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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02388
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 08/01/2010
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
sobekcm - UF00028315_02388
System ID: UF00028315:02388

Full Text
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*********A['UTO**SC l 3-D)IGIT 326
*LIBRARY OF FLORID A I STORY-205 S
*PO() BOX 117007
S G *GAINI'SVILL F1:1L 32611-7007
Special sections: Elections and education /Insid .
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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community S$


Price of




progress



Terra Vista


The county purchases North
Ottawa Avenue, which abuts
Terra Vista, from Citrus Hills
developer Stephen Tamposi for
$2.9 million. The county plans
to use Ottawa as a connector
between C.R. 486 and S.R. 44.

2 Tamposi paved Ottawa in
2006-07 as part of a plan for
a new Citrus Hills development
between Ottawa and C.R. 491.
A gated road for the new develop-
ment will intersect with Ottawa.


3 The county bought a notch of
vacant land for about
$81,000 to construct a connection
between Ottawa to the north and
Quartz Avenue to the south.

4 Quartz connects to Otis
Avenue, which intersects with
S.R. 44 across from the Withla-
coochee State Forest about a mile
east of C.R. 491. Officials say the
Ottawa-Quartz-Otis connection
should be complete in a year.
-Compiled by Mike Wright


County forced to buy Ottawa Ave.

afterprevious agreement fell apart


MIKE WRIGHT
Chronicle
Some call it the road to
nowhere, nothing more than a
gift to an influential land devel-
oper.
Others say it represents plan-
ning at its best, buying property
now to move traffic for growth
that is sure to come.
Either way, the quiet 1.4 mile
North Ottawa Avenue has gener-
ated plenty of buzz since Citrus
County commissioners voted
unanimously in April to buy it
from developer Stephen Tamposi
for $2.9 million.
Since then, barely a commis-
sion meeting goes by without
someone going to the microphone


ESTIMATED COSTS
County officials say the
Ottawa connection is the
cheapest way to provide a
north-south reliever between
County Road 486 and State
Road 44.
Estimated cost to four-lane
C.R. 491: $17 million.
Estimated cost to four-lane
Croft Avenue: $17.8 million.
Estimated cost for Ottawa
connection: $4.3 million.

complaining that the county
bought something it should have
received for free.
County commissioners and top
officials say they don't under-


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Sylvia Piercy makes her way Friday morning down a short dirt path off North Ottawa Avenue in Citrus Hills.


MORE DETAILS
County Administrator Brad
Thorpe writes his opinion
about Ottawa./Page C1
View a video with this story
at www.chronicleonline.com.

stand the complaints. They say
that the Ottawa purchase, and the
eventual connector road it will
provide between County Road
486 and State Road 44, has been
in the works for years.
County records and interviews
offer insight
Tamposi, general manger of
Citrus Hills and its subsidiaries,


COST BREAKDOWN
Here is the cost breakdown of the Ottawa connection, as provided
by county officials:
* Citrus Hills right of way and road improvements: $2.9 million.
* Purchasing full or parts of 16 parcels: $600,000.
* Buying five lots south of Ottawa to offset intersections: $517,000.
* Engineering, design and permitting: $64,000.
* Construction: $240,000.


Hampton Hills and Terra Vista,
actually planned in 2005 to give
Ottawa to the county in lieu of im-
pact-fee credits, according to
county records and Citrus Hills
attorney Eric Abel.


Instead, a routine maintenance
agreement between Citrus Hills
and the county that would have
placed Ottawa in public owner-
See PROGRESS/Page A7


Schultz: Experience


results in effectiveness


CHERI HARRIS
Chronicle
Ron Schultz is still having fun.
He said that is the reason he is
up for re-election for the State
House District 43. He claimed the
spot in 2007 in a special election
and was re-elected in 2008 with-
out opposition.
Schultz said he also believes he
can be effective in the state capi-
tal.
At times, he has had disagree-
ments with the Republican lead-
ership over issues such as Senate
Bill 6, an education bill that
would have tied merit pay for
teachers to student performance.



C lassifieds ......................D4
Crossword ....................A16
Editorial ..................... ..... C2
Horoscope ......................B6
Lottery Numbers ............-B4
Lottery Payouts ..............SB6
Movies ..........................A16 S u
Obituaries ......................A6 Blac
Together ........................A15 in Fl(


Most Republi-
cans supported it;
he was among a .. -.
handful of GOP
dissenters.
After these "oc-
casional dis-
agreements" with
Republican lead-
ership, Schultz Schultz
said he has com- candidate for
municated to his state House.
colleagues that
he is willing to
compete with ideas and also co-
operate.
He said it takes time to become


See : P.4T;. Page A4


Primary Election 2010

CANDIDATES FORUM
Familiarize yourself with the
candidates at the Citrus
County Chronicle's candi-
dates forum at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 5, at the Citrus
County Auditorium. Candi-
dates whose names are on
the primary ballot will speak.

WHAT: State House of
Representatives District 43.
COVERS: All Citrus, parts of
Hernando and Levy counties.
TERM: Two years.
PAY: $29,697.
Aug. 24 primary: Incumbent
Ron Schultz and Jimmie T
Smith. Winner is elected.
Because both candidates are
Republican, all registered
voters regardless of party af-
filiation vote in the primary.


._Therapy dogs bring comfort
.'_- Ho,,pital patientS:. oldc arnd young respond to friend

CIA videos Ped tape meets black ops in c

IV ,. Check scams Computer hackers steal image


nn


Smith: Ready to make

things happen as state rep.


CHERI HARRIS
Chronicle
Jimmie T. Smith said it has al-
ways been a dream of his to be
politically active.
He told the Chronicle Editorial
Board that is why he is a candi-
date for the District 43 seat,
which includes all of Citrus and
parts of Levy and Hernando
counties, in the state House of
Representatives.
The Republican challenger is
up against incumbent Ron
Schultz, R-Homosassa, in the pri-
mary election Tuesday, Aug. 24.
He said a state representative
should be the go-to guy in a posi-



dly canines./Page A5


ase./Page C1


ges./Page D1


k-eyed Susans grow well
orida's soils./Page E9 I Hosa garden Retired Marine cultivates plants./HomeFront


tion to make
things happen
and his military
experience has
given him the
skills to accom- -
plish this.
Smith said he
was born in New Jimmie
Jersey but moved Smith
in the '70s to Cit- candidate for
rus County, at- state House.
tending Inver-
ness Primary
School, Inverness Middle School
and Citrus High School. Accord-
ing to information he submitted
to the Chronicle, Smith served in
See SMITH/Page A4


Passport fraud
Posing as someone else


- and using fake birth certiti-
cates and driver's licenses
... to get a U.S. passport can
PerTRAM, still work./Page All


6 84578 20075 o0


- ^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I'


START:


I] TUE
TUESDAY


BUYING PLATINUM
Platinum Wire, Crucibles,
Industrial, Jewelry, Theralcuple
WE CAN TEST UNMARKED PLATINUM




BUYING ALL
ROLEX WATCHES
n PAYINGo 150 TO $10,000
p Any Condition Running Or Not
'. New & Old Date & Date Just
New & Old GMT & GMT Master- -
New & Old Presidents S
L Air Kings, Cellini
1 Ok-1I8k-14k-Steel


BRING ALL OLD
WATCHES FOR
US TO LOOK AT
l\J ,s t le e t .i ,: f'ur,,,,,


SILVER COINS
For Every $1.00 Worth Of
1964 & Before Silver We Pay...


NOW IS
THE TIME
TO SELL
NITH GOLD
AT $1200
rPER OZ.


WRIST WATCH
Rolex Cartier WEWILL
Patek Phillips LeCoultre WE WILL
Omega International LOOK AT
Vach-eron Gruen ALL OLD
IWC Hamilton WATCHES
Breitling Bulova WATCHES

POCKET WATCHES
10k-14k-18k 21-23-26 Jewels
^Hamilton Ball
S. Repeaters Moonface
S- BRING ALL
A "POCKET WATCHES
a FOR EVALUATION


mi


Dimes, Quarters & Halves


NCG-PCGS
BUYING ALL:
Graded Coins Gold Coins
American Eagles Silver Eagles
Silver Dollars Carson City
Proof Eagles


GOLD COINS
1 Gold 1849.1889 150 To1500
$2'/2 1796.1929 1150 UpTo 10,000
3 1854.1881 500 upTo10,000
$5 1795.1929 $200 Up To S 0,000
$10 1795.1932 500 UpTo 10,000
120 1849-1932 Paying 51,100And Up
ALSO BUYING: AMERICAN EAGLES,
KRUGGERANDS. MAPLE LEAFS. PANDAS


FLATWARE SETS


Tea Sets, Bowls, Jewelry, Antiques

SILVER
DOLLARS$
I 1794 To 1873
S100" To 100,00000
1878 To 1935 Pay 14 Each
WE PAY MORE FOR BETTER DATES
AND BETTER CONDITION
UNCIRCULATED PAYING s16,00 TO o20.O0 EA.


BUYING ALMOST ALL OLD US CURRENCY ULr i -J
BUYING ALL LARGE BILLS
Silver Certificates Confederate Buying $1,000
Red $2 Bills Red $5 Bills & $500 Dollar Bill
Hawaii Hawaii & North Africa
WE RECENTLY PAID $85,000 FOR A CURRENCY COLLECTION


:IHI.


I lk


BUYING IM IDS
1/2 Ct. To 1Oct,
TOP PRICES PAID FOR:
DIAMOND BRACELETS,
ENGAGEMENT RINGS, -
LARGE CLUSTERS,
PLATINUM JEWELRY, E :.,
TIFFANY, CARTIER
WE RECENTLY PAID $10,000 FOR A 2CT AND $55,000 FOR AN 8CT ROUND DIAMOND,
For Average Quality: IF YOU DON'T WEAR T
1/2ct $200 To $1,000
ct $1,000 To $3,000 NOW IS THE TIME TO SEL!
2ct $3,000 To $20,000 Bring All Your Diamond Jewelry
3ct $5,000 To $30,000 For An Offer
Rounds, Oval, Emerald, Marquise, Pears, Old Cuts, G.I.A., E.G.L, Broken
Diamonds, Diamond Studs, Diamond Pendants


WE ARE FULL-TIME DEALERS
with over 30 years in the Coin & Jewelry Business
WE WILL TRAVEL TO YOUR HOME OR BANK!
TUESDAY, AUG. 3 WEDNESDAY, AUG. 4
10:00 am 4:00 pm 10:00 am 3:00 pm


WHERE:
Citrus Hills Lodge
(Formerly Best Western Citrus Hills Lodge)
350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy
(Hwy 486) Hernando, FL
(3 miles W. of Rt. 41 on Hwy 486)


Hernando
Hwy 486/Norvell Bryant Hwy. ,
- -

Citrus Hills Inverness
Lodge


ATATA7-/


Il


III


HIl


CALL 1-352-598-5232
WE ARE FLORIDA LICENSED
A m. ,4f A AT A DPC(R ATC~'' FTT AT


A2 SUNDAY, AU'GUST 1, 2010


!1










PageA3- su E'.., ...,I.1 !j



TATE&


L LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


County


'gets


water


grant

Special to the Chronicle
The Withlacoochee Re-
gional Water Supply Au-
thority has awarded
Citrus County Water Re-
sources Department a
$45,000 grant to continue
its efforts in water conser-
vation.
A number of counties
received the matching
grant with Citrus, includ-
ing Hernando and Marion
counties, and they will
oversee local programs
for rebates, incentives, ir-
rigation audits, outreach,
media campaigns, educa-
tion and grants for low-
flow devices.
"The success of the
grant application is a trib-
ute to the efforts and suc-
cesses being implemented
by Bernadine Flood," said
Citrus County Water Re-
sources Director Robert
Knight, referring to the
county's conservation and
outreach coordinator.
Flood works with both pri-
vate and commercial in-
terests to educate the
public and create partner-
ships that focus on water
conservation. She works
with individuals, groups
and businesses on meth-
ods to conserve water in-
side and outside of homes
and businesses.
Jackson Sullivan, exec-
utive director of the au-
thority, said in his
notification to Citrus of
the grant approval, "As
you know, the authority
places the highest priority
on water conservation
projects within the re-
gion."
He told the counties get-
ting the grant: "The au-
thority is counting on your
water conservation pro-
grams to lead the way in
our region toward meet-
ing the 150 gallons per
capital per day require-
ment by 2018," adopted by
the Southwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict which sets per
capital consumption goals
for the district.
"That per capital use is
now at about 187 gallons
per day for the area," he
said.
For information about
water conservation, visit
the Citrus County Exten-
sion Service website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and
click "Community Serv-
ices" under "Depart-
ments" at the top of the
page. Then click on "Ex-
tension Services."
Also, the water district's
website at www.swfwmd.
state.fl.us has extensive
water conservation infor-
mation.

County BRIEF

Absentee ballots
are in the mail
Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections Susan Gill has
given notice that all absentee
ballots are now being mailed
daily. Voters who requested
an absentee ballot should ex-
pect to receive their ballot at
the address the elections of-
fice was provided.
Voters can expect to re-
ceive a smaller, standard-size
envelope in place of the
larger envelope. Call 341-
6740 for more information.
-From staff reports

Correction


Due to an editor's error,
both candidates for U.S.
House of representatives
were misidentified in
photo captions on Page Al
of Saturday's edition. Rich
Nugent and Jason Sager
are running for the Dis-
trict 5 seat in the U.S.
House in the Republican
primary.


Sales tax holiday Aug. 13 to 15


Savings help students with costs ofsupplies


AMANDA MIMS
Chronicle
Citrus County residents who want to
take advantage of the Back to School
Sales Tax Holiday this year will have
to wait until after school starts to do
their shopping.
This will be the first Back to School
Sales Tax Holiday since 2007. It starts
at 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 13, and ends
at midnight Sunday, Aug. 15. School
starts Aug. 9.
During the sales tax holiday, no
sales tax will be collected on books,
clothing, footwear and certain acces-
sories selling for $50 or less and school
supply items selling for $10 or less.
In Citrus County, the savings will


amount to $6 for every $100 spent on
tax-exempt items. The statewide sav-
ings to Florida families is expected to
be $26 million.
Gov. Charlie Crist signed a bill cre-
ating the 2010 Back to School Sales
Tax Holiday at a Target store in May.
"I am confident this tax break will
help students, families and businesses
as they prepare for a new school year,"
Crist said in a press release. "It is im-
portant that we continue to alleviate
the tax burden on Floridians, as well
as seek ways to improve the economic
future of (our) state."
What's covered:
N Books. This does not include
newspapers, magazines, periodicals
or audio books.


SAny article of wearing apparel, in-
cluding footwear. This does not in-
clude skis, swim fins, roller blades or
skates. Watches, jewelry, umbrellas,
handkerchiefs and sporting equip-
ment are also not included.
School supplies including pens,
pencils, erasers, crayons, notebooks,
notebook filler paper, legal pads,
binders, lunch boxes, construction
paper, markers, folders, poster board,
scissors, glue, rulers, computer disks,
protractors, compasses and calcula-
tors.
The exemption does not include
books, clothing or school supplies pur-
chased in a theme park, entertain-
ment complex, public lodging
establishment or airport.
For more information, visit the
Florida Department of Revenue web-
site at http://dor.myflorida.com.


Ba-k-toschoo
^ ^ ) ~ ~ *'- =* .'* i ~ ' i <-: .


-J S


'I


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
From left: Jazmyn Little, 9, Karisa Garrison, 5, and Bobbi Toledo, 6, paint wooden snakes, birdhouses and other
craft items during the fifth annual Back-to-School Party sponsored by the Community Action Foundation of Citrus
County at Copeland Park in Crystal River. Along with food, crafts and games, the foundation gave away more than
600 backpacks for students both young and college age.


Copeland Park plays host to fifth annual CAFCC event

AMANDA MIMS "We had about 1,200 people last said. "This is a poor county. We
Chronicle year," she said, and the crowd was need as much help as we can get."
expected to be about the same this McCray said the event is a way to
Families filled Copeland Park in year. help families in the community
Crystal River Saturday night and where she grew up.
cars were parked around "This is our way of
the block. Music blared, giving back to the com-
food was served and chil- This is our way of giving back munity," she said. "It's a
dren were readied to go to the community, big party. It's a back-to-
back to school during the school celebration."
Community Action Foun- The CAFCC received
dation of Citrus County's Andrea McCray fewer donations for this
fifth annual Back-to- event organizer, year's event than in pre-
School Party. vious years and the or-
The CAFCC gave away She said parents are grateful for ganization had 150 fewer
600 backpacks for students from el- the help they get this time of year. backpacks to give away than it did
ementary-school age to college stu- Two of those parents, Dawn last year. Several organizations
dents, complete with Bach and Nola Young, both 31, said helped put the event together, in-
age-appropriate school supplies, the party makes back-to-school cluding the Citrus County Sheriff's
Event organizer Andrea "Ka- shopping easier. Office, Kids Central Inc., the De-
trice" McCray said the backpacks "It's a big help. They give us a lot apartment of Children and Families
and supplies are worth about $50 of stuff they need for school that I and Citrus County Parks and
apiece. don't have to go out and buy," Bach Recreation.




Entities pen partnership on mapping systems


Commission, appraiser agreement a winfor all


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Com-
mission and the county
Property Appraiser's Office
have signed an agreement
to formalize a partnership
to cooperate on their two
Geographic Information
Systems (GIS).
GIS refers to computer
mapping with a virtually un-
limited number of layers of
information related to land
that can be pulled up
quickly on computers and
utilized in numerous ways.
The Memo of Under-


standing, signed last Tues-
day, is significant in that
prior to Property Appraiser
Geoff Greene taking office,
the two agencies had devel-
oped their systems sepa-
rately. Both the County
Commission and the Prop-
erty Appraiser's Office be-
lieve there were many
benefits in collaborating
and sharing GIS resources
and information, according
to press releases from each
entity.
The cooperative effort
represents significant sav-
ings for taxpayers and wider


technological applications
of GIS for everyone not
only for both agencies and
other constitution offices
that utilize such land and
property related data, but
for emergency services, too,
according to a news release.
The county and the Prop-
erty Appraiser's Office have
different responsibilities
and different uses of their
respective systems but they
also have some overlap and
similar needs, and each de-
velops and uses a lot of in-
formation that is useful and
valuable to the other.


The county, for example,
has zoning, addressing and
utility location information
on its GIS mapping that the
Property Appraiser's Office
can utilize in its statutory
appraisal and valuation du-
ties.
The Property Appraiser's
Office has other addressing
information and aerial im-
agery that goes beyond just
top-down photography -
giving perspective and
measurement possibilities
the county doesn't have -
and the county can use that
in a number of applications.
Both have information that
can be applied to emer-
gency services.


Campaign
TRAIL


Campaign Trail is a listing
of political events for the elec-
tion season. Send informa-
tion, including fundraisers, to
mwright@chronicleonline.
corn; or fax to 563-3280. In-
formation will not be taken by
phone.
The Citrus County
Chronicle's primary candi-
dates forum is at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 5, at the Cit-
rus County Auditorium. Can-
didates whose names are on
the primary ballot will speak.
Information: Mike Wright,
563-3228.
Candidates for county
commission District 4 Re-
becca Bays, Donald Ster-
ling and incumbent John
Thrumston will be fea-
tured at a forum at 8:30 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 14, at Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River.
Sponsored by the Nature
Coast Republican Club.
The Women's Political
Network will feature candi-
dates for county commission
District 2 (incumbent Gary
Bartell and John "JJ" Ken-
ney) and school board Dis-
trict 1 (Thomas Kennedy
and incumbent Lou Miele) at
its meeting from 6:30 to 7:45
p.m. Monday, Aug. 16 at Cen-
tral Ridge Library. Informa-
tion: Patricia Cowen,
746-9003.
The Realtors Association
of Citrus County will have a
candidates' forum from 5 to 7
p.m. Thursday, Aug. 19, at the
group's headquarters on S.R.
44. Information: 746-7550.
Jason Sager, Republi-
can for U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives District 5, will greet
the public from 3 to 6 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 8 at the home
of Doug Lobel, 1537 E. Vent-
nor Lane, Inverness. Informa-
tion: Doug Lobel, 400-0540.
Lou Miele, incumbent
for school board District 1, will
have a barbecue fundraiser
from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 9 at the Realtors Associ-
ation of Citrus County on S.R.
44 in Lecanto. Information:
(352) 697-1685.
Rich Nugent, Republi-
can for U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives District 5, will have
a fundraiser from 5:30 to 7
p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 10, at the
Grove Downtown on Tomp-
kins Street, Invemess. Infor-
mation: Jeanne Mcintosh,
352-484-9975.
Jim Brunswick, Demo-
crat for county commission
District 4, will have a barbe-
cue fundraiser from 4 to 11
p.m. Saturday, Aug. 14, at his
home, 11155 E. Salmon
Drive, Floral City. Information:
637-0716.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation plans a candidates'
forum at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 13, at the Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club.
The Chronicle's election
candidates forum is 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 14, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida's
Lecanto campus. Information:
Mike Wright at 563-3228.
The Chronicle plans can-
didate forums for both Inver-
ness and Crystal River city
elections. Inverness is at 7
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30, at
the Historic Old Courthouse;
Crystal River is at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 7, at Crystal
River Middle School. Informa-
tion: Mike Wright, 563-3228.

County BRIEF

LPS announces
changes in hours
Changes have been made
to orientation, student and
teacher hours at Lecanto Pri-
mary School. These changes
were made after the Chroni-
cle's Back to School publica-
tion was printed.
Lecanto Primary School's
Meet-Your-Teacher/Orienta-
tion for Pre-K through kinder-
garten will start at 2 p.m.
Thursday and for first through
fifth grades, it will be from 3 to
6p.m.


Student school hours will
be 9:20 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and
teacher hours will be 8:05
a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
-From staff reports











A4 SUNDAY, Aucus~ 1, 2010 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Volunteers help build N.M. garden area


JOHN LIVINGSTON
The Daily Times

FARMINGTON, N.M. In the mid-
dle of industrial buildings and under
the scorching sun, 44 volunteers from
Florida were working hard to make a
difference more than 1,500 miles from
home.
A youth group of 34 high school stu-
dents and 10 adults from St Stephens
Lutheran Church in Longwood, Fla.,
last week helped construct a garden
area including building fences,
benches and planter boxes for flowers
- at Mosaic, a nonprofit organization
that works with people who have de-
velopmental disabilities.
"These volunteers have big hearts
and big spirits to come out here and
work in this heat," said Amy Dickson,
community relations manager for Mo-
saic.
".We had the idea to build these
planters and make this a garden, and
it is going to be a great outdoor area
where our clients can go and be a part
of a community."
Kenny Champagne, youth and fam-
ily ministry coach with St. Stephens
Lutheran Church, said his volunteers


SCHULTZ
Continued from Page Al

an effective member of the
Legislature and he believes
he has an opportunity to
make a difference, in part
because he is the first prop-
erty appraiser in 25 years to
be in the Florida Legisla-
ture.
"So far I have been effec-
tive in those areas where I
was recognized as having
expertise," Schultz said.
The Homosassa resident
spent 14 years as Citrus
County's property ap-
praiser.
In an interview with the
Chronicle Editorial Board,


take a trip across the country one
week every summer for various mis-
sion activities, and this year his group
wanted to travel West
"We got in touch with Mosaic out
here last October or November, and
thought New Mexico would be a great
culture for our kids to experience,"
Champagne said. "Mosaic is a great or-
ganization to help out, so we loaded up
the bus and here we are."
Troy Goetz, a volunteer with the
church, helped bring the teens cross-
country on a tour bus. Once they ar-
rived in Farmington, he took
command of the building project
"I got the idea of doing the planters
out here when talking back and forth
with Mosaic, and I got links to exam-
ples of these raised flower beds on the
Internet, so I took that idea and kind
of simplified it," Goetz said.
"(Mosaic) and our group discussed
having some wheelchair accessible
planter boxes, so we made some that
are wheelchair accessible and some
that aren't so we can help accommo-
date everybody"
The group of Florida missionaries
has left New Mexico for Mesa Verde,
Colo., but the work they did will be


Schultz conceded that fel-
low GOP challenger Jimmie
T. Smith was better with
people, but Schultz said he
was better with the "nitty-
gritty" of legislation.
"I can get more done in
Tallahassee," he said.
In his approach to educa-
tion, Schultz said, "I would
move for more control into
our local school boards."
Then he said individual
school districts could ex-
periment with ways to in-
spire teachers such as tying
merit pay to student per-
formance.
Schultz said his most dis-
appointing failure in the
Legislature surrounded his
effort to introduce a bill to
create a preserve in the


Gulf to fill in the gap of pro-
tected areas off the shore-
lines of Pasco, Hernando
and Citrus counties.
The purpose of the pre-
serve would be to protect
sea grass beds that Schultz
said are "a breeding ground
for much of the Gulf of Mex-
ico."
Schultz said bringing in
heavy equipment to drill for
oil in these shallow areas
would be destructive to the
sea grass beds.
He plans to introduce the
bill again.
"I think the atmosphere
has changed immensely."
Chronicle reporter Cheri
Harris can be reached at
564-2926 or charris@chron
icleonline.com.


long remembered by Mosaic's patrons,
said Executive Director Joanna Smith.
"It means everything to (our clients)
that they can come out and be in the
shade, enjoy their lunches, and a have
a nice place to go where there is a gar-
den," Smith said.
"The garden also helps them and
teaches them how to take care of
themselves. They can plant vegetables
and flowers, which helps them grow
skills that are very normalizing. It is
also something pretty here in this
area."
Dickson said there is still work to be
done, but said she was incredibly
grateful for the help from Mosaic's
new friends.
"We are a little late in the summer
season to start planting flowers, but
we have plenty of work ahead of us
with these dirt pathways to make them
100 percent accessible to all of our
consumers," she said.
"We want to make this a fully work-
ing garden, and we have to thank St.
Stephens Lutheran Church's mission-
aries for all the paint and shelves they
also put up inside our building, too.
"They were a bunch of busy bees
and it was great to have them here."


SMITH
Continued from Page Al

the Army from 1983 to 2003,
retiring as a staff sergeant
He told the editorial
board Schultz has done his
job, but he doesn't have
enough energy and has
been "lackadaisical" in par-
ticipating in the community.
Smith said if he is
elected, he will resign his
job working security at
Progress Energy to become
a full-time representative,
though it would mean a
$5,000 to $7,000 pay cut
"I'm willing to tighten my
belt," he said. "I will lead by
example."


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
William E. Sandbom, 38,
of 1259 S. Elmwood Drive, In-
verness, at 5 p.m. Friday on a
misdemeanor charge of pos-
session of a listed drug without
a prescription. He is accused of
having Xanax pills in his pos-
session during a traffic stop.
Bond $500.
Cathy Mane Caroppoli,
46, of 1203 Beverly Ave.,
Springfield, Ohio, at 3:54 p.m.
Friday on a Citrus County war-
rant for violation of probation for
several original charges includ-
ing organized fraud, dealing in
stolen property, fraud and utter-
ing false banknotes, checks or
drafts. No bond.
Michael Joseph Paquet,
34, of 5011 S. Incognito Point,
Homosassa, at 10:25 a.m. Fri-
day on felony charges of bur-
glary of an occupied structure,
trafficking in stolen property and
giving false information to a
pawn broker. According to his
arrest affidavit, he is accused of
committing a burglary at 4117


Rather than targeting a
specific state area to trim,
Smith said he would look
for nickels and dimes to cut
"absolutely everywhere."
"I do not have a particu-
lar item to cut," he said. "I
think it should be a broad
view sort of issue."
On the subject of educa-
tion, Smith was critical of
merit pay for teachers.
Smith said he disagreed
with the GOP about Senate
Bill 6, which included merit
pay, which Schultz also op-
posed. If he had been the
state representative, Smith
said he would have gar-
nered more.local support,
talking to the local commu-
nity and to teachers.
On the issue of offshore


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made by
the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public In-
formation on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County. Click
on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record reports
are archived at www.
chronicleonline.com.

N. Mitchum Point in Crystal
River and breaking into a safe.
He reportedly stole jewelry,
cash, collectible coins and a
checkbook and pawned some
of the items in Homosassa.
Bond $17,000.


drilling, rather than letting
the "not in my back yard"
attitude prevail, Smith's ap-
proach would be to put
them in "everybody's back
yard."
He said wells in shal-
lower water are safer to op-
erate than those in deeper
areas of the Gulf of Mexico.
Smith said there should be
a way to block off a well in
more shallow water, con-
taining any leaks. With
measures like this, Smith
said he believes oil produc-
tion can reach a level of
safety and environmental
responsibility.
Chronicle reporter Cheri
Harris can be reached at
564-2926 or charris@chron
icleonline.com.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES '


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
2 feet or less. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Partly cloudy
with isolated showers and thunder-
storms today.


96 78 0.00 95 78 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 96 Low: 77
Partly cloudy; 30% chance of
t-storms
r = MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 94 Low: 76
S.j Partly cloudy; 40% chance of t-storms


TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 94 Low: 76
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of t-storms


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


Gulf water
temperature

93

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.62 28.67 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.55 37.54 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.01 39.02 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.37 39.39 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 99/80
Record 95/67
Normal 90/72
Mean temp. 90
Departure from mean +9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 10.72 in.
Total for the year 40.17 in.
Normal for the year 31.15 in.
"As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.84 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 75
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 54%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grass, sagebrush
Today's Count: 2.8
Monday's Count: 4.9
Tuesday's Count: 4.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was 22 with pollutants


mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MI
(MORNING)
8/1 SUNDAY 10:53 4:42 1
8/2 MONDAY 11:40 5:29


NOR M
(AFTERNO0
1:15
- E


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O SUNSET TONIGHT....
SUNRISE TOMORROW.
(1 0 MOONRISE TODAY.......
M.IL M ILS XII.18 Al. 24 MOONSET TODAY........

BURN CONDITIONS


MAJOR
ON)
5:04
5:52


...8:22 P.M.
...6:52 A.M.
.11:49 P.M.
.12:33 P.M.


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:49 a/5:28 a 10:32 p/6:17 p
Crystal River" 8:10 a/2:50 a 8:53 p/3:39 p
Withlacoochee* 5:57 a/12:38 a 6:40 p/1:27 p
Homosassa * 8:59 a/4:27 a 9:42 p/5:16 p


*"At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:24 a/6:02 a 11:41 p/7:13 p
8:45 a/3:24 a 10:02 p/4:35 p
6:32 a/1:12 a 7:49 p/2:23 p
9:34 a/5:01 a 10:51 p/6:12 p


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L City H L Pcp. Fcst H L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
I Htl DeRLk


76 50
82 68
79 70
95 75
82 59
97 73
85 65
94 64
98 77
95 68
72 61
77 59
75 48
89 77
79 65
83 74
80 64
83 67
81 65
90 77
81 69
79 44
10278
85 61
88 71
79 68
90 73
91 69
82 59
82 61
97 78
78 69
99 73
10288
I no 7


ts
.44 ts
.35 ts
pc
.02 ts
s
ts
ts
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc
.02 ts
.68 pc
pc
pc
.09 ts
.10 pc
pc
s
ts
pc
pc
pc
.21 s
ts
ts
pc
pc
pc
s
PC


79 64
88 67
84 64
93 76
80 71
101 70
86 67
89 59
99 77
89 53
78 63
78 64
81 63
88 76
88 66
86 69
86 67
86 68
83 65
93 72
85 66
78 57
104 80
93 66
88 70
82 69
93 71
91 70
82 64
79 64
99 77
87 67
102 78
103 83
10 77


New Orleans 97 80 pc 97 80
New York City 85 66 ts 83 68
Norfolk 84 68 c 86 72
Oklahoma City 10074 s 101 74
Omaha 90 73 pc 90 72
Palm Springs 10679 s 100 76
Philadelphia 85 68 ts 84 70
Phoenix 92 75 1.16 pc 99 81
Pittsburgh 82 63 pc 82 62
Portland, ME 73 51 pc 74 59
Portland, Ore 69 57 pc 76 58
Providence, R.I. 77 62 pc 80 63
Raleigh 78 68 .03 sh 80 67
Rapid City 98 62 ts 96 66
Reno 90 56 s 92 58
Rochester, NY 77 58 pc 78 62
Sacramento 89 55 s 90 56
St. Louis 88 74 s 92 73
St. Ste. Marie 71 61 .02 pc 77 64
Salt Lake City 97 71 pc 90 69
San Antonio 96 75 s 98 74
San Diego 69 61 pc 69 63
San Francisco 67 56 pc 62 54
Savannah 10080 ts 93 75
Seattle 69 53 pc 70 56
Spokane 77 62 .08 pc 82 56
Syracuse 76 51 ts 79 64
Topeka 93 74 s 92 73
Washington 86 71 ts 86 67
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 China Lake, Calif. LOW 36 Saranac
Lake, N.Y.
WORLD CITIES


Lit.tl I.CuuK iU, 5u PC luu
Los Angeles 71 59 pc 68 62 SUNDAY
Louisville 87 66 1.00 pc 91 71 CITY H/L/SKYI
Memphis 98 79 pc 99 81 Acapulco 91/78/ts
Milwaukee 76 66 .65 pc 82 69 Amsterdam 70/58/sh
Minneapolis 86 68 pc 86 70 Athens 90/74/s
Mobile 98 78 pc 98 78 Beijing 85/74/c
Montgomery 10077 pc 100 77 Berlin 75/59/sh
Nashville 91 73 .55 pc 97 73 Bermuda 84/77/ts
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; Cairo 103/77/pc
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; Calgary 72/54/sh
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; Havana 91/74/ts
sn=znow ts=thundersntorms w=wndy. Hong Kong 92/81/ Ats
02010 Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Jerusalem 98/71/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


91/67/s
70/58/sh
97/66/s
79/56/pc
80/58/s
92/66/s
74/58/sh
86/68/s
83/67/s
58/44/sh
88/79/ts
79/62/ts
76/61/ts


C- C I T R U S.0,' -,C 0 U N T Y




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' For the RECORD


...................
...................
...................


A4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


CITRus CouNTy (FL) CHRONICLE


F







OIL SPILL


Salazar keeps oil drill ban, for now


Associated Press
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO -
The helicopter passes over the
blue waters of the Gulf of Mexico
- with surprisingly little oil visi-
ble on its surface when out of
the sea rises a skyscraper-like
structure nearly 350 feet above the
waves. The $600 million rig, nearly
100 miles off Louisiana's coast,
has a hull larger than a football
field and can drill more than 5
miles beneath the ocean floor.
But the gleaming new rig sits
idle, shut down by the govern-
ment's freeze on drilling at 33
ocean wells.
Interior Secretary Ken Salazar
visited the colossal structure this
past week while on a tour of three
offshore oil rigs. It was his most
extensive tour since the April 20
explosion of the Deepwater Hori-
zon rig led to one of the largest en-
vironmental disasters in U.S.
history and the unprecedented
shutdown of offshore drilling.
Salazar told The Associated
Press, which accompanied him on
the trip, that he's gathering infor-
mation to decide whether to re-
vise or even lift the ban, which is
scheduled to last until Nov 30.
Business groups and Gulf Coast
political leaders say the shutdown
is crippling the oil and gas indus-
try and costing thousands of jobs,
even aboard rigs not operated by
BP PLC, which is responsible for
the Gulf disaster. The freeze "is
like punishing the whole class"


Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, second from right, looks at blowout prevent
the Murphy Front Runner deep water oil drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico,
left is Deputy Interior Secretary David Hayes, and partially visible at right
ergy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEM) Michael R. Broi


when a student does something
wrong, oil executive John Breed
told Salazar during a tour of the
Noble Danny Adkins, one of the
rigs Salazar visited Wednesday
Salazar told the AP he believes
the industry-wide moratorium im-
posed after BP's Gulf oil spill was
the correct call.
"I think we're in the right direc-
tion," he said, adding that the ulti-


mate goal is to allow deepwater
operations to resume safely
"We're not there yet," he said.
"I've got a lot of questions about
drilling safety," Salazar said. "I
learned a lot about the different
kinds of rigs out there the dif-
ferent limitations in terms of
(water) depth and equipment and
the different zones of risk. It's a
complex question."


ON THE NET
Salazar's memo on freeze:
http://tinyurl.com/2et448d
Noble Drilling Services Inc.:
http://tinyurl.com/2eouhjx
S~ a Murphy Exploration &
Production Co.:
http://tinyurl.com/22ke66o
0 Nabors Offshore Corp.:
www.nabors.com

Sfri-eeze was causing hardship, but
he said his job was to protect the
public and the environment even
as he supports domestic energy
production.
"We're here because we take
what you're doing very seriously,
and we will do the right thing" he
told oil executives at his first stop,
Sa deepwater production rig run by
Arkansas-based Murphy Explo-
ration & Production Co.
Associated Press The Front Runner rig, owned by
iter controls Wednesday as he tours Houston-based Nabors Offshore
, off the coast of Louisiana. Second Corp., operates in 3,300 feet of
t is Director of Bureau of Ocean En- water 92 miles off the Louisiana
mwich. coast.
Harris and other officials
Texas-based Noble Drilling stressed the redundancies built
Services Inc., which owns the idle into the rig's design a series of
rig, said the company and rig op- backup systems meant to ensure
orator Shell have top-notch safety the blowout preventer works in
records, unlike BP Congressional case of disaster. Yet pressed by
investigators revealed last month Salazar, James Hunter, Murphy's
that BP had 760 safety violations general manager for field devel-
in the past five years, while no opment and facilities engineering,
other major oil company had finally conceded that, no, he could
more than eight. not make such a guarantee.
Salazar acknowledged that the Salazar beamed.


3 squabbling companies

must cooperate to plug well


Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS On
shore, BP Halliburton and
Transocean are engaging in
a billion-dollar blame game
over the blown-out oil well
in the Gulf of Mexico. At sea,
they're depending on each
other to finally plug up the
environmental disaster.
Workers say the compa-
nies' adversarial relation-
ship before Congress, in
public statements and
maybe one day in the courts
isn't a distraction at the site
of the April 20 rig explosion,
where Transocean equip-
ment rented by BP is
drilling relief wells that
Halliburton will pump ce-
ment through to perma-
nently choke the oil well.
The Development Driller
II, which is drilling a
backup relief well, was in a


holding pattern Saturday,
awaiting progress by its sis-
ter rig, the Development
Driller III, which is drilling
the primary relief well and
ran into a minor snag while
preparing for a procedure
known as a static kill that
will make it easier to stop
the gusher for good.
Once the DD III clears de-
bris, engineers plan to start
as early as Monday on the
static kill, which involves
pumping mud and possibly
cement into the blown-out
well through the temporary
cap.
If it works, it will take less
time to complete another
procedure known as a bot-
tom kill, the last step to per-
manently sealing the well by
pumping mud and then ce-
ment in from the bottom,
which could happen by mid-
to late August.


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is scrmethirig that happern- t.:. o.ie..nr, l- Andr it i the impact of
the diagnosis isn't enough ... what treatment and where to receive it
can be difficult decisions to make. It's emotionally overwhelming.
Half of all cancer patients will receive radiation as a form of
treatment. At this difficult time, patients need honesty. They
need an objective, unbiased recommendation for care. In
radiation treatment, such a recommendation is available. Many
years ago, the American College of Radiology (ACR) established
credentialing boards for their specialties. Rigid standards were
established ... so rigorous that, in radiation treatment, only nine
percent of all facilities are approved. Every facet is evaluated
including the physicians, physics and treatment staff, nursing
staff, equipment, quality control, and training. The ACR evaluates
completely and methodically. Not one thing is left to chance.
In our area of Florida, eight facilities are accredited by the
ACR, representing over half of all facilities in Florida. Along
with MD Anderson, Orlando; the Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville;
and Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, the combined facilities
of the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute comprise
these eight entities. There are no others in this region.
When you're seeking cancer care, turn to those who have
earned the accreditation and recommendation of the American
College of Radiology Make your decisions with confidence.


c y ROBERT BOISSONEAULT

ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
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A6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Fla. told

to reduce

crossing

mishaps

MICHAEL TURNBELL
AND DANA WILLIAMS
South Florida
Sun Sentinel

FORT LAUDERDALE
- Federal officials have
ordered Florida to reduce
railroad crossing acci-
dents, even as the number
of collisions between
trains and automobiles
has been cut in half over
the past four years.
A new rule released by
the Federal Railroad Ad-
ministration requires
Florida and nine other
states with the highest
rates of crashes to develop
plans to further reduce
the number of accidents.
The irony is that failure
to do so could jeopardize
federal funding that goes
toward crossing safety.
Plans must be submit-
ted by August 2011 and im-
plemented within five
years.
"The numbers are
trending in the right way,
but we would still like to
see the number of inci-
dents reduced substan-
tially," said Rob Kulat, an
administration
spokesman.
"Zero is the ultimate
goal."
About 80 percent of the
state's crossings already
have lights and gates.
Short of closing crossings
or building costly over-
passes, state officials may
have to turn to the public
to drill home the message
about the dangers of will-
fully ignoring warning
lights or driving around
crossing gates.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
gets $7 million a year from
the federal government to
spend on rail crossing
safety. That usually covers
40 to 50 projects a year,
mostly installing warning
devices where there are
none, upgrading signals
with LED lights to make
them brighter or putting
in gates that completely
block both sides of a cross-
ing.
Some states are experi-
menting with new tech-
nology that relies on
sensors that detect the
presence of a vehicle on
the tracks and alert train
engineers and dispatch-
ers in traffic management
centers. Advance warning
is crucial because it can
take a train a mile or more
to come to a complete
stop.
"If they see someone is
stopped on the tracks,
they can dispatch law en-
forcement," said Annette
Lapkowski, the state's rail
operations administrator.
In Broward, Palm
Beach and Miami-Dade
counties, 34 people were
killed and 51 were injured
in 145 crossing accidents
from 2005 through April
2010, according to a Sun
Sentinel analysis of Fed-
eral Railroad Administra-
tion data.
Six of the 145 accidents
in South Florida occurred
at crossings without gates,
although in one case the
devices were down for re-
pair at the time of the
crash. Two of the six
crashes occurred at a
crossing in Miami that
had overhead flashing
lights. One of the six had a
standard flashing light
system with an audible
signal, stop signs and
cross bucks, the sign say-
ing "railroad crossing."
Three crossings were


marked by cross bucks
only
Most of the 220 cross-
ings on the Florida East
Coast Railway between
Miami and Jupiter have
gates and lights but not
the type that prevent driv-
ers from going around
when a train is approach-
ing. That likely would
change if passenger trains
return to the tracks.
A study on the proposed
passenger rail service has
identified up to 14 FEC
crossings in Broward and
five in Palm Beach County
from Boca Raton to West
Palm Beach that could be
replaced with overpasses.
One overpass could cost
$20 million to $40 million.


CITRUS COIINIY (FL) CHRONII.IC


Obituaries


Cecelia
Koschel, 82
INVERNESS
Cecelia Theresa Koschel,
age 82, died Thursday, July
29,2010, at Brentwood Nurs-
ing Care Center in Lecanto.
A Funeral Service of Re-
membrance will be held on
Tuesday, August 3, 2010, at
4:00 PM. at the Chas. E. Davis
Funmeral Home with Pastor
Chuck Cooley, Hospice of Cit-
rus County Chaplain officiat-

family will
receive
friends in
visitation
from 2:00
e e PM. until the
hour of serv-
ice.
Cecelia Cecelia
Koschel was born on
July 17,1928,
in Chicago, IL, to the late
William and Gladys Outly
and came to this area in 1985
from Hoffman Estates, IL.
She was a homemaker who
enjoyed spending time with
her family and friends. She
liked to work crossword puz-
zles and read. She enjoyed
singing. She was Methodist
by faith.
Her survivors include her
husband of 57 years, George
R. Koschel, Inverness; her
son James and wife Judith
Koschel, Inverness, IL; two
daughters, Diane and hus-
band Thomas Beck, Las
Cruces, NM, and Carol
Koschel and husband James
Anderson, Madison, WI; and
her sister Rosemary Panzer,
Franklin Park, IL. She was
preceded in death by a
brother, Paul.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations in Ce-
celia's name to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.






Helen
Payne, 86
INVERNESS
Helen Catherine Payne,
age 86, Inverness, went home
to be with The Lord, Thurs-
day, July 29, 2010, at Arbor
Trail Rehab and Nursing
Center. A Funeral Service of
Remem-
brance will
be held on
Wednesday,
August 4,
? 2010, at 3:00
PM. at the
Chas. E.
S v Davis Fu-
Helen neral Home.
Payne The family
will receive
friends in visitation from 1:00
PM. until the hour of service.
Helen was born on Febru-
ary 19,1924, in McGraw, West
Virginia, to the late Charles
and Amy Rollins. She was
employed as a bookkeeper
for Teave Oil and Gas in
Charleston, WV She enjoyed
gardening, crocheting, quilt-
ing and working crossword
and jigsaw puzzles. She par-
ticularly enjoyed her church
fellowship at both Victory
Baptist Church and First
Christian Church. She also
served our country in the
U.S. Army.
Survivors include two sons,
Claudie "Bob" Payne II (San-
dra), Frame, WV G. Richard
(Darlene) Payne, Newton,
WV; two daughters, Shirley
(Gene) Pittman, Inverness,
and Sundra Payne, Frame,
WV; her brother Charles
Rollins, Lake, W, two sisters
Elsie Miller, Fayetteville, NC,
and Alice Smith, Bethel, OH;
four grandchildren, five great-
grandchildren; and a dear
family friend, Joyce Lilly. She
was preceded in death by her
husband, Claudie Payne.
The family requests dona-
tions in Helen's memory to
Hospice of Citrus County, 10.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 in lieu of flowers.


Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.
0005KEA

BROWN
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY


Jennie
Pologruto, 92
INVERNESS
Celebration of Life and
Musical Tribute Saturday,
August 7,2010, in Memory of
Jennie C. Pologruto. The
Family will receive friends
beginning 1:30 p.m. Tribute
begins at
2:00 p.m.
Hernando
S D A
Church,
1880 N.
Trucks Ave.,
Hernando,
FL 34442.
Refresh-
enntie ments to fol-
og low "Little
Jennie's"
Bench Dedication.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline. com.


Florence
Lohman, 92
INVERNESS
Florence J. Lohman, 92, of
Inverness, died Friday, July
30, 2010, in Inverness.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Home & Crematory.

Katherine
Mitchell-
Spooner, 50
CITRUS SPRINGS
Katherine Ann Mitchell-
Spooner, age 50, Citrus
Springs, died Tuesday, July
27, 2010, at her residence.
A lifelong resident of Cit-
rus County (Homosassa), she
was born on November 30,
1959, to Willie V Mitchell and
the late Nettie (Trotter) Gre-
gory. She was employed as a
medical biller and coder for
West Florida Medical.
Katherine will be remem-
bered as an excellent mother,
grandmother and sister She
enjoyed decorating her home
and fishing. She was a mem-
ber of the House of Power
Church in Holder
Her survivors include her
daughter and husband,
Deana Sexton-Nickerson and
Tim Nickerson, Hernando;
three sisters Patricia
Mitchell, Citrus Springs,
Theresa and husband Josh
Spooner, Hernando, and
Shirley Harrell, Orange
Springs; two grandsons,
Timmy and William.
Chas E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is in
charge of private arrange-
ments.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Theresa
Beatrice, 99
FLORAL CITY
Theresa D. Beatrice, 99,
Floral City, died July 28,2010,
in the Hospice Unit of Citrus
Memorial Health System.
Mass of Christian burial will
be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 3,
2010, from Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church. Burial
will follow Friday in St
Charles Cemetery in New
York Calling hours from 5 to
7 p.m. Monday at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home.

Dorothy 'DJ'
Russo, 79
CITRUS HILLS
Dorothy Jo Witt Russo, of
Citrus Hills, died on July 28,
2010, at the age of 79. "DJ"
as she was known, was born
in Oklahoma City, daughter
of Bernie Tate and Dorothy
Elizabeth
George Witt.
ffj1 .. As a child
SI she lived in
S Oklahoma,
H and Kansas,
graduating
.'" from Ottawa
S HS in Ot-
t a w a
Dorothy Kansas. She
'DJ'Russo married
Frank
Russo of Queens, New York,
and Albuquerque NM. They
meet on a blind date on St.
Valentine's Day and were
married three months later.


DJ's fondest wish was to be
reunited with her husband,


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lover and father of their two
children. Frank preceded
her in death by about 15
years. In his honor, she es-
tablished the Frank Russo
Memorial Scholarship at
Lecanto High School, which
has assisted many deserving
local students with their col-
lege expenses. They had a
son William Andrew Russo
and a daughter Nancy Jo
Russo. Together they lived
in New Mexico, Missouri,
Florida, Puerto Rico, Cali-
fornia, North Carolina, Vir-
ginia, and Oklahoma before
coming to Citrus Hills in re-
tirement in 1990. Frank was
an aeronautical engineer,
instrumental in the devel-
opment of the F4 and F15
U.S. Fighter jets and retired
and Dep. Director of Logis-
tics for the Eastern Fleet of
the U.S. Navy.
Dorothy Jo was a home-
maker and a community vol-
unteer and actively engaged
in local and state politics.
She attended the University
of New Mexico in 1967-1969.
She began her political ac-
tivities in California serving
as Chairperson of the Uni-
versity Area Republican
Women in San Diego, and
working in the Nixon guber-
natorial and Goldwater
presidential campaigns.
She was Public Relations
Chair of the Women for
Nixon campaign in New
Mexico in 1968 and won the
state Theta Pi Omega
Achievement award for her
efforts. She was a founding
member of the Lincoln Club
of Virginia and a member of
the State Board of the Okla-
homa Republican Women in
the late '80's and estab-
lished the first Chamber of
Commerce scholarship
award program in Daven-
port, Oklahoma.
She and Frank came to
Citrus Hills from Daven-
port, Oklahoma in 1989. As
was their wont, they imme-
diately became involved in
their community. DJ at-
tended several Episcopal
parishes in Citrus County;
including St. Margaret's in
Inverness, and earlier, St.
Anne's in Crystal River and
frequently visited other
churches with friends. She
served in numerous offices
including President of the
Citrus Hills Civic Associa-
tion. She was founder of the
very successful Citrus Hills
Civic Association Informa-
tion Fiesta (now cospon-
sored by the Chronicle), and
remained active in its im-
plementation until her
death. She also was co-
founder of the successful
Citrus Hills Circle of
Friends women's organiza-
tion. In addition, DJ was a
member of the Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club, the
Genealogical Society, and
active in the National Asso-
ciation of Retired Federal
Employees.
Most will remember
Dorothy as a friend, but
many will also remember
her political work in Citrus.
She was recently recognized
at a County Commissioner's
Board meeting as Ms. Unity,
Unity, Unity, echoing her fa-
vorite call at Republican
Executive Committee meet-
ing, supporting her view of
the Republican Party as a
broad and inclusive entity.
She served eight years
(1996-2004) as the Citrus
County State Committee-
woman on the Florida State
Republican Executive Com-
mittee. She championed nu-
merous local candidates. In
February she was honored
with the Citrus County Re-
publican Distinguished
Service Award. She asked
for nothing except support
of a broad Republican Vi-
sion, a love of Country and
County and support for our
military and fiscal responsi-
bility.
DJ died of complications
from terminal cancer. She
was struck Monday with a



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minor stroke and took her
last breath Wednesday with-
out pain or discomfort. She
was expected to pass on last
October, when last rites
were administered for the
first time, but recovered
with her fighting spirit and
used this gift of 10 months to
see and enjoy her friends,
her family and her politics.
She helped put on one last
Information Festival, wrote
her last columns for the
local Citrus Hills Commu-
nity Association newspaper,
and made one last foray into
local politics. She lived her
life to the fullest, and kind-
est, looking for joy and fun
in all work and play We will
miss her.
She is survived by her son
Bill, and four grandchil-
dren: Jason and his wife
Kathye (and her first great-
grandchild, expected in
early 2011) in Virginia, Alex,
in Nashville, TN, Philip in
Raleigh, NC and Ted in Win-
ston Salem, NC.
A Memorial Service for
DJ will be held at 2:00 p.m.
on Tuesday, August 3, 2010
at the Beverly Hills Chapel
of Hooper Funeral Home.
DJ requests that Memorial
donations should be made
to the organization that as-
sisted both her and Frank so
well and so lovingly, Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
Florida, 34464 (www.hos-
piceofcitruscounty.org). On-
line condolences to the
family and sharing thoughts
with the community she
loved may be made at
www.hooperfuneralhome.
com.

Robert
Slater, 73
LECANTO
Robert D. Slater, 73, of
Lecanto, Fl, went to be with
the Lord on July 30, 2010,
with the love and care of
Hospice of Citrus County
and wife and family at his
side.
He leaves his wife, Marie;
his son, Robert Slater Jr., his
daughter Karen Saccavino,
son Chris
S Slater, son
Patrick and
b brother
William
Slater; six
grandchil-
Sdren ,
"- Robert
Robert Slater III,
Slater M i e I i s i a
B u r y ,
Joseph Tuttle, Chris Slater
Jr., Aaron and Christian
Slater; as well as 4 great-
grandchildren.
He was a member of the
Teamster Union Local 443
for thirty years, he loved
trucking and fishing. He was
a great father and husband
and grandfather. He will be
truly missed.
Service arrangements
will be made at a later time.
Donation arrangements will
take place under the direc-
tion of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, FL.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Shane
Torres, 23
INVERNESS
Shane C. Torres, 23, of In-
verness, FL, died Thursday,
July 29, 2010, in Citrus Me-
morial hospital, Inverness.
Born December 8, 1986, in
Inverness
and was a
Lifelong res-
ident of Cit-
.' rus County.
Shane
was a 2006
F graduate of
Sha--s River High
Shane School.
Tores She was
preceded in
death by her brother, Justin
D. Judge.


To Place Your


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Shane is survived by her
mother and stepfather,
Alma Judge and Mark D.
Judge of Homosassa; father
Gordon Rowland of Ho-
mosassa; brothers Gordon
Rowland III, Tyler Judge,
both of Homosassa, and
Christopher Judge of Crys-
tal River; sister Brandi Olds
of Crystal River; maternal
grandmother Alma Gonza-
lez of Homosassa; maternal
grandfather Reinaldo Gon-
zalez of Miami; maternal
great-grandfather Joaquin
Cardona of Miami; fianed
Daniel Adamson of Lecanto.
Funeral services will be
held 2 p.m., Wednesday, Au-
gust 4, 2010, at the Corner-
stone Baptist Church, 1005
Hillside Court, Inverness,
FL. Friends will be received
Wednesday from 1 p. m.
until the hour of service.
Condolence may be given at
www.wilderfuneral.com.
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa Springs.

OBITUARIES
The Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by th
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements,.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
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If websites, photos,
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Additionally, all
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printed as submitted by
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Area funeral homes
with established
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$8.75 per column inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in ad-
vance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
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Small photos of the
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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PROGRESS
Continued from Page Al

ship by 2010 became bogged
down by a dispute over the
developer's performance
bond.
Then-Public Works Direc-
tor Glenn McCracken re-
fused to negotiate with
Tamposi over wording on
the letter of credit, which
protects the county should
the developer default on the
maintenance agreement,
records show.
"I am not inclined to ad-
just these documents for
every developer and project
in the county," he wrote in an
October 2007 e-mail to then-
County Attorney Robert
"Butch" Battista.
McCracken offered a "re-
vised" security agreement in
January 2008. By then, Tam-
posi changed his mind on
dedicating the road for pub-
lic use.
"I guess this means they
plan on holding off the
turnover of the infrastruc-
ture to the county until
sometime in the future," Mc-
Cracken wrote to county of-
ficials.
Tamposi decided to sell
the road and its right of way
to the county after officials
insisted on placing a County
Road 486 traffic signal at Ot-
tawa rather than a little far-
ther up the road at
Brentwood Circle, the en-
trance to another Citrus
Hills development
Abel said he learned in
2008 the county planned to
add Ottawa to the county's
transportation network -
lining it up with other roads
to connect C.R. 486 to State
Road 44 in the hopes of re-
lieving traffic off C.R. 491.
Abel said that's when
Tamposi insisted on com-
pensation.
"It seemed pretty auda-
cious to put a traffic light
into my driveway, so to
speak," Abel said Friday in
an interview.
McCracken, in a memo to
then-Development Services
Director Gary Maidhof in
September 2008, asked if
plans to connect Ottawa to
Otis Avenue a residential
street off S.R. 44 violated
two comprehensive plan
policies that discourage in-
creasing traffic coming onto
local streets.
Maidhof who lives on
Ottawa replied: "No. Ot-
tawa is recognized as a
minor collector Its expan-
sion is both projected and
expected."
He then referred Mc-
Cracken to a planning map
that shows Ottawa as part of
the county's transportation
system.
In March 2009, McCracken
sent an e-mail to Abel outlin-
ing several concerns he had
with the proposed purchase
of Ottawa.
Among them was that the
county didn't have funds for
a new road, that Ottawa al-
ready was open to the public
and the road would be used
by Citrus Hills construction
workers when they built the
newest phase of the commu-
nity between Ottawa and
County Road 491 to the west
Abel sent his e-mail re-
sponse to Maidhof.
"We have been straightfor-
ward and reasonable
throughout our dealings
with the county," Abel wrote.
"However, right now, we are
feeling duped. If the county's
decision to incorporate Ot-
tawa Avenue into its road
network has changed, please
let us know."
Seven months later, Mc-
Cracken reversed his stance.
He so impressed board
members with his Ottawa re-
port during a commission
meeting in October 2009 that
two commissioners phoned
Tamposi afterward to men-
tion it
'A couple of the commis-
sioners called Stephen after
Tuesday's meeting, and both
said that you made a good


presentation concerning Ot-
tawa, and they remain en-
thusiastic about the Ottawa
extension," Abel wrote in an
e-mail to McCracken.
McCracken maintained
that strong support up to,
and including, April 27,
when commissioners voted
to buy the road.
A month later, McCracken
abruptly resigned from his
$96,720-a-year job and was
given three months' sever-
ance pay worth about
$16,000.
County Administrator
Brad Thorpe said Mc-
Cracken offered no explana-
tion for his resignation and
Thorpe didn't ask for one.
McCracken could not be


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 A7


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The corner of North Quartz Avenue and North Olympia Street intersect with the dirt road that leads to North Ottawa Av-
enue.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
The 1.4-mile-long North Ottawa Avenue, seen here heading south from its intersection with
County Road 486, has generated a lot of buzz since the county agreed to purchase it for
2.9 million from developer Stephen Tamposi.


reached for comment Friday.
Attorney: 'Fantastic
bargain' for county
Ottawa began as a clay
road in the late 1970s as part
of a development called
Crystal Hills Mini Farms. A
Delaware-based company,
Context Development Co.,
recorded with the county
clerk a set of "restrictive
covenants" for Crystal Hills,
a community of 2.5-acre lots.
Ottawa Avenue, which
connected the development
to C.R. 486, would be used
for the benefit of the public,
according to records with
the Citrus County Clerk's Of-
fice.
That in itself does not
make it a public road,
County Attorney Richard
Wesch said. Wesch told com-
missioners two weeks ago
that state law requires pub-
lic maintenance for seven
years of a private roadway
before it assumes it to be a
public road.
County records also in-
clude a report from an Or-
lando land-title company to
Abel at Citrus Hills. The
title company's vice presi-
dent cites a 1946 Florida
Supreme Court ruling that
states that a plat or
covenant that states a road
is available for public pur-
poses is nothing but a "mere
offer" that must be formally
accepted by the county.
In the Crystal Hills case,
the county did not accept
Ottawa as a public road.
Citrus Hills continued its
expansion west to add Terra
Vista and the purchase of
Brentwood Farms. It began
developing property on the
east side of Ottawa, and
Crystal Farms in 1998 pro-


vided a perpetual easement
of Ottawa to Hampton Hills.
Abel said Tamposi did not
pay for the easement, but
the developer promised to
eventually pave and main-
tain the road and its rights
of way.
Citrus Hills amended its
development plan with the
county to include a new par-
cel between Ottawa and
C.R. 491. It would be a gated
community of about 2,500
homes with access to Ot-
tawa and C.R. 491.
Tamposi, according to
that development agree-
ment, was to pave Ottawa


from C.R. 486 to the end
where it would connect with
a roadway heading into the
new development.
Tamposi applied in May
2005 for a plat for Ottawa
that called for a three-year
maintenance agreement,
followed by county owner-
ship of the road.
During the course of two
years, however, officials
with the county and Hamp-
ton Hills haggled over word-
ing of the agreement that
specified the county's ac-
tions should the developer
not maintain the road to
county standards.


