The 5.0's power is just right for most consumers'
needs, handling typical work duty and providing ample
on-tap acceleration for city and highway driving. More
muscle -- with a better 15/21 fuel economy -- is avail-
able with a $2,370 upgrade to the 3.5-liter V-6 Eco-
Boost. With twin-turbocharging efficiency, it propels the
F-150 with 365 horsepower at 5,000 rpm and, more
importantly, 420 lb.-ft. of torque at 2,500 rpm. This
hefty torque, coupled with a 4.10 rear axle, gives the F-
150 the grunt to tow 11,300 pounds
and tote a payload up to 2,080
pounds.
Inside the SuperCab, the well-insu-
Slated cabin prevents much of the en-
gine and road noise from entering the
cab. Ride quality also is surprisingly
good for a 4x4 pickup. The suspension
is a coil-on-shock, independent type up
front and leaf springs with outboard
shocks in the rear.
A new engineering refinement is
the F-150's class-exclusive electric
See FX4/Page D4


Cadillac Dealer Growth


Surging Globally


- and in U.S. Sales


The new Cadillac XTS concept sedan has a distinctive proportion that transcends the traditional aesthetic
of luxury sedans and pushes Cadillac design in a more progressive manner. The unique proportion creates
a sleek profile that complements the car's advanced technology elements and necessary aerodynamics.


Selling-off its remaining DTS and STS
large sedan models, Cadillac is preparing
for the debut of a model called XTS in a
concept version.
The XTS will replace both the DTS and
STS when it goes on sale next year.
Cadillac could actually run out of the
big cars before the XTS debuts, but the


brand is headed for strong sales growth
in 2011.
This increase is due mostly to the suc-
cess of the SRX midsize cross/utility vehi-
cle, which has vaulted from ninth to
second place in its segment.
The SRX is outsold only by the Lexus
RX 350/450. Sales of the CTS still lag be-


hind Cadillac's two major German com-
petitors: BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-
Benz C-Class. The BMW 3 Series is far and
away the sales leader in the segment.
The CTS only trails the Mercedes-Benz
C-Class by about 2,200 units as of April
30. The Cadillac CTS outsells the Audi A3,
A4 and A6 combined. The CTS also out-


sells its Asian competitors.
The XTS concept is just one of the
bookends that Cadillac plans to fortify
around its CTS products. Cadillac also
announced plans to build a car smaller
than the CTS about 18 months ago. The
See GROWTH/Page D3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A


~m1~* * -


-J


On


ALL NEW 2012 FOCUS SE NEW 2011 FUSION SE NEW 2012 MUSTANG
SMPG ..wMPG MPG
-. ,I Hwy 40 .y 33 wy 31
or4a -,.... z-4.


MSRP $17,620
Dealer Discount -$122


Sale Price
Retail
Customer Cash


$17,498
-$500


*16,998*


MSRP
Dealer Discount
Sale Price
Ford Credit Retail
Customer Cash


$20,280
-$782
$19,489
-$500


*18,998*


MSRP $21,925
Dealer Discount -$927
Sale Price $20,998
Retail Customer Cash -$500
Ford Credit Retail Customer Cash -$1,000
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000


*1 8,498*


MSRP
Dealer Discount


Sale Price
Retail Customer Cash


NEW 2011 EXPLORER NEW 2011 EDGE
S-- MPG
II \ iHwy 26


NEW 2011 ESCAPE NEW 2011 F150 STX


1 * )L


MSRP
Promotional Retail Bonus
Customer Cash


$34,230


-$500


$33,730*


MSRP $28,990
Dealer Discount -$792


Sale Price


$28,198


Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000


$26,198*


MSRP
Dealer Discount
Sale Price
Retail Customer Cash
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash


$26,135
-$1,166
$24,969
-$1,000
-$500
-$1,000


$22,469*


MSRP $27,340
Dealer Discount -$1,351


Sale Price
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash
F150 3.7L V-6 Bonus Cash
Retail Customer Cash


$25,989
-$1,000
-$1,000
-$500
-$500


$22,989*

I TJ 1 1*


Great basic transportation. IN 1 l9bA
S $5,995


N 1998 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS
Big on luxury small on price& a one owner too. N1T315M
$8.995


A nice 4x4 without breaking the bank. NP5536A
I 13,968


2008 FORD FOCUS 2 DR SE
Low mileage and great gas mileage. NP5555A
$14.168


2001 FORD MUSTANG BULLET
Your chance to own BULLITT number 4608 a piece of history N1TO91 C
$14.995


4 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LT 4X4 :
This is one nice and loaded SUV. NP5547
$15.968


