Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02450
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 06-21-2011
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02450

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Triumphant return: Venus makes Wimbledon statement/B1


TODAY & Wednesday morning
HIGH Sunny with isolated
96 afternoon storms. Chance
LOW of rain 20 percent.
72 PAGE A4
JUNE 21, 2011


CITRUS


COUNTY


Historic
hot spots
on June 21
* In Citrus County:
99 degrees in
Inverness in
1963, 1998
and 2009.
* In the state:
109 degrees
in Monticello.
Source: The National
Weather Service


C=

FWC to
weigh in
on springs
The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service is
expected to release
proposed rules for
manatee protection
in King's Bay and
Three Sisters
Springs today.
Highlights of the
proposed rules were
given Monday to
U.S. Rep. Rich Nu-
gent. His office de-
clined to release the
information and
Michael Lusk, man-
ager of the Crystal
River National
Wildlife Refuge, said
the information
would be made
public Tuesday.
Lusk said a public
hearing on the pro-
posed rules is July 7.
For more, go to www.
chronicleonline.com
and see Wednesday's
Chronicle.


SOCIAL SECURITY
OFFICE CLOSING:
Time is
running out
The Social Security
office in Lecanto closes
for good June 30. After
that, you'll have to go to
Ocala./Page A3
TARMAC MINE:
Yankeetown,
WAR file suits
In separate filings,
group and municipality
fight to stop mine from
opening./Page A3
HEALTH & LIFE:


No charges in Ozello killing

Homicidejustifiable, prosecutor finds.'.I-


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
OZELLO -An assistant state at-
torney issued a letter Monday stating
no criminal charges will be filed
against an Ozello man who shot and
killed his neighbor in January
According to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, Scott Sumner Stan-
dard, 46, was shot and fatally
wounded Jan. 24, by his neighbor,
James W Conner III, 49. Officials
said the shooting took place on
Conner's property on South Urchin
Point in Ozello.
A sheriff's office news alert from
January stated deputies had been


dispatched numerous times over
many months regarding an ongoing
dispute between the neighbors. Au-
thorities said it appeared there was
some kind of verbal altercation be-
fore the shooting.
In a letter issued by Assistant
State Attorney Pete Magrino to both
Detective Dave Gallant of the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office and
Bruce Carney, a local attorney rep-
resenting the Standard family, Ma-
grino stated there was "insufficient
evidence to prove a criminal
charge beyond and to the exclusion
of a reasonable doubt."
See . Page A4


It


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle file photo
The house of Scott Standard is pictured in this file photo. Standard was shot
and fatally wounded by his neighbor, James W. Conner III, on Monday,
Jan. 24, in the driveway of Conner's property on South Urchin Point in Ozello.


Alligators on the loose


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
John Littnan's Fairview Estates home backs up to a former gator farm, where 17 of the amphibians escaped last week. Eight are still on the loose.

Seventeen alligators escape from farm near Fairview Estates; eight captured


SHEMIR WILES
Staff Writer
- HERNANDO
T he Yankees game was on and Bob Lisotta had
settled comfortably into his seat watching the
action on the field unfold Thursday Then some-
thing caught his attention. He turned to his French
doors to see what was outside. What he found
was a 5-foot alligator lounging in his backyard.


Dog days
Tips to keep dogs
healthy and comfortable
this summer./Page Cl
RUSH TO FLUSH:
Urine trouble
After a man is caught
relieving himself in a
Portland reservoir, the
city announces it will
drain all 8 million
gallons. /Page AO1


Comics . . . . . . . . . .C8
Community ....... C6
Crossword ........ C7
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment ..... B3
Horoscope ........ B3
Lottery Numbers . . .B2
Lottery Payouts . . . .B3
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A5
Classifieds ....... .C9
TV Listings ....... C7



6 III5 IIIII8 200251I 5


"It was like, 'Voila!'
There he was," Lisotta
said Monday
Lisotta's unwanted visi-
tor was just one of eight
alligators that had been
captured within a four-
day period in the quiet
Fairview Estates neigh-


borhood in Hernando. Ac- -
cording to Florida Fish .--.S,
and Wildlife Conservation -
Commission, 17 alligators .,, . L .
escaped from an alligator: 'A,
farm located on Nicholas .. , -.*-- . 1,
Street in the Crystal Hills k - .J .l:'%. .
Special to the Chronicle
See Page A5 This alligator made its way to the doorstep of a resident of Fairview Estates.


Nugent takes a look at Citrus businesses


^-- �4
I IA

* --

-~ v4 L


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Michael McCarthy, owner of Sibex Electronics, center, talks
to U.S. Rep. Rich Nugent and County Commissioner Joe
Meek on Monday during a tour of the Crystal River facility.


Representative spends day touring Sibex, TCG


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff Writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -U.S.
Rep. Rich Nugent toured a
pair of Citrus County elec-
tronics businesses Monday
and came away impressed.
Now he wants to make
sure federal regulations
don't mess with their
success.
Nugent, R-Brooksville,
spent part of the day at
TCG, an electronics recy-
cler in Lecanto, and Sibex


* COMING WEDNESDAY:
Rep. Nugent's trip to
Afghanistan.

Electronics Inc., which
makes computer boards at
its new facility in the old
Scotty's building in Crystal
River
Officials with the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce and Economic De-
velopment Council led
Nugent on the tour to give
him an insight in the type of


manufacturing Citrus
County hopes to attract and
retain.
"This is exactly the type
of company we want to
highlight or focus on," Com-
missioner Joe Meek, the
EDC chairman, said as Nu-
gent walked through the
vast Sibex facility.
Sibex owner Mike Mc-
Carthy said 83 people work
in the plant, with most of
them creating computer
See Page A2


- 1










Teachers union sues over pension plan changes


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - Florida's
statewide teachers union is taking
the lead in a lawsuit that seeks to
block a requirement for teachers,
state workers and many local gov-
ernment employees to contribute
3 percent of their pay to the state
pension fund.
The suit filed Monday also chal-
lenges a phase-out of cost-of-living
increases in retirement benefits.
The Florida Education Associa-
tion filed the class action on be-
half of 11 government workers
representing several unions in
state circuit court here against
what FEA President Andy Ford
called "essentially an income tax"
on public employees.
Two other unions later filed mo-
tions to intervene. The Florida Po-
lice Benevolent Association has
asked to add two members, an Or-
ange County sheriff's deputy and
a state correctional officer
The Florida Public Services
Union, part of the Service Em-
ployees International Union,
wants to add four members. They
include Palm Beach County
School District maintenance
worker Bobby Mcghee, who said
he took his job with the under-
standing it included a district-paid
paid retirement plan.
"By showing up to work every
day and doing everything I'm


asked, I have held up my end of
the agreement," Mcghee said.
"Now they are trying to change the
rules in the middle of the game so
they don't have to uphold theirs."
The Florida Retirement System
covers 655,000 active employees
and provides benefits to 219,000
retirees.
The suit alleges the contribu-
tion requirement and benefit re-
duction violate existing public
employees' contract rights that
date back to a law passed in 1974
and which are guaranteed by the
Florida Constitution.
"We believe that a promise is a
promise and the state of Florida
should abide by promises it
makes," Ford said.
The suit, though, doesn't chal-
lenge the state's ability to impose
the changes on workers hired
after the new pension law goes
into effect on July 1.
It also alleges the law violates a
state constitutional provision that
guarantees employees the right to
bargain collectively The Republi-
can-controlled Legislature passed
the law without negotiating with
public employee unions.
Gov Rick Scott, who had sought
an even larger 5 percent contribu-
tion, said he was confident the law
will stand up in court
"Asking state employees to pay
a small percentage into their pen-
sions is common sense," the Re-


The suit alleges the law violates a state
constitutional provision that guarantees
employees the right to bargain collectively.
The Republican-controlled Legislature
passed the law without negotiating
with public employee unions.


publican governor said in a state-
ment. "Floridians who don't work
in government are required to pay
into their own retirement. This is
about fairness for those who don't
have government jobs. Plus, we
are ensuring a pension will be
there for state employees when
they retire."
The suit, though, won applause
from Florida House Democratic
Leader Ron Saunders of Key West
He said House Democrats "fought
this unconstitutional attempt to
balance the state budget on the
backs of our public servants."
The employee contributions
won't be used to strengthen the
pension plan, which is rated as
one of the nation's best-funded. In-
stead, they will be offset by equal
reductions in employer contribu-
tions. That's expected to save the
state and local governments $1.2
billion the first year.
At least one public employer in
Pensacola, though, is not taking
the savings. Escambia County is


giving its employees a 3.1 percent
pay raise to offset the pension con-
tributions
The suit was filed on behalf of
two teachers from Hillsborough
and Columbia counties, a pair of
school maintenance workers from
Leon and Madison counties, two
Santa Rosa County sheriff's deputies,
a Hillsborough Community Col-
lege staffer, a Hillsborough County
solid waste worker and three em-
ployees of the Jackson Health Sys-
tem in Miami-Dade County.
The plaintiffs are members of
FEA, local teachers unions, the
Fraternal Order of Police, the
AFL-CIO, American Federation of
State, County and Municipal Em-
ployees and the Service Employ-
ees International Union-Health
Care Florida Local 1991.
The suit names Scott as a defen-
dant along with Attorney General
Pam Bondi and Chief Financial
Officer Jeff Atwater, all members
of the State Board of Administra-
tion, as well as Department of


Management Services Secretary
John Miles. The board oversees
pension fund investments and
Miles administers the plan.
FEA lawyer Ron Meyer said he
expects the case to wind up in the
Florida Supreme Court regard-
less of how it's decided at the trial
court level.
The plaintiffs have asked Cir-
cuit Judge Jackie Fulford to order
that the state set aside the em-
ployee contributions in an inter-
est-bearing account until the issue
is resolved. The employees then
could be reimbursed with interest
if they ultimately win.
The suit is the first of what may
be several by the teachers union
challenging what Ford called
"reckless legislation that was
dreamed up by legislative leaders
and heartily endorsed by our gov-
ernor"
Meyer said "it would be a fair
statement to say we will be litigat-
ing" portions of a new law affect-
ing teacher pay and work
conditions. It sets up a merit pay
system based heavily on how
much each teacher's students im-
prove on standardized tests and
eliminates tenure for new hires.
Ford said the Republican-con-
trolled Legislature made "the
state of Florida a colder and
harsher state" by passing such
laws instead of trying to fix the
state's economy


NUGENT
Continued from Page Al

boards of all shapes and sizes for a va-
riety of enterprises, including med-
ical, military and commercial.
McCarthy told Nugent he thinks the
work force will jump to about 200 in
the next few years.
Nugent, elected to Congress in 2010,
said regulation is the enemy of small
and medium-sized businesses.
"Let's make sure we don't throw a


whole lot of regulations at you," he
said.
Both explained that when Mc-
Carthy's work force tops 100, that trig-
gers a pile of regulations for his
human resources department.
"It doesn't create any more jobs or
sell any more product," Nugent said.
Nugent blamed the Environmental
Protection Agency, especially, for cre-
ating rules and then continuing to add
or change rules.
"You never know what's lurking
over there," he said.
Nugent said business owners who


Fireworks Festival and Poker Run


start off with an investment should be
given the chance to recoup that in-
vestment before the government
changes or adds regulations.
"A lot of businesses are afraid of
changing regulations," he said. "Peo-
ple are taking a risk. You can't keep
moving the goalposts."
To end the day, Nugent walked
around the Three Sisters property in
Crystal River and was given a boat
tour of King's Bay
Chronicle reporter Mike Wright can
be reached at (352) 563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. com.


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A2 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


LOCAI/STATE


CiTnus CouNT'y (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 - TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Yankeetown, Withlacoochee aim to stop Tarmac


Residents suing to overturn Levy County's

decision allowing miningproject


Lou ELLIOTT JONES
Special to the Chronicle
YANKEETOWN - The Town of
Yankeetown and the Withla-
coochee Area Residents are sepa-
rately asking a judge to overturn
the Levy County Commission's ap-
proval of a conditional special ex-
ception permit for the proposed
Tarmac King Road mining project
near Inglis.
Yankeetown is petitioning for a
writ of certiorari, basically a review
of the commissioners' decision to
grant the exception, while the With-
lacoochee group is asking for an in-
junction on the grounds the
approval is inconsistent with the
county's own Comprehensive Plan


Around the
COUNTY

Webb to speak at
political meeting
County Commissioner
Winn Webb, who is running
for sheriff in 2012, is the guest
speaker at tonight's meeting
of the Women's Political Net-
work of Citrus County.
The group meets at 6:30 p.m.
at Central Ridge Library. The
meeting is open to the public.
For information, call Jeanne
McIntosh at (352) 746-5660.
TOO FAR to discuss
disaster preparation
Patty Muscalla of the Cit-
rus County Resource Center
will speak at the TOO FAR
General Meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday, June 23, at East
Citrus Community Center on
State Road 44, about 4 miles
east of Inverness.
The discussion topic is
how to prepare in case of a
major event, including
storms, earthquakes, mas-
sive fires, explosions and nu-
clear events.
Of course, it is hurricane
season, and attendees will
find out what to do if they
don't have water, electricity,
telephone service and no
way to evacuate.
TOO FAR meetings are
open to the public.
For information, call TOO
FAR at (352) 726-5004.
Social Security office
closing June 30
The local Social Security
office at the Citrus County
Resource Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto,
will close permanently at the
end of the month.
The office has been open
two days a week at the cen-
ter from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Monday and Thursdays.
Noting almost all services
are available online, the So-
cial Security Administration
announced the closure of the
Citrus office and many similar
branches around the country.
The Citrus office is based out
of the Ocala regional office,
which will be the closest So-
cial Security office for most
Citrus residents.
Residents may access So-
cial Security services online
at www.socialsecurity.gov.
If locals need help or do not
have a computer and Internet
access, they may go to a
county public library to access
the services online and re-
ceive help from a library staff
member. They may also call
(800) 772-1213 or visit the
Ocala Office at 217 S.E. First
Avenue, Ocala, FL 34471.
-From staff reports

Correction
Because of a reporter's
error, a story on Page Al of
Saturday's edition, "Lost to
addiction," contained incor-
rect information. Terry Allen
Karamalakis Jr. died March 24.
The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles by
mailing dmann@chronicle
online.com or by calling (352)
563-5660.


on environmentally sensitive lands.
A hearing has been set on the
Yankeetown petition for July 20 by
8th Judicial Circuit Judge Robert
Rountree Jr No date has been set
for the WAR suit.
The County Commission voted
3-1 to approve a special exception
permit May 4, allowing mining of
hard limerock on 2,757 acres of a
4,750-acre site for 110 years. The
rock will be mined to depths of 120
feet by blasting and water-dredg-
ing. About 6 million tons of rock
per year will be removed, leaving
behind more than 20 lakes sur-
rounded by berms.
The public hearing and ap-
proval came even though the pro-
posal has yet to receive a permit


from the Army Corps of Engi-
neers. The mining company ap-
plied for the permit in 2007 and
the Corps is expected to release a
draft Environmental Impact
Statement later this year
In the petition, Yankeetown
claims the county commission vio-
lated its own ordinances:
* that require all federal, state
and local permits be obtained be-
fore the application for a special
exception is made; and
* that the project is located in
environmentally sensitive lands -
a coastal zone and a coastal high
hazard area, and contains listed
species, both of which are pro-
tected from mining.
Yankeetown Mayor Dawn Clary
said the town filed the suit be-
cause of concern about the impact
the mine will have on water wells
and for another important reason.
"I think Yankeetown is a very,
very environmentally sensitive


area and we are just a town of en-
vironmentalists," she said.
Clary said some residents are
still concerned by Tarmac's re-
fusal to perform a dye test on the
groundwater to see if the flow of
groundwater would go from the
mines to wells used by residents.
"You never really know until
you do the test," she said.
"We do live kind of on the edge
here," she continued. "We're in a
very hard spot and we went
through a lot for our water plant."
The town dedicated a new
water plant about two years ago.
The Withlacoochee group said
121 of its members live in Levy
County and make use of its natu-
ral resources. The suit states:
* Surrounding lands "could be
adversely impacted by the long-
term impacts of the proposed Tar-
mac mine," including wildlife and
wetlands;
* Residents could suffer ad-


Local heroine

TO MEN AND WOMEN IN THE MILITARY


Chronicle file
Barbara Mills found out she will be formally recognized for her work honoring service men and women returning
to their home from their deployment.

40 &e 8 to honor Mills with Nationale Americanism Award


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff Writer
For Barbara Mills, it's not about
the recognition for herself.
It's about the returning military
members coming home to Citrus
County from Iraq and Afghanistan
and getting the hero's welcome
they deserve.
Mills recently learned she will
receive the Nationale American-
ism Award from the 40 & 8 organi-
zation in Vancouver, Wash., this
September for her efforts with Op-
eration Welcome Home.
The 40 & 8, an off-shoot organiza-
tion of the American Legion, began
after World War I and is named for
the French Railways boxcars that
carried 40 American doughboys or
8 horses to the frontlines.
The Americanism award is given
to nonmembers of the 40 & 8 who
exemplify patriotism and support
ofAmerican veterans and the spirit
of Americanism.
"She inspires others," local 40 &
8 member John Kaiserian said.
"It's not just her fundraising or the


gift baskets she puts together, but
her work and dedication as a
whole. She's been able to get a lot
of the local veterans groups to
come together, which is an accom-
plishment in itself."
He noted she regularly visits
wounded service members at the
hospital in Tampa and works tire-
lessly baking rum cakes, sending
off care packages and fundraising.
"We as an organization love and
support her," Kaiserian said.
Mills said she is honored and
flattered to receive this award, but
that's not why she does what she
does.
"I love doing this," she said. "I
think I've found my niche in life be-
cause I love working with these
guys. For me, it's personal. My son
Kevin's been to Iraq and
Afghanistan and now he's in Eng-
land."
She said the only negative aspect
to getting this award is traveling to
Washington state for the event. As
she said, "Barbara doesn't do air-
planes." However, a fear of flying
won't keep her from going. She just


bought tickets for a four-day cross-
country train trip.
'"Actually, it's been on my bucket
list to take a train trip and go west,"
she said.
She said ever since her son
joined the Navy she made it her
goal to send as many comforts of
home to service members overseas
and give local members a party in
their honor and a gift basket worth
hundreds of dollars when they re-
turn.
"When I read the letters from the
local veterans who nominated me
for this award, that they think that
much of me, it brings tears to my
eyes," she said.
"I work with a lot of great people,
retired veterans. Some of them -
during the Vietnam War, they were
treated so badly they didn't even
wear their uniforms when they
came home," she said. "But these
retired veterans want to welcome
these guys back the right way"
Chronicle reporter Nancy
Kennedy can be reached at (352)
564-2927 or nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


FWC bans campfires in wildlife, park areas


Chronicle
Due to significant
drought conditions and the
increased threat of wild-
fires, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) in coopera-
tion with other agencies
issued an order banning
campfires in wildlife man-
agement areas, wildlife and
environmental areas and all


other lands FWC manages.
The order went into ef-
fect at 12:01 a.m. June 17
and will remain in effect
until another order re-
scinds it. The FWC joins the
state's Division of Forestry,
the Department of Environ-
mental Protection and
Florida's water manage-
ment districts in this effort.
Public land in Citrus
County affected by the ban


includes the Citrus and Ho-
mosassa tracts of the With-
lacoochee State Forest as
well as Potts Reserve and
Flying Eagle wildlife man-
agement areas.
If placed openly on the
ground, the fire is consid-
ered a campfire and is pro-
hibited under the order Only
cooking fires contained in
commercially designed ap-
paratuses, such as charcoal


or gas grills, are allowed.
"Well, the problem is,
we're so dry that any kind
of fire has the possibility of
starting another wildfire,
which we do not need,"
FWC spokeswoman Karen
Parker said.
Any violation is consid-
ered a second-degree mis-
demeanor, punishable by
up to a $500 fine and 60
days in jail.


verse effects to the Comprehen-
sive Plan, including health and
safety, and environmental or nat-
ural resources which exceed the
interest held by all county resi-
dents;
* Residents' ability to engage in
educational, scientific, recre-
ational and advocacy activities
would be harmed by the county's
failure to comply with its Compre-
hensive Plan for the Withla-
coochee ecosystem;
* It fails to protect the "Florida
Outstanding Waters" of the nearby
Waccasassa Preserve State Park
- a national natural landmark, as
required by the environmentally
sensitive lands policy element;
* It could endanger the nearby
945,000-acre Big Bend Seagrass
Aquatic Preserve, the sealife
within, and commercial seafood
harvesting.
Lou Elliott Jones is the editor of
the Chiefland Citizen.



Judge


recesses


murder


trial early

Official orders

attorneys to

stop bickering
Associated Press
ORLANDO - Fed up with
the constant bickering and
legal posturing, the judge in
the Casey Anthony murder
trial scolded prosecutors
and defense attorneys Mon-
day, warning them they may
face punishment when the
trial concludes. Then, the
judge abruptly canceled
proceedings for the day to
give both sides time to work
out their differences.
From the start, Judge
Belvin Perry has had to be
more than a legal referee.
He forced both sides to
shake hands a couple of
months before the trial even
started, and lately he has
grown frustrated the jury
has to wait in another room
while the two sides haggle
over witnesses.
"There has been games-
manship on both sides,"
Perry said. "... Obviously
there is a friction between
attorneys. That's something
I guess the Florida bar will
deal with. And at the conclu-
sion of this trial, the court
will deal with violations that
may have occurred."
Anthony, 25, is accused of
killing her 2-year-old daugh-
ter during the summer of
2008. She has pleaded not
guilty. The defense says the
girl drowned in her grand-
parents' swimming pool
while the state says she was
suffocated by duct tape
being placed over her nose
and mouth. If convicted, An-
thony could get the death
penalty.
In response to the attor-
neys' infighting on Day 23 of
the trial, Perry told them to
expect to work a full day this
Saturday, instead of just a
half. He also said they must
be in their seats at 8:30 each
morning, ready to go, rather
than getting to courtroom
any time before 9 a.m.


Associated Press
Chief Judge Belvin Perry
warned defense attorneys
and prosecutors today that
he is getting fed up with
games being played during
the course of the Casey
Anthony trial. Anthony is
charged with the death of her
daughter in summer 2008.






A4 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
* Gregory Preston Massey
Jr., 25, of 35 S. Adams St., Bev-
erly Hills, at 9:39 p.m. June 15,
on a misdemeanor charge of
driving under the influence. Ac-
cording to Massey's arrest re-
port, he failed all field sobriety
tasks he was asked to perform
and stated he had taken six oxy-
codone and three Xanax pills
that day. His blood alcohol con-
centrations were .000 percent
and .000 percent, below the legal
limit of .08 percent. Bond $500.
* Alba L. Gomez-Hernan-
dez, 41, of 474 W. Sugarberry
Lane, Beverly Hills, at 12:03 a.m.
Thursday on misdemeanor
charges of driving under the in-
fluence and failure to stop or flee-
ing a law enforcement officer
after being ordered to stop. Ac-
cording to Gomez-Hernandez's
arrest report, a deputy attempted
to stop Gomez-Hemandez after
he observed her traveling north
in the southbound lanes on U.S.
19 in Crystal River near Apple-
bee's. Gomez-Hernandez re-
portedly kept driving until she
stopped in a Taco Bell parking lot
near the intersection of U.S. 19
and State Road 44. The report
stated Gomez-Hernandez
smelled of alcohol; however, her
blood alcohol concentrations
were .000 percent and .000 per-
cent, below the legal limit of .08
percent. According to the report,
the breath samples were not re-
liable. Bond $500.
Other arrests
* John Calvin Ash, 56, of
3441 W. Cypress Drive, Dunnel-
Ion, at 11:22 a.m. June 15, on an
active Citrus County warrant for
a failure to appear on a felony
charge of driving with a sus-
pended/revoked license, an ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for a
write of bodily attachment for
nonpayment of child support,
and new felony and misde-
meanor charges of failing to stop
or fleeing law enforcement after


ordered to stop, false imprison-
ment, driving with a suspended/
revoked license, resisting an offi-
cer without violence and obstruc-
tion by disguise. No bond.
* Kathryn Marie Sanderson,
49, of 1470 E. Ray St., Her-
nando, at 12:41 p.m. June 15, on
a felony charge of felony retail
theft. Bond $2,000.
* Wendy Gail Anderson
Brooks, 40, of 9530 W. Green-
bay Lane, Crystal River, at 2:12
p.m. June 15, on felony charges
of grand theft, traffic/endeavor to
traffic in stolen property and pro-
viding false information to a
metal recycler. Bond $30,000.
* Michael Douglas Bevis,
23, of 34 S. Adams St., Beverly
Hills, at 5:08 p.m. June 15, on a
misdemeanor charge of petit re-
tail theft. Bond $250.
* Amanda Lavona McEI-
murray, 19, of 7290 S. Gilbert
Terrace, Lecanto, at 5:40 p.m.
June 15, on misdemeanor and
felony charges of possession of
a controlled substance and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Bond $5,500.
* John Stephen Hrivnak,
48, of 8550 W. Mayo Drive Apt.
18, Crystal River, at 5:40 p.m.
June 15, on an active Citrus
County warrant for a failure to
appear on a misdemeanor charge
of driving with a suspended/re-
voked license and new felony
and misdemeanor charges of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance (cocaine), driving with a
suspended/revoked license and
sale of cocaine. Bond $22,500.
* Cody Alan Cooke, 18, of
11145 N. Easter Terrace, Dun-
nellon, at 7:24 p.m. June 15, on
an active Citrus County warrant
for a felony charge of lewd and
lascivious battery. Bond $20,000.
* Alan Keith Swinburnson,
26, of 4163 W. Oaklawn St.,
Lecanto, at 7:26 p.m. June 15,
on misdemeanor and felony
charges of possession of a con-
trolled substance and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia. Bond
$2,500.


LOCAL


KILLING
Continued from Page Al

In Gallant's copy of the
letter, Magrino stated his
decision not to file charges
was not based on a "lack of
quality of the investigation
or any lack of investigative
effort on your part." In-
stead it was based on
Florida Statutes 776.013
and 776.032, also know as
the "Stand Your Ground
Law."
Florida Statute 776.013
(3) states: "A person who is
not engaged in an unlawful
activity and who is attacked
in any other place where
he or she has a right to be
has no duty to retreat and
has the right to stand his or
her ground and meet force
with force, including
deadly force, if he or she
reasonably believes it is
necessary to do so to pre-
vent death or great bodily
harm to himself or herself
or another or to prevent the
commission of a forcible
felony."
Magrino said Monday af-
ternoon during a telephone
interview that since the


Legislature changed the
law in 2005, law enforce-
ment and state attorney of-
fices have had to change
the way they conduct these
kinds of investigations and
under that law coupled
with the evidence, this
homicide qualified as being
justifiable.
It has been nearly five
months since the incident
shook the quiet community
of Ozello, and Magrino said
several factors resulted in
the impediment of his de-
cision, including schedul-
ing a number of interviews
that were delayed, await-
ing information from the
medical examiner's office
and coordinating sched-
ules with the lawyers rep-
resenting Conner and
Standard.
He added there were wit-
nesses who, at first, said
they either saw or heard
something the night of
shooting, but after tracking
down the witnesses and in-
terviewing them, it turned
out not to be true. In addi-
tion, Magrino said he
wanted to give the Standard
family enough time to con-
tribute to the investigation.
In conclusion of his in-


It's been a

terrible time for

me. ... It should

never have come

to that.


James Conner III
reacting to the news that he
was cleared of criminal
wrongdoing in the shooting
death ofr Scott Standard.

vestigation, Magrino recom-
mended to the sheriff's of-
fice it close its case as a
justifiable homicide. How-
ever, he did state if any new
evidence should come up
down the road, he would
certainly revisit the case
again.
While Conner has been
cleared of any criminal
wrongdoing, he stated Mon-
day afternoon during a
brief telephone interview
that the ruling didn't make
him feel any better about
what happened between
him and his neighbor.
"It's not as gratifying as I
thought it would be," he
said. "I sincerely feel bad."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

He stated he wished he
had never purchased the
property next to Standard's
residence; that's when he
said their relationship went
sour
And while he expressed
remorse for what occurred,
Conner added that his ac-
tions were in self-defense.
"I feel bad for the kids
and I feel bad for the family,
but all I could do was do
what I did. I didn't have a
choice in the matter," he
said.
Still distraught and
breaking down in a fit of
tears, Conner stated he
would be seeking counsel-
ing to deal with his emo-
tions and attempt to move
on with his life.
"It's been a terrible time
for me. God knows I been
going through a lot," he
said. "It should have never
come to that."
Messages left for Carney,
Conner's attorney Randall
Grantham and Standard's
wife, Joellen, were not im-
mediately returned Mon-
day
Chronicle reporter Shemir
Wiles can be reached at
(352) 564-2924 or swiles@
chronicleonline. com.


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


p . Meeting Notices.....................................C12

Miscellaneous Notices..........................C12

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices..........C12

Notice to Creditors/Administration......C12

PDRB Notices .................................... C12

Surplus Property .................................... C12


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO R H OPR HI LO PR
96 71 0.00 96i 0 o J96 70 0.00
1 -0 ,- 96 69 O.O .


96 72 0.00 96 71 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK forecast by
,i,-IIIP"- I TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 96 Low: 72
Very warm temperatures will continue
with a light WNW wind of 5-10mph.

a-gri. gg WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
)1� High: 95 Low: 72
A few more clouds will drift across the area, but
rain chances will remain 20%
THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Increased moisture will result in higher rain
S' chances and a few more thunderstorms

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 96/69
Record 98/65
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 83
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 3.44 in.
Total for the year 27.42 in.
Normal for the year 21.42 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.98 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 6'
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 44�%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweeed, grasses, nettle
Today's count: 3.7/12
Wednesday's count: 5.0/12
Thursday's count: 3.9/12
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING)
6/21 TUESDAY 11:02 4:51
6/22 WEDNESDAY 11:46 5:36


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


S ^ - ,TUNStTl ONlU HIH
SUNRISE TOMORF
0 O O0 MOONRISETODAY
JULY 1 JULY8 JULY 15 MOONSETTODAY.


MINOR MAJOR
(AFTERNOON)
11:23 5:12
-- 5:56


...................... 8:32 P.M.
ROW ............... 6:33 A.M.
. ...................12:02 A.M.
.................... 12:03 P.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. A burn ban is in effect.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site: http://
flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may water on
Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water on Wednesday and/or
Saturday before 10 a m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is limited to once per week, before
8 a.m. or after 6 p.m
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants (other than
lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers
Tu
ty High/Low
hassahowitzka* 10:30 a/5:50 a
ystal River** 8:51 a/3:12 a
ithlacoochee* 6:38 a/1:00 a
omosassa*** 9:40 a/4:49 a


**At King's Bay
esday
High/Low
10:05 p/6:07 p
8:26 p/3:29 p
6:13 p/1:17 p
9:15 p/5:06 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
11:06 a/6:25 a 11:06 p/7:03 p
9:27 a/3:47 a 9:27 p/4:25 p
7:14 a/1:35 a 7:14 p/2:13 p
10:16 a/5:24 a 10:16 p/6:02 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast


ts
ts
pc
pc
sh
ts
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast

ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts

PC


MARINE OUTLOOK
West winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas Gulf water
2 feet. Bay and inland waters will temperature
have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy,
chance of scattered showers and 0
thunderstorms today.

Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a 27.68 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 35.66 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness n/a 36.97 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a 37.90 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being e ualed or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is sub ectto revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


S31 ol


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L


81 53
83 57
84 64 .01
92 76
79 61 .02
99 78
79 68 .08
74 51
96 78
79 50
83 62
84 58
77 50
101 80
80 67 .25
94 70
79 65 .18
76 64 .77
80 63 .01
101 76
74 63 .02
81 45
99 78
66 48 1.05
83 64 2.11
77 61 .04
96 78
90 75
77 63 .03
82 55
97 81
78 66 2.03
98 75 .03
94 71
97 78
69 60
91 70 .57
94 78
71 55 .45
77 62
95 76
96 75
93 70


84 65
87 62
91 63
95 72
82 68
97 77
90 74
78 49
93 75
82 55
79 64
73 64
82 56
95 77
92 70
95 72
87 69
91 71
85 69
100 75
91 71
82 57
97 76
78 52
78 61
83 69
97 72
93 72
86 69
84 64
93 78
91 73
92 74
102 81
89 71
73 63
95 73
91 73
75 65
75 62
93 78
96 74
94 73


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c~cloudy; dr=drizze, Wair; h=hazy;
pG~parfly cloudy; w~ain; rs--rain/snow mix; s--sunny;
sh-showers; sn=snow; ts-thancierstorms; w-windy.
02011 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 95 80 ts 90 79
New York City 81 67 ts 84 69
Norfolk 80 66 .06 pc 87 72
Oklahoma City 96 78 ts 90 67
Omaha 87 68 .24 ts 75 61
Palm Springs 10771 s 106 75
Philadelphia 79 69 ts 85 71
Phoenix 10378 s 109 82
Pittsburgh 78 66 .35 ts 88 69
Portland, ME 78 51 pc 76 56
Portland, Ore 71 57 pc 81 59
Providence, R.I. 81 54 s 83 63
Raleigh 93 69 pc 95 73
Rapid City 63 57 .66 sh 72 53
Reno 89 52 s 90 62
Rochester, NY 79 52 ts 82 62
Sacramento 97 62 s 102 65
St. Louis 91 79 ts 88 70
St. Ste. Marie 70 59 .02 sh 72 54
Salt Lake City 72 49 s 79 57
San Antonio 99 78 pc 96 76
San Diego 69 61 s 72 62
San Francisco 90 57 s 81 58
Savannah 97 77 ts 98 77
Seattle 69 54 pc 74 55
Spokane 70 48 s 82 54
Syracuse 83 52 ts 85 63
Topeka 92 83 ts 83 62
Washington 80 67 .34 ts 90 72
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 109 Laredo, Texas LOW 25 Grand Canyon
Airport, Ariz.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/I/SKY
Acapulco 87/77/ts
Amsterdam 68/57/sh
Athens 84/73/s
Beijing 95/73/pc
Berlin 73/57/c
Bermuda 81/73/pc
Cairo 91/69/s
Calgary 73154/sh
Havana 91/75/pc
Hong Kong 88/83/ts
Jerusalem 84/63/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


82/64/s
68/54/sh
95/64/s
75/59/ts
79/59/pc
70/55/c
73/59/sh
79/67/s
88/70/s
60/45/s
82/70/ts
79/66/pc
72/55/ts


C I T R U S


C 0 U N TY


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'44.
- '- Norvell Brarnt Hwi
vDunen I - _ Cannondale Dr
A MeadowcresI
N :1

I Iz | Courthouse
To mpkins St. T square





Who's in charge:


34
JUNE 23


Ci
Ch
Cr
W
Ho


01 IRIOCT Tnhllr'UT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Critics bash redistricting process


Legislators defend

process, only listen to

residents' comments

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - Anti-gerryman-
dering advocates used the Republi-
can-controlled Florida Legislature's
first public meeting on redistricting
Monday to say what they think's wrong
with the process.
They argued lawmakers should
draw up proposed maps for legislative
and congressional districts first and
then get public comment on how they
might be changed. Lawmakers don't
plan on drawing maps until after they
hold public meetings through Sept. 1
in 25 more cities and towns.
"Where are the maps?" asked Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union regional di-
rector Susan Watson. "Make a map
now, present it to the public now and
start a meaningful conversation.... We
don't want fake hearings and mean-
ingless talk."
Lawmakers didn't immediately re-
spond because legislative leaders
have ordered them not to comment
during the meetings, but they de-
fended their procedures later at a
news conference.
"Are you going to be able to talk to
us?" Tallahassee resident Bob Fulford
asked during the meeting.
After a brief silence, House Redis-
tricting Chairman Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel, said he would re-
spond only after Fulford finished his
comments, including an observation
that present districts "look like the
original gerrymander."
"There is no gag order," Weatherford


GATORS
Continued from PageAl

Mini Farms area.
A local nuisance-alligator
trapper reportedly caught
the eight 4- to 6-foot alliga-
tors in the housing develop-
ment, which has no nearby
natural water sources. An-
other alligator was found
dead. It had been struck by
a vehicle, FWC reported.
According to a report,
FWC investigator Jim Smith
knew of a licensed facility
that had alligators in a
fenced-in area and said Al-
bert J. Spiegel had been ap-
proved for an alligator farm
license in February He pur-
chased 20 animals that same
month. Two died at the farm.
During the last inspection
in February, Smith said
Spiegel met all the require-
ments. However, after
learning about the at-large
alligators, Smith met with
Spiegel and conducted an
inspection of the 2.5-acre
farm. Spiegel was report-
edly surprised to learn that
of his 18 alligators, only one
remained in the enclosure.
It was determined the al-
ligators escaped through a
hole they dug under the
fence.
Spiegel's neighbor, John
Littnan, said he believed
the gators came into
Fairview Estates possibly by
climbing a wire fence that
separates his property from
Spiegel's.

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ONLINE
* Florida Legislature redistricting
site: www.floridaredistricting.org.


then said. "This is a listening tour"
Lawmakers broke their silence only
once more during the meeting when
Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah, insisted
on defending the honor of Miami-
Dade County after a woman said she
left there because "That is not my
country anymore."
Weatherford and his Senate coun-
terpart, though, had plenty to say to re-
porters after the meeting, including a
response to several critics who had
urged them to speed up the redistrict-
ing process.
They included Deidre Macnab,
president of the Florida League of
Women Voters. She said it appears the
Legislature won't finish its work until
March, leaving little time for legal
challenges and a federal Justice De-
partment review before candidates
begin qualifying next June.
"Florida deserves elections where
the people have time to understand
their choices," Macnab said. "This
timeline only benefits incumbents."
Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, later
said it's not necessarily true lawmak-
ers won't vote until February or March.
He said there's no reason they won't
vote sooner at least in committee.
Gaetz said the public will have a
chance to comment on the maps at
meetings in Tallahassee before they go
to a vote, although lawmakers may not
take their show on the road again.
"We live in the Internet age," Gaetz
said. "You don't have to get in a car and
drive across town or across the state to
participate."
The two redistricting leaders noted
the public can comment at any time


Standing outside on his
property just feet away from
the alligators' enclosure,
Littan said he had been
complaining about his
neighbor to the county and
FWC for at least three years
before this incident oc-
curred, but nothing was
ever done.
Now, he said, he has been
encouraging a lot his neigh-
bors to be careful when they
go outside to retrieve their
mail or walk their dogs.
Frustrated, Littnan said
he would anticipate this
kind of activity if he lived
near the water, but to think
hungry, thirsty alligators
could be lurking around the
neighborhood puts him on
edge.
"Somebody could have
been hurt. Thank God no-
body was attacked," he said.
"You expect this near water
... but not five, six miles
away from the lake."
Lisotta's wife, Patricia,
said their gator sighting
happened only a few hours
after an elderly neighbor
learned she had one in her
driveway
Lisotta said he now keeps
his eyes wide open when
he's outside. Every rustle in


and citizens even can submit their
own maps on the Legislature's redis-
tricting website.
Fort Walton Beach tea party activist
Henry Kelly was one of the few speak-
ers who defended the Legislature's
approach, saying he's "glad to start
with a blank slate."
Macnab also urged lawmakers to
drop their code of silence and stop
using taxpayer money to fight a pair
of state constitutional amendments
on legislative and congressional re-
districting that voters adopted last
year. The House has joined two mem-
bers of Congress in a court challenge
to the congressional redistricting
amendment.
Amendments sponsored by the Fair
Districts Now coalition prohibit
drawing districts to favor incumbents
or the party in power. Other provi-
sions require district lines to follow
existing political boundaries as much
as possible and they do nothing to di-
minish representation of minorities.
Representatives of the National As-
sociation for the Advancement of Col-
ored People and Common Cause,
partners with the in the coalition with
the League of Women Voters, offered
similar criticism.
Common Cause national governing
board member Peter Butzin suggested
lawmakers hold another round of pub-
lic meetings after proposed maps are
drawn.
Gaetz and Weatherford also wrote a
letter to Fair Districts leader Ellen
Freiden reminding her that she once
said lawmakers should get public
input for drawing maps.
At the meeting, though, Tallahassee
resident Marty Monroe, who called
herself a "recovering civics teacher,"
told lawmakers the 63 percent voter
approval the amendments received
was "a lot of input" from the public.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Bob Lisotta.
the bush makes him uneasy
"If (an alligator) attaches
himself to my leg, I'm in
trouble," he said. "I don't
want my calf ripped off."
The couple also said the
trapper who caught their al-
ligator said it was emaci-
ated, meaning those still on
the loose are probably look-
ing for food.
"We don't know how many
are still out there," Lisotta
said.
According to FWC, eight
of the farm's gators remain
unaccounted for.
Spiegel was reportedly
cited for maintaining


wildlife in an unsafe/un-
sanitary condition, a sec-
ond-degree misdemeanor,
punishable by a fine of up
to $500 and/or up to 60
days in jail, and voluntar-
ily surrendered his alliga-
tor farm license to FWC
investigators.
The lone alligator
Smith found at the farm
was transferred to a per-
mitted facility
Though the other alliga-
tors have yet to be found,
FWC is urging people not
to be worried, but to re-
main aware of their sur-
roundings.
"This is Florida and we
have gators everywhere,"
FWC spokeswoman
Karen Parker said Mon-
day "The others have
probably just found some-
place nice to live and
they're just hiding out"
If people do see an alli-
gator in a place where it's
not supposed to be, they
should call the Nuisance
Alligator Hotline at (866)
FWC-GATOR.
Chronicle reporter
Shemir Wiles can be
reached at (352) 564-2924
or swiles@chronicle
online.com.


To Place Your

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at 563.3266
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* Durial
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Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


BEST


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Audioproslhologisl
M. Div., BC-HIS


21 .ApopkaAve,-nvrnss- ww -nernssearng'co


James
Briske, 74
HERNANDO
James Joseph Briske, 74,
Hernando, died June 19,
2011. Private arrangements
at Florida National Ceme-
tery Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory

Nelda
Gasiorek, 78
HERNANDO
Nelda Ruth Gasiorek, 78,
of Hernando, passed away
on June 17, 2011, at HPH
Hospice, Lecanto. A native
of Louisville, KY, she moved
here 20 years ago and was a
lifelong homemaker and
parishioner of Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church, Bev-
erly Hills.
She is survived by her
husband of 54 years, John J.
Gasiorek of Hernando; sons,
David Gasiorek of Her-
nando and John J. Gasiorek
Jr. of Brooklyn, Michigan;
daughter, Marian Hallee of
Crystal River; grandson,
John J. Gasiorek of Brook-
lyn, Michigan; and grand-
daughter, Nicole Gasiorek
of Beverly Hills.
A private memorial serv-
ice was requested by
Nelda's family. Fero Fu-
neral Home in Beverly Hills
is handling the arrange-
ments. www.ferofuneral
home.com.

Merle Jones, 93
CRYSTAL RIVER
Merle D.H. Jones, 93, of
Crystal River, died Friday,
June 17, 2011. Private cre-
mation will take place
under the direction of


Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto.

Karleen
Klice, 57
INGLIS
Karleen Bea Klice, 57, of
Inglis, died Thursday, June
16, 2011. Private cremation
will take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto.

Sue Tozier, 73
INVERNESS
Sue Darlene Skiles
Tozier, 73, died June 15,

rus Memo-
rial Hospice
in Inver-
n e s s ,
Florida.
She was
born July
18, 1937, in
Charleston, Sue
West Vir- Tozier
ginia, to
Richard and Pauline Skiles.
Her final days were spent
surrounded by family and
friends.
Sue is survived by her 2
sisters, Faye Mallory and
Laura Forester; 2 brothers,
Richard Skiles and Joe
Roucchio; 4 daughters, Kim
Bear, Crystal Cox, Connie
Cox and Kelly Cox; 10
grandchildren; and 18 great-
grandchildren. She was pre-
ceded in death by her
parents; her sister, Debbie
Lear; her daughter, Kerry
Hatten; and 1 grandchild.
A private service will be
held at a later date.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County Chronicle's policy permits both free
and paid obituaries.
* Obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home or
society in charge of arrangements.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next
day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicleonline.com or fax (352) 563-
3280.
* Call (352) 563-5660 for details.


Obituaries


598-0621 TUCRN
NOTICE OF INTENT TO
CONSIDER AN
ORDINANCE
AMENDING THE CITRUS
COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE

Citrus County Development Services is requesting
two public hearing workshops to review several
sections of the Proposed Land Development Code.

WORKSHOPS on the proposed ordinance will be held
by the Citrus County Planning and Development
Review Board (PDRB) on July 7,2011 and on July 21,
2011, at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida at 9:00
AM for their review and recommendation to the Board
of County Commissioners. Please note that the
PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time
that a particular item is discussed will vary
depending on how fast the PDRB moves through
the agenda.

Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed ordinance
amendment.

A copy of the proposed ordinance and supporting
materials are available for public inspection and
copying between the hours of 8:00 AM. and 5:00
P.M., Monday through Friday, at the Department of
Development Services, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461. For more information about
this application, please contact the Land Development
Division at (352) 527-5239.

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need
to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes all testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the County Administrator's
Office, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565,
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD
telephone (352) 341-6580.

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
00081RX


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 AS







AG TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE M RKETIN RE IEWU


IHowTKs *I 'IEA H T I i W


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Ameri-
S&P500ETF1373273127.70 +.65 CheniereEn 46746 8.17 +.17 RschMotn 540430 25.89 -1.86 can Stock Exchange. Tables show name, price and net change.
BkofAm 869155 10.60 -.08 VantageDrl 37422 1.66 -.01 Cisco 536006 15.14 +.17 Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
SPDRFncl 510637 14.88 -.01 OpkoHIth 34876 3.28 -.01 Microsoft 532769 24.47 +.21 tion). Names consisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letter's list.
iShR2K 466480 78.95 +.72 Adventrx 32930 2.66 +.29 Level3 426563 2.15 +.03 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
FordM 450841 12.94 +.17 KodiakOg 29931 5.28 -.27 Intel 369788 21.33 +.14 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by...