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The road maintenance
issue was never resolved. In
2007, the paving of Ottawa
was complete.
Abel blamed county bu-
reaucracy for the break-
down.
"The longer we debated
with the county... it made us
rethink the entire project,"
Abel said. "Stephen said,
'I'm not even sure I want to
give the thing anymore.' We
were getting so much resist-
ance."
Thorpe, who was hired as
county administrator in
mid-2009, said he knew little
about the Ottawa project's
history.
"You probably know as
much as I do," he told a re-
porter Friday.
Thorpe said he didn't
know about the developer's
issues with the county in
trying to reach a mainte-
nance agreement, nor was
he aware that McCracken
had problems with the
county's purchase of the
road.
"When I started this
process with Glenn Mc-
Cracken, it was negotiating
a purchase price," Thorpe
said. "He helped me recom-
mend the purchase price. It
was never an option not to
purchase the road."
The issues McCracken
raised in his March 27,2009,
e-mail to Abel included con-
cerns that the county could-
n't afford the road.


"As you know the cup-
boards are bare at the
county," McCracken wrote.
"I am having a hard time
justifying the county pur-
chase for perpetual care, a
dead end road, on an ease-
ment, which serves very few
residences when we are still
in need of significant im-
provements to our major
transportation network"
Thorpe, however, said the
Ottawa project connect-
ing Ottawa to Quartz Av-
enue, and then to Otis
Avenue, which runs to State
Road 44 is the cheapest
alternative to pulling traffic
off the more heavily con-
gested County Road 491 in
Lecanto and Croft Avenue
near Inverness.
County officials estimate
the Ottawa project, includ-
ing buying right of way, resi-
dential lots and
construction, at $4.3 million.
Widening either Croft or
C.R. 491 from two lanes to
four lanes would cost at
least $17 million, according
to county estimates.
And county officials are
still awaiting word about an
October 2008 grant applica-
tion to the Department of
Transportation to help pay
for the Ottawa connection.
Right now Ottawa ends at
an impassable dirt path. On
the other side is Quartz Av-
enue and that road leads to
Otis Avenue, which ends at
S.R. 44 across from the
Withlacoochee State Forest
about a mile east of C.R. 491.
County officials say they
hope to have the connection
completed in 12 months.
Maidhof, the former de-
velopment services director
who now is operations and
projects officer, said the
county will need to update
its comprehensive plan to
include Quartz and Otis av-
enues as part of its trans-
portation collection system.
Plus, he said, neither
roadway is wide enough to
handle traffic expected
from the new Ottawa con-
nection.
Maidhof said he has
steered clear of the issue
because he owns a home on
Ottawa.
Tamposi could not be
reached for comment
Abel, the Citrus Hills at-
torney, said he doesn't un-
derstand the fuss.
"If you took any inde-
pendent person and just
looked at the facts of this
case," he said, "the county
just made a fantastic bar-
gain to get a north-south col-
lector road as cheap as they
did."


HEALTH


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Wednesday, August 11th

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Thomas Dawson, OD


352.795.3317
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Crystal River, FL 34429


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NOTICE OF SPECIAL WORKSHOP OF THE CRYSTAL RIVER
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

The Crystal River Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA)
will hold a SPECIAL WORKSHOP to hear
public input regarding a proposed New Sign Ordinance for the
Community Redevelopment District
on August 5, 2010 at 5:00 pm in
Council Chambers located at City Hall
123 NW US Highway 19
Crystal River.

The CRA is looking for input from District business owners and
interested parties of the general public. Since the CRA is a special
district, we will be allowed to "craft" a special ordinance that will
work for the CRA District. Any and all interested parties are
encouraged to attend the Special Workshop.

For more information please contact the CRA at (352) 794-0072.
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A8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 STATE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Therapy dogs bring comfort


Hospital

patients

respond

to canines

STEPHANIE GENUARDI
The Miami Herald

MIAMI The man sitting
with his dying wife in a
Broward Vitas Hospice room
at first told Jana Thomas and
her Shetland sheepdog Pogo
not to come in.
But when Thomas put
Pogo in bed beside the
woman, she wrapped her
arms around the dog, stroked
his fur and began to grin.
"She hasn't been able to
smile in two years," her hus-
band told Thomas.
The woman died the next
day, but Thomas soon re-
ceived a letter from the hus-
band thanking her for
allowing him to see his wife
smile one more time.
"I have so many stories like
that," said Thomas, who has
been making pet therapy
rounds with Pogo for 11
years. "It's just amazing what
the animals can do."
Thomas' Paws for Smiles
program, which operates pri-
marily in Broward's Memo-
rial Healthcare System, is
one of at least five pet ther-
apy programs in South
Florida.
Designed to bring smiles to
suffering patients, the pups
and their handlers travel to
the rooms of patients at
Miami Children's, Jackson
Memorial, South Miami and
Baptist hospitals in Miami-
Dade, along with Memorial
Manor, Memorial West, Me-
morial Pembroke, Joe
DiMaggio Children's Hospi-
tal and Vistas Hospice in
Broward.
"We hear that the patients
miss their own pets," said
Nuria Claramunt, assistant
director for community and
volunteer resources at Miami
Children's Hospital.
"It allows them to be loved
unconditionally in stressful,
scary moments," she said.
Miami Children's robust
pet therapy program, which
has been in existence for
more than 15 years, features
14 dogs.
Among them: a 2-year-old
Great Dane named Max that
weighs 147 pounds and
stands a towering six-foot
two-inches from his hind
legs.
"That's not a dog, that's a
horse!" patients and their
families have said as they
whipped out their iPhones to
snap pictures as Max trotted
by their rooms.


MARICE COHN BAND/The Miami Herald
Steven Bonwit, right, introduces his dog Max to patient, 21-month-old Matthew Roig, center, and his grandmother, Lidia
Alonso, both of Miami, Thursday, July 1, 2010. Max, a 147 pound, 6-foot-2 on hind legs, male, 2-year-old Great Dane, is a
therapy dog. He visits sick children at Miami Children's Hospital in Miami.


A thirsty Max is just the right height for the faucets in the hospital rooms.


Max's human counterpart,
Steve Bonwit, has been a vol-
unteer at the hospital for 14
years.
When Bonwit was recover-
ing at South Miami Hospital
from abdominal surgery in
2009, a dog from the hospi-
tal's pet therapy program
came into his room and lifted
his spirits.
The visit got him thinking
that Max would make a great
therapy dog.
And so in February of this
year, after six visits to a local
nursing home to see how Max
would react in such a setting,
Bonwit began taking Max
around the second floor of
Miami Children's Hospital
once a week for an hour to


visit the orthopedic and car-
diac patients.
"Max absolutely loves kids.
They can pull on his tail, and
he won't respond," said Bon-
wit, who added that his white
Great Dane can sense when a
patient has had surgery. He
sniffs around and can detect
which part of the patient's
body has been worked on,
and he will lie along the other
side.
To participate in most pet
therapy programs, dogs must
be at least a year old, walk
well on a leash and get along
with other dogs.
They also must be well-
groomed, with clipped nails,
and have an up-to-date ra-
bies vaccine and a negative


fecal exam.
Thomas is a certified tester
for the national organization,
Therapy Dogs Inc. She takes
potential therapy dogs on at
least three visits to Memorial
Manor nursing home.
If the dogs are well-be-
haved on their visits they
have to be able to handle
loud noises, crowded rooms
and lots of petting they
"graduate" and can begin
working in a local pet therapy
program.
The graduates' owners
must pay $35 for national reg-
istration, which covers insur-
ance.
A 9-year-old, trilingual
golden Lab named Jean com-
prises Jackson Memorial


Hospital's unique pet ther-
apy unit
Jean doesn't only cheer up
her patients, she helps them
get moving.
Jean was bred and trained
by Canine Companions for
Independence, a nonprofit
organization that provides
trained assistance dogs to
people with hearing loss, de-
velopmental disorders and/or
physical disabilities.
When Jean's owner, Cathy
Herring a recreation ther-
apist at Jackson for 20 years
- found out that the organi-
zation trained dogs to work
with professionals in hospi-
tals, she immediately put in
an application.
Jean had already had nine
months of intensive training
with the organization when
Herring got her The two un-
derwent two weeks., of team
training.
Seven years later, the two
are staples in Jackson's pedi-
atric, trauma and spinal-cord
rehabilitation units, coming
two to three days a week for
eight-hour days. Herring in-
corporates Jean into tradi-
tional physical therapy
regimens.
On a recent morning, Jean
helped 49-year-old Edgar
Castaneda improve the
strength and mobility of his
right arm and hand.
Castaneda was the victim
of a brutal assault in 1995.
Two teenagers attacked him
as he made a nighttime de-
posit at bank The teens fol-
lowed him back to his
apartment and shot him in


State BRIEFS


FHP: Pregnant
woman dies in crash
ELLENTON The Florida
Highway Patrol says a pregnant
Tampa woman and her unborn
child are dead, and seven other
children injured, after a crash in
southwest Florida.
Investigators say 35-year-old
Shakia Peterson was riding in a
2003 Ford Expedition Saturday
morning on Interstate 75 in
Manatee County when one of
the vehicle's tires failed.
According to the FHP, the
driver, 45-year-old Freddie


James, was unable to maintain
control of the vehicle. It began
rotating, entered a'shoulder of
the highway and began to over-
turn.
Seven children, ages 12 to
17, were hospitalized. Two are
in critical condition.
James and four of the chil-
dren suffered serious injuries.
Home phones
disappearing in Fla.
WEST PALM BEACH The
three largest landline telephone
providers in Florida Verizon,
AT&T and CenturyLink lost 1


million customers in 2009.
That's according to a report
released Friday by the state
Public Service Commission,
which researches and regu-
lates utilities.
The data show consumers
may've been trying to save
money during the recession by
canceling services like wireline
home phone accounts.
Cellular and Intemet phone
providers continued to gain
customers, but the wireless
growth rate is slowing.
The aging pay-phone indus-
try fared worst of all. Officials


^ Become a fan
Please RSVP to: Meredith@citruscountychamber.com on Facebook:
Sponsored by: Special thanks to: NGPCITRUS

twwwvi(eE CITRUSeCom UNTY
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say almost- percent of the year-old Michael Duda died Fri-
state's pay phones were re- day after he fell off a 17-foot
moved in 2009, meaning there boat near Plantation Key when
are now only 16,500 left. the 16-year-old operator made
a sharp left turn. The Fort
11-year-old dead in Myers boy was thrown over-
boating accident board and struck by the vessel.
FORT MYERS The Duda was pronounced dead
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con- at a local hospital.
servation Commission said 11- -From wire reports


ROTARY CLUj


Max has his own Identifica-
tion tag for visiting children
in the hospital.
the back of the head.
He was in a coma for two.
months, and has spent the"
past decade in assisted living
facilities. Now, he goes to
Jackson for physical, occupa-
tional and speech therapy.
Herring instructed Cas-
taneda to stroke Jean's fur
and to feed her carrots, Jean's
favorite treat, by clasping the
chopped vegetable in his
palm, holding it to her mouth,
and saying "OK"
When Edgar's shaking
hand grazed Jean's mouth
and Jean licked his fingers,
he giggled.
"She loves to give kisses,"
said Herring.
'Jean," Edgar murmured:
as he rested his chin on the
table to be at eye-level with
the Lab and grinned.
Herring said the mild-
mannered Jean, who under-
stands commands in English,
Spanish and Creole, is loved
by all with whom she comes
in contact Everyone on
Metrorail knows her name,
Herring said, and patients
bring her gifts and dog cook-
ies.
In addition to bringing
smiles to patients, Herring
believes Jean enhances the
therapy sessions.
"They try so much harder
with the dog there," she said,
describing how one patient
refused to glide around the
perimeter of a bed, but when
Herring suggested that the
patient glide to certain points
to feed Jean carrots, the pa-
tient happily obliged.
And making patients
happy, improving their day, is
what it's all about for these
pups and their owners.
"If we make one child'
smile a day, we've done our
job," said Bonwit "That's my
goal."

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Crews battle wildfire


in desert north of L.A.


Associated Press
PALMDALE, Calif. Fire
crews working through the
night beat back flames and
built containment lines
around a two-day old wild-
fire that charred nearly 22
square miles of brush in the
high desert north of Los An-
geles.
The blaze was 62 percent
contained Saturday morn-
ing and no structures were
threatened, according to
Los Angeles County Fire
Capt Sam Padilla.
Crews hoped to close the
fire's south flank before
temperatures rise and dry
winds whip up again as ex-
pected Saturday.
"We're getting a handle on
it," Padilla said. "As soon as
we contain that south end
we'll be in better shape."
Padilla said there were no
open flames -just smolder-
ing embers which has sig-
nificantly slowed the fire's
spread.
Officials were prepared to
again activate water-drop-
ping aircraft, which helped
hold back the fire late Fri-
day when flames jumped an
aqueduct and menaced
power lines that deliver
electricity to Southern Cali-
fornia.
Winds apparently carried
embers across the wide con-
crete channel, with flames
rapidly spreading to back-
yard fences at the edge of
Palmdale. Plumes of smoke
streamed across the city of
139,000 as winds picked up.
Two giant airtankers
swooped into the Antelope
Valley to drop red flame re-
tardant around the perime-
ter while helicopters
hovered over the aqueduct
to suck up water and release
it quickly on top of the smol-
dering hotspots.
"They make a big differ-
ence but it's a coordinated
aggressive attack with fire-
fighters laying hose, doing
structure protection and
perimeter control," said Los
Angeles County Fire Inspec-
tor Frederic Stowers. "It's a
tough situation but we're
steadily taking chunks out of
this fire, protecting the in-
frastructure power lines,
roads and the like."
Stowers said 1,700 person-
nel worked in high heat to
outflank the blaze and build
containment lines around
20 percent of the fire.
Fire officials expect low
humidity and high tempera-
tures again Saturday with
winds gusts of up to 50 mph
in the foothills in the
evening.
As many as 2,300 struc-
tures were threatened at the
height of the fire late Thurs-
day. Evacuation orders were
lifted Friday morning, but
some roads remained
closed.
One house and three mo-
bile home residences were
destroyed, another house
had roof damage and vari-
ous other outbuildings and
garages were lost in the
horse country region, au-
thorities said.
Most of the homes closer
to Palmdale, however, are of
recent construction with
fire resistant roofs, stucco
walls, boxed eaves and land-
scaped with fire-resistant
vegetation, fire officials
said.
Maria Norton, 19, ex-
pected to be home Friday
evening preparing for Sat-
urday's Miss Antelope Val-
ley pageant.
Instead, this year's Miss
Leona Valley is in a motel,
worrying about her horse,
Sally, after fire destroyed
her family's stable on Thurs-
day
"It's kind of all a big night-
mare," Norton said.
Sheriff's deputies told her
family there was no time to
load the horse into a trailer
so the college sophomore
packed her purple pageant
dress and fled, freeing Sally
just before flames engulfed
the barn.
A few hours later, Norton
learned that animal res-
cuers had taken the horse to
local fairgrounds where


large animals were being
sheltered during the fire.
The fire broke out near a
state highway that snakes
through the San Gabriel
Mountains, connecting Los
Angeles to the high desert.
Deputy Fire Chief
Michael Bryant said an in-
vestigation into the cause of


the fire is centering on
workers who were hammer-
ing on some bolts to remove
a tire rim. The workers were
cooperating with the inves-
tigation.
The blaze spread rapidly
after breaking out at
midafternoon Thursday,
triggering overnight evacua-
tions of about 2,000 homes.
Elsewhere, good weather
in neighboring Kern County
helped firefighters build
containment lines around
two wildfires that destroyed
homes in remote mountain
communities earlier in the
week
Officials said a fire near


Tehachapi was 85 percent
contained Saturday morn-
ing. Damage assessment
teams counted 23 homes
that were destroyed and
eight that were damaged by
a fire that sped through
about 2 1/2 square miles of
heavy brush starting Tues-
day afternoon. Crews ex-
pected to have the blaze
fully contained by Sunday.
To the north, a fire that
destroyed eight residences
and six outbuildings as it
spread across about 26
square miles of the Sequoia
National Forest in the
Sierra Nevada was 81 per-
cent contained.


Associated Press
A U.S. Forest Service firefighter sets an intentional backfire Saturday to keep flames away
from homes in Leona Valley, just west of Palmdale, Calif., and along Lake Elizabeth Road.
Firefighters said they have no idea as to when the fire will be completely controlled.


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 A9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NATION


:I ---














NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Invaders













Associated Press
Judy Pederson examines a
dock Saturday at Spring
Point Marina for marine
species in South Portland,
Maine. Pederson is part of
a team of scientists who
are surveying piers, docks
and coves in the region for
invasive pests.

Army: Weapons
should stay put
HONOLULU Chemical
weapons dumped in deep
water five miles south of
Pearl Harbor after World War
II should remain at the site
because moving them could
pose more of a threat to peo-
ple and the environment, the
Army said Friday.
Records show the Army
dumped 16,000 bombs at the
site after the war; each of the
bombs contained 73 pounds
of the chemical agent mus-
tard.
J.C. King, assistant for mu-
nitions and chemical matters
at the Army, said in a state-
ment that the Army is review-
ing a University of Hawaii
study released earlier this
week on the dumped
weapons. Margo Edwards, a
senior research scientist at
the university, said the study
showed the munitions aren't
a hazard, but that they're de-
teriorating and should con-
tinue to be monitored.


World BRIEF


Pipeline break pinpointed in river


Official say cleanup could take months


Associated Press
MARSHALL, Mich. Officials
said they've located the pipeline
break that caused hundreds of
thousands of gallons of oil to spew
into a major river in southern
Michigan.
An official with the Canadian
company that owns the pipeline
that leaked oil into the Kalamazoo
River, confirmed the break's dis-
covery during a news conference
Saturday afternoon in Marshall,
Mich.
Enbridge Inc. executive vice
president Steve Wuori said "it is


highly unlikely there is any other
break in the pipe." Wuori also said
no oil was leaking from the exposed
pipe.
The company shut down the
pipeline Monday and had been
looking for the break since.
Enbridge said 820,000 gallons of
oil leaked. The Environmental Pro-
tection Agency puts the total at
more than 1 million gallons.
Officials predict it will take
months to clean up the mess, and
damage to wetlands and wildlife
may last considerably longer
Enbridge said the spill is con-
tained. Gov. Jennifer Granholm


said after a helicopter inspection of
the stricken area Friday that the
company's handling of the problem
had improved since she gave it poor
reviews earlier this week.
"I can say there's been significant
progress," Granholm said at a news
conference, adding: "I don't want to
suggest we are satisfied. We continue
to ask for additional resources."
"No one is sugarcoating it," com-
pany spokesman Alan Roth said.
"There's still a tremendous amount
of work to do, but good progress is
being made."
EPA chief Lisa Jackson said she
was "very confident" the oil would
not reach Lake Michigan, where the
river empties about 80 miles from
where the spill has been contained.


Enbridge said it had recovered
100,800 gallons of oil and estimated
that 420,000 gallons are in a holding
area and will be pumped into tanks.
Scientists fear the worst may be
yet to come for fish in the river Jay
Wesley, a biologist with the state of
Michigan, said the oil spill had killed
fish in "very limited numbers" along
the affected stretch of the river from
Marshall westward into Battle
Creek
The bigger problems for fish may
come within a week or so, if the oil
spill results in decreased water oxy-
gen levels. Wesley said insects, algae,
frogs and turtles along the river have
been killed in high numbers -
which could hurt the fish food sup-
ply.


Associated Press
Police officers detain oppo-
sition activists taking part
Saturday in a banned anti-
Kremlin protest in Moscow.

Russian police
arrest activists
MOSCOW Russian po-
lice arrested a leading Krem-
lin opponent and dozens of
fellow activists Saturday at a
demonstration demanding
freedom of assembly.
Several hundred protesters
gathered in a Moscow square
chanting "Freedom! Free-
dom!" at the rally city authori-
ties tried to ban.
An Associated Press re-
porter saw Kremlin critic Boris
Nemtsov dragged to a police
car and driven away. The rally
had barely started. Three or
four others appeared to have
been detained.
Police spokesman Viktor
Biryukov said he wasn't sure
how many people had been
detained in total, but human
rights advocate Lev Pono-
maryov said there were as
many as 30 arrests.
"Authorities are just not lis-
tening to our demands,"
Ponomaryov told AP.
Police encircled the re-
maining protesters, who defi-
antly held aloft signs reading
"31" to symbolize their move-
ment, Strategy 31. The name
refers to a plan by Kremlin
opponents to hold such rallies
on the last day of each month
with 31 days a nod to the
Constitution's Article 31 guar-
anteeing the right to peaceful
assembly.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
NOWSHERA, Pakistan The
death toll in the massive flooding
in Pakistan surged past 800 as
floodwaters receded Saturday in
the hard-hit northwest, an official
said. The damage to roads, bridges
and communications networks
hindered rescuers, while the
threat of disease loomed as some
evacuees arrived in camps with
fever, diarrhea and skin problems.
Even for a country used to
tragedy especially deadly sui-
cide attacks by Taliban militants
- the scale of this past week's


flooding has been shocking. Mon-
soon rains come every year, but
rarely with such fury. The devas-
tation came in the wake of the
worst-ever plane crash in Pak-
istan, which killed 152 people in
Islamabad on Wednesday.
In neighboring eastern
Afghanistan, floods killed 64 peo-
ple and injured 61 others in the
past week, while destroying hun-
dreds of homes and huge
stretches of farmland, according
to Matin Edrak, director of the
Afghan government's disaster de-
partment
As rivers swelled in Pakistan's


northwest, people sought ever-
shrinking high ground or grasped
for trees and fences to avoid get-
ting swept away. Buildings simply
crumbled into the raging river in
Kalam, a town in the northern
part of the Swat Valley, Geo TV
showed Saturday.
Reports coming in from districts
around the northwest, where such
flooding has not been seen since
1929, showed at least 800 people
had died, said Mian Iftikhar Hus-
sain, the region's information min-
ister. The U.N. estimated that
some 1 million people nationwide
were affected by the disaster,


though it didn't specify exactly
what that meant
Floodwaters were receding in
the region, and many people re-
main missing, Hussain said.
More than 30,000 Pakistani
army troops engaged in rescue
and relief work had evacuated
19,000 trapped people by Saturday
night, said army spokesman Maj.
Gen. Athar Abbas.
"The level of devastation is so
widespread, so large," he said. "It
is quite possible that in many
areas there is damage, deaths,
which may not have been re-
ported."


= Around the WORLD


Associated Press Associated Press Associated Press
A man walks through the forest Saturday after it Men push a cartload of cooking gas cylinders on Rescue workers and medical personnel help 10-
was burned by a fire near the town of Voronezh, Saturday through a waterlogged area during rain- year-old Imma Maurlello as she is finally rescued
some 294 miles south of Moscow. Fires have fall in Mumbai, India. Heavy rains continued to Saturday from a collapsed apartment building,
spread quickly across more than 200,000 acres in lash different parts of the city Saturday, resulting after waiting for more than 10 hours under the rub-
recent days after a record heat wave and severe in waterlogging in several suburban areas, ac- ble in Afragola, near Naples, southern Italy. The
drought that has plagued Russia for weeks. cording to a news agency. building fell apart after 1 a.m. Saturday.


Death toll surges


Associated Press
Pakistani villagers collect their belongings at their flooded house Saturday on the outskirts of Peshawar, Pakistan. The death toll in the mas-
sive flooding in Pakistan surged past 800 as floodwaters receded Saturday in the hard-hit northwest, an official said.


Scale of flooding in Pakistan shocking as monsoon strikes with excessive fury


----~-~~ '~I~~~


~LIII~L- ~--1411~ 1_








Page All SLr'NDAY, AUGUST 1,2010


XCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE






History, chocolate, bridge es




Trendy DUMBO


pulls tourists


to Brooklyn / "

BETH J. HARPAZ ,
Associated Press / '


NEW YORK

That's what tourists get in
trendy DUMBO. The history
of this offbeat Brooklyn
neighborhood includes Dutch
settlers, George Washington, Walt
Whitman, the Brooklyn and
Manhattan bridges, and a 21st-
century chocolate shop.
But history and chocolate are just a small part of
what makes DUMBO which stands for Down
Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass worth visit-
ing. The neighborhood and an adjacent area called
Fulton Ferry Landing are also home to Brooklyn
Bridge Park, which opened in March with panoramic
views of the bridges, Empire State Building and
Statue of Liberty, all in one turn of the head.
For foodies, in addition to Jacques Torres Choco-
late, destinations include Grimaldi's, famous for
brick-oven pizza; the Michelin-starred River Cafe,
and the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory. And then there
are the streetscapes gritty and majestic, chaotic
and charming. Every corner reveals a visual urban
jazz that is uniquely New York
To get to DUMBO from Manhattan, take the F train
to the York Street station. Exit, turn right on Jay
Street, and start your sightseeing by looking up.
Wooden-barrel water towers dot the rooftops and
"NECK FACE" graffiti adorns a building to your
right. Continue a few blocks along Jay, then turn left
on Water Street. Here stands the Manhattan Bridge
overpass that gives the neighborhood its name.
Walk under the massive stone arch. Above, subway
trains roar and clatter across the bridge, but layers of
history can also be found by looking down. Beneath
your feet, asphalt gives way to old granite paving
stones crisscrossed with tracks from the Jay Street
Rail line, which transported freight for the factories
that once dominated the neighborhood. As you con-
tinue down Water Street, look to your right at the in-
tersection of Washington Street The Empire State
Building is straight across the river.
A stop at the chocolate shop, 66 Water St, is a
must The frozen hot chocolate is a divine summer
treat, bonbons are $1.50 apiece and there's an ice
cream annex next door. When the store opened in
See DUMBO/Page A14


i. -1- '
.-




Associated Press
A view of the Statue of Liberty Is seen July 15 from the Brooklyn Bridge Park In the DUMBO section of the Brook-
lyn borough of New York. The history of this offbeat Brooklyitneighborhood Includes Dutch settlers, George Wash-
Ington, Walt Whitman, the man who designed the Brooklyn Bridge and a 21st-century chocolate shop.


Expanding horizons
7.~ .- 1;. ~-A MNW .-


Special to the Chronicle
Cousin June Moore, granddaughter Hannah Harris, Linda Williams and sister Carol
Cape traveled to Italy, Croatia, Greece and Turkey In June. Here, they are In front of
the Acropolis in Athens. They learned about many historical sites and exposed
Hannah to the culture outside her world. Linda has taken each of her grandchildren
on a trip when they reach age 10 or older. She has taken them on trips to Scotland,
Rome, Venice and Russia. "I believe it helps them begin to experience the Immen-
sity of the world and appreciate the beautiful country we live In," said Unda.


DREAM
VACATONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Documents in danger


US. Passports still

vulnerable to fraud
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Posing as someone
else and using fake birth certificates and
driver's licenses to get a U.S. passport can
still work For the second time in two
years, government investigators exposed a
gaping hole in the country's security by
deliberately using fraudulent material
to obtain passports.
The investigation by the Govern-
bility Office,
detailed on
Capitol Hill
Thursd ay,
demonstrates
that despite se- 1""
curity overhauls .
since the Sept.
11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the State De-
partment's system for issuing passports
remains vulnerable to fraud.
It also shows how an illegally obtained
U.S. passport one of the most sought-
after travel documents in the world -
could provide cover for drug dealers, mur-
derers and others trying to avoid capture.
In the most recent probe, GAO investi-
gators applied for seven passports and re-
ceived three, no eyebrows raised. In two
other cases, the applications were initially
approved but later denied when fraud
was discovered. State Department offi-
cials rejected two other bogus applica-
tions.
In a similar investigation in March 2009,
government investigators used phony doc-
uments and the identities of a dead man
and a 5-year-old boy to obtain U.S. pass-
ports. One investigator used the Social Se-
curity number of a man who died in 1965,
a fake New York birth certificate and a


fake Florida driver's license. He received
a passport four days later.
In the latest ruse, conducted between
January and June of this year, investiga-
tors used a fake Florida birth certificate,
fake West Virginia driver's license and a
recently issued Social Security number
for a 62-year-old applicant The same pic-
ture was used for multiple applications
under different names.
"Nearly nine years after the terrorist at-
tacks on 9/11, it is long overdue for the
State Department to secure its system for
issuing passports," said Sen. Susan
Collins, R-Maine.
Brenda Sprague, deputy
assistant secretary
for passport serv-
ices at the State
Department, said
human error and
the sheer vol-
ume of docu-
ments that the
department
produces each year will always
challenge the integrity of the
passport application review process. The
State Department issued 13 million pass-
ports in 2009.
In Sprague's prepared remarks for a
Senate Judiciary Committee hearing
Thursday, she listed steps consular offi-
cers took once they discovered they were
dealing with fakery. These included or-
dering a new schedule for improvements
at passport offices and agencies across the
country so that more facial recognition
technology is used.
Sprague said the improvements made
after previous investigations are among
the reasons officials were able to catch
four out of the seven fake applications in
the most recent test.
"It shows that our work has improved in
terms of detecting passport fraud, but we
still have work to do," State Department
spokesman PJ. Crowley said Thursday.








A12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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/ am from Louisiana and I know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


At BP we have taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf.
We are committed to keeping you informed.

Looking For Oil
Crews are cleaning Gulf Coast beaches 24 hours a day, 7 days
a week. When oil is spotted, the Response Command Center
is notified, a Shore Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) is
mobilized and cleanup begins immediately. Cleanup efforts are
being coordinated from 17 staging areas in Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama and Florida. Over 33,000 people are involved in the
cleanup operation.

If you see oil on the beach, please call 1-866-448-5816 and we'll
send a team to clean it up.

Cleaning Up the Beaches
The number of people mobilized to clean up the beaches depends
on the size of the affected area. Individual teams can number in
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Working with the Coast Guard, our teams continue cleaning up
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Our Responsibility
Our beach cleanup operations will continue until the last of the oil
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Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes.
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For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
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twitter.com/bp_america To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
youtube.com/bp www.floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BR E&P


bp


A12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (Ff.) (CIRONICCI.IV:


,-:. .... Veterans NOTES =S--


Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call Ed Murphy at the Hunger
and Homeless Coalition at 382-
0876, or pass along this phone
number to the veteran.

Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is looking for female
veterans. Many functions go on
where we would like to involve
female veterans, but we don't
know how to reach them. We
are particularly looking for
WWII Veterans to participate in
the Parade this year, but all fe-
male veterans are encouraged
to contact us. If you are a fe-
male veteran and would like to
be involved, contact Cynthia
Holden at 628-6481 or e-mail
Cynthia@advocate4victims.org.
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its an-
nual Veterans in the Class-
room program, Nov. 1 through
12, as part of its 18th annual
Veterans Appreciation Week
activities.
Coordinated by the Citrus
County Chapter of the Military
Officers Association of America
(MOAA), the Veterans in the
Classroom program brings liv-
ing history to the classrooms of
the county's public and private
schools, as well as home
school groups. Veterans share
with students their firsthand mil-
itary experiences and travels
while serving our country in uni-
form around the world in peace
and war.
The model Veterans in the
Classroom program was recog-
nized in 2008 with a Florida Ed-
ucation Foundation award. The
program's success has gener-
ated the need for additional vet-
erans to share their
experiences with students. Per-
sian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq, Air
Force, National Guard and
women veterans are especially
needed as participants.
All interested veterans are
encouraged to contact Gary
Runyon 563-5727, Mac
McLeod 746-1384 or Bob Truax
860-1630.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252.and Ladies Auxilk
iary 3190N. Carl G. Rose' :
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 726-3339. Send e-mails
to vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Pizza special every day: 10-
inch pizza, $6.
Free pool all week.
Today: Lounge bingo 2 p.m.,
food available, bring a can food
item and get a free winner-take-
all (WTA) card.
Monday: Wings three for $1,
2 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday: Auxiliary lounge
bingo 2 p.m., food available,
bring a can food item and get a
free WTA card. Dart league at 7
p.m.
Wednesday: EUCHRE 2:30
p.m.
Thursday: Show Me the
Hand at 1 p.m.
Friday: Baked chicken
breast. Music by Sun Coasters.
Saturday: Ladies Auxiliary
bingo at 10:30 a.m. Doors open
at 8:30; food available.
Post 4252 Auxiliary goes to
nursing homes four times a
month to play bingo with resi-
dents. Everyone is welcome.
Post and Auxiliary meet at
6:30 p.m. every second Thurs-
day.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising, nurs-
ing homes. Main post hall is
available for rent for your pal-
ties. Call Cmdr. John Stark or
President Crystal Thompson at
726-3339.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
(352) 465-4864. The schedule
of events for the week of Aug. 1
is:
Canteen opens noon Mon-
day to Saturday, 1 p.m. Sun-
day.


Tuesday: Darts at 1 p.i Post com mi
Wednesday: Shuffleboard at
7 p.m.
Thursday: Bingo starts at 1
p.m.
Friday: Turkey dinner 5 to
6:30 p.m., $8.
Saturday: Breakfast served -' ,
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free shuffle- '
board. t
Every Saturday: Breakfast
served from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.
Breakfast items served will be
eggs, sausage, grits, home
fries, sausage gravy and bis- 7 .
cuts, pancakes and coffee or
tea. Cost is $6 per person. Re-
duced price for children. Public .-
is invited.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary, Post Commander Sterling.
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-', July 29 with a U.S. Coast Gua
ness, phone 344-3495. Week Inverness.
of Aug. 1:
Today: Pool tournament 2
p.m.; Karaoke with Turner Rent the hall for any event -
Camp Dave from 5 to 9 p.m. a reunion, wedding reception,
Monday: No bingo. birthday party, baby shower,
Tuesday: Chicken wings etc. We have a beautiful facility,
three for $1.25 at 4:30 to 7 p.m. plenty of room, and smoke free.
French fries, onion rings and Covered patio available for
celery available. Karaoke with smokers, (352) 489-1772.
Mark B from 5 to 9 p.m. Dumas-Hartson VFW
Wednesday: Ladies Auxiliary Post 8189 officers and House
bar bingo at 6 p.m. ', Committee members will meet
Thursday: Bar bingo at 3 at 7 p.m. Monday to plant the
p.m. agenda for next week's general
Friday: Fish fry, baked or meeting. The Men's Auxiliary
fried, or baked half chicken meets at the same time tomor-
served with potatoes, coleslaw, row. The Ladies Auxiliary meets
hush puppies, dessert and cof- concurrently with the general
fee. $6.50, at 4:30 p.m. membership at 7 p.m. as usual
Karaoke with Wild Willie from 5 on the second Monday monthly.
to 9 p.m. Any eligible veteran inter-
Saturday: Lounge music and ested in becoming a VFW
food available for a nominal member is encouraged to visit
charge, 5 to 9 p.m. Entertain- .:'the post on West Veterans
ment with Mad Cow. Drive, halfway between Crystal
Starting in August, there will River and Homosassa. The
be a change made in the meet- Post is open at 1 p.m. daily.
ing date of the Ladies Auxiliary. The phone number is 795-
Their meetings will be the sec- 5012.
ond Thursday monthly and the Monthly activities include:
Post will still meet the third Mixed pool at 2 p.m. on Sun-
Thursday monthly. Meeting days and bargain refreshments
times are 7:30 p.m. each Monday. Tuesday are set
Su iday, Aug. 8: Post picnic, aside to keep cool and relax in
food available for a nominal the canteen, but Wednesdays
cost. Entertainment with Jack get lively at 2 p.m. with bingo
and Sheila from.2 to 5 p.m. and and a snack prepared by the
Salt Run (bluegrass) from 5 to Men's Auxiliary at the break.
7 p.m. The canteen really starts
Blanton-Thomas Ameri- jumping at 3 p.m. every Thurs-
can Legion Post 155 6585 W. day for the musical jam ses-
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal sion. Bring your musical
River. instrument and talent and con-
SEvents for the week of Aug. 1 tribute to the session: Lacking
td 7 one or b6th, just drop in and
Today: Dart tournament at 5 enjoy the impromptu program.
p.m. American Legion Day at A fish fry prepared by the
the Tampa Bay Rays game. Men's Auxiliary is on the menu
Monday: Lunch specials from for Friday's evening meal.
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 Looking farther into the month,
p.m. a pig roast will highlight the end
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3 of the month's membership
p.m. SAL meeting 6 p.m. drive on Saturday, Aug. 28.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot Each new member and his/her
wings" noon to 3 p.m.; Ameri- recruiter will eat free at this one.
can Legion Riders di, iner night Come alive and keep cool this
5 to 7 p.m. week and every week at
Thursday: Lunch 1i a.m. to 3 VFW Post 8189.
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. 'Lounge U Joe Nic Barco Memorial
card bingo 5 p.m. Post 155 VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
"Happy Hour" 5 p.m. to closing. Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
Friday: Sons of The Ameri- 0100.
can Legion 155 dinner night First Sunday of each Month:
special 5 to 7 p.m. for $6; live Floral City Minis, two for $1,
music from 6 to 10 p.m. served from 2 to 6 p.m.
Saturday: Pool tournament at Today: Drink specials,
2 p.m. NASCAR.
Every Monday and Thursday, Monday: Show me the Hand
there are lunch specials from from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; House
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Every Committee meeting 7 p.m.
Wednesday, chicken "hot Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
wings" served from noon to 3 p.m. Big pots, big prizes.
p.m. and drink specials from 11 Wednesday: Wings and
a.m. to 5 p.m. For information, things, 4 to 7 p.m.; weekly spe-
call Commander Jay Conti St cials new sandwich menu,
at 795-6526 or visit karaoke by Mark B from 6 to 9
www.post155.org. p.m.
Dunnellon VFW Post Thursday: Show me the
7991, 3107 W. Dunnellon Hand from 1 to 3 p.m.; VFW
Road, (352) 489-1772. and Ladies Auxiliary meeting
Come join us for breakfast 6:30 p.m.
every second and fourth Sun- Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
day of the month. Full breakfast (fried, baked or blackened) or a
menu, Adults $6, children 10 three-piece fried chicken dinner
and younger $3, from 8:30 to $7. Scallops; Karaoke by Jan-
11 a.m. Public welcome, nie Faye from 6 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Darts starting at Guests welcome.
1 p.m., everyone welcome. Saturday: Benefit Pig Roast
Pizza now available, pig from 3 to 6 p.m. for $7.
Thursday: Ladies Day, two First Saturday of every
for one drinks, month, slow-roasted prime rib
Friday: Bingo starts at 1:30 dinner $9.25. All remaining Sat-
p.m.; Hot dogs, hamburgers urdays will be home-style din-
and french fries available, ners for $6.50 served 4 to 7


I


Ii


ander feted times. Dart Tournament in the
Canteen beginning at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament in
the canteen beginning at 2 p.m.
House Committee meeting and
staff meeting every second
Tuesday and post general
meeting every fourth Tuesday
monthly.
Wednesday: ladies night.
Cookout serving Hamburgers,
cheeseburgers and hot dogs
with all the trimmings for a very
W nominal donation from 4 to 6
p.m. We have card bingo from
5 to 7 p.m. hosted by the Men's
Auxiliary. We also have
past 'i Karaoke and entertainment fea-
turing a different host each be-
Special to the Chronicle ginning at approximately 7 p.m.
Celebrated his 85th birthday and continuing until as late as
rd cake at VFW Post 4337 in 11 p.m.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League alternating between
.. - -Twisted Oaks Golf Club with an
p.m. Guests welcome. To-go 8 a.m. tee time and Seven
orders are available for 25 Rivers Golf Club with an 8:30
cents extra. Call 637-0100. a.m. tee time. Check with Rick
Canteen open daily at 9 or Jayne Stasik for available
a.m., Monday through Satur- tee times. Pool tournament in
day. On Sunday canteen opens the canteen at 7 p.m.
at 1 p.m. Members only, but Friday: Dart tournament start
guests are allowed with a mem- time is 7 p.m.
ber in good standing. Saturday: Karaoke in the
We invite all qualified veter- lKcanteen from 7 to 11 p.m: fea-
ans to join the Post. We areac- turning a different host each
tive in the community and with week,
numerous veterans programs. ,N.The Korean War Veter-
Our Ladies and Men's auxil- ans Association, Citrus
diaries also welcome new or Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
past members, call Senior Vice Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
Commander Peggy Peardon at p.m. the first Tuesday monthly
344-5334 for more information, except July and August. Any
Operation Homecoming, veteran who has seen honor-
VFW Post 7122 is now offering able service in any of the
a 15 percent discount on all Fri- Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
day dinners (first and third Fri- gible for membership, if said
days monthly) to help with the service was within Korea in-
ongoing Operation Homecom- cluding territorial waters and
ing Project in Citrus County, airspace at any time from Sept.
when you come in for your 3, 1945, to the present or if said
meal just tell the cashier that service was outside of Korea
you support our troops and from June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
want to help welcome them 1955. For information, call
home, she will then take 15 Hank Butler at 563-2496,
percent off your dinner cost. Neville Anderson at 344-2529
As always on Fridays, wear or Bob Hermanson at (352)
red to show support for our 489-0728.
troops. U The American Legion
M American Legion Post Wall-Rives Post 58, 10730
237 Beverly Hills is at 4077 N. U.S. 41, Dunnellon, regular
Lecanto Highway in the Beverly meeting of the post will be at 7
Plaza, invites all eligible veter- p.m. on Aug. 4; no dinner
ans to visit and transfer or join served.
our family. Sons of the Ameri- Dunnellon Young Marines
can Legion (SAL) and the Le- meeting suspended until Sept.
gion Auxiliary (AUX) are now in" 7 after that they normally meet
full operation and seeking ...frOm 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday.:
members as well. Color and Bingo is held every Thursday
Honor guard positions also evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
being filled. Games start at 6 p.m. Refresh-
Post meetings fourth Thurs- ments available.
day at 7 p.m. Third Saturday outdoor flea
SAL meets first Tuesday at 7 market and all you can eat
p.m. breakfast is suspended until
AUX meets fourth Wednes- Sept. 18, after that the pancake
day at 7 p.m. breakfast is normally from 7:30
Ampri an I innn Rid irsr to 10:30 a.m. on the third Satur-


Chapter is now being formed.
Visit the post for printed sched-
ules and newsletter.
For information, call the post
at 746-5018.
0 The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
C.R. 491, directly behind the
new Superior Bank.
Today: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m. Lots of
games and lots of payouts. Al-
ways plenty of snacks and re-
freshments. All the big time
sporting events on our big
screen TV (to include the NFL
package, during season) all af-
ternoon in the canteen with lots
of good cheer to go around.
Monday: The VFW Golf
League plays at different
courses. Contact Dick Sorrells .
The Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at 8 a.m. at
Twisted Oaks G.C. Check with
Lou Kempf for available tee


day monthly with a $5 donation.
For further information call
Carl Boos (352) 489-3544.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Potluck dinner at 6 p.m., meet-
ing starts at 7:15. Auxiliary Unit
77 meets at the same time and
place. Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Provencal at 726-4257 or Auxil-
iary president Alice Brumett at
860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday, monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley
Davidson.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For more in-
formation call Sam at 382-
4222.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 will not have
monthly meetings during July
and August. The chapter will re-
sume regular scheduled meet-
ings on Tuesday, Sept. 14. The
chapter will continue to be open
for general information on
Tuesday mornings from 9 to 11
a.m. A service officer is avail-
able to assist in disability claims
by appointment. Contact Bill
Geden, 341-6875. The chapter
is now offering to the public
quality American-made U.S.
flags and all branches of mili-
tary service flags. Various sizes
are available we are also a col-
lection point for the proper dis-
posal of flags that are no longer
serviceable. For further infor-
mation on our offerings, chapter
activities, veterans' benefits or
membership, contact John
Seaman, 860-0123. For auxil-
iary information, contact Sonia
Hayes, 527-3395.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
See Page A14


P-ul Sunday's 4

Puzzle is on Page A16.


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* Primary Election

Political Forum

Thursday

August 5

Citrus County Auditorium
(Citrus County Fairgrounds)
Doors open at 6 p.m.


Forum begins at


7 p.m.
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A14 SUNA,', A(I'M'r 1, 2010


DUMBO
Continued from Page All
December 2000, "I was in a
neighborhood that was de-
serted," recalled owner
Jacques Torres, a former
pastry chef at Le Cirque. "It
was definitely a risk. It was
not the neighborhood we
know today."
The evolution from post-
industrial to residential
chic is ongoing, as evi-
denced by massive con-
struction along Water
Street and signs advertising
new rentals and loft apart-
ments in old factory and
warehouse buildings.
Brooklyn was the country's
fourth-largest manufactur-
ing center by 1880. DUMBO,
with access to the river for
easy shipping, was home to
a sugar refinery, coffee-
packaging plant, and facto-
ries that made soap, shoes,
Brillo steel pads and house
paint. A business that made
paper boxes for companies
like Nabisco and A&P em-
ployed 1,700 people in 10
buildings in the early 20th
century. The box titan's
name, Robert Gair, can still
be seen on some buildings.
"It's incredible how
many different products
still recognized to this day
were made there," said
Marcia Reiss, who wrote a
neighborhood history
guide about DUMBO sold
by the Brooklyn Historical
Society.
At the foot of Water
Street lies Fulton Ferry
Landing. Ferry service be-
tween Brooklyn and Man-
hattan started here in 1642,
when the area was a Dutch
farming settlement. "It was
just a man rowing a boat,"
said Reiss.
The ferry landing also
played a role in the Ameri-
can Revolution. In 1776,
George Washington and
9,000 of his troops rowed
across the water in retreat
after a terrible defeat to the
British, "narrowly preserv-
ing the Continental Army,"
Reiss wrote in her book
Notice the railing around
the pier. Words stamped
into the metal offer an ex-
cerpt from a Whitman
poem, "Crossing Brooklyn
Ferry." Whitman served
from 1846 to 1848 as editor
of the Brooklyn Eagle, an
important daily paper in its
day. The massive arched
entrance to the Eagle Ware-



NOTES
Continued from Page A13
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Love 344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare Rick
Logan at 795-4233; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Bar-
bara Logan at 795-4233 or visit
us on the Web at
www.Post155.org.
The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-


",: B Associated Press
With the Manhattan Bridgg stretching above them, a couple Ylax July 15 on the grass
at Brooklyn Bridge Park in'he DUMBO section of the Brooklyn borough of New York.


house, on the site of the
paper's pressroom, is at 28
Old Fulton St., across from
the pier on the right as you
face the street. A plaque
outside the building ex-
plains the connection to
Whitman. The building'was
converted to apartments 30
years ago, and today a two-
.bedroom apartment there
lists at nearly $1 million.
Connie Fishman moved
into the Eagle in 1986. "For
a decade nothing hap-
pened, and then all of a
sudden, there was a new
wave of people and a lot
more tourists," she said.
"Now they wander up and
down our block looking for
the entrance to the Brook-
lyn Bridge. There's always
somebody lost trying to fig-
ure out where to go."
(Note to bridge-seekers:
Look for a sign farther up
Old Fulton Street, on the
left, for the bridge stairs,
which will take you to the
pedestrian walkway lead-
ing back to Manhattan.)
The fact that DUMBO is
still relatively unknown is
part of its charm. Sean Ca-
vanaugh, visiting on a re-
cent summer day from
Alexandria, Va., with his
wife Jean and two children,
admitted that he thought
the neighborhood housed
"a mini-amusement park."
(Dumbo is a circus ele-
phant character from Dis-
ney)
Instead, the Cavanaughs
found beautiful old build-
ings and the waterfront.
"This is a great little area,"
Cavanaugh said, taking in
the soaring view from the
ferry landing of Lower


ous Airborne members and their
wives are welcome to join us.
Call Steve Leonard at 726-
3693.
The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
E., Inglis, (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Come join us for our Sunday
dinners. New big-screen football


* Manhattan and the bridges.
It was near this spot that
John Roebling, who de-
signed the Brooklyn
Bridge, was mortally in-
jured, hit by a ferry as he
surveyed the future con-
struction site. His son
Washington Roebling -
who was also seriously in-
jured supervising construc-
tion of the bridge and
Washington's wife Emily
completed the project.
The Brooklyn Bridge,
with its majestic Gothic
arches and delicate filigree
of cables, opened in 1883.
At the time, it was the
longest span ever built. "It
was an achievement ahead
of its time, an engineering
marvel," said Ron
Schweiger, a Brooklyn his-
torian who has served as an
official city tour guide for
the bridge. The Manhattan
Bridge, built to accommo-
date the increasing traffic
between the boroughs,
opened in 1909.
As beautiful as views
from the ferry landing are,
there's an even better spot
for photographs. As you
face the water, continue to
your left, to the new Brook-
lyn Bridge Park. Enjoy the
waterfront promenades,
grassy fields and
panoramic vistas.
Options for food here
range from street vendors
to the River Cafe at 1 Water
St. ($98 prix-fixe dinner).
The Brooklyn Ice Cream
Factory is housed in a fire-
boat house on the ferry
lafiding that dates to 1926.
And there's always a long
line outside Grimaldi's, at
19 Old Fulton St., across


games during season.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at 7:30
p.m. at the Floral City Fire Sta-
tion on U.S. 41. Work is pro-
gressing on a new home in
Floral City. All eligible Veterans
are welcome to join our growing
organization. Call Commander
Tom Gallagher 860-1629. Amer-
ican Legion Post 225 P.O. Box
456 Floral City, FL 34436 Tgal-
lagl@tampabay.rr.com.
Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in Crys-
tal River at 2 p.m. the fourth
Thursday monthly. Call Jimmie
at 621-0617.
Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post


FLAGS & FREEDOM TOUR


September 25 ~ p.m.

Rock Crusher Canyon Pavilion Crystal River


from the Eagle Warehouse.
Or head back toward
Jacques Torres, where the
neighboring Water Street
Restaurant offers a cre-
ative but unpretentious
menu with many dishes
under $20.
Other DUMBO attrac-
tions include Bargemusic,
which hosts concerts on
Fulton Ferry Landing; a
free art gallery walk the
first Thursday of every
month, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m., www.dumboculture
411.com and big yellow
water taxis that connect the
ferry landing to Lower
Manhattan and Governor's
Island, www.nyharborway.
com.
In conjunction with the
DUMBO Arts Festival,
Sept. 24 through 26, the
Brooklyn Historical Society
is sponsoring two free 45-
minute tours of DUMBO,
Sept. 26, at 1 p.m. and 2:30
p.m., meeting at York and
Jay streets by the F train
stop.
DUMBO is also part of a
2 1/2-hour bus tour called A
Slice of Brooklyn $75,
http://asliceofbrooklyn.com
- with stops at great pizze-
rias, landmarks and movie
locations around the bor-
ough. The itinerary in-
cludes the ferry landing,
Eagle Warehouse,
Grimaldi's, and filming
sites for "Once Upon a
Time in America" and
"Scent of a Woman."
"DUMBO has the modern
things -Jacques, Torres
and Grimaldi's but it also
has the history," said the
tour founder, Tony Muia.
"It's a little hidden gem."


10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies AuxiliaryAll eligible per-
sons are invited to join. Stop in
at the post or call for informa-
tion. Post 4252 is at 3190 N.
Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hemando; phone
726-3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.


$ FISHING CHARTERS J
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TRAVEL


Woman's club plans
trek to park
The Crystal River Woman's
Club invites the public to join
them on a one-day bus trip to
visit the Stephen Foster Culture
Center State Park on Sept. 15.
Lunch will be at the Historic
Telford Hotel in White Springs.
The cost covers the park ad-
mission, escorted bus, guided
tours, lunch, taxes and gratu-
ities.
To reserve or for more infor-
mation, contact Joan Sweety at
564-8773 or Jo Ann Ryan at
382-1138.
Senior Prom for
senior citizens
The Citrus County Senior
Foundation, along with the Cit-
rus County Chronicle, an-
nounces a trip to attend the
Tampa Bay Rays' inaugural
Senior Prom for Senior Citizens
game. The Rays are taking on
the Texas Rangers and the
game begins at 1 p.m. on
Wednesday, Aug. 18.
The Rays are offering special
seating in their "Press Level" for
this game. Boutonniere/cor-
sages will be available for the
first 1,000 people. There will be
opportunities for Senior Prom
photographs and the largest
group in attendance will have
the honor of selecting the Prom
King and Queen (honored pre-
game). All seniors will have the
opportunity to go on the field
post-game for the "Centerfield
Shuffle" with an Elvis and Frank
Sinatra performance.
The Citrus County Senior
Foundation is offering roundtrip
chartered bus transportation
and admission to the game for
$40 per ticket. The bus will
leave Lecanto at 10 a.m. and
travel directly to Tropicana
Field. Tickets are on sale at the
Citrus County Resource Cen-
ter, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. For additional
information, call 527-5975.
Fishing Club hosts
guest Amy Barnett
The Fishing Club of Beverly
Hills and Becky's Travel invite
everyone to a slide presenta-
tion on Alaska at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 18, at the
Lions Den,-7-2 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills? .... T
Amy Barnett of Holland
America Cruise Lines will show
some of the sights of the state.


CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


The presentation will feature
Denali National Park, as well as
the glaciers that can be seen
on the cruise, slated for May
2011.
Many reservations have al-
ready been secured for the trip.
Those who plan to attend the
meeting are asked to call Becky
at 527-8835 or Pat at 257-9328
in advance.
Cruise with seniors
to Caribbean
Citrus County Senior Foun-
dation will host a seven-night
Eastern Caribbean cruise on
Oct. 23, sailing from Port
Canaveral on the Norwegian
Sun and visiting Nassau, St.
Thomas and St. Maarten.
Participants can choose from
inside cabins, ocean-view cab-
ins and balcony cabins. Prices
will include all taxes, fees and
port charges, roundtrip bus, a
private cocktail party and a
$150 per cabin donation.
To reserve, call 628-0668.
For more information, call Mary
Ellen Finster at 564-0669.
Hop on bus with
BHRA to Hudson
For a special treat during the
upcoming holiday season, the
Beverly Hills Recreation Associ-
ation will sponsor a trip to the
Show Palace in Hudson for all
folks in the community.
Anyone interested in attend-
ing the Christmas show can
sign up now. The trip will be on
Thursday, Dec. 16; this is an af-
ternoon event. There is a pay-
ment plan for everyone's
convenience. Cost includes
roundtrip on a luxury coach, full
buffet lunch, show and all taxes
and tips.
Sign up no later than Sept. 1
for this event. Bus will leave
from the BHRA parking lot.
For further information, call
the office at 746-4882 between
9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Head outdoors
with Ramblers
Nature Coast Ramblers is an
outdoor activity club of friendly
people of all ages who enjoy
self-paced hiking or walking,
biking and kayaking activities in
the Citrus County area.
You can become a member
of Nature Coast Ramblers for
only $10 per year for a single or
$12 per couple. Visit the Web
site: www.naturecoastramblers.
org or call Karl at -1531.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) C-cRONICLE TOGETHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 A15


45th ANNIVERSARY

The Menglers
Phyllis and John Men-
gler celebrated their 45th
wedding anniversary on
July 18, 2010. They were
married in Park Ridge,
N.J., in 1965. Their two
children and six grand-
daughters live in Florida.
John is retired from the
Cape Cod (Mass.) Times
and Phyllis is retired from 0
the Citrus County Library
System.

First BIRTHDAY

Olivia Catherine Byron
Olivia Catherine Byron
is the daughter of Jennifer
and Matthew Byron of
Crystal River Olivia is cel-
ebrating her first birthday
on Aug. 3, 2010.
Maternal grandparents
are Brian and Catherine
McElroy of Rensselaer,
N.Y
Paternal grandparents
are Michael and Jane
Byron of Crystal River.
Olivia also has a big
brother, Matthew Byron Jr

====Worth NOTING


Concert will
benefit 9/11 group
The Ryan Weaver Flags
and Freedom Tour Benefit
Concert, hosted by the Post
911 Foundation and spon-
sored by AT&T, will come to
Crystal River's Rock Crusher
Canyon Pavilion on Sept. 25.
The proceeds from the
ticket sales and additional
fundraising activities during
the concert will go to the Post


9/11 Foundation, which is ded-
icated to honoring and assist-
ing first responders and
veterans who have served our
nation in the aftermath of 9/11.
Gates will open at 6 p.m.
VIP sponsorship packages
are still available. Contact
Dana Rise, 400-5234, for
more information.
General admission tickets
on sale now. Go to
www.weavercountry.
com. Tickets are limited.


60th ANNIVERSARY-

The Dehnels
Carolyn and Dean
Dehnel, longtime residents
of Inverness, celebrated
their 60th wedding an-
niversary on July 30, 2010.
Family will welcome all
friends to help them cele-
brate from 2:15 to 3:30 p.m.
today at Citrus Rehab Cen-
ter, 701 E. Medical Court,
Inverness. -
To wish them well, call
Dean at 344-0491; for infor-
mation, call Denise at 208-
2858.



55th ANNIVERSARY

The Williamses


Ken and Marilyn
Williams, who very re-
cently relocated to Crystal
River from Lima, Ohio, cel-
ebrated their 55th wedding
anniversary on July 29,
2010.
Ken is originally from St.
Stephen, New Brunswick,
Canada, and Marilyn is
from Calais, Maine. They
were married in St.
Stephen on July 29, 1955.
The Williamses have
three children: Arty
(Angie), from Hamilton,
Ontario, Canada; Barbara
from PennYan, N.Y; and
Janet (Mark) from Crystal
River.
One year ago, they lost a
daughter, Gloria (Bill), due
to a failed heart transplant
at Johns Hopkins, Balti-
more, Md.
Gloria and Bill lived in
Annapolis, Md. They have
12 grandchildren and
seven great-grandchildren.


The Williamses are re-
tired Salvation Army Offi-
cers and have seen service
in several states, but also in
Singapore, Hong Kong and
the Dominican Republic.
Marilyn is also an R.N. and
a certified nurse midwife.
A family cruise to Mex-
ico is planned for the fall.


Florence Mary and Frank
John Albrecht of Hernando
recently celebrated their
60th wedding anniversary.
The couple married on
July 29, 1950, at St John the
Martyr, Manhattan, New
York City.


Jay and Toni Conti of In-
verness, both lifelong resi-
dents of Citrus County, will
celebrate their 29th wedding
anniversary on Aug. 7, 2010.
Citrus High School sweet-
hearts, they were married at
Our Lady of Fatima Church
in 1981 in Inverness.
Jay is a retired Navy senior
chief petty officer and dis-
abled veteran (he was in-
jured in Split, Croatia, while
serving on NATO staff) of 21
years and a very active vol-
unteer. Jay is currently the
commander of American Le-
gion Post 155; commander of
American Legion 4th District,
Department of Florida; co-
coordinator of Citrus County
welcome organization's "Wel-


Florence and Frank are
both retired and have four
children: two in New York,
one in Virginia and one in
Heaven.
They also have 11 grand-
children and one great-
grandchild.


come Home Basket Pro-
gram"; and member of VFW
Post 4337, DAV Chapter 70,
Fleet Reserve Association
and numerous other veter-
ans' organizations.
Toni is a CNA and works as
a home health care techni-
cian in Citrus County and
serves as the president of the
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155. Both are heavily ac-
tive within the community,
the American Legion family
and for veterans' rights.
They have three children:
Maryann Willoughby of Crys-
tal River, Teresa Stevenson
and Jay Conti Jr. of
Northampton, Pa., and are
patiently waiting for their
first grandchild.


County's


Bridal


addingg

Guide


Planning a wedding is


rarely simple.


From the early stages ofplanning to gift buying,

u'eddings can often befilted with difficult choices.

To ensure the process goes as quickly/ and smoothly

as possible check out these local bridal services.


