Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02454
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 06-25-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02454

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Shining on diamond: Gators advance to C' final, 1
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I I T R U S


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TODAY & Sunday morning
HIGH Mostly cloudy with scat-
90 tered showers and thun-
Low derstorms.
73 PAGE A4
JUNE 25, 2011


WARNING
* With the opening
of scallop season
and the
Homosassa River
Fireworks Festival
today, those going
to Homosassa
should anticipate
jam-packed
streets, parking
lots and boat
ramps.
* Under the burn
ban now in effect,
setting off any
kind of fireworks
is illegal in all of
Citrus County.



Scallop season
opens today
* The bag limit is 2
gallons of whole
scallops in the shell,
or 1 pint of
scallop meat per
person per day.
* Also, no more than
10 gallons of whole
scallops or 1/2
gallons of scallop
meat may be pos-
sessed aboard any
vessel at any time.
* Scallops may be
harvested by hand
or with a net.
* A valid Florida
saltwater fishing
license is required
for each person
scalloping from ages
of 16 to 65.
* Scallopers must
remain in the legal
scalloping area while
in possession of
scallops on the
water, including the
point where they
return to land.
* When in the water, a
diver-down flag must
be displayed.
* Scallop season runs
through Sept. 25.
* Alcohol sales begin
at 7 a.m. Sunday in
unincorporated
areas of Citrus
County.


SPORTS:


Little League
Ball season started
Friday./Page BI


Peter Falk
The stage and movie
actor who became iden-
tified as "Columbo" died
Thursday./Page A5



In focus
Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer and
photographer Matthew
Beck take an in-depth
look at Homosassa. See
Sunday's and Monday's
editions.


Comics . . . . . . . . . .C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . . . .B5
Horoscope ........ . B5
Lottery Numbers . . .B4
Lottery Payouts . . . .B5
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ....... .C9
TV Listings ....... C7


6 I184II 4 178 2002!


Manatees not to blame


Study:


Septic tanks making mess


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER - The
popular saying goes: A dif-
ferent shovel, same ole


poop. However, when it
comes to fecal water pollu-
tion, it appears some mam-
mals pack more punch than
others.
As for birds, well, they are


off the charts when it comes
to making a mess around
water, said Dale Griffin, en-
vironmental and public
health microbiologist with
the U.S. Geological Survey
(USGS).
The major culprit for the
algae-laden waters in parts


of King's Bay Manatee
Refuge is not manatee
feces, but human effluent
and fertilizer, Griffin said.
"We have found no evi-
dence manatee feces has
ever fouled a river," he told
an audience of U.S. Fish
Wildlife Service employees


Chassahowitzka challenge


Dredging in the Chassahowitzka River could begin as early as July 15.

Water district restoring the river to


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CHASSAHOWITZKA - Quiet
beauty along the river's surface
does not reveal the grime below.
What was once sandy bottom in
the Chassahowitzka River head-
spring is a dark, gooey muck, the
result of silt, salt, nuisance algae
and even litter.
A $1.3 million project spear-
headed by the Southwest Florida
Water Management District aims to
fix that, restoring the river's main
spring to its natural state.
The district is expected to start a
dredging project in mid July that
will vacuum out 3,000 cubic yards
of sediment in the river's main
spring near the Chassahowitzka
boat ramp.
"It's an exciting project and
we're really looking forward to it,"
project manager Philip Rhine-
smith said.
The project's first phase oc-
curred in 2009 when the county
and water district split the cost of a
$50,000 feasibility study The dis-
trict then went about designing and
obtaining permits and then issued


We used to
snorkel up and down
the river and see the
sandy bottom. It was
gorgeous.
Henry Klein
longtime Chassahowitzka resident.

a dredging contract.
Rhinesmith said the project tim-
ing is crucial because federal per-
mits only allow construction
between May and October to pro-
tect manatees. With the project tak-
ing about 60 days, he said it cannot
start later than August in order to
meet the federal deadline.
Even with summer dredging, the
federal permit requires the con-
tractor to have manatee spotters on
site. If a manatee is seen in the
area, all work must stop and equip-
ment removed from the water so
the manatee is not disturbed. Work
may resume when the manatee
leaves the area.
Rhinesmith said an archeologist


a thing of beauty


will also be on site to review the ma-
terials removed by the vacuum. He
said while he doesn't expect to find
pre-historic artifacts, it's possible
the project may turn up early 20th
century items that could be placed
in the county museum in Inverness.
Most of the material pumped
from the river will be recycled as
topsoil. The rest will end up in the
county landfill.
The construction will remove
some parking spaces during the
work time, but the boat ramp will
remain open, he said.
Rhinesmith said when it's fin-
ished, boaters and swimmers will
see the difference.
"They'll notice a recreational
benefit in water clarity and water
quality," he said.
Henry and Cindy Klein, who
have called Chassahowitzka home
for 30 years, say they are looking
forward to seeing the river they
once knew.
"We used to snorkel up and down
the river and see the sandy bottom,"
Mr Klein said. "It was gorgeous."
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright
can be reached at (352) 563-3228 or
mwright@chronicleonline.com.


and environmental activists
Friday morning.
"The No. 1 polluter we
have found is septic tanks,"
Griffin added.
He said the combination
of nitrates in human waste
and properties in fertilizer
See .Page A2



School

cuts strain

counselors

CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
COOPER CITY - Roslyn
Wagner's tone shifts from
cheerful to concerned as
she looks through the
grades of the teenage boy
seated before her.
"There's no reason for
this," the guidance coun-
selor tells him.
Just three years ago,
Blake Mankin scored at the
highest possible level on
Florida's standardized as-
sessment in math. He could
be in honors math classes,
but had to repeat algebra.
He's just a freshman, but his
grades are so low that if he
doesn't raise them, he could
be in danger of not graduat-
ing from Cooper City High
School.
"What happened?" Wag-
ner asks.
He admits that he hasn't
worked hard enough.
It is 10:02 a.m. and al-
ready a group of students
await Wagner's attention.
The 15-year-old boy has to
get back to his gym class.
They both glance at the
clock.
In all, Wagner has to reg-
ister 600 freshmen in this
high school in a suburb
north of Miami for their
next year's classes, and help
another 200 12th grade stu-
dents through college appli-
cations and graduation.
There are recommendation
letters to write, crises to
handle. On the one hand,
she must monitor low per-
forming students; on the
other, she must shepherd a
bevy of meticulous students
at this A-rated school vying
to get into the nation's most
prestigious colleges.
There's just not enough
time - but the boy is there,
and he needs her help.
Wagner takes an extra
minute.
MEN
The caseload wasn't al-
ways this high; before Wag-
ner used to handle just one
grade. But two years ago,
one of the school's four
See . Page A9


Thunderstorms roll across county


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A strong storm packing some intense lightning passed across much of Citrus County Fri-
day afternoon. For more on the storm and its effect, see Page A3.


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff Writer
A bill recently signed by
Florida Gov Rick Scott caps
property taxes to water
management districts, but
also delivers the death blow
to local water resource proj-
ects.
While the bill that was
publicly signed Wednesday
will mean a $19 reduction
for the average Citrus
County resident on their
next property tax bill, it also
cemented the elimination of
county basin board.
Basin boards were often
the conduits between the
water districts and local
governments for a raft of
water resource projects.
"Now the big question is,


how do we get money from
SWFWMD (Southwest
Florida Water Management
District)," County
spokesman Jim Hunter
asked.
According to SWFWMD
spokeswoman Robyn Felix,
such funds will now be hard
to give.
"This cap will mean our
budget will decrease by
$119 million," she said. "We
will definitely have money
for fewer water resource
projects."
The law requires the Leg-
islature to annually review
the budget and tax rate for
each of the state's five water
management districts, and
sets caps on the rate.

See Page A9


IT Y


Tax cap to cut


property bills










Color TV marks 60th anniversary


SAMANTHA KENNEDY
Chronicle Intern
Back in 1951, a landmark in tele-
vision history was made, although
it's not one many people remember
Colored television is something
that most of us today take for
granted. But once, there was no
such thing as a color in the TV
world.
Sixty years ago today, a four-hour
broadcast was aired by Columbia
Broadcasting System - or CBS, as
most know it today
"I didn't see it," said 67 year-old
Inverness resident Caroline
Glowacki, "I only saw black and
white TV back then. My parents
probably watched that broadcast,
but we definitely didn't see it in
color."
Talking with residents at Crown
Court assisted living facility in In-
verness, many don't remember this
huge milestone in television his-
tory In fact, many homes were
without television sets, and radio
was the means of getting informa-
tion and entertainment
CBS had only 40 colored re-
ceivers at their 5 stations in New
York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia,
Boston and Washington, D.C. All of
the stations broadcast this event
live.
Margaret Wilson, 69, of Inver-
ness, recalls her first colored TV
"It was a small box TV that me
and six other kids, along with my


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Stanley Fiege, a resident of Crown Court in Inverness, relaxes while watching an afternoon television show
Friday. Today marks the 60th anniversary of the first colored television broadcast.


parents, huddled together to watch.
When I say the TV was small, I
mean it was REALLY small!"
Sarah Arnet can also remember
seeing it for the first time.
"I was either 12 or 13, and the re-
ception was awful," she said. "I re-


member all the figures were like
shadows. The closest TV station to
us in Inverness was in Jack-
sonville."
Living in Florida, perhaps the
technological advancements just
weren't the same as in New York,


Arnet said with a smile.
But for 69-year-old Susan Mulvey,
there was an upside.
"The color TV brought a lot more
movies and game shows," she said.
"Well, there were actually a lot
more shows in general."


* 1993 - Closed captioning is
a requirement on all new tele-
vision sets.
* 1994 - DirecTV was
launched.
* 1998 - Digital broadcasting
begins in November.
* 2009 - All broadcasts go
digital.
Source: timeline-help. com/history-of
the-television-timeline.html


Even with .
hundreds of
manatees
inhabiting
the Crystal
River, an
official with -k 1
the U.S.
Geological '
Survey
believes
human
effluent . |
and .
fertilizer,
not
manatee
feces, are
the major
causes for
the algae
in the river.
Dozens of
the animals
huddle
around a
small
spring near
Three
Sisters
Spring this
past
winter,.
MATTHEW
BECK/
Chronicle file

BLAME
Continued from Page Al

used - sometimes right on
the edge of the bay - help
feed the abundant amounts
of algae visitors see at the
refuge. Studies have shown
nitrates boost algal bloom.
Bird feces, Griffin noted,
can sometimes be more in-
vasive than anything mana-
tees can muster.
Michael Lusk, manager of
the Chassahowitzka Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge, said
there has been a lot of con-
fusion among area residents
about the causes of pollu-
tion in the bay
"I would like for people to
know that it's not the mana-
tees that are at fault, but a
combination of several fac-
tors," Lusk said.
He said a significant num-
ber of homes near the bay
and on waterways feeding
into it use septic tanks, and
fertilizer use is prevalent.
Crystal River City Man-
ager Andy Houston said
about 500 homes in the
neighborhoods nearest to
the bay are on septic tanks.
"In another 2 to 2 1/2
years, those homes should
all be part of the sewer sys-
tem," Houston said.
The Crystal River City
Council voted June 13 to
build sewer lines along Fort
Island Trail to serve neigh-
borhoods south of the road
and the Harbor Isle area to
the north.
The controversial project
affects only property owners
living outside city bound-
aries. County commission-
ers also recently approved a
special assessment district
with strong opposition from
some home- and business
owners.
The final cost of switching
from septic to city sewer
lines for individual home-
owners, estimates put it at
nearly $6,000.
Houston said a few years


ago the city also set rules
which only allow use of
slow-release fertilizer and
setbacks for its use if the
home is on the bay
Manatee diets are ex-
tremely low in nitrates and
"there is no evidence mana-
tee feces is a threat to hu-
mans," Griffin said.
Manatees in Florida feed
on more than 60 species of
plants including turtle
grass, manatee grass, shoal
grass, mangrove leaves, var-
ious algae, water hyacinth,
acorns, and hydrilla.
For more information
about King's Bay Manatee
Refuge, call (352) 563-2088
or email chassahow-
itzka@fws.gov
Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe can be reached at
(352) 564-2925 or at
asidibe@chronicleonline.
corn.


Hospital bill now law


Chronicle
Legislation that wrests
control of Citrus Memorial
Health System from the
Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation to the Citrus
County Hospital Board of
Trustees is now law.
Gov Rick Scott allowed
the bill, sponsored by State
Rep. Jimmie T Smith, R-
Inverness, to become law
Friday without his signa-
ture.
The law gives the Board
of Trustees oversight of the


hospital's management.
The bill becomes law July
1, although the Foundation
board of directors is ex-
pected to challenge it in
court.
Board of Trustees attor-
ney Bill Grant said trustees
will meet Monday to begin
working on the next steps.
He said he hopes the Foun-
dation will join in the tran-
sition.
Citrus Memorial Chief
Executive Officer Ryan
Beaty could not be reached
for comment.


Fith your annual subscription
with your annual subscription*


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A2 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


..- A
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Page A3 - SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011



TATE &


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County

Deputies arrest man
on sex charge
A 25-year-old Crystal River
man was arrested Friday for
allegedly having sex with a
13-year-old girl.
Richard Aaron Wall Sr., of
North Owl Point, was
charged with one felony
count of lewd and lascivious
battery. He was booked at
the Citrus County Detention
Facility in Lecanto where he
is being held on a $15,000
bond.
According to the arrest re-
port, a 12-year-old girl said at
around 1 a.m. Tuesday, she
saw her sister leave the
house and go to Wall's home.
Curious, the girl reportedly
stated she went over to Wall's
house, stood on a stool,
looked through the window
and saw her sister and Wall
engaging in sexual activity.
During an interview with
the sister, she admitted to
having sex with Wall, the re-
port stated.
According to sheriff's office
officials, Wall stated, after
hearing the evidence against
him, that it was possible he
had sex with the girl. He also
reportedly said he has been
drinking a lot so it was possi-
ble the incident happened
while he was drinking
alcohol.
Governor reappoints
WRPC members
Gov. Rick Scott has reap-
pointed two Citrus County
residents to the Withla-
coochee Regional Planning
Council.
Avis Craig, of Crystal
River, is director of public af-
fairs for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office.
Craig also served as planning
director for Citrus Hills prior to
joining the property ap-
praiser's office.
Bill Murray, of Lecanto, is a
member of the Citrus County
School Board. Murray is a
former teacher.
Both appointments end
Oct. 1 and are subject to
Senate confirmation.

Tallahassee

Babb appointed to
governing board
Gov. Rick Scott on Thurs-
day appointed Michael A.
Babb to the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District's Governing Board.
Babb is from Hillsborough
County and is president of
Two Rivers Ranch, Inc. His
term ends March 1, 2014.
Governing Board members
are unpaid volunteers ap-
pointed by the governor and
confirmed by the state Sen-
ate. The Governing Board
sets policy for the Water
Management District.
Scott to act on
death warrants
Gov. Rick Scott still hasn't
acted on signing death war-
rants.
He is approaching his sixth
month in office and has not
taken the first formal step in
carrying out an execution. A
spokesman said he is pre-
pared to fulfill that responsi-
bility. Florida has 399 inmates
on death row.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction

A story on Page A3 of Fri-
day's edition, "Career's end
a new beginning," contained
incorrect information. Jor-
dyn Bruno was 22 months
old when she was found
dead, officers with the In-
verness Police Department
had their final drive around
town on March 31, 2004,
and Jim Booth is a part of
the sheriff's office cold case
unit.


The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert the Cit-
rus County Chronicle to any
errors in news articles by e-
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling (352)
563-5660.


Man accused of child abuse


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
HOMOSASSA - A 45-
year-old Homosassa man
was arrested for allegedly
striking a 16-year-old girl
twice in the face Thursday
night.
Jack George Ward was
taken into custody on one
felony count of child abuse.
He was booked at the Citrus
County Detention Facility in
Lecanto where his bond was
set at $2,000.
According to Ward's ar-
rest report, the girl told law
enforcement her mother
and Ward were arguing
about a vehicle when Ward
shoved her mother into the


driver's side door
The girl said she
yelled at Ward to stop
hitting her mother, at
which time he began
running toward her
as she stood on the
front porch.


n.


The girl said she
Jack
started to run across Ward
the front yard to get
away from Ward when he struck,
caught up with her and then mother
pushed her to the ground, rate bo
according to the report. As Ward
she hit the ground, the re- again,
port stated the girl rolled the gi
over onto her back and stated.
Ward then struck her two said she
times in the face. neighb
"She stated she was not for hell
sure if she had been kicked Offic:


or punched due to
it happening so
fast," the arrest af-
fidavit stated.
"However, she
knew she had been
struck and had sus-
tained injuries to
the inside of her
mouth as a result."
As she was being
the girl said her


Attempted to sepa-
th her and Ward, but
shoved her mother
causing her to fall to
round, the report
At that time, the girl
e was able to run to a
or's house and call
ap.
ials stated that when


deputies spoke with the
mother, the mother advised
that the altercation was only
verbal and that the girl was
lying. The mother then re-
portedly stated that it was
she who struck the girl in
the mouth, not Ward.
While the authorities
waited for a child protec-
tive investigator to arrive
on the scene, the deputy
advised the mother and girl
to remain separated. How-
ever, according to the re-
port, the mother went
inside the home were the
girl was and began to beg
for the girl to say that it was
her who struck her and not
Ward.
"I opened the door and


Storms bring rain, lightning


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
The rainy season is
here.
Showers and thunder-
storms hit the east side of
the county Friday after-
noon, dumping as much as
three inches of rain in
some areas.
Brian McClure, a mete-
orologist with Bay News 9,
said the storms were nor-
mal and expected as the
rainy season arrives.
"It's behaving like it's
supposed to be," he said.
McClure said most of
the rainfall Friday hap-
pened in the Her-
nando/Inverness/Floral
City area as the storms
trekked along U.S. 41
heading north. He esti-
mated that most received
about an inch and a half of
rain with some spots re-
porting about two inches
and one spot northeast of
Citrus Springs receiving
three.
McClure said there is a
60 percent chance of rain
for today For those con-
cerned about the rain
washing out the fireworks
in Homosassa, he believes
despite the call for rain,
weather conditions will
be fine when the time
comes for the fireworks
show.
"I wouldn't worry about
it," he said.
For Sunday, McClure
predicts a 50 percent
chance of rain, but as
Monday comes around,
the chances of rain will go
back to being in the nor-
mal range of 40 percent
every day
Bob Wesch, assistant di-
rector of Citrus County
Emergency Management,
said a report of damage
came from a lady who
lives off County Road 480
in Floral City.
"A deputy went out and
looked at it and said it was
high wind," he said. "Not
a tornado."
Katie Mehl, spokes-
woman for Citrus Memo-
rial Health System in
Inverness, said at approx-
imately 3 p.m., lightning


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
A tree fell on power lines during a thunderstorm Friday afternoon on North East Av-
enue in Inverness, causing some area residents to temporarily lose power.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A thunderstorm blew across Citrus County Friday after-
noon with strong winds and heavy lightning.


struck the historic 1911
Citrus High School build-
ing in downtown Inver-


ness. The building houses
offices for human re-
sources, accounting, pur-


chasing and corporate ed-
ucation at the hospital.
"The lightning strike
caused a small electrical
fire in the attic and cre-
ated a hole in the ceiling
which allowed rain to fall
into the second floor," said
George Mavros, Director
of Professional Services
for Citrus Memorial. "The
water damage is limited to
the accounting depart-
ment and everyone is safe
and accounted for"
Jim Hunter, spokesman
for the county, said the
storms kept firefighters
busy for a couple of hours
responding to calls for
limbs on power lines
catching fire and lighten-
ing striking buildings.
However, he said as of late
Friday afternoon, there
was nothing serious.
McClure said he pre-
dicts that this summer
will definitely continue to
be a rainy one, hopefully
putting people who were
worried about the recent
dry period at ease.
"We're going to have a
good rainy season," he
said. "It's kicking into high
gear fast."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924
or swiles@chronicle
onlinecom.


County receives PetMeals grant

Funds to help provide foodfor homebound seniors'pets


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Community
Services' PetMeals Program
recently received a $1,750
grant from Banfield Chari-
table Trust to help provide
pet food for the companion
pets of homebound seniors.
Banfield's mission is to
keep pets and families to-
gether. The trust, a non-
profit offshoot of Banfield
Pet Hospital, has been mak-
ing it possible for pets to
enjoy a better quality of life,
the trust states, by giving
back to communities and
helping advance pet-related
charities.
Citrus County's Home De-
livered Meal Program pro-
vides a nutritious daily meal


The grant will help provide for the
program, but it is always seeking
donations of unopened pet food, as
well as volunteers to help deliver it.


to seniors in Citrus County.
Hunger can become a mu-
tual problem for pets as well
as their owners, especially
when the owners are home-
bound.
People have been known
to go without eating so that
their companion pets can
eat. The PetMeals Program
was created to help seniors
provide the proper food for
their dogs and while getting
their own proper nutrition
from Meals on Wheels.


Banfield Charitable Trust
has teamed up with Meals
on Wheels Association of
America to help start and
sustain pet food distribution
programs with more than $1
million annually awarded to
nonprofit organizations
across the country
Citrus County's PetMeals
Program partners with the
Key Training Center The
program is 100 percent do-
nation based and volunteer
driven.


While the grant from the
Banfield Charitable Trust
will help provide for the
program, it is always seek-
ing help with donations of
unopened pet food, as well
as volunteers to help deliver
the pet food to clients.
There is currently a need
for a volunteer coordinator
for the PetMeals Program.
The coordinator would co-
ordinate the meals office,
the volunteers from the Key
Training Center who pack-
age the pet food, and the
volunteer drivers who de-
liver the food.
For more information
about either the Home De-
livered Meals Program or
the PetMeals Program, call
(352) 527-5978.


requested the victim's
mother to come back out-
side and to stop attempting
to get her daughter to lie for
the defendant," the report
stated.
"The victim's mother then
broke down crying and
stated that she did not want
the defendant to get in trou-
ble."
A deputy later found
Ward and asked him about
the incident to which he re-
portedly replied, "It was just
a bunch of mumbo jumbo."
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924 or
swiles@chronicle
online, com.



Anthony

defense

shows

photos

of pool

Associated Press

ORLANDO - Defense
attorneys for a Florida
mother charged with
killing her 2-year-old
daughter showed jurors
several photos on Friday
that they hope bolster
their argument that the
toddler drowned and
wasn't murdered.
Casey Anthony's attor-
neys showed photos of
her daughter Caylee
climbing a ladder into an
above-ground pool at the
family's home as her
grandmother, Cindy An-
thony, supported her from
behind.
From the witness stand,
Cindy Anthony testified
that Caylee was able to
open a sliding glass door
that led to the backyard
pool.
"Even at that point, she
could even climb into the
pool," Cindy Anthony said
when shown a photo.
Casey Anthony's attor-
neys contend that Caylee
drowned in the pool and
that her mother didn't kill
her
Casey Anthony, 25,
wiped away tears while a
video of her playing with
the girl was viewed by the
jury during her mother's
testimony
Prosecutors have ar-
gued Casey Anthony suf-
focated her daughter in
June 2008. She didn't re-
port the girl missing for
31 days.
Later Friday, Casey An-
thony's brother, Lee, testi-
fied about stains found in
the trunk of his sister's
car Cindy Anthony also
has testified about the
stains, saying they were
present when the family
bought the car in 2000.
Prosecutors claim the
child's body was in the
car trunk and then
dumped near the Antho-
nys' home in Orlando in a
wooded area, where
Caylee's remains were
found nearly six months
after she disappeared.
They have presented ex-
tensive evidence of
human decomposition in
the car trunk, including
stains.
Lee Anthony started
crying on the witness
stand when he recalled
how he didn't go to the
hospital for his niece's
birth. He said he was
angry at his sister and
mother for not directly
confiding in him about
Casey Anthony's preg-
nancy
On Thursday, Cindy An-
thony's testimony directly
contradicted prosecutors'
theory that Casey An-
thony was the one who
made Internet searches
about chloroform, a
chemical compound that


can be used to knock
someone unconscious
and also is found in
human decomposition.












Dean sponsors 3 bills signed into law


Chronicle

Gov Rick Scott signed into law
this week three bills sponsored by
state Sen. Charlie Dean (R, Inver-
ness). The legislation covers budg-
eting standards for local
government, sexting and minors,
and new rules for pest control
companies.
* Senate Bill 224, Local Gov-
ernment Accountability, provides
minimum budgeting standards for
counties, county officers, munici-
palities and special districts. It
also requires the budget of each
county, municipality, special dis-
trict, water management district,
school district and certain county
officers to be posted on the gov-


ernment entity's website.
In addition, the bill re-
quires these entities to file
their financial report and .
financial audit report with
the Department of Finan-
cial Services and the an-
nual financial audit report
with the Office of the Au- Cha
ditor General within nine De
months of the end of the state s
fiscal year R-Inv
"I believe it is important
the people of our state are made
aware of how every penny of their
tax dollars are spent," Dean said
in a press release. "This is some-
thing we have always done on the
state level and I believe it is time it
is done on the local level. I am also


i




af


proud this never received
a single 'no' vote. I believe
this speaks volumes to
what I am trying to accom-
plish with this bill."
S' S S.B. 888/House Bill 75
creates a section of
Florida law regarding
rlie "sexting," creating new
an guidelines for punish-
enator ments of minors who send
mress. sexually explicit elec-
tronic data transmissions
or distribute such message via text
messages, photos or videos via
electronic data transmission, such
as cell phones.
Under the new law, first-time vi-
olations come with a $60 fine or
eight hours of community service.


Subsequent violations have
harsher penalties, and a second
offense is considered a first-de-
gree misdemeanor
"This is an issue we need to ad-
dress with our young people, our
parents and our schools," Dean
said in a press release," and I felt
it was time for our current laws to
catch up with current technology."
* S.B. 1290/H. B. 949 authorizes
the Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services to issue a
license to operate a customer con-
tact center for the sole purpose of
soliciting pest control business
and coordinating services to con-
sumers for one or more business
locations. The bill also stipulates
that a person cannot operate a


customer contact center for a pest
control business that is not li-
censed by DACS, and establishes
a licensing and renewal fee struc-
ture. The legislation establishes a
limited certification for a com-
mercial wildlife management per-
sonnel category within DACS
authorizing persons to use non-
chemical methods for controlling
rodents.
"This issue was brought to my
attention by the department of
Agriculture and consumer Serv-
ices, local pest control consumers
and, more importantly, by pest
control operators themselves who
saw the need to reform how their
profession was regulated," Dean
said in a news release.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrests
* Juan Armando Loa III, 28,
of 7181 N. Everest Terrace, Dun-
nellon, at 8:56 p.m. June 13, on
misdemeanor charges of battery
and domestic battery. According
to Loa's arrest report, he pushed
a 26-year-old Dunnellon man
and punched him in the face and
body during an altercation. A 26-
year-old Dunnellon woman re-
portedly said she tried to pull Loa
off the man and that's when he
allegedly pushed her down,
causing her to break a closet
door. The report stated Loa said
he did punch the man several
times and meant only to fight the
man, not harm the woman. No
bond.
* Nathan Mace Roberts, 37,
of Beverly Hills, at 11 p.m. June
13, on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. According to
Roberts' arrest report, a 31-year-
old Beverly Hills woman said
Roberts threw cups of water at
her. Roberts reportedly said he
did throw cups of water at the


woman, but she threw cups of
water at him, also. The deputy
noted in the report the front of the
woman's shirt was wet but
Roberts' clothing was not. No
bond.
* Charles Junior Reichrath,
30, of Lecanto, at 2:08 a.m. June
14, on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. According to
Reichrath's arrest report, a 12-
year-old Lecanto boy said Re-
ichrath struck his hand and the
side of his head with his crutch.
Reichrath reportedly said he did
hit the boy with his crutch, but it
was not deliberate. No bond.
* Nicole Jennifer Davis, 21,
of Crystal River, at 8:06 p.m.
June 14, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. Ac-
cording to Davis' arrest report, a
36-year-old Crystal River man
said Davis punched and
scratched him and ripped his
shirt. Davis reportedly said she
never touched the man. No
bond.
* Jessica Lynn Atchison,
24, of Inverness, at 9:22 p.m.
June 14, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. Ac-


ON THE NET

* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


cording to Atchison's arrest re-
port, a 26-year-old Inverness
man said Atchison slapped him
on the left side of his head, pulled
his shirt and punched him in the
back side of his head. Atchison
reportedly said she and the man
got into a "heated discussion,"
but did not say it became physi-
cal. No bond.
* Chad Albert Schneider,
33, of Crystal River, at 10:36 p.m.
June 12, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. Ac-
cording to Schneider's arrest re-
port, a 36-year-old Crystal River
woman said Schneider knocked
her out of a chair and held her
down on the ground by her neck
and shoulders. No bond.
* Heath Ray Dempsey, 36,
of Beverly Hills, at 10:39 p.m.
June 11, on a felony charge of
aggravated battery on a preg-
nant woman. According to


Dempsey's arrest report, a 25-
year-old Beverly Hills woman
said Dempsey, who she said
knows she is 19 weeks preg-
nant, shoved her in her chest, al-
most causing her to fall, and
pushed her out the back door be-
fore locking it. Dempsey report-
edly denied touching the woman
but stated she smacked him
three times in the face. The
deputy noted in the report that
Dempsey had no signs of red-
ness on his face. No bond.
* James Eugene Blaskie,
63, of Hernando, at 7:18 p.m.
June 11, on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. Ac-
cording to Blaskie's arrest report,
a 49-year-old Hemando woman
said Blaskie kicked her in the
stomach and legs and grabbed
her by the throat. Blaskie report-
edly denied touching the woman.
No bond.


* Donna Marie Hart, 49, of
Crystal River, at 5:48 p.m. June
10 and at 5:07 p.m. Sunday, on
misdemeanor charges of do-
mestic battery. According to
Hart's arrest report, a 59-year-old
Crystal River man said Hart
struck him in the elbow and legs
with a metal key holder and
struck him with a frying pan on
his left elbow. Later on June 19,
Hart was reportedly arrested
again for throwing household
products at the man. No bond.
* David Alan Ringgenberg,
51, of 55 S. Otis Ave., Lecanto,
at 5:50 p.m. Sunday on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic bat-
tery. According to Ringgenberg's
arrest report, a 46-year-old Her-


nando woman said Ringgenberg
jumped on her and held her
down before leaving the house.
He then reportedly returned,
grabbed her and threw her to the
floor. No bond. Ringgenberg said
the woman hit him and he was
acting in self defense, the report
said. No bond.
* Jeffrey J. Horrell, 22, of
Beverly Hills, at 5:50 a.m. Sun-
day on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. According to
Horrell's arrest report, a 20-year-
old Beverly Hills woman said
Horrell pulled her out of the car
and grabbed her by her throat.
Horrell reportedly said nothing
had happened other than an ar-
gument. No bond.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


Light and variable winds. Seas around
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will be
smooth outside of thunderstorms.
Expect scattered showers and thun-
derstorms today.


96 73 0.00 91 70 0.30

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

I TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
Mostly cloudy; 60% chance of
showers and t-storms
W SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 73
Scattered thunderstorms will move east though-
out the day.
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 92 Low: 74
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of t-storms


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE* DEW POINT
Friday 96/76 Friday at 3 p.m.
Record 101/64
Normal 90/71 HUMIDITY
Mean temp. 86 Friday at 3 p.m
Departure from mean +5 POLLEN CC
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.21 in. Todays a
Total for the month 3.88 in. Ragweed, gra
Total for the year 27.86 in. Today's C
Normal for the year 22.46 in.
*As of 6 p m at Inverness Sunday's
UV INDEX: 8 Monday'
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALIT
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday was good
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.95 in. mainly particular

SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
6/25 SATURDAY 1:26 7:37 1
6/26 SUNDAY 2:06 8:18 2


1. 76%
)UNT**
active pollen:
asses, chenopods
ount: 3.5/12
s Count: 4.6
s Count: 4.3
TY


d with polluta
ites.


NOR MA
AFTERNOONO
:48 7
:29 8


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT........
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
MOONRISE TODAY.......
JULY 15 JULY 23 MOONSET TODAY........


BURN CONDITIONS


ints



LJOR
)N)
7:59
8:41


.8:32 P.M.
.6:34 A.M.
.2:06 A.M.
.3:33 P.M.


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:44 a/8:46 a 1:26 p/10:31 p
Crystal River" 12:05 a/6:08 a 11:47 a/7:53 p
Withlacoochee* 9:34 a/3:56 a 11:15 p/5:41 p
Homosassa*** 12:54 a/7:45 a 12:36 p/9:30 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
3:07 a/9:50 a 2:19 p/11:34 p
1:28 a/7:12 a 12:40 p/8:56 p
10:27 a/5:00 a - /6:44 p
2:17 a/8:49 a 1:29 p/10:33 p


Gulf water
temperature



91
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.64 27.66 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 35.58 35.66 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 36.91 36.94 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 37.75 37.78 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data Is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


dS, oji6'od-Amneau
\ A,' 6""i
/ n me.


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Is -.
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


75 63
10065
85 61
84 73
90 68
98 73
87 71
74 57
95 70
76 51
61 57
70 64
66 59
92 73
80 66
93 73
68 60
72 65
69 62
94 72
73 64
56 54
95 75
88 58
78 54
71 62
10775
81 61
83 68
70 63
93 73
71 62
93 72
10483
94 76
70 63
78 67
90 76
70 58
78 52
93 75
94 70
87 67


.03 ts
s
.03 pc
.03 pc
pc
pc
pc
ts
.09 ts
pc
.01 ts
.32 ts
.20 sh
pc
pc
.08 pc
pc
.01 pc
.19 pc
.03 pc
.04 pc
.16 ts
pc
pc
ts
.04 pc
s
pc
pc
.01 ts
pc
.01 pc
pc
s
pc
pc
PC
ts
pc
pc
ts
ts
ts


74 59
101 66
84 59
94 70
86 62
97 74
84 66
74 53
94 71
75 49
69 62
67 55
69 57
91 74
81 61
91 66
75 63
81 62
75 57
95 72
79 60
69 55
99 76
90 59
76 66
76 57
106 77
83 70
80 59
77 60
95 77
80 61
94 73
103 80
93 74
71 59
84 66
94 76
76 59
77 62
92 74
96 71
89 71


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 90 78 .05 pc 92 76
New York City 70 65 .03 ts 83 64
Norfolk 89 74 pc 89 69
Oklahoma City 101 71 pc 99 78
Omaha 79 58 ts 80 67
Palm Springs 10973 s 108 73
Philadelphia 88 70 pc 85 65
Phoenix 11085 s 112 86
Pittsburgh 71 64 .03 pc 76 56
Portland, ME 55 53 1.04 ts 62 55
Portland, Ore 68 55 pc 72 52
Providence, R.I. 69 60 ts 75 60
Raleigh 96 72 pc 91 66
Rapid City 83 56 ts 80 62
Reno 87 56 s 86 52
Rochester, NY 75 67 .05 ts 70 56
Sacramento 89 55 s 87 55
St. Louis 83 63 ts 83 70
St. Ste. Marie 63 53 .03 pc 70 48
Salt Lake City 86 61 s 88 66
San Antonio 94 72 pc 99 76
San Diego 67 62 pc 70 62
San Francisco 70 52 pc 67 51
Savannah 98 73 .02 pc 91 74
Seattle 67 51 .13 pc 66 51
Spokane 66 44 pc 66 44
Syracuse 86 66 .71 ts 72 55
Topeka 86 64 ts 88 72
Washington 90 73 pc 86 67
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 112 Needles, Calif. LOW 33 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY Lisbon
CITY H/L/SKY London
Acapulco 88/78/ts Madrid
Amsterdam 64/57/sh Mexico City
Athens 89/70/s Montreal
Beijing 84/67/pc Moscow
Berlin 66/52/sh Paris
Bermuda 80/74/pc Rio
Cairo 90/70/s Rome
Calgary 62/45/pc Sydney
Havana 91/76/ts Tokyo
Hong Kong 86/78/ts Toronto
Jerusalem 86/64/s Warsaw


89/68/s
74/58/sh
95/64/s
74/60/ts
69/60/sh
75/61/ts
78/57/pc
79/66/s
85/63/s
66/49/s
87/75/ts
68/56/sh
67/52/ts


CITRUS C COUNTY




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44.
"- ' Norvell Brant Hwi
D ven - _- Cannondale Dr
A Miedowcresl
N -I

I I | Courthouse
To pkins St. T square


S ra
41 44



Who's in charge:


S
JULY 1 JULY 8


.....................


A4 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r


r





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries





Calvin
Clingan, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Calvin C. Clingan, 86, of
Beverly Hills, FL, formerly
of Glen Cove, NY, passed
away peace-
fully on
June 23,
2011, sur-
rounded by
his family.
Cal was
born on the
Planting
Calvin Fields es-
Clingan tate of WR.
Coe in 1925
to the late Thomas George
Clingan and Mary Arm-
strong Clingan, and was pre-
deceased by his five sisters
Dorothy, Anne, Mae, Gwen
and Mildred. He enlisted in
the Army Air Corps immedi-
ately after graduation from
high school, serving in the
European campaign of
World War II, for which he
received the Bronze Star.
On returning home, Cal
married his Cadet Nurse
sweetheart, Alice Palmer, on
February 1, 1948, beginning
their more than 63 years to-
gether He is also survived
by his son, Thomas George
Clingan II (and his wife
Carol); daughters Margaret
Francis and Kathleen Har-
rington (and her husband
John); along with grandchil-
dren Jerry Francis, Victoria
Clingan, Carrie Clingan,
Kelly Francis, Katharine
Clingan, Heather Harring-
ton and Alexandra Clingan;
and Cal's best buddy, great-
grandson Hunter Calvin
Francis. He is also survived
by his brother-in-law Sam
Linden and twelve nieces
and nephews.
Cal became a master
painter, and operated his
own painting company be-
fore overseeing painting op-
erations for State University
College at Old Westbury,
from which he retired in
1987. Cal and Alice built
their retirement home in
Florida the following year
and enjoyed 24 years of re-
tirement together. They
were among the founders of
Shepherd of the Hills Epis-
copal Church in Lecanto. An
avid fisherman "up north,"
Cal came to appreciate
travel, bowling and golf in
addition to sharing his fa-
ther's lifelong love of flow-
ers and plants.
Relatives and friends are
invited to call at Fero Fu-
neral Home, 5955 N.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Beverly Hills, on
Monday, June 27, from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. A Memorial
Service led by the Rt. Rev
James M. Adams will be
held Tuesday, June 28, at
Shepherd of the Hills Epis-
copal Church, 2540 W
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Lecanto,
at 10 a.m., with interment to
follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens, 5891 N. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Beverly Hills.
The family would like to
thank the staff of Nature
Coast Lodge in Lecanto and
HPH Hospice of Inverness. In
lieu of flowers, contributions
to SOTH Memorial Fund, PO.
Box 1375, Lecanto FL 34461,
would be appreciated.
"He knows me, for I am an
old friend."- CCC
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.
www. ferofuneral
home.com.




Portland
Harvey, 79
CRYSTAL RIVER
Portland Lee Harvey, 79,
of Crystal River, died Thurs-
day, June 23, 2011, at HPH
Hospice House in Lecanto.


Private cremation
arrangements are under the
care of Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory,
Crystal River.

iLaA. S. !bav,
Funeral Home With Crematory
JAMES H.JOHNSON
Graveside: Friday, 2:30pm
Florida Nation Cemetery
EVERETT VAUGHN
Service: Mon. 3pm- Chapel
JAMES WATSON
Service: Saturday, 3pm
New Church Without Walls
EDWARD HOPPER
Service: Sunday,4pm
NORMAALLARD
Service: Friday, 11am
Floral City Baptist Chruch
726-8323


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 A5


'Columbo' actor Peter Falk dies


Associated Press

NEW YORK - The best
way to celebrate Peter
Falk's life is to savor how
Columbo, his signature
character, fortified our
lives.
Thanks to Falk's affec-
tionately genuine portrayal,
Lt. Columbo established
himself for all time as a
champion of any viewer
who ever felt less than
graceful, elegant or well-
spoken.
Falk died Thursday at
age 83 in his Beverly Hills,
Calif., home, according to a
statement released Friday
by family friend Larry Lar-
son. But Columbo lives on
as the shining ideal of any-
one with a smudge on his
tie, whose car isn't the
sportiest, who often seems
clueless, who gets dissed by
fancy people.
As a police detective,
Columbo's interview tech-
nique was famously dis-
jointed, with his inevitable
awkward afterthought
("Ahhh, there's just one
more thing ...") that tried
the patience of his suspect
as he was halfway out the
door.
Columbo was underesti-
mated, patronized or sim-
ply overlooked by nearly
everyone he met - espe-
cially the culprit
And yet Columbo, draw-
ing on inner pluck for
which only he (and an actor
as skilled as Falk) could
have accounted, always
prevailed. Contrary to all
evidence (that is, until he
nailed the bad guy),
Columbo always knew what
he was doing.
Even more inspiring for
viewers, he was uncon-
cerned with how other peo-
ple saw him. He seemed to
be perfectly happy with
himself, his life, his pet bas-
set, Dog, his wheezing Peu-
geot, and his never-seen
wife. A squat man chewing
cigars in a rumpled rain-
coat, he stands tall among
TV's most self-assured he-
roes.
What viewer won't take
solace forever from the les-
sons Columbo taught us by
his enduring example?
Columbo - he never had
a first name - presented a
refreshing contrast to other
TV detectives. "He looks
like a flood victim," Falk
once said. "You feel sorry
for him. He appears to be
seeing nothing, but he's see-
ing everything. Underneath
his dishevelment, a good
mind is at work."
On another occasion, he
described Columbo as "an
ass-backwards Sherlock
Holmes."
"As a person, he was like
Columbo. He was exactly
the same way: a great sense
of humor, constantly forget-
ting things," said Charles
Engel, an NBC Universal
executive who worked with
Falk on "Columbo" and was
his neighbor and longtime
friend.
He remembered Falk as
a "brilliant" actor and "an
amazingly wonderful, crazy
guy," and said a script was
in place for a two-hour
"Columbo" special, but
Falk's illness made the
project impossible. In a
court document filed in De-
cember 2008, Falk's daugh-
ter Catherine Falk said her
father was suffering from


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Alzheimer's disease.
Somehow fittingly, Falk
-the perfect choice to play
Columbo - failed to be the
first choice. Instead, the
role was offered to easygo-
ing crooner Bing Crosby
Fortunately, he passed.
With Falk in place,
"Columbo" began its run in
1971 as part of the NBC
Sunday Mystery Movie se-
ries, appearing every third
week. The show became by
far the most popular of the
three mysteries, the others
being "McCloud" and
"McMillan and Wife."
Falk was reportedly paid
$250,000 a movie and could
have made much more if he
had accepted an offer to
convert "Columbo" into a
weekly series. He declined,
reasoning that carrying a
weekly detective series
would be too great a bur-
den.
NBC canceled the three
series in 1977. In 1989 ABC
offered "Columbo" in a two-
hour format usually ap-
pearing once or twice a
season. The movies contin-
ued into the 21st century
"Columbo" appeared in 26
foreign countries and was a
particular favorite in
France and Iran.
Columbo's trademark: an
ancient raincoat Falk had
once bought for himself.
After 25 years on television,
the coat became so tattered
it had to be replaced.
Falk was already an ex-
perienced Broadway actor
and two-time Oscar nomi-
nee when he began playing
Columbo. And, long before
then, he had demonstrated
a bit of Columbo-worthy
spunk: at 3, he had one eye
removed because of cancer
Then, when he was start-
ing as an actor in New York,
an agent told him, "Of
course, you won't be able to
work in movies or TV be-
cause of your eye." And
after failing a screen test at
Columbia Pictures, he was
told by studio boss Harry
Cohn that "for the same
price I can get an actor with
two eyes."
But Falk prevailed, even
before "Columbo," picking
up back-to-back Oscar
nominations as best sup-
porting actor for the 1960
mob drama "Murder, Inc."
and Frank Capra's last
film, the 1961 comedy-
drama "Pocketful of Mira-
cles."
Paying tribute, actor-co-
median Michael McKean
said, "Peter Falk's assault
on conventional stardom
went like this: You're not
conventionally handsome,
you're missing an eye and
you have a speech impedi-
ment. Should you become
a movie star? Peter's cor-
rect answer: Absolutely
"I got to hang with him a
few times and later worked
a day with him on a forget-
table TV movie," McKean
went on, calling Falk "a
sweet, sharp and funny
man with a great soul. Wim
Wenders called it correctly
in 'Wings of Desire': He
was an angel if there ever
was one on Earth."
"There is literally no-
body you could compare
him to. He was a com-
pletely unique actor," said
Rob Reiner, who directed
Falk in "The Princess
Bride."
"His personality was re-
ally what drew people to


To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Call Gale Randall

at 563-3266
or e-mail
grandall@chronicleonlinex.om


Closing 'iilacing ad]
KXis as pior to un date.~tM


Associated Press
Actors Fred Savage, left, and Peter Falk are shown in a scene from "The Princess Bride"
in this 1987 photo originally released by 20th Century Fox. Falk, the stage and movie
actor who became identified as the squinty, rumpled detective in "Columbo," died Thurs-
day at his Beverly Hills, Calif., home. He was 83.


him. ... He had this great
sense of humor and this
great natural quality no-
body could come close to,"
Reiner said. Falk's work
with Alan Arkin in "The In-
Laws" represents "one of
the most brilliant comedy
pairings we've seen on
screen."
Peter Michael Falk was
born in 1927, in New York
City and grew up in Ossin-
ing, N.Y, where his parents
ran a clothing store.
After serving as a cook in
the merchant marine and
receiving a masters degree
in public administration
from Syracuse University,
Falk worked as an effi-
ciency expert for the budget
bureau of the state of Con-
necticut
He also acted in amateur
theater and was encour-
aged to become a profes-
sional by actress-teacher
Eva Le Gallienne.
An appearance in "The
Iceman Cometh" off-Broad-
way led to other parts,
among them Josef Stalin in
Paddy Chayefsky's 1964
"The Passion of Josef D." In
1971, Falk scored a hit in
Neil Simon's "The Prisoner
of Second Avenue," Tony-


nominated for best play
Falk made his film debut
in 1958 with "Wind Across
the Everglades" and estab-
lished himself as a talented
character actor with his
performance as the vicious
killer Abe Reles in "Mur-
der, Inc."
Among his other movies:
"It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad
World," "Robin and the
Seven Hoods," "The Great
Race," "Luv," "Castle
Keep," "The Cheap Detec-
tive" and "The Brinks Job."
Falk also appeared in a
number of art-house fa-
vorites, including "Wings of
Desire" (in which he played
himself as a former angel),
and the semi-improvisa-
tional films "Husbands"
and "A Woman Under the
Influence," directed by his
friend John Cassavetes.
"Today we lost someone
who is very special and
dear to my heart. Not only a
wonderful actor but a very
great friend," said Gena
Rowlands, who co-starred
with Falk in the latter film,
and was married to the late
Cassavetes.
Falk became prominent
in television movies, begin-


Associated Press
Actor Peter Falk arrives for
the Hollywood Foreign
Press Association's annual
installation luncheon at The
Beverly Hills Hotel in Bev-
erly Hills, Calif., in 2007.
ning with his first Emmy for
"The Price of Tomatoes" in
1961. His four other Emmys
were for "Columbo."
He was married to pi-
anist Alyce Mayo in 1960;
they had two daughters,
Jackie and Catherine, and
divorced in 1976. The fol-
lowing year he married ac-
tress Shera Danese. They
filed for divorce twice and
reconciled each time.
Falk is survived by his
wife Shera and his two
daughters.












A U J 5 SOKCTYINR)VCHROIC


I HowTKs *I '1,H"TI f i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
S&P500ETF1984382126.81 -1.49 Hyperdyn 178681 4.32 -.02 MicronT 1104874 7.21 -1.22 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 1194746 10.52 -.19 TrnsatlPet 135323 1.80 -.07 Cisco 1035346 14.93 -.54 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
FordM 731726 13.24 -.23 ParaG&S 125588 3.50 -.05 Oracle 707317 31.14 -1.32 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
SPDRFncl 711078 14.76 -.09 Ur-Energy 93560 1.62 +.06 SiriusXM 690193 1.98 -.06 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
GenElec 669167 17.97 -.41 Neoprobe 80097 3.70 ... Intel 681645 21.20 -.51 Chg: Loss or gain for the day No change indicated by.

