Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02456
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 06-27-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02456

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Tastes so good: Kurt Busch wins first Sprint Cup r e /B1


I M 0ND I


TODAY & Tuesday morning
HIGH Cloudy with numerous
90 showers and thunder-
LOW storms in the afternoon.
70 PAGE A4
JUNE 27, 2011


CITRUS COUNT Y






www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 116 ISSUE 324


PROBE DEMANDED:


Man in legal fight with former Dean aide


Hamilton County resident charged with

secretly recording telephone call


Nuke plants
Senators demand probe
on nuclear safety./A12
ONLINE POLL:
Your choice?
Should county govern-
ment hire a consultant
to market business and
recreational
Sopportuni-
ties?
A. Yes. We
need a unified
voice if we are
to compete.
B. No. The county has a
funding stream for the
Tourism Development
Council and the Eco-
nomic Development
Council - plus we have
the Chamber of Com-
merce.
C. Yes. But only if it's
an existing county-
based consultant.
D. No. My taxes should
not fund marketing.
To vote, visit www.
chronicleonline.com.
Click on the word "Opin-
ion" in the menu to see
the poll.
Results will appear
next Monday. Find last
week's online poll re-
sults./Page A4


Council to look at
water speed rules
The Crystal River City
Council will have a spe-
cial meeting at 6 p.m.
Monday to discuss pro-
posed federal rules that
would restrict King's Bay
to slow speed year-round.
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service is propos-
ing the summer 35 mph
sport zone be eliminated
to protect manatees. Fed-
eral officials also propose
other rules designed to
protect manatees.
Also Monday, the coun-
cil will discuss possible
changes to the city's alco-
hol beverage ordinance.
The county this month
lifted its ban on alcohol
sales before 1 p.m. Sun-
day, but that decision ex-
cludes the cities of Crystal
River and Inverness.
N. Future Ave. to be
closed this week
The road contractor
currently doing Phase III
of the County Road 486
widening project informed
the county it will be clos-
ing one lane of traffic on
North Future Avenue dur-
ing normal working hours
for the first part of the
week starting Monday,
June 27.
The one lane traffic
during the day will be
controlled by a flagman,
and traffic will be re-
opened to two-way traffic
each evening after work.
The closure is needed
to construct the new tie-in
between Future and the
new highway alignment.
D.A.B., the contractor,
said it anticipates three
days will be required to
complete the work.


Comics ....................B7
Crossword ............. B6
Editorial ................ AIO
Entertainment ..........B5
Horoscope .............B5
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B5
Movies............ .......... B7
Obituaries ................A6
TV listings .............. B6
Classifieds ............ B8


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
LIVE OAK - By rally standards,
the one Saturday for Bob Burton cer-
tainly lacked in numbers. There were
no signs, no speeches.
The Libertarian Party of Florida,
which organized the rally, expected


"crowds ranging from tea party mem-
bers to environmental groups," ac-
cording to its news release.
Instead less than a dozen people
milled about on a sidewalk across
from the Suwannee County Court-
house and near the office of Third
Circuit State Attorney Robert "Skip"
Jarvis, who is prosecuting Burton.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Brian Thompson, a fourth-generation crabber, pours some fresh water on a basket of blue crabs
he caught Monday morning. He sells the crabs to restaurants in Homosassa.


Area s pioneer families

worked land, water
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
Most mornings, Brian Thompson is one of
the first boaters people see on the Homosassa
River
The fourth-generation county resident
catches and sells crabs and mullet to restau-
rants and fish houses.
His family has been here since 1851.
Thompson has a degree in economics and
finance.
"I got out during the last big recession we
had; I couldn't find a job," Thompson said.


Fresh blue crabs are a delicacy to many.
From his upbringing, fishing just came
naturally
His father was a fisherman, "until Mosquito
Control came to town. He was one of the first
ones to get a job in Mosquito Control. He
See Page A5


Though small in number, everyone
agreed Burton is getting railroaded.
"I think it's government abuse of
power," Libertarian state chairman
Adrian Wyllie said. "It has the ap-
pearance of a cover-up."
Burton, 53, who works in the logging
trade, is charged with illegally tape
recording a phone conversation in No-
vember with Ryan Tyson, then an aide
to Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness.
Burton then posted the phone con-
versation on YouTube, where it


Page A7


Charlie
Dean
senator says
Bob Burton
harassed
Dean's former
aide.


Homosassa s fture rife

with opportunity
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer
The way ahead for Homosassa will hold to
traditions, but reach for opportunities.
"We've got to
encourage devel- FOCUS ON
opment, but not -
encourage devel-
opment that's
going to impact
our way of life,"
said District 2
County Commis-
sioner John "JJ"
Kenney. "A big -
portion of U.S. 19 Homosassa
goes through my
district. And I def-
initely do not want
to see this turned Hs
into a Hudson or a
New Port Richey."
With a Walmart
planned for the
corner of Cardinal (-SrSBY
Street and U.S. 19,
growth turning
into sprawl is a
worry. So far, Ken-
ney approves of
the work. Land
clearing started ---p -
last week, and he .
noted the project
appeared to havear
a good setback
with trees.
The building is
something Kenney. _
will have to pass
frequently on his
way to work in In- Homosassa is still known
verness. as a quaint fishing
"I go past Cardi- community.
nal every day and
sometimes I'll transit down there," he said.
"We've got a lot of open land in that area. It's
ripe for development, the right kind of
development."
Kenney would like to see more mini-farms
along Cardinal Street.
"Homesteads of 10 acres, where they run
some horses," he said. "If they can do it in
Ocala, we can certainly do it here. We've got
some hills, too."
He noted some Homosassa businesses,
such as the River Safari, have been doing
fairly well.
For generations, people have visited to go
fishing, and people have earned their liveli-
hoods by fishing and crabbing.
On the other hand, the Seagrass River Re-
sort & Pub on Halls River Road had to close
earlier this year
See Page A5


Flow of spring water affects those downriver


WATER FLOW REPORTS
* To locate reports, visit www.Water
Matters.org/mfl and click on the
"MFL documents and reports" link.

setting minimum flows of the rivers in
the county, Homosassa residents come
forward to tell officials how the Ho-
mosassa River is special.
"Homosassa is very sensitive to spring


See Page A5


J.
Bob Burton
believes Sen.
Charlie Dean
supports
activities that
are not
constitutional.


HOMOSASSA




Steeped in tradition


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff Writer

Water is precious to Homosassa's way
of life.
When the Southwest Florida Water
Management District tasks itself with
Cameron Godinez, left, and his friend
Joseph Ogane spend Monday morning
fishing along Mason Creek off the
Homosassa River. Like many who visit
Homosassa, the two teens hope to land
a redfish, snook or trout.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Food PROGRAMS


ANGEL FOOD
The Angel Food Ministries
program enables families to
stretch their food budget by
providing quality food at half or
less of the retail price. For exact
menus, order dates and times
and pickup dates and times
view online at: AngelFood
Minstries.com. You may also
place an online order with a
credit card or a debit card.
* Hernando United
Methodist Church, 2125
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Hernando.
Payment is required at time of
order, by check, cash or food
stamps (EBT). For information,
call the church office at (352)
726-7245 or Grant Schlenker at
(352) 419-4028.
* Redeemer Presbyterian
Church of Inverness, 1005 Hill-
side Court and Washington
Street (behind Central Motel),
Inverness. Payment online or at
church office.
Call (352) 726-0077.
* Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 9425 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. To sign up for Angel
Food, order food and learn of
pick-up date and time, call the
church office at (352) 489-5511
or Victor Kahler at (352)
465-4182. All orders are pre-
paid by check, cash or money
order.
* Homosassa Knights of
Columbus 6954, at 9020 W.
Atlas Drive, Homosassa (off
U.S.19 across from Love Mo-
torsports), or call Joann at (352)
382-2129 or (352) 586-6698.
Payment is required at the time
the order is placed. Payment
online is debit or credit card
only. Payment at the K of C is
cash, check, money orders or
food stamps (EBT).
* First Assembly of God of
Dunnellon, 2872 W. Dunnellon
Road, one mile west of U.S. 41
(across from Nichol's Lumber).
Call (352) 489-8455.
HUNGRY?
* St. Anne's Anglican
Church food pantry opens from
9:30 to 10:30 a.m. daily in the
administration building.
* Daystar Life Center gives
out food to all needy individuals
and families throughout Citrus
County. Doors are open from 9
a.m. until 2 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Picture ID and
interview required. Daystar is at
6751 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River, across from the
Publix Shopping Center. Call
(352) 795-8668.
* Citrus United Basket
(CUB) food pantry is open to all
underserved Citrus County resi-
dents from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday
at 103 Mill Ave, Inverness (east
of the new courthouse). Partici-
pants must provide proof of in-
come, photo ID and Social
Security numbers for each fam-
ily member. Contact CUB
at (352) 344-2242 or
cublisa@embarqmail.com.
* First Baptist Church of
Crystal River has its food
pantry open from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday. The church is at 700
N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
For more information, call (352)
795-3367.
* Our Lady of Fatima's
Food Pantry, at 604 U.S. 41 S.,
is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday to Friday. Proper photo
ID, proof of residence and inter-
view are required for assistance
to needy residents of Floral
City, Hernando and Inverness.
Call (352) 726-1707.
* First United Methodist
Church of Inverness God's
Kitchen serves from 11:30 a.m.
to noon Mondays in the fellow-
ship hall, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road. A bus is available
for transportation to the church
on Monday.
Call (352) 726-2522.
* The New Church Without
Walls gives free food boxes
away at 5 p.m. Monday at the
neighborhood park in Hernando
off Railroad Drive where feed-
ing the homeless takes place.
Call (352) 344-2425.
* Floral City United
Methodist Church offers free
breakfast to those who need it


from 7 to 9 a.m. Tuesday in
Hilton Hall, 8478 E. Marvin St.
Call (352) 344-1771.
* Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church food pantry is
open from 9 to 10 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd. Food is distributed
on right side of parish office
garage area. Parking is avail-
able in right parking field next to
garage area. Pantry is open to
those who truly qualify for this
program. No vouchers or finan-


SO YOU KNOW
* Submit information or changes for this feature via
email to community@chronicleonline.com or fax to
(352) 563-3280, attention "Food Programs."
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* It is the responsibility of the organizations listed here
to provide information and updates about their pro-
grams. Contact the groups directly for details.
* For additional information about health and human
resources available in Citrus County, call 211.


cial aid given. Call Anna at
(352) 527-2381 or the church at
(352) 746-2144.
* Nature Coast Ministries'
food pantry is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday. The
office is at 1592 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River. Call
(352) 400-2689.
* The Hernando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, at
1880 N. Trucks Ave., Her-
nando, provides food distribu-
tion for needy families through
its Food Pantry, which is open
the second and fourth Tuesday
monthly from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Please have proper photo I.D.
available at the time of the re-
quest for food. For information,
call (352) 212-5159.
* EI-Shaddai food ministries
"brown bag of food" distribution
takes place from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday at Crystal River
Church of God, 2180 W. 12th
Ave., behind the former Lincoln
Mercury dealership. Although
food is distributed once a week,
families are only eligible for
food once a month. For infor-
mation, call (352) 628-9087 or
(352) 302-9925. The USDA is
an equal-opportunity provider.
* We Care Food Pantry
gives out food to needy people.
Initial registrations are accepted
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays. To qualify
for assistance, participants
must be a Homosassa or Ho-
mosassa Springs resident with
identification. For information
and dates for food distributions,
call (352) 628-0445.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church's Food Pantry, 82 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, distributes
food from 11 a.m. to noon and
6 to 7 p.m. the last Tuesday
monthly. To qualify for assis-
tance, you must be a Beverly
Hills resident with identifi-
cation. Call the church office at
(352) 746-3620 to make a
reservation. There will be an ini-
tial registration for each recipi-
ent, then you will need to call
the office at least a week ahead
of time to let us know you will
be requiring food.
* The food pantry of First
Presbyterian Church of Crys-
tal River is open from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Tuesday. The pantry
is open to meet the emergency
needs of people in the commu-
nity. Everyone is invited to par-
ticipate once a week as
needed. Bring a photo ID and
the date of birth for each mem-
ber of your household. The
church is at 1501 S.E. U.S.19,
north of Sweetbay. Call (352)
795-2259.
* Suncoast Baptist
Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs, has
its food pantry open from 8 a.m.
to noon the second Wednesday
monthly for pre-bagged food.
Free bread is available from 8
a.m. to noon Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Feed My Sheep out-
reach provides a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday. The
food pantry is open from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday. The pantry is no
longer open Wednesday
evenings or Fridays. For infor-
mation, call (352) 726-3153.


* Food pantry of Floral City
First Baptist Church Emer-
gency Feeding Program is
open from 1 to 3 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly.
* Dunnellon Presbyterian
and Holy Faith Episcopal food
pantry opens from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursdays at 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
* SOS Ministry food pantry
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
for those in need at the Key
Center in Lecanto. If new to the
program, bring driver's license
and Social Security cards for all
family members for initial regis-
tration. Food distributed accord-
ing to family size.
* Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness "Feed the Hungry" free
lunch is served from noon to 1
p.m. Thursday in the fellow-
ship hall, 960 S. U.S. 41. Come
enjoy a home-cooked meal.
Food pantry is open from 1 to 2
p.m. Thursday only. Call (352)
726-1480.
* Our Father's Table serves
free Saturday lunches from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at St.
Anne's Anglican Church, one
mile west of the Plantation Inn
on West Fort Island Trail. Call
(352) 795-2176.
* St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs serves those in need
with free boxes of food from its
food pantry the third Saturday
morning monthly.
Call (352) 465-6613 on the
preceding Tuesday to sign up
for the distribution.
* Inverness Church of God
hosts a soup kitchen the first
and third Sunday monthly fol-
lowing the 10:30 a.m. worship
service in the Family Life
Center.
Inverness Church of God is
at 416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Call (352) 726-4524.


Sidewalk closed


RIC BUSH/Special to the Chronicle
Matt Cousteau works below ground last week on the new sidewalk going in on Citrus
Avenue in Crystal River.



Key plans arts, crafts show


Consumers make gifts

Special to the Chronicle
The Key Training Center Consumers
Arts & Crafts Show will be from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday, July 23, during the Run for
the Money celebration, with a lunch break
from noon to 1:30 p.m. The show will be at
Roger Weaver building No. 1297, second
building on the right on the Key Training


To find a donor center or a
blood drive near you, call (352)
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to donate.
A photo ID is also required.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491) and the In-
verness branch is at 301 W.
Main St. Both centers are
open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays and 8:30 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday. Centers stay
open late Wednesdays, until
7 p.m. The Lecanto center is
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday.


r H


Beverly Hills

DENTAL CENTER E
*Dentures, Partials & Bridges E am,
* Invisalign (Removable Braces)
* Children Welcome I A"K ys
* Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions
* One Visit Root Canals Cleanina
*Gum Surgery *Implants *One Hour Whitening
Ask about Mini Implants * FM0021O10
for over dentures! Initial Oral Exams 00150

aeed A Second Opinion. Value 215
FR EE 7 Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. � . 0 �

Consultation Senior Citizens $ 000
With the Dentist (Ask For Must Preser
11CO 1 Details) CouponAt
Time discount Of Vis
1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) I

Open Fridays 746.0330 = = L - II


I








I








at
kt
I


Center's Lecanto campus, at the Imagina-
tion Workshop.
Key artists have created unique, one-of-
a-kind arts and crafts, including polymer
clay beaded bracelets and necklaces; T-
shirts and fisherman hats; trinket boxes;
butterfly, sand dollar and starfish magnets;
Christmas ornaments and more.
The public is invited to make your own
bracelets. Take a tour of the Imagination
Workshop and shop, shop, shop!
For details, call (352) 527-8228, ext. 311.


Blood DRIVES
Visit www.lifesouth.org for
details.
* 8 a.m. to noon Monday,
June 27, Anytime Fitness, 4
5723 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa, drawing
for a free three-month
membership.
* 1 to 4 p.m. Monday,
June 27, Bealls, 346 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues-
day, June 28, Lowe's, 2301 E.


Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
S*10a.m. to 7p.m.
Wednesday, June 29,
Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
0 Noon to 5 p.m.
Thursday, June 30, Sumter
Electric Cooperative, U.S. 301
and Sumter C.R. 471, Sumter-
ville, drawing for a free $25 gift
card.


CITRUS


PODIATRY CENTER, PA
Specializing in Wound Care &
Reconstructive foot/Ankle Surgery

Treatment of...
* Difficult non-Healing Wounds & Ulcers of the Foot,Ankle & Leg
* Sports Related Injuries of the Foot & Ankle
* Ankle Arthroscopy * Bunions & Hammer Toes
* Flat Foot Reconstruction * Arch & Heel Pain
* Ingrown Nails & fungal Nails * Diabetic & Geriatric Foot Care
* Corns, Calluses & Warts * Diabetic Shoes

EDWARD J. DALY, DPM * KENNETH P. PRITCHYK, DPM
Board (. -,i-. .I by American Board of Podiatric Surgery
Fellow American (, , ..., ' of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Certified by the American Academy of Wound Management

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME
Allow our professional & Courteous Staff to schedule your appointment
Most
LECANTO insurances HOMOSASSA
2385 North Lecanto Highway accepted 4930 South Suncoast Boulevard
746-0077 -W a 621-9200 E


Carry-out only. Plus tax. Crystal River location only
4ulfHto Lake Hwy 1


VenableSt


A2 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011


LOCAL







Page A3 - MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011



TATE


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Rule mandates more girls in school sports


4 Citrus County schools devise plan to

recruit females into athletic programs
CHERI HARRIS the corrective action is necessary
Staff Writer because of federal rule changes for
the 2010-11 school year she was not
INVERNESS - Several local informed of until February, well
schools will focus more on re- into the school year
cruiting female athletes into Under the new requirements, if
sports programs. a school's population is comprised
The initiative is the result of a of 52 percent girls and 48 percent
report from the Citrus County boys, 52 percent or more of the
School District that shows the dis- students participating in school
trict is out of compliance with sports must be girls.
Title IX federal rules governing In the past, Allegretta said
gender equity in athletics. schools were allowed latitude of 5
According to self-monitoring percent, so if a student population
conducted by the district, four was 50 percent female, between 45
schools will adopt corrective ac- to 55 percent of athletes partici-
tion plans to lure more girls into pating in school sports were ex-
school sports. pected to be female.
Regina Allegretta, director of stu- "We were not provided that in-
dent services for the district, said formation prior to when the docu-


* WHAT: Citrus County School Board meeting.
* WHEN: Special meeting and workshop, 9 a.m.; administrative
hearing, 10 a.m.
* WHERE: District Services Center, 1007 W. Main St., Inverness.
* GET INFO: Call (352) 726-1931. The agenda is available online
through the district website, www.citrusschools.org. Click "School
Board" and "2010-20111 Agendas/Minutes."

SCHOOL PERCENTAGES


Female students Females in Varsity


CHS


Junior Varsity
44
47


CRHS
CRMS


ment came out Feb. 4 to begin get-
ting information to complete the
annual report," she said.
Schools with corrective action
plans for gender equity are Citrus


High School, Lecanto High
School, Crystal River High School
and Crystal River Middle School.
Plans to attract more girls to
school sports include more active


recruiting, more announcements
on school morning shows, enlist-
ing help from administrators and
teachers to recruit female ath-
letes, handing out and posting fly-
ers, adding more teams for girls
and promoting equal coverage
through media and websites.
"My hopes are that these extra
actions they will put in place will
close that gap," she said.
It is unusual for the district to
have this many corrective action
plans for gender equity, because
there have been years when the dis-
trict has had none, Allegretta said.
The Title IX information is part
of the 2010-11 Equity and Access
Report up for Citrus County School
Board approval during a special
meeting at the District Services
Center, 1007 W Main St, Inverness.
Chronicle reporter Cheri Harris
can be reached at (352) 564-2926 or
charris@chronicleonline. com.


Citrus County
Local Social Security office
closes Thursday
The local Social Security office at the
Citrus County Resource Center will
close permanently at the end of the
workday Thursday.
The office has been open two days a
week at the center, from 8 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. Monday and Thursdays.
Noting almost all services are available
online, the Social Security Administration
recently announced the closure of the Cit-
rus office and many other similar branch
type offices around the country. The Cit-
rus office is based out of the Ocala re-
gional office, which is the closest Social
Security office for most Citrus residents.
Citizens may access Social Security
services online at www.socialsecurity.gov.
If residents need help or do not have
a computer and Internet access, they
may go to a county public library branch
to access the services online and re-
ceive help from a library staff member if
necessary. They may also call (800)
772-1213 or visit the Ocala Office at
217 S.E. FirstAve., Ocala, FL 34471.

Lake City
Forest rangers killed in blaze
mourned Sunday
Firefighters across the state were
among more than 1,000 mourners at-
tending funeral services for two state
forest rangers killed while fighting a
wildfire in north Florida.
Josh Burch and Brett Fulton died
Monday in Hamilton County. They were
using bulldozers to contain a 12-acre
blaze that suddenly flared up.
Two Florida Division of Forestry heli-
copters flew overhead during the serv-
ices held Friday and Saturday in Lake
City. It's the first time since 2000 that a
forestry division employee has died
fighting a wildfire.
Many public service workers had a
black ribbon pinned to their shirts.


Naples
Central Florida man clocked
driving at 108 mph
Authorities have arrested a central
Florida man whom they say zoomed by
a trooper at a speed of 108 mph.
The Florida Highway Patrol says
Jonathan Ouellette of Merritt Island
pushed his BMW even faster when the
trooper made a U-turn to pursue the
car, which was traveling on Interstate
75 in Collier County. FHP says Ouel-
lette passed vehicles on the outside
lane three times before eventually being
pulled over Friday night.
The 33-year-old was charged with
reckless driving.

Hollywood
3-year-old boy discovered
wandering streets
Police are investigating how a 3-year-
old boy ended up wandering the streets
of South Florida.
A passerby spotted the boy in Holly-
wood Sunday. He has black hair and
eyes and is wearing a blue polo shirt with
a yellow stripe and black jean shorts.
Child welfare officials are now caring
for the child.
Anyone who recognizes the child
should call the Hollywood Police De-
partment at (954) 967-4357.

Port Charlotte
Body in car identified as
29-year-old woman
Authorities have identified the 29-
year-old woman whose body was found
in a car parked outside a southwest
Florida Walmart.
Charlotte County Sheriff's deputies
said Jennifer Anne Simpson's decom-
posed body was found Friday night in
the back seat of a white car after re-
ports of a foul smell.
-From staff and wire reports


Commissioners to


consider mining plan


Proposed limerock

mine near Red

Level Cemetery

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
INVERNESS - Citrus County
commissioners are poised to
vote Tuesday whether to allow
mining near the historic Red
Level Cemetery
Nature Coast Development,
owned by car dealer Steve
Lamb, proposes a limerock mine
on 150 acres in northwest Citrus
County.
The property is zoned for ex-
tractive but requires a 1,000-foot
setback from surrounding prop-
erties. The company is propos-
ing to mine within 250 feet of the
cemetery, which dates back to
the late 1800s and is the final
resting place for some of the
county's pioneer families.
A hearing officer recom-
mended a 400-foot setback from
the cemetery
Representatives from the
cemetery fear blasting and vi-
brations could damage fragile
tombstones. Lamb's attorney,
Clark Stillwell, offered testi-
mony to the hearing officer from
an expert who stated the type of
blasting proposed would not af-
fect the cemetery
The expert testified he studied
three other cemeteries where
roadwork had taken place
nearby In all three, the expert
said, the construction did not
damage tombstones even though
the vibration was worse than it
would be at the proposed mine.


m WHAT: Citrus County
Commission meeting.
* WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday;
mining public hearing at
5:15 p.m.
* WHERE: Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.
* ONLINE: www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us.

The hearing officer also rec-
ommended blasting be limited to
once a month and not occur the
day before, the day of, or the day
after a funeral at the cemetery
Lamb said earlier this year he
doesn't intend to mine the prop-
erty at all. He said he wants to
sell the property to the state to
protect it from being mined.
Dottie Dixon, whose ancestors
are buried at the Red Level
Cemetery, said she does not
doubt Lamb's sincerity, but that
is no reason to allow mining.
"We can't cut Mr Lamb any
slack," she said. "What if the
state says it's not interested in
buying that?"
Dixon is also hopeful Tues-
day's public hearing actually
takes place. The scheduled hear-
ing has been postponed three
times, much to the annoyance to
Dixon and other relatives or
property owners who traveled
great distances to Inverness.
County spokesman Jim Hunter
said he didn't know of any rea-
son why Tuesday's hearing
wouldn't take place as
scheduled.
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at (352)
563-3228 or mwright@chronicle
online.com.


Scallop season starts


Keep eyes

open for

mosquitoes
Special to the Chronicle
With the onset of summer
and the rainy season, it's
once again time to look
around the property for
places where mosquitoes re-
produce.
One essential for all mos-
quito breeding is standing
water. The water need only
be calm and preferably stag-
nant. Water in flower pots,
buckets, child toys and even
storm gutters can create an
ongoing supply of hungry
mosquitoes as long as it re-
mains wet.
Sagging tarps filled with
leaf litter, low areas, even
crumpled up plastic bags can
hold enough water to start a
cycle of life that could lead to
illness and even death.
Mosquitoes in Citrus
County have the potential to
spread dengue fever, yellow
fever, malaria, encephalitis
and dog heart worm.
So even if residents can
avoid the bite of one of these
hungry critters, the family
dog may not fare so well. In-
oculations and monthly med-
ications are available to
lessen the likelihood of dis-
ease transmission. However,
the Citrus County Mosquito
District urges all to remain
on guard and regularly inoc-
ulate pets and livestock.
Empty all containers hold-
ing water. If water is inten-
tionally kept in a dog bowl or
bird bath, flush it out at least
every three days.
June 26 through July 2 is
National Mosquito Awareness
Week. Citrus County Mosquito
Control will have displays up
at Crystal River Mall and the
Lecanto Government Build-
ing. Residents are encour-
aged to stop by and visit with
Mosquito Control technicians.
They are trained and certi-
fied in the identification and
control of mosquitoes and can
help solve many mosquito-re-
lated problems.
For information, call the
Citrus County Mosquito Con-
trol District at (352) 527-7478;
or visit the website www.
citrusmosquito. org.


Sentinel chickens
Hernando County Mosquito
Control Director, Dr. Guangye
Hu, announced this week one
of the county's sentinel chick-
ens in western Hernando
County tested positive for the
Eastern Equine Encephalitis
(EEE) virus.
This means mosquitoes
carrying the virus are present
in the area. The county main-
tains five flocks of chickens
throughout the county that are
tested periodically to deter-
mine if they are carrying a
mosquito-bome virus. Viruses
are not harmful to chickens,
but can be deadly to humans
and horses.
EEE is a rare disease
caused by a virus spread by
infected mosquitoes. It is a
virus that can cause inflamma-
tion of the brain and therefore,
is very serious in humans.
- From staff report


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
George Parker, from left, Rachel Parker, Ken Ruppert, April Ruppert and Vicki Parker clean scallops Saturday at Homosassa Riverside
Resort after gathering the mollusks on the first day of the season. "Our scallops are a lot larger from what they are usually at this time of
year," Capt. Dan Yount said. They are not yet abundant, but Yount is optimistic about a good season. Scallop season has been extended
through Sept. 25.


Around the STATE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOW YOUR LAWMAKERS VOTED
Key votes for the week ending: June 24
By Voterama in Congress
* Election Assistance Commission: Members failed, 235-187, to reach a two-thirds
majority needed to pass a bill (HR 672) abolishing the Election Assistance Commis-
sion. Congress created the bi-partisan agency in 2002 to help states and localities
modernize equipment and avert electoral problems such as Florida's presidential
vote fiasco in 2000. A yes vote was to kill the agency. Rich Nugent, Yes.
* Arctic-Drilling Environmental Rules: Members voted, 253-166, to
ease environmental rules to make it easier for Shell Oil Co. and
other energy firms to obtain exploratory drilling permits for the
Outer Continental Shelf off Alaska. A yes vote backed a bill (HR v
2021) requiring, in part, expedited action by the Environmental
Protection Agency on permit applications. Nugent, Yes." .
* States' Environmental Rights: Members defeated, 180-242, an
amendment to prevent the weakened environmental rules in HR
2021 (above) from overriding any stricter state or local laws against
air pollution from offshore drilling. California and Delaware are two Rich
states with such laws. A yes vote was to adopt the amendment. Nugent
Nugent, No.
* Oil-Company Subsidies: Members defeated, 183-238, an amendment requiring that
energy companies seeking drilling permits under the terms of HR 2021 (above) dis-
close in their applications detailed information on the taxpayer subsidies they re-
ceive. A yes vote was to adopt the amendment. Nugent, No.
* Libya Funds Cutoff: Members defeated, 180-238, a bill to end funding for direct U.S.
military involvement in the ongoing NATO-led war over Libya. A yes vote was to end
most funding but continue it for actions such as search-and-rescue and aerial-refuel-
ing missions. (HR 2278) Nugent, No.
* Libya War Authorization: Members defeated, 123-295, a measure
(HJR 68) under which Congress would authorize for one year U.S.
participation in the NATO coalition that is supporting rebel forces in ..
Libya's ongoing civil war. A yes vote was to authorize U.S. actions ,
over Libya. (HJR 68) Nugent, No. -
* Patent-Law Revamp: Members passed, 304-117, the first overhaul
of U.S. patent law since 1952. A yes vote backed a bill that would
set "first to file" as the rule for ranking applications and reform the
fee system to generate funds for reducing a backlog of 700,000 ap- Bill Nelson
plications. ((HR 1249) Nugent, Yes.
* Economic-Development Dispute: Senators refused, 49-51, to take
up a bill (S 782) to renew the Economic Development Administra-
tion through 2015 at funding levels of up to $500 million annually.
A yes vote was to renew an agency that since 1965 has directed
loans and grants to distressed communities.. Bill Nelson, Yes;
Marco Rubio, No.
* Defense Secretary Panetta: Senators unanimously confirmed CIA
Director Leon E. Panetta, 72, to become the 23rd U.S. secretary of
defense. The vote was 100-0. A yes vote was to confirm Panetta, Marco
who served in the Nixon and Clinton administrations and was a Cal- Rubio
ifornia congressman. Nelson, Yes; Rubio, Yes.
* Executive Branch Czars: Senators defeated, 47-51, a bid to defund any "czar" posi-
tion created by presidents to avoid the Senate confirmation process. Critics say
President Obama has done just that in naming czars for policies such as the auto-in-
dustry recovery and climate-change. (S 679) Nelson, No; Rubio, Yes.
* Key votes ahead: In the week of June 27, the House will be in Independence Day re-
cess. The Senate's legislative schedule was to be announced. The Senate will take its
Fourth of July recess the following week.
� 2011 Thomas Reports Inc. Call: (202) 667-9760.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
* Cynthia Lois Hall, 48, of
8975 W. Halls River Road, Unit
106, Homosassa, at 2:35 p.m.
Tuesday, on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under the in-
fluence, following a traffic stop
for failure to drive within a single
lane. Hall was unable to perform
field sobriety tasks as demon-
strated. Breath tests were 0.181
percent, 0.207 percent and
0.199 percent. Florida law pre-
sumes impairment at 0.08 per-
cent. Bond $500.
* Nelson J. Johnson, 24, of
5670 N. Brookgreen Drive,
Crystal River, at 1:52 a.m.
Thursday, on a misdemeanor
charge of driving under the in-
fluence, following a traffic stop
for driving at a speed of 67 mph
in a 45 mph zone. Johnson was
unable to perform field sobriety
tasks as demonstrated. Breath
tests were 0.214 percent and
0.202 percent. Florida law pre-
sumes impairment at 0.08 per-
cent. Bond $500.
Other arrests
* Donald Charles Daigh,
73, of 315 HendrixAve., Unit 18,
Inverness, at 7:28 p.m. June 20,
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for a misdemeanor charge
of issuing a worthless check.
Bond $150.
* Jesus Mejia Nonohal, 28,


QUESTION: What is your favorite Elvis movie?
* "Follow That Dream." 35 percent (6 votes)
* "Jailhouse Rock." 12 percent (2 votes)
* Viva Las Vegas." 18 percent (3 votes)
* "Blue Hawaii." 12 percent (2 votes)
* "Love Me Tender." 24 percent (4 votes)
Total votes: 17.


of 2604 W. Woodland Ridge
Drive, Lecanto, at 10:15 p.m.
June 20, on an active Marion
County warrant for failure to ap-
pear, in reference to an original
charge of driving while license
suspended. Bond $2,000.
* Maurice Robert Archam-
bault, 37, of 940 Birch Ave., In-
verness, at 12:21 a.m. Tuesday,
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for violation of probation, in
reference to an original misde-
meanor charge of driving under
the influence as a first offense.
No bond.
* Robin L. Esteves, 27, of
11391 S.E. 203rd Place, Inglis,
at 12:49 a.m. Tuesday, on a
misdemeanor charge of know-
ingly driving while license sus-
pended. Bond $250.
* Donald Ray Cash, 33, of
6521 W. Erlen Lane, Ho-
mosassa, at 1:18 a.m. Tuesday,
on misdemeanor charges of
driving while license suspended
as a habitual traffic offender and


resisting an officer without vio-
lence. Bond $2,500.
* Dean Allen Saulmer, 26,
and John Ruley, 23, both of
6720 N. Carl G. Rose Highway,
Hemando, at 8:56 a.m. Tuesday,
on felony charges of burglary of
an unoccupied residence, grand
theft and trafficking in stolen
property. Bond $12,000 each.
* Leslie L. Adams, 29, of
5738 County Road 317, Bush-
nell, at 11:46 a.m. Tuesday, on
an active Citrus County warrant
for two counts of violation of pro-
bation, in reference to original
misdemeanor charges of pos-
session of less than 20 grams of
cannabis and possession of
drug paraphernalia. No bond.
* Tad J. Leach, 39, of 5860
37th Ave., St. Petersburg, at
9:23 p.m. May 9, by Pinellas
County Sheriffs Office on a war-
rant for violation of probation, in
reference to an original charge
of driving while license sus-
pended. Bond $605.


egal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle

I Meeting Notices................................ 11

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.......... B11

-. Notice to Creditors/Administration......B11

' Self Storage Notices.............................. 11

;J Surplus Property.................................... 11
- Department of Development...................A8


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
South winds around 5 knots. Seas 2 Gu
feet. Bay and inland waters will have tel
a light chop. Partly to mostly cloudy
skies with a chance of scattered
showers and thunderstorms today.


87 75 trace . 88

SIOUTLOOK Exclusive daily
UILUUOK forecast by:


TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 70
Variably cloudy; 60% chance of
thunderstorms
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 71
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of thunderstorms

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 71
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of a thunderstorm


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday 88/73
Record 101/62
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday 0.80 in.
Total for the month 5.45 in.
Total for the year 29.43 in.
Normal for the year 22.98 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Sunday at 3 p.m. 30.05 in.


DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 71
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 67%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's Count: 3.0/12
Tuesday's Count: 3.8
Wednesday's Count: 4.0
AIR QUALITY
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
6/27 MONDAY 2:48 9:00
6/28 TUESDAY 3:32 9:45


JULY 1 JULY8*


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
3:12 9:25
3:58 10:11


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


0
JULY 15


JULY 23


SUNSET TONIGHT................... 8:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW...............6:34 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY................... 3:20 A.M.
MOONSET TODAY ................. 5:23 PM.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site: http://
flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may water on
Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and/or
Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to once per week, before
8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants (other than
lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers
MO
ity High/Low
hassahowitzka* 4:18 a/10:54 a
crystal River** 2:39 a/8:16 a
Vithlacoochee* 12:26 a/6:04 a
omosassa*** 3:28 a/9:53 a


**At King's Bay
onday
High/Low
3:09 p/--
1:30 p/9:48 p
11:17 a/7:36 p
2:19 p/11:25 p


***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday
High/Low High/Low
5:14 a/12:26 a 3:57 p/11:52 a
3:35 a/9:14 a 2:18 p/10:34 p
1:22 a/7:02 a 12:05 p/8:22 p
4:24 a/10:51 a 3:07 p/--


H L
89 78
93 71
90 73
92 77
91 74
95 73
93 75
88 74
89 77


ulf water
nperature



89�
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.69 27.81 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.72 35.74 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 36.94 36.94 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.79 37.77 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Sunday Monday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


75 60
10065
83 64 .03
92 70 .57
86 64
97 78
84 60
73 53 .02
94 72
81 50
76 61
74 61 .02
75 63 .01
96 74
70 57 .06
90 63
81 57
76 63 .45
77 57
98 69
75 64 .01
78 57
97 77
92 61
81 62
81 61
10871
76 64 1.36
78 60
83 67
97 79
74 64 .19
96 75
10479
98 78
71 61
77 66 .30
94 78
75 54
79 61
93 73
96 72
76 66 .45


83 61
99 67
86 63
93 73
84 68
100 75
89 74
76 55
95 74
88 60
79 65
75 68
83 62
92 75
88 70
95 71
84 66
87 71
82 70
98 73
86 71
84 58
101 76
78 57
83 62
81 70
107 78
90 72
87 68
84 64
96 78
89 69
96 74
105 82
98 77
72 63
90 73
97 78
78 58
79 59
93 74
98 74
93 74


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drzzle; f=fair; h=hazy;
pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny;
sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
�2011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
MONDAY

Sunday Monday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 94 78 .10 pc 94 76
New York City 79 66 pc 83 66
Norfolk 84 71 ts 90 72
Oklahoma City 101 79 pc 106 76
Omaha 75 66 pc 79 60
Palm Springs 10970 s 107 76
Philadelphia 82 65 pc 88 69
Phoenix 11286 s 115 86
Pittsburgh 77 58 c 85 68
Portland, ME 71 57 s 77 59
Portland, Ore 75 51 .01 c 81 57
Providence, R.I. 76 63 pc 82 64
Raleigh 94 68 ts 92 71
Rapid City 76 58 .23 s 74 54
Reno 87 52 s 90 58
Rochester, NY 72 59 pc 81 66
Sacramento 91 56 s 89 58
St. Louis 86 66 1.76 ts 93 72
St. Ste. Marie 79 50 ts 75 55
Salt Lake City 82 59 s 87 65
San Antonio 98 77 pc 100 76
San Diego 72 61 s 74 62
San Francisco 69 53 s 67 53
Savannah 98 70 ts 93 75
Seattle 72 48 c 75 55
Spokane 73 48 c 81 53
Syracuse 72 65 .02 pc 84 64
Topeka 92 72 pc 87 65
Washington 86 67 pc 89 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 116 Childress, Texas LOW 29 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES
MONDAY Lisbon 89/68/s
CITY H/L/SKY London 83/64/ts
Acapulco 90/77/ts Madrid 100/70/pc
Amsterdam 83/65/s Mexico City 68/55/ts
Athens 80/66/s Montreal 81/66/s
Beijing 89/69/s Moscow 78/61/ts
Berlin 80/60/pc Paris 91/66/s
Bermuda 81/77/ts Rio 75/65/sh
Cairo 87/67/s Rome 88/66/s
Calgary 72/52/s Sydney 64/45/s
Havana 90/75/ts Tokyo 83/71/sh
Hong Kong 87/79/ts Toronto 75/64/s
Jerusalem 85/63/s Warsaw 72/52/pc


C I T R U S


C O U N TY


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A4 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE'S COMMUNITY FOCUS:



HOMOSASSA


FUTURE
Continued from Page Al

"We lost that restaurant and
those condos down there," he
said. "They went bankrupt and
hopefully someone will pick up
on that."
That business could have been
a victim of having to connect to
the sewer line.
"I think that's how we lost Sea
Grass restaurant," Kenney said.
"The bill for them to connect all
their condos and the restaurant
itself: They just didn't have the
money to do it. So they shut the
door."
The Halls River Road Project
was completed about four years
ago to connect a central sewage
system and get rid of septic
tanks. For the sake of clean
water, it's necessary
"Especially when you look at
how many times we've had to
shut the beach down," Kenney
said. "We have to get those tanks
out."
The septic tank contamination
goes along with the need for
slow-release lawn fertilizer.
"We've got to get people used
to using the slow release rather
than the quick release stuff be-
cause all that does is go through
the sand and goes right down
into the aquifer and we end up
with bad water," Kenney said.
"Down here, water is a serious
commodity"
The expense of connecting to
the sewer line has been a worry
for Homosassa homeowners for
several years. But Kenney said
the BOCC has been finding
grants and other solutions.
"I don't think anyone's going to
lose their house over the sewer
issue," he said. "If anything, the
county would put a lien on the
house. They would have to clear
up the lien before they could sell
the property
"But I don't foresee anyone
being kicked out in the street.
That's not the idea. The idea is to
get septic systems off line and
that's a start down in that area
and then we'll move up to the
King's Bay area.


FLOW
Continued from Page Al

water flow," Ron Miller, vice
president of Save the Ho-
mosassa River Alliance, told
county commissioners in
April when Douglas Leeper,
the water district's chief en-
vironmental scientist, made
a presentation about pro-
posed pumping.
The district is required to
set minimum flows for rivers
-the limits at which further
water withdrawals in the sur-
rounding areas will cause
significant harm to the water
resource and the related nat-
ural environment
"You cut 2 percent of the
flow, you lose 15 percent of
the blue crabs," Miller said.
The alliance has fought to
keep every drop of water.
Miller said data from the
district has shown a 1 per-
cent loss of flow would
cause a 15 percent loss of
bass in the Homosassa
River.
"If you cut the 5 percent
that's recommended, you
lose the bass and the blue
crabs totally," Miller told
county commissioners.
The district met June 8 for
the first of a series of work-
shops to discuss issues with
stakeholders. The stake-
holders are members of cit-
izen organizations and staff
of government agencies.
They will meet six times to
identify issues about county
water systems.
The first session raised
more questions than an-
swers, causing district offi-
cials to save most of their
answers for the next input
meeting.
Leeper laid out the dis-
trict's goals. It wants to set
Homosassa River flow level
at 85 percent of natural flow
Leeper listed factors for
discussion:
* Sea levels.
* Discharge measure-
ment.
* Impact of groundwater
withdrawal.
* Refuges for manatees.
These issues would factor
into the recommendation to
the district before new rules
are decided.
Jim Bitter, alliance presi-
dent, lamented the present
state of the river and warned
of further degradation if


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
U.S. 19 cuts through the heart of Homosassa. The intersection of U.S. 19 and Grover Cleveland Boulevard
north to Homosassa Trail becomes a congested area during peak travel times.


Halls River project
The Halls River Retreat proj-
ect that failed to go forward nine
years ago has returned in a mod-
ified form as the Halls River
Resort.
"The gentleman has revised
his plans now," Kenney said. "He
wants to put up 31 upscale cabins
and a 3,000-sqare-foot
restaurant."
The Citrus County Planning
and Development Review Board
voted 4-3 in April to recommend
approval for the project. County
commissioners will decide
whether it goes ahead.
For Homosassa, Kenney said
for development along the river
he wants to see projects that are
aesthetically pleasing and don't
infringe on the environment
"Essentially, that's what we
sell down here. We're the nature
coast," he said.
Job prospects
What Homosassa has in com-
mon with the rest of the county,
the state and the nation, Kenney
said, is it needs more jobs. He
shared his thought about bring-
ing more people and jobs to his
district.
Homosassa would be an ideal
place for the baby-boomer gen-
eration to retire.
"We probably should be mak-
ing some info trips up north to try


flows are altered. Having
watched the river for more
than 50 years, he said he has
seen its natural flow gradu-
ally dwindle to a relative
trickle.


to get people interested," he said.
In past economic boom times,
land developers would fly people
down to get them interested in
investing here.
However, Homosassa has more
to offer than just becoming a
community for baby boomers.
"We can be a bedroom commu-
nity with the Suncoast Parkway,"
Kenney said. "It's an hour from
my house to the (Tampa) airport,
and there are a number of peo-
ple living in Sugarmill Woods
who are commuting into Tampa."
Area appeals
The community has wide
appeal.
"It's the place to raise your
family," Kenney said. "We have
relatively low crime. We've only
got one beach, but it's a pretty
cute little beach."
Homosassa also attracts winter
residents and weekenders, some
of whom drive up from the
Tampa area just as a getaway
"They have a place along the
river Some of them don't boat that
much, but just like getting away
from the sprawl to come up here
and mellow out," Kenney said.
The Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park was another
feature to attract people.
"Isn't it great?" Kenney asked.
"They have made changes over
the years. What I like about it is
they've made it more ADA com-


pliant. A person in a wheelchair
can now get around there with-
out any hassle at all."
The park could have a greater
role in attracting people to
Homosassa.
"I would like to see them make
a television commercial with the
manatees and feature the
wildlife park and send that up
north," Kenney said. "Come on
down to the Nature Coast and
meet Lucifer"
But for bringing jobs to Ho-
mosassa, Kenney said he would
like to see a couple of brand
name restaurants go to the west
side of the county
"Everything has been on the
east side of the county," Kenney
said. "There's room on the cor-
ner there for a Cracker Barrel at
U.S. 19 and U.S. 98."
He's looking for ideas for jobs
that fit his criteria.
"The big thing is that any jobs
we bring into the county, they
have to be sensitive to our envi-
ronment and provide a decent
wage," he said.
At the bottom line, it's the jobs.
"We've got everything in our
community that young families
could want with the exception of
jobs," Kenney said. "That's the
missing piece. This would be a
great place for a young family to
be raised. We're just lacking the
one piece, that's the jobs. And
that's the whole county."


People opposed to the pro- district.
posed changes mostly took Officials said they will un-
issue with the amount of veil a detailed breakdown of
withdrawal from the aquifer how that process works and
for human use, a permitting other impact questions at
process controlled by the the next workshop.


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Leeper hopes to have at
least two more workshops
before submitting recom-
mendations to the district


STEEPED
Continued from Page Al

worked there for 30 years."
The pioneer families worked the
environment for their living.
"My family had a place in Mannfield
and a place in Homosassa," Thompson
said. "When the summer came, they
would go up there and grow corn."
Mannfield is a historic area a few
miles east, between Grover Cleveland
Boulevard and Cardinal Street It pre-
ceded Inverness as the county seat.
"My father was a cow man. In win-
ter time, they'd come out here and
farm the tourists. My grandfather was
a fishing guide for a $1.50 a day"
Thompson's grandfather, like all
fishing guides at the time, rowed his
boat everywhere. They were tough
and sinewy from the exercise.
During the winter months, more
people were around the river and liv-
ing on the islands. Thompson said
people lived on the islands during
the Great Depression, eating by
catching fish.
"They would go up country in the
summertime because you couldn't
live down here in the summertime,
the mosquitoes were so bad," Thomp-
son said.
Thompson also is the caretaker for
Tiger Tail Island that is privately
owned. People aren't supposed to
trespass, but they walk along the
beach looking for Seminole artifacts.
Named for a Seminole Indian
leader, Tiger Tail Island has inspired
works of fiction, including a novel by
Ann Turner Cook, who is also known
as the Gerber Baby Cook retired
from teaching in Tampa to become a
novelist.
Among her four novels is "Ho-
mosassa Shadows," published in 2005.
The work of fiction describes the is-
land's bloody history and spins a mys-
tery about the island's secret
In fact, Tiger Tail Island was the site
of David Levy Yulee's mansion, "Mar-
garita," that was destroyed in 1864 by a
Union naval attack during the Civil
War
Another early resident, William D.
Harman, great-grandfather of Carlis
Harman, retired Homosassa postmas-
ter, moved his family to Tiger Tail Is-
land in the late 1890s and built his
home just west of the ruins of Yulee's
mansion.


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MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 A5





CITRUS COUNTi (FL) CHRONICLE


Citizens still mourn 9/11 losses


Almost decade

has passed since

terrorist attacks

Associated Press
HILLIARD, Ohio - Carla
Gilkerson, a 54-year-old
school bus driver, sits at a
table with friends at Abner's
diner on Main Street in this
small Ohio town. She's
never been to New York City
and doesn't know a soul who
died Sept. 11 - but talk of
the terror attacks a decade
ago immediately moves her
to tears.
Step outside of Abner's
and there, across the road at
Main and Center Streets, is
one of the largest Sept. 11
memorials outside the at-
tack sites; a granite monu-
ment etched with all the
victims' names, surrounded
by four giant pieces of World
Trade Center steel.
Gilkerson often walks and
bikes past the memorial,
stopping to run her finger
over the names.
"I feel like I knew them,"
she said. "And that I can
keep their memory alive."
In mourning
A decade of public
mourning for the nearly
3,000 people killed in the
nation's worst terror attack
hasn't abated; in fact, it
thrives in this country, from
the steel memorial parks to
the fake Statue of Liberty
outside a Las Vegas casino
to a tiny chapel by ground
zero. The attacks have
spawned a ritual of extrava-
gant public mourning that
hasn't waned; even Ameri-
cans who didn't lose a loved
one Sept. 11 are still griev-
ing as if they had.
Gilkerson says it best: "I
think we'll always mourn
our losses from that day"
Experts in grief say the
outsized sorrow for "our
losses" is Americans' way of
processing the most devas-
tating public event of their
lifetimes, which they need
to do before they can begin
to let go.
"This," said Michael Ka-
tovich, a Texas sociology
professor who teaches on
death and dying, "is a
process of solidifying our
memories."
Building memorials
They're still grieving in
Hilliard, a suburb of the
state capital of Columbus,
and an eight hour's drive
from New York City. None of
its 28,000 residents died
Sept 11, yet the people who
live in the new subdivisions
and work in the small brick
buildings that line down-
town still mourn. Mayor
Don Schonhardt was one of
the mourners, and he went
to New York to ask authori-
ties there for trade center
steel for the city's memorial.
"We felt it was important
to be a community in middle
America that would say to
the U.S. and the world, that
we do remember what hap-
pened that day," Schonhardt
said.
The memorial fills a city
block in the center of town
with its two pieces of rusted
track from the subway that
ran underneath the World
Trade Center, and two other
large hunks of twisted metal


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Associated Press
Friends Carla Gilkerson of Hilliard, Ohio, Regenia Skaggs of Columbus, Charlotte Ewing
of Dublin, Ohio, and Nancy Sustersic of Marco Island, Fa., stand together and say a prayer
June 14 after visiting First Responders Park, a memorial to the first responders and
victims of the Sept. 11 attacks, in Hilliard, Ohio.


from the towers themselves.
Las Vegas has a perma-
nent memorial at the fake
Statue of Liberty outside the
New York, New York-Hotel
Casino. There's a rotating
exhibit of items that were
left at the casino in the days
after the attacks. Recently,
about a dozen fire depart-
ment and police T-shirts
from around the U.S. were
on display in the shadow
boxes, which are lighted at
night. The hundreds of
other items are archived
and stored at the University
of Nevada Las Vegas. In a
city of excess and fantasy,
the memorial - which is
across the street from the
MGM Grand casino and its
golden Lion statue and from
Excalibur, a medieval-
themed gambling hall - is a
sober reminder of reality,
and visitors stop and peer
into the shadow boxes while
walking from one casino to
the next.
The small western Penn-
sylvania town of Shanksville
is touched like no other by
the attacks; it's believed to
have been an attack site by
accident, but one whose res-
idents had little connection
to the 40 people who per-
ished aboard the hijacked
jetliner that crashed at
more than 500 mph into the
lush, green landscape.
A $60 million memorial is
being built in the field. In-
side a temporary visitor
center, people write mes-
sages on slips of paper.
A message signed by
"Cathy" on June 18 reads,
"Almost ten years and I still
can keep back the tears
when I visit any of the three
memorials or watch a TV







E.
lwt-10 f)�ZS
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show about 9/11. So truly, we
never forget."
Still processing
Psychologists and sociolo-
gists who study grief and
public mourning say most of
us - at least for those who
didn't lose a loved one in the
attacks - are still process-
ing the pain, which will
dwindle with each succes-
sive generation.
"It's part of our defense
mechanism to distance our-
selves," said Katovich, a
professor at Texas Christian
University.
Carla Ross, an expert on
grief and forgiveness from
Raleigh, N.C., said many
Americans are still actively
mourning 9/11.
"There's two things that
make it really complicated
for people," said Ross, a
communication professor at
Meredith College. "People
don't know who to forgive.
They don't know how to let
it go. And instead of grieving
and letting go, we're blam-
ing a whole culture of peo-
ple. People are really
struggling with that."
Remembering
Gilkerson and her friends
don't want to stop. They say
if we do, we'll forget what
happened and the sacrifices
made by first responders
and soldiers who fought in
the wars the attacks
wrought
Brad Fetty, a 34-year-old

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firefighter-in-training and
a bus driver with Gilker-
son, said his city's memo-
rial conjures up
complicated emotions and
questions about that day
While looking at the
twisted and rusted steel
beams, he said he won-
ders, "What am I looking
at? Was there blood, were
there tears, actually on
this piece of metal?"
Ross thinks societies
that have experienced
large tragedies never re-
ally stop grieving, but the
mourning becomes softer,
less edgy.
"Usually when people
get to the end of the griev-
ing process, they start
making sense of things,
how it's impacted their
lives for the positive," she
said.
Karl Glessner is a 60-
year-old volunteer "am-
bassador" at the Flight 93
memorial in Shanksville.
He spends entire days at
the public viewing area
that overlooks the field
where the 40 people
aboard the plane died,
and explains what he saw
and heard that day
"This is basically the
best thing I do," he added.


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Marilyn
Dickinson, 84
INVERNESS
Marilyn Jane DuBois
Dickinson of Inverness, FL,
died peacefully at the Citrus
County Hospice House on
Saturday, June 25,2011. She
succumbed to complica-
tions of emphysema and
lung cancer.
She is survived by her
three children, Anne (Ger-
ald) Brown of Portland, OR,
Jean (Mark) Dayton of
Bloomington, IN, and Tom
(Debra) Dickinson of
Geneva, IL. She is also sur-
vived by 10 grandsons; one
granddaughter; by her elder
brother, James (Nancy)
DuBois of Inverness, FL;
and her sisters-in-law, Irene
Dickinson and Dorothy Vail,
also of Inverness. Mrs. Dick-
inson was preceded in
death by her husband of 53
years, Donald.
Mrs. Dickinson was born
in Waterloo, IA, on Decem-
ber 23, 1926. She attended
Northern Iowa University
for her freshman year and
then transferred to the Uni-
versity of Iowa from which
she graduated with a degree
in economics and English
literature. After graduation,
she worked for the
Houghton Mifflin Publish-
ing Company in Chicago, IL.
She was proud to have been
instrumental in the building
of a branch of the publish-
ing company in Geneva, IL.
Her love of reading and
books continued throughout
her life.
She and her husband
moved to Geneva, IL, in 1963


and raised their family
there. She was an active vol-
unteer in the community
and often drove patients to
the Fermi National Acceler-
ator Laboratory for cancer
treatment. Marilyn was an
enthusiastic gardener and
enjoyed being part of the
Geneva Garden Club. She
was also a brilliant bridge
player. She obtained her
real estate license in the
mid-1970's and worked with
Bill Grossklag Realty Com-
pany for a number of years
prior to retirement when
she and her husband moved
to Florida.
Following retirement,
Mrs. Dickinson often visited
her children and their fam-
ilies and was pleased to
have the opportunity to
travel. She and her husband
enjoyed visiting Europe as
well as New Zealand. Mari-
lyn was a devoted member
of PEO and was grateful for
the friendship and support
offered by that group.
Memorial contributions
can be made in her name to
the Geneva Public Library,
127 James Street, Geneva,
IL 60134. Private burial
arrangements in Florida
National Cemetery Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

John Goetz, 93
HOMOSASSA
John Goetz, 93, Ho-
mosassa, died June 26,2011.
Private arrangements with
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
handling arrangements.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of
deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place
of death; date, time and place of visitation and fu-
neral services. If websites, photos, survivors, memo-
rial contributions or other information are included,
this will be designated as a paid obituary and a cost
estimate provided to the sender.
* Paid obituaries are printed as submitted.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* Email obits@chronicleonline.com or fax (352) 563-
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U.S. taps $45M in gear for terror fight in Somalia


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -The Pentagon
is sending nearly $45 million in mil-
itary equipment, including four
small drones, to Uganda and Bu-
rundi to help battle the escalating
terror threat in Somalia.
The latest aid, laid out in docu-
ments obtained by The Associated
Press, comes as attacks intensify in
Somalia against the al-Qaida-linked
terror group al-Shabab, including
an airstrike late Thursday that hit a
militant convoy, killing a number of
foreign fighters, according to offi-
cials there.
U.S. officials, including incoming
Pentagon chief Leon Panetta, have
warned the threat from al-Shabab
is growing, and the group is devel-
oping stronger ties with the Yemen-
based al-Qaida in the Arabian
Peninsula. Panetta told lawmakers
earlier this month that as the core
al-Qaida leadership in Pakistan un-
dergoes leadership changes, with
the killing of Osama bin Laden, the
U.S. needs to make sure the group


does not relocate to Somalia.
The Pentagon plan is aimed at
helping to build the counterterror-
ism of Uganda and Burundi, two
African Union nations that have
sent about 9,000 peacekeeping
forces to Somalia. The military aid
includes four small, shoulder-
launched Raven drones, body
armor, night-vision gear, communi-
cations and heavy construction
equipment, generators and surveil-
lance systems. Training is also pro-
vided with the equipment
In addition, the Pentagon will
send $4.4 million in communica-
tions and engineering equipment to
Uganda.
Somalia has not had a fully func-
tioning government in two
decades. The government controls
just a small slice of Mogadishu, but
officials have said the peacekeep-
ing offensive is enabling them to
wrest swaths of territory in the city
and in southern Somalia from the
insurgents.
The aid is part of a $145.4 million
package Pentagon officials ap-


proved and sent to Capitol Hill last
week as part of a notification
process before the equipment can
be delivered.
Up to $350 million in military aid
can be distributed this year to sup-
port counterterror operations in
other countries. The Pentagon rou-
tinely releases the military aid in
three or four installments each year,
and the first package approved ear-
lier this year was for about $43 mil-
lion. So far, none of the assistance
this year has gone to Yemen -
which has been a top counterter-
rorism priority for the U.S.
Last year, the Pentagon allocated
$155 million for aid to Yemen, and
military leaders had proposed as
much as $200 million for this year
But U.S. officials have become in-
creasingly alarmed about the vio-
lent anti-government protests and
unrest rocking the country.
Protesters are demanding Presi-
dent Ali Abdullah Saleh's powerful
sons and other members of his
inner circle leave the country, even
as Saleh remains in Saudi Arabia


receiving treatment for injuries he
suffered in an attack on his palace
early this month.
Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has said aid
to Yemen has been interrupted by
the chaos there, and once that ebbs
the U.S. will consider what next
steps to take. But U.S. officials con-
sider AQAP in Yemen one of the
most serious and immediate terror-
ist threats, fueled in part by radical
American-born cleric Anwar al-
Awlaki.
Al-Qaida in the Arabian Penin-
sula has been linked to a number of
terror attacks in the U.S., including
the Christmas Day 2009 attempted
airliner bombing.
The Pentagon aid package also
includes funding a number of
other North African countries, in-
cluding several where there is a
continuing terror threat from al-
Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb. The
plan includes:
* $22.6 million for Mauritania for
a turbo prop aircraft for troop
transport and surveillance, and


necessary maintenance and train-
ing; and $8.1 million for airfield sys-
tems and construction and
communications equipment to de-
velop a forward operating base in
the country
* $17.7 million for an aircraft for
Djibouti, where the U.S. has its only
Africa military base.
* $12.1 million for helicopter up-
grades and training for Kenya.
* $1 million for Mali for mine
detector kits.
Also included in the aid package
is $12 million for small boats and
communications equipment for
Maldives; $12 million for six patrol
boats and trailers, body armor and
communications equipment for
Philippines; $8.4 million for com-
munications equipment and
weapons for Bangladesh; $900,000
for biometric data collection de-
vices for Oman; and $850,000 for
radar installation services for
Malaysia.
There is also about $600,000 in
the plan for human rights training
in the countries.


LEGAL
Continued from Page Al

stayed for at least one day
until yanked off the Internet
site by state law
enforcement.
He faces two third-degree
felonies: Recording the con-
versation without Tyson's
knowledge or permission,
and then "publishing" the
conversation by posting it
on YouTube.
Burton admits to doing
both, though he said Tyson
gave blanket permission
months earlier to record all
phone conversations. The
November call, however,
was the only one Burton
said he taped, and he did
not receive Tyson's permis-
sion to record that specific
call.
He said he posted the call
on YouTube and sent a
recording of the conversa-
tion back to Tyson in an
email in the hopes of getting
the attention of Tyson and
Dean to stop what Burton
and his supporters claim is
illegal activity.
The allegations? Dean
supports funding for state
and local agencies that
carry out the directives of
Agenda 21, a two-decade-
old United Nations program


Citrus DIABETES
Treatment Center


designed to bring "sustain-
able development" across
the globe.
Burton and Wyllie, a syn-
dicated talk show host on
the underground 1787
Radio Network, believe
Agenda 21 is nothing more
than an unconstitutional
government takeover of pri-
vate property and owner-
ship rights.
"We wanted to show him
he's got to do something
about this," Burton said, re-
ferring to Dean.
Burton also claims first-
hand knowledge of illegal
activity by state agencies.
He said for his whistleblow-
ing, people have shot at his
house and threatened him.
Dean, in an interview Fri-
day, said he doesn't know
what Burton is talking
about
"This fella has some type
of attitude or idea that peo-
ple have a conspiracy with
the U.N. or something like
that," Dean said.
"I don't know how I got in
his focus."
Prosecutor:
'Straight-up'
violation of law
Burton, who lives in the
Hamilton County commu-
nity of Jasper with his com-
mon-law wife, Kathy Scott,
said he took his complaints


of illegal activity to Dean
because similar complaints
to the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection got
him nowhere.
In 2003, he alleged that
DEP employees were
dumping old batteries into
a sinkhole at the Suwannee
River State Park. A DEP in-
vestigation not only found
the claims untrue, the
agency gave Burton a life-
time ban from the park for
allegedly threatening a
DEP officer.
Burton said he didn't
threaten anyone; in fact, he
said one of his complaints
to Dean and Tyson con-
cerned that ban.
Burton said he informed
Dean about the impropri-
eties and Dean told him to
talk with Tyson about it. He
said he brought it up again
during a legislative delega-
tion meeting in Lake City
and Dean agreed the activi-
ties were illegal.
Dean doesn't recall it that
way He said Burton was
"stalking" Tyson and the
first time he saw Burton
was at the meeting in Lake
City when Tyson pointed
him out to another Dean
aide.
In November, after Tyson
told Dean that Burton had
recorded the phone conver-
sation, Dean said he called


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the Senate police and the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement.
Dean said he told author-
ities, "We got a guy we think
is a little kook."
In January, FDLE agents,
armed with a search war-
rant, raided Burton's home
and confiscated his com-
puter, cell phone and vari-
ous records.
About that same time,
Tyson left Dean's office to
become vice president of
political operations for As-
sociated Industries of
Florida, a move Dean said
was not connected at all
with the Burton case.
"He was offered a much
better job and he took it,"
Dean said.
Tyson could not be
reached for comment.
The FDLE case was
turned over to the statewide
prosecutor in Tallahassee
because it crossed jurisdic-
tional lines. The phone call
originated in Hamilton
County and received in
Leon County; both counties
are in separate judicial
circuits.
The statewide prosecutor,
however, did not file
charges. Skip Jarvis, the
prosecutor whose circuit in-
cludes Burtons' hometown,
said Burton sent an email to


various public officials an-
nouncing he had done noth-
ing wrong.
Jarvis, a prosecutor since
1984 who was elected state
attorney in 2008, said Friday
he decided to take the case.
"It's a straight-up viola-
tion of the statute," he said.
"You can't record someone
without their knowledge.
You can't take that record-
ing and publish it."
Burton was arrested June
5 and jailed on $50,000
bond. He spent six days in
jail before a friend bailed
him out. Each of the two
felony counts carries a max-
imum five years in prison
and $5,000 fine.
Burton's neighbor, Bill
Ryan, said the arrest didn't
surprise him, though he
thinks Burton is innocent.
"I always thought at some
point something was going
to happen to him," Ryan
said. "Bob's the squeaky
wheel. Bob always follows
the law. They want him to
disappear."
Burton, who as of now has
no attorney, said he will
fight the charges.
"I can't wait to face my ac-
cuser," he said.
Dean said Burton crossed
a line.
"Running your mouth's
one thing," Dean said.


PAIN


MANAGEMENT


V


"Threatening people is
another."
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright can be reached at
(352) 563-3228 or mwright
@cchronicleonline. com.
































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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 A7


t r





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Many new Florida laws


reflect GOP philosophy


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
Florida will take another
step into an era of declining
expectations from its cash-
strapped state government
this week when the most
austere in a series of tight
annual budgets goes into
effect.
It's one of about 160
statutes that will go on the
books Friday, the beginning
of a new fiscal year
Many of those laws, as
well as the budget, carry out
the conservative governing
philosophies of Republican
Gov Rick Scott and the
GOP-majority Legislature.
Among them are a hotly
debated law that will effec-
tively cut the pay of 655,000
public employees - if it sur-
vives a legal challenge -
and a pair of landmark
measures privatizing health
care for poor and disabled
Floridians that also are
under fire.
Also going on the books
are laws to require drug
testing of welfare appli-
cants, curtail abortion
rights, crack down on "pill
mills" that supply prescrip-
tion painkillers to drug
dealers and addicts and ban
a designer drug often mar-
keted as "bath salts."
Three new laws will help
usher out a technological
era by deregulating landline
telephone service, televi-
sion picture tubes and ac-
cess to outdoor theaters, all
fading icons of 20th century
modernity
The $69.1 billion annual
appropriations bill (SB
2000) and related laws com-
ply with recommendations
from Scott and orders from
legislative leaders to cut
spending rather than in-
crease taxes to balance the
budget.
"In these tough economic
times, the people of Florida
are forced to do more with
less," Scott wrote in his
budget signing letter that
also included dozens of line-
item vetoes totaling a record
$615 million.
Scott, a former hospital
chain CEO, campaigned last
year on a platform of spend-
ing cuts as well as reducing
the regulation and taxation
of businesses, which he be-
lieves will foster private-
sector job creation.
If that happens it will
come at least partly at the
expense of public-sector
jobs.
The budget eliminates
about 4,500 state jobs, most
of them filled. Agencies al-
ready have begun sending
out pink slips. It also cuts
$1.35 billion in education
spending. That's expected
to result in more layoffs and
unpaid leaves for teachers
and other school district
employees.
The new budget includes
about $300 million in tax
cuts and raises college and
university tuition by 8 per-
cent. The Board of Gover-
nors has added another 7
percent increase for the
state's 11 public universities
for a 15 percent total.
It's the fifth budget in a
row without an across-the-
board raise for state work-
ers. Instead, they will see
their paychecks shrink be-
cause of the new pension
law (SB 2100) that drew a
legal challenge even before
going into effect.
The Florida Education As-


sociation, the state's teach-
ers union, sued June 20 to
challenge the law that would
require its members and
other state and local em-
ployees to fork over 3 per-
cent of their wages to the
Florida Retirement System.
The pension plan has
been fully supported by tax-
payers since the 1970s. The
employee contributions are
expected to save the state
and local governments $2
billion in the first year.
"It's unfair and it breaks
promises made to these em-
ployees when they chose to
work to improve our state,"
FEA President Andy Ford
said.
Scott says it's a matter of
fairness because most pri-
vate-sector pensions require
employee contributions.
The final verdict also is
not in on a pair of new laws
(HB 7107 and 7109) designed
to cut spending by turning
Florida's Medicaid system
over to for-profit companies
and hospital networks. That
plan will require approval
by the federal government.
It would build on an existing
managed care pilot program
in five Florida counties and
be phased in over several
years beginning in October
2013.
Another top priority of
Scott's - and a lawsuit wait-
ing to happen - is the new
law (HB 353) requiring wel-
fare applicants to take drug
tests at their own expense.
If they pass, they'll get reim-
bursed. If they fail they can't
get benefits for at least a
year and could face child
abuse charges.
The drug testing law has
been targeted for possible
legal challenge by the Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union.
The ACLU already has sued
Scott over his executive
order to screen applicants
for state jobs and conduct
random drug testing of ex-
isting employees.
Two other new laws deal-
ing with drug abuse, both
top priorities of Attorney
General Pam Bondi, also
are going into effect
After unsuccessfully try-
ing to kill Florida's pre-
scription drug-tracking
program before it even got
started, Scott signed a new
law that will keep the data-
base going and make other
changes to crack down on
pill mills.
Law enforcement officials
say the lack of a monitoring
system until this year and
inadequate laws have made
Florida the nation's leading
source of illicit prescription
drugs. Many if not most of
those drugs are taken back
to other states with stronger
laws.
The new Florida law (HB
7095) includes penalties for
doctors who over-prescribe
painkillers and tightens
rules for operating
pharmacies.
While it keeps the pre-
scription monitoring system
alive, the Legislature again
refused to pay for it. Law-
makers also threw up a new
barrier to private funding by
prohibiting pharmaceutical
companies from making
contributions.
Another measure (HB
1039) sought by Bondi will
outlaw a designer drug
known as MDPV sold as
bath salts. Bondi earlier is-
sued an emergency order
temporarily prohibiting its
sale or possession until law-


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makers could make the ban
permanent.
Law enforcement officials
say the drug, which has
been compared to LSD, was
sold at malls and other re-
tail outlets. The new law
provides for up to five years
in prison for possession.
Two bills aimed at making
it more difficult to get abor-
tions also set to go into ef-
fect Friday if Scott, who
describes himself as pro-
life, signs them as expected.
One (HB 97) would ex-
clude abortion from policies
obtained through insurance
exchanges that states will be
required to set up under the
federal health care over-
haul. The other (HB 1127)
would require women in
most cases to undergo ultra-
sound exams before getting
an abortion.
Florida will join about 20
other states in deregulating
landline telephone service.
The AARP opposed the
deregulation law (HB 1231),
arguing it would result in
higher rates for the elderly
and other customers who
can least afford phone serv-
ice. But it passed easily
Many people are relying
solely on cell phones. A
Florida Public Service
Commission report says the
number of landlines in the
state dropped 38 percent
from 12 million to 7.5 mil-
lion from 2001 through 2009.
Other new laws will
deregulate television pic-
ture tubes that are going the
way of the horse and buggy
as the result of flat-screen
technology (HB 4013) and
repeal access and exit re-
quirements for six outdoor
theaters believed to be still
operating in Dade City, Fort
Lauderdale, Lake Worth,
Lakeland, Ruskin and
Tampa (HB 4009).
Several new laws de-
signed to advance alterna-
tives to traditional public
schools also will go into
effect.
One (HB 7107) directs the
Department of Education to
expand online learning op-
tions and require students
who enter high school this
fall to take at least one vir-
tual course before they
graduate.
Another (HB 1329) ex-
pands an existing voucher
program that lets disabled
students attend private
schools at taxpayer expense
to children with lesser af-
flictions such as allergies,
asthma and diabetes.
A third (SB 1546) offers
more training and technical
assistance to charter
schools and longer contracts
and other benefits to those
with high performance
ratings.
Another education-re-
lated law (SB 228) is de-
signed to prohibit students
from wearing "droopy draw-
ers" but requiring school
districts to pass dress codes
that prohibit the wearing of
clothing in a revealing or
disruptive way
A couple of other new
laws will exempt photos,
videos and audio recordings
of deaths from the state's
public records law (HB 411)
and create a new Depart-
ment of Economic Opportu-
nity while dismantling the
Department of Community
Affairs (SB 2156).