Room for the whole family. N1 I 146A
$16.668


2003 FORD FI50 XLT 4X4 SUPER CREW 2007 MERCURY MOUNTAIN ER
Well cared for low miles 4x4, don't miss this one. NP5578A Don't miss this loaded loaded loaded mountaineer. NP5521
S 199968 $23,668


2009 JEEP WRANGLER X 4X4 2009 FORD EXPLO R E. BAUER 2006 HUMMER H2 4X4 2011 FORD FLEX SEL 2006 FORD F350 DUALLY4X4 CREW CA
Great looking fun vehicle. NP5590 Do not miss this one owner certified vehicle. N1T221A Not for everyone but whatan incredible piece of machinery N1C054A Great riding and handling with room for thewhole family NP5562 If its power you need this is the truck for you. NNT006A
$23 ,968 27,668 29 ,668 29 ,968 *30 668

* NTInglis Dunnellon
IN EN OR A : P Ocala
ni- nl o cBeverly Hills
S:i:Crystal 486
River nverness
SALESPERSON City
OF THE MONTH -FloralCity

Homosass f Nick Nicholas
a Springs Hwy. 98

Spring Hwy. 50
*- * * * BRAD HILL Hill Brooksville


NEW 2011 FIESTA SES
HWy 40MPG
I Hwy 40


$24,485
-$500


$23,985
-$500


$23,485*


pp-


r--


I


-.W


2011 North m erican^^^
kiuc o Te er Award^


I -


I - - I - - - I I


, ,


D2 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tacoma Double Cab


Pumped with TRD


Off-Road Package


There's not a lot of buzz
these days from the compact-
pickup segment, but Toyota
continues to make a strong
statement with its 2011
Tacoma. It has the right stuff
to stand out as the best-sell-
ing compact pickup truck in
North America.
A lineup with models ap-
pealing to varied tastes and
needs, muscular body lines,
refined and practical interiors,
a choice of efficient four- and
six-cylinder powertrains, and
a reputation for durability
give Tacomas an edge with
consumers.
A solid representative of
the rugged-and-refined char-
acter for which Tacomas are
known is the up-line Double
Cab V-6 4x4 (4WDemand)
model with
the TRD Off- A li
Road Extra
Value Pack- with r
age. Double
Cab V-6 4x4 appeal
models with varied
5-foot short
box start at and n
$26,145 and muscul
the TRD Off-
Road Pack- lines, I
age adds and p
$2,930 and
(manual interiors
transmission)
and $3,035 of effici
(automatic and six-
transmis-
sion). Long- power
b o x an
(6-foot- 1
inch) V-6, repul
4x4 Double
Cab models for du
require an give Ta
automatic
transmission an edg
and start at consu
$27,525.
Tacomas
equipped with the TRD Off-
Road Package address the de-
mands of those who regularly
battle hostile terrain, needing
enhancements beyond only
4x4 traction. Lessening the
challenges of steep grades are
Downhill Assist Control and
Hill Assist Control.
The DAC assists in main-
taining downhill speed to 15
mph or less and helps keep
the truck on a straight track
by independently controlling
brakes at each wheel. The
HAC helps when the pickup
is in transition from a stopped
position to proceeding up a
steep hill.
HAC independently con-
trols brakes at each wheel to
prevent the truck from rolling
back or slipping sideways.
Differential lock, included
in the TRD Off-Road Package,
plays an important role dur-
ing serious off-road situations
such as crawling through
deep mud.A tap on a switch,
with the truck traveling
below 5 mph, boosts traction
by evenly distributing traction
to both rear wheels.
Addressing the need for a
compromise between off-road
capability and on-pavement
handling, Toyota engineers
made chassis modifications.
The TRD Off-Road Package
upgrades with specially tuned
Bilstein shocks, progressive-
rate front springs that become
stiffer as they are compressed,
28-mm front stabilizer bar and
265/70/R-16 B.F. Goodrich
Rugged Trail tires.
Tacoma's 4.0-literV-6 en-
gine, protected beneath by a
skid plate, is a requirement to
get the TRD Off-Road Pack-