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: ld - Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d- New 52-week
low. dd - Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amencan Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Emerging Company Marketplace. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
BlueLinx 2.75 +.40 +17.0 ConmedH 3.95 +.47 +13.5 Lantron 3.20 +.73 +29.6 ng qualification n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
SoUnCo 39.85 +5.70 +16.7 BreezeE 11.15 +1.15 +11.5 MetaFincl 18.60 +4.03 +27.7 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferredstock ssue.pr- Preferences.pp-
Continucre 4.77 +.50 +11.7 Crexendo 4.85 +.50 +11.5 SalemCm 3.98 +.78 +24.4 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security ata specified price. s-
C-TrCVOL 36.55 +3.41 +10.3 SwGAFn 9.03 +.88 +10.8 FFinSvc 2.93 +.53 +22.1 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the lastyear. wi -Trades will be settled when the
Pandoran 15.37 +1.37 +9.8 AntaresP 2.17 +.20 +10.2 BridgfdFds 8.99 +1.45 +19.2 stock is issued. wd - When distributed, wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New
52-week high. un - Unit, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
STRHIdgs 14.33 -2.39 -14.3 Cover-All 2.35 -.21 -8.2 PainTher 5.30 -3.94 -42.6
PhxNMdan 8.00 -.92 -10.3 FieldPnt 2.40 -.15 -5.9 DurectCp 2.13 -.96 -31.1
Qihoo360 n 16.24 -1.76 -9.8 GoldResrc 24.81 -1.47 -5.6 SptChalB 2.03 -.39 -16.1
HollyCp 59.81 -5.69 -8.7 GtPanSilvg 3.37 -.19 -5.3 Zionwt1-12 3.15 -.58 -15.5 52-Week Net % YT[
FrontierOil 28.68 -2.71 -8.6 CheniereEn 8.04 -.38 -4.5 MicronT 7.21 -1.22 -14.5 High Low Name Last Chg Chg Ch


DIARY


1,092 Advanced
1,939 Declined
112 Unchanged
3,143 Total issues
48 New Highs
38 New Lows
4,463,370,008 Volume


216 Advanced
247 Declined
31 Unchanged
494 Total issues
9 New Highs
9 New Lows
216,405,351 Volume


DIARY


1,086
1,532
95
2,713
61
50
2,870,551,072


12,876.00 9,614.32Dow Jones Industrials
5,565.78 3,872.64Dow Jones Transportation
441.86 353.53Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,355.83NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,770.05AmexIndex
2,887.75 2,061.14Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,010.91S&P 500
14,562.01 10,596.20Wilshire 5000
868.57 587.66Russell 2000


11,934.58
5,214.15
423.99
7,974.72
2,260.66
2,652.89
1,268.45
13,480.56
797.79


I NYSE


) % 52-wk
ig %Chg


-115.42 -.96 +3.08+17.65
-88.48 -1.67 +2.10+22.94
+.56 +.13 +4.69+15.78
-79.36 -.99 +.13+17.90
-19.15 -.84 +2.37+21.40
-33.86 -1.26 ...+19.31
-15.05 -1.17 +.86+17.80
-145.14 -1.07 +.90+19.04
-4.89 -.61 +1.80+23.67


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BcpSouth 12.21 -.08
BkofAm 10.52 -.19
BkIlrend 1.11 -.03
BkNYMel 24.64 -.80
ABBLtd 24.71 -.16 BankUtdn 26.46 .57
ACELtd 63.95 -.53 Barday 15.33 -.61
AESCorp 12.12 -.09 BariPVixrs 24.53 +.98
AFLAC 44.30 -.75 BarnesNob 17.26 -.41
AGLRes 39.66 +.03 BarrickG 43.04 -.95
AKSteel 14.22 -.25 Baxter 58.50 -.49
AMR 5.64 -.41 BectDck 84.84 -.84
ASAGold 27.25 -.49 BerkHaA113100.00 -315.00
AT&TInc 30.44 -.28 BerkH B 75.62 +.01
AbtLab 51.75 -.17 BestBuy 32.48 +.36
AberFitc 64.62 -2.28 BIkHillsCp 29.92 -.27
Accenture 57.02 +1.33 BlkDebtStr 4.29 +.03
AccretivH 24.59 +.04 BkEnhC&l 13.78 -.06
Accuriden 11.91 -.29 Blackstone 16.02 -.24
AdamsEx 10.69 -.09 BlockHR 15.85 -.22
AMD 6.90 -.16 Boeing 71.26 +.01
Aerofexn 16.80 -.15 Boiselnc 7.08 +.10
Aeropost 17.15 -.36 BorgWarn 78.16 +1.74
Aetna 43.28 -.35 BostBeer 88.79 +.91
Agilent 48.49 -.89 BostProp 102.61 -1.06
Agnicog 63.95 -.97 BostonSci 6.89 -.20
AirLeasen 23.55 -1.44 BoydGm 8.24 -.09
AlcatelLuc 5.19 -.14 BrMySq 28.93 -.40
Alcoa 15.23 -.05 BrkfldOfPr 18.39 +.06
Alere 34.57 -1.98 Brunswidck 19.01 -.42
AllegTch 60.01 -.75 Budckeye 63.95 +.30
Allete 40.41 +.66 CBREllis 23.29 -1.01
AlliBGlbHi 15.10 +.06 CBSB 26.79 +.09
AlliBlnco 8.00 +.02 CH Engy 52.11 +.28
AlliBern 18.80 -.29 CIGNA 48.42 -.90
Allstate 29.43 -.23 CNOFind 7.24 -.08
AlphaNRs 42.71 -.91 CSSInds 20.08 +.48
Altria 26.79 -.06 CSXs 24.99 -.30
Ameren 28.26 +.25 CVREngy 22.79 -1.54
Amerigrp 64.34 -.51 CVS Care 36.42 -.40
AMovilL 50.78 -.37 CablvsnNY 34.53 -.20
AmAle 10.93 +10 CabotO&G 61.45 -.04
AEagleOut 12.59 -.29 Calix 20.68 +.17
AEP 37.10 -.20 CallGolf 6.15 -.19
AmEx 48.34 -.87 Calpine 15.72 -.18
AmlntGrp 28.45 -.22 Camecog 24.81 +.10
AmSIP3 7.79 +.05 Cameron 45.70 -.93
AmTower 51.75 -.74 CampSp 33.90 +79
Amerigas 44.46 +.23 CdnNRsgs 38.76 -.96
Ameriprise 55.40 -.73 CapOne 49.51 -.85
AmeriBrgn 40.14 -1.17 CapiflSrce 6.02 -.07
Anadarko 72.46 -.03 CapM pB 14.70 +.02
AnalogDev 37.32 -.66 CardnlHlth 44.00 -.31
AnglogldA 40.12 -1.34 CareFusion 26.40 -.80
ABInBev 55.65 -1.01 CarMax 31.93 -.62
AnnInc 26.03 -.08 Carnival 37.30 -.34
Annaly 18.70 -.02 Caterpillar 100.01 -.54
Apache 115.98 -1.43 Celanese 50.51 -.62
AquaAm 21.43 -.03 Cemex 8.00 -.08
ArcelorMit 32.02 -.20 CenterPnt 18.95 +.19
ArchCoal 25.30 -.58 CntyLink 39.16 -.55
ArchDan 29.30 -.21 Checkpnt 17.31 -.16
ArmourRsd 7.28 -.10 Chemturan 17.13 -.36
Ashland 62.29 -.99 ChesE 28.01 -.96
AsdEstat 16.05 +.25 ChesUfi 39.73 +.71
AfPwrg 15.30 -.21 Chevron 97.90 -1.46
ATMOS 32.30 +.04 Chios 15.02 -.24
AutoNath 34.44 -.23 Chimera 3.52
Avon 27.53 -.15 ChinaMble 47.03 +.69
BB&TCp 25.45 -.12 Chubb 60.93 -.52
BHPBiIILt 88.61 +.23 CindBell 3.10 -.05
BP PLC 41.90 -.68 Cinemark 20.03 +.02
BPZRes 3.29 +.05 Cifgrprs 39.59 +.18
BRT 6.50 +.16 CleanH 99.29 +.29
BakrHu 67.27 -2.98 CliffsNRs 86.62 +.09
BallCp s 37.49 -.32 Clorox 66.29 -.94
BcBilVArg 10.62 -.32 CloudPeak 20.38 +.50
BoBrades 19.32 -.06 Coach 58.66 -2.23
BoSantSA 10.66 -.37 CobaltlEn 13.18 +.32
BoSBrasil 10.92 -.04 CCFemsa 90.82 +.89


CocaCola 64.93 -.05
CocaCE 28.34 -.31
CohStlnfra 16.83 -.19
ColgPal 85.46 -.75
CollctvBrd 14.72 +.26
Comerica 33.74 -.15
CmwReitrs 25.14 -.07
CmtyHIt 24.27 -.76
CompPrdS 30.22 -.83
CompSci 37.09 -.61
ComskRs 27.33 -.61
Con-Way 36.75 -1.10
ConAgra 25.20 -.17
ConocPhil 71.43 -1.57
ConsolEngy 46.87 -.74
ConEd 52.40 +.16
ConstellA 20.82 -.24
ConstellEn 37.14 +.66
Cnvrgys 13.37 -.16
Corning 17.55 -.24
CottCp 8.29 +.30
Covidien 52.33 -.49
Crane 46.89 -1.02
CSVS2xVxS 24.05 +1.80
CreXus 10.95 +.31
CrownHold 38.09 +.09
Cummins 96.67 -1.68
,�22�667+ 04

DCTIndl 5.11 -.02
DNPSelct 9.93 -.00
DPL 30.11 -.04
DR Hortn 11.42 -.19
DSWInc 49.49 -1.40
DTE 49.04 +.35
DanaHldg 17.20 +.22
Danaher 51.31 -.87
Darden 48.51 -.17
DaVita 83.96 -.43
DeanFds 12.00 -.22
Deere 79.98 -1.75
DeltaAir 9.43 -.51
DenburyR 18.70 -.43
DevelDiv 13.36 -.14
DevonE 76.61 -.88
Dex One 2.30 -.02
DiaOffs 67.71 -.34
DiceHldg 13.51 +.35
Dillards 50.69 -1.52
DrSCBrrs 38.70 +.57
DirFnBrrs 50.60 +1.01
DirLCBrrs 39.00 +1.30
DrxEMBull 33.25 -.18
DrxEBearrs 17.49 +.90
DirEMBear 20.02 +.10
DrxFnBull 22.79 -.50
DirxSCBull 73.55 -1.10
DirxEnBull 61.90 -3.60
Discver 24.79 +.90
Disney 37.58 -.24
DomRescs 47.25 +.11
Dominos 24.79 -.05
DoralFnd 1.86 +.07
DowChm 35.23 -.39
DrPepSnap 39.89 -.15
DuPont 51.96 +.64
DuPFabros 24.87 +.12
DukeErgy 18.51 -.04
DukeRlty 13.41 -.14
ECDangn 10.44 -.81
EMC Cp 25.64 -.95
EOG Res 98.27 -1.89
EQT Corp 49.18 -.63
EagleMat 27.57 +.03
EastChm 98.58 -.39
EKodak 3.42 -.15
Eatons 48.19 -.66
EVEnEq 11.61 -.06


Edisonlnt 38.70
BPasoCp 19.46
Ban 10.80
BdorGldg 14.06
EmersonEl 53.57
EmpDist 18.61
EnbrEPts 30.55
EnCanag 28.95
EndvSilvg 8.07
EnergySol 4.91
EnPro 44.67
ENSCO 51.44


Entergy 68.17
EqtyRsd 58.36
ExcelTrst 11.13
ExoRes 18.78
Exelon 42.02
Express 21.47
ExterranH 20.03
ExxonMbl 76.78
FTICnslt 36.45
FairchldS 16.51
FedExCp 91.87
FedSignl 6.32
Ferrellgs 22.58
Ferro 12.31
FidNatlnfo 30.07
FstBcPRrs 3.81
FstHorizon 9.54
FstRepBn 32.96
FTActDiv 10.72
FtTrEnEq 11.90
FirstEngy 43.05
FiveStar 6.03
RagstBcp 1.29
Rotek 7.63
Ruor 61.12
FootLockr 24.24
FordM 13.24
ForestLab 39.33
FortuneBr 62.51
FMCG s 48.43
Freescalen 16.86
FronterCm 7.87
FronferOil 28.68


Fronline 14.90 -.57

GATX 36.25 -.52
GNCn 19.39 -.66
GabelliET 5.90 -.06
GabHIthW 7.46 +.00
GabUl 7.11 -.07
GaisaSA 9.19 -.01
GameStop 26.12 -.14
Gannett 13.53 -.11
Gap 17.66 -.32
GenDynam 72.29 -.61


GenElec 17.97
GenGrPrn 16.11
GenMarit 1.40
GenMills 36.85
GenMotn 29.92
GenOn En 3.74
Genpact 16.34
Genworth 9.95
Gerdau 9.68
GlimchRt 9.25
GoldFLd 13.92
Goldarpg 46.84
GoldmanS 130.91
Goodrich 92.39
Goodyear 15.88
jGrace 42.50
GrafTech 19.03
GraphPkg 5.30
GtPlainEn 20.49
Griffon 9.77
GuangRy 20.50
HCA HIdn 32.25
HCP Inc 36.55
HSBC 48.24
HSBCCap 26.98
Hallibrth 45.87
HanJS 15.23
HanPrmDv 12.32
Hanesbrds 27.84
Hanoverlns 36.43
HarleyD 38.07
HarmonyG 12.34


HartfdFn 24.72 +.37
HawaiiEl 23.55 +.10
HItCrREIT 52.27 +.13
HItMgmt 10.34 -.25
HlthcrRlty 20.47 -.03
HeclaM 7.29 -.20
Heinz 53.01 +.45
HelmPayne 60.68 -.58
Hertz 15.19 -.12
Hess 69.04 -.54
HewlettP 34.90 -.33
HigherOne 18.47


HighwdPrp 32.43 -.01
Hillenlnc 22.70 -.45
HollyCp 59.81 -5.69
HomeDp 35.08 -.57
HonwIllnf 56.35 -.15
HorizLns 1.10 -.01
HospPT 23.79 +.06
HostHofs 16.14 +.01
Humana 80.38 -1.08
Huntsmn 17.49 -.16
IAMGIdg 17.96 -1.00
ICICI Bk 46.34 +.78
ING 11.12 -.47
IONGeoph 8.18 -.20
iShGold 14.66 -.21
iSAsfia 24.64 -.26
iShBraz 69.57 -.25
iShGer 25.36 -.47
iSh HK 17.94 +.05
iShJapn 10.12 +.06
iSh Kor 62.51 +.22
iSMalas 14.75 -.14
iShMex 59.31 -.25
iShSing 13.23 -.08
iSTaiwn 14.60 -.24
iShSilver 33.36 -1.01
iShChina25 41.64 +.37
iSSP500 127.29 -1.46
iShEMkts 45.50 -.08
iShSPLatA 49.05 -.22
iShB20T 96.98 -.41
iS Eafe 57.10 -.55
iSR1KV 65.84 -.66


iSR1KG 58.31
iSR2KV 71.12
iSR2KG 91.13
iShR2K 79.94
iShREst 58.76
iStar 7.42
ITTCorp 56.22
Idacorp 38.92
ITW 54.35
Imafon 9.11
IngerRd 43.13
IntegrysE 50.82


IntcnlEx 118.56 -1.06
IBM 165.07 -1.05
InfGame 16.73 -.23
IntPap 28.78 -.17
Interpublic 11.46 -.15
IntraLksn 17.85 +.25
Invesco 21.92 -.73
IronMtn 32.83 -.33
ItauUnibH 22.00 -.11

JPMorgCh 39.49 -.58
Jabil 19.14 +.04
JanusCap 8.79 -.26
Jefferies 20.12 -.57
JohnJn 65.06 -.61
JohnsnCfi 39.17
JnprNtwk 30.02 -.25
KB Home 11.76 -.09
KBRInc 36.01 +.01
KVPhmA 2.53 +.08
KCSouthn 55.59 -.41
Kaydon 36.22 -.14
KAEngTR 28.25
Kelbgg 54.76 +.64
Kemetrs 13.92 -.12
KeyEngy 16.55 -.27
Keycorp 7.93 -.16
KimbClk 65.36 -.72
Kimco 18.08 +.04
KindME 71.41 -.08
KindMor n 28.60 -.50
Kinross g 15.14 -.37


Kohls 49.45 -1.45 Mosaic 63.60 +.21 PiedmOfc 20.10 -.30 Revlon 15.67 -.09
KosmosEn 17.34 -.50 MotrlaSoln 45.40 -.24 Pier1 11.39 -.02 ReynAms 37.06 -.19
Kraft 34.60 +.34 MotrlaMon 23.11 -.35 PilgrimsP 5.20 -.19 RioTinto 67.63 -.08
KratonPP 38.78 -.67 MurphO 62.81 -.41 PimoStrat 11.27 -.07 RiteAid 1.20 +.03
KrispKrm 9.13 +.03 NCRCorp 18.23 -.17 PinWst 43.72 -.01 RockTen 64.23 -.82
Kroger 24.50 -.24 NRGEgy 22.80 -.43 PitnyBw 22.12 -.54 RockwAut 80.62 -1.12
KronosWs 28.08 -.14 NVEnergy 15.10 ... PlumCrk 39.20 -.16 RockColl 60.19 -.33
LDKSolar 6.81 -.18 NYSEEur 31.87 -.89 Polaris 106.73 -1.06 RockwdH 51.81 +.15
LSICorp 6.83 -.16 Nabors 23.04 -.86 Polypore 63.72 +1.03 Rowan 35.92 -1.01
LTCPrp 27.00 +.29 NBkGreece 1.31 -.11 PostPrp 39.33 -.07 RylCarb 36.21 -.66
LaZBoy 9.37 -.23 NatFuGas 69.96 -.15 Potash s 52.54 -.40 RoyDShllA 67.36 -1.22
Ladede 37.31 +.36 NatGrid 47.55 +.09 PwshDB 28.26 -.34 Royce 14.26 -.23
LVSands 39.19 -.36 NOilVarco 70.10 -1.71 PSAgri 31.93 -.29 RoceB 2549 29
LeeEnt .82 -.00 NatSemi 24.64 -.06 PS USDBull 21.63 +.13 l
LeggMason 31.25 -.50 Navistar 53.33 -.75 PSFinPf 17.76 -.05
LenderPS 20.31 -.39 NewAmHi 10.89 +.09 Praxair 103.29 -.22 SAIC 16.55 -.07
LennarA 18.04 -.47 NJRscs 43.39 +.12 PrecDrill 13.45 -.19 SAPAG 58.19 -1.39
LbtyASG 4.35 ... NYCmtyB 14.94 -.15 PrinFnd 29.01 -.46 SCANA 38.66 +.13
LillyEli 36.76 -.43 NYTimes 7.98 -.10 ProLogis 34.16 +.33 SKTIcm 17.83 +.09
Limited 37.17 +.12 NewellRub 15.66 +.31 ProShtS&P 42.61 +.49 SLMCp 16.66 +.03
LincNat 26.76 -.38 NewfdExp 64.82 -.89 PrUShS&P 22.38 +.51 SpdrDJIA 119.20 -1.12
Lindsay 62.16 +.07 NewmtM 52.27 -1.71 PrUIShDow 18.56 +.35 SpdrGold 146.26 -2.08
LionsGtg 6.57 -.06 NewpkRes 8.82 -.09 ProUltQQQ 80.45 -2.91 SPMid 171.71 -1.27
LizClaib 5.34 09 Nexeng 19.75 -56 PrUShQQQrs55.61 +1.93 S&P500ETF126.81 -1.49
LloydBkg 2.73 -.15 NextEraEn 56.61 +23 ProUltSP 48.89 -1.17 SpdrHome 17.89 -.21
LodhdM 79.20 -.49 NiSource 19.48 +.31 ProUShL20 32.50 +.22 SpdrKbwBk 22.99 -.25
LaPac 8.14 +.07 Nicor 54.25 +.13 ProUltR2K 43.95 -.43 SpdrLehHY 39.45 -.14
Lowes 23.25 -.46 NikeB 81.18 -1.01 ProUSSP50017.54 +.59 SpdrKbwRB 24.59 -.08
vonBa 58 48 NobleCorp 37.71 -.39 PrUltSP500 s 69.70 -2.51 SpdrRefl 51.96 -.69
j 17 . NokiaCp 5.88 .14 ProUSSlvrs 19.58 +1.08 SpdrOGEx 55.12 -1.04
Nordstrm 44.90 -.98 PrUltCrders 39.04 -.45 SpdrMetM 65.30 -.69
M&TBk 85.32 -.96 NorfikSo 71.67 -.70 PrUShCrders52.97 +.62 STRHIdgs 14.33 -2.39
MBIA 8.29 -.04 NoestUt 3464 +07 ProUShEuro 17.53 +.19 Safeway 22.55 -.41
MDC 25.51 -.40 NorthropG 66.35 +.18 ProctGam 62.59 -.87 StJoe 19.80 -.32
MDURes 22.04 +.14 Novaris 59.31 -.51 ProgrssEn 47.18 -.10 SUude 46.30 -1.10
MEMC 8.08 -.34 NSTAR 45.25 +.28 ProgsvCp 20.56 +.11 Saks 10.97 -.17
MFGlobal 7.50 -.12 Nur 39.56 -.44 ProUSR2Krs44.92 +.45 Salesforce 143.04 -1.44
MFAFnd 8.04 +.05 NvlM 1352 +03 PrudenD 59.71 -.69 SaelyBty 16.85 -.33
MCR 9.39 +.01 NvMuSI&G 8.77 -.06 PSEG 31.08 -.50 SJuanB 23.62 -.20
MGIC 6.04 -.01 NuvQPf2 8.25 -.02 PubSrg 110.73 +1.96 SandRdge 10.37 -.18
MGMRsts 12.20 -.25 OGEEy 48.97 +.15 PlteGrp 7.52 -.06 SaraLee 18.60 -.23
Macquarie 26.21 -.22 OasisPet 26.94 .20 PPrT 6.41 +.05 Schlmbrg 80.92 -2.15
Macys 28.02 -.68 OcciPet 98.46 93 QEPRes n 40.52 +.59 Sciwab 15.78 -.25
MageiMPr 58.71 +.36 Oceaneers 37.58 -.25 QuadGrp n 38.01 -1.92 SedrillL 33.04 -.73
Magnalgs 49.93 +.13 OfficeDpt 417 .08 QuanexBld 15.90 +.06 SealAir 22.51 +.01
MagHRes 6.15 +.0 76 4 QuantaSv 19.46 -.37 SemGroup 25.73 -.25
Manitowoc 15.34 -.81 OilSHT 140.91 3.57 QntmDSS 3.16 -.11 SemiHTr 32.66 -.74
Manulifeg 16.20 .16 Olin 21.75 .21 Questars 17.59 +.06 Sensient 36.35 -.29
MarathonO 49.55 -2.07 megaHt 20.39 .14 QksilvRes 14.60 -.18 SiderurNac 1.81 -.07
MkVGold 52.58 -1.43 m P 13.42 RATFn 2.09 +.03 SilvWhg 31.75 -1.38
MMtRs 36.88 -.26 Omnicom 45.61 -.84 RLJLodgn 17.07 -.31 SilvrcpMg 8.82 .48
MktVJrGd 32.99 -1.10 ONEK 45.61 -.84 RPCs 22.54 -.29 SimonProp 112.44 +.46
MMVArid 32.99 -1.10 5 ONEOK 73.27 +.94 RPM 22.32 -.30 SixFlags 73.55 -.74
MMVAgri 51.35 -.05 ONEOKPt 83.87 +.87
MarlntA 3396 -.8 OshoshCP 2775 +10 RSCHldgs 10.89 -.46 Skechiers 13.65 -.25
MrlntA 33.96 -.25 OshkoshCp 27.75 +.10 Rackspace 40.48 -.36 SmithAOs 40.82 -.28
MarshllsM 29.92 -.15 Oenslll 25.56 +.010 RadianGrp 3.92 -.29 SmithfF 21.87 +.09
Mas 77 .2 -10] RadioShk 12.85 -.35 Smudcer 74.90 -1.33
Masm 12.01 -.35 PG&ECp 41.81 +.32 Ralcorp 86.50 -.82 SolarWinds 24.80 -.54
McDrmlnts 19.03 +.11 PNC 56.61 -.08 RJamesFn 31.32 -.46 Soluta 21.01 -.73
McDnlds 81.84 -.45 PNM Res 16.34 +.15 Rayonier 63.01 +.27 SoJerlnd 52.04 +.45
McGrwH 39.51 -.56 PPG 87.16 +.15 Raytheon 47.93 -.46 SouthnCo 39.43 +.09
McKesson 81.55 .49 PPLCorp 27.08 -.01 ReaDn 24.61 +20 SthnCopper 31.42 .16
MedmoHIth 53.31 -1.11 PallCorp 54.17 -.46 Rltylnm 33.09 +.14 SoUnCo 39.85 +5.70
MediaGen 4.03 -.28 PariotCoal 21.25 -.19 RedHat 45.03 -.24 SwstAirl 11.36 -.05
Mednic 38.40 +.06 PeabdyE 57.04 +.11 RegionsFn 5.94 -.23 SwsthEngy 40.84 -.78
Merck 3455 -.42 Pengrthg 12.20 ReneSola 5.04 -.02 Spansion 18.56 -.05
Meredith 30.40 -.82 PennVaRs 26.00 +.16 Renrenn 6.23 -.30 SpectraEn 26.45 -.30
,t, 40nn. -.2 D o ..,nn to 2.2 o , RepubSvc 30.49 -.61 SprintNex 5.00 -.06


MetroPCS 16.66 -.11 Penney 34.24
MidAApt 65.48 +.34 PepBoy 10.78
Midas 6.15 +.25 PepsiCo 68.45
MobileTele 18.68 -.13 Prmian 21.31
Molyorpn 55.76 +1.79 Petrohawk 23.24
MoneyGrm 3.32 -.04 PetrbrsA 28.92
Monsanto 65.96 -.61 Petrobras 31.87
MonstrWw 13.50 -.41 Pfizer 20.08
Moodys 37.05 -.62 PhilipMor 65.10
MorgStan 22.21 -.14 PhilipsEl 23.76
MSEmMkt 15.24 +.02 PiedNG 29.38


IA EIA N - 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.23 +.01
AbdnEMTel 18.36 +.18
AdmRsc 25.11 -.09
Advenbx 2.85 -.04
AlexmoRg 6.88 -.12
AlldNevG 33.30 -1.27
AmApparel .84 -.07
AmDGEn 1.62 +.02
Anooraq g .78 -.04
AntaresP 2.17 +.20
AoxingPh 1.40 -.03
Armourwt .04 -.00


Aurizong 5.38
AvalRaren 6.66
Bacterin n 3.04
Ballanty 4.94
BarcUBS36 46.77
BarcGSOil 23.46
BioTime 4.75
Brigusgrs 1.63
CAMACEn 1.19
CanoPet .31
CardiumTh .27
CelSd .50
CFCdag 20.46
ChaseCorp 15.97
CheniereEn 8.04


-.07 ChiGengM 1.94 -.10
+.02 ChinaShen 3.60 +.05
-.12 ClghGlbOp 12.94 -.02
+.20 CrSuislno 3.88 -.02
-.41 CrSuiHiY 3.21 -.06
-.18
+20 DenisnMg 1.80 -.04
-.01 EVMuni2 12.56 +.05
-.04 EllieMaen 5.86 +.16
-.03 EllswthFd 7.43
-.00 eMagin 5.53 +.26
-.02 EvolPetol 7.13 +.05
-.57 ExeterRgs 4.20 -.19
+.57 Express-1 3.13 -.08
-.38 FrkStPrp 12.33 -.07


GabGldNR 17.25
GascoEngy .23
Gastargrs 3.39
GenMoly 4.33
Geoldnecs 7.96
GeoPeto .44
GoldResrc 24.81
GoldenMin 19.68
GoldStrg 2.25
GranTrrag 6.22
GrtBasGg 1.97
GtPanSilvg 3.37
GugFront 22.92


HooperH .91 +.08
Hyperdyn 4.32 -.02
ImpOilgs 43.89 -.68
.10 InovioPhm .59 +.00
-.01 IntellgSys 1.32 +.06
-.01
-.15 wikiwA
+.08 KodiakOg 5.35 +.09
-1.47 LadThalFn 1.40 +.08
-.54 Lannett 5.35 -.04
-.02
.12
-.07 MadCatzg 1.35 -.03
-.19 Metalico 5.62 -.18
+.05 MetoHIth 4.88 +.09


MdwGoldg 2.05
NeoStem 1.72
Neoprobe 3.70
Neuralstem 1.66
Nevsung 5.86
NwGoldg 9.71
NA Pall g 3.75
NDynMng 9.41
NthnO&G 19.30
NthgtMg 2.58
NovaBayP 1.30
NovaGldg 8.62
Oilsandsg .33
OpkoHlth 3.45
OrsusXelrs 4.87


ParaG&S 3.50 -.05 SagaComm 37.00 -.80
PernixTh 8.67 -.30 SamsO&G 2.83 +.15
PhrmAth 3.20 +.16 SeabGldg 26.87 -.54
PbnDrill 13.48 -.43 SreamGSv 3.36 +.04
Procerars 10.04 -.03 Taseko 4.42 +.04
PyramidOil 4.56 -.05 TimberlnR .77 -.06
Quepasa 6.65 +.16 TrnsaflPet 1.80 -.07
QuestRMg 6.53 +.24 TravelCks 4.99 -.01
RareEleg 10.67 +.17 TriValey .61 +.04
Rentech 1.01 +.06 TriargPet 5.98 -.17
RevettMrs 4.44 +.22 Tuowsg .81 +.05
RexahnPh 1.24 +.02 UQM Tech 2.29
Rubicong 4.54 -.01 Univlnsur 4.89 +.19


Ur-Energy 1.62 +.06
Uranerz 3.04 -.06
UraniumEn 3.09 -.08


VantageDrl 1.84 +.09
VirnetX 28.24 +.65
VistaGold 2.77 -.02
VoyagerOG 2.63 +.11
Walterlnv 19.11 -.84
WhitestRn 12.75 +.05
WTDrfChn 25.40 -.02
WizzardSft .16 -.00
YMBiog 2.67 -.01


A ADAQ N AT OA LMARKET*11


Name Last Chg


ACMoorelf 2.49 +.07
AMCNetwi 35.55 +.55
ASML HId 34.98 -.58
ATCross 10.84 -.37
ATPO&G 14.67 -.54
AVIBio 1.40 +.04
Abraxas 3.23 -.04
Accuray 7.67 -.07
Achillion 7.23 +.20
AcmePk 65.16 -2.71
AcivePwr 2.41 -.05
AcivsBliz 11.29 -.09
Actuate 5.53 +.02
AcuraPh 4.10 +.37
Acxiom 12.02 -.17
AdobeSy 29.97 -.47
AdvATech 6.05
AdvBattery 1.07 -.03
AdvEnld 13.85 +.16
Aegerionn 15.41 -.14
AEternag 2.21 -.04
Affymax 6.96 +.35
Afymetix 7.46 -.21
AkamaiT 29.25 -.59
Akorn 6.85 +.37
AlaskCom 8.98 -.05
Alexions 44.82 -.47
Alexza 1.65 +.03
AlignTech 22.09 -.56
Alkerm 17.31 -.26
AlldHlther 2.47 +.09
AllosThera 2.10 +.01
AllscriptH 18.70 -.25
AlphaOmg 13.53 +.24
AlteraCp f 43.63 -.74
AlterraCap 21.73 -.15
Amarin 14.44 -.08
Amazon 192.55 -1.61
ACapAgy 28.73 +.09
AmCapLd 9.14 -.11
AmSupr 8.11 -.03
AmCasino 22.67 -.11
Amgen 57.04 -.89
AmicusTh 5.71 -.31
AmkorTIf 5.97 -.05
AmpioPhm 8.10 +.34
Amtech 18.59 -.66
Amylin 11.83 -.29
Amyrisn 30.12 +1.00
Anadigc 3.12 -.03
Anlogic 51.96 +.30
Analystlnt 3.15 -.02
Ancesry 39.92 -.17
AntheraPh 8.11 +.07
A123Sys 4.94 +.01
ApolloGrp 41.94 -.52
Apollolnv 9.71 -.20
Apple Inc 326.35 -4.88
ApldEnerh .32 +.01
ApldMai 12.40 -.36
AMCC 8.56 +.19
Approach 21.77 -.42
ArchCaps 31.99 -.32
ArenaPhm 1.31 -.03
AresCap 15.86 -.19
AriadP 10.63 +.21
AribaInc 33.12 +.42
ArmHId 28.07 -.06
Arris 10.95 +.05
ArubaNet 26.70 -.66
AscenaRf 33.22 +.13
AsialnfoL 14.61 +.08
AspenTech 15.45 -.26
AspenBio h .71 +.01
AssetAcc 3.70 +.06
AssodBanc 13.25 -.02
AstaFdg 8.21 +.36
Atmel 13.06 -.35
AtiCure 12.40 +.26
Audvox 7.35 -.07
Autodesk 36.69 -.48
AutoData 51.22 -.70
Auxilium 19.12 -.10
AvagoTch 35.52 -.30


AvanirPhm 3.46 +.06 Codexs 9.51 +.07
AVEOPh 19.55 +.54 CoffeeH 15.69 -.16
AvisBudg 15.80 -.10 CognizTech 71.14 -.96
Awareh 2.98 -.17 CogoGrp 5.27 +.06
Axcelis 1.75 +.14 Coinstar 50.62 +.21
BEAero 38.93 -.04 ColdwtrCrk 1.31 +.01
BGCPtrs 7.51 -.35 ColumLabs 3.23 -.06
BMCSft 51.64 -1.42 Comcast 23.58 -.13
Baidu 128.68 -.54 Comcspd 22.50 -.13
Bannerrs 16.92 -.30 CommSys 16.39 -.99
BeasleyB 4.10 +.37 CompCred 2.60 -.08
BedBath 56.59 -.34 Compuwre 9.40 -.21
BenihanaA 9.50 -.15 ComScore 25.60 -.35
BigBandN 2.16 -.12 Comverge 2.99 +.24
Biodel 1.81 +.14 Concepts 10.69 -.18
Biogenldc 103.42 +2.75 Conmed 27.16 +.19
BioLase 5.52 -.41 Conns 8.83 +.64
BioMarin 25.55 -.23 ConvOrgh .09 -.02
BioSante 2.80 +.18 Corcept 4.62 +.14
BlackDiam 7.46 +.12 CorinthC 4.14 +.13
Blkboard 43.94 +3.17 CorOnDmn 17.56 -1.00
BlueCoat 21.46 -.39 CostPlus 10.21 -.16
BobEvans 34.03 +.08 Costco 79.13 -1.27
BodyCenn 22.35 +.35 Covenant 7.99 -.16
BookMill 3.65 +.24 CowenGp 3.80 +.14
BravoBrin 23.93 +1.18 CraftBrew 8.77 +.07
BridgeCp 10.39 -.27 CreeInc 33.96 -.56
BrigExp 26.89 -.29 CrimsnExp 3.22 -.11
Brighpnt 8.07 -.07 Crocs 24.81 -.40
Broadcom 32.22 -.57 CrosstexE 11.00 -.23
BroadSoft 36.12 +.08 CrwnMedia 1.88 +.07
Broadwind 1.43 -.07 Ctip.om 39.31 -1.48
BrcdeCm 6.19 -.48 CubistPh 35.71 -.56
BrklneB 9.16 +.14 CumbldPh 5.86 +.57
BrukerCp 18.59 -.04 Curis 3.58 +.26
Bucyrus 91.64 -.08 Cutera 8.31 +.02
CAInc 21.91 -.36 CypSemi 19.90 -.22
CBOE 24.10 -.01 CytRxh .74 +.01
CDCCprs 2.10 -.05 dnet 1.22 +.07
CH Robins 76.09 1.32
CIFC Deerf 6.73 -.08
CTC Media20.02 -.07 DUSA 5.93 -.04
CVBFnd 8.79 -.02 DeckOuts 83.04 -2.00
CadencePh 9.28 +.13 DellInc 15.93 -.34
Cadence 10.20 -.15 DeltaPth .51 -.02
Callidus 5.60 +.17 DemandTc 9.16 -.01
CdnSolar 11.10 +.16 Dndreon 38.65 -.49
CapeBncp 10.00 -.08 Dennys 3.82 -.09
CapBNC 3.16 -.20 Dentsply 37.39 -.41
CapCtyBk 10.97 +.50 Depomed 8.10 +.20
CapFdFrs 11.79 +.02 DexCom 14.60 -.08
CpstnTrbh 1.44 +.03 Dialogicn 3.88 -.25
CardiovSys 13.63 -.14 DirecTVA 47.75 -.23
Cardtronic 21.82 -.65 DiscCmA 40.22 -.42
CareerEd 19.84 -.45 DiscCmC 35.92 -.56
CaribouC 12.97 +.67 DishNetwk 28.00 -.39
Carmike 6.99 +.17 DllrTrees 65.26 -.68
Carrizo 36.49 -.38 DonlleyRR 18.92 -.37
CarverBch .55 +.04 DotHillSy 2.60 -.09
CasellaW 5.47 +.20 DrmWksA 20.96 -.36
CatalystH 52.94 +.35 DryShips 3.96 -.06
Cavium 40.60 -.44 DurectCp 2.13 -.96
Celgene 58.77 -1.12 DynRsh 12.14 -.40
CellTherrsh 1.99 +.09 Dynavax 2.73 +.08
CelldexTh 3.58 +.36 E-Trade 13.38 -.17
CenterBc 9.98 -.25 eBay 28.35 -.90
CentEuro 11.14 -.26 EagleBulk 2.30 -.02
CEurMed 19.16 -.60 ErthLink 7.65 -.10
CenGrdAlf 9.60 -.27 EstWstBcp 19.25 -.06
CentAI 14.22 -.18 EducDevh 5.37 +.04
Cephln 79.89 -.06 8x8 nc 4.02 -.14
ChrmSh 3.94 -.09 ElectSd 17.78 +.04
Chartlnds 49.90 +1.63 ElectArts 21.77 -.13
CharterCm 54.41 -1.11 Emorelf 2.19 -.01
ChkPoint 54.45 -.07 EmpirRsth 1.06 +.21
Cheesecake 30.91 -.01 EndoPhrm 38.63 -.50
ChelseaTh 5.12 -.06 Endocyten 12.88 +.95
ChrchllD 42.95 -.33 Endobgix 9.15 +.63
CienaCorp 17.76 -.80 Enerl 1.15 +.02
CinnFin 28.13 -.05 EngyConv 1.15 -.01
Cintas 31.75 -.37 EnrgyRec 3.06 +.20
Cirrus 14.19 -.41 EngyXXI 31.49
Ciso 14.93 -.54 Entegris 9.78 +.03
CitzRepBh .65 -.00 EntopCom 8.61 +.30
CitixSys 76.24 -.91 EnzonPhar 10.01 -.15
CleanEngy 12.54 -.15 EricsnTel 13.16 -.37
Clearwire 3.98 -.04 EssexRent 6.67 +.14
ClevBioLh 3.39 -.10 EvrgrSlrrs .49 -.04


ExactSdh 8.20 +.14 HunJB 45.71 -.53
Exelixis 8.74 -.16 HuntBnk 6.10 -.11
ExideTc 7.07 -.21 HutchT 2.33 -.07
Expedia 27.96 -.33 IACInter 36.49 -.17
Expdlnf 47.58 -.92 ICOGIbA 3.23 +.37
ExpScripts 52.94 -1.12 iGateCorp 15.57 -.13
F5Netwks 106.10 -1.52 IPGPhoton 66.17 +.27
FLIRSys 32.03 -.54 iShAsiaexJ 59.57 -.20
FSIlln 2.81 -.12 lonixBr 23.07 -.35
FairptCmn 9.65 -.40 IdenixPh 5.25 -.05
FalonStor 4.29 +.09 Idenfve 2.44 +.11
Fastenals 33.42 -.28 Ikanos 1.27 +.08
FiberTwr 1.30 +.14 Illumina 73.00 -1.13
FiftlhTird 12.18 +.09 Immuor 19.37 -.21
FindEngin 25.13 +.90 inContact 4.39 -.21
Fndlnst 16.10 +.31 Incyte 18.37 -.09
Finisar 16.06 -.46 Infinera 6.58
FinLine 21.34 -1.83 Informat 56.81 -.60
FstBusey 5.29 +.14 InfosysT 62.36 +.16
FstCashFn 38.91 -.11 Inhibitx 3.93 +.13
FstDeiFn 14.31 -.17 Innospec 30.86 -1.33
FsNiagara 13.11 -.13 Insmedrs 12.00 +.27
FstPacTrst 14.83 -.24 Insulet 20.60 +.83
FstSolar 116.56 -5.89 IntgDv 7.51 -09
FstSouthB 4.22 +.26 Intel 21.20 51
FstMerit 16.04 -.02 InteracBrk 15.1720 -.51
Fiserv 6071 -.60 InteractBrk 15.17 -.72
Flexn 640 +06 interClidc 7.34 -.32
Flowlnt 3.24 -.15 InterDig 38.31 -.20
FocusMda 29.01 +1.02 InterMune 35.02 -.33
ForcePro 465 -.13 InterNAP 7.10 -.26
Forfnets 25.85 +.73 I"nSpdw 26.83 -.31
FosterWhl 28.97 -.50 Intersectns 5.93 -.30
Fox Chase 13.68 -.17 Intersil 12.50 -.18
FranklnFn 11.80 -.22 Intuit 50.50 -.22
FreshMktn 38.83 -.70 IridiumCm 8.19 -.07
FriendFdn 3.80 +.10 IronwdPh 16.03 -.23
FuelCell 1.46 +.01 Isis 8.93 +.02
FultonFncl 10.63 -.03 IstaPh 7.07 -.08
sba 12.19 -.38

GSIGrprs 11.32 -.33
GTSolar 15.30 +.27 JASolar 5.57 -.10
GTxlnc 4.77 +.14 JDSUniph 16.01 -.65
Gaiam 4.81 -.01 Jamba 2.17 +.05
Garmin 33.45 -.56 JamesRiv 19.86 +.20
GenProbe 69.51 +1.62 JazzPhrm 31.82 -.18
Gentex 29.48 +.04 JetBlue 6.06 -.13
Genfvah 20.01 +.60 JoeJeansh .81 -.07
GeronCp 3.92 -.04 JoyGlbl 86.65 -1.09
GileadSd 39.71 -.42 KEYWn 12.04 +.66
GladerBc 12.97 -.05 KITDigit 12.00 -.04
Gleacher 2.12 +.02 KLATnc 39.03 -.43
Globllnd 5.02 -.20 KeryxBio 4.62 -.03
GblPowEq 25.25 -.23 KiORn 15.00
GloblTraff 11.30 -.33 Kohlberg 7.98
Globalstar 1.22 +.04 Kulicke 11.01 +.15
GlbSpcMet 20.59 -.31 L&LEngy 5.56 -.14
GluMobile 4.70 +.14 LCAVis 4.84 +.23
Google 474.88 -5.34 LKQ Corp 25.40 -.06
GrCanyEd 13.54 -.24 LPLlnvn 33.15 -.47
GreenBcsh 2.65 +.02 LSI Indlf 8.14 +.24
GreenMtC 83.43 -1.46 Labophgh .16 -.00
GrifolsSAn 6.92 -.11 LamResrch 43.22 -.12
GulfportE 26.47 +1.40 Laftce 6.37 +.05
HMNFn 2.45 -.20 LawsnSft 11.21 -.01
HainCel 32.01 -.31 LeCroy 11.51 -.64
HampRBrs 13.44 -1.56 LeapWirlss 16.46 -.03
HanmiFnd .89 +.01 Level3 2.27 -05
HansenMed 3.11 +.19 LePhrm 1.79 +.19
HansenNat 78.05 +3.04 LibGlobA 42.27 +.24
HanwhaSol 5.90 -.31 L A 1
HarbinElec 14.95 +.27 LibtyMantA 15.97 -.34
Harmonic 7.06 -.21 LibStarzA 69.00 -1.28
HrvrdBo 517 -.32 LifePrtslf 3.79 -.10
Hasbro 4335 -.30 LifeTech 51.89 -1.22
HawHold 5.74 -.11 LimelghtN 4.61 -.13
HIthStrm 11.45 +.07 Lincare 28.94 -.39
HercOffsh 5.07 -.22 LincEdSv 16.09 +.13
HrtgeCo 4.84 -.13 LinearTch 31.78 -.56
Hickory 11.38 -.58 LinnEngy 38.00 +.34
Hoku Corp 1.75 . LivePrsn 12.77 +.01
Hollysys 10.40 +.53 Local.com 3.35 -.06
Hologic 19.94 -.31 LodgeNet 3.28 -.06
Homelnns 35.92 +.80 Logitech 10.67 -.27
HookerFu 9.08 +.09 LogMeln 37.88 -1.43
HudsCity 7.94 -.06 LookSmart 1.53 -.04
HumGen 24.91 -.36 lululemng 104.38 -2.32


MDCPrg 17.35
MELASd 2.33
MGE 40.19
MIPSTech 6.63
MTS 39.30
Magma 7.83
Majesco 2.96
MannKd 3.99
MarinaB rs .25
MarvellT 14.06
Mattel 26.75
Mattson 1.79
Maximlnig 24.10
MaxwllT 15.52
MediaMdn 21.92
MedicAcIn 8.23
MedQuistn 12.01
MeloCrwn 11.45
MentorGr 12.30
MergeHIth 5.25
Microchp 36.55
MicronT 7.21
MicroSemi 19.72
Microsoft 24.30
MillerHer 26.46
Misonix 2.49
Mitcham 15.67
MobileMini 20.26
Molex 25.91
Monotype 13.72
MotorcarP 14.73
Moticity 8.49
Move Inc 2.00
Mylan 23.11
MyriadG 22.52
NIC Inc 13.06
NIl HIdg 40.40
NNInc 12.62
NPS Phm 9.25
NXPSemn 23.46
Nanosphere 1.64
NasdOMX 23.39
NatPenn 7.63
NektarTh 7.40
NessTech 7.61
NetogicM 39.03
NetApp 49.22
Netease 43.30
Netiix 256.96
NtScout 19.92
NetSolTch 1.54
NetwkEng 1.16
NtwkEq 2.22
NeurogX 1.98
NewsCpA 16.73
NewsCpB 17.27
NichFnd 11.73
NobilityH 8.07
Nordsons 51.34
NorTrst 44.98
NwstBcsh 12.14
NoviWrls 5.26
Novavax 1.97
Novlus 34.37
NuVasive 32.01
NuanceCm 20.47
Numerex 9.16
Nvidia 15.74
NxStageMd 20.00
OCZTech 8.35
OReillyAu 64.00
Oclaro 6.04
OdysMar 2.96
Omeros 4.50
OmniVisn 31.07
OnAssign 9.25
OnSmcnd 10.17
OnoGenex 17.48
Onothyr 8.95
OnlineRes 3.30
OpenTable 77.67
Opnext 2.41
OpbmerPh 12.02
Oracle 31.14
Orbcomm 3.08
Orexigen 1.71


Orthfx 41.77 -.02
Orthovta 3.83 -.02
.45 OtterTail 20.82 -.07
-.06 Oversk 14.70 -.05
+.12 CA h 253 01
-.20
-.65
-.09 PC-Tel 5.95 +.06
+.11 PDllnc 6.69 +.19
-.02 PDLBio 5.75 -.19
-.00 PGTInc 1.94 +.13
-.40 PLXTch 3.24 -.05
-.18 PMCSra 7.16 +.03
+.06 PRGXGlbl 6.90 +.15
-.49 Paccar 48.46 -.63
-.06 PacBbsdn 11.32 +.74
+.02 PacSunwr 2.54 -.01
+.02 PaetecHId 4.44 -.04
-.38 PainTher 5.30 -3.94
+.31 PanASlv 29.66 -.86
-.35 ParamTch 22.81 -.07
+.10 ParkStrg 4.92 -.19
-.69 Patterson 31.64 -.53
-1.22 PattUTI 28.32 -.54
.28 Paychex 29.99 -.58
-.33 PeapkGI 12.40 +.62
-.29 PensonWw 3.65 +.09
.04 PeopUdF 12.86 -.09
+.1 PetroDev 29.67 -.41
+.47 PetsMart 44.81 -.22
-.20 PharmPdt 26.14 -.05
-.11
-.12 Pharmacyc 10.11 +.79
-.42 Pharmasset 106.98 -1.74
-.12 PinnaclA 4.48 +.14
+.19 Polyom 60.76 -.39
.47 Popular 2.66 -.09
+15 Power-One 7.80 -.30
-.51 PwShs QQQ54.38 -.96
.40 Powrwav 2.84 -.16
-.22 Presstek 1.56 +.04
+.05 PriceTR 56.51 -.57
+.12 priceline 482.97 -7.03
+.04 Primoris 12.61 +.46
-.01 PrinctnRh .21 +.01
-.17 PrivateB 13.25 -.36
+.02 PrUPShQQQ28.75 +1.44
-.04 PrognicsPh 6.93 +.03
-2.04 ProgrsSfts 23.34 +.05
-.87 ProspctCap 10.10 -.04
+1.24 PureBio .80 -.01
-.34 PureCycle 3.10 +.08
+.07 QIAGEN 18.78 -.35
+.12 QlikTechn 33.39 +.12
-.02 Qlogic 15.46 -.15
-.06 Qualom 54.19 -.77
+.11 QuestSft 22.20 -.03
+.10 Questor 23.45 -.02
+.07 QuinSteet 12.46 +.34
+.10 RFMicD 5.91 -.06
-.50 RPXn 27.30 -.07
-.53 RTIBiolog 2.87 -.02
+.06 RXiPhrm 1.01 +.03
-.25 RadNet 4.10 -.12
-.02 RadntSys 20.06 -.42
+.16 RadOneD 1.86 -.06
-.13 RAMEngy 1.33
-.25 Rambus 14.21 -.23
+.09 RaptorPhm 6.32 -.01
-47 RealPagen 24.92 -.33
+.05 Regenrn 52.89 -.36
-.10 RentACt 29.22 +.06
-.60 RepubAir 4.66 -.01
.26 RschMotn 28.57 -1.20
-.09
-.19 Respnsysn 15.67 +.41
+.16 RexEnergy 9.93 -.36
-.13 RigelPh 8.36 -.14
4 Riverbeds 34.88 -.65
+.5 RochMed 9.02 +.35
+.38 RockvFns 9.96 +.02
+.08 RckwllM 13.64 -.34
-1.97 RodmanR 1.41 +.09
+.10 RosettaR 46.14 -.31
-.29 RossSts 77.60 -1.49
-1.32 RoyGId 57.20 -.80
-.04 RubionTc 16.54 -.48
+.08 RuthsHosp 5.43 -.08


Tekelec 8.81 -.05
TeleNav 16.57 +.09
SBACom 38.34 -.19 Tellabs 4.45 +.05
SEIInv 21.34 -.14 TeslaMotn 27.57 -.14
SS&CTech 19.03 -.05 TetaTc 22.63 +.48
STEC 17.34 -.23 TevaPhrm 47.15 -.84
SagentPhn 26.94 -1.17 TexRdhse 17.36 +.09
SanDisk 38.94 3.94 ThomasPrp 3.17 -.09
Sanfilp 8.13 +.14 TibmSft 26.32 +.32
Sanmina 9.26 -.21
Sapient 14.11 -.39 InerTech 4.78 -.24
Satmnh 2.15 +.02 �Volnc 9.93 -.17
SavientPh 6.74 -.13 Torniern 27.59 +.09
Sawis 39.54 +.10 Towersht 4.94 -.09
SciClone 5.96 +.16 TownSports 7.00 -.03
SciGames 9.70 -.02 TractSups 64.91 -1.29
SciQuestn 17.07 -.27 Travelzoo 60.59 -.66
SeacoastBk 1.49 -.08 TridentMh .67 -.04
SeagateT 15.35 -.37 TriMash 23.20 +.20
SearsHldgs 69.51 -1.99 TrimbleN 37.06 -1.28
SeattGen 20.70 +.48 TriQuint 10.52 -.30
SelCmfrt 17.04 +.08 TrstNY 4.98 -.08
Selectvlns 15.84 +.16 Trusk 22.70 -06
Semtech 25.72 -.17 TuesMrn 4.35 +.02
Sequenom 7.25 -.23 USATrk 10.04 -.05
SvcSourcn 20.36 +.33 UTStcm 1.50
Shire 89.53 -.82
ShoreT 10.4 +.23 UltaSalon 62.82 +.24
SilyTech 4.39 +.09 Umpqua 11.12 -.11
SigaTechh 10.80 -.20 Unilife 4.46 +.06
SigmaAld 68.76 -.06 UtdOnln 5.81 -.17
SilganHId 40.06 +.01 USEnr 4.19 +.02
Silicnlmg 6.34 ... UtdTherap 54.06 -.32
Slcnware 6.08 -.15 UniTkGSrs 7.78 -.09
Sina 89.35 +1.45 UnivDisp 32.91 -1.07
Sindair 10.43 +.08 UnivFor 26.36 -.29
SiriusXM 1.98 -.06 UranmRs 1.64 +.06
SironaDent 52.09 +.04 UrbanOut 28.43 -.83
Sky-mobin 7.88 +.20 Urolas 769 +23
SkywksSol 22.87 -.41
SmartM 9.19
SmithMicro 4.01 -.06 VCAAnt 20.23 -.26
SnydLance 21.01 -.07 ValenceTh 1.21 +.03
Sohu.cm 68.47 -1.12 ValVisA 793 .26
SolarCap 24.68 +.22 ValueClick 16.29 -.55
Solazymen 20.54 -.77
Somaxon 2.09 -.01 VarianSemi 61.34 -.10
SonicCorp 10.42 -.03 Veemlnst 47.01 -1.03
Sonus 3.17 -.04 VBradleyn 37.88 -2.43
SouMoBc 20.54 .. Verigy 14.97 +.01
SpectPh 8.45 +.01 VerintSys 34.63 -.41
SpiritAirn 12.00 -.05 Verisign 32.74 -.33
Spreadtrm 14.10 +.88 Verisk 33.99 -.34
SdMic 23.43 +.09 VertxPh 48.59 +.57
Staples 15.31 +.03 Vical 4.03 -.02
StarSdent 4.96 +.10 ViewPtFns 13.52 +.02
Starbucks 37.35 -.38 VirgnMdah 30.85 -.02
StateBkFn 16.37 -.38 ViroPhrm 17.71 -.24
SfDynam 15.66 -.14 Vitacosth 4.61 +.08
StemCells .54 -.04 Vivus 7.61 -.01
Stereotas 3.60 +.15 Vodafone 26.20 -.33
SterlBcsh 7.97 -.02 WCAWste 5.83 +.06
StrFWArs 15.82 -.27 WarnerChs 23.40 42
StewEnt 6.77 -.08 WarnerChs 23.40 -.42
StewEnt 6.77 -.08
Stayer 123.39 -1.98 WarrenRs 3.54 .08
SuccessF 29.58 -2.82 Web.com 11.20 -.13
SunBcpNJ 3.25 -.01 WestellT 3.43 -.16
SunesisPrs 2.11 +.09 Wesbmrd 17.87 -.50
SunPowerA 16.95 -.34 WetSeal 4.45 +.03
SunPwrB 16.21 -.13 WholeFd 60.52 -.65
SuperGen 2.90 +.11 WilshBcp 3.08 +.13
SuperMda 3.62 -.16 Windstm 13.04 -.10
SurWest 14.60 -.55 Winn-Dixie 8.12 -.16
SusqBnc 7.65 -.01 Wynn 131.33 -1.52
SwisherHn 5.62 +.08 XenoPort 6.74 -.25
Symantec 18.75 -.18 Xilinx 34.64 -.33
Symetricm 5.48 -.06 YRCWwrs 1.12 +.18
Synergetc 5.36 -.12 Yahoo 14.89 .20
Syneron 11.96 +.37 Yahg 14.3 -.
Synopsys 25.35 -.23 Zagg 14.32 -.70
Symnos 17.24 -.03 Zalicus 2.42 +.24
Synovis 17.24 -.03
Syntoleum 1.99 +.06 Zongpin 10.98 -.32
TDAmerit 18.66 -.28 ZonO&G 5.56 -.12
THQ 3.48 ZonBcp 22.39 -.33
TTMTCh 15.05 -.33 Zopharm 6.02 -.11
TakeTwo 14.80 -.41 Zpcarn 20.49 -.81
TASER 4.26 -.12 ZxCorp 3.75 +.11
TechData 46.10 -.69 Zoran 8.49 -.02


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.1000 4.0990
Australia .9526 .9529
Bahrain .3771 .3771
Brazil 1.6003 1.5920
Britain 1.5974 1.5987
Canada .9880 .9799
Chile 473.98 474.45
China 6.4763 6.4691
Colombia 1786.50 1779.34
Czech Rep 17.21 17.15
Denmark 5.2634 5.2471
Dominican Rep 38.04 38.08
Egypt 5.9605 5.9620
Euro .7057 .7038
Hong Kong 7.7894 7.7906
Hungary 190.48 189.75
India 44.984 44.944
Indnsia 8605.00 8612.50
Israel 3.4419 3.4322
Japan 80.52 80.58
Jordan .7105 .7100
Lebanon 1512.45 1512.95
Malaysia 3.0401 3.0320
Mexico 11.8949 11.8757
N. Zealand 1.2341 1.2327
Norway 5.4900 5.4804
Peru 2.760 2.761
Poland 2.81 2.82
Russia 28.2167 28.3206
Singapore 1.2390 1.2376
So. Africa 6.9042 6.8451
So. Korea 1080.04 1080.34
Sweden 6.4935 6.4725
Switzerlnd .8377 .8388
Taiwan 28.93 28.90
Thailand 30.69 30.61
Turkey 1.6346 1.6281
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6734
Uruguay 18.5014 18.5014
Venzuel 4.2952 4.2952


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.03
6-month 0.07 0.09
5-year 1.38 1.52
10-year 2.86 2.94
30-year 4.17 4.20



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMXAug11 91.16 +.14
Corn CBOT Dec 11 632 -14
Wheat CBOT Sep 11 661 -8/4
Soybeans CBOT Nov11 13091/4 -8
Cattle CME Aug11 113.50 +.78
Pork Bellies CME Jul11 121.00
Sugar (world) ICE Oct11 26.00 -.08
Orange Juice ICE Sep11 192.65 +5.55

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (trov oz.. spot) $1500.50 $1538.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) Y34.641 $3b./39
Copper (pound) $4.0985 $4.1030
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$16//.60 $1/b2.10

NMER= NewYork Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


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I NASDA


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 1.4 ... 14.22 -.25-13.1 McDnlds 2.44 3.0 17 81.84 -.45 +6.6
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.7 9 30.44 -.28 +3.6 Microsoft .64 2.6 6 24.30 -.33-12.9
Ameteks .24 .6 22 42.52 -.50 +8.3 MotrlaSoln .........45.40 -.24 +19.3
BkofAm .04 .4 19 10.52 -.19-21.1 MotrlaMon ...... ... 23.11 -.35-20.6
CapCtyBk .40 3.6 42 10.97 +.50-12.9 NextEraEn 2.20 3.9 14 56.61 +.23 +8.9
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 12 39.16 -.55-15.2 Penney .80 2.3 20 34.24 -.77 +6.0
Citigrprs .04 .1 13 39.59 +.18-16.3 PiedmOfc 1.26 6.3 26 20.10 -.30 -.2
CmwReitrs 2.00 8.0 19 25.14 -.07 -1.5 ProgrssEn 2.48 5.316 47.18 -.10 +8.5
Disney .40 1.1 17 37.58 -.24 +.2 RegionsFn .04 .7 ... 5.94 -.23-15.1
EKodak ... ... 16 3.42 -.15-36.2 SearsHldgs ... ... ... 69.51 -1.99 -5.7
EnterPT 2.80 6.1 22 45.97 -.09 -.6 Smucker 1.76 2.3 19 74.90 -1.33 +14.1
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.4 11 76.78 -1.66 +5.0 SprintNex ......... 5.00 -.06 +18.2
FordM ...... 6 13.24 -.23-21.1 TimeWarn .94 2.7 15 34.46 -.70 +7.1
GenElec .60 3.3 16 17.97 -.41 -1.7 UniFirst .15 .3 13 50.90 -.49 -7.5
HomeDp 1.00 2.9 17 35.08 -.57 +.1 VerizonCm 1.95 5.4 21 36.00 -.05 +.6
Intel .84 4.0 10 21.20 -.51 +.8 Vodafone 1.44 5.5 ... 26.20 -.33 -.9
IBM 3.00 1.8 14165.07-1.05+12.5 WalMart 1.46 2.812 52.41 -.88 -2.8
Lowes .56 2.4 16 23.25 -.46 -7.3 Walgrn .70 1.7 16 41.39 -1.20 +6.2


