Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02168
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: November 15, 2010
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02168

Full Text





Pro football: Tampa Bay Bucs take the win


TODAY & Tuesday morning
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NOVEMBER 15, 2010


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VOLUME 116JSM 100


Feels good to give


Today marks National Philanthropy Day


CHRIs .'. ;ORMER
Chronicle
Reach for your checkbook: It's Na-
tional Philanthropy Day.
"No gift is too big or too small,"
said Chris Pool, director of market-
ing and philanthropy at Citrus Me-
morial Health System.
Pool wanted to use the special day
to recognize the contributions county
residents have made to help the
community hospital in Inverness.
Whether they have left bequests in
their wills, raised funds for a specific


item or project or put in many volun-
teer hours, the residents have made
the hospital a better place, Pool said.
First celebrated in 1986, then-
President Reagan signed a procla-
mation officially recognizing Nov 15
as National Philanthropy Day. Since
then, the day has been recognized by
many state, provincial and local gov-
ernments in the United States.
"We can think of so many creative
ways to give," Pool said.
Pool has been with the hospital di-
recting its philanthropy for the past
six years.


"When Ryan Beaty came in as
chief executive officer was when phi-
lanthropy was entertained," Pool
said. "He wondered why a nonprofit
hospital didn't have a philanthropy
program."
The concept had not been raised
before.
See IPage A6
A 10-year-old boy recently donated
new toys to Pediatric Park, the chil-
dren's suite at Citrus Memorial Health
System in Inverness, as part of the
hospital's philanthropy program. Alex
Riley, right, hands over a toy to
Melanie Hynes, R.N., in front of one of
the murals in Pediatric Park.
Special to the Chronicle


Killer fungus ravages Citrus County trees


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Chasshowitzka National Wildlife Refuge Manager Michael Lusk looks at the treetops to find which laurel trees are being killed by the
non-native redbay ambrosia beetle. The pests came from Asia and are believed to have been transported into this country in shipping
containers. The beetle infestation was first seen in Georgia.

Insect-carried disease threatens Florida's redbay, laurel avocado trees


AMANDA MIMS
Chronicle
A fungus that could spell the
end of redbay trees and other
laurels in the Southeastern
United States is spreading
through the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge.
The culprit? The redbay am-
brosia beetle, which causes the
trees to become infected with
the deadly fungus.
Since it was first discovered
in Georgia in 2002, the disease


has worked its way north to
South Carolina and south,
eventually reaching counties
throughout Florida. It has yet
to reach Miami-Dade County
or counties south of Miami-
Dade, southeast Florida, or the
Florida Panhandle, with the
exception of Bay County. The
disease was first discovered in
Citrus County last year and af-
fects native trees such as red-
bays and other laurels, as well
as avocados, which are not na-
tive to Florida.


Bay trees at the Crystal River
refuge have been dying rapidly,
according to Michael Lusk,
manager of the Chassahow-
itzka National Wildlife Refuge
Complex. The brown leaves of
the dead bays aren't hard to
spot in the tree line along parts
of King's Bay, including Three
Sisters Springs.
Lusk said he was shocked by
how quickly trees on the prop-
erty died and how many trees
had been affected.
"It's amazing," he said. "I re-


member going to Three Sisters
and everything was fine and I
went back maybe a week later
and there were all these dead
trees."
Major concerns with the dis-
ease, which found its way to
Florida in 2005, is it could have
devastating effects on the
state's avocado industry, the
second largest in the nation.
The disease has not yet been
found in Miami-Dade County,
See F1 ". Page A5


MICHAEL C. THOMAS/Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services, Bugwood.org
The redbay ambrosia beetle
measures only about 1/16
of an inch (2 mm) long. It is
dark brown to black in color
and cylindrical in shape. It
can be separated from
other similar beetles found
in or on redbay trees by
looking at the tip of the ab-
domen, which is somewhat
V-shaped and pointed. It is
also glabrous or shiny and
without hairs. (Information
from the USDA Forestry
Service.)
FREQUENT QUESTIONS
Frequently asked ques-
tions about the redbay
ambrosia beetle the and
laurel wilt fungus (from
the U.S. Department of
Agriculture Forest Service):
Q: Where did the redbay am-
brosia beetle and laurel
wilt fungus come from?
A: The redbay ambrosia bee-
tle is native to Asia (includ-
ing India, Japan, Myanmar
and Taiwan). The fungus is
believed to have arrived
with the beetle and is
probably Asian in origin as
well.
Q: How did they get here?
A: Like many other non-na-
tive wood-boring beetles,
the redbay ambrosia bee-
tie likely arrived in solid
wood packing material
(SWPM), such as crates or
pallets. SWPM is routinely
used to ship goods inter-
nationally, but these mate-
rials can harbor unwanted
wood-inhabiting pests if
See FREQUENT/Page A5


, Manatee camera up at Three Sisters


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Lt. Chris Sella from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion attaches a camera in a waterproof housing at the entrance to Three
Sisters Springs for a webcam that will show manatees coming and going
Into the springs and along the Crystal River entrance.


AMANDA MIMS
Chronicle
With the help of modern technology, law enforce-
ment officers and wildlife officials are keeping bet-
ter watch over the manatee sanctuary at Three
Sisters Springs.
For the past three years, officers have installed a
camera that takes streaming video of the sanctuary
during the winter months, when manatees are ac-
tive in and around the springs. The video will help
them make sure people do not enter the sanctuary
and harass the animals.
The sanctuary at Three Sisters is one of seven
manatee sanctuaries in King's Bay Three Sisters is
also a very popular place for snorkelers to swim
with manatees in the wintertime.
"This place gets a lot of complaints every year
about harassment and stuff like that," said Lt. Chris
Sella of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation


ON THE NET
n Three Sisters: manateecam.viewnetcam.com.
Click the "single" tab to view streaming video.

Commission (FWC). "We're monitoring to make sure
(harassment doesn't happen). The officers can log
on from their laptop computers and see what kind
of activities are going on."
It will also help FWC and U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service officers investigate complaints from the
public, he said.
"If someone does call and complain, our dispatch
can pull it up and look to see what's going on right
then and there."
This year, the public also has access to the video
at manateecam.viewnetcamn.com. Click on the "sin-
gle" tab to view the streaming video.


i ,l l ".
Com ics ..........................B8
Crossword ...................B7
Editorial ..................... A10
Horoscope ...................B6
Lottery Numbers ............B4
Lottery Payouts ..............B6
M ovies ......................... B8
Obituaries ................... A6
TV Listings....................B7


GM stock
Should you invest?/Page A6


Online poll
Is the strategy of blacking out TV coverage of certain non-sell-out NFL games effective?
A. Yes. It's caused me to go to a game or more.
B. No. Dumb business move considering the masses of fans who live an hour or
@ more from their team's home.
C. Yes. Teams need direct support from ticket-buying fans if they're to deny offers
to move to another city.
SD. No. But I've gotten more chores done around the house because of it.
To vote, visit the website at www.chronicleonline.com.
Results will appear next Monday. Find last week's online poll results./Page A4


SPage A5


No lottery
Early deadlines prohibited
the printing of Sunday
night's lottery numbers.
Look for the numbers in
Tuesday's edition.


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A2 MONIDA, NOViuMBiR 15, 2010


Crowds flock to home and outdoor show


SANDRA FREDERICK
Chronicle

Roger Harris spent Sun-
day talking about the same
thing he does every day of
the week while on the job:
propane gas.
The account manager with
AmeriGas was joined by 29
other vendors from across
the county at the 33rd annual
Home & Outdoor Show on
Saturday and Sunday at the
National Guard Armory in
Crystal River.
The purpose?
"To showcase our busi-
nesses," Harris said. "The
turnout was excellent
"Many people stopped by the
booth and said they were
having a great time and it
was very informative."
Fred and Aurea Vega spent
an hour walking through the
auditorium looking for prod-
ucts to perhaps, some day,
better their Lecanto home.
"It was very informa-
tional," Fred Vega said. "If I
ever want to remodel, I will
know where to go. And, it was
free."
.Donna Bidlack, executive
officer with Citrus County
Builders Association, said
the event was "very success-
ful."
"So far this weekend, we
had about 1,300 people come
through the doors," she said


V--


RIC BUSH/Special to t
Brandy Robbins, right, and Russ Parke, left, from Progress Energy talks with Ken Rodgers of Homosassa about how
his electric bill Sunday during the 33rd annual Home & Outdoor Show at the National Guard Armory in Crystal Ri'


about a two hours before the
3 p.m. closing time. "We had
about 1,000 people yesterday,
which was double from last
year"
Bidlack believes piggy-
backing with the Homosassa
Seafood Festival allowed
people to attend several
events once leaving home.
CCBA is a trade association
with 194 members.
Ron Hagen traveled from
Hernando to see what was in
the marketplace for roofing.
.-


"I recently had my roof re-
placed and it still leaks," he
said. "It is frustrating and I
just wanted to see what prod-
ucts are available in case I


need to do something else."
While there, he was able to
find out about pest control,
flooring, windows, kitchen
and bathrooms, cutting-edge
-I I


Judy Gransbury listens as Bill Larden, owner of Larder & Sons Rufus Minard, owner of AAA Roofing, talks with Ron Hagan,
Construction Inc., talks about remodeling, of Hernando, about different types of roof materials.


air conditioning un
dream kitchens.
There was also
room promoting mei
reduce carbon foo
Gold Crest Homes, bi
green homes, hand
free basil sticks to gro
own herb plants.
The University of
Cooperative Extens
fered brochures
Florida-friendly law
garden plants, protect


F natural springs and fertiliz-
U .. ing facts. Many left the booth
91 0 with rain gauges to measure
,,!. rainfall totals.
Walter Stachowicz, presi-
dent of the Citrus County
Green Building Council, was
on hand to talk to about ways
people can get involved in
the "green" way of thinking.
In the main room, Bill
Larder shared his years of
experience with one woman
who stopped by his booth to
inquire about handicapped
bathrooms.
"There are not many peo-
ple who know about his," he
said. 'And, as a pastor, I also
remodel and work on
churches."
But Dennis Ramsey may
he Chronicle have had one of the best
to lower spots. His diverse display of
ver. recreational vehicles was
outside in the sunshine.
its and From the I Camp, a 16-foot
self-contained portable
a green camper to a large fifth-wheel
thods to RV almost like a three bed-
)tprints. room house on wheels, there
builder of was a constant flow of on-
led out lookers.
)w-your- "We have had an excep-
tional weekend," said Den-
Florida nis Ramsey, sales manager of
sion of- Como, with stores in Inver-
about ness and Homosassa. "We
wn and sold two RVs and close to
ting the closing on the other."


Joyce and Manny Smigel talks with a representative from
Surfaces Flooring. The crystal River couple said they are ed-
ucating themselves about new technology.


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STATE &


LOCAL
CITRiUS COUNrTY (CIR()ONIC.LE


Around



Inverness
City council
meets Tuesday
The Inverness City Council
is scheduled to have its regu-
lar meeting at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday inside the Inverness
Government Center at 212
W. Main St.
The council's meeting
agenda includes:
A resolution for park
reservation fees;
Consideration of a land-
scape maintenance agree-
ment between the city and
the Florida Department of
Transportation.
A resolution amending
the city's Land Development
Code fee schedule.
For information, call 726-
2611 or visit www.
inverness-fl.gov.

Homosassa
Geoff Greene
to speak at CRWC
Citrus County Property Ap-
praiser Geoff Greene will be
the speaker at the Citrus Re-
publican Women's Club
meeting Tuesday, Nov. 16.
The Republican Women
meet at the new Homosassa
Library off Grover Cleveland
Boulevard. The purpose of
the CRWC is to inform and
educate the attendees on Re-
publican issues. This meeting
is open to all, so come and
meet the property appraiser.
Social time begins at 5:30
p.m., with the meeting start-
ing at 6 p.m. and lasting until
7:45 p.m.
If you would like further in-
formation, or directions, call
Rosella Hale at 746-2545.

Crystal River
Pool t&be cros 1
during holdays...
The Citrus County Parks
and Recreation Bureau will
close the pool at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River around
the Thanksgiving, Christmas
and New Year holidays.
The pool will be closed for
those holidays on the follow-
ing dates:
Nov. 25 and Nov. 26.
Dec. 25 and Dec. 26.
0 Jan. 1.
For more information, call
the 795-1478 or the Parks
and Recreational Bureau
527-7540.
City seeks review
applicants
The city of Crystal River is
seeking applicants for a char-
ter review committee.
The city's charter requires
formation of a committee
every four years to recom-
mend proposed changes to
the charter.
City council members
make appointments to the
committee. The committee
must be formed by March 1
and have its recommenda-
tions to the council 60 days
later.
Applications are available
on the city's website,
www.crystalriverfl.org, or at
City Hall, 123 N.W. U.S. 19.

Clearwater
3 fishermen
rescued in Gulf
Three fishermen who went
missing on a trip in the Gulf of
Mexico have been rescued.
The men were spotted Sat-
urday about 20 miles west of
Clearwater. They were on the
hull of their overturned boat,
but safe. Arlen Gastineau of
Orlando, Ken Harper of Col-
orado Springs, Colo., and
Randy Waldorf of Kansas
City, Kan., hung onto the side
of boat for 18 hours.


They set out Friday morn-
ing and when they didn't re-
turn home that night as
expected, their families grew
worried.
The Coast Guard scoured
the area with boats and heli-
copters. A Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission boat also searched.
-From staff and wire reports


Meek: Offer tax-break incentives


Move could help

expand businesses,

create more jobs

MIKE WRIGHT
Chronicle
Citrus County Commissioner Joe
Meek will recommend Tuesday that
commissioners consider an ordi-
nance to allow property tax breaks
to companies that expand their
businesses and add jobs with high-
end wages.
Meek, who also is chairman of the
county's Economic Development
Council, says tax breaks could stim-
ulate the economy if they are aimed
at businesses with large invest-


* WHAT: Citrus County
Commission meeting.
WHEN: 1 p.m. Tuesday.
WHERE: Courthouse,
110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness.
ONLINE: www.bocc.citrus.fl.us

ments that promise to increase
their work force.
Meek will ask the board to direct
the staff to prepare an ordinance
for a future public hearing. He said
state law requires an ordinance to
allow property tax relief as an eco-
nomic incentive.
Commissioners meet at 1 p.m.
Tuesday in the Citrus County Court-
house. It is the first meeting of new
Commissioners Rebecca Bays and
John "JJ" Kenney
Meek noted an EDC grant pro-


gram has been suc-
cessful in assisting
two local compa-
nies expand and
add employees.
The program
would work this way:
To qualify, busi-
nesses would need
to expand a current
facility, or invest at
least $500,000 in a
new building, and
add at least 12 new


will attend first
meeting since
her election.


employees with pay 15 percent
above the county's average wage.
The county could offer a 10-year
property tax abatement on the tax-
able value of the new facility or ad-
dition.
Meek, in an e-mail to a reporter,
said the tax-break program is a way
for the county to encourage busi-


FISHFUL OF FUN


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Eric Waddilove, left, vacationing from Ontario, Canada, finishes his lunch of seafood chowder and fries Saturday
during the 36th annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts & Seafood Festival. He was attending the festival with his wife,
Unda. The festival started Saturday and ended Sunday on Yulee Drive in Old Homosassa.

Annual eventprovides food financial gains for Homosassa


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Chronicle
Right down to the water-
front, the Homosassa Arts
and Crafts Seafood Festi-
val was making waves.
"This is a wonderful fes-
tival," said Dave Wooten,
who performs with the
band Sarasota Slim, lined
up for the festival week-
end at The Shed at
MacRae's in Old Ho-
mosassa. "We had lots of
dancers on the floor last
night We've really en-
joyed it."
The local motel felt the
difference, too.
"The festival always
brings business here,"
said Lynn Schweighart,
minding the desk at
MacRae's. "We are usually
a full a year in advance.
Right now, we've only got
two rooms open for next
year"
The festival was a short
stroll away in the area
around the Homosassa
Civic Club, which spon-
sors the event.
"This is the first year
I've not been totally in
charge," said Diane Toto,
one of the club's founders.
"We've got many other
members and volunteers
and they are doing a fan-
tastic job."
Bill Andrews and Penny
Yost headed the event this
year, the 36th of its kind.
"The volunteers appear
and find their niche," An-
drews said.
"This has been a
tremendous community
effort," Yost said.
"Every dollar we make
is given back to the com-
munity," Toto said.
This year's event
boasted 100 crafters, 75
artists and about 20 food
vendors.
"About 80 to 90 percent
of them are repeat ven-
dors," Toto said. "The peo-
ple who live around here


ABOVE: Leslie Erb, of
Hernando, has a perfect
seat for people-watching
Saturday during the 36th
annual Homosassa Arts,
Crafts & Seafood Festival.
RIGHT: Linda Wilkes, of
Clermont, bought a
flamingo sign. She and a
group of girlfriends who
have known each other for
30 years refer to them-
selves as the Flamingos.
can do well out of it too,
even selling parking
spaces. Then they all go to
Walmart to do some
Christmas shopping."
Vendors came from
near and far. Louise Whit-
ney runs The Glass
Garage on Yulee Drive,
with a partner, Lori
Lenoir.
"I've been doing this
show for a long time -
since the late '80s," Whit-
ney said. "It is good adver-
tising for us and we like
helping the civic club."
Steve and Brenda Rains
run Tropical Caribbean
Gifts in Sarasota.
"We're doing OK," Steve
Rains said. "We come up
each year. This is our
ninth year. It's affected by
the economy, but we keep


siwniiiiL the 'be-back
book."'
The Rainses said they
mostly come for the fun.
"What do you think this
is worth?" Steve Rains


asked a woman passerby
as he held an ornamental
bird in his outstretched
hand.
"Two in the bush," the
woman replied.


A'-1
John "JJ"
Kenney
will attend first
meeting since
his election.


ness growth and he
encouraged sup-
port from current
and new board
members.
"As this is the
first meeting of the
newly seated
BOCC, it will be an
opportunity for the
new board to start
the process of en-
acting policy that
will help us diver-


sify and recruit industry into our
community," Meek wrote.
Along with the formal swearing in
Tuesday of new Commissioners
Bays and Kenney, the board will se-
lect its chairman for 2010-11. That
appointment traditionally falls to
the vice chairman, who is Commis-
sioner Dennis Damato.


Regional


science


fair faces


changes

Date is now

Dec. 8; place

i Citrus Co.

auditorium
Special to the Chronicle
Changes are coming to
the Citrus Regional Sci-
ence & Engineering Fair.
Growing to more than
250 projects, the highly
popular and successful
event draws elementary,
middle and high school
sfud ests'dh7bT p e n t
nlonth hs-i p-rioib an-
swers to their.r scientific
hypotheses.
Each year, students dis-
. play their projects and
compete for top honors.
This year's date and
venue have changed. The
fair will be Wednesday,
Dec. 8, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in In-
verness.
The public is welcome
to view projects from 4 to
7p.m.
The awards ceremony
will be at 6 p.m. Dec. 13 at
the Curtis Peterson Audi-
torium in Lecanto. Com-
munity members and area
businesses who wish to
sponsor a special award to
be presented at the
evening ceremony are in-
vited to go to www.citrus.
kl2.fl.us/edserv/science
fair/ and fill out a donor
form.
Coordinators of this
year's Citrus Regional
Science & Engineering
Fair are looking for
judges. The volunteers
would be treated to a con-
tinental breakfast preced-
ing the start of judging at
8:30 a.m. Dec. 8 and would
receive a complimentary
lunch at Beef O'Brady's of
Inverness after the close
of judging around noon.
Categories include ani-
mal sciences; behavioral
and social sciences; bio-
chemistry; cellular and
molecular biology; chem-
istry; computer sciences;
earth and planetary sci-
ences; engineering: elec-
trical and mechanical;
engineering: materials &
bioengineering; energy
and transportation; envi-
ronmental management;
environmental sciences;
mathematical sciences;
medicine and health sci-
ences; microbiology;
physics & astronomy;
plant sciences team.

CITRUS REGIONAL
SCIENCE &
ENGINEERING FAIR
PUBLIC DISPLAY: 4
to 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Dec. 8, at auditorium.
AWARDS CEREMONY:
6 p.m. Dec. 13 at
Curtis Peterson Audi-
torium in Lecanto.









Criawis COUNtJY (Ml) CHRCONICI.E


A4 MONDA', Novi'Mitlit 15, 2010


New county engineer joins
county Public Works
The Board of County Commission's Public
Works Department has hired Ken Cheek as its
new county engineer. Cheek replaces Charles
Balut and took over as director of the Engineer-
ing Division this week.
Cheek comes to the county from Burrell Engi-
neering of Dunnellon. He previously worked for
the county from 1998 to 2005, first as the water
quality project manager and then as engineering
services director.
Cheek grew up in the St. Petersburg area and
graduated from the University of South Florida
with Bachelor of Science degree in civil engi-
neering. He came to the county in 1991. He
worked for the former company Henigar and Ray
before starting with the county in 1998.
Deputies: Human head
found on canal bank
DANIA BEACH Sheriff's officials say a
human head was found on the bank of a canal in
South Florida.
The Broward County Sheriff's office said in a
news release that investigators were at the
scene in Dania Beach gathering evidence. The
head was found around 11 a.m. Sunday.
No other details were immediately released.
New Navy destroyer
commissioned in Florida
FORT LAUDERDALE Thousands of peo-
ple turned out for a celebration of the Navy's
newest destroyer and a tribute to a fallen Marine.
The commissioning of the USS Jason Dun-
ham happened under sunny skies at Port Ever-
glades in Fort Lauderdale on Saturday.
The $1 billion guided-missile destroyer was
adorned with red, white and blue flags and rib-
bons to mark the day.
The 510-foot-long ship was built in Bath,
Maine, and will have its home port in Norfolk, Va.
It's named for a Marine corporal from New
York who died in Iraq six years ago after throw-
ing himself on a grenade to protect others.
More than 650 red lionfish
caught in Keys
KEY WEST There are 659 fewer Indo-Pa-
cific red lionfish occupying the waters of the
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
The final in a series lionfish derbies was Sat-
urday off the Lower Keys. Divers captured 109 of


QUESTION: Are manatees suffi-
ciently protected?
No. More refuges, idol speed
zones and law enforcement are
needed. 35.9 percent (170 votes)
Yes. Citrus County, in particular,
has good safeguards in place. 26
percent 123 votes)
Yes. In my opinion, the regulation
has gone overboard. 25.7 percent
(122 votes)
No. The number of personal
power boats and tour boats
needs to be regulated 12.2 per-
cent (58votes)
Total votes: 473.


ON THE NET

Keys Lionfish Derbies:
www.reef.org/lionfish/derbies

the invasive species, adding to the haul of previ-
ous contests in Key Largo and Marathon.
Lionfish off the southeast United States, Ba-
hamas and the Caribbean harm indigenous fish
because they eat important juvenile reef species,
such as grouper and snapper.
Lad Akins of the Reef Environmental Educa-
tion Foundation says lionfish have no known
predators, except man.
They have venomous spines, but when prop-
erly cleaned, yield a white meat that is consid-
ered a delicacy. Saturday night's derby banquet
featured lionfish.
Art project brings massive
snails to South Beach
MIAMI BEACH South Beach is about to ex-
perience an invasion of snails.
Dozens of massive pink snail sculptures are
due to, begin appearing throughout Miami Beach
on Monday in places including Lummus Park
and the Venetian Causeway. They'll slowly be
moved until they're all set in Collins Park in mid-
December, and displayed through Jan. 3.
All told, there will be 45 snails made of recy-
cled plastic. They're the work of Italian artists
and are as big as 8 feet tall and 11 feet long.
-From staff and wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Dennis V. Mansfield Jr.,
38, of 678 S. Fairlane Terrace,
Lecanto, at 6:31 p.m. Thursday,
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for failure to appear in ref-
erence to five misdemeanor
charges of worthless checks.
Bond $2,000.
Mark Allen Parker, 29, of
7013 W. Avocado St., Crystal
River, at 11:33 p.m. Thursday, on
an active Citrus County warrant
for failure to appear in reference
to an original misdemeanor
charge of battery. No bond.
Victoria Audrey Tavolac-
cio, 40, of 11322 Silver Leaf
Court, Riverview, at 11:16 p.m.
Thursday, on a felony charge of
knowingly driving while license
suspended for driving under the
influence, a felony charge of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance, a misdemeanor charge
of possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and a mis-
demeanor charge of possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond
$16,000.
Roy Durwood Hooten Jr.,
26, of 4115 S. Alabama Ave.,
Homosassa, at 1:01 a.m. Fri-
day, on a misdemeanor charge
of knowingly driving while li-
cense suspended. Bond $500.
Rose Marie Salozzo, 21,
of 412 E. Circlewood St., Inver-
ness, at 2:25 a.m. Friday, on
misdemeanor charges of driving
while license suspended or re-


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriff
citrus.org and click on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


voked for failure to pay court fi-
nancial obligations and driving
on the highways while privilege
was cancelled. Bond $1,000.
Kimberly E. Heater, 23, of
20 N.W. Third St., No. 5, Crystal
River, at 3:30 a.m. Friday, on an
active Citrus County warrant for
violation of probation in refer-
ence to an original misde-
meanor charge of petit theft.
Bond $1,355.
Norman R. Maillet, 59, of
7328 Landmark Drive, Spring
Hill, at 3:54 a.m. Friday, on a
felony charge of grand theft in
reference to the removal of a
boat, a 1988 Carral vessel, val-
ued at $100,000, from where it
was docked. Bond $10,000.
Dawn Marie Hayes, 38, of
9325 W. Milwaukee Court,
Crystal River, at 8:22 a.m. Fri-
day, on a misdemeanor charge
of knowingly driving while li-
cense suspended for the sec-
ond time. Bond $500.
Richard D. Curran, 39, of
2604 W. Woodland Ridge Drive,
Lecanto, at 10:45 a.m. Friday,
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for violation of probation in
reference to an original felony


charge of two counts of dealing
in stolen property. No bond.
Rachelle M. Byrd, 28, of 5
N. Shadow Wood Drive, Inver-
ness, at 10:40 a.m. Friday, on
an active Lake County warrant
for failure to appear in reference
to an original misdemeanor
charge of retail petit theft. Bond
$2,000.
Janice Lajoie Skuta, 56,
of 8232 E. Tower Terrace, Floral
City, at 1:01 p.m. Friday, on mis-
demeanor charges of not re-
moving a derelict boat at Pete's
Pier and excessive amount of
garbage in front yard. Bond
$750.
John William Campbell,
37, of 3707 E. Nugget Lane, In-
vemess, at 2:30 p.m. Friday, on
an active Hernando County
warrant for attempted first de-
gree murder of a law enforce-
ment officer. Bond $100,000.
Robert Louis Stewart Jr.,
19, no address given, at 2:55
p.m. Friday, on misdemeanor
charges of possession of less
than 20 grams of cannabis and
operating a vehicle without a
valid driver's license. Bond
$750.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Bid Notices .................... B13

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices. B13

Notice to Creditors/Administration...B13

Surplus Property............................. B13


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


L Fcast
60 s
69 s
60 s
55 pc
64 s
57 pc
71 pc
56 s
62 s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light chop. Sunny to partly cloudy
today.


76 47 0.00

THUDRB AY OUTLOOKIr


179 47 0.00
Exclusive daily


mlU VV m forecast by,
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 80 Low: 53
Early morning fog, mostly sunny.

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 64
Partly cloudy with a 30% chance of a shower.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 50
Partly cloudy with a 30% chance of a shower.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Sunday 79/47
Record 102/33
Normal 57/79
Mean temp. 63
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Sunday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 3.16 in.
Total for the year 59.52 in.
Normal for the year 48.80 in.
'As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
'Sunday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DATE DAY

11/15 MONDAY
11/16 TUESDAY


DEW POINT
Sunday at 3 p.m. 51
HUMIDITY
Sunday at 3 p.m. 40%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, composites, chenopods
Today's Count: 3.2
Tuesday's Count: 4.6
Wednesday's Count: 3.1
AIR QUALITY
Sunday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
12:24 6:34 12:44 6:54
1:00 7:10 1:20 7:30


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:36 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW ...........6:54 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY...................... 1:55 P.M.
mHR. D2 5E. 5 DEC. 13 MOONSET TODAY ....................1:24 A.M.
NW 22 lK. I _________________________


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
,Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
-water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
,on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
'limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
:Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
,4488.
,Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-Irrigation of plants
,(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


of rivers "**At King's Bay
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:29 a/8:25 a 12:39 p/8:39 p
11:00 a/5:47 a 11:36 p/6:01 p
8:47 a/3:35 a 9:23 p/3:49 p
11:49 a/7:24 a ---/7:38 p


***At Mason's Creek
Tuesday
High/Low High/Low
1:15a/9:34a 1:56 p/9:35 p
12:17 p/6:56 a -- /6:57 p
10:04 a/4:44 a 10:04 p/4:45 p
12:25 a/8:33 a 1:06 p/8:34 p


L Fcast
69 s
57 pc
58 s
64 sh
59 s
59 pc
60 s
61 s
66 s


Gulf water
temperature


73
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sat. Sun. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.03 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.28 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.30 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.45 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Sunday
H L Pcp.
61 27
54 30
64 29
70 44 .06
64 31 .03
60 45
64 31
47 33
61 51
44 37 .03
52 41
59 46 .03
63 27
72 35
56 43 .07
70 28
48 37
60 37 .01
62 40 .01
72 30
58 42 .03
54 24
62 39
45 20
46 29
55 35 .04
66 32
53 32
63 31
62 29
56 48
50 39
60 48 .03
70 47
58 34
78 52
55 40 .05
58 35
45 39 .01
36 33 .06
76 56 .39
75 42
57 44 .17


Monday
FcstH L
sh 51 35
c 52 27
sh 59 43
sh 63 49
s 59 45
c 71 44
s 60 40
sn 50 30
sh 59 52
pc 55 40
sh 53 45
pc 50 35
sh 50 35
pc 70 57
pc 55 42
sh 66 48
c 52 39
pc 54 38
pc 50 37
sh 71 50
pc 54 36
sh 54 34
c 65 47
c 47 29
c 49 33
pc 51 37
pc 63 35
pc 57 37
pc 57 41
sh 51 37
ts 65 52
pc 56 36
sh 57 50
s 68 49
c 59 44
s 69 54
pc 57 40
c 59 45
c 51 38
c 38 27
sh 71 62
sh 69 56
sh 57 44


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; shshowers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
@2010 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
MONDAY

Sunday Monday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 65 60 ts 70 61
New York City 61 46 s 59 45
Norfolk 60 37 s 65 49
Oklahoma City 58 32 c 57 38
Omaha 48 29 c 51 32
Palm Springs 83 54 s 79 52
Philadelphia 66 37 s 60 45
Phoenix 73 49 pc 73 49
Pittsburgh 52 42 .15 pc 52 36
Portland, ME 49 36 sh 53 42
Portland, Ore 56 47 .54 sh 55 46
Providence, R.I. 59 35 sh 57 44
Raleigh 70 32 pc 67 48
Rapid City 45 14 c 43 28
Reno 52 30 pc 62 33
Rochester, NY 60 34 .04 s 51 33
Sacramento 81 42 pc 74 50
St. Louis 55 34 c 57 39
St. Ste. Marie 46 39 .04 c 43 33
Salt Lake City 40 36 .01 pc 47 36
San Antonio '60 52 c 71 45
San Diego 78 53 s 69 54
San Francisco 76 52 s 76 54
Savannah 74 32 pc 73 55
Seattle 52 46 .30 sh 54 45
Spokane 40 34 pc 46 39
Syracuse 64 33 pc 52 35
Topeka 56 28 c 57 37
Washington 65 40 s 62 49
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 85 Camarillo, Calif. LOW 4 Alamosa, Colo.

WORLD CITIES


MONDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/74/pc
Amsterdam 52/42/pc
Athiens 71/55/shi
Belling 48/29/s
Berlin 50/43/sh
Bermuda 74/69/pc
Cairo 79/63/s
Calgary 46/21/sht
Havana 80/61/pc
Hong Kong 81/67/pc
Jerusalem 82/58/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


61/47/s
48/37/pc
51/31/pc
76/43/pc
48/37/sh
52/45/shi
51/38/sh
78/72/ts
71/57/shl
70/65/r
60/46/sh
48/39/c
56/45/pc


C.- C I T R LI .C 0 U I T N



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Local/State z- =l -F= S


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*From mouths
. City
'Chassahowitzka*
'Crystal River"*
.Withlacoochee*
,Homosassa*"








MONDMY, No)VwMIn 15, 2010 A5.


FUNGUS
Continued from Page Al

where most of Florida's avocados
are grown, but researchers have
trapped the redbay ambrosia beetle
there. Avocado growers could stand
to lose millions of dollars.
The disease, which started when
the Asian beetle arrived in the
United States, mostly likely in solid
wood packing material, could mean
the functional extinction of the na-
tive trees in the genus Persea. It's
unclear how the widespread loss of
laurels will affect the ecosystem.
The disease doesn't work as
quickly in avocados, but it is deadly
to them nonetheless, according to
Jeffrey Eickwort, forest biologist
with the Florida Division of
Forestry Researchers are working
to come up with a fungicide to rid
individual trees of the disease, but a
fungicide wouldn't be a practical so-
lution for forests.
"Obviously, the threat to the avo-
cado industry has gotten the most
attention," Eickwort said. "But eco-
logically, this is just a terrible, terri-
ble situation."
Numerous species of birds feed
on fruit of redbay trees and
Palmedes swallowtail butterfly lar-
vae feed primarily on their leaves.
Biologists are helpless to keep
the rapidly spreading disease from
entering new areas. When the dis-
ease entered Duval County in 2005,
10 percent of the susceptible trees
had been affected.


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The redbay ambrosia beetle burrows into the tree, causing a bacterial infection to destroy the tree's systems.


"Within a couple of years, it went
from 10 percent of trees dead to
over 90 percent dead," Eickwort
said.
Eickwort said the most important


to avoid transporting diseased
trees, which has been responsible
for spreading the disease to new
areas.
Such was the case in 2010 when


thing for residents to remember is the disease showed up in Panama sible.


City, hundreds of miles from the
nearest counties where the disease
had taken hold.
Dead trees affected by the fungus
should be burned or chipped if pos-


. : M K 1 ,1r... I . ...
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
The webcam was installed
Friday at Three Sisters
Springs. The camera will
be up through March 31.

MANATEE
Continued from Page Al

Not to be confused with
the manatee cam at Ellie
Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park, this camera gives
viewers more of a bird's
eye view of the sanctuary
but not a good look at the
manatees inside.
The camera at Three
Sisters Springs was in-
stalled Friday morning,
when there were at least
10 manatees, including
one calf, inside the sanc-
tuary. The camera will be
up through March 31,
Sella said.


FREQUENT
Continued from Page Al

they are not properly
treated before export.
Q: Where has laurel wilt
been found?
A: Laurel wilt has been
found at an increasing
number of locations in
the southeastern coastal
plain of South Carolina,
Georgia and Florida.
Q: How long have this insect
and disease been in the
U.S.?
A: The redbay ambrosia
beetle was first detected
in a survey trap at Port
Wentworth, Ga., (near Sa-
vannah) in 2002. By
2003, unusual mortality
of redbay trees was no-
ticed in the vicinity of Sa-
vannah, Ga., and Hilton
Head, S.C.; but laurel wilt
was not recognized as the
potential cause of this
mortality until late 2004
and 2005.
Q: What types of trees are
affected?
A: Thus far, only trees and
shrubs in the family Lau-
raceae (Laurel family) are
known to be affected by
laurel wilt. Redbay (Persea
borbonia) appears to be
the most widely affected
species. Other species
that have developed the
disease in the field in-
clude sassafras (Sas-
safras albidum),
pondberry (Lindera melis-
sifolia), pondspice (Litsea
aestivalis) and avocado
(Persea americana).
Q: What are the symptoms?
A: Trees diseased with laurel
wilt initially exhibit droop-
ing leaves with a reddish


or purplish discoloration.
On redbay, this discol-
oration may occur in a
major portion the crown
at first, but gradually the
entire crown wilts. The
leaves eventually turn
brown and may remain on
the branches for up to a
year or more. Removal of
bark from wilted trees re-
veals a dark, blackish dis-
coloration on the surface
of the sapwood that can
also be seen in stem
cross-section.
Q: How can I confirm that
my tree was infected by
the laurel wilt fungus?
A: If the tree is a redbay or
a related species in the
Laurel family, is wilted in
a large proportion of its
crown, and has black dis-
coloration in the sapwood
it is likely infected with
the laurel wilt fungus. The
sapwood discoloration is
the'most conclusive diag-
nostic feature in the field.
Full confirmation of the
disease requires taking
samples of stained wood
from the affected tree and
isolating the laurel wilt
fungus in the laboratory.
Q: What does the redbay
ambrosia beetle look like?
A: The redbay ambrosia
beetle is a very small,
elongated, cylindrical bee-
tle about 2 mm (1/16th
inch) in length. It is simi-
lar in appearance to sev-
eral other ambrosia beetle
species (both native and
exotic) that are already
found in the southeastern
U.S. The combination of
its black color, nearly
smooth (glabrous) upper
surface and the shape of
its wing covers (an abrupt
apical declivity) helps to
distinguish it from other
species, but positive iden-


tification will require ex-
amination by a specialist.
Q: Are there other ambrosia
beetles that attack red-
bay?
A: Yes. Examination of red-
bay trees killed by laurel
wilt has shown that sev-
eral other species of am-
brosia beetles colonize
the stems. These other
beetles do not contribute
to the death of the tree,
but rather come to repro-
duce and cultivate their
own associated fungi
(upon which they feed) in
the dead wood. Like the
redbay ambrosia beetle,
these other ambrosia bee-
tle species often produce
toothpick-like tubes or
piles of fine sawdust on
the bark as they bore into
the tree. An ambrosia bee-
tle called the black twig
borer commonly bores
into small diameter twigs
and branches of redbay
and other trees, causing a
"flagging" effect in the
crown (isolated death of
small branches). The
damage caused by laurel
wilt is much more exten-
sive (major branches or
entire crown wilting) than
that caused by the black
twig borer alone.
Q: What is the life cycle of
the redbay ambrosia bee-
tle?
A: The life cycle of an am-
brosia beetle includes


four stages: egg, larva,
pupa and adult. After bor-
ing into a tree, adult am-
brosia beetles create
tunnels (galleries) in the
wood. They inoculate
those tunnels with fungal
spores that are carried on
their bodies, and cultivate
this fungus as food. Fe-
males lay eggs in the gal-
leries; these eggs hatch
into larvae that feed on
the fungus, eventually pu-
pate, and change to the
adult form. The cycle
from egg to adult is called
a generation.
The redbay ambrosia bee-
tle probably has multiple
generations per year, with
the length of each genera-
tion varying with season
and temperature. Only the
female beetles fly and ini-
tiate attacks on new host
trees. Unmated females
lay eggs that hatch as
males, with whom the par-
ent female can mate.
Mated females lay eggs
that hatch as females,
which in turn can mate
with their sibling males.
Thus only one female bee-
tle is needed to establish
a new local population of
the insect.
Q: What is the laurel wilt
disease cycle?
A: Much is still unknown
and unstudied about the
laurel wilt disease cycle.
Female redbay ambrosia


beetles carry spores of
the laurel wilt fungus at
the base of their mouth-
parts. Trees become inoc-
ulated with the fungus
when these beetles bore
into the xylem (sapwood).
There is evidence to sug-
gest that initial inocula-
tion of trees may happen
in the crown, but early at-
tacks may not be limited
to this location. The fun-
gus gradually colonizes
sapwood throughout the
stem, causing the tree to
wilt and die in a matter of
weeks or a few months.
As the tree wilts, it be-
comes suitable breeding
material for the ambrosia
beetles, which colonize
the stem, reproduce in
the sapwood and cultivate
the fungus on gallery
walls as food. Emerging
female redbay ambrosia
beetles fly and initiate
new infections on healthy
trees or colonize
dead/diseased trees.
Q: How does this insect and
disease spread?
A: The disease is not known
to spread apart from the
redbay ambrosia beetle
transmitting the fungus.
The beetle can disperse
naturally through flight, or
can spread through the
transport of infested host
material, such as fire-
wood, logs and infested
plants.