I



n
r





c





-

r
iC
t(

r
a
g
\I


age. This gutsy six moves the
Tacoma with 236 horse-
power at 5,200 rpm and 266
Ib.-ft. at 4,000 rpm. The en-
gine can be mated with a six-
speed manual, or for an extra
$880, a five-speed automatic
transmission.
Maximum towing capac-
ity is 6,400 pounds and the
payload max is 1,295
pounds. Estimated fuel econ-
omy is 16 miles per gallon
city and 20 mpg highway.
Toyota recommends filling
Tacoma's 21.1-gallon fuel
tank with regular unleaded
gasoline.
Along with pumping up
the grunt, the TRD Off-Road
Package dresses the
Tacoma's exterior and inte-
rior. The body is distinguished
with a
neup chrome grille
eup surround,
models body-col-
ored front
ing to bumper and
tastes over-fenders,
smoked
eeds, headlamp
ar body trim, round
foglamps,
defined chrome rear
tactical bumper, slid-
ing rear pri-
a choice vacy glass
and "TRD
ent four- OFF ROAD"
cylinder graphics on
the bed
trains, sides. Utility
d a is added
with a
action 400ow/15V
ability powerpoint
comas Inside,
the cab is fit-
e with ted with
mers. front sport
seats with
driver-side
adjustable lumbar support,
and an overhead console
with compass and tempera-
ture gauge. The seats are
trimmed in special Sport Fab-
ric, and the steering wheel
and shifter are leather-
wrapped. Refinement is
added with "metallic tone"
instrument panel accent. A
third cupholder - along with
a pair up front - planted in
the center console behind the
shifter, is especially handy.
Double Cab and Access
Cab models benefit from a
backup monitor system with
backup camera linked with
the auto-dim mirror that in-
corporates a small monitor. In
the rear is a 60-40-split
bench with under-seat and
bulkhead storage. Seatback
portions with hard rear sur-
faces fold to make a conven-
ient load floor.
For a $4,150 investment
the TRD Off-Road Extra Value
Package is offered with the
addition of a JBL Audio, fea-
turing AM/FM CD with six-
disc in-dash CD changer,
MP3/WMA playback capabil-
ity, six speakers and sub-
woofer, auxiliary audio jack,
and steering wheel controls
for Bluetooth and XM Radio.
The Tacoma Double Cab
is a large "compact" pickup,
offering upscale looks inside
and out, comfortable five-
passenger cab with easy rear-
compartment access and,
with the V-6, spirited acceler-
ation for in-town and high-
way driving. The TRD
Off-Road package expands
appeal to for those needing
an occasional dose of off-
pavement adventure.


1931 Dodge in Shootout with


American Gangster John Dillinger


CLASSIC CLASSICS
BY VERN PARKER, Motor Matters
In the early 1930s, the sheriff of Wisconsin's Iron County,
Frank Erspamer, needed an automobile in which to patrol
his jurisdiction. He lived in Hurley, Wis., but went to Besse-
mer, Mich., to purchase a 1931 Dodge four-door sedan.
Erspamer paid $950 as he took delivery of a DH-6
model Dodge. In 1931, Dodge gave customers a choice of
wire wheels with adjustable spokes or wooden artillery
wheels with elliptical spokes made of select hickory and
balanced.There was no difference in price, so the sheriff se-
lected the 3x19-inch wood wheels.The wheels were shod
with 5.00x19-inch non-skid balloon tires.
About three years passed with the Dodge faithfully
serving Sheriff Erspamer. In April 1934, word spread
through the regional law enforcement community that
bank-robberJohn Dillinger, along with several armed gang-
ster companions, were at the Little Bohemia Lodge in Man-
itowish Waters in northern Wisconsin.
Dozens of federal, state and local lawmen raced to the
resort. Sheriff Erspamer responded in his Dodge accompa-
nied by three of his deputies. Dillinger managed to escape
during the ensuing gun battle.
Following his term as Sheriff, Erspamer passed the
Dodge to his son, Bernie.The son had his father's Dodge re-
stored to like-new condition in 1980, which included re-
upholstering the interior and spraying fresh lacquer on the
exterior. Around the fabric insert in the top a coat of dark
forest green was applied.The lower portion of the car wears
a coat of light mint green.
Like most cars of that era, the fenders and apron above
the running boards are painted black.The spare tire is out-
side at the rear of the car.
The 2,820-pound Dodge is propelled by an in-line, six-
cylinder, L-head, 211-cubic-inch engine that is rated at 68