WeirdWIRE


Doo your duty
LEBANON, N.H. - Here's
the scoop: Some apartment
complexes are using DNA test-
ing on dog doo to find out
who's not cleaning up after
their pets.
The Timberwood Commons
in Lebanon, N.H., opened this
year and already has had
problems with some residents
who aren't cleaning up messes
their dogs leave.
So manager Debbie Violette
is going to use commercially
available DNA sampling kits to
check the DNA that dogs leave
behind when they go.
"We've tried doing the warn-
ing letters. We've tried all sorts
of things," she said Friday. "It's
always a problem. It's just that
the majority of people are re-
sponsible pet owners and
there are a few who are not."
She said residents have
been told they must submit
samples from their dogs so
DNA profiles can be put on file.
"I want people to know that
we're serious about this," she
said.
More than 30 dogs call the
252-unit complex home.
Violette just received the kits
from a Knoxville, Tenn., com-
pany called PooPrints, a sub-
sidiary of BioPet Vet Lab. Jim
Simpson, president of the lab,
said about 20 properties in the
country have used the kits.
Klepto kitty
GENEVA- Forget mice. A
Swiss cat named Speedy has
an eye for finer things.
Speedy has stolen so much
loot that its owner had to post
leaflets throughout a northern
Swiss town saying "Help, our
cat steals!" and inviting people
to recover their missing things.
Margrit Geiger of Wiesen-
dangen said her kleptomaniac
cat switched three years ago
from bringing home mice to
stealing badminton shuttle-
cocks, all to impress her
teenage son.
Then the cat began special-
izing in gloves, scarves and T-
shirts. The latest obsession:
underwear and black socks.
Geiger told the Swiss daily
Blick the cat has nabbed more
than 100 items, and the paper
said Thursday some neighbors
have already reclaimed items.
Veterinarian Brigitte
Buetikofer said animals steal
to gain attention, so ignoring
them is the best cure.
Class ring returned
CANTON, Ga. -A 13-
year-old boy has found a high
school class ring in the Geor-
gia soil and tracked down the
widow of the man who lost it
50 years ago.
Kelvin Foskey Jr. was play-
ing basketball when he spied
the ring and scratched it from
the earth, his father Kelvin
Foskey told the Cherokee
Tribune.
The two decided to search
for its owner. They found
Robert Anderson in in a 1960
Dublin High School yearbook,
but the man had since died
and relatives led them to his
widow, Joan Anderson of
Canton.
She was thrilled to have
the ring back.
Joan Anderson said her
husband had gone searching
for the ring in 1961 near the
spot where it was found ear-
lier this month.
$24,988 too much
PITTSBURGH - State


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Associated Press
Timberwood Commons apartment complex manager Deb-
bie Violette poses at her desk Friday, June 24, with a DNA
test kit for pets in Lebanon, N.H. Violette is using the kit
to keep residents who own pets at the complex to clean up
after their animals.


regulators say a gambler won
a $25,000 jackpot on a Pitts-
burgh casino slot machine that
should have paid out only $12.
The Gaming Control Board
told the Pittsburgh Post-
Gazette the false jackpot hap-
pened May 29, 2010. It was
one of five at Rivers Casino in-
volving machines that were not
properly tested or certified.
The board was to have
levied an unspecified fine
against the casino. But it nixed
a consent agreement with the
casino Monday after some
board members felt a stronger
message needed to be sent.
Casino officials said the
player was allowed to keep the
jackpot and it paid all taxes on
it.
Rivers spokesman Jack
Horner said the casino takes
the matter seriously and has
retrained all of its technicians.
'Zombies ahead'
FLORENCE, Ky. - The
zombie menace has once
again found its way onto a
highway sign.
After pranksters switched the
message on an electronic road
sign, motorists in northern Ken-
tucky were warned this week to
watch for zombies along the In-
terstate 71-75 corridor.
The usual message about
upcoming roadwork was
changed to: "Nightly lane clo-


sures, zombies ahead."
Kentucky Transportation
Cabinet spokeswoman Nancy
Wood said the Transportation
Cabinet learned about the new
message midmorning Thurs-
day and turned it off until it can
be fixed. Wood said officials
were not amused by the prank.
The gag was hardly original.
There was a spate of such
pranks in 2009 in Florida,
Pennsylvania, Maryland, Illi-
nois and Texas. Last March,
someone posted a zombie
warning on a highway sign in
South Carolina.
Seal slapper
HONOLULU - Touching an
endangered Hawaiian monk
seal will cost a 19-year-old
man $100.
The Honolulu Star-Adver-
tiser reported Thursday that
Cameron Cayaban pleaded
guilty in federal court to ha-
rassing, harming or pursuing
an endangered species.
A federal magistrate judged
imposed $100 in fines and
fees.
Cayaban was charged with
slapping a Hawaiian monk
seal at Kalaeloa's White Plains
Beach in March.
His lawyer said Cayaban
was overcome when he saw
the seal, ran up to the endan-
gered animal and touched it.
-From wire reports


429-0627 MCRN

NOTICE OF INTENT TO
CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE
REGULATIONS AFFECTING
THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BCC)
proposes to adopt the following by ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE CITRUS COUNTY FUTURE LAND USE
MAP BY REDESIGNATING APPROXIMATELY 206 ACRES
OF THE FUTURE LAND USE OF PROPERTY FROM LOW
INTENSITY COASTAL AND LAKES TO RECREATIONAL
VEHICLE PARK; AMENDING THE CITRUS COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE ATLAS BY REDESIGNATING THE
ZONING OF APPROXIMATELY 206 ACRES OF PROPERTY
FROM LOW INTENSITY COASTAL AND LAKES TO
RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARK; PROVIDING FOR
APPLICABILITY; PROVIDING FOR MODIFICATION;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE..
CPA/AA-PDO-11-03, John H. Eden, IV, ESQ. for New
Horizon Funding, Inc.
The property is located in Sections 14 and 15, Township 19
South, Ranae 20 East.
Further described as a portion of Parcel 10000; (E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness Area). A complete legal description is on file.
The public hearing on the Ordinance will be held on
Tuesday, July 12, 2011 at 5:01 p.m., in Room 100, Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida.
Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard
regarding the proposed amendment.
LOCATOR MAP


CPA/AA-11-03











A copy of the proposed ordinances) and supporting materials are
available for public inspection and copying between the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday, at the Department
of Development Services, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto,
Florida 34461. For more information about this application, please
contact the Planning Division at (352) 527-5239.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the
board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting or
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings and,
for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes all
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this
meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should
contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida
34450, (352) 341-6565, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
c Citrus County, Florida


A8 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Public invited to 'Follow That Dream'


Chronicle

Bring a chair, spread your blan-
ket and as the sun goes down on
Inverness' Courthouse Square on
Friday, July 1, watch the movie
that brought the King to Citrus
County.
The open-air free showing of
"Follow That Dream" is in cele-
bration of the Chronicle's 2011
"Remember When," which pub-
lishes July 2 and is a tribute to the
50th anniversary of the filming of
that movie in Citrus and Levy
counties in 1961, starring Elvis
Presley
This section includes a collec-


tion of photographs and
memories that local resi-
dents have submitted, as
well as a compilation of
newspaper articles writ-
ten during this period.
Prior to the movie, ap-
pearing on a giant screen
outside the courthouse, El
Elvis favorites will be Pre
heard around the square celeb
as the Historic Courthouse planned
Museum remains open Jul
throughout the evening to
allow special tours, including vis-
its to the famous second-story
courtroom where scenes for "Fol-
low That Dream" were shot, as


i



br
A
Y


well as visits to the "Cin-
ema in the Sunshine" now
exhibiting in the John
Murray Davis Rotating
Gallery
Organizers of the event
encourage families to take
advantage of dinner spe-
is cials offered at the local
sley restaurants and eating es-
ration tablishments in the down-
I Friday, town Inverness area
y 1. before they claim their
spot on the lawn to view
the movie. Movie-time refresh-
ments will be offered by Big
Brothers Big Sisters and Boy
Scout Troop 457.


Tables will also be set up hous-
ing information from the Citrus
County Historical Society on this
year's successful "Follow That
Dream" anniversary celebration,
which had to schedule additional
performances to please the
crowds wanting to attend this
production.
There will also be information
concerning the return of the cele-
bration in 2012.
Representatives from the
Chronicle will distribute "hot off
the press" editions of the 2011
"Remember When," along with
displaying additional Elvis arti-
cles and memorabilia.


To add to the festivities, mem-
bers of Citrus County Cruisers will
open the hoods of special vintage
cars and trucks on view on the
courthouse lawn.
At 8:30 p.m. or as soon as it turns
dark, staff of the county's Parks &
Recreation Department will begin
showing "Follow That Dream" on
the specially equipped outdoor
screen and projection
system.
The movie will be visible from
side of the courthouse adjacent to
North Apopka Avenue.
There will be no rain date for
this event. For information, call
(352) 314-6427.


Worth NOTING


Zumba classes
at Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call (352) 465-7007.
Yoga offered at
canning center
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers yoga with
Laura Boetto from 10 and 11
a.m. Tuesday and Fridays at
the Canning Center in Lecanto.
Cost is $6 per class; $20
monthly. No pre-registration re-
quired.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call (352) 465-7007.
Women's golf
clinics coming up
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in association with
Pine Ridge Golf Course, will
offer a series of women-only
golf clinics this summer.
Pine Ridge Golf Pro Randy
Robbins will be lead instructor
and will have two separate
classes. Beginner classes will
begin at 5:30 p.m. Monday
and intermediate classes will be
at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.
The clinics will be offered as
three one-hour weekly sessions
for $90 and there are three clin-
ics to choose from. The clinics
will begin in July (July 11 for be-


* t.JtA*. . -i-T*~- ~
--
4


ginners and July 13 for interme-
diate) and August (Aug. 1 for
beginners and Aug. 3 for inter-
mediate).
Women who would like to
participate in more than one
clinic can sign up for a second
clinic at half price. Golf clubs
will be provided.
Pine Ridge Golf Course will
also be starting a Saturday
morning Working Women's
League. This league will play on
the Little Pines, which is a nine-
hole, Par 3 course. The fee for
Saturday play will be $13 and
will include the cart fee.
To find out more information
or to register, call Randy Rob-
bins at (352) 746-6177 or visit
www.pineridgegolfcc.com.


Club offers weekly
Zumba lessons
Yankeetown/Inglis Woman's
Club is offering Zumba classes
in air-conditioned comfort from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday.
Everyone is welcome. For
more information, call (352)
447-2057.


erans recommended by a local
veterans' organization.
Send applications with en-
dorsements to: Board of
County Commissioners, Sup-
port Services, Veterans' Serv-
ices, 2804 Marc Knighton Court
- Key No. 13, Lecanto, FL
34461-8334. For information,
call (352) 527-5918.
* . . .. L-_--- - -*-L- -- - - l--


The Citrus County Veteran
Services Department is accept-
ing applications for a new Vet-
erans' Services Advisory Board.
This is a volunteer position cre-
ated by the county commission.
Members must be wartime vet-


Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a new low-im-
pact stretching class. This on-
going class will be from 10 to 11
a.m. at Citrus Springs Commu-
nity Center. Cost is $5 per
class.
The low-impact class is easy,


Approximately 1 ton of trash
was picked up and 24
volunteer hours were put in
by eight volunteers who
cleaned up Saturday, June
18, around Bird Creek
Bridge on County Road 40
in Yankeetown. Trash that
could be recycled was
disposed of in county
recycle bins and an esti-
mated 18 bags and buckets
of glass and plastic bottles
and aluminum cans were
recycled. Participants were
Jack and Susie Schofield,
Yankeetown; Whitey
Markle, Orange Lake; Brack
Barker, Levy County; Emily
Casey, Tracey Colson and
Matt Clemmons of Crystal
River; and John Herbert of
Gainesville. The group
represented the Florida
Paddling Trails Association.
The county boat ramp was
packed with more than 70
boaters, numerous kayakers
and many people picnicking,
swimming and fishing.
Special to the Chronicle


fun with good benefits.
Stretching helps to make you
more flexible and regular
stretching will help mobility and
balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Research suggests moder-
ate-intensity, low-impact activity
is just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the risk
of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call (352) 465-7007.


Center has
'seniors on move'
"Seniors on the Move" offers
trips to the community centers,
movies, flea markets, libraries,
parks, beach, theater, shopping
trips and more.
Recent surveys have shown
seniors in the county listed so-
cialization as something they
lacked - Seniors on the Move
hopes to change this. For infor-
mation, call Sue Carscadden at
(352) 527-5959.
Seniors on the Move is a
program of the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center and is spon-
sored by the Citrus County
Senior Foundation.
What's your child
doing this summer?
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation will again host its
summer youth camp program,
Camp Fusion.
Activities include arts and
crafts to weekly field trips and
athletic programs to guest
speakers. The camp is for chil-
dren from 6 to 10 years of age;
6-year-olds must have attended
kindergarten before the sum-
mer and 10-year-olds cannot
have started middle school.
Camp Fusion accepts weekly
as well as daily registrations. All
staff are trained in CPR and
first aid, and undergo an exten-
sive background check.
Campers will go swimming at
Bicentennial Pool twice a week,
to the movies at Citrus Cine-
mas once a week and on an
additional weekly field trip to a
wildlife park or other attraction.
Each of the trips is factored
into the weekly fees of $60 per
child; for extended care, cost is
$75 per child, per week.
For details about Camp Fu-
sion, call (352) 527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.


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MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 A9


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Page A10 - MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011



PINION


"I think patriotism is like
charity - it begins at home."
Henry James
"The Portrait of a Lady," 1881


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan............. .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan .................. ............... editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ............. .................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz......... .................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............... ............citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ...........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LOCAL HEROINE





Patriotism




award well




deserved


It's heartwarming when
people do well by doing
good.
In this case, it's county resi-
dent Barbara Mills. She was
chosen by the 40 & 8 veterans
honor organization to receive
the Nationale Americanism


Award, exemplify-
ing patriotism and
support of Ameri-
can veterans and
the spirit of Amer-
icanism. She'll
travel to Vancou-
ver to accept the
award in Septem-
ber.
If you've ever
been around
Mills, you've prob-
ably been advised


THE IS
Local re
receives N
Americ
Awa

OUR OP
A great h
her and
comm


about how little it takes to show
appreciation for our men and
women in uniform. And, of
course, you've probably been
asked if you can help.
Mills is the driving force be-
hind Operation Welcome
Home. She tirelessly collects
donations to create gift baskets
for returning service members,
to show them how much this
community appreciates them.
She also bakes, sends care
packages to service members
still overseas, visits veterans in


A heart for history
I have to laugh at the person
who complained about
all the money being 0
wasted on the Valerie
Theater to renovate it
and make it usable
again. I suppose he was
upset years ago with all
the money used for fix-
ing up the Old Court- A
house and making it into
a museum. He has no CALL
interest in historical 563-
places and would just as
soon tear them down
and make them into parking
lots. My heart goes out to people
like this who have no interest in
history of the past but live only
for the present. He'd rather have
some discount store put in the
square, or maybe another
Wendy's or McDonald's, instead
of anything old and filled with
history. Such a pity.
Store requests
Happy to hear that our mall
will stay. Would like to see a
Bath & Bodyworks and a JoAnn
Fabrics store for sewing needs
and decorating items. Now I
have to go to Spring Hill.
Why sell them?
In today's Chronicle (June 23),
on the front page, it said that
our fire chief has announced
that setting off fireworks of any
kind is illegal in Citrus County.
My simple question is: Why do
we have firework tents all over
the county selling fireworks, en-
dangering the lives, the limbs of
our children and people, and
also the danger of fire in this
county?
Fireworks conundrum
Please help me to understand
this: There's supposed to be a


I

(


hospitals and lines up re-
turned veterans to speak at
schools and to organizations.
This is the second recogni-
tion to Citrus County from the
40 & 8 group. Last year, it
named Inverness as the City of
the Year, citing the numerous
parades, cere-
;SUE: monies, events
recognizing veter-
isident ans, monuments
rationale honoring those
anism killed in combat
rd. and overall com-
munity support,
INION: including gift bas-
kets. It's laudable
onor for the year after In-
for the verness was hon-
unity. ored, the 40 & 8
group awarded
Mills this special individual
recognition.
Unlike with many do-good-
ers who develop an inflated
self-image, Barbara Mills is
humble.
"I love doing this," she said.
"I've found my niche in life."
With Mills, it's about the vet-
erans, not about her.
In Citrus County, we don't do
it for the prizes. We follow our
hearts in honoring our military
members. That's as it should
be.


burn ban. The fire marshal says
that all use of any firecrackers
or any fireworks displays
at all is prohibited, but
JND there are fireworks for
yf sale on every corner,
11rr just about, that you go
by. I'm not sure, you
know, maybe I'm stupid,
but I'm not sure I'm
quite getting that. So
somebody needs to
explain it.
)579 One-term Obama
You're running a story,
a story in your newspa-
per about the "Libyan lie," with
President Obama stating he
would only be in Libya for a cou-
ple of days, not weeks. And the
writer of the story said he mis-
understood him when he said
that when the politicians deliber-
ately lie, they should be im-
peached, and I agree with him.
This president is turning out to
be the biggest conman the
United States has ever seen. And
we're still - not me, because I
wouldn't vote for him - but
we're still accepting his lies over
and over and over. When are the
American people going to wake
up and vote Obama out of of-
fice? I just wanted to say that.
Soft-spoken lawyers
I've been watching "Court TV"
for quite some time now and I
see where they have two women
state attorneys. It's nice to see
new faces. The only problem is
that when they talk, I wish they
would talk a little bit louder or
get the microphones closer to
them so that you could under-
stand what they're saying. Keep
up the good work. And keep put-
ting women out there and give
them the opportunity to do
something also.


One reason

I pay my taxes. I will
not offend your in-
telligence by pre-
tending to enjoy it. , -
Writing that check is
about as enjoyable as a
chainsaw root canal.
But I don't resent it, ei-
ther.
I pay my taxes be-
cause this is how we Leonard Pitts
the people pay for OTHER
things we deem to be VOICES
in our communal in- VOICES
terest. This is how our
military is sustained. This is how He con
our children are educated. This He con
is how our potholes are filled. "The
This is how our libraries are erance
stocked. This is how our police of- told a
ficers are supplied. This is how Gazett
we take care of us. So I pay my accour
taxes. brick v
It is because I do, that I was ap- Thai
palled by the story of James crime.
Verone. He is a 59-year-old man he wa]
from Gastonia, N.C. Drove a sen ba
Coca-Cola delivery truck for 17 note d
years until he lost his job three medic:
years ago. He got another job showe
driving a truck, but that job went while
away, too. So Verone took part- on a cc
time work at a convenience store, to arri
only to find himself physically un- went t
able to do it. Verone has a bad shelter
back, a problem with his left foot care.
that causes him to limp, arthritis I am
that swells his knuckles and His stu
carpal tunnel syndrome. He one hu
could not stand behind the regis- taken t
ter, bend to reach the low shelves, blood ]


why to

lift things to the high
ones.
And he had no med-
ical insurance. Then, to
make matters worse, he
found a lump on his
chest. Desperate,
Verone considered his
options. He filed for
disability and early So-
cial Security, but did
not qualify Meanwhile,
his savings were run-
ning out like sand
through an hourglass.
nsidered a homeless shelter
nsidered asking for charity.
e pain was beyond the tol-
that I could accept," he
reporter from the Gaston
e, upon whose story this
nt is based. "I kind of hit a
wall with everything."
t's when Verone turned to
On the ninth of this month,
lked into a randomly cho-
ink and passed a teller a
demanding one dollar and
al attention. He never
d a weapon, stood there
she called police, waited
ouch in the lobby for them
ve, surrendered quietly He
to jail, where he now has
r, food and, yes, medical

not here to lionize Verone.
nt could have gotten some-
irt. Indeed, the teller was
;o the hospital because her
pressure spiked.


pay taxes

No I don't lionize him. But I do
empathize.
I pay my taxes. I consider it a
patriotic obligation - a sacrifice
for the greater we.
But that is not how the anti-gov-
ernment forces that have domi-
nated political debate in recent
years see it. To hear them tell it,
to pay taxes is to be robbed. And
every federal program our taxes
support is wasteful and unneces-
sary, except, of course, those that
directly benefit the complainer
himself.
During the health care debate,
we kept hearing a government-
run system amounted to "social-
ized medicine," as if Marx would
be your triage nurse and Lenin
your doctor As if, by that defini-
tion, our government-run li-
braries, police forces, schools
and garbage pickup were not also
"socialized." As if it's Aetna that
really has your interests at heart.
If health care were "social-
ized," a law-abiding workingman
would not have felt driven to this
extreme. A great nation has a
moral obligation to provide a
safety net, to care for the most
broken and vulnerable of its peo-
ple.
I pay my taxes. That's one rea-
son I do.

Write to Leonard Pitts Jr at 1
Herald Plaza, Miami, FL 33132
or lpitts@miamiherald. com.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Turning troubles
There are at least a couple of
intersections in the area that
have no turning arrow. One of
them is at County Road 486 and
State Road 44, and the other at
West Homosassa Trail and U.S.
19. There seems to be an un-
written rule that while I am
making a legal right-hand turn
on a green, those coming from
the opposite direction
can make a simultaneous left
turn into the left-hand lane. In
a couple of occasions, a driver
attempted to go into the right-
hand lane and almost collided
with my car.
At these same intersections,
when I don't have the right-of-
way, and I am waiting until it is
safe for me to turn left, most
drivers behind me honk
the horn.
There are many other places
where drivers make a "rolling
stop" before turning. One place
where this is pervasive is
southbound County Road 491 at
C.R. 486. While sitting at the
stoplight, I have seen car after
car turn right on red without
coming to a complete stop.
Many others use the right-turn-
only lane to beat traffic across
C.R. 486 at this same location.
I would suggest officials look
at putting turning arrows at
some of the intersections that do
not have them and to patrol the
corner of C.R. 491 and C.R. 486.
Myron Brashears
Pine Ridge

Support your Chamber
As a 40-year Crystal River
resident and current small-
business owner, I have been
witness to the worst econ-
omy Citrus County has seen in


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

my lifetime. I 'm not alone.
For many years our
nation, state and especially Cit-
rus County enjoyed unprece-
dented prosperity. For now,
those days are gone.
To survive, I have found my-
self searching for business
where business used to find me.
One of the strongest tools I have
available to me now is our
Chamber of Commerce. The
networking opportunities pro-
vided by the Chamber are
invaluable.
"Networking" in this context
is a verb. It is cooperative. If
you have been overlooking this
fact, please consider first shop-
ping locally. Then join, re-join
or become more active in


Chamber events, activities and
programs that the
Chamber works so hard to pro-
vide. Dollar for dollar, it is the
most effective and least expen-
sive marketing tool your busi-
ness can have.
The partnerships formed are
too numerous to mention, but
are all strong resources. The
Chamber staff is constantly
seeking ways to better
serve members. Change re-
quires a lot of hard work and
stepping out of comfort zones.
Recent restructuring and per-
sonnel changes demonstrate
the Chamber's willingness to
evolve and take on new chal-
lenges. Downsizing and stream-
lining are realities we all have
to deal with. This puts extra
burdens on all. The staff seems
to find ways to continue to pro-
vide all I need.
I would like to thank individ-
uals I hope will understand are
included when I say the entire
staff.
Particularly, I would like to
comment on the energy, expert-
ise and integrity Josh Wooten
so willingly shares. I would not
be able to pay a professional
consultant for the guidance
Josh (Wooten) offers. His many
years serving Citrus County
and his diverse knowledge
of local business and politics
consolidates a wealth of infor-
mation to only a phone call
away The Chamber could not
have chosen a more effective
president.
I urge all to support the
Chamber and all its partners
and members as we work to-
ward a prosperous future.
Mitch Simmons
Neon Leon's Zydeco Steakhouse
Old Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Tax cuts don't work
I keep reading the call-ins
about people saying the
very wealthy should not be
taxed, that they are job cre-
ators. People just don't re-
member history, I guess,
because George Bush did
that, OK? (He) made these
huge tax cuts for the very
wealthy and he created less
jobs than any president in
recent history during his
eight years in office. And so,
you know, the trickle-down
theory does not work.
No motor homes
I'm reading the article in
the newspaper regarding
sacrificing safeguards of the
comprehensive
plans. And then I 0
see in yesterday's
(June 23) paper
John Eden is trying,
he's going to try to
convince the county (
commissioners to
change the land
that he has on the CAL
lake system that is 5
considered residen- 56 -
tial low density, to
change it to high-
density residential and put a
bunch of motor homes
there. What a disgrace. He
tried this five years ago and
the people came out en
masse. They don't want it.
You know, they don't want
this little lake destroyed.
Why can't he put 10 or 15
or 20 big, beautiful homes
in there instead of putting
450 motor homes? Give me
a break. I hope this county
commission has the same
good sense the county com-
mission had five years (ago).
Mexican sunflowers
That picture of the sun-
flower in the Homosassa
Beacon on the back page
(June 24) is a Mexican sun-
flower. They all grow 13, 14,
15 or more feet high.
Flat tax
It appears Republicans
are willing to see America
go down the drain rather
than budge on their de-
mands for continued tax
breaks for the very wealthy.
They seem to prefer seeing
one more nail hammered
into the middle-class coffin.
I think it's time to go to a
flat-tax rate with no loop-
holes and no deductions.
That way everyone pays
their fair share. Corpora-
tions should only get tax
breaks for actual jobs cre-
ated. If they cut back on
jobs or they export jobs,
they lose the tax breaks.
Michelle in Africa
I've been following the
Michelle Obama trips to
South Africa with her family.
I'm just kind of wondering
who's paying for this trip. I
hope it's not us, the taxpay-
ers. I can understand she


OPINION


has her two daughters with
her and possibly even her
mother. But I also under-
stand she has other rela-
tives, such as cousins and
nieces and nephews, and
other friends with her. That's
fine, but I hope that we, the
taxpayers, aren't footing the
bill for this whole trip, which
is, to me, nothing more than
a paid vacation.
Let's drill here
Don't be fooled by the
sudden use of the world oil
reserves. We still need to
drill 25 percent of our own
oil while looking for better
alternatives of oil use. Soon
as the reserve oil goes
down, the price of
LJND (gas) will jump to
JND $4 a (gallon) or
P W higher. In order to
keep the oil prices


U'


down, we need to
keep drilling for our
own oil. We have
plenty of oil.


I,*W Late spray
)5790 I'd just like to
)u 57 know who the Ein-
stein is (who) de-
cided to send Mosquito
Control out to spray the
streets at approximately 8
o'clock when everyone was
out walking their dogs, rid-
ing their bikes, because the
sun had gone down and it
was a lot cooler and every-
one goes out in the evening.
The Mosquito Control truck
was spraying as everyone
was walking and it was re-
ally ridiculous. No wonder
they call this "Circus
County" - it's run by a
bunch of clowns.
Where's weather?
I don't know if anybody
else is really perturbed with
Channel 9 News. It's sup-
posed to be news and
weather and they have the
Casey Anthony trial on all
day long. We've had some
serious storms go through
here and if you're lucky, you
might get on when there's
news and weather. But
come on, Channel 9. Do
what you're supposed to be
doing - news and weather,
not media frenzy.
Litter bugs
People who litter are
trash. A real estate publica-
tion reported the amount of
trash and litter on the side
of the road is a reflection of
the type of people who live
in the area. I don't think
that is a compliment for us
residents of Citrus County.
What say you?
Scientific religion
I see where science vs. re-
ligion is becoming popular
again. I'll just say this: Sci-
ence is the art of trying to
figure out how God made
everything or how we can fix
what we screwed up with
our scientists.


Concert success
TEENSTOCK 2011-
what a great day it was.
There was plenty of
shade. The sun was
bright, but a cool breeze
prevailed. And the talent
was the hottest part of
the day
Citrus County has a
wealth of teen talent and
concert attendees saw a
good portion of that on
Saturday Big Brothers
Big Sisters was there
with a crafts table for the
younger kids and girls
from Camp E Nini Has-
see cooked up hot dogs
and other goodies for the
crowd. Band members
took turns at the gate,
collecting money and
volunteers from the Na-
ture Coast Friends of
Blues and College of
Central Florida Phi
Theta Kappa helped in
the T-shirt and silent
auction areas. Teen dads
Jim Metz and Norm
Biggs provided excellent
sound for the day and
moms Martee Biggs and
Rhonda Newcomb
helped at the gate.
I witnessed great ca-
maraderie among peers
throughout the day The
support each teen gave
the other was remark-
able. Sophie Robitaille is
only 11 and she opened
the show. Robert Biggs
with Noiz Control and
Curb Side Goodbye was
there to wish her good
luck just before taking
the stage. Sophie's dad
got to talk with other
teen parents and found
similar situations in sup-
porting their children's
talents.
Side Kick got the
crowd involved early
with hand clapping en-
thusiasm. A 12-year-old
guitar player from Ocala
was there with his dad
hoping he could get on
stage. He did because of
teen compassion from
Virtual Volume. Thir-
teen-year-old Haley
Schroeder, also from
Ocala, received support
from teens rushing the
stage during her per-
formance.
Virtual Volume had to
play without their lead
guitarist and they did not
miss a beat. Monkeys
with Hand Grenades
Matthew Morrow got out
from behind his drums
to introduce a new
rhythm instrument - a
gourd! The Broken
Home Children stood
'round one microphone
and shared their won-
derful bluegrass har-
monies. From solo artists


Brashear's
www.BrashearsPharmacy.com PHARMI ACY


471 N. Dade Point, Lecanto..............746-3420
Hwy.491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology
206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness.....637-2079
One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness


A Face That Looks Younger

After 90 Minutes

IT CAN BE YOURS -
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Join Double Board certified
Richard Castellano, M.D. who will
share how his face lift procedure has
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people like you. Hear them tell their
stories. You can't afford to miss this!


Limited seating -
Reserve your spot today!
As seen on:
SCBS* [03 N1


o A
L..
to';


to rock 'n' roll, from blue-
grass to head banger
music, they brought all to
the stage on Saturday
Many thanks go to the
business community who
donated items for the
silent auction. They in-
clude Crowley & Company,
New Concepts Interna-
tional Hair Salon, Citrus
County Visitors and Con-
vention Bureau, River
Sport Kayak, Neon Leon's
Zydeco Steakhouse, Hud-
son Tire and Seven Rivers
Medical Center. Members
and friends also donated
items to make the Silent
Auction a success.
A big thank you also
goes out to Jessyca
Thibault who wrote sev-
eral articles on TEEN-
STOCK in the days leading
up to the event. Jessyca
goes to Lecanto High
School and it was a pleas-
ure working with her on
this article. She did her
homework and wrote very
well-researched articles
that captured what TEEN-
STOCK's vibe. In addition,
the Nature Coast Friends
of Blues is always thankful
to the Chronicle for sup-
porting their events
through ads and articles
and photos.
If you were not there, we
are interested in why and


how we can make next
year's event more appeal-
ing. Ideas are welcome. So
please send them our way
Email sukelo@tampabayrr.
com.
The Nature Coast
Friends of Blues loves
helping these kids, Big
Brothers Big Sisters, and
we need your ideas and
support to make it bigger
and better in the years to
come.
Susan Mitchell
Nature Coast Friends of
Blues president

Benefitting
The Melody Mobile Park
of Inverness, Gene's Jam,
the many pickers and grin-
ners and residents would
like to thank and praise all
of the giving businesses
that contributed to the
"Bernie and Terry Whittle
Benefit" that they spon-
sored on Saturday, June 18.
They contributed foods and
prizes that made a beauti-
ful day and successful ben-
efit for the couple and all
involved. We 'ALE' thank
each and every one of you.
These establishments
contributed to the benefit:
* Ace Hardware -
Inverness
* Sonny's BBQ -


Inverness and Bushnell
* Citrus Plaza Barber
Shop - Inverness
* Papa J's Restaurant -
Inverness
* Hollywood Pizza -
Inverness
* Beef O'Brady's -
Inverness
* Frankie's Grill -
Inverness
* Inverness Family
Restaurant - Inverness
* Joe's Restaurant -
Inverness
* Rustic Ranch -
Inverness
* Market Street -
Bushnell
* Homil's - Bushnell
* Granny's Restaurant -
Crystal River
* Manatee Lanes -
Inverness
* Kracker Shack -
Inverness
* Floral Nails -
Inverness
And a special thanks to
the staff of the Citrus
County Chronicle for their
support and widespread
advertising of this event.
You all made this a suc-
cessful happening. Gene
Whitesides, players and all
of our wonderful friends
and supporters.
Eugene Whitesides
Inverness


L1- EY1POPIIK


They're so big your eyeballs will pop out!



4I Mon. thru Fri. 10 am-6 pm
Sat. 10 am-3 pm* * Closed Sun.
West Hwy. 44, Crystal River (1/2 Block West of New Holiday Inn)
(Look for us in the Plaza between Racetrac Gas & Turkey Oak Light)
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE MEAT
Almost hidden in a little strip plaza along Hwy. 44 in Crystal River (located between
Racetrac gas and Huddle House) is a really great place for "Real Philly Cheesesteaks &
Hoagies" along with a host of other philly favorite items.
The name of this little slice of the "city of brotherly love" is called EYEPOPPIN'
CHEESESTEAKS & HOAGIES, which says it all! Everything is created with a real
Philadelphia style passion. From the real AMOROSO rolls to the imported Birch Beer soda
& the real ribeye steak meat that's sliced daily and not to mention fried onions that you can
smell down the highway as you drive by.
You get real Philly cheesesteaks cooked with whatever your favorite toppings are (like
fried onions, mushrooms, etc.) The meat just simply overflows the Philly imported rolls.
"We don't pack our steaks & hoagies with veggies" - H ERE "IT'S ALL ABOUT THE
MEAT BABY!" We also do killer Ruebens, monstrous Burgers, and Italian Hoagies Done
Right (no bologna, no pepperoni) - Just Done Right!!!
The owners of EYEPOPPIN", Claudine and John, have been in town for a while. They
are the former owners of Gannon's Beef. Check them out!
*AII food prepared to order in house daily. So "if the food runs out" which it
often does because it's so good, then we go home early!

ATTENTION ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY




7" CHEESESTEAK

OR HOAGIE
* MUST HAVE VALID MILITARY ID. LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER PER DAY. OFFER EXPIRES 7/2/11. COUPON NOT NEEDED


l WFiREE IL LARGE

LU BEVERAGE I FRENCH FRY
WITH PlURCHASE OF ANY WITH PURCHASE OF A
W H R S E OF AN FAMILY SIZED 2O"(Ser.es.2to4)
12" CHEESESTEAK CHEESESTEAK OR HOAGIE
OR HOAGIE LIMIT ONE PER PURCHASE PER COUPON
U COUPONMUSTBEPRESENTEDATTIMEOFPURCHASE - * WHILE SUPPLIES LAST
L � * WHILE SUPPLIES LAST . NO UPGRADES OR
SUBSTITUTIONS * NO UPGRADES OR SUBSTITUTIONS
*LIMIT 1 PER COUPONIPER PURCHASE * COUPON REQUIRED
GOOD 6127/11 - 712/11 GOOD 6127/11 - 7130/11


MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 All


Thank-you LETTERS


IMAGE LIFT


888.789.4624
www.ImageLift.com


*Notice - individual results and times vary Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for
payment for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hrs of responding to ad for free, discounted fee or reduced
fee service, examination, or treatment Before and after photos are all actual patients of Image Lift 2007-2010 Richard D Castellano, M D All rights reserved


m
-











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS No more damage in floods
Gay pride

SCity still under full

alert as river ebbs %4
Associated Press


Associated Press
Women dressed as bride
and groom march in the an-
nual Gay Pride parade in
Greenwich Village, Sunday,
June 26, 2011 in New
York. One of the world's
oldest and largest gay
pride parades was ex-
pected to become a victory
celebration Sunday after
New York's historic deci-
sion to legalize same-sex
marriage. The law signed
by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on
Friday doesn't take effect
for 30 days.



One wildfire under
control in Ariz.
PHOENIX - One of three
major wildfires burning in Ari-
zona was declared fully con-
tained Sunday, a second was
nearly out, and a third was
growing only in a rugged area
with a handful of residents.
Authorities said the Horse-
shoe Two wildfire near Portal
in southeastern Arizona was
completely surrounded after
burning more than 348
square miles of the Chiric-
ahua mountains in seven
weeks. All evacuation orders
have been lifted.
The huge blaze started
May 8 and burned across
one of the state's so-called
"sky island" mountain ranges,
which rise from the surround-
ing desert and grasslands
and aren't connected to other
ranges. The fire essentially
burned the entire Chiricahua
range, which is part of the
Coronado National Forest.


World BRIEFS

Playing


Associated Press
A Libyan plays soccer on
the beach Sunday in the
rebel-held capital Benghazi,
Libya.