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i Gift/IWe[come Baskets
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOGETHER


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 A15


K







Cri Tms CouIN'IY (FL) CHRONICL.IE


Dear Annie: I am a 45-
year-old attorney My
wife helped put me
through law school. Once we
got on our feet, I said she did-
n't need to continue working,
and she opted to
stay home. We do
not have children.
She pursues her
art and education,
generally keeps
the house clean
and does some of
the cooking. I
think it's fantastic
that she is able to
do as she pleases.
The problem is
weekend time. I ANN
like to use my Sat-
urdays to run er- MAIL
rands, hit the mall,
go to a library or do other
things I cannot do during the
week I'd love to have my wife
with me. She, however, wants
to get out of the city, go hiking,
see nature or take drives on
Saturday.
I can't run my errands on
Sunday because in my area,
most shops are closed. Sun-
day is the perfect time for
hiking or taking a drive. I've
asked my wife several times
to stay in the city on Saturday,
saying we can head out to-
gether on Sunday, but she
somehow "forgets." When I
insist on staying in town on
Saturday, she sulks and says I
should "do whatever I want"
Her attitude makes that no
fun. I end up looking forward
to the next weekend, and
then the next and the next,


1
L


and my frustration is build-
ing.
How can I get my wife to
understand that I have only
one day a week to enjoy my
errands and would appreci-
ate her cheerful
company? --N.Y
Dear N.Y: Your
wife understands.
Shopping and li-
brary trips are
things she can do
during the week
If you go hiking
with her on Satur-
day, she gets your
company for the
entire weekend
IE'S and also controls
ES all the activities
-BOX to her advan-
tage. Your choices
are to continue doing things
her way, tell her to have a
good time while you run er-
rands on your own, or get into
counseling to figure out why
she refuses to be more ac-
commodating. We'd try the
second option first
Dear Annie: In my office,
we all have different, uncon-
nected job functions. I am
usually busy, and when my
work is finished, I take a
break I do not disturb any-
one else while I go online,
take a walk or do some or-
ganizing and other things to
pass the time until my next
assignment
One of my co-workers
makes sarcastic comments
about my work ethic. It's not
like I can use my free time to
help her, because our jobs


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Charlie St. Cloud" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10 p.m.
"Cats and Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore" (PG)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:35 p.m.
"Ramona and Beezus" (G) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Salt" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05
p.m. No Passes.
"Inception" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" (PG) 9:30 p.m.
"Despicable Me" (PG) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 9:25 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Charlie St. Cloud" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Cats and Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore" (PG) 1


4W -


are unrelated. The boss
knows he can count on me
when there is work to be
done, but he isn't going to in-
vent assignments. How do I
handle my nosy co-worker,
who seems to be watching my
every move? -Looking Busy
Enough
Dear Looking: Your co-
worker is envious that you
have finished your work and
have time to yourself and she
doesn't. As long as your boss
is satisfied, you are under no
obligation to please anyone
else.
Dear Annie: Like "Ari-
zona," I, too, am estranged
from my daughter. At a large
family gathering, her hus-
band got all worked up and
screamed profanities at me
(not the first time) over an in-
nocuous statement I made.
She seems to think this be-
havior is OK since I "made
him angry." Since then, I
have been unable to see or
speak to our grandchildren.
Through counseling, I have
learned to live with this hole
in my heart on a daily basis
and to redirect my thoughts
when I am consumed with
sorrow over the loss of my
daughter and grandchildren.
-Canada


Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Please e-mail your
questions to annies
mailbox@comcastnet


p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. No Passes.
"Dinner for Schmucks" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No Passes.
"Ramona and Beezus" (G) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:25 p.m.
"Salt" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10
p.m. No Passes.
"Inception" (PG-13) 1:05 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:25 p.m.
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:15
p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Despicable Me" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:10
p.m., 9:35 p.m.
"Grown Ups" (PG-13) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30
p.m.
"Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (PG-13) 9:50 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


ifteenth Annual


Save Our



Waters



Week


Photo Contest

otos submitted should depict scenes
Citrus County's waters and/or
bitats. Enter photos by Friday, August
Photos must have been taken within
Last year and cannot depict any
rticular business. All photos become
property of Citrus Publishing, Inc.


SAVE OUR WATERS CITRUS COUNTY Cia

PHOTO CONTEST


NAME


C

pp


-ADDRESS

CITY, STATE

ZIP CODE

PHONE
Email photo and information to- saveourwaters@chronicle-online.com
Attach photo and bring in or mail to the Citrus County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcresl Blvd Crystal River FL 34429 by August 27, 2010.

tmsored by Citrus 20/ ,/fii 1CHR0ONICLE
SF '-, www chidearirta corn


The flavors that we savor


Wife wants her way,



even on weekends


My brother-in-law and I both said all
the things you're supposed to say
when you're about to eat a meal
that someone has taken the time and trou-
ble to prepare. We said that everything
looked wonderful and that everything
smelled delicious and that the variety and
color of the fare were much better than we
deserved. Then we both reached for the
hot sauce at the same time. I poured it
over the roasted pork on my
plate, and over the potatoes and
over my salad as did he. Sue
looked at us both and said,
"Why do I bother to cook?"
We both said that we would
rather put hot sauce on her
food than anyone else's, but it
seems the compliment was lost
on her. She picked up her plate
and went to eat in another room
by herself. Ji
I don't want to take on the MUL
food sciences, but it seems they
have been extremely slow in
climbing onto the hot sauce bandwagon.
They keep saying there are only five real
flavors: sweet, sour, bitter, salty and a new
one, umami, which is the thing that makes
meat and cheese taste, well, so scrump-
tious. All this ignores the sixth and much
more popular flavor: hot sauce. Its exact
flavor profile may be shrouded in mystery,
but spicy hot is a basic flavor group made
up of horseradish, curry and wasabi and a
slew of other spices that make bad food
tolerable and good food great.
A seventh basic flavor has to be fried.
Try to think of a food that can't be im-
proved by simply frying it. Blueberries
and milk are all I'm coming up with, and
the blueberries might work They are also
about the only two things I wouldn't want
smothered in hot sauce. If you think about
it, this idea that there are only five kinds of
taste buds on your tongue has a lot of holes
in it. Eighth flavor: fish! How does fish fit


August 2 to 6 MENUS


CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: New York strip patty, garlic mashed
potatoes, garden peas with mushrooms, one
slice white bread with margarine, peaches, low-
fat milk.
Tuesday: Sliced smoked sausage and butter
bean casserole, spinach, carrot cuts, one slice
white bread with margarine, pears, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Hamburger patty, baked
beans, yellow com with diced tomato, one ham-
burger bun, sliced cheese, ketchup, mustard,
fresh fruit in season, low-fat milk.


Thursday: Smothered chicken breast, lima
beans, rutabagas with diced red pepper, one
slice French bread with margarine, peanut but-
ter cookie, low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna pasta, tossed garden salad
with French dressing, carrot raisin salad, one
slice whole grain wheat bread with margarine,
peach and pear cup, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include: Lecanto,
East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 527-5975.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page A13.


ACROSS
1 Unmention-
able
6 Club charge
10 Sacks
14 Ancient Euro-
pean
18 Power of at-
traction
20 Jason's ship
21 St. Elmo's
22 Sea
24 Flew high
25 Prince in
opera
26 Genesis name
27 Little Bighorn
general
29 Throw
30 Telegram
32 Cudgel
34 Fiddling des-
pot
36 Partly (prefix)
37 Newt
38 Like a doily
39 Prima -
41 Make smooth
by rubbing
43 Steal from
44 Drill
45 Book's covers
and spine
47 Aqua -
49 Burial garment
52 Scald
53 Chess piece
55 Flowers
59 Pursue relent-
lessly
60 Kind of knife
62 Fat
64 French painter
65 Isle of exile
66 Hamburger
meat
67 Expert
69 The present
time
71 Punta del -
1 2 3 4 5

24
29


72 High-society
gal
73 Sheriffs gang
74 Studio VIP
75 Tolerated
77 Before
78 Merits
80 Part of FHA or
FCC
82 Tore
84 Forbidden -
85 Kitchen bigwig
87 Finished
88 Licit
89 A little crazy
90 Madman
92 Rice Bur-
roughs
93 Cigar residue
94 Automaton
96 Popular pet
97 Casals or Pi-
casso
99 Summer drink
102 Told a tale
104 Insect egg
105 EU nation
(abbr.)
106 Large eel
107 Help in wrong-
doing
108 Center of ac-
tivity
110 One "grand"
112 Dependable
114 Country home
115 Sock
117 Times
119 Applications
120 Breakfast fare
121 Frond
123 Greek god-
dess of the
hunt
125 Salver
126 Dandy
129 Be acquainted
with
131 Column order
132 Marine mam-


mal
133 English net-
work
136 Racetrack
shape
138 Equipment
140 Samovar
141 Relative of an
X-ray
142 Entreaty
143 Flinch
145 Natural talent
147 Remotely
149 Works dough
151 Effrontery
152 Fencing sword
153 Old garment
154 Small dog, for
short
155 Act
156 Antlered ani-
mal
157 Test
158 Judges'
DOWN
1 Eat some of
2 Standoffish
3 Explosion
4 Yours and
mine
5 Mineral
6 Kind of farm
7 Press
8 The "I"
9 School in
Paris
10 50's noncon-
formist
11 Priestly vest-
ment
12 Agents (hyph.)
13 Parts of shoes
14 Palm fruit
15 Old French
coin
16 Minus
17 Spud
19 Hopper or
Norton


23 Verne captain
28 Tease
31 Frost
33 Moreover
35 Gentle blow
38 Raucous
39 Needing
cleaning
40 Cordial flavor-
ing
42 Metal con-
tainer
44 fide
45 Town in Mon-
tana
46 Wildebeest
48 Winglike parts
49 Molt
50 Pit
51 Worthless
payment
(2 wds.)
52 No ifs, ands,
or -
54 Mild
56 Always to-
gether
57 Sea bird
58 Equine animal
60 Singing voice
61 Foray
63 In addition
66 Seaplane part
68 Ledger entry
70 Secular
73 Earlier
74 Mar the ap-
pearance
of
75 Clemente
76 Velazquez or
Rivera
79 Diving bird
80 Swamp
81 Bird of legend
83 Sports org.
84 Kind of nu-
clear reaction
85 Dress
86 Simple house


89 lily
91 Sour
92 Online auction
95 Piece
97 Sits for a
painter
98 Fine or liberal
100 Walter--
Mare
101 Footnote abbr.
103 Boring
105 Watch over
106 Kind of hall
107 Not practical
109 Look for
111 "... man --
mouse?"
113 Reflect deeply
114 Stew meat
116 Knotty
118 More sturdy
120 Nettlesome
122 Enemy
124 Go wrong
125 Brewed bever-
age
126 Favoring
127 Baking cham-
ber
128 Walked back
and forth
130 Conducted
132 Get lost!
133 British poet
134 Make less
clear
135 Instances
137 Learning
139 Mature
141 Long story
142 Title for
French
priests
144 "- Got a Se-
cret"
146 Charge
148 Reynard
150 Show assent


into the sweet, sour, bitter, salt, umami the-
ory? How about fried fish? Or fried fish
with hot sauce?
I can hear the scientists now: "You're
forgetting that 90 percent of flavor is smell.
If we held your nose and blindfolded you,
all you could taste is sweet, sour, etc. You
couldn't tell the difference between an
onion and an apple, between pig's feet and
head cheese, between Limburger and Stil-
ton!"
Which is one very good rea-
son why you should never let a
scientist blindfold you and put
a clamp on your nose. There's
no telling what disgusting stuff
they might make you eat veal
kidneys, fried grasshoppers,
fish heads. Still, even a scientist
could taste hot sauce, even if we
blindfolded him, battened down
M his snoot and made him drink a
LEN glass or two.
Which brings us back to Sue's
pork. If you held your nose
while you ate it, she would certainly say,
"Why do I bother to cook?" and take her
plate into another room and eat in peace.
So we apologized and choked down some
pork without hot sauce and said she was
right, what were we thinking?
And what were we thinking? We should
have distracted her before using the hot
sauce.
"Did you hear someone upstairs?"
"It sounded like someone banging on
the back door, to me."
She would turn around just long enough
for us to make sure our dinners had all six
basic flavors.


Jim Mullen is the author of "It Takes a
Village Idiot: Complicating the Simple
Life" and "Baby's First Tattoo." You can
reach him atjim mullen@mywaycom.


First place is $100. W//
You could also win tickets to
area attractions and have your
photo entry featured on the
cover of the Citrus County
Chronicle's Homefront
magazine or the Sunday
Commentary Section.


A16 SUNDAY, A(;UGST 1, 2010


!


-9"









S Section B SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010



PORTS


* Tampa Bay
Buccaneers sign
veteran, rookie
before camp./B5


0 Golf/B2
0 MLB/B3
N Scoreboard, lottery/B4
0 TV schedule/B4
0 Auto Racing briefs/B4
0 NFL/B5
N Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Cano's homer breaks tie in 9th; Yankees win


New York
Yankees' Mark
Telxeira, left, Is
congratulated
by teammate
Derek Jeter
after his
two-run home
run In the sixth
Inning of
Saturday's
game against
the Tampa Bay
Rays in
St. Petersburg.
The Yankees
won.
Associated Press


Rodriguez stillat 599 home runs;

Crawford earns 400th stolen base


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG -
Robinson Cano's 21st home
run of the season snapped a
ninth-inning tie and enabled
the New York Yankees to beat
the Tampa Bay Rays 5-4 and
hang on to first place in the
AL East on Saturday night
While Alex Rodriguez


failed for the ninth consecu-
tive game to hit his 600th ca-
reer homer, Mark Teixeira
and Nick Swisher went deep
for the defending world
champions, who rallied
from an early deficit against
Matt Garza before beating
All-Star closer Rafael Sori-
ano (2-1) on Cano's drive into
the right field seats.


Garza allowed four runs
and five hits over seven in-
nings in his first outing
since pitching the first no-
hitter in Tampa Bay history.
He gave up a sacrifice fly to
Curtis Granderson in the
second and game-tying
home runs to Teixeira and
Swisher in the sixth and
seventh innings.
Teixeira's two-run shot
erased a 3-1 Yankees deficit.
Swisher's solo homer made
it 4-all after Tampa Bay had
regained the lead on Matt
Joyce's two-out, sixth-inning


homer off Javier Vazquez.
Evan Longoria, Carl Craw-
ford and Jason Bartlett also
drove in runs for the Rays.
David Robertson (2-3)
pitched a perfect inning for
the win. Mariano Rivera
worked the ninth for his
22nd save in 24 opportuni-
ties, ending Tampa Bay's
seven-game winning streak
and increasing New York's
division lead over second-
place Tampa Bay to two
games in the AL East
See YANKEES/Page B3


Little League STATE TOURNAMENTS






Safe and


INN I U
BALiRk Utf


MAJORS STATE
LITTLE LEAGUE
TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
(AU. GAMES AT BICENTENNIAL PARK, CRYSTAL RIVER)
Major Baseball
Pool A


TEAM
Oviedo
RL Tumer
Lakeshore
Bayshore


iound





_- S . .


W L
4 0
2 2
1 2
0 3


Pool B
TEAM W
Viera Sun Tree 4
Tamarac 2
Land O' Lakes 1
South Fort Myers 0


MAJORS BASEBALL STATE TOURNEY
(Bicentennial Park, Crystal River)
Friday, July 30
Oviedo 17, RL Turner 7 (In 4 Innings)
Lakeshore 8, Bayshore 1
Viera Sun Tree 14, South Fort Myers 1
Tamarac 12, Land 0' Lakes 2
RL Turner 7, Bayshore 0
Ovledo 9, Lakeshore 8
Viera Sun Tree 12, Tamarac 1
Land 0' Lakes 9, South Fort Myers 6
Saturday, July 31
Oveldo 12, Tamarac 1
Viera Sun Tree 7, RL Turner 3
Sunday, August 1
11 a.m. Oviedo vs. Viera Sun Tree

Seniors State
Little League
Tournament Standings
(ALL GAMES HELD IN MELBOURNE)
Pool A
TEAM W L
Crystal River 2 0
San Mateo 1 1
South Orange 0 2
Valparaiso/Destin 1 1
Pool B
TEAM W L
Buckingham 1 0
Miami Springs 0 1
E. Boyton Beach 1 0
New Tampa 0 1
SENIORS BASEBALL STATETOURNEY
(Viera Regional Park, Melbourne)
Friday, July 30
San Mateo 11 Valparaiso/Destin 5
Crystal River 7, South Orange 3
Buckingham 12, Miami Springs 7
E. Boynton Beach 3, New Tampa 2
Saturday, July 31
Crystal River 8, San Mateo 3
Valparaiso/Destin 10, South Orange 7
New Tampa vs. Miami Springs (Rain delay)
East Boynton Beach vs. Buckingham (Rain delay)
Sunday, August 1
10 a.m. San Mateo vs. South Orange
10 a.m. Valparaiso/Destin vs. Crystal River
1 p.m. New Tampa vs. Buckingham
1 p.m. E. Boynton Beach vs. Miami Springs
Monday, August 2
10 a.m. Both semifinal games (TBD)
4 p.m. State championship game (TBD)


TOP GOLF
STORIES INSIDE


Photos by BRIAN CURL/Special to the Chronicle
Second baseman Weston Pope of Crystal River dives for the ball as Logan Turknett of San Mateo slides to safety during the Senior All-Stars State
Little League Tournament game Saturday at Viera Regional Park in Melbourne. Crystal River rallied to win 8-3 in the pool-play round.

Crystal River Senior All-Stars team rallies to 8-3 win at state tournament


JOHN COSCIA
Chronicle
MELBOURNE It's
been said when the going
gets tough, the tough get
going. It has also been
noted a true winner shows
his mettle by how he han-
dles adversity.
Well, the Crystal River
Seniors All-Stars baseball
team hasn't had much of a
chance to prove either. The
teens have dominated
most of their competition
over the past few weeks,
demolishing nearly every-
one in their path en route
to a District 15 title and a
Section 7 championship.
This, however, is the
Florida state tournament.
At this venue in Mel-
bourne, things might just
get tougher. And they did
Saturday morning at Viera
Regional Park when Crys-
tal River faced San Mateo,
the only other undefeated
team from Pool A.
But in championship-


like fashion, Crystal River
rallied for an 8-3 victory to
move into sole possession
of first place in their pool
despite falling behind
early.
While the end result
proved to be another com-
fortable win, things were a
bit more precarious early
on. In fact, while Crystal
River was stranding base
runners in the first two in-
nings, San Mateo was capi-
talizing on the slimmest of
opportunities. In the sec-
ond inning, San Mateo par-
layed one of those chances
into a run.
Trevor Stott led off the
frame with a single for San
Mateo, and Johnny Ro-
driguez laid down a perfect
bunt to move his teammate
over. Jesse Prather's single
put runners on the corners.
Justin Lawrence's RBI sin-
gle scored Stott, and San
Mateo was banging on the
door for a potential big in-
ning.
Then came the play that


.. ,: .. tz,.
Second baseman Logan Turknett of San Mateo waits for the throw as Sheldon Baxter
of Crystal River slides safely Into the bag.


righted the Pirates' ship. for the taking. But Crystal
With runners at first and River's catcher Aaron
second and one out, San Bertine had other ideas,
Mateo called for a double riffling a strike to third
steal that appeared there baseman Gary Levengood,


who applied the tag to nail
Prather for the out
"That was definitely a

See SAFE/Page B4


Undefeated all-star teams to face off in state final


* Tseng shoots third
straight round of 68


* Couples ties Langer for
lead at U.S. Senior Open
See Page B2


Oviedo, Viera Sun Tree win semifinal

games, advance to championship match


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Chronicle
Both Oviedo and Viera Sun Tree
came into the Florida Little League
State Tournament with high expec-
tations. In light of that, both teams
took care of business in the semifi-
nals Saturday afternoon at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River.


Oviedo earned a 12-1 mercy-
rule victory over Tamarac with a
walk-off three-run home run by
Carlos Cortes while Viera Sun
Tree used two big home runs and
a stellar pitching performance
from Hayden Kingston to take a 7-
3 triumph over RL Turner
(Panama City).
That set up the state title game


between Oviedo and Viera Sun
Tree for 11 a.m. today The winner
of today's game advances to the Lit-
tle League Southeastern Regional
on Aug. 6 in Warner Robbins, Ga.
Oviedo and Viera Sun Tree have
actually played against each other
during travel ball and know how
good one another is.
"We play a lot of baseball with
those kids," Oviedo manager
Quinn Barrows said. "And we
know what they're bringing ... and
that's the real stuff."
Should either of the teams be
good enough to win the regional, a


ticket to Williamsport, Pa., awaits
them for the Little League World
Series.
While it may be redundant to
state, the championship game will
be a match up of the two best teams
throughout the tournament Oviedo
and Viera Sun Tree are the top two
scoring teams in the tournament
and boast a stable of live arms.
"We've really be playing well,"
Viera Sun Tree manager Mark
Muzzi said. "And we're excited to
be in the championship game."
See FINAL/Page B4








CriRus COUtN'Y (FL) CHRONICLE


Women's British Open
Saturday Par Scores
At Royal Birkdale Golf Club, Southport,
England, Purse: $2.5 million, Yardage:
6,458, Par: 72, Third Round, a-amateur:
YaniTseng 68-68-68 -204 -12
Katherine Hull 68-74-66-- 208 -8
In-Kyung Kim 70-72-68--210 -6
Brittany Lincicome 69-71-71 211 -5
Christina Kim 74-68-70-- 212 -4
Hee Kyung Seo 73-69-70 212 -4
Momoko Ueda 72-70-70-- 212 -4
Suzann Pettersen 73-68-71 212 -4
Cristie Kerr 73-67-72 212 -4
Morgan Pressel 77-71-65-213 -3
Na Yeon Choi 74-70-69 213 -3
JiyaiShin 71-71-72-214 -2
Amy Yang 69-71-74-214 -2
Chie Arimura 77-68-70 215 -1
Karine Icher 74-72-70-216 E
Maria Hernandez 73-70-73 216 E
Lee-Anne Pace 74-72-71-217 +1
Becky Brewerton 73-73-71 217 +1
Michelle Wie 70-76-71 -217 +1
Azahara Munoz 74-71-72 217 +1
Irene Cho 73-71-73--217 +1
M.J.Hur 74-68-75-217 +1
Anne-Lise Caudal 69-73-75-217 +1
Juli lnkster 71-70-76--217 +1
Paula Creamer 74-74-70-218 +2
Meena Lee 75-71-72-- 218 +2
Gwladys Nocera 71-75-72-218 +2
Brittany Lang 71-72-75-218 +2
Song-Hee Kim 75-73-71 219 +3
Sophie Gustafson 73-74-72 219 +3
Ai Miyazato 76-70-73-219 +3
Sherri Steinhauer 76-70-73 219 +3
Karrie Webb 73-73-73-219 +3
Stacy Prammanasudh 71-74-74 219 +3
Ashleigh Simon 74-69-76-219 +3
Sun Young Yoo 69-72-78-219 +3
Angela Stanford 76-73-71 -220 +4
Amy Hung 75-74-71 -220 +4
Katie Futcher 74-74-72-220 +4
Henrietta Zuel 74-73-73 220 +4
Mindy Kim 72-75-73-220 +4
Jee Young Lee 72-75-73 -220 +4
SakuraYokomine 74-71-75-220 +4
Iben Tinning 73-72-75-220 +4
Stacy Lewis 71-74-75-220 +4
Inbee Park 72-71-77 220 +4
Haeji Kang 75-74-72-221 +5
a-Caroline Hedwall 74-75-72-221 +5
Jeong Jang 74-73-74 221 +5
Jimin Kang 74-73-74-221 +5
CarinKoch 72-77-73-222 +6
Mi Hyun Kim 72-77-73 222 +6
Melissa Reid 77-71-74-222 +6
Vicky Hurst 77-71-74 -222 +6
Alena Sharp 77-71-74-222 +6
Moira Dunn 75-73-74-222 +6
Janice Moodie 72-76-74-222 +6
Laura Davies 72-74-76-222 +6
Hee Young Park 72-72-78-222 +6
Seon Hwa Lee 75-74-74-223 +7
Ji Young Oh 79-69-75-223 +7
Jennifer Rosales 76-72-75-223 +7
Sarah Lee 74-74-75-223 +7
Wendy Ward 73-73-77-223 +7
Sarah Jane Smith 76-69-78-- 223 +7
Stacy Bregman 71-73-79 223 +7
Shanshan Feng 75-73-76 224 +8
Meaghan Francella 74-74-76-224 +8
Giulia Sergas 76-73-76-225 +9
Anja Monke 75-74-76-225 +9
Kris Tamulis 75-74-76-225 +9
EunjungYi 73-76-76-225 +9
Anna Nordqvist 72-77-77 226 +10
Mariajo Uribe 73-74-79 226 +10
Florentyna Parker 77-71-79 227 +11
PGA European
Irish Open Saturday
Scores
At Killarney Golf and Fishing Club, Killar-
ney, Ireland, Purse: $3.5 million, Yardage:
7,161, Par: 71,Third Round:
Ross Fisher, England 69-61-71-201
Francesco Molinari, Italy 67-66-69 202
'Ctlt s'Wood, England 71-65-66--202
G. Femandez-Castano, Spain 66-69-68 203
Padraig Harrington, Ireland 68-67-69 204
Richard Green, Australia 65-70-69-204
Seung-Yul Noh, S. Korea 66-69-20 205
Anders Hansen, Denmark 67-68-70 205
Richard Bland, England 69-71-66 206
Mark Haastrup, Denmark 67-72-67 206
Michael Hoey, N. Ireland 66-69-71 206
Shane Lowry, Ireland 74-65-68 207
Johan Edfors, Sweden 67-69-71 207
Darren Clarke, N. Ireland 66-70-71 207
Paul McGinley, Ireland 67-68-71 207
Paul Waring, England 75-66-67 208
Brett Rumford, Australia 66-69-73 208
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 74-65-70 209
Sam Hutsby, England 69-69-71 209
Marcel Siem, Germany 66-70-73 209
Others
Graeme McDowell, N. Ireland70-72-68 210
Rory Mcliroy, N. Ireland 67-68-76 211
Justin Rose, England 74-68-73 215
PGA Tour
The Greenbrier Classic
Saturday Par Scores
Saturday, At The Old White Course, White
Sulphur Springs, W.Va., Purse: $6 million,
Yardage: 7,031, Par 70, Third Round, a-
amateur:
Jeff Overton 64-62-66-192 -18
D.A. Points 68-66-61 -195 -15
Boo Weekley 67-63-67-197 -13
J.B. Holmes 69-69-60 -198 -12
Jonathan Byrd 69-65-64-198 -12
Brendon de Jonge 65-68-65-198 -12
Jimmy Walker 67-64-67-198 -12
Stuart Appleby 66-68-65-199 -11
Charles Howell III 65-67-67-199 -11
Erik Compton 63-68-68 199 -11
Justin Leonard 67-68-65-200 -10
Roger Tambellini 69-66-65 -200 -10
BobEstes 66-68-66-200 -10
Spencer Levin 66-67-67-200 -10
Jim Furyk 68-65-67-200 -10
Scott Piercy 66-67-67-200 -10
Briny Baird 67-65-68 -200 -10
Derek Lamely 69-69-63-201 -9
MattKuchar 69-69-63-201 -9
Rocco Mediate 70-68-63-201 -9
Aron Price 65-71-65-201 -9
Marc Leishman 68-68-65-201 -9
Brandt Snedeker 68-68-65- 201 -9
Kevin Na 70-66-65- 201 -9
Tim Herron 69-66-66-201 -9
SkipKendall 67-68-66-201 -9
Brett Wetterich 67-68-66-201 -9
Troy Matteson 69-65-67 -201 -9
Paul Stankowski 69-65-67-201 -9
John Rollins 65-69-67-201 -9
Matt Bettencourt 65-69-67-201 -9
Chris Couch 66-67-68-201 -9
Scott McCarron 67-66-68-201 -9
Chris Stroud 69-63-69-201 -9
Aaron Baddeley 67-65-69-201 -9
Brenden Pappas 71-67-64- 202 -8
Nicholas Thompson 70-68-64-202 -8
J.J. Henry 69-69-64-202 -8
Dean Wilson 66-70-66-202 -8
Mathew Goggin 66-70-66-202 -8


Stephen Ames 68-67-67-202 -8
Woody Austin 67-68-67-202 -8
Sergio Garcia 68-67-67 202 -8
Pat Perez 64-69-69-202 -8
Ben Crane 66-67-69-202 -8
Richard S. Johnson 66-67-69 202 -8
Roland Thatcher 71-67-65 203 -7
Joe Durant 70-68-65 -203 -7
Chris Riley 68-69-66-203 -7
Charles Warren 69-68-66 203 -7
Cameron Percy 69-68-66 203 -7
Michael Letzig 72-65-66 -203 -7
Graham DeLaet 70-67-66 203 -7
Arjun Atwal 68-68-67 203 -7
Michael Bradley 69-67-67-203 -7
Chad Collins 66-69-68 203 -7
Ben Curtis 69-66-68 203 -7
John Senden 68-67-68-- 203 -7
Steve Flesch 68-67-68-203 -7
Davis Love III 68-66-69-203 -7
Garrett Willis 71-67-66-204 -6
JayWilliamson 66-71-67 204 -6
Greg Chalmers 68-69-67 204 -6
John Daly 69-68-67-204 -6


Jeev Milkha Singh 67-69-68 204 -6
Charlie Wi 69-67-68 -204 -6
Carl Pettersson 71-64-69-204 -6
Tom Gillis 72-63-69-204 -6
Blake Adams 71-67-67-- 205 -5
Jeff Quinney 66-72-67-- 205 -5
Jerod Turner 69-69-67-205 -5
Craig Bowden 68-70-67 205 -5
Brent Delahoussaye 68-69-68-- 205 -5
Joe Ogilvie 68-69-68--205 -5
Kevin Sutherland 67-69-69-- 205 -5
Chris DiMarco 70-66-69 205 -5
Matt Every 63-72-70-- 205 -5
Made cut, but did not qualify for final round
Ricky Barnes 70-68-68-- 206 -4
Brian Stuard 67-69-70-206 -4
Cameron Beckman 68-70-69 207 -3
Bill Lunde 69-67-72-208 -2
John Huston 71-65-72 -208 -2
a-Jonathan Bartlett 70-68-71 -209 -1
Troy Merritt 69-67-73-209 -1
Charley Hoffman 70-66-73-209 -1
U.S. Senior Open
Championship
Friday Par Scores
At Sahalee Country Club, Sammamish
Wash., Purse: $2.6 million, Yardage:
6,866, Par 70, Second Round, a-denotes
amateur:
Bernhard Lanoer 69-68-137 -3


J. R. Roth
John Cook
Tommy Armour Ill
Tom Watson
Fred Couples
Loren Roberts
Michael Allen
Scott Simpson
Tom Kite
Mark Calcavecchia
Javier Sanchez
Chien Soon Lu
Joe Ozaki
J. L. Lewis
Jay Haas
Peter Senior
Larry Mize
Olin Browne
Eduardo Romero
Keith Fergus
Russ Cochran
Tom Lehman
Mike Reid
Mark Wiebe
Jeff Hart
Joey Sindelar
Don Pooley
Fred Funk
Bruce Fleisher
John Morse
Ralph West
Corey Pavin
Tom Purtzer
Jim Rutledge
Jeff Sluman
Mark Johnson
a-Tim Jackson
James Mason
Bob Tway
Mike Goodes
Jeff Thomsen
Jim Chancey
a-Steven Hudson
David Frost
Allen Doyle
Bruce Vaughan
Rich Parker
Jon Fiedler
Bill Britton
Dan Forsman
Craig Stadler
a-John Grace
Bob Gilder
Rod Spittle
Jim Roy
Morris Hatalsky
Gene Jones
Paul Trittler
Gil Morgan
Denis Watson
Gary Hallberg
Tsukasa Watanabe
Bob Niger
Mike Lawrence
Rod Nuckolls
Hal Sutton
Graham Marsh
Bill Sautter


73-66 139 1
71-68-139-1
71-68 -139-1
70-70-140
70-70-140
68-72-140
69-71 -140
70-71-141
72-69-141
69-73-142
71-71-142
71-71-142
69-73-142
72-70-142
70-73-143
73-70-143
74-69 -143
73-70-143
71-72-143
71-73-144
75-69-144
69-75-144
74-70-144
73-72-145
73-72-145
74-71 -145
72-73-145
76-70-146
77-69-146
72-74-146
71-75-146
72-75-147
72-75-147
73-74-147
73-74-147
75-72-147
68-79-147
75-72-147
73-75-148
73-75-148
75-73-148
73-75 -148
73-75-148
76-72-148
72-76-148
66-82-148
72-77-149
75-74-149
76-73-149
78-71-149
74-75-149
74-75-149
75-74-149
75-74-149
76-73-149
77-72-149
78-71 -149
77-73-150
76-74-150
79-71-150
73-77-150
75-75-150
77-73-150
77-73-150
73-77-150
73-77-150
74-76-150
73-77-150


Failed to qualify
Hale Irwin 73-78-151
Andy Bean 76-75-151
Mike Hulbert 75-76-151
R.W. Eaks 74-77-151
John Jacobs 77-74-151
Ron Ptacek 72-79-151
a-Casey Boyns 73-78 -151
Mark Houser 76-75-151
Mark O'Meara 75-77-152
Dave Eichelberger 78-74 152
Curt Byrum 79-73-152
Ron Vlosich 75-77-152
John Adams 76-76-152
Rick Lewallen 80-73-153
Tommy Brannen 76-77 -153
Jerry Johnson 81-72-153
a-Chris Lange 75-78-153
Bob Ford 79-74-153
Phil Blackmar 76-77-153
Mitch Adams 77-77-154
Robin Freeman 77-77 154
Jerry Courville 77-77-154
Tim Parun 81-74-155
Trevor Dodds 78-77-155
David Ogrin 79-76-155
Tom Jenkins 78-77-155
Mike Donald 76-80-156
a-Ken Lacy 77-79-156
a-Pat Laverty 75-81-156
Will Copeland 78-78-156
Dale Douglass 78-78 156
a-Mike Booker 76-81 -157
Glenn Ralph 81-76-157
Dave Bell 82-75-157
Ben Crenshaw 76-81 -157
Brad Bryant 79-78-157
Stacey Hart 79-78-157
Steve Krause 78-79 157
a-Tom Brandes 82-76-158
a-Buddy Marucci 76-82-158
Lindy Miller 83-75-158
Jeff Klein 80-78-158
Tom Bryant 79-79-158
Michael Paul 83-75-158
a-Kevin Klier 82-76 158
Eddie Terasa 81-77-158
a-Dirk Maust 81-78-159
Fuzzy Zoeller 76-83-159
Bobby Wadkins 79-80-159
Thomas Herzan 81-78-159
Tim Matthews 76-83-159
a-John Vaccaro 80-79-159
a-Pat Thompson 74-85-159
a-Martin Rifkin 84-76-160
Kim Dolan 79-81 -160
a-Ken Palladino 77-83-160
a-Vinny Giles 81-81 -162
Gary Sowinski 84-78-162
Doug Harris 81-81 -162
Dale Tallon 81-81 -162
Tim Walton 76-87-163
Mike Diffley 83-80-163
Tom Cleaver 83-81 -164
a-Mark Nickeas 83-81 -164
Larry Stubblefield 86-79-165
a-Jim Stormont 84-81 -165
John Paesani 81-84 165
Jay Norman 82-83-165
a-Pete Williams 81-85-166
a-Dave Massey 82-84 -166
Gary McClure 78-88-166
a-Steve Moran 85-82-167
a-Dan Bieber 83-84-167
Pat Diesu 91-76-167
a-Scott Sullivan 87-81-168
a-Rick Ten Broeck 86-83 169
a-Tom Norton 80-90-170
Scott Mahlberg 82-89-171
Ned Weaver 84-88 172
a-Mark Battista 91-81 -172
a-Tommy Robinson 83-90-173
Gary Lindeblad 89-85-174
a-James Ferguson 90-88 -178
Peter Jacobsen 74-WD
D. A. Weibring 77- WD
Wayne Levi 80-WD


Third straight round of 68


Tseng le adby ||

4 at women s


British Open

Associated Press

SOUTHPORT, England -
Yani Tseng shot her third
straight 4-under 68 on Sat-
urday, and will take a four-
stroke lead into the final
round of the Women's
British Open.
The 21-year-old star from
Taiwan took advantage of
the short, 472-yard, par-5
final hole by hitting an 8-
iron to within 20 feet with
her second shot She rolled
in the eagle putt to finish off
her round, doubling her
cushion over Australian
Katherine Hull.
"I played really well
again," said Tseng, who is at
12 under and has just one
bogey through 54 holes. "I
really enjoyed the big crowd
out there. They clap on
every shot and I showed
them my big smile all the
way around."
Hull played a flawless
third round, including four
straight birdies to finish
with a 66.
"A great way to finish. I'll
always remember this
round," Hull said.
The Australian made only
one birdie on the way out, at
the long sixth, when she hit
a pitching wedge to within 3
feet. Four straight pars on
the back nine followed, be-
fore a 5-iron to within 6 feet
on the short 15th started her
run of birdies.
She followed with a gap
wedge to within 12 feet for
birdie at No. 15, and a 5-iron
to 20 feet the following hole.
She got up and down out of a
bunker at 17, then two-putted
from the back of the green for


Associated Press
Taiwan's Yani Tseng reacts after making a putt for eagle on the 18th hole Saturday during
the third round of the Women's British Open at Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England.


another birdie on the short,
par-5 finishing hole.
"I really love links golf. I
just wish we played more,"
Hull said. "I played pretty
well all day and got a hot
putter at the end.
"It will be exciting going
out in the final pairing in a
major for the first time to-
morrow. It's what we all
work hard for. It's my first
time being in this position,
but I'm going to treat it like
any other day and just go
out there and do my best."
South Korean In-Kyung
Kim moved into third place
at 6 under with a 68. She
picked up three birdies on
the front side, dropped a
shot at the 10th, got it back
at the 16th. Her roller
coaster round included an-
other bogey at No. 17, but an
eagle at 18 left her smiling.


Birdies at the last two
holes moved American Brit-
tany Lincicome into fourth
place at 5 under, and there
were five players another
stroke back
Cristie Kerr's even-par 72
put her alongside fellow
American Christina Kim,
after Kim finished birdie-
eagle on the closing holes.
Norway's Suzann Pettersen,
South Korea's Hee-Kyung
Seo and Japan's Momoko
Ueda also are in the group
at 4 under.
Earlier, American Morgan
Pressel equaled the course
record with a 7-under 65 to
move to 3 under for the tour-
nament. She dropped shots
at the first two holes before
making eight birdies and an
eagle against one more
bogey on her way in.
"I just made a lot of putts


today and put myself right
back in the tournament,"
Pressel said. "Some days it
goes well and this was one
of those days."
Pressel was tied along-
side Na Yeon Choi, and two
other Koreans Am Yang
and Jiyai Shin were at 2
under. Japan's Chie
Araimur was the only other
player under par.
Becky Brewerton of Wales
hit the shot of the day, acing
the 149-yard 12th with a 5-
iron.
"My first one ever!" Brew-
erton said. "To have it here,
at this tournament as well,
was brilliant. The shot was
great all the way. It looked
really good but I couldn't
see it go in. There was quite
a big crowd to the left of the
green and they all went
nuts."


Couples shoots 65, ties Langer for lead


Leaders 5 shots

ahead at Senior

U.S. Open


Associated Press

SAMMAMISH, Wash. -
Fred Couples shot a 5-under
65 on Saturday for a share of
the U.S. Senior Open lead,
feeding off a raucous home-
town crowd hoping the na-
tive son can win his first
U.S. Golf Association
championship.
Couples matched Bern-
hard Langer (68) at 5 under
at tree-lined Sahalee Coun-
try Club, with Langer
birdieing the final hole to
pull even. They are the only
players under par after
three rounds.
Couples shot a 4-under 31
on the front nine Saturday,
making birdies at Nos. 2, 5,
7 and 9 and holing a bunker
shot on the sixth to save par
He added a birdie at the
16th to post the best round
of the week
Langer had a streak of 20
holes without a bogey
snapped at the 12th, but re-
bounded with the birdie at
No. 18.
And they might have the
stage to themselves Sunday


Associated Press
Fred Couples hits from the bunker on the 15th hole in the
third round of the U.S. Senior Open on Saturday at Sahalee
Country Club in Sammamish, Wash. He is tied for the lead.


Couples and Langer were
five shots clear of Chien
Soon Lu (68) and Tom Kite
(69). Peter Senior (68),
Michael Allen (71), Tommy
Armour III (72) and John
Cook (72) were 1 over.
A charge from the back of
the field seems unlikely,
considering Couples' 65 is
the lowest score of the week
"If we shoot even par or 1
or 2 under it's going to be
very hard for anyone to get
there," Langer said.


While Couples was mak-
ing his charge and eliciting
waves of cheers through the
trees of Sahalee, plenty of
other contenders stumbled.
Playing with Couples,
Tom Watson was 10 shots
worse, shooting a 75. J.R.
Roth, in the final group with
Langer, also shot 75. John
Cook was 3 under for the
tournament early in his
round, then finished with a
2-over 72.
Couples' round was


U.S. Senior Open
Par Scores
Scores from Friday's
round can be found.on
this page while Saturday's
round are located
on Page B4.

bogey-free and his best
score since shooting a 63 in
the first round of a Champi-
ons Tour event in late April.
Couples nearly holed his
second shot on the seventh
to the point Watson ques-
tioned the gallery, "That's a
gimmie, isn't it?"
But the most important
hole was the sixth where
Couples appeared headed
to at least a bogey, but made
a spectacular par. His tee
shot flared right and tucked
near some overhanging tree
limbs. His second caught
one of the tree limbs, ad-
vancing only 70 yards, and
his third was punched
under another tree and into
a bunker fronting the right
side of the green.
Fortunate to have a little
green to work with, Couples
flopped the bunker shot and
watched it roll in the cup for
a par, sending a massive
roar through the course.
The 31 tied the lowest nine-
hole score in the first three
rounds, matched only by
Lu's front nine Saturday.


Go#fBRIEFS


Fisher's lead in Irish
Open cut to one
KILLARNEY, Ireland Ross
Fisher of England will take a
one-shot lead into the final
round of the Irish Open after
shooting an even-par 71 on
Saturday.
Fisher built a five-shot lead
after opening his third round
with four birdies in his first
seven holes. But after putting
his approach shot into the ,
water the par-4 eighth, Fisher
made double bogey and
dropped two more shots late in
his round to finish at 12 under.
That gave renewed hope to
his playing partner Francesco
Molinari, who at one point was
six strokes off the lead. Molinari
shot a 69 to finish one behind
Fisher.
Overton has 3-shot lead
at Greenbrier Classic
WHITE SULPHUR
SPRINGS, W.Va. Jeff Over-
ton shot a 4-under 66 on Satur-
day for a three-stroke lead
entering the final round of the


inaugural Greenbrier Classic.
Overton, the second-round
leader, overcame a pair of early
bogeys with a solid back nine.
He's at 18 under through three
rounds on the Old White course.
Overton kept the lead de-
spite a pair of others flirting with
59s.
D.A. Points three-putted the
par-5 17th for bogey, finished
with a 61 and is alone in sec-
ond at 15 under. Boo Weekley
shot a 67 to reach 13 under.
Earlier, J.B. Holmes couldn't
convert a 10-foot eagle try at
No. 17 and shot 60. He's in a




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four-way tie for fourth place with
Jonathan Byrd (64), Brendon
de Jonge (65) and Jimmy


Walker (67) at 12 under for the
tournament.
From wire reports


11111111~-- 1


_I_1_X~I~I~


B2 SUNDAY. AUGUST 1, 2010


GOLF










SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 B3


AL







NL


New York
Tampa Bay
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore


W
Atlanta 59
Philadelphia 56
New York 53
Florida 52
Washington 46


East Division
GB WCGB
2 -
72 51
12/2 10/2
342 32/2

East Division
GB WCGB

3 314
6 6'/
7 7
13% 13'/2


Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit
Kansas City
Cleveland



St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB L10 Str
6-4 L-1
61/ 9-1 W-7
6 12 3-7 L-1
141/ 201 3-7 W-2
151 2114 3-7 W-1


Central Division
GB WCGB

2
10 12
11 13Y2
13 15
201 2214


Texas
Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle


Away
22-30 San Diego
26-24 San Fran.
24-29 Colorado
20-31 Los Angeles
19-30 Arizona
13-40


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Toronto 8, Cleveland 1
Detroit 6, Boston 5
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y.Yankees 2
Kansas City 7, Baltimore 5
Chicago White Sox 6, Oakland 1
Minnesota 5, Seattle 3
L.A. Angels 9, Texas 7
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 2, Toronto 1
Boston 5, Detroit 4
Oakland 6, Chicago White Sox 2
Kansas City 4, Baltimore 3
N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 4
Minnesota 4, Seattle 0
Texas at L.A. Angels (LATE)
Today's Games
Cleveland (J.Gomez 1-0) at Toronto (Litsch 1-
4), 1:07 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 12-6) at Boston (C.Buchholz
11-5), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 13-4) at Tampa Bay
(J.Shields 9-9),1:40p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-6) at Chicago White
Sox (Floyd 6-8), 2:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Millwood 2-10) at Kansas City (Chen
5-5), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (French 0-1) at Minnesota (Liriano 9-7),
2:10 p.m.
Texas (CI.Lee 9-4) at L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 9-
7), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Washington 8, Philadelphia 1
Arizona 9, N.Y. Mets 6
Atlanta 6, Cincinnati 4, 10 innings
Houston 5, Milwaukee 0
St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 0,10 innings
Colorado 17, Chicago Cubs 2
Florida 4, San Diego 2
San Francisco 6, L.A. Dodgers 5
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati 5, Atlanta 2
San Francisco 2, L.A. Dodgers 1
Houston 6, Milwaukee 0
Washington 7, Philadelphia 5
N.Y. Mets 5, Arizona 4
Colorado 6, Chicago Cubs 5
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (LATE)
Florida at San Diego (LATE)
Today's Games
Arizona (D.Hudson 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-
4), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 8-7) at Cincinnati (Volquez 1-
1), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 7-7) at Washington (Lan-
nan 2-5), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Ra.Wolf 7-9) at Houston (W.Wright
0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 5-9) at St. Louis (Wainwright
14-6), 2:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Silva 10-4) at Colorado (De La
Rosa 3-3), 3:10 p.m.
Florida (Jo.Johnson 10-3) at San Diego (Gar-
land 9-7), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 10-5) at San Francisco
(M.Cain 8-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mats at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox's David Ortiz, right, is mobbed by teammates
Kevin Youkilis and Marco Scutaro after his game-winning hit
during the bottom of the ninth inning of their 54 win over the
Detroit Tigers in Saturday's game at Fenway Park in Boston.


Red Sox 5, Tigers 4
BOSTON David Ortiz lined a
three-run double to the left-center gap
with one out in the ninth inning Satur-
day to give the Boston Red Sox a 5-4
victory over the Detroit Tigers.
It was the 18th game-ending hit of
his career.
Hideki Okajima (4-3) pitched a
perfect ninth inning.
Phil Coke (6-2) took the loss after
coming in with one on in the ninth.The
only batter he retired was Marco Scu-
taro, who hit a long fly ball that left-
fielder Don Kelly jumped to grab in the
top of the webbing of his glove.
The Red Sox trailed 2-0 on Miguel
Cabrera's 26th homer in the first inning
and fell behind 4-0 in the fourth. Ortiz
earlier struck out with the bases loaded
in the seventh and with runners on
second and third in the sixth.
But he got another chance in the
ninth when Darnell McDonald beat out
an infield single to lead off the inning,
and Coke came in to relieve Ryan
Perry. Scutaro's drive was more of a
warning shot: Pinch-hitter Jed Lowrie
doubled to the same part of the field,
and then Kevin Youkilis was walked to
load the bases.
Ortiz, who was 0 for 8 with three
strikeouts against Coke in his career,
showed bunt against the shifted defense
on the first pitch, then took another pitch
for Ball 2. After fouling one off, he lined
the next pitch into the left-center gap as


the runners raced around the bases.
Youkilis slid across the plate without
a throw, while Ortiz celebrated at sec-
ond base.
His teammates soon joined him


Detroit

AJcksn cf
Rhyms 2b
Boesch rf
MiCarr lb
JhPerit 3b
Kelly If
Frazier dh
Laird c
Santiag ss

Totals
Detroit
Boston


Boston
ab rh bi
5 0 1 0 Scutaro ss
3 1 0 0 J.Drewrf
4 0 0 0 EPtrsn pr-cf
3 1 2 2 Lowrieph
3 0 0 0 Youkilslb
4 0 0 0 D.Ortizdh
4 22 0 VMrtnzc
4 0 1 0 ABeltre 3b
4 0 2 2 Hall 2b
Kalish If
DMcDn cf-rf
34 48 4 Totals
210 100 000
000 000 203


A. k I


5 0 1 0
2 01 0
0 00 0
1 1 1 0

5 0 2 3
402 0
4 1 1 0
4 020
4 1 2 1
4 1 2 1
36515 5
4
5


One out when winning run scored.
DP-Detroit 3. LOB-Detroit 7, Boston 10.
2B-A.Jackson (26), Frazier (1), Santiago (8),
Lowrie (4), Youkilis (26), D.Ortiz (22), D.Mc-
Donald (13). HR-Mi.Cabrera (26). S-
Rhymes.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
Scherzer 61-39 1 1 1 3
B.Thomas 0 1 1 1 0 0
Perry H,11 12-33 1 1 1 2
Coke L,6-2 BS,2-3 1-3 2 2 2 1 0
Boston
Matsuzaka 6 8 4 4 2 5
Richardson 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Atchison 11-30 0 0 0 1
OkajimaW,4-3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Matsuzaka pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
B.Thomas pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Perry pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by Perry (Youkilis).
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Dale
Scott; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Mark Wegner.
T-3:29. A-37,498 (37,402).


Indians 2, Blue Jays 1
TORONTO Shin-Soo Choo dou-
bled home the go-ahead run in the
seventh inning and the Cleveland Indi-
ans beat the Toronto Blue Jays 2-1 to
snap a three-game losing streak.
Indians right-hander Jake Westbrook
was scratched before the game and
traded to St. Louis as part of a three-
team deal, with Josh Tomlin taking his
place. Tomlin was working on three days'
rest and allowed only one run in 51/3 in-
nings in his second major league start.
Jensen Lewis (3-2) worked one in-
ning of relief for the win, Joe Smith
pitched 1 2/3 shutout innings and Chris
Perez survived a bases-loaded jam in
the ninth to earn his 11th save.
Vernon Wells led off the ninth with a
single and went to second when Adam
Lind was hit on the knee on the first
pitch he saw from Perez, with De-
wayne Wise coming on to pinch run.
Both runners moved up on Aaron Hill's
sacrifice before Lyle Overbay was
walked intentionally to load the bases
for Edwin Encarnacion, who struck out
on three pitches.
Travis Snider, called up from the mi-
nors Friday and batting for the first time
since May 14, pinch hit for catcher
Jose Molina but struck out swinging to


au I 1 i b n i
n id t


Cleveland Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crowecf 5 00 0 FLewis If 4 00 0
ACarerss 4 1 1 0 YEscorss 4 00 0
Choo rf 5 1 2 1 JBautstrf 3 0 0 0
CSantndh 4 0 1 0 V.Wellscf 4 02 0
LaPortIb 3 00 0 Linddh 3 00 0
Duncan If 3 02 0 Wise pr 0 00 0
J.Nix3b 4 0 1 0 A.Hill2b 3 0 1 0
AMarte3b 0 00 0 Overaylb 1 00 0
Donald 2b 1 00 1 Encrnc 3b 4 0 0 0
Gimenz c 4 00 0 JMolin c 3 1 2 1
Snider ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 27 2 Totals 301 5 1
Cleveland 000 100 100 2
Toronto 000 010 000 1
E-J.Nix (7), LaPorta (1). DP-Cleveland 2,
Toronto 1. LOB-Cleveland 10, Toronto 8.2B--
A.Cabrera (8), Choo (20), Duncan (5). HR-
J.Molina (4). S-A.Hill.
IP H RERBBSO


Cleveland
Tomlin
J.Lewis W,3-2
J.Smith H,9
C.Perez S,11-14
Toronto
Cecil
Tallet L,1-4


51-34 1
1 0 0
12-30 0
1 1 0
6 5 1
2-3 1 1


Frasor 11-31 0 0 0 2
S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by C.Perez (Lind). WP-Cecil.
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Alan
Porter; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Fieldin Cul-
breth.
T-2:48. A-22,663 (49,539).


Twins 4, Mariners 0
MINNEAPOLIS-- Kevin Slowey
pitched eight sparkling innings, Joe
Mauer had three hits and the Min-
nesota Twins beat the Seattle Mariners
4-0 for their seventh consecutive win.
Delmon Young added two hits and
two RBIs, including a run-scoring triple
in Minnesota's three-run first.
Felix Hernandez (7-8) pitched
seven innings for the Mariners, yielding
three runs and seven hits.
Seattle has lost six straight and its
6-22 record for July matched the fran-
chise record for losses in a month, set
by the 1977 expansion team in August.
Slowey (10-5) allowed three hits,
tying a season low, and struck out five.
The right-hander has allowed just one
run over 14 innings covering his last
two starts, both victories.
The Twins jumped all over Hernan-
dez, who was third in the American
League with a 2.86 ERA and second
with 145 strikeouts entering the game.
After Denard Span flew out on the
first pitch, Alexi Casilla tripled to left
field and scored on Mauer's single.
Young followed with a triple to right,
making it 2-0 after just eight Hernan-
dez pitches.
Jim Thome watched the first two
balls from Hernandez before eventu-
ally belting an RBI double to left
against an outfield shift.
Swinging early and often worked for
the Twins as they stayed away from
getting behind in the count against
Hernandez.


Seattle


Minnesota


ab rh bi
ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Span cf
Figgins 2b 4 0 0 0 ACasill 2b
Ktchm lb 4 0 1 0 Mauerc
Branyn dh 4 0 0 0 DImYn If
FGtrrz cf 3 0 0 0 Thome dh
MSndrs If 3 0 1 0 Cuddyr lb
J.Bard c 3 0 1 0 Kubel rf
Tuiassp 3b 3 0 0 0 Valenci 3b
JaWlsn ss 3 0 0 0 Hardy ss
Totals 31 04 0 Totals
Seattle 000 000 000
Minnesota 300 000 01x


ab rhbi
4 00 0
4 1 1 0
4 23 1
4 1 2 2
4 0 1 1
4 0 1 0
2 00 0
3 01 0
2 000
31 4 9 4
0
4


E-F.Hernandez (2), Tuiasosopo (7). DP-Seat-
tle 2. LOB-Seattle 4, Minnesota 5. 2B-
M.Saunders (9), J.Bard (5), Mauer (34), Thome
(12). 3B-A.Casilla (3), Delm.Young (1). S-
Hardy.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
F.Hernandez L,7-8 7 7 3 3 1 4
J.Wright 1 2 1 1 0 0
Minnesota
SloweyW,10-5 8 3 0 0 0 5
Mijares 1 1 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Ron Kulpa;
Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Ed Rapuano.
T-2:07. A-40,799 (39,504).


Royals 4, Orioles 3
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- Billy Butler
hit a late two-run homer and Zack
Greinke pitched eight strong innings as
the Kansas City Royals rallied for a 4-3
victory over the Baltimore Orioles.
After Jason Kendall singled in the
eighth, Butler sent a drive over the Ori-
oles bullpen in left field for his 12th
homer. It came on a 2-2 pitch from
David Hernandez (5-8).
Greinke (7-10) held the Orioles to
three runs on seven hits. He struck out
five and walked three. Greinke, the
2009 American League Cy Young
Award winner, is 5-2 in his past seven
starts.
Orioles starter Brad Bergesen, who
is 0-7 with four no-decisions since a
victory May 12 over Seattle, left with a
3-2 lead after seven innings. He al-
lowed five hits.
Hernandez, however, failed to hold
the lead.
The Orioles scored all their runs in
the sixth. Julio Lugo and Brian Roberts
opened the inning with singles. Nick
Markakis' doubled both runners home.
With two outs, Adam Jones singled
home Markakis.
Mitch Maier drove in the first two
Kansas City runs. Maier led off the
third with a home run, his fourth. His
single in the seventh scored Alex Gor-
don.
Joakim Soria gave up a single in the
ninth but finished for his 28th save in
30 opportunities.
Baltimore Kansas City
ab rhbi ab r hbl
B.Roberts 2b21 10 Getz2b 30 1 0
Markakis rf 4 112 Kendall c 41 1 0
Wigginton 1b3000 B.Butler lb 41 1 2
Scott dh 4 000 J.Guillen dh 40 0 0
Ad.Jonescf4 021 Gordon If 31 1 0
Pie If 4020 Aviles3b 40 1 0
Wieters c 3 010 Maiercf 31 2 2
J.Bell 3b 3 000 Bloomquist rf 30 0 0
Lugo ss 3 110 Y.Betancourt ss3 0 0 0
Totals 30 3 83 Totals 31 4 7 4
Baltimore 000 003 000 3
Kansas City 001 000 12x 4
E-Wigginton (15). DP-Baltimore 1, Kansas
City 4. LOB-Baltimore 4, Kansas City 5. 2B-
Markakis (34), Getz (6). HR-B.Butler (10),
Maier (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Bergesen 7 5 2 2 1 5
Hernandez L,5-8 1 2 2 2 1 2
Kansas City
GreinkeW,7-10 8 7 3 3 3 6
Soria S,28-30 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Greinke (B.Roberts). WP-Da.Her-
nandez.
Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First, Laz Diaz;
Second, Casey Moser; Third, Todd Tichenor.
T-2:09. A-25,055 (37,840).


Teams trade players


before deadline today


Westbrook, Lilly,

Ludwick, Wooda

Berkman move

Associated Press

Former All-Stars Jake
Westbrook, Ted Lilly, Ryan
Ludwick and Kerry Wood
were traded Saturday as
pennant contenders played
a game of beat-the-clock.
Lance Berkman went to the
World Series champion
New York Yankees after re-
jecting the Chicago White
Sox.
Octavio Dotel, Rick
Ankiel, Kyle Farnsworth,
Chad Qualls and Ryan The-
riot also joined the playoff
chase and Ryan Church
highlighted a five-player
deal between last-place
teams.
The swaps came as clubs
scrambled before the 4 p.m.
EDT deadline for making
trades without waivers. It
was a day full of deals be-
tween haves and have-nots
- veterans for prospects,
mostly
The NL Central-leading
St Louis Cardinals were the
prime players in a three-
team trade, getting West-
brook from Cleveland and
sending Ludwick to NL
Central-leading San Diego.
"I'm excited to go to a club
that's contending for a play-
off spot and pitch in some
meaningful ballgames,"
Westbrook said. "That's why
you play the game, to get a
chance to play in the play-
offs and I look forward to
doing that."
Westbrook was scratched
before he was set to start at
Toronto. Ludwick leaves a
crowded outfield in St.
Louis.
The Yankees plucked


Wood from Cleveland,
shortly after finishing off
the deal to get Berkman
from Houston. The Astros
sent $4 million and Berk-
man, the Yankees' new des-
ignated hitter, for reliever
Mark Melancon and minor
league infielder Jimmy
Paredes.
"You don't want to play
games that don't have any-
thing riding on them. This is
a chance to get back into
that mode of playing games
that are meaningful and
that there's an excitement
about," Berkman said.
A five-time All-Star, the
34-year-old Berkman was
hitting only .245 with 13
home runs and 49 RBIs.
"I didn't perform like I
should have performed or
like I have in the past," the
switch-hitter said. "I felt like
there was a decent chance
that a change of scenery
would do me some good. I'm
at the point in my career
where I needed to either re-
tire or find something that
would sort of light the fire
again. ... So this is almost a
litmus test for me to see how
much more baseball I have
left"
The AL Central-leading
White Sox had a deal in
place for Berkman, general
manager Kenny Williams
said. But because Berkman
is a 10-and-5 player 10
years in the majors, the last
five with the same team -
the slugger could turn it
down. Instead, he chose the
Yankees.
"What is the most frus-
trating part is we actually
did get something done and
unfortunately the player
had other ideas and wanted
to be somewhere else. But
we did come to an agree-
ment on a deal and you're at
the mercy of contract some-
times," Williams said.


YANKEES
Continued from Page B1

Rodriguez, 9 for 37 with
eight RBIs since hitting ca-
reer homer No. 599 on July
22, went 0 for 3 with a walk
and one strikeout
The victory capped a busy
day for the Yankees, who
put together three deals be-
fore Saturday's trade dead-
line, acquiring slugger
Lance Berkman from the
Houston Astros and out-
fielder Austin Kearns and
reliever Kerry Wood from
the Cleveland Indians.
Berkman made his debut
for his new team, batting
second and going 0 for 4
with a strikeout as the des-
ignated hitter. Kearns was
available off the bench, and
Yankees manager Joe Gi-
rardi said there's a chance
Wood could join the team in
time for today's season fi-
nale against the Rays.
Tampa Bay didn't make
nearly as much noise before
the 4 p.m. deadline, acquir-
ing reliever Chad Qualls
from the Arizona Diamond-
backs.