A6 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 A7


I MB TA3lFUN Iy i


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: EmgLd
Balancp 16.28 -.11 GNMA 15.92
Retlnc 8.66 ... GrChinaAr 44.66 +.96
Alger Funds B: HiYIdAp 6.62
SmCapGr 6.79 -.06 StratValA 28.75 -.32
AllianceBernA: TechGroA 32.19 -.53
BalanAp 15.39 -.12 DreihsAclnc 11.02 -.01
GIbThGrAp73.01 -.59 Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 35.73 -.32 EMktGr 31.51 +.06
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEmI 50.13
LgCpGrAd 26.37 -.34 EatonVanceA:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 20.14 +.10
GIbThGrBt 62.81 -.52 AMTFMulnc 9.33
GrowthBt 24.66 -.34 MuInCGrA 8.04 -.12
SCpGrBt 28.63 -.26 InBosA 5.86
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 17.88 -.17
SCpGrCt 28.82 -.26 NatlMunlnc 9.13 +.01
Allianz Fds Instl: SpEqtA 16.38 -.16
NFJDvVI 11.66 -.12 TradGvA 7.49
SmCpVI 31.10 -.17 EatonVanceB:
Allianz Funds A: HlthSBt 10.56 -.09
SmCpVA 29.66 -.15 NatlMulnc 9.13 +.01
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 23.62 -.36 GovtCp 7.47
TargetCt 15.04 -.19 NatMunlnc 9.13 +.01
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 19.59 -.21 FltgRt 9.02 -.01
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 10.13
LgCaplnv 18.58 -.20 LgCapVal 17.92 -.17
Amer Century Adv: FBR Funds:
EqGroAp 21.43 -.25 Focuslnv 49.52 -.44
EqlncAp 7.26 -.04 FMI Funds:
Amer Centurylnv: LgCappn 16.06 -.14
Balanced 15.80 -.11 FPA Funds:
DivBnd 10.94 ... Nwlnc 10.92
Eqlnc 7.26 -.04 FPACresn 27.55 -.17
Gift 28.87 -.33 Fairholme 31.22 -.41
Growthl 26.10 -.32 Federated A:
Heritagel 21.76 -.16 MidGrStA 36.61 -.41
IncGro 24.55 -.29 KaufmAp 5.45 -.04
InfAdjBd 12.31 +.04 MuSecA 9.91
IntDisc 10.57 -.04 Federatedlnstl:
IntfGrol 11.11 -.02 KaufmnR 5.46 -.04
NewOpp 7.99 -.09 TotRetBd 11.29 +.01
OneChAg 12.31 -.08 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChMd 11.79 -.06 EnergyT 37.86 -.96
RealEstl 19.92 +.01 HItCarT 24.71 -.25
Ultra 23.17 -.29 Fidelity Advisor A:
Valuelnv 5.71 -.06 Nwlnsghp 19.89 -.19
American Funds A: StrnA 12.58 -.01
AmcpAp 19.17 -.19 Fidelity Advisor C:
AMutAp 25.79 -.24 Nwlnsghtn 18.93 -.18
BalAp 18.20 -.13 Fidelity Advisor :
BondAp 12.42 ... EqGrln 59.63 -.65
CaplBAp 50.57 -.20 Eqlnin 24.10 -.23
CapWGAp 35.62 -.19 FItRatel n 9.79
CapWAp 21.11 -.03 IntBdln 11.39 +.02
EupacAp 41.45 -.06 Nwlnsgtln 20 .10 .19
FdlnvAp 37.13 -.34 Fidelity AdvisorT:
GovtAp 14.19 ... BalancT 15.28 -.11
GwhAp 30.48 -.31 DivGrTp 12.45 -.15
HI TrAp 11.35 ... EqGrTp 55.68 -.61
IncoAp 16.86 -.09 EqInT 23.71 -.23
IntBdAp 13.60 +.01 GrOppT 36.16 -.43
InFGrlncAp31.13 -.12 HilnAdTp 10.17 -.02
ICAAp 27.92 -.29 IntBdT 11.37 +.02
NEcoAp 25.90 -.18 MulncTp 12.75
NPerAp 28.55 -.21 OvrseaT 18.60 -.13
NwWrldA 53.74 +.01 STFiT 9.30
STBFAp 10.11 ... SSelAIICp 18.74 -.22
SmCpAp 38.40 -.13 Fidelity Freedom:
TxExAp 12.11 ... FF2010n 13.81 -.06
WshAp 28.04 -.25 FF2010K 12.76 -.06
American Funds B: FF2015n 11.53 -.05
BalBp 18.15 -.13 FF2015K 12.80 -.06
CaplBBp 50.62 -.20 FF2020n 13.99 -.08
CpWGrBt 35.45 -.19 FF2020K 13.23 -.07
GrwthBt 29.48 -.30 FF2025n 11.65 -.08
Ariel Investments: FF2025K 13.38 -.09
Apprec 43.92 -.51 FF2030n 13.90 -.10
Ariel 49.56 -.59 FF2030K 13.55 -.10
Artio Global Funds: FF2035n 11.54 -.09
IntfEqlr 29.37 -.01 FF2035K 13.67 -.11
InEqA 28.64 ... FF2040n 8.06 -.06
IntEqlllr 12.16 -.01 FF2040K 13.73 -.11
Artisan Funds: FF2045n 9.54 -.08
Int 22.05 -.07 Incomen 11.47 -.02
IntfValr 27.41 -.18 Fidelity Invest:
MidCap 35.37 -.36 AIISectEq 12.42 -.16
MidCapVal 21.43 -.18 AMgr5n 15.66 -.07
SCapVal 17.49 -.12 AMgr70rn 16.53 -.10
BNY Mellon Funds: AMgr20rn 12.98 -.02
EmgMkts 11.39 +.04 Balancn 18.55 -.14
Baron Funds: BalancedK 18.56 -.13
Asset 57.05 -.55 BlueChGrn 45.90 -.55
Growth 54.36 -.19 CAMunn 11.94
SmallCap 25.56 -.19 Canadan 56.46 -.94
Bernstein Fds: CapApn 25.81 -.35
IntDur 14.02 +.01 CapDevOn 11.01 -.12
DivMu 14.50 ... Cplncrn 9.49 -.03
TxMgdlnt 15.13 -.14 ChinaRgr 31.09 +.12
BlackRock A: CngS 465.09
EqtyDiv 18.00 -.16 CTMunrn 11.53
GIAIAr 19.60 -.13 Conran 67.67 -.66
HiYlnvA 7.70 ContraK 67.68 -.66
InfOpAp 33.19 -.21 CnvScn 26.00 -.27
BlackRock B&C: DisEqn 22.98 -.33
GIAICt 18.25 -.11 DiscEqF 22.98 -.33
BlackRock Inst: Divlntl n 29.79 -.18
USOpps 41.78 -.38 DivrslntKr 29.79 -.18
BaVII 25.89 -.31 DivSkOn 15.07 -.16
EquityDv 18.04 -.16 DivGthn 28.34 -.34
GIbAllocr 19.71 -.13 EmergAsrn30.73 +.33
Brinson FundsY: EmrMkn 25.58 +.12
HiYdl Y n 6.23 . Eq Incn 44.45 -.51
BruceFundn398.51-2.58 EQIIn 18.35 -.21
Buffalo Funds: EqncK 44.46 -.51
SmCapn 26.28 -.23 ECapAp 18.91 -.21
CGM Funds: Europe 31.17 -.34
Focusn 30.19 -.40 Exch 323.88
Mutl n 26.53 -.33 Exportn 21.76 -.26
Realty n 28.20 -.09 Fidel 32.82 .36
CRM Funds: Fiftyrn 18.14 -.18
MdCpuVI 29.85 -.27 FItRateHi r n 9.80
FrlnOnen 27.50 -.22
Calamos Funds:
GNMAn 11.74
GrwthAp 53.40 -.56 Govtlnc 10.66 +01
CalvertGSup:s Govtlnc 10.66 +.01
Calvert Group: GroCon 87.46 -.96
Incop 16.26 +.02 Grolncn 18.32 -.21
InSlEAp 14225 -.02 GrowCoK 8746 -96
SocialAp 27.75 -.20 1 GrSatrn 20.56 -.17
SocBdp 15.81 +.01 Highlncrn 9.00
SocEqAp 37.20 -.40 Indepnn 2451 .36
TxFLgp 15.49 +.01 IntBdn 10.80 +.02
Cohen & Steers: Intlon 10.96 +.02
RltyShrs 62.60 -.04 IntnMu n 10.19
Columbia Class A: InlDiscn 32.30 -.19
Acornt 29.65 -.26 IntSCprn 21.57 -.05
DivEqlnc 10.10 -.12 InvGrBdn 11.67 .01
DivrBd 5.09 ... GBn 7.58
DivOpptyA 8.04 -.07 napanGr 1.21 8+.0
LgCorQAp 5.60 -.07 JpnSmn 8.94 +.03
MdCpGrOp 11.21 -.17 LgCapVal 11.61 -.16
MidCVIOpp 8.05 -.09 LCpVmrn 10.69 -.13
PBModAp 10.85 . LatAm 56.30 -.27
SelCommA44.31 -.63 LevCoStkn 28.92 -.41
FrontierA 10.77 -.06 LowPrn 40.33 -.32
GlobTech 20.45 -.22 LowPriKr 40.33 -.32
Columbia ClI ,T&G: Magellnn 70.06 -.81
EmMktOpIn9.83 +.02 MagellanK 70.01 -.82
Columbia Class Z: MDMurn 11.00
AcornZ 30.60 -.27 MAMunn 11.92 -.01
AcornlntZ 39.50 -.15 MegaCpStknl.00 -.11
IntBdZ 9.17 MIMunn 11.87
LgCapGr 13.17 -.15 MidCapn 28.18 -.25
LgCpldxZ 24.64 -.29 MNMunn 11.51
MdCpldxZ 11.77 -.10 MtgSecn 11.05
MdCpVIZp 13.84 -.11 Munilncn 12.59
ValRestr 49.33 -.57 NJMunrn 11.49
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktrn 15.81 -.01
ComRett 9.07 -.02 NwMilln 29.96 -.27
DFA Funds: NYMunn 12.90
IntlCorEqn 11.01 -.10 OTCn 56.84 -.68
USCorEqlnll.20 -.13 OhMunn 11.66
USCorEq2nll.15 -.12 100 ndex 8.79 -.11
DWS Invest A: Ovrsean 32.21 -.22
CommAp 17.85 -.18 PcBasn 25.45 +.14
DWS InvestS: PAMunrn 10.74
CorPlslnc 10.74 +.01 Purihn 18.24 -.15
EmMkGrr 18.16 +.03 PuritanK 18.25 -.14
EnhEmMk 10.54 ... RealEn 27.47 +.01
EnhGlbBdr 10.34 -.02 SAIISecEqF12.44 -.16
GIbSmCGr 39.94 -.31 SCmdtyStrtnl2.07 -.08
GlblThem 23.74 -.22 SrEmrgMkt 18.10 +.08
Gold&Prc 20.14 -.57 SrslntGrw 11.19 -.07
GrolncS 16.89 -.22 SrslntVal 9.90 -.10
HiYldTx 11.92 +.01 SrlnvGrdF 11.68 +.01
IntTxAMT 11.46 ... StlntMun 10.72 +.01
Intl FdS 44.18 -.33 STBFn 8.54
LgCpFoGr 29.73 -.38 SmllCpSrn 19.60 -.35
LatAmrEq 47.73 -.30 SCpValur 15.47 -.09
MgdMuniS 8.89 +.01 SkSlcACapn25.90-.31
MATFS 14.22 +.01 SkSelSmCp19.24 -.14
SP500S 16.86 -.20 Sbratlncn 11.26 -.01
WorldDiv 23.51 -.22 SbrReRtr 9.78 -.01
Davis Funds A: TotalBdn 10.96
NWYVenA 33.79 -.33 Trendn 69.64 -.95
Davis Funds B: USBI n 11.57 +.01
NYVenB 32.30 -.31 Utilityn 16.98 -.04
Davis Funds C &Y: ValStratn 28.52 -.28
NWYVenY 34.18 -.33 Valuen 69.36 -.81
NYVenC 32.56 -.32 Wrldwn 18.95 -.14
Delaware Invest A: Fidelity Selects:
Diverl Incp 9.38 +.01 Aim 38.74 -.57
SMIDCapG 24.30 -.18 Bankingn 16.80 -.13
TxUSAp 11.21 +.01 Biotchn 83.91 -.44
Delaware Invest B: Brokr n 46.95 -.64
SelGrBt 30.61 -.32 Chemn 102.76 -.65
Dimensional Fds: ComEquipn26.04 -.46
EmMCrEqn21.33 +.03 Compn 56.81-1.29
EmMktV 34.07 +.08 ConDisn 23.70 -.22
IntSmVan 16.92 -.11 ConsuFnn 11.61 -.03
LargeCo 10.00 -.12 ConStapn 70.52 -.51
TAUSCorE2n9.08 -.11 CstHon 35.02 .43
USLgVan 20.75 -.27 DfAern 78.99 -.58
USMicron 13.97 -.07 Elecbkn 48.16 -1.07


USTgdVal 16.76 -.17 Enrgyn 53.95-1.36
USSmalln 21.98 -.16 EngSvn 76.16 -1.79
USSmVa 25.68 -.23 EnvAltEnrnl8.71 -.21
IntSmCon 16.90 -.12 FinSvn 56.17 -.64
EmgMktn 29.77 -.02 Goldrn 44.99-1.04
Fixdn 10.36 Healthn 139.17 -1.39
IntVan 17.91 -.21 Insurn 45.81 -.30
Glb5Fxlncnll .30 +.02 Leisr n 93.05 -.53
TMUSTgtV21.65 -.21 Materialn 68.60 -.48
TMMktwV 15.43 -.19 MedDIn 57.54 -.70
2YGIFxdn 10.22 ... MdEqSysn 30.25 -.28
DFARIEn 23.16 ... Mulbtdn 45.51 -.27
Dodge&Cox: NtGasn 32.68 -.42
Balanced 71.53 -.64 Pharmn 13.37 -.15
Income 13.57 ... Retail n 52.57 -.69
IntStk 35.02 -.19 Softwrn 82.71 -1.04
Stock 109.23 -1.33 Techn 93.70 -1.22
DoubleUne Funds: Telcmn 49.08 -.23
TRBdl 11.15 ... Transn 55.15 -.87
Dreyfus: UtilGrn 51.41 +.10
Aprec 39.58 -.40 Wirelessn 7.94 -.10
CTA 11.60 Fidelity Spartan:
CorVA 24.64 -.28 ExtMklnn 38.92 -.32
Dreyf 9.12 -.10 5001dxlnvn 45.09 -.53
DryMidr 29.18 -.24 Intlnxlnvn 35.23 -.22
Dr5001nt 35.12 -.42 TotMktlnvn 37.10 -.41


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Fidelity Spart Adv:
500dxAdv n45.09 -.54
IntAd r n 35.24 -.21
TotMktAdrn37.10 -.41
First Eagle:
GIlblA 47.42 -.20
OverseasA 23.10 +.01
First Investors A
BIChpAp 21.43 -.27
GloblAp 6.58 -.04
GovtAp 11.49
GrolnAp 14.95 -.14
IncoAp 2.51
MATFAp 11.64
MITFAp 12.02
NJTFAp 12.86
NYTFAp 14.38
OppAp 28.75-.25
PATFAp 12.91 +.01
SpSitAp 24.95 -.27
TxExAp 9.67
TotRtAp 15.51 -.07
ValueBp 7.13 -.07
Forum Funds:
AbsStlr 10.92 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.85
ALTFAp 11.04
AZTFAp 10.61
CallnsAp 11.85 +.01
CAIntAp 11.36 +.01
CalTFAp 6.90 +.01
COTFAp 11.51
CTTFAp 10.81 +.01
CvtScAp 15.49 -.13
DblTFA 11.55
DynTchA 30.93 -.33
EqlncAp 16.79 -.16
Fedlntp 11.69
FedTFAp 11.74
FLTFAp 11.36
FoundAlp 10.81 -.07
GATFAp 11.82
GoldPrMA 42.88 -.83
GrwthAp 45.55 -.47
HYTFAp 9.96 +.01
HilncA 2.01
IncomAp 2.19 -.01
InsTFAp 11.73
NYITFp 11.20
LATFAp 11.24
LMGvScA 10.45
MDTFAp 11.20
MATFAp 11.41
MITFAp 11.79
MNInsA 12.19
MOTFAp 11.91
NJTFAp 11.85
NYTFAp 11.50
NCTFA p 12.08
OhiolAp 12.31 +.01
ORTFAp 11.81
PATFAp 10.18
ReEScAp 14.59 +.01
RisDvAp 34.21 -.27
SMCpGrA 38.43 -.40
Sbratlnc p 10.57
USGovAp 6.84
UFIsAp 12.24 +.01
VATFAp 11.55
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvn 13.73 -.02
IncmeAd 2.18 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.21 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.13 -.17
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 24.90 +.16
ForgnAp 7.22 -.03
GIBdAp 13.77 -.02
GrwthAp 18.52 -.12
WorldAp 15.18 -.10
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.53 -.12
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 24.23 +.16
ForgnC p 7.04 -.04
GIBdCp 13.80 -.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 17.90 -.08
GE Elfun S&S:
S&Slnc 11.54 +.01
S&SPM 40.31 -.52
GE Instl Funds:
InlEq 11.44 -.04
GMOTrust Ill:
Quality 20.67 -.27
GMOTrust IV:
IniGrEq 23.65 -.12
Intlntrb 22.29 -.22
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 13.54 +.03
IntCorEq 29.75 -.23
Quality 20.68 -.27
StbFxlnc 15.94
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 50.40 -.41
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.19 -.12
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.62 -.32
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.47 -.35
HiYield 7.26 -.01
HYMuni n 8.40 +.01
MidCapV 36.95 -.32
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.38
CapAplnst 37.83 -.45
Inllnvt 60.63 -.63
InlAdmp 60.83 -.63
Intir 61.29 -.64
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.93 -.44
DivGthAp 19.21 -.19
FItRateApx 8.85
IntOpAp 14.78 -.07
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 29.12 -.39
FItRateCtx 8.84
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 27.84 -.35
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppYn 35.80 -.48
CapAppl n 32.97 -.44
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 41.56 -.52
Div&Gr 19.81 -.20
Advisers 19.56 -.15
TotRetBd 11.28 +.01
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrign15.91 -.19
Hussman Funds:
SbTotRetr 12.21 -.04
StrGrowth 12.47 +.02
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 20.46 -.44
HIhcareS 15.05 -.19
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.86 -.01
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 17.01 -.11
Wldwidelr 17.02 -.11
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.48 -.09
Invesco Funds:
Energy 41.61 -.76
Utlites 16.10 +.07
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 16.72 -.19
CmstkA 15.84 -.17
Constp 23.13 -.29

GrlncAp 19.24 -.20
HilncMup 7.44
HiYldp 4.22
HYMuA 9.10
IntlGrow 28.18 -.14
MunilnA 12.87
PATFA 15.68 +.01
USMortgA 13.18 -.01
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.60 -.21
DivGtSecB 13.25 -.10
MunilnB 12.85
USMortg 13.10 -.02
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt 23.93 -.11
AssetStAp 24.71 -.12
AssetSblr 24.94 -.12
GINatRsAp 20.64 -.16
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.70 +.01
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpValn 24.41 -.21
JPMorgan RCI:
CoreBond nll.70 +.01
ShtDurBd 11.05 +.01
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.24 -.11
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.70 +.02
HighYldn 8.20
InfnTFBdnll 1.02 +.01
ShtDurBd n 11.04
USLCCrPlsn20.55 -.20
Janus S Shrs:
Forty 32.15 -.42
JanusT Shrs:
BalancdT 25.68 -.16
ContrarnT 13.70 -.21
EnterprT 60.83 -.54
FIxBndT 10.64 +.01
GlUfeSciTr 25.64 -.25
GIbSelT 11.34 -.08


GITechTr 17.03 -.19
Grw&lncT 31.24 -.37
Janus T 28.89 -.37
OvrseasTr 45.24 -.28
PrkMCValT23.02 -.20
ResearchT 29.57 -.35
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 62.99 -.78
VentureT 59.23 -.17
WrldWTr 45.35 -.32
JensenJn 27.53 -.30
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.73 -.01


Name NAV Chg
RgBkAx 13.78 -.07
StrnAp 6.75 -.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.75 -.02
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.36 -.11
LSBalanc 13.09 -.07
LSConsrv 13.05 -.02
LSGrwth 12.98 -.10
LSModer 12.87 -.05
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp 25.32 -.22
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktl 20.99 -.05
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 21.35 -.05
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 118.39 -1.03
CBApprp 13.86 -.15
CBLCGrp 24.00 -.32
GCIAIICOp 8.72 -.03
WAHilncAt 6.13
WAMgMup15.59 +.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 22.35 -.29
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 31.11 -.52
CMValTrp 37.98 -.58
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 29.80 -.31
SmCap 29.28 -.32
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.69 -.06
StrncC 15.32 -.07
LSBondR 14.64 -.05
StrncA 15.24 -.06
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.46 -.02
InvGrBdY 12.47 -.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.39 -.13
FundlEq 13.10 -.15
BdDebAp 7.92 -.02
ShDurlncAp 4.61
MidCpAp 17.06 -.21
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.64
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.31 -.24
MIGA 15.52 -.19
HilnA 3.48
MFLA 9.52
TotRA 14.30 -.08
UtilA 17.49 -.02
ValueA 23.08 -.23
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 13.94 -.18
GvScBn 10.30 +.01
HilnBn 3.48
MulnBn 8.20
TotRBn 14.30 -.08
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 16.03 -.08
Valuel 23.18 -.23
MFS Funds Instl:
InlEqn 18.39 -.10
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.93
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 16.29 -.14
GovtBt 8.79
HYIdBBt 5.90
IncmBldr 16.52 -.06
IntlEqB 10.94 -.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 35.32 -.40
Mairs & Power:
Growh n 73.76 -.65
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 8.77 -.08
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.67 -.01
China Inv 28.43 +.36
Indialnvr 19.77 +.22
PacTgrlnv 23.40 +.10
MergerFdn 16.16 -.03
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.90 -.52
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.52
TotRtBdl 10.51
Midas Funds:
MidasFdt 4.28 -.10
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.34 -.23
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobSbatB 16.42 -.06
MorganStanley Inst:
IntEql 13.86 -.01
MCapGrl 39.79 -.29
MCapGrPp38.52 -.27
Muhlenkn 54.00 -.64
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 28.01 -.40
Under Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn29.80 -.20
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.66 -.08
GblDiscA 29.68 -.17
GIbDiscC 29.36 -.16
GIbDiscZ 30.07 -.17
QuestZ 18.06 -.08
SharesZ 21.32 -.17
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 19.70 -.27
Genesis 34.92 -.20
Geneslnst 48.36 -.27
Intlr 17.51 -.11
Partner 27.43 -.32
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 50.05 -.29
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc In 9.68 +.01
Nichn 45.51 -.49
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 7.34
MMEmMktr 22.17
MMIntEqr 9.73
SmCpldx 8.85
Sklcdx 15.88
Technly 15.30
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 10.98
Nuveen CI Y:
RealEstn 19.42 +.02
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 39.32 -.61
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.61 -.19
Globall 22.16 -.15
Intl r 19.56 -.12
Oakmark r 42.34 -.48
Select 28.58 -.32
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 7.90 -.04
GIbSMdCap 15.57 -.10
NonUSLgC p 10.40 -.09
RealRet 10.67 +.01
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.19 +.01
AMTFrNY 10.91 +.02
CAMuniAp 7.71 +.01
CapApAp 43.74 -.56
CaplncApx 8.78 -.10
ChmplncAp 1.95
DvMktAp 34.72 -.04
Discp 62.44 -.56
EquityA 8.95 -.12
GlobAp 61.86 -.54
GIbOppA 29.77 -.25
GblStlncAx 4.34 -.01
Goldp 43.08 -1.16
IntBdA p 6.65 -.02
MnStFdA 31.90 -.32
PAMuniAp 10.61 +.01
SenFltRtA 8.34 -.01
USGv p 9.49
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.16 +.01
AMTFrNY 10.91 +.01
CplncB tx 8.62 -.07
ChmplncBt 1.95
EquityB 8.26 -.11
GblSfrlncBx 4.35 -.01
Oppenheimer C&M:
DevMktCt 33.29 -.03
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.25
RoMuAp 15.49 +.01
RcNtMuA 6.86 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.39 -.04
IntlBdY 6.64 -.03
IntGrowY 28.60 -.19
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.90
TotRtAd 11.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIAsetAutr 10.84 +.01
AIIAsset 12.36 -.01
ComodRR 8.63 -.01
DevLcMkr 10.92 -.03
Divine 11.54 -.01
EmMkBd 11.20 +.01
Fltlnc r 8.86 -.03
ForBdUnr 11.00 -.01
FrgnBd 10.53 +.01
HiYld 9.31
InvGrCp 10.71
LowDu 10.48 -.01
ModDur 10.80 -.01
RealRet 11.77 +.05
RealRtnl 11.73 +.03
ShortT 9.90


TotRt 11.01
TRII 10.53
TRIII 9.73 -.01
PIMCO Funds A:
AIIAstAutt 10.78 +.01
ComRRp 8.49 -.01
LwDurA 10.48 -.01
RealRtAp 11.73 +.03
TotRtA 11.01
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.73 +.03
TotRtCt 11.01


Name NAV Chg
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.01
PIMCO Funds P:
TotRtnP 11.01
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.42 -.26
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 47.72 -.27
Pioneer Funds A:
BondA p 9.72
InfValA 19.86 -.02
PionFdAp 40.90 -.45
ValueAp 11.21 -.11
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.40 -.03
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.50 -.03
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 18.35 -.15
Price Funds:
Balance 19.66 -.13
BIChip n 38.58 -.45
CABondn 10.64 +.01
CapAppn 20.90 -.16
DivGron 23.50 -.25
EmMktBn 13.33 -.01
EmEurp 22.26 +.01
EmMktSn 33.97 +.08
Eqlncn 23.81 -.24
Eqlndexn 34.30 -.41
Europen 15.61 -.17
GNMAn 10.06
Growthn 32.19 -.39
Gr&lnn 20.45 -.24
HIlSci n 34.69 -.32
HiYieldn 6.79 -.01
InsflCpG 16.45 -.20
IntlBondn 10.28 -.03
IntDisn 44.20 -.19
IntlG&l 13.61 -.10
IntlStkn 14.21 -.04
Japan n 7.88 +.02
LatAmn 51.30 -.39
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 10.37 +.01
MidCapn 60.59 -.72
MCapValn 24.31 -.23
NAmern 33.45 -.41
NAsian 19.10 +.08
NewEran 50.41 -.68
NHorizn 35.98 -.18
NIncn 9.62
NYBondn 11.08
Overs SF r n 8.49 -.06
PSIncn 16.34 -.07
RealEstn 18.75 +.01
R2010n 15.69 -.09
R2015n 12.14 -.07
R2020n 16.75 -.11
R2025n 12.24 -.10
R2030n 17.54 -.15
R2035n 12.40 -.11
R2040n 17.64 -.16
SciTecn 27.06 -.48
ShtBd n 4.87
SmCpStk n 35.94 -.26
SmCapVal n36.64 -.18
SpecGrn 17.90 -.17
Speclnn 12.51 -.03
TFIncn 9.79 +.01
TxFrH n 10.61 +.01
TxFrSIn 5.62
USTIntn 6.05 +.02
USTLgn 11.73 -.02
VABondn 11.53 +.01
Value n 23.68 -.28
Principal Inv:
LgCGIIn 9.40 -.11
LT20201n 11.93 -.07
LT20301n 11.82 -.07
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.61 -.18
HiYldAp 5.52
MuHilncA 9.48 +.01
NatResA 52.90 -.87
UblityA 10.71 -.05
Prudential Fds B:
GrowhB 16.42 -.20
HiYldBt 5.51
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.72
AZTE 8.88
ConvSec 20.55 -.15
DvrlnAp 8.04 +.01
EqlnAp 15.75
EuEq 20.28 -.15
GeoBalA 12.17 -.08
GIbEqtyp 9.35
GrlnAp 13.47 -.17
GIblHItA 48.98 -.55
HiYdAp 7.73
HiYld In 5.96
IncmAp 6.91
IntGrlnp 10.03 -.06
InvAp 12.96 -.16
NJTxAp 9.17
MulACpGr 51.23 -.74
PATE 8.93
TxExA p 8.40 -.01
TFInAp 14.58
TFHYA 11.47 +.01
USGvAp 14.34
GIblUtilA 10.58 -.01
VoyAp 22.30 -.38
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnBt 7.97
Eqlnct 15.59
EuEq 19.38 -.15
GeoBalB 12.04 -.08
GIbEqt 8.44
GINtRst 19.81 -.21
GrlnBt 13.24 -.16
GIblHIthB 40.15 -.46
HiYldBt 7.72
HYAdBt 5.86
IncmBt 6.85
IntGrlnt 9.91 -.06
IntfNopt 15.18 -.03
InvBt 11.64 -.15
NJTxBt 9.16
MulGCpGr 44.15 -.64
TxExB t 8.40 -.01
TFHYBt 11.48
USGvBt 14.28
GlblUtilB 10.53 -.01
VoyBt 18.89 -.32
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.65 -.11
LgCAIphaA 41.47 -.56
Value 25.41 -.26
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.26 -.13
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 18.10 -.18
MicroCapl 17.47 -.05
PennMulr 11.99 -.10
Premierlr 21.36 -.21
TotRetl r 13.38 -.08
ValSvct 12.92 -.15
VIPISvc 13.38 -.17
Russell Funds S:
SbratBd 11.00
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 13.52 -.23
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 22.00 +.03
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 17.77 -.18
10001nvr 37.90 -.43
S&PSel 19.92 -.23
SmCpSI 21.83 -.18
TSMSelr 23.26 -.26
Scout Funds:
Intlx 32.09 -.48
Selected Funds:
AmShD 40.87 -.38
AmShSp 40.84 -.37
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 31.97 -.35
Sequoian 139.51 -1.62
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.09 -.58
SoSunSClnvtn21.17-.15
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 53.66 -.43
Stratton Funds:
Mull-Cap 36.03 -.40
RealEstate 27.91 -.04
SmCap 51.78 -.38
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.73 -.01
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.95 +.01
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 20.32 -.04
Third Avenue Fds:
InlValnstr 16.96 -.14
REVallnstr 23.63 -.03
Valuelnst 50.03 +.09
Thornburg Fds:
IntValApx 28.29 -.27
IncBuildAt 19.10 -.16
IncBuildCp 19.10 -.16
IntValue lx 28.91 -.29
Valuel 34.98 -.42
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.83
Incom 8.81
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 78.83 -1.75
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.19
Flexlncp 9.06
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.89 -.36
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 23.99 -.02


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 23.08 -.23
ChinaReg 8.59 +.10
GlbRs 11.09 -.17
Gld&Mtls 16.13 -.33
WdPrcMn 17.98 -.34
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.36 -.50
CA Bd 9.87
CrnstStr 23.17 -.10
GNMA 10.31
GrTxStr 13.16 -.07


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 14.73 -.22
Gr&lnc 15.15 -.18
IncSk 12.42 -.15
Inco 13.05 +.02
Inl 24.83 -.16
NYBd 11.53 +.01
PrecMM 37.49 -.76
SciTech 13.16 -.15
ShtTBnd 9.21
SmCpSk 14.06 -.10
TxElt 12.94
TxELT 12.72 +.01
TxESh 10.73 +.01
VABd 10.91
WldGr 19.28 -.20
VALIC :
MdCpldx 21.50 -.17
Skldxb 25.21 -.30
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 18.22 -.22
Van Eck Funds:
GIHardA 50.14 -.78
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmln 21.87 -.14
CAITAdmn 11.02 +.01
CpOpAdl n 76.52 -.92
EMAdmr r n 38.76 +.05
Energyn 125.51 -1.97
EqlnAdm nn44.61 -.46
EuroAdml n 62.81 -.86
ExplAdmln 71.44 -.78
ExtdAdm n 42.75 -.35
500Admln 116.80 -1.39
GNMAAdn 10.99
GrwAdmn 31.84 -.39
HlthCrn 57.83 -.51
HiYldCpn 5.75 +.01
InfProAdn 26.88 +.08
ITBdAdml n 11.55 +.04
ITsryAdmln 11.72 +.04
IntGrAdmn 61.17 -.36
ITAdmln 13.61 +.01
ITGrAdmn 10.07 +.02
LtdTrAdn 11.09
LTGrAdmln 9.58 -.02
LTAdmln 10.96 +.01
MCpAdml n 95.98 -1.04
MorgAdmn 56.90 -.78
MuHYAdmnlO.36 +.01
NYLTAdn 11.08 +.01
PrmCapr n 69.09 -.76
PALTAdm n11.01
ReitAdmrn 82.96 +.01
STsyAdmln 10.80
STBdAdmlnlO.67 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.91
STFdAdn 10.88
STIGrAdn 10.79
SmCAdmn 36.02 -.30
TxMCap rn 63.95 -.73
TBAdml n 10.80 +.01
TStkAdmn 31.99 -.35
ValAdmln 21.10 -.23
WellslAdm n54.50 -.18
WelltnAdm n54.80 -.35
Windsor n 45.69 -.50
WdsrllAdn 46.93 -.52
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.77 -.28
CALTn 11.03 +.01
CapOppn 33.12 -.40
Convrtn 13.50 -.10
DivdGron 15.02 -.13
Energy n 66.83 -1.05
Eqlncn 21.28 -.22
Explr n 76.71 -.84
FLLTn 11.39 +.01
GNMAn 10.99
GlobEqn 18.20 -.12
Grolnc n 26.90 -.35
GrthEqn 11.05 -.15
HYCorpn 5.75 +.01
HlthCren 137.02 -1.21
InlaPron 13.68 +.04
InLtExplrn 16.33 -.10
IntlGrn 19.22 -.11
IntfValn 31.49 -.13
ITIGraden 10.07 +.02
ITTsryn 11.72 +.04
LifeConn 16.63 -.07
LifeGron 22.37 -.19
Lifelncn 14.33 -.04
LifeModn 19.95 -.13
LTIGraden 9.58 -.02
LTTsryn 11.43 -.02
Morgn 18.34 -.25
MuHYn 10.36 +.01
Mulntn 13.61 +.01
MuLtdn 11.09
MuLongn 10.96 +.01
MuShrtn 15.91
NJLTn 11.50
NYLTn 11.08 +.01
OHLTTEn 11.89 +.01
PALTn 11.01
PrecMtls r n 24.16 -.42
PrmcpCorn 14.02 -.16
Prmcp r n 66.56 -.73
SelValurn 19.43 -.18
STARn 19.50 -.12
STIGraden 10.79
STFedn 10.88
STTsryn 10.80
SbtatEqn 19.64-.21
TgtRe2005nl2.10 -.03
TgtRetlncn 11.58 -.02
TgRe2010n22.93 -.09
TgtRe2015nl2.71 -.07
TgRe2020n22.57 -.14
TgtRe2025 n12.86 -.09
TgRe2030n22.06 -.17
TgtRe2035 nl3.29 -.12
TgtRe2040n21.82 -.19
TgtRe2050n21.72 -.19
TgtRe2045 nl3.70 -.12
USGron 18.54 -.25
USValuen 10.57 -.11
Wellslyn 22.49 -.07
Welltnn 31.72 -.21
Wndsrrn 13.54 -.15
Wndsll n 26.43 -.30
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnPl r n104.16 -.82
MidCplstPI n104.58-1.13
TotlntAdmrr26.10 -.16
Totlntllnstrn104.43 -.63
500 n 116.80 -1.39
Balancedn 21.86 -.14
DevMktn 10.07 -.08
EMktn 29.48 +.04
Europe n 26.94 -.37
Extend n 42.70 -.35
Growth n 31.84 -.39
LgCaplxn 23.51 -.28
MidCapn 21.13 -.23
Pacific n 10.36 +.03
REITr n 19.44
SmCapn 35.97 -.30
SmlCpGthn23.14 -.21
SmlCpVIn 16.23 -.12
STBndn 10.67 +.01
TotBndn 10.80 +.01
Totllntln 15.60 -.10
TotStkn 31.98 -.36
Valuen 21.10 -.23
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 21.87 -.14
DevMklnst nl0.00 -.07
Extln n 42.74 -.36
FTAIIWIdl r n93.17 -.59
Grwthlstn 31.84 -.39
InfProlnstn 10.95 +.03
Instldxn 116.55 -1.38
InsPIn 116.56 -1.38
InstTStldxn 29.05 -.32
InsTStPlus r29.05 -.33
MidCplstn 21.20 -.23
SCInstn 36.02 -.30
TBlstn 10.80 +.01
TSInstn 31.99 -.36
Valuelstn 21.09 -.24
Vanguard Signal:
ExtSgl n 36.72 -.31
500Sgln 96.48 -1.15
ITBdSign 11.55 +.04
MidCplcbdx n 30.29 -.33
STBdlcbdxn 10.67 +.01
SmCpSig n 32.46 -.27
TotBdSgl n 10.80 +.01
TotStkSgl n 30.87 -.35
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 15.09 -.22
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.86
WM Blair Mtl Fds:
IntlGhIl r 21.99 -.03
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.44 -.05
CorelnvA 6.18 -.07
DivOppAp 14.66 -.21
DivOppCt 14.52 -.21
ScTechA 10.51 -.17
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 41.12 -.21
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIIAp 12.36
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.97
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSkZ 21.35 -.24
Opptylnv 39.75 -.47
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UIStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Instl:
UIStMulnp 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 11.00 -.01


William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.41 -.12
InfiGthN 21.48 -.03
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 17.35 -.14
Focusedn 18.49 -.15


Stocks end week low


Associated Press


If weak financial results
from big tech companies are
a sign of what's to come,
stock indexes are in for a
tough summer.
Stocks fell Friday, giving
the market another losing
week, after poor earnings
reports from two major
technology companies sug-
gested that companies in-
vested less in new
technology as the economic
recovery slowed.
Fears of a spreading Eu-
ropean debt crisis also
weighed on markets. Italian
bank stocks plunged and
trading in some of them was
halted after Moody's
warned that it might down-
grade their credit ratings.
"I think it spooked a lot of
people," said Frederick
Rizzo, who analyzes Euro-
pean banks for T. Rowe
Price. "The markets are re-
ally emotional right now."
The Dow Jones industrial


Market watch
June 24, 2011

DowJones -115.42
industrials 11934

Nasdaq -33.86
composite 265289

Standard & -15.05
Poor's 500
1,268 45
Russell -4.89
2000
79779

NYSE diary
Advanced: 1 092
Declined: 1,939
Unchanged: 112
Volume: 45b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,089
Declined: 1,529
Unchanged: 95
Volume: 28b
AP

average fell 115.42 points to
11,934.58. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index fell 15.05,
or 1.2 percent, to 1,268.45.
The Nasdaq composite fell
33.86, or 1.3 percent, to
2,652.89.
The decline erased all of


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Ii~i NEWYORK S[TOCK]31iI I EXCANE Ii'i
0* S A^^^fl


Name Last Chg
SPMals 37.47 -.24
SP HIthC 34.68 -.41
SP CnSt 30.61 -.25
SPConsum 38.50 -.38
SPEngy 70.93 -1.37
SPDRFncl 14.76 -.09
SP Inds 35.63 -.41
SPTech 24.54 -.43
SPUI 32.80 +.10
StdPac 3.40 -.10
Standex 28.86 -.64
StanBlkDk 69.28 -1.78
StarwdHfl 53.25 -.79
StarwdPT 20.03 -.74
StateStr 43.31 -.82
StatoilASA 23.44 -.61
Steelcse 11.16
Steris 34.00 -.11
St lwtM 20.52 +.24
StatHotels 6.51 -.20
Sbtyker 57.38 -.85
SturmRug 20.55 +.15
SubPpne 51.71 -.04
SunCmts 36.76 -.04
Suncorgs 37.44 -.67
Sunoco 39.15 -1.42
Suntech 7.60 -.15
SunTrst 25.00 -.03
Supvalu 8.57 -.20
SwiftTrnsn 12.79 -.38


SymetraF 13.15
Synovus 2.12
Sysm 30.76
TCFFncl 13.56
TECO 18.50
TJX 49.72
TRWAuto 57.02
TaiwSemi 12.40
Talbots 3.66
TalismEg 18.75
Target 46.33
TeckResg 46.49
TelcmNZ 10.07
TelefEsp s 22.90
TelMexL 16.02
Templelnld 29.68
TenetHlth 5.99
Teradyn 14.13
TerraNitro 133.98
Tesoro 20.84
TetraTech 12.00
Texlnst 31.53
Textron 22.36
Theragen 1.85
ThermoFis 62.51
ThmBet 51.03
ThomCrkg 9.49
3MCo 90.89
Tiffany 75.70
Timberlnd 43.19
TWCable 74.50
TimeWarn 34.46


Timken
TitanMet
TorchEngy
Trchmrk
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers
Tredgar
TriContI
TwoHrblnv
Tycolnt
Tyson
UBSAG
UDR
UIL Hold
USAirwy
US Gold
USEC
USG
UndrArmr
UniSrcEn
UniFirst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
UtdContI
UtdMicro
UPSB
USBancrp
US NGs rs
US OilFd


USSteel 41.82 -1.29 WellsFargo 27.26
UtdTech 84.33 -.79 WendyArby 5.00
UtdhlthGp 50.46 -.69 WestarEn 26.30
24.52 .25 WAstEMkt 14.17
WstAMgdHi 6.14
ValeSA 30.66 -.08 WAstlnfOpp 12.53
ValeSApf 27.78 -.03 WDigital 35.18
ValeroE 23.18 -1.58 WstnRefin 16.24
VangTSM 65.72 -.75 WstnUnion 19.23
VangREIT 58.58 +.01 Weyerh 20.33
VangEmg 46.64 Whrlpl 76.76
VarianMed 67.64 -.60 WhitngPts 52.80
Vectren 27.31 +.05 WmsCos 28.55
VeoliaEnv 26.77 -.35 WmsPtrs 52.53
VeriFone 41.24 -1.25 Winnbgo 9.17
VerizonCm 36.00 -.05 WiscEns 30.68
ViaomB 47.92 +.04 WT India 22.79
Visa 73.37 -1.94 Worthgn 19.67
Visteonn 65.27 -.02 Wyndham 32.04
Vonage 4.42 -.02 XLCoEqU 28.76
Vornado 90.67 +.10 Grp 2
WGLHol 37.65 +.15 XL G 21.18
Wabash 8.88 -.24 XcelEngy 24.02
WalMart 52.41 -.88 Xerox 9.89
Wagrn 41.39 -1.20 Yamanag 11.37
WalterEn 112.22 -1.82 YigliGrn 8.71
WsteMInc 36.80 -.30 Youku n 27.94
WatsnPh 65.66 -.20 YumBnds 53.84
Weathflnf 17.72 -.24 ZaleCp 5.67
WeinRlt 24.69 +.04 Zimmer 61.50
WellPoint 77.33 -.39 ZweigTI 3.37


this week's gains for the
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age and S&P index. The
broad stock market has now
fallen for seven of the last
eight weeks, largely because
of concerns that the U.S.
economy is slowing and that
Europe's debt problems
may lead to another finan-
cial crisis. The S&P 500 is
down 7 percent since it hit a
high for the year on April 29.
Technology stocks were
broadly lower. Government
bond prices rose to their
highest level of the year as
investors favored lower-risk
assets. The yield on the 10-
year Treasury dipped to
2.86 percent.
The U.S. economy has
cooled since late April. Re-
cent reports on housing, em-
ployment, manufacturing
and retail sales all have
been weak. The debt crisis
in Greece and fears that
China's growth is slowing
have also pushed markets
lower


I'n-tk









Days


ARMTOiiiMUijjnriie


ARMTOiM-ira"Mjii~-i.


AMMYT.Mr.F.WOnT .


AMMIMM-MM-TMMS


. dMw-Tf T qr W wrrj%


ArwIn~m-M-Mrr. s







Page A8 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011



PINION


"Ifyou cannot catch a bird ofparadise, better take a wet hen."
Nikita Khrushchev, quoted in Time Magazine, Jan. 6, 1958


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan....................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .................. ....................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ....................................... HR director
Sandra Frederick........................... managing editor
F Curt Ebitz................. .................citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..................... ........... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Rebecca Martin ................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


KING'S BAY RULES





Emotional





arguments




won't cut it


he long-awaited new
federal rules for the
management of King's
Bay have been released, and
not everyone is happy
In fact, it's hard to find any-
one who is totally satisfied with
the new rules.
King's Bay will become a
permanent national manatee
refuge under the management
of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife


Service. The most
significant change
proposed is that
the summer
"sports zone"
would be elimi-
nated. A year-
round, slow-speed
rule would be de-
clared and those
folks who water
ski or use per-


The federal rules require
Fish and Wildlife to protect the
manatees and they believe ex-
tending the slow zone is the ap-
propriate action to take. The
rules say the only other factor
involved is an economic one. If
local government or business
could prove the new regula-
tions would hurt the economy,
Fish and Wildlife would pay at-
tention.


THE ISSUE:
Proposed
rule changes
on King's Bay.

OUR OPINION:
Offer input
at hearings.


sonal water craft would be re-
stricted.
On the other side of the de-
bate, the rule still permits
human interaction and touch-
ing of the manatees - a privi-
lege not granted anywhere else
in the United States.
The rules do not become of-
ficial until a public hearing is
held on July 7, but unless some
individual, business or govern-
ment entity can make a strong
economic argument, the rules
will become law.
The federal government's
rule-making process is frus-
trating because local input is
not solicited until after the
rules are created by staff. That
irks local officials, but Citrus
County isn't going to have any
impact on the process the fed-
eral government uses to make
its rules.
The government feels the
rules are necessary because
the manatee population in
King's Bay has experienced
tremendous growth over the
last 20 years. Similarly, the
recreational use of King's Bay
has increased as the county's
population doubled during the
same time period.
Over the past decade, 13
manatees have been killed in
boat-related incidents and over
half of those deaths took place
during the summer months -
a time when it was tradition-
ally thought that the manatees
were not here. But in recent
years, more and more female
manatees have remained in
King's Bay during the warm
summer to birth their young.


The federal
agency is not
going to get
worked up about
emotional argu-
ments concerning
water-skiing or
other recreational
pursuits. They
will listen to the
economic con-
cerns.


The Crystal River City Coun-
cil will have a meeting on Mon-
day, June 27, to take a position
on the proposed rules. The of-
ficial Fish and Wildlife public
hearing will be Thursday, July
7, at the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto. An open
house starts at 5:30 p.m. and
the public hearing is at 7 p.m.
It is important that all inter-
ested parties participate in the
public hearing. Citrus County
is in a unique position. We are
a community that loves and
cares about the future of the
manatees; and on the west side
we are dependent on an econ-
omy that is built around inter-
action with the manatees and
recreation on the water.
This is also a community that
is not very trusting of govern-
ment - and there are real
fears that the federal govern-
ment will over-extend its reach
into the lives of the people who
live here. Most locals know that
the federal government cur-
rently has lots of rules on
King's Bay that are not en-
forced because the government
doesn't have the money to hire
the people to do the actual en-
forcing.
At the same time, we have
groups of people that would
like to ban all interaction with
the manatees and could care
less about the economic vital-
ity of the community.
Somewhere in the middle
ground is a place where most
of us would be comfortable. We
hope the representatives of the
federal government are wise
enough to find that spot.


Disposable toilets Q OUND Perry's profile


It's a waste of taxpay-
ers' money to put so
many restrooms out at
the beach. For years
and years, it's always
been vandalized with
sand and toilet paper
stuffed in the toilets and C
all over the floor. Leave
the Port-a-Potties out
there and put an open
shower so people can
rinse off. Save our money
for something that can't be
damaged.


63-0579


I like Judge Perry of
the (Casey) Anthony trial.
Can someone give me
background (about)
where he is from and how
long he has been a judge?
Wrong cards
I guess when you say
you're having a military
card party, you should let
the people know that it is


not a card party; it is bridge and
pinochle. What a disappointment.
I guess the joke is on me.


Demography is destiny


For too many years, Ameri-
can immigration policy has
headed in one misguided
direction: harsher language, higher
walls and rising deportations.
Now there are a few small signs
that trend might be changing.
One reason is practical reality.
Most of the 11 million undocu-
mented immigrants are so deeply
rooted in our culture and econ-
omy that they won't re-
turn home, no matter
how badly they are
treated. Policies that
increase deportations
are backfiring, driving
illegals deeper under- '
ground and alienating
them from community
institutions, especially
the police. The Obama Coki
administration seems
eager to project a Steven
tough image against OTI
lawbreakers, but VOI
when people are fear-
ful of reporting crimes or testify-
ing in court, public safety is
undermined, not improved.
The second reason is political
reality. Enlightened Republicans
understand that demography is
destiny The rising tide of His-
panic voters will swamp the GOP
if it does not change its virulently
anti-immigrant image. Mike Mur-
phy, a shrewd Republican strate-
gist, wrote recently in Time
magazine that "changing demo-
graphics (are) the real ace up
Obama's sleeve in 2012 ...Repub-
licans need to learn that we no
longer hold our presidential elec-
tions in Ronald Reagan's Amer-
ica." His stark message: "The
GOP must shed its nativism and
attract more Latinos, or the Elec-
toral College math becomes pro-
hibitive."
With the economy stuck in neu-
tral, there's almost no chance for
a major overhaul of the immigra-
tion laws any time soon. But a few
sane voices in both parties, who
know that self-delusion is not a
workable national policy, are
bravely speaking out.


Start with three Democratic
governors: Andrew Cuomo of
New York, Deval Patrick of
Massachusetts and Pat Quinn of
Illinois. All have canceled
participation in a federal
program called Secure
Communities, which requires
local police to tell the U.S.
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement agency (ICE) when


e and
Roberts
HER
CES


they make an arrest.
The feds say they
use that information
to identify and deport
illegal aliens "who
have been convicted
of serious criminal of-
fenses." But critics say
just as many "busboys
and nannies" have
been seized as hard-
ened lawbreakers. In
Illinois, for example,
one out of five illegals
deported by ICE had
no criminal record of


any kind.
"Illinois signed up to help
ICE remove criminals con-
victed of serious crimes, but
based on the statistics from
ICE, that's not what was hap-
pening," a representative for
Gov. Quinn told the New York
Times. Gov. Cuomo accused
Washington of "actually under-
mining law enforcement."
Gov. Patrick was even more
critical, telling the Christian Sci-
ence Monitor: "We run a serious
risk of ethnic profiling and,
frankly, fracturing incredibly im-
portant relationships in commu-
nities that are important for law
enforcement."
Recently, ICE admitted the
critics had a point. The agency is-
sued new rules, giving prosecu-
tors more discretion and
providing greater protection for
immigrants who report crimes
and serve as witnesses. The
changes are minor but useful;
any time a government agency ac-
tually listens to complaints and
concedes mistakes is cause for
celebration.


The battle over Secure Com-
munities is part of a much larger
debate with enormous long-range
political implications. Whites ac-
counted for 88 percent of the
electorate in 1980. By 2008, that
percentage had dropped sharply
to 74 percent, and Obama won
two of three Latino votes. "Worse
for the GOP" says Murphy, "the
proportion of overall votes cast by
white voters will decline even
more in 2012."
One Republican who understands
this shift is Jon Huntsman Jr, the
former Utah governor who an-
nounced for president this week
by promising "civility" and de-
nouncing the "corrosive" nature
of contemporary political debate.
In an interview with Rolling Stone
two years ago, Huntsman con-
demned the "nativist language
(that) drove a lot of people out" of
Republican ranks in recent years.
"Fmndamentally," he said, "we've got
to expand our demographic base."
A week before Huntsman an-
nounced, an analysis of census data
reinforced the essential role that
immigrants play in the American
economy The Brookings Institu-
tion studied newcomers of all
kinds, legal and illegal, and con-
cluded that more have college de-
grees (30 percent) than lack a
high-school diploma (28 percent).
Earlier this spring, a report by
the National Foundation for
American Policy made a similar
point Of the 40 finalists in the Intel
Science Talent Search competi-
tion for high-school students, 28
were the children of immigrants.
Those kids, and their parents,
don't take jobs away from Ameri-
can workers. They create new ones.
Fear of foreigners has always
been part of American life, but
the nativists have always been
wrong. They're wrong again
today, and a few courageous
politicians are saying so.
--*--A
Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by email
at stevecokie@gmail. com.


A 6RAPWi IMe THAT MiAT DefeR sMeRs.