New cracks form
in Egypt's Muslims
CAIRO - Several mem-
bers of Egypt's Muslim Broth-
erhood, including a prominent
senior figure, broke off to form
a new political party Sunday,
exposing further cracks in the
influential Islamic group that is
expected to be the most for-
midable contender in Egypt's
upcoming elections.
The Brotherhood was the
most powerful and organized
opposition party before Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak was
ousted Feb. 11 in a popular
uprising. It is expected to win
big in parliamentary elections
set for September.
But the movement also
faces new challenges in post-
revolutionary Egypt, where the
new political openness is taking
a toll on the venerable Islamist
group. Several factions - most
recently several young mem-
bers - have already broken
away to form new parties to
rival to the Brotherhood's main
Freedom and Justice Party.
-From wire reports


MINOT, North Dakota - The
Souris River began a slow retreat
from Minot on Sunday with no fur-
ther flood damage in the city, but of-
ficials warned danger would
remain for several days until the
highest water passed.
"We're still at full alert until the
water starts going down," said
Shannon Bauer, a spokeswoman for
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
"It's still a war."
The city's levees were reinforced
with plastic sheeting to help them
withstand the sustained exposure
to high water. Forecasts called for
the Souris to fall nearly 2 feet by
Wednesday
More than 4,000 homes and hun-
dreds of businesses flooded when


Senators demand
Associated Press
Three U.S. senators, alarmed
by findings of an Associated
Press investigation about aging
problems at the nation's nuclear
power plants, asked Thursday
for a congressional investigation
of safety standards and federal
oversight at the facilities.
The request by Democrats
Barbara Boxer of California and
Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode
Island and independent Bernard
Sanders of Vermont builds on in-
creased public concern about
nuclear safety in recent months
- an outcry unlike anything
since the Chernobyl nuclear ac-
cident in 1986.
Public interest first spiked
after the March accident at the
Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear
plant in Japan. Concern has been
heightened this week as the AP
began releasing the results of a
yearlong investigation into aging
related safety problems at the
104 reactors operating in the
United States.
That's led activists, politicians,
critics and safety watchdogs to
say they hope to turn the public
focus more sharply onto the in-
dustry in America and broader
regulatory problems at the U.S.
Nuclear Regulatory Commis-
sion. One after another, they said
they hope the result will be
tougher relicensing and safety
standards, safer storage of spent
fuel and better disaster planning.
Janet Tauro, of Brick, N.J., co-
founder of Grandmothers, Moth-
ers, and More for Energy Safety
who lives near the Oyster Creek
nuclear plant, said the latest de-
velopments have led her to con-
clude "the light is really starting
to shine on a very closed regula-
tory agency"
Senators Boxer, Whitehouse
and Sanders asked for the over-
sight investigation by the Gov-
ernment Accountability Office.
Boxer chairs the Senate Commit-
tee on Environment and Public
Works.
New Jersey's two Democratic
senators, Frank R. Lautenberg
and Robert Menendez, made a


Associated Press
Floodwaters from the Souris River surround a home and truck Sunday in the
Oak Park neighborhood of Minot, N.D.
the Souris flowed over levees Fri- residents were evacuated early last
day Bauer said crews had dealt week in anticipation of flooding.
only with isolated problems since Smaller cities along the Souris also
then, including a leaky dike that warned their residents to leave. The
was reinforced Saturday night. Corps was sandbagging in Sawyer
About a fourth of Minot's 40,000 and Velva, two small downsteam


congressional probe on nuke safety

Populations around nuclear plants soar since 1980
Populations around nuclear power plants have increased as much as 4.5 times since 1980 making the once
rural areas more difficult to evacuate. Set in 1978, evacuation zones have remained frozen at a 10-mile radius
from each site, even as plants run at higher power and are more dangerous in the event of an accident.
Population change in 10-mile nuclear evacuation zones from 1980-2010
* Seattle


. ...
Population
change


S. Ml.nreap
* 'a. I- a
C ,a U .


Chatanooga *1b
Dallas
* Houston NewOr
Houston. 'sNewOrisenea *


-40% 1 51 101 201
to to to to to
-1 50 100 200 366%
SOURCES: Nuclear Regulatory Commission; AP data analysis

similar request of the GAO ear-
lier this week.
In recent months, public anxi-
ety over nuclear power has
"peaked incredibly," said engi-
neer Paul Blanch, an industry
whistleblower who later re-
turned to work on improving
safety. He is now fighting reli-
censing applications at four sites.
"I was fighting the world, and
now I'm only fighting half the
world," Blanch said.
Visits to the website of
Fairewinds Associates, a nuclear
safety consultant in Burlington,
Vt., have exploded from about 80
a day to 7,000 since the Japanese
accident, according to chief engi-
neer, Arnie Gundersen. Site vis-
its rose about another 10 percent
when the AP series started on
Monday
The AP's four-part investigative
series shows government and in-
dustry have been working in tan-
dem to weaken safety standards
to keep aging reactors within the
rules. The series also found there
have been leaks of radioactive tri-
tium, often from corroded under-
ground piping, at three-quarters
of U.S. commercial nuclear
power sites.
In a GAO report released Tues-
day by Democratic Reps. Ed-
ward J. Markey of Massachusetts


AP

and Peter Welch of Vermont, the
watchdog agency concluded that
nuclear power plant operators
haven't figured out how to
quickly find the underground
leaks, which often go undetected
for years.
The AP series, which continues
this week with an examination of
explosive population growth
around the 65 sites that house the
reactors, comes three months
after a tsunami born from an
earthquake caused a nuclear cri-
sis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nu-
clear complex in Japan. The
March 11 natural disaster
swamped backup generators, dis-
abled cooling systems, caused
fuel melts and explosions, and re-
leased vast amounts of radiation
into the grounds and sea.
The NRC has said it disagrees
with AP's conclusions, but wel-
comes the attention the stories
have generated to nuclear plant
safety. The agency defended its
standards and approach to safety.
The industry's Nuclear Energy
Institute criticized AP's overall
findings and "selective, mislead-
ing reporting" on U.S. nuclear
power plant safety.
Public concern about nuclear
safety reached a zenith after the
Three Mile Island accident in
1979 and Chernobyl.


1d Minot

towns of just a few hundred people,
that face crests later this week.
On Sunday, North Dakota Na-
tional Guard soldiers were moni-
toring a submerged pedestrian
bridge in Minot to make sure it did-
n't break off in the river channel.
The bridge has been trapping de-
bris and could harm nearby levees.
Guard commander David Sprynczy-
natyk said soldiers were ready to
pull it out if it came loose.
Problems at Minot's water treat-
ment plant prompted the state De-
partment of Health to issue a boil
order Saturday for users of city
water The order also applies to the
Minot Air Force Base, about 13
miles north of town, which gets its
drinking water from Minot's munic-
ipal system.
Once the Souris recedes, Minot
will begin tackling the job of re-
building. Federal and state agen-
cies have promised to help the
counties with the most extensive
flood damage.



Karzai:


Pakistan


firing on


Afghanistan

Afghan president

says 36people

killed in 3 weeks
Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai on Sunday ac-
cused Pakistan of firing 470
rockets into two eastern Afghan
provinces over the past three
weeks, a deadly rain of artillery
that Afghan officials said killed 36
people, including 12 children.
The attacks came in areas of
Kunar and Nangarhar provinces
where NATO forces have with-
drawn, and where Pakistani Tal-
iban moved in behind fleeing
civilians, Afghan border officials
said.
Karzai indicated Pakistani gov-
ernment forces are responsible for
the bombardment, and "they
should be stopped immediately"
And "if they are not being carried
out by Pakistan, Pakistan should
make it clear who is behind the at-
tacks," he said in a statement is-
sued by the presidential palace.
NATO reported, meanwhile,
five service members were killed
in at least three insurgent attacks
in western, southern, and eastern
Afghanistan on Sunday The inter-
national coalition gave no other
details. The deaths bring to at
least 53 the number of NATO serv-
ice members killed in June, and to
more than 200 the number this
year
Karzai said he discussed the
rocket barrage with Pakistani
President Asif Ali Zadari during
an anti-terrorism conference in
Tehran on Saturday, the same day
the Afghan Defense Ministry
spokesman spoke of the attacks
and warned Afghanistan would
defend itself.
"The government of Pakistan
should understand that there will
be a reaction for killing Afghan cit-
izens," said spokesman Moham-
mad Zahir Azimi.
In response to the Pakistani bar-
rage, Afghan security forces in the
eastern provinces of Khost and
Paktika fired artillery across the
border at least twice Friday, Azimi
said. Afghan security officials said
NATO also fired into Pakistan on
June 17. NATO and Pakistan mili-
tary officials earlier denied any
knowledge of such border fire
from the Afghan side.
The Afghan president said he
also discussed the border attack
with Afghan NATO commander
Gen. David Petraeus and U.S. Am-
bassador Karl Eikenberry during
his regular national security coun-
cil meeting Sunday
American and Afghan officials
have pressured Pakistan to end its
security forces' long-standing rela-
tionship with the Taliban move-
ment, viewed as a tool for Pakistani


influence over strategically placed
Afghanistan. Such major artillery
support for a Taliban operation,
however, would be one of the most
blatant recent examples of Pak-
istani support and bodes ill for the
testy relationship among the three
countries.


Dangerous rust


Associated Press
This April 2006 photo made available by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to a public
records request by The Associated Press shows a badly rusted valve in a containment spraying system
that was initially a focus of concern as workers tried to find the source of leaks at the closed Indian Point
1 reactor in New York state.













SPORTS


* Rays complete
sweep of Astros
on Sunday to keep
pace in tight AL
East race./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


J0 U Golf, college baseball/B2
0 MLB/B3
0 Entertainment/B5
0 Puzzles/B6
0 Comics/B7
0 Classifieds/B8


Long time coming


District 15 Tournament
9-10 Baseball
POOL A (Crystal River) POOL B (West Hernando)
W L W L
Crystal River 2 0 Shady Hills 2 0
Lady Lake 2 1 Inverness 1 1
Dunnellon 1 1 West Hernando 1 1
Central Citrus 1 1 Greater Hudson 0 2
Dixie County 1 2
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Lady Lake 15, Dixie County 14
Crystal River 11, Dunnellon 4
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 16, Dixie County 6
Lady Lake 6, Central Citrus 2
Inverness 6, Greater Hudson 5
Shady Hills 12, West Hernando 7
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus 15, Dixie County 3
Crystal River 12, Lady Lake 1
Shady Hills 12, Inverness 2
West Hernando 10, Greater Hudson 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Dixie County vs. Crystal River, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Dunnellon vs. Central Citrus, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Inverness vs. West Hernando, 6:30 p.m. (WH)
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus vs. Crystal River, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Dunnellon vs. Lady Lake, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Greater Hudson vs. Shady Hills, 6:30 p.m. (WH)
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner Pool Avs. Runner-up Pool B, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
Winner Pool Bvs. Runner-up Pool A, 6:30 p.m. (WH)
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner Pool Avs. Runner-up Pool B, 6:30 p.m. (CR)
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Winner CR Semi vs.WinnerWH Semi, 6:30 p.m. (CR)

10-11 Baseball
(West Hernando)
W L
Dunnellon 2 0
West Hernando 1 1
Shady Hills 1 1
Inverness 0 2
FRIDAY'S GAMES
West Hernando 4, Shady Hills 2
Dunnellon 22, Inverness 2
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 11, West Hernando 0
Shady Hills 13, Inverness 9
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Shady Hills 2 Dunnellon 7
West Hernando 12, Inverness 25

Senior Baseball
(West Hernando)
W L
Inverness 2 0
West Hernando 0 2
SATURDAY'S GAME
Inverness 7, West Hernando 6
TODAY'S GAME
Inverness 5, West Hernando 4

9-10 Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Crystal River 3 0
Dunnellon 2 1
South Sumter 2 1
Central Citrus 1 2
Inverness 1 2
Dixie County 0 3
FRIDAY'S GAMES
South Sumter 13, Inverness 5
Crystal River 13, Central Citrus 10
Dunnellon 16, Dixie County 6
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 13, South Sumter 8
Dunnellon 13, Central Citrus 1
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River 5, Dunnellon vs. 1
South Sumter 16, Dixie County 6
Inverness 17, Dixie County 7 (Resumed game)
Central Citrus 12, Inverness 8
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Crystal Rivervs. Central Citrus, 6:30 p.m.
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner No. 1 Semi vs. No. 2 Semi, 6:30 p.m.

Major Softball
POOL A (Crystal River) POOL B (Crystal River)
W L W L
Crystal River 1 0 Dunnellon 2 0
Central Citrus 0 1 Shady Hills 1 1
Dixie County 1 1 Inverness 1 1
South Sumter 0 2
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon 5, Inverness 4
Shady Hills 13, South Sumter 1
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus 25, Dixie County 8
Crystal River 18, Dixie County 0
Inverness 9, Shady Hills 7
Dunnellon 20, South Sumter 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Inverness vs. South Sumter, 6:30 p.m.
Dunnellon vs. Shady Hills, 6:30 p.m.
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Central Citrus vs. Crystal River, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Winner Pool A vs. Winner Pool B, 6:30 p.m.
Junior Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Dunnellon 1 1
South Sumter 1 1
SATURDAY'S GAME
Dunnellon 9,. South Sumter 1
SUNDAY'S GAME
South Sumter 9, Dunnellon 1
TUESDAY'S GAME
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 6:30 p.m.
Senior Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Crystal River 2 0
Shady Hills 0 1
Inverness 0 1
SATURDAY'S GAME
Crystal River 12, Inverness 2
TODAY'S GAME
Crystal River 10, Shady Hills 0
MONDAY'S GAMES
Shady Hills vs. Inverness
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River vs.Winner Inverness/Shady Hills
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Crystal RWver vs. Winner Inverness/Shady Hills (i nec.)


Special to the Chronicle
The Inverness Senior All-Stars won the District 15 Championship on Sunday. The team is comprised of Koty House, Tristan Gompers, coach Jason
House, Chad Dawson, assistant coach Andrew McKinley, Dylan Coleman, Joseph Nunes, Hunter Zuppinger, Giovanni Bencini, coach Ed Lloyd,
Michael Bello, Bobby Langley and Dominic Humphries.


Inverness Senior All-Stars win first District 15 champions

LARRY BUGG
Sports correspondent

SPRING HILL - Sooner or later,
Hunter Zuppinger was going to hit
a home run.
The Inverness Senior Baseball
All Star just happened to time it
beautifully
Zuppinger blasted a go-ahead
solo shot in the sixth inning solo
shot, which gave the Inverness ..
Senior Baseball All Stars a 5-4 lead
over West Hernando Sunday in the
Little League District 15 All Star
Tournament at Freedom Field.
That became the final score.I
Behind Chad Dawson's pitching,
Inverness won its second game
and took the District 15 title in the
two-team district. They beat West
Hernando 7-6 on their opponent's
home field on Saturday
Now, Inverness is headed for a
sectional game July 26 in Largo. -- -_
Zuppinger scored three runs
and Inverness had seven hits
while taking advantage of three .
West Hernando errors.
Dylan Coleman, Giovanni . .
Bencini and Koty House all had a .- . ..
pair of hits for the Citrus County .
residents. Bencini doubled and =.. :
scored on a fifth inning error "
West Hernando hurler Steve
Merrill took the pitching loss. ..
Inverness Manager J.L. McKin-
ney had to miss the tournament as r . -
he was in North Carolina on per- - --- -
sonal business but the team did .. : . - .. ..
well under coach Jason House. - .. ..
"Zuppinger hit the winning .s X . ..
home run," said House. "It could- ..
n't have come at a better time. .
What can I say about Chad? He
came out and pitched his heart
out. We knew West Hernando was-
n't going to go away Coach (the late BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Crystal River Senior All-Stars pitcher Rachel Roe struck out six Shady Hills
See Page B4 batters in four innings to pick up the win in Crystal River's 10-0 victory.





Kurt Busch wins 1st race of year


Victory is also

driver's first ever

on a road course

Associated Press

SONOMA, Calif. - It cer-
tainly seemed as if Kurt
Busch's season was in serious
trouble just two months ago,
when poor performances led
to an intense radio tirade
against his entire Penske Rac-
ing organization.
What could have destroyed
his race team has actually had
the opposite effect.
Busch's impressive turn-
around continued Sunday


with a dominating run at Infi-
neon Raceway, where he
earned his first career road
course victory and his first win
of the season.
"We've been on a great run


these last few
weeks," Busch
said. "To get a
road course
win, it's a big
check mark on
my list. It's just
really neat to


Sprint Cui
* For all of the
Sunday's rac


bring home that 'W"'
Busch led a race-high 76
laps and beat Jeff Gordon by
almost 4 seconds for his first
win of the season. It's a
marked turn for Busch, who
unraveled over his team radio
at Richmond in early May be-
cause of how poorly his Dodge


had been running.
The rant led to behind-the-
scenes changes at Penske Rac-
ing that have sparked both
Busch and teammate Brad Ke-
selowski, who won at Kansas
earlier this
p results month. Busch,
despite three
finishers in consecutive
-e, please see: poles, was win-
PAGE B4 less but inch-
ing closer and
closer
It finally came on a road
course, of all places. Busch
was winless in 10 career starts
at both Sonoma and Watkins
Glen, the only two road
courses on the Sprint Cup

See Page B4


np in over a decade

JOHN COSCIA
Sports Editor

CRYSTAL RIVER - On a day
that saw a full flurry of games fill Bi-
centennial Park, it was the last
game of the day that would prove to
hold the greatest impact It was In-
verness and Central Citrus, two
cross-county rivals, which found
each other facing off in the 9-10 soft-
ball finale of their six-team district.
And both teams were well aware
of the stakes - win or go home.
By day's end it would be Central
Citrus that would rally to a 13-9
barnburner win, sending Inver-
ness packing in its final game of
the summer
Central Citrus jumped out to a 2-
0 lead in the bottom of the first
when Peyton Burdette and Court-
ney Dye both scored. Central Cit-
rus, however, would take a 3-2 lead
in this seesaw battle with two runs
in the top of the second (Zarrie
Washington and Camryn Cyr) and
one in the third (Faith Alexander).
But Central Citrus was quick
with an answer, plating four runs
(Burdette, Dye, Caitlyn Poteet and
Caitlyn Dye) to take a 6-3 lead.
Central Citrus looked poised for
an easy win when it padded its
lead to 8-3 with runs from Kelly
Sullivan and Angela Woychowski
in the bottom of the fourth.
But Inverness would not go qui-
etly In fact, in its very next at-bat,
the team answered with five runs
to tie the game. Scoring for Inver-
ness in the frame were Ashten
Fehrenbach, Shelby Beetow,
Alexander, Jailyn Rivera and
Washington.
Central Citrus, however, hadn't
been in control for virtually the
whole game only to lose it in the

See Page B4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tseng on top


Golfer becomes

youngest to win

all four majors

Associated Press

PITTSFORD, N.Y. -Yani
Tseng wasn't satisfied with
merely winning the LPGA
Championship and, at 22,
becoming the youngest to
win four LPGA majors.
Once she made the turn
with a 10-stroke lead Sun-
day, the best female player
in the world set her sights on
making a little more history
"I was like, what's a new
goal for me?" Tseng said.
"And that's why I told myself
I wanted to set a record, to
make 20 under"
She missed by one stroke
in what was the only minor
blemish in one of the most
dominating performances
to date from Tseng.
In closing with a 6-under
66 to finish at 19-under 269
at Locust Hill Country Club,
Tseng matched the LPGA
record low at a major, most
recently by Cristie Kerr a
year ago when she shot the
same score to win the tour-
nament by 12 strokes. Dottie
Pepper (1999 Kraft Nabisco)
and Karen Stupples (2004
Women's British Open) also
finished at 19 under.
There is one mark Tseng
can claim as her own by bet-
tering Se Ri Pak, who was 24
when she won her fourth
major By comparison, Tiger
Woods didn't win his fourth
until he was 24. And Tseng's
well ahead of her idol, An-
nika Sorenstam, who was 24
when she won the first of
her 10 majors - the 1995
U.S. Women's Open
"It's very special," Tseng
said. "Now I'm thinking
about a grand slam."
It's one step at a time for
the top-ranked Tseng, who
won her second LPGA
Championship and has won
three of the tour's last six
majors. The only major she's
missing is the U.S. Women's
Open title, which she'll have
an opportunity to complete
her career slam in two
weeks at The Broadmoor in
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Morgan Pressel (71) fin-
ished second. Kerr (69),
Suzann Pettersen (67) and
Paula Creamer (69) tied for
third at 8 under.
"Pretty unbelievable," said
Kerr, who rallied late with a
birdie on No. 16 and an eagle
on 17. "Yani's doing what I
did last year Obviously, it's
hard to beat. I'm not sur-
prised. Yani's a great player"
Pressel initially thought


Associated Press
Yani Tseng acknowledges the crowd after making birdie on the third hole during the final
round of the Wegmans LPGA Championship golf tournament Sunday in Pittsford, N.Y.


she'd have an outside
chance to catch Tseng be-
fore the final round began.
Pressel dropped that hope
once she dropped a shot
with a bogey on No. 2.
"It's definitely a dominat-
ing performance," Pressel
said. "She didn't make many
mistakes out there."
Tseng didn't, in claiming
$375,000 at the $2.5 million
event. Wearing a smile for
much of the day, Tseng
raised her arms and tipped
her hat as she was greeted
by the gallery upon arriving
at the 18th green.
After a bogey on No. 1,
which she chalked up to
nerves, Tseng reeled off five
birdies on her next seven
holes to run away from the
field. Tseng added three
more birdies on the back
nine, while bogeying 13, and
had a chance to get to 20, be-


fore missing a 12-foot birdie
putt on No. 18.
Travelers Championship
CROMWELL, Conn. -
Fredrik Jacobson closed out his
first PGA Tour title, shooting a
4-under 66 in the Travelers
Championship for a one-stroke
victory over John Rollins and
Ryan Moore.
Jacobson, a 36-year-old
Swede who joined the tour eight
years ago and has three Euro-
pean Tour victories, had just
one bogey in the tournament
and finished at 20 under - two
shots off the course record.
Jacobson hit all 28 fairways
over the weekend.
Rollins and Moore closed
with 63s. Moore missed a 4-
foot par putt on 18.
Nineteen-year-old Patrick
Cantlay, the UCLA star who
had a 60 on Friday to break the


tour record for an amateur -
tied for 24th at 11 under after
weekend rounds of 72 and 70.
Dick's Sporting
Goods Open
ENDICOTT, N.Y. -John
Huston shot a 7-under 65 to
win his first Champions Tour
title, taking advantage of three
straight bogeys by Mark Wiebe
to capture the Dick's Sporting
Goods Open.
Huston finished at 16-under
200 in his third Champions Tour
start since turning 50 on June 1,
earning a three-shot victory
over Nick Price (66). Wiebe was
another shot back after a 71.
Wiebe won two weeks ago at
Rock Barn and began the day
with a two-shot lead over Hus-
ton, but his string of bogey-free
holes stopped at 75 when he
bogeyed Nos. 12-14 to drop out
of the lead.


UF-USC rivalry



to heat up again


Gators will face

Gamecocks for

CWS crown

Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. - Florida
and South Carolina don't
immediately come to mind
when you're talking about
Southeastern Conference
rivalries - unless it's
baseball.
The Gators (53-17) and de-
fending national champion
Gamecocks (53-14) play their
biggest series to date when
they meet in the College
World Series finals begin-
ning Monday
Last year, the Gators trav-
eled to Columbia, S.C., the
final weekend of the regular
season and won two of three
to edge out the Gamecocks
for the SEC title.
"But they got the last
laugh," said Florida catcher
and SEC player of the year
Mike Zunino. "They got to
hold the national champi-
onship trophy up."
Three months ago, South
Carolina went to Florida
and won two of three, and
the teams ended up in a
three-way tie with Vander-
bilt for the best record in
the league.
Yes, anticipation for this
championship series has
been brewing for a while.
"You know, if all you guys
went away and there were
no fans and we were on the
back sandlot, I'm not sure it
would be any different,"
Gamecocks coach Ray Tan-
ner said Sunday "I think
they love to play. We love to
play Yeah, there's a lot more
at stake now than there ever
was before. But it's really
genuine baseball. Let's go."
Florida will start sopho-


more Hudson Randall (11-3)
against freshman Forrest
Koumas (6-1) in Game 1. The
Gators will send out fresh-
man Karsten Whitson (8-0)
for Game 2.
Tanner said he doesn't
know who will pitch the
second game. It's possible
Michael Roth, who threw
90 pitches in seven innings
against Virginia on Friday,
will be back on three days'
rest.
"My guess is that he'll
want to pitch," Tanner said.
"If it's a situation where we
feel like Michael gives us the
best opportunity, we'll run
him back out there."
Before coach Kevin O'Sul-
livan's arrival four years ago,
the Gators had failed to
make the NCAA tournament
in back-to-back seasons for
the first time in 20 years.
O'Sullivan said Florida
athletic director Jeremy
Foley wanted a program that
would be competitive year
in and year out O'Sullivan
said a team has to get lots of
breaks to be in position to
play for a national title.
"It was all about consis-
tency and being one of the
elite programs in the coun-
try," he said. "I've never put
a timetable on it This league
is too difficult I think if you
get too far ahead of yourself
and look too far ahead, then
you'll find yourself in some
trouble."
Zunino, Randall, short-
stop Nolan Fontana and
third baseman Cody Dent
were among the freshmen
on the 2010 team that
reached the College World
Series for the first time
since 2005.
Preston Tucker, who has a
home run and team-leading
six RBIs in the College
World Series, said last year's
0-2 finish in Omaha left him
and his teammates hungry
for more.


Associated Press
Florida, seen here defeating Vanderbilt to advance to the
College World Series final, will begin a best-of-3 series
against South Carolina at 8 p.m. for the championship.


Sunday's GOLF LEADERBOARD


LPGA Tour
Wegman's LPGA Championship
Sunday
At Locust Hill Country Club, Pittsford, N.Y.
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 6,534, Par: 72
Final Round
(a-amateur)
Yani Tseng, $375,000 66-70-67-66 - 269
Morgan Pressel, $228,695 69-69-70-71 - 279
Suzann Pettersen, $132,512 72-72-69-67 - 280
Paula Creamer, $132,512 67-72-72-69 - 280
Cristie Kerr, $132,512 72-72-67-69 - 280
Meena Lee, $77,630 68-73-70-71 -282
Stacy Lewis, $77,630 69-72-70-71 -282
Maria Hjorth, $53,840 71-71-70-71 -283
Pat Hurst, $53,840 70-67-75-71 -283
Mika Miyazato, $53,840 72-72-68-71 -283
Azahara Munoz, $53,840 70-71-71-71 -283
Amy Yang, $42,445 70-69-74-71 -284
I.K. Kim, $42,445 73-70-69-72 - 284
Amy Hung, $33,765 69-73-73-70 - 285
Heather Bowie Young, $33,765 72-70-73-70 - 285
Inbee Park, $33,765 73-69-71-72- 285
Katie Futcher, $33,765 75-68-69-73- 285
Hee Young Park, $33,765 69-69-72-75 - 285
Cindy LaCrosse, $33,765 70-69-69-77- 285
Brittany Lincicome, $26,795 74-72-71-69- 286
Sun Young Yoo, $26,795 73-72-72-69 - 286
Paige Mackenzie, $26,795 72-73-70-71 - 286
Karrie Webb, $26,795 74-69-71-72 - 286
Candle Kung, $26,795 71-71-71-73 - 286
Hee-Won Han, $22,162 71-72-74-70 -287
Anna Nordqvist, $22,162 73-70-74-70 - 287
Jimin Kang, $22,162 71-70-73-73-287
Pornanong Phatlum, $22,162 71-72-71-73-287
Tiffany Joh, $22,162 71-70-72-74 -287
Jennifer Song, $18,531 72-72-72-72 - 288
Reilley Rankin, $18,531 73-68-74-73 - 288
Angela Stanford, $18,531 68-72-74-74 - 288
Momoko Ueda, $18,531 72-69-71-76- 288
Karen Stupples, $14,232 72-74-78-65 - 289
M.J. Hur, $14,232 70-75-76-68- 289
Jiyai Shin, $14,232 75-71-73-70 - 289
Se Ri Pak, $14,232 78-68-72-71 - 289
Juli Inkster, $14,232 74-70-73-72 - 289
Catriona Matthew, $14,232 73-69-75-72 - 289
Michele Redman, $14,232 73-70-73-73 - 289
Yoo Kyeong Kim, $14,232 72-72-71-74 -289
Hee Kyung Seo, $14,232 71-73-71-74 - 289
Taylor Leon, $10,285 75-70-75-70 - 290
Eun-Hee Ji, $10,285 70-76-73-71 - 290
Mindy Kim, $10,285 70-75-74-71 - 290
Mi Hyun Kim, $10,285 75-67-76-72- 290
Na Yeon Choi, $10,285 73-70-74-73 - 290
Jennifer Johnson, $10,285 69-76-72-73 - 290
Karin Sjodin, $10,285 72-70-73-75 - 290
Shanshan Feng, $8,138 75-66-80-70- 291
Kristy McPherson, $8,138 72-74-74-71 - 291
Sarah Jane Smith, $8,138 73-72-75-71 -291
Julieta Granada, $8,138 73-73-73-72 -291
Sarah Kemp, $8,138 74-71-74-72 - 291
Beatriz Recari, $8,138 71-74-73-73 - 291


a-Danielle Kang
Becky Morgan, $6,249
Christel Boeljon, $6,249
Sophie Gustafson, $6,249
Ryann O'Toole, $6,249
Leta Lindley, $6,249
Dewi Claire Schreefel, $6,249
Lorie Kane, $6,249
Laura Davies, $6,249
Jeehae Lee, $6,249
Stacy Prammanasudh, $6,249
Katherine Hull, $6,249
Jennie Lee, $5,196
Jenny Shin, $5,196
Natalie Gulbis, $5,196
Minea Blomqvist, $5,196
Kyeong Bae, $4,883
MichelleWie,$4,883
Haeji Kang, $4,883
Sherri Steinhauer, $4,729
Silvia Cavalleri, $4,729
Grace Park, $4,641
Diana D'Alessio, $4,582


74-70-72-75 -
75-71-78-68-
73-72-77-70 -
73-72-76-71 -
69-76-76-71 -
72-72-75-73 -
73-72-74-73 -
73-72-73-74 -
75-71-70-76 -
74-72-69-77-
68-73-74-77 -
70-72-72-78 -
72-71-78-72 -
72-70-79-72 -
71-73-72-77-
69-69-77-78 -
72-74-75-73-
72-72-75-75-
74-72-71-77-
73-73-76-73-
75-69-77-74-
73-73-73-77-
68-77-80-76-


PGA Tour
Travelers Championship
Sunday
At TPC River Highlands, Cromwell, Conn.
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 6,841, Par: 70
Final Round
(a-amateur)


Fredrik Jacobson (500), $1,080,000
John Rollins (245), $528,000
Ryan Moore (245), $528,000
Michael Thompson (135), $288,000
James Driscoll (110), $240,000
Kevin Streelman (92), $201,000
Andres Romero (92), $201,000
Bryce Molder (92), $201,000
Tom Gillis (73), $156,000
Brian Davis (73), $156,000
John Merrick (73), $156,000
Blake Adams (73), $156,000
Bo Van Pelt (57), $112,500
Brendan Steele (57), $112,500
Nick Watney (57), $112,500
Webb Simpson (57), $112,500
David Toms (51), $78,514
Chris Stroud (51), $78,514
Heath Slocum (51), $78,514
David Mathis (51), $78,514
Tommy Gainey (51), $78,514
Johnson Wagner (51), $78,514
D.J. Trahan (51), $78,514
Steve Flesch (43), $46,425
Bud Cauley (0), $46,425
Zach Johnson (43), $46,425
lan Poulter (43), $46,425
Carl Pettersson (43), $46,425
Brandt Snedeker (43), $46,425
Aaron Baddeley (43), $46,425
J.J. Henry (43), $46,425
a-Patrick Cantlay


65-66-63-66 -
65-68-65-63 -
64-70-64-63 -
67-65-68-62 -
69-64-64-67-
66-70-63-66 -
64-67-67-67 -
65-66-64-70 -
66-69-66-65 -
65-67-68-66 -
67-66-66-67 -
66-66-66-68 -
66-65-69-67 -
68-64-67-68 -
65-65-68-69 -
66-65-67-69 -
69-66-69-64 -
66-69-67-66 -
70-63-68-67 -
67-65-68-68 -
66-69-65-68 -
65-63-71-69-
69-62-68-69 -
68-68-70-63 -
68-67-69-65 -
65-68-70-66 -
68-68-66-67 -
68-68-65-68 -
70-63-67-69 -
67-67-66-69 -
68-67-65-69 -
67-60-72-70 -


Jhonattan Vegas (36), $33,960
Chris DiMarco (36), $33,960
Martin Laird (36), $33,960
Vaughn Taylor (36), $33,960
Alexandre Rocha (36), $33,960
Bubba Watson (31), $27,000
Tim Petrovic (31), $27,000
David Hearn (31), $27,000
Jerry Kelly (31), $27,000
Spencer Levin (31), $27,000
Shane Bertsch (24), $18,840
Vijay Singh (24), $18,840
Morgan Hoffmann (0), $18,840
D.J. Brigman (24), $18,840
Tag Ridings (24), $18,840
Charley Hoffman (24), $18,840
Ricky Barnes (24), $18,840
Colt Knost (24), $18,840
Hunter Mahan (24), $18,840
Scott Verplank (18), $14,310
Joseph Bramlett (18), $14,310
Aron Price (18), $14,310
Joe Durant (18), $14,310
Chris Couch (14), $13,680
Paul Stankowski (14), $13,680
Brandt Jobe (14), $13,680
Carl Paulson (11), $13,260
J.B. Holmes (11), $13,260
Ben Crane (11), $13,260
Fran Quinn (11), $13,260
Padraig Harrington (7), $12,780
Michael Bradley (7), $12,780
Keegan Bradley (7), $12,780
Sean O'Hair (7), $12,780
Lee Janzen (2), $12,240
Nate Smith (2), $12,240
Dean Wilson (2), $12,240
Briny Baird (2), $12,240
Michael Putnam (2), $12,240
John Daly (1), $11,880
Zack Miller (1), $11,760
Daniel Summerhays (1), $11,640
Champi
Dick's Sportii
S
At En-Joie Golf i
Purse:
Yardage:
Final
John Huston (263), $262,500
Nick Price (154), $154,000
MarkWiebe (126), $126,000
Jim Gallagher, Jr. (95), $94,500
Joey Sindelar (95), $94,500
Peter Senior (60), $59,500
Peter Jacobsen (60), $59,500
Ted Schulz (60), $59,500
Jay Don Blake (60), $59,500
Jim Rutledge (39), $38,850
Hale Irwin (39), $38,850
Lee Rinker (39), $38,850
David Frost (39), $38,850
Mark Calcavecchia (39), $38,850


69-67-68-66 -270 -10
66-66-70-68 -270 -10
68-67-66-69-270 -10
65-66-69-70 -270 -10
65-66-69-70 -270 -10
66-69-69-67 - 271 -9
66-69-68-68 - 271 -9
66-67-70-68 -271 -9
69-66-67-69 - 271 -9
67-68-66-70 -271 -9
67-63-75-67 - 272 -8
67-68-69-68 -272 -8
68-67-68-69 - 272 -8
68-67-68-69-272 -8
65-68-69-70 - 272 -8
67-67-68-70 -272 -8
68-65-68-71 - 272 -8
67-68-65-72 -272 -8
71-63-66-72-272 -8
67-69-69-68 -273 -7
68-67-69-69 - 273 -7
69-66-68-70 -273 -7
67-68-68-70 - 273 -7
65-69-68-72 -274 -6
67-68-66-73 - 274 -6
65-69-67-73 -274 -6
69-66-71-69 - 275 -5
68-67-71-69 -275 -5
66-70-69-70 - 275 -5
71-63-69-72 -275 -5
69-67-71-69-276 -4
65-69-72-70-276 -4
71-65-68-72-276 -4
66-67-68-75 -276 -4
66-67-75-69 - 277 -3
71-65-70-71 -277 -3
68-68-70-71 - 277 -3
70-66-68-73 - 277 -3
65-70-69-73 -277 -3
69-67-71-74 -281 +1
70-66-76-72 - 284 +4
69-67-75-74 -285 +5
ions Tour
ng Goods Open
.unday
Course, Endicott, N.Y.
$1.75 million
6,974, Par: 72
al Round
65-70-65 - 200 -16
66-71-66 - 203 -13
65-68-71 -204 -12
74-66-65 - 205 -11
68-69-68 - 205 -11
70-69-67- 206 -10
67-71-68 - 206 -10
71-67-68 - 206 -10
68-68-70 - 206 -10
69-71-67- 207 -9
70-70-67 - 207 -9
72-68-67- 207 -9
73-66-68 - 207 -9
71-68-68 - 207 -9


Tom Lehman, $28,875
Gil Morgan, $28,875
Phil Blackmar, $28,875
Joe Ozaki, $28,875
Steve Lowery $22,444
Brad Bryant, $22,444
Lonnie Nielsen, $22,444
Hal Sutton, $22,444
Tom Pernice, Jr., $17,938
Olin Browne, $17,938
John Cook, $17,938
Ronnie Black, $17,938
Chien Soon Lu, $14,204
Tom Jenkins, $14,204
Fred Funk, $14,204
Tim Simpson, $14,204
Dick Mast, $14,204
Bobby Wadkins, $14,204
Mike Goodes, $11,025
Jim Thorpe, $11,025
Fuzzy Zoeller, $11,025
Mark Brooks, $11,025
Robert Thompson, $11,025
Gary Koch, $8,575
Steve Pate, $8,575
Keith Fergus, $8,575
Keith Clearwater, $8,575
Mike Reid, $8,575
Larry Mize, $8,575
Tom Watson, $8,575
Jay Haas, $6,125
David Eger, $6,125
Andy Bean, $6,125
Rod Spittle, $6,125
Mark McNulty, $6,125
Tommy Armour III, $6,125
Bill Glasson, $6,125
Tom Kite, $4,235
Bobby Clampett, $4,235
Bob Gilder, $4,235
Chip Beck, $4,235
Bruce Fleisher, $4,235
Jay Sigel, $3,413
Wayne Levi, $3,413
Scott Simpson, $3,413
Dana Quigley, $3,413
D.A. Weibring, $2,800
David Peoples, $2,800
Morris Hatalsky, $2,800
Jeff Sluman, $2,363
Fred Holton, $2,363
Vicente Fernandez, $1,925
Roger Chapman, $1,925
John Morse, $1,925
Jim Roy $1,593
Dan Forsman, $1,593
Tom Purtzer, $1,286
Mike Hulbert, $1,286
J.L. Lewis, $1,286
James Mason, $1,286
Fulton Allem, $1,085
Tom Wargo, $980
Allen Doyle, $980
Gary Hallberg, $875
Ken Green, $805


71-71-66-
69-71-68-
70-69-69-
72-67-69
67-73-69
70-70-69
70-68-71 -
67-70-72
74-71-65-
72-70-68
67-71-72-
66-72-72
75-70-66
71-71-69-
71-71-69-
71-67-73-
72-66-73-
68-69-74
73-71-68-
71-72-69-
71-71-70-
71-70-71 -
71-69-72-
68-75-70
72-72-69-
70-73-70
70-72-71 -
72-70-71 -
71-70-72-
72-67-74-
74-73-67-
76-69-69-
71-72-71 -
72-70-72-
74-68-72
71-70-73-
68-71-75-
75-71-69-
70-74-71 -
71-72-72-
71-72-72-
70-71-74
72-76-68
73-69-74
70-71-75-
70-71-75
76-72-69
74-73-70
74-69-74
77-70-71 -
69-75-74
73-74-72
76-72-71 -
74-73-72-
74-77-69
69-75-76
78-74-69
74-77-70
74-73-74
74-71-76
78-68-76
76-76-71 -
75-72-76
80-70-74
76-75-76


B2 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011


SPORTS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NewYork
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore


NL


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


W L
45 31
45 32
44 34
39 39
35 40


Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
New York
Florida


East Division
GB WCGB
Y2 -
2 11/2
7 6/2
91/2 9


East Division
GB WCGB

5 -
8Y2 3Y2
9Y2 4Y2
14 9


Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota




Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 B3


Central Division
GB WCGB

/2 4
41/2 8
9 12Y2
9 12Y2


Central Division
GB WCGB

3 3
4 4
4 4
12 12
16 16


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland





San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego


West Division
GB WCGB

2 7
2 7
6 11



West Division
GB WCGB

1 1
5 5
9 9
10 10


INTERLEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 8, Colorado 3
San Francisco 1, Cleveland 0
L.A. Angels 6, L.A. Dodgers 1
N.Y Mets 14, Texas 5
Chicago White Sox 3, Washington 0
Detroit 6, Arizona 0
Pittsburgh 6, Boston 4
Cincinnati 10, Baltimore 5
Oakland 4, Philadelphia 1
Tampa Bay 7, Houston 2
Kansas City 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 11, Minnesota 1
Toronto 6, St. Louis 3
Florida 4, Seattle 2
Sunday's Games
Detroit 8, Arizona 3
Boston 4, Pittsburgh 2
Baltimore 7, Cincinnati 5
Philadelphia 3, Oakland 1
N.Y.Yankees 6, Colorado 4
Tampa Bay 14, Houston 10
Kansas City 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Milwaukee 6, Minnesota 2
Washington 2, Chicago White Sox 1
Toronto 5, St. Louis 0
N.Y Mets 8, Texas 5
L.A. Dodgers 3, L.A. Angels 2
Cleveland at San Francisco, late
Seattle at Florida, late
Monday's Games
Toronto (Z.Stewart 0-1) at Detroit (Scherzer 9-
3), 6:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-2) at Tampa Bay (Hellick-
son 7-6), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 6-6) at Minnesota
(Blackburn 6-5), 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Talbot 2-4) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 8-
2), 9:40 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 3-8) at San Diego (Latos
4-8), 10:05 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 5-5) at L.A. Angels
(E.Santana 3-8), 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 2-1) at Seattle (Bedard 4-5),
10:10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Boston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7:07p.m.
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay 7:10 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Florida at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 10, San Diego 1
Sunday's Games
San Diego 4, Atlanta 1
Monday's Games
Colorado (Chacin 8-4) at Chicago Cubs (Garza
3-6), 2:20 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m., 1st
game
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m., 2nd
game


... . ... . .' . ...

Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Evan Longoria (3) hits a three-run home
run as Houston Astros catcher Carlos Corporan, left, reaches
for the pitch during the ninth inning Sunday in Houston.


Rays 14, Astros 10
HOUSTON - Down by a run with
two outs and the bases loaded in the
eighth inning, Tampa Bay Rays man-
ager Joe Maddon wrestled with
whether to send up his last remaining
position player as a pinch-hitter.
Maddon did it and quickly knew he'd
made the right decision.
Evan Longoria homered twice and
drove in five runs and Matt Joyce deliv-
ered a go-ahead, pinch-hit double Sun-
day that sent the Rays over the Houston
Astros 14-10 for a three-game sweep.
"If I have a chance to really think
about it, it's pretty easy," Maddon said.
'When everything is rushing through
your head ...there's all these different
thoughts. But at the end of the day the
one thought that is overriding was, the
bases are loaded, two outs, this is your
best chance to win the game right
there. And that's what I went with."
Joyce didn't think Maddon was
going to use him there.
"I didn't have my batting gloves on
because I didn't expect to hit for (Sean
Rodriguez) because I kind of expected
to hit for a pitcher in a later inning,'
Joyce said."
B.J. Upton homered for the third
straight day and tied a season high
with four RBIs for the Rays, who have
won four in a row to improve to a sea-
son-high 10 games over .500.
Longoria came within a triple of the
cycle and had his first multihomer game
since 2009- one of his homers was
initially ruled a single until the call was
overturned after a video replay review.
Longoria had eight hits, including
three home runs, and 10 RBIs in the
series while going without batting


Washington Nationals Nationals 2,
make Johnson manager Washington
CHICAGO - Davey John- Berndn cf 3 0 0 0
son was announced as the Werth rf 4 0 0 0
manager of the Washington Zmrmn 3b 4 0 0 0
Nationals on Sunday, three L.Nix dh 4 0 0 0
days after Jim Riggleman Morse lb 3 1 0 0
stunned the team by resigning. Espinos 2b 3 1 1 2
WRams c 2 0 0 0
Johnson will manage the rest HrstnJr If 3 0 2 0
of the season and his first Cora ss 2 0 0 0
game will be Monday against Dsmnd ph-ssl 0 0 0
the Los Angeles Angels. He
has been a senior adviser with Totals 29 23 2
the team since 2009, though he Washington 000
Chicago 001
hasn't managed in the big DP-Chicago 1. LOB-
leagues since 2000 with the 9.2B-Pierre (6), Quel
Los Angeles Dodgers. (14).
Johnson also agreed to a
three-year consulting contract Washington
that will allow him to remain L.Hernandez W,5-8
Clippard H,21
with the team and participate in S.Burnett H,9
the selection of a successor. Storen S,19-22
Interim manager John Chicago


McLaren ran the team for the
third straight game in Sunday's
game against the White Sox.


Brewers 6, Twins 2
Minnesota Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Revere cf 4 01 0 RWeks 2b 4 0r0 0
ACasill 2b 4 0 0 0 Morgan cf 3 1 1 1
Cuddyrrf-1b4 0 1 0 CGomzph-cf 1 0 0 0
Valenci 3b 4 1 1 0 Braun If 4 2 1 2
LHughslb 3 1 0 0 Fielder b 4 0 1 1
Perkins p 0 00 0 McGeh3b 4 0 0 0
Repko If 4 0 1 1 C.Hart rf 4 0 1 0
Nishiokss 4 0 2 0 YBtncrss 4 1 3 0
Butera c 1 0 0 0 Lucroy c 3 2 2 1
Mauerph-c 2 0 1 0 Narvsnp 2 0 1 1
Pavano p 2 00 0 Hwkns p 0 00 0
Thome ph 1 0 1 1 Loe p 0 0 0 0
Dunsng pr 0 0 0 0 JoWilsnph 1 0 0 0
Mijaresp 0 00 0 Axfordp 0 0 0 0
AIBrntt p 0 0 0 0
Tosoni rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 28 2 Totals 34610 6
Minnesota 010 000 100 - 2
Milwaukee 000 032 10x - 6
E-L.Hughes (3), A.Casilla (8). DP-Milwaukee
1. LOB-Minnesota 7, Milwaukee 8. 2B-Cud-
dyer (16), Lucroy (8), Narveson (1). 3B-Va-
lencia (1), Lucroy (1). HR-Braun (16).
SB-Repko (3), Braun (17), Y.Betancourt 2 (2).
S-Narveson.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Pavano L,5-6 6 8 5 5 1 5
Mijares 1-3 1 1 0 0 1
AI.Burnett 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Perkins 1 1 0 0 1 1
Milwaukee
Narveson W,5-5 62-35 2 2 2 7
HawkinsH,8 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Loe 1 0 0 0 0 1
Axford 1 2 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Pavano (Morgan). WP-Pavano.
Umpires-Home, John Tumpane; First, Derryl
Cousins; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Dan
Bellino.
T-2:44. A-41,624 (41,900).


White Sox 1


Chicago (A)

Pierre If
Vizquel ss
Quentin rf
Konerk lb
A.Dunn dh
Rios cf
Przyns c
Teahen 3b
Lillirdg ph
Bckhm 2b
AIRmrz ph
Totals
000 200
000 000


ab r h bi
5020
4 1 1 0
3 02 0
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
2 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
3 00 0
1 0 0 0
351 8 1
- 2
- 1


-Washington 4, Chicago
ntin (22). HR-Espinosa

IP H RERBBSO


62-38 1
-3 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 0


HumberL,7-4 62-33 2 2 3 4
Sale 21-30 0 0 0 3
HBP-by Humber (Bernadina). Balk-Humber.
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, BillWelke;
Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Mike Estabrook.
T-2:56. A-24,057 (40,615).


Orioles 7, Reds 5
Cincinnati Baltimore
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Heisey rf 6 1 2 1 Hardy ss 4 0 0 0
BPhllps2b 4 2 2 1 Markksrf 5 0 3 2
Vottolb 2 0 0 0 AdJonscf 4 1 2 0
JGomsdh 3 0 0 1 Guerrrdh 4 1 1 0
FLewislf 3 0 0 1 D.Leelb 4 1 1 3
Stubbs cf 5 0 1 0 Scott If 3 1 1 1
RHrndzc 5 1 2 1 Pie If 0 0 0 0
Cairo 3b 5 1 2 0 MrRynl3b 3 1 1 1
Janish ss 4 0 0 0 BDavis 2b 2 2 2 0
Rolenph 1 0 0 0 Andinoph-2b 1 0 0 0
Tatum c 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 59 5 Totals 32711 7
Cincinnati 000 013 001 - 5
Baltimore 001 401 10x - 7
E-Mar.Reynolds 2 (18). LOB-Cincinnati 14,
Baltimore 7. 2B-Cairo (5), Ad.Jones (14).
HR-B.Phillips (6), R.Hernandez (8), D.Lee (6),
Scott (9), Mar.Reynolds (14). SB-Markakis (6),
B.Davis (1). CS-Mar.Reynolds (1). S-Tatum.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
H.Bailey L,3-2 5 9 5 5 2 5
Arredondo 1 1 1 1 1 1
Chapman 1 1 1 1 1 2
Cordero 1 0 0 0 1 0
Baltimore
GuthrieW,3-9 52-36 4 4 4 5
Rapada 0 0 0 0 1 0
Ji.Johnson H,12 11-32 0 0 2 1
UeharaH,9 1 0 0 0 1 1
GreggS,14-18 1 1 1 1 0 0
Rapada pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Arredondo.
Umpires-Home, Alan Porter; First, Fieldin Cul-
breth; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third, Adrian
Johnson.
T-3:10. A-27,809 (45,438).


gloves for the first time since his rookie
season.
With the way he's hitting, he may
never put on the gloves again.
Tampa Bay Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Damon If 6 3 4 0 Bourncf 5 1 1 1
Zobrist rf-2b5 4 3 1 Kppngr2b 3 3 3 2
Longori 3b 6 3 4 5 Melncn p 0 00 0
BUptoncf 5 22 4 Escalnp 0 00 0
SRdrgz 2b 2 0 0 0 Michalsph 1 00 0
Joyce ph-rf 2 1 1 2 Pence rf 5 1 1 0
Ktchmlb 5 0 2 2 Ca.Leelf-1b 4 0 2 3
Shppch c 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 1 1 0
Jasoph-c 2 0 0 0 Wallaclb 3 1 1 0
EJhnsn ss 4 1 1 0 WLopez p 0 00 0
Howell p 0 0 0 0 MDwns 2b 1 1 1 2
JoPerlt p 0 0 0 0 Barmes ss 4 1 2 1
ARussll p 0 0 0 0 Corprn c 3 1 1 0
WDavis ph 1 0 1 0 Happ p 1 00 0
Frnswrp 0 0 0 0 Bourgs If 2 0 1 0
Niemnnp 1 0 1 0
Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0
CRamsp 0 000
Fuld ph 1 0 0 0
J.Cruz p 0 0 0 0
Brignc ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 46141914 Totals 3610149
Tampa Bay 301 102 043 - 14
Houston 122 200 120 - 10
E-Shoppach (2). DP-Tampa Bay 1. LOB-
Tampa Bay 9, Houston 2. 2B-Zobrist (25),
Longoria (13), Joyce (17), Kotchman (14),
E.Johnson (3), Keppinger (6), Pence (22),
Ca.Lee (20), C.Johnson (18), Wallace (19),
Barmes (11), Corporan (1). 3B-Ca.Lee (3).
HR-Longoria 2 (9), B.Upton (11), Keppinger
(2), M.Downs (6). SB-Bourn (33). CS-Bour-
geois (4). S-Corporan, Happ. SF-Keppinger.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Niemann 3 7 5 5 0 2
C.Ramos 1 2 2 1 0 0
J.Cruz 2 1 0 0 0 2
HowellW,1-1 1 1 1 1 0 0
Jo.Peralta 0 2 2 2 0 0
A.RussellH,2 1 1 0 0 0 0
Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 1
Houston
Happ 5 9 5 5 3 8
W.Lopez L,1-4 21-34 4 4 0 2
Melancon BS,3-9 11-36 5 5 1 2
Escalona 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Jo.Peralta pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP-Niemann, W.Lopez, Melancon. Balk-
W.Lopez.
T-3:50. A-23,965 (40,963).


Royals 6, Cubs 3


Chicago (N)


Kansas City


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Fukdm rf 4 00 0 MeCarr cf 5 1 2 0
SCastross 4 0 1 0 Hosmerlb 4 1 2 1
ArRmrdh 3 0 0 0 Butler dh 4 1 1 1
C.Penalb 4 0 1 0 AGordn If 4 1 2 1
RJhnsn cf 4 1 1 0 Francr rf 4 0 3 1
DeWitt 3b 4 1 2 1 Mostks 3b 3 00 0
ASorin If 2 0 0 0 Treanr c 2 1 1 1
Soto c 3 1 3 2 AEscor ss 3 0 1 0
LeMahi 2b 4 0 0 0 Getz 2b 3 1 1 1
Totals 32 38 3 Totals 32613 6
Chicago 001 200 000 - 3
Kansas City 400 200 00x - 6
E-C.Carpenter (1), Hosmer (5). DP-Chicago
1, Kansas City 3. LOB-Chicago 7, Kansas City
7. 2B-Re.Johnson (11), Soto (13), A.Gordon
(23). HR-Soto (7). CS-A.Gordon (5), Fran-
coeur 2 (2). S-A.Escobar. SF-Treanor.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
R.WellsL,1-2 6 10 6 6 2 2
J.Russell 1 0 0 0 0 1
C.Carpenter 1 3 0 0 1 1
Kansas City
HochevarW,5-8 52-37 3 3 3 5
L.ColemanH,3 1 0 0 0 1 3
CollinsH,4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
CrowH,8 1 0 0 0 0 2
SoriaS,13-18 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Wells pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by L.Coleman (Ar.Ramirez).
T-2:43. A-28,401 (37,903).


Mets 8, Rangers 5
NewYork (N) Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
JosRysss 5 3 4 1 Kinsler2b 4 1 0 0
Turner3b 5 0 1 0 EnChvzcf 5 1 2 1
Beltran dh 4 0 1 2 MiYong dh 5 1 2 3
Bay If 5 0 0 1 ABeltre3b 5 1 1 0
Hairstn rf 5 0 1 0 N.Cruz rf 5 0 1 0
RPaulnc 4 2 2 0 Morlndlb 3 0 1 1
DnMrplb 4 23 1 DvMrp If 3 0 0 0
Pagan cf 4 1 1 0 Tegrdnc 4 0 1 0
RTejad 2b 4 0 1 1 ABlanc ss 4 1 2 0
Totals 40 8146 Totals 38510 5
NewYork 140 002 001 - 8
Texas 200 010 002 - 5
E-Turner (6), R.Tejada (2), A.Beltre (9), D.Hol-
land (1). DP-NewYork 1, Texas 1. LOB-New
York 6, Texas 9. 2B-R.Paulino (5), Dan.Mur-
phy (12), En.Chavez 2 (6). 3B-Jos.Reyes (14).
HR-Mi.Young (7). SB-Jos.Reyes (28). CS-
Dan.Murphy (4), Pagan (4).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
GeeW,8-1 6 8 3 3 2 1
Beato 1 0 0 0 0 0
Byrdak 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Isringhausen 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Fr.Rodriguez 1 2 2 2 1 0
Texas
D.Holland L,6-3 6 12 7 3 0 0
Tateyama 1 0 0 0 0 2
Rhodes 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
M.Lowe 11-31 1 1 1 1
Feliz 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
D.Holland pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
PB-Teagarden.
Umpires-Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Tim
Welke; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Mike
DiMuro.
T-3:03. A-37,879 (49,170).


Padres 4, Braves 1
SAN DIEGO - Jason Bartlett hit a
bases-loaded infield single for the tying
run with two outs in the eighth inning
and Orlando Hudson followed with a
two-run single as the San Diego
Padres rallied to beat the Atlanta
Braves 4-1 on Sunday.
Cory Luebke, making his first start of
the season for the Padres, combined
with four relievers on a two-hitter. Both of
Atlanta's hits were doubles. The Padres
took two of three from the Braves and
have won four of five overall.
The Padres' rally came after the
Braves scored an unearned run in the
top of the eighth for a 1-0 lead.
San Diego loaded the bases on a
walk, an infield single, a sacrifice bunt
and an intentional walk off Jonny Ven-
ters (4-1) before Will Venable popped a
bunt to the pitcher for the second out.
Bartlett hit a grounder that deflected
off Venters' glove and rolled to short-
stop for an infield single, allowing Chris
Denorfia to score the tying run. Hudson
singled up the middle to bring in two
more runs. Chase Headley added an


RBI single.
Atlanta


ab r h bi
Schafercf 4 0 1 0
Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0
C.Jones 3b 4 0 0 0
Fremnib 4 0 0 0
Uggla2b 4 0 0 0
D.Rossc 3 00 0
AIGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0
McLoth If 1 0 1 0
THudsn p 1 0 0 0
OFIhrt p 0 0 0 0
Linernkp 0 0 0 0
Hinskeph 1 1 0 0
Venters p 0 0 0 0
Proctor p 0 0 0 0


Totals 29 1 2 0
Atlanta 000
San Diego 000


San Diego


ab rh bi
Venale rf 4 0 2 0
Bartlett ss 4 1 2 1
OHudsn 2b 5 01 2
Headly 3b 3 0 1 1
Rizzolb 3 0 0 0
Ludwckph 1 00 0
MAdmsp 0 0 0 0
AIGnzlz ph 1 0 0 0
H.Bellp 0 0 0 0
Denorfilf 2 1 1 0
Maybincf 3 1 2 0
KPhlps c 3 00 0
RJhnsn ph-c 0 0 0 0
Luebke p 1 00 0
Richrd ph 1 0 1 0
Spence p 0 00 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0
Guzmnph-lbl 1 1 0
Totals 32411 4
000 010 - 1
000 04x - 4


E-Ale.Gonzalez (7), D.Ross (1), Venable (2).
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Atlanta 4, San Diego 13.
2B-Schafer (4), McLouth (11), Guzman (2).
SB-Bartlett (15), Denorfia (6). CS-Bartlett (5).
S-Bartlett, Ro.Johnson.


Atlanta
THudson
O'Flaherty
Linebrink
Venters L,4-1
Proctor
San Diego
Luebke
Spence
Quails
M.Adams W,3-1
H.Bell S,20-21


Yankees 6, Rockies 4
NEW YORK- Eduardo Nunez hit
a tiebreaking single in the seventh in-
ning after shortstop Troy Tulowitzki
made an error, Nick Swisher and Jorge
Posada had consecutive homers and
the New York Yankees beat the Col-
orado Rockies 6-4 Sunday.
Mark Teixeira homered for New York
and Alex Rodriguez drove in a run for
his sixth straight game.
Ty Wigginton connected twice for
his second multihomer game this week
and Chris lannetta also homered for
Colorado.
It was New York's first series win
against the Rockies since sweeping a
three-game set at the old Yankee Sta-
dium in 2004. New York improved to
22-4 in day games.
Posada walked with one out in the
seventh and advanced to second when
Russell Martin's sharp grounder hit off
Tulowitzki's glove. Nunez singled off
Matt Belisle (5-3) and pinch-runner
Chris Dickerson crossed home plate
with a belly-flop slide.
Joba Chamberlain, out after having
Tommy John surgery, immediately
tweeted "Do it Nunez!!!" after the short-
stop filling in for Derek Jeter, who
turned 37 on Sunday, gave NewYork
the lead.
Colorado New York (A)
ab rhbi ab rhbi
CGnzlzcf 2 1 0 0 Gardnrlf 4 1 1 0
JHerrr 2b 4 0 0 0 Grndrs cf 3 0 0 0
Heltonib 2 0 0 1 Teixeirlb 4 1 1 1
Tlwtzk ss 4 0 0 0 AIRdrg 3b 4 0 1 1
Giambi dh 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 1 0
S.Smith rf 4 0 1 0 Swisher rf 4 1 1 2
Wggntn 3b 4 2 3 2 Posada dh 2 1 1 1
Blckmn If 4 0 1 0 Dickrsn pr-dh 0 1 0 0
lannett c 4 1 2 1 Martin c 3 0 0 0
ENunezss 3 0 1 1
Totals 32 47 4 Totals 31 6 7 6
Colorado 010 021 000 - 4
NewYork 000 031 11x - 6
E-Tulowitzki (4), Martin (5), E.Nunez (9). DP-
Colorado 1, New York 2. LOB-Colorado 5,
New York 3. HR-Wigginton 2 (12), lannetta
(10), Teixeira (23), Swisher (9), Posada (8).
SB-C.Gonzalez (12), lannetta (2), Gardner
(16). SF-Helton.
IP H RERBBSO


IP H R ER BB SO Colorado
Nicasio
6 6 0 0 3 8 Belisle L,5-3 BS,5-5
2-3 1 0 0 1 1 Mat.Reynolds
1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Lindstrom
2-3 4 4 4 2 0 NewYork
1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Nova
Ayala
5 1 0 0 2 6 LoganW,2-2
11-30 0 0 0 2 Robertson H,15
2-3 0 0 0 0 2 Ma.RiveraS,20-23


HBP-by O'Flaherty (Venable).
T-2:53. A-24,048 (42,691).



Tigers 8, D-Backs 3


Arizona

Blmqst 2b
S.Drew ss
J.Upton rf
CYoung cf
Monter c
W.Penadh
Nady lb
GParra If
RRorts 3b


Totals
Arizona
Detroit


Detroit
ab r h bi


4 0 1 0 AJcksn cf
3 0 0 0 C.Wells rf
5 0 2 1 Ordonz dh
5 1 2 0 MiCarrlb
4 1 3 1 VMrtnzc
h 4 0 0 0 JhPerltss
4 0 0 0 Boesch If
4 0 1 0 RSantg 2b
4 1 3 1 lnge3b
Raburn 2b
Kelly ph-lf
37 3123 Totals
000 000 201
010 000 07x


ab rh bi
4000
3 1 0 0
3 1 1 0
4 1 2 2

4232
4 1 1 0
0 00 0

2000
2 1 1 0
34810 7
- 3
- 8


E-R.Roberts (7). DP-Arizona 1, Detroit 1.
LOB-Arizona 10, Detroit 5.2B-C.Young (21).
HR-Jh.Peralta (12). SB-Bloomquist (8),
C.Young (9), Montero (1). CS-R.Roberts (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
J.Saunders 7 4 1 1 1 8
Heilman L,4-1 H,5 2-3 1 2 2 1 1
Da.Hernandez BS,2-40 3 4 4 1 0
Shaw 1-3 2 1 0 0 1
Detroit
Penny 62-38 2 2 1 2
AlburquerqueW,5-1 11-32 0 0 1 2
Furbush 2-3 2 1 1 1 0
Valverde 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Da.Hernandez pitched to 4 batters in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Mark
Carlson; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Mike
Muchlinski.
T-3:06. A-41,036 (41,255).



Blue Jays 5, Cardinals 0


Toronto


St. Louis


5 4 4
11-32 1
2-3 1 1
1 0 0


Ayala pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Nicasio pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Mat.Reynolds pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
T-3:11. A-47,894 (50,291).


Dodgers 3, Angels 2
LOS ANGELES - Clayton Ker-
shaw outlasted Jered Weaver in a
matchup of Los Angeles aces and the
Dodgers rallied for two runs in the bot-
tom of the ninth inning to beat the An-
gels 3-2 on Sunday, preventing a
Freeway Series sweep.
Pinch-hitter Aaron Miles, batting for
Kershaw, drove in the tying run in the
ninth on a sacrifice fly and Tony Gwynn Jr.
won it with a two-out single. The Dodgers
ended a three-game skid, though they re-
main nine games below .500.
Kershaw (8-3) gave up six hits in his
second consecutive complete game,
tying a season high with 11 strikeouts
for the second straight outing. He also
walked none in his 100th career start.
The 23-year-old lefty struck out the
side in the fifth and his 128 strikeouts
surpassed Philadelphia's Roy Halla-
day, who has 123, for the NL lead.
Vernon Wells homered in the top of
the ninth to give the Angels a 2-1 lead.
Weaver allowed one run and seven
hits in seven innings. He struck out four
and walked one.
The Angels had won six straight at
Dodger Stadium, including wins in the
first two games of the series, when
they outscored the Dodgers 14-4.
Jordan Walden (1-2) walked his first
two batters in the ninth before Jamey
Carroll advanced the runners with a
sacrifice bunt.

Los Angeles (A) Los Angeles (N)
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Mlzturs 2b 4 0 1 0 GwynJ If 5 0 3 2
Aybarss 3 1 1 0 Blake 3b 4 00 0
HKndrc If 4 0 1 1 Ethier rf 4 0 2 0
V.Wells rf 4 1 1 1 Kemp cf 4 0 1 0
Trumolb 4 0 0 0 Loneylb 4 00 0
Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0 Uribe 2b 3 0 0 0
Bourjoscf 2 0 1 0 DGordnpr 0 1 0 0
Mathis c 3 0 1 0 Navarr c 2 0 0 0
Weaver p 2 0 0 0 Oeltjen pr 0 1 0 0
Abreu ph 1 0 0 0 Carroll ss 3 0 1 0
SDowns p 0 0 0 0 Kershw p 3 1 1 0
Walden p 0 0 0 0 Miles ph 0 00 1
Totals 30 26 2 Totals 32 3 8 3
Los Angeles (A) 000 000 101 - 2
Los Angeles (N) 000 000 102 - 3
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Loney (3). DP-Los Angeles (N) 2. LOB-
Los Angeles (A) 3, Los Angeles (N) 8. 2B-
Aybar (14), Mathis (7), Ethier (20).
3B-Gwynn Jr. (2). HR-V.Wells (9). SB-
D.Gordon (5). S-Aybar, Carroll. SF-Miles.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles (A)
Weaver 7 7 1 1 1 4
S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 1
WaldenL,1-2 2-3 1 2 2 2 0
Los Angeles (N)
KershawW,8-3 9 6 2 2 0 11
HBP-by Kershaw (Bourjos).
T-2:50. A-43,104 (56,000).


Red Sox 4, Pirates 2 Phillies 3, Athletics 1


PITTSBURGH -Andrew Miller
picked up his first win with Boston,
scattering five hits over six innings as
the Red Sox snapped a four-game los-
ing streak with a 4-2 win over the
sloppy Pittsburgh Pirates.
Miller (1-0) struck out four and al-
lowed just one earned run. Recently pro-
moted from the minors, he earned his
first AL victory since 2007 with Detroit.
The Pirates tied a season high with
four errors, preventing them from mov-
ing three games above .500 this late in
the season for the first time in 12 years.
Adrian Gonzalez had two hits for
Boston and raised his batting average to
.361, tops in the majors. Yet the Red Sox
won by doing the little things, scoring their
four runs on a Pittsburgh error, a pair of
sacrifice flies and an RBI groundout.
Both teams had starting outfielders
leave in the early innings. Pittsburgh
left fielder Jose Tabata was taken off
the field on a stretcher after injuring his
left quadriceps beating out an infield
single in the first.


Boston
a
Ellsury cf
Pedroia 2b
AdGnzl 1 b
Youkils 3b
J.Drew rf


ab rh bi ab rh bi DMcDn rf
YEscorss 4 0 2 1 Theriot ss 4 0 0 0 Sltlmch c
A.Hill2b 5 0 1 0 Valdesp 0 0 0 0 Reddcklf
Bautist rf 5 0 1 0 Schmkr2b 4 0 1 0 Scutaro ss
Lind lb 4 1 1 0 Hollidy If 3 0 0 0 AMillerp
JRiverIf 4 0 2 0 Brkmn lb 4 0 1 0 Ortizph
RDavis pr-cfl 0 0 0 Jay pr 0 0 0 0 Aceves p
Encrnc3b 4 1 1 0 ABrwn rf 4 01 0 Bardp
JMcDnI3b 1 0 0 0 Rasmscf 2 0 1 0 Camrnph
CPttrsn cf-lf 3 1 0 1 TCruz c 3 0 0 0 Papeln p
Arencii c 3 2 1 1 Descals 3b 2 0 0 0
RRomrp 4 0 1 2 McCllln p 2 0 0 0 Totals
MBggs p 0 00 0 Boston
Motte p 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh
Kozma ph-ss 0 0 0 0 E-Scutaro
Totals 38 5105 Totals 280 4 0 A.McCutche
Toronto 010 004 000 - 5 LOB-Bostc
St. Louis 000 000 000 - 0 macchia (12


E-Berkman (5). DP-Toronto 2. LOB-Toronto
11, St. Louis 5. 2B-Y.Escobar (10), J.Rivera
(11), A.Brown (1). HR-Arencibia (11). SB-
J.Rivera (3). S-Rasmus.
IP H RERBBSO


Toronto
R.Romero W,7-7
St. Louis
McClellan L,6-4
M.Boggs
Motte
Valdes


9 4 0 0 2 5


51-38 5
12-31 0
1 0 0
1 1 0


HBP-by R.Romero (Holliday), by Valdes
(Lind).
Umpires-Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Ted Bar-
rett; Second, Tim McClelland; Third, Marvin
Hudson.
T-2:27. A-36,542 (43,975).


Pittsburgh
ib r h bi
4 0 1 0 TabatalIf
5 0 1 1 GJonespr-rf
3 0 2 0 dArnad 3b
3 1 1 1 AMcCtcf
1 0 0 0 Walker2b
4 0 0 0 Diaz rf-lf
3 1 1 0 Overaylb
3 0 0 1 Cedenoss
3 1 0 0 Fryer c
2 00 0 JMcDnIp
0 1 0 0 BrWodph
0 00 0 TiWood p
0 00 0 Moskos p
1 00 0 Resop p
0 00 0 DMcCt p
Paul ph
32 46 3 Totals
000 101 200
000 110 000


ab r h bi

4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 1
3 1 0 0
4 00 0
4 0 0 0
2 0 1 1
3 0 0 0
1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
322 5 2
- 4
- 2


(5), Reddick (1), Ja.McDonald (1),
'n (5), Moskos (2), d'Arnaud (1).
in 10, Pittsburgh 8. 2B-Saltala-
). SB-Ellsbury (25), Pedroia (15).


CS-D.McDonald (2). S-Ellsbury. SF-Youk-
ilis, Reddick, Cedeno.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
A.MillerW,1-0 6 5 2 1 2 4
AcevesH,5 1 0 0 0 0 0
Bard H,15 1 0 0 0 0 1
PapelbonS,14-15 1 0 0 0 1 1
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald 6 5 2 0 2 5
Ti.WoodL,0-2 0 0 1 1 1 0
Moskos 0 0 1 0 1 0
Resop 1 0 0 0 1 0
D.McCutchen 2 1 0 0 1 1
Ti.Wood pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Moskos pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by A.Miller (Walker).
T-3:21. A-39,511 (38,362).


PHILADELPHIA- Eight hits off
Roy Halladay was pretty good for the
Oakland Athletics.
Of course, it wasn't nearly good
enough. The Philadelphia ace limited
Oakland to one run in his fifth complete
game of the season and the Phillies
beat the A's. 3-1 Sunday.
Jimmy Rollins went 4 for 4 for
Philadelphia and Halladay (10-3) im-
proved to 30-3 in a Philadelphia uni-
form in the 35 starts in which the
Phillies have given him the lead.
'Yeah, he obviously pitched well,"
Oakland's Scott Sizemore said.'We
got quite a few hits off him but we
weren't able to piece them together. I
guess that's why he's so good. He
spreads them out and bears down
when he needs to."
After the Phillies scored twice in
the first, Oakland got on the board in
the fourth on Ryan Sweeney's bloop
single.
The Phillies tacked on a run on Ben
Francisco's infield single in the fifth, be-
fore the A's threatened in the seventh.
Conor Jackson, who had three hits,
led off with a single and went to third
on Sizemore's one-out double down
the right-field line. Jackson probably
could have scored on the hit, but he
appeared to hesitate rounding second.
Oakland couldn't get the run home
later, either. Landon Powell popped out
and pinch-hitter David DeJesus struck
out looking. DeJesus has three hits in
his last 38 at-bats (.079).


Oakland

JWeeks 2b
Pnngtn ss
Crisp cf
Matsui If
CJcksn lb
Sweeny rf
SSizmr 3b
Powell c
Outmn p


Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi


4 00 0
4 00 0
4 1 2 0
4 00 0
4 03 0
4 0 2 1
3 0 1 0
3 00 0
2 00 0


Rollins ss
Polanc 3b
Victorn cf
Howard lb
BFrncs rf
Ruiz c
Ibanez If
WValdz 2b
Hallady p


DeJess ph 1 0 0 0
Zieglerp 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 18 1 Totals 33310 2
Oakland 000 100 000 - 1
Philadelphia 200 010 00x - 3
DP-Oakland 1, Philadelphia 2. LOB-Oakland
5, Philadelphia 9. 2B-Crisp (17), C.Jackson
(8), S.Sizemore (5), Rollins (13), Polanco (11).
SB-Howard (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
OutmanL,3-2 6 8 3 3 2 4
Ziegler 2 2 0 0 1 1
Philadelphia
HalladayW,10-3 9 8 1 1 0 4
PB-Powell.
T-2:14. A-45,863 (43,651).


i






B4 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011


How Americans
fared At Wimbledon
No. 8 Andy Roddick- lost third round to Fe-
liciano Lopez.
No. 10 Mardy Fish - to fourth round vs. No.
6 Tomas Berdych.
James Blake - lostfirst roundto No. 32 Mar-
cos Baghdatis.
Alex Bogomolov Jr. - lost third round to No.
6 Tomas Berdych.
Ryan Harrison - lost second round to No. 7
David Ferrer.
John Isner - lost to second round to No. 16
Nicolas Almagro.
Michael Russell - lost first round to No. 1
Rafael Nadal.
Ryan Sweeting - lost second round to No. 1
Rafael Nadal.
Donald Young - lost first round to Alex Bo-
gomolov Jr.
Women
No. 7 Serena Williams - to fourth round vs.
No. 9 Marion Bartoli.
No. 23 Venus Williams - to fourth round vs.
No. 32Tsvetana Pironkova.
No. 30 Bethanie Mattek-Sands - lost first
round to Misaki Doi.
Jill Craybas - lost first round to Alexandra
Dulgheru.
Irina Falconi - lost first round to Stephanie
Dubois.
Alexa Glatch - lost first round to No. 8 Petra
Kvitova.
Vania King - lost first round to Petra Martic.
Varvara Lepchenko - lost first round to No.
19 Yanina Wickmayer.
Christina McHale - lost second round to
Tamira Paszek.
Melanie Oudin - lost first round to No. 18
Ana Ivanovic.
Alison Riske - lost first round to No. 2 Vera
Zvonareva.
CoCo Vandeweghe - lost first round to Eleni
Daniilidou.
Wimbledon Show
Court Schedules
Monday
At The All England Lawn Tennis
& Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Play begins on Centre Court and No. 1
Court at 8a.m. EDT
all other courts at 7 a.m. EDT
Centre Court
Andy Murray (4), Britain, vs. Richard Gasquet
(17), France
VenusWilliams (23), United States, vs.Tsve-
tana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, vs. Juan Martin del
Potro (24), Argentina
No. 1 Court
Marion Bartoli (9), France, vs. Serena
Williams (7), United States
Michael Llodra (19), France, vs. Novak
Djokovic (2), Serbia
MikhailYouzhny (18), Russia, vs. Roger Fed-
erer (3), Switzerland
No. 2 Court
Peng Shuai (20), China, vs. Maria Sharapova
(5), Russia
Caroline Wozniacki (1), Serbia, vs. Dominika
Cibulkova (24), Slovakia
Mardy Fish (10), United States, vs. Tomas
Berdych (6), Czech Republic
No. 3 Court
Nadia Petrova, Russia, vs. Victoria Azarenka
(4), Belarus
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, vs. Feliciano Lopez,
Spain
David Ferrer (7), Spain, vs. Jo-Wilfried
Tsonga (12), France



Sprint Cup
Toyota/Save Mart
350 Results
Sunday
At Infineon Raceway
Sonoma, Calif.
Lap length: 1.99 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (11) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 110 laps, 142.6 rat-
ing, 48 points, $293,300.
2. (13) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 110, 92.6, 42,
$234,486.
3. (23) Carl Edwards, Ford, 110, 98.1, 41,
$204,791.
4. (9) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 110, 116.5, 41,
$179,508.
5. (8) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 110, 110.2, 39,
$141,066.
6. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 110, 92.2, 39,
$131,250.
7. (12) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 110, 108.5,
37, $148,561.
8. (14) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 110, 101.2, 36,
$104,325.
9. (26) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 110, 83.4, 36,
$139,111.
10. (15) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 110, 94.8, 34,
$117,758.
11. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 110, 97.1, 33,
$134,491.
12. (29) David Gilliland, Ford, 110, 80.7, 33,
$105,333.
13. (7) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 110, 88.5, 31,
$125,511.
14. (33) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 110, 69.6, 30,
$123,761.
15. (2) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 110, 82.8,
29, $122,464.
16. (24) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 110, 70.5,29,
$110,920.
17. (3) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 110, 71.4, 27,
$92,400.
18. (28) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 110, 57.1, 26,
$97,408.
19. (16) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 110, 61.9, 25,
$90,625.
20. (6) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 110, 86.3, 24,
$101,658.
21. (25) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 110, 60.3, 23,
$90,525.
22. (17) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 110,
85.3, 23, $118,533.
23. (22) Greg Biffle, Ford, 110,51,21, $96,275.
24. (32) David Reutimann, Toyota, 110, 63.2,
20, $107,533.
25. (5) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 110, 76.4,19,
$118,700.
26. (43) Andy Pilgrim, Chevrolet, 110,46.6,18,
$78,475.
27. (42) Chris Cook, Ford, 110, 38.9, 17,
$78,825.
28. (30) Boris Said, Chevrolet, 110, 59.8, 16,
$86,797.
29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 110, 49.7, 15,
$84,625.