New York Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Jeter ss 4 1 1 0 Jasodh 4 23 0
Brkmn dh 4 00 0 Crwfrd If 4 02 1
Teixeirlb 4 1 1 2 Longori3b 3 0 0 1
ARdrgz3b 3 1 0 0 C.Penalb 3 00 0
Cano 2b 4 1 3 1 Brignc 2b 1 0 0 0
Swisherrt 4 1 1 1 Joycerf 4 1 1 1
Grndrscf 3 0 0 1 SRdrgz2b-1b4 0 1 0
Cervelli c 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 1 1 0
Gardnr If 3 0 0 0 Shppch c 2 0 0 0
WAyarph 1 0 1 0
Bartlett ss 2 0 0 1
Totals 32 56 5 Totals 324 9 4
NewYork 010 002 101 5
Tampa Bay 101 011 000 4
DP-NewYork 1. LOB-New York 2, Tampa Bay
5. 2B-Jeter (20), Cano 2 (30), Jaso 2 (10),
B.Upton (24). 3B-Jaso (2). HR-Teixeira (21),
Cano (21), Swisher (20), Joyce (5). SB--Craw-
ford (38). S-Shoppach. SF-Granderson, Lon-


goria, Bartlett.

New York
Vazquez
Logan
D.Robertson W,2-3
M.Rivera S,22-24
Tampa Bay
Garza
Benoit
R.Soriano L,2-1


IP H RERBBSO
61-38 4 4 1 3
2-3 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 2
1 1 0 0 0 1
7 5 4 4 1 9
1 0 0 0 0 2
1 1 1 1 0 1


T-2:58. A-36,973 (36,973).


Astros 6, Brewers 0 -
HOUSTON Wandy Rodriguez
added another impressive start to his
dazzling streak and Houston's young
hitters got off to a fast start in a 6-0 vic-
tory over the Milwaukee Brewers on
Saturday night.
On the same day the Astros traded
star slugger Lance Berkman to the
New York Yankees, Houston's rookie-
filled lineup scored five times in the first
two innings and led the club to its
fourth straight win. It was the fourth -t
consecutive loss for Milwaukee. .
Chris Johnson had three hits and
drove in a run while extending his hit-
ting streak to a career-long 14 games Atlanta Braves catcher Bri
and fellow rookie Angel Sanchez had Cincinnati Reds' Orlando Cabi
two RBIs. score on a base hit by Joey Voti
Rodriguez (9-11) struck out nine in game in Cincinnati.
a season-high eight innings, allowing Reds 5, Braves 2
five hits while improving to 6-1 with a CINCINNATI- Ryan Hanigan hit a
1.91 ERA in his last seven starts. Ciebreaking double during a wacky sev-
Rodriguez gave up a pair of singles tiebreaking double during a wacky sev-
to start the game before retiring the enth-inning rally on Saturday, and the
next nine batters. The left-hander also Cincinnati Reds held on for a 5-2 vic-
dropped nine straight before Ryan tory over the Atlanta Braves, who lost
Braun doubled with no outs in the sev- leadoff hitter Martin Prado to injury but
enth inning. made a trade to upgrade their outfield
Tim Byrdak took over for the ninth and bullpen.
inning and allowed one hit and walked Center field was the problem in this
two before he was replaced by Nelson one.
Figueroa, who struck out two batters to Hanigan doubled to the wall in cen-
complete the shutout. ter off Jair Jurrjens (3-4), who has yet
Milwaukee Houston to win on the road. Two runs scored
ab r h bi ab r h bi while Melky Cabrera chased the ball to
Weeks 2b 4 0 2 0 Bourn cf 4 2 1 1 the wall. When the outfielder turned
Hart rf 4 0 1 0 AngSnc ss 5 1 1 2 and threw quickly, the ball slipped from
Fielder lb 4 0 2 0 Kppngr2b 5 03 his hand and rolled across the outfield,
Braun If 3 0 1 0 Pencert 5 0 1 0
McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 Michals If 3 1 2 1 allowing the catcher to chug home.
Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 Wallac lb 4 0 0 0 Bronson Arroyo (11-6) gave up five
AEscor ss 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 1 3 1 hits in seven innings against a strug-
CGomzcf 3 0 0 0 JaCastrc 3 11 0
Inglett ph 1 0 0 0 WRdrg p 4 0 0 0 gling offense now missing its most pro-
Bush p 2 0 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 ductive hitter.
Capuan p 0 0 0 0 Figuero p 0 0 0 0 Francisco Cordero, who took the
Counsel ph 1 0 0 0 loss in Atlanta's 6-4 win on Friday
Riske p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 06 0 Totals 36612 6 night, got booed when he was intro-
Milwaukee 000 000 000 0 duced to start the ninth. He gave up a
Houston 230 010 00x 6 pair of singles, then got Jason Hey-
E-Lucroy (3). DP-Houston 1. LOB-Milwau- ward on a called third strike for his 28th
kee 8, Houston 10.2B3-Braun (27), Bourn (21), ward on a called third strike for his 28th
Michaels 2 (8), C.Johnson (9). SB-Bourn (32). save in 34 tries.
SF-Michaels. Heyward had doubled home a pair
IP H R ER BB SO of runs in the 10th inning off Cordero
Milwaukee
Bush L,5-9 5 10 6 6 1 5 for Atlanta's win the previous night.
Capuano 2 1 0 0 2 2 The Braves will be without Prado for
Riske 1 1 0 0 0 1 at least a week. Tests on Saturday
WRodriguez W,9-11 8 5 0 0 1 9 found he broke the second knuckle on
Byrdak 1-3 1 0 0 2 0 his right pinkie when he slid headfirst
Figueroa 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 into home plate on Friday night. Prado
Umpires-Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Chris Guc- leads the league in hits, ranks third
clone; Second, Brian O'Nora;Third, Jerry Craw- wisth a .31 ae an ,dsthem
ford. with a .315 average, and leads the ma-
T-2:42. A-38,824 (40,976). jors with 44 multihit games.


Associated Press
an McCann, right, tags out
rera (2) at home plate trying to
to in the first inning of Saturday's

As the game began, the Braves
made a five-player deal with Kansas City
to improve their outfield and an already
formidable bullpen, getting Rick Ankiel
and hard-throwing Kyle Famsworth.
Cincinnati entered the day a half-
game behind St. Louis in the NL Cen-
tral. The Reds made no moves before
the non-waiver trade deadline Satur-
day a couple of potential deals for
relievers fell through.


Atlanta Cincinnati
ab rhbi
Infante 2b 5 1 3 0 BPhillps 2b
Heywrdrf 5 10 0 OCarerss
C.Jones 3b 3 0 0 0 Votto lb
McCnnc 3 03 0 Rolen 3b
Glaus lb 4 00 0 Gomes If
Hinske If 3 0 0 1 FCordrp
AIGnzlz ss 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf
MeCarr cf 4 0 1 0 Stubbs cf
Jurrjns p 2 00 0 Hanign c
Moylan p 0 0 0 0 Arroyo p
MDunnp 0 00 0 L.Nixph
Conradph 1 00 0 Rhodesp
Masset p
Heisey If
Totals 34 27 1 Totals
Atlanta 200 000 000
Cincinnati 000 100 40x


ab rhbi
4000
4 01 0
4010
3 22 1
4 1 1 0
0000
3 1 1 1
40 000
2000

0 0 0 0
0000
0000
0 00 0
325 8 4
2
5


E-Ale.Gonzalez (1), Me.Cabrera (4), Hanigan
(4). DP-Cincinnati 2. LOB-Atlanta 9, Cincin-
nati 5. 2B-Infante (9), O.Cabrera (24), Rolen
(21), Hanigan (7). HR-Rolen (18).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Jurrjens L,3-4 62-38 5 5 0 6
Moylan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
M.Dunn 1 0 0 0 2 2
Cincinnati
ArroyoW,11-6 7 4 2 1 3 3
Rhodes H,20 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
MassetH,12 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
F.Cordero S,28-34 1 2 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Arroyo (Jurrjens).
Umpires-Home, Angel Campos; First, Altonso
Marquez; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Bob
Davidson.
T-2:53. A-41,611 (42,319).


W L
60 43
52 51
53 52
39 66


West Division
GB WCGB
8 12
8 12
22 26


West Division
GB WCGB

2 -
7 514
7 51
231/ 21%


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


e I U l1.









B4 N


GOLF
U.S. Senior Open
Championship
Saturday Par Scores
At '-nUU MihU suJ


Saiurday, At analei
Sammamlsh Wash., F
Yardage: 6,866, Par
a-denotes a
Fred Couples
Bernhard Langer
Chien Soon Lu
Tom Kite
Peter Senior
Michael Allen
Tommy Armour III
John Cook
Scott Simpson
Loren Roberts
Olin Browne
John Morse
Jay Haas
Mark Calcavecchia
J. R. Roth
Keith Fergus
Larry Mize
J. L. Lewis
Joe Ozaki
Tom Watson
Mike Reid
Tom Lehman
Javier Sanchez
Jeff Hart
Mark Wiebe
Eduardo Romero
Dan Forsman
Allen Doyle
Bob Tway
Fred Funk
Russ Cochran
Jim Roy
Bruce Vaughan
Jeff Sluman
Joey Sindelar
Rod Spittle
David Frost
Jim Rutledge
Corey Pavin
Don Pooley
Gary Hallberg
a-Tim Jackson
Mark Johnson
Tom Purtzer
Bruce Fleisher
Gil Morgan
Bob Gilder
Craig Stadler
Jim Chancey
Jeff Thomsen
Hal Sutton
Rod Nuckolls
Tsukasa Watanabe
Paul Trittler
Morris Hatalsky
Mike Goodes
Ralph West
Bob Niger
Denis Watson
Gene Jones
Rich Parker
James Mason
Mike Lawrence
a-Steven Hudson
Bill Britton
Jon Fiedler
Bill Sautter
Graham Marsh
a-John Grace


Bue uunuy inluU
'urse: $2.6 million,
70,Third Round,
amateur:
70-70-65-205 -5
69-68-68-205 -5
71-71-68-210 E
72-69-69-210 E
73-70-68-211 +1
69-71-71-211 +1
71-68-72-211 +1
71-68-72-211 +1
70-71-71-212 +2
68-72-72-212 +2
73-70-70--213 +3
72-74-68-214 +4
70-73-71-214 +4
69-73-72-214 +4
73-66-75-214 +4
71-73-71-215 +5
74-69-72-215 +5
72-70-73-215 +5
69-73-73-215 +5
70-70-75-215 +5
74-70-72-216 +6
69-75-72-216 +6
71-71-74-216 +6
73-72-72-217 +7
73-72-72-217 +7
71-72-74-217 +7
78-71-69-218 +8
72-76-70-218 +8
73-75-70-218 +8
76-70-72-218 +8
75-69-74-218 +8
76-73-70-219 +9
66-82-71-219 +9
73-74-72-219 +9
74-71-74-219 +9
75-74-71-220 +10
76-72-72-220 +10
73-74-73-220 +10
72-75-73-220 +10
72-73-75-220 +10
73-77-71-221 +11
68-79-74-221 +11
75-72-74-221 +11
72-75-74-221 +11
77-69-75-221 +11
76-74-72-222 +12
75-74-73-222 +12
74-75-73-222 +12
73-75-74-222 +12
75-73-74-222 +12
73-77-73-223 +13
73-77-73-223 +13
75-75-73-223 +13
77-73-73-223 +13
77-72-74-223 +13
73-75-75-223 +13
71-75-77-223 +13
77-73-75-225 +15
79-71-75-225 +15
78-71-76-225 +15
72-77-76-225 +15
75-72-78-225 +15
77-73-76-226 +16
73-75-78-226 +16
76-73-78-227 +17
75-74-78-227 +17
737-7-78-228 +18
74-76-78-228 +18
74-75-80-229 +19


AUTO '


For the record

---- Florida LOTTERY

CASH 3 (early)
V.W. 8-8-7


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:

LOTTO
5-8-18-19-47-48
XTRA
4


CASH 3 (late)
8-1-8
PLAY 4 (early)
8-4-2-0
PLAY 4 (late)
0-3-8-7
FANTASY 5
19- 28 32- 33-34
POWERBALL
1-16-17-41 57
POWER BALL
15
POWER PLAY
3


====On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
7:30 a.m. (SPEED) Formula One: Hungarian Grand Prix
1 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Sunoco Red Cross
Pennsylvania 500
2 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Sunoco Red Cross
Pennsylvania 500 (Same-day tape)
EQUESTRIAN
5 p.m. (11, 20 ABC) Haskell Invitational
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: 3 Irish Open, Final
Round
10 a.m. (ESPN) RICOH Women's British Open, Final
Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Greenbrier Classic, Final Round
3 p.m. (10 CBS) PGA Tour: Greenbrier Classic, Final
Round
4 p.m. (8 NBC) U.S. Senior Open Championship, Final
Round
MLB
1:30 p.m. (SUN) (TBS) New York Yankees at Tampa Bay
Rays
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Oakland Athletics at Chicago White Sox
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Marlins at San Diego Padres
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco
Giants
RODEO
3 p.m. (VERSUS) PBR: San Antonio Invitational TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA: U.S. Open Series Bank of the West
Classic, Final
5 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP: U.S. Open Series Farmers Classic,
Final
TRACK AND FIELD
4 p.m. (IND1) PK Takes Las Vegas (Taped)


MONDAY'S SPORTS
MLB
7 p.m. (ESPN) New York Mets at Atlanta Braves


NASCAR Camping 7 p.m. (SUN) Minnesota Twins at Tampa Bay Rays
World Truck SOCCER
Pocono Mountains 125 2 p.m. (FSNFL) WPS: FC Gold Pride at Atlanta Beat
Results (Taped)
Saturday at Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa. oca/CALENDA
Lap length: 2.5 milesLcalCALENDAR
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 55 laps, 148.1
rating, 195 points, $36,950. TODAY'S LOCAL SPORTS
2. (2) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 55, 131.1, 175, Seniors Little League state tournament
$27,815. Seniors Little League state tournament
3. (18) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 55, 92.1,165, (Melbourne)
$21,535. 10 a.m. San Mateo vs. South Orange
4. (5) Aric Almirola, Toyota, 55, 109.5, 160, 10 a.m. Valparaiso/Destin vs. Crystal River
$18,800.
5. (7) Justin Lofton, Toyota, 55, 95.6, 155, 1 p.m. New Tampa vs. Buckingham
$15,450. 1 p.m. E. Boynton Beach vs. Miami Springs
6. (10) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 55, 97.9, 150,
$11,350.
7. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 55, 100.3, 146,
$10,850. MONDAY LOCAL SPORTS
8. (13) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 55, 85.8, 142, 10 a.m. Both semifinal games (TBD)
$10,625. 4 p.m. State championship game (TBD)
9. (3) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 55, 112.3, 143,ate championship game (TBD)
$8,325.
10. (16) Jason White, Dodge, 55, 75.3, 134, D.Starr, 1,652; 10. J.White, 1,627. Carrasco from Pittsburgh for C Chris Snyder,
$11,450. NASCAR Driver Rating Formula INF Pedro Ciriaco and cash considerations.
11. (11) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 55, 88.9, A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a ATLANTA BRAVES-Recalled OF Gregor
130, $8,200. race. Blanco from Gwinnett (IL). Designated OF Brent
12. (6) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 55, 109.1, 132, The formula combines the following categories: Clevlen for assignment.
$10,325. Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run- CHICAGO CUBS-Acquired INF Blake De-
13. (15) David Starr, Toyota, 55, 76.8, 124, ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average Witt, RHP Kyle Smit and RHP Brett Wallach
$10,275. Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most fromthe LosAngeles Dodgersfor LHPTed Lilly,
14. (12) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 55, 72.5, Laps, Lead-Lap Finish. INF Ryan Theriot and a cash consideration.
121, $10,225. HOUSTON ASTROS-Purchased the con-
15. (19) Mario Gosselin, Chevrolet, 55, 70.1, tract of 1B Brett Wallace from Round Rock
118, $10,950. (PCL).
16. (25) Brent Raymer, Ford, 55, 61.8, 115, BASEBALL LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Acquired RHP
$10,000. Major League Baseball Octavio Dotel from Pittsburgh for RHP James
17. (9) Stacy Compton, Chevrolet, 55, 78.2, MLB-Rescinded the four-game suspension McDonald and OF Andrew Lambo.
112, $10,100. for Atlanta LHP Jonny Venters, deciding he did- PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Recalled INF Ar-
18. (26) Tim Andrews, Dodge, 55, 62.5, 109, n'tpurposely throw at Milwaukee's Prince Fielder. genis Diaz and INF Jeff Clement from Indi-
$9,775. American League anapolis (IL). Acquired RHP Joseph Martinez
19. (17) Ricky Carmichael, Chevrolet, 55,73.3, BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Traded LHP Will and OF John Bowker from San Francisco for
106, $9,675. Ohman to Florida for RHP Rick VandenHurk. LHP Javier Lopez.
20. (24) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 55, 57.1, 103, Optioned VandenHurk to Norfolk (IL). Recalled SAN DIEGO PADRES-Designated OF
$10,125. 3B Josh Bell from Norfolk. Quintin Berry for assignment.
21. (14) Chris Fontaine, Chevrolet, 55, 60.9, BOSTON RED SOX-Designated OF Je- WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Acquired
100, $7,225. remy Hermida for assignment. Selected the RHP Ryan Tatusko and RHP Tanner Roark from
22. (20) Donny Lia, Chevrolet, 55, 68, 97, contract of OF Ryan Kalish from Pawtucket (IL). Texas for INF Cristian Guzman and assigned
$9,375. Traded RHP Ramon Ramirez to San Francisco them to Harrisburg (EL). Agreed to terms with
23. (30) Brett Butler, Chevrolet, 55, 43.2, 94, for RHP Daniel Turpen. Recalled LHP Dustin RHP Yunesky Maya.
$9,275. Richardson from Pawtucket. Midwest League
24. (35) Joe Aramendia, Chevrolet, 55,42.2,91, CLEVELAND INDIANS-Activated RHP QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS-An-
$7,950. Kerry Wood from 15-day DL. Recalled OF Jor- nounced C Roberto Espinoza was transferred
25. (28) Tim Bainey Jr., Chevrolet, 55,46.9, 88, dan Brown from Columbus (IL). Traded RHP to Batavia (NYP).
$6,915. Jake Westbrook and cash to St. Louis for San United League
26. (33) Mike Harmon, Ford, 55, 37.9, 85, Diego RHP Corey Kluber. St. Louis sent OF LAREDO BRONCOS-Signed OF Jonel
$6,875. Ryan Ludwick to San Diego for LHP Nick Pacheco.
27. (27) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, 53, 43, 82, Greenwood. FOOTBALL
$8,200. DETROIT TIGERS-Traded OF Wilkin National Football League
28. (34) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 52, 34.1,79, Ramirez to Atlanta for a player to be named or CLEVELAND BROWNS-Agreed to terms
$6,825. cash considerations, with CB Joe Haden on a five-year contract.
29. (8) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, accident, KANSAS CITY ROYALS-Acquired LHP Tim DENVER BRONCOS-Agreed to terms with
50, 84.8,76, $7,800. Collins, RHP Jesse Chavez and OF Gregor WR Demaryius Thomas.
30. (29) Chase Mattioli, Chevrolet, accident, 45, Blanco from Atlanta for OF Rick Ankiel, RHP INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Signed CB Kevin
43.9, 73, $7,275. Kyle Farnsworth and cash. Signed manager Thomas.
31. (31) Chad McCumbee, Chevrolet, suspen- Ned Yost to a two-year contract extension NEW YORK GIANTS-Signed DT Linval
sion, 30, 29.9, 70, $6,750. through the 2012 season. Joseph to a multiyear contract.
32. (23) Bobby Hamilton Jr., Chevrolet, acci- NEWYORK YANKEES-Acquired 1B Lance PHILADELPHIA EAGLES-Signed WR Kel-
dent, 26, 46.1, 67, $6,725. Berkman and cash considerations from Hous- ley Washington to a one-year contract. Re-
33. (22) Mike Garvey, Chevrolet, electrical, 14, ton for RHP Mark Melancon and INF Jimmy leased Jared Perry.
36.9, 64, $6,700. Paredes. Acquired RHP Kerry Wood and cash SEATTLE SEAHAWKS-Announced the re-
34.(32) Butch Miller,Dodge,reargear, 10, 31.1, from Cleveland for a player to be named or tirement of WR Sean Morey Placed OL Chester
61, $6,675. cash. Designated RHP Chan Ho Park for as- Pitts, FB Owen Schmitt and CB Josh Pinkard
35. (36) J.C. Stout, Chevrolet, electrical, 4, 33.3, signment. Optioned OF Colin Curtis and 1B on the active/physically-unable-to-perform list.
58, $6,650. Juan Miranda to Scranton-Wilkes-Barre (IL). TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Agreed to
36.(21) Carl Long, Dodge, overheating, 2, 30.3, OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Recalled RHP terms with DT Gerald McCoy on a five-year con-
55, $6,622. Boof Bonser from Sacramento (PCL). Optioned tract and OT Donald Penn on a six-year con-
Race Statistics LHP Cedric Bowers to Sacramento. tract. Released OT James Williams.
Average Speed of Race Winner: 111.966 mph. SEATTLE MARINERS-Assigned 18 Justin TENNESSEE TITANS-Placed DT Tony
Time of Race: 1 hour, 13 minutes, 41 seconds. Smoak to Tacoma (PCL). Placed OF Milton Brown, WR Damian Williams, LB David Thorn-
Margin of Victory: 0.445 seconds. Bradley on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Sean ton, S Nick Schommer, CB Jamar Love and F
Caution Flags: 6 for 18 laps. White and INF Matt Tuiasosopo from Tacoma. ton, S Nick chomer, physCB Jamally-uove and FB
Lead Changes: 6 among 4 drivers. TAMPA BAY RAYS-Acquired RHP Chad Willie Rose on the physically-unable-to-
Lap Leaders: E.Sadler 1-20; K.Kahne 21-32; Quails from Arizona for a player to be named. perform list.
E.Sadler 33-37; T.Bodine 38-39; D.Hamlin 40- TEXAS RANGERS-Acquired RHP Roman Canadian Football League
44; K.Kahne 45-49; E.Sadler 50-55. Mendez, 1B Chris McGuiness, a player to be EDMONTON ESKIMOS-Fired general
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps named and cash considerations from Boston for manager-director of football operations Danny
Led): E.Sadler, 3 times for 31 laps; K.Kahne, 2 C Jarrod Saltalamacchia. Placed INF Joaquin Maciocia.
times for 17 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 5 laps; Arias on the 15-day DL. Activated RHP Rich HOCKEY
T.Bodine, 1 time for 2 laps. Harden off the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Doug National Hockey League
Top 10 in Points: 1. T.Bodine, 1,993; 2. Mathis to Oklahoma City (PCL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS-Named Todd
A.Almirola, 1,844; 3. J.Sauter, 1,800; 4. T.Peters, National League Reirden assistant coach.
1,791; 5.M.Crfton, 1,748; 6.A.Dilon, 1,730;7. ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS-Acquired OF SAN JOSE SHARKS-Re-signed F Devin
R.Hornaday Jr., 1,725; 8. M.Skinner, 1,724; 9. Ryan Church, INF Bobby Crosby and RHP D.J. Setoguchi to a one-year contract.


Sadler holds off Kahne,



Crafton in truck series


with a solo home run in the
fourth inning.
"Our kids are veteran
kids, and they've been doing
it for a long time," Barrows
said. "Austin Thompson on
the mound threw a flawless
game for us and had a good
day with the bat"
Viera Sun Tree went up


Associated Press

LONG POND, Pa. El-
liott Sadler held off Kasey
Kahne in a green-white-
checkered finish to win the
inaugural NASCAR Truck
Series race Saturday at
Pocono.
Sadler was the benefici-
ary after a flurry of late
mishaps sent the trucks
race into NASCAR's version
of overtime. He cut off Matt
Crafton's pass attempt in-
side, then pulled away from
Kahne on the final lap to
take victory
It was Sadler's first trucks
win, giving him victories in
all three NASCAR racing
series.
Sadler started from the
pole and led for much of
the first half of the after-
noon before being chal-
lenged by points leader
Todd Bodine and Sprint
Cup stars Kahne and
Denny Hamlin.
Each took turns near the
front before Sadler closed
with his late dash to the
checkered flag. Kahne fin-
ished second, Crafton was



SAFE
Continued from Page B1

big moment in this game,"
Crystal River manager Mark
Strifler said. "They go on to
score three or four there
and we're really in a hole. A
one-run deficit for our of-
fense isn't all that big a deal,
but you start scoring a few
and now you can start press-
ing as a team. no matter how
good you are. But that's the
way our defense has been
for us. It's bent at times, but
never broke and that was a
big play by Aaron."
The out seemed to settle
the pitcher Sheldon Baxter,
who got the next batter to hit
a harmless ground ball to
second to end the inning.
That, however, wasn't the
day's first defensive' high-
light for Crystal River. In the
first inning, Weston Pope
made a phenomenal play on
an errant throw by the
catcher as he attempted to
gun down a San Mateo base
runner stealing second.
While the runner was safe,
Pope's defensive effort
knocked down the throw
and kept it from sailing into
center field, which would
have allowed the runner to
advance easily to third.
Having used its defense to
calm the storm, it was time
for the Crystal River offense
to answer the wake up call.
That they did, pounding out
10 hits over the next three
innings and plating eight
runs in the process.
In the bottom of the third
inning, Josh Howell opened
the frame when he laced a
double down the first base
line. Travis Coleman then
entered as a pinch runner
and easily scored the game's
tying run when Donnie De-
wees lifted a ball to deep
center field and raced his
way to a triple. Dewees then
used his aggressive base
running to give Crystal
River the lead for good
when he broke for home on
a wild pitch.
Crystal River plated two
more runs in the fourth in-
ning when Skyler Hastings
delivered a leadoff single,
stole second and scored on



FINAL
Continued from Page B1

Oviedo had three-run
home runs by Cortes and
Austin Thompson while Luis
Curbello and Joey Schulz hit
solo shots. Thompson, also
making the start on the
mound for Oviedo, dazzled
there as well.
Thompson tossed five in-
nings of one-run, four-hit
baseball game and struck
out eight Tamarac batters.
Luis Leal drove in and
scored Tamarac's lone run


third and Bodine was 12th.
Sadler was in his first
trucks race since a ninth-
place finish last month at
Michigan. He'll remember
his afternoon at Pocono for
more than just the race-
way's first trucks race.
Brent wins ARCA race
at Pocono
LONG POND, Pa. Robb
Brent has won the ARCA race
at Pocono Raceway for his first


an RBI single by Pope.
Bertine was hit by a pitch
and Pope scored on How-
ell's RBI single before an in-
ning-ending double play
stopped the scoring threat.
While a 4-1 lead was good,
it was by no means safe. In
the top of the fifth inning,
San Mateo worked two
walks and brought the tying
run to the plate in the per-
son of its cleanup hitter
John Clay But Baxter, who
was brilliant in his 5 2/3 in-
nings of work, baffled San
Mateo's biggest bat, striking
him out to end the inning.
His team would reward
him with four more runs in
the fifth when Ross Obstfeld
crushed a one-out double
down the left field line and
advanced to third on a wild
pitch. Levengood was hit by
a pitch and Hastings came
up withr'aiRBI -single to
score Obstfeld. Baxter
helped his own cause with a
two-RBI double to score
both runners. He would
later come home with the
team's final run of the game
on an RBI single by Bertine.
San Mateo would score
two unearned runs in the
sixth inning but Tyler
Humphreys would close out
the game, registering the
game's final four outs.
"We made some foolish
mistakes on the base paths.
We've gotta clean that up,"
Strifler said. "But all-in-all it
was another great effort by
the whole team. We came out
and fell down early But we
just kept battling and that's a
testament to these kids.
"Sheldon did a great job
for us today That's exactly
what we needed from him
and he really delivered," he
continued. "Our bats are
just alive and it's someone
different every game. If
you're trying to scout this
team, you're gong to need a
full sheet of paper."
The other winner on this
day was Mother Nature,
who drenched the area dur-
ing the early afternoon
games. The downpour ren-
dered the fields unplayable,
turning the tournament
schedule upside down for
the rest of the weekend.
Games originally sched-
uled for Saturday afternoon


early on RL Turner thanks
to a pair of home runs by Se-
bastian Samuels and
Michael Pineda.
Samuels, who has now hit
six home runs in four
games, rocketed a first-in-
ning pitch off the net beyond
the fence in center field for
a three-run home run to put
Viera Sun Tree up 3-0.
Samuels' blast was hit on
the button and didn't take
more than a second or two
to leave the yard Viera Sun
Tree kept up the scoring in
the third inning with a sac-
rifice fly to go up 4-0 and
then Pineda's home run put
Viera Sun Tree in control by
six runs.
Pineda picked up another
RBI in the fifth when he sin-
gled off of RL Turner pitcher
Sean Maddox's leg to score
Samuels for a 7-0 advantage.
RL Turner did fight back
in the top of the sixth, get-
ting a leadoff triple from


career victory.
Brent became the ninth first-
time winner this year in the
ARCA series. Dakoda Arm-
strong was second and Craig
Goess was third on Saturday
Tom Hessert and Justin Marks
rounded out the top five.
There have been 10 different
winners in 11 ARCA races this
year
Brent won for the first time in
48 career ARCA races.


are today. The state semifi-
nal game is scheduled for 10
a.m. Monday with the cham-
pionship game slated for 4
p.m. the same day.
While the win doesn't offi-
cially clinch a spot for Crys-
tal River in the semifinals, it
puts the team in the definite
driver's seat.
Valparaiso/Destin defeated
South Orange 11-5 in the
other game Saturday morn-
ing, which means it and San
Mateo are 1-1. Crystal River
(2-0) is the only undefeated
team left in the pool. But if
San Mateo beats South Or-
ange today and Val-
paraiso/Destin defeats
Crystal River, it would cre-
ate a three-way tie.
The tiebreaker in the sce-
nario is runs allowed/per in-
ning. As it stands now, Crystal
River holds a seven-run ad-
vantage (having yielded 6
runs in 14 innings) over San
Mateo (who has given up 13
runs in 14 innings) and
Niceville (who has allowed
18 runs in 14 innings). That
means if Crystal River loses,
it would have to give up at
least seven runs (provided
San Mateo shuts out South
Orange) to not win the pool.
The only way for Crystal
River to be eliminated from
the semifinals is if San
Mateo does just that- wins
the pool. Because second
place in the pool is deter-
mined by head-to-head of
the two remaining teams.
not runs allowed, and Val-
paraiso/Destin would win
that tiebreaker by virtue of
having beat Crystal River to
force the three-way tie.
All of that said, Strifler
had a very simple solution
to the potential scenario,
which he made abundantly
clear to his players.
"This thing isn't clinched
yet," he said. "We've got to
beat Niceville (Sunday).
We've just got to go out and
win, and then we win the
pool and clinch a spot. It's
that simple and that's the
end of it. We need to take
care of our business and not
worry about anything else "*
John Coscia is the sports
editor of the Chronicle and
can be reached at
(352) 564-2928 or at jcoscia
@chronicleonline. com.


Jacob Brown, who scored on
J.T. Duncan's fly ball.
Viera Sun Tree had an
error with two outs, allow-
ing a runner to reach base.
RL Turner's Tanner Harden
followed that miscue with a
two-run homer to pull
within four runs.
Viera Sun Tree's Kingston
struck out seven batters
over 5 2/3 innings and al-
lowed three hits with one
earned run. He then gave
way to Samuels, who struck
out the final batter to secure
the victory.
"Our pitching has been
good all year, "Muzzi said.
"We've really got some good
pitchers and some kids who
know how to compete out
there on the mound."
Jon-Michael Soracchi is
a sports reporter for the
Chronicle. He can be
e-mailed atjmsoracchi
@chronicleonline.com or
reached at (352) 563-3261.


SCOREBOARD


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


B4 sUNDAYAUGUST 1 2010


Associated Press
Driver Elliott Sadler celebrates in Victory Lane after winning
the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Pocono
Mountains 125 on Saturday in Long Pond, Pa.








CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Haynesworth's knee
keeps him from test
ASHBURN, Va. -Albert
Haynesworth came to work
Saturday morning with a slightly
swollen knee, forcing him to
scrap his latest chance to pass
the Washing-
ton Redskins
conditioning
test and
keeping him
exiled from
practice for
yet another
Albert day.
Haynesworth The two-
Redskins time All-Pro
defensive tackle. defensive
tackle arrived
early at Redskins Park and told
the team he had some irritation
in one of his knees. Doctors
recommended that he not take
the test and instead ride a sta-
tionary bike and get treatment.
"Here's a setback already,"
coach Mike Shanahan said.
"His knee's a little bit swollen.
Hopefully it's not too bad."
Shanahan is requiring
Haynesworth to pass the test,
which consists of two timed 300-
yard shuttle runs, before taking
part in practice. Haynesworth is
the only player required to do so
because he skipped the team's
offseason conditioning program.
Haynesworth failed the test
Thursday and Friday, and it's
uncertain when he will try again.
He had been undergoing spe-
cific training to help him pass
the test, which might have con-
tributed to the knee problem.
Haynesworth did make his
first appearance on the field
during a practice, albeit briefly.
Wearing his No. 92 jersey for
the first time at this training
camp and holding a piece of
paper in his hands, he stood to
the side and watched the de-
fense walk through some plays
for about 10 minutes. He stood


NFC EAST

DALLAS COWBOYS
(11-5)
OPEN CAMP: July 24
LAST YEAR: Finally, another playoff victory
for the five-time Super Bowl champions. With
Terrell Owens gone and Miles Austin going from
relative unknown to Pro Bowl receiver, Tony
Romo set single-season Cowboys passing
records while also throwing a career-low nine
interceptions. After clinching the NFC East, the
Cowboys won their first playoff game at their
new stadium and their first postseason vic-
tory anywhere since 1996. That eased the sting
of a lopsided loss at Minnesota in the NFC di-
visional playoff game.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: WR Dez Bryant,
their first-round draft pick; OT Alex Barron; LB
Sean Lee.
IMPORTANT LOSSES: LT Flozell Adams, S
Ken Hamlin, LB Bobby Carpenter, OL Cory
Procter.
CAMP NEEDS: Determine who will protect
Romo's blind side after Adams, the expensive,
35-year-old, five-time Pro Bowl, left tackle was
cut. Doug Free is being given the first chance,
but Barron was acquired from St. Louis for Car-
penter in a swap of underachieving former first-
round picks. Marion Barber, Felix Jones and
Tashard Choice how will that talented run-
ning back trio be used? The secondary, with
converted cornerback Alan Ball taking over for
the cut Hamlin at safety.
EXPECTATIONS: For owner Jerry Jones, to
be the first team to play the Super Bowl in its
home stadium. Cowboys players certainly know
that the next Super Bowl will be played in the
$1.2 billion Cowboys Stadium on Feb. 6 -
Jones constantly reminds them. Then again, it
might not be an unrealistic expectation. Instead
of a spending spree during an uncapped year,
Jones emphasized continuity. Romo and Co. no
longer have that postseason winning drought in
the background and Bryant is a potentially ex-
plosive playmaker who provides yet another of-
fensive weapon for a unit that should be able to
pass and run. Head coach Wade Phillips set-
tled nicely into the dual role of defensive coor-
dinator last year, and has basically the same
players that allowed the fewest points in the
NFC, including consecutive shutouts to end the
regular season.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS
(4-12)
OPEN CAMP: July 29
LAST YEAR: The Snyder-Redskins circus
imploded beyond its usual laughingstock status.
Owner Dan Snyder overpaid for Albert
Haynesworth, front office chief Vinny Cerrato
assembled a thin and aging offensive line, and
coach Jim Zorn was still overwhelmed by the
job. Before long, Sherm Lewis was hired out of
bingo-calling retirement to call the plays, Cer-
rato was ousted before the season was done,
and Zorn was fired immediately after the final
game of the worst Redskins season since 1994.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: Coach Mike
Shanahan, GM Bruce Allen (actually hired late
last season), QB Donovan McNabb, RB Larry
Johnson, RB Willie Parker, T Trent Williams, T
Jammal Brown, G/T Artis Hicks, CB Phillip
Buchanon, DE Adam Carriker, DL Vonnie Holl-
iday, NT Maake Kemoeatu, WR Joey Galloway.
IMPORTANT LOSSES: QB Jason Campbell,
T Chris Samuels, G Randy Thomas, WR
Antwaan Randle El, DT Cornelius Griffin, KR
Rock Cartwright.
CAMP NEEDS: The offensive line was over-
hauled after 46 sacks allowed last year, with No.
4 overall pick Williams and veterans Brown and
Hicks the favorites to earn starting nods. Red-
skins also must complete installation of new of-
fense and defensive schemes and decide what
to do about Haynesworth, who's unhappy over
switch to a 3-4 defense and threatening to be
huge distraction at camp.
EXPECTATIONS: After a decade of disap-
pointment, Snyder had little choice but to give
Shanahan final say over football operations.
However, the coach who won two Super Bowls
with Denver appears to be have adopted Sny-
der's win-now mantra. Older players were
purged, but many of the new ones are just as
old or older. One of the knocks on Shanahan is
overconfidence in his ability to mold hand-
picked players into winners a theory that will
be tested right away with this group. Redskins


next to defensive line coach
Jacob Burney, who kept point-
ing to the other players to help
explain the terminology of the
team's new 3-4 defense.
Giants sign 2nd-round
pick DT Unval Joseph
ALBANY, N.Y. The New
York Giants have only one draft
choice left to sign.
Defensive tackle Linval
Joseph, the Giants' second-round
draft pick, signed a multiyear con-
tract with the team Saturday.
The team did not disclose
terms of the deal, which was
concluded the day before the
Giants opened training camp at
the University at Albany.
First-round draft pick Jason
Pierre-Paul is the team's only
unsigned rookie. Drew Rosen-
haus, the defensive end's agent,
has not responded to telephone
and e-mail messages seeking
comment on contract talks.
Colts sign 3rd-rounder,
wait on top pick
INDIANAPOLIS The Indi-
anapolis Colts have signed
third-round draft pick Kevin
Thomas, leaving only first-
round pick Jerry Hughes with-
out a contract agreement as
training camp starts.
Thomas is the seventh of the
Colts' eight draft choices to
reach a deal this week, though
the Southern Cal comeback is
expected to miss the entire sea-
son after hurting his right knee
during rookie minicamp in May.
Indianapolis has traditionally
handed out four-year deals to
draft picks after the first round.
Second-round pick Pat Angerer,
a linebacker from Iowa, signed
a four-year deal reportedly
worth $3.14 million Thursday.
The Colts report Sunday to
Anderson University, their new
training camp site, with their
first official practice Monday.
From wire reports


have made major upgrades at four vital posi-
tions: coach, GM, QB and LT.That alone should
make this team three or four wins better than
last year's.
NEW YORK GIANTS (8-8)
OPEN CAMP: Aug. 1
LASTYEAR: After a 5-0 start, the Giants fell
apart in the second half and missed the play-
offs for the first time since:2005.Theonce-solid
defense was a major culprit, and rookie coordi-
nator Bill Sheridan was fired as a result. The
running game, which led the league in rushing
in 2008, slumped behind a banged-up Brandon
Jacobs. QB Eli Manning was a bright spot, com-
ing up with the best statistical season of his ca-
reer 4,021 yards, 27 TDs and found a true
go-to receiver in Steve Smith (team-record 107
catches, 1,220 yards).
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: Defensive coor-
dinator Perry Fewell, S Antrel Rolle, S Deon
Grant, DE Jason Pierre-Paul (first-round pick),
DT Linval Joseph (second-rounder), LB Phillip
Dillard (fourth-rounder), P Matt Dodge (seventh-
round pick).
IMPORTANT LOSSES: MLB Antonio Pierce,
DT Fred Robbins, P Jeff Feales, CB Kevin
Dockery.
CAMP NEEDS: The Giants need to return
their defense to dominance and it may start with
the guys up front. Justin Tuck has to show he's
back after dealing with a shoulder injury, and
Osi Umenyiora needs to rebound from a sea-
son marked by injuries and a benching.
Jonathan Goff and Dillard have to prove they
can replace Pierce. S Kenny Phillips and CB
Aaron Ross dealt with injuries last season and
could be major factors if they can stay healthy.
An aging offensive line could see some
changes if LG Rich Seubert is phased out and
replaced by David Diehl, with young Will Beatty
moving in at LT. Domenik Hixon is out for the
season with a knee injury, meaning the Giants
need to find a new kickoff and punt returned -
with Sinorice Moss and wide receiver Mario
Manningham the likely candidates.
EXPECTATIONS: The Giants will enter the
season with some major questions, but also
with their sights set on a playoff appearance
and putting last year's disastrous finish behind
them. As long as the running game gets going,
the offense behind Manning, Smith & Co.
should produce points. It will be up to Fewell's
defense to keep opponents off balance and
keep shootouts to a minimum in a competitive
NFC East.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
(11-5)
OPEN CAMP: July 26
LAST YEAR: Strong contenders to make a
championship run heading into the final week
of the regular season, the Eagles were exposed
in consecutive losses to Dallas. The first cost
them the NFC East title and a first-round bye
and the second one knocked them out of the
playoffs. That signaled the end of the Donovan
McNabb Era in Philadelphia. The six-time Pro
Bowl quarterback was traded to Washington
and several other veterans were jettisoned in
the offseason.
IMPORTANT ADDITIONS: DE Brandon Gra-
ham, S Nate Allen, LB Ernie Sims, DE Darryl
Tapp, RB Mike Bell.
IMPORTANT LOSSES: QB Donovan McN-
abb, RB Brian Westbrook, CB Sheldon Brown,
OT Shawn Andrews, LB Will Witherspoon.
CAMP NEEDS: It's Kevin Kolb's first camp as
the starting quarterback, so he needs to estab-
lish himself as the leader on offense. There's
uncertainty in a secondary that used to be the
defense's strength, and it's important that start-
ing linebacker Stewart Bradley is able to return
from a knee injury that forced him to miss the
entire 2009 season. Michael Vick also could
prove to be a distraction because of off-field is-
sues.
EXPECTATIONS: Despite overhauling the
roster, trading McNabb and getting rid of other
veterans, coach Andy Reid and the rest of man-
agement refuse to consider this a rebuilding
year. If Kolb steps in and plays to his potential,
a young offense that has plenty of talent could
score a bunch of points. A defense that strug-
gled down the stretch has several holes that are
being filled by rookies who will be counted on
to make immediate contributions.
TOMORROW:
NFC NORTH


Bucs sign Penn, McCoy


Rookie, veteran

agree to deas

before camp

Associated Press

TAMPA The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers agreed to
terms on a five-year con-
tract with first-round draft
pick Gerald McCoy and
reached a six-year deal
with restricted free agent
left tackle Donald Penn
on the opening day of
training camp.
General manager Mark
Dominik announced the
developments Saturday
during the club's first
practice. Penn joined the
workout about 15 minutes
later, and there was a
chance McCoy would join
the team at One Buc Place
by the end of the day
"We're finishing up
some language and paper-
work," Dominik said of
McCoy, the third overall
pick in this year's draft
out of Oklahoma. The
Bucs are counting on the
6-foot-4, 295-pound tackle
to fill a hole on the defen-
sive line that's existed


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Raheem Morris, left,
speaks with offensive lineman Donald Penn (70) during
Saturday's training camp in Tampa.

since Warren Sapp de- Bucs," the general manager
parted Tampa Bay after the added, "in terms of securing
2003 season, two players to long-term
"It's a great day for the deals that can be really im-


portant to this organization."
Penn is a sixth-year pro
who's appeared in 48 career
games, including 44 straight
as the Bucs' starting left
tackle. He declined a $3.168
million tender offer and
stayed away from the team's
voluntary offseason work-
outs and mandatory mini-
camp while seeking a
long-term contract that's
worth about $43 million.
To make room on the ros-
ter, tackle James Williams
was released.
Penn, who's played under
one-year contracts the past
three seasons, said he made
a call to his agent a few days
ago and pushed for a resolu-
tion to his dispute.
"I said: Let's get it done.
Let's make some sacrifices
if we need to. ... It wasn't
about financial security. I
wanted longevity, a commit-
ment," Penn said. "That's
what I got"
Second-year coach Ra-
heem Morris was relieved to
be able to open camp with his
left tackle in place. He and
Penn remained in contact
throughout the offseason,
often through text messages.
"I understand the business
of this game. ... That's just
what it was," the coach said.
"It was a business deal."


Steelers QB practices with starters


Players notice

difference in

Roethlisberger

Associated Press

LATROBE, Pa. His
No. 7 hasn't changed. Nei-
ther has his place in the
offense. Ben Roethlis-
berger is the Steelers'
starting quarterback, and
that was quickly evident
during their first practice
of training camp.
What is different, team-
mate Hines Ward said, is
Ben Roethlisberger.
Roethlisberger, whose
image and popularity were
badly damaged during a


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger passes
during the first practice session Saturday at the team's
training camp in Latrobe, Pa. Roethlisberger will miss the
first six games of the season because of his suspension.


March night of barhopping
in which he was accused of
assaulting a college student,
took the first public steps


Saturday in trying to recon-
nect with his teammates.
Roethlisberger, admit-
tedly not a good teammate


at times during his first six
NFL seasons, was more out-
going and animated than
usual during the first of the
day's two practices. Ward
said the disgraced quarter-
back was clearly working to
improve his relationship
with his teammates.
Drawing a six-game sus-
pension a punishment
that could be trimmed to
four and the public reac-
tion to his aberrant behav-
ior in Georgia apparently
convinced Roethlisberger
that changes were needed,
some teammates suggested.
"For many years, people
didn't know t was really
going on with Ben," Ward
said. "He's starting to open
up and be more personal
with guys. Today he was
talking to everybody."


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Associated Press
Actors perform July 17 as
modern-day knights to re-
enact the Battle of Grun-
wald, In which Poles and
Lithuanians, helped by
Russian and Czech forces,
repulsed a German force of
Teutonic knights, on July
15, 1410, In Grunwald,
northern Poland.


Knights


go for


tourism
Associated Press

KWIDZYN, Poland -
The Teutonic Knights have
long been reviled in
Poland, where the Ger-
manic warriors swept in
during the Middle Ages
and converted pagans to
Christianity at the point of
a sword.
Many here see them as
an early incarnation of a
Germany that has attacked
Poland over the centuries,
most recently in World War
II.
But now one Polish town
is putting all grudges aside
and celebrating the mem-
ory of the Teutonic Knights
in an attempt to highlight
the rich history of this
once-German municipality
and stimulate tourism in a
region still struggling with
high unemployment and
other legacies of commu-
nism.
In an elaborate cere-
mony Saturday that drew
hundreds of people,
Roman Catholic priests
consecrated the newly dis-
covered remains of three of
the order's 14th- and 15th-
century leaders or
"grand masters" with a
Mass in the city's St John
the Evangelist Cathedral.
The cathedral is part of a
massive red-brick fortress
that was once a base for the
knights' notorious raids, an
imposing reminder to the
town's 40,000 inhabitants of
its German past
"This history belongs to
this city," said Wojciech
Weryk, who leads a drive to
promote Kwidzyn. "It is a
very good product from the
point of view of history and
tourists.".
The ceremony was cele-
brated by priests and mod-
ern-day representatives of
the Teutonic order, which
today exists as a religious
order in Austria and six
other European countries,
and is devoted to helping
the poor, elderly and or-
phans, and doing educa-
tional and pastoral work
Many of the local people
feel proud that their his-
toric town has something
new to boast of.
"We are happy that
something so significant
was found here and that we
will have something of in-
terest in our cathedral,"
said Janusz Urbanowicz, a
64-year-old retired carpen-
ter. "We know that this was
the cathedral of the Teu-
tonic Knights and that this
was Prussia before the war
But we are glad this histor-
ical finding was made and
that it will bring more
tourists."


am





-


Associated Press
"American Idol" hopefuls wait In line July 19 outside the Bradley Center in Milwaukee to register for auditions for the show's
10th season. Auditions began July 21.

Who will bejudged fit to be the 'American Idol' judges?


FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer


NEW YORK Don't call it "Ameri-
can Idol." Call it "Extreme Makeover:
'Idol' Edition."
The composition of the "Idol" judges'
panel seems to be changing by the
minute, in flux like a lunch
counter during the noon rush.
Everyone but Larry King and
Kate Gosselin is rumored as a
candidate to replace tart-
tongued Simon Cowell (out the
door to create his own talent
competition), Ellen DeGeneres
and who knows who else.
The only guarantees left on Jen
"Idol" are off-key contestants, Lo
host Ryan Seacrest (peerless as
a combination maitre d' and traffic
cop), and all those conspicuous glasses
of Coke.
Even the ratings while still gigan-
tic are no longer on the upswing. The
audience for "Idol" has lately been
sliding, which, of course, is what the
makeover is meant to arrest.
So who will actually populate the
judges' panel when "Idol" returns on
Fox for its 10th season next January?
An abrupt announcement went out
Thursday that DeGeneres was calling
it quits. This, after Fox had breathlessly
announced signing the popul a r co-
median-talk show host last Octo-
ber to replace dizzy Paula Abd u I,
a charter "Idol" judge who is
planning yet another talent
tourney.
"Idol" wasn't "the right fit,"
DeGeneres explained, while
reports surfaced that
singer-dancer-actor Jen-
nifer Lopez is game to
see if "Idol" fits her.
Meanwhile, other re-
ports proposed that
time had run out for
singer-songwriter
Kara DioGuardi. J
Brought on board two
seasons ago when -
the panel of judges
was expanded from
three to four, she has -
always seemed no
more knowledge-
"American Idol"
judges Kara DIo-
Guardi, left, and
Randy Jackson,
center, pose July
19 with former
judge Paula Abdul
before the 2010
VH1 Do Something
Awards In Los Angeles.


n
)P


able than she is expendable. (If these
were the Marx Brothers, she would be
Chico.)
No word on the prospects for affably
bland Randy ("dawwwg!") Jackson,
who is currently the only remaining
original. Who knows? Maybe "Idol"
producers will decide to go another
way and replace him
with Mel Gibson,
But seriously, folks:
Other names that con-
tinue to be bandied
about include pillow- '
lipped Aerosmith front
man Steven Tyler and
indomitable rocker
lifet (and "Celebrity Ap- El
3ez prentice" champ) Bret DeGe
Michaels. But wait,
there's more! Justin Timberlake, Jes-
sica Simpson, Elton John, Chris Isaak,
Howard Stem and Harry Connick Jr. -
they've all been mentioned, too.
Adding to the uncertainty: It is far
from clear whether Fox will retain a
four-member panel, or trim the num-
ber back to three. (Or, as a move to re-
store some of the show's diminished
authority, "Idol" producers might opt to
further boost the number of judges to
nine, mirroring the U.S. Supreme


ie
on


Court You heard that here first)
The truth is likely to be revealed by
Monday, when Fox presents its 2010-11
programs to a meeting of the Television
Critics Association in Beverly Hills.
Then the world can get a good night's
sleep.
While the stars who occupy the
judges' table next season won't
have quite the juice of, say,
Supreme Court justices, nor is
the gravity of filling vacancies
at the same level, the pressure
on "Idol" producers is enor-
ti mous to pick the right people.
As a financial gold mine and
cultural rallying point, "Idol"
on can hardly be overstated. Now
neres the challenge looms to reinvent
and refresh the show whose
ninth-season finale drew nearly 5 mil-
lion viewers less than the year before.
(Not that 24.2 million viewers is
chicken feed.)
Key to the future dominance of
"Idol" is its panel of judges and the
chemistry they share. For years, the
chemistry was perfect among Cowell,
Jackson and Abdul.
Can the "Idol" producers repeat that
miracle next season? Or, in trying to fix
the show, will they end up breaking it?
Frazier Moore is a national televi-
sion columnist for The Associated
Press He can be reached at
fmoore,'iap.org


Today'sHOROSCOPE -


Birthday: If you live up to your abilities and produce what
you're capable of doing, the recognition you're seeking will
be there for you in the year ahead. Coming months will
offer you many opportunities to establish yourself.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You won't have to make a lot of
noise, wave your arms or wear a funny tie to capture the at-
tention of your peers. Those who know you already sense
much power and strength in your quiet presence.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't discount any signals or
messages your second sense is picking up, even if some
come from left field. Your intuition is likely to be one of the
most effective assets that you possess.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It's always to your advantage
to be selective regarding your choice of friends. If you can,
associate with those pals who are the thinkers in the group,
because something worthwhile could come of it.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Once you realize that most


of the impediments that you have been envisioning are all
imaginary, clear thinking can take over. Several important
matters will be resolved as a result.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) --You'll make such an im-
pression that everyone within earshot will take notice when
you render an opinion or offer a suggestion. What you have
to say will be noteworthy to your listeners.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Let the debtor who owes
you know that your patience is coming to an end about
waiting for repayment.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Stand up and be counted if
someone is putting down a good friend who isn't present to
defend him/herself. The loyalty you show will further
strengthen bonds you have with onlookers.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Afriend for whom you did a
kindness recently hasn't forgotten it. This person has some-
thing up his/her sleeve for you, in hopes that it will reward


your gracious gesture.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -A group of friends is likely to
follow your lead about what to do, when to do it and how to
do it. You won't let them down, you'll think of something
quite original that they'll all enjoy.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When it comes to a competi-
tive situation, don't tip your hand as to what you have in
mind to beat out ihe others. It'll be a lot more fun for every-
body if they don't know what's coming.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) If a friend comes to you hop-
ing you'll be critical of someone s/he dislikes, don I think
you have to comply if you think differently You can only be
of help to your pal if you tell them the truth.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) You have the grit and deter-
mination to successfully fulfill your intentions. However, to
your credit, much of what you want to do will be on behalf
of another.


FRIDAY, JULY 30
Mega Money: 6 17 32 -42
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $842
3-of-4 MB 44 $377.50
3-of-4 845 $58.50
2-of-4 MB 1,272 $27
2-of-4 26,975 $2
1-of-4 MB 11,929 $2.50
Fantasy 5:7 18 22 24 36
5-of-5 3 winners $75,313.36
4-of-5 284 $128
3-of-5 9,873 $10
THURSDAY, JULY 29
Fantasy 5: 10 21 24 25 27
5-of-5 1 winner $199,731.45
4-of-5 255 $126
3-of-5 8,958 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Aug. 1,
the 213th day of 2010. There
are 152 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Aug. 1, 1944, an upris-
ing broke out in Warsaw,
Poland, against Nazi occupa-
tion; the revolt lasted two
months before collapsing.
On this date:
In 1894, the First Sino-
Japanese War erupted, the
result of a dispute over con-
trol of Korea; Japan's army
routed the Chinese.
In 1907, the U.S. Army
Signal Corps established an
aeronautical division, the
forerunner of the U.S. Air
Force.
In 1935, the British movie
thriller "The 39 Steps," di-
rected by Alfred Hitchcock
and starring Robert Donat
and Madeleine Carroll,
opened in the U.S.
In 1946, President Harry S.
Truman signed the Fulbright
Program into law, establish-
ing the scholarships named
for Sen. William J. Fulbright.
America's Atomic Energy
Commission was estab-
lished.
In 1960, the Western
African country of Dahomey
(now Benin) became inde-
pendent of French rule.
In 1981, the rock music
video channel MTV made its
debut.
Ten years ago: A U.S. mil-
itary court in Germany sen-
tenced Army Staff Sgt. Frank
Ronghi to life in prison with-
out parole for sexually as-
saulting and killing Merita
Shabiu, an 11-year-old ethnic
Albanian girl, while on peace-
keeping duty in Kosovo.
Five years ago: Saudi
Arabia's ruler, King Fahd,
died; Crown Prince Abdullah,
the king's half-brother, be-
came the country's new
monarch.
One year ago: A gunman
opened fired at a gay youth
center in Tel Aviv, Israel,
killing two people.
Today's Birthdays: Actor-
director Geoffrey Holder is
80. Singer Ramblin' Jack EI-
liott is 79. Cartoonist Tom
Wilson (retired creator of
"Ziggy") is 79. Actor Gian-
carlo Giannini is 68. Blues
singer-musician Robert Cray
is 57. Rock singer Joe Elliott
(Def Leppard) is 51. Rapper
Chuck D (Public Enemy) is
50. Rapper Coolio is 47.
Rock singer Adam Duritz
(Counting Crows) is 46.
Movie Country singer George
Ducas is 44. Actor Charles
Malik Whitfield is 38. Actress
Tempestt Bledsoe is 37.
Actor Jason Momoa is 31.
Actress Taylor Fry is 29.
Actor Elijah Kelley is 24.
Thought for Today: "Mid-
die age snuffs out more tal-
ent than ever wars or sudden
deaths do." Richard
Hughes, Welsh author and
dramatist (1900-1976).


I- - I -











COMM-ENTARY____
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
David Addington, then-chief of staff for Vice President Dick Cheney, testifies on June 26, 2008, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.




In destroyed CIA videos,




red tape meets black ops


MATT APuzzo
AND ADAM GOLDMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
When the CIA sent word in 2005 to de-
stroy scores of videos showing waterboard-
ing and other harsh interrogation tactics,
there was an unusual omission in the care-
fully worded memo: the names of two
agency lawyers.
Once a CIA lawyer has weighed in on
even a routine matter, officers rarely give
an order without copying the lawyer in on
the decision. It's standard procedure, a
way for managers to cover themselves if a
decision goes bad.
But when the CIA's top clandestine offi-
cer, Jose Rodriguez, sent a cable to the
agency's secret prison in Thailand and told
his station chief to destroy videotapes
showing two terrorists being water-
boarded, he left the lawyers off the memo.
The destruction of the tapes wiped away
the most graphic evidence of the CIA's
now-shuttered network of overseas pris-
ons, where suspected terrorists were inter-
rogated for information using some of the
most aggressive tactics in U.S. history.
Critics of that George W Bush-era pro-
gram point to the tapes' destruction and
say his administration was trying to cover
its tracks.
The reality is not so simple.
Interviews with current and former
U.S. officials and others close to the in-
vestigation show that Rodriguez's order
was at odds with years of directives from
CIA lawyers and the White House. Ro-
driguez knew there would be political
fallout for the decision, according to doc-
uments and interviews, so he sought
enough legal cover to get the tapes de-
stroyed but not so much that anyone
would stop him.


Leaving the lawyers off such a sensitive
cable was so unusual that a top CIA official
noted it in an internal e-mail just days
later. The omission is now an important
part of the Justice Department's 2 1/2-year
investigation into whether destroying the
tapes was a crime.
As that investigation appears to be near-
ing a conclusion, prosecutors have focused
on a little-used section of the 2002 Sar-
banes-Oxley law intended to prevent fu-
ture Enron accounting scandals. The law
makes it a crime to destroy documents,
even if no court has said they must be kept
and no investigators are looking for them.
Rodriguez, who wasn't disciplined for
what some former officials told prosecu-
tors amounted to insubordination, is fre-
quently back at CIA headquarters as a
contractor.
The Associated Press has compiled the
most complete account to date of how the
tapes were destroyed, a narrative that re-
veals the challenges prosecutors face in
bringing charges.
Most of the people interviewed spoke on
condition of anonymity because of the con-
tinuing investigation. Some of the princi-
pals declined comment or were
unavailable.
Videotaping interrogations is unusual at
the CIA, but the capture and questioning of
senior al-Qaida operative Abu Zubaydah
and accused USS Cole bombing plotter
Rahim al-Nashiri in 2002 were unusual
cases. They presented a chance to unravel
al-Qaida from within, and the Bush admin-
istration authorized increasingly severe
tactics to ensure they cooperated.
CIA officers at the secret prison began
videotaping to show that Zubaydah arrived
in Thailand with wounds from a firefight
and to prove that interrogators followed
broad new rules Washington had laid out.