_ LETTERS to the Editor


A new attraction
I live on Old Jones Road and
have a 40-foot motorhome. The
most dangerous part of any trip I
make is the start, because I have
to enter Stagecoach Road.
The view to the east is good,
but you cannot see a vehicle
traveling at you from the west
more than a couple hundred
feet. Traveling at 55 mph, a vehi-
cle is on you before you can
clear the lane and proceed. If an
RV park is allowed with the en-
trance being the old haul road
and Old Jones Road, the main at-
traction will be sitting at the
Stagecoach intersection and
watching the wrecks happen.
Maybe I can take advantage of
this crazy idea: Since my house
is only a quarter-mile from the
haul road, I can get one of
those "conditional-use permits"
for a wrecker service and fu-
neral home - maybe even a
beer hall to encourage work for
the other two. Nah, there will
be plenty of that brought in by
the RVs and by the bikers and
mud boggers.
If the county allows this pro-
posal to proceed, are they ready


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

to buy a bunch of houses nobody
else will want?
Jack Daniel
Floral City


Commission failure
On May 16, an overwhelming
majority of the citizens present
for the county commissioners
meeting told the sitting county
commissioners, "Do not shed
your constitutional duties. Do
not transfer the duties, responsi-
bilities and management of fire
services to another constitu-
tional agency"
And the result? A 3-to-2 vote in
favor, against the majority.
Today the powers, and duties
of fire rescue have been re-
moved from our county adminis-
trator and fire chief and have
been handed over to the sheriff.
In essence, three county com-
missioners have told both the
county administrator and fire
chief, "You are fired."
Apparently the three county
commissioners, Damato, Meek
and Bays have lost faith, trust and
confidence in their own hires.
Bye-bye, Administrator
Thorpe and, sadly, our own Fire
Chief Morabito, who was de-
fended only by the majority.
Deborah Faunce
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


.'Aif I


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COUNSELORS
Continued from Page Al

guidance counselors retired
and the Broward County
School District-the nation's
sixth largest, now facing a
shortfall of nearly $172 mil-
lion - hasn't replaced her
That left Wagner with the 600
students she previously
guided and a portion of the
retired counselor's caseload,
divided up among the three
counselors that remain.
"It's too many kids," Wag-
ner says with a sigh.
She's far from alone in her
predicament. The average
public school counselor in
the United States has 457 stu-
dents. In Michigan, the aver-
age counselor had 759
students in 2008-09. In Cali-
fornia, it was 814.
"States and districts have
been hit really hard by
budget cuts and the reces-
sion," said Jill Cook, assistant
director of the American
School Counselor Associa-
tion. "There are positions
being cut and jobs lost"
One UCLA researcher cal-
culated that public high
school counselors spend
about 38 minutes each year
per student A Public Agenda
survey of first-year college
students conducted found
that more than half felt their
counselors treated them like
"just another face in the
crowd."
The same survey found
that those with little mean-
ingful interaction with coun-
selors were less likely to go
directly from high school to
post-secondary education -
an important predictor of fu-
ture college completion.
Researchers think these
high counselor-to-student ra-
tios are partially to blame for
why more students don't go
on to graduate from college.
A recent study from Harvard
University, for example, cited
the nation's weak guidance
counseling system as one of
the reasons why more stu-
dents aren't making a
smoother transition into post-
secondary education and ca-
reers, and noted that many
other developed counties
dedicate significantly more
time and resources to coun-
seling.
"Parents get angry when
you don't do more," said
Robert Bardwell, past presi-
dent of the New England As-
sociation for College
Admissions Counseling. "And
it's sad because we should be
doing more."
To cope, Wagner runs her
office like a sort of triage cen-
ter: She has a brochure, book
or online resource for nearly
every student concern. Schol-
arships? Check Require-
ments to enter a state
college? Check. Trouble de-
ciding what career path to
choose? She's got a book on
that, too.
Even with her limited time,
Wagner's impact is notice-
able. Banners to colleges
where students have been ac-
cepted hang from the walls -
this year's graduating class
includes students going to
state colleges and prestigious
Ivy League universities. Par-
ents and students send her
letters of thanks. "It has been
an amazing turnaround," one
parent wrote. "He is now on
the honor roll (all As) and
seems happier than ever and
is planning on college."
She advises her students
with the candor of a strict su-
pervisor and the concern of a



TAX
Continued from Page Al

The new law caps
SWFWMD's tax ability at
$107 million.
Felix said for an average
Citrus County resident with a
home valued at $150,000, it
means their tax bill drops
from $17 to 21.
SWFWMD's budget was
about $280 million last year.
The water district is now pro-


posing a budget of $161 mil-
lion for the upcoming fiscal,
Felix said.
In a brief event at the
South Florida Water Man-
agement District in West
Palm Beach on Wednesday,
the Republican governor cer-
emonially signed into law the
estimated $210 million in tax
cuts. The bill was actually
signed last month.
Scott stood before a large
banner proclaiming
"Promises Made, Promises
Kept" and said the law would
help fulfill his campaign
mantras of stimulating the
economy and job growth.
But, Felix said, besides
fewer funds for community


STUDENTS-TO-COUNSELOR RATIO BY STATE
Average number of students assigned to each guidance counselor in 2008-09, by state:


a Alabama, 398
* Alaska, 467
* Arizona, 743
* Arkansas, 333
a California, 814
a Colorado, 387
* Connecticut, 507
a Delaware, 440
a District of Columbia,
275
a Florida, 434
a Georgia, 449
a Hawaii, 272


m Idaho, 434
* Illinois, 672
* Indiana, 540
* Iowa, 354
* Kansas, 419
* Kentucky, 459
* Louisiana, 238
* Maine, 318
a Maryland, 348
* Massachusetts, 432
* Michigan, 638
* Minnesota, 759
* Mississippi, 234


* Missouri, 373
* Montana, 309
* Nebraska, 366
* Nevada, 511
* New Hampshire, 233
* New Jersey, 613
* New Mexico, 391
* New York, 411
* North Carolina, 374
* North Dakota, 335
* Ohio, 499
* Oklahoma, 381
* Oregon, 522


* Pennsylvania, 386
* Rhode Island, 355
* South Carolina, 383
* South Dakota, 400
* Tennessee, 353
* Texas, 435
* Utah, 733
* Vermont, 207
* Virginia, 308
* Washington, 491
* West Virginia, 387
* Wisconsin, 464
* Wyoming, 197


Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute for Education Statistics, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data
- Public Elementary and Secondary Student Enrollment and Staff Information: School Year 2008-2009.


caring mother On a recent
weekday, she is scheduled to
help register about 20 fresh-
men for next year's classes.
For many, it's the first time
she's meeting one-on-one
with them. They're pulled out
of a gym class and wait to be
called in from a small lobby
outside her office.
Mankin, whose talents are
evident but whose grades
have flagged, is among them.
What does he want to be
when he gets older? How
does he plan to get there?
"The first thing is getting a
high school diploma, because
then you'll get a better job,"
she explains.
Mankin doesn't quite know
what he wants to do. He's
thought of something with
cars or maybe an invention; a
math teacher who saw him
stick up for another student
who was being teased re-
cently suggested he might
make a good lawyer someday,
and the idea is appealing.
But since middle school
he's lagged behind in classes.
He says school stopped
seeming relevant to him. He
started hanging out more,
going to the beach or movies
with friends.
"I don't think I ever saw a
counselor in middle school,"
he says.
Mankin says he would like
to study at Florida State Uni-
versity, where his mother at-
tended, but he'd need to get
his GPA up to at least a 3.3 to
attend. Wagner goes through
scenarios that could bring
him there. He still has three
years to turn things around.
"It's doable," she says.
"How do you study?" Wag-
ner asks.
"Read," Blake replies.
"You can't just read," says
Wagner "You have to memo-
rize."
She takes him through a
list of study techniques. She
shows him how even just
handing in homework assign-
ments could dramatically im-
prove his grades.
"You know what you have
to do, right?" Wagner asks.
The boy nods.
Wagner calls in the next
student
SE
The work is never finished.
This summer, Wagner will go
to the office for a day every
couple of weeks, registering
new students for next year's
classes. In the past, she's
been paid for this, but after
years of budget cuts, she is
now a summer volunteer She
does not complain. "This is
my school," she says, simply
Nor does she complain
that there was no time to
leave her post for lunch on a
recent day She reached into
her desk for a jar of peanut
butter and made a sandwich.
"When you love what you
do, you don't mind," she says.
"But you do get tired."


initiatives and projects,
SWFWMD is looking at re-
ducing staff levels through at-
trition.
"We will continue to look
for ways to be more effective
with the funds we have," she
said.
Hunter said the whole
thing feels like taxation with-
out representation.
"At least when we had the
basin board, we had a county
representative and we were
able to work with SWFWMD
on a number of local water
resource projects, but now
who is going to be able to do
what that person did," he
queried.
SWFWMD is looking at al-
ternative methods of commu-
nity outreach, perhaps via
subcommittees, Felix said.
"It's all up in the air right
now," she said.
Scott's office says the water
district tax cuts will amount
to the following: 36 percent
for the Southwest Florida
district; 30 percent for the
South Florida district; 26
percent for the St. Johns dis-
trict; 8 percent for Suwanee
River district; and no change
for the Northwest Florida
district


It is not unusual for Wag-
ner to bring college recom-
mendations and other work
home. While her husband
reads or watches the news,
she'll work at a table nearby
Does she feel like she is
able to meet the needs of
every student? Yes. But is she
as effective as before, when
she had fewer students?
Not really "You don't have
that personal contact" Wag-
ner says.
Families, often reacting to
the high caseloads assigned
to public school counselors,
are increasingly hiring pri-
vate counselors to help their
children get ahead. And the
persistent struggles linked to
the recession - parents los-
ing jobs, foreclosures that
have displaced families for
their homes - mean many
children are coming to school
with a host of worries they
didn't have before.
The nationwide counselor-
to-student ratio hasn't risen
in recent years, but Cook said
the numbers can lag a year or
two. The real picture is clear
in individual states and dis-
tricts, like Broward. Schools
throughout Broward have
proposed further reducing
the number of guidance
counselors in light of this
year's budget cuts. Spokes-
woman Nadine Drew said
the guidance cuts are in part
an effort to avoid teacher lay-
offs.
For Wagner, what were
once one-on-one meetings
with students are now some-
times handled in large
groups.
She's been a counselor for
nearly 15 years; she took the
job after directing a middle
school production of
"Grease." At the time, she
was working as a school
speech pathologist, and
through the play, built a close
relationship with the stu-
dents, who often confided in
her
"You need to see your
counselor about this," she
often found herself telling
them.
"When enough of those sit-
uations came up," Wagner
says, "I said, 'I want to be a
counselor"'
Notwithstanding the cut-
backs, it was "the best deci-
sion I ever made." she says.
MEN
Jessica Hujber, a tall girl
with long black hair and a
schedule filled with ad-
vanced placement and hon-
ors classes, follows Malkin
into Wagner's office. She
seeks help in putting together
a plan packed with tough
courses, one that is likely to
gain her admission into a
prestigious college.
Hujber has clearly done
her homework: She knows
which colleges want more
math or science, and which
prefer a well-rounded cur-


riculum. Her dream school is
MIT, which accepts just 10
percent of its applicants; she
wants to become a doctor or
engineer
She doesn't let the pres-
sure affect her, but she does
worry about how she'll stand
out among other college ap-
plicants. Should she dual en-
roll at the local college while
in high school? Perhaps do a


research project abroad one
summer?
"It's just really competi-
tive," Hujber says. "Any kid
could do well in challenging
classes."
Wagner counsels her on
what she can do to prepare,
like applying now for schol-
arships, doing extracurricu-
lar activities and developing
leadership skills.


-

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" < <' RALA'
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SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 A9

"They want rigor, they want
good grades, and they want a
resume," Wagner tells her
Hujber jots down some of
the ideas on the palm of her
hand with a blue pen. They
agree to a schedule for the
upcoming years and Wagner
calls in the next student, a
skinny girl with bright pink
nails and a rainbow-colored
bracelet
In the course of the day,
Wagner will see highly driven
students like Hujber who
sign up for extra appoint-
ments, and others who could
easily be lost in the shuffle,
without a guidance coun-
selor's attention.
"You do the best you can,"
she says. "It's a lot of work.
The outside world doesn't re-
alize it"
As the final bell rings, Wag-
ner eyes a stack of paper she
has to organize. There are
phone calls to return and a
recommendation letter to
write. Impossible to finish in
a day, it's work she'll take
home again tonight.


7-1960
\\" c om
11 I ,\ It. I l, t I


408 Lake St., Inverness
lora((' ' r Ia law.corni


Sunday, July 3

Liberty & Wallace Brooks Parks


S 5:00 PM 7:00 PM
Music Opening Ceremonies
Concessions with Citrus County Sheriff's
Info Booths Office Honor Guard
Games & Patriotic Medleys

Dusk: Fireworks Presentation

Grab a blanket or lawn chair and bring the family to enjoy one of the
finest fireworks display in Citrus County!

For more information, call 726-2611 or log on to www.Inverness-F1.Gov


www.chronicleonline.com


7:30 PM
Performance by
Neon Truckers


Please leave your pets, alcohol &
personal fireworks at home


Lora L. Wilson, PL

Attorney at Law



Areas of Practice:

* Auto Accident

* Wrongful Death

* Motorcycle/ATV's

* Boat/Watercraft

* Pedestrian

* Animal Attacks


I


m 0


���,.












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BREFS House rebukes Obama on Libyan incursion
Celebrating 104

* | Representatives reject measure to continue U.S. role, but stop short of cutting off funds


Associated Pres


BEV HORNE/Dally Herald
Ruth Smith smiles Thursday
as she gets a hat at her
104th birthday celebration
at Belmont Villages in
Carol Stream, III.

Google facing
antitrust probe
WASHINGTON - Federal
regulators have begun a for-
mal antitrust investigation into
Google's business practices.
In a blog post Friday, the
Internet search giant said it
received notification from the
Federal Trade Commission of
the review on Thursday.
Google said "it's still un-
clear exactly what the FTC's
concerns are."
But the inquiry is expected
to focus in large part on
whether Google abuses its
dominance of Internet search
to extend its influence into
other lucrative online mar-
kets, such as mapping, com-
parison shopping and travel.
Rivals complain that Google,
which handles two out of
every three Internet searches
in the U.S., manipulates its
results to steer users to its
own sites and services and
bury links to competitors.
The Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee's antitrust subcommit-
tee, too, is examining whether
Google gives its own services
favorable treatment in search
results.
Google maintains most of
the accusations of anticom-
petitive behavior come not
from users, but from competi-
tors that are not pleased with
their search rankings. "Since
the beginning, we have been
guided by the idea that, if we
focus on the user, all else will
follow," the company said in
its blog post.

World BRIEFS

Cats at play


Associated Press
A 6-week-old jaguar cub
plays with his mother,
Daniela, on Thursday at the
Parque de las Leyendas
Zoo in Lima, Peru.


Syrian for
15 during
BEIRUT-- D(
ernment guns, tl
Syrian protester.
down city streets
highway Friday I
mands for Presii
Assad's ouster.
forces opened fi
least 15 people,
children, activist
"Our revolution
Assad has lost Il
YouTube video
testers chanting
a suburb of Dan
Syrian capital.
The Syrian op
1,400 people ha
killed as the gov
cracked down or
ment demanding
four decades of
rule - a popular
newed each Frid
weekly Muslim p


rces kill
marches
efying gov-
housands of
s poured
s and a main
to press de-
dent Bashar


WASHINGTON - The
House refused to vote Pres-
ident Barack Obama the au-
thority for U.S. military
operations against Libya on
Friday but stopped short of
cutting off funds for the mis-
sion, a mixed message rem-
iniscent of congressional
unease on Vietnam and
more recent wars.
In a repudiation of the
commander in chief, the
House voted overwhelm-
ingly against a resolution
that would have favored let-
ting the mission continue


lur uone year willle uarling
U.S. ground forces, a resolu-
tion the president said he
would welcome.
The vote was 295-123, with
70 Democrats abandoning
Obama one day after Secre-
tary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton had made a
last-minute plea in a Capitol
Hill meeting.
But shortly after that vote,
the House turned back a Re-
publican-led effort to cut off
money for military hostili-
ties in the Libyan war.
The vote was 238-180. The
funding measure would
have barred drone attacks


and airstrixes bUt anllweu
the United States to con-
tinue actions in support of
NATO.
While the first vote on
White House authority has
no immediate effect on
American involvement in
the NATO-led mission, it
was an embarrassment to a
sitting president and certain
to have reverberations in
Tripoli and NATO capitals.
The vote marked the first
time since 1999 that either
House has voted against a
president's authority to
carry out a military opera-
tion. The last time was to


innlit PresluentL Dinll '111-
ton's authority to use ground
forces in Kosovo.
Republican leaders
pushed for Friday's consti-
tutional showdown between
the executive and legisla-
tive branches, with rank-
and-file House members
saying the president broke
the law by failing to seek
congressional approval for
the 3-month-old war
The Republican leader of
the House, Speaker John
Boehner, said he supported
the president's authority as
commander in chief. "But
when the president chooses


Associated Press
The floodwaters of the Souris River flow through a neighborhood Friday in Minot, N.D. The Souris River set a record
for flooding, rising so quickly that it could be seen climbing up the sides of homes in the North Dakota city.




Levees not enough


N.D. governor: Water cresting over most levees in Minot


Associated Press
MINOT, N.D. - Geese and air-
boats on patrol shared the streets
of Minot on Friday as the Souris
River set a new record for flood-
ing, rising so quickly that it could
be seen climbing up the sides of
homes in the North Dakota city
The Souris broke a more than
130-year-old record at noon when
it measured 1,558.52 feet above
sea level at the city's Broadway
Bridge. That was about 9.5 feet
above flood stage and a half-foot
higher than the record set in 1881.
Gov. Jack Dalrymple said the
Souris was flowing over most lev-
ees in the city and, on his helicop-
ter tour, he could see it in the
streets and against most houses in
an evacuation zone. That was
nearly 5,000 houses.
The river is expected to go as
much as 6 or 7 feet higher over the
weekend, fed by heavy rain up-
stream and water releases from
Canadian reservoirs.
In a sign of how high the water
could go, Dalrymple said it would
be close whether a levee protect-
ing the Broadway Bridge, a major
north-south artery, would be high


enough. That levee is higher than
nearby rooftops.
A car parked near the bridge
that had been dry Friday morning
was submerged by midday as the
river advanced. Nearby, about a
half-dozen gophers found them-
selves stranded in a small and
shrinking dry patch. Furniture store
workers cheered as one of the go-
phers swam 20 yards to safety.
Minot expected widespread
flood damage, and as many as
10,000 residents, about one-fourth
of the city's population, were or-
dered from their homes earlier
this week. Crews focused on pro-
tecting critical infrastructure to
avoid an expanded evacuation.
"We don't like to lose," Capt. Jeff
Hoffer, an Army National Guard
officer, said during a tour of
flooded areas Friday "This is very
disheartening. I feel badly for all
the people."
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serv-
ice launched four boats on Friday
to patrol flooded neighborhoods,
ready to respond to 911 calls. City
officials said no injuries or inci-
dents had been reported
overnight. The evacuation zone
was empty except for emergency


officials and the geese, who pad-
dled in about 5 feet of water wash-
ing down the streets.
George Moe, whose house was
about a block from the water's
edge, returned briefly to pick up
some keys. Moe said the only
thing left in his house was the
mounted head of an antelope shot
by his wife, who died about three
years ago.
Moe, 63, said he had lived in the
house for 40 years. He worried
about it as well as the shop where
he works as a mechanic; it was
taking on water and he was unsure
he'd have a job after the flood.
"I hate to see something go to
hell after 40 years," he said.
"There ain't much you can do."
The U.S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers on Thursday accelerated
water releases from the upstream
Lake Darling dam. In just four
days, the predicted release of
water from the dam more than
doubled - from 11,000 cubic feet
per second to 29,000. National
Weather Service hydrologist Steve
Buan laid the blame on 4 to 6
inches of rain that fell last week in
largely rural - and saturated -
areas to the north.


'I" � A M PnV n ,n 17anV hil hn: ina nnrl nivcfvlrnc hllf nlIM. nf] i: i P a, ifla~t Pill P i"-


Stranded penguin moved to zoo over health fears


Associated Press


security WELLINGTON, New
re, killing at Zealand - After planning to
including two let nature take its course,
s said. wildlife officials moved a
n is strong! stranded emperor penguin
egitimacy!" a from a New Zealand beach to
showed pro- a zoo Friday after its health
in Zabadani, appeared to be worsening.
lascus, the The young penguin had been
eating sand and small sticks of
opposition says driftwood, which it tried to re-
ve been gurgitate. First seen on a North
yernment has Island beach Monday, the pen-
n a move- guin appeared more lethargic
Sas the week progressed, and
3 an end to officials feared it would die if
Assad family they didn't intervene.
r uprising re- The rare venture north by
day after an Antarctic species captured
)rayers. public imagination, and ex-
-From wire reports perts initially said the bird ap-


peared healthy and well-fed and
intervention was unnecessary
They became concerned
enough to step in Friday
Three experts lifted the
penguin from the beach into a
tub of ice and onto the back of
a truck. The bird was docile,
so they didn't sedate it for the
40-mile journey to the Welling-
ton Zoo, said one of the
helpers, Colin Miskelly, a cu-
rator at Te Papa, the Museum
of New Zealand.
It made sense that a pen-
guin might mistake sand for
Antarctic snow, which emper-
ors eat for hydration, Miskelly
said, but he had no explana-
tion for the bird eating wood.
Miskelly said experts at the
zoo were considering sedating
the penguin and putting it on


an intravenous drip as they
tried to nurse it back to health.
Ideally, the bird would heal
enough that it could be re-
leased into the wild.
Miskelly noted no facilities
in New Zealand were designed
to house an emperor penguin
long-term. It's the tallest and
largest penguin species and
can grow up to 4 feet high and
weigh more than 75 pounds.
Christine Wilton, the local
resident who discovered the
penguin Monday while walk-
ing her dog, was back at the
beach Friday to say goodbye.
"I'm so pleased it's going to
be looked after," she said. "He
needed to get off the beach.
He did stand up this morning,
but you could tell that he was-
n't happy"


New Zealand
Department
of Conserva-
tion Ranger
Clint Purches
watches an
Emperor pen-
guin June 20
as he walks
along Peka
Peka Beach
in New
Zealand. The
young pen-
guin took a
rare wrong
turn while
looking for
food and
ended up
stranded on
the beach.
Associated Press


to challenge the powers of
the Congress, I as speaker of
the House will defend the
constitutional authority of
the Legislature," he said.
House Republicans and
some Democrats are furious
with Obama for failing to
seek congressional authori-
zation as required under
the War Powers Resolution.
The 1973 law, often ignored
by Republican and Demo-
cratic presidents, says the
commander in chief must
seek congressional consent
for military actions within
60 days. That deadline has
long passed.



Bulger


back in


Boston,


but will


he sing?

Associated Press

BOSTON - James
"Whitey" Bulger's capture
could cause a world of trou-
ble inside the FBI.
The ruthless Boston crime
boss who spent 16 years on the
lam is said to have boasted
he corrupted six FBI agents
and more than 20 police of-
ficers. If he decides to talk,
some of them could rue the
day he was caught.
The 81-year-old gangster
was captured Wednesday in
Santa Monica, Calif., where
he apparently had been liv-
ing for most of the time he
was a fugitive. He appeared
Friday afternoon inside a
heavily guarded federal
courthouse in Boston to an-
swer charges he committed
19 murders.
Bulger, wearing jeans and
a white shirt under a white
unbuttoned shirt, was brought
into court in handcuffs,
which were then removed.
He had back-to-back
hearings for two separate
indictments. Attorney Peter
Krupp was appointed to
represent Bulger on Friday,
but Bulger asked that a pub-
lic defender be appointed.
The government objected,
citing the $800,000 found in
his apartment and "family
resources," including money
from immediate family
members.
"We feel he has access to
cash," said prosecutor Brian
Kelly
In the second hearing,
Magistrate Judge Marianne
Bowler asked Bulger if he
could pay for legal counsel.
"I could, if you give me my
money," Bulger replied.
The government is seek-
ing to seize Bulger's assets,
which prosecutors said in-
cluded the cash and 30 guns
found in the apartment.
Prosecutors also asked
that Bulger be held without
bond. Bulger waived his
right to a detention hearing
on Friday, but Krupp says he
may ask for a hearing later.












SPORTS


* Roddick makes another
premature exit from Wimbledon/B3




CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Tennis, Golf, NHL/B2
W MLB Baseball/B3
0 NASCAR/B4
STV, Lottery/B5
0 Scoreboard/B6
0 Entertainment/B5
L Adult sports/B6


Gators advance to CWS championship series


~ r'UFawaits winner of South Carolina, Virgina


Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. - Florida
is in the College World Se-
ries finals, which is right
where most people in col-
lege baseball figured they
would be all along.
The second-seeded
Gators advanced with a 6-4
victory over Vanderbilt on
Friday Preston Tucker
drove in the go-ahead run in
the eighth inning to offset a
shaky bullpen that squan-
dered a three-run lead.
Florida (53-17) will play
South Carolina or Virginia
in the best-of-three finals
starting Monday For the


Gators, it's the place to be to
finish a year in which they
were the preseason No. 1-
ranked team, won the
Southeastern Conference
tournament and lost back-
to-back games on only two
occasions.
"You have to feel fortu-
nate," Gators coach Kevin
O'Sullivan said. "You've got
to have some breaks along
the way This is a long grind.
This team, from day one, its
goal was to set out to play for
the national championship.
That doesn't always come in
the end, doesn't always work
out that way. But they've
been focused, and we're


looking forward to it."
Alex Panteliodis limited
Vanderbilt (54-12) to three
hits in six innings before a
parade of five relievers
blew his 4-1 lead.
"That thing could have
spiraled out of control,"
O'Sullivan said.
Daniel Pigott singled and
Cody Dent and Nolan
Fontana reached on back-
to-back bunts to load the
bases in the eighth before
Tucker drove a ball into
deep left field. The Gators
added another run when
Mark Lamm's breaking ball
in the dirt bounced away
See Page B4


Little League ALL STARS TOURNAMENT


District 15 Tournament
9-10 Baseball
POOL A (Crystal River) POOL B (West Hernando)
W L W L
Crystal River 1 0 Inverness 0 0
Lady Lake 1 0 Greater Hudson 0 0
Dunnellon 0 1 Shady Hills 0 0
Dbie County 0 1 West Hernando 0 0
Central Citrus 0 0
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Lady Lake 15, Diie County 14
Crystal River 11, Dunnellon 4
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Diie County vs. Dunnellon, 10 a.m. (CR)
Lady Lake vs. Central Citrus, 10 a.m. (CR)
Inverness vs. Greater Hudson, 10 a.m. (WH)
Shady Hills vs.West Hernando, 10 a.m. (WH)
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Diie County vs. Central Citrus, 10 a.m. (CR)
Lady Lake vs. Crystal River, 10 a.m. (CR)
Inverness vs. Shady Hills, 10 a.m. (WH)
Greater Hudson vs. West Hernando, 10 a.m. (WH)
10-11 Baseball
(West Hernando)
W L
Inverness 0 0
Dunnellon 0 0
Shady Hills 0 0
West Hernando 0 0
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Games will resume at 12 p.m. on Saturday
Shady Hills vs. West Hernando (Suspended)
Dunnellon vs. Inverness (Suspended)
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon vs. West Hernando, 12 p.m.
Inverness vs. Shady Hills, 12 p.m.
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Shady Hills vs. Dunnellon, 12 p.m.
West Hernando vs. Inverness, 12 p.m.

Senior Baseball
(West Hernando)
W L
Inverness 0 0
West Hernando 0 0
SATURDAY'S GAME
Inverness vs. West Hernando, 11 a.m.
SUNDAY'S GAME
Inverness vs. West Hernando, 11 a.m.
MONDAY'SGAME
Inverness vs. West Hernando, 6:30 p.m. (if nec.)
9-10 Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
South Sumter 1 0
Crystal River 1 0
Dunnellon 1 0
Dbie County 0 1
Inverness 0 1
Central Citrus 0 1
FRIDAY'S GAMES
South Sumter 13, Inverness 5
Crystal River 13, Central Citrus 10
Dunnellon 16, Diie County 6
SATURDAY'S GAMES
South Sumter vs. Crystal River, 10 a.m.
Dunnellon vs. Central Citrus, 12 p.m.
Inverness vs. Diie County, 2 p.m.
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Dunnellon vs. Crystal River, 10 a.m.
South Sumter vs. Dixie County, 12 p.m.
Inverness vs. Central Citrus, 2 p.m.

Major Softball
POOL A (Crystal River) POOL B (Crystal River)
W L W L
Crystal River 0 0 Inverness 0 0
Central Citrus 0 0 Dunnellon 0 0
Dbie County 0 0 Shady Hills 0 0
South Sumter 0 0
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Inverness vs. Dunnellon, 10 a.m.
Shady Hills vs. South Sumter, 12 p.m.
Central Citrus vs. Diie County, 2 p.m.
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Diie County vs. Crystal River, 10 a.m.
Inverness vs. Shady Hills, 12 p.m.
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 2 p.m.
Junior Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Dunnellon 0 0
South Sumter 0 0
SATURDAY'S GAME
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 10 a.m.
SUNDAY'S GAME
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, 12 p.m.
Senior Softball
(Crystal River)
W L
Crystal River 0 0
Shady Hills 0 0
Inverness 0 0
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Crystal River vs. Inverness, 12 p.m. (1)
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Shady Hills vs.WinnerGame 1, 10 a.m. (2)


LET THE GAMES BEGIN


- U.. . ~ -


Io
i


Photos by BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
ABOVE: Crystal River's Alleah Valle beats the throw to second base Friday night and slides safety under Central Citrus shortstop Courtney Dye.
BELOW: Inverness shortstop Zarrie Washington scores under South Sumter pitcher Lindsey Collings after hitting a triple in the third inning.



Copeland's 3-run shot gives C.R. win


Crystal River tops

Central Citrus in

All-Stars opener

BY LARRY BUGG
For the Chronicle

CRYSTAL RIVER - The situa-
tion called for a heroine.
And on Friday night Bailey
Copeland delivered the goods.
Copeland blasted a three-run
home run over the heads of the
Central Citrus outfielders in the
fifth inning to deliver a 13-10 vic-
tory for Crystal River Copeland
hit the inside-the-park shot off los-
ing pitcher Krystina Woychowsky
for her Crystal River 9 and 10 soft-
ball team.
"She was due for it," said Crys-
tal River manager Scott Hamilton.
"It worked out very well. I'm very
proud of her. We made some er-
rors tonight. I'm very relieved (to
win). We gave up a lot of runs. We
were throwing the ball around.
Other than that, they did a really
good job to come back. I'm proud
of them."
This was the opening night of
the Little League District 15 All
Star Tournament at Harley Levins
Field.
Jaden Vickers picked up the vic-
tory in relief. Vickers also had
three hits.
Crystal River had 16 hits while
Central Citrus took advantage of
12 walks and had just six hits.
For Crystal River, Alyssa Hamil-


ton was 4-for-4 with three runs.
Shannon Ryan had three hits and
two runs.
Central Citrus had a six-run
fourth inning and Peyton Burdette
had three walks and three runs for
the team.
9 and 10 Softball
South Sumter 13, Inverness 4
South Sumter's Daisy Hall had
a pair of two-run singles leading
South Sumter to a 13-4 victory Fri-
day night over Inverness.
Inverness hurler Madison


Spires started the game and took
the loss.
Sarah Grinrod pitched two in-
nings and picked up the pitching
victory for South Sumter
Inverness scored all their runs
in the third inning. Faith Alexan-
der and Spires both walked. Jacyn
Rivera hit a two-run single. Zarrie
Washington hit a triple to drive in
Rivera. Washington then scored
on a wild pitch.
South Sumter had 10 hits while
Inverness had only two. South


Sumter pitchers registered 11
strikeouts. Leading the way for
South Sumter was Shamerica
Williams who went 2-for-3 with
three runs scored. Courtney Cox
had a three-run single in the first
inning.
"The girls hit really good," said
South Sumter manager Teresa
Hall. "The pitching was really
good. We had good defensive
plays."
All Star play continues today
with games starting at 10 a.m.


" "9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Amateur Cantlay


leads at Travelers

Tseng holds one-stroke midway
I I -1 T 77)/ A I _ I ,


leaa at LIjA
The Associated Press

CROMWELL, Conn. -
Nineteen-year-old UCLA
star Patrick Cantlay shot a
course-record 10-under 60
- the lowest PGA Tour
round ever by an amateur -
to take a four-stroke lead
Friday in the Travelers
Championship.
The low amateur last
week in the U.S. Open, Cant-
lay tied the tournament
record set by Tommy Bolt
when the event was played
in Wethersfield in 1954.
Cantlay birdied the final
two holes at TPC River
Highlands to reach 13
under After shooting a 67 on
Friday morning in the rain-
delayed first round, he had
eight birdies and an eagle in
the afternoon.
D.J. Trahan (62), Webb
Simpson (65), Vaughn Taylor
(66) and Alexandre Rocha
(66) were 9 under along with
Andres Romero, who com-
pleted only five holes in the
second round before play
was suspended because of
darkness just after 8 p.m.
Seventy-seven players were
unable to finish the round.
Cantlay just completed
his freshman year at UCLA,
and has said he plans to stay
until he earns his degree.
Four players have shot
61s at the TPC River High-
lands course. The last was
Kenny Perry in 2009.
An amateur hasn't won a
PGA Tour event since Phil
Mickelson in the 1991
Northern Telecom Open in
Arizona.
LPGA Championship
PITTSFORD, N.Y -Top-
ranked Yani Tseng shot a 2-
under 70 to take a
one-stroke lead over Pat
Hurst after the second
round of the LPGA Champi-
onship, the tour's second
major of the year.
Battling a torrential
downpour then a steady
drizzle for nearly half her


championsmp
first nine holes, Tseng fol-
lowed her first-round-best
66 with a grinding perform-
ance that put her at 8 under
overall. She won the LPGA
State Farm Classic two
weeks ago for her second
LPGA Tour victory of the
year.
Hurst shot a 67 in the
morning before the heavy
rain hit Locust Hill Country
Club.
Morgan Pressel, Minea
Blomqvist, and Hee Young
Park were 6 under after 69s.
Defending champion
Cristie Kerr shot her second
straight 72 to make the cut.
Michelle Wie also opened
with consecutive 72s.
Dick's Sporting
Goods Open
ENDICOTT, N.Y - John
Huston and Mark Wiebe shot
7-under 65s to share the lead
after the first round of the
Dick's Sporting Goods Open.
Huston, playing just his
third Champions Tour event
since turning 50 on June 1,
had seven birdies on a
bogey-free day, nearly mak-
ing eagle at No. 18 when his
second shot at the par 4 hit
the flag and stayed out. The
tap-in birdie tied him with
Wiebe, who also had seven
birdies and no bogeys as he
began his drive to win his
second straight event.
Wiebe won at Rock Barn
two weeks ago.
Ronnie Black and Nick
Price were tied for third at
6 under, and Steve Lowery,
Hal Sutton, John Cook and
Peter Jacobsen were 5
under
BMW International Open
MUNICH - South
Africa's George Coetzee
birdied four of his last six
holes for his second straight
5-under 67 and a share of
the lead with Henrik Sten-
son in the BMW Interna-
tional Open.
Stenson followed his
opening 64 with a 70 to
match Coetzee at 10 under.


Associated Press

ST PAUL, Minn. - Ryan
Nugent-Hopkins was picked
first in a center-heavy NHL
draft by the Edmonton Oil-
ers on Friday night.
The Oilers, going first
overall for the second
straight year, selected the
slick passer from the Red
Deer Rebels of the Western
Hockey League. The 18-
year-old center led the WHL
last season with 75 assists.
Nugent-Hopkins is the
first WHL player to be
drafted first since 1996. Six
of the first eight picks were
centers.
Left wing Gabriel Lan-
deskog of Sweden went sec-
ond to the Colorado
Avalanche. He had 36 goals
in 53 games last season for
the Kitchener Rangers of
the Ontario Hockey League.
The Oilers chose left wing
Taylor Hall from the Wind-
sor Spitfires of the OHL No.
1 in 2010, and Nugent-Hop-
kins could eventually find
himself on a line with him.
To get there, Nugent-Hop-
kins has to bulk up. Listed at
6-foot-1 and 164 pounds, the
native of British Columbia
said this week he's added 10
pounds since the end of his
junior season and plans to
pack on five more.
"Steak and potatoes,
mostly," he said when asked
about his diet. "Just trying to
put some weight on."
Jonathan Huberdeau, a
center from Quebec, was
taken third by the Florida
Panthers, who were also in
the same slot for the second
year in a row. Huberdeau
was the MVP of the Quebec
Major Junior Hockey
League playoffs after get-
ting three goals and three
assists in four games for the
Saint John's Sea Dogs.
Adam Larsson, a 6-foot-3,
200-pound defenseman from
Sweden, was selected fourth
by the New Jersey Devils.
He played two full seasons
for Skelleftea and was the
third blue-liner to make his
debut in the Swedish Elite
League at age 16.
Then the New York Is-
landers chose center Ryan
Strome of the Niagara Ice-


Dogs of the OHL. Strome was
third in the league with 106
points in 65 games. Islanders
right wing Kyle Okposo, a na-
tive of Minnesota, introduced
Strome. The Islanders, too,
were picking fifth for the sec-
ond straight year
After that, the Ottawa
Senators chose center Mika
Zibanejad from Djurgarden
of the Swedish Elite
League. His mother is
Finnish, and his father is
Iranian, but he was born in
Stockholm.
Then came the big an-
nouncement by Winnipeg:
The team will be called the
Jets. Formerly the Atlanta
Thrashers, the franchise
waited until the seconds be-
fore choosing center Mark
Schiefele with the seventh
selection to announce the
new - er, old - nickname.
Team chairman Mark
Chipman spilled the poorly
kept secret as he turned to
general manager Kevin
Cheveldayoff to make the
pick "on behalf of the Win-
nipeg Jets."


A


Associated Press
Andy Roddick reaches for a forehand shot during his match against Feliciano Lopez at Wimbledon on Friday.



Wimble-DONE, again!

Roddick makes yet another disappointing early exit at All England Club


Sharapova,

Venus advance

Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England
- Head bowed, Andy Rod-
dick trudged off Centre
Court, his purple Wimble-
don towel dragging along
the turf.
As the three-time runner-
up at the All England Club
headed for the exit, he
passed some kids clamoring
for an autograph from their
front-row perch. Roddick
paused and tossed his blue-
framed racket underhand.
Thanks to his latest earlier-
than-anticipated Grand Slam
loss, the American won't be
needing it next week
The eighth-seeded Rod-
dick departed quickly Fri-
day, beaten 7-6 (2), 7-6 (2), 6-4
in the third round by un-
seeded Feliciano Lopez of
Spain. Lopez served spec-
tacularly well, hitting 28
aces, and finally got the bet-
ter of the 2003 U.S. Open
champion after losing all
seven previous matches
they played.
Roddick turns 29 in Au-
gust, and he was asked
whether, as the years go by,
one particularly depressing
thought creeps into his
mind: He might never win
Wimbledon.
"Well, sure. You're
human. I mean, of course it
does," he replied. Then,
speaking directly to the re-
porter, Roddick added: "You
know, you may never get
your favorite job, either -
no offense to your current
employer"
Roddick lost to Roger
Federer in the 2004, 2005
and 2009 finals - 16-14 in
the fifth set of that last one
- but only made it as far as
the fourth round last year,
and second round in 2008.
"What do you do? You
keep moving forward until
you decide to stop," Rod-
dick said. "At this point, I've
not decided to stop, so I'll
keep moving forward."
He hasn't been past the
quarterfinals at any of the
past seven major tourna-
ments; he withdrew from


the French Open in May be-
cause of a right shoulder in-
jury, but said he's healthy at
the moment.
That, in part, is why Rod-
dick figured he'd make a
deep run at the grass-court
Grand Slam tournament.
"He gears a lot of his year
for Wimbledon. It's a tough
loss," said Roddick's coach,
Larry Stefanki. "He's disap-
pointed. Very disap-
pointed."
It didn't help that Lopez
was nearly perfect, conjur-
ing up 57 winners and eight
unforced errors.
"Unbelievable," Lopez
said. "When I came back in
the locker room, my
coaches told me. I was sur-
prised that I didn't miss
anything, almost."
Because of rain, only two
other third-round men's
matches finished Friday:
No. 4 Andy Murray moved
forward in his bid to give
Britain its first male cham-
pion at Wimbledon since
1936, beating Ivan Ljubicic
6-4, 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (4) with the
help of a behind-the-back,
between-the-legs trick shot
under the Centre Court roof;
and No. 17 Richard Gasquet
of France beat Simone
Bolelli of Italy 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.
Murray plays Gasquet next.
Roddick is the highest-
seeded man out of the tour-
nament so far. Two of the top
three women already are
gone: No. 2 Vera Zvonareva,
the runner-up at Wimbledon
and the U.S. Open in 2010,
was eliminated by No. 32
Tsvetana Pironkova of Bul-
garia 6-2, 6-3 Friday, less
than 24 hours after No. 3 Li
Na, the French Open cham-
pion, lost.
Pironkova reached the
semifinals last year, when
she upset five-time Wimble-
don champion Venus
Williams, and they'll have a
rematch in the fourth round
next week. Williams over-
powered 76th-ranked Maria
Jose Martinez Sanchez of
Spain 6-0, 6-2 on Court 1.
"I'm in the next round.
That's my main goal, regard-
less whether I play amazing,
whether I play halfway de-
cent. Doesn't matter,"
Williams said. "It's just
about finding a way to win."
Looking ahead to facing


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Pironkova, Williams said:
"Last year, you know, I think
I just got unhappy with how
I was playing, and I let that
affect my game. This year, I
won't let that happen."
Another past Wimbledon
winner, Maria Sharapova,
struggled at the start against
17-year-old Laura Robson of
Britain before righting her-
self to win their second-
round match 7-6 (4), 6-3, her
shot-accompanying shrieks
as loud as ever
Sharapova trailed 4-1
early, then fell behind 4-2 in
the tiebreaker, before taking
the set's last five points,
closing it with a 108 mph
service winner against 2008
Wimbledon junior cham-
pion Robson.
Top-seeded Caroline Woz-
niacki also won a delayed
second-round match, as did
2007 finalist Marion Bartoli.
Defending champion Rafael
Nadal's match was among
several in the third round
stopped because of rain Fri-
day evening.
Having saved two set
points against Gilles Muller
of Luxembourg, the top-
seeded Nadal came back to
take the opener 7-6 (6), de-
spite slipping behind the
baseline and tumbling to his
knees. At the ensuing
changeover, Nadal asked to
see the trainer for treatment.
But play was suspended
before the start of the sec-
ond set, then called off for
the day at about 7 p.m.
Shortly thereafter, Nadal
walked out of the club with-
out any noticeable hitch in
his gait.
It has rained on four of
the first five days of compe-
tition, but the tournament
press office said there has-
n't been consideration given
to scheduling matches for


the middle Sunday, tradi-
tionally a day off at Wimble-
don. Saturday's forecast
calls for a chance of rain in
the morning, but dry
weather in the afternoon.
In three second-round
men's matches held over
from Thursday, 18-year-old
Bernard Tomic of Australia,
the youngest man left, de-
feated Igor Andreev of Rus-
sia 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1; No.
11 Jurgen Melzer of Austria
beat Dmitry Tursunov of
Russia 6-3,2-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (1);
and No. 7 David Ferrer of
Spain finished off a 6-7 (6), 6-
1, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 comeback vic-
tory over 19-year-old Ryan
Harrison of the United
States.
Harrison credited Rod-
dick with being a mentor.
"He's helped me deal with
every situation I've faced, as
far as all the new stuff I
haven't experienced myself
yet," Harrison said. "He's
made himself available to
ask him any questions,
whether or not it's about ten-
nis, life, priorities, whatever.
I can ask him and talk to him
about anything, which has
been a great help to me."
Roddick beat Lopez on
grass two weeks ago at the
Queen's Club tuneup tour-
nament But this time, Rod-
dick said, "He played better
than I did. He beat me. It's
easier for me to walk out of
here with that and move for-
ward with that than, let's say,
'08, where I lost to (Janko)
Tipsarevic, and I felt like I
completely choked, or last
year, where I just kind of had
a million opportunities and
kind of gave it away"
"That was about his only
opportunity to make a
dent," Stefanki said. "He re-
turned as well as he could
return when he got his
racket on it."


ulOO TODAY'S
FULL BINGO
STILL .I ,


CAVAILABL

SINGLE BINGO
AND
DOUBLE BINGO

WINNER

JEWEL

DUNAWAY


U


NUMBER




064



564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO


Nugent-Hopkins heads to

Edmonton with top NHL pick


I


B2 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


SPORTS


11111111


?6I5?W






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Boston
NewYork
Tampa Bay
Toronto
A L Baltimore


NL


Philadelphia
Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Florida


MLB BASEBALL


East Division
GB WCGB

/2 -
2/2 2
7/2 7
9 8/2


East Division
GB WCGB

42 -
9 4/2
10/2 6
14 9/2


Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City




Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


Central Division
GB WCGB

1'/2 4
4/2 7
8'2 11
10/2 13


Central Division
GB WCGB
- - I
1 2/2
3 4/2
3 4/2
10 11Y2
14 15'2


Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Oakland


W L Pct
Arizona 43 34 .558
San Francisco 41 34
20-21
Colorado 38 37 .507
Los Angeles 34 42 .447
San Diego 32 44 .421


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 B3

West Division
GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
- - 5-5 W-1 23-14 18-22
3 6/2 4-6 L-3 21-18 16-20
3'2 7 6-4 W-1 15-20 22-19
7 10'2 6-4 L-3 19-16 15-27


West Division
GB WCGB

.547 1

4 4/2
8'2 9
10/2 11


L10 Str Home Away
6-4 W-4 22-17 21-17
1'2 5-5 W-2 21-13

7-3 W-1 19-19 19-18
4-6 L-1 18-22 16-20
3-7 W-2 14-26 18-18


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Washington 1, Seattle 0
N.Y Mets 4, Oakland 1
San Francisco 2, Minnesota 1
Arizona 5, Kansas City 3
Friday's Games
Arizona 7, Detroit 6
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 1
Baltimore 5, Cincinnati 4, 12 innings
Colorado 4, N.Y Yankees 2
Philadelphia 1, Oakland 0
Texas 8, N.Y Mets 1
Tampa Bay 5, Houston 1
Chicago Cubs 6, Kansas City 4
Milwaukee 4, Minnesota 3
Washington at Chicago White Sox, (LATE)
Toronto 5, St. Louis 4
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Seattle at Florida, 10:10 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Colorado (Cook 0-2) at N.Y Yankees (Sabathia
9-4), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 5-5) at San Francisco
(Cain 6-4), 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Chatwood 4-4) at L.A. Dodgers
(Kuroda 5-8), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Niese 6-6) at Texas (Ogando 7-2),
4:10 p.m.
Washington (Gorzelanny 2-5) at Chicago White
Sox (Danks 3-8), 4:10 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 4-3) at Detroit (Verlander
9-3), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 4-2) at Pittsburgh (Karstens
4-4), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 6-6) at Baltimore (Matusz 1-
2), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 7-5) at Philadelphia (Hamels 9-
3), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 6-5) at Houston (Norris 4-
5), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 6-4) at Kansas City
(Duffy 1-2), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 4-6) at Milwaukee (Gallardo
8-4), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (C.Villanueva 4-1) at St. Louis (J.Gar-
cia 6-2), 7:15 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 5-4) at Florida (Volstad 2-7),
10:10p.m.
Sunday's Games
Arizona at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Oakland at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y Yankees, 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Washington at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Toronto at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Florida, 10:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Detroit, 6:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.



Blue Jays 5, Cardinals 4
ST. LOUIS - Jose Bautista's major
league-leading 23rd home run in the
top of the ninth inning helped the
Toronto Blue Jays snap a four-game
losing streak with a 5-4 victory over the
St. Louis Cardinals on Friday night.
Bautista's one-out drive off Fer-
nando Salas (4-2) barely cleared the
wall in right field, landing just past the
outstretched glove of a leaping Jon Jay
and in the Cardinals' bullpen. He has
homered in the last two games after
hitting only one in a 22-game stretch.
Colby Rasmus and Matt Holliday
homered for the Cardinals, who have
lost 10 of 13 and are 1-3 without in-
jured Albert Pujols.
Bautista, due to move from the out-
field to third base in the next few days
to beef up a struggling offense, dou-
bled and scored in the first, flied out to
the warning track in left and drew an
intentional walk.
Bautista's homer came not long
after a 13-minute delay when portions
of two light standards failed for the sec-
ond time this month.
Toronto St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
YEscorss 5 01 0 Theriotss 3 0 0 0
EThmslf 5 22 0 Jayrf 3 1 11
Bautist rf 4 32 1 Hollidylf 4 1 2 2
Lindlb 5 01 2 Brkmnlb 4 0 0 0
A.Hill2b 5 0 2 2 Rasmscf 4 1 1 1
JMolinc 3 02 0 Schmkr2b 4 0 1 0
J.Nixpr 0 0 0 0 YMolinc 3 0 0 0
Arenciic 0 0 0 0 Westrkp 1 0 0 0
Encrnc 3b 4 0 1 0 MBggs p 0 00 0
JMcDnl3b 0 00 0 MHmltph 1 00 0
RDaviscf 3 00 0 Lynnp 1 00 0
CPttrsn ph-cfl 0 1 0 Salasp 0 0 0 0
Morrow p 3 00 0 Descals3b 2 1 0 0
JRiverph 1 0 0 0
Frasorp 0 00 0
Frncscp 0 00 0
Totals 39 5125 Totals 30 4 5 4
Toronto 200 020 001 - 5
St. Louis 011 002 000 - 4
LOB-Toronto 9, St. Louis 2. 2B-E.Thames 2
(4), Bautista (11), Encarnacion (16), Jay (9),
Schumaker (7). HR-Bautista (23), Holliday (9),
Rasmus (6). SB-C.Patterson (12). S-Theriot.
SF-Jay
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Morrow 7 5 4 3 1 9
FrasorW,2-1 1 0 0 0 0 1
FFrancisco S,8-11 1 0 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
Westbrook 41-310 4 4 1 3
M.Boggs 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
Lynn 3 1 0 0 1 2
SalasL,4-2 1 1 1 1 0 0
PB-J.Molina.
Umpires-Home, Tim McClelland; First, Marvin


Hudson; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Ted Bar-
rett.
T-2:53 (Rain delay: 0:13). A-37,724 (43,975).


Rockies 4, Yankees 2 Pirates 3, Red Sox 1 Phillies 1, Athletics 0


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Sean Rodriguez, left, reaches to touch
home plate as he scores past Houston Astros catcher Car-
los Corporan during Friday night's interleague game.


Rays 5, Astros 1
HOUSTON - James Shields be-
came the first pitcher in Tampa Bay
franchise historyto throw three straight
complete games and Evan Longoria
homered and drove in three runs to
lead the Rays to a 5-1 win over the
Houston Astros on Friday night.
Shields (8-4) allowed three hits and
struck out nine with one walk.
He leads the majors with six com-
plete games this season. He's the first
pitcher since Toronto's Pat Hentgen in
1997 to have six complete game wins
through the first 76 games.
Longoria hit a two-run shot before
Justin Upton's solo homer gave Tampa
Bay back-to-back homers for the first
time this season in the Rays'four-run
third inning. Sean Rodriguez had three
hits and scored twice and Longoria
drove in a run in the fifth inning.
Chris Johnson drove in Houston's
run with a double in the seventh inning.
It was the first earned run Shields has
allowed in his last three starts.
Houston starter Wandy Rodriguez
(5-4) allowed six hits and five runs in
six innings to lose for the first time
since April 24. He had been 4-0 in
seven starts since then.
Shields became the fourth pitcher in
the last five years to win three com-
plete games. Brandon Webb did it in
2007, CC Sabathia in 2008 and Cliff
Lee in 2010.
Shields threw 100 pitches the first
two, a 4-0 win against Boston and a 2-
1 victory over the Marlins, but needed
106 on Friday.
Shields sailed through the first three
innings and didn't allow a baserunner
until Michael Bourn singled with no



D'Backs 7, Tigers 6
DETROIT-Wily Mo Pena hit a
towering solo home run in the eighth

inning, and the Arizona Diamondbacks

beat the Detroit Tigers 7-6 on Friday
night.

Pena, called up from the minor
leagues earlier this week for his first
big league stint since 2008, hit a two-
out homer an estimated 454 feet over

the left-field fence off David Purcey (1-
1). The ball landed in the final rows of
seats under the big scoreboard at
Comerica Park.

Pena has homered twice since join-

ing the Diamondbacks. They've been
able to use him as a designated hitter
in American League ballparks during

interleague play.

Esmerling Vasquez (1-1) pitched a
scoreless seventh for Arizona. David

Hernandez worked the eighth, and J.J.
Putz finished for his 21st save.


Arizona

RRorts 3b
KJhnsn 2b
J.Upton rf
CYoung cf
S.Drew ss
Nady lb
W.Pena dh
HBlanc c
Blmqst If
GParra If

Totals
Arizona
Detroit
E-Raburn


Detroit
ib r h bi


4 0 0 0 AJcksn cf
3 1 0 0 C.Wells If
3 2 2 0 Boesch ph
4 2 1 0 Ordonzrf
3 1 1 1 MiCarrlb
4 0 2 3 VMrtnz dh
4 1 2 2 JhPerltss
4 0 0 0 Avila c
4 0 2 0 Inge3b
0 0 0 0 Raburn2b
Kelly ph
33 7106 Totals
000 330 010
202 200 000
n (7). DP-Arizona 2,


ab r h bi
4 1 1 0
4110
4222
1 0 0 0
4 2 2 1
3 1 1 0
3 0 1 1
4 0 2 2
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
31000




- 7
- 6
Detroit 2.
4221
3110
301 1
4022
4000
4010
3000
1000
35610 6
- 7
- 6
Detroit 2.


LOB-Arizona 6, Detroit 6.2B-C.Wells (7), Or-
donez (4), Jh.Peralta (13). 3B-A.Jackson (6).
HR-W.Pena (2), C.Wells (4). SB-J.Upton
(14). CS-J.Upton (6). S-K.Johnson. SF-


S.Drew.

Arizona
Duke
Shaw
VasquezW,1-1
Da.Hernandez H,11
Putz S,21-24
Detroit
Coke
Perry
Purcey L,1-1
Benoit
WP-Perry.
Umpires-Home, N


IP H RERBBSO


42-37 6
21-31 0
11-32 1
2-3 0 0

dike Everitt;


Muchlinski; Second, Chris Guccione; Third,
Mark Carlson.
T-3:06. A-37,335 (41,255).


outs in the fourth inning. He still faced
the minimum through four thanks to his
defense turning a double play. He hit
Chris Johnson with a pitch with two
outs in the fifth inning but struck out
Clint Barmes to get out of that inning.
He walked Bourn with two outs in
the sixth, but Jeff Keppinger lined out
to end that inning.
Brett Wallace got Houston's second
hit of the game on a single with two
outs in the seventh. Johnson's double
sailed over B.J. Upton's head and
landed on Tal's Hill in center field to
score Wallace and make it 5-1.


Tampa Bay Houston
ab r h bi
SRdrgz 2b 4 2 3 0 Bourn cf
Zobrist rf 3 1 1 1 Kppngr2b
Longori 3b 4 1 2 3 Pence rf
BUptoncf 3 1 1 1 Ca.Leelf
Shppchc 4 0 0 0 Wallaclb
Ruggin If 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b
Ktchmlb 4 0 1 0 Barmesss
EJhnsn ss 4 0 0 0 Towles c
Shields p 4 0 0 0 Corprnc
WRdrg p
AngSnc ph
FRdrgz p
Michals ph
AnRdrg p
Totals 34 58 5 Totals
Tampa Bay 004 010 000
Houston 000 000 100


ab rh bi
3 0 1 0
3010
4000
4000
4000
3110
201 10
2 0 1 1
3000
0000
3000
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1000
1000
1 0 0 0
0000
1000
0000
29 1 3 1
- 5
- 1


DP-Tampa Bay 1, Houston 1. LOB-Tampa
Bay 4, Houston 3. 2B-Kotchman (12), C.John-
son (17). HR-Longoria (7), B.Upton (9). SB-
S.Rodriguez (5), B.Upton (20).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
ShieldsW,8-4 9 3 1 1 1 9
Houston
W.Rodriguez L,5-4 6 6 5 5 2 5
Fe.Rodriguez 2 1 0 0 0 2
An.Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Shields (C.Johnson). WP-W.Ro-
driguez.
Umpires-Home, Brian Gorman; First, Jim Wolf;
Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Larry Vanover.
T-2:33. A-26,682 (40,963).


NEWYORK - Jason Giambi hit a
long homer against his former team
and Ubaldo Jimenez overcame early
wildness to pitch seven impressive in-
nings, leading the Colorado Rockies to
a 4-2 victory Friday night over New
York in a rare trip to the Bronx.
Troy Tulowitzki homered again in
NewYork City and Todd Helton hit an
RBI single for Colorado. No. 9 batter
Chris lannetta walked three times and
scored a run. The Rockies were swept
by the Yankees in a three-game series
in 2004, their only other trip to the
Bronx.
A.J. Burnett (7-6) became the first
pitcher in Yankees history to strike out
four batters in one inning when he fol-
lowed up three ineffective innings with
the major league record-tying perform-
ance in the sixth.
The gangly right-hander struck out
lannetta and Carlos Gonzalez looking
before Chris Nelson swung at a pitch in
the dirt. The wild pitch bounced off
catcher Russell Martin and went to the
backstop, allowing Nelson to reach
base. Helton struck out swinging to end
the inning.
Seattle's Felix Hernandez was the
last to strike out four in a game - in
the eighth inning on June 3, 2010,
against Minnesota.


Colorado


New York


ab r h bi
CGnzlz cf 4 0 2 0 Gardnr If
Nelson 2b 4 0 0 0 Grndrs cf
Helton lb 5 0 1 1 Teixeirlb
Tlwtzkss 5 1 1 1 AIRdrg3b
Giambi dh 4 2 3 1 Cano 2b
EYongpr-dh 0 0 0 Swisherrf
S.Smith rf 5 0 1 0 Posada dh
Wggntn 3b 4 0 1 1 Martin c
Blckmnlf 4 0 0 0 ENunezss
lannettc 1 1 0 0
Totals 36 49 4 Totals
Colorado 011 110 000
NewYork 101 000 000


ab rh bi
4000
1200
1 2 0 0
3000
3012
3 0 1 2
4000
4020
4000
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
4010
3010

302 5 2
- 4
- 2


E-Nelson (2). DP-Colorado 1, New York 1.
LOB-Colorado 11, New York 6. 2B-C.Gon-
zalez 2 (17), S.Smith (20), AI.Rodriguez (17).
HR-Tulowitzki (14), Giambi (8). SB-Nelson
(3), Granderson 2 (12). CS-E.Nunez (4). SF-
Al.Rodriguez.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
JimenezW,3-7 7 4 2 2 4 7
Mat.Reynolds H,13 1 0 0 0 0 0
StreetS,23-25 1 1 0 0 0 0
NewYork
A.J.BurnettL,7-6 61-37 4 4 5 5
Logan 11-31 0 0 1 2
Ayala 11-31 0 0 0 0
WP-A.J.Burnett.
Umpires-Home, Ed Hickox; First, Ed Rapuano;
Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Alfonso Marquez.
T-2:58. A-46,028 (50,291).


Brewers 4, Twins 3 Orioles 5, Reds 4, (12)


MILWAUKEE - Prince Fielder dou-
bled in the go-ahead runs with two
outs in seventh inning to raise his NL-
leading RBI total to 65 and rally the
Milwaukee Brewers over the Min-
nesota Twins 4-3 on Friday night.
Milwaukee is 2-2 on this interleague
homestand after a back-and-forth affair
with their border rivals. The Brewers
led 2-0 on doubles by Corey Hart in
the fourth and Ryan Braun in the fifth.
Danny Valencia hit a three-run
homer off Randy Wolf (6-4) to give
Minnesota a 3-2 lead in the sixth, but
Fielder answered the next inning off re-
liever Jose Mijares.
Twins starter Scott Baker (5-5) had
his personal three-game winning streak
snapped after leaving two on for Mijares.
John Axford pitched the ninth for his
17th straight save and 20th this season.
Milwaukee is the only team in the
majors not to lose consecutive home
games this year, and the Brewers ap-
peared to be in complete control of this
one leading 2-0 until it unraveled over
three batters in the sixth.
Michael Cuddyer walked, Delmon
Young singled and Valencia snapped
an 0-for-13 skid with a towering shot
that landed in the restaurant in left field
to put the Twins ahead 3-2.