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Stock Footnotes: cld - Issue has been called for redempbon by company. d -New 52-week
low. dd -Loss in last 12 mos. ec- Company formerly listed on the Amenrican Exchange's
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Cha Emerging Company Marketplace. h- temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus list-
DexOne 2.90 +.80 +38.1 OrsusXel rs 4.05 +.86 +27.0 HarbinElec 13.35 +4.96 +59.2 ing qualification. n-Stock was a new issue in the last year.The 52-week high and low fig-
Talbots 3.73 +.65 +21.1 Bacterin n 3.17 +.41 +14.9 ReconTech 2.50 +.40 +19.0 ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf- Preferred stock issue. pr- Preferences. pp-
CaptiTr 3.68 +.56 +17.9 HKN 2.33 +.28 +13.7 AcuraPh 4.50 +.63 +16.3 Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt- Right to buy security at a specified pnce. s-
Pharmerica 11.91 +1.30 +12.3 Cover-All 2.55 +.29 +12.8 QuickLog 3.12 +.42 +15.6 Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the
ZaleCp 5.41 +.58 +12.0 Adventrx 2.66 +.29 +12.2 HimaxTch 2.01 +.26 +14.9 stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock., u - New
52-week high. un - Unit, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or re-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) ceivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name.
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
QiaoXMob 2.00 -.70 -25.9 Accelr8 3.95 -1.00 -20.2 Vitacost h 3.41 -2.29 -40.2
ChinaDEd 2.22 -.30 -11.9 GoldRsvg 2.60 -.39 -13.0 RITTech 8.18 -2.00 -19.6
PhxNMdan 9.04 -.90 -9.1 NewEnSys 2.48 -.30 -10.8 CoffeeH 13.10 -2.49 -16.0


BPZRes 3.22 -.31 -8.8 PhrmAth 2.41 -.22 -8.4 AlmostFam 23.95 -3.82 -13.8
ChiNBorun 3.93 -.37 -8.7 EllieMaen 5.40 -.49 -8.3 Spire h 2.09 -.32 -13.3


2,061 Advanced
975 Declined
100 Unchanged
3,136 Total issues
31 New Highs
51 New Lows
3,045,242,705 Volume


231 Advanced
240 Declined
34 Unchanged
505 Total issues
4 New Highs
9 New Lows
103,776,660 Volume


DIARY


1,486
1,120
98
2,704
30
104
1,604,127,860


52-Week
High Low Name
12,876.00 9,614.32Dow Jones Industrials
5,565.78 3,872.64Dow Jones Transportation
441.86 353.53Dow Jones Utilities
8,718.25 6,355.83NYSE Composite
2,490.51 1,770.05Amex Index
2,887.75 2,061.14Nasdaq Composite
1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500
14,562.01 10,596.20Wilshire 5000
868.57 587.66Russell 2000


Last
12,080.38
5,201.22
429.17
8,032.22
2,268.63
2,629.66
1,278.36
13,526.94
788.48


I NYSE


Net % YTD % 52-wk
Chg Chg Chg %Chg
+76.02 +.63 +4.34 +15.69
+42.67 +.83 +1.85+17.31
+2.38 +.56 +5.97+12.86
+32.11 +.40 +.86+15.09
+1.52 +.07 +2.73 +20.99
+13.18 +.50 -.87 +14.88
+6.86 +.54 +1.65+14.84
+78.56 +.58 +1.25+15.79
+6.73 +.86 +.62+19.46


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


I NEWYORK STOKECAG


Name Last Chg BomSantSA 11.26
BoSBrasil 11.25 +.06
BkofAm 10.60 -.08
BkAm wtB 1.52 -.05
ABBLtd 24.63 -.33 BkIlrnd 1.14 -.04
ACELtd 64.49 +.18 BkNYMel 26.06 -.14
AES Corp 12.27 Barday 16.49 -.08
AFLAC 45.34 +.32 BariPVixrs 24.12 -1.12
AGL Res 39.84 +.40 BarnesNob 20.14 -.27
AKSteel 14.18 +.02 BarrickG 43.17 -.01
AMR 5.71 +.02 Baxter 59.93 +1.59
AOL 20.23 -.34 BectDck 85.96 +.83
ASA Gold 27.10 +.30 BerkHaAl114250.00+1000.00
AT&T Inc 30.96 +.19 BerkH B 76.10 +.59
AU Optron 6.75 -.31 BestBuy 31.54 +.53
AbtLab 52.02 +.34 BigLots 32.69 +.29
AberFitc 66.39 +91 BioMedR 19.13 +.11
Accenture 53.96 +.01 BIkHillsCp 30.34 +.23
Actuant 24.99 +.64 BlkDebtStr 4.18
AdamsEx 10.69 +.04 BlkEnhC&l 13.28 -.21
AdvAuto 59.04 +.92 Blackstone 16.45 -.18
AMD 6.89 -.11 BlockHR 15.55 +.15
Aeropostf 17.85 +.49 Boeing 74.52 +.36
Aetna 44.77 +1.56 BoiseInc 6.93 +.18
Agilent 48.38 +.95 BorgWarn 73.18 +1.66
Agniomg 60.98 -1.12 BostBeer 86.16 +1.32
Agriumg 82.98 +3.23 BostProp 105.68 +1.75
AlcatelLuc 5.21 +.07 BostonSci 6.74 -.05
Alcoa 14.78 +.06 BoydGm 7.92 +.10
AllegTch 60.00 +1.38 Brandyw 11.46 +.18
Allete 39.40 +.49 BrMySq 27.81 +.29
AlliBGIbHi 15.06 +.23 Brunswick 18.30 +.32
AlliBInco 7.92 +.01 Buckeye 62.71 -.80
AlliBern 19.04 +.02 CBREIlis 23.86 -.12
Allstate 29.88 +.23 CBLAsc 18.00 +.18
AlphaNRs 40.98 -1.14 CBSB 26.37 +.49
Altria 27.32 +.24 CF Inds 138.57 +2.51
AmBev s 31.80 +.69 OH Engy 52.42 +.55
Amdocs 28.70 +.03 CIGNA 50.05 +1.16
Ameren 28.79 +.40 CMS Eng 19.64 -.04
AMovilL 50.06 +.26 CNOFind 7.38 +.18
AmAxle 10.25 +.12 CSS Inds 18.64 +.39
AEagleOut 12.73 +.18 CSXs 25.11 +.30
AEP 37.91 +.27 CVR Engy 22.57 +.20
AmExp 48.88 +.38 CVSCare 37.49 +.16
AmlntGrp 28.02 +.04 CablvsnNY 35.30 -.74
AmSIP3 7.70 -.05 CabotO&G 60.47 +.13
AmTower 50.68 +.48 CallGolf 6.39 +.11
Amerigas 43.93 +.92 Calpine 15.53 -.02
Ameriprise 56.55 -.11 Cameoeg 23.20 -.61
Anadarko 69.65 -.80 Cameron 45.80 -.31
AnalogDev 36.74 +.16 CampSp 34.23 +.06
Ann Inc 26.39 -.03 CdnNRsgs 38.59 -.23
Annaly 18.50 +10 CapOne 49.59 +.75
AonCorp 49.58 +19 CapifhSrce 6.10 +.09
Apache 116.80 -.36 CapM pl 14.61 +.01
Aptlnv 25.99 +.61 CardnlHIth 44.46 +.58
AquaAm 21.53 +.01 CareFusion 26.81 +.15
ArcelorMit 31.59 +.06 CarMax 29.28 +.03
ArchCoal 24.81 -.26 Carnival 35.73 +.46
ArdichDan 30.44 +.27 CarpTedich 51.92 +4.04
ArmourRsd 7.47 ... Caterpillar 98.18 +2.23
Ashland 62.53 +2.80 Celanese 49.16 +1.60
AsdEstat 16.14 +.26 Cemex 7.83 +.10
AssuredG 15.59 +.39 Cemigpf 19.74 +.50
ATMOS 32.17 +.26 CenterPnt 18.83 +.09
Avnet 29.97 -.02 CnBBrasIf 13.07 -.08
Avon 27.61 +.25 Cntyink 39.60 +.15
BB&T Cp 26.27 +.08 Checkpnt 16.43 +.04
BHPBilLt 88.90 +.35 ChesEng 28.10 +.08
BJs Whls 45.55 -1.95 ChesUfi 38.11 +.30
BP PLC 41.84 -.32 Chevron 99.91 +.74
BPZRes 3.22 -.31 Chicos 14.45 +.19
BRFBrasil 16.08 +.15 Chimera 3.50 +.05
BRT 6.45 -.05 ChinaUni 19.53
BakrHu 69.29 -.06 Chubb 62.30 -.36
BailCp s 37.76 -.06 CindBell 3.05 +.06
BcBilVArg 11.25 -.07 Cifgrprs 38.16 -.14
BcoBrades 19.32 +.15 CleanH 96.26 +.58


Name Last Chg


A-Power 1.74 -.11
ACMoorelf 2.45 -.04
AMCNetwi 34.95 -.10
ASML HId 35.07 -.31
ATP O&G 15.35 -.34
AVI Bio 1.38 -.01
Aastrom 2.52 +.01
Abraxas 3.16
AcadiaPh 1.61 +.09
Accuray 7.77 -.22
Achdiillion 6.09 -.10
AcmePkt 60.52 -2.07
AomrdaTh 31.37 +.85
AcfvePwr 2.39 +.02
AcfvsBliz 10.98 +.11
AcuraPh 4.50 +.63
Acxiom 12.21 +.11
AdobeSy 30.95 +.48
AdolorCp 1.99 +.10
Adtran 37.41 +.10
AdvATech 6.04
AdvBattery 1.16 +.05
AdvEnId 13.70 -.02
AeroViron 28.62 +1.57
AEternag 2.16 +.03
Affymetrix 7.11 +.01
AgFeed 1.22 +.06
AirTrnsp 6.27 -.06
AkamaiT 29.24 -.25
Akorn 6.54 +.35
AlaskCom 8.96 +.14
Alexion s 45.01 +.40
Alexza 1.54
AlignTech 22.69 -.23
Alkerm 17.04 +.43
AllosThera 2.06 +.05
AllscriptH 18.59 +.11
AlmostFam 23.95 -3.82
AlteraCplf 42.93 +.15
AlterraCap 21.92 +.24
Alvarion 1.15 -.07
Amarin 13.64 -.05
Amazon 187.72 +1.35
Amedisys 26.22 -1.44
ACapAgy 29.80 -.35
AmCapLd 8.93 -.01
AmSupr 7.61 +.06
AmCasino 22.00 +.02
Amgen 58.45 +.44
AmkorTIf 5.72 +.03
Amylin 11.42 -.24
Anadigc 2.92 -.02
Anlogic 50.84 +.22
Analystlnt 3.18 -.07
Ancestry 35.59 -.41
A123Sys 4.78 -.07
ApolloGrp 42.07 +.40
Apollolnv 10.05 +.07
Apple Inc 315.32 -4.94
ApldMatf 12.42 +.01
AMCC 8.39 -.01
Approach 20.30 +.68
ArchCap s 32.75 +.20
ArenaPhm 1.36 -.04
AresCap 15.97 +.06
AriadP 9.97 +.65
Ariba Inc 31.80 +.63
ArmHId 27.05 +.06
ArrayBio 2.17 +.04
Arris 10.70 +.05
ArubaNet 24.51 +.50
AscenaRb 32.83 +.76
AsialnfoL 13.93 -.04
AspenTech 15.17 +.03
AssodBanc 13.36 +.01
Atmel 12.64 +.08
Audvox 7.18 +.14
Autodesk 35.70 +.01
AutoData 52.40 +.73
Auxilium 19.45 -.19
AvagoTch 32.75 +.25
AvanirPhm 3.26 -.39
AVEO Ph 17.50 +.55
AvisBudg 15.90 +.20


CliffsNRs 82.20 +.69
Clorox 67.86 +.32
Coach 60.38 +1.07
CCFemsa 89.28 +1.26
CocaCola 65.83 +.21
CocaCE 28.77 +.16
Coeur 23.60 +.61
CohStlnfra 17.20 -.10
ColgPal 89.11 +1.23
CollctvBrd 14.88 +.53
Comerica 34.28 -.13
CmclMfis 13.64 +.15
CmwReitrs 24.90 +.34
CmtyHIt 25.05 +.05
Con-Way 36.99 +.28
ConAgra 24.86 +.21
ConocPhil 72.27 +.34
ConsolEngy 46.11 +.25
ConEd 53.01 +.23
ConstellA 21.20 +.07
ConstellEn 37.11 +.42
Cnvrgys 13.19 +.35
Corning 17.92 +.12
Cosan Ltd 12.28 -.30
CottCp 7.91 +.09
Covidien 52.91 +.41
Crane 47.60 +.55
CSVS2xVxS 23.44 -2.21
Cummins 93.48 -.14
C 2Shar 12.53 +.03

DCATotRet 3.61 -.10
DCTIndl 5.13 +.04
DNP Selct 9.88
DPL 30.14 +.08
DRHorton 11.23 +14
DSW Inc 48.30 +1.35
DTE 49.25 +.01
DanaHIdg 16.20 +.10
Danaher 51.99 +.15
Darden 47.16 +.04
DeanFds 12.54 -.12
Deere 80.06 +1.53
DeltaAir 9.69 +.11
DenburyR 18.82 +.05
DevelDiv 13.93 +.10
DevonE 76.73 -.22
Dex One 2.90 +.80
DiamRk 10.06 +.05
DiceHIdg 11.90 -.90
DrSCBrrs 40.33 -1.14
DirFnBrrs 49.20 -.07
DirLCBrrs 38.44 -.64
DrxEMBull 33.29 -.20
DrxEBearrs 16.87 -.18
DirEMBear 20.39 +.09
DrxFnBull 23.53 +.03
DirxSCBull 71.06 +1.92
DirxEnBull 64.78 +.53
Discover 23.62 +.53
Disney 38.23 +.19
DomRescs 48.16 +.50
DowChm 34.96 +.37
DuPont 50.39 +.82
DukeEngy 18.83 +.09
DukeRlty 13.76 +.31
ECDang n 12.25 +.75
EMC Cp 26.03 +.20
EOG Res 100.90 -1.35
EastChm 96.47 +1.45
EKodak 3.37
Eaton s 47.41 +.41
EVEnEq 11.65 +.03
Ecolab 54.22 +.27
Edisonlnt 39.24
EducRIlty 8.39
EIPasoCp 19.69 -.06
Elan 10.22 -.06


Aware h 3.25 -.06 CogoGrp 5.05 +.12
Axcelis 1.59 +.08 Coinstar 48.58 +.80
BEAero 38.42 +.49 ColdwtrCrk 1.27 -.07
BGCPtrs 7.93 +.12 Comcast 23.69 +.04
BMCSft 52.09 +.44 Comcspd 22.54 +.12
BSDMed 3.71 -.23 CommSys 16.72 -.25
Baidu 118.28 +.60 CommVIt 39.96 +2.68
BeasleyB 4.04 +.15 Compuwre 9.55 +.12
BedBath 52.59 +.60 ComScore 24.05 -.95
Biodel 1.69 -.03 Comtech 25.86 +.70
Biogenldc 98.60 +3.84 Concepts 11.64 +.05
BioLase 5.87 ... ConcurTch 47.97 +.46
BioMarin 25.50 -.16 Conmed 27.38 +.75
BioSante 2.50 -.02 ConstantC 23.31 -.09
BioScrip 6.84 +.20 ConvOrgh .10 -.01
BIkRKelso 9.29 +.11 Copart 44.43 -.24
Blkboard 40.15 -.61 CorinthC 4.13 -.01
BlueCoat 21.36 -.12 Costao 81.25 +1.62
BobEvans 33.82 +.37 CowenGp 3.75 +.10
BreitBurn 19.20 -.02 Creelnc 33.15 -1.12
BrigExp 25.73 +.50 Crocs 24.64 +1.43
Brightpnt 7.84 +.13 CrosstexE 10.91 +.16
Broadcom 31.25 -.36 Ctrip.omm 40.08 +.13
BroadSoft 33.82 +2.62 CubistPh 35.68 +.72
Broadwind 1.38 -.03 Curis 3.32 +.11
BrcdeCm 6.43 -.02 CypSemi 19.74 +.14
BrklneB 9.20 +.23 CytRxh .78
BrukerCp 17.97 +.12 C oMnet 1.15 ..
Bucyrus 91.63 +.11
CA Inc 21.71 +.12
CBOE 23.77 -.02 Daktronics 9.93 +.08
CEVAInc 27.10 -.33 DeckOuts 80.60 +1.17
CH Robins 77.30 +.42 DeerConsu 5.66 +.59
CKX Inc 5.50 +.02 Delcath 5.09 +.03
CMEGrp 278.92 +1.04 Dell Inc 16.19 +.18
CNinsure 13.97 +.35 DeltaPtrh .52 -.01
CVB Fnd 8.95 +.08 DemandTc 8.59 +.66
CadencePh 9.12 +.26 Dndreon 38.55 +.42
Cadence 10.00 -.03 Dennys 3.85 -.06
Callidus 5.00 -.21 Dentsply 36.52 +.23
CdnSolar 9.80 -.30 Depomed 7.78 -.08
CapCtyBk 10.38 +.13 DexCom 13.72 +.32
CapFdFrs 11.98 +.09 DianaConn 7.00 +.24
CpstnTrbh 1.36 +.03 Diodes 23.50 -.20
CareerEd 20.14 -.23 DirecTVA 46.93 +.28
CaribouC 12.87 +.77 DiscCmA 40.92 +.51
Carrizo 34.73 -.43 DiscCm C 36.91 +.33
CarverBch .54 -.02 DishNetwk 27.89 +.14
Caseys 45.51 +.51 DllrTrees 64.17 +1.52
CatalystH 54.64 +.32 DonlleyRR 19.37 +.29
Cavium 37.58 -.37 DotHillSy 2.75 +.19
Cbeyond 12.58 -.66 DragonWg 5.10 +.25
Celgene 59.59 +1.72 DrmWksA 21.46 -.06
CellTherrsh 1.97 -.05 DryShips 3.97 +.03
CelldexTh 3.25 +.09 DurectCp 2.95 +.17
CentEuro 11.88 +.16 DyaxCp 2.04 -.02
CentAI 13.95 -.07 Dynavax 2.53 -.05
Cephln 79.74 +.03 E-Trade 13.78 +.06
Cepheid 32.54 +.43 eBay 28.82 -.01
Cerner 117.40 +.32 EMSTch 32.88 +.04
ChrmSh 4.02 +.22 EVEngy 48.79 -1.18
CharterCm 56.03 -.78 EagleBulk 2.32 +.01
ChkPoint 52.80 +.77 ErthLink 7.43 +.02
Cheesecake 30.04 +.29 EstWstBcp 19.27 +.08
ChelseaTh 5.26 +.27 Ebixlnc 20.29 +.14
ChildPlace 45.70 +.98 EducDevh 5.50 -.05
ChinaCEd 4.50 +.13 8x8 Inc 3.86 +.18
ChiFnOnI 3.19 +.17 ElectSd 16.42 +.11
ChinGerui 2.96 -.03 ElectArts 22.36 +.12
ChinaSun 1.66 +.06 Emomrelf 2.18 +.02
ChinaTcF 3.53 -.21 EmpirRsth 1.17 +.37
ChinaTInfo 2.45 -.35 EndoPhrm 38.37 +.05
ChXDPlas 3.97 +.17 Enerl 1.41
ChrchllD 43.92 +1.06 EngyConv 1.14 +.02
CienaCorp 16.96 +.23 EngyXXI 29.34 -.68
CinnFin 28.54 -.35 Entegris 9.02 -.13
Cintas 32.29 +.26 EntropCom 7.64 +.07
Cirrus 13.49 -.02 EnzonPhar 10.16 +.19
Cisco 15.14 +.17 Equinix 96.49 +.66
CitzRepBh .67 -.00 EricsnTel 13.54 -.08
CitrixSys 74.80 +.61 ExactSci h 7.69 -.08
CleanEngy 12.52 +.05 Exelids 9.15 -.20
Clearwire 3.63 +.03 E)ddeTc 7.03 +.22
ClevBioLh 3.43 -.16 Expedia 27.37 +.34
Codexis 9.44 -1.04 Expdlni 47.55 +.01
CoffeeH 13.10 -2.49 ExpScripts 54.79 -.89
CogentC 15.47 +.12 ExtrmNet 3.10 -.04
CognizTech 67.91 +.26 Ezcorp 30.65 +.33


BdorGldg 13.45
Embraer 31.33
EmersonEl 52.83
EmpDist 18.93
EnbrEPts 29.36
EnCanag 30.10
EndvSilvg 7.86
EnPro 45.75
ENSCO 50.93
Entergy 69.40
Equifax 34.14
EqtyRsd 59.64
Exelon 41.98


ExxonMbl 79.71 +.69
FMCTchs 40.12 +.09
FairchldS 15.92 +.11
FedExCp 87.50 +.51
FedSignl 6.05 +.07
Ferrellgs 22.72 +.11
Ferro 12.63 +.50
idlNFin 15.25 +.18
RFidNatlnfo 31.22 +.23
FstHorizon 10.08 -.14
FTActDiv 10.63 +.44
FtTrEnEq 12.10 +.01
FirstEngy 44.16 +.42
Hotek 7.44 -.11
Ruor 61.51 +1.03
FootLockr 23.41 +.59
FOrdM 12.94 +.17
ForestLab 39.49 +.81
ForestOil 25.50 -.30
FbrtuneBr 63.95 +.48
FMCG s 47.41 -.52
FronberCm 7.93 +.06
FronberOil 31.07 +.96

GATX 36.96 +.56
GMXRs 4.23 -.31
GabelliET 5.85 +.04
GabHlthW 7.49
GabUDI 6.99 +.08
GafisaSA 9.51 +.06
GameStbp 26.80 +.36
Gannett 13.76 +.05


Gap 18.13 +.30
GencoShip 7.50 +.48
GenDynam 72.77 +1.10
GenElec 18.48 -.01
GenGrPrn 16.46 +.10
GenMills 38.33 +.38
GenMotn 29.52 +.52
GenOn En 3.76 -.03
Genworth 10.20
Gerdau 9.93 -.03
GoldFLtd 14.33 +.10
Goldcrpg 47.35 +.90
GoldmanS 135.14 -2.09


Goodrich 92.51 +1.39
Goodyear 14.92 +.12
GraphPkg 4.99 -.04
GtPlainEn 20.92 +.08
Griffon 9.77 +.04
GuangRy 20.17 -.56
HCA HId n 34.23 -.36
HCP Inc 37.71 +.62
HSBC 48.87 -.14
HSBC Cap 26.85 +.03
Hallibrt 46.43 +.41
HanJS 14.70 +.17
HanPrmDv 12.22 -.02
Hanesbrds 28.11 +.67
Hanoverlns 36.18 -.87
HarleyD 36.98 +.24
HarmonyG 12.63 +.19
HartfdFn 24.27 -.17
HawaiiEl 23.94 +.19
HItCrREIT 52.98 +.78
HItMgmt 10.51 +.13
HlthcrRlty 21.02 +.47
HeclaM 7.06 +.07
Heinz 54.08 +.32
HelixEn 15.38 +.55
HeimPayne 59.29 +.94
Hertz 15.31 +.01
Hess 68.73 -.55
HewlettP 34.99 -.01
HighwdPrp 32.79 +.53
HollyCp 64.45 +1.87
HomeDp 34.77 +.24
HonwIlInI 56.43 +.58


F5Netwks 98.18 +.98 iShACWI 46.94 +.18
FEI Co 37.02 +.42 iShs SOX 52.72 +.07
FLIRSys 32.96 -.19 IonixBr 22.83 +.62
FSI Inf 3.48 -.23 IdenixPh 5.10 -.05
FX Ener 7.44 ... Illumina 72.40 +.98
Fastenal s 33.09 +.28 ImunoGn 11.76 +.04
FedMogul 20.10 +.12 Imunmd 3.75 -.03
FiberTwr 1.08 -.09 ImpaxLabs 20.45 +.08
FifthThird 12.55 -.01 inContact 4.42 +.14
FindEngin 23.01 -.08 Incyte 18.25 +.32
Fndlnst 16.29 -.01 Infinera 6.05 +.03
Finisar 14.65 -.22 Informat 55.45 +1.32
FinLine 22.98 +.37 InfosysT 60.70 -.93
FstBusey 5.25 +.05 Inhibitex 3.75 +.03
FstCashFn 39.07 +.13 InsitTc 18.57 -.70
FFnclOH 16.03 +.21 Insulet 19.60 +.28
FMidBc 12.20 +.12 In1gDv 7.31 -.01
FstNiagara 13.64 +.11 Intel 21.33 +.14
FstSolar 125.02 +3.47 InteractBrk 16.32 +.25
FT Copper 38.59 +.09 InterDig 35.83 +.64
FstMerit 15.98 -.02 InterMune 33.20 -.15
Fiserv 61.35 +.16 InterNAP 7.28 +.26
Flextrn 6.27 -.04 InfiBcsh 16.36 +.16
FocusMda 26.02 -.41 InfiSpdw 27.49 +.90
ForcePro 4.74 +.06 Intersil 12.39 +.10
FormFac 8.56 -.08 Intuit 49.40 +.24
Forfnets 22.72 +.06 InvRIEst 8.64 +.01
Fossil Inc 110.71 +4.03 IridiumCm 8.42 +.03
FosterWhl 29.11 +.61 Isis 8.62 -.10
FredsInc 14.25 +.13 IstaPh 7.73 +.20
FreshMktn 36.73 +1.38 IvanhoeEn 1.85 +.16
FueTech 6.18 -.80 bIa 12.51 +.05
FuelCell 1.43 -.03
FultonFncl 10.60 -.07
FushiCo 480 +27 JA Solar 5.08 -.01
i w JDSUniph 15.78 +.27
JacklnBox 22.05 +.44
GT Solar 13.31 -.12 Jamba 2.05 -.04
GTxInc 5.83 +.58 JamesRiv 18.78 +.01
Garmin 33.67 +.01 JazzPhrm 29.32 +.09
GenProbe 68.03 -.10 JetBlue 6.00 +.06
Gentex 28.27 +.34 Jinpan 9.95 -.53
Genfiva h 19.41 -2.50 JoeJeans h .91 +.07
GeronCp 3.92 +.06 JosABnks 47.99 +1.29
GileadSd 40.10 +.57 JoyGIbl 84.79 +1.42
GladerBc 13.40 -.03 KLATnc 38.18 +.08
Gleacher 2.25 +.02 KeryxBio 4.28 -.04
GlobCrsg 33.79 +.29 Kulicke 10.30 +.10
GloblInd 5.17 +.08 L&L Engy 4.53 -.22
GIbSpcMet 20.25 -.20
GluMobile 4.33 -.20 LHC Grp 22.66 -1.68
GolarLNG 31.02 +.08 LKQCorp 25.31 +.06
Google 484.58 -.44 LML Pay 3.60 +.38
GrCanyEd 12.96 +11 LSI Indlf 7.81 +.03
GrLkDrge 5.33 -.15 LamResrch 42.04 -.39
GreenMtC 79.98 -.12 LamarAdv 27.09 -.06
GrifolsSA n 7.09 -.04 Lattce 6.09 +.06
GulfRes 2.89 +.19 LawsnSft 11.18 +.02
GulfportE 24.12 -.53 LeapWirlss 16.07 +.60
HMN Fn 2.60 +.02 Level3 2.15 +.03
HSN Inc 30.73 -.11 LexPhrm 1.46 +.01
Halozyme 6.59 +.10 LibGlobA 40.04 -.49
HancHId 31.72 -.07 LibGlobC 38.28 -.32
HanmiFnd .88 -.17 LibtyMlntA 15.51 -.26
HansenMed 3.03 +.20 LibStarzA 72.45 +.66
HansenNat 73.83 +1.52 LifeTech 51.99 +.23
HanwhaSol 5.23 -.10 LifePtH 39.10 -.42
HarbinElec 13.35 +4.96 LimelghtN 4.22 -.08
Harmonic 6.90 -.04 Lincare 29.84 -.14
Hasbro 44.07 +.71 LincElecs 33.49 -1.47
HawHold 5.66 +.20 LinearTch 31.33 +.03
HrfindEx 15.88 -.14 LinnEngy 36.65 -.24
HSchein 71.06 +.78 LivePrsn 11.94 +.17
HercOffsh 5.11 -.15 LodgeNet 3.25 -.06
Hibbett 39.00 +1.16 Logitech 11.27 -.32
Hollysys 9.65 -.17 LookSmart 1.49 -.21
Hologic 19.99 +.36 LoopNet 18.48 +.05
Home Inns 35.11 +1.49 Lulkin 82.02
HorsehdH 11.33 +.62 llululemn 97.75 +4.37
HotTopic 7.31 +.09 I
HudsCity 8.18 +.01
HumGen 25.09 -.06 MCG Cap 6.05 +.03
HuntJB 45.04 +.07 MGE 40.56 +.46
HuntBnk 6.32 -.09 MIPSTech 6.27 -.04
HutchT 2.46 -.13 MKS Inst 24.15 +.11
IAC Inter 36.30 +.15 MTS 39.06 +.58
iGateCorp 15.39 -.03 MagelnHI 52.84 +.52
IPG Photon 62.00 -.18 Magma 7.53 +.22


HospPT 23.33 +.42 InfiGame 16.56 +.22
HostHofis 16.30 +.21 IntPap 27.44 +.87
HovnanE 2.02 +.02 InterOilg 49.98 -.07
Humana 80.26 +2.75 Interpublic 11.45 +.09
Hunting n 35.99 +.04 Invesco 23.11 +.07
Huntsmn 16.95 +.15 InvMtgCap 20.99 +.10
IAMGIdg 18.99 +.44 IronMtn 32.85 +.30
ICICI Bk 45.32 -.51 ItauUnibH 22.22 +.19
ING 11.59 -.13
iShGold s 15.04 +.01
iSAsfia 25.23 -.18 JPMorgCh 40.48 -.32
iShBraz 71.25 +.36 Jabil 18.26 -.03
iSCan 30.33 +.09 JanusCap 9.39 +.17


iShGer 26.37 +.08
iSh HK 17.97 -.23
iShJapn 10.01 +.01
iSh Kor 61.55 -.36
iSMalas 15.04 -.05
iShMex 59.54 +.29
iShSing 13.37 +.06
iSTaiwn 14.82 -.10
iShSilver 35.09 +.14
iShChina25 41.95 -.13
iSSP500 128.79 +.70
iShEMkts 45.72 -.07
iShSPLatA 49.78 +.30
iShB20T 97.02 +.12
iS Eafe 58.59 -.07
iShiBxHYB 89.47 +.62
iSR1KV 66.40 +.25
iSR1KG 58.43 +.35
iSR2KV 70.84 +.68
iSR2KG 89.28 +.84
iShR2K 78.95 +.72
iShREst 60.07 +.63
iShSPSm 70.24 +.70
iStar 7.41 +.06
ITT Corp 57.08 +.75
Idacorp 38.89 +.19
ITW 54.62 -.31
Imafon 9.01 +.23
Imax Corp 29.04 -.55
IngerRd 43.73 +.08
IntegrysE 51.02 +.68
IntcnfiEx 120.63 +2.52
IBM 165.02 +.58


JohnJn 66.51
JohnsnCfi 37.39
JnprNtwk 29.51
KBHome 11.66
KBR Inc 34.44
KKRn 15.22
KTCorp 17.94
KCSouthn 54.00
Kaydon 35.58
KAEngTR 27.94
Kelbgg 55.25
KeyEngy 16.56
Keycorp 8.20
KimbClk 66.78
Kimco 18.02
KindME 71.00
Kinross g 14.88
Kohls 51.06
Kraft 34.80
KrispKrm 8.70
Kroger 24.04
L-1 Ident 11.81
LDK Solar 6.73
LG Display 13.04
LSI Corp 6.81
LTC Prp 27.00
LaZBoy 10.54
Laclede 36.74
LVSands 37.82
LeggMason 31.71
LeggPlat 23.64
LenderPS 19.64


MaidenH 9.31
Majesco 3.02
MAKOSrg 27.10
MannKd 4.10
MarinaB rs .27
MarvelT 13.40
Masimo 30.36
Mattel 26.82
Mattson 1.73
Maxim lntg 23.82
MaxwlT 14.80
MedAssets 13.41
MediaMdn 21.93
MedicAcIn 8.06
Medivafon 20.15
MelomCrwn 10.56
MentorGr 12.31
MercadoL 74.33
MergeHIth 5.02
MeritMeds 17.97
Metabolix 6.69
Micrel 9.95
Microchp 35.97
Micromet 5.44
MicronT 7.91
MicrosSys 47.28
MicroSemi 20.02
Microsoft 24.47
Micrvsn 1.21
MillerHer 23.10
Mindspeed 7.37
Misonix 2.47
Molex 24.90
Momenta 18.59
Motricity 7.65
Move Inc 1.96
Mylan 22.57
MyriadG 22.76
NETgear 39.84
NIl HIdg 40.10
NPS Phm 9.59
NXPSemn 22.85
NasdOMX 23.83
NatPenn 7.48
NektarTh 7.89
Ness Tech 7.56
NetLogicM 36.16
NetApp 49.71
Netease 41.89
Netfiix 245.63
NetSolTch 1.42
NetSpend n 8.63
NetwkEng 1.01
NewsCpA 16.19
NewsCpB 16.89
NobilityH 7.99
Nordson s 50.50
NorTrst 46.56
NwstBcsh 12.29
NovfiWrls 5.53
Novavax 1.98
Novlus 32.89
NuVasive 33.66
NuanceCm 20.12
NutriSyst 12.40
Nvidia 15.62
NxStageMd 19.74
OCZTech 7.89
OReillyAu 63.00
OceanFrt .31
Oclaro 6.17
OdysMar 3.11
OldDomFs 35.38
OmniVisn h 28.75
OnAssign 9.45
OnSmcnd 9.63
Onoothyr 8.51
OnyxPh 34.68
OpenTable 73.99
OpnwvSy 2.14
Opnext 2.18
OpbmerPh 12.49
optXprs 16.37
Oracle 31.91
Orexigen 1.56
Oritanis 12.55
Orthfx 40.75
Orthovta 3.85


OtterTail 21.22 +.25
Overstk 14.36 -.15


PDLBio 5.78 -.03
PFChng 38.93 -.47
PMCSra 7.04 -.05
PSS Wrld 27.07 -.08
Paccar 47.87 +.20
PacEthrs 1.67 +.17
PacSunwr 2.51 -.06
PaetecHId 4.60 -.06
PainTher 8.99 +.35
PanASIv 28.56 +.61
ParamTch 21.71 +.21
Parexel 22.44 +.22
Patterson 32.15 +.20
PattUTI 27.94 +.21
Paychex 29.67 +.04
PnnNGm 38.39 +1.28
PennantPk 11.25 -.02
PeopUtdF 13.11 +.04
PerfectWd 18.05 +.67
Perrigo 85.16 +1.43
PetroDev 30.38 -.13
PetsMart 44.34 +.95
PharmPdt 25.86 +.17
Pharmacyc 9.35 +.09
Pharmasset 108.18 -.31
PhotrIn 8.06 -.12
PlugPwrrs 2.32 -.02
PluristemT 3.15 +.18
Polyomm 57.35 +.81
Popular 2.80 -.02
Power-One 8.12 +.02
PwShs QQQ 54.07 +.28
Powrwav 2.66 -.05
Presstek 1.42 -.10
PriceTR 57.67 +.44
priceline 458.78 -3.57
PrivateB 14.21 +.01
PrUPShQQQ 29.41 -.46
PrognicsPh 7.05 +.04
ProspctCap 10.68 +.03
PureCycle 3.00 +.01
QIAGEN 19.18 +.08
QiaoXirg 1.02 -.38
QlikTech n 31.29 +.71
Qlogic 15.41 +.02
Qualomm 53.48 +.79
QuestSft 21.32 +.34
Questomr 23.48 +.18
QuickLog 3.12 +.42
QuinStreet 11.27 -.33
RFMicD 5.38 +.18
RITTech 8.18 -2.00
RX Phrm .95 -.03
RadOneD 1.90 +.01
RAM Engy 1.33 -.06
Rambus 14.46 +.51
Randgold 75.05 -.08
RaptorPhm 6.41 -.06
Rdiff.cm 7.62 +.09
Regenrn 53.21 -.81
RentACt 29.19 +.39
RepubAir 4.45 -.16
RschMotn 25.89 -1.86
RexEnergy 10.00 +.07
RigelPh 8.32 +.19
RightNow 30.45 -.02
Riverbeds 31.62 -.31
RosettaG h .28 -.02
RosettaR 43.62 +.64
RossStrs 76.11 +.93
RoviCorp 54.14 +.13
RoyGId 56.39 +.24
RubiomnTc 16.15 -.21
rue21 30.50 +.54
RuthsHos 5.49 -.10

S1 Corp 7.22 -.04
SBACom 36.98 +.30
SEI Inv 21.61 +.03
STEC 16.81 +.28
SalixPhm 36.69 +.85
SanDisk 41.79 +.85


LennarA 17.59 +.13
LbtyASG 4.27
LillyEli 37.56 +.23
Limited 36.37 +.90
LincNat 27.10 +.15
Lindsay 59.48 -.12
Linkedlnn 63.71 -1.82
LiveNatn 10.96 +.29
LizClaib 5.75 +.10
LloydBkg 3.01 -.07
LockhdM 80.34 +.33
Lorillard 111.10 -.24
LaPac 7.70 +.17
Lowes 23.11 +.28
Lubrizol 134.18 -.07
L3oBA 36.56 .32

M&TBk 87.80 -.22
MBIA 8.04 +.04
MDURes 21.90
MEMC 8.22 -.24
MFGlobal 7.59 +.10
MFAFnd 7.92 +09
MCR 9.33 +14
MGIC 6.34 +.01
MGMRsts 11.89 -.21
Macquarie 27.32 +.36
Macys 27.65 +.38
MageiMPtr 57.17 +.53
Magnalgs 48.18 +.03
MagHRes 5.88 -.22
Manitowoc 15.10 -.05
Manulifeg 16.30 +.39
MarathonO 51.10 +.51
MktVGold 52.25 +.28
MktVRus 37.55 -.25
MktVJrGId 32.64
MarlntA 33.12 -.03
MarshM 29.85 +.06
Marshlls 7.72 +.03
MStewrt 4.05 +.06
Masom 12.19 +.06
McClatdichy 2.36 -.13
McDrmlnts 17.98 -.21
McDnlds 82.69 +.17
McGrwH 40.17 +.56
McKesson 83.02 +.61
McMoRn 15.56 +.04
MeadWvco 31.32 +.27
MedoHlth 55.28 +.10
Metrnic 38.68 +.49
Merck 35.79 +.40
MetLife 40.52 +.15
MetroPCS 16.10 +.08
MidAApt 67.45 +.38
Mias 5.98 -.09
MitsuUFJ 4.48 +.02
MobileTele 19.12 -.11
Molycorp n 52.44 +3.51
MoneyGrm 3.17 -.05
Monsanto 66.46 +.61
MonstrWw 13.43 -.05
Moodys 37.29 +.94
MorgStan 22.39 -.44
MSEmMkt 15.17 -.00
Mosaic 60.73 +1.41
MotrIaSol n 45.57 +.09
MotrlaMo n 24.49 -.29
MurphO 63.36 +.23
NCRCorp 17.78 +01
NRG Egy 23.49 +.18
NV Energy 15.40 -.05
NYSE Eur 33.37 +.03
Nabors 23.59 -.44
NBkGreece 1.33 -.01
NatFuGas 69.02 -.85
NatGrid 47.80 -.12
NOilVarco 69.90 +.85


SangBio 5.59 -.03
Sanmina 9.36 +.06
Sanofirt 2.38 -.03
Sapient 13.99 -.09
Saton h 2.00 +.05
SavientPh 6.80 -.11
Sawis 39.48 +.08
SciClone 5.64 +.57
SciGames 9.58 +.30
SeagateT 14.37 +.12
SearsHldgs 75.13 +1.11
SeattGen 20.02 +.52
SelCmfrt 16.48 +.78
Selectvlns 15.83 +.12
Semtech 24.33 -.41
Sequenom 7.37 +.05
ShandaGm 6.02 +.09
Shire 89.65 +.79
ShoreTel 8.98 +.07
SifyTech 4.00 -.14
SigaTechh 10.71 -.03
SigmaAld 67.65 +1.08
SilganHId 39.38 -.62
SilicGrln 14.73 +.01
Silicnlmg 5.86 -.23
SilcnLab 38.56 +.74
SilicnMotn 9.66 +.13
Slcnware 6.02 -.06
SilvStdg 24.45 +.21
Sina 77.62 -2.95
Sindair 10.01 +.17
SinoClnEn 1.24 -.07
Sinovac 2.87 -.14
SiriusXM 1.92
SironaDent 50.78 -.09
Sky-mobi n 5.40 -.50
SkywksSol 21.70 -1.46
SmartM 9.16 +.03
SmartTgn 5.84 -.01
SmithWes 2.68 -.26
SmithMicro 4.05 -.01
SodaStrmn 52.99 +1.54
Sohu.cm 67.10 +1.28
Somaxon 2.11 -.02
Sonus 2.94 +.06
SouMoBc 20.69 +.18
Sourcefire 26.67 +1.09
SpectPh 8.48 -.32
Spreadtrm 12.35 -1.60
Staples 15.40 +.05
StarSdent 4.43 +.01
Starbucks 35.83 +.39
SfDynam 15.25 +.18
StemCells .56 +.01
Stereotads 3.06 +.03
SterlBcsh 8.09 -.01
StewEnt 6.80 +.14
SuccessF 31.03 +.38
SunesisP rs 1.99 +.07
SunPowerA 16.39 -.33
SunPwrB 15.85 -.30
SuperGen 2.86 -.04
SusqBnc 8.34 +.08
SwisherHn 5.70 -.14
Symantec 18.80 +.25
Symetricm 5.37 -.04
Synaptfcs 25.71 -.35
Syneron 11.33 +.15
Synopsys 25.09 +.16
Synovis 17.30 +.01
SynthEngy 1.82 +.11
TC PpLn 45.29 +.25
TDAmeritr 18.85 +.09
TFS Fncl 9.73 +.04
THQ 3.37
TICCCap 9.53 -.08
TTMTCh 14.65 +.04
tw teleomm 20.07
TakeTwo 14.63 +.14
TASER 4.23 -.01
TechData 45.22 +.13
Tekelec 7.86 +.07
TICmSys 4.39
Tellabs 4.05 -.02
Telvent 39.88 +.02
TeslaMotn 26.01 -.49
TesseraT 15.97 +.27
TevaPhrm 46.87 -.62


NatSemi 24.63 +.04 Polaris 104.38 +4.65 RockColl 60.76 +.51
Navistar 52.41 -.74 PortGE 25.81 +.36 Rowan 35.96 -.32
NewAmHi 10.48 +.05 PostPrp 40.77 +.81 RylCarb 35.59 +.99
NJ Rscs 43.59 +.36 Potash s 51.68 +.71 RoyDShllIA 68.70 +.25
NYCmtyB 15.83 -.07 PwshDB 29.07 -.16 Royce 14.20 +.05
NYnTmes 8.14 -.04 PSAgri 32.37 +.13 Roce 2527 -.09
Newcastle 5.42 -.17 PSUSDBull 21.45
NewellRub 15.07 +.35 Praxair 102.12 +1.06
NewfidExp 62.93 -.77 PrecDrill 12.88 +.03 SAIC 16.52 +.01
NewmtM 51.82 +.23 PrinFnd 29.35 +.25 SAPAG 60.84 +.60
NewpkRes 8.42 +.44 ProLogis 34.07 +.37 SCANA 38.95 +.19
Nexen g 20.66 -.08 ProShtS&P 42.36 -.20 SKTIcm 17.42 -.08
NextEraEn 57.05 +.42 PrUShS&P 22.09 -.23 SLM Cp 16.31 +.35
NiSource 19.51 +01 PrUIShDow 18.14 -.24 SpdrDJIA 120.54 +.80
Nicor 54.31 +.39 ProUltQQQ 79.56 +.77 SpdrGold 150.03 +.09
NikeB 83.23 +2.12 PrUShQQQrs56.37 -.61 SPMid 170.52 +1.37
99 Cents 20.26 -.15 ProUItSP 49.62 +49 S&P500ETF127.70 +.65
NobleCorp 37.51 -.09 PrUShtFnrs 65.63 -.05 SpdrHome 17.68 +.25
NokiaCp 5.85 -.17 ProUShL20 32.54 -.05 SpdrKbwBk 23.43 -.13
Nordstrm 44.93 +1.17 ProUIltSRE 14.70 -.32 SpdrLehHY 39.49 +.11
NorfikSo 71.61 +.64 ProUltFin 59.64 +.07 SpdrKbwRB 25.08 +.07
NoestUt 35.06 +.33 ProUSSP50017.23 -.26 SpdrRefi 51.71 +1.12
NorthropG 65.73 +1.04 PrUltSP500s71.32 +1.16 SpdrOGEx 54.71 -.20
Novarfs 60.42 +18 ProUSSIvrs 17.81 -.16 SpdrMetM 63.46 +.69
NSTAR 45.82 +56 PrUltCrders 41.14 +.27 Safeway 22.80 +.06
Nucor 39.73 +.28 PrUShCrders50.78 -.30 StJoe 19.04 -.14
NvIMO 13.37 +.04 ProUShEuro 17.27 +.02 SJude 49.30 +1.11
NvMulSI&G 8.66 ProctGam 65.09 +.40 Saks 10.84 +.45
NuvQPf2 8.15 -.08 ProgrssEn 47.94 +.15 Salesforce 139.45 -.08
OGEEngy 49.05 +.54 ProgsvCp 20.54 +.18 SallyBty 16.80 +.23
OasisPet 26.81 +.56 ProUSR2Krs46.18 -.92 SJuanB 23.19 +.08
OcciPet 101.50 -.69 ProvEng 8.23 +.08 SandRdge 10.32 -.01
Oceaneers 36.49 +.43 Prudenti 59.65 +.46 Sanofi 37.32 -.01
OfficeDpt 4.07 +.25 PSEG 31.66 +.10 SaraLee 19.19 +.16
OfficeMax 7.64 +.53 PubStrg 112.19 +.42 Schlmbrg 82.13 +.34
OilSvHT 141.72 -.29 PulteGrp 7.29 +.10 Schwab 16.10 +.19
Olin 21.53 +.60 PPrIT 6.38 ... Scotts 50.89 +1.90
OmegaHIt 20.95 +19 QEPResn 38.80 +.20 SealAir 22.90 -.08
Omnicom 45.89 +57 Qihoo360 n 16.75 -.73 SemiHTr 32.43 +11
ONEOK 70.68 +1.31 QuanexBld 15.79 +.10 SenHous 23.88 +.57
ONEOK Pt 81.50 +1.00 QntmDSS 3.25 +.07 Sensient 36.26 +.71
OshkoshCp 26.08 -.27 QstDiag 60.58 +.02 ShawGrp 32.47 +.59
Owenslll 25.11 -47 Questars 17.77 +.09 SiderurNac 12.11 -.04
QksilvRes 14.98 +.01 SilvWhtng 31.16 +.97
tRAITFin 2.02 SilvrcpM g 8.57 +.47
PG&ECp 42.35 +17 RPCs 21.40 -.16 SimonProp 115.06 +1.06
PMIGrp 1.14 -.02 RPM 22.04 +.36 Skedichers 14.50 +.26
PNC 56.66 -1.13 Rackspace 38.24 -.03 SmithAOs 40.50 +.46
PNM Res 16.78 +.24 RadianGrp 3.93 +.03 SmithfF 21.94 +.21
PPG 85.43 +.68 RadioShk 12.79 +.16 Smuker 77.88 +.84
PPL Corp 27.21 +.13 Ralcorp 87.37 +1.17 Soluba 21.28 +.01
PackAmer 26.33 -.29 RangeRs 52.18 +.17 SonyCp 24.28 -.64
PallCorp 5402 +.43 RJamesFn 32.40 +.15 Soaderlnd 51.26 +.23
Pandoran 1461 +1.21 Rayonier 63.06 +.65 SouthnCo 40.00 +.19
ParkDrl 6.00 +.13 Raytheon 49.02 +.25 SthnCopper 30.72 -.07
ParkerHan 85.29 .03 Rltylnonm 33.63 +.15 SoUnCo 33.70 +.14
PariotCoal 19.32 +.34 RedHat 41.95 +75 SwstAirl 11.04 +.10
PeabdyE 5421 +.34 RegalEnt 11.94 -.44 SwstnEgy 41.26 +.10
Pengrthg 12.20 .15 RegionsFn 6.19 -.08 SpecfraEn 26.84 +.21
PennVaRs 25.26 +.43 ReneSola 4.61 -.32 SprintNex 5.21 +.02
PennWstg 22.73 -.08 Renrenn 7.60 +.57 SPMats 36.95 +.31
Penney 35.19 +.90 RepubSvc 30.84 +.38 SP HIthC 35.12 +.35
PepBoy 10.91 +.26 Revlon 15.41 +.63 SPCnSt 31.37 +.24
PepsiCo 68.98 +.26 ReynAms 38.25 +.24 SPConsum 38.26 +.31
Prmiani 20.68 +.21 RioTinth 66.37 +.38 SP Engy 71.88 +.20
Perohawk 22.65 -.45 RiteAid 1.10 +.03 SPDRFncI 14.88 -.01
PetrbrsA 29.43 -.29 RobtHalf 26.36 +.48 SP Inds 35.76 +.31
DPt oba 32o Rn .4 ROckwlAut 79.79 +.67 SPTech 24.54 +.10


Pfizer 20.27
PhilipMor 69.08
PiedNG 29.77
PiedmOfc 20.72
Pier1 11.14
PimomStrat 11.12
PinWst 44.17
PioNtrl 84.49
PitnyBw 22.55
PlainsEx 35.08
PlumCrk 39.33


IA EIA N - 5 XCANE1


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 7.20
AbdnEMTel 18.32 +.09
Accelr8 3.95 -1.00
AdmRsc 25.50 +.79
Advenbx 2.66 +.29
AlexcoRg 7.10 +.33
AlldNevG 30.13 +.55
AlmadnMg 3.06 +.06
AmApparel 1.00 +.03
AntaresP 1.94 -.01
ArcadiaRs .10 +.01
Aurizong 5.19 -.07


AvalRaren 6.25 +.16 ComstkMn 3.01
BarcGSOil 24.12 +.07 CrSuiHiY 3.14 -.02
BioTime 4.27 -.19 Crosshgrs .65 -.02
Brigusgrs 1.60 +.02 CubicEn .74 +.01
BritATob 86.41 +.31
CAMAC En 1.23
CanoPet .34 +.03 DeisnM g 1.70 -.11
arimTh . - EV LtdDur 16.02 -.09
Cad mTh .8 .0 EVMuni2 12.54 -.06
CelSd .4 .04 EllswthFd 7.39 +.03
CFCdag 21.07 +.02 ExeterRgs 4.38
CheniereEn 8.17 +.17 Express-1 2.86 +.03
CheniereE 17.48 +1.02 FullHseR 3.26 -.23
ChinNEPet 3.23 -.05
ChinaShen 2.43 +.04
ClghGlbOp 12.84 -.03 GabGIdNR 17.09 +.01


GascoEngy .24 +.01
Gastargrs 3.38 +.02
GenMoly 4.30 +.16
GoldRsvg 2.60 -.39
GoldResrc 24.30 +2.20
GoldStrg 2.31 +.04
GranTrrag 6.35 +.10
GrtBasGg 1.76 -.02
GtPanSilvg 3.33 +.30
Hemisphrx .40 -.01
HooperH .95 +.04
Hyperdyn 4.14 -.02
ImpOilgs 44.74 -.51
InovioPhm .61 -.02
IntellgSys 1.30 -.01


IntTowerq 6.57

KodiakOg 5.28 -.27
LadThalFn 1.24 -.02

MadCatzg 1.39 +.12
Metalico 5.58 +.02
MetroHlth 4.79 -.05
MdwGoldg 1.80 -.04
MincoG g 1.47 -.05
Minefndg 11.91 +.29
NeoStem 1.41 -.03
Neoprobe 3.39 -.08
NBRESec 4.21 +.05


Neuralstem 1.42 -.02 PhrmAth 2.41 -.22 Senesco
Nevsung 5.61 +.12 PbnDrill 13.25 +.10 SprottRLg
NewEnSys 2.48 -.30 PolyMetg 1.32 -.09 TanzRyg
NwGoldg 9.26 +.07 Protalix 6.21 -.04 Taseko
NA Pallg 3.72 +.08 PyramidOil 5.04 +.48 TrnsafiPet
NDynMng 9.24 +.65 Quepasa 6.11 -.48 TravelCts
NthnO&G 17.62 -.45 QuestRMhg 5.20 +02 TriValley
NthgtMg 2.56 -.04 RadientPh .22 -.01 TriamngPet
NovaGldg 8.69 -.11 RareEleg 10.16 +.72 TwoHrbwt
Oilsandsg .37 -.01 Rentedich .85 -.02 UQM Tech
OpkoHlIth 3.28 -.01 RexahnPh 1.24 -.01 US Geoth
OrsusXelrs 4.05 +.86 Rubin 3.98 Univ Insur
_ MUnivlnsur
Ur-Energy
PHCInc 3.20 +.11 SamsO&G 2.46 -.11 Uranerz
ParaG&S 3.79 -.03 SeabGldg 25.87 -.45 UraniumEn


VangTotW 48.11 +.04
VantageDrl 1.66 -.01
VirnetX 25.92 -.52
VistaGold 2.59 -.11
VoyagerOG 2.44 +.14
Walterlnv 17.97 +.42
WFAdvlnco 10.16 +.18
WT DrfChn 25.39 -.05
WTDrfBz 28.43
YM Biog 2.58 +.14


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.






Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 4.0950 4.0932
Australia .9458 .9421
Bahrain .3771 .3769
Brazil 1.5935 1.5970
Britain 1.6183 1.6178
Canada .9796 .9805
Chile 472.74 471.15
China 6.4742 6.4750
Colombia 1792.50 1787.00
Czech Rep 16.86 16.86
Denmark 5.2140 5.2110
Dominican Rep 38.05 37.95
Egypt 5.9467 5.9467
Euro .6991 .6986
Hong Kong 7.7924 7.7918
Hungary 187.62 187.62
India 45.005 44.783
Indnsia 8615.00 8580.00
Israel 3.4395 3.4310
Japan 80.32 80.06
Jordan .7100 .7088
Lebanon 1514.05 1512.95
Malaysia 3.0436 3.0376
Mexico 11.8699 11.9013
N. Zealand 1.2357 1.2306
Norway 5.5402 5.5139
Peru 2.760 2.763
Poland 2.79 2.78
Russia 28.0899 28.0191
Singapore 1.2361 1.2337
So. Africa 6.7815 6.7691
So. Korea 1084.15 1086.54
Sweden 6.4103 6.3980
Switzerlnd .8465 .8482
Taiwan 29.00 29.04
Thailand 30.57 30.54
Turkey 1.6016 1.5935
U.A.E. 3.6732 3.6732
Uruguay 18.5014 18.5014
Venzuel 4.2953 4.2926


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.