BUSCH


Continued from Page B1

circuit. And Busch helped
Keselowski finish 10th with
advice and a tour of the track
on Friday.
"It's a good feeling to know
that the two teams are work-
ing as closely together as
they ever have," Busch said.
"Knowing that Brad is defi-
nitely maturing, seeing him
bust off a top 10 at a road
course is great. We went
around the race track, I
pointed out some of the apex


SCOREBOARD


For the r cord


Florida LOTTERY

CASH 3 (early)
6-5-6
CASH 3 (late)
4-2-2
PLAY 4 (early)
i 6-3-7-5
otda Lttoy PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 9-1-4-3
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Sunday in the 4-6-17-19-32
Florida Lottery:


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB
7 p.m. (ESPN2, SUN) Cincinnati Reds at Tampa Bay Rays
3 a.m. (ESPN) Cincinnati Reds at Tampa Bay Rays
(Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN) College World Series Championship -
Game 1: Florida vs. South Carolina
GOLF
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Professional National Championship
WOMEN'S SOCCER
8:45 a.m. (ESPN) FIFA World Cup: Japan vs. New Zealand
11:45 a.m. (ESPN) FIFA World Cup: Mexico vs. England
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) Wimbledon Championships Round of 16
10 a.m. (8 NBC) Wimbledon Championships Men's and
Women's Round of 16
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Wimbledon Championships Round of 1


30. (38) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 110, 42.5,
14, $75,475.
31. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 110, 47, 13,
$73,800.
32. (39) Terry Labonte, Ford, 110, 35.7, 12,
$73,630.
33. (40) Brian Simo, Ford, 109, 38.6, 11,
$74,470.
34. (27) Casey Mears, Toyota, 108, 32.2, 10,
$73,405.
35. (41) Andy Lally Ford, 104,32.2,9, $82,770.
36. (10) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 103, 58.1, 8,
$100,374.
37. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 99, 102.8, 8,
$121,350.
38. (21) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 91, 47.9, 6,
$99,255.
39. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, accident, 88,
93.1, 6, $118,208.
40. (31) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, transmission,
66, 29, 0, $72,625.
41. (18) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, over-
heating, 45, 54, 3, $80,450.
42. (37) Mike Skinner, Toyota, ignition, 10, 28.3,
0, $72,355.
43. (35) PJ. Jones, Dodge, suspension, 5, 29.4,
0, $72,724.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 75.411 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 54 minutes, 10 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 2.685 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 17 laps.
Lead Changes: 12 among 9 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-5; D.Hamlin 6-12;
Ku.Busch 13-31; D.Hamlin 32-36; Ku.Busch 37-
50; C.Bowyer 51; Ku.Busch 52-71; TStewart 72-
74; J.Montoya 75-76; D.Gilliland 77; K.Harvick
78-82; R.Smith 83-87; Ku.Busch 88-110.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): Ku.Busch, 4 times for 76 laps; D.Hamlin,
2 times for 12 laps; J.Logano, 1 time for 5 laps;
K.Harvick, 1 time for 5 laps; R.Smith, 1 time for
5 laps; TStewart, 1 time for 3 laps; J.Montoya,
1 time for 2 laps; C.Bowyer, 1 time for 1 lap;
D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. C.Edwards, 573; 2. K.Har-
vick, 548; 3. J.Johnson, 540; 4. Ku.Busch, 539;
5. Ky.Busch, 536; 6. M.Kenseth, 521; 7. D.Earn-
hardt Jr., 508; 8. C.Bowyer, 496; 9. J.Gordon,
480; 10. R.Newman, 475; 11. D.Hamlin, 463; 12.
TStewart, 460.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.



MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-AdGonzalez, Boston, .361;
VMartinez, Detroit, .333; MiCabrera, Detroit,
.330; Bautista, Toronto, .325; Konerko, Chicago,
.324; MiYoung, Texas, .323; Ortiz, Boston, .311.
RUNS-Granderson, NewYork, 68; Bautista,
Toronto, 60; MiCabrera, Detroit, 57; AdGonza-
lez, Boston, 56; Ellsbury, Boston, 55; Boesch,
Detroit, 52; Kinsler, Texas, 52; Zobrist, Tampa
Bay 52.
RBI-AdGonzalez, Boston, 71; Konerko,
Chicago, 60; Teixeira, New York, 58; Beltre,
Texas, 56; Granderson, New York, 55; Youkilis,
Boston, 55; MiYoung, Texas, 53.
HITS-AdGonzalez, Boston, 114; MiYoung,
Texas, 100; Ellsbury, Boston, 94; Konerko,
Chicago, 92; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 90;
AGordon, Kansas City, 90; ACabrera, Cleve-
land, 89.
DOUBLES-AdGonzalez, Boston, 25; Zo-
brist, Tampa Bay, 25; AGordon, Kansas City, 23;
Ellsbury, Boston, 22; Quentin, Chicago, 22; MiY-
oung, Texas, 22; Youkilis, Boston, 21.
TRIPLES-Bourjos, Los Angeles, 6;
Granderson, NewYork, 6; AJackson, Detroit, 6;
Aybar, Los Angeles, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 5;
RDavis, Toronto, 5; CCrawford, Boston, 4; Gard-
ner, New York, 4; AGordon, Kansas City, 4; Zo-
brist, Tampa Bay, 4.
HOME RUNS-Bautista, Toronto, 23; Teix-
eira, New York, 23; Granderson, New York, 21;
Konerko, Chicago, 21; NCruz, Texas, 18; Ortiz,
Boston, 17; Quentin, Chicago, 17.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 25;
Crisp, Oakland, 23; Andrus, Texas, 22; BUpton,
Tampa Bay 20; ISuzuki, Seattle, 19; RDavis,
Toronto, 18; Fuld, Tampa Bay, 16; Gardner, New
York, 16.
PITCHING-Verlander, Detroit, 10-3;


points, exit points, shifting
points. He absorbed it like a
sponge.
"That's what it takes as a
veteran of the team to help
the kid that's coming up
through and to have his in-
formation help us. That's ex-
actly what's helped both
teams get stronger."
Beating Gordon made it
extra special for Busch, who
was one of many drivers
wrecked by Gordon here last
year It was fresh in his mem-
ory when he arrived, and
one of the first things Busch
said was Gordon had apolo-
gized to every driver he


Sabathia, New York, 10-4; Scherzer, Detroit, 9-
3; Lester, Boston, 9-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 9-
4; Tomlin, Cleveland, 9-4; Arrieta, Baltimore,
9-4.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 124; FH-
ernandez, Seattle, 118; Shields, Tampa Bay,
117; Weaver, Los Angeles, 106; Price, Tampa
Bay 104; Lester, Boston, 100; CWilson, Texas,
97.
SAVES-MaRivera, New York, 20; League,
Seattle, 20; CPerez, Cleveland, 18; Valverde,
Detroit, 17; Walden, Los Angeles, 17;
Farnsworth, Tampa Bay, 16; SSantos, Chicago,
15.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-JosReyes, New York, .341; Kemp,
Los Angeles, .329; SCastro, Chicago, .326;
Votto, Cincinnati, .318; Pence, Houston, .315;
Ethier, Los Angeles, .314; SSmith, Colorado,
.314.
RUNS-JosReyes, NewYork, 61; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 57; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 56; Stubbs,
Cincinnati, 54; Votto, Cincinnati, 53; Pujols, St.
Louis, 52; CYoung, Arizona, 51.
RBI-Fielder, Milwaukee, 68; Howard,
Philadelphia, 62; Kemp, Los Angeles, 60;
Braun, Milwaukee, 59; Berkman, St. Louis, 54;
Pence, Houston, 52; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 50;
Walker, Pittsburgh, 50.
HITS-JosReyes, New York, 113; SCastro,
Chicago, 104; Pence, Houston, 95; RWeeks,
Milwaukee, 92; Kemp, Los Angeles, 91; JUpton,
Arizona, 91; Votto, Cincinnati, 91.
DOUBLES-Pence, Houston, 22; Beltran,
New York, 21; SCastro, Chicago, 21; Headley,
San Diego, 21; JUpton, Arizona, 21; CYoung,
Arizona, 21; 8 tied at 20.
TRIPLES-JosReyes, New York, 14; Vic-
torino, Philadelphia, 8; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6;
Bourn, Houston, 5; SCastro, Chicago, 5; Fowler,
Colorado, 5; 5 tied at 4.
HOME RUNS-Fielder, Milwaukee, 21;
Kemp, Los Angeles, 21; Berkman, St. Louis, 18;
Bruce, Cincinnati, 17; Pujols, St. Louis, 17;
Braun, Milwaukee, 16; Howard, Philadelphia,
16; Stanton, Florida, 16.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 33; Jos-
Reyes, New York, 28; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 22;
Kemp, Los Angeles, 21; Desmond, Washington,
20; Bourgeois, Houston, 17; Braun, Milwaukee,
17.
PITCHING-Jurrjens, Atlanta, 10-3; Halladay,
Philadelphia, 10-3; Hamels, Philadelphia, 9-4;
Gallardo, Milwaukee, 9-4; DHudson, Arizona, 9-
5; Correia, Pittsburgh, 9-6; 5 tied at 8.
STRIKEOUTS-Halladay, Philadelphia, 123;
Kershaw, Los Angeles, 117; CILee, Philadel-
phia, 114; Lincecum, San Francisco, 113;
Hamels, Philadelphia, 108; AniSanchez,
Florida, 101; Norris, Houston, 100.
SAVES-Street, Colorado, 23; BrWilson, San
Francisco, 23; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 22; Putz,
Arizona, 21; LNunez, Florida, 21; FrRodriguez,
New York, 20; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 20; Axford, Mil-
waukee, 20; HBell, San Diego, 20.
NCAA College World
Series Glance
AtTD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
Saturday, June 18
Vanderbilt 7, North Carolina 3
Florida 8, Texas 4
Sunday, June 19
Virginia 4, California 1
South Carolina 5, Texas A&M 4
Monday, June 20
North Carolina 3, Texas 0, Texas eliminated
Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1,512 innings, susp., rain
Tuesday, June 21
Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1, comp. of susp. game
California 7, Texas A&M 3, A&M eliminated
South Carolina 7, Virginia 1
Wednesday, June 22
Vanderbilt 5, North Carolina 1, North Carolina
eliminated
Thursday, June 23
Virginia 8, California 1, California eliminated
Friday, June 24
Florida 6, Vanderbilt 4, Vanderbilt eliminated
South Carolina 3, Virginia 2, 13 innings, Vir-
ginia eliminated
Championship Series
Best-of-3
x-if necessary
Monday June 27- Florida (53-17) vs. South
Carolina (53-14), 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 28 - Florida vs. South Car-
olina, 8p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 29 - Florida vs. South
Carolina, 8 p.m.


wrecked last year but Busch.
"It was a definite boost at
the end of the day, to see him
finish second," Busch
smiled.
Gordon congratulated
Busch in Victory Lane, but
said "I still didn't apologize."
Carl Edwards, who de-
cided Friday to skip Satur-
day's Nationwide Series
race at Road America, fin-
ished third. He was sched-
uled to miss both of
Saturday's practice sessions
so he could be in Wisconsin
for the race.
"It was very tough to watch
the race from Road America,


BUGG
Continued from Page B1

Lloyd McMullins) Mac was
up there looking over our
shoulder."
10 and 11 Baseball
Dunnellon 7,
Shady Hills 2
Dunnellon's 10 and 11 All
Stars baseball team didn't
explode like they did Satur-
day
Still, the team was strong
enough to down Shady Hills
7-2 Sunday
The victory gave them a 3-
0 record and the District 15
10/11 baseball title.
Dunnellon will advance
to a sectional game in
Dunedin on July 15.
Saturday, Dunnellon beat
Inverness 22-2 and West
Hernando 11-0 in "mercy
rule" victories.



COSCIA
Continued from Page B1

end. And, in the bottom of the
fifth, they plated six runs to
take a commanding 14-8 lead.
Scoring for Central Citrus in
the frame were Dye, Carly
Karaffa, Alyssa Colassurd,
Burdette and Sullivan.
Inverness would score a
run in the top of the sixth in
the person of Rickelle Car-
raway, but it wasn't enough to
complete the comeback
With the win Central Citrus
now moves on to the champi-
onship semifinals where they
will face undefeated Crystal
River on Tuesday Meanwhile
Dunnellon and South Sumter
will face off in the other semi-
final with both winners ad-
vancing to Wednesday's
championship match.
9-10 Softball
Crystal River 5,
Dunnellon 1
Crystal River jumped out to
a 1-0 lead in the first inning
when Montana Baldner
scored. But Dunnellon was
quick with an answer in the
second when Mandy B.
plated the game-tying run.
But Crystal River shut Dun-
nellon down the rest of the
way and scored four more
runs to clinch the win and the
top seed in the bracket in the
process.
Baldner scored again in the
third, followed by Shannon
Ryan in the fourth and Alyssa
Hamilton and Maddie Fox in
the fifth frame.
South Sumter 16,
Dixie County 6
This one was close early on
as Dixie County actually
jumped out to a 6-2 lead over
South Sumter In the home
half of the second, however,
South Sumter scored three
runs as part of a 14-0 run to
close out the game.
Inverness 17,
Dixie County 7
In a game resumed be-
cause of Saturday's weather,
Inverness easily blew away
Dixie County When the rains
came, Inverness was leading
12-7. On Sunday they wasted
no time scoring five runs to
invoke the mercy rule.
Inverness took a 3-0 lead in
the first inning when Olivia
Muscott, Rickelle Caraway
and Zarrie Washington all
scored. In the second inning
Caraway, Faith Alexander,
Camryn Cyr and Washington
gave Inverness a 7-3 lead.
They then plated five runs in
both the third and fourth in-
nings to close out the game.
In the third and fourth in-
nings Muscott, Caraway
Alexander and Washington
scored in both frames. In the
third inning it was Emma
Clemente providing the
team's fifth run and in the
fourth inning it was Jailyn
Rivera that scored the run
that ended the game.
Major Softball
Dixie County 25,
Central Citrus 8
The two teams resumed
their game from Saturday
and Dixie County came out
on fire, scoring 11 runs (they
led 14-8 when the game was
delayed) to end the game in
four innings.
Central Citrus jumped out


but I think staying was the


right decision," Edwards
said. "It worked out It was a
good call."
Sunday's race featured
several on-track flare-ups,
most notably Brian Vickers'
payback spin of Tony Stew-
art
Stewart knocked Vickers
out of his way early in the
race, and Vickers gave it
right back later The bump
sent Stewart's car spinning
into a stack of tires, and the
rear of his Chevrolet came to
a rest on top of the stack
Stewart didn't seem angry
over the retaliation, but he


Sunday, Dunnellon had to
battle Shady Hills.
Dunnellon's Chandler
Neal belted a run-scoring
triple and pitcher Maurice
Goolsby won the game with
relief help from Jase
Williams. Dylan Roy added
an RBI single.
Shady Hills hurler Carter
Garlitz pitched a tough
game but took the loss. For
Shady Hills, Ben Mendoza
singled in a run and the
Pasco Countians added a
last inning run on an error.
Shady Hills scored both
runs in the sixth inning.
"I'm proud of our kids,"
said Dunnellon manager
Tim Tyson. "We definitely
played very hard. They put
a lot of heart into it We have
great coaches. They did a
great job. I'm just happy for
them."
10 and 11 Baseball
Inverness 25,

to a 5-0 lead in the game when
Lillian Torres, Samantha
Merchant, Kathryn, Laura-
Lynn Planto and Morgan
Jemison scored in the first in-
ning but once the Dixie
County bats woke up, Central
Citrus was never able to an-
swer
Crystal River 18,
Dixie County 0
Crystal River scored four
runs in the first, added three
in the second and then closed
out the game with an eye-pop-
ping 11 runs in the third in-
ning. The most notable thing
about the 11-run third was
that Crystal River scored
nearly a dozen runs and only
managed one hit as the Dixie
County pitchers struggled to
find the plate. Scoring in the
first inning for Crystal River
were Alexa Mack, Harley
Broughton, Savannah Bostic
and Brittney Bloom. In the
second inning Morgan Trot-
ter, Mack and Haley Coleman
plated runs.
And in the decisive third
inning Trotter, Mack and Age
Thompson each scored twice.
They were joined in the
scorebook by Shyann Hunter,
Broughton, Haley Fields,
Emily Doughman and Kacey
Downing.
Crystal River and Central
Citrus face off on Tuesday If
Crystal River wins they auto-
matically advance to the Dis-
trict 15 title game on
Wednesday If Central Citrus
wins it will force a three-way
tie in Group A that would
then be decided by run defer-
ential.
Inverness 9, S. Hills 7
Inverness kept its champi-
onship hopes alive, albeit
slim, with a 9-7 win over
Shady Hills on Sunday The
game opened with Darian
Stephens scoring the first run
for Inverness in the top of the
first inning. But the lead was
short-lived as Shady Hills an-
swered with two in the home
half of the inning.
Inverness regained the
lead 3-2 in the second when
Tiffany Hindalong and Gabby
Wright both scored. But again
Shady Hills answered with
three of its own to take a 5-3
lead in the fourth. Inverness,
however would take the lead
for good when they plated
five runs in the top of the fifth.
Scoring in the frame for In-
verness were Lauran
Meadow, Chase Davis, Alyssa
Sloan, Sarah Taulbee,
Tamiesha Haywood and An-
drea Mundreanu.
South Sumter would close
the gap to one in the bottom of
the fifth but Inverness would
add an insurance run in the
person of Madison Hoeffler
in the sixth inning.
Inverness now needs help
from Shady Hills to keep
their season alive. First In-
verness must beat South
Sumter tonight and then hope
that Shady Hills can beat
Dunnellon, forcing a three-
way tie in Pool B. If Dunnel-
lon, who crushed South
Sumter 20-4 on Sunday wins,
they clinch a spot in the Dis-
trict 15 title game.
Junior Softball
South Sumter 9,
Dunnellon 7
South Sumter knew com-
ing into Sunday's game
against Dunnellon it faced a

wasn't apologetic, either


"I probably had it coming,
because I dumped him ear-
lier, but I dumped him be-
cause he was blocking,"
Stewart said.
While Stewart was calm,
tempers were flaring across
the rest of the garage. Juan
Pablo Montoya was mad at
Keselowski, Kasey Kahne
was mad at Montoya, Joey
Logano was mad at Robby
Gordon and Denny Hamlin
was mad atAJAllmendinger.
"(Seventh) week in a row
I've had a winning car and
then Boom. We get Dinger'd,"
Hamlin posted on Twitter


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

West Hernando 13
Inverness put on quite an
offensive fireworks display
Sunday.
Inverness had 22 hits and
took advantage of nine
walks in taking the six-in-
ning victory They finished
1-2 in pool play
Dustin Zuppinger had two
hits and scored two runs for
Inverness.
Cameron Piffath hit a
two-run triple.
David Connors had two
hits and two runs batted in.
Justin Shephard was the
winning pitcher.
"We started off very
strong," said Inverness man-
ager Jason Shephard. "We
had some great pitching. We
pulled it off."
9 and 10 Baseball
Shady Hills 12,
Inverness 2, four innings
West Hernando 10,
Great Hudson 0, four inns.

tall order - win or home.
Dunnellon had beaten South
Sumter 9-1 on Saturday and
another victory by Dunnellon
on Sunday would secure the
district title for them in the
two-team district
But instead South Sumter
answered the call with a 9-7
victory to force a winner-
takes-all game for the District
15 title Tuesday night at Bi-
centennial Park
Senior Softball
Crystal River 10,
Shady Hills 0
Crystal River jumped out to
a 3-0 lead in the first inning
which was the start of an ava-
lanche of runs for the home
team. While Crystal River
would go on to plate seven
more runs, the first inning
lead was more than enough
for its ace Rachel Roe, who
went four innings and struck
out six en route to the win.
Scoring for Crystal River in
the first were Bree Martin,
Cheyenne Phelps and
Danielle Gomez. In the sec-
ond inning Crystal River
added four runs when Bree
Martin, Meagan McMichen,
Bridget Whitley and Ashley
Mieman all scored.
Crystal River invoked the
mercy rule in the fifth inning
when Bree Martin,
McMichen and Meiman
scored the game's final three
runs.
With the win Crystal River
advances to the champi-
onship round where they will
face the winner of Shady
Hills and Inverness, who will
have to beat Crystal River
twice to advance to the sec-
tional tournament
9-10 Baseball
Crystal River 12,
LadyLakel
Crystal River jumped out to
a 1-0 lead in the first inning
when Tyler Labelle platted
the game's first run. Lady
Lake, however, was quick
with an answer in the home
half of the fifth inning.
But that was as close as
Lady Lake would get as Crys-
tal River reeled off 11 straight
runs to close out the win.
Scoring in the second in-
ning for Crystal River were T
J. Keefer, Zach O'Callahan
and Shield Gay In the third
inning Crystal River in-
creased its lead to 6-1 when
Caleb Dix and Kyle Mitchel
both scored.
Crystal River closed things
out when Roman Newkirk,
Dix, Mitchel and Keefer
scored in the fourth and La-
belle and Kyle Touchton
scored in the fifth.
Central Citrus 15,
Dixie County 3
Central Citrus scored five
runs in the first, two in the
second and eight in the fourth
as they routed Dixie County
In the first inning it was
Chris DiRosa, Coby Howati-
neck, Blake Briscoe,
Cameron Cain and Nate
Reynolds plating runs.
DiRosa and Briscoe added
two runs in the second. And
Central Citrus proved eight
was just enough in the fourth
Andy Garcia, DiRosa,
Howatineck, Cain, Julian
Davelli, Reynolds, Brendan
Rocks and Briscoe provided
the runs necessary to invoke
the mercy rule.


immediately after the race.
Hamlin, who led 12 laps
and was competitive with
Busch, wound up 37th.
"Man, it was nuts out
there," Jeff Gordon sur-
mised.
Clint Bowyer finished
fourth, Marcos Ambrose was
fifth and pole-winner Logano
was sixth. It was a huge turn-
around for Logano, who used
coaching from Max Papis to
score his career-best road
course finish. He also
showed some mettle in in-
tentionally moving Robby
Gordon out of his way mid-
way through the race.







E Page B5-MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE -


Associated Press
A worn and signed "Thriller"
jacket that belonged to
Michael Jackson is shown
at Julien's Auctions in
Beverly Hills, Calif.

Thriller'jacket
fetches $1.8M
BEVERLY HILLS,
Calif. -A famed black-
and-red calfskin jacket
Michael Jackson wore in
the classic "Thriller"
video has sold at auction
for $1.8 million.
Darren Julien, presi-
dent and CEO of Julien's
Auctions in Beverly Hills,
says the jacket was pur-
chased Sunday by Milton
Verret, a commodities
trader from Austin, Texas.
The jacket is one of two
Jackson wore during the
filming of the 1983
"Thriller" video. Jackson
wears the jacket in a
scene with a troupe of
zombies who rise from
their graves and break
into a dance routine.
Verret says the jacket
will be sent on tour and
used as a fundraising tool
for children's charities.

Craig, Weisz date,
marry quietly
LOS ANGELES -
Daniel Craig and Rachel
Weisz, who play husband
and wife in an upcoming
film, have taken the roles
to heart.
Robin
Baun of
Slate PR,
which
repre-
t, ] sents
S Craig,
said Sat-
urday the
Daniel actor and
Craig Weisz
have mar-
ried. She
did not
offer any
details.
The
British ac-
tors had
Rachel been qui-
Weisz etly dat-
ing.
Craig is
the latest James Bond and
will star in "The Girl with
the Dragon Tattoo." Weisz
won an Academy Award for
"The Constant Gardener"

Duhamel named
honorary chair
MINOT, N.D. - Holly-
wood actor and Minot,
N.D., native Josh
Duhamel has been
named honorary chair-
man of a fund set up for
the city's flood recovery
In a statement,
Duhamel said he grew up
in Minot and his sister
and her family lost their
home to flooding from the
Souris River Duhamel
says he would always
consider the city home.
The fund will help
Minot and the surround-
ing area with grants for
construction materials,
mortgage help, household
items and other needs.
-From wire reports


Gainesville girl goes to Broadway


Easide High

senior competes

for acting award

JACKIE ALEXANDER
The Gainesville Sun

GAINESVILLE - Emily
Hart stood alone on the
stage at Eastside High
School, rehearsing a heart-
breaking rendition of "Still
Hurting" from the musical
"The Last Five Years."
Soon she will be singing it
on Broadway
Hart, a senior at Eastside,
will travel to New York City
as part of the National High
School Musical Theater
Awards, where she will
compete to receive the
Jimmy Award for best per-
formance by an actress.
Hart will participate in
several intensive workshops
before performing at the
Minskoff Theatre, the same
stage upon which the
award-winning "The Lion


Associated Press
Emily Hart, a recent Eastside High School graduate, sings
"Still Hurting" from the musical "The Last Five Years," on
June 3 in Gainesville in this photo provided by the Alachua


County School Board.
King" was presented.
"It's been my dream for-
ever to perform on a Broad-
way stage," she said.
But before she gets there,
her performance needs a bit
of work. After Hart finished
singing, Eastside High the-
ater director Tammy Meyers
launched into a critique of
Hart's lack of movement
through the entire piece.
"I understand the still-


ness, I really do," Meyers
said, "but there's moments I
feel like if I were going
through this emotionally I
would be frustrated and
have to move."
Meyers said she wasn't
surprised Hart won a spot at
the Jimmy Awards.
"I just think she's spe-
cial," Meyers said. "I've al-
ways thought she's special."
Hart started musical the-


ater in middle school.
"You get to really get in
touch with yourself," she said.
"You can learn new things
about yourself and how to ex-
press yourself creatively,
which is very important"
Her ability to share her
emotions on-stage makes
Hart an exceptional per-
former, Meyers said.
"She has a magnetism, a
strength about her emotions
that carry out," she said. '"A
lot of performers don't do
that"
Although Hart sings on
stage in front of full audi-
ences, she said through the-
ater she learned she's shy
"The applause, it freaks
me out more than it excites
me, but I really love it," she
said.
It was a performance of
"Hair" her freshman year
that solidified her love of
song and stage.
"It was magical," she said.
"The cast was really well
bonded. It really showed me
how a show can affect an au-
dience and how a cast can
become a family"


Driving to top spot


- .- -- . - - =r-- . I
Associated Press
Animated characters Lightning McQueen, voiced by Owen Wilson, foreground left, Mater, voiced by Larry the Cable
Guy, center, and Finn McMissile, voiced by Michael Caine, right, are shown in a scene from "Cars 2."


'Cars 2' keeps Pixar in driver's seat


DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer

LOS ANGELES - Pixar Anima-
tion remains undefeated at the box-
office races.
The Disney unit's animated sequel
"Cars 2" cruised to a No. 1 finish with
a $68 million opening weekend, ac-
cording to studio estimates Sunday
That makes 12 wins in a row for Pixar
since the company's first feature film,
1995's "Toy Story"
"It couldn't be any better than that
What an unbelievable track record
these guys have," said Chuck Viane,
head of distribution for Disney
"Cars 2" added $42.9 million in 18
overseas markets, giving it a world-
wide total of $110.9 million.
Domestically, "Cars 2" nearly
matched the $68.1 million debut of
Disney-Pixar's "Up" two years ago,
though it was well below the com-
pany's record of $110.3 million for last
year's "Toy Story 3."
The original "Cars" had a $60.1
million debut in 2006, but factoring in
today's higher admission prices, it
sold more tickets than "Cars 2."
Premiering in second-place was
Cameron Diaz's classroom comedy
"Bad Teacher" with $31 million. The
Sony Pictures release added $12.9
million overseas in about 10 coun-
tries.
The previous weekend's No. 1 flick,


BOX OFFICE RESULTS
1. "Cars 2," $68 million ($42.9
million international).
2. "Bad Teacher," $31 million
($12.9 million international).
3. "Green Lantern,"
$18.4 million.
4. "Super 8," $12.1 million
($10.5 million international).
5. "Mr. Popper's Penguins,"
$10.3 million.
6. "X-Men: First Class,"
$6.6 million.
7. "The Hangover Part II,"
$5.9 million.
8. "Bridesmaids," $5.4 million
($11.5 million international).
9. "Pirates of the Caribbean: On
Stranger Tides," $4.7 million
($13.5 million international).
10. "Midnight in Paris,"
$4.5 million.

Ryan Reynolds' "Green Lantern," fell
to third-place with $18.4 million. That
was off a steep 65 percent from its
revenues over opening weekend,
raising the domestic total for the
Warner Bros. superhero tale to $89.3
million.
Both new wide releases came in
ahead of industry projections, which


with $68M debut

had pegged "Cars 2" at an opening of
around $60 million and "Bad
Teacher" at about $25 million.
"Cars 2" features Owen Wilson and
Larry the Cable Guy reprising their
voice roles for race car Lightning Mc-
Queen and tow truck Mater as the
two are caught up in a spy adventure
during an international racing tour
The movie overcame unusually
harsh reviews for Pixar, whose films
include such critical darlings as
"Ratatouille," "Finding Nemo," "The
Incredibles" and "WALL-E."
Disney's Viane said audiences
gave "Cars 2" top grades in exit sur-
veys, a sign that the movie should
have a long life at theaters like previ-
ous Pixar flicks.
"I'm always concerned when it
comes to dollars and cents. What does
the paying public think?" Viane said.
With global settings that include
Japan, Italy, France and Great
Britain, "Cars 2" also has strong
prospects as it continues to roll out
overseas.
The international haul for "Cars 2"
included $9.3 million in Russia, $8.1
million in Mexico and $7.6 million in
Brazil.
While the G-rated "Cars 2" cor-
nered the family market, "Bad
Teacher" was the weekend's grown-
up choice, starring Diaz as a foul-
mouthed, boozy, gold-digging
educator


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: There are indications you could get involved in
some kind of self-improvement program in the year ahead,
which will not only do wonders for your health, but com-
pletely change your life in many advantageous ways as well.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Your wit and humor can be
quite good at times, but making another the butt of your
joke may not be a laughing matter to your victim. Be pre-
pared to eat what you dish out.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Be on guard when negotiating a
complicated matter. There is a strong chance someone is
not leveling with you and failing to put all his or her cards
on the table. Don't be left holding the bag.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - Just because your spirits are
high doesn't mean someone won't come along and try to
put a damper on them. It'll be up to you make light of any-
thing negative this person has to say.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Sometimes there can be a thin line


between assertiveness and aggressiveness. Be careful you
know the difference, so you can conduct yourself accordingly.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - If something you propose still
needs further study, you should inform the people you're
discussing the matter with. If they move forward without this
knowledge, you'll be held accountable.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - It's important to logically,
not emotionally, evaluate a business matter if you hope to
accurately assess both its values and frailties. Don't act on
a whim or a prayer.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Regardless of how well
you know somebody, carefully lay out in detail all the impor-
tant facts before entering into a pricy agreement. One party
could assume certain unintended tidbits.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - It'll be up to you to avoid a
position in which a friend whom you're working with as-
sumes you're laboring as a favor, not for recompense. Get


it in writing if need be.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Regardless of how much
you have to tell your friends, don't monopolize the conver-
sation when at a social gathering. You'll be a welcome ad-
dition if you let your pals share the stage.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Starting the week off full of
big ideas is great, but having what it takes to follow through
on anyone of them is another story. Don't start anything you
know you won't finish.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Trying to pretend you're
knowledgeable about something, when in fact you know
bubkes, will turn out to be an embarrassment when you're
placed in a position of having to prove it.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - It's nice to have someone do
you a favor, but remember you need to credit this person
and show him or her an appreciation for the effort. Strive to
acknowledge the individual in some way.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

SATURDAY, JUNE 25
Powerball: 18 - 36 - 39 - 41 - 57
Powerball: 12
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 2 -27 -36 -43 -44 - 52
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 31 $5,220
4-of-6 1,933 $71.50
3-of-6 41,671 $5
Fantasy 5:23 - 24 - 26 - 32 - 33
5-of-5 1 winner $258,450.10
4-of-5 325 $128
3-of-5 10,013 $11.50
FRIDAY, JUNE 24
Mega Money: 21 - 27 - 32 - 38
Mega Ball: 1
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 No winner
3-of-4 MB 35 $679.50
3-of-4 882 $55
2-of-4 MB 1,168 $28.50
1-of-4 MB 10,148 $3
2-of-4 26,407 $2
Fantasy 5:9 - 19 - 28 - 31 - 36
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 357 $555
3-of-5 9,772 $15.50
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY =
Today is Monday, June 27,
the 178th day of 2011. There
are 187 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 27, 1944, during
World War II, American
forces liberated the French
port of Cherbourg from the
Germans.
On this date:
In 1846, New York and
Boston were linked by tele-
graph wires.
In 1893, the New York
stock market crashed.
In 1950, the U.N. Security
Council passed a resolution
calling on member nations to
help South Korea repel an
invasion from the North.
In 1957, more than 500
people were killed when Hur-
ricane Audrey slammed
through coastal Louisiana
and Texas.
In 1985, the legendary
Route 66, which originally
stretched from Chicago to
Santa Monica, Calif., passed
into history as officials decer-
tified the road.
In 1991, Supreme Court
Justice Thurgood Marshall,
the first black to sit on the
nation's highest court, an-
nounced his retirement. (His
departure led to the con-
tentious nomination of
Clarence Thomas to suc-
ceed him.)
Ten years ago: The
United Nations concluded a
three-day summit on
HIV/AIDS after adopting a
blueprint which set tough tar-
gets for reducing infection
rates and called for protecting
the rights of infected people.
Five years ago: A consti-
tutional amendment to ban
desecration of the American
flag died in a Senate
cliffhanger, falling one vote
short of the 67 needed to
send it to states for ratifica-
tion.
One year ago: Pope
Benedict XVI lashed out at
what he called "deplorable"
raids carried out by Belgian
police as part of an investiga-
tion into priest sex abuse.
Today's Birthdays: Busi-
ness executive Ross Perot is
81. The former chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retired
Army Gen. John Shalikashvili
is 75. Singer-musician Bruce
Johnston (The Beach Boys) is
69. Writer-producer-director
J.J. Abrams is 45. Olympic
gold and bronze medal figure


skater Viktor Petrenko is 42.
Actor Tobey Maguire is 36.
Thought for Today: "The
main dangers in this life are
the people who want to
change everything - or
nothing." Viscountess Nancy
Astor, American-born British
politician (1879-1964).