Minnesota
ab r
Reverecf 4 0
ACasill2b 4 0
Mauerc 4 0
Cuddyrrf 2 1
DYong If 4 1
Valenci3b 4 1
LHughslb 3 0
Nishiokss 4 0
SBakerp 3 0
Mijaresp 0 0
AIBrnttp 0 0


Totals 32 3
Minnesota
Milwaukee


Milwaukee


h bi ab rh bi
2 0 RWeks2b 3 1 2 0
0 0 Morgancf 4 1 1 0
0 0 Braun If 4 0 1 1
0 0 Fielderlb 2 1 1 2
2 0 McGeh3b 4 0 1 0
1 3 C.Hartrf 3 0 1 1
0 0 YBtncrss 4 0 0 0
0 0 Kottarsc 4 00 0
1 0 Lucroy c 0 00 0
0 0 Wolfp 2 1 2 0
0 0 Counsllph 1 00 0
Loe p 0 00 0
Axford p 0 00 0
6 3 Totals 314 9 4
000 003 000 - 3
000 110 20x - 4


DP-Minnesota 2, Milwaukee 1. LOB-Min-
nesota 5, Milwaukee 7.2B-Revere (4), Braun
(17), Fielder (19), C.Hart (11). HR-Valencia
(8).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
S.BakerL,5-5 62-38 4 4 4 4
Mijares BS,2-2 0 1 0 0 0 0
AI.Burnett 11-30 0 0 0 1
Milwaukee
WolfW,6-4 7 6 3 3 3 5
LoeH,14 1 0 0 0 0 2
AxfordS,20-22 1 0 0 0 0 1
Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Wolf.
Umpires-Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Dan Bellino;
Second, John Tumpane; Third, Derryl Cousins.
T-2:28. A-39,819 (41,900).


BALTIMORE - Derrek Lee led off
the bottom of the 12th inning with a
home run to give the Baltimore Orioles
a 5-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds
on Friday night.
Lee sent a 1-2 pitch from Jose
Arredondo (0-3) into the seats in left
field to end the marathon. It was Lee's
fifth home run, the first since May 8.
Cincinnati missed a chance to take
the lead in the top of the 12th when
Joey Votto was thrown out at the plate
trying to score from first on a two-out
double by Jay Bruce.
Mike Gonzalez (1-1) worked the
12th for the Orioles, who led 4-0 after
four innings. Baltimore stranded 13 and
went 2 for 14 with runners in scoring
position.
The Orioles improved to 4-6 in
extra-inning games.
Adam Jones homered for Baltimore,
and rookie second baseman Blake
Davis - who made a costly error
Wednesday in a 5-4 loss to Pittsburgh
- rebounded with his first major
league hit: a two-run triple that made it
2-0 in the second inning.


Cincinnati


Baltimore


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Heiseylf 5 1 1 0 Hardyss 5 0 2 1
BPhllps 2b 6 1 2 2 Markks rf 5 0 1 0
Vottolb 6 01 1 AdJonscf 6 1 11
Rolen3b 6 02 0 Guerrrdh 4 0 0 0
Bruce rf 5 0 2 0 Scott If 3 0 0 0
JGomsdh 4 1 1 0 Pie If 1 0 0 0
Stubbscf 5 0 0 0 D.Leelb 5 2 3 1
RHrndzc 4 1 2 0 Wietersc 5 2 2 0
Janishss 5 01 1 MrRynl3b 3 0 0 0
BDavis 2b 5 0 2 2
Totals 46 4124 Totals 42511 5
Cincinnati 000 031 000 000 - 4
Baltimore 021 100 000 001 - 5
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Cincinnati 2. LOB-Cincinnati 10, Balti-
more 13.2B-B.Phillips (16), Votto (17), Bruce
2 (14), J.Gomes (8), R.Hernandez (8), Hardy
(13), D.Lee (10), Wieters 2 (13). 3B-B.Davis
(1). HR-Ad.Jones (12), D.Lee (5). SB-
Markakis (5). CS-Bruce (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Volquez 41-37 4 4 5 4
LeCure 12-30 0 0 1 3
Ondrusek 12-32 0 0 0 0
Bray 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Masset 2 0 0 0 2 1
Arredondo L,0-3 1 2 1 1 1 0
Baltimore
Jakubauskas 5 5 3 3 3 3
BerkenBS,1-1 1 2 1 1 1 2
Ji.Johnson 2 2 0 0 0 1
Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 1
Uehara 2 1 0 0 0 3
M.GonzalezW,1-1 1 2 0 0 0 0
Arredondo pitched to 1 batter in the 12th.
WP-Berken.
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First,
Adrian Johnson; Second, Alan Porter; Third,
Fieldin Culbreth.
T-3:55. A-45,382 (45,438).


PITTSBURGH - Jose Tabata and
Lyle Overbay each had two hits and an
RBI to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a
3-1 win over the Boston Red Sox on
Friday night.
Paul Maholm (4-8) beat an Ameri-
can League team for the first time in
nearly two years by surviving 5 1-3
eventful innings. Joel Hanrahan
worked a perfect the ninth to pick up
his 21st save in as many chances as
the Pirates won their third straight to
climb back above .500.
Boston starter Jon Lester (9-4)
pitched six solid innings but failed to
become the ALs first 10-game winner,
giving up three runs, two earned, while
striking out five and walking one.
Adrian Gonzalez had two hits to
bump his major league-leading aver-
age to .360, but the Red Sox left 11
men on base while dropping their third
straight to a National League team.
The Pirates, in the midst of their
best start in a dozen years, added a lit-
tle quality to their quantity by shutting
down baseball's most potent offense,


at least for a night.
ab r h bi


Ellsury cf
Pedroia 2b
AdGnzl lb
Youkils 3b
DMcDn If
Camrn rf
J.Drew ph-r
Varitek c
Scutaro ss
Lester p
Reddck ph
Albers p
Hottovy p
Ortiz ph
Wheelr p


4
4
4
2
4
3
f1 (
3
4
2
1 (
0
0
1
0


Totals 33
Boston
Pittsburah


I 0 0 Tabata If
) 1 0 dArnad 3b
) 2 0 AMcCtcf
) 0 1 Walker2b
) 1 0 Diaz rf
0 0 0 Paul rf
0 1 0 Overaylb
) 2 0 Cedeno ss
0 1 0 McKnrc
) 0 0 Mahlm p
0 1 0 Resopp
) 0 0 BrWodph
0 0 Watson p
) 0 0 DMcCtp
) 0 0 Veras p
Hanrhn p
19 1 Totals
100 000 000
002 001 OOx


ab rh bi
4 0 2 1
3 0 1 0
4021
3010
3000
4 1 1 0
3 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
4 0 2 1
4 10 0


0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

31 3 9 2
4110
3010
1000
4021
4110
3110
1000
0000
1000
0000
0000
0000
0000
3139 2
-1
-3


E-Youkilis (5). DP-Boston 2, Pittsburgh 1.
LOB-Boston 11, Pittsburgh 7. 2B-McKenry
(2). 3B-d'Arnaud (1). S-Varitek, d'Arnaud.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
LesterL,9-4 6 8 3 2 1 5
Albers 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Hottovy 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 2
Pittsburgh
MaholmW,4-8 51-36 1 1 3 2
ResopH,9 2-30 0 0 0 0
Watson H,5 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
D.McCutchen H,3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
VerasH,15 1 2 0 0 0 1
HanrahanS,21-21 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Lester (A.McCutchen), by Maholm
(Ad.Gonzalez).
Umpires-Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Gerry
Davis; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Sam Hol-
brook.
T-3:10. A-39,330 (38,362).



Cubs 6, Royals 4
KANSAS CITY, Mo.- Tony Cam-
pana hit a bunt single and scored the
go-ahead run on an error in the ninth
inning to help the Chicago Cubs beat
the Kansas City Royals 6-4 Friday
night.
With one out, Campana popped up
a bunt against Aaron Crow (2-1) that
Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas
appeared to catch at his shoetops.
Plate umpire Jeff Kellogg ruled that it
hit the grass and Campana was safe at
first.
He went to third on D.J. LeMahieu's
single to right and came home when
Kosuke Fukudome hit a bouncer that
went off the glove of second baseman
Chris Getz for an error. Starlin Castro
added an RBI single that helped send
the Royals to their sixth straight loss.
Sean Marshall (4-2) pitched a per-
fect eighth.
Bruce Chen, who came off the dis-
abled list Friday and made his first start
since May 5, left after six-plus innings,
allowing four runs on eight hits, while
walking two and striking out four. Chen
was out with a strained left lat.
Chicago Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Fukdmcf-rf 5 01 1 MeCarrcf 5 0 2 1
SCastross 5 03 1 Hosmerlb 5 00 0
ArRmr3b 5 23 0 Butlerdh 4 0 2 0
JeBakrdh 4 0 1 1 Dysonpr 0 0 0 0
Soto c 3 00 0 AGordn If 4 2 2 0
C.Pena b 4 2 2 1 Francrrf 4 1 1 2
ASorinlf 3 01 0 Mostks3b 4 0 1 0
RJhnsnlf 0 0 0 0 B.Penac 3 0 0 1
Montnzrf 2 0 1 1 AEscorss 3 1 0 0
DeWittph 1 00 0 Getz2b 3 0 2 0
Campncf 1 1 1 0
LeMahi2b 41 2 0
Totals 37 6155 Totals 35410 4
Chicago 100 200 102 - 6
Kansas City 010 300 000 - 4
E-Dempster (1), Getz (5). DP-Kansas City 2.
LOB-Chicago 6, Kansas City 9. 2B-
Ar.Ramirez (19), C.Pena (7), Montanez (3),
Me.Cabrera (17), Butler (19). 3B-Je.Baker (1).
HR-Francoeur (10). SB-Me.Cabrera (10).
CS-S.Castro (1), Getz (4). SF-B.Pena.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Dempster
J.Russell
C.Carpenter
Marshall W,4-2
Marmol S,16-20
Kansas City
Chen
BI.Wood BS,1-1
Crow L,2-1


6 8 4 4 2 4
1 4 0 0 0 1
2 3 2 1 0 2
684424
140001
232102


Chen pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Dempster.
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Eric
Cooper; Second, Mark Ripperger; Third, Tim
Timmons.
T-2:54. A-32,921 (37,903).


PHILADELPHIA - Ben Francisco's
transition back to the bench is easier to
accept when he delivers clutch hits.
Francisco's pinch-hit RBI single
with two outs in the bottom of the ninth
lifted the Philadelphia Phillies to a 1-0
victory over the Oakland Athletics on
Friday night.
"It's not easy not playing," said Fran-
cisco, who began the season as the
starting right fielder. "We've been win-
ning so I have to just try to continue to
work. I know we have a lot of games
left and if I can be consistent, maybe I'll
get a chance."
In a game in which rookie starters
Vance Worley and Guillermo Moscoso
took no-hitters into the sixth, neither
team got a runner to third until the ninth.
Shane Victorino walked to start the
inning against Brian Fuentes (1-8). He
went to second on Domonic Brown's
one-out single to right. Both runners
advanced on Brian Schneider's
grounder to first. Francisco then hit a
high bouncer over third baseman Scott
Sizemore's head to drive in Victorino.
"Any time you get a walk-off win, it's
exciting for everybody," Francisco said.
"I was trying to put a good swing on the
ball. I slipped in the box and swung
one-legged."


Oakland
ab r h bi
JWeeks2b 3 0 0 0
Pnngtnss 4 0 0 0
Sweeny cf-rf2 0 0 0


Matsui If
CJcksn lb
DeJess rf
Fuents p
KSuzukc
SSizmr 3b
Moscos p
Devine p
Crisp cf


3 0 1 0
3010
4000
4000
0000
4 0 1 0
4010
2000
2000
0000
0000


Totals 28 02 0
Oakland 000


Philadelphia
a
Rollins ss
Polanc 3b
Utley 2b
Howard lb
Victorn cf
Ibanez If
DBrwn rf
Schndrc
Worley p
Herndn p
J.Perez p
Gload ph
Stutes p
BFrncs ph
Totals
000 000


ab rh bi
4000
2 0 1 0
32010
3000


Philadelphia 000 000 001 - 1
Two outs when winning run scored.
LOB-Oakland 7, Philadelphia 9.2B-Matsui
(11). S-Moscoso.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Moscoso 7 2 0 0 3 2
Devine 1 0 0 0 2 0
FuentesL,1-8 2-3 2 1 1 1 0
Philadelphia
Worley 6 1 0 0 4 4
Herndon 12-31 0 0 1 1
J.Perez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
StutesW,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Joe West; First, Angel Her-
nandez; Second, Angel Campos; Third, Chad
Fairchild.
T-2:48. A-45,685 (43,651).



Rangers 8, Mets 1
ARLINGTON, Texas - Matt Harri-
son pitched seven strong innings,
Adrian Beltre snapped a 13-game
homeless drought and the Texas
Rangers beat the NewYork Mets 8-1
on Friday night.
Michael Young and Josh Hamilton
also connected for the AL West-leading
Rangers. It was the 100th career
homer for Hamilton.
Harrison (6-6) gave up one run and
seven hits, struck out four and walked
one. The left-hander has allowed one
earned run or less in five of his last six
starts, though this was only his third
win in a wild six-week span.
Six days earlier, Harrison remained
on the mound after a rain delay of 2
hours, 16 minutes in Atlanta and
earned a no-decision in his first career
start against the team that drafted him,
when the Rangers won in 10 innings.
He had already missed a start this
month because of a blister on his left
index finger and also pitched through a
kidney stone.
Harrison is 3-2 with a 1.43 ERA
over his last six starts and his season
ERA of 3.00 is among the best in the
majors for a lefty.
Beltre's 13th homer of the season, his
first since June 8, capped a three-run
outburst in the first off Mike Pelfrey (4-6).

NewYork Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
JosRysss 3 0 0 0 Kinsler2b 3 21 0
Turner3b 4 0 1 0 Andrusss 2 02 1
Beltranrf 3 0 0 0 ABlancss 2 00 0
Bay If 4 0 3 0 JHmltncf 5 22 3
Hairstndh 3 00 0 Gentrycf 0 00 0
Dudaph-dh 1 0 0 0 ABeltre 3b 5 23 2
RPaulnc 4 1 1 0 MiYongdh 5 1 2 2
Pagancf 4 0 1 0 N.Cruzrf 4 00 0
DnMrplb 40 1 0 Morlndlb 4000
RTejad 2b 3 0 1 1 Torreal c 4 1 3 0
DvMrplf 2 00 0
Totals 33 18 1 Totals 36813 8
NewYork 000 010 000 - 1
Texas 300 100 22x - 8
E-Jos.Reyes (10). DP-Texas 2. LOB-New
York 7, Texas 10. 2B-R.Paulino (4), Kinsler
(17), A.Beltre 2 (19). HR-J.Hamilton (7), A.Bel-
tre (13), Mi.Young (5). SB-Andrus (22). S-
Kinsler, Andrus.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Pelfrey L,4-6 6 8 4 4 2 3
Acosta 12-35 4 4 2 1
D.Carrasco 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Texas
M.Harrison W,6-6 7 7 1 1 1 4
D.Oliver 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
M.Lowe 11-30 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Mike
DiMuro; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Tim
Welke.
T-2:47. A-46,092 (49,170).


a






B4 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011



LPGA
LPGA Tour-Wegman's LPGA Championship
Par Scores, Friday, At Locust Hill Country Club,
Pittsford, N.Y, Purse: $2.5 million, Yardage:
6,534, Par: 72, Second Round, a-amateur:
YaniTseng 66-70-136 -8
Pat Hurst 70-67-137 -7
Minea Blomqvist 69-69-138 -6
HeeYoung Park 69-69-138 -6
Morgan Pressel 69-69-138 -6
Cindy LaCrosse 70-69-139 -5
AmyYang 70-69-139 -5
Paula Creamer 67-72-139 -5
Angela Stanford 68-72-140 -4
Shanshan Feng 75-66-141 -3
Reilley Rankin 73-68-141 -3
Momoko Ueda 72-69-141 -3
Tiffany Joh 71-70-141 -3
Jimin Kang 71-70-141 -3
Azahara Munoz 70-71 -141 -3
Stacy Lewis 69-72-141 -3
Meena Lee 68-73 -141 -3
Stacy Prammanasudh 68-73-141 -3
Mi Hyun Kim 75-67-142 -2
Catriona Matthew 73-69--142 -2
Inbee Park 73-69-142 -2
Jenny Shin 72-70-142 -2
KarinSjodin 72-70-142 -2
Heather Bowie Young 72-70-142 -2
Maria Hjorth 71-71 -142 -2
Candle Kung 71-71--142 -2
Katherine Hull 70-72-142 -2
Amy Hung 69-73-142 -2
Katie Futcher 75-68-143 -1
Karrie Webb 74-69-143 -1
NaYeonChoi 73-70-143 -1
I.K. Kim 73-70-143 -1
Anna Nordqvist 73-70-143 -1
Michele Redman 73-70-143 -1
Jennie Lee 72-71 -143 -1
Hee-Won Han 71-72-143 -1
Pornanong Phatlum 71-72-143 -1
Silvia Cavalleri 75-69 -144 E
Juli Inkster 74-70 -144 E
a-Danielle Kang 74-70 -144 E
Cristie Kerr 72-72 -144 E
Yoo Kyeong Kim 72-72 -144 E
Leta Lindley 72-72-144 E
Mika Miyazato 72-72-144 E
Suzann Pettersen 72-72-144 E
Jennifer Song 72-72-144 E
Michelle Wie 72-72 -144 E
Natalie Gulbis 71-73-144 E
Hee Kyung Seo 71-73-144 E
Taylor Leon 75-70 -145 +1
Sarah Kemp 74-71 -145 +1
Christel Boeljon 73-72-145 +1
Sophie Gustafson 73-72-145 +1
Lorie Kane 73-72-145 +1
Dewi Claire Schreefel 73-72-145 +1
Sarah Jane Smith 73-72-145 +1
Sun Young Yoo 73-72 -145 +1
Paige Mackenzie 72-73-145 +1
Beatriz Recari 71-74-145 +1
M.J. Hur 70-75-145 +1
MindyKim 70-75-145 +1
Jennifer Johnson 69-76-145 +1
RyannO'Toole 69-76-145 +1
Diana D'Alessio 68-77-145 +1
Se Ri Pak 78-68- 146 +2
Laura Davies 75-71 -146 +2
Becky Morgan 75-71 -146 +2
Jiyai Shin 75-71 -146 +2
Haeji Kang 74-72-146 +2
Jeehae Lee 74-72- 146 +2
Brittany Lincicome 74-72-146 +2
Julieta Granada 73-73-146 +2
Grace Park 73-73-146 +2
Sherri Steinhauer 73-73-146 +2
Kyeong Bae 72-74-146 +2
Kristy McPherson 72-74-146 +2
Karen Stupples 72-74-146 +2
Eun-HeeJi 70-76-146 +2
Failed to qualify
Chie Arimura 78-69-147 +3
Beth Bader 77-70-147 +3
Song-Hee Kim 75-72-147 +3
Chella Choi 74-73-147 +3
Meaghan Francella 74-73-147 +3
Haru Nomura 74-73-147 +3
JinYoung Pak 74-73-147 +3
Alena Sharp 74-73- 147 +3
Jessica Korda 73-74-147 +3
Kris Tamulis 73-74-147 +3
Moira Dunn 72-75-147 +3
Mollie Fankhauser 72-75-147 +3
Christina Kim 72-75-147 +3
Nicole Hage 78-70-148 +4
Mariajo Uribe 78-70-148 +4
Shi Hyun Ahn 77-71 -148 +4
Allison Fouch 76-72-148 +4
Julie Hennessy 76-72-148 +4
Seon Hwa Lee 76-72- 148 +4
Jessica Shepley 76-72- 148 +4
Ai Miyazato 75-73-148 +4
Angela Oh 75-73-148 +4
Giulia Sergas 75-73-148 +4
llhee Lee 74-74-148 +4
JiYoung Oh 74-74-148 +4
Stephanie Sherlock 74-74-148 +4
Jee Young Lee 72-76 -148 +4
Amelia Lewis 72-76-148 +4
Vicky Hurst 71-77-148 +4
Ashli Bunch 75-74-149 +5
SandraGal 75-74-149 +5
Dina Ammaccapane 74-75-149 +5
Marcy Hart 74-75- 149 +5
Aree Song 73-76- 149 +5
Jenny Suh 73-76- 149 +5
JiminJeong 72-77-149 +5
Gwladys Nocera 80-70--150 +6
Amanda Blumenherst 76-74-150 +6
Pernilla Lindberg 75-75-150 +6
Gerina Piller 74-76-150 +6
Mina Harigae 77-74--151 +7
Alison Walshe 77-74- 151 +7
Dori Carter 76-75--151 +7
Stephanie Louden 76-75-151 +7
Jennifer Resales 76-75--151 +7
LauraDiaz 75-76--151 +7
Jane Park 75-76-151 +7
Samantha Richdale 75-76--151 +7
Lisa Meldrum 74-77-151 +7
WendyWard 73-78--151 +7
Annette DeLuca 75-77-152 +8
DanahBordner 74-78-152 +8
Brittany Lang 74-78 -152 +8
LexiThompson 74-78-152 +8
Janice Moodie 77-76-153 +9
Sarah Lee 76-77- 153 +9
Karen Davies 75-78- 153 +9
Mhairi McKay 80-74-154 +10
Lindsey Wright 78-76--154 +10
Belen Mozo 77-77-154 +10
Jean Reynolds 77-77-154 +10
Louise Friberg 81-74-155 +11
Sara Brown 78-77 -155 +11
Christine Song 78-77-155 +11
Sue Ginter 77-78-155 +11


Lisa DePaulo 81-75-156 +12
Birdie Kim 78-78-156 +12
Louise Stahle 77-79-156 +12
Na On Min 79-78 -157 +13
Debbi Koyama 81-79-160 +16
Anna Grzebien 79-WD
Allison Hanna 81 -WD
PGA
Travelers Championship Par Scores, Friday,
At TPC River Highlands, Cromwell, Conn.,
Purse: $6 million, Yardage: 6,841, Par: 70, Par-
tial Second Round, a-amateur:
a-Patrick Cantlay 67-60-127 -13
Webb Simpson 66-65-131 -9
VaughnTaylor 65-66 -131 -9
D.J.Trahan 69-62-131 -9
Alexandre Rocha 65-66-131 -9
Blake Adams 66-66- 132 -8
Brendan Steele 68-64-132 -8
Brian Davis 65-67-132 -8
David Mathis 67-65-132 -8
Michael Thompson 67-65-132 -8


For the record


S Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Friday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
0-3-8
CASH 3 (late)
2-6-8
PLAY 4 (early)
9-1-3-8
PLAY 4 (late)
0-1-8-4
FANTASY 5
9-19-28-31-36
MEGAMONEY
21-27-32-38
MEGA BALL
1


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Nationwide Series: Bucyrus 200
6:30 p.m. (VERSUS) IndyCar Racing Firestone Indy
8 p.m. (VERSUS) IndyCar Racing Iowa Corn Indy 250
9 p.m. (ESPN) Rallycross Championship (Tape)
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Summit Qualifying (Tape)
12 a.m. (ESPN2) Rallycross Championship (Tape)
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Bucyrus 200 (Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Virginia vs. South Carolina
MLB BASEBALL
4 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) New York Mets at Texas Rangers
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Houston Astros
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Kansas City Royals
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Seattle Mariners at Florida Marlins
BOWLING
12 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
12:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
1:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
BOXING
9:45 p.m. (HBO) Devon Alexander vs. Lucas Matthysse
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Golf BMW
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGATour Golf Travelers Championship
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour Golf Championship
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Golf Champions (Tape)
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) 2011 Wimbledon Championships
1 p.m. (8 NBC) 2011 Wimbledon Championships
TRACKAND FIELD
5 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) U.S. Outdoor Championships
VOLLEYBALL
3 p.m. (VERSUS) Volleyball FIVB World League. (Tape)
GOLD CUP SOCCER FINAL
9 p.m. (62 UNI) United States vs. Mexico

SUNDAY
AUTO RACING
12 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Formula One Racing Grand Prix (Tape)
3 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup Toyota/Save Mart 350
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Summit Nationals (Tape)
BADMINTON
11 p.m. (47 FAM) Badminton BWF Indonesian, Final. (Tape)
BASEBALL
2 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Houston Astros
2 p.m. (TBS) Colorado Rockies at New York Yankees
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Washington Nationals at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) Cleveland Indians at San Francisco Giants
BOWLING
4 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
5 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling Team Shootout (Tape)
GOLF
8:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Golf BMW Open (Tape)
2 p.m. (GOLF) Golf PGA Professional National Championship
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGATour Golf Travelers Championship
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour Golf Championship
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Golf Champions (Tape)
MARTIAL ARTS
11:30 p.m. (VERSUS) UFC Post Show
FIFA WOMEN'S WORLD CUP SOCCER
8:45 a.m. (ESPN2) Nigeria vs. France
11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Germany vs. Canada
SOCCER
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Galaxy at San Jose Earthquakes
2 p.m. (ESPN) New York Red Bulls at Chicago Fire
7 p.m. (47 FAM) Shimizu Pulse vs. Vegalta Sendai (Tape)
9 p.m. (47 FAM) Beijing Guoan vs. Tianjin Teda (Tape)
TENNIS
2 p.m. (2,8 NBC) 2011 Wimbledon Championships
TRACKAND FIELD
5 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) U.S. Outdoor Championships
VOLLEYBALL
3 p.m. (VERSUS) Volleyball FIVB World League (Tape)
UFC
8 p.m. (VERSUS) UFC Pre-Fight Show
9 p.m. (VERSUS) Marquardt vs. Story; Barry vs. Kongo


Tag Ridings
James Driscoll
Heath Slocum
Brandt Snedeker
Ricky Barnes
David Hearn
Charley Hoffman
Brandt Jobe
Spencer Levin
J.J. Henry
Jerry Kelly
Martin Laird
David Toms
Bubba Watson
J.B. Holmes
Joe Durant
Paul Stankowski
Chris Stroud
Tommy Gainey
D.J. Brigman
Michael Putnam
Colt Knost
Aron Price
Morgan Hoffmann
Bud Cauley
Kevin Streelman
Dean Wilson
Scott Verplank
Jhonattan Vegas
Keegan Bradley
lan Poulter
Carl Pettersson
John Daly
Zack Miller
Charlie Wi
Arjun Atwal
Geoff Ogilvy
Craig Bowden
Kevin Stadler
Jim Renner
Kent Jones
Troy Merritt
Brendon de Jonge
Anthony Kim
Cameron Tringale


Sunghoon Kang 74-64 -138
Kyle Stanley 72-66 -138
Justin Leonard 70-69 -139
Woody Austin 72-67 -139
Chris Baryla 69-70-139
Michael Connell 70-70 -140
Alex Prugh 69-71 -140
GarrettWillis 66-74-140
Josh Teater 71-69 -140
Matt Bettencourt 71-69-140
Chad Campbell 71-69-140
Kevin Tway 72-68 -140
Christopher DeForest 74-67-141
Scott Gutschewski 75-66-141
Kevin Na 74-68 -142
Trevor Immelman 70-72-142
Steven Bowditch 71-71 -142
Boo Weekley 71-72 -143
Will Strickler 73-70 -143
Billy Horschel 73-71 -144
Billy Andrade 72-73-145
Bobby Gates 72-76 -148

Leaderboard at time of suspended play
SCORE THRU
1. Patrick Cantlay -13 F
2. D.J. Trahan -9 F
2. Webb Simpson -9 F
2. Alexandre Rocha -9 F
2. Vaughn Taylor -9 F
2. Andres Romero -9 5
7. Brendan Steele -8 F
7. David Mathis -8 F
7. Michael Thompson -8 F
7. Blake Adams -8 F
7. Brian Davis -8 F
7. Johnson Wagner-8 8
13. Heath Slocum -7 F
13. Brandt Snedeker-7 F
13. James Driscoll -7 F
13. Ricky Barnes -7 F
13. David Hearn -7 F
13. Bryce Molder -7 8
13. Tag Ridings -7 Fl3. Chris Couch -7 9
13. Fredrik Jacobson -7 4


Logano wins pole,



McMurray second for



Sunday's Sonoma race


Associated Press

SONOMA, Calif. - Joey
Logano never thought he'd
win the pole at Infineon
Raceway, even after he
claimed the top qualifying
spot
As he sat in his Joe Gibbs
Racing hauler Friday
watching the final drivers
make their qualifying laps,
Logano expected to be
bumped. But when Kasey
Kahne, Denny Hamlin and
Kurt Busch all failed to beat
him, Logano wound up with
just the second pole of his
career
Logano turned a lap at
93.256 mph in his Toyota to
claim the top starting spot in
Sunday's race.
"I was very surprised," he
said. "We were sitting in the
trailer watching the last
three guys to go and it was
Kasey, who got the pole here
last year, Denny, who is re-
ally good here and our
teammate, and then Kurt,
who has got the last three
poles in a row. We didn't
think we were going to be
good enough to get the pole,
but made some good adjust-
ments and got some speed
in the car.
"This is the last place I ex-
pected to get a pole. I never


considered myself a road
course racer."
Logano snapped Busch's
streak of three straight
poles this season.
Jamie McMurray quali-
fied second in a Chevrolet
with a lap at 93.223 and Paul
Menard was third in a
Chevrolet. Hamlin was
fourth, Ryan Newman fifth
and Kahne sixth.
Richard Petty Motor-
sports teammates AJ All-
mendinger and Marcos
Ambrose qualified seventh
and eighth in Fords.
Clint Bowyer and Brian
Vickers filled out the top 10.
Busch wound up 1lth and
defending race winner Jim-
mie Johnson was 12th.
Tony Ave was the only
driver to fail to qualify for
the race.
Current points leader
Carl Edwards qualified 23rd
and decided to skip the Na-
tionwide Series race Satur-
day at Road America.
Running the event in Wis-
consin would have forced
him to miss both practices
Saturday in Sonoma, and he
decided to let Billy Johnson
race in his place to concen-
trate on Cup.
It will snap Edwards'
streak of 210 consecutive
starts - the longest active


streak in the Nationwide
Series.
"We felt like as a team
that we needed more prac-
tice on the Cup side," Ed-
wards said.
For Logano, the qualify-
ing run was a much-needed
boost for a struggling driver.
After closing last season
strong, he was picked by
many to make the 12-driver
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship this year.
But he's had a rocky start
to the year, and has just two
top-10 finishes through the
first 15 races. He's ranked
23rd in points.
Starting first Sunday will
give him his first lap led at
Sonoma, and in two previ-
ous starts, he's not finished
higher than 19th.
"We've been going
through a bit of a drought, so
this is going to help us a lot,"
Logano said. "I really think
the big thing today is self-
confidence in me and the
team and giving us momen-
tum.
"Knowing you can do it
now and you can drive
around a road course, I
think that is going to help us
get our car setup better and
in the race help us be as
smart and methodical as
you can."


NASCAR-Sprint Cup-Toyota/Save Mart 350 Lineup


After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Infineon Raceway, Sonoma, Calif.
Lap length: 1.99 miles
1. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 93.256 mph.
2. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 93.223.
3. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 93.176.
4. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 93.081.
5. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 93.062.
6. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 92.936.
7. (43) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 92.935.
8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 92.918.
9. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 92.83.
10. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 92.72.
11. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 92.616.
12. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 92.561.
13. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 92.553.




GATORS
Continued from Page B1

from Curt Casali, allowing
Dent to come home.
Austin Maddox (3-0)
pitched the last 12-3 innings
for the win, which was
Florida's fifth in six meet-
ings this season against its
SEC Eastern Division rival.
"We're happy we're in the
finals," Tucker said, "but
we're going to be just as dis-
appointed as if we went 0-2
if we lose the series. So we'll
stay focused, bear down at
practice and do the same
thing we did today - exe-
cuting some bunting, maybe
some hit-and-runs."
Oakland Athletics first-
round draft pick Sonny Gray
(12-4) took the loss for Van-
derbilt, which was playing
in the College World Series
for the first time.
"We put together a great
season. Nothing to be
ashamed of," Gray said.
"We battled throughout
the year and, unfortu-
nately, we came up short
two games here to
Florida. They're a good
team, but I don't think


14. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 92.545.
15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 92.447.
16. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 92.439.
17. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 92.411.
18. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 92.372.
19. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 92.348.
20. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 92.184.
21. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 92.157.
22. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 92.096.
23. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 92.076.
24. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 92.022.
25. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 91.986.
26. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 91.818.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 91.764.
28. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 91.751.
29. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 91.689.


they're any better than us.
I just think they're able to
get the best out of us."
Gray, who struggled de-
spite winning his first
CWS outing against North
Carolina, was up and
down during his 132-pitch
outing Friday. He struck
out eight but walked five,
and had trouble picking
up Fontana's bunt in the
deciding eighth inning.
"We drove the pitch count
up on Sonny," O'Sullivan
said. "That was our goal be-
cause we knew we weren't
going to just sit there and
bang away on him."
Corey Williams came in to
face Tucker, who was hitting
.364 in the national tourna-
ment. He drilled a 1-0 pitch
over left fielder Tony Kemp
for his NCAA tournament-
leading 19th RBI.
"I was looking for a fast-
ball up I could elevate,"
Tucker said. "I knew the
wind was blowing in, so I
knew it would be tough to
get it over his head. All I was
worried about is getting the
run in from third."
Panteliodis, the New York
Mets' ninth-round draft
pick, retired the last eight
batters he faced before he


30. (51) Boris Said, Chevrolet, 91.603.
31. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 91.406.
32. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 91.388.
33. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 91.315.
34. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 91.255.
35. (77) PJ. Jones, Dodge, 91.223.
36. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 91.214.
37. (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 90.781.
38. (66) David Mayhew, Toyota, 90.561.
39. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 90.504.
40. (81) Brian Simo, Ford, 90.346.
41. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 90.303.
42. (37) Chris Cook, Ford, 90.285.
43. (46) Andy Pilgrim, Chevrolet, 89.885.
Failed to Qualify
44. (38) Tony Ave, Ford, 79.851.


turned the game over to the
normally reliable Florida
bullpen.
Tommy Toledo faced five
batters, getting pulled after
Connor Harrell's two-out
single made it 4-2. Nick
Maronde walked the bases
full, then walked Kemp to
make it a one-run game.
Greg Larson came on and
got Anthony Gomez to fly out
to right to end the inning.
Vanderbilt was back at it
in the eighth. Steven Ro-
driguez, who held Vandy hit-
less in 4 1-3 innings of relief
earlier in the week, left
after giving up back-to-back
singles.
Maddox, the closer, came
on to face Jason Esposito,
who broke an 0-for-15 slump
with an infield single to load
the bases. Maddox then hit
Conrad Gregor to force in
the tying run.
"We had nine outs to go,
three-run lead. We like our
'pen, and it didn't quite go
the way we want it to today,"
O'Sullivan said. "But the
bottomline is those guys
needed to throw. They're all
going to contribute. They're
all going to need to con-
tribute if we're going to win
this thing."


Gay out of 100 at US nationals


Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. -Anyone
who saw the way he slowly
uncoiled from his crouch
and lumbered down the
track during his first race at
nationals could tell - some-
thing was wrong with Tyson
Gay
It turned out to be some-
thing big - a hip injury that
forced one of the world's top
sprinters and one of the top
challengers to Usain Bolt
out of the meet, off the U.S.
team for worlds and into
rehab mode with the Lon-
don Olympics only 13
months away
Gay said he made the de-
cision Friday as he was talk-
ing to his agent's assistant
while trying, without much
success, to warm up before
the 100-meter semifinals.
"He pulled me to the side
and said, 'I can't take it, see-
ing your face keep grimac-
ing,"' Gay told The
Associated Press. "He said,
'I know you do it because
you love it and it's all you
know' I decided to try to get
ready and take care of it."


The hip has been bother-
ing Gay for most of the year,
and after a lackluster run in
Thursday's prelims - a
major effort in a race he can
usually coast through - he
said it was, in fact, still both-
ering him.
Instead of fighting
through it Friday, where he
needed a top-three finish to
secure a spot in worlds, he
chose to shut it down. He
won't run in the 200, either.
Afterward, as he hobbled
around the perimeter of
Hayward Field, he was
downcast, and not only be-
cause this denies him a
chance to challenge Bolt
this year.
"I'm real bummed about
not running, period," Gay
said. "It's all I know, it's all I
love. It's what I study every
day"
Gay said there was no
point in looking too far into
the future. Because he com-
peted in nationals, he is
technically eligible for the
U.S. relay pool at worlds,
though if the injury turns
out to be significant, it's un-
likely he'd receive one of


the two spots that don't go to
the 100 qualifiers and the al-
ternate.
It means the U.S. team
will probably have to do
without its top sprinter of
the last several years - the
2007 world champion in the
100 and 200 and the Ameri-
can record holder with a
time of 9.69 seconds. And it
would be a significant set-
back in Gay's quest to catch
Bolt, who holds the Olympic
title and world records in
the 100 and 200.
The men's 100 prelims at
the London Olympics are
Aug. 4, 2012, a date very
much on Gay's mind when
he made the decision to end
his stay this week in Eu-
gene.
"I've been bandaging it
up, couldn't really take any
more," Gay said. "I decided
to stay healthy It's pretty
painful running in pain."
Gay's absence put a dif-
ferent twist on the final,
where Walter Dix (9.94),
Justin Gatlin (9.95) and
Michael Rodgers (9.99) fin-
ished 1-2-3 to earn the three
spots at worlds.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







E Page B5 - SATURDAY, JUNE 25,2011




ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE -

Colbert, White cut
record together
NEW YORK -
Stephen Colbert wants to
climb the charts.
The satirical late-night
TV host debuted his new
Jack
White-
produced
single,
"Char-
lene II
(I'm Over
You)" on
"The Col-
bert Re-
Stephen pobert"Re-
Colbert port"
Thursday
night.
Colbert has featured
White on "The Colbert
Report" all week during
his "rock odyssey" series,
"Dr Pepper Presents
StePhest ColbChella '011
- Rock You Like a
Thirst-Icane."
White and his
Nashville-based record
label, Third Man
Records, produced the
track. The Black Belles, a
goth girl rock band on
Third Man, performed
backup.
The song is a follow-up
to his mock '80s new
wave song, "Charlene
(I'm Right Behind You)."
Since 2006, Colbert has
occasionally alluded to
the song. But the sequel,
"Charlene II (I'm Over
You)," is entering the real
world. The song will be
available from iTunes
and Third Man Records.

Jerry Lewis
cancels show
SYDNEY -Comedian
Jerry Lewis has canceled
a show in
Australia
due to
poor
health.
The
Muscular
Dystrophy
Founda-
Jerry tion Aus-
Lewis tralia said
the come-
dian's show Friday night
in Sydney had been sold
out.
Foundation CEO David
Jack apologized in a
statement, saying the 85-
year-old was "not well
enough to take the stage."
It didn't give details.
Lewis was on a na-
tional tour to raise funds
for the Australian foun-
dation. He arrived in
Australia on Monday and
had performed Wednes-
day in Brisbane.
He has in recent years
battled a debilitating
back condition, heart is-
sues and pulmonary fi-
brosis.


Diana dr
at auc
TORONTO
worn by Princ
when she dan
John Travolta
the top bid at
auction that f(
some of late p
well-known dE
gowns.
The midnig
velvet dress d
Victor Edelste
800,000 Canad
($821,000). Dia
the Edwardia
gown with off-
der straps wh:
memorable sp
dance floor w:
during a 1985
House state d


In search of a star


The Glee Project'

looks for new

guest star

Associated Press

NEW YORK - Ryan Murphy,
one of the creators of "Glee," ac-
knowledges that he made a mistake
when judging the reality competi-
tion "The Glee Project," which will
pick a new cast member to appear
on the show's upcoming third sea-
son.
On the sixth episode, Murphy
says he cut "the wrong person"
from the reality show.
"I call it my 'I was wrong
episode,"' he says. "I should have
kept the person until the final. I
don't think that person would have
won but... I'm editing the show now
and I'm seeing all this amazing
footage."
In the end, he believes the right
kid won the competition.
When he saw and worked with
the contestant, he talked to the
other "Glee" co-creators, Brad
Falchuk and Ian Brennan, about
making that contestant a character
on the hit Fox show. "We instantly
came up with a name. We came up
with a back story I knew what (his
or her) ... role on the show was
going to be. I knew what kind of
songs I wanted (him or her) ... to
sing."
Murphy wouldn't reveal who the
contestant was; the show is only up
to Episode 3, which airs Sunday on
Oxygen at 9 p.m. But he does prom-
ise "a shocking revelation" on Sun-
day's show, in which a contestant
divulges something that greatly
moved Murphy
"I was so inspired," he says. "I
want to sort of write an episode
about (the topic) next year."
On "The Glee Project," 12 candi-
dates live together in Los Angeles,
learn song-and-dance numbers,
fine-tune their acting chops and es-
sentially go through "Glee" boot
camp. Their experience is docu-
mented by a camera crew for a 10-
week series. As it airs, hopefuls are
cut from the competition. So far,
two contestants have been sent
home. In the end, the winner will
have a seven-episode role on the
next season of Fox's "Glee." He or
she will also get a recording con-
tract and possibly be invited to take
part in the show's tour next sum-
mer
If the character is a hit with view-
ers, he or she could end up return-
ing for more episodes.
Robert Ulrich, a casting director
for both "Glee" and "The Glee Proj-


Associated Press
The cast of "The Glee Project," is shown in this image released by Oxygen.
The winner of the singing competition series, airing Sundays at 9 p.m. on
Oxygen, will receive a seven-episode storyline on the third season of the
Fox series "Glee."


ect" says the contestants are al-
ready getting noticed by Holly-
wood.
"I have gotten so many phone
calls from agents and managers
who want to represent these kids....
We cast such a wide net. ... There
are people who would never have
had a chance and suddenly there's
an opportunity."
The 12 contestants on "The Glee
Project" also seem to fit in with the
characters on the scripted show.
There's Matheus Fernandes, who
stands at just 4 feet and 9 inches.
He looks like an atypical heart-
throb but he has rock-hard abs and
when he dances, he gyrates and
performs like a pop star.
Zach Woodlee, the choreogra-
pher on "Glee," says walking into
the experience, he felt like it was
meeting the kids of McKinley
High's New Directions for the first
time.
"(When) I stepped into the room
... I realized, 'Oh, my gosh. There's a
lot of work.' And in a way it almost
felt like starting over with a brand-


new version of misfits in their own
right-just the real, live version of
it. I don't think they were even
quite aware of what they were get-
ting into."
Mentoring a group of kids in a
pressure-cooker situation wasn't al-
ways easy It was often like being a
camp counselor. In one episode,
Murphy says, a contestant has a
nervous breakdown because of the
stress and the show had to decide
how much viewers would be al-
lowed to see.
"Most of them aren't far from high
school and we can all relate to high
school," says Ulrich. "Everything is
heightened and so important"
Murphy says "The Glee Project"
was a great experience and he'd
like to do a Season 2.
"I loved it," he says. "It was one
of the best things I've ever done. ...
It's not only good for the mother
ship of 'Glee' to keep finding new,
fantastic talent, but I think the fans
love it because they follow and
learn about people who are going
to be on the show."


TV producer fighting extradition


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES - Fed-


eral prosecutors nave asked
ess sold a judge to ignore efforts by a
reality television producer
Ation charged with killing his wife
-A dress in Mexico to present testi-
ess Diana mony from his 6-year-old
ced with daughter to fight extradi-
Sbrought in tion.
a Toronto A prosecution brief filed
featured Thursday calls Bruce Beres-
rincess' ford-Redman's efforts to call
designer his daughter as a witness
during an upcoming extradi-
ht-blue silk tion hearing an effort to dis-
esigned by tract the court from
Bin sold for overwhelming evidence that
lian dollars he killed his wife.
ana wore Lawyers for the former
n-inspired "Survivor" producer have
the-shoul- introduced statements from
ile taking a the couple's 6-year-old
)in on the daughter into their opposi-
ith Travolta tion paperwork, and said at
White a news conference on Tues-
inner day they hope to call her as
a witness.
-From wire reports In an interview with a


Il49Z


Associated Press
Bruce Beresford-Redman,
the former "Survivor" pro-
ducer, is accused of killing
his wife in Mexico.
therapist, the girl stated that
she did not witness any vio-
lence in their parents' hotel
room at a swank Cancun re-
sort during their April 2010
vacation. The interview was
requested by Beresford-
Redman's attorneys.
"The fugitive relies pri-
marily on a lawyer-driven


interview of his 6-year-old
daughter, which fails to dis-
tance him from the incrimi-
nating facts," the brief
states. They also cite that
the therapist has treated
Beresford-Redman and met
him up to a dozen times.
They also state that the
girl's statements contradict
other statements by her fa-
ther, including one to a hotel
clerk who called to inform
that other guests com-
plained about loud noise
coming from the family's
room the night Monica
Beresford-Redman was ap-
parently killed.
The producer told the
clerk he and his wife had
been fighting and that it
wouldn't happen again, al-
though his daughter said
she recalled them playing a
loud game. Tourists in an
adjacent room described
the noise as coming from a
woman who sounded like
she was in distress.


Monica Beresford-Red-
man's body was found in a
sewage cistern days later
The U.S. government's
brief states that Beresford-
Redman is not allowed to
call witnesses during the
proceeding, and that much
of the evidence he seeks to
enter is inadmissible.
They also state Beresford-
Redman's other criticisms
of the case - that Mexican
investigators "rushed to
judgment" and Cancun is
rife with corruption - are
not supported by evidence
and should not be consid-
ered by the court.
"Finally, in his efforts to
attack the police work of the
Mexican authorities, the
fugitive tries to indict the
entire Mexican judicial sys-
tem, alleging corruption,"
the filing states.
A call to a spokesman for
Beresford-Redman's attor-
neys was not immediately
returned.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Today's birthday: In the year ahead,, stick to the special
endeavor you are working on, even if it takes many small
parts to make a whole. It'll be worth all the effort, if what
you develop has excellent marketing possibilities.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Your excellent leadership
qualities will be called for in several developments, and
turning to you to take charge will be automatic to your fol-
lowers. You won't let them down.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Business and finances are the
two primary areas in which you'll shine and are likely to
generate some extremely positive results. Don't hesitate to
involve yourself in some serious enterprise.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) - You could be luckier than usual
in an area where, up until now, you could only be hopeful of
success. It may involve something to do with friends.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - When you do nice things for
others, you call attention to your good qualities in ways that


win you greater respect from your friends. It might be the
time when you'll stand out.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Those with whom you spend
your time will end up having greater respect for your posi-
tion and opinions, mainly because of the way you present
things. They'll respond to your optimism.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - This is a better than
usual day for involving yourself in a promising, joint en-
deavor, mostly because you aren't afraid to think in ex-
panded terms that could benefit more than a few.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - Your judgment will be ex-
tremely keen and right on the money where significant fac-
tors are involved, mainly because you're not apt to overlook
the many fine points.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Compensation for a service
you perform is apt to be much larger than usual, not be-
cause your employer is more generous than others, but be-


cause of the exceptional quality of your work.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Spend as much time as you
can with that special someone, because conditions are ex-
tremely favorable for you in the romance department. Rel-
ish every delectable morsel.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- With little effort you should
be able to accomplish your aims, regardless of how difficult
they usually are to affect. This is the time to do those jobs
you think of as being tough.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Because you tend to look at
jobs, people or events as positive entities, you'll create your
own good fortune. This constructive viewpoint will make
you a winner.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Be creative when it comes to
your budget. With a little bit of thought, you'll be able to get
quite creative and stretch your dollars far beyond their
usual worth.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JUNE 23
Fantasy 5:1 - 3 - 7 - 11 - 22
5-of-5 12 winners $16,898.12
4-of-5 752 $43
3-of-5 14,400 $6
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Powerball: 12-15- 19-46-59
Powerball: 12 5-of-5 PB
No winner 5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 2 -6 -19 -31 -36 -39
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 40 $3,671.50
4-of-6 2,067 $55.50
3-of-6 42,904 $5
Fantasy 5: 11 - 20 - 21 - 27 - 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 300 $555.00
3-of-5 9,564 $20.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY=

Today is Saturday, June
25, the 176th day of 2011.
There are 189 days left in
the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 25, 1950, war
broke out in Korea as forces
from the communist North in-
vaded the South.
On this date:
In 1788, Virginia ratified
the U.S. Constitution.
In 1876, Lt. Col. George A.
Custer and his 7th Cavalry
were wiped out by Sioux and
Cheyenne Indians in the Bat-
tle of the Little Bighorn in
Montana.
In 1910, President William
Howard Taft signed the
White-Slave Traffic Act, more
popularly known as the
Mann Act, which made it ille-
gal to transport women
across state lines for "im-
moral" purposes. In 1951,
CBS transmitted the first
commercial color telecast
from New York to four other
cities using its field sequen-
tial system that was incom-
patible with existing black
and white TVs.
In 1991, the western Yu-
goslav republics of Croatia
and Slovenia declared their
independence.
In 2009, death claimed
Michael Jackson, the "King
of Pop," in Los Angeles at
age 50 and actress Farrah
Fawcett in Santa Monica,
Calif. at age 62.
Ten years ago: The
United Nations opened its
first global gathering on
HIV/AIDS with emotional
pleas for help from African
leaders.
Five years ago: Palestin-
ian militants kidnapped an Is-
raeli soldier, Cpl. Gilad
Shalit, after tunneling under
the border and attacking a
military post, killing two other
soldiers.
One year ago: Group of
Eight leaders, including
President Barack Obama,
began meeting in Huntsville,
Ontario, Canada. BP said its
effort to drill a relief well
through 2% miles of rock to
stop the oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico was on target for
completion by mid-August.
Today's Birthdays: Actress
June Lockhart is 86.
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Eddie Floyd is 74. Actress
Barbara Montgomery is 72.
Singer Carly Simon is 66.
Actor-comedian Jimmie
Walker is 64. Actor-director
Michael Lembeck is 63.
Supreme Court Justice
Sonia Sotomayor is 57.
Actor-writer-director Ricky
Gervais is 50. Rapper-pro-
ducer Richie Rich is 44. Con-
temporary Christian musician


Sean Kelly (Sixpence None
the Richer) is 40. Actress An-
gela Kinsey (TV: "The Of-
fice") is 40.
Thought for Today: "A
straight line is the shortest in
morals as in mathematics."
- Maria Edgeworth, Anglo-
Irish novelist (1767-1849).










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0


CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY


CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO OUTDOORS



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(A



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. . .... ..
o Q


HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS


GET


IN


THE


GAME


Tidwell Bombers flex softball muscles, Stingers win nailbiter


Alcoballics

remains top

kickball team
JOHN COSCIA
Chronicle

It was billed as a battle be-
tween two undefeated co-ed
softball teams when the Tid-
well Bombers and the Bad
News Bears took to the soft-
ball diamond earlier this
week. But by night's end the
Tidwell Bombers had sepa-
rated themselves atop the
standings with a 23-1 thrash-
ing of the Bad News Bears.
The win improved the
Tidwell Bombers record to
3-0 and dropped the Bad
News Bears into a three-
way tie for third with R.C.
Lawn Care and the Stingers,
both of whom won this
week. The Stingers out-
lasted Elite Roofing 17-16 in
the closest game of the week
and R.C. Lawn Care im-
proved to 2-1 with its 13-7
win over Plain White T's.
In kickball action there
were only two games this
week. Nature Coast Wings
and Things defeated Audio
Works 9-6 and Alcobalics
were 4-3 winners over the
Green Machine. The win by
Alcobalics allowed them to
maintain a 1.5 games lead
over Nature Coast Wings &
Things who, by virtue of its
win, kept pace with the
frontrunners.
The Flag football adult
league completed its third
week of the season with all
six teams in action. In the
biggest game of the week
Black took on previously un-
beaten Lime Green and
handed it their first loss of
the season with a 31-26 vic-
tory The win by black, cou-
pled with Gray's 47-6 win
over Camo created a three-
way tie atop the standings.
The Blue team earned its
first victory of the season
with a 20-12 win over Purple.
Six teams were in action
in the men's basketball
league. The first place Or-
ange team needed to pull
out all of the stops in its 54-
49 win over the Black squad.
Meanwhile the Purple and
Yellow teams both kept
pace, remaining just one
game behind, following
their respective victories.
The Purple team was a 63-
59 winner over Teal and Yel-
low handled Green by a
63-49 margin.
League Standings
COED KICKBALL TEAMS
Stats as of June 22


Alcoballics
Nature Coast Wings & Things
Unassistedsports.com
Firecrackers
Green Machine
Audio Works


7.5 -.5
6-2
5-2
3.5-6.5
3.5-3.5
1-7


This week's scores
Nature Coast Wings & Things 9, Audio Works 6
Alcobalics 4, Green Machine 3
COED SOFTBALL
As of June 21
Tidwell Bombers 3-0
Quit Your Pitchin' 2-0
Stingers 2-1
Bad News Bears 2-1
R.C. Lawn Care 2-1
Just Us 1-1
Elite Roofing 1-2
Harley Hoodlums 0-2
Gulf to Lake Church 0-2
Plain White T's 0-3
This week's scores
Tidwell Bombers 23, Bad News Bears 1
Stingers 17, Elite Roofing 16
R.C. Lawn Care 13, Plain White T's 7
FLAG FOOTBALL TEAMS
Stats as of June 20
Gray 2-1
Black 2-1
Lime Green 2-1
Camo 1-2
Purple 1-2
Blue 1-2
This week's scores
Gray 47, Camo 6
Black 31, Lime Green 26
Blue 20, Purple 12
BASKETBALL TEAMS
Stats as of June 23
Orange 9-1
Yellow 8-2
Purple 8-2
Teal 7-3
Green 6-4
Gray 3-6
Red 3-6
Blue 2-7
Black 2-8
Camo 0-9
This week's scores
Orange 54, Black 49
Purple 63, Teal 59
Yellow 63, Green 49


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" ,,,j _-a � , :, . ., � -'-/ -. , . _ - --


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4-�.�


JASON WEST/Special to the Chronicle
Pitcher Jeff Russell showing the ease in his skilled pitching style while throwing a practice pitch during a kickball game earlier this week.