horsepower.A total of 29 louvers on each side of the long
engine hood help dissipate heat produced bythe engine.A
17.5-inch, four-blade fan pulls air through the radiator to
help control the heat in the 3.5-gallon cooling system. As
with all Chrysler products, the Dodge was equipped with
four-wheel hydraulic internal-expanding brakes.
The front interior has a bench seat and a 17-inch di-
ameter, three-spoke steering wheel. On the hub of the
steering wheel are the horn and light controls, which in-
clude both straightaway and depressed headlight beams,
cowl lights and taillight. Dodge literature points out that
the stoplight is automatic.
The ebony paneled dashboard is home to the choke
and throttle controls.All the usual instruments are clustered
near the 90-mph speedometer. The odometer can record
100,000 miles before rolling over to begin the second
100,000 miles, quite a feat in 1931.
Sprouting from the floor, so as to be close to the right
knee of the driver, is the handbrake lever and the gearshift
lever to operate the three-speed manual transmission.
Above the one-piece non-glare windshield is a fixed
metal visor. The windshield, in a chrome-plated frame, is
hinged so that it can be pushed open at the bottom to
admit fresh air into the cabin. In front of the windshield is
a pair of cowl ventilators.A single wiper keeps clear the dri-
ver's side of the windshield.
The Dodge is equipped with a single barrel up-draft
carburetor, an air cleaner, as well as a flame arrestor. The
gasoline tank has a capacity of 15.5 gallons.
In September 2001, the Dodge was still sparkling
thanks to a lot of pampering.That's when Bernie Erspamer
sold the car to his niece, Leigh Anne Price -- a grand-
daughter of Sheriff Erspamer. For the last decade, the 1931
Dodge has been shown at various events near her Min-
neapolis, Minn., home -- and it's always a favorite at the
local parades.


I D RI ' ' IN EI


The XTS concept is just one of the bookends that

Cadillac plans to fortify around its CTS products


GROWTH
Continued from Page D1
small Cadillac is expected to be
called the ATS.
"We're about a year away from
fleshing out our entire product line,"
says James R. Vurpilat, Cadillac's
global marketing director.
The CTS, which is a little bigger
than the 3 Series and C-Class -- al-
most big enough to be classed in
size with the Mercedes E-Class and
BMW 5 Series -- is recently doing
phenomenal business, Vurpilat says.
Cadillac has been selling 3,000
to 3,500 CTS sedans per month,
compared to 1,200 CTS coupes. Nev-
ertheless, the CTS coupe is the best
selling luxury coupe on the market.
The V-Series cars have been a


critical element in the revival of the
Cadillac brand. The CTS-V accounts
for about 10 percent of Cadillac's
sales. "The V-series puts us in a
league with BMW M models and
Mercedes-Benz AMG cars," Vurpilat
says. "It allows us to compete with
the finest cars in the world."
Going forward, Vurpilat forecasts
that Cadillac's biggest growth op-
portunity is in the compact luxury
segment. Cadillac's entry in that cat-
egory will have rear-drive architec-
ture.
"How much growth, I don't
know," he says. The executive is
guarded in discussing Cadillac's op-
portunities in the real premium lux-
ury category. "Our priority is to get
the main segments covered," Vurpi-


lat says. "Then we can start thinking
of cars in the S-Class and 7 Series
range," he says.
Cadillac also hopes to become a
global brand like its German com-
petitors. Last year Cadillac exports
accounted for just under 20 percent
of the brand's overall sales -- half of
those in China.
The remainder were exported to
the Middle East, Russia and Europe;
as well as NAFTA countries. "We
would like our export business to
grow to 35 to 40 percent of overall
sales," he says.
Cadillacs are sold in 42 countries
now. There are 40 dealers in Europe
at present. Vurpilat predicts that
there will be 60 Cadillac dealers in
China by the end of the year.


To advertise in


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 D3



ASK THE

AUTO

DOCTOR
WITH JUNIOR DAMATO




BAD VIBES

CALL FOR

OVERHAUL
DEAR DOCTOR: I own a 2005
Mercedes-Benz S500 with 4-
Matic all-wheel drive and
99,000 miles. When turning
the steering wheel all the
way to either side in a park-
ing lot I feel a binding vibra-
tion, as I speed up or
straighten wheel the feeling
goes away.
Also, the transmission does
not shift as firmly as it once
did.The dealer said the trans-
mission and transfer case
would need to be overhauled
at a cost of $6000. What
other solutions are there?
Barry
Dear Barry: I see this type of
problem on AWD vehicles of
many makes.
One of the biggest problems
is the lack of driveline fluid
changes. Every one of the ve-
hicles I have serviced for
these complaints had the
original fluids in them and
the fluids were burnt.
In order to change the
transfer case fluid on the
Mercedes 4-Matic, the heat
shield and transmission sup-
port needs to be removed to
drain the fluid. The transfer
case only holds a quart of
fluid.
I recommend using 3 quarts
- two to flush the unit and
one to refill it.
The front differential fluid
needs to be flushed using a
power steering flush machine
with a long plastic tube push-
ing it to the bottom on the
case.
Next, use the new fluid to
push out all the old fluid. The
transmission fluid and rear
end differential fluid also
should be drained and filled.
Make sure the shop uses only
Mercedes factory fluids.
I recommend the fluids be
changed every 50,000 miles
or 5 years.
I realize my recommenda-
tion time interval does not
agree with the factory recom-
mendation.
Junior Damato is an
ASE-certified Master Technician.
E-mail questions to
info@motormatters.biz
Mail questions to:
Auto Doctor
3 Court Circle,
Lakeville, MA 02347
Listen to Junior online
at www.1460wxbr.com
Saturday from 7am to 10 am eastern time.