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A6 MANomy, Novi;miOi
Obituaries

Miguelina
Acosta, 90
OCALA
Miguelina Acosta, 90,
Ocala, formerly of Inver-
ness, died Nov. 13, 2010, in
Ocala.
Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Friday,
Nov 19, at the Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with burial
following in Fero Memorial
Gardens. Visitation will be
at the funeral home from
noon until the hour of
service.

Amy
Hornbuckle, 35
LECANTO
Amy Lu Hornbuckle, 35,
Lecanto, died Saturday, No-
vember 13, 2010, at her resi-
dence.
A Funeral Service of Re-
membrance will be at 3 p.m.
Wednesday,
November
17, 2010, at
the Chas. E.
Davis RFu-
neral Home
with Pastor
Greg Kell
4, \V officiating.
Burial will
,Hobuc ',e follow at
Oak Ridge
Cemetery in Inverness. The
family will receive friends
in visitation from 1 p.m.
until the hour of service.
Amy was born on March 7,
1975, in Miami, Florida, to
Michael and Audrey Exley.
A wonderful homemaker,
she was a loving wife and
mother; she was proud of
her children's achievements
and happy with her life. She
was also a "super" Gator
fan. She enjoyed riding her
own Harley Davidson. She
was Baptist by faith.
Survivors include her
husband of 14 years,
Thomas James "T.J." Horn-
buckle, Lecanto; her three
children, Travis James,
Kyra Louise and Austin
Jamie "A.J."; her mother
and stepfather, Audrey
Exley-Whitley and Michael
Whitley, Hernando; her
brother, Dennis R. Exley,
Hernando; and father-in-
law, Thomas M. Hornbuckle,
Lecanto. She was preceded
in death by her father,
Michael D. .Exley, in 1994
and mother-in-law, Johna
Hornbuckle, on Aug. 11,
2010.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Frances 'Nana'
Wagner, 75
Frances M. Wagner,
known by most as "Nana,"
75, died Monday, Nov. 8,
2010, with Hospice and fam-
ily at her side. Arrange-
ments by Roberts Funeral
Home of Dunnellon.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County Chroni-
cle's policy permits both
free and paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be sub-
mitted by the funeral
home or society in
charge of arrangements.
Free obituaries, run one
day, can include: full
name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at www.chronicleonline
.com.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or soci-
eties.
Paid obituaries may in-
clude the information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family


members; year married
and spouse's name
(date of death, if pre-
deceased by spouse);
religious affiliation; bi-
ographical information,
including education,
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/in-
urnment; and memorial
contributions.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 563-
3280.
* Phone 563-5660 for
details.


(;iRUs CoNimy (FL) CmumoNicLE


Reasons to sit out GM's initial stock offering


-.. ` 1.* r CARTY
AP auto writer

DETROIT General Motors ex-
ecutives are playing up three bright
spots in the company's future as
they try to persuade investors to
buy GM stock: a better lineup of
cars and trucks, potential for global
growth and a new cost structure
that enables the company to make
money even when the economy
dips.
But the world's most charming
used car salesman couldn't cover
up major concerns hanging over
GM's initial public offering on
Thursday
GM emerged from a government-
organized bankruptcy just 16
months ago, a process the company
says has made it stronger and
healthier. The reorganization
erased debt and lowered labor
costs. It also removed $27 billion
from the wallets of bondholders
and left stockholders with nothing.
Taxpayers spent more than $50 bil-
lion to save GM from ruin between
December 2008 and July 2009 and
are not expected to get all their
money back.
Critics say GM is speeding into its
IPO before it has proved that its
structural problems are fixed.
Other IPOs often leave the invest-
ing public a little slap-happy: Each
newly minted stock certificate
could turn into the next Walmart or
Apple, but it's rare that one does.
Here are some reasons investors
may want to sit this one out:
EVEN WITH AN IPO, GM IS
STILL GOVERNMENT MOTORS
You might find the nickname


GIVE
Continued from Page Al

"A lot of people just didn't
realize the hospital was a
charity," Pool said.
Pool, who has a back-
ground in working for non-
profits, was. recruited to
start the program. She said
she is paid like the director
of any other hospital de-
partment. She is not paid
out of the funds she raises
for the hospital. Some char-
ities, by necessity., must use
as much as 22 percent of the
funds they raise to pay for
salaries and overheads. But
gifts to the hospital go for
100 percent of the project
intended.
"Every dollar I bring in
goes right to the bottom line
as profit," Pool said.
The best part about the
job is building a relation-
ship with the community.
"What's cool is that peo-
ple get engaged with us,"
Pool said.
Whatever people want to
give the hospital, Pool asks
staff how it can be used.
When someone donated
one unused hospital bed,
Pool accepted it for training
equipment. Likewise,
someone donated dialysis
equipment that went to
training purposes.
The hospital has a capital
expenditure program that
ensures its needs are met.
The philanthropy makes
the hospital a little easier to
use and brighter.
"It's nice to have money
for extras," Pool said.
"Twenty donor families cre-
ated Pediatric Park."
When Pool started at
CMHS, the hospital had no
dedicated pediatric unit.
The suite opened Aug. 4,
2006.
"We knew what we
wanted the best equip-
ment, specialized training
of staff, and a colorful, se-
cure environment. We
wanted it to be apart from
the rest of the inpatient
beds, yet accessible to all of
the facilities and services
within the hospital," said
Margie Leturno, RNC,
BSN, director of women's
and children's services.
"The hospital had commit-
ted the space, so we drew
up a budget to cover every-
thing."
Pediatric Park is a four-
bed pediatric suite, fully
outfitted with state-of-the-
art pediatric equipment.
The secure, child-friendly
unit includes kid-sized
hospital beds, colorfully


ELECTRIC VEHICLES
AREN'T A SAVIOR
After a decade of selling Hum-
mers, GM must change its image
and become greener. It's heading in
the right direction: The Chevrolet
Volt, which can go 40 miles on bat-
tery power alone, will debut in
showrooms next month.
But there's no guarantee GM can
afford to continue to invest in elec-
tric vehicles or other green tech-
nologies. And much like the Toyota
with its Prius, GM probably won't
make money on the Volt until the
third or fourth generation. It was a
gamble Toyota was willing to make
because the company believed hy-
brids would catch on eventually,
and having the first fully functional
hybrid would give Toyota a green
image with consumers.
GM is betting the Volt will pro-
vide a similar kind of green halo
over its cars.
MEN
In the days leading up to GM's
New York Stock Exchange debut,
investment bankers say they have
more orders than stock. Joe
Phillippi, president of AutoTrends
Consulting, says he expects GM's
IPO will price even higher than
current estimates up from a
range of $26 to $29 a share to as
high as $32 a share.
But even if the stock pops on the
first day of trading, the red flags
aren't going away.
Phillippi expects the company
will continue improving as time
goes on.
"It's going to be a slow and steady
march back upward," Phillippi
said.


HOW TO HELP
Citrus County charities
welcome philanthropy.
These are three of the
better known. But
many others can use
help.
Citrus Memorial -
344-6560.
United Way of Citrus
County 795-5483.
Key Training Center -
527-0822.

was very generous with the
hospital," Pool said. "I
costed it out. We knocked
down a wall and the auxil-
iary paid for it. We have
new seating when coming
away from the elevators. It
was an area that needed
chairs and a clock"
Signature events, such as
the Heart Ball, bring in
funds. But Pool also appre-
ciates all donations.
"A lot of people giving a
little bit can bring in a lot,'"
Pool said.
Retired people who want
to give can arrange a chari-
table gift annuity. The re-
tired person receives
monthly payments from the
annuity and a charitable
tax deduction. The balance
would benefit the hospital.
Ideas and projects con-
tinue for Pool.
"It would be nice to have
digital mammography at
the Allen Ridge Family
Care Center," Pool said.
"We could use a facelift for
the elevators. It would be
nice to have a sculpture in
front of the hospital be-
tween the emergency room
and the main entrance, or a
fountain as a memorial."


clever; but inside the company, it's
an embarrassment and the driving
force behind the decision to hold
the IPO as early as possible. GM
wants the government sell off its
shares.
"We want the government out.
Period," Chairman Ed Whitacre
said this summer.
But the IPO process will be more
like a drawn-out divorce between
GM and taxpayers. This stock of-
fering will only reduce the govern-
ment's stake in GM from 61 percent
to 43 percent. It will take more
stock offerings, staggered over the
next few years, before the U.S. gov-
ernment is out of the car business.
YEARS OF FUZZY MATtH
STILL NOT FIXED
GM admits it doesn't have great
control over its finances. It said so
in a long list of potential risk fac-
tors spelled out in its stock regis-


painted themed-wall mu-
rals and artwork, and a fully
equipped playroom. Dona-
tions paid for the transfor-
mation.
Pool also started the Art
Heals program. When pa-
tients take some exercise by
walking along the corridors,
they see many fine art
paintings. These paintings
have been made possible by
acts of philanthropy
After the success of Pedi-
atric Park, the Women's
Unit needed updating.
"It looked pretty stark,"
Pool said. "With color and
design, you heal faster. We
decided to create it as a bed
and breakfast. Every room
has a different theme and a
name, just like a bed and
breakfast. We got each room
adopted."
Pool calls these projects
creative ways to give to the
hospital.
"I have a three-ring
binder of projects that need
to be funded," Pool said.
"But the most important
part is to listen to the donor
and find out how they
would like their gift to be
used."
In addition to giving time
and funding decorating,


tration statement with the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission.
That should be troubling to in-
vestors, who need reliable finan-
cial disclosures to figure out how
much a stock is worth.
MEET GM'S NEW STEP-
BROTHER, THE UAW
The United Auto Workers union
has gone from a drag on the com-
pany to a part owner. How the new
relationship will play out is still un-
known.
The UAW owns 17.5 percent of
GM right now, and has the option to
buy 2.5 percent more before the
end of 2015. It could sell stock dur-
ing the IPO or hunker down and re-
main a major player.
But arguments over wages will
likely start cropping up and will be-
come even tougher to deal with as
GM talks about how financially se-
cure the company is now.


A


, ,.







.'-,
/J


3--,


philanthropists have
helped by other means.
This year, a couple gave a
buildable lot at Black Dia-
mond to the hospital. The
Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation Board of Direc-
tors was not certain it could
accept the lot because it
came attached with home-
owners' association fees
and property tax. A dona-
tion must not cost the hos-
pital money.
"I have an advisory coun-
cil of about 20 business peo-
ple, and one of the business
leaders said, 'Auction it,"'
Pool said.
The donors auctioned the
property first, then donated
the money to the hospital.
One couple this year left
their entire estate of $1.3
million to the hospital.
"They had no children
and they retired here,"
Pool said. "They were im-
pressed with the hospital
and left their entire es-
tate."
With gifts, Pool said peo-
ple could have naming
rights.
"As they age, they are
asking how they can make
their mark," Pool said. "Or
family members can leave


Surprise gt
Aoefo.2etes hnigwel


L Monda


a legacy without them
knowing it It can be as sim-
ple as people just writing it
in their will."
Dr. F William Ortolf and
Alice Ortolf wanted to
brighten up the hospital's
chapel.
"When we take care of
patients, we take care of the
whole family," Pool said.
"We need money to do re-
ally nice upgrades."
The new-look chapel has
a lot of white paint and a
nautical look.
"The Nantucket theme
was important to the
donors," Pool said. "I have
fun with those projects."
Many areas within the
hospital look better these
days. The reception area at
the critical care unit was
improved.
"The hospital auxiliary


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Associated Press
In this Nov. 7 file photo, Samantha Lozon of Grosse Pointe, Mich., stands
next to the 2011 Chevrolet Volt, a rechargeable electric car, during the
South Florida International Auto Show in Miami Beach. There's no guar-
antee GM can afford to continue to invest in electric vehicles or other
green technologies. And much like the Toyota with its Prius, GM probably
won't make money on the Volt until the third or fourth generation.


Is~..


Special to the Chronicle
The chapel at Citrus Memorial Health System in Inverness got a facelift thanks to the phi-
lanthropy of Dr. F. William Ortolf and Alice Ortolf. It was brightened up to take on a Nan-
tucket theme.


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A8 PON\\, Nx \tItR Li,2010 A)CAI (A I IIS(nN iy (Fl) GIVIeQNICIE


Food'


THANKSGIVING
"Community Wide Thanks-
giving Dinner" from 5 to 7 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 22, at First Bap-
tist Church of Floral City, 8545
E. Magnolia St., Floral City.
Everyone is invited to come
and enjoy a traditional Thanks-
giving meal.
Redemption Christian
Church will sponsor its annual
Thanksgiving meal from 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thanksgiving
Day, Nov. 25, at Hernando
Beach Park. The dinner is free
of charge and will consist of the
traditional turkey and all the
trimmings. For transportation,
call James at (352) 400-5133.
Fourth annual Thanksgiv-
ing Day dinner served from
noon to 3 p.m. Thursday, Nov.
25, at First Baptist Church in
Crystal River. Complete meal
with all the trimmings. Dinner is
available to all who would enjoy
fellowship in a Christian setting
on that day (parades and foot-
ball included). No ticket is re-
quired and there is no charge.
This is a community outreach.
Volunteers and donations
needed. Call 795-3367.
Our Father's Table at St.
Anne's Anglican Church will
host a free community Thanks-
giving dinner at 11:30 a.m. Sat-
urday, Nov. 27. The church is
one mile west of the Plantation
Inn on West Fort Island Trail.
Call 795-2176.
ANGEL FOOD
The Angel Food Ministries
program. This program enables
families to stretch their food
budget by providing quality food
at half or less of the retail price.
For exact menus, order dates
and times and pickup dates
and times view online at web-
site: AngelFoodMinstries.com.
You may also place an online
order with a credit card or a
debit card.
Gulf to Lake Church,
1454 N. Gulf Ave., Crystal
River, takes orders one Sunday
monthly following the 9:30 and
11 a.m. services. Food distribu-
tion takes place on a Saturday
at the Ministry Complex (di-
rectly across the street from the
church).
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 9425 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. To sign up for Angel
Food, order food and learn of
pick-up date and time, call the
church office at (352) 489-5511
or Victor Kahler at (352) 465-
4182. All orders are prepaid by
check, cash or money order.
Homosassa Knights of
Columbus 6954, at 9020 W.
Atlas Drive, Homosassa (off
U.S.19 across from Love Mo-
torsports), or call Joann at 382-
2129 or 586-6698. Payment is
required at the time the order is
placed. Payment online is debit
or credit card only. Payment at
the K of C is cash, check,
money orders or food stamps
(EBT).
First Assembly of God of
Dunnellon, 2872 W. Dunnellon
Road, one mile west of U.S. 41
(across from Nichol's Lumber).
Call (352) 489-8455.
SHARE
Hernando Civic Center,
3848 Parsons Point Road, Her-
nando. Payment must be cash
or an EBT card. Orders must


be claimed on the announced
Saturday. No refunds. With
your receipt, a friend or neigh-
bor may accept delivery for
you. No refunds, but if we sell
your order and you have made
arrangements with one of us,
we will order the next month's
food for you. Call Judy at 344-
9833, Terry at 726-9981, Mar-
garet at (352) 465-7203, or
Civic Center (from 8:30 to 10
a.m. on distribution day) at 860-
0225. Distribution of orders al-
ready placed is from 9 to 10
a.m. Saturday. Sign-up is from
4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 7.
Distribution of those orders is
from 9 to 10 a.m. Saturday,
Dec. 18.
Peace Lutheran Church,
7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
north of downtown Dunnellon.
For information, call James
Spiegelberg, host site coordina-
tor at (352) 489-5249.
First United Methodist
Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw
St., Homosassa. Call 382-1034
or 628-5945 for registration and
distribution dates. Minimum
order is $6 to be paid for in
cash or food stamps at time of
order. No refunds. Food must
be picked up on delivery date.
Floral City United
Methodist Church participates
in the SHARE program. Every-
one is welcome; save 30 to 50
percent off retail. Healthy foods
for healthy families. For order
dates and pick-up, call the
church office at 344-1771.
Church is across from the ele-
mentary school on Marvin
Street.
North Oak Baptist
Church, 9324 N. Elkcam Blvd.,
Citrus Springs. For registration
and distribution dates, call (352)
489-1688 or 746-1500.
HUNGRY?
The Hernando Seventh-
day Adventist Church, at
1880 N. Trucks Ave., Her-
nando, provides food distribu-
tion for needy families through
its Food Pantry. Open the sec-
ond and the fourth Tuesday
monthly from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Please have proper photo I.D.
available at the time of the re-
quest for food. Call 212-5159.
St. Anne's Anglican
Church food pantry opens from
9:30 to 10:30 a.m. daily in the
administration building.
First Baptist Church of
Crystal River has its food
pantry open from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday, Wednesday and
Friday. The church is at 700 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. For
information, call 795-3367.
First United Methodist
Church of Inverness God's
Kitchen serves from 11:30 a.m.
to noon Mondays in the fellow-
ship hall, 3896 S. Pleasant
Grove Road. A bus is available
for transportation to the church
on Monday. Call 726-2522.
The New Church Without
Walls gives free food boxes
away at 5 p.m. Monday at the
neighborhood park in Hernando
off Railroad Drive where feed-
ing the homeless takes place.
Call 344-2425.
Floral City United
Methodist Church offers free
breakfast to those who need it
from 7 to 9 a.m. Tuesday in
Hilton Hall, 8478 E. Marvin St.
Call 344-1771.
Our Lady of Grace


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SO YOU KNOW
* Submit information or changes for this feature via
e-mail to community@chronicleonline.com or fax to
563-3280, attention "Food Programs."
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit notices.
* It is the responsibility of the organizations listed here
to provide information and updates about their
programers. Contact the groups directly for details.
* For additional information about health and human
resources available in Citrus County, call 211.


Blood donation sites
Special to the Chronicle

Through Nov. 22, all donors will be entered into a
drawing for a Thanksgiving basket (turkey and all the
trimmings) given away from each center. A turkey din-
ner cooked by the staff will be offered to donors Nov. 22.
On Nov. 24, visit the bloodmobile for a free pumpkin pie
given away by Sweetbay Supermarket at 1202 W Main
St Inverness, to every donor. Also during the month of
November, all donors at the Lecanto or Inverness cen-
ters will be offered hot dogs for lunch.
To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call
527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental
permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in
good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is also
required.
The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491) and the Inverness branch is at
301 W Main St, Both centers are open from 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. weekdays and 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The
centers stay open late Wednesdays, until 7 p.m. The
Lecanto center is also open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun-
days.
Visit www.lifesouth.org for details.
* 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15, Subway, 3756 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 3 to 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, Walmart Su-
percenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, Central
Florida Community College, 3800 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
* 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills.
* 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18, Seven Rivers Re-
gional Medical Center, 6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crys-
tal River.
* 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 19, Crystal River High
School, 1205 N.E. Eighth St.
* 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 20, Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 22, Bealls, 2851 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
* 8 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Nov. 23, Walden Woods Com-
munity, 7086 W. Eatonshire Path, Homosassa.
* 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 23, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 24, Sweetbay Su-
permarket, 1202 W. Main St., Inverness.


Catholic Church food pantry is
open from 9 to 10 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd. Food is distributed
on right side of parish office
garage area. Parking is avail-
able in right parking field next to
garage area. Pantry is open to
those who truly qualify for this
program. No vouchers or finan-
cial aid given. Call Anna at 527-


2381 or the church at 746-2144.
Nature Coast Ministries'
food pantry is now open only on
Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 2 pm.
Pick up already-placed Angel
Food orders at the "Ministry
Complex" building next to Sun-
Trust Bank on State Road 44.
You will no longer need to bring
a cooler or box as all items are
coming pre-boxed. We will also


distribute food out to your cars
to speed up delivery process.
Bring your receipt. The office is
at 1592 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River.
Beverly Hills Community
Church's food pantry, 82 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, distributes
food from 11 a.m. to noon and
6 to 7 p.m. the last Tuesday
monthly. To qualify for assis-
tance, you must be a Beverly
Hills resident with identification.
Call 746-3620 for reservations.
There is an initial registration
for each recipient, then you will
need to call the office at least a
week ahead of time, every
month, if you will require food.
The food pantry of First
Presbyterian Church of Crys-
tal River is open from 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
days. The pantry is open to
meet the emergency needs of
people in the community.
Everyone is invited to partici-
pate once a week as needed.
Bring a photo ID and the date
of birth for each member of
your household. The church is
at 1501 S.E. U.S.19, north of
Sweetbay. Call 795-2259.
Suncoast Baptist
Church, 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa Springs, has
its food pantry open from 8 a.m.
to noon the second Wednesday
monthly for pre-bagged food.
Free bread is available from 8
a.m. to noon Wednesdays.
Everyone is welcome.
EI-Shaddai food ministries
"brown bag of food" distribution
at Crystal River Church of God,
2180 W. 12th Ave., behind the
Lincoln Mercury dealership.
This food giveaway is normally
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the last
Wednesday monthly unless
noted. Call 628-9087 or 302-
9925.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Feed My Sheep out-
reach provides a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday. The
food pantry is open from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday and 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday. The pantry is
closed Fridays. Call 726-3153.
Food pantry of Floral City
First Baptist Church Emer-
gency Feeding Program is
open from 1 to 3 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly.
Dunnellon Presbyterian
and Holy Faith Episcopal food
pantry opens from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursdays at 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
SOS Ministry food pantry
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
for those in need at the Key
Center in Lecanto. If new to the
program, bring driver's license


and Social Security cards for all
family members for initial regis-
tration. Food distributed accord-
ing to family size.
Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness "Feed the Hungry" free
lunch is served from noon to 1
p.m. Thursday in the fellow-
ship hall, 960 S. U.S. 41. Come
enjoy a home-cooked meal.
Food pantry is open from 1 to 2
p.m. Thursday. Call 726-1480.
Our Father's Table serves
free Saturday lunches from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at St.
Anne's Anglican Church, one
mile west of the Plantation Inn
on West Fort Island Trail. Call
795-2176.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs serves those in need
with free boxes of food from its
food pantry the third Saturday
morning monthly. Call (352)
465-6613 on the preceding
Tuesday to sign up for the dis-
tribution.
Inverness Church of God
hosts a soup kitchen the first
and third Sunday monthly fol-
lowing the 10:30 a.m. worship
service in the Family Life Cen-
ter. Inverness Church of God is
at 416 U.S. 41 South, Inver-
ness. Call 726-4524.
One of the programs of-
fered by Beverly Hills Com-
munity Church is a
Community Partner to ACCESS
Florida, a division of the Florida
Department of Children and
Families (DCF). The church
provides application assistance
only and is not an approval/dis-
approval authority. Call 746-
3620.
Footsteps Preschool, a
ministry of First United
Methodist Church of Inverness,
announces its participation in
the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture's Child Care Food Pro-
gram, which is a federally
funded program that reim-
burses childcare providers for
serving nutritious meals and
snacks to enrolled, eligible chil-
dren. The church is at 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
Pope John Paul II
Catholic School officials have
released their policy regarding
free and reduced-price meals
under Nations School Lunch-
eon and Breakfast Program.
Children from certain families,
based on state eligibility guide-
lines regarding household size
and income, may be eligible for
free and reduced-price meals.
To apply, guardians must com-
plete and submit applications to
the school. Call Tonya Peters at
746-2020.


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Dog stuck on cliff
rescued by deputy
PUEBLO, Colo. -A springer
spaniel stuck overnight on a cliff
ledge in Lake Pueblo State
Park is OK after a sheriff's
deputy rappelled down a
canyon to retrieve him.
The dog named "Doc" went
over an 80-foot cliff Thursday
morning while training to be-
come a hunting dog.
The Pueblo Chieftain reports
the spaniel became trapped
after sliding down a shale
canyon side. The pup landed
on a ledge about 80 feet down
a 200-foot ravine.
Master Deputy Dylan Jack-
etta says it was too dark Thurs-
day to attempt a rescue, so
rescuers passed blankets down
to the ledge. On Friday morn-
ing, Jacketta rappelled down
the canyon and rescued Doc.
Man nabs thousands
of Colo. newspapers
ASPEN, Colo. -A man who
acknowledged stealing thou-
sands of free copies of a Col-
orado resort town's two daily
newspapers because his friend
was named in police blotters
has made a public apology.
The Aspen Daily News and
The Aspen Times both printed
an apology letter Friday from
23-year-old Mitchell Reed of
Carbondale, who agreed to
write the apology to avoid crimi-
nal theft charges.
Reed stole thousands of pa-
pers Nov. 5 because one of his
friends was in that day's police
blotter in both publications for a
drug arrest. A maintenance
worker told police Reed
dumped the papers in trash
bins behind an area grocery
store, and Reed confessed to
the theft.
In his letter Friday, Reed
apologized to newspaper em-
ployees and readers.
Man sentenced for
fake online dating
SEATTLE The U.S. attor-
ney's office in Seattle says a
Canadian man who ran online
dating services but set up
clients with fake "dates" has
been sentenced to more than
four years in prison for mail
fraud.
The government says a fed-
eral judge on Friday also or-
dered 66-year-old Barrie Turner


-.4 -


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4k- ^

OP^ ,
.47 -


N- Z . ..
., .. * ,!




Ass
An emergency personnel rescues a springer spaniel stuck on a cliff ledge in Lak
State Park on Nov. 12, in Pueblo, Colo., in this photo released by Pueblo County
Department. The dog named "Doc" went over an 80-foot cliff Thursday morn
training to become a hunting dog.


of Delta, British Columbia, to
pay more than $300,000 in
restitution.
Prosecutors allege Turner
took money from more than
1,000 customers, but sent them
fake matches with elaborate,
made-up profiles. They say if
clients attempted to meet the
matches, they were sent e-
mails saying the person was no
longer interested.
Turner was arrested ini March
after he tried to cross the bor-
der at Point Roberts to pick up
mail. He pleaded guilty in June.
No more riding horse
to school for teen
HAVERFORD, Pa. Whoa!
There will be no more horsing
around for a suburban Philadel-
phia teen who's been commut-
ing to school on his trusty
steed.
Roby Burch had been riding
his horse Jet about four miles
each way to the private Haver-
ford School. He kept the horse
in a corral on school grounds.
Burch tells The Philadelphia
Inquirer the school trustees de-
cided in October the horse was
a liability issue. The teen then
began keeping Jet at his
uncle's house nearby.


However, Burch says Jet hurt
his hoof from the repeated trips
over pavement. Another family
horse twice escaped while
Burch was in class.
Now he's getting a ride from
his parents. The 16-year-old
hopes to get his driver's license
in February.
Driver hits Jet Ski
left in N.Y. highway
WARRENSBURG, N.Y. -
Motorists driving on upstate
New York roads this time of
year have to be alert for deer,
not personal watercraft. But
that's just what one driver
slammed into while traveling on
Interstate 87 in the Adiron-
dacks.
Police in Warren County tell
the Post-Star of Glens Falls
that 60-year-old Betty Marriott
of Brant Lake was headed
north on the Adirondack North-
way around 5 p.m. Thursday
when her BMW smashed into
an object in the highway in
Warrensburg, 60 miles north of
Albany.
Police say the object turned
out to be a 1994 Kawasaki Jet
Ski that had been abandoned
along the side of the highway.
Marriott wasn't hurt, but her


car sustained extensiN
age to its front end.
The Jet Ski was de
Police are trying to fin
owner.
Pittsburgh cl
adds 2:30 a.m


./4;4a


PITTSBURGH Old-time
Pittsburghers remember when
a church in the city offered
services in the early morning
hours for employees who
worked odd hours. One church
is now bringing that tradition
back with a 2:30 a.m. service.
The Rev. Carmen D'Amico
says he's adding a weekly Mass
on Sunday just after the bars
close. The church is next to the
new Consol Energy Center.
D'Amico is hoping to attract those
out for a late Saturday night and
officials have been handing out


Ky. man says he was
forced to eat beard
LAWRENCEBURG, Ky. -A
central Kentucky man says he
was forced to eat his beard
after an argument about a lawn
mower got out of control.
Harvey Westmoreland of
Lawrenceburg told WLEX-TV
two men cut off his beard,
stuffed it into his mouth and
forced him to eat it.
Westmoreland says two for-
mer friends got angry as they
tried to negotiate a price for a


-- -- fliers at local colleges to publicize
the new service.
The early-morning Mass tra-
dition began in 1905 and was
frequented by employees from
.1jt; .seven daily newspapers. Some
of the employees had just fin-
ished their shifts while others
would attend Mass and then go
deliver newspapers.
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
reports the service was dubbed
the "Printer's Mass." The early
Mass hasn't been held since
1991.
Boy finds boomerang
he lost in river
MARYSVILLE, Wash.-
Eleven-year-old Brenden Hale
.: was playing with a boomerang
along the Skagit River in Mount
'. ; Vernon last June when it landed
,..-;' in the water and floated away.
He thought it was gone for-
ever, until he went duck hunting
with his grandfather last month
on family property at Skagit
sociated Press Bay. Brenden was taking a
ke Pueblo break on the beach when he
Sheriff's saw a crusty-looking piece of
ing while wood that looked familiar. It
was a boomerang. It was his
boomerang identified by a
ve dam- notch on the back.
The Daily Herald of Everett
stroyed. reports it had floated 10 miles
d its down the river and wound up on
a beach at his family's property.
church Brenden told his mom,
"Boomerangs really do come
. Mass back!"


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lawn mower they wanted to buy
from Westmoreland. He says
"one thing led to another, and
before I knew it, there were
knives and guns and everything
just went haywire."
The two men pleaded guilty
to charges related to the inci-
dent and will be sentenced next
week.
Whoopie cushion
cards available now
CLEVELAND Now in
greeting card aisles, a new
product for pranksters: cards
that double as whoopie cush-
ions.
American Greetings Corp. on
Friday unveiled the line of cards
that can make embarrassing
sounds, aptly named "It's a
gas!"
The Cleveland-based com-
pany says each whoopie cush-
ion-turned-card in the collection
can be signed and sent in an
accompanying envelope.
The nation's largest publicly
traded greeting card company
has about 2,000 employees in
northeast Ohio.
$3K worth of dog
food stolen
VANCEBURG, Ky.- The
Lewis County Sheriffs Office is
investigating the theft of $3,000
worth of dog food.
Sheriff Bill Lewis told The
Ledger Independent he re-
ceived a call from the owner of
the Big Barn farm supply store
Friday morning.
The store was not broken
into, but several pallets of dog
food in front of the store were
taken.
Lewis said he is wondering
why someone would steal so
much dog food. He said, 'They
must have some purpose for it,
some kind of market for it."
He asks anyone who sees
someone selling a large
amount of dog food to call the
sheriff's office.
From wire reports














OPINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD


Gerry Mulligan..........................................publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................ editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold .......................................... HR director
Cheri Harris......................................features editor
Curt Ebitz........................................ citizen member
Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member
Cliff Pierson .................................... guest member


"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
:: :...:. S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


Founded
by Albert M.
Williamson


Outcome of delayed


septic inspections


can roll downhill


tate Sen. Charlie Dean
has joined with other Re-
publican leaders in the
Legislature in efforts to repeal
portions of a major environ-
mental bill passed in the last
session.
The legislation, Senate Bill
550, was signed into law by Gov.
Charlie Crist. A section of the
bill requires that septic tanks


be pumped out
and inspected
every five years.
The legislation is
aimed at protect-
ing Florida's wa-
ters by assuring
that failing septic
tanks are re-
moved and re-
placed.
Half of Florida's
2.6 million septic
tanks are more
than 30 years old,


THE I
Sen. De
effort to r
requiring;
tank insp

OUR OP
Don't let s
concerns
long-term


and state environmental regu-
lators estimate that one in 10 of
these septic systems is failing.
Under the law, during the next
five-years, these failing septic
systems would be replaced.
However, the law has raised
the ire of many homeowners,
who have protested the cost of
the inspections. While the law
limits the cost of inspection to
$30, the tank must be pumped
out for the inspection to be
done. According to local com-
panies, the cost of a pump-out
for a typical tank runs about
$130 to $200.
Should the system not meet
standards, it would have to be
repaired or replaced. Local
companies say repairing the
system by installing a new
drain field would typically cost
$1,500 to $2,000. Replacement
of the system would run from
$2,500 to $3,500 for a simple


system in an area with good
drainage, but could cost from
$12,000 to $15,000 for a mound
system in areas with a high
water table.
During the upcoming one-
day special legislative session
on Nov. 16, Sen. Don Gaetz will
introduce a stopgap bill to
delay implementation from
Jan. 1 of next year to July 1.
This would allow
the Legislature to
SSUE: overturn the bill
in the next ses-
an joins sion.
epeal law Since this ses-
g septic sion is usually re-
)ections. served for the
swearing-in of
'INION: new legislators,
hort-term Gaetz needed ap-
outweigh proval of both the
benefits. incoming Florida
Senate president
and incoming
speaker of the House of Repre-
sentatives to introduce such a
bill during the reorganization
session.
While Dean and others seek-
ing repeal of the bill raise con-
cerns about the financial
impact of the septic tank in-
spection, this concern should
not override the fact that fail-
ing septic systems are a major
contributor to pollution enter-
ing state waters, and some type
of program for inspection and
repair or replacement of fail-
ing.systems is necessary to pro-
tect water quality.
We urge our legislators to
look at ways to minimize the fi-
nancial impact of the program
rather than trying to stop it.
This would provide the envi-
ronmental benefits of the in-
spection program, while still
helping to mitigate the finan-
cial impact on homeowners.


=-===Hot Corner: OTTAWA===


Speed limits
What will be the speed limit on.
the Ottawa bypass? It is a residen-
tial zone, so it cannot be more
than 25 mph, unless I'm wrong.
Unjustified cost
Concerning the eminent do-
main proceedings, or, as some
refer to it, condemnation of prop-
erty along Ottawa Avenue: Now
perhaps the Chronicle can en-
lighten taxpayers on this, but my
understanding is, if the public en.
tity and the property owner can't
agree on compensation, then
three separate and independent
qualified appraisals are made on
the subject property. Then at the
court proceeding, the presiding
judge awards the property on the
highest appraisal value of the


Meaningless TV
I really don't know how far
we've sunk in television
with this Lisa (Rinna) per-
son who's on. S1
(F)or the past 30 min-
utes, she advertises her
big lips and she's going to
have surgery and it's f,
going to be viewed on TV.
Who really cares if she's
got big lips? I'd be inter- CAL
ested to know how she
got them to start with. 3J6t.
But I guess my biggest
concern is why are we watching
junk like this on TV? What is this
teaching our young people? This


property. A former commissioner
should know this.
The proceedings, they are de-
signed to favor the property own-
ers. I am all for property owners
protecting themselves, but to cost
the county $7,000 to find out if
the $34,000 is fair compensation,
to me just makes the stink from
the Ottawa Avenue deal get a lot
worse.
Price of property
This morning's front page says
that Vicki Phillips and her hus-
band, Jim, received $34,375 for
their property on Ottawa.
Could someone please tell me
exactly how much property, how
much land, the dimensions of
this land that they received this
amount of money for?

is on at the early part of the
evening when children are still up.
We're watching this garbage like
this. What is going on with
JND this country if this is the
Kind of crap we put on TV
for entertainment? It's un-
believable.
There's several other
shows, the same way, that
are so meaningless, it's
a pathetic. Yet, we have to
be exposed to them and
)579 waste good TV time when
we could be showing
some documentaries,
some good history more than
what we've got today just to
watch junk like this.


"Long-range planning does not deal
with future decisions, but with the
future of present decisions."
Peter Drucker, 1909-2005


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Fidel, we're expressing our rights


D ear Cuba: [ .g
Maybe you've
got a point. ..
I refer to your out- I
rage over a new video i -
game, the object of
which is to assassinate
Fidel Castro. In "Call
of Duty: Black Ops,"
the latest in the popu-
lar series from Activi- Leonai
sion Blizzard Inc., the OTH
player is transported VOB
to Havana during the VOl
Cold War with a mis-
sion to kill the young communist
revolutionary.
As an article on your state-run
news website put it, "What the
United States couldn't accom-
plish in more than 50 years, they
are now trying to do virtually." It
says the game will turn American
kids into sociopaths.
That's a dubious claim, at least
according to Christopher J. Fer-
guson, a psychology professor at
Texas A&M International Uni-
versity and expert in video-game
violence, who was quoted in an
Associated Press account '"At this
point," he said, "there is no evi-
dence that video games, violent
or otherwise, cause harm to mi-
nors."
Youth violence in this country,
said Ferguson, is at its lowest ebb
in 40 years, even though research
indicates that virtually all young
men up to 95 percent have
at some point in their lives played
violent video games. So, Cuba,
your suggestion that "Call of
Duty" will produce kill-crazy psy-
chos seems naive, at best Hyster-
ical at worst
All that said, it's not hard to em-


JUt.


pathize with your feel-
ing of pique. How
would we like it if you
produced a game
where players had to
shoot their way
through Washington
with a goal of killing
President Obama? The
U.S. government would
d Pitts likely have a thing or
IER two to say about that.
-CES Not to equate our
duly elected president
with your former dicta-
tor for life, but only to say, I un-
derstand where you're coming
from. Castro is a murderous thug,
but he's your murderous thug and
it really knots your knickers
when people try to video-game
assassinate him. Message re-
ceived.
But the question is, what do
you think we can do about it?
We have this thing in this coun-
try, maybe you've heard about it,
called the First Amendment.
Among the things it guarantees is
freedom of expression. That's a
right enjoyed by everybody -
even video game makers. Every
American is free to say pretty
much anything she or he pleases,
and the government is legally
proscribed from stopping them.
That sounds crazy to you, right?
How can the government be pro-
scribed from doing anything it
wants?
In your country, it's different
Say something the government
doesn't like and they whisk you
off to the ol' gulag. You throw
journalists in jail. You throw dis-
sidents in jail. You throw poets in
jail. Don't do the rhyme if you


can't do the time, right?
And we're not talking some
country club jail with conjugal
visits and a TV room, are we? No,
we're talking jails with moldy,
maggoty food, roaches, rats, reek,
rampant physical, mental and
sexual abuse, and cells so narrow
you barely have room to sit Nor
is it just those dangerous poets
who get sent to such places. I
hear you even lock up private
restaurateurs who sell the lob-
sters that are reserved for tourist
hotels and government-owned
eateries.
Wow. Sell a lobster, go to jail.
Now that's tough.
Yes, we have some pretty dra-
conian policies in this country,
but I'm afraid ours pale next to
yours. Heck, we haven't a gulag to
our name. And no law to send
video game makers there if we
did.
But don't despair. Maybe your
statement will get people talking
about the propriety of assassinat-
ing other nation's leaders in
video games. Maybe they'll de-
bate whether that's in the best of
taste. Of course, maybe Activision
Blizzard will tell them to take a
flying leap.
That's kind of how freedom of
speech works, y' know? Every-
body gets their say. It's messy and
unpredictable. But we like it We
think it works.
Anyway, thanks for listening.
And tell Elian we said hi.

Leonard Pitts is a columnist for
the Miami Herald, 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, FL 33132;
lpitts@miamiherald.com.


9-AWER.
-MEQCDi'IES9t5PATCI-I


DEC.


Editor
that waste? Or better yet, How
about the EPA look into that
waste?
We are paying for over 650,000
present and past postal employ-
ees to deliver 8,000 tons of an-
nual junk 95 percent junk that
nobody wants.
What, no cartoon?
Robin Humphrey
Crystal River

Woman's Club thanks
The Crystal River Woman's
Club would like to thank all
those who participated in our re-
cent Glamour Magic photogra-
phy fundraising event and to the
Chronicle for publicizing it Your
help made our event a success.
The money we raise with all of
our events goes to provide assis-
tance to those in need in the
community, and scholarships for
high school students and adult
women.
A special thank-you to Sharon
Malm, owner of the New Con-
cepts International Hair Salon in
Crystal River and her staff, Trish
Enberg, Amanda O'Neal, Ashley
Rainwater and John Sandora for
their assistance with the hair
styles.
We would also like to thank Ja-
nine Moore and Betsy Sovereign
of Weight Watchers for their co-
operation in modifying their
meeting times to accommodate
this fund-raising event
Mary Lee Johnson
Madeline Markowitz
co-chairs


r


ARk A P
MAR. APR.