Adult League
EVENT BRIEFS

Parkview Lanes
Weekly News
CONGRATULATIONS: Dorine
Fugere is the first woman to roll
a perfect game at Parkview
Lanes! She accomplished the
feat in the third game of the
Wednesday Night Scratch
league. Her first two games
were 225 and 257, giving her a
782 series, the highest known
series ever scored by a woman
in Citrus County.
League and Tournament
scores for the week ending
June 19, 2011:
MIXED DOUBLES 7-9-8
NOTAP TOURNEY RESULTS
Two of our recent perfect
game bowlers teamed up to
win the June Mixed Doubles
NoTap tourney. Dorine Fugere
and David Black had a 1725
series, with Dorine rolling two
300 games and David one. Ka-
trina Hamby and Mark Kinser
finished second with 1595 pins,
followed by June and Shorty
Williams (1543) and Marilyn
Seymour and Ken Sprague
(1536). Dorine had the high se-
ries for the women (886) and
Mark was high for the men
(843), who also outlasted eight
competitors for the Krazy Eights
title. The next Mixed Doubles
7-9-8 NoTap will be July 17.
MONDAY NIGHT
SUMMER SPECIAL
Jake Duncan 303,769; Chris
Carr 288,835; Janie Oakeson
284; Saad Bouve 273,722; Kat-
rina Hamby 725. Scratch:
Chris Carr 266,769; Jake Dun-
can 263,729; Katrina Hamby
225,587; Saad Bouve 208; Dee
Smith 528.
SUNCOAST SENIORS NOTAP
Handicap: Allan Gobbi 357;
Brendan Dooley 341,896; Jack
Trafalski 901; Jerry Konecky
896; Ginny Belle-Oudry
316,880; Marylou Halovich
316,853; June Williams 306.
Scratch: Jerry Ness 300,726;
Murphy Combs 278,744; Allan
Gobbi 278; Diana Steuterman
218,573; June Williams 218;
Pat Combs 212,552.
YOUNG & RESTLESS
Handicap: (adult) Bryan
Craig 287,766; Charlie Stein
287; Brian Carney 251; (youth)
Andrew Allen 264,713; Tate
Townsend 242; Chandler Car-
ney 686. Scratch: (adult)
Charlie Stein 258; Brian Carney
237,684; John Saltmarsh 237;
(youth) Michael Andriuolo
192,491; Andrew Allen
180,461.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
SCRATCH
Dorine Fugere 300, 782;
Stephanie Flory 208; Debbe
Chung 562; Chuck Clouse 276;


Chris Carr 275,710; Tom Dan-
toni 729.
HOTSHOTS NOTAP
DOUBLES
Handicap: Joe Markham
250,640; Nick Waters 242,671;
Betty Rauch 282,731; Ellen
Bowman 269; Betty Wood 747.
Scratch: Shorty Williams
187,504; Nick Waters 161,428;
Saad Bouve 242; Ellen Bow-
man 236,607; Betty Rauch 581.
SUMMER OWLS
Handicap: John Ethridge
294,851; Roy Bass 268; Shorty
Williams 731; Betty Rauch
247,722; Linda Ethridge
238,683; June Williams 238.
Scratch: John Ethridge
234,671; Roy Bass 199; Bren-
dan Dooley 487; Anna Dooley
165,452; June Williams 153;
Betty Rauch 431.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK
Andrew Allen (youth), 53 pins
over his average; Adults Dorine
Fugere, 140 pins over her aver-
age, and John Ethridge, 161
pins over his average.
'For Ladies Only'
golf tourneys
Attention ladies, Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
in association with Pine Ridge
Golf Course will be starting a
series of ladies only golf clinics
throughout the summer. Pine
Ridge Golf Pro Randy Robbins
will be the lead instructor and
will be holding two separate
classes. Beginner classes will
be on Monday evenings start-
ing at 5:30 p.m. and intermedi-
ate classes will be held on
Wednesday at 5:30 p.m.
Whether you have played for
years or you're interested in
learning this great game, these
clinics are for you. The clinics
will be offered as three one
hour weekly sessions for only
$90 and there are three clinics
to choose from, so pick the one
that is best for your schedule.
There will also be clinics be-
ginning in July (July 11 for be-
ginners and July 13 for
intermediate) and August (Au-
gust 1 for beginners and August
3 for intermediate).
All classes will begin at 5:30
p.m. at Pine Ridge Golf Course.
If you would like to participate in
more then one clinic, you can
sign up for a second clinic at
half price. That's just $45. Golf
clubs will be provided if you do
not have your own.
Pine Ridge Golf Course will
also be starting a Saturday
morning Working Women's
League. This league will play
on the Little Pines which is a
nine-hole Par 3 course. The fee
for Saturday play will be $13
and will include the cart fee.
To find out more information
or to register for the clinics call
Randy Robbins at 352-746-
6177 or visit www.pineridge-
golfcc.com.


Parks & Rec
plan Jazzercise
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Jazzercise
classes at the Citrus County
Auditorium. The 60-minute
workout blends dance and
muscle-toning movements cho-
reographed to music. It is de-
signed to improve strength,
balance and flexibility.
Classes are: 6 p.m. Mon-
days, Tuesdays and Thursday.
Cost is $20 the first month for
new students.
Every class includes a gentle
warm-up, 30-minute aerobic
workout, muscle toning, and
strengthening segment with
weights and a final stretch.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com,
then the health and fitness tab,
or call (352) 465-7007.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation offers a new low-impact
stretching class. This on-going
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is easy,
fun with good benefits. Stretch-
ing helps to make you more
flexible and regular stretching
will help mobility and balance.
This helps to slow down the
onset of common degenerative
conditions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases physi-
cal and mental relaxation and
reduces the risk of joint sprain,
muscle strain or back problems.
Low-impact exercises can im-
prove health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing joints.
Research suggests that moder-
ate-intensity, low-impact activity
is just as effective as high-im-
pact activity in lowering the risk
of heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call (352) 465-7007.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club
plays at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday
and Fridays and at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at Floral Park in
Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to
meet people in the community,
and get some light exercise.
We welcome all newcomers.
Yearly dues are $3 per person,
and there is no need to pur-
chase any equipment.
Call the vice president of the
Floral City Shuffleboard Club,
Dana Bause, at (352) 726-0670.
B.H. Shuffleboard
seeks members
Beverly Hills Shuffleboard


Club seeks new members to
join to make it more fun. Dues
are $15 yearly and participants
must be 45 or older.
The club plays at 9 a.m.
Monday through Friday during
the summer and 2 p.m. during
the winter. The monthly meet-
ing is at 3 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Civic
Center Community Building.
Coffee and cake are served
after the meeting. All interested
persons are welcome.
For more information, call Val
Pierce, president, at (352) 746-
0657 or Sharon Pineda, vice
president, at (352) 527-8488.
Dragon boat
team practice
Nature Coast Dragon Boat
Racing Team practices at 9
a.m. Monday and Wednes-
days at Riverside Resort in
Homosassa.
Males and females of all
ages are invited to participate.
No experience necessary; will
train. Equipment is provided.
Call Michael Mondrall at
(352) 220-6024 or e-mail
mmondrall@tampabay.rr.com.
Head outdoors with
Nature Coast Ramblers
Nature Coast Ramblers is an
outdoor activity club of friendly
people of all ages who enjoy
self-paced hiking or walking, bik-
ing and kayaking activities in the
Citrus County area. The club is
associated with the American
Volkssport Association (AVA), a
national walking association,
which in turn is affiliated with an
international group.
You can become a member
of Nature Coast Ramblers for
only $10 per year for a single or
$12 per couple. Visit the web-
site at www.naturecoastram-
blers.org or call Karl at (352)
344-1531.
Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center. Zumba is a fit-
ness program designed with
exciting Latin and international
dance rhythms. No member-
ship or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com or
call (352) 465-7007.
Paddlesports
America program
Canoeists and Kayakers are
boaters also. Now there is a
new program available to ad-


dress the unique needs of this
audience. Homosassa Flotilla
15-4 of the US Coast Guard
Auxiliary offers Paddlesports
America, an exciting safety pro-
gram designed to attract the
novice paddle enthusiasts. This
four-hour program presents five
chapters of safety information.
Topics include:
Know Your Paddlecraft -
parts of a canoe and kayak; un-
derstanding paddlecraft charac-
teristics such as basic types,
hull shapes hull materials,
lengths and widths and
weights; selecting your paddle
for both canoe and kayak.
Before You Get Underway -
knowing your paddlecraft's ca-
pacity and how to file a float
plan; transporting your paddle-
craft; conducting a pre-depar-
ture check; dressing for a safe
trip; loading gear in a canoe or
kayak; storing paddle craft; the
responsibilities when paddling
with others.
Operating Your Boat Safely
- how to enter and exit a
canoe or kayak safely; securing
the paddlecraft and sharing the
waterways with others; the U.
S. Aids to Navigation System
(ATONS); learning about local
hazards on waterways.
The Legal Requirements of
Boating - vessel registration,
hull identification numbers and
who may operate a paddlecraft;
unlawful operation of paddle-
craft; Homeland Security re-
strictions; policies on alcohol
and drugs. Life jackets; naviga-
tion lights; sound-producing de-
vices and visual distress
signals; protection of environ-
ment and what to do if in a
boating accident. State specific
information may be added at
the end of this chapter.
Boating emergencies: What
to Do - minimizing the risk of
drowning, capsizing, swamping
or falling overboard; emergency
techniques; how to deal with
cold water immersion and hy-
pothermia; understanding heat
related illness; dehydration;
handling weather emergencies.
The program will be from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday June
11, at the West Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 8940 W. Veterans
Drive, Homosassa. Afee of $20
for materials will be charged.
Call Elaine Miranda at (352)
564-2521 orAl Hepner at (352)
795-9875.
The Auxiliary can use men
and women of every age. We
are the volunteer arm of the US
Coast Guard. We are the Ho-
mosassa Flotilla 15-04. We'd
love to have you join us. Call
Rusty Hays at (352) 598-4369
or email rhayslfla@aol.com.












CITRUS COUNTY CHRLIGIONONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Crusader city re-emerges


ARIEL SCHALIT/Associated Press
This photo taken on June 19 shows a tunnel built by the Knights Templar order under the old port city of Acre, on the Mediterranean coast in
northern Israel. Off the track beaten by most Holy Land tourists lies one of the richest archaeological sites in a country full of them: Acre, where
the busy alleys of an Ottoman-era town cover a uniquely intact Crusader city now being rediscovered.

Archaeologists unearth relic of medieval Christendom in the Holy Land


Associated Press
-ACRE, Israel
Off the track beaten by most Holy Land
tourists lies one of the richest archae-
ological sites in a country full of them:
the walled port of Acre, where the busy al-
leys of an Ottoman-era town cover a
uniquely intact Crusader city now being re-
discovered.
Preparing to open a new subterranean
section to the public, workers cleaned
stones this week in an arched passageway
underground.
Etched in plaster on one wall was a coat


of arms - graffiti left by a medieval trav-
eler Nearby was a main street of cobble-
stones and a row of shops that once sold
clay figurines and ampules for holy water,
popular souvenirs for pilgrims.
All were last used by residents in 1291,
the year a Muslim army from Egypt de-
feated Acre's Christian garrison and leveled
its remains.
The existing city, built by the Ottoman
Turks around 1750, effectively preserved
this earlier town, which had been hidden
for centuries under the rubble.
"It's like Pompeii of Roman times - it's a
complete city," said Eliezer Stern, the Is-


raeli archaeologist in charge of Acre. He
called the town "one of the most exciting
sites in the world of archaeology."
The newly excavated area, part of a Cru-
sader neighborhood, is set to open later this
year
Today, old Acre is a picturesque enclave
jutting into the Mediterranean, home to
5,000 Arab citizens of Israel who live in
dense warrens of homes that are them-
selves historic artifacts. Most residents are
poor
On a recent afternoon, a smattering of

See Page C5


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Should


you be


happy?

A few weeks ago I was
with a group of sen-
ior adults and
asked, "How many of you
would say, for the most
part, that you're happy?"
Almost all of them
raised their hands.
I told them I'm mostly
happy, too, although I
would be completely, to-
tally, 100 percent happy if
my kitchen floor would
stay clean, I had a flat
stomach and if I could eat
birthday cake with butter-
cream frosting every meal
every day without feeling
sick or getting fat.
My daughter's boy-
friend was the happiest
guy on the planet when
the Dallas Mavericks beat
the Miami Heat in basket-
ball, but not so happy a
few days later when Van-
couver lost to the Boston
Bruins in the Stanley Cup
playoffs.
He said the one thing
that would make him do
the everlasting happy
dance is if the Miami Dol-
phins would win the
Super Bowl.
Happiness is so tenu-
ous.


Page C4


Local Methodist pastors bid fond farewells


nhe Kev. Kip
Younger


SANDRA S. KOONCE
Chronicle correspondent

I iSince the days of John Wesley,
founder of Methodism, the church
has called its preachers to be itiner-
ant servants, going where they are
appointed and needed.
The Rev. In years past, the Bishop fre-
David Gill quently moved ministers as often as


VBS
* Inverness First United
Methodist Church's Vacation
Bible School theme this year
is "Big Apple Adven-
ture." Grab a cab and discover
adventure waiting at every cor-
ner. Amid the sights and
sounds of the city, kids will con-
nect faith and life through
our Crafts District, play games
at Playground 1017, enjoy
snacks at Midtown Cafe, hear
great Bible stories at Battery
Park, and more. Kids will have
lots of fun learning to connect
with others and with
Jesus. This free VBS adventure
for ages 5 through completed
fifth grade is from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, July 11-15. The church is
at 3896 S. Pleasant Grove
Road in Inverness, approxi-
mately 2-1/2 miles south of Ap-
plebee's on the right. For more
information and to register, call
(352) 726-2522.
* Area children ages 5
through fifth grade are invited to
"Where God is Wild About
You VBS" from 9 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday, July
11-15, at Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N. Cit-
rus Ave. Program includes
Bible study, crafts and music.
No charge. Pre-registration en-
couraged. Call (352) 795-3148


for more information.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church presents "PandaMania
Vacation Bible School" free of
charge for grades kindergarten
through sixth from 9 to 11:30
a.m. Monday through Friday,
July 11-15, with the closing ses-
sion at 4 p.m. Sunday, July 17,
with water play and
parents/guardians invited to at-
tend to review the children's ac-
complishments. Pre-registration
is available from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monday through Thurs-
days through July 7 at the
church office, 82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Call (352) 746-
3620 for information.
* "Free Son Surf VBS" for
grades 1 through 6 from 9 a.m.
to noon Monday through Friday,
July 11-15, at Victory Baptist
Church, 5040 E. ShadyAcres
Drive, Inverness. Church kick-
off is July 10 in the morning
service, with a "Family Day,
Surf's Up" cookout and water
fun for the whole family Friday,
July 15. VBS awards for the
children and family during the
morning service July 17. Call
(352) 726-9719 or (352)
465-8866.
* Blast-off to Space Station
Salvation VBS at St. Paul's
Lutheran Church & School and
Precious Lambs Preschool at
6150 N. Lecanto Highway in
Beverly Hills. Have fun as we


every two years.
In the past few decades, the
church has moved toward longer ap-
pointments that have been less dis-
ruptive to families, as well as
congregations. However, knowing
that no one person has every talent
needed to shepherd a particular
congregation, the itinerant system is
still in place.


Religion NOTES

learn that Jesus is our Sav-
ior. Children ages 3 through 12
are invited to join us from 9 to
11:45 a.m. Monday through Fri-
day, July 18- 22. This is a free
event at which everyone will
enjoy upbeat songs, Bible
study, games, crafts, snacks
and hear how precious all peo-
ple are to Jesus. Call the
church at (352) 489-3027.
* "Hometown Nazareth"
VBS for ages 5 years through
fifth grade is from 9 a.m. to
noon Monday through Friday,
July 18-22, at Joy Lutheran
Church, 7045 S.W. 83rd Place
(at State Road 200), Ocala.
This program will take children
back to the days when trans-
portation was by donkey and
water was drawn from a well.
They will meet Jesus' mother,
Mary, and hear stories of Jesus'
boyhood, how he grew and
lived. They will learn about
Jesus' life in Nazareth through
crafts, songs and games chil-
dren in ancient Nazareth
learned and played. Registra-
tion is available all month at the
church office. Call (352)
854-4509, Ext. 221.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church and St. James AME, in
downtown Inverness, invites
children ages 3 years old
through adulthood to "Inside
Out & Upside Down on Main
Street VBS" from 5:30 to 8


p.m. Sunday through Thursday,
July 31 through Aug. 4. Supper
served at 5:30 each evening.
"Inside Out & Upside Down" is
a VBS experience designed to
show "Where Jesus makes a
difference every day!" For more
information and to register, call
(352) 726-3153.
* Church of the Advent,
11251 S.W. County Road 484,
Dunnellon will present its VBS
from Aug. 8-12. Children ages 4
to 11 are invited to attend this
free program. Kids will "Take
The Plunge And Make A Splash
With Jesus," where fearless
kids shine God's light. "Take
the Plunge VBS" is filled with
incredible Bible learning that
kids see, hear, touch and taste,
Bible Point crafts, team-building
games, cool Bible songs and
tasty treats. To register, call the
church at (352) 465-7272 or
Mrs. Florence at (352)
566-6934.
* Kids ages 2 through fifth
grade are invited to "Rock Out"
with Jesus. Rock Crusher Road
First Church of God will host a
summer children's program,
"Journey with Jesus," from
9:45 to 11:15 a.m. Sunday and
6:15 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
through Aug. 21. Kids enjoy
Bible lessons on the life of
Jesus, '50s-style music, games,
Bible memory work, sword
drills, and the Buzz Box. The


With its "connectional" structure,
United Methodist ministers may be
sent to a new mission where an in-
dividual's talents "till new soil and
harvest more souls for the Lord." In-
dividual churches do not "call" the
pastors.
The Rev Kip Younger, senior pas-


Page C2


children are divided by grade
and prepare to participate in the
regional Bible Olympics Com-
petition. Children also work on
the musical, "Solid Rock Cafe,"
to be presented Sunday, Aug.
21. The church is at 419 N.
Rock Crusher Road, Crystal
River. Call the church office at
(352) 795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Just for kids
* Children ages 10 and
younger are invited to enjoy a
"Wet Field Day" from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. today at North Oak Bap-
tist Church at the corner of N.
Elkcam Blvd. and N. Citrus
Springs Blvd. in Citrus Springs.
Water slides, slip n' slide, kiddie
pools, games and more avail-
able. The Sonshine Clown
Troupe will host a clown theatre
for entertainment and crafts. All
children must be accompanied
by an adult, wearing appropri-
ate swimming attire and bring a
towel. There is no charge for
this event. Call (352) 489-1688
or (352) 746-1500 for informa-
tion.
* Free voluntary pre-
kindergarten (VPK) classes at
Crystal River United Methodist
Church's Bright Beginnings pre-
school will begin Monday, Aug.
8, in the church educational

See .Page C2


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


No


church


allowed
nce a month, Vil-
lage Church volun-
teers offer their
neighborhood a gift-
free baby-sitting.
This Friday "Parents'
Night Out" program uses
nonreligious crafts and
games, which is important
because the Presbyterian
flock's leaders insist that
it's open to parents of any
"creed, color, party or ori-
entation." It helps to know
that this evangelical
church is in New York
City's Greenwich Village
and meets in rented space
in Public School 3.
"We're New Yorkers
and we know all about the
incredible diversity of life
in the Village," said the
Rev Sam Andreades, a
former computer profes-
sional with a New York
University graduate de-
gree. "We're trying to be
part of that diversity. We
live here."
The question, however,
is whether the Village
Church will get to stay
where it is, pending the
resolution of an old
church-state clash that is
probably headed back to
the U.S. Supreme Court. It
is one of 60 churches that
rent space - outside of
school hours - in New
York City's nearly 1,700


Page C4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PASTORS
Continued from Page C1

pastor of the First United
Methodist Church of Inver-
ness, and the Rev. David Gill,
senior pastor of Crystal River
United Methodist Church,
will bid farewell to their re-
spective congregations Sun-
day and, by direction of the
Bishop, who is over all
United Methodist Churches
in Florida, go to new
churches.
Younger has been in Inver-
ness for almost 10 years and
Gill has been in Crystal River
for five years.
New ministers will take
their pulpits next Sunday
Similar ministerial changes
will take place across the en-
tire state of Florida, following
appointments made at the
church's annual conference
in early June.
That Sunday, Gill will be
serving at his new church,
Aldersgate UMC in Largo.
Younger will be further
away His new church is Es-
tero United Methodist
Church, near Ft. Myers.
Gill has particularly pre-
pared his congregation for the
changes coming, noting that
in some cases, parishioners
actually mourn the loss of the
pastor.
He has explained that, ac-
cording to the church's Book
of Discipline, he cannot re-
turn for weddings or funerals
or baptisms. Several sermons
and a special service two
weeks ago were in prepara-
tion for the change.
Several members from both
congregations have expressed
their feelings of loss for each
of the ministers.
Fred and Vera Persechino
have appreciated Younger's
unique way of presenting a
message and noted that he
and his wife, Sherry, "are
moving forward with their
ministry but they will remain


close in our hearts."
Part of Younger's leader-
ship emphasis has been on
community outreach and the
need to share Christ with
those who don't normally at-
tend church.
An annual car show each
fall, for example, was
Younger's idea to draw peo-
ple to the church grounds and
to collect food for the needy
He also served as chaplain
at the Citrus County Speed-
way
Tom and Marion Morgan
said of his connection at the
Speedway, "many of us would
never have thought of this as
an outreach but it filled a
void."
Other things that began
while he was in Inverness
were the annual "trunk and
treat" for children at Hal-
loween and the new Foot-
steps Day Care begun this
past year.
Buddy Gangler, a former
Outlaw biker who leads a mo-
torcycle ministry in Valdosta,
Ga., and who has often at-
tended FUMC Inverness, said
"I learned much - he was ap-
proachable - down to earth,
like he was one of us - not
above us. Pastor Kip's
preaching was powerful in
God's power - I will miss
him."
Florence Wilson said she
has appreciated Younger's
"Spirit-filled preaching, his
compassion and caring." She
added that he is also a really
cool guy and it "makes him a
very special man of God."
Gill has shared his talent on
the banjo as a member of
Annie & Tim's United Blue-
grass Gospel Band, an ecu-
menical group from several
Crystal River churches,
brought to town the Nomads, a
group of wandering Methodist
handymen who move from
town to town repairing local
structures, and reached out to
the homeless in a way the
church had never done, bring-
ing them to the church for


dinners and services.
The Bright Beginnings Pre-
school expanded and became
a full ministry of the church.
Those closest to him also
praise his prayer leadership
and deep concern for his con-
gregation.
Wayne Hemmerich said of
his ministry, "the pains and
losses of his flock became his
pains and losses. He is very
much a man who cares for
others and shares the love of
Christ in humility"
Karen Janota, who headed
up the church's 125th an-
niversary celebration while
Gill was here, said "he has a
heart for the Lord, and that
goes with him wherever he
goes."
Others commented on his
patience, his love of family,
his willingness to try new
things "as long as the budget
allowed for it," and the strong
emphasis on prayer in every
phase of the church's life.
"I saw David as someone
deeply concerned about the
souls of his people, the state
of their eternal souls.
Whether that person was for
or against his ministry, he
cared deeply I never once
heard him speak ill of anyone.
I mean anyone. He was open
with issues he struggled with
when he preached and he of-
fered grace to anyone who
struggled," said Susan Yerton,
who served as church secre-
tary during a portion of Gill's
tenure.
As the Reverends Gill and
Younger move on to new re-
sponsibilities, church mem-
bers will embrace a reminder
that Gill sent to his congrega-
tion recently: The mission of
the church does not change
because the pastors are reap-
pointed.
Referring to the motto of
the United Methodist Church,
"Open doors, Open hearts,
Open minds," he said, "God
has set an open door... which
he invites us to walk through
in faith."


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

building, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. The state-
funded program is for children who will turn
4 by Sept. 1. Classes are from 9 a.m. to
noon Monday through Friday. In addition to
following the Early Literacy Learning Module
and Handwriting Without Tears programs
used by most Citrus County's public schools'
VPK classes, the school has a hands-on
Bible curriculum. Bright Beginnings has
been one of the top five preschools in Citrus
County for the past four years. All lead
teachers at the school have a college de-
gree in the field of education and all assis-
tant teachers and subs have completed 45
hours of state-mandated training. A before-
and after-school educational program is also
available for children whose parents want
more school experience. Call (352) 795-
1240 for more information.
* Little Vines Daycare, on the grounds
of Calvary Chapel of Inverness, has open-
ings for the summer program. Breakfast,
snacks, and field trips are included in the
weekly fee of $85 per child with a discount
for a second child in the same family. Call
Christine at (352) 726-2875 for more infor-
mation.
* Little Friends Learning Center, a min-
istry of the Inverness Church of God, is en-
rolling children for its Summer Camp 2011.
Camp is from 6 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Cost is $85 per week (sec-
ond child discount). This includes breakfast,
lunch, snack, activities and field trips. Activi-
ties include swimming, bowling, skating, arts
and crafts, etc. Little Friends Learning Cen-
ter is at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness. Call
(352) 344-5487.
* Footsteps Preschool Summer Camp
for ages 5 to 12 is from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, at the First United
Methodist Church of Inverness, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. No regis-
tration fee. Cost is $100 a week. Field trips
and activities daily. Breakfast, lunch and an
afternoon snack are provided daily. Call
(352) 344-4331.
Special events
* Peace Lutheran Church will have a
"2011 God and Country Celebration" on
Sunday, July 3. The 9 a.m. Bible study and
10 a.m. worship service will be followed by a


chicken and potluck lunch and fellowship.
The community is invited to share this day
honoring our God and our country with wor-
ship, fun and fellowship. Bring your family
and friends. Peace Lutheran Church, "The
Church on the Hill," is five miles north of
Dunnellon, at 7201 S. U.S. 41. Call the
church office at (352) 489-5881, or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.org.
* Greater Mt. Carmel Missionary Bap-
tist Church has been honoring its pastor,
Lee Inmon, with a week of church services
and festivities for his first anniversary. Inmon
became pastor of the church in May 2011
succeeding Pastor Ed Jones, who led the
congregation for more than 17 years. Inmon,
who also works as a Correctional Senior Of-
ficer for the Department of Corrections, has
almost 20 years of prior pastoral experience
in Hernando and Sumter counties. Services
continuing on Sunday will begin with Sunday
school at 9:45 a.m. followed by 11 a.m. wor-
ship presided over by Associate Pastor
Calvin Dyer, a former pastor with more than
25 years experience who adjoined to the
church in November 2009. A full-course
meal featuring fried and baked chicken or
ham, assorted vegetable dishes and
desserts will be served after morning wor-
ship. The afternoon program will begin at
3:30 with Mt. Pisah AME Church from Web-
ster and Mt Olive Missionary Baptist Church
of Crystal River in charge of services.
* Groundbreaking ceremony at 12:45
p.m. Sunday for the Father James Hoge
Parish Center at St. Scholastica Catholic
Church, 4301 Homosassa Trail, Lecanto.
Join us for this momentous occasion. Light
refreshments to follow.
* Jim and Debi Higgins will minister in
music and the word at 6 p.m. Sunday at In-
verness Church of God. The public is in-
vited. The church is at416 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. Call the church at (352)
726-4524.
* Solo concert by Paul Mast, lead
singer of the Mast Brothers, at 6 p.m. Sun-
day at First Baptist Church of Dunnellon,
20831 Powell Road. Contemporary and
gospel music. Call (352) 229-0228.
M A Fourth of July musical tribute to
our past and present troops for keeping this
country free, also a special time of prayer
and praise to God for His ongoing blessing
on this nation, from 9 a.m. to noon on Mon-
day, July 4, at the Inverness Walmart.

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that



offer love, peace and



harmony to all. ,


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA .


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. - Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 - 4:30pm
795-4479


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
795-5325
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Blueqrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
7:30am, 8:30am & 11:00am
Sunday School
All Ages & Adults 10:00am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


r














TCrystal River
"The
Church



Sinthe
IV,. IVI.-















Sunday MorningC
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
S (12th Ave.) Nursery
h Provided



ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
I . I THOMASr
Sday 4:30P.m . H
628-700 I 0I-I

L- -A I


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive * Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AllAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
7 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities


The First Assembly
of God Family
WELCOMES YOU!


Pastor
Richard
Hart


Schedule of Services:
Sunday:
9:00 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Classes
10:00 a.m.
Spirit Filled Worship Service
Inspiring Message
Youth and Children's
Ministries
6:00 p.m
Youth Ministries
Wednesday 7:00 p.m
Praise and Worship
In-Depth Bible Study
Youth and Children's
Ministries
Nursery Provided Every Service
Loaton


-I5W.Gl.T ak w.


� ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
wwwstannescr.org


9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.



2,

US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
SBob Dickey


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller








HCEK, YOU'LL FIND
A CAING FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

C YSTXL
RIVKE
UNITED(
M- METHODIST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Gill, Pastor
Sunday Worship
8:00 Early Communion
9:30 Praise & Worship
11:00 Traditional
Bible Study
At 9:30 & 11:00 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. - Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:A Stephen Ministry Provider:


BE Crystal Csl River
River CHURCH OF


Foursquare

Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.


Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor Brona Larder


GULF TO LAKE~4
CHRC
ww .gufolk.com


CITRUS COUNTY'S
COMMUNITY
CHURCH

"WE ARE
FAMILY"
Sunday Mornings
Contemporary
Praise/Worship
Services
9:00 & 10:30 AM
Son Studio
(Worship for Kids)
Evening Activities
5:00 PM
Adult Bible Study
BANG Student
Worship (Grades 6-12)


CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.* 11:00 A.M. 6:00 .M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 * 746-1239


I ASSEMBUES OF GOO I
Come FGOD West
grow Citrus
with us! Citus
S Church of Christ


Clokinm
M *ianic

Synagogue





Rabbi Phil Davis
Rabbi Tamah Davis - 352-302-8098
http://www.yahshuarevealed.org
rabbidavisn@netscape.net








Worship
Services:
Friday Night
7:30 pm
Saturday
10:00 am

Everyone is invited!
Worship as Yahshua
(Jesus) did!


C2 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


RELIGION


s
>-
8





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

All are welcome. Call Joe
Hupchick at (352) 726-9998.
* Join Pastor Al Hopkins for
the "2011 Summer Revival" at
7:30 nightly Tuesday through
Friday, July 12-15, at Kingdom
Empowerment Church, 557
N.E. 2nd Ave., Crystal River.
* "The FresHope Place"
Women's Ministry Center will
host a "Creative Couponing
Class" from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday,
July 15, at Inverness Family
Restaurant and Bakery, 727
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Come


RELIGION


join us. Bring your Sunday
newspapers and any other
coupons you may have and we
will show you how clipping
those coupons can help you
get the most for your money.
Space is limited, so registration
is required. For information or
to register, call "The FresHope
Place" at: (352) 637-0544.
* Third Saturday supper
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, July
16, in the Dewain Farris fellow-
ship hall at Community Congre-
gational Christian Church, 9220
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes beef
stroganoff with noodles, salad,
rolls, granny cake and cof-
fee. Cost is $10 for adults and


$5 for children.
* New Day Ministries will
be in concert at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, July 17, at Suncoast Bap-
tist Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs. All
are welcome. A freewill offering
will be collected for the group.
Call (352) 621-3008 or visit
www.NewDayMusicMinistries
.com.
* Bluegrass Gospel
singing and barbecue dinner
with The Marksmen Quartet at
5 p.m. Saturday, July 23, at
New Hope Baptist Church. Fol-
lowing the concert, a barbecue
dinner will be served. Advanced
tickets for $5 can be purchased
by calling (352)795-5391. Cost


at the door is $7. Ages 10 and
younger admitted free of
charge. Visit www.newhope
baptisthomosassa.com.
* Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church "Brothers In
Christ Annual Fundraising
Cruise" on the Norwegian Star
on Jan. 15-22, 2012, sailing
roundtrip from Tampa. Ports of
call include Roatan, Belize,
Costa Maya and Cozumel. For
rate information, call Accent
Travel at (352) 726-6623 or
email Kathy@accenttravel
group.com.
* Feb. 25 fundraiser cruise
to benefit SOS (Serving Our
Savior) Interfaith Food Bank.
Travel from Tampa on a five-


night cruise on the Carnival
Paradise to Cozumel and
Grand Cayman. Enjoy a
Caribbean cruise while support-
ing a local food pantry. Cost in-
cludes cruise, port charges, all
taxes and fees, donation to
SOS, round-trip bus to Tampa
from Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Hernando, round-trip
bus driver tips and one-
way porter tips. Deposit is due
on June 20. For deposit and
cabin price quotes or other in-
formation, contact Lenore Deck
at cruiselady@tampabay.rr.com
or call (352) 270-8658.
* Abundant Life conducts an
"Hour of Prayer" from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. Sunday. These


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C3

times of prayer are open to
everyone who wants to see a
spiritual awakening sweep Cit-
rus County and the surrounding
areas. Join us as we pray for
the government, the nation, the
church, the city and the world.
Abundant Life can also receive
prayer requests through its
website at www.abundant
lifecitrus.org. Call the church for
more information at (352)
795-LIFE.
* Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at its

See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

ICome on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! I


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF


HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Litil ( Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:00 AM Blended Worship Service
9:30 AM Sunday School
10:45 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


*YOUTH
*SINGLES
*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor


Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School & Nursery
at 10:30 am
Christian Education
9:15 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
\ " .S(O TH EC.org.r .-

.|;:L...^-" '


, I' I *
FistBpts

Chrc
Of ernnd
Recin ndrstrn


.... ry for Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(12 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245


Reverend
Aelly Greenawald


Sunday School
8:45 AM - 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.
| "l


Sunday
9:30 AM...................Discovery Time
11:00 AM................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM..................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM..................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1/2 mi.east of US.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


Old Floral
3 of a mile north of SR 48
at 7431 Old Floral City Rd.
Come & Fellowship
Service Times:
Sunday School.........9:30 am
Sunday Worship.....11:00am
Wed-Night Awesome
Bible Study...............7:00 pm
Call 352-726-0501
Where Love
isn't what
it says
dti'' 1LI
a~i d's-3


St. Scholastica

Roman Catholic
Church
Masses:
Saturday Vigil
4:00 p.m.
Sunday
9:00 a.m. and
11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. - Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 - 3:30 p.m.

4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
S Floral City, FL.


FAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
Homosassa Springs
Pastor Chris Owens

SUNDAY
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:45 am
WORSHIP: 11:00 am & 6 pm
WEDNESDAY
WORSHIP: 7 pm
YOUTH: 6:30pm
Independent & Fundamental
On Spartan * 1/2 mile from U.S. 19
off Cardinal 628-4793


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA










Worship
8:30 am & 11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
* Weekly Communion

Sunday School
9:45 am
* Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gslutheran.googlepages.com

32 I46 1


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information


C"huchof Shepherd
The Nazarne I
A Place o Belong of the Hills

2101 N, Florida Ave, EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Hernando FL Our mission is to be
a beacon offaith known
726-6144 for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
Nursery Provided ofJesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
*CHILDREN 527-0052


1 Faith
Lutheran

Church(L.CS.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


I I I


Henno F 44


Ji


VI - geneis" m" , i t ch , L r





C4 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

A few years ago, Gretchen
Rubin embarked on a happiness
project. She spent an entire year
test-driving the wisdom of the
ages, current scientific studies
and lessons from pop culture.
Anything that promised "Do this
and you'll be happy," she did.
The results, a book titled "The
Happiness Project," reached
number two on the New York
Times Bestseller list. She also has
a blog (wwwhappiness-
project.com) where she posts her
happiness tips - and also how not
to be happy
On her blog she wrote that in
her research she discovered that
some people don't want to be
happy and some people are only
happy when they're miserable.
Everybody's out to swindle them.
Every politician is corrupt. Every
good deed is suspect. People who
smile all the time are up to some-
thing or they're just plain morons.
Her tips on how not to be happy
include: Be sure to tell everyone
how the food, service or perform-
ance fell short. When someone
bugs you, whether a stranger talk-
ing loudly on a cell phone or a rel-
ative telling the same stupid jokes
year after year, tell as many peo-
ple about it as possible.
Try to control people and/or cir-
cumstances. Expect perfection
from yourself and others. Over-
spend and overeat.
Her tips for being happy in-
clude: Be grateful, sing in the
morning, use good manners, laugh
out loud, quit nagging and com-
plaining, don't expect or demand
praise or recognition, give some-
thing up.
Probably if everyone followed
her advice we could all raise our
happiness levels, but is that really
the goal of those of us who call
ourselves Christians? God wants
us to be joyful and thankful, but
does he want us to be happy?
Years ago, former Washington
Redskins quarterback Joe Theis-
mann told his second ex-wife the
reason he cheated on her was be-
cause "God wants Joe Theismann


to be happy" (I think Joe Theis-
mann wanted Joe Theismann to
be happy)
Let's just say that God wants us
to be happy Does that end justify
the means? Where do you draw
the line? Maybe you draw it at
adultery or murder or armed rob-
bery, but what about the pursuit of
the ultimate fine dining experi-
ence or the extremist extreme
makeover of your house or your
body? How do you know when or
if you've reached your happiness
limit?
What if you could have every-
thing you think will make you
happy only to discover you're still
not satisfied?
I think God sometimes lets us
have what we think will make us
happy just so we can taste exactly
how much it doesn't.
That's not to say God doesn't
give us moments of happiness -
breathtaking sunrises and sun-
sets, an emotion-soaring piece of
music or delicious piece of choco-
late, a day when everything goes
right followed by a good night's
sleep, a walk in the woods with a
friend.
C.S. Lewis wrote, "The security
we crave would teach us to rest
our hearts in this world and pose
an obstacle to our return to God ...
Our Father refreshes us on the
journey with some pleasant inns,
but will not encourage us to mis-
take them for home."
God never promised in this life
we would be happy 24/7 or even
16/5. He did, however, promise us
joy in sorrow, peace in pain, com-
fort in suffering. He said if we de-
light ourselves in him, something
amazing would take place: He
would give us the desires of our
hearts, which turns out to be him-
self (Psalm 37:4).
Truly, whether we think so or
not, that is ultimate happiness.


Nancy Kennedy is the author of
"Move Over Victoria -I Know
the Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest book,
"Lipstick Grace." She can be
reached at (352) 564-2927, Mon-
day through Thursday or via
e-mail at nkennedy@chronicle
onlinecom.


RELIGION


CHURCH
Continued from Page C1

schools. About 10,000 nonreli-
gious groups take advantage of
the same opportunity
The question that vexes some
educators is whether it's accept-
able for churches to worship in
their buildings. This is currently
allowed under equal-access
laws that have become common
nationwide in recent decades.
At the heart of the debate is a
2001 Supreme Court decision -
Good News Club v Milford Cen-
tral School -that instructed ed-
ucators to offer religious groups
the same opportunity to use pub-
lic-school facilities as secular
groups. School leaders can elect
to close their buildings to secu-
lar and religious groups alike,
thus avoiding discrimination.
Now, the 2nd U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals has challenged
this status quo. In a 2-1 decision,
it backed New York City school-
board attempts to ban regular
worship services in its facilities,
while allowing for some other
forms of religious expression by
religious groups.
"When worship services are
performed in a place, the nature
of the site changes," wrote Judge
Pierre N. Leval. "The site is no
longer simply in a room in school
being used temporarily for some
activity ... The place has, at least
for a time, become the church."
The implication is that a
"mysterious transformation" lit-
erally takes place during these
worship services, noted Jordan
Lorence of the Alliance Defense
Fund, a lawyer who has been in-
volved in equal-access cases in
New York City and elsewhere
for a quarter of a century
"There isn't some kind of ar-
chitectural alchemy at work
here that suddenly turns a
school facility into a dangerous
place," he said.
"Allowing unions to rent
space in schools doesn't turn
them into union halls. Allowing
Alcoholics Anonymous to use a
school doesn't turn it into the
Betty Ford Clinic."


However, this ongoing conflict
is evidence that many New
Yorkers are spooked by the
thought of people - especially
evangelicals - worshipping in
spaces created for secular edu-
cation. The bottom line: What if
believers dared to pray for the
students and teachers who oc-
cupy those spaces on school
days?
In a New York Times essay,
activist Katherine Stewart ex-
plained why she fiercely op-
poses having a church meet
behind the red door of her local
school on the Upper East Side.
She also attacked the Village
Church by name.
"I could go on about why my
daughter's photo should not be
made available for acts of wor-
ship, or why my PTA. donations
should not be used to supply
furniture for a religious group
that thinks I am bound for hell,"
concluded the author of the up-
coming book, "The Good News
Club: The Christian Right's
Stealth Assault on America's
Children."
"Maybe it's just that I imagine
that that big red door is about
education for all, not salvation
for a few. Sometimes a building
is more than a building."
The most disturbing theme in
these arguments, said An-
dreades, is the frequent claim
that his church and others like it
are somehow aliens in their city
Renting space in PS3, he noted,
allows his small flock to invest
10 percent of its budget into Vil-
lage charities - from an AIDS
research center to programs for
shut-ins, from arts projects to
soup kitchens.
"This church has been in the
Village for 16 years," he said.
"We've had members attend that
public school and teach at it.... We
know who we are and where we
are and we think we belong here."

Terry Mattingly is the director
of the Washington Journalism
Center at the Council for Chris-
tian Colleges and Universities
and leads the GetReligion.org
project to study religion
and the news.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

new address at 604 U.S. 41 South.
Proceeds fund the food pantry. The
store is accepting donations of house-
hold goods, clothing and small appli-
ances. Estate donations are also
accepted. Pick-up is available for
larger donations. Items donated are
tax deductible and a form is provided
from Helping Hands. Call (352)
726-1707.
Worship
* Faith Lutheran Church, 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive (Crystal Glen sub-
division), Lecanto, invites the public to
the Holy Communion service at 6 p.m.
today, and the 9:30 a.m. service on
Sunday. The sermon by Pastor Lane
is: "Not Quite What You Expected,"
from Matthew 10:34-42. Following the
Sunday service is a time of fellowship,
then adult Bible study on the Book of
Galatians. The church's services can
be heard on the website faithle-
canto.com. The church is wheelchair
accessible and offers assistance for
the hard of hearing. Call (352) 527-
3325. Thank you to all children who at-
tended Vacation Bible School, and to
the helpers who made VBS a success.
This was a Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans sponsored event.
* Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal
Church will celebrate the second Sun-
day after Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10:30 a.m. tomorrow with nursery
at 10:30 a.m. Healing service and Eu-
charist at 10 a.m. Wednesday. SOS
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday at Key
Training Center. Thursday evening
Bible study at 7 in the parish hall.
* St. Timothy Lutheran Church
will have a "come as you are" service
at 5 p.m. today. Sunday worship serv-
ices begin with 7:30 a.m. spoken Eu-
charist; 8:30 a.m. Folk Mass; 10 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all ages;
coffee fellowship hour at 9:30 a.m.;
and 11 a.m. traditional Eucharist. Spe-
cial services are announced. Nursery
provided. The church is at 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.19), Crystal River.

See NOTES/Page C5


"First For Christ"...John 1:41
Q006T9U
FIRST
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS t
We welcome you and inviteyou
to worship with our family.
John A. Scott, Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





The little House

Fellowship 0
A Christian Ministry to enhance
believers by providing discipleship
training and counseling
Sunday Service
10am
Life Skills Bible Study
Tues. 7pm
Free Coffee & Prayer
M-F 6:30-8:00am
Outreach Events
Joe and Kathi Hupchick
Servants of Christ
4929 E. Shady Acres Drive
Inverness, FL
352-726-9998 Cell 352-613-5216
jkhupchick@tampabay.rr.com









A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School
Morning Worship
Evening Service
- =IIJ"I


9:00 A.M.
10:15 A.M.
6:00 P.M.


Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 P.M.
!ig *


FIS 45 Yearsof
S T Bringing Christ
FIR I I to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson







Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
W orship.....................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School...............6:30


Mission Possible
MINSISRIES
V. David Lucas, Jr.
SSenior Pastor
9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays
Worship ................... 10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs................7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am


nature Coast

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
GLBT WELCOME
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG

First Baptist Church
of Beverly Hills
Marple Lewis, III Jeff Owen
Pastor
Sunday Services:
Bible Study 9:15 A.M.
Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Services:
Prayer and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
Located at the intersection of
Hwy. 491 (Lecanto Hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970
Office Hours 9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay rr.com
www.fbcbh.com


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH



i V



'//h./,y Wlos

SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260














VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. 810:00 A.M.

SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 PrM to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
. .catholicweb.com .!


The difference
is worth the distance!

GRACE
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
* Expositional Bible Teaching
* Conservative Music
For a map, schedule of services, and
sample messages check our website
www.gracebapchurch.org
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sun. Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Phone (352) 445-9013










S Hwy. 44 E@
0 Washington Ave., Inverness
Contemporary
9:30 AM
* Sunday Services
* Traditional
11:00 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
* Sunday School for all ages
* 9:30 AM
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group .
5 to 7 PM 0
m 24-Hour Prayer Line 0
0 563-3639 0
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org0
" Podcast: FPC inv.com
S ChurchOffice 637-0770
P 0
0 Pastor Craig Davies m


God Loves You Just
The Way You Are

You Were Created
For Greatness

Service 8:45 & 10:30
Sunday School 10:30



LNITh

LGBT - Welcome and loved
2628 W. Woodview -
Beverly Hills
746-1270
www.unityofcitrus.org
Knowing God,
Loving God, Serving God


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! .

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ACRE
Continued from Page C1

tourists walked through the
old market, while at a sleepy
fishing dock one boat's radio
blared Katy Perry
In 2001, Acre became Is-
rael's first UNESCO World
Heritage site. But whether be-
cause of its out-of-the-way lo-
cation in the country's north
or simply because it must
compete with better-known
sites like Jerusalem and the
desert fortress of Masada,
Acre has been overshadowed.
Jerusalem, for example, at-
tracted an estimated 2.5 mil-
lion foreign tourists last year,
according to the Tourism Min-
istry. In contrast, during the
same period, Acre's historic
sites had 444,000 paying visi-
tors - Israeli and foreign -
according to the Acre Munici-
pality. Old Acre has just one
hotel with a total of 16 rooms.
Acre has existed for at least
4,500 years, but reached the
height of its importance with
the Crusader conquest in
1104.
Under Christian rule, the
city became an unruly trading
hub home to combative orders
of soldier-monks, European
factions that distrusted each
other and sometimes fought in
the streets, competing mer-
chants from cities like Genoa,
Venice and Pisa, and small
populations of Jews and Mus-
lims, all sharing an enclosed
area that at its height was
barely the size of two football
fields.
A French bishop, Jacques
de Vitry, reached Acre after a
perilous sea journey in 1216.
He was appalled.
"When I entered this horri-
ble city and found it full of
countless disgraceful acts and
evil deeds, I was very con-
fused in my mind," he wrote in
a letter home.
Acre, he found, was "totally
depraved." Murders took
place constantly, the town was


RELIGION


"filled with prostitutes," and
residents - many of whom he
believed to be outlaws who
had fled their own lands -
were "utterly devoted to
pleasures of the flesh."
Acre was "like a monster or
a beast having nine heads,
each fighting the other," the
bishop wrote.
Israeli excavations got
under way in earnest in the
1990s, and some remnants of
the city that de Vitry knew can
already be visited. One is the
fortress of the Hospitaller
knights, with its pillared din-
ing hall and storerooms, an or-
derly latrine and a dungeon
whose stone walls still have
holes for attaching shackles.
Also open is an under-
ground passage constructed
by the knights of the rival
Templar order, leading from
their own fortress to the port.
Some used it on the day Acre
fell to escape to Europe-
bound vessels as their city, and
the two-century-old Crusader
kingdom, collapsed around
them.
Underwater digs in Acre's
harbor have revealed sunken
fortifications and more than
20 lost ships. The most recent
one to be found, armed with
cannons and special shot used
to shred enemy sails, dated to
Napoleon Bonaparte's failed
siege of the city in 1799.
Workers are now shoring up
one of Acre's seawalls -
which witnessed assaults by
Napoleon, the Egyptian ruler
Ibrahim Pasha, and a com-
bined British, French and
Austrian fleet - discovering,
in the process, Napoleonic
cannonballs and a Hellenistic
pier more than two millennia
old.
Acre, with its newer neigh-
borhoods, has grown to a mod-
ern city of 56,000 people,
two-thirds of them Jewish and
the rest Arab. It has experi-
enced occasional ethnic ten-
sion, as well as violence linked
to poverty and the drug trade.
But the streets feel safe, and
residents are welcoming. The


past, Acre's residents seem to
recognize, is their city's pri-
mary resource.
"It's a whole ancient city un-
derground," said Bassam
Dabour, a storeowner in the
Old City market "It's beautiful
- why not continue working?"
Because of Acre's impor-
tance and the complexity of
conducting archaeological
work in a living city, the gov-
ernment's Israel Antiquities
Authority has made Acre
something of a laboratory for
conservation work. The au-
thority recently turned an old
Ottoman mansion into a con-
servation center for local and
international students who in-
cluded, this week, representa-
tives from Britain, Russia,
Poland, Puerto Rico and the
U.S.
Shelley-Anne Peleg, who
heads the center and serves as
a liaison with local residents,
said archaeologists have
learned that Acre's history
cannot be separated from the
people who live there.
The Antiquities Authority
runs programs seeking to edu-
cate residents, teaches munic-
ipal sanitation workers about
the importance of preserva-
tion and works with women to
revive local handicrafts.
There are signs that Acre's
fortunes as a tourist destina-
tion might be about to change.
In addition to the under-
ground city, there are plans for
a new museum, a youth hostel
is about to open in the Old
City, and an investor has re-
ceived permission to turn a
currently empty Turkish inn
into a luxury hotel.
But efforts to increase
tourism, Peleg said, must be
done "in a way that doesn't
take over the city and over-
power the people who live
here."
"When you look at the city,
it's not just archaeology, and
it's not just Ottoman buildings.
One of our jobs is to look at the
city from all directions, and
there is heritage still alive in
these alleys," she said.


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C5


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

Call (352) 795-5325 or visit www.sttimothy
lutherancrystalriver.com.
* St. Paul's Lutheran Church, at 6150
N. Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills, contin-
ues its summer worship schedule at 9:30
a.m. New "Bible Information Class," cover-
ing the basics of the Bible, begins after wor-
ship in the fellowship room at 10:45 a.m.
and is conducted by the Rev. Mark
Gabb. Visitors are always welcome to wor-
ship and/or Bible study. Sunday is the last
day to contribute to a food shower for the
new teachers who arrive Wednesday. Vaca-
tion Bible School with theme of Space Sta-
tion Salvation is July 18-22. The "Annual
Favorite Hymn Sing" is during 9:30 a.m.
worship service Sunday, Aug. 7. Call (352)
489-3027.
* Massage therapist and wellness expert
Adam Dyer will present a special program
Sunday at the Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida Ave.
( U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. This dancer and
choreographer, who performed in "Ragtime"
on Broadway, will speak about how we ex-
press ourselves through movement. He will
invite the listeners to be more accepting and
less judgmental about their bodies. All are
invited. Coffee and a discussion will follow.
Call (352) 465-4225 or visit
www.NCUU.org.
* First Baptist Church of Inverness
Sunday activities: SONrise Sunday school
class at 7:45 a.m., blended worship service
at 9 a.m., kid's church for ages 4 through
fourth grade during 9 a.m. service featuring
Bible stories, skits, music and group activi-
ties, Sunday school classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. Choir practice at 4:15 p.m. Nurs-
ery available during all services. Sunday
evening worship at 6 for adults and Praise
Kids for kindergarten through fifth grade.
Bread Basket Cafe is open from 4:30 to 6
p.m. Wednesday. Youth worship, Awana,
Connection classes and prayer meeting at 6
p.m. Wednesday. Call the church at (352)
726-1252. The church is at 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness.
* The Rev. David Gill, who has served as
senior minister at Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave., for
the last five years, will preach his last ser-
mon at the church Sunday. The Rev. Gill
has been reassigned by the church's lead-


ership to another Methodist church in Largo.
Services are at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal Church will
celebrate the second Sunday after Pente-
cost with Holy Eucharist Rite 1 service at 8
a.m. and Holy Eucharist Rite 2 service at
10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday school begins at
9:30 a.m. Lunch, summer Sunday school
for children and youths, and "Young Adult
Forum" follow the 10:30 a.m. family Eu-
charist service. Feed My Sheep feeding
program for people in need is at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday followed by a Holy Eucharist
and healing service celebrating St. Peter
and St. Paul, Apostles, at 12:30 p.m. Food
pantry is open from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday. Visit www.st
maggie.org. The church is at 114 N. Osce-
ola Ave., Inverness.
* St. Anne's Anglican Church will cele-
brate the second Sunday after Pentecost at
the 8 and 10:15 a.m. services. St. Anne's
will host Our Father's Table from 11:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. today in the parish hall.
Overeaters Anonymous meets Wednes-
days from 10 to 11:30 a.m. and 7 to 8 p.m.
in the parish library. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and Mondays in the
parish library. The sing-alongs are canceled
until the fall. There will not be a sing-along
today as previously advertised. The church
is at 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River.
* First Baptist Church of Floral City in-
vites everyone to share in Sunday's worship
at the 8 a.m. blended service or the 10:45
a.m. traditional service. Doughnuts and cof-
fee are served in the fellowship hall at 9
a.m. Sunday school for all ages begins at
9:30 a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6.
Supper is served at 5 p.m. Wednes-
days. Cost is $3 for adults, $2 for youths,
Children younger than 12 are $1, and the
maximum is $10. Wednesday Bible study
and prayer service, AWANA and youth serv-
ices begin at 6:30 p.m. Game night for
youths in grades 6 through 12 begins Friday
from 5 to 8 p.m.
The church is at 8545 E. Magnolia St.
Local transportation for all services pro-
vided. Call the church office at (352)
726-4296 or visit www.fbcfloralcity.org.
* First Christian Church of Inverness
welcomes all to attend summer services
with Bible school classes at 9 a.m. Sunday
followed by worship services at 10:15 a.m.,
and Wednesday services at 6 p.m.
(Wednesday night meals will resume in
September.) Call the church at (352)
344-1908.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! I -


SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS 1 I U


N� First


Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

SPastor,
S Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


INVERNESS
Y CHURCH
OF GOD

sund.\ a rsite<
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E C ,11111 , l n. , 111 1 '

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~~I~ ~~.,..... I~~ ~


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
% Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy, 41 South, Inverness,
Florida

Sunday Masses
9:00 A.M. & 11:00 A.M.
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00A.M.
Confessions 2:30 - 3:30 P.