MONDAY EVENING JUNE 27, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
(WESHI NBC 0 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Access Hollyw'd America's Got Talent 'PG' s Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14' Law & Order: LA "Van Nuys" '14' News Against Casey
BBC World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Xa Antiques Roadshow Chrysler Antiques Roadshow Campaign but- Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A Secrets of the Dead "Michelangelo
WE PBS B 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) xa Turbine model and manual. (N) 'G' tons; court affidavit. 'G' s House Divided (N) 'PG' s Revealed"'PG' s (DVS)
WUFT PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) xc Antiques Roadshow (N)'G'Ec Antiques Roadshow'G'sa Abraham and Mary Lincoln-House World News Tavis Smiley (N)
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 NewsChannel 8 NBC Nightly Entertainment Extra (N) 'PG' s America's Got Talent Auditions con- Law & Order: Criminal Intent "The Law & Order: LA Party guests are NewsChannel 8 2011 Wimbledon
(WF][) NBC U 8 8 8 8 8 8 at 6PM (N) News (N)'G' Tonight (N) 'PG' tinue in NewYork.'PG'x cLast Street in Manhattan"'14' beaten to death. (N) '14 m at 11PM (N) Update (N)
WF ABC 20 20 20 20 Eyewitness News ABC World News Jeopardy! (N) Wheel of Fortune The Bachelorette (N) (In Stereo) xc Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Eyewitness News Nightline (N)
SA6 (N) I G'G ccG'sccEdition "LaRhonda" (N) PGc'c at 11PM 'G c
i n 10 News, 6pm CBS Evening Dr. Phil (In Stereo) 'PG'Ec How I Met Your How I Met Your Two and a Half Mike & Molly Hawaii Five-0 A science-fiction fan is 10 News, 11pm Late Show With
W CBS 10 10 10 10 10 (N) News/Pelley Mother'14' Mother'14' Men'14' E '14' s murdered. (In Stereo) 'PG' c (N) David Letterman
(W V) FOX v 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) c TMZ (N)'PG' s The insider (N) MasterChef Competing for a spot in MasterChef Competin for a spot in FOX13 10:00 News (N) c FOX13 News Thelnsider
FOX 0 13 1313 'PG' x the next round. 14' Xc the next round. (N) '14'x Edge at 11pm 'PG'Ea
WCJB ABC E 11 11 4 15 News |World News Entertainment Inside Edition The Bachelorette (N) (In Stereo) Xa Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss News Nightline (N) 'G'
The Place for Miracles: Your Hour of Zola Levitt Great Awakening Life Today With Kingdom Great Awakening
IND E 2 2 2 2 22 22 Healing 'G' Presents 'G' sc James Robison Connection xc
C AB C 11 1 11 aABC Action News ABC World News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) The Bachelorette (N) (In Stereo) Xc Extreme Makeover: Weiqht Loss ABC Action News Nightline (N)
FS ABC 11 1111 11at6PM G'ac G'Xs Edition "LaRhonda" (N) G' a at 11 PM 'G X
SFamily Guy '14' s Family Guy '14' s How I Met Your The Office'PG' Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Frasier'PG' Frasier 'PG' How I MetYour The Office 'PG' South Park South Park'14' E
IND B 12 12 Mother '14' "Lust" (In Stereo) 14' s Mother 'PG' "Ginger Kids"'14'
(WITAI MNT ED 6 6 6 6 9 Smarter Don't Forget Love-Raymond Old Christine Law & Order: Criminal Intent '14' Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14' Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' Entourage'MA' Enthusiasm
WACX TBN B 21 21 21 The Faith Show The 700 Club'PG' s Wisdom-Siddiki Love a Child |Give Me the Bible |Paid Program Claud Bowers Tims Ministries
The King of The King of Two and a Half Two and a Half 90210 Ivy decides to tell Dixon the Gossip Girl "Easy J"Jenny has a According to Jim George Lopez Friends '14' s Friends'PG' s
cWG W 4 4 4 4 12 12Queens PG' Queens'PG' Men'14' E Men'14' a truth. (In Stereo) '14' sc chance to meet Tim Gunn. '14' 'PG' c 'PG' c
WYKiE FAM 16 16 16 16 JUNK'D'G'x Chamber Chat YourCitrus Inverness Zorro x Straight Talk Med Moving On'G' **, "Alice in Wonderland" (1949, Fantasy) Carol Marsh, Stephen
FAM M 16 16 16 16County Court Spotlight 7Murray. Live action and puppets blend in this adaptation. 'NR'
rW FOX 13 13 7 7 TMZ (N)'PG' My Name Is Earl The Simpsons The Simpsons MasterChef (In Stereo) '14' sa MasterChef (N) '14' sa FOX 35 News at 10 (N) E TMZ (N)'PG' King of the Hill
(WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias Noticiero Univ. Cuando Me Enamoro (N) '14' Teresa (N)'14'(SS) Triunfo del Amor (N)'14'(SS) Don Francisco Presenta'PG' Noticias Noticiero Univ.
WXPX) ION 17 Without a Trace 'PG' c Without a Trace 'PG' s Without a Trace 'PG' s Criminal Minds '14' s Criminal Minds'PG' c Criminal Minds "About Face"'14'
54 48 54 54 25 27 Hoarders"Phyllis; Janet"'PG' Hoarders"Glen & Lisa"'PG' Hoarders"Andrew; Lydia"'PG' Hoarders"Billy Bob; Jean"'PG' Intervention "Sarah; Mikeal"'PG' Intervention "Jenna"'PG'c
(Af) 55 64 55 55 ** "Rambo: First Blood Part11 " (1985) Sylvester Stallone.'R' cc ***, "The Shawshank Redemption" (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman. 'R' cc "The Shawshank Redemption"'R'
QI) 52 35 52 52 19 21 Untamed and Uncut '14' s |River Monsters: Unhooked 'PG' River Monsters: Unhooked 'PG' River Monsters: The Lost Reels |River Monsters: Unhooked 'PG' River Monsters: Unhooked 'PG'
EUTD 96 19 96 96 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live 'PG' c ***Y "Ray"(2004, Biography) Jamie Foxx. Ray Charles overcomes hardships to become a legend.'PG-13' |Family Affair
BiBRAVO 254 51 254 254 Housewives Housewives/NYC |Housewives/NJ |The Real Housewives of New Jersey (N)'14' Platinum Hit "The L Word" (N)'14' Housewives/NJ
cm 27 61 27 27 33 Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14' * "Good Luck Chuck" (2007) Dane Cook, Jessica Alba. 'NR's Always Sunny |Always Sunny Always Sunny |Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report
(W ID 98 45 98 98 28 37 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition The Singing Bee (In Stereo)'PG' The Singing Bee (In Stereo)'PG' The Singing Bee (In Stereo) 'PG' The Singing Bee (In Stereo) 'PG'
(CjM i 43 42 43 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) TBA | It's Everybody's CNBC Titans "Jack Welch" (N) CNBC Titans "Jack Welch" Mad Money
UK 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) cc
(I ) 46 40 46 46 6 5 Phineas, Ferb |Good-Charlie My Babysitter |Wizards-Place Good-Charlie |Shake It Up!'G' "16 Wishes" (2010, Comedy) Debby Ryan.'G'Ec |Good-Charlie My Babysitter Wizards-Place
ESP 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) a College Baseball NCAA World Series Championship, Game 1: Teams TBA. From Omaha, Neb. (N) Xa SportsCenter (N) (Live) xa
CES ) 34 28 34 34 43 49 NASCAR Now (N) xa MLB Baseball Teams TBA. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) xa Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) xa 30 for 30
fEW I 95 70 95 95 48 Twelve IMother-Help Daily Mass: Our Lady The Journey Home'G' Lamb's Supper |The Holy Rosary The World Over Raymond Arroyo. Vaticano |Women of
[FM) 29 52 29 29 20 28 Switched at Birth '14' Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Switched at Birth (N) Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club 'PG' s
[F ) 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baier (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) Xa Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor cc
[F ) 26 56 26 26 Iron Chef America Chopped Unwrapped |Candy Store Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Meat- Potatoes Best Thing Ate Challenge"Paranormal Cakes"
[TSEIF 35 39 35 35 Ship Shape TV |Boys in the Hall World Poker Tour: Season 9 Ball Up Streetball Boys in the Hall Sports Stories The Game 365 The Final Score Golden Age The Final Score
mFX] 30 60 30 30 51 "Forgetting Sarah Marshall"'R' Two/Half Men |Two/Half Men *** "Superbad" (2007) Jonah Hill. Co-dependent teens hope to score booze and babes at a party. 'R' *** "Superbad" (2007) 'R'
GOL 67 Golf Central (N) Playing Lessons The Golf Fix (N) (Live) Big Break Indian Wells Big Break Indian Wells (N) The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center
fALLJ 39 68 39 39 45 54 Little House on the Prairie 'PG' Little House on the Prairie 'PG' Little House on the Prairie 'PG' Frasier'14' |Frasier 'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'G' c Frasier 'PG' Frasier'PG'
302 201 302 302 2 2 ** "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" 2007) Aidan Quinn. U.S. poli- Real Time With Bill Maher (In "Hot Coffee"(2011, Documentary) Big business uses **Y "Going the Distance" (2010) Drew Barrymore.
302 201 302 302 2 2 cies and policy breaches victimize western ndians. 'NR' s Stereo) 'MA' a a famous case to promote tort reform. R' s Lovers try to maintain a bicoastal romance. 'R
Wili1J 23 57 23 23 42 52 Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int'l |House Hunters Yard - Disney House Hunters HGTV'd (N)'G' |House Hunters Hunters Int'l Hunters Int'l House Hunters |House Hunters
fiSD 51 25 51 51 32 42 Tech It to the Max Modern History Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' American Pickers 'PG' s Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' American Pickers 'PG' c
IFE) 24 38 24 24 31 "My Family's Secret"(2010, Suspense) Nicholle Tom. 'NR' sc "Gone" (2011, Suspense) Molly Parker, Lochlyn Munro. Premiere. ca Vanished With Beth Holloway '14' How I Met How I Met
LM�*N5 * "Georgia Rule" (2007, Drama) Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan. An incor- ** "A Killer Among Friends" (1992, Drama) Patty Duke, Loretta Swit. A "The Tenth Circle" (2008, Drama) Kelly Preston, Ron Eldard, Britt
50 rigible teen goes to live with her stern grandma.'R' s jealous teenager heFps murder her best friend. 'NR' sa Robertson. A family becomes the focus of a murder investigation. 'NR' s
*** "Frailty" (2002, Suspense) Bill Paxton. A widower claims that God **Y "Wild Things" (1998, Suspense) Kevin Bacon. Two high-school vix- **Y "Robin Hood" (2010, Adventure) Russell Crowe. Robin and his men
il 320 221 320 320 3 3 has chosen him to slay demons. (In Stereo) 'R' s ens conspire against a faculty member. (In Stereo) 'R' a battle the Sheriff of Nottingham. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' s
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Live (N) Hardball With Chris Matthews The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word
ITV 97 66 97 97 39 That '70s Show |That '70s Show The Challenge: Rivals '14' Teen Wolf (In Stereo) Teen Wolf (In Stereo) Teen Wolf (N) (In Stereo) Teen Wolf (In Stereo)
65 44 53 Rebuilding Titanic Alaska State Troopers '14' Amish: Out of the Order '14, L Snipers, Inc. (N) Doomsday Preppers (N) Amish: Out of the Order '14, L
[NiCli 28 36 28 28 35 25 iCarly'G'x |iCarly'G'a iCarly'G'x |SpongeBob Winx Club (In Stereo) 'Y7' s George Lopez |George Lopez That '70s Show |That '70s Show The Nanny'PG' |The Nanny'PG'
MY) 44 **Y2 "Just Friends" (2005) Ryan Reynolds. 'PG-13' saThe Glee Project'PG' The Glee Project'PG' The World According to Paris 'PG' **Y2 "Just Friends" (2005)
S** "Letters to Juliet"(2010, Drama) Amanda Seyfried. iTV. A young **Y "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (2010, Romance) Kristen Stewart. Weeds "Bags" The Big C 'MA' sa Weeds "Bags" The Big C (iTV)
340 241 340 340 woman finds an old note to someones lover. (In Stereo) 'PG' s Bella must choose between Edward and Jacob. 'PG-13' s 'MA' c (iTV)'MA' I 'MA' a
1SPEED) 122 112 122 122 Pass Time'G' |Pass Time'G' |NASCAR Race Hub (N) The 10 'PG, V |The 10 'PG, V Pinks--AllOut'PG, L Car Warriors "'69 VW Bugs"'14' The 10'PG, V The 10'PG, V
([PiKE) 37 43 37 37 27 36 ** "Star Wars:Episodef--ThePhantomMenace"(1999, Science Fiction) Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor. (In Stereo) 'PG' ** "Star Wars: Episodel-- The Phantom Menace"(1999) Liam Neeson.'PG'
36 31 36 36 Rays Live! |MLB Baseball'G' Rays Live! |Inside the Rays |TBA Jimbo Fisher
SFY 31 59 31 31 26 29 *** "GoldenEye"(1995, Action) Pierce Brosnan. 'PG-13' *** "Casino Royale" (2006) Daniel Craig. James Bond plays poker with a man who finances terrorists. *** "GoldenEye"(1995)
49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens |King of Queens Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' FamilyGuy'14' |Family Guy'14' Conan (N)'14'
T 3 96 3 * "Saadia"(1954, Drama) Cornel Wilde. A Moroccan Now Playing "July **Y "Stage Fright"(1950, Suspense) Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich. A *** "I Confess" (1953, Drama) Montgomery Clift, Anne Baxter.
169 53 169 169 30 35 ruler and his friend fall for the same girl. 'NR' 2011" murder suspect enlists a friend to help find the killer. 'NR' Religious vows prevent a priest from exposing a murderer. 'NR'
(TiM ) 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash Cab 'G' |Cash Cab 'G' Dual Survival "Bitten" 'PG' s Dual Survival "Eating Dust"'14' Dual Survival "Hippo Island" 'PG' Dual Survival "Adrift" 'PG' sDual Survival "Hippo Island"'PG'
TLC 50 46 50 50 29 30 Toddlers & Tiaras 'PG' s Kate Plus 8 "Giving Back"'PG' Cake Boss'PG' |Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' |Cake Boss'PG' Kate Plus 8'PG' |Kate Plus 8'PG' Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG'
(TNT 48 33 48 48 31 34 Law & Order "Bounty"'14' Law & Order "Crashers"'14' Law & Order "Locomotion"'14' Law & Order '14' s (DVS) The Closer (Part 1 of 2)'14' s Rizzoli & Isles'14' s
TRAM 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bourdain: No Reservations Off Limits "Tennessee"'PG' s Off Limits "Buffalo" (N) 'PG' s Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations
(iiifrtu 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'14'x |Cops'PG'Ba Bait Car'14' Bait Car'14' Bait Car Bait Car (N) AllIWorked Up AlI Worked Up AllIWorked Up All Worked Up Southern Sting Southern Sting
(TVL 32 49 32 32 34 24 Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond The Nanny 'PG' The Nanny'PG'
USA 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Witness" 'PG' sa NCIS "Conspiracy Theory"'PG' NCIS "Bikini Wax"'PG' sa WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (In Stereo Live) 'PG, L,V s Suits "Pilot" 'PG' s
MWE) 117 69 117 117 Charmed (In Stereo) '14' s Charmed (N) 'PG' s Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls
(WJIMAl 18 18 18 18 18 20 Dharma&Greg Dharma&Greg America's Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine (N) Xa Scrubs'14' Scrubs'14'


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Pierre Trudeau said, "Let us
overthrow the totems, break the
taboos. Or better, let us consider
them canceled. Coldly, let us be in-
telligent."
It is good to be intelligent at the
bridge table, and part of that intel-
ligence is recognizing when to
break the taboos, those "rules" that
players like to follow. In this deal,
what is the intelligent line for
South in three no-trump after West
leads the heart queen?
North has a textbook takeout
double over one heart: short hearts
and length in the other three suits.
South's jump to two no-trump
shows 10-12 points with, usually, at
least two heart stoppers. North has
an easy raise to game.
The original declarer saw that he
had only five top tricks: three
spades and two hearts. But he ex-


ACROSS 41
42
1 Tight spot 45
4 Style 49
8 Common ID 53
11 Hardly - 54
13 Not sunnyside 55
up
14 Perjure 56
15 Metric prefix 57
16 Nightclubs 58
18 Grab 59
20 Feels grateful
21 Drivers' org.
22 "When We Was
-" 1
24 Blowing 2
27 Basic assump- 3
tions
30 To - - (pre- 4
cisely)
31 Warm month 5
32 911 staffer 6
34 Flee hastily 7
35 Downy fungi
36 Pigeon talk 8
37 Diner's gaffe 9
39 Pig out 10
40 Diver's need 12


Container
Nonexistent
Scolding
Sheer fabrics
Lazing about
Not their
Textbook divi-
sion
Movie theater
Any woman
Nods off
Toyota product
DOWN
Marshy areas
Tsar name
Warrior prin-
cess
Gourmet cof-
fee
Caviar, actually
Society miss
Memorable
time
Vast number
Location
Monster's loch
Spin around


Bridge

North 06-27-11
* AK Q 5
V 4
* K Q 10
K 8 6 5 2
West East
4 J * 1098632
VQJ1097 V863
*A62 *754
* A 10 9 3 7
South
* 7 4
VAK5 2
4 J 9 8 3
* QJ 4
Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 V Dbl. Pass
2 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: t 6



Answer to Previous Puzzle

KAI SLA Y OREOE
EINSTEIN BIAS
DEARE ACES

BRISK SOOTHE
ROB ELAN SALT
ASEA AMEN RIA
AXIOMS ESTEE
LOA RAP

FAIR TAKEWING
EURO AGED DIA
EDEN PAD APBt


17 Chenille item
19 Coral islet
22 Good buy
23 Wide st.
24 Pump abbr.
25 Rocky Mountain


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


state
26 Highway
cruiser
27 Big swallow
28 Gaudy sign
29 Urban haze
31 Bon -, mon-
sieur!
33 Half a fly?
35 Roman 1101
36 Acid in lem-
ons
38 Veal source
39 Tropical snake
41 Gnats and
mice
42 Pvt.'s superi-
ors
43 Nope (hyph.)
44 Trevi Fountain
coins
46 S&L protector
47 Humerus
neighbor
48 Wolf's expres-
sion
50 Enjoyable
51 - - roll (lucky)
52 Bite


6-27 � 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


pected to get four more tricks from
clubs, and he knew all about the
"honor from the shorter side first"
dictate.
So, after taking trick one in his
hand, South led the club queen.
West won with his ace and perse-
vered with the heart nine. Declarer
took that and cashed the club jack.
When East discarded a low spade,
South knew that he was doomed.
Rules be damned! This is one of
the rare deals when declarer must
ignore the textbooks. The correct
play at trick two is to lead the club
four from the South hand. How can
West defend?
If West takes his ace, declarer
wins three spades, two hearts and
four clubs. Alternatively, if West
plays low on the club, South wins
with dummy's king and shifts to di-
amonds, taking three spades, two
hearts, three diamonds and one
club.


Dear Annie: I have been
dating Jeff for three years.
He has two teenage kids
from a prior marriage.
During the first two
years, I understood
that he did separate
activities with his chil-
dren, but I now feel he
should include me in
more than the occa-
sional dinner.
Jeff claims he wants
us to be together for-
ever, but his actions
say otherwise. We
spend all our time to- ANNI
gether, except when MAIL
his kids are involved.
Then I am completely
excluded. And on occasions when
we make plans and the kids want
to visit, he will cancel his time
with me. He indulges their every
whim.
Jeff has no problem interacting
with my adult children and me on
every level, but won't give me the
same respect. I feel like my fu-
ture is on perpetual hold. Am I
wasting my time with false
hopes? - Questioning This
Relationship
Dear Questioning: It's possible
that Jeff's children are not happy
about your relationship and are
putting subtle pressure on him to
exclude you. It's also possible
that he is uncomfortable behav-
ing as if he has a romantic life
when he is with his children. Or,
he might be waiting until they are
older.
Nonetheless, if you have been
together for three years and in-
tend to stay that way, it is best for
everyone if the children get to
know you and acclimate them-


K THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
J by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Let us go over
one letter to each square, the use of
to form four ordinary words. proper English,
today. -.
WIELH


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. . .
All Rights Reserved , . . � ? **
ESGEE -. . .

<

PAETCC "'" 7

, 7 1 I 7 _ THE TEACHER ZRE55P
___________ UP FOR SCHOOL-
I RSEYLU CAUSE SHE WAS THIS.
RSElYLU \_________


Print your answer here:


selves to your presence. It won't
make things easier if Jeff gives
the kids the impression that they
control his social life.
Talk to Jeff. If he is se-
rious that this rela-
tionship is for the long
haul, it's time to bring
you into the family
mix. There will be
bumps along the way,
but they cannot be
smoothed out if you
don't work through
them and learn to ac-
cept each other
IE'S DearAnnie: I read a
BOX lot of advice columns,
but yours is my fa-
vorite because I love
the practical advice.
I need some help. My dad was
adopted at a young age. Without
going into too much detail, he
blamed his birth family for all the
pain and suffering from the sepa-
ration and loss he experienced.
As a result, he refused to meet his
birth mother when she came
looking for him in the 1960s.
My father is in his mid-70s now
and would like to track down his
siblings. He has asked for my
help, but I don't know where to
start His original paperwork and
the Internet have only gotten us
so far. We know his birth mother's
first and last name and the first
names of his siblings, but we
don't know how to find out more
about them. Is there an agency
that can help us? - Baby M's
Daughter
Dear Daughter: We recom-
mend the International Soundex
Reunion Registry (isrrnet) at
(888) 886-ISRR (4777). You also
can try the Adoption Reunion


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)


Ir "

0
< i
W CO W







LL CU a)
cc-^


~CU
F -Q

LL -
a)
co u
LLIE .

w --



I-2
U)..

cj


Registry (registry.adoption.com).
Keep in mind that a great deal of
your success with a search re-
quires that Dad's siblings have
made themselves available to be
found. Otherwise, you may need
to hire a professional to help you.
Good luck.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Sad and Frustrated,"
whose grandchildren misbehave
when the parents pick them up.
Bless them for taking five grand-
children at a time for overnights
and weekends. We have three
grandsons and know what that is
like. Instead of letting the parents
pick them up, the grandparents
should drive them back home.
This gives the kids time to transi-
tion, which children have trouble
with, and then the grandparents
can drop them off and leave with-
out having to watch the antics
and disruptive behavior. Keep in
mind, the parents may feel un-
comfortable disciplining their
children in the grandparents'
home.
We also enjoy having the
grandsons over one at a time.
That gives each one special at-
tention that is priceless. We hope
those grandparents don't give up.
They are making memories for a
lifetime. - Grandma, Too
--in--
Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 5777 W Century
Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA
90045. Visit the Web page at
www crea tors. com.


B6 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011


ENTERTAINMENT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


AAVE Y \
EVER 6EEl -
To A YEAR,
FrOERAL? MY
GRAMW'$

^ I;"n7.


Sally Forth


OKAY, SO THE VEGGIES GO ON THE
LEFT, MEATS ON THE RIGHT...NOW WE
NEED SOMETHING BOL-L>
SFOR THE MIDbLE... O WE REALLY
^' - HAVETO CkRAW UP
BLUEPRINTS?


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

"F YOU WERE GKRNTF.b T> EE "COACE OR,CWREF-CA'TYOU
WlRE.5 TO IFPROVEY'OUR UF, | TIARKOF AN( NTOOS T-IAT
N4TN TIAR-E TQNG WOULt> 1 OUL 1P-PRODVE YOUZ-. UFC.
6 ?- |


I THOUGHT
WE WERE
DOUBLING
THE
DIRECTION.


NO, WE'RE
DOUBLING
THE
CLARITY.


Blondie


350 FkA, ALL I CAk COME\ UP
W\T.-k 15 A 5UTRACTION-'OV!


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"Like all new devotees, your first lesson
begins with the following question: What is
the sound of one hand smacking?"


Doonesbury Flashback


Big Nate
READY YUP' READY
FOR TO GET A
T UHE HUNDRED'
SOCIAL H1
ES n OH,







Arlo and Janis


HE'5 TRYING TO 6ET
ME TO JOIN HIS
mUTTLE BIL-UO- WHAT
AR1'5 BLEEP- vO
cIA6 HEARTS SAY?
CUUB BAAW. p




' - , ^ "


T HIM BUT HE 5sAW
1M YOUR HEI-
A SOUP COPTER

' FU 1'A, .
KITCHEN. LAWAl.
~~^ '< ^\f lJMBOJ
_, --r mso





cop^


THAT MYNAH BIRD USED TO SPEAK HE SURE ISN'T TRUTH IS, HE'S I GUESS HE'S SAIO ) OGER THAT,
A OOZEN LANGUAGES SAYING MUCH (GETTING A LITTLE --\ HIS PIECE-- YOU OLD
- * - h--" LONG IN THE a m--- GEEZE
.... }' - ^ TOOTH Ft "II'








Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


' P 'YOU HAV-ANS VITAMINS T1ATWOULP HLP
ME TO KEFP UP \NITH W?"
Betty


�2011 2 li Kene, Irc
www farlycircus comn
"Sorry, that's how it is. I'm your
sister, so you're always gonna
hafta be my brother."


SOH- .i
PANCE o " 0-

TA-7
Y^ .. ./._ ( i
^^^ ^\s'-^'c' ~


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 4:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 4 p.m., 10
p.m. No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Cars 2" (G) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
No passes.


"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:45 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In RealD 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7
p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 1:10 p.m., 4:30
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 4:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No
passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In RealD 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:35 p.m.
"X-MEN: First Class" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 1:50 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals L


"BFH RXF FHKHO SXDTWHZ. WH UXN


X TJXFY XRBFT RHF. WH UXN LBLLA


ZXOJF XFZ WH UXN RA MOJHFZ."


- UXAFH FHUYBF


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The two big advantages I had at birth were to have been born
wise and to have been born in poverty." - Stevie Wonder
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-27


Peanuts


Pickles


Dilbert


YOU HAVEN'T I'M TRYINGTO
EVEN STARTED FIGURE OUT
CLEANING LUP/THE BEST WAY
TO ATTACK IT






' W-57


EMPLOYEES KEEP
WHINING THAT WE
DON'T HAVE A CLEAR
DIRECTION.

� n vo


SO I'VE DOUBLED
THE NUMBER OF
MANAGERS IN EACH
GROUP TO INCREASE
THE CLARITY.


YOU'LL " -
BE PASS? OH,
LUCKY I'LL PASS,
TO G G&INA.I
PASS'


KL (DANCE (9 LIKE
IOUKNT ATING-
LIrE SOv'OMTING I
A4NCE6 Q ENJOY DOING Lrr
NOT WATCH(IN

(% ^


Today's MOVIES


COMICS


MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 B7






B8 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C CITRUS COUNTY





HKONICLE

www.chronicleonline.com


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY



WE GLADLY ACCEPT


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday...............................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday.............................4...4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday............................4...4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............11 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.................2...2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday..................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Good active man
would like to meet
good active, mature
woman for friendship.
(over 50 years old)
Call (352) 527-0054
HANDSOME Widower in
decent shape seeks to
meet fun , loving,
intelligent, socially
extroverted woman in
her 60's or 70's with a
sweet, warm,
humorous personality
in good health,
petite or slim shape
for meaningful
conversation & other
social activities &
perhaps a personal
loving relationship
(352) 527-0591
Sincere, loving, caring
woman needed to care
for children & elderly
woman, app. 4 to 5
hours a week to start.
References Required
Linda at 352-400-9416
or Maria at 400-9417.



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not*
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
CALL 352-476-8949
SERVICE (YOUR DOG)
EVALUATION - FREE
Veteran discount
352-464-0779













Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


FIREWOOD
U-Cut & Haul
(352) 628-9566
Free 8 Year Old
Quarter Horse/
Mustang Mix Stallion
(352) 457-9030
FREE KITTENS
3 females, 1 male
litter trained,
eat solid food.
(352) 447-0072
FREE Kittens
Multi- Colors
(352) 270-4774
Free to Good Home
White German
Shepherd
6 months old
Female, Spayed
(352) 634-5129
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS (2)
Males, 8 wks old, 1
red/white and 1
gray/white, litter
box/house trained,
good with dogs
and other cats.
(352)201-4217
Need clean dirt
concrete, blocks ,etc
to fill in pool
Carl (352) 400-6021
WEIGHT BENCH
No weights
(352) 621-4795
WHITE FEMALE
cat spayed declawed
shots UTD under 2 yr old
owner illness forces
finding a home
(352) 209-5593




SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E.
on Eden Dr. from Hwy.
41, Inverness
WATERMELON,
SHELLED PEAS
8:30a-6p
352-726-6378
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
$2.75/lb. Pesticide Free!
Open Saturday Only
7a-7p (352) 746-2511
4752 W. Abeline Dr.
Citrus Springs
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
Pesticide Free! $2.50/lb.
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm.
(352) 726-7907



Cat male
nuet. area of Pine
Ridge. REWARD
(352) 746-2746
Lost Dachshund,
1 yr. male, chocolate
w/ white dapple,
Chassahowitzka Area
$50. REWARD
(352) 613-6872



19FT Skiff style boat
found by boatramp at
Days Inn canal, Crystal
River, on Sept. 18, 2010,
If this is yours please
contact 352-447-2692,
ext. 304.




r BANKRUPTCY
DIVORCES
I CHILD SUPPORT
* 352-613-3674 E,


LEARN TO SEW I
I furnish everything!
My home or yours
(352) 795-7206, Mary




CRYPT (Fl)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$4000. 586-596-7580




CARDIOLOGY
PRACTICE
Exp. Receptionist
Mon-Thurs 9-4
Fri9-12
Email resume to:
cvsllcl0@gmall.com











Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Crystal River Health
& Rehab Center
136 NO.E. 12th Ave
352-795-5044
accepting
applications for
R.N. &L.P.N.
Full-time and
Part-time for
3pm- 11pm &
1 1pm-7am
If you are a team
player,have
Experience in Long
Term Care,
Short - Term Care
COME BY FOR A TOUR
Excellent pay, benefit
package......

DIETARY
DEPARTMENT
Is looking for a few
serious minded, hard
working, dependable
people. Must be able
to work flexible hrs.
Drug free facility,
prior criminal
background need
not apply
Apply in Person
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE


0008C3G

Sudoku * 4*Z 4puz.oOm


41 73


9 6


71 5 4 9 98


859 143





372 9__965


14 8 9 36


2 3


57 14

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9,


A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

INVERNESS MEDICAL
FT Positions
Available!

Full-time positions
available in busy,
growing cardiology
practice for
EXPERIENCED billing/
collections, front desk
and MA's. Profes-
sional attitude and
appearance is a
must. Excellent
compensation
package including
full benefit pack-
age-cardiac experi-
ence commands a
premium wage!
No weekends!
Apply in person only
to Citrus Cardiology:
308 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness.
References required,
DFWP and
applications without
verifiable experience
will not be accepted.

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, wlth Hospltal
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828




Busy Insurance
Office
Looking for an exp.
agent with active
220 license. Salary
commiserates
w/experience.
Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd Blind Box 1721p
Crystal River, Florida
34429

P/T COMPUTER
TEACHER
1st-8th grd 25 hrswkly.
Must be able to teach
basic computer skills,
key boarding, Microsoft
Office Word, Power
Point & Excel. Send
resume to: mspeters@
pjp2.net or fax to:
352-746-3448




BARTENDER
Who makes a good
bloody mary
early Sun am
(352) 465-7707




AUTO SALES
Join a Winning Team!
We're Looking for
Used Car
Sales Professionals
Experienced
Preferred But Not
Necessary. Build Your
Future in a Great
Career. Excellent
Income Potential,
Health, Dental &
Vision Ins. Pkg. 401K,
Paid Vacation &
More! Dress
Professionally.
Apply in Person to
Ron or Dave
JENKINS ACURA
St. Rd. 200 & 17th St.,
Ocala

OUTSIDE SALES
REP

Business to Business
Sales Must Have Sales
Experience.
Experience In The
Waste Industry
Considered a Plus
but not required.
Mail Resume to
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906
Hernando, Fl 34442
Attention: William
or Email to
fdsdisposalinc@
aol.com
Do NOT
Apply in Person
& NO Phone Calls
Will Be Accepted




Avante
At Inverness
is seeking a qualified
individual for our
Maintenance/
Environment
Supervisor.
Must have a
minimum of 2 years
experience in Long
Term Care.
Electrical, Heating,
Air conditioning ex-
perience along with
knowledge of build-
ing and fire codes.
Send resume to
Mark Daniels
Administator
304 South Citrus Ave.
Inverness Fl. 34452
Or Email: mdaniels
@avantecenters.com


Exp. ELECTRICIAN
for residential & light
commercial. taking
applications 9-11 a
Mon - Fri/ S&S
Electric Dunnellon
(352) 746-6825
352-489-4116

PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL wants
exp. tech $9hr.+comm
Apply 5882 Hwy 200




* Tire/Lube Tech
* Detailer
* & Office Help
(352) 726-3539

Maintenance
Technician
Immediate opening
for a full time
Maintenance Tech
at a local apartment
community. Need
motivated individual
with previous
experience in
general mainte-
nance- plumbing,
sheetrock, electrical
and carpentry. Must
have valid drivers
license.
Drug free workplace
and EOE
Competitive salary
and benefits
package offered
Send resumes to:
humanre-
souices@roval-american.c
om or
fax (850) 914-8410

/ THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.

SECURITY
OFFICER, P/T

All Shifts, Class D
security lic. required.
Tobacco free /
professional workplace
CALL M - F, 10a-2p.
352-257-0780

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential for
the right person to
manage a route of
newspaper racks and
stores. Must have two
vehicles and be able
to work early morning
hours.
Email
emorales@chronicleonli
ne.com or come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/ svc, will traln,
cond apply, all ages
17+, Call ASAP!
352-364-4121




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


Act w

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy
-* NOW ENROLLING*
SPRING HILL
COSMO - Days
June 27th
* ***
COSMO - Niahts
June 27th, Sept 19th
* * *
BARBERING - Niahts
Aug. 8,
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
***
FACIAL TECH -Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.
NAIL TECH - Days
1st Mon. ofea. mo.
I (866) 724-2363
1486 Plnehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606
----- Jm


A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

NE I .W

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105



REALTOR ONE. LLC
* Coin Laundry, $75.K
w Bait & Tackle $599.K
More Info 352-229-5273
or: realtoronellc.com



Make Money
From Home
PT or FT 10 yrs in busi-
ness & stock traded.
Over 3,000 contractual
agreements w/ biggest
retailers, turn $50 mo.
into Thousands Call for
Appt. 1-800-603-9840



BOYD'S BEARS
18 TTL, Orig Bxs, 5
Spcl Ed 1998-03, 13
W/Auth, 5 W/O. EXC
Cond. $100 746-7355
DALE EARNHARDT
Authentic 124 scale
cars, 164 scale cars.
$80/obo. (352)
503-7131; 212-6627



2 Window
Air Conditioners
12,000 BTU, $75.
$7,000 BTU $50.
(352) 726-9647
ELECTRIC STOVE
WHITE, GE PROFILE
W/CONVECTION OVEN
$325.00. MICROWAVE
CONVECTION ABOVE
THE RANGE OVEN
WHITE $125.00 OR
BOTH FOR $400.00
352-527-4319
FRIGIDAIRE
Refrig. side by side
Ice & water in door
Black & stainless steel
$350 obo352- 794-3685
352-228-1445
GE 22 Cu. Ft.
Upright Freezer
white, excel. cond.
$250.
(352) 382-4615
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914

KENMORE Elite
White Washer &
White Whirlpool
dryer $300
(352) 382-1756
KENMORE WASHER
white, good cond.
works great 100.00
o.b.o call dennis @
352-503-7365
Maytag Kitchen
Appliances, 6 years old
Refrig. side by side,
glass top self cleaning
Stove, under counter
Dish Wash., Microwave
Almond $825. or will
separate (646)584-2740


PRESSURE COOKER
Mirro, clean, used once,
taking up storage, $11.00
270-8783
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent cond. Can
deliver 352-263-7398



STIHL CHAIN SAW
14" model MS180C.
New condition, used
once. $175
(352) 270-1366



PANASONIC 5 DVD
DISC HOME THEATER
1000 WATT SURROUND
SOUND, 1 YEAR OLD
$100.00 352-726-0686
Sharp 32" tube TV with
stand, $85 or best offer
(352) 344-4978
400-8193
Call after 10am



BEVERLY HILLS
KITCHEN CABINETS
Complete 8' galley.
Counter top w/sink & fau-
cet. $100 527-1239
Florida WINDOWS
(2)6X6 sq. windows
(3) 4x5 sq windows,
(1)38x80 $800 OBO
(352) 794-3081



DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
WIRELESS ROUTER, by
D-link Like New Includes
stand & install CD $15
Great for home or office
352-382-3650



Jon Deere Tractor
Brand New, 15hrs.
JDLA115 19.5HP,
42 Hyrdo $1,600.
352-382-3663



2 WHITE WASHED
BOOKCASES
12' Deep, 80" High,
24" wide, $30. ea.
(352) 637-2254
3 Piece Light Wood
Glass Top Tables. 2 end
and 1 coffee. $150
(352) 560-7386
4 PIECE light blue floral
king hide-a-bed sofa,
loveseat, chair,
hassock & 4 pillows.
$400 (352) 560-7386
4 Poster Double Bed
& night stand,
$150.
(352) 637-4690
42" ROUND SOLID Oak
Table. Natural finish.
Like new. $200
(352) 382-5883
70" La-Z-Boy double
sofa sleeper, like new,
$175 obo 48" round
kitchen table, 4 chairs,
$100obo Call after 10a
344-4978, 400-8193
Armoir
(Drexel Studio)
Excellent condition,
$400 (352) 364-1725
Bar Stools
PLUSH, BAMBOO,
SALMON COLORED
CUSHIONED, 2 for
$80.00 464-0316
BED
king sized, bed mattress
and box springs, $75
352-364-1771


CHAIR Burgundy with
gold diamonds, comfy,
$50 (404)416-9362
COFFEE TABLE & TWO
END TABLES, Wooden,
glass top cofee and end
tables, $20.00 @, $50.00
all 352 634-0591
College Deal
country plaid, sleeper
sofa matching love
seat, dining rm table
78" L 6 chairs 42" w.
entertainment center
$375(352) 270-3613
COMPUTER DESK good
condition, cabinet and
drawer, $35
(404)416-9362
DINETTE SET, Block
Iron Leg Dinette Set with
Light Wood Table Top
with 6 Golden, Cushioned
Chairs. 352-628-7192
DINING PEDESTAL TA-
BLE & 4 CHAIRS, very
nice, dark wood, 45"
diameter, $55.00
352-344-2321
Dining Room Set
Henredon, solid ash,
clean lines, beautiful,
large table w/6 chairs,
and China cab. $1,500
(352) 304-6293
Dining Room Table
2 leaves, 6 fabric chairs
and China Cabinet
dark wood
$725.
(352) 527-8766
Dining Room Table
5.5', tile table top, all
wood, great shape.
$100 (352) 364-1725
DINING TABLE W/4
CHAIRS & BENCH
Cherry top & seats
w/black legs, Exc. cond.
$100 firm 563-1615
END TABLES (2)
Glass Top End Tables
$25 for both.
352-628-9590
Entertainment Center
Large off white
71 "54X21" 4 glass dis-
play doors, 2 Ig
cabinets, adj shelves
$125(352) 302-8797
Entertainment Center
w/ lighted curio
excel. cond., med. oak
$250.
352-598-5242
Entertainment Center
with 36" TV
2 glass doors, both
in excellent cond. $400
(352) 364-1725
FLORIDA ROOM TABLE
& 4 ROLLING,
CUSHIONED CHAIRS
$75.00 464-0316
KITCHEN CORNER
CABINET
DARK WOOD $20.00
352-344-2321
Large Solid Oak
Roll Top Desk,
30" x 52"
$400.
(352) 637-4690
LIFT CHAIR RECLINER
Brand new. Only used
two weeks. Perfect condi-
tion. Purchased from
Quality Mobility in Crystal
River. Cost $800, selling
for $350. Located in
Sugarmill Woods. Call
Jim at 410-504-2860
MICROWAVE CART
with wheels, White, sell
for $30.00, phone
352-344-3472
OAK HUTCH
w/matching dinette
tab,4 chs. $350.
Q. hdbd solid oak,
mattress/frame $75.
(352) 220-8211


OVER STUFFED
ROCKER/RECLINER
.Tan sell for
$40.00.ca11352-344-3472
Pinewood table
w/ 4 chairs $85.
dark hard wood tabi
w/6 barrels chairs $115
no call before noon
(352) 628-4766
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER
clean, used, Green in
color-$50.00
352-257-5722 for details
SOFA Burgundy and
gold, very comfortable w/
throw pillows, great condi-
tion, $100 (404)416-9362
SOFA
clean, used, traditional
style-$100.00
352-257-5722 for details
TWIN XL MATTRESS
SET, Very clean-$75.00
352-257-5722 for details.
WATERBED
New, Queen sized,all
accessories included,
no frame, paid $169,
asking $100.
(352) 746-4874
White King size bed
headboard footbd
mattress box springs
like new $400. pd new
$1700 (352) 637-6108



AGRI-FAB 42' LAWN
SWEEPER -Tow behind.
Great condition.
$175. (352) 270-1366
CRAFTSMAN
2.5 hp gas engine
Edger ,runs good $50.
(352) 465-0721
Craftsman Riding
Lawn mower
42" deck
15.5 hp $400
(352) 746-7357.
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, $2800.
352-527-4114
352-445-9901
LAWN TRACTOR
38" Yard Machine used
only 50 hours, looks like
new, must be seen
$550. Steve (352)
794-4118 Ive message
RYOBI TRIMMER
W/ATTACH, Saw, edger,
etc. $75, Good cond.
Dunnellon 352-465-4441






FREE
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.
-Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
- 1 item per ad
-Ad must contain price
- $3.25 per additional line
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Need a JOB


#1 Employment source is












www.chronicleon line.com


ImGe


IGenea


(2) VERY NICE
SUITCASES - 1 LARGE - 1
MEDIUM. $20
(352) 628-1723

5,000 watt Coleman
generator, new, never
used, $450.
(352) 400-8662

BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop * Cordless
Phone- Cell Phone
* U.P.S and Rebuild
* Camera- Watch
* Hearing. Power Tool
* Wheel Chair Alarm
* Power Tool Etc..
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy.