Yesterday Pvs Day

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.03 0.05
6-month 0.10 0.105
5- ear 1.53 1.58
10-year 2.96 2.99
30-year 4.20 4.20



* FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg

Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug 11 93.63 +.23
Corn CBOT Jul11 70012 +1/4
Wheat CBOT Jul11 65914 -13
Soybeans CBOT Jul11 13353/4 +234
Cattle CME Oct 11 117.80 +1.68
Pork Bellies CME Jul 11 121.00
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 11 26.21 +.83
Orange Juice ICE Sep 11 182.70 +4.45

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1541.50 $1515.10
Silver (troy oz., spot) 36.065b $34./3b
Copper (pound) $4.0/bO $4. 030
Platinum (troy oz., spot) 1/30.50 $1806.8U

NMER= New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT=
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


TexRdhse 16.54 +.69
Theravnce 21.20 +.02
Thoratec 30.96 +.98
TibcoSft 24.95 +1.15
TitanMach 29.07 +.81
TlVo Inc 9.88 +.10
Toreador 3.64 -.01
TowerSemi 1.14 -.06
TractSup s 63.46 +2.52
Travelzoo 55.64 -.34
TridentM h .70 -.01
TrimbleN 37.57 -.03
TriQuint 10.49 -.24
TrstNY 5.21 +.08
Trustmk 23.27 +.18
UTStrcm 1.57 +.06
UltaSalon 58.74 +1.32
Ultratech 29.12 -.58
Umpqua 11.54 +.05
UtdOnln 5.73 +.07
US Enr 3.99 +.04
UtdTherap 53.75 -.64
UnivDisp 33.58 +1.84
UnivFor 27.56 +.32
UnvStainIs 40.65 +4.74
UranmRs 1.51 -.01
UrbanOut 28.97 +.16


VCAAnt 20.68 -.24
ValenceTh 1.22 -.01
ValVisA 8.03 +.19
ValueClick 16.81 +.21
VarianSemi 61.28 +.14
Veeomlnst 49.00 -1.28
Velfi n 14.85 -.41
VBradleyn 38.54 +.28
Verigy 14.96
Verisign 32.60 -.12
Verisk 33.94 +.07
VertxPh 45.16 +.15
Vical 4.06 +.12
ViewPtFns 13.58 +.24
VirgnMdah 29.75 -.16
ViroPhrm 17.62 +.34
VisnChina 2.51 +.12
VistaPrt 46.81 -.02
Vitacosth 3.41 -2.29
Vivus 7.65 -.02
Vodafone 26.43 +.53
Volcano 29.99 +.49
WarnerChs 22.93 -.05
WashFed 16.01 +.05
WaveSys 2.46 +.25
WebMD 44.73 -1.03
WernerEnt 24.32 +.02
WestellT 3.60 +.03
Westmrld 18.35 +.14
Wstptlnng 20.51 +.69
WetSeal 4.41 +.11
WholeFd 56.90 +1.21
WilshBcp 3.04 -.04
Windstrm 13.14 +.06
Winn-Dixie 8.24 +.49
Wynn 132.27 +2.87
XOMArs 2.27 -.09
XenoPort 7.19 +.14
Xilinx 33.60 +.65
YRCWwrs .60 +.00
Yahoo 14.99 +.29
Yandexn 30.32 -.49
Yongye 4.98 -.06
Zagg 12.12 -.18
Zalicus 2.07 -.11
Zhongpin 10.69 -.10
ZonO&G 5.46 -.44
ZonBcp 23.16 +.02
Zopharm 5.98 +.09
Zoran 8.31 +.02
Zumiez 24.48 +.56


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YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AKSteel .20 1.4 ... 14.18 +.02 -13.4 McDnlds 2.44 3.0 17 82.69 +.17 +7.7
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.6 19 +5.4 Microsoft .64 2.6 6 24.47 +.21-12.3
Ameteks .24 .6 21 41.27 +.37 +5.1 MotrlaSoln ......... 45.57 +.09 +19.8
BkofAm .04 .4 19 10.60 -.08 -20.5 MotrlaMo n ... ... ... 24.49 -.29 -15.8
CapCtyBk .40 3.9 40 10.38 +.13-17.6 NextEraEn 2.20 3.9 14 57.05 +.42 +9.7
CntryLink 2.90 7.3 12 39.60 +.15-14.2 Penney .80 2.3 21 35.19 +.90 +8.9
Citigrprs .04 .1 13 38.16 -.14 -19.3 PiedmOfc 1.26 6.1 27 20.72 +.19 +2.9
CmwReitrs 2.00 8.0 19 24.90 +.34 -2.4 ProgrssEn 2.48 5.2 16 47.94 +.15+10.3
Disney .40 1.0 17 38.23 +.19 +1.9 RegionsFn .04 .6 ... 6.19 -.08 -11.6
EKodak ... ... 15 3.37 ... -37.1 SearsHIdgs ... ... ... 75.13 +1.11 +1.9
EnterPT 2.80 6.0 22 46.31 +.76 +.1 Smucker 1.76 2.3 19 77.88 +.84 +18.6
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.4 11 79.71 +.69 +9.0 SprintNex ... ... ... 5.21 +.02 +23.2
FordM ...... 6 12.94 +.17 -22.9 TimeWarn .94 2.7 15 35.34 +.21 +9.9
GenElec .60 3.2 16 18.48 -.01 +1.0 UniFirst .15 .3 13 50.98 +.60 -7.4
HomeDp 1.00 2.9 17 34.77 +.24 -.8 VerizonCm 1.95 5.5 21 35.65 +.14 -.4
Intel .84 3.9 10 21.33 +.14 +1.4 Vodafone 1.44 5.4 ... 26.43 +.53
IBM 3.00 1.8 14165.02 +.58+12.4 WalMart 1.46 2.8 13 53.04 +.22 -1.7
Lowes .56 2.4 16 23.11 +.28 -7.9 Walgrn .70 1.5 19 45.18 +.51 +16.0







CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 A7


IMTALFN3


Name NAV Chg Name NAV Chg
Advance Capital 1: EmgLd
Balancp 16.30 +.05 GNMA 15.86
RetInc 8.65 -.01 GrChinaAr 42.41 -.42
Alger Funds B: HiYIdA p 6.61 -.03
SmCapGr 6.66 +.05 StratValA 28.95 +.13
AllianceBern A: TechGroA 31.70 +.12
BalanAcp 15.40 ... DreihsAcInc 11.11 -.01
GIbThGrAp72.20 -.36 Driehaus Funds:
SmCpGrA 35.09 +.24 EMktGr 31.34 -.15
AllianceBern Adv: EVPTxMEmI 50.05 -.22
LgCpGrAd 26.29 +.08 Eaton Vance A:
AllianceBern B: ChinaAp 19.88 -.08
GIbThGrBt 62.12 -.31 AMTFMulnc 9.31
GrowthBt 24.60 +.09 MulICGrA 8.00 +.04
SCpGrBt 28.12 +.19 InBosA 5.86 -.01
AllianceBern C: LgCpVal 18.04 +.05
SCpGrCt 28.31 +.20 NatlMunlnc 9.10
Allianz Fds Instl: SpEqtA 16.28 +.11
NFJDvVI 11.77 +.04 TradGvA 7.48
SmCpVi 30.93 +.27 EatonVance B:
Allianz Funds A: HIthSBt 10.62 +.06
SmCpVA 29.50 +.26 NatlMulnc 9.10
Allianz Funds C: Eaton Vance C:
AGICGrthC 23.57 +.10 GovtCp 7.47
TargetCt 14.78 +.12 NatMunlnc 9.10
Amer Beacon Insti: Eaton Vance I:
LgCaplnst 19.74 +.07 FItgRt 9.03 -.01
Amer Beacon Inv: GblMacAbR 10.14 ...
LgCaplnv 18.73 +.07 LgCapVal 18.08 +.05
Amer Century Adv: FBR Funds:
EqGroAp 21.55 +.14 Focuslnv 49.01 +.34
EqIncAp 7.32 +.03 FMI Funds:
AmerCenturyl Inv: LgCappn 16.18 +.09
Balanced 15.84 +.06 FPA Funds:
DivBnd 10.91 -.01 Nwlnc 10.92
EqInc 7.32 +.03 FPACresn 27.68 +.03
Gift 28.58 +.22 Fairholme 31.30 -.09
Growthl 26.11 +18 Federated A:
Heritagel 21.26 +.17 MidGrStA 36.05 +.28
IncGro 24.70 +.16 KaufmAp 5.42 +.01
InfAdjBd 12.20 -.01 MuSecA 9.90
IntDisc 10.53 -.10 Federated Instl:
InfiGrol 11.10 -.08 KaufmnR 5.42
NewOpp 7.84 +.07 TotRetBd 11.28
OneChAg 12.28 +.04 Fidelity Adv FocT:
OneChMd 11.83 +.03 EnergyT 38.36 +.09
RealEstl 20.25 +.25 HItCarT 24.81 +.25
Ultra 23.16 +.15 Fidelity Advisor A:
Valuelnv 5.78 +.02 Nwlnsghp 19.76 +.06
American Funds A: StrlnA 12.58 -.02
AmcpAp 19.21 +.13 Fidelity Advisor C:
AMuDAp 25.98 +.15 Nwlnsghtn 18.81 +.06
BalAp 18.28 +.07 Fidelity Advisor l:
BondAp 12.39 -.01 EqGrIn 59.20 +.24
CaplBAp 50.94 +.06 Eqlnin 24.41 +.06
CapWGAp 35.92 -.01 FItRatel n 9.80
CapWAp 21.12 -.02 IntBdln 11.36 -.01
EupacAp 41.54 -.11 Nwlnsgtln 19.97 +.06
FdlnvAp 37.22 +.14 Fidelity AdvisorT:
GovtAp 14.14 -.01 BalancT 15.31 +.03
GwthAp 30.50 +.12 DivGrTp 12.47 +.05
HI TrAp 11.35 -.02 EqGrTp 55.29 +.23
IncoAp 16.96 +05 EqInT 24.02 +.06
IntBdAp 13.57 -.01 GrOppT 35.73 +.22
InDGrlncAp31.40 -.03 HilnAdTp 10.14 -.02
ICAAp 28.16 +.13 IntBdT 11.34
NEcoAp 25.84 +.10 MulncTp 12.74
N PerAp 28.71 +.02 OvrseaT 18.63 -.04
NwWrldA 53.81 -.11 STFiT 9.29 -.01
STBFAp 10.10 ... StkSelAIICp 18.79 +.08
SmCpAp 38.32 -.05 Fidelity Freedom:
TxExAp 12.09 ... FF2010n 13.82 +.01
WshAp 28.30 +.19 FF2010K 12.77 +.01
American Funds B: FF2015n 11.54 +.01
BalBp 18.23 +.08 FF2015K 12.81 +.01
CaplBBp 50.99 +.06 FF2020n 14.01 +.02
CpWGrBt 35.74 -.02 FF2020K 13.25 +.02
GrwthBt 29.50 +.12 FF2025n 11.67 +.01
Ariel Investments: FF2025K 13.41 +.02
Apprec 44.16 +.42 FF2030n 13.94 +.03
Ariel 49.57 +.43 FF2030K 13.58 +.02
Artio Global Funds: FF2035n 11.58 +.03
InflEqlr 29.23 -.08 FF2035K 13.71 +.03
IniEqA 28.49 -.09 FF2040n 8.09 +.02
IntEqlllr 12.10 -.03 FF2040K 13.77 +.02
Artisan Funds: FF2045 n 9.57 +.02
Inl 22.17 ... Incomen 11.46
InfiVal r 27.63 ... Fidelity Invest:
MidCap 34.79 ... AIISectEq 12.49 +.05
MidCapVal 21.38 ... AMgr50n 15.65 +.01
SCapVal 17.28 ... AMgr70rn 16.54 +.02
BNY Mellon Funds: AMgr20rn 12.97 +.01
EmgMkts 11.27 -.08 Balancn 18.58 +.04
Baron Funds: BalancedK 18.59 +.04
Asset 56.68 +.43 BlueChGr n 45.63 +.23
Growth 53.73 +.36 CAMunn 11.93
SmallCap 25.23 +.23 Canada n 56.75 +51
Bernstein Fds: CapApn 25.78 +.15
IntDur 13.99 ... CapDevOn 11.00 +.05
DivMu 14.50 Cplncrn 9.46 -.02
TxMgdlnI 15.20 -.08 ChinaRg r 30.74 -.09
BlackRock A: CngS 465.09
EqtyDiv 18.14 +.10 CTMunrn 11.53
GIAIAr 19.65 Contran 67.23 +.21
HiYInvA 7.69 -.03 ContraK 67.24 +.21
InfOpAp 33.19 -.05 CnvScn 25.88 +.05
BlackRock B&C: DisEq n 23.11 +.16
GIAICt 18.29 -.01 DiscEqF 23.11 +.17
BlackRock Insti: Divintin 29.82 -.09
USOpps 41.38 +.36 DivrslntKr 29.82 -.08
BaVil 26.16 +.13 DivStkOn 15.19 +.03
EquityDv 18.18 +10 DivGthn 28.38 +.10
GIbAllocr 19.75 -.01 EmergAsrn30.23 -.06
Brinson Funds Y: EmrMkn 25.29 -.10
HiYldlYn 6.26 -.02 Eqlncn 44.89 +.11
BruceFundrn398.14 +.28 EQIIn 18.55 +.05
Buffalo Funds: EqlncK 44.89 +.10
SmCapn 25.96 +.05 ECapAp 19.12 -.10
CGM Funds: Europe 31.51 -.15
Focusn 29.61 +.16 Exch 323.88 ..
Muti n 26.29 +.09 Exportn 21.84 +09
Realtyn 28.75 +.39 Fideln 32.90 +.13
CRM Funds: Fiftyrn 18.01 +17
MdCpVII 29.97 +19 FItRateHi r n 9.80 -.01
Calamos Funds: FrInOne n 27.59 +.07
CAam os Funds: GNMAn 11.70
GrwthAp 52.43 +.19 Govtlnc 1062 01
Calvert Group: GroCon 86.38 +.57
InEqAp 14.33 -.5 Grolncn 18.55 +03
SocilAp 4.3 +. 0 GrowthCoK 86.38 +.57
SocialAp 27.80 +.10 GrSratrn 20.26 +.07
SocBdp 15.78 .01 Highlncr n 9.00 -.02
SocEqAp 36.96 +08 Indepnn 24.21 +.17
TxF Lgp 15.46 " n IntBdn 10.77 .01
Cohen & Steers: ntGovn 10 -.092
RltyShrs 63.59 +.72 IntmMun 10.19
Columbia Class A: nfDiscn 32.36 -.12
Acornt 29.35 +.23 InfSCprn 21.67 -.13
DivEqlnc 10.20 +.04 2 nvGrBdn 11.63 -.01
DivrBd 5.08 nvGBn 756
DivOpptyA 8.15 +.03 'apan ,0.4 +.03
LgCorQAp 5.63 +.03 JpnSmn 8.82 -.03
MdCpGrOp 11.08 +.07 LgCapVal 11.72 +.04
MidCVIOpp 18.05 +.04 LCpv9M rn 10.82 +.05
PBModAp 10.79 +.02 LatAm 56.18 +.23
SelCommA43.86 +.17 LevCoStkn 28.79 +.11
FrontierA 10.58 +.07 LowPrn 40.26 +.21
GlobTech 20.11 +.03 LowPriKr 40.26 +.21
ColumbiaCl 1,T&G: Magellnn 69.96 +.17
EmMktOp I n 9.78 -.04 MagellanK 69.92 +.17
Columbia Class Z: MDMurn 10.99
AcornZ 30.29 +.24 MAMunn 11.92
AcornlntZ 39.62 -.21 MegaCpStknl0.11 +.03
IntBdZ 9.15 -.01 MIMunn 11.87
LgCapGr 13.16 +.10 MidCapn 28.05 +.14
LgCpldxZ 24.83 +.13 MNMunn 11.51
MdCpldxZ 11.70 +.09 MtgSecn 11.02
MdCpVIZp 13.86 +.09 Munilncn 12.58
ValRestr 49.47 +.14 NJMunrn 11.48
Credit Suisse Comm: NwMktr n 15.83
ComRett 9.26 ... NwMilln 29.98 +.09
DFA Funds: NYMunn 12.89
InflCorEqn 11.08 -.03 OTCn 55.64 +.07
USCorEqlnls.22 +.07 OhMunn 11.65
USCorEq2nll.16 +.07 100index 8.88 +.04
DWS Invest A: Ovrsea n 32.26 -.10
CommAp 17.98 +.08 PcBasn 25.01 -.10
DWS InvestS: PAMunr n 10.74
CorPlslInc 10.74 -.01 Purihin 18.24 +.04
EmMkGrr 18.08 -.07 PuritanK 18.24 +.04
EnhEmMk 10.72 ... RealEn 27.96 +.34
EnhGlbBdr 10.47 ... SAIISecEqF 12.50 +.05
GIbSmCGr 39.83 -.13 SCmdtyStrtn12.34
GIbliem 23.80 -.06 SrEmrgMkt 17.93 -.09
Gold&Prc 20.10 ... SrslntGrw 11.23 -.03
GrolncS 16.96 +.15 SrslntVal 10.00 -.03
HiYldTx 11.88 ... SrlnvGrdF 11.64
IntTxAMT 11.45 ... StlntMu n 10.71
Int FdS 44.55 .18 STBFn 8.53
LgCpFoGr 29.59 +.13 SmllCpSrn 19.57 +.15
LatAmrEq 47.66 ... SCpValur 15.46 +.16
MgdMuniS 8.87 ... SIISIcACapn25.96 +.11
MATFS 14.21 ... SIISelSmCp 19.09 +.18
SP500S 17.05 +.09 Sfratlncn 11.26 -.01
WorldDiv 23.98 ... SfrReRtr 9.82 +.01
Davis Funds A: TotalBdn 10.93 -.01
NYVenA 34.11 +.05 Trendn 69.09 +.32
Davis Funds B: USBI n 11.53 -.01
NYVenB 32.61 +.05 Utilityn 17.13 +.08
Davis Funds C &Y: ValStratn 28.41 +.17
NYVenY 34.50 +.05 Value n 69.74 +.31
NYVenC 32.87 +.04 Wrldwn 18.91 +.06
Delaware Invest A: Fidelity Selects:
Diver Incp 9.35 -.01 Airn 38.96 +.22
SMIDCapG 24.01 +.22 Banking n 17.09 -.02
TxUSAp 11.18 ... Biotchn 83.34 +.65
Delaware Invest B: Brokr n 47.72 -.09
SelGrBt 30.41 +.13 Chemn 101.21 +1.30
Dimensional Fds: ComEquipn25.51 +.11
EmMCrEqn21.20 -.09 Compn 56.09 +.13
EmMktV 33.88 -.20 ConDisn 23.36 +.18
IntSmVan 16.95 -.10 ConsuFnn 11.58 +.08
LargeCo 10.08 +.06 ConStapn 71.98 +.36
TAUSCorE2n9.09 +.06 CstHon 35.01 +.36
USLgVan 20.86 +.13 DfAern 79.88 +.89
USMicron 13.79 +.10 Elecfrn 47.12


USTgdVal 16.67 +.14 Enrgyn 54.65 +.13
USSmalln 21.72 +.18 EngSvn 76.54 +.12
USSmVa 25.48 +.24 EnvAltEnrnl8.77 +.11
IntlSmCon 16.95 -.10 FinSvn 56.88
EmgMktn 29.60 -.08 Goldrn 44.75 +.05
Fixdn 10.36 Heallthn 139.71 +1.40
IntVan 18.05 -.03 Insurn 46.12 +.22
GIb5Fxlnc n 11.24 Leisr n 91.20 +.54
TMUSTgtV21.52 +.19 Materialn 67.47 +.54
TMMktwV 15.47 +.09 MedDIn 58.42 +.71
2YGIFxdn 10.21 MdEqSysn 30.40 +.30
DFARIEn 23.56 +.29 Multmdn 45.40 +.11
Dodge&Cox: NtGas n 32.72 -.09
Balanced 71.92 +.13 Pharmn 13.47 +.09
Income 13.54 Retail n 51.74 +.69
IntflStk 35.35 -.02 Softwrn 82.08 +.54
Stock 110.11 +.27 Techn 92.13 +.23
DoubleUne Funds: Telcm n 48.72 +.20
TRBdI 11.13 Transn 55.00 +.43
Dreyfus: UtilGr n 51.81 +.23
Aprec 40.11 +18 Wirelessn 7.85 +.03
CTA 11.58 Fidelity Spartan:
CorVA 24.81 +12 ExtMklnn 38.57 +.27
Dreyf 9.14 +05 5001dxlnvn 45.43 +.24
DryMidr 29.01 +.24 lnfIlrxlnvn 35.40 -.13
Dr5001nt 35.40 +19 TotMktlnvn 37.25 +.21


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq. Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Fidelity Spart Adv:
5001dxAdv n45.44 +.25
IntAdrn 35.40 -.13
TotMktAd r n37.26 +.22
First Eagle:
GIlblA 47.42 +.09
OverseasA 22.93 +.01
First Investors A
BlChpAp 21.66 +.12
GloblAp 6.62 +.01
GovtAp 11.46 -.01
GrolnAp 14.97 +.11
IncoAp 2.51
MATFAp 11.62 -.01
MITFAp 12.01
NJTFA p 12.84
NYTFA p 14.36
OppAp 28.57 +.25
PATFAp 12.89
SpSitAp 24.89 +.09
TxExAp 9.66
TotRtAp 15.50 +.07
ValueBp 7.19 +.04
Forum Funds:
AbsStrlr 10.96
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
AdjUSp 8.85
ALTFAp 11.03 +.01
AZTFApx 10.59
CallnsApx 11.83
CAIntApx 11.34
CalTFAp 6.88
COTFA px 11.49
CTTFAp 10.79
CvtScAp 15.45 +.05
DblTFAx 11.51 +.01
DynTchA 30.45 +.12
EqlncAp 16.89 +.08
Fedlntpx 11.69 +.01
FedTFAp 11.72 +.01
FLTFAp 11.35
FoundAlp 10.88 +.01
GATFApx 11.81
GoldPrM A 42.73 -.03
GrwthAp 45.59 +.27
HYTFA p 9.93
HilncA 2.01
IncomAp 2.20 -.01
InsTFApx 11.72
NYITFpx 11.20
LATFAp 11.22
LMGvScA 10.45
MDTFAp 11.18
MATFApx 11.41
MITFApx 11.79
MNInsAx 12.18
MOTFAp 11.90
NJTFAp 11.82
NYTFAp 11.49 +.01
NCTFA p 12.07
OhiolApx 12.29
ORTFAp 11.79
PATFApx 10.17
ReEScAp 14.84 +.18
RisDvAp 34.53 +.24
SMCpGrA 37.96 +.37
Stratlncp 10.56 -.01
USGovA p 6.82
UIsAnp 12.39 +.06
VATFAp 11.54 +.01
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdv n 13.73
IncmeAd 2.19
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
IncomC t 2.22 -.01
Frank/Temp Mtl A&B:
SharesA 21.31 +.05
Frank/Temp Temp A:
DvMktAp 24.53 -.17
ForgnAp 7.26 -.03
GIBdAp 13.77
GrthAp 18.61 -.01
WorldAp 15.23 -.01
Frank/Temp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 18.63
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 23.87 -.16
ForgnC p 7.09 -.03
GIBdCp 13.80 +.01
Franklin Mutual Ser:
QuestA 18.00 +.02
GE Elfun S&S:
S&S Inc 11.50 -.01
S&SPM 40.53 +.18
GE Instl Funds:
InfiEq 11.49 -.03
GMOTrust IIll:
Quality 20.99 +.12
GMOTrust IV:
InfGrEq 23.72 -.05
InflnFrVl 22.45 -.08
GMOTrustVI:
EmgMktsr 13.45 -.04
InflCorEq 29.87 -.10
Quality 21.00 +.12
StrFxInc 15.94 +.04
Gabelli Funds:
Asset 50.47 +.23
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 26.38 +.07
Goldman Sachs A:
MdCVAp 36.64 +.20
Goldman Sachs Inst:
GrOppt 24.45 +.17
HiYield 7.28
HYMuni n 8.35
MidCapV 36.97 +.20
Harbor Funds:
Bond 12.36
CapAplnst 37.52 +.30
Intllnvt 61.21 -.12
InflAdmp 61.41 -.12
Intir 61.88 -.11
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 32.99 +.03
DivGltAp 19.36 +.07
FItRateApx 8.85 -.01
IntOpAp 14.84 -.02
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 29.18 +.03
FItRateCtx 8.84 -.01
Hartford Fds L:
GrwOppL 27.61 +.09
Hartford Fds Y:
CapAppYn 35.87 +.05
CapAppl n 33.04 +.04
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 41.62 +.08
Div&Gr 19.96 +.07
Advisers 19.64 +.05
TotRetBd 11.24
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrllOrig nl5.76 +.20
Hussman Funds:
StrTotRetr 12.16
StrGrowth 12.39 +.03
ICON Fds:
EnergyS 20.84 +.10
HIthcareS 15.23 +.16
ISI Funds:
NoAm p 7.84
IVA Funds:
WldwideAt 17.08 +.04
WldwideIr 17.09 +.03
Invesco Fds Invest:
DivrsDivp 12.57 +.07
Invesco Funds:
Energy 41.63 -.01
Utlibes 16.20 +.07
Invesco Funds A:
Chart p 16.82 +.09
CmstkA 15.91 +.07
Constp 23.00 +.11
EqlncA 8.68 +.02
GrlncAp 19.40 +.04
HilncMu p 7.43
HiYldp 4.22 -.01
HYMuA 9.07
InfiGrow 28.31 -.02
MunilnA 12.85
PATFA 15.66 +.01
USMortgA 13.15
Invesco Funds B:
CapDevt 14.43 +.12
DivGtSecB 13.35 +.08
MunilnB 12.83
US Mortg 13.08
Ivy Funds:
AssetSC t 23.76 +.03
AssetStA p 24.54 +.04
AssetSbl r 24.76 +.03
GINatRsAp 20.43 -.13
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBdA 11.67
JP Morgan Insth:
MdCpValn 24.55 +.13
JPMorgan R C:
CoreBond nil.66 -.01
ShtDurBd 11.03
JPMorgan Select:
USEquityn 10.27 +.06
JPMorgan Sel CIs:
CoreBdn 11.66
HighYldn 8.19 -.01
IntmTFBdn 11.01
ShtDurBd n 11.03
USLCCrPIsn20.61 +.11
Janus S Shrs:
Forty 32.12 +.21
Janus T Shrs:
BalancdT 25.72 +.08
ContrarnT 13.77 +.01
EnterprT 60.63 +.46
FIxBndT 10.61 -.01
GlUfeSciTr 25.71 +.18
GIbSel T 11.27 -.02


GITechTr 16.92 +.06
Grw&lncT 31.36 +.18
JanusT 29.04 +.15
OvrseasTr 44.85 -.17
PrkMCVal T 23.12 +.11
ResearchT 29.58 +.16
ShTmBdT 3.10
TwentyT 62.91 +.37
VentureT 58.37 +.46
WrldWTr 45.32 -.07
JensenJn 27.89 +.24
John Hancock A:
BondAp 15.72 -.02


Name NAV Chg
RgBkA 13.98 -.01
StrlnAp 6.75 -.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 6.75 -.01
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSAggr 12.33
LSBalanc 13.07
LSConsrv 13.05
LSGrwth 12.96
LSModer 12.86
Keeley Funds:
SmCpValAp25.12 +.18
Lazard Insti:
EmgMktl 20.88 -.02
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 21.24 -.01
Legg Mason A:
CBAgGrp 117.37 +.95
CBApprp 13.94 +.07
CBLCGrp 24.13 +.17
GCIAIICOp 8.75 -.02
WAHilncAt 6.15
WAMgMu p 15.56 -.01
Legg Mason B:
CBLgCGrt 22.47 +.15
Legg Mason C:
CMSplnvp 31.22 +.22
CMValTrp 38.26 +.17
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 29.83 +.13
SmCap 29.29 +.26
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 14.74
StrlncC 15.36 -.01
LSBondR 14.68 -.01
StrlncA 15.28 -.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 12.44 -.01
InvGrBdY 12.45 -.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilAp 11.49 +.04
FundlEq 13.17 +.07
BdDebAp 7.91 -.02
ShDurlncAp 4.60
MidCpAp 17.09 +.14
Lord Abbett C:
ShDurlncC t 4.63
Lord Abbett F:
ShtDurlnco 4.60
MFS Funds A:
MITA 19.51 +.09
MIGA 15.60 +.09
HilnA 3.47 -.01
MFLA 9.54
TotRA 14.38 +.04
UtilA 17.54 -.01
ValueA 23.46 +.09
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 14.02 +.09
GvScBn 10.27
HilnBn 3.48 -.01
MulnBn 8.18
TotRBn 14.38 +.04
MFS Funds I:
ReInT 16.11 -.08
Valuel 23.57 +.09
MFS Funds Instl:
InflEqn 18.56 -.02
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.93
MainStay Funds B:
ConvBt 16.22 +.03
GovtBt 8.77
HYIdBBt 5.90 -.01
IncmBldr 16.56 +.02
InfEqB 11.03 -.08
MainStay Funds I:
ICAPSIEq 35.69 +.14
Mairs & Power:
Growth n 73.94 +.62
Manning&Napier Fds:
WIdOppA 8.83 -.02
Matthews Asian:
AsianGllnv 17.89
China Inv 27.88 +.11
Indialnvr 19.42 -.36
PacTgrlnv 23.10 +.08
MergerFdn 16.15 +.02
Meridian Funds:
Growth 45.43 +.41
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 10.51
TotRtBdl 10.51
Midas Funds:
Midas Fdt 4.24 +.02
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 15.13 +.08
Morgan Stanley B:
GlobStratB 16.47
MorganStanley Inst:
InflEql 13.99 -.04
MCapGrl 39.45 +.29
MCapGrPp38.19 +.28
Muhlenkn 54.18 +.47
Munder Funds A:
GwthOppA 27.85 +.16
Munder Funds Y:
MCpCGrYn29.59 +.20
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 12.73 +.02
GblDiscA 29.93
GIbDiscC 29.61 +.01
GIbDiscZ 30.32
QuestZ 18.16 +.02
SharesZ 21.50 +.05
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 19.91 +.12
Genesis 34.68 +.28
Geneslnst 48.02 +.39
Intl r 17.58 -.09
Partnhier 27.56 +.10
Neuberger&Berm Tr:
Genesis 49.71 +.40
Nicholas Group:
Hilnc I n 9.67 -.02
Nichn 45.60 +.29
Northern Funds:
HiYFxlnc 7.36
MMEmMktr 22.12
MMIntEqr 9.73
SmCpldx 8.62
Stkldx 15.80
Technly 14.73
Nuveen Cl A:
LtMBAp 10.97
Nuveen Cl Y:
RealEstn 19.74 +.22
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSG 39.46 +.11
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 28.63 +.12
Global 22.13 +.09
Intllr 19.60 -.05
Oakmark r 42.63 +.24
Selectr 28.49 +.13
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 8.00 -.01
GIbSMdCap 15.82 +.01
NonUSLgCp 10.48 -.06
RealRet 10.88
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 6.09
AMTFrNY 10.82
CAMuniAp 7.61
CapApAp 43.84 +.26
CaplncAp 8.85 +.01
ChmplncAp 1.95 -.01
DvMktAp 34.59 -.09
Discp 60.71 +.67
EquityA 9.01 +.05
GlobAp 62.32 -.02
GIbOppA 29.84 +.05
GblStrlncA 4.35 -.01
Gold p 42.30 +.04
IntBdA p 6.68 -.01
MnStFdA 32.05 +.15
PAMuniAp 10.50
SenFltRtA 8.36
USGv p 9.47 -.01
Oppenheimer B:
AMTFMu 6.06
AMTFrNY 10.82
CplncB t 8.67 +.01
ChmplncBt 1.95 .01
EquityB 8.31 +.05
GblSfrlncB 4.36 -.01
Oppenheimer C&M:
DevMktCt 33.17 -.08
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.23
RoMuAp 15.34 +.01
RcNtMuA 6.78 +.01
Oppenheimer Y:
DevMktY 34.26 .09
InfiBdY 6.67 -.02
IntGrowY 28.85 -.20
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAd p 9.90
TotRtAd 11.00
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAutr 10.85
AIIAsset 12.36
ComodRR 8.80 -.01
DevLcMkr 10.98 -.02
Divlnc 11.55 -.01
EmMkBd 11.20 -.02
Fltlnc r 8.91
ForBdUnr 11.01 -.02
FrgnBd 10.48
HiYld 9.31 -.02
InvGrCp 10.70 -.02
LowDu 10.49
ModDur 10.80
RealRet 11.56 -.02
RealRtnl 11.64 -.02
ShortT 9.90


TotRt 11.00
TRII 10.52
TRIll 9.73
PIMCO Funds A:
AllAstAut t 10.79
ComRRp 8.65 -.02
LwDurA 10.49
RealRtAp 11.64 -.02
TotRtA 11.00
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 11.64 -.02
TotRtCt 11.00


Name NAV Chg
PIMCO Funds D:
TRtnp 11.00
PIMCO Funds P:
TotRtnP 11.00
Parnassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 26.63 +.10
Perm Port Funds:
Permannt 48.00 +.17
Pioneer Funds A:
BondAp 9.71
InflValA 19.87 -.04
PionFdAp 41.32 +.24
ValueAp 11.32 +.04
Pioneer Funds B:
HiYldBt 10.37
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYIdC t 10.47
Pioneer Fds Y:
CullenVY 18.55 +.06
Price Funds:
Balance n 19.69 +.03
BIChipn 38.31 +.19
CABondn 10.61
CapAppn 21.02 +.06
DivGron 23.68 +.12
EmMktBn 13.35 -.01
EmEurp 22.41 -.46
EmMktSn 33.56 -.14
Eqlncn 24.05 +.10
Eqlndexn 34.57 +.19
Europen 15.92 -.11
GNMAn 10.03
Grownthn 31.93 +.12
Gr&ln n 20.60 +.09
HIthSci n 34.70 +.26
HiYield n 6.80 -.01
InsfCpG 16.36 +.06
InflBondn 10.32 -.02
IntDis n .44 -.26
Intl G& 13.71 -.06
InflStkn 14.20 -.05
Japan n 7.75 -.03
LatAmn 51.46 +.08
MDShrtn 5.23
MDBondn 10.35
MidCapn 60.35 +.31
MCapValIn 24.46 +.12
NAmer n 33.45 +.18
N Asian 18.85 -.01
New Era n 50.39 -.02
N Horizn 35.48 +.26
N Inc n 9.60
NYBond n 11.07
OverS SF r n 8.56 -.03
PSIncpn 16.34 +.01
RealEstn 19.03 +.21
R2010n 15.72 +.02
R2015n 12.16 +.02
R2020n 16.77 +.04
R2025n 12.26 +.03
R2030n 17.56 +.04
R2035n 12.41 +.03
R2040n 17.66 +.04
SciTecn 27.04 +.08
ShtBd n 4.87
SmCpStkn 35.70 +.25
SmCapVal n36.35 +.26
SpecGrn 17.91 +.05
Speclnn 12.53
TFInc n 9.77
TxFrHn 10.58
TxFrSIn 5.61 -.01
USTIntn 6.02
USTLgn 11.70
VABondn 11.51
Valuen 23.90 +.10
Principal Inv:
LgCGI In 9.33
LT20201n 11.91
LT20301n 11.80
Prudential Fds A:
BlendA 17.52 +.11
HiYIdAp 5.51 -.02
MuHilncA 9.42
NatResA 52.65 -.05
UblityA 10.71 +.03
Prudential Fds B:
GrowthB 16.28 +.13
HiYIdBt 5.51 -.01
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvA p 9.69
AZTE 8.86
ConvSec 20.46
DvrlnAp 8.03 -.01
EqlnAp 15.59
EuEq 20.57
GeoBalA 12.25 +.04
GIbEqtyp 9.27
GrInAp 13.53
GIbIHIthA 49.24
HiYdAp 7.76 -.02
HiYld In 5.99 -.01
IncmAip 6.93
IntGrlnp 10.09
InvAp 13.06 +.08
NJTxAp 9.15
MulCpGr 51.08 +.30
PATE 8.92
TxExA p 8.39
TFInAp 14.56
TFHYA 11.42
USGvAp 14.29 -.01
GIblUtilA 10.72
VoyAp 22.30 +.08
Putnam Funds B:
DvrlnBt 7.97 -.01
Eqlnct 15.44
EuEq 19.66
GeoBaIB 12.12 +.03
GIbEqlt 8.36
GINtRst 19.85 -.04
GrlnBt 13.30
GIbIHIthB 40.38
HiYldBt 7.75 -.02
HYAdBt 5.88 -.01
IncmBt 6.87
IntGrlnt 9.97
InfiNopt 15.17 -.08
InvBt 11.73 +.06
NJTxBt 9.14
MuldCpGr 44.02 +.26
TxExBo t 8.39
TFHYBt 11.43
USGvBt 14.22 -.02
GlblUtilB 10.67
VoyBt 18.89 +.07
RS Funds:
IntGrA 17.68 -.06
LgCAIphaA 41.80 +.13
Value 25.45 +.12
RidgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 10.19 +.06
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 17.91 +.05
MicroCapl 17.25 +.08
PennMulr 11.92 +.08
Premierlr 21.22 +.11
TotRetlr 13.38 +.11
ValSvct 12.86 +.08
VlPISvc 13.25 +.07
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 10.98
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 13.44 +.06
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkt 21.81 -.10
Schwab Funds:
HIthCare 17.91 +.17
0lOOOnvr 38.10 +.21
S&P Sel 20.07 +.011
SmCpSI 21.67 +.20
TSMSelr 23.36 +.13
Scout Funds:
Inl 32.47 -.08
Selected Funds:
AmShD 41.23 +.06
AmShSp 41.19 +.05
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 32.31 +.16
Sequoia 140.41 +.93
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 42.21 +.24
SoSunSCInv tn20.83+.20
St FarmAssoc:
Gwlh 54.20 +.31
Stratton Funds:
Mul-Cap 36.10 +.14
RealEstate 28.34 +.36
SmCap 51.65 +.47
SunAmerica Funds:
USGvBt 9.71
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.94
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS 20.43 -.10
Third Avenue Fds:
InflValnstr 17.03 -.12
REVallnstr 23.65 -.06
Valuelnst 49.48 -.43
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 28.41 -.06
IncBuildAt 19.23 -.02
IncBuildC p 19.23 -.02
IntValue I 29.05 -.07
Valuel 35.06 +.04
Thrivent Fds A:
HiYld 4.83 -.02
Incom 8.79 -.01
Tocqueville Fds:
Goldtn 78.20 +.33
Transamerica A:
AegonHYBp 9.18 -.02
Flexlncp 9.06
Turner Funds:
SmlCpGrn 35.14 +.32
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 24.16


US Global Investors:
AIIAm 23.15 +.12
ChinaReg 8.28 -.06
GIbRs 11.06 -.02
Gld&Mtls 16.13 -.01
WdPrcMn 17.98 -.20
USAA Group:
AgvGt 33.26 +.18
CA Bd 9.82
CrnstStr 23.19 +.02
GNMA 10.28 -.01
GrTxStr 13.19 +03


Name NAV Chg
Grwth 14.75 +.09
Gr&lnc 15.25 +.08
IncStk 12.55 +.09
Inco 13.00
Inl 25.08 -.03
NYBd 11.51
PrecMM 36.93 +.01
SciTech 13.03 +.06
ShtTBnd 9.20
SmCpStk 13.97 +.12
TxElt 12.92
TxELT 12.68
TxESh 10.72
VABd 10.89
WIdGr 19.55 +.07
VALIC:
MdCpldx 21.37 +.17
Stkldx 25.41 +.14
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 18.26 +.12
Van Eck Funds:
GIHardA 49.61 -.01
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmI n 21.90 +.08
CAITAdmn 10.99
CpOpAdlIn 76.04 +.38
EMAdmr r n 38.52 -.09
Energyn 126.76 -.14
EqlnAdm n n45.14 +.26
EuroAdml n 63.87 -.29
ExplAdml n 70.57 +.55
ExtdAdm n 42.39 +.32
50OAdml n 118.27 +.64
GNMAAdn 10.95
GrwAdm n 31.95 +.20
HIthCr n 58.46 +.56
HiYldCp n 5.75 -.01
InfProAd n 26.64 -.02
ITBdAdml n 11.49 -.01
ITsryAdml n 11.65 -.01
IntGrAdmn 61.20 -.19
ITAdmln 13.58
ITGrAdmn 10.03 -.02
LtdTrAdn 11.09
LTGrAdmlIn 9.59
LTAdmln 10.93
MCpAdml n 95.55 +.63
MorgAdm n 56.63 +.37
MuHYAdm nlO.32
NYLTAdn 11.06
PrmCap r n 69.00 +.50
PALTAdm n 11.00
ReitAdm r n 85.09 +1.06
STsyAdmln 10.78
STBdAdmlnlO.65
ShtTrAdn 15.91
STFdAdn 10.86
STIGrAdn 10.79
SmCAdm n 35.72 +.31
TxMCap r n 64.32 +.35
TUBAdml n 10.77
TStkAdmn 32.25 +.18
ValAdmln 21.46 +.10
WellslAdm n54.65 +.11
WelltnAdm n55.06 +.12
Windsorn 45.88 +.14
WdsrllAdn 47.37 +.21
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 24.96 +.14
CALTn 10.99
CapOppn 32.91 +.16
Convrt n 13.44 +.02
DivdGron 15.18 +.11
Energy n 67.50 -.07
Eqlnc n 21.53 +.12
Explr n 75.78 +.59
FLLTn 11.37
GNMAn 10.95
GlobEqn 18.20 +.02
Grolncn 27.10 +.14
GrthEqn 11.00 +.07
HYCorpn 5.75 -.01
HlthCren 138.52 +1.34
InflaPron 13.56 -.01
IntlExplrn 16.48 -.10
IntGrnn 19.23 -.05
InfiValn 31.57 -.12
ITIGraden 10.03 -.02
ITTsryn 11.65 -.01
LifeConn 16.66 +.03
LifeGro n 22.45 +.06
Lifelncn 14.34 +.02
LifeModn 19.99 +.04
LTIGrade n 9.59
LTTsryn 11.41
Morgn 18.26 +.12
MuHYn 10.32
Mulntn 13.58
MuLtd n 11.09
MuLongn 10.93
MuShrtn 15.91
NJLTn 11.47
NYLTn 11.06
OHLTTEn 11.86
PALTn 11.00
PrecMtls r n 24.31 -.20
PrmcpCorn 14.02 +.08
Prmcp r n 66.47 +.47
SelValurn 19.52 +.15
STARn 19.50 +.03
STIGraden 10.79
STFed n 10.86
STTsrynn 10.78
StratEqn 19.48 +.21
TgtRe2005 nl2.08 +.01
TgtRetlncn 11.55 +.01
TgRe2010n22.92 +.03
TgtRe2015 n2.72 +.02
TgRe202O n22.60 +.05
TgtRe2025 nl2.89 +.03
TgRe203O0n22.12 +.06
TgtRe2035 nl3.33 +.03
TgtRe204O n21.89 +.06
TgtRe2050 n21.79 +.06
TgtRe2045 nl3.75 +.04
USGron 18.46 +.08
USValuen 10.64 +.06
Wellsly n 22.55 +.04
Welltnn 31.87 +.06
Wndsrrn 13.59 +.04
Wndslln 26.68 +.12
Vanguard Idx Fds:
DvMklnP r n104.88 -.41
MidCplstPI nl04.11 +.68
TotlntAdm r r26.19 -.09
Totlntllnstr n104.77 -.36
500 n 118.23 +.63
Balancedn 21.89 +.08
DevMktn 10.14 -.04
EMktn 29.29 -.07
Europen 27.40 -.12
Extend n 42.34 +.31
Growth n 31.94 +.20
LgCaplxn 23.75 +.13
MidCapn 21.04 +.14
Pacific n 10.24 -.02
REITr n 19.93 +.24
SmCapn 35.67 +.31
SmlCpGth n22.76 +.19
SmlCpVin 16.22 +.14
STBndn 10.65
TotBndn 10.77
Totllntin 15.65 -.06
TotStkn 32.24 +.19
Valuen 21.45 +.10
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 21.90 +.08
DevMklnstnlO.07 -.03
Extln n 42.39 +.32
FTAIIWIdl r n93.53 -.27
Grwthlstn 31.95 +.20
InfProlnstn 10.85 -.01
Instldxn 117.44 +.63
InsPIn 117.45 +.63
InstTStldxn 29.17 +.17
lnsTStPlusr29.17 +.17
MidCplstn 21.11 +.14
SCInstn 35.72 +.31
TBIstn 10.77
TSInstn 32.26 +.19
Valuelstn 21.46 +.10
Vanguard Signal:
ExtSgl n 36.42 +.27
500Sgl n 97.69 +.52
ITBdSig n 11.49 -.01
MidCpldxn 30.15 +.19
STBdldxn 10.65
SmCpSign 32.19 +.28
TotBdSgl n 10.77
TotStkSgln 31.13 +.18
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 15.20 +.08
Virtus Funds A:
MulSStAp 4.86
WM Blair Mtl Fds:
InflG llIr 21.87 -.11
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 9.37 +.01
CorelnvA 6.18 +.04
DivOppAp 14.75 +.10
DivOppCt 14.61 +.10
ScTechA 10.42
Wasatch:
SmCpGr 40.61 +.24
Wells Fargo Adv A:
AstAIlAp 12.35
Wells Fargo Adv C:
AstAIICt 11.95
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmSIIZ 21.14 +.13
Opptylnv 39.61 +.20
Wells Fargo Ad Ins:
UlStMulnc 4.82
Wells Fargo Insth:
UlStMuln p 4.82
Western Asset:
CorePlusl 10.99 -.01


William Blair N:
GrowthN 11.38 +.06
InfiGthN 21.36 -.11
Yacktman Funds:
Fundpn 17.45 +.08
Focusedn 18.59 +.09


of 0.100 percent, down from
0.105 percent last week.
The three-month rate was
the lowest since these bills
averaged 0.030 percent on
May 16. The six-month rate
was the lowest since those
bills averaged 0.070 percent,
also on May 16.
The discount rates reflect
that the bills sell for less
than face value. For a
$10,000 bill, the three-month
price was $9,999.11 while
the six-month bill sold for


Associated Press sons," said Paul Simon,
chief investment officer for
NEW YORK - Investors Tactical Allocation Group,
largely put aside their con- which has $1.5 billion in as-
cerns about the Greek fi- sets under advisement.
nancial crisis Monday and The S&P 500 index rose
focused instead on value. 6.86 points, 0.5 percent, to
Stocks rose broadly after close at 1,278.36. The Dow
the market shook off its Jones industrial average
longest weekly losing streak added 76.02 points, or 0.6
in nearly a decade. percent, to 12,080.38. The
The downturn brought Nasdaq composite gained
the S&P 500 close to its av- 13.18, or 0.5 percent, to
erage level over the prior 2,629.66.
200 days. So long as the The S&P 500 notched its
index doesn't sink far below third straight day of gains,
that level, many technical the longest stretch of in-
traders see it as a sign to creases in the stock market
start buying stocks again, for nearly a month. The
The S&P is now 6 percent index eked out a tiny gain
below the 2011 high it last week, breaking a six-
reached on April 29. week losing streak driven by
"In the short term, stocks concerns that U.S. economic
have been oversold, and growth would falter in the
you're going to get some sort second half of the year and
of bounce, whether justified that Greece's debt crisis
or not, just for technical rea- would spread.


$9,994.94. That would equal
an annualized rate of 0.036
percent for the three-month
bills and 0.102 percent for
the six-month bills.
Separately, the Federal
Reserve said Monday that
the average yield for one-
year Treasury bills, a popu-
lar index for making
changes in adjustable rate
mortgages, was unchanged
last week at 0.18 percent,
the same as the previous
week.


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NEWY KSTOCK EXCHANGE


Name Last Chg
SPUI 33.18 +.19
Standex 30.37 +.59
StanBlkDk 68.83 +.54
StarwdHl 52.16 +.28
StateStr 43.41
Statoil ASA 23.82 +.09
Steris 33.88 +.10
SDIIwrM 19.20 +.10
Stryker 58.00 +.29
SturmRug 19.26 +.14
SubPpne 50.83 +.72
SunCmts 38.00 +.78
Suncorgs 37.72 -.27
Sunoco 39.42 +.50
Suntedh 7.73 -.38
SunTrst 25.93 -.25
Supvalu 8.73 +.08
SwiftTrnsn 13.39 -.03
Synovus 2.33 +.04
Sysco 31.12 +.22
TCFFncl 13.75 -.05
TE Connect 34.30 +.47
TECO 18.72 +.11
TJX 50.38 +.32
TaiwSemi 12.90 +.18
Talbots 3.73 +.65
TalismEg 18.89 -.19
Target 47.24 +.71
TataMotors 21.13 -.48
TeckResg 44.00 -.61


TelNorL
TelcmNZ
TelefEsp s
TelMexL
Templelnld
TempurP
TenetHlth
Teradata
Teradyn
TerraNitro
Tesoro
TetraTech
Texlnst
Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThmBet
3MCo
Tiffany
Timberlnd
TW Cable
TimeWarn
Timken
TitanMet
TollBros
TorchEngy
Trdichmrk
TorDBkg
Total SA
TotalSys
Transocn
Travelers


Tredgar 17.12
TriConfi 14.37
TrinaSolar 19.14
Turkcell 13.62
TwoHrblnv 10.78
Tycolni 47.01
Tyson 18.28
UBSAG 17.94
UDR 24.93
UIL Hold 31.62
USAirwy 8.60
US Gold 5.47
USEC 3.30
USG 14.84
UndrArmr 71.87
UniSrcEn 37.11
UniFirst 50.98
UnilevNV 32.00
UnionPac 101.80
UtdConf 24.29
UtdMicro 2.48
UPS B 69.30
UtdRentals 23.21
US Bancrp 24.50
USNGsrs 10.94
US OilFd 36.72
USSteel 41.47
UtdTedich 85.54
UtdhlthGp 51.27
UnumGrp 25.14


VaalcoE 5.40 -.43
Vale SA 30.19 +.33
ValeSApf 27.37 +.31
ValeantPh 50.97 +.44
ValeroE 24.24 +.14
VangTSM 66.23 +.31
VangREIT 60.00 +.72
VangEmg 46.44 -.13
VangEAFE 36.42 -.02
VarianMed 67.49 +1.29
Vecren 27.52 +.31
VeoliaEnv 27.56 -.28
VeriFone 40.05 +.10
VerizonCm 35.65 +.14
ViacomB 47.75 +.30
VimpelCm 13.09 -.12
Visa 74.05 -.38
VishayInt 13.97 +.18
Vonage 4.12 +.04
Vornado 92.64 +1.16
WGL Hold 37.76 +.15
Wabash 8.79 -.01
WalMart 53.04 +.22
Walgrn 45.18 +.51
WalterEn 105.59 -2.48
Warnaco 52.28 +1.78
WsteMInc 37.32 +.58
Weathflnt 16.90 -.13
WtWatch 71.55 +.53
WeinRIt 24.72 +.32


Stocks continue rally


Market watch
June 20, 2011

Dow Jones +76.02
industrials 12,080.38
1 2,080.38


Nasdaq
composite


+13.18
2,629.66


Standard & +6.86
Poor's 500
1,278.36

Russell +6.73
2000
788.48

NYSE diary
Advanced: 2,061

Declined: 975

Unchanged: 100

Volume: 3.0 b

Nasdaq diary

Advanced: 1,486
Declined: 1,120

Unchanged: 98

Volume: 1.6 b
AP


Treasuries down at weekly auction


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - Inter-
est rates on short-term
Treasury bills fell in Mon-
day's auction to the lowest
levels in five weeks.
The Treasury Depart-
ment auctioned $27 billion
in three-month bills at a dis-
count rate of 0.035 percent,
down from 0.050 percent
last week. Another $24 bil-
lion in six-month bills was
auctioned at a discount rate


WellPoint 78.69
WellsFargo 26.95
WendyArby 5.03
WestarEn 26.68
WAstEMkt 13.88
WstAMgdHi 6.14
WAstlnfOpp 12.41
WDigital 33.50
WstnRefin 15.16
WstnUnion 19.80
Weyerh 20.34
Whrlpl 77.70
WhitngPts 53.94
WmsCos 28.54
WmsPtrs 50.02
WmsSon 35.83
Winnbgo 8.59
WiscEn s 31.31
WT India 22.36
Worthgtn 19.41
Wyndham 31.93
XLGrp 21.35
XcelEngy 24.60
Xerox 9.87
Yamanag 11.32
YingliGrn 8.21
Youkun 28.13
YumBmnds 54.57
ZweigTI 3.34







Page A8 - TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011



PINION


"Ifyou cannot be chaste, be cautious."
Spanish proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........... .................. publisher
Charlie Brennan ................. ............. editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
K Mike Arnold ................................. HR director
Sandra Frederick....................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz.... . ......................... citizen m em ber
Founded Mac Harris ........................ citizen member
Williamson Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DEADLY HIT-AND-RUN





One death,




one arrest,




no changes


he Florida Department
of Corrections recently
came back with a deci-
sion of no wrongdoing in the
handling by five probation offi-
cers in a case involving 33-
year-old Jennifer Marino in the
Inverness office last year.
Marino was dropped off at the
the office and sat for several
hours as staff verified the sta-
tus of her travel permit, but
walked unchal-
lenged out the THE I
door and was sub-
sequently ar- State rep
rested and probation
charged with the
carjacking and OUR OH
murder of 64-year-
old Mary Haynie Complicat
of Lecanto. excuse th
The very sad an innoce
part of the inci-
dent was the death of an inno-
cent person, who started the
day at the pet groomer and was
put into a situation where she
sought to stop someone from
stealing her automobile and
was fatally run over. With all
the state budget cuts coming
down the pipeline, it becomes
even more relevant for profes-
sionals to make wise decisions
in cases like this and not com-
promise the safety of the public.
The state report said the pro-
bation officers followed the
rules. If that is the case, the
rules must be changed. An in-


Do Not Call registry
I know you've printed this be-
fore, but I would really appreciate
if you would print the "no call
list" phone number to get these
people off my telephone.
Editor's note: (888) 382-1222
or www.donotcall.gov.
Tyson and Rose
Mike Tyson, I just read in the
paper, was inducted into the Box-
ing Hall of Fame. Mike Tyson, who
is a convicted felon and spent
time in prison. Yet Pete Rose can-
not be inducted into the Baseball
Hall of Fame. Why not? All he did
was bet on a few games.
He's not a convicted felon., 0
Get screened
First, I want to thank
Bud Conklin for his
courage to have that /
story printed in the
Chronicle, and thank the
Chronicle for printing it. CA
Years ago, my primary
care doctor had a blood i563-
test made and referred
me to the treatment cen-
ter and the oncologist, or what-
ever you calls those guys. And
then he referred me out to the
same treatment center as Mr.
Conklin. What a wonderful job.
Man, this don't hurt. Get it done
and get it done now. It's like skin
cancer; if you catch it in time, it's
just a blip on the radar screen.
Have these things done. Thank you,
Chronicle, you did a great service.
Forget the fireworks
I can't believe it. Fireworks at
these tents for amateur people
when we've got a burn ban in Cit-
rus County. I can't believe it.


S



i

e


L


I

(


nocent bystander died when a
person with a criminal back-
ground sent visual and audible
warning flags to those in the
parole office and was given the
freedom to make the personal
choice to stay or leave.
We feel there is a strong indi-
cation that if the scenario hap-
pened again, the outcome would
not be any different. Would the
officers follow the same proto-
cols and not stop
;SUE: the person from
UE leaving? Would they
:rt clears use the tools that
officers. are in place to se-
cure a person with
INION: obvious mental is-
sues, such as the
ons do not Baker Act ruling?
death of The question of
it person. whether they vio-
lated the proce-
dures in place is one that must
be scrutinized further. Maybe
on the surface, no, but the out-
come is a dead senior citizen
and no determination as to
how the fatal hit-and-run could
have been prevented. No one
has taken responsibility and
apparently no processes have
been overhauled.
We urge the probation office
to take ownership of this inci-
dent and not look at it as a
black eye, but as an opportu-
nity to make positive changes
to protect the citizens of Citrus
County.


Patient priority
I find it ironic that Medicaid will
pay for a man for erectile dysfunc-
tion and Viagra, but yet, you
know, my mother's 81 years old
on Medicare and they won't pay
nothing toward a hearing aid that
she desperately needs and she
can't afford the monthly pay-
ments. It's just because she's on
a fixed income, which is unbeliev-
able. How does Medicare distin-
guish the two? Why does a
70-year-old man need erectile
dysfunction (medication) or Via-
gra when a person 81 years old
needs to hear? What
do you think is more
JND important?
QFF Hospital impasse
I see where Citrus Me-
EQ morial is in the editorial
again. These people are
well educated yet seem
to be unable to act as
691 adults and resolve mat-
) 579 ters. All these lawyers
and wasted time are
costing the taxpayer a
fortune for our people.
No ideas, just insults
I would like to make a comment
on the Tuesday paper (June 14),
the "GOP debate blasts Obama."
You know, that's all they did do. I
watched it to try to get a sense of
what these candidates was going
to do if they were elected and I
didn't hear anything except criti-
cism of Obama, which I have criti-
cized him, too, but I'm not
running for president of the
United States. They talked more
about Obama than they did the
seven people that was there as
the candidates.