Almost as soon as taping began, top offi-
cials at the agency's headquarters in Lang-
ley, Va., began discussing whether to
destroy the tapes.
Many dozens of CIA officers and contrac-
tors cycled in and out of Thailand to help
with the questioning. If those videos ever
surfaced, officials feared, nearly all those
people could be identified..
In November 2002, CIA lawyer John L.
McPherson was assigned to watch the videos
and compare them with summaries being
sent to headquarters. If the reports called
cables accurately described the videos,
it would bolster the case that the tapes
were unnecessary and could be destroyed.
The 92 tapes they compiled were poorly
organized. Several had been taped over so
the video quality was poor. According to
documents released in a federal lawsuit,
others contained gaps. When one tape ran
out, interrogators didn't immediately insert
a new one. Many tapes contained brief in-
terrogation sessions followed by hours of
static. Also, the tapes weren't time-
stamped.
Nonetheless, McPherson, a former Naval
officer, concluded in a January 2003 memo
that the tactics described in the cables
matched what he saw on the video. With
that assurance, the CIA planned to destroy
the tapes when the inspector general com-
pleted a review of the interrogation program.
But lawmakers who were briefed on the
tapes pushed back In February 2003 came
a warning from Rep. Jane Harman, D-
Calif., that destroying the videos would "re-
flect badly on the agency" The CIA's
deputy director, James Pavitt, decided not
to destroy them, agency documents show.
The White House didn't learn about the
tapes for a year, and even then, it was
somewhat by chance.
See VIDEOS/Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Agrand


effort, a


grander


success,


and the


grandest


reward
t might be because I
have three sisters of
my own.
I am not sure.
But I do know the cul-
mination this past week of
the 25-year effort to pur-
chase and save Three Sis-
ters Springs in Crystal
River is one of the most
significant community ac-
complishments that I've
seen Citrus County get
done.
The thought of seeing
the 57-acre Three Sisters
Springs site turned into a
high-density residential
development depressed
me like nothing in a long
time. There are some parts
of this beautiful planet that
are just too perfect for any
one individual to own.
Three Sisters Springs is
one of those places.
It always needed to,be
owned by the public. It be-
longs to all of us the same
way it belongs to the man-
atees that crowd those
pretty little springs when
the weather turns cold
and they go searching for
protection.
Folks who have been
around here a long time
will remember that there
was a time when a high-
density condominium de-
velopmentwas also planned
for the headwaters of Ho-
mosassa Springs. At the
time, the attraction that is
now the wildlife park was
owned by a company that
was experiencing finan-
cial difficulties, and a de-
veloper offered a sack of
money so he could build
high-rise condominiums.
At that time, the com-
munity came together and
stopped the project. In
fact, county residents voted
to tax themselves to buy
the property and save it.
The late John Barnes of
Homosassa Sptings led
the charge along with J.P
Garner from the attraction.
See WINDOW/Page C4


Facts show Ottawa Avenue


was a prudent purchase
As the county administrator, I am tween Croft Avenue and County Road 491
aware of the public discussion con- has been a priority.
cerning the purchase of Ottawa Av- This project was included in the
enue by the county, and unfortunately County's 2008-2012 Capital Improvement
much of it is based on some misunder- Program. The county applied for funding
standings. I feel I must correct through a County Incentive
that by explaining the factual t Grant from the Florida De-
details surrounding the deci- apartment of Transportation in
sion to purchase this roadway October of 2008 for the Citrus
When you look at the reali- County Ottawa to Quartz Con-
ties of the situation, the needs, nector Road Project specifi-
and the costs, you will see cally the extension of Ottawa.
graphically why this is a pru- At the time, the county had set
dent move on the county's part. $885,000 in the 2008 Capital Im-
This is not a new project. provement Program (CIP) and
Purchase of Ottawa Avenue Brad Thorpe another $145,000 in the 2009
has been included in the GUEST CIP budget. The grant applica-
county's overall transportation tion stated, "The planned im-
plan since its adoption in 2007, COLUMN provements to North Ottawa
and this roadway has been will help provide access to the
classified as a minor collector on the middle portion of Citrus County and is an-
county's Functional Classification Map. ticipated to help alleviate congestion on
Since the cancellation of extending Forest C.R. 491 and S.R. 44."
Ridge Boulevard to State Road 44, the
need for a north/south reliever road be- See OTT .'. Page C4


ave our students failed to learn, or
is there really something wrong
with the FCAT?
After receiving their FCAT results more
than a month late, school districts across
the state were shocked to see
some of their scores take a
plunge dramatically down-
ward. In what seems almost
statistically impossible, the re-
sults indicated that students
had failed to make adequate
learning gains.
After a majority of school su-
perintendents launched com-
plaints, the commissioner of Pat Deu
education arranged for an out- GU
side audit of the test results, all
the while proclaiming his "ut- COLI
most confidence in the accuracy
and reliability of the 2010 FCAT results."
Is this a case of schools rightly question-
ing the scores, or is this truly an indicator
that somehow a large number of students
failed to learn all at the same time? Either


t
E


way, the results can have devastating
repercussions, as FCAT scores are used
for everything from grading schools (which
rewards improving schools with hundreds
of thousands of dollars) to determining if
a student can go on to the next
grade level, will graduate from
high school, or will have to take
an entire year of remedial courses.
Personnel issues such as re-
tention of principals and
teachers are becoming more
dependent on "adequate yearly
progress" as determined by
FCAT and, as we just witnessed
tschman in the knock-down, drag-out
EST over Senate Bill 6, there are
powerful people in Florida
JMN who still want teachers' pay
and continuing employment to
be determined by their students' perform-
ance as measured by the FCAT or similar
standardized statewide tests.
See FCAT/Page C4


FCAT imbroglio proves


need to take tests to task









Page C2 -SUNDAY, AUGUST 1,2010



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........................................ publisher
Charlie Brennan .................................editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ........................................ HR director
Cheri Harris.................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz...................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ..................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SUCCESS!




Cooperative



effort results



in public prize


Three Sisters Springs is a
legacy to the Nature
Coast.
Three Sisters Springs now
belongs to us.
In one of the most significant
accomplishments of the
decade, the public officially
took ownership Wednesday of
the 57-acre site in
Crystal River THE I.
known as Three
Sisters Springs. Public ow
With all of the Three Siste
bad economic
and environmen- OUR 01
tal news that has
hit Florida in re- A goal acc
cent years -
from recession to oil the


purchase of the Three Sisters
Springs property shows what
can happen when people come
together for a common purpose.
The positive impact on Crys-
tal River and Citrus County
this public purchase ensures is
hard to measure.
The purchase of the springs
property is an environmental
benchmark on two fronts:
First, the property is the
most important refuge for the
endangered manatees when
the weather turns dangerously
cold. Public ownership means
that these animals will always
have access to this critical area
of protection.
And second, the property
will also be used by the South-
west Florida Water Management
District to treat stormwater
runoff that is now directly pol-
luting the entire ecosystem
around Crystal River. This will
be the most significant step to-
ward dealing with this pollu-
tion source in decades. We can
only hope that it starts a trend
of government and residents
opening their eyes to the dam-
age stormwater and fertilizer
have done to our waterways.
The purchase of the Three
Sisters Springs property is an
economic benchmark. People
already visit our area from
around the world for the op-
portunity to visit the Springs.
Under public ownership, the
springs are protected from res-
idential encroachment and the
ecotourism-dependent busi-
nesses know the asset will not
be destroyed.
Under management by the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
we are confident the property
will be cared for properly.
There will certainly be plenty
of discussion about the
specifics of the management
plan, but we know the property
will now be managed in the
name of the public.
The purchase of the springs
property is an educational op-
portunity for our citizens and
visitors. By creating an educa-
tion center, an observation
tower, nature walks and other
amenities, visitors will have
the opportunity to enjoy the
beauty of the area and view
manatees in their natural habitat
Many people, organizations
and businesses deserve spe-
cific recognition for their lead-
ership on this project. Lace
Blue-McLean and Andy Houston


shared the Chronicle's Citizen
of the Year honor in 2009 for
their leadership on this project.
Ms. McLean is the president of
the Friends of the Chassahow-
itzka National Wildlife Refuge
and Houston is the city man-
ager of Crystal River.
The effort would not have hap-
pened if Hal
SSUE: Flowers, the
head of the own-
nership of ership group,
rs Springs. hadn't been will-
ing to push for
PINION: public ownership.
Helen Spivey
omplished. and Pat Rose of
the Save the
Manatee Club and local veteri-
narian Dr. K.C. Nayfield played
important roles as did Lisa
VanDeBoe and her fundraising
efforts at the Stone Crab Jam.
Mayor Ron Kitchen and the
Crystal River City Council were
on board from the start, as was
the Citrus County Commission
and the county Tourism Devel-
opment Council. Michael Lusk,
manager of the wildlife pre-
serve, and the entire U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service made
Three Sisters the top priority in
the southeastern United States.
State Sen. Charlie Dean and
his staffer Kevin Sweeny
worked tirelessly to find solu-
tions for state funding.
The leadership at the South-
west Florida Water Management
District came up with $1.3 mil-
lion for the purchase. Eric Sut-
ton with the water district was
key. The Felburn Foundation,
the Conservation Fund, the Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge Associa-
tion and Jane's Trust all became
significant contributors.
There are folks many Citrus
County residents don't know who
really gave their all to make this
happen. Jim Green and David
Houghton with the Friends of
the Chassahowitzka National
Wildlife Refuge were key play-
ers. Elizabeth Souheaver, the
head of the Atlanta office of
U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the
one-time manager of the local
refuge, was terrific. John Beasley
of that office actually put off
his retirement so he could see
the project through. George
Willson and Ken Reecy were
extremely important advocates.
The Rotary Clubs in the
county and hundreds of indi-
viduals made significant con-
tributions. While the members
of the Inverness City Council
could not contribute city tax
dollars, they each opened their
personal wallets and made
contributions.
This was truly a time when
people from all walks of life
came together to do something
very important for our future.
And finally, Citrus County's
quiet volunteer lobbyist -
Gene McGee played a criti-
cal role in helping the funding
come together.
This effort of citizens, gov-
ernment, business and founda-
tions has significantly altered
the future of our county. We
can now, with pride, tell one
and all that we really are the
Nature Coast of Florida.


"The reward ofa thing well done is to have done it."
Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Essays: Second Series," 1836


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Is he really anti-business?


I
1:


Other VOICES


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
With the economy in the
doldrums, Republicans
are blaming President
Obama, saying that he hates
business and his policies stifle
capitalism. Obama's reliance on
government spending to bail out
the financial industry and the
automobile industry is hardly
anti-business. His policies have
worked to keep those sectors of
the economy afloat, and with
them the livelihoods of many
people.
However, a poll taken by the
centrist Democratic group,
Third Way, found that 52 percent
of those surveyed associate De-
mocrats with being anti-busi-
ness, and 58 percent say
Democrats believe government
is the solution to every problem.
To say that Obama "hates" busi-
ness is way overstated, but
clearly the president has an
image problem when it comes to
promoting confidence in his
policies in the corporate world
and among the small business
entrepreneurs that drive much
of the economy.
A fairer charge would be that
Obama doesn't understand busi-
ness, that he's never met a pay-
roll and that no one in the
highest reaches of his adminis-
tration is in touch with the needs
of business. That's all true, and
Obama would benefit from
bringing into his inner circle an
adviser or two with a nitty-gritty
perspective that goes to the
needs of real-life business peo-
ple instead of a theoretical Har-


vard Business School case study.
New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg comes to mind as
someone Obama should call if he
hasn't already Bloomberg's a bil-
lionaire, so he's not exactly rep-
resentative, but he can speak to
the leadership aspect of instill-
ing confidence in the business
community as government con-
tinues to steer the economy out
of the deepest recession the
country has experienced since
the 1930's. Obama believes he
has put the right policies in
place; now he has to convey
those policies with a strength of
conviction that can quiet the
doubts that have taken hold.
One thing we do know about
Obama is that he's extremely
bright, and that he's teachable.
He does not hold on to dogmatic
views because they're politically
correct. Indeed, he has shown so
much willingness to abandon po-
sitions that Democrats hold dear
that he has lost popularity with
liberals and progressives who
feel abandoned and taken for
granted. The argument in liberal
circles will never be resolved,
and that's whether the compro-
mises Obama made to pass
health care reform and financial
services reform were necessary,
or whether he caved to the oppo-
sition and gave away more than
he should.
Obama's style is very different
from his immediate predecessor,
George W. Bush, who asserted
himself and never left doubt
about where he stood. Obama


Il-- LETTERS to the Editor


Save King's Bay
I don't understand how we can
justify spending $10.5 million for
Three Sisters Springs when we
have King's Bay rotting in front
of our faces.
I'm a resident of Crystal River,
been here since the '60s. The bay
was as clear as a glass of drink-
ing water Our local leaders must
be either deaf, dumb or blind -
or maybe all three. Has anyone
seen the $40,000-plus "dredging
project" at Hunters Spring Park?
What a waste of time and money.
It looks the same now as it did
before. Of course, the city leaders
will say "at least we're trying."
Well, trying ain't good enough.
We need to hire the right person
to get it done right the first time.
There are old and broken sewer
lines, stormwater drainage pipes
dumping into our bay 24 hours a
day, and no one cares. We need
to restore King's Bay now. I'll bet
you a dollar to a doughnut that
in 40 years, Three Sisters
Springs will look like King's Bay
Come on, King's Bay property
owners and friends of Crystal
River: I'll buy the first 100 signs
saying "Help Us Restore King's
Bay" Who else is in?
Johnny McCormick
Crystal River

Poll clarification
Your July 12 online poll stated
the governor wants state legisla-
tors to ban offshore drilling.
It is my understanding that
Gov. Crist called a special session
of the state Legislature to debate
a constitutional amendment that
would ban drilling off the state's
coasts. Placing this amendment on


OPINIONS INVITED
8 The opinions expressed in Chronicle
editorials are the opinions of the
editorial board of the newspaper.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
U All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail.
We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
8 Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

the ballot would give the citizens
of Florida the opportunity to choose
whether or not they want offshore
drilling. The current bans on
drilling can be changed at the whim
of the Legislature. If restrictions
were written into the constitution,
it would make it much more dif-
ficult for politicians to change
the rules to suit other interests
than we the people of Florida.
Julia Steinwachs
Inverness

Stop spending
This letter is in response to the
Associated Press analysis by David
Espo in the July 18 Chronicle.
Mr. Espo indicated that after
the first 18 months in office, the
president's legislative initiatives
will be coming to an end. (Thank
God). Espo states that Republi-
cans "worked ceaselessly to
thwart the president's agenda."


The truth is that they didn't
work hard enough. They didn't
stop health care and they didn't
stop the equally reckless spend-
ing contained in the stimulus
package and the pork-laden
budget that was passed. Both
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi
and the president use the same
language when describing the
current crisis, i.e. "we inherited
it" and we are "digging our way
out" Rather than continue swal-
lowing these lies, let's take a
look at where Pelosi, Reid and
Obama were when the economy
went south.
Reid was in the Senate and in
2007 he became majority leader.
Pelosi was in the House and in
2007 became speaker Obama
was in the Senate and in 2009
became president The last
budget when Republicans con-
trolled both Congress and the
presidency was the 2007 budget
that had a $169 billion deficit
The 2008,2009 and 2010 budgets,
which were written and passed
by a Democrat-controlled Con-
gress, tripled the deficit each
year over the previous year, put-
ting it at well over $4 trillion.
While George W Bush is com-
plicit in running up the debt, he
sure didn't do it without a lot of
help form Pelosi, Reid and
Obama. The liberal economists
all are having difficulty figuring
our why the economy is not im-
proving. The answer is simple:
Neither the president nor Nancy
Pelosi understand the theory of
holes, which states that "once
you find yourself in one, stop
digging."
Dave Groff
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


likes to leave all options open, an
approach that invites questions
about what he really supports.
And unlike the last Democratic
president, Bill Clinton, Obama
doesn't easily empathize with
the voters. Clinton famously felt
everybody's pain whereas
Obama stands back and intellec-
tualizes problems, then puts a
plan in place and waits for it to
be assessed on merit.
His plans to revive the econ-
omy are working, but too slowly
for many Americans to feel a
positive impact. Business is lag-
ging when it comes to hiring be-
cause consumers aren't feeling
confident, and they're not buy-
ing. When the demand returns,
businesses will meet it, and in
the meantime Obama has to
keep doing what he's doing, and
that's highlighting the successes
of his policies, from a revived au-
tomobile industry to a newly en-
ergized advanced battery
business that will keep U.S. man-
ufacturers competitive with
China in the green jobs of the fu-
ture.
The president seems to be-
lieve he will be fine if all comes
out right in the end, but if this is
so, he not only needs help un-
derstanding business, he needs
help realizing that perception is
as important as reality.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


S
vr
F

P
ei










CuRt S COUNTY (FL) CIIRVNIcu COMMENTARY SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 CS


At 65, my theory is sort of like my hair


I started to begin this
writing by announcing
that today is Aug. 1,
2010, and it is my 65th birth-
day, but that isn't entirely
correct.
If everything goes accord-
ing to plan, this column will
be published on Aug. 1, 2010,
which will indeed be my
65th birthday, but today, the
day on which it is being
written, is July 7, 2010.
On Aug. 1, Cheryl and I
expect to be in Southamp-
ton, England, going through
the throes of disembarka-
tion from the Queen Victo-
ria after what we have every
reason to believe will have
been a delightful cruise
around the British Isles, in-
cluding stops in Ireland,
Scotland, England and with


a single port day in France.
Unfortunately, everything
has a price, and one of the
prices of enjoying a cruise is
going through the torment
of getting off of the boat!
Right now, at 9:40 a.m. on
July 7, 2010, as I've been
doing recently, I'm working
on preparing columns for
those weeks we will be away.
I've been lying in wait to write
a column about this particu-
lar birthday, and today seems
like a good day to do it
Stand steady for just a
moment while I air a com-
plaint which has been stuck
in my craw for the past sev-
eral years: When I entered
the workforce at age 17 in
1962, the government prom-
ised me that once I reached
age 65, it would begin to pay


me the Social Security
stipend to which I was enti-
tled. I didn't have any choice
about paying into the system,
but somewhere
along the way,
they increased my f
full retirement
age from 65 to 66. -,
They changed
the terms of the
contract without
even consulting
me. History I
records that in Fred B
1773, some folks A SL
in Boston
dumped a bunch OF I
of tea in a harbor
over something similar.
Of course, I should have
expected it. The only time I
ever put a political bumper
sticker on my car was back


in 1964. Even though I was-
n't old enough to vote, I
jumped on the "All the Way
with LBJ" bandwagon be-
cause he said he
wasn't going to
send American
boys to fight a
war in southeast
Asia but, by
mid-year 1965,
I'd received a
personal invita-
tion from the
rannen draft board.
LICE I remember a
lot of other birth-
LIFE days: I remem-
ber being 5 and
thinking how old my good
brother William was be-
cause he was already 8,
going on 9. I remember my
14th birthday, starting my


first year of high school and
being in absolute awe of all
those older women, the sen-
ior girls who were already
17 years old! I remember my
21st birthday and all of the
excitement which came
with knowing that in just a
few more weeks, my Cheryl
and I would be married.
But, now, the number has
crept right on up there. For
years I've held to the philos-
ophy that old people are
those who are at least 10
years older than me. I must
confess, at age 65, my theory
is sort of like my hair it's
beginning to wear thin.
Even so, I have much for
which to be thankful:
I still have all of my own
teeth at least the roots.
Most of 'em have now been


supplemented with artifi-
cial caps or crowns. I still
have all of my own joints -
no hip replacements, not
yet. My heart has been re-
paired and continues to
tick-tock away like a brand-
new clock My good brother
William is still older than
me. Finally, and of greatest
importance, even though we
will have to deal with the ag-
gravation of finding our
bags, getting to the airport
and flying for hours to get
home, Cheryl will be with
me to celebrate my birthday,
just as she has been for the
past 44 years.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


TAPES
Continued from Page Cl


CIA general counsel Scott Muller sat
down for a regular meeting with White
House lawyers in May 2004. Near the end
of the meeting, the conversation turned to
the growing scandal over photos of abuse
at the military's Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.
The question from National Security
Council lawyer John Bellinger was almost
offhand: The CIA isn't sitting on anything
explosive like the Abu Ghraib pictures,
right? Something
that, if leaked,
would create a
firestorm?
Right?
Wrong.
David Adding-
ton, a former CIA
lawyer who was 9 ?
Vice President
Dick Cheney's
legal counsel, was
stunned when he
heard about the
videos, officials
said. Why had the
agency made the
tapes in the first .
place, he asked?
But he told Muller
not to destroy
them, and
Bellinger and
White House coun- This undated handol
sel Alberto Gonza- the CIA, shows Jose I
les agreed,
according to CIA documents and inter-
views with former officials familiar with
the meeting.
That was the standing order for more
than a year. When Muller left the agency
that July, John Rizzo became acting CIA
general counsel. In early 2005, Rizzo re-
ceived a similar order from the new White
House counsel, Harriet Miers. The CIA
wouldn't destroy the tapes without check-
ing with the White House first.
All the while, courts and lawmakers
were unknowingly coming close to the
tapes, but the CIA always was a technical-
ity away from having to reveal their exis-
tence:
In early May 2003, U.S. District Judge
Leonie M. Brinkema told the CIA to reveal
whether there were interrogation videos
of any witnesses relevant to the case of
Zacarias Moussaoui, who was charged as
a Sept. 11 conspirator. But that order did-
n't cover Zubaydah, who Brinkema ruled
was immaterial to the Moussaoui case, so
the CIA didn't acknowledge the existence
of his interrogation tape.
H A judge in Washington told the agency
to safeguard all evidence related to mis-
treatment of detainees at Guantanamo
Bay But Zubaydah and al-Nashiri were
held overseas at the time.
A judge in New York told the CIA to
search its investigative files for records
such as the tapes as part of a Freedom of
Information Act suit. But the CIA consid-
ered the tapes part of its operational files
and did not disclose their existence to the
court.
The Sept. 11 commission asked for
broad ranges of documents, but never is-
sued a formal subpoena that would have
required the agency to turn over the tapes.

Despite the standing orders from the
White House not to destroy the tapes with-
out checking with Bush officials, momen-
tum for their destruction grew again in
late 2005 as the CIA Thailand station chief,
Mike Winograd, prepared to retire.
Winograd had the tapes in his safe and
believed they should be destroyed, officials
said. Back at Langley, Rodriguez and his
chief of staff, whom the AP is not identifying
because she remains undercover, agreed.
Winograd, who has been publicly iden-
tified as a retired CIA officer but has not
been previously named in connection with
the tapes case, did not return several mes-
sages seeking comment.
On Nov. 4,2005, as the CIA scrambled to
quell a controversy from a Washington Post
story revealing the existence of the secret
prisons, Rodriguez called two CIA lawyers.
To Steven Hermes, his lawyer in the
clandestine service, Rodriguez asked
whether he had the authority to order the
tapes destroyed. Hermes said Rodriguez
did, according to documents and inter-
views.
Then Rodriguez asked Robert Eatinger,
the top lawyer in the CIA's Counterterror-
ism Center, whether there was any legal
requirement that the tapes be kept.
Eatinger said no.


Both Eatinger and Hermes remain with
the agency and were not available to be in-
terviewed. Both have told colleagues they
believed Rodriguez was merely teeing up
a new round of discussions about the tapes
and, because of previous orders not to de-
stroy them without White House approval,
they were unaware that Rodriguez
planned to move immediately, officials
told the AP
Relying on the advice from Hermes and
Eatinger, Rodriguez told Winograd to write
an official request to destroy the videos.
On Nov. 5, the request came in. Its justifi-
cation: The inspector general had com-
pleted its investigation and McPherson
had verified that
the cables accu-
rately summarized
the tapes.
On Nov. 8, Ro-
driguez sent his ap-
proval.
He and his chief
of staff were the
only names on the
.cable. Had he sent
a copy also to the
CIA lawyers -
Rizzo, Hermes or
Eatinge-r or even
to CIA Director
Porter Goss, any of
them could have
intervened.
But no one did.
"Before Jose did
what he did, he
Associated Press was confident it
t'phO to, ovided by was legal, that
di he. g.rovded ry there was no im-
pediment to him
doing it," his lawyer, Robert Bennett told
the AP "And he always acted in the best in-
terest of the U.S. and its people."
It took about 3 1/2 hours to destroy the
tapes. On Nov. 9, Winograd informed Ro-
driguez the job was complete. Goss and
Rizzo wouldn't find out until the next day.

It was clear almost immediately that
there would be repercussions.
The next day, a senior CIA officer -
whom the AP is identifying only as John
because he is still with the agency wrote
a pair of e-mails to his boss, Kyle "Dusty"
Foggo, the agency's No. 3 official. Those e-
mails provide the most complete account
available of the fallout from the destruc-
tion within the CIA.
Rizzo was angry, and when he called
Miers at the White House, Bush's counsel
was livid. Goss agreed with the decision to
destroy the tapes, John wrote, but pre-
dicted he'd get criticized for it.
"As Jose said, the heat from destroying
is nothing compared to what it would be if
the tapes ever got into public domain-- he
said out of context, they would make us
look terrible; it would be devastating to
us," John's e-mail reads.
Such statements could be used as evi-
dence if prosecutor John Durham, who is
heading the Justice Department's investi-
gation, seeks charges in the case. Even if
Rodriguez genuinely worried about the
safety of his officers and wasn't trying to
obstruct an investigation, if he feared the
tapes might someday be made public
through Congress or the courts, that could
be enough to violate the Sarbanes-Oxley
obstruction law.
Nationwide, prosecutors have brought
such a case only about a half dozen times.
Durham has done it twice.
As the case winds down, McPherson, the
same man who had reviewed the tapes in
2003, has again taken a central role.
McPherson has received immunity in ex-
change for his cooperation with prosecu-
tors, an unusual protection for a
government lawyer.
It's not clear what information he is pro-
viding, but he has intimate knowledge of
the tapes, and as the CIAs former litiga-
tion chief, he probably would know
whether destroying them was an effort to
obstruct any of the agency's court cases.
CIA spokesman George Little said the
agency is cooperating with the investiga-
tion.
"This event occurred nearly five years
ago and most of the details have been on
the public record for some time," he said.
Rodriguez is assailed by those who see
him as the key figure in a cover-up. He is
hailed by many current and former col-
leagues as a hero who protected his offi-
cers' identities. After leaving the agency,
he became senior vice president of CIA
contractor Edge Consulting, a job that
gives him access to the national intelli-
gence director's office and Langley.
With the investigation still hanging over
him, Rodriguez has yet to receive an offi-
cial retirement party.


Kennedy is a 'doer'
I have known Thomas Kennedy for 13
years as the public accountant for his
business, and I have gotten to know him
personally. Thomas Kennedy is an intelli-
gent and fiscally prudent "doer" and
leader who commits himself to achieve-
ment. Having served as a volunteer in
leadership positions for various organiza-
tions, including being the past treasurer
of the Citrus County Academy of Environ-
mental Science, I appreciate those who
enthusiastically and proactively get in-
volved to successfully achieve goals. Mr.
Kennedy is such a person. He has served
for the past five years voluntarily as the
chairperson on a school advisory council
that brought together a coalition of inter-
ests with the results that the school he
represented out-performed in all five cat-
egories that were evaluated. He has also
demonstrated a strong interest and abil-
ity to keep informed about national and
state legislative issues that will impact
the Citrus County school system now and
the future ramifications they may have -
no small task I am sure, if elected as Dis-
trict I's school board member, he will
make a full-time commitment on behalf
of our children and the Citrus County
School Department's future by address-
ing now the challenges to be faced in the
coming years. From my experience in
working with him, he will advocate for
cost- effective policy and procedures to
achieve the best results. Vote Thomas
Kennedy School Board District I.
Thomas E. Leahy
Beverly Hills

Thrumston for commission
Of all of the Citrus County commission-
ers who are currently serving in office, I
believe that John Thrumston is one who
has said what he would do and done
what he has said, regardless of the politi-
cal correctness. During his first two years
when he was out-voted time and again by
commissioners who ultimately were fired
by the electorate during the last election,
Thrumston stuck by his guns voting
against bad budgets and reckless spend-
ing time and again. Then he took a lead-
ership position at a regional level in the
Tampa Bay Regional Transportation Au-
thority that other commissioners said
was a waste of time. The result was that
Citrus County got more than $10 million
in state transportation money to fix our
roads. As a result of Thrumston's re-
gional work, we have also been invited
and have joined the Tampa Bay Partner-
ship and have representation through
Commissioner Meek that is according to
Executive Director John Seifert of the
Citrus County Economic Development
Council "paying big dividends in return
for the small investment we have made."


Volunteer 'jobs'
There was a call-in by someone who
disagreed with a previous caller who said
volunteers in hospitals were taking away
paying jobs. There was a nationwide TV
media study several months ago giving
average hospital profit margins
over costs. In New York, it was
over 300 percent, Pennsylvania
over 200 percent, and various
other states, 100 percent and
well over. Only the state of
Delaware has a cap on hospital
profits, between 20 and 21 per-
cent. I think, considering the
profit margins hospitals make,
they can afford to hire more CAL
help. Hospitals are businesses 563
that pay dividends to stockhold- U "U
ers. Volunteers mean well, but
they are depriving people of jobs.
Incentive to share
In response to "No incentive" in the
July 26 Sound Off. If "No incentive"
would call in a list of places that are ac-
tually hiring, that would be much more
helpful than to put down everyone stuck
with no job.
Split the costs
I see where in the past month, there
have been a number of call-ins and a let-
ter suggesting churches and synagogues
be taxed. If you want religious buildings
taxed, what about social or fraternal or-
ganizations? If the state and county need
money that badly, let's share the burden
equally.


I


We finally have a commission that is vot-
ing 5-0 on many issues that are moving us
forward instead of the in-fighting that
used to go on. Much of this is due to
Thrumston's leadership and logical, well-
informed input into the process. So I say,
let's keep Thrumston and continue to
move Citrus County forward.
Doug Lobel
Inverness

Jason Sager for Congress
I've been seeking to have a congres-
sional representative with the same val-
ues as I have. Honor, discipline, family
values and a desire to leave a better
America when I depart this Earth. For
my children and grandchildren, I want
the greatest generation to be ahead, not
already past After speaking to Jason
Sager and reviewing his platform, I have
confirmed that Jason is that person. The
first item in his platform is: "Uphold the
Constitution." After serving in the Navy,
he tried to find a college that would teach
history and law as provided under the
Constitution, but most elite liberal col-
leges today teach court case law and
precedence the cases set. These cases
are used to create a "Living Constitution"
that is a 2,700-page document, or as I
view it, a "perverted Constitution." So
Jason, like Abraham.Lincoln, through
hours of research, taught himself the
Constitution and now conducts classes in
Constitutional Law.
Meanwhile, our elected representa-
tives use the perverted Constitution to
ever increase their power over we the
people. The executive branch has even
negated Congress's power, as in the ex-
ample of appointing Dr Donald Berwick
the Czar of the new ObamaCare law
when Congress was not in session. What
arrogance from our current leader. You
would expect that only a dictator would
use such a misuse of power to bypass
Congress in total disregard for the origi-
nal Constitution.
Jason has a desire to represent the
people according to the founding Consti-
tution. He wants his 4-year-old son to
have a better tomorrow. He does lack the
backing of special interest groups. He
hasn't been promoted for past favors. He
hasn't been in politics or even been a
community organizer.
His extensive platform is long to enu-
merate here, but is listed on his website,
Standwithsager.com. Included is: Stop
the spending; enforce immigration law;
defend the second amendment; no
bailout no stimulus; Term limits.
If this platform represents your values
and you want to stop the erosion of Amer-
ica, vote for Jason Sager.
Ron Lundberg
Beverly Hills


Church money
Questioning the caller who says that for
every 25 people in Inverness, there's a church
and they don't pay taxes. He ought to go
to church one of these days and see where
the money goes. They help poor people in
Inverness, they help poor people
JND in Florida, around the world. A lot
WN of the churches' money goes all
f over the world, does a lot of wonderful
things for a lot of people who are
S down and out. Go investigate what
the churches do with their money.
Nuts to squirrels
Is there some way that we can
get rid of these nasty squirrels?
0579 They just started tearing all my
S5 79 branches down from my trees,
the leaves and that, just to make
a nice big nest. And then they eat your
wires on your car and they eat your wires
on your barn. How do we get rid of these
rats? That's what they are. They're not
squirrels; they're rats. Rats, rats, rats. Let's
get rid of them. They multiply and multiply.
Zucchini patch
This is in response to "Pumpkin patch:"
who said pumpkins froze last winter. Try
zucchini. The zucchini bread tastes just as
good as pumpkin bread, if not better.
Works out quite well.
Republican initiative
I'm calling in regards to the Sound Off
"Bailout joke." I just wanted to point out
that it wasn't Obama who attempted to
cancel unemployment; it was Republicans.


Endorsement LETTERS


CITRUS COUNTY' (FL) CIIRONICI.E


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGUST i, 2010 C3


I!

I
L


R














Tea partiers to triumph in November


At the height of the
housing bubble, it
could have been said
of the American public that
they were fat, dumb and
happy. Everyone had a job.
Interest rates were low.
Homeowners felt wealthy as
they watched neighboring
homes sell for ever-higher
prices, raising the value of
their own. Americans
elected a Democratic Con-
gress to rid themselves of
corrupt big-spending Re-
publicans. All seemed well.
Not so much anymore.
When the housing bubble
burst, it took down the
banks and brokerage
houses with it. Credit froze
up worldwide. More than
$10 trillion of wealth van-
ished into thin air in a mat-
ter of less than a year.
Homes, boats, cars, pen-
sions the value of every
asset owned by the public -
plummeted. Consumer de-


mand disappeared as peo-
ple saved what they could.
Businesses were forced to
close or cut back. Unem-
ployment soared.
The Democrats who
promised to "drain the
swamp" turned out to be
themselves creatures of the
swamp looking to expand it
rather than drain it. Still
hoping for relief from the
economic crisis, Americans
elected a man to the presi-
dency who promised to cut
the waste in government
and bring the Congress to-
gether in a transparent non-
partisan fashion to save the
public. He promised an end
to divisive politics and a
post-racial presidency.
That hasn't worked out
well. This president has, for
political purposes, at-
tempted to divide us by
race, gender and wealth
into competing special in-
terest groups. Racial rela-


tions are, if anything, worse
than before his presidency.
His political agenda en-
courages class warfare.
Rather than eliminate
wasteful spending, he
signed into law a so-called
stimulus pack-
age of $862 bil-
lion that
contained bil-
lions of dollars
worth of useless
earmarks and
paybacks to
unions and his
supporters. Fully
$270 billion went Dr. Willia
to states to help
them save the OTI
jobs of their VOI0
unionized public
employees and teachers
and to fund their Medicaid
obligations.
This president bailed out
and took control of two of
our three major automak-
ers. He paid off their unions


I
a

I


while ripping off the bond-
holders. He hired a czar to
tell private banks what they
could pay their employees.
Then he passed regulations
to control the financial in-
dustry at large. The health
care bill he
signed put the
federal govern-
ment in control
of virtually every
aspect of health
care from train-
ing to delivery.
Both the finan-
cial bill and the
rm Dixon health care bill
very specifically
oER require affirma-
CES tive action for
minorities and
women in support of his
agenda.
Today, as a result of the
recession and the Demo-
cratic takeover of Congress,
one could describe the
American public as still fat,


not so dumb and definitely
not happy!
We've gotten a good look
at what Democratic control
of the presidency and both
houses of Congress means:
Wasteful spending on politi-
cal allies and favored social
welfare programs; wealth
redistribution through job-
killing taxes; bigger govern-
ment with more control over
our lives and an explosion
of the national debt.
According to a recent poll,
70 percent of us don't like it.
We are concerned, for the
very first time, for the via-
bility of our nation both eco-
nomically and politically
We have concerns that all
that made America the
greatest nation of all time
will be lost in the headlong
rush toward the dreary so-
cialism of Western Europe.
We worry that our grand-
children will be impover-
ished by the debt we are


creating.
The tea party movement
is resisting these excesses of
government. Though they
number just 25 percent of
voters, they are passionate
about smaller government
and their constitutional
freedoms. The first major
battle of this ideological war
will be in November.

William Dixon is a gradu-
ate of Columbia University
New York Medical College
and the USF College of
Business Administration.
He was an assistant profes-
sor of surgery at the Uni-
versity of Georgia before
entering private practice.
He served 11 years in the
Army as a surgeon and as a
Special Forces Officer,
achieving the rank of Lieu-
tenant Colonel. Dr Dixon
can be reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo. com.


Accountability, not anger, driving dispute


VICKIE LAMARCHE
Special to the Chronicle
he editorial that appeared on
July 29 in the Citrus County
Chronicle, "Lawyers are not
helping to resolve dispute," has infor-
mation that could potentially mis-
guide and misinform the public.
This editorial first gives the impres-
sion that the lawyers have no incen-
tive to resolve the issue between the
corporate Foundation and the Citrus
County Hospital Board. I cannot speak
for the corporate Foundation's attor-
ney, but rest assured as I sit in my of-
fice next to the entrance of the law
office of Grant & Samargya, there is a
continuous steady stream of traffic.
Obviously, it is a law firm doing very
well irrespective of its involvement
with the Citrus County Hospital Board.
I would suggest that this is why the Cit-
rus County Hospital Board of Trustees
hired Bill Grant in the first place.
Saying that both sides have "pre-
conditions" prior to meeting is a myth.
The Citrus County Hospital Board
does not have any preconditions upon
which it refuses to meet with the cor-
porate Foundation. The corporate
Foundation on the other hand insists
that monies, already paid, be paid
once again before any mediation or
conversation between the two boards
can occur. This parody of needing
money, in my opinion, flies into the
face of logic when almost $100,000 has
been spent on and continues to be
spent on an expensive communica-
tions firm used solely to unrealisti-
cally spin the truth to favor the


corporate Foundation Board mem-
bers. In addition, the corporate Foun-
dation has spent at least 75 percent
more on legal fees and legal maneu-
vering than the Citrus County Hospital
Board of Trustees even contemplates.
Currently, the Foundation has been
overpaid by the Trustees approxi-
mately $3.8 million. As has been
stated in previous articles, there is no
significant funding amount outstand-
ing, so to that end the Board of
Trustees will not "pay up" before sit-
ting down and meeting with the cor-
porate Foundation. The Trustees
agree to meet and discuss all of the is-
sues with no preconditions by either
side. A demand to receive money that
is unaccounted for out of the taxpay-
ers' coffer before agreeing to a meet-
ing reeks of bad taste and sets a
continual stage for ill will.
There have been many articles ex-
pressing "Trustees please meet with
us" as if the Citrus County Hospital
Board is the reason for the holdup. It
should not cost anything to have a dis-
cussion. What harm could it do? This
continued refusal to meet with the
Hospital Board and the continued
preconditions merely cost the taxpay-
ers more money. If the corporate
Foundation wants to save money then
schedule this meeting and attempt to
resolve issues, albeit, one issue at a
time if necessary.
The fact that the Citrus County Hos-
pital Board has finalized its Charity
Care Policy should come as no sur-
prise to the corporate Foundation.
The corporate Foundation knew about
the upcoming charity care policy


based on the 2009 resolution that
clearly states that the charity care pol-
icy would be defined and decided
upon by the Citrus County Hospital
Board of Trustees. The corporate
Foundation has been repeatedly ad-
vised that the Citrus County Hospital
Board was preparing its Charity Care
Policy and that any monies advanced
to the corporate Foundation would be
reconciled upon the completion of the
Citrus County Hospital Board Charity
Care policy. The transcripts of meeting
reflect this motion on a regular basis.
I have to admit that I am continually
bothered when I see the word "anger"
constantly used to discuss accounta-
bility. To continually give rise to the
suggestion that "anger" is what is fu-
eling this dispute is merely a desper-
ate attempt to point fingers. These are
real issues dealing with real people
who need our compassion and con-
cern. Any other description shows a
complete lack of knowledge and per-
spective of the true issues at hand.
As I continue to work to support the
efforts of the Citrus County Hospital
Board and the citizens of Citrus
County, one thing I do know is that the
Trustees will not abandon its position
to insert oversight into what I believe
is a runaway corporate Foundation
beleaguered by continued misman-
agement and a corporate Foundation
that has grown accustomed to feeding
upon the generosity of the Citrus
County taxpayer.

Vickie LaMarche is executive of
the Citrus County Hospital Board.


Keep our cops
I see where someone wrote in suggesting cutting
back law enforcement officers because of budgetary
shortfalls. When the economy is bad and there are no
jobs, crime always goes up. Some people will not do
without and if it means climbing in your window to fill
their wallets, that's exactly what they'll do, or grab
someone's handbag or steal your car. Also, law en-
forcement cars parked along the highway are not nap-
time. They're waiting and watching for traffic violators.
I hardly think this is the time to cut
0 IUND law enforcement officers.
Great Depression 2.0
rFF People, whether you know it or
not, this is not a recession; this is
a great depression. People are
standing in food lines, people are
losing their homes, people can't
find work, and children are going
CAL hungry at night. It is very bad out
56O 0579 here. My mother talked about the
563 0 5 u Great Depression years and years
ago back in 1920s and '30s. Well,
this is a great depression now. There are children with-
out clothes or food. Unemployment's at an all-time high.
Obama needs to do something about this. Somebody
needs to do something about it. It's bad; it's real bad out
here. You can't get a job, you can't buy a job, you can't
do nothing. Something needs to be done for this country
and the people. We're worse than a third-world country.
People (are) living in campers and people (are) living
out in the streets and in tents. It's a great depression.
Clubs for critters
Considering all the social and fraternal organiza-
tions in Citrus County the Moose, Elks, Lions, Ma-
sons, Rotary Club, Knights of Columbus and various
veterans organizations it would be a wonderful ges-
ture on their part if one or more of them ran a benefit
for the Citrus County Animal Shelter. With the horrific
economy the past two or three years, people have
been surrendering pets in droves to that shelter. Dona-
tions must be at rock bottom, and it costs money to
feed the animals. Also, the staff is kept to a bare mini-
mum. Salaries must be paid, and utilities.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

After county residents saved
the land, it was eventually sold to
the state of Florida and turned
into the state wildlife park we
know today. What you may not
know is that our own state park is
one of the most popular in
Florida and one of the best in the
nation.


And it could have been a con-
dominium project where the
springs were the "play toy" for
just a few wealthy people.
My potential depression turned
into joy as people from all walks
of life came together to save this
little plot of land. I realize there
are some folks in Beverly Hills or
Inverness who might be asking,
"What's in it for me?"
It's called the future.
I have never been to the Grand
Canyon, but I'm darned glad the


Grand Canyon National Park was
created and it wasn't turned into
a condominium project with a
miniature golf course.
While lots of private dollars
were used to save Three Sisters,
it took the effort of government to
pull together the most significant
financial contributions.
Trust me, the Three Sisters
Springs national wildlife park
will become one of the most pop-
ular and treasured sites in our


entire nation.


And the joy we


should all feel is that it is in our
backyard and we fought to save it.
And we won.
Citrus County has a legacy of
standing up and fighting for the
right thing at the right time. We
did it at the Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park and we did it
again at Three Sisters Springs in
Crystal River.
That gives me confidence that
we are capable of doing good
things. And people who are capa-
ble of doing good things can solve


any problem that comes their
way.
Over the years I have taken
each of my three sisters Mary,
Terri and Jeannine to swim at
our Three Sisters. My three sis-
ters love our Three Sisters.
It's a very special place and
now it belongs to all of us.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of
the Chronicle. His e-mail address is
gmulligan@chronicleonline. com.


OTTAWA
Continued from Page C1

We fully expect part of the cost to be
granted, but DOT has not yet officially no-
tified us.
When Ottawa was purchased, the proj-
ect was funded with $1.5 million of gas tax
and impact fee revenue, not property taxes.
The remainder of the purchase price of
$2.9 million was derived from gas tax re-
serves. The county purchase of this prop-
erty also included drainage facilities and
16 additional individual lot purchases for
the expansion of the right of way In addi-
tion, a traffic light has been installed at the
intersection of Ottawa and County Road
486 and intersection improvements have
been planned which include turning lanes.
As required by county ordinance, there
were two independent appraisals com-
pleted, and the purchase price was estab-
lished by fair market value from these
appraisals. Upon recommendation from
the staff, the Board of County Commis-
sioners unanimously supported this op-
tion to be the lowest cost of the three
alternatives that were presented to
achieve our transportation needs.
Since the adoption of the Citrus County
Comprehensive Plan in 1989, growth has
been directed to the central area of the
county and away from the sensitive lands
on both the eastern and western parts of
the county. To ensure the needs of our
comprehensive plan, it is the county gov-
ernment's responsibility to provide ade-
quate transportation corridors to
accommodate the anticipated growth.
With the current restrictions on the traf-
fic counts on County Road 491, the devel-
opment planned along it and the potential
for growth of the medical corridor, ade-
quate transportation infrastructure in this


area is essential.
Ottawa Avenue will provide concur-
rency for that roadway. It was constructed
to county standards by the developer but
was privately owned and maintained. Be-
cause this was a private road, the devel-
oper and the other 15 property owners did
have the option to eliminate access by the
general public.
It is also important to look at alterna-
tives to constructing the Ottawa connector.
To four-lane County Road 491 would cost
an estimated $17.07 million. To four-lane
Croft would cost an estimated $17.78 mil-
lion. Given that, the total cost of $4.32 mil-
lion in adding the Ottawa Avenue
connection speaks for itself. It is very plain
which traffic reliever makes sense for the
taxpayers. It made sense almost three
years ago and today's economics make it
even that much more the best choice.
One of the primary goals of local gov-
ernment is to plan for future growth and
take the necessary steps to ensure there is
the needed infrastructure to maintain ad-
equate transportation capacity. It is my
firm belief that the unanimous decision to
acquire Ottawa was a wise investment by
the Board of County Commissioners to
provide an additional public transporta-
tion corridor within the center of the
county that will provide long-term benefits
to our community.
The fact is we would have been negli-
gent in our responsibility to provide ade-
quate road infrastructure if we let the
opportunity go by the wayside. In planning
for roads, if you wait until congestion de-
mands immediate relief, you are too late.
Road projects take years to plan and con-
struct, and I believe the board made the
correct decision to plan for the future
transportation needs of our community.

Brad Thorpe is Citrus County administrator


FCAT
Continued from Page C1

As a school board member, I suspected
the day would eventually come when our
students would fail to make adequate
progress after the bar was raised impossi-
bly high or that they would hit a saturation
point where students were achieving at
their maximum level
and could not better It's time to
themselves year after
year even though tests in tI
that is the expectation.
I am not one who is place, as j
in favor of setting
lower goals or elimi- a number o
nating accountability that define
for student learning.
Quite the opposite. We achieve
have seen steady in-
creases in student per- with demo
formance as a result.
But I am also realistic Of problem
about the wide range of leadership
individual students'
abilities and not a big and a p
fan of a punishment
that far exceeds the for lea
crime. For instance,
when a school fails to demonstrate ade-
quate learning gains for even one subset
of students (based on race, poverty, speak-
ers of other languages or a disability)
every student at the school is entitled to
transfer to another school and every stu-
dent is entitled to free after-school tutor-
ing- paid for with school district funds -
regardless of how that student scored on
the test. Does this make sense?
Making decisions with dire conse-
quences based on only one test is what's
fundamentally wrong with FCAT, espe-
cially when there are questions about the


0



)
1

i1

A

'1
I




1
a


validly or reliability of results. This is what
teachers have been saying all along.
And even worse, what we have lost with
the emphasis on FCAT is an emphasis on
creativity and problem solving in our cur-
riculum. Not enough time to spend on de-
sign and debate, invention or unique
ideas. Public education policy is in a stan-
dards-obsessed mindset, desperate for our
students to be competitive with students
from South Korea, China or Sweden on
standardized tests.
put these After putting all of
our eggs in one basket,
ieir proper it is only fitting that we
would be faced with
ust one of the prospect of 1.8 mil-
lion invalid or suspect
if indicators results leading to
a student's the question of: Now
what?
ent, along It's time to put these
tests in their proper
nstrations place, as just one of a
ing number of indicators
n solving, that define a student's
creativity, achievement, along
with demonstrations of
passion problem solving, lead-
ership, creativity, and a
rning. passion for learning
what interests the stu-
dent most Without this, we will continue
to slip in our ability to lead the world with
solutions to real problems, new inven-
tions, improvement to quality of life and
innovations for which we have always
been known.
We need to put good old American inge-
nuity the hallmark of our success -
back at the head of the class where it be-
longs.

Pat Deutschman is chairwoman of the
Citrus County School Board.


C4 SUNDAY, AU(;UST 1, 2010


COMMENTARY


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CirRus CouNlv (FL) CHRONICLE COMMENTARY SLNUM, Acxusi 1, 2010 C5


Hot Corner: SHERIFF'S BUDGET


Money well deserved
All these Sound Offs about the
sheriff's budget. Why in the world
would you want to cut back our
sheriff's department? Who do you
call when you need help? Who is
watching over you? These men
put their lives on the line, as
we've seen recently. I know it's
rare, but it does happen. Pick
something else. Do not touch the
sheriff's budget. We need these
men and women. They have given
up their lives for us; they are
ready to. Please, people. Just
calm down.
Don't touch budget
The sheriff's office has cut mil-
lions out of their budget. If they
had ways to cut, we would.
Budget cuts don't need to be
made in the services end of gov-
ernment, fire, EMS and law en-
forcement. The county has a
large population of elderly
adults. Who is going to come to
their rescue when there aren't
enough ambulances to cover the
county? All is well unless it's your
house burning down because
they had to cut funding to the fire
departments. Who do you think
'is going to respond to your house
in the middle of the night when
you're getting broken into?
Wouldn't you feel safer knowing
there are enough men and
women working on any given shift
that they can protect you?
Amendment 1 has had a devas-
tating effect on revenues for this
county. People paying lower prop-
erty taxes are putting the county
in a bind. The sheriff's office
can't take another cut out of
their budget. They're running
bare minimum now. Next it will
be jobs. With fewer deputies
working, this county will be less
safe. There's drugs, gangs and
burglars.


I'm
budg
cut a
to be
public
Instead
spons
tinns.


Save our safety the sheriff's office has, where the tives, easily? Please share with us
county commissioners and stuff, this information so we all can
i calling about the sheriff's they keep getting their bonuses and make a proper judgment.
et. If the budget needs to be their raises and everything every No cars
ny more and deputies need year where the deputies are not. No car
cut off the street ... then They have sucked it up and stayed If the sheriff's department wants
c safety's going to go down. with the same amount of money to trim money from the budget, it
ad of two to three-minute re- the entire time. should not allow deputies to take
se time to life-or-death situa- their vehicles home at night. It
it will hbe 1 15 minutes The Who knows? .. --


sheriff's deputies will have to cut
back on different things that they
actually use, as being they won't
be able to respond to as many
calls as they go to and everything
of that nature. And as for the
budget, we've cut back every sin-
gle year for the past three years,


would save a lot d


.1 .. -. ... . -. -.. .. j ...
This is in response to the Hot cut down on gas expenditures.
Corner item, "More with less." I
don't know if Sheriff Dawsy's Short already
budget is right or wrong, but I This is in reference to Sheriff
don't think the person who called Dawsy's budget. I hope one day
this in knows, either. How did you these people that are in the
determine that we could do away Sound Off, or everybody calling
with 10 deputies and five detec- the Sound Off, need the sheriff's


office after he cuts the budget
and has to fire people. And I
hope, I really do hope, that we're
not available to get there as fast
as we can. And in reference to
auctioning off the sheriff's toys: I
hope that the person breaks into
their house and we don't catch
them because, you know, we're
shorthanded and we don't have
the chopper to get up and find
people and then everything gets
stolen and, you know, it's some-
thing sentimental and they never
get it back because everybody
thought that we needed to cut the
budget when we're already short.
Bigwig sacrifice
We don't agree with cutting the
sheriff's budget or laying off
county workers. We have crazies
on our roads and neighborhoods
and we need protection. Losing
county workers will cut our serv-
ices. Why not have the bigwigs
bring their salaries back to 2004
levels and discontinue all perks?
Wasting money
In reference to the Sound Off
item, "Budget blame." This lady
calls in and says we should blame
the county commissioners for
giving Sheriff Dawsy too much
money for his budget. Well, I think
she is wrong because if they gave
him too much money, he should
have enough common sense not
to spend that money, not to give
it in bonuses and raises, but to
return that money to the county.
He should take care of the peo-
ple of the county and consider
them first, which he's not doing.
All he does is waste money and
he thinks that Citrus County and
Inverness is maybe Tampa or
Palm Harbor or Miami, which it's
not. It's a little old county. Wast-
ing this kind of money is totally
ridiculous and the people should
remember that come election time.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, AUGus'T 1, 2010 C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE







HACKER HEA


JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -
Think of it as one more rea-
son not to write checks.
Hackers believed to be
operating out of Russia have
figured out a high-tech way
to carry out the decidedly
low-tech crime of check
fraud, a computer security
company says writing at
least $9 million in fakes
against more than 1,200 le-
gitimate accounts.
But these hackers got the
account information in an
unusual way:
They broke into M THE SCA
three websites ers have
that specialize out a hig
in a little- to carry
known type of low-tech
business check fra
archiving THE HA(
check images group ha
online, at least
Check coun- in county
terfeiting is a checks a
crime that more tha
savvy Internet accounts
criminals usu- data the'
ally pass up. breaking
After all, it's far sites tha
easier for them check imr
to make money line, accc
by stealing SecureW
credit cards a compu
and online rity comic
banking pass- CRAFTIN
words. TERFEIT
The scam criminals
was discovered bank rou
by Secure- bers, nar
Works Inc., an address
Atlanta com- natures (
puter security mate acc
company. The holders.
organization the infor
says it is work- create th
ing with the checks u
FBI and says to-acquit
the hackers and prin
have not been
caught
Retailers and other busi-
nesses use the sites to store
records of all the checks
they write. Check-cashing
operations use them to sock
away images of checks they
receive. And some banks
pay them to store images of
customers' checks, so the
customers can see them
when they log in to their on-
line banking accounts.
The criminals down-
loaded all the images they
could find, grabbing bank
routing numbers, names
and addresses and even sig-
natures of legitimate ac-
count holders. They used
the information to create
their own checks using easy-


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to-acquire software and
printers.
Because all the account
information is real and the
victims don't know their ac-
counts have been compro-
mised, the odds of the
checks going through are
high.
SecureWorks notified the
three sites and said they
have closed their security
holes, but warned that the
scam is ongoing and target-
ing other, similar sites.
"It's not the standard kind
of criminal operation," Joe
Stewart, direc-
tor of malware
M: Hack- research for Se-
figured cureWorks'
h-tech way Counter Threat
out the Unit, told The
crime of Associated
ud. Press ahead of
K: One the report's
s written scheduled re-
'9 million lease Wednes-
.rfeit day.
against "Check coun-
n 1,200 terfeiting is
,using kind of old
got by school, but
into web- these guys have
t archive figured out how
ages on- to make it
trding to highly auto-
orks Inc., mated," he said.
ter secu- "They can get
:any. all this data and
IG COUN- use that to write
S: The counterfeit
grabbed checks all day
ting num- long."
nes and The research
s and sig- was being re-
rf legiti- leased in con-
:ount junction with
They used the Black Hat
nation to computer secu-
eir own rity conference
sing easy- in Las Vegas,
e software this past week
ters. and which
draws security
professionals
from around the world to
hear about the latest vul-
nerabilities and attacks and
ways to thwart criminals.
Notable presentations
this year included a demon-
stration of how to break into
widely used ATMs, a talk
that was pulled last year by
the researcher's employer
after complaints from the
ATM maker. Researchers
were also expected to dis-
cuss vulnerabilities in smart
phones and in the technol-
ogy used to secure online
transactions.
A consistent theme at
Black Hat, and at the re-
lated DefCon conference
this weekend in Las Vegas,




0


Associated Press
Joe Stewart, director of malware research for SecureWorks, which manages security infor-
mation systems for corporations worldwide, is pictured with servers in the company's At-
lanta office. The company discovered that hackers had stolen checking account numbers
and signatures from websites that store check images for customers to view online.


is that most Internet crimi-
nals are now motivated by
money rather than mayhem.
And they're getting more
clever in their approaches
as banks and other valuable
targets tighten their secu-
rity, as SecureWorks' three-
month investigation into the
check-counterfeiting ring
found.
Dan Clements, a com-
puter security expert who
wasn't involved in Secure-
Works' research, said the
scheme represents a "very
significant" escalation of




)N THE RISE


Jennifer R. Thompson


the abilities of online
crooks.
He said people should
watch for small test charges
that criminals make to fig-
ure out which accounts are
still active, and avoid writ-
ing their driver's license
numbers and other per-
sonal details on checks. He
said the attackers were
shrewd in their choice of
targets.
"I think it's brilliant- it's
where the data is," he said.
"It's a way to get into these
accounts and they don't


need to be in the country."
It's unclear how much of
the $9 million in that scam
the criminals actually got to
keep.
The main bottleneck lies
with the "money mules" -
people recruited from on-
line job sites to launder the
money.
They were sent the bogus
checks via overnight
shipping paid for with
stolen credit cards and
asked to deposit them into
their own bank accounts.
See HACKER/Page D3


Title: Advertising Account Executive
Age: 31
Company: Citrus Publishing Inc.


Describe your work history: I was a management trainee for
Enterprise-Rent-A-Car here in Crystal River while I was attending
USF in Tampa. After that I became the Tampa marketing rep for The
Children's Sleep Laboratory under the direction of Orlando Pedi-
atric Pulmonary and Sleep Associates. After moving from Tampa to
Crystal River, I tried my hand at sell-
ing insurance with Combined Insur-
ance before landing my current To nominate a Risin
position selling display advertising for Citrus County Chamb
the Citrus County Chronicle. members may obtain
What subjects are you passion-
ate about? I am passionate about calling 795-3149.
healthy eating, education reform and
supporting your local community versus big business.
Describe your education background. I graduated from Uni-
versity of South Florida in 2007 with a BA in Marketing. I main-
tained a 3.7 GPA. I was VP of professional development for the
American Marketing Association, USF chapter.
Describe your community involvement. Member/on Vendor
Committee for the Stone Crab Jam 2010 for King's Bay Rotary;
charter committee member/marketing and educational develop-
ment chair for Next Generation Professionals


L624 Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
iber: (352) 563-6363
re you live: Crystal River
rrent position: Eight months




Why did you choose your current career field? I am motivated
by sharing creative concepts with a variety of business owners and I
like the challenge of the workload.
Why did you choose to live and work in Citrus County? When
recently given the opportunity to move out of the state, I stayed be-
cause I enjoy the people I work with
in the community and I have been
g Star: blessed with being a part of some-
ber of Commerce thing bigger than myself.
nomination forms by What do you see for your fu-
ture? I believe I will be able to look
back on this time in my life and be
proud of what we are accomplishing
with NGR As far as a career is concerned, I plan on staying in the
advertising field.
What do you bring to Citrus County's business community? I
bring an outsider's perspective and a fun, no-limits mindset to what
can be accomplished or achieved in our community. I promote the
"shop local" mentality.
What do you do in your free time? When I have free time, I like
to exercise, listen to music, research my next vacation, play cards
and engage in conversation with friends.