OCT. NV.


- LETTER=S L to the


Flawed philosophy
I suppose I am a high-net-
worth person who Obama wants
to take my Social Security away.
For over 45 years, I paid into
Social Security with my em-
ployer matching my contribu-
tions, generally at the highest
taxable level, all the while pay-
ing taxes on the phantom income
that I never received, because it
was diverted into the Social Se-
curity trust fund that doesn't
exist Today, my Social Security
check forms the basis of my re-
tirement living, supplemented
with earnings from my savings,
once again, I pay taxes on the So-
cial Security payments.
President Obama's redistribu-
tionist philosophy will do noth-
ing for you in minimizing animus
to the capitalist system.
Claude Strass
Homosassa

Junk mail waste
I was watching a video of a car-
toon, partially sponsored by the
EPA, that is being projected in
some of our public schools to
make our children aware and
conscious of the waste in some of
our paper products.
Specifically, this cartoon was
railing against juice boxes and
the ecological consequences -
negative, of course of dispos-
ing of these containers.
Out of curiosity, I went to the
U.S. Postal service statistics page
and discovered the weight of


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
M Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at (352) 563-5660.
0 All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
I We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
M SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

mail shipped in the last few
quarters was in the order of
4,000,000 pounds. That would
work out to about 16,000,000
pounds or 8,000 tons a year!
Ninety-eight percent of the
mail I get is "junk mail."
Requests to the local post of-
fice to discontinue junk mail de-
livery to my home are responded
to by "we can't do anything about
it" or "It is our bread and butter."
How about a cartoon about


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


AUG. SER


-i,,i .


3-C







( ()NMONOY, Novimwitu 15, 2010 All


Letters to the -


Thank-you


CASI chili cook-off
The Lecanto Levi's 4-H Club hosted the
ninth annual CASI Chili Cook-Off for
Charity in October. The Citrus County
Chronicle, The Photo Ranch, Curry's
Roofing and Home Instead Senior Care
sponsored this event. Donna Ashby
chaired the chili cook-off.
The event included a beauty pageant, a
poker run, a car show, entertainment and
lots of chili. The proceeds from the chili
cook-off went to the Relay for Life Team
Eddie and The Blessings in a Backpack
program at Hernando Elementary School.
The members of the Lecanto Levi's 4-H
Club presented each organization with a
check for $2,000.
Carolyn Quintanilla
Lecanto

Successful author fair
The Citrus County Library System
(CCLS) would like to thank the authors;
co-sponsor, the GFWC Woman's Club of In-
verness; and the attending public for mak-
ing the first ever Local Author Fair at the
Lakes Region Library in Inverness on Sat-
urday, Nov. 6,2010, a huge success.
Twenty-two published writers from our
local area showcased their work which in-
cluded historical fiction, romances, mys-
teries, westerns, sci-fi and fantasy genres,
along with non-fiction and children's
books as well. Ten percent of sales was do-
nated to the library system to fund future
author events.
The people who attended were able to
interact one-on-one with these talented
authors; share stories, get some insight
into the publishing business and perhaps
were inspired to try writing themselves.
The GFWC Woman's Club of Inverness


has a Book Festival planned at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum on Jan. 28-
29.
For more information about other pro-
grams and events, visit the library sys-
tem's website at www.citruslibraries.org,
or contact your nearest library: Coastal
Region Library, Crystal River 795-3716;
Lakes Region Library, Inverness- 726-
2357: Central Ridge Library, Beverly Hills
- 746-6622; Floral City Public Library -
726-3671; Homosassa Public Library -
628-5626.
Jim Ehlers
communications facilitator

Heart-warming thanks
Citrus United Basket (CUB), and the
clients we serve, extend a heart-warming
thank you to those who provided food and
invaluable volunteer time in support of
"Make a Difference Day," which is an an-
nually designated day to pull together in
doing good. The food that we received will
help to feed needy families throughout
the county for another month.
A very special thank you to Debbie Lat-
tin of Citrus County Harvest, Nature Coast
Volunteer Center. United Way of Citrus
County, and U.S. Postal Service employees
for their tireless and dedicated efforts to
orchestrate such a huge endeavor
Thank you also to CUB on-site volun-
teers from First United Methodist Church.
First Lutheran Church, Century Link,
CUB Board of Directors and especially to
our former and current clients who simply
wanted to "give back."
As always: Serving Citrus and you.
Brenda Flowers
executive director
Citrus United Basket Inc.


Letter to the -


Hypocritic believers
Westboro Baptist Church,
Topeka, Kan., is not a
church of Christians, but of
fanatically prejudiced hyp-
ocrites who have found
their way to news head-
lines by their ungodly
protests.
Regardless of religious
belief or non-belief, it is
wrong, disrespectful and
pathetically immoral to dis-
rupt rites of final farewells
and remembrances held
for lost loved ones. If this
schismatic religious body
knew how to read the
Bible, there would be no
questions about God's
never-ending love for
everyone of His children.
He does not judge the se-
riousness of sin for sin is
sin. He forgives and does
not bear grudges. He alone
can and will punish as He
chooses, when He decides,
and in which manner.
The Westboro demon-
strators are present in
God's watchful eyes and He
does not condone their sa-
tanic beliefs and behavior.
Their twisted attitudes and
uninvited presence does
not represent freedom of
speech or peaceful move-
ment and must be brought
to an end. This church of

LETTERS
Follow the instructions
on Page A10 to write a
letter to the editor.


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hate-mongers should be ig-
nored and punished be-
hind the doors of the
building harboring hate
they call a church. Inside,


they will be able to con-
vene in wait for God's
wrath.
Joanie Welch
Inverness


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CCSO positives, negatives
I want to commend the sheriff's office
on its recent state reaccredidation. I also
want to commend them on their opera-
tion I.l i -' 1 i,- Internet predators.
It is amazing with all the exposure
these operations have received, they con-
tinue to be successful. It appears the only
thing greater than the depths of the de-
pravity of these suspects is the height of
their stupidity.
I was a bit surprised by the follow-up
operation targeting prostitutes. As we
live in a rural county, we don't have the
prostitution problems of our larger
neighbors to the south. The fact that all
of four of the suspects arrested traveled
here from other counties bears that out.
How did this operation benefit our resi-
dents?
As the suspects lived out of county, it
can't be said that they were committing
other crimes here in Citrus. Farther, the
likelihood that they could provide intelli-
gence on other criminal activity here is
low. It appears that all we netted out of
this was the added burden of prosecu-
tion. I believe there are more pressing is-
sues here in Citrus County our sheriff
could address.
On Oct. 12, the FDLE released the
Semi Annual Uniform Crime Report
(UCR), by heralding an overall drop in
crime statewide. This data can be found
on their Web page, at www.fdle.state.fl.us.
Unfortunately, once again Citrus County
is one of the few areas seeing an in-
crease, a dramatic one at that, 24.8 per-
cent. The City of Crystal River also saw
an increase of 2.3 percent The sheriff
doesn't report separate UCR statistics for
the City of Inverness, so they are not in-
cluded in the report. Once again, Her-
nando County had better statistics, a
drop in crime of 6.4 percent
While arresting Internet predators is
important, I would like to see just as
much if not more emphasis on address-
ing the threats posed to our citizens by
increasing crime, impaired drivers and
high traffic fatality rates.
Steven Burch
chief of police (ret)


Do the right thing
There is the "right" thing of sprucing
up the Family Resource Center so it is
more aesthetically appealing. Or, there's
the "politically" right thing to bow under
the pressure of certain voters that the
commissioners wish to appease. And,
what about the "charitable" right thing to
do? Let's tear down walls to make things
look good. Let's plant pretty flowers to
make things smell better Let's empty the
trash, get a fresh coat of paint on this
matter. Right?
The problem is that the "trash" are
human beings. Good men and women
who have counted on the Resource Cen-
ter for food and clothing. So now what?
We treat them like so much left-over
used tissues? We just don't speak about it
at all? Except, maybe when drinking our
morning coffee, possibly mentioning it
aloud while reading about it in the
Chronicle? What happens to the home-
less who are fed and clothed from the
Resource Center? When you, the com-
missioners, close the doors on them, are
you opening new doors? What is the con-
tingency plan??
Do the right thing! Furnish the home-
less with another location. With the econ-
omy at an all-time low and no recovery in
sight, why would you take this place that
feeds and cares for the homeless and
turn it into an empty shell? Oh, right, for
"historical" value. Why would you choose
to pretty up a building with worldly
goods while throwing away the opportu-
nity to help your neighbor? God didn't
say, "I am going to shower you with my
gifts so you can horde, and share not
with your neighbors." NO!
Don't you realize that everything God
gave you talents, thoughts, monies,
training, and a host of other gifts were
all given to use for the betterment of oth-
ers?
Do the right thing! It will justify you in
this life. It will certainly go a long way in
the next life. As the saying goes: "Eter-
nity is a long time." May the love and
peace of God be with you all during this
trying decision.
Janine Enger
Beverly Hills


CT4 Audio,
(352) 341-4001


Vhel Trs pryin.edLnes, Naigtin4ystms& or


HIOLIDHY Ipn SPECI.L.
HEDS ] uUrS SECTIonS
A 63329 Before 10am
CAu.L 5633295 on Nov. 25, 2010
(Can not have subscribed within the past 60 days)
New or Additional Subscriptions Only. 0 -C 'l*'1r.C y
Not good with any other offers. i l
Subscription price includes a separate charge for transportation and
co0ooOn applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-6363 for details. chronictlonline.com


www.pulseresearch.com/america

You must complete the survey Y Could WinI
between November 15th and Could W I!
Nov. 21st to be entered to win
a vist to a day spa..
Drawings will be held Nov.29th.
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5P e.iT _


[(I]: Ik I II] I


Cri'lal's Convi'l. (FL) ("Imaivico:


OPINION


- T-










A12 -


&
CITRUS COUNT


Y CHRONICLE


W ORLD


Nation RIIEFS

Girlfound,arrest Farm subsidies' staying power
made in Ohio case ______


MOUNT VERNON, Ohio-
A 13-year-old girl who went
missing with her mother,
brother and a friend was found
bound and gagged Sunday in
the basement of a man's
home about 10 miles from her
house, authorities said.
Knox County Sheriff David
Barber said Sarah Maynard's
mother, Tina Herrmann, is still
missing, along with her 10-
year-old brother, Kody, and
her mother's 41-year-old
friend Stephanie Sprang.
Barber said 30-year-old
Matthew Hoffman was ar-
rested on one count of kid-
napping at his home in Mount
Vemon, about 40 miles north
of Columbus, and that more
charges are expected. He
said reports from neighbors
that a body bag had been
taken from the home are
false.
He did not know if Hoffman
was connected to either Her-
rmann or Sprang, but said he
is not the ex-boyfriend of
either woman.

Halloween gorilla
suit attack was lie
WEST PAWLET, Vt. Ver-
mont State Police say a 22-
year-old man has admitted to
making up a report that he
was stabbed Halloween night
by someone in a gorilla suit.
Police say Donald Gould,
of West Pawlet, initially told
investigators that a person in
a gorilla suit stabbed him with
a needle-like device when he
answered his door, then took
off running. Gould was taken
to a hospital in Glens Falls,
N.Y., for treatment.
Police now say in a follow-
up interview with an investi-
gating trooper, Gould
admitted he created the
puncture wound himself.

World BRIEFS

Out of jail
lT 'Ir


I
.aV /


a


Associated Press
Freed dissident Arnaldo
Ramos Lauzurique, right,
walks with his wife, Lidia
Lima, after a Mass Sunday
with dissident group Ladies
in White in Havana, Cuba.
Lauzurique, the first of 13
remaining Cuban dissidents
jailed since 2003, was
released Saturday from
prison and returned to his
home in the capital. Ladies
in White is an organization
of wives and mothers of
Cuban political prisoners.


Haiti leader gives
cholera advice
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
- Haitian President Rene
Preval is giving citizens tips
on fighting the rapid spread of
cholera.
The disease had never had
a confirmed case in Haiti be-
fore it appeared in late Octo-
ber along the rural Artibonite
River and spread across the
country.
More than 917 people have
died and at least 14,600 have
been hospitalized. Health
care workers consider those
numbers to be understated.
Cholera is mainly spread
by fecal contamination of
food and water. The strain
ravaging Haiti is mainly found
in South Asia.
The president led a panel
of speakers in a Sunday ad-
dress to implore citizens to
practice good hygiene and
proper cooking methods.
But most Haitians do not
have access to clean water or
reliable sanitation.
-From wire reports


Newly elected GOP

to decide on cutting

or keeping program

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Many Republi-
cans who swept rural Democrats
from office are now confronting the
reality of a promise to reduce
spending: Should it cover the farm
subsidies that have brought money
and jobs to their districts and di-
rectly benefited some GOP lawmak-
ers or their families?
At least 13 Democrats on the
House Agriculture Committee lost
on Nov. 2, and most of them helped
steer generous farm support back


nome. iviany of01 tneir replacements
avoided the issue of farm payments
during the campaign as they fo-
cused on broader themes of lower-
ing federal spending and changing
Washington.
They'll have to face it soon
enough. Congress is expected to
begin work on the next five-year
farm bill before the 2012 election.
"They are here to represent their
districts, and if their district is clearly
a strong agricultural district that uses
the programs in the farm bill, it may
be something where they have to
break with what they campaigned
on," said Chandler Goule, a lobbyist
for the National Farmers Union.
For some deficit-cutting Republi-
cans, it's a question that's close to
home.
Consider Vicky Hartzler of Mis-
souri, who courted tea party support


anda etnroned the cnair-
man of the House Armed
Service Committee, Demo-
c6atic Rep. Ike Skelton.
' Hartzler and her husband
own a farm equipment busi-
ness and a farm where they
grow corn and soybeans.
She received more than Vic
$770,000 in farm subsidies Har
over the past 15 years, ac- elect
cording to the Environmen- Cong
tal Working Group, a
Washington advocacy group that col-
lects and analyzes farm subsidy data.
While promising to cut what she
called wasteful spending, Hartzler
says protecting farmers is a na-
tional security issue because the
decline of farms could mean more
imported food.
"There are fewer and fewer farm-
ers today so it makes them more of


;ky
tzler
ed to
iress.


NAIROBI, Kenya The
retired British couple
were sailing the world on a
38-foot-yacht that repre-
sented most of their life
savings when Somali pi-
rates captured them last
year, demanding the sort of
huge ransom a multimil-
lionaire or a multinational
company might cough up.
The fact Parti4'dM.RchTel
Chandler coiilpay a big
ransom helped'trtetch out
their ordeal 388 agonizing
days until Sunday, when
they were released thin
and exhausted, but smiling.
It was one of the longest
and most dramatic hostage
situations since the Somali
piracy boom began several
years ago.
The Chandlers were
welcomed by the Somali
community close to where
they had been held, and
later met with the Somali
prime minister in Mo-
gadishu. A private jet then
flew them to Nairobi's mil-
itary airport, where they
were whisked away in a
British Embassy vehicle.
"We are happy to be
alive, happy to be here,
desperate to see our fam-
ily, and so happy to be
amongst decent, everyday
people, Somalis, people
from anywhere in the
world who are not crimi-
nals, because we've been
a year with criminals and
that's not a very nice thing
to be doing," Rachel
Chandler said 'at a news
conference in Mogadishu.
She also said in a BBC
interview that their cap-
tors beat them during


Associated Press
British couple Paul and Rachel Chandler gesture at the British High Commission
residence Sunday In Nairobi, Kenya. The couple was kidnapped off their private yacht
by Somali pirates more than a year ago. They were set free Sunday, ending one of the
most drawn-out hostage situations since the rash of piracy began off East Africa.


their captivity after decid-
ing to separate the couple.
"We were really dis-
traught, very frightened at
that point," Chandler said.
"We refused to be sepa-
rated and we were beaten
as a result. And that was
very traumatic."
When asked about their
health, she said "we're OK"
'Pirates boarded the
Chandlers' yacht the night
of Oct. 23, 2009, while the


couple were sailing from
the island nation of Sey-
chelles. The couple, mar-
ried for almost three
decades, took early retire-
ment about four years ago
and were spending six-
month spells at sea. They
had sailed to the Greek is-
lands, Egypt, Sudan, Er-
itrea, Oman, Yemen, India
and the Maldives.
They could not make it
through the dangerous


waters of East Africa,
where pirate attacks have
spiked the last several
years. Despite an interna-
tional flotilla of warships
and aircraft, pirates con-
tinue to prowl the Indian
Ocean seemingly at will,
pouncing on pleasure
craft, fishing vessels and
huge cargo ships using
small skiffs, automatic
weapons and rocket-pro-
pelled grenades.


Suu Kyi calls for compromise in Myanmar

Nobel Peace laureate presses

ahead with denocraticplans


Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar -
Democracy heroine Aung
San Suu Kyi took her first
steps back into Myanmar's
political minefield Sunday,
vowing to press ahead in
her decades-long fight for
democracy while also call-
ing for compromise with
other political parties, and
the ruling junta.
Suu Kyi, who was freed
from house arrest Saturday
amid a divided political
landscape and days after
widely criticized elections,
made clear she faces a pre-
carious position: maneu-
vering between the
expectations of the coun-


try's pro-democracy move-
ment and the realities of
dealing with a clique of se-
cretive generals who have
kept her locked up for much
of the past two decades.
"I've always believed in
compromise," the Nobel
Peace laureate told reporters
in the dilapidated offices of
her party, the National
League for Democracy, with
its rough concrete floor and
battered wooden furniture. "I
am for national reconcilia-
tion. I am for dialogue. What-
ever authority I have, I will
use it to that end... I hope the
people will support me."
This Southeast Asian na-
tion, once known as Burma,
has been ruled by the mili-


Associated Press
Myanmar's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, center,
gestures during her first press conference Sunday since she
was released from house arrest In Yangon, Myanmar.


tary since 1962, leaving it
isolated from much of the
international. community
and battered by poverty.
The junta has an abysmal
human rights record, hold-
ing thousands of political
prisoners and waging brutal
military campaigns against


ethnic minorities.
In recent years, though, it
has also become an increas-
ingly important regional
trading hub, and its natural
gas reserves and hydroelec-
tric possibilities have
brought it close to energy-
hungry China and India.


~-- I- -- -~~4t-- R7 ------------ ' =


tus of the massive backlog
in applications for disabil-
ity benefits, which are
available to people who
can't work because of
medical problems.


----


FINALLY FREE


AFTER 388 DAYS WITH PIRATES

Somalians

release retired

British couple
Associated Press


~


an easy target than others,"
she said. '"American con-
sumers have a vested inter-
est in making sure we have
a safe and reliable food sup-
ply that is home grown."
Still, she believes some
programs may need to be
cut
"There's a benefit to keep-
ing that food safety net there,
but we need to look at all dis-
cretionary spending and ask
ard questions," she said.
op insurance it costs taxpay-
illions of dollars a year is an
tive way to give farmers the se-
ty they need when weather
s a harvest, Hartzler said. She
tests the Conservation Reserve
ram, which pays farmers to
environmentally sensitive land,
have to go.




'Judges


facing


violent


threats

Social Securiy

claimants mad

at the delays in

process, denial
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Judges who hear Social,
.Security' disability cases
are tacing a growing ti n-
ber of violent threat rom
claimants angry over
being denied benefits or:
frustrated at lengthy de-
lays in processing claims.
There were at least 80
threats to kill or harm ad-
ministrative law judges'or
staff over the past year -
an 18 percent increase
over the previous report-
ing period, according to
data collected by the
agency
The data was released
to the Association of Ad-
ministrative Law Judges
and made available to The
Associated Press.
One claimant in Albu-
querque, N.M., called his
congressman's office to
say he was going to "take
his guns and shoot em-
ployees" in the Social Se-
curity hearing office. In
Eugene, Ore., a man who
was denied benefits said
he is "ready to join the
Taliban and hurt some
people." Another
claimant denied benefits
told a judge in Greenville,
S.C., that he was a sniper
in the military and "would
go take care of the prob-
lem."
"I'm not sure the num-
ber is as significant as the
kind of threats being
made," said Randall Frye,
a judge based in Char-
lotte, N.C., and the presi-


harm, not only to the
judge but to the judge's
family."
Fifty of the incidents
came between March and
August, including that of a
Pittsburgh claimant who
threatened to kill herself
outside the hearing office
or fly a plane into the
building like a disgruntled
tax protester did earlier
this year at the Internal
Revenue Service building
in Austin, Texas.
A Senate subcommittee
is expected to hear testi-
mony Monday at a field
hearing in Akron, Ohio,
about the rising number of
threats, as well as the sta-










S PR,



SPORTS


* Due to press
problems and early
deadlines, portions
of the lottery and
updated sports
standings are
missing.


* FSU ekes out
close win; Gators
just stomped in
the Swamp./B9


n NBA, NHL/B2
0 NFL/B2, B3
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf/B5
N Entertainment/B6
0 College football/B9


CUirius COu NTY CH-RONxICLE


Inverness Country Club wins Citrus Cup


IG&CC tops

7 Rivers byfive

points to earn title
JOHN COSCIA
Chronicle
Picture-perfect weather. Two
days of friendly competition be-
tween a pair of cross-county coun-
try clubs. Thirty-six holes of golf.
Four separate formats. And one
Citrus Cup.
It all came to an official conclu-
sion on one conceded hole when
Seven Rivers Country Club mem-
ber Jim Moss removed his floppy
hat and extended his handshake
to Inverness Golf & Country Club


member Scott Toumbleston. The
match finished all squared and
gave Inverness the half a point
they needed to reach the 20 '/2
magic number.
And just like that the Inverness
Golf and Country Club were the
champions of the inaugural Citrus
Cup. By day's end the two-day total
would be 22 A- 17 '/2 for IG&CC in
the inaugural event played in a
Ryder Cup-style format
"I don't think I've ever had so
much fun losing," said Seven
Rivers co-captain Wayne Larsen
as he prepared to present Jeff
Shelton with the trophy "It's been
an absolute blast and we definitely
have to do this again next year It's
not so sad to pass this over"
Well that might have been easy
for Larsen to say but his 4-year old


daughter Evie didn't exactly see it
that way. Somehow the pre-
schooler was grasping what was
taking place and as she witnessed
the unfolding events and watched
her daddy hand over the trophy,
she burst into tears. In fact it
would take some time to settle the
youngster whose competitive
juices had overwhelmed her and
gotten the best of her emotions.
Eventually, however, she be-
came settled when the pair of co-
captains, Seven Rivers' Larsen
and Reid Callahan along with In-
verness co-captains Shelton and
Nathan Connor coerced the
youngster to pose along with them
and the Citrus Cup trophy.
Following the picture taking
session it was Inverness president
See '. Page B4


LARRY JORDAN/Special to the Chronicle
The two country clubs general managers, Jeff Shelton (left) from Inver-
ness Golf & Country Club and Wayne Larsen from Seven Rivers Country
Club shake hands on the 18th hole of their match Sunday. Both players
conceded birdies to the other, finishing their match all square.


Walking the plank


Photos by Associated Press
IC' .' /. Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman (5) throws a pass as Carolina Panthers defensive tackle Derek Landri (61)
moves in during the third quarter Sunday in Tampa. The Bucs defeated the Panthers 31-16. BELOW: Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back
LeGarrette Blount (27) gets a lift from teammate center Jeff Faine (52) after scoring a first quarter touchdown Sunday.

Tampa Bay Bucs steamroll hapless Panthers, 31-16, to improve to 6-3 overall


Associated Press on a 17-yard run in the first half,
and Cadillac Williams put the
TAMPA As long as Tampa game out of reach with a 45-yard
Bay keeps winning, Raheem TD burst on third-and-10 late in
Morris doesn't care how others the fourth quarter.
feel about how the surprising Rookie Jimmy Clausen made
Buccaneers stack up against the his fourth start at quarterback
rest of the NFC. for injury-riddled Carolina (1-8),
The NFEs youngest team has which got 100 yards rushing on
already doubled its win total from 23 carries from fourth-string
last season, impressing their running back Mike Goodson.
coach with the type of resilience Josh Vaughan scored on a 2-
that's normally associated with yard run and John Kasay kicked
more experienced teams. field goals of 46, 28 and 48 yards
Rebounding from a tough loss for the Panthers, who also drove
to Atlanta that knocked them out to the Tampa Bay 1 in the clos-
of first place in the NFC South, ing seconds only to have Clausen
the Bucs (6-3) beat the Carolina denied the end zone on consecu-
Panthers 31-16 Sunday tive quarterback sneaks.
Josh Freeman threw two "I thought Jimmy played well
touchdown passes and rookie enough to give us a chance, and
LeGarrette Blount ran for a I think he'll continue to im-
score before an announced prove," Carolina coach John Fox
crowd of 44,264 more than said of the second-round draft
20,000 shy of capacity at Ray- pick out of Notre Dame.
mond James Stadium. "We knew it was going to be
Losing to the Falcons forced tough sledding. Their quarter-
Morris to back off his declara- back does an outstanding job,"
tion that Tampa Bay is the best Fox said. "They operate pretty
team in the NFC, however the smooth in the passing game, and I
Bucs are convinced they have thought they did so today as well."
what it takes to remain in con- Tampa Bay started seven rook-
tention for a playoff berth. ies, including Benn and fellow
"This team has done it receiver Mike Williams, who also
throughout the season," Morris had a productive day According
said. "We got beat bad by the to the Bucs, the last time a team
Pittsburgh Steelers and we started as many as seven rookies
bounced back We came out got in a game it won, Dallas beat
beat bad by the New Orleans Jacksonville on Nov. 24,2002.
Saints and we bounced back It's Freeman, who's in his second
no different when you get beat season, completed 18 of 24
by Atlanta.... You can't have any passes for 241 yards and no in-
hangovers. This team is too terceptions. Cadillac Williams
young for hangovers." gained 16 yards on a third-down
Freeman threw TD passes of 8 screen pass to keep the clinching
yards to Arrelious Benn and 20 drive alive, then broke through
yards to Kellen Winslow. Blount an opening on the right side of
rushed for 91 yards and scored the line and raced untouched to


the end zone to end any chance
for a Carolina comeback.
Already last in the league in
yards gained and points scored,
the Panthers played without in-
jured running backs DeAngelo
Williams and Jonathan Stewart
and simply lacked the firepower
to keep up with a Bucs offense
that's become more balanced


since the 247-pound Blount took
on a bigger role three weeks ago.
The rookie best known for
punching an opposing player
after a game when he was in col-
lege at Oregon, carried five
times for 73 yards on an 87-yard
scoring drive that Tampa Bay


See BL, Page B4


Edwards


races to


weekend


double

Driver wins while

Hamlin's big lead

is wiped out

Associated Press
AVONDALE, Ariz. Carl Ed-
wards marked the end of a 70-
race losing streak by climbing
into the grandstands at Phoenix
International Raceway for a
raucous celebration with the
fans.
Roughly 50 feet away, Denny
Hamlin sat in silence on the pit
road wall, wondering how his
ironclad grip on
the Sprint Cup l
had been pried
apart by fuel
strategy.
"It's tough to ,
not be happy .
having the point
lead going into
the last race. carl
Edwards
But we were sit-
ting pat Phoenix.
ting pretty," won Sunday
Hamlin said.
He was in prime position to
take a comfortable lead into
next week's season finale by
dominating Sunday's race at
Phoenix. He led a race-high 190
laps and had four-time defend-
ing champion Jimmie Johnson
in trouble for much of the
afternoon.
And when third-place driver
Kevin Harvick was penalized
for a loose lug nut on a late stop,
See "" '.i;Page B4



Boise St.


gains


ground

Broncos narrow

gap on TCUin

BCS standings
Associated Press
NEW YORK Watch out,
TCU. Boise State is gaining.
The Broncos narrowed the
gap on the
Ho r n e d College
Frogs in the rankings
Bowl Chain- For the BCS
pionship Se- Standings
r i e s Stand other
standings polls, please
and put see:
themselves
in position to PAGE B4
pass their
BCS Buster
rivals down the stretch.
Oregon and Auburn are still
See' .Page B4








SPORT'S


Hawks stop 4-game skid


Pistons turn

back Kings

Associated Press

ATLANTA AlI Horford
had 28 points and 10 re-
bounds and the Atlanta
Hawks beat Kevin Love and
the Minnesota Timber-
wolves 111-105 on Sunday
to end a four-game losing
streak.
Love had 22 points and 17
rebounds in his first game
since posting 31 points and
31 rebounds in a win over
the Knicks, the NBA's first
30-30 game since Moses
Malone in 1982.
Horford needed three
stitches for a cut on the top
of his head following a col-
lision with Anthony Tolliver
late in the opening quarter.
Horford returned midway
through the second.
Michael Beasley led Min-
nesota with 25 points.
Josh Smith added 23
points and 10 rebounds for
Atlanta, which won for the
first time since moving to 6-
0 with a 113-103 win at Min-
nesota on Nov. 5. The
Hawks avoided losing five
straight for the first time
since 2008.
Minnesota led 17-7 after
an 11-0 run, but Atlanta re-
covered to lead 30-27 at the
end of the first period and
kept the lead the rest of the
game. The Hawks took their
biggest lead at 81-64 and led
93-78 before the Wolves
closed the deficit with a
string of three 3-pointers.
Corey Brewer's 3 cut the
lead to 97-93, but after
coach Larry Drew called a


Associated Press
Minnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love (42) has his
shot blocked by Atlanta Hawks forward Josh Smith (5) in
the first quarter Sunday in Atlanta.


timeout, the Hawks recov-
ered with two quick baskets
by Smith and Joe Johnson
and two free throws by Hor-
ford for a 103-92 lead.
Johnson finished with 17
points and Jamal Crawford
had 11, while Sebastian
Telfair had 18 points and
eight assists for Minnesota.
Tolliver finished with 13
points for the Wolves.
Notes: Wolves C Nikola
Pekovic (left foot) and G
Wayne Ellington (left thigh)
were not with the team.
Ellington missed his fourth
straight game, leaving Min-
nesota with 10 players in


uniform.... Horford blocked
three shots.... The Timber-
wolves had 21 turnovers.
Pistons 100, Kings 94
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -
Rodney Stuckey scored 17
points and Ben Gordon hit a
late 3 that sent the Detroit
Pistons over Sacramento
100-94 Sunday, the Kings' fifth
straight loss.
The Pistons have won four
of five after their 0-5 start.
Gordon's 3-pointer from the
corner put the Pistons ahead
99-94 with 23.9 seconds left.
He finished with 16 points.
Tayshaun Prince had 14


points for the Pistons, Richard
Hamilton scored 13 and Char-
lie Villanueva added 11.
Tyreke Evans scored 20
points and Carl Landry had
19 points and eight rebounds
for the Kings. Luther Head
added 13.
It was the fourth consecutive
home loss for the Kings. They
are in the midst of playing eight
of nine games at home, a
stretch that extends to Nov. 21.
After Villanueva's two free
throws gave Detroit a four-
point lead, a driving basket by
DeMarcus Cousins pulled the
Kings within 94-92 with 1:52
remaining. But Prince an-
swered with a pull-up jump in
the lane.
Ahead 75-72 to open the
fourth quarter, Villanueva
made a jumper and followed
with a 3-pointer, putting the
Pistons up by eight points at
the 10:17 mark. It had been a
quiet first three quarters for Vil-
lanueva, who had just two
points after scoring a season-
high 30 in Detroit's overtime
win Friday against the Los
Angeles Clippers.
It was a frustrating first half
for the highly touted Cousins,
the fifth pick in the 2010 draft.
He had six points, eight re-
bounds and six turnovers.
The Kings' backup center
missed several easy opportu-
nities from close range and
committed three fouls and
three turnovers in just under
nine minutes.
Notes: Cousins drew a
technical foul following an of-
fensive foul in the second
quarter.... Beno Udrih, the
Kings' second-leading scorer,
had no points in the first half.
He finished with five.


N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo

Indianapolis
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Houston

Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Oakland
Kansas City
San Diego
Denver


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas

Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Detroit


Seattle
St. Louis
San Francisco
Arizona


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
Pct PF PA Home ,
.778 208 150 2-2-0
.750 219 188 4-0-0
.556 172 192 1-3-0
.111 164 245 1-4-0
South
Pct PF PA Home ,
.667 240 185 4-0-0
.556 241 179 2-2-0
.556 196 250 3-2-0
.444 217 257 2-3-0
North
Pct PF PA Home
.750 174 123 2-1-0
.667 196 165 4-0-0
.333 172 182 2-3-0
.222 184 213 1-3-0
West
Pct PF PA Home
.556 235 188 4-1-0
.556 212 194 4-0-0
.444 239 197 3-1-0
.333 203 252 2-3-0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
Pct PF PA Home
.667 236 193 3-2-0
.625 198 181 2-2-0
.500 155 170 2-2-0 2
.222 194 252 0-4-0
South
Pct PF PA Home A
.778 222 175 5-0-0 ,
.667 201 151 3-2-0
.667 188 206 3-2-0 3
.111 104 215 1-4-0 0
North
Pct PF PA Home
.667 175 146 3-2-0
.667 221 143 4-1-0
.333 169 195 3-1-0
.222 215 202 2-2-0
West
Pct PF PA Home
.556 166 199 3-1-0
.444 160 164 4-1-0
.333 160 198 3-2-0
.333 175 261 2-2-0


Thursday's Games
Atlanta 26, Baltimore 21
Sunday's Games
Chicago 27, Minnesota 13
Miami 29, Tennessee 17
Buffalo 14, Detroit 12
Jacksonville 31, Houston 24
N.Y. Jets 26, Cleveland 20, OT
Indianapolis 23, Cincinnati 17
Tampa Bay 31, Carolina 16
Denver 49, Kansas City 29
Dallas 33, N.Y. Giants 20
San Francisco 23, St. Louis 20, OT
S Seattle 36, Arizona 18
New England at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay, New
Orleans
Monday's Game
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.


Chicago at
Detroit at D
Oakland at
Washington
Houston at
Buffalo at C
Arizona at K
Cleveland a
Baltimore a
Green Bay.
Atlanta at S
Seattle at N
Tampa Bay
Indianapolis
N.Y. Giants
Denver at S


Away NFC AFC Div
3-1-0 5-3-0 1-0-0 3-0-
2-2-0 4-2-0 2-1-0 2-1-
0-5-0 3-3-0 0-3-0 1-2-
0-5-0 2-5-0 0-2-0 0-3-
Away NFC AFC Div
2-3-0 4-2-0 1-2-0 3-1-
0-4-0 3-4-0 1-1-0 1-2-
0-4-0 1-5-0 2-1-0 1-1-
1-4-0 2-5-0 1-1-0 1-2-
Thursday, Nov.18
Miami, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 21
alias, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
m at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
;incinnati, 1 p.m.
Kansas City, 1 p.m.
at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
t Carolina, 1 p.m.
at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
t. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
New Orleans, 4:05 p.m.
at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
s at New England, 4:15 p.m.
at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 22
San Diego, 8:30 p.m.


CUP
Continued from Page B1

Connor's daughter Ashton
who felt obliged to poke a
little fun at her dad and
shine a bit of light on the
weekend.
"That's just very rude
that you guys (Shelton and
Connor) get to hold the tro-
phy for the picture in the
newspaper," joked the 19-
year old senior at Florida
State University who came
home for the weekend and
was part of the gallery both
days. "I mean between the
two of you, you only earned
a half a point (in four
matches) the whole tourna-
ment."
Shelton laughed, and
while he couldn't help but
agree, he shot back at the
young lady only months
away from her teaching de-
gree and snipped, "Hey,
don't you have to go back to
school?"
Everyone within earshot
on the Seven Rivers ve-
randa burst into laughter.
And that pretty much
summed up the tone of the
entire weekend as all of the
golfers from both teams ex-
hibited great sportsman-
ship and played with the
kind of class you would ex-
pect from such a unique
event.
"We had a great time,"
said Shelton, echoing
Larsen's words as he held
the trophy "We want to
thank everyone here at
Seven Rivers for your hos-
pitality in this inaugural
event. It was fun and a well
fought match."
And indeed it was. Head-
ing into Sunday's final two
formats, Inverness held a
10-6 lead. The club then
built on that lead by two (15-
9) when they won five of the
eight scramble matches in
the morning round.
Reiterating Ashton's
point, the only team for
Seven Rivers to win a
match in the morning ses-
sion scramble was Larsen


JOHN COSCIA/Chronicle
The two sets of co-captains from the Seven Rivers Country Club and the Inverness Golf &
Country Club pose with the Citrus Cup following IG&CC's 22 1/2 17 1/2 victory. Pic-
tured from left to right are Reid Callahan and Wayne Larsen from Seven Rivers and Jeff
Shelton and Nathan Connor from Inverness. Holding the trophy is Larsen's 4-year old Evie,
who was none too happy to relinguish the Cup afterwards.


and Callahan who were 3
and 2 winners over Shelton
and Connor. On the flip side
Inverness won three morn-
ing matches as John Mar-
tin/Dave McKean were 3
and 2 winners over Chuck
Demicoli/Tom McLaughlin,
Mike Downing/Eric Evil-
sizer were 1 up winners
over Joe Rio/Duke McKear-
ney and Lee Schultz/Chris
Bernhard were 1 up win-
ners over Dick Laxton/Bob
Sherman.
The other four matches
were all squared, earning
each team two points.
Those teams were the four
from Inverness which in-
cluded Corey Gibbs/Charles
Kelly, Steve Bagby/Jack An-
derson, Scott Toumble-
ston/Jason Russ and
Bobby Shoemaker/Mike
Russ who faced their Seven
Rivers counterparts Bob
Beaufait/Curt Spring,
Sonny McGee/Jim Moss,


Jim Anspach/Bob Eiserman
and Rick Moorbeck/Dick
Hutchinson.
But the afternoon singles
individual matches were a
testament to how close the
teams were actually evenly
matched as Seven Rivers
won seven matches, Inver-
ness won six and three
matches finished all
squared. Winning matches
for Seven Rivers in the af-
ternoon were Callahan,
Anspach, Eiserman, Moor-
beck, Hutchinson, McKear-
ney and Sherman. The
Inverness winners were
Martin, McKean, Anderson,
Russ, Evilsizer and Bern-
hard. The three matches
that were squared were be-
tween Larsen and Shelton,
Spring and Bagby and
Toumbleston and Moss.
With the closing cere-
mony speeches and picture
taking concluded, the
golfers all headed their sep-


rate ways all taking
away memories none of
them will soon forget.
New friendships had
been formed. Mutual cama-
raderie shared. Two full
days playing golf at a pair of
great Citrus County country
clubs. Pristine course con-
ditions, coupled with
Chamber of Commerce-like
weather. An inaugural his-
tory-making event. All-in-
all a pretty great way to
spend a weekend.
And then there was the
added bonus for the 16
golfers from the Inverness
Golf & Country Club. Get-
ting to hoist the first-ever
Citrus Cup and taste the
sweetness of its victory
Priceless!
John Coscia is the
sports editor of the
Chronicle and can be
reached at (352) 564-2928
or atjcoscia@(
chronicleonline.com.