COPYRIGHT IAUTOWRITERSASSOCIATESINC.. 2011


1. Crystal Chevy 866-434-3065
2. Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep 866-434-3064
3. Crystal Nissan 866-434-3057
4. Nick Nicholas Ford 726-1231
5. Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln 795-7371





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL CLUB NEWS


SUNDAY
* CITRUS COUNTY RETREADS meet for breakfast at 8 a.m. Sunday at
the restaurant at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness. All makes and
models of motorcycles welcome. Ride follows.

TUESDAY
* CITRUS COUNTY CORVETTE CLUB meets each second Tuesday on the
month thereafter to Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club 7395 W. Pinebrook
Crystal River, FL. You can find directions and maps on our web site
www.citruscorvettes.com Guests are always welcome come check us
out.
* CITRUS A'S MODEL A FORD CAR CLUB meets the 1st Tuesday of
every month at 7:30pm at the Floral City Lions Club on E. Orange Ave
(next to the library) in Floral City, FL. www.citrusas.com or contact Pat
at 352-746-7790.
WEDNESDAY
* INVERNESS "BIG DOGS" MOTORCYCLE CLUB meets for breakfast
at 8 a.m.Wednesdays at rear of B&W Rexall Drugs. Ride follows, all bikes
welcome. Call J.R. and Rachel Harris at 726-6128.
* CITRUS MOPAR CAR CLUB meets informally every Wednesday at 9
AM at Joe's Family Restaurant, 911 W Main St (Hwy 44), Inverness (next
to Auto Zone, across from the Bank of America). All car enthusiasts are
welcome to join the club members for breakfast and car chat. For further
info, call either Ken McNally at 352-341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at
352-341-1019.
* NATURE COAST CORVAIR CLUB meets the second Wednesday of
every month at 7:00 p.m. The club gathers at the B/W Rexall Drug Store
in Inverness. (They have a private dining room in the back of their restau-
rant.) Their address is 214 US Hwy 41 S Inverness. Most of of the club ar-
rives at 6:00 p.m. to have dinner and welcomes the company of other
classic car and Corvair enthusiasts. For any additional information, con-
tact David Langdon, Secretary, Nature Coast Corvair Club, 352-563-1817,
or by email at dlangdonl@tampabay.rr.com.


THE


FAST LANE
Send us your automotive and auto club events information to
wheels@chronicleonline.com

THURSDAY
* GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS CHAPTER FL1-R OF DUNNELLON
meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second, third and fourth Thursday of each
month at McDonald's in Dunnellon. Monthly gathering is the firstThurs-
day at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dun-
nellon, 6 p.m. to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call chapter director Bruce
Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
* GOLD WING ROAD RIDERS ASSOCIATION CHAPTER T OF INVER-
NESS kick tire at 6 p.m. Thursday at Burger King parking lot, corner of
U.S. 41 and S.R. 44 East. Call directors Rachel, JR Harris at 726-6128 or
Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY
* NATURE COAST MUSTANGS meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy's
on U.S. 19 in Homosassa across from the wildlife park. Bring your car
and enjoy a fun evening. Call Bob at 860-2598.
* THE WANDERERS CLUB meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot
of the Beall's Department Store on State Road 44 West of Inverness. Bring
your old car and have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966
or visit wandererscarclubofinvernessfl.com.

SATURDAY
* FREE WHEELIN' SERTOMA CLUB MOTORCYCLE CLUB meets at 9 a.m.
Saturday "on the road." Call Rainer Jakob at 726-7903 for destinations.