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
ASK SCORE


The ABCs

of ad

know-how

T he decision to
launch a new busi-
ness is filled with
challenges and planning.
The consideration to ad-
vertise is only one of
many concerns. Nonethe-
less, you need to get the
word out But, how?
People who teach ad-
vertising stress the follow-
ing basics: Create a
standout message, one
that compels response;
deliver it frequently; pick
the right medium; and
target your audience.
In short, implement the
essential ingredients of a
good advertising program.
For a small business,
the first steps can be a lit-
tle intimidating and
somewhat of a mysterious
process. On a personal
level, we see advertising
everywhere. But its cre-
ation, media selection, ex-
pense and anticipated
results are not always eas-
ily understood.
Advertising is only one
element of the broader
area of marketing. Here
are a few of the many
forms in which it appears:
newspapers, magazines,
directories, online search
engine ads, website ban-
ners, radio spots, TV, bill-
boards, flyers and direct
mail. That's a lot of
places and choices.
So before you advertise
and spend that hard-
earned cash, investigate
what is realistic for your
business. What are your
expectations as to out-
comes? Once you decide,
move ahead.
Ads can do the follow-
ing:
Attract new cus-
tomers, prospects and
leads.
Encourage existing
customers to spend more
on your product or serv-
ice.
Build credibility, es-
tablish and maintain your
"brand" or unique busi-
ness identity and enhance
your reputation.
Inform or remind
customers and prospects
of the benefits your busi-
ness offers.
Promote your busi-
ness to customers and
others and slowly build
sales.
Here is what advertis-
ing probably cannot do:
Create an instant cus-
tomer base.
Solve your cash flow
or profit issues by produc-
ing an immediate sales
windfall.
Cure poor or indiffer-
ent customer service.
Create benefits that
don't really exist or sell
products or service no-
body wants.
Advertising won't guar-
antee quick sales by itself,
but it will help you get no-
ticed. But you need to do
it right. This means you
should know as precisely
as possible the demo-
graphics of your target au-
dience. Craft your
message so it drives them
to buy Customers should
feel compelled to call or
visit your website or read
your brochure, re-read
your ad and visit your
place of business.
Frequency and repeti-
tion are key factors. A sin-
gle ad in one place won't
do much. When people
see your ad often and in
different places, it will de-
liver better results. And,
remember, SCORE coun-
selors are ready to help.
See SCORE/Page D3


Your bank account can be an open checkbook for counterfeiters who know the scam


i


E












D2

SUNDAY
AUG. 1, 2010


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


C[hmber Connection


The Rustic Ranch


Sun Spiced Alpacas


The Rustic Ranch is open for business, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Owners Kim Dil- lli0 -..'
Ion and Chad McPherson invite you to come on in and experience great homemade food and Sun Spiced Alpacas is dedicated to improvement of the Suri alpaca in the United States.
desserts in their newly remodeled restaurant. House specialties include homemade bakery With an eye to enhancing quality with each generation of crias, we also strive to serve our
items, belly bustin' breakfast skillets, Southern style comfort food, and a wide selection of customers with honesty and integrity. We have a full range of services, including agist-
specialty salads. Locals say they have the best breakfast around. Come visit them seven ment, consulting, brokering, training and new breeder mentoring. We view every new cus-
days a week and see for yourself. Pictured with Chamber Ambassadors are owners Kim Dil- tomer as an addition to our alpaca community. Visitors are always welcome. Pictured with
Ion and Chad McPherson, Whitney Wright, LeeAnna Mitchell, Don Banic, Chris Mason, Chamber Ambassadors are owners Mike and Sheila Temple and award-wining alpaca Spiced
Scott Kartuane, Bill Brown, Jackie Worley, Ashley Tufano and Hunter Dillon. Mahogany Murdock.
* The Rustic Ranch Restaurant N Sun Spiced Alpacas
* 104 U.S. Hwy. 41 S. in Inverness 0 www.sunspicedalpacas.com
* (352) 726-7333 0 (352) 628-9980


Applications are ready for


The Great American Cooter Festival


October 29-31, 2010


Step out of your shell and into
some fun at the Great American
Cooter Festival in the historic city
of Inverness. Crafts, fine art, en-
tertainment, children's activities,
Cooterween, contests, Cooter
Poker Tournament & Casino
Night, Cooter Chariot Contest,
, Cooter (turtle) Races, BBQ Cook-
Off Contest, Cooter Idol, Miss
Cooter Pageant and much more.
Applications are now ready for
handmade crafters, fine artists,
food vendors, marketplace ven-
dors and sponsors. We will also be


looking for committee members
to help plan this year's event. We
want to make this well-known
event even bigger and better than
it has been in the past. Lcoations
for the Cooter Idol Contest and
the Miss Cooter Pageant are being
finalized. Dates of these events
will be Thursday nights, Oct. 7,14,
21 and 28. Applications for partic-
ipation can be obtained on the of-
ficial "City of Inverness Great
American Cooter Festival" web-
site at www.cooterfestival.com.
Also, be on the lookout for


Sunny Cooter! He will be out and
about through the county, remind-
ing everyone of the 8th Annual
Great American Cooter Festival.
More information will soon be
available. Keep track of this event
on our Chamber website at
www.citruscountychamber.com or
www.cooterfestival.com
For more information, e-mail
Suzanne at suzanne@citruscoun-
tychamber.com or call 726-2801.
The Great American Cooter
Festival ... A Shell of a Good
Time!


NGP volunteers participate in Run for Money celebration


The Next Generation Profes-
sionals (NGP) was honored to be a
part of the Key Training Center's
Run for the Money Celebration on
Saturday, July 24. Thank you to the
following NGP committee mem-
bers who represented NGP by vol-
unteering for the Crystal River
Beef 'O'Brady's food tent: James
Segovia, Tricia Durham, Mo Dah-
man, Jennifer Thompson, Amanda


Next
Generation
Professionals


Rowthorn and Rachelle Garrett.
If your organization is seeking


volunteers in our community and
would like more information,
please contact Ashley Rainwater
at amjrain624@yahoo.com or
Rachelle Garrett at Rachelle.
Garrett@regionsbank.com.
The next NGP Networking So-
cial and Membership Drive will be
held at the Realtors Association of
Citrus County in Lecanto Thursday
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Anyone in-


terested in becoming a member is
encouraged to attend. If you cannot
attend, please e-mail our member-
ship chair, Mo Dahman, at
modahman@hotmail.com. For
more information, contact the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Commerce
or follow us on
www.facebook com/ngpcitrus.
Don't forget those business
cards!


August
Calendar of
Events
* Aug. 4 Chamber
Breakfast Van der
Valk open network-
ing 7:45 a.m.
* Aug. 4 Chamber
After-Hours Business
Mixer-Jewel of the
Nail Hair Salon -
State Road 44 in Crys-
tal River-- 5 p.m.
* Aug. 5 Next Genera-
tion Professionals Net-
working Mixer -
Realtors Association
of Citrus County-
5:30 p.m.
* Aug. 13 Chamber
Luncheon Planta-
tion Golf Resort & Spa
guest speaker will
be from Crystal River
Commons- 11:30
a.m.
* Aug. 26 Chamber
After-Hours Mixer-
Art Center of Citrus
County Hwy. 486 in
Hernando 5 p.m.
For more information or
to make a reservation,
please contact the
Chamber office at
(352) 795-3149.


M ember ........ ...... . .. .. .. .. .


Heritage Village
Market Day with Art is on the grounds of Her-
itage Village on Saturday, Aug. 14. Enjoy the out-
door stroll among the plants, produce, artists and
craft vendors while visiting our downtown shops
in historic downtown Crystal River. For more
info, call (352) 564-1400.
Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity CC helped Habitat for
Humanity International achieve the rank of No. 8
on the Builder 100 list, marking the first time the
nonprofit has.been among the top 10 biggest
builders in the United States. HCHCC has com-
pleted 56 homes since 1993, providing decent
affordable housing for 77 adults and 114 chil-
dren. We currently have two houses under con-
struction and will finish house No. 60 in
December 2010. We plan to build at least nine
houses in the coming year.
HFHCC is proud to be part of Habitat's mis-
sion for the people of Citrus County. It is a "help-
ing hand up" and not a "hand out" by giving
families the opportunity to realize the dream of
home ownership. In 2009, Habitat affiliates re-
paired 710 homes nationwide, up from 621
homes in 2008. Around the world, Habitat for Hu-
manity helped 61,005 low-income families by
building 23,657 new houses and rehabilitating or
repairing 37,348 houses. Builder magazine's an-
nual Builder 100 List compiles data provided by
the nation's builders, including their closings.
College of Central Florida
The College of Central Florida, Citrus Cam-
pus, at 3800 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, will be
offering the following classes in the near future.
For information or registration call (352) 249-
1210 or log onto CFltraining.cf.edu.
Outlook 2007. Microsoft Outlook does
more than e-mail. Learn to publish and share
calendars, organize and work with your contacts
and learn how all your e-mail can come into the
same mail program. Learn how to do a mall
merge with MS Word using your contacts in Out-


look. Class will be on Fridays, Aug. 6 through 20,
from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fee is $79.
Advanced Accounting and Bookkeeping.
Expand your knowledge with a more compre-
hensive look at concepts introduced in the basic
course. Learn about accrual accounting, adjust-
ing entries, depreciation, amortization, ratio
analysis for management purposes, and closing
the books. Class will be on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, Aug. 12 through 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. for a
fee of $115.
Call (352) 249-1210 for registration and infor-
mation or log onto CFltraining.cf.edu.
Sellaview: Digital Advertising
Sellaview: Indoor Digital Advertising is excited
to announce the addition of two more locations,
the Holiday Inn Express of Inverness and Tug's
Bar & Grill of Crystal River. Sellaview now has
16 indoor advertising screens in 14 locations
throughout Citrus County. According to president
Regina Zamboli, "Sellaview provides a cost-ef-
fective advertising medium to those businesses
that want to reach Citrus County residents and
tourists alike where they live and play." For fur-
ther information, please visit www.sellaview.com.
SRRMC HEALTHconnection
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center pres-
ents HEALTHconnection Community Program-
ming, your source for health education programs
presented by board-certified physicians and
health care professionals in your community.
Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp. Patients sched-
uled for knee or hip replacement surgery learn
pre- and post-surgery exercises, how to use a
walker, knee and hip precautions and adaptive
equipment that may be needed for activities of
daily living. Monday, August 2 or August 16 at 1
p.m. This program is free. Call 795-1234 for lo-
cation and to register.
One-day Childbirth Education. Expecting
parents learn about labor, delivery, breathing and
relaxation techniques, exercising, newborn char-
acteristics and breast-feeding. Saturday, Aug.
14, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Medical Offices


Building, Suite 2A. $30 registration fee. Call 795-
1234 to register.
Breast-Feedingllnfant Care. Provides ex-
pecting or new mothers with effective techniques
that may help them successfully breast-feed.
Also teaches basic infant care. Tuesday, Aug.
17, from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Women's & Family
Center. This program is free. Call 795-1234 to
register.
Free Balance Screenings. Seven Rivers
Rehab & Wound Center offers free balance
screenings. The Center is at 1675 S.E. U.S.
Hwy. 19 in the Crystal River Shopping Center
(next to Sweetbay). Call (352) 795-0534 to
schedule an appointment.
Resume Writer/Career Coach
Charles Lawrence, resume writer/career
coach, will hold a free hour-long seminar at the
Beverly Hills Recreation Center on Saturday,
Aug. 14 at 11 a.m. This seminar will be organ-
ized through Meetup.com
(www.meetup.com/Job-Coaching). Anyone who
is seeking employment is encouraged to attend
this informative free seminar by sending an
RSVP through www.meetup.com/job-coaching.
RSVPs are required as seating is limited. We'll
be discussing best career searching strategies
and networking skills. Career-seekers are en-
couraged to bring their resumes for critiquing.
This seminar will also cover how to approach
businesses with unadvertised openings, how to
develop relationships with hiring authorities,
what questions might be asked during an inter-
view. We'll brainstorm ideas and provide en-
couragement and support during these difficult
economic times. Bring a pad of paper and a pen
to write down ideas for your resume and your
career search. Free light refreshments will be
served. For more information, contact Charles
Lawrence, (352) 613-3624, prosperre-
sumes@gmail.com.
SeaTow
SeaTow is happy to announce a Labor Day
gift basket we are giving away. You do not need


to be a member to win. Simply stop by our Crys-
tal River or Homosassa location and fill out an
entry with your name and phone number. (En-
tries will not be used or sold for solicitation pur-
poses.) SeaTow will draw the lucky winner's
name on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 6. We will
contact the winner by phone. Included in this
$300 give-away is: One year SeaTow member-
ship, gift cards for Sweetbay, MacRae's & West
Marine, maps, floating lantern, cooler bag, free
admission to Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park,
water-tight box, sunglass holder, coozie, scallop
bag, GPS rock locations, and all types of water-
related literature. Our Crystal River office is at
9070 W. Fort Island Trail and our Homosassa lo-
cation is at MacRae's. You must enter in person;
no phone entries will be taken.
SRRMC doctor
Awilda M. Pena, M.D. has been appointed to
the medical staff at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center with privileges in internal medicine.
The hospital's governing board confirmed her
appointment in July. Dr. Pena, board-eligible in
internal medicine, received her medical degree
from Pontificia Universidad Catolica Madre y
Maestra in the Dominican Republic. She com-
pleted her residency in internal medicine at St.
Barnabas Hospital in Bronx, N.Y., where she
was named resident of the year three years in a
row. She is fluent in English and Spanish. Dr.
Pena practices with West Florida Medical Asso-
ciates at 3775 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. Call (352) 746.0600.
Arbor Trail Rehab
The new school year is almost here, and
once again we will have our third annual school
supply drive. Arbor Trail Rehab will kick off the
start of this drive by donating $200 worth of sup-
plies. All donations will go to Inverness Middle
School. Come help the children in our commu-
nity by giving them the tools they need to excel
and grow. Donation box is in the front lobby of
Arbor Trail Rehab. All donations will be dropped
off on Aug. 5.


- I -- -








SUNDAY, AUG(US 1, 2010 D3


What is the Rx for disputing a hospital bill?


DEAR BRUCE: If you are put in no hospital is going to administer
a hospital for an emergency and medications that have not come
are on special medication, do hos- from their pharmacy. You indicate
pital employees have that you think the hospi-
the right to administer tal has given you the
the medication? Or can pw' wrong dose of medica-
I refuse and say that I tion. Did you immedi-
want to have my med- ately contact the
ication from my house? physician who pre-
I need to know this an- S scribed this medication
swer because it has hap- / and ask him to treat you
opened to me, and the at the hospital? Given
hospital administered today's litigious society, I
the wrong dosage of can't imagine a compe-
medication. I'm in a dis- Bruce Williams tent hospital staff would
pute with the hospital SMART allow you to use pre-
now about paying a bill, MONEY scription medication
and I was told to go to without them at least
the head of the hospital. consulting the physician
I even told them I could put this who prescribed them. Be careful
story in the paper with all the evi- about telling the hospital you could
dence I have on all their mistakes. publicize their "mistakes." There
Can you help? Carol, via e-mail are some very interesting laws with
DEAR CAROL: In all likelihood, regard to that type of activity.


DEAR BRUCE: Can I get a copy
of a will if the person is still alive?
Does the person have to file it at the
registry of probate or only when the
person dies? C.R., via e-mail
DEAR C.R: You can get a copy of
the will, but only if the person
wants to give it to you. A will does-
n't have to be filed anywhere, and,
as a practical matter, is a totally
meaningless document until the in-
dividual dies. Only then is the orig-
inal filed for probate, and only then
can it become public, which would
allow you to buy a copy. If you want
to know whether you are an heir,
but the person involved doesn't
want to tell you, you are completely
out of luck
DEAR BRUCE: I am about to get
married. We are both over the age
of 50 but not yet ready to retire. My
question is, when the time comes to
collect Social Security, do we both


collect our own after we are mar-
ried? Or does the marriage prohibit
both of us from collecting individu-
ally, forcing us to choose to collect
one or the other? Sue, via e-mail
DEAR SUE: You ask an interest-
ing question. Unfortunately, I don't
believe anyone can answer it be-
cause the rules may very easily
change soon. You can contact a So-
cial Security office, and people
there may be able to give you an an-
swer, but until you make the elec-
tion, you will be required to follow
a law that is in place at that time.
The overwhelming likelihood is
that because you are both em-
ployed, you will both have to apply
under your own account
DEAR BRUCE: What do you
think about putting $500,000 in a 10-
year CD at 4.5 percent that is FDIC-
insured? We have been retired for
10 years and are looking for a safe


place to make an income. ER.,
via e-mail
DEAR ER.: So you know, 4.5 per-
cent is a rather high interest rate in
today's world, but who knows what
it will be over the next 10 years. I
would want some type of a condi-
tion added that in the event that the
FDIC obligations are reduced over
the next decade, which is a possi-
bility, you would be able to move
the CD at that time to some title,
which would ensure that the entire
amount was insured.


Send your questions to Smart
Money, PO. Box 2095, Elfers, FL
34680. Ore-mail Bruce at
bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions ofgeneral interest will be an-
swered in future columns. Owing
to the volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


--- ~Business DIGEST


Green jobs
training starts
Workforce Connection and
the College of Central Florida
are providing the latest in green
jobs training to unemployed and
low-income adults and older
youths (18 and over) in and
around West Ocala. Participants
take a week of green basic train-
ing, followed by specialized
training in a variety of areas.
Orientations for the current
term are scheduled for:
Tuesday, 4 to 6 p.m.
Thursday, 10 a.m. to noon.
Tuesday, Aug. 10, 4 to 6
p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 12, 10 a.m.
to noon.
Tuesday, Aug. 17, 4 to 6
p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 19, 10 a.m.
to noon.
Tuesday, Aug. 24, 4 to 6
p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 26, 10 a.m.
to noon.
The orientations will take
place at CF Hampton Center,
1501 W. Silver Springs Blvd.,
Ocala. Register at www.clm
workforce.com, click on Calen-
dar of Events. Contact (352)
291-9550 or WestOcalaGreen
Jobs@clmworkforce.com to
check with a Workforce Repre-
sentative to see if you would
qualify for training.
The training is funded by the
$2.9 million Department of
Labor Pathways Out of Poverty
Grant. It should be noted this is
a training program, not a job-
hiring event. This training pro-
vides an opportunity to prepare
for jobs expected to be in future
demand. The no-cost training is
for individuals meeting the
grant requirements. Find out
more about Green Jobs by
watching videos at
www.youtube.com/Workforce
CLM.



HACKER
Continued from Page D1

They were then supposed to
wire a portion to accounts in
Russia.
Stewart said the six
"mules" he was able to
reach all told him they had-
n't wired any money to the
criminals because either
they or their banks got sus-
picious. Many more likely
did wire the money, how-
ever.
Stewart uncovered the
scam while investigating
malicious software that
steals banking passwords.
In eavesdropping on one
criminal group's communi-
cations, which he was able to
do by infecting his own com-
puter with the malicious
program the group was
using, he noticed that they
were doing something unex-
pected: collecting massive
amounts of images of checks.
He found a file logging all



SCORE
Continued from Page Dl
Our mission is to educate,
mentor and coach the small
business owner.
SCORE (Service Core of
Retired Executives) is an af-
filiate of the Small Business
Administration. The Citrus
County Chapter 646 can be
reached at (352) 249-1236 or
on the Internet at
www.scorecitrus.org

Dr Frederick J. Herzog is
Chairman of Citrus County
SCORE. His e-mail is
therzog@tampabayrr.com.


YMCA steering group


Special
The YMCA of the Suncoast Citrus County Branch
welcome local attorney Bill Grant to the Steering C
that has spent several years starting YMCA progi
borrowed facilities from places like schools and
Now as the organization is about to receive its c0
full-blown YMCA with the steering committee coi
a Board of Directors, they are reaching out to the
to recruit tried-and-true individuals who can help
ital campaign to eventually build their own 43,0
foot facility on 20 acres of donated land on Higi
one mile west of Highway 491. Pictured from left
of the Suncoast Regional Vice President Sue Bal
Bill Grant, Chairman of the Citrus County YMCW
Committee Gerry Mulligan.


Allen j
HPH Hospi
Eva Marie Allei
appointed to the I
rectors of HPH H
also serves on its
Board of Director
ancestors are amr








Eva IWVarie
Allen
in literature in 197
tended graduate
University of Sou
earned her law di
University of Flori


joins
ce Board
n has been
Board of Di-
ospice and
Real Estate
s. Her paternal
long the first
settlers of Cit-


Microsoft training
vouchers available


Could your business or organi-
zation benefit from Microsoft
training?
/ Anew public-private partner-
ship between Workforce Florida
Inc. and Microsoft can help.
Through Microsoft Elevate Amer-
ica, 40,000 vouchers for no-cost
training and certifications are
available to Floridians for a limited
time only.
This innovative initiative pro-
to the Chronicle ides an excellent opportunity for
to the ronicud to Florida workers to improve their
Committee technology skills, productivity and
rams using value. Businesses can benefit di-
churches. rectly by encouraging their em-
harter as a ployees to upgrade their skills
averting to through free training. No-cost
community training also is available for IT
with a cap- professionals.
00-square- Each Elevate America training
hway 486, voucher is redeemable for one
are YMCA online course or certification
I, Attorney exam in any of three categories:
A Steering ME-Leaming: Self-paced, on-
line training in the Microsoft 2003
or 2007 Office "learning collec-


ana nas previously worKed in
private practice, as well as in-
house counsel for Barnett Bank
of the Suncoast, N.A. Ms Allen
has twenty-five years of bank-
ing experience and currently
works as a vice president and
trust officer for Capital City
Trust Company.


tions" including Excel, Outlook,
PowerPoint and Word.
*Microsoft Certifications:
Exams in Microsoft 2007 Office
products such as Excel, Outlook,
PowerPoint and Word. All certifi-
cation exams must be proctored
at Certiport Testing Centers.
*Or Professionals: Online
training courses designed for IT
professionals or individuals inter-
ested in entering the IT field.
Vouchers must be activated by
Aug. 21 and will be available
through Aug. 21 or while supplies
last. E-Leaming vouchers are
good for 12 months after the date
of activation; certification exam
vouchers must be activated and
used by Aug. 21. There is no cost
for the E-Leaming and Certifica-
tion exam vouchers; however, in
some instances, a small proctor-
ing fee may be charged by a Cer-
tiport Testing Center, where
exams are administered.
Additional information on the
Florida vouchers and an applica-
tion is available at http://
elevateamerica.floridajobs.org/.


Bay Area AC earns
Angie's List award
Award reflects company's con-
sistently high level of customer
service
Bay Area Air Conditioning and
Heating has been awarded the
prestigious 2009 Angie's List
Super Service Award!
The Super Service Award,
now celebrating its 11th year, is
reserved for companies that
have achieved and maintained a
superior service rating on Angie's
List a national provider of con-
sumer ratings on local service
companies throughout the past
year. Fewer than 5 percent of the
companies on Angie's List meet
the eligibility requirements to be
considered for the award.
"Our Super Service Award win-
ners are the cream of the crop
when it comes to providing the
best customer service," said Angie
Hicks, founder of Angie's List.
Bay Area Air Conditioning and
Heating has been servicing Cit-
rus, Hemando and Pasco Coun-
ties for more than 30 years.


rus County. She is a member of the Cit-
She gradu- rus County Bar Association, the
ated from Estate Planning Councils of
Crystal River Hernando and Alachua coun-
High School ties, and participates as a
in 1976, from member of the Citrus-Hernando
the University Inn of Court. She is also a
of Florida with member of the "Founder and
her Bache- Friends" of Citrus Memorial
lor's degree Hospital. She has attended
78, and at- Florida Graduate Trust School
school at the and will obtain her certificate
th Florida. She from the University of Florida in
degree from the 2010 for Geriatric Care Man-
ida in 1987, agement.


of their transactions, which
revealed that 3,285 checks
were written against 1,280
accounts since June 2009.
Most checks were written
for less than $3,000 to evade
banks' anti-fraud measures.


Overall, he saw about
200,000 stolen check images
- suggesting the criminals
have only exploited a frac-
tion of the accounts on
which they have informa-
tion.


Wednesday, August 18th

6pm 8pm
(Followed by an hour of individual counseling)

The seminar will be held at the Citrus
Campus College of Central Florida
in Lecanto, (building L4, room 103)

The Citrus County Chapter of SCORE is offering a free
seminar for individuals thinking about starting their
own business.
The two hour session will cover the main issues
involved in becoming an entrepreneur from the
business idea to the reality of owning your own
business. Following the seminar, interested participants
will have the opportunity to meet with seasoned
SCORE counselors to further discuss their ideas.
"R U Ready" is specifically designed for individuals
who are not business owners, but who are interested in
learning what is involved in becoming one. If you have
ever asked yourself "do I have what it takes to be an
entrepreneur?" then this seminar is for you!

A one hour counseling session will follow for those
interested in meeting with a SCORE counselor.
For more information and to register for the
seminar, please contact Jeremy Moyes at SCORE

352-249-1236
Seating is limited.


ICIIIIIII--~llllll^l111-~--1~ ----I


CITRUi's COUNnY (FL) CiuONICLIE;


k- -,; 1,, ."









D4 SUNDAY, Au(;LI's 1, 2010











Classifieds


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds



In Print



and



Online



All



The Time


Fa:(5) 6-65 1 olFe : (8)85-30 m i: ca. *es. rnclonie. com I ebit wwchrnilenlneco


Widowed Woman
Young thinking, 70's,
Loves life, fit, healthy
and attractive. Seeks
other widow or
gentleman, fit/healthy
well educated,
assertive, honest, who
enjoys traveling, com-
panionship. conversa-
tion and friendship.
Respond to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1632P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blv. Crystal Riv, Fl. 34429
WOMAN In her 70's
would like to meet a
gentleman in his 70's
Must be Republican
love dogs and sense of
humor.Reply to Citrus
County Chronicle
Blind Box 1635 P
106W. Main St
Inverness Fl. 34450


-Nw
FRONT DESK

P/T w/possible F/T.
Must have good com-
puter skills, exc, phone,
people skills & also be
professional/ dependa-
ble. Email Resume To:
keycontact37@gmail.
com Incl. References
& Desired Salary.
RN POSITIONS

Our five star, 60 bed
SNF is searching for
an experienced
LTC RN. This position
provides you a
complete benefit
package including
medical, dental,
PTO, and 401K after
one year employ-
ment. If interested
Please Mail Or Email
Your Resume And
Cover Letter Stating
Salary History To:
Human Resources
Osprey Point Nursing
Center
1104 N. Main Street
Bushnell, FL 33513
Email: hropnc@
embarqmail.com
EOE

SOCIAL SERVICES
DIRECTOR/
ADMISSIONS
ASSISTANT

Osprey Point Nursing
Center, a 5 Star
facility 60 bed SNF
located In Bushnell
needs a Social
Services Director.
Duties include Social
Services sections
of MDS, manage
behavior, Social
Service documenta-
tion, discharge
planning & assist w/
Admissions dept.
BSW pref. We offer
a complete benefit
pkg. w/medical,
vision, dental,
disability & life Ins.
PDO, etc.
If Interested in
Working With A Strong
Team, Submit Your
Resume To:
Osprey Point Nursing
Center ATTN:
Human Resource
1104 North Main
Street
Bushnell, Florida
33513
Fax # (352) 568-8780
Email:
hrop-
nc@embarqmail.com
No phone calls
please.




Your world first.
Every Diay


OClassifieds
Classfieds


-I
GOLF COURSE AT
SUGARMILL WD'S
On Green & Tee.
Lecanto Schools
3/2/2. Fire pice.
Animals ok. $1,000
Mo. (352) 422-1933

P/T CLEANING
PEOPLE
(Retiree's Welcome)
Must pass
background check
ServiceMaster
352-726-4555 EOE




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
No titles, OK.
J.W. 352-228-9645

S$$ TOP DOLLAR $
I For Wrecked, junk or I
Unwanted cars/trks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appis. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600



Beautiful Mix ed Golden
Tan 3 month old Pups,
fenced yd preferred
352-220-2573
Excell. Home for any
exotic birds or poultry
U-R unable to care for.
(352) 726-9966
Female Ragdoll
8 yr. old Cat
front paws declawed,
spayed. No children or
OTHER PETS
(352) 344-2302
FREE KITTENS
liter trained, cute,
ready to go.
(352) 746-3206
Kitten
3 months, female litter
trained, short hair
calico(352) 621-0570
KITTENS
10 wks old. 1 grey tiger
& 1 black both females
(352) 621-4711
MAKE YOUR AD
STAND OUT FROM
THE REST I
USE OUR SPECIAL
HEADERS

Ask your classified rep
for the details.
352-563-5966
Peek-A -Pom
Female,
seeking good home
not trained,
needs patience
(352) 476-3691



DOZENS OF PAPER


Lost Airedale,
Female, approx. 90 Ibs,
in Forest Lake Area
Lost on Friday 30th
352-201-6372
LOST black & white
SHIH TZU 12 Ib.malehas
chip, missing collar, short
clip,lost in Pine Ridge,
Beverly Hills area Please
Call 352-476-6614
REWARD
Lostl Famly heartbro-
ken. Red, female
min-pinscher. Has
scars on top of back
due to chem. burns.
Last seen Tues 7/27 in
vic. of Hajik path and
Maylen. Please call
352-746-6928 or
352-302-5865.


Medium haired, 9 wks.
old. (352) 228-2961.
Lost Dog
Long Hair Chihuahua
missing 7/28,
Has markings
of 666 on belly
(352) 860-0790
REWARD for return of
my male Shih tzu .He is
tan & blond and weight is
about 18 bs.Please call






For a CRAFT SHOW
FRIDAY, OCT. 29 and
SATURDAY, OCT. 30
1st Annual Craft show
First Presbyterian
Church, Crystal River.
For more Info
Call: 795-2259



Advertise In Over 100
Papers throughout
Florida.
Advertising
Networks of Florida,
Put us to work for Youl
(866)742-1373 or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.
..cri -Is''
BANKRUPTCY
DIVORCES
CHILD SUPPORT
352-613-3674 *

BANKRUPTCY,
DIVORCE & More
(352) 860-1533

COLOR COUNTRY
NURSERY
WILL BE CLOSING
FOR THE MONTH OF
AUGUST. THE 50% OFF
SALE WILL CONTINUE
ON A VARIETY OF
PLANTS SOMETIME IN
SEPT. THANK YOU, FOR
YOUR PATRONAGE.
(352) 746-6465

DIVORCES
BANKRUPTCIES
CHILD SUPPORT
WILLS
CRYSTAL RIVER MALL
(352) 795-9666.
VENDORS WANTED
For Sunset Festival
w/entertainment, Arts,
Crafts, Sat 9/25/10
1pm till 9pm
Crystal River Ale House
& Port Hotel. For more
Info (352) 422-7910
or keylime
@tampabay.rr.com



Need someone for
Home Schooling
for 7th Grader. Crystal
River Area. Hrs. vary
$8 hr. starting Aug 10th
Must be Mature &
Responsible
(352) 564-0719



TEACHER
F/T or P/T, Exp. Required
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444



Now interviewing
for an
Administrative
Assistant
In our Citrus County
office. Previous
experience a plusll!
We have long been
among the largest
private health
insurance agencies
And WE ARE
EXPANDING!
Please fax resumes
Attn: Karen at
352-726-6813


-I. Home e Finder

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Iuiiu Yowr Dreawu Homer
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.comn


OFFICE
COORDINATOR
FOR REAL ESTATE
OFFICE

Must have Exc.
Customer Service
Skills, Be Computer
Literate, Organized
& Be Able Multi-Task.
Fax resume To:
(352) 746-3685












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966







#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED & book
Included. I week class
getvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)


A CNA PREP &
TEST PROGRAM
Day & Evening Classes
CPR Available
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
ezlearningservices.com


ACCOUNTS
RECEIVABLE/
BILLING
Needed for Busy
Medical office.
Medical Experience
a plus.Fax resume to:
352-746-2236


Case Manager
RN Home Health

We are currently
seeking FT Home
Health Case
Manager RNs. Ideal
candidates will have
FL RN license and
current FL driver's
license and automo-
bile liability Insurance.
One to two years of
current med/surg
experience, one
year of prior home
health experience
desired. CPR
certification. Provides
nursing care to
patients In the home
care environment.
Please apply online
at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an EOE.



CNA
Part Time, All Shifts
Also PRN
Nightshift 8p-8a
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto



COME
GROW
WITH US!




HbSPICE
of Citrus County
of the Nature Coast

Home Care/
Facility Teams
RN FT M-F
LPN FT M-F
CNA FT M-F
Team Assistant
Continuous Care
Team
RN's & LPN FT
Must be available
Nights/Eves/
Weekends
PRN Staff
RN's
LPN's
CNA's
(must have HHA)
Job summaries,
other open positions
and applications
found at:
.wwwhosoiceof
citruscountv.ora
Fax: 352.527.9366
hr@hosplceof
citruscounty.org
Hospice of
Citrus County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FI 34464
DFWP/EOE


BECOME A CNA
Low Fees CPR,AED
Info 352-564-8378 or
ficnatestoreo.com

DFWP Looking
For RECEPTIONIST
With 2 yrs. exp. In
Insurance verification
and billing,
Email Resume:
medoftl6
@yahoo.com

Experienced
Medical Staffing
Specialist
On-Call, Night &
Weekends required.
Human Resource
Director
with at least 2 yrs. exp
NURSE TEMPS
(352) 344-9828

F/T RN
3-11 ,11-7 also
RN Unit Mgr

If you are dedicated
to the higher stand-
ards of elder care,
good documentation
and a genuine caring
attitude, we have a
place for you. We
offer great benefits.
Mail or fax resume:
Aft: Laurie Coleman
136 NE 12th Ave.
Crystal River, FL 34429
Fax J ) 795-5848
CONTACT Laurie Via
Mail d&Fax ONLYII
DFWP/EOE

F/T RN Supervisor
Mon-Fri 3p-I Ip

F/T RN & LPN
all shifts

PRN LPN & RN
Positions.
Experience
preferred
Competitive pay
based on exp.
Apply within
Health Center at
Brentwood
2333 N Brentwood
Circle
Lecanto, FL
(352) 746-6600
EOE D /VM/F
Drug Free Facility
GRANNY NANNIES
LIVE IN'S, must be
cert. CNA/HHA,
needed immediately.
352-560-4229

MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
F/T for busy office.
Experience req'd.
Knowledge of
Visionary Medical
Systems Is a plus
Must possess
excellent customer
service skills & have
ability to muti task,
Salary based upon
experience.
Non-Smoking
Environment
Mail Resume to:
1634 P
C/O Citrus County
Chronicle, 106W.
Main St. inverness, FL
34450

P/T DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST

Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. Email Resume
to ConslderMvDental
Resume@pmall.com

RN POSITIONS

Our five star, 60 bed
SNF is searching for
an experienced
LTC RN. This position
provides you a
complete benefit
package including
medical, dental,
PTO, and 401K after
one year employ-
ment. If Interested
Please Mail Or Email
Your Resume And
Cover Letter Stating
Salary History To:
Human Resources
Osprey Point Nursing
Center
1104 N. Main Street
Bushnell, FL 33513
Email: hropnc@
embarqmall.com
EOE

RN/LPN
11-7 Fulltime
Looking for an
experienced nurse
leader to join our
Great Teami
We offer excellent
benefits:
401K/Health/Dental/Vis
Ion/Vacation/
Sick time/CEUs
Apply In person:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness, FL
An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


SOCIAL SERVICES
DIRECTOR/
ADMISSIONS
ASSISTANT

Osprey Point Nursing
Center, a 5 Star
facility 60 bed SNF
located In Bushnell
needs a Social
Services Director.
Duties include Social
Services sections
of MDS, manage
behavior, Social
Service documenta-
tion, discharge
planning & assist w/
Admissions dept.
BSW pref. We offer
a complete benefit
pkg. w/medical,
vision, dental,
disability & life ins.
PDO, etc.
If Interested in
Working With A Strong
Team, Submit Your
Resume To:
Osprey Point Nursing
Center ATTN:
Human Resource
1104 North Main
Street
Bushnell, Florida
33513
Fax # (352) 568-8780
Email:
hrop-
nc@embarqmail.com
No phone calls
please.




ASSISTANT
ACADEMIC
ADVISOR

Saint Leo University,
Florida's oldest
Catholic Education
Institution in the
Benedictine Tradition
currently enrolls
more than 15,000
students in 17
regional centers
throughout Florida,
the Southeastern
United States and
through our Center
for Online Learning.
University Campus
Is located approx.
20 miles north of
Tampa, Florida.
We are currently
seeking qualified
applicants for an
Assistant Academic
Advisor for the Ocala
Center Location. The
Assistant Academic
Advisor reports
academic progress
and provides
recommendations
to students. The
Assistant Academic
Advisor also provides
support & assistance
to the department's
Academic Advisors.
Other functions
include representing
the University at
Education Fairs and
Career Day Seminars;
advising students
regarding course
schedules, degree
programs & assisting
with the recruitment
and retention of
new/perspective
students. A Bachelor's
Degree from a
regionally accredited
College or University
& previous adminis-
trative exp. Is req.
For Additional Info.
And Application
Instructions,
Please Visit:
www.saintieo.
edu/jobs Or
For A Direct Unk To
This Position:
http://www.saintleo.
jobs/postings/6066
Saint Leo University is
an Equal Opportunity
Employer. Catholics,
Women & Minorities
Are Encouraged
To Apply.

Join our family
of caring
professionals




HOSPICE
or Citrus County
of the Nature Coast

Community
Education
Specialist
Responsible for
assisting in planning
and coordinating
special projects and
events to provide
Hospice Education
throughout Citrus
County. Minimum of
a Bachelor's degree
with at least 3 to 5
years experience
and a proven track
record within the
development
services arena.
Job summary as well
and application can
be found at:
www.hosplceofcltrusc
ounty.org
email:

Hospice of the

Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE


We're Growing
Again




HbSPICE
of Citrus County
of the Nature Coast


Grief Services
Specialist
Provides bereave-
ment services to
patients, families and
friends of Hospice of
Citrus County. MIn of
B.S. In Social Work or
Social Science field,
and 2 years exp In
health care;
bereavement experi-
ence at a Hospice
with appropriate
Hospice training In
bereavement Is
preferred.
Children's Grief
Services Specialist
Provides bereave-
ment services to
patients, families and
friends of Hospice
of Citrus County.
Requirements are
same as above, plus
a minimum of two
years exp. working
with children.
Social Worker
Maintains continuity
of care and services
to Hospice patients
through the use of a
comprehensive Plan
of Care. Requires a
min of a B.S in Social
Work or related field
and 4 years exp.
Hospice or Home
Health exp is
preferred.
Job summaries as well
and application can
be found at:
www.hospiceof
citruscounty.org
email: .....
hr@hospiceof
cltruscounty.org
Hospice of Citrus
County
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE




EXP. LINE COOK
Serious Only. Apply In
Person at The Loft
10131 N Citrus Av.
No phone calls

RESTAURANT
MANAGER
Food and Bev.
manager needed-
Restarant Mgmt. exp.
req. Porfesslonal w/
business and great
customer service skills
a must. For large rest.
In Citrus Co. Good
Pay & benefits.
Send Resume to:
newjobs@
tampabay.rr.com


Sale Hel


Join the
NATION'S
LARGEST
Senior Financial
Planning Firm

The best opportunity
In Citrus County.
2009 was $56.000,.
Our 15
Representatives enloy
Company
Sponsored Trips
WORLD WIDE
Bonuses
Full Support &
Training
Qualifications:
Team Player
Professional
Positive Attitude
Willingness to Learn
Self-Motivated
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
necessary.

Fax Resumes
ATTN: Karen
352-726-6813





A/C Sales Tech
2 Needed for
Hernando, Citrus &
Marion County.
Must be Exp. Reliable.
15% across the Board
+ Bonus's. Must Need
to make minium of
$85,000 per year.
(727) 236-2466








EXPERIENCED A/C
SERVICE TECH
Refrigeration Exp.
A +. Excellent pay.
(352) 795-7405

Local Fuel
Delivery Driver
Min. Class B CDL
must have HAZMAT,
Apply In Person
1021 S. E. US Hwy 19
Crystal River
No Phone
Calls Please




AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified Job
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769

ANIMAL CARE
for boarding kennel.
Responsibilities in-
clude cleaning dog
cages and runs, bath-
ing and brushing pets.
Must be reliable, ener-
getic and pleasant.
Drug free workplace.
352.843.8387

CITRUS MAIDS
Cleaning Person
needed. Must have
flex. schedule,
llc./vechicle. Exp. a
plus. Leave message
(352) 257-0925

Drivers -
FLORIDA TRUCK
DRIVERS NEEDED ASAPI
IN-STATE DRIVING
POSITIONS AVAILABLE!
CDL-A w/ 1 yr. experi-
ence Outstanding
pay & Benefitsi
Call a recruiter TODAYI
(877)484-3042
www.oaklevltransaort.
cam

EXPERIENCED
OFFICE
SECRETARY/
DISPATCHER

Must be detailed
oriented, comfortable
w/sales & have
excellent phone and
customer service
skills. Work 30 to
40 hrs. wkly., one
weekend day, req.
Send Resume
W/References To:
PO Box 1511
Inverness, Fl 34451

FRONT DESK

P/T w/possible F/T.
Must have good com-
puter skills, exc. phone,
people skills & also be
professional dependa-
ble. Email Resume To:
keycontact37@gmail.
cam Incl. References
& Desired Salary.

LAWN CARE SERV
seeking reliable help
352-637-6251 Ive mess.


Maintenance
Worker
The City of Crystal
River is seeking an
experienced mainte-
nance worker to
maintain and repair
streets, sidewalks.
storm drains, grounds,
fields/parks and
facilities. The
qualified applicant
will possess 2 years
experience in
building, grounds
and equipment
maintenance and
must have a valid
Florida Drivers license
with a Class B
designation.
Applications may be
obtained at
Crystal River City Hall,
(Finance Dept)
123 NW Hwy. 19,
Crystal River, FL 34428
or downloaded from
our website at
www.crystairiverfl.org
Application deadline
is Friday, August 6,
2010 at 4 p.m.

Opportunity
Knocking
Great Job, Office
Setting. Looking for
ClosersI Call Barb
352-726-5600 or
e-mail resume to
barb@oslfl.com



RECREATIONAL
THERAPIST

F/T or P/f Pos. avail.
Assist in scheduling
and implementing
Indoor & outdoor
group recreational
& leisure activities
for developmentally
disabled adults in a
residential setting.
Duties incl. monitoring
residents during
activities, transporta-
outings & document
group activities.
High School Diploma
& Valid FlI. D.L. Req.
Basic First Aid/CPR
& Ufe Guard cert. a
plus. Apply At New
Horizons Village 1275
N. Rainbow Loop,
Lecanto, FL 34461,
(352) 746-3262
Or Emall Resume To:
maryloulse@new
horizonsvlllage.us

RETAIL CUSTOMER
SERVICE CLERKS

F/T & P/T Positions
For Shipping/Printing
Business. Computer /
office machine exp.
pref. Fax Resume
To: (352) 637-2209
Or Email To:
shippingprinter
@yahoo.com
Start a New Career
in Heat & Air.
National Trade School.
We will assist you In
finding a JOB.
3wk Training Program.
National Accreditation.
(877)994-9904.




P/T CLEANING
PEOPLE
(Retiree's Welcome)
Must pass
background check
ServlceMaster
352-726-4555 EOE




AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program. Fi-
nancial aid If qualified -
Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (877)741-9260
F--- --- Eu

SALON
PROFESSIONAL
ACADEMY

Cosmetology
Start Dates
August 9
September 13
October 18
I352-753-5511
S 11915 CR 103
The Villages, FI 32162
www.thevlllagest





Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Asslstancel
(877)994-9904
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistancel
(877)994-9904











CITRUS COUNT (FL) CHRONICLE


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOWI!! $$$
As seen on TV$$SS In-
jury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500.000++
within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE
Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321www.lawc
apital.com




r TEE U, '

International
School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy

*NOW ENROLLING*

Cosmo Days
Aug. 16.
Sept. 27, Nov. 8

Cosmo Nights
Aug. 16, Nov. 8

Massage Days
September 7,

Massage Nights I
September 7

Barber Stylist
(Nights Only)
Sept. 27,

Nails & Skincare
Classes begin wkly.
Days & Nights
S when possible

(352) 263-2744
1486 Pinehurst Dr
Spring Hill Fl. 34606
.mmmmm1
-_--- -,--

SALON
PROFESSIONAL I
ACADEMY

Cosmetology
Start Dates

August 9
September 13
October 18

352-753-5511
11915 CR 103
The Villages, FI 32162 =
www.thevillagest
spa.com





CASH NOW!
Get cash for your
structured settlement
or annuity payments.
High payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth.
1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536). Rated
A+ by the Better
Business Bureau.
Citrus County Business
Established for over 30
yrs. Owners must relo-
cate(352) 287-9073

CONVENIENT
STORES w/Gas
Great business oppt.
1-800-553-0831

Vendors Wanted
For a CRAFT SHOW
FRIDAY, OCT. 29 and
SATURDAY, OCT. 30
1st Annual Craft show
First Presbyterian
Church, Crystal River.
For more info
Call: 795-2259
VENDORS WANTED
For Sunset Festival
w/entertainment, Arts,
Crafts, Sat 9/25/10
Ipm till 9pm
Crystal River Ale House
& Port Hotel. For more
Info (352) 422-7910
or keylime
@tampabay.rr.com




Need Cash Fast?
(352) 422-3043


STEEL BUILDING
SALE...SPECIALS from 54
to $11/sq.ft. Great pric-
ing on ABSOLUTELY
every model, width
and length. Example:
30x40x14 NOW
$8995.00. Pioneer Steel
Manufacturers
(800)668-5422




Antique wooden
Picture Frame
36x 30 & 18 x24 inside
$130
(352) 628-7226
Illinois Pocket Watch
1913 Gold case,
15 jewels $200.
Impress Crank Up
Victrolla, 78 RPM.
portable w/ records
Swiss made $100.
(352) 344-5283




LENOX DISNEY Thim-
bles collection
& rack
$200.00 352-527-1399
Precious Moments
statues 30 individual
pieces, all for $200.
Call 10am-8pm
(352) 344-4882


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

THOMAS KINKADE Tap-
estry & Brackets "Pools
of Serenity".
54"X 80" $200.00
352-527-1399




LARGE HOT TUB. seats
4+ adults. Two 5HP
motors, less than 1 yr
old. Cost $7800, Only
$3K. LIKE NEWI 564-8436
Leisure Bay Spa
4 seat/lounge
New $2700
Now $350.
601-5119




APPLIANCES Kenmore
white frig, s/s ice/water
dispenser, 19 cu ft, 8 yrs
old, $250. Kenmore black
dishwasher, 3 yrs old,
$200.(352) 527-1844
GAS RANGE
30" almond, super
clean, works great
$145.(352) 212-1751
Gas Range
Kenmore, Self cleaning.
excel. cond. $200.
(352) 527-2121
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&lns. CAC 057914
JENN-AIR OUTDOOR
GRILL ELEMENT fits
most models Gently used
$20 Call for details
352-382-3650


Electric smooth top
good cond. White
w/blk top $150 obo
(352) 563-0595
Kenmore white
washer/dryer. Washer 10
yrs old, $100. Dryer 4 yrs
old, $150. All good condi-
tion. 352-527-1844
REFRIGERATOR &
STOVE Bth 5.5 yrs old,
Off White. Refrldge.
Maytag 24CF. Side by
Side, ice/wtr in door
$325. Kenmore
Cooktop. 30" Self Clean
$175. Both work & Look
Great. 352-795-1692
SOLD
STAND-UP FREEZER
Self .Defrost $200 leave
message
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
AND DRYER A matching
set, Washer and dryer,
Works! $125.00
563-1509 for information


DESK PAD Genuine
Black Leather by Execu-
tive Gallery 34"x20"
Excellent Cond.$30 Can
email pic 352-382-3650
FILE CABINET &
CHAIRS Desk Chairs,
fabric covered,$25. Metal
5 drawer file cabinet,$75
727-463-4411
METAL FILE CABINETS
2 drawer,used,$35.2
drawer,new-in box,$60.3
drawer,used,$45.
727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
Fabric Armed Fabric
$20.Vinyl, $7 & $12.
727-463-4411



LINEMAN SAFETY BELT
New! never used, Bashlin
Linemans Belt,
(size = 20) $150.00 obo



on wheels, fence
upgrade $140
.(352) 201-1970
TOOLS Circular saw
blades 8" rip, plywood,
carbide tip. Take all for
$14 352-746-1108
TOOLS Hand saw 20" rip
set $8.Combination 24"
pry bar $7
352-746-1108
TOOLS Stanley screw-
drivers and Wood chis-
els. All sizes 10 pieces.
$20 Take all
352-746-1108
TOOLS Star drills 4
pieces, Masonry bits
7 pieces. Take all $10
352-746-1108




6376251 36" TV
PIP w/owner manuel
exc. cond $120. obo
(352) 341-1576
SONY 50"
Wide Screen, high def.
built in, cable card
ready with 3 tier glass
table & DVD player pro
scan all $500 746-9621



COMPUTER DOCTORS
112 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer repair/sales

Computer Repair
we come to you. Call
today visa/mc. 352-
212-1551/422-6020
DESKTOP TOWER
Pent4 XP PRO OS
$160.00
352 382 3895
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
LINSKYS PC ROUTER
$20 352-796-9350


brand new once used
eighty dollars
352-697-2564
WEB CAM Creative Live!
Cam Voice. Never used
and unopened. Also co-
mes with a Headset. $35
obo. (352) 860-0023



6', 3'2" Oval Glass Top
Lanai Table w/ 6 chairs,
1 Rocker w/ ottoman,
neutral color,
Excel. cond. $250.
(352)382-1564
TABLE ROUND wrought
iron and glass & 4
Cushioned Chairs $125
Can email pic
352-382-3650



2 SWIVEL CHAIRS-$20
EACH Black leather
heat/massage chair
$40 352-796-9350
42" Round Wood Pedes-
tal Table $20. Wood
Bookcase $35.
727-463-4411
4-SECTION WALL UNIT.
Lighted shelves. Beige
acrylic. $40.00 Call Ruth
352-382-1000
48" Round Glass Top
Kitchen Table
on white wicker pedes-
tal w/ 6 cushioned
wicker chairs $200.

BEDROOM SET
Beautiful 7 pieces includ-


727-463-4411
BOOKSHELF $20.00
Lamp $10.00
Denise
(352)527-9248


BROWN LEATHER
COUCH AND
OTTOMAN brown
leather couch and
ottoman
good shape
asking 159.00
352-419-6108
CHERRY BEDROOM SET.
Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in
factory boxes. English
Dovetail. Original cost
$4500. Sell for $895.
Can deliver. Call
Tom(407)574-4955
CHERRY BEDROOM SET.
Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in
factory boxes. English
Dovetail. Original cost
$4500. Sell for $895. Can
deliver. Call Tom
(407)574-4955
COMPUTER DESK and
Reclining Chair
$50.00 each
Denise (352)527-9248
COMPUTER DESK
LARGE, Couch &
Love Seat $125 for
all obo 724-8835
Couch & Love Seat
2 end tables, 1 coffee
table, sofa table,
corner curio cabinet
all cherry wood. Exc.
cond. $1,000 for all.
(352) 344-1415
DINING FURNITURE
Complete Tommy Ba-
hama honey tone finish
dinette set including ped-
estal table with 54" diam-
eter glass top. 4 chairs,
etagere and 3 barstools.
Excellent condition. $800
352-382-3370
DINING SET 72" x 42"
glass top tbl w/dolphin
base, 6 white chairs &
hutch $375. Coffee
Table Glass Top $50.
352-344-0866
DININGROOM SET Pa-
lermo dining table
(42"x62" with 20" insert)
with 4 side chairs and 2
arm chairs. Looks great!
Original $1,000, now
$300. 352-795-9113


CLASSIFIED


U--c

Mirror, Armoire w/
pull out TV shelf.
& 2 End Tables w/pull
out drawer all solid oak,
Exc. cond. $850.
Kingsize Wrought Iron
Headboard & Foot-
board, sleigh design.
Very heavy, exc. cond.
$350. (352) 476-4191
Entertainment Center
1 pc 5' W x 6' H. lighted
med. oak wood. Holds
34" TV & Coffee table &
2 matching end tables
med oak wood $275,
32" Panasonic Portable
TV $75. ExecIlent Cond
352-465-5215
FURNITURE
70S vanity cherry wood
65.00. Wash stand with

352-228-1325
FURNITURE Brown
wicker loveseat 75.00
pair living room lamps like
new 50.00 352-228-1325
FURNITURE White rattan
Etageree 3 shelfs 70" tall
30" wide 17" deep $75.
Rocking chair brown $35
352-228-1325
King Size Bed, w/
boxspring & mattress
$150.
Call (352) 563-5232
LARGE VINYL CHAIR
WITH WOOD ARMS
AND LEGS $25 E-MAIL
PICS 637-2949
LEATHER LIVING ROOM
SET. In original plastic,
never used. Orig price
$3000. Sacrifice $975.
Can deliver, Call Bill
(813)600-3653
LOVE COUCH
RECLINES ON BOTH
SIDES $45
352-796-9350
Love Seat
Broyhill, nuetral colors.
In exc. cond. $125.
Obo. (352) 344-1088
MISC. LIVING ROOM
FURNITURE Teal green
leather sofa $125.00,
Teal green leather chair
with ottoman $75.00, 8'
by 11' area rug, $35.00
and Love seat,blue
cordaroy/wood trim w/4
pillow back cushions,
$100.00 Call for
appt to see,
352-382-4063,
Sugarmill Woods
NEW FULL MATTRESS
SET Pillow Top Mattress
Set Full Size Still in plastic
275. call 352-209-8389
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
QUEEN SOFA
SLEEPER
$150.00 Denise
(352)527-9248
ROCKER
CHAIR $40.00
Denise
(352)527-9248
SOLID MAPLE HUTCH
Ex condition 45"x18"x68"
Top w shelves Brass
hardware $200.00
352-270-8475
VINTAGE CHERRY
STEREO CABINET $100
STORAGE ELECTRON-
ICS @ RECORDS
E-MAIL PICS 637-2949
WOOD CABINET
DRY SINK $65
DECORATMIVCOUNRTY
STYLE LOTS STOR-
AGE 637-2949
Yorkie Puppy
Male, 4 mos. old,
health cert.,
Looking for Loving Home
$350. (352) 860-1216




Craftsman Rider, LT100
42", 16HP Kohler motor,
auto transmission
well maintained
$600. obo
(352) 726-5698
Craftsman Self propelled
mower Front gear drive
Key Start 6.75hp/ 21" cut
A+ condition $160


352-270-8475


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 D5


Electric strait shaft line
trimmer, $25.00, Electric
leaf blower, $20.00,
Electric hedge trimmer,
$25.00. Please call
352-382-4063, Sugarmlll
Woods
LOW VOLTAGE LIGHT
Two Twilight Transform-
ers for outdoor use. $10.
pair Rainbow Spnngs
465.8495
MURRAY RIDING
MOWER, 30" cut, 11HP,
Exc cond, $400.
352-465-1069
New Craftsman 46"
-21HP, Riding
Mower-used 1 mo
Moving Must sell
Paid $1,399. sell for
$1,100 (352) 257-5209
PUMP SPRAYER Solo
Model 457 three gal ca-
pacity $10.Rainbow
Springs 465.8495
TROY-BILT ELEC
BLOWER
$65.00 Denise
(352)527-9248
TROY-BILT ELEC
BLOWER $65.00
Denise
(352)527-9248
Troy-Bilt self prop.
mower B&S eng.,
6.75HP, like new cond.
(cost new $379), $150
firm (352) 344-1310
8-10am or 5-7pm




COLOR COUNTRY
NURSERY
WILL BE CLOSING
FOR THE MONTH OF
AUGUST. THE 50%
OFF SALE WILL
CONTINUE ON A
VARIETY OF PLANTS
SOMETIME IN SEPT.
THANK YOU, FOR
YOUR PATRONAGE.
(352) 746-6465




PINE RIDGE
Sat & Sun 6arn -1pm
4905 W. Pinto Loop



TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
BIG jobs, small jobs,
$25 + $25/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



HAWAIIAN MUUMUU
$25 NEW, NEVER
WORN-100%
RAYON-SIZE 2X-E-MAIL
PICS 637-2949



2 Printer's
Lexmark, all In one, one
does 2 sided, $135.
New,4 in lw/phone$85.
(352) 465-6558
3 1ST GENERATION
XBOX CONTROLLERS
$10 each brand new
352-697-2564
4 TON A/C & HEAT
Unit. Maytag A ton
largeunit for Ig Sq Ft,
$1100 abo.
(352) 601-2690
16 Piece Dish Set
Thompson Pottery
Beach Scene, $30.
Lg. Motor Cycle Hel-
met, Harley Davidson,
never used. $250.
(352) 563-6035
195/65 R15 (4) Pretty
decent. Only asking $120
for the set. (352)
220-9190
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
No titles ok.
J.W. 352-228-9645
225/70 R16 (4) Lots of
tread left.
Only asking $120 (352)
220-9190


nice set of (4).] animal Hutch, Brand
Only asking $120. new, cedar wood, $75.
(352) 220-9190 Diamond Plate metal
Affordable Top Soil, tool box fortruck $75.
Dirt, Rock, Stone (352) 422-2719
Driveways/Tractor work Refrigerator,
341-2019 or 302-7325 good for garage
ANTIQUE VICTROLA $100.
Crank Style w/78 RPM Glider
Records $250 $50.
Sofa Sleeper $150 (352) 344-2509
(352) 527-9074 Riding Mower,
BIKES 20" Girls,Purple like new, Self propelled
$35 mower, good shape
20" Girs,Blue $25 $600. obo
727-463-4411 Wurlitzer Organ $600.
CARPET STEEM (352)527-1763
CLEANER SMALL ANIMAL CAR-
Bissell w/accessories RIER $7.50-LARGE
$200.(352) 465-6558 WITH handle and wheels
CERAMIC FROG @ $30 352-796-9350
BEAR $8 EACH-AS SOLD
GARDEN DECORATION New Well Aire
OR KNICKNACK E-MAIL Bladder Tank
PICS 637-2949 was$d175.
COLOR COUNTRY NOW $100
NURSERY SOLD!
WILL BE CLOSING ABS Exercise Machine,
FOR THE MONTH OF brand new, $100.
AUGUST. THE 50% King Size Bedroom Set
OFF SALE WILL French Provincial Sleep
CONTINUE ON A number, dresser
VARIETY OF PLANTS w/mirror, dresser, 2
SOMETIME IN SEPT. night stands, & chair.
THANK YOU, FOR Comforter,9 sheet sets
YOUR PATRONAGE. & 2 bedspreads Incl., 1
(352) 746-6465 brand new, all for $700.
COMPUTER Souvenir Plates
Dell Desktop Pentium4 International & USA.
2.4 gigs processor $125 Exc. cond. Will not
.(352) 527-9074 separate. Selling all for
COMPUTER -L- Shape $400. (352) 860-1397
desk, 6 mos old pdnew SPECTRUN
$550 sell $200. TANNING BED
(352) 465-6558 Stand up or Lay down.
Call for information.
CUSTOM DOOR WALL $100.00 352-628-5737
VALANCE. 14' W. beige Te
w/forest green hem & Tires
burgundy accent stripe Continental
+ 2 burgundy sheers LT 275-70R 18 set of 4.
$300 firm 352- 382-5957 35K. Mi. on tires. $150.
Foldable steel ramp set (352) 860-0203
New $160. TOBY STEAM
(352) 465-6558 Cleaner new,
FREE HD FOR LIFEI Only w/attachments $130.
on DISH NETWORK. Low- Complete
est Price In Americal KingComforter Set &
$24.99/mo for OVER 120 curtalns(352) 465-6558
Channels PLUS $500 Tow dolly, 89" across
Bonus! Call Today. for a small vehicle.
(888)696-9121 Rated 2500 lbs. New
GAS EDGER radial tires & rims with a
New $160. spare tire mounted on
(352) 465-6558 tow bar anchored.
New stop lights and
Gem Keyboard turn signal wired and
GK 360, w/stand $300. working $625 obo
Welder (352)344-8334 or cell
Lincoln Electric $250. 352-302-0850
(352) 563-6035.
(35) 63-635. TRAINS" G" SCALE 2
HONDA MOWER SETS LOTS OF TRACK
21"cut rear whl dr $165 $1000
Craftmans mower 352-527-4
ft whi dr 21" cut $95
40" plasma TV RCA ULTRASONIC Trainer
$475 ex pic 344-5021 Automatic device stops
Medical bed rails $75 barking in or out New-pd
calaft bam til3p $89 Will sell for $49 Call
call aft 10am til 3p 352-270-8475
2 end tables
& I coffee table. VENT FREE PROPANE
Mahogany & glass. LOG FIREPLACE,
$150. 352-794-6376 thermostat & blower,
MOSQUITO DELETO manuals, like new, flat
Traps mosquitos with black, gold trim, $150
Octenol attractant Uses (352) 637-3983
propane gas Water heater, 30 gal-
$110 Call 352-270-8475 Ion, never used, still in
PET DOOR/DOG OR the box. Fits In base
CAT PETSAFE 1 to 15 tank retainer which is
bs Fits standardsceen included. Paid$400 will
door New in box $25 Call sacrifice for $250. Call
352-270-8475 (352) 344-8334 or
PETSAFE PET DOOR cell 352-302-0850
To 40# Standard/screen WHITE SWIMMING
door w locking panel New POOL SLIDE,
w Video instruction $49 $500.
Call 352-270-8475 352-628-7633
PLAY STATION II
2 games $55.00 M
X-Box 360 3 games, like
new $100...Yamaha E u m t
Vintage guitar 2007 Golden
accoustcal $75. 4 wheel Scooter 4 y.o
(352) 220-4540 this Dec. new batteries
POOL FOR SALE cost $165 Installed
ROUND 24' X 54" above 6/10/10 .Exc Cond $500
ground. All new equipt, (352)628-5386 lye mess
lots of extras. Must See Wanted Power
to appreciate!! $1500. wheelchair/scooter
Call for appt 628-5779 (352) 503-3554
PORTABLE BED Sturdy
Single CampNan Foam
Matt $25.Rainbow
Springs 465.8495
Portable Honeywell BUYING US COINS
HEPA Air Cleaner 17000 Beating all Written
$40. 19" Color TV $20. offers. Top $$$$ Paid
352-447-4380 between We Also Buy Gold
12 noon & 8PM Jewelry (352) 228-7676


Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
We Also Buy Gold
Jewelry (352) 228-7676



Ibanez acoustic-electric
guitar $95.Harmonica $2.
352-419-4464
KOSIO KEYBOARD
$100. Tenor Sax $200.
Trupet $125. Clarinet
$125.(352) 566-8216
Left-handed electric
guitar $65.
Microphone $2.
352-419-4464
YAMAHA M-1 ORGAN
many bells & whistles,
w/bench, foot peddle
volume cont. $75.00
352-949-0147








ORECK VACUUM XL
$55.00
White GE range hood
$10.00 never used, mov-
ing 270-8783
OSTERIZER 10 SPEED

BOTH LIKE NEW
637-2949
STYLISH LIGHTS FOR
CEILING FANS (2)Brass
with Shades $75 ea
MUST SEE- Email Pic
352-382-3650
TV$55.00, LAMPS, KITCHEN
OSTERIZER 10 SPEEDk






set, linens, cabinets.