Minnesota goes Wild on Tampa Bay


Associated Press

TAMPA Cal Clutter-
buck and Antti Miettinen
scored on the power play
during a three-goal first pe-
riod, and Niklas Backstrom
made 37 saves for Min-
nesota in a 4-1 win over the
Tampa Bay Lightning.
John Madden and Eric
Nystrom also scored, and
Martin Havlat had three as-
sists, giving him 13 assists
and 22 points in 18 games
against Tampa Bay


Martin St. Louis scored
for the Lightning, who have
lost three in a row and six of
seven. Steven Stamkos had
an assist, but saw his four-
game goal streak end.
Rangers 8, Oilers 2
NEW YORK-- Marian Ga-
borik scored his first three goals of
the season, and the New York
Rangers beat the Edmonton Oil-
ers 8-2 on Sunday to spoil the re-
turn of former coach Tom Renney.
The game turned ugly with
8:42 left after a fight between


New York's Sean Avery and Ed-
monton's Ladislav Smid. As
Avery was being ushered to-
ward the tunnel next to the
benches, Oilers defenseman
Ryan Whitney yelled at him.
Theo Peckham joined the fray
and was cut off by Rangers for-
ward Brian Boyle. Those two
fought after Peckham was
blocked from going into the tun-
nel, and New York's Brandon
Prust took on Zack Stortini.
Gaborik, playing in his fifth
game, added an assist as the


Rangers won their second
straight at home.
Capitals 6, Thrashers 4
WASHINGTON -John Er-
skine scored the tiebreaking
goal with 6:49 remaining to help
Washington beat Atlanta for its
sixth straight home victory.
Trailing a rush into the
Thrashers' zone, Erskine used
a slap shot from the left point to
convert a drop pass from David
Steckel, beating Ondrej Pav-
elec to cap a sloppy, goal-filled
game.


Broncos 49, Chiefs 29 6 27.
NYG-Boss 35 pass from Manning (Tynes


Kansas City 0 10 7 12- 29 kick), 5:19.
Denver 21 14 7 7- 49 A-80,851.
First Quarter
Den-Moreno 17 pass from Orton (Prater kick), First downs
12:02. Total Net Yards
Den-Lloyd 6 pass from Orton (Prater kick), Rushes-yards
4:19. Passing
Den-Gaffney 40 pass from Orton (Prater kick), Punt Returns
1:19. Kickoff Returns
Second Quarter Interceptions Ret.
Den-Tebow 1 run (Prater kick), 10:07. Comp-Att-Int
Den-Hunter 75 fumble return (Prater kick),- Sacked-Yards Lost


Dal
15
427
27-103
324
0-0
5-107
2-128
13-22-1
1-3


NYG
25
480
28-107
373
0-0
6-129
1-0
33-48-2
0-0


5:48. Punts 3-53.3 4-42.3
KC-Chades 5 pass from Cassel (Succop kick),' Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1
1:28. Penalties-Yards 5-60 8-69
KC--FG Succop 40, :00. Time of Possession 22:09 37:51
Third Quarter INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Den-Larsen 3 pass from Tebow (Prater kick), RUSHING-Dallas, Jones 14-51, Barber 8-47,
9:24. Kitna 4-5, Austin 1-0. N.Y. Giants, Bradshaw 20-
KC-Bowe 15 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 73, Jacobs 5-17, Manning 3-17.
2:22. PASSING-Dallas, Kitna 13-22-1-327. N.Y. Gi-
Fourth Quarter ants, Manning 33-48-2-373.
Den-Lloyd 15 pass from Orton (Prater kick), RECEIVING-Dallas, Bryant 3-104, Jones 3-
11:47. 85, Austin 2-68, R.Williams 2-33, Bennett 1-32.
KC-Chambers 11 pass from Cassel (pass Witten 1-7, Barber 1-(minus 2). N.Y. Giants,
failed), 6:54. Manningham 10-91, Bradshaw 6-62, Nicks 5-
KC-Bowe 22 pass from Cassel (pass failed), 82, Boss 5-81, Barden 3-34, Beckum 2-12, Ja-
:10. cobs 2-11.
A-75,334. MISSED FIELD GOALS-Dallas, Buehler 34


KC Den (WR).
First downs 30 25
Total Net Yards 484 452 49 irs 23, Rams 20, OT
Rushes-yards 22-51 31-153 St. Louis 3 7 7 3 0 20
Passing 433 299 San Francisco 7 3 010 3 23
Punt Returns 1-16 2-27 First Quarter
Kickoff Returns 6-128 2-68 StL-FG Jo.Brown 42, 9:35.
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 SF-Gore 1 run (Nedney kick), 3:10.
Comp-Att-Int 33-53-0 23-35-0 Second Quarter
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-36 0-0 SF-FG Nedney 26,12:04.
Punts 3-43.3 2-41.0 StL-Amendola 5 pass from Bradford
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0 (Jo.Brown kick), 9:08.
Penalties-Yards 6-40 3-28 Third Quarter
Time of Possession 31:51 28:09 StL-Jackson 13 run (Jo.Brown kick), 2:48.
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS Fourth Quarter
RUSHING-Kansas City. Charles 14-41, Battle SF-FG Nedney 47, 9:02.
2-4, Jones 4-3, Cassel 2-3. Denver, Moreno 22- SF-Crabtree 16 pass from T.Smith (Nedney
106, Royal 2-20, Larsen 2-17, Ball 2-9, Tebow Ikick), 2:10.
2-2, Orton 1-(minus 1). StL-FG Jo.Brown 33, :00.
PASSING-Kansas City, Cassel 33-53-0-469. Overtime
Denver, Orton 22-34-0-296, Tebow 1-1-0-3. SF-FG Nedney 29, 9:38.
RECEIVING-Kansas City, Bowe 13-186, A--69,732.
Charles 5-80, Copper 5-55, Chambers 4-36, StL SF
Pope 2-21, Tucker 1-38, Moeaki 1-34, Jones 1- First downs 22 19
19, Cox 1-0. Denver, Lloyd 6-90, Royal 5-39, Total Net Yards 332 421
Gaffney 3-57, D.Thomas 3-51, Moreno 3-50, Rushes-yards 24-104 26-98
Buckhalter 2-9, Larsen 1-3 Passing 228 323
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Kansas City, Succop Punt Returns 2-22 0-0
52 (WR). Denver, Prater 58 (SH). Kickoff Returns 5-76 3-42
Cowboys 33, Giants 20 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Atit-Int 30-42-0 17-28-0
Dallas 6 1314 0 33 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 5-33
N.Y. Giants 3 314 0- 20 Punts 10-43.7 8-47.0
First Quarter Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0
NYG-FG Tynes 43, 5:04. Penalties-Yards 12-135 14-105
Dal-Bryant 13 pass from Kitna (kick blocked), Time of Possession 35:03 30:18
3:28. INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Second Quarter RUSHING-St. Louis, Jackson 20-81, Amen-
Dal-FG Buehler 22, 14:26. dola 2-12, Bradford 2-11. San Francisco, Gore
Dal-McCann 101 interception return (Buehler 22-87, T.Smith 3-12, Dixon 1-(minus 1).
kick), 7:34. PASSING-St. Louis, Bradford 30-42-0-251.
Dal-FG Buehler 23, 3:04. San Francisco, T.Smith 17-28-0-356.
NYG-FG Tynes 25,1:24. RECEIVING-St. Louis, B.Gibson 8-72, Jack-
Third Quarter son 8-67, Amendola 7-51, Robinson 2-24.
Dal-Jones 71 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), Hoomanawanui 2-20, Fells 2-11, Darby 1-6.
13:56. Gan Francisco, Walker4-80, VDavis 4-79, Crab-
NYG-Manningham 5 pass from Manning tree 4-61, Gore 3-67, Morgan 1-65, Westbrook
(Tynes kick), 8:56. 1-4.
Dal-Austin 24 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), MISSED FIELD GOALS-None.









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B2MOM~iim,., Novi:,Ntiwi~ 11), 2010


CITRUS COIJN'IY (114) CHRONICLE









CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

NFL BOXES

Bucs 31, Panthers 16
Carolina 3 7 6 0- 16
Tampa Bay 7 14 0 10 31
First Quarter
TB-Benn 8 pass from Freeman (Barth kick),
10:37.
Car-FG Kasay 46, :52.
Second Quarter
TB-Blount 17 run (Barth kick), 12:23.
Car-Vaughan 2 run (Kasay kick), 7:57.
TB-Winslow 20 pass from Freeman (Barth
kick), :50.
Third Quarter
Car-FG Kasay 28, 4:28.
Car-FG Kasay 48, 1:02.
Fourth Quarter
TB-FG Barth 32, 10:02.
TB-C.Williams 45 run (Barth kick), 2:42.
A-44,264.
Car TB
First downs 18 21
Total Net Yards 300 421
Rushes-yards 31-118 30-186
Passing 182 235
Punt Returns 3-47 3-5
Kickoff Returns 5-101 4-61
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 16-29-0 18-24-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-9 1-6
Punts 5-31.6 4-44.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-2
Penalties-Yards 7-71 10-80
Time of Possession 28:40 31:20
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Carolina, Goodson 23-100,
Clausen 5-11, Vaughan 3-7.Tampa Bay, Blount
19-91, C.Williams 5-62, Freeman 5-19, John-
son 1-14.
PASSING-Carolina, Clausen 16-29-0-191.
Tampa Bay, Freeman 18-24-0-241.
RECEIVING-Carolina, Smith 3-47, Gettis 3-
42, LaFell 3-36, Goodson 3-13, Rosario 2-24,
Clowney 1-25, King 1-4. Tampa Bay, Winslow 6-
65, M.Williams 4-68, Gilmore 3-52, Benn 2-29,
C.Williams 2-23, Parker 1-4.
Jaguars 31, Texans 24
Houston 3 014 7- 24
Jacksonville 3 14 0 14- 31
First Quarter
Jac-FG Scobee 38, 8:59.
Hou-FG Rackers 24, 4:31.
Second Quarter
Jac--Jones-Drew 3 run (Scobee kick), 5:32.
Jac-Jones-Drew 9 run (Scobee kick), :38.
Third Quarter
Hou-Foster 1 run (Rackers kick), 11:19.
Hou--Johnson 9 pass from Schaub (Rackers
kick), 5:10.
Fourth Quarter
Jac-Miller 52 pass from Garrard (Scobee
kick), 6:57.
Hou-Walter 18 pass from Schaub (Rackers
kick), 4:19.
Jac-Thomas 50 pass from Garrard (Scobee
kick), :00.
A-62,340.
Hou Jac
First downs 20 29
Total Net Yards 395 491
Rushes-yards 21-81 36-165
Passing 314 326
Punt Returns 0-0 1-1
Kickoff Returns 2-40 4-103
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 22-32-0 24-31-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-16
Punts 4-37.5 3-43.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-0
Penalties-Yards 8-49 8-62
Time of Possession 24:37 35:23
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Houston, Foster 15-56, Schaub 3-
14, Ward 3-11. Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 24-
100, Garrard 7-35, Thomas 2-18, Jennings 1-8,
G.Jones 2-4.
PASSING-Houston, Schaub 22-32-0-314.
Jacksonville, Garrard 24-31-0-342.
RECEIVING-Houston, Johnson 9-146, Walter
6-90, D.Anderson 2-27, Dreessen 2-24, Casey
1-18, Jones 1-5, Foster 1-4. Jacksonville,
Thomas 8-149, Lewis 5-53, Miller 4-79, Sims-
Walker 3-26, Jones-Drew 2-23, G.Jones 2-12.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Jacksonville, Scobee
39 (WR), 43 (WL).
Bears 27, Vikings 13
Minnesota 3 7 3 0--13
Chicago 0 14 6 7- 27
First Quarter
Min-FG Longwell 36, 3:30.
Second Quarter
Chi-Olsen 17 pass from Cutler (Gould kick),
6:57.
Min-Harvin 53 pass from Favre (Longwell
kick), 3:17.
Chi-Hester 19 pass from Cutler (Gould kick),
:44.
Third Quarter
Chi--FG Gould 34,13:12.
Min-FG Longwell 33, 8:14.
Chi-FG Gould 37, 5:26.
Fourth Quarter
Chi-K.Davis 19 pass from Cutler (Gould kick),


8:37.
A-62,206.
First downs
Total Net Yards
Rushes-yards
Passing
Punt Returns
Kickoff Returns
Interceptions Ret.
Comp-Att-Int
Sacked-Yards Lost
Punts
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


Min
15
240
23-70
170
0-0
6-151
2-5
18-31-3
0-0
4-44.0
1-1
2-19
25:21


Chi
18
360
38-130
230
2-47
3-132
3-3
22-35-2
1-7
4-38.5
0-0
11-116
34:39


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Minnesota, Peterson 17-51, Ger-
hart 4-20, Favre 2-(minus 1). Chicago, Forte 21-
69, Taylor 11-33, Cutler 5-24, Bennett 1-4.
PASSING-Minnesota, Favre 18-31-3-170.
Chicago, Cutler 22-35-2-237.
RECEIVING-Minnesota, Harvin 4-64, Shian-
coe 4-29, Peterson 4-24, Gerhart 2-17, Lewis
1-13, Camarillo 1-11, Dugan 1-9, Kleinsasser
1-3. Chicago, Knox 5-90, Hester 4-38, Olsen 3-
31, Bennett 3-21, Taylor 3-8, K.Davis 1-19,
R.Davis 1-12, Aromashodu 1-9, Forte 1-9.
MISSED FIELD GOALS-Minnesota, Longwell
39 (WL). Chicago, Gould 43 (WL).
Colts 23, Bengals 17
Cincinnati 0 10 0 7- 17
Indianapolis 10 10 0 3- 23
First Quarter
Ind-FG Vinatieri 28, 3:25.
Ind-Hayden 31 interception return (Vinatieri
kick), 2:28.
Second Quarter
Ind-J.James 3 run (Vinatieri kick), 14:19.
Cin-FG Nugent 27, 9:51.
Cin-Ochocinco 5 pass from C.Palmer (Nugent
kick), 1:06.
Ind-FG Vinatieri 47, :00.
Fourth Quarter
Ind-FG Vinatieri 23, 10:01.
Cin-Gresham 19 pass from C.Palmer (Nugent
kick), 2:35.
A-67,404.
Cin Ind
First downs 19 16
Total Net Yards 341 256
Rushes-yards 20-72 22-76
Passing 269 180
Punt Returns 2-4 2-5
Kickoff Returns 4-124 2-44
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-77
Comp-Att-Int 31-42-3 20-36-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 2-5
Punts 4-40.3 7-41.3
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 0-0
Penalties-Yards 4-38 5-45
Time of Possession 34:11 25:49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Cincinnati, Leonard 1-42, Benson
14-24, Scott 4-8, Caldwell 1-(minus 2). Indi-
anapolis, D.Brown 12-50, J.James 10-26.
PASSING-Cincinnati, C.Palmer 31-42-3-292.
Indianapolis, Manning 20-36-0-185.
RECEIVING-Cincinnati, Gresham 9-85,
Ochocinco 7-86, Benson 5-27, Owens 4-64,
Shipley 2-13, Kelly 2-9, Leonard 2-8. Indi-
anapolis, Tamme 7-73, Garcon 5-37, B.James
4-36, Wayne 3-34, Robinson 1-5.


NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE




Hail Mary comes tru


Jacksonville's 50-yard

TD pass uith no time

left sinks Houston

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Mike Thomas
caught a 50-yard touchdown pass
from David Garrard that Houston de-
fensive back Glover Quin batted into
his hands on the final play in regula-
tion, giving the Jacksonville Jaguars
a 31-24 win over the Texans on
Sunday.
The game looked as if it was going
to overtime, but Garrard heaved a
pass toward the end zone with no
time on the clock. Quin, who was
burned all afternoon, tried to bat the
ball to the ground. Instead, he
knocked it right to the 5-foot-8
Thomas.
Thomas, who was trailing behind
the pass and looking for a ricochet,
caught it at the 1-yard line and then
stepped across the goal line bfor the
winning score.
The Jaguars (5-4) went into a frenzy
and even drew a celebration penalty
that couldn't be enforced. The Tex-
ans (4-5) trudged off the field in dis-
belief. It was Houston's third straight
loss, dropping them from the top of
the AFC South to the bottom.
The Jaguars had a chance to take
the lead in the closing minutes, but
Josh Scobee yanked a 43-yard field
goal left The miss gave Houston the
ball with a chance to win it, but the
Texans needed to drive 67 yards in
1:34 with no timeouts. They moved
the ball some and got close to field-
goal range, but Joel Dreessen fum-
bled on a third-and-15 play, giving the
Jaguars one more shot
Bills 14, Lions 12
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. Fred Jack-
son scored two touchdowns in leading
Buffalo to its first victory of the season
and sending Detroit to an NFL-record set-
ting 25th consecutive road loss.
Jackson scored on a 1-yard plunge
and a 16-yard catch in a sloppy game
played in rain-soaked conditions between
two perennial losers.
Buffalo (1-8) ended what had been its
worst start to a season since going 0-11
in 1984. The Lions (2-7) broke the road
losing streak they set in g 24 in a
row from 2001-2003.
The win wasn't assured until Detroit
quarterback Shaun Hill overthrew Bran-
don Pettigrew at the back of the end zone
on a failed 2-point conversion attempt
with 14 seconds left. The Lions had
pulled within two points on Hill's 20-yard
TD pass to Calvin Johnson.
Jets 26, Browns 20, OT
CLEVELAND Santonio Holmes
scored on a 37-yard touchdown pass
from Mark Sanchez with 16 seconds left


As
Jacksonville quarterback David Garrard (9) celebrates a touchdown
Jaguars guard Vince Manuwai (67) during the fourth quarter
Jacksonville. The Jaguars beat the Texans 31-24.


in overtime, giving the Jets eighth straight
regular-season road win.
It was the second consecutive over-
time victory for the Jets (7-2), who won
23-20 in Detroit a week ago. New York
overcame three missed field goals by
Nick Folk, including a 47-yarder in OT.
On first down, Sanchez whipped a
quick pass to Holmes, who after catching
it, stepped inside of rookie safety T.J.
Ward and sprinted into the end zone.
The Browns (3-6) had rallied to force
OT on rookie quarterback Colt McCoy's
3-yard TD pass to Mohamed Massaquoi
with 44 seconds left in regulation.
Colts 23, Bengals 17
INDIANAPOLIS Peyton Manning
didn't throw a TD pass for the second
game this season, but Kelvin Hayden re-
turned an interception for a touchdown
and Javarris James ran for a TD to lead
Indianapolis.
The banged-up Colts (6-3) didn't need
Manning's arm to win this one. Instead,
they scored 17 points off five turnovers
and stopped the Bengals twice in the final
2:40.
The Bengals (2-7) have lost six straight
and dropped to 0-7 against Manning.


Cincinnati created most of itc
problems. Carson Palmer was
three times and nearly had two
for touchdowns. Cedric Bensol
fumble led to another Indy touc
Bears 27, Vikings
CHICAGO Jay Cutler three
three touchdowns, Devin HestE
big returns and Chicago move
with Green Bay for the NFC N(
It was a rough day for Brett F
the Vikings (3-6), who needed
beat the Packers next week to
into the division race.
Favre had 170 yards passing
ting a career-best 446 last wee
Arizona, when Minnesota wipe
14-point deficit and beat the Ca
overtime. This time, there were
rallies.
Favre threw three interception
the second half and two late
game that wiped out whatever
the Vikings had at a comeback
held Adrian Peterson to 51 yarc
Cutler completed 22 of 35 pa
237 yards with two interception
19-yard TD pass to Kellen Dav
27-13 in the fourth quarter.


Dolphins bring fight to Tita


Associated Press

MIAMI Miami
achieved its season-high
point total, and it only took
three quarterbacks, a flea-
flicker and the revival of
the wildcat.
Defense helped, too.
Randy Moss managed only
one catch in his first game
with the Titans, Miami
takeaways led to two touch-
downs in a 29-17 victory.
After Miami quarter-
backs Chad Pennington
(shoulder) and Chad
Henne (knee) departed
with injuries, third-
stringer Tyler Thigpen led
an 85-yard drive in the
fourth quarter to seal the
bizarre victory.
The Dolphins (5-4)
snapped a five-game home
losing streak, including
three losses this season.
Tennessee (5-4) lost coming
off a bye for the first time in
five years.
Kerry Collins started at
quarterback for the Titans
and struggled through the
first half before departing
with a calf injury Vince
Young replaced him de-
spite a sprained left ankle
and threw for only 92 yards
with two turnovers.
Cowboys 33, Giants 20
AST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
-~on Kitna passed for 327
yards and three touchdowns
and the Dallas Cowboys
looked revitalized under in-
terim coach Jason Garrett in a
33-20 victory that served as
reality check for the New York
Giants on Sunday.
Kitna had TD passes of 13
yards to rookie Dez Bryant, 71
to halfback Felix Jones and 24
to Miles Austin as Dallas (2-7)
snapped a five-game losing
streak in its first game since
Garrett replaced Wade Phillips.
Rookie cornerback Bryan
McCann scored on a team-


.'~-
I .,at~L h~


As
Tennessee Titans cornerback Alterraun Verner, right, brings down Miami Dolp
receiver Brian Hartline (82) in the second quarter Sunday in Miami.


record 101-yard interception
return in a game highlighted by
big plays and two third-quarter
power failures that delayed the
game for 11 minutes.
Eli Manning threw two
touchdown passes for the Gi-
ants (6-3), who had a five-
game winning steak snapped.
Broncos 49, Chiefs 29
DENVER Kyle Orton
threw a career-high four
touchdown passes and Know-
shon Moreno had his first 100-
yard rushing performance as
the Denver Broncos routed the
Kansas City Chiefs 49-29 on
Sunday in their highest-scor-
ing game in 47 years.
Snapping a four-game skid,
the Broncos (3-6) kept alive
their thin hopes of getting back
into the playoff race by hand-
ing the Chiefs (5-4) their sec-
ond straight loss.
The only time the Broncos
scored more was in 1963,
when they put up 50 on the


San Diego Chargers.
The Broncos stuffed the
Chiefs' vaunted ground game
by jumping out to a 35-0 lead
behind a trio of touchdown
passes from Orton, a 1-yard
run by Tim Tebow and a 75-
yard fumble return for a TD by
linebacker Jason Hunter.
Tebow also threw his first
NFL pass, a 3-yard TD toss to
fullback Spencer Larsen.
49ers 23, Rams 20, OT
SAN FRANCISCO Joe
Nedney kicked a 29-yard field
goal with 9:38 left in overtime,
and Troy Smith passed for 356
yards while leading the San
Francisco 49ers' late rally for a
23-20 victory over the St.
Louis Rams on Sunday.
Smith earned his second
straight victory as a starter for
the 49ers (3-6), throwing a go-
ahead 16-yard touchdown
pass to Michael Crabtree with
2:10 left in regulation.
After Sam Bradford and


Steven Jackson led
(4-5) back for Josh E
33-yard field goal on
snap of regulation, S
couldn't get a first do
winning the overtime
Smith swiftly mov
49ers 55 yards, con
third down for the fir
the game when St. I
hiomogho Atogwe w
for a 22-yard pass ir
ence penalty.
Seahawks 36, C
GLENDALE, Ariz.
Hasselbeck, back af
game absence, there'
yards and Mike Willia
the biggest game of
venated NFL career
the Seattle Seahawk
nant 36-18 victory ov
zona Cardinals on S
Williams, who spe
past two seasons ou
NFL after flopping inI
caught 11 passes for
yards, both career hi


MONIAY, NoviiMBmlt 15, 2010 B3

NFL BOXES

eI Dolphins 29, Titans 17
Tennessee 10 0 7 0- 17
Miami 7 310 9--29
First Quarter
Mia-Brown 2 run (Carpenter kick), 11:23.
Ten-C.Johnson 17 run (Bironas kick), 8:32.
Ten-FG Bironas 40, 5:36.
Second Quarter
Mia-FG Carpenter 23, 10:26.
Third Quarter
V. Mia-FG Carpenter 26, 8:07.
Mia-Cobbs 13 pass from Henne (Carpenter
kick), 6:59.
Ten-Washington 14 pass from Young (Bironas
kick), 1:13.
Fourth Quarter
Mia-FG Carpenter 42, 13:30.
Mia-Fasano 9 pass from Thigpen (run failed),
5:15.
p A-65,585.
Ten Mia
First downs 15 21
Total Net Yards 259 404
Rushes-yards 25-135 30-88
Passing 124 316
Punt Returns 3-61 0-0
S Kickoff Returns 4-92 2-60
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-0
Comp-Att-Int 18-38-1 24-37-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-19 1-7
Punts 5-41.8 3-48.3
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 1-0
Penalties-Yards 5-55 4-63
Time of Possession 26:56 33:04
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Tennessee, C.Johnson 17-117,
Young 2-14, Ringer 6-4. Miami, Williams 11-64,
Brown 12-11, Thigpen 2-5, Polite 2-4, Henne 2-
3, Cobbs 1-1.
PASSING-Tennessee, Young 9-18-1-92,
*, 3 Collins 9-20-0-51. Miami, Henne 19-28-1-240,
Thigpen 4-6-0-64, Pennington 1-2-0-19, Mar-
shall 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-Tennessee, Scaife 7-51, Wash-
ington 3-26, Gage 3-18, Hall 2-11, Moss 1-26,
C.Johnson 1-7, Ringer 1-4. Miami, Fasano 5-
107, Hartline 5-98, Bess 4-29, Cobbs 3-35, Mar-
shall 3-34, Williams 2-6, Polite 1-11, Hilliard 1-3.
Jets 26, Browns 20, OT
N.Y.Jets 314 0 3 6- 26
Cleveland 10 3 0 7 0-20
First Quarter
Cle-FG Dawson 34, 9:52.
NYJ-FG Folk 27, 5:52.
Cle-Hillis 12 run (Dawson kick), :16.
Second Quarter
NYJ-Cotchery 25 pass from Sanchez (Folk
kick), 11:09.
associated Press Cle-FG Dawson 23,5:13.
pass with NYJ-Sanchez 1 run (Folk kick), :23.
Fourth Quarter
Sunday in NYJ-FG Folk 25, 2:42.
Cle-Massaquoi 3 pass from McCoy (Dawson
s own kick), :44.
.s o ,,Overtime
picked off NYJ-Holmes 37 pass from Sanchez, :16.
returned A--67,449.
I's first-half NYJ Cie
n's first-half First downs 28 19
chdown. Total Net Yards 456 303
Rushes-yards 45-172 25-107
13 Passing 284 196
Sfunt Returns 2-36 1-5
ew for Kickoff Returns 4-81 4-73
er had two Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0
d into a tie Comp-Att-int 27-44-1 18-31-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 3-9
north lead. Punts 3-38.7 5-45.8
Favre and Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-2
to win and Penalties-Yards 9-70 4-52
Time of Possession 47:08 27:36
jump back INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-N.Y. Jets, Greene 20-72, Tomlinson
After get- 18-57,B.Smith5-39,Sanchez2-4.Cleveland, Hillis
19-82, Cribbs 1-14, McCoy 4-11, Clayton 1-0.
k against PASSING-N.Y. Jets, Sanchez 27-44-1-299.
d out a late Cleveland, McCoy 18-31-0-205.
rda i RECEIVING-N.Y. Jets, Tomlinson 6-53,
cardinals in Holmes 5-76, Edwards 4-59, Cotchery 3-43,
no late Keller 3-25. Greene 3-22, Richardson 2-15,
B.Smith 1-6. Cleveland, Watson 5-74, Hillis 4-
27, Stuckey 4-27, Massaquoi 2-8, Cribbs 1-37,
:ns all in Moore 1-18, Royal 1-14.
Sin the MISSED FIELD GOALS-N.Y. Jets, Folk 48
chance (WR), 24 (WR). 47 (WR).
Chicago Bills 14, Lions 12
ds rushing. Detroit 0 3 0 9 12
ass r Buffalo 0 7 7 0-14
asses for BI Second Quarter
is, but his Buf-Jackson 1 run (Lindell kick), 13:10.
is made it Det-FG Rayner25, :00.
Third Quarter
Buf-Jackson 16 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell
kick), 11:26.
Fourth Quarter
Det-FG Rayner 45, 5:53.
n, S Det-C.Johnson 20 pass from Sh.Hill (pass
failed), :14.
aLJ JA-56,721.
Det Buf
First downs 19 12
Total Net Yards 390 290
Rushes-yards 26-76 33-151
,. Passing 314 139
V'1 s Punt Returns 2-34 7-69
Kickoff Returns 2-41 3-41
.- Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-8
Comp-Att-Int 29-50-1 12-24-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-9 1-7
Punts 8-41.6 7-42.4
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1
Penalties-Yards 11-60 4-30
Time of Possession 32:24 27:36
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Detroit, Best 17-35, K.Smith 6-19,
Burleson 1-17, Felton 1-4, Sh.Hili 1-1. Buffalo,
Jackson 25-133, Spiller 2-14, Ganther4-2, Fitz-
patrick 1-1, Mclntyre 1-1.
PASSING-Detroit, Sh.Hill 29-50-1-323. Buf-
Sfalo, Fitzpatrick 12-24-0-146.
RECEIVING-Detroit, C.Johnson 10-128, Petti-
grew 4-50, Burleson 4-47, Best 4-4, K.Smith 3-
41, Scheffler 3-34, Felton 1-19. Buffalo, Jackson
6-37, StJohnson 3-37, Evans 2-52, Jones 1-20.
.... 1MISSED FIELD GOALS-Detroit, Rayner 49
(WR). Buffalo, Lindell 41 (WR).
Seahawks 36, Cards 18
Seattle 7 10 9 10 36
Arizona 7 3 0 8-18
First Quarter
Ari-Hightower 2 run (Feely kick), 12:48.
Sea-Lynch 1 run (Mare kick), 7:44.
Second Quarter
Sea-FG Mare 41,13:23.
sociated Press Ari-FG Feely 23, 8:11.
ihins wide Sea-Butler 63 pass from Hasselbeck (Mare
kick), 7:28.
Third Quarter
the Rams Sea-FG Mare 34, 7:05.
Brown'S Sea-FG Mare 19, 4:50.
the final Sea-FG Mare 23,1:15.
the final Fourth Quarter
it. Louis Sea-FG Mare 19, 12:18.
twn after Ari-Doucet 2 pass from Anderson (Fitzgerald
coin toss. pass from Anderson), 7:52.
coin tos Sea-Forset 4 run (Mare kick), 3:49.
ed the A-61,904.


averting on Sea Arl
vrigo First downs 24 19
st time in Total Net Yards 490 327
Louis' Os- Rushes-yards 31-110 14-41
vas called Passing 380 286
Punt Returns 2-51 1-11
nterfer- Kickoff Returns 1-22 7-175
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-26
Comp-Att-Int 26-40-1 23-45-1
ards 18 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-6 5-36
Punts 1-42.0 6-40.5
Matt Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1
ter a one- Penalties-Yards 6-51 10-50
W for 333 Time of Possession 35:05 24:55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
arns had RUSHING-Seattle, Forsett 9-64, Lynch 13-29,
his reju- Obomanu 2-17, Butler 1-4, Hasselbeck 1-0,
Sunday in Williams 1-0, Whitehurst 4-(minus 4). Arizona,
s' domi- Hightower 13-39, Doucet 1-2.
as'domni- PASSING-Seattle, Hasselbeck 22-34-0-333,
ver the Ari- Whitehurst 4-6-1-53. Arizona, Anderson 23-45-
unday. 1-322.
RECEIVING-Seattle, Williams 11-145, Butler
lnt the 4-66, Obomanu 4-60, Forsett 3-31, Baker 2-51,
it of the Lynch 2-33. Arizona, Fitzgerald 7-91, Doucet 6-
Detroit, 71, Breaston 4-98, Hightower 2-23, Stephens-
Howling 2-14, Spach 1-14, Patrick 1-11.
r 145 MISSED FIELD GOALS-Seattle, Mare 29
ghs. (WL).









B4 MONDAY, NOVEMuER 15, 2010



Sprint Cup
Kobalt Tools 500 Results
Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Arlz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 312 laps, 135.2 rat-
ing, 190 points, $247,098.
2. (18) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 312, 111.1,
170, $190,529.
3. (10) Joey Logano, Toyota, 312, 92.4, 165,
$165,690.
4. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, 312, 95.8, 160,
$119,550.
5. (21) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 312, 110.3,
155, $160,303.
6. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 312, 101.3,
150, $140,951.
7. (15) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 312, 94.4, 151,
$130,101.
8. (28) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 312, 85.9, 142,
$103,725.
9. (3) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 312, 105.2, 143,
$128,148.
10. (5) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 312, 78.3,
134, $114,954.
11. (22) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 312, 85.7,130,
$121,251.
12. (17) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 312,131.8,137,
$103,300.
13. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 312, 112.7, 129,
$119,881.
14. (31) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chnvrolet, 312, 76,
121, $81,975.
15. (11) MartinTruexJr., Toyota, 312,93.6,118,
$73,950.
16. (35) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 312,
81.8, 115, $108,081.
17. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 312, 95.2,
112, $107,548.
18. (2) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 312, 83.2, 109,
$109,251.
19. (40) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 312, 87.3, 106,
$105,990.
20. (26) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 311, 57.5,
108, $72,875.
21. (14) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 311, 69, 100,
$78,525.
22. (13) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 311,62.5, 97,
$96,823.
23. (8) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 311, 69.5, 94,
$78,025.
24. (24) Casey Mears, Toyota, 311, 63.5, 91,
$70,725.
25. (12) David Ragan, Ford, 310, 54.3, 88,
$78,400.
26. (6) David Reutimann, Toyota, 310, 68.4, 85,
$99,731.
27. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 310, 59, 82,
$108,590.
28. (23) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 310, 58.2, 79,
$76,950.
29. (19) Paul Menard, Ford, 310, 53.5, 76,
$76,825.
30. (25) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 310, 54.2, 73,
$107,148.
31. (33) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 309, 43.8, 70, $78,575.
32. (16) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 309, 51.7, 67,
$73,400.
33. (34) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 308, 45.2, 64,
$82,798.
34. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 308, 35.7, 61,
$83,910.
35. (27) Scott Speed, Toyota, 307, 40.7, 58,
$79,598.
36. (42) Tony Raines, Ford, 306, 31.3, 55,
$64,875.
37. (32) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 306, 37, 52,
$64,750.
38. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, brakes, 274, 35.7,
49, $76,698.
39. (36) Mike Bliss, Toyota, overheating, 193,
32.2, 46, $64,500.
40.(39) Landon Cassill, Toyota, rear gear, 191,
26.4, 43, $64,350.
41. (43) Terry Labonte, Dodge, electrical, 190,
26.5, 40, $64,190.
42. (30) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, accident, 58,
38.6, 37, $90,825.
43. (41) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, accident,
1, 25.3, 34, $64,447.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 110.758 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 49 minutes, 1 second.
Margin of Victory: 4.770 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 25 laps.
Lead Changes: 13 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: C.Edwards 1-6; Ku.Busch 7-26;
C.Edwards 27-60; B.Labonte 61-62; C.Edwards
63-65; D.Hamlin 66-102; C.Edwards 103-105;
D.Hamlin 106-170; Ky.Busch 171-172;
M.Kenseth 173; D.Hamlin 174-224; Ky.Busch
225-228; D.Hamlin 229-265; C.Edwards 266-
312.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): D.Hamlin, 4 times for 190 laps; C.Ed-
wards, 5 times for 93 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for
20 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 6 laps; B.Labonte,
1 time for 2 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. D.Hamlin, 6,462; 2. J.John-
son, 6,447; 3. K.Harvick, 6,416; 4. C.Edwards,
6,198; 5. M.Kenseth, 6,151; 6. J.Gordon, 6,124;
7. Ky.Busch, 6,115; 8. G.Biffle, 6,113; 9.T.Stew-
art, 6,074; 10. Ku.Busch, 6,033; 11. C.Bowyer,
6,028; 12. J.Burton, 5,958.
NHRA
Automobile Club of
So. Cal Finals Results
Sunday
At Auto Club Raceway at Pomona
Pomona, Calif.
Final Finish Order
Top Fuel
1, Antron Brown. 2, Shawn Langdon. 3, Larry
Dixon. 4, Morgan Lucas. 5, Tony Schumacher.
6, Brandon Bernstein. 7, Doug Kalitta. 8, Cory
McClenathan. 9, Bob Vandergriff. 10, Ron Au-
gust. 11, T.J. Zizzo. 12, David Grubnic. 13, Steve
Torrence. 14, Mike Strasburg. 15, Dora Lagana.
16, Terry McMillen.
Funny Car
1, John Force. 2, Jeff Arend. 3, BobTasca III. 4,
Melanie Troxel. 5, Bob Bode. 6, Tony Pedregon.
7, Ashley Force Hood. 8, Del Worsham. 9, Jack
Beckman. 10, Ron Capps. 11, Cruz Pedregon.
12, Jim Head. 13, Robert Hight. 14, Gary Den-
sham. 15, Matt Hagan. 16, Paul Lee.
Pro Stock
1, Shane Gray. 2, Jeg Coughlin. 3, V, Gaines. 4,
Allen Johnson. 5, Rodger Brogdon. 6, Greg
Stanfield. 7, Kurt Johnson. 8, Ronnie Humphrey.
9, Greg Anderson. 10, Dave Connolly. 11, Vin-
nie Deceglie. 12, Bob Yonke. 13, Ron Krisher.
14, Jason Line. 15, Warren Johnson. 16, Mike
Edwards.


Pro Stock Motorcycle
1, Eddie Krawiec. 2, Hector Arana. 3, LE Ton-
glet. 4, Jim Underdah'. 5, Karen Stoffer. 6,
Michael Phillips. 7, Steve Johnson. 8, Angie
Smith. 9, Andrew Hines. 10, Shawn Gann. 11,
Craig Treble. 12, Matt Smith. 13, David Hope.
14, Matt Guidera. 15, Bailey Whitaker. 16, Fred-
-die Camarena.
Final Results
Top Fuel Antron Brown, 3.840 seconds,
311.99 mph def. Shawn Langdon, 4.185 sec-
onds, 306.46 mph.
Funny Car-John Force, Ford Mustang, 4.085,
310.41 def. Jeff Arend, Toyota Solara, 4.109,
307.65.
Pro Stock Shane Gray, Pontiac GXP, 6.566,
209.20 def. Jeg Coughlin, Chevy Cobalt, 6.568,
210.18.
Pro Stock Motorcycle Eddie Krawiec, Harley-
Davidson, 6.811, 196.90 def. Hector Arana,
Buell, foul.
Top Alcohol Dragster Michael Manners,
5.347,270.64 def. Shawn Cowie, 5.333,263,00,
Top Alcohol Funny Car Mickey Ferro, Chevy
Monte Carlo, 5.522, 257.58 def. Mark
Woznichak, Chevy Camaro, 6.055, 171.05,
Competition Eliminator- Dan Fletcher, Chevy
Cobalt, 7.713,171.08 def.Vinny Barone, Chevy
Roadster, 7.727, 171.69.


SCOREBOARD


For the recoWrd


Here are the winning
numbers selected
Sunday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
3-8-5
CASH 3 (late)
9-3-5
PLAY 4 (early)
4-2-2-6
PLAY 4 (Rate)
8-6-1-2

Fantasy 5 was unavailable
because ofproduction
problems. Please see
Tuesday's Chronicle for
the winning numbers.


On the ..-..