726-1670


First
Baptist
Church of
Inverness
550 Pleasant Grove Road
Inverness, Florida
(352) 726-1252

SUNDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
7:45 a.m.
Bible Study
9:00 a.m.
Worship
10:30 a.m.
Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Worship
WEDNESDAY
OPPORTUNITIES
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Dinner
6:00 p.m.
AWANA for Children
6:00 p.m.
IGNITE for Youth
6:00 p.m.
Prayer & Bible Study
Classes
Nursery Provided All Services
Donnie Seagle,
Senior Pastor
wuwfbinvIernesIlslco


SPRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM - Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM - Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM - Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM - Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. * Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711





V fory

Vic ory

in


Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Si11d.', Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


Pastor:
Kevin & Ruth Ballard
Sunday
10 AM Worship
7 PM Bible Prophecy
Wednesday
Free Dessert & Coffee 6 PM
Bible Study 7 PM


960 S. Hwy 41, Inverness, FL
S www.calvarychapelinverness.com
352-726-1480


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL First United
CHURCH M thA
where everyone is still welcome! Methodist


in Historic downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor






All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. - 6:00 PM Bible Study
Children's Church School
Weekly
ALL ARE WELCOME


tChurch
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
KIPYOUNGER
Senior Pastor



8:00 AM
Holy Communion
9:00 AM
Contemporty
Praise & Worship
10:45 AM
Traditional
Worship

School
Readiness
Provider
FOOTSTEPS

PRESCHOOL
Ages 3 mos.-10 yrs.
Monday-Friday
6:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Before/After
School Care
Christian Based
Call Pam at
(352) 344-4331
for details!
Lic.# C05C 10056
� www.invernessfirstumc.org


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107







Page C6 - SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES State park offers summer camp


Items sought for
basket effort
Clubs are being sought to
donate 9-ounce disposable
cups and canisters of instant
lemonade mix to raise funds
for Operation Welcome
Home, an effort that provides
baskets of special gifts to sol-
diers returning from Middle
East service.
Operation Welcome Home
will be set up in Crystal River
and Inverness for Fourth of
July events, as well as the
monthly Farmer's Market day
in downtown Inverness. Op-
eration Welcome Home par-
ticipates in other scheduled
community events to raise
money for its efforts, includ-
ing November veterans'
events.
Gift cards are always wel-
come and can be used to
purchase items for the bas-
kets. To date, more than 300
baskets have been given.
Call Barbara Mills at (352)
422-6236.
Native American
Cultural Camp set
Red Eagle Lodge will
sponsor a Native American
Cultural Camp from 7:30 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. during two
weeks, July 11 to 15 or July
18 to 22, at Fort Cooper
State Park in Inverness for
children ages 9 to 11. Cost is
$100 per child for a week of
camp.
Children must be regis-
tered by July 1. Call Pansey
Cleaveland at (352)
400-5644.
The camp will cover: mak-
ing moccasins, medicine
bags and neck cords, picture
frames, foods, games, hous-
ing, booklets. Participants will
learn about tracking, mound
digging, tools, history, plants,
regalia, stories, drumming
and dances.
Nature Coast
artists to convene
WEEK WACHEE - Na-
ture Coast Decorative Artists
Chapter of the Society of
Decorative Artists will meet at
9 a.m. July 2 at the Weeki
Wachee Senior Center (off
U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail).
There will be a short meet-
ing, show and tell and a birth-
day drawing. The project for
"Christmas in July" is a snow-
man on a bowling pin, taught
in acrylic by Pat Estes. On
July 30, another "Christmas
in July" project will be taught
by Pat Otto; a candle and
holly in oils.
For more information, visit
www.ncda-artist.com or call
Andi at (352) 666-9091,
Jeanette at (727) 857-1045
or Pat at (352) 249-7221.
Hit the road rally
on July 2
The Rotary Club of Crystal
River and BSA Venturing
Crew 370 are inviting partici-
pants to compete for prizes in
the second annual Uncle
Sam Scallop Jam Road Rally
starting at noon on Saturday,
July 2.
The rally is a navigational
challenge where participat-
ing vehicles get course di-
rections in the form of clues.
Each directional clue may be
a riddle, a picture or a
rhyme.
The cost per vehicle is
$25. Each participating team
will receive two tickets worth
$5 each for the Uncle Sam
Scallop Jam that evening. To
sign up, or for more informa-
tion go to www.scallopjam.
com or call Marc Shapot at
(352) 613-6851.
VFW post to picnic
on Fourth of July
Edward W. Penno Post
4864 plans a July 4 picnic
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., serv-
ing hamburgers, hot dogs,
Italian sausage with peppers
and onions, potato salad and
baked beans. Public is in-
vited. Cost is $7.
The post is at 10199 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs, (352) 465-4864.


Program helps

children learn about

Florida's wildlife

Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection's Ellie Schiller Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State Park will
offer a weeklong Nature Academy sum-
mer camp program July 11 through 16,
sponsored by the Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park and
Progress Energy. July's program is for


children who are 10 to 12 years old.
The program includes four half-day
camp sessions from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Monday through Thursday Friday ses-
sion starts at 4 p.m. with an overnight
stay in the park. A graduation cere-
mony will be conducted Saturday
morning, during which Nature Acad-
emy campers will earn Junior Ranger
badges. Each Nature Academy pro-
gram is limited to 20 students. The cost
of the program is $45 and includes a T-
shirt and supplies.
Camp topics include mammals,
birds, reptiles, manatees, the ocean,
sea turtles and saving energy through
alternative sources. Indoor and out-
door activities for children include na-


ture hunts, visiting the wildlife areas
in the park, water testing and other
scientific activities.
The June summer camp for chil-
dren ages 8 and 9 years old is filled. If
you would like to be added to a wait-
ing list for the June camp, call Allyssa
Taylor at (352) 628-5445, ext 1006.
Applications for the Nature Acad-
emy summer camp program are avail-
able at the park office. Applicants are
asked to write a short essay on "Why I
want to go to Nature Academy and
what I hope to learn while I am there"
to attach to their application. Parents
and guardians may stop by the park of-
fice to pick up an application or call
Taylor at (352) 628-5445, ext 1006.


Double wall-raising in North Citrus


Special to the Chronicle
Habitat for Humanity of
Citrus County had a double
wall-raising effort May 14,
kicking off construction for the
first of five Habitat homes to be
built this summer and fall in
northern Citrus County. Olive
Garden Italian restaurant in
Inverness provided a catered
lunch and large volunteer team
to support one of their
employees in the Habitat
program. A team of volunteers
also came from the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, Lecanto, as part of a
nationwide day of service for
the Mormon Church. Habitat
house No. 68, the Baldwin-
Smalt Family home, and house
No. 69, the Trickel Family
home, are expected to be
completed in mid-September.


News NOTES


Second Festival of Books
set for February
The second annual Festival of Books,
sponsored by the GFWC Woman's Club of
Inverness, has been set for Feb. 4.
Nancy Kennedy, Chronicle reporter and
religion writer, will be the featured author.
She will also conduct a clinic on how to
break into the religious writing market.
At least five other clinics on writing or
publishing will be offered and, in a similar
venue as last year, Citrus County authors
will be invited to participate for free and
sell their books to the public.
There will be a charge for seminars;
however, access to the authors will be
free.
The theme of the festival is "Books and
Beyond."
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, in
downtown Inverness, will be the host site
this year.
For more information about the festival
or to be added to email communication,
call Sandra Koonce at (352) 634-4216, or
email her at skoonce@tampabay.rr.com.
Dunnellon Friends to offer
discount books
Beginning Friday, July 1, Friends Book
Store at Dunnellon Public Library will
begin a storewide, half-price book sale, to
continue from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays
and from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
The bookstore is overstocked in all cate-
gories - novels, fiction, children's books,
mysteries, history, computer, classics and
more - as well as with books on tape,


videos, DVDs, CDs, cassettes and puz-
zles and games.
The library is at 20351 Robinson Road
(behind Sweetbay) in Dunnellon. It is oper-
ated by an all-volunteer staff with pro-
ceeds benefiting the library. The Friends
are committed to providing a monthly book
endowment of $2,500 for new books and
other library enhancements.
Uncle Sam Jam, Rally
slated for Saturday, July 2
The second annual Uncle Sam Scallop
Jam and Road Rally, sponsored by the
Rotary Club of Crystal River, will run from
4 to 11 p.m. Saturday, July 2, on Third
Street N.W., King's Bay Park, Crystal
River.
All are invited to join the fun with live
bands, food and craft vendors, beer and
wine, as well as fresh scallops. Highlight-
ing the festivities will be fireworks over
King's Bay beginning after sunset. Admis-
sion is $5, with those 16 years and
younger admitted free. Proceeds will ben-
efit Rotary charities.
The Road Rally will begin at 11:30 a.m.
from Crystal Chevrolet, U.S. 19, Ho-
mosassa. To participate or for more infor-
mation, call (352) 613-6851 or visit
www.scallopjam.com.
West Citrus Elks plan
hoedown, dinner July 4
West Citrus Elks Lodge 2693 will cele-
brate Independence Day, Monday, July 4,
with a Country Hoedown dinner/dance.
Entertainment will be by Lee Ann Noel
Band from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.


Menu will consist of grilled steaks,
grilled shrimp, au gratin potatoes, corn on
the cob, fancy fruit cup dessert and coffee
for members and guests at 6 p.m.
Cost for the special event is $15. Tickets
are available in the lounge.
Hospice plans volunteer
orientation for July 7
Hospice of Citrus County will provide
orientation training for individuals who are
interested in learning more about Hospice
and Hospice volunteer opportunities. The
class will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday,
July 7, at the Homosassa Public Library,
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.
The class provides an overview of Hos-
pice philosophy and history. Participants
will become acquainted with services pro-
vided by Hospice of Citrus County for pa-
tients and their families. They will also
become familiar with the concept of pallia-
tive care and learn the importance of confi-
dentiality.
Volunteers are needed at the Hospice of
Citrus County Homosassa Thrift Shoppe
and those desiring to volunteer there will
be able to do so following this orientation.
Teens and high school students are en-
couraged to attend. Volunteering for Hos-
pice of Citrus County will provide
community service hours for the Bright Fu-
tures Scholarship and other academic
needs.
To register or to request training for a
group, call Dianna Boggs, Hospice of Cit-
rus County Volunteer Services manager,
at (352) 621-1500, ext. 1706 or email
DBoggs@hospiceofcitruscounty.org.


For information, call (352)
527-5202 between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or email to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Florida

Folk Artist

concert

today

Special to the Chronicle

Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club, 5 56th St. in
Yankeetown, will host an-
other Withlacoochee Area
Residents' Florida Folk
Artist Concert Saturday,
June 25. Doors open at 6
p.m.
Frank Thomas and Star-
bird perform from 7 to 9
p.m. Florida folk musician
Thomas has written more
than 500 songs, produced
nine CDs and has re-
ceived the Golden Quill
Award, Florida Folk Her-
itage Award and the Jil-
lian Prescott Award.
Thomas toured nationally
with the Arkansas Travel-
ers.
Val McQueen and Jay
Wood are Starbird. The
singer-songwriter team
from Eustis write and per-
form in several styles in-
cluding contemporary,
folk, mountain, blues and
Celtic. They have traveled
the state of Florida for
five years and performed
weekly for three years on
Tampa PBS. Locally, they
have performed for With-
lacoochee Area Resi-
dents, Three Sisters
Concert On the Point, 2010
Earth Day at Crystal River
Preserve State Park and
at Abigail's in Dunnellon.
Donations will be ap-
preciated and accepted
for the ongoing initiatives
of the Withlacoochee Area
Residents Inc., to protect
and preserve the Nature
Coast. The organization is
nonprofit and all dona-
tions are tax deductible.
Donations can also be
sent to PO. Box 350, Inglis,
FL 34449.
The Woman's Club will
sell burgers, dogs, chips
and sodas.
Concert dates, perform-
ers, times and locations
for the Summer Concert
Series in Dunnellon and
Crystal River will be an-
nounced soon. For more
information, call Lee
Paulet at (352) 795-4506 or
Jack Schofield at (352)
447-6152.


News NOTES


Club seeks
hearing aids
Inverness Sertoma Club
Inc. will collect donations of
used hearing aids at the Ser-
toma food tent during the In-
dependence Day celebration
beginning at 4 p.m. Sunday,
July 3, at Wallace Brooks
Park.
Those who donate hearing
aids will receive a free hot
dog and soda.
For information about Ser-
toma's work to help the hear-
ing impaired, call Bud Osborn
at (352) 726-7805 or Susan
Healey at (352) 860-5834.
Plant group
gathers July 5
Citrus County Native Plant
Society meet at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, July 5, at Beverly Hills
Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle, in
Beverly Hills.
Speaker for the July meet-
ing will be Bobby Vigliotti of
Homosassa Butterfly. He will
discuss the butterfly life cycle
in depth, including how to
plant a butterfly garden to at-
tract butterflies and keep them
in the yard. He will have live
displays of eggs, caterpillars
and chrysalis. In addition, he
will talk about survival strate-
gies and interesting facts
about each cycle of the butter-
fly. Questions pertaining to the
butterfly life cycle will be wel-
come at the end of the pres-
entation. The public is invited.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING JUNE 25, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon 1: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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IA&E 54 48 54 54 25 27 **** "Titanic"(1997, Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio.'PG-13' *** "A Time to Kill"(1996) Sandra Bullock. A lawyer's defense of a black man arouses the Klan's ire. The Glades "Lost & Found"'PG'
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E 96 19 96 96 **Y, "Stomp the Yard"(2007) Columbus Short. *** "Love & Basketball"(2000, Romance) Sanaa Lathan, Omar Epps. 'PG-13' ** "Daddy's Little Girls"(2007, Romance) Gabrielle Union. 'PG-13'
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( _ 50 retired FBI agent searches for a serial killer in Washington, D.C. for a serial killer. NR' B
i**l "MacGruber" (2010) Will Forte. A clueless sol- ** "The Jackal"(1997, Suspense) Bruce Willis, Richard Gere, Sidney Poitier. An impris- **12 "Robin Hood" 2010) Russell Crowe. Premiere. Robin and his men
S 320 221 320320 3 3 dier-of-fortune must find a stolen nuke. 'R' B oned Irishman accepts an offer to nab an assassin. (In Stereo) R' B battle the Sheriff of Nottingham. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' B
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary |MSNBC Documentary
I(TVI 97 66 97 97 39 Teen Wolf (In Stereo) Teen Wolf (In Stereo) Teen Wolf (In Stereo) Teen Wolf (In Stereo) 16 and Pregnant "Allie" (In Stereo) 14' B 116 and Pregnant
NGC65 44 53 Turnaround King 'PG' The Truth Behind the Druids Titanic: How It Really Sank'G' Rebuilding Titanic Rebuilding sections of the Titanic. Titanic: How It Really Sank'G'
fNICK) 28 36 28 28 35 25 iCarly'G'B iCarly'G' | iCarly'G'm |iCarly'G'B Big Time Rush |Victorious'G' Supah Ninjas'G' liCarly'G' |My Wife & Kids |MyWife & Kids That'70s Show That'70s Show
OXYI 44 Top Model *** "Pretty Woman"(1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. 'R' *** "Erin Brockovich"(2000, Drama) Julia Roberts, Albert Finney Premiere. 'R' Erin Brockovich
*** "A Single **Y "Youth in Revolt"(2009) Michael Cera. A teen Nurse Jackie United States of ** "Letters to Juliet" (2010, Drama) Amanda Seyfried. iTV A young Nurse Jackie United States of
( _ 340 241 340 340 Man"(2009) goes on a carnal quest to lose his virginity 'R' (iTV) 'MA' B Tara (iTV) 'MA' woman finds an old note to someones lover. (In Stereo) PG' (iTV) 'MA' B Tara (iTV) 'MA'
SPEED 122 112 122 122 Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction From Orange County Fair & Events Center, Calif. (N) (Live) SPEED Center NASCAR Perfor.
SPIKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 Repo Games |Repo Games Repo Games Repo Games |Repo Games **| "Eraser"(1996, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Caan. (In Stereo) 'R' **** "Unforgiven"(1992) 'R'
ISUNI 36 31 36 36 MLB Baseball 'G' Rays Live! College Baseball (Joined in Progress) To Be Announced Fight Sports MMA
FY 31 59 31 31 26 29 ** "Malibu SharkAttack"NR' "Lake Placid2"(2007, Horror) John Schneider 'NR' "Swamp Shark"(2011, Suspense) Kristy Swanson. Premiere. 'NR' "Supergator"(2007) 'NR'
TBS 49 23 49 49 16 19 Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' King of Queens |King of Queens **Y "The Longest Yard" (2005) Adam Sandler.'PG-13' B Falling Skies "Pilot" A father wants to protect his family '14' x
n*** "Mister Roberts"(1955, Comedy) Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon. **** "Out of the Past"(1947, Crime Drama) Robert Mitchum. A ** "The Big Steal"(1949) Robert Mitchum. A U.S. "The Company
S 169 53 169 169 30 35 Ensign and cargo officer suffer nit-picking captain.'NR' gambler's no-good girlfriend crosses a private eye.'NR' B (DVS) Army officer pursues payroll thieves across Mexico. She Keeps"
(TDC) 53 34 53 53 24 26 Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers River Monsters'PG' B River Monsters'PG' B River Monsters'PG' B River Monsters'PG' B
( ) 50 46 50 50 29 30 PoliceWomen of Broward County NY Ink (In Stereo)'14' NY Ink"The Gloves Are Off"14' NYInk "Dis-Appointment"14' NY Ink (In Stereo) NY Ink "The Gloves Are Off"'14'
(TNrI 48 33 48 48 31 34 **Y; "The Guardian"(2006, Drama) Kevin Costner. 'PG-13' **** "The Dark Knight"(2008) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. **** "The Dark Knight" B
TRA9 54 9 9 44 Barbecue Paradise 'G' Ribs Paradise 'G' Ghost Adventures'PG' B Ghost Adventures 'PG' B Ghost Adventures 'PG' B Ghost Adventures 'PG' B
ftruTVi 25 55 25 25 98 98 Most Shocking 14' World's Dumbest... '14' World's Dumbest...'14' World's Dumbest...'14' It Only Hurts It Only Hurts Falling Skies "Pilot"'14'
[TVL 32 49 32 32 34 24 Sanford & Son'PG' B Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond |Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond |Hap. Divorced
USA 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS "Angel of Death"'14' c NCIS "Family"'14'' NCIS Reopened investigation.'PG' NCIS (In Stereo) '14' NCIS "Obsession"'PG' B In Plain Sight'PG' B
WE 117 69 117117 My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding Staten Island Cakes Cupcake Girls |CupcakeGirls Staten Island Cakes
WGN-A 18 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Videos |Lead-Off Man MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Kansas City Royals. From Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. (N) B WGN News at Nine (N) B Scrubs'14' How I Met


PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
John Kenneth Galbraith, an
economist who died in 2006, said,
"If all else fails, immortality can al-
ways be assured by spectacular
error."
A bridge expert does not gain im-
mortality by spectacularly misplay-
ing a deal. But these blunders
usually end up in print, the colum-
nists perhaps thinking that they
will make other players feel less
unhappy with their own errors.
Today's deal occurred in a Vander-
bilt Knockout Teams final some
years ago. How should South have
played in seven diamonds after
West led a low spade?
In this constructed auction,
South's seven-diamond bid is de-
batable because he has no reason
to expect his partner to have the
trump queen.


Bridge

North 06-25-11
*53
1 K Q 7 6 3
*KQ763
.94
* K Q 10 7
West East
SJ 8 7 2 Q 9 6 4
S9 8 5 2 V104
7 Q 8 3 2
* J832 954
South
- AK 10
VAJ
SA K J10 6 5
SA6
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
Pass Pass
2 1 Pass 2 V Pass
3 + Pass 4 Pass
4 * Pass 5 * Pass
7 * Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 2


At the other table, the contract
was six no-trump by South, which
made with an overtrick via a dou-
ble squeeze after a spade lead. The
curious may work it out.
In seven diamonds, though, de-
clarer had to play the trump suit
without loss. He erred by cashing
the ace first and going down one.
Since West will have a low single-
ton four times more often than the
queen singleton, South should have
taken a first-round diamond fi-
nesse.
He should have played a club to
dummy's queen, then led a dia-
mond to his jack.
When the finesse won, he would
have cashed the club ace, over-
taken the heart jack with dummy's
queen, discarded the spade 10 on
the club king, repeated the dia-
mond finesse, drawn trumps, and
claimed.


ACROSS
1 Website
4 RR terminal
7 - noire
11 Chiang - -
shek
12 Vanquish a
dragon
13 Sandwich
cookie
14 Relativity name
16 Favoritism
17 "The Wreck of
the Mary -"
18 Poker pair
19 Kennel sound
20 Books pro
21 Chilly
24 Give comfort
27 Filch
28 Joie devivre
30 Season
32 Between ports
34 Revival shout
36 Estuary
37 Theorem foun-
dations
39 Helena rival


41 Mauna -
42 Seance sound
43 Honk
45 Fields of study
48 Just
49 Fly (2 wds.)
52
Mark'sreplace
ment
53 Like good
cheddar
54 Width of a cir.
55 Early garden?
56 Hippie's digs
57 PD dispatch
DOWN
1 Luau strings
2 Maraud
3 Row
4 Lie dormant
5 Mai - (rum
drink)
6 Author - Rand
7 Wild felines
8 Cleveland's
lake
9 Mild brews


Answer to Previous Puzzle
DAM RPM BIOD
OLE HEAT RAGE
VAN IN KY AY LA
ENDANGER NOEL
IOU U OCCUR
METAL AP I I LI
EVAER i IOIE L




NO VAS COMB
FLEUR SOUND

DLEVI ORAL II ON
ERIC MEGA LO Y
WED YES ESAI


10 Dawn goddess
12 Bowling feat
15 Utters
18 GI address
20 Orange road
marker


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


21 Two-piece part
22 Diva-
Ponselle
23 Mountain goat
24 - Club (retail
chain)
25 Male deer
26 Journalist -
Ducommun
29 Prayer-wheel
turner
31 - kwon do
33 Pilot's flap
35 Came closer
to
38 Comics cave-
man
40 Eject
42 Did a lawn
chore
43 Modem-speed
unit
44 Patrick's
domain
46 Verdi heroine
47 Lop off
48 Service
charge
49 Collect maple
sap
50 Turkish offi-
cial
51 Chat


Stay out of dad's personal issues


ear Annie: I'm confused counseling if he's having trouble.
about what to do with a sit- But that's it. He needs to handle
uation in my family At the his marriage in his own way
age of 21, I am the old- Dear Annie: Why is
est of four children. it that when you hit the
My parents have been magic age of 60, people
divorced for seven automatically think of
years and still remain you as being old? I am
good friends. Dad re- 62 years old. I do not
married six years ago act old, and I do not
and is miserable. I dress old.
know because he told But ever since I
me. v1 turned 60, people have
I have evidence that been treating me like I
makes me believe my should be sitting in a
father is having an af- rocking chair waiting
fair with my best to die.
friend's mother (She is ANNIE'S I had a 22-year job
divorced.) I am con- MAILBOX with a large company
vinced he is in love that decided those of


with her. I am not con-
doning his affair, but I want him
to be happy I want him to get out
of his current marriage with
some integrity left.
The only person this is going to
hurt is my stepmom. I don't wish
her ill, but I have seen how un-
happy my father is and have been
hoping for a long time that he
could see his way out of his mis-
ery Should I encourage him to
fight for his happiness? - Dis-
traught Son
Dear Son: We know you love
your father and want him to be
happy, but you truly need to stay
out of this. Too often, well-mean-
ing family and friends get blamed
for whatever happens. You can
tell Dad that he deserves to be
content and you want that for
him. You can also tell him to seek


us with years of expe-
rience should no longer be work-
ing for them. And now it's
impossible to find another posi-
tion.
Companies should not be
afraid to hire older people. We
are good, reliable and responsi-
ble workers. We don't take time
off for maternity leave and are
willing to work long and late
hours.
I have been looking for full-
time employment for more than a
year. I am not ready to retire. I
know how important it is to keep
active at any age, so I've taken a
series of part-time jobs. Please
tell businesses not to be afraid to
hire an older adult. We are will-
ing to give our all for the better-
ment of YOUR company -
Young at Heart


Dear Young at Heart: In most
instances, companies drop older
workers for economic reasons.
However, they lose a great deal
when it comes to experience and
continuity, which can end up
costing more in the long run.
Seniors can find information
on job searches and training at
foundation.aarp.org and through
experienceworks.org (1-866-976-
5939).
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Michigan," who was wor-
ried about her future connection
to her sons after they marry
Please allow me to give her the
advice my father gave to me.
Before I married, my father sat
me down at the kitchen table and
said, "You'll have a couple of
houses, several cars, maybe some
kids and even the possibility of
another wife, but let me tell you
something, boy You're only going
to have one mother. Treat her
well while she's here."
Two years ago, I buried both
parents and have no regrets be-
cause I was there for them. -
Still Miss Them


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of theAnn
Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@ comcastnet,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777
W CenturyBlvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

ETHTE


�2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
SFSYU



ODLRLA



PIMIRA
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iC cu
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- CO

w> -s =>
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wn

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cu)
0 cI
Em o





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CO
CO

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Answer: 111
(Answers Monday)


6-25 � 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


SEE TVIS PILE OF
GRAMPA'S SOCKG?
I'0 LIKE YOUbTO
MATCH O P EACH
SOCK WITTR
ITS MATE.

",, " _ ..


,I :-.a ,,_:-


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser

A 3ELL'Y DONUT, GLA Y 9 | YOU SWORE YOU WERE.
WRNT ABOUT TRE A-ET GOING TO COMAIT ENRY
YOU JUST STARTEt T OF YOUR.
4 WILLPOWER
SO STICKN.I T
/`� TTO f / TO


ANP PEOPLE
THINK IPS
ARE SMEAXK!






L -1


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"I have absolutely no idea what this putrid
stuff is, but you know me. I just hate to see
perfectly bad food go to waste."


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie

MR. B., I CAME TO '- 00BVE?!
SAY GOOYE..
THEY'RE SHIPPING )
S ME OFF 70
SUMMER CAMP...





- - j


THEY GAVE ME NEW
SHOES, CHOPPED MY
4iR, AND TOOK AWAY /
MY I-POO! IT'S LlKE j C l
I SOT DRAFTE"-! 1.- -




-- . . . ^ .^


SUT ISN'T IT JUST DAY CAMP?
WON'T YOU E HOME
FOR DINNER?
DON'T STOP ME,
MR. a...I'M ON A ROLL '
", - -



, _ _-^ _


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"The egg! We had IT for breakfast."


"I CAN SEE WNY \R.WIL60N MARRIED HER."


Doonesbury


APPARNTLFUN PIX I I'M ON COUP ALL 'WILL POST APPROPRIATE
5BEE~ NPIN6 2 UR PA/P OF UL PLEASE PHOTOS SOONEST IN FACT,
'INAPPROPRIATE,' COULP rfF4P" 4! v? V. 'VI "
6ETMFIRRF." ; ..4 _ .
O . . - .'---' ---- .. ThER-

_ YOU HOM -



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L - i -


Big Nate

PRESIDENT OF THE
CONFEDERACY? /
] JEFFERSON DAVIS.
BATTLE OF
ANTIETAM' SEPTEMBER.
Arlo and 1862






Arlo and Janis -


LINCOLN'HSHECRETARY
OF THE NAVY'
SGIDEON WELLES.
PRED SHCOTT
D E C IS H ION[ Z-7
M ARCH (H, 1857-
WHO TOOK ATLANTA'
WILLIAM TECUMSEH
SHERMAN


WHO WASH IMPEACHEDI
IN I18687
ANlDREW JOHNSON.
WHAT FOR?
VIOLATION
OF THE TENURE
OF OFFICE ACT.


I DON'T
EVEN
KNOW (OU E
, OU .. WHEW',
A MORE 0 -R-



ICri. &
^.1^1


Betty








.r , '- ', r - -


Frank & Ernest
Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Cars 2" (G) In Real 3D. 4:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 1:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) 1:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In real 3D. 4 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
9:55 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 1:10 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Cars 2" (G) 11:15 a.m., 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.


"Bad Teacher" (R) ID required. 11:10 a.m., 1:45
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Cars 2" (G) In Real 3D. 10:45 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Mr. Popper's Penguins" (PG) 10:50 a.m., 1:10
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) 11 a.m., 4:40 p.m., 10:25
p.m. No passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In real 3D. 1:40 p.m., 7:40
p.m. No passes.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 10:40 a.m., 1:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"X-MEN: First Class" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 11:20 a.m., 1:50
p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals Y




"GFD GLC XPR TYZTAGTRDO P FTY TG


XPWGF LDWD


GC FTZD XDDA XCWA LPOD


TAY GC FTZD XDDA XCWA PA KCZDWGH."


- OGDZPD


LCAYDW


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There's one major difference between James Bond and me! He
is able to sort out problems!" - Sean Connery
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-25


DOG FOOP?WELL,IT USUALLY
HAS A HEARTY FLAVOR..A
LITTLE SPICY..MAYBE A
TOUCH OF 6AMINES5...


--it^5


FLe5T'S SAY I IAVFTRMUMPIE
, OVER. YSELF-MTcCIPUNF 4!


Today's MOVIES


C8 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


COMICS






CIASSIFIEDS


C CITRUS COUNTY






HRwONiCLE

www.chronicleonline.com


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C9


Classifieds



Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:


MONDAY-FRIDAY

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY




WE GLADLY ACCEPT


I.qs.w. e


ii [, ' I gi




T ADV ERTISECALL


352* * ' *


OR PLAC OR DOLIEA


Publication Days/Deadlines


Chronicle / Daily...................................... PM, Daily

Homefront / Sunday.............................. 3 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Sunday...........................4....4 PM, Friday

Chronicle / Monday..........................4....4 PM, Friday

Sumter County Times / Thursday............... 11 AM, Tuesday

Riverland News / Thursday...............2....2 PM, Monday

South Marion Citizen / Friday................. 4 PM, Tuesday

West Marion Messenger / Wednesday....... 4 PM, Friday


Good active man
would like to meet
good active, mature
woman for friendship.
(over 50 years old)
Call (352) 527-0054
HANDSOME Widower in
decent shape seeks to
meet fun, loving,
intelligent, socially
extroverted woman in
her 60's or 70's with a
sweet, warm,
humorous personality
in good health,
petite or slim shape
for meaningful
conversation & other
social activities &
perhaps a personal
loving relationship
(352) 527-0591
Sincere, loving, caring
woman needed to care
for children & elderly
woman, app. 4 to 5
hours a week to start.
References Required
Linda at 352-400-9416
or Maria at 400-9417.



2 WHITE WASHED
BOOKCASES
12' Deep, 80" High,
24" wide, $30. ea.
(352) 637-2254
5,000 watt Coleman
generator, new, never
used, $450.
(352) 400-8662
Banjo
$40.
(352) 637-2254
BEVERLY HILLS
Renovated 2/1, $33K
cash or terms $365. or
Rent $525.352-422-2433
Cit. Spas. & Homosassa
Homes for Sale or Rent
Will Finance * Also
RMS. FOR RENT $135 wk
(352) 422-1284


CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440


2/1, DW, Remodeled,
$550. mo 352-795-0898
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse,
1200 Sq. Ft., Hwy 44.
$600/mo+ 1 mo. sec.
352-628-6764, 220-0488
Dining Room Table
2 leaves, 6 fabric chairs
and China Cabinet
dark wood
$725.
(352) 527-8766
ELECTRIC STOVE
WHITE, GE PROFILE
W/CONVECTION OVEN
$325.00. MICROWAVE
CONVECTION ABOVE
THE RANGE OVEN
WHITE $125.00 OR
BOTH FOR $400.00
352-527-4319
MUSTANG RIMS
Set of 4 18" x 18.5", fits
2005 - 2011, polished
alum., like new, asking
$1,000 OBO
(352) 795-0558
Really In Need of
FREE OVEN Badly,
Disabled Child
(352) 397-1511
Schwinn Airdyne
$120 cash
(352) 382-7037



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE JUNK PICK UP
Appliances, Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Autos,
352-224-0698
SERVICE (YOUR DOG)
EVALUATION - FREE
Veteran discount
352-464-0779



2 Bunnies
1 black & white
1 white
free to good home
cage, food and water
bottles. (352) 464-2967
2 male Sugargliders
with cage to experi-
ence/knowledgeable
home
(352) 628-1277
FIREWOOD
U-Cut & Haul
(352) 628-9566
Free 8 Year Old
Quarter Horse/
Mustang Mix Stallion
(352) 457-9030
Free Dog Male
Australian Shepherd
Mix, Loves children,
must be in family
with children
(352) 302-8095
Free Horse Manure
bring your bucket or your
truck, great for gardens
or compost.
352-344-2321


FREE KITTENS
3 females, 1 male
litter trained,
eat solid food.
(352) 447-0072
FREE Kittens
Multi- Colors
(352) 270-4774
FREE KITTENS
To good home
(352) 527-8619
FREE Male Black Lab
3 yrs old 100 pounds
great w/kids & other
pets.
9 English Bull Mastodor
pups M & F 8wks old
good homes onlv
great watch doas
aood hog doa
(352) 726-6234
Free to good home
large, neutered, mixed
dog needs room to run,
good with other dogs.
352-364-1771
Free to Good Home
White German
Shepherd
6 months old
Female, Spayed
(352) 634-5129
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
KITTENS (2)
Males, 8 wks old, 1
red/white and 1
gray/white, litter
box/house trained,
good with dogs
and other cats.
(352)201-4217
Mobile Home
8 ft x 40 ft. Must take in
one piece, good for
scrap, hunt camp
(352) 476-1023
Need clean dirt
concrete, blocks ,etc
to fill in pool
Carl (352) 400-6021
PUPPIES
2 females, 1 male mix
breed, 8 wkS old.
Call for details.
(352) 634-2781
Rich Black Top Soil
You Dig
(352) 621-3135
TABLE
Two drawers
FREE! 341-4449
Tuxedo Cat
Free to a good home,
beautiful, spayed, litter
trained and declawed,
Female 353-572-8832
White Dove Bird with
black ring around neck
needs home,
cant take care of any
(352) 419-6838



SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E.
on Eden Dr. from Hwy.
41, Inverness
WATERMELON,
SHELLED PEAS
8:30a-6p
352-726-6378
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
$2.75/Ilb. Pesticide Free!
Open Saturday Only
7a-7p (352) 746-2511
4752 W. Abeline Dr.
Citrus Springs
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
Pesticide Free! $2.50/lb.
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm.
(352) 726-7907


Cat male
nuet. area of Pine
Ridge. REWARD
(352) 746-2746
Chihuahua
Small, Brown, in Lecanto
area, children are heart
broken, please call
364-1719 if found.
REWARD!!
Lost Dachshund,
1 yr. male, chocolate
w/ white dapple,
Chassahowitzka Area
$50. REWARD
(352) 613-6872
Pit Bull
Female light brown
last seen 6/15 in Citrus
Springs (352) 470-7663



19FT Skiff style boat
found by boatramp at
Days Inn canal, Crystal
River, on Sept. 18, 2010,
If this is yours please
contact 352-447-2692,
ext. 304.
Australian Cattle Dog
male blk/brn, 6-9
months old, found 6/17
on New Florida & S
Jackson Bev Hills
(352) 746-7823
352-270-0816
Shih-tzu
black & white female
New York St In
BeverlY Hills 6/20/11
(352) 697-2155



--- --- q
r BANKRUPTCY
DIVORCES I
CHILD SUPPORT
* 352-613-3674 *

LEARN TO SEW I
I furnish everything!
My home or yours
(352) 795-7206, Mary



CRYPT (Fl)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$4000. 586-596-7580



TEACHER'S

Exp. Cert F/T & P/T
& self motivated only
to need apply.
Citrus Chronicle
Blind Box 1720p
106 W. Main St
Inverness FIl34428




CARDIOLOGY
PRACTICE
Exp. Receptionist
Mon-Thurs 9-4
Fri9-12
Email resume to:
cvsllc 10@gmall.com










Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

CARE GIVERS
NEEDED
Needs Med Tech
CROWN COURT
352-344-5555

Crystal River Health
& Rehab Center
136 NO.E. 12th Ave
352-795-5044
accepting
applications for
R.N. & L.P.N.
Full-time and
Part-time for
3pm-1 1pm &
1 1lpm-7am
If you are a team
playerhave
Experience in Long
Term Care,
Short - Term Care
COME BY FOR A TOUR
Excellent pay, benefit
package........


A[CNAPREP&
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

DIETARY
DEPARTMENT
Is looking for a few
serious minded, hard
working, dependable
people. Must be able
to work flexible hrs.
Drug free facility,
prior criminal
background need
not apply
Apply in Person
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE

INVERNESS MEDICAL
FT Positions
Available!
Full-time positions
available in busy,
growing cardiology
practice for
EXPERIENCED billing/
collections, front desk
and MA's. Profes-
sional attitude and
appearance is a
must. Excellent
compensation
package including
full benefit pack-
age-cardiac experi-
ence commands a
premium wage!
No weekends!
Apply in person only
to Citrus Cardiology:
308 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness.
References required,
DFWP, and
applications without
verifiable experience
will not be accepted.

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospltal
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828




Busy Insurance
Office
Looking for an exp.
agent with active
220 license. Salary
commiserates
w/experience.
Send resume to
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd Blind Box 1721p
Crystal River, Florida
34429 1


P/T COMPUTER
TEACHER
1st-8th grd, 25 hrs wkly.
Must be able to teach
basic computer skills,
key boarding, Microsoft
Office Word, Power
Point & Excel. Send
resume to: mspeters@
pjp2.net or fax to:
352-746-3448




AUTO SALES
Join a Winning Team!
We're Looking for
Used Car
Sales Professionals
Experienced
Preferred But Not
Necessary. Build Your
Future in a Great
Career. Excellent
Income Potential,
Health, Dental &
Vision Ins. Pkg., 401K,
Paid Vacation &
More! Dress
Professionally.
Apply in Person to
Ron or Dave
JENKINS ACURA
St. Rd. 200 & 17th St.,
Ocala

OUTSIDE SALES
REP
Business to Business
Sales Must Have Sales
Experience.
Experience In The
Waste Industry
Considered a Plus
but not required.
Mail Resume to
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906
Hernando, Fl 34442
Attention: William
or Email to
fdsdisposalinc@
aol.com
Do NOT
Apply in Person
& NO Phone Calls
Will Be Accepted




Avante
At Inverness
is seeking a qualified
individual for our
Maintenance/
Environment
Supervisor.
Must have a
minimum of 2 years
experience in Long
Term Care.
Electrical, Heating,
Air conditioning ex-
perience along with
knowledge of build-
ing and fire codes.
Send resume to
Mark Daniels
Administator
304 South Citrus Ave.
Inverness Fl. 34452
Or Email: mdaniels
@avantecenters.com

ee************
Exp. ELECTRICIAN
for residential & light
commercial, taking
applications 9-11 a
Mon - Fri/ S&S
Electric Dunnellon
(352) 746-6825
352-489-4116


PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL wants
exp. tech $9hr.+comm
Apply 5882 Hwy 200




* Tire/Lube Tech
* Detailer
* & Office Help
(352) 726-3539

Maintenance
Technician
Immediate opening
for a full time
Maintenance Tech
at a local apartment
community. Need
motivated individual
with previous
experience in
general mainte-
nance- plumbing,
sheetrock, electrical
and carpentry. Must
have valid drivers
license.
Drug free workplace
and EOE
Competitive salary
and benefits package
offered
Send resumes to:
humanresources@
roval-american.com or
fax (850) 914-8410

P/T Clerk-
Inverness Store
Retail experience
strongly preferred.
Must be able to work
in outside conditions
unloading & sorting
donated items.
Flexible schedule,
weekends.
Apply in person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL
*"EOE*"

v' THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE.
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential for
the right person to
manage a route of
newspaper racks and
stores. Must have two
vehicles and be able
to work early morning
hours.
Email
emorales@chronicleonli
ne.comor come to
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/ svc, will train,
cond apply, all ages
17+, Call ASAP!
352-364-4121


Cleaners/evenings
(Retirees Welcome)
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555 E.O.E





#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)





-- - - -- Eug

NActNOW

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy
* NOW ENROLLING*
SPRING HILL
COSMO - Days
June 27th
COSMO - Nights
June 27th, Sept 19th
BARBERING - Nights
Aug. 8,
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
FACIAL TECH -Days

NAIL TECH - Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.

1 (866) 724-2363
1486 Plnehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606


NE6R EW

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
-MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105










ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
* Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebo
All for just $295. mo.
PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces
Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals
a, Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park

REALTOR ONE LLC
" Coin Laundry, $75.K
w* Bait & Tackle $599.K
More Info 352-229-5273
or: realtoronellc.com



Make Money
From Home
PT or FT 10 yrs in busi-
ness & stock traded.
Over 3,000 contractual
agreements w/ biggest
retailers, turn $50 mo.
into Thousands Call for
Appt. 1-800-603-9840


~XXX3~'


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


765 891 2 3 4
43 8276 1955
2 19 5 3 4 678
915163 18-41217

12131 6' 4'7 1 19
174 <925 8653
64 1753982
3 8 2 4 6 9 7 5 1
597182 346


0008C3J

Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

7 8 2


4 6 95


1 3


56 18





92 86


5 8


38 4 1


7 2 6

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


HOW ABOUT SOME




EXTRA




CASH!







CIO SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


BOYD'S BEARS
18 TTL, Orig Bxs, 5
Spcl Ed 1998-03, 13
W/Auth, 5 W/IO. EXC
Cond. $100 746-7355
BULL WHIPS (2)
Hand made by a Prem-
ier World Whip maker.
$65 each, firm.
John (352) 726-1076


DALE EARNHARDT
Authentic 124 scale
cars, 164 scale cars.
$80/obo. (352)
503-7131; 212-6627

Native American High
Quality Collection
all hand made pieces,
sell as a group, $500
firm. Call for info, seri-
ous callers only.
John (352) 726-1076

TONY STEWART
SIGNED ITEM
Cardboard, Lifesize
Standup. $100.00 Firm
352-228-0826


2 Window
Air Conditioners
12,000 BTU, $75.
$7,000 BTU $50.
(352) 726-9647


ELECTRIC STOVE
WHITE, GE PROFILE
W/CONVECTION OVEN
$325.00. MICROWAVE
CONVECTION ABOVE
THE RANGE OVEN
WHITE $125.00 OR
BOTH FOR $400.00
352-527-4319


I Appianc


CHEST FREEZER
Chest Freezer,
Excellent condition,
$95.00 352-726-2278
FRIGIDAIRE
Refrig. side by side
Ice & water in door
Black & stainless steel
$350 obo352- 794-3685
352-228-1445

HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914


CLASSIFIEDS



GE 22 Cu. Ft.
Upright Freezer
white, excel. cond.
$250.
(352) 382-4615
KENMORE Elite
White Washer &
White Whirlpool
dryer $300
(352) 382-1756
Maytag Kitchen
Appliances, 6 years old
Refrig. side by side,
glass top self cleaning
Stove, under counter
Dish Wash., Microwave
Almond $825. or will
separate (646)584-2740


KENMORE WASHER
white, good cond.
works great 100.00
o.b.o call dennis @
352-503-7365
PRESSURE COOKER
Mirro, clean, used once,
taking up storage, $11.00
270-8783
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers, FREE pick up
352-564-8179
SOLD!
MICROWAVE GE Table
Top,1100 Watts, 1.9 Sq
Ft.Turn Table. Used
lightly for 6 mo.
Like New. $50.00


WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135

WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent cond. Can
deliver 352-263-7398





PLASTIC WELDER
(Prota Welder) - Used
primarily in the marine
industry. $600
(352) 503-2774


RYOBI ROUTER
5 new cutters
Model #P161
$50 (352) 503-2774


SOLD!
STIHL HS 75, 18 IN.
HEDGE TRIMMER
Needs tune up & oiling.
Not used for 7 years
$75.00


STIHL CHAIN SAW
14" model MS180C.
New condition, used
once. $175
(352) 270-1366


trwicns Drec


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.
Attention Consumers
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

./THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In I x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825
TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696


A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705

Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779

DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435




SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273



*******
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lie/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs .352 613-2518





Certified & Experi-
enced Nurse's Aid
(HAA) seeking em-
ployment. Can live in.
Call Valerie at:
(786) 879-2962 or
(352) 249-7919

Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Children
Any hrs., exc ref's
cell 850-242-9343
Local 352 341-0404

WE HAVE BATTERIES
Laptop, UPS, cell,
Hearing Aid, pwr
tools Camera




ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174
NANCY'S CLEANING
"A Touch of Class"
Full Line of Services
(352)345-9738,794-6311




Entertainment Centers
furn. vanities,cabinets
Top Quality reasonable
352 726-5832/212-3532


Ron's Affordable

Handyman Services

S** ALL Home
Repairs
* Small Carpentry
* Fencing
* Screening

, Affordable & Dependable
Experience lifelong
* 352-344-0905
t ell: 400-1722


ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129








Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300






Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 850-201-7451




1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Steve 352-476-2285
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129


I66OOLS/PA I


.... -J.LJ JAiJ



VACA11ON IN *Pool
Y Refinishing
YOUR OWN I "
BACKYARD... * Iew ys
* Inmerlocking
Order Nour Pool Today Brick P3vers
Weekly
Pool Serice
Lic.& Insured
CPC 1456565


- ' 352-400-3388


All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777






L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up,
hauling352 220-6761


A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *



Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc 132549 302-9269



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers.
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838


Installations hBrianR -.....
,FREEPermitAnd "
E Engineering Fees
'FSk Up to $200 value I




Siding SoffitFascia-Skirting*Roofovers*Carports
Screen Rooms*Decks-Windows*Doors*Additions
c352-62-7519 t


Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325




All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436
Mobile Home
Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733




Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374
LEE RIVENBARK
Lawn Care*Landscape
Tree Care. Receive 10%
off * (352) 464-3566 *




A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do If All!!!
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
L& J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal,cleanup,haul.
(352) 726-9570


LEE RIVENBARK
Lawn Care*Landscape
Tree Care. Recieve 10%
off *(352) 464-3566 *
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935




344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190


CODE VIOLATIONS
We'll help! Fix up, Clean
up, Mowing. Free est.
lic/ins. (352) 795-9522




SECURITY CAMERAS
Home theatres, TV wall
mounts. 13 yrs. exp.
ultimate-visions.com
Free Est 352-503-7464




ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998

* . 7


Owner/Manager Name:
James B. Goerndt
Business Name:
A Whole Hauling & Tree Service
How long has the business been in
operation in the Citrus County area?
6 years Tree Service, 10 years Taxidermy
Describe the servicelproduct you offer?
Complete tree service, palms, lawn service, debris
hauling, garage clean-outs, free recyclable
removal, pressure washing, juggler, taxidermist -
real skin mounts and fiberglass fish reproduction.
What do your customers like best about
your business?
Excellent cleanup, prompt service with appointments
being kept. License and insured. Professional tree
climber. Free estimates and flexible prices.
What is something your business offers that
people don't expect?
Trained arborist, horticulturist & landscaper on
staff. Retired Tampa Firefighter/Paramedic and a
Christian. Firewood, dump trailer drop-off
service, handyman, painting, etc.
Why did you choose this business?
General community and neighborhood
beautification. Eco-friendly - better than organic
soil decontamination and restoration with
anaerobic microbes for gardens.
What are your business hours, address,
phone number and e-mail?
Available 24 hours, 7 days a week with appointment
2016 S. Prism Pt., Homosassa, FL 34448
352-697-1421
Email: jgoerndt@gmail.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0008DOV


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$250 for 30 days


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FOR MORE INFO CONTACT GALE RANDALL.352- 563-3266


20' TV w/ VCR,
Rewinder, digital to
analog converter & 42
VCR movies
All For $55.
(352) 726-0931

PANASONIC 5 DVD
DISC HOME THEATER
1000 WATT SURROUND
SOUND, 1 YEAR OLD
$100.00 352-726-0686

Sharp 32" tube TV with
stand, $85 or best offer
(352) 344-4978
400-8193
Call after 10am


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
KITCHEN CABINETS
Complete 8' galley.
Counter top w/sink & fau-
cet. $100 527-1239
Florida WINDOWS
(2)6X6 sq. windows
(3) 4x5 sq windows,
(1)38x80 $800 OBO
(352) 794-3081
SLIDING GLASS
SHOWER DOORS
Chrome trim, 5'7.5"H x
5'1" W. $50
(352) 382-3202
WOOD LAMINATE
FLOORING
1 box, never used, me-
dium Oakcolor. $10
352-201-2665




Compaq Presario
100 gb, Computer
Monitor, keyboard,
mouse, printer, 3 new
ink cartridges, Desk &
Chair All For $130.
(352) 726-0931
COMPUTER MONITOR
Envision, 17" LCD Moni-
tor. PD. $200 For Sale
$50.00. Call
352-344-4357
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
GAME BOY
kids, good condition
$20.00 341-4449
Scanner Microsoft new
with PS & CD $20.
(352) 382-3357
WIRELESS ROUTER, by
D-link Like New Includes
stand & install CD $15
Great for home or office
352-382-3650




Jon Deere Tractor
Brand New, 15hrs.
JDLA115 19.5HP,
42 Hyrdo $1,600.
352-382-3663




2 WHITE WASHED
BOOKCASES
12' Deep, 80" High,
24" wide, $30. ea.
(352) 637-2254
3 Piece Light Wood
Glass Top Tables. 2 end
and I coffee. $150
(352) 560-7386
4 PIECE light blue floral
king hide-a-bed sofa,
loveseat, chair,
hassock & 4 pillows.
$400 (352) 560-7386
4 Poster Double Bed
& night stand,
$150.
(352) 637-4690
42" ROUND SOLID Oak
Table. Natural finish.
Like new. $200
(352) 382-5883
70" La-Z-Boy double
sofa sleeper, like new,
$175 obo48" round
kitchen table, 4 chairs,
$100obo Call after 10a
344-4978,400-8193
ANTIQUE DRY SINK
Very good condition $25
352-419-5830
Armoir
(Drexel Studio)
Excellent condition,
$400 (352) 364-1725
BAR STOOLS (2)
Wooden Bar Stools, Dark
Wood, Leather Seat. $50
for both 352-419-5830
Bar Stools
PLUSH, BAMBOO,
SALMON COLORED
CUSHIONED, 2 for
$80.00 464-0316
BEAUTIFUL QUEEN SIZE
Mattress - used 3
months. $75 paid $400
(352) 201-5789
BED
king sized, bed mattress
and box springs, $75
352-364-1771
Brass Day Bed
Ceramic Decorative
Bedpost
Excel. Cond. $75.
(352) 465-0339
BREAKFAST TABLE
Light Oak breakfast table,
$45. Like new. Exc. con-
dition Call 352-344-4357
CHAIR Burgundy with
gold diamonds, comfy,
$50 (404)416-9362
COFFEE & END TA-
BLES SET W/ LAMPS
sturdy,dark color. Can
EM pix $99.OBO
560-7857
COFFEE TABLE & TWO
END TABLES, Wooden,
glass top cofee and end
tables, $20.00 @, $50.00
all 352 634-0591
College Deal
country plaid, sleeper
sofa matching love
seat, dining rm table
78" L 6 chairs 42" w.
entertainment center
$375(352) 270-3613
COMPUTER DESK good
condition, cabinet and
drawer, $35
(404)416-9362

CRYSTAL RIVER
LAST DAY!
Nature Coast Ministry
GROWING & MOVING
INDOOR YARD SALE

Small Plastic..........$3.
Large Grocery......$5.
50% OFF
* ENTIRE STORE*
1492 Meadowcrest
Blvd. 44 E. bldg
behind SunTrust Bk
Saturday 9a-3p
Phone (352) 563-1860
VOLUNTEERS &
DONATIONS NEEDED

Curio Cabinet,
4 glass shelves,
Light up , $100
(352) 795-4596


DINETTE SET, Block
Iron Leg Dinette Set with
Light Wood Table Top
with 6 Golden, Cushioned
Chairs. 352-628-7192
DINING PEDESTAL TA-
BLE & 4 CHAIRS, very
nice, dark wood, 45"
diameter, $55.00
352-344-2321
Dining Room Set
Henredon, solid ash,
clean lines, beautiful,
large table w/6 chairs,
and China cab. $1,500
(352) 304-6293
Dining Room Table
2 leaves, 6 fabric chairs
and China Cabinet
dark wood
$725.
(352) 527-8766
Dining Room Table
5.5', tile table top, all
wood, great shape.
$100 (352) 364-1725


Maple Chairs, $15 for
both 352-419-5830
DINING TABLE W/4
CHAIRS & BENCH
Cherry top & seats
w/black legs, Exc. cond.
$100 firm 563-1615
DOUBLE BED
good condition
$50.00 341-4449
DRESSER
Hi Boy Dresser, Dark
wood color. $25
352-419-5830
END TABLES (2)
Glass Top End Tables
$25 for both.
352-628-9590
Entertainment Center
w/ lighted curio
excel. cond., med. oak
$250.
352-598-5242
Entertainment Center
with 36" TV
2 glass doors, both
in excellent cond. $400
(352) 364-1725
FLORIDA ROOM TABLE
& 4 ROLLING,
CUSHIONED CHAIRS
$75.00 464-0316
KITCHEN CORNER
CABINET
DARK WOOD $20.00
352-344-2321
Large Solid Oak
Roll Top Desk,
30"x 52"
$400.
(352) 637-4690
LIFT CHAIR RECLINER
Brand new. Only used
two weeks. Perfect condi-
tion. Purchased from
Quality Mobility in Crystal
River. Cost $800, selling
for $350. Located in
Sugarmill Woods. Call
Jim at 410-504-2860
MICROWAVE CART
with wheels, White, sell
for $30.00, phone
352-344-3472
OAK HUTCH
w/matching dinette
tab,4 chs. $350.
Q. hdbd solid oak,
mattress/frame $75.
(352) 220-8211
OVER STUFFED
ROCKER/RECLINER
.Tan sell for
$40.00.ca11l352-344-3472
Pinewood table
w/ 4 chairs $85.
dark hard wood table
w/6 barrels chairs $115
no call before noon
(352) 628-4766
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER
clean, used, Green in
color-$50.00
352-257-5722 for details
ROCKER RECLINER
Tan in color. New
$100.00 352-419-5830
SOFA blue, cream and
mauve floral pattern;
good condition & sturdy;
$35 352-726-2872
SOFA Burgundy and
gold, very comfortable w/
throw pillows, great condi-
tion, $100 (404)416-9362
SOFA
clean, used, traditional
style-$100.00
352-257-5722 for details
SOLD
BROYHILL RECLINER
Like New! Tan, Navy,
Burgundy and Green
plaid. Asking $95.00
Table
w/4 chairs,
china cabinet
$300.
(352) 489-1980
Table, solid oak, 48"
round, built in 24" leaf,
exc. cond. $250.
(352) 637-3232
TV STAND
Oak Stand. With Glass
Doors. $25 352-419-5830
TWIN BED
Drawers under boxspring
and Sealy Mattress. $75
352-419-5830
TWIN XL MATTRESS
SET, Very clean-$75.00
352-257-5722 for details.
WATERBED
New, Queen sized,all
accessories included,
no frame, paid $169,
asking $100.
(352) 746-4874
White King size bed
headboard footbd
mattress box springs
like new $400. pd new
$1700 (352) 637-6108
WHITE OAK HUTCH
Glass drs top, bottom
Irge storage w/doors.
20" x 7' wood cabinet
w/4 shelves. $75/both
(352) 628-0173



AGRI-FAB 42' LAWN
SWEEPER -Tow behind.
Great condition.
$175. (352) 270-1366
CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Great for your garden,
yard, plants! 201b bag
$4.00 352-563-1519
CRAFTSMAN
2.5 hp gas engine
Edger ,runs good $50.
(352) 465-0721
Craftsman Riding
Lawn mower
42" deck
15.5 hp $400
(352) 746-7357.
GREEN HOUSE
30x50 w/approx. 700
orchids, you dismantle
$1500 firm!!!
(352) 563-0129
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, $2800.
352-527-4114
352-445-9901
IN-GROUND YARD
POND, Approx. 3'x5'
Came w/house I bought.
You remove. $35.00
352-382-1000
LAWN TRACTOR
38" Yard Machine used
only 50 hours, looks like
new, must be seen


$550. Steve (352)
794-4118 lye message
RYOBI TRIMMER
W/ATTACH, Saw, edger,
etc. $75, Good cond.
Dunnellon 352-4654441











CHASSA-

HOWITZKA
Sat. 8a-5p 3 Family Sale
2dryers, clothing, stereo
books, and more
7495 Miss Maggie Dr.
V2 mi. off 19


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. & Sat. 8am- Until
ESTATE SALE Contents
of home. Inside & Out!
1 Beverly Hills Blvd



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri Sat Sun 7a-2p
Indoor yard sale
Rain or Shine
439 Country Club Dr

CRYSTAL RIVER
LAST DAY!
Nature Coast Ministry
GROWING & MOVING
INDOOR YARD SALE
"STUFF A BAG"
Small Plastic..........$3.
Large Grocery......$5.
50% OFF
* ENTIRE STORE*
1492 Meadowcrest
Blvd. 44 E. bldg
behind SunTrust Bk
Saturday 9a-3p
Phone (352) 563-1860
VOLUNTEERS &
DONATIONS NEEDED



SALE

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat 7:30a to 1:30m
Evervthina must Go!
6055 W. Woodside Cir


YARD SALE

CRYSTAL

RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 8am-3pm
Tools, play station
games, Lots more!
1215 N Merlin Terr.
off HWY 44





HERNANDO
Fri Sat 8am til ?
little of everything
2662 N.
Reston Terr



HOMOSASSA
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tues
8am -5pm
3496 S.Lee Way
No Early Birds
INVERNESS
8948 E Executive Loop
HUGH MOVING SALE
Tons of boys & Ladies
Clothes, Furniture, Toys,
Appliances & Misc. All
Good Quality







INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8A./2P.
Househld, Craft supply
furn., stereos, comics
collectibles, tools, DVDs
4085 S. Big Al Point

MOVING
LS.- .E
SARLE

INVERNESS
Sunday 26th, 8am
Buildable Lot, furniture,
appl's, tools, collecti-
bles, electronics, baby
items & much more!
Everything Must Go!
959 S. Arlene Ave.