Saturday-Sunday 10-2
1410 Chaplecross Lp.
563-27641978-502-7457.



EXERCISE BIKE
Vitamaster Air Max II,
Triple Action
Asking $60.00 call
352-628-5737 after 10am
HOME GYM
Marcy Diamond Elite
MD-3500. Exc. cond.
Purchased 1/2010,
$300. Obo.
(352) 503-7216

-II

BACKYARD 3MAN TENT
great for kids.
$10
352-726-4480
BUTTERFLY KNIFE
Never used, 4" blade
$20, firm 860-2475
SCAH FOR GUNS &1
GOLD, Concealedc
Weapons Course
Gunslingers 341-4867
CAMP COTFold Aing Alum

like new $15. Rainbow
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238

Pistol
Smith a Wesson 44
Mag. Model #29. Orig.
owner & flawless. $750.
(352) 344-0355
Rifle
SKS, 10 shot, se auo.
Yugo Miritary, w/400
rounds & extras,
$425. Offer or trade.
(352) 270-8903
SOLD

P-38, 9MM 5 mags
Hard Chrome finished
$500.
TAYLOR MADE BURNER
Conc reg. granite
shaft 10.5 exc.cond
$75. & T.M.B.Wesson 44
Mag. Modeshlaft 10#29.5 very
good $75.& Taylor
Made Burner #3 fair-
way wood, like new
$55. Will sell separtely
(352) 382-1372
(352) 382-1372


YOU'LL t THIS!
VIDEO & AUDIO TAPE
CONVERSIONS $5.95
VHS-DVD, Mini DV-DVD,
Audio Cassette Tape-CD
352-628-0639
vhs-dvdconversions.com















Lie.& Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452



DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
K&K Tree & Debris Tree
Trimming 8 Removal
Free Estimates!
746-0632 or 302-7213
R WRIGHT Tree Service

352-341-6827




COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer repair/sales.
(352)344-4839
Computer Repair.
We come to you.
call today visa/mnc
2742-1551/422-6020


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa MCard
352-637-5469




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
optionss 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dole 586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP press. clean/paint
Summer Spec. 100's of
Refs. 352-637-3765
FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleaning..352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 28 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435




AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor. Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273
Mower Repair,
Hernando. Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352- 400-1483





itcebenb9
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. L/c/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




ALTERATIONS
Sr. Discount, Inv.
(352) 345-1438


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings 'Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
BBQ Covers Swing
Covers & Cushions
Repairs .352 613-2518




9VVVVVVV
Seniors Choice Home
Care Services.
Non-Medical Practical
Care in your home.
352-628-0719 We look
forward to serving
you. Lic # 231824




Child Care/Private
Home, Mon.-Fri. all
ages. Citrus Hills Area
(352) 746-5234




A SPARKLING
KLEAN
Maid Service
352-220-7147

DEPENDABLE HOUSE
CLEANING
(352) 400-6565
(352) 419-5758
HOME CLEANING
Res. & Comm. and
LANDSCAPING Service
Call 352-637-0585



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872
ROGERS Construction
All Construction
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
628-0562 (CBC1257141)


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
Qftions, 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
Roofs w/no pressure
lic/ins I 352-341-3300
picardselfstorage.com




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl

GenlMaint/Repalrs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Uc.
ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
OPtions, 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Any Home
Repair.CBC #1253431
(352) 464-3748

CONCRETE PAVERS
Pools, sidewalks, etc.
landscape design/instal
tile home &repairs. 25
yrs exp.(352) 746-5009









FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *
MASTER CRAFTSdMAN
repairs a Affordable
Rates. Refs. Lc. & Ins.
#35836 (352)628-6960


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. Service Calls
352 -302-2366
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699Serving
Citrus Co. Since 1978
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator main
reoalr Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert.
Tech. 352-621-1248
#ER00015377




FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *



A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash.
lawn maint, turn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422


Sales, Service, Carpet,
Vinyl, wood, tile.
Restretch, repair, clean
Mitch (352) 637-6801




ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc132549 302-9269




Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097

JC's CONCRETE
SPECIALTY
Slabs. Driveways.
Patio, Sidewalks
Tractor Work lic/Ins
F2896 352-220-9330
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. 1476, 726-6554


ALUei Nced ,(UM1Mc
Installations by Brian tnci-sis

352-628-7519
www.advancedaluminum.info


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
Renovations Repairs, &
Drywall Quality Work
Ref. Avail. #cbc 1251997
ULc/ns (352) 302-4512



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
Renovations Repairs, &
Drywall Quality Work
Ref. Avail. #cbc1251997
Uc/Ins (352) 302-4512



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep. Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755



All AROUND TRACTOR
LandclearingHaulingSite
Prep,Dnveways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755


HOME CLEANING
Res. & Comm. and
LANDSCAPING Service
Call 352-637-0585









Re/Cmm/Acreage
HENLEY'S GROUND
MAINT. Free Est.
Serving all Citrus Co
(352) 302-6589
L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Acreage
(352) 302-8348
NEED A CHANGE I
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Residential I Comm.
LIc./lns. 352-613-4250

Sm Acreage/Lot
bushhogging, mow-
ing, debris removal
Free Est 352 795-9522




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




ROOTER MAN SEPTIC
Tank Pumping/Repair
Drain Field Clean/Rep.
Lic./Ins. (352) 503-3815


GWet Resulgts
In Th e Hcomefronat
Classifiedsl


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeing"
In Just One Day,
We will Insto/a A Beoutiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old Onet!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!t
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
0005M02


ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190




WIREMASTERS
Home Theatre/TV/
Sound/Install & Service.
BUYWIREMASTERS.COM
(352)503-7361




ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Pricel 6"
Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 621-0881
ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Mobile Massage
Therapy,
$40 a session (Uc. No
58438) 352) 897-4670




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
wherel Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE # CPCO51584










D6 SUNDAY, AUGUTII 1, 2010


AND CHARGER in good
cond. $1150 /best offer.
352-220-4540
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



19FT enclosed, 8FT
high, 8FT wide,
14,000 Ibs., $3,695
(315) 466-2268
6'x10' Utility trailer
enclosed w/ramp
door, new tires & bear-
ings. spare tire. $1,200
(508) 654-8566
GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.

Cargo, Utility, Motor-
cycle & Boat Trailers

352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
Utility Trailer
10 x 6 Open trailer
$480
Call (352) 795-0783



POPEYE WATCH 75TH
ANNIVERSARY $50
NEW, NEVER
WORN-E-MAIL PICS
637-2949


Sel orSw


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





AS SEEN ON TV
Major collector paying
ALL CASH on the spot
for vintage sportscards
(pre-1970). Autographs,
Memorabilia, Coins
And Pawn Tickets.
Call anytime
(216)219-6827 or
(216)322-9898
AS SEEN ON TV Major
collector paying ALL
CASH on the spot for
vintage sports cards
(pre-1970). Autographs,
Memorabilia, Coins
And Pawn Tickets. Call
anytime (216)219-6827
or (216)322-9898
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE AnyArea.
Condition or Situationf
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED: DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS. Will pay
up to $10/Box Cash.
352-621-3001
WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



1 Apple head
CHIHUAHUA
Female
Ready to go!
Call 352-465-6339
352-517-6133
2 LONG HAIRED
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
All female, ready to
go. Call for Info.
352-476-6393 or
352-503-6726


BEAUTIFUL KOI FISH
All sizes, long or short
fin. Show quality or
pond. Great prices
JEAN (352) 634-1783
CHIHUAHUAS First
shots/dewormed.
Asking price $150
First come first serve.
9wks of age
352-201-8004
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Maltese Puppies

babies, beautiful, play-
ful & sassy. Health
certs., & groomed.
$500. (813)333-8540
Pit Bull Puppies
w/ papers, 11 wks old
3 Fem. 1 male, colorful
selections $250.
(352) 601-2600
POMERANIAN PUPS,
2 MALES,
$300 ea.
352-465-6490
POODLE PUPS
AKC, Red, males $450,
tea cup female $650.
Home raised with love
shots, H/C 352 564-2865
Pug Puppies
pure bred, just over
9 wks old., black or
buckskin, home raised,
$350-$400 call for appt.
Crys. Riv. 352795-8054
Pure Bred Pit Bull
Puppies, Big Heads
$50.
Call Anytime
(352) 634-2055
SHI TZU PUPPIES
CKC Registered, home
raised & spoiled, shots,
health cert., parents &
pedigree on hand $400
(352) 503-6249
Shih Tzu' s
Males & Females
$350. to $400.
Chinese Crested
Hairless & Powder Puff
$400. All are
Registered, W/Health
Certs., & Shots.
(352) 563-1479
ShihTzu Puppies
Females $500. Variety of
colors. Registered (ACA),
H/C, shots. Home raised
& loved. Come meet the
parents Call/ for appt.
3902 N. Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)872-8099
(352)270-8827
Siberian Husky Puppies
Reds & Whites, 14 wks.
old. No papers,
$200.
(352) 860-2391


Beautiful 2 males, I I
wks old, tails cropped,
dew claws done,
health certs $300
(352) 628-0206



Arabian Stallion
Registered, exc.
pedigree, 7 yrs. old.
Greenbroke. $600.
(352) 726-9316
REGISTERED MARES
18 year Appaloosa, 7
year paint. sweet horses,
come look and make of-
fer. cp50ish@yahoo.com
517-673-2991



2 Steers
/2/Dairy & /2 Beef, grass
& grain fed, wt. over
600lbs. each.
$550. Ea. obo
(352) 795-7513


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
De t for details
352-563-5966





2002 BAYLINER
A MUST SEEI
18' Bowrider w/traller.
Inci flsh/fndr, safety
vests, water tube etc.
$7,950. Call for direc-
tions. (352) 586-7346
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
BONITO
17'90 hp,evinrude,
bow rider,exc. cond.,
Many extras $2,500.
(352) 628-6367
CAROLINA SKIFF
19.8 DLX C/C 07,
Perfect cond 90 hp
4 stroke Suzuki, trailer
$12,500 352-586-9349
CATAMARAN
40'x 20'. Live Aboard
Edsen steering,12 V
Refrig., anchor winch
$6,500 as Is, 628-2825
CRYSTAL RIVER
MARINE
17' Sundance Skiff
50 Johnson $7,995.
19' Carolina Skiff V
50 Honda $5,850.
17' Pralne 90 SuzukI
$13,995.
20' Pontoon 70
Yamaha $9,995.
22' Hurricane 115
Yamaha $19,995.
HONDA/YAMAHA
SERVICE SECURE
STORAGE
WE NEED BOATS
352-795-2597
EGG HARBOR
'79, 33ft, 13ft Beam,
fully loaded, 95% re-
stored, Too much to list
$12,000. (352) 423-3201
FOUR WINNS
21' Liberator 88, 460
Ford big block, 340hp
king cobra, out driv,
Alum. Continental trial,
1st $4K 352 302-8833
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats

2010 20' Bentley
Pontoon, 40hp,
4 stroke, $14,995
2010 14' Pondtoon
electric motor $6995

Many late model used
Fishing & Pontoon Boats
Avail
(352) 527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
HOMOSASSA
MARINE
NEW PONTOON BLOW
OUT III
2011'S ARE ON THE
WAY
2010'S GOTTA GO!I
Example: 2010 18' Fish
2010 Yamaha T-50
2010 Galv. Trailer
WAS $ 20,995.
NOW $17,994.
www.homosassa
marine.com
WE SELL BOATS ON
CONSIGNMENT
(352) 628-2991
HURRICANE
03' Godfrey, 4 strk. 200
Yamaha. Many extras
great cond. w/trailer.
$25K.(352)302-9681
JON BOAT
07, 14' w/trailler 15 hp
Yahama 4 strk. troll
motor, fishfinder + more
$3100 352-560-7166
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,500 (352) 628-0281
PRO SPORTS
21 ft. 6", Baykat, 2004,
200 stroke, Suzuki, low
hrs.. T top. Jack Plate, 2
live wells, GPS Garmin,
FF, alum, tandem trir.
$22,500 (352) 442-3119
PROLINE
21' 150 hp Evinrude,
cutty cab, good shape
alum trallr $5500 will talk
(352) 489-3661
RIVERHAVEN
MARINA


1996 Quest
19' Bay Boat
Johnson 115
$7,995.00

2000 Sea Swirl
19' Bow Rider
4.3L I/O $6000

2000 Boston Whaler
18' Dauntless
Mere 135 Opti
$17,995
2005 Sea Pro
19 Bay Boat
Yamaha 4strk
$15,900
Call for Prices
(352) 628-5545


Crystal Riv. Lited, canal
to river & Gulf. Up to
25FT, no sails 795-1986
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Biminl, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$6,900. (352) 382-3298
SEA-DOO
Bombardier. Twin carb.
new battery & motor &
long neck trailer, gar
kept runs great S1K
352-302-6705
SEAFOX 09
17' Suzuki 90, 4 Str, 10 hrs
on boat & motor, 5 yr
warranty on motor, trailer
$14,500 352-795-2053
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225, 400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$19,500. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
14' Alumacraft
15 Honda $4,295.
J16' Carolina Skiff
25 Yamaha $4,495.
2072 Sea Ark
90 Johnson $7,295.
18' SeaChaser
90 Yamaha $10,495.
20' Sweetwater
Pontoon T50 Yamaha
$9,995.
WE NEED BOATS
352-563-5510
TRIUMPH 195CC
'08 115 Yamaha 4 stk,
Tamden Trlr, Lowera-
nce, Radios, jump
seats, bow cushions.
$24,000. 352-212-5810
TROPHY 22FT
1999 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force,
E-Z Load Tand.Trlr. elec-
tronics will sacrifice for
$7900. 352-726-1489






















-e ,icles


'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 39 K Mi.
NON SMOKER NO
PETS, Immaculate
Loaded $27,700 obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
AUTO.BOAT I*
A.M.*
DONATIONS
45 years old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
Tax Deductible *
COACHMAN
'03. Class A, 30 ft.,
29K mi., like new
$25,800.
(352) 637-2735
COACHMAN
05' Concord, 3 slide
outs, fully loaded as-
sume payments, like
new, (352) 341-5948
COACHMAN
1997, Class B, Motor
Home, very clean, ex-
cel. cond. 2 cold airs
$13,000. 352-220-2112
COACHMAN
84' 22', loaded, exc.
cond. Needs nothing,
but a driver, $6,900.
obo (352) 726-9647
COACHMAN
90' New transmission,
tires, breaks, full bath
sleps. 6, loaded,15 mpg
$5K. Firm.(352)795-1590
Crewcab
1972, Ford,
38 years same family
$2,000
(352) 447-6038
DAMON ULTRA-
SPORT
'02 DIESEL PUSHER 38'
300 CAT, FREIGHTLINER
CHASS, SXS, FRIG,
ICEMAKER, W/D
FULL PAINT, 2 SLIDES
MANY MORE OPTIONS,
FULLY EQUIPPED,
$78,000. 352-419-4332
Dutchstar
$6,300.
1994 Newmar, 34ft,
w/ slideout, 58k ml.
(352) 447-6038
ENDEAVOR
'98, 38', w/slide, turbo
diesel, 12 mpg,6spd.
Jake levelors, air ride,
7.5 gen., 4 DR w/ ice,
DSS, W/D $45,900
352-228-0976
FLEETWOOD
04' Vista, 31' w/ work-

$26,000. (352)860-0559
(352) 228-1651
FLEETWOOD
94' Bounder, 34',
wide body. celler
model motor home,
REDUCED TO $14,000
(352) 628-7993
FLEETWOOD
Class A '94, Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self cont,
sips 6. 2 LCD TV's
$13,900 352-795-6736
GEORGIA BOY
05' 36', Pursuit, 2 slides.
Fully loaded, exc.
cond. Must Seel
$45,000. (352) 503-5002
LAYTON 5TH WHEEL
99' 34', 2 slides, $12,000.
Or pkg. deal w/00' cus-
tom 350, 4 diesel 4 dr.
$25k (352) 628-3617
Luxury Motor Home
Diesel Pusher,
ready to go
many extras
304-281-3744
PACE ARROW
35' Class A, 1996, dual
AC. new tires, 5K gen,
60K mi. Exc Cond. $25K.
352-382-1000
SOUTHWIND
1990 36' Class A, 52k MI
4 TV's good shape, gas
engine. $4,800 Crystal
River 727-534-1655
WINNEBAGO
08' 38' Adventurer,
V-10, gas, work horse
chassis, w/d, 4 dr.
fridg/icemaker, sleep
# queen bed, elec
fire price HD TV, King
Dome satellite, auto
level, back-up cam.,
To many opts. to
mention. $125.K.
(352) 897-4451


$12.00/best offer.
344-9573




WINNEBAGO
2008 "Class C" Ford
V10, Outlook, 1 slide.
Exc cond. New Mi
chelin
tires & alignment, Just
Serviced. Under Fact
Warr: ext warranty on
coach. 32K miles,
Hoses, leveling biks, etc
convey. Asking $59,900
352-503-3611
Winnebago
85', 27ft, New Interior
$1,000
(352) 344-1668
WINNEBAGO
94' 31' Brand new gen-
erator, brakes, batter-
ies, & vehicle tow trailer
best offer 352-637-5525



GULFSTREAM
'08, Amerilite, 23 ft.,
excel. cond.
$9,000 obo
(352) 726-2750
HOLIDAY RAMBLER
05' Alumascape 5th wh.
29', 3 slides, no smoke
or pet owner. W/D, rear
kit. $25K. incis nation
wide 1000 trail camp
memebersip
(352) 465-4081
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
ROCKWOOD 30
2005, Model 8285SS,
5th wheel. 1 slldeout.
exc. cond $10,500 abo
352-422-1789
ROYAL INT.
40ft 5th Wheel, 1988
All amenities, very
liveable, New tires.
$4,500. (352) 628-0847
WILDWOOD
'05, 26 ft, 1 slide out,
Great Shape,
$7,200.
352-422-5472

Auo ars
Accssoie


1969 Mopar 440 Engine
+ trans, engine runs
real good, 906 heads +
Holly Carb, MSD Ign.,
$2,100.
(352) 503-7211
New 16" Mustang Rims
dealer cost $222 ea.
4 for $350
(352) 621-4927
Ranger Tonneau Cover
Jason Brand, white, fi-
berglass, w/ lock.
cost $695 will sell for
$299 Cash
Ed, 726-5677, Eve. 6-9
RUNNING BOARDS
New for Gm Products
Van ,Truck, SUV,
chrome $180 obo.
(352) 465-6558
SMITTY'S AUTO
(352) 628-9118
Service Now Availlf!

Vehicle Sales and
SERVICE
WE pay CALSHfor all
vehicles.
Trades are WELCOME
We have Used Pars
Call us for your
SERVICE NEEDS
(352) 628-9118
VAN SEAT
15 pass. fits Ford 2003
Maxi-Van, great cond
$100.(352) 527-3177


Vehicles

$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trks.
No title, no problem. I
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
--- --- J
$$CASH PAID$$
Vehicles, Dead or Alive,
New or Used Parts
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Not!
352-445-3909
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID $150 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON
UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms,
Breast Cancer Info
www.ubcf.lnfo FREE
Towing, Tax Deducti-
ble, Non-Runners Ac-
cepted,
888-468-5964


ACURA
2005, TL, 60k orig miles
leathersunroof
14988 or 289mo.
1866-838-4376

American
Auto Sales
of Crystal River
Guaranteed
Credit Approval

Summer
Blow Out!

'00 Chevy Cav. Z24
Coupe
$5,495 To $3,995
'99 Pontiac
Grand Am
$5.495 To $3,495

'99, Chevy Malibu
$4,995 To $3,495
'99 Dodge Neon
$5,495 To $3,995
'03, Chevy Impala
Discounted To $7,295

Discount for Cash
Warranty's Available

(352) 794-6012
AcTire Kdom

BUICK
'03, Park Ave., Loaded.
runs, drives & looks like
new, garage kept. 98k
mi. $8000.obo 220-2112
CHEVROLET
08' impala SS, 24K. Mi.
Fully equip'd, like new.
Under MFG. Warranty
$18,900. (352) 527-4475


Auto, Home, Boat, RV
Motorcycle & Morel
352-794-3820
CHEVY
2009 Impala LT
leather, sunroof ,26k
orig miles, assume
payments @229mo
1866-838-4376

CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser
nicely equipped
w low ml., assume
payments @159mo
1866-838-4376
CHRYSLER
SPORTY WHITE 2000 Se-
bring JX1 convertible,,
in showroom cond.
Low ml. $6000. 382-7002
CORVETTE
Conv. 91,2 tops, new
paint, top & leather 91k
ml. $10, 500. exc. cond
(352)628-5513
DODGE
2005 Neon SXT, all the
toys this one wont last
39k orig miles assume
payments @149mo
1866-838-4376
FORD
93' Crown Vic., Mother
In Laws car, 38K. Ml.
Exc. cond. $3,995
(603) 860-6660
HONDA
1999 Accord LX
59k orig miles
unbelievable
$6990 don't hesitate
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2008 EXL Accord
leather, sunroof
16990 or assume
payments @299mo
1866-838-4376
JAGUAR XJ6
94' Green, leather Int.
loaded,under 99K. + Mi.
In exc. cond. runs great
$3,800. (352) 613-7117
KIA
07' Rondo EX, V-6.
Very clean, 27K. mi.
Deluxe CD/Stereo sys-
tem, moon roof & lug-
gage rack. $13,500.
(352) 726-8358
LINCOLN
'07, MKZ, 15l, miles, red
exterior ind leather In-
terior w/ wood trim. AM
FM In Dash 6 CD player
Sat. Rddfoi, mint cond.
$18,495.{352) 746-6584
LINCOLN
'89 ToWoCar, 1 own,
29K mniles.'mint Like
new, lee blue, leather
$5,900, (352)637-7117
MAZDA
94' MIata, A/C, auto,
$2,895. (352) 344-2883
Nissan 03
Silver 350Z new
crank,chain, harden
push rods, cold chrome
Intake, Tit. Exh. 18"
chrome rims/tires, pig
back comp. nitrous,
$33K (352) 586-4620
SATURN
'07, Sky, red conver.,
auto, 10,800 ml., trans.
ext. warr., 1 own. ga-
raged, many opt. $24K
obo 352-212-5810
SATURN
2000 SC1, 3 dr, stand, 30+
mpg, 105K ml, Exc
cond! Well malnt.
$2500. 564-0223
SUBARU
95 Legacy LS wagon,
4 whl dr. auto. 95k ml
org owner, moon roof
$4900 (352) 637-2803
SUZUKI
08' Forenza,.51K. MI.
All power, cruise,
keyless ent., anti theft,
$7,800. (352) 302-9217
TOYOTA
05 Prius, Pkg 5, 37K mi.
60mpg, well equipped,
warranty, like new
$13K (352) 220-2112
vw
06' Jetta, 4 dr.,gas, 5
spd. auto, 53K. MI.
clean car. $10,900.
(352) 601-0936
VW
'09, Jetta TDI, 45MPG,
automatic, sunroof,
sirus radio, Michilan tires
$20,000 (352) 746-3069
VW BEETLE
'05S, convertible,
fully loaded, like new,
gar. kept. 28,108ml. ,
$13,857, 352-382-3269


CHEVY
1983 Camaro T-Top Z28
$1800 352-621-0114
352-476-1662
CHEVY
'55, 2 dr. wagon, frame
off/restoration. $25,900
or Obo.(727) 946-3794
(352) 419-6045
CHRYSLER 1954
Imperial, GREAT
HOBBY CAR, Needs
Engine $1,700/obo.
352-228-0597
CORVETTE
03' Z06, 50th. anniv.
edition. $30K., 18,800
Mi. Show car cond.,
fully loaded, heads up
display, new tires. Da-
vid@(352) 637-6443
FORD
1977, LTD, 72K org. ml..
460 eng., auto trans.
2 DR, garage kept
$2,700 (352) 726-6197
JAGUAR
Classic 1985 Vander
Plas 4-dr. V-6 new Perilli
radial tires, rebuilt auto.
transm. (Cost $2,000).
Rear seat has a slight
tear. rust free Fla. car.
2nd owner. Asking
$5,595 firm. Serious buy-
ers only (352) 344-8334
or cell 352-302-0850
MERCURY
71' Cougar Cony.
351 auto. 72K. actual
mi. Nice car, $5,500.
(352) 344-9153
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hard top,
29K mi., I ow, excel
cond. $12,990Call
352-621-4600





-h * * *
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966


bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes. $4,500.
352-726-5926



CHEVROLET
2005 Colorado, ext.
cab. auto 33.600 miles,
$9,500
(352) 637-5322
CHEVY
2006 Colorado LS
x cab auto
assume payments at
159mo call
1866-838-4376

'DODGE
2008 Dakota
crew cab sxt 3.7 V6
11,551 orig miles
tunnel cover and
more call for deal
1866-838-4376
DODGE
97' Ram 2500, 4 wh. dr.,
auto, liner, tow, turbo
diesel, 246K. ml.
$6,575. (352) 634-2590
FORD '01
F-250 XL Super
dutyTrition crew cab
chrome whis.fenders,
running bds. 97k ml.
exc $9100 352 795-0288
FORD
2005 F-250 Lariat 6.0
diesel 4x4 crew cab
51k orlg this oneIs a
diamond call for
deal 1866-838-4376

FORD
2007 F-150 Lariat
crew cab low miles 1
owner call for deal
1866-838-4376
TOYOTA
1987, 4x4, a/c, tinted
Window new tires
runs & looks good
$2500 obo352-302-6705



BUICK
2005 Rainer CXLAll
options,moonroofleather,
6cyl,56k mi.for $13,700
Call 352-344-3112
DODGE
DURANGO 03, 4whl dr.
1 owner, 54K ml leather
3rd row seat Exc cond
inside/out, new tires
$15K (352) 795-1015
FORD
2005, Expedition XLT
3rd row seating a
rare find take over
payments @239mo
1866-838-4376

FORD
2007 Edge SEL
leather, sunroof low
miles, assume
payments @299mo
wac 1866-838-4376
JEEP
05' Grand Cherokee
Limited, 5.7 Heml, 4x4.
58,312K. Mi. leather Intl,
Iod'ed,chrome Wheels,
Sun Roof $16,750.00
Bob. (352)212-2829
KIA
'02, Sportage, 5spd,
black, tint, well main-
tained $4,100. abo
(352) 795-8792



CHEVY
'02, Express Cargo Van
4.3 L, 76,200 ml. excel
cond. maker offer
352-897-4447, 697-1384
CHRYSLER
05' Touring Town &
Country. LWB, 4 Capt.
seats, 19K. Mi. Reduced
$10,750.(352) 341-4864
CHRYSLER
2006 Town n Country
40k orig miles
rear ac and more
13990 or 259mo
1866-838-4376

CHRYSLER
2009 Town n country
touring leather
power doors, and
much more dvd
20299 or 359mo
1866-838-4376
FORD
'05, Econollne, white,
Ac, new transmission,
good tires. One owner.
$5,200 (352) 465-7469
FORD
2003, Windstar
51k dual ac one
owner, 7990 or 159mo
better hurry
1866-838-4376
FORD
'96, E150. 302 & over-
drive 190K, no leaks,
runs good $795.
(352) 563-1993
FORD
98 E250, new tires &
battery, runs good
factory shelving &
I-,,-t'L- r r/~,',,t P 01" m I


r"U l, 'o oFJUIibli cll0
2002 Like new ATV,
looks new, almost never
used, black, 300 miles,
$3,200 (352)746-6604,
(218)529-9331



HARLEY
05' Ultra Classic, 10,900
Ml. newly serviced,
ready to ride, loaded.
$14,500 (352) 465-3668
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'03 ROADKING Fact.
custom. Hi pert.
Over $43k In receipts.
17k ml. $12,200
563-0615 Crystal River
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05 DynaGlIde, black,
13K. Mi. Wind shield,
chrome, one owner.
Warranty/2012. $9,500.
(352) 672-4348
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05, Fat Boy, 13K mi.,
stage one upgrade,
extra chrome $11,000
Obo.(352) 634-4401
Harley Sportster
2008 1200 XL, 2,000 mi.
Power clutch, sissy bar,
saddlebags, windshield,
upgraded seat, engine
guard, more. White/gray
two-tone.Pristine. $8400
firm. 352-400-5016
HONDA
02 VTX 1800 R
7,900 mi, Exc Cond.
$5,999 w/extras
352-212-8860
HONDA
'02, Sabre 1100,
10,700mi., many extras,
excel. cond. $3,875
obo. (352) 344-4537


'03, GL 1800 candy or-
ange Goldwing Cham-
pion Trike, w/ matching
custom escapade trir.
$8,000 In ad ons, 35k
entle ml. garage kept
25,900 Contact Darrell
352-302-9427
HONDA
1999, 1100 American
Classic Edition,
windshield, hard bags,
lots of chrome, excel.
cond. low, ml., blk w/
candy red $3,500
(352) 621-3274
HONDA TRIKE
'04, 1800 Champion
Conversion E-Z steer
AM/FM,-CB, and more
27,000 ml. excel. cond.
$24K obo 352-465-7755
Over 3000 Homes
and roperties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.co


KAWASAKI
1981 KZ 750 LTD Black
good looking bike
runs good 16,000 miles
$1,495. (352) 249-7027
KAWASAKI
2006 Concourse
2,600 miles $5,499
obo
(352) 697-2760
KAWASAKI
2006 Concourse
2,600 miles $5,499
obo
(352) 697-2760
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500.
obo. (352) 527-0679
TRIUMPH
'05 Rocket 3, 14K. Mi.
Black, loaded, $8,300
Obo.(352) 746-1895


372-0801 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
FictitIous Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
GRIME STOPPERS
CLEANING SERVICES
located at P.O. Box 2543,
Bushnell. FL 33513, In the
County of Citrus Intends
to register the said name
with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida
Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Bushnell, FL.
this 28 day of July. 2010.
/s/ Christina Strong
Owner
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, Aug.. 1, 2010.


370-0801 SUCRN
8/20 meeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Notice:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a Regular Meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 20th day of August, 2010 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166. Lecanto, FL
34461. This will also serve as the Annual Public meeting.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that The Annual Public Hearing will be held before thi
meetina from 9:30AM 10:30AM.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further Information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1300 S. Lecanto Highway, Building #22. Lecanto, FL 34461. Telephone: (352)
527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding Is made, which Includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal Is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
GARY BARTELL, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published In the Citrus County Chronicle, August 1, 2010.

371-0801 SUCRN
William & Cynthia Cason Order to Demolish
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 91849
Description of property: AK: 1170745 and legally described as GREEN ACRES ADD 6
UNIT 2 PB 7 PG 70 LOT 257
WILLIAM & CYNTHIA CASON
4233 S COLONY TER, HOMOSASSA FL 34446
On April 22, 2010, an order was Issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Official
to demolish the mobile home & shed on the property located at: 4233 S. Colony
Terr.; Homosassa, FL. If the property owners) fall to comply with this order, the Code
Compliance Division will Issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal Interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Development Services, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL 3-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.

Published In Citrus County Chronicle, August 1,.2010.

357-0801 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC MEETING OF THE CITRUS COUNTY CANVASSING BOARD
PRIMARY ELECTION
LOGIC AND ACCURACY TESTING, CANVASSING OF
ABSENTEE BALLOTS AND POST- ELECTION AUDIT
The Citrus County Canvassing Board will convene at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, August 6,
2010 to conduct a Logic and Accuracy Test on the tabulating equipment to be used
In the August 24, 2010 Primary Election. This meeting will be held at the Citrus County
Supervisor of Elections Office, 120 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, and In ac-
cordance with the Sunshine Law of Florida, all meetings are open to the public, the
press, and representatives of political parties. All candidates or their designated rep-
resentative are Invited to attend. The purpose of this test is to ascertain that the
equipment will correctly count the votes cost for all offices and on all measures. This
test Is held pursuant to Section 101.5612 (1) Florida Statutes and verified by the can-
vassing board.
The canvassing of absentee ballots will begin on Wednesday, August 18, 2010 at 8:30
a.m. In the Elections Office and will be available for public Inspection between 8:00
a.m. and 8:30 a.m. The Canvassing Board will reconvene on Saturday, August 21,
2010 at 1:00 p.m. to continue canvassing the absentee ballots and again on Tues-
day, August 24,2010 beginning at 9:00 a.m. until final certification.
The Post Election Audit will commence on Wednesday, September 01, 2010 at 8:30
a.m. In the Supervisor of Elections office. A race and precinct will be randomly se-
lected and Immediately following the random selection the manual audit will com-
mence and continue until completed.
Persons with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodation to participate should
call the Elections Office at (352) 341-6740: (352) 341-6752 (TDD).
Susan Gill, Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450
Published one,(1) time In Citrus County Chronicle, Aug. 1, 2010.

369-0801 SUCRN
Utility Line Crew Construction Agenda BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
meet in Regular Session on Tuesday, August 24, 2010, at 3:30 P.M., In the Commission
Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida. A public hearing will be conducted pursuant to Section 286.011, whereas under
Chapter 255.20 the County Is required to bid projects above $298A,465 (indexed) un-
less it Is exempted as allowed by this same statute. Exemption is being sought for
these projects pursuant to Chapter 255 of the Florida Statutes, namely 255.20(1)(c)9
which allows an exemption. The purpose for the public meeting is to consider
whether It Is In the public's best Interest to perform the two construction projects CIP
2010 for a water main and CIP U2007-17 for a wastewater forcemain using Citrus
County Board of County Commissioners own services, employees, and equipment.
CIP 2010-10 Is for construction of 4,700 feet of 12 Inch pipe from CR. 486 along the
WIthlacoochee Trail, across US 41, along E. Loulse Lane and shall tie Into the existing
12 Inch water main along SR 200. This project shall Improve system pressure and fire
protection and will provide future expansion capabilities along US 41 as well as en-
suring greater reliability to the Intersection (US 41 & CR 486) where a water line cur-
rently exists. CIP U2007-17 Is for construction of 3,880 feet of 8 Inch diameter force
main from CR. 486 along the Withlacoochee Trail and tie Into the existing 6 Inch
force main along US 41. The combined Engineer's Opinion of Probable Cost for
these projects Is $632,500 (CIP 2010 Estimated Cost: $390,500 and CIP U2007-17 Esti-
mated Cost: $242,000).

Documents related to the two projects,. Including details to the Engineer's Opinion of
Probable Cost are available for public inspection at the Department of Water Re-
sources Office at Suite 202, located at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida
34461, during normal business hours of 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday. Phone contact for this office Is 352-527-7646
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sloners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing he will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made which record shall In-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical Impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560. at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
GARY BARTELL, CHAIRMAN
Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida
Published In Citrus County Chronicle. August 1. 2010.

353-0801 SUCRN
To: Daniel Leroy Smith 2009-DP-589 Term. of Parental Rights
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2009-DP-589
IN THE INTEREST OF: M.S. DOB: 06-29-2004
D.S. DOB: 06-06-2006
Minor Child(ren)
NOTICE OF ACTION, SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY HEARING FOR
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: Daniel Leroy Smith
L/K/A unknown
You are hereby notified that a petition under oath has been filed In the
above-styled court for the termination of your parental rights as to M.S.., a female
child born on 29th day of June, 2004, In Citrus County, Florida; D.S., a female child
born on the 6th day of June, 2006 In Citrus County, Florida; and for placement of the
children with the Florida Department of Children and Families for subsequent adop-
tion, and you are hereby commanded to be and appear before General Magis-
trate Keith Schenck of the Circuit Court or any Judge assigned to hear the above
cause, at the Advisory Hearing on August 16, 2010 at 1:30 PM at the Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, inverness, FL 34450.
YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT
TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE
CHILDREN NAMED IN THE PETITION.
YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST NOTIFY THE
COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO
BE APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person
with a disability who needs any accommodation In order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact John Sullivan at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue. Inverness, FL 34450 or phone (352) 341-6700 within two working days of your re-
ceipt of Notice of Advisory Hearing for Termination of Parental Rights. If you ore
hearing impaired or voice Impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks In the Cit-
rus County Chronicle's Classified Section.
Dated this 7th day of July, 2010 at Inverness, Citrus County, Florida.
BETTY STRIFLER, Clerk of Courts
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Mlchelle Apple, Deputy Clerk

Published four (4) times In Citrus County Chronicle, July 11, 18, 25 & Aug. 1, 2010.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Section E-SUNDAY, AUGUST1,2010



O ME COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDE


I Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E6


~- -'--U.
- ...

~zj


Howard Luttrell shows off his hosta
garden. The retired Marine raises
more than 400 varieties of hostas,
including the earth angel in the fore-
ground.
MICHAEL PATRICK/Knoxville News Sentinel


wj^q -,
ONO:^t^. ^*/""' .^


-i


I


;2-


Cs~:


I ,i








E2 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ZUUU W. VtHMtNA PL.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/3BA/2CG Custom Built in 2002
* 1.4 acre comer lot Living & Family Rooms
* All Appliances and window treatments
PETER & MARVIA KOROL I"
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


1021 W. CHAPLAIN IN., CITRUS SPRINGS
3BR/2BA/2CG
Kitchen w/ Eat-in Area
Screened & Carpeted Lana
Split Floor Plan
Irrigation System
Detached Storage Shed/Workshop
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.nel


742 W BANNISTER DR., CITRUS SPRINGS
4BR/3BA/2CG
Split Foor Plan
Kitchen w/ Eat-in Area
Beautiful Master Bath
Heated Pool w/ Spa
Nice Comer Lot
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 iI
Email: lenpolmnr@remax.net


3889 H. INDIANRIVER DR.
HERNANDO
* 3BD/3BA/2CG Solar Heated Pool
* Great Rm + Office Fenced yard
* Built in 2002 2258 sf living

PETER & MARVIA KOROL .,
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875










BUILT IN 1996 THIS CB HOME
SITS ON 4.5 ACRES OF PASTURE
Bring your horses] It has 4 bed/2 Baths/2 car
garage, Ig. living room, formal dining room,
Florida or family room. Fully applianced
kitchen, laminate floors. Pride of ownership
throughout! Pole barn and stalls.
DEB INFANTINE (352) 302-8046
debinfntine@yahoo.com rnh* j aMaCr.niiiarn ,


10 MIMOSA CT., SUGARMILL WOODS
Sweetwater Tradewinds Model
with Salt Pool.
3/2/2 with Office/Den.
Many Extras!
Call Today for Appointment.
SVAL MAHONEY (352)220-4023
Email: moahboey@iampabay.rr.com
SAiLY CURE (352)-220-3001
Email: scuretampabay.rr.com


4<,;
r-rN T W T, i


INFO

--H HOUSE #


CRYSTAL RIVER
Singlewide on 2/2 Acres.
2BR, 2BA
with an Inground Pool.
Bring your tools & mower.
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyallman@remax.nel


NEED A LOT OF SPACE??
LOOK NO FURTHER.
This is itl 2006 triple wide situated on a fully
fenced acre off that beaten path. Living,
dining, family room and a large eat-in kitchen,
plus 4 bedrooms make a great home for a
large family. Two decks.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 71
Email: cnadal@earlhlink.nel


* zi2z on '/4 acre lot
* 1559 Sq.ft. of liv. Built 1979
* Large living area Nice trees
* Public water & sewer Nice laundry area
* Family room used as 3rd bedroom
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kaaningham@remax.net


LOOKING FOR SOMETHING INEXPENSIVE
AND READY TO MOVE IN? HERE IT IS!
Sits on a clean comer lot right in the middle
of Crystal River and close to everything. 2/1
with new front deck, new microwave hood
and all cleaned up for you. No side or back
neighbors eitherll Owner says sell, so come
look and make an offer.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: caadal@earthlink.nel


* Yes the price is right!!
* 1988 3/2 split floor plan
* 5 Years or newer Roof, A/C unit
* 5 Year or newer Water softener/filter system
* 5 Years or newer Appliances
* Enclosed Florida room
* Fenced in backyard Room for a pool
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200 i
Email: cheryllambern@remax.nel


WOW! WON'T LAST 3 Bedroom,
2 bath, with vaulted ceilings, wood floor
kitchen, caged inground pool and six
foot vinyl privacy fence on large lot.
Over 2000 sf. under roof and 1500 sf.
living, in quiet neighborhood.
MONICA SAIDARRIAGA (352) 476-8695 1ECT I


BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY!
3/2+2 car gar. Beautiful street but
close to stores, doctor, etc. Move-in
condition. LR, DR, plus large family
room and patio. Lg. kitchen. Priced
to sell!
VICKI LOVE 352-697-0712
www.VickiloveHomes.com


CRYSIAl RIVER WATERFROIHT Modem 3/2/2 waterfront home that
meets the No Flood" Building code. Formal din area, eat-in
kitchen, pantry, wooden cabinets, plant shelves, tile flooring.
Master suite has walk-in closets, walk-in shower, garden tub &
dual sinks. Kil., liv. rm. & master BR have a great view of the
water Tiled screened-in porch with built-in Jacuzzi, new rip rap
seawall with large double dock & fish cleaning station. Easy
access to Crystal River & Gulf. Enjoy Beautiful sunsets,
manatees, birds & world class fishing. Short Sale.
RICHARD VENTICINQUE (352) 795-2441 F 3
Email: rikhardv@remax.net
www.dtruscounty-florida-realestate.com


2929 FOX COURT, INVERNESS
* 3.2 acres of azaleas, palms and Century oaks
* Screened pool and 24x24 detached garage & workshop
* Almost 1.524 sq. feet under air
* Newer roof. drainfield and AC compressor
* New well & water system, refrigerator & range
' Very large family room.
lILLIAN A. WILSON (352) 613-3679 iimEa cT
Email: lillianwilson@remax.net


3 I







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E3


Don't let summer weather



sock it to your water usage


The dog days of sum- lot more water for our
mer have arrived, and homes in the long run.
in many With that in
communities, mind, here is my
water-use restric- new list of sum-
tions are in full mertime water-
swing. You may s a v i n g
have noticed that suggestions. I
your water pres- don't expect
sure has also everyone to use
slowed down due every tip on this
to the high de- list, but if each of
mand. us picks out a few
Remember r, Ed Del Grande favorites, we can
everybody suffers ASK THE create bigger
when water lev- PLUMBER water reserves in
els are low. each area of the
You've heard me country until the
say this before, and I'll say it cooler fall weather kicks in.
again: If we all cut down just 1. Turn off the water:
a little bit with our personal While brushing your teeth
water use, we'll all have a or shaving, please keep the


1 ID s W.
Morrison Built .E
22/2/2

Class to cover water


usage guidelines _,,


Special to the Chronicle
Water, water, everywhere
and not a drop to drink But
wait! Haven't the water re-
strictions changed? Aren't
we free to water now?
Do you want to learn
about water, where it comes
from, how much to use,
when to use your sprinkler
system, or how to calibrate
sprinkler systems? Come to
one of the free Master Gar-
dener Volunteer Plant Clin-
ics to learn about water in
Citrus County. The August
topic is "Water and You."
Master Gardener Volun-
teer Plant Clinics meet at
various libraries throughout
Citrus County. The schedule
for the August free plants
clinics is:
E 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
4- Floral City Library, Flo-
ral City.
1 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 10
- Lakes Region Library, In-
verness.


1:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 11 Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills.
1:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 13
- Coastal Region Library,
Crystal River.
1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
18 Citrus Springs Library,
Citrus Springs.
2 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 24
- Homosassa Library, Ho-
mosassa.
If water isn't your concern
- if you have a well or ac-
cess to "free" water such as
the Gulf or a nearby pond or
stream it is still a good
idea to learn about water
usage and its impact on
everyone. Master gardener
volunteers will be available
to discuss this topic, answer
questions, identify plant
problems and offer solu-
tions at any of these free
clinics.
For more information,
please call Citrus County
Extension Office at 527-
5700.


faucet off.
2. Cut just one minute off
your shower time: Your
home can save more than
750 gallons a year by follow-
ing this simple, water-saving
trick
3. Landscape with native
or drought-tolerant plants:
Especially in drier areas, if
you use native plants and/or


grasses that live naturally in
dry climates, you'll water
less.
4. Replace old, water-guz-
zling toilets: Installing new,
high-efficiency toilets in
place of older models can
save thousands of gallons of
water per year.
See : .,,Page E13


LKINGSBAY 795-1555
"TT"'A lMV,"r 478 NE 3RD ST.
7~- REAE... CRYSTAL RIVER

$1_26,500


Bult in 1988 THE ISLANDS CONDO WATEr
ainless Kitchen 2/2 BOAT DOCk
beautifully Decorated Quality Furnished Waterview
49-7642 Newly Painted 'Best waterfron


FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and en-
gagement announcements, anniversaries, birth an-
nouncements and first birthdays.
* Call 563-5660 for details.


CLOSED OYER1L5 MILLION IN SALWS Yl1!
AWARD WINNING
J de. MULI-MIUWON $$$ PRODUCER
; 10)74646700
1 (C) 302.3179
5.. ,tet WEEKS REALM
.. wesellrealestatefatyahoo.com

22 S. Fillmore St. 3/2 ........$39,900 3214 N. Juniperus Way 2/1. $74,900
51 Regina Blvd. 2/2 ..........$54,900 87 Regina Blvd. 2/2..........$75,000
312 S. Washington 2/2....$54,900 204 S. Adam St. 2/2/2.......$84,900
63 S. Davis 2/1 ...................$54,900 208 S. Tyler St. 2/2/2.........$89,900
28 S. Lincoln St. 2/1 .........$59,900 318 S. Jackson St. 212/2..$89,900
3 Idaho St. 2/2/2 ..................$69,900 3170 N. Starflower Ter.
211 S. Osceola 2/1 ............$69,900 2/2/2.............................. $89,900
Oak Ridge 6058 N. White Palm Way 3/2/2, pool, summer kit........$154,900


4375 N. Mayan Dr. 3/2/3, pool, 1.75 acres.........................$289,900
1854 W. Redding 3/2/3, pool, 1 acre.................................. $299,900

3519 N. Woodgate Dr. The Glen, 2/2/1.............$49,900
3637 N. Laurelwood Lp Lakeside, 2/2/1............................$74,900
1708 W. Spring Meadow Lp. Brentwood, 2/2/1..............$129,900
1064 W. Diamond Shore Terra Vista, 3/2/2, pool................$269,900


H SUAAMMER DEALS


a,


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


P .MAN


L






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tools a terrific gift


for handyman hubby


Q My husband reads
your column. Your
0 advice has helped
him to maintain our home. I
would like to buy
him the various 1-
tools he needs,
but everywhere I
go they have dif-
ferent sugges-
tions of what to
buy for him.
What do you N
think he needs in
his tool collec- A
tion? Dwight
A: Having the HO
proper tools MAINTE
makes any job so
much easier, and
tools make perfect gifts for
the do-it-yourself home-
owner.
First, check your hus-
band's toolbox to make sure
you don't buy something he
already has. A basic tool kit
will contain a claw hammer
(a 16-ounce version will do),
different sizes of standard
and Phillips screwdrivers,
pliers, wire cutters, a box
knife, safety glasses and, of
course, a tape measure.
To tackle most small


home-repair projects, he
will also need a handsaw,
coping saw, nail-set (punch),
a standard-size handy bar,
as well as a
ai miniature handy
bar, a cat's paw
i for pulling nails,
side-cutting pli-
ers, and needle-
nose pliers.
Find pliers
with rubber grips
to protect the
user from electri-
Barnett cal wiring. Also
ME consider a car-
NANCE center's tool belt,
pocket square
and a sturdy pair
of sawhorses or a sturdy
workbench with built-in
wood vise clamps. Plumbing
projects will require two
pairs of Channellock pliers,
two pipe wrenches and a
crescent wrench, and don't
forget a flashlight.
Every handyman can use
a variety of nails, screws,
picture hangers and various
fasteners, all of which can
be found in pre-stocked

See TOOLS/Page E7


Summer camping on a budget


When you think fru-
gal family vaca-
tions, camping
comes to mind. How much
can a tent and
some bug spray
cost compared to
airfare and hotel
accommoda-
tions, right? Un-
fortunately, if
you're a novice
camper and don't
plan ahead, it
can be far more Sara
expensive than
you anticipated. FRU
How have you LIV
camped on a
budget? Do you have any
camping tips?
Here are a few ideas to
keep your camping ex-
penses to a minimum.
GEAR: You can get by
with a tent and tarp, sleep-
ing bags, toiletries, clothing,
a cooler for food/water and
dinnerware, but you might
want to consider additional
items such as a cook stove


or Dutch oven (for campfire
cooking), sleeping pads, pil-
lows or air mattresses,
flashlights, first-aid kit and
a plethora of
items to make
your trip more
comfortable.
Visit www.love
theoutdoors.
com/camping/
checklists.htm
for a handy
camping check-
Noel list.
Check with the
GAL campground
ING (don't try primi-
tive camping if
you're a novice) on their
prices, availability (some
accept reservations, while
others are first-come, first
served) and amenities. If
you don't own camping
gear, see whether you can
borrow any from friends or
family, or possibly chip in
together to buy gear and ask
them to join you. Window
shop at sporting-goods


stores. Check prices and
make a list of items you are
interested in buying. Ask a
salesperson for information
and learn about the prod-
ucts you like and need. You
can also check other
sources such as Army sur-
plus stores, garage sales,
eBay classified, Freecycle
and thrift stores for equip-
ment or consider renting
equipment to try before you
buy. Don't forget to give new
equipment a test run at
home before your trip, and
arrive at your destination
before dusk to setup camp.
FOOD: Prepare your
food as much as possible
ahead of time. For example,
it's easier to reheat pan-
cakes you made at home
than it is to make pancakes


when camping. Foods such
as fruit, raw vegetables, ce-
real, cookies, muffins, gra-
nola bars, nuts, crackers,
instant oatmeal, popcorn,
canned or instant soup, hot
dogs and sandwiches are
easy foods to pack Remem-
ber you can bring along a
skillet, and aluminum foil
(foil-packet meals are tasty),
and if you have electricity
available, bring a slow
cooker. Remember food
safety. Put food away so it
doesn't attract animals. (In
your car works best) Keep
your cooler packed with
ice, be careful handling raw
food, don't keep hot foods
out too long and keep your
site clean. Check your local

See FRUGAL/Page E5


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
mkFi CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633


14.67 ACRES on paved road, 1980 3/2 D/W, M/H. SUGARMILL WOODS CYPRESS VILLAGE
24x42 galvanized domed workshop with concrete fir.; Bright, cheery 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage,
20 x 20 frame shed w/concrete fir, wood fireplace, almost half acre. Split floor plan, large screen
.,-/ .,;,:, I A.. .- 1 l.. .. h ,


HOMOSASSA. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, D/W M/H, large CITRUS SPRINGS. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 cm
living rm. w/fireplace, large kitchen w/island & built- garage almost totally renovated, dbl pan
in range & breakfast bar, rear wood deck, front wood windows, tile & carpet, kitchen has lots of cabinet:
deck, vinyl window porch w/wall A/C, 3 sheds, breakfast bar, screened porch, front & rear patios.
#341577 REDUCED TO $69,500 #343295 REDUCED TO $79,900


HOMOSASSA. 2 bedroom. 1.5 baths S/W M/H BEVERLY HILLS. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1
w/screened porch, 1 car carport and fenced yard. garage, w/screened porch, needs some
Shed in backyard. Lovely shade trees. Rear porch. & minor repairs, newer section.
Carpet & vinyl floors.
#341061 REDUCED TO $29,500 #343418 $65,000


I


E4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


Lt


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE 5UNDA~ AUGUST 1, 2010 E5


Protect trees


from lightning


While observing another
lightning storm this past
week, thoughts of this
week's article came to mind the
need for lightning protection.
Some tree species in Florida
shade and beautify our landscape
for hundreds of years. They pro-
vide shelter for wildlife, produce
oxygen for the environment and
perform many other beneficial du-
ties.
These majestic assets to our en-
See ARBORIST/Page E13


Kerry Kreider
THE
ARBORIST


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

library or websites such as
www.scoutorama.com/
recipe for camping recipes,
too.
ADDITIONAL TIPS:
Have a separate cooler
for drinks and snacks be-
cause they get opened more
often. Water frozen in milk
jugs works well for coolers.
Large plastic bins help
organize everything and
give some protection from
rain.
Consider how you pack
your vehicle. What will you
need first?
Remember to pack


F 8702 N. COLLARETTE 3261 W. BABCOCK 10043N.LANGDON 8981 N. LISA
3/2/2 341665 $99,500 32/2 321417 $139,900 23/2/2 333289 $189,000 4/2/2 337357 $126 900


jackets, warmer clothing
and a spare pair of shoes.
Bring garbage bags.
They're helpful for dirty
clothes, too.
Pack cards, books or
board games in case it rains.
Hand sanitizer and toi-
let paper are your friends.
Camping is the perfect time
to use those free samples of
shampoo, toothpaste, etc.,
too.
Wear flip flops or water
shoes for campground bath-
rooms and showers.
Bring a dishpan or large
pot for cleanup.
Don't forget bug spray
and sunscreen.
Have a good attitude
and practice camping eti-
quette.


~- -
6024 N PEARLDALE





2510 W. DOLPHIN DR.
3/2/2 340356 $82,900


MEN
Steel-wool soap pads are
great for scouring, but they
tend to rust. When using
soap-filled scrubbing pads
like S.O.S., wet the object to
be scrubbed instead of the
pad. The pad lasts longer
and doesn't rust as quickly
If you place S.O.S. pads in a
zip enclosure bag or alu-
minum foil after use and
store them in the freezer,
they'll last longer, too. The
first reader has more tips
for steel-wool pads.
STEEL WOOL PADS: I
am currently using a quart
plastic jar with a lid under
the sink to store my S.O.S.
pads. The jar keeps the


moisture out I also now cut
the pads in half before I put
them in the jar (sharpens
my scissors, too). Most jobs
you can get by with only half
a scrubbing pad. Patti,
New York
SOAP SLIVERS: I always
see comments about people
saving soap scraps. Ugh, an-
other jar of stuff. I'm tired of
clutter around the house.
Now when my bar of soap
gets too thin, I meld it to the
new bar. Just make sure
both bars are wet and then
push together. One less
thing to bother with. -
Louise G., e-mail

See FRUGAL/Page E7


N KEIVY Your Sugarmill Woods Specialists
ERAA l"f11c, 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
Office 382-1700 1-800-237-1112 Fax: (352) 382-5580 |


r,,,a 0. ,' YOU WONT FIND NORE SPACE FOR
LOg. a,,',il, THIS PRICE! 2/3/2 + oversized family
steel appliances, Conan countertops, wood room & Florida room. 2 master suites. Eat-
cabinets, snail shower. Parking for 4 vehicles in kitchen. 3 full baths. All appliances. Built-
on concrete pad under house. Fenced in entertainment center. New roof. Private
property. #342731. $169,000 greenbelt. #328484. $119,000



ANY MAN'S PARADISE! ).:I, *r ,nf l..r.: THREE LIVING AREAS in this spacious
of storage and adjacent half bath. 4 bedrooms, 3/2/2 home. Family room & kitchen have
2Y, baths and heated pool with summer kitchen, marble floors. Oversized enclosed lanai has
Family room with gas fireplace. Vaulted ceilings, bay window & tile floors. Updated kitchen
central vacuum, security system and newer w/Corian countertops & wood cabinets. Side
roof. #341961 $199,000 entry garage. #343491 $159,000

Tony & Louise Schmid
S 352-382-5579
www.goFLhomes.com



WATERFRONT
5145 MYSTIC FT. $200,000
'" 105' on deep channel, '/i block to main
Homosassa River. City water on site. Riprap ..
"- retaining wall. Riverhaven Deed Restricted
community ..
7057 S. BLACKBERRY PT. $47,000
6969 S. BLACKBERRY PT. $47,000
These are level treed 5 acre lots on a paved
GOLF COURSE SETTING street. Zoned rural land. Perfect for a couple of
Mainte OLF COURSE SETTING horses or farm animals and gardens. Adjoining
Maintenance free condo, over 1800 sf lots are about 2.5 miles East of Hwy. 19 on
Fabulous views over Sugarmill Woods Cardinal St. May be purchased together for
S1st Floor Great room with fireplace, vaulted $90000
ceiling; formal dining room; kitchen w/huge eating 5671 GEORGIAN RD. $40,000
area &'1 bath
2nd Floor has 2 bedrooms each with private bath These 5 acres are the perfect getaway on one of
and balcony the highest points west of the Withlacoochee
4 PINEWOOD GARDENS $117,200 State Forest. Rural zoning allows for 2 horses (or
r wy. f to Sugaml Woods main enanc Eon 1 cate or sheep) per acre.OnasandRoadN
Cypress Blvd., to 4th left from Cardinal St.


_A746-9000

a& IkJohm TomBalour er Ene i uSteinMr ToniWNas ArtPaty 465-3000
B5E/MASSiC REALTOR REA R IATOR- RO R REALTOR REALTOR
R 10R_ Gi


PIERDE I PN RIDG PIERIG


69W. SUGARMAPLE 3847 BRIARBERRY T. 332 WASHINGTON 219 S. MONROE 15 OAK HOLLOW
2/2.5/2 316263 $113,700 2/1/1 336607 $69,000 2/1.5 340736 $59,500 /1/1 341945 $53,500 2/1/2 342871 $69,900


3521 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


I PINE RIDGE J


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I~y~' BEVRLY HILL I BEVRLY HIL


I BEVERLY HILLS I BEVERL


CITRS HLLSVLLA'H0140SASSA _r CITRUS SPJRINGS


F_ CITRUS 14ILLS I


CITRUS HILLS


I ;. ; CITRUS S I 0 I SPRi ING l CITRUS SIPRIINGS E CITRUS S INGS I






E6 Sunday, August 1, 2010 CITRUS CoUNm' (FL) CHRONIcLE


HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information............563-5592
................................................ advertlslng@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising Information................................ 563-5966
News Information........................................................ 563-5660
................................................. newsdesk@chronlcleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronlcleHomeFInder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
* Submit information for Real Estate Digest via e-mail to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 563-3280,
attention HomeFront."
* News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
* E-mail high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
* Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
* For more information, call the newsroom at 563-5660.


Citrus County 4-H'ers


attend state Congress

Citrus County 4-H'ers pre-
pare to represent 4-H Dis-
trict VII at the Congress
Spirit Rally. Front row,
from left: David Meeks,
Olivia Snipes, Emily Damp-
man, Alicia Indelicato,
,Christina Uzar, Bryce Uz-
4 zolino. Back row, from
"left: Nathan Snipes and
Veronica Uzar.
Special to the Chronicle

workshops, activities build skills


Amy Duncan
YOUNG
IDEAS


Citrus County 4-H members
joined more than 300 4-H teens
from across Florida with one
mission in mind. "Mission: Pos-
sible"was this year's theme for
the Florida 4-H Congress. The
five-day event is a culmination
of events for Florida's 4-H
youths. Held on the campus of
the University of Florida, the
Congress publicly recognizes
the work of 4-H'ers who have
been making an impact in their


local clubs and communities.
Eight Citrus County 4-H mem-
bers had a week of teambuild-
ing, leadership development
and education. Accompanied
by Amy Duncan, Citrus
County's 4-H Agent, Citrus
youths participated in educa-
tional workshops, activities
and competitions covering a
range of subject matter, includ-

See 4-H/Page E10


Inside,..