The normalization of deviance


In the aftermath of the expo-
sure and resignation of Rep.
Anthony Weiner (D-NY) from
Congress, his colleagues, some
journalists, ethicists and pundits
are trying to sort out what it
means. Has a new standard been
created in Washington? How can
Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) re-
main in office under an ethical
cloud about money
and Weiner be forced
to resign because he
had fantasy sex? It
wasn't even "real" sex,
like Bill Clinton had.
Clinton also lied about
sex and was im-
peached for lying (but
not for the sex be-
cause, as comedian Cal T
Janeane Garofalo told OTI
Bill Maher recently,
"everyone lies about VOI
sex"). Some wondered
then if standards had fallen for
occupants of the Oval Office, or
whether the behavior of Clinton
and some Republicans mirrors a
national moral decline?
The Washington Post ran a
front-page story last Friday, the
sub-headline of which read,
"Had congressman not lied, col-
league says, 'it could have ended
differently."'
So it isn't what used to be
called moral turpitude that did
Weiner in, but lying about it? If he
had not been exposed, would he
have been any less morally guilty?
Who decides? Not the voters.
Democratic Party leaders forced
Weiner out. They were embar-
rassed by his behavior and they
wished to discuss other things.
A University of Maryland stu-
dent friend of mine tells me one
of her classes last semester dis-


I
Ph
H
Ic


cussed "the normalization of de-
viance." In an age when what is
normal is determined by culture
and opinion polls and when "or-
thodoxy" is regarded as some-
thing to be avoided, deviance has
ceased to have meaning. That's
because there is now no nation-
ally accepted standard by which
it can be measured and, thus, be
used to hold people,
even members of Con-
gress, accountable.
If lying is now the
unpardonable politi-
cal sin, we may at last
have found a way to
limit congressional
terms. If lying is suffi-
cient reason to expel
iomas a member, then the
IER halls of Congress may
soon be vacant of all
CES but the janitorial crew
who empty the trash
and mop the floors at night.
All politicians lie at some level,
even Jimmy Carter, who prom-
ised during the 1976 campaign
and in the aftermath of Water-
gate, "I'll never lie to you." He did
though. Google "Jimmy Carter
lies" and read for yourself. Ac-
cording to the list, he's still telling
lies, 30 years after leaving office.
George H.W Bush promised,
"Read my lips: No new taxes." We
read his lips, but were they lying
lips? He caved to Congress, which
raised taxes during his single
term. Bush signed the legislation.
In 1963, before cynicism re-
placed skepticism in the press,
Pentagon spokesman Arthur
Sylvester spoke about govern-
ment's "inherent right to lie."
Granted, it was in the context of
"to save itself when facing a nu-
clear disaster," but as we know


from the Pentagon Papers, lies
from government became com-
monplace during the Vietnam
War More than 58,000 Americans,
whose names appear on the Viet-
nam Memorial Wall in Washing-
ton, are victims of those lies.
President Obama's lies about
many things are catalogued on
various websites and increas-
ingly in mainstream newspa-
pers. Some who led cheers for
him in 2008 are now finding his
lies difficult to ignore. Glenn
Kessler, who writes the Fact
Checker column for The Wash-
ington Post, recently awarded
the president "three Pinocchios"
(out of four) for his claim that
"Chrysler has repaid every dime
and more of what it owes Ameri-
can taxpayers for their support
during my presidency"
Sure, Republicans lie, too, but
if lying about something, rather
than bad ideas or bad behavior, is
the new standard in Washington,
D.C., someone had better tell the
politicians.
Thomas Jefferson did in an
Aug. 19, 1785, letter to Peter Carr:
"...he who permits himself to tell
a lie once, finds it much easier to
do it a second and third time, till
at length it becomes habitual; he
tells lies without attending to it,
and truths without the world's be-
lieving him. This falsehood of the
tongue leads to that of the heart,
and in time depraves all its good
dispositions."

Direct all mail for Cal Thomas
to: Tribune Media Services, 2225
Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buf-
falo, N. Y 14207. Readers may
also e-mail Cal Thomas at
tmseditors@tribune. com.


eAN4TIW iW We~


_ LETTERS to the Editor


Standard deviation
As I write this, New York Rep.
Anthony Weiner has retreated to
a back bench in Congress. He is
between a rock and a hard place
and is hoping for a distracting
major crisis that will flush him
off the front pages. Slow news
days and Republicans will be his
enemy
Weiner's defense is in the
words of our Constitution rather
than the words of social ethics
and morals or the Bible. He
longs for the Charlie Rangel
soft-soap or the Barney Frank
dodge. He rests on the next rung
down on the ladder of ethical
standards. Only a bit more egre-
gious is he than last year's vil-
lians. He seeks sanctuary in the
Washington High Church of Ar-
rogance. His embarrassment does
not move him to resignation.
Can we give Mr. Weiner a
break and lower the standards?
We have done this everywhere
else, it seems. Clinton thrives.
Ted Kennedy reached saint-
hood. Volunteers for the military
can't pass the physical or liter-
acy tests, so we lower the stan-
dards. High school drop-outs
cannot pass the qualifying tests
for police or fire department
jobs, so we lower the standards.
Is an "F" grade now a "D" in
many schools? Is a 30 percent
score a passing grade in some
California schools now? Is a smile
the reward for the 20 percent of
high school graduates who can-
not locate Washington, D.C., on a


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
email. Names and hometowns will
be printed; phone numbers will
not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
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* Letters must be no longer than
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* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or email to
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map or cannot name the first
president of the United States?
Have we abandoned our stan-
dards when choosing our lead-
ers? Do we even know what our
standards are? Do we vote for a
name on a sign or a religion or a
color or a slogan or, more likely,
for a free lunch? Do we lower our
own standards for selfish ends?
One wonders if the new Amer-
ican standard is the lowering of
standards to solve every problem.


Will Weiner's reprehensible
behavior change anything? I
wish so. I think not. Are we abdi-
cating our standards of morals
and ethics to government?
Ted LaPorte
Hernando

Dad's details
This is in response to Mr. Shin-
sky's request of June 10, 2011, on
his dad's service in the 744th
light tank battalion. Hopefully,
the following information will be
of assistance to him.
In researching, the 744th was
part of the 2nd Armor Division
(2nd AD). I was able to find the
following two contacts, one
which is the 2nd AD Association
Secretary/Treasurer, Richard
Smith, 100 Water Street, Nau-
gatuck, CT 06770-4100; phone
(203) 723-7425. The other is a
2010 reunion notice with contact
Romaine D. Mounts, 7400 North
Rowdy St., Las Vegas, NV 89131.
Perhaps these individuals may
be able to provide further infor-
mation.
As a side note, there is an
abundance of information as to
this and other units in action
during WWII. Obviously, I do not
know Mr. Shinsky's circum-
stances, but he may want to seek
out the public library's com-
puter system to further his re-
search. Good luck to him.
Nancy Deering
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


04RA647





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tritium found at many nuke sites


Associated Press
BRACEVILLE, Ill. - Ra-
dioactive tritium has leaked
from three-quarters of U.S.
commercial nuclear power
sites, often into groundwater
from corroded, buried pip-
ing, an Associated Press in-
vestigation shows.
The number and severity
of the leaks has been esca-
lating, even as federal regu-
lators extend the licenses of
more and more reactors
across the nation.
Tritium, which is a ra-
dioactive form of hydrogen,
has leaked from at least 48 of
65 sites, according to U.S.
Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission records reviewed as
part of the AP's yearlong ex-
amination of safety issues at
aging nuclear power plants.
Leaks from at least 37 of
those facilities contained
concentrations exceeding
the federal drinking water
standard - sometimes at
hundreds of times the limit
While most leaks have
been found within plant
boundaries, some have mi-
grated offsite. But none is
known to have reached pub-
lic water supplies.
At three sites -two in Illi-
nois and one in Minnesota
- leaks have contaminated
drinking wells of nearby
homes, the records show, but
not at levels violating the
drinking water standard. At
a fourth site, in New Jersey,
tritium has leaked into an
aquifer and a discharge
canal feeding picturesque
Barnegat Bay off the At-
lantic Ocean.
Any exposure to radioac-
tivity, no matter how slight,
boosts cancer risk, accord-
ing to the National Academy
of Sciences. Federal regula-
tors set a limit for how much
tritium is allowed in drink-
ing water, where this con-
taminant poses its main
health risk. The U.S. Envi-
ronmental Protection
Agency says tritium should
measure no more than
20,000 picocuries per liter in
drinking water. The agency
estimates seven of 200,000
people who drink such
water for decades would de-
velop cancer
The tritium leaks also
have spurred doubts among
independent engineers
about the reliability of emer-
gency safety systems at the
104 nuclear reactors situated
on the 65 sites. That's partly
because some of the leaky
underground pipes carry
water meant to cool a reac-
tor in an emergency shut-
down and to prevent a
meltdown. Fast moving, tri-
tium can indicate the pres-
ence of more powerful


Radioactive tritium leaks at 48 of 65 U.S. nuclear sites
The radioactive form of hydrogen, tritium has often entered the groundwater through corroded pipes, with
at least 37 sites containing concentrations exceeding federal drinking water standards.


U.S. nuclear plants that have reported tritium leaks


A Nuclear sites
* Seattle


Tritium leak reported at site


Minneapolis

ChicagoA
A IA


Omaha *


,Los Angeles
* *Phoenix
San Diego


Tritium leak prevalence
Rep,: ie le i 1
73.8


Boston
, La
Philadelphia
A 4 *New
A ' York


A Washington D.C.0
A


Chattanooga.
DA A
Dallas


Houston


* Charlotte
A


* New Orleans A


Miami


Sources: Nuclear Regulatory Commission; AP data analysis


radioactive isotopes, like ce-
sium-137 and strontium-90.
So far, federal and indus-
try officials say, the tritium
leaks pose no health or
safety threat. Tony
Pietrangelo, chief nuclear
officer of the industry's Nu-
clear Energy Institute, said
impacts are "next to zero."
Like rust under a car, cor-
rosion has propagated for
decades along the hard-to-
reach, wet underbellies of
the reactors -generally built
in a burst of construction dur-
ing the 1960s and 1970s.
There were 38 leaks from
underground piping be-
tween 2000 and 2009, accord-
ing to an industry document
presented at a tritium con-
ference. Nearly two-thirds of
the leaks were reported over
the latest five years.
For example, at the three-
unit Browns Ferry complex
in Alabama, a valve was mis-
takenly left open in a storage
tank during modifications
over the years. When the
tank was filled in April 2010,
about 1,000 gallons of tri-
tium-laden water poured
onto the ground at a concen-
tration of 2 million pic-
ocuries per liter. In drinking
water, that would be 100
times higher than the EPA
health standard.


And in 2008, 7.5 million
picocuries per liter leaked
from underground piping at
Quad Cities in western Illi-
nois - 375 times the EPA
limit.
Subsurface water not only
rusts underground pipes, it
attacks other buried compo-
nents, including electrical
cables that carry signals to
control operations.
A 2008 NRC staff memo
reported industry data
showing 83 failed cables be-
tween 21 and 30 years of
service - but only 40 within
their first 10 years of service.
Underground cabling set in
concrete can be extraordi-
narily difficult to replace.
Under NRC rules, tiny
concentrations of tritium and
other contaminants are rou-
tinely released in monitored
increments from nuclear
plants; leaks from corroded
pipes are not permitted.
The leaks sometimes go
undiscovered for years, the
AP found. Many of the pipes
or tanks have been patched,
and contaminated soil and
water have been removed in
some places. But leaks are
often discovered later from
other nearby piping, tanks
or vaults. Mistakes and de-
fective material have con-
tributed to some leaks.


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However, corrosion - from
decades of use and deterio-
ration - is the main cause.
And, safety engineers say,
the rash of leaks suggest nu-
clear operators are hard put
to maintain the decades-old
systems.
Over the history of the
U.S. industry, more than 400
known radioactive leaks of
all kinds of substances have
occurred, the activist Union
of Concerned Scientists re-
ported in September.


Nuclear engineer Bill
Corcoran, an industry con-
sultant who has taught NRC
personnel how to analyze
the cause of accidents, said
that since much of the pip-
ing is inaccessible and car-
ries cooling water, the worry
is if the pipes leak there
could be a meltdown.
'"Any leak is a problem be-
cause you have the leak it-
self - but it also says
something about the piping,"
said Mario V Bonaca, a for-
mer member of the NRC's
Advisory Committee on Re-
actor Safeguards. "Evidently
something has to be done."
However, even with the
best probes, it is hard to pin-
point partial cracks or dam-
age in skinny pipes or bends.
The industry tends to in-
spect piping when it must be
dug up for some other rea-
son. Even when leaks are de-
tected, repairs may be
postponed for up to two
years with the NRC's
blessing.
"You got pipes that have
been buried underground
for 30 or 40 years, and
they've never been in-
spected, and the NRC is
looking the other way," said
engineer Paul Blanch, who
has worked for the industry
and later became a whistle-
blower. "They could have
corrosion all over the place."
One of the highest known
tritium readings was discov-
ered in 2002 at the Salem


nuclear plant in Lower Al-
loways Creek Township, N.J.
Tritium leaks from the spent
fuel pool contaminated
groundwater under the fa-
cility- located on an island
in Delaware Bay - at a con-
centration of 15 million pic-
ocuries per liter That's 750
times the EPA drinking
water limit. According to
NRC records, the tritium
readings last year still ex-
ceeded EPA drinking water
standards.
And tritium found sepa-
rately in an onsite storm
drain system measured 1
million picocuries per liter
in April 2010.
An NRC task force on tri-
tium leaks last year dis-
missed the danger to public
health. Instead, its report
called the leaks "a challeng-
ing issue from the perspec-
tive of communications
around environmental pro-
tection." The task force
noted ruefully that the ram-
pant leaking had "impacted
public confidence."
For sure, the industry also
is trying to stop the leaks.
For several years now, plant
owners around the country
have been drilling more
monitoring wells and taking
a more aggressive approach
in replacing old piping when
leaks are suspected or
discovered.
But such measures have
yet to stop widespread
leaking.


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Gay debate Court bars Walmart suit


K&4
Associated Press
Same-sex marriage sup-
porter Rabbi Sharon Klien-
baum, center, of the Beit
Simchat Torah Congrega-
tion, speaks to the media
Monday as protesters
gather both for and against
a bill to allow same-sex
marriage, in the halls at the
Capitol in Albany, N.Y.

Internet names
set to grow
SINGAPORE -Aquarter-
century after the creation of
".corn," the agency that as-
signs Internet addresses is
loosening its rules and allow-
ing suffixes named after
brands, hobbies, political
causes and just about any-
thing else.
Under guidelines approved
Monday, Apple could register
addresses ending in ".ipad,"
Citi and Chase could share
".bank" and environmental
groups could go after ".eco."
Japan could have ".com" in
Japanese.
It's the biggest change to
the system of Internet ad-
dresses since it was created
in 1984.
More than 300 suffixes are
available today, but only a
handful, such as the familiar
".net" and ".com," are open
for general use worldwide.
Hundreds of new suffixes
could be established by late
next year, thousands in years
to come.

World BRIEFS

Lemurs


Associated Press
A 6-week-old ring-tailed
lemur receives a hug from
its mother Monday in an
enclosure at the Sofia Zoo,
Sofia, Bulgaria.


Girl forced to wear
suicide vest
TIMERGARAH, Pakistan
- Police said Monday that
militants kidnapped a 9-year-
old girl on her way to school
and forced her to wear a sui-
cide bomb vest. The girl and
police said she managed to
escape her captors as they
directed her to attack a para-
military checkpoint in north-
west Pakistan.
Sohana Jawed, who is in
third grade, said she was ab-
ducted near her home in the
northwestern city of Pe-
shawar on Saturday and
taken to Lower Dir district, a
four hours' drive away, where
she was found Monday.
Police in Lower Dir pre-
sented Jawed at a news con-
ference, where she told her
story dressed in her blue and
white school uniform.
Militants in the country
have often used young boys
to carry out attacks, but the
use of young girls is rare.
Jawed said during the
news conference that she
was grabbed by two women
while on her way to school
and forced into a car. One of
the kidnappers put a hand-
kerchief over her mouth that
knocked her unconscious,
Jawed said in a separate in-
terview with a local TV


station.


-From wire reports


Says class action

unwarranted

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Supreme
Court blocked the largest sex-dis-
crimination lawsuit in U.S. history
on Monday, siding with Walmart
and against up to 1.6 million female
workers in a decision that makes it
harder to mount large-scale bias
claims against the nation's other
huge companies, too.
The justices all agreed that the
lawsuit against Walmart Stores Inc.
could not proceed as a class action
in its current form, reversing a de-
cision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in San Francisco. By a 5-


4 vote along ideological lines, the
court also said there were too many
women in too many jobs at Walmart
to wrap into one lawsuit.
A class action is a form of lawsuit
in which a group of people collec-
tively bring a claim to court.
"Because respondents provide no
convincing proof of a companywide
discriminatory pay and promotion
policy, we have concluded that they
have not established the existence
of any common question," Justice
Antonin Scalia said in his majority
opinion.
Theodore Boutrous Jr, Walmart's
lawyer, said the decision also would
affect pending class-action claims
against Costco and others. Compa-
nies as varied as the big Wall Street
firm Goldman-Sachs & Co., elec-
tronics giant Toshiba America Inc.,
and Cigna Healthcare Inc. also face


class-action claims from women
they employ
"This is an extremely important
victory not just for Walmart, but for
all companies that do business in
the United States," Boutrous said.
The assessment was similar on
the other side of the issue. Marcia
D. Greenberger, co-president of the
National Women's Law Center, said,
"The court has told employers that
they can rest easy, knowing that the
bigger and more powerful they are,
the less likely their employees will
be able to join together to secure
their rights."With 2.1 million work-
ers in more than 8,000 stores world-
wide, Walmart could have faced
billions of dollars in damages if it
had had to answer claims by the
huge group of women.
Now, the handful of employees
who brought the case may pursue


Urine cause for big flush


Associated Press
This is the spot at a Portland, Orgeon reservoir where a 21-year-old man was seen on surveillance video urinat-
ing into the water. City officials have decided to drain the reservoir at the cost of about $36,000 because of the
incident, which some residents say is overkill.


Man relieves self in

Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. - Call it the
big flush.
Because a 21-year-old man was
caught on a security camera uri-
nating into a city reservoir, Ore-
gon's biggest city is sending 8
million gallons of treated drinking
water down the drain.
Portland officials defended the
decision Monday, saying they
didn't want to send city residents
water laced, however infinitesi-
mally, with urine.
Public health officials say, how-
ever, that urine is sterile in healthy
people and that the urine in the
reservoir was so diluted -perhaps
a half pint in millions of gallons -
that it posed little risk.
Some people in the city, in the
suburbs and around the world
called the flush an overreaction,
especially since animals such as
ducks contribute waste routinely
and, sometimes, die in the water.
"More than 1 billion people
worldwide do not have reliable ac-
cess to clean drinking water, and
here we are tossing away nearly 8
million gallons of water just to ap-


reservoir; city to dump 8 million gallons


pease the ignorant residents who
believe their tap water will other-
wise turn yellow," read one com-
ment posted on The Oregonian's
website.
Water from the city's five open
air reservoirs, all in parks, goes di-
rectly to customers. The reservoirs
are due to be replaced by under-
ground storage within a decade, a
result of federal requirements.
The reservoirs distribute water
that flows from glaciers on Mount
Hood. It is treated before it goes to
the reservoirs for distribution, and
then goes directly to consumers.
The reservoirs are drained twice
a year for cleaning, and workers
have found animal carcasses, paint
cans, construction material, fire-
works debris and even the plastic
bags people use to scoop up after
their dogs, said David Shaff, ad-
ministrator of the city water
bureau.
Even so, Shaff said, the yuck fac-
tor was the primary reason for the
decision to drain the 8 million gal-
lons, at a cost of less than $8,000 to
treat it as sewage.
"Nobody wants to drink pee, and
I don't want to deal with the 100


people who would be unhappy that
I'm serving them pee in their
water," he said. Shaff said the se-
curity cameras also showed some-
thing that's still unidentified was
thrown in the water, heightening
concern about potential risks.
City Commissioner Randy
Leonard, who is in charge of the
water bureau, defended the deci-
sion, citing a potential public
health risk. He said he worried
about the possibility of chlamydia
or AIDS from blood in urine.
"I'm for taking the most conser-
vative approach," he said.
Dr. Gary Oxman, the county
health officer, said the risk was so
close to nil that it falls in the "never
say never" range. Even with the
uncertainty over an object thrown
in the water, "that's still a very
small risk," he said.
The young man, Josh Seater, told
KATU-TV he'd been drinking, was
with friends and thought that the
reservoir was a sewage treatment
plant. He said he felt guilty in-
stantly, and then security guards
arrived.
"I knew I did wrong when I did
it," he told the station.


British Library, Google to digitize books


Associated Press


LONDON -A treatise on
a stuffed hippopotamus, an
18th-century English
primer for Danish sailors
and a description of the
first engine-driven subma-
rine are among 250,000
books to be made available
online in a deal between
Google and the British
Library
The agreement, an-
nounced Monday, will let
Internet users read, search,
download and copy thou-
sands of texts published be-
tween 1700 and 1870.
It is a small step toward
the library's goal of making
the bulk of its 14 million
books and 1 million period-


icals available in digital
form by 2020.
"So far we have only been
able to digitize quite a small
fraction of the global collec-
tion," said the library's chief
executive, Lynne Brindley
"There is a long way to go."
The deal marks another
step in Google's effort to
make digital copies of the
world's estimated 130 mil-
lion books. The company,
based in Mountain View,
Calif., touts the ambitious
project as a way to enable
anyone with an Internet
connection to tap in a vast
reservoir of knowledge.
Google, though, stands to
make more money if it can
build the world's biggest
digital library


By stockpiling millions of
books that can't be easily
found elsewhere, Google
gives people another rea-
son to use its search engine,
which already processes
about two out of every three
queries on the Web. Gener-
ating more search requests
gives Google more opportu-
nities to show ads that bring
in revenue each time they
are clicked upon.
"Having richer content
means people around the
world are searching more
for it, and that is good for
our business," said Peter
Barron, Google's European
spokesman. He declined to
say how much the project
would cost, beyond describ-
ing it as "a substantial


sum." The books will be
available on the websites of
the British Library and
Google Books.
Google has scanned more
than 15 million books into
its search index during the
past seven years, but has
only been able to show snip-
pets of many of them be-
cause of copyright
restrictions. The company
tried to remove the U.S.
copyright obstacles in a set-
tlement of a class action
lawsuit with authors and
publishers only to have the
agreement rejected by a fed-
eral judge three months ago.
The books that Google
will scan from the British li-
brary are no longer pro-
tected by copyrights.


their claims on their own, with
much less money at stake and less
pressure on Walmart to settle. Two
of the named plaintiffs, Christine
Kwapnoski and Betty Dukes, vowed
to continue their fight, even as they
expressed disappointment about
the ruling.
"We still are determined to go for-
ward to present our case in court.
We believe we will prevail there,"
said Dukes.
'All I have to say is when I go back
to work tomorrow, I'm going to let
them know we are still fighting,"
said Kwapnoski. Both women spoke
on a conference call with reporters.
The women's lawyers said they
were considering filing thousands
of discrimination claims against
Walmart, but they acknowledged
the court had dealt a fatal blow to
their initial plan.


Study:


Sea


level


rising


Shift linked to

climate change

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sea lev-
els have been rising signifi-
cantly over the past century
of global warming, according
to a study that offers the most
detailed look yet at the
changes in ocean levels dur-
ing the last 2,100 years.
The researchers found
that since the late 19th cen-
tury - as the world became
industrialized - sea level
has risen more than 2 mil-
limeters per year, on aver-
age. That's a bit less than
one-tenth of an inch, but it
adds up over time.
It will lead to land loss,
more flooding and saltwater
invading bodies of fresh
water, said lead researcher
Benjamin Horton whose
team examined sediment
from North Carolina's
Outer Banks. He directs the
Sea Level Research Labo-
ratory at the University of
Pennsylvania.
The predicted effects he
cites aren't new and are pre-
dicted by many climate sci-
entists. But outside experts
say the research verifies in-
creasing sea level rise com-
pared to previous centuries.
Kenneth Miller, chairman
of the Department of Earth
and Planetary Sciences at
Rutgers University, called
the new report significant.
"This is a very important
contribution because it
firmly establishes that the
rise in sea level in the 20th
century is unprecedented for
the recent geologic past,"
said Miller, who was not part
of the research team. Miller
said he recently advised New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
that the state needs to plan
for a sea level rise of about 3
feet by the end of the century
Horton said rising tem-
peratures are the reason be-
hind the higher sea level.
Looking back in history,
the researchers found that
sea level was relatively sta-
ble from 100 B.C. to A.D. 950.
Then, during a warm climate
period beginning in the 11th
century, sea level rose by
about half a millimeter per
year for 400 years. That was
followed by a second period
of stable sea level associated
with a cooler period, known
as the Little Ice Age, which
persisted until the late 19th
century
Rising sea levels are
among the hazards that con-
cern environmentalists and
governments with increas-
ing global temperatures
caused by "greenhouse"
gases like carbon dioxide
from burning fossil fuels
like coal and oil over the
last century or so.












SPORTS


0 NASCAR/B2
0 Scoreboard/B2
0 Lottery, TV/B2
0 MLB Baseball/B2
0 Entertainment/B3
0 Citrus Speedway/B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hot CORNER

MLB
Pujols out 6 weeks
with wrist fracture
ST. LOUIS - Concluding a news
briefing about Albert Pujols' injury that
killed the mood at Tony La Russa's char-
ity golf event, the St. Louis Cardinals
manager let down his guard.
"I'm going to go find a place to cry," La
Russa said.
Pujols will be out an estimated six
weeks with a fractured left wrist from a
first-base collision over the weekend.
The team announced the results of an
MRI and CT scan Monday, one day after
Pujols was injured during a home game
against Kansas City. The injury is a non-
displaced fracture of the left radius bone
and his arm is in a splint.
MLB rejects proposed
Dodgers TV deal
LOS ANGELES - Baseball Commis-
sioner Bud Selig on Monday rejected a
proposed television deal between the Los
Angeles Dodgers and Fox Sports that
voids a recent divorce settlement be-
tween team owner Frank McCourt and
his ex-wife, Jamie McCourt.
Selig said in a statement the TV con-
tract would not be in the best interests of
baseball and would further divert team
assets to McCourt's "personal needs."
Selig's decision fuels more uncertainty
about the ownership of one of baseball's
most storied franchises. Frank McCourt
has struggled to meet team payroll since
the start of the season and without
money from a TV deal, Selig could seize
control of the Dodgers if McCourt doesn't
pay his bills.
MLB draws biggest
weekend since 2008
NEW YORK - Major League Baseball
has drawn its biggest weekend crowds in
three years, boosted by sellouts at Wrigley
Field, Fenway Park and the Coliseum.
Nearly 1.65 million fans saw games Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday. That made for
the top attendance during a regular, 45-
game weekend since Sept. 26-28, 2008.
The Chicago Cubs set a three-game at-
tendance record by drawing over 126,000
fans to see the New York Yankees. The
Oakland Athletics sold out all three games
against the visiting San Francisco Giants.
Boston, Seattle and Colorado also had
sellouts for interleague matchups.
Commissioner Bud Selig says the at-
tendance totals help show interleague
play is still popular with fans.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Rape charges dropped
against FlU's Wittels
NASSAU, Bahamas - A court in the
Bahamas has dismissed the rape case
against a Florida International baseball
star and two friends.
The judge dropped charges against
Garret Wittels and two friends from New
York on Monday after prosecutors filed a
motion saying they had no case against
them. Wittels, who had a 56-game hitting
streak end earlier this year, was charged
with raping a 17-year-old girl on Dec. 20.
Wittels, Robert Rothschild and
Jonathan Oberti shook hands with police
and lawyers outside court.
Defense attorney Richard Sharpstein
tells reporters the accusations by two 17-
year-old Americans stemmed from an ap-
parent attempt to extort money from the
Atlantis resort.
CONCUSSIONS
Helmets avoid injuries,
not concussions
NEW ORLEANS - Helmets in foot-
ball and hockey are extremely effective at
preventing catastrophic head injuries but
their track record for avoiding concus-
sions is spottier, according to sports sci-
ence professors at the National Athletic
Trainers Association convention Monday.
Helmets "certainly help to mitigate
forces that are distributed by impact to the
skull and the intracranial cavity and the
brain," said Kevin Guskiewicz, a professor
of sports science at North Carolina. "But
the brain is still going to move inside that
cranial cavity regardless of whether
there's a helmet on or not."
Guskiewicz believes "behavior modifi-
cation" such as not "leading with the
head" when tackling in football can pre-
vent concussions as much as improved
helmet design.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Coach K, JoePa lessons
in made-for-TV talk
STATE COLLEGE, Pa.- Mike
Krzyzewski and Joe Paterno sat side-by-
side Monday and talked like they were old
acquaintances even though it was the first
time the college coaching greats had
spent any significant time together.
Duke's basketball coach and Penn
State's Hall of Fame football coach


shared stories about coaching, leadership
and building successful programs during
a 90-minute conversation taped Monday
for an ESPN program before more than
800 people on Penn State's campus.


Tar Heels eliminate Longhorns in CWS


Gators lead3-1; rain delay atpress time


Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. -Texas couldn't
fight off elimination this time, not
with a second straight shaky per-
formance by its starting pitcher
and an offense that wilted in the
heat and humidity at the College
World Series.
Cole Green lasted just two-plus
innings and the Longhorns man-
aged only four singles Monday in


a 3-0 elimination-game loss to
North Carolina.
Freshman left-hander Kent
Emanuel pitched the first com-
plete-game shutout in five years,
sending the Longhorns (49-19) out
of the CWS in two games for only
the second time in 25 appear-
ances since 1966.
"We didn't come here to be the
first team to leave," shortstop
Brandon Loy said. "You're never


going to be satisfied, I don't think,
unless you come out here with a
national championship. We did
some amazing things with this
team. It's tough to leave now."
The Longhorns had been 8-1 in
elimination games since the Big
12 tournament, but Emanuel was
too much for them to overcome.
North Carolina right fielder Seth
Baldwin attempts a catch during
Monday night's College baseball
World Series elimination game.
Associated Press


The Championships WIMBLEDON


Associated Press
Venus Williams returns a shot to Uzbekistan's Akgul Amanmuradova at the All England Lawn Tennis
Championships at Wimbledon on Monday. Williams won the match with a 6-3, 6-1 straight-set victory.




Making a Statement


Venus makes triumphant return; Nadal, Murray win


Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England -
Back on one of tennis' top
stages, Venus Williams cut a fa-
miliar figure Monday at Wim-
bledon, from her latest original,
somewhat-see-through outfit to
her trademark booming serves
and aggressive groundstrokes.
Williams smacked seven aces
at up to 118 mph, totaled 23 win-
ners to only five unforced er-
rors, and overwhelmed
97th-ranked Akgul Amanmu-
radova of Uzbekistan 6-3, 6-1 in
the first round at the All Eng-
land Club.
The seven-time major cham-
pion recently was off the tour
for about five months with a
bum hip, including missing the
French Open, and this is only
her fourth tournament in
nearly a year
"It's a good place to start. And
this is kind of like a home for
her She loves it," said Williams'
hitting partner, David Witt.
"She feels confident out here,
and in women's tennis, 'confi-
dent' goes a long way"
There sure was nothing shy
about a playsuit Williams called
"trendy": white and sleeveless,


with a deep "V" neckline, a tri-
angle cut out in the back, a gold
belt and gold zipper
"Jumpers are very 'now,"' she
explained, "as is lace."
Not as sensational as the
corset-like black lace number
with skin-toned undergarments
that drew so much attention at
the 2010 French Open, but Mon-
day's romper looked something
akin to a toga and surely would
have won the approval of her
Roman goddess namesake.
"She always has something
interesting," said the 6-foot-3
Amanmuradova, a rare oppo-
nent taller than the 6-foot-1
Williams. "It's good to have
something different on the tour
I wear shorts, and everybody is
criticizing that I look like a guy
... If she feels comfortable, per-
fect. Personally, I wouldn't wear
this, because it's not going to
look good on me. But if it's
white, you can play That's the
rule. If everybody wears the
same, it's boring."
Williams' outfit - and, of
course, superb play, which be-
trayed no lingering effects from
her injury - generated the
most buzz on Day 1 in the 125th
edition of the grass-court Grand


Slam tournament.
"I do realize I don't have as
many matches," said Williams,
only 5-2 this season and only 9-3
since last July "So, yeah, for sure,
I know I need to kind of come out
firing. Been pretty good at that in
the past- and today"
Others reaching the second
round included 10-time major
champion Rafael Nadal, whose
parents sat in the Royal Box
during his 6-4, 6-2, 6-2 victory
over 90th-ranked Michael Rus-
sell of Houston; No. 4 Andy
Murray, and No. 10 Mardy Fish.
It was Nadal's first chance to
play the tournament's opening
match on Centre Court, an
honor given to the defending
men's champion, and some-
thing he called a "big emotion."
Bad knees forced Nadal to
withdraw in 2009, a year after
he won Wimbledon for the first
time.
He was more blase about his
parents' special seats, saying:
"It doesn't make any difference
to me whether I see them in my
(guest) box or in the Royal Box.
But I think it was a beautiful ex-
perience for them."
See Page B4


Murray's messages; McHale upsets seeded player


Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England - One
message read: "Believe in your-
self and never give up." Another
simply said: "Make history"
The words of support from
Facebook fans printed on Andy
Murray's racket bag looked as if
they might be having the opposite
effect Monday when he dropped
his first set at Wimbledon.
Then, as if flicking on a switch,
Murray reeled off 15 consecutive
games for a 4-6, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0 victory
over Daniel Gimeno-Traver to
reach the second round.
Gimeno-Traver began the
match confidently under the roof
at Centre Court and hit some par-
ticularly good forehands, but by
the end, the 56th-ranked
Spaniard looked every bit the
player who has lost in the first
round at eight of his 12 Grand
Slam tournaments.
And Murray's unusual bag -
the brainchild of his racket spon-


WIMBLEDON NOTEBOOK
sor - didn't end up being con-
signed to history Murray said it
might even turn out to be a source
of inspiration in the future.
"I didn't today, but a lot of play-
ers in the past have done it with
having notes in their bag, and
some have had things written on
like their rackets or something,
on the back of their hand," he
said. "Players have done those
sort of things a lot in the past.
And, yeah, something I could do if
I felt like I needed it"
Murray is once again carrying
the hopes of the home nation,
desperate for the first British
male champion at Wimbledon
since 1936.
The 24-year-old from Scotland
has reached the semifinals the past
two years, and after a poor run of
form following a loss to Novak
Djokovic in the Australian Open
final, he has raised hopes again by
making the French Open semifi-


nals and winning the grass-court
title at Queen's Club last week.
A rare day off in the lead-up to
Wimbledon was interrupted by a
7 a.m. call from drug testers on
Thursday It was the third time he
had been called upon for a sam-
ple in less than a month since los-
ing at Roland Garros.
"It's a lot of testing, but just part
of our job, unfortunately," Murray
said. "It's just very intrusive when
you get someone sort of in your
house in the morning. When
you're going to the toilet and
they're staring at you, it's a bit...
you know, in your own home, it's
just quite strange feeling."
The only negative for Murray
about his match Monday was that not
all of his fans inside the All England
Club got to see him play With heavy
rain falling, organizers switched off
the big outdoor TV screen for "health
and safety reasons."
The tournament said it was to
prevent spectators from slipping
on the grass.


Old friend


is Marlins


new skip


80-year-old

McKeon takes

over reigns

Associated Press
MIAMI - New Florida Mar-
lins interim manager Jack McK-
eon sat listening as team
president David Samson offered
a spirited defense of the deci-
sion to give the
job to an octo-
genarian.

said the 80- l --
year-old McK-
eon works e.
harder than
many people Jack
half his age McKeon
and seems takes over as
even sharper Marlins skipper.
mentally than
in 2003, when the led the Mar-
lins to an improbable World
Series championship.
In response to the com-
ments, a grinning McKeon in-
tentionally messed up
Samson's name.
"Thanks, George," McKeon
said.
The new, old skipper drew
some laughs at his re-intro-
ductory news conference
Monday, but the hiring was no
joke. Nearly six years after
McKeon retired as the Mar-
lins' manager, he returned to
his former job on an interim
basis and will lead the team
for the rest of the season.
He becomes the second-
oldest manager in major
league history. Connie Mack
managed the Philadelphia
Athletics in a suit, tie and
straw hat until 1950, when
he was 87.


High hopes:

Mcllroy

tries to add

majors

Associated Press
BETHESDA, Md. - The
manner in which Rory Mcll-
roy won the U.S. Open made
comparisons
with Tiger
Woods in-
evitable.
Not since
Woods' his-
toric 15-shot
win at Pebble
Beach in 2000
has anyone Rory
crushed the Mcilroy
competition haseyesseton
at a U.S. more majors.
Open. McIlroy's performance
was so stunning at Congres-
sional that only four of his 72
holes were worse than par, he
broke the scoring record by
four shots and finished at an
astounding 16-under 268.
Such a score is rare at the
other three majors. It's un-
fathomable for a U.S. Open.
But there was more than
just his golf.
The buzz around the 22-
year-old from Northern Ire-
land made this feel like the
1997 Masters.
That was a watershed mo-
ment in sports, signaling the
arrival of Woods. He brought a
breathtaking blend of power
See . Page B2









Florida LOTTERY On the AIRWAVES Staging hoops game on flat top a big task


Associated Press


TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES
2 p.m. (ESPN) Teams TBA
7 p.m. (ESPN) Teams TBA
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Angels at Florida Marlins
8 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Milwaukee Brewers
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox
WNBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Phoenix Mercury at San Antonio Silver Stars
10 p.m. (ESPN2) New York Liberty at Los Angeles Sparks
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) 2011 Wimbledon Championships


W L
39 35
37 35
35 38
33 40


Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Oakland




San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego


Based at North Island Naval Air
Station, across the bay from downtown
San Diego, the Carl Vinson returned
Wednesday from a deployment of
nearly seven months.
The inspection, which was to
continue Tuesday, is a big step to-
ward a final agreement for the game
to be played.
Putting on the game on Nov. 11
won't be as simple as plopping a court
and seating on the flight deck, which
normally is full of jet fighters either
about to be catapulted into flight or re-
turning from missions.


West Division
GB WCGB
- - I
1 5/2
31/2 8
5Y2 10


West Division
GB WCGB


AMERICAN LEAGUE


INTERLEAGUE CINCI
Sunday's Games started N
Cleveland 5, Pittsburgh 2, 11 innings started N
L.A. Angels 7, N.Y Mets 3 with an R
Cincinnati 2, Toronto 1 Nova har
Baltimore 7, Washington 4 fense for
Boston 12, Milwaukee 3 kensefor
Atlanta 4, Texas 2 kees to a
Tampa Bay 2, Florida 1 Cincinnal
Minnesota 5, San Diego 4 TheY
St. Louis 5, Kansas City 4
Detroit 9, Colorado 1 moving a
Oakland 2, San Francisco 1 .500 at 4:
Chicago White Sox 8, Arizona 2 fense has
Seattle 2, Philadelphia 0 New
N.Y Yankees 10, Chicago Cubs 4 Newr
Monday's Games hander T1
Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 3 an unexp
Colorado 8, Cleveland 7 ruled to pi
N.Y Yankees 5, Cincinnati 3ed
Boston 14, San Diego 5 moved Up
Atlanta 2, Toronto 0 showed
L.A. Angels at Florida, 7:10 p.m. Nova
Texas 8, Houston 3 st,
Chicago Cubs 6, Chicago White Sox 3 start, all
Tampa Bay at Milwaukee, (LATE) without w
Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, (LATE) The A
Tuesday's Games Reds tor
Baltimore (Guthrie 2-8) at Pittsburgh (Ja.Mc- Phillips le
Donald 5-4), 7:05 p.m. illp
Colorado (Chacin 8-4) at Cleveland (Talbot 2- Logan hit
4), 7:05 p.m. Mariano
Seattle (Fister 3-8) at Washington (L.Hernan- Scott Rol
dez 4-8), 7:05 p.m. cott o
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 3-7) at Florida (Vazquez Heisey's
3-7), 7:10 p.m. fanning p
N.Y. Yankees (B.Gordon 0-0) at Cincinnati his 18th&
(Cueto 4-2), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Outman 2-1) at N.Y Mets (Gee 7-0), New York
7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 4-8) at Boston (Beckett 6-2), Swisher rf
7:10 p.m. Dickrsn rf
Toronto (Z.Stewart 0-0) at Atlanta (Minor 0-2), Grndrs cf
7:10 p.m. Teixeir lb
Houston (Lyles 0-2) at Texas (C.Wilson 7-3), AIRdrg 3b
8:05 p.m. R.Pena pr-
Arizona (J.Saunders 3-7) at Kansas City Cano2b
(Hochevar 4-7), 8:10 p.m. Martin c
Chicago Cubs (Garza 3-6) at Chicago White AnJons If
Sox (Buehrle 6-5), 8:10 p.m. Gardnr If
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 7-5) at Milwaukee ENunez ss
(Greinke 6-2), 8:10 p.m. Nova p
Detroit (Scherzer 9-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Billings- Ayala p
ley 5-6), 10:10 p.m. Logan p
Minnesota (Pavano 4-5) at San Francisco MaRivr p
(Bumgarner 3-8), 10:15 p.m. Totals
Wednesday's Games New York
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m. Cincinnati
N.Y Yankees at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m. E-Janish
Toronto at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m. LOB-New
San Diego at Boston, 1:35 p.m. SB-Gran'
Tampa Bay at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. E.Nunez (2
Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 3:10 p.m.
Colorado at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. New York
Seattle at Washington, 7:05 p.m. Nova W,7-
L.A. Angels at Florida, 7:10 p.m. Ayala
Oakland at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Logan
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Ma.Rivera
Arizona at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Cincinnati
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Tr.Wood L,
Minnesota at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Arredondo
Fisher
NATIONAL LEAGUE Ayala pitch
Sunday's Games Logan pitcl
L.A. Dodgers 1, Houston 0 HBP-by
Tuesday's Games Arredondo
Philadelphia (Halladay 9-3) at St. Louis (Mc- Umpires-
Clellan 6-3), 8:15 p.m. Reyburn; S
Wednesday's Games Clelland.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. T-2:46. A


MCILROY
Continued from Page B1

and putting, seized control
of the tournament on the
second day, demoralized
Colin Montgomerie in the
third round and won by 12
shots with a record score to
become the youngest Mas-
ters champion.
Woods wasn't at Congres-
sional, but at times it felt
like it
The energy picked up
late Friday morning, right
after Mcllroy holed out a
pitching wedge for eagle on
the par-4 eighth to become
only the fifth player in U.S.
Open history to reach dou-
ble-digits under par.
The difference was it took
him only 26 holes, and he
was just getting warmed up.
When he stood on the 10th
tee, thousands of fans stood
shoulder-to-shoulder from
the tee all the way up the
hill to the clubhouse. They
crowded onto the verandah
at the clubhouse, and there
were so many fans leaning
against the railing on the
balcony they looked like
passengers on a cruise ship
coming into port.
All this to see a Boy Won-
der who just might be the
future of golf.
Golf might be ready for a
new star, especially consid-
ering the personal failures
of Woods and the health


Yal


nkees 5, Reds 3
NNATI- Alex Rodriguez
lew York's four-run first inning
RBI single, and rookie Ivan
indled the NLs most prolific of-
eight innings, leading the Yan-
5-3 victory over the
ti Reds on Monday night.
inkees have won nine of 11,
season-best 13 games over
2-29. Their high-powered of-
s led the way.
York started fast against left-
ravis Wood (5-5), who made
iected start. Originally sched-
tch on Tuesday, he was
p a day when Johnny Cueto
up with a stiff neck.
(7-4) won his third straight
owing a run and four singles
walking a batter.
['s top bullpen allowed the
rally in the ninth. Brandon
ed off with a single and Boone
t Joey Votto with none out.
Rivera came on and gave up
len's RBI single and Chris
run-scoring forceout before
pinch-hitter Edgar Renteria for
save in 21 chances.
Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
3 1 1 0 Stubbscf 4 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b 4 1 2 0
3 1 0 0 Votto lb 3 1 0 0
4 1 1 0 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0
4 1 2 1 Rolen 3b 4 0 1 1
3b0 0 0 0 Heisey If 4 0 0 1
4 1 2 1 Hanignc 3 0 0 0
4 0 1 1 Renteri ph 1 0 0 0
3 0 1 1 Janish ss 3 0 1 0
1 00 0 TrWood p 2 00 0
s 4 0 1 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0
3 00 0 FLewis ph 1 0 1 0
0 00 0 Fisher p 0 0 0 0
0000
0000
33 59 4 Totals 333 6 2
400 000 010 - 5
100 000 002 - 3
(7). DP-New York 1, Cincinnati 2.
,York 3, Cincinnati 4.2B-Cano (16).
derson (11), Stubbs (21). CS-
2).
IP H RERBBSO

4 8 4 1 1 0 7
0 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 0 0
S,18-21 1 1 0 0 0 1

5-5 7 8 4 4 1 6
1 1 1 1 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 2
ied to 1 batter in the 9th.
hed to 1 batter in the 9th.
Logan (Votto). WP-Nova,

-Home, Marvin Hudson; First, D.J.
Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Tim Mc-

-41,173 (42,319).


problems that cloud his fu-
ture. Mcllroy brings a killer
instinct to the course, yet al-
ready has shown he can
lose as well as he can win.
Leave it to a kid, however,
to preach patience.
As he was on his way to
posting the first sub-200
score over 54 holes in a U.S.
Open - 14-under 199 - in
the third round, Padraig
Harrington declared him as
being the player perhaps
best suited to chase Jack
Nicklaus' benchmark of 18
professional majors.
"If you're going to talk
about someone challenging
Jack's record, there's your
man," Harrington said.
"Winning majors at 22 with
his talent, he would have 20
more years... where he could
be competitive. It would give
him a great chance."
Upon hearing this, McIl-
roy bowed his head and said
quietly into the microphone
with playful condemnation,
"Paddy, Paddy, Paddy"
Then came Sunday, when
he was as relentless as ever,
stretching his lead to as
many as 10 shots, and his
score as low as 17 under.
Graeme McDowell, who
grew up hearing about and
then appreciating the skill
of McIlroy, said he was the
"best player I've ever seen."
These are the expecta-
tions that will follow McIl-
roy to Royal St. George's for
the British Open, to Atlanta
for the PGA Championship,


Orioles 8, Pirates 3
PITTSBURGH - Nick Markakis
had three hits and Jake Arrieta moved
into a tie for the American League lead
in wins as the Baltimore Orioles
pounded the Pittsburgh Pirates 8-3 on
Monday night.
Arrieta (9-4) gave up three runs over
five innings and even added his first
major league hit to became the first Ori-
oles pitcher to reach nine wins by June
20 since Sidney Ponson in 2003.
Though Arrieta wasn't dominant, he
didn't have to be thanks to an offense
that springs to life whenever he's on
the mound.
The Orioles average 6.5 runs per
game when Arrieta starts. They
needed just two innings to top that
mark against struggling starter Charlie
Morton (7-4) to hand the Pirates their
fourth straight loss.
Morton gave up seven runs - six
earned - and eight hits in two innings
to continue his June swoon. He fell to
2-2 this month with an ERA of 8.50.
Baltimore wasted little time pounc-
ing on Morton, whose resurgence
has been one of the pleasant sur-
prises in a pleasantly surprising sea-
son for the Pirates.
Baltimore Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Hardy ss 4 1 2 0 Tabata If 4 0 0 0
Markks rf 5 23 0 JHrrsn 3b 3 0 0 0
AdJons cf 5 1 2 2 Moskos p 0 0 0 0
D.Lee lb 5 2 2 1 TiWood p 0 0 0 0
Wieters c 5 0 1 1 Diaz ph 1 0 0 0
MrRynl3b 1 1 1 1 Hanrhnp 0 0 0 0
Pie If 5 00 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 3 0
Andino2b 5 1 2 1 GJoneslb 2 1 0 0
Arrieta p 2 0 1 1 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0
MGnzlz p 0 0 0 0 Paul rf 3 1 1 1
Guerrr ph 1 00 0 Cedeno ss 3 0 1 2
Berken p 0 00 0 McKnr c 3 00 0
Gregg p 0 00 0 Morton p 0 0 0 0
DMcCt p 1 0 0 0
Ciriaco ph-3b 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 8147 Totals 30 3 5 3
Baltimore 521 000 000 - 8
Pittsburgh 010 200 000 - 3
E-Tabata (2), Moskos (1), J.Harrison (1). DP-
Baltimore 2, Pittsburgh 2. LOB-Baltimore 9,
Pittsburgh 2. 2B-Markakis (7), Wieters (11),
A.McCutchen (15), Cedeno (13). SB-Paul (9).
S-Arrieta. SF-Mar.Reynolds.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
ArrietaW,9-4 5 3 3 3 2 2
M.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 0 1
Berken 2 0 0 0 0 3
Gregg 1 1 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Morton L,7-4 2 8 7 6 1 4
D.McCutchen 3 2 1 1 1 1
Moskos 2 3 0 0 0 0
Ti.Wood 1 1 0 0 1 0
Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 1 1
Umpires-Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Chris
Guccione; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mike
Everitt.
T-2:54. A-22,447 (38,362).


and to every major he plays
for a long time, if not the
rest of his career
His name is on the U.S.
Open roll of champions
with Woods, a three-time
winner. For now, that's
where the similarities end.
The comparisons are
mainly a product of youth,
skill and delivering on po-
tential. In his first trip to
America as a pro, McIlroy's
peers figured it was only a
matter of time before he
won the biggest events and
rose to No. 1. He was that
good, his swing that simple
and pure, his talent simply
too much to ignore.
McIlroy became the sec-
ond-youngest player to win
a major since the Masters
began in 1934, trailing
Woods in that 1997 Masters
by about 10 months. That's
why there is so much ex-
citement about his future,
and rightfully so.
However, this was his
10th major as a pro. Woods
won in his professional
debut at the majors.
The one question about
McIlroy, aside from his put-
ting, was his ability to fin-
ish. For someone with so
much talent, this was only
his third career victory in
107 starts in European and
PGA Tour events.
Woods already had won
31 tournaments, including
five majors, after his 107
starts in European and
PGA Tour sanctioned tour-


Braves 2, Blue Jays 0
ATLANTA - Tim Hudson pitched
eight scoreless innings and hit his sec-
ond career home run in the Atlanta
Braves' 2-0 victory over the Toronto
Blue Jays on Monday night.
Hudson (6-6) allowed two hits, one
walk and struck out a season-high
eight, including the 1,600th of his ca-
reer. He took Ricky Romero (6-7) deep
to make it 2-0 with two outs in the sixth.
Toronto has lost two straight and
five of seven.
Hudson retired 20 straight batters
before Mike McCoy walked to lead off
the ninth and advanced to second on
Yunel Escobar's infield single.
Closer Craig Kimbrel struck out Corey
Patterson, Jose Bautista and Adam Lind
to earn his 20th save in 25 chances.
Bautista, who began the game lead-
ing the major leagues with a .483 on-
base percentage, went 0 for 4 with two
strikeouts to snap a streak of reaching
base in 24 straight games.
Toronto hadn't been shut out since
losing 9-0 at home to Detroit on May 7.
But the Blue Jays were nearly punch-
less against Hudson, who had gone 1-
4 with a 5.80 ERA in his previous
seven starts.
Hudson became the first pitcher to
homer against Toronto since Felipe
Lira hit one out against David Wells on
July 8, 2000, at Montreal.
Toronto Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
YEscorss 4 0 1 0 Schafercf 4 0 1 0
CPttrsn If 4 0 0 0 AIGnzlz ss 3 0 1 0
Bautist rf 4 00 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 1 0
Lindlb 4 00 0 Fremnib 3 0 0 0
A.Hill2b 3 0 0 0 Uggla2b 4 0 1 0
Arencii c 3 0 1 0 D.Ross c 2 0 1 0
RDavis cf 3 0 0 0 McLoth If 2 0 0 0
J.Nix3b 2 0 0 0 DHrndz3b 3 1 0 0
Encrncph 1 00 0 THudsnp 3 1 1 2
L.Perezp 0 0 0 0 Kimrelp 0 0 0 0
Camp p 0 0 0 0
RRomrp 2 000
McCoy 3b 0 0 00
Totals 30 02 0 Totals 282 6 2
Toronto 000 000 000 - 0
Atlanta 000 000 20x - 2
E-YEscobar (7), Freeman (5). DP-Toronto 1.
LOB-Toronto 4, Atlanta 6. 2B-Ale.Gonzalez
(13), Heyward (6). HR-T.Hudson (1). SB-
Heyward (4), McLouth (2). CS-Schafer (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
R.Romero L,6-7 7 6 2 2 2 4
L.Perez 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Camp 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
T.Hudson W,6-6 8 2 0 0 1 8
Kimbrel S,20-25 1 0 0 0 0 3
T.Hudson pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by R.Romero (Freeman).
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First,
Angel Campos; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third,
Joe West.
T-2:20. A-22,937 (49,586).


naments. Four of those ma-
jors were won in a span of
294 days, an achievement
that might rank among the
most difficult to match.
"When you win a major
quite early in your career,
everyone is going to draw
comparisons," McIlroy said.
"It's natural."
McIlroy does not shy
away from the expecta-
tions, although he has
amazing perspective for
one so young.
"It's nice that people say
that 'He could be this' or
'He could be that' or 'He
could win 20 major champi-
onships,"' he said. "But at
the end of the day, I've won
one. I obviously want to add
to that tally But you can't let
what other people think of
you, influence what you
have to do. You have to just
go out there, work hard, be-
lieve in yourself."
There's another reason
for all the excitement.
Golf has been searching
for a star since the downfall
of Woods, who has not won
any tournaments since his
personal life and image were
shattered in November 2009,
and whose health is such
now that no one knows when
he'll play his next event,
much less his next major
Martin Kaymer won the
PGA Championship and
eventually rose to No. 1 for
two months. Lee Westwood
now has five top 3s in his
last 12 majors.