YARDSALE
KEEPIT SAFE
Fri. & Sat. 8-12 Furniture
5050 W. Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Crystal River

YARD SALE
LECANTO
4477 W. Sandy Hill St
Saturday, June 25th from
8:00am to 4:00pm. An-
tique Furniture, costume
jewelry, entertainment
center, bedroom furni-
ture, bowflex and other
exercise equipment,
framed artwork, band
saw, sound equipment,
baby items, general
household items and
clothes.
PINE RIDGE
ESTATE SALE!! 3780 W
COGWOOD CIRCLE.
TOOLS, FURNITURE,
ELECTRONICS AND
MUCH MORE!
FRI & SAT 8 TO 2.



Cowboy brown boots
like new size 10 $25.
Cowboy hat brown
size 7.5 $10.call aft
6pm (352) 382-3357
MINK STOLE VINTAGE
1950'S Classy looking
pc of apparel for any
function. Exc Cond. $75
OBO 746-7355



(2) VERY NICE
SUITCASES - 1 LARGE - 1
MEDIUM. $20
(352) 628-1723
5,000 watt Coleman
generator, new, never
used, $450.
(352) 400-8662
1940's & 50's Big Bands
& voacialist on records
& tapes $5. ea. A-I
cond. call after 6pm
(352) 382-3357
CARDS (100)
Sports and non-sports
cards. $1.00 each.
352-453-6668
COMFORTER, w/skirt,


2 shams,3 throw
pillows.King,dark sage
w/multi patches. Exc
cond $50 563-1615
Deluxe Foot Bath
heater & massager etc.
excellent cond. $20.
(352) 382-3357
call after 6pm
Dress Form
$25.
(352) 637-2254
Grandfather Clocks
For Sale
$250.
(352) 726-3217
KING COMFORTER
w/2 shams & skirt.
BH&G white w/lIt sage
skirt &trim w/pink flowers.
New $60 563-1615
KING PATCH WORK
QUILT, JCP, beige
w/multi pattern,It weight.
Never used $40
563-1615


�-
10 pc. Antique Din. Rm.
Set., Sectional Sofa,
Coffee & 2 end table
Set, 25" Television, 2 bi-
cycles, porcelain dolls,
33 rpm record albums,
& MORE! 352-382-3227
POOL 24' Round
above ground, 3 yrs old
new filter pump good
cond many xtra's,
you remove $1000.
(727) 644-0157
PROPANE FURNACE
MOBILE HOME
Exc Cond 45000BTU
Model #migh05ga aw
$300(352) 563-1855



FREE!
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.

- Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
- 1 item per ad
-Ad must contain price
- $3.25 per additional line

Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



SOLD!
MOTOR OIL CASTROL
GTX 5W-30, 6 QTS -
$15.00
SUPPORT BAR (2)
SHOWER OR TUB
white, $5.00 each
352-344-2321



FILE CABINETS 5
drawer legal size $50
each 352-726-0258



Affordable, Lift Chair,
Recliner, for handi-
capped or elderly
person, will stand you
up or sit and lay you
down. excel. cond.
$325. (352) 270-8475
ALUMINUM WALKER
FOLDS UP FOR
TRANSPORT, $20.00
464-0316
MEDICINE CABINET
BROAN, METRO DE-
LUXE new, still in box,
lists for $300. Sell for
$90. 344-2321
TOILET SEAT EXTEN-
SION, 4" HIGHER
$25.00464-0316









BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" STRING
BANJO OPENBACK,
NICE MAHOGONY FIN-
ISH, READY TO PLAY!
$100 352-601-6625
Banjo
$40.
(352) 637-2254
IBANEZ ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/TUNER,GIGBAG+
MUCH MORE! $100
352-601-6625
LEARN PIANO! CASIO
LK100 KEYBOARD
W/ONBOARD LESSONS
& STAND $65
352-601-6625



CROWN MOLDING
*New* Fancy Wide De-
sign, 25 ft & 2 corners
$40 352-382-3650
LIGHT FOR CEILING
FAN Designer Brass and
Glass, 5 bulb Email pic
$30 MUST SEE
352-382-3650
VEGETABLE BIN
Dark Walnut Bin. $20
352-419-5830



$165.00 GIFT CERTIFI-
CATE FOR DYNABODY
GYM-Membership-
Trainer-Tanning-Massage
$100.00 Mike 586-7222
Gym Quality Exercise
Bike, hard or easy work
out programs, all digital
even works the arms
$175(352)464-0316
Schwinn Airdyne
$120 cash
(352) 382-7037
TREADMILL, ALL ELEC-
TRONICS LIGHT UP 1
problem needs fuse or
something else $50.00
OBO 464-0316



12 gauge Beretta
shot gun Model A-390ST
28" barrel, 3 choke
tubes, 1 turkey choke
tube, engraved re-
ceiver, gold trigger
$450.(352) 465-2867
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM

FEG PA-63 (9X18) PIS-
TOL, This is a complete
package deal: Pistol, Hol-


ster, 2 extra Mags and 3
bxs of Russian Ammo,
$300 FIRM, Ask for
Randy :563-1509, A great
Concealed carry Pistol
INLINE SPEED SKATES
Great, Asking for $100.
Great performing skates.
Call for more info
352-341-4449
Ladies Golf Clubs
Patty Berg Irons $50.
Golf shoes white, new
$55.(352) 382-3357
call after 6pm
Olympic Arms
AR15.. $733.00
Shiappa Rhino 357
mag $719.00
(352) 447-5595
SOLD!!
FISHING ROD HOLDER
Wood-Light Walnut,
20 rod holder slots,
360 Swivel,
Good Cond. $35.00


CLASSIFIED



-V
Body Guard 380
w/trac $390.00
(352) 447-5595
Three Wheel
Adult Bike.
Custom-modified
24" wheels,
plus I carrier
basket.
Absolute mint
cond. $250.
352-419-6798

SWE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




15' Utility Trailer
2 axles, $300.
269-252-9134
GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
HEAVY DUTY
UTITLIY TRAILER
Dual axle, diamond
platted metal.
$1300/obo. (352)
794-3081; 228-2324



BABY ITEMS baby swing
$10, girl baby bouncer $
5, girl baby clothes
nb-3mo $.25-$3,
352-364-1771


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










Want to Buy
Nice Clean DW $35k &
under, 3/2 on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 828-728-4834
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED VIDEO
GAMES COLLECTION.
LRG. OR SMALL. FOR


Australian Shepherd
Tri color male, 2 yrs. old
have all papers, great
family dog, needs
fenced yd. and some-
one to play with. $200
firm (352) 726-2023
BIRDS One Scarlett Ma-
Caw and One Congo Af-
rican Gray. 800.00 each
with cages 352464-3314
Breeding Pair
Rottweilers
Female in Heat
$400 pair
(352) 341-0934



English Bull Dog
Puppies I male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com
Mini Dachshund
Long Hair Pup
Champion blood lines
Female blk & tan $400
(352) 795-6870;
220-4792
Parrotts, MaCaws, twin
males, with cages, $800
each. Chain link
10xOx 10 cage, $999
(352) 726-8177
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
many avail Blk/whi. M
$400 BIk/whi Fem. $450
Appts avail 7 days a
wk. Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Shi-A-Poo & Toy Poodle
Female $250 Male $200
CKC registered. 8 wks
HIth Cert., Paper
trained, great with kids
(352) 489-6675



ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will e-mail
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AA^^AAAAAA


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
Crystal River
2/1, $515 incls W/Sew/
trash 352-584-3348
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, DW, Remodeled,
$550. mo 352-795-0898
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 2/1, close to
everything. $500. +
Sec. (352) 446-8810
352-446-9701
DUNNELLON
2/1,$500 mo st& $200
Sec. 352-625-4339
DUNNELLON
2br,1.5 bath.nr Citrus
Spgs$550.
Clean,bright,quiet.Available
now 352-603-0024
FLORAL CITY
2/1, $450 no pets.
(352) 201-0714
HERNANDO/INV.
Nice 2/1, lease, no pets
Water. lncl'd.$425.mo
$425 sec. 352-726-7319
HOMOSASSA 1 /2
Bd $330mo. 2bd $450
Crystal RIv. waterfrt 3bd
$680. 352-422-1932
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3/2 DW $650 + sec 352
503-6747(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA 3/2
DWMH No pets $625 mo
$600.sec. 352-613-1921
INVERNESS 2/1
Plus in-law apt. $400.
Ist/Ist/sec . No pets
(352) 419-7228
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964



W X IM



ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
, Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals
or Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park






3/2,2 Acres, fenced,
Homosassa
Owner Financing
(352) 302-9217
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport, utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040







ONLY 5 FREE

, Free $300. Home
Depot glft card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse

w/ hammocks
and azebos
All for just $295. mo.
PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
&RVSpaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals

or Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759

auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park

PALM HARBOR
HOMES
has closed 2 model
centers Save up to
$60K on selectmodels


I (813) 719-3335

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183




BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 CLL

.1


"We believe the guy who ran off with your

wallet is probably an Olympic medalist."









JOHN GORDON ROOFING


V & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269 ' |
99 * Jo 9- ,, 9 6


A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801
FLORAL CITY
2 Master BR 14x66'
3 lots/park/RV
sheds garwell/septic
Priv Financ w/$12K dn.
Cridland Real Living.
Jackie 352-201-5201
HERNANDO/Ap. Shores
4552 N. Pine Dr., Handy
person special 75x100
lot, on dead-end quiet
street, $8,000 Appt.
only (502) 330-0260
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204




DW, fecnced a /2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms, nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411

LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807
SMALL FARMS
MORRISTON
READ THIS ONLY
If you are you
interested in 2.67 acres,
keep horses, fenced,
spotless 3/2 furn'd 2001
MH, out bldg w/elect.
$80K, Owner financing.
Dale Ravens Rainbow
Springs Community
Realty Inc.
352-489-1486




2 LUXURY HOMES
* LOADED *
With Every Option.
Now Priced Below
Dealer Cost 40% OFF
3/2 AND 2/2
AVAILABLE NOW!
Come See TODAY!
(352) 795-7161
Crystal River Village
Best Value on the
Nature Coast
2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2, furnished on Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot
Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
Ist month lot rent
(352) 817-1987
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR $350/up; 1BR,1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR,
1-r2BA, $450 includes lot
rent; 12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964

YOU'LL THIS!
MAKE OFFER
Inverness
2 lots/ 3 Mobile
Homes off Turner
Camp Rd
813-545-3457
Opt For Owner Finance
2/1/2 Bath, 55+ Park
washer/Dryer, range
refrigerator, MUST SEE!
Lot Rent $249.
352-419-6825, 464-0590
SINGING FOREST PK
2/2 dble 2 Ig scrn prchs,
jacuzzi, Ig corner lotC11
facing pond. W/D, Lot
rent$159. $20K. (352)
860-2208; 810-359-8315
Updated 2/2
Mobile Home $20,500
In Oak Pond Estates
Nicely landscaped
Remodeled
(423) 596-0879


Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090





(SeeMe ow0

Homosassa

3/2, DW

Move In

cond. River

view mins to

Gulf

$29K or rent

$675.

(352)

212-7272













835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com

Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furnished $895
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $695.
2/2 Waterfront $595.
Agent (352) 382-1000



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. NEAR
TOWN 352-563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1 BR, AC, Cable, Clean
$495. mo.352-628-4391
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $600. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, furn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
until. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964



-II
Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River Apts
2 BED RM 1 BA $500.
CRYSTAL RIVER
Newly Remodeled 1/1
all util. incl',d. $600 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
1/1 $450 Mo No pets.
352- 697-0310
INVERNESS
2/2 Pool, tennis + facili-
ties, H20, W/D+ appl's
incl. Scr. patio, 2nd Fl.
$645. (973) 222-1100
Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
Ist MO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626





t THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.



CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse,
1200 Sq. Ft., Hwy 44.
$600/mo+ 1 mo. sec.
352-628-6764, 220-0488
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000SQFT
Ideal location, corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391


Salon, 160 N. Fla. Ave.
352-201-2958



BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 Sun rm. Den,
55+comm 352-746-2621
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000 dn+ lot rent,at
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Homosassa
Riverfront, 2/2/1, Dock
& Pool, H20 IncI $900.+
$900 dp 407 415-0622



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, C/H/A $450 + dp
(352) 464-2716
INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. 786-999-2365




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225





Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370



CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/3, Pool Home, w/
office, Util. incl'd, $1,900
mo.+dep 352-621-4600



BEVERLY HILLS
2 or 3/1.5/1 garage
57 S. Harrison $600
(352) 697-1907
Beverly Hills 2/1/1
Nice, Fen'd yd, $495. EZ
Terms (352) 410-6699
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1+ FmRm, $635 mo.
352-795-1722/212-6980
BEVERLY HILLS
2/3 Bd/IBa/1/2Crpt,No
Pets $595. 407-878-6767
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
3/3.5/2 Beautiful home
Pine Rdge area, full
guest house, shop/RV
pad, 5 acres. No re-
stricitons (954) 612-6779
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 1 or 2 Bd. Rm., EZ-
TERMS $485., 382-3525
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 2/2 w/
scrn. rm. great location
Incl water, sewer, lawn,
Fl. Pest & Soc mem.
$900. (352) 422-4086
Citrus Hills 3/2/3
w/Pool-Yard Maint. &
Pool Service included.
$1,000 @ MO. call Skip
Craven 352-464-1515
Craven Realty, Inc.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer House,
very clean, SS appl's
W/D $895. mo. Also
2/LL2 Very Clean in
Nice NH. scr. por., Ig. lot
$650 mo. 352-382-1373
CITY OF
HERNANDO
1 bedroom. 1 bath. 1,300
sq ft house. Over an
acre of property.
Call 813-277-4045
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
FLORAL CITY
3/1, $650 mo &
1/1, $390. Secluded,
Scenic (352) 586-1872
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relax.com
RENT TO OWN
lovely 3 or 4/2,
white picket fence,
sunken hot tub, E-Z
Terms 352-228-2587


16-25


32011 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal Uclicl







C12 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


INVERNESS
2/2/2, Great Location
Fl. Rm., Appl's IncI'd
$750.mo (352) 637-0894
RENTED!
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2/1, Scrn. Lanai,
$650 mo.




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INGLIS 3/2
furn, w/dock on With.
River on stilts. Incl until.
$1400/mo 352-267-4632



CRYSTAL RIVER
$100 a wk. incLs
everything 352-634-0708



BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/carport. CHA
Remodeled, $600 or
$58k (352) 897-4447
(352) 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Renovated 2/1, $33K
cash or terms $365. or
Rent $525.352-422-2433







ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
* Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.

PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals

a, Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
WWW.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




Crystal River RV Lot
For Sale
Snowbird/Investor/Visitor
star gated com-
munity. Must sell.
Will take $39,900 if
close quickly.
GREAT LOT!!! Con-
tact at 860-841-8419
leave message or text

For Sale LA
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester
407-761-0627








FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE






GREAT DEALS

www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

FLORAL CITY

4 Pretty Rolling,
fenced Ac, paved
Rd, 3/2, 1344 Sqft DW
"move in" condition.
workshop, water to
pastures, mls 344713
to settle estate.
$114,900 obo

25 Fenced Ac w
frontage on 581 &
480. Nice 2351 Sq Ft
home, carport,
workshop, barn, good
pastures, high and
dry beautiful land.
mls #345878
$485,000 obo
Commercial BLG
4000 Sq Ft w Office
.89 Ac pvd Parking for
15 County is
cutting costs to move
in businees until
October! mls 33440
$295,000 owner finan!

WATERFRONT

Keywest/Coastal
style 3397 Sq Ft home
built 2007, crows nest,
walk out deck covered
porches, FP. wood
floors,granite coun-
ters, energy efficient,


3/3 & half bath much
more. 1.89 Ac on
Lake Bradley near the
trail! mls# 345427
$389,000

On the main Lake
and near the Trail In
Inverness, 2/2/2 at
720 Edgewater,
renovated and move
in ready. mis 347168
$249,000 obo

Istachatta on
Daviston nice 2/2 SW
w carport & porches,
dock and boat
launch just oOff the
River and near the
trail. mls 344129
$74,900

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EO HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com





Por Sale %o

Homosassa 7 Acres Cor-
ner of Grover Cleveland
and Grand March-Across
from Library. $40,000 1/6
share 423-371-1161




OWNER FINANCING
Fabulous 3/2 Like new.
SS appliances, custom
flooring, 2 car garage +
golf cart space.
Price to sell. $195K.
(352) 527-3501




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yd. new roof,
dble carport, poss. rent
to own. $59, 900
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076




Cit. Spas. & Homosassa
Homes for Sale or Rent
Will Finance * Also
RMS. FOR RENT $135 wk
(352) 422-1284



CITRUS HILLS 3 bed-
room. 2-1/2 bath. 3,400
SG/FT Solar Heated Pool
Home. New A/C, Pool
Screen, Marcite, House
Paint. Too Many Extras
To List!!! (352)220-1440




ARBOR LAKES 55+
Comm 3/2/2 + Lg en-
close sunrm. on most
pvt.lot $199,500 (352)
726-7952 Selling
commission to Realtors




2 BR, 1 BA, I car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.tt. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see $59,000
(352) 419-6719
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.lnvernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnan111@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.
Lease Option
3/2/2 excl cond. mod-
ernm newer clean,
quiet, fenced$107K
Keystone Arbor RItyFI
LLC(813) 265-8833





EXCELLENT
OWNER
FINANCING

$137K


Sits high on a hill
w/great view 3/2/2
w/bonus rm. Approx
2650sf U.R. 2100 sf.
Real Mexican Tile.
Brand new Jaccuzzi,
raised oak cabinets,
kitchen island. Lrg
stone fireplace in
great room, 3 very
large bedrooms,
2 bigwalk in closets,
florida room.HOME
JUST totally UPDATED
Beautiful
landscaping and 800'
of vinyl, picket &
privacy fencin,
almost an acre
Owners Winter Home
FOR SALE or LEASE.
(352) 341-1334


FLORAL CITY

4 Pretty Rolling,
fenced Ac, paved
Rd, 3/2, 1344 Sqft DW
"move in" condition.
workshop, water to
pastures. mis 344713
to settle estate.
$114,900 obo
----------------
25 Fenced Ac w/
frontage on 581 &
480. Nice 2351 Sq Ft
home, carport,
workshop, barn, good
pastures, high and
dry beautiful land.
mls #345878
$485,000 obo

Commercial BLG
4000 Sq Ft w Office
.89 Ac pvd Parking for
15 County is
cutting costs to move
in business until
October! mis 33440
$295,000 owner finan!

Waterfront

Keywest/Coastal
style 3397 Sq Ft home
built 2007, crows nest,
walk out deck covered
porches, FP. wood
floors,granite coun-
ters, energy efficient,
3/3 & half bath much
more. 1.89 Ac on
Lake Bradley near the
trail! mls# 345427
$389,000

On the main Lake
and near the Trail In
Inverness, 2/2/2 at
720 Edgewater,
renovated and move
in ready. mis 347168
$249,000 obo

Istachatta on
Daviston nice 2/2 SW
w carport & porches,
dock and boat
launch just oOff the
River and near the
trail. mls 344129
$74,900

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







3/2 2200

sq ft.
33' htedinground
pool w/sum kit.
near schools, hospital
$150K, 1350 NE 7th av
352-564-0001 day
352-794-6504 night


4/2 CEMENT HOME
1,200SF on /4 acre
Remodeled, Clean
$65K.
(305) 619-0282





For Sale .






2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Far rm. w/frpl.
2000+sf living + encl.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19 Jungleplum Ct. E.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!

BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com


.4 it~. A


CLASSIFIED



NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!

Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685








ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
* Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen


Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All for just $295. mo.
PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces

Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals
a- Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park









Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887







En lo ent


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS 3/2/2
pool home oversize
lanai on 1 acre
For Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529


ForWSale %*
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283
FLORAL CITY
Pool home, w/extra
house, By owner,
foreclosure priced
(352) 586-9498

HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


Gitta Barth/Realtor

Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc
SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME Ozello Keys
private boat dock &
ramp. 1000sqft upstairs,
1000sqft screened
downstairs. 2/1.
Fenced yard, CHA
Owner Finance. 5%
down payment.
$174,900. Call Craig
352-422-1011



Crystal River Area
Professional business
person w/ excellent credit
looking to lease option,
rent to own or buy a
home w/ owner financing
in the CR Area. If
interested please call
352-388-1064 or email
home-
search352@gmail.com.


0008C18


W1ORDY I GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE


1. Yours truly would lead a tour (1)


2. Montego and Tampa water mania (1)


3. Nosy person's belt holders (1)


4. "Batman" villain strangler (2)


Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word.

�2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


5. Apple's Jobs's "pet" complaints (1)


6. Attention-worthy drinkable liquid (3)


7. Tiered stadium seats' traits (2)


Snafl1VHa SIHOV'Ia 'L ISVIOd 'IHVION '9 SHARa[d SHAAIS '
HIOHO3 IHOP T' SdOOI SdOONS ' ZWVO) SAVf 'g a *OLRD 11'
6-25-11 SaASlv


BY OWNER
Residential Building Lots
W. Highland & N. High-
land. Must buy both
$25,000/firm. Please no
agents. 617-471-7417





HERNADO .88 acres
with well, septic and
power all in place.
For more details call
Kristin Holland at
Plantation Realty
352-220-1186.

INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots #39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033




2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000
(352) 382-3202


FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday s.

Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.

To place your free
ad, simply go to:
WWW.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.


Y, ui ', 1,1 I I-St.
L i, .

CH IIkONICfd


'02, 23ft,
Magic Tilt Trailer
Dual axle, 4 V-hull
$1,300
(352) 628-5008
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
ALUMINUM
PROPELLER, V4, Fits
60-115HP, $80.00
464-0316
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
PROPELLER, FITS V-6,
140 ON UP, Aluminum
$80.00 464-0316
JOHNSON/EVINRUDE
STAINLESS STEEL
PROPELLER, off of 200,
V-6, $85.00 464-0316


i t Your treamu (O.fom



Search Hundreds of Local Listings



www.chronicleihomefinder.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


runs great,
$450. obo
(352) 795-6870;
(352) 220-4792
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066
STAINLESS STEEL
PROPELLER, 13.5x18
$80.00 464-0316



19 Flare made by
Lake wells Fl.
Evinrude w/kicker
$800 obo(352)
794-3081 352-228-2324
'08 SEA PRO
176CC, 90 Merc. Opti-
Max. 24V Minnkota
w/autopilot trolling mtr.
2 fish finders - 1 w/GPS
On brd batt charger.
$13,000 (352) 552-2950
12'ALUMACRAFT
2008, Jon Boat, Nice,
with Tilt Trailer, 2006-9.8
Nissan motor. $1,300
OBO Call 352-634-4421
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alui trn iler $ I4K "


AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019
BASS TRACKER 3
1979, Bass Boats Inc.,
16ft W/ Trailer. Many new
items. $2,000 Firm.
352-634-2791

BASS TRACKER 3
50hp Mercury, with trailer.
Too many new parts to
list. $2,000.00 FIRM
352-634-2791
CRESTLINER
Pontoon boat, fresh
water, 2085 CFI 1996
customized and refur-
bished, fiberglassed
deck, 75HP motor re-
done, bimini top &
other seat covers, new
trolling motor & battery
(MinnKota) perfect for
fishing, cruising or scal-
loping, $8,000 Call for
particulars, (941)
662-9077 cell or
(352) 201-2656

HURRICANE
KAYAK, SANTEE 116
SPORT,L11"6" W36LBS
USA MADE XCON $775
352.503.5319


cond 352-613-4071

i/THIS OUT! :
C-DORY
1999 Fiberglass 22' out-
board w/80hp Yamaha
New Bimini top, GPS,
Laran, two radios,
icebox,stove,sleeping
quarters,chem.toilet,2
gas tanks,auto
bilge pumps,
Magic-Tilt trailer
inuded.Exconditnused app
50 hoursAsking
$42,000 or BO
352-628-3393
after 6pm
352-302-8098
Please leave message
if no answer.




2005 Ford F-350 Crew Cab Diesel


4x4, XLT, Auto, Powerstroke - Stk # 10144
$9,988
'92 Honda Accord Auto, 130K.......$1,800
'93 Jeep Cherokee Auto, 2WD......$2,200
'01 F-350 Aluminum Bed, Auto.........$2,500
'99 Nissan Sentra 5 Speed, A/C......$3,500
'99 Toyota Tacoma Xcab, 4 Cyl...$4,900
'01 Suburban Z71, 4x4, Clean..........$7,000
'87 Corvette Auto, Clean..................$7,900
CHECK US OUT AT
www.w.352CARLOT.COM
Bring in this ad and receive $100 off*


1701 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto
352-513-4833


$150/mo(352) 212-7272
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
VOLVO ENGINE
170 HP 6 CYL,LOW
HRS,COMPLETE,RUNS
GREAT,$800 ALSO
HAVE 2 280 OUT-
DRIVES 352-256-8488



36' Winnebago
ITASCA - 3 slides, under
11K mi! GREAT CONDI
Homosassa. $76,900/
obo (850) 449-1811
JAMBOREE 89
Class C, 24' 59k Miles
exc cond $6500 obo
(352) 795-3729



'07 STARCRAFT
POP-UP
17ft open. Used 3 times.
Sleeps 6 with extras.
$4200. (352) 382-5309
8FT SLIDE IN
CAMPER
for pickup, good cond.
$1,200 obo
(352) 860-1055
HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8, very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
KODIAK 30'
06 used very little 12'
slide out, sips 8, $8500
(352) 621-9845
352-586-7797







ONLY 5 FREE
HOMES LEFT
* Free $300. Home
Depot gift card Now!
or Free Flat Screen
TV In 6 months
HURRY CALL NOW!
Offer includes:
Home, water, sewer,
trash, wifi, use of
pool new clubhouse
& park-like setting
w/ hammocks
and gazebos
All forjust $295. mo.
PROGRESS ENERGY
SPECIALS
Discounted Housing
& RV Spaces
Weekly & Monthly
Furnished Rentals
i* Call for Details
AURORA ACRES
11240 N. Northwood
Drive Inglis, Fl. 34449
(352) 447-2759
www.
auroraacresfl.com
Crystal River Primary
bus stop located in
front of park


ROCKWOOD
Ultra-lite 27' 2005,
exc cond. upgrades
dinette pwr slide
w/topper, Q bed, 2nd
dr. 20' awning $16k obo
(352) 527-9535

SOLD
A-LINER
'07, 15 ft, w/ micro-
wave, AC, refrigerator
Excel. Cond. $7,900
WILDERNESS
19 FT.
$1,500 obo
(352) 860-1151




!! ! 215/65 R16 !!!!
Nice tread. Only asking
$100 for the set (4)!
(352)551-1810
- 215/40 $17 **
Nice tread. Only asking
$60 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
---TRUCK TIRES---
Load range "F". 8R19.5
Nice tread. Only asking
$100 for the pair!
(352)551-1810
CHROME TRUCK
Bed rails & gas cap
cover exc cond
$125.
352-422-3745
CUSTOM BRA FOR
'"9"SPIDER,CONVCOVERS
FRONTCOST
$150,SELL $100.
352-746-4160
Fiberglass Truck
Cap
$100(352) 637-1242
Michelin TEX TEMPO-
RARY TIRE, on Rim -
Used -T125/80 R16 -
sold 'as is' - $25
(352)-489-5245
MUSTANG RIMS
Set of 4, 18" x 18.5", fits
2005 - 2011, polished
alum., like new, asking
$1,000 OBO
(352) 795-0558
NEW GOODYEAR TIRE
& WHEEL 245/75/22.5
on 10 lug wheel.
$100 firm 563-1615
TRAILER TIRE & RIM
Brand new on 5 lug
rim, 5.30X12,
never used. $40
352-746-4160




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909

* BIG SALE!! 4
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191


CIASSIFIEDS



CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794




* THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
* BIG SALE!! .
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments
352-461-4518

BMW
2006 750 BMW 750LI
2006 black mint 52000 mi
19.6/25 mpg $34,000
OBO 352-382-7489
CADILLAC
1995, sedan, Deville
Cadillac, 132,000 miles,
runs good, $1250. Call
Bob @813-469-2392
CHEVY
'07, HHR LT, keyless en-
try, loaded AC good
gas mileage, 58,600 mi.
$9,900 (352) 503-6431
CHEVY
2005 Malibu LT
leather, sunroof,
a gas sipper 9,988
866-838-4376
CHRYSLER
1980, LeBaron, Six cylin-
der, automatic. Very relia-
ble. Good body. No A/C.
$775 OBO 352-726-9416
CHRYSLER
2002 Sebring LXI
leather, power seats
69k orig miles $6990
866-838-4376
FORD
2000 Escort SE
60K org. mi., 32 mpg
$5,500
(352) 382-7783

FORD
2006 Focus SES
four door sedan
57k 10,988
866-838-4376

HONDA
2001 Accord LX
89k auto, ac, 6,990
Don't Hesitate
866-838-4376

HONDA
2004 Accord coupe
77k miles, Ix coupe
rare find 10980
866-838-4376


2005 Civic 55k orig
miles, auto, ac, nicely
equipped, 9,990
one owner 40mpg
866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2007 Elantra 27,000
miles, Great
Condition/Great on Gas
$10,500 352-212-7454
LINCOLN
2000 Lincoln Town Car
Executive L
Black on black $2500
OBO (352) 422-7755
LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL
1998 Good cond. Runs
well. LOADED! $2000
(352) 794-3134
MONTE CARLO
'05, great cond., runs
great 1 owner 73K mi.
$6,800
352-613-4071

NISSAN
2003 350 ZX , Touring
leather 31k orig
all the rider call for
deal! 866-838-4376

NISSAN
2004 Maxima sunroof
top of the line
69k miles mint call for
deal! 866-838-4376

OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625




FORD
'74, FO00, 360/C6, LB
w/ extra rebuilt 360
$1,400
(352) 564-4598







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





88 FORD
Square bed w/topper
runs great, great farm
truck etc. $1400
(352) 795-0088
4 BIG SALE!! .+
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518

CHEVY
'95, S10, V6, 5spd. 152k
mi, good cond. new
tires, runs excel.. $2,500.
(352) 382-2199


FORD
1986 F150 w/ 302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800 (404)416-9359
FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934

*/THIS OUT!
FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920

FORD
2004 Ranger X cab
XLT 67k miles,
better hurry 11,488
866-838-4376
FORD F 250
99 Lariat, 150k mi 4x4
Extented cab 4 dr.
$5,650 352-201-0177
GMC
'03, Sonoma 65K mi., 6
cyl. Clean, excel. cond
Red w/ silver $7,000
obo 352 382-3663
GMC
2006, 2500 HD pick up
low miles 4x4
better hurry 14988
866-838-4376
TOYOTA 05
Tundra Max low mis.
X warrty tool box tow
pkg new tires $12,500
cell(727) 644-0157
TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADED!Tow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622




CHRYSLER
2005 Pacifica
57k orig miles one
owner 11 988
866-838-4376
GMC
1995, Suburban,
4WD,3rd row seat, runs
excellent,$2000 obo call

Meeing^^
Notice


200




20C
color
low r
nic
17,98





Ram'
eng. V
mi $8
(3
C
'02. V
ger
look
(3

2005
sto a
ing


96 Cc
cylir
very g
obo

1984
work
$60
352-3

2
Tou
one
wc











VoIL
2008
custon
dbe





02
custom


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C13



HONDA ---ey av Ison
2 CRV all wheel '05, 1200 Sportster
e ex 89khow very clean, lots of
em new $8990 chrome & extras $5,000
866-838-4376 (352) 344-3081
Harley Davidson
HONDA '06, Sportster, brand
09 Element SC new, low mi., Alarm sys.
r keyed bumpers Sissy Bar $5,200
miles a diamond Cry River 727-207-1619
;ely equipped HARLEY DAVIDSON
88 866-838-4376 '09, Ultra Classic
Has everything, excel.
cond. only 8,400 mi.
selling because health
$19,900. (352) 795-7335
HONDA HELIX
02 DODGE (2) 93-96 low miles
Van 1500, 5.9 Liter 250cc 70mpg $2400 for
8 leather 59500K both (352) 697-5530
8,888. make offer
152) 503-7577 Honda Trike
'05 Goldwing,
:HEVROLET 20,000 mi. Black Cherry
venture , 7 passen- $26,500.
cold air, runs & (352) 465-6991
ks good $2A475.
352) 201-9035 KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
CHRYSLER 1600, Excellent condition,
Tow nn Country well serviced. Full factory
nd go, 42 k four- warranty til Jan 2012.
navi dvd 11 990 14k miles. Bike jack.
866-838-4376 Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
DODGE $7995. 352-601-7460
aravan 5 doors, 4 Moped
under, automatic 50CC, Tank,
good cond $1500 needs repair 379mi.
)(352) 476-1113 $400 cash
FORD (352) 382-7037
4, Econoline 150, Suzuki 2010
van, runs, asking Boulevard C50
00.00 OBO. Call Less than 800 miles, my
41-5164 after 5:00 loss, your gain! $6,500
HOONDsA firm. (352) 422-4528
005 Odyssey WANTED
ring, navi, dvd JUNK MOTORCYCLE
e owner carfax Will Pay up to $200 for
ont last 17,988 Unwanted Motorcycle
866-838-4376 352-942-3492

TOYOTA B2er
Sienna LE low mi
e owner 7 pass 918-0715 DAILY CRN
ter hurry 19,988 Surplus Prop.
166-838-4376 PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
- of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
)04 SUZUKI 15,2011 - July 15,2011.
Isia, 9,300 miles, Published in Citrus County
n acc., immaculate, Chronicle, June 15 thru
or serviced, $4900 July 15,2011.
352-613-4576 E
-eeing Me-in
Noties N tice


920-0626 F/SA/SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
A Finance Committee meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on
Monday, June 27, 2011 at 2:30 p.m. in the Cafeteria Meeting Room (this is a change
of meeting room ONLY), located in the Main Hospital by the Entrance of the Cafete-
ria of Citrus Memorial Hospital located at 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida to dis-
cuss:
* Monthly Finance Reports.
* Other.
A regular meeting of the Citrus County Hospital Board will be held on Monday, June
27, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. in the Cafeteria Meeting Room (this is a change of meeting
room ONLY), located in the Main Hospital by the Entrance of the Cafeteria of Citrus
Memorial Hospital located at 502 Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida to discuss:
* Approval of Minutes.
* Citrus County Hospital Board Finance Committee Report
* Finance Director Report.
* Chief Operating Officer Report.
* Foundation Governance Issues.
* Citrus County Hospital Board Committees Report.
* Other
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Law Office of Grant & Dozier, LLC
at 352-726-5111. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board,
with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 N. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness, Florida, 34450 (352) 419-6566.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 24, 25, 26, 2011.


VOUM SPRING


mmmw


IM





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2011 Mazda3i Sport


HCe - -Cie nelien bec


�ACURA

Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands & t a.,t II1


TL Lease: $399 mo x 36 months. $2,499 Due At Signing
Includes Security Deposit, Down Payment; Excludes Tax & Tag,
With Approved Credit 3o
**** To 99/month
Safety Rating SaMethy Pick
- NHTSA - IIHS
* Star ratings are part of the U.S. Department of Transportation' Safercar gov program Iwww.safercar.govl. Mooels tested witn standard side-Impact alroags (SABsl. r Based
on ALG's 2009 and 2010 Resiaual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand " Subject to l-mned ava-labillity Through July 5 2011 to approved lessees by Acura Finarcial Services
DBA of Amnier-can Hona Finance Corp. Closed-end 'ease for 2012 TL 5 Speed Aulomaic IModel aUASF2CJWI. MSRP S36 465. Aclual nel capital.ed col Si34.189.84 Total
monthly payments Si .36A. Opilon Io purchase al lease end 523.702.25. Addillonal lease lerms lor well-qjailed lessees. Nol all losses will Qualily. Higher lease rates apply
for lessees will' lower creall railings or in diterean rg-ons Dealer parnicipal-on may affeci aclbal paymenil MSRPs include deaslinalon taxes license ile lees options and
insurance exira. Security aeposil waived Lessee responsible roi ma-ntenance. excessive weardea, ana 15qIc.. over 10.000 mileslyear for vehicles wiln MSRP less Inan
$30.000. out for vehicles with MSRP ol 530.000 or more mileage cost is 20eiml over 10.000 mllesiyear. See dealer ior complete details. * Available on 2010 TL. RL. RDX. ZDX
with approved credit.


C14 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


liU


614 : le] [


FND OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR TRADE!
NO MATTER WHERE YOU
PLAN TO BUY!
CALL THE INSTANT APPRAISAL LINE:

800=440-9054


'08 IMPALA
FREE 24 HR RECORD IBSAGE WIH IFr AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext. 11275
*11,999, 199 MO.



'08 SEBRING
ME 24 HR RECORD MESSAGE mWM INFO AM SPECIAL MPRIIC
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11330
$7,999 1132Mo.


'08 HHR
FME 24 HIR RECORDED MESSAGE WmH INFO ADM SPhIAL PRICU
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16807
'8,499^ 141
9 ~ 41 EMo.



'07 PACIFICA
24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WMIi INFO MAND SPECIAL PIC
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11141
112,999 o215 o


"4a
'08 SANTA FE
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH NO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16819
m15, 699o 260P.



'07 F150
FME 24 M RECORD MESSAGE WmIH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICE
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11197
$7,999 O3132 M


'06 SILVERADO
FRE 24 RECORDIW MESSAGE m MIH INFO MAl SPECIAL PRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11131
$7,999 132 MO.


'06 CHARGER
FRE 24 I RECORD MESSAGE WMIH INFO MAl SPECIAL PRICG
1-800-584-8755 Ext.16813
12,999 215^PER



'06 QUINOX
FME 24 lR RHiORDE MESSAGE Wmin IN A SOCIAL PRI GL
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11181
'9,999A166


-~,


'07 CAMRY
FREE 24 IR RECORD MESSAGE NUM INFO AND SPECIAL PRICE
1-800-584-8755 Ext.10200
*11,999o^199M


'06 RAM
FRAME 24R RECORDED MESSAGE i INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext. 1183
$7,999A 132



'05 MURANO
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WIll INFO A SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.L11320
1,999^199^ Mo


U.'


,i


SI_.


S


Fm


^PRICES AND PAYMENTS EXCLUDE TAX, TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. PRICES AND PAYMENTS
INCLUDE $2999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. PAYMENTS ARE 6 YEARS AT 5.99% APR WITH APPROVED
CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK


A


II I II I1


'07 WRANGLER
FREE 24 HR RECORDED IMESAGE Wmi1 FO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11029
$14,999^o49, ' .


'07 TOWN & COUNTRY
FME 24 I RECORDED MESSAGE WMi INFO Ai SPECIAL PRIC
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11136
999^16
19,999 .166 RMO.


'07 300
FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WI FO AND SPECIAL PRICING
1-800-584-8755 Ext.11228
*11,699^o 194^ E


I


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C15


,01 q=FA ;


Ai:X


HIl-


I I I^


s




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'///4


Introducing the new standard


of


uxury ownership


2011
Cadillac


MSRP
VILLAGE SAVINGS


$


12


$37,765
$3,496
9*
Stock
#Cl110151


2011


Cadillac
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION


MSRP
VILLAGE SAVINGS


$


$39,920
$1,464


*
Stock
#Cl110146


IViIage


Cadillac


2431 Suncoast Blvd., US Hwy. 19, Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-5100
www.villagecadillac.com
*MSRP based on $37,765 3 liter base edition. Tax, tag, title, ad dealer fees extra. Pictures are for illustration only.
Cannot be combined with any other offer. Non Premium Color.


C16 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


*AF1P




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BETTER CARS, BETTER DEALS
BETTER HURRY


01= -


Making Room For 2012 Models


GET ABSOLUTE TOP
DOLLAR FOR YOUR TRADE!


20
In Stock


a In


4 Speed
Automatic


$18,085
$3,086


2011 CAMRY


MSRP
Village Savings


s14,999
or Lease for $149.00 mo.*
OR BUY FOR 0%
* VSC, Trac * Air Conditioning with Air Filter
* AM/FM/CD MP3/WMA Player w/6 Speakers
* Cruise Control * Power Door Locks
* Power Windows w/Dr.-Side Auto Down
* In-Key Keyless Entry System


$17,999
or Lease for $189.00 mo.*
OR BUY FOR 0%
* Air Conditioning
* AM/FM/CD Player w/MP3/WMA Capability
* Cruise Control
* Power windows w/Auto Up/Down, Jam
* Power Door Locks


WE WILL BEAT ANY DEAL BY '500

or GIVE YOU '500 ON THE SPOT!!


MA IWLW~AI VJC
MN I NW WNSiff O IM
I OYO_!gI3ALR _El

ONNE imjiW IeS
eiiWsYlFi ame


Cryslal Rver
Homosassa
VILLAGE
19 *


Beverly H,5s
Lecarilo
IrlvC rrI655


Spring H1ii Brooksviie


WITH EVERY NEW VEHICLE GET
ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenance
plan with roadside assistance


Maintenance: Oil and filter, Tire rotation, Multi-point
inspection
24-Hr. Roadside Assistance: Lockout protection, Flat tire
changes, Jump starts, Fluid delivery, Towing for the
unexpected


CRYSTAL RIVER

352-628-5100
*Price excludes tax, tag, registration, title, and $499 dealer fee. Beat Any Deal on New Toyota, with a signed buyers order by any competitor. Prices include all Village Toyota
incentives. Offers cannot be combined. All vehicles subject to prior purchase. All customers who purchase or lease a new Toyota receive a 2 year, 25K mile free maintenance
plan. Photos for illustration purposes only. We reserve the right to correct typographical errors. All leases are 39 mos. with $1,999 Cash Cap Reduction, 12,000 miles.


WiACAF


25
Stock


2011 COROLLA LE


MSRP
Village Savings


6 Speed
Automatic


$21,655
$3,656


i


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C17


IS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IHONTDA


2011HOND
ACCORD LStEDAN
Moel CP2FBEWAuo, CPoer
PkCrieConw~tro &MchMre~'j'w
Dfi-'iR I S"i T .............. $22,73


2011HOND
PIOT2 L
Moe F111EI uo C rie
Veh icl. tbiiyAsit


Come See What LOVE
Can Do For You!!!


i'H itlo
rOMP'


SBased on 2012 Civic Sedan & Civic Coupe EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on howyou dre and maintainourvehicle.* On approved credit. 1.2011 Civic VP: Lease for $99 plusax for 36 months. MSRP $18,10558% residual,
zero sec. deposit. $2,974 down, 35 payments left at $99plus tax. WAC or for well-qualified buyers. 2.2011 Accord LX: Lease for $149 plus tax for 36 months. MSRP $22,730, 59% residual, zero sec.deposit.$2,974 own, 35 payments left at $149 plus tax WAC or for well-qualified buyers. 3.2011 Pilot 5 Speed Automatic WD LX (Model
YF3H2BEW): Lease for $279.00 per month for 36 months with a $2,700 capitalized cost reduction available to customers who qualify for the HFS Super Preferred or Preferred credit tier. Other rates/tiers are available under this offer. $2,999 total due a lease signing (includes first month's payment and capitalized cost reduction with no security
deposit; total net capitalized cost and base monthly payment does not include tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Dealer installed options and accessories additional cost. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Applies to in stock units. Offer expires 6-23-11.


NEW 2011 CD E
CHEwVY CRUZE


Power
Windows
& Locks,
Tilt, CD,
OnStar


M SRP: ................................................................ $18,115
DEALER DISCOUN..............* $945
CASH OR TRADE EQUI....-..- $2,500


YOU
PAY


$14,670


NEW 2011 IMPALA
LS,
Auto,
OnStar,
Air
Conditining
M SRP: ...................................................................$25,505
DEALER DISCOUN .................. $905
FACTORY REBATE: ....-- ..... $2,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUTY........ $2,500

AV $19,600


CHEVY CAMARO


LS,
5-Speed,
V8


MSRP: .............................$23,590
DEALER DISCOUNr . ............- $300
CASH OR TRADE EQUrr.......... $2,500

YOU $20,790


CHEv E1TRAVERSE
Power
Windows
& Locks,
AM/FM CD,
OnStar, XM
M SRP: .............................................................. $30,454
DEALER DISCOUNT .............- $1,690
FACTORY REBATE: ............- $1,500
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY:.......- $2,500


YOU
PAY


$24,764


NEW 2011
CHEVY AVEO LT


M SRP: ............................................................. $16,520
REBATE & DISCOUNT .............. $2,20
CASH OR TRADE EQUITY....... $2,500

YAV11,480

NEW 2011
CHEVY SILVERADO
Auto,
Keyless
Crew Cab,
Power
Locks
M SRP: ............................................................. $29,219
DEALER DISCOUN ...........- $2,257
FACTORY REBATE: .............- $4,505
CASH OR TRADE EQUTY...........2,500

YOU$19,957
PAY I|I


09BUICK LACROSSE CXL
LEADER PW,PILOADE I71O
$13.899


07 CHEVY HHR LT
PWP ICRUSE COM T1.T,CD,9 4
$12.995


07 CHEVY SILVERADOREG CAB
V8,A1in,2W6,9S7
$14,269


PRE-LOVED
SUPERCENTER
KRft^ B-- 07 CHEVYCOLORADOEXT CAB 02 FORD F-150 CREW CAB
Z71ili,AC,PW,Ll8l1 LARIT,.UKEFEW
$15.495 $9.995


05 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
EIRLOADE T SREATCONODMONMIIM
$10,888


08 CHEVYAVALANCHE LTZ
AIGNSUNROOF,OVD,A1o W
$29,995


08 CHEVY COBALTLT
COUPE$11,777AC,
$11,777


U 06 CHEVY MONTE CARLO SS
LEATHER ROOF,LOADED,LOWMILES!#1018N
08CHEVYCOLORADO,REGCAB $16,995
LT,l 995LOWESIIP1U7
$14,995


Come See What I
LOVE Can Do For You! -

LoveChevySales.com


10 CHEWVY CAMAROSS
TRANSFORMERS EDION, LOW MILES!
$32,995


97 PONACTRANSAM
BUCKMILES,MPEEI.
$9,995


08 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS
RIDE IN ST ! LIKENEW. LOW MIl! 10
$14,488


07CHEVYYTAILBU..ERLT
LEATHER,LOADE
$16,995


L

'I On Hwy. 44West
iJ in Inverness

352-341-0018


MUST QUALIFY FOR ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES. 0% INTEREST WAC. ALL PRICES INCLUDE 2500 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUITY, ALL REBATES, OWNER LOYALTY, DOWN PAYMENT ASSIST INCLUDED
IN PRICES AND PAYMENTS, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST, PLUS ANY DEALER ADDED EQUIPMENT IF APPLICABLE. * 12 MONTHS OR 12,000 MILES ON MOST PRE-OWNED VEHICLES, POWERTRAIN ONLY. PHOTOS
FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY. VEHICLES SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. APPLIES TO IN STOCK UNITS. OFFER EXPIRES 6/23/11.


0 _ Lw.AJ. W)


C18 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


N


A


T


0


N


A


L


EVENT


2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S


$ 16,999 0% / 189M


2011 VERSA


S11.990


2011 SENTRA




$159 MO


2011 FRONTIER 2011 MURANO
�* i ,i ,. . S._. ., _


,999 R APR


$299M1 01 ,R,


FIND OUT THE VALUE
OF YOUR TRADE-IN
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
CALOUR INSTA9T5
PPWSAL UNE: 1-800-440-9054


NISSAN CRYSTAL
NIN I I
_______NISSAN
NZ7~ ~ r I4NIS


crystalautos.com
937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34448
*ALL PRICES INCLUDE ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES, NOT
EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. PRIES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE &
DEALER FEE OF $599.50. INCLUDES $2999.00 DOWN CASH OR
TRADE EQUITY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES FOR ILLUS-
TRATION PURPOSES ONLY PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
A 0% APR AVAILABLE ON SELECT YEARS AND MODELS FOR
VARYING TERM LENGTHS WITH APPROVED CREDIT + LEASE
PAYMENTS BASED ON 39 MVI/39K MI $0.15 PER MILES OVER W/
$3999 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE AND $599.50 DEALER FEE,
WITH APPROVED CREDIT ** EPA ESTIMATED HWY MILEAGE.


TENT


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C19


0


q




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PRE-0


ED


VEHICLE


07 HONDA
RIDGELINE
$22,995


03 SATURN
L300LS
'7,995


10 KIA
RIO
s12,495


09 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA
14,295


Loaded, Hemi
CITRUS KIA 'p
"PEACE OF MIND 07JEEPGRAN
WARRANTY" CHEROKEE IT
PROGRAM Sig 99
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia introduced the New "Peace Of Mind" I!
Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a Dealership promise...
When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side
for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your driving. If anything, and we are
talking anything breaks* on your vehicle, from the headlights to the taillights we
will fix it for you at NO CHARGE. You have trusted us for all your NEW car
needs and and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we 10 FORD
want to prove to you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the state of Florida to EDGE
buy a Used vehicle also.
At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships".


WE NEED EVERY TRADE -
AND LOWEST PRICES


4.:::;: " ..^= "
's::; ;,/: ,1


HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOW/
IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA


V


from Home @ www.citruslida.com


10 KIA FORTE
SEDAN
16,495


09TOYOTA
MATRIX
s15,295


00 KIA
BORREGO
s21,995


- 1L YO 0

NO i H


C20 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


Citru K, A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


oi
m ~-EL


-


NEW 2011 FIESTA SES
\ MPG
uHwy 40

ftL,4f


w -


MSRP
Dealer Discount
Sale Price
Retail
Customer Cash


N1C148
$17,620
-$122
$17,498
-$500


*16,998*

NEW 2011 EXPLORER


^jroThYartAard


MSRP
Promotional Retail Bonus
Customer Cash


$34,230
-$500


$33,730*


pp-


ALL NEW 2012 FOCUS SE
MPG
muHwy 40


MSRP $20,280
Dealer Discount -$782


Sale Price
Ford Credit Retail
Customer Cash


$19,489
-$500


*18,998*

NEW 2011 EDGE
MPGHwy 26


MSRP $28,990
Dealer Discount -$792


Sale Price


$28,198


Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000


$26,198 *


On Full

NEW 2011 FUSION SE NEW 2012 MUSTANG
i . MPG MPG
S*uHwy 33 _Hwy31


MSRP $21,925
Dealer Discount -$927
Sale Price $20,998
Retail Customer Cash -$500
Ford Credit Retail Customer Cash -$1,000
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000


=*18,498*


MSRP $26,135
Dealer Discount -$1,166
Sale Price $24,969
Retail Customer Cash -$1,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$500
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash -$1,000


$22,469*


MSRP
Dealer Discount


Sale Price
Retail Customer Cash


$23,485*


MSRP
Dealer Discount
Sale Price
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash
Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash
F150 3.7L V-6 Bonus Cash
Retail Customer Cash


$22,989*


!2004 FORD F50 STX REG CAB 1998 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS
Avery nice truck for not a lot of money. N1T035B Big on luxury small on price & a one owner too. N1T315M
$8.995 $8.995


2008 FORD FOCUS 2 DR SE
Low mileage and great gas mileage. NP5555A
$14,168


2007 PONTIAC G6 GTP 2005 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING
Only 22k miles on this fine looking sporty car. N1T356A A nice touring 300 that will not hurt your pocketbook. NP5563
$16,968 16,968


2001 FORD MUSTANG BULLITT 2004 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LT 4X4 2007 DODG
Your chance to ownBULLITT number 4608 a piece of history N1T091C This is one nice and loaded SUV. NP5547 Room for the whole
$149995 $15,968 16,


2006 JEEP COMMANDER
Only in a jeep. N1T199C
$18,688


2009 JEEP WRANGLER X 4X4
Great looking fun vehicle. NP5590
$23.968


2006 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 SL
Terrific looking car with terrific fuel economy NNT453D
*18,995


Do not miss this one owner certified vehicle. N1T221A
$27.668


2008 DODGE NITRO
Only 24k miles on this extra clean SUV. NNC214A
$19,668


2003 FORD FI50 XLT 4X4 SUPER CREW
Well cared for low miles 4x4, don't miss this one. NP5578A
S 19,968


2006 HUMMER H2 4X4 2011 FORD FLEX SEL
Not for everyone but what an incredible piece of machinery. N1C054A Great riding and handling with room for the whole family NP5562
$29.668 $29.968


2007 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER PREMIER
Don't miss this loaded loaded loaded mountaineer. NP5521
$23,668


AWo rFKU rJv UU A I wA tVIEW URD
If its power you need this is the truck for you. NNT006A
$30.668


$24,485
-$500


$23,985
-$500


$27,340
-$1,351
$25,989
-$1,000
-$1,000
-$500
-$500


AVVZ nEIYKUHI 9I1EU9VA 3VV T94A4 RV WB
A nice 4x4 without breaking the bank. NP5536A
$13,968


e family. N1 I 146A
668


r-


-.4


SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 C21




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE







12,99M o/6U o IR A149MO
4 2011 MAUBU LT 2011 IMPALA LT


6,.OOO*$ 189w -7,5OO s269
2011 SILVERADO 2011 EQUINOX 2011 TAHOE



I $ 3999 ,AA NO PAYMENTS $S
3I 9999TIHll AUGUST 2011 SAVE R

FIND OUT THE VALUE
OF YOUR TRADE-IN
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
" 1-800-440-9054
APPRAISAL lINE :I

H CRYSTAL CR

SCRYSTAL crystalautos.com
C H E V R 0 L E T 1035 S.SuncoastBludHomosassa, F.
*ALL PRICES INCLUDE ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY.
PRICES EXCLUDE TAX TAG, TI[E & DEALER FEE OF $599.50. INCLUDES $2999.00
THE CLEAR CHOICE IS CRYSTAL L AUTOMOTIVE DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.PICTURES FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK ^A 0% APR
AVAILABLE ON SELECT YEARS AND MODELS FOR VARYING TERM LENGTHS WITHi
3 5 26-17 APPROVED CREDIT. + LEASE PAYMENTS BASED ON 39 MW39K MI $0.15 PER MILES
OVER W/ $3999 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAG, TITE AND $599.50 DEALER FEE, WFTH
APPROVED CREDIT ^PRICES ARE AFIER ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES INCLUDING
USA REBATE,NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. EXCLUDES TAX,TAG,Tm.E AND DEALER
FEE $599.50 INCLUDES 2999 DOWN CASH OR TRADE EQUITY WITH APPROVED
3 5 2 =Eom 1 97^^ ^ CREDIT W/ FINANCING WIITH APPROVED CREDIT. *** ON SELECT MODELS WITH
APPROVED CREDIT.** ESTIMATED EPA HWY MILEAGE.


C22 SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


L Free 24 HR Recorded Message with Ifffo and Special Pricing
inea1800-584-8755 EXL I 1161


L re2 H e odd M gIeI with ~'l~ - I nfo an d peial Pr.^ MJ icing
fB-11~180058-875 XI 114



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