1-1
- 11. ** ; -


Curl


up by the fire
PAGE E8


Ask The Plumber
PAGE E3
Jane's Garden
PAGE E9
For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office,
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Kimono is handsome piece of work, but collector interest soft


Dear John: I live in Crystal
River. I have a few ques-
tions to ask you. About 10
yeas ago, my mother was given by
her Chinese friend a Geisha out-
fit. The Chinese friend died
about six years ago;
she was 97. She was es-
caping China in her
early thirties and
while on a ship, a
Japanese Geisha ap- -
proached her and
asked her to keep this
item for her. If she re-
turned for it, she
would give it back. If John S
not, the item was hers SIKOR
to protect. Before
Bertha died, she gave AT
the item to my mother
for safekeeping. Attached are
some pictures so you can see a
little of the item and let us know
if it is worth anything, or if you
would like to see more of it. I
have permission from the girl
who is in the photograph that
posed with the outfit to release it


to you. Thank you for any infor-
mation in helping me on this
quest WS., Crystal River
Dear WS.: What an interesting
story. Although beautiful to look
at and completely hand-done,
there is very little
market interest. The
same beautiful work is
still being produced in
China, Vietnam and
other Asian countries.
I suggest you pass it on
to a dear friend or
family
Dear John: A retired
ikorski friend has a complete
(SKI'S collection of Franklin
Mint Bicentennial Sil-
TIC ver Ingots, totaling'70
in all. They are in
their original envelopes and in a
collector's album. I have looked
up some information online for
him, but I cannot seem to find
many sales or the best way to go
about valuing the set or finding a
suitable place to sell them. In all
your knowledge, do you have any


suggestions? M. VR., internet
Dear M1V.R.: The secondary
market interest is very soft for
most Franklin Mint products.
There is no specific collector in-
terest in your bicentennial silver
ingots. Potential dollar value at
this time is determined by the
price of silver and will likely re-
main so for a long time.
If you are determined to sell
them, take them to a gold and sil-
ver buyer several would be a
good idea for comparison and
see what they are willing to pay.
Your friend might consider pass-
ing them on in the family.
Dear John: I have a small vase
See ATTIC/Page E7
Although it's an authentic,
handmade Geisha kimono,
collector interest in this
piece would likely be very soft;
high-quality examples are
still being made throughout
Asia. It might make a lovely
family heirloom, however.
Special to the Chronicle


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E6 Sunday, August 1, 2010


RI
I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E7


TOOLS
Continued from Page E6

storage cabinets. Once you've
selected the tools he will need,
pack them all together in a
sturdy portable toolbox.
Q: I have a concrete-slab
patio with a long crack in it that
seems to be widening. What
could be causing this? The
house is about 30 years old and
the yard slopes.
A: Some things in life are
guaranteed, such as death and
taxes. Cracks in concrete can be
added to that list Concrete con-
tains gallons and gallons of
water when it's first poured. As
the concrete dries, the water
evaporates, leaving space for the
concrete to shrink and crack.
Most flat slabs have expan-
sion and control joints installed
by the contractor. The purpose
of the control joints is to man-
age cracking. They should be


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

REUSE TISSUE BOXES: I
cut the lids off old Kleenex
boxes, decorate them and place
cookies in them for bake sales,
cookie exchanges, etc. -


designed so that the cracks that
form will be in the control joint
or will stop when they reach the
control joint
To slow the process of shrink-
age and cracking, the slabs
should be watered every other
day for the first few months. To
maintain the control joints that
crack, fill the joints with a clear
silicone caulk. This prevents
water entry that, in colder cli-
mates, can cause freeze and
thaw damage.
Another reason why concrete
cracks is improper surface
preparation. Patio slabs are
generally poured over dis-
turbed soils without proper
compaction of the soil. As the
soil compacts under the weight
of the patio or when, on a hill-
side, subsurface water removes
some of the soil, the patio set-
tles and cracks.
Assuming the soil was com-
pacted and the patio is on a
hillside, dewatering the ground
can allow the soil to shrink and

Melina, Massachusetts
WRAP A GIFT CARD: CD
cases make great pockets for
holding gift cards. Just wrap
them and present. Barb,
Pennsylvania
CRAYON TIP: It seems kids
and parents forget that crayons
can be sharpened. Not all
crayon boxes have the built in


the patio to settle.
Cracked and settled concrete
can be repaired by slab jacking,
where grout or slurry is
pumped under the slab, raising
the concrete back to its previ-
ous position. If you decide to re-
place the patio, have the
ground properly compacted
and well drained, and use rein-
forcing wire or steel to
strengthen the concrete slab.
Concrete with small, almost
invisible, fibers of nylon mixed
in at the factory can be used in
conjunction with the reinforce-
ment to prevent cracking.


Dwight Barnett is a certified
master inspector with the
American Society of Home In-
spectors. Write to him with
home-improvement questions
at C. Dwight Barnett, Evans-
ville Courier & Press, PO. Box
286, Evansville, IN 47702, or e-
mail him at d.Barnett@
insightbb.com.

sharpener, but that doesn't
mean you can't sharpen a
crayon with your own sharp-
ener. Kelly e-mail
REUSE COFFEE
CREAMER CONTAINER: I
reuse my coffee creamer con-
tainers by putting sugar in

See FRUJGAL/Page E13


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

with a pouring spout
and handle about 7 to 8
inches high. Inside the
spout and the handle
are gold. There are gold
lightning type markings
going up the sides of the
vase. The background of
the vase is teal green
and black in a sponged
type fashion. The bot-
tom of the vase reads
Germany 578 or 573/1G.
Could you tell me any-
thing about this vase? -
C.S., internet
Dear C.S.: Yes, I
would be glad to help.
Send a couple of good
clear photographs of the
front, back, and bottom.
Then I will give you my
opinion of collector in-


terest and potential dol-
lar value.
Dear John: I have my
mother's Johann Havi-
land china set, which is
60 years old. It has plat-
inum trim and printed
blue roses. The 12 place
settings are complete,
plus I have additional
pieces including sugar
and creamer, etc. Do
you have any idea what
the set is worth? I have
multiple sets of other
family china, so my
mother and I have de-
cided to sell this set. I
enjoy your show and
column. -E. T, internet
Dear E.T.: Dollar
value for your set is
based on interest in the
china pattern replace-
ment market.
When someone
breaks a cup and wants
to replace it, they go to


the secondary market to
find a replacement.
There are numerous
companies looking to
purchase pieces and
sets for inventory. I sug-
gest you contact Re-
placements Ltd. in
Greensboro, North Car-
olina at 1-800-
REPLACE.


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the
antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, c/o The
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429 or
asksikorski@aol.com.


SeTY OUPnerai
RELT GROUPo Rsae


- -. : . '. .-y .
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* aren't scen 2 wak piert d aosB etsat msir sud Polished wood laminate fto s, 3 large Bis, 2BA. All high useable land. Nice trees & pasture. Lg. eat-in kit., beautiful cabinets, quality appls.
*Cagt irsT Updated kit.& BAs, granite tops. Only mins. from town. Rolling farmland with a treed knoll 3 CAR ATT GAR. PLUS 33 X 27
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Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442
11 (352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 ooo4,,.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E7


CITRUS COUN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE





ES Sunday, August 1, 2010 Qmus cOUNIY (FL,) CHRONICLE


BEMPER Fl




Former leatherneck

now fights his battles

in the garden
LAUREN SPUHLER
Scripps Howard News Service

start a garden when he retired from
the U.S. Marine Corps after 29
years. So he moved home to Lenoir
City, Tenn., with wife Anna and
bought a home on four acres of land.
His passion is hostas, a lily-like perennial
plant known for its foliage. Hosta leaves
come in a range of sizes, colors, shapes and
textures. They're typically green in color,
and some species are known for their waxy
leaf coating. Luttrell has more than 400 vari-
eties spread throughout the yard in 21 dif-
ferent beds.
One bed he's proud of has a rectangular-
shaped mass of Carolina Sunshine, with
glossy, dark green leaves lined in butter-
scotch yellow, surrounded by Lancifolia,
solid green hostas with lance-shaped leaves.
A fan-shaped, wrought-iron fence stands 4
feet tall in the center of the bed.
The color contrast is important to Lut-
trell, who explains that the dark coloring of
a Segae hosta in another bed would not be
as vibrant against other dark varieties.
Luttrell isn't always so serious, though.
"The women that will come through say,
'Boy, you have a good eye.' I'm not supposed
to have an eye (for gardening). I was a Ma-
rine," jokes Luttrell, a former colonel.
The yard started as a barren space, with
mature pine, oak and hickory trees as the
only foliage. But Luttrell could envision the
yard's future and relied on natural charac-
teristics of the land to dictate his pathways
and beds. For example, he first cleared
smaller trees and trees with great distance
between them to create pathways through
the yard. He planted every shrub himself,
See MARINE/Page E9
Howard Luttrell walks past a bed of hostas.
MICHAEL PATRICK/Knoxville News Sentinel


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E8 Sunday, August 1, 2010





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Black-eyed Susans bring smiles


JANE WEBER/Chronicle
Black-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia fulgida, is a favorite in Central and North Florida gardens, Zones 8 to 10. Native to the
southeastern states, fulgida has naturalized by seeds and escaped cultivation in Florida.


MARINE
Continued from Page E8

starting with 600 azaleas
that line the upper banks of
his driveway, and many of
the hostas.
While on active duty, Lut-
trell would cross paths with
people who hybridized
hostas and exposed him to
the plant
"It didn't take me long to
get hooked," Luttrell re-
called. "Then when I retired
and could have a place, I
brought it all together"
Hosta hybridizers name
the new varieties of the
plant they create. The
names aren't always scien-
tific, and sometimes a
theme is used. Luttrell has
two beds organized by
hostas named after food
and drinks. Guacamole,
Fried Green Tomatoes and
Squash Casserole are
planted together in one
bed, while Gin and Tonic,
Whiskey Sour and Frozen
Margarita mix in another
There are more than 4,000


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E9

kinds registered with the
American Hosta Society.
The 71-year-old has
named his yard Eagle's
Nest for the silver eagle
that appears on the in-
signia for colonel. Luttrell
believes he has more
hostas than anyone else in
East Tennessee.
His property also in-
cludes 325 cultivars of
daylilies, hundreds of
springtime daffodils, a
gazebo and a large pond.
Luttrell spends six to seven
hours a day in the yard and
says he's always behind.
But he enjoys it
"It's cheerful, colorful -
it makes me feel good to
look down at 50 hostas and
all the different colors,
tones, textures," he said.
And the former Marine
loves the peace and seren-
ity he finds in the yard.
"It's about opposite of
what I did, and I loved the
Marines. My alter ego has
taken over now. I can't be
tough and mean anymore."
E-mail Lauren Spuhler
of the News Sentinel at
spuhlerl@knoxnews.com.


Hardy flowers a

great fit for Florida
There are about 15 species of
coneflowers in the Rudbeckia
genus. These composite, daisy-
like wildflowers originated in North
America. Most have yellow ray flowers
around a central, somewhat conical
disk of florets
which may be '
black, brown, j
purple, or in
some cultivars,
green. These
easily grown
perennials re-
main evergreen .
in frost free
zones but will
shed their Jane Weber
leaves after a JANE'S
hard freeze and GARDEN
remain dormant GARDEN
until spring.
Olaf Rudbeck the elder, 1630-1702, a
Swedish physician and botanist who
founded Uppsala Botanic Gardens,
and Olaf Rudbeck the younger, 1660-
1740, a professor at Uppsala, are hon-
ored by the genus name. Both were


See JANE/Page E14


The Southwest Florida
Water Management
District is offering
Community Education Grants
up to $5,000 each to
individuals, groups and
governments to provide
in a 4t d te+affar ti.


JANE WEBER/Chronicle
A reliable summer to fall flower, Black-
eyed Susan lives for years, and can be
divided at the end of winter every third
year, or left to form a meter-wide
colony.


eI I vetLIVW
bout any
ects:


nnov aI lU a /cOI.s-
education projects a
of the following subj(

Watersheds
Water quality


f.+I.TFIUND
avaiab 1o d c* ti o
pBT.roet tha h protect

WATER RESOURCES^





CIrRIIS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


4-H
Continued from Page E6

ing science and technology, citi-
zenship, leadership, and environ-
mental education.
Monday's "Missions" for the
youths included the task of getting
settled in some of the UF dorms -
an adventure in itself and a
BBQ dinner at Ben Hill Griffin
Stadium! After that, David Meeks
had the opportunity to lead his
first meeting as 4-H District VII
president. Christina Uzar said,
"This would be a great experience
for anyone because you get to
meet a lot of people from different
backgrounds. During our Monday
'Speed Meeting' I met more than
20 people and they each had a


very unique question answering
style." The evening concluded
with a huge spirit rally with guest
motivational speaker Jim Atkin-
son, "Mr. Happy."
Tuesday had very diverse mis-
sions for our youths! Bryce Uz-
zolino, Olivia Snipes, David
Meeks, and Nathan Snipes all
competed in Demonstration/Illus-
trated Talks. Alicia Indelicato and
Emily Dampman enjoyed the
Healthy Lifestyle workshops. And
Veronica and Christina Uzar rep-
resented our 4-H District by
singing in harmony during the
Share the Fun talent competition.
Wednesday's "Community Serv-
ice" had the youths in locations
around Gainesville for various
volunteer missions. Some served
at the Rooterville Pig Sanctuary,
while others helped at the Chil-


Thursday's missions allowed all the youths to
experience in-depth program area workshops.
These workshops expose 4-H'ers to future

college-level classes and career opportunities.


dren's Home Society Hot Spot or
made Hero Packs to send to sol-
diers.
Thursday's missions allowed all
the youths to experience in-depth
program area workshops. These
workshops expose 4-H'ers to fu-
ture college-level classes and ca-
reer opportunities.
"Congress encourages our youth
to embrace their strengths to
make a difference," said Julie Wil-
son, senior secretary to central
and northeast regional special-
ized agents. "This year's theme of


Mission: Possible gives a sense of
responsibility to our youths to be
informed citizens and to continue
to make a positive impact within
their community."
The Citrus County 4-H Founda-
tion deserves great thanks for
helping support our county's 4-H
program. The Foundation assisted
these Senior 4-H'ers in attending
this enjoyable and educational
state trip by providing scholar-
ships to help with registration
costs. The Citrus County 4-H
Foundation provides funding for


the 4-H program through
fundraisers such as the Citrus
Stampede Rodeo in November.
Come out and enjoy the rodeo and
help support the youth of Citrus
County.
For information about how to
start or join a 4-H club in your
area, contact your Citrus County
Extension's 4-H Office by calling
527-5712, or e-mail Amy Duncan at
amyduncan@bocc.citrus.fl.us. Cit-
rus County Extension connects
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, re-
search, and resources to address
youth, family, community and agri-
cultural needs. Programs and ac-
tivities offered by the Extension
Service are available to all per-
sons without regard to race, color,
handicap, sex, religion or national
origin.


PINE* I OFFICE
RENTALS AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AVAILABLE
0052- Open 7 Days For Your Convenience


Prudential
'W FLORIDA SHOWCASE PROPERTIES
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
1-888-553-2223 (352) 527-1820
T#- For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos,Go to: swww.floridashowcaseproperties.com


1107 E Bluebird Ct
$209,900
This beautiful, bright & open home sits
on over 1 acre shows like a model. It
has 3 Ig BR, Ig BA, 2 car garage &
office/den w/an oversized lanai that
looks out to very private wooded
backyard.
352-527-1820 MLS# 343369


6117 N Whispering Oak Lp
$144,900
Warm, bright & open describes this well
maintained home. It has 3 Ig BR, 2'/ BA
& 2 car garage. Stunning &
breathtaking this home is well built &
ha- wonderfully open Ig rms. Formal


3600 N Lucille Dr 6742 W Sentinel Post Path
$69,900 $629,900
PRICED TO SELL! Most popular floor BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY ESTATE ON 10
plan in The Glen w/open front porch & ACRES! The main house has 4
screened back porch. 2BR, 2BA 1CG bedrooms, an office, 3BA, 2 car garage.
Needs some work. 55+ community. The guest suite is a 2/1/1 handicapped
Beverly Hills community membership accessible residence w/a private
eligible, entrance.
352-527-1820 MLS# 341807 352-527-1820 MLS# 335540






3563 W Blossom Dr -' vx
$265,000 636 E Gilchrist Ct 23-3B
STEAL ME! AWESOME & THEN SOME! $84,900
Beautiful 3BR, 3BA pool home office/ Wonderful 2 story unit 2 BR, 2'/2 BA w/
den w/2 computer station 3 car carport. Home has all new appliances &
attached & 2 car detached garage ** new wood laminate firs. Wait until you
14x38 pool w/spa lanai hurricane see the view from your screen lanai or
shutters & whole house generator your private master balcony.
352-527-1820 MLS# 336881 352-527-1820 MLS# 342547


RENTALS AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AVAILABLE


Prudential
FLORIDA SHOWCASE PROPERTIES


Open 7 Days For Your Convenience

20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
1-888-222-0856 (352) 746-0744


1.. iFor a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: www.floridashowcaseproperties.com Q


770 E IRELAND C7 330 E IRELAND CT
$224,900 $264,900
OAKS GOLF COURSE-PRIME LOCATION One owne ome or Details galore in this home on 5th tee ot the Oaks in
quiet cul-de-sa, updated kitchen with Conan counter Lana, Citrs Hills. Storage is no a problem with large
walkways and dinveway all pavers. Ultrnate land,.iogNo- .l S g ...
in condition. 2 zone heat iosets and loads of cabinet space in the kitchen.
Directions: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd to eas0 on Ireland ,' om 24nd your own private retreat.
Ct to home on right 352-746-07A'.- MLS# 343450
Dickh nMidrlir,',dl 3H2-746 b7" HNL:i iJ.jJ


1881 W CAROLINE PATH 3444 N CANTERBURY LAKES DR 2279 N GLADES PT 790 E GILCHRIST CT 27-4B
$144,000 $139,900 $114,900 $76,500
Never lived in Aspen Model, 2/2/2 with Bright, sunny and almost new home in gated section Beautiful, lowest priced patio home in Meadowview 2 story townhouse w/kitchen, dining area, living
spacious Den, neutral colors, wood cabinets of Canterbury Lake Estates 3/2/2 Huntington model of Citrus Hills. Florida Room has been completely room, 1/2 bath, laundry room and a screened lanai.
ceing, carpet, nel l Aoffers plenty of privacy, nothing behind you but enclosed with A/C. Air conditioning unit was replaced Nicely furnished w/carport. Tile and carpet. Full-time
Berber carpet. Make An Offer!!! nature. Membership required. in 2009. Don't miss out on this lovely home. residence or vacation, Warranty is Provided
352-746-0744 MLS# 339528 352-746-0744 MLS# 340847 352-746-0744 MLS# 343214 352-746-0744 MLS# 337553






377 N HAMBLETONIAN DR 51 W DOERR PATH 3530 N INDIANHEAD RD 3532 E COVE PARK TRL
$249,900 $249,900 $159,000 $150,000
Clearview Estates of Citrus Hills 3/2/2, self-deaning Attractive 3/2/2 villa on a beautifully landscaped lot. Well-maintained 3/2.5 pool home on a nicely Everyone's searching for. Great Neighborhood,
pool spacious rooms, lots of floor tile, cathedral Spedcial features include tray ceilings, lots of tile, wooded one acre lot. Tile throughout, new kitchen Great Home & a Killer Deal' Well here it is. An
ceilings, carpet, nicely landscaped, easterly fadng mural in formal dining room, custom blinds, recessed cabs with Conrian. Solar Tubes in kitchen & laundry, immaculate 3BR Sanlbel Model on the 1st comer
lanai. Citrus Hills Membership Available. lighting. Social Membership Required Lots of extra storage, summer kitchen. Priced to lot in the sought-after Arbor Lakes Gated
352-746-0744 HMLS# 335902 352-746-0744 HMLS# 341806 sell. Community.
352-746-0744 MLS# 335179 352-746-0744 MLS# 337894











0 To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate Classifieds


Classifieds -.In Print


and


Online


S"All


The Time


I I II 1 I #


1/1 nicely furnish
clean quiet park $550
f/I/s (352) 220-2077
CR/ Homosassa
2/1'/2, SW. CHA.
$475/mo 1st, last. sec.
813-361-4615
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $425mo. + $450 sec.
No Pets wkly. Pymt
plan avail. 352-795-3605
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
CH/A, water & garbage
turn., no pets. $500. mo.
+dep. 352-795-0061
HERNANDO
2/1,W/D, dish washer
$400. Mo. + $400. Sec.
(352)464-0719
HOMOSASSA
I Br.furn & Unfurn
nice park w/pool $400/up
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH urn., priv. ranch
no pets. (386) 871-5506
HOMOSASSA
3 Bd, 2 Bth deck, scrn
par. $650 7311 Grover
Cleveland Drive by &
Call (603) 860-6660
HOMOSASSA
Lg 3/2 $650 + dep
352-503-6747/628-1928
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own. Lrg 3/1/2,
1/2 ac fenced, W/D,
dish washer $750/mo
(352) 560-3355
INVERNESS
1st MONTH FREE
55-Plus waterfront park,
602 Conroy, 1 BR. 1 BA,
furn., $450 incl. lot rent,
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Close in, 1 & 2 bdrm.
Clean. Quiet & Com
portable 352-212-6182
LECANTO
Leisure Acres 312, on
1/2 acre, wld hk. up.
H20, garb, inc. $575. +
Sec. (813) 695-4037
RENT TO OWN
Floral City, 2 Mobiles on
canal to lakes & River.
Rent to own. 2/1 single
wide, $3,000 down, $285
mo 3/2 Doublewide,
$4,000 down, $425 mo.
Needs TLC May take
vehicle, boat or RV as
deposit 352-726-9369


Rent To Own
Lovely, 3/2 Lg pool
I acre Flex Terms.
352-212-2613
2/1, FURN MH, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
352 220-2077




BEST OF THE BEST
JACOBSEN, New 2010
Custom Home 28x60,
3/2, Open living, 2 x 6
construction, cherry
cabinets, big pantry,
large rooms, monster
closets, eat on raised
bar. $10,000 in
upgrade options.
Only $54,900
352-621-9181
Inverness,
Stoneridge Landing 55+
3/2 xtra Irge dw, corner
lot carport w/ storage furn
$39,500.352-201-9371
LEFT OVER
2007 Jacobsen Home
1700 sq. ft. high end
home, tape-n-
textured walls,
18" ceramic tile,
granite countertops,
stainless appliance
pkg. 6" crown moldi-
Ing, 6" baseboard,
craneboard siding.
R30-19-22 insulation,
$20,000 under
invoice, $65,817
SEE IT AT
TAYLOR MADE HOMES
352-621-3807

OWNER FINANCE
$2,500 Dwn $650 Mo.
Ready to Move In
4/2 DW, Wooded Lot,
new carpet &
roof, CHA, W/D,
Stove/Refrigerator
(352) 568-2500


Get
Results in
the
homefront
declassified!


USED HOMES
28x $900
28X60, 32,000
HOMES OF MERIT
28X40, $22,900
PALM HARBOR
28x46, $19,900
SINGLEWIDES
from $3,000
DOUBLEWIDES
from $8,000
CALL TO VIEW
352-621-9183




INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
IBR, 1BA, unfurn,,
$425 includes lot rent.
Call 352-476-4964



Lake Henderson
$12,999, 55+ Waterfront
Park, Close To The
Water A Beautiful View,
Boat Dock & Storage,
Pool. 1/1/Carport, Fl.
rm. Will consider fi-
nanclng.(352) 476-8364
LAKE ROUSSEAU
RV Park. See the lake
fully turn. immaculate
1/1 scr porch PRICED
REDUCED $15K obo.
352-220-1570
931-537-3202




1 ACRE HOMESITE
3/2, L/R & den, appx.
1400 sq. ft. on dead
end, private country
living, great shape,
deck, fenced back
yard has shed.
Bank short sale only
$67,400 or $449/mo
w/ $2,500 down WAC
352-621-9182
Crystal River
6594 N. Citrus Ave. 5.4
acres, 3/2 MH. $120K.
(352) 586-7952
HOMOSASSA
2/1.5 on 1/2 acre
$43,500. 5585 S. Cast Pt
Lou Ann(352) 464-0931


CRYSTAL RIVER
Nice 3/2 DWMH,
fenced rear yard,
workshop/storage.Lg
rear porch. /2 acre.
X-tra clean $43K.
850-260-4575
Floral City
01' 3/2 D.W., carport
on 4 acres, 1,600 Sq.
Ft. fenc'd b-yard,
work shop. $97,900
(352) 726-2286
HOMOSASSA 95, HoM
DW 3/2,wlk-in closets
& pantry ,2 car CB gar.
w/wkshp & storagelge
cvrd/scrnd lanai, fen'cd
yard,1/2 ac corner lot.
RV hkups,1 yr Home war-
ranty, $89K OBO may fi-
nance (352) 423-0220
Little House
on the Prairie!
in Old Town, FL
Secluded & Peaceful
2 br/2 ba 1988
manufactured home
surrounded by majestic
live oaks on 10 acres.
Screened-in back
porch overlooking
Careless Prairie. Plenty
of wildlife and beautiful
sunsets. Entire interior
recently remodeled.
Located 4 miles from
the Suwannee River.
The perfect retreat
for SnowbirdsI
For pictures, see
Craig's Ust. $99,500.
http://lakecitv.
craiaslist.ora/reo/
1866445082.html
Call 352-542-0605




FLORAL CITY
SINGING FOREST
00'3BR,2Ba,28x48
Fleetwood manufac-
tured home,1344sf,
all appliances Incl.
$36,990.00 Call
352-796-6360 or
352-796-3925
Ask for Jack

Homosassa 55 + Park
2/2 Dbl. w/upgrades,
carport, new roof, kit.,
patio, CHA, part. furn.
$11,900. (352) 503-7558


HOMOSASSA
QUICK SALE
2/2, Lg. L/R, Big Fam.
Rm., wet bar, finished
parch w/carpet, new
A/C, carpeting, sink,
ceramic tile in baths,
laundry, wonderful
kitchen, Like New,
(352) 794-3601
Walden Woods South
08' 3/3, laundry rm.,
eat in kitch., carport,
12' X12' scrn'd porch.,
New/S10.000, asking
$70K.(352) 503-7151
WEST WIND VILL 55+1
DWMH,part tum.
stainless appis, $34,900
Well maintain
Pet ok. 352-628-2090


Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Single Family Homes,
Duplexes, WF Mobiles
Apts, furn/unfurnished
We have them ALL
throughout the
county. From $500/m
to $1250 month


Get

Results in

the

home front

classified!


Castro
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverly Hills
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 $750/mo.
Citrus Springs
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 $1050/mo.
Inverness
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
$825 $1050/mo.
Pine Ridgae
3 & 4 Bedrooms
$800 $1800/mo.
Hernando
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 $800/mo.
Check Out Our
Website At www.
castrorealtyl.com
Rental Inventory
changes daily.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine




Crystal River
I & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms
954-918-4644 cell #
352-794-3322 office
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. Near
Town 352-563-9857


CRYSTAL RIVER
Long or Short Term
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972



1 & 2 BEDRM UNITS
Move In Special *
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Reduced Sec. De.
& First Months Rent
S1BR Rent $450 mo.
I BRSec. Dep S300.
2BR Rent$475 mo.
2 BR Sec. Dep $350
CALL 344-1010
TUES, THUR, FRI.
8-12 & 1-5
No Pets HUD
Vouchers Accept'd
L Equal Housing Opp
----- J

BEDWOMS
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises,
352-465-2985
Crystal River
I & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms
954-918-4644 cell #
352-794-3322 office
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Laundry on site, no pets.
Lecanto Duplex 2/2
Dish/wash., wash/dryer.
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm $525,
1 Bdrm $489.
Clean, quiet, safe, con-
venient. Will consider
1st mo. FREE w/out
dep. to well qualified
tenants that meet
criteria. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
352-464-5441
FLORAL CITY
2BD just 150 yards from
fishing dock, $350 +
$200 dep. NO Pets,
Near Floral City, 10 min.
from Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
HERNANDO
1 BRs, quiet area near
lake$425.352- 228-2701
INVERNESS
1/1 ,$450 Incis water &
garbage 352 422-2393


HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 Bd. Rm Apts.
$450.- $500 Mo. No pets.
Incls garb & H20. 352-
628-7300 or 697-0310
HOMOSASSA 1/1
CHA, clean, quiet, No
pets. $375 Incls water.
(352) 563-2114
INVERNESS
2/2 Pool. tennis +
facilities, H20 incl. $665.
Fst. floor. (973) 222-1100
LECANTO
1 Bedroom $500/mo
Ist/sec (352)746-5238
H 527-3502, C 216-0012
LECANTO
Lrg 2/2, C/H/A, screen
porch, water incl. $550.
F/L/S, 352-746-4191
352-697-5900

MAYO DRIVE
I APARTMENTS I
I 1stMO. RENTFREE |
(352) 795-2626






i Act Now
l IB -






PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
*h i *


CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm Storefront, 1000
SF, exc location, Hwy
19 Downtown $895/mo
352-634-2528
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT Ideal
location.corner
Hwy 41 & 48. $595
mo.813-310-5391
FOR LEASE
Prime Retail Space
on CR 48 Bushnell, FL
4200 soft.
S3 Office Spaces
250 up to 850 sq. ft.
Call (352) 457-1877




CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse 2/2'2.
Furnished. No pets
352-746-0008
CRYSTAL RIVER
Long or Short Term
Completely furn., Pool,
boat dock, Wash/Dry
(352) 302-5972
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000dn + lot rent.at
EvanRldge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS
2 BR 2-1/2 Bath
Townhouse on canal in
Cypress Cove. End unit
w/newly screened porch,
comm. pool. Inc. washer
& dryer. $650, 1st mth
FREE! Call (352)
464-5590.
LAKESIDE VLG 55+
Villa 2+2,den,garage.
Beautiful & quiet,lvg rm,
dining, eat-in kit, pool. 1
yr. Incl/TV,appl,trash, yd.
$850/mo 352-527-2444



CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/2 CHA dishwasher,
W/D hk-up $545 no dogs
$600 moves u n726-9570
INVERNESS 2/2
LIKE Newwl/WID $600
mo. 352-563-2118


-ACTION- 352-795-RENT
(UBamuairniA,wic.) 352-795-7368


HOMES MOBILES APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
*CRYSTAL RIVER
3/1/lcp Charming House .................... $700
Affordable Apt. 2/1...................................... $375
*HOMOSASSA
3/2/1cp Furnished Waterfront.................. $1200
2/1 Furnished Duplex.................................. $650
*INVERNESS
Large House, Nice Yard, 3/2/2..... .....$800
*LECANTO
4/2/3 Pool Home........................... $1300
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 Ell


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUGARMILL WD'S
2/2, H20 incl. Scr. prch.
$675. (352) 382-1866



CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn w/equip
kitchen. Starting at $30
per day. Wkly or monthly
only. Incl all util. Call
John 352-586-1813
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225









C.Riv/Homosassa
2/2 furn condo.
WF Home 1-3 month
minium. Summer Rates
Riverlinks Realty
(352) 628-1616
CRYSTAL RIVER
STILT HOME, 3/2 on 5
acres. Lease or sea-
sonal. 727-504-7087
INVERNESS
1 / 1 urn just bring
toothbrush $450.
352-220-3899
Property
Management
& Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
) Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
) Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
Owner Assoc.Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM
352-628-5600
info@rooertv
managmentgrouo.




AVAILABLE NOW
2/1 duplex $400/up
3/2/2 home $725.
Riverlink RIty 628-1616
riverlinksrealtyrentals
.com
BEVELY HILLS
2/1 carport, updated
lots of tile $550. f/s
(352) 257-2461
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, Fl. rm. CHA, $550.
35 Golden352.464.2701
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 and 3/2/2
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1+FI rm,10 N. Barbour
$575 mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1, Fl. Rm. $700.
1/1 W/Carport $500.
(845) 282-3504
BEVERLY HILLS
Move in special!
Clean 3BR.2BA 1st,
last, sec. $645 mo
352-400-1501


CITRUS SPRINGS
Rent or Rent to Own
$699. Move-In Special
3 Bed 2 Bath, garage
Tiled, Spotless,
Fenced, Pets ok
352-527-0493

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean. $800/mo
795-6299 697-1240
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large. 2/2/2. No pets.
$850/mo + 1st, last, sec.
Call Matt 352-228-0525
DUNNELLON
2/1/1 Remodeled
$575.mo+Sec 427-3078

GOLF COURSE AT
SUGARMILL WD'S
On Green & Tee.
Lecanto Schools
3/2/2. Fire plce.
Animals ok. $1,000
Mo. (352) 422-1933
Homosassa SMW
3/2/2, No Pets/smoke
Lg Patio, $775. mo+ util.
Aftr 6pm (561)674-5083
INVERNESS
2/1, water front, fenc'd
yd., dock. $700. Fst./Lst.
(352) 726-9316
INVERNESS 3/2
Near Ft Cooper, poss
In-Law suite, near bike
trI $800 727-410-3248
INVERNESS
3/2%/ Waterfront Tile,
WID, Scrn'd. Pch. Com.
pool, tennis & dock.
$875. Mo. 352-812-3213

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $800.
Mo.(352) 601-2615
(352) 328-3152

Pool-Pool-Pool
2/2 Citrus Springs .Tile
firs, patio, pool service
3/ acre. Pet ok. Pet $ 825.
mo. (352)615-8293
RENT TO OWN
No Credit Check
4/2/2 352-484-0866
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

INVERNESS
3/2% Tile, W/D, Scrn'd.
Pch. Community pool,
tennis & dock. $875.
Mo. 352-812-3213
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Duplex on canal,great
neighborhood, No pets
$625 + dp 813-986-6630




CRYSTAL RIVER
$100 a wk. incLs
everything 352-634-0708




INVERNESS 3/2/2
Priv, near Hwy 44. $800
Ist/Sec. (305) 975-5121


IMMACULATE
INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
garage, new
floorsstainless appl.,
granite, fenced yard,
w & d.$850 per mth.
856-761-7004



CRYSTAL RIVER
Private Room. Quiet
Neigh., Close to town.
Share Liv. rm/bath/kit.
352-563-6304
DUNNELLON
Incis utils. priv entrance
$450/mo.(352)816-0936
HOMSASSA
1 or 2 bedroom Must
be neat & non- smoke.
rt.iLneg(352) 382-0481



2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
352 220-2077




AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20
lines of copy w/
photo.
352-563-5966

PINE RIDGE
Just completed, New
3/2/3 lots of woods,
built-ins. Much More!
Citrus Builder
352-302-0910
lic CRC1327965

Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial






r f
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classfifeds!


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.









12.5 ACRES GNC
Full Entitled with State
Swiftmud Permits
Aug 7, 2010
10aView 11:30a Sale
8265 W Dunnellon Rd
7% Comm for Succ.
Sale Side MLS#
341066. Add. Info Call
Doc 352-489-1700
Poss. Owner Finance



BEVERLY HILLS
214 S. Lincoln
55,12-3pm. 2/1.5/,
53,500 352- 527-1239




Your World


%Clastfit(d .



mww.cfro n.cleoN.in.


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP
TO 100%
Offering FHA
Conventional & USDA
CAII CANDY

Paramount
Mortgage Group
352-563-2661
Credit and income
restriction apply
Florida licensed
mortgage lender



Cmeca
Real Estate*


HIGHWAY 41, FLORAL
CITY 2 Story Bldg over
3,500 SQ FT avail for
rent Aug 1 on Hwy 41 @
Floral City light. Backs up
to the trail. Plenty of attic
storage & Brand New
roof. $800 per month -
CALL (352) 464-5590.




New Home New
Price! Sale or Trade
$88,000 ask about
trading in older home or
mobile for new 3/2/2
352-897-4447
352-697-1384
NEW LISTING
Own your Home 2004
3/2/2 w/20% dn. Only
$620/mo Kristin Holland
Plantation RIty 220-1186

SKIDMORE'S MOVING
LOCAL & INSTATE
(352) 726-8998




New Home-Just
Completed!! 3/2/3
energy efficient a/c
& windows. Crown
molding, granite .Call
Joe @ Citrus Builder
352-302-0910
CRC 1327965




779 west Buttonbush dr.
2 bedroom. 1 bath, florida
room, new kitchen, wood
floors, carpet, paint. 14 X
28 inground pool has
been paid for but not in-
stalled yet. large lot, nicer
area. 352-560-7703


2/2/2. Imperial Exec.
Lg. rms., beautiful
home In excel, area
Sale or rent.
$69,950 OBO
(352) 795-0538



1.1 Acre Lot
On Cul De Sac.
Good schools, close
to shopping. $39,000
(352) 328-3152
(352) 601-2615










I Sell Homes & Get
Results Douglas
Lindsey Realtor. ERA
American Realty & Inv.
Cell (352) 212-7056
Office (352) 746-3600
Douglas.lindsey
@era.com


MEADOWVIEW VILLA
Fully Furn. Beautiful
2/2/1 duplex on quiet
cul de sac. Nicely deco-
rated and landscaped -
Move right itl Citrus
Hills Social
membership available.
$119,000.
(352) 527-9888
We Have short/long
term rentals
www.plantation
rentals.com


Plantation Realty,
Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner




3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
For Sale, 2,000 sq.ft.
workshop, close to
hosp. shopping, school.
518 Poinsettia $179,000
obo (352) 860-0878
Cozy & convenient
2/1/2 + Fam. Rm., nes-
tied among newer
homes in the Heart
Of Inverness. Incls. all
appls. + washer, dryer,
hot tub & gar. door
opener. $69,900 Obo.
(352) 637-5930
(352) 212-2702
Golf Course Home
3/2/2, spacious,
beautiful, needs
some work. $90,000.
(908) 322-6529


SKIDMORE'S MOVING
LOCAL & INSTATE
(352) 726-8998



3/2, DW on 1.1 Acre
w/ detached 2 Car
garage for large mtr
home, pool, $119.900
GAIL GEE
Tradewinds Realty
352-400-0089


ADVICE FROM
REGIS :
Mortgages on
Vacant Homes are
RUFF! Call Plantation
Rentals, Inc.
to start making
income
352-795-0782 and
visit our website:
www.Plantation
Rentals.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For Youl
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com



4/2 CEMENT HOME
Remodeled on I/4 AC
Ready to Go. Great
Family Neighborhood
Must Sell $75K. Make
Offer 305-619-0282

CHARLES KELLY


JW. M Se. EArMfl. 1
ofc 352-726-6668
cell 352-422-2387

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
propertyll
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


SKIDMORE'S MOVING
LOCAL & INSTATE
(352) 726-8998


PINE RIDGE
Brand New 3/2/3
built In great location
on 1 acre. Many
Extra's Included
352-302-0910
CRC1327965




DIRECT WATERFRONT
with Sandy Beach
Shoreline! Only $34,900.
Wooded, park-like
setting with gorgeous
sandy shoreline on one
of Alabama's top rec-
reational waterways.
All amenities com-
pleted. BOAT TO GULF
OF MEXICO! Excellent
financing. Call now
(866)952-5302 x 5462
NC MOUNTAINS -
BEST LAND BUY!
2.5acres, spectacular
views, gated, paved
road. High altitude.
Easily accessible, se-
cluded. Bryson City.
$45,000. Owner financ-
ing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
NC MOUNTAINS BEST
LAND BUY! 2.5acres,
spectacular views,
gated, paved road.
High altitude. Easily ac-
cessible, secluded.
Bryson City. $45,000.
Owner financing:
(800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com

NC MOUNTAINS
CLOSEOUT SALE!
Cabin Shell, 2+ acres
with great view, very
private, big trees,
waterfalls & large
public lake nearby,
$99,500 Bank financing
(866)275-0442


IWW. LUCYl BANE


Ha 'Be w\ithl I h r l

I -[. Call fr raItes.


1] *It iH u 1y I i'g Klc 634-0435

33 I . .3 -^^fH^^


E12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In rn


CirsCut







Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E13


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

them. My sugar is easy to pour and
doesn't clump like it used to in my
sugar bowl. -Patty, Indiana
USE CEREAL CRUMBS: I keep
the last little crumbs of cereal from
the box and use it on top of yogurt,
muffins or quick bread (sprinkle
on batter) and oatmeal. Tina H.,
Wisconsin
SOAP DISH TIP: I hate cleaning
my soap dish. I put a sponge under
the soap and it makes cleanup very
easy! And the sponge is already
soapy to clean my bathroom sink
and counter. Gina, North Car-
olina
BOTTLE OPENER: I used to ask
my husband to open pop bottles for
me. Now I use a nutcracker to twist
the top off. Suzanne, California
LONGER LASTING GARDEN
FLAGS: Keep your outdoor garden
flags from fading and weathering
as fast Spray both sides of the flag
with a fabric protector such as
Scotchgard Outdoor Water Shield.
- Wendy, e-mail
HOME REMODELING ON A
DIME: For those looking to update
and remodel your home, look to
see whether your local chapter of
Habitat For Humanity has a re-
claim store. We have one here and
have found some great deals. We
have always wanted a set of French
doors in our dining room that
opened to the backyard. Last April,
I found a brand new set of Ander-
son aluminum clad doors for $450.
We had priced these at $2000 from
Lowe's a month before. Not every-
thing in the store is new, but if you
go in often and watch, you can find
new or near new items. You can
also donate anything you take out
during your remodel, and they'll
give you a receipt for your taxes. -
Jerrald, Missouri


DEAR SARA: I have a few large
jars of grape jelly that have been
rotated to the front of the pantry
and will be expiring soon. I have
made the grape jelly/chili sauces,
used it in BBQ sauces and melted
it down for syrups. My daughter
used to live off grape jelly, but now
she's anti-peanut butter and jelly
because she has a friend who is fa-
tally allergic to peanuts. Help.
Please. Jenelle, Massachusetts
DEAR JENELLE: You can add
grape jelly to smoothies, yogurt,
pancakes, French toast, waffles,
cottage cheese, oatmeal, ice cream
or muffins. Or add it to cream
cheese to top a bagel, cornbread,
biscuit or toast. My mom used to
add some to leftover pie dough.
She'd make thumbprint cookies.
You could do similar with a peanut
butter cookie recipe for you to
enjoy (since your daughter isn't
eating peanut butter). Simply roll
the dough into a ball, make a im-
printer well into the dough, bake
as usual and spoon some jelly in-
side.
DEAR SARA: Can I freeze
bagged lettuce? I bought a bag of
lettuce on Friday not realizing that
its expiration date is tomorrow!
Can I freeze it or should I just try
to use it up? Danni, Ohio
DEAR DANNI: No. Don't freeze
it. You can repackage it in a plastic
baggie with a paper towel and
maybe get an extra couple of days
before it goes bad.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com), a
Web site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o United Media, 200 Madison
Ave., 4th Floor, New York, NY
10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage. com.


ARBORIST
Continued from Page E5

vironment can be destroyed in
less than a second by a bolt of
lightning.
Trees that stand in the open
landscape or the tallest tree in an
area are likely candidates for
lightning strikes.
There are many circumstances
that warrant protecting a tree
from a lightning strike historic
trees, trees of great economical
value, large trees 10 feet from a
structure, trees on a golf course,
in a park, trees that are used to
aid in shelter from weather or
trees in our own front or back
yard. These should be equipped
with lightning protection systems.
A lightning protection system
entails a series of copper con-
ductors that extend from the top
of the tree down and from the
main stems and trunk, past the
tree's drip line. The conductors
are then grounded. All lightning


WATER
Continued from Page E3

5. Use leftover water
for houseplants: By
doing things like putting
a bucket under your
showerhead while you
wait for the water to
heat up, you can reclaim
all the water you may
need for watering
houseplants and filling
your dog's bowl.
6. Make sure your
dishwasher is fully
loaded: Many of us just
run a partly filled dish-
washer out of habit Take


There are many circumstances that
warrant protecting a tree from a lightning
strike historic trees, trees of great
economical value, large trees 10 feet from
a structure, trees on a golf course, in a
park, trees that are used to aid in shelter
from weather or trees in our own yard.


protection hardware should be
approved by NFAA and LPI.
The tallest point of a system is
called the air terminal. Copper
or copper bronze is used for this
purpose. These are attached to
the tree using copper nails. The
number of grounds depends on
the girth of the tree. Lightning
protection systems should be in-
spected annually to maintain a
continuous flow of current
Florida is the lightning capital
of the world, and unfortunately, a
tree struck by lightning cannot be


the time to make sure it's
completely loaded.
7. Use the appropriate
water level for your
laundry: Again, a small
thing many of us over-
look Check the laundry
load size and set your
washing machine to the
proper level; you'll save
on water and sewer-use
charges.
8. Fix leaky faucets/in-
stall water-saving aera-
tors: Repairing and/or
installing new, efficient
aerators on faucets can
save hundreds of gal-
lons a month.
9. Use a broom, rather
than a hose: It seems


that most of us forgot
how to use a broom
when cleaning a drive-
way or a walkway
Sweeping saves water.
10. Water your garden
in the early morning:
Take advantage of the
head start created by
morning dew. Get up a
just a little earlier to
water your garden.
These are just some
tips that I have seen
work around my own
home. If you have any
ideas or tricks that work
for you, please send
them in. If we get
enough of them, I can
keep the water-saving


replaced as easily as a television,
answering machine, or tele-
phone. Scientific research and
the skills of an arborist can help
protect our historical old friends.


Kerry Kreider is a practicing ar-
borist and a member of the In-
ternational Society of
Arboriculture, a tree preserva-
tionist and president ofAction
Tree Service. Reach him at 726-
9724 or actionproarborist
@yahoo.com.


tips flowing by writing
"volume two" before the
summer ends.


Master
Contractor/Plumber Ed
Del Grande is known
internationally as the
author of the book "Ed
Del Grande's House
Call" and for hosting
TVshows on Scripps
Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For
more information, visit
eddelgrande.com or
write eddelgrande
@hgtvpro.com. Always
consult local contrac-
tors and codes.


CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2.5, dock on head
of canal, 2 mins to
Crystal River, 5 mins to
Kings Bay. $185K obo
(352) 364-1132
Floral City, 2/2 Modular
on 2 lots, 80 X 120.
Canal goes to lake &
river. Furn, large scrn'd
room, deck & sheds.
$90,000 Or make offer.
6545 S. Dolphin Dr.
(352) 341-7798
LAKE FRONT MOBILE
1/1 on Lake Rousseau,
turn, Ig scrn por.. bet
Inglis & Dunnellon, Drift-
wood MH Park, $7500
352-489-5918


HOMOSASSA
REDUCED MUST
SELL! Owner Finance
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $449K
727-808-5229

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


I Sell Homes & Get
Results Douglas
Lindsey Realtor. ERA
American Realty & Inv.
Cell (352) 212-7056
Office (352) 746-3600
Douglas.lindsey
@era.com


Seniors may qualify
for NO pmt option


- O
Plantation Realty, Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Usa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner


GULF HAMMOCK
155 acres ,org timber
prim camp w/cookhse,
elect& well.hog/turkey
deer $2300 per ac
352-489-5918
HORSE & HUNTERS
PARADISEI 40 ac. near
Dunnellon surrounded
by state land. Adjoins
Greenway, $7500 per
acre. call 352-489-5918

Get
Results in
the
home ront
classifieds!


AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20
lines of copy w/
photo.
352-563-5966
Over 3000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


CHECK THIS OUT
Final Price
Reduction for quick
sale 2..5 acres
in Crystal Hills Mini-
Farms, across from
Citrus Hills. Will take
Best offer over
$22,000. Terms poss.
352-212-7613


Citrus Springs Land
1/4 acre Foreclosure,
w/guarnteed
financing, $100 down
$100 per month $4900
Call 877-983-6600
www.florldalotsusa
.corn


Rainbow Lakes
1/4 acre Foreclosure,
Land w/guarnteed fi-
nancing, $100 down
$100 per month $4900
Call 877-983-6600
.corn
wwflot daosusa



635 S FAIRBANKS
PATH LECANTO Lot for
sale $3000. call
912-681-6812
LAND FOR SALE
1.15 Acre, Off Cardinal
(352) 382-0785
(352) 476-2202


.. :~I, e Finder

Eu^^^^fi


rtl R DYw i.HNF1


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E13


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Waterfront
Homes






E14 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010


JANE
Continued from Page E9

colleagues, friends and pa-
trons of Carl Linnaeus, 1707-
78, who developed the
method of scientific names
for all living things.
Black-eyed Susan, Rud-
beckia fulgida, is a favorite
in Central and North
Florida gardens, Zones 8 to
10. Native to the southeast-
ern states, fulgida has natu-
ralized by seeds and
escaped cultivation in
Florida. A reliable summer
to fall flower, it lives for
years, and can be divided at
the end of winter every
third year, or left to form a
meter-wide colony.
Viable seeds develop if
spent flowers are left to
ripen. Snipping off seed-
heads, called deadheading,
prevents seed from matur-
ing and promotes extended
flowering twice as long as
an untended plant You can
deadhead the first crop and
let later flowers set seed.
Fulgida makes an excellent


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


cut flower, lasting a week in
an air conditioned home.
Coneflowers bloom pro-
fusely in full sun, less in part
shade. Sandy, well-drained
soil should be amended
with well-rotted organic
compost to increase mois-
ture retention and provide
natural nutrients for lush
plant growth. A tablespoon
of slow release 12-2-14 fer-
tilizer per plant can be ap-
plied in mid-March to foster
the spring growth spurt. A
second application in early
September will be used up
before winter arrives, and
your perennial will be
strong and healthy, with a
good root system to survive
the toughest winter Florida
can offer.
An inch or two of pine
needles can be tucked
around the leaves and over
the extensive root system to
trap in heat from the soil
and insulate the plant from
cold night temperatures, as
well as buffering it from
chilly winds. Decayed pine
needles have a pre-emer-
gent herbicide property that
prevents germinating seeds


from developing. Pine
"straw" is a sustainable nat-
ural resource readily avail-
able loose or in bales. On a
recent drive through Geor-
gia and the Carolinas, every
Walmart I saw had a stack of
bales for sale. If enough
Florida gardeners ask for it,
perhaps big box outlets here
will carry them too.
All perennials will benefit
from similar care and tend-
ing and reward the gar-


dener with bigger plants
and copious flowers. Since
cultivated Black-eyed Su-
sans are actually tended
wildflowers, they can be
maintenance-free, too, if
planted in rich soil with
good sunlight and the right
location.
Left alone, Black-eyed
Susan will spread by root
runners and seed dispersed

See JANE/Page E15


" "J L ..
GEMAT PRICE GREAT VALUE! CAEFREE LIVING BY THE POOU
* 2/2/2 home in quiet setting 3/2/2 w/solar heated pool
SVaulted family room w/2 skylights Pool resurfaced with Florida Gem
SEnclosed Florida Room New roof in April 2007
* Well for yard with newer pump Bricked fireplace with bookcases
SAdded 7'x8' garage storage Dual paned windows throughout
Extra parking pad for guests Home warranty for the buyers
#342270 $107,900 #338485 $159,500
Sfee ir'T f .l T io @ ww eae o .co -m-, -,.i


2+ ACRES ON THE BEAUTIFUL
WITHLACOOCHEE
280 ft. on the river with great views
Platted lot in McKay Plantation off CR 39
Pricedl to sell *180,000
Cl F
Dietos3524 2g S S,


island locale. Close to town &I Raoilsto-Trails.
MlS#342198 $74,900

PINE RIDGE
BEST BUY
1 ACRE TRACT
MLS#343011 $19,900


BANK-OWNED
2 Side-by-side 1 acre tracts
Deeded access to Lake Rousseau
MLS#3438 $18,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (32 726-2471
Email: royboss@tampaboy.rr.com www.olldtrusrealty.com After Hours s52) 302-6714


I s rrs. ,o, ..,*.- ,, ,, -,i.,, :--- ,,, ,
"l "l 29,90 SEE VIS UAL TOURI


I -- -3 ~ I -







Cimus COUNTY (Eb CHRONICLE SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E15


JANE
Continued from Page E14

by the wind, birds and small crea-
tures.
Natural controls such as turtles and
insects chomping the leaves, pocket


gophers tunneling through the roots
and birds eating the seed make rud-
beckias non-invasive.
Hairy leaves 6 inches long and 2.5
inches wide on a mature plant are
deep green. Lower leaf stems have a
reddish tint.
Leaf edges are entire, not toothed,
but wavy or ruffled. The best feature


are the bright yellow flowers on
sturdy stems. Different varieties
sometimes have single flowers on sin-
gle stems. Most selected garden plants
have branched stems with several
flowers.


Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and nursery owner She wel-
comes weekend visitors to her
Florida Friendly Yard and Wildlife
Habitat at 5019 W Stargazer Lane,
Dunnellon. Call (352) 465-0649.


How

To Make

Your

Dining

Room

Set

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966



www.chronicleonline.com '


F S 6.peci Report From Realto Dv I oI I.e-
7Want toigiive your home
7 Insider Secrets on Showcasing a Uowfao This
Your Home for a Successful Sale seore essionalhe
insiders use to make a
Many homeowners don't understand why one property the one that
house will languish on the market for months, buyers remember- and
resulting in systematic price reductions, while
others seem to stand out and get sold quicker
and for top dollar. This report will outline many
of the tips, tricks and tools industry insiders
use to enable a home to outshine its
competition and generate quicker and more
substantial offers. If you're thinking of selling
your home, be sure to read this informative
report. Order your free copy today.
: To get your free copy of this report, call 1-877-204-7276,
ext. 2003, 24 hours for a recorded message.
There's no obligation.


...........ve r .u. r guiy nili, ta ......... u .s..u ui .u ......it .... lodlu upi .li...l.. luppu w.u..e l.d, corner lot, split Tloor plan, stanaarc
Sl17pasture land for your dream home and let your Home Warranty! MLS# 333867. $275,500. :eilings....and yup some work! MLS# 343313
'J"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" livestock graze. $115,000- MLS #342479 Call Tomika Spires.Hanssen 352-586-6598 or 10 Elkcam.
Call Julie VanNess 352-302-9157 Michelle Wells 352-400-0263 Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.
1 NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225 .
PONTICOSKEY 1 REALTY INC. a- -lF 3
3,,. 1i,, i. --"i-" -6 "ro.cr THIS IS A REAL CUTIEI I V5. 2-1 noart

BEAUTIFUL 2006 3/2 with 2040 living just n.,,, ..oms (garage converted to family
remodeled? Split floorplan, cathedral ceilings, BANK-OWNED FIXER UPPER! 2/1 close to room) Rear glass enclosed porch, comer lot,
MLS# 343314. $109,900. 8276 Empire. 7071 Crestview. 8912 Waterview, Floral City.
"-S. .. ..' *-:. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598



HEATED POOL & SPA HOME HAS BEAUTIFUL HOME ON BOULEVARD LOT -2005 32 WITH 2360 LIVING AREA
DOUBLE GOLF COURSE FAIRWAY VIEW! HAS HUGE PRIVATE BACKYARD! CUTE 2A1 HOME IN HERNANDO FOR e- I a2 WITH 2360 LIVIN G AREA
Summer Kitchen hasl /2Both Oversized 3 CAR Grage Oversized Garagehs Workshop *SplitBerms O shop Split Bedroom :.?i GR E O TH.,i- l2e.0l0, ,2,2- .. 1r ,,'1 a ,u Iret m ,, H,,".r
iL Mni te ie [ D Prn R n r as i n W i Spi Bt ONLY $54,000! F .:,-r -,, trr-.j ,', GREAT BUY ON THIS 2003 30122 .-it, 1517' ior S175,500 H: rr, ir ,,,', anJ iTln
SPEACUAR Master ue giving AND Fm Rooms Custom Built-n Entertinment Center in Great Room laundry, living room, and some repairs required living for $84,900! Split plan, vaulted ceilings, rooms, dining area, split floor plan, partial
$349,900 MLS #340653 $182,500 MLS #337308 however priced accordingly. MLS# 343470. living and family rooms, open floor plan...take a appliances, and covered rear porch.
3216 Buckskin. peek quick! MLS# 343476. 2828 Santana. MLS# 342869. 1741 Gate Dancer.
TZe* .ifyrigt0 fOU Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 Call Tomlka Splres-Hanssen 352-586-6598.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010 E15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Fanlaslic get away
Warieronil Mobile Home
Furnished all you needJ I i bring
is your boti
Call Patty Marrero 352.7266668
L


JiG

SSE! COUgT
R FOE | INC_
1645 W. MiStIvresFL3401fT


I Truly a country paradise
I 2.2 5 on 2 5 garden selling acres
* Access river and lake chain
S* Custom. cedai hardwood IIs. 3 Ipis
. Detached 24x30 RV barn workshop
* LR-FR game room
MLS #341860 ASKING $295,000
Pat Davis 352 212 7280


* TARAWOOD 55+
* Gated community
* Well maintained 2. 2
* Across from clubhouse and pool
MLS #339243 $79,900
Jeanne or Willard Pickiel 352-212-3410
www.citruscountvsold. crm


* 3 2 '2 with large oak trees
* Newer rool and laminate flooring
* Fenced real yard
* Fireplace and open plan
MLS #343075 $129,900
Charles Kelly 352422-2387








Walirlroril Esiate al D.ajiuron, .n the i'uigh'
OJldel nAt,,rr u niuifli, riieeI. A3 ireilli
iiyv *'ilr new A( Teirano Ilio.ing carbon
OD porir',ir lv if.uv w aerlrurin in e
neighborhood and make T11 KObU iifl
MAKE AM OFFER LIST PRICE $85,900
Ce.iT,/-.J lhl / I .llyPs 3I525 -'41 273M 11- E-
N M. W l I, rn rl .,, W M--,-..' Il,,- r)uAT Sn hlr, II
Call Mary Paersons 352634 1273


- uv u iii iill.lu YjI.ru I.uiiiiiiiilly
* 10 Acie r.mesnesirs paved roads
* 3 miles fiom Inveiness off 581 S
* Equestrian community
MLS #326586 PRICES FROM $150,000I
Jim Morton 352422-2173


* INVERNESS HOME
* 3 bedrooms 2 5 baths 2 car garage
* Newer kitchen w, wood cabinets
* Inside laundry, screened porch
MLS #343322
Call Martha 352-476-8727 to preview










2 Bedroom, 2 bath Manulactured
Close to everything
Nice wooded lot 1501160 3appio< als I
Fenced Yard Carport
MLS #343292 Listed for $32.900
Call Maxine Hellmers 352.2124147


* Private selling 3' Beautillul dry acres
* Split 3BRs 2 5BAs
* Handsome master bedroom suile
* Stone Fireplace
MLS #342974 $120,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352.212.3410
www. citruscountysold. coamrn









* Family size 6 Iradlional style
* 5 3 5 2 Pool home 75 acre homesile
* Large detached workshop garage
* Minutes to schools, shopping
* Beaultlul home great price
MLS #342792 ASKING $398,900
Pat Davis 352 212-7280


* Citrus Hills pool home
* 3 '2/2 with family room liv E dining
* One acre homesile
* Move in ready
* Seller relocating.,mothialed
MLS #343427 ASKING $217,900
Pat Davis (352) 212 7280


* Custom built on I 9 acres
* 3,2. 2 Family room. 2 838 UR
* POOL a summer kitchen
MLS #341774 $250,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www.citruscountysold.com


* 3 '2 triplewide with fireplace
* New carpet and Iresh paint.
* Move in ready
MLS #342535 $59,900
Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


$65,900 WOW!
* WALOON WOODS 55 Over two acres wnn 3BR 2BA cleaO
* 2, 2 Better than new DW mobile doublemide mobdiel
* Family room 2 car carport. shed Nice 12 x 24 utility bldg on properly a buoust
* Pano nicely furnished. split plan i Close in lwn location located in Deerwcood
$39,900 Easy to see
Call Ruth Frederick 352-563 6866 Call Mary Parsons 352-634-1273


* BIG REDUCTION Estale PI.
* 2 3 Home with awesome renovations
* Fireplace. family loom dining area
* Breakfast nook. 2 car garage, dock
* Big Lake Henderson, awesome water
$249,900
Call Ruth Frederick 352-563-6866









* Citrus Hills pool home Large corner lot
* 2 master suites. Light and bright decor
* Open floor plan. Inside laundry
* Large lanai to pool
* Lots ol upgrades, kit rool. AC and more
MLS #342963
Call Martha 352-476-8727 to preview


* duiM, ZBA uodDiewiae w/i-rieplace
* 2 MOL Fenced Wooded Acres
* City Water/NO Restrictions
MLS #343110 GREAT PRICE AT $95,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www. citruscountysold.com


I


Luxurious waterfront living -
56 NEW Mediterranean style homes
World renowned ihshmg grounds at your doorstep
Private docks, boat launch, comm pool and tennis
Immediate occupancy or
customT build your own home
Several Models available'
Prices starting at $250,000 for water
TRADEWINDS HOMOSASSA access to $599.000 for waterfront!
MARINA RESORT Call Elias Kuallah 352400 2635


10265 Fishbowl Drive, Homosassa, FL 34448


* Gieat location ur Ithis commercial properly
* 1031 Sq Ft building
* 281 F oul road Ironmage 41 S
* Backs up to Rails to Trails
MLS #343297 LISTED FOR $149,000
Call Maxine Hellmers 352-212-4147


o .am


* Gated 55- COMMUNITY
* Almost brand new 2 2 2 with lots ol
upgrades including air to glassed porth
* View ol enra lot available to buyer of house
* Lois of tile 2 master suites A must see
MLS #342031
Call Martha 352476-8727 to preview


E16 SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 2010




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