TODAY'S SPORTS
MONDAY
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (SUN) Memphis Grizzlies at Orlando Magic
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Georgia Tech at Kennesaw State
12 a.m. (ESPN) Miami at Memphis
2 a.m. (ESPN) St. John's at St. Mary's
4 a.m. (ESPN) Central Michigan at Hawaii
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Philadelphia Eagles at Washington Redskins
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m. (VERSUS) St. Louis Blues at Colorado Avalanche
SOCCER
2 p.m. (FSNFL) English Premier League: Chelsea vs.
Sunderland


P rep .....,.o: "'n


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
7 p.m. South Sumter at Crystal River
BOYS SOCCER
7 p.m. Citrus at Land O'Lakes
GIRLS SOCCER
7 p.m. Land O'Lakes at Citrus
8 p.m. Vanguard at Crystal River


BCS STANDINGS---

Nov. 14, 2010
Harris USA Today Computer BCS
Rk Pts Pct Rk Pts Pct Rk Pct Avg Pv
1.Oregon 1 2788 .9782 1 1457 .9878 2 .960 .9753 1
2.Auburn 2 2733 .9589 2 1397 .9471 1 1.000 .9687 2
3.TCU 4 2583 .9063 4 1318 .8936 3 .890 .8966 3
4. Boise St. 3 2591 .9091 3 1329 .9010 6 .780 .8634 4
5.LSU 6 2241 .7863 6 1175 .7966 3 .890 .8243 5
6. Stanford 8 2118 .7432 8 1066 .7227 5 .800 .7553 6
7.Wisconsin 5 2268 .7958 5 1197 .8115 12 .570 .7258 7
8. Nebraska 9 1971 .6916 9 1061 .7193 8 .750 .7203 8
9.OhioSt. 7 2142 .7516 7 1107 .7505 13 .500 .6674 9
10. Oklahoma St. 12 1657 .5814 10 913 .6190 6 .780 .6601 10
11. Alabama 11 1693 .5940 12 828 .5614 9 .690 .6151 12
12. Michigan St. 10 1753 .6151 11 892 .6047 10 .600 .6066 11
13.Arkansas 13 1524 .5347 13 745 .5051 13 .500 .5133 15
14. Oklahoma 14 1326 .4653 14 683 .4631 15 .490 .4728 16
15. Missouri 16 1122 .3937 16 583 .3953 11 .580 .4563 17
16.VirginiaTech 15 1244 .4365 15 673 .4563 20 .210 .3676 20
17. South Carolina 17 969 .3400 17 521 .3532 19 .280 .3244 23
18. Nevada 18 851 .2986 18 422 .2861 17 .320 .3016 21
19. Texas A&M 20 636 .2232 19 359 .2434 16 .370 .2788 25
20. Iowa 19 698 .2449 20 298 .2020 20 .210 .2190 13
21. Mississippi St. 22 331 .1161 22 184 .1247 18 .290 .1770 19
22.Arizona 23 321 .1126 23 164 .1112 22 .200 .1413 18
23. Utah 21 364 .1277 24 140 .0949 23 .110 .1109 14
24. Miami, Fla. 24 311 .1091 21 216 .1464 28 .010 .0885 NR
25. Florida St. 25 187 .0656 26 87 .0590 29 .000 .0415 NR
AH RB CM KM JS PW
1. Oregon 2 2 4 2 2 2
2. Auburn 1 3 1 1 1 1
3.TCU 4 1 3 5 6 3
4. Boise St. 5 4 6 7 12 8
5. LSU 3 5 2 4 4 4
6. Stanford 9 10 7 3 3 5
7. Wisconsin 14 9 14 11 11 11
8. Nebraska 8 7 9 8 5 6
9. Ohio St. 13 11 12 16 17 13
10. Oklahoma St. 6 8 5 6 7 7
11. Alabama 7 6 11 10 8 10
12. Michigan St. 10 12 8 13 13 9
13. Arkansas 15 17 15 12 9 12
14. Oklahoma 11 14 13 14 14 15
15. Missouri 12 15 10 9 10 14
16. Virginia Tech 22 16 18 25 23 20
17. South Carolina 16 21 19 19 19 19
18. Nevada 18 23 16 18 20 16
19. Texas A&M 17 0 17 15 15 18
20. Iowa 21 20 20 21 21 21
21. Mississippi St. 19 19 23 20 16 17
22.Arizona 23 22 21 17 18 23
23. Utah 24 13 22 0 25 22
24. Miami, Fla. 0 0 25 0 0 25
25. Florida St. 0 0 24 0 0 0
Explanation Key
The BCS Average is calculated by averaging the percent totals of the Harris Interactive, USA Today
Coaches and Computer polls. Team percentages are derived by dividing a team's actual voting
points by a maximum 2850 possible points in the Harris Interactive Poll and 1475 possible points
in the USA Today Coaches Poll.
Six computer rankings are used to determine the overall computer component. The highest and
lowest ranking for each team is dropped, and the remaining four are added and divided to produce
a Computer Rankings Percentage. The six computer ranking providers are Anderson & Hester,
Richard Billingsley, Colley Matrix, Kenneth Massey, Jeff Sagarin, and Peter Wolle. Each computer
ranking accounts; for schedule strength in Its formula.


The AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press
college football poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Nov. 13, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote, and


previous ranking:

1. Oregon (38)
2. Auburn (12)
3. Boise St. (9)
4.TCU (1)
5. LSU
6. Wisconsin
7. Stanford
8. Ohio St.
9. Nebraska
10. Alabama
11. Michigan St.
12. Oklahoma St.
13. Arkansas
14. Virginia Tech
15. Missouri
16. Oklahoma
17. South Carolina
18. Texas A&M
19. Nevada
20. Southern Cal
21. Iowa
22. Mississippi St.
23. Arizona
24. Miami
25. Utah


Record
10-0
11-0
9-0
11-0
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
8-2
9-1
9-1
8-2
8-2
8-2
8-2
7-3
7-3
9-1
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
8-2


Others receiving votes: Northwestern 99,
Florida St. 69, N.C. State 38, N. Illinois 37, San
Diego St. 32, Temple 9, Michigan 4, Syracuse 2,
Tulsa 2, Delaware 1, Maryland 1.


USA Today Top 25 Poll
The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll,
with first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Nov. 13, total points based on 25 points
for first place through one point for 25th, and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Oregon (46) 10-0 1,457 1
2. Auburn (6) 11-0 1,397 2
3. Boise State (5) 9-0 1,329 4
4. TCU (2) 11-0 1,318 3
5.Wisconsin 9-1 1,197 5
6.LSU 9-1 1,175 6
7. Ohio State 9-1 1,107 7
8. Stanford 9-1 1,066 9
9. Nebraska 9-1 1,061 8
10. Oklahoma State 9-1 913 11
11. Michigan State 9-1 892 10
12. Alabama 8-2 828 12
13. Arkansas 8-2 745 14
14. Oklahoma 8-2 683 16
15. Virginia Tech 8-2 673 17
16. Missouri 8-2 583 20
17. South Carolina 7-3 521 22
18. Nevada 9-1 422 21
19 Texas A&M 7-3 359 25
20. Iowa 7-3 298 13
21.Miami (Fla.) 7-3 216 NR
22. Mississippi State 7-3 184 18
23. Arizona 7-3 164 19
24. Utah 8-2 140 15
25. Northwestern 7-3 93 NR
Others receiving votes: Florida Slate 87;
Michigan 72; North Carolina State 55; Northern
Illinois 30; Temple 23; San Diego State 20; Mary-
land 18; Syracuse 13; Hawaii 10; Navy 6; Central
Florida 5; Kansas State 5; Southern Mississippi
4; Baylor 3; Air Force 2; Penn State 1.
Harris Top 25
The Top 25 teams in the Harris Interactive
College Football Poll, with first-place votes in


Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 15 11 3 1 23 51 37
St. Louis 15 9 3 3 21 38 34
Columbus 15 9 6 0 18 41 38
Chicago 19 8 9 2 18 54 57
Nashville 15 7 5 3 17 38 43
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 16 10 4 2 22 51 39
Minnesota 16 8 6 2 18 38 38
Colorado 16 8 7 1 17 53 50
Calgary 16 7 9 0 14 46 49
Edmonton 16 4 9 3 11 42 66
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 15 12 3 0 24 47 28
Anaheim 18 10 7 1 21 48 54
Phoenix 17 7 5 5 19 47 53
San Jose 15 8 5 2 18 42 37
Dallas 15 8 7 0 16 46 44
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Nashville 4, Chicago 3, SO
Ottawa 2, Boston 0
Buffalo 3, Washington 2, OT
Vancouver 5, Toronto 3
Montreal 7, Carolina 2
Philadelphia 5, Florida 2
Pittsburgh 4, Atlanta 2
Detroit 3, Colorado 1
Phoenix 5, St. Louis 3
San Jose 4, Calgary 3
Los Angeles 5, N.Y. Islanders 1
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 8, Edmonton 2
Washington 6, Atlanta 4
Minnesota 4, Tampa Bay 1
Anaheim at Chicago, late
Today's Games
New Jersey at Boston, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


drop.
It played out perfectly for
everyone but Iamlin,
whose rally still lef? him
12th. Johnson wound up
fifth, Harvick was sixth and
Hamlin's lead going into
Homestead-Miami Speed-
way is a mere 15 points over
Johnson. Harvick is a man-
ageable 46 points out
"Everybody made it on
fuel, is that what you are
telling me?" Hamlin asked
as he crossed the finish line.
"I know. That was ugly,"
Ford replied. "That's some-
thing we've definitely got to
work on."
"What do we got to work
on? I don't understand," the


Flot~ida


parentheses, records through Nov. 13, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place voto
through one point fora 25th-place vote and pre-
vious ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Oregon (65) 10-0 2,788 1
2. Auburn (35) 11-0 2,733 2
3. Boise State (11) 9-0 2,591 4
4. TCU (3) 11-0 2,583 3
5. Wisconsin 9-1 2,268 5
6. LSU 9-1 2,241 6
7. Ohio State 9-1 2,142 7
8. Stanford 9-1 2,118 8
9. Nebraska 9-1 1,971 9
10. Michigan State 9-1 1,753 10
11. Alabama 8-2 1,693 11
12. Oklahoma State 9-1 1,657 13
13. Arkansas 8-2 1,524 14
14. Oklahoma 8-2 1,326 16
15. Virginia Tech 8-2 1,244 17
16. Missouri 8-2 1,122 20
17. South Carolina 7-3 969 22
18. Nevada 9-1 851 21
19. Iowa 7-3 698 12
20. Texas A&M 7-3 636 24
21. Utah 8-2 364 15
22. Mississippi State 7-3 331 18
23. Arizona 7-3 321 19
24. Miami (FL) 7-3 311 NR
25. Florida State 7-3 187 NR
Other teams receiving votes: Northwestern
165; North Carolina State 98; Michigan 80;
Northern Illinois 48; Temple 34; San Diego State
29; Maryland 27; Navy 25; Syracuse 23; West
Virginia 22; Florida 14; Central Florida 12;
Hawaii 11; Air Force 9; Kansas State 9; South-
ern Miss 8; Fresno State 4; Tulsa 4; Baylor 2;
Penn State 2; Connecticut 1; South Florida 1.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 8 2 .800 -
New Jersey 3 6 .333 4V2
New York 3 6 .333 4Y2
Philadelphia 2 8 .200 6
Toronto 2 8 .200 6
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 6 3 .667 -
Atlanta 7 4 .636 -
Miami 6 4 .600 Y2
Charlotte 3 7 .300 3Y2
Washington 2 6 .250 3Y2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 5 3 .625 -
Milwaukee 5 5 .500 1
Indiana 4 4 .500 1
Cleveland 4 5 .444 1VY
Detroit 4 6 .400 2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
New Orleans 8 0 1.000 -
San Antonio 7 1 .875 1
Dallas 6 2 .750 2
Memphis 4 6 .400 5
Houston 2 6 .250 6
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Utah 7 3 .700 -
Oklahoma City 5 3 .625 1
Denver 5 4 .556 11
Portland 6 5 .545 1
Minnesota 3 8 .273 41
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 8 1 .889 -
Golden State 6 4 .600 21
Phoenix 4 4 .500 3Y2
Sacramento 3 6 .333 5
L.A. Clippers 1 9 .100 71/2
Saturday's Games
Utah 96, Charlotte 95
Orlando 91, New Jersey 90
Indiana 99, Cleveland 85
Miami 109, Toronto 100
Chicago 103, Washington 96
Boston 116, Memphis 110, OT
New Orleans 107, Portland 87
Milwaukee 79, Golden State 72
San Antonio 116, Philadelphia 93
Sunday's Games
Atlanta 111, Minnesota 105
Detroit 100, Sacramento 94
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, late
Houston at New York, late
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Minnesota at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
New Jersey at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Philadelphia 17 11 4 2 24 58 37
N.Y. Rangers 17 9 7 1 19 52 47
Pittsburgh 18 9 8 1 19 56 49
New Jersey 17 510 2 12 33 56
N.Y. Islanders 17 410 3 11 37 58
Northeast Division


Boston 14 8 5 1 17 41 29
Buffalo 18 6 9 3 15 47 57
Toronto 16 5 8 3 13 35 47
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington 18 13 4 1 27 66 47
Tampa Bay 17 8 7 2 18 48 54
Atlanta 18 7 8 3 17 57 67
Carolina 17 8 9 0 16 51 60
Florida 15 7 8 0 14 44 39
WESTERN CONFERENCE


BUCS
Continued from Page B1

covered entirely on the
ground. He broke runs of 12,
24 and 17 yards before fin-
ishing the drive with an-
other 17-yarder that put the
Bucs up 14-3 early in the
second quarter.
"We came out fast, exe-
cuted our game plan and
did everything we planned,"
Blount said. "The defense
came out and played well
also."
Although Goodson had
some success running the
ball for Carolina, Clausen
rarely looked to throw
downfield and put pressure
on the Bucs with the passing
game.
The rookie's longest com-
pletion was 18 yards until
Clausen completed a 24-
yarder up the sideline to



BCS
Continued from Page B1

in the top two spots in the
standings released Sunday
TCU remained third, but
had a bad week in BCS
terms.
The Horned Frogs and
Broncos are vying for two
prizes. The team in third
place in the BCS standings is
likely to be next in line for
the national championship
game if Auburn or Oregon
slip up down the stretch.
Auburn plays Alabama the
day after Thanksgiving and
South Carolina in the South-
eastern Conference title
game.
Oregon has off this week-
end, followed by a home
game against Arizona and a
road game against Oregon
State.
Even if a title game spot
doesn't up, TCU and Boise
State are still competing for
an automatic BCS bid, one
that would likely send the
highest ranked team to the
Rose Bowl while the other
could get left out of the BCS
all together
The Horned Frogs played
their closest game of the sea-
son Saturday, a 40-35 victory
against San Diego State in
which they allowed the
Aztecs back in the game with
two long fourth-quarter
touchdown passes.
TCU also was hurt by
Utah's 28-3 loss at Notre
Dame. The Horned Frogs
beat the previously un-
beaten Utes 47-7 in their
prior game. It looked like a
big win at the time and
helped TCU widen its lead
on Boise State in the BCS



NASCAR
Continued from Page B1

for a loose lug nut on a late
stop, nothing seemed to be
in the way of Hamlin's first
career NASCAR title.
Then cautions didn't fall
as they should have, Ed-
wards chased him down and
Hamlin had to burn a ton of
fuel trying to preserve the
win. His Joe Gibbs Racing
crew knew he was going to
be at least a dozen laps
short of making it to the fin-
ish on his last tank of gas,
and crew chief Mike Ford
called in the No. 11 Toyota
for gas with 14 laps remain-
ing.
Hamlin was in second
place when he headed to pit
road, with a nearly 60-point
lead over Johnson. The pit
stop dropped him to 19th,
and he had to drive like a
madman through the field
trying to salvage the day.
His crew watched and
waited for Johnson to make
his fuel stop Harvick's
penalty had given him the
opportunity to make an
extra stop for gas but
Johnson never ducked onto
pit road. Crew chief Chad
Knaus coaxed his driver
around the track, urging
him to conserve every final


crew members packed up
their equipment in silence,
Knaus reveled in the final
results just a few feet away.
Johnson, meanwhile,
lounged on a patio outside
the press room. He didn't
join Hamlin on the podium,
as is routine, because he
wasn't interested in what
Hamlin had to say
Hamlin's face said it all,
though.
"He didn't go out of his
way to say 'Hi' on his way
out, so I can imagine he was-
n't in a good mood," Johnson
joked.
No, he wasn't, and it was a
Car cry from the celebration
Johnson and Harvick were
in after the gut-wrenching
turn of events.


CITIRu COUNTY (IL) (CI RONIC.I

Steve Smith to set up the
first of two field goals Kasay
kicked in the third quarter
to trim Tampa Bay's lead to
21-16.
Freeman reduced the sus-
pense, leading a fourth-
quarter field goal drive that
Connor Barth finished with
a 32-yarder that made it 24-
16 with 10 minutes remain-
ing.
Clausen was 16 of 29 pass-
ing for 191 yards and no in-
terceptions. He was sacked
twice.
"I thought guys made im-
provements. The results
weren't quite what we were
looking for," said Fox, noting
that the Panthers are also
coping with injuries.
"When you're in a close
game like that, field goals
are not going win a game for
you," Clausen added.
"When you get down to the
red zone, you need to put
seven points on the board."

standings.
A week later, beating the
Utes doesn't look so impres-
sive and Boise State has
crept closer. The Broncos
beat Idaho 52-14 on Friday
night
"It was as bad a day as you
can have and not lose your
game," BCS analyst Jerry
Palm said about TCU's Sat-
urday
With three more games to
play, compared with one for
TCU, the Broncos might
have enough left to edge past
the Frogs.
Boise State jumped TCU
and moved into third in both
the Harris and coaches'
polls, though in both cases
the Broncos and Frogs are
separated by less than a
dozen points. TCU still holds
a decided edge in the com-
puter ratings at third com-
pared to Boise State's sixth.
That leaves Boise State
with a BCS average of .8634
and TCU with an average of
.8966.
'"A lot can happen in three
weeks, (the Broncos) have a
very slight lead in the polls,
but they still have a lot of
ground to make up and the
strength of the conference
schedule has yet to come,"
Palm said.
Boise State plays Fresno
State (6-3), Nevada (9-1), 18th
in the BCS standings, and
Utah State (4-6) over the next
three weeks.
TCU has a week off before
closing its season against
New Mexico (1-9).
'TCU is done making their
case. They're out of the na-
tional spotlight," Palm said.
"Boise has the floor to them-
selves to do what they can.
That's an advantageous posi-
tion to be."

frustrated driver replied.
"Fuel mileage," Ford re-
sponded. "That was awful."
It couldn't have gone any
worse for Hamlin, who com-
pletely outperformed the
competition but had little to
show for it at the end.
"I hate that it boils down
to the final race," Hamlin
said.
Not Johnson.
"We have one heck of a
points race going to Miami
and I'm pumped," Johnson
said. "I am so happy to put
pressure on the No. 11 team.
We're ready to race for this
thing. I hope the pressure of
us being on his heels really
works on his mind through-
out the course of the week
One race, winner take all,
and it's going to be a hell of
a show."
A week after Knaus
benched his pit crew in the
middle of Hamlin's win at
Texas, the champions were
riding high after stealing
one in Phoenix. They were
clearly off their game -
Johnson had won the last
three Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship races at
Phoenix and never con-
tended Sunday
But as Ford huddled with
car owner Joe Gibbs, and








CITRUS ()t 'N'i (FL) C(ItRWNICL;


Children's Miracle Network Classic
Sunday
At Walt Disney Resort, Lake Buena Vista
Purse: $4.7 million
m-Magnolia Course: 7,516 yards, par-72,
p-Palm Course: 7,010 yards, par-72
Final
Robert Garrigus, $846,000 68p-65m-70m-64m 267 -21
Roland Thatcher, $507,600 65p-63m-70m-72m 270 -18
Rickie Fowler, $244,400 66p-70m-69m-66m 271 -17
Johnson Wagner, $244,400 70m-65p-69m-67m -271 -17
Spencer Levin, $244,400 68p-68m-67m-68m 271 -17
Mark Wilson, $169,200 69p-66m-69m-68m 272 -16
Michael Connell, $151,575 71m-68p-67m-67m 273 -15
Chris Stroud, $151,575 62p-70m-70m-71m 273 -15
Charles Warren, $126,900 67p-70m-69m-68m 274 -14
Charles Howell III, $126,900 68m-69p-69m-68m 274 -14
Steve Marino, $126,900 72m-68p-65m-69m 274 -14
Vijay Singh, $92,120 69p-71 m-68m-67m 275 -13
Jerry Kelly, $92,120 66p-69m-70m-70m 275 -13
John Senden, $92,120 69m-69p-67m-70rn 275 -13
Rory Sabbatini, $92,120 67p-71m-66m-71m -275 -13
Brian Gay, $92,120 67p-65m-71 m-72m 275 -13
Paul Stankowski, $72,850 72m-67p-71m-66m 276 -12
Brett Wetterich, $72,850 68m-67p-68m-73m 276 -12
Ryan Palmer, $58,985 72m-68p-70m-67m 277 -11
Stewart Cink, $58,985 71 m-68p-69m-69m 277 -11
Davis Love Ill, $58,985 71p-70m-70m-66m 277 -11
Tom Lehman, $58,985 67m-70p-69m-71 m 277 -11
Briny Baird, $43,240 70m-67p-72m-69m 278 -10
Justin Bolli, $43,240 68m-73p-68m-69m 278 -10
John Merrick, $43,240 71 m-66p-70m-71 m 278 -10
Cliff Kresge, $43,240 70m-66p-68m-74m 278 -10
Tim Petrovic, $34,780 71 m-67p-71 m-70m 279 -9
Jeff Quinney, $34,780 67p-68m-71 m-73m 279 -9
Cameron Percy, $34,780 66p-71 m-69m-73m 279 -9
Michael Letzig, $26,179 69p-70m-71m-70m- 280 -8
Chris Tidland, $26,179 67m-70p-72m-71 m 280 -8
John Mallinger, $26,179 70m-68p-72m-70m 280 -8
Sean O'Hair, $26,179 70p-70m-70m-70m 280 -8
Brendon de Jonge, $26,179 72m-65p-71m-72m 280 -8
Brenden Pappas, $26,179 66p-71m-70m-73m 280 -8
Ted Purdy, $26,179 68p-71 m-72m-69m 280 -8
Pat Perez, $26,179 69m-69p-69m-73m 280 -8
Tom Pernice, Jr., $26,179 68p-70m-68m-74m 280 -8
Troy Merritt, $26,179 69p-71m-73m-67m 280 -8
John Huston, $18,330 69p-71 m-69m-72m 281 -7
Joe Durant, $18,330 72p-69m-67m-73m 281 -7
Brett Quigley, $18,330 69m-66p-71 m-75m 281 -7
Matt Every, $18,330 68p-73m-70m-70m 281 -7
Webb Simpson, $18,330 71 m-69p-72m-69m -281 -7
Jason Bohn, $12,732 68m-70p-71 m-73m 282 -6
Derek Lamely, $12,732 70m-70p-70m-72m 282 -6
J.B. Holmes, $12,732 68m-69p-73m-72m 282 -6
D.J.Trahan, $12,732 68p-68m-72m-74m 282 -6
Fred Funk, $12,732 68p-72m-70m-72m 282 -6
Troy Matteson, $12,732 70p-69m-72m-71m 282 -6
David Lutterus, $12,732 68p-70m-73m-71 m -282 -6
Heath Slocum, $12,732 71 m-68p-73m-70m 282 -6
Tim Herron, $12,732 66p-75m-72m-69m 282 -6
Tom Gillis, $10,669 71 m-66p-72m-74m 283 -5
Ben Curtis, $10,669 69m-70p-70m-74m 283 -5
Lee Janzen, $10,669 69m-69p-70m-75m283 -5
Joe Ogilvie, $10,669 71 m-69p-71 m-72m 283 -5
Mathew Goggin, $10,669 70p-68m-73m-72m 283 -5
Steve Flesch, $10,669 72p-69m-73m-69m 283 -5
Greg Owen, $10,340 69p-68m-75m-72m 284 -4
Charlie Wi, $10,105 72m-68p-70m-75m 285 -3
Jeff Maggert, $10,105 71p-69m-72m-73m-285 -3
Blake Adams, $10,105 73m-68p-71 m-73m- 285 -3
Roger Tambellini, $10,105 69m-72p-72m-72m 285 -3
Matt Bettencourt, $9,635 71 m-68p-71 m-76m 286 -2
Aron Price, $9,635 69p-71 m-72m-74m 286 -2
Mike Small, $9,635 70p-71m-71m-74m 286 -2
Scott Piercy, $9,635 70p-70m-73m-73m 286 -2
Martin Flores, $9,635 73p-66m-76m-71 m -286 -2
Aaron Baddeley, $9,635 70m-71 p-74m-71 m 286 -2
Jay Williamson, $9,306 69m-72p-73m-73m 287 -1
Jesper Parnevik, $9,165 74m-66p-73m-75m 288 E
Chris DiMarco, $9,165 68p-73m-75m-72m 288 E
Nicholas Thompson, $9,024 71p-69m-74m-81m -295 +7
Australian Masters
Sunday
At Victoria Golf Club, Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,886, Par: 71
Final
Stuart Appleby, Australia 71-69-69-65 274
Adam Bland, Australia 65-67-70-73 275
Daniel Gaunt, Australia 65-72-68-71 276
Tiger Woods, United States 69-72-71-65 277
Jarrod Lyle, Australia 69-70-69-70 278
Andre Stolz, Australia 67-67-72-72 278
David McKenzie, Australia 71-72-68-69 280
Robert Allenby, Australia 73-72-68-68 281
Won Joon Lee, Australia 69-71-71-70 281
Camilo Villegas, Colombia 71-70-70-70 281
Geoff Ogilvy, Australia 72-70-69-70 281
Ryan Haller, Australia 71-72-66-72 281
Michael Hendry, New Zealand 68-73-73-68 282
Terry Pilkadaris, Australia 73-70-71-68 282
Paul Sheehan, Australia 71-72-69-70 282
Jim Herman, United States 69-73-74-67 283
Peter Senior, Australia 70-73-72-68 283
David Bransdon, Australia 69-71-74-69 283
Gareth Paddison, New Zealand 67-72-74-70 283
Brad Kennedy, Australia 68-75-70-70 283
Steven Jones, Australia 71-72-68-72 283
Brett Rumford, Australia 72-72-74-66 284
Michael Sim, Australia 73-71-73-67 284
Ashley Hall, Australia 71-69-75-69 284
Kurt Barnes, Australia 67-76-69-72 284
Anthony Brown, Australia 70-69-72-73 284
Kieran Pratt, Australia 69-72-70-73 284
Wade Ormsby, Australia 72-72-72-69 285
Sergio Garcia, Spain 73-65-77-70 285
Michael Campbell, New Zealand 70-73-72-70 285
Steven Bowditch, Australia 73-72-70-70 285
Ben Wharton, Australia 73-71-74-68 286
Nathan Green, Australia 68-71-76-71 286
Matthew Millar, Australia 67-72-75-72 286
Mitchell Brown, Australia 68-77-74-68 287
Anthony Summers, Australia 70-73-74-70 287
Steve Collins, Australia 67-75-74-71 287
Doug Holloway, New Zealand 71-73-71-72 287
Peter O'Malley, Australia 69-70-74-74 287
Luke Bleumink, Australia 67-74-75-72 288
Daniel Fox, Australia 68-75-73-72 288
Luke Hickmott, Australia 69-75-72-72 288
Adam Crawford, Australia 71-72-74-72 289
Josh Younger, Australia 74-70-73-72 289
Paul Gow, Australia 73-72-75-71 -291
Greg Chalmers, Australia 68-74-76-73 -291
Michael Choi, Australia 70-70-77-74 -291
Scott Arnold, Australia 69-75-77-71 292
Ewan Porter, Australia 69-76-76-71 -292
Alistair Presnell, Australia 65-80-75-72 -292
Kim Felton, Australia 72-73-75-72 292
Craig Hasthorpe, Australia 67-76-75-74 292
Henry Epstein, Australia 73-72-76-72 -293
Martin Doyle, Australia 71-71-76-75 -293
Craig Scott, Australia 70-73-74-76 293
Mahal Pearce, New Zealand 70-75-77-72 -294
Aaron Townsend, Australia 73-68-71-82 -294
Josh Geary, New Zealand 69-73-76-77 -295
Josh Carmichael, New Zealand 69-73-75-78 295
Scott Laycock, Australia 70-75-76-75 -296
Nathan Uebergang, Australia 71-74-80-73 -298
Leigh McKechnie, Australia 71-74-75-79 299
Lorena Ochoa Invitational
Sunday
At Guadalajara Country Club Course, Guadalajara, Mexico
Purse:, $1.1 million
Yardage: 6,638, Par: 72
Final
In-Kyung Kim, $220,000 69-68-68-64 -269 -19
Suzann Pettersen, $113,794 70-65-69-68-272 -16
Karine Icher, $82,550 70-67-68-68-273 -15
Cristie Kerr, $57,629 64-76-68-66-274 -14
Paula Creamer, $57,629 68-66-72-68-274 -14
Ai Miyazato, $42,054 68-69-68-70- 275 -13
Angela Stanford, $31,255 73-70-70-63-276 -12
NaYeonChoi,$31,255 68-70-71-67-276 -12


Stacy Lewis, $31,255 67-69-69-71 -276 -12
Hee Young Park, $23,467 69-71-70-67-277 -11
Karrie Webb, $23,467 70-69-68-70-277 -11
Azahara Munoz, $23,467 70-67-70-70- 277 -11
Song-Hee Kim, $19,812 72-67-71-68 -278 -10
Meena Lee, $19,812 72-65-70-71 278 -10
Juli Inkster, $17,569 70-70-71-69 280 -8
Amy Yang, $17,569 71-68-68-73 280 -8
Vicky Hurst, $16,199 70-71-72-68 -281 -7
Brittany Lang, $15,140 73-68-70-71 -282 -6
Candle Kung, $15,140 71-70-68-73-282 -6
Mika Miyazato, $14,329 72-70-70-71 283 -5
Gwladys Nocera, $13,831 70-73-68-73 284 -4
Morgan Pressel, $12,834 73-69-73-70 285 -3
Beatriz Recari, $12,834 71-71-72-71 -285 -3
Katherine Hull, $12,834 68-69-75-73 285 -3
Lorena Ochoa, $11,682 74-71-69-74-288 E
Catriona Matthew, $11,682 70-71-70-77-288 E
Yani Tseng, $11,027 76-70-72-71 289 +1
Anna Nordqvist, $9,984 76-72-73-70 291 +3
M.J. Hur, $9,984 75-76-69-71 -291 +3
Sophia Sheridan, $9,984 74-72-73-72-291 +3
Pat Hurst, $9,984 72-74-71-74 -291 +3
Kristy McPherson, $9,034 74-73-72-75 -294 +6
Christina Kim, $8,660 75-72-72-76- 295 +7
Brittany Lincicome, $8,286 79-77-71-72-299 +11
Carling Coffing, $7,975 78-75-78-72 303 +15


Final round charge

...tU. n w i


Garrigus wins at

Disney to keep

PGA Tour card

Associated Press

LAKE BUENA VISTA -
Robert Garrigus was on the
final hole with a three-stroke
lead. The gallery was lined up
along the ropes. The cameras
were focusing on his every
move. The pressure was on.
Again.
This time he came through.
Garrigus shot an 8-under 64
to win the Children's Miracle
Network Classic on Sunday, al-
lowing him to keep his PGA
Tour card and atoning for his
colossal collapse earlier this
year at Memphis. He finished
at 21 under, three shots clear
of Roland Thatcher for his first
tour victory
"It feels great to be able to
close this one off and figura-
tively shut everybody up about
Memphis," Garrigus said.
The victory was certainly
sweet redemption.
He made triple bogey with a
three-shot lead on the 72nd
hole at Memphis, allowing Lee
Westwood to win his only title
this year a playoff victory
that helped the Englishman
earn the No. 1 ranking.
That loss was the only reason
Garrigus was even at Disney
He began the tournament
122nd in earnings and needed
a solid finish to stay inside the
top 125 the cutoff for full
PGA Tour status. Dozens more
were in the same situation.
Garrigus began the final
round five strokes behind
Thatcher who led everyone
by at least four and put pres-
sure on a player who needed
an even stronger finish.


Associated Press
Robert Garrigus, left, kisses the championship trophy next to Mickey Mouse after winning the
Children's Miracle Network Classic on Sunday in Lake Buena Vista. Garrigus won by three strokes
at 21 under par and will get to keep his PGA Tour card now.


Thatcher had to at least finish
solo second or he was heading
to qualifying school next week.
Thatcher imploded with
three bogeys on the back nine,
including on 16 and 17, when
he badly misread putts. He got
another chance to save his full
status when Spencer Levin bo-
geyed the final hole, leaving
his chip shot short and missing
an 11-foot putt.
Then came Thatcher's last
opportunity.
"I couldn't imagine having a
more stressful moment in my
life," Thatcher said.
He examined the green for
a few minutes to analyze a
pressure-packed par putt from
5 feet to keep his card. He
looked over the putt, stepped
back, then moved over it
again. He struck the ball
crisply and watched it roll in,
barely pumping his fist and
letting out a huge sigh in


relief.
"You'll never see a happier
guy who just vomited away a
tournament," he said.
Several others also faced
pressure to keep their tour
cards.
But after all the jostling for
the final spots, Thatcher
joined Mark Wilson (123) and
Michael Connell (115) as the
only players this week to jump
inside the top 125 after start-
ing the week outside of it. Wil-
son was already exempt for
next year with his win at
Mayakoba in 2009. They
bumped Troy Matteson, Woody
Austin and Michael Allen.
Troy Merritt won the $1 mil-
lion Kodak Challenge in a
playoff with Rickie Fowler and
Aaron Baddeley The contest
designates a hole at 30 tourna-
ments and keeps score
throughout the year
"Emotions are all over the


Appleby steals show


Gofer wins

Down Unde;

Singapore delayed

Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia -
Stuart Appleby received
hardly any fanfare at the Aus-
tralian Masters until he
slipped on the gold jacket that
a year ago belonged to Tiger
Woods.
He wasn't among the five
faces on promotional posters
around Melbourne, nor was he
invited to the gala dinner And
even though none of the others
had more wins this year and
none had ever shot a 59 to win
a PGA Tour event that was
fine with him.
"I noticed it, but it was not
even close to annoying me,"
Appleby said Sunday after
closing with a 6-under 65 for a
one-shot victory "I have an
ego, no doubt about it. But it
wasn't like, 'Oh, they haven't
got me up there?' It's the Tiger
Woods show, and the others.
You know what? It didn't play
out that way"
The only entertainment
value from Woods came in his
final hour, when he made two
eagles over the final four holes
and shot 65 to match his best
score of the year. He still
ended a full year without win-
ning, as he finished in fourth
place as the defending cham-
pion.
"I didn't play good enough,"
Woods said. "I didn't make
enough putts. That's what hap-
pens."
Appleby was as golden as the
winner's jacket he wore.
He rallied from a seven-shot
deficit in the final round,
stayed in the game by making
a 30-foot par putt on the 16th,
pulled ahead with a 25-foot
birdie on the 17th and two-
putted for birdie on the final
hole.
Adam Bland, who had a
three-shot lead going into the
final round, was the last one
with a chance to catch him.
Bland hit 6-iron to 10 feet on
the par-5 18th, but missed the
eagle putt that would have
forced a playoff.
Appleby already had reason
to celebrate this year, winning
The Greenbrier Classic with a
59 on the last day. This might
have been even sweeter. It has
been nine years since he won
on home soil, dating to the 2001
Australian Open.
It wasn't from a lack of effort,


Associated Press
Australia's Stuart Appleby reacts after missing a putt during the
final round of the Australian Masters on Sunday at Victoria Golf
Club in Melbourne, Australia. Appleby made two long putts in the
last three holes for a 6-under 65 to win the tournament, his first
victory on home soil in nine years.


or attention.
"We play around the world
for big money and big tourna-
ments and big fancy ratings
and everything like that," he
said. "But you come home to
Australia, and it's real. That's
probably hurt me too many
times, really wanting to win."
Not many would have given
him much of a chance going
into the final round seven
shots behind. With four birdies
on the front nine, he got back
into the game, then holed the
two long putts to finally win the
third leg of the Australian
Slam. He previously won the
Australian PGA and the Aus-
tralian Open.
Appleby finished at 10-
under 274 and won for the 12th
time worldwide.
About his only mistake was
nearly missing the trophy pres-
entation. Coming out of the
bathroom, lie saw what looked
to be the closing ceremony on a
big video screen, then heard
his name announced as the
winner and sprinted under the
grandstands and onto the 18th
green. Another big gallery --
the Sunday attendance ap-
proached 18,000 stuck


around to watch him.
Appleby thanked them, real-
izing that they weren't all there
to watch him.
Scott has 3-shot lead in
suspended Singapore Open
SINGAPORE -Adam Scott
has a three-stroke lead after eight
holes of the suspended final round
of the Singapore Open.
The tournament was delayed
52 hours by thunderstorms on
Sunday and will be completed
today.
Scott is a two-time champion at
Sentosa Golf Club. He was 3
under in his final round and 17
under on the tournament after
leading by one stroke following
Saturday's third round.
Defending champion lan Poulter
of England was in second place,
also after eight holes, with South
Korea Kang Kyung-nam a further
stroke back after eight.
Masters champion Phil Mickel-
son had completed 13 holes and
was 4 under on the tournament
and 2 under in his final round.
Thunderstorms also delayed
play for four hours during Thurs-
day's first round.


place," Merritt said.
Garrigus can relate.
In Memphis this year, he
knocked his tee shot into the
woods, then hit one off a tree
- when he probably should
have just chipped out and
eventually had a triple bogey
Then he bogeyed the first play-
off hole.
It was a similar scenario this
time around.
Garrigus' final tee shot
found a patch of rough far left.
Fortunately, the ball kicked
back right, rolled onto. the
fringe and he eventually had
an easier approach to save par.
Earlier on the ninth hole, his
tee shot also landed in a tree
before trickling out for a clear
shot to the green.
"I got lucky, and it hit a tree
and came back in," Garrigus
said. "And you got to have that
to win. I really haven't had that
yet."



Kim



cruises



to Ochoa



victory

Associated Press

GUADALAJARA, Mexico
South Korea's In-Kyung
Kim won the Lorena Ochoa
Invitational on Sunday for
her third LPGA Tour title,
closing with an 8-under 64
for a three-stroke stroke vic-
tory over Suzann Pettersen.
Kim matched the tourna-
ment record set by Cristie
Kerr in the first round with
her 64, playing the front
nine in 6-under 30 and
adding three birdies and a
bogey on the final nine. Kim
finished at 19 under on the
Guadalajara Country Club
course and earned $220,000.
Pettersen shot a 68. The
Norwegian star has 11 top-
five finishes in 18 starts this
season. She's winless since
the 2009 Canadian Women's
Open.
Karine Icher (68) was
third at 15 under, Kerr (66)
and U.S. Women's Open
champion Paula Creamer
(68) tied for fourth at 14
under, and Ai Miyazato (70)
finished at 13 under.
Ochoa, playing her first
LPGA Tour event since re-
tiring in April, shot a 74 on
her home course, leaving
her 19 strokes back in a tie
for 25th.
Kim also won the 2008
Longs Drugs Challenge and
2009 LPGA State Farm
Classic.


1'1


Associated Press
South Korea's In-Kyung Kim
poses with the trophy after
winning the Lorena Ochoa
Invitational on Sunday in
Guadalajara, Mexico. Kim
won her third LPGA Tour
title, closing with an 8-under
64 for a three-stroke stroke
victory over Norway's
Suzann Pettersen.


MONI)AY Novmwj 15e i, 2010 B5


I














ENTERTAINMENT
--- FITRUIS COUNTY CIA-1R1)N|I:L]E


Rock Hall


honors 2


pioneers


Stars tribute

Fats Domino,

Bartholomew
Associated Press

CLEVELAND Bour-
bon Street had nothing on
Cleveland's Euclid Av-
enue for three hours Sat-
urday during an all-star
concert that paid tribute
to Antoine "Fats" Domino
and Dave Bartholomew,
two trailblazing Rock and
Roll Hall of Famers from
New Orleans.
Domino couldn't make
it, but Bartholomew was
there, along with Lloyd
Price, Irma Thomas, Mac
"Dr. John" Rebennack
and other greats from The
Big Easy. The show was
the climax of the 15th an-
nual American Music
Masters series, presented
by the Rock Hall and
Case Western Reserve
University.
In the 1950s, only Elvis
Presley sold more records
than ivory-tickling singer
Domino and trumpet-
playing bandleader and
producer Bartholomew.
They co-wrote dozens of
hits, steeped in the multi-
cultural rhythms and
melodies of their home-
town, that kept jukeboxes
rocking and rolling.
In a brief interview be-
fore the concert, Domino,
82, told The Plain Dealer
he was grateful for all the
fuss.
"I just don't travel too
much anymore," he said
by phone from his home in
Harvey, La.
"I appreciate what
they're doing, you know?
Mmm hmmm. ... It feels
good."
He sent his regards to
fans.
"I can't thank them
enough for what they've
done for me," he said.
A half-century after they
first hit the scene, the
same tunes made for an
evening of great music.
Leave it to guest of
honor Bartholomew to
steal the show with mas-
terful versions of"Blues in
B Flat," "The Monkey
(Speaks His Mind)" and
"Tenderly." At 89, he still
blows a mean horn.
Price, a Hall of Famer
himself, did right by "Ain't
That a Shame" and his
own smash, "Lawdy Miss
Clawdy" Thomas deliv-
ered a soulful take on
"Blueberry Hill." And the
Dixie Cups Barbara
Hawkins, Rosa Hawkins
and Athelgra Neville -
brought three-part har-
monies to bear on "I'm
Walkin'," punctuated with
a sax solo by former
Domino/Bartholomew
sideman Herb Hardesty.
Underscoring the inter-
national popularity of
Domino and
Bartholomew's music,
Toots and the Maytals
turned "Let the Four
Winds Blow" into a fun
reggae jam.
Actor Wendell Pierce
from the HBO television
series "Treme" emceed
the show. Former NAACP
Chairman Julian Bond
also spoke briefly, ad-
dressing how the music of
Domino and Bartholomew
integrated black and
white audiences.