Cubs 6, White Sox 3 Red Sox 14, Padres 5


CHICAGO - Carlos Zambrano kept
his cool this time after a tough first in-
ning, Carlos Pena hit a three-run homer
and Starlin Castro drove in three runs
as the Chicago Cubs rallied to beat the
White Sox 6-3 on Monday night.
The first matchup of six this season
between the crosstown rivals with los-
ing records drew a crowd of 36,005 at
U.S. Cellular Field on a 75-degree
night. White Sox manager Ozzie
Guillen was ejected in the sixth inning
after apparently arguing that a ball hit
near the plate by Alexei Ramirez
should have been ruled foul.
Zambrano (6-4), who had a melt-
down nearly a year ago at U.S. Cellular
Field, recovered from a shaky three-
run first that included Paul Konerko's
20th homer. He allowed seven hits over
eight innings.
Carlos Marmol allowed two hits in
the ninth before retiring the side for his
15th save in 19 chances.
Castro's second homer of the sea-
son leading off the sixth against Gavin
Floyd tied the game at 3-3. And after a
single by Blake DeWitt and walk to
Aramis Ramirez, Pena connected to
right center for his 12th homer.
Zambrano went on a dugout tirade
after giving up four runs in the first in-
ning of his start against the White Sox
last June 25, angry over his team's
defense.
Chicago (N) Chicago (A)
ab rhbi ab r h bi
Fukudome rf4 1 00 Pierre If 51 1 0
S.Castro ss 4 1 23 Vizquel 2b 40 1 0
DeWitt If 4 1 10 Quentin rf 41 1 1
Montanez If 0 0 00 Konerkolb 31 1 2
Ar.Ramirez 3b 310 0 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0
0
C.Penalb 3 1 13 Al.Ramirez ss 40 0 0
A.Soriano dh4 0 1 0 Pierzynski c 40 3 0
Soto c 4 1 10 Rios cf 40 1 0
LeMahieu 2b4 0 00 Teahen 3b 30 1 0
Campana cf 3 0 10
Totals 33 6 76 Totals 35 3 9 3
Chicago (N) 002 004 000 - 6
Chicago (A) 300 000 000 - 3
DP-Chicago (N) 1. LOB-Chicago (N) 4,
Chicago (A) 7. HR-S.Castro (2), C.Pena (12),
Konerko (20). SB-S.Castro (9). S-Campana.
IP H RER BB SO
Chicago (N)
ZambranoW,6-4 8 7 3 3 2 5
Marmol S,15-19 1 2 0 0 0 0
Chicago (A)
Floyd L,6-7 5 5 6 6 3 3
Bruney 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ohman 2 0 0 0 0 1
Harrell 2-3 2 0 0 0 2
Sale 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Floyd pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
WP-Floyd.
Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First, Tom
Hallion; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Bill Miller.
T-2:45. A-36,005 (40,615).



TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

Nadal now faces another
American, 69th-ranked
Ryan Sweeting of Ft Laud-
erdale, Fla., who dropped
the first two sets against
Pablo Andujar of Spain be-
fore coming all the way back
to win 3-6, 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-1.
It'll be Sweeting's third
match against Nadal this
year. Nadal won the others
in straight sets, including at
the Australian Open.
"They keep putting me up
in the top half of the draw. I
don't know what the deal is,"
Sweeting said. "What can I
say? He's obviously one of
the toughest opponents to
play on any surface."
The second question at
Nadal's news conference
concerned whether he be-
lieves Murray, Roger Fed-
erer or Novak Djokovic is
likeliest to thwart his title
hopes.
"My biggest opponent is
Sweeting now. I am focused
on my part of the draw. I'm
focused on myself. To play
against Andy or Djokovic or
Federer only can be in the
final; against Andy in the
semifinals," the Spaniard
replied. "So let's talk about
today Let's talk about to-
morrow.... Let's (not) talk
about ... 10 days or 12 days
(from now), because I don't


BOSTON - Adrian Gonzalez drove
in three runs with a single and double in a
10-run seventh inning against his former
team and the hot-hitting Boston Red Sox
rolled to a 14-5 win over the struggling
San Diego Padres on Monday night.
Gonzalez boosted his major league-
leading RBI total to 67 since the Padres,
unable to give him a lucrative contract,
traded him to the Red Sox in the offsea-
son for three top prospects. He went 3
for 5 to increase his batting average to
.353, also the best in the majors.
Tied at 3 going into the seventh,
Gonzalez drove in the go-ahead run
with a one-out double. After Kevin
Youkilis flied out, the Red Sox scored
nine more runs.
Boston entered with baseball's best
batting average at .275 and scored at
least 10 runs for the fifth time in nine
games. San Diego, which began the day
with a major league-low .232 average,
has lost a season-high six straight games.
Matt Albers (2-3) pitched 1 1-3
scoreless innings to get the decision
as the AL East-leading Red Sox won
for the 14th time in 16 games to remain
112 ahead of the New York Yankees.
San Diego Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Denorfirf 5 0 1 1 Ellsurycf 4 1 1 1
Bartlett ss 3 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 3 1 1
Venaleph-lf 1 00 0 AdGnzllb 5 2 3 3
Headly 3b 5 2 4 0 Youkils 3b 4 1 2 2
Ludwck If 3 1 1 0 Sutton pr-3b 0 0 0 0
AIGnzlzss 1 00 0 Ortizdh 4 1 2 2
Guzmndh 5 0 2 1 DMcDnlf 3 0 0 0
OHudsn2b 5 2 3 3 J.Drew ph-rf 1 2 1 0
Maybin cf 4 0 0 0 Scutaro ss 4 2 2 1
Rizzolb 4 0 1 0 Varitekc 4 1 1 1
Hundlyc 3 0 1 0 Camrnrf 2 0 0 0
Reddckph-lf 1 1 1 2
Totals 39 5135 Totals 361414
13
San Diego 000 003 0 11 - 5
Boston 101 100(10)1x - 14
DP-San Diego 2, Boston 1. LOB-San Diego
11, Boston 9. 2B-Headley (21), Rizzo (2), Pe-
droia (14), Ad.Gonzalez (25), Youkilis (20), Ortiz
(20). 3B-Guzman (1). HR-O.Hudson (1).
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
LeBlanc 3 7 3 3 2 1
Luebke L,1-2 31-31 2 2 2 6
Frieri 1-3 0 4 4 2 0
Scribner 0 4 4 4 1 0
Neshek 11-32 1 1 2 2
Boston
A.Miller 52-37 3 3 3 6
AlbersW,2-3 11-31 0 0 1 1
Bowden 1 3 1 1 0 0
Hottovy 1 2 1 1 0 1
LeBlanc pitched to 3 batters in the 4th.
Scribner pitched to 5 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Frieri (Scutaro, Varitek). WP-Bow-
den.
Umpires-Home, Ed Rapuano; First, Chris
Conroy; Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Ed
H ickox.
T-3:40. A-38,020 (37,493).

know if I am here or I am
fishing in Mallorca."
Four seeded players ex-
ited Monday, including No.
28 Ekaterina Makarova of
Russia, who was beaten 2-6,
6-1, 8-6 by 19-year-old
Christina McHale of Engle-
wood Cliffs, N.J. McHale en-
tered the day 1-6 in Grand
Slam matches. No. 17 Kaia
Kanepi lost to Sara Errani 6-
1, 6-4, No. 22 Shahar Peer
was eliminated 5-7, 6-4, 6-4
by Ksenia Pervak, and No.
30 Thomaz Bellucci was sent
home in straight sets by 35-
year-old Rainer Schuettler,
the oldest man in the field.
Otherwise, the most signif-
icant development probably
was the rain that began
falling at about 5 p.m., result-
ing in the suspension of 14
matches in progress and the
postponement of 17 others.
And Tuesday's forecast
calls for more rain.
Two matches were played
under the retractable roof,
which was added to Centre
Court before the 2009 tour-
nament. That included two-
time Wimbledon semifinalist
Murray's 4-6, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0 vic-
tory over 59th-ranked Daniel
Gimeno-Traver of Spain.
Murray is trying to give
Britain its first male cham-
pion at any Grand Slam tour-
nament since 1936, and he
overcame a slow start
against Gimeno-Traver, a
first-round loser for the
eighth time in 12 major
tournaments.


CASH 3 (early)
: J .6-8-1
CASH 3 (late)
4-1-2
PLAY 4 (early)
lt 0-8-9-7
Florida Lottery PLAY 4 (late)
Here are the winning 0-0- 1 - 8
numbers selected FANTASY 5
Mondayin the 3-6-17-21-34
Florida Lottery:


CORONADO, Calif. - Staging the
first NCAA college basketball game on
the flight deck of an aircraft carrier is
going to be a task as big as the USS
Carl Vinson itself.
Just less than five months before
North Carolina and Michigan State are
scheduled to play on Veterans Day, of-
ficials from the Navy, ESPN and the
Morale Entertainment Foundation
spent a few hours Monday inspecting
the flat top, which last month buried
Osama bin Laden at sea.


W L
44 28
42 29
39 33
36 37
33 37


East Division
GB WCGB
12 -
5 3/2
812 7
10 812

East Division
GB WCGB


Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore



Philadelphia
Atlanta
New York
Washington
Florida


Away
22-14
19-12
21-15
19-19
13-19


Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City


Central Division
GB WCGB

/2 3/2
5Y2 8Y2
7Y2 10Y2
8Y2 11Y2

Central Division
GB WCGB
- Y2
- Y2
21/2 3
412 5
9/2 10
1312 14


Away
17-16 Milwaukee
21-16 St. Louis
19-18 Cincinnati
16-24 Pittsburgh
17-18 Chicago
Houston


B2 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


SPORTS


CiTnus CouNT'y (FL) CHRONICLE







E Page B3- TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011



ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE -

Kingston says
he's feeling better
MIAMI - Singer Sean
Kingston says he's feeling
better almost a month
after crashing his water-
craft into a Miami Beach
bridge.
On his
Twitter
page Mon-
day,
Kingston
posted a
message
to his
Sean fans. He
Kingston wrote:
"Feeling
alot better! GOD IS
GREAT! Thanks for all
the prayers and support!
Love you ALL!"
Kingston also posted a
picture of himself, in the
hospital, flashing a peace
sign. His publicist,
Joseph Carozza, said
Kingston's condition has
been upgraded to fair
The singer famous for
his 2007 hit "Beautiful
Girls" has been hospital-
ized in Miami since the
May 29 crash.

Sirius XM to
highlight Carlin
NEW YORK-- The late
George Carlin's comedy
will come alive again this
weekend.
Sirius
XM Radio
Inc. said
Monday it
will air a
special
channel
devoted to
George Carlin's
Carlin comedy
this week-
end. Carlin died three
years ago, on June 22,
2008, at age 71.
This year marks the
40th anniversary of the
making of his album "FM
& AM."
The channel will air
several of Carlin's rou-
tines, including the clas-
sic "Seven Words You Can
Never Say on TV" Be-
cause it is a subscription-
based satellite radio
channel, Sirius has no
problem playing the pro-
fanity-laced routine.
"George Carlin Radio"
will also include inter-
views with the comic's
daughter, brother and
business partner


Miss USA crowned


Newest winner is

"history geek"

from California

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS -America's latest Miss
USA winner is a California model and
self-described history geek, obsessed
with Britain's monarchy of centuries
past but also a fan of "Star Wars."
Alyssa Campanella of Los Angeles
says on Twitter that she was born in
the wrong time period and played the
popular pig-exploding game Angry
Birds backstage on her iPad before
the pageant Sunday night.
She hopes to keep modeling after
her run as Miss USA is finished, de-
pending on how she does representing
the country at Miss Universe in Sep-
tember in Brazil.
The celebrity she'd most like to
meet, now that she's one herself? Pas-
try chef Buddy Valastro of TLC reality
show Cake Boss.
"I love to bake cakes, and he's an
Italian, and he acts like I do in the
kitchen," the 21-year-old said after
beating 50 other hopefuls in Miss
USAs 60th pageant at the Planet Hol-
lywood Resort & Casino on the Las
Vegas Strip.
"Right now, I'm still kind of like -
whoa," Campanella said.
She strutted across the stage in a
blue bikini with white polka dots, then
donned a dark turquoise Sherri Hill
evening gown with beading on its top.
After making the final four, she an-
swered a question about legalizing
marijuana by saying she didn't think it
should be fully legalized as a solution
to help ailing economies.
She also professed a love for history
after E! News anchor Giuliana Rancic
asked her about it during the pageant.
"I'm obsessed with the Stuart and
Tudor era," Campanella said. "When-
ever I go to Barnes & Noble I'm always
in the history section and that is
where you will find me."
"I watch 'Game of Thrones,' I
watched 'Camelot' - I know those are
fantasy but I also watch the Tudors, so
I'm a huge history geek," she said.
She said she grew up watching "Star
Wars."
Campanella said during a news con-
ference after the pageant that the win
validated her decision to quickly move
to Los Angeles from New Jersey after
losing an apartment more than a year
ago.
"The downs happen for a reason,"


Associated Press
Alyssa Campanella, Miss California, reacts Sunday after being crowned the 2011
Miss USA in Las Vegas.


she said. "The path that I'm on now is
the path that's been meant to be."
Campanella, a former Miss Teen
USA runner-up from 2007, when she
represented New Jersey, said she has
been competing in pageants since she
was 15 because of her mom.
"I was going through a tough time in
high school and she thought it'd be a
great way for me to meet other girls
throughout the state," she said. "It's
Mom's fault"
Originally from Manalapan, N.J.,
Campanella began modeling at age 16,
graduated from high school a year
early and received a scholarship to
the New York Conservatory for Dra-
matic Arts, according to her personal
website.
Campanella said she thought the
marijuana question posed to her from
"Real Housewives of New Jersey"
housewife Caroline Manzo was fair,
given that she represents California.
"Well, I understand why that ques-
tion would be asked, especially with


today's economy, but I also understand
that medical marijuana is very impor-
tant to help those who need it med-
ically," she said during the pageant.
"I'm not sure if it should be legalized,
if it would really affect, with the drug
war," she said. "I mean, it's abused
today, unfortunately, so that's the only
reason why I would kind of be a little
bit against it, but medically it's OK."
Marijuana has been legal for med-
ical use in California for about 15
years.
Miss Tennessee Ashley Durham was
the first runner-up, while contestants
from Alabama and Texas placed third
and fourth.
Campanella, a natural blonde, said
she dyed her hair six years ago for a
part in a play, for a "fiery" character
with whom she found she had traits in
common.
"It's really brought out the true
Alyssa Campanella, I feel, and that's
why I really enjoy being a redhead,"
she said.


Daytime Emmys mark changes


Associated Press
Tone Loc LAS VEGAS --"The Bold
arrested, jailed and the Beautiful" won
BURBANK, California drama series honors for the
- The rapper Tone Loc third consecutive year at the
has been arrested on sus- Daytime Emmys on Sunday
picion of night in a bittersweet cere-
felony do- mony that marked the im-
mestic vi- pending daytime
olence in departures of two veteran
Southern soap operas along with
Califor- Regis Philbin and talk show
nia. queen Oprah Winfrey
Bur- Executive producer
bank po- Bradley Bell accepted the
Tone Loc lice Sgt. trophy, saying, "It's over the
Tracy top. We're so grateful."
Sanchez says 45-year-old Bell saluted his late fa-
Anthony Smith was ar- their William Bell, who cre-
rested Saturday That's ated "The Young and the
Tone Loc's real name. Restless" and gave the
Sanchez could not con- younger Bell his start in the
firm that the man ar- business.
rested is Tone Loc, but Laura Wright, who plays
Smith's birthdate and de- Carly Corinthos on "General
scription in Los Angeles Hospital," won her first
County jail records match Emmy in her first nomina-
those of the rapper tion. She joins Finola
Sanchez also could not Hughes in 1991 as the only
provide any details about stars of the ABC soap to win
the alleged victim or the lead actress honors.
circumstances. "Hell, yeah!" she said,
Smith was being held thrusting the trophy in the
in a Burbank jail on air "This has been 20 years
$50,000 bail. of the best career ever"
Michael Park, who plays
-From wire reports Jack Snyder on CBS' "As the


World Turns," earned lead
actor honors.
Scott Clifton won younger
actor honors for his role as
Liam Cooper on "The Bold
and the Beautiful," one of
four trophies the show
earned. It tied with "The
Young and the Restless" for
directing in a drama series.
"The Young and the Rest-
less" won for best writing.
Brittany Allen of "All My
Children" earned the show's
final Daytime Emmy, win-
ning for younger actress in a
drama series. She is no
longer playing the role of
Marisa Chandler
The ABC soap opera,
along with the network's
"One Life to Live," are leav-
ing the air after more than
40 years because of declin-
ing ratings.
"My heart breaks for all
these people that this is not
going to be a part of their
lives," she said backstage
about the show's impending
demise. "Having just gone
through something like this,
I survived. It was scary, but
change is a good thing and it
opens the door for new op-
portunities."
Jonathan Jackson of
"General Hospital" and


Heather Tom of "The Bold
and the Beautiful" won as
supporting actor and actress
in the live show hosted by
Wayne Brady at the Las
Vegas Hilton.
Jackson, who plays Lucky
Spencer, brought his young
son and daughter onstage
with him.
"It's Father's Day I could-
n't resist," he said.
Tom, a veteran soap ac-
tress who plays Katie Logan
Spencer on the CBS show,
won for the first time after
five nominations in the sup-
porting category
"I have to thank the day-
time community as a
whole," she said. "You have
been my home for most of
my life and I am so grateful
for that."
"Jeopardy!" and "Wheel
of Fortune" tied for best
game show, fitting since the
respective hosts, Alex Tre-
bek and Pat Sajak, received
lifetime achievement
awards during the show.
Those shows dethroned
"Cash Cab," which had won
three straight years.
Trebek has quizzed
brainy contestants for 27
years, while Sajak has been
selling vowels for 30 years.


Associated Press
Actress Laura Wright poses
Sunday with her award for
Outstanding Lead Actress in
a Drama Series at the 38th
Annual Daytime Emmy
Awards in Las Vegas.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: Knowledge you've gained from many of your
past experiences is likely to play a big role in shaping your
destiny in the year ahead. Most of the lessons you've
learned will help you to avoid making the same mistakes.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) - If you're too easily influ-
enced, spending too much time with people who don't
know how to laugh at themselves could end up having a
depressing effect on your attitude. Choose pals wisely.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Tend to critical matters or jobs
that need doing as early as possible before moving onto
anything else. The later it gets, the fewer chances you'll
have of contacting necessary parties.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -A discussion might be in order
concerning something you either loaned or borrowed from
a friend. Resolve the situation as amicably as you can.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - If you act contrary from what
others have learned to expect from you, confusion and mis-


understandings could easily occur. In order to stay in char-
acter, be extra mindful of your behavior.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - More than one friend will be
disappointed if you appear hopeful of getting more from
others than you're willing to give. Examine your motives for
what you do or say.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - Group contributions
could create complications if certain people think they don't
need to make the same effort as the others. Don't be one
of the shirkers.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --When discussing a subject
of great importance, don't allow your attention to wander.
Unless you pay heed to every little detail, a misunderstand-
ing could easily manifest.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - If you can choose, try to en-
gage in work that requires muscle power rather than mental
concentration. This isn't likely to be one of your better days


for sharp thinking.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Not everything will run as
smoothly as you envision, but unless it's vital, don't make a
big deal out of it. There's a chance you could start blaming
others who have tried to do their best.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - The intentions of both friends
and family are likely to be noble, but kin won't always be
able to do what they promised, and you shouldn't expect it.
It might be the time to look to your own house for aid.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Those you recruit to help you
might make more work instead of easing your load. If you
want things done properly, sometimes it's better to do the
job yourself.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - Unless you treat others the
way you want to be treated, trying to profit at their expense
would lead to losses instead of helping you make any
gains.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B2.

SUNDAY, JUNE 19
Fantasy 5:2 - 7 - 12 -17 -28
5-of-5 2 winners $85,316.34
4-of-5 381 $72
3-of-5 9,392 $8
SATURDAY, JUNE 18
Powerball: 12 - 21 - 22 - 38 - 41
Powerball: 18
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
Lotto: 4 - 14 - 17 - 37 - 42 - 50
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 33 $5,061.50
4-of-6 2,127 $65.50
3-of-6 45,686 $5
Fantasy 5: 9 - 12 - 20 - 22 - 35
5-of-5 2 winners $128,491.28
4-of-5 343 $120.50
3-of-5 11,255 $10
FRIDAY, JUNE 17
Mega Money: 8 - 9 - 25 - 39
Mega Ball: 18
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 10 $698
3-of-4 MB 30 $510

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY =

Today is Tuesday, June
21, the 172nd day of 2011.
There are 193 days left in the
year. Day. Summer arrives at
1:16 p.m.
Today's Highlight in
History:
On June 21, 1788, the
United States Constitution
went into effect as New
Hampshire became the ninth
state to ratify it.
On this date:
In 1964, civil rights work-
ers Michael H. Schwerner,
Andrew Goodman and
James E. Chaney were mur-
dered in Philadelphia, Miss.;
their bodies were found
buried in an earthen dam six
weeks later.
In 1989, a sharply divided
Supreme Court ruled that
burning the American flag as
a form of political protest was
protected by the First
Amendment.
In 2005, 41 years to the
day after three civil rights
workers were beaten and
shot to death, Edgar Ray
Killen, an 80-year-old former
Ku Klux Klansman, was
found guilty of manslaughter
in a Mississippi court. (Killen
was sentenced to 60 years in
prison.)
Ten years ago: A federal
grand jury in Alexandria, Va.,
indicted 13 Saudis and a
Lebanese in absentia for the
1996 bombing of the Khobar
Towers in Saudi Arabia that
killed 19 American service-
men.
Five years ago: The Ma-
rine Corps announced that
seven Marines and a sailor
had been charged with mur-
dering an Iraqi civilian in
April. (The sailor and three
Marines later pleaded guilty
to lesser charges.)
One year ago: Faisal
Shahzad, a Pakistan-born
U.S. citizen, pleaded guilty to
charges of plotting a failed
car bombing in New York's
Times Square. (Shahzad
was later sentenced to life in
prison.)
Today's Birthdays: Rock
singer-musician Ray Davies
(The Kinks) is 67. Rock musi-
cian Nils Lofgren is 60. Car-
toonist Berke Breathed is 54.
Writer-director Larry Wa-
chowski is 46. Actress Juli-
ette Lewis is 38. Britain's
Prince William is 29. Pop
singer Kris Allen ("American
Idol") is 26. Actor Jascha
Washington is 22.


Thought for Today: "In
America, to look a couple of
years younger than you actu-
ally are is not only an
achievement for which you
are to be congratulated, it is
patriotic." - Cynthia Propper
Seton, American writer
(1926-1982).






CITRUS COUNTY'S RECREATIONAL GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY SPEEDWAY

I- CD






HITTING THE LINKS OUTDOORS YOUTH LEAGUE ULTLEA







GET IN T HE M


Last lap pass brings win for Kempgens


Stalnaker wins

Stomquist Mem.

JOHN CHANCE
Special to the Chronicle

Saturday night marked the sec-
ond asphalt sprint car race of the
season at Citrus County Speedway
Fourteen wingless sprint cars made
the trip to the "friendliest track in
the south" for their 30-lap feature.
Jimmy Alvis Jr. (9) would bring the
field to the green. Alvis Jr. would
soon get pressure from the "Bush-
nell Bullet" Shane Butler, and give
up the top spot falling back into the
second position.
Lap 10 would see the first of
three cautions when Jimmy Alvis
Sr. (21) and Tommy Nichols (55)
would spin in turn 4. Both cars
would restart and join the tail of the
field. Butler would lead the field to
green, with Alvis Jr. in second and
Mickey Kempgens (70) in third.
Kempgens would make quick work
of Alvis Jr, and set his sights on But-
ler (18). Lap 12 saw the second cau-
tion fly with Matthew Hall (01)
spinning in a single-car incident.
He would restart and join the rear
of the field. Butler would bring the
field back down to the green once
again, but now with Kempgens
fixed to his back bumper.
The green would not be out for
long, as Shane Miller (78) would
spin in turn three, collecting
Tommy Nichols (55), and Alvis Sr.
(21). Nichols and Miller would suf-
fer front end damage, which
ended their night, retiring to the
pit area. Butler would again try to
get the jump on the lap 12 restart,
but Kempgens wasn't fooled, stay-
ing fixed to the tail piece of But-
ler's machine.
For the remaining 18 laps, the two
racers would not be separated by
more than five feet Kempgens
looked high and low trying to make
a pass for the lead but Butler was as
cool as ice, never slipping even the
slightest bit As the two drivers came
to take the 2-lap to go sign, a lapped
car would give this race its final
twist Butler had to check up for just
a split second, which gave Kemp-
gens the opening he needed. As the
leaders exited turn four, the lapped
car did not move low enough on the
race track and both leaders made
inside moves on the car, going three-
wide across the stripe.
Kempgens would make the pass
on the bottom heading into turn
one, but Butler would pull a
crossover move that would have
made Dale Earnhardt Sr. proud, to
retake the lead off of turn 2. The
two drivers would take the white
flag side by side, with Kempgens fi-
nally taking the lead for good on the
outside heading into turn 1. The
last lap also saw some action for the
third position with Alvis Jr (9) and
defending race winner Colin Cabre
(12). Cabre would get a look on the
inside headed into turn 3 on the
final lap, which resulted in contact,
and Alvis Jr. spinning to the infield.
Cabre would regain control of his
racer and come home in the third
position. Victory Lne was electric
with the excitement of such a close
finish. Kempgens was exhausted,
saying he tried everything he could
to get by Butler, but was truly ex-
cited with the victory Kempgens
thanked Butler for such a great
race and his entire Miller Motor-
sports crew. Butler was equally ex-
cited, but disappointed that he
couldn't hold on to the victory But-
ler said that he thinks Kempgens
would have passed him even if the
lapped car had not got in the way,
admitting that Kempgens had the
car to beat all day
Kempgens and Butler have been
friends since they were 1-years old,
and consider each other to be al-
most brothers. Both drivers met be-
tween the cars in Victory Lane and
shared a hug and moment of em-
brace before even taking their hel-
mets and safety equipment off.
Cabre, who was happy to come
home third after starting deep in the
field, thanked his crew and Mike
Rudloph for helping set up his car
The second annual Frank
Stromquist Memorial 57-lap street
stock race saw a field of 18 drivers
start their night off with a shot at
the time clock. Kyle Peters (53)
would come out on top after every-
one completed their two-lap quali-
fying runs. Peters would earn the


"R


--- -a


--


ROBERT CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
The No. 27 of John Makula and the No. 8 of Michael Stalnaker race for the lead early in the Frank
Stromquist Memorial. Stalnaker would go on to take the win. Leo Cioe Sr. accepts his $50 dollars worth
of gas cards from the Chronicle's John Provost after winning last week's NASCAR contest.


came to the green for their 15-lap
feature. John Fisher (98) would
jump out to an early lead and then
run away with the rest of the race.
Mathew Street (151) would come
home second followed by Kane
Dixon (15) in third. During post race
inspection, it was found that the 98
had performed an illegal driver
change at the last minute, putting a
driver in the car with substantial
racing experience. The Hornet Di-
vision is designed for new drivers
only and drivers with racing experi-
ence are not allowed in the division.
This resulted in the disqualification
of the 98 machine and handed
Mathew Street his second feature
win in a row. Kane Dixon then
moved to the second position, fol-
lowed by Carson Taylor (60) in third.
The Daytona Antique Auto Rac-
ing Association brought 35 cars for
four divisions for their second visit
of the year to Citrus County Speed-
way It was some of the best racing
they have seen in years at the
Speedway Please see the results
listed on the page.
This Saturday night the Speed-
way welcomes back the Open
Wheel Modifieds along with the
Sportsman, Street Stock, Taylor
Made Homes Pure Stocks, Sheldon
Palmes Insurance Mini Stocks, Pro
figure 8's, and the Southeast
Champ Kart Series. Please visit the
track website at wwwcitruscoun-
tyspeedwaycom or call the speed-
way office at 352-726-9339 for
complete details.
See you at the races!


I - X. -MINNOWANONOW


POINTS LEADER
Super Late Models
# Drivers Name
98 Herb Neumann Jr.
Open Wheeled Modifieds
88 Bobby Ervien
Mod. Mini Stocks
33 Chris Allen
Sportsman
55 Ernie Reed
Street Stocks
3 Curtis Flanagan
Pure Stocks
35 David Walls
Mini Stocks
71 Sonya Heater
PRO FIGURE-8s
Joey Catarelli
PS/SS FIG-8s
62 Eric Sharrone


$50 fast time award for his efforts.
Peters would soon have an uphill
battle to get to the front, after one
the speedways young fans rolled
the tracks giant foam dice for the
field's inversion. The dice would
come up a four, putting Peters in
the forth row for the feature. On the
start, John Makula would jump out
to an early lead, but caution on lap
2 for contact between Kenny May
(10) and Bubba Martone (98) would
slow the field.
On the restart, Makula would get
pressure from Michael Stalnaker
(8), and give up the lead just before
and lap 8 caution for a single car
spin. Stalnaker would bring the
field to the green, and check out on
the field while everyone else bat-
tled behind him. The race saw sev-
eral tough battles which resulted in
some damaged race cars. Two of
those cars were Makula (27) and
Tom Potts (31) who made heavy
side-to-side contact off of turn 4.
Makula would suffer a flat tire, and
Potts would have to head to the pits
for repairs.
Stalnaker would again drive
away from the field on the restart,
with his brother Jeff Stalnaker now
in second followed by a hard charg-
ing Bill Ryan in third. Lap 28 would
see contact between those two driv-
ers while racing for the second po-
sition, which resulted in a caution
that sent them both to the rear.
These two drivers would continue
to have problems with each other
later in the event. They were both
eventually black flagged and sent
off of the racing surface for rough
driving. Michael Stalnaker would
go on to take an unchallenged vic-
tory and the $500 win purse.
Fast Qualifier Kyle Peters (53)
would race his way to second at the
checkers. Kenny May recovered
from his early race incident, and
drove to a solid third place finish.
All three drivers in Victory Lane
commented on their respect for the
late Frank Stromquist, and thanked
his family for attending. Frank was
a one of a kind man and he is dearly
missed by the entire Citrus County
Speedway racing family
In the Modified Mini Stocks 9-
cars took the green for their 25-lap
feature with defending point cham-
pion Clint Foley on the pole posi-




FPCI


EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST

Hamlin races his way to first win of the season

Out of 126 entries submitted this past week six picked Denny Hamlin as the winner of the Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips 400 at Michigan on Sunday. The contestant that
was closest to the Hamlin's actual speed of 153.029 was Nick Slonaker who guessed the speed at 153.800. Slonaker won $25 as the contest winner this week.
r - ----------------------------------------------------------- ---


tion. Foley would jump out to an
early lead and pull away to a com-
fortable margin before a lap 11 cau-
tion would bring Chris Allen (33) to
his bumper for the restart. Foley
would get the jump on the restart,
but with each lap, Foley's car would
begin to get loose off of both cor-
ners. Allen would close to within
two car lengths at the end but didn't
have enough to claim his third win
in a row. Jesse Henley (18) came
home with a strong third place fin-
ish behind the two front runners.
Another unusually short 8-car
Taylor Made Homes Pure Stock
field took the green for their 25-lap
feature. Levi Roberts would make
short work of the field to take his
fifth feature win of the year.
Roberts leads all drivers in every
division at the Speedway with five
feature wins. Last weeks winner,
Tyler Stickler, came home in the
second position. Arden Franklin
would come home in the third posi-
tion after a hard-fought battle with
the points leader David Walls (35),
who came home fourth.
The Street Stock/Pure Stock Fig-
ure-8 event saw 13 cars take the
green for their 20-lap feature. Ron-
nie Schrefiels would take his sec-
ond feature win of the year, but not
without constant pressure from
Thomas Peet (35). Peet was glued to
the bumper of Schrefiels (6) yellow
machine for the last half of the fea-
ture event. Despite a great effort,
Peet would have to settle for second
ahead of Eric Sharrone (62).
There were six cars in the Inter-
County Recycling Hornets race that


NASCAR CONTEST ENTI

for the Toyota/Save mart 350 on Sunday, June 26 in Sc



DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE N

TIEBREAKER: (Guess the average speed of the race to three decimal places:)

Mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sp
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be recei


RY FORM

)noma, Califorinia


lUMBER


orts editor,
ived by 5 p.m. on June 24.


--_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ J-


THEI WE44INNER


JUNE 18 RESULTS
Street Stocks Feature
# Drivers Name Home Town P
8 Michael Stalnaker Ocala 1
53 Kyle Peters Ferndale 2
10 Kenny May Spring Hill 3
3 Curtis Flanagan Inverness 4
85 TimWilson Floral City 5
18 Justyn Elwood Ocala 6
26 Bradley Lyon Brooksville 7
Pure Stocks Feature
15 Levi Roberts Inverness 1
9 Tyler Stickler Pinellas Park 2
7 Arden Franklin Hernando 3
35 David Walls Summerfield 4
44 Glen Colyer Homosassa 5
72 Karlin Ray Floral City 6
27 Sheri Makula N. Port Richey 7
Mod Mini Stocks Feature
7 Clint Foley Dunnellon 1
33 Chris Allen Center Hill 2
18 Jesse Henley Homosassa 3
44 Michael Lawhorn Clermont 4
32 Jim Smith Inverness 5
85 Rex Hollinger Titusville 6
13 Richard Heath Inverness 7
Street/Pure Stocks Fig-8s Feature
6 Ronnie Schrefiels Brooksville 1
35 Thomas Peet Floral City 2
62 Eric Sharrone Floral City 3
5 H. Higgenbothan Bushnell 4
33 Gary Swing Floral City 5
81 W. (Gator) Jones Inverness 6
89 Charles Herne Homosassa 7
Hornet Division Feature
151 Matthew Street Lakeland 1
15 Kane Dixion Inverness 2
60 CarsonTaylor Lecanto 3
31 Chris Hennessy Beverly Hills 4
55 DarylVeltman Crystal River 5
Independent Pavement Sprint Car Association
70 Mickey Kempgens Dade City 1
18 Shane Butler Bushnell 2
12 Collin Cabre Thonotosassa 3
8 Stan Butler Bushnell 4
21 Jimmy Alvis Sr. Seffner 5
41 Mathew Hall Apollo Beach 6
75 Darin Miller Tampa 7
Daytona Antique Auto Racing Association
2 Bob Jordan Bainbridge, GA 1
88 David Johnston Miami 2
6 Jerry Paquin Lake Worth 3
49 Jerry Carbone Ft. Lauderdale 4
56 Ken Davison Mulberry 5
5 Don Farnum Longwood 6
9 Bill Wheellock Brandenton 7
Six Cyl./Small V8) Feature
138 Steve Parrish Okeechobee 1
46 Tom Zwally Mulberry 2
400 Tim Brush Dayton, Ohio 3
61 Richie Iverson Lecanto 4
73 Bill McPeek Oviedo 5
72 Hank Goodrich Port Orange 6
0 Steve Miller Sebastion 7
(Uncaged Sprints/Caged Sprints) Feature
9 Matt Jarrett Orlando 1
98 Dave Cash Palm Coast 2
7 Sue Yoder Sarasota 3
60 Janis Strickland Plant City 4
80 Fred Strickland Plant City 5
56 Josh Rynd Lakeland 6
8 Scott Winter Wesley Chapel 7
(V8 Stocks/Modifieds) Feature
93 Frank Lenhardt Punta Gorda 1
81 Rock Reigle Bradenton 2
711 Larry Larivee Titusville 3
2x Toby Smith Titusville 4
M1 TC. McElyea Dania Beach 5
93x Pat McNear Ft. Myers 6
1 Ronnie Rohn Jacksonville 7







Section C - TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011



H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hot




dogs


How to make

your dog's days

ofsummer

safer
SUE MANNING
Associated Press
- LOS ANGELES
Ready for your dog's
days of summer?
Everybody seems to have
a list of tips.
Most are no-brainers.
Don't leave dogs in hot cars
or let them walk on hot as-
phalt, play too hard or get
too much sun. Apply flea
and tick repellents, and if
you're in a mosquito-prone
area, talk to your vet about
heartworm prevention
pills. Take dogs on walks
early or late to avoid mid-
day heat and provide
ample drinking water
But there are other risks
that come with heat, vaca-
tions and outdoor play
Here are some ways to
keep dogs healthy and com-
fortable this summer, with
tips from veterinarian
Louise Murray, vice presi-
dent of the American Soci-
ety for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals' Bergh
Memorial Animal Hospital
in New York City.
* GROOMING: A dog's
coat is like insulation,












at
Sse


warding off cold in the win-
ter and heat in the summer
Trim, but don't give your
dog a crew cut or such a
close shave that it takes
away that protection.
Dogs get sunburn and
skin cancer, so never cut
fur shorter than an inch. (In
some breeds, even an inch
is too short)
Dogs shed more in sum-
mer, so brush to get rid of
extra fur along with fur
that's matted from water
play
* HEAT RELIEF: Most
pets find cool, shady spots
to lie down, but some, espe-
cially animals that are over-
weight or can't tolerate
heat, might benefit from
cooling beds,
mats or vests.
The mats
get filled
with water,
which
. " s mixes with a
high-tech gel
k o to create a
cool, wa-
terbed-like
cushion.
S Consumer re-
* views are gen-
erally positive
Bodie gets a summer cut
t Petco in the Van Nuys
section of Los Angeles.


ON THE NET
* www.aspca.org

but caution some beds
spring leaks (or are
chewed by dogs).
* FOOD: No food will
keep your dog cooler, but
food helps keep body tem-
perature up, so dogs may
not need to eat as much in
the summer
If your dog stays at a dog-
friendly hotel with you or at
a kennel, consider bringing
food from home. A change
in diet can cause diarrhea.
Barbecues and picnics
are a veterinarian's night-
mare. Keep pets in the
house or on a leash to pre-
vent them from being fed
or lapping up things that
are bad for them, whether
it's spilled alcohol or onion
dip. Onions, garlic, grapes,
raisins and chocolate are
the most toxic foods for
dogs.
* VACATIONS: Dogs can
get carsick if they're not
used to driving, so go for
small trips before a road
trip.
On boats, consider a dog-
gie life vest Protect the dog
from gasoline and other
toxic products. At the


Futuristic medicine in

additive manufacturing?


In places around the
world, including
England where the
Concorde supersonic
airliner was built, here
in the United States, as
well as China, there is a
move to develop and
perfect three-dimen-
sional printing, which
would come from digital
designs.
The term is called,
"Additive manufactur-
ing."As opposed to what


SJ - -..-




Dr. Denis Grillo
EAR, NOSE
& THROAT


we do now, we start out with a turning
block of raw materials and we cre-
ate the final product, such as hip


replacement implant,
heart valve, facial and
long bones, and end up
with a great deal of
waste. This means to get
the final result, you may
cut away 90 percent of
the raw material. With
additive manufacturing,
a three-dimensional
product can be made
with a computer and
raw material that is lay-
ered or sprayed to get
the final product, thus
around the material
See Page C4


beach, provide drinking
water so the dog does not
drink salt water
On planes, if your pet is
small enough, keep it in
the cabin with you. Call
ahead because some air-
lines limit animals per
flight. Be prepared to pay a
fee and check on necessary
paperwork.
If your dog must fly as
cargo, note the U.S. De-
partment of Transportation
says short-faced breeds
like pugs and bulldogs die
during air transport at
much higher rates than
other breeds.
If you're boarding your
dog, remember many ken-
nels require proof of vac-
cines such as rabies and
kennel cough.
* LAWNS: Some lawn
products are toxic to dogs
and cats. Weed killers and
herbicides are the worst-
some cause cancer Some
fertilizers are also toxic. All
a dog or cat has to do is
walk on the lawn and lick
its paws to be exposed.
In 2010, the ASPCA Ani-
mal Poison Control Center
received more than 4,000
calls related to garden tox-
ins. These include herbi-
cides, plants (hydrangea,
tulips, azaleas, lilies), insec-


ticides, mushrooms, fertiliz-
ers and cocoa mulch.
* OVERHEATING: Rec-
ognize overheating if you
see it - excessive panting,
difficulty breathing, in-
creased heart and respira-
tory rate, drooling, mild
weakness, seizures, and el-
evated body temperatures
over 104 degrees.
'A lot of dogs will just
keep running until they
drop because they have so
much heart and so much
energy," said Murray "You
have to be proactive."
Animals with flat faces,
like pugs and Persian cats,
are more susceptible to
heat stroke since they can-
not pant as effectively
Sponge the animal with
lukewarm water and seek
veterinary care if you sus-
pect overheating.
* WINDOWS: Murray's
clinic sees two or three
pets a week that have
fallen or jumped from
apartment windows, roofs,
balconies or fire escapes.
Multiple limb fractures or
potentially deadly internal
or brain injuries often re-
sult Use window screens,
open windows from the top
instead of the bottom, con-
sider child-safety window
guards.


Give yourself a break

Summer is upon us. Our kids hammock softly swinging over
are out of school, beginning freshly mown lawn, the cool breeze
the excruciating 10-week rit- tousling my hair, my afternoon ball-
ual of bickering siblings. game on the radio
The cost of staying cool lulling me into a rest-
ramps up as sharply as the ful nap?
temperature and humidity Of the many tradi-
does, draining our bank tions from the last cen-
accounts and zapping our tury relegated to the
energy Anticipating a va- curiosity museums,
cation becomes exhaust- one desperately needs
ing as we race against to be dusted off and re-
deadlines with our lists of inserted into our lives
myriad things to buy and Yvonne Hess - I'm referring to the
things to do before we WALKING concept of rest.
leave. WALKING Countless recent
Where are those blissful THE WALK studies report the
dog-days of summer the same facts over and
old novelists wrote about? over: We are a tired
Where is my glass of fresh people, frustrated, overwhelmed,
squeezed lemonade, my shaded See .Page C4


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


Things

that may

cause

cancer
E ight substances
have been added to
the list of carcino-
gens by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and
Human Services, and
today I want to discuss
these agents. While most
of us will never come into
contact with these sub-
stances, for those who
have, careful observation
could be in order
The "Report of Carcino-
gens" has added formalde-
hyde, aristolochic acids,
o-Nitrotoluene, captafol,
cobalt-tungsten carbide
(in powder or hard metal
form), riddelliine, certain
inhalable glass wool fibers
and styrene to the list of
carcinogens. With these
See Page C5


Dr. Frank
Vascimini
SOUND BITES

Crash

leads to

comparison

I thought I would write
about something a lit-
tle different this week.
Unfortunately, my son was
rear-ended in an accident
this weekend. He had
been staying at a friend's
house and when the crash
happened, he was in the
median coming out of
church.
When he called me, I
could sense he was nerv-
ous. I asked him if he was
OK and if anyone was
hurt Thank God everyone
was fine. He explained
the accident to me and
forwarded me some pho-
tos. He took care of the po-
lice report once FHP
arrived. I was proud of
him and the way he han-
dled things under the cir-
cumstances. I guess all of
mine and Rita's persist-
ence on how to handle


Page C5


"., Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in
Sthe Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to:
" a - * Failed Laser Spine Surgery ft
* Spinal Stenosis
or H. .d r


* Herniate Disc
!- ' * Degenerative Disc Disease
* Scoliosis
- - * Spinal Fractures due to
- Trauma or Osteoporosis

Little to no out of pocket expense
for most Medicare Patients with
secondary insurances.


James J. Ronzo, D.O.
Frank S. Bono, D.O.


Associated Press
This Feb. 26 photo shows a mixed breed dog getting a cooling shower at the Sepulveda Dog Park in the Van Nuys sec-
tion of Los Angeles. By now, everybody has heard a litany of summer dog dos and don't. Don't leave your dog in a hot
car, walk on hot asphalt, play too hard or get too much sun. Take walks early or late, drink lots of water and remem-
ber flea, tick and heartworm medicine.


F;


m


b
-%


k'Im"


f





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Health NOTES


* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule: To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive, call (352)
527-3061. Donors must be at
least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum
of 110 pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to donate.
A photo ID is also required. Visit
www.lifesouth.org for details.
The Lecanto branch office is
at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491) and the In-
verness branch is at 301 W.
Main St. Centers are open from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
and 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
days, and stay open late
Wednesday, until 7 p.m. The
Lecanto center is open from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.
* 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday,
June 21, MidwayAnimal Hospi-
tal, 1635 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
* 2 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, June
21, Walmart, 3826 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesday,
June 22, Walmart Supercenter,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 22, Citrus County
Detention Facility, 2604 W.
Woodland Ridge Drive,
Lecanto.
* 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday,
June 23, Citrus Kia, 1850 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River, $5 gro-
cery gift card.
* 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday,
June 24, Subway, 2639 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness,
free six-inch sub.
* 2:30 to 7 p.m. Friday, June
24, Walmart Supercenter, 2461
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
* Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday,
June 25, American Legion Post
155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
* 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
June 25, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday,
June 26, Walmart, 3826 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 8 a.m. to noon Monday,
June 27, Anytime Fitness, 5723
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa,
drawing for a free three-month
membership.
* 1 to 4 p.m. Monday, June


27, Bealls, 346 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
June 28, Lowe's, 2301 E. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
* Diabetes classes are of-
fered from 9 to 10 a.m. Mon-
days at the Citrus County
Health Department in Lecanto.
Classes are free. No registra-
tion is required. Blood sugar
testing is no longer available
prior to class.
0 Avoiding complications -
June 27.
Call (352) 527-0068 or Carol
Burke, R.D., at (352) 726-5222,
or visit www.citruscountyhealth.
org.
* Free diabetes education
classes, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Friday, at the Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center, 7493 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River, given by Patti Keller,
R.N., BSN, certified diabetes
educator. Limited seating avail-
able; call (352) 564-0444.
* Citrus Memorial Health
System and Publix will host a
free cooking course for dia-
betics from noon to 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 22, in the
Citrus Memorial Auditorium.
"Eating Out the Healthy Way"
will be presented by one of Cit-
rus Memorial's Registered Di-
etitians who will instruct
participants on how to incorpo-
rate healthy selections into their
diabetic meal pattern when
choosing to eat out.
The class will focus on mak-
ing small changes in food
preparation and menu selection
to foster healthier versions of
favorite meals.
Seating is limited, so reser-
vations are required. Call (352)
560-6266 to reserve a seat.
* Jerry Fisher, MSW, will
provide free Memory Screen-
ings on Wednesday, June 22.
Call Wendy Hall, HPH Hospice
community liaison, at (352)
527-4600, to schedule your ap-
pointment. The private session
will last about 10 minutes.
Find more information on the
website alz.org. HPH Hospice
is pleased to partner with the
Alzheimer's Association in Cit-
rus County with special pro-
grams such as this, and
monthly Caregiver Groups. For
details or to schedule an ap-


HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES
* Support group information will list monthly meetings
first, as space is available, then weekly meetings.
* It is the responsibility of each organization to inform
the Chronicle about changes to existing listings.
* To submit information about upcoming seminars,
health-related events open to the public or support
group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline
.com attn: Health Notes; fax (352) 563-5660 or write
to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.
* Information relating to professional training or
seminars attended by those in the health care
industries are considered business briefs, and would
appear in the Business Digest listings of Sunday's
Business section.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call (362)
563-5660 and ask for Cheri Harris. Be prepared to
leave a detailed message with your name, phone
number and the address of the news event.
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions.
* Publication of submitted information or photos on
specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed.


pointment, call (352) 527-4600.
* HOMOSASSA-
"Spouse Loss ... From This
Day Forward" is one program
of a new educational series of-
fered at 2 p.m. the fourth Tues-
day monthly at the Wings
Community Education Center,
8471 W Periwinkle Lane, Ho-
mosassa. "Spouse Loss ...
From This Day Forward" will be
offered at 2 p.m. Tuesday, June
28. Coping with the loss of a
spouse is often one of the diffi-
cult challenges in life, whether
the spouse dies in middle age,
old age or somewhere in be-
tween. The surviving spouse,
now a widow or widower, faces
many challenges in coming to
terms with a life without their
friend and partner.
0 July 26: "An Overview of
Grief and Loss."
*Aug. 23: "Pet Loss ... Say-
ing Goodbye."
The new Wings Education
Center, a program of Hospice
of Citrus County/Hospice of the
Nature Coast provides a variety
of educational programs and
grief support to anyone in the
community at no cost. Reser-
vations are suggested. Call
(352) 527-2020 for more infor-
mation or visit www.hospiceof
citruscounty.org.


* Join the free LifeSharers
program to donate your organs.
Everyone is welcome to join
LifeSharers. There is neither
age requirement nor limit and
parents can enroll their minor
children as well. Pre-existing
medical conditions do not ex-
clude you from becoming a
member. Even if you are al-
ready a registered organ donor,
you can improve your chances
of getting an organ if you ever
need one by joining.
Visit the website to join online
at www.lifesharers.org.
From 5 to 8 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly, Applebee's at
1901 Main St. in Inverness has
"Dining to Donate" - 10 per-
cent of the guests' bill will be
sent to the corporate office of
LifeSharers. A flier must be pre-
sented: email Anna DiPleco at
floridiananna@aol.com (with
the subject Re: LifeSharers) for
a copy of the flier for presenta-
tion. Call DiPleco at (352) 726-
8489 to answer any questions.
* The George A. Dame
Community Health Center
Board Meetings are at 3 p.m.
the first Wednesday monthly at
the Citrus County Health De-
partment, 3700 W. Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, in the first floor
conference room.


* Free cholesterol and dia-
betes screenings from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. July 8 at Winn-Dixie
Pharmacy, 333 Highland Ave.
Space 600, Inverness.
Call Cholestcheck at (800)
713-3301, no appointments.
* SPRING HILL- The
Heart Institute at Oak Hill Hos-
pital offers a monthly Healthy
Hearts education series from
4 to 5:30 p.m. Monday, July 11,
in the cafeteria conference
room at Oak Hill Hospital,
11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill.
Admission is free and com-
plimentary refreshments will be
served. Seating is limited and
reservations are required; go to
www.OakHillHospital.com or
call (352) 628-6060 in Citrus or
(352) 597-6333 in Hernando.
* The Citrus Alliance
Against Adult Abuse (C4A)
monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m.
the second Wednesday
monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545
N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. For information, call Judy
Stauffer at (352) 303-2620.
Your help is needed to protect
our vulnerable against abuse,
neglect and exploitation.