* NATURE COAST RETREADS meets at 8 a.m. Saturday at Momma
Sally's, US 19 in Crystal River. A ride follows.All styles of motorcycles are
welcome. Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* CITRUS COUNTY CRUISERS invites you to its weekly cruise-in from 6
to ? (depending on the weather and no-seums) every Saturday at the
parking lot next toWendy's in Crystal River. We have oldies music, trivia,
50/50s and special events the second and third Saturday of every month.
Questions call Jim at 527-0024 or Lester at 628-7021. www.citr-
uscountycruisers.com.
* CITRUS MOPAR Citrus MOPARS Car Club will have their weekly cruise-
in each Saturday at 5 PM with the Citrus County Cruisers in the parking
lot next to Wendy's on Rt. 19 in Crystal River. Call Ken McNally at 352-
341-1165 or Mike Bonadonna at 352-341-1019 for more info.


LOCAL EVENTS ALL EVENTSARE SUBJECTTO NGE

SATURDAY, JULY 2
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Closed. Call 726-9339 for more information.

SATURDAY, JULY 9
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Open Wheel Modifieds, Sportsman, Pure
Stocks, Mini Stoks, Pro Figure 8, Outlaw Mod Mini. Call 726-9339for more
information.

SATURDAY, JULY 16
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Street Stocks, Pure Stocks, Modified Mini
Stocks, Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure 8, Hornet Division, Mini Cups. Call 726-
9339 for more information.

SATURDAY, JULY 23
* CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY Super Late Models, Sportsman, Street
Stocks, Pure Stocks, Min Stocks, Florida Opwn Wheel Lites. Call 726-9339
for more information.


.. . .... ..... . . .

-~Awl


Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet


BONUS WHEELS
BY ARV VOSS, Motor Matters
It may be classified as a truck, but
the all-new Nissan Murano ragtop
actually breaks new ground. It's like
nothing that has ever appeared in the
marketplace before. It's part all-
wheel-drive crossover SUV and part
convertible, and it's called the Nissan
Murano CrossCabriolet.
Nissan's 2011 CrossCabriolet de-
livers a new and unique, custom bou-
tique design form, transforming the
Murano from a 4-door to a 2-door
vehicle on a crossover body. The
crosscab looks like the regular Mu-
rano from the nose to the "A" pillar,
but everything else from the "A" pil-
lar back is new.
The top is a three layer,
low-profile soft-top that high- T
lights the CrossCabriolet's C
sleek and sexy silhouette.
Wheel wells are pronounced, in
and there's an upper character
line that runs from the front
wheel arch to the taillamp assembly
that is consistent with the
boomerang styling of the Nissan Z.
The 2011 CrossCabriolet's curva-
ceous lines carry over into the inte-
rior, with available quilted seatbacks
and door panel inserts. The front seat
design features sloping shoulders
that offer improved forward visibility
for rear seat occupants.
The Murano CrossCabriolet draws
its motive force from a 3.5-liter


DOHC, 24-valve V6. Power is trans-
ferred from the transversely mounted
front engine, through Nissan's sec-
ond generation Xtronic CVT trans-
mission with Adaptive Shift Control
to all four wheels via an intuitive all-
wheel drive system. Horsepower rat-
ing is 265 at 6,000 rpm, and the
torque rating is 248 at 4,400 rpm.
EPA fuel economy estimates are 17-
mpg city and 22-mpg highway. Es-
sentially, the drivetrain is shared with
the AWD version of the Murano.
The 2100 Nissan Murano Cross-
Cabriolet represents innovation with-
out limits, and comes only in one
extremely well-equipped model, with:
leather appointed seating, available



he 2100 Nissan Muran

rossCabriolet represent

innovation without limil

with premium diagonally quilting for
both seats and door panel inserts;
Nissan's Hard-Drive Navigation Sys-
tem with 9.3GB Music Box Hard
Drive and XM NavTraffic; Bose
AM/FM/CD audio system with 8
speakers including subwoofer and
automatic audio adjustment for soft
top position; and RearView Monitor.
Pricing is $46,390 completely
equipped.
My first reaction to the concept
of a convertible Murano was "What


in the heck is Nissan thinking?" Pho-
tos don't really do the unusual Cross-
Cabriolet justice - it's better looking
when viewed in person.
In fact, once you've experienced
driving and riding in it, the realization
sets in that it actually overcomes the
traditional limitations of a conven-
tional convertible such as limited
trunk space, a cramped back seat and
a lack of flexibility and versatility for
everyday use. Ultimately, the Murano
CrossCabriolet reinvents the open-air
versatility issue and encourages peo-
ple to rethink what a convertible can
become.
Trunk capacity with the top up is
12.3 cubic feet, and 7.6 cubic feet
when the top is stowed; cabin
space storage is plentiful.
0 Acceleration is more than
ts adequate and handling char-
acteristics are sporty.
tS. The suspension is on the
firm side, yet not to the point
of stiffness.
The CVT transmission shifts
smoothly, but tends to allow the ve-
hicle to roll back on an incline when
letting off the brake, which may be
offset by left foot braking.
Nissan owes its success to think-
ing outside the box.
The Murano CrossCabriolet could
prove to be a big success, especially
for open-air motoring fans who have
the need for more functionality than
conventional convertibles provide.