Ahead of the pack


Megamind'

continues reign

at box office

CHRISTY: i
AP movie writer

LOS ANGELES Will
Ferrell's dastardly schemes
continue to succeed, with
the animated "Megamind"
staying at the top of the box
office.
The DreamWorks Anima-
tion 3-D comedy, featuring
Ferrell as the voice of a
super villain, made just over
$30 million in its second
week in theaters, according
to Sunday studio estimates.
It's now made nearly $90
million total. "Megamind"
also features the voices of
Brad Pitt, Tina Fey and
Jonah Hill.
Opening in second place
is the 20th Century Fox ac-
tion thriller "Unstoppable,"
starring Denzel Washington
and Chris Pine as railroad
workers trying to stop a
massive runaway train. It
made $23.5 million. The
movie is based on a 2001
Ohio incident in which a
train carrying hazardous
cargo traveled 66 miles
without a crew.
Last week's No. 2 film,
"Due Date," fell to the third
spot with $15.5 million. The
Warner Bros. comedy fea-
tures Robert Downey Jr and
Zach Galifianakis as oppo-
sites stuck together on a
cross-country road trip. It's
now made $59 million in
two weeks.
Among the weekend's
other new releases. "Sky-
line" opened in fourth place
with $11.7 million. The Uni-
versal Pictures sci-fi thriller
depicts aliens invading and
destroying Los Angeles. And
"Morning Glory," a Para-
mount comedy set in a net-
work morning show starring
Rachel McAdams, Harrison
Ford and Diane Keaton,
opened at No. 5 with about
$9.6 million.
Anne Globe, head of
worldwide marketing for
DreamWorks Animation,
said positive word of mouth
helped "Megamind" remain
on top.
"It's exciting because au-
diences are clearly re-
sponding very well to the
movie," Globe said. "This
was a decided No. 1 again.
We were only down 35 per-
cent, which is a pretty ter-
rific hold for the movie."
But "Megamind" is the
rare family movie in the-
aters these days, which also
helps, said Hollywood.comn


BOX OFFICE WEEKEND RESULTS
Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S.
and Canadian theaters, according to Hollywood.com.
Final figures will be released Monday.
* 1. "Megamind," $30 million.
* 2. "Unstoppable," $23.5 million.
* 3. "Due Date," $15.5 million.
E 4. "Skyline," 11.7 million.
* 5. "Morning Glory," $9.6 million.
* 6. "For Colored Girls," $6.75 million.
* 7. "Red," $5.1 million.
* 8. "Paranormal Activity 2," $3 million.
a 9. "Saw 3-D," $2.75 million.
* 10. "Jackass 3-D," $2.3 million.
Online:
http://www.hollywood.com/boxoffice


analyst Paul Dergarabe-
dian. Next week, the fever-
ishly anticipated first half of
the "Harry Potter" finale,
"Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows: Part 1,"
debuts.
"Up until 'Megamind' the
marketplace was virtually
devoid of any family films,"


Dergarabedian said. "The
R-rated films were dominat-
ing: You had 'Paranormal
Activity 2,' 'Saw 3-D,' 'Jack-
ass 3D.' Then there was a
plethora of adult-oriented
dramas: 'Secretariat,' 'The
Social Network,' 'Hereafter,'
all those films. Then there
were movies for older audi-


ences like 'Red.'"
The fact that "Megamind"
is in 3-D is also a draw to
younger audiences, he said:
"Kids love 3-D. Kids love the
gimmicky thing."
"Unstoppable," the fifth
film Washington has made
with director Tony Scott, de-
buted slightly better than the
$21.4 million average open-
ing of their collaborations.
Previously, they'd worked on
"Crimson Tide," "Man on
Fire," "Deja Vu" and "The
Taking of Pelham 123."
The movie had surpris-
ingly good reviews for an ac-
tion picture 86 percent
positive on Rotten Tomatoes
- and the audience was
evenly divided between men
and women, said Bert Liv-
ingston, general sales man-
ager for 20th Century Fox
"It doesn't happen very
often, but when you get re-
views like that and people
like the movie so much, and
they come out and tell their
friends, it's the first week-
end but it's just a begin-
ning," Livingston said.


Sugarland members settle lawsuit


Associated Press

ATLANTA--The two members of the
country duo Sugarland avoided a nasty
public trial with the group's founding
member, settling a lawsuit over claims
that she was owed an estimated $14 mil-
lion of the band's profits after she left to
pursue a solo career five years ago.
Sugarland, which last week was
named the Country Music Association's
vocal duo of the year, was set to go to trial
Monday with founding member Kristen
Hall over claims she was owed one-third
of the band's profits even though she
quit the band in December 2005.
U.S. District Judge Timothy Batten
signed a court order Friday saying the
parties reached a settlement Terms of
the agreement were not disclosed, but
Batten gave both sides until Dec. 13 to
complete the agreement Attorneys for
the parties could not immediately be


reached for comment
Hall sued Jennifer Nettles and Krist-
ian Bush in 2008, claiming she should
have been given a third of the group's
profits a sum her lawyers said could
exceed $14 million.
The complaint said Hall, who founded
the band in 2002, set the stage for the
group's success by acting as its manager,
marketing officer and tour organizer in
its early years. It said she used her per-
sonal credit cards to pay for the band's
expenses, and she "collaborated gener-
ously" on the debut album, which sold
millions of copies.
Nettles and Bush countered in court
documents that Hall never reached a
profit-sharing agreement with them
when she quit They said they were left
to repay almost $100,000 in debts after
Hall left, and she had "no expectation
that the parties would ever work to-
gether again."


Associated Press
The band Sugarland with Jennifer
Nettles and Kristian Bush accept the
Vocal Duo of the Year Award at the
44th annual Country Music Awards on
Wednesday in Nashville, Tenn.


Today's


Today's Birthday: Far more movement than usual is likely
to be in the works for you in the next year. Some activity
might be for pleasurable purposes, but most is likely to
have something to do with business and everyday life.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Managing and directing oth-
ers with extreme skill is within you, but you'll need to reach
out in a manner that is not only acceptable, but is also wel-
comed. Show your stuff.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) The victory that you're
envisioning can only be accomplished with a lot of tenacity
combined with much optimism. Both are needed to pull off
what you want.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Larger than usual strides
can be made at this time if you baste your desires in a lot of
positive thinking. Big accomplishments can be made in
matters that you recently became interested in.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) You're entering a brief but


extremely favorable period for achieving financial success,
which might be larger than anything you've ever experi-
enced in the past. Don't waste this cycle lollygagging.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) There is a strong probability
that you could meet someone who has access to contacts
you've been trying to reach. If asked, this person will open
up some of these doors.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Believe in yourself and your
abilities, and you will soar at whatever it is you want to ac-
complish. It's a good day to begin with, but having faith in
your abilities will make things even better.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be friendly to everybody, be-
cause although it's a given that involvements with success-
ful people can rub off on you, even some lowly types can
open up some big doors of opportunity.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Lady Luck is likely to be
showering you with multiple opportunities where your work


or career is concerned. Take advantage of every one of
them, regardless of size.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Although a number of condi-
tions might be better for you than others might be, you
could fare best with people or things that have never been
fortunate for you previously.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Detecting that you have more
control than usual in certain important endeavors won't be
a figment of your imagination. Act on any positive feelings
or hunches you get.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Lots of great friends, good con-
versation, interesting activities and perhaps even a surprise
could all be in store for you. This could be a happy days.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The possibilities for achieving
large material gains are much greater at this time than
usual, but it will still be up to you to get out there and make
things happen. Don't sit on your luck.


Florida


SO YOU KNOW
Lottery numbers
were not available at
press time.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Powerball: 17-30-48-51 -54
Powerball: 29
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 1 winner $200,000
No Florida winner
Lotto: 8- 20-25-28-42-44
6-of-6 1 winner $14 million
5-of-6 52 $4,113.50
4-of-6 2,409 $72
3-of-6 49,520 $5
Fantasy 5: 5- 11 12- 22- 24
5-of-5 3 winners $88,298.54
4-of-5 481 $88.50
3-of-5 13,946 $8.50
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Mega Money: 6 24 27 34
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $1.1 million
4-of-4 3 $2,495.50
3-of-4 MB 42 $390.50
3-of-4 900 $54
2-of-4 MB 1,370 $24.50
2-of-4 28,993 $2
1-of-4 MB 12,536 $2.50
Fantasy 5: 10- 19-20-28-29
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 316 $555
3-of-5 9,981 $19

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
sTORY =
Today is Monday, Nov. 15,
the 319th day of 2010. There
are 46 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 15, 1777, the
Second Continental Con-
gress approved the Articles
of Confederation, a precursor
to the Constitution of the
United States.
On this date:
In 1806, explorer Zebulon
Pike sighted the mountaintop
now known as Pikes Peak in
present-day Colorado.
In 1935, the Common-
wealth of the Philippines was
established as its new presi-
dent, Manuel L. Quezon,
took office.
In 1939, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt laid the comer-
stone of the Jefferson Memo-
rial in Washington, D.C.
In 1966, the flight of Gem-
ini 12 ended successfully as
astronauts James A. Lovell
and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin Jr.
splashed down safely in the
Atlantic.
In 1969, a quarter of a mil-
lion protesters staged a
peaceful demonstration in
Washington against the Viet-
nam War.
Ten years ago: Democrat
Al Gore made a surprise pro-
posal for a statewide hand
recount of Florida's 6 million
ballots an idea immedi-
ately rejected by Republican
George W. Bush.
Five years ago: Israel and
the Palestinians, under
strong U.S. pressure,
reached an agreement to
open Gaza's borders.
One year ago: Kosovo's
first independent elections
ended peacefully, with Prime
Minister Hashim Thaci claim-
ing victory for his party.
Today's Birthdays: Judge
Joseph Wapner is 91. States-
man Howard H. Baker Jr. is
85. Actor Ed Asner is 81. Co-
median Jack Bums is 77. Ac-
tress Joanna Bamrnes is 76.
Actor Sam Waterston is 70.
Pop singer Frida (ABBA) is
65. CNN anchor-reporter John
Roberts is 54. Former "Jay
Leno Show" bandleader Kevin
Eubanks is 53. Country singer
Jack Ingram is 40. Actress
Sydney Tamiia Poitier is 37.
Rock musician Jesse San-


doval is 36. Actress Virginie
Ledoyen is 34. Actor Sean
Murray (TV: "NCIS") is 33.
Pop singer Ace Young (TV:
"American Idol") is 30. Golfer
Lorena Ochoa is 29. Actress
Shailene Woodley is 19.
Thought for Today: "My
father used to say superior
people never make long vis-
its." Marianne Moore,
American poet (1887-1972).


Associated Press
Tina Fey, right, dresses as Roxanne Ritchi, and actor Will Ferrell dresses as Megamind,
during the NBC "Today" television program's annual Halloween show in New York in this
Oct. 29 file photo. The DreamWorks Animation family comedy, featuring Ferrell as the voice
of a super villain, made more than $30 million in its second week in theaters, according to
Sunday studio estimates. It's now made nearly $90 million total.


I









C(r1RUS COU NiTY(FL) (IIRVNUICNEIANETMOnv, oiMwu1,2(1)B


EVENING NOVEMBER 15, 2010
C B D I F H 6:00 6:30
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A 52 35 52 52 19 21 Confessions: Animal Hoarding '14' |Pit Boss "So Long, Shorty"'14' Pit Bulls and Parolees 'PG' Pit Bulls and Parolees'PG' River Monsters'PG' a Pit Bulls and Parolees'PG'
(BET) 96 19 96 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live 'PG' sBlack Girls Rock! The most exceptional women of color.'PG' A Truth About Women In Hip Hop The Mo'Nique Show '14' am
RAV 254 51 254 254 Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta The Real Housewives of Atlanta The Real Housewives of Atlanta Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta
C) 27 61 27 27 33ScrubsScrub scrubs'14' *** "American Ple"(1999, Comedy) Jason Biggs. a South Park'14' SouthPark'14' South Park'MA' South Park'MA' Daily Show Colbert Report
CMT 98 45 98 98 28 37 Pure Country Home Videos The Dukes of Hazzard'G' The Dukes of Hazzard 'G' Invitation Only "Rascal Flatts" (N) 40 Greatest Songs of the Decade Successful and influential songs.
[ B 43 42 43 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Beyond Barrel: Race to Fuel Biography on CNBC American Greed Jewel thief. Mad Money
11Mi 40 29 40 40 41 46 Situation Room John King, USA (N) Parker Spitzer (N) Larry King Live (N) 'PG' l Anderson Cooper 360'PG' a
IM 46 40 46 46 6 5 Good-Charlie Sonny-Chance Sonny With a Chance'G' Hannah Montana Forever'G' Shake it Upl'Y' |Shake it Upl'Y' Suite/Deck [Suite/Deck Phineas, Ferb Phineas, Ferb
(E 1 33 27 33 33 21 17 SportsCenter: Monday Kickoff Monday Night Countdown (Live) a |NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Washington Redskins. From FedEx Field in Landover, Md. (Live) SportsCenter
( 34 28 34 34 43 49 SportsNation (N) Interruption 2010 World Series of Poker Final Table, from Las Vegas. ESPNU All Access College Basketball Season Preview (Live)
EWTiN 95 70 95 95 48 All Things Girl To God Daily Mass: Our Lady The Journey Home'G' First Cms Love |The Holy Rosary The World Over Raymond Arroyo. Rome Reports Women of
IFAMJ 29 52 29 29 20 28 My Wife & Kids My Wife & Kids *** "Freaky Friday" (2003, Comedy) Jamie Lee Curtis. 'PG' *** "Mean Girls" (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan.'PG-13'aI The 700 Club 'PG'as
iFNC) 44 37 44 44 32 Special Report With Bret Baler (N) FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O'Reilly Factor a Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
li 26 56 26 26 Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals 5 Ingredient Fix Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Unwrapped Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Good Eats Good Eats'G'
F( jJ 35 39 35 35 After-Jay Glazer Head to Head Ship Shape TV College Basketball Georgia Tech at Kennesaw State. (Live) Florida State The Game 365 The Final Score Profiles The Final Score
X 30 60 30 30 51 *x "What Happens in Vegas" Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ** "Anger Management" (2003, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Jack Nicholson.'PG-13' ** "The Girl Next Door" (2004) Emile Hirsch.
(GL 1 67 Golf Central Playing Lessons Masters Highlights Golf in America Golf in America Being John aly BJohn Dohn Daly Golf Videos Golf Videos Golf Central Playing Lessons
(3AL 39 68 39 39 45 54 "The National Tee" (2009, Drama) Andrew McCarthy. ** "The Ultimate Gift" (2006, Drama) Drew Fuller.'PG' a "A Christmas Visitor" (2002, Drama) William Devane. s
*** "Invictus"(2009, Drama) Morgan Freeman, Matt 24/7 Pacquiao/ Real Time With Bill Maher (In In Treatment (N) In Treatment (N) **, "It's Complicated" (2009, Romance-Comedy Meryl Streep. A divor-
(_ 302 201 302 302 2 2 Damon, Tony Kgoroge. (In Stereo)'PG-13' as Margarito'MA' Stereo)'MA' as 'MA' si 'MA's cee is caught between her ex and an architect. (In Stereo) 'R'
(HTD 23 57 23 23 42 52 Holmes on Homes'G' a Hunters Int'l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place House Hunters Hunters Int'l House Hunters Hunters Int'l My First Place My First Place
(1HiDJ) 51 25 51 51 32 42 Tech It to the Max Modern History Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' Restoration Restoration Pawn Stars'PG' Pawn Stars'PG' Restoration Restoration
(IFE 24 38 24 24 31 Old Christine Old Christine "Sins of the Moter"'(201, Drama Jill Scott, NicoleBeharie.N "One Angry Juror"(2010) Jessica Capshaw.Premiere. 'NR' How I Met How I Met
S** "Seak" (2004, Drama) Kristen Stewart, Michael Angarano. A 15- "Confessions of a Go-Go Girl" (2008, Drama) Chelsea Hobbs, Sarah "What Comes Around" (2006, Suspense) Emmanuelle Vaugier. An ex-
I )____ 50 year-old keeps her rape at a party a secret. PG-13' asCarter. A young go-go dancer loses control of her life.'NR' s convict seeks revenge against his former wife.'NR' a
(MH 320 1221 320 3 3 **3 "Beverly Hills Cop I" (1987 Comedy) Eddie Murphy. A Detroit cop **"Valentine's Day"2010) Jessica Alba. Los Angeles residents wend Lingerie'MA' Lingerie'MA' a Lingerie'MA' Lingerie'MA'
(W )J 320 221 320 320 3 3 tangles with a vicious gang in Califomia. (In Stereo) 'R' their way into and out of romance. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' as
MSNB 42 41 42 42 The Ed Show (N) Hardball With Chris Matthews Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann
(MTV) 97 66 97 97 39 That'70s Show That'70s Show True Life (In Stereo) True Life (In Stereo) True Life (In Stereo) World of Jenks The Buried Life World of Jenks The Buried Life
HOC 65 44 53 American Doomsday'PG, V' Explorer'PG' America Before Columbus'PG, V' Lost Gold of the Dark Ages America Before Columbus 'PG, V
ii 28 36 28 28 35 25 Victorious'G' |Victorious'G' iCardy'G' |SpongeBob My Wife-Kids iMy Wife-Kids |Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez George Lopez The Nanny'PG' The Nanny'PG'
(XY) 44 ** "Something New" (2006) Sanaa Lathan, Mike Epps.'PG-13'Ba **% "Just Friends" (2005) Ryan Reynolds.'PG-13'ma **, "Just Friends" (2005) Ryan Reynolds.'PG-13'
i 340 2 340 30 ** "Vanilla Sky" (2001) Tom ** 'Transporter 3" (2008 Action) Jason Statham. iTV. Frank Martin Dexter "Take It" (iTV) (In Stereo) Weeds'MA' The Big C'MA' a Weeds (iTV) The Big C (iTV)
340 241 340 Cruise. iTV. (n Stereo)'R' becomes involved with a Ukrainian woman. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' 'MA' as 'MA'as 'MA'B
(gP[i) 122 112 122 122 Pass Time (N) Pass Time NASCAR Race Hub (N) Hot Rod TV'G' Hot Rod TV'PG' Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV'G' Hot Rod TV'PG'
(5PiEJ 37 43 37 37 27 36 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation UFC Unleashed (In Stereo)'14, V UFC Unleashed (In Stereo)'14, V *** "KungFu Hustle"2004, Action) Stephen Chow. (In Stereo)'R' UFC 123 Countdown (N)
(Sll 36 31 36 36 Magic Overtime Magic Live! NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Orlando Magic. (Subject to Blackout (Live) Magic Livel Magic Overtime TBA Jimbo Fisher
SYFY 31 59 31 31 26 29 Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics care Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Scare Tactics Gundam aB Gundam a
IITBS 49 23 49 49 16 19 King oQueens King of Queens Seinfeld'PG' Seinfeld'PG' Family Guy'14' FamiGuy'14' FamilyGuy'4' FamlyGuy'14' FamilyGuy'14' Family Guy'14' Conan(N)'14'
S***' "The Lady From Shanghai" Moguls and Movie Stars: A History Moguls and Movie Stars: A History **** "Sunrise"(1927, Drama) George O'Brien Janet Gaynor. Silent. A Moguls and Movie Stars: A History
____169 53 169 16930 35 (1948) Rita Hayworth. of Hollywood of ollywood (N) city woman induces a farmer to murder his wife.'NR' of Hollywood
ITDC] 53 34 53 53 24 26 Cash b'G' CashCab'G' Swamp Loggers'PG' _Wreck Chasers Wreck Chasers American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Wreck Chasers Wreck Chasers
(TLCI 50 46 50 50 29 30 Ultimate Cake Off'PG' m Little People ILittle People Little People Little People Cake Boss'PG' Cake Boss'PG' TBA TBA Little People Little People
TD 48 33 48 48 31 34 Law & Order "Mothers Day"'14' Bones (In Stereo)'14'K Bones (In Stereo)'14'aI Bones (In Stereo) '14'm The Closer War Zone"'14' a Men of a Certain Age'MA'
[TRjV 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food'G' Man v. Food'G' Bizarre Foods/Zimmem Bizarre Foods/Zimmem Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations
iiuTVl 25 55 25 25 98 98 World's Wildest Police Videos Cops'14' s Cops'14'as Operation Repo O operation RRepo Operationperation Repo Southern Sting Southern Sting Forensic Files Forensic Files
0TJ 32 49 32 32 34 24 All in the Family |All in the Family Sanford &Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son ***% "JenyM aguire"(1996, Romance-Comedy)TomCruise, CubaGooding Jr., ReneeZellweger.'R
(oS) 47 32 47 47 17 18 NCIS"Probie"'14' a NCIS "Light Sleeper'PG' s WWE Monday Night RAW (In Stereo Live)'PG, V S ** "Bad BoysI" (2003)'R'
WE 117 69 117 117 Charmed (In Stereo)'PG' Charmed (In Stereo)'14' s Golden Girs Golden Giris Golden Girs |Golden Girls Golden Girls |Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls
WGN- 18 18 18 18 18 20 America's Funniest Home Videos Dharma &Greg Dharma &Greg Old Christine Old Christine America's Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine (N) as Scrubs'PG' Scrubs'14'


Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Last week, we looked at declarer
being careful to retain trump con-
trol. This week, let's study how the
defenders try to undermine de-
clarer's trump control.
In this deal, you are West, de-
fending against four spades. You
lead the heart king: two, eight, four.
How would you plan the defense?
If we first look at the deal from
declarer's point of view, he seems
to have no worries. He has only
three losers: one spade and two
hearts. And he appears to have 10
tricks: four spades, three diamonds
and three clubs. The only risks are
a defensive ruff (if an opponent has
a minor-suit singleton and can
arrange a ruff) or losing trump con-
trol (which will happen if spades
are 5-0 and might occur if they are
4-1).


Bridge--

North 11-15-10
A Q 8 7
VJ 5 2
10 9 5 4
4 K Q 2
West East
AA 6 5 3 A 2
V K Q 10 9 V A 8 7 3
* 873 J62
S76 e 109854
South
A K J 10 9 4
S6 4
SAK Q
46 A J 3
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both


When you have four trumps, es-
pecially when you expect declarer
to have only five, try to make him
ruff something, getting his length
down to yours. Here, continue
hearts, forcing South to trump the
third round. Declarer then leads
the spade king. What now?
If you win this trick or the next
round of spades and play a heart,
South will ruff in the dummy, cross
to his hand in a minor, draw your
trumps, and claim.
You must hold up your spade ace
for two rounds. If declarer plays an-
other trump, win with your ace and
lead your last heart South has to
ruff with his final trump, establish-
ing your remaining spade as the
setting trick Alternatively, if South
abandons trumps and plays on the
minors, you get a ruff with your
spade six, which again defeats the
contract


ACROSS 37 Peron's third
wife
Part of an ear 39 Investment
Kelly's return
possum 40 Casserole
Likable prez? cover
Guinness or 41 Okra morsel
Baldwin 42 ex machine
Field of study 45 Song of praise
TVA project 49 Tumblers
The Louvre's 53 Medal
Mona recipient
Avid reader 54 Cousins of
Dinosaur bone "um"
Jazzy 55 A Simpson
Fitzgerald 56 Bang
Starman's ves- 57 Light wrap
sel 58 "Wool" on clay
Weed whacker sheep
Map source 59 Natural elevs.


27 Tired out
30 Mare's
offspring
31 Perchance
32 Green veggie
34 45 or 78
35 Royal
decree
36 Join metal


DOWN


Veal source
Jumble
Porgy's love
Picasso's
name
Madrid gold


Answer to Previous Puzzle
ER GMCHI A Q U A
LOO FEAR SURF
MAG NOLIA SILTI
MOIRE HATS
N-!A B C II
UNPEG YIELDS
FIEMETON SUED
OP L AREIA LE I
S TABLE PIOL K A
URE HIEIM
AEGA EXELS
ANT I ES S.RIO
M A D ESS T AIN


6 Earth (pref.)
7 Hard wood
8 Matinee-
9 Mr. Maiden
10 Madame Bovary
12 Offhand


17 Pay period
19 Maybes
22 Throng
23 Hamilton's
prov.
24 Carthage loc.
25 Pith helmet
26 Takes a pow-
der
27 Enthusiasm,
plus
28 Fencer's
weapon
29 Valley
31 Schubert song
33 Build on to
35 Kind of agent
36 Breadths
38 Plus
39 Over there
41 Vermicelli
42 Finger-paint
43 Sound bounce
44 Bear, to
Brutus
46 Post of con-
trol
47 Latin I verb
48 Some parents
50 "Doctor Who"
network
51 Ooh compan-
ion
52 Prefix for dent


Dear Annie: I'm a public
school teacher with 20
years of experience, but
this one has me
shaken.
The sweetest and
brightest of my 9-year-
old students spends
most of the day posi-
tioning herself so she
can rub against her
chair in a way that
gives her pleasure.
Her previous teachers
noticed this, too, and it -
was brought to the
principal's attention ANN
when she was in first MAIL
grade. Out of concern,
he contacted Child
Protective Services, but they said
it was a non-issue. The principal
brought the parents in, and they
said it's "just something she
does" and the pediatrician told
them it was normal.
I'm not sure there is anything
normal about a student spending
the entire day masturbating on
her plastic chair. Fortunately,
none of the other students is ma-
ture enough to notice. I suspect
the girl doesn't realize how fre-
quently she's doing it. It almost
seems obsessive-compulsive. It
certainly wouldn't be appropri-
ate if a boy were doing the same
thing all day long in class.
I know toddlers do this, but
grow out of it. Are the parents
covering something up? I imagine
terrible things happening if she
does it in a public place where a
predator might be lurking.
Budget cuts have limited our
psychological services. In first
grade, the teacher used to take
her chair away and make her


L


stand, but the parents com-
plained that this was humiliating
to her. I'm not sure what a
teacher is supposed to
- do in this situation. -
Concerned Teacher
Dear Concerned:
"Natural" does not
mean the behavior is
acceptable in public.
All young children
masturbate. Responsi-
ble parents teach
them to do this only in
private, and most chil-
dren stop by the time
IE'S they reach kinder-
BOX garten. You and the
parents should work
together to make the
girl more aware of her behavior
and to help her control it. At
school and at home, it should be
explained to the girl that this is
something to be done in her bed-
room or bathroom. When you no-
tice her rubbing herself in school,
simply call on her to get her at-
tention focused elsewhere.
Dear Annie: We recently were
invited to a farewell party for the
son of family friends who is en-
tering basic training. It's an out-
door affair at their home, and the
e-mail invitation says it is a "time
to wish him well and enjoy food,
fellowship, and fun."
Are we supposed to bring a
gift? Since he can't take anything
with him, should we give him a
check? Is there an appropriate
price range? -Just Wondering
Dear Just: You are not obli-
gated to bring a gift since your
friend's son is likely to be allowed
only religious medallions and his
wallet. You can ask his parents if
there is anything he needs. You


also could give him cash, phone
cards or gift cards, although he
may not be able to use them for a
while. The amount is up to you.
The most important gift is to be
supportive and offer to write him
often.
Dear Annie: I think you left out
an important point in your re-
sponse to "Sam in Pittsburgh,"
whose sister wanted to use the
family home for her vacation, but
didn't want to pay anything.
By selling the house to Sam, his
sister gave up her claim. It is no
longer "the family home." It is
Sam's property. She traded her
interest in the home for the es-
tate settlement. Now she wants
the money and the use of the
home. I say Sam should explain
this and then change the locks. -
Same Situation in Salt Lake City,
Utah
Dear Utah: It's true that Sis
may require a better understand-
ing of what constitutes "her"
home. However, if Sam doesn't
mind that she uses the place, nei-
ther do we, although she should
not saddle him with her electric
and water bills.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Katlhy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. E-mail annies mail-
box(icomcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 5777 W Century Blvd.,
Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.
To find out more about Annie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists. visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at wwmcere-
atols.conm.


MONDAY


11 11
2 2


North
2 A
Pass


Opening lead: Y K


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
lb\ Vjy I] a. by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek .j
Unscramble these four Jumbles, ome to me,
one letter to each square, my little
to form four ordinary words. fishes
STULY -


@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved. '''
ENCAP ,,
,



LADLAB c, -

jj | WHAT TH -
WITCH PIP ON E
S THE FISHING TRIP,
/ 1s 1 / *^ -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as .
suggested by the above cartoon. "o

Answer: A w
(Answers tomorrow)


1
4
8
11'
13F
141
15 1
16
18
20 ,
21 c
22 1
24 I


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


~


ENTERTAINMENT


MOM),w,; NovitmmiiI!I 15, 2o io B7


South
SA4
44


West
Pass
Pass


East
Pass
Pass









BS MON'on. NiovI MNw i1, 20 10 C is ( ()


YO V GT -0DAMtW1
I- WHitEP.TEETI-'IF
ARND FRESIR r1


L~CONVINCIN&\7
ARlGUMENT'


Forth


\.'.0-*


SORRY, I DIDN'T
HAVE TIME TO GET
THE INFORMATION
YOU ASKED FOR.


Born


Kit 'N' Carlyle -,..-


. YOU'RE SAYING THAT
FOR AN ENTIRE WEEK,
EVERY SINGLE THING
' YOU DID WAS MORE
IMPORTANT THAN
S MY TEN-MINUTE
REQUEST?


Answering nature's call


Doonesbury


Big Nate


L4 .











I'M HANDING OUT
THE SUPPLIES YOU'LL
NEED, AND IN A
MOMENT I'LL EXPLAIN
WHAT WE'LL BE DOING!

^rA- -?^


Arlo and Janis


I' ** 1 'lj" .kI *.5 ii:-,


Blondie


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


%%\WRE EV5N NOW! MR.ILSON JUST HAT P aLL
11AROU6H OLIR Wl NlOWI"


"We're havin' a bake sale tomorrow
and I have to bring in 12 cupcakes
and a quarter to buy one of them."


Betty


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Skyline" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40
p.m.
"Unstoppable" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Morning Glory" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"Megamind" (PG) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:05
p.m.
"Due Date" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Red" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Skyline" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m;, 4:45 p.m., 7:45
p.m.
"Unstoppable" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.


"Morning Glory" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m.
"For Colored Girls" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"Megamind" (PG) 1:05 p.m., 4:05 p.m.
"Megamind" In RealD 3D Event Pricing
(PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m. No
Passes.
"Due Date" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Saw" In RealD 3D Event Pricing (R) 2
p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m. No Passes.
"Paranormal Activity 2" (R) 7:05 p.m.
"Red" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: W equals F


"GIHO FZVJ VJXFZTJL OCRO, T'N CTUO Fl


YO VJ ICN GVJ ATFZ V LIIN WVDO, CTUO


ZTFDZDIDU IH STDVRRI."


- ROVJ


DIJJOHX

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Adolescence is just one big walking pimple." "I liked myself
better when I wasn't me." Carol Burnett
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 11-15


YES, BUT THE WAY
I SAID IT DOESN'T
MAKE ME THINK OF
A BROOMSTICK.


I5OMETIM5' IT'S 9EAL
CL05E TO HOME.












A MAYBE WE
STY'O- GET TO DRINK
FOAM COFFEE'!
CLJPI------
-- I WAS HOP-
S II ING WE COULD
CLONE A
SHEEP OF,
SOMETHING.


Today's ;1.o `,-/IES


COMICS


CITRUS COUNTY(FI) CIIIIONICLE


lj. r n:Il1~i- I or al s







CITRUS CoUNTY (FL) CnIRoNICL


Field goal gives FSU win


Associated Press
Florida State kicker Dustin Hopkins, right, and holder Shawn Powell watch as Hopkins' last second kick goes 55 yards to
give Florida State a 16-13 win over Clemson late Saturday night in Tallahassee.


Seminoles defeat

Clemson 1-13

on Hopkins kick

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State's Dustin Hop-
kins got nothing but love
from his teammates after
missing a pair of fourth-
quarter field goals last week
that let North Carolina slip
out of town with a win.
Hopkins couldn't wait to
redeem himself. It took only
a week.
The sophomore from
Houston, Texas, kicked a ca-
reer-best 55-yard field goal
as time expired to give the
Seminoles a dramatic 16-13
victory and keep them in
the hunt for a berth in next
month's Atlantic Coast Con-
ference title game.
"I was thinking about last
week and how disappointed


that I was," said Hopkins,
who also had field goals of
28 and 39 yards. "To pay
them (teammates) back a lit-
tle bit, that's awesome."
His winning kick Satur-
day night was the third-
longest field goal in Florida
State history and marked
the first time since a 1983
win at Arizona State that
Florida State won on the
last play of the game, assis-
tant athletic director Rob
Wilson said.
EJ Manuel, who started in
place of an injured Chris-
tian Ponder at quarterback,
scored Florida State's only
touchdown on an 8-yard run
with 10:08 left to give the
Seminoles a 13-10 lead.
Chandler Catanzaro's sec-
ond field goal for Clemson
- a 29-yard kick with 53 sec-
onds left, tied the game.
Xavier Rhodes picked off
a Kyle Parker pass in the
Seminoles' end zone to set
up the 85-yard, 12-play drive
led by Manuel.
Manuel completed 15 of


24 passes for 210 yards and
ran for another 71 yards on
15 carries.
Florida State (7-3, 5-2),
which snapped a two-game
losing streak, is up against
Maryland and North Car-
olina State in the ACC's
jumbled Atlantic Division.
Each has two losses and the
Seminoles travel to Mary-
land next Saturday.
The loss knocked Clem-
son (5-5, 3-4) out of con-
tention for any league
laurels.
"This is a tough one,"
Clemson coach Dabo Swin-
ney said. "You win a lot of
statistical battles but we
didn't win on the score-
board."
Clemson dominated
much of the game, but
missed two good scoring op-
portunities in the second
half. Catanzaro missed a 38-
field goal try in the third
quarter and Rhodes' inter-
ception came as a result of
receiver DeAndre Hopkins
falling on the play.


The Tigers were up 10-3
at halftime, despite domi-
nating Florida State on
both sides of the ball. Clem-
son ran 47 plays to Florida
State's 18 and had the ball
for 20:08 to the Seminoles'
9:52. Florida State man-
aged only three first downs
in the first half, just one
after its first two plays of
the game.
Jamie Harper ran for a
career-high 126 yards and
Clemson's lone touchdown
and caught nine passes, a
school record for a running
back. His 26-yard TD run
culminated an 82-yard
Clemson drive on the open-
ing possession of the game.
It was the fifth time this sea-
son the Tigers scored on
their first drive of a game.
"I knew going in we
weren't going to score a lot,"
Manuel said. "Their defen-
sive line was dominant and
we knew that That was the
mismatch in the game and
we had to find ways to
nickel and dime it."


South Carolina


stomps Florida

Spurrier, No. 22 Gamecocks

clinch SEC East in 36-14 win


Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Steve
Spurrier's huge victory at
his ol' stomping grounds is
taking him to another place
he used to visit all the time
-Atlanta.
After years of being the
top Gator, the head ball
coach led South Carolina to
its first division crown in the
stadium he nicknamed The
Swamp.
Marcus Lattimore ran 40
times for a career-high 212
yards and three touch-
downs, Stephen Garcia
played turnover-free and
the 22nd-ranked Gamecocks
upset No. 24 Florida 36-14
Saturday night to clinch the
Southeastern Conference's
Eastern Division.
"We'll celebrate a little
more than they do,"
Spurrier said, referring to
Florida winning the East
three of the previous four
years.
The Gamecocks won for
the second time in 19 tries
against Florida, snapped an
0-for-12 streak in Gainesville
and earned a spot in the
league title game for the
first time since joining the
SEC in 1992. South Carolina
(7-3, 5-3 SEC) will play sec-
ond-ranked Auburn on Dec.
4, with the winner advanc-


ing to the Bowl Champi-
onship Series.
"Sometimes the Game-
cocks get out alive,"
Spurrier said, taking a mild
shot at The Swamp's motto
"Where only Gators get out
alive."
The Gators (6-4,44) lost to
a division opponent for the
first time in 17 games,
dropped their third consec-
utive home game and
proved they didn't deserve
to play for a championship.
It's the program's first three-
game losing streak at home
since 1989.
South Carolina started
celebrating after Garcia's 8-
yard TD run early in the
fourth that put the Game-
cocks ahead 29-7. Players
and fans got even more rau-
cous after Lattimore's 11-
yard scoring run with 2:43
remaining.
Spurrier acknowledged
that he orchestrated part of
the celebration in the clos-
ing seconds. He whispered
in an assistant's ear, then re-
moved his headset and elec-
tronic equipment
The assistant talked to
players, who then doused
Spurrier with what else?
- Gatorade. Several others
carried Spurrier toward
midfield after the clock hit
zero.


Associated Press
South Carolina head coach Steve Spurrier, center, is
carried onto the field by his players after defeating Florida
36-14 on Saturday night in Gainesville.


SCITRUSCOUNTY

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Are you a SWM 55+
seeking a caring
relations hip with a
gracious, attractive
SWF who simply
enjoys life. Ufe Is a
banquet lets enjoy
it together Respond
To: Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1660 P
106W. Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450


Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?
This area's
#1
employment
source!