Support GROUPS

* National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, meets at 1 p.m.
the third Tuesday monthly at
the Citrus Resource Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Guest speaker will be
from Seniors vs. Crime.
Call Laura Henderson at
(855) 485-3262.
* The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society Suncoast
Chapter, Cancer Support
Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner
Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no
charge and light refreshments
are provided. Contact: Lourdes
Arvelo, LCSW, patient services
manager, at (813) 963-6461
ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org
or visit The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society website at
www.lls.org.
* Look Good ... Feel
Better, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radiation
or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the


second Wednesday monthly at
the Cancer & Blood Disease
Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday monthly at
the Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call
Joann Brown at 341-7741 or
the American Cancer Society at
(800) 395-5665 to register.
* SPRING HILL - Stroke
Support Group, noon the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Pam McDonald at
(352) 346-6359.
* Celiac support meeting
for all people who have celiac
disease or dermatitis, 10 a.m.
to noon the fourth Saturday
monthly in the Community
Room at the Coastal Region Li-
brary, 8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River. If bringing a
gluten-free snack, provide the
recipe and/or list of ingredients
for people with other allergies.
Call Mary Lou Thomas at (352)
628-9559.
* Fibromyalgia Support
Group meets from 1:30 to 3
p.m. the fourth Saturday
monthly at the organizer's
home in Inverness. Call Ada at
(352) 637-3364.
* Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at (352) 527-2443.
* SPRING HILL--Am-
putee support group, 7 p.m.
the last Monday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Eva Baker at (352)
592-7232.
* Caregivers' Support and
Information meeting, 1 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
St. Timothy Lutheran Church,
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal
River. Call Charlotte Downing
at (352) 422-7044 for direc-
tions/information. Refreshments
served.
* SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/ Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Spring Hill Center,
See Page C3


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Y0040_GHHH18LHHE File & Use 02092011 TMP 6/11


C2 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


HEALTH & LIFE


��Iq





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FDA changes guidelines for cholesterol-lowering drug


Q I heard that tients who have been
* the FDA is taking this dose for 12
* warning about .. months or more and
using high-dose simvas- - have not experienced
tatin (Zocor) to lower any muscle injury. It
cholesterol levels. ,. should not be pre-
What can you tell me i scribed to new patients.
about this? There are also new con-
A: On June 8, the U.S. traindications and dose
Food and Drug Admin- limitations for when
istration (FDA) an- Richard Hoffmann simvastatin is taken
nounced safety label ASK THE with certain other med-
changes for the choles- PHARMACIST ications.
terol-lowering medica- Simvastatin is used
tion simvastatin. The together with diet and
highest approved dose of 80 mil- exercise to reduce the amount of
ligrams (mg) has been associated "bad cholesterol" (low-density
with an elevated risk of muscle in- lipoprotein cholesterol or LDL-C)
jury myopathyy), particularly dur- in the blood. High levels of LDL-C
ing the first 12 months of use. are linked to a higher risk of heart
The FDA recommends simvas- attack, stroke and cardiovascular
tatin 80 mg be used only in pa- death.


In 2010, about 2.1 million pa-
tients in the United States were
prescribed a product containing
simvastatin 80 mg.
The changes to the label for sim-
vastatin-containing medications
are based on the FDAs review of
the results of the seven-year
"Study of the Effectiveness of Ad-
ditional Reductions in Cholesterol
and Homocysteine" clinical trial,
other clinical trial data and analy-
ses of adverse events submitted to
the FDAs Adverse Event Report-
ing System.
All showed that patients taking
simvastatin 80 mg daily had an in-
creased risk of muscle injury com-
pared to patients taking lower
doses of simvastatin or other
station drugs.
The risk of muscle injury is


highest during the first year of
treatment with the 80 mg dose of
simvastatin, and is often the result
of interactions with certain other
medicines, and is frequently asso-
ciated with a genetic predisposi-
tion for simvastatin-related
muscle injury
Simvastatin is sold under the
brand-name Zocor and as a single-
ingredient generic product. It is
also sold in combination with eze-
timibe as Vytorin and in combina-
tion with niacin as Simcor.
The FDA has revised the drug
labels for simvastatin and Vytorin
to include the new 80 mg dosing
restrictions. The agency also re-
vised the labels for simvastatin,
Vytorin and Simcor to include
new dosing recommendations
when these drugs are used with


certain medications that interact
to increase the level of simvastatin
in the body, which can increase
the risk for myopathy
Patients who are unable to ade-
quately lower their level of LDL-C
on simvastatin 40 mg should not
be given the higher 80 mg dose of
simvastatin. Instead, they should
be placed on an alternative LDL-
C-lowering treatmentss.
It should also be noted that pa-
tients should consult with their
physician before discontinuing
any of their medications.
--In--
Richard P Hoffmann, PharmD,
has been a pharmacist formore
than 40years. Send questions to
him at 2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442.


GROUPS
Continued from Page C2

10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building
next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilita-
tor, at (352) 688-7744.
* PINELLAS PARK-
"Connections" fireside-discus-
sion-style support group for
cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly, WellSpring
Oncology, 6600 66th St. N.,
Pinellas Park, (727) 343-0600;
www.wellspringoncology.org.
* Families Against Multiple
Sclerosis Support Group, 11
a.m. the first Saturday monthly
at Sandy Oaks RV Resort,
6760 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, for families,
friends and anyone affected by
MS. Call (352) 422-5868.
* Ocala Peripheral Neu-
ropathy Support Group, 10
a.m. Saturday, July 2, at the
Marion County Sheriff's Brian
Litz Building, 9048 S.W. State
Road 200. Individuals afflicted
with this disease, their family
members and friends are en-
couraged to attend. Anyone in-
terested in learning about
peripheral neuropathy is invited
to attend. Call Jack Koehler at
(352) 861-1630.
Weekly meetings
* Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
0 Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41.
0 Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
* Last ResortAFG: 11:30


a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S. Plea-
sant Grove Road, Inverness.
* Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at
(352) 503-3961.
* Crystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m. Thursday at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Awareness Lunch
Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fri-
days, St. Margaret Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
* Beginners Al-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:


FULL BINGO 4
TILL
VAILABL


SINGLE BINGO
AND
DOUBLE BINGO

WINNER

JEWEL

DUNAWAY


If you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at (352)
621-0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
* AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at (352)
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian support
group meets at 6 p.m. every
Wednesday at Living Waters
Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St.,
Beverly Hills. Call Meg at (352)
527-2443. Free.
* DUNNELLON - Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist Church
of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell
Road. Call the church at (352)
489-2730.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh


TODAY'S




NUMBER




G59


564-2907
TO REPORT A BINGO


St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, 8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
C.R. 491 and S.R. 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: (352) 382-0851.
* Overeaters Anonymous:
* Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the Sen-
ior Center (V.A. building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Dolores at (352) 746-5019.
* Solution, 3 to 4 p.m. Tues-
days at the Lakes Region Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness. Call Marilyn at (352)
726-9112.
* The Refuge, 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at St. Anne's


Citrus DIABETES
Treatment Center


Church, 9870 Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River, in Mary Chapel.
Call Peg at (352) 447-5080.
* The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call
Carolyn at (352) 341-0777.
* The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
(352) 341-0777.
* The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years. Weekly
meeting. Call (352) 637-3196.
* Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at (352) 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Liter-
acy workshops, 9 to 11:45 a.m.


Monday at the Center for Inde-
pendent Living of North Central
Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Lecanto. Call Cathy
Jackson at (352) 527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program, 6
p.m. Tuesday in the fellowship
hall, 88 Civic Circle. Free. Call
the church at (352) 746-3620 or
Meg at (352) 527-2443.
* HPH Hospice presents
free grief support programs,
2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
for anyone who has experi-
enced the sudden loss of a
loved one. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
10:30 a.m. to noon Wednes-
days. Call (352) 344-8111.
See GROUPS/Page C4


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HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 C3


CUM





C4 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


HESS
Continued from Page C1

anxious and sleep-deprived.
Not only are we exhausted,
it's getting worse. In the past
few years, studies show a
widening gap between the
demands of our lives and
our ability to live those lives.
We see clinical data pour-
ing in about how the nega-
tive consequences from our
recent technological ad-
vances are tearing down our
health and tearing up our
relationships. Americans
are struggling with rising in-



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

wasted, which would nor-
mally be 90 percent to per-
haps as little as 10 percent.
But what is more important
is that it could be cus-
tomized to each patient.
Engineers and designers
have been using 3-D print-
ers and computers for more
than 10 years.
This has been, up till now,
mostly for prototypes, and
then we rely on the usual
way of manufacturing,
which is called "subtrac-
tive," because once again
you start out with a big block
of material and reduce it to
the small final product. Not



GROUPS
Continued from Page C3

* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call (352) 503-3262. The
National DBSAAssociation's
number is (800) 826-3632.
* Celebrate Recovery:
* 7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Recov-
ery Fellowship Church, 2242
W. State Road 44. Call (352)
726-2800.
0 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Dinner available be-
fore the meeting from 6 to 7
p.m. for $4 donation and a cof-
fee house after.
Call (352) 746-6200.
* Gulf to Lake Church Min-


cidences of rage and domes-
tic violence. Depression and
anxiety statistics are at
near-epidemic levels. Peo-
ple are reporting sleep dep-
rivation, feelings of
isolation and failure in their
primary relationships.
Many are so overwhelmed
and frustrated they see no
relief from their burdens
and plot to end their lives.
Self-help aisles, websites,
and blogs are full of tech-
niques to manage stress, de-
crease anxiety, improve
mood and balance life's de-
mands. Yoga classes, moti-
vational seminars and
spiritual guides are avail-


only could you have a cus-
tom implant for a patient,
but because of the savings
and less waste, it could ulti-
mately lower the cost and
risk factors.
It all sounds kind of far-
fetched, but think about it.
We are all used to photo-
copiers, which involve one-
dimensional printing.
This is taking it to an en-
tirely different level.
As with many advances in
medicine, its basis comes
from defense and aerospace
research.
The fiber-optic technol-
ogy which I routinely em-
ploy in my office at one time
was only reserved for top se-
cret defense and aerospace
work.
Think about the printing


istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal River.
Dinner at 6 p.m. Friday, fol-
lowed by large- and small-
group time and a Coffee Cafe
at 9. Call 586-4709.
* Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless and
hurting of Citrus County. We
offer referrals to Celebrate Re-
covery, call (352) 563-1860.
* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at (352) 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and co-depen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
Ion. Call Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* SPRING HILL - Parkin-


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When you need
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able to those seeking peace.
As a clinician, I've treated
hundreds of "technique"
failures who have shed hun-
dreds of dollars and hours
attempting to grasp tran-
quility.
Yet they find only emo-
tional bankruptcy as one
method after another fails
to break the cycle.
The answer is not due to a
flawed technique or a
flawed person. It's due to
the lack of personal permis-
sion to change the locus of
control. For instance, if I
feel shame about my inabil-
ity to accomplish my list, it's
extremely difficult to take a


press which was invented in
the 15th century, an ad-
vancement in the printed
word at that time, and think
about the inkjet in your
printer at home, and how it
has advanced things.
We are talking about a
printer that can print three
dimensional objects in
nylon, stainless steel, plastic
or titanium. They can actu-
ally take titanium dust and
layer it, and then solidify it
in the required pattern that
is needed.
Think about this concept
for a moment: You fall and
break your hip, you go to the
hospital, and they do scan-
ning and imaging of your
leg, and take this informa-
tion, plug it into a computer,
and your implant does not


son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at (352) 346-8864.

Organizations
* First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that run
on a monthly basis. All groups
are open to the public and free
of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in
Room 203 in the Administration
Building:


break. My shame will drive
me ever on to more and
more tasks in an attempt to
overcome my previous fail-
ures. My shame grows with
each task because my obli-
gations demand perfection,
which ensures failure. It be-
comes impossible for me to
give myself permission to do
anything (internal locus of
control) because my list re-
quires me to perform (exter-
nal locus of control).
As long as my list is my
priority, and I continue to
view myself as a failure, I
don't have the ability to
grant myself any rest.
There is a saying: "If you


come off of the shelf size
small, medium or large; in-
stead, it is manufactured to
the exact specifications of
the bone that was damaged.
This means that your im-
plant is likely going to work
better, last longer and less
likely to cause you prob-
lems.
Another obvious benefit
of additive manufacturing is
that, compared to subtrac-
tive manufacturing, the part
that is being made can be
lighter, yet stronger For ex-
ample, our leg bone, which
is called the "femur," is
shaped differently at differ-
ent points.
The density and the stiff-
ness also is different, all of
which could be reproduced
in detail using computer


* First Monday: diabetic
support group.
* Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia care-
givers support group.
* Fourth Monday: stroke
survivors support group.
* Memory Lane Respite of-
fered weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia. Anyone
bringing a loved one for the first
time is encouraged to come
early to fill out information
forms. Call (352) 628-4083 for
meeting dates.
See GROUPS/Page C5


don't own your life, some-
one will steal it from you."
If I place my burdens in
charge of my life, they've
taken it. Since I don't own it,
I can't make decisions about
it and will fail every time I
try to exert control - hence,
the "technique" failures.
Taking back control is a
process that addresses
every item one at a time,
evaluating it, and re-decid-
ing its place and priority in
one's life.
Begin by practicing the
process of granting personal
permission to build restful,
peace-filled moments in
daily life, making them a


driven 3-D printers. Besides
being a customized product,
digital productions will also
keep the costs down, which
will stimulate further re-
search and development,
and newer products will
evolve faster.
We probably will see the
days when a manufac-
turer/producer will not have
to make thousands or hun-
dreds of thousands of items
to cover their costs of re-
search and development.
That will lead to greater
competition and success,
and more choices for us.
The future for this tech-
nology and process seems
limitless.
We may see the day when
body parts are manufac-
tured on a 3-D printer in the


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

priority and demoting the
obligations to a more
healthy rank.

Yvonne Hess is a Licensed
Marriage and Family
Therapist (LMFT) and a
Certified Addictions
Professional (CAP) with an
International Certification
as an Alcohol and Drug
Counselor (ICADC) who
works for the Citrus County
Health Department's
PhoenixProgram. She can
be reached at (352)
527-0068, ext. 272, or
yvonnehess@
doh.state.fl. us.


hospital, to be implanted
without being manufac-
tured in a factory or lab, and
shipped via FedEx to the
operating room to be im-
planted.
This could very well be
the next great industrial
revolution finding that is
going to benefit medicine
and health care.
The preceding article was
put together from informa-
tion in the Feb. 12, 2011,
issue of The Economist
magazine.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River
Call him at (352) 795-0011
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

additions, we now have 240
carcinogens on the list.
The "Report on Carcino-
gens" is prepared each year
for the HHS Secretary, and
it is a congressionally man-
dated document.
It identifies substances,
agents, mixtures or expo-
sures that are known to be
human carcinogens or
those reasonably antici-
pated to be human
carcinogens.
A substance included in
the list in this report does
not in itself mean it causes
cancer, but it may be one of
many factors that cause
cancer, including how long
the human is exposed and a
person's susceptibility to a
particular substance.
So, with the addition of
these eight substances, let's
look at each individually
* The first is the group
called aristolochic acids.
Studies have shown that
people with kidney disease
who consumed botanical
products containing aris-
tolochic acids were found to
have a higher risk of devel-
oping bladder and kidney
cancer.
Some plant species natu-
rally have amounts of aris-
tolochic acids in them.
Even though the Food
and Drug Administration in
2001 recommended people
stop using any botanical
products with aristolochic
acids in them, they are still
for sale online and abroad.
Several herbal products
contain aristolochic acids,
such as those for the treat-
ment of inflammation, gout
and arthritis.
You should avoid prod-
ucts with the words "Aris-
tolochia," "Bragantia" or
"Asarum" listed as ingredi-
ents on the label, or any of




VASCIMINI
Continued from Page C1

things in difficult circum-
stances paid off.
The main reason for
telling you this is to discuss
how similar car insurance is
to dental insurance. I've al-
ways known how difficult
dental insurance could be,
but this experience with car
insurance was an education.
I quickly took the truck to
the repair shop at a local
dealership Monday morning
to get the ball rolling. They
took a look at the truck and
gave me an estimate.
Later that day, I got a call
from the other person's in-
surance company They ex-
plained I needed to take it
to their estimator for an es-
timate. I went to them and
they wrote an estimate and
gave me a check. Needless
to say, there was approxi-
mately $1,000 difference be-
tween the two.
As you might have
guessed, the dealership's es-
timate was the higher of the
two. They, of course, told me
it was only an estimate and
just a starting point. As you
might imagine, I felt uneasy
When I took the estimate
back to the dealership, they
explained this is just the
way it works, saying, "It will
all be fine." Because I have
dealt with this dealership
before, I trust them.
Through all of this, I could
not help but think about
how similar this is to dental
insurance. You pay the pre-
miums and then, somehow,
you get less than you ever
thought. Plus, they make
you jump through all these
hoops just to get what
should be coming to you
anyway
I can't tell you how many
times I will write letters to
try and get my patients what
they are due. Sometimes it
works and sometimes it
doesn't. I hope it works for


me this time and, "It will all
be fine."
Frankie, you did a great
job handling yourself. What
better day to be writing this
than Father's Day Frankie
and Anthony, you are great
kids and I love you both.
Thanks for making me a
proud father.


Dr Frank Vascimini is a
Homosassa dentist. Send
your questions to 4805 S.
SuncoastBlvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446 or
email them to him at
info@masterpiecedental
studio.com.


the products found to con-
tain aristolochic acid.
* Second is formalde-
hyde. We have long been
concerned about formalde-
hyde, ever since it was
found to cause nasal cancer
in laboratory rats.
There is now compelling
evidence from human stud-
ies to demonstrate that peo-
ple with higher exposure to
formaldehyde have a
greater risk of developing
cancer of the nasal and
sinus region, as well as
myeloid leukemia.
It is a colorless, flamma-
ble, pungent chemical that
is extensively used to make
resins for composite wood
products, synthetic fibers,
textile finishes and paper
product coatings.
It is also used as a pre-
servative in mortuaries,
medical laboratories, some
hair-straightening products
and other consumer goods.
* Third is a chemical
called captafol. Captafol is
a fungicide used to protect
fruits, vegetables, ornamen-
tal plants and grasses.
This fungicide was
banned by the FDA in 1999,
so none of us have access to
it today, nor do we have a
risk of being exposed to it,
but for those individuals
who may have been ex-
posed in the past, careful
follow-up with your physi-
cian is in order.
In laboratory experi-
ments, captafol was found


to cause tumors to develop
at several different tissue
sites in mice and rats.
* Fourth is a metal:
cobalt-tungsten carbide in
powder and hard metal
form.
Cobalt-tungsten carbide
is used to make dies, cutting
and grinding tools, and
wear-resistant products for
several industries. Cobalt-
tungsten hard metals are
often referred to as ce-
mented or sintered car-
bides in the U.S.
Those exposed to this
metal due to work in indus-
trial settings should be
aware of the risk.
* Fifth on the list - some
kinds of inhalable glass
wool fibers. Now, not all
glass wool fibers are a risk,
and the HHS Secretary
stresses only some glass
wool and man-made fibers
were included in the list of
carcinogens. The only ones
that are concerning are
those that can easily enter
the respiratory tract and
stay in the lungs for a long
time.
There are two main cate-
gories of glass wool fibers,
as far as consumers are
concerned, that should be
avoided.
They are low-cost, gen-
eral purpose fibers, mainly
glass wool used for home
and building insulation,
and those known as special
purpose or premium fibers.
* Sixth on the list is o-Ni-


0007W9A


trotoluene. This chemical is
used when preparing azo
dyes and some other dyes,
including magenta and sev-
eral sulfur dyes for paper,
leather, silk, wool and cot-
ton. O-Nitrotoluene is also
used in agricultural chemi-
cals, pesticides, petrochem-
icals, rubber chemicals,
explosives and pharmaceu-
ticals.
Those exposed to o-Ni-
trotoluene are susceptible
to exposure by breathing it
in or through the skin dur-
ing production and use.
This substance has also
been found in water and
near ammunitions facili-
ties, as well as near military
training facilities.
* Seventh on the list is
styrene. Styrene is a syn-
thetic chemical used world-
wide in the manufacturing
of plastics, insulation, fiber-
glass, pipes, food contain-
ers, carpet backing and car
parts.
Human exposure can
occur by inhaling styrene
from tobacco smoke, build-
ing materials and other
products.
Limited evidence points
to a higher risk of lym-
phomas and leukemias
among workers exposed to
styrene.
* Last but not least, and
please pay attention to the
spelling, is Riddelliine.
If you were not paying at-
tention, you may think I am
writing about Ritalin, a


medicine used to treat
ADHD.
This is not that medica-
tion.
Riddelliine is classified
as a botanical, and those ex-
posed to it are considered
to be at a higher risk of de-
veloping liver cancer, lung
cancer and leukemia.
Riddelliine is found in
some plants of the genus
Senecio, which is a member
of the daisy family, and
grows in sandy areas in the
western U.S. Examples of
plants include groundsel
and ragwort.
At least 13 Senecio
species have been detected
in herbal medications.
Human exposure can occur
by consuming teas, honey,
herbal medications or foods
from animals that have
been fed on the plants.
Pay attention to labels of
any preparations that may
contain this botanical and
avoid exposure to it


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit
of the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board ofDirectors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American Cancer Society
Contact him at 522 N
Lecanto Highway Lecanto,
FL 34461 or email
cjbennett@rboi. com.


HEALTH & LIFE


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Center, Jodi MS
Davis, JoanieAuD
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 11, Crystal River
...................................... . ..........795-5377
CARDIOLOGY
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
Delfin, Luis MD FACC
Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC
Govindarajan, Balachander MD FACC
Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
Savage, Kenneth L. MD
Sieving, Richard R. MD FACC
Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
Upadya, Shrikanth P.Y. MD FACC
Walker, Dennis J. MD
Yelamanchi, Vishnu P. MD FACC
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
........................................ ............... 7 9 5 -4 16 5
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.795-4165
.......................................................795-4 165
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
... . ... . .... .... ... ........ .... .. .. ...... . 72 6-8 35 3
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
........................................ ... 726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
. ........................................ 352-31 5-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter
Professional Plaza, The Villages
................................................. 352-751 -3356
CHIROPRACTIC
INVERNESS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Carter, James C. DC PA
2202 State Road 44 W., Inverness
............ ... ... ............................ 726-4441
DENTAL
CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS
Holland, Edwin DDS
Pichardo, Edgar L. DMD
2231 State Road 44 W., Unit 101, Inverness
...................................... . ..........726-5854
CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES
Christian, III, Cephas N. DDS PA
2460 N. EssexAve., Hernando
............... ............... .... ..............5 2 7 -16 14
LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
3644 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.........................................................628-3443
MEADOWCREST PERSONALIZED
DENTAL CARE
Linda Witherow, DDS
Patel, Jayraj J. DMD
6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
.................................... . ...... .....795-5935


DENTAL

SMILES AT CITRUS & 5TH
Dahman Mouhammad, DDS
535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
........................................ ..... ..... 795-1881

TIMBERLANE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
1972 N. Future Terrace, Lecanto
.........................................................746-9 111

Hany Williams, DMD, PA
4361 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..........................................................628-7788

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

PET/CT SERVICES OF FLORIDA
Beverly Hills Medical Park
3404 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills
..................................... . ....... ... 74 6 -68 88

FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE
INVERNESS FAMILY PRACTICE
Figueroa, Pablo MD
2222 State Road 44 W., Inverness
...................................... . ..... ..... 860-0633

SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD
Navarro, Catherine MD
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
Villacastin, Alexandrea T.ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
........................................... 352-489-2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.........................................................3 8 2 -8 2 8 2
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness
.................................... . ....... ... 3 4 1-5 5 2 0

HEARING EXAMS/HEARING AIDS

AUDIBEL HEARING AID CENTERS
Pruett, Daniel HAS
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................. 352-621 -8000
2036 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness
.................................................352-586-7599
2400 S.W. College Rd., Suite 206, West
Ocala
........................................ 352-873-0034
918 Rolling Acres Rd., #3, Lady Lake
.......................................... 352-750-2005
910 Old Camp Road, #182, The Villages
.................................................352-259-5234

FATHER & SONS HEARING AID CENTERS
Jason Thorneburg
Roger Thorneburg
2240 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
................................................352-860-1100
3944 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Springs
......................................... 352-628-9909
Crystal River Mall, (Next to JC Penny)
.................................................352-564-8000

PROFESSIONAL HEARING CENTER
Dingier, Denny M. DIV. BC-HIS ACA
211 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
..................................... . ....... ... 7 26 -4 3 27

HOME HEALTH SERVICES

COMFORT KEEPERS
2244 State Road 44 W., Inverness
..................................... . ....... ... 7 26 -4 54 7

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
................................ ........... ... 249-1257

S.E.T. HOME HEALTH
8016 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
.........................................................564-2738
SENIOR HOME CARE
494 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
..................................... . ....... ... 3 4 4 -0 15 0

HOSPITALS

BROOKSVILLE REGIONAL HOSPITAL
17240 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
......................................... ......35 2-7 96 -5 111


HOSPITALS

CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
......................................... .. .... 7 2 6 -15 5 1

MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala
......................................... 352-351-7200
OAK HILL HOSPITAL
11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................352-628-6441
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
.................................. .... ...... .....79 5-6 56 0

INDEPENDENT LIVING

INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR APARTMENTS
518 Ella Ave., Inverness
................................. .... ....... ....34 4 -84 7 7

MASTECTOMY APPAREL

Connie's Mastectomy Boutique
430 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River
........................................ ..... .... 795-5223

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING

Purdy, Cyndie Ford LMHC NCC
MAC SAP SAE
470 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
.........................................................34 1-0435

NURSING HOMES

DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH
& REHABILITATION
2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
.........................................................74 6-9500

WOODLAND TERRACE OF CITRUS
COUNTY INC.
124 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
........................................ ...............24 9-3 100

ONCOLOGY-HEMATOLOGY

ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett, C. Joseph MD
Brant, TimothyA. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
605 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
... . ..... ............... ........... ....... ...726-3400
522 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................ ...... ...........527-0 106

OPHTHALMOLOGY

WARD EYE CENTER & OPTICAL
Ward, H. Christopher DO
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa
................................. .... ....... ....62 8-0 12 3

OPTICAL/OPTICAL GOODS

MEZMEREYES AT OPTICAL EXPRESS
Fosen, Bruce OD
Fialko, Hilda LDO
631 N. Citrus Ave, Ste. C, Crystal River
........................................ ..............795-2020

OPTOMETRY

CITRUS VISION CLINIC - CITRUS OPTICAL
Harless, Heather A. OD
Nothnagel, Victor T OD
2332 State Road 44 W., Inverness
.......... ... ...... .... ......... ......7 26 -20 85

SUNCOAST EYE CENTER
Kaplan, George H. OD
221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River
........... .... ..........................79 5-2 52 6

WEST COAST EYE INSTITUTE
Coppedge, Amanda OD
Howard, Julie B. OD
240 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................. .... ....... ....74 6-2 24 6


ORTHOPEDIC/SPORTS MEDICINE

THE CENTER FOR BONE
AND JOINT DISEASE
11307 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
...................................... . (352) 596-0900

GULFCOAST SPINE INSTITUTE
Bono, Frank S. DO
Ronzo, James J. DO
2300 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Hernando
......... .................... ........... ...... 341-4 778

NATURE COAST ORTHOPAEDICS &
SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC
Choung, Walter I. MD
Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO
2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills
.......................................................74 6 -5 7 0 7
520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River
.......................................................5 6 4 -2 6 6 3
2236 State Road 44 W., Inverness
.......................................................34 4 -2 6 6 3

SEVEN RIVERS ORTHOPAEDICS
AND SPORTS MEDICINE, PA
10495 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................... ...................... 352-465-5663

PEDIATRICS

ALL CHILDREN'S SERTOMA THERAPY
CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY-
PEDIATRIC CARE
538 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
........................................................74 6 -3 3 0 0

PHARMACIES

B&W REXALL DRUGS
214 WS Hwy. 41 S., Inverness
........................................................ 7 2 6 -1 0 2 1

PODIATRY

ADVANCED ANKLE AND
FOOT CENTERS OF FLORIDA
Raynor, David B. DPM
490 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness
.................................... ........ ..7 2 6 -3 6 6 8

REHABILITATION HOSPITALS

HEALTHSOUTH REHABILITATION
HOSPITAL OF SPRING HILL
12440 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................352-592-4250

SUPPORT GROUPS

HPH HOSPICE
Adult Bereavement
Caregiver Support Groups
Children Bereavement
........... ......................................5274 600
SURGERY
Mohammadbhoy, Adnan DO PA
11535 W. Emerald Oaks Drive, Crystal River
..........................................................79 4 -6 0 5 6

PREMIER VEIN CENTER
Sharma, Ravi MD
7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
....................................................... 6 2 1-0 7 7 7
UROLOGY
ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett, C. Joseph MD
Brant, Timothy A. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
605 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.... ............................ ......... .... 726-3400
522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
..................................... ....... ....5 2 7 -0 10 6

WHEELCHAIRS/SCOOTERS

MR. MOBILITY/MRS. MOBILITY
3221 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
.................................... ........ ..6 3 7 -6 0 8 8
11163 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill
...............................................352-666-3006


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 C5


GROUPS
Continued from Page C4

* Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities. Sup-
port group meetings are usually
in the CMHS Administration
Building.
Visit the website at
http://www.citrusmh.com/
community/support-groups/ for
details.
* Hospice of Citrus
County support groups. Free,
but reservations suggested.
Call Jonathan Beard at (352)
527-2020; website: www.
hospiceofcitruscounty.org to
see all groups.
* Caregiver support group, 1
p.m. second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Citrus County
Community Center, 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Call Mary Williams at (352)
527-2020.
* Newly Bereaved Work-
shop, 1 p.m. Thursday at the
Hospice of Citrus County Clini-
cal Office, 326 S. Line Ave.,
Inverness.
* LIFT (Living Information
For Today) luncheon, 11:30
a.m. the third Tuesday monthly.
LIFT provides social support to
widows and widowers through
outings and luncheons. Call
(352) 527-2348, ext. 1507.







Page C6 -Tuesday, June 21, 2011



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


June 21
Americans United for Sep-
aration of Church and State
(Nature Coast Chapter) will
meet at 4 p.m. June 21, at
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness. The
public is welcome to attend.
For information, call Mara
at (352) 726-9112 or email
Naturecoastau@hotmail.
com.
Senior friends
schedules lunch
Senior Friends for Life will
have one more monthly activ-
ities in June.
It will be June 21. The
group will visit to Stump-
knockers on State Road 200
at 4 p.m. The group will order
from the menu. It will be a
special time for one of our
members celebrating her
101st birthday.
Reservations required at
least two days before each
event.
Call Myrna Hocking at
(352) 860-0819, Astrid Grant
at (352) 341-0346 or Jackie
Bouyea at (352) 527-6929.
Sugar Babes Doll
Club to gather
Sugar Babes Doll Club will
meet at 10:30 a.m. Wednes-
day, June 22, at the Central
Community Center, Room
115. This facility is off County
Road 491 behind Diamond
Ridge Health & Rehabilitation
Center. The meeting will be
followed by lunch in the cen-
ter's cafeteria.
The June program will be
presented by Teddi Rusnak,
a member who loves Ginnys.
This is Part II of her presenta-
tion on Ginnys; she will con-
centrate on Jill and Jan. Any
member who has Ginnys is
welcome to share them.
The will be no meeting in
July; the next meeting will be
Aug. 24.
Visitors and all who share
an interest in this hobby are
welcome. Call Laurie at (352)
382-2299 or Barbara at (352)
344-1423. Sugar Babes Doll
Club is a member of the
United Federation of Doll
Clubs.
Retired nurses
begin meetings
Citrus Marion Chapter of
the Florida Society of Regis-
tered Nurses, Retired, will
begin summer meetings to
plan next year's programs.
Members will meet for lunch
at 1 p.m. the fourth Monday in
June, July and August at The
Preserve at Spruce Creek,
Sandwedge Restaurant.
All interested members are
welcome to attend.

CentralFlorida
PET RESCUE

Nameless


Coursefrom

10a.m. to

noon today

Special to the Chronicle

Bewildered, befuddled,
or bemused by computers
and technology? Then head
to your library During Tech
Help Tuesdays from now


through June, several li-
brary branches will offer
one-on-one technology help
sessions.
Tech Help Tuesdays are
offered at the following
dates and locations:
* Third Tuesday - 10
a.m. to noon at Lakes Re-
gion Library, Inverness.
* Fourth Tuesday - 1 to 3
p.m. at Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills.
Still not sure how to use
that new Kindle or Nook the


grandkids bought you for
Christmas? No luck making
sense of your laptop? Want
to learn how to manage your
mp3 player or iPod?
If you have questions, the
library's tech staff and vol-
unteers have answers. At-
tendees are encouraged to
bring their portable devices,
such as laptops, iPads,
tablets, e-readers, cameras,
or other digital devices, for
a hands-on learning experi-
ence.


All devices or laptops
must be in working condi-
tion.
The programs are free
and open to the public. For
persons with special needs
requiring reasonable ac-
commodation, contact a li-
brary at least two working
days prior to the program.
For the deaf or hearing im-
paired, TTY lines are avail-
able at all libraries or call
the Florida Relay Service at
(800) 955-8771.


Military officers' convention


Special to the Chronicle
The Military Officers Association of America is an advocacy group comprised of active, retired and former commissioned
officers of all of America's uniformed services: Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard, Public Health Service and the
National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. With some 370,000 members nationally, Florida has 41
chapters. This year, the Florida Council of Chapters had its 34th annual convention at sea onboard the Royal Caribbean
cruise ship Freedom of the Seas. Business meetings and workshops were conducted while the ship was at sea between
port visits to Coco Cay, St. Thomas and St. Maarten. Attendees from Citrus County Chapter, from left, are: Michael Melvin,
Army Col. Sharon Richie-Melvin, Navy Capt. Tim Holme, Joy Holme, Pat Green, Army Col. Tom Green, AUS Col. Marge Blunk
and Navy RADM Mac McLeod. For information about MOAA and Citrus County Chapter, visit the website at
www.citruscountymoaa.org.



Members of Leadership Citrus wrap up active year


Special to the Chronicle

Leadership Citrus 2011 redefined
the phrase "well-oiled engine" May
7 when the class converged on the
Family Resource Center in Her-
nando. As their class project, mem-
bers chose the new building the
Resource Center received from the
disbanded Hernando Civic Club.
Ginger West, director of the Re-
source Center was thrilled as she
watched them go to work.
Projects the class completed in-
cluded trimming bushes and
mulching the beds in front of the
building. They weeded and mulched
the flowerbed area under the sign,
painted the sign poles, and repaired
a downspout. An area 24 feet square
was fenced that will house a bicycle
repair shop, a fence was placed to
provide privacy for both the clients


Special to the Chronicle
Members of Leadership Citrus 2011
setting a pole for the 24-foot-square
bicycle repair area, from left, are: Jan-
ice Saltmarsh, John Maisel and
Melissa Bowermaster.


of the Resource Center and the
neighboring homes and a fence went
up around the AC unit. All of the
fences received a fresh coat of stain
and several tables and a rocking
chair after sanding received a fresh
coat of polyurethane. They created a
mulched picnic area behind the cen-
ter and lockers donated to the center
were painted and moved into place.
Class members also donated an en-
tire truckload of clothing, food, a
computer and bicycles to the Re-
source Center
The class was tired at days end,
but pleased to have helped such a
valuable asset in the community. In
all, 15 volunteers donated 120 hours
to see the job done. If you are inter-
ested in becoming part of Leader-
ship Citrus 2012, call Gailen Spinka
for more information at (352)
697-2288.


s NOTES Libraries teach tech help
Ground to meet


Concert honors veterans, servicemen and -women


Special to the Chronicle
"Name your puppy!" I am a
5-month-old pure Pomeran-
ian F. sable puppy with the
sweetest personality. I
have been donated to help
raise money for the older
dogs' vet bills for $250. I
will be spayed, vaccinated,
chipped, leash- and crate-
trained. I have four white
feet and started potty
training. See me and
friends at a Humane
Society of Central Florida
Pet Rescue Inc.'s adoption
in Pet Supermarket,
Inverness, from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturdays. Visit
www.AHumaneSociety
PetRescue.com; Helping
to re-home small dogs and
Doberman Pinschers. Call
(352) 527-9050.


How very blessed we are in
Citrus County to have the
dedicated leadership of
Deb Allen, director of the Sugarmill
Chorale. Each year, we are treated
to some of the finest entertainment
around. This year's "Patriotic Cele-
bration: Made in the USA' was out-
standing. In this sixth season, the
concert honored veterans and those
now serving in the armed forces.
In addition, we were treated to a
historical retrospective of the 200-plus
years that we have been singing songs
about our beloved country and those
who have served to keep us free.
Veteran members of the chorale
introduced the various patriotic se-
lections. The Junior ROTC from
Lecanto High School presented the
colors.
Marty Bachthaler served as the
accompanist Aptly described as the
heart of the chorale by director
Allen, he has thrilled audiences
through the years with his endear-
ing style that memories are made
of, time after time.
This -the chorale's historic 33rd
performance - was an astounding
array of patriotic selections begin-


ning with "The Star
Spangled Banner" fea-
turing Frank Pifer, Lt.
Col. U.S. Army, with Deb
Allen, vocalist, and An-
gela Metcalf, interpreter
We heard "Give Me
Your Tired, Your Poor,"
"You're a Grand Old
Flag," "This is My Coun-
try" and "Let There Be Ruth:
Peace on Earth." In AROUI
memory of his sister, Mil- COMm
lie Heinz, Marty
Bachthaler's "America
The Beautiful" was soundly ap-
plauded by fans. Rick Harris di-
rected the Armed Forces Salute as
veterans of the various branches
stood and were recognized for serv-
ice to the country
After the intermission, we were
invited to sing along in celebration
of American music. This was fol-
lowed by a New Orleans set, a rock
'n' roll medley, a "Back to Country"
set, leading up to my personal fa-
vorite grouping, "Give My Regards
to Broadway," which evoked nostal-
gic memories of America's finest
hours along the Great White Way,


L
N
at


including "South Pa-
cific," "Oklahoma,"
"Gigi," "Cabaret," "Jesus
Christ Superstar" and
"Annie" selections.
SFrom the greeting at
Curtis Peterson Audito-
rium's outer door by Lin
Tomkins, dressed in a
bright red polka-dot
.evins dress trimmed in white
ID THE lace and her signature
UNITY hat with the dangling
price tag as Minnie
Pearl, to the triumphant
finale, "God Bless America" and
"America The Beautiful," it was
solid entertainment and we ap-
plaud the 40-plus members of the
chorale for continuing this legacy of
music for a most grateful audience.
Sponsored by the Citrus County
Chronicle, director Allen prompted
us to tap our feet and sing along to
the songs we love to hear
We could almost picture James
Cagney when the chorale sang,
"You're A Grand Old Flag" from his
hit movie, "Yankee Doodle Dandy"
Memories of dancing the boogie
woogie came alive as they sang,


"Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" "Let
There Be Peace on Earth" re-
minded me of FFWC (Florida Fed-
eration of Woman's Clubs) annual
conventions. At the close of each
convention, we join hands and sing
"Let There be Peace on Earth." An-
gela Metcalfe performed an inter-
pretive signing for this piece.
Words are unnecessary when
Bachthaler sits down with the
ivories, for he said it best, "I'll talk
with my fingers." And did he ever!
As fun-loving director Allen bade
us goodbye with "See You In Sep-
tember," reminding prospective
new members to audition, we stood
in admiration and applauded the
Sugarmill Chorale.
Favored with "The William Tell
Overture," with voices instead of in-
struments as the chorale's encore,
we exited the hall having been roy-
ally entertained.


Ruth Levins participates in a variety
ofprojects around the community
Let her know aboutyourgroup's up-
coming activities by writing to PO.
Box 803, Crystal River FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. 0 Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at (352) 563-3280; or e-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed, community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


News NOTES

'Book' a trip
at the library
Venture to faraway cities
and leam about different cul-
tures by traveling only as far as
the Floral City Public Library.
This summer, the library
will present a new program,
Armchair Travel. The first ad-
venture whisks participants
away to China during Arm-
chair Travel from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. Thursday, June 23.
Travel guides for the trip
are Holly and Justin Schuster
and Linda and Dennis Rei-
land. The Schusters recently
returned from a year in China
as high school teachers and
will share their experiences.
The Reilands will divulge tid-
bits about the Great Wall
from their travels.
In addition, a variety of fic-
tion, memoirs and travel liter-
ature selections will be
available to check out so par-
ticipants can experience an
armchair traveling adventure
from the comfort of home.
For information, call the
Floral City Public Library at
(352) 726-3671.
CMUG to offer
software classes
Citrus Macintosh Users
Group will offer a class in
Keynote, the presentation
software included in the
iWork suite of applications,
and in NeoOffice, open
source office software for the
Mac, during July.
Keynote is scheduled for 1
to 5 p.m. Thursday, June 23,
and NeoOffice is slated for 6
to 9 p.m. Monday, June 27.
Cost is $10, single member-
ship; $15, family member-
ship; and $20, nonmember.
For more detailed informa-
tion about the classes, visit
cmugonline.com and click on
the News and Events button.
The club will meet at 7
p.m. Thursday, June 23.
There is a question-and-an-
swer session at 6:30 p.m.
Classes and the meeting
will be in Classroom 103,
Building C4 at CF Citrus
Campus in Lecanto.
For information, contact
Alan Wentzell, president, at
cmugpres@gmail.com or
(352) 220-6158.
Golf tournament
for Deputy Dogs
The public is invited to at-
tend the second annual
Deputy Dogs/Kody Snodgrass
memorial foundation golf tour-
nament at 7:30 a.m. Saturday,
June 25, at El Diablo Golf &
Country Club, Citrus Springs.
The cost for the event is
$75 per person which in-
cludes cart and greens fee,
lunch, door prizes and much
more. There's a 50/50 putting
contest and a chance draw-
ing for a Sony 46-inch HD TV.
For information, call Doug
Sidwell at (352) 302-9538 or
go to www.deputydogs.org.








TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 21, 2011 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
[WESH) NBC 0 19 19 19 News Nightly News Entertainment Access Hollyw'd America's Got Talent (N)'PG' The Voice The eight remaining vocalists face off. (N)'PG' x News JayLeno
SBBC World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) History Detectives Airplane engine A Cemetery Secial Graveyards Frontline Ponzi scheme by Bernard POV Sixteen pastry chefs compete
NWE PBS F 3 3 14 6 America Report (N) xc parts; Civil War cannon.'G' c across the U.S hold artwork.'G' Madoff.'PG' (DVS) for award. (In Stereo)'PG'c
[WUFT) PBS 0 5 5 5 5 16 World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) s History Detectives 'G's Frontline "The Madoff Affair"'PG' POV Sixteen pastry chefs compete for award.'PG' Tavis Smiley (N)
SNBC D 8 NewsChannel 8 NBC Nihtly Entertainment Extra (N)'PG'x America's Got Talent Hopefuls audi- The Voice "The Semi-Finals"The eight remaining vocalists face off. (N) (In NewsChannel 8 Tonight Show
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W V ABC 0 20 20 20 20 at6 (N) 'G' 'G'x sPreview of summer stunts. (N) "You Fuse, You Lose" a at Kandahar Airfield. a at11PM 'G '
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W CBS 10 10 10 10 10 10 News/Pelley death may be one in a series.'PG' from the autopsy room.'14' social networking site.'14' X (N) David Letterman
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WFT ABC j 11 11 11 at 6 PM 'G' a 'G' a Preview of summer stunts. (N) "You Fuse, You Lose" a at Kandahar Airfield. a at 11 PM 'G '
WM IND f 12 12 Family Guy '14' s Family Guy '14' s How I MetYour The Office "The Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Frasier"Rivals" Frasier"Crane vs. How I MetYour The Office'PG' c South Park South Park'14' s
(WM IND E 12 12 Mother'14' Client"'14' Murdered transsexual.'14' x 'PG' Crane"'PG' Mother'PG' 'MA'c
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[WiCx) TBN D 21 21 21 The Faith Show The 700 Club'PG' Pastor Babers Power of Praise Manna-Fest'G' Jewish Voice Paid Program Claud Bowers Tims Ministries
,wjD The King of The King of Two and a Half Two and a Half One Tree Hill Chase learns a secret Hellcats The team lets Dan direct its According to Jim George Lopez Friends'14' s Friends 'PG' s
WTO CW ) 4 4 4 4 12 12ueens PG' Queens'PG' Men'14' E Men'14' E about Alex.'PG' a bid video. (In Stereo) 'PG' a 'PG' a 'PG' a
Junkd Car Talk with YourCitrus Every Day is a Every Mnute Counts GrandviewChurch Cmoke&Chase My Family TV Movie
(WYKE) FAM iD 16 16 16 16 Chad County Court Gift Loca health.
(WOGX) FOX 9 13 13 7 7 TMZ(N)'PG' My Name Is Earl TheSimpsons The Simpsons MasterChef (N)'PG'x Raising Hope |Raising Hope FOX 35 News at 10 xc TMZ'PG'x King of the Hill
(WVEA) UNI ( 15 15 15 15 15 15 Noticias Noticiero Univ Cuando Me Enamoro (N)'14' Teresa (N) '14'(SS) Triunfo del Amor (N)'14'(SS) Noticias Noticiero Univ
WXI) ION 17 Without a Trace "Trip Box"'PG' Without a Trace 'PG' Without a Trace '14' a Criminal Minds "Revelations"'14' Criminal Minds 'PG' Criminal Minds "Distress"'PG'
E) 54 48 54 54 25 27 The First 48'14' The First 48'14' Storage Wars StorageWars Storage Wars StorageWars Family Jewels Family Jewels Family Jewels Family Jewels
hAi 55 64 55 55 ** "Conan the Destroyer" (1984) Arnold Schwarzenegger.'PG' X ** "Rambo:First BloodPart/ "(1985) Sylvester Stallone.'R' X ** "Rambo: First Blood Part 11"(1985) Sylvester Stallone.'R' a
CANI 52 35 52 52 19 21 Day of the Shark'PG, V' I'm Alive "Trial by Fire"'PG' c Planet Earth "Caves"'G'a | Croc Keeper (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' Rocky Mountain Gators'PG' Planet Earth "Caves"'G' a
(BETI 96 19 96 96 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live'PG' **', "Romeo Must Die"(2000, Action) Jet Li, Aaliyah, Isaiah Washington.'R' Family Affair Family Affair The Mo'Nique Show'14' a
BRAVO 254 51 254 254 Million Dollar Decorators'14' Platinum Hit "Rap Heroes"'14' Housewives/OC Housewives/NJ Million Dollar Decorators (N)'14' Million Dollar Decorators '14'
CC 27 61 27 27 33 Wyatt Cenac: Comedy Person Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama'PG' |South Park'MA' Tosh.0'14' Tosh.0'14' Tosh.0 (N) '14' Workaholics'14' Daily Show Colbert Report
(CII1 98 45 98 98 28 37 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition **Y2 "Fletch"(1985, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Tim Matheson.'PG' Country Fried Country Fried The Dukes of Hazzard'PG'
CNBC 43 42 43 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) CNBC Reports Executive Vision On the Money Mad Money
(CNN1 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N)
(DISNI 46 40 46 46 6 5 Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie *** "Cars"(2006, Comedy) Voices of Owen Wilson.'G' c Shake It Up! 'G' Suite/Deck Good-Charlie |Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place
ESPN 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) (Live) a College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 8: Teams TBA. From Omaha, Neb. (N) (Live) a Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) sa SportsCenter (N) (Live) a
ESPN2 34 28 34 34 43 49 Around the Horn Interruption NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight (N) WNBA Basketball Phoenix Mercury at San Antonio Silver Stars. (N) WNBA Basketball New York Liberty at Los Angeles Sparks. (N) a
EWT 95 70 95 95 48 Choices Loretta Young Daily Mass: Our Lady Mother Angelica-Classic EWTN Religious The Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope'G' Fulton Sheen Women of
AM) 29 52 29 29 20 28 The Nine Lives of Chloe King'PG' Pretty Little Liars "It's Alive"'14' Pretty Little Liars (N)'14' x The Nine Lives of Chloe King'PG' Pretty Little Liars '14' s The 700 Club 'PG' a
MF I) 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baler (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor (N) a Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor x
(TOOD1I 26 56 26 26 Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Marc Murphy Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped Chopped "Go for It!" (N) 24 Hour Restaurant Battle
FSNFL 35 39 35 35 Sports Stories Marlins Live! MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Florida Marlins. From Sun Life Stadium in Miami. (Live) MLB Baseball'G'
(X) 30 60 30 30 51 Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men *** "Marley & Me"(2008, Comedy-Drama) Owen Wilson, Eric Dane. Premiere.'PG' *** "Marley & Me"(2008) Owen Wilson.'PG'
(GOFI.) 67 Golf Central (N) Playing Lessons School of Golf Inside PGA Tour Big Break Indian Wells Feherty Feherty School of Golf Golf in America Golf Central Inside PGA Tour
[HALLI 39 68 39 39 45 54 Little House on the Prairie'G' Little House on the Prairie'G' Little House on the Prairie'G' Frasier'G' a Frasier'G' a Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
n 302 1 2 ** "Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief"(2010, *Y "Repo Men" (2010, Science Fiction) Jude Law. Agents repossess REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel Game of Thrones A new king rises
302 201 302 302 2 2 Adventure) Logan Lerman. (In Stereo) 'PG' a transplanted organs for nonpayment. (In Stereo) 'R' (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' in the north. (In Stereo)'MA' x
IHGTV) 23 57 23 23 42 52 PropertyVirgins Property Virgins Hunters Int'l House Hunters My First Place |My First Place Real Estate propertyVirgins House Hunters Hunters Int'l My First Place |My First Place
(HI1 51 25 51 51 32 42 How the States Got Their Shapes How the States Got Their Shapes Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy How the States Got Their Shapes Brad Meltzer's Decoded'PG'
ILIFE) 24 38 24 24 31 Unsolved Mysteries '14' x Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars 'PG' American Pickers 'PG' a American Pickers 'PG' a Love Handles: Couples in Crisis Drop Dead Diva'PG' a
"In Her Mother's Footsteps"(2006, Suspense) Emma Caulfield. A "Unstable"(2009, Suspense) Shiri Appleby, Kathy Baker. A newlywed "Stranger in My Bed" (2005, Suspense) Jamie Luner, Chris Kramer. A
50 woman sees visions of murders in her new house. NR' suspects that her husband is keeping secrets.'NR s woman fakes her own death to leave her abusive husband. a
Im **Y2 "Wild *i "Couples Retreat" (2009) Vince Vaughn. Four **Y2 "National Lampoon's Vacation" 1983, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A *," "Vampires Suck" (2010, Comedy) Matt Lanter, Femme Fatales
(1 ) 320 221 320 320 3 3 Things"(1998) Midwestern couples descend on an island resort. vacationing family detours into screwball side trips. 'R c Jenn Proske. (In Stereo) PG-13' c 'MA' c
MSNBC) 42 41 42 42 MSNBC Live (N) Hardball With Chris Matthews The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word
iyJ 97 66 97 97 39 16 and Pregnant |16 and Pregnant '14' |16 and Pregnant'14' 1 |16 and Pregnant "Where Are They Now, Part 2"'14' 16 and Pregnant "Allie" (Season Finale) (N)'14' 16 and Pregnant
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L W) 340 241 340 340 Documentary) Ken Coolen. iTV (In Stereo) 'NR' c goes on a carnal quest to lose his virginity 'R' (iTV) 'MA' c Tara (iTV) 'MA' (iTV) 'MA' c Tara (iTV) 'MA' "Episode 4"'MA' (iTV) 'MA'
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PKE 37 43 37 37 27 36 Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die |Ways to Die Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Repo Games Repo Games
CSUN1 36 31 36 36 Rays Live! MLB Baseball'G' Rays Live! Insidethe Rays To Be Announced College Football
ISFYJ 31 59 31 31 26 29 Star Trek: Enterprise 'PG'a ** "Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid" (2004) 'NR' a ** "Anaconda 3: Offspring" (2008) David Hasselhoff.'R' a "Anacondas: Trail of Blood"'R'
(TBS 49 23 49 49 16 19 King of Queens Kingof Queens Seinfeld'G' |Seinfeld'PG' The Office'14' |The Office'14' The Office'14' The Office'14' The Office'14' |The Office'14' Conan (N)'14'
S**i "The Outlaw" (1943, Western) Jane Russell, Jack Buetel, Walter *** "The Actress"(1953, Drama) Spencer Tracy, **~ "Angel Face" (1952, Crime Drama) Robert Mitchum. A devious ***, "Young
11___) 169 53 169 169 30 35 Huston. Billy the Kid and Doc Holliday become friends.'G' Jean Simmons, Anthony Perkins. NR' woman pots the death of her wealthy stepmother.'NR' s Bess"
ITMD 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash Cab'G' Cash Cab'G' Deadliest Catch '14' x Deadliest Catch '14' x Deadliest Catch (N) '14' s After the Catch "Relentless" (N) Deadliest Catch '14' x
(T) 50 46 50 50 29 30 Fabulous Cakes Las Vegas.'G' Little Couple |Little Couple 19 Kids-Count |19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count Little Couple |Little Couple 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count
(TNT _ 48 33 48 48 31 34 Law & Order"Chattel"'14' Law & Order "Oxymoron"'14' Memphis Beat "At the River"'14' Memphis Beat "Inside Man"'PG' HawthoRNe "Fight or Flight"'14' Memphis Beat "Inside Man"'PG'
(TRAVI 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
LtruTV) 25 55 25 25 98 98 Cops'PG' x Cops'14' TruTV Presents...'14' Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Hardcore Pawn Storage Hunters Storage Hunters Police POV Police POV
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(USA 47 32 47 47 17 18 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar "Deadline" (N)'PG' Covert Affairs (N) 'PG' a Law & Order: Criminal Intent'14'
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PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Dorothy Parker wrote, "My land
is bare of chattering folk; / the
clouds are low along the ridges, /
and sweet's the air with curly
smoke / from all my burning
bridges."
Bridge is unusual because dur-
ing play, the tables are bare of chat-
tering folk, but it is still a sociable
game. After a deal is over, though,
sometimes there is too much chat-
ter- analysis. Remember, you may
not comment on an opponent's bid-
ding or play unless asked to do so.
And it is much better not to discuss
partner's possible errors until after
the session has finished.
Against three no-trump, West
leads his fourth-highest club and
East plays his jack. How should
South continue?
First, declarer must count his top
tricks, his immediate winners.