CFX4
Continued from Page D1
power-assisted steering.
EPAS draws power only
when needed versus the
conventional hydraulic
system that runs continu-
ously off the engine. This
system contributes to im-
proved fuel economy.
Another advantage of
EPAS is that its tuning is
software-based, so it can
be custom-tuned in sync
with the truck's power-
train, wheelbase and
other factors. With EPAS
the F-150 gains on-road
feel and provides less ef-
fort to maneuver in park-
ing lots.
Along with engineer-
ing refinements, the FX4
test truck offers luxury
and convenience pluses,
making life pleasant for
long treks.
Among the extras of-
fered with the available
FX Luxury Package are:
powered and heated
leather-upholstered front
captain's chairs; auto-
matic temperature con-
trol; power-adjustable
pedals; power-sliding rear
window; premium audio
system with six-disc CD
changer and MP3 capabil-
ity; rear-view camera; and
a reverse-sensing system.
Standard on the FX4
is Ford's Sync system, al-
lowing for voice-activated


hands-free calling and
selection of songs from
the music collection on
your digital music player,
mobile phone or USB
drive.
Also standard is a 4.2-
inch LCD productivity
screen, centered in the in-
strument cluster, which
provides selections from
several categories: Gauge
Mode; Trip A/B; Fuel Econ-
omy; Truck Apps; Settings;
and Information. I partic-
ularly like the Truck Apps,
which assists those who
are towing a trailer with a
checklist of questions to
help ensure the trailer is
connected properly.
Truck Apps also pro-
vides information for off-
roaders: angle of ascent
or descent; pitch-and-roll,
which shows the angle of
surface incline, the degree
of tilt and steering angle;
and off-road gear selec-
tion, if the vehicle is in
4x4 high or 4x4 low and
if the E-locker is engaged.
With the electronic
shift-on-fly 4x4 system,
electronic locking rear dif-
ferential and skid plates,
the FX4 is outfitted to
handle the challenges of
the rough stuff.
And of course, this
rugged F-1 50 is equally at
home in the city or cruis-
ing smooth stretches of
highway.


AUTOMOTIVE CLASSIFIED

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.com email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com FAX: (352) 563-5665 * TOLL FREE (888) 852-2340


'08 SEA PRO
176CC, 90 Merc. Opti-
Max. 24V Minnkota
w/autopilot trolling mtr.
2 fish finders -1 w/GPS
On brd batt charger.
$13,000 (352) 552-2950
12'ALUMACRAFT
2008, Jon Boat, Nice,
with Tilt Trailer, 2006-9.8
Nissan motor. $1,300
OBO Call 352-634-4421
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071
BASS TRACKER 3
1979, Bass Boats Inc.,
16ft W/ Trailer. Many new
items. $2,000 Firm.
352-634-2791


BASS TRACKER 3
50hp Mercury, with trailer.
Too many new parts to
list. $2,000.00 FIRM
352-634-2791
HURRICANE
KAYAK, SANTEE 116
SPORT,L11"6" W36LBS
USA MADE XCON $775
352.503.5319
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225, 400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
VOLVO ENGINE
170 HP 6 CYL,LOW
HRS,COMPLETE,RUNS
GREAT,$800 ALSO
HAVE 2 280 OUT-
DRIVES 352-256-8488


36' Winnebago
ITASCA - 3 slides, under
11K mil GREAT COND!
Homosassa. $76,900/
obo (850) 449-1811




'07 STARCRAFT
POP-UP
17ft open. Used 3 times.
Sleeps 6 with extras.
$4200. (352) 382-5309

KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797


CADILLAC
1995, sedan, Deville
Cadillac, 132,000 miles,
runs good, $1250. Call
Bob @813-469-2392
CHRYSLER
1980, LeBaron, Six cylin-
der, automatic. Very relia-
ble. Good body. NoA/C.
$775 OBO 352-726-9416
FORD
2000 Escort SE
60K org. mi., 32 mpg
$5,500
(352) 382-7783
LINCOLN
2000 Lincoln Town Car
Executive L
Black on black $2500
OBO (352) 422-7755