Classified


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Needed, no nights
or weekends.
Commission Based
Pay. Apply @ 6421
W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa Fl. 34428
TOYOTA
'90 Corolla, 4 dr. AC,
auto trans., 49,279K. ml.
Clean runs great, 34
mpg. First $2,400 gets
ltl(352) 586-1905


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
No titles OK.
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk c
unw, nted cars/trks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
A Better Paid Price for
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call 352-726-2503


Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
Cash Paid For Junk
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Todayl (352)426-2334
FREE PICK UP
JlNK Appl.'s Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Etc
Call J.P. (352) 613-0108
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
Will Haul Vehicles
& Anything Metal.
(352) 637-0004


1 Lab Mix
very special dog.
needs gentle home.
fenced yrd,
Hound,
to good family
(352) 949-8373
Couch, dark brown,
micro fiber, good
shape, Just need spot
(352) 422-7742
after 9am
Excell. Home for any
exotic birds or poultry
U-R unable to care for.
(352) 726-9966


q


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MONi)A\Y, NovliMwiti 15, 2010 B9


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


(









BIO Mo)NL~x~, N )Vr.IMIrtrR 15, 2010 ius(LI'Y()CnNCL


I I
i November


SReader Recipes




















Submitted by:Susan Eline Graves of Inverness

Ingredients:
1 Package frozen broccoli florets I
I
I I

~I








II









SPackage frozen broccoli florets i
1 Package frozen clicauliflower
(Cook both as directed on package and drain)

1 Package thinly shredded ham from deli (opt.)
1 Package shredded cheese
1 Bottle of Lite Ranch Dressing I
* 1 Package hamburger buns (separated top/bottom)

I Instructions:
Butter the buns and place upside down on grill
to toast lightly. Remove to cookie sheet. Spread
Ranch dressing on top of buns and sprinkle
with cheese. Place under broiler to melt cheese
1 minute. Spoon broccoli and cauliflower on
top. Add shredded ham if desired. Sprinkle with
more cheese and place back under broiler to

melt cheese 1-2 minutes. Serve hot or cold.
Makes 16


L For a complete list of

r reader submitted recipes, go to

I www.chronicleonline.com o
I (Keyword Search: Recipes) I


UClaCK LaD
Male, older dog,
weighs 0O0Ibs. His
name Is Caeser. Had
choker chain on. Lost
off of Tom Mason Dr.
German Shepherd
Male, 9 mos. old black
& white, Was wearing
collar w/llcense &
rabies shot Info. Lost
in Lecanto area
REWARD (352) 302-2063
German Shepherd
Male, 9 mos. oldblack
& tan. Dog needs
medicine. Lost off of
Country Club Dr.
(352) 794-6249
Jack Russell
Mole, brown & white.
green collar w/black
paw prints on it. Lost in
the Hernando area, off
of Spooner. & Bitzer.
(352) 257-0228
Orange Fluffy Male Cat
Approx. 8 month old
Lecanto, behind
Dunkin Doughnuts
Heartbroken
(352) 527-4145
Reward
Chihuahua & Jack
Russell Mix. Female,
small reddish, brown,
wearing red collar.
Answers to Zippy.
Lost on Hwy 44 by
Dan's Clam Stand.
Owner heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302


FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@S 5 lb. 9ct/$71b
off boat & delivered
(727) 771-7500


1 Male and 1 Female
(352) 697-0006
Free Approx. 1 yr.
Male, Fixed
Yorkle/Schnauzer
mix, all shots, friendly
(352) 634-3753
Free Horse Manure
& shavings
Great for garden
and planting.
(352) 746-7044
FREE to Good Home
Beautiful Kittens Litter
Trained 3mos, old, &
7 mos, old. very lov-
lng.(352) 726-2594
KITTENS
3 months old, medium
gray & white hair, flea'd
and
8 month, white
w/ blue eyes
(352) 464-0999
Kittens
6 wks. old. Yellow Lab
Male 1 yr. old. Owner
must give away due to
health reasons.
(352)419-6451
Terrier Mix
Male, neutered,
weighs 14 Ibs. All shots
and heartworm pre-
ventatives up to date.
Good with Children.
(352) 746-4571



FRESH MUSTARDS,
COLLARDS &
TURNIPS 302-1600
SWEET CORN AT
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 ml. east
on Eden Dr. from
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(352) 726-6378
^SP/Over\ cilm~rAve


7.LASSIFIEDS



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Help is needed from
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help. i crochet for many
charities and need good
usable yarn. will pickup
claudlne @ 613-0512
leave message


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
Includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





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Email Resume
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CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed Immediately.
Must be certified.
(352) 560-4229

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Email Resume To:
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Fax Resume To:
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COORDINATOR
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Full Time W/Benefits.
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RN/LPN
Immediate Need
for physically
disabled young adult,
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352) 637-3111
Fax Resume
(352)637-1176


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Seeks entrepreneurial
professional with sales
experience to become
a District Manager.
Life/Health license is
required. Substantial
earnings potential.
Please contact
mifed-
ltewei@cdoa le.com or
cdl

Local Real estate
Company
Looking for a dyna-
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leadership position.
Great opportunity for
the right person.
Fax resume to
352-746-7203 or call
352-746-7113

SALES POSITION
40 hours/week.
Monday through Friday,
$8/hr. Must have
retail experience
with references.
Background check req,
employer will pay.
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1659P
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 32248

Telemarketing
Regional Builder has
opportunities for tele-
marketers to cultivate
large prospect
database. No cold
calling. Late after-
noon, evening and
weekend hours with
flexible schedule.
Must be personable
and computer
literate. Fax resume
to 352-746-7707.
sleeman@citrus
hills.com


WANTED
Highly Self Motivated
SALES PEOPLE
Company truck Is
provided. Paid
vacation & Holidays.
Benefits available.
Apply In Person ONLY
9am to 4 pm, Mon-Fri,
Brays Pest Control
3447 E.Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FL
DFWP



AC Service Tech
5 + years exp. required,
clean driving record,
must pass drug test.
Clean Background.
Start immediately
(352) 564-8822




APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Needed, no nights
or weekends.
Commission Based
Pay. Apply @ 6421
W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa FI. 34428

FREE
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Friday Nov. 19th
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Morning refreshments
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equipment Space
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Call for details!
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RUNEQUIPMENT.COM


,~ A ,~, e~Y


BANKRUPTCY
SPECIAL $175.
(352) 201-8594


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(352) 860-1533


uwnerimanager Name:
Mario Carta
Business Name:
Affordable Handyman Service

How long has the business been in operation
in the Citrus County area?
20 Years experience
Describe the service/product you offer?
Fast, affordable and reliable handyman service for
most home repair and maintenance needs.
What do your customers like best about your
business?
The fast, friendly and reliable service provided in a
professional manner, but saving them money is
what keeps them coming back.

What is something your business offers that
people don't expect?
Friendly, reliable, professional service. Free
estimates and a desire to save customers money
on every job.
Why did you choose this business?
Second generation handyman. I've learned the
business from my father. I enjoy working with my
hands and solving problems for customers.
What are your business hours, address,
phone number and e-mail?
24 Hour emergency service is available.
Monday Friday 8:00 am to 6:00 pm.
Saturday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
Located at 2829 Crede Ave., Crystal River
352-257-9508
Email: mc0869@yahoo.com


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
A Whole Tree Service
Taxidermist, Pressure
Wash. Lic. & Insured
Free Est. (352) 697-1421
David's Tree, Lawn &
Landscape Specialist.
Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
(352)302-5641
Carey's Tree Service
Compl Tree Care
IIc/ins-. Firewood
Sales/del 352-364-1309
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
lns.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827



Affordable Home
Computer Repairs
Free Est & Inspect.
212-1551/422-6020
CITRUS COMPUTERS
On site computer repair
$89 Virus Removal
352-613-2958
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New .& Used systems
repairs. Visa/l MCard
352-637-5469



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
Opions 25 yrs exp
llc/Ins Dale 586-8129
ALL-IN-ONE Painting &
Home Repairs. Gutter
cleaning & screen
repairs (352) 406-0201







Handyman Dave
Painting, Press clean,
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./lIns.
(352) 726-9998
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int./Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845









AT YOUR HOME
PhMower, Lawn Tractor, Smbile



enMarine Repair 2230 yrs4244



Uc#99990001273



REFINSIHING Bath tubs
& Kit. counter tops,
many colors w/ war-
ranty (352) 302-6130
*******
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing In
handicap. Lic//ns.
#2441. 352-634-1584



SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings Carports
'Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs .352 613-2518


CARE GIVER,
Preferably Sugarmill
Woods. 30 yrs. Exp.
(352) 382-2695
HOME HEALTH CARE
Christian lady. Priv. duty
15+ yrs. exp., Ref.
352-422-6114



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397



Cleaning Res./Comm.
Pressure Washing,
Lawn maint. LIc./Ins.
(352) 414-6681
DENNIS CLEANING
SERV. COMM OFFICE
CLEANING & BUILDING
MAINT 30 yrs exp.
Uc & Ins. 746-5694



Handyman Dave
Painting, Press clean,
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Husband/Wife Team
Aluminum/Screen Con-
tractor, Window Wash-
ing & Gutter cleaning
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Husband/Wife Team
Aluminum/Screen Con-
tractor, Window Wash-
ing & Gutter Clean outs
628-0562(CBC1257141)



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


Choice. Easy Payment
.QRtIDs, 25 yrs exp
llc/Ins Dale 586-8129







Handyman Dave
Painting. Press clean,
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
Roofs w/no pressure
lic/ins I 352-341-3300
plcardselfstorage.com



Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Malnt/Repalrs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smalllReli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
PtIns 25 yrs exp
IIc/ins Dale 586-8129
AFFORDABLE FAST
RELIABLE Most Repairs
Free Est., LiUc#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *
AFFORDABLE FAST
RELIABLE Most Repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Any Home
Repalr.CBC #1253431
(352) 464-3748





Handyman Dave
Painting, Press clean,
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348
LABOR READY
We Do Anything *
Indoors/Outdoors $12hr
Visa/Master, 257-0624


Repair, remod., or build
mobile homes/homes.
Free Est. LiUc. CRC-
1330081 (352) 949-2292



ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Uc & Ins.
Special $40hr.lst hour
352 -302-2366
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
reair, Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
352-621-1248
#ER00015377



ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Uc. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *
A STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc132549 302-9269



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Slabs
LIc25791/.. 352-257-0078
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repairstaining &
garage Firs. Recession
Prices 352-527-1097
JC's CONCRETE
SPECIALTY
Slabs. Driveways,
Patio. Sidewalks
Tractor Work lic/Ins
#2896 352-220-9330


& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768



COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays IntJExt. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845



Affordable Top Soil.,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755



All AROUND TRACTOR
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PrepDriveways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755
EVERYTHING from
Clearing to Landscape
Fill, Rock, Debris IIc/ins
628-3436/586-7436



Paver Patios / Decks
Driveways / Walkways
Mulch / Water Features
Retaining Walls & More
352-287-9896 Uc. & Ins.



L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/Ins.
(352) 302-8348


LAWNCARE 'N More
mulch, trim beds,, tree
removal, fall clean up.
hauling352 220-6761
McDonough's Lawn
Service Est.
* Yard Maint* Hedge trim
* Weed Pulling. 201-2202



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered/Stacked.
352-344-2696
Season Oak 4x8 Stack
$75. Free Delivery
(508) 904-1328
(352) 410-2550
SEASONED SPUT
Firewood,$75 per stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352



WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard



AFFORDABLE
DRAIN FIELDS
New & Replacement
LiUc. #CFC1427970 & Ins.
352-628-3436,586-7436



ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977



Music Lessons
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 422-7012



Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
wherel Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352)746-1998


POOL-TEC

REPAIRS EQUIPMENT
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
SALT SYSTEMS
WEEKLY POOL SERVICE
30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
CALL ALAN 422-6956
STATE LICENSE # CPC051584


, ,:,, i..I urIl I
& SUPPLY INC.
'Fanfiy Owned And Operated In Citr's
Countylv For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS ~ RE-ROOFS ~ REPAIRS

'ANY RE-ROOF,
- - One coupon per household. -
\ rTi FREE ESTIMATES
S(352) 628-5079


R&D Handyman
Services
352,422,6865

* Insured
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a a
30 Years Exp.
Hem Mantenance
Peinting (ln. & Gxl.)
Pressure Washing

sus ar e a
FREETIAE


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11-15


"I made you a nice fruitcake, but the guard
said it could be used as a weapon."
ooo0006e1N


$$$$$$$$$$$
Are you currently
Making $40. hr?
Would you like to
MakeS40. hr.?
New programs
starting soon.
No Experience
Necessary
Training Provided
As much over-
time Available
As you would like
3 Positions
Available
Call or Fax Dana
Phone
352-726-7722
Fax 352-726-6813






EXP. SERVERS &
LINE COOKS.
Homossa
(352) 228-7353






Best Kept Secret
in Citrus Co.

Looking for energetic
self motivated, sales
people for great
oppt., well Est Co.
w/proven record of
success unlimited
earning potential, fun
atmosphere, In depth
training. Mon Fri
NO weekends
1-866-777-1166










CITRUS C(OUNIT (FL) CIIRONICLE


ASAPI NEW PAY
INCREASE!!
34-40 cpm. Excellent
Benefits Need CDL-A
& 3 mos. recent OTR
877-258-8782
ww.meltontruck.con
OTR Drivers

Wanted Food grade
Tanker Drivers Needed.
Class A-CDI w/tonker
endorsement
Competitive pay,
Benefits, Guaranteed
time off Prefer 2yrs
experience,
(800)569-6816
www.ottery
transportation.com





RUN YOUR OWN
BUSINESS.

Applications being
accepted for single
copy newspaper
routes.
Apply at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
in Crystal River.



CHMbNiesE





Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877)994-9904



AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid If qualified
Housing Available.
Call Aviation Institute
Of Maintenance.
(866)314-3769



$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOWI!I
$$$ As seen on TV.
$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need
$500-$500,000++within
48/hrs? Low rates AP-
PLY NOW BY PHONE!
Call Todayl Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321
www.lawcaoltal.com
CASH NOW!
Get cash for your
structured settlement
or annuity payments.
Call
J.G, Wentworth.
Rated A+ by the
Better Business Bureau.
1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536)



REALTOR ONE, LLC
Gayland Reed, Broker
Considering Selling
or Buying a Business,
Go to my web site.
www.realtoronellc.com
*Italian Restaurant
*Pizza/Salad/Sub To Go
*Graphic Sign/Print Co.
or Call 352-229-5273
WeGetOurGrocees
Free.coam




REALTOR ONE, LLC
Gayland Reed, Broker
Considering Selling
or Buying a Business,
Go to my web site.
www.realtoronellc.com
*Italian Restaurant
*Pizza/Salad/Sub To Go
*Graphic Sign/Print Co.
or Call 352-229-5273


"OCCUPIED JAPAN"
FIGURINES. Eleven
pieces, Great selection.
Great prices from $5 to
$12 each. Call 527-6709




2 Collectible Dolls
Cindelella & Bride Doll
2 feet lall w/ stands
Still in boxes $100 eo.
(352) 746-9896
HAND CROCHETED
dolls various colors gift
for child for xmnas/b'day
$25.ea 352-637-2881


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





HOT TUB
Dream maker, eclipse,
4 person partible spa,
cover, food tray.
chemicals, standard
outlet, all weather,
resistant, $1,300
(352) 344-2746




30" WHIRLPOOL
ELECTRIC STOVE
White all works $75.00
352-419-5483
AMANAALMOND COL-
ORED REFRIGERATOR
W/ICE MAKER Works
GREAT! $200.00
464-0316
ARCTIC KING Window
A/C w/remote.
6000BTU. Used Iwk,
while A/C was down,
Cost $138., Sell $79.
352-382-3879
DISHWASHER
Kenmore. black face
good cond. $125
(352) 419-4019
FRIDGE
Haler 26cf 67"x31 top/bot
stainless w/ice mkr $300;
9.6 Merc Outboard
short shaft runs perfect
$375 352-503-7450
or 352-586-3551
FRIDGIDAIRE WASHER
& DRYER SET 3 years
old, works great $300
obo 352-697-0953
FRIGIDAIRE
Refrigerator, Fridge 20.6
cu/ft. freezer 5.8 cu/ft
total 26.4 cu ft good
cond $225
(352) 564-1280
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Eauipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Uc.&Ins. CAC 057914

Large Side by Side
Refrigerator, glass top
stove, under cabinet
microwave &
dishwasher, Black
$800.obo 352 -344-9931
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-303-0029


Roper exc. cond.
$135. Microwave
Samsung $25.
(352) 419-5826



CHERRYWOOD BOOK-
CASES Commenorcial
Freestanding 6 ft, adjust-
able shelves. $50. 4 It,
$40. 727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS
AdjustableFabric
Covered.Home Office or
Business. $35 each
7274634411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS Ergonomic
Seating for Personalized
Comfort.Fabric Covered.
$50 each. 727463-4411
FILE CABINETS Com-
mercial Pre-Owned Metal
2 Drawer Lateral. Graphic
Color. $40 727-463-4411
FILE CABINETS
Preowned Metal Com-
mercial 5 drawer.Putty
Color.$125. 3 draw Putty
Color. $65. 727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
Excellent for Reception or
Breakrooms. Fabric Cov-
ered. $25 each.
727-463-4411




ART AUCTIONS TO
BENEFIT CHILDREN'S
CHARITY -
NO BUYER'S PREMIUM
and several artworks
with no reserve
Chagall, Picasso.
Dali, Mira, Max,
Neiman, Tarkay,
Maimon, Pino, Agam,
Gockel and more!
FREE food, drinks and
raffle prizes. BATERBYS
PALM BEACH,
Saturday,
November 13th-
4pm Preview,
5pn Auction -
13900 Jog Road
Delray Beach, FL
33446. BATERBYS-
ORLANDO,
Saturday.
November 20 4pm
Preview, 5pm
Auction -9101
International Dr.,
Unit 1008, Orlando. FL
32819. RSVP at
www.baterbys.com
or call (866)537-1004
or email
fallauction2010@
baterbys.com
ABi2746 AUe3750




10"TABLE SAW RYOBI
Sliding Table
EXCELLENT COND.
$195 Call 527-6425
DRYWALL STILTS Brand
New adjustable 15" to 30"
$150.00. Call Ray @
352-464-0573
JOINTER 6X36
CRAFTSMAN W/LEGS.
Very good cond.
$195 Call 527-6425
RADIAL ARM SAW
8 1/4" RYOBI
Excellent Cond.
$195 Call 527-6425
Ryobl 10" Table
Saw with stand
$75.00(352) 746-0100



32" Quasar TV
w/ remote good cond.
$50.
(352) 628-0818
48" FLAT SCREEN
TV $600.
352-746-1705
Stereo
Mcintosh MX 113 tuner
pre amp. Macintosh
MC2105 amp. Pair of
XR14 speakers, all
books & paper work.
Early 70's all like new.
$1,500 firm.
(352) 697-3468


54" HITACHI TV 1080i
LCD TV in good shape
$350 352-341-5755 or
352-400-2593



BROTHER WORD PRO-
CESSOR for child learn
type & comp portable
$25.cash 3526372881
CITRUS COMPUTERS
On site computer repair
$89 Virus Removal
352-613-2958
COMPUTER
Complete system,
LCD monitor, delivered
and set up. $299.
(352) 270-3779
Computer Repair
we come to you. Call
today! visa/mc. 352-
212-1551/422-6020
DELL LAPTOP D610
WXP PRO wireless $
195.00 MS office Internet
ready 3523823895
DESKTOP WXPPRO
Includes Monitor,key
B,mouse speakers &
(printer new)$195.00
352-382-3895
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Tractor
Hinomoto E 2304, 4x4,
w/loader,this tractor will
do the job. Good Cond.
$5,500. (352) 621-0316



Patio Set "
All aluminum, glass top
table & 4 cushioned
chairs. Exc. cond. $95.
(352) 746-5157



2 BEDROOM SETS
contemporary style. 1
dark/1 light. $300ea.
Complete liv. rm set
green fabric, Exc.
cond, $600. 746-1705
CHERRY BEDROOM SET.
Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in
factory boxes. English
Dovetail. Original cost
$4500. Sell for $795, Can
deliver. Call Tom
(813)600-3653
Computer Desk
& New Chair. Very
good cond. $50.
(352) 613-5023
Couch & Love Seat,
Sage Green, has 4
recliners. brand new
pd $1,200 asking $800
Kitchen Set, wooden 4
chairs, brand new pd
$300 sell $175 795-0363
Dual Recliner
Lazy Boy, light
tan-taupe, New
$1,600 asking $800.
Call (352) 746-0022

--- .


HI TOP TABLE, Beveled
glass top with 2 bar stools
$300 & Full Mattress set
$85 -352-266-9434
Media Cabinet
cherry wood, holds 300+
CD's, swing out door,
$85.
352-270-8250
OAK BOOKCASE Solid
Wood, 4 ft, Freestanding,
3 Adjustable Shelves.
$50 727-463-4411
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Reopen for Season
Tues-Fri 9-5 Sat 9-2
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808


CLASSIFIED

Furniture

RECLINER W/BUILT IN
PHONE & MASSAGE
Tan Plaid Only $75.00
464-0316
SMALL COMPUTER /

No wobble, $20 firm
860-2475
SOFA/SLEEPER
& love seat, florida
style, 3 tables glass lop
& 2 lamps $600.
(352) 382-2620
SOLID PINE
BOOK SHELF Head
Board w/ 6 drawers
King frame, exc cond
$250.(352) 746-4901
USED FURNITURE
Used King Mattress
set-$250.00
Lazboy
Recliner-$50.00
Call 352-257-5722
for details
WOOD JCP 3 TIER
center holds TV,
xbox,wii,books, etc nice in
kids room $75.cash
352-637-2881




LAWN MOWER
weedeater 4.75HP push
low hours
$95.00 352-527-2398
M.T.D. Rider
12HP 38" cut $200 firm.
Murry Push Mower
3.5 B&S engine
20" cut $35.00
(352) 302-6069




Gas Range 30"
almond, looks fine
works great $120
Microwave Oven works
great $25.
(352)212-1751
WEEPING YAUPON
HOLLY TREE 20 ft. tall.





9 :
$100. 352-249-7017




CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
9-4p Everyday
337 NE 11th St




TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
BIG jobs, small jobs,
$25 + $25/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733




KNIT COAT Handmade
3/4 LNG NVER USED SZ
12 CREAM COLOR $40.
CASH 352-637-2881
MEN'S 5 pair light wt
slacks sz34 $50.
pair med weight slacks
sz34 $50. 352-637-2881
MEN'S SUITS gray lei-
sure,1 Tan LEE,sz34
$30.ea, BLAZER LRG
$45. Dk Grn never worn
352-637-2881



2 BASE CABINETS
36Hx15W white,2 ig
drawers, ex. cond.never
used. $20.00 each
(352)382-5297
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
No titles, ok.
J.W. 352-228-9645
Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
BAR MIRRORS Various
Beer and Liquor.Great for
your Business or Game
Room $50-$75 each.
727-463-4411
BICYCLE MIRROR,
EASY TO INSTALL. $10
352.503.5319


Lf ,j J f f

%

J.) Li&




--I s


MONrDAY, NoVIMIBER 15, 2010 B11


WITH BACK FLAP $10
CAN E-MAIL PICS
637-2949
BINGO SEAT CUSHION
WITH BACK SEAT FLAP
$10 CAN E-MAIL PICS
637-2949
CAMERA TRIPOD, 54 in
EXTENSION. $8
352.503.5319
CHAIN SAW, ELECTRIC,
10IN., 11 AMPS $30
352.503.5319
DOG KENNELL 8X10X8
CHAIN LINK KENNEL
ASKING $125.00. CON-
TACT JAMES
(352)344-8359
ERA REAL ESTATE
JACKET & SKIRT Size
10. Worn once. $45.00
Call Ruth 352-382-1000
FORMAL SHIRTS White
pleated size 17 34/35
sleeve. 2 wing tip and 1
pointed collar. $8 each.
Like new. 352-746-1908
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@$ 5 lb. 9ct/$71b
off boat & delivered
(727) 771-7500
GENERATOR
5600 Watts, brand new
never used,
$450 firm
(352) 637-6310,
leave message
GENERATOR
6000 watt General pwr.
13 hp $650.
Troy Bllt Tiller 318 cc
20" tilling width $650
(352) 795-5682
HAND STITCHED QUILT
Full size blue,browngold
& green tones.
New-never used. $35
352-489-6894





ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.

Go to:
chronlcleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
Land Space
1/2 ac to 8 acre avail
for yard promotions,
Hwy 19 & 98 ( Byrd Rd
1 blk pass 98 on L)
Call Mr Thomas
727-372-8584
Lexmark InkJet Printer
750 model, w/
installation disc. $20.
Homellte Yard Blower,
150MPH, gas operated,
$30 (352) 465-4691
Mattress & Boxspring
Full size, brand new,
wrought Iron head
board. Unnens Incl.
$400.(352) 746-1535
MEN'S FORMAL SHOES
Black patent leather size
10-1/2M Stafford Still in
box, new never worn. $25
352-746-1908
Necchi-Model#4825
Sewing Matching
New-Never used With
work, I have no time to
sew comes with all
purpose foot, zipper
foot, buttonhole foot,
button sewing foot,
overlook cutter foot,
case, book & more
$250 firm
Call 352-308-1970 or
352-794-3793 after 5pm
NEWAMERIPHONE
SR100 SUPER LOUD
PHONE RINGER $20
ADJUSTABLE SOUND
E-MAIL PICS 637-2949
NEW EYEGLASS
FRAMES Small and light-
weight. Black wire. $25.
860-2475
PATRIOTIC AFGHAN
RED/WHITE/BLUE $15
HANDMADE-64 BY
64-CAN E-MAIL PICS
637-2949


'~'d4S1.

N. -' ,.




N ~
~
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V,3


"Ar


, A ,


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


I.


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~*1


(352) 563-5966


WIDE $10 352.503.5319
PELLETIER'S HOUSE-
CLEANING references
available 352-560-7907
SEAL A MEAL VACUUM
SEALER, like new, has
many attachments.
Model 800, $35.00.
1-352-726-2350
SOFA, DAYBED
tan soft 150. bed 30.
(352)503-2156/697-9458
TRUCK TAILGATE for a
1986 Chevrolet PU Truck
S10. $50.00 Call Ruth
352-382-1000
TUXEDO Black
3-button 44L 38/32 pants
never worn $65.00
352-746-1908



4 WHEEL WALKER
W/SEAT AND BRAKES
LIKE NEW $65.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
OR SHOWER CHAIR
Only $30.00 each
464-0316
HOOVER AROUND
NewS1000. K SZ. white
hand crochet bed
spread, table 70" table-
cloth $100.8 place sett-
ing of China $100
(352) 344-4408
Jazzy Power Chair
1 /2 years old,
new battery $600 obo
Transfer wheel chair
$75, New,
All in good shape
(352)201-7221
LAZY BOY
Uft/Recliner Chair,
mauve, exc cond.
$450.(352) 795-2317
MANUAL WHEEL CHAIR
NO FOOT RESTS
$50.00 464-0316



BUYING U.S. COINS
1964 and before. What
do you have? Let's talk.
(352) 795-3842
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
We Also Buy Gold
Jewelry (352) 228-7676










WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



CONQUEROR BASS
GUITAR- 2 picks tuner,
strap, case crate AMP
& cord complete outfit
$200 obo(352) 795-6257
Kurz Well
Keyboard Esemble
Grant, portable,
professional Excl cond
$450 (352) 503-6960
NUMARK DDS 80
DJ System
for CD and HD Media
New $500. Firm
(352) 613-7323
Peavy Nashville
112 Amplifier, $350
(352) 344-4951
YAMAHA DIGITAL
PIANO DGX520 Like new
88 key portable grand
with matching stand,
bench, pedal, box, all
discs and literature.
$499.00 email:
dme 323@yahoo.com
Yamaha,
clavinova digital piano,
CVP-50 88 key, built in
rythyms & bench.
excel cond. $1,000
352-621-4600



2 6FT French Doors
Glass enclosed blinds,
like new all hardware
included
$150
(352) 419-5836
CHRISTMAS TREE 7'
750 clear lights.w/ stand
Excell. cond. $50.
Call 527-6425
NEW HOME Sewing ma-
chine dial a stitch cabinet
+ extra's $150. serious
only cash 352-637-2881
WINDOW 2 BLINDS
50'wide good for garage
$25. each cash
352-637-2881



BOWFLEX BLAZE Great
Christmas GiftI
Like New. Paid $800
Sell for $245
352-628-5222
ELECTRIC TREAD MILL
LIFESTYLE $100.00
464-0316
sparrlng/klckbox gear
varied pcs/sizes $75
uniforms
352-628-3099
STATIONARY RECUM-
BANT EXERCISE BIKE
Only $145,00 464-0316



32 Automatic
Beretta, Made in Italy
in 1956. $350.
(352) 201-1866
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


FEDERAL 357 MAG
HI-SHOK SELF-DEF
AMMO Brand new, 50rd
box. $60. 860-2475
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@$ 5 lb. 9ct/$71b
off boat & delivered
(727) 771-7500
PURPLE GIRLS BIKES
20"Handbrakes,Basket
and Helmet $35. With
Helmet $30.Great Holiday
Gifts. 727-463-4411
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithlng
(352) 726-5238
Winchester Rifle
Model 94, 30-30
Lever action $350.
Thompson Contender
Handgun w/3 barrels,
30-30, 22 Mag., 45
Colt/410, new cond.
w/holster $650.
(352) 637-2784
(352) 228-1430




10 x 5 Trailer
2 x10 floor $350
(352) 795-5682

GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.

4x8 Open $490
5x8 End $1675
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




NEW POPEYE WATCH
75TH ANNIVERSARY
COLLECTION $50 CAN
E-MAIL PICS 637-2949


# w*




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966















CASH FOR
DIABETIC TEST
STRIPS (352) 621-3001
Want To Buy
Refrigerator with
bottom freezer drawer.
(352)726-2074
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any-A eg.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED VIDEO
GAMES COLLECTION.
LRG. OR SMALL. FOR
CASH (352)361-4464




2 Maltese Litters
4 Females $650.
3 Males $550. Parents
on site, current shots,
CKC reg. Health certs.
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
AKC LAB PUPS 10
weeks old ready for a
good home 2 male blacks
1 female chocolate ask-
ing $275 per pup
352-897-4339 or
352-302-9559.
AKC LABRADOR RE-
TRIEVER PUPPIES
Just In time for
Christmas, Will be 8
weeks on Thanksgiv-
ing Day. Born Sept.
30th, 2010 are adora-
ble chocolate and
yellow, male and fe-
male, labrador re-
trievers. Dew claws
removed at 5 days
old. AKC puppy pack-
ets and health certifi-
cates will be available
at 8 weeks when you
pick your puppy up.
Please call Mick at
352-527-3023 for In-
formation and to
reserve yours for
Christmas.
mlck.flelds@fleldco.
biz
352-527-3023
AUSTRALIAN SHEP-
HERD PUPPIES Out-
standing show and work-
ing lines. Black Tri &
Blue Morles.
Born 10/17/2010.Can
hold until XMAS
650.00 800.00
(352)212-9018
rhumonik@hotmail.com


Lrk
BEAUTIFUL KOI FISH
All sizes, long or short
fin. Show quality or
pond. Great prices!
JEAN (302) 634-1783
BLUE BENGAL KIT-
TENS 8 Weeks Old.
Beautiful spots and mark-
ings. Males and females
available. Very Sweet
raised in home with chil-
dren & pets.
$200.352-302-5788
COTTON' LITTER HAS
ARRIVED! 1 Male, 3
females. Small & Med.,
AKC POMERANIAN'S
(352) 503-7779
(352) 220-2844
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Mini Dachunds Pups
2 males $275. 4 females
$350. papers & health
cert. taking deposits
(352) 465-0647


Livestock


*t *,/ \ *
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
A ^ ^^*


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. tum, quiet park
Util. incl.clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
DUNNELLON
Hwy 488. 2/1. priv lot
new a/c,$425.
(352) 795-6970
HERNANDO 1/1,
Fresh remod., private,
nice yd. scrn'd porch.
$450. Fst/Lst/$300.sec.
Worth A Look!
(352) 400-2411
HERNANDO
2/2, Manuf., DW, CHA,
good water, hilltop view
550 mo. 352-464-0548
1714 Fletcher St off 486
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 BD fum or Unfum
call for prices
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Furn.,1 ac. fen'cd.
Add'tion, deck, shed
$550 +Sec. 352.628.5244
HOMOSASSA
2/1 No smok/pets.
$390. Fst/Lst/Sec.
(352) 628-9884 Lv. msg.
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR. 1-/2BA, $475
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$425; 1BR. 1BA Park
model, $475. Call
352-476-4964
RENT TO OWN
3/2 DW on canal to
River, Floral City, $2,500
down & $450 mo.
352-726-9369




2002 PARK MODEL
40 ft., 2 Ig. slides, stand-
ard frige & toilet, mi-
crohd. sound syS.,. W/D
sleeper sofa, Extras
$10,950 (352) 628-0045
DUNNELLON Nice 2/2
DW in Dunnellon Sq, lot
117, sunroom, carport,
util/stor. Sell furn or un-
furn. All apple. Close to
shopping, PO, restau-
rants Call(352)447-2317
or (352)489-5040
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Liquidation
Sale. 2009 Model
Homes MUST GOII
Call for FffRcolor
brochures
800-622-2832
STONEBROOK 55 +
2/2/1 carport SW, 2 scr.
porches util shedon
pond make offer.
Clubhse, pool, jacuzzi.
(352) 628-0744
Stonerldge Landing 55+
Reduced to $30K, neg.
corner lot. '95 3/2, xtra Irg
DW, excl cond. new roof,
windows & hard wood firs
fireplace, wkshop,
carport, lot of storage
863-514-3615
352-201-9371
USED HOMES

14x52, 2/1 $9,800
'90. HOMES OF MERIT
28x40,2/2, $19,900
'01. SKYLINE
28x56, 3/2, $29,900
16x66, 2/2, $23,900
-96. FLEETWOOD
28x56,.3/2, $29,900
16x56, 2/2 ($23,900
Call for more Info
352-621-9182


WORDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Everyone reaches out by phone (1) Evely answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
L JL0LB11 and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Cost-compare craps cubes (1) they will fit in the letter
__|-_-___1 -__ ~ squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Hobo settlement with tents (1) syllables in each word.

S1 1 1 2010 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
4. Dirt-free lima or pinto veggie (1)


5. Give reply to a spear carrier (2)


6. Cost-conscious search engine company (2)


7. Bullet casing for a "pear tree" bird (2)


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B12 MONDAY, NOVI:MnBIR 15, 2010


Homosassa/Chaz
2/1 CHA Clean, No pets
$485. mo. 727-415-1805




Lake Henderson
$11,500. 55+ Waterfront
Park, Close To The
Water A Beautiful View,
Boat Dock & Storage,
Pool. 1/1/Carport, Fl.
rm. Will consider fi-
nanclng.(352) 476-8364
(352) 563-8694




BIG HOME
New 2011 Jacobsen
triplewide,42 x 60
(2460 sq. ft.) 4/2, L/R
has Stone Fireplace,
Master B/R has re-
treat, 2 & 3 bedrooms
have playroom.
Appliance pkg.,
front deck,
2x6 construction,
R30-19-1 1, only
$89,900 (36.55/sq.ft.)
Call for more info.
352-621-9183

CRYSTAL RIVER
nice 2/2 DW, Ig scr rm.
fully turn, from pots &
pans to linens, /2 ac,
fenced bk yard $47,900
850-260-4575
HOMOSASSA
2 Bed 2 Bath
Fully furnished
Call for Detailsl
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2 BR DW, all appl's.
spacious liv, rm., Ig. lot,
3360 ARUNDEL TERR
1 BIk off Grover
Cleveland $550 mo.
A.T. Tubolino Brk/Owner
(727) 385-6330 Appt.
HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on fenci/2 ac
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs. Open plan,
$39,900 neg. By Owner
(352) 527-3204
HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1/2 ac. cnr lot. New
roof & A/C, 3 W-l cists
& pntry, 2 car gar w/wk
shp/storage, Ige covrd
scrnd patio, fen'cd yd. RV
hkups,$89Kobo owner
finance. 352-423-0220
HOMOSASSA
3/2, on 1/2 acres,
scr'nd porches, well
& septic.(352) 464-3748

must sell!
Inverness-off S. 581
Near Arbor. 3-Br. 2-Ba.
Inground Pool. Many new
upgrades. Huge 30 x 20
Garage. $49,500/obo.
352-533-7953

LAND-N-HOME
Top of the line
Jacobsen, 3/2, 2176
sq. ft. Drywall thru out,
hurricane shutters,
upgrade insulation,
thermo pane double
hung windows
appliance pkg., stone
fireplace, 16x40
screened in back
deck w/hot tub,
13x25 screened front
porch, 45x25 RV port,
300 sq. ft. workshop,
many more features,
too many to list.
Must see! Call to view
352-621-9181

Mobile Apache Shore
4552 N. Pine Dr., Handy
person special 75x100
lot, on dead-end quiet
street, $12,500 Appt.
only (352) 476-7517
Priced to Sell!!
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
1 Acre, Large Deck,
Pole Barn, $49,900
352-746-5912




16 x 62,
930 sq. ft., 2/2
Only $24,900
14x18 florida rm.,
12x30 screened
carport. Home has
large rooms, must
see. In quite park
only $230/mo.
Includes garbage,
sewer, water,
pets allowed.
Call 352-621-3807
to View


703572


/, new renova ons
porch, W/D hookup,
work shop, cent.
air/heat Lake access
$5,500 (Lot rent $220)
(352) 228-1836 after 3P
3/2 DWMH Worth $75K
Selling for $20K
completely renovated,
new kit., ouLtide eshly
palnled. handicap, 2
ools, corlioI lo, Lots ol
ExhIas l 352-212-9499
352-613-38996
55+ Mobile Home Park
2/2, Extra Lg. Shed,
2 LanaI's all apple's,
partial furniture, Asking
$20,000 MUST SEE!
Price Negotiable
(352) 344-1632
Crystal River 55+
2/2/Carport,all apples.
scrn'd rm. Good cond.
$6,000. (352) 220-6634
Crystal River Village
55+ Gated Community
2/2, Den, 2005 Homes
Of Merit, 1457 Sf. Inc.
all appls., carport, Irg
scrn'd rm., Close to
shopping. Must Seel
Immaculate, A Steal At
$59,900 (352) 419-6926
FLORAL CITY
SINGING FOREST
00' 38R, 2Ba, 28x48
Fleetwood manufac-
tured home, 1344sf,
all appliances incl.
$36,990.00 Call
352-796-6360 or
352-796-3925
Ask for Jack
Homosassa 55 + Park
2/2 Dbl. w/upgrades,
carport, new roof, kit.,
patio, CHA, part. turn.
$11,900. (352) 503-7558
Homosassa 55+
2/1 SW, furn, newly
remod, all new appls.
Move In cond. Must
see! $12K. Obo.
(352) 382-7043
Inverness 55+ Park
New 3/2, Carport &
shed. Mid to upper
$20's. (352) 341-1646
INVERNESS
Stoneridge Landing
5460 S. Winged Elm Wy
55+, '93 Modular 2/2,
split plan, 56'LX26'W.
New roof, GREAT
COND. A Must Seel
$47,500. (800) 779-1226
Oak Pond 55+
2/2 DW, 24'x44', new
paint, floor coverings &
appls. Near Lakes &
Bike Trail. $25,500.
(352) 344-4008
Rent to own, Inverness,
2/1, nice older
singlewide, carport,
screen porch, in 55+
Park, $100 mo. + $290
lot rent (352) 726-9369
WEST WIND VILL 55+1
Looking for New or Used
M.H. in a Great Pet
Friendly Community?
Call 352-628-2090


U
0'tv


CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 great neighborhood
7 mos min. No Pets
352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. Near
Town 352-563-9857


2/1.5, CHA, Nice/Quiet
Washer/dry/cable 828 5th
Ave NE $575. Mo.+ Sec.
(727) 343-7343/776-3120
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pots
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
Studio, no dep. $400.
mo. Vicki 352-341-1277




1 BR & 3 BR
Slarting F) $375/mo
Laundry on premises,
352-465-2985
Crystal River 2/1
CHA $425/mo. 1st, last,
sec. (352)697-1680
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 3/1 carport
W/D hkup., $575 mo.
1st& Sec. 352-634-5499
Free Flat Scr TV
w/lease near CR
Newer 2/2
duplex, all kitchen
appliances, patio,
W/D hook-up, nice
yard, Exc. Cond. $625
Maggie (352) 634-1341

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M, W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
2/2 Pool, tennis + facili-
ties, H20, W/D + appi's
incl. Scr. patio,Fst. fir.
$645. (973) 222-1100
INVERNESS
2-2/1, 2nd fl. Air, $370.
incl. H20. (352)344-1337
INVERNESS
Close to hosp. 1/1 $450
2/1 $500 352 422-2393
LECANTO
Nice I Bedroom
746-5238/ 527-3502,
SUMMERHILL
at Meadowcrest Luxury
3/2,5 Townhouse $995
(352) 563-5657



INVERNESS
55+ waterfront pork,
2BR, 1-'2BA. $475
includes lot rent: 1 BR.
$425; 1BR, IBA Park
model, $475. Call
352-476-4964








PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday "
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





HERNANDO
Industrial Park 1800, sf.,
office, brk. rm., 4 bay
garage, fen'cd, & sec.
cameras. Asking$ 1,000.
imo. (352) 637-2220
INVERNESS
Prime Retail & Office
FOR LEASE 900-2800 sf,
Hwy. 44 & Croft Ave.
726-3236, Cell 613-9000


CITRUS HILLS
2/2, unfurn. 1st. floor,
end unit, H20& sewer
Incl. pool, tennis. No
pets, lease opt. owner

HERNANDO
Condo 2/2V/2/Carport,
C. Hills,, long/sht leln
furt/unfultn., 344-0235
HOMOSASSA
Besl I lousinm Valt e
DW's & SW's I loms,
fionr $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000dn + lot rental
EvanRldge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/2 CHA dishwasher,
W/D hk-up $575 no dogs
$600 moves u n726-9570




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225









INVERNESS
Unfurn. 2/1 Villa, $525
mo $525 dep. Incl.
elec. water, boat ramp,
dockage & pool.
(352) 726-1736




Beverly Hills
2/1. Water/Garb. Incld.
$600/mo. 352-400-4663
CITRUS HILLS
3bd w/membership Lawn
care incl./Golf for into
Call 352 201 8687

Property
Management
& Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
> Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
> Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
> Condo & Home
Owner Assoc.Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM
352-628-5600
info@propery
manaamentarouo.