ACROSS 36 Claim on prop-
erty
Page of an 37 Navaho handi-
itlas work
Grind away 38 Yoked team
Apt. location 39 Spleen
The Loco- 40 Playful swim-
Motion" girl mers
Port near 42 Basilica area
Kilauea 44 Colorado
Long sighs Springs acad.
Was a candi- 47 Grow wheat
date 49 Naval guide
Bookie's fig- 51 Forewarning
ures 53 Get real! (2
- gin fizz wds.)
Films on cas- 55 Kind of fever
;ette 56 Vitamin D
Ultimatum word source
Tardy 57 Crewmate of
Overhead Uhura
New plant vari- 58 911 responder
ety 59 Baja Ms.
Shirt or blouse 60 Sock part
'Hawkeve" 61 Batik need


'ierce
Untold cen-
uries
Make public


Bridge

North 0621-11
# K Q 4
V K 7
*KQ4
YK7
* A J 10 9 3
S 9 5 2
West East
4962 410853
S Q 5 4 VJ 10982
+ 72 *K6
* A10 7 6 4 J3
South
6 A J 7
*AJ7
VA63
Q 8 5 4
S K Q 8
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 4 6

Here, he has seven: three spades,
two hearts, one diamond and one



Answer to Previous Puzzle
BACHIK FCIS A|G
OI LY ALA AX LES
ALOG TEMBLORS
SPICEDIJ AIN"ET
EDS HOD
KOANS PERSIA
LI TEIHORN M HO
MST SOUR U S ED
ENGULF GGNOME
ED Y NOV
OWENS GIVEN
ERRIYING INCA
FEMENAHLI IAR
SPAS NWT ST |A


2
3


DOWN 4
5
1 Vanna's boss 6


Do the trick
Bamboo munch-
er
Rats!
Caps
Dilapidated


7 Capsule,
maybe
8 Low singer
9 Buyer's bur-
den (2 wds.)
10 Electrical unit
11 Mao - -tung
19 Fictional
Frome
21 Arith. term
24 Ripped
26 A Muppet
27 Defeat
28 He wrote
"Picnic"
30 Corral
31 Ms. MacGraw
32 Milan money,
formerly
33 Sincere
(hyph.)
35 - nova
40 Poet's con-
traction
41 Sorry about
43 Folger rival
45 Throbbed
46 Like the surf
48 Pulverize
49 Liver output
50 Wall St. land-
mark
51 Mantra chants
52 First space lab
54 Bring action


club (given trick one). South needs
two more winners, which can obvi-
ously come from the diamond suit.
What is the danger?
If East has the guarded diamond
king and only two clubs, declarer
might lose one diamond and four
clubs. Look at the given layout.
Many players would win the first
trick and run the diamond queen.
East would take his king and return
his second club, and West would
cash four tricks in the suit for down
one.
Some better players would take
trick one and lead the diamond
queen, but call for dummy's ace
when West does not cover. Perhaps
East has a singleton king; and if
West has the king, the contract is al-
ways safe. Here, though, they fail
too.
The best players duck the first
trick, letting East's jack hold. Now
the contract is ensured.


Dear Annie: I have been in
a relationship with
"Derek" for two years. I
love him dearly and
know we will marry
someday The problem
is, my sister and her
husband will not ac-
cept Derek because we
started dating when he
was still going through
a divorce.
Annie, I know we
should have waited
until the divorce was
final, but my sister
can't seem to move ANN
past it. She refuses to MAII
meet Derek and has
told me that neither
she nor her husband will come to
our wedding.
My sister has made mistakes in
her marriage, and I was always
very accepting and forgiving.
Leaving Derek is not an option,
but I hate that I don't see my
nieces anymore because of this
tiff.
How can I convince her Derek
is a good guy if she won't make an
effort to meet him? - Miss My Sis
Dear Miss: All choices have
consequences, and it helps to be
prepared to deal with them. Yes,
your sister seems unforgiving and
harsh, but you cannot fix that.
She also may believe that her
intransigent position will force
you to give Derek up. If you plan
to stay with this man, you should
conduct your lives with dignity
and integrity and hope that your
sister will someday accept the
two of you as a couple.
Dear Annie: I have a friend
who has the "call waiting" fea-
ture on his phone. If I am talking


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. o

GOMRO


�2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. '
All Rights Reserved.
KWECR



RCRYEH



ATLTET


F- =
_�5
CD

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a)
= Z
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Now arrange the circled letters
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suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: A
(Answers tomorrow)


to him and a second call comes
in, he will say, "Oh, I have an-
other call," and either hang up on
me, or leave me wait-
ing interminably
while he chats with
the second caller.
Once he kept me hold-
ing so long, I finally
hung up.
However, if I am the
second caller, he will
S say, "I'm on the other
line. Can I call you
back?" This seems to
indicate that other
IE'S callers are always
.BOX more important to him
than I am. Unless it is
a dire emergency, I
feel the first call should take pri-
ority. I also think his treatment of
me is disrespectful.
My friend also has "Caller ID,"
so he knows who the second call
is from and doesn't need to an-
swer it unless he believes it's ur-
gent Is there an etiquette rule for
this? Am I wrong to feel rudely
treated? -Unimportant Caller
Dear Caller: Etiquette says the
person with whom you are al-
ready on the phone takes prece-
dence over an incoming call.
Your friend should put you on
hold just long enough to inform
the second caller that he will call
back. However, if your conversa-
tion has already gone on for quite
a while, it makes sense for you to
say, "Go ahead and get that. I'll
talk to you later" Courtesy works
both ways.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Scared Sister," who is wor-
ried about her younger sister's
night vision and her ability to
drive. The sister, "Louise," is a


full-time operating-room nurse
who is required to rotate being
on call at night. You recom-
mended she speak to her super-
visor along with several other
alternatives. Here's one more:
Louise may be able to apply for a
reasonable accommodation
under the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act She should speak to
her HR department or contact
the Americans with Disabilities
website to start the process.
This is federal law, and if
Louise has a legitimate disability,
her employer needs to make a
reasonable accommodation for
her If they simply took her off the
night shift, the employer would
not have to bear any financial
burden. - Ron in Connecticut
Dear Ron: Several readers sug-
gested that Louise find out if she
is eligible for accommodation
through the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act. For more informa-
tion, readers can contact the ADA
information line at (800) 514-0301
or check their website at
www.ada.gov Our thanks to all
who wrote.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
longtime editors of the Ann
Landers column. Email annies
mailbox@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 5777 W Century
Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA
90045. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


1
a
4
8 A
12 '
13 F

15 \V
16 E
17 -
18 F
20 L
22 1
23 (
25 r
e
29 S
31
34 L
t
35 M


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 C7


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


For Better or For Worse


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Frank & Ernest


Arlo and Janis


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passes.
"Green Lantern" (PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer (PG)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"Super 8" (PG-13) 1:25 p.m., 4, 7:45, 10:20 p.m.
"X-MEN: First Class" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Kung Fu Panda: The Kaboom of Doom" (PG)
1:50 p.m., 4:55 p.m.
"The Hangover 2" (R) ID required. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8
p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides"
(PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides"
(PG-13) In Real 3D. 1:10 p.m., 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 p.m.
"Bridesmaids" (R) ID required. 7:25 p.m., 10:25.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News I alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals Z


"WL WG JVN, YSUN AKTH BHSLYHV.


BH SVH ZCVH Cl LYH HSVLY, ISVLYHV


IVCZ YHSEHT LYHGH JSNG."


- YHTVN JSEWJ


LYCVHSK


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The only things Mick (Jagger) and I disagree about is the band,
the music and what we do." - Keith Richards
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-21


W ELL, WAE ' WOR12
FOP, IT - RASMr 6ENh
MoWEf . A0W SQiINrVt
IMJG YOOR~ Eql:-s WtDQ
G E i-r E~


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CAN
YOU
APPROVE
THIS?


WHAT DID
EVERYONE
ELSE SAY?
--


I'
'I-~~ p


Big Nate


WE NEED YOUR
NOTESH FOR THE
WHOLE YEAR .
THoOSE ARE
MY NOTES
FOR THE
WHOLE YEAR
1.-c---


Today' MOVIES


CS TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


COMICS






CIASSIFIEDS


C CITRUS COUNTY




CH ONICLE
www.chronicleonline.com


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 C9


Classifieds


Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time!


BUSINESS HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
CLOSED SATURDAY/SUNDAY


WE GLADLY ACCEPT

..... . B


ORPACE OUR AD NIEA
0 * *


*m A * A* *



vjw~hrnilonlneco


Publication Days/Deadlines

Chronicle / Daily..................................... 1 PM, Daily
Homefront / Sunday................................3 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Sunday..................................4 PM, Friday
Chronicle / Monday.................................4 PM, Friday
Sumter County Times / Thursday.............1 1 AM, Tuesday
Riverland News / Thursday.....................2 PM, Monday
South Marion Citizen / Friday...................4 PM, Tuesday
West Marion Messenger / Wednesday.......4 PM, Friday


Good active man
would like to meet
good active, mature
woman for friendship.
(over 50 years old)
Call (352) 527-0054



2 Box Springs
Twin
Excel. condition
$50. Both
(352) 726-9647
2 Window
Air Conditioners
12,000 BTU, $75.
$7,000 BTU $50.
(352) 726-9647
3 Piece Light Wood
Glass Top Tables. 2 end
and 1 coffee. $150
(352) 560-7386
'07 STARCRAFT
POP-UP
17ft open. Used 3 times.
Sleeps 6 with extras.
$4200. (352) 382-5309
A-LINER
'07, 15 ft, w/ micro-
wave, AC, refrigerator
Excel. Cond. $7,900
352-697-9339, 249-6505
CHICKEN
MANUREIFERTILIZER
Great for your garden,
yard, plants! 201b bag
$4.00 352-563-1519
FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934
IN-GROUND YARD
POND, Approx. 3'x5'
Came w/house I bought.
You remove. $35.00
352-382-1000
Lost lyr old male pug
and 7yr old female
lab/shar-pei mix. Last
seen off of Arundel Ter-
race in Homosassa.
Family heartbroken
please call if you have
any info 352-287-2546.
Call anytime!!






i.












How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966

Cwn khrolein.E

www.chronicleonline.com


MOVING SALE
10 pc. Antique Din. Rm.
Set., Sectional Sofa,
Coffee & 2 end table
Set, 25" Television, 2 bi-
cycles, porcelain dolls,
33 rpm record albums,
& MORE! 352-382-3227
Suzuki2010
Boulevard C50
Less than 800 miles, my
loss, your gain! $6,500
firm. (352) 422-4528
Want to Buy
Nice Clean Dblewide
3 Bd, 2 Bth, on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 828-728-4834



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
FREE JUNK PICK UP
Appliances, Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Autos,
352-224-0698
SERVICE (YOUR DOG)
EVALUATION - FREE
Veteran discount
352-464-0779



Aluminum Walker
Nadline,
almost new
holds 3001b capacity
352-746-3687
Fancy Tail
Guppies
(352) 560-3019
Free Kittens
Cute, 8 week olds, me-
dium hair. 352-613-7117
Free to good home
Moma Cat &
2 Tortos Shell kittens
(352) 563-2987
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Savage Pays top $$$.
352-628-4144
Pool Solar
Cover Reel
352-382-7042
PUPPIES
2 females, 1 male mix
breed, 8 wkS old.
Call for details.
(352) 634-2781
SHELTIE
Male, 7 yrs. old. House-
broken, not good with
small children other-
wise good tempera-
ment. (352) 628-7403
TABLE
Two drawers
FREE! 341-4449




BLACKBERRIES
Cert. Organic. U-PICK
$3.50 per lb., 9333
Hwy 48 Floral City.
Open Everyday JUNE
Mon. thru Sun. 8a-1p
Thurs. 8a-7p
Call 352-643-0578

SWEET CORN @
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi. E.
on Eden Dr. from Hwy.
41, Inverness
Watermelons,
Cantelopes, Shelled
Peas, 8:30a-6p
352-726-6378
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
$2.75/Ilb. Pesticide Free!
Open Saturday Only
7a-7p (352) 746-2511
4752 W. Abeline Dr.
Citrus Springs


Chihuahua
small, Brown, Lecanto
area, kids heart broken.
Please call 364-1719
Lost lyr old male pug
and 7yr old female
lab/shar-pei mix. Last
seen off ofArundel Ter-
race in Homosassa.
Family heartbroken
please call if you have
any info 352-287-2546.
Call anytime!!
LOST
Bloodhound Puppy,
red w/ black face
male, Gospel Is. Rd.
* REWARD *
(352) 228-1458
LOST Women's 14K
Figaro Bracelet
Inverness Area
Around 5/30/11
(352) 613-0529
Pit Bull
Female light brown
last seen 6/15 in Citrus
Springs (352) 470-7663



19FT Skiff style boat
found by boatramp at
Days Inn canal, Crystal
River, on Sept. 18, 2010,
If this is yours please
contact 352-447-2692,
ext. 304.
Found Class Ring
Class of 1972
Call for Details
(352) 726-2249




r �BANK�RUPTCY�
I DIVORCES I
CHILD SUPPORT
I * 352-613-3674*

LEARN TO SEW I
I furnish everything!
My home or yours
(352) 795-7206, Mary



CRYPT (Fl)
Fero Memorial Gar-
dens. Bldg F, outside.
$4000. 586-596-7580




EC4 Teachers
Aide

Parttime, experience
req.'d. 23 hrs. wk. at
POPE JOHN PAUL II
CATHOLIC SCHOOL
Contact Tonya Peters
mspetersDpip2.net
(352) 746-2020




Lic. Nail Tech
With following
Call (352) 860-0633










Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A, AA ,#, , , ,A


0008C3J

Sudoku** 4puz.com


1 6 2 9


91 83


7 4


938 765


2 9


645 18 2


4 6


69 48


5 2 7 4


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)

A CNAPREP&
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)

ARNP
Immediate opening for
busy family practice in
Crystal River. Special
emphasis in nursing
homes a plus. Submit
resumes to: www.
wfmaresumes.com

CNA/HHA's
HOMEMAKERS
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Exp.'d Nuclear
Cardiology Tech
1 day a week. Wages
based per study.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 860-1918
or email droffice511
@vahoo.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA'S
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


NOW HIRING

RN's
All Units, with Hospital
Experience
Apply on Line: www.
nurse-temps.com
(352) 344-9828

RECEPTIONIST
receptionists needed - full
time and part time, prior
medical experience pre-
ferred. Apply in person
West Coast Eye Institute,
240 N. Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352-746-2246 x 834





Executive
Director -
Citrus County, FL
This full-time/exempt
position will serve as
the staff face/voice
of the YMCA in Citrus
County to facilitate
preparation for a
Capital Campaign
that will kick off within
2 years, as well as to
oversee current pro-
grams and activities.
Must possess a
four-year degree or
commensurate expe-
rience. Must also
have the ability to
build and maintain
relationships.
Excellent benefits.
$54,500-$61,500.
DFWP/EOE.
Resumes to: Elizabeth
Dubuque, YMCA of
the Suncoast, 2469
Enterprise Rd,
Clearwater, FL 33763
or
edubuque@suncoast
ymca.org.
Cutoff Date: July 22

Piano
Accompanist
for Church Adult
Choir at Good
Shepherd Lutheran
Church, Hernando, FL.
The normal schedule
for the
position is a
mid-week rehearsal
plus one Sunday
worship service per
week, September
through May. Pay is
negotiable.
Experience with
church music is a
plus. To apply, call
352-746-7161.


P/T COMPUTER
TEACHER
1st-8th grd, 25 hrs wkly.
Must be able to teach
basic computer skills,
key boarding, Microsoft
Office Word, Power
Point & Excel. Send
resume to: mspeters@
pjp2.net or fax to:
352-746-3448





AUTO SALES
Join a Winning Team!
We're Looking for
Used Car
Sales Professionals
Experienced
Preferred But Not
Necessary. Build Your
Future in a Great
Career. Excellent
Income Potential,
Health, Dental &
Vision Ins. Pkg. 401K,
Paid Vacation &
More! Dress
Professionally.
Apply in Person to
Ron or Dave
JENKINS ACURA
St. Rd. 200 & 17th St.,
Ocala

OUTSIDE SALES
REP
Business to Business
Sales Must Have Sales
Experience.
Experience In The
Waste Industry
Considered a Plus
but not required.
Mail Resume to
F.D.S. Disposal Inc.
P.O. Box 906
Hernando, Fl 34442
Attention: William
or Email to
fdsdisDosalinc@
aol.com
Do NOT
Apply in Person
& NO Phone Calls
Will Be Accepted





ee************e
Exp. ELECTRICIAN
for residential & light
commercial, taking
applications 9-11 a
Mon - Fri/ S&S
Electric Dunnellon
(352) 746-6825
352-489-4116



--p-
r - -EXP.
HOUSEKEEPERS

Good Benefits
SApply in Person.
BEST WESTERN
614N.W. Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone Calls.


THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immed FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/ svc, will train,
cond apply, all ages
17+, Call ASAP!
352-364-4121




TATTOO ARTIST
must be licensed in
body piercing
(352)843-1151





Cleaners/evenings
(Retirees Welcome)
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555 E.O.E


#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED-Free Book
Am & PM classes
aetvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
CPR/AED-Med. Tech/
352-382-EASY (3279)
F------^

"NActNow

BENE'S
International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy
I* NOW ENROLLING* I

COSMO - Days
June 27th
COSMO - Nlahts
June 27th, Sept 19th
BARBERING - Nights
Aug.8,
MASSAGE THERAPY
Days & Nights
Sept 26th
FACIAL TECH -Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo.
I *** *
NAIL TECH - Days
1st Mon. of ea. mo
I 1(866) 724-2363
1486 Plnehurst Dr
SSpring Hill Fl. 34606

NE&AfW

2 Week Courses!
*PT TECH $450.
*NURSING ASST. $450.
*PHLEBOTOMY $450.
*EKG $450.
*MEDICAL ASSISTANT
TAYLOR COLLEGE
tavlorcolleae.edu
(352) 245-4119

TUTORING
22 yrs. exp. Specializing
reading, math, learning
disabilities 352.270.9105




REALTOR ONE. LLC
w Coin Laundry, $75.K
w Bait & Tackle $599.K
More Info 352-229-5273
or: realtoronellc.com




Make Money
From Home
PT or FT 10 yrs in busi-
ness & stock traded.
Over 3,000 contractual
agreements w/ biggest
retailers, turn $50 mo.
into Thousands Call for
Appt. 1-800-603-9840




BULL WHIPS (2)
Hand made by a Prem-
ier World Whip maker.
$65 each, firm.
John (352) 726-1076
Coca Cola Collector
Yo-Yo, very rare, never
used, uncirculated,
trademark stamped,
$40 firm. (352)726-1076
COLLECTORS DOLL
Princess of South Africa,
Barbee doll, In Box.
$20.00, 352-513-4009
Native American High
Quality Collection
all hand made pieces,
sell as a group, $500
firm. Call for info, seri-
ous callers only.
John (352) 726-1076


HOW ABOUT SOME


EXTRA



CASH!


V Able to work early morning
hours before 6am
V Must be 18 years old
V Florida driver's license
and insurance
Must apply in person at
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. in Crystal River
(Drive around to the side door
S6.- . Ih .- ,IY. I1I ,- , I,,1


It really pays
to work for the
-*^^ ...i i... E


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

TONY STEWART
SIGNED ITEM
Cardboard, Lifesize
Standup. $100.00 Firm
352-228-0826
VINTAGE 1890'S LA-
DIES HAT Black and red,
feathers and flowers,one
of a kind. $65.00 beautiful
352-513-4009



2 Window
Air Conditioners
12,000 BTU, $75.
$7,000 BTU $50.
(352) 726-9647
GE ELECTRIC DRYER
white ,5 cycle,good cond.
works great, $100.00.
firm 352-513-4009
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
JANOME 9000 EMBROI-
DERY Machine,3
hoops,MC
reader/writer,Customizer
2000,
Clothsetterill,Memorary
cards, Manuals: $650.
352-637-1463
MAGIC CHEF MICRO-
WAVE, White, Dimen-
sions are 29"X16". Excel-
lent condition, asking
$50. Call 352-650-0180
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-564-8179
TOP OF THE LINE
ELECTROLUX DRYER
pd over $1000 sacrifice
$675 firm(352) 726-9151
WANTED DEAD OR
ALIVE Washers & Dryers
will purchase & pick up
Rebuilt Wash & Dryer for
Sale (352) 209-5135
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 ea. Reliable, like
new, excellent cond. Can
deliver 352-263-7398



FILING CABINET
metal, 3 drawer, with
hanging folder racks. $45
Call Randy,
352-746-6029



2 AUCTION WEEK
THURS. ESTATE JUNE 23
Adventure Auction
3PM Outside filled with
value & variety. Orchid
supplies, cactus collec-
tion, tools, household &
more. 6PM Inside
Quality High end furn.,
Oriental Bedrm Set, art,
sm. appl., jewelry, etc!
FRI. JUNE 24
ON SITE AUCTION
Prev. 8AM Sale 9AM
2845 E. Hayes St.,
Inverness. Complete
living estate Farm house
workshop & barn. 1986
Fleetwood Eagle
motorhome, Nascar,
sword/knilfe. Doll col-
lection, country style
furn. & decor & 2 shops
w/hand tools, parts,
pieces, power tools, etc
DudleysAuctlon.com
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S) Inverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667-AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc



Compressor
Sear's Craftsman, 25
gal., 4 HP single cy-
clinder, rarely used.
$100 (352) 726-1076
Electric Sander
belt driven, table top
model. $25.
John (352) 726-1076
PLASTIC WELDER
(Prota Welder) - Used
primarily in the marine
industry. $600
(352) 503-2774
Trailer Dolly
used 3 times, $30.
John (352) 726-1076
WOOD SURFACE
PLANER, Ryobi 10"
planer/model AP-10.
Great for hardwoods and
pine. 2HP, 8,000 RPM,
extra blades and tools,
like new. $200 Call
Randy 352-746-6029



Turn Table, 8 track
/cassette recorder
Stereo with 2 Bang and
Olefson, solid walnut
speakers, woolfer,
tweeter, & sub along
w/94- track tapes &
101 cassette All For
$75.(352) 726-0931


3 1
56
78


Rewinder, digital to
analog converter & 42
VCR movies
All For $55.
(352) 726-0931



1 SLIDING GLASS
DOOR. 4x8 double
pane $25.
(352) 637-2402
BEAUTIFUL KITCHEN
OR BATHROOM CABI-
NET DOORS, all wood,
assorted sizes (8),
$10 each 352-344-2321
BEAUTIFUL WOODEN
DRAWER FRONTS, as-
sorted sizes and types of
wood(10), $6.00 each.
352-344-2321
Florida WINDOWS
(2)6X6 sq. windows
(3) 4x5 sq windows,
(1)38x80 $800 OBO
(352) 794-3081
PLASTIC 50-55 GAL-
LON DRUM BARRELS
(4), $15.00 each
352-344-2321
SLIDING GLASS
SHOWER DOORS
Chrome trim, 5'7.5"H x
5'1" W. $50
(352) 382-3202
WOOD LAMINATE
FLOORING
1 box, never used, me-
dium Oak color. $10
352-201-2665



Compaq Presario
100 gb, Computer
Monitor, keyboard,
mouse, printer, 3 new
ink cartridges, Desk &
Chair All For $130.
(352) 726-0931
COMPUTER MONITOR
Envision, 17" LCD Moni-
tor. PD. $200 For Sale
$50.00. Call
352-344-4357
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
GAME BOY
kids, good condition
$20.00 341-4449



MASSEY FERGUSON
2006 1433V Compact
Tractor w/ bucket loader,
4Wh Dr, 33HP Diesel, 8
sp shuttle shift, 120 hrs,
Box blade, Brush Chop-
per. Same as new,
$13000 269 252-9134




SOLD
PATIO TABLE
w/4 chairs. White
wicker (simulated)
$100.



2 Box Springs
Twin
Excel. condition
$50. Both
(352) 726-9647
3 Piece Light Wood
Glass Top Tables. 2 end
and 1 coffee. $150
(352) 560-7386
4 PIECE light blue floral
king hide-a-bed sofa,
loveseat, chair,
hassock & 4 pillows.
$400 (352) 560-7386
4 Poster Double Bed &
night stand, $150.
Queen Mapelwood
Bedroom Set,
headboard triple
Dresser/ mirror, chest &
night stand $500.
(352) 637-4690
42" ROUND SOLID Oak
Table. Natural finish.
Like new. $200
(352) 382-5883
ANTIQUE DRY SINK
Very good condition $25
352-419-5830
BAR STOOLS (2)
Wooden Bar Stools, Dark
Wood, Leather Seat. $50
for both 352-419-5830
Brass Day Bed
Ceramic Decorative
Bedpost
Excel. Cond. $75.
(352) 465-0339
BREAKFAST TABLE
Light Oak breakfast table,
$45. Like new. Exc. con-
dition Call 352-344-4357
CHAIRS (2)
Maple Chairs, $15 for
both 352-419-5830
COFFEE & END TA-
BLES SET W/ LAMPS
sturdy,dark color. Can
EM pix $99.0BO
560-7857
Colonial, Maple
Dining Room Set,
Table, w/ 4 chairs,
2 leafs & china hutch
$300
(352) 527-8107
Curio Cabinet,
4 glass shelves,
Light up, $100
(352) 795-4596
Dining Room Set
Henredon, solid ash,
clean lines, beautiful,
large table w/6 chairs,
and China cab. $1,500
(352) 304-6293


3672 51


3956


DOUBLE BED
good condition
$50.00 341-4449
DRESSER
Hi Boy Dresser, Dark
wood color. $25
352-419-5830
Entertainment Center
w/ lighted curio
excel. cond., med. oak
$250.
352-598-5242
Large Solid Oak
Roll Top Desk,
30" x 52"
$400.
(352) 637-4690
OAK HUTCH
w/matching dinette
tab,4 chs. $350.
Q. hdbd solid oak,
mattress/frame $75.
(352) 220-8211
Pinewood table
w/ 4 chairs $85.
dark hard wood tabi
w/6 barrels chairs $115
no call before noon
(352) 628-4766
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
ROCKER RECLINER
Tan in color. New
$100.00 352-419-5830
SOLD
FULL SIZE
MATTRESS SET w/frame.
Never used. $100
SOLD
MOVING
BEDROOM SET
KingSize 5-piece plus
mattress & frame. $300
SOLD
Queen Size
Bedroom Set,
2 night stands,
dbl dresser mattress &
box spring $300
SOLD
Sofa Table
Dark wood
$50
Table
w/4 chairs,
china cabinet
$300.
(352) 489-1980
Table, solid oak, 48"
round, built in 24" leaf,
exc. cond. $250.
(352) 637-3232
TV STAND
Oak Stand. With Glass
Doors. $25 352-419-5830
TWIN BED
Drawers under boxspring
and Sealy Mattress. $75
352-419-5830



CHICKEN
MANURE/FERTILIZER
Great for your garden,
yard, plants! 201b bag
$4.00 352-563-1519
Craftsman Riding
Lawn mower
42" deck
15.5 hp $400
(352) 746-7357.
GRASS SEEDS
American Farm & Feed
(352) 795-6013
GREEN HOUSE
30x50 w/approx. 700
orchids, you dismantle
$1500 firm!!!
(352) 563-0129
HUSTLER ZERO TURN
48 deck, $2800.
352-527-4114
352-445-9901
IN-GROUND YARD
POND, Approx. 3'x5'
Came w/house I bought.
You remove. $35.00
352-382-1000
LOWE"S Riding Mower
17.5 B &S engine 42"
cut $300. firm Murray
self propelled mower
runs great $75.00
(352) 302-6069
RIDING MOWER
automatic, $100.00
Call 352-634-4421
SOLD
CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER
42" cut 17.5 hp
w/12 cu ft trailer $400.



4 Tires
Like new M+S LT245/75R
17 heavy duty load
range E $150. Mulching
mower 21" cut 3.5 B7S
Eng Runs great $50.
(352) 302-6069



FREE
Place any General
Merchandise Ad for
FREE on our EBiz
CLASSIFIED SITE.
- Item must be
$100 or less
- 5 lines
-5 days
-1 item per ad
-Ad must contain price
- $3.25 per additional line

Goto:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


9384 2 1765
271586'439
645 739 182
-419 78 13256

1 2 6954 873
8 5 3267 941


Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers I through 9.












Pool Deck Solutions

Call Jamey at 352-220-9696


I Coletbi


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C10 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


1 HP, Submersible Grandfather Clocks Smoker ADULT POTTY CHAIR
pump, 2 wire & 3 wire, For Sale Upright, charcoal oven Good for disabled, pot
$125. Guaranteed will $250. with cover, seasoned, Removable, for over the
demonstrate (352) 726-3217 but never used, $65. toilet use. $25.00
352-726-7485 John (352) 726-1076 352-513-4009
Gas BBQ Grill POOL 24' Round Stadium Seats (2)
Gas BB Grill with above ground, 3 yrs old Quality, with back
Table topmodel, with new filter pump good rests, never used,
table. $25. cond many xtra's, both for $45. Affordable, Lift Chair,
John (352) 726-1076 you remove $1000. John (352) 726-1076 Recliner, for handi-
GENERATOR (727) 644-0157 Wcapped or elderly
Honda EM2500(727)44-0157 WEDDINGSTEPS FOR person, will stand you
120 & 12 volt output PROPANE FURNACE 4' deep above ground up or sit and lay you
practically New $300. MOBILE HOME pool. Valued at$450 down. excel, cond.
(352) 563-1855 Exc Cond 45000BTU bring $200 cash and $325. (352) 270-8475
Model #migh05ga aw take away.
MOVING SALE $300(352) 563-1855 (352) 527-4146
10 pc. Antique Din. Rm.
Set., Sectional Sofa, SHED Ricon R-30 Wheel Chair
Coffee & 2 end table 10 X 16 ALUM. 2 win- Lift for Van
Set, 25" Television, 2 bi- dows 1 door insulation works perfect still
cycles, porcelain dolls, & elect. some shelves, TYPEWRITER installed $500
33 rpm record albums, 3 yr old$1200 U move Brothers, $35 FIRM cell 989-928-6919
& MOREl 352-382-3227 (352) 341-2574 Phone 746-6676 (352) 860-1205





M aBijB^B|j*^r. *is e ^SL-S1 ^Si sy


Attention
Consumers
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers are
required by state law
to include their state
license number in all
advertisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious that
you may be contact-
ing an unlicensed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For questions
about business
licensing, please call
your city or county gov-
ernment offices.


Owner/Manager Name:
Thomas Zuppa Sr.
Business Name:
A Plus Home and Business Technologies, LLC
How long has the business been in operation
in the Citrus County area?
4 Years (Before that, we operated this company for
11 years in New Jersey)
Describe the service/product you offer?
Sales, service and installation of alarms, TV's,
sound systems, CCTV, intercom, central VAC,
phone, data access control and most low voltage
applications.
What do your customers like best about your
business?
The personal touch that I give to each and every
customer along with professional work and fast
service.
What is something your business offers that
people don't expect?
Great pricing and reliable equipment. We clean up
to where they do not know we were there except for
the enjoyment of their new products.
Why did you choose this business?
I have always enjoyed the high tech world that we
live in, so I went to college and received a degree
in electronics and the rest is history.
What are your business hours, address, phone
number and e-mail?
Business hours are normally 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
But we are always there to answer our customers
questions whenever they call.
Located at: PO. Box 122
Lecanto, FL 34460
352-746-3777
Email: ztuppa@aol.com


Attention Services
Industry!
Do you want your mes-
sage in the face of
over 60,000 readers
each and every day?
Can you image the po-
tential extra revenue
you may receive as a
result of your advertis-
ing? Plus, to introduce
yourself to our readers,
we will "spotlight" your
business on a rotating
basis during the 30
days. This "spotlight"
will include a photo
and a short bio on your
business. The cost to
run in our Services
Directory is approxi-
mately 3.3 cents
per reader.
Please call your current
ad rep or 563-5966.




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452

*/THIS OUT!
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352)302-5641
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
Ins.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remove Free Est.
Lic/Ins (352) 628-2825
TREE REMOVAL
& STUMP GRINDING
Tree Removal/Trim.,
Lic/insured, 55ft. Bucket
Truck 352-344-2696




A+ Computer Repair &
Virus Removal. 24 Hrs.
7 Days a Week. $40/Hr.
Call (352) 794-1270
www.citrusarea.com
Lic.#37705


Bob LePree
Computer Repair
Sales & Services
New & Like New
Wireless Networks
(352) 270-3779
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting & Handy
man Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins
Dale 352-586-8129







INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Affordable Mobile
Citrus Marion Levy, all
makes/models. High
Performance 398-5903
Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435



SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Washer &
Dryers, Free Pick Up
352-564-8179



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273


66.!.i PAVR


)jC ' .ja -0wJ


VACATION IN Po Al.fInshn
YOUR OWN P "ano
BACKYARD... * Diveways
* Weekly

" Pool Service
5 Lic. & Insured
CPC 1456565

l 3%52-400-3188


*


m


Remodeling, Additions,
Doors, Windows, Siding,
Tile work. Free estimate
Lic.& Ins. (352) 949-2292
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50. HR. NO JOB TO
SMALL. 352-302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699 Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
Briggs Stratton 352-
621-1248 #ER00015377



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. furn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up,
hauling352 220-6761



A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279 *


All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
All Tractor/Dirt Service
Specializing In 1 x clean
Up Yard, Tree, Debris
Removal 352-302-6955
All AROUND TRACTOR
Se ,,_-, , ,, - ,). I_.: W -:
352-795-5755
Clearing Seeding, Fertil
zing, Fill, Rock, Debris
accepting credit cards
352-628-3436/586-7436


- -r-mm-r o l.cO =o
#1 EmpIoy-ment source is i
w . ch, ron* cileoni ne - corn |


B

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584



Exp. Caregiver for
Elderly or Children
Any hrs., exc ref's
cell 850-242-9343
Local 352 341-0404
PERSONAL CARE
Light house work
Respite Care. Male
CNA (352) 875-9793



Overnight Infant care
in my home. Medical
background and
Mom certified! Rea-
sonable weekly and
weekend rates.
Call Kerry:
(352) 465-7584




Cleaning
Free Est/Lic/Ins
(352)621-0837
(352)400-1423
ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174



Entertainment Centers
furn. vanities,cabinets
Top Quality reasonable
352 726-5832/212-3532



ROGERS Construction
Remodeling, small jobs
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Aluminum & Screen
Contractor, 628-0562
(CBC1257141)


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0008DOV


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low. Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129







Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
352-341-3300




Leek
Window Cleaning
Exterior Carpenter work
& Lawn Work 352-
341-0404; 850-201-7451



1 CALL & RELAX! 25 vrs
exp in home repairs &
remodel WE DO IT ALL!
Steve 352-476-2285
#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Painting &
Handyman.
Low, Low Rates
25 yrs exp lic/ins Dale
352-586-8129






L& J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348


* Siding* Soffit Fascia *Skirting * Roofovers* Carports
* ScreenRooms* Decks*Windows *Doors *Additions
352-628-7519 4
www.Advancedaluminumofcits..corn


BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We Also
Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676


WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477


Tweet

Tweet

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LFollowthe
C C 0
ollowt
hronicle on


Promote your '


business for just:


$250 for 30 days


brIL


chr nicleonline.com


FOR MORE INFO CONTACT GALE RANDALL.352- 563-3266


LK100 KEYBOARD
CASIO, LIGHTED KEY
LEARNING SYSTEM,
W/STAND $75
352-601-6625
P-STYLE BASS
"NEW" BLACK
W/BAQTUNERSTRAPCORD
+ MORE $100
352-601-6625




VEGETABLE BIN
Dark Walnut Bin. $20
352-419-5830


$165.00 GIFT CERTIFI-
CATE FOR DYNABODY
GYM-Membership-
Trainer-Tanning-Massage
$100.00 Mike 586-7222




12 gauge Beretta
shot gun Model A-390ST
28" barrel, 3 choke
tubes, 1 turkey choke
tube, engraved re-
ceiver , gold trigger
$450.(352) 465-2867

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


INLINE SPEED SKATES
Great, Asking for $100.
Great performing skates.
Call for more info
352-341-4449
MOTORCYCLE
HELMET, Black, open
face, 2 shields, one clear,
one tint, XL. Can e-mail
pics, $35.00 621-8067

Three Wheel
Adult Bike.
Custom-modified
24" wheels,
plus 1 carrier
basket.
Absolute mint
cond. $250.
352-419-6798













Sprinkler Repair & In-
stallation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc132549 302-9269



Bianchi Concrete
inc.com lic/ins
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks.352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, staining &
Garage Firs. Recession
Prices! 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



A Cutting Edge
Tile Jobs Showers
Firs .Safety Bars. ETC
352-422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL - 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755


D 1. r z-,, z


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRomcLE


CLASSIFIED


Olympic Arms
AR15.. $733.00
Shiappa Rhino 357
mag $719.00
(352) 447-5595
SMITH & WESSON
Body Guard 380
w/trac $390.00
(352) 447-5595

WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




15' Utility Trailer
2 axles, $300.
263-252-9034





Uy






Demolition, Debris,
Brush & Tree Removal
(352) 634-0329
SMALL ACREAGE/LOTS
Bushhogging & Mowing
Debris Removal
Free Est. 352-795-9522
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
$30 + $30/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
MORE Call 352.201.7374
LEE RIVENBARK
Lawn Care*Landscape
Tree Care. Receive 10%
off * (352) 464-3566 -



A+ LAWN CARE
& LANDSCAPING,
Affordable & Reliable
(352) 228-0421
AFFORDABLE Lawn care
Cuts Starting at $20
We Do It AllI
CALL 352-228-7320
Florida Sitescapes, LLC
FREE est: Spring Yard
Clean up Mowing, and
more Call 352.201.7374
L &J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
LAWNCARE 'N ' More
mulch, trim beds tree
removal,cleanup,haul.
(352) 726-9570
LEE RIVENBARK
Lawn Care*Landscape
Tree Care. Recieve 10%
off *(352) 464-3566 *
Sprinkler Repair &
Installation, Lawncare,
Handyman Service
Call 352-212-4935



344-2556, Richard
WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


I


I


I ALUMINUM 1�







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


20' FLATBED DOVE-
TAIL TRAILER
CAR/UTIL TRAILER
W/RAMPS NEW WOOD
WHINCH 352-256-8488
352-897-7479
GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Offering New & Used
Cargo & utility trailers

6x12 trailer enclosed
$2095.
6x16 utility $1395.

Trailer Tires
starting at $69.95
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
UTILITY TRAILER
7 X 12, enclosed, brand
new, used only 2 times.
Not what I need. Must
sell. All lights, brake as-
sist, side door, rear ramp.
Tie downs installed.
$2,000 firm.
352-637-2226



FISHER- PRICE
Pop onz building table,
farm, circus and
more. $30
352-422-3157



AQUARIUMS/
FILTERS/DECOR
$50.00 FIRM
Phone 746-6676
0 A& 0 ,


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966










Want to Buy
Nice Clean DW $35k &
under, 3/2 on land or
in Sr. Park, owner fin. w/
$5K down 8728-4834
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED VIDEO
GAMES COLLECTION.
LRG OR SMALL. FOR
CASH (352)601-0105



Australian Shepherd
Tri color male, 2 yrs. old
have all papers, great
family dog, needs
fenced yd. and some-
one to play with. $200
firm (352) 726-2023

Leek

English Bull Dog
Puppies I male 1
female, 12 weeks old
$1200 each
(386) 585-9612
jk662@hotmail.com
Mini Dachshund
Long Hair Pup
Champion blood lines
Female bik & tan $400
(352) 795-6870;
220-4792

MINI DACHSHUNDS
Two well socialized Mini
Dacshunds.12 weeks
old,1 male bl/tan and 1
female silver dapple.H/C
CKC registered,2nd
shots. Call 503-6564
Parrotts, MaCaws, twin
males, with cages, $800
each. Chain link
10x0xI10 cage, $999
(352) 726-8177
Reg. Shih-Tzu Pups,
many avail Blk/whi. M
$400 BIk/whi Fern. $450
Appoots avail 7 days a
wk. Beverly Hills,
FL(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.net
Shi-A-Poo & Toy Poodle
Female $250 Male $200
CKC registered. 8 wks
HIth Cert., Paper
trained, great with kids
(352) 489-6675



ANGUS BULL
Red, 4 yrs. old, beautiful
offspring. Will email
picture. $1,700.
(352) 628-6271
4,Am "'-a


- AT




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
DUNNELLON
2/1, $500 mo Ist & last
$200 Sec. 352-625-4339
DUNNELLON
2br,1.5 bath.nr Citrus
Spgs$550.
Clean,bright,quiet.Available
now 352-603-0024


Nice 2/1, lease, no pets
Water. lncl'd.$425.mo
$425 sec. 352-726-7319
HOMOSASSA
2 Bd 2 Ba. fully furn
SR.Discount.
352-746-0524
Homosassa
2/1 $550. Lecanto 2/1
$500. 352-464-3159
HOMOSASSA
3/2 DW $650 + sec 352
305-6747(352) 628-1928
HOMOSASSA
3/2, Lrg. fen. yd., New
Paint, Deck, Storage
$650. mo. 1st., Ist, sec.
(352) 628-3098
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-2BA, $450
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$350/up; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $450.
12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964





3/2, 2 Acres, fenced,
Homosassa
Owner Financing
(352) 302-9217
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosassa area
Owner 352-220-2077
DUNNELLON SQUARE
Well-kept 40x26 Palm
Harbor 2/2 in quiet 55+
park. Roof-over, all
appl,sunrm,carport,utility
rm. Close to shopping, li-
brary, P.O. Lot 117 on
Ash St. 352-447-2317 or
352-489-5040
Palm Harbor Homes
RED TAG SALE
Over 10 stock units
MUST GO!! Save
uo to $35K!
800-622-2832

USED HOMES/
REPOS
Doublewides from
$9,500
Singlewides from
$6,500
Bank authorized
liquidator. New
inventory daily
CALL (352) 621-9183




A New 2010
Home on 1 acre, 3/2
In Homosassa, under
warranty, $3,850
down, $418.67/mo.
4.75% Interest W.A.C.
Call to see
352-621-3801

BEST BUY! 1600+ Sq ft.
on 1/2 ac. Land &
home only $48,900.
Owner has financing
only $350/mth. $2500
dwn W.A.C. New
air/appliances. Must
see, good location.
352-621-9182
FLORAL CITY
2 Master BR 14x66'
3 lots/park/RV
sheds,gar.well/septic
Priv Financ w/$12K dn.
Cridland Real Living.
Jackie 352-201-5201
HERNANDO/Ap. Shores
4552 N. Pine Dr., Handy
person special 75x100
lot, on dead-end quiet
street, $8,000 Appt.
only (502) 330-0260
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenc/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900. No Financing
(352) 527-3204


HOMOSASSA
GREAT BUY 3/2
DW, fecnced /2 ac.
wkshop & storage
bldg, carort & rear
cover porch, ceils
fans all rooms, nearly
new a/c unit, X clean
$42K (352) 596-2411
HOMSASSA
RENT TO OWN 3/2
Lg lot bk fenced $1000
dn $650 mo terms neg
(352) 857-6050
LAND-AND HOME
Morriston off Hwy
337/Goethe Forest
beautiful 2 '/2 acres of
manicured land all
fenced with 2 pas-
tures, 1700 plus sq. ft.,
4/2, 2005 model all
tape-n-texture walls,
crown molding etc.
You have to see this
fine country home!
Only $2,500 down,
$564.04/mo. P & I,
W.A.C. Call to view
352-621-9181

NEED A NEW
HOME?
Bad credit OK. We
finance anybody
with land. Call for
approval now! Low
rates 352-621-3807
SMALL FARMS
MORRISTON
READ THIS ONLY
If you are you
interested in 2.67 acres,
keep horses, fenced,
spotless 3/2 furn'd 2001
MH, out bldg w/elect.
$80K, Owner financing.
Dale Ravens Rainbow
Springs Community
Realty Inc.
352-489-1486



2003 MOBILE HOME
2/2 furnishedon Lake
Rousseau. Low Lot


Rent, used seasonally
$27,700.SELLER will pay
1st month lot rent
(352) 817-1987
AWESOME DEALS
Owner Finance
0 down
1/1 renov. shed $4K
2/1 furn, deck $12K
2/1 carport, roof over
$7,000 Financ Avail
55+ Park clean quiet
C.R/Homosasa area
Owner 352-220-2077
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
1BR, $350/up; 1BR, 1BA
Park model, $450. 2BR,
1- 2BA, $450 includes lot
rent; 12th Month FREE!
Call 352-476-4964
LECANTO HILLS
55+ 60 ft. 2/2 carport
Remodeled, Many
upgrades. $9,000. obo
Lot rent $230. mo.
(352) 527-3499


YOU'LL* THIS!
MAKE OFFER
Inverness
2 lots/ 3 Mobile
Homes off Turner
Camp Rd
813-545-3457
Opt For Owner Finance
2/11/2 Bath, 55+ Park
washer/Dryer, range
refrigerator, MUST SEE!
Lot Rent $249.
352-419-6825, 464-0590
SINGING FOREST PK
2/2 dble 2 Ig scrn prchs,
jacuzzi, Ig corner lotC11
facing pond. W/D, Lot
rent$159. $20K. (352)
860-2208; 810-359-8315
Updated 2/2
Mobile Home $20,500
In Oak Pond Estates
Nicely landscaped
Remodeled
(423) 596-0879
WESTWIND VILLAGE 55+
Park. Updated 2/2 DW's
for sale. Reasonable
(352) 628-2090







Homosassa

3/2, DW
Move In

cond. Rer

view mins to

Gulf

$29K or rent

$675.

(352)

212-7272














835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FI
(352) 795-0021
View our website
C21 NatureCoast.com




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1 BR, AC, Cable, Clean
$495. mo.352-628-4391
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
util. Includ. $600. mo.+
sec, 352-628-6537
INVERNESS
2BR, turn., upper Apt.
55+ waterfront Park. All
utll. pd except phone
$650. (352) 476-4964




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/1 W/D Hkuplncld
water & lawn. $550 mo.
+ Sec. 352-634-5499
FLORAL CITY
1BD $300/mo $200 dp
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $495 Mo No pets.
352- 697-0310

Lecanto
NEWER 2 BR 2 Ba
duplex, $595
352- 634-1341

MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
Ist MO. RENTFREE
(352) 795-2626





THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.




FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT 1000SQFT
Ideal location, corner
Hwy41 &48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 Sun rm. Den,
55+comm 352-746-2621
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000 dn + lot rentat
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




INVERNESS 2/1
Brand New, Upscale
$599. 786-999-2365
INVERNESS
2/1/1, W/D $550. mo
+dep. 815-325-4110


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Furunised $900
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Furn. Waterfront $600
2/2 Waterfront $500
Agent (352) 382-1000




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg. 2/2/2 Incls all utils.
By Power Plant $1,250.
+ dep. (352) 564-8165


BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 lanai carportnew
carpet CHA $515
352-302-4057
BEVERLY HILLS
2or 3/1 /2/1 garage
57 S. Harrison $620
(352) 697-1907
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1+ FmRm, $635 mo.
352-795-1722/212-6980
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2
352-464-2514
BLACK DIAMOND
Lecanto Gated Comm.
3/2/2/2, SS kit. appls,
custom flooring. W/D.
Free cable & lawn care
& social membership
$1250. (352) 527-0456
BRENTWOOD
At Terra Vista 2/2 w/
scrn. rm. great location
Incl water, sewer, lawn,
Fl. Pest & Soc mem.
$900. (352) 422-4086
CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2/1, Scrn. Lanai, $650
mo. (352) 249-6044
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Newer House,
very clean, SS appl's
W/D $895. mo. Also
2/1/2 Very Clean in
Nice NH. scr. por. Ig. lot
$650 mo. 352-382-1373
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $750/mo
795-6299 364-2073
Crystal River/B. H.
Houses & Condos, Mint
Cond., 352-302-1370
FLORAL CITY
3/1, $650 mo&
1/1, $390. Secluded,
Scenic (352) 586-1872
HERNANDO
2/1/1, Pool, Carport,
fenc'd yd., Big Lanai
$650/mo + sec.
352-422-0025
HOMOSASSA
1/1 duplex $295.
2/1 duplex $505.
SMW villa 2/2 $595
$3/2/2 house $650
Riverlinks Realty
(352) 628-1616
HOMOSASSA
3/2/1, $595. Fenced yard.
Lease Opt. NO CREDIT
NEEDED! $2,900 DN.
(352)266-0960
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.352-341-0220
www.relax.com
RENT TO OWN
lovely 3 or 4/2,
white picket fence,
sunken hot tub, E-Z
Terms 352-228-2587




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
Nice 3/2 - Handicap
acc. $7001st/$700 sec
Also 2 MH available
(352) 697-1359



CRYSTAL RIVER
$100 a wk. incLs
everything 352-634-0708




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/carport. CHA
Remodeled, $600 or
$58k (352) 897-4447
(352) 697-1384



Homosassa
Nice room, $100 per wk
incl everything
(352) 503-2481



C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. furn, quiet park
Util. incl. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077




Crystal River RV Lot
For Sale
Snowbird/Investor/Visitor
star gated com-
munity. Must sell.
Will take $39,900 if
close quickly.
GREAT LOT!!! Con-
tact at 860-841-8419
leave message or text

FLORAL CITY

4 Pretty Rolling,
fenced Ac, paved
Rd, 3/2, 1344 Sqft DW
"move in" condition.
workshop, water to
pastures, mls 344713
to settle estate.
$114,900 obo

25 Fenced Ac w/
frontage on 581 &
480. Nice 2351 Sq Ft
home, carport,
workshop, barn, good
pastures, high and
dry beautiful land.
mls #345878
$485,000 obo
Commercial BLG
4000 Sq Ft w Office
.89 Ac pvd Parking for
15 County is
cutting costs to move
in businees until
October! mIs 33440
$295,000 owner finan!