Alte


MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 B9


CARDS (100)
Sports and non-sports
cards. $1.00 each.
352-453-6668

COMFORTER, w/skirt,
2 shams,3 throw
pillows.King,dark sage
w/multi patches. Exc
cond $50 563-1615

Grandfather Clocks
For Sale
$250.
(352) 726-3217

KING COMFORTER
w/2 shams & skirt.
BH&G white w/lIt sage
skirt &trim w/pink flowers.
New $60 563-1615


CIASSIFIEDS



Dress Form
$25.
(352) 637-2254
KING PATCH WORK
QUILT, JCP, beige
w/multi pattern,It weight.
Never used $40
563-1615
MOVING SALE
10 pc. Antique Din. Rm.
Set., Sectional Sofa,
Coffee & 2 end table
Set, 25" Television, 2 bi-
cycles, porcelain dolls,
33 rpm record albums,
& MORE! 352-382-3227
PROPANE FURNACE
MOBILE HOME
Exc Cond 45000BTU
Model #migh05ga aw
$300(352) 563-1855


SUPPORT BAR (2)
SHOWER OR TUB
white, $5.00 each
352-344-2321




ALUMINUM WALKER
FOLDS UP FOR
TRANSPORT, $20.00
464-0316
MEDICINE CABINET
BROAN, METRO DE-
LUXE new, still in box,
lists for $300. Sell for
$90. 344-2321
TOILET SEAT EXTEN-
SION, 4" HIGHER
$25.00 464-0316


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



Banjo
$40.
(352) 637-2254


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.
Attention Consumers
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

V THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955


zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825
TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696



A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705
BATTERIES ETC.
Laptop Cordless
Phone- Cell Phone
� U.P.S and Rebuild
� Camera- Watch
� Hearing. Power Tool
� Wheel Chair - Alarm
. Power Tool Etc.-
352-344-1962
3850 E Gulf to Lake
Hwy.

Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Patitng
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129







INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174

NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




Entertainment Centers
furn. vanities,cabinets
Top Quality reasonable
352 726-5832/212-3532




ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872

ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300

Home -7



Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 850-201-7451



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129






L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348


,44~aeead,4 mac
InstallationsbyBian d,

, kR PermitAnd "
E Engineering Fees
' E Up to $200 value




Sding Sofit Fasc a Sktin Roofover Carports
Screen Rooms, Decks Windows Doors Addtons
www.Advanedaluminumofcitrus.. m'


Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. turn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264 /201-1422



A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0008DOV


ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *




Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc 132549 302-9269




Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768




A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838


REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374




A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do If All!!!
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
L& J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348


I66OOLS/PA I


I ,,


VACATION IN risingg
YOUR OWN I po&
BACKYARD... orevas
Moc Ingerlodng
Order NOur Pool Today' Brick P3vers
_ Weekly
Pool Service
* Lic. & Insured
(CPC 1456565

-52400.38


NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./ins. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190
CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522


SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions.com
Free Est 352-503-7464






ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977






Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


Business Name:
Cutting Edge Ceramic Tile
How long has the business been in
operation in the Citrus County area?
In business about 5 years, doing tile about 10
years.
Describe the service/product you offer?
Most anything you want to tile: Showers,
counters, entry ways, etc.
What do your customers like best about
your business?
We are honest, dependable, courteous, fair,
professionals. We don't just do the big jobs.
We work all over Citrus County.
What is something your business offers
that people don't expect?
We do a lot of shower tear out and retile jobs.
We have many satisfied customers. We're
not the biggest or fastest, just one of the
best.
Why did you choose this business?
Because there is an art to doing tile. Yes
anyone can set tile, but if quality and looks
matter call us.

What are your business hours, address,
phone number and e-mail?
You can call most any time. My phone is on
from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm.
352-422-2019


� , ,,T Ru .... - c oa .,r




chronicleonline.com


FOR MORE INFO CONTACT GALE RANDALL 352- 563-3266


I


m


I Ho


Ftess
Equipment


CROWN MOLDING
*New* Fancy Wide De-
sign, 25 ft & 2 corners
$40 352-382-3650
LIGHT FOR CEILING
FAN Designer Brass and
Glass, 5 bulb Email pic
$30 MUST SEE
352-382-3650



Gym Quality Exercise
Bike, hard or easy work
out programs, all digital
even works the arms
$175(352) 464-0316
Schwinn Airdyne
$120 cash
(352) 382-7037


TREADMILL, ALL ELEC-
TRONICS LIGHT UP 1
problem needs fuse or
something else $50.00
OBO 464-0316




Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FEG PA-63 (9X18) PIS-
TOL, This is a complete
package deal: Pistol, Hol-
ster, 2 extra Mags and 3
bxs of Russian Ammo,
$300 FIRM, Ask for
Randy :563-1509, A great
Concealed carry Pistol


I


I


0m1mt







BIO MONDAY, JU



W rlymplCArms
AR15.. $733.00
Shiappa Rhino 357
mag $719.00
(352) 447-5595
SMITH & WESSON
Body Guard 380
w/trac $390.00
(352) 447-5595
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers
6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.
Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
HEAVY DUTY
UTITLIY TRAILER
Dual axle, diamond
platted metal.
$1300/obo. (352)
794-3081; 228-2324



BABY ITEMS baby swing
$10, girl baby bouncer $
5, girl baby clothes
nb-3mo $.25-$3,
352-364-1771


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966











Want to Buy
Nice Clean Dblewide
3 Bd, 2 Bth, on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 828-728-4834
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area
Condition or~ Situation
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED VIDEO
GAMES COLLECTION.
LRG OR SMALL. FOR
CASH (352)601-0105



BIRDS One Scarlett Ma-
Caw and One Congo Af-
rican Gray. 800.00 each
with cages 352-464-3314
Breeding Pair
Rottweilers
Female in Heat
$400 pair
(352) 341-0934



English Bull Dog
Puppies 1 male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com
Mini Dachshund
Long Hair Pup
Champion blood lines
Female blk & tan $400
(352) 795-6870;
220-4792
Parrotts, MaCaws, twin
males, with cages, $800
each. Chain link
10xI0x10 cage, $999
(352) 726-8177
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
many avail Blk/whi. M
$400 Blk/whi Fern. $450
Appoots avail 7 days a
Mwk. Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Shi-A-Poo & Toy Poodle
Female $250 Male $200
CKC registered. 8 wks
HIth Cert., Paper
trained, great with kids
(352) 489-6675



ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will email
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271
4 . ,.o -


S , ,




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $450. mo. + Dep.
RV, $325 + electric
352-795-0061
Crystal River
2/1, $515 incls W/Sew/
trash 352-584-3348


NE 27, 2011


p


2/1, DW, Remodeled,
$550. mo 352-795-0898
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-8810
352-446-9701
DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo Ist & $200
Sec. 352-625-4339
DUNNELLON
2br,1.5 bath.nr Citrus
Spgs$550.
Clean,bright,quiet.Available
now 352-603-0024
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO/INV.
Nice 2/1, lease, no pets
Water. lncl'd.$425.mo
$425 sec. 352-726-7319
HOMOSASSA 1'/v2
Bd $330mo. 2bd $450
Crystal RIv. waterfrt 3bd
$680. 352-422-1932
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3/2 DW $650 + sec 352
503-6747(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA 3/2
DWMH No pets $625 mo
$600.sec. 352-613-1921
HOMOSASSA
3/2, DWMH, FP, $675
2/2, $550, Homosassa
3/1V/2,$575. Hernando
352-628-0913
INVERNESS 2/1
Plus in-law apt. $400.
1 st/sec . No pets
(352) 419-7228
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; BR, BAPark
model, $450.
12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964





3/2, 2 Acres, fenced,
Homosassa
Owner Financing
(352) 302-9217
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040
PALM HARBOR
HOMES
has closed 2 model
centers Save up to
$60K on selectmodels
(813) 719-3335

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183




A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182
FLORAL CITY
2 Master BR 14x66'
3 lots/park/RV
sheds,gar.well/septic
Priv Financ w/$12Kdn.
Cridland Real Living.
Jackie 352-201-5201
HERNANDO/Ap. Shores
4552 N. Pine Dr., Handy
person special 75x100
lot, on dead-end quiet
street, $8,000 Appt.
only (502) 330-0260
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204


HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW, fecnced 72 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411

LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807
SMALL FARMS


MORRISTON
READ THIS ONLY
If you are you
interested in 2.67 acres,
keep horses, fenced,
spotless 3/2 furn'd 2001
MH, out bldg w/elect.
$80K, Owner financing.
Dale Ravens Rainbow
Springs Community
Realty Inc.
352-489-1486



2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2, furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
1st month lot rent
(352) 817-1987


AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furndeck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077

INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR, $350/up; 1BR, 1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR,
1-/2BA, $450 includes lot
rent; 12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964

YOU'LL THIS!
MAKE OFFER
Inverness
2 lots/ 3 Mobile
Homes off Turner
Camp Rd
813-545-3457
Opt For Owner Finance
2/1'2 Bath, 55+ Park
washer/Dryer, range
refrigerator, MUST SEE!
Lot Rent $249.
352-419-6825, 464-0590
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090







Homosassam

3/2, DW
Move In

cond. Rier

\Aviewminsto

Gulf

$29K or rent

$675.

(352)

212-7272













835NEHwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
until. Include. $600. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, furn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
utll. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964


-I*
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all util. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699

GREAT PRICE
I GREAT VALUE
Move-In Special

KNOLLWOOD
Townhouses
INVERNESS
$565.00
2BR - 1V2 BATHS
Sec. Deposit $250.
Ist Mnths Rent $250.
No Pets CALL I
352-344-1010
MON. WED. THURS.
HUD VOUCHERS
ACCEPTED

HOMOSASSA
1/1 $450 Mo No pets.
352- 697-0310
INVERNESS
2/2 Pool tennis + facili-
ties, H20, W/D+ appl's
incl. Scr. patio, 2nd Fl.
$645. (973) 222-1100

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
IstMO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626





*' THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.


FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000SQFT
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 &48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391
INVERNESS
Salon, 160 N. Fla. Ave.
352-201-2958



BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 Sun rm. Den,
55+comm 352-746-2621
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000 dn + lot rent,at
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2, $595/mo 1st sec
(352) 697-0770.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 laundry rm w/W/D
Kings Bay area. (352)
726-6515; 407-791-2642
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1,C/H/A$450+dp
(352) 464-2716
INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. 786-999-2365




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370



CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/3, Pool Home, w/
office, Util. incl'd, $1,900
mo.+dep 352-621-4600



BEVERLY HILLS
2 or 3/1.5/1 garage
57 S. Harrison $600
(352) 697-1907
Beverly Hills 2/1/1
Nice, Fen'd yd, $495. EZ
Terms (352) 410-6699
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1+ FmRm, $635 mo.
352-795-1722/212-6980
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
3/3.5/2 Beautiful home
Pine Rdge area, full
guest house, shop/RV
pad, 5 acres. No re-
stricitons (954) 612-6779
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 1 or 2 Bd. Rm., EZ-
TERMS $485., 382-3525
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 2/2 w/
scrn. rm. great location
IncI water, sewer, lawn,
Fl. Pest & Soc mem.
$900. (352) 422-4086
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1,000 @ MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITRUS SPRINGS
I3/2/2 Newer House,
very clean, SS appl's
W/D $895. mo. Also
2/1/2 Very Clean in
Nice NH. scr. por., Ig. lot
$650 mo. 352-382-1373
CITY OF
HERNANDO
1 bedroom. 1 bath. 1,300
sq ft house. Over an
acre of property.
Call 813-277-4045
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
INVERNESS
2/2/2, Great Location
Fl. Rm., Appl's Incl'd
$750.mo (352) 637-0894
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relax.com
RENT TO OWN
lovely 3 or 4/2,
white picket fence,
sunken hot tub, E-Z
Terms 352-228-2587




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS 3/2
furn, w/dock on With.
River on stilts. Incl util.
$1400/mo 352-267-4632



CRYSTAL RIVER
$100 a wk. incLs
everything 352-634-0708



BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/carport. CHA
Remodeled, $600 or
$58k (352) 897-4447
(352) 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Renovated 2/1,$33K
cash or terms $365. or
Rent $525.352-422-2433



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077



ForSde

Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester


FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE






GREAT DEALS
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


CLASSIFIED




Crystal River RV Lot
For Sale
Snowbird/Investor/Visitor
star gated com-
munity. Must sell.
Will take $39,900 if
close quickly.
GREAT LOT!!! Con-
tact at 860-841-8419
leave message or text


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.







Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






For Sale IM-,S
Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161




OWNER FINANCING
Fabulous 3/2 Like new.
SS appliances, custom
flooring, 2 car garage +
golf cart space.
Price to sell. $195K.
(352) 527-3501




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yd. new roof,
dble carport, poss. rent
to own. $59, 900
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cit. Spas. & Homosassa
Homes for Sale or Rent
Will Finance * Also
RMS.FOR RENT $135 wk
(352) 422-1284



CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440





2 BR, I BA, I car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see $59,000
(352) 419-6719

3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.lnvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com

High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnanlll@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.






FLORAL CITY
4 Pretty Rolling,
fenced Ac, paved
Rd, 3/2, 1344 Sqft DW
"move in" condition.
workshop, water to
pastures, mis 344713
to settle estate.
$114,900 obo
25 Fenced Ac w/
frontage on 581 &
480. Nice 2351 Sq Ft
home, carport,
workshop, barn, good
pastures, high and
dry beautiful land.
mis #345878
$485,000 obo

Commercial BLG
4000 Sq Ft w Office
.89 Ac pvd Parking for
15 County is
cutting costs to move
in businees until
October! mis 33440
$295,000 owner finan!
Waterfront
Keywest/Coastal
style 3397 Sq Ft home
built 2007, crows nest,
walk out deck covered
porches, FP. wood
floors,granite coun-
ters, energy efficient,
3/3 & half bath much
more. 1.89 Ac on
Lake Bradley near the
trail! mls# 345427
$389,000
On the main Lake
and near the Trail In
Inverness, 2/2/2 at
720 Edgewater,
renovated and move
in ready. mis 347168
$249,000 obo
Istachatta on
Daviston nice 2/2 SW
w carport & porches,
dock and boat
launch just oOff the
River and near the
trail. mis 344129
$74,900

crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


landscaping and 800' recent a/c & heat
of vinyl, picket & pump, ext. paint &
privacy fencin, roof. Fam rm. w/frpl.
almost a acre 2000+sf living + encl.
Owners Winter Home fla. rm. $102,500. By
FOR SALE or LEASE. appt. (352) 382-7086
(352) 341-1334 19 Jungleplum Ct. E.


| e a JO Best Time to Buy
also have lease
options & owner
#1 Employment source is financing available
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty






lanai on 1 acre
* eFor Rent or Sale
www.chrOnicleoninecom (908) 322-6529


FItsi Yoar treaw* Homer


Search Hundreds of Local Listings


www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


783572


EXCELLENT
OWNER
FINANCING

$137K





Sits high on a hill
w/great view 3/2/2
w/bonus rm. Approx
2650sf U.R. 2100 sf.
Real Mexican Tile.
Brand new Jaccuzzi,
raised oak cabinets,
kitchen island. Lrg
stone fireplace in
great room, 3 very
large bedrooms,
2 bigwalk in closets,
florida room.HOME
JUST totally UPDATED
Beautiful


3/2 2200
s9 ft.
33 htedingound
pool w/sum kit.
near schools, hospital
$150K, 1350 NE 7th av
352-564-0001 day
352-794-6504 night
Buying or Selling
S = 11 T REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
>orA &le H q,, ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com


6-2 � LaughingSlock International Inc ,Dist by Universal Uclickfor UFS, 2011

"You've got one hope ... reincarnation:'










JOHN GORDON ROOFING


& Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269

Rofngi#CC3592-HoeIspco H26


Citrus C unty
Hom:s I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Michele Rose Realtor
Simply put I 'II work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountyv()
yahoo.crm
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!

Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


For Sakleo1
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283

FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498

HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


Gitta Barth/Realtor

Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc

SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME Ozello Keys
private boat dock &
ramp. 1000sqft upstairs,
10OOsqft screened
downstairs. 2/1.
Fenced yard, CHA
Owner Finance. 5%
down payment.
$174,900. Call Craig
352-422-1011




Crystal River Area
Professional business
person w/ excellent credit
looking to lease option,
rent to own or buy a
home w/ owner financing
in the CR Area. If
interested please call
352-388-1064 or email
home-
search352@gmail.com.




BY OWNER
Residential Building Lots
W. Highland & N. High-
land. Must buy both
$25,000/firm. Please no
agents. 617-471-7417




HERNADO .88 acres
with well, septic and
power all in place.
For more details call
Kristin Holland at
Plantation Realty
352-220-1186.


INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033




2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000
(352) 382-3202





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
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Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.

To place your free
ad, simply go to:
www.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.


'02, 23ft,
Magic Tilt Trailer
Dual axle, 4 V-hull
$1,300
(352) 628-5008
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
ALUMINUM
PROPELLER, V-4, Fits
60-115HP, $80.00
464-0316
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
PROPELLER, FITS V-6,
140 ON UP, Aluminum
$80.00 464-0316
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
STAINLESS STEEL
PROPELLER, off of 200,
V-6, $85.00 464-0316
Mariner 4 HP, Engine
runs great,
$450. obo
(352) 795-6870;
(352) 220-4792
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066


WORDY GURD Y TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Actress Blanchett dined (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Romantically see 6 + 2 people (1) they will fit in the letter
S squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Dinner dish shipping box (1) syllables in each word.

01 �2011UFS,Dist byUniv JUcickforUFS
4. Terrific list of candidates (1)


5. Cargo condition after shipping (1)


6. Can't stand dumbbells and barbells (1)


7. Singer Bonnie's 3-of-a-kind beaters (1)


SIHDIVHILS SIIVI 'L SIHOIAM SaIVH '9 HIVIS IHDIMIJ *
aiVIS JVala9 I V' 3 1V3 aVId 11 H9HDI 31VI * HiV I3vo 'I
6-27-11 SH3MSNV


36' Winnebago
ITASCA - 3 slides under
11K mi! GREAT COND!
Homosassa. $76,900/
obo (850) 449-1811
JAMBOREE 89
Class C, 24 59k Miles
exc cond $6500 obo
(352) 795-3729


This page is a great opportunity to showcase

those special homes. The Open House

weekend page will be published July 9, 2011.


ChNi LE. Call Kim Thrombley
www.chroniclonlineco 563-3218 for more details


STAINLESS STEEL
PROPELLER, 13.5x18
$80.00 464-0316




19 Flare made by
Lake wells Fl.
Evinrude w/kicker
$800 obo(352)
794-3081 352-228-2324
'08 SEA PRO
176CC, 90 Merc. Opti-
Max. 24V Minnkota
w/autopilot trolling mtr.
2 fish finders -1 w/GPS
On brd batt charger.
$13,000 (352) 552-2950
12'ALUMACRAFT
2008, Jon Boat, Nice,
with Tilt Trailer, 2006-9.8
Nissan motor. $1,300
OBO Call 352-634-4421
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019
BASS TRACKER 3
1979, Bass Boats Inc.,
16ft W/ Trailer. Many new
items. $2,000 Firm.
352-634-2791
BASS TRACKER 3
50hp Mercury, with trailer.
Too many new parts to
list. $2,000.00 FIRM
352-634-2791
BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272

V THIS OUT!
C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22' out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
ice box,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
induded.Exc.condifon,used app
50 hoursAsking
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.
CRESTLINER
Pontoon boat, fresh
water, 2085 CFI 1996
customized and refur-
bished, fiberglassed
deck, 75HP motor re-
done, bimini top &
other seat covers, new
trolling motor & battery
(MinnKota) perfect for
fishing, cruising or scal-
loping, $8,000 Call for
particulars, (941)
662-9077 cell or
(352) 201-2656
HURRICANE
KAYAK, SANTEE 116
SPORT ,L11"6" W36LBS
USA MADE XCON $775
352.503.5319
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
VOLVO ENGINE
170 HP 6 CYL,LOW
HRS,COMPLETE,RUNS
GREAT,$800 ALSO
HAVE 2 280 OUT-
DRIVES 352-256-8488

grNW UT1


Bob @ 813-469-2392
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded, AC, good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900 (352) 503-6431
CHEVY 96
Camero, red w/ 2 tops
needs head gasket,
new tires, well maint
$1200(352) 302-8797
CHRYSLER
1980, LeBaron, Six cylin-
der, automatic. Very relia-
ble. Good body. No A/C.
$775 OBO 352-726-9416

CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring LXI
leather, power seats
69k orig miles $6990
866-838-4376

FORD
2000 Escort SE
60K org. mi., 32 mpg
$5,500
(352) 382-7783


MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011 BII


CIASSIFIEDS




'07 STARCRAFT
POP-UP
17ft open. Used 3 times.
Sleeps 6 with extras.
$4200. (352) 382-5309
8FT SLIDE IN
CAMPER
for pickup, good cond.
$1,200 obo
(352) 860-1055
HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8, very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797
ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27' 2005,
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper, Q bed, 2nd
dr. 20' awning $16k obo
(352) 527-9535
WILDERNESS
19 FT.
$1,500 obo
(352) 860-1151




!!!!!! 215/65 R16 !!!!!!
Nice tread. Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)551-1810
- 215/40 $17 *-
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
---TRUCK TIRES---
Load range "F". 8R19.5
Nice tread. Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
CHROME TRUCK
Bed rails & gas cap
cover exc cond
$125.
352-422-3745
MUSTANG RIMS
Set of 4, 18" x 18.5", fits
2005 - 2011, polished
alum., like new, asking
$1,000 OBO
(352) 795-0558
NEW GOODYEAR TIRE
& WHEEL 245/75/22.5
on 10 lug wheel.
$100 firm 563-1615




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909

* BIG SALE! I
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144





v THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.

ACURA
2007 TL equipped w/
tech package, navi
a diamond $18,990
866-838-4376

* BIG SALE!! +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

BMW
2006 750 BMW 750LI
2006 black mint 52000 mi
19.6/25 mpg $34,000
OBO 352-382-7489

BMW
2008, 328i leather
sunroof mint cond.
$21988
866-838-4376

SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376

CADILLAC
1995, sedan, Deville
Cadillac, 132,000 miles,
runs good, $1250. Call


1995, Suburban,
4WD,3rd row seat, runs
excellent,$2000 obo call
(352)201-0374

JEEP
1998 Wrangler Sahara
hard top, 78k orig mi.
$10988
866-838-4376




'02 DODGE
Ram Van 1500, 5.9 Liter
eng. V8 leather 59,500K
mi $8,888. make offer
(352) 503-7577
CHEVROLET
'02. Venture, 7 passen-
ger cold air, runs &
looks good $2 475.
(352) 201-9035


HONDA
2004 Accord LX
coupe 77k miles
$10990
866-838-4376

HONDA
2007 Civic hybrid
44k orig miles, mint
cond. 48 mpg better
hurry call for deal!
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Civic LX 7k miles
one owner honda
certified, 100k warr.
Call for deal!
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2005 Tuscan leather
sunroof, great gas
sipper 10988
866-838-4376
HYUNDAI
2007 Elantra 27,000
miles, Great
Condition/Great on Gas
$10,500 352-212-7454
LINCOLN
2000 Lincoln Town Car
Executive L
Black on black $2500
OBO (352) 422-7755
LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL
1998 Good cond. Runs
well. LOADED! $2000
(352) 794-3134
MONTE CARLO
'05, great cond., runs
great 1 owner 73K mi.
$6,800
352-613-4071
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625
SCION
2009 XB 19k orig miles
nicely equipped
$16980
866-838-4376

TOYOTA
2005 Camry LE
low miles, nicely
equipped $9988
866-838-4376




FORD
'74, FO00, 360/C6, LB
w/ extra rebuilt 360
$1,400
(352) 564-4598







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





88 FORD
Square bed w/topper
runs great, great farm
truck etc. $1400
(352) 795-0088
4 BIG SALE!! +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

CHEVY
2003 Silverado 28k
orig miles, bedliner a
must see pick up call
fast! 866-838-4376
CHEVY
'95, $S10, V6, 5spd. 152k
mi, good cond. new
tires, runs excel.. $2,500.
(352) 382-2199
FORD
1986 F150w/R302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800 (404)416-9359
FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934
FORD
2003 F250 Lariat
super duty 6.0 diesel
lift kit stack exaust
chip, too much ride
call for deal!
866-838-4376


* THIS OUT!
FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920
FORD F 250
99 Lariat, 150k mi 4x4
Extented cab 4 dr.
$5,650 352-201-0177
GMC
'03, Sonoma 65K mi., 6
cyl. Clean, excel, cond
Red w/ silver $7,000
obo 352 382-3663
TOYOTA 05
Tundra Max low mis.
X warrty tool box tow
pkg new tires $12,500
cell(727) 644-0157
TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADED!Tow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622




CADILLAC
2004 Escalade EXT
suv diamond white
pearl 58k orig miles
wheels all the ride
Call for deal!
866-838-4376
GMC


DODGE
96 Caravan 5 doors, 4
cylinder, automatic
very good cond $1500
obo(352) 476-1113
FORD
1984, Econoline 150,
work van, runs, asking
$600.00 OBO. Call
352-341-5164 after 5:00

FORD
2003 E-250 econoline
cargo van 76k miles
showroom new $8990
builders welcome
866-838-4376

HONDA
2010 Odyssey LX
low miles, 20,990
certified 100k
warranty must see!
866-838-4376





2004 SUZUKI
Volusia, 9,300 miles,
custom acc., immaculate,
dealer serviced, $4900
352-613-4576

Self Storag
Notce


Harley Davidson
'05, 1200 Sportster
very clean, lots of
chrome & extras $5,000
(352) 344-3081
Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,200
Cry River 727-207-1619
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
HONDA HELIX
(2) 93-96 low miles
250cc 70mpg $2400 for
both (352) 697-5530
Honda Trike
'05 Goldwing,
20,000 mi. Black Cherry
$26,500.
(352)465-6991
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995. 352-601-7460


425-0627 MCRN
7/7 sale Units 130, 153, 154, 229 Kings Bay Self Storage
PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC CASH AUCTION
Kings Bay Self Storage located at 7957 W Gulf to Lake Hwy. Crystal River, FL. 44429.
On Thursday July 7th 2011 at 10:00 am, we will auction per FL.ST. 83.806 the following
units delinquent in rent and fees:
Deborah Miller Unit 130 Misc household items
Gidget M. Beyers Unit 153 Misc household items
Joseph Metcalf Unit 154 Misc household items
Virginia Branham Unit 229 Furniture and misc household
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 20 & 27, 2011.


N it


426-0627 MCRN
McCutchan, Eleanor Constance 2011 -CP-000131 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. 2011-CP-000131
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF ELEANOR CONSTANCE McCUTCHAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Eleanor Constance McCutchan, deceased,
whose date of death was February 11, 2011, is pending in the Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, File Number 2011-CP-000131; the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT' S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 20, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Thomas M. Van Ness, Jr
1205 North Meeting Tree Boulevard, Crystal River, FL 34429
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750 1-352-795-1444
VanNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 N. Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 20 & 27, 2011.


427-0627 MCRN
Vs. Ellis, Donald R. 09-2011-CA-001516 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-001516
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD R. ELLIS, ET. AL.,
Defendant(s),
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DONALD R. ELLIS AND SARAH JUNE ELLIS if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown
heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through,
under or against him (them).
Residence is unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following
property in CITRUS County, Florida:
LOT 18, BLOCK 8, OF RIVER-LAKES MANOR UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 96 THROUGH 101, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700
South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 670-2299, within 30 days
after the first publication of this notice, and to file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 10 day of June, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts, As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, As Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of cer-
tain assistance, please contact the ADA Coordinator, Telephone (352) 341-6400, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, within 2 working days of you receipt
of this notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 20 & 27, 2011. BBE-C-2433/aq


428-0627 MCRN
Vs. Morgan, Richard Patrick 2010-CA-6107 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-6107
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 175, Tampa, Florida
33634,
Plaintiff,
v.
RICHARD PATRICK MORGAN, A/K/A RICHARD MORGAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
RICHARD PATRICK MORGAN, A/K/A RICHARD MORGAN, TERESA LEE GAMBLE, F/K/A
TERESA MORGAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TERESA LEE GAMBLE, F/K/A TERESA
MORGAN, and THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1771 W. SUNDROP LANE,
LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RICHARD PATRICK MORGAN, A/K/A RICHARD MORGAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF RICHARD PATRICK MORGAN, A/K/A RICHARD MORGAN, TERESA LEE GAMBLE,
F/K/A TERESA MORGAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TERESA LEE GAMBLE, F/K/A TERESA
MORGAN, and THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1771 W. SUNDROP LANE,
LECANTO, FLORIDA 34461:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court,
County of Citrus, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as
follows:
SEE EXHIBIT "A", TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1997 PALM HARBOR
MOBILE HOME, 66 x 28, SERIAL NUMBER: FLA14611586AB.
You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30)
days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
Dated this 10 day of June, 2011.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts, CLERK OF COURT
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
EXHIBIT "A"
Beginning at the NW corner of the NEI/4 of the NW 1/4 of fractional Section 1, Town-
ship 20 South, Range 18 East, thence run N 89 deg. 49' 20" E along the North line of
said fraction Section 332.56 feet to a point, thence run S 0 deg. 42' 25" E 304.47 feet to
the North line of the existing road that is 50.0 wide, thence run S 89 deg. 46' 53" W 25.0
feet, thence run S 0 deg. 42' 25" E 25.0 feet, thence run S 89 deg. 46' 53" W 307.56 feet
to a point, thence run N 0 deg. 42' 40" W 329.27 feet to the Point of Beginning, which
said tract is also known as Tract 20-D of CASON'S HIGH ACRES, an unrecorded subdi-
vision
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, June 20 & 27, 2011.


919-0627 TU/SU/MCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NRC PUBLIC MEETING
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is holding public meetings to discuss the
content of the Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Plant draft supplemental environmental
impact statement (DSEIS), clarify the environmental issues covered in the DSEIS, and
accept comments that the public may have on the DSEIS.
Two identical sessions will be held at:
Plantation Inn
9301 W Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429
Tuesday, June 28, 2011
2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
"Open House" with NRC staff one hour prior to each meeting
For additional information, please call the NRC at (800) 368-5642 extension 3748
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21, 26 & 27,2011.


Moped
50CC, Tank,
needs repair 379mi.
$400 cash
(352) 382-7037

Suzuki 2010
Boulevard C50
Less than 800 miles, my
loss, your gain! $6,500
firm. (352) 422-4528

WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492




918-0715 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
15, 2011 - July 15, 2011.
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15,2011.


Nodces to Creditorms/
Administradon I


Nodces to Creditorms
Administration I


CitusC t
Hom- I


Forclosre Sal
Acion Noice


Foclsural


Focosr Sl


MeBetin
I Notces


Metn


Metn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1 4


FND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE!
NO MATTER WHERE YOU
PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800-440-9054


'11 ALTIMA
FRM 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE WIfH INMO AND SPECIAL PRICIG
1-800-584-8755 Ext. 1329
116, 999o 281 M


'10 CR-V
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIT INFO AND SPECIAL PRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11132
15,999o^ 265=


'10 SONATA
FREE 241 RECORIMD MESSAGE W I INR AND SOCIAL PCMG
1-800-584-8755 Ext 16829
11 ,999o?199^



'10 ELANTRA
FREE 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE WH INRM AND SPECML PRE
1-800-584-8755 Ext.L1641
*10,999 ^182.


'11 SONATA
FREE 24 HR RECOlRDED IMAGE WITH INMO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext16828
$16,9990 281M



'10 CHARGER
REE 24 R RECORDED MESSAGE WilH FO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16821
$16,999^oR281^ .


'10 EQUINOX
REE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH MFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.10267
*18,999^O31 5^



'10 AVENGER
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESAEM WH NMFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16794
$15,999 O265



'10 RAM
REE 24 R RECORDED MESSAGE WIH FO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11147
$11,999^o199A


'11 CRUZE
FREE 24 M RECORDED NMSAI E WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11266
p15,999o$265Mo.


'10 EXPLORER
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WMi IOM AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext. 16717
115,999.1265.



'10 CALIBER
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH Ol AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16681
12Z999^ 21 5A



'10 JOURNEY
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIM IMO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext. 11266
*13,9990$232 .



'10 COBALT
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIH MFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16672
9,9999^OR166M.


*0iH6:


Ib


^All prices and payment exclude, tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. Prices and payments include $2999.00
down cash or trade equity. Payments are for 6 years at 5.99% APR with approved credit.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock


A


I I '


'11 CAMARO
RE 24 HR RECORDED MSAGE WI INO AND SPECIAL PRICI
1-800-584-8755 ExLt.11317
21,999AA364P


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fill
EU


B12 MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011


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