KIM
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 wtlrnt. C/H/A.W/D
$550/mo $1100 Move In
(352) 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
l//CP, w/ FI. Rm. $425.
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
1/2-AC fenc'd yd. $575
Mo. $500 sec. No Pets/
smoke (352) 746-2932
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, 600 Mo. Fst./Lst.
& dep. req. No pets/
smoking, (352)746-0330
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/carport. $540 Mo.
+ $400. Sec.(352)
746-7824(352) 697-9339
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/carport, $575
Rent or Rent to Own
(352)897-4447, 697-1384
BEVERLY HILLS
Laurel Ridge, 3/2/2
Pool & Spa $1,200 mo.
no pets 352-527-1051
CITRUS HILLS
2/2,Unfurn. Ist. floor,
end unit, H20& sewer
incl. pool, tennis. No
pets, lease opt. owner
fin. $700. (352)697-1907
(352) 527-8432
CITRUS HILLS
avail 12/10. 3/2/2 on 1
acre $1000/month
w/purchase option
(352) 201-0991
CITRUS SPRINGS
Cozy 3/2+den wash
/dry., shed, shaded yrd
$725. 954-557-6211


ClASSIFIEl)S




Fm Rm, CHA, Xtra Rm
$625. (352) 795-1722
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $700/mo
795-6299 697-1240
FLORAL CITY
'06 3/2/2 CB. Low dwn.
I-Z lerrrs, Near Floral
Elem, 813-777-7586
FLORAL CITY
.4/1 $495. Fst/Lst/Sec.
HOMOSASSA
*3/2 $600. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-586-5013
HOMOSASSA
3/1, 2 Carports, CHA,
No pets $650. Ist/sec.
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
3/1 Fenced. $750
352-804-4234
INVERNESS
3/2/2, New $850. Mo.
Waybright Real Estate
352.795.1600
INVERNESS
Great Neighboorhood!
Lrg. lovely 3/2/2, Totally
refurbished, next to Fort
Cooper St. Park, Rails To
Trails & close to town.
$800. (352) 409-1900
INVERNESS
Highlands 2 br + .1 ba
2 car. $650.
2/1/1 $590.1st Ist dp
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.(352) 601-2615
(352) 419-6268
INVERNESS
Large 3/2/2, Near Golf,
boat ramp, $750,
3/2 New tile, paint,
$645. 352-228-1542
LECANTO
4/2/2 Just Remodeled.
New granite, flooring.
& carpet. Free
cableGated Comm.
Black Diamond
membership avail
$1,250. (352) 527-0456
LECANTO
Newer 2/2/2, 1 acre
all appls Clean, $750.
+ dep. 352-249-4460
NO CREDIT
CHECK!! RENT TO
OWN!! ...3 BDRMS
352-484-0866
JADEMISSION.COM
RENT TO OWN
Easy Terms 2 BR
Firplace, rustic
fishina/boating
$475 352-220-2573



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Duplex on canal,great
neighborhood, No pets
$600 + dp. 813-986-6630
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
air, until. cbl. Include. $650
nro.+ sec, 352-628-6537




CITRUS COUNTY
Rent or Purchase
3000 UR .3/2/2+pool,
1 ac $800 incls pool
maint.(908) 322-6529
Come into our office
for a FREE list of
foreclosures









Plantation Realty Inc
352-795-0784
ULisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant Biding
For Lease. 3,200 Sf.
large parking lot. Great
visabilty from Hwy.
(352)584-9496 1305 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy.
34432
LECANTO
Newer 2/2/2, 1 acre
half fencedall appls
$750. + dp or buy$129K,
249-4460 /613-0277



C.R/Homosassa
1 & 2 Br.quiet parkutil
incl clean, short/long term
352 220-2077
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Waterfront 3/2 $900+
HIGH POINT 55+
2/2 scr rm. W/D $1100
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Pool Home $1600
Agent (352) 382-1000
FLORAL CITY
Nice 2/2 scr prch Nice
yard. Long/short term.
352-344-8213
HERNANDO
3/2, Res/Comm. Poss.
Office. Furn./ Unfurn. On
Withlacoochee River,,
scrn'd porch, dock $795
Mo.Dave (352)628-4878
(352)302-5875.



Inverness, Citrus County
Tree Farm 21 ac MOL
Shown by appt only
352-694-4442
OWNER FINANCING
Bad/No Credit Okay
727-992-1372
$38.700. LECANTO
4 BR, lbth. 1500SF/


Block/Lg lot/Needs
total Interior rehab/
structurally okay/
fenced/$7.71< down
$439/Mo,
$251( under Mkt.
$72.700. LECANTO
Buy one get 2 FREE
6bds-4 Bths In 3
LuIls/3-2/1-2/2-1/+2.5AC-2Par
cels/Harses
OK/Fenced/$37K
DW/Qulet Setting

$43.700 HOMOSASSA
3Bd-2Bt-single/Ig 4rm
addl-
Ilin/1000sf/2,MAC/bordes
50achiunlling
preserve/Horses
OK/$14.7Dw/$326/Mo
12yrs lefl on nole
** *,**
$58.700. DUNNELLON
3Bd-2Bt/Bit-2000/18 0f/DbIlw
d/1AC/Move-l
ready/Fireplace/H-lot
Tub/Quiet selling/
$9.7Dw/$439/Mo/
$25K Under Mkt.
$69.700 DUNNELLON/
LEVYCO.2Bd- 1Bth/
925SF/Very Private/1
Natural AC/Mlns from
Ocala/US19-US41-SR121/


tatrnationalor


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper Is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes It ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an Intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination. "
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com

I


New Homes
$79,900
3/2/2 1880 sq. ft.
Includes Lot
352-897-4447
352-697-1384



$44,900.
Completely Remod'ld
2/2/1, 1,200 St. new kit.,
baths, flooring, lights,
fans, etc.
Open house Sunday,
12P. 3P. 41 S. Jefferson
St. (352) 527-1239

NO CREDIT
CHECK!! RENT TO
OWN....3 BDRMS
352-484-0866
JADEMISSION.COM




3/2/2 Brentwood Villa in
Terra Vista/Citrus Hills
by Owner. All Kitchen
Appliances, carpet,
Laminate, tile floors.
1784 living SF. Home
has been well Main-
tained and move in
ready. $162,500
(352)527-1789








Community Poo


Avail. Easy access to
OrSF., 2 land, Tampa,
& Ocala. $79,800.
(352) 422-5819
REDUCED!
Citrus Hills POOL HOME
4/3/oversz. 2 Car Gar
cir dr. tile fir. 2000 sf of
LA on 1 ac Membership
Avail .Not req $237,900.




Arbor Lakes 55+,
3/2/2 New kit., GE Prof.
stainless appls. oak
cabs., walk in shower.
Prime loc. $234,900.
(352) 726-7952



3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.lnvemrnessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com













Short Sales


Call Quade Feeser
Century 21,
J.W. Morton Real
Estate Inc
Office: (352) 726-6668
Cell (352) 302-7699
qfeeser@yahoo.com
Great Location
Oaklee Grove
3BR, 3BA, 2 Story
Town Home
2Car gar./detached,
inclosed pool. All for
Only $122,000 firm
(352) 726-9349 M-F 8-4



Move In Ready
3/2/2 '98 Pool Home,
ceiling fans, walk in
closets, all appls.
$182K. (352) 860-2303
(352) 586-0555




3/2, Fenced Yard,
Newly remodeled
1,250 sq. ft. Home
$45000
(352) 362-9793


2/2 Home, Completely
furnished, near Publlx,
Walgreens &
Chassawolizka River,
1/2 lot, city water &
sewer $47,500 Call Ray
(352) 382-5901
Six Room House 3/2
5951 Mink Ln $8,000
dwn, $400 mo 1/2 acre.
$47,000 Property sold
AS IS. Open House Sun
10-4727-586-4292














Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For Youl
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY I Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com


Michele Rose, Realtor
Simply put I '1I work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvyt)
yahoo.aom
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
propertylIll
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685
OWNER FINANCING
Bad/No Credit Okay
727-992-1372
$38.700. LECANTO
4 BR. lbth. 1500SF/
Block/Lg lot/Needs
total interior rehab/
structurally okay/
fenced/$7.7K down
$439/Mo.
$25K under Mkt.
*****
$72.700. LECANTO
Buy one get 2 FREE
6bds-4Bths in 3
urits/3-2/1-2/2-1/+2.AC-2Par
ceisfHorses
OK/Fenced/$37K
DW/Quiet Setting

$43.700 HOMOSASSA
3Bd-2Bt-single/Ig 4rm
addi-
fion/r10sf/'2,5AC/badcrs
50 oac huntrg
preserve/Horses
OK/$14.7Dw/$326/Mo
12yrs left on note

$58.700. DUNNELLON
3Bd-2Bt/Bt-20D/185f/Dblw
d/1AC/Moven
ready/Fireplace/Hot
Tub/Quiet setting/
$9.7Dw/$439/Mo/
$25K Under Mkt.
,*****
$69,700 DUNNELLON/
LEVY CO.
2Bd-1Bt/925SF/Very Pri-
vate/1 Natural AC/Mins
from
Ocala/US19-US41-SR121/
a ,r -I


Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmall.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887




INVERNESS, Great Loc!
2/2, 2nd floor. Enl
porch overlooks pool.
Updated kit, baths. etc.
Low maint fees reduc'd
$54,900 352-586-1920




1267ac
LAND AUCTION
November 26th
Riverfront-Divided View
full details onllnel
CetiledandAucltkncom
(800)711-9175 Cer-
tifled Real Estate
AUC-002792, GAL3046
10% Buyer's Premium




BUY OWNER
panoramic, River view
4200 sf, 4 level custom
hm, 3 spacious suites
Jacuzzi rm .4 ac $839K
(352) 503-2288


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Watedroinic


Come into our office
for a FREE list of
foreclosures


Plantation Realty Inc
352-795-0784
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 story, 2 covered boat
slips & seawall, 5br/3ba
2kit. near Kings Bay
$525K (352) 563-9857










Foreclosures

aind

Short Sales
Call Quade Feeser
Century 21,
J.W. Morton Real
Estate Inc
Office: (352) 726-6668
Cell (352) 302-7699
qfeeser@yahoo.com
HOMOSASSA
REDUCEDIMUST
SELLI Owner Finance
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied. 2 frpls,
granite. $449K.Owner
Finance or Trade.
727-808-5229




2 ACRES $16,000!
Best price in Citrus Co.
Dead end road.,
overlooking open
acreage, very private.
Livestock & mobiles ok.
C.Mike Smith R. E.
Broker (352) 628-0505
10 ACRES
With Single Wide Trailer
$89,000 (786) 255-6955
Hernando City Heights,
2 side by side lots, well,
septic, pwr pole, water
conditioning system
and Shed incl. $13,000
firm. (352) 228-0769
HOMOSASSA/CHAZ
2 beautifully wooded
1 ac lots for homes or
MH. close to shopping,
water & gulf $16 k ea or
$30K both 352 795-7235
INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots #39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919)329-7033




Citrus/Lecanto
ABSOLUTE
SOLD REGARDLESS
OF PRICE
AUCTION
IN CRYSTAL OAKS
Westchase Sub.
Phase I: 52 Lots
"Sold Separately"
Phase II: 21+/-Ac
Phase lll:37+/Ac
All Sold Separately
Auction held at
Lot 12 Westchase Lp.
Sat. Dec. 4th
at 11am
Preview From
10am Sale Day
Additional Info
On Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.com
Call David Slavinsky
813-928-6832








Homosassa
.4 Acre Lot
wooded, river access,
$17 000 owner finance
352-621-1664




BOAT TRAILER
14' galvanized. $275.
Obo. (352) 453-6789



2001 ROBALO 21'
OPEN FISHER
130HP Honda 4 stroke /
ALL ELECTRONICS /
tandom trailer EXC
COND 14K
305-905-3047 cell
2002 BAYLINER
A MUST SEE!
18' Bowrider w/traller.
only 114 hrs. on motor.
Incls. fish/fndr, safety
vests, water tube etc.
$7,500. Obo. Call
for directions.
(352) 586-7346
2010 CAROLINA
SKIFF 16' 60 hp Suzuki,
bimini Top, $15k or
take over pmts
(352) 503-7425
cell 330-316-0013
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $8,000
(352) 560-3019
GALAXY C/C
22,5 IB /OB ,V6 Merc
Cruiser, tandum trailer
fully equipped, GREAT
boat ,GREAT buy $4K
(352) 746-0348
HOMOSASSA
MARINE

NEW BOATS!
Sundance 17 Flats
Yamaha F-70
Aluminum Trailer


$18,900.
Starcraft 155 Bay
Aluminum Trailer
$8,500.
Sundance 17 CC
Yamaha T-60
Aluminum Trailer
$15,900.
Pathfinder 20 Bay
Yamaha F-150
Aluminum Trailer
$36,900.
homosassamarine.
cam
We sell consignmentsl
352-628-2991


15FT '03. swivel seats
galv. trlr, 40HP Yamaha
30 hrs., extras, $4,650
abo 628-2703 586-3132
HURRICANE FUNDECK


Nice, Extras
$9900/obo. 795-0122
NEW AIRBOAT
16 x 8, Good fishing
boat, Livewell and rod
holders, Lot of storage
$14,000 (352) 637-1391
PONTOON
20ft Lowe, 50HP
Johnson, new trailer,
$4,000 will separate
(352) 344-9810
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$6,900. (352) 382-3298
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225, 400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$19,500. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
STRUCTURE
CRAFT
93 16 fiberglass flats
boat, 40 tiller Johnson
w/trim,live-well trolling
motor B/top, galv trailer
safety equip, $2900.00
firm. 352 566 8504 or
352-400-2132
SYLVAN 15' ALUM
V-Hull, 25HP Yam. 4 strk
Bimini, live well, troll
mtr. depth fndr, trir.
$3,495. 239-565-4839
TRITON 220 LTS
'06 Bay Boat 225hp
Merc, trim tabs, jack
plate, troll mtr, VHF,
alum rr. $26,500/Obo.
352-463-7420, 493-3008
TROPHY 22FT
1999 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force,
E-Z Load Tand.Trir. elec-
tronics will sacrifice for
$7900. 352-726-1489
WANTED Old Canoe
any condition
(352) 249-0877
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsuoercenter.com














B T." S










"--I



2004 Montana 5th
wheel, slides/awning
$16k. w/orw/out
matching '03 Dodge
diesel 2500 crew,
new tires 95K miles
$32K for both
352 873-7560

r CONSIGNMENT USA
y R, MthP A rV's .
9 8% Sale Sucess
Nor






352-461-4518 Frank

DAMION INTRUDER
'01 36F 2 slides, 20K
m, V-10 motor 7Kw
gen., icemaker,
washer, dryer, very
good cond., $33,500



02 Diesel Pusher 38'
300 Cat, freightliner
chass, SXS, Frig,
icemaker. W/D,
full paint.. 2 slides.
Many more options,
fully equipped.
352-307-6157
FLEETWOOD
94' Bounder, 34',
wide body., celler
model motor home,
REDUCED TO $14,000
(352) 628-7993
FLEETWOOD
Class A '94, Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self cant,
sips 6, 2 LCD TV's
$12.900 352-795-6736
GEORGIA BOY
00 Landau 33.5' 1 slide
V10 fully equip.w/00
Jeep Grand Cherokee
equip to tow $32K for
both. or $27K for RV
(352) 422-1250
GEORGIA BOY
05' Pursuit, 35' 2 slides.
Fully loaded, gas.
Exc. cond. Must Seem
$40,000. (352) 503-5002
I Buy RV'S Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Since
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778
Luxury Motor Home
Diesel Pusher, ready
to go many extras
304-281-3744
PACE ARROW
35' Class A, 1996. dual


AC, new tires, 5K gen,
60K mi Exc Cond, $25K.
352-382-1000
RV Financing Is Easy
at COMO RV,
Hwy. 44-W., Inverness
(352) 628-1411 W.A.C.
SOUTHWIND
98' V-10 eng., dual AC,
super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers,
new tires, good cond.
$31k Obo(352)302-6534



FOURWINDS '08
25' lite T/T, sips 6 used
time, 1 owner, like
new $13,500 firm.
(352) 746-2925
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778


I i .^ Finder

www.chroniclehomriefinder.com


Fita Youwr Drea t Home

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch ro nicdI-ho ,(.efinder.com











CITRUS COUNTY' (FL) CHRONICLE


Cmpes


24' Front B ed $7k
new tires .ready to go
(352) 621-9766
JAYCO
5th whl 40' toy hauler
w/12' garage. 13ft
slide, generator 1999
Ford Larado LA West
F350 Dually 93K1 ml
$44,900 can sep'rte,
no smoke
Local (502) 345-0285
STARCRAFT 07
Homestead Ilte 5th whl
240 RLS 26' exc cond
$14,900(352) 795-7808



Engine Houst
3 ton Long Ram Jack
model LR 13B, extension
legs $300
(352) 564-1280
SMITTY'S AUTO
(352) 628-9118
Service Now AvailllI

Vehicle Sales and
SERVICE

WE pay CASH for all
vehicles.Dead or Alive
Trades are WELCOME
We have Used Parts
Call us for your
SERVICE NEEDS
(352) 628-9118




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Notl
352-445-3909
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CONSIGNMENT USA
|Cr.Trucks Boats. |
I I
RV., Mhs, Al's
| 98% Sale Sucess I
352-461-4518 Frank

VEHICLE DONATIONS
Help fight breast
Cancer
RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPONS
Help us Win
Pepsi-Refresh Grant
www.ubcf.info
FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners
Ar'eontdi


AF-ORDABLE
AUTOS SUV'S
CAH H
$ SPECIAL $
'94 Lincoln Town
Car $695.
'93 Buick Park Ave.
$725.
'98 Mazda Millenia
$795.
Clean, Dependable.
CALL TOM TODAY
(352)563-1 902
WE BUYS CARS I

Homosassa, FL

AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
E-Z LOANS
$495. DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL TONY TODAY
(352) 563-1 902
WE BUYS CARS
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.

AMERICAN
AUTO SALES
of Crystal River

WE CONSIGN
10% OFF
MOTORCYCLES
NEW CARS ARE IN

'06 SATURN VUE
VUE $10,999.

'04, DODGE
STRATUS $5,495.

CHECK OUT
OUR FINANCING
WARRANTY ALL CAR


Tire Kingdom
Auto & Truck Financing
Is Easy at COMO AUTO
Hwy. 44-W., Inverness
(352) 344-1411 W.A.C.
AUTO RENTALS
AUTO SALES
AUTO TRADES
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR by Airport
461-4518 or 795-4440
BUICK
01OLeSabreLTD, loaded,
leather, alloys, 82K ml
needs nothing,X-tra's
$6300 352 341-0791
BUICK
'03, Century, 42K miles,
like new, leather,
CD, AC $6,100
(352) 382-1583
BUICK
'98, Century, 92K miles,
good cond. $2,750 obo
(352) 249-3195
Beverly Hills
CADILLAC 02
STS, loaded, moon roof
Silver/grey leather, mint
cond. 85K ml,. $7,900
(352) 746-1308
CADILLAC
2001, Elderado ETC
leather bose stereo
showroom new
Diamond white pearl
$7990, 1866-838-4376

CHEVROLET
2005, Corvette 6-spd
leather bose stereo
heads up display, 35k
orig. ml. Call for
more details $28980
1866-838-4376
CHRYSLER
'06, Crossfire, convert.
auto, low ml., excel.
cond. $14,000 obo
352-601-2053,228-1053
CHRYSLER
1995 Concord, 4 dr,
loaded, like new $3,000
(352) 860-1610
CHRYSLER
2005 Chrysler PT
Cruiser Touring edition
68k nicely equipped
$7990, 1866-838-4376
CORVETTE CON-
VERTIBLE
1994 Corvette White/Red
interior. 59K miles, Gar-
age kept, non-smoker.
Mint condition.
352-527-8663


08' Shelby Mustang,
2, 500 MI., Navi. syst.
Over $50.K. Invested.
Better Than Newl
Sacrifice for $36,900.
(352) 302-5875
FORD
2007, Taurus SEL
loaded Great
condition 78k
Better hurry $7990
1866-838-4376
FORD CROWN VIC
2004, A one owner, full
pwr, cruise control,
excell. cond., 57,761 ml.
$7,900 (352) 527-3828
HONDA
2000, Accord EX
W/Leather 69k Orig.
Miles, Cleanest one in
Florida $7990
1866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2006, Elantra GLS 57k
original miles 1-owner
Don't hesitate $8990
1866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2007, Sonata SE, V6
Sunroof alloy wheels
33k orig. mi.$11990
1866-838-4376
LEXUS
2005 RX330 beige,
35K mi., loaded, mint,
$26,000 (352) 228-7940
MAZADA 03
Mata 46K mi. 5
spd.Shinsen Special
Edition in exc cond
und blue bk $10,750
(352) 382-1854
MERCEDES BENZ
'04 C230 Sport Com-
pressor, silver w/Ilght
gray int. 4 dr., 4 cyl.,
30 mpg, 95K. ml., great
cond. Priced to sell
$11,000 (352) 489-7674
MERCURY
'03, Grand Marquis.
72k miles, Loaded, mint
$5,900
(352) 249-7702
MERCURY
1996, Sable GS nicely
equipped 86k original
miles $3990
1866-838-4376
MITSUBISHI
'03 Diamanti ES, fully
equip. Superior cond.
$5,995. Obo.
(352) 382-5702
OLDSMOBILE
'93 Cutlass Clera S, 4 dr.
2nd owner 151K. ml.
full power, exc. cond.
$1,850 (352) 637-1074
TOYOTA
2005, Corolla Le
nicely equipped 14k
original miles
Better hurry wont last
call for deal!
1866-838-4376
TOYOTA
'90 Corolla, 4 dr. AC,
auto trans., 49,279K. ml.
Clean runs great, 34
mpg. First $2,400 gets
Iti(352) 586-1905
VW
06' Jetta, 4 dr.,gas, 5
spd. auto, 53K. Mi.
clean car. $9,99500.
(352) 601-0936


1954 FORD
F100 pick up auto,
V8, pwr steer/brks,
hunterz_carz@yahoo
.com (352) 621-0182
TRADE (727) 422-4433
CORVETTE
03' Z06, 50th. anniv.
edifiton. $29,500, 19,100
Ml. Show car cond.,
fully loaded, heads up
display, new fires.
Davld@(352) 637-6443
CORVETTE
'81, Mirror T-tops
350 Chrome eng., Air,
auto, new fires, excel
cond. $7,500 obo
352-601-2053, 228-1053
FORD
1973 THUNDERBIRD 39K
orig. ml, like new, al-
ways stored Inside.
$9900/obo. 795-0122
JAGUAR 58
4 dr. good shape too
be restored$5500
1959 Jag parts only
4 dr.$600(352) 637-1770

j. ,. l J



-1A A; 1-11

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





AUTO RENTALS
AUTO SALES
AUTO TRADES
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR by Airport
461-4518 or 795-4440

DODGE
2004, Dakota Crew
Cab SLT Mint cond.
low ml., Color coded
bed topper $11980
1866-838-4376
Dodge
99 Dakota, V6 mag.
exc cond new brakes
$2500 352-257-8277
FORD
2000, F-150 Super cob
Lariat leather 5.4 liter
V8 bed liner, 58k origi-
nal miles Wont find
another $9990
1866-838-4376


FORD
2001 F350 $6,400
Stake Bed, 82000 ml,
White exterior, Gray inte-
rior, 10 cylinder, Auto,
2WD, 2 door, excellent
condition, A C, airbags,
AM FM radio, Cruise, tilt
wheel, low miles. Cold air
runs great. Tim
352-860-1138


FORD
2004, Expedition
Eddie Bauer 3rd row
of seating leather snrf
4X4 hard to find bet-
ter hurry call for deal
1866-838-4376
FORD
'94 Ranger, 4X4, V-6,
AC, 5 spd., exc. cond.
$3,500. (352) 465-1499
FORD
94, F150 4x4, auto hubs
306 motor, a/c, good
cond new motor 75 K
ml $3900 (352) 220-2958
FORD
97 F150 runs great, good
tires all around,cold A/C,
body is in good shape, in-
cludes bed liner. 158K
miles. Wine color with
gold accents $3400.00.
Call between 6pm-9pm.
352-564-8284
HONDA
2008 Ridgeline, RTL
model 4WD, loaded,
15,400 mi. $28,380
(352) 419-4776
TOYOTA 99
Tacoma Pre-Runner
110K mi. big tires, great
a/c, well kept, well
maint $6K,obo(352)
795-3625/212-1854




FORD
2002 escape xlt 4x4 v-6
automatic. 152k. runs
and looks great $4200.
obo. 352-978-0022
FORD
2003 Excursion XLT V8
gas. ICE cold A/C. New
tires. Runs like new.
159K miles. $8500.00
OBO 352-249-7787 or
352-586-3339
HONDA
2004, Pilot EX-L leather
sunroof 3rd row of
seating. Low miles 4X4
$12988
1866-838-4376
ISUZU RODEO
1995 4x4, nearly new
oversize tires, w/extra
set, $5,000. Poss, finan-
cing at $250 mo. or
discount for cash
(352) 726-9369
SOLD
JEEP
'00 Grand Cherokee,
Laredo, 2 wd, orig.
owner, all paper work
& maint. records.,
$5,000. exc. cond. NO
accidents, 150,000k.
Mi. Call David




DODGE
'88, Ram 3/4 Ton, 4x4
89K org. miles, 35" tires
$2,500
(352) 634-5499


CHEVY EQUINOX
Van '05 Tan, top cond.
in & out. asking $11,500
obo 352 527-0004
DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
SXT allot wheels rear
air conditioning
50k orig. miles $10988
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2003 Odyssey LX
77k original miles rear
a/c, 1-owner vehicle
Great Value $9980
1866-838-4376


POLARIS MAGNUM
2001,325, ATV, 4x4 shaft
driven, mossy oak
color, $2,C00 firm
(352) 726-8804




BIG DOG
'03, Custom chopper,
3,500 miles, S & S mo-
tor, 6spd Baker, 3" open
drive, Lots of extras,
$14,000 obo MUST SELL
352-382-0403
BIG DOG
'03, Custom chopper,
3.500 miles. S & S motor,
6spd Baker, 3" open
drive. Lots of extras,
$14,000 obo MUST SELL
352-382-0403
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'03 ROADKING Fact.
custom. HI pert.
Over $43k In receipts.
17k ml. $9,700 563-0615
Crystal River
Harley Davidson
2007 Heritage Softtall,
red/black w/ lots of
chrome 15,500 ml.,
$12,000 (352) 212-6450
Harley Davidson
2010 Super Glide, 1,007
miles, still under warr.
many extras, like new
$12,500. firm 382-2425








LIFAN ENDURO
2007 Street legal 2007'
Lifan TMS200GY-5
Blu/Blk Enduro, 200cc,
ONLY 2678 miles, runs
like new, comes w/ cover
& Blu/White Fulmer
helmet..ALL READY TO
GO..$1,200.00 OBO
Contact Frank
BH-352-464-0703

Lucky U Cycles
352-330-0047
www.luckvucvcles

1989 HONDA GL1500
TRIKE
FULL LEHMAN TRIKE
REVERSE$12,900.00
352-330-0047
2003 YAMAHA VSTAR
650 SILVERADO
SADDLEBAGS, WIND-
SHIELD, LOW MILES
$2,995.00
352-330-0047
2004 H-D DYNA
SUPERGLIDE
SADDLEBAGS.
WINDSHIELD. EXTRAS

352-330-0047
LUCKY U CYCLES
2001 H-D ELECTRA
GLIDE
RADIO, BACKREST,
$7,500.00
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
CaM
2006 H-D 883L
TWO UP SEAT, LOW
MILES
$3.900.00
352-330-0047
2002 KAWSAKI
VULCAN 75.0
VOYAGER TRIKE


HARLEY DAVIDSON
84 Soft tall,custorn
paint, lowered, APES
lots of Xtra's, exc. cond
$8500 firm 352 637-7124

KAWASAKI
2006 Concourse
5200 miles $4,995
obo.




988-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board

Noic toiehos-


CLASSIFIED




SUZUKI
02 Intruder Volusla,
800cc water cooled,
shaft drive, excl. cond
$2,950 (352) 628-4360


SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard, black,
805 CC, w/ windshelld,
saddlebags, tach,




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty & equipment via the
Internet at govdeals.com


MONDAY, NOVEiMBER 15, 2010 B13


YAMAHA
'01, V Star Classic 650,
looks & runs great. Bags
& WInshleld $2,495
(352) 270-9254

YAMAHA 06
Slverado 1100 Classic
almost mint cond. silver
& gold new tires, lights
& Xtra chrome $4k firm
Cr 2528-6130



from November 1, 2010 -
November 30, 2010.
Published In Citrus County
Chronicle Nov. 1 thru
Nov. 30, 2010.

Noicst Ceitors


402-1115 MCRN
Wilkins, Richard Linn 2010-CP-00725 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-CP-00725
IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD LINN WILKINS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Richard Linn WIlkins, deceased, whose date of
death was February 27, 2010 and whose Social Security Number Is XXX-XX-7688, Is
pending In the circuit court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice Is required to be served must file
their claims witl this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER 1HE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED,
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 8.2010.
Personal Representative:
Beth E. Wilkins a/k/a Beth E. Antrim c/o Courtney D. Durham, Esq.
P.O. Box 1913, Inverness, Florida 34451
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Courtney D. Durham, Esq. FL Bar No. 834041
204 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Tel: (352) 726-0407
Published in Citrus County Chronicle. Nov. 8 & 15, 2010.


403-1115 MCRN
Lafferty. Michael J. 2010 CP 724 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. 2010 CP 724
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL J. LAFFERTY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Michael J. Lafferty, deceased, whose date of
death was Sept., 20, 2010, is pending in the Citrus County. Florida, Probate Division.
File Number 2010 CP 724; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is Nov 8, 2010.
Personal Representatives:
Mariann D. Wright
440 N. Griffith Avenue. Crystal River, FL 34429
Attorney for Personal Ropresentaltive
Thomas M. VanNess. Jr, Esq Florida Bar No 0857750 1-352-795-1444
VanNess & VanNess. PA 1205 N Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 8 & 15. 2010.


404-1115 MCRN
Chnstenson. Richard L. 2010 CP 705 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. 2010 CP 705
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF RICHARD L. CHRISTENSON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Richard L. Christenson, deceased, whose date
of death was Sept., 12, 2010, is pending in the Citrus County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion. File Number 2010 CP 705; the address of which Is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness. FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is Nov. 8, 2010.
Personal Representatives:
Brent Louis Christenson
8519 10th Place. Kenosha, WI 53144
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Thomas M. VanNess. Jr., Esq. Florida Bar No. 0857750 1-352-795-1444
VanNess & VonNess, PA., 1205 N. Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 8 & 15, 2010.


405-1115 MCRN
Blochowiak, Paul R. 2010-CP-666 Notice to Cred. (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-CP-666
IN RE: ESTATE OF PAUL R. BLOCHOWIAK A/K/A PAUL ROBERT BLOCHOWIAK
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of Paul R, Blochowiak a/k/a Paul Robert Blochowiak, deceased,
File Number 2010-CP-666 by the Circuit Court for Citrus County. Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that
the decedent's date of death was February 21,2010: that the total value of the
estate is $43,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been
assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Patricia A. Blochowiak 5611 South Delilah Point, Homosassa, FL 34446
1 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made In the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733,.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of tils Notice is Nov. 8, 2010.
Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ Patricia A. Blochowiak
5611 South Delilah Point, Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ John A. Nelson, Esq. Florida Bar No.; 0727032 Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A,
2218 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness. FL 34453 Telephone: (352) 726-6129 Fax: (352) 726-0223
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. B & 15,2010.


406-1115 MCRN
Ash, Ernest A. 2010-CP-747 Notice to Cred. (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2010-CP-747 Division: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF ERNEST A. ASH
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered In the estate of ERNEST A. ASH, deceased, File Number 2010-CP-747, by the Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Piobate Division, the address of which Is 110 N,
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450: that the decedent's date of death was Nov. 2.
2006: that the total value of the estate Is $64,950,00 and that the names and ad-
dresses of those to whom It has been assigned by such order are:
Name Address
Diana Smith 1141 Coulter Rd., Lapeer, MI 48446
Christopher Ash 704 Cherry St., Linden, MI 48451
Allan Ash 11485 Kolth Dr., Linden, MI 48451
Thomas Ash 2770 Shady Hollow Dr., White Lake, Ml 48383
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is Nov. 8, 2010.
Person Giving Notice:
/s/ VERNA K, SMI1H
1062 Sabal Palm Way, Inverness, FL 34453
Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /s/ MARIE T. BLUME. Attny Florida Bar No. 0493181
P.O. Box 2763, Inverness, FL 34451 Telephone: (352) 726-7778 Fax: (352) 726-7798
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 8 & 15, 2010.


407-1115 MCRN
Lynch, Maile Theresa 2010-CP-793 Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBA1E DIVISION
File No.: 2010-CP-793
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE THERESA LYNCH,
DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ES1AIE::
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administrallon ihas been
entered In the Estate of MARIE THERESA LYNCH, deceased, File Number 2010-CP-793,
by the Circuit Court for Citrus Couniy, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
Is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of
death was SEPT., 13, 2010; that the total value of the estate Is $938.52 and that the
names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
SUNTRUST BANK, 501 EAST LAS OLAS BLVD., FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the Decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made In the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with


'I I


I s ti Cei


this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is Nov. 8.2010,
Person Giving Notice:
SUNTRUST BANK /s/ CARMELA R. FOGLIO
501 EAST LAS OLAS BLVD., FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301
Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, PA.
/s/ Michael Mountjoy, Esq. Florida Bar No. 157310 209 Courthouse Square, Inverness,
FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 8 & 15, 2010.


410-1122 MCRN
Bucclante, Joseph 2010-CP-660 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
FILE NO. 2010 CP 660
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH BUCCIANTE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the ESTATE OF JOSEPH BUCCIANTE, deceased, File Number
2010 CP 660 Is pending In the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, Including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this Notice Is served must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate, Including unmatured, contingent or unliquldated
claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is November 15, 2010.
Personal Representative:
DANIEL J, BUCCIANTE
1710 S.W. 106th Terr., Davie, FL 33324
Attorney for Personal Representative:
BRUCE CARNEY, Esq. Carney & Associates, P.A. 7655 W Gulf to Lake Hwy., Suite 2,
Crystal River, Florida 34429 352-795-8888
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, November 15 & 22 ,2010.


411-1122 MCRN
McWilliams, Carl F 2010-CP-809 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2010-CP-809
IN RE: ESTATE OF CARL F. MCWILLIAMS,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of CARL F, MCWILLIAMS, deceased, whose date of
death was September 23. 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL
34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MOREAFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is November 15, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, Florida 34447
Attorney for Personal Representatives:
/s/ ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN Florida Bar No. 0075272 Attorney for the Estate
PO Box 415, Homosassa Springs, Florida 34447 Ph: (352) 382-7934 Fax: (352) 382-7936
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, November 15 & 22, 2010.


ForcisueSl


Focosf Sale/
AconNoice


408-1115 MCRN
Vs. Atherton. Ruth Arlene 09-2010-CA-002813 Notice of Action Constr. Service
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE C'TCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 09-2010-CA-002813
CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
RUTH ARLENE ATHERTON, ET AL..
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: RUTH ARLENE ATHERTON AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RUTH ARLENE ATHERTON,
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living: and if he/she/they be dead,
the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or
against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties hav-
ing or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the
mortgage being foreclosed herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property:
LOT 3, BLOCK 127, OF WITH-LA-POPKA ISLANDS, UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 69, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1989 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, ID # FLIFL4513A AND FLIFL4513B.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any. to it on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ. Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 900
South Pine Island Road, #400, Plantation, FL 33324-3920 on or before Dec. 8. 2010.
(no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice of action)
and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or Immediately thereafter: otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at CITRUS County. Florida, this 29 day of
October, 2010.
BETTY STRIFLER, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Kathy Stalbaum, Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J,. STERN, Attorney for Plaintiff, 900 S. Pine Island Rd., Suite
400, Plantation, FL 3324-3920
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate In this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact COURT ADMINISTRATION at least 7 days before
your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. at the CITRUS County
Courthouse at 352-341-6400; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 8 & 15,2010. 10-25549 TCFMH


409-1122 MCRN
Vs. Alzona, Gilbert 2010 CA5344 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2010-CA-5344
SUPERIOR BANK, a Federal Savings Bank,
Plaintiff,
vs..
GILBERT ALZONA, JOCELYN ALZONA, DOUGLAS COURT, LLC, a Nevada limited liability
company a/k/a DOUGLAS CT., LLC, a Nevada limited liability company, CYPRESS
VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not-for-profit corporation,
and JOHN DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT, JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT and ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER SAID DEFENDANTS,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER SAID DEFENDANTS
(Addresses Unknown)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that on action has been filed by Plaintiff. SUPERIOR BANK, a
Federal Savings Bank, seeking foreclosure of the following real properly:
Lot 7, Block B-3, Cypress Village, Sugarmill Woods, according to the map or plot
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 9, Pages 86 throughISO, Plot Book 10, Pages 1
through 150, and Plat Book 11, Pages I through 16, of the Public Records of Citrus
County, Florida, as amended in Plat Book 9, Page 87-A, of the Public Records of
Citrus County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a ',isv ol a written c
fense, if any, to L. Geoffrey Young, Esquire Plaintiff's attorneys. ',s address is 1,
Second Avenue North, 17th Floor, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701, winon 30 days fron,
the date of this Notice, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or Immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in Plaintiff's complaint.
Dated this 5 day of November, 2010.
BET1Y S1RIFLER. Clerk of Courts, CLERK OF COURT. CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL)
-v: Is/ Kathy Stoalboaum Depuy Cleik
Published In Citrus County Chronicle. November 15 & 22, 2010.


I-Bi Nt


992-1118 M/THCRN
Bids for Mosquito Chemicals C.C. Mosquito Control
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE TO BID
The Citrus County Mosquito Control District wishes to invite you to submit sealed pro-
posals for Mosquito Chemicals. Sealed bids plainly noted on envelope. "BID
PROPOSAL FOR MOSQUITO CHEMICALS" will be received at the Lecanto Office until
2:00 p.m. on December 8, 2010.
The bid will be awarded at the regular board meeting on December 14. 2010 at 8:00
a.m.
Specifications may be obtained by contacting the office, 968 N, Lecanto Hlwy.
Lecanto, Fl. 3'4461 or by calling (352) 527-7478.
The Board reserves the light to reject any and all bids and to waive any and all for-
mallies. By order of the Board of Commlssloners of the Citrus County Mosquito Con-
trol DIstrict.
Any person toqulilng reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical Impairment should contact the Citrus County Mosquito Control Dis-
lilct. 968 N. Lecanto IHwy, Lecanto, Fl. 34461 (352) 527-7478, at least two days before
the meeting.
Any person who wishes to appeal any decision made by the Board. Agency ao
Commission with respect to any matter consldeled at such meeting or healing, will
neeu a lecoid of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, may need to ensure
that a veiballm record of the ,. I., 1 i ... which record includes the testi
money and evidence upon whic 1.: '..r1 i i I 1
Bev Davis,
Chairman of the Board
Published In the Citrus County Chronicle, November 15 & 18, 2010.


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