WATERFRONT

Keywest/Coastal
style 3397 Sq Ft home
built 2007, crows nest,
walk out deck covered
porches, FP. wood
floorsgranite coun-
ters, energy efficient,


3/3 & half bath much
more. 1.89 Ac on
Lake Bradley near the
trail! mls# 345427
$389,000

On the main Lake
and near the Trail In
Inverness, 2/2/2 at
720 Edgewater,
renovated and move
in ready. mis 347168
$249,000 obo

Istachatta on
Daviston nice 2/2 SW
w carport & porches,
dock and boat
launch just oOff the
River and near the
trail. mls 344129
$74,900

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


CIASSIFIEDS


Ra E

For Sale
Dunnellon $21,900, 2
bedroom. 1 bath. Handy
Man Special, Great
Starter Home, or Rental.
Motivated Seller. Make
an Offer!!! Deedra Hester
407-761-0627








FARMS, LAND
AND SMALL
TOWN COUNTRY
LIFESTYLE






GREAT DEALS

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EUOV MOUSiNG
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com




OWNER FINANCING
Fabulous 3/2 Like new.
SS appliances, custom
flooring, 2 car garage +
golf cart space.
Price to sell. $195K.
(352) 527-3501




3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
includes, priv. suit,
fenced yd. new roof,
dble carport, poss. rent
to own. $59, 900
(352) 464-0641
(239) 298-0076




ARBOR LAKES 55+
Comm 3/2/2 + Lg en-
close sunrm. on most
pvt.lot $199,500 (352)
726-7952 Selling
commission to Realtors




2 BR, 1 BA, I car gar.,
laundry rm, new floor-
ing & LR, 1,000 sq.ft. liv-
ing area, Highlands,
Come see $59,000
(352) 419-6719
3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.invernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com
High End Red Cedar
2/2/2.5 home. Granite,
stainless steel, tiled,
recessed lights, huge pa-
tio, enclosed tiled porch.
Nestled in a rain forest
yet minutes to town. 85k
firm. email for pics
evnan11l@yahoo.com
Nancy 352-345-0738.
Lease Option
3/2/2 excl cond. mod-
ern, newerclean,
quiet, fenced$107K
Keystone Arbor RItyFI
LLC(813) 265-8833




EXCELLENT
OWNER
FINANCING

$137K






Sits high on a hill
w/great view 3/2/2
w/bonus rm. Approx
2650sf U.R. 2100 sf.
Real Mexican Tile.
Brand new Jaccuzzi,
raised oak cabinets,
kitchen island. Lrg
stone fireplace in
great room, 3 very
large bedrooms,
2 bigwalk in closets,
florida room.HOME
JUST totally UPDATED
Beautiful
landscaping and 800'
of vinyl, picket &
privacy fencin,
almost an acre
Owners Winter Home
FOR SALE or LEASE.
(352) 341-1334


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 CIl


FLORAL CITY

4 Pretty Rolling,
fenced Ac, paved
Rd, 3/2, 1344 Sqft DW
"move in" condition.
workshop, water to
pastures. mis 344713
to settle estate.
$114,900 obo
----------------
25 Fenced Ac w/
frontage on 581 &
480. Nice 2351 Sq Ft
home, carport,
workshop, barn, good
pastures, high and
dry beautiful land.
mls #345878
$485,000 obo

Commercial BLG
4000 Sq Ft w Office
.89 Ac pvd Parking for
15 County is
cutting costs to move
in businees until
October! mis 33440
$295,000 owner finan!
----------------
Waterfront

Keywest/Coastal
style 3397 Sq Ft home
built 2007, crows nest,
walk out deck covered
porches, FP. wood
floors,granite coun-
ters, energy efficient,
3/3 & half bath much
more. 1.89 Ac on
Lake Bradley near the
trail! mls# 345427
$389,000

On the main Lake
and near the Trail In
Inverness, 2/2/2 at
720 Edgewater,
renovated and move
in ready, mis 347168
$249,000 obo

Istachatta on
Daviston nice 2/2 SW
w carport & porches,
dock and boat
launch just oOff the
River and near the
trail, mis 344129
$74,900

WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







OPEN

HOUSE SAT.
3/2 2200 sq la. 33'
hted inground pool
w/sum kit. near
schools, hospital
$150K, 1350 NE 7th av
352-564-0001 day
352-794-6504 night




4/2 CEMENT HOME
1,200SF on '/4 acre
Remodeled, Clean
$65K.
(305) 619-0282


2/2,

Cul-de-sac,
recent a/c & heat
pump, ext. paint &
roof. Fam rm. w/frpl.
2000+sf living + encld.
fla. rm. $102,500. By
appt. (352) 382-7086
19 Jungleplum Ct. E.


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com












Best Time to Buy
also have lease
options & owner
financing available.
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty

CUSTOM BUILT
HOMES
3/2/2 +Lanai
Starting @ $69,900
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
J. Cintula Builder


Lee k
INVERNESS 3/2/2
pool home oversize
lanai on 1 acre
For Rent or Sale
(908) 322-6529






\oLirm rld firsi


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!


(I,, ,I../'


"Still having trouble with that shoulder?"










JOHN GORDON ROOFING


Ig & Home Inspections


(352) 302-9269


Roige i#C1359 - Home-nsecorHI36


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I '11 work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvy()
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property!!!!
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685









Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


"Let's Go To The
Real Estate Auction"
Call Lisa for the
details
352-795-0784
Plantation Realty
plantationrealtvlisinas
.corn
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner

For Sale o4
2 BR Modular Home
On Water
Great Fishing Area
$150,000 obo
443-619-6283
HOMES ARE MY
PASSION


mr *' *<- . �
Gitta Barth/Realtor

Certified International
Property Specialist
(352) 220-0466
Coldwell Banker
Investors Realty, Inc
SALT WATERFRONT
STILT HOME Ozello Keys
private boat dock &
ramp. 1000sqft upstairs,
1000sqft screened
downstairs. 2/1.
Fenced yard, CHA
Owner Finance. 5%
down payment.
$174,900. Call Craig
352-422-1011



BY OWNER
Residential Building Lots
W. Highland & N. High-
land. Must buy both
$25,000/firm. Please no
agents. 617-471-7417




HERNADO .88 acres
with well, septic and
power all in place.
For more details call
Kristin Holland at
Plantation Realty
352-220-1186.
INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots #39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033


2 SUPREME ADJACENT
ELEVATED LOTS
Oak Village Blvd. SMW
Approx. 30K sq ft.
$100,000
(352) 382-3202





FREE!!!
Do you have a trans-
portation vehicle you
are wanting to sell for
$2,000 or less? If you
do, you can sell
it here in our
classified ads
section for FREE!

You'll get 6 Lines,
14 days in the
Chronicle and
2 runs in our Wheels
section on Tuesday's.

Offer valid for private
party sellers through
our Chronicle
website only please.

To place your free
ad, simply go to:
WWW.
chronicleonline.com
and click on the
"Place an Ad" icon
located on our home
page.




'02, 23ft,
Magic Tilt Trailer
Dual axle, 4 V-hull
$1,300
(352) 628-5008
MERCURY 150XL
EFI. New 2007. $7900
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
MERCURY 1998
125HP, 20" shaft. $2850
(352) 795-1923;
605-351-1419
SALE 50% Off Mnf. Price
Pontoon Boat Reuphol.
Sale Tops & Covers
Repairs 352-563-0066



2 Kayaks Fiberglass
12' -NATIVE "DELUXE
stable ideal for fishing
pd $2k used once$1k
incls fiberglass peddles
life vest(352) 220-6100
19 Flare made b y
Lake wells Fl.
Evinrude w/kicker
$900 obo(352)
794-3081 352-228-2324
12'ALUMACRAFT
2008, Jon Boat, Nice,
with Tilt Trailer, 2006-9.8
Nissan motor. $1,300
OBO Call 352-634-4421
14' Aluminium Flat
bottom $200.
269-252-9134
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $6500
(352) 560-3019
BASS TRACKER 3
1979, Bass Boats Inc.,
16ft W/ Trailer. Many new
items. $2,000 Firm.
352-634-2791
BASS TRACKER 3
50hp Mercury, with trailer.
Too many new parts to
list. $2,000.00 FIRM
352-634-2791
BLUE WAVE 2007
200 Bay 115HP
Yamaha, Performance
trailer. $10,500 (352)
795-1923; 605-351-1419
BOAT DOCKAGE
old Homosassa
$150/mo(352) 212-7272
CAROLINA SKIFF
1999, 21', 115 Suzuki 4
stroke, new trolling motor
- many extras. 12K
563-1265
HURRICANEKAYAK
2008, SANTEE, 116
SPORT 36LBS, EXEL
CON., $775 OBO
352.503.5319
SOLD
14' Jon Boat
25HP Evinrude elect.
start motor, trailer, troll.
mtr., FF, $1,850. firm
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225,400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
VOLVO ENGINE
170 HP 6 CYL,LOW
HRS,COMPLETE,RUNS
GREAT,$800 ALSO
HAVE 2 280 OUT-
DRIVES 352-256-8488


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used

Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsup ercenterucom







mre. IIPM Inside
















ON SITE AUCTION WEEK





THURS ESTATE JUNE 23M
AdInventurness. ComAuplete lon
Mng estate Farm house
workshopvalue & arety. Orch1986












Fleetwood Eagle
supplies, cactus collec-
lection, tools, household &
more. 6PM Inside
Quality High end turn.,
Oriental Bedrm Set, art,
sm. apple , jewelry, etc!
FRI. JUNE 24
ON SITE AUCTION
Prey. 8AM Sale 9AM
2845 E. Hayes St.,
nvern41) nveess. Complete v-
Ing estate Farm house
workshop & barn. 1986
Fleetwood Eagle
motorhome, Nascar,
sword/knife. Doll col-
lection, country style
turn. & decor & 2 shops
w/hand tools, parts,
pieces, power tools, etc
DudleysAuctionecom
4000 S. Fla. Ave.
(US 41-S)500/obnverness
(352) 637-9588
AB1667 AU2246
12% BP-2% ca.disc
36' Winnebago
ITASCA - 3 slides, under
11K mi! GREAT CONDI
Homosassa. $76,9006
obo (850) 449-1811
INTRUDER
'98 Ford 460 31Kw/ mi.
New tires, brakesair
Exc cond. Engine/trans
serviced. $15,500/obo
352-212-6182



'07 STARCRAFT
POP-UP
17ft open. Used 3 times.
Sleeps 6 with extras.
$4200. (352) 382-5309
A-LINER
'07, 15 ft, w/ micro-
wave, AC, refrigerator
Excel. Cond. $7,900
352-697-9339, 249-6505
HORNET 37'
2 slides, awning, wood
cabinets, split 2 bdrms
sleeps 8, very nice $14K
352-586-9627/586-9268
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
call me 352-201-6945
WILDERNESS
19 FT.
$1,500 obo
(352) 860-1151



'08 CHEVY GRILL
Chevy grill for a truck,
nothing wrong
with it. $50
352-422-3157
CHROME TRUCK
Bed rails & gas cap
cover exc cond
$125.
352-422-3745
CUSTOM BRA FOR
"09"SPIDER,CONV.COVERS
FRONT,COST
$150,SELL $100.
352-746-4160
Fiberglass Truck
Cap
$100(352) 637-1242
Michelin TEX TEMPO-
RARY TIRE, on Rim -
Used - T125/80 R16 -
sold 'as is' - $25
(352)-489-5245
RAISED TOPPER FOR
TRUCK, Florida Line
Rebel II, 60"X89", $80.00
352-344-2321
TRAILER TIRE & RIM
Brand new on 5 lug
rim, 5.30X12,
never used. $40
352-746-4160







C12 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


:9X? 6) Ootosrae^;.
i . ............... ..... .... ........... . .......... -


352-49-569


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trucks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909

4 BIG SALE!! +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not*
CASH PAID - $200 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
KEEP your used auto
parts in Citrus Co.
Dale's Auto Parts. &
Salvage Pays top $$$
for your autos.
352-628-4144
We Buy Any Vehicle
Perfect Condition
or not so perfect, titled,
no title, no problem.
I will pay up to
$15,000 for Vehicles.
Any make, any model.
Call A.J. (813) 335-3794




THIS OUT!
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY ON OUR
EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click on the "Place
an Ad" icon.
4 BIG SALEII +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
k Low Payments *
352-461-4518
BMW
2006 750 BMW 750LI
2006 black mint 52000 mi
19.6/25 mpg $34,000
OBO 352-382-7489
CADILLAC
1995, sedan, Deville
Cadillac, 132,000 miles,
runs good, $1250. Call
Bob @813-469-2392
CHEVY
1993, Lumina, Tan color,
needs work, body in good
shape. $900.00
201-7968
CHEVY
2005 Malibu LT
leather, sunroof,
a gas sipper 9,988
866-838-4376

FORD
2006 Focus SES
four door sedan
57k 10,988
866-838-4376

HONDA
2001 Accord LX
89k auto, ac, 6,990
Don't Hesitate
866-838-4376

HONDA
2004 Accord coupe
77k miles, Ix coupe
rare find 10980
866-838-4376

HONDA
2005 Civic 55k orig
miles, auto, ac, nicely
equipped, 9,990
one owner 40mpg
866-838-4376
LINCOLN
2000 Lincoln Town Car
Executive L
Black on black $2500
OBO (352) 422-7755
LINCOLN
CONTINENTAL
1998 Good cond. Runs
well. LOADED! $2000
(352) 794-3134
MONTE CARLO
'05, great cond., runs
great 1 owner 73K mi.
$6,800
352-613-4071

NISSAN
2003350 ZX, Touring
leather 31k orig
all the rider call for
deal! 866-838-4376


NISSAN
2004 Maxima sunroof
top of the line
69k miles mint call for
deal! 866-838-4376
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625
SOLD
SATURN
2002, Cold A/C, 5 spd,
140K miles. Good Condi-
tion. $2,000 OBO.




FORD
'74, F100, 360/C6, LB
w/ extra rebuilt 360
$1,400
(352) 564-4598







Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





4 BIG SALEII +
CONSIGNMENTS USA
WE DO IT ALL
BUY-SELL-RENT-
CAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RV
39 YRS IN BIZ
US19 BY AIRPORT
* Low Payments *
352-461-4518
CHEVY
'95, S10, V6, 5spd. 152k
mi, good cond. new
tires, runs excel.. $2,500.
(352) 382-2199
DODGE
'04 DUALLY DIESEL 4dr
Only 77k mi. exc. cond.
Asking only $21,400.
(352) 465-4157
FORD
1986, F150, 302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800. (404)416-9359
FORD
1990, F350, dually, crew
cab, a/c, tilt cruise, runs
good, $2,500 OBO
Robert 352-563-1934
FORD
1993 F-150, 4 x 4,
shortbed, good shape,
runs great, good tires
$3,500, (352) 795-1015
FORD 2002 F350
7.3 diesel, auto, 12ft
cargo bx, 202K mi alum
lift gate. $6900 (352)
795-1923; 605-351-1419

* THIS OUT!
FORD
2004 Explorer XLT w/
Moon Roof +++ Like
Show Room New!
7,200 miles! $15,900
352-746-4920

FORD
2004 Ranger X cab
XLT 67k miles,
better hurry 11,488
866-838-4376
FORD F 250
99 Lariat, 150k mi 4x4
Extented cab 4 dr.
$5,650 352-201-0177
GMC
2006, 2500 HD pick up
low miles 4x4
better hurry 14988
866-838-4376
TOYOTA 05
Tundra Max low mis.
X warrty tool box tow
pkg new tires $12,500
cell(727) 644-0157
TOYOTA '07
Tundra SR5 4dr. Auto,
cold air. LOADED! Tow
pkg. 59k miles. $13,900/
obo. (352) 746-1622




CHRYSLER
2005 Pacifica
57k orig miles one
owner 11,988
866-838-4376


GMC
1995, Suburban,
4WD,3rd row seat, runs
excellent,$2000 obo call
(352)201-0374

HONDA
2002 CRV all wheel
drive, ex 89k show-
room new $8,990
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Element SC
color keyed bumpers
low miles a diamond
nicely equipped
17,988 866-838-4376

ISUZU
'97 RODEO
Runs great. $1500
(573) 690-4002
TOYOTA
1999, 4-Runner,
low mi. garage kept,
Like New! $7000
850-260-4575




FORD
1996 F-250, 4x4, AT,
cold AC, new tires, 98K
mi., Top Kat topper.
Asking $4,850
(352) 586-9498




CHRYSLER
1999 Town & Country
Limited, Lthr int, new
tires, garage kept, clean,
runs great. 138k. $5,000
352-746-9457

CHRYSLER
2005 Town n Country
sto and go, 42 k tour-
ing navi dvd 11,990
866-838-4376

DODGE
88, Ram LE 250, 8 Pass
130K mi.V8, auto, all
options $1200 obo
(352) 601-3656
DODGE
'96 Caravan, runs
good, needs transmis-
sion work. $500
(573) 690-4002

HONDA
2005 Odyssey
Touring, navi, dvd,
one owner carfax
wont last 17,988
866-838-4376

TOYOTA
2008 Sienna LE low mi
one owner 7 pass
better hurry 19,988
866-838-4376




Harley Davidson
'06, Sportster, brand
new, low mi., Alarm sys.
Sissy Bar $5,700
Cry River(352) 613-2849
HONDA HELIX
(2) 93-96 low miles
250cc 70mpg $2400 for
both (352) 697-5530
Honda Trike
'05 Goldwing,
20,000 mi. Black Cherry
$26,500.
(352) 465-6991
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995. 352-601-7460
Suzuki 2010
Boulevard C50
Less than 800 miles, my
loss, your gain! $6,500
firm. (352) 422-4528
WANTED
JUNK MOTORCYCLE
Will Pay up to $200 for
Unwanted Motorcycle
352-942-3492




918-0715 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com from June
15,2011 -July 15, 2011.
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, June 15 thru
July 15, 2011.



PR Noie


500-0621 TUCRN V-11-08
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION
FOR VARIANCE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) will conduct a
Public Hearing on the following application on July 7 2011 at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Flor-
ida:


CLASSIFIED


Wuniw Grim BY TRICKY RICKY KANE

1. Bath fixture fan group (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Amaze a Chinese Chairman (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Less dangerous thin cookie (2) syllables in each word.

I 1 1 I� 2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc
4. Longtime bud's B'way awards (2)


5. Comedian Lopez's smithies (2)

I I I I II * I----
6. River running losing speed (2)


7. Sandy strands' security lapses (2)


SHHV E SH3HVH 'LODNIAO IS I ONIO'ld '9 S H Oa SH1OHOD
*s SANOL SANOH T dVAM HVS ' OVW MOM % ffaIJ RW11i
6-21-11 SHIASNV


594-0621 TUCRN
Goldenstern, Eleanor 2011-CP-32 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-32
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELEANOR GOLDENSTERN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELEANOR GOLDENSTERN, deceased, whose date
of death was December 9, 2010, and whose Social Security Number is 336-20-6629, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ William Jay Bornhausen
5220 33rd Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55417
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ R. Shawn Fitzpatrick Florida Bar No. 40999 352-726-1821
FITZPATRICK & FITZPATRICK, P.A. 213 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida 34450-4239
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 14 & 21, 2011.


595-0621 TUCRN
McWilliams, Flossie L, 2011-CP-245 Notice to Cred,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2011-CP-245
IN RE: ESTATE OF FLOSSIE L. MCWILLIAMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of FLOSSIE L. MCWILLIAMS, deceased, whose date
of death was January 29, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN Florida Bar No. 0075272 Attorney for the Estate
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, Florida 34447 Ph: (352) 382-7934 Fax: (352) 382-7936
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 14 & 21,2011.


596-0621 TUCRN
Wooten, Rosemary 2011-CP-292 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 201 1-CP-292
IN RE: ESTATE OF ROSEMARY WOOTEN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ROSEMARY WOOTEN, deceased, whose date of
death was March 22, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Julia M. Westphal
1349 County Road M, Pickett, Wisconsin 54964
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ R. Shawn Fitzpatrick Florida Bar No. 40999 352-726-1821
FITZPATRICK & FITZPATRICK, P.A. 213 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, Florida 34450-4239
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 14 & 21, 2011.


597-0621 TUCRN
Ramistella Sr., Gene Lohse 2011-CP-338 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-CP-338
IN RE: ESTATE OF GENE LOHSE RAMISTELLA, SR. A/K/A GENE L. RAMISTELLA
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Gene Lohse Ramistella, Sr a/k/a Gene L.
Ramistella, deceased, whose date of death was February 20, 2011, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is June 14,2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Darlene B. Ramistella
2387 West Begonia Drive, Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
/s/ John A. Nelson, Esq., Florida Bar No.: 0727032
Slaymaker & Nelson, P.A. 2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, Florida 34453
Telephone: (352)726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223 E-Mail: john@slaymakerlaw.com
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 14 & 21,2011.


502-0628 TUCRN
Vs. Lexington Homes, Inc. 51-2009-CA-6456WS Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR PASCO COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: Case No.: 51-2009-CA-6456WS
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, successor by merger to First South Bank,
Plaintiff,
v.
LEXINGTON HOMES, INC., a Florida corporation; CRAIG J. FIEBE, individually; LAURIE A.
GRIFFIN-DYL; CYPRESS VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; GLEN HOBBS,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


V-11-08 Fagan Construction, Inc. for Richard Carroll - To allow a Variance from the
Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC) for the construction of a room addi-
tion and a screen porch addition to an existing single family residence exceeding
the maximum allowable Impervious Surface Ratio (ISR), pursuant to Section 4654.
Impervious Surface Requirements (ISR) for All Uses, of the LDC; Section 23, Township
19 South, Range 20 East: more specifically Lot 11, Block A, Inverness Golf Estates Plat
Book 14, Page 33; which address is known as 3192 South Blackmountain Drive, Inver-
ness, FL. A complete legal description of the property is on file with the Land Devel-
opment Division.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21, 2011.


599-0621 TUCRN V-11-07
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION
FOR VARIANCE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) will conduct a
Public Hearing on the following application on July 7 2011, at 9:00 AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Flor-
ida:
V-11-07 Wayne Walker for Catherine Holliday - To allow a Variance from the Citrus
County Land Development Code (LDC) for the placement of a single family resi-
dence having less than the required 50-foot minimum building setback from the
mean high water line (35-feet with berm and swale), pursuant to Section 4120.
Surface Water Quality Protection, of the LDC; Section 31. Township 19 South, Ranae
17 East more specifically, Lots 25 and 26, of Homosassa Isle, which address is 5458 S.
Island Dr., Homosassa, Florida. A complete legal description of the property is on file
with the Land Development Division.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21,2011.


501-0705 TUCRN 11-SE-01
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the City of Inverness, Inverness, Florida, pursuant to
Chapter 163, Laws of Florida, for the following Public Hearing to consider and act
upon the following Special Exception.
The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a Public Hearing on the 6th day of
July, 2011 at 5:00 P.M. at City Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to act upon the
following case:
Case 11-SE-01- Applicant Todd Mathes, Agent for Benderson Development Co. LLC.
request a Special Exception use for a Shopping Center in the C-Commercial Zoning
District on the following described property:
1012 W. Main Street
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E, PINE HILL ADDITION TO INVER-
NESS ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF DAVIDSON STREET (F.K.A. CLARK AVENUE), THENCE N.0 DE-
GREES 06'01"E, ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 166.89 FEET TO
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 41, THENCE N.45 DEGREES
25'51"W, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 438.76 FEET TO
THE CENTERLINE OF HENDRIX AVENUE (F.K.A. LEE STREET) THENCE S.0 DEGREES 35'51"W,
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 176.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE INTERSEC-
TION OF SAID HENDRIX AVENUE AND WEST DAMPIER STREET, THENCE S.89 DEGREES
42'47" W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID WEST DAMPIER STREET A DISTANCE OF
408.49 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORD
BOOK 1553, PAGE(S) 2203 THROUGH 2210, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE S.0 DEGREES 42'12"W, ALONG SAID EAST LINE A DISTANCE OF 29.83
FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 10, BLOCK E, OAK PARK ADDITION TO
INVERNESS ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT BEING ON THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID WEST DAMPIER STREET, THENCE N.89 DEGREES
57'14"E, ALONG SAID LINE A DISTANCE OF 46.06 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT 10, BLOCK E, SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CLEVE-
LAND STREET, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 37'40"W, ALONG SAID CLEVELAND STREET A DIS-
TANCE OF 269.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E OF SAID OAK
PARK ADDITION TO INVERNESS, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE
OF TOMPKINS STREET (F.K.A. PEARCE STREET), THENCE N.89 DEGREES 41'11"E, ALONG
SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 24.98 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF
SAID CLEVELAND STREET, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 20'16"W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF
CLEVELAND STREET A DISTANCE OF 30.01 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SAID TOMPKINS
STREET, THENCE S.89 DEGREES 55'06"W, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID TOMPKINS
STREET A DISTANCE OF 134.55 FEET TO A PROJECTION OF LOTS 11 THROUGH 15, BLOCK
E, PINE HILL ADDITION TO INVERNESS, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 45'19"W, ALONG THE PRO-
JECTION AND ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOTS 11 THROUGH 15, BLOCK E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 169.28 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 5, BLOCK E OF SAID PINE
HILL ADDITION TO INVERNESS, SAID POINT BEING ON THE NORTH LINE OF A 10 ALLEY AS
SHOWN ON SAID PLAT, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 41'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 10.02 FEET TO
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5, BLOCK E, THENCE S.00 DEGREES 32'39" W,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 5, BLOCK E A DISTANCE OF 110.16 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 44, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 46'50"E,
ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 462.48 FEET TO THE CENTER-
LINE OF AFOREMENTIONED HENDRIX AVENUE, THENCE N.0�33'44"E, ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 309.47 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF AFORE-
MENTIONED TOMPKINS STREET, THENCE N.89 DEGREES 48'42"E, ALONG SAID NORTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 317.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CON-
TAINING 352,306 SQ.FT. (8.09 ACRES MORE OR LESS)
The Zoning Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on the 20th of July, 2011 at
5:00 P.M. at City Hall, 212 West Main Street, Inverness, to consider the recommenda-
tion of the Planning and Zoning Commission on the above referenced Case
11-SE-01.

Copies of the proposed application and plans are on file in the Department of De-
velopment Services at 212 West Main Street in the City Hall and may be reviewed
between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday of each
week.
All property owners and interested persons are invited to inspect such proposed reg-
ulation changes and to be present at and participate in the Public Hearings by the
Planning and Zoning Commission and Zoning Board of Adjustment.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Board with respect to any
matter considered at these hearings will need a record of proceedings, and for
such purposes, and need to ensure a verbatim record of proceedings is made,
which included the testimony and evidence upon this appeal is based (Section
286.010 F.S.)
Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually impaired, etc.) may be ar-
ranged, with advanced notification of 5 days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Pre-arrangements may be initiated by dialing (352) 726-3401 weekdays from 8:00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Signed: /s/ Kenneth Koch
Director Development Services

Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21 & July 5, 2011.


503-0621 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
To Whom It May Concern:
You are hereby notified that the following described livestock, black and white spot-
ted mare, approximately 10 years in age, is now impounded with the Citrus County
Animal Services, 4030 S. Airport Road, Inverness, FL 34450. This animal was picked up
at or near 6122 Deadwood, Beverly Hills. Unless redeemed with 3 days from date
hereof, this animal will be offered for sale at public auction to the highest and best
bidder for cash.

Citrus County Sheriff's Office
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21, 2011.


919-0627 TU/SU/MCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NRC PUBLIC MEETING
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is holding public meetings to discuss the
content of the Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Plant draft supplemental environmental
impact statement (DSEIS), clarify the environmental issues covered in the DSEIS, and
accept comments that the public may have on the DSEIS.
Two identical sessions will be held at:
Plantation Inn
9301 W Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429
Tuesday, June 28, 2011
2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
"Open House" with NRC staff one hour prior to each meeting
For additional information, please call the NRC at (800) 368-5642 extension 3748
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21, 26 & 27,2011.


INC.; C. STERLING QUALITY ROOFING, INC.; L&S SUPPLIES LLC; MONTROSE SHELVING,
INC.; CEMEX CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS OF FLORIDA LLC; OVERHEAD DOOR COM-
PANY OF CLEARWATER, INC.; BLAIR'S AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING; C&C WINDOW
& DOOR CO. INC.; ANTHONY T. SAVARESE; MADEWELL KITCHENS INC.; SOUTHWEST
LAWN SPRINKLERS INC.; SPRINGWOOD ESTATES UNIT 4 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.; VALLEYCREST LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE, INC.; SPYGLASS AT RIVERBEND
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; REUNION RESORT & CLUB OF ORLANDO MASTER
ASSOCIATION, INC.; LAKE JOVITA HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SERENGETI
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.; PAVIMENTO, INC.; DENNIS ROSASCO; RIVER BEND
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; JOHN/JANE DOE I, as unknown tenants in posses-
sion; JOHN/JANE DOE II, as unknown tenants in possession; JOHN/JANE DOE III, as
unknown tenants in possession; and JOHN/JANE DOE IV, as unknown tenants in pos-
session;
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 13,
2011, entered in Case No. 2009-CA-6459-WS pending in the Sixth Judicial Circuit
Court in and for Pasco County, Florida, in which Branch Banking and Trust Company
is the Plaintiff and Lexington Homes, a Florida corporation, Craig J. Fiebe, individu-
ally, Laurie A. Griffin-Dyl, Cypress Village Property Owners Association, Inc., Glen
Hobbs, Inc., C. Sterling Quality Roofing, Inc., L&S Supplies LLC, Montrose Shelving,
Inc., Cemex Construction Materials of Florida LLC, Overhead Door Company of
Clearwater, Inc., Blair's Air Conditioning & Heating, C&C Window & Door Co., Inc.,
Anthony T. Savarese, Madewell Kitchens, Inc., Southwest Lawn Sprinklers Inc., Spring-
wood Estates Unit 4 Homeowners Association, Inc., Valleycrest Landscape Mainte-
nance, Inc., Spyglass at Riverbend Homeowners Association, Inc., Reunion Resort &
Club of Orlando Master Association, Inc., Lake Jovita Homeowners Association, Inc.,
Serengeti Homeowners' Association, Inc., Pavimento, Inc., Dennis Rosasco, River
Bend Homeowners Association, Inc., John/Jane Doe I as unknown tenants in posses-
sion, John/Jane Doe II as unknown tenants in possession, John/Jane Doe III as un-
known tenants in possession,, John/Jane Doe IV as unknown tenants in possession,
are the Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder via online Inter-
net at www.pasco.realforeclose.com, at 11:00 a.m. on July 12, 2011, the
following-described property set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
PASCO COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOT 745, LAKE JOVITA GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB PHASE FOUR-A, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 54, PAGE(S) 10 THROUGH 16, INCLUSIVE,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND
LOTS 63, 64, 65 AND 66, SERENGETI UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 59, PAGES 9 THROUGH 16, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
HERNANDO COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOTS 3, 7, 8, 10, 13, 16, 17 AND 20, SPRINGWOOD ESTATES, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 37 PAGES 25 AND 26, INCLUSIVE, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HERNANDO COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOT 49 BLOCK 13, AND LOTS 3 AND 13 BLOCK 15, SPYGLASS AT RIVER BEND, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 106 PAGES 206 THROUGH 219,
INCLUSIVE, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
CITRUS COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOT 6, BLOCK B-90, LOT 6, BLOCK B-97, AND LOT 21, BLOCK B-91, SUGARMILL WOODS,
CYPRESS VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,
PAGES 86 THROUGH 150, INCLUSIVE; PLAT BOOK 10, PAGES 1 THROUGH 150, INCLU-
SIVE; AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, INCLUSIVE; AND AS AMENDED IN
PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87-A; ALL AMONG THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
AND
OSCEOLA COUNTY PROPERTY:
LOTS 301 AND 303, REUNION WEST VILLAGE 3A, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 16 PAGES 136 THROUGH 141, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Dated this 15 day of June, 2011
GRAY ROBINSON, P.A.
/s/ David S. Hendrix, Esquire Florida Bar No. 827053
/s/ Alexandra de Alejo, Esquire Florida Bar No. 43108
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite 2200, Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 273-5000 (813) 273-5145 (fax)
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, June 21 & 28, 2011.


I PDRB Notic


I PDRB Nod


Foreclosure Sale
Action Notices I


Foreclosure Sale/
Acdon Nodces I


Forclosure Sale/
es
Acdon Notic E


Notices to Creditors/
Administration I


Notices to Creditors
Administration I


Nodces to Creditors
Administration I


I Misc. Notic


I Misc. Notic


I Misc. Noti


Meeting

I Notices I


Meeting

I Notices I


Meeting

I Notices I


Foreclosure Sale
Acdon Nodces I


Foreclosure Sale
Acdon Nodces I


Foreclosure Sale
Acdon Nodces I







TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011



IEELS


INSIDE


* l IIi li' Ih. II'I li


I iii I I I
I ii,, I
iii' 'iii' 'ii Ii iii. 'I


Y O U R S O U R C E F O R A L L T H IN G S A U T O M O T I V E


Dramatic freshening of the 2011 Ford Edge includes extensive exterior redesign, improved materials and craftsmanship on the interior, class-exclusive technology and new powertrains. MyFord Touch is a driver-connect technol-
ogy powered by SYNC that links drivers with in-car technologies and their digital lifestyles.


BONUS WHEELS
BY ARV VOSS, Motor Matters


Ri


The 2011 Ford Edge definitely
has an "edge" with its bolder,
more smoothly flowing exte-
rior character lines, stronger grille pres-
ence and new chin spoiler.
The hood flows into the A-pillar, displaying the
essence of sculpture. The exterior enhancements are
matched by the interior modifications that reflect
heightened craftsmanship, the utilization of better ma-
terials and improved fit and finish. Touch points have
been softened and flexibility improved in terms of space
for gear stowage.
Starting at $27,515, the 2011 Edge is available in
four models: SE, SEL, Limited, and a Sport trim with a
more athletic presence and added power.
New features for 2011 are: MyFord Touch; the all-
new 3.5-liter Ti-VCT V6 engine; 18-inch wheels and tires
on Edge SEL and Edge Limited; retuned suspension;
available HID headlamps; thicker acoustic-laminated
windshield and enhanced sound package.
In addition to the upgraded high-
tech exterior appearance, the 2011
Edge gains more power for the SEL and
Limited models provided by the 3.5-
liter 24-valve Ti-VCT V6 that produces
285 horsepower and 253 lb.-ft. of
torque.
Power for the top-of-the-line Edge
Sport model comes from a 3.7-liter V6
that generates 305 horses and 280 lb.- . -
ft. of torque -- the same engine in the ,
2011 Mustang. Both engines mate to a
six-speed SelectShift automatic trans-
mission, with the Sport model provid-


revamped Technology,


Design, Po wertrains


ing class-exclusive paddle shifters that activate gear
changes without having to shift to a manual mode.
My test 2011 Ford Edge was a front-wheel drive
model in Limited trim finished outside in a Red Candy
tinted metallic hue and done inside in Black leather with
satin-finished faux wood trim accent pieces. The base
price was $34,220, while extras such as the metallic
paint, Vision Package, Driver's Entry Package, Voice ac-
tivated Navigation system and destination charges
raised the price to $37,475.
The 2011 Ford Edge is an attractive crossover util-
ity vehicle that clearly displays Ford's Blue Oval DNA in
an advanced and futuristic way. In addition to its im-
proved good looks, the performance is gratifying with
the 3.5-liter V6 delivering all the power that's needed
to the front wheels via the 6-speed automatic trans-


mission, that makes for smooth gear transitions.
The ride quality is compliant and comfortable with-
out being mushy. Handling characteristics are positive
with an on center feel from the steering. The 60/40 split
folding rear seat adds to the Edge's versatility and func-
tionality, making it possible to convert the interior to
suit cargo and passenger needs.
MyFord Touch is a driver-connect technology pow-
ered by SYNC that links drivers with in-car technologies
and their digital lifestyles. MyFord Touch replaces most
traditional vehicle buttons, knobs and gauges with
clear, crisp LCD screens and five-way controls like those
found on cellphones and MP3 players. It also utilizes
voice commands and is standard on Limited and Sport
models.
MyFord Touch is amazing with all of its connective
technology in a touch pad format. It
takes a while to adapt to accessing
the various menus and to become fa-
miliar with, but given enough time to
master all of its possibilities, it no
doubt brings a level of satisfaction
never before available to a "techno-
geek", and while I am able to appre-
ciate the system's capabilities, I still
prefer to have simple control knobs,
particularly for the audio system func-
tions.
Hopefully, I will be able to adapt to
the new wave of technology soon.


2011 JEEP WRANGLER HAS

MOVED UPSCALE


Jeep has evolved from a butt-busting, no
frills military vehicle to a comfortable, well-
equipped Sport Utility Vehicle. For 2011, leg-
endary capability is combined with an all-new
interior that delivers rich styling with signifi-
cantly upgraded materials and occupant com-
fort. The new interior includes a redesigned
instrument panel and storage areas. A lock-
able console and upgraded door armrest areas
are padded for comfort. A redesigned center
stack is easy to reach and operate. Heated
seats and heated power mirrors are now avail-


able, along with automatic temperature con-
trol. All-new steering-wheel controls operate
the radio, cruise control, handsfree phone and
other vehicle functions.
(SOURCE: DOWN THE ROAD, MOTOR MATTERS)




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


O


0


:1f~lIkiIA 1 .9,


III


FREE 24 HOUR RECORD
MESSAGE WITH INFO AN
SPECIAL PRICING:
800-584-875
Eru.1682 2

2011 HYUNDAI

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EXT.11249 EXT.16819
$21,999"o1W $14,999"oi


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CRYSTAL www.urysimuos.
937 S. Suncoast Blvd
AUTOMOTIVE Homosassa, FL 34448 I


T,


352-564-1971
*All prices and payments exclude tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. Prices and payments include $2999 down cash or trade equity. Payments are 72
months at 5.99% APR with approved credit. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.


$


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D2 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


'Alil!-QMll


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CiRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cruise into



summer with



simple auto fixes


(ARA) - We all know the
winter months can be hard
on vehicles, and this year was
no exception. Chances are
your vehicle is in need of a lit-
tle restoration. Returning
your car to optimal condition
may be less expensive and
time-consuming than you
think. Use these tips to get
your car back in shape for a
summer of smooth and smart
travel.

Paint protection
Winter can be tough on a
car's exterior, and snow and
ice may have made it difficult
to see any chips or scratches
in your vehicle. But now
spring sunshine will reveal
every nick, chip and scratch in
your vehicle's paint. Restor-
ing your ride to its original
factory finish takes only min-
utes with the easy to apply
Dupli - Color ScratchFix 2in1.
This innovative product is
available in hundreds of
exact-match colors for do-
mestic and imported vehicles.
Simply use the vehicle
make, model and year to find
your guaranteed matching
color code, and use one of
the two applicators to fix any
scrapes or nicks in no time.
With a roller ball tip for preci-
sion and a
tapered
brush for full X.
coverage,
ScratchFix
2in1 will
help restore
your vehicle
to its opti-
mal condition. And not only
will ScratchFix 2in1 make
your car look great, the
touch-up paint will also pro-
tect the damaged surface
from rusting and becoming a
big, expensive problem.

Under pressure
Driving on tires that are
too flat or full can make sum-
mer traveling dangerous and
expensive. With sky-high gas
prices, maintaining optimal
air pressure and getting the
most out of your miles is
more important than ever.
You can improve gas mileage
by up to 3.3 percent by keep-
ing your tires properly in-
flated, according to the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency. The recommended
tire pressure for vehicles is
usually found on a sticker in-
side the driver's-side door or
glove box, as well as in your
vehicle owner's manual.
Checking tire pressure takes
only a few seconds, but it
may have a significant effect
on both your well-being and
your wallet.


Wiper replacement
Don't let springtime show-
ers catch you off-guard this
year. Even if your windshield
wipers aren't visibly worn,
they may not be working ef-
fectively after the winter
months. Freezing tempera-
tures can cause rubber to be-
come brittle, making your
blades more likely to crack or
split. If yours leave behind
spots or streaks of cleaning
fluid, they need to be re-
placed. If you can pull the
blades away from the wind-
shield with little resistance,
you may need new wiper
arms.
Visibility is essential to
safe driving year-round, and
replacing these essential
pieces every six to 12 months
will ensure your view of the
road is always clear. And, if
you have one, remember to
check and replace your rear
windshield wiper as well.

Attention to detail
With just a few basic
cleaning products and a little
elbow grease, you can make
your ride gleam. First, remove
and wash the floor mats, and
vacuum the carpets and
seats. Using an all-purpose
cleaner, wipe down the dash-
board and
use canned
air to re-
move dust
and dirt
from the
tiny nooks
and cran-
nies in the
instrument panel. Use foam-
ing fabric soap or leather
cleaner on any stains, and fix
small tears with a vinyl repair
kit.
Next, use hot water and
vehicle soap to wash the ve-
hicle in sections from top to
bottom.
Remember the wheel
wells, and give a final rinse to
avoid soap spots. When dry,
wax the body, including
under door jambs and behind
the bumpers.
Use a toothbrush to re-
move excess wax from em-
blems or flat black surfaces,
then scrub your tires and pol-
ish the rims for a head-turn-
ing exterior.
You don't need to break
the bank to get your car back
in shape for the hottest auto
season. With just a little time
and minimal cost, a summer-
ready car is at your fingertips.
These tips will help you whip
your vehicle into prime con-
dition, so get ready to show
off your refreshed ride and
enjoy wherever the new sea-
son takes you.


1954 Chevrolet Bel Air Kept



in Family in Honor of Father


CLASSIC CLASSICS
BY VERN PARKER, Motor Matters
Owning a 1954 Chevrolet Bel Air was never high on
Texan Gregory Tennessee's wish list. His father-in-law,
Jacob Richardson, however, purchased a used Bel Air a
couple of decades ago and drove it to his home in Sil-
ver Creek, Ga.
In the early 1950s, Chevrolet built hundreds of
thousands sound, reliable cars, all of them powered by
the famous six-cylinder engine. The engine was virtually
indestructible, but performance was not very exciting.
Richardson died inAugust 2009.Tennessee and his
wife, Sondra, were visiting her widowed mother the last
week of December 2009. Tennessee thought that keep-
ing his father-in-law's old Chevrolet in the family would
be a good thing to do in honor of Richardson's memory.
He asked his mother-in-law if she planned on sell-
ing the Bel Air. If so, he told her that he would like to
buy it. She responded by saying, "If you want it the only
thing you have to do is figure out how to get it from
Georgia to Houston."
Soon after returning to their home in Texas, Ten-
nessee borrowed a trailer, hooked it onto his SUV and
drove the 15 hours back to Georgia to retrieve his late
father-in-law's Chevrolet.
After making the 15-hour return trip to Texas he
did not take the car to his home. Instead, the old Chevro-
let was delivered to a restoration shop.
Tennessee reports that to be on the safe side the
235.5-cubic-inch, inline engine was removed, as was the
three-speed manual transmission. He says both were re-
built to original specifications. With a manual transmis-
sion the engine was set up to deliver 115 horsepower.
The few spots of rust along the lower parts of the
Chevrolet were removed and replaced with healthy new


steel. When the time for repainting arrived Tennessee
opted for a pearl-over-black combination to replace the
original teal color.
Tennessee located new bumpers and had the orig-
inal bumper guards related with chrome. Since all of
the stainless steel trim was removed while the painting
was being done, Tennessee took the opportunity to pol-
ish the shine back on the trim.
He says it was a two-day project cleaning and polish-
ing with baking soda and SOS pads. When every trim part
was sparkling he sprayed each one with a clear coat finish.
The top-of-the-line four-door BelAir model was the
best-selling Chevrolet in 1954 with a total of 248,750
sold. Each of the 3,255-pound cars had a base price of
$1,884. This particular Chevrolet came equipped with
anAM radio, heater, turn signals, backup lights and rear
fender skirts.
"There is no power steering and no power brakes,"
Tennessee says.
"If you get hot, open the vents and go fast."
WheneverTennessee enters the reupholstered cabin
he settles behind the shoulder-wide two-spoke steering
wheel where he can see the 110-mph speedometer. "It
will probably do 75 downhill with a tail wind," he says.
A set of 6.70x15-inch tires on a 115-inch wheel-
base provides a comfortable ride. According to the
owner, all of the glass is original and the one-piece
windshield is kept clear by a pair of vacuum wipers. The
anemic performance of the vacuum operated wipers is
of no concern to Tennessee because he never plans to
have the Bel Air out in rainy weather.
The completed restoration was done last autumn
when Tennessee finally was able to bring the Bel Air
home. Since then he has driven his Chevrolet about 400
miles. Tennessee and his wife are pleased with the out-
come. "We wanted to keep it in the family," he says.


&I ADVRTIER INEI


AUTOMOTIVE CLASSIFIED

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.com email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com FAX: (352) 563-5665 * TOLL FREE (888) 852-2340


MERCURY 150XL
EFI. New 2007. $7900
(352) 795-1923
605-351-1419
MERCURY 1998
125HP, 20" shaft. $2850
(352) 795-1923;
605-351-1419


14' Jon Boat
25HP Evinrude elect.
start motor, trailer, troll.
mtr., FF $1,850. firm
(352) 341-1569
'84 WELLCRAFT, 25ft
Sportsmen, '06250hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, 60 hrs
on engine, w/new
alum. trailer $14K exc
cond 352-613-4071



YOLur \\-LI fl rst.
ELi) bl)

( ,,a , ,


BASS TRACKER 3
50hp Mercury, with trailer.
Too many new parts to
list. $2,000.00 FIRM
352-634-2791
BLUE WAVE 2007
200 Bay, 115HP
Yamaha, Performance
trailer. $10,500 (352)
795-1923; 605-351-1419
CAROLINA SKIFF
1999, 21', 115 Suzuki 4
stroke, new trolling motor
- many extras. 12K
563-1265
HURRICANEKAYAK
2008, SANTEE, 116
SPORT 36LBS, EXEL
CON., $775 OBO
352.503.5319
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225, 400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$15k. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
VOLVO ENGINE
170 HP 6 CYL,LOW
HRS,COMPLETE,RUNS
GREAT, $800 ALSO
HAVE 2 280 OUT-
DRIVES 352-256-8488


36' Winnebago
ITASCA - 3 slides, under
11K mil GREAT COND!
Homosassa. $76,900/
obo (850) 449-1811
INTRUDER
'98 Ford 460 31K mi.
New tires, brakes, air.
Exc cond. Engine/trans
serviced. $15,500/obo
352-212-6182


BMW
2006 750 BMW 750LI
2006 black mint 52000 mi
19.6/25 mpg $34,000
OBO 352-382-7489
BUICK
1997, LeSabre Custom,
White, 108k,
very clean, cold air
$2000.00 352-795-0049
CADILLAC
1995, sedan, Deville
Cadillac, 132,000 miles,
runs good, $1250. Call
Bob @ 813-469-2392
CHEVY
1993, Lumina, Tan color,
needs work, body in good
shape. $900.00
201-7968


CHEVY
2005 Malibu LT
leather, sunroof,
a gas sipper 9,988
866-838-4376
FORD
2006 Focus SES
four door sedan
57k 10,988
866-838-4376
HONDA
2001 Accord LX
89k auto, ac, 6,990
Don't Hesitate
866-838-4376
HONDA
2004 Accord coupe
77k miles, Ix coupe
rare find 10980
866-838-4376
HONDA
2005 Civic 55k orig
miles, auto, ac, nicely
equipped, 9,990
one owner 40mpg
866-838-4376
LINCOLN
2000 Lincoln Town Car
Executive L
Black on black $2500
OBO (352) 422-7755


'05, great cond., runs
great 1 owner 73K mi.
$6,800
352-613-4071
NISSAN
2003 350 ZX, Touring
leather 31k orig
all the rider call for
deal! 866-838-4376
NISSAN
2004 Maxima sunroof
top of the line
69k miles mint call for
deal! 866-838-4376
OLDS MOBILE '95
Delta 88 Royale, Like
New, all options, 53k mi.
new premium paint
$4,900 obo, 465-5625
TOYOTA
'05, Camary LE, very
clean, 79K mi.,
26-32 mpg, $10,995
(352) 637-9256


FORD
'74, F100, 360/C6, LB
w/ extra rebuilt 360
$1,400
(352) 564-4598


DODGE
'04 DUALLY DIESEL 4dr
Only 77k mi. exc. cond.
Asking only $21,400.
(352) 465-4157
FORD
04 F150 Lariat 4x4,
4 dr, 93Kmi, procomp
chrome, rims/tires,
loaded $15,500
(352) 726-0359
FORD
1986, F150, 302, drives
excellent, new tires,
$1,800. (404)416-9359
FORD
1993 F-150, 4x4,
shortbed, good shape,
runs great, good tires
$3,500, (352) 795-1015

FORD 2002 F350
7.3 diesel, auto, 12ft
cargo bx, 202K mi alum
lift gate. $6900 (352)
795-1923; 605-351-1419

FORD
2004 Ranger X cab
XLT 67k miles,
better hurry 11,488
866-838-4376


GMC
2006, 2500 HD pick up
low miles 4x4
better hurry 14988
866-838-4376
NISSAN '03
FRONTIER XE, V6, 4 dr.
115k mi, 5spd, topper,
1 owner, good cond
$8k (352) 746-1486
TOYOTA
'02, Tundra Limited,
good cond., w/ towing
pkg & more $9,995
(352) 637-9256
TOYOTA 05
Tundra Max low mis.
X warrty tool box tow
pkg new tires $12,500
cell(727) 644-0157


99 EXPLORER
$1250/obo. Engine great,
front axle needs work.
More info 8135275627
and leave message.
CHRYSLER
2005 Pacifica
57k orig miles one
owner 11,988
866-838-4376


GMC
1995, Suburban,
4WD,3rd row seat, runs
excellent,$2000 obo call
(352)201-0374

HONDA
2002 CRV all wheel
drive, ex 89k show-
room new $8,990
866-838-4376

HONDA
2009 Element SC
color keyed bumpers
low miles a diamond
nicely equipped
17,988 866-838-4376

TOYOTA
1999, 4-Runner,
low mi. garage kept,
Like New! $7000
850-260-4575



CHRYSLER
1999 Town & Country
Limited, Lthr int, new
tires, garage kept, clean,
runs great. 138k. $5,000
352-746-9457


CHRYSLER
2005 Town n Country
sto and go, 42 k tour-
ing navi dvd 11,990
866-838-4376
HONDA
2005 Odyssey
Touring, navi, dvd,
one owner carfax
wont last 17,988
866-838-4376
TOYOTA
2008 Sienna LE low mi
one owner 7 pass
better hurry 19,988
866-838-4376



KAWASAKI
'07 Vulcan Nomad
1600. Exc. cond. 2200
mi. LOADED as new.
$7250. (352) 222-5905
KAWASAKI
2006 Vulcan Nomad
1600, Excellent condition,
well serviced. Full factory
warranty til Jan 2012.
14k miles. Bike jack.
Cycleshell. Newer tires
and battery. Accessories.
$7995. 352-601-7460


To advertise in


ASK THE

AUTO

DOCTOR
WITH JUNIOR DAMATO



WHAT



BRAND


OF OIL


IS BEST

DEAR DOCTOR: I always read
your column and I am very cu-
rious about the "recom-
mended" oil brand by the
various carmakers. Why do
they sometimes recommend
one brand of oil? Jake
Dear Jake: I own a few dif-
ferent vehicles, and each one
of my cars also has a recom-
mendation for a particular oil
brand. I advise my customers
of this: Oil manufacturers give
automakers a great price on
the oil and figure with factory
endorsement car owners will
likely use that brand. I use
multiple oil brands. As long as
you are using the recom-
mended "type" of oil that
meets or exceeds what the
factory recommends your war-
ranty will not be void, regard-
less of what "brand" you are
using.

Dear Doctor: Our teenage
daughter has a rare condition
called "RSDS," which trans-
lates to "every single bump
hurts" nerve damage. Can you
give me direction on where to
start searching for a smooth
ride? Molly
Dear Molly: There are many
makes of vehicles on the mar-
ket today. A lot of them have
low-profile tires (55-60 series
tires). Vehicles with these size
tires tend to have stiffer sus-
pensions and harder rides. The
only suggestion I can make is
for you and your daughter to
test-drive as many vehicles
you can. Travel the roads that
will be driven frequently.

DEAR DOCTOR: I am now
driving very short trips and a
friend told me that condensa-
tion will build in the engine of
my 2002 Mazda B Series
pickup truck with the V-6 en-
gine. Are there oil additives
that will prevent this?
Answer: This is a very com-
mon condition for your type of
driving. The best treatment to
prevent the build-up is the use
of full-synthetic oil, and no oil
additives at all.

Junior Damato is an
ASE-certified Master Technician.
E-mail questions to
info@motormatters.biz
Mail questions to:

Auto Doctor
3 Court Circle,
Lakeville, MA 02347
Listen to Junior online
at www.1460wxbr.com
Saturday from 7am to 10 am eastern time.

COPYRIGHT, AUTOWRITERS ASSOCIATES INC., 2011


1. Crystal Chevy 866-434-3065

2. Crystal Chrysler Dodge Jeep 866-434-3064

3. Crystal Nissan 866-434-3057


TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 D3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WIS&


0


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A


T


0


N


A


L


TENT


EVENT


2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S


$1a999R fl/AWR1$IUPER
OR AP RWM


2011 VERSA


s11.99


2011 SENTRA




* 159MP
^^^-^l


2011 FRONTIER 2011 MURANO


$1


OR


FIND OUT THE VALUE
OF YOUR TRADE-IN
NO MATTER WHERE YOU PLAN TO BUY!
"CAL OUR INSTT R-05
MAPSA UHE: 1-800-440-9054


NISSA CRYSTAL
N I SSA I


crystalautos.com
937 S. Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34448
*ALL PRICES INCLUDE ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES, NOT
EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY PRIES EXCLUDE TAX, TAG, TITLE &
DEALER FEE OF $599.50. INCLUDES $2999.00 DOWN CASH OR
TRADE EQUITY. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PICTURES FOR ILLUS-
TRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK
A 0% APR AVAILABLE ON SELECT YEARS AND MODELS FOR
VARYING TERM LENGTHS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. + LEASE
PAYMENTS BASED ON 39 MI/39K MI $0.15 PER MILES OVER W/
$3999 DOWN PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE AND $599.50 DEALER FEE,
WITH APPROVED CREDIT ** EPA ESTIMATED HWY MILEAGE.


0


D4 TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011


L Free 24 HR Recorded Message with Info and Special Pricing
A1800-584-8755 EXL61031


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