IVIIUNIt I(,- 'L
'05, great cond., runs
great 1 owner 73K mi.
$6,800
352-613-4071

OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625




FORD
'74, F100, 360/C6, LB
w/ extra rebuilt 360
$1,400
(352) 564-4598


CHEVY
'95, S10, V6, 5spd. 152k
mi, good cond. new
tires, runs excel.. $2,500.
(352) 382-2199

FORD
1986 F 150 w/302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800 (404)416-9359

FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934

GMC
'03, Sonoma 65K mi., 6
cyl. Clean, excel. cond
Red w/ silver $7,000
obo 352 382-3663


TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADED!Tow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622


GMC
1995, Suburban,
4WD,3rd row seat, runs
excellent,$2000 obo call
(352)201-0374


CHEVROLET
'02. Venture, 7 passen-
ger cold air, runs &
looks good $2,475.
(352) 201-9035


1984, Econoline 150,
work van, runs, asking
$600.00 OBO. Call
352-341-5164 after 5:00




2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576

Harley Davidson
'05, 1200 Sportster
very clean, lots of
chrome & extras $5,000
(352) 344-3081


HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335

KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995. 352-601-7460

Suzuki 2010
Boulevard C50
Less than 800 miles, my
loss, your gain! $6,500
firm. (352) 422-4528


D4 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IN 1AIlI


I


i f i | i '


OLUINER ClRE
R A Jeep M(
NOW RECEIVE A NO-EXTRA CHARGE A
2-YEAR MAINTENANCE PLAN
+24-HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE


I 1 1 1


2011 200


$160PER
*169 mEo
2011 CARAVMO.
2011 CARAVAN


.CARAVAN OWNERS +

7000O
h2011 TOWN & COUNTRY


0%APR^A
FINANCING
AVAILABLE


2011 RAM
-A--


1-0058$85 2,1 00


2011 WRANGLER


wih nf ad peial Pr. icJJJing

1-800954855EL12.
IER
IWMO,


2011 CHEROKEE


w^ith Ino .a.d.eci lPrcn
1 -800-584-8755EKL4122


O PER
MO.


2011 CAUBER


BUY FOR
$13,999
2011 JOURNEY


LOWEST PRICE OF THE YEAR


2011 NITRO


Free 4 HRRecored Mssg
wihIf n pca rcn


....... 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL
S. 12077 Highway 44W Inverness, FL
Jeep CRYSTAL 14358 Cortez Blvd Brooksville, FL
mAM CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP crystalautos.com

352-564-1971


II :


TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011 D5


44a;


L^>*-


0


q%




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A9

,i //
s J


{1u JAI


2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE


I1 1 I I I
$OR OR $ PER
~1219991 OO/6oR149aMO


2011 MAUBU LT


2011 IMPALA LT


fI 800~iI-58~ '4-8755 EXLI I 6


SAVE
$ 7,0OR$29
s7r" 1 'i- ,


2011 SILVERADO


AF h.


2011 TAHOE
- IW^


:11Jji j'j :.J H


NO PAYMENTS
Till AUGUST 2011


FIND OUT THE VALUE
OF YOUR TRADE-IN
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
P"AISW 1-800-440-9054


CRYSTAL CHEVY
SAcrystalautos.com
C H EV R O L ET 1035S.SuncoastBlvdHomosassa,FL
*AI PRICES INCLUDE ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY.
PRICES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE & DEALER FEE OF $599.50. INCLUDES $2999.00
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL AUTOMOTIVE DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK A 0% APR
AVAILABLE ON SELECT YEARS AND MODELS FOR VARYING TERM LENGTHS WITH
APPROVED CREDIT + LEASE PAYMENTS BASED ON 39 W 39K MI $0.15 PER MILES
OVER W/ $3999 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE AND $599.50 DEALER FEE, WITHI
APPROVED CREDIT. ^PRICES ARE AFTER ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES INCLUDING
USA REBATENOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY EXCLUDES TAXTAGTELE AND DEALER
FEE $599.0 INCLUDES 2999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY WITHI APPROVED
3 5 2 =E OP I^ ^ 9 CREDIT 0o%. RNANCING WITHl APPROVED CREDIT. "ON SELECT MODELS WITHl
APPROVED CREDIT. ** ESTIMATED EPA HWY MILEAGE.


2011 EQUINOX


D6 TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2011


0




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs