Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02167
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: November 14, 2010
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02167

Full Text






Coach Dabney Day: Popular educator honored


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NOVEMBER 14, 2010


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Online tool maps crimes


Sheriffs office website

pinpoints problems
SHEMIR WILES
Chronicle
Keeping an eye on crime in the neigh-
borhood doesn't have to be a task left up to
a neighborhood watch group.
With the Citrus County Sheriff's Office
crime-mapping tool, any individual can
learn valuable information about crime ac-
tivity in their area.
"It's all about community policing," Sgt.
Chris Evan with the crime prevention unit
said. "It's a great tool to know what's going
on. I always say 'knowledge is power."'
CrimeMapping is a browser-based inter-


active application that allows users to ac-
cess crime data in their neighborhoods.
The information, which is extracted from
the sheriff's office's records management
system, is updated daily with people being
able to view, at the most, 90 days worth of
data.
Since Oct. 2008, the application has been
available on the sheriff's office website
and Evan said many deputies and even
public service officers use the tool to keep
an eye on their communities.
Though it is helpful to law enforcement,
See CRIMES/Page A5
Citizens can check When and
where crimes have been committed
using a crime-mapping tool on the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office website,
www.sheriffcitrus.org.


K\. ~iKg74 'I. B~~


Smith: Tm not

one to block

people out'
MIKE WRIGHT
Chronicle
Jimmie T Smith dropped out
of high school at age 17 to join
the Army. More than 20 years
later, he returned to his home-
town eager to get involved.
He joined Kiwanis. Smith
volunteered as a leader in the
Nature Coast Young Marines.
He became politically active in
the Republican Party and
wrote numerous letters to the
editor.
People urged him to run for
county commission but he de-
clined, saying he wasn't caught
up on the issues. But when the
election for state House of
Representatives rolled around
this year, Smith filed the pa-
perwork to run against incum-
bent Ron Schultz, one of Citrus
County's biggest political
names.
When the dust cleared, it
See SMITH/Page A7
Newly elected Florida House of
Representatives member Jim-
mie T. Smith took office Nov.
2. Smith is a 20-year military
retiree, and proudly displays
his dog tags and a personal
memento from his service on
his desk in Lecanto.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Rebecca Bays was elected to the Citrus County Commission.

Bays: It's about service, not a job


MIKE WRIGHT
Chronicle
Rebecca Bays knows about
work.
As an only child, young Re-
becca helped her father with
his logging and sawmill busi-
ness in southern Illinois across
the Missouri River from St.
Louis. She did whatever a 7-
year-old girl could do.


"We always said I was my fa-
ther's son," she said.
The family worked hard dur-
ing the week, and then at-
tended church together on
Sunday.
"My father took care of his
family," Bays said.
And then, when Rebecca was
11, her father was killed in a
See BAYS/Page A7


Kenney: Ready

for 'awesome

responsibility'
MIKE WRIGHT
Chronicle
There are two events of par-
ticular interest in John "JJ"
Kenney's life that shaped the
man he is today.
When JJ was 7 years old, he
watched from the front yard of
his suburban Philadelphia
home as workers unloaded fur-
niture from the house. His fa-
ther, unable to find work,
couldn't afford the mortgage
payments.
JJ and his family began a se-
ries of moves from one tempo-
rary location to another He
never forgot what it is like to be
poor.
After graduating high school,
his football coach said he was
a natural and worked to get
him enrolled at East Carolina
State. While waiting for that to
happen, a teenage-JJ was in-
stalling hardwood floors but
basically living aimlessly


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Bob Truax, right, greets JJ Kenney on Friday at Kenney's farewell
party at the Citrus County Resource Center. Kenney spent 11 years
as the county veterans' service officer and gets sworn In Tuesday
as a new county commissioner.


In November 1963, shortly
after the assassination of Pres-
ident John F Kennedy, Kenney
enlisted in the Marines and re-
ceived boot camp training at
Parris Island, S.C.
A few weeks into boot camp,
Kenney got news from East
Carolina State: He had been
accepted into college.
"I was ready to go. The
Marines had other ideas," Ken-


ney said.
Thus began a 23-year Marine
career that included two tours
of Vietnam.
After retiring from the mili-
tary, Kenney found himself liv-
ing in Citrus County. He spent
two years doing nothing "It
sucked," Kenney said -before
returning to employment in the


Page A7


! ,'- '- ,
Classifieds ................... D4
Crossword ....... .............A20
Editorial ...................C2
Horoscope ....................B6
Lottery Numbers ............B4
Lottery Payouts ...........B6
M ovies ...........................A14
Obituaries ...............A6
Together...................... A14


Homespun treasure No lottery
Antiques expert John Sikorski writes about this Indian basket./E6 Early deadlines prohibited
the printing of Friday
Dealy CrlSh A man from The Villages died after a crash. A7 .ght's lottery numbers.
Monday's edition.
'Palin's Alaska' Mortgage machine Every aspect is under scrutiny., C1 111.,1111 III I I
TLC debuts new show about '
former governor./Page B6 Best d alS The battle for holiday shoppers' dollars has begun./D1 6 845' 0


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A2 SUNIA,, NoVEMUIR 14, 2010


www. crystalautos.com


Citrus


We Need


Advertisement
November 14, 2010


www.crystalautos.com


County




Your Help


Dear Citrus County Residents,
As a Citrus County Commissioner and president of the
Citrus County Economic Development Council, I witness
firsthand the hardships and difficulties individuals and
families are going through in these extremely difficult
economic times. Fortunately there are a number of
groups and organizations that are here to provide as-
sistance, food and shelter to those in need.
Last year these caring agencies came together with one
goal in mind; to find a way to end hunger in Citrus
County. From that collaboration, Feed Citrus County,
Inc. was born. Along with the We Care Food Pantry,
Feed Citrus County will build a central food distribution
facility where the organizations on the front lines of
feeding the less fortunate in our county can obtain
food. Feed Citrus County needs our help making this
distribution center a reality.
Citrus County is blessed to have individuals that time
and again stand up and provide the assistance needed
to make things happen. As they have many times be-
fore, Steve and Jewel Lamb, owners of Crystal Motor
Car Co., are doing so again. They have graciously
donated a 2011 Chevy Corvette
to the Feed Citrus County capital
campaign, which is selling raffle
tickets for the car at $100 per
ticket.
Since only 2,000 tickets will be
sold, the odds of winning are
Very good. With this generous


donation from the Lambs, Feed Citrus County, Inc., has
the opportunity to raise $200,000 of the $500,000 it
will take to build the distribution facility. All proceeds
of the raffle will be used to construct the building. If
you're able, please take the opportunity to purchase
raffle tickets and assist this fantastic organization. Your
contribution will have a direct positive impact on our
community, not to mention it gives you a good chance
of winning a brand new Corvette!
While times are very difficult, it is individuals like Steve
and Jewel Lamb, and organizations like Feed Citrus
County Inc., that make Citrus County such a special
place. I consider myself so fortunate to live in a com-
munity and to be raising my family in a place that con-


tinues to rise to the occasion of the challenges ahead
of us. Please join me in helping make this center a re-
ality. Together we will make Citrus County a better
place!

God Bless,



Joe Meek
Citrus County Commissioner


Advertisement
November 14, 2010


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Dear Citrus County Residents,
Steve and I, along with our company and staff,
have been long-time supporters of many charities that
benefit Citrus County residents. Through the years,
much of our support came from donating various ve-
hicles to these charities. These charities used the vehi-
des in their raffles which raised hundreds of thousands
of dollars.
This year we decided to give a new 2011 Chevy
Corvette to the Feed Citrus County Capital Campaign.
The money raised will go into a capital fund for build-
ing a central food distribution warehouse. The food
from this warehouse will help feed the hungry in all
areas of Citrus County.
The success of all of the past raffles has been the
result of concerned Citrus County residents purchasing
raffle tickets. Once again, we need your help to make
this raffle successful. If we sell all of the raffle tickets
available for this bright red Corvette, the Feed Citrus
County Capital Campaign will raise $200,000 to-
ward its $500,000 goal.
Why support the Feed Citrus County Capital
Campaign? The answer is simple: there are hungry
people in Citrus County and the number is growing.
Half of them are families struggling to feed their kids
and those that must choose between food, rent, gas
or medicine. This is a terrible soul-destroying choice
to have to make. One of every four homeless people
is a veteran. The very men and women who once
fought for our country for our safety are now con-
cerned with their own. The vast majority of these peo-
ple have been thrust into homelessness and hunger
because of a life-altering, unexpected event or series
of events.
Feed Citrus County, Inc. is the result of collabora-
tive brainstorming among more than 50 local agen-
cies dedicated to feeding the hungry. Feed Citrus


County and the We Care Food Pantry are endeavor-
ing to construct a central food distribution warehouse
so that untold thousands of pounds of food no longer
leave our county for other distribution centers. A cen-
tral distribution facility means local agencies will no
longer have to drive long distances to obtain the food
they need to help the hungry. This distribution center
will serve as a local food bank which will facilitate the
equitable distribution of food to Citrus County agen-
cies that will, in turn, distribute it free of charge to
those in need.
Today's rapid, unexpected loss of jobs and result-
ing foreclosures has caused great dislocation among
families and has dramatically added to the number of
people without a roof over their head and food for the
table. Who would have ever known or thought that
our economy would take such a downturn? No one
was prepared but everyone was affected, some
harder than others. In these troubling times it is even
more incumbent upon us to rally together to meet the
needs of those less fortunate. This is where you can
help. There are only 2000 opportunities to win this
new 2011 Corvette, which has an MSRP value of
$53,000. Raffle tickets are being sold at $100 per
ticket. I know that $100 is a lot of money, but you need
not go it alone. Grab a friend or family member and
split the cost of a ticket. Create a time-sharing plan for
the Corvette or, if you prefer, we do offer all winners
the option of taking cash instead of the vehicle.

Sincerely,



Jewel Lamb
Crystal Motor Car Company


Everyone looks great in a shiny new Corvette!
Come out and see the Corvette at:

The Stone Crab Jam Nov. 6 in Crystal River
The Homosassa Arts & Crafts Seafood Festival -
Nov. 13 & 14 Crystal Chevrolet in Homosassa
Raffle tickets are available at the following locations:
All four Crystal Dealerships located in Homosassa &
Inverness All three Citrus County Chamber offices
All five Capital City Banks
Superior Bank in Homosassa
Jewels & Diamonds in Homosassa
Or simply contact:
The We Care Food Pantry
352.628-9333

Cash, checks and credit cards are accepted.

Need not be present to win but stay close to your
phone on
December 4, 2010. Around 2:00 P.M.,
someone will win a Brand new
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352-795-1515


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1005 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448
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Dodge Jeep Dodge Jeep
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One convenient website www.crystalautos.com


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CO(JN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE
. ......... ............... .. I.- ........ ...... .... .... -.- ........ ............ .......... ...... ..... ........... ..... ... .. .... .... .....














TATE &


LOCAL
CIIRUS (C)UN INTY (I-IRONICLIE


Veteran


speaks


to EDC

CHRIS VAN ORMER
Chronicle
In honor of Veterans Ap-
preciation Week, Eber
Brown was the guest
speaker Wednesday at the
board ofdirectors' meeting
of the Citrus County Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil.
"I always wanted to be in
the service, and I had a ca-
reer in the Army," Brown,
who was 18 when he en-
listed, said. In all, he
served 30 years as a master
army aviator and served in
Korea and Vietnam.
During the business
meeting, the board agreed
to ask the Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners on Nov. 16 to create
an ordinance for business
incentives. The county
must adopt an ordinance to
enable the EDC to offer in-
centive programs for a sys-
tem of relief from
advalorem or tangible
taxes to encourage new
businesses to come to the
county and to help existing
businesses expand.
Gary Maidhof, the
county's operations and
projects officer, said county
staff already had been put-
ting the ordinance together
"Perhaps we will have it
on the books by the end of
the year," Maidhof said.
County Commissioner
Joe Meek, president of the
EDC, said the ordinance
could be modified for spe-
cific types of industry be-
cause the criteria may not
fit every business.
Ron Lieberman asked
how many counties offer
these incentives.
"We would be on the cut-
ting edge," Maidhof said.
"The ordinance will be
flexible enough to be in-
dustry specific."
Maidhof said he had
been invited to speak to the
Highlands County Eco-
nomic Development Com-
mission about Citrus'
incentives and proposed
ordinance.
John Siefert, EDC execu-
tive director, said he had
met with his counterparts
in Hernando and Pasco
counties and identified
three issues they shared.
"We all want to bring
broadband to our coun-
ties," Siefert said.
In February, Withla-
coochee River Electric Co-
operative dropped out of a
federal grant application to
bring broadband to rural
counties when it decided it
would not be able to re-
cover its costs. Siefert and
the EDC have continued to
try to find ways to go ahead
withthe project He said
the three counties would
ask WREC to turn over the
workthey have done on the
project to them.
Siefert said Pasco and
Hernando had benefitted
from the construction of
the Suncoast Parkway
through their counties.
The third issue the three
counties had in common
was improving educational
opportunities in the region.
Randy Messer of ED.S.
Disposal asked the EDC to
give his company a letter of
support in a bid to pur-
chase land from Sumter
County, where the com-
pany already has pur-
chased the county's
compost digester
"It's a boost for Citrus
County, because it will cre-
ate jobs, reduce the use of
its landfill and reduce
greenhouse gases," Messer
said.
ED.S. Disposal has pre-
sented Sumter County a


letter of intent to purchase
the land, Messer said. The
land purchase would mean
the compost digester, a
large piece of equipment,
would not have to be
moved for about $750,000.
The board agreed to pro-
vide the letter of support
The EDC will not meet in
December Its next meeting
will be Jan. 26.


Belovedfonnrmer

coach honored

Saturday
SHEMIR WILES
Chronicle
People gathered Saturday
afternoon at Heritage Village
in Crystal River to pay trib-
ute to beloved teacher,
coach, principal and mentor
Archie Dabney
Cheers and applause
erupted as "coach" made his
way over to the crowd of for-
mer students and coworkers,
friends and family
"Man, it's mind-boggling,"
Dabney said, referring to the
"Coach Dabney Day" cele-
bration in his honor. "I told
them not to do it, but it's
great"
Dabney began his educa-
tion career in the school dis-
trict as a teacher at the
then-all-black Booker T
Washington School, which is
now Inverness Middle
School. There he coached
football, baseball, basketball
and track After schools were
integrated in the 1960s, he
moved to Crystal River High
School, where he taught sci-
ence and later worked as a
guidance counselor He also
coached football, basketball,


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Shirley Greene embraces Archie Dabney on Saturday at Heritage Village in Crystal River dur-
ing a gathering honoring the retired coach and educator. She ran track for Dabney at the
old Booker T. Washington School in the 1960s.


track and tennis. Dabney
was an assistant principal,
and later principal of
Lecanto High School, and
opened Citrus Springs Ele-
mentary School as a princi-
pal.
Dabney retired in 1995
and has been staying at the
Lake City VA Medical Center


after having complications
from diabetes.
For an hour, a steady
stream of people gave hugs,
reminisced and thanked him
for making a difference in
their lives.
"He means so much to
me," Andrew "Pop" Vickers
said. "He's just like a father


to me. I love him. I love him
all the way."
Vickers said Dabney was
his coach when he played
varsity football in high
school at Crsytal River High
School, and also his science
teacher. Just before a game,
Vickers said he remembered
how Dabney used to take


him out fishing. And ifVick-
ers ever got into trouble, like
the time he got in a fight in
Brooksville, he said Dabney
would always come get him
and carry him back home.
"He took care of me all
through school," he said.
Dabney cared about his
students and worked to
make sure every single one
of them made it to college,
Vickers said. He didn't give
up on any of his students,
even the ones who struggled,
and Tammy Hicks said she
was one of those students.
"If we had teachers like
him today ...our kids today
would be better off," she
said.
Hicks said Dabney was
her guidance counselor at
Crystal River High School in
the 1970s. At that time, she
said she was having a diffi-
cult time at home and was in
danger of flunking out of
high school. Dabney gave her
two choices: choose a path of
success or a path of failure.
With his patience and guid-
ance, she said she chose suc-
cess and not only graduated,
but graduated early.
The fact so many people
were in attendance for
"Coach Dabney Day" speaks
volumes about his impact,
she said.
"It's well deserved and
long overdue."


C)A


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Bonnie Walker, of Bullhead, Arlz., talks about her artwork called Dazzlers decorative pieces made from chrome and glass crystals that can
be hung In one's garden.

36th annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts & Seafood Festival


WHAT: 36th Annual Homosassa Arts, Crafts & Seafood Festival.
N WHEN: Continues today, Sunday, Nov. 14, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
WHERE: Yulee Drive and Mason Creek Road in Old Homosassa.
INFO: Visit the website at www.homosassaseafoodfest.com





Day for fresh foods: Market on your calendar


City to showcase locally grown goods


Special to the Chronicle
The soon to open Inverness
Farmers' Market will be a showcase
of locally grown goods with an edu-
cational and entertaining experi-
ence for visitors.
The market's grand opening is
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
20, at the Inverness Government
Center. More than two years in the
making, the opening day will fea-
ture more than a dozen vendors.
Featured items will include fresh
fruits and vegetables, fresh herbs,
breads and pastries, homemade
soaps and lotions, honey, flowers,
plants, boiled peanuts and other


items. The market will also feature
cooking demonstrations, and edu-
cational exhibits covering a range
of topics, including proper plant se-
lection, organic gardening and tips
to protect the environment.
The market is a partnership be-
tween the city of Inverness and
Skoors Neighborhood Market.
After the grand opening, the mar-
ket will be open each month on the
third Saturday from November to
May; organizers hope that as the
market becomes popular, it can ex-
pand to more times a month and
possibly weekly.
Future plans include music and
other entertainment, reusable


shopping bags and the ability to
process food stamps.
The market has gained support
from the Tourist Development
Council, downtown merchants,
hundreds of residents and the
county's Agricultural Alliance.
Months of research and a survey by
the County Extension office pro-
vided valuable feedback in estab-
lishing a market.
Market managers at numerous
markets across the state were also
contacted for advice on starting one
locally.
Skoors owners LeRoy and
Stephanie Rooks will manage the
market while the city will provide
logistical and marketing support.
Skoors will also be one of the fea-
tured vendors, selling produce and


an organics-only booth.
An advisory committee met regu-
larly during the past year to develop
a market concept and plan. Com-
mittee members include County Ex-
tension Director Dr. Joan
Bradshaw; Matt Lenhardt, county
horticultural extension agent;
Danielle Ackermnnan of the Visitors &
Convention Bueau; Lace Blue-McLean,
incoming presidentofthe InvemessOlde
Ibwne Association; LeRoy Rooks; and
Dave Pieklik, assistantdirectorofsatellite
paits forthe city
Anyone interested in becoming a
vendor at the market or obtaining
more information may call LeRoy
Rooks at Skoors at 341-2777, e-mail
info@invernessfarmersmarketcom,
or log onto the market website at
www.invernessfarmersmarket.com.


Dandy day for Dabney









A4 SLINDAY, NovEMBER 14, 2010

Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Ryan Joseph Maguire, 20,
of 7555 E. Turner Camp Road,
Inverness, at 7:45 p.m. Saturday
on an active Citrus County war-
rant for a violation of probation on
original charges of dealing in
stolen property. No bond.
Louis Michael Lauro Jr.,
36, of 2889 S. Euclid Terrace,
Homosassa, at 1:35 a.m. Satur-
day on an active Citrus County
warrant for a violation of proba-
tion on original charges of pos-
session of cocaine and
possession of oxycodone. No
bond.
Fermin Anthony Martinez,
51, of 150 Alan Ave., Inglis, at
noon Monday on an active Citrus
County warrant for violations of
probation on original charges of
possession of cannabis (less
than 20 grams) and possession
of drug paraphernalia. No bond.
Donna Marie Triba, 46, of
27 S. Jefferson St., Beverly Hills,
at 4:16 p.m. Monday on a fugitive
from justice charges in reference
to a Massachusetts warrant for a
violation of probation on an orig-
inal charge of felony larceny. No
bond.
Alan Fredrick Blanken, 39,
of 9556 W. Cranberry St., Crystal
River, at 9:58 a.m. Tuesday on
an active Marion County warrant
for a charge of driving under the
influence (third offense within 10
years since prior conviction).
Bond $5,000.
Dennis Nicholas Damato,
54, of 3853 N. Everlasting Drive,
Inverness, at 11:16 p.m. Oct. 24,
on a Citrus County warrant for a
charge of exploiting the elderly.
Bond $10,000. (Editor's note:
This is not county commissioner
Dennis Damato.)
Randy Lee Fredette, 34, of
3970 Puffer Terrace, Spring Hill,
at 12:25 p.m. Tuesday on an ac-
tive Citrus County warrant for a
violation of probation on original
charges of burglary, grand theft
and criminal mischief. No bond.
Jennifer Lynn Creamer,
29, of 13210 Little Farms Drive,


Spring Hill, at noon Tuesday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for violations of probation on orig-
inal charges of dealing in stolen
property and providing false in-
formation to a pawnbroker. No
bond.
Patrick Joseph Curcio, 45,
of 2626 E. Marylue St., Inver-
ness, at 8;50 a.m. Tuesday on a
Citrus County warrant for a
charge of failure to return leased
property. Bond $2,000.
Melissa A. Strong, 28, of
8710 W. Mayo Drive 18, Crystal
River, at 9 p.m. Tuesday on ac-
tive Citrus County warrants for vi-
olations of probation on original
charges of possession of co-
caine and grand theft and for a
failure to appear on an original
charge of possession of drug
paraphernalia. No bond.
Markus Allen Knierim, 25,
of 8488 N. Sussex Drive, Citrus
Springs, at 8:04 a.m. Wednes-
day on a charge of possession of
drug paraphernalia. Bond $500.
Ronald Douglas Glover,
40, of 6954 S. Threshold Ave.,
Homosassa, at 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday on charges of traf-
ficking or endeavoring to traffic in
stolen property, grand theft auto,
providing false information to a
metal recycler and motor vehicle
title fraud. Bond $11,000.
Joshua Wayne McNall, 20,
of 7662 E. Spanish Trail, Floral
City, at 10:37 a.m. Wednesday
on a charge of retail petit theft.
Bond $250.
Tammy L. Williams, 38, of
9279 W. Sleepy Oak Court,
Crystal River, at 1:55 p.m.
Wednesday on charges of grand
theft, plan/manage/supervise
and traffic in stolen property and
providing false information to a
pawnbroker. Bond $17,000.
Tia Denean Graves, 44, of
10495 E. Rabbit Lane, Floral
City, at 2:01 p.m. Wednesday on
an active Citrus County warrant
for a violation of probation on an
original charge of possession of
oxycodone and methampheta-
mines. No bond.
Christina !L. Bingham, 30,
of 190 W. Keller St., Hemando,


For the RECORD -

ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus
.org and click on the Public Information link, then on
Arrest Reports.
* Watch "Arrested Developments" show from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicleonline.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.
* The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Volunteer Unit is
comprised of nearly 900 citizens serving Citrus
County. Members come from all walks of life and
bring with them many years of life experience. This
experience, combined with dedication and a
willingness to help fellow citizens, is an excellent ex-
ample of people "helping one another." To volunteer,
call Sgt. Chris Evan at 527-3701 or e-mail
cevan@sheriffcitrus.org.


at 8:45 p.m. Wednesday on a
charge of felony petit theft. Bond
$2,000.
Domestic battery
arrests
Daniel Joseph Geoghe-
gan, 46, of Crystal River, at 2:03
a.m. Nov. 7, on a charge of do-
mestic battery. According to Ge-
oghegan's arrest report, a
64-year-old Crystal River man
said Geoghegan went to throw a
punch at him and he blocked it
with his arm, causing substantial
pain. No bond.
Shelly Ann Carbonara, 20,
of 29 E. Murry St., Beverly Hills,
at 12:18 a.m. Nov. 2, on a charge
of domestic battery. According to
Carbonara's arrest report, a 24-
year-old Beverly Hills man said
he was putting Carbonara's
clothes outside when she began
hitting him in the face. He report-
edly had bleeding wounds on his
face, but expressed that he didn't
want to press any charges. The
report stated that Carbonara said
she hit the man only after he
grabbed and twisted her arm. No
bond.
Kimberly Rochelle Sweet,
33, of Homosassa, at 10:02 a.m.
Oct. 31, on a charge of domestic
battery. According to Sweet's ar-
rest report, she told a deputy that
she slapped a 37-year-old Ho-


mosassa man across the face
during an argument. The man re-
portedly said Sweet hit him on
the leg with an open hand and
then punched him in the jaw dur-
ing a confrontation. No bond.
David E. Young, 28, of
Dunnellon, at 9:21 p.m. Nov. 5,
on a charge of domestic battery.
According to Young's arrest re-
port, a 39-year-old Dunnellon
woman said Young pushed her
in the bathroom, causing her to
fall over the toilet and strike her
head in the bathtub. Awitness re-
portedly corroborated the
woman's story. No bond.
Brandy Ann Debritto, 27,
of Inverness, at 2:45 a.m. Nov. 5,
on a charge of aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weapon. Ac-
cording to Debritto's arrest
report, a 30-year-old Inverness
man said Debritto grabbed a
knife and began yelling at him as
she advanced toward him during
an argument. The man report-
edly said he thought Debritto was
going to stab him and he was in
fear for his life. According to the
report, Debritto said the man
grabbed her by the arm and
slammed her head against a
chair, but she denied having
pulled a knife. No bond.
Danny L. Green, 27, of Ho-
mosassa, at 2:33 a.m. Oct. 31,


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


Fcast
s

s
s
s

pc
s
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Sunny skies will be the rule
for today. Clouds increasing tonight.


75 49 0.00 78 42 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily

TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 42
Early AM Fog; Mostly sunny


MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 51
Early AM Fog; Mostly sunny to partly cloudy


TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
hb High: 80 Low: 61
; Partly cloudy; 30% chance of a shower

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 78/51
Record 96/33
Normal 79/57
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean -3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 3.16 in.
Total for the year 59.52 in.
Normal for the year 48.72 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 6
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.09 in.


DATE DAY

11/14 SUNDAY
11/15 MONDAY


0 21
MiZI


F'cast
s
s
s

s
s
s
s
s


Gulf water
temperature


74
Thken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.05 28.03 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.29 37.28 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.30 38.30 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.47 38.45 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 50
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 40%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, composites, chenopods
Today's Count: 3.6
Monday's Count: 4.2
Tuesday's Count: 4.7


AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with po
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
MINOR MAJOR MII
(MORNING)
5:56 1:
12:24 6:34 1:


NOR MA
tAFTERNO(
2:06
2:44


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT.........
SUNRISE TOMORROW..
MOONRISE TODAY........
NE. 21 113.5 DaI. 13 MOONSET TODAY.


llutants



MAJOR
ON)
6:17
6:54


5:37 P.M.
..6:53A.M.
..1:26 P.M.
12:32 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no bum ban.


For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fireweather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Inverness: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-Irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "**At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 11:13 a/7:07 a -- /7:40 p
Crystal River'* 9:34 a/4:29 a 10:50 p/5:02 p
Withlacoochee* 7:21 a/2:17 a 8:37 p/2:50 p
Homosassa"* 10:23 a/6:06 a 11:39 p/6:39 p


-"At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
12:29 a/8:25 a 12:39 p/8:39 p
11:00 a/5:47 a 11:36 p/6:01 p
8:47 a/3:35 a 9:23 p/3:49 p
11:49 a/7:24 a -- /7:38 p


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
63 27 s 57 40
53 29 pc 54 26
68 30 pc 67 38
68 41 c 68 49
65 35 .01 s 60 48
65 48 c 62 46
65 30 s 62 42
44 32 c 45 30
72 47 sh 65 46
44 27 sh 49 38
61 41 s 50 43
61 31 sh 60 39
57 27 s 52 37
71 35 s 71 47
74 36 sh 61 40
69 27 s 69 41
57 42 .03 pc 45 35
74 32 pc 54 33
69 32 sh 57 37
69 30 s 72 39
70 35 sh 56 36
66 23 s 50 36
60 46 s 62 42
43 22 pc 44 23
51 36 .11 pc 45 30
61 37 pc 49 35
62 31 pc 66 34
63 44 .23 pc 56 32
62 28 s 62 41
65 30 s 52 38
71 55 .35 sh 60 52
70 45 .16 pc 52 33
75 52 .09 sh 62 49
67 44 s 66 47
68 46 .30 s 59 38
78 54 s 76 56
74 47 pc 56 40
65 48 .23 pc 59 42
53 42 .04 pc 45 33
36 33 .97 rs 37 26
76 48 pc 74 56
73 39 pc 73 49
74 46 c 57 36


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 79 61 sh 73 57
New York City 64 46 s 60 45
Norfolk 58 48 s 64 43
Oklahoma City 54 40 pc 58 38
Omaha 44 34 .13 pc 45 28
Palm Springs 82 50 s 76 51
Philadelphia 66 41 s 62 46
Phoenix 76 48 s 73 48
Pittsburgh 67 31 sh 60 39
Portland, ME 65 32 s 48 40
Portland, Ore na na na sh 55 43
Providence, R.I. 66 40 s 54 43
Raleigh 69 32 s 68 39
Rapid City 48 23 c 44 28
Reno 49 28 pc 54 35
Rochester, NY 63 28 sh 61 41
Sacramento 69 38 pc 75 51
St. Louis 66 46 .01 pc 56 36
St. Ste. Marie 43 40 .02 sh 45 37
Salt Lake City 43 34 sh 44 35
San Antonio 67 49 c 62 47
San Diego 74 52 s 73 55
San Francisco 71 47 s 74 57
Savannah 73 32 s 72 46
Seattle 48 42 .06 sh 53 47
Spokane 37 31 .06 c 40 31
Syracuse 66 24 pc 60 43
Topeka 53 38 pc 52 34
Washington 68 37 s 63 46
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 91 El Cajon, Calif. LOW I Alalnosa, Colo.

WORLD CITIES
SUNDAY Lisbon 60/50/sh
CITY H/L/SKY London 49/39/shI
Acapulco 87/74/pc Madrid 55/41/sh
Amsterdam 51/45/r Mexico City 75/44/pc
Athens 72/56/shI Montreal 46/42/c
Beijing 46/23/pc Moscow 48/35/sh
Berlin 59/49/sh Paris 54/43/r
Bermuda 75/69/pc Rio 77/69/pc
Cairo 82/63/s Rome 72/55/pc
Calgary 49/37/pc Sydney 81/68/ts
Havana 80/61/pc Tokyo 66/54/c
Hong Kong 79/68/s Toronto 52/37/sh
Jerusalem 85/58/pc Warsaw 58/42/s


on charges of domestic battery,
burglary with battery and criminal
mischief. According to Green's
arrest report, a 24-year-old Ho-
mosassa man said Green kicked
in his front door, walked into his
bedroom and began punching
him in the back of his head. A 17-
year-old Homosassa girl then re-
portedly said she left the house
with Green, but Green pulled
over after leaving the house,
threw her on the ground and
punched her in the stomach. Ac-
cording to the report, Green de-
nied hitting anyone. No bond.
Jesse J. Jokisch, 25, of
3303 N. Lakeview Dr., Tampa, at
12:51 a.m. Oct. 31, on charges
of domestic battery and battery.
According to Jokisch's arrest re-
port, a 24-year-old Lecanto
woman said she was at a Hal-
loween party when Jokisch at-
tacked her and began beating
and biting her. A 24-year-old
Mishawaka, Ind., woman report-
edly said she went to break up
the fight when Jokisch struck her
in the face. The report stated that
Jokisch first said the Lecanto
woman attacked him, but later
said that he bit her. No bond.
Odell Kenyon, 18, of 76 S.
Washington St., Beverly Hills,
and Cynthia Lynn Sexton, 41,
of Lecanto, at 9:43 p.m. Oct. 31,
on charges of domestic battery.
According to Kenyon and Sex-
ton's arrest reports, a deputy re-
sponded to a call in reference to
a battery. The deputy reportedly
made contact with a 21-year-old
Lecanto man who appeared dis-
oriented and was bleeding from
his lip. According to the report,
the man said he was involved in
an altercation with Kenyon and
Sexton. A 16-year-old Lecanto
girl reportedly said she saw Sex-


Crirus CouN'TY (FL) CHRONICLE

ton strike the man, causing him
to fall to the ground. Sexton said
she struck the man, but only in
self-defense, the report said.
Kenyon reportedly admitted to
also hitting the man several
times and seeing Sexton hit the
man several times. No bonds.
Tamara Moore, 30, of In-
verness, at 8:55 p.m. Nov. 4, on
a charge of domestic battery. Ac-
cording to Moore's arrest report,
a 41-year-old Inverness man
said Moore struck him in the
face. The deputy noted in the re-
port that Moore had blood and
several lumps all over his face.
Moore reportedly said the man
struck her in the face. She also
had swollen spots and blood on
her face, the report said. No
bond.
Gary Dean Sturgill Jr., 29,
of Inverness, at 3:35 a.m. Nov. 4,
on a charge of felony domestic
battery by strangulation. Accord-
ing to Sturgill's arrest report, a
29-year-old Inverness woman
said Sturgill woke up from a
dream, began screaming at her
and then began choking her. The
woman also reportedly said
Sturgill grabbed her by her hair,
threw her around and punched
her in the face. The report stated
that Sturgill said the woman
punched him. No bond.
Chad Warren Ross, 30, of
Inverness, at 11:35 a.m. Nov. 3,
on a charge of violation of condi-
tion of pre-trial release and ag-
gravated domestic battery.
According to Ross' report, a
deputy said Ross used an alu-
minum walking cane to strike a
58-year-old Inverness man in the
head, right shin and left foot,
which violated his pre-trial re-
lease conditions in an unrelated
case. No bond.


al notice in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Miscellaneous Notices ........... D7


Surplus Property............. D7



C I T R U ST' Y~,C 0 U N



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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=raln/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
02010 Weather Central, Madison, WI.


.......... .........
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................... 1


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f








CnIRs COUN)'I' (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state government: How 'bout them Democrats


KEITH LAING
The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE After faring
about as well in this year's elec-
tions as the 1-7 Dallas Cowboys
have in the NFL so far this season,
Florida Democrats are consider-
ing turning to a familiar player to
turn things around.
Fresh off an unsuccessful run as
Alex Sink's lieutenant governor,
former state Sen. Rod Smith
emerged this week as the front-
runner to replace Florida Demo-
cratic Party Chairwoman Karen
Thurman, who waited until the
week's end to announce she was
going the way of fired Cowboys
coach Wade Phillips.
Thurman remained silent as
talks about her replacement
mounted this week And when she
finally confirmed she was step-
ping aside, she said it was because
she wanted to spend more time
with her family.
"After many months of reflec-
tion and discussion with my fam-
ily, our staff, and many of you, I
have decided to retire as Chair of
the Florida Democratic Party,"
she wrote in a letter to demoral-
ized Florida Democrats.
Thurman made no mention that
the party she was leaving had just
lost a fourth straight governor's
race, as well as all three statewide
Cabinet contests. Nor did she
mention the Republicans' new su-
permajorities in both chambers of
the Legislature. As the jockeying
to replace her kicked into high
gear this week, others were more
than willing to bring up 'those is-
sues and did so, a lot
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, the lone
Democrat still standing as a
statewide elected official, quickly
made his choice known: Miami-


Dade Democratic Chair Richard
Lydecker. The name of outgoing
House Democratic Leader
Franklin Sands, who remains in
the Legislature, was floated too -
by Sands himself.
Hillsborough state committee-
man Alan Clendenin, who re-
leased a prescription for healing
what ails the party in a plan he put
on the Web, was touted too, as was
Pasco County Democratic Chair
Alison Morano, state party vice-
chairman Rhett Bullard and for-
mer state Rep. Loranne Ausley.
The former Tallahassee represen-
tative was last seen bicycling to
defeat in the race to replace Dem-
ocratic Chief Financial Officer
Alex Sink.
But by week's end it looked like
Democrats were preparing to turn
the playbook over to former state
Sen. Rod Smith, who is fresh off a
turn as Sink's running mate in the
party's latest unsuccessful attempt
to wrest control of state govern-
ment from the elephants in
charge. It doesn't take an ele-
phants' memory to remember that
Smith was touted as helping Sink
reach out to rural Panhandle vot-
ers, the same group he tapped
during his own unsuccessful bid
for the party's 2006 gubernatorial
nomination.
Smith did not immediately take
the hand-off this week. But it was
pretty clear he was waiting with
open arms for the ball to come his
way
"The challenges are daunting,"
Smith said. "But the pendulum al-
ways swings back."
For now, though, the pendulum
remains with the ruling Republi-
cans, who made it clear again this
week they intend to use it when
they return Nov. 16 to organize
themselves and hold a special ses-


sion to override vetoes on up to
nine bills. They're swinging as
much at outgoing Gov. Charlie
Crist, who left the party to run for
U.S. Senate as an independent, as
they are at the demoralized Dems.
The new governor
(not yet) in town
comes to town
An unlikely victim of the veto-
fest is Gov-elect Rick Scott, who
came to Tallahassee this week to
meet with lawmakers' intended
target: Crist.
Lawmakers are looking to re-
vive a measure (H.B. 5611) that
would take oversight of the state's
oft-maligned Department of Man-
agement Services away from the
new chief executive. Legislative
leaders want to place DMS under
the control of the governor and the
state's three Cabinet members, in-
stead of just Scott himself, as it
would be now under current law.
Speaking to reporters, Scott
shrugged off the probable power
grab, saying he was focusing his
attention on creating jobs.
"I don't think anybody's trying to
go after my power," Scott said of
legislative leaders. "They're fol-
lowing through on things they be-
lieve in."
As for his beliefs, Scott said he
was eager to follow his ubiquitous
campaign slogan and get to work.
"The reason I won the election
is over one issue: And that's get-
ting us back to work," Scott said.
"My whole goal and the things I'm
going to focus on when I take of-
fice is how we're going to get this
state back to work"
The old guy in charge, Crist, did
not have much advice for dealing
with a Legislature that is likely to
be less hostile to Scott as it is to
him. But the self-proclaimed peo-


pie's governor did tell the people's
soon-to-be governor to "work
hard...Do the best you can. Enjoy
the job. It's a great gig."
Crist said he looks forward to
his next gig as a private citizen but
declined to say specifically
whether he'll run for office again
- though he hinted he might.
"There is a lot to do and I'm only
54," Crist said. "I look forward to
it. So, we'll see you around."
Hats off to U.S. Rep.
Frederica Wilson.
Now hats off!
Soon-to-be U.S. Rep. Frederica
Wilson, now a state senator from
Miami, said she had no intention
of complying with a rule banning
hats on the floor of the U.S. House,
whether presumptive House
Speaker John Boehner likes it or
not.
"I'm just going to dress the way
I normally dress," Wilson said this
week. "If they tell me I can't, well,
there's going to be a problem."
Perhaps Wilson is brimming
with confidence that her hats will
survive the transition from Talla-
hassee to the nation's capital.
After all, she has survived similar
assaults before. When she was
elected to the state Senate in 2002,
former Sen. Anna Cowin raised
the issue of whether members
were allowed to wear hats on the
floor. Then-Senate President Jim
King asked Cowin if there was a
good reason to ban the attire.
"She said I might be sitting in
front of somebody and they might
not be able to see," Wilson, a De-
mocrat in an overwhelmingly Re-
publican Senate, recalled this
week
"She's going to be sitting on the
back row anyway," Wilson recalled
King saying in dismissing the


issue.
Now a Democrat in an over-
whelming Republican U.S. House
- where the political parties are
separated by an aisle, not proxim-
ity to the front of the chamber -
Wilson won't have the same
defense when she gets to Wash-
ington, D.C.
Ten years flies by when
you're having fun
This week marked the 10th an-
niversary of the now infamous
Florida recount in the 2000 presi-
dential election, when the world
began waiting for "Florida,
Florida, Florida," as late NBC an-
chor Tim Russert wrote on an
election night chalkboard when
asked where the race would be
decided.
Several former recount players,
including Bush lawyer Barry
Richard, Gore lawyer Dexter Dou-
glass, former Supreme Court Jus-
tice Harry Lee Anstead, current
Supreme Court Justice Jorge
Labarga, and then-circuit court
Judge Nikki Clark discussed the
frenetic process in a program in
Tallahassee put on by The Village
Square.
STORY OF THE WEEK: De-
mocrats continued searching for
answers and a new leader as
party chairwoman Karen Thur-
man made her resignation official.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK: "It's
kind of like becoming the head
coach of the Dallas Cowboys," Rod
Smith on the possibility of assum-
ing the helm of the Florida Demo-
cratic Party.
In most years, that would be
considered a big compliment This
year, not so much.
It's not entirely clear if the in-
sult is worse for the politicians or
the football team.


TO USE CRIMEMAPPING
* Go online at www.sheriffcitrus.org.
* Click on the public information link at the top of the
page, then click on the CrimeMapping Citrus
County link at the left.
* Refine your search by inserting addresses or regions,
types of crimes, specific dates, etc.


CRIMES
Continued from Page Al

Evan said he believes not as
many regular citizens take
advantage of the crime-
mapping tool as they should.
"I think a lot of citizens
don't know about it," he
said. "I don't think they're
familiar with it"
To get to the tool, one
must visit www.sheriffc-
itrus.org and click on the
"Public Information" tab at
the top of the page, then
"CrimeMapping Citrus
County."
Once access to the inter-
active application has been
achieved, users can learn
about and produce detailed
reports of criminal activity
near a specific address; by
parks, schools, churches
and other significant land-
marks; and within neigh-
borhoods and other
particular boundaries.
The colorful, cartoonish
icons, which pinpoint the lo-
cation of a crime, each have
graphics on them to repre-
sent a kind of crime. Simply
clicking on the icon will re-
veal a case number, date,
time and address of the
crime, a description and
what the specific crime is.
For example, a syringe in-
dicates a drug/alcohol viola-
tion; a dollar sign shows a
theft/larceny crime; an eye
mask means a burglary oc-
curred; and the figure of a
person in a prone position
means homicide.
"There is a selection for
everything." Evan said.
People can also look at
clusters of criminal activity,
examine patterns within a
specific area, find out how
far a crime occurred from
their home or even see a
satellite image of an area's
geography.
However, Evan said that
people should be cautious
and not become too excited
right away when they see
any type of activity in their
neighborhood or notice a
trend.
"You shouldn't take it at
face value," he said.
For instance, someone
could be from a different
town and was just driving
through when they were
stopped for a particular of-
fense. Or, Evan explained,
that an incident could be
first slugged as a burglary,
but later turn out to be a


civil matter.
- To .find outmore informa-
tion about the crime, he said
people should call the
records clerk for more de-
tails.
Karen Huscher, a public
service officer on the west
side of the county, said the
crime-mapping tool actually
helps her discover which
areas need extra law en-
forcement presence.
"Our patrol in these areas
not only helps our neighbor-
hoods feel more secure and
safe, but tells the criminals
that we the sheriff's of-
fice are not going to toler-
ate their behavior and
crimes, and we are looking
for them," she said.
Later, Huscher said she
could also use the tool to see
if the extra patrolling is de-
creasing crime in an area.
Sgt Charles Tepe, an east-
side public service officer
and a training and stan-
dardization officer, said
through the crime-mapping
tool, he has learned that
crime can happen any-
where.
"Crime can happen right
next door or up the street,"
he said.
By receiving automatic
free e-mail alerts, Tepe said
he definitely stays more
aware of the activity in his
neighborhood. He also said
he likes to look at other
agencies' maps in nearby
counties and even across
the country
Evan said it could be a
handy tool to use before a
vacation. If a law enforce-
ment agency in the area
you're planning to visit uses
the CrimeMapping pro-
gram, you can browse the
community you may be stay-
ing in to see what kind of
criminal activity is in the
area.
No matter where anyone
lives, Evan said crime
would always be a concern.
Some people may think Cit-
rus County doesn't have
crime, but that's not true.
"We always have crime,"
he said.
Therefore, people need to
not only be more aware of
their surroundings, but
Evan explained that people
need to report crime more
often so the data becomes
more reflective of the actual
state of affairs in the county.
"If they (people) never
call, it never happened," he
said. "We need them to give
us feedback."


Bush on post-presidency: 'I miss being pampered'


Associated Press

THE VILLAGES For-
mer President George W.
Bush doesn't miss much
about the White House -
except the pampering.
In a rally Saturday at The
Villages, a sprawling cen-
tral Florida retirement
community, Bush remi-
nisced about the luxuries of
America's highest office, in-
cluding the convenience of
Air Force One and never
waiting in traffic jams.
He recalled, in the days
after leaving office, being
told by his wife Laura that
doing dishes was his new


domestic policy agenda.
And he described how odd
it felt taking his dog Barney
for a post-presidential
walk, plastic bag in hand.
"I really don't miss much
about the presidency,"
Bush told a crowd of more
than 3,000 people. "I miss
being pampered."
The 43rd president said,
most of all, he missed being
commander in chief of the
U.S. military.
"Imagine what it was
like to return the salute of
men and women," he said
in his 30-minute speech.
Bush also described his


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"love-at-first-sight" moment
when he first met Laura,
and he spoke at length
about the 9/11 attacks.
"I still hear the voices of
the loved ones searching
for survivors," he said.
The Villages is heavily
Republican and many in
the crowd waved American
flags or wore hats noting
their military service.
Some who gathered to hear


Bush speak said he has
been unfairly blamed for
the country's problems.
"I think all presidents get
a bum rap," said Linda
Zwick, 60.
"I think he made deci-
sions to keep our country
safe."
Bush is on a national tour
promoting his new memoir,
"Decision Points."


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A6 SUNmAy, NOVliWmliR 14, 2010


Ready for crash course


Associated Press
Republican Majority Transition team members, from right, Rep.-elect Adam Kinzinger, R-IIl., Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-
Utah, Chairman Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., Rep.-elect Tim Scott, R-S.C. Rep.-elect Martha Roby, R-Ala., Rep. Jim Jor-
dan, R-Ohio, and Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., talk Nov. 9 during a pause In their meeting on Capitol Hill In Washington. It's
freshman orientation and the larger-than-usual Class of 2010, 85 Republicans and a meager nine Democrats, is getting
a crash course on how to navigate the next two years.


Congressional freshman class of2010 arrives in Washington


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Where to live?
Whom to hire? What's a voting card
- and where are the bathrooms?
More than 90 members of Congress
arrive in Washington this coming
week for the first time since winning
election, trading the loftiness of cam-
paign speeches for mundane lessons
in how to do their new jobs.
It's freshman orientation on Capi-
tol Hill, and the larger-than-usual
class of 2010 is getting a crash course
on how to navigate the next two years.
Talk of changing the nation's direc-
tion? That's on the back burner for
now. The newly elected -85 Republi-
cans, a meager nine Democrats -
need actual directions around their
new workplace.
Instead of American exceptional-
ism, his election night theme, Rep.-
elect Tim Scott, R-S.C., is focused on
Washington's exceptional rental
prices.
"Nothing here is affordable, is what
I've learned," says Scott, who might
share an apartment with classmates.
Rep; Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., told
supporters in his victory speech that
he would "stand strong in the epic bat-
tle that we have in front of us to take
back our country" But come Monday,
Kinzinger will be looking for a one-
bedroom apartment, setting up an in-
terview with a prospective chief of
staff and figuring out whether he
wants to deal with a commute or live
within walking distance of the Capitol.
Even before the freshmen learn
lawmaking, they'll be figuring out how
to live with a new set of rules, customs
and rituals. Here to help: an array of
congressional committees and veter-
ans, and a constellation of foundations
and lobbyists.
The second-ranking Republican,
Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, had a
144-page book in the mail to new
members within hours of Election
Day. "Hit The Ground Running"' ex-
plains the nuts and bolts of setting up
a congressional office, hiring staff,
managing the office budget and being
an employer. It also offers some gen-
eral rules of the road.
"Do: Get answers for any ethical
questions you may have if you are in
doubt," according to the manual, an


updated version of one originally sent
out by former House Republican
leader Dick Armey, R-Texas.
"Don't: Completely disappear from
the public" between Election Day and
the new Congress. "Even though you
won't take office until January, many
of your constituents will view you as
their member of Congress."
Lodgings? Taken care of-- at least
for this week The House Administra-
tion Committee, charged with the
House's day-to-day operations, is put-
ting the group up at the LEnfant Plaza
Hotel and shuttling the members to
and from the Capitol.
Food? Virtually everywhere the in-
coming lawmakers go during their
Sunday-to-Friday stay Receptions,
working lunches and welcome din-
ners dot the schedule. In between,
members-to-be attend seminars on
everything from setting up an office to
hiring, and how the electronic voting
system works on the House floor.
A schedule obtained by The Associ-
ated Press shows a wow-worthy social
schedule.
The freshmen will hear from
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-
Calif., on Sunday and dine with the
man in line to replace her, Ohio Re-
publican John Boehner.
Pelosi hosts an open house Monday
in what, for now, is her Capitol suite.
Dinner follows next door in magnifi-
cent Statuary Hall, according to the
schedule. There also are special
events for their aides and spouses.
The Congressional Management
Foundation, a nonprofit group
funded by dozens of corporations and
industry groups with business before
Congress, is hosting a reception Mon-
day and, two days later, a seminar,
"Navigating the First 90 Days."
"Everyone has told me expect
more information than you can pos-
sibly digest, but just take good notes,"
said Rep.-elect Cedric Richmond of
Louisiana, one of the few Democrats
who will be attending.
A rare Democratic face in a sea of
Republicans, Richmond said he's ex-
cited to meet and interview some of
the most respected and experienced
Capitol Hill staffers in the party -
newly jobless after their bosses lost
their re-election battles.
It's all a little overwhelming to some.


"What I'll probably do is sleep in my
office for a little while until I can find
a like-minded freshman to room
with," said Rep.-elect Bobby Schilling,
R-Ill., a pizza shop owner who has no
intention of moving his wife and 10
children to Washington.
Rep-elect Nan Hayworth, R-N.Y, is
way ahead of many of her colleagues.
She's landed an experienced chief of
staff who found her an apartment two
blocks from the Capitol.
But she has to get office space -
there's a room draw Friday and fig-
ure out how to work effectively in Con-
gress' often slow and tedious culture.
"I'm a surgeon," said the ophthal-
mologist-turned congresswoman.
"We're used to acting on the evidence
expeditiously."
For some, the education in the
quirks, perks and pressures of Con-
gress has begun.
Florida tea party candidate Allen
West, for example, is looking for a
replacement for his chief of staff.
The Republican's chosen candi-
date, conservative radio host
Joanne Kaufman, first accepted,
then rejected the job Thursday
after reports surfaced of Kaufman's
incendiary on-air comments, which
included calling Pelosi "garbage."
Also Thursday, all 300 Broward
County schools were locked down
for a few hours after Kaufman's sta-
tion, WFTL, received what police
said was a threatening e-mail from
a man who said he felt a connec-
tion to the talk show host.
West issued a statement saying
he deeply regretted Kaufman's de-
cision to turn down the job.
The fishbowl-like nature of their
new post they're apt to be trailed
and peppered with questions by
packs of reporters and news pho-
tographers may not have sunk in
for some freshmen.
Rep.-elect Sean Duffy, R-Wis., a
reality show star in 1997, now
wants to shun the national media
in favor of local news outlets until
he takes his oath of office in Janu-
ary
"Just about every media outlet
has called wanting to talk to him, so
it's about the fairest way to handle
it," his spokeswoman, Wendy
Reimann, said in an e-mail.


Government sells spoils of lavish life


Auction clears Madoffhome


Associated Press

NEW YORK Anyone
wanting to walk in the
shoes of fallen financier
Bernard Madoff is in luck:
Thousands of belongings
from his New York City
penthouse, including his
used shoes, went on the
auction block Saturday.
A 1917 Steinway grand
piano from his living room
went for $42,000 six
times the minimum esti-
mate of $7,000. The buyer
was an 81-year-old Long Is-
land real estate executive.
"I've got loads of pianos,
but this one has history -
it'll make an interesting
conversation piece," said
John Rodger, an amateur
pianist who will keep the
Steinway in his home in
East Islip.
The Manhattan sale is
the last auction in New
York of Madoff belongings.
A third and final auction is
to be held in Florida to
sell off items from a Palm
Beach home that went for
more than $5.5 million last


month.
Three hours into the
New York auction, the
highest bid was for an oil
painting by the late Amer-
ican artist Frederick Carl
Frieseke that sold for
$47,500. A stainless-steel
Rolex watch with an oyster
band sold for $40,000,
against an estimate of
$65,000 to $70,000.
When Madoff was ar-
rested two years ago, U.S.
marshals seized every-
thing in the apartment and
his Long Island beach
house: worn socks, new
monogrammed boxer
shorts, Italian velveteen
slippers bearing the ini-
tials "BLM" in gold em-
broidery. All of it is being
sold.
The disgraced 72-year-
old convict is behind bars
for life in a North Carolina
prison.
His wife, Ruth Madoff,
was ordered to leave their
home. Her diamond en-
gagement ring was up for
sale Saturday, worth at
least $300,000, but ex-


pected to fetch far more.
The auction started in
the morning in a ballroom
of the Sheraton New York
Hotel & Towers at fever
pitch.
Buyers raised their
hand to signal a bid ac-
companied by a bloodcur-
dling shout from one of the
bid-spotters from Texas if
it was a winning price.
Their swaggering style
- as if herding bulls in-
stead of selling them -
seemed appropriate for a
sale of the belongings of a
Wall Street trader who
cherished the winning
bull in every form. He
bought statues and paint-
ings of them, and even
named his boats "Bull,"
"Sitting Bull" and "Little
Bull."
A leather bull foot stool
- including a tail that had
broken off sold for
$3,300, against a pre-sale
estimate of $250 to $360.
The Madoffs apparently
didn't make much room
for house guests.
The auction included
their early 19th-century
bed with fabric hangings
and "intense sun fading,"


at a pre-auction estimate
of $8,000 to $11,400.
"Just $500?" the incred-
ulous auctioneer, Bob
Sheehan, said of the first
bid, adding, "This was the
only bed in the whole
house, I'm not kidding!
$500? My God, it's not a
pullout."
It sold for $2,250.
Madoff loved shoes. He
owned about 250 pairs,
many never worn made
in Italy, France, Belgium
and England.
Auction proceeds, ex-
pected to top $1.2 million,
will go to more than 3,000
clients Madoff swindled in
a multibillion-dollar Ponzi
scheme.


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For Information and costs,
o call 726-8323


Dean
Bonsall, 83
CITRUS SPRINGS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Rev. Dean Allen
Bonsall, age 83 years, of Cit-
rus Springs, Florida, will be
held 11:00 am, Wednesday,
November 17, 2010, at the
First Baptist Church of In-
verness with Rev. Donnie
Seagle, Rev. Chris Whaley
and Rev. Jared Heatherly
officiating. Interment will
follow at Florida National
Cemetery, Bushnell,
Florida. The family will re-
ceive friends from 4 to 7:00
pm Tuesday at the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes. The family
requests expressions of
sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to First
Baptist Church, Inverness
or Hospice of Citrus County.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com.
He was born December
23, 1926, in Grampian, PA,
son of Ivan and Violet
(Seger) Bonsall and moved
to Citrus Springs in 1992
from Westport, MA. He died
November 12, 2010, in Cit-
rus Springs, FL.
Mr. Bonsall was an Army
veteran serving during
World War II. He was a pas-
tor in New York State Bap-
tist churches for 20 years
and Pastor of Calvary Bible
Church in Massachusetts for
20 years before moving to
Florida. Rev. Bonsall was a
member of First Baptist
Church of Inverness, where
he was a member of the Pas-
tor's class. He attended
Moody Bible Institute.
Rev. Bonsall was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents, 3 brothers and 2
sisters. Survivors include
his wife of 58 years, Char-
lene Bonsall, Citrus
Springs; 2 sons: Gerald Bon-
sall, Saint Albans, Vermont;
Chris William Bonsall, Mid-
dleboro, MA; a daughter:
Cheryl Puryear,
Bartlesville, OK; and 4
grandchildren. Arrange-
ments are under the direc-
tion of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory.






Ronald 'Ronnie'
Jessup, 52
INVERNESS
Ronald Eugene Jessup,
52, died Nov. 3,2010. He was
born Oct 27, 1958. Memorial
service will be at 1 p.m. Sat-
urday, Nov. 20, at Praise and
Worship Ministry, 1274 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Her-
nando.

Charlotte
Mohr, 92
INVERNESS
Charlotte Elizabeth Mohr,
age 92, Inverness, died
Thursday, November 11,
2010, at her residence under
the loving care of her family
and HPH Hospice. A Fu-
neral Service of Remem-
brance will be held on
Monday, Nov 15th, at 3:00
PM at the
Chas. E.
Davis Fu-
: neral Home
, with Rev.
.j- i Steven Rid-
X dle of the
o Floral City

Chlo ~Methodist
Charlotte Church offi-
Mohr citingn. Bur-
ial will
follow on Friday in Harri-
son, MI. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 1:00 PM until the hour
of service at the funeral
Home.
Charlotte was born on Au-


gust 13, 1918, in Romney,
WV, to the late Elias and



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Fannie (Blackburn) Barbe
and came to this area in
1996 from Harrison, MI. She
was employed as a meat
wrapper at the Food Fair
Grocery Store in Royal Oak,
MI. Charlotte enjoyed trav-
eling, reading and doing
puzzles. She was an excel-
lent seamstress and also
liked to crochet. Her mem-
berships include Interna-
tional Order of Foresters,
The Amaranth and Order of
Eastern Star of Floral City.
She was a member of Floral
City United Methodist
Church.
Survivors include two
sons, Ronald MacKay,
Phoenix, AZ; Harry Poland,
Madison Heights, MI; six
daughters, Nancy Richards,
Inverness; Denise MacKay,
Sacramento, CA; Wilma
Heller, Middletown, OH;
Sheryl Bailey, Emmett,
Idaho; Judy Kitchen,
Phoenix, AZ; and Marcella
Valle, Floral City, FL; sev-
eral grandchildren, great-
grandchildren and one
great-great-grandchild. She
was preceded in death by
her husband, 4 brothers and
4 sisters. In lieu of flowers,
the family suggests memo-
rial contributions to the Cys-
tic Fibrosis Foundation.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Velma
Wilson, 97
LECANTO
Velma Jane Wilson, 97,
Lecanto, died Nov 11, 2010,
in the Hospice Unit of Cit-
rus Memorial hospital. A na-
tive of Paulding County, OH,
she was born Oct 26,1913, to
the late Elmer and Ola (Ack-
erman) Connin and moved
to Citrus Co.
in 1995 from
Naples, FL.
She was em-
S played for
25 years by
S the City of
Springfield,
OH, in the
Velma tax depart-
Wilson ment and
was a mem-
ber of the Hernando Church
of The Nazarene. Velma en-
joyed reading, sewing and
quilting.
She is survived by her
husband of 63 years, Archie
M. Wilson; two daughters,
Dotty (Marvin) Small, Ho-
mosassa, FL, Judith Ann
Wilson, Beverly Hills, FL;
her sister, Darlene Fritz,
Mesa, AZ; 4 grandchildren,
10. great-grandchildren, 2
great-great-grandchildren.

Carson, Dwight and Elmer
Connin and Audrey Niebel
and Iona Mae Cowan.
Funeral services will be
conducted on Thursday,
Nov 18th, at 10:00 AM from
the Hernando Church of
The Nazarene with pastor
Randy Hodges officiating.
Following cremation, her
urn will be placed in the
columbarium of Florida Na-
tional Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, memorials re-
quested to Hospice of Citrus
County or Hernando
Church of The Nazarene.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.


SO YOU KNOW
U The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and paid
obituaries. E-mail
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
563-5660 for details
and pricing options. ,
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
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Obituaries











Elderly man dies, deputy released after crash


AMANDA MIMS
Chronicle
A 78-year-old man
from The Villages has
died following a Friday
night crash on State
Road 44 near Crystal
River.
The 35-year-old Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Of-
fice deputy injured in
the crash has been re-
leased from Shands
Hospital in Gainesville,
according to sheriff's of-
fice spokeswoman Gail
Tierney.
The Florida Highway
Patrol did not immedi-
ately release the name
of the elderly man, who
died after being flown to
a hospital.
The crash happened
at about 7 p.m. when the
man attempted to turn
left out of the Publix
parking lot onto S.R. 44
in a 1993 GMC pickup,


according to an FHP
press release.
He reportedly pulled
out in front of Deputy
Todd Cridland, who was
on duty and traveling
east in the inside lane of
S.R. 44 in a 2010 Ford
Crown Victoria patrol
car.
Cridland's car hit the
left side of the truck and
the truck was pushed
into the westbound
lanes of S.R. 44. When it
stopped, the truck was
blocking both west-
bound lanes. The patrol
car stopped, facing
northeast in the inside
westbound lane.
Both drivers were air-
lifted from the scene for
medical treatment The
driver of the truck was
wearing a seatbelt, ac-
cording to the news re-
lease.
FHP continues to in-
vestigate the crash.


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
A 78-year-old Villages man died Friday night after driving his 1993 GMC pickup into the path of a Citrus County Sheriff's deputy's
car. His identity had not been released at press time. The Florida Highway Patrol continues to investigate the crash.


SMITH
Continued from Page Al

was Smith who the voters of
Citrus County chose to lead
them in Tallahassee.
Smith, 45, officially took of-
fice Nov. 2. He and other
members will take the cere-
monial oath of office Tuesday
in the Capitol.
Smith acknowledged he
benefited from an anti-in-
cumbent mood, but he said
that wasn't the only reason
voters chose him over
Schultz.
"I had to make sure they
understood there was an al-
ternative to the incumbent,"
he said. "Ron is very well



BAYS
Continued from Page Al

job-related accident Before
long, Rebecca's mother told
her that if she wanted any-
thing in this world, she
would have to pay for it
"Iff Iwanted a car, I would
have' to get a job to pay for
it," Bays said. "I saved and
always paid cash for every-
thing."
And now Bays, who owns
Insurance Resources and
Risk Management Inc., in
Beverly Hills, heads to the
Citrus County Commission
understanding first-hand
the challenges people face
to make ends meet.
Bays, who moved to Citrus
County nine years ago, is ac-
tive in Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters, American Cancer
Society and Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce. Pol-
itics was the farthest thing


known. But he didn't have a
specific platform."
While Schultz, a former
Citrus County property ap-
praiser, had name recogni-
tion in political circles, Smith
said his backing came from
ordinary people that he came
to know through his volun-
teer service.
Indeed, Smith hammered
Schultz for what he consid-
ered the incumbent's lack of
community know-how.
Smith, on the other hand,
had those community con-
nections to fall back on.
"I spent hundreds of hours
doing volunteer work with
the Young Marines," he said.
"I got to meet, a lot of people.
I wrote letters to the editor.
Slowly the outreach I had got


1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer
in their lifetime.
Melanoma, the most common form of
cancer for young adults is fatal if left
untreated and 1 in 58 will be diagnosed
during their lifetime.
Routine screening and early detection
of skin cancer is key to treatment.

To schedule a skin cancer examination,
please call our staff at 746-2200.
Ralph E. Massullo, M.D., F.A.A.D.
William Welton, M.D., F.A.A.D.
Michael Wartels, M.D., F.A.A.D. Medicare,
Margaret Collins, M.D., F.A.A.D. Blue Cross &
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tErin Watkins, P.A.-C fdlwtAmeinScitelyborMOHSSurgeq


JIMMIE T. SMITH
* Age: 45.
* Hometown: Inverness.
* Occupation: Retired Army; until election, security
guard at Progress Energy power plant.
* Married to Lisa, one daughter and three stepchildren.
* To reach Rep. Smith: Call 560-6020. His Inverness of-
fice is in the Village West Plaza at 591 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, just west of the Holiday Inn Express between
Inverness and Lecanto.


bigger and bigger."
He added: "Ron had the
professional side of things. I
had boots on the ground."
Born in New Jersey, Smith
moved to Citrus County with
his family at age 9. He at-
tended school in Inverness,
but didn't graduate Citrus


REBECCA BAYS
N Age: 47.
* Hometown: Floral City.
* Occupation: Owner, Insurance Resources and Risk
Management Inc., Beverly Hills.
* Married to Mike, two children and two stepchildren.
* To reach Commissioner Bays: Call her business office
at 527-1488.


on her mind when her step-
son Paul changed her focus.
Paul had returned from
Iraq where he served in the
Army. He spoke of losing 17
soldiers from his unit
"He told us some horrific
stories," Bays said.
Rebecca and Mike Bays
hoped Paul would settle in
Citrus County. Instead, he
returned to service.
"Mike and I really wanted
him to come home and be
our protdgd," she said. "He
decided the Army was the
place for him."
But Paul also bluntly told


KENNEY
Continued from Page Al

county's veterans' service office.
Kenney left that job Friday to start
his new one on Monday: Citrus County
commissioner.
"It's kind of surreal," he said. "Defi-
nitely some nervous anticipation."
Kenney comes into office with a
working knowledge of veterans and
their needs.
"We see 30 veterans a day in here,"
he said. "We schedule six and the rest
are walk-ins."
Kenney helped vets with their pen-
sions and disability claims. In some
cases, even with their electric bills.
As a veteran, Kenney understood
the necessity to cut through red tape.
His upbringing reminded him of the
difficulty of living with small means.
"This job was probably one of the


his mom that her commu-
nity involvement wasn't
enough. She had to get in
the thick of things to get any-
thing done, and that meant
serving in public office.
That was a whole differ-
ent area for Bays.
"I was very distant from
it," she said, referring to
politics. "There was nothing
political about me. I was
surprised as anybody else
when I decided to do this."
The more she thought
about a campaign for com-
mission, the more it made
sense. It's easy to hand over


JOHN "JJ" KENNEY
Age: 65.
Hometown: Sugarmill Woods.
Occupation: Retired from
Marines; until his election, county
veterans service officer.
Married, six children.
To reach Commissioner Kenney:
Call 382-0430.

most rewarding things I've ever done,"
Kenney said.
He decided to further his public
service by running for county commis-
sioner. Kenney said he found the cam-
paign trail repetitive, but he kept it
above board.
Kenney said he had much respect
for 20-year incumbent Gary Bartell,
whom Kenney defeated in the Repub-
lican primary en route to a Nov. 2 elec-
tion win.


High School.
"High school was not work-
ing out for me," he said.
He dropped out at 17 to
join the Army. His military
career, exactly 20 years and 6
days, sent him to places like
Korea and Panama. Smith
served in Panama when Gen.

a check for a cause; it's
something altogether differ-
ent to be a part of that solu-
tion.
"For me it's about service.
It's not a job," Bays said.
Bays spent much of the
campaign talking about two
issues: the economy and the
Ottawa-Quart connection.
While all the challengers
criticized the commission
for spending $2.9 million on
Ottawa, Bays was the first to
say the connection shouldn't
take place. She hasn't soft-
ened that position.
"I've never been able to
make any sense out of Ot-
tawa," she said.
Bays said the Ottawa proj-
ect doesn't benefit the
county's transportation fu-
ture. "I don't think it does
anything to our bottom
line," she said. "It's short-
sighted."
As for the economy, Bays
said she knows the difficulty
small business face in deal-


"The man was a gentleman," Ken-
ney said.
Kenney said he hasn't spoken much
with current commissioners, other
than socially.
"I'm very cautious about that Sun-
shine Law," he said. "The people's
business should be conducted in front
of the people."
Kenney said his top priority is re-
moving barriers to businesses. He said
he wants citizens back to work.
As a commissioner, Kenney said he
wants citizens to know he is available
to hear their concerns.
"I want to be approachable," he
said. "In my heart of hearts, I carry the
best interest of Citrus County"
Kenney said he doesn't want to let
voters down.
"I want to thank them for placing
their confidence in me," he said.
"That's an awesome responsibility, if
you stop and think about it."


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SUnCORIT DERMATOiOGY
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ot iysy Allen Ridge Professional Village 352-746-2200
ul" 525 North Dacie Point, Lecanto, Florida 34461 352-873-1 500


Manuel Noriega was re-
moved from office and he re-
calls his then-inlaws
discussing the government's
overthrow in hushed tones.
"I thought, that's a shame
you have to watch what you
say," Smith said.
Smith received his high
school diploma through the
Army while serving in Korea.
And a granite rock that sits on
his desk includes messages
from soldiers who served
with him as platoon sergeant
After returning to Florida,
Smith said he honed up on is-
sues of the day to become bet-
ter informed. He found a
community where debate
was common but disagree-
ment didn't mean personal
feuds.


ing with county permitting.
"It seems like we're al-
ways hitting a wall," she
said. "We've run some really
good things out of town.
There is a level of frustra-
tion."


* Read Jimmie Smith's
guest column./Page Cl

That congenial attitude al-
lowed Smith to find support
in all reaches of the county.
"I sat down with the .De-
mocrats for three hours de-
fending my views," he said.
"I'm not one to block people
out. I'm very positive I
walked out of there with
votes."
Smith said he knows Re-
publicans swept the elec-
tions, and now the pressure is
on to produce.
"We have to provide re-
sults," he said.
"If we fail, the pendulum
will swing the other way even
farther."


Bays said commissioners
should set the tone for
county employees, and still
be respectful of their jobs.
"I wouldn't ask anyone to
do something," she said,
"that I wouldn't do myself."


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MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Black Diamond Foundation recently presented a check to Brenda Miley-Kelley, Withlacoochee Technical Institute
guidance counselor, in the amount of $10,000 for scholarships. From left, Black Diamond Foundation board members
Susan Pratt and Art Thomas present the check to the school representative as fellow board member Dave Burns looks
on. The school will select and present five students each with a $1,000 scholarship that can be renewed.


Citrus scholar


Citrus High School student
Emily Spilios, seated at left,
recently received a Letter of
Commendation from the
National Merit Scholarship
Program designating her as a
Commended Student in the
program. In a letter to her, the
National Merit Scholarship
Corporation states that her
index score has placed her
among the top 50,000 of
more than 1.5 million
students who entered the
2011 National Merit Program
by taking the 2009
Preliminary SAT/National
Merit Scholarship Qualifying
Test. Further, the letter states
that she is among about
34,000 Commended Students
nationwide who have shown
exceptional promise. Her
principal, Dale Johns, seated
at right, reads the
commendation to Emily and
(from back left) Dr. Roy
Swihart, guidance counselor,
and her parents, Brenda and
Ken Spilios.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


ACS seeks


drivers to help


cancer patients


Citrus County in urgent need


Special to the Chronicle

Local cancer patients
often struggle to find trans-
portation to and from treat-
ment, but you can help.
The American Cancer
Society is recruiting volun-
teers to drive patients to
and from treatment as part
of the organization's free
patient transportation pro-
gram. The program, Road
to Recovery, matches pa-
tients in need with volun-
teer drivers in their area
who can offer a ride.
Road to Recovery is the
very essence of the Ameri-
can Cancer Society mis-
sion -people helping
people overcome cancer.
Road to Recovery volun-
teers provide an essential
and necessary service be-
cause even the greatest
medical advance is useless
if patients can't get treat-
ment.
The program makes it
easy for volunteers to help
patients get to lifesaving
treatment. Drivers can


specify the times and days
that are most convenient
for them, and they can
choose to drive as often as
their schedules allow. The
American Cancer Society
provides training and coor-
dinates transportation
schedules between pa-
tients and drivers.
Road to Recovery volun-
teer driving requires no
special skills or education
- just a safe driving
record, a valid driver's li-
cense, some free time, a ve-
hicle in good working
condition, and the desire
to help.
This volunteer opportu-
nity is designed to be an
easy and stress-free serv-
ice for both patients and
volunteers. Training ses-
sions, maps and directions
are provided to those who
volunteer their time. Cit-
rus County is in urgent
need of volunteer drivers.
To learn more about the
program, contact Nancy
Nethery at (813) 319-5929 or
nancynethery@cancer.org.


Audubon Society to meet


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Audubon
Society will meet at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 17, at
Unity Church of Citrus
County.
Dr. Gary Williams will
describe local birding op-
portunities on lands man-
aged by the Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District, which is re-
sponsible for managing
water resources for the 5
million residents living
within a 10,000-square-
mile area of west-central
Florida. To help accom-


plish this mission, the dis-
trict protects more than
436,000 acres of land
within its boundaries.
Birding opportunities
are plentiful on these
lands, including many ex-
cellent spots in and around
Citrus County. Williams
will discuss examples of
environmental restoration
projects carried out by
water management dis-
tricts.
All CCAS meetings and
field trips are open to the
public. For more informa-
tion, visit www.Citrus
CountyAudubon.com.


Worth


Annual 'Scramble
for the Scouts' golf
SCORE is proud to support
The Withlacoochee District of
the Gulf Ridge Council of the
BSA's annual "Scramble for the
Scouts." Mark. your calendar for
Monday, Nov. 15, at Citrus Hills
Golf and Country Club.
Proceeds from this event
provide underprivileged youths
the opportunity to participate in
traditional scouting programs.
The Gulf Ridge Council serves
youths from Citrus, Hardee,
Highlands, Hillsborough,
Pasco, Polk and Sumter
counties.
For information, call Paul
Perregaux at 746-7899, e-mail
sdpapx@aol.com; or Duane
Rieker at (813) 872-2691,
e-mail drieker@bsamail.org.
Honeymoon Island
field trip on tap
Citrus County Audubon Soci-
ety has scheduled a birding
field trip at Honeymoon Island
for Tuesday, Nov. 16. The pub-
lic is welcome to attend. Pre-
registration is not necessary
and participants with all levels
of birding skills are welcome.
This field trip is led by experi-
enced birders Eileen Riccio and
Jim Meyer. It begins at 8:30
a.m., will involve mostly driving
with some easy walking, and
will last about six hours.
We will visit Gulf beaches,
mangrove swamps, tidal flats
and one of the few remaining
virgin slash pine forests in
South Florida. There is an $8
park entrance fee per vehicle.
Some of the unusual bird
species we hope to see in-
clude: dowitchers, reddish
egret, American oystercatcher,
black-hooded parakeet,
Eurasian collared dove, sharp-
shinned hawk, and black skim-
mer. Visit www.CitrusCounty
Audubon.com for more details
and directions.
Separation group
meets Tuesday
Americans United for Sepa-
ration of Church and State (Na-
ture Coast Chapter) will meet at
4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, at the
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
The public is welcome. For in-
formation, call 726-9112 or visit
naturecoastau@hotmail.com.


Companion class
set for Nov. 16
Health Matters Inc. will offer
another Homemaker Compan-
ion Class on Tuesday, Nov. 16.
This is a five-hour course for
persons who want to learn to
be caregivers for the elderly. All
ages are welcome.
Ruth Branson, registered
nurse, will also teach a certified
nursing assistant (CNA) class
beginning Nov. 17. A pay-as-
you-go plan will be offered to
allow those persons on a lim-
ited income to take part.
For information and to sign
up, call 586-1954 or 686-5593.
Visit Brooksville for
Accordion Adventure
"Accordion Adventure" meet-
ings are from 6 Ito 9 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
Brooksville BPO Elks No 2582;
14494 Cortez Blvd.
This is an informal group of
accordionists/enthusiasts of all
levels of performance. The pub-
lic is welcome to the "Christmas
Celebration" (party/jam) on
Dec. 21. Admission is $2.
Call Cathy at (352) 686-0975
or Peg at (352) 442-5574.

LIFT program
continues meetings
LIFT (Living Information for
Today) meetings are the third
Tuesday monthly beginning at
11:30 a.m. November's meet-
ing will be Tuesday, Nov. 16, at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club.
LIFT provides social support
to widows and widowers
through organized outings and
luncheons that are both enter-
taining and educational. The
LIFT program is managed by
Hospice of Citrus County and
sponsored by the Dignity Me-
morial Network. Call Lynn Miller
at 527-2348.
BHRA Military
Card Party set
The Beverly Hills Recreation
Association, 77 Civic Circle, will
sponsor a Military Card Party
on Tuesday, Nov. 16. Cost is
$12; including lunch.
Doors open at 11 a.m., with
lunch at noon and games start-
ing at 1 p.m.
Call Barbara at 746-3636 or
the BHRA office at 746-4882.


Detachment 819
meeting slated
Marine Corps League De-
tachment 819 will meet at 7
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, at the
Beverly Hills VFW.
This meeting is on a Tuesday
instead of Thursday, since the
last Thursday of November is
Thanksgiving.
There will be no regular
meeting in December. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen,
male or female, are invited to
attend.
If you have any questions,
call Commandant John Koser
at (352) 422-0119.
Sewphisticates
meets Nov. 17
The Pine Ridge Sewphisti-
cates meet at 10:30 a.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 17, at in the
Pine Ridge Community Center.
The program will feature
guest speaker Teddi Hollar,
who will talk about her career in
the fashion industry.
The Sewphisticates is a
Neighborhood Group of the Na-
ture Coast Chapter of the
American Sewing Guild.
All sewing enthusiasts are in-
vited to visit group meetings of
the ASG.
For additional information,
call Carole at 527-3034 or Con-
nie at 527-9943.
Withlacoochee sets
turkey dinner
Withlacoochee Area Resi-
dents' second annual turkey
dinner and quarterly meeting
will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 17.
The public is invited to join
the group for the dinner -
which will feature turkey with all
the fixings and meeting at
Yankeetown-Inglis Woman's
Club.
Guest speakers for the
meeting will be representatives
of the Southwest Water Man-
agement District, who will dis-
cuss the ongoing minimum
flows and levels determination
for the Lower Withlacoochee
River.
The Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club is at 5 56th St.,
Yankeetown, next to the library
and post office.
For more information about
the meeting and the group, call
(352) 447-5434.


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'Lost Boys' documents revealed


Associated Press
PHOENIX When a hu-
manitarian worker asked
Ajak Dau Akech in 1988 why
he fled civil war in Sudan
and walked 1,000 perilous
miles to a refugee camp in
Ethiopia, the boy answered
with words few 8-year-olds
would know.
"We ran away from mas-
sacring and butchering of
the people," the boy said.
More than 20 years later,
Akech had no idea he had
spoken those words until he
read them from a document
he didn't know until re-
cently even existed.
Akech and other Su-
danese war orphans, known
as the Lost Boys of Sudan,
are starting to receive eight-
page records that include
their family histories, the
names of people they trav-
eled with on their flight
from war, the names of
those who died along the
way, medical information
and observations about
their well-being and photo-
graphs of themselves.
For many of the Lost Boys,
the roughly 13,000 docu-
ments are the only record of
their childhood and fami-
lies, the photos the only
ones taken of them as chil-
dren.
The records were a proj-
ect by Radda Barnen, the
Swedish branch of Save the
Children International, and
were meant to document
the histories of the boys who
arrived at the refugee camp
without parents in hopes
they could be reunited later.
But the war lasted 21
years, nearly 2 million peo-
ple were killed and many
villages were destroyed,
making reunions virtually
impossible. The records had
been moved repeatedly,
were nearly destroyed by
another agency intent on
throwing them out, and
were languishing in a
Radda Barnen warehouse


Associated Press
MALAKAL, Sudan- A
bombing on the disputed
north-south border of
Sudan heightened concerns
of renewed conflict in the
region, but a Southern
Sudan army official says the
attack was aimed at rebels,
not the south, and observers
doubt this one incident
would lead to anything
more serious.
Sudan has been high on
the U.S. foreign policy
agenda, with top officials
working to ensure a Janu-
ary referendum that could
split Africa's biggest coun-
try into two is held on time.
They are also working to
avoid renewed conflict be-
tween north and south
Sudan, who more than five
years ago ended a decades-
long war.
The borders of Northern
Bahr Gazal and Southern
Darfur, where the bombing
occurred, are in dispute
and the 2005 peace deal re-
quired the border between
Southern Sudan and the
north be demarcated. That
exercise, however, has also
been fraught with delays.
Col. Philip Aguer,
spokesman for the Sudan
People's Liberation Army,
which protects oil-rich
Southern Sudan, said Sat-
urday that north Sudan's


in Ethiopia when Kirk Fels-
man learned of them.
Felsman was a senior re-
search scholar at Duke Uni-
versity and was working on
a children's rights project
with Radda Barnen when
he saw the documents in
2004.
Felsman obtained a grant
from the Andrew W Mellon
Foundation, and a team of
anthropologists and others
scanned more than 100,000
pages over four months be-
fore giving them to the Ari-
zona Lost Boys Center in
Phoenix, where about 600
Lost Boys have resettled.
It took the center and a
team of mostly volunteers
six more years to sift
through the scanned docu-
ments, but all are now digi-
tized and searchable online
at www.lostboysreunited.org.
Of the 30,000 children
who began the trek, only
about 11,000 survived, ac-
cording to the Lost Boys
Center In the first month
that the database was avail-
able, the website got 4,000
hits from 32 countries and
orders for 400 personal his-
tories, which started going
out in the mail from
Phoenix last week.
Ann Wheat, founder of
the Arizona Lost Boys Cen-
ter, said the arduous task
has been worth it
"We venture out into the
world from a platform, and
that platform is provided by
family, siblings, stories from
our grandparents, and
photo albums and reminisc-
ing about family events,"
she said. "What if you never
had that?
"We're right at the very
beginning of this, and while
we probably can't articulate
or know what this means to
them, it has to be huge, sort
of just giving them that
roadmap back, and that's
where healing comes from,"
she said.
Wheat said the current
system requires Lost Boys


military bombed a disputed
north-south border area but
the attack was not meant for
the south.
Both parts of Sudan are
allowed to keep separate
armies under a 2005 peace
deal that ended their 21-
year war.
Aguer said north Sudan
military officers consulted
with their southern coun-
terparts through a joint mil-
itary panel after the Friday
bombing by an Antonov
plane and determined the
bombs were launched in
the north, but landed in
Southern Sudan territory
close by. The panel, called
the Joint Defense Board, is


INTERN

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to have computer access
and a mailing address, but
that's not possible for many
still living in Africa. The
center also is trying to de-
termine how to get docu-
ments of those who didn't
survive to their anfmily mem-
bers.
Felsman, who is now a
senior technical adviser for
orphans and vulnerable
children at the United
States Agency for Interna-
tional Development's re-
gional office in Pretoria,
South Africa, wrote in an e-
mail that part of being
human is constructing one's
personal story.
"From a child's rights per-
spective, 1 have always be-
lieved that children on the
move should have access to


part of the 2005 peace deal
and is meant to help avoid
misunderstandings be-
tween the armies of the
north and the south.
"The bomb fell in our ter-
ritory by mistake and the
SAF (Sudan Armed Forces)
admitted it was not inten-
tional," said Aguer He said
the bombing took place in
Northern Bahr Gazal State,
located in the southwest of
the country and part of
Southern Sudan, but would
not give a precise location.
Aguer said there were casu-
alties but declined to give
details.
The top U.N. official in
Southern Sudan, David


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the facts of their story, as it
informs their reality, what
those facts mean and feel
like," he wrote.
David Turkon, an anthro-
pology professor at Ithaca
College in New York who
helped get the documents in
order, said the records
mean different things for
different Lost Boys.
Hie said some of the docu-
ments have provided the
names of forgotten family
members in a potential first
step to a reunion, and one of
the Lost Boys living in New
York was planning to use his
documents to prove he mar-
ried his wife in Africa so she
can be brought to the U.S.
For some, the documents
are a curiosity. Others expe-
rience intense emotional


This undated photo
provided by Arizona Lost
Boys Center shows the
refugee identification
document of Ajak Dau
Akech. The documents of
the Sudanese war orphan,
one of the group known as
the Lost Boys of Sudan,
were missing for many
years. For the first time in
most of their lives, these
survivors of the civil war in
Sudan are finding out more
about families and history,
and getting the only known
photographs of themselves
as children. It has taken
years to track down
personal records kept by
humanitarians at refugee
camps in the 1980s and
compile them in an online
database. 'Akech
smiles Nov. 5 as he holds
the hard copy of his refugee
identification document.
Associated Press
reactions.
"To be able to look at your
own eyes at this time in your
life, these are terrified
young children," Turkon
said. "You can just see it in
their faces ... It's terribly im-
portant for a lot of people."
For Akech, it was a re-
minder and a record of a
stolen childhood.
He wept as he looked
through his document for
the first time recently in
Phoenix, where he now
lives.
He listed his activities be-
fore the war as tending cat-
tle and playing, and said
that he had finished the first
grade. The humanitarian
worker who conducted the
interview noted that Akech
was crying and frightened.


Sudan border bombing heightens tension


Gressly, said casualties are
in the single digits and a
U.N. team is going to the
area to assess the situation
Lazaro Sumbeiywo, the
Kenyan retired general who
mediated the 2005 peace
deal, said that since signing
the agreement, north and
south had only fought once,


in 2008, in a dispute over
the oil-rich area of Abyei.
Sumbeiywo declined to
comment on the Friday in-
cident but said when he
went to assess the general
situation in Southern
Sudan two weeks ago, he
did not find the semiau-
tonomous region tense.


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Akech had not only had
escaped war and left all but
one brother behind, he also
had survived famine, thirst,
sickness, ambushes, unfor-
giving desert conditions and
attacks by wild animals dur-
ing the months-long walk to
Ethiopia.
"I didn't have my parents,
and I was afraid the whole
time that I wasn't going to
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The photo taken of Akech
at the refugee camp is quite
the opposite of Akech now,
whose ready grin led one of
his former teachers to nick-
name him Mr. Smile.
"I can't imagine that was
me," Akech said as he
looked at the photo. "How
can a young little kid like
that survive all these
tragedies?"
Akech's father died be-
fore the war. His mother
and most of his siblings scat-
tered to different parts of
Africa.
Akech said he's grateful
to have his document.
"It commemorates what
went wrong, who I was,
where I was," he said. "It's
historical."


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AIO SUNumAY Niovluiat 14, 2010


Insurgents attack NATO base


10 perish in another bombing 'i .r .


Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan A group
of would-be suicide bombers tried
to storm a major NATO base in east-
ern Afghanistan early Saturday but
were repelled before they could
enter; officials said.
A bomb hidden in a motorbike
also exploded on a busy street in
the Imam Sahib district of the
northern province of Kunduz,
killing 10 people, including a police
commander and three children, ac-
cording to the Interior Ministry.
Separately, NATO reported that
insurgents killed three coalition
service members Saturday in an at-
tack in southern Afghanistan. The
coalition did not provide any fur-
ther details or the nationalities of
the service members killed.
The attacks, which occurred a
day after a suicide car bomber tar-
geted a U.S. convoy outside Kabul,
were the latest show of force by the
Taliban as the U.S.-led alliance
steps up pressure against the insur-
gents in the southern stronghold of
Kandahar
Saturday's assault on the NATO
base the second against it in five
months underscored the Tal-
iban's ability to strike at the core of
the NATO mission and to enjoy rel-
ative freedom of movement across
the country despite a series ofcoali-
tion offensives and an infusion of
thousands of additional interna-
tional forces.
The insurgents attacked an
Afghan army checkpoint outside


the Jalalabad base at dawn, spark-
ing a gunbattle that lasted at least
two hours as NATO helicopters
fired from above.
Six insurgents were killed, in-
cluding two who were wearing
bomb-laden suicide vests, accord-
ing to the international military
coalition. No NATO or Afghan
troops were killed, the coalition
said.
Taliban spokesman Zabiullah
Mujahid said there were 14 attack-
ers and 11 of them were killed,
though the insurgent group typi-
cally gives inflated numbers.
An Associated Press photogra-
pher at the scene saw three dead
bodies laid out, all in Afghan army
uniforms, which militants often
wear as a disguise. An AK-47 assault
rifle, a rocket-propelled grenade
launcher and a grenade were laid
out nearby
NATO said it would not be de-
terred by the attack, the second
against an eastern outpost in the
past two weeks. Insurgents attacked
an observation post in Paktika
province on Oct 30, and NATO said
at least 40 Taliban fighters were
killed before the attackers were re-
pelled.
The coalition "will continue to
work with our Afghan partners to
establish a safe and peaceful
Afghanistan," said NATO
spokesman U.S. Army Col. Rafael
Torres.
The base attacked Saturday was
also targeted in June with a car
bomb, rocket-propelled grenades


Associated Press
An Afghan police officer stands guard Saturday near the site of an explosion in Kunduz, Afghanistan.


and automatic weapons although
the militants again failed to breach
its defenses. Eight militants were
killed in that attack. The base is
about 75 miles (120 kilometers) east
of Kabul on the main road between
the Afghan capital and the Pakistan


border.
With. NATO focusing its coun-
terinsurgency campaign in the
southern provinces of Kandahar
and Helmand, the security situation
in the east and north has steadily
been deteriorating.


The bombing in Kunduz appar-
ently was targeting a senior police
officer as he drove past Com-
mander Mohammad Manan and
one of his bodyguards were among
those killed, said Abdul Qayum
Ebrahimi, the district police chief.


Iraq lawmakers Afgha


approve deal to Taliban still
g Ao intimidating
form new govt. Associated Press


Associated Press
BAGHDAD Iraqi law-
makers approved an agree-
ment on Saturday that aims
to bring all of Iraq's feuding
political blocs into a new
government led by Shiite
Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki, although deep dis-
agreements remain about
the role to be played by the
country's minority Sunnis.
The deal struck this week
ended an eight-month im-
passe that had stalled the
formation of a new govern-
ment and threatened to re-
ignite sectarian violence.
But the agreement ap-
peared on the brink of col-
lapse almost immediately
after it was announced be-
cause of the deep-rooted
distrust that pervades
Iraq's sectarian politics.
The Sunni-backed
Iraqiya bloc had threatened
to boycott the Saturday ses-
sion to approve the deal
after storming out of parlia-
ment on Thursday and rais-
ing fears the group would
abstain from government
altogether. Iraqiya lawmak-
ers said they had been be-
trayed by al-Maliki's Shiite
coalition, who they fear is
trying to deprive them of a
significant role in the next
government.
Leaders of the major par-
ties met early Saturday to
try to iron out their differ-
ences and salvage, the deal.
When parliament convened
later in the day, Iraqiya was
present and took part in the
parliament vote to approve
the power-sharing agree-
ment.
"There was a misunder-
standing in the last ses-
sion," Iraqiya spokesman
Haider al-Mulla told law-
makers. "We here stress
that we will be an active
part in producing a na-
tional unity government."
There was no immediate
tally of how many members
attended or voted for the
deal, which was described
as a general outline for the
new government but with
few specifics. Kurdish law-
maker Mahmoud Othman
said it passed by a large
margin.
Under the agreement, al-
Maliki and President Jalal
Talabani, a Kurd, keep
their current posts. Iraqiya,
meanwhile, gets the parlia-
ment speaker's post as well
as the top spot on a council
intended to serve as a
check on al-Maliki's pow-
ers. That job is supposed to
go to Iraqiya leader Ayad
Allawi.
But in comments to CNN


Associated Press
Iraqi lawmaker Khalid
Shawani speaks to the press
Saturday In Baghdad, Iraq.

television late Friday,
Allawi said he would not
take part in the al-Maliki
government and described
the power-sharing deal as
dead. Allawi did not attend
the parliament session, and
other lawmakers said he
had already left the coun-
try
While Allawi absent,
Iraqiya official Fattah al-
Sheik said the majority of
the bloc's members were
there.


PANJSHIR VALLEY,
Afghanistan President
Hamid Karzai's moves to
make peace with the Tal-
iban are scaring
Afghanistan's ethnic mi-
norities into taking their
weapons out of mothballs
and preparing for a fight.
Mindful that Karzai's
overtures come with
NATO's blessing, and that
U.S. and NATO forces will
eventually leave, they
worry that power will
shift back into the hands
of the forces they helped
to overthrow in 2001.
Such a peace deal won't
be easy in a country with
a complex ethnic makeup
and a tradition of
vendetta killings. With
ethnic and tribal differ-
ences having sharpened
during the violence of the
last 30 years, there's little
indication that Karzai's
overtures are gaining
much traction.
Still, some mujahedeen
- commanders of the
Northern Alliance of mi-
nority groups that fought
the Taliban are taking
no chances. They speak
openly of the weaponry
they have kept despite a
U.N. disarmament drive.
In the Panjshir Valley,


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n minorities fear peace talks


heartland of the Northern
Alliance, Mohammed
Zaman says that when the
U.N. came looking for
weapons, "the rnujahedeen
gave one and hid the other
19."
"We have plenty of
weapons, rocket launchers
and small arms and we can
get any kind of weapons we
need from the gun mafias
that exist in our neighbor-
ing countries," he said. "All
the former mujahedeen
from commander to soldier,


they have made prepara-
tions if they (the Taliban)
come into the government."
Zaman was speaking to
The Associated Press at the
grave of'Ahmad Shah Mas-
soud, the charismatic Tajik
leader who commanded
the Northern Alliance and
died in an al-Qaida suicide
bombing two days before
the Sept. 11 attacks that
provoked the U.S. invasion.
Somah Ibrahim, a U.N.
spokesman, said 94,262
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heavy weapons were col-
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armament program ended
in 2005. But fewer than half
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some went to the army and
police, which many of the
militiamen joined.
The Hazara, a mainly
Shiite ethnic group, are
also worried.
"We have lots of weapons
but they are not modern
weapons. They are simple
weapons," said Abbas
Noian, a Hazara legislator.


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(',llaS (COUNTY (FL~) (CHRONvuICEiiAY ohws1,20t l


Democracy



leader free



in Myanmar

_-- Affi


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660,
and ask for Sandra Frederick, managing editor, be prepared to give your name, phone number, and the address
of the news event.


---


Myanmar's pro-democracy
leader Aung San Suu Kyi's
supporters celebrate her re-
lease Saturday, in New Delhi,
India.


Associated Press

YANGON, Myanmar -
Myanmar democracy hero-
ine Aung San Suu Kyi
gained her freedom Satur-
day for the first time in 7 1/2
years, as jubilant supporters
stormed the lakeside com-
pound that was her home
and prison minutes after the
country's military rulers au-
thorized her release.
After the national police
chief read Suu Kyi the offi-
cial order, several thousand
supporters at her residence
began singing the national
anthem when the Nobel
Peace Prize laureate poked
her head over the gate.
A smiling Suu Kyi, wear-
ing a traditional jacket and a
flower in her hair, spent al-
most 10 minutes asking the
cheering crowd to quiet
down before speaking
briefly. She asked listeners
to spread her words to those
standing in the back who
couldn't hear.
"If we work in unity, we
will achieve our goal. We
have a lot of things to do,"
Suu Kyi told well-wishers,
who quickly swelled to as
many as 5,000. She said she
would see them again Sun-
day at the headquarters of
her political party.
While her release elated
man y,
from ordi-
n a r y
Myanmar unity we v
citizens to
world our goal.
leaders,
s o m e a lot of
warned to
her strug- to
gle was far
from over.
London- was released Saturc
based
rights
group Amnesty Interna-
tional estimates more than
2,200 political prisoners re-
main jailed by the junta.
"While Daw Aung San
Suu Kyi's release is cer-
tainly welcome, it only
marks the end of an unfair
sentence that was illegally
extended, and is by no
means a concession on the
part of the authorities," said
Amnesty's Secretary-Gen-
eral Salil Shetty.
"The fact remains that au-
thorities should never have
arrested her or the many
other prisoners of con-
science in Burma in the first
place, locking them out of
the political process."
The release of one of the
world's most prominent po-
litical prisoners came a
week after an election that
was swept by the military's
proxy political party and de-
cried by Western nations as
a sham designed to perpetu-
ate authoritarian control.
The 65-year-old, whose
latest period of detention
started in May 2003, has
come to symbolize the strug-
gle for democracy in the
Southeast Asian nation
ruled by the military since
1962. Suu Kyi has been
jailed or under house arrest
for more than 15 of the last
21 years.
Supporters had been
waiting most of the day near
her residence and the head-


Associated Press
A portrait with flags and sup-
porters of leader Aung San
Suu Kyi hangs Saturday in
front of City Hall, in Paris,
France.


quarters of her party.
As her release was under
way, riot police stationed in
the area left the scene and a
barbed-wire barricade near
her residence was removed,
allowing the waiting sup-
porters to surge forward.
Mya Kyi, a 65-year-old
housewife with tears rolling
down her face, said she had
waited anxiously since the
morning after traveling 25
miles (40 kilometers) from
her home north of Yangon.
"Now that I have seen her
face, I'm ready to die," she
said.
Suu Kyi's release was im-
mediately welcomed by
world leaders.
President Barack Obama
called Suu Kyi "a hero of
mine" and said the United
States "welcomes her long
overdue release."
U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon praised Suu
Kyi upon her release. "Her
dignity and courage in the
face of injustice have been
an inspiration to many peo-
ple around the world," Ban
said in a statement
British Prime Minister
David Cameron said her
freedom was long overdue.
"Aung San Suu Kyi is an in-
spiration for all of us who
believe in freedom of
speech, democracy and
human


ve work in
vill achieve
We have
f things
do.


lay from house art


rights,"
he said in
e a state-
ment
In a
rare men-
tion of
the oppo-
sition
lead r,
i state tele-
rest. vision an-


nounced
Saturday
night that national police
chief Maj. Gen. Khin Yee vis-
ited Suu Kyi at 5 p.m. to read
the official release order.
Khin Yee said he was
happy to see Suu Kyi in good
health, and that the authori-
ties were ready to provide
any assistance she needs,
the report said.
The police chief told her
authorities want to maintain
the rule of law, peace, stabil-
ity and tranquility, and Suu
Kyi replied "she feels the
same way, too," it said.
Critics say the Nov 7 elec-
tions were manipulated to
give the pro-military party a
sweeping victory. Results
have been released piece-
meal and already have given
the junta-backed Union Sol-
idarity and Development
Party a majority in both
houses of Parliament.
The last elections in 1990
were won overwhelmingly
by Suu Kyi's National
League for Democracy
party, but the military re-
fused to hand over power
and instead clamped down
on opponents.
Suu Kyi's release gives the
junta some ammunition
against critics of the election
and the government's
human rights record, which
includes the continued de-
tention of some 2,200 politi-
cal prisoners and brutal
military campaigns against
ethnic minorities.


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Open your account and start earning more todaN.
Visit vour nearest location or call Mercantile Banh at I-800-238-Sb8l.


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W ORLD


Nation sRMEFS

Sand, snow


Tough stand on tax cuts


Associated Press
Jack Sand shovels snow
Saturday in St. Paul, Minn.,
where the first snow of the
season arrived early.

Suspect charged
in bridge standoff
SAN FRANCISCO -A
California man accused of
halting traffic on the San
Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge and threatening to
blow it up is scheduled to be
arraigned Monday on multiple
crimes.
Prosecutors charged 51-
year-old Craig Carlos-
Valentino, of Antioch, on
Friday with making a false
bomb threat, resisting or de-
laying a California Highway
Patrol officer, kidnapping and
child endangerment.
Authorities say he was dis-
traught over family problems
when he stopped his SUV on
the upper deck around 7 a.m.
Thursday, dialed 911 and
threatened to blow up the
span.
Police say he brandished a
gun and threatened to kill
himself during an ensuing
standoff.
His 16-year-old daughter
escaped from the SUV.

World BRIEFS

Putin, pup


Associated Press
Russian Prime Minister
Vladimir Putin cuddles a
Bulgarian "Karakachanka"
breed sheepdog puppy, a
gift from his Bulgarian
counterpart, Boiko Borissov,
after signing agreements on
the South Stream gas tran-
sit pipeline, one of the two
countries' joint energy proj-
ects, Saturday in Sofia, Bul-
garia.

Gov't quits before
Cabinet reshuffle
PARIS French Prime
Minister Francois Fillon re-
signed Saturday along with
his government ahead of a
long-planned Cabinet reshuf-
'fle.
The office of President
Nicolas Sarkozy said in a two-
line statement that the presi-
dent accepted the resignation,
"thus putting an end to Mr.
Francois Fillon's functions."
The move was a formality
because the prime minister
must formally resign with his
team before a new govern-
ment can be put in place.
Speculation in the French
media over who would be the
next prime minister has not
excluded Fillon.
Sarkozy said in June that
he planned to change the
Cabinet once a reform of the
pension system was adopted.
The hotly contested reform
raising the retirement age
from 60 to 62 became law
Wednesday, a day after
Sarkozy signed the measure.
The conservative Sarkozy
has had record low poll ratings
despite the wide mandate he
received when elected in
2007. It is assumed that in
naming a new government he
would try to create a solid
base for 2012 presidential
elections.
-From wire reports


GOP lawmakers

empowered after

election victories

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Fresh off big
victories on Election Day, Republi-
cans in Congress feel empowered in
their fight to extend tax cuts that
expire in January, including those
for the wealthy.
President Barack Obama has
said he wants to compromise with
Republicans to ensure that tax cuts
for middle-income families con-
tinue, suggesting he's open to ex-
tending all the tax breaks for a year
or two. Republican leaders say it's
a nice gesture by the president, but
some key GOP lawmakers want
more.
"It should be permanent," said
Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H. "We've got
to get this economy to pick up and
if you raise taxes you're going to
stifle the economy significantly. I'm
sure that somebody's explained
that to the president."
Rep. John Boehner of Ohio,
who's in line to be the next House
speaker in January, also played
down talk of a compromise.
"I think that extending all of the
current tax rates and making them


A LOOK AT EXPIRING BUSH TAX CUTS


What will happen if the 2001 and
2003 tax cuts expire in January:
Income tax rates increase. The
bottom rate rises to 15 percent from
10 percent. The top rate goes up to
39.6 percent from 35 percent. Sev-
eral rates in between increase as
well.
The child tax credit returns to
$500 per child from $1,000 per child.
The standard deduction for mar-
ried couples decreases, affecting
many married couples.
Capital gains taxes rise. The top
rate returns to 20 percent from 15
percent.
t Taxes on dividends increase as
they are taxed at the same rate as

permanent will reduce the uncer-
tainty in America and help small
businesses to create jobs again,"
Boehner said. "You can't invest
when you don't know what the
rules are."
Democrats will have majorities
in both the House and Senate
when Congress returns this week
for a lame-duck session that is ex-
pected to stretch into December.
They will need Republican sup-
port to get the 60 votes necessary to
pass a tax bill in the Senate.
Obama and Democratic leaders


earned income. The top marginal rate
increases to 39.6 percent from 15
percent.
The federal estate tax goes back
to 55 percent next year, with a $1 mil-
lion exemption. It had been gradually
reduced, then repealed for 2010.
'* The Alternative Minimum Tax is
no longer adjusted to spare more
than 20 million middle-income fami-
lies from a tax hike averaging $3,900.
The tax was enacted in 1969 to make
sure wealthy people couldn't avoid
taxes, but it wasn't indexed for
inflation. /
Associated Press
Sources: Joint Committee on Taxation;
Tax Policy Center

in Congress want to make the tax
cuts permanent for lower- and mid-
dle-income families, while letting
them expire for individuals mak-
ing more than $200,000 a year and
married couples making more than
$250,000. Republicans want to
make the tax cuts permanent for
everyone.
Many congressional aides, both
Republican and Democrat, think
lawmakers will settle on a tempo-
rary extension of all the tax rates,
perhaps for a year or two. While
some Democrats have supported


the idea, interviews with lawmak-
ers and aides from both parties
suggest that compromise won't be
easy.
Republicans are itching for a tax
fight. They believe voters punished
Democrats for increasing the size
of government, and are looking for-
ward to next year when the GOP
will control the House and have
more seats in the Senate.
Democrats must balance the in-
terests of liberals who are dead set
against extending tax cuts for the
wealthy even for a short time -
with the more conservative in their
ranks who don't want to raise taxes
on anyone in a bad economy.
Clouding the issue is whether
Democrats who lost at the polls
will have the stomach for one last
knockdown debate before they
leave office.
An impasse would mean all the
cuts could expire in January, at
least temporarily, resulting in sig-
nificant tax increases for families
at every income level.
The tax cuts enacted under the
Bush administration in 2001 and
2003 reduced marginal income tax
rates at every level. They also pro-
vided a wide range of income tax
breaks for education, families with
children and married couples.
Taxes on capital gains and divi-
dends were reduced, while the fed-
eral estate tax was gradually
repealed, though only for 2010.


Solid stand on poverty


Associated Press
A child lights a candle Saturday during an event of solidarity with the more than 30 percent of Romanians struggling with extreme poverty and
other forms of social exclusion in Bucharest, Romania. Candles were lit simultaneously In 20 Romanian cities and 52 cities in Germany, ac-
cording to the organizers, an international social assistance organization.




Calif. rejects legal pot, but cities embrace drug


Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif Cali-
fornians may have rejected
legalizing recreational mar-
ijuana, but voters across the
state are more than ready to
reap revenue from the
state's largest cash crop.
On Election Day, all 10
cities with local measures
on their ballots approved
new or higher taxes on mar-
ijuana sales that put the
need for cash above the
stigma of a federally
banned drug.
The same was true in Col-
orado, where medical mar-
ijuana was approved in
2000. Nine municipalities
approved higher sales taxes
on medical marijuana
products this year. So far, no
Colorado town with a mari-
juana tax question on the
ballots has rejected it.
The embrace of pot as a
legitimate revenue stream
signals the continued main-
streaming of marijuana in
both states, despite the de-
feat of California's Proposi-
tion 19.
"As part of treating this
business like any other


Associated Press
Medical marijuana patient Ezekiel Muses, who uses the drug
for back pain, checks out a jar of medical marijuana Sept. 21
at the CANNA CARE medical marijuana shop in Sacramento,


Calif.
business in the city, we
need to update our busi-
ness operation tax to in-
clude them," said Amy
Williams, a spokeswoman
for the City of Sacramento,
where voters approved a 4
percent tax on medical pot.
Other cities that ap-
proved special marijuana
taxes, including San Jose,
Long Beach and Oakland,
have all struggled with re-


cession-driven deficits, and
all decided to look to mari-
juana to bridge the gap.
Some cities put measures
on the ballot to prepare
themselves in case voters
approved Proposition 19,
which included a provision
that would have legalized
small-scale cultivation of
marijuana across the state.
Long Beach's measure,
which passed overwhelm-


ingly, would have imposed a
15 percent tax on busi-
nesses that sold marijuana
for recreational use.
Voters in Stockton im-
posed a 4 percent tax on
medical marijuana dispen-
saries. The same measure
would have levied a 10 per-
cent tax on non-medical
marijuana businesses.
Oakland voters led the
way last year by passing the
country's first special tax
on medical marijuana, an
extra $18 for every $1,000 in
sales on top of the city's reg-
ular sales tax of 9.75 per-
cent. In the most recent.
election, voters raised that
tax rate to $50 for every
$1,000.
And the city is poised to
lead again in pushing the
limits of government-sanc-
tioned pot sales. Later this
month, the city will begin
taking applications for per-
mits to run four industrial-
scale medical marijuana
growing operations.
Nearly 300 groups and in-
dividuals have registered
their interest in applying
for the permits. Each would
have to pay a $5,000 nonre-


fundable fee to apply. Re-
cipients of the permits
would be required to pay an
annual fee of $211,000.
The decision to tax the
drug in a way that resem-
bles special taxes on recre-
ational substances like
alcohol and tobacco moves
the state even closer to ac-
knowledging openly that
marijuana being sold
legally under state law is
"medical" in name only
Medical marijuana advo-
cates are frustrated by the
comparison to other mood-
altering substances. They
believe that what they see
as the drug's broad thera-
peutic properties should
put pot in the same cate-
gory as prescription med-
ications, which are not
taxed.
Yet how much revenue
cities will really see from
marijuana remains difficult
to predict. Dispensaries
have always been required
to pay state sales tax like
any other business, but
many would rather risk
state penalties for not pay-
ing taxes than leave a paper
trail for federal authorities.












EXCURSIONS ___
CItRUSILI COUNTY C-HROINICLEI






Ancient survivors


Associated Press


Tourists on a recent visit the Temple of Ramses II, illuminated at night, at Abu Simbel on Lake Nasser, Egypt.


Relocated temples highlight Egyptian lake cruise


PAUL SCHEME
Associated Press
-ABU SIMBEL, Egypt
n the 1960s, rising waters
from a new dam
threatened to submerge
the temples and
monuments of Nubia, the
ancient home of black
pharaohs in Egypt's far south.
To preserve them, the
antiquities were dismantled,
moved and reconstructed.
Today, most of the surviving
monuments can only be seen
from the lake created by the
waters that nearly destroyed
them.


Cruises on the 300-mile-long Lake
Nasser, one of the largest manmade
lakes'iirthe world, include stops to visit
nearly a dozen of the temples. Four-day
trips are offered on a pair of elegant
cruise ships, the Eugenie and the Kasr
Ibrim, that hark back to a golden age of
1920s travel in Egypt and carry more
than just a whiff of an Agatha Christie
novel.
For tourists, the lake's vast waters
are also a welcome respite from the din
of Egypt's teeming cities and offer a
contrast to the intensely farmed ver-
dant fields of the Nile Valley Birds
wheel overhead and Egypt's last croco-
diles slip unseen through the dark wa-
ters. The only other sound is the gentle
chug of the ship's engine.
But the temples, and the story of
their survival, are a highlight of the
trip. They were saved by the interna-
tional community in one of the most
dramatic feats of engineering and con-


servation the world had ever seen,
painstakingly cut into pieces and re-
built on higher ground, or in one case,
carefully chipped out of the rock and
slid on rails for more than a mile and a
half.
The most dramatic project was the
dismantling of the massive statues of
Pharaoh Ramses II at Abu Simbel into
a thousand pieces. They were rebuilt
on high ground over a period of four
years as the rising waters lapped at
their feet
The lake, which crosses over into
Sudan, was created when Egypt, with
the help of the former Soviet Union,
built the High Dam, which would go on
to provide half of Egypt's electricity in
the 1970s. It also protected the country
from the droughts and famines that rav-
aged east Africa in the ensuing
decades.
But while some 50 countries, includ-
ing the United States, pitched into save


the monuments, nothing could be done
for the people who had lived there for
millennia, even ruling as pharaohs in
the 8th century B.C.
Around 60,000 people had to be relo-
cated north to rudimentary housing in
Aswan, far from the fields and orchards
they grew up in. Accounts describe
families kissing the ground and pocket-
ing handfuls of soil before leaving, even
as the waters rose over their villages.
To this day, members of the surviving
community are trying to preserve their
distinctive language and culture. When
the government started talking about
cultivating the desert shores of the lake
once again, the Nubians demanded to
be allowed to return.
For now, though, the lake's rocky
shores remain deserted, with only the
occasional fisherman sailing around
the barren islands that were once the
crests of distant hills.
See Page A17


Machu Picchu


The Great Wall


Special to the Chronicle
Last year's adventure was a trip to Peru for David and Mary Waterfield of Sugarmill
Woods. It began in Lima and ended at Lake Titicaca high in the Andes Mountains.
The photo shows the highlight of the trip, a two-day tour of the Inca ruins, Machu
Picchu, now considered one of the new Seven Wonders of the World.


DREAM
LA ID


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Looking down on one of the many signal towers at the Great Wall of China.

1 China makes for fascinating trip


Neil Sawyer
Sij W .'M r, _,' t_",,S


Upon arrival in Beijing,
after a 15-hour flight
from Los Angeles, we
were met at the airport by our
guide and driver, with whom
we would spend the next (bour
days. We were taken to our
hotel, a fully westernized
abode, for a much-needed rest.
It was late in the evening and
morning would come much too
soon.


Our first trip to China, 1995,
was full of anticipation to see
the various sights that we had
read so much about: the Great
Wall, the Summer Palace, the
Forbidden City, the Ming
Tombs, etc. But our first con-
cern was that we were going to
spend a full four days with a
couple of total strangers.


Page A17


See IF







To(;uIm &R & VETERANS


A14 SUNIAY, NovIuiih'R 14, 2010


Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 382-0876, or pass
along this phone number to
the veteran.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Coalition (CCVC) has
a monthly Veterans Benefit
Yard Sale at Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church, 550
U.S. 41 S. in Invemess from 5
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. the second
Saturday monthly that oper-
ates September through May.
Come and visit the CCVC
Veterans Benefit Yard Sale.
This event has grown, offering
treasures and collectables of
all descriptions. Plenty of ac-
tivities are available through-
out the sale with food vendors
on site, restroom facilities,
plenty of free parking.
Booths are available by
reservation for a tax de-
ductible donation of $10 per
space, $5 for veterans' organi-
zations and free to charitable
organizations on space-avail-
able basis by calling Richard
Floyd at 400-8952 between 1
and 7 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Reserved spaces not


occupied by 7 a.m. on yard
sale day will be sold on a first-
come, first-served basis to
those vendors who do not
have prepaid registration.
All proceeds help the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
continue to work on their mis-
sion of "Veterans Helping Vet-
erans" and we hope the
community will also support
this effort in a way of thanking
them for their service to our
country.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is looking for female
veterans. Many functions go
on where we would like to in-
volve female veterans, but we
don't know how to reach
them. We are particularly
looking for World War II veter-
ans to participate in the pa-
rade this year, but all female
veterans are encouraged to
contact us. If you are a female
veteran and would like to be
involved, contact Cynthia
Holden at 628-6481 or e-mail
Cynthia@advocate4victims.or
9.
CCVC's Monthly Gen-
eral Meeting at New Loca-
tion and Dates for
November and December
The Citrus County Veterans
Coalition (CCVC) invites all
See NOTES/Page A15


V veterans r ;


Citrus Cinemas 6
Inverness; 637-3377
"Skyline" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Unstoppable" (PG-13) 1:20
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Morning Glory" (PG-13) 1:10
p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Megamind" (PG) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m. No Passes.
"Due Date" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40
p.m., 7:45 p.m. No Passes.
"Red" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7
p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9
564-6864
"Skyline" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Unstoppable" (PG-13) 1:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.


"Morning Glory" (PG-13) 1
p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"For Colored Girls" (R) 1:10
p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Megamind" (PG) 1:05 p.m.,
4:05 p.m. No Passes.
"Megamind" In RealD 3D -
Event Pricing (PG) 1:35 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m. No Passes.
"Due Date" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:50 p.m. No Passes.
"Saw" In RealD 3D Event
Pricing (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
No Passes.
"Paranormal Activity 2" (R)
7:05 p.m.
"Red" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20
p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Visit www. chronicleonline. corn
for area movie listings and enter-
tainment information.


First m. Arm' r o

BraydenJ Armstrong

Brayden J. Armstrong
will celebrate his first
birthday on Nov. 20, 2010.
Brayden is the son of *
Drew and Ashley of Stan- 1
dish, Mich. His paternal 1
grandparent is Shirley
Graniveman. -






Todayt S '
,


Marriages
10/25 to 10/29/10
William Lee Mramor, Beverly
Hills/Tara Jeanette Spicer, Bev-
erly Hills.
11/1/10 to 11/5/10
Andrew James Codling,
Crystal River/Teakeyla Nahtar-
sha Fisher, Crystal River
Dustin Scott Moore, Inver-


der as well as three
grandchildren and four
stepgrandchildren.
They have lived in Citrus
County since 1976. Judy is a
retired teacher and her hu4-
band is a retired minister
and school psychologist. A
reception is planned for
family members.


ness/Jazmin Antoinette
Cepeda, Inverness
Lance Richard Wicker, Ho-
mosassa/Rebecca Lynn Blos-
som, Homosassa
Divorces and marriages filed
in the state of Florida are a mat-
ter of public record. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 341-
6400.


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Judy L. and James Calvin
Mulder will soon celebrate
their 50th wedding anniver-
sary.
The couple were married
Nov. 26, 1960, at the
Nazarene Church in El-
lisville, Ill. They have three
children -, Tonja Mulder
Purtee, Doran and Lee Mul-


The Mulders


.-o For the ~F :,:c-" -.


- - - - -- -- -


I I Y--.---- C--e~ll -C -~ll--llll--LI~ y-l CI~~IY--C-)ICIIIII~---~-~ ~--CI-~ --~- ~--~--


..-.----Y-~1*U ~ I--- IllllllllC I - -C-F--- Ill~-lICIIIII 1~-- 1------ ---- ~1


Cl-III[IS COINTY (111) (,'IllONI(,'IJi


50th:-,T,


b








CI( Tl' (A ( 'iNIT (FL.) (l0liUNIfC.


NOTES
Continued from Page A14

honorably discharged veterans,
tleir spouse, widows and wid-
6Nvers along with other vet-
4an's organizations and
current coalition members to
bur open business meetings at
6 p.m. at the DAV Building lo-
dated at 1039 N. Paul Dr. Inver-
riess just off U.S. 41.
'" 6 p.m. Thursday CCVC
Regular meeting
10 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 9 -
CCVC Board meeting
'" 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 16 -
CCVC Regular meeting
Regular meetings will re-
sume on the fourth Thursday
and Board meeting will be on
the second Thursday of each
month starting in January 2011.
Come see what the Citrus
Veterans Coalition is all about,
and if you feel you can assist in
the "Veterans Helping Veter-
ans" program, please come on
board as a member.
We are a service to needy
veterans' organization. We are
providing assistance to needy
and disabled veterans and their
families with minor repairs to
their homes through the gen-
erosity of volunteers who are in
the plumbing, electrical and
construction industry. We also
provide funds for annual schol-
arships to veterans' family
members who apply through
their school counseling serv-
ices.
If you are looking for an or-
ganization that devotes all of its
energy and fund raising to the
philosophy of "Veterans Helping
Veterans" then the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
wants you! Annual membership
donation is just $10 for a calen-
dar year or $25 for three years.
We have life members and or-
ganizations from most of the
veteran's organizations in Cit-
rus County and we are not at-
tempting to take you away from
your parent organization.
The CCVC is a nonprofit,
corporation, and your donations
are tax deductible. Current
members should check their
membership card for expiration
dates, and renew with John
Ring 746-0826 or at the meet-
ing. Come on out and get in-
volved. For further information,
go to www.ccvcfl.org.
CCVC's Membership
Drive The Citrus County Vet-
erans Coalition (CCVC) invites
all honorably discharged veter-
ans, their spouse, widows and
widowers along with other vet-
erans organizations and current
coalition members to our open
business meetings on the
fourth Thursday of each month
at 6 p.m. at the DAV Building lo-
.ated at 1039 N. Paul Dr. Inver-
ness just off U.S. 41.
; If you are looking for an or-
ganization that devotes all of its
energy and fund raising to the
philosophy of "Veterans Helping
Veterans" then the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
wants you. Come see what the
Citrus Veterans Coalition is all
about, and if you feel you can
assist in the "Veterans Helping
Veterans" program, please
come on board as a member.
Annual membership donation
is just $10 for a calendar year
or $25 for three years. We have
life members and organizations
from most of the veteran's or-
ganizations in Citrus County
and we are not attempting to
take you away from your parent
organization. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates, and
renew with John Ring 746-0826
or at the meeting. Membership
applications are also available
oh the CCVC website
vww.ccvcfl.org. You can also
ceck the website for updated
hews and announcements. The
SCVC is a nonprofit, corpora-
tion, and your donations are tax
deductible. We are a service to
needy veterans' organization
providing food, assistance,
scholarships and more. Come


on out and get involved. For
further information, go to
www.ccvcfl.org.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200, Her-
nando; 726-3339. Send e-mails
to vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Pizza special every day: 10-
inch pizza, $6.
Free pool all week.
Today: Lounge bingo, 2 p.m.;
food available bring a can food
item and get a free winner-take-
all (WTA) card; MOC and AUX
meeting 10 a.m.
Monday: Wings three for $1,
2 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday: Auxiliary lounge
bingo, 2 p.m.; food available;
bring a canned food item and


get a free WTA card. Dart
league at 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Euchre, 2:30
p.m.
Friday: Show me the Hand, 2
to 4 p.m.
Saturday: Ladies Auxiliary
bingo at 10:30 a.m. Doors open
at 8:30; food available.
Thursday, Nov. 25: Post
Thanksgiving Dinner, 1 to 3,
p.m.; $5 advanced ticket sales
only; deadline to purchase tick-
ets is Saturday
Post 4252 Auxiliary goes to
nursing homes three times a
month to play bingo with resi-
dents. Everyone is welcome.
Post is available for Christmas
parties; book early.
Post and auxiliary meet at
6:30 p.m. every second Thurs-
day. See our post activities:
Google us as VFW 4252, Her-
nando.
Post honor guard is available
for funerals, flag raising, nurs-
ing homes. Main post hall is
available for rent for your par-
ties. Call Cmdr. John Stark or
President Mary Martin at 726-
3339.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus.
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springis,
(352) 465-4864. The schedule
of events for the week of Nov.
14 is:
Canteen opens noon Mon-
day to Saturday; 1 p.m. Sun-
days.
Monday: Show Me the
Money, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday: Darts at 1 p.m.
Wednesday: Shuffleboard at
7p.m.
Thursday: Bingo starts at 1
p.m.; Darts at 7 p.m.
Friday: Donna's Rib dinner,
Ladies Aux., 5 to 6:30 p.m., $8.
Saturday: Breakfast served
8:30 to 10:30 a.m. free shuffle-
board
Friday, Dec. 31: New Year's
Eve Party, plan ahead. At 6
p.m., hot and cold buffet, two
complimentary beverages,
karaoke, $25 per person, spon-
sors available for nonmembers.
Every Saturday: Breakfast
served from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
Breakfast items served will be
eggs, sausage, grits, home
fries, sausage gravy and bis-
cuits, pancakes and coffee or
tea. Cost is $6 per person. Re-
duced price for children. Public
is invited.
Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337 and Ladies Auxiliary,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness, phone 344-3495. Week
of Nov. 14:
Today: Pool tournament, 2
p.m. Karaoke with Turner
Camp Dave, 5 to 9 p.m.
Monday: No bingo.
Tuesday: Chicken wings by
Bill, three for $1.25 at 4:30 to 7
p.m. French fries, cheesy fries,
chili fries, onion rings and cel-
ery available; Karaoke with Mr.
T, 5 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday: Ladies bar
bingo, 6 p.m.
Thursday: Bingo, 3 p.m.;
VFW meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Friday: Fish fry (fried or
baked), by Bill, or baked
chicken served with potato,
coleslaw, hush puppies, dessert
and coffee, $6.50 from 4:30 to
7 p.m.; Karaoke with Mr. T, 5
p.m.
Saturday: Stuffed pepper din-
ner, 5 to 7 p.m.; entertainment
with Johnny Lobo.


Happy hours Monday
through Friday are 10 to 11
a.m. and 3 to 4 p.m.
Blanton-Thomas Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
Events for the week of Nov.
14 to 20:
Today: NFL Sunday ticket
drink specials; Citrus County
Veterans Organization Dart
Tournament, 5 p.m., with
prizes.
Monday: Lunch specials,
noon to 3 p.m.; Bingo, 1 to 4
p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch, noon to 3
p.m.; Post 155 "Happy Hour," 5
p.m. to closing; lounge card
bingo, 5 p.m.; Wounded War-
riors "Ride to Recovery"
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings,"/shrimp basket, noon to
3 p.m.; American Legion 155
dinner night special, 5 to 7 p.m.;
Live music, 6 to 10 p.m.;
Wounded Warriors "Ride to Re-
covery."
Thursday: Lunch from noon
to 3 p.m.; bingo, 1 to 4 p.m.;
lounge card bingo, 5 p.m.; Post
155 "Happy Hour," 5 p.m. to
closing; Wounded Warriors
"Road to Recovery."
Friday: American Legion 155
family dinner night, 5 to 7 p.m.;
live music 6 to 10 p.m.; Fall
Conference, Orlando.
Saturday: Pool tournament, 2
p.m.; College football game
plan drink specials; Ann/birth-
day bash, 6 p.m. with live enter-
tainment, Fall Conference,
Orlando.
In addition to the above
schedule, every Monday and
Thursday there are lunch spe-
cials from noon to 3 p.m. and
bingo from 1 to 4 p.m. Every
Wednesday, chicken "hot
wings" served from noon to 3
p.m. and Post 155 "Happy
Hour" drink specials from 5
p.m. to closing every Tuesday
and Thursday and from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Wednesday. For infor-
mation, call Cmdr. Jay Conti Sr.
at 795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
Dunnellon VFW Post
7991, 3107 W. Dunnellon
Road, (352) 489-1772.
Come join us for breakfast
every second and fourth Sun-
days of the month. Full break-
fast menu, Adults, $6; children
12 and younger, $4, from 8:30
to 11 a.m. Public welcome.
Start bringing your items to


donate for the big flea market.
Bingo every Friday starting at
1 p.m.
Thursday: Post meetings
starts at 6 p.m.
Saturday: Flea Market, out-
side tables available, $10 call
the Post the reserve yours.
Time 8 a.m. to noon.
Everyday: Lunch from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Rent the hall for any event -
a reunion, wedding reception,
birthday party, baby shower,
etc. We have a beautiful facility,
plenty of room and smoke free.
Covered patio available for
smokers; (352) 489-1772.
E Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 It was standing
room only last Thursday in the
canteen at VFW Post 8189.
The main meeting room, which
by the way is available to rent
for party occasions, had the
place jumping with the weekly
Jam Session.
The music reverberates be-
ginning at about 3 p.m. every
Thursday at the post, located
on W. Veterans Dr. west of U.S.
19 between Crystal River and
Homosassa. Bring a musical in-
strument and join the jam, or
simply come by to hear the of-
ferings.
Prior to the Thursday pro-
gram, of course, is today's rib
eye steak dinner with the usual
fixin's for $12. Prepared by the
Ladies'Auxiliary, the dinner is
offered every Sunday.
NFL football and wings high-
light Monday evening's action,
and Bingo is the attraction at 2
p.m. on Wednesdays. There's
something of interest daily. The
post opens at 1 p.m. each day
is open until 8 p.m. Sunday
and 9 p.m. the rest of the week.
Call 795-5012 for information
Trustee Larry Boatright has
had surgery and during the
Nov. 1 officers' meeting, Eric
Persons was selected fill in for
him. Also at that meeting judg-
ing began in the post's Voice of
Democracy competition, a na-
tionwide VFW program partici-
pated in by students.
Post Adjutant/Quartermast
Dick Bachtel announced this
year's membership drive has
boosted membership to 102
percent of its goal, ranking Post
8189 No. 5 in the state.
VFW membership is open to
men and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including serv-


= Sunday's

Puzzle is on Page A20


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A0 RE R O O NE DENSE
LL MER ENTER
11-14 C 2010 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


ice in Iraq and Afghanistan. The
Korean Campaign medal re-
mains open, as well. Call the
post at the phone number
above for information.
N Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100.
First Sunday of each month:
Floral City Minis, two for $1,
served from 2 to 6 p.m.
Today: NFL and NASCAR;
Canteen's open at 1 p.m.
Monday: Show Me the Hand
from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. big jack-
pot.
Tuesday: Bingo, 3 to 5 p.m.
big pots, big prizes.
Wednesday: Weekly spe-
cials; Karaoke by Debbie G
from 6 to 9 p.m.; Wednesday
and Saturday is now fried
chicken day; complete chicken
dinners and more to go or stay
noon to 4 p.m.
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
(fried, baked or blackened), $7,
from 4 to 7 p.m. also available
scallops or a three-piece fried
chicken dinner. Karaoke with
Wild Willie from 6 to 9 p.m.
Guests welcome.
Saturday: Fried chicken spe-


VETERANS


See NM Page A16


1 (0 KNHT 10 N


StIlNIA', No)VI.MIl '14, 2010 A15

cial noon to 4 p.m.; smother
pork chops, $7.
First Saturday of every
month, slow-roasted prime rib
dinner, $9.75. All remaining
Saturday will be homestyle
dinners for $6.50, served 4 to 7
p.m. Guests welcome. To-go
orders are available for 25
cents extra. Call 637-0100.
Canteen open daily at 9
a.m., Monday through Satur-
day.
On Sunday, canteen opens
at 1 p.m. Members only, but
guests are allowed with a mem-
ber in good standing.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza, invites all eli-
gible veterans and their families
to visit our post and consider
joining our Legion family: Amer-
ican Legion, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion (SAL), or American
Legion Auxiliary (ALA). Color
Guard/Honor Guard accepting
volunteers. American Legion
Riders Chapter now being
formed.












SBA expands Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for vets


Special to the Chronicle

With thousands of service men
and women returning from wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S.
Small Business Administration
and Syracuse University are ex-
panding their Entrepreneurship
Boot Camp (or Veterans with Dis-
abilities (EBV) to a seventh school,
Louisiana State University, and
launching two new entrepreneur-
ship programs for women veter-
ans and National Guard and


Reserve members and their fami-
lies.
According to the SBA, nearly
one quarter of veterans indicate
they are interested in starting or
buying their own small business,
and that percentage is even higher
among women veterans. With that
in mind, the growing partnership
between SBA and Syracuse Uni-
versity provides training on how to
start and grow a small business to
veterans, with programs targeted
to service-disabled veterans,


women, National Guard and Re-
serve members and their families
of the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
"When you consider the lead-
ership and management skills our
veterans develop while on active
and reserve duty, it's no wonder
we see more of them pursuing
their dreams as entrepreneurs
and small business owners," SBA
Administrator Karen Mills said.
"Through our partnership with
Syracuse University we are con-


tinuing to strengthen the tools and
resources available to them."
"We often speak about the sa-
cred trust we have with our serv-
ice men and women, and one way
we honor that trust is ensuring
they have every possible opportu-
nity for success," Mills continued.
"When it comes to entrepreneur-
ship, their success also means suc-
cess in driving economic growth
and creating jobs."
In 2009, SBA partnered with
Syracuse University, providing a


three-year cooperative agreement
providing funding totaling
$450,000, to support the univer-
sity's year-long EBV program on
six campuses. Now in the second
year of the partnership, with
SBA's support, the "boot camp" is
expanding to a seventh campus,
E.J. Ourso College of Business at
Louisiana State University. The
other five campuses are: the Uni-
versity of Connecticut School of

See /Page A17


NOTES
Continued from Page A15

Post meets fourth Thursday
at 7 p.m.
SAL meets first Tuesday at 7
p.m.
ALA meets fourth Wednes-
day at 7 p.m.
NFL Sunday Package to
view games on six TVs. WiFi
on premises and Wii games
available. Many upcoming vet-
erans' and community activities
planned, including several
charity fundraisers. Visit the
post for printed schedule or visit
the website at
www.post237.org.
For information, call the post
at 746-5018.
The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 in Beverly Hills off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Superior Bank weekly
events as listed:
Today: Bingo in the big hall
beginning at 1 p.m. Lots of
games and lots of payouts.
There will be coffee and dough-
nuts. All the big-time sporting
events on our big-screen TV (to
include the NFL package) all af-
ternoon in the canteen with lots
of good cheer to go around.
Monday: The VFW Golf
League plays at different
courses. Contact Dick Sorrells.
The Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at 8 a.m. at
Twisted Oaks G.C. Check with
Lou Kempf for available tee
times. Dart Tournament in the
canteen beginning at 7 p.m.
Tuesday: Pool tournament in
the canteen beginning at 1 p.m.
House Committee meeting and
staff meeting every second
Tuesday and post general
meeting every fourth Tuesday
monthly.
Wednesday: Ladies night.
Cookout serving hamburgers,
cheeseburgers and hot dogs
with all the trimmings for a
nominal donation from 4 to 6
p.m. We have card bingo from
5 to 7 p.m. hosted by the Men's
Auxiliary. We also have
karaoke and entertainment fea-
turing a different host each
week, beginning at 7 p.m. and
continuing until as late as 11
p.m.
Thursday: VFW Mixed Golf
League alternating between
Twisted Oaks Golf Club with an
8 a.m. tee time and Seven
Rivers Golf Club with an 8:30
a.m. tee time. Check with Rick
or Jayne Stasik for available
tee times. Pool tournament in
the canteen at 7 p.m.
Friday: Dart tournament start
time is 7 p.m.
Saturday: Karaoke nights
have been reinstated so come
on out and support your post
and support your favorite
karaoke host. Review your
monthly newsletter as well as
the Chronicle for further up-
dates. $1.25 day from 1 p.m.
until 5 p.m.
The Korean War Veter-


ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly Hills, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Any veteran who has seen hon-
orable service in any of the
Armed Forces of the U.S. is eli-
gible for membership if said
service was within Korea, in-
cluding territorial waters and
airspace,, at any time from
Sept. 3, 1945, to the present or
if said service was outside of
Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955. For information,
call Hank Butler at 563-2496,
Neville Anderson at 344-2529
or Bob Hermanson at (352)
489-0728.
The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meetings of the Post
and Auxiliary are on the first
Wednesday of each month at 7
p.m. Dinner will be served from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. for members,
wives and prospective mem-
bers.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet every Tuesday from 6 to 9
p.m. Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
games start at 6 p.m. refresh-
ments available.
Outdoor Flea Market is every
third Saturday with vendor's fee
of $10. All-you-can-eat pancake
breakfast is every third Satur-
day from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m., for
a $5 donation.
Thursday, Nov. 25: Open
House Bingo will not be played
Thanksgiving Day evening. The
public is invited, to a free
Thanksgiving Dinner, from 11
a.m. to 2; p.m. by the Legion
Post and Volunteers of Amer-
ica. Call Jan of Jan's Nursery
for details 208-3514.
For further information, call
Carl Boos at (352) 489-3544.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.
Potluck dinner at 6 p.m.; meet-
ing starts at 7:15. Auxiliary Unit
77 meets at the same time and
place. Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Provencal at 726-4257 or Auxil-
iary president Alice Brumett at
860-2981.
Oratorical contest for high
school, private and home-
schooled students in Hemando
and Inverness areas, as we
have done the past several
years. Information packets with
rules and entry forms for The
American Legion Oratorical
Contest will be available at Cit-
rus High School guidance
counselor's office. Private and
home-schooled students can
obtain the information by calling
Chuck Ferguson, Allen-Rawls
Post 77 Oratorical chairman at
341-2276.
The Post is looking for WWII
veterans who are interested in
riding in the Inverness Veterans
Day parade. Call Norman
Provencal, post commander at
726-4257.


U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets 1:30 p.m., first Sat-
urday monthly at the Dumas-
Hartson VFW Post 8189 Ladies
Auxiliary facility on Veterans
Drive, Homosassa, on the west
side of U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto
Sales across from Harley-
Davidson.
All former and current post
members, as well as all inter-
ested veterans, are cordially in-
vited to be a part of American
Legion Post 166. For more in-
formation, call Sam at 382-
4222.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary meets at
2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness,
at the intersection of Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41.
The chapter is open for gen-
eral information Tuesday mom-
ings from 9 to 11 a.m. A service
officer is available to assist in
disability claims by appoint-
ment. Contact Bill Geden at
341-6875. The chapter now
has its own website
www.davachapter70@brave-
host. The chapter offers to the
public quality American-made
U.S. flags and all branches of
military service flags. Various
sizes are available. We are also
a collection point for the proper
disposal of flags that are no
longer serviceable. For further
information on our offerings,
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, con-
tact John Seaman at 860-0123.
For Auxiliary information, con-
tact Sonia Hayes at 527-3395.
Disabled American Veterans,
Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of
Inverness announces the de-
sign of this year's Citrus County
Veterans Appreciation Com-
memorative Pin. In keeping
with this year's theme, "World
War II The Greatest Genera-
tion," the pin displays the U.S.
flag in the shape of Citrus
County superimposed with the
World War II honorable service
lapel button. The lapel button,
more commonly called the
"Ruptured Duck," was awarded
to military members who were
about to be discharged from
service.
The pins are available for a
donation of $2.50 and may be
obtained from DAV Chapter 70
by calling 344-3464 or John
Seaman at 860-0123. Other lo-
cations will be announced at a
later date. All proceeds go to-
wards DAV Chapter 70's schol-
arship and veterans' assistance
programs.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and


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Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills
Country Club, Rose and Crown
restaurant, Citrus Hills. Call
John Lowe at 344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Rick Logan at 795-4233; for the
Cabane, call La Presidente
Barbara Logan at 795-4233 or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
The Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard Veterans and
Merchant Marine Veterans of
World War II will conduct its
next meeting at 11:30 a.m. the
second Saturday, monthly at
Kally K's, 3383 U.S. 19 in
Spring Hill.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets at
2 p.m. on the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto, on the west side of
South Lecanto Highway, ap-
proximately one mile south of
State Road 44.
All combat-wounded veter-
ans, lineal descendants, next of
kin, spouses and siblings of
Purple Heart recipients are cor-
dially invited to attend and to


Clemembonye

Crystal River Mall
Homosassa Thrift Shoppe
Inverness Thrift Shoppe
Beverly Hills Thrift Shoppe
Hospice House


DEXimaging


join the ranks of Chapter 776.
To learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit the chapter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 726-0834 or
Wayne Howard at 634-5254.
Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
E., Inglis; (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 6:30
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Come join us for our Sunday
dinners. New big-screen foot-
ball games.
Sunday Steak dinner spe-
cial, every third Sunday
monthly.
Grilled to order by Rick (Z-Man)
Depue. Steak with baked po-
tato, salad, and roll for a $10
donation; advance tickets only
(we need to know how many to
thaw). 520 State Road 40 E.,
Inglis (one mile east of U.S.
19), (352) 447-3495. Everyone


is welcome.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at 7:30
p.m. at the Floral City Fire Sta-
tion on U.S. 41. Work is pro-
gressing on a new home in
Floral City. All eligible veterans
are welcome to join our grow-
ing organization. Call Cmdr.
Tom Gallagher at 860-1629.
Write to: American Legion Post
225, P.O. Box 456, Floral City,
FL 34436; e-mail
Tgallagl @tampabay.rr.com.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.
Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen,
male or female, are invited to
attend. Call Commandant John
Koser at 422-0119.
VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary: All eligible
persons are invited to join. Stop
in at the post or call for informa-
tion. Post 4252 is at 3190 N.
Carl G. Rose Highway, State
Road 200, Hernando; phone
726-3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.


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CALL 563-3295 on Nov. 25, 2010
(Can not have subscribed within the past 60 days)
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Subscription price Includes a separate charge for transportation and J. -AL'
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C;ITRUS COt NIT'(El) Ca1RONrICIT ~A~I IIANvMt.i1,21 1


TRAVELER
Continued from Page A13


There is always a risk to such an
event: Will we be compatible? Will
we be able to understand our guide,
as I speak no Chinese and often
have problems with their verbal in-
flections? What if? What if? ... and
we were locked into this contract!
All of 'those fears were quickly dis-
pelled as Kong, our guide, and
Hank, our driver, were everything a
dream holiday could be built upon.
Kong, especially, was well-educated,
university trained in Chinese his-
tory and most cordial in every re-
spect. We breathed a sigh of relief.
My fascination with China began
about 40 years ago when my family
connected with a Chinese family
who had recently moved to Jack-
sonville, where we were living at
the time. Their stories of living in
China when Mao Zedong was in
power and their escape to Hong
Kong and Australia in the hold of a
cargo ship were always intriguing.
China loomed larger and larger in
my vision, as I often read about
their many ancient icons.
When I think of a foreign country
my first thoughts are of physical
characteristics such as the Alps, Ni-
agara Falls, or the rivers of Europe.
Often, it is a famous monument such
as the Eiffel Tower, the London
Bridge, or the Taj Mahal.
It was the Great Wall of China that
became my obsession and was on
my list of places to visit. However,
our first destination was the For-
bidden City that mystical walled
enclave of 999 rooms that was home
to many emperors, and finally Cixi,
the Dowager Queen of China until
1908. Enjoying the history and mys-
tique of this fabled city built in the
1400s was already worth the trip.
Kong then told us that in two days
we would visit the "great war."
During the next few days we were
ushered to Tianamin Square, the
Summer Palace and the Temple of
Heaven, as well as more subordi-
nate destinations steeped in Chi-
nese history the hutongs, the
typical olden times communes in
large Chinese cities.
"Tomorrow we go to the great
war," Kong reminded us. Our cu-
riosity was piqued with every utter-


SBA
Continued from Page A16

Business, Mays Business
School at Texas A&M,
UCLA Anderson School of
Management, Florida State
University's College of Busi-
ness, and the Krannert
School of Management at
Purdue University.
Created and delivered by
a network of some of the
best business schools in the
country, it is designed to
leverage the skills, re-
sources and infrastructure
of higher education to offer
experiential training in en-
trepreneurship and small
business management to
veterans. Last year, the first
year SBA partnered with
Syracuse University, 129
service-disabled veterans
participated in the program.
Since the program's incep-
tion, more than 320
wounded warriors have
graduated to date and more
than 150 businesses to date
have been launched by


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
Some of the many steps along every section of the wall.


ance of "great war" and we were
most anxious to experience what we
believed would be another once-in-
a-lifetime experience.
Finally, the morning came, and as
we were leaving the hotel, Kong
said, "this is the day we go to the
'great war'." Hallelujah (we felt like
shouting), we'll probably see some
action like none ever witnessed be-
fore.
As we drove north out of Beijing
we saw various directional signs
pointing to the Great Wall. Duh! My
traveling companion, Karyn, and I,
looked at each other in wide-eyed
amazement. Slightly, but silently
embarrassed, we admitted to each
other that we had completely for-
gotten that Chinese (generally) do
not pronounce the letter "L." Our
destination was now abundantly
clear.
The phenomenal proportions of
the Great Wall are breathtaking as
they snake up and over the hills and
down into the valleys. It could be
seen for miles in both directions,
particularly the watchtowers that
dominated nearly every mountain
top. A considerable walk, then thou-
sands of stairs to climb, put us atop
a gigantic landmark that stretched
from the Yellow Sea to the Tibetan
Plains, a total length of approxi-
mately 5,500 miles, 20-foot wide
pathways at the top, and varying
heights up to 30 feet, plus the tow-


graduates.
Additionally, SBA is also
providing $2.6 million
through a cooperative
agreement over three years
for two new programs sup-
porting veteran entrepre-
neurs. The first, Women
Veterans Igniting the Spirit
of Entrepreneurship (V-
WISE), focuses on training,
networking and mentorship
for women veterans. The
three-day, off-site training
program, online training
and network support struc-
tures will be delivered in
several locations around the
nation, and anticipates serv-
ing up to 1,400 female veter-
ans over a 36-month period.'
The second new program,
Operation Endure & Grow,
targets National Guard and
Reserve members, their
families and business part-
ners. The goal of this pro-
gram is to mitigate the
economic hardship of de-
ployed members and their
families. The eight-week on-
line course will focus on the
fundamentals of launching
and/or growing a small busi-


ness for those who will sus-
tain the business when the
service member is de-
ployed, injured or killed.
Initially 550 individuals are
expected to participate. In
total V-WISE and Operation
Endure & Grow will serve
over 1,950 individuals and
their families.
The expansion of SBA's
partnership with Syracuse
University builds on more
than $1.25 billion in loan
guarantees for veterans in
its flagship 7(a) and 504 pro-
grams, and through its Pa-
triot Express loan pilot
initiative. In three years Pa-
triot Express has supported
nearly $550 million in loans
to more than 6,500 veterans
and spouses looking to es-
tablish or expand their
small businesses.
SBA reaches out to veter-
ans through its 68 local SBA
district offices, 16 Veterans
Business Outreach Centers
nationwide, and its partner-
ship with 1,000 Small Busi-
ness Development Centers
and some 12,000 SCORE -
Counselors to America's


FLORAL CITY


HMTAIE BYS
/r CANDLES 'N' CAROLS
Horse-drawn Wagon Rides, Lion's Fish
Fry, "Country Store" and Exhibits
Friday, Dec. 3 5:30 to 9 p.m.


ers.
Many travel maps show the Great
Wall as one continuous structure;
whereas, there are many sections to
the wall that were built at different
times, from about 220 B.C. to the
1500s. Many emperors, representing
a sequence of dynasties, ordered a
section of wall built in the areas of
greatest threat from invading Mon-
gols and other nomadic tribes.
That first trip in 1995 was simply a
warm response to my fascination of
the longest man-made structure on
earth. We returned in 2003, visiting
a different section of the wall, and
again in October, 2010, to yet a dif-
ferent section that had recently
opened to the public.
In the end we were not disap-
pointed in the fact that we didn't see
a "war" after all, but certainly the
remnants, a UNESCO World her-
itage Site, of where many wars were
fought.


Neil Sawyer is a 25-year Crystal
River resident and businessman. He
and his wife, Karyn, are extensive
travelers, venturing to foreign
countries two to three times a year in
addition to taking several domestic
excursions annually They prefer
independent travel or with small
group guided tours. E-mail him at
gobuddyttampabayrr.com.


Small Businesses volun-
teers. SBA has numerous
programs creating govern-
ment contracting opportuni-
ties for vet-owned small
businesses. For more infor-
mation visit
www.sba.gov/vets and
www.sba.gov/reservists.


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ANCIENT
Continued from Page A13

The lake is also the last
home for Egypt's famed
crocodiles, with some
5,000 flourishing in the
cool waters, together with
monitor lizards, Nile geese
and the numerous birds
that can be seen from com-
fortable lounge chairs on
the Kasr Ibrim's polished
wooden promenade deck.
The cruise includes sev-
eral classy touches, like
cocktails at the start of the
trip as the ship sails past
the Tropic of Cancer, the
northern boundary of the
tropics. Then as the awe-
some statues of Abu Sim-
bel rise out of the waters
on the final day, the tri-
umphal sounds of Verdi's
Egypt-inspired opera
"Aida" burst out of the
ship's speakers.
The biggest highlights,
however, are the trips to
the rescued temples along
the way Guests clamber
aboard motor launches
and dart across the lake to
the ruins.
Many date from the time
of Ramses the Great,
Egypt's megalomaniacal
pharaoh, who filled the
Nile Valley with statues of
himself in the 13th century
B.C., culminating in the
colossi of Abu Simbel.
Ramses was only the lat-
est Egyptian pharaoh to in-
vade and subjugate Nubia,
carrying off its gold, ivory
and cattle, but also re-
cruiting its men for his
armies.
At the Beit al-Wali tem-
ple near the High Dam, he
filled the walls with carv-
ings of his victories over
the Nubians, his chariots
trampling defeated armies
and lopping off enemy
heads.
Farther south at Ram-


ses' Wadi el-Seboua tem-
ple, which includes an av-
enue of sphinxes at the
entrance, history has left
other signs. Crosses
carved in the wall and
paintings of St. George
above the altar speak of
the arrival of Christianity
to the deep south.
Egypt experienced mas-
sive persecutions by the
Roman Empire, culminat-
ing in 284 A.D. with Em-
peror Diocletian's "Time
of Martyrs" that so scarred
the Christians that the
Egyptian Church now
dates its calendar to it.
Many Christians fled to
remote monasteries in the
desert or deep into Nubia
to escape the reach of the
Romans and they con-
verted the old temples into
churches, often defacing
the images of the old gods
even as they worshipped
in their shadow.
The temple of Kalabsha
near Aswan and the Dakka
temple farther south are
interesting as well be-
cause they date to Egypt's
Greek and Roman periods
around 1,000 years after
the heyday of the
pharaohs.
Mindful of the culture of
the country they were oc-
cupying, the Ptolemaic
and Roman overlords
closely mimicked the an-
cient styles and honored
the old gods with a few
improvements.
Greek-trained crafts-
men carved the familiar
Egyptian deities in the
more contemporary bas-
relief style with more
physical detail, yielding
beautiful wall carvings
that have now been art-
fully lit from below.
The ancient Egyptians
often covered temple walls
with plaster and carved
into it an easier method
that did not, however,
stand the test of time.


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TRAVEL.








CiITRUS COUN'IY (14) ;ICIRONICL.E


COMMUNITY


AIB StNImm, NoN nui \I 1-1,i20i10


November 15to 19


Share Club plans
trip for comedy
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem's Share Club has tickets
to the Feb. 13 Broadway
smash "Mel Brooks' Young
Frankenstein." This is a musi-
cal comedy to be staged at
Ruth Eckerd Hall in Tampa.
Price includes roundtrip
motor coach, orchestra seats
and all taxes and gratuities.
There are two motor coach
pick-up points in Citrus
County. Place your name on
the list to reserve a seat; pay-
ment is due Jan. 5. Call Deb-
bie Muir at 860-2805 for more
information.
Lady Journey
Seekers to meet
The Lady Journey Seekers
will meet at 6 p.m. Monday,
Nov. 15, at the Crystal River li-
brary. A presentation and dis-
cussion on China will be
given.
All women are welcome to
attend. For more information,
call Val at 795-0358.
CRWC to Kennedy
Space Center
The CRWC invites the pub-
lic to join them on a one-day
trip to the Kennedy Space
Center at Cape Canaveral on
Wednesday, Nov. 17. It will be
a full day, leaving Meadow-
crest at 7 a.m. and returning at
approximately 10:30 p.m.
Price includes escorted
motor coach, admissions, buf-
fet dinner, all taxes and gratu-
ities. It will involve lots of
walking; make reservations as
soon as possible.
Call Joan Sweety at 564-
8773 or Jo Ann Ryan at 382-
1138.
Tampa Downs
trip slated
The GFWC Woman's Club
of Beverly Hills is sponsoring a
trip to Tampa Downs to view
thoroughbred horseracing on
Saturday, Jan. 22. Cost in-
cludes, bus transportation
from the Winn-Dixie in Mead-
owcrest, reserved seats in the
clubhouse, program and a buf-
fet.
All proceeds from these
trips assist the club in their
charitable causes throughout
the county. There are a limited
number of seats for this trip,
so if you are interested call
Rosella Hale, club president,
at 746-2545.
Co-op club offers
travel ops
The Co-Op Club plans ac-
tivities for single women, cou-
ples, widows and widowers,
something for just about
everyone. Many trips are
planned for this season, rang-
ing from state parks to holiday
shopping at downtown Disney.
Travel with the Co-Op Club
to the IKEA Store in Tampa on
Sunday, Nov. 21, for free
cooking demonstrations by
celebrity chef Claudine Pepin,
daughter of world-renowned
chef Jacques Pepin. Learn
basic kitchen know-how from
the 2002 Academie Cluinaire
de France-Filiale des Etas
Unis "Woman of the Year," in
the Showroom Kitchens de-
partment.
The group will depart Citrus
County at 10 a.m. and return
at 6 p.m. Trip includes trans-
portation, sweet treats and a
driver tip.
Visit the website at www.
flcitrustravelcoop.com. Some
upcoming day trips for Decem-
ber are: Premium Outlets in
Ellenton on Dec. 4 and Down-
town Disney with lunch at the
Rainforest Cafe on Dec. 14.
Contact Carol at 410-3150
or Karen at (352) 270-8854 to
sign up; space is filling up
quickly for all trips.
Senior Friends for
Life to gather
On Nov. 19, Senior Friends
for Life will go to Frankie's
Restaurant, 1674 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando, next to the
KMart Mall on U.S. 41 in In-


verness. Lunch is at 11 a.m.
from the menu.
The club plans to go to the
Dec. 5 Sunday matinee of the
Singing Christmas Trees at
First Baptist Church, 700 N,
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. The
program starts at 4 p.m.
Senior Friends for Life on
Dec. 10 will take a bus trip to
the Word of Life in Hudson to
see the "Sights and Sounds of
Christmas" starting at 2:30
p.m. Meet at Winn Dixie Plaza
at 9:30 a.m.; the bus leaves at
10 a.m. The second stop will
be at 10:30 at the Walmart in


Inverness next to Wendy's.
Lunch will be at the Word of
Life prior to the program. Cost
is $52 for trip, lunch and the
show. Payment must be made
at the time of reservation. Bus
seating will be made at the
time of payment. All reserva-
tions must be made by Nov. 1.
For reservations for any of
these activities, call Astrid
Grant at 341-0346 or Myrna
Hocking at 860-0819. Anyone
who needs a ride should let us
know at the time when reser-
vations are made.
Valentine's Day
Cruise with BHRA
The Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Association at 77 Civic
Circle invites all to sail Feb. 12
on Carnival's ship, the "Inspi-
ration" for a five-night cruise
that sails from Tampa Bay to
the tropical ports of Grand
Cayman and Cozumel, Mex-
ico.
Cost includes the room,
roundtrip motor coach trans-
portation, along with port
charges and government
taxes. To reserve a stateroom
or for questions, call the asso-
ciation at 746-4882 or Just
Cruise and Travel at 726-
2889.
Visit the Aquarium
and Brewery
A&E Travel Club presents a
trip to Florida Aquarium and
Tampa Brewing Company.
This tour is designed for those
people who cannot get away
during a workweek. This trip
departs on a Saturday. Enjoy
the Florida Aquarium, eco-
boat tour and end the day at
the Tampa Brewing Company
for lunch. Beermasters will be
on hand to introduce you to
the different brews and tasting
will be on your own.
The trip will be Saturday,
Jan. 15. Cost includes
roundtrip bus, Florida Aquar-
ium and boat tour and lunch.
Call Debbie Muir alt 860-2805
for more information.
Hop on the bus
with BHRA
For a special treat during
the upcoming holiday season,
the Beverly Hills Recreation
Association is sponsoring a
trip to the Show Palace in
Hudson on Thursday, Dec. 16,
to enjoy the Christmas per-
formance. Everyone interested
in attending can sign up now.
This is an afternoon event.
There is an easy payment
plan for everyone's conven-
ience, and includes tickets,
roundtrip bus ride, buffet
lunch, the show and all taxes
and tips. The bus will leave at
10:30 a.m. from the Beverly
Hills Recreation Association
parking lot.
For further information, call
the office at 746-4882 be-
tween 9 and 4 p.m. Monday to
Friday.
BHRA day trip
to St. Augustine
The Beverly Hills Recre-
ation Association invites the
community to motor with them
to historic St. Augustine on
Tuesday, Dec. 7, just in time to
see this quaint area dressed
up for Christmas. Cost in-
cludes roundtrip motor coach
transportation, a one-hour tour
of the city, and a hop-on-hop-
off voucher for the Old Town
Trolley.
The coach leaves the park-
ing lot of the recreation center
at 77 Civic Circle promptly at


7:30 a.m. We will depart from
St. Augustine at 4 p.m.
Register for the trip at the
recreation center from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday.
For questions, call 746-4882.
C.R. Lions Club to
Cruise for Sight
Crystal River Lions Club will
sponsors a cruise on Royal
Caribbean cruise lines sailing
from Tampa to Cozumel, April
7 through April 11. One hun-
dred dollars from each cabin
booked will go to Crystal River
Lions Club.
These funds are used in the
community for glasses for
those who can't afford them,
guide dogs, schools for the
blind and many other causes.
This cruise offers an opportu-
nity for participants to get to
know local Lions and what
they do. New members who
want to make a difference are
always welcome.
For prices and information,
call Cruise One Travel at 746-
7640 or Janet Home at 212-
0667.
Jerseyites, friends
head to Biloxi
The New Jersey and
Friends Club of Citrus County
will take its annual bus trip to
the Beau Rivage Casino in
Biloxi, Miss., from Jan. 30 to
Feb. 2. Casinos will give food
coupons plus "play money."
Contact Mary Anne for more
information at 746-3386.

Center has 'seniors
on the move'
"Seniors on the Move" of-
fers trips to the community
centers, movies, flea markets,
libraries, parks, beach, the-
ater, shopping trips you
name it.
Recent surveys have shown
that seniors in our county
listed socialization as some-
thing they lacked our Sen-
iors on the Move hope to
change this so if you would
like to enjoy the benefits of this
program, or just want further
information, call Sue Carscad-
den at 527-5959.
Seniors on the Move is a
program of the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center.


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast MVP breakfast,
cereal, toast, grits, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch Sausage pizza,
chicken nuggets, PB dippers,
fresh baby carrots, peas,
peaches, seasoned rice,
milk/juice.
Tuesday:
Breakfast Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal, tater tots,
toast, milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch Tacos, chicken and
yellow rice, turkey salad bowl,
fresh baby carrots, corn, ranch
pasta salad, applesauce, yogurt
parfait, crackers, milk/juice.
Wednesday:
Breakfast Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal, toast, tater tots, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch Barbecue sandwich,
mozzarella maxstix, PB dippers,
garden salad, glazed carrots,
baked beans, mixed fruit,
milk/juice.
Thursday:
Breakfast-- Ultimate break-
fast round, cereal, toast, grits,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch Sliced turkey and
gravy, ham salad bowl, un-
crustable grape PB&J, garden
salad, green beans, ranch
mashed potatoes, sweet potato
bake, apple crisp, crackers, milk
variety, juice variety.
Friday:
Breakfast Egg and cheese
loco, grits, cereal, toast, milk va-
riety, juice variety.
Lunch Macaroni and
cheese, hot dog on a bun, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
peas, baked beans, juice bar,
milk variety, juice variety.
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast Morning
sausage roll, MVP breakfast,
grits, tater tots, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch Pepperoni pizza,
barbecue sandwich, yogurt par-
fait, fresh baby carrots, corn,
seasoned rice, pears, milk, juice.
Tuesday:
Breakfast Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cinna-
mon bun, tater tots, grits, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch Turkey and gravy,
ham salad bowl, uncrustable
grape PB&J, garden salad,


p' -~s '' ,



The City of
Crystal River presents .-.. "



SIC IN THE PARK.:
BE IN THE
EE PARK

j Saturday, Nov. 20

ku 4-6 p.m.
Gazebo behind City Hall

Enjoy a mixture of Jazz, Pop and Rock
C'"[. from Citrus High School's
own music group The Breez,
under the direction of John Edel.

~ Refreshments r
Available


RONICLE 6


green beans, seasoned mashed
potatoes, sweet potato bake,
apple crisp, crackers, milk vari-
ety, juice variety.
Wednesday:
Breakfast Pancake slider,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch Sausage pizza,
turkey wrap, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, glazed carrots, apple-
sauce, gelatin, seasoned rice,
milk, juice.
Thursday:
Breakfast Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultimate break-
fast round, tater tots, grits, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch Orange chicken
plate, hamburger, turkey salad
bowl, PB dipper plate, fresh
baby carrots, green beans,
baked beans, peaches, apples
crisp, crackers, milk, juice.
Friday:
Breakfast Ham, egg and
cheese loco, ultra cinnamon
bun, grits, tater tots, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch Chicken tenders,
mozzarella maxstix, fajita
chicken salad, fresh baby car-
rots, corn, juice bar, crackers,
roll, milk variety, juice variety.
HIGH SCHOOL
Monday:
Breakfast Morning
sausage roll, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, grits, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch Chicken and yellow
rice, hamburger, pizza, ham
salad bowl, yogurt parfait, gar-
den salad, glazed carrots, corn,
Artic fruit cup, French fries,
crackers, milk.
Tuesday:
Breakfast- Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultimate break-
fast round, tater tots, grits, milk
variety, juice variety.
Lunch Pasta with moz-
zarella and meat sauce, chicken
sandwich, pizza, turkey salad
bowl, yogurt parfait, garden
salad, glazed carrots, corn,
pears, french fries, crackers,
milk.
Wednesday:
Breakfast Pancake slider,
MVP breakfast, tater tots, grits,
milk variety, juice variety.
Lunch Turkey and gravy,


hamburger, pizza, ham salad
bowl, garden salad, green
beans, seasoned mashed pota-
toes, sweet potato bake, apple
crisp, roll, French fries, crackers,
milk variety, juice variety.
Thursday:
Breakfast Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinnamon
bun, tater tots, grits, milk variety,
juice variety.
Lunch Tacos, chicken
sandwich, pizza, turkey salad
bowl, yogurt parfait, fresh baby
carrots, green beans, corn,
Spanish rice, mixed fruit, French
fries, crackers, milk.
Friday:
Breakfast-- Ham, egg and
cheese biscuit, MVP breakfast,
tater tots, grits, milk variety, juice
variety.
Lunch Chicken Alfredo,
Cuban pork wrap, pizza, fajita
chicken salad bowl, yogurt par-
fait, fresh baby carrots, com,
peas and carrots, pears, gelatin,
French fries, crackers, milk.
Menus are subject to change
without notice.
CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Pork riblet with
brown gravy, whipped sweet po-
tatoes, garden peas, one slice
white bread with margarine,
cranberry orange relish, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter, baked
beans, carrot cuts, one hot dog
bun, mustard, pineapple chunks,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Beef and maca-
roni, green beans, yellow corn
with red peppers, one slice ital-
ian bread with margarine, mixed
fruit, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Roast chicken coq
au vin, herb mashed potatoes,
Harvard beets, one whole grain
wheat roll with margarine cup,
birthday cake, low-fat milk.
Friday: Beef stew with veg-
etables in gravy, parsley white
rice, brussel sprouts, one slice
French bread with margarine,
fresh fruit in season, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites in-
clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
Call Support Services at 527-
5975.


Held by GFWC Woman's Club of Beverly H



November 20
from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Fashions provide
Belks Celebrity M
Lunch provide
Sunshin


~ mini ma
~ Mary Kay ma
~ Glamour Pc
by Rebecca Pujals
~ Estate Ji
- Circle of Friends Gif
~ Door
~ Baskets di


'za
lills







ded by
Models
ded by
e Cafe
ssages
ake-up
portraits
-Jones
jewelry
t Shop
prizes
drawing


Proceeds to benefit CASA
and The Senior Center


For tickets and
more information
call 746-2545


Take a


Ci RON ICLE
www.chronicleonline.com

Sunday


Look in the Chronicle everyday for the "Deal
of the Day!" Each deal is equal to or greater
than the cost of the Chronicle.
It's like getting the paper
(and more) for free!


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For coverage beginning January 1, 2011, you need to
enroll by December 31.*

Don't miss out! Call today to attend a seminar:


BEVERLY HILLS
Village Inn
4401 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Nov. 15th 2:00 PM
Dec. 16th, 27th 2:00 PM


CRYSTAL RIVER
Cody's Roadhouse
305 S.E. Hwy 19
Nov. 18th *9:00 AM
Dec. 8th 2:00 PM


HOMOSASSA
Mr. Wang's
3906 Suncoast Pkwy
Nov. 22nd 2:00 PM
Dec. 13th, 29th 2:00 PM


CRYSTAL RIVER
Claw Daddy's
1601 S.E. Hwy 19
Nov. 23rd 2:00 PM
Dec. 21st 2:00 PM


INVERNESS
Golden Corral
2605 E. Gulf To Lake Hwy.
Nov. 29th 2:00 PM
Dec. 22nd 2:00 PM


LECANTO
Holiday Inn
903 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy
Nov. 30th 2:00 PM
Dec. 7th 2:00 PM


HOMOSASSA
Two guys from Italy
5792 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Dec. 6th, 20th 2:00 PM


INVERNESS
Stumpknockers
110 W. Main Street
Dec. 9th, 28th 2:00 PM


CRYSTAL RIVER
Cracker's Bar, Grill and Tiki
502 NW 6th St.
Dec. 14th 10:00 AM


INVERNESS
J. Willies Texas Steakhouse
724 US Hwy 41
Dec. 15th, 30th 2:00 PM


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8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week. *Some exceptions may apply.


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SUM)^)AY Novimil~lot 14, 201OA19l


TMP 11/10


i








CITRUS Crs(OC NIr (FI)C~vuI)


A20 Sr N ,v-, Novi tizi it, 2()10


Stepdad wants college


kid to pay rent at home


Dear Annie: My 20-
year-old son from a
previous marriage
lives with my husband and
me. "Jacob" is in his second
year of college and main-
tains a B average. He has
worked the same part-time
job since he turned 16 and
pays all of his
own bills, includ-
ing car insur-
ance, cell phone
and basic neces-
sities. Student
loans cover his

terrific kid,
never disrespect-
ful, and is loved
by everyone.
When my hus- _
band and I mar-
ried six years
ago, we agreed *,
that as long as
the kids were full-time stu-
dents, they could live here
without paying rent. Unfor-
tunately, my husband re-
cently changed his mind
and feels that Jacob should
pay for his room and board
or move out He is quite
aware that in order to do
this, Jacob would have to
find a full-time job and
might need to drop out of
school.
I have talked to my hus-
band until I am blue in the
face. I raised my two chil-
dren on my own and have
often been complimented
on the wonderful job I did.
Jacob is rarely home to eat
meals and doesn't cost much
to maintain. We are finan-
cially secure and don't need
the rent money. This situa-
tion has turned into a power
struggle and is causing a
major problem in my mar-
riage.
Jacob is not yet aware of
the disagreement behind
the scenes, but I know he
has always thought my hus-
band dislikes him, and there
may be some truth to it. Is


there a possible compro-
mise I haven't thought of? -
Tug-O-War
Dear Tug: Jacob sounds
like a great kid, and it's too
bad your husband doesn't
appreciate him. Can Jacob
pay a nominal fee that
would placate your husband
and not break the
bank? Would your
husband, in his
eagerness to get
Jacob out of the
house, be willing
to cover room and
board in a college
dorm? Although
we are in favor of
adult children
paying a reason-
able amount of
rent, in this in-
stance, your hus-
-' ~" band is wrong.
The two of you
had an agreement, and he is
reneging.
Dear Annie: I send out
handmade cards to friends
and family for their birth-
days, anniversaries, etc. It
hurts my feelings when I
take the time to make an in-
dividualized card and the
person doesn't mention any-
thing to me about it, not
even "Hey, I got your card!"
If I receive a card, I like to
contact the person to say
thank you and let them
know how thoughtful it was.
This is how my mother
raised me. Is there etiquette
for this type of thing? -
Constant Card Sender
Dear Card Sender: The
proper way to acknowledge
a card is with a phone call
or an e-mail. If you see
someone to whom you have
sent such a card, it is per-
fectly OK to ask whether it
was received. However, we
believe the amount of time
and effort you put into your
cards makes the lack of ac-
knowledgement particu-
larly hurtful. Scale back
DearAnnie: This is in re-


spouse to "Out of Concern,"
whose neiolihir has body
odor even though she
bathes.
I am a nurse and had a co-
worker with relentless body
odor. She had gone to sev-
eral physicians, but with no
relief. She tried every type
of deodorant and changed
her clothing and soap, but
nothing helped. She fiiall.
found an "old-time" doctor
who told her that her prob-
lem was a zinc deficiency.
He put her on a supplement.
In a few short weeks, she
lost her body odor.
When I was growing up,
my mother used to tell us
that zinc deficiency was re-
sponsible for "stinky" feet.
When my son was on the
wrestling team, his tennis
shoes were banned from the
locker room because of the
horrendous odor. I gave him
zinc, and his feet stopped
smelling.
People who have inade-
quate nourishment and
poor diets often have linger-
ing body odors, even with
proper hygiene. Hope
this Helps
Dear Hope: Thanks. Be-
fore taking zinc supple-
ments, please see your
doctor.



Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers
column. Please e-mail your
questions to anniesmail
box@comcastnet, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 5777 W.
Century Blvd.. Ste. 700, Los
Angeles, CA 90045. To find
out more about Annie's
Mailbox and read features
by other Creators Syndi-
cate writers and cartoon-
ists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
wwwcireators. com.


Vegetables are new meat


used to hate Brussels
sprouts. The only way I
had ever had them was
boiled, and they were
smelly and disgusting.
Then 1 found a recipe for
pan-fried Brussels sprouts
in bacon. Now, be honest, is
there anything that a little
bacon cannot improve?
There is a reason we are
in the midst of a
bacon boom -
it's not just for
eggs and ham-
burgers any-
more. I've seen
pictures, some
quite disturb- .
ing, of bacon- ,
wrapped jelly
doughnuts,
bacon pizza,
BLTs without .' ::.
the L and the T,
chocolate-cov-
ered bacon, deep-fat fried
bacon and bacon on a stick.
One company has intro-
duced Baconnaise may-
onnaise with bacon in it to
save you the trouble of
adding bacon to tuna salad.,
I hear someone has also in-
troduced a bacon-scented
aftershave. If that is not il-
legal, it is certainly irre-
sponsible. What woman can
resist a man who smells of
bacon? It could wreck the
balance of power in the war
between the sexes.
But can bacon power
save something as intrinsi-
cally loathsome as Brussels
sprouts? I'm here to tell
you, "Yes." If you still boil
Brussels sprouts after read-
ing this, you are committing
a crime against nature. I


think my mother did it be-
cause in the '50s and '60s
vegetables were something
you ate in spite of their
taste. You ate them because
there was this vague idea
out there that they were
good for you. Other than
mashed potatoes with gravy
and corn on the cob, I can't
think of a vegetable dish my
Smother made that
wasn't a penance
you ate for having
;. meat. Maybe they
are good for you,
but not after
they've had what-
ever was good in
them boiled out. I
don't know what
people had
against vegetables
back then, but
they would do
anything to keep
them from tasting like veg-
etables: creamed corn,
creamed spinach, creamed
peas. If you could put some-
thing crunchy on top of a
creamed vegetable, then
you were in the realm of the
daring and exotic.
"Baked bread crumbs on
top of creamed string
beans! You must give me
the recipe!" Some may say
that mixing in toothsome,
fat-filled bacon is not the
healthy answer either. And
if you're a vegetarian, you
probably didn't get this far
anyway; who cares what
you think? But if you did get
this far, just because some-
thing doesn't contain meat
doesn't automatically make
it a healthy food. Dough-
nuts? Candy bars? Potato


chips? Popcorn?
I'm just telling you, if you
cut your Brussels sprouts in
half and pan fry them in
bacon drippings and then
crumble some bacon on
them, you will start eating
your vegetables. Drip a lit-
tle balsamic vinegar on
them and McDonald's could
sell them faster than
French fries.
So, as a new sprout con-
vert, I planted some in my
garden this year, and they
took off. Finally, I found
something the deer won't
eat Now, after a few frosts,
I have harvested 25 pounds
of sprouts, but people won't
eat them. The same folks
who were happy to be gifted
with tomatoes, garlic, pep-
pers and eggplants from our
garden won't touch the
sprouts.
"Oh, thanks, I still have
some from last year," said
one neighbor, even though I
didn't grow them last year.
"I'm cutting back on cru-
ciferous vegetables," said
another fast-thinking
friend.
"I hear they make great
compost," is something I
hear a lot.
"But you like them, don't
you?" I asked Sue.
"Very much," she said.
"About once a year."


Jim Mullen is the author of
"It Takes a Village Idiot:
Complicating the Simple
Life" and "Baby's First
Tattoo." You can
reach him at
jim mullen@myway.com.


ACROSS
1 Cold-weather
wear
6 Serf
11 Skirt feature
16 John and
John Quincy
21 Forbidden
22 Old Greek
marketplace
23 Variety show
24 Part of RFD
25 With
26 Electrical
problem
(2 wds.)
28 British length
29 Nourished
30 Drink
32 Grating
33 Bright and
pleasant
35 President
Eisenhower,
for short
36 Insect
38 Waistcoat
41 River in Bel-
gium
43 Cereal grass
44 Finest
45 Part of speech
48 Opposing
force
50 By way of
52 Gambler
55 Pointed arch
57 Chinese "way"
58 Applauds
62 Go, team!
63 A ride in a car
65 Funny fellow
67 School org.
69 Tyrannical
ruler
70 Mature
71 Writer Tolstoy
72 Kind of biscuit
74 Repeat
76 Lhasa -
77 Infamous
Roman
emperor
79 Transgression
81 Vice -
83 Ancient gar-


ment
85 Kinsman
(abbr.)
86 Hang in folds
88 Place for
a bou-
tonniere
90 Hasten
92 Entreat
94 Butter serv-
ings
96 Annoy
97 --fi
99 Summit
100 Protective
covering
103 Kitchen item
105 Forthright
107 Make impure
110 de cologne
111 Love personi-
fied
113 Mother-of-
pearl
115 Done --
turn
117 Merganser
118 Crazy
120 Meat for stew
122 Luau fare
123 Depression-
era org.
125 Rd. relative
126 Indolent
128 Golf standard
130 Plaines
132 Disastrous
destiny
133 Pipe joint
134 Happen re-
peatedly
135 Light meal
137 Playing card
139 Hidden
141 Weep
143 Ceramic ware
145 Not cognizant
147 The O'Hara
plantation
150 "-- Yankee
Doodle..."
152 Christen
154 Was in debt
155 Punta del-
159 Native of (suf-
fix)


160 Like a cappuc-
cino
162 Wash
164 Long, long
time
166 French article
167 Stage play
169 Oppressive
(hyph.)
173 Missouri's
Moun-
tains
175 Vented
176 con polio
177 "Loma -"
178 Closely
packed
179 Endures
180 Dipper
181 Fudd or
Gantry
182 Stage direc-
tion

DOWN
1 Alpenstock
2 Caravan ani-
mal
3 Place to live
4 Howard or
Perlman
5 Makes ob-
scure
6 Occur
7 ideal
8 Downhearted
9 The Beaver
State
(abbr.)
10 Wait
11 Sensible
12 Give permis-
sion to
13 Gabor and
Peron
14 Portent
15 Itsy-bitsy
16 Horde
17 Payable
18 Shaw the
bandleader
19 Grades
20 Rain icy rain
27 River in
France
31 Piano's keys


34 Neighbor of
Calif.
37 Fitting
39 Chimney dirt
40 Pull
42 Do a farm job
44 Very light
wood
46 Somersault
47 Modem
49 Airborne
speck
51 Kind of show
52 Mark with a
hot iron
53 Avid
54 Tending to
cure
56 Atelier item
59 Nearly correct
60 Baffling ques-
tion
61 Pilfered
64 Baffle
66 Part of Eur.
68 Play part
69 Religious doc-
trine
73 Fire residue
75 polloi
78 Fall birthstone
80 Take suddenly
81 Strict vegetar-
ian
82 Way between
seats
84 Meeting
(abbr.)
87 Diminutive
suffix
89 Young canine
91 Old French
coin
93 Grasslands
95 Put the ball in
play
98 Loan charge
(abbr.)
100 Mister, in
Madrid
101 Terre-
102 Fish eggs
104 Short sleep
105 Lawyer's doc-
ument
106 Dorothy


Gale's dog
108 At no time
109 Bird sound
112 Weaken
114 Food fish
116 Alligator pear
119 The March
King
121 Wood strip
124 Love god
127 Sellout an-
nouncement
129 Bridle strap
131 Coin of small
worth
132 Sketch
136 Study, in a
way
138 Numero-
140 Flying forma-
tion
142 Life story, for
short
143 obscura
144 Female do-
mestic
146 Gardener, at
times
147 wave
148 Heart cham-
bers
149 Raises
151 Taj -
153 Get away from
156 Bias
157 Not at all
wordy
158 Glacial ridge
160 Crazes
161 Distance
measure
163 Organic com-
pound
165 Stem joint
168 Encountered
170 Loudness
(abbr.)
171 Monk's title
172 Dir. letters
174 Buddhist doc-
trine


Al MT H E WATS Progress Energy





Rdlrlrhir j0 be e ipI4idIio bV'Fvfidrass FhIf,jyprdltierfihenh mel a, Ioap-iri ef, 101 'i o n.


Sunday .

Puzzle answer is on Page Ai5.


* For local newsand entertainment, visit us online at www.chronicleonline.com.


. .r,. ,-











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that upgrading

my inultion

M Hoff@,!


5








'The 31orida Sheriffs youth Ranches, 9nc. Presents
.^U waii^ k kilk~ ti .. hi~hil,.th ti .. hiiA~ii ^ AA~itL


G


The 2010


Caruth Camp

I golf Challenge
We encourage you to utilize the services or products offered by
these Caruth Camp Golf Challenge sponsors. And when you do,
let them know you appreciate their support.
Our Thanks to these MVlajor Sponsors...


proud to




challege
ost theGolf Resort & Spa
EST. 1962






Citru KIA

The Power to Surprise
Hwy. 19
Crystal River
www.citruskia.com

Proud Sponsor of the
2010 Caruth Camp Golf Challenge


Bright House Networks proudly
supports the Caruth Camp Challenge.




T a L
Three Great Services. One Low Monthly Price.
TV Home Phone Internet


And Our thanks to these Platinum Sponsors


Progress Energy


Knight
Enterprise


Kable
Link


SUNTRUST


Greg
Construction T
A ~'l
"1^-,' 0!-


A Golf Tournament to Support the Boys & Girls Caruth
Camp at the Sheriffs Youth Ranch in Inglis, FL
www.YouthRanches.org


/1


-Il


The Citrus County Chronicle is
a proud supporter of the
2010 Caruth Camp Golf Challenge
SC I T R U SC 0 U N T Y

CHpoNICLE


To donate or sign-up to play in this tournament,
contact Bill Sizemore at (352) 563-2480.


Nx


L- I 0


.,~Ylllrr~~l~~rlr~,~ ~,rli~llll~ll~~~~llL.


IL -- E I


.,r~~lllrrl~~~~l~l~,i .1~4~~4441/11~~~111~.


,***44


I


;!~Alr ", ~ ~;4 ~


.. -


I









k


0 0 the Caruth 1

Camp golf challenge

2010


Supported by these Caruth eamp __

gold Sponsors...

Citrus Cardiology Consultants, PA


Accuform Sign Company
Nick Nicholas Ford/
Lincoln/Mercury
Publix Supermarket
Charities
General Utility Construction

With Additional Support by the
Garuth Gamp Silver Sponsors...
Pamla Bennett Teloh, LCSW
Cedar Creek at Kings Bay
Cheney Bros.
Collections Unlimited
Daly & Zilch Contractors
Airboat Adventure Tours
Harley-Davidson of Crystal River


to BENEFIT

THE FLORIDA

SHERIFFS

YOUTH

RANCHES, INC.


* Home Depot of Crystal River
* State Farm Insurance
* Withlacoochee River Electric Company
* The Ted Williams Museum
* Crowley & Company Advertising, Inc.


Challenge on
the Links:

Hosted by Plantation
Golf Resort & Spa


The Caruth Camp Challenge annual golf tournament is slated for
Thursday, November 18th at the Plantation Golf Resort & Spa,
and the beneficiaries will be our community's children.
Organizers of the tournament hope to break the $18,000 mark from
sponsorship money, with all monies raised benefitting the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches. "It's been close to 20 years that we've been
holding this event and it's the biggest fundraiser that Caruth Camp puts
on," said tournament organizer Bill Sizemore. "Caruth Camp provides
services to around 2,500 kids each year. That's a combination of two
programs. One is "Project Harmony that goes on during the school
year. It's a leadership retreat for middle-schoolers, and 12 weeks of that is
exclusively for Citrus County children." The other is "Harmony in the
Streets, a 5-day camping adventure for youngsters 6 12 years of age.
Participants will receive tee gifts and be able to attend a banquet after
tournament'play. "It's a wonderful thing," Sizemore said.
"We get out and have a good time and raise much-needed
funds for the children."
For more information or to register for golf, call Bill
Sizemore at 352-563-2480.


Put A Star
on Your Car
Io FLORIDA o )





The
Florida Sheri fts Youth
Ranches specialty license plate 1irovides
Florida citizens with a unique and personal way to help the
ongoing fight against juvenile delinquency and neglect. Along
with the regular tag fees, the additional specialty tag donation
will help Florida's needy boys and girls find shelter, guidance
and confidence. To purchase your Youth Ranches specialty
plate today, please contact your local tax collector's office.


You May Find a Hidden
S"Treasure" at the
Opportunity Store

YVou never know what you'll find in the "Opportunity
Store" located in the Crystal Square Plaza in Crystal
River. Established by the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc.
as a way to sell donated goods to local citizens, it has become a
form of recycling center for used-but-still-usable goods.
The low-cost items are often bought as necessities by
families with low incomes, while other visitors to the store
search out selected pieces of glassware, toys, collectibles,
furniture, bedding and more.
Donations come from all sources and in all sizes. Most
people carry in their used merchandise. For larger pieces or
quantities, pickup service can be arranged by calling 352-795-
8886.
Stop in at the Opportunity Store soon. You may find a
treasure that will make you grin. Any purchase made is certain
to help make needy children happier!
//_________


-K


A Message 1
from Sheriff
Jeffrey J. Dawsy


Each year, the Caruth Camp Challenge stands out as the single largest Citrus
County fundraiser that benefits the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. This fall
golf classic draws outstanding support from golfing enthusiasts, business leaders and
ordinary citizens who share a genuine commitment when it comes to "Florida's
charity for Florida's children."
The Caruth Camp is located just north of Inglis, off U.S. Highway 19, in
neighboring Levy County. While many of Citrus County's youth have spent quality
time at the camp itself, others have reaped the benefits of a youth ranch experience by
participating in affiliated programs like Harmony in the Streets and Project
Harmony.
Harmony in the Streets is an interactive five-day camping adventure designed to
nurture character building and teamwork in youngsters, ages 6-12. Project Harmony
is a weeklong leadership retreat that promotes communication, cooperation and
cultural understanding among middle school students.
Since 1957, the Florida Sheriffs youth ranches and camps have provided
counseling and referral services, plus residential group care, for at-risk boys and girls
around the state.
As caring supporters of the Caruth Camp Challenge, you have wisely recognized
that troubled youngsters with everything to lose are the very same ones with the most
to gain from new perspectives, helping hands and renewed self-worth.
On behalf of all of us at the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, heartfelt thanks for
your unwavering support of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. It's people like you
who give Florida's youngest citizens a second chance at building a successful future.


060b k Glf Turnaent o Suport he Bys &Girl C Cap.atthe S fhi s


moo


I










SL 1i i AY, NC '' iI 1 ::14, 2010



PORTS


* Due to press
problems and early
deadlines, portions
of the lottery and
updated sports
standings are
missing.


* South Carolina
held a 22.7 lead on
Florida at press
time. Please see
Monday's Chronicle
for the full story.


ILA



. 4'


* High school sports/B2
* NFL, golf, tennis/B3
* Auto racing/B4
* TV, lottery/B4
* College football/B5
* Entertainment/B6


Battle for the Cup


F7


-~ -
_._77 --1 -,






Photos by TED TRUE/Speclal to the Chronicle
Nathan Connor, far right, tees off for Inverness Golf & Country Club at the Inverness course during the Citrus Cup against 7 Rivers
on Saturday. 7 Rivers' Wayne Larsen hits a shot at Inverness Golf & Country Club.

Inverness Golf & Country Club leads 7 Rivers after first day of Citrus Cup


JOHN COSCIA
Chronicle
The scene was the Inverness
Golf & Country Club. And when
Nathan Connor teed off the first
tee on Saturday morning, history
was made. What was once only
the vision of Connor's and a cou-
ple of other area golfers was now
a reality.
Cornnor and his 16 teammates
were set to battle %x ith 16 mem-
bers trom the Seven Rivers
Country Club in the county's in-
augural Citrus Cup.
By the end of the first day of
the weekend-long competition,
Seven Rivers had won the battle
but IG&CC had won the war.
Seven Rivers' top team of Wayne
Larsen and Reid Callahan de-
feated IG&CC's top team of Jeff
Shelton and Nate Connor in both
of their matches. In the end, at
least on this day, IG&CC's depth
proved stronger as they took six
of the eight afternoon matches to
take a commanding 10-6 lead in
the quest for the first-ever event.
"It's a whole lot of fun. It's
great to get out here and mix it
up with another club," Seven
Rivers head pro Larsen admit-
ted. "The makeup of their club is
very similar to ours. They've got
their fair share of characters and
so do we. I think that their local
knowledge really showed on the


back nine. I'm looking for the
same thing in reverse when the
tournament shifts to our place to-
morrow."
As for Connor, the president of
IG&CC, he reiterated Larsen's
sentiments. "Their club is a lot
like ours. It was great to get to-
gether and it was a super atmos-
phere. Our members were out


following all of the teams around
and it was really a cool thing to
see. I'm sure their members will
be out in full force to support
them tomorrow at their place.
"Our team played great Even
though Jeff and I didn't do any-
thing to help the cause," Connor
laughed. "We had to overcome a
late substitution right before the


event teed off but everybody that
played wanted to be here and that
was the important thing. Our guys
really rallied on the back nine but
I totally expect a push from them
at their place (Sunday)."
In the morning session each
team won three matches and two
See CLIP/Page B4


Dewitt,


CR girls


bound


for state

JOHN COSCIA
Chronicle
TITUSVILLE All the
miles logged. The long days of
training. Countless hours in
the weight room. They're all
done in preparation of a day
like Crystal River's Geremy
Dewitt had at the Class 2A-2
region meet at Chain of Lakes
Park in Titusville on Saturday.
Dewitt, a senior, finished
fourth at the meet, and with
his time of 16:52 set a new
school record for the course
in the process.
"Geremy is the toughest kid,
mentally speaking, that I've
ever coached," Crystal River
head coach Tim Byrne ex-
plained, "Sometimes I can't
believe he's up where he is
and has done so
well. His form
isn't by any
means what
you would
call the best,
but his heart
is unmatched.
"He'll look beat
down physically but then he'll
get back off the ground and
keep going," Byrne's contin-
ued. "He just never gives up.
He makes it through it.
Geremy is just a super tough
kid mentally."
On Saturday Dewitt par-
layed all of that hard work
and never-say-die attitude
into a spot at next week's
Class 2A state meet. But De-
witt isn't just satisfied with
going to state, his is the intent
of placing well. In fact his eyes
are on the gold medal.
And why not? After all, yes-
terday he accomplished
something he hadn't all year,
namely, defeating Pasco's An-
thony Plourde, who after
leading for most of the race,
fell off the pace and finished
with a disappointing time of
17:15 and an 11th place finish.
Dewitt's strong finish has
him fired up as was evident by
his comments afterwards.
"The wind was killing me. I
was dying out there but I just
kept telling myself, 'don't give
up. You can do this, just don't
quit' Now my goal is to catch
the four guys that finished in
front of me at state (which will
include Lake Highland Prep's
Nick Papa, who ran a 16:32 to
win the race). I know I can do
it if I run my race and work
hard this week"
Dewitt's confidence was
temporarily tampered when
Byrne chided his senior run-
ner. "You're going to need to


Good tennis for a cause


See CR/Page B3




Wenger, Benoist qualify for state


CATHY KAPULKA" r.:?, ... II,..: o .r,:,,rl.:
Carrie Ingersoll returns the ball for a point in the first round of
a mixed doubles tennis match during the Legacy Tennis Tour-
nament of Citrus County at Skyview Tennis Center in Her-
nando. Ingersoll partnered with Joe Miller in a match up
against Sam Stiteler and Hank Keats. The tournament hon-
ored Pat Dixon, a long-time resident of Citrus County and a
well-known and well-liked tennis player who passed away due
to pancreatic cancer in November of 2009. Funds raised from
the tournament benefited both the boys' and girls' tennis pro-
gram at Citrus High School. Tournament play continues today.


Citrus jr., Lecanto soph. lone

Citrus County runners to advance
LARRY BUGG very well today," said
For the Chronicle Lecanto girls coach Bob
Lecours. "We move on to
NEW PORT RICHEY states next week at Little
Lecanto High dis- Everglades Ranch.
tance runner Chloe We have some high
Benoist has found a quality runners
home at the Class here. We'll see if
3A state meet. she can move up in
The sophomore the states next
qualified for her week."
fourth straight trip Also heading to
to the state Satur- the state meet at
day. She was fourth Little Everglades
overall with a time h Ranch in Dade City
of 19:06. She quali- is Citrus High run-
fled at the Class 3A- Lecanto runner ner Tim Wenger He
Region 2 meet came in 4th. finished eighth with
Saturday at New a time of 16:30.
Port Richey o "I did all right,"
Starkey Park. said Wenger, a jun-
"I felt good," ior. "I could have
Benoist said. l run a little better.
"There was a lot of v The main point of
good competition. I this race is to make
got my second best it to states. I went
time. This is the i j my freshman and
first time I have run Tim sophomore years. I
on this course. It's Wenger feel very excited
(going to state) Citrus runner right now."
pretty exciting." finished 8th. "I'm so proud of
"Both (Benoist him," said Citrus
and Sandi Boyington) did boys coach James Martone.


"He's worked really hard.
He knows what it takes. He
represents Citrus County
and our team with a lot of
heart and I am very proud
of him."
Lecanto High's Boying-
ton also ran but finished
24th in the girls race. Only
the top 15 runners advance
to state.
Benoist and Wenger qual-
ified as individuals. Nei-
ther Lecanto nor Citrus
High's boys teams qualified
for the regional.
Dunnellon High's boys
fell short of state. They
were 10th and only the top
six teams move on.
Durant High's Grace Van-
degrift and the Wiregrass
Ranch High boys and girls
all took titles Saturday at
the Class 3A-Region 2 Cross
Country Meet at Starkey
Park.
Vandegrift set a course
and personal record with
an 18:05 time.
Wiregrass Ranch High's
boys and girls took the re-
gional title along with most
of the meet team titles for
2010. The boys won with 40
points.
The Wiregrass Ranch


girls won the team title with
65 points.
Alex Foss of Lakeland
George Jenkins High won
the boys title with a course
record 15:55.
The top 15 individuals
and the top six girls and
boys teams will advance to
the Class 3A state meet Sat-
urday, Nov. 20 at Little
Everglades Ranch in Dade
City.
Results of Class 3A-
Region 2 Cross Country
Meet 2010 Saturday, Nov. 13
at Starkey Park
Girls team scores
1. Wiregrass Ranch 37; 2.
New Port Richey Gulf 104; 3.
Spring Hill Springstead 113; 4.
New Port Richey Ridgewood
148; 5. Belleview 150; 6.
Brooksville Nature Coast Tech
161; 7. Lecanto 162; 8. Inver-
ness Citrus 170; 9. Trinity
Mitchell 188; 10. Land O'
Lakes 203; 11. Zephyrhills 318;
12. Leesburg 335; 12. Land 0'
Lakes Sunlake 353.
Girls Top 15 Individuals
1. Anne-Marie Blaney, Belle-
view 18:33; 2. Kelli Williams,
Mitchell 18:46; 3. Nikita Shah,
Wiregrass Ranch 18:56; 4.
See R I-'.I I.. Page B4


( I
CITRUS :.10UN"I'Y IC'HRONICLU













Hurricanes rout Pirates in 'Pink Out' game


Twogols each by Fagan, Jones

propel Citrus to 7-0 win over CR


SEAN ARNOLD
For the Chronicle

Friday night's girls soccer
match between Citrus and
Crystal River was a success
before the teams even
kicked off.
The match up repre-
sented the 3rd Annual
Breast Cancer Awareness
"Pink Out" Game, founded
by Citrus graduate Candace
Smith, between the two
schools and proved to in-
spire a better-than-
expected crowd attendance
while organizers provided
critical facts about breast
cancer in pre-game, pink
balloons draping the Citrus
Bowl stands, and raffled
pink gifts at half-time in
order to raise funds for
fighting the disease.
On the field, where play-
ers sported pink socks and
pink hair apparel, it was an-
other sort of success for the
hosting 'Canes a 7-0
shutout of their cross-county
rivals which featured a pair


of goals each by junior mid-
fielder Kylie Pagan and jun-
ior forward Haley Jones.
After tying its other coun-
try rival, Lecanto, 0-0 and
losing a game they felt
should have never lost to
Wiregrass Ranch, Citrus
head Coach Steve Ekeli
wanted his team to get back
to fulfilling more of its po-
tential.
His team answered the
challenge.
"The big thing for us was
to get back onto level
ground in this game and to
not check out mentally since
we are a young team posi-
tionally, even though we
have some excellent
strengths at the heart of the
team," said Ekeli. "How-
ever, if you told me before
the game to guess whether
we'd win 7-0, I would have
said absolutely not Overall,
we played a very intelligent
game against a rival that re-
fused to give up."
A penetrating dribble by
Jones seven minutes into


play ignited the Citrus (2-1-1 adopted from the boys'
overall) offense early when game and it can be rare to
she was fouled on her way see in girls high school soc-
to the Pirate goal, giving cer."
senior 'Cane midfielder Reynolds, along with
Stacey Bigge a Crystal River jun-
chance to score ior captain
on the ensu-i Haley De-
ing l)enal3 whurst and
kick. senior de-
Bigge later fender Kim
a s s i st ed Dixon, were
Fagan's first score busy fighting off
of the night for a 2-0 Citrus the aggressive 'Cane at-
lead at 25 minutes. tack all night with several
Sophomore forward Dey- clear-outs.
casha Miller added the After the half, Jones came
'Canes' third and final goal on strong for the 'Canes,
of the first half in stoppage scoring her pair of goals
time. Pirate junior de- within the first 11 minutes
fender Jessica of second-half play.
Reynolds helped .- Her first goal was
deny another made after rico-
Citrus scoring i;. cheting off a Pi-
chance shortly rate defender,
after Miller's while the sec-
goal with an : ond had
slide tackle that enough velocity
drove the ball to spin off the
away from the hands of sopho-
'Cane offensive front more Crystal River
"We did a great job of goalie Minnah Baranhas.
moving the ball from inside Just two minutes prior to
to the outside line, and back Jones' second goal, Bara-
inside again while taking nhas needed a tough save
care of the ball," said Ekeli. against a powerful shot by
"That's something we've Miller to limit the 'Canes'


momentum.
Citrus' fortunes would
continue into the early sec-
ond half, however, when
Fagan knocked in a header
at 54 minutes to the right of
the net from a sharp left
angle to the goal.
'Canes' senior midfielder
Alex Trick followed Fagan's
second score with the
night's final goal, coming
seconds after a corner kick
by Citrus.
At 73 minutes, Pirate
freshman Delaney Owens
was able to slip deep into
'Cane territory for a scoring
opportunity off of a pass by
senior Pirate captain Nicole
McPhee, but the ball was
defended at the last second
by senior 'Cane defender
Veronica Morton.
Morton is part of a group
of Citrus midfielders and
defenders, which also in-
clude Bigge and Trick, that
Ekeli confidently feels
match up against any play-
ers around.
"Our middle is able to
keep switching the field for
us by going sideline to side-
line and intelligently coun-
tering and dropping the ball
back when needed."


Pirate head coach Bill
Reyes understood his team
was less experienced as a
squad than Citrus, particu-
larly having a few players
need to sit on Friday, but he
felt his players too often
made self-inflicted errors.
"We'd have trouble win-
ning the ball and when we'd
sometimes win the ball, we
couldn't make a pass. Or if
we made a pass, we would-
n't make a play with the ball,
and so we were never able
to put together a complete
performance," Reyes said.
"Overall, we didn't win
the ball, and when you don't
win the ball you don't win
the game."
Despite his team's strug-
gles, Reyes was thankful to
the Citrus program and
Smith to have the opportu-
nity to play in the annual
"Pink Out" event to help a
cause that he personally un-
derstands the importance
of.
"I really appreciate being
a part of this game and what
it means,"'said Reyes. "It
has sentimental value to me
because I know two people
back home who have the
disease."


Warriors fall on Second-half surge


road to Pirates


SR's impressive season over

after 44-16 loss to St. Edward's


MICHAEL BIELECKI
For the Chronicle

VERO BEACH St Ed-
ward's won its 10th game
of the season when it beat
Seven Rivers Christian
School, 44-16, at home.
The Pirates play at home
for the Sunshine State
Athletic Conference
Championship on Thurs-
day, when they will play in
their first championship
game since 1991.
Seven Rivers started off
the game with an onside
kick, which was recovered
by Lonnie Scott of St. Ed-
ward's at the Seven Rivers
47-yard line. Cortez brown
ripped off a 14-yard run on
the first play from scrim-
mage, but the offense sput-
tered. Dillon Benson's
41-yard field goal attempt
went wide-left, and the
game stayed scoreless.
After a Seven Rivers
punt to midfield, St. Ed-
ward's capped a nine-play
49-yard drive when Jamari
Williams scored on a 1-
yard dive into the end
zone. Seven Rivers got the
ball back after a 12-yard
kickoff return by Andrew
Gage, and went three-and-
out again.
A 40-yard punt started
St. Edward's at their own
40. Brown and Williams
combined for 22 rushing
yards on a drive that once
again put the Pirates into
field goal range. Dillon
Benson failed on his 47-
yard attempt, and Seven
Rivers got the ball back
Seven Rivers put to-
gether a seven-play, 80-
yard drive which featured
two runs for 45 yards by
Winsor Sineus. John
Iwanic's 19-yard TD run
caped the drive, and a two-
point conversion run by
Sineus put the Warriors up
8-7.
St. Edward's responded
with their own seven-play
drive, which ended with a
37-yard Dillon Benson
field goal with 2:38 left to
play in the first half. This is
where the game changed.


The Pirates executed a
perfect pooch kickoff when
Benson lofted a ball that
hit the ground at the Seven
Rivers' 35 yard-line and
rolled for five more. The
Warriors weren't ready for
the surprise play, and
Devon Kahle recovered
the ball at the 30-yard line
without it touching a single
Seven Rivers player.
Seven Rivers Coach
Chad Turner credited the
St. Edward's coaches for
recognizing the perfect op-
portunity to try the pooch
kick. "That pooch kick
changed the game-it was
a great call," Turner said.
"Their staff made great
calls all game and over
time their strength and
numbers wore us down."
The play sparked two
quick touchdowns by St
Edward's. Scoring runs of
31 and 71 yards by J.D.
McGee and Williams put
the Pirates up 24-8 at half-
time.
McGee's run came two
plays after the pooch kick
After holding Seven Rivers
on the next series, .St. Ed-
ward's got the ball back at
their own 29 yard-line.
Williams ran the ball 71
yards for a touchdown on
the very next play, crossing
the goal line with 30.3 sec-
onds in the half. "McGee is
our top cornerback, and
our main guy for special
teams," Motta said. "He
doesn't get a lot of work at
running back, but he
stepped in and did a real
nice job."
St. Edward's went on to
control the game after
halftime, starting with a
10-play 35-yard drive
which ended when Collier
Proctor found Kahle for a
18 yard touchdown pass.
The Pirates scored two
minutes later when Brown
broke off a 39-yard touch-
down run.
The two teams ex-
changed touchdown runs
when Williams scored on a
23-yard touchdown run
and Sineus scored on an
18-yard TD run the very
next possession.


J. PATRICK RICE/For the Chronicle
Seven Rivers Christian junior quarterback Josh Downey
looks to hand the ball off against St. Edward's In the
semifinals of the Sunshine State Athletic Conference
Championship on Friday night in Vero Beach. The Warriors
suffered a 44-16 setback.


... ..










BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Crystal River senior running back Willie Jackson (4) Is hit Friday night by Lecanto defensive backs Addison Holstein (rear)
and Brandon Dawes (middle) at Earl Bramlett Stadium in Crystal River. The Pirates scored 21 unanswered points in the
second half to defeat the Panthers 24-3 and win the county championship in football.


Crystal River scores 21 in last two quarters for 24-3 win over Lecanto


JON-MICHAEL
SORACCHI
Chronicle

It's a game neither team
wanted to lose but ultimately
only one was equipped to
win.
Crystal River got rushing
touchdowns from Willie Jack-
son and Napolean Hutcher-
son in the third quarter to
break open a tied ballgame
and propel the Pirates to a
24-3 victory Friday night at
Earl Bramlett Stadium
against Lecanto.
Jackson, a senior running
back, toted the ball 41 times
for 213 tough yards and two
touchdowns and the Pirates'
defense racked up two
turnovers and four sacks to
stymie Lecanto. The num-
bers gave Jackson over 1,600
yards rushing and 17 touch-
downs on the season.
Pirates head coach George
Arscott challenged his entire
team, particularly the offen-
sive line to step up its play,
and Crystal River responded.
"We made a couple of
changes," Arscott said. "We
just tightened our splits down
(on the offensive line) and
ran at them."
The Pirates rolled up 316
yards of total offense, not ex-
actly the numbers of an of-
fensive juggernaut but with a
fierce defense, more than
enough to get the job done.
Crystal River quarterback
Joseph LaFleur went 4-of-10
passing for 72 yards but hit
two plays of over 25 yards
and, more importantly, did
not turn the ball over to the
Panthers.
With the way each defense
played in the first half, the
score could have just as eas-
ily been 0-0. But Lecanto
kicker Blake Parsons nailed
a 31-yard field goal less than
a minute into the start of the
second quarter to give the
Panthers their first and only


lead of the contest
The three-pointer came
after Lecanto recovered a
punt at the Crystal River 30
that the Pirates were ruled to
have touched.
Crystal River junior Don-
nie Dewees nailed a 40-yard
field goal of his own with 24
seconds before halftime to
ensure the Pirates would not
be shut out in the first 24 min-
utes.
Interestingly enough,
Lecanto would have one last
chance to score off the leg of
Parsons by invoking a little-
used rule.
Crystal River (6-4 overall)
hit a high, very short ball on
the ensuing kickoff and
Lecanto signaled for a fair
catch at the Pirates' 40-yard
line. Following a fair catch on
a kick, a team can opt for a
free kick, which is similar to a
field goal attempt, except the
Panthers were able to kick
the ball off a tee with no Crys-
tal River rush to contend
with. The Pirates, however;
could also return the ball like
a regular kickoff.
Parsons' 50-yard attempt,
however; was just yards short
as the Panthers couldn't take
what would have been a sur-
prising lead heading into
halftime.
The Panthers (2-8 overall)
held Jackson to 63 yards on
18 carries in the first half, but
the Pirate finally broke
through with a 51-yard scor-
ing burst on fourth-and-2 to
deliver Crystal River a 10-3
advantage.
On the touchdown run,
Jackson used his great sense
of anticipation to allow block-
ing to set up in front of him
before bursting into the Pan-
thers secondary and outrac-
ing his opponents to the left
pylon to hit pay dirt
The score came after Pi-
rates cornerback Pedro Diaz
picked off an Addison Hol-
stein pass attempt Holstein


was pressed into relief duty
at quarterback after a hard
sack knocked Lecanto soph-
omore Scott Stearns out of
the game on the second play
of the second half. Stearns,
who appeared to suffer an in-
jury to his left (non-throwing)
arm, would not return.
After forcing a three-and-
out of Lecanto, Crystal River
took over at its own 25 and
put together the signature
drive of the evening. The Pi-
rates marched 75 yards on 13
plays, not once putting the
ball in the air The big run of
the drive came from Hutch-
erson, who galloped 26 yards
to the Panthers' 3 before
punching it in from three
yards out three plays later
"We had a couple of defen-
sive breakdowns in the third
quarter that hurt us," Allan
said.
A 14-point lead would
prove to be insurmountable
for Lecanto, who managed
just 125 yards of total offense
and had two turnovers.
Still, down two touch-
downs with 10 minutes re-
maining, the Panthers still
had a chance. Lecanto forced
a turnover on downs of Crys-
tal River at midfield and im-
mediately got a 15-yard pass
from Holstein to Vincent
Armstrong.
The Panthers stalled and a
third-down sack by the Pi-
rates' Manuel Henriquez
forced Lecanto to punt Hen-
riquez would single-hand-
edly thwart Lecanto's next
possession as well when the
sophomore defensive tackle
pursued Panthers wide re-
ceiver TJ. Jones 10 yards
downfield and stripped the
ball. Pirates defensive back
John McAteer recovered
with 5:15 left.
Crystal River added a
score with the game already
decided when Jackson scam-
pered in from seven yards
out with 20 seconds left. The


32-yard, five play drive to ef-
fectively end the game was
extended by a personal foul
on the Panthers after the Pi-
rates gained just one yard on
a pass from LaFleur to Dal-
ton Owens on third-and-8
from Lecanto's 16. In the
game's last minutes, the Pan-
thers got hit with four per-
sonal fouls and actually had
an assistant coach ejected
from the contest
Although neither side was
more to blame than the other,
the ugliness at the end of the
game marred what was oth-
erwise a hard, physical,
mostly well-played contest by
both teams up until that
point
'Any game that we're close
in at the half, we're going to
come out on top of it," Arscott
said. "It's always going to be a
bloodbath when you have
two rivals going at it I don't
care what the records are."
For Crystal Rive;r, Chris-
tian Balkcom had a 37-yard
catch in the second quarter
and Diaz had a 25-yard grab
on a swing pass in the first
quarter
Lecanto got 45 yards on
eight carries from sopho-
more Akeem Gibbs to lead
the way offensively for
Lecanto. Vincent Armstrong,
a senior wide receiver who
worked his way back from
major ligament damage sus-
tained during his sophomore
season, had a total of two
touches for 37 yards in the
fourth quarter
"I'm proud of the kids' ef-
fort for the whole year," Allan
said.
Lecanto's season is over
while Crystal River will host
a bowl game 7 p.m. Wednes-
day against West Port.
Jon-Michael Soracchi is
a spoils irporter br the
Clnvnicle. He can be
e-mailed atjmsolacchi@
chronicleonline.com or
reached at (352) 563-5660.
ext 1389.


Ciniusa (,()ijNTY (FL)~ CHROI~(NICEG


B2 SUMIxv, Nouliitwit 14-, 2010


PREP SPORTS








SUNIAY, NovaiMlwti 14, 2010 B3


C0 n 1 s (:() 'N.f (FL) (;]mR:NICI.E:

Children's Miracle
Network Classic
Saturday
At Walt Disney Resort, Lake Buena Vista
Purse: $4.7 million
m-Magnolia Course: 7,516 yards, par-72
(36-36), p-Palm Course: 7,010 yards, par-72
(36-36)
Third Round
Roland Thatcher 65p-63m-70m 198 -18
Chliis SIoud 62p-70mn-70n 202 -141
Spencer Lovin G8p-68in-67-ni 203 -13
Brett Wettelich 68n- 67p-68i -- 203 -13
Robeit Ganigus 6tlp-65nll-70n 203 -13
B ian Gay 67p-65m-71mi 203 -13
Roiy Sabbalini 67p-71in-66mn 204 -12
Johnson Wagnm 70m-65p-69m 204 -12
Cliff Kiesge 70m-66p-68m 204 -12
Mark Wilson 69p-66m-69m 204 -12
John Sonden 69-69p-67mn 205 -11
Steve Marino 72m-68p-65mn 205 -11
Rickle Fowler 66p-70m-69m 205 -11
Jerry Kelly 66p-69m-70m 205 -11
Tom Pernice, Jr. 68p-70m-68mn 206 -10
Michael Connell 71m-68p-67m -206 -10
Cameron Percy 66p-71m-69m 206 -10
Tom Lehman 67rn-70p-69m 206 -10
Charles Warren 67p-70m-69m 206 -10
Charles Howell IIll 68nm-p69p-69m 206 -10
Jeff Quinney 67p-68n-71m 206 -10
Bretl Quigley 69m-66p-71m -206 -10
Pat Perez 69m-69p-69m 207 -9
John Merrick 71m-66p-70m 207 -9
Brenden Pappas 66p-71 m-70m 207 -9
Stewart Cink 71m-68p-69rnm-208 -8
Lee Janzen 69m-69p-70m 208 -8
Brendon de Jonge 72m-65p-71 m 208 -8
Vijay Singh 69p-71 m-68m 208 -8
D.J. Trahan 68p-68m-72m 208 -8
Joe Durant 72p-69m-67m 208 -8
Ben Curtis 69m-70p-70m 209 -7
Jason Bohn 68m-70p-71 m 209 -7
Chris Tidland 67m-70p-72m-209 -7
Tim Petrovic 71m-67p-71m-209 -7
John Huston 69p-71in-69m- 209 -7
Tom Gillis 71m-66p-72m 209 -7
Briny Baird 70m-67p-72m 209 -7
Justin Bolli 68m-73p-68m 209 -7
Michael Letzig 69p-70m-71m -- 210 -6
Paul Stankowski 72m-67p-71m -- 210 -6
Matt Bettencourt 71m-68p-71m 210 -6
John Mallinger 70m-68p-72m- 210 -6
Charlie Wi 72m-68p-70m 210 -6
Ryan Palmer 72m-68p-70m 210 -6
Derek Lamely 70in-70p-70m-210 -6
J.B. Holmes 68m-69p-73m 210 -6
Sean O'Hair 70p-70m-70m 210 -6
Fred Funk 68p-72m-70m -210 -6
Troy Matteson 70p-69m-72m 211 -5
David Lutterus 68p-70n-73m-211 -5
Ted Purdy 68p-71m-72m-211 -5
Joe Ogilvie 71m-69p-71m -211 -5
Mathew Goggin 70p-68m-73m 211 -5
Davis Love III 71p-70m-70m 211 -5
Matt Every 68p-73m-70m 211 -5
Heath Slocum 71 m-68p-73m 212 -4
Webb Simpson 71 m-69p-72m 212 -4
Jeff Maggert 71p-69m-72m-212 -4
Greg Owen 69p-68m-75m 212 -4
Aron Price 69p-71m-72m-212 -4
Mike Small 70p-71m-71m- 212 -4
Blake Adams 73m-68p-71m-212 -4
Scott Piercy 70p-70m-73m-213 -3
Troy Merritt 69p-71m-73m 213 -3
Jesper Parnevik 74m-66p-73m 213 -3
Tim Herron 66p-75m-72m-213 -3
RogerTambellini 69m-72p-72m-213 -3
Nicholas Thompson71 p-69m-74m 214 -2
Jay Williamson 69m-72p-73m-214 -2
Steve Flesch 72p-69m-73m 214 -2
Martin Flores 73p-66m-76m 215 -1
Aaron Baddeley 70m-71 p-74m 215 -1
Chris DiMarco 68p-73m-75m 216 E
Lorena Ochoa Invite
Saturday
At Guadalajara Country Club Course,
Guadalajara, Mexico
Purse: $1.1 million
Yardage: 6,638
Par: 72
Third Round
Suzann Pettersen 70-65-69-204 -12
Karine cher 70-67-68 205 -11
In-Kyung Kim 69-68-68-205 -11
Ai Miyazato 68-69-68 205 -11
Stacy Lewis 67-69-69 205 -11
Paula Creamer 68-66-72 206 -10
Amy Yang 71-68-68-207 -9
Karrie Webb 70-69-68-207 -9
Meena Lee 72-65-70 207 -9
Azahara Munoz 70-67-70 207 -9
Cristie Kerr 64-76-68-- 208 -8
Candle Kung 71-70-68-- 209 -7
Na Yeon Choi 68-70-71 209 -7
Hee Young Park 69-71-70- 210 -6
Song-Hue Kim 72-67-71 -210 -6
Gwladys Nocera 70-73-68-211 -5
Brittany Lang 73-68-70-211 -5
Catriona Matthew 70-71-70-211 -5
Juli nkster 70-70-71 -211 -5
Mika Miyazato 72-70-70-212 -4
Katherine Hull 68-69-75-212 -4
Angela Stanford 73-70-70 213 -3
Vicky Hurst 70-71-72-213 -3
Lorena Ochoa 74-71-69 214 -2
Beatriz Recari 71-71-72- 214 -2
Morgan Pressel 73-69-73-215 -1
Pat Hurst 72-74-71-217 +1
Yani Tseng 76-70-72-218 +2
Christina Kim 75-72-72-219 +3
Kristy McPherson 74-73-72-219 +3
Sophia Sheridan 74-72-73-219 +3
M.J. Hur 75-76-69-220 +4
Anna Nordqvist 76-72-73-221 +5
Brittany Lincicome 79-77-71 227 +11
Carling Coffing 78-75-78-231 +15
Australian Masters
Saturday
At Victoria Golf Club, Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,886, Par: 71
Third Round


Adam Bland, Australia
Daniel Gaunt, Australia
Andre Stolz, Australia
Jarrod Lyle, Australia
Ryan Hailer, Australia
Stuart Appleby, Australia
Steven Jones, Australia
David McKenzie, Australia
Geofl Ogilvy, Australia
Kieran Pratt, Australia
Camilo Villegas, Colombia
Won Joon Lee, Australia
Anthony Brown, Australia
Paul Sheehan, Australia
Kurt Barnes, Australia
Aaron Townsend, Australia
Tiger Woods, United States
Robert Allenby, Australia
Brad Kennedy, Australia
Gareth Paddison, Australia
Peter O'Malley, Australia
Terry Pilkadaris, Australia
Michael Hendry, Australia
David Bransdon, Australia
Matthew Millar, Australia
Also
M. Campbell, New Zealand
Nathan Green, Australia
Sergio Garcia, Spain
Michael Sim, Australia
Brett Rumford, Australia


65-67-70-202
65-72-68-205
67-67-72-206
69-70-69-208
71-72-66-209
71-69-69-209
71-72-68-211
71-72-687-211
72-70-69-211
69-72-70-211
71-70-70-211
69-71-71-211
70-69-72-211
71-72-69-212
67-76-69-212
73-68-71 -212
69-72-71-212
73-72-68-213
68-75-70-213
67-72-74-213
69-70-74-213
73-70-71-214
68-73-73-214
69-71-74-214
67-72-75-214
70-73-72-215
68-71-76-215
73-65-77-215
73-71-73-217
72-72-74-218


Singapore Open
Saturday
At Sentosa Golf Club
Serapong Course (7,300 yards, par-71),
Tanjong Course (6,577 yards, par-71),
Singapore
Purse: $6 million
Third Round
Adam Scott, Australia 65-65-69-199
K. Kyung-nam, South Korea 66-67-67 200
lan Poulter, England 69-63-68 200
G. McDowell, N. Ireland 65-68-68 201
Anders Hansen, Denmark 71-66-65- 202
Jamie Donaldson, Wales 66-69-68 203
Prayad Marksaeng, Thailand 69-65-70 204
Rikard Karlberg, Sweden 64-70-70 204
Francesco Molinari, Italy 69-69-67- 205
Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain 67-69-69 205
Y.E. Yang, South Korea 66-73-66 205
Liang Wenchong, China 69-65-71 205
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-64-73- 205
Also
Martin Kaymer, Germany 68-68-70- 206
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland 70-68-70-208
Phil Mickelson, United States 67-69-75 211


Bucs still in NFC South play
-,.- -'.- .: : ,..:....


Tampa Bay will be ,,

blacked out against

Carolina Panthers


Associated Press

TAMPA- Midway through what
Raheem Morris and the surprising
Tampa Bay Buccaneers describe as
a "race to 10" wins, the NFEs
youngest team isn't shying away
from talk about a goal of reaching
the playoffs in a rebuilding year.
The youthful but struggling Car-
olina Panthers look at their NFC
South rivals and can't help but won-
der what might have been if their
own modest expectations for suc-
cess had not been undermined in
part by inexperience and injuries.
Second-year quarterback Josh
Freeman has flourished for the
Bucs (5-3). Young QB's Matt Moore
and Jimmy Clausen haven't for the
Panthers (1-7), who've dropped
their last two games to St. Louis
and New Orleans by a combined
score of 54-13.
Tampa Bay won a September
meeting between the teams, 20-7 in
Charlotte, and is aiming for its first
season series sweep of the Pan-
thers since 2002, the year the NFC
South was formed.
"You look at Tampa, we're in the
same mold," Panthers linebacker
Jon Beason said, looking ahead to
Sunday's rematch. "We're a young
team. The difference is they were
able to get some wins early and get
some confidence. I think it's car-
ried on throughout the season."
The biggest reason is Freeman,
the third quarterback selected in
the 2009 draft behind Matthew
Stafford and Mark Sanchez.
The 22-year-old has led fourth-
quarter comebacks in six of eight
career victories and nearly pulled
off another in Atlanta to keep the


.:






Associated Press
Tampa Bay wide receiver Mike Williams and the Bucs will host the Carolina Panthers at 1 p.m. today at Raymond
James Stadium in Tampa. The Buccaneers are 5-3 overall and now 11/2 games behind the Atlanta Falcons.


Bucs atop the division last week.
With five wins at the season's
midpoint, Tampa Bay has already
surpassed its victory total for 2009.
That's also halfway to the 10 wins
that Morris believes will give his
team a good chance to get into the
playoffs.
Last week's 27-21 loss to the NFC
South-leading Falcons forced the
NFEs youngest head coach to back
off his declaration that the Bucs
were the best team in the NFC. But
it hasn't affected the 34-year-old re-
solve and confidence in his players.
Morris said his contention was
more about instilling an attitude
and belief than making a statement
about whether Tampa Bay is actu-
ally an elite team.
"We're still a work in progress.
There's no doubt about that. We
talk about that all the time," Morris
said. "By no means do I think we


have all the pieces."
The Panthers began the season
with the youngest roster in the
NFL. The Bucs replaced them last
month after releasing guard Key-
drick Vincent and tight end Jer-
ramy Stevens.
"These guys got to feel that they
can go out and be the best and com-
pete with the best every week,"
Morris said. "It is no different than
when you tell your children when
you send them out in the world to
be their very best. ... There is no
reason why we can't go out and
have a chance to compete for this
division this year."
Moore, who entered the season
as Carolina's starting quarterback,
was lost for the year to a shoulder
injury during last week's 34-3 loss
to the Saints.
Clausen, drafted in the second
round out of Notre Dame, will


make his fourth pro start Sunday.
Fellow rookie Tony Pike, who took
his first snaps in a regular season
game last week, moves into the No.
2 role.
Carolina has sputtered offen-
sively, regardless of who's been
under center ranking last in the
NFL in yards and points. As poorly
as Moore performed, Clausen's
numbers are worse with a 46.8 com-
pletion percentage, one touchdown
pass, four interceptions and two
lost fumbles.
Ideally, the Panthers would like
the run the ball to take the pressure
off their inexperienced quarter-
back
But with the team's top three
running backs DeAngelo
Williams, Jonathan Stewart and
Tyrell Sutton slowed by injuries,
second-year pro Mike Goodson will
start against the Bucs.


Tiger stuck in neutral

Associated Press two-putt birdie on the 18th Chris Stroud (70) was sec-


MELBOURNE, Australia
- Tiger Woods failed to
make up any ground in the
rain Saturday in the Aus-
tralian Masters, shooting an
even-par 71 that left him re-
signed to going an entire
year without a victory.
Adam Bland, who is
headed to the second stage
of PGA Tour qualifying
school next week in Califor-
nia, started and finished
with a birdie for a 1-under
70 that gave him a three-
shot lead over Daniel Gaunt
- and 10 shots clear of
Woods, the defending
champion.
Woods was at 1-under 212,
and will need the biggest
comeback of his year to win.
Bland briefly slipped into
a share of the lead with
Andre Stolz after a bogey on
the eighth hole, but a birdie
on the par-5 ninth allowed
him to regain the outright
lead, and he never trailed
again. He finished with a


to reach 11-under 202 at
Victoria Golf Club.
Gaunt had a 68 and will
be in the final group with
Bland. Stolz had a 72 and
was four shots behind.
Children's Miracle
Network Classic
LAKE BUENA VISTA-
Roland Thatcher remained on
track in an improbable bid to
keep his PGA Tour card, shoot-
ing a 2-under 70 to take a four-
stroke lead in the Children's
Miracle Network Classic.
Thatcher began the season-
ending event 179th on the
money list and needs to win or
finish alone in second to vault
into the top 125 the cutoff for
full status to retain his card.
Nos. 126-150 get partial status.
Thatcher would have had a
record 54-hole lead at Disney if
hadn't given back three shots
over the final two holes to finish
at 18 under. Tim Simpson had
a six-stroke lead after three
rounds in his 1990 victory.


ond.
Lorena Ochoa Invite.
GUADALAJARA, Mexico-
Suzann Pettersen moved into
position for her first LPGA Tour
victory of the year, shooting a
3-under 69 to take a one-stroke
lead in the Lorena Ochoa Invi-
tational.
Pettersen, the Norwegian
star who has 10 top-five fin-
ishes season, was 12 under on
the Guadalajara Country Club
course. She had five victories
in 2007 and also won the 2009
Canadian Women's Open.
Ai Miyazato (68), Stacy
Lewis (69), In-Kyung Kim (68)
and Karine Icher (68) were tied
for second, and second-round
leader Paula Creamer (72) was
another stroke back at 10
under.
Pettersen birdied five of the
first 10 holes to reach 14
under, but dropped two strokes
with bogeys on the par-4 15th
and par-3 17th.
Ochoa, playing her first


Federer bounced from Maste:


Monfils beats

star to reach

Parisfinal

Associated Press
S - -- --- -- .
PARIS Gael Monfils
saved five match points to
beat top-seeded Roger Fed-
erer 7-6 (7), 6-7 (1), 7-6 (4) and
reach the Paris Masters final
against Robin Soderling.
Soderling saved three
match points before overcom-
ing Michael Llodra of France
6-7 (0), 7-5, 7-6 (6).
Monfils faced five match
points in the 12th game of the
final set before forcing the
tiebreaker with an ace.
Federer :shanked a fore-
hand to give Monfils two
match points, and the French-
man converted the first with a
service winner.
"He's someone I admire a
lot," Monfils said about Fed-
erer. "He's a legend of tennis,
THE legend, and beating him
is a beautiful victory. I will re-
member it for my whole life."
Federer had a 5-0 record
against Monfils before their
semifinal.
In the first tiebreaker, Fed-
erer fired an ace at 6-5 down
to erase a set point then hit a
forehand winner for a 7-6


Associate
Gael Monfils reacts after winning his semifinal match ag
Roger Federer at the Paris Tennis Masters tournament Sat


lead. But Monfils replied with
a service winner to level at 7-7
before a wide service return
from the Australian Open
champion gave Monfils a set
point that he converted when
Federer netted a forehand.
Federer bounced back by
winning five straight points to
take the second set.
In the third, Federer broke
for a 2-0 lead on an unforced
error from Monfils.
"I guess I had control over it
in the third, went a break up,"
Federer said. "That's a disap-
pointment there. It's a tough
match to lose."


Federer dropped ser
the seventh game with a
forehand and M
snapped a backhand w
to level at 44.
"What really made m
lieve I could win is tha
moment with that fore
where he gave me the
point," Monfils said.
Despite the defeat, Fe
remained upbeat about
end of his season.
"In a way it is a relief
was able to finish the to
ment in good physical he
Federer said. "I'm fresh
tally, too.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods watches his ball after an approach shot during
the third round of the Australian Masters on Saturday at
Victoria Golf Club in Melbourne, Australia.


LPGA Tour event since retiring
in April, shot a 69 on her home
course, leaving her 10 shots
back in a tie for 24th.
Singapore Open
SINGAPORE -Adam Scott
shot a 2-under 69 to take a
one-stroke lead into the final
round of the Singapore Open,
a tournament he won in 2005
and 2006 at Sentosa Golf Club.
The Australian had a 14-



rs CR
Continued from Page

push harder than
did today if you w
to get on that me
stand at state n
week."
"Yes, sir," Dew
replied.
And then that ail
confidence return
"Oh okay, press
That sounds like
challenge coach. Br
it on, I love it."
While Dewitt \
the only member
the Pirates boys te
to advance the g
team, for the seco
straight year advan
to the state meet a
against team, clinching
ay final team spot wit
urday. sixth-place finish. T
*ve in five girls that c(
i wide bined to accrue
onfils points for a 25-pc
inner margin over Pas
were Maeg
ae be- McMichen (31st wit
at key time of 21:35), Mor
'hand Schwall (33rd witl
break time of 22:03), Eli
beth Bruty (42nd w
derer a time of 22:31), En
it the Cilman (44th with
time of 22:32) a
that I Larissa Gough (4.
mrna- with a time of 22:56
alth," The winner of
men- girls race was Co<
Beach's Shelby Dav


under 199 total.
Defending champion lan
Poulter (68) and Kang Kyung-
nam (68) were tied for second,
and U.S. Open champion
Graeme McDowell (68) was
another stroke back. Phil Mick-
elsen fell off the pace with a 75
that left him 12 strokes behind
Scott in the event sanctioned
by the Asian and European
tours.


son who ran a phe-
nomenal time of 18:09
to beat her closest
B1 competitor; teammate
Savannah Bradley by
you 1:17 minutes. Also
ant competing for the
dal Crystal River girls
ext team and advancing
were Martina Tofoya
vitt (51st with a time of
23:11) and Kristen
r of Dunlap (54th with a
ed. time of 23:18).
ire. "We were expecting
. a and hoping for a little
'ing better today," Crystal
River girls head coach
vas Lisa Carter admitted.
of "But it's been a good
am season and we have a
iris talented bunch of girls
)nd and we're moving on
ced to state that's the im-
.s a portant thing.
the "We just didn't run
h a well today. We don't
?le have the kind of com-
min- petition we faced
187 today in our area and I
int think that hurts us in
sco training sometimes,"
gan Carter continued. "We
h a have a tendency of
gan running to the level of
i a our competition. But
za- it's been a great sea-
'ith son and now we get to
lily run one more week.
i a I'm proud of the girls."
ind John Coscia is thle
5th sports editor ol'the
). Chronicle and can be
the reached at (352) 564-
coa 2928 or at jcoscia(r
'id- chronicleonline. om.


SPORTSIl









B4 SUNAY, NOViiMIa 14, 2010



Glantz-Culver Uine
NFL
Today
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Indianapolis 8 7(47) Cincinnati
at Jacksonville +1 1 (4914) Houston
Tennessee +2 1(421,) at Miami
Minnesota 13 1(40h) at Chicago
at Buffalo 3 2(45) Detroit
N.Y. Jets 34 3(3714) at Cleveland
at Tampa Bay 714 7(37) Carolina
Kansas City 214 1(444) at Denver
at San Fran, 511 514(38) St. Louis
at Arizona 3 3(42) Seattle
at N.Y. Giants 1314 1314(4514) Dallas
at Pittsburgh 4 41(45) New England
Tomorrow
Philadelphia 3 3(42&) at Wash.
NFL Standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


N.Y. Jets
New England
Miami
Buffalo

Tennessee
Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Houston

Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati

Kansas City
Oakland
San Diego
Denver


East
W L T
6 2 0
4 4 0
0 8 0
South

5 3 0
5 3 0
4 4 0
4 4 0

W L T
6 2 0
6 3 0
3 5 0
2 6 0
West
W L T
5 3 0
5 4 0
4 5 0
2 6 0


Pet PF
.750 182
.750 219
.500 143
.000 150

Pct PF
.625 224
.625 217
.500 165
.500 193

Pot PF
.750 174
.667 196
.375 152
.250 167
Pct PF
.625 183
.556 235
.444 239
.250 154


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 216 160
Philadelphia 5 3 0 .625 198 181
Washington 4 4 0 .500 155 170
Dallas 1 7 0 .125 161 232
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 7 2 0 .778 222 175
New Orleans 6 3 0 .667 201 151
Tampa Bay 5 3 0 .625 157 190
Carolina 1 7 0 .125 88 184
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 221 143
Chicago 5 3 0 .625 148 133
Minnesota 3 5 0 .375 156 168
Detroit 2 6 0 .250 203 188
West
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 4 4 0 .500 140 141
Seattle 4 4 0 .500 130 181
Arizona 3 5 0 .375 157 225
San Francisco 2 6 0 .250 137 178
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 26, Baltimore 21
Today's Games
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Miami, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay, New
Orleans
Monday's Game
Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 18
Chicago at Miami, 8:20 p.m.
NFL Leaders
AFC Individual Leaders
Week 9
Quarterbacks
Alt Corn Yds TO Int
V. Young, TEN 122 72 998 9 2
P. Rivers, SND 329 215 2944 19 8
Garrard, JAC 149 101 1098 13 7
P. Manning, IND 351 228 2478 16 4
Brady, NWE 261 166 1826 14 4
Orton, DEN 316 195 2509 12 5
Cassel, KAN 214 125 1412 12 4
Flacco, BAL 263 160 1917 12 6
Schaub, HOU 267 170 2005 10 7
Fitzpatrick, BUF 227 136 1499 13 7
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Foster, HOU 157 864 5.50 74t 9
McFadden, OAK 139 757 5.45 571 4
Johnson, TEN 178 721 4.05 76t 8
Charles, KAN 113 719 6.36 56t 2
Mendenhall, PIT 168 702 4.18 50t 7
Jones-Drew, JAC 162 645 3.98 24 1
Hillis, CLE 133 644 4.84 48 7
R.Rice, BAL 153 606 3.96 30 2
Benson, CIN 161 599 3.72 22 3
Tomlinson, NYJ 124 591 4.77 31 5
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Wayne, IND 60 724 12.1 42 3
T. Owens, CIN 55 770 14.0 781 7
B. Marshall, MIA 52 618 11.9 46 1
Gaffney, DEN 45 516 11.5 28 1
Collie, IND 45 502 11.2 731 6
Bess, MIA 44 451 10.3 26t 3
Welker, NWE 44 355 8.1 27 3
A. Johnson, HOU 43 635 14.8 48 3
B. Lloyd, DEN 42 878 20.9 71 4
S. Johnson, BUF 41 554 13.5 45 6
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Mi. Thomas, JAC 15 170 11.3 49 0
E. Royal, DEN 14 155 11.1 32 0
Mariani, TEN 13 142 10.9 38 0
Parrish, BUF 12 131 10.9 33 0
Bess, MIA 11 119 10.8 18 0
Leonhard, NYJ 16 172 10.8 32 0
Arenas, KAN 18 166 9.2 36 0
Jac. Jones, HOU 12 107 8.9 39 0
Cribbs, CLE 11 95 8.6 17 0
Ky.Wilson, NYJ 11 91 8.3 15 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Bra. Smith, NYJ 22 675 30.7 86 0
Br.Tate, NWE 26 751 28.9 103t 2
Mariani, TEN 28 746 26.6 981 1
E. Sanders, PIT 15 391 26.1 48 0
D.Thomas, DEN 11 282 25.6 65 0
Spiller, BUF 30 763 25.4 95t 1
Karim, JAC 19 476 25.1 51 0
T. Underwood, JAC19 473 24.9 53 0
Jac. Jones, HOU 15 370 24.7 35 0
J. Ford, OAK 22 535 24.3 94t 1
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
A. Foster, HOU 10 9 1 0 60
Gates, SND 9 0 9 0 54
Hillis, CLE 8 7 1 0 48
Chr. Johnson, TEN 8 8 0 0 48
Britt, TEN 7 0 7 0 44
Tolbert,SND 7 7 0 0 44
BoweKAN 7 0 7 0 42
Marc. Lewis, JAC 7 0 7 0 42
Mendenhall, PIT 7 7 0 0 42
T. Owens, CIN 7 0 7 0 42
Kicking


Janikowski, OAK
D. Carpenter, MIA
Bironas, TEN
Vinatieri, IND
Folk, NYJ
Cundiff, BAL
Rackers, HOU
J. Reed, PIT
Nugent, CIN


FG LG
22-29 54
19-22 54
15-16 55
14-16 48
16-19 56
14-17 49
13-15 53
14-20 53
14-18 54


Crrinus CoumN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the record


F/orida LOTTERY =


I FloridaLottry
Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
8-7-2
CASH 3 (late)
1-5-0
PLAY 4 (early)
7-7-3-0
PLAY 4 (late)
2-7-4-9

Due to production
issues, Fantasy 5, Lottery and
Power Ball numbers were
unavailable on Saturday.
Please see Monday's edition
of the Chronicle for the
winning numbers.


==On the AIRWAVES=-


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Get Screened
America Pro Modified Series
3 p.m. (ESPN) Sprint Cup: Kobalt Tools 500
3:30 p.m. (VERSUS) Viper Cup Spec Series
9 p.m. (ESPN) NHRA Drag Racing Automobile Club
of Southern California Finals
2:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Sprint Cup: Kobalt Tools 500
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at UNC-Greensboro
BILLIARDS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's Atlanta Classic
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's Atlanta Classic
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Women's Atlanta Classic
BOATING
4 p.m. (VERSUS) Boat Racing OPA Offshore Powerboat
Racing Ocean City
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (10 CBS) Tennessee Titans at Miami Dolphins
4 p.m. (13 FOX) Dallas Cowboys at New York Giants
8:15 p.m. (8 NBC) New England Patriots at Pittsburgh
Steelers.
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Golf Children's Miracle Network
Classic, Final Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Golf Lorena Ochoa Invitational,
Final Round
NHL HOCKEY
5 p.m. (SUN) Minnesota Wild at Tampa Bay Lightning
SKATING
4 p.m. (8 NBC) Figure Skating ISU Grand Prix of Figure
Skating: Skate America
SOCCER
1 p.m. (FSNFL) College Soccer ACC Tournament, Final:
Teams TBA
1 p.m. (SUN) Women's College Soccer NCAA Division 1
Championships: Florida State vs. TBA
9 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS Soccer Western Conference,
Final FC Dallas at Los Angeles Galaxy


Scobee, JAC 18-18 13-13 59
NFC Individual Leaders
Week 9
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds "
Vick, PHL 125 76 1017
Romo,DAL 213 148 1605
E. Manning, NYG 271 178 2075
Brees, NOR 374 261 2587
Rodgers, GBY 303 192 2300
M.Ryan, ATL 288 180 1949
Cutler, CHI 211 128 1671
Freeman, TAM 246 146 1722
Kolb, PHL 153 97 1035
Sh. Hill, DET 208 127 1309
Rushers
Att Yds Avg I
A. Peterson, MIN 180 857 4.76 I
Bradshaw, NYG 153 765 5.00
M. Turner, ATL 155 694 4.48
Gore, SNF 164 691 4.21
S. Jackson, STL 172 676 3.93 ,
L.McCoy, PHL 121 572 4.73
Br. Jackson, GBY 108 460 4.26
Forte, CHI 104 401 3.86 (
Torain, WAS 91 391 4.30
Ivory, NOR 78 382 4.90
Receivers
No Yds Avg I
R.White, ATL 58 796 13.7
Colston, NOR 54 592 11.0
H.Nicks, NYG 51 653 12.8 4
Sa. Moss, WAS 48 604 12.6
St.Smith,NYG 47 517 11.0
Austin, DAL 45 657 14.6 6
Witten, DAL 45 506 11.2
Amendola, STL 45 379 8.4
Fitzgerald, ARI 42 510 12.1
Best, DET 41 356 8.7 7


Pu

D. Hester, CHI
D. Bryant, DAL
B. Banks, WAS
Logan, DET
G.Tate, SEA
Amendola, STL
Camarillo, MIN
Munnerlyn, CAR
Ginn Jr., SNF
T. Williams, GBY


nt Returners
No Yds Ai
18 287 15
14 202 14
17 234 13
16 211 13
14 161 11
21 208 9
21 195 9
14 129 9
13 112 8
21 167 8


Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg
Washington, SEA 24 753 31.4
Logan, DET 27 793 29.4
De.Thomas, WAS 12 336 28.0
S-Howling, ARI 38 1060 27.9
Spurlock, TAM 21 578 27.5
B. Banks, WAS 16 436 27.3
Ginn Jr., SNF 16 419 26.2
Weems, ATL 23 576 25.0
D. Manning, CHI 18 448 24.9
Roby, NOR 24 589 24.5
Scoring
Touchdowns
TDRush Rec
H. Nicks, NYG 9 0 9
Ca. Johnson, DET 8 0 8
A. Peaterson, MIN 8 7 1
Forte, CHI 6 3 3
D. Bryant, DAL 6 0 4
G. Jennings, GBY 6 0 6
Maclin, PHL 6 0 6
Harvin, MIN 5 1 3
R. White, ATL 5 0 5
Best, DET 5 4 1
Kicking
PAT FG
M. Bryant, ATL 20-20 16-19
Akers, PHL 21-21 15-19
Crosby, GBY 26-26 13-18
Gano, WAS 14-14 15-20
Jo. Brown, STL 14-14 14-18
Ja. Hanson, DET 19-19 12-14
Gould, CHI 14-14 12-15
Tynes, NYG 23-23 9-12
Barth,TAM 16-16 11-14


LG TD
101t 2
105t 1
42 0
1021 2
891 1
96t 1
61 0
55 0
62 0
39 0


Ret Pts
0 54
0 50
0 48
0 38
2 36
0 36
0 36
1 32
0 32
0 30


Hartley, NOR 19-19 10-14 46
BASKETBALL
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pet
Boston 7 2 .778
New Jersey 3 5 .375
New York 3 6 .333
Philadelphia 2 7 .222


Toronto


Orlando
Atlanta
Miami
Charlotte
Washington


Chicago
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit


2 7 .222
Southeast Division
W L Pet
5 3 .625
6 4 .600
5 4 .556
3 6 .333
2 5 .286
Central Division
W L Pet
4 3 .571
4 4 .500
4 5 .444
3 4 .429
3 6 .333


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pet
New Orleans 7 0 1.000
San Antonio 6 1 .857
Dallas 6 2 .750
Memphis 4 5 .444
Houston 2 6 .250
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Utah 6 3 .667
Oklahoma City 5 3 .625
Portland 6 4 .600
Denver 5 4 .556
Minnesota 3 7 .300
Pacific Division
W L Pet
LA. Lakers 8 1 .889
Golden State 6 3 .667
Phoenix 4 4 .500
Sacramento 3 5 .375
L.A. Clippers 1 9 .100
Friday's Games
Utah 90, Atlanta 86
Houston 102, Indiana 99
Toronto 110, Orlando 106
Charlotte 93, Washington 85
Minnesota 112, New York 103
Dallas 99, Philadelphia 90
Phoenix 103, Sacramento 89
Oklahoma City 110, Portland 108
Detroit 113, L.A. Clippers 107, OT
Saturday's Games
Utah at Charlotte, late
Orlando at New Jersey, late
Indiana at Cleveland, late
Toronto at Miami, late
Washington at Chicago, late
Boston at Memphis, late
Portland at New Orleans, late
Golden State at Milwaukee, late
Philadelphia at San Antonio, late
Today's Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 2 p.m.
Detroit at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Houston at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


New Jersey at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF
Philadelphia 16 10 4 2 22 53
N.Y. Rangers 16 8 7 1 17 44
Pittsburgh 17 8 8 1 17 52
NewJersey 17 510 2 12 33
N.Y. Islanders 16 4 9 3 11 36
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
Montreal 16 10 5 1 21 39
Boston 13 8 4 1 17 41
Ottawa 16 8 7 1 17 43
Toronto 15 5 7 3 13 32
Buffalo 17 5 9 3 13 44
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF
Washington 16 12 4 0 24 58
TampaBay 16 8 6 2 18 47
Atlanta 16 7 6 3 17 51
Carolina 16 8 8 0 16 49
Florida 14 7 7 0 14 42
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 14 10 3 1 21 48 36
St.Louis 14 9 2 3 21 35 29
Columbus 15 9 6 0 18 41 38
Chicago 18 8 9 1 17 51 53
Nashville 14 6 5 3 15 34 40
Northwest Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 15 9 4 2 20 46 36
Colorado 15 8 6 1 17 52 47
Minnesota 15 7 6 2 16 34 37
Calgary 15 7 8 0 14 43 45
Edmonton 15 4 8 3 11 40 58
Pacific Division
GP W LOT Pis GF GA
Los Angeles 14 11 3 0 22 42 27
Anaheim 18 10 7 1 21 48 54
Phoenix 16 6 5 5 17 42 50
SanJose 14 7 5 2 16 38 34
Dallas 15 8 7 0 16 46 44
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
New Jersey 4, Edmonton 3, OT
Pittsburgh 5, Tampa Bay 1
Colorado 5, Columbus 1
Florida 2, Minnesota 1
Phoenix 5, Calgary 4
Anaheim 4, Dallas 2
Saturday's Games
Ottawa at Boston, late
Washington at Buffalo, late
Vancouver at Toronto, late
Carolina at Montreal, late
Florida at Philadelphia, late
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, late
Colorado at Detroit, late
Chicago at Nashville, late
St. Louis at Phoenix, late
Calgary at San Jose, late
N.Y. Islanders at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Edmonton at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
Anaheim at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
New Jersey at Boston, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

O.. ACING

Sprint Cup
Kobalt Tools 500 Uneup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1.0 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Car Edwards, Ford, 136.389 mph.
2. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 136.25.
3. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 136.24.
4. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 135.741.
5. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 135.665.
6. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 135.547.
7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 135.527.
8. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 135.303.
9. (9) Aric Almirola, Ford, 135.227.
10. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 135.206.
11. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 135.206.
12. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 135.176.
13. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 135.15.
14. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 135.089.
15. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 135.084.
16. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 135.039.
17. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 134.938.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 134.917.
19. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 134.917.
20. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 134.821.
21. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 134.816.
22. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 134.801.
23. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 134.801.
24. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 134.766.
25. (83) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 134.756.
26. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 134.494.
27. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 134.429.
28. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 134.394.
29. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 134.353.
30. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 134.273.
31. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 134.163.
32. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 134.013.
33. (26) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 133.944.
34. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 133.65.
35. (42) J.R Montoya, Chevrolet, 133.625.
36. (55) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 133.61.
37. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 133.492.
38. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 133.383.
39. (64) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 133.343.
40. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 133.319.
41. (71) B. Gaughan, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (34) Tony Raines, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (81) Terry Labonte, Dodge, Past Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (66) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 133.294.
45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 133.225.
46. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 133.107.
Nationwide Series
Wypall 200 Results
Saturday
At Phoenix international Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200 laps, 150 rating,
195 points, $55,900.
2. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 119, 170,
$39,025.
3. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 121.3, 170,
$38,675.
4. (12) Brad Keselowskl, Dodge, 200, 103.9,
160, $27,500.
5.(14) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 200,104.9,155,
$35,918.
6. (17) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 200,107.1,155,
$30,068.
7. (20) Colin Braun, Ford, 200, 84.4, 146,
$30,418.
8. (3) Justin Allgaier, Dodge, 200,109.6,142,
$28,968.
9. (22) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 88.7,
138, $27,603.
10. (8) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 200, 96, 134,
$28,043.
11. (16) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 89.1, 130,
$29,243.
12. (25) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 200, 79, 127,
$26,893.
13. (7) Paul Menard, Ford, 200, 94.4, 124,
$20,675.
14. (9) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 84.6, 121,
$20,165.
15. (23) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 81.3, 118,
$20,030.
16. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 111.3, 120,
$21,670.
17. (15) Coleman Pressley, Chevrolet, 199,
70.4,112, $28,478.
18. (18) Michael Annett, Toyota, 199,71.7,109,
$26,793.
19. (26) Tony Ralnes, Chevrolet, 199,65.7,111,
$25,933.
20. (38) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, 199, 55.4,


Edwards makes


it 2 wins in a row


Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. -Carl
Edwards won the Nation-
wide Series race Saturday
at Phoenix International
Raceway, setting himself up
for a big weekend for
Roush-Fenway Racing.
Edwards dominated the
Nationwide race, leading
153 of the 200 laps while
beating runner-up Kevin
Harvick by 5.210 seconds.
He was that good despite
missing the final practice on
orders from team owner
Jack Roush, who wanted the
driver to concentrate on his
Sprint Cup Series car.
Edwards will start from
the pole in Sunday's main
event He set a track record
in qualifying, and was the
fastest car in all three Cup
practices.
"It's already been spe-
cial," Edwards said of his
weekend. "We've got one
more thing to do, and that's
go win that race. We got the
pole, the win here, it's going
well.
"I am enjoying myself,
that's for sure."
He was skeptical when
Roush told him to skip the
final Nationwide practice,
but Roush said he made the
rare move of stepping in
and giving an order.
"I thought I should take
the heat if it went horribly
bad," Roush said.
So far, so good.
It was Edwards' second
consecutive Nationwide vic-
tory he also won last
weekend at Texas and his
fourth of the season.
Like Edwards, Harvick
skipped the final Nation-
wide practice and was look-
ing forward to Sunday. He's
third in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship
standings, and trails leader
Denny Hamlin by 59 points
with two races remaining.
"It was just a solid day,"
Harvick said. "Always want
to win, but hopefully we can
save that for Sunday."


RUNNERS
Continued from Page B1

Chloe Benoist, Lecanto 19:41;
5. Ariel Grey, Wiregrass Ranch
19:57; 6. Catherine Blaney,
Belleview 20:00; 7. Elise Cedre,
Wiregrass Ranch 20:19; 8.
Alyssa Baladad, Ridgewood
20:33; 9. Sandi Boyington,
Lecanto 20:34; 10. Kelsey Stur-
man, Wiregrass Ranch 20:37;
11. Mikayla Bogulski, Spring-
stead 20:41; 12. Marissa
Tomei, Wiregrass Ranch 20:46;
13. Angela Way, Gulf 20:47; 14.
Nicole Solmonson, Zephyrhills
20:54; 15. Amy Mueller, Ridge-
wood 21:07.
Boys team scores
Wiregrass Ranch 33; 2. Land
0' Lakes 87; 3.Nature Coast
Tech 116; 4. Trinity Mitchell
126; 5. Land O' Lakes Sunlake
153; 6. New Port Richey Ridge-
wood 156; 7. Dunnellon 224; 8.
Belleview 230; 9. Citrus 243;
10. Brooksville Central 251; 11.


CUP
Continued from Page BI

ended all squared and the
tournament was all squared
as the teams headed to the
back nine.
Winning matches for
Seven Rivers were Wayne
Larsen/Reid Callahan 2 and
1 over Jeff Shelton/Nathan
Connor, Chuck
Demicoli/Bob Beaufait 3
and 2 over Steve
Bagby/Jason Russ and Dick
Hutchinson/Bob Sherman 1
up over (IGCC) Eric Evil-
sizer/Billy Shoemaker. The
three winning pairs for the
Inverness Golf & Country
Club were John Martin/Dave
McKean 2 up over Curt
Spring/Tom McLaughlin,
Scott Toumbleston/Jack An-
derson 2 and 1 over Bob Eis-
erman/Jim Moss and Mike
Downing/Chris Bernhard 4
and 3 over Rick Moor-
beck/Dick Laxton. The other


two matches between (IGCC)
Charles Kelly/Mike Russ
and (SR) Jim
Anspach/Sonny McKee and
Lee Schultz/Corey Gibbs
and (SR) Joe Rio/Duke McK-
earney finished all square.
The afternoon session of
alternate shot on the back
nine, however, was a differ-
ent story as Inverness won
six of the eight matches of
alternate shot The only two
teams to win for Seven


Joey Logano, Brad Ke-
selowski and Reed Soren-
son rounded out the top five.
Aric Almirola was sixth,
followed by Colin Braun
and Justin Allgaier. Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. and Steve
Wallace completed the top
10.
Danica Patrick finished
32nd after a rough race. She
had a tire problem after
making contact with Tony
Raines, but also bumped
and banged with Alex
Kennedy for several laps in
the middle of the race.
Kyle Busch, meanwhile,
finished 16th but kept Joe
Gibbs Racing in the lead in
the owner championship
race. Keselowski already
has the driver title locked
up, but Busch has JGR up 41
points over Penske Racing
in what's shaping up to be a
split title.
"We're going all-out at
Homestead. We know it's
not going to be easy," Ke-
selowski said. "We know the
Joe Gibbs Racing cars have
been good at the mile-and-a-
half tracks all season."
Anderson wraps
up Pro Stock title
POMONA, Calif. Greg An-
derson wrapped up his fourth
Pro Stock season champi-
onship and first since 2005,
qualifying fourth Saturday in the
Auto Club NHRA Finals.
Anderson overcame team
owner Ken Black's severe
health issues, a home fire and
a middling regular season to
win the title. He entered the six-
race Countdown in fourth place
and fell to fifth place after the
first playoff race, but won three
of the next four races.
"This has been the most try-
ing and certainly the most re-
warding season since I've been
in drag racing," Anderson said.
"You couldn't have bet me any-
thing in the world two months
ago that this would have hap-
pened so you never give up,
you never give up."

New Port Richey Gulf 253;
12.New Port Richey River
Ridge 296; 13. Lake Weir 299;
14. Spring Hill Springstead 348;
15. Leesburg 383; 16. Lecanto
427; 17. Zephyrhills 491.
Boys Top 15 Individuals
1. Joshua Reilly, Wiregrass
Ranch 16:16; 2. Ryan Pulsifer,
Wiregrass Ranch 16:23; 3.
Hendrix Lafontant, Land 0'
Lakes 16:29; 4. Kenneth Fes-
sel, Sunlake 16:38; 5. Nicholas
Buliga, Gulf 16:40; 6. Timothy
Wenger, Citrus 16:45; 7.
Samuel Hippely, Wiregrass
Ranch 16:48; 8. Nicholas
Kostakis, Mitchell 16:49; 9.
Charles Cacavas, Ridgewood
16:49; 10. Ermias Bireda, Wire-
grass Ranch 16:49; 11. Cody
Van Natter, Brooksville Nature
Coast 16:50; 12. Jacob
Morken, Land O' Lakes 16:59;
13. Tyler Mattera, Wiregrass
Ranch 17:00; 14. Logan
Seltzer, Wiregrass Ranch
17:04; 15. Dillon Oergel, Land
O' Lakes 17:09.

Rivers in this round were
Larsen/Reid and
Anspach/McKee.
The tournament now
shifts to Seven Rivers Coun-
rty Club this afternoon
where the two teams will
once again be paired in
teams on the front nine in a
scramble format And then
it's every man for himself on
the back nine where the 16
players from each club will
face off head-to-head.
Connor, of the brain-chil-
dren behind the event, con-
sidered day one a complete
success. "We've been trying
for three or four years to get
this event started. And now
that it is other clubs are al-
ready calling us letting us
know they want in on it next
year. This is going to grow
and definitely be an annual
thing. In this economy all of
the clubs have to help each
other out and I think this is a
a great way of bringing them
together"
But all of that is tomorrow.


Today there is still a Cup to
win. By day's end one of
these two Citrus County
country clubs will be hoist-
ing the Citrus Cup for the
very first time. It will be a
historic event that will set
the standard and be remem-
bered for years to come.
John Coscia is the sports
editor of the Chronicle and
can be reached at (352) 564-
2928 or atjcoscia@
chronicleonline.com


SCOREBOARD,








CITRI IS C.W )' (FL) CCHRONICLEI


Tigers prevail


Associated Press

No. 2 Auburn and No. 3
TCU faced down early
deficits to stay undefeated
Saturday.
Cam Newton and the
Tigers rolled past Georgia
49-31 after being down 21-7
in the first half, while the
Horned Frogs spotted San
Diego State the first 14
points before going on to
win 40-35.
No. 1 Oregon played at
California later and No. 4
Boise State got to sit back
and watch the other na-
tional championship con-
tender after staying perfect
with a 52-14 victory at Idaho
on Friday night.
Newton seemed unaf-
fected by a tumultuous
week in which it was re-
ported that his father asked
Mississippi State for money
for his son to play for the
Bulldogs. There was some
uncertainty about whether
Newton would play, but he
started and Georgia was un-
able to stop him.
No. 2 Auburn 49,
Georgia 31
AUBURN, Ala. Cam New-
ton responded to allegations of
wrongdoing by passing for two
touchdowns and running for
two more to lead Auburn into
the SEC championship game.
The Tigers (11-0, 7-0) will
face Florida or South Carolina
for the conference title Dec. 4
in Atlanta, and have their eyes
on a national championship.
Newton carried 30 times for
151 yards and completed 12 of
15 passes for 148 yards. He
finished off the Bulldogs in the
fourth quarter with a touchdown
pass that made it 42-31, then
dove over for the final score.
No. 3 TCU 40,
San Diego State 35
FORT WORTH, Texas -
Andy Dalton threw three touch-
down passes to Jeremy Kerley
as TCU rallied from an early
two-touchdown deficit, then held
on to beat San Diego State,
T-he Horned Frogs (-17-0 70
Mountain West) won their 2th
consecutive home game and
clinched at least a share of the
conference title. They also kept
alive their chance to reach the
BCS national championship
game, but it'll be interesting to
see how poll voters react to the
Horned Frogs' closest game of
the season.
No. 6 Wisconsin 83,
Indiana 20
MADISON, Wis. Montee
Ball ran for three touchdowns
in his first start, replacing in-
jured running back John Clay,
and Scott Tolzien threw for


Associated Press
Auburn's Cameron Newton (2) reacts following a second
half Auburn score during a 49-31 win over Georgia on
Saturday at Jordan-Hare Stadium in Auburn, Ala.


three more scores as Wiscon-
sin matched the highest-scor-
ing game by a Big Ten team in
60 years.
The Badgers (9-1, 5-1) put
up the most points by an FBS
school this season and
matched the highest scoring
total by a team in a Big Ten
conference game since Ohio
State's 83-21 victory over Iowa
in 1950.
Ball ran for 167 yards and
freshman James White added
144 yards and two scores in
place of Clay, who missed the
first game of his career after
spraining his right knee last
Saturday.
No. 8 Ohio State 38,
Penn State 14
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Devon Torrence tipped and
snagged an interception and
returned it 34 yards for the go-
ahead touchdown to turn the
tide for the Buckeyes.
, ObioState,-which trailed 14-
3 at half, added scores when a
long pass into double coverage
ricocheted off a defender to
Dane Sanzenbacher for a 58-
yard score and Travis Howard
picked off a pass and brought it
back 30 yards, also in the
fourth quarter.
The victory sends the Buck-
eyes (9-1, 5-1) into a critical
showdown at Iowa next week
tied for first place with Michigan
State and Wisconsin in the
conference.
Northwestern 21,
No. 13 Iowa 17
EVANSTON, I:11. Dan


Persa ruptured his Achilles'
tendon after throwing the win-
ning pass, and Northwestern
handed No. 13 Iowa another
devastating loss.
Persa, who threw for 318
yards, capped an 85-yard TD
drive with a 6-yard pass to Je-
remy Ebert with 6:21 to go to
bring the Wildcats within three.
He finished a 91-yard drive with
a 20-yard TD pass to Demetrius
Fields with 1:22 to play.
Iowa (7-3, 4-2 Big Ten) is
now a long shot to win the Big
Ten title after losing to North-
western (7-3, 3-3) for the fifth
time in six games. Ricky Stanzi
threw for 270 yards but had a
critical interception in the sec-
ond half that started the Wild-
cats' rally.
Notre Dame 28,
No. 15 Utah 3
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Freshman Tommy Rees threw
three touchdown passes in his
first start and Notre Dame used
two Utah special teams mis-
takes to rout the slumping Utes.
Returning from a week off,
Notre Dame (5-5) moved
within one win of becoming
bowl eligible. Utah (8-2), mean-
while, was still reeling from its
47-7 loss to TCU a week ear-
lier. The victory was Notre
Dame's first over a ranked
team since 2006, when the
Irish defeated Penn State.
Robert Blanton blocked a
Utah punt, picked up the ball
and ran in for a TD late in the
opening period. And a fumble
on the second-half kickoff by
star Utah returned Shaky


Smithson was quickly turned
into the first of two Rees-to-
Duval Kamara TD passes.
No. 16 Va. Tech 26,
North Carolina 10
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -
Tyrod Taylor hit Marcus Davis
with a pair of third-quarter TD
passes to lead Virginia Tech.
Taylor threw for 249 yards
while the defense locked down
the Tar Heels, helping the Hok-
ies (8-2, 6-0 ACC) improve to
4-0 in Chapel Hill since joining
the league in 2004.
Virginia Tech entered Satur-
day with a chance to wrap up the
Coastal Division for the fourth
time in six seasons, but Miami's
easy win at Georgia Tech earlier
in the day delayed the Hokies'
coronation. Virginia Tech travels
to Miami next weekend and
needs to win one of its final two
games to wrap up a berth in the
league championship game in
Charlotte on Dec. 4.
No. 19 Oklahoma 45,
Texas Tech 7
NORMAN, Okla. Ryan
Broyles caught three of Landry
Jones' five touchdown passes
and broke a few more Okla-
homa records.
Broyles caught eight passes
for 119 yards and broke Mark
Clayton's career records for re-
ceptions and touchdown
catches at Oklahoma (8-2, 4-2
Big 12). He also eclipsed his
own mark for catches in a sea-
son and now holds almost
every significant receiving
record at the school.
No. 20 Missouri 38,
Kansas State 28
COLUMBIA, Mo.- Blaine
Gabbert accounted for three
touchdown in a strong effort,
while the Missouri defense made
just as many big plays against
error-prone Kansas State.
The Tigers (8-2, 4-2 Big 12)
capitalized on three fumble re-
coveries, two of them huge
swing plays, and scored 17
straight points to put away the
Wildcats (6-3, 3-4)..
Southern Miss 31,
No. 25 UCF 21,
ORLANDO- Austin Davis
threw for 264 yards and four
touchdowns, helping Southern
Mississippi ruin Central
Florida's first game as a
ranked team.
The victory keeps the Ea-
gles in the race for Conference
USA's East Division title.
Davis overcame an early
two-touchdown deficit with
scoring passes of 5 yards to
Johdrick Morris and 23 yards
to Kelvin Bolden that put
Southern Miss (7-3, 4-2) up 17-
14 at halftime. Bolden's second
TD reception broke the game
open early in the fourth quarter.


College Football
Scores
EAST
Albany, N.Y. 24, Wagner 14
Bentley 27, Stonehill 17
Blullton 21, Defiance 16
Bowdoin 26, Colby 21
Brown 35, Dartmouth 28
Bryant 27, Robert Morris 21
C.W. Post 42, Slippery Rock 38
Cent. Connecticut St. 49, Monmouth, N.J. 48,
20T
Clarion 49, Millersville 10
Colgate 31, Bucknell 7
Columbia 20, Cornell17
Cortland St. 20, Ithaca 17
Dayton 41, Marist 34, 20T
Delaware 45, Massachusetts 27
Duquesne 41, St. Francis, Pa. 17
Edinboro 28, East Stroudsburg 25
Endicott 38, Maine Maritime 35
Geneva 30, Westminster, Pa. 24, 30T
Gettysburg 57, Franklin & Marshall 35
Grove City 35, Thiel 21
Holy Cross 37, Lafayette 27
Indiana, Pa. 27, West Chester 10
Lebanon Valley 28, Albright 13
Lehigh 24, Georgetown, D.C. 7
Maine 28, Towson 18
Merrimack 46, Pace 14
Middlebury 42, Tufts 20
Montclair St. 21, William Paterson 8
Morrisville St. 48, W. Connecticut 25
Navy 38, Cent. Michigan 37
New Hampshire 31, Villanova 24
Penn 34, Harvard 14
RPI 29, Merchant Marine 27
Rochester 35, Hobart 34
Rowan 27, College of N.J. 7
S. Connecticut 52, St. Anselm 21
Springfield 26, Union, N.Y. 15
Stony Brook 55, Gardner-Webb 3
Syracuse 13, Rutgers 10
Ursinus 41, Dickinson 21
Washington & Lee 45, Juniata 3
West Virginia 37, Cincinnati 10
Widener 28, Delaware Valley 27
Wilkes 21, King's, Pa.17
Yale 14, Princeton 13
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 21, MVSU 7
Appalachian St. 43, Wofford 13
Bethel, Tenn. 36, Shorter 26
Bethune-Cookman 35, Howard 20
Boston College 21, Duke 16
Bridgewater, Va. 38, Catholic 28
Carson-Newman 49, Tusculum 48
Charleston Southern 42, Presbyterian 39
Chattanooga 48, Samford 14
Christopher Newport 49, Methodist 10
Coastal Carolina 45, Liberty 31
Cumberlands 52, Cumberland, Tenn. 27
Delta St. 41, Lambuth 17
E. Kentucky 42, Tennessee Tech 29
Elon 30, Furman 253
Emory & Henry 27, Guilford 3
Florida A&M 17, Hampton 12
Georgetown, Ky. 24, Belhaven 19
Georgia Southern 28, W. Carolina 6
Glenville St. 28, Shepherd 24
Hampden-Sydney 31, Randolph-Macon 28
Jacksonville 31, Campbell 24
Jacksonville St. 29, SE Missouri 27
James Madison 30, William & Mary 24
Kentucky 38, Vanderbilt 20
Louisiana College 44, Hardin-Simmons 42
Marshall 28, Memphis 13
Maryland 42. Virginia 23
McMurry 28, Mississippi College 17
Miami 35. Georgia Tech 10
Morehead St. 37. Valparaiso 15
Murray St. 61. Austin Peay 35
N.C. State 38, Wake Forest 3
Nicholls St. 37, Northwestern St. 7
Norfolk St. 31, Delaware St. 21
North Texas 23. Middle Tennessee 17
Old Dominion 45, VMI 28
Richmond 15, Rhode Island 6
San Diego 29, Davidson 15
Savannah St. 28. N.C. Central 21
Shenandoah 44, Greensboro 16
South Florida 24, Louisville 21. OT
Southern Miss. 31. UCF 21
Tennessee 52, Mississippi 14
Thomas More 33, Mount St. Joseph 0
Tulane 54, Rice 49
Union, Ky. 47, Faulkner 33
Virginia Tech 26, North Carolina 10


COLLEGE FoOOfBALL


Miami routs Georgia Tech
)l


South Florida's

late kick edges

Louisville

Associated Press

ATLANTA Freshman
Stephen Morris didn't have
to carry Miami in his first
road start, not with four
backs running for touch-
downs and Leonard Hanker-
son making big catches.
Morris only had to avoid
mistakes to help Miami set a
season high in total offense
for the second straight week.
Morris passed for 230
yards and a touchdown to
win the matchup of backup
quarterbacks and Miami
beat Georgia Tech 35-10 on
Saturday to stay alive in the
ACC's Coastal Division.
Morris, making his second
start as Jacory Harris recov-
ers from a concussion, com-
pleted 10 of 18 passes and
did not have a turnover.
"Stephen did a tremen-
dous job ofjust managing the
game," said Miami coach
Randy Shannon.
Lamar Miller, Damien
Berry, Mike James and Graig
Cooper ran for touchdowns
and Hankerson had a 78-
yard touchdown catch as
Miami had a season-high 507
total yards, including 277
yards rushing. The big day
topped Miami's 504 yards be-
hind Morris in last week's 26-
20 win over Maryland.
"If we continue to do this,
we can be a very special foot-
ball team," Shannon said.


Associated Press
Miami quarterback Stephen Morris (17) throws during the
fourth quarter Saturday against Georgia Tech in Atlanta. The
Hurricanes won 35-10.


Shannon said Morris
showed impressive compo-
sure on the field and on the
sideline, including in his
comments to the coach as
the lead grew in the second
half.
"He was standing beside
me and he looked over at me
and said 'You can loosen up
a little,"' Shannon said,
adding "I said to him 'You
can loosen up, too."'
Added Shannon: "He
doesn't get nervous."
Hankerson had three
catches for 132 yards, includ-
ing the long touchdown, his
11th of the season to tie
Michael Irvin's school
record set in 1986.
It marked the second
straight week Hankerson
caught a touchdown pass
from Morris.
"He does what he has to
do," Hankerson said of Mor-
ris. "He makes every drive
count."
Miami (7-3, 5-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference) is chasing


Virginia Tech in the Coastal
Division and will play the
Hokies next week
USF tops Louisville
24-21 on kick in OT
LOUISVILLE, Ky. South
Florida is making a habit of win-
ning close games.
Last week the Bulls needed
late-game heroics to beat Rut-
gers by a point. Against
Louisville on Saturday, the Bulls
again needed to rally in a nail-
biter to notch a 24-21 win in
overtime.
This time, sophomore kicker
Maikon Bonani -who missed
what would have been the
game-winning field goal in regu-
lation hit a 37-yard overtime
field goal to give South Florida
(6-3, 3-2 Big East) bowl eligibil-
ity for the sixth straight season.
"He didn't bat an eye and he
gave me a little wink," South
Florida coach Skip Holtz said of
Bonani's overtime kick. "He
came through in the clutch; I'm
really proud of him."


r" L


Q.,


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Online Contest, Winners Every Week

Win 2 Large Pizzas and

One 2 Ltr. Bottle of Soda .-

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cIT RU COU E


CHRltE 9


SUNDAY, NoviMmiirlt 14, 2010 B5



MIDWEST
Adrian 24, Alma 13
Allegheny 17, Oberlin 14
Army 45, Kent St. 28
Ashland 87, Lake Erie 17
Augustana, Il. 20, Illinois Wesleyan 17
Augustana, S.D. 32, Upper Iowa 0
Bemidji St. 45, Minn.-Crookston 3
Benedictine, III. 35, Wis. Lutheran 14
Bethel, Minn. 19, Augsburg 6
Capital 34, Marietta 31
Case Reserve 28, Carnegie-Mellon 0
Chadron St. 31, Mesa, Colo. 21
Chicago 13, Washington, Mo. 10
Coe 47, Cornell, Iowa 7
Concordia, III. 52, Aurora 45
Concordia, Moor. 24, St. Olaf 21
Concordia, St.P. 32, SW Minnesota St. 14
Crown, Minn. at Minn.-Morris, ccd.
Denison 27, Kenyon 7
Doane 42, Briar Cliff 14
Drake 10, Butler 7
Dubuque 21, Buena Vista 14
Franklin 48, Hanover 25
Grand Valley St. 28, Saginaw Valley St. 7
Hastings 17, Nebraska Wesleyan 14
Hillsdale 31, Tiffin 24
Hope 56, Olivet 21
Illinois St. 27, E. Illinois 23
Indiana St. 30, Youngstown St. 24
Indianapolis 31, Ohio Dominican 17
John Carroll 31, Baldwin-Wallace 28
Lakeland 29, Concordia, Wis. 7
Lindenwood 29, William Jewell 18
Loras 24, Luther 10
Malone 56, Olivet Nazarene 21
Maranatha Baptist 14, Rockford 6
Mary 48, Northern St., S.D. 3
Michigan 27, Purdue 16
Michigan Tech 12, N. Michigan 0
Minnesota 38, Illinois 34
Missouri 38, Kansas St. 28
Missouri Western 48, Fort Hays St. 21
Mount Union 52, Muskingum 0
N. Dakota St. 31, S. Dakota St. 24
Northwestern 21, Iowa 17
Northwestern, Iowa 24, Midland 6
Notre Dame 28, Utah 3
Ohio Northern 35, Heidelberg 14
Ohio St. 38, Penn St. 14
Ohio Wesleyan 47, Hiram 24
Otterbein 37, Wilmington, Ohio 14
Rose-Hulman 40, Earlham 15
S. Illinois 20, W. Illinois 10
Sioux Falls 44, Concordia, Neb. 7
St. Cloud St. 42, Minn. St., Moorhead 16
St. John's, Minn. 49, Hamline 0
St. Scholastica 34, Westminster, Mo. 28
Trine 58, Albion 16
Urbana 32, Notre Dame Coll. 0
W. Michigan 45, E. Michigan 30
Wabash 47, DePauw 0
Wartburg 27, Simpson. Iowa 14
Wayne, Mich. 44, Findlay 27
Winona St. 24, Wayne, Neb. 13
Wis.-River Falls 45, Wis.-Eau Claire 42
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 45, Wis.-Platteville 24
Wis.-Stout 28, Wis.-Oshkosh 14
Wis.-Whitewater 24, Wis.-LaCrosse 0
Wisconsin 83, Indiana 20
Wittenberg 22, Wooster 1
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 47, SW Oklahoma 17
Angelo St. 49, Cent. Oklahoma 35
E. New Mexico 35, Tarleton St. 10
E. Texas Baptist 47, Sul Ross St. 28
Henderson St. 40. West Georgia 6
Incarnate Word 17, Texas A&M Commerce
16 ,
Jackson St. 52, Ark.-Pine.Bluff30 ..
l 10 h .EP I.] T'1 . L 'rEa.- 3
Midwestern St. 28. Northeastern St. 8
NW Oklahoma 31, S. Oregon 26
Okla. Panhandle St. 21, Bacone 20
Oklahoma 45. Texas Tech 7
Ouachita 52. S. Arkansas 34
Prairie View 35, Alcorn St. 27
S. Nazarene 30, Langston 27
Sam Houston St. 20, Cent. Arkansas 13
Stephen FAustin 51, SE Louisiana 14
Trinity. Texas 28, Austin 24
W. Kentucky 36. Arkansas St. 35, OT
W. Texas A&M 52, East Central 21
FAR WEST
BYU 49, Colorado St. 10
Colorado 34, Iowa St. 14
E.Washington 31, S. Utah 24
Montana 27, North Dakota 17
N. Colorado 35, Portland St. 30
Washington St. 31, Oregon St. 14


I









E PRe I.') SUNDAY, N(V[ M IR 14, 2010



ENTERTAINMENT
C4ITRus COUNTY CHRONICLE



Lenon Northern exposure KNOW

-SO YOU KNOW


bIIULUW


rousing

Associated Press

NEW YORK-Juggling
to "Lucy in the Sky with
Diamonds"? Modern
dance, to "Free as a
Bird"? Perhaps not the
usual stuff of a John
Lennon tribute concert.
But looking at the wry,
quirky smiles on Lennon's
face as classic photos of
the Beatle great alter-
nated all evening long on a
screen at the Beacon The-
ater, one couldn't help but
think he would have thor-
oughly enjoyed himself
Lennon, it's still star-
tling to think, would have
turned 70 last month -
and so, even though Fri-
day's trib-
ute was
the 30th in
a series,
this one
had a spe-
cial feel.
Produced
by The-
a t r e John
Within, a Lennon
nonprofit
arts group, the evening
was a benefit for the Play-
ing for Change Founda-
tion, which builds music
schools in poor areas of
the world.
Among the big names
this year: Cyndi Lauper,
who performed "Across
the Universe," a song she
said had gotten her
through some tough times.
Then she recalled how,
singing Beatles songs long
ago with her sister, she
would "be" John and her
sister would stand in for
Paul.
"Not this time, though,"
Lauper quipped, calling
onstage a substitute
"Paul" none other than
Jackson Browne to col-
laborate on '"A Day in the
Life." Earlier, Browne had
the somewhat graying
crowd singing happily
along to "You've Got to
Hide Your Love Away."
Patti Smith was there,
too, with a quirky rendi-
tion of "Strawberry
Fields," before striking an
emotional chord when she
spoke of losing her hus-
band. Yoko Ono, she said,
was an example for her of
how to carry on as a
widow. So she serenaded
Ono with Lennon's "Oh
Yoko," of course. (Ono was
present via video message,
telling the organizers:
'John would have loved
what you are doing.")
Dance, anyone? The
Wendy Osserman com-
pany presented a free-
flowing duet to "Free as a
Bird," nicely capturing
the whimsical song's
mood. The evening's most
curious offering, though,
came from juggler and
YouTube sensation Chris
Bliss, who expertly plied
his trade to "Lucy in the
Sky with Diamonds." On
vocals: Joan Osborne and
Maura Kennedy
At the end of the The-
atre Within's 30th Annual
John Lennon Tribute, all
the artists joined the
house band, led by Rich
Pagano, for a rollicking fi-
nale.
"All we are saying," the
artists sang along with the
audience, "is give peace a
chance."


Associated Press
In this July 4 photo provided by Discovery Communications, Sarah Palln holds her son Trig and watches fireworks on a
beach In Dlliingham, Alaska, as her daughter Piper holds grandson Tripp Johnston as part of a documentary for the TLC
channel. "Sarah Palln's Alaska" portrays the show's heroine as a folksy wife and mother enjoying a whirlwind of adven-
tures amid spectacular settings In her home state. There Is nothing overtly political about It, no televised clues to her po-
litical ambitions. However, throughout the first episode of Palln's eight-part TLC documentary series beginning Sunday,
her outdoorsy Image against the stunning scenery often plays nicely with her familiar political message.

Sarah Palin's reality TVseries a stage political future?

RACHEL D'ORO
Associated Press --


ANCHORAGE, Alaska "Sarah
Palin's Alaska" portrays the show's
heroine as an adventure-loving wife and
mother enjoying a whirlwind of activi-
ties amid spectacular settings in her
home state. There are no overt clues to
her future political ambitions.
However, throughout the first episode
of the eight-part TLC documentary se-
ries beginning Sunday, Palin's out-
doorsy image against the stunning
scenery often plays nicely with her fa-
miliar political message.
One telling scene shows Palin and
members of her family fishing near a
bear and two frolicking cubs. Cut to the
Tea Party darling and her self-suffi-
ciency speech. For months, Palin has re-
ferred to strong Republican female
candidates as "mama grizzlies."
"I love watching these mama bears,"
Palin tells the TLC camera. 'They've got
a nature, yeah, that humankind could
learn from. She's trying to show her
cubs, 'Nobody's gonna do it for ya. You
get out there and do it yourself, guys."'
Translation: Stop relying on govern-
ment
That scene and others are sure to sug-
gest to some viewers that the former
Alaska governor and 2008 Republican
vice presidential nominee is position-
ing herself for a 2012 presidential run.
There are other messages that seem
to conflict with those ambitions, though.
Palin talks about her love of wild
Alaska, offering in one well-known hom-
ily, "A poor day of fishing beats even a
great day at work"
In a promo for the show with a mon-
tage of outdoor scenes, she says, "I'd
rather be doing this than in some stuffy
old political office" and "I'd rather be
out here being free."
Then come the snippets that easily
could fill in as campaign slogans, par-
ticularly with Palin's very political
tweets, Facebook postings and other
media forums. Her Alaska landscapes
also loom larger than life.
"What all this suggests is that she's
crafting her lifestyle and her biography
as typifying a person who's independ-
ent, rugged, resilient, in touch with na-
ture and has learned life lessons that
she can bring into governance if she
moves back into governance," said
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, a University of
Pennsylvania communications profes-
sor who studies political rhetoric.
"It also could be life lessons to get to
lead a better life in the rugged fron-
tiers," Jamieson said. "They have to
have that duo message or this will read
as if it's a political ad."


In this July 2 publicity Image released by TLC, former Republican vice presiden-
tial candidate and Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin is shown by the family boat In Dilling-
ham, Alaska, In a scene from the reality series.


In a scene outside the family's Wasilla
home, viewers see the 14-foot-high
fence the Palins erected when author
Joe McGinniss moved next door to work
on a book about Palin.
"By the way, I thought that was a good
example," Palin says on TLC. "What we
just did, others could look and say, 'Oh,
this is what we need to do to secure our
nation's border."'
The intent of the series is not clear-
is she merely showing off a state she
truly loves with off-the-cuff remarks, or
are these the opinions of the paid Fox
News consultant subtly laying the
groundwork for a presidential bid?
Of course, with a production of this
magnitude, money also could be a pow-
erful motivation.
Palin, who could not be reached for
comment, reportedly was seeking as
much as $1.5 million per episode in
pitching the show earlier this year, ac-
cording to The Hollywood Reporter
TLC, a division of Discovery Communi-
cations, has refused to divulge Palin's
cut from the series, which is produced
by Mark Burnett of "Survivor" fame.
Alaska has a fairly new film office that
offers incentives, including a 30 percent
tax credit to qualifying productions
filming in the state. It's not clear ifTLC's
Palin series is tapping into the program
- Burnett's office did not respond to re-
quests for comment which could
mean the show ultimately would be sub-
sidized by the state.
Alaska film office manager Dave Wor-
rell said he could discuss only produc-
tions that have already received
incentives and Palin's show is not
among them. The program is open to
any production that spends at least


$100,000 in Alaska, with added incen-
tives for Alaska hires, as well as offsea-
son and rural shoots.
History's "Ice Road Truckers," for ex-
ample, spent almost $1.2 million in the
state, earning almost $400,000 in incen-
tives, according to Worrell.
As far as TLC spokeswoman Laurie
Goldberg is concerned, the series is "a
love letter to Alaska."
Well, except for one temporary
Alaskan.
In the debut episode, viewers catch a
glimpse of McGinniss reading on his
balcony as Palin and her family make
snide remarks about the author they say
has intruded on their privacy They
charge that he is writing a hit piece on
them. McGinniss, who has since moved
out, says he was filmed without his
knowledge or consent and he's de-
manding through his attorney that it be
removed from the episode, according to
Slate.com.
The California attorney, Dennis Ho-
lahan, did not return multiple calls
seeking comment Goldberg said she
had no comment and referred questions
to Burnett's office, which also did not re-
turn calls.
If the series is about more than Palin's
love for the state, it would be hard to
overlook the irony of a former governor
who abruptly resigned in July 2009 with
17 months left in her first term. Take the
footage of Palin struggling to climb a
steep rocky slope in Denali National
Park.
'"About halfway up the rock, I did not
know if I was going to be able to finish
the task," she tells the camera. "But I
didn't want to quit I didn't want to quit
in front of other people."


-) 1 .1-, ':


Birthday: The coming solar cycle is looking to be one
where much can be accomplished and many wishes can
be fulfilled for those who are willing to do their part. Any
frustrations you might encounter are likely to be products of
your own impatience.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) The boss won't pay for a lot
of small talk, but s/he will pay well for a superior perform-
ance. When in need of funds, keep your mind and muscles
in motion and your mouth shut.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Even if you believe that
you have some wise suggestions to offer, unless they are
explicitly requested, keep your mouth shut. If things go
wrong, someone will need to be blamed.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Be guarded, because a
curious acquaintance is trying to poke his/her nose into a
private matter between you and another friend. Watch your
step regarding your replies.


Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) You're not likely to be stingy
in your dealings with friends, but do be careful not to let
yourself be maneuvered into an arrangement where you're
asked to pay an unfair share.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Performance speaks louder
than words, so if you have others working for you, set an
example of what you want from them. An old-fashioned pep
talk will not suffice,
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't be afraid to be a bit
more assertive than usual, if that's what it takes to accom-
plish your aims. Do so without being hostile or pushy.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It's not likely that you'll be
prone to being extra careful with issues or things that are
insignificant to you. However, when it comes to something
of great importance it'll be a different story.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) There isn't a chance that
you'll allow important decisions that affect you personally to


be left to others. You'll make sure that any final judgment
calls are approved by you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) You should be able to find
some new ways or places to stretch your dollars, by ana-
lyzing where and what you purchase on a regular basis.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you sense that persons with
whom you associate are a bit intimidated by your strong
personality, try to lighten up a bit, if you have an opportunity
to do so. Let the warmth within you shine through.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Although favors you ask of
others are likely to be granted, there's a strong chance that
they'll have strings attached. If that's the case, handle
things on your own.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Find a way to use your head
instead of your checkbook when getting involved in a new
endeavor with another. Good ideas or strong leadership
can be worth more than their weight in gold.


Lottery numbers
were not available at
press time.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Mega Money: 6 24 27 34
Mega Ball: 17
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $1.1 million
4-of-4 3 $2,495.50
3-of-4 MB 42 $390.50
3-of-4 900 $54
2-of-4 MB 1,370 $24.50
2-of-4 28,993 $2
1-of-4 MB 12,536 $2.50
Fantasy 5:10 19 20 28 29
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 316 $555
3-of-5 9,981 $19
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Fantasy 5: 3 17 23 24 26
5-of-5 2 winners $102,148
4-of-5 320 $102.50
3-of-5 9,768 $9

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
I To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery, Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777,


Today in
HISTORY

Today Is Sunday, Nov. 14,
the 318th day of 2010, There
are 47 days left In the year.
Today's Highlight:
On Nov. 14, 1970, a char-
tered Southern Airways DC-9
crashed while trying to land
in Huntington, W,Va., killing
all 75 people on board, in-
cluding the Marshall Univer-
sity football team and its
coaching staff.
On this date:
In 1851, Herman Melville's
novel "Moby-Dick; Or, The
Whale" was first published in
the United States.
In 1889, inspired by Jules
Verne, New York World re-
porter Nellie Bly (Elizabeth
Cochrane) set out to travel
around the world in less than
80 days. (She made the trip
in 72 days.)
In 1910, Eugene B. Ely be-
came the first aviator to take
off from a ship as his Curtiss
pusher rolled off a sloping
platform on the deck of the
scout cruiser USS Birming-
ham off Hampton Roads, Va.
In 1922, the British Broad-
casting Corporation began its
domestic radio service.
In 1972, the Dow Jones In-
dustrial Average closed
above the 1,000 level for the
first time, ending the day at
1,003.16.
Ten years ago: Pioneer-
ing CBS Radio newsman
Robert Trout died in New
York at age 91.
Five years ago: Alex Ro-
driguez of the New York Yan-
kees won his second
American League Most Valu-
able Player award in three
seasons.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama, on a mission
to repair America's global
standing, told Asian countries
during a speech in Tokyo that
he was determined to en-
gage them as equal partners
in the economy, diplomacy
and security.
Today's Birthdays: For-
mer U.N. Secretary-General
Boutros Boutros-Ghali is 88.
Actress Kathleen Hughes is
82. Jazz musician Ellis
Marsalis is 76. Writer P.J.
O'Rourke is 63. Singer-musi-
cian Buckwheat Zydeco is 63.
Britain's Prince Charles is 62.
Rock singer-musician James
Young (Styx) is 61. Singer
Stephen Bishop is 59. Pianist
Yanni is 56. Former Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice is
56. Actress Laura San Gia-
como is 49. Actor D.B.
Sweeney is 49. Rapper Rev-
erend Run (Run-DMC) is 46.
Actor Patrick Warburton is 46.
Rock musician Nic Dalton is
46. Actor Josh Duhamel is
38. Actor Brian Dietzen (TV:


"NCIS") is 33. Actress Olga
Kurylenko is 31.
Thought for Today: "Ad-
venture is not outside man; it
is within." George Eliot,
English author (1819-1880).


~










C AYNC 'i 14, 2010



COMMENTARY
i I.............. TRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


~71r ~


Associated Press
Fannie Mae Mortgage Help specialists help homeowners with mortgage information at the new Fannie Mae Help Mortgage offices, Wednesday
in Culver City, Calif. Fannie and Freddie Mac provide a low-cost flow of funding to the nation's mortgage markets by buying mortgages from
lenders, packaging them into securities and then selling them to investors.






The curse of MERS



Bypassing county fees may cost banks
CURT ADERSO


CURT ANDERSON
Associated Press
NEW YORK
I t used to be that every time a bank
sold a mortgage, the county land
recording office received a fee. It
wasn't much $30 or so but then
real estate boomed in the 1990s and
banks pooled millions of mortgages into se-
curities that investors bought and sold.
One mortgage transaction became a
dozen or more, and the tab grew ever
larger. So the banks came up with a way
around the fees. And now they are fight-
ing to avoid perhaps tens of billions of
dollars in penalties that have added up
over the years.
In 1997, when the banks' burgeoning
business in mortgage securities was
clashing with the unwieldy nature of writ-
ten forms, the industry created its own al-
ternative, an electronic system that would
track the ever-changing ownership of
home loans.
The banks formed a private company
called Mortgage Electronic Registry Sys-
tems Inc., or MERS. Its motto: "Process
loans, not paperwork." It has registered
more than 65 million loans, three out of
every five on the market.
MERS' owners are all the big mortgage
companies, including Bank of America, Cit-
igroup, Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase and
GMAC. They are all facing a foreclosure-
fraud investigation launched by all 50 state
attorneys general, and all took government
bailout money after the financial melt-
down in 2008.
Counties complained about the lost rev-
enue after MERS was implemented, but
they rarely tried to challenge the new way
of doing business. Now, three years after
the housing crash and two months after al-
legations that some banks submitted fraud-
ulent documents to foreclosure courts,
every aspect of the nation's mortgage ma-
chine is under scrutiny.


Two lawyers in Reno, Nev., have filed
suit in 17 states alleging that banks cheated
counties out of billions of dollars. In Vir-
ginia, a lawmaker has asked the state's at-
torney general to investigate MERS over its
failure to pay recording fees. And every-
where elected officials and class-action
lawyers turn, the back-office procedures of
MERS are being called into question.
The lawsuits challenge MERS' author-
ity to act on behalf of banks or other in-
vestors that own a mortgage. With so
many loans registered to MERS, it's a
claim that goes to the heart of the mort-
gage-fraud scandal.
With MERS ostensibly keeping track of
who owns what, counties still get their pa-
perwork and fees the first time a mortgage
is filed. Typically, that county fee is rolled
into the closing costs homeowners pay
when they buy a new home.
MERS is "an admitted fee-avoidance
scheme," says Robert Hager, the Nevada
lawyer who, along with his partner Treva
Hearne, is filing the suits against MERS
and its bank owners, including the govern-
ment-backed mortgage-finance companies
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Fannie and
Freddie provide a low-cost flow of funding
to the nation's mortgage markets by buying
mortgages from lenders, packaging them
into securities and then selling them to in-
vestors.
The suits were filed in California, Ne-
vada and Tennessee and 14 undisclosed
states where the cases are still under court
seal. Hager and Hearne chose the states
because their laws allow what are called
false claims suits, in which citizens can
take legal action against companies that
may have cheated the government.
The suits allege that by privatizing pub-
lic records, MERS enabled banks to cir-
cumvent American property law and
bypass the counties' fee and paperwork re-
quirements, costing billions of dollars in
lost revenue over more than a decade.
MERS says its process is legal, and that the
fees are not required under its system.


"These are local fees for service; if no
service is needed or requested, no fee is
appropriate," MERS spokeswoman
Karmela Lejarde said in an e-mail.
Assuming each mortgage it tracks had
been resold, and re-recorded, just once,
MERS would have saved the industry $2.4
billion in recording costs, R.K. Arnold, the
firm's chief executive officer, testified in
2009. It's not unusual for a mortgage to be
resold a dozen times or more.
The California suit alone could cost MERS
$60 billion to $120 billion in damages and
penalties from unpaid recording fees.
The liabilities are astronomical because,
according to laws in California and many
other states, penalties between $5,000 and
$10,000 can be imposed each time a record-
ing fee went unpaid. Because the suits are
filed as false claims, the law stipulates that
the penalties can then be tripled.
When MERS was created, some county
recorders recognized the potential for lost
revenue. "It smelled like it could be a scam
from hell," said Gary Ott, county recorder
in Salt Lake County, Utah.
From the beginning, many county officials
were uneasy about the idea. But most were
loath, and lacked the resources, to take on
the financial industry Those who did com-
plain to legislators and reporters say they had
a hard time getting anyone to take notice.
"People blew whistles, but a lot of people
weren't paying attention," says Christopher
Peterson, a University of Utah law professor
who has written about MERS and consulted
with Hager on the lawsuits in California and
Nevada. "It's not like MERS makes good TV"
A few county recorders took bold stands.
In one prominent case, Edward Romaine,
then recorder of deeds for New York's Suffolk
County, refused to accept MERS recordings.
He argued that not only would the county lose
out on fees $1 million in one year alone
- but that MERS failed to even maintain a
clear chain of title on a property. He got
backing from New York's attorney general.
See ,Page C4


Fixing Florida: More business, fewer entitlements


Election Day is over, and now
is the time for the hard work
to begin. The new class of
elected officials has been given a
mandate by the people: Fix it!
However, we have not been told
to fix it just for today or tomorrow,
but to fix it so that the state of
Florida will continue to be the Sun-
shine State.
We have not been told to fix it
only so people will retire or vaca-
tion here, but because we owe it to
our future. We must instead look to
write legislation to clear out red
tape so that businesses can prosper
and our state can be vibrant once
again.
This is not just for our genera-
tion, but for our children and our
children's children. Our legislation
must be done so that we can pros-
per 30 years from now. This pros-
perity must not come from


boom-and-bust industries such as ral advantages, such as our prox-
tourism and construction, solely, imity to the Panama Canal, and en-
We must instead encourage the sure a strong infrastructure so that
growth of industry, support our Florida can be open for business.
agriculture industry so We also must not fail
it may thrive again and our children. We must
create incentives for foster an education sys-
small businesses. tem, in addition to the
The people of the college track, which en-
state are asking for one courage education
thing: leadership. We ending in industry cer-
must provide leader- -' tification so that we
ship by telling them the have a strong base of fu-
hard truth the state ..____ ture employees for the
cannot support the enti- Jimmie T. Smith businesses we will en-
tlements at the levels GUEST courage to come to
we spend now. Our Florida.
overregulation of busi- COLUMN How can we expect to
ness has caused corpo- attract corporations


rations to go to other states. We
cannot allow this to continue and
must work to create a thriving busi-
ness environment for Florida
through the utilization of our natu-


when we lack a skilled workforce
needed to fill factories, work in
shipyards and continue to con-
struct our infrastructure? With the
support of the people who have


sent the message "fix it," we can.
We are going to cut spending! We
will test things on the basis of needs
and wants. We will push to strictly
enforce regulations which are
needed while also working to cut
out overburdening rules and regu-
lations. We will also work to
strengthen our education system to
make sure that we have educated
and skilled labor for our future
workforce.
These things can be done and we
in the state of Florida will do it, we
will fix it. The state of Florida will
be a state that we will be proud of
and one we can turn over to our
children and their children 30
years from now!
--

State Rep. Jimmie T Smith
represents District 43, which
includes Citrus County:


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Waiting


won't fix


anything
While visiting m3
daughter ir
Rhode Islanc
last weekend, I was taking
an early morning wall
through a city park in hei
Cranston neighborhood.
As I have gotten older
I've developed a strange
habit of talking out loud t(
myself when I think I'rr
alone. Most times, I don'!
even know I'm doing it
But on this cold morn
ing, while walking on E
path beside a fog-coverec
lake, I said out loud, "Wha
a beautiful morning."
"It certainly is," cami
the response.
I had a clear view of m
surroundings and I couldni
see another human being
There were some ducks or
the lake, but I was hoping
the ducks weren't talking t(
me because, from a menta
health standpoint, it wouk
be pretty hard to explain.
"It is a little cold',"
replied aloud in an effor:
to determine if the duck
were in fact talking an<
my screws had official:
come loose.
See WINDOW/Page C


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GR AY


We reserve

the right to

edit letters...'
t's a common misun-
derstanding. People
look to the Chronicle
as a means to voice theii
opinions, yet when we re-
ject letters to the editor
one can pretty much sil
back and wait to hear
"How dare you deny me
my right to free speech?"
A case in point arose
Friday The writer was
cordial in his request anc
cordial albeit seem
ingly a bit frustrated ir
response to our response(
to shorten the letter an(
tame some phrasing.
The writer seems a goo<
person, concerned about
an excellent cause and h<
offered some valuable corn
mentary But-- paraphiras
ing from our response t(
him: "The terms 'harass
ment,' 'egomaniac control
freaks' and even 'I refus(
to use the term Gestapo
like ...' aren't suitable foi
publication and have th(
potential to expose the
newspaper to liability."
The suggestion tc
rewrite the letter was in.
terpreted as censorship
and a violation of free
speech, so the author optec
to withdraw it entirely
Here's the thing: News-
papers are businesses
They're not government'
agencies. They're not In
ternet chat rooms. They'n
not an unrestrained vehi
cle for anyone and every
one to insult and injure
See SHAI. ;'Page C3


I










"To be always ready a man must be able to
cut a knot, for everything cannot be untied."


OPINION


CITRUS CouNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
SEDTORIAL BOARD
Gerry M ulligan..........................................publisher
Charlie Brennan ...................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ............... ..............HR director
Cheri Harris............................... features editor
Curt Ebitz................................. citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ............................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ............................. guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

:. ,' ...






Pro-Line's




departure




a gloomy




prospect


News that the president
of the parent company
of Pro-Line Boats is
considering relocating its man-
ufacturing facility from Ho-
mosassa to North Carolina -
or anywhere outside of Citrus
County couldn't
come at a worse THE I1
time.
Citrus County Pro-Lin
unemployment consider
has only recently
fallen below 14 OUR OP1
percent, fewer
than 200 new sinkingHe o
homes are ex- sinking
pected to be built
here this year, and more than
500 job-seekers came to Inver-
ness to apply for 165 positions
last month at the new Olive
Garden by mid-afternoon on
the first day of hiring.
Although always at the mercy
of the ebb and flow of the econ-
omy, Pro-Line Boats has re-
mained a fresh breeze of diversity
in our largely service- and retail.:
based business community.
In late 1998 and early 1999,
Pro-Line employed about 425
employees and its payroll was
about $10 million. Through the
years, that number has fluctuated.
In 2008, Pro-Line cut its
workforce from about 225 to
110 employees, and in Novem-
ber 2008, about 100 workers


Only the strong
To the lady in Wednesday morn-
ing's paper that said if we repeal
the health care reform, we need
to repeal Medicare. I don't guess
she knows that I pay for my
Medicare. It is not free. I pay a
monthly premium for my
Medicare. I paid into Social Secu-
rity for 40 years. I think I'm
vested. The health care bill is a
bill for me to pay for the
weak, lame and lazy, and
I'm tired of it.
Bad timing
Who are the brilliant
people who decided to do
the work on (U.S.) 41
from now until May when
all the snowbirds are here
instead of from May until Cu .-
November when there are
no snowbirds here? 563-(
Somebody is not thinking.
Gophers be gone
Does anyone know how to get
rid of these yard gophers?
Editor's note: Contact the county
extension service at (352) 527-
5700.
Dirt dump
To the person inquiring about
all the dirt being dumped next to
Walgreens on (County Road) 486.
It is the excess dirt from (County
Road) 491's widening. It is being
dumped there to fill an empty
lot. This answer was in Sound Off
recently.


IE
r


L


0
I


were laid off. In parts of 2009,
the company stayed afloat with
a skeleton crew of about 12 to
14 people.
When American Marine Hold-
ings, Pro-Line's parent company,
sold shares to private investors
in 2009, it created
SSUE: hope that re-
launching the
e boats manufacturer
*s move. would mean more
local jobs.
4INION: The prospect of
seeing this local
nes that company sail into
feeling, the sunset is dis-
couraging, partic-
ularly because earlier this
year, the company reported
boat sales on the rise and the
climate for new business show-
ing signs of improvement.
It also underscores the na-
ture of the economic climate in
which communities compete to
retain or lure employers, and
the need for those represent-
ing Citrus County to vigorously
participate.
We urge the Citrus County
Commission, Economic Devel-
opment Council and other
local business leaders to do all
in their power to keep this
valuable company here and,
even if Pro-Line does weigh
anchor, to be persistent in ef-
forts to reel it back.


Full stop
This is about Crystal River Pri-
mary and picking up students
from school in the afternoon. Too
many cars are treating a stop sign
as a yield sign. They need to get
the sheriff out there and watch
the cars that are stopping or just
yielding through a stop sign in
front of the school. It's not the one
they usually cut through at the
end, but at the front of
the school. Cars are just
JND yielding right through it.
W Thanks, Frank
We want to thank you
so very much for your ar-
ticle by Frank Yuelling. It
was incredible. It's so
true. And please know
0a4 there's a lot of injustice
)f579 going on about the little
) cats and doggies. A poor
old man's being fined for
feeding cats a 99-year-
old man in this county. Please
help Frank Yuelling Jr., and have
more articles.
Kind stranger
I just want to do a Sound Off to
the lady and her husband that
were at Thai food restaurant by
Save-A-Lot. We are a low-income
family with a baby and we walk a
lot and this woman must have
seen us. She gave us some money
to hold us over and just said,
"Merry Christmas," and walked
away. I just want to say God bless
to that woman. Thank you.


An election of rejections


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
Balance the budget is not a
legislative program any
more than hope and
change is an effective strategy for
governing. The tea party Repub-
licans won their elections spout-
ing buzzwords and platitudes
without saying how they will
reach the promised land of bal-
anced budgets without cutting
defense spending or entitlements
like Social Security and
Medicare.
They got away with it because
the election wasn't about them -
it was about the Democrats. It
was a rejection election, a chance
for voters to register their dis-
pleasure with the state of the
economy and a recovery that re-
wards the folks on Wall Street,
who created the problem, while
Main Street lags behind.
But now that the Republicans
control the House, they won't be
able to hide behind slogans like
"big government takeover," and
the voters will get a clearer un-
derstanding of what they actually
propose to do with their new-
found power. Exhibit A will be
the health care reform law which
Republicans promise to repeal.
They will likely hold one sym-
bolic vote after another in the
House dismantling the bill, but
whatever passes will likely die in
the Senate, or fall to President
Obama's veto pen.
The benefit of the process is
that the voters will get a crash
course in what the Republicans
have in mind, and the answer is


== Other
"not much." They had a grand
time on the campaign trail demo-
nizing Obama's health care plan
as socialism, but they didn't offer
an alternative plan. Instead, they
promised to keep the parts of the
bill that they like, such as no
penalty for pre-existing condi-
tions, allowing young adults to
stay on their parents' plan until
age 26, and no cap on lifetime
benefits (a huge relief for the
chronically ill).
They pledged to end the man-
date on individuals to purchase
health insurance. Anybody who
knows anything about how the in-
surance industry works recog-
nizes the impossibility of
requiring companies to lift re-
strictions on whoever they cover
without the guarantee of a much
larger pool of customers to
spread the risk. In other words,
without the mandate, and with-
out government regulation, all
those goodies that Republicans
say they like would be gone.
Medicare is a particularly
thorny issue. In the midterm elec-
tion, Democrats lost seniors by 18
points. Today's older voters are
solidly in the Republican camp in
large part because they believe
the health care reform bill will
impact them negatively Republi-
cans campaigned on a pledge to
seniors to repeal the $500 billion
in government money slated to be
shifted from Medicare Advantage
plans to help pay for expanded
coverage for the millions of
Americans without coverage.


That $500 billion is a federal
subsidy to insurance companies
to encourage them to recruit
more seniors away from fee-for-
service plans into Medicare Ad-
vantage plans, which they did by
expanding benefits beyond the
basic Medicare plan to include
dental and vision coverage, and
in some cases, gym benefits.
There is nothing in the health
care reform legislation that takes
away these extra benefits, and in-
surance companies are doing
quite well in their profit margins.
Republican forecasts of major
cuts are wildly exaggerated, but
there could be some shrinkage of
benefits initiated by various in-
surance companies with or with-
out the new law in place.
If Republicans truly want to cut
the deficit, assailing the very
minimal steps that Democrats
have taken to curb Medicare costs
will only make it tougher to get
spending under control. The core
of health care reform, the mar-
ket-oriented health exchanges
where people can shop for differ-
ent plans, won't be in place until
2014. In the meantime, insurance
premiums will likely rise, and
that is the crux of the problem
which both parties must address.
A rejection election recognizes
the problems; it doesn't solve them.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift
author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 by Drew Pearson.


to the Editor=--


Values voting
President Clinton ended his
presidency with a substantial
surplus. Fast forward eight years
for the Bush years and two wars.
As of Oct 23, we have spent
$739,039,057,623 (and counting)
on the Iraq war. These figures do
not include war and
$357,934,738,423 (and counting)
on Afghanistan. Then, add the
cost of ongoing military medical
care and permanent lifetime dis-
ability benefits owed as a result
of these two wars.
There appears to be no money
available except for the wars.
So where does this end? If pa-
triotic Americans would fight in-
vaders and occupiers of our
country, is it reasonable to ex-
pect the Afghans and Iraqis to do
likewise? Lest we forget, the
Sept 11 terrorists were all Saudis.
When and how will we know
when we have won? Since ter-
rorists are mobile, European
countries are handling terrorists
as an international police matter.
Regarding the economy: One
in seven Americans is living in
poverty. It was recently reported
that the Florida unemployment
rate was 11.9 percent.
Citrus County has a large per-
centage of retirees collecting
government pensions and/or So-
cial Security benefits, SSI dis-
ability benefits, unemployment
benefits, Medicaid, or if lucky, a
decent paying job.
On Oct 31 an article on
"wealth" reported the astound-
ing wealth inequity existing in
the U.S. The top 20 percent of
earners own close to 84 percent


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the newspaper's editorial board.
M Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including e-mailed letters.
W We reserve the right to edit letters
for length, libel, fairness and taste.
M Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
M SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River,; FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com".

of the nation's wealth. The other
80 percent of us are left with 16
percent of the wealth. Some peo-
ple made their fortunes legally,
some illegally, and the most for-
tunate inherited their share.
The Republicans want to ex-
tend the current 10-year Bush tax
cuts, which benefits the wealthy.
Under President Obama, the Bush
tax cuts will end. Households with
incomes under $250,000 will be tax
exempt How many Citrus County
voters are fortunate to have more
than $250,000 yearly income?
Everyone has their own per-
sonal "values," and contrary to
the fear-mongers, no one is
threatening to "take away" any
of your values.
So, voters, concentrate on vot-
ing your economic interests, in-
stead of for the benefit of the
obscenely wealthy
V. Nero
Inverness


Fire victims say thanks
On Oct 10, we had a fire at our
home. We are all doing fine and
beginning to get our lives back in
order. We wanted to thank all of
our friends and neighbors who have
generously donated money and
clothing, offered words of concern
and support, and rallied around us
during this difficult time. We would
especially like to thank the fol-
lowing people and organizations:
The Crystal River Volunteer
Fire Department: You are all
true professionals, and we will
be eternally grateful.
The wonderful members of
the Crystal River Women's Club,
especially Mary Lou Rothen-
bohl, Margie Harper, Pauline
Thomson, Ruth Samuda, Mary
Lee Johnson; we are humbled by
your kindness and generosity.
The Woodland Estates Home-
owner's Association, especially
Jane Leuder, Mary Clark, Caryn
Poloske, Carole Aylward, Holly
and Hiawatha Terrace (please
forgive me, I forgot your last name!),
the Ladies ofKut 'n Krew and the
dear children at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian School. Your con-
cern and thoughtful gifts made
this stressful situation so much
easier for them. The clothing,
shoes, book bags and games were
all very considerate. We are so
touched by your love and goodwill.
The caring people of this com-
munity make it a special place to
call home. In our time of crisis, you
were all there for us. Our sincer-
est thanks and God bless you.
Charles and Mary
Wentzell and family
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely.,thase of the callers.


PHe""8 Fr elvwic


Bunn 1.6,


~I









SUNDAY, NoviMj3II 14, 2010 C3


Some things pass away; others are ours to keep


e "T- little GTO, you're
really looking'
fine, three
deuces and a four-speed
and a 389. Listen to her
tachin' up now, listen to her
why-ce-eye-ine, c'mon and
turn it on, wind it up, blow it
out GTO!
"Gonna save all my money
and buy a GTO, get a helmet
and a roll bar and I'll be
ready to go. Take it out to
Pomona and let 'em know,
that I'm the coolest thing
around, little buddy gonna
shut you down, when I turn
it on, wind it up, blow it out
GTO!" John Wilkins, 1964.
Many of us automatically
give credit for this song
about the GTO to the Beach


Boys or maybe Jan and
Dean, and both of those
groups did cover it, but ac-
cording to my research, it
was Ronnie and the Day-
tonas who first released it in
1964 the same year that
Pontiac first released the
GTO.
During the last few weeks,
a couple of news items have
made me groan:
First, I read about the
passing of Barbara Billings-
ley Mrs. Cleaver, the
Beaver and Wally's mom -
the lady who cleaned house
and cooked supper wearing
high heels and a strand of
pearls, all right in front of
our eyes on television.
Barbara lived to be 94,


and I have every reason to
believe she was a nice lady,
but she did in fact leave


some of us boys
with an unrealis-
tic image of what
to expect when
we got married.
No matter.
My wife never
wore pearls nor
high heels to do
her chores, and
by the time we'd
been married six
months, she was
into maternity
smocks, but re-


Fred Br

i i.
:... .. A


gardless of how she dressed,
Cheryl was (and still is) the
prettiest housewife I've ever
seen.


Next, I saw that General
Motors has discontinued the
Pontiac brand.
The very first
S time I remem-
,.., ber seeing a
,.M Pontiac I be-
lieve it was a
new 1953 Sky
Chief-- I wasn't
'- yet old enough
to be impressed
with its engine,
rannen but I was totally
in awe of the
hood ornament,
E.* which was the
face of a native


American chief made from
an iridescent, amber-like
substance. It was cool. It
was very cool!


GTOs were produced be-
tween 1964 and 1974, and
some say they were the first
true "muscle" cars. No
doubt many owners of vin-
tage Corvettes and Thun-
derbirds will take
exception, but it is, nonethe-
less, what some say.
I bought my first car in
1964, and just like everyone
else my age, I wanted a
brand new GTO but just
like most of my associates, I
couldn't afford one. I chose
instead a used red 1962
Ford Fairlane 500 Sports
Coupe. My car was nothing
to be ashamed of, and while
she insists it was me and not
my wheels that impressed
her, the little red Ford was


what I was driving when I
began dating my Cheryl.
Yes, as life passes, there
are some things which pass
away; and although I was
saddened by the passing of
Barbara Billingsley and the
discontinuation of the Pon-
tiac, I wouldn't swap the
memories made in my little
red Ford nor the good times
Cheryl and I have shared
without her wearing high
heels and pearls to do
housework, for anything -
these are ours to keep until
we pass away!

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and a
Chronicle columnist


Indigent care is not



CMH's main problem


Special to the Chronicle
r. Steven Campbell's diatribe
against physician colleagues and
the Hospital Trustees in support of
CMHS management is lacking a key ingre-
dient: Accuracy
Dr. Campbell states there are "no skele-
tons in (my) closet" no business rela-
tions with CMHS. Has he forgotten that the
Foundation voted him $14,040 per year to
perform 104 hours of work for CMHS at
$135/hour?
He berates physicians in private practice
for "cherry picking" favoring patients who
pay well and turning the poor over to the
hospital. And yet it's my understanding that
Dr Campbell does not accept low-paying
elective Medicaid patients or Health De-
partment patients in his private practice.
Much is said about being unable to care
for the poor if the Trustees do not release
all tax money collected to the hospital. Dr.
Campbell fails to note that Citrus Memorial
Hospital is reimbursed for every penny it
spends on providing care to the poor from
several sources in addition to taxes paid
by Citrus County property owners. In fact,
until the Trustees exposed them, the hos-
pital was getting money from several
sources for treating the same poor patient
"Dr. Fallows does not currently practice
medicine at CMH nor has he ever prac-
ticed medicine at CMH." Really? In Octo-
ber 2007 I chose to resign from staff
because a procedure I offered my patients
was not thought profitable enough to be
supported by CMHS. I have since per-
formed this procedure 83 times at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center (SRRMC).
Apparently they know something CMHS


'does not about how to make a profit.
Dr. Campbell questions why I monitor
the Foundation Board meetings. Simple. I
was elected to represent 90 of Dr. Camp-
bell's colleagues who are deeply con-
cerned about what effect continued losses
at CMHS might have on its ability to pro-
vide quality care.
Does Dr. Campbell believe that only
physicians who work at CMHS should
have a voice in how our tax-supported hos-
pital is managed? What about taxpayers?
We all foot the bill for poor management.
All taxpayers are vested in the process of
turning this hospital around.
He complains about physician practices
which compete with CMHS. Why? Compe-
tition reduces the cost of medical care. As
an example, a cataract surgery performed
at CMHS would cost Medicare 65 percent
more than at an ambulatory surgery center.
Dr. Campbell finds it "easy to under-
stand why the hospital is struggling when
one considers the amount of uninsured
care provided to the community by CMH."
Had Dr. Campbell checked his facts, he
would have learned that Seven Rivers
RMC provides indigent care comparable
to CMHS, while making a profit in the
same market as CMHS. Seven Rivers re-
ceives no local tax support and pays prop-
erty, sales and income taxes.
The problem seems to be management
That's something easily fixed. With new
management at CMHS, the hospital could
turn toward profitability, and trust could
be restored between the medical staff and
administration.

Dr Mark Fallows is president of the
Florida Wellcare Alliance.


Critical pontificators?



No, just involved citizens


THEODORA C. RUSNAK
Special to the Chronicle

n response to the Nov. 5,2010, editorial:
There are lots of folks who sit on the
sidelines and talk about what an awful
job our elected officials do. And there are
lots of critics who attend every
board meeting and pontifi- Those de
cate about the bad decisions ,
made by politicians., in th6
As someone who speaks rit
regularly at the meetings of as Criti
the Board of County Com- rally C
missioners, I read this edi-
torial with more than a exercisil
passing interest Even when
representingtheCitrus County First Aml
Council, the voice of 17 rih to
homeowner, civic and envi- right to
ronmental groups and asso- the gove
ciate members, the time limit
at the podium is 5 minutes for a re(
maximum to speak, so the
opportunity to "pontificate" grievaI
is thereby seriously truncated.
Those described in the editorial as "crit-
ics" are really citizens exercising their
First Amendment right to "petition the
government for a redress of grievances."
Or, if you prefer a simpler version of the
same sentiment, "It is the duty of the pa-
triot to protect his country from the gov-
ernment!" (Thomas Paine, 1792.)
And what about the admission of the
"bad decisions that are made by politi-
cians?" Is the humble taxpayer expected
to accept bad decisions without comment?
Not in my country, thank you!
To paraphrase President Theodore
Roosevelt, "To announce that there must
be no criticism of the Government, or that


Iic





I&

1r


we are to stand by the Commissioners re-
gardless of their decisions, is not only un-
patriotic and servile, but is morally
treasonable to the American public."
(Kansas City Star, May 7, 1918)
My colleagues, Chris Lloyd (1000 Friends
of Florida) and Al Grubman (Too Far Inc.),
are also frequent contributors
scribed to the deliberations of our
commissioners, speaking, as
editorial in the case against water pri-
9V vatization, against capricious
OS are staff raises, or two weeks ago,
citizen in defense of residents from
Tarawood, Floral City. We ac-
ig their cept and welcome the oppor-
tunity to advocate for the
hndment public interest and educate
our government officials.
petition Tuesday, Nov 2, was the final
rnment meeting for Commissioners
Gary Bartell and John Thrum-
ress of ston, the former having served
s 20 years and the latterfouryears.
iCOS. Who took the podium to ex-
press thanks to them? It was
not the Chamber, the EDC, the Realtors or
the Builders Association.
No, it was those same critics whom the
editorial castigates as prone to "pontifi-
cate." Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Grubman and myself
were the only people who took the time to
express our thanks.
Homeowner associations, residents and
voters are warmly welcome to join Citrus
County Council and may contact us via our
new website www.citruscountycouncil.org,
or by calling me personally at 746 3006.

Theodora C. Rusnak is president
of the Citrus County Council.


Sound OFF


Bottleneck
This is in reference to the traf-
fic following the Veterans Day
Parade on Tompkins and Pine
streets. I think we need some
more directions for semis be-
cause they're all lined up on
Pine Street and they couldn't
even get out because they didn't
know where they were going be-
cause they don't even live
around here. We need some
more traffic directions during
parades.
Thanks, ladies
I'm a retired USAF veteran and
would like to thank the Crystal
River Women's Club for the won-
derful luncheon they had for
women vets. The delicious food
was graciously served by four
women from the Crystal River
Mission. The decorations were
beautiful and the sing-along of
songs from each branch of the
military brought tears to many
eyes. It was such a warm and
poignant experience. A lot of
hard work was put into it and
was much appreciated. I also
want to thank the town of Inver-
ness for their awesome parade,
and, last but not least, Apple-
bee's and Ice Cream Doctor for
their veterans' specials on Veter-
ans Day. Citrus County does so
much for their vets. Thank you so
much.
Hats off
Thank you. Hats off to Apple-
bee's for treating all veterans to a
free meal yesterday. It was well
done. Thank you.


High speeds, big crowds More sin taxes Tax the rich


At the parade for our vets on
Thursday, before the parade
started, roads were all blocked
off and a deputy came flying
through there at speeds of prob-
ably 60, 65 mph, sirens blaring.
Everybody thought the parade
was starting and walked over to
the road., I don't know what the
emergency was, but he should
have gone by on a back road. I
mean, children could have been
killed. Everybody was aghast at
this. And 10 minutes later, here
comes another deputy. This was
ridiculous.


The president's deficit commis-
sion is preparing to cut Social Se-
curity benefits and disallow the tax
deductions of interest on mort-
gages to reduce our huge national
deficit. Although lottery tickets are
state-run, how about a federal tax
on them? They're most certainly
not necessary and if you can af-
ford to buy them, you can surely
afford the tax on each one. This
would be the average ticket's,
what, a dollar at 6 percent, it
would be 6 cents. We all can afford
that. Let the federal people start
raising taxes on liquor, as well.


The hotshots in Washington, all
they want to do is keep cutting
the deficit on the backs of the
poor, the people who can least af-
ford a cut in whatever they're re-
ceiving in Social Security and
Medicare and Medicaid. How
about putting those cuts onto the
rich and the people who make at
least $250,000 to $300,000 a
year? They can afford it. We can't.
Get that through your head, you
people in Washington..Rermem-
ber, there's going to beanother
election and unless it's in our
favor, you're going to be out.


No more war
I see where they're going to
work on cutting the deficit and
they say it will hurt. Well, it
seems like whenever they have
to cut, it always hurts Americans
but not foreigners. Get out of
Afghanistan, get completely out
of Iraq and get out of other
countries, all our military. Right
there would save billions a year.
Cut all foreign aid off. You're
promising billions to Pakistan
and Africa and other nations.
Cut all that off. Then cut Con-
gress by 10 percent of the peo-
ple and cut their pay by 50
percent and cut their retirement
by 50 percent. Right there would
save a pile of money. The Ameri-
can people didn't put this deficit
in place. It was the reckless
spending of our government,
who, for some reason, spent it
all overseas and gives money
away like it's water to other
countries, but they always make
the Americans suffer. I know
people on Social Security that
can't even afford homeowners
(insurance) no more.
Cut from tiny slice
I would like to sound off about
the debt committee in Washing-
ton made up of one Republican
and one Democrat. They are pro-
posing cutting domestic spend-
ing, Social Security and, I
understand, some Medicaid,
Medicare. How about cutting for-
eign aid first? Keep our money at
home. If there's any left over and
somebody needs it, then spread
it as far as it will go.


SHADES
Continued from Page C1

those with whom they dis-
agree.
Granted, we want to pub-
lish opinions from multiple
sides of most any issue in
the newspaper, but regard-
less of what angle they're
coming from, there are
some basic parameters that
apply to all. As stated in the


"Opinions Invited" box on
our daily Opinion page, "We
reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fair-
ness and good taste."
It's a judgment call, not a
science. The best bet is to
err on the side of safety.
For us, allowing a letter-
writer to call a specific
group of individuals "ego-
maniac control freaks" is
about as desirable as it
would be for the manager of
a department store to walk


out and see someone spray-
painting that accusation on
the exterior of his or her
business.
We're not lawyers here in
the newsroom, but minimiz-
ing the number of calls we
get from lawyers is a healthy
approach to processing
news and commentary. Is
referring to a group of indi-
viduals as "egomaniac con-
trol freaks" defamatory?
Maybe, maybe not but if
the gut reaction is that it


doesn't feel "fair" or isn't in
"good taste," then this news-
paper business is better off
not publishing the com-
ment.
As for the writer's phrase,
"I refuse to use the term
Gestapo-like ..'.' well, in
refusing to do so, it sure
looks like it was done.
It all boils down to de-
grees of good taste, risk,
fairness, etc. Many op-ed
submissions make accusa-
tions, but phrasing can be


everything. Anytime there's
a personal attack in submit-
ted material, little figurative
red flags should go up. In
certain instances, writers
are responding to previ-
ously published pieces and
there may be a little more
latitude for comment, but
it's on a case-by-case basis.
Send letters. Make your
feelings and observations
known. But be constructive,
not demeaning.
Would you favor allowing


any old Angry Joe to spray-
paint disparaging remarks
willy-nilly on private prop-
erty that you're responsible
for? That's not a constitu-
tional right it's vandal-
ism, and possibly
defamation.

Charlie Brennan is
editor of the Citrus County
Chronicle. He can be
e-mailed at cbrennanc('
chronicleonline. conm.


~ I


CI I RI S (.()I'N Il (FL) (,'JIRONICIJ,-


COMMENTARY









C4 SUtN,w, NoviyMiritu 14, 2010



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

"It sure is," was the re-
spouse.
At that point I looked
up, and sitting in a large
maple tree was a young
teenage boy. He was
wrapped in a blanket and
wedged onto a large limb.
He had obviously spent
some part of the night
sleeping in the tree.
This wasn't a homeless
kid seeking refuge. The
park was in a nice neigh-
borhood and the kid was
well-dressed and groomed
and his blanket was thick
and expensive. He had
some type of handheld
computer/phone in his
hand.
I was guessing the kid
had an argument with his
parents and his solution
was to hide in a tree.
"What are you doing up
there?" I asked.
"Waiting," he replied.
"For what?" I asked.
"For something to hap-
pen," he said.
At that point I decided
not to put on my Travis
McGee hat and attempt an
intervention on the side of
good. I simply continued
my walk and left the kid in
the tree.
As I continued my walk,
it came to me that climb-
ing up and hiding in a tree
was pretty symbolic of
What we as a country have
been doing the past few
years with the problems
that face us.
We've got a government
that is out whack with its
spending, but we refuse to
pay higher taxes and we
don't want to reduce


CrImis COUN'Y (FL) CHRONICLE


spending on programs that
we love. We've elected a
whole new group of politi-
cians to send to Washing-
ton, Tallahassee and
Inverness and all of them
are pledging to make
things right. But if they
come back with the same
answer they want to cut
the programs we love -
are we going to listen or
throw them out of office
during the next wave of
elections?
Are we going to collec-
tively climb up a maple
tree with our blankets and
video games and pout
until things get better?
The national economy is
slowly beginning to im-
prove, but there is still
much sacrifice ahead of
us. And if there is one
thing you can say about
Americans in 2010, we re-
ally are not big on the sac-
rifice thing.
We avoided another de-
pression, but our unem-
ployment rate hovers near
10 percent and millions
have lost their homes to
foreclosure.
My favorite irony is that
folks all over America are
terrified about China be-
coming the next great su-
perpower and how awful
it is that the U.S. Treasury
sells our bonds to the Chi-
nese government. And
then in the very next
breath we run out to the
discount store and buy the
cheap stuff made in China
because it's the best deal.
We can buy stuff made
in America, but it costs
more money and we
Americans love the best
deal.
Things will really get
better when we climb
down out of the maple tree


and get to work.
We need to build things
in this country and buy the
things we make. We need
to reduce the size of gov-
ernment even when it
hurts us as communities
and individuals.
We need to embrace en-
trepreneurs and get the
barriers out of their way
so they can grow busi-
nesses, employ more peo-
ple and pay the taxes that
go along with that.
We need to penalize the
companies that move jobs
and manufacturing out of
the country and reward
those that stay. We con-
sumers need to recognize
that stuff made in America
does often cost more be-
cause we don't pay our
workers 25 cents an hour.
And we need to remem-
ber that the greatest and
only entitlement that is re-
ally guaranteed in Amer-
ica is that we will give all
children the opportunity
to attend a public school
and then we will give them
the freedom and opportu-
nity to make a living with-
out government getting in
the way.
Things are out of whack.
And we all deserve some
of the responsibility for
letting it get that way.
But we are still the
greatest nation on Earth;
and when we finally do
come down out of the
maple tree, we can make
things right. It will take
hard work and sacrifice by
all of us, but it can be
done.


Gerny Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gimulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


=-=== Soundorr ====


Great ideas; they won't work
This is in response to Mr. E. Paul Mills,
"Four simple solutions to help our econ-
omy." Great suggestions, Mr. Mills. You will
not see any changes in our lifetime. There's
too many dishonest people. Again, great
suggestions. I'm 100 percent for them, but
I don't see any changes, not with the dis-
honest people and the politicians.
Buy American
Our newly elected Gov. Rick Scott, his
slogan: "Let's get to work, let's get to
work." Well, I've been a union man all my
life and our slogan was also, "Buy Ameri-
can, buy American." We have to buy Ameri-
can to get to work in this country. I got that
off my chest. Buy American.




MERS
Continued from Page Cl

MERS sued Suffolk County in 2001. The
suit went all the way to New York's highest
court, where MERS won on appeal. The court
found that a county clerk lacks the author-
ity to refuse to record MERS transactions.
MERS, which does business out of a sub-
urban Washington office building, has
about 40 employees. But according to the
company, it operates by appointing "certi-
fying officers" and "vice presidents" who
work for about 3,000 mortgage companies
or their vendors, such as law firms, to sign
documents on behalf of MERS.
Several of these "officers" have gained
infamy as robo-signers who said they
signed as many as 1,000 foreclosure affi-
davits a day without verifying the accuracy
of the information. The robo-signers testi-
fied in depositions that even though they
had been named as executives of MERS,
and signed mortgage documents in that ca-
pacity, they were given no MERS training,
had no idea where MERS was located, had
never received compensation from MERS,
and had never communicated with MERS
in any form.
The lawsuits over county fees are not the
first suits to be filed against MERS. As the


Wonderful tale
How wonderful it was to open the paper
on Wednesday (Nov. 10) and read a story
that was beautiful, "Fairytale for a night."
Thank you so much for New Concepts (In-
ternational) Hair Salon in helping that
beautiful young girl. Thanks to everyone
else who helped her have a night to re-
member going to her prom. All young peo-
ple deserve that, no matter what their
circumstances are. It shows you there still
are loving, God-caring people in our world.
Thank you again so much.
Covers covered
For the lady looking for the toaster cov-
ers: Go to the Miles Kimball catalog-
mileskimball.com. They have toaster covers.


recession deepened in 2007 and home val-
ues plummeted, lawsuits challenging bank
foreclosures also alleged that MERS had no
legal right to act as a middleman for banks,
or other investors, who actually own the
mortgage. Recent court documents have
shown how mortgage notes are often lost,
casting doubt on who actually owns the
mortgage and possibly blighting the chain
of title on the property. So far, rulings on
these challenges have been mixed. But the
red flags were enough to cause JPMorgan
Chase CEO Jamie Dimon to stop using
MERS for foreclosures in 2008.
Legal experts say the new attack, focus-
ing on the issue of county fees, may have a
better chance of success than the foreclo-
sure challenges because of the recent rev-
elations about robo-signers and fraudulent
foreclosure documents.
County recorders say they're not opposed
to moving out of the world of wet ink and
into the world of digital tracking. It's that
they feel local government should be doing
the tracking, not a private entity like MERS.
They also say important principles are at
stake.
"We do want to preserve the integrity of
our public records. That is our top priority,"
says Kay Wrucke, recorder in Martin
County, Minn. "If it's not in the public
record, how can you know whether the title
is clear on a home?"


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CH(ONICLE


( Nov. 19-20,2010

7:30 p.m.
Cilrus Counit Fairgrounds
lnernesv. FL



Adults: '15 ('12 Advance)
Children 4-11 yrs.: '5 ('4 Advance)
S. Child 3 & Under. FREE




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JANUARY
* Citrus Jazz Society
* Manatee Festival
* ACT The Champagne Charlie Stakes
* Sgt. Dennis Flanagan Foundation
Sports Celebrity Auction Dinner
* Sgi Dennis Flanagan Foundation
Annual Goll Tournament
* Keys to Fashion West Cilrus Ladies Elks
* Truck and Traclor Pull
* Kiwanis Concert Live
* USA Yoga Day
*Light Shine-The Space Center and History
ol Technology in Florida
* Cattle Barons Ball
* CFCC Forbidden Broadway
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Golt Tournament
* Crystal River Open Tennis Tournament
* Music in the Park
* Florida Lifestyle Fashion Show
* SI Scholaslica CCW Fashion Show
* CF Performing Arts Series Garrison Keillor
FEBRUARY
* Filness in Citrus
* Citrus Has Talent
* Jr Achievment Bowl-A-Thon
*CFCC Flamenco Vivo
SArican American Read In
* Jazz Concert Series
* On Our Own Expo
* 'School'astic Golf Tournament
* Altrusa Monte Carlo Night
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Beverly Hills Intemational Feslival
* Singing Valentines
* Grand Ole Opry
* 41h Annual Boy Scout Golf Classic
* ACT I Love You. You're Pertecl, Now Change
* German American Club Celebrate Spring
* Spring Fling Citrus County Craft Council
' Ozello ChiliCook Off and Craft Show
SAcademy of Environmental Science Dinner
SPJPII Goods-Services Auction
* Music in the Park Big Bands
* Purple Heart Ceremony
* ACT The Second Time Around
* The Presidenl's Walk
* CF Performing Arts Senes Chensh the
Ladies. Traditional Irish Music
* Dollars for Scholars Doo Wop
MARCH
SFitness in Citrus
* Manatee Car Truck Show
* Luminary Art Nights
SCitrus Jazz Jam
* Steak & Steak
* Strawberry Festival
* Homosassa Heritage Day
* Nature Coast Corvair Car & Truck Show
* Floral City Library Book Sale
* Wood Wind and Water
* Fort Cooper Days
* Citrus County Fair
* Clean Air Bike Ride
* ACT Mixed Emotions
* Corvettes in the Sunshine
* Swing For A Cure
* St. Palrick's Day Golf Classic
* Pilot Club of Crystal River Gol Tournament
* Red Ribbon Tour of Homes
* Fashion Cares


Scope it Out 5K
* TOO Far Art Show
* Rotary Blood Screening
* SCORE Golf Classic
* Sugarmill Chorale
* Citrus County's Amazing Race
* A Night of Imagination
* Forever Irish
SCrystal River Relay for Life
Affair To Remember
SBarbershop Harmony At Its Best
SFloral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
Mystery Dinner Theater
Tricky tray Crystal Oaks
SBecky O'Connell Foundation Benefit
* Spring Blossoms Ladies West Citrus Elks
SMusic on Ihe Square
SSalute to our Community CMH
*Military Card Party Knghls of Columbus
* AMERICA- A Patriotic Celebralrlon -
Sugarmill Chorale
Appointment for Murder -
Encore Ensemble Theater
SMusic in the Park Blues
SPet Photo Contest
SUS Air Force Concert Band
SACT Twentieth Century
APRIL
Cilrus Jazz Jam
Inverness Relay For Lite
CCBA Fishing Tournament
Friends of the Library Book Sale
Wildlife Park Easier Egg Hunt
*Jazz Appreciation Month Celebration
Ozello Adventure Race
Volunteer Fair
Citrus County Bass Challenge
Sheriffs Summer Safety Expo
Skyview Boys & Girls Club Tennis Tourney
Nened's Military Card Party
* Central Citrus Rotary Golf Classic
Mayor's Ball
American Irish Club Golf Tournament
Annual Musicale
Family Fun Day
Not So Blue Monday
ACT Murder by Misadventure
Lecanlo Relay For Life
April Madness Basketball Tournament
Military Card Party Crsytal Oaks
ABWA Diamonds in April
Wilhlacoochee Wilderness
Canoe & Kayak Race
Sugarmill Woods Food Drive
Rays vs Yankees
Cl IA- Innovalive Technology
Happy Birthday Earthl
ILove Letters Sugarmill Woods Rotary
Pol Photo Conlest
United Way Spirit of the Community Awards
Inverness Rotary Goll Tournament
Homosassa Springs Easier Egg Hunt
'Jazz Appreciation Clinic
Rotary Blood Screening
Children's Week One Voce lor Children
Spring Greek Festival
Citrus Community Concert Choir
Citrus Springs Family Fun Day
Camp Good Hope Goll Tournament
Music in the Park
Lions Spring Craft Fair
Pilol Club Golf Tournament
Carriers Food Dnve


* Red Eagle Lodge Interlribal Pow-Wow
* Light Shine Florida's Cracker History
* Jazz Concert Series
MAY
ACT Murder by Misadventure
SCitrus Jazz Jam
Gospel Jubilee
SInformalional Fiestla
World's Greatest Baby Snower
Winds. Rains oi Flames
Chronicle Pines Tennis Tournament
SCitrus Memorial Ball
SRays vs Red Sox
Taste of Inverness
Amendment 4 Forum
The King and Queens of Music
832 K 9 Deputy Dogs Golf Tournament
Superintendent's Goal Tournament
Cryslat River Women's Club
Entertainment Series
Mental Mystery Tour
Spring Into Summer
ACT Write Me a Murder
JUNE
' Inverness Flag Day Ceremony
SCobia Big Fish Tournament
SCHS Protect Graduation
* Homosassa Fireworks & Poker Run
SFlag Day at Fort Cooper
SRolng thunder Independence Day
Goil tournament
* Senior Safety Summit
* Music on the Square
* Citrus Jazz Jam
* Next Generation Professional Networking
JULY
* Palriolic Evening
* Fireworks over Kings Bay
* Key Training Center Celebnty Auction
* Key Run For the Money
SKeyCenler Telethon
* AC The King and I
* Family Fun Day Kings Bay Park
* Firecracker 5K
* Beverly Hills Recreation Military Card Party
* Cool and Sassy Fashion Gala
STeen Stock 2010
SUncle Sam's Scallop Jam
SStar Spangle Salute to America
SBack to School Party
STampa Bay Rays vs. Yankees
* Tampa Bay Rays vs Red Sox
AUGUST
* Bowl For Kids Sake
* Comedy Magician Show
* Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods
Arts and Cralls
* Chronicle Pnmary Forum
* Military Card Party
* Taking Swings to Cure Cystic Fibrosis
* Friends of Blues Fundraiser
* OC 5K RuniOne Mile Walk
* Cilrus High School Foolball Fundraiser
* Music in the Park
SEPTEMBER
* Harvest Moon Craft Show
* Beal the Sheriff 5K Race
* Veterans Golf Tournament


Jazz Society Jam Session
Citrus 20/20 Fundraiser
Save our Waters Week
Save Our Waters Week Fundraiser
Christmas in September
United Way Kick Off
German Club Oklobertesl
Business Women's Alliance
Health & Fitness Expo
Industry Appreciation Luncheon
EDC Barbecue
832 K-9's Deputy Dog Fundraiser
VFW Post 1008 Golf Outing
Chalk the Walk IOTA
Music on the Square IOTA
Green Expo
Sunset Festival
Big Yard Sale
Win with Win
Chalk the Walk
Ryan Weaver Flags Freedom Concert
T AC- LendMeaTenor
SMatt Curley Memorial Blood Dnve
SHoneymoon From Hell Encore
Ensemble Theater
* Show n Shine
SMusic in the Park
OCTOBER
Sertoma Oktoberiesl
Suncoast Buddy Walk
Friends of the Library Fall Book Sale
Habilat For Humanity Golf Tournament
Jazz Jam
Skyview Chanty Tennis Tournament
Rails to Trails Bike Ride
SNature Coast Fine Arts and True Crafts Show
SWest Citrus Elks Colors of Fall
Artisans Boutique
Jazz Concert Series
Great Amencan Cooler Festival
Day of CaringiMake a Difference Food Drive
National Wildlife Refuge Week
Scarecrow Festival
SWest Citrus Elks Arts & Crafts Show
SHomosassa Rotary Chili Cook Off
'Cooter Blasi
Harvest Time Festival
Haunted Tram Ride
Coolerween
Tasle of Citrus
SGreek Festival
Spike Fitzpatrick Memorial Gol Tourney
CR Women's Club Arts & Crafts Festival
Chronicle General Election Forum
SPurple Heart Poker Run
Nereld's Military Card Party
SHaunted Halloween
Hernando Heritage Days
SSugarmill Woods Rotary Golf Tournament
Spanish American Club Goll Tournamen
SDinner. Dancing and Diamonds
SACT Witness for the Prosecution
SLight Shine Tuskegee Airmen
Cooler Poker Tournament & Casino Night
SCR Council Election Forum
SBilly Lindsay as Elvis
SKiev Symphony
SBFF Fashion Show
While Elephant Sale
Halloween Party
91h Annual CASI Chili Cookolt
Goll for Kids


* Pack a Pail
* Community Fall Festival
NOVEMBER
BH Lions Foundation Craft Fa,
Inglis/Yankeelown Arts and Seafood Festival
Festival of The Arts
Jazz Society Jam
SRotary Blood Screening
SBlues & Bar BOue
SVeterans Fair
Veterans Day ParaderMemorial Service
SVeterans Appreciation Show
SStone Crab .Jam
West Cilius Elks Annual Craft Snow
CCBA Home & Outdoors Snow
SCaruth Camp Challenge
SParade oi Trees
SCitrus Stampede Rodeo
Winter Wonderland Craft Show
Ozello Arts & Crafts Festival
SJazz Concert
Friends of the Homosassa Library Book Sale
SOS Golt Tournament
K9 Kamrnval
Festival of the Ails Wine Tasling
Veteran's Appreciation Week
SBootscootin' Barbershop Too
SColor Your World Wiln Fashion
The Hundred Dresses
Light Shine Antebellum and Civil War Flonda
Holiday Extravaganza
Hospice Tree of Remembrance
Suncoast Business Masters Annual
Silent Auction
*Send Them To Serve
Believe Voices ot the Future
Kiwams Pancake Breakfast
Beverly Hills Military Card Partny
Annual Sciamble for the Scouts
SBnan Mast Fundaiser
CF Performing Arts Series Shangii La
Chinese Acrobats
* Trash N' Treasuie CR Garden Club
* Make a Child Smile Golf Tournament
* Annual Chrislmas Toy Run
* Messiah Community Concert Choir
DECEMBER
Father Christmas Ball
Fort Cooper State Park Nights ol Lights
Floral City Heritage Days
Beverly Hills Christmas Parade
Chnslmas Craft Show
CRWC Silver Bells
Crystal River Christmas Parade
*Jazz Concert Series
Jazz Jam
Inverness Christmas Parade
SHomosassa Boal Parade
SSugannill Chorale Christmas Concert
Airboal Chnstmas Parade
SCitrus Springs Holiday Parade
Nutcracker Ballet
Celebration of Lights
SACT Richard Gilewitz
Inverness Winter Celebration
ACT Halvan Youth Theatre
* Jim Blackshear Memorial Goll tournament
* Frosty s Winter Wonderland
* Annual Holiday Party


II Ga ________________


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For Rodeo Information Call (352) 564-4525


COMMENTARY







( ITRIJN COIfNI (F.L) Ci IIRONvCLi


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H IM i IA;1 P I


Making This Right


Beaches
Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


Fmi iii ~tiion V 'siftzz xmirn

~/1v~GOV


"Now Gulf seafood is coming back on the menu, so come on down,
we're open for business."
Bryan Zar
Co-owner, Restaurant des Familles
Crown Point, LA



I grew up bussing tables at this restaurant. Last year, my wife,
Brooke, and I bought it. We were working hard to build a
business, then the spill hit. BP said they would try to make
things right. But how was an energy company going to help
our restaurant?

Keeping Businesses Open
We figured they would tell us to take a number and wait in line.
Instead, they asked us if we could serve food to the workers,
engineers, scientists, and local residents they had hired to
cleanup the spill. It kept us busy round the clock. And we
weren't the only ones. They hired a lot of local businesses and
kept a lot of people working. They have kept businesses up and
down the Gulf open and it's still making a difference.

Open for Business
BP asked us to share our story with you to keep you informed.
Our restaurant's open six days a week. Customers are filling our
restaurant again and we think it's a good time to come down to
the Gulf Coast, And if we could make just one request, please
think of us when planning your next vacation. We're still here
and while it's been tough, we are still cooking. And we are just
one of the hundreds of great places ready to welcome you when
you come down. So don't wait. We're looking forward to
seeing you,


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BUSINESS


Looking For
Something Unique?
Check out today's Classified ads.
?0 SHOP NOW! 1


CITUS uIC(UNTY (t RONIJ(L'


Let the shopping






season begin!


This year, retailers have declared November 'Black Friday Month' with

ofonline and in-store deals and in some cases, free shipping


ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP retail writer
NEW YORK
From free shipping from Wal-
Mart to Sears stores open on
Thanksgiving for the first time, the
battle for holiday shoppers' dollars
has begun in earnest
The early competition to break
through shoppers' caution about
spending promises savings for
those willing to buy amid an econ-
omy that's still worrying many. It
also promises convenience. Re-
tailers are offering deals anytime,
anywhere their customers want,
through websites, smart phones
and Facebook
Black Friday, the day after
Thanksgiving that typically kicks
off holiday shopping, is not only
being marketed as "Black Friday
week," but for a growing number
of stores, "Black Friday month."
As for Thanksgiving, some re-
tailers like Sears and Gap's Old
Navy hope shoppers will head to
stores after they finish their turkey
feasts. On the Web, Kohl's Corp.
and Target Corp. are among many
merchants dramatically stepping
up deals that day, counting on that
holiday to be one of the busiest
days of the year online.
"Everything is faster and
sooner," said Dan Grandpre, edi-
tor-in-chief of Dealnews.com,
which opened an office in Dublin,
Ireland, a few months ago to mon-
itor the frenetic pace of offers, par-
ticularly during the holidays.
Dealnews is based in Huntsville,
Ala.
Walmart Stores Inc. is clearly
going for the jugular in the holiday
retailing fight. It announced
Thursday that it will offer free
shipping on nearly 60,000 online
items with no minimum pur-
chase requirement. The offer,
which includes most electronics,
jewelry and toys, will run through
Dec. 20. Return shipping is also
free, or items can be returned to a
local store.


WHEN TO GRAB THE BEST DEALS


NEW YORK Before you head
into the final stretch before the holi-
day rush, when stores lose all sub-
tlety in the ways they push
gift-buying, you may wonder
whether to pass up November bar-
gains in the hope that some prices
will keep falling.
Last year, most customers who
waited until the final days before
Dec. 25 found empty shelves be-
cause stores had sold most of their
stock.
This year, most stores are head-
ing into the holidays with only a lit-
tle more inventory. But many are
discounting holiday goods earlier
than last year because shoppers
remain cautious.
Generally, "retailers are going out
with their best prices of the season
around the Thanksgiving week,"
said John Long, a retail strategist at
Kurt Salmon Associates.
Here are some tips for timing
your purchases this year.
MFLAT-PANEL TVS: Particu-
larly for lower-priced TV models,
the time to act is now through Black
Friday, the day after Thanksgiving,
analysts say.
In years past, it would have been
Black Friday. But retailers already
are slashing prices to move a
mounting glut of TVs. Walmart
Stores Inc., the nation's largest re-
tailer, discounted a 26-inch Vizio
LED HDTV from $298 to $198 last
weekend, for example. And a 55-

Walmart's free offer comes on
top of similarly aggressive free
shipping programs from Target
and J.C. Penney. Walmart's deal
adds to the discounter's Site to
Store program, which lets cus-
tomers buy an item online and
have it shipped free to their local
Walmart store for pickup.
Walmart.com is even testing a
service at nearly 800 stores that


inch Vizio LCD HDTV TV that had
been selling for $1,098 dropped to
$898 as part of a two-day sale.
Don't hold your breath for dis-
counts on the latest and greatest,
though. For 3-D and TVs that con-
nect to the Intemet, shoppers will
have to wait until after Christmas
for discounts, according to Craig
Johnson, president of retail consul-
tancy Customer Growth Partners.
ECOMPUTERS: Both low-end
and high-end laptop computers are
cheapest around Black Friday. Look
for the deals on laptops offered on-
line by manufacturers such as Dell
Inc. and Hewlett-Packard Co., rec-
ommended Dan de Grandpre, edi-
tor-in-chief of dealnews.com.
Anyone looking for ultra-cheap
laptops should also check Wal-
mart, office superstores and Ama-
zon.com, he said.
WHOT TOYS: If you want the
season's hottest toys, buy between
now and Black Friday because
many retailers, including Toys R Us
and Wal-Mart, have already dis-
counted some of them. Walmart
has cut prices on WowWee's Paper
Jamz Guitar and Mattel Inc.'s
Loopz electronic memory game.
And prices can even rise on the
hottest toys by mid-December as
supplies dwindle, analysts say.
*CLASSIC TOYS: If you're in
the market for evergreen toys like
See DEALS/Page D2

lets customers see inventory and
purchase products right from
home. The online orders are usu-
ally ready to be picked up at a
store within four hours.
That concept isn't new, but many
stores are joining Walmart in try-
ing to speed up the turnaround
time, says Noam Paransky, retail
strategist at Kurt Salmon Associ-
ates.


----: Business 'rT"


Co-op returns $14M
to its members
DADE CITY One of the many
benefits of being a member of a not-for-
profit electric cooperative is members
get to share in any excess margins at
the end of the year.
These margins are called capital
credits, and the Withlacoochee River
Electric Cooperative Board of Trustees
has authorized another $14 million dol-
lar return. Members who have had serv-
ice for more than one year will receive a
credit on their December bill.
Capital Credits are the accumulation
of all prior year's revenue after the Co-
op's expenses have been paid. These
credits are applied on a pro-rata basis to
each WREC member's account and


represent a portion of the total monies
paid to the co-op by each member.
"While WREC faces many of the
same economic challenges our mem-
bers face, we are very pleased to be
able to return another 14 million in capi-
tal credits to our members this year,"
said Billy Brown, WREC'S general man-
ager.
Capital Credits are unique to the co-
operative business model. Counting
this year's refund, WREC has given
back more than $223 million to its mem-
bers in Pasco, Hernando, Citrus,
Sumter and Polk counties since 1990.
Home and Outdoor Show
continues today
The second and final day of The Cit-
rus County Builders Association's an-


nual Home and Outdoor Show is today
at the National Guard Armory in Crystal
River. Featured is the Citrus Green
Building Council's Green Room, show-
casing green building services and
products Hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information, call 746-9028 or
visit www.citrusbuilders.com
Builders building
a better Christmas
Citrus Builders Care has kicked off the
Building a Better Chrislntras Toys for Tots
drive. Anyone nteresled in helping can
drop off new, unwrapped toys and/or
stocking stuffers to the Citrus County
Builders Association offices between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through
Thursday.
Applications and sponsorship forms are


"Retailers are trying to
front of customers 24/7," Pa
said. With the wider adopt
smart phones, "it's explode
year"
Facebook.com r
launched its Deals program
ing up with a number of sto
cluding Penney and Gap Ii
offering allows shoppers to
in" using smart phones t(
shops and reap rewards
counts.
The intense marketing
opening in a season in whici
pers are expected to spend
little more than last year.
ployment is still stuck close
percent, and consumer coni
has been anemic for mont
months.
The National Retail Fed(
expects a 2.3 percent incr
spending to $447.1 billion
would fall short of the 10-ye
toric average of 2.5 perce
cording to the retail trade g
Online, the prospect
brighter. Online research
comScore Inc. expects any
from 7 to 9 percent growth
pared with a year ago, whe.
ness was up 4 percent ov
previous year, according to
culations. About 10 percent
iday sales are made
according to Forrester a
Sucharita Mulpuru.
"You clearly have a con
who is restrained. So you ha
drive to encourage consun
spend," Kevin Mansell,
president and CEO, said in
terview with The Asso
Press. But a bigger factor
tailers have to move with th
summer, and the consumer
ultimate flexibility of buyir
have to move with her"
Against this background
holiday deals have come in
fire succession. In the p
hours, Best Buy Co. announce
discounting a number
See :; P


available at www.citrusbuilders
contact Melissa Sutherland, Ai
ing and Cooling, at 564-3181,
Wright, Gold Crest Homes, at
If you know of anyone who r
fit from a helping hand with a t(
day season, have them contact
above numbers or visit the wel
application. Child sponsorships
available for $25 per child.
Citrus Builders Care is a nor
ganization founded by the Citru
Builders Association, whose m
correct substandard housing in
County. For more information,v
www.citrusbuilderscare.org or
ministrative assistant Linda Ga
364-1056.


Laura Byrnes
WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


Helping

veterans

find jobs


S ome serious red,
white and blue burst
through the bur-
nished oranges and golds
of autumn this week as we
celebrated Veterans Day.
On Nov. 11, people
throughout Citrus County,
Florida and the nation
honored and thanked
those who served in our
Armed Forces. This year,
we commemorated the
92nd anniversary of the
armistice that ended
World War I a war de-
scribed by congressional
resolution as the "most
destructive, sanguinary
and far-reaching war in
human annals...'
The annals of time,
however, marched on, and
so on Thursday, we joined
in recognizing those who
served in all our wars,
AdBullder from Revolutionary to
I Afghanistan.
S There was plenty of flag
waving, military exhibits
and stirring speeches, not
to mention the traditional
patriotic parade which
be in wound from Citrus High
iransky School to the Old Court-
>tion of house in downtown Inver-
ing this ness.
And then Friday, Nov.
recently 12, rolled around.
i, team- For thousands of Citrus
)res, in- County's veterans, that
nc. The meant another day with-
"check out a job.
o these According to the most
or dis- recent American Commu-
nity Survey available for
is hap- this area, approximately
h shop- 22,000 veterans, or nearly
only a one out of every five resi'
Unem- dents, calls Citrus County
3e to 10 home.
idence That ACS data, it should
hs and be noted, tracks the three-
year period from 2006-
eration 2008 before the recession
ease in took root As a percentage
a. That of the overall labor force,
ar his- Citrus County veterans'
*nt, ac- unemployment rate as of
group. January 2008 was 8.5 per-
s are cent. While that was
h firm higher than the national
'where rate of 5.4 percent, today it
h com- is likely considerably
n busi- higher, given that Citrus
'er the County's overall unem-
its cal- ployment rate is 13.7 per-
of hol- cent compared to a
online, national rate of 9.2 per-
analyst cent
But even if we stick with
isumer the more conservative
ve this numbers, consider this:
ners to The unemployment rate
Kohl's among Citrus County's
an in- veterans tops 21 percent.
)ciated Of the 21,577 veterans es-
is "re- timated to live in Citrus
ie con- County, 4,549 are jobless.
wants More startling, perhaps, is
ig. You the fact that only 157 vet-
erans who receive unem-
d, the ployment compensation
rapid- or who have exhausted
ast 24 their benefits are regis-
ced it's tered for services through
of its Workforce Connection of
Citrus, Levy and Marion
age D2 counties and the Employ
Florida Marketplace.
So this year, in addition
to the star-spangled trib-
scare.org or utes and shows of appre-
r Care Heat- ciation, another way we
orAnjela can truly celebrate our
697-5831. veterans is by helping
might bene- them re-enter the civilian
oy this holi- workforce. Here are some
t one of the ideas to get started for
site for an both employers and veter-
s are also ans:
Employers: Hiring a
profit or- veteran isn't just an act of
us County good will, it's good busi-
ission is to ness. Veterans not only
SCitrus have demonstrated lead-
visit ership and teamwork
contact ad- skills, they have thle
rrettat proven ability to learn
new skills and concepts
quickly.


See Page D2


See .- ',Page D2









D2 S-Not A, NovE'MEliIR 14, 2010


SHOP
Continued from Page Dl

electronics items this Fri-
day and Saturday. For ex-
ample, it has a 40-inch LCD
HDTV for $399.99.
Retailer Kmart said it's
letting customers who buy
items online pick up pur-
chases on the same day at
more than 600 locations.
The retailer, owned by
Sears Holdings Corp., also
announced customers can
now buy items through the
Kmart2go mobile web site
or smart phone applica-
tions and select in-store
pickup.
The apps also can be used
in-store for product infor-
mation.
But many are also not
waiting to give shoppers a


BUSINESS


sneak preview of what type
of come-ons they'll find the
day after Thanksgiving:
Target will offer dis-
counts both online and in
stores. It's offering a
Thanksgiving Day sale on-
line with deals including
discounts of up to 50 per-
cent off on electronics such
as cameras, TVs, a Blu-ray
player and video game con-
sole. In stores, Target will
have 25 early morning Black
Friday bargains, 11 more
than last year.
Staples is offering deals
from 6 a.m. to noon, includ-
ing a $499.98 HP Laptop
with an Intel Celeron 900
Processor marked down to
$299.98.
The Disney Store plans
to offer 20 percent off most
items until 10 a.m. It also
plans to open 110 locations
at midnight.


DEALS
Continued from Page D1

board games, however, defi-
nitely wait until after Thanks-
giving week for better deals.
But don't expect 70 percent
off on Dec. 26, either. That's
because stores want to be
ready for post-Christmas
shoppers bearing gift cards,
says toy analyst Chris
Byrne.
CLOTHING: Many
stores may cut prices on key
clothing items like sweaters
and jackets up to 50 percent
this weekend and next, said
Marshal Cohen, chief ana-
lyst for market research firm
NPD. That's earlier than
usual, but merchants are
still trying to clear out a


backlog of cold-weather
items after an unseasonably
warm autumn.
He said stores aren't ex-
pected to cut prices any fur-
ther for Black Friday
weekend, but they may
deepen discounts to 70 per-
cent after Dec. 26. Just be-
ware that you may not find
the color or size you need.
Regardless, a lot depends
on the weather. If it warms
up, stores will have to dis-
count cold-weather items
even more, said Tom Jacob-
son, managing director of
pricing and profit optimiza-
tion strategy atAccenture.
Overall, "stores are really fo-
cusing on sticking to their
(discounting) plans," he
said.
-Associated Press


DIGEST
Continued from Page Dl

Realty Executives
launches website
Executives International Inc.
announced the launch of its re-
designed website, www.
RealtyExecutives.com, at the
National Association of Realtors
Convention & Expo in New Or-
leans Nov. 5-8.
The website has been in beta
testing for approximately two
months and has already ex-
ceeded 1.2 million web pages,
making it one of the most popu-
lated real estate websites online.
Realty Executives Intema-
tional made the site public to
major search engines like
Google, AOL and Yahoo! during
the convention. The company


CrrUvs COUNTY (FL) CIRONici.E

says search engines like Google
will take at least 30 to 60 days to
index the sites' pages, thus in-
creasing its search rankings.
Different from traditional real
estate websites, www.
RealtyExecutives.com is a
"community" of websites in the
Realty Executives International
network of nearly 11,000 sales
associates and approximately
700 franchises globally.
The website is in the process
of integrating every Multiple List-
ing Service (MLS) in every Re-
alty Executives market, as well
as each individual real estate
agent, broker and regional de-
veloper), into one central loca-
tion online.
"The website is a one stop
shop for home buyers and sell-
ers," said Glenn Melton, chief
executive officer of Realty Exec-
utives Intemational.


BYRNES
Continued from Page Dl

They are also efficient, respectful
and possess a high-degree of integrity
Workforce Connection can provide
businesses with pre-screened, quali-
fied candidates, facilitate job inter-
views either at your workplace or
elsewhere, and post your job opening
on Employ Florida.
Additionally, private sector employ-
ers are eligible for a Work Opportunity
Tax Credit of up to $2,400 for every un-
employed veteran hired before the
close of the year.
Veterans: Workforce Connection of-
fers a variety of services and programs,
at no charge, that can help veterans get
the job they need and deserve. Those
include:
Power Seeker Workshop on Mon-
day, Nov 15 from 8-11:30 a.m. at the Col-
lege of Central Florida's Lecanto
conference center. In partnership with
Monster.com, the global online em-
ployment solutions provider, the work-
shops can help veterans and their
spouses learn how to stand out in the
crowd in today's tough labor market.
Tools include developing power re-


sumes that demonstrate how military
skills transfer to civilian careers; how
to nail a job interview through brand-
ing, research and other key techniques;
developing meaningful career net-
works; maximizing use of Monster.com,
Military Advantage, Militarycom and
the Employ Florida Marketplace.
Talent Marketplace for Veterans
on Thursday, Dec. 9 from 8:30 a.m. to
noon at CF's Lecanto conference cen-
ter. The Talent Marketplace replaces
the old "job fair" concept with a Career
Launch strategy designed to get the
best talent match between employers
and job seekers.
Retooling and Refueling for Suc-
cess Workshops designed to provide
veterans with career tools and strate-
gies to stay focused and successful dur-
ing career-transitions. The next
workshop takes place Jan. 25-27, 2011.
Veterans Job Information services
are available when you need them at
the Citrus County Workforce Connec-
tion Center at 1103 E. Inverness Blvd.,
in Inverness. The center is staffed with
a network of professional Disabled Vet-
erans Outreach Program specialists
and Local Veterans Employment Rep-
resentatives tasked to provide priority
workforce services to veterans. Serv-
ices include job placement, informa-


tion about the local job market, assess-
ments and career-interest testing, re-
ferral to training programs and help
securing funds to complete training or
retraining.
To learn more about these or other
workforce programs, contact the Citrus
County Workforce Connection at 637-
2223, visit www.clmworkforce.com, or
call 1-800-434-JOBS.

Laura Byrnes, APR, is community
relations/communications manager
at Workforce Connection.
Contact her at 352-291-9445 or
lbyrnes@clmworkforce. com.

Workforce Connection is a member of
force services and resources. Work-
force Connection is an equal
opportunity employer/program. Auxil-
iary aids and services are available
upon request to individuals with dis-
abilities. All voice telephone numbers
listed above may be reached by per-
sons using TTY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at 711. Ifyou
need accommodations, please call
352-840-5700, ext 7878 or e-mail ac-
commodations@clnmworldbrce.conm at
least three business days in advance.


banks and oter lending fnanoal nsristuens offering best yields nao ide APY (Annual Percentage I
Yietd), Eve instituton must have outstanding scores from independent rating agenees. Guaranteed fied
S lax-deferred annuities are not FDIC Insured To ensure hl funds are protected, depositoa should
understand coverage s Frsl Amencan Trs is not a ste ot federally insured financal msSlution.
oeNsuoT APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


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my banker made sure to find it.


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Your stories make us more than a bank.
/At Caitll City Bank, "we believe iin pirrovidiing more than just sound advice and excellent service. We strive to build
personal! re!a-tionshiil ipsW tJh d~th our clients. That promise of inii'd'vilual attention is what separates Capital City Bank
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Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


humbe SUNDAYn
[hum r ar NOVEMBER 14, 2010
.. ..:?,.' .3:, '".: '. .r, ,!. .I%'. M-.. 1. ,' lbT o' .' .. -:.:.. .


i


Neapolitan Ice Cream Shoppe


Mixing it up!


j,.b
L~


Neapolitan, the Ice Cream Shoppe, is on County Road 486 next to Terra Vista and proudly
serves a wide variety of Working Cow sherbets, no-added-sugar frozen yogurt and premium
Ice creams. They specialize in milkshakes, Ice cream floats, smoothies, sundaes, malts
and more! Stop by Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 9 p.m. Pictured with Chamber
ambassadors is owner James Cook.
* Neapolitan Ice Cream Shoppe
* 2484 North Heritage Oaks Path in Hernando
* (352) 249-1073


Many thanks to Suncoast Plumbing and Surfaces Flooring for hosting a fabulous Cham-
ber After Hours Business Mixer this week. More than 100 Chamber and EDC members
attended and were treated to a fabulous spread of appetizers and beverages. Many plumb-
ing and flooring representatives were on hand to speak with the members. Pictured are
owners Todd Workman and Joe Bell.


UNDERSTAND
THE COUNTY
BID PROCESS

* WHAT: Work-
shop on under-
standing the
county bid
process. Also,
learn how to
get your busi-
ness registered
as a county ven-
dor eligible to
place bids on
county con-
tracts.
* WHEN: Tuesday,
Nov. 16,
9 to 11 a.m.
M WHERE: Citrus
County Builders
Association.
* PRESENTED
BY: The Cham-
ber, EDC, and
the Citrus
County Business
Resource
Alliance.
* COST: Free to
attend, but
reservations are
required.
* CONTACT: 795-
3149 or jackie@
citruscounty
chamber.com.


Veterans Appreciation Week


The Chamber andi the EDC were honored to present Jordan Bush with a certificate of appreciation in honor of his duty to
the United States and in support of Veterans Day. Pictured are EDC Executive Director John Siefert, EDC President and
County Commissioner Joe Meek, Andrea Bush, Jordan Bush, Chamber Chairwoman Teresa Bell and Chamber CEO Josh
Wooten.


Business

start-up

workshop

is Monday

Thinking of starting your
own business? The Citrus
County Start Smart Work-
shop, provided through the
Small Business Develop-
ment Center at UNF, gives
the aspiring entrepreneur
a realistic view of the basic
requirements for business
startup.
Topics include: Selecting
an Idea, Testing the Market,
Acquiring Capital, WRiting
a business Plan, Turning
for Help, Understanding
Legal Requirements, Pro-
jecting Cash Flow.
* WHAT: Citrus County
Start Smart Workshop
E WHEN: Monday, Nov. 15,
9 a.m. to noon
N WHERE: College of Cen-
tral Florida Learning Cen-
ter, 3800 S. Lecanto
Hwy., Lecanto (tentative
location)
COST: $40 per person in
advance/$50 at the door.
(Registration fee includes
"Start-Up Kit.")
INFO: (866) 998-8332


Hospice of Citrus County
Pawfection Ranch Grooming & Pet Hotel,
6420 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, will pres-
ent "Pet Photos With Santa" on Sunday, Nov. 14
from 1 to 4 p.m. Pawfection Ranch will present
refreshments, prizes and raffles and special
store sales. There is a suggested donation of $5
per pet photo. All pets must be on a leash. All
donations will benefit patients and families
served by Hospice of Citrus County. Hospice of
Citrus County, licensed in 1985, has earned the
Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval. For ad-
ditional information on the Pawfection Ranch
"Pet Photos With Santa" fundraising event, con-
tact Hospice of Citrus County Development
Manager Linda Baker at (352) 527-2020. Con-
tact Pawfection Ranch at (352) 628-2828 or visit
Pawfection Ranch on the Web at www.pawfec-
tionranch.com.
College of Central Florida
The College of Central Florida Continuing
Education on the Citrus Campus will have the
following classes in the near future. Call 249-
1210 or log on to CFItraining.cf.edu for more in-
formation or for other classes that may be of
interest.
Let's Get to know herbs II is a continua-
tion of "Let's Get to know Herbs." Learn to propa-
gate herbs, make "herb dirt" using a standard
herb mixture and learn about organic fertilizers
as well as making your own pest control. Plan
your herb garden and learn how to dry your
herbs, harvest and preserve them. Class is $39
and will be held in building C4 Room 204 on Sat-
urdays, Nov. 27 through Dec. 11 from 10 a.m. to
noon. Call 249-1210 or log on to CFItrain-
ing.cf.edu for more information or for other
classes that may be available.
eBay Buying & Selling Basics will show
you how to how to open an eBay account, utilize
PayPal, how to research and create listings.
Learn to enhance your listings, pricing and shop-
ping on eBay. Class will be on Saturdays, Dec. 4
and 18 from 9 a.m. to noon for a fee of $89 in
building C4, Room 110. Call 249-1210 or log on
to CFItraining.cf.edu for more information or for


other classes that may be available.
Advanced Golf will be taught on select golf
courses and will expand on techniques learned
in the beginning and intermediate classes. Im-
prove your playing skills and knowledge of the
rules. Prerequisites include beginning/intermedi-
ate class or a handicap of 15 or lower. Class is
held on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Dec. 7
through 16 from 3 to 6 p.m. for a fee of $150.
Call 249-1210 or log onto CFItraining.cf.edu for
more information or for other classes that may
be available.
Notary Training is a state-approved three-
hour course required for all individuals seeking to
obtain a Florida notary commission. Students will
receive a class completion certificate that must
accompany the application for a new notary
commission. The course is also recommended
as a refresher for veteran notaries. Class will be
held on Thursday, Dec. 9, from 12:30 to 3:30
p.m. in Building C2, Room 102 for a fee of $99,
Call 249-1210 or log on to CFltraining.cf.edu for
more information or for other classes that may
be available.
HPH Hospice workshop
HPH Hospice is offering two Holiday Bereave-
ment Workshops to help people who have lost a
loved one prepare for and cope during the up-
coming holiday season of events. Paul Win-
stead, LMHC, will conduct the workshops on
Thursday, Nov. 18 at 2 p.m. and Thursday, Dec.
9, at 6:30 p.m. Both meetings are at the Genesis
Community Church Youth Annex, 2389 E.
Norvelle Bryant Hwy., Lecanto. This is located
near the Knights of Columbus building on
County Road 486. The program offers partici-
pants an opportunity to explore their expecta-
tions of the holiday season this year, and
develop coping skills that allow expression of
normal grief during the holiday season.
This program is free and provided for any
members of the community. Call Paul Winstead
at 527-4600 to let him know you will be attend-
ing, as materials are provided.
If you have any questions about bereavement
services or local hospice programs, call the HPH


Administrative office at 527-4600.
Quick Stop Barber Shop
Quick Stop Barber Shop will sponsor a kickoff
party for "The Teen Experience," a nonprofit
foundation that aids local teens. The event will
be on Saturday, Nov. 27, at 3 p.m. at the Thun-
der Inn on U.S. 41. The Bad Kitty Band will play.
Come out for prizes, 50/50 drawings, and more.
For more information, call (352) 220-7260.
Skoors Neighborhood Market
The soon-to-open Inverness Farmers' Market
will be a showcase of locally grown goods with
an educational and entertaining experience for
visitors. The market's grand opening is Saturday,
Nov. 20, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Inverness
Government Center.
More than two years in the making, the open-
ing day will feature more than a dozen vendors.
Featured items will include fresh fruits and veg-
etables, fresh herbs, breads and pastries, home-
made soaps and lotions, honey, flowers, plants,
boiled peanuts and other items. The market will
also feature cooking demonstrations and educa-
tional exhibits covering a range of topics, includ-
ing proper plant selection, organic gardening and
tips to protect the environment.
The market is a partnership between the City
of Inverness and Skoors Neighborhood Market.
After the grand opening, the market will be
open each month on the third Saturday from No-
vember to May. Organizers hope that as the
market becomes popular, it can expand to sev-
eral times a month and possibly weekly.
Skoors owners LeRoy and Stephanie Rooks
will manage the market while the City will pro-
vide logistical and marketing support. Skoors will
also be one of the featured vendors, selling pro-
duce and offering an organics-only booth.
An advisory committee met regularly over the
last year to develop a market concept and plan.
Anyone interested in becoming a vendor at the
market or obtaining more information can con-
tact LeRoy Rooks at Skoors at (352) 341-2777;
e-mail info@invernessfarmersmarket.com; or log
on to the market website at www.invernessfarm-


ersmarket.com.
Professional Appraisers
Professional Appraisers and Liquidators An-
tique Auction Gallery, 811 U.S. 19 in Crystal
River (in the Crystal Square Plaza), announces
that in addition to their "high-end" antique and
collectibles auctions, they will also conduct
auctions offering the contents of estates they buy
or take on consignment. This means that be-
sides the antiques, fine jewelry and art they've
been auctioning for more than 30 years, you can
now also bid on contemporary furniture and
many other great items that they find in the es-
tates.
The first of these Estate Auctions, offering a
combination of antiques and estate items, was
Nov. 13. The next auction of this type will be Nov.
27 at 1 p.m.
If you've never attended an auction, this will
be a great introduction, since they will literally
have something for everyone. Also, keep them in
mind if you have antiques, fine jewelry or coins
to sell or consign, or you know of anyone who
needs to liquidate an estate. More info at
www.charliefudge.com.
HPH Hospice Tree of Ufe
Holiday lights are twinkling and HPH Hospice
is getting into the spirit as it celebrates its 16th
annual Tree of Life, a community event to re-
member and pay tribute to those we love. In Cit-
rus County, there will be Trees of Life ready for
HPH ornaments beginning Friday, Nov. 26, with
donations supporting the not-for-profit agency's
patient and family care programs.
The trees will be at the HPH Hospice Care
Center, 701 Medical Drive Ct. E in Inverness,
and the HPH Hospice House on County Road
486 at Emeritus of Barrington Place, outside the
hospice wing.
Beginning Monday, Nov. 29, the Tree of Life
will be featured at the Old Courthouse Museum
in the Square at Inverness. Individuals can place
ornaments at these locations through Christmas
Eve, or by calling the HPH administrative office
in Beverly Hills at 527-4600.


---~-- -~~


n Aqb.









CITRUS(1 S (]OIzT' (FL) (CHRIIONI(CLE


Macy's CEO: Personal


approach will help shoppers


AP retail writer

NEW YORK Across the
country, Macy's is ringing in
this Christmas with local fla-
voi; from Elvis ornaments in
Tennessee to Texas-themed
martini glasses.
These 2,200 themed orna-
ments and other decor sold
locally for the holidays are
vivid examples of how Macy's
Inc.'s chairman, CEO and
president Terry J. Lundgren,
58, is looking to harness the
magic of the storied 152-year-
old department store chain
this Christmas and beyond.
Since its 2005 merger with
May Department Store Co.'s
various regional nameplates,
Lundgren has ditched sto-
ried names such as Marshall
Field's to convert most stores
to one national Macy's brand.
But the chain's latest shift
emphasizes local stores' roots
by tailoring merchandise to
local markets, he says.
Shoppers are now finding
conservative suits in Wash-
ington, D.C., and large-size
cookware in Utah to cater to
larger families, for example.
The strategy, rolled out last
year to all its stores, has
1,600 district managers in 69
regional districts oversee-
ing merchandise assort-
ments in no more than 12
stores each.
Lundgren, a 35-year retail
veteran, conceived of the
changes, dubbed "My
Macy's," as consumer spend-
ing was slowing down three
years ago. But the financial
meltdown made the top exec-
utive accelerate the move.
That has helped the nation's
second-largest department
store chain after Sears Hold-
ings Corp. outperform com-
petitors.
Lundgren expects the local
strategy to help revenue at
stores open at least a year
rise as much as 3.5 percent in
the second half. Based on
stronger-than-expected Octo-
ber revenue, Macy's raised its
earnings forecast last week.
The retailer is scheduled to
report its third-quarter earn-
ings Wednesday.
Lundgren is also focusing
on Macy's exclusive brands to
help differentiate the chain
from competitors. For the
back-to-school season,
Macy's, based in Cincinnati,
launched its Material Girl
fashion collection, created by


P4~


1.

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-


A.e. Pr.s



Associated Press


Terry J. Lundgren, chairman, CEO and president of Macy's
Inc., stands in the Holiday Lane section of Macy's depart-
ment store in New York.


pop star Madonna and her
daughter Lourdes, which has
been a home run. The teen
collection enhances Macy's
portfolio of celebrity brands,
which include Martha Stew-
art's home furnishings collec-
tion, Donald Trump's ties
and Tommy Hilfiger sports-
wear. Forty-two percent of its
revenue comes from exclu-
sive brands or store labels,
Lundgren says.
Lundgren became CEO of
Macy's former parent Feder-
ated Department Stores Inc.
in 2003. Two years later; he
spearheaded the $17 billion
acquisition of May, giving the
company more than 800
stores.
Here, excerpts from a re-
cent phone interview with
Lundgren:
Q: What's the biggest les-
son you learned from the
Great Recession?
A: (After the financial melt-
down), we just quickly knew
there wasn't going to be a
quick response to the con-
sumer and that this was the
time to make major changes
and to address all the
changes that perhaps we
were concerned about mak-
ing. We made structural
changes for the better As we
come out of this period ... we
are clearly benefiting.
Q: How optimistic are you
about the Christmas season?
A: In our company, we re-
ally rally around the holiday
period. We get geared up for
the Macy's Thanksgiving Day
parade. Our position is not
only to make this known on a
national scale, but also on a
local basis. Texas has their
own tree of boots. Every store
has a Christmas ornament
that's geared toward their
marketplace. ... A couple


hundred stores on the main
floor have a section of unique
gifts. This is going to be very
different from everything we
had ever done.
Q: What's the biggest finan-
cial issue facing your cus-
tomer today?
A: I think the job issue is
number one on the minds of
consumers. We (still have) a
significant number of indi-
viduals out of work. But the
dllhii ti-.- is that the people
who have a job today believe
they are going to keep their
jobs.
Q: You started your retail-
ing career in 1975 as a trainee
with Bullock's. What drew
you to retailing?
A: It was the people. ... I
had 13 job offers. ... I took a
job for less money at Bul-
lock's, but I felt if I performed
well ... I would be more likely
noticed (there) because of the
attention I received during
the interview process.
Q: Any life experiences
that have shaped you as a
leader?
A: When I was a sopho-
more in college my father
called me at the fraternity He
told me he no longer had the
funds to pay for college. If I
wanted to continue, I would
have to do it on my own. I was
19. I figured he was trying to
ruin my life.
I ended up having a job
working 40 hours a week I
started out cracking oysters
and peeling shrimp. I worked
full time and I went to school
full time, and I had very good
gr-ades. I discovered that the
best thing for me was to be
very busy all the time. I can
get a lot done, and I can do
those tasks well. That was a
big switch that went off for
me.


Should I borrow my


gifted cash to pay debt?


DEAR BRUCE: I
have a huge amount
of credit
card debt,
which I am
hoping to pay
off completely
one day My 84- -*
year-old dad
just decided to
give each of his
four children
the $12,000 he
is allowed to Bruce Wi
give tax-free
each year. He
does not have a
lot of money
and will not be able to do
this ever again, but he
wanted to do it while he
can. He does have money
from the sale of his house,
but it's not a lot. My sister
thinks we should consider
this money untouchable for
five years because we
would have to return it
should he go into a nursing
home. I think I should use
the money now to pay off
the high-interest debt and
then try to save what money
I can to replace it, with the
idea that if I ever have to
return the $12,000, I can
borrow what I need. -
D.K, via e-mail
DEAR D.K: Assuming
you are a reasonable per-
son and have fairly exam-
ined the possibility of
having to replace the
$12,000, then I would think
that your plan to use the
$12,000 to repay the high-
interest debt is the better
way to go. Obviously, if the
things that Ijust mentioned
do take place, the state (if
they decide to come after
you) will have to find a way
to force you to pay. Given
that you are amenable to
borrowing the money, I
don't have any problem. I
suspect that your sister and
perhaps the other kids are
in a little better position to
sit on the money rather
than use it the way you de-
scribed. Other things being
equal, you sound like a re-
sponsible person and given
that you are paying a very
substantial amount of high
credit card interest. I
would follow your plan.
DEAR BRUCE: I sold my
house this year I am 70
years old and did not buy
another house. Is there
such a thing as forgiveness
on your income tax if you


did not buy another prop-
erty? I will have to pay a
large amount on
my income tax. I
live on my Social
Security and a
small pension. My
yearly income is
around $15,188. -
Evelyn, via e-mail
DEAR EVE-
LYN: You said "I"
rather than "we,"
lliams so I assume that
you are unmar-
ried. In that case,
the first quarter of
a million dollars
of profit on your home is to-
tally tax-free (a married
couple's would be half a
million). Assuming that you
were living in your home
for more than three years,
you will have a substantial
tax deduction.
By all means, consult an
accountant. I don't think
you have anything to con-
cern yourself with unless
the house sold for a lot
more than the profit, and
the profit on the house ex-
ceeded that quarter-of-a-
million-dollar deduction.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 57
and plan to retire within
five years. I purchased a
condo in 2006, and in 2008
got deep into debt and
walked away from my
home. I walked away in
2008 under the impression
that it would go into fore-
closure. However, the lend-
ing company did a charge
off. I understand a charge
off, but I would like to know
if I should consider moving
back. I owe the association
fees and taxes for one year.
I can catch up in 12 months.
I'm not disputing the
charges from the associa-
tion. I just need a payment
plan, and they say they will
work with me. I would like
to offer a settlement to the
lending company in hopes
of owning the condo. Can I
move back to my condo? Is
this a good idea? I also un-
derstand that I can also do
a short sale, but would pre-
fer to pay it off. E.D., via
e-mail
DEAR E.D.: Your letter
confuses me. You said you
were under the impression
that there would be a fore-
closure. Is the property still
in your name? That can be
determined in the county
where the property is lo-


cated.
If the property is still in
your name, I am not at all
sure what your options are.
You could go back to the
lender and see if you could
work out a deal. The asso-
ciation charges are what
they are, and as you say
"they will work with you."
They have nothing to lose;
right now they have no in-
come.
It may be that the mort-
gage company still has this
property in their name and
they would like to clear the
books.
First thing to do is find
out who owns this property.
In the event that it is still in
your name, that presents
some other interesting
problems, not the least of
these is liability (should
something happen) because
I am sure at this time you
have dropped your home-
owners insurance. When
you get all these details
sorted out, get back to me
and I will try and help you.
DEAR BRUCE: My par-
ents have gifted me money
on a yearly basis with the
understanding that I would
hold onto it for them in case
they needed it. Should they
not need it, the money
would be split between my
two siblings and me. They
have decided they would
like me to distribute the
money. I am very willing
but am wondering if there
are any tax or legal ramifi-
cations for me. Am I al-
lowed to give away $30,000
to two siblings? Is there a
yearly limit? I am 57 years
old. Susan, via e-mail
DEAR SUSAN: This
should not present any
problems. You are allowed
to give $12,000 to any one
person in any one year.
That would mean $24,000
immediately, .and if you do
this before the end of this
year, the remaining $6,000
($3,000 a piece) in the next
tax year. Alternatively, if the
siblings are married, you
could give $12,000 a piece to
them and $3,000 to the
spouses, but either way,
there is no serious problem.

Send your questions to
Smart Money. PO. Box
2095. Elfers, FL 34680.
Or e-mail
bruce@brucewilliams.com.


CITRUS C OUN T



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Are you a SWM 55+
seeking a caring
relations hip with a
gracious, attractive
SWF who simply
enjoys life. Life Is a
banquet lets enjoy
It together Respond
To: Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1660 P
106 W. Maln St
Inverness, FI 34450


I KNOW you are out
there In your late 70's
would love to hear
from you. Write me
so we can talk and
take It form there.
Citrus Co Chronicle
Blind Box 1657P
106 W. Main St
Inverness, FI 34450


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Needed, no nights
or weekends.
Commission Based
Pay. Apply @ 6421
W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa Fl. 34428


BEVERLY HILLS 2/1
'h-AC fenc'd yd. $575
Mo. $500 sec. No Pets/
smoke (352) 746-2932


CARE GIVER,
Preferably Sugarmill
Woods, 30 yrs. Exp.
(352) 382-2695


CITRUS HILLS
3/3/1/2 on 2 AC. $825.
$850, Sec352.628.5272
CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat. & Sat. 8640 Sarazen
Dr. (352) 897-4754
INVERNESS
2/2/1.5 Scenlc views,
quiet neighborhood,
Irg. yd., tile/berber.
Super clean, $700 Mo.
(352) 476-4896
POOL. ROUTE
HERNANDO Net
$230K. + year. Will
train. Guaranteed
accounts, $651K.
full price. Other
routes available
(772) 220-3306
www.poolroute
salescoker
NPRS Inc. Broker


INVERNESS
Studio, no dep. $400.
mo. Vicki 352-341-1277
Mattress & Boxspring
Full size, brand new,
wrought Iron head
board. Linnens Incl.
$400.(352) 746-1535
RECEPTIONIST
F/T Mon.-Frl. for
Crystal River Office.
(352) 257-8273


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
No titles, OK.
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$


$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389

A Better Paid Price for
Uinlwnt~eJucks &
Cars. Countryside Tires
call 352-726-2503

Cash Paid For Junk
Vehicles. No Title, No
Problems Call Mark
Today (352)426-2334

FREE PICK UP
JUNI Appl.'s Scrap
Metal, Mowers, Etc
Call J.P. (352) 613-0108

FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949


Will Haul Vehicles
& Anything Metal.
(352) 637-0004

1 Lab Mix
very special dog,
needs gentle home.
fenced yid.
Hound,
to good family
(352) 949-8373

Cats
1 Male and I Female
(352) 697-0006

fortilizor/horse Manure
mixed with pine shavings
great for gardens etc. u
load and hual it away
call 352-628-9624


Excell. Home for any
exotic birds or poultry
U-R unable to care for.
(352) 726-9966

Free Approx. 1 yr.
Male, Fixed
Yorkide/Schnouzer
mix, all shots, friendly
(352) 634-3753


Free Horse Manure
& shavings
Great foi garden
and planting,
(352) 746-7044


KITTENS
3 months old, medium
gray & white hair, flea'd
and
8 month, white
w/ blue eyes
(352) 464-0999


I I I 1 11 1--- -- ---- ......... I I


--j I


I I


I


I


D4,Sl No.%N, Novizmmmi I t, 20 10


BU sINiNss















FREE to Good Home
Beautiful Kittens Littei
flained 3mos. old, &
7 mos. old. veiy lov-
ina.(352) 726-2594


FREE HORSE
Manure, U Haul
(352) 789-5770


S- - - - - - - - I

November


b Reader Recipes






.. -
I I






I I

I I





Martha's Coconut Cake

Submitted by: Martha Daddio of Inverness
Ingredients:
1 Box of moist white cake mix
*3 large eggs
3/4 cup of water
1/4Tablespoon of vegetable oil
1 Teaspoon of coconut extract
1 (16oz.) can of coconut liquid
Topping:
1 package of whip topping (Use as the directions indicate) I
I 1 (15oz.) bag of coconut flakes I
Instructions:
For cake. In a large mixing bowl, add the cake mix, eggs, water,
vegetable oil, and coconut extract. Use a electric mixer, on
medium speed for 15 minutes or until all ingredients are well
blended. Pour the mixture into two round cake pans. Spray the
two cake pans with unstick cooking spray. Place in a 375 degree
oven for 35 minutes or until toothpick comes out clear. Start
making your topping by using a medium size bowl, add package
of whip topping, vanilla extract and low-fat milk. Use a electric
blender, mix until topping comes out fluffy. Set topping in the
refrigerator until cakes are done cooking. After cakes are done
and ready to come out of the oven, with a folk poke holes in the
cake all over.Then place cakes on rack to cool.Then shake the can
of coconut liquid and place it in the hot oven for 5 minutes to get
it warm, so the coconut liquid will melt inside the can. After the
cakes are cooled, pour the coconut liquid on both cakes. With a I
knife spread all over cakes. Take the whip topping and spread
I over the bottom layer cake, sprinkling coconut flakes on it. Then
add the top layer cake repeating with whip topping and coconut
flakes all around, including the sides. Prepare time: 20 minutes.

For a complete list of

I reader submitted recipes, go to
I www.chronicleonline.com

I (Keyword Search: Recipes) I



OR-GAINIC5 TO GO
A fresh alternative & cost effective
way to put Organics on your table.
Become a member today!

SK$RS
130 N Pine Ave Inverness
Mon-Fri 9AM-6PM
Sat 9 AM- 4PM
ph 341-2777 www.skoors.com I
e-mail: organicstogo@skoors.com .


Couch, dark brown,
micro fiber, good
shape, just need spot
(352) 422-7742
after 9am


(:tItI' (StUtNIII (11 i) (tfIR)NI(CJ.


I ime


SUNDAY, NoVIlMBIItR 14, 2010 D5


1


Kittens
6 wks. old. Yellow Lab
Male 1 yr. old. Owner
must give away due to
health reasons.
(352)419-6451
Terrier Mix
Male, neutered,
weighs 14 lbs. All shots
and hearlworm pre-
ventatives up to date.
Good with Children.
(352) 746-4571
TOY POODLE
Male nuet 5 y.o.
white, paper trained
under 10 Ibs
(352) 628-9065




FRESH MUSTARDS,
COLLARDS &
TURNIPS 302-1600

SWEET CORN AT
BELLAMY GROVE
Located 1.5 mi, east
on Eden Dr. from
Hwy. 41, Inverness,
*GREENS, SQUASH*
(352) 726-6378
CLOSED SUNDAYS




Black Lab
Male, older dog,
weighs 100bs. His
name is Caeser. Had
choker chain on. Lost
off of Tom Mason Dr.
Black Male ShiTzu
w/white chest
lost Near Floral City
Subs on 41
(352) 419-7100
Chihuahua
Tan, male, lost in Inver-
ness off of N. Fitzpatrick.
(352) 613-7359
German Shepherd
Male, 9 mos. old black
& white, Was wearing
collar w/license &
rabies shot info. Lost
in Lecanto area
REWARD (352) 302-2063
German Shepherd
Male, 9 mos. old,black
& tan. Dog needs
medicine. Lost off of
Country Club Dr.
(352) 794-6249

Male brown & white,
green collar w/black
paw prints on it. Lost in
the Hernando area, off
of Spooner, & Bitzer.
(352) 257-0228
Miraculous Medal
and chain in
Homosassa or Crystal
River area, great
sentimental Value
and remembrance
REWARD
(352) 628-2119
Orange Fluffy Male Cat
Approx. 8 month old
Lecanto. behind
Dunkin Doughnuts
Heartbroken
(352) 527-4145
Rat Terrier
Brown female. Lilly, red
collar, lost in Copeland
Park area 11/5/10
(352) 795-7282
Reward!
Chihuahua & Jack
Russell Mix. Female,
small reddish, brown,
wearing red collar.
Answers to Zippy.
Lost on Hwy 44 by
Dan's Clam Stand.
Owner heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302


g 'sMyc k(


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Compulei available,
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r BANKRUPTCY
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(352) 860-1533

CATHETER USERS
Medicare/most
private insurances
pay for up to 200
disposable
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No more
cleaning/reusing. No
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YARN DONATIONS
NEEDED
Help is needed from
retired craters. I am in
need of yarn that is clut-
tering your closet!lPlease
help. i crochet for many
charities and need good
usable yarn. will pickup!
claudine @ 613-0512
leave message

CAT
ADOPTIONS


Full-Time Clerical
position. Filing, light
accounting, and
running office
errands musl hove
clean driving record
and be at leasl
21 years of age.
Entry-level position
plus benefits,
Submit application
In person to
Crystal Chevrolet
in Homosassa,
Crystal Chrysler/
Dodge/Jeep
in Homosassa
or Inverness,
or Crystal Nlssan
In Homosassa.
Send resumes to
cscott@crvstalautos
.corn
or fax to
(352) 417-0810.
No phone calls
please

P/T RECEPTIONIST
Needed for Busy Ins.
Agency. Must be a
multi tasker. Office
exp. pref. Flex. Hrs.
(352) 746-7016




HAIR STYLIST
& NAIL TECH
For established salon
In Crystal River.
352-422-5916


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CPR-AED-Med/Tech
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352-341-PREP (7737)


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EXP. MEDICAL
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Must also be Exp.
with Medicare.
Email Resume
To:medicalbillingfl
@gmail.com



Nursing
Supervisor-Home
Health

Come join our team
Citrus Memorial
Health System Home
Health agency has
been awarded top
agency Home Care
Elite for the third
consecutive year.
Ideal candidate must
have a current FL RN
license. Supervisory
experience preferred.
One year of current
nursing experience in
med/surg or equiva-
lent area, one year of
home health nursing.
Responsible for the
supervision of clinical
staff, coordination of
patient care and
agency services and
assessing the clinical
staff performance.
Please call
352-341-6069 for
details or apply
online at
www.citrusmh.com.
CMHS is an EOE.


with proven results

in quality and

patient safety"

Q nthia Hein:mari. P-N.. 1HRM
rm l,' ofS'i ",'_-, 1 -A2,'011






$ NEW RATES $ COMPLETION BONUS $

$ MONTHLY HOUSING STIPEND $
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center is dedicated to
quality patient care with a personal touch.


RN OPPORTUNITIES
Resource Manager


OTHER OPPORTUNITIES
Chemistry Supervisor
hA.,I,.l Thnnynict


Seasonal, Full Time, Per Diem: ivleuldil lTe.UlliUo
Med/Surg, Telemetry, ICU, OR, OB, Pathology Transcrip
Comprehensive Rehab, Wound Care Physical Therap

SEVEN RIVERS


oiylst
ptionist
list


REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
Apply in person or online:
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax 352.795.8464 Job Line 352.795.8418
Email: Linda.Macaulay@hma.com www.srrmc.com
EOE/DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
coaNs_______________w_______________^ ____


K35


A


BANKRUPTCY
SPECIAL $175.
(352) 201-8594

BANKRUPTCY,
DIVORCE & More
(352) 860-1533















A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates
Free est.(352)860-1452
A Whole Tree Service
Taxidermist, Pressure
Wash. Lic. & Insured
Free Est. (352) 697-1421
David's Tree, Lawn &
Landscape Specialist.
Lie. & Ins. Free Est.
(352)302-5641
Carey's Tree Service
Compl Tree Care
lic/ins- Firewood
Sales/del 352-364-1309
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling, Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
lns.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827




Affordable Home
Computer Repairs
Free Est & Inspect.
212-1551/422-6020
CITRUS COMPUTERS
On site computer repair
$89 Virus Removal
352-613-2958
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visal MCard
352-637-5469




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


Choice. Easy Payment
Options, 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129
ALL-IN-ONE Painting &
Home Repairs. Gutter
cleaning & screen
repairs (352) 406-0201







FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleaning..352- 465-6631
Handyman Dave
Painting. Press clean.
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./ns.
(352) 726-9998
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int.Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845



Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 30 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435



AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Lic#99990001273



REFINSIHING Bath tubs
& Kit. counter tops,
many colors w/war-
ranty (352) 302-6130

The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in
handicap. Lic/Ins.
#2441. 352-634-1584




SHADY VIEW CANVAS
Awnings 'Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
Repairs .352 613-2518




CARE GIVER,
Preferably Sugarmlll
Woods, 30 yrs. Exp.
(352) 382-2695
HOME HEALTH CARE
Christian lady, Priv. duty
15+ yrs. exp., Ref.
352-422-6114


Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-464-1397



Cleaning Res./Comm.
Pressure Washing,
Lawn maint. Lic./Ins.
(352) 414-6681
Dailey Home Cleaning
Family owned/operated
267-640-6850

DENNIS CLEANING
SERVE. COMM OFFICE
CLEANING & BUILDING
MAINT 30 yrs exp.
Lic & Ins. 746-5694
MAIDS ON CALL *
Lic. Handyman /
Pr. Wash / Windows /
Holiday Decorating
Lawn, Landscaping,
Pavers, Lic & Ins.
(0)726-8077(c)400-0516



Handyman Dave
Painting, Press clean,
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Husband/Wife Team
Aluminum/Screen Con-
tractor, Window Wash-
ing & Gutter cleaning
628-0562 (CBC1257141)



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



SUBURBAN IND. INC,
Husband/Wife Team
Aluminum/Screen Con-
tractor, Window Wash-
ing & Gutter Clean outs
628-0562 (CBCI257141)


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
Options. 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129









Handyman Dave
Painting, Press clean,
Repairs, Hauling, Clean
up(352) 726-9570
Pic PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
Roofs w/no pressure
lic/ins I 352-341-3300
picardselfstorage.com




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Llc.#5863 352-746-3777

Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Malnt/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smaillRell able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
Options, 25 yrs exp
lic/Ins Dale 586-8129

AFFORDABLE! FAST
RELIABLE Most Repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *
AFFORDABLE! FAST
RELIABLE Most Repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
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1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
Ou i tl1


Docks, Any Home
Repair.CBC #1253431
(352) 464-3748






Handyman Dave
Painting, Press clean.
Repairs, Hauling. Clean
up(352) 726-9570
L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lic/lns.
(352) 302-8348
LABOR READY
We Do Anything *
Indoors/Outdoors $12hr
Visa/Master, 257-0624
MAIDS ON CAL *
Home/Office Cleaning
Lic. Handyman /
Pr. Wash / Windows /
Holiday Decorating
Lawn, Landscaping,
Pavers, Lic & Ins.
(o)726-8077(c)400-0516
Residential Contractor
Repair, remod., or build
mobile homes/homes.
Free Est. Lic. CRC-
1330081 (352) 949-2292



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV Installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL
Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
Special $40hr.lst hour
352 -302-2366
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint &
repair. Guardian
Homestandby, &
Centurion. Cert. Tech.
352-621-1248
#ER00015377


L 6J2 7-,x' |L-;

VACATION IN i *P-
Refinishing
YOUR OWN patio&
BACKYARD... Drveways
e Interlocklng
Order Your Pool Todayl Brick Pavers
Weekly
P oolService
Lic. & Insured
CPC1456565

A352.400.3188


ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
352 422-7279 *
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencina.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc132549 302-9269




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Slabs
Lic25791.. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, curbing,
flocrete. River rock
reseals & repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repairstaining &
garage Firs. Recession
PricesI 352-527-1097
JC' CONCRETE
SPECIALTY
Slabs. Driveways.
Patio, Sidewalks
Tractor Work Ilc/Ins
#2896 352-220-9330
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic, #1476, 726-6554




Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services 40
Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768


COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838
REPAIRS Wall & Ceiling
Sprays Int/Ext. Painting
Since 1977
Lic/Ins 352-220-4845



Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755



All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulinTgSite
Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755
EVERYTHING from
Clearing to Landscape
Fill, Rock, Debris lic/Ins
628-3436/ 586-7436



L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Lc/Ins,
(352) 302-8348
LAWNCARE 'N More
mulch, trim beds, tree
removal, fall clean up,
haullng352 220-6761
McDonough's Lawn
Service Free Est,
Yard Maint* Hedge trim
* Weed Pulling. 201-2202



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
Split, 4 X 8 Stack $80
Delivered/Stacked.
352-344-2696
Season Oak 4x8 Stack
$75. Free Delivery
(508) 904-1328
(352) 410-2550


SPromote Your
Service Here And
See Your Business
Grow

only 17 perdav
Run 3 (Mon., Wed., Sat.)
or 7 days weekly
Call Gale for more
information at
563-3273


SEASONED SPLIT
Firewood,$75 per stack
(4x8) Free Delivery
(352) 527-8352




WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




AFFORDABLE
DRAIN FIELDS
New & Replacement
Lic. #CFC1427970 & Ins.
352-628-3436, 586-7436


ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6" Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Music Lessons
Piano, Organ, Keyboard
at your home. Limited
openings. 422-7012




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


CNA/LPN
Join our team of
Quality Healthcare
Professionals.
We have full and
part-time positions
available on third shift
(llpm-7:30am).
If you have 1-2 years
nursing home
experience and are
available weekends,
please fax your
resume to
352-854-9730
or apply on site.
Excellent benefits
and shift differentials
available to qualified
candidates.
TimberRidge Nursing
and Rehab Ctr.
9848 SW 11 Oth Street
SR 200 1 ml. N
of CR 484
EOE/DFWP

DIETARY AIDE

PRN/PT positions for
our skilled nursing
facility. We offer a
good salary & work
environment.
Apply in person.
Citrus Health and
Rehabilitation
Center 701 Medical
Court E Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit


Come see

our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A. till 4:00 P.
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofspha.oro.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Corner of 44 and
Conant.
Look for the big white
building with the
bright paw prints.




FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.,t$S 5 lb 9cl/$71b
off boat & delivered
(727) 771-7500


Owner/Manager Nane:
Gary Philip Badessa and Donna Badessa g

Business Name:
Suburban Industries. Inc.
How long has the business beeoo in operation
In the Citrus County aren?
Thie cooperation was started In 2003, although
before that we did sub-contract aluminum work
from 1996 until 2003.
Describe the service/product you offer?
We are a state certified building contractor that
specializes in a iuminurn structures such as screen
enclose as, glass roons, Florida rooms. W also
hive the, knowledge and experience to take onl
larger projects such as constructing residential and
commercial buildings.
What do your customers like best about your
business?
I think it is o Ur attention to detail on our projects.
We take goat care onil our cuIstomners construction
projects as if we were working on our own home.
We also make sure we keep all scheduled
appointments with our customers. If we can not
make it we will always call to reschedule.
What is something your business offers that
people don't expect?
It is usually thie hands on aspect of tine
corIstluctioin as we usuLally Iuse no sub-contractors.
Whien ylou hire Sulburban Industries, Inc. you wilt
see Gary Badossa on job in chaige of thio
construction. Also mty wife Oorina hanridles thile
office work. We aro a family oriented business.
Why did you choose tills business?
Whon I was a young man I worked for my dad in
thie nialuminumr business. He was Ini aluminumn111
contractor In New England for about 30 years until
moving to Flolida. It has always boon family
oliOntod buHsiess Heo tns passed away anid I hivo
been working It constrLuction for 25 yenrs 1mtyself, It
is something that is just i tie blood, sort of spoak,
What are your business hours, address, phone
nunmbor and e-mnlii?
HouL. .: Monday Satiulday, e:00 'In 5:00 p1t1
We are located in Locarito. ,Iordi.
352-628-0562
aluinrtI tumtwiz g nlI.cot


S1 ,. i




ir "A -A- AA"- <
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966






ADON/RN UNIT
MANAGER

Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a
progressive customer
service oriented
team. Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and manage-
ment abilities, great
organizational skills
and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Excellent benefits

Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
DLSpangleri@
SouthernLTC.com
,An EEO/AA Employer
M/F/V/D


GRANNY NANNIES

CNA'S & HHA'S,
Needed immediately.
Must be certified.
(352) 560-4229
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experienced only.
skilled phlebotomist
a must, all others
need not a apply.
Please fax resume to
352-628-1620

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

For Busy Dr's Office
In Dunnellon 16-24
Hrs. Wk. Exp. Pref.
Email Resume To:
jhmedassistant
@gmail.com

RECEPTIONIST

F/T, for Busy Medical
Office. Must Have
Medical Experience.
Fax Resume To:
(352)746-2236

RESEARCH DATA
COORDINATOR
Exp'd w/Oncology
Clinical trials.
Full Time W/Benefits.
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-6333

RN/LPN
Immediate Need
for physically
disabled young adult,
INTERIM HEALTH CARE
(352)637-3111
Fax Resume
(352) 637-1176











D6 sUNim,'r. Novri~sM-ic 14, 2010


info 352 564-8378 or





$$$$$$$$$$$
Are you currently
Making $40. hr?
Would you like to
Make$40. hr.?
New programs
starting soon.
No Experience
Necessary
Training Provided
As much over-
time Available
As you would like
3 Positions
Available
Call or Fax Dana
Phone
352-726-7722
Fax 352-726-6813




EXP. SERVERS &
LINE COOKS.
Homossa
(352) 228-7353
Servers-Cooks
Utility

EGGHEADS
in Hernando
Publix Plaza CR486
& Forest Ridge Blvd.

We'll Miss You,
George
George has been our
extraordinary
chef/kitchen
manager and is
leaving for a tremen-
dous opportunity.
He was the leader of
our kitchen and was
always happy and
dedicated beyond
description. He could
plan menus, hire and
train our other staff
members, manage
his budget with the
expertise of an exec-
utive while producing
wonderful dishes that
made our member-
ship proud. if you
think you could fill
George's shoes, we
would like to talk with
you. Please
submit your resume
along with an enthusi-
astic cover letter to
Continental Country
Club, 50 Continental
Blvd, Wildwood, FL
34785.


Sale H


Best Kept Secret
in Citrus Co.

Looking for energetic
self motivated, sales
people for great
oppt., well Est Co.
w/proven record of
success unlimited
earning potential, fun
atmosphere, in depth
training. Mon Fri
NO weekends
1-866-777-1166

Local Real estate
Company

Looking for a dyna-
mitic individual for a
leadership position.
Great opportunity for
the right person.
Fax resume to
352-746-7203 or call
352-746-7113

SALES POSITION
40 hours/week.
Monday through Friday,
$8/hr. Must have
retail experience
with references.
Background check req,
employer will pay.
Send Resume to
Citrus Co. Chronicle
Blind Box 1659P
1624 N. Meadowerest
Blvd. Crystal River
Florida 32248

Telemarketing

Regional Builder has
opportunities for tele-
marketers to cultivate
large prospect
database. No cold
calling. Late after-
noon, evening and
weekend hours with
flexible schedule.
Must be personable
and computer
literate. Fax resume
to 352-746-7707.
sleeman@citrus
hills.com

WANTED
Highly Self Motivated
SALES PEOPLE

Company truck Is
provided. Paid
vacation & Holidays,
Benefits available.
Apply In Person ONLY
9am to 4 pm, Mon-Fri
Brays Pest Control
3447 E.Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Inverness, FL
DFWP




AC Service Tech
5 + years exp. required,
clean driving record,
must pass drug test.
Clean Background.
Start Immediately
(352) 564-8822



AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified -
Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866) 314-3769
FREE
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Friday Nov. 19th
8a-4p @ A.T.S.
Lecanto Campus
Morning refreshments
& lunch provided.
Earn a $500 scholar-
ship. Attendees will
operate heavy
equipment Space
limited to 18.
Call for details
1-866-933-1575 Ext 0
RUNEQUIPMENT.COM


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Needed, no nights
or weekends.
Commission Based
Pay. Apply @6421
W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa Fl. 34428
INSURANCE
REPRESENTATIVE
NEEDED.
Most earn $50K-$ 100K1<
or more. Coll our
branch office at
(407)296-5985.
Ask tar Steve Landaal
or e-mail
steven.landaal@
insphereis.com. Visit
www,inspherels.com/st
even.landaal

Key Training
Center

P/T Receptionist.
Answer phones.
Proficient in Word,
Excel, etc. Excellent
customer service
skills. HS diploma/
GED required.

P/T Positions Avail.
in group home
setting. Assist Devel-
opmentally Disabled
adults with daily living
and employment
skills. HS Diploma/GED
required
F/T Instructor position
available working
with Developmen-
tally Disabled adults
in classroom setting.
Four yr. college
degree or four yrs.
experience working
with DD population
required.
Apply in Person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
"E.O.E.*

OTR Drivers
Wanted Food grade
Tanker Drivers Needed.
Class A-CDL w/tanker
endorsement
Competitive pay,
Benefits, Guaranteed
time off Prefer 2yrs
experience.
(800)569-6816
www.ottery
transportation.com
RECEPTIONIST

FIT Mon.-Fri. for
Crystal River Office.
(352) 257-8273


CHkoNiCLE


RUN YOUR OWN
BUSINESS.
Applications being
accepted for single
copy newspaper
routes.
Apply at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.
In Crystal River.


C~i' ibNidiE


Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program.
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job
Placement Assistance!
(877)994-9904



$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOWIII
$$$ As seen on TV.
$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need
$500-$500.000++within
48/hrs? Low rates AP-
PLY NOW BY PHONE
Call Todayl Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com
CASH NOW!
Get cash for your
structured settlement
or annuity payments.
Call
J.G. Wentworth.
Rated A+ by the
Better Business Bureau.
1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536)




INVERNESS Dntwn.
52 Seat Restaurant, Lse.
Turn Key 352-344-5234
REALTOR ONE, LLC
Gayland Reed, Broker
Considering Selling
or Buying a Business,
Go to my web site.
www.realtoronellc.com
*Italian Restaurant
*Pizza/Salad/Sub To Go
*Graphic SIgn/Print Co.
or Call 352-229-5273
WeGetOurGroceries
Free.com




POOL ROUTE

HERNANDO Net
$230K. + year. Will
train. Guaranteed
accounts, $651K.
full price. Other
routes available
(772) 220-3306
wwwmoolroute

NPRS Inc. Broker
REALTOR ONE, LLC
Gayland Reed, Broker
Considering Selling
or Buying a Business,
Go to my web site.
www.realtoronellc.com
*Italian Restaurant
*Pizza/Salad/Sub To Go
*Graphic Sign/Print Co.
or Call 352-229-5273



"OCCUPIED JAPAN"
FIGURINES. Eleven
pieces. Great selection.
Great prices from $5 to
$12 each. Call 527-6709




2 Collectible Dolls
Cinderella & Bride Doll
2 feet tall w/ stands
Still In boxes $100 ea.
(352) 746-9896
CHINA Beautiful 40 piece
Haviland Bavaria China
Forever Spring Pattern
$125 or OBO
352-465-8495


HANDCR HETED
dolls various colors gift
for child for xmas/b'day
$25.ea 352-637-2881


# A A A i
Tell that special
person
SHappy Birthday
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
^ --A-AA -


SpasHotubs


4 person, pearl finish, 6
x 6. strong jets, incis.
steps & cover $1,000
obo. 352-344-1413
HOT TUB
Dream maker, eclipse,
4 person partible spa,
cover, food tray.
chemicals, standard
outlet, all weather,
resistant, $1,300
(352) 344-2746



30" WHIRLPOOL
ELECTRIC STOVE
White all works $75.00
352-419-5483
AMANAALMOND COL-
ORED REFRIGERATOR
W/ICE MAKER Works
GREAT! $200.00
464-0316
ARCTIC KING Window
A/C w/remote.
6000BTU, Used lwk,
while A/C was down.
Cost $138., Sell $79.
352-382-3879
Dishwasher & Electric
Dryer, Used,
$100. ea.
(352) 503-7350
DISHWASHER
Kenmore. black face
good cond. $125
(352) 419-4019
FRIDGE
Haler 26cf 67"x31 top/bot
stainless w/ice mkr $300;
9.6 Mere Outboard
short shaft runs perfect
$375 352-503-7450
or 352-586-3551
FRIDGIDAIRE WASHER
& DRYER SET 3 years
old, works great $300
obo 352-697-0953
FRIGIDAIRE
Refrigerator, Fridge 20.6
cu/ft, freezer 5.8 cu/ft
total 26.4 cu ft good
cond $225
(352) 564-1280
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equlpment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Uc.&Ins. CAC 057914
Large Side by Side
Refrigerator, glass top
stove, under cabinet
microwave &
dishwasher, Black
$800.obo 352 -344-9931
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR, washers
dryers,FREE pick up
352-303-0029
Tappan dishwasher
$45.
good working order
352-628-2150
WASHER OR DRYER
$135 Each. Reliable like
new, exc. cond. Can
deliver 352 263-7398
Washer
Roper exc. cond.
$135. Microwave
Samsung $25.
(352) 419-5826


CHERRYWOOD BOOK-
CASES Commercial
Freestanding 6 ft, adjust-
able shelves. $50. 4 ft,
$40. 727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS
Adjustable,Fabric
Covered.Home Office or
Business. $35 each
727-463-4411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS Ergonomic
Seating for Personalized
Comfort.Fabric Covered.
$50 each. 727-463-4411
FILE CABINETS Com-
mercial Pre-Owned Metal
2 Drawer Lateral. Graphic
Color. $40 727-463-4411
FILE CABINETS
Preowned Metal Com-
mercial 5 drawer.Putty
Color.$125. 3 draw Putty
Color. $65. 727-463-4411
STACKABLE CHAIRS
Excellent for Reception or
Breakrooms. Fabric Cov-
ered. $25 each.
727-463-4411




ART AUCTIONS TO
BENEFIT CHILDREN'S
CHARITY -
NO BUYER'S PREMIUM
and several artworks
with no reserve
Chagall, Picasso,
Dali, Miro, Max,
Neiman, Tarkay,
Malmon, Pino, Agam,
Gockel and morel
FREE food, drinks and
raffle prizes. BATERBYS
PALM BEACH,
Saturday,
November 13th -
4pm Preview,
5pm Auction -
13900 Jog Road
Delray Beach, Fl.
33446. BATERBYS-
ORLANDO,
Saturday,
November 20 4pm
Preview, 5pm
Auction 9101
International Dr.,
Unit 1008, Orlando, FL
32819. RSVP at
www.baterbys.com
or call (866)537-1004
or email
follauctlon2010@
baterbys.com
AB#2746 AU#3750


10"TABLE SAW RYOBI
Sliding Table
EXCELLENT COND.
$195 Call 527-6425
DRYWALL STILTS
Brand New adjustable
15" to 30"
$150.00. Call Ray @
352-464-0573
DRYWALL STILTS Brand
New adjustable 15" to 30"
$150.00. Call Ray @
352-464-0573
JOINTER 6X36
CRAFTSMAN W/LEGS.
Very good cond.
$195 Call 527-6425
RADIAL ARM SAW
8 1/4" RYOBI
Excellent Cond.
$195 Call 527-6425
Ryobi 10" Table
Saw with stand
$75.00(352) 746-0100




32" Quasar TV
w/ remote good cond.
$50.
(352) 628-0818
48" FLAT SCREEN
TV $600.
352-746-1705
54" HITACHI TV 1080i
LCD TV in good shape
$350 352-341-5755 or

Stereo
McIntosh MX 113 tuner
pre amp. Macintosh
MC2105 amp. Pair of
XR14 speakers, all
books & paper work.
Early 70's all like new.
$1,500 firm.
(352) 697-3468




BROTHER WORD PRO-
CESSOR for child learn
type & comp portable
$25.cash 3526372881
CITRUS COMPUTERS
On site computer repair
$89 Virus Removal
352-613-2958
COMPUTER
Complete system,
LCD monitor, delivered
and set up. $299.
(352) 270-3779
Computer Repair
we come to you. Call
today! visa/mc. 352-
212-1551/422-6020
DELL LAPTOP D610
WXP PRO wireless $
195.00 MS office Internet
ready 3523823895
DESKTOP WXPPRO
Includes Monitorkey
Bmouse speakers &
(printer new)$195.00
352-382-3895
DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




Tractor
Hinomoto E 2304, 4x4,
w/lIoader,thls tractor will
do the job. Good Cond.
$5,500. (352) 621-0316




Patio Set
All aluminum, glass top
table & 4 cushioned
chairs. Exc. cond. $95.
(352) 746-5157


2 BEDROOM SETS
co nleporary style. 1
dalk/ I Ilghiln 300ea,
Complete liv. rm. set
green ftubric, Exc
cond, $600. 746-1705
Computer Desk
& New Chair. Very
good cond. $50.
(352) 613-5023
Couch & Love Seat,
Sage Gieen, has 4
recliners, brand new
pd $1,200 asking $800
Kitchen Set, wooden 4
chairs, brand new pd
$300 sell $175 795-0363
COUCH NEUTRAL
COLORS GOOD
CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
Dual Recliner
Lazy Boy, light
tan-taupe, New
$1,600 asking $800.
Call (352) 746-0022


HI TOP TABLE, Beveled
glass top with 2 bar stools
$300 & Full Mattress set
$85 -352-266-9434
LEATHER LIVING ROOM
SET. In original plastic,
never used. Orig price
$3000, Sacrifice $975.
Can deliver. Call Bill
(407) 574-4955
Maple Welsh
Cabinet
3 Glass doors, 4V/2'x6'.
$200.(352) 382-4481
Media Cabinet
cherry wood, holds 300+
CD's, swing out door,
$85.
352-270-8250
OAK BOOKCASE Solid
Wood, 4 ft. Freestanding,
3 Adjustable Shelves.
$50 727-4634411
PAUL'S FURNITURE
Reopen for Season
Tues-Fri 9-5 Sat 9-2
Homosassa 628-2306
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628-0808
RECLINER W/BUILT IN
PHONE & MASSAGE
Tan Plaid Only $75.00
464-0316
SMALL COMPUTER /
WRITING DESK Black.
No wobble. $20 firm
860-2475
SOFA/SLEEPER
& love seat. florid
style, 3 tables qlass top
& 2 lamps $600.
(352) 382-2620


SOLID PINE
BOOK SHELF Head
Board w/ 6 drawers
King frame, exc cond
$250.(352) 746-4901
USED FURNITURE
Used King Mattress
set-$250.00
Lazboy
Recllner-$50.00
Call 352-257-5722
for details
WOOD JCP 3 TIER
center holds TV,
xbox,wii,books, etc nice in
kids room $75.cash
352-637-2881


CRAFTSMAN
Green riding tractor
lawn mower, 42" cut
deck, like new $750.
obo(352) 382-1616
LAWN MOWER
weedeater 4.75HP push
low hours
$95.00 352-527-2398
M.T.D. Rider
12HP 38" cut $200 firm.
Murry Push Mower
3.5 B&S engine
20" cut $35.00
(352) 302-6069




Gas Range 30"
works great $120
Microwave Oven works
great $25.
(352)212-1751
WEEPING YAUPON
HOLLY TREE 20 ft. tall,
very healthy, you dig up,
$100. 352-249-7017




CITRUS HILLS
Moving Sale, Fri. -Sun.
9A.-2P. Sports memo-
rabilia, art, turn., hse
hid., tools & much
morel 652 N.
Spendabuck Dr.
CITRUS SPRINGS
sat. & Sat. 8640 Sarazen
Dr. (352) 897-4754
CRYSTAL RIVER
MOVING SALE
9-4p Everyda
337 NE 11th St
DUNNELLON
Multi Family,Cedar
Cove, Sat.-Sun. 8a.-3p.
Wood burning stove,
motorcycle lift, trench-
ers, toys, 60"clawfoot
table & Bowfront Cabi-
net all Tiger Oak. '90
Suburban 4x4, '87
Subaru. 8938 N.
Cascade Pt. Off of C39
HERANDO
Sat. & Sun. Until 5pm
Honda Scooter, 6' 45
Cal. Black hawk,
Schwinn men's bike.
fish/fly rods & reels,
fly's tools, clothing.
Lots of Good Stuff
1163 E. Getty Lane
352-586-8946
LECANTO,BEV
HILLS AREA
ESTATE Sale 11/13-14.
7:30 A.-? 2726 W.Fairfax
Ct, FumArt, Etc
RIVER LAKES MANOR
Paring Down Sale
tools, hsehld. bdg
materials & more
Fri Sat Sun 8-5
follow signs from
Delight or Orchid off
Rt 200 out of Hemando
to 4556 E. Shorewood.


Sat & Sun 8-1p
6065 E. Loring Ln



TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
BIG jobs, small jobs,
$25 + $25/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



CLOTHING Women's
2x-3x, 100 pcs. Nothing
fancy. $45 for all.
601-6279; 228-2076
KNIT COAT Handmade
3/4 LNG NVER USED SZ
12 CREAM COLOR $40.
CASH 352-637-2881
MEN'S 5 pair light wt
slacks sz34 $50.
5pair med weight slacks
sz34 $50. 352-637-2881
MEN'S SUITS gray lei-
sure,1 Tan LEE,sz34
$30.ea, 1 BLAZER LRG
$45. Dk Grn never worn
352-637-2881


2 BASE CABINETS
36Hx15W white,2 Ig
drawers, ex. cond.never
(352)382-5297
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
No titles, ok.
J.W. 352-228-9645
Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
AMERITRAC 255 70
R17 (4) Really nice!! Only
asking $140 for the set!
(352) 551-1810
BAR MIRRORS Various
Beer and Liquor.Great for
your Business or Game
Room $50-$75 each.
727-463-4411
BEAR WHITETAIL
HUNTER COMPOUND
BOW- adjustable, in soft
case, Ex+., it's a beauty,
$70. 352-628-0033
BICYCLE MIRROR,
EASY TO INSTALL. $10
352.503.5319
BINGO SEAT CUSHION
WITH BACK FLAP $10
CAN E-MAIL PICS
637-2949
BINGO SEAT CUSHION
WITH BACK SEAT FLAP
$10 CAN E-MAIL PICS
637-2949
CAMERA TRIPOD, 54 in
EXTENSION. $8
352.503.5319
CHAIN SAW, ELECTRIC,
101IN., 11 AMPS $30
352.503.5319
COUCH NEUTRAL
COLORS GOOD CONDI-
TION $50 352-613-0529
DINOSAURS, for school
or play 12 different,
hard rubber life like
animals, about 14" ea.
very realistic, $85. for
all obo(352) 489-3914
after 11am
DOG KENNELL 8X10X8
CHAIN LINK KENNEL
ASKING $125.00. CON-
TACT JAMES
(352)344-8359
ERA REAL ESTATE
JACKET & SKIRT Size
10. Worn once. $45.00
Call Ruth 352-382-1000
FORMAL SHIRTS White
- pleated size 17 34/35
sleeve. 2 wing tip and 1
pointed collar. $8 each.
Like new. 352-746-1908


Chronicle


Classifieds


In Print


& Online









Cl

ft v /


i~y
~
A- ~
= -


-
WIDE $10 352.503.5319
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@$ 5 lb. 9ct/$7lb
off boat & delivered
(727) 771-7500
GAS GRILL SUNBEAM
GOOD CONDITION $50
352-613-0529
GENERATOR
5600 Watts, brand new
never used,
$450 firm
(352) 637-6310,
leave message
GENERATOR
6000 watt General pwr.
13 hp $650.
Troy Bilt Tiller 318 cc
20" tilling width $650
(352) 795-5682
GOODYEAR 245 70
R16 (2) Really nice tread.
Only asking $70 for the
pair! (352) 551 1810
HAM GEAR Ham gear for
sale. Email
HamRadioSale@tampabay.
rr.com for list and pric-
ing or call 352.563.2288
HAND STITCHED QUILT
Full size blue,brown,gold
& green tones.
New-never used. $35
352-489-6894


Act Now


ITS FREE

Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
Land Space
1/2 ac to 8 acre avail
for yard promotions,
Hwy 19 & 98 (Byrd Rd
I blk pass 98 on L)
Call Mr Thomas
727-372-8584
Lexmark Inkjet Printer
750 model, w/
installation disc. $20.
Homelite Yard Blower,
150MPH. gas operated,
$30 (352) 465-4691
LT COOPER 285 75
R16 (2) Really decent
light truck tires. Only ask-
ing $80 for the pair.
(352) 551-1810
Mattress & Boxspring
Full size, brand new,
wrought Iron head
board. Unnens Incl.
$400.(352) 746-1535
MEN'S FORMAL SHOES
Black patent leather size
10-1/2M Stafford Still in
box, new never worn. $25
352-746-1908
MURRAY PUSHMOVER
New with Briggs & Staton
engine
$55.00 352-628-3507
Necchl-Model#4825
Sewing Matching
New-Never used With
work, I have no time to
sew comes with all
purpose foot, zipper
foot, buttonhole foot,
button sewing foot,
overlook cutter foot.
case, book & more
$250 firm
Call 352-308-1970 or
352-794-3793 after 5pm
NEW AMERIPHONE
SR100 SUPER LOUD
PHONE RINGER $20
ADJUSTABLE SOUND
E-MAIL PICS 637-2949


FRAMES Small and light-
weight. Black wire. $25.
860-2475
PATRIOTIC AFGHAN
RED/WHITE/BLUE $15
HANDMADE-64 BY
64-CAN E-MAIL PICS
637-2949
PELLETIER'S HOUSE-
CLEANING references
available 352-560-7907

SEALER, like new, has
many attachments.
Model 800, $35.00.
1-352-726-2350
SOFA, DAYBED
tan soft 150. bed 30.
(352)503-2156/697-9458
TRUCK TAILGATE for a
1986 Chevrolet PU Truck
S10. $50.00 Call Ruth
352-382-1000
TUXEDO Black
3-button 44L 38/32 pants
never worn $65.00
352-746-1908
WASHER
$30
419-5808












EMeotdicoalr
4 WHEEL WALKER
W/SEAT AND BRAKES
LIKE NEW $65.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
OR SHOWER CHAIR
Only $30.00 each
464-0316
Electric Scooter
Go Go Ultra X,
w/battery charger, exc.
cond. Asking $650.
Electric Chair
Jazzy Select GT
w/charger, $700.
Obo. After 5P.
(352) 249-6453
HOOVER AROUND
New$ 100. K SZ. white
hand crochet bed
spread, table 70" table-
cloth $100.8 place sett-
ing of China $100
(352) 344-4408
Jazzy Power Chair
1 1/2 years old,
new battery $600 obo
Trasfer wheel chair
$75, New,
All in good shape
(352) 201-7221
LAZY BOY
Lift/Recliner Chair.
mauve, exc cond.
$450.(352) 795-2317
MANUAL WHEEL CHAIR
NO FOOT RESTS
$50.00 464-0316
PRIDE JETTA
Power Chair approx 5
yrs old. new batteries
w/pwr cord, exc cond
$700 obo352 628-5386



BUYING U.S. COINS
1964 and before. What
do you have? Let's talk.
(352) 795-3842
BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
We Also Buy Gold
Jewelry (352) 228-7676










WE BUY
US COINS & CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477


flip -





c uN k1


(352) 563.5966


''. 1.* ,,


.9


CITRUS COUNTY (Fl)~ C;IIRONICIXJ


I










SUNDAY, N)OViMBIRI 14, 2010 D7


ACOUSTIC ESTABAN
GUITAR AND AMP. New
with case, stand and in-
structional materials.
$100 352-628-3507
CONQUEROR BASS
GUITAR- 2 picks tuner,
strap, case crate AMP
& cord complete outfit
$200 obo(352) 795-6257
Kurz Well
Keyboard Esemble
Grant, portable,
professional ,Excl cond
$450 (352) 503-6960
NUMARK DDS 80
DJ System
for CD and HD Media
New $500. Firm
(352) 613-7323
Peavy Nashville
112 Amplifier, $350
(352) 344-4951
SOUND SNAKE 100 ft, 9
channels $125 Firmn
(Serious inquiries only)


PIANO DGX520 Like new
88 key portable grand
with matching stand,
bench, pedal, box, all
discs and literature.
$499.00 email:
dme 323@yahoo.com
Yamaha,
clavinova digital piano,
CVP-50 88 key, built In
rythyms & bench,
excel cond. $1,000
352-621-4600



2 6FT French Doors
Glass enclosed blinds,
like new all hardware
included
$150
(352) 419-5836
CHRISTMAS TREE 7'
750 clear lights.w/ stand
Excell. cond. $50.
Call 527-6425
GAS GRILL SUNBEAM
GOOD CONDITION
$50.00 352-613-0529
NEW HOME Sewing ma-
chine dial a stitch cabinet
+ extra's $150. serious
only cash 352-637-2881
WINDOW 2 BLINDS
50'wide good for garage
$25. each cash
352-637-2881



BOWFLEX BLAZE Great
Christmas Gift!
Like New. Paid $800
Sell for $245
352-628-5222
ELECTRIC TREAD MILL
LIFESTYLE $100.00
464-0316

For Sale
Large Exercise equip.
$35.-$50 ea.
(352)527-8090
sparrlnglkickbox gear
varied pcs/sizes $75
uniforms
352-628-3099
STATIONARY RECUM-
BANT EXERCISE BIKE
Only $145.00 464-0316


-
32 Automatic
Beretta, Made In Italy
In 1956. $350.
(352) 201-1866
BIKE
6 SPEED FOLDING.
better than New $150.
(352) 628-3097
Conceal Carry Classes
NRA Certified Instructor
You-name Day & Time
Woody (352) 621-3739
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
FEDERAL 357 MAG
HI-SHOK SELF-DEF
AMMO Brand new, 50rd
box. $60. 860-2475
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct.@$ 5 lb. 9ct/$71b
off boat & delivered
(727) 771-7500
MARLIN MODEL 60 22
LR Shoots great, Nice
Wood & Metal $125 OBO
563-1509 or 504-9929
PURPLE GIRLS BIKES
20"Handbrakes,Basket
and Helmet $35. With
Helmet $30.Great Holiday
Gifts. 727-463-4411
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238
Winchester Rifle
Model 94, 30-30
Lever action $350.
Thompson Contender
Handgun w/3 barrels,
30-30, 22 Mag., 45
Colt/410, new cond.
w/holster $650.
(352) 637-2784
(352) 228-1430




10 x 5 Trailer
2 x10 floor $350
(352) 795-5682
GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES

Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.

4x8 Open $490
5x8 Encd $1675
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto




NEW POPEYE WATCH
75TH ANNIVERSARY
COLLECTION $50 CAN
E-MAIL PICS 637-2949


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
AAhA ir-t^if f


CASH FOR
DIABETIC TEST
STRIPS (352) 621-3001
Want To Buy
Refrigerator with
bottom freezer drawer.
(352)726-2074
WANTED HOUSE or
MOBILE Any.AEm.
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED VIDEO
GAMES COLLECTION.
LRG OR SMALL. FOR




2 Maltese Litters
4 Females $650.
3 Males $550. Parents
on site, current shots,
CKC reg. Health certs.
(352) 212-4504
(352) 212-1258
AKC LAB PUPS 10
weeks old ready for a
good home 2 male blacks
1 female chocolate ask-
ing $275 per pup
352-897-4339 or
352-302-9559.
AKC LABRADOR RE-
TRIEVER PUPPIES
Just In time for
Christmas. Will be 8
weeks on Thanksgiv-
ing Day. Born Sept.
30th, 2010 are adora-
ble chocolate and
yellow, male and fe-
male, labrador re-
trievers. Dew claws
removed at 5 days
old. AKC puppy pack-
ets and health certifi-
cates will be available
at 8 weeks when you
pick your puppy up.
Please call MIck at
352-527-3023 for In-
formation and to
reserve yours for
Christmas.
mick.flelds@fleldco.
biz
352-527-3023
AUSTRALIAN SHEP-
HERD PUPPIES Out-
standing show and work-
ing lines. Black Tri &
Blue Merles.
Born 10/17/2010.Can
hold until XMAS
650.00 800.00
(352)212-9018
rhumenik@hotmail.com


BEAUTIFUL KOI FISH
All sizes, long or short
fin. Show quality or
pond. Great prices
JEAN (352) 634-1783
BLUE BENGAL KIT-
TENS 8 Weeks Old.
Beautiful spots and mark-
ings. Males and females
available. Very Sweet
raised in home with chil-
dren & pets.
$200.352-302-5788
COTTON' LITTER HAS
ARRIVED 1 Male, 3
females. Small & Med.,
AKC POMERANIAN'S
(352) 503-7779
(352) 220-2844
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
Mini Dachunds Pups
2 males $275. 4 females
$350. papers & health
cert. taking deposits
(352) 465-0647



HILLTOP FARM SWAP
Buy/Sell/Trade anything
and everything poultry,
livestock, small animals,
supplies. hilltop farm
@earthllink.net
www.HilltopFarm.info




For Sale Saddles,
Pads, Horse Tack
(352) 527-8090

Have you always
wanted to learn to
drive a horse and
carriage? Bob Giles,
world renowned
carriage driver and
trainer Is holding a
clinic on Monday.
Nov. 15 In Pine Ridge
sponsored by
Sherr C. Parker &
Associates, Reators.
Auditors $10 Private
Lessons $60 hr.
(352) 527-8090 for
Info. to register


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





BOAT TRAILER
14' galvanized. $275.
Obo. (352) 453-6789



2001 ROBALO 21'
OPEN FISHER
130HP Honda 4 stroke /
ALL ELECTRONICS /
tandem trailer EXC
COND 14K
352-270-3265 home
305-905-3047 cell
2002 BAYLINER
A MUST SEEI
18' Bowrider w/traliler.
only 114 hrs. on motor.
Incls. fish/fndr, safety
vests, water tube etc.
$7,500. Obo. Call
for directions.
(352) 586-7346


2010 CAROLINA
SKIFF 16' 60 hp Suzukl,
blmlnI Top, $15k or
take over pmts
(352) 503-7425
cell 330-316-0013
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cublc
Inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt. $8,000
(352) 560-3019
ALUMCRAFT
15FT, '03, swivel seats
galv, trlr, 40HP Yamaha
30 hrs., extras, $4,650
obo 628-2703 586-3132
GALAXY C/C
22.5 IB /OB ,V6 Merc
Cruiser, tandum trailer
fully equipped, GREAT
boat ,GREAT buy $4K
(352) 746-0348

HOMOSASSA
MARINE
NEW BOATS

Sundance 17 Flats
Yamaha F-70
Aluminum Trailer
$18,900.
Starcraft 155 Bay
Aluminum Trailer
$8,500.
Sundance 17 CC
Yamaha T-60
Aluminum Trailer
$15,900.
Pathfinder 20 Bay
Yamaha F-150
Aluminum Trailer
$36,900.
homosassamarine.
cam
We sell conslgnmentsl
352-628-2991

HURRICANE FUNDECK
Boat 2000 20', Honda
130HP, galv tandem trir.
Nice. Extras
$9900/obo. 795-0122
KAYAK
12ft, Native w/all
accessories & a Sail
$500 firm
(352) 628-3097
NEW AIRBOAT
16 x 8, Good fishing
boat, Livewell and rod
holders, Lot of storage
$14,000 (352) 637-1391
PONTOON
20fft Lowe, 50HP
Johnson, new trailer,
$4,000 will separate
(352) 344-9810
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimlni, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$6,900. (352) 382-3298
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225, 400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$19,500. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
STRUCTURE
CRAFT
93 16 fiberglass flats
boat, 40 tiller Johnson
w/trlm,live-well trolling
motor B/top, galv trailer
safety equip, $2900.00
firm. 352 566 8504 or
352-400-2132
SYLVAN 15' ALUM
V-Hull, 25HP Yam. 4 strk
Blmini, live well, troll
mtr, depth fndr. trir.
$3,495. 239-565-4839
TRITON 220 LTS
'06 Bay Boat 225hp
Merc, trim tabs, Jack
plate, troll mtr, VHF,
alum tdr. $26,500/Obo.
352-463-7420, 493-3008
TROPHY 22FT
1999 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force,
E-Z Load Tand.Trlr. elec-
tronics will sacrifice for
$7900. 352-726-1489
WANTED Old Canoe
any condition
(352) 249-0877
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck & Fishing
Boats
(352)527-0555
bootsupercenter.com































2w00 Montana 5th
352k.- 7r -11









$32K (or both
352873-7560



DONATI
45 years old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
*Tax Deductible *


CONSIGNMENT USA
Cars, Trucks Boatsi, |
R, M. h5, AM' =
98% Sale Sucess
352-461-4518 Frank

DAMION INTRU ER
'01, 36FT, 2 slides, K1':
ml., V-10 motor, 7lk'
gen., Icemaker,
washer, dryer, very
good cond., $33,500
(352) 302-9634
DAMON
ULTRASPORT
'02 Diesel Pusher 38'
300 Cat, frelghtllner
chass, SXS, Frig,
Icemaker, W/D,
full paint., 2 slides.
Many more options,
fully equipped.
352-307-6157
FLEETWOOD
94' Bounder, 34',
wide body, caller
model motor home,
REDUCED TO $14,000
(352) 628-7993


Class A '94, Bounder,
32ft., loaded, self cont,
sips 6, 2 LCD TV's
$12,900 352-795-6736
GEORGIA BOY
00 Landau 33,5' 1 slide
V10 fully equlp.w/00
Jeep Grand Cherokee
equip to tow $32K for
both, or $27K for RV
(352) 422-1250
GEORGIA BOY
05' Pursuit, 35' 2 slides.
Fully loaded, gas.
Exc. cond. Must Seel
$40,000. (352) 503-5002
I Buy RV'S, Steve
Henry, RV World of
Hudson Inc.Slnce
1974. (888) 674-8376
(727) 514-8875
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778
Luxury Motor Home
Diesel Pusher, ready
to go many extras
304-281-3744
PACE ARROW
35' Class A, 1996, dual
AC, new tires, 5K gen,
60K ml. Exc Cond. $25K.
352-382-1000
RV Financing Is Easy
at COMO RV,
Hwy. 44-W., Inverness
(352) 628-1411 W.A.C.
SOUTHWIND
98' V-10 eng., dual AC,
super slide, drivers
door, hydr. levelers.
new tires, good cond.
$31k Obo(352)302-6534



FOURWINDS '08
25' llte T/T, sips 6 used
time, 1 owner, like
new $13.500 firm.
(352) 746-2925
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Portable Sheds
Glenn (352) 302-0778
JAYCO 02
24' Front B ed $7k
new tires ,ready to go
(352) 621-9766
JAYCO
5th whl 40' toy hauler
w/12' garage. 13ft
slide, generator 1999
Ford Larado LA West
F350 Dually 93K ml
$44,900 can sep'rte,
no smoke
Local (502) 345-0285
STARCRAFT 07
Homestead life 5th whl
240 RLS 26' exc cond
$14.900(352) 795-7808



Engine Houst
3 ton Long Ram Jack
model LR 13B, extension
legs $300
(352) 564-1280
SMITTY'S AUTO
(352) 628-9118
Service Now Avallil

Vehicle Sales and
SERVICE

WE pay CASH for all
vehicles.Dead or Alive
Trades are WELCOME
We have Used Pars
Call us for your
SERVICE NEEDS
(352) 628-9118




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trks.
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Noil
352-445-3909
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not
CASH PAID $150 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333

CONSIGNMENT USA
Sga Trucks gats, |
R, M8.1. AM's
98% Sale Sucess
352-461-4518 Frank
VEHICLE DONATIONS
Help fight breast
Cancer
RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPONS
Help us Win
Pepsi-Refresh Grant
www.ubcf.lnfo
FREE Towing,
Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners
Accepted,
(888)468-5964




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & SUV'S
SCAH H
$ SPECIAL $
'94 Lincoln Town
Car $695.
'93 Buick Park Ave.
$725.
'98 Mazda Milienla
$795.
Clean, Dependable.
CALL TOM TODAY
(352)563-1 902
WE BUYS CARS I
S1675 Suncoast Hwy.
.'.WHosassa, FL

AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
E-Z LOANS
$495. DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE..


Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL TONY TODAY
(352) 5 63-1902
WE BUYS CARS
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
H.Pmsassa Ft.

AMERICAN
AUTO SALES
of Crystal River
* WE CONSIGN *
10% OFF
MOTORCYCLES
NEW CARS ARE IN

'06 SATURN VUE
VUE $10,999.
'04, DODGE
STRATUS $5,495.

CHECK OUT
OUR FINANCING


Tire Klangdom


Is Easy at COMO AUTO
Hwy. 44-W., Inverness
(352) 344-1411 W.A.C.
AUTO RENTALS
AUTO SALES
AUTO TRADES
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR by Airport
461-4518 or 795-4440
BUICK
01LeSabreLTD. loaded,
leather, alloys, 82K ml
needs nothlng,X-tra's
$6300 352 341-0791
BUICK
'03, Century, 42K miles,
like new, leather,
CD, AC $6,100
(352) 382-1583
BUICK
'98, Century, 92K miles,
good cond. $2,750 obo
(352) 249-3195
Beverly Hills
CADILLAC 02
STS, loaded, moon roof
Silver/grey leather, mint
cond. 85K mi. $7,900
(352) 746-1308
CADILLAC
2001, Elderado ETC
leather bose stereo
showroom new
Diamond white pearl
$7990, 1866-838-4376

CHEVROLET
2005, Corvette 6-spd
leather bose stereo
heads up display, 35k
orig. ml. Call for
more details $28980
1866-838-4376
CHRYSLER
'06, Crossfire, convert.
auto, low ml., excel.
cond. $14,000 obo
352-601-2053,228-1053
CHRYSLER
1995 Concord, 4 dr,
loaded, like new $3,000
(352) 860-1610
CHRYSLER
2005 Chrysler PT
Cruiser Touring edition
68k nicely equipped
$7990, 1866-838-4376
CORVETTE CON-
VERTIBLE
1994 Corvette White/Red
Interior. 59K miles, Gar-
age kept, non-smoker.
Mint condition.
352-527-8663
FORD
08' Shelby Mustang,
2,500 Ml., Navi. syst.
Over $50.K. invested.
Better Than Newl
Sacrifice for $36,900.
(352) 302-5875
FORD
2007, Taurus SEL
loaded! Great
condition 78k
Better hurry $7990
1866-838-4376
FORD CROWN VIC
2004. A one owner, full
pwr. cruise control,
excell. cond., 57,761 mi.
$7,900 (352) 527-3828
HONDA
2000, Accord EX
W/Leather 69k Orig.
Miles. Cleanest one in
Florida $7990
1866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2006, Elantra GLS 57k
original miles 1-owner
Don't hesitate $8990
1866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2007, Sonata SE, V6
Sunroof alloy wheels
33k orig.ml.$11990
1866-838-4376

LEXUS
2005 RX330 beige,
35K ml., loaded, mint,
$26,000 (352) 228-7940
MAZADA03
Miat C 46K mi. 5
spd.Shlnsen Special





pressor, silver w/llght
gray Int. 4 dr., 4 cyl.,
30 mpg, 95K. ml., great
cond. Priced to sell
$11,000 (352) 489-7674
MERCURY
'03, Grand Marquis,
72k miles, Loaded, mint
$5,900
(352) 249-7702
MERCURY
1996, Sable GS nicely
equipped 86k original
miles $3990
1866-838-4376
MERCURY
'96, Grand Marquis LS,
good cond. 91K ml.,
$3,000 (352) 249-3195
Beverly Hills
MITSUBISHI
'03 Diamanft ES, fully
equip. Superior cond.
$5,995. Obo.
(352) 382-5702
OLDSMOBILE
'93 Cutlass Clera S, 4 dr.
2nd owner 151K. ml.
full power, exc. cond.
$1,850 (352) 637-1074
SOLD!!
CHEVY
'00 Cavalier, 4dr., gold
metallic, one owner,
42K. ml. extra clean,
$3,450.

TOYOTA
2005, Corolla Le
nicely equipped 14k
original miles
Better hurry wont last
call for deal
1866-838-4376
VW
06' Jetta, 4 dr.,gas, 5
spd. auto, 53K. MI.
clean car. $9,99500.
(352) 601-0936



1954 FORD
F100 pick up auto,


V8, pwr steer/brks,
hunterz_carz@yahoo
.com (352) 621-0182
TRADE (727) 422-4433
CORVETTE
03' Z06 50th. annlv.
ediflton. 29,500, 19,100
MI. Show car cond.,
fully loaded, heads up
display, new tires.
David@(352) 637-6443
CORVETTE
'81, Mirror T-tops
350 Chrome eng., Air,
auto, new tires, excel
cond. $7,500 obo
352-601-2053, 228-1053
FORD
1973 THUNDERBIRD 39K
orlg. ml, like new, al-
ways stored Inside.
$9900/obo, 795-0122
JAGUAR 58
4 dr, good shape too
be restored$5500
1959 Jag parts only
4 dr,$600(352) 637-1770


1. -l.
,!- !.- l 2



Tell that special
person
SHappy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





AUTO RENTALS
AUTO SALES
AUTO TRADES
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 CR by Airport
461-4518 or 795-4440

DODGE
2004, Dakota Crew
Cab SLT Mint cond.
low ml., Color coded
bed topper $11980
1866-838-4376
Dodge
99 Dakota, V6 mag.
exc cond new brakes
$2500 352-257-8277
FORD
2000, F-150 Super cab
Lariat leather 5,4 liter
V8 bed liner, 58k origi-
nal miles Wont find
another $9990
1866-838-4376


FORD
2001 F350 $6,400
Stake Bed, 82000 mi,
White exterior, Gray inte-
rior, 10 cylinder, Auto,
2WD, 2 door, excellent
condition, A C, airbags,
AM FM radio, Cruise, tilt
wheel, low miles. Cold air
runs great. Tim
352-860-1138
FORD
2004, Expedition
Eddie Bauer 3rd row
of seating leather snrf
4X4 hard to find bet-
ter hurry call for deal!
1866-838-4376
FORD
'94 Ranger, 4X4, V-6,
AC, 5 spd., exc. cond.
$3,500. (352) 465-1499
FORD
94, F150 4x4, auto hubs
306 motor, a/c, good
cond new motor 75 K
mi $3900 (352) 220-2958
FORD
97 F150 runs great, good
tires all around,cold A/C,
body is in good shape, in-
cludes bed liner. 158K
miles. Wine color with
gold accents $3400.00.
Call between 6pm-9pm.
352-564-8284
HONDA
2008 Ridgellne, RTIL
model 4WD, loaded,
15,400 m. $28,380
(352) 419-4776
TOYOTA 99
Tacoma Pre-Runner
110K mi. big tires, great
a/c. well kept, well
maint $6K,obo(352)
795-3625/ 212-1854



FORD
2002 escape xlt 4x4 v-6
automatic. 152k. runs
and looks great $4200.
obo. 352-978-0022
FORD
2003 Excursion XLT V8
gas. ICE cold A/C. New
tires. Runs like new.
159K miles. $8500.00
OBO 352-249-7787 or
352-586-3339
HONDA
2004, Pilot EX-L leather
sunroof 3rd row of
seating: Low miles 4X4
$12988
1866-838-4376
ISUZU RODEO
1995 4x4, nearly new
oversize tires, w/extra
set, $5,000. Poss, finan-
clng at $250 mo. or
discount for cash
(352) 726-9369
SOLD
JEEP
'00 Grand Cherokee,
Laredo, 2 wd, orig.
owner, all paper work
& maint. records.,
$5,000. exc. cond. NO
accidents, 150,000k.
MI. Call David



DODGE
'88, Ram 3/4 Ton, 4x4
89K org. miles, 35" tires
$2,500
(352) 634-5499




DODGE
2005, Grand Caravan
SXT allot wheels rear
air conditioning
50k orig. miles $10988
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2003 Odyssey LX
77k original miles rear
a/c, 1-owner vehicle
Great Value $9980
1 8AA-3A-A'47A


rPOLARKIO IVIS w7IIVI
2001,325, ATV, 4x4 shaft
driven, mossy oak
color, $2,000 firm
(352) 726-8804



BIG DOG
'03, Custom chopper,
3,500 miles, S & S mo-
tor, 6spd Baker, 3" open
drive, Lots of extras,
$14,000"obo MUST SELL
352-382-0403
BIG DOG
'03, Custom chopper,
3,500 miles, S & S motor,
6spd Baker, 3" open
drive. Lots of extras,
$14,000 obo MUST SELL
352-382-0403


HARLEY DAVIDSON
'03 ROADKING Fact.
custom. HI pert.
Over $43k In receipts.
17k ml. $9,700 563-0615
Crystal River
Harley Davidson
2007 Heritage Softtall,
red/black w/ lots of
chrome 15,500 ml.,
$12,000 (352) 212-6450
Harley Davidson
2010 Super Glide, 1,007
miles, still under warr.
many extras, like new
$12,500. firm 382-2425

.

LIFAN ENDURO
2007 Street legal 2007'
Lifan TMS200GY-5
Blu/Bik Enduro, 200cc,
ONLY 2678 miles, runs
like new, comes w/ cover
& Blu/White Fulmer
helmet..ALL READY TO
GO..$1,200.00 OBO
Contact Frank
BH-352-464-0703



988-1130 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board


Misc. MOO


Lucky U Cycles
352-330-0047
www.luckvucvcles
.com
1989 HONDA GL1500
TRIKE
FULL LEHMAN TRIKE
REVERSE$12,900.00
352-330-0047
2003 YAMAHA VSTAR
650 SILVERADO
SADDLEBAGS, WIND-
SHIELD, LOW MILES
$2,995.00
352-330-0047
2004 H-D DYNA
SUPERGLIDE
SADDLEBAGS.
WINDSHIELD. EXTRAS
352-330-0047
LUCKY U CYCLES
2001 H-D ELECTRA
GLIDE
RADIO, BACKREST,
$7,500.00
WWW.LUCKYUCYCLES.
C9M
2006 H-D 883L
TWO UP SEAT, LOW
MILES
352-330-0047
2002 KAWSAKI
VULCAN 750
VOYAGER TRIKE



of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty & equipment via the
Internet at govdeals.com


KAWASAKI
2006 Concourse
5200 miles $4,995
HARLEY DAVIDSON
84 Soft tall.custom
paInt, lowered, APES
lots of Xtra's, exc. cond
$8500 firm 352 637-7124

KAWASAKI
2006 Concourse
5200 miles $4,995
obo.
(352) 697-2760

SUZUKI
02 Intruder Volusia,
800cc water cooled.
shaft drive, excl. cond
$2,950 (352) 628-4360

SUZUKI
'06, Boulevard, black,
805 CC, w/ windshelld,
saddlebags, tach,
$4,750 (352) 746-7424

YAMAHA
'01, V Star Classic 650,
looks & runs great, Bags
& Winshleld $2,495
(352) 270-9254

YAMAHA 06
Silverado 1100 Classic
almost mint cond. silver
& gold new tires, lights
& Xtra chrome $4k firm
Cry, RIv(772) 528-6130



from November 1, 2010 -
November 30, 2010.
Published In Citrus County
Chronicle Nov. 1 thru
Nov. 30, 2010.


344-1107 SUCRN
Use Uniform Ad Volorem-2011 LUmerock Road Paving CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA, OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM AD VALOREM METHOD OF COL-
LECTION OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF RECON-
STRUCTED STREETS, DRAINAGE AND OTHER PERTINENT FACILITIES TO THE 2011 LIMEROCK
ROAD PAVING PROGRAM.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2011 Umerock
Road Paving Program, more particularly described In Exhibit "A" attached hereto
and made a part hereof, that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County
intends to use the uniform ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assess-
ments levied by the Board of County Commissioners as set forth in Section 197.3632,
Florida Statutes, ana the Board will hold a public hearing on December 7, 2010, at
4:15 P.M. at the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will be to consider the adoption of a Resolution
authorizing the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County to use the uniform
ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments as provided for,in
Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County proposes to adopt a non-ad
valorem assessment for the provision of reconstructed streets, drainage and other
pertinent facilities within the area of Citrus County known as the 2011 Umerock Road
Paving Program, more particularly described in Exhibit "A".
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County is considering the adoption of a
non-ad valorem assessment for reconstructed streets, drainage and other pertinent
facilities commencing In fiscal year 2011/2012.
Interested persons may appear at the public hearing to be heard regarding the use
of the uniform ad-valorem method of collecting said non-ad valorem assessments. If
this method of collection is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a tax certifi-
cate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with ,pect to any matter considered at this public hearing, they will need to
ensure that verLotim record of the proceedings is made which record shall In-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: /s/ GARY BARTELL, CHAIRMAN
2011 LIMEROCK ROAD PAVING PROGRAM
EXHIBIT "A"
EAST FLETCHER STREET plattedd as Fletcher Avenue) from the east right-of-way line of
North Frazier Terrace plattedd as Frazier Street) thence easterly 545 feet to the end of
the existing base as recorded in Plot Book 8, Pages 16-18, Hercala Acres. Section 28,.
Township 18 South, Range 19 East. Citrus County, Florida.
WEST OHIO DRIVE plattedd as Ohio Avenue) from North Ira Martin Avenue to the west
right-of-way line of North Bardge Terrace .cn-i .D Bardge Street) as recorded in
Plat Book 6, Page 51, Holiday Heights ..-, i'':. sectionn 20, Township 17 South,
Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida.
WEST ROCKHAVEN LANE from South Hancock Road to South October Drive,
Homosasso Retreats Unit 5 Unrecorded Subdivision, Sections 8 & 9, Township 20
South. Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida. (County Road per deed recorded in
Official Record Book 309, Pages 25-27)

NORTH SARAH POINT plattedd as Third Court) from the north right-of-way line of East
Evelyn Street plattedd as Evelyn Road) thence northerly 302 feet to the end of the
platted roadway as recorded In Plat Book 6. Pages 139-141, Forest Lake, Section 21,
Township 18 South, Range 19 East, Citrus County, Florida.
Published In Citrus County Chronicle. Nov. 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2010.

346-1128 SUCRN
2011 Citrus Springs Water Une Ext. CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM AD VALOREM METHOD OF COL-
LECTION OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF WATER SER-
VICES FOR THE CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS 2011 SPECIAL ASSESSMENT
DISTRICT.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of vacant lands located within the Citrus
Springs Water Line Extensions 2011 Special Assessment District, more particularly de-
scribed in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof, that the Board of
County Commissioners of Citrus County intends to use the uniform ad valorem
method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments levied by the Board of County
Commissioners as set forth in Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, and the Board will
hold a public hearing on December 7, 2010, at 3:00 P.M. in the Board of County
Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness. Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will be to consider the adoption of a Resolution
authorizing the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County to use the uniform
ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments as provided for in
Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County proposes to adopt a non-ad
valorem assessment for the provision of water services within the area of Citrus
County known as the Citrus Springs Water Line Extensions 2011 Special Assessment
District, more particularly described in Exhibit "A*, and commencing In fiscal year
2011/2012,
Interested persons may appear at the public hearing to be heard regarding the
use of the uniform ad-valorem method of collecting said non-ad valorem assess-
ments, If this method of collection is used. failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in a loss of title.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, they will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record shall in-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue. Inverness. Florida 34450. (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA

CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS
2011 SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "A"
The Citrus Springs Water Line Extensions 2011 Special Assessment District consisting of
all vacant lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads in which a water system
and water system improvements are constructed or reconstructed and all vacant
lots and parcels which are to be served by a water system and water system im-
provements, located In Citrus County, Florida, further described as follows:
CITRUS SPRINGS (Description of Territory Served)
Township 16 South, Range 18 East
Section 34: The Southeast 1/4 of sold Section 34: and the Southwest 1/4 of the North-
east 1/4 of said Section 34,
Township 17 South, Range 18 East
All of Sections 10, 11,12. 13. 14, 15. 16.21. 22,.23. 24, 25.26.27 and 28.
Section 1: All of said Section 1 lying and being Southwesterly of the Withlacoochee
River less and except the following parcels: The East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 and
the North 770' of the West 330' of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 1.
Section 2: The Southwest 1/4 of said Section 2: and the South 1/2 of the Southeast
1/4 of said Section 2: and all that portion of the West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of said
Section 2 lying Westerly of the Seaboard Railroad R.O.W.: and the South 1/2 of the
Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4: and all that portion of the Southeast 1/4 of the
Northeast 1/4 of said Section 2 lying North of State Road 39.
Section 3: All of said Section 3 LESS and EXCEPT the West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4.
Section 20: The East 1/2 of said Section 20.
Section 29: The East 1/4 of said Section 29; and the Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast
1/4; and the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 29.
Section 32: All that portion of the East 1/2 of said Section 32 lying and being 570 feet
more or less North of a line North of and parallel to the South boundary AND the
Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 32.
Section 33: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 22 and 25 as recorded In Plat Book
7. Pages 93 Ihrough 109, and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively and in-
clusively of the Public Records of Citrus County. Florida,
Section 34: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 22. 23. and 25 as recorded in Plat
Book 7, Pages 93 through 109, and Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through 133 and Plat Book
8, Pages 19 through 24. respectively and Inclusively.
Section 35: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23 and 25 as recorded in Plat Book
7, Pages 115 through 133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24. respectively and in-
clusively,
Section 36: The North 3/4 of said Section 36,


ISell1oI


CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUIN'IY (FL) CHRONICLE











DS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2010


Township 18 South, Range 18 East
Section 1: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23 and 25 as recorded In Plat Book
7. Pages 115 through 133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24 respectively and
conclusively.
Section 2: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23 and 25 as recorded In Plat Book
7, Pages 115 through 133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24 respectively and
conclusively.
Township 17 South, Range 19 East
All of Sections 18 and 19,
Section 6: All that area southwest of the Withlacoochee River lying In the Southwest
1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 6,
Section 7: The Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 7: and the West 1/2
of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 7; and the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 7: and
the West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 7.
Section 17: The Southwest 1/4 of said Section 17; and the East 1/2 of the Northwest
1/4 of said Section 17.
Section 20: The West 1/2 of said Section 20; and the South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4;
and the Southeast 1/4 less and except the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said
Section 20.
Section 30: All Section 30 less and except the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2010.


352-1114 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote- Cyr
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given:
Jennifer Cyr
6958 S. Kirk Pt.
Lecanto, FL 34461
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is In question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections, In Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result In a determination of In-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance Is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 14,2010,


348-1128 SUCRN
Paradise Isle- CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM METHOD FOR THE LEVY, COLLEC-
TION AND ENFORCEMENT OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS FOR THE
RE-CONSTRUCTION OF THE ROADWAY SHOULDERS, SIDE SLOPES AND OTHER PERTINENT
FACILITIES OF THE PRIVATE CAUSEWAY CONNECTING PARADISE ISLE UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION TO THE MAINLAND WITHIN THE 2011 NORTH KING'S COVE POINT MUNICI-
PAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands within Paradise Isle Unrecorded Subdi-
vision located In Section 20, Township 18 South. Range 17 East of Citrus County, Flor-
Ida, that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners; will hold a public hearing
on Tuesday, December 7, 2010 at 2:45 p.m. In the Board of County Commissioners'
Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida,
The purpose of the hearing Is to adopt a resolution authorizing the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners to use the uniform method for the levy, collection
and enforcement of non-ad valorem assessments as provided for in Section
197.3632, Florida Statutes for the re-construction of the roadway shoulders, side
slopes and other pertinent facilities of the private causeway connecting Paradise Isle
Unrecorded Subdivision to the mainland.
The proposed non ad valorem assessment would commence during the fiscal year
2011/2012 In the unincorporated area of Citrus County known as the 2011 North
King's Cove Point Municipal Service Benefit Unit, more particularly described In Ex-
hibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof,
interested persons may appear at the public hearing to be heard regarding the use
of the uniform ad-valorem method of collecting said non-ad valorem assessments. Ift
this method of collection Is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a tax certifi-
cate to be Issued against the property which may result In a loss of title.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, they will need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made which record shall In-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical Impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days be-
fore the meeting, If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TTY Telephone
(352) 341-6580,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
2011 NORTH KING'S COVE POINT
MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT
EXHIBIT "A"
NORTH KING'S COVE POINT CAUSEWAY from North Watersedge Drive plattedd as
Magnolia Avenue) within Crystal Shore Estates First Addition, approximately 144' mol
to the edge of a causeway being the point of beginning then to the opposite side
of said causeway lying In Paradise Isle Unrecorded Subdivision. Section 20, Township
18 South, Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida.
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2010.


349-1128 SUCRN
Harbor Isle- CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2010 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES HARBOR ISLE OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM AD
VALOREM METHOD OF COLLECTION OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS FOR THE
PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES FOR THE 2010 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT HARBOR ISLE SPECIAL ASSESS-
MENT DISTRICT.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2010 Citrus
County/City Of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Harbor Isle.
more particularly described In Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof,
that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County intends to use the uniform
ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments levied by the Board
of County Commissioners as set forth In Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, and the
Board will hold a public hearing on December 7. 2010, at 3:15 P.M. at the Board of
County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will be to consider the adoption of a Resolution
authorizing the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County to use the uniform
ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments as provided for in
Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County proposes to adopt a non-ad
valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services within the area of Citrus
County known as the 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special As-
sessment District Harbor Isle, more particularly described In Exhibit "A".
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County is considering the adoption of
a non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services commencing
In fiscal year 2011/2012.
Interested persons may appear at the public hearing to be heard regarding the
use of the uniform ad-valorem method of collecting said non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection Is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be Issued against the property which may result In a loss of title.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she will need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made which record shall In-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical Impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
2010 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT-HARBOR ISLE
EXHIBIT A
The 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Harbor Isle consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads In which
a sewage disposal system and sewer Improvements are constructed or recon-
structed and all lots nd ad parcels which are served or to be served by a sewage dis-
posal system and sewer Improvements, located In Citrus County, Florida, further de-
scribed as follows;
HARBOR ISLE:
DESCRIPTION:
A PORTION OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 28,
TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S89Deg.
51'30"W, ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4, A DISTANCE OF
342.77 FEET; THENCE S03Deg. 40'05"E ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY AND THE
NORTHERLY EXTENSION THEREOF, OF PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3 AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 43, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA, A
DISTANCE OF 866.86 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 44 (FORT ISLAND TRAIL) AND ALSO THE BOUNDARY OF
SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID
CURVE BEING CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 1318.57 FEET, A
CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S48DEG 57'45"W, 274.83 FEET; THENCE ALONG
THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 275.33 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE S42DEG 58'50"W ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AND SAID BOUNDARY OF
PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3, A DISTANCE OF 219.00 FEET THE POINT OF CUR-
VATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET, A
CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N02DEG 01'10"W, 35,36 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE
ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 39.27 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE


N47DEG 01'10"W A DISTANCE OF 354.36 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1,
BLOCK C OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 3, THENCE S51DEG 20'00"W.
ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK C, A DISTANCE OF 290.14 FEET: THENCE CON-
TINUING ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK C, S75DEG 59'30"W A DISTANCE OF
154.81 FEET; THENCE N73DEG 57'00"W A DISTANCE OF 260.94 FEET; THENCE N08DEG
36'50"W A DISTANCE OF 44.39 FEET TO A POINT ON A TRAVERSE LINE ALONG THE
SOUTHERLY, EASTERLY AND NORTHERLY SHORES OF CRYSTAL RUN AND PRETTY LAKE,
THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID TRAVERSE LINE N56DEG 43'00"E A DISTANCE OF
562,21 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE N17DEG 56'30"E A DISTANCE OF 278.00 FEET,
MORE OR LESS; THENCE N60DEG 51 '00"E A DISTANCE OF 73.20 FEET, MORE OR LESS;
THENCE S76DEG 14'20"E A DISTANCE OF 95,45 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE LEAVING
SAID TRAVERSE LINE AND CONTINUING ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK C,
S76DEG 14'20"E A DISTANCE OF 46.13 FEET; THENCE S53DEG 50'10"E A DISTANCE OF
80.38 FEET; THENCE S13DEG 27'40-E A DISTANCE OF 45.71 FEET; THENCE S26DEG
55'00"W A DISTANCE OF 378,35 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF NORTH ISLAMIRADA WAY; THENCE ALONG, SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE
S47DEG 01'10"E A DISTANCE OF 83,25 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT
11, BLOCK B OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. .3: THENCE N26DEG 55'00"E,
ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 10 AND 11, OF SAID BLOCK B, A DISTANCE
OF 190.00 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 10; THENCE ALONG THE
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 10, S63DEG 05'00'E A DISTANCE OF 163.05 FEET
TO A POINT ON A CURVE ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF S.E. PINWHEEL
DRIVE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 683.67
FEET, A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N27DEG 50'56"E 22.25 FEET; THENCE
ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 22.25 FEET TO THE END OF SAID
CURVE; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE N26DEG
55'00"E A DISTANCE OF 120.00 FEET; THENCE S63DEG 05'00"E A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET
TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 10, BLOCK A OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY
CLUB UNIT NO. 3; THENCE ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 10 S57DEG
03'26"E A DISTANCE OF 223.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.


Less and except any Islands, State and Federally owned conservation lands, govern-
mentally owned lands, less and except any property already served by a Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protection permitted sewage treatment system and less
and except any properly within the Corporate Boundary of the City of Crystal River,
Florida.
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov, 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2010.



350-1128 SUCRN
Crystal River Wastewater Spec, Assess.- CC BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA SITTING AS THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE 2010 CITRUS
COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER WASTEWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE BENEFIT UNIT FOR
WASTEWATER UTILITY SERVICES AREAS 112 & 113 OF ITS INTENT TO USE THE UNIFORM
AD VALOREM METHOD OF COLLECTION OF NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS FOR THE
PROVISION OF WASTEWATER SERVICES FOR THE 2010 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL
RIVER WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREAS 112 & 113 SPECIAL AS-
SESSMENT DISTRICT,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the 2010 Citrus
County/City Of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District Areas 112 &
113, more particularly described In Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part
hereof, that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County Intends to use the
uniform ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments levied by the
Board of County Commissioners as set forth In Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, and
the Board will hold a public hearingon December 7, 2010, at 3:15 P.M. at the Board
of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida,
The purpose of the public hearing will be to consider the adoption of a Resolution
authorizing the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County to use the uniform
ad valorem method of collecting non-ad valorem assessments as provided for In
Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes.
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County proposes to adopt a non-ad
valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services within the area of Citrus
County known as the 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special As-
sessment District Areas 112 & 113, more particularly described in Exhibit "A".
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County Is considering the adoption of
a non-ad valorem assessment for the provision of wastewater services commencing
In fiscal year 2011/2012.
Interested persons may appear at the public hearing to be heard regarding the
use of the uniform ad-valorem method of collecting said non-ad valorem assess-
ments. If this method of collection Is used, failure to pay the assessment will cause a
tax certificate to be Issued against the property which may result In a loss of title.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commis-
sioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she will need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made which record shall In-
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical Impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
2010 CITRUS COUNTY/CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT AREAS 112 & 113
EXHIBIT A
The 2010 Citrus County/City of Crystal River Wastewater Special Assessment District -
Areas 112 & 113 consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets and roads In
which a sewage disposal system and sewer Improvements are constructed or recon-
structed and all lots and parcels which are served or to be served by a sewage dis-
posal system and sewer Improvements, located In Citrus County. Florida, further de-
scribed as follows:
AREA 112:
DESCRIPTION
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PART OF SECTIONS 28 AND 33 OF TOWN-
SHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID PARCEL ALSO LYING
IN AND BEING A PART OF PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 182, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND PARADISE COUNTRY
CLUB UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 34, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA: THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY
OF SAID SECTION 33 S89DEG 58'33"W A DISTANCE OF 174.09 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO
A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A.C.L RAILROAD (ABANDONED).
SAID POINT ALSO BEING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2. PAGE 182, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY
OF PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB S03DEG 40'05"E A DISTANCE OF 3915.76 FEET, MORE OR
LESS. TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 33; THENCE S89DEG 37'02"W ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DIS-
TANCE OF 1331.08 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 AND THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 3, BLOCK F OF
SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB: THENCE SOIDEG 02'45"E ALONG THE WEST BOUND-
ARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 AND THE BOUNDARY OF SAID
BLOCK F AND THE EXTENSION THEREOF, A DISTANCE OF 1304.22 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID
SECTION 33: THENCE ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY S89DEG 33'21VW A DISTANCE OF
2713.48 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 NOODEG 16'46-W A DISTANCE OF 1307.08 FEET, MORE OR LESS. TO
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE
ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4
N89DEG 37'02"E A DISTANCE OF 1346.99 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33, SAID
CORNER ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 13, BLOCK J OF SAID PARADISE
COUNTRY CLUB: THENCE ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 AND THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK J, AND THE EXTENSION
THEREOF. NOODEG 42'25"W A DISTANCE OF 1355.60 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT
ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF EAST PLANTATION LANE (FORMERLY
KNOWN AS PLANTATION DRIVE AND PLANTATION ROAD, AS DESCRIBED IN THE RIGHT
OF WAY DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 251, PAGE 162 AND RIGHT OF
WAY DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 239, PAGE 168 AND OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 244, PAGE 720 OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS). SAID POINT BEING 50.00
FEET FROM AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID PARADISE COUN-
TRY CLUB UNIT 2: THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE N89DEG
4040'E A DISTANCE OF 215.61 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID EAST PLANTATION LANE; THENCE SOODEG 19'20" E, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF SAID EAST PLANTA11ON LANE, A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID EAST PLANTATION LANE, SAID SOUTHEAST COR-
NER BEING ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT
NO. 2 AND THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33:
THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARIES N89DEG 40'40"E A DISTANCE OF
150.72 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 37, BLOCK K OF SAID PARADISE
COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 2: THENCE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID PARADISE
COUNTRY CLUB UNIT NO. 2 SOODEG 42'25"E A DISTANCE OF 1878.49 FEET: THENCE
N89DEG 33'24"E A DISTANCE OF 620.41 FEET: THENCE N01DEG 02'45"W A DISTANCE OF
973,60 FEET: THENCE S89DEG 37'02'W A DISTANCE OF 104.94 FEET, THENCE NOODEG
22'58"W A DISTANCE OF 263.82 FT: THENCE S87DEG 22'00'E A DISTANCE OF 692,94
FEET; THENCE S64DEG 16'00'E A DISTANCE OF 426,86 FEET; THENCE N48DEG 02'00"E A
DISTANCE OF 436.78 FEET: THENCE N35DEG 49'03'W A DISTANCE OF 128.80 FEET TO
THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 40, BLOCK A OF SAID PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB,
SAID CORNER BEING THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWEST-
ERLY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 422.14 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF
N39DEG 18'14'W 51.34 FEET: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF
51,37 FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N42DEG 47'25"W A DISTANCE OF
280.05 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY,
HAVING A RADIUS OF 422.14 FEET AND CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N23DEG
13'45" W 282.68 FEET: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 288.24
FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE: THENCE N03DEG 40'05'W A DISTANCE OF 850.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY. HAVING
A RADIUS OF 422.14 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N15DEG 53'35"E
282.68 FEET: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 288.24 FEET TO
THE END OF SAID CURVE: THENCE N35DEG 27'15'E A DISTANCE OF 280.05 FEET TO THE
POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS
OF 422.14 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N15DEG 53'35"E 282.68
FEET, THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 288.24 FEET TO THE
END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N03DEG 40'05"W A DISTANCE OF 802.27 FEET TO THE
POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS OF
850.69 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N06DEG 19'55"E 295,44 FEET:
THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 296,94 FEET TO THE POINT
OF REVERSE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS
OF 318.84 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N03DEG 40'04"W 218.10
FEET: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 222.59 FEET TO THE
POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY, HAVING A
RADIUS OF 850.69 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N13DEG 40'04'W
295.43 FEET: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 296.94 FEET TO
THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N03DEG 40'05"W A DISTANCE OF 502.53 FEET. MORE
OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 213.50 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N16DEG
50'58"W 97.37 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 98.23
FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE END OF SAID CURVE ; THENCE N30DEG 01'47"W A DIS-
TANCE OF 48,61 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF WEST FORT ISLAND TRAIL, COUNTY ROAD 44, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE
CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 1465.69 FEET AND A CHORD BEAR-
ING AND DISTANCE OF N44DEG 45'38"E 91.06 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE A DISTANCE OF 91.08 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE END OF SAID CURVE:
THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE N42DEG 58'50"E A
DISTANCE OF 233.57 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE S31DEG 46'56"E A DISTANCE OF 155.51 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE
S21DEG 34'11 "E A DISTANCE OF 115.65 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE N86DEG 1955"E
A DISTANCE OF 62.99 FEET, MORE OR LESS. TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
SAID A.C.L RAILROAD (ABANDONED), THENCE ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE S03DEG 40'05"E A DISTANCE OF 1280,04 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING

AREA 113:
DESCRIPTION
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PART OF SECTIONS 32 AND 33, TOWNSHIP
18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
BLOCK J OF PARADISE COUNTRY CLUB UNIT 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE
34, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA: THENCE ALONG THE WESTERLY
BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK J, SOODEG 42'25"E A DISTANCE OF 1305.60 FEET TO THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4, SAID CORNER
ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE REPLAT OF HOURGLASS LAKE, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 114, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY. FLORIDA:
THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID REPLAT OF HOURGLASS LAKE,
S89DEG 37'02W A DISTANCE OF 1347,44 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID RE-
PLAT OF HOURGLASS LAKE; THENCE ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID REPLAT
OF HOURGLASS LAKE. NOODEG 17'28"W A DISTANCE OF 657.01 FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 50.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD RIGHT
OF WAY (W. GREEN LANE) AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 284, PAGE 690,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE AND THE EXTENSION THEREOF, S89DEG 40'40W A DISTANCE OF
1330.71 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO A POINT ON THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST


1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33: THENCE S 89DEG 53'09"W A DISTANCE OF 685.69 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 50.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD RIGHT
OF WAY (N, WINTERSET AVENUE) THENCE ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE
SOODEG 14'32"W A DISTANCE OF 25.00 FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A
50.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD RIGHT OF WAY (W. WELLSPRING LANE): THENCE
ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE S89DEG 4440W A DISTANCE OF 641.22 FEET,
MORE OR LESS; THENCE NOODEG 21'20"W A DISTANCE OF 679.93 FEET TO THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32;
THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 N89DEG 59'51"E A
DISTANCE OF 1324.24 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
SOUTHWEST 1/4 N89DEG 40'40"E A DISTANCE OF 322,92 FEET, MORE OR LESS: HENCE
NOODEG 03'16"E A DISTANCE OF 781.66 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF W. FORT ISLAND TRAIL, COUNTY ROAD NO, 44.
SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 988,37
FEET AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N89DEG 35'58"E 545.30 FEET, MORE
OR LESS; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 552.46 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, TO THE END OF SAID. CURVE: THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE N73DEG 34'50"E A DISTANCE OF 1159,75 FEET, MORE OR LESS: TO
THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 606.69 FEET, A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N51DEG 14'50"E, 461.08
FEET, MORE OR LESS: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 472.97
FEET TO THE END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N28DEG 54'50"E A DISTANCE OF 795.89 FEET
TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY HAVING A
RADIUS OF 3786.83 FEET, A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N33DEG 46'50"E,
642.50 FEET, MORE OR LESS: THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF


643.27 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION
33; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY N89DEG 58'32"E A DISTANCE OF 462,78
FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S02DEG 42'25"W A DISTANCE OF 425.38 FEET, MORE OR
LESS; THENCE S5900'00"W A DISTANCE OF 888,66 FEET, MORE OR LESS: THENCE
S55DEG 06'05"W A DISTANCE OF 52.35 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S43DEG 47'22"W
A DISTANCE OF 99.35 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S28DEG 15'26"W A DISTANCE OF
688.46 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S71DEG 01'20"W A DISTANCE OF 766.88 FEET,
MORE OR LESS; THENCE S73DEG 34'50"W A DISTANCE OF 652,27 FEET, MORE OR LESS;
THENCE SOODEG 03'16"W A DISTANCE OF 266.45 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE
S78'04'31"E A DISTANCE OF 651,70 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE N89DEG 40'40"E A
DISTANCE OF 1534.93 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S1431'40"W A DISTANCE OF 34.37
FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE S33DEG 10'40"W A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET, MORE OR
LESS; THENCE S89DEG 40'40"W A DISTANCE OF 366.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
Less and except any Islands, State and Federally owned conservation lands, govern-
mentally owned lands, less and except any property already served by a Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protection permitted sewage treatment system and less
and except any property within the Corporate Boundary of the City of Crystal River,
Florida.
Published In Citrus County Chronicle, Nov, 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2010.

353-1114 SUCRN
11/17 Special Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public Is hereby notified that the Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct
its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, November 17, 2010 @ 9:00 A.M. In
the Lecanto Government Building, Multi-purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons Interested
are Invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date, If you have ques-
tions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527-5350.
Bass, Tammy L.
7410 S, Wanderlust Pt, Homosassa, FL
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth In excess of 18" In height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Bass, Tammy
7410 S. Wanderlust Pt. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: bags & cans of household trash & other debris
on the property.
Belllpannl, Dominic J. & Elsie F.
6921 N. Castlebury Rd. Hernando, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. Section 20-31(a). To Wit: tires, metal, household Items & misc. Junk.
Belllpanni, Dominic J. & Elsie F.
6805 N. Bighorn Pt. Hernando, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: metal roofing & trusses, paint cans, plastic
containers, car parts, cardboard boxes & misc. Junk.
Belllpannl. Dominic J. & Elsie F.
6921 N. Castlebury Rd, Hernando, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed.
Inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any property, street or highway. Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
To Wit: SouthwInd RV
Buck, Charles A.
2230 S. Rock Crusher Rd. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed.
Inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41,
To Wit: one green van & three boats.
Buck, Charles A.
2230 S. Rock Crusher Rd. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31 (a). To Wit: plastic, wooden, papers trash & junk.
Bunge EST, Patricia ATTN: Charles H. Bunge Jr.
46 S,. Harrison St. Beverly Hills, FL
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" In height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Decker, George H.
371 N, Pirate Pt. Crystal River, FL
Violation of LDC 4612A CLR zoning excludes all recreational vehicles
Ettlnger, Rabbi Zvl & Jean
38 S. Tyler St. Beverly Hills, FL
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth In excess of 18" In height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances,
Foster. John A.
3454 S. Kings Ave, Homosossa. FL
It shall be a violation to permit. cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: tires, old fencing, furniture, tool box, misc. junk
& a shed full of household garbage.
Gregory, David J.
6241 W. Moven Ct. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property. junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: home furniture, plastic, wooden, paper trash &
Junk.
Hebert, Steven Joseph & Tracy Ann
6861 W. Hans Ct. Homosassa, FL
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" In height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Island Lake LLC
5725 & 5765 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy. Hernondo, FL
Appeal of a demolition order
Koon, Jacquellne L. Howerton
1940 S. Mooring Dr. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed.
Inoperable, junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
To Wit: grey GMC SUV (no tag), white van (no tag), black trailer (no tag).
L & S Builders Inc.
4915 S. Florida Ave. Inverness, FL
Violation of LDC 2021: Change of use without approval from commercial to residen-
tial
L & S Builders Inc.
4915 S. Florida Ave. Inverness, FL
Violation of LDC 2020 Failure to obtain Development Order for: utility building
Lambert, Don ATTN: Stice, Caroline
2020 S. Comforter Pt. Homosassa, FL
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" In height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Lambert, Don ATTN: Stice. Caroline
2020 S. Comforter Pt. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: tires, metal, old trailers, furniture & huge
amounts of misc. Junk.
Lee Jr., Thomas B. & Susan L.
810 N. Leisure Pt, Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed,
Inoperable, Junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any properly, street or highway, Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
To Wit: a camper & two door red vehicle.
Lee Jr,, Thomas B. & Susan L.
810 N. Leisure Pt. Inverness, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have on accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: plastic, wooden, paper trash & Junk.
Lee. Marjorle O. ATTN: McCann, James
52 S. Columbus St. Beverly Hills, FL
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth In excess of 18" In height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Leonard, Ray & Georgia
5049 W, Strawberry Ln, Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a), To Wit: bags of household trash, mattress, old chairs,
other Junk & debris,
Marmon. Suzanne
416 S. Washington St. Beverly Hills, FL
It shall be a violation to keep, dump, store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed,
Inoperable, Junked, disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on
any property, street or highway, Citrus County Code of Ordinances, Section 20-41.
To Wit: one cream colored Mercedes & one gold colored Volvo with no visible tag
or current decals,
Mylln. Kent L, & Doreen M,
4750 W. Justice Ct. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a), To Witk concrete rubble, plastic sheeting, plastic pipe.
building materials & roof trusses.

OrslcSr., George M.
6429 W. Folger Ct. Homosassa, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property, Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property, Citrus County Code of
Ordinances, Section 20-31(a). To Wit: tires, metal, old trailers, furniture & huge


amounts of misc. Junk,

Orslc Sr., George M.
6429 W. Folger Ct. Homosassa, FL
Violation of LDC 4422E Vehicles, trailers (semi or utility), manufactured housing & mo-
bile homes shall not be used as storage buildings.
Zhang. Shao Quan
48 S. Columbus St. Beverly Hills, FL
It shall be a violation to permit, cause or have an accumulation of abandoned
property. Junk & debris (as defined) on the above property. Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. Section 20-31(a). To Wit: household garbage, broken household furni-
ture, broken table & plastic chairs, used broken dryer, dead Christmas tree, broken
standup punching bag, broken bicycle & misc. trash & debris.
NO1E: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based,
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical Impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office. Cit-
rus County Court FHouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341-6560. at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN. SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, Nov. 14, 2010,


Crnwus Coumy~ (FL) CPIROolvCLE


C.LASSX.FZE"S


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Misc. Notices
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CITRus COUNvT (FL) CHRONICLE


E2 SUNDY, Nov'imiii.t t-, 2010


GOLF COMMUNITY!!
* ELEGANT DECOR LARGE HEATED POOL
* Large lanai to entertain FR off large kit
* 3 BR/Office w/closet 1 Acre comer lot
* Huge MBR-2 closets Master has luxury bath
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
VIRTUAl TOUR *ww iFirmuli.ringllto ci'


;-"ir" I-i.kg-rP1,I



COUNTRY LIVING!!
REALLY NICE LOT .1.37 ACRES
2/2 Split BR/bath plan Large rooms
C l,- "-u .1 L. i. Fl rm w/skylights
Attached garage 15 x 45 CP/boat storage
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997 '
Email kellyg .remax nel


Hr''637.2828]







2888 W. VERBENA PL.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/3BA/2CG Custom Built in 2002
* 1.4 acre corner lot Living & Family Rooms
* All Appliances and window treatments
PETER & MARVIA KOROL 7
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


3600 N. WILLOWTREE PT.
BEVERLY HILLS
* 2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance Free
* 1481 sf living area Community pool
* Living & Family Rms. 2 Master suites
PETER & MARVIA KOROL F
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


FEEL RIGHT AT HOME
1564 sq. ft. of OPEN living area. This home
boasts high ceilings, Ig. windows, pretty
backyard, bay window, Great room and a
breakfast nook. Plus: Three good size
bedrooms w/deep closets, a home warranty,
landscaped lawn and screened
back porch.
bEB INFANTINE (352) 302-8046
debinfantlne@yohoo.com www.deb.infaatine.remax.com


7 INE
? 637.2828
.. ^ter house #8242 _j







8242 N. SANTOS DR.
CITRUS SPRINGS
* 4/5BR; 2BA; 2 car garage.
* Spacious open and split floor plan.
* 2625 Living sq. ft.
* Freshly painted
and new carpeting.
GARY ALTMAN (352) 795-2441
Email: garyalltmn@remax.net


WELL TAKEN CARE OF 2/2 WITH
FAMILY ROOM AND FLORIDA ROOM
This home has 130A sq t. of l'ing a;ea. a woe car oarage
kitchen and ba:h hae been uodatd. and current surrounded by
vacant los that give ots of prnvacy ThIe maste- bedroom has an
X-larce aood-lined alk-in close: and kitchen has a buder's pant'
for all the kitchen storage needs Short sale, come take a look:
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net











METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED D/W ON
1/2 ACRE ON DEAD-END STREET
Open floor plan, eat-in kitchen, laundry room,
12x18 screened-in patio. Three sheds, fully
fenced backyard + 3-rail fencing in the front.
Definite MUST SEE.
All appliances included. ..
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnandl@earthlink.netl


242 H. Let Hw. Beel Hil 527784 ww.EMAo 110 W. Mai StIvres6760


0 "2637-2828







1680 W. REDDING ST.
CITRUS HILLS
3BR/3BA/2CG Kitchen w/eat-in area
Large master bath Heated poolVscreened lanai
Det utility bldg/workshop *Private wooded backyard
Beautiful mature landscaping
Situated on 1 acre/lots of privacy
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.nel


Bank of America is here to help
with affordable mortgage programs.

Contact us at 800.364.2222 to speak
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3/2/2, 3/2.5/2,
1800 sq. ft. pool 2273 sq. ft.
home built 2004. golf course home.
Dir: Cypress Blvd. Dir: Cypress Blvd.,
W., Cypress Blvd. E, right on 2nd Pine,
left Linder Dr., right left Balsam Dr., right
Whitewood #52. Balsam Ct. W #6.
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.bjuvdtrscounty.com


I' I~I rC -r~--C~ d- F4-r~-__--rl _1 I~ - i


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Use old canning jars for decoration


DEAR SARA: I need help with
old glass-top canning jars. I was
given two boxes of glass-top
canning jars. They have the orange
rubber seal and the metal that is
around and on top of the jar How do
you use these? I wanted to make a
small batch of spaghetti
sauce. My sister-in-law got
them for me from a tag
sale. -Amy, Connecticut
DEAR AMY: I wouldn't
use them for canning.
Those glass lid, rubber
seal/gasket and wire/bale ".
jars aren't endorsed by the
U.S. Department of Agri-
culture anymore (not since
late 1980s) and are consid- Sara
ered unsafe. The USDA
r e c o m m e n d s
Kerr/Ball/Mason jars with
rings and lids. You can find
replacement rubber seals at places
such as Amazon.corn and
Lehmans.com, but I'd use your jars for
decoration, crafts or short-term food
storage. The
lid/ring method
makes it easy to
see whether a jar is ,
properly sealed. Also,
your old jars might
not hold up to can-
ning. Many have
cracks on the rims
from use, and even
if it looks OK be-
fore canning, it
can break during ,,/
canning. If the rim
cracks while pro-
cessing, air can get
in, and you don't have any definitive
way to know whether the jars have a
good seal. Although some people will
argue that you can grab the jar by the


lid and know that it's sealed well, it's
not worth the risk of jar breakage
(think: exploding jars of tomato sauce)
and compromising food safety.
DEAR SARA: I am having some
problems with mold and mildew in my
shower We are a "green" household,
and I am looking for a solu-
tion minus the toxic chemi-
cals. Can you give me some
help with this? Thanks so
much. Melva, Indiana
.* DEAR MELVA: Use tea
tree oil or grapefruit seed
,* extract. Combine 2 tea-
spoons tea tree oil and 2
cups water in a spray bottle,
and spray your shower. Or
Noel combine 20 drops grapefruit
seed extract and 2 cups
water in a spray bottle. Do
not rinse. Some of my read-
ers use MoldZyme Mold &
Mildew Stain Remover. Molderizer
Organic Mold and Mildew Remover
and H20range2. I haven't used any of
these products, but readers have re-
ported they have
/ used them with good
S-__s results.
DEAR SARA: 1 got
your recipe for home-
:-.- made ketchup out of my
newspaper What is the
Shelf life of homemade
.o k ichup? I made it,
and it tasted just
like store-bought
, ketchup. Thanks
tor your help. I
-' ,njoy your column.
- ie C. e-mail
-- DEAR CONNIE: The
shelf life is two weeks (refriger-
ated). If you don't use it all, freeze it.
DEAR SARA: I've been using the
oxygen-type cleaners as an additive to


r 1Jackie Gaffney A HOUSE Jason Gaffney ,
Realtor', SOLD Name! Realtor /
-. The WEEKS REALTY 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
Golden C/352.302.3179 0/352.746.6700 '

- I 'e ".l M


7 DONNA COURT 15 N. WADSWORTH 63 S. DAVIS
1/1/1, 1,157 sq. ft., newer roof, ul-de-s 2/1/1, 1,120 sq. ., Ig. living rm, fen. bekyar d 2/1/1, ,156 sq. fl., new pint copet, newer A(.


2631 E. NEW HAVEN ST.
3/2/2, 1,436 sq. ft., split piln, Citrus Hills.


5966 E. HOLLY ST.
2/2/1,1,293 sq. fl. lam. wood loor, end. porch.


605 WHISPERING PINES BLVD.
2/2 Villa wih Iwo (ar porking.


OVER2.7 MILIONCLOSD SLES 03L


my laundry, but I am wondering
if there is anything else I could
use that might work well but
with less cost. One friend says
she uses table salt, and another
said he uses baking soda. Any
suggestions? Thank you. -
Martha A., e-mail
DEAR MARTHA: In addition
to using salt or baking soda, try
vinegar, Arm & Hammer Super
Washing Soda, Fels Naptha,
Zote or 20 Mule Team Borax.
All are good laundry boosters.
You might consider using Char-
lie's Soap (www.charliesoap.
com) for your laundry instead


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lr ln, IS Io :, Ci lrc ShJ W. It Lelr, r "- 'i r .o
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of your regular laundry deter-
gent, too.



A dusty ceiling fan can dam-
age the motor. Dust can fly
around whenever you turn it
on, too. Some people can reach
their fan with a step stool or
small ladder; but even that can
be a hassle. There are ceiling-
fan cleaning tools that have an
extension pole, but why buy a
tool when you can use items
you already own?
CEILING-FAN DUSTER: We


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have a ceiling fan in our stair-
way My husband can reach it,
but I can't. I also can't reach the
ceiling above it, so it gets
cleaned, but about twice a year.
Today, when I looked (he just
did it), I saw a lot of stuff he
missed. I got my handy dusting
stick and stretched. Sure
enough, I could get some of it.
My husband came by while I
was doing this and said: "Tape
it to a dowel. You could proba-
bly get all of it." I went down-
stairs and got my broom, and I


/Page E14


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the "wow" factor? This
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-....... .. i- - -

HANDYMAN SPECIAL RAINBOW SPRINGS COUNTRY CLUB SNOWBIRDS WATERFRONT PARADISE EXECUTIVE COUNTRY RANCH ESTATE
* Settle this estate 10Ac. v/3mobile iomes. *Easy stance to pnt.s i eRi bo Rxer Flyso uthto the peaceful home estled unerthe .. .
* Fenced, horses OK. *.3BR, 2&. vendefu fir pan v. li I rns Fma t I,' & dn majestic grandfather oaks .. -- -- .
* Mobiles can be removed and county Ioadedv w cabinss & panel t odm mrnir 30, 2BA"DW MH. pa'ed rd., city water *, s So ai r us.e ora :e a n k'v
vill credit or3 impact fees. *Lg moasilsrte oarn-i ltu Fami. wr s tider1 Fl. Givethi home te t glove tesasI isotss'l S *o St I rIa c vK.' r i
* Room for 3 additional homes. Uatelroanad AC, cty'era'r sewr Nw roofl.new er heatair. workshop boatl da L. o SarR n r i IS-a tiaeSaa', rea nzti'Tn ra.
MLS 345523 $96,900 NLS #34209 $124,750 MLS=345703 $115,000 MLS 339374 REDUCED $100,0 NOW S795,000

KAREN E. MORTON -- R'EDCE
Hall of Fame Centurion Member
,"' .'^ '.. ....; iE-mail: k.emoron@tmpabay ..com . c
S .Website: karene.morton.com .-
(352) 726-6668 (352) 212-7595
CANTERBURY LAKE ESTATES BAY EADIWS- SPECThCttAI WATFRTONT LOCAION
*o. Uf sronPtOOL AHOME Wl, iaE 3FSry l2 TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 2500 q ft. LA, fom. am. casual areas.
*2toiSRiancr.tlti. ors prt *Dl Fantastic open kitchen, orite tops, tle f lor
,o.' ; .ie ;l storage b drawne rl" J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE inredble storage. nok with seamless window
. ... . 1. ..W1t , 16n h S M ,i ..n e I ~ FL 344.50 e overlooino pool area
'" .. ...D and*Century21RealEstalEsCoportC f 3BR, 2k. all larierooes plus oersized arae'
,ON,,,,' "'" 4 900 INDEPENDENTLY c,, 'tdE, ~ '1_, sPF ,i-O Great location onlyn minutes foamlfnvereo .
ONLY 154,900 INDEPENDENTYC WAS389,900 NOW 5322,000 MLS' 344039

.'. . .
-.'- -F _____________
(O'AIIAVMr_ ; -. REDUCED

GENERAL COMMERCIAL (GNC) PLUS HAMPTON POINT WITH DEEDE LAKE ACCESS DETACHED 3 CAR GARAGE OFFERS
3 P-' 4BR RENTAL HOME, PAVED ROAD trit in20063BR, 2BA.2 car. 1 i. 1800 li"' a1 GREAT STORAGE/WORKSHOP
INVERNESS MINI RANCH l Centrally located in Citis County on paved Great im. 'to. dil. nm Elegant isle te 3BR 2BA, spacious living area, FL rm
.. .. .... .. ..... , ,, ,, *i rd only mien. flo r intersection o 486 & ,191 Fiully-equipped ki, TOl calbinels, tle flois. 3BR.2BA spa s livingarea Lr .
* ,, ,,, ",l,,,,, ,, ,,, ,,i ,, ,,,' Ideal location for business in need of Giealaea- ly milir tni0f Living room and family room.
tied tlers, elieg n t Srle suite, saem Inglirr l pol. parikirng space tor vehicles,1.25 acres fully fenced paved road.
*A surrounded byB.Scisdeareds o ei tel'pnile poid Thins oe sa sleeper' Near ithe laccocheerBike Trail 1.25 acres fuly enced paved mad
MLS #342690 A GREATVALUE AT $44,900 MLS #339050 REDUCED $199,500 MLS #340165 NOW $165,000 MLS#340170 $107,900
...i S .* -


FREE SpecW Report From Realtor David Brambleft


I


SUNDAY NoveMBIER 14, 201o E3


Cri'mrs Coi w7,i, (FL) CHRONICLE


Bi













Some Idaho gardeners looking to grow medicine


Herbs can heal wounds, etc.


The Times-News

KETCHUM, Idaho All
around you are herbs and
plants that can heal wounds,
ease your cold and treat
chronic conditions like al-
lergies and heart disease -
at least, that's what modern
herbalists like McCall resi-
dent Darcy Williamson say,
basing that assertion on
passed-down native knowl-
edge and careful experi-
mentation.
Most herbs used as medi-
cine are gathered from nat-
ural environments, often
growing on public lands


where they can be har-
vested with a permit and
then made into salves, tinc-
tures, teas or oils.
Some, like yarrow, are so
much stronger in their use-
ful constituents when grow-
ing in native environments
that it isn't productive to
try to cultivate them for
medicine.
However, Williamson
said, there are many plants
that can be grown in a
home garden without
weakening any of their me-
dicinal properties. She re-
cently taught a class at the
Sawtooth Botanical Gar-
den in Ketchum, and


toured the garden pointing
out dozens of native plants
with useful healing ele-
ments.
Among the students were
Florence Blanchard of
Hailey and Heather Johns
of Ketchum, both relatively
new to making herbal med-
icines.
"I like the idea that it's
simple and pure. I'm very
conscious about toxins and
what I put in and on my
body, so the herbals really
appeal to me," Johns said.
Because she lives in a
condo, she doesn't grow
many medicinal plants, but
she wanted to learn how to
use them.
Johns lauded
Williamson's vast knowl-


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end unit townhome has all tre upgrades. Extensive Tile & FBu anstryirea This home has a i ret open p re d .,
Wood Flooring, Corian countertops. Upgraded Cabinets and a beautiful bamboo wood f oonng in Ti min hvmg area and formal
location that can't be beat on a spacious lot with a great view dining room Excellent location in a n initenance free area o'
of the clubhouse pool. Priced to sell Won't last long. Terra Visla
TVRG# 1219 $94,500 TVRG# 1234 $229,000




.,. .. ;- - ..
Single Family/3Bd/2Bath/2Car/ Detached Villa/3Bd/2Bath/2Car/
Woodside Hillside Villas
Exquisite. Immaculate and Elegant describe this "Richmond" Vla
home in Terra Vista Vista Complete with a Gourme kitchen with Custom Martinique Model with a lovely garden view from
expanded island, granite countertops, high end appliances and the Lanai. This home has a formal living room as well as
beautifully built custom cabinetry. This home has it all including a a separate family room. Cooks will love the large pantry
Bella Vita Spa & Fitness Center s a e with plenty of storage. Lots of tile. Priced to sell!
TVRG# 1236 $309,000 TVRG# 1233 $232,000

A
M 7-7 W, F, 1,J 17b- 71111 i T=u~~~(tn 911j I .tud.pttDt M, rT. tM .A' .7d iE.tt4 ,aIt


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


edge.
SIt s
important to refer back to
the experts, and Darcy did
such a good job of explain-
ing what part of the plant to
use.'"
Blanchard is an avid gar-


,CURB
. APPEAL 6
George E. L'Heureux. Broker
Contact us for your
Buying and Selling Needs
(352) 637-2872
www.cacitrus.com


* To submit
feature story
ideas, call
563-5660
and ask for
Cheri Harris.


dener, but she wanted to
It id out what was growing
on her uncultivated Hailey
..:reage.
"My interest is not to
6 become an herbalist,
but to learn some re-
ally basic kinds of things
i that I could do to help
my family, for colds and
flus and abrasions,
'coughs," she said. "It's a
Scry satisfying thing to do,
even though I do it on a
very modest level. Even if I
don't make something of a
particular plant, it's nice to
know what it could be used
for, that it has (medicinal)
properties."
JoAnn Robbins, Univer-
sity of Idaho Extension ed-
ucator in the Jerome office,
cautioned that many of the
plants could be medici-
nally useful in small
amounts, but toxic in large
amounts.
The extension office
does not offer any advice
on the medicinal proper-


ties of plants for liability
reasons, and Robbins said
it is important to talk to
your physician before tak-
ing medicinals because
they can interact with med-
ications you may be taking.
Williamson suggested for
home cultivation, Robbins
noted that they fall into
three general categories:
those that are quite weedy,
those that need a lot of
water and shade, and those
that need lots of sun and
very little watering.
She suggested determin-
ing which medicinal bene-
fits you are looking for first,
then tailoring your garden
to those plants' needs.
"What your object is, is
going to determine what
you're going to grow, but
that's true of all landscapes
and plants," she said.
"They need to be suited to
the location, or the location
needs to be suited to them."

See : /Page E10


SLou Miele, Realtor ( AMERICAN
7 Cell: (352) 697-1685 ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
S ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU Office: 352-746-3600

f-


TERRA VISTA Ki F
+1111. 1111uisurfaci 7 3-3Z ,
PINE RIDGE counters in kitchen and CITRUS HILLS BEVERLY HILLS HERNANDO
3 Bed, 3 Bath, 2.494 sq ft bathroom, ceramic tile, beautiful 3 Bed, 2 Bath 2,273 sq. ft. 2 Bed, 1 Bath, 816 sq. ft. 3 bed. 2 bath, 1.344 sq ft
3 car attached garage. formal heated pool Pool. Summer kitchen, 1 car garage, two porches. 2005 doublewide, walk-in closet.
living room and dining room MLS n;342834 $324,900 jetted tub in master bath appliances included garden tub
MILS 0344780 $249,000 SEE VISUAL TOUR MLS #341377 $229,000 MLS #343296 $59,900 MLS= 345554 $49,900


CITRUS HILLS
2 Bed. 2 Bath. Inside Laundit
Furnished Condo. Ground Level
MLS #336272 $59,900
SEE VISUAL TOUR



,W j i -i j


LECANTO
Sbed,a billi, Otl. J.a uO I1,
25 Acres, custom built-in 2005,
hardwood floors, oversized tile.
granite. oak cainels, 16x32 pool
NMLS a340993 $299,900
SEE VISUAL TOUR


INVERNESS.
WATERFRONT
2 Bed. 2 Bath. 1.556 sq. ft.
On canal just off Withlacoochee
River. Gas fireplace. Boat Dock.
MLS #345185 $99,900


a- a a


TERRA VIS
TERRA VISTA


N


TERRA VISTA
3 Bed, 2 Bath. 1.713 sq. ft
Lovely screened porch.
Comer lot.
MLS #324009 $199,900
SEF VISUAL TOUR


SELLER MOTIVATED
Nice building lot in Crystal Paradise
estates. Build your dream home in
this wonderful and sought after
neighborhood. Make an offer.
MLS #344759 $14,000
VACANT LAND
Want privacy and lots of room :o
roamnr Almost 20 acres in
Dunnellon.
MLS =34451 $220,000
TERRA VISTA
Wonderful buildnc !o: surrounded

LAi' llestvle w.un
state-of-he a,,
lie dining, luxury'
S- and llmore.
$74,900
HNW -14 COMMERCIAL SITE
.F bI


TERRA VISTA GOLF COURSE 2 Bed. 2 Bath. Office'c LAKESIDE VILLAGE ......,-nto. E\cellelt:
3 Bed, 2 Bath, 2.321 sq. It 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 1,836 sq ft 1.666 sq. ft, beautiful open plan. 2 bed, 2.5 bath, 1,481 sq, ft .
il'-ll ,l 1 1, ,I No neighbors behind. Custom 2 master suites, extra half bath. ....
II1 $324,900 11 ' 5139,99 plantation shutters throughout new A'C 44 Gu :f:c Lke Hv-
SEE VISUAL TOUR SEE VISUAL TOUR IMLS #342586 $239,900 NMLSu 345580 $89,900 NMLS= 345552: 159.900
I ,I J* l* ll lIill l I imI


Detached Villa/2Bd+Den-2Bath-2Car/
Brentwood Villas
Maintenance free unfurnished Villa in the community of
Brentwood. 2 bedrooms plus a den. Just a short walk
to the amenities and close to shopping. Social Club
Membership included.
TVRG# 1145 $1,000


--- --- --- --


CITRusS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E4SUNIMY, Novizmiimt t4,-j 20 10






SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2010 E5


Buy quality seed and chances are it will last


But do germination testfirst beforeplanting


Associated Press

Cooks aren't the only ones
who create leftovers. Gar-
deners end up with them,
too frequently, unused
seeds.
But keep those seeds
around another year or
more rather than discarding
the pricey packets.
"If you grow very much,
you can save money," said
Carol Yaw, a veteran gar-
dener and merchandising
manager with Charley's
Greenhouse and Garden in
Mount Vernon, Wash. "I al-
ways start with my old seeds
before buying new. It's sim-
ply a matter of getting qual-
ity seeds to start with. Look
to reputable nurseries in-
stead of shopping for dis-
counts."
Seeds from certain crops
stay viable longer than oth-


ers. Samples of the so-called
"New Mexico Cave Beans"
were successfully germi-
nated after 1,500 years of
dormancy They did so well
that some commercial grow-
ers added them to their
product lines.
"Old seed is fine to plant
in most cases by home gar-
deners," said Bill McDor-
man, founder and president
of the Seeds Trust Inc., in
Cornville, Ariz. "You don't
get a lower quality plant just
because the seed is old.
That's a misconception. 1
routinely get 90 percent-
plus germination from
tomato seeds that are over
10 years old."
Hard, round seeds seem
to last longest, he said.
"Generally, onion and chive
(seeds) are among the first
to die off. But I've planted
onion seeds five years old or


Woodcarving show


slated for Dec. 4


S* to the Ch'ro"icf

The Nature Coast Carving
Club will have its 13th an-
nual Woodcarving Show at
the Citrus County Audito-
rium, 3610 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness, from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4. Unlim-.
ited free parking is avail-
able.
Come see the woodcarv-
ings and wood-carving sup-
plies displayed, and the
many items for sale. If you


are looking for a special
Christmas; gift, this is the
place to find it. Carving
demonstrations will be per-
formed on stage. Free cata-
logs for tools and supplies
will be available until de-
pleted. Approximately 200
carved Christmas tree orna-
ments will be given as door
prizes. You select your fa-
vorite ornament.
Admission at the door is
$2. If you have any questions
call Dave Melton at 5274561.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 563-5660, and
be prepared to give your name, phone number, and
the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections,
call 563-5660 and ask for Cheri Harris. Again,
be prepared to leave a detailed message.


more and still got many to
grow."
B. Rosie Lerner, a con-
sumer horticulturist with
Purdue University Exten-
sion, has compiled a
longevity index for many
vegetable and flower seeds.
Expect at least a four-year
life span for beet, cucumber.
lettuce, muskmelon, pump-
kin, radish, squash, tomato,
turnip and watermelon
seeds, Lerner said. That
same four-year-or-more


standard applies to alyssum,
calendula, celosia, di-
anthus, nasturtium, poppy
and zinnia, among annual
flower seeds, she said.
Still, it would be prudent
to do a germination test be-
fore dropping any leftover
seeds into the ground.
"Take a random sample of
10 or 100 seeds some
number that's easy to re-
member- and spread them
out on a paper towel," said
Scott Peterson, owner of'
Hometown Seeds in Orem,
Utah. "Wet the paper towel
thoroughly, roll it up with


the seeds inside, and put it
in an open polyethylene bag
that will let the air circulate
but not the water. Put it
somewhere warm such as
on top of a refrigerator."
Determine the typical
germination time from the
seed supplier or by search-
ing the Internet, he said. If
your test rate is 70 percent
or less, then plant more
densely, using two to three
seeds per hole to get the
yields you want.
"This is a great way to in-
crease success in the gar-
den," Peterson said. "It's


very discouraging to plant a
garden and lose the plant-
ing window to poor germi-
nation."
Proper storage is crucial
to seed viability.
"Keep them as dry as pos-
sible, as cold as possible and
as dark as possible," Peter-
son said. "The lower the
temperature, the better. Re-
frigerators or freezers are
the best storage areas.
"Keeping seeds over one
year is easy Just keep them
out of the sun in a dry place
and they will germinate well
the next year."


A I 1 1] 1 1 A&

i746.9000
AiKia ukh S Tom Bafour Waler Engelken 'u ., sI lt p Toni Nast ArtPaty
Wv.C X REALTOR REALTOR RLICT). ?SK REALTOR REALTOR







3542 N. PALOMINO TER. 6002 N. ROSEBARK 2200 W. TALL OAKS 3685 N. PALOMINO TER. 4999 N. BUFFALO DR.
5 4 3 344185 $575,000 3,2 342540 $239,900 3/2.5/2 342552 $185,000 3/2/2 344154 $395,000 3/2,2 345020 $189,000


12015 W CALADIUM 6393 W. GLORY HILL 4217 N. STANWYCK 2372 W. SNOWY EGRET PLACE
3/2.5/2 344633 $299,000 | 4/2/6 345028 $365,000 32/2 345500 $109,500 4/2/2 3433/3 $189,900


' ,..._ __ '___"_ .'.E. ,

1885 W SWANSON DRIVE 6401 E. MOBI.E 2580 W. GARDENIA 3861 N. TAMARISK AVE. 11286 W. BAYSHORE
3/2/2 343378 $148,500 3/2/2 345394 $79,)00 3'2/1 345756 $109,000 2.2/2 345172 $79,900 | 2/2 345027 $78,500




375 W CRESTMONT 390 E. EUREKA CT. 137 N. FRESNO 411 S WASHINGTON 8163 N. TINY LILY DR.
2/2/2 345321 $149,000 2/2/2 342401 $144,000 3/2/2 338314 $134,900 3/2/2 344969 $89,900 3/2/2 343512 $104,900
:221 34532 $[1 49,000':]:~ i!k' 1!L::V l!K 'l~- ]:/l 1 J l l


3521 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100
Ieel Hil, 46


CITRUS COUrNT (AI) CHRNONICU


OAKWOOD VUAAGE


I CITRUS SPRINGS __,I


I CRYSTAL RIVER


F777#1-"DGE FARM j






E6 Sunday, November -l,, 2010





Home1'Vont is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information............563-5592
................................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................................ 563-5966
News information........................................................ 563-5660
................................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing............www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
C i k. I*(" I"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via e-mail to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 563-3280,
attention HomeFront."
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
E-mail high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes for
space and/or clarity.
For more information, call the newsroom at 563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Vessel sinks: A very old


idea for a new bathroom


Q Every week I look forward to
picking up plumbing tips for
my home. What I need to know
are the ins and outs of picking
out a vessel sink for a bath-
room. I went online thinking
this would be an easy task, but
there was so much information
that I got lost in the shuffle. Can
you please give me some Ed-
friendly, easy-to-understand in- .
formation on vessel sinks? -
Lori, Georgia
A: This is a fun topic, since
vessel sinks have been making -
a big splash in the plumbing -
world recently. First off, these Ed Del
so-called "new style" sinks ac-
tually go way back to the years
when indoor-plumbing systems
were hard to find.
Vessel sinks are reminiscent of wash-
basins and pitchers of water that sat on
vanity countertops. Basically, they look
like large bowls with finished inside and
outside walls. As plumbing progressed, in-
door plumbing became a standard system
in most homes. Vessel sinks changed
shape and were mounted inside our vani-


ties and countertops, or were hung on
walls. Vessel sinks are now the preferred
high-end choice for many bathrooms.
Even though vessel sinks are available
in many styles and materials, I'm going to
focus on the bowl-type styles
and three of the most popular
materials. This will help you
cut through a lot of the clutter
First, we have vitreous china.
China is basically fired clay
coated with a bright glaze. It's
probably the most versatile ma-
terial used for vessel sinks. The
color, style and decorative as-
pects of a china vessel sink can
Grande match up with just about any
bathroom layout and design.
Next we get a little fancy with
thick-glass vessel sinks. Of
course, glass will be translucent
in appearance, creating a deep, rich look,
and can also offer a wide variety of color
choices.
Rounding out my top three is stone. Yes,
sinks cut from an actual block of marble,
creating a totally natural style of vessel


/Page E10


Inside...


Herb gardening
PAGE E4

Frugal Living
PAGE E3

Home Maintenance
PAGE E15

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the website for the Citrus County
Property Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Papago Indian basket a homespun treasure


D ear John: Enclosed of "- ,
are photographs ofa : ;
basket that I bought
as a Papago Indian basket.
The person I bought it from
said it was given to her par-
ents, who had volunteered
on the reservation many
years ago.
I have other Papago bas- "
kets, but not one nearly this John S
large. I would like to know
its value. Thank you for any
information. I enjoy your
newspaper articles. -J.M.,
Homosassa
Dear J.M.: Southwest American Pa-
pago Indian baskets are of' specific
collector interest. Currently I think
the basket would sell below $1,000',
likely in the $300 to $600 range.
Dear John: I was hoping you could
help me with these two items that
were given to me in a box. The pitcher
is an Ott & Brewer and on the bottom
it is marked Ott & Brewer Co. Trenton
New Jersey and also numbered 1525.


S'" The other piece looks
S* i}' like some kind of box that
' could fit a bar of soap.
There are no markings that
Jr .y I could find only three dot-
like markings on the bot-
* tom. Is this piece also an Ott
& Brewer? I was wondering
what these might be worth
and also do you know of any
ikorski collectors that would be in-
terested. K., Internet
Dear K.: The name Ott &
Brewer is widely recog-
nized among collectors of
American ceramics. During its time
the company was regarded as one of'
the finest ceramics producers in the
United States. They started business
in Trenton, New Jersey in 1865 and
continued until 1893. Your brightly
colored pitcher would likely sell in the
$50 to $100 range.
The decorative little dresser box
was likely made within the last. 50
years and was not made by Ott &
Brewer. Potential dollar value is


catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: Attached are photos of
two silver pieces. I have tried to de-
termine what they are via Internet re-
search, but have not found anything
even similar The only thing I learned
is that they are electroplated nickel
silver
Item one is approximately 4-1/2
inches tall including the knob and 7
inches in diameter including the
curled handles. The markings on the
bottom are Wilcox Quality, then a semi
circle with Wilcox S.P Co., E.PN.S., In-
ternational Co.; beneath that is WM.
Mounts and then the numbers 7750N.
Item two is approximately 7-1/2
inches tall including the knob and 4-
3/4 in diameter at its widest point. The
markings on the bottom are Wallace
5539N E.PN.S. Have you seen items of
this nature? They certainly cannot be
part. ofa cream and sugar set since the
tops are like cut lace. They may be 40
to 60 years old as I found them in a

See ,'. ,/Page E7


-..x
* X.


' '.,.,



IA


Special to the Chronicle
Southwest American Papago Indian baskets are of specific
collector interest.


L
(


Bi












-. -



...- '-a ^ ,.-


T Wi-,
^ k*- :'.*r .y .-. :.. --- '.
Potpourris such as this one have been in use for hundreds of
years in various forms and styles. This one and a companion
piece (not pictured) were likely manufactured prior to World
War II.


Nov 19th 9 am & 2 pm

TWO ON-SITE REAL ESTATE, HOME & CONTENTS AUCTIONS
WO I



*.,.".. -:.--' '.iu .

4339 N. Weewahi Pt. 4294 E. Van Ness Rd.
Crystal River, FL Hernando, FL
PRiE m8a-M~ ON:am. RE:10am PREVIEW:1pm-AUCTION:2pm- RE:3pm
RE: 1985 2/2 Dbl Wide MH w/ 12x10 addition & This home 24x36 1993 with a 15x12 enclosed
12x10 screened lanai added in 1996 to be sold sun room built in 2009 and 15x34 screen porch
"regardless of price", to highest bidder. Kitchen w/ & 15x17 carport built in 1998 is filled with
appliances, & master BR w/walk-in closet & bath. furniture, collectibles, household items &
Also, carport w/shop, i. 1' ii hii .,t i.,, 1/2+/- goodies galore. Property must be sold to close
acre treed yard. Contents: Fully furnished incl the estate. Great MH wall the additions you
dining, office & BR. Also, china & collectibles, need located in a well-established
TV's, 1988 Force 15hp outboard motor, fishing neighborhood. This sale will feature a 1999
items, tools & hardware, bicycles,& yard tools. BuickCentury 'I .m.
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
S '" .; BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE.
Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588, Up-todate photos en web,
Personal Property sold Dudley'sAuctionAb1667. The Real Estate by Maine-Ly Real Eslate.#381384
all dimensions are approx, 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


4 1.





"V



I ..


....... .. .


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

china cabinet in 2006 at, my
father-in-law's home where
he had lived for 60 years. He
married his first wife in the
late 1930s and second wife in
1947. Do they have any value?
-J.E Hernando
Dear J.P: The items you
have are potpourris. The rea-
son the containers have
open-work lids are in order
for the fragrance of the pot-
pourri to escape. They have
been in use for hundreds of'
years in various forms and
styles. Yours were likely man-
tufactured prior to World War
II. The letters EPNS stand for
electro-plate on nickel silver
There is no specific collector
interest. Potential dollar
value is -. I.,' each. I sug-
gest you purchase bags ofpot-
pourri in a home decor store
and enjoy them.
Dear John: 1 read your ar-
ticles every week in the Cit-
rus County Chronicle. I
would appreciate it if you can
give names and numbers of
dealers interested in my


CITRuI- (; UNT' (1L) ('HRNOIy(:Li


Hummels, some old cameras,
and a hardcover collection of
the Hardy Boys. FJ.S., Cit-
rus Springs
Dear EJ.S.: Current inter-
est in vintage IHummels is
very soft and the outlook for
future collecting interest is
not rosy Many specialty deal-
ers in Humnmel's have disap-
peared as well as Hummel
collecting clubs. Young peo-
ple in their 20s, 30s, and 40s
are generally not interested
in Hummels.
In order to help you with
the cameras, I need to know
manufacturer and model
number There is very little
interest in Hardy Boys books:
prices are very low\:


Jlohli Sikorski has been a;
prot'essio)nal in the
antiquess business for 30
years. IHe hosts radio show: Sikorski's Attic.
on WJUF (90.1 FID
Saturday ti'om noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic. c o The
Citrus County Chronicle.
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd..
Crystal River: FL 34429. or
asksikorski( aol. com.


T3


per person.
An array of artistically
decorated, pre-sold holi-
day trees with varying
themes will be on display
Thursday, Nov. 18, from 2
to 8 p.m.
Admission to the "Tree-
view" is an unwrapped
children's toy or a nonper-
ishable food item.
Entertainment from 4 to
6 p.m. will be provided by
the Citrus High School
Chamber Choir, under the
direction of John Edel.
Seating is limited: Only
a few tickets remain. To
obtain tickets to the char-
itable event, call Barbara
at 795-1395.


REAL ESTATE. INC.
5569 WV. GULF TO LAKE HwY.
AitS CRYSTAL RIVER. FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
VWWV.ALEXRE.COM E-rI w.: SALES(i

- C.


CRYSTAL RIVER Immaculate 2000 DAV M0H,
rean wood deck vwap'robo, mean yand chain-lnk
fencO, 3 hiedoom, 2 bath, split floor plan,
kitchen island \v,\v t & hleaktast bar, new
dishwasher & tigi (2010), & new roof (2010).
W Ood-huini ninnl police #345577. S79.900.


CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT. Tn-level home
with decks on every level 3 bedroom, 25
bath, 1 car garage, all newly remodeled
vw/wiring, doors, windows, floors, deck
railings, baths, kitchen & of course paint,
0345 97. 5399.900.


,- ..j .
g"-,'. ' .: ,^'

HOMOSASSA. E.ao.,,., bUtl., OurjNELLON :.., ., ,' .. L ,
RV garage. Lg. covered rear porch w/stone bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2.5 acres. Master bath
BAR-B-Q pit. Wood-burning fireplace, ceiling garden tub wdbl. vanity & shower. Country
r. ,. ,1 I , ;, J. ; i, ,,.idry, workshop kitchen, vaulted ceilings, 16 x 20 workshop
* .,E 12, F .--,,.. -.. yard. #344239 w/electric, inside laundry wAvasher-dryer.
PRICE REDUCED S129,000. #339660. REDUCED PRICE S75,000.




HOMOSASSA. Fleetvood DW M;H wi2 bedrooms, SUOARMILL WOOOS CrPRESS VILLAGE.
2 baths, on I acre of land, Has a great 1400 sq, ft Bright, cheery 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage,
workshop w,'Ai hath, 2-traveing hosts, air on almost half acre Split floor plan, large
cra soo rns on r Seectice ot ko sie screened lanai, newer appliances, priced tight,
f ,1, :i "UEO i. s4 ^' ,11 OREDIICEDTO SS050 0




CRYSTAL RIVER. 2 Bedroomn, 2 hath, 1 cai INVERNESS 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1 cai gaiagc
glang, zoned PSO & nisdeonial, uIe as home new nouf (2010), screened poich. shed on 051
ei low impact commercial .Ao glassed-in ,
poich, new roof (2009), washer/dryel, ceiling ace, Ig. teo V' d fenced, kitchen & dining im,
ians, walk-in closets, cathedral ceilings Open & bright w.lg. breakfast bar, well & septic.
#344833. $79,000. #342038. S79,900.


SistDAY, No)VEIMBIER 14, 2010 E7


Pilot Club Parade of


Trees coming soon


Special to the Chronicle

Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club
of Citrus County will pres-
ent the annual Parade of
Trees gala charitable
event at Archangel
Michael Greek Orthodox
Church on Friday, Nov. 19.
Festivities start at 5:30
p.m. with a cash bar and
appetizers. followed by a
6:30 p.m. buffet dinner in-
cluding a variety of
desserts. Items donated
for the silent auction will
be exhibited for selection.
A live auction follows
the dinner
Tickets for the
evening's event are $50


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
^2^ (352) 634-2371 Cell .
fE [[ (800) 476-2590 Toll Free .
ER X For a Visual Tour of our listings
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com
HUGE GARAGE
2 Bedrooms. 2 baths
Newer roof
Newly painted inside & out
'' Vinyl-windowed porch
Lots of tile
2-Car garage
$58,000 MLS 343528
ON A CUL-DE-SAC
i-. 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths
Split plan
Fireplace in family room
S. Newer appliances
* "* Workshop & storage shed
S .* On .7 acre, fenced
S'$111,500 MLS 345428
"-. ',' REGENCY PARK
A condo community offering a 2
t ,-ndrn', 2 bath apartment at
S -$59,900 (ground floor) and a 2
J ... .- bedroom, 2 bath villa with a garage
and double driveway at $84,900.
Maintenance free with a clubhouse
ind pool and conveniently located.
''. f;tsg ,J&J.".._ .. ..._______


~~lc- -3~as~sr I





E8 SSUNDw, NOVENMBIiR ii. 2010


Catalog Living


Associated Press
Catalog Living creator Molly Erdman poses in her apartment Oct. 28 with props in Los Angeles. Erdman manages a website called Catalog Living, a daily parody of the photos taken
for upscale home catalogs.

Blogs poke fun at over-seriousness of home design and displays in catalogs


THA : :
Associated Press
CHICAGO It started with figs, on a
plate, stashed under a poolside table.
The caption under the photo in the home
design catalog urged readers to "enjoy the


comfort and ease of indoor entertaining
with outdoor sectionals, pillows and acces-
sories."
But Molly Erdman saw something else.
She saw a chance to poke fun at something,
well ... kinda ridiculous.
The actor/comedian sat down at her com-


puter last June and wrote her own caption, overly put-together nature of photos from
"Sweetheart," it said. "the Turners will high-end home accessory catalogs. She got
be here any minute now! Did you put the her start as a comedian with Chicago's Sec-
plate of figs under the table?" ond City and moved to Los Angeles three
. And her blog, "Catalog Living," was born. years ago to pursue an acting and writing
Erdman didn't necessarily set out to cre-
ate a daily parody of the sometimes serious, See CATALC Page E9


CrInTs Coumv (FL) CHRONICLE






Cr'Im's C'oINTY (IL) CHRONiCLI


CATALOG
Continued from Page E9

career You might recognize
her as "the wife in the mini-
van" from a series of popu-
lar TV commercials for the
Sonic restaurant chain.
One night, though, after
she wrote the "fig" caption,
she showed it to her
boyfriend. He laughed.
Then she wrote more cap-
tions and her comedian
friends thought those were
funny, too.
She realized she was on to
something and as her
blog entries multiplied, they
started getting attention
from Facebook fans and
people in the design field.
"I've gotten a lot of e-
mails from catalog photog-
raphers and art directors,"
she says. "They say, 'We al-
ways think what we do is
ridiculous.'
"No one seems to take re-
sponsibility for lining up 30
apples on a table."
This is a reference to the
pieces of fruit or other ob-
jects that show up in odd
places in some of the cata-
log photos. One of Erdman's
favorites showed a rowboat
on a dock filled with pillows.
Her caption: "In her an-
nual end-of-season ritual,
Elaine sent the outdated
summer cushions out to
sea."
This isn't the only website
like this. Another is called
"Unhappy Hipsters: It's
Lonely in the Modern
World." The creator of that
site prefers to remain
anonymous, and thus, did
not return e-mails request-
ing an interview.
That site has a slightly dif-
ferent perhaps darker -
feel, with captions focusing
exclusively on photos from
Dwell magazine. One photo,
for instance, with a man
looking into stacked storage
containers was described
like this on "Unhappy Hip-
sters": "Someday he'd re-
member which pod
contained his sister; until
then, her piercing cries cut
into his practice time."
Another, with an older
man in a modern home li-
brary near a table lined


SUNDm, NOVEMBER 14, 2010 E9


with stones, reads: 'A steady
diet of rocks and reading
had almost reversed the
aging curse."
Earlier this year (before
Erdman started her site),
Los Angeles Times archi-
tecture critic Christopher
Hawthorne called the Hip-
sters site "the most wel-
come addition to the often
self-serious world of archi-
tecture and design in re-
cent memory, not to
mention a pocket of satiri-
cal warmth in the middle of
a soggy, recessionary, earth-
quake-wracked, Martha
Coakley winter."
Could it be true that the
recession has made people
a bit cranky about high-end
design?
Sure, it's possible.
But Gayla Shannon, a de-
signer in Fort Worth, Texas,
thinks every trend also has
a backlash. Maybe it's no
longer trendy to be trendy.
"The positive side of this
phenomenon is that attrac-
tive, slick, well designed
products are affordable
and much more available to
everyone," says Shannon,
who's also an assistant pro-
fessor in the department of
design, merchandising and
textiles at Texas Christian
University.
"The downside is that liv-
ing up to the designer
lifestyle also creates a tran-
sient aesthetic the desire
to have the latest mobile
phone device, television,
kitchen gadget, and discard
the perfectly functional in
favor of newness.
"Fashion conformity has
become extremely attrac-
tive, and conformity is a
great target for satire."
So, yes, she thinks these
sites are funny, too.
And so do a lot of other
people.
Julie Roller, a "Catalog
Living" fan in Wamego,
Kansas, marvels at Erd-
man's ability "to make us
stop and reevaluate some-
thing as simple as cata-
logs." She checks the site
every morning right after
she reads the news online,
and she likens the humor to
the TV show "Seinfeld."
"I just can't get enough of
Gary, Elaine and their
wacky lives!" she says.


Gary and Elaine are the
main fictional "characters"
in Erdman's blog. They're
probably in their 40s, she
says. They seem to have no
jobs, are very wealthy and
have a "ridiculous 1,000-
room house," Erdman says.
"Gary's sort of the bum-
bling fool, and Elaine has
her hands on her hips,
telling him what to do all
the time.
"To me, they are the peo-
ple who live in Pottery
Barn," she says, chuckling.
Gary and Elaine cele-
brate holidays, too.
One recent "Catalog Liv-
ing" entry has a photo of a
tidy to-do list that includes
"DECK THE HALLS" as
one of the things to do.
Erdman's tag line: "Oh,
it's not all holiday spirit
The Halls are our next door
neighbors."
She says she'll keep
doing the blog as long as
she has ideas. There's cer-
tainly enough material
there.
"In my 15 years or so of
being an actor and writer,
I've done many things, and


this was purely for fun -
and it's the thing that gets
the most attention," she


says. you.
"It's a good little life les- "I think people can tell
son: do what entertains that I enjoy doing it."


__ _i










Window and patio screens offer a first line of defense


Home Improlvement Nenws Whether a simple cloth draped carefully outside
over the entrance to living quarters-or the intri-
Few home improvement products impact daily cate bronze screen sur-rounding the fanciest
life around the world more than insect screens. rooftop garden-screens keep out insects of all


SAND 311 W. Main St., Inverness

LANDK 352-726-5263 I
.. ... ., www.landmarkinverness.com
.7. PM I s


LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


1043 N MORNINGSTAR LN. (Fairview Estates)
3/2/2 pool home oil 1.5 Acres MIS #343262 PRICED AT
$199,900. Coll Debbie Tanney 352-613-3983 or
Tonya Koch 352-613-3982


2,


PLEASE COME SEE ME. Lovely setting with over
large 2 bedroom home. RV parking, electric to sheds and ingiound
pool. Buy now so you can be ready for those summer pool parties.
MIS 339455 ASKING $95,400.
Kathy Chapman 352-726-5263





BEAUTIFULLY CRAFTED, k .. ..' i.n iI
CABIN HOME on 4 5 acres. The wraparound porch completes the
country feel. Property also features on oversized 3 cor detached
garage...and much more. MLS #341502 $279,900
Call Jean Cassese 352-201-7034


I, b I --U


p


EXTREMELY WELL KEPT POOL HOME
nice residential area. 3/2 2 plus a corport for beet or extri vehic
il .... :1 ; 1.. Newer foof and winowrs
Home Wormnir goes c0g with this great buyi 11060 1' threeuo
Place AILS 343103 $89,500.
Call inda Begec 352-726-5263


4 ". '-'"'' -
.' . .

WANT A WATERFRONT RETREAT? Here i
is. Lake Tsolo Apopka chain of lokes, 2 bedioom/1 both, 1536 inir
with o fireplace on a triple lo' AILS i344204 ALL FOR
$115,000. Call Julie VanNess 352-302-9157


- I -r


HOMOSASSA RIVERFRONT WITH
STUNNING VIEWS in ooo!or Riuerhamn VWe
Loge 2 4 '2 home built 1981 wilh les l oa!n:ei l
MhS .345600 Nwvly li[ed el $485,000. 2865 S
un an! Broo D. Hion ois 1 (nil enya keIh 352613-o' o l

..a ,




IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A UNIQUE
HOME 'c no i. e St2 r,: toi- Im bIc home with
!rge tcred ':,d 0 asking $50,000. Owner .;i be
ctcit w. c0 ,' 25 34 :20 Ic', Chim" 352-72c-5263


HOME OR BUSINESS...E\n large ,ol and very
iv my? 2 1'2 ,ne . '. ., busnes-'s
.sih cs a varbi dd U ,, (countanl Or
nsru'ance eco. P0ssi!e po itnlll to rf-:0ne ;o comimctil lor nore
uses lose to moroi slopx'ng cnd cmenites M',S '343808
$127,500 ,',cke ffeI. Lnda Eega 352-726-5263


WATERFRONT GETAWAY! 2/2/2 home on
ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS BUY! 2007 3/2/2 waterfront canal for only $89,900. Home features rear
with 1844 living for $89,900! Home features split floor plan, screened porch, multiple sheds, dock, fencing, family room with bar, CHARMING BANK OWNED 2006
rear covered porch, interior lauoondry, eat in kitchen and dining room, living room with fireplace..take a peek and make on offer! 3/2/2 with 1524 having for $85,000. Split fool plon eat-
nke fixtures. MIS #345717. 11119 Easter. MIS? 345714. 7690 four Ooks. in 'I .. !,,,,,,!, ... .......1 ,, "I".' 15674.
Call Tomiko Spires-Honssen 352-586-65698. (aCol Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. 3 li. i .. i....., ,

' ..

FANNIE MAE OWNED 3/2.5/2 in charming
DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH AND I (itHus Springs! Home in need of some repairs however home CHARMING FANNIE MAE OWNED 3/2
MEAN ROUGH! 3/2/1 pool home in Inverness for features roomy sear patio, newel windows, living & family rooms, home in Bevedy Hills. Home has been updated. Living & Florida
$44,900! Home features rear porch, caged inground pool, two olattched garage, split plan, standard ceilings, partial appliances, and rooms, spit plan, updated windows, rear patio, and front covered
car attached garage, fireplace, and office. MILS #345588. 4575 rear fencing. MIS #345525. $57,250 9121 Golfview. porch. MS #345473. $58,500 75 Regina Blvd.
Roinbow. Coll Tomika Spires-Honssen 352-586-6598 Coal Tomika Spires-Honssen 352-586-6598. Ccl Tomike Spires- Hnssen 352-5864598
---- .--. .. . . '
,' I .=- ..... ...


YOU MIGHT GET LOST on the spacious 2.5 acres _. :, -
i40L or lost inside this huge 2002 4/2 Doublewide with 2160 GREAT FANNIE MAE OWNED 2003 3/2/2
living! New AC 2010, fireplace, interior laundry, living and family w- with 1612 living area. Home features rea screened porch, fully
rooms, split floor plan and ear screened porch. Only asking BANK OWNED DUPLEX. 2006 2/2 units wilh appliances, interior laundry room, ent-in kitchen, formal living a
$65,000!!! MIS #344686. 6417 Polr Pt. minimal woak for $89,900. MLS #345763 dining rooms, pany, split plan, and vaulted ceilings. 6502 Eadishie.
(all Tomiko Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Coll Tomika Spires-lnassen 352-586-6598. MLS #344190. Call Tomikir Spires-Honssen 352-586-6598.


sizes and shapes and help stop the
spread of dangerous diseases from one
part of the country to another
As designs and innovation enable the
screen industry to be more efficient, of-
fering ever more affordable and avail-
able products, the Screen
Manufacturers Association (SMA), or-
ganized more than 50 years ago, pro-
vides a watchdog operation that
oversees various safety issues sur-
rounding the manufacture and use of
window screens. In addition to their
decades-long child safety labeling pro-
gram: "Kids Can't Fly." the Association
em-barked last year on a program to ex-
pand awareness of the health benefits
of window screens.
A cooperative fifty-state effort
worked with the help of the CDC Cen-
ters for Disease Control, to publicize
and distribute the Screen Manufactur-
ers Association's new "For Health's
Sake" posters at the website
smnainfo.og 41S_sima.pdf
Screens for ventilation and protec-
tion from insects are available for win-
dows, front and back doors. sliding
doors, pet doors and even garage doors.
and when kept in repair or replaced an-



PLUMBER
Continued from Page E6

sink. Stone can really take you way
back to the days of old. especially if
you walk around your bathroom in a
toga.
Keep in mind a few side notes that
you also need to consider with vessel
sinks: Matching countertops. faucets
and extra plumbing labor that are
needed to install this type of sink can
add up, on top of the higher cost of the
sink itself. My recommendation is to
have your plumber price a standard


HERBS
Continued from Page E4

Both Williamson and
Robbins emphasized
that properly identify-
ing a plant before you
use it is critical, as mis-
takes could be danger-
ots and there are often
several species that ap-
pear alike.
Williamson suggested


nually will provide everyone with peace
of mind. Custom or standard screens
are generally available for all areas of
the home where insects can invade.
It is possible to obtain many sizes and
screen mesh with most available in 18
by 16 with wire diameters of .001 inch to
.013 inch. Fiberglass screen will not
shrink, rust or dent, is resilient, easy to
use, and long lasting, standard grade
fiberglass screening is recommended
for windows and doors. Mesh: 18 by 16
wire diameter .011 inch.
Colors vary and standard width is 4
inches through 54 inches in 2-inch in-
crements plus 60 inches. 72 inches, 84
and 96 inches. Roll Length: 100 foot or
600-foot heavy-duty fiberglass screen is
recommended for patio and pool enclo-
sures. Fine mesh screen is proven to be
effective in areas that need protection
from tiny insects commonly referred to
as sand fleas or "no-see-ums."
Fiberglass screen is manufactured
under strict standards to assure that the
colors are consistent and the mesh is
uniform.
Visit www.SMAINFO.org for a full
history of the industry. their products
and ready contact information.


lavatory sink for your bathroom, along
with an upgrade price for a vessel sink
Then. if you can swing it, go for the ves-
sel. If not. stay inside your budget with
a sink that stays inside your vanity.


Master Contractor Plumber Ed Del
Grande is known internationally as
the author of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and tbfor hosting
TV shows on Scripps Networks and
HGCTVPro.com. For more
intbration. visit eddelgrande.comn or
write eddelgrande(@hgt pro. conm.
Always consult local contractors
and codes.


that people new to me-
dicinal herbs plant just
one or two and learn a
lot about them before
moving on to new ones,
and she advocated
learning local plants
rather than those that
don't grow here natu-
rally.
Plants should be pur-
chased from local nurs-
eries, grown from seed
or taken from private
property with permis-


sion. Williamson said.
because public lands
prohibit taking plants
for landscaping pur-
poses. Parts of medici-
nal plants may be
harvested from public
lands with a permit
from the agency respon-
sible for that land. such
as the Bureau of Land
Management or the For-
est Service: contact the
agency for its rules and
regulations.


E10SUNDAY,)~ NoN\.iimiiiiR 14, 2010


Onurs Cot-wry (H.) CHRONICEE







CITRrS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




IR3SSEB3H


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Real Estate


Classitieds




** "


'9


9:


,,

,'~-~'
-~ "V-f
4






C


C1lssi(ficdsf


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I- ,- e-a 0 : aed h i # It ,


C.R/Homosassa
1& 2 Br. turn, quiet park
Util. inc. clean, shrt/long
term 352 220-2077
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 $450. *Lecanto
2/112. fenc'd yd. $450.
Pets Ok. (352) 212-3031
DUNNELLON
Hwy 488, 2/1, priv lot
new a/c,$425.
(352) 795-6970
HERNANDO 1/1,
Fresh remod., private,
nice yd. scrn'd porch.
$450. Fst/Lst/$300.sec.
Worth A Look!
(352) 400-2411
HERNANDO
2/1 Fenc'd. $550. Fst/
Lst/Sec. 352- 637-4797
HERNANDO
2/2, Manuf., DW, CHA,
ood water, hilltop view
5050 mo. 352-464-0548
1714 Fletcher St oft 486
HOMOSASSA
1 & 2 BD turn or Unfum
call for prices
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Furn.,1 ac. fen'cd.
Addition, deck, shed
$550 +Sec. 352.628 5244
HOMOSASSA
2/1 No smok/pets.
$390. Fst./Lst/Sec.
(352) 628-9884 Lv. msg.
HOMOSASSA
3/11/2, CHA, On I Acre
$450. mo (352) 563-0964
HOMOSASSA
Large 4/2/CP, FP, No
Pets, ref. req. $850 mo.
352-302-7863, 628-9919
INVERNESS 55+
1 Br., $425. New carpet
& vinyl. 727-457-2017
INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1- /2BA, $475
includes lot rent; 1BR,
$425; 1BR, IBA Pork
model, $475. Call
352-476-4964

LECANTO
3/2 $575. 2/1 $525.
+ Sec. Both on 1/2
acre, Water & garb.
incl. (813) 695-4037


LECANTO 55+
2/2, DW $600. 3/1,
$485. Remod. carports
& sheds. (352)287-9175
(352) 746-1189
RENT TO OWN
3/2 DW on canal to
River, Floral City, $2,500
down & $450 mo.
352-726-9369




2002 PARK MODEL
40ft. 2 g. slides, stand-
ard frige & toilet, mi
crohd. sound sys., W/D
sleeper sofa, Extras
$10,950(352) 628-0045
DUNNELLON Nice 2/2
DW in Dunnellon Sq, lot
117, sunroom, carport,
util/stor. Sell turn or un-
turn. All apple. Close to
shopping, Pe, restau-
rants Call(352)447-2317
or (352)489-5040
Palm Harbor Homes
has closed 2 model
centers. Save up to
$60K on select
models. Call
1-800-622-2832
STONEBROOK 55 +
2/2/1 carport SW 2 scr.
porches. until shedon
pond make offer.
Clubhse, pool, jacuzzi,
(352) 628-0744
Stoneridge Landing 55+
Reduced to $30K, neg.
corner lot. '95 3/2, extra Irg
DW, excl cond. new roof,
windows & hard wood firs
fireplace, wkshop,
carport, lot of storage
863-514-3615
352-201-9371

USED HOMES
'06. FLEETWOOD
14x52, 2/1 $9,800
90. HOMES OF MERIT
28x40, 2/2, $19,900
'01. SKYLINE
28x56, 3/2, $29,900
'07. GENERAL
16x66, 2/2, $23,900
'96. FLEETWOOD
28x56, 3/2, $29,900
'07. SKYLINE
16x56, 2/2 f $23,900
Call for more info
352-621-9182


Homosassa/Chaz
2/1 CHA Clean, No pets
$485. mo. 727-415-1805



Lake Henderson
$11,500. 55+ Waterfront
Park, Close To The
Water A Beautiful View,
Boat Dock & Storage,
Pool. 1/1/Carport, Fl.
rm. Will consider fi-
nancing.(352) 476-8364
(352) 563-8694




BIG HOME
New 2011 Jacobsen
triplewide.42 x 60
(2460 sq. ft.) 4/2, L/R
has Stone Fireplace,
Master B/R has re-

Appliance pkg.,
front deck,
2x6 construction,
R30-19-1 1, only
$89,900 (36.55/sq.tff.)
Call for more info.
352-621-9183
CRYSTAL RIVER
nice 2/2 DW, Ig scr rm.
fully turn. from pots &
pans to linens, / ac.
fenced bk yard $47,900
850-260-4575
HOMOSASSA
2 Bed 2 Bath
Fully furnished
Call for Details!
352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2 BR DW, all appl's,
spacious liv. rm., Ig. lot,
3360 ARUNDEL TERR
1 BIk off Grover
Cleveland $550 mo.
A.T. Tubolino Brk/Owner
(727) 385-6330 Appt.
Homosassa 2/1
Quiet Country Setting.
Almost 1 acre fenced,
just remod. Shed, Lrg.
addition, huge deck,
Furnished, $35K.
(352) 628-5244
HOMOSASSA
3/2, on 1/2 acres,
scr'nd porches, well
& septic.(352) 464-3748


HOMOSASSA
2/2 SW on tencl, Oc
Remodeled hardwd &
tile firs Open plan
$39,900 ne7. B, Owner
(352) 527-3204
HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1/2 ac. cnr lot. New
roof & A/C. 3 W-l clsts
& pntry, 2 car gar w/wk
shp/storage, Ige covrd
scmd patio, fen'cd yd. RV
hkups,S89Kobo owner
finance. 352-423-0220

must sell!
Inverness-off S. 581
Near Arbor. 3-Br. 2-Ba.
Inground Pool. Many new
upgrades. Huge 30 x 20
Garage. $49,500/obo.
352-533-7953
LAND-N-HOME
Top of the line
Jacobsen, 3/2, 2176
sq. ft. Drywall thru out,
hurricane shutters,
upgrade insulation,
thermo pane double
hung windows
appliance pkg., stone
fireplace, 16x40
screened in back
deck w/hot tub,
13x25 screened front
porch, 45x25 RV port,
300 sq. ft. workshop,
many more features,
too many to list.
Must see! Call to view
352-621-9181
Mobile Apache Shore
4552 N. Pine Dr., Handy
person special 75x100
lot, on dead-end quiet
street, $12,500 Appt.
only (352) 476-7517
Priced to Sell!!
CRYSTAL RIVER 3/2
1 Acre, Large Deck,
Pole Barn, $49,900
352-746-5912



2/2, new renovations
porch, W/D hookup,
work shop, cent.
air/heat Lake access
$5,500 (Lot rent $220)
(352) 228-1836 after 3P
Crystal River 55+
2/2/Carport, all appls.
scrn'd rm. Good cond.
$6,000.(352) 220-6634


16 x 62,
930 sq. ft., 2/2
Only $24,900
14x18 florida rm.,
12x30 screened
carport. Home has
large rooms, must
see. In quite park
only $230/mo.
Includes garbage,
sewer, water,
pets allowed.
Call 352-621-3807
to View

3/2 DWMH Worth $75K
Selling for $20K
completely renovated,
new kit., outside freshly
painted, handicap, 2
rooas, corner lot. Lots of
Extras' 352-212-9499
352-613-3899
55+ Mobile Home Park
2/2, Extra Lg. Shed,
2 Lanai's all appl's,
partial furniture, Asking
$20,000 MUST SEE!
Price Negotiable
(352) 344-1632
Crystal River Village
55+ Gated Community
2/2, Den, 2005 Homes
Of Merit, 1457 Sf. Incl.
all appls., carport, Irg
scrn'd rm., Close to
shopping. Must Seel
Immaculate, A Steal At
$59,900 (352) 419-6926

FLORAL CITY
SINGING FOREST
00' 3BR, 2Ba, 28x48
Fleetwood manufac-
tured home,1344sf,
all appliances incl.
$36,990.00 Call
352-796-6360 or
352-796-3925
Ask for Jack
Homosassa 55 + Park
2/2 Dbl. w/upgrades,
carport, new roof, kit.,
patio, CHA, part. turn.
$11,900. (352) 503-7558
Homosassa 55+
2/1 SW, turn, newly
remod, all new appls.
Move in cond. Must
see! $12K. Obo.
(352) 382-7043

Inverness 55+ Park
New 3/2, Carport &
shed. Mid to upper
$20's. (352) 341-1646


INVERNESS
Stoneridge Landing
5460 S. Winged Elm Wy
55+, '93 Modular 2/2,
split plan, 56'LX26'W.
New roof, GREAT
COND. A Must See!
$47,500. (800) 779-1226

Oak Pond 55+
2/2 DW, 24'x44', new
paint, floor coverings &
appls. Near Lakes &
Bike Trail. $25,500.
(352) 344-4008

Rent to own, Inverness,
2/1, nice older
singlewide. carport,
screen porch, in 55+
Park. $100 mo. + $290
lot rent (352) 726-9369

WEST WIND VILL 55+1
Looking for New or Used
M.H. in a Great Pet
Friendly Community?
Call 352-628-2090






Alexander Real Estate
(352) 795-6633
Single Family Homes.
Duplexes, WF Mobiles
Apts, furn/unturnished
We have them ALL
throughout the
county. From S375/m
to $1250 month


BUYING, SELLING,
or RENTING
View Our Website
C2 NatureCoast.com








835 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, Fl
(352) 795-0021
Email:info@g c21
naturecoast.com


CASTRO
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverly Hills
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 $750/mo.
Citrus Springs
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 $1050/mo.
Inverness
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
$825 $1050/mo.
Pine Ridge
3 & 4 Bedrooms
$800 $1800/mo.
Hernando
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 $800/mo.

Commercial
Property
Hernando Plaza
1300 sq ft can be
subdivided waterr
included Next to
Giovanni's, $1000/mo
+ o% sales tax
Check Out Our
Website At www.
castrorealty 1.com
Rental Inventory
changes daily.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine


">-



LOVE ADVICE
FROM REGIS:
Dog days ot summer
aie ovei. this autumn,
toll in love all over
aaoin
Plantation Rentals,
Inc 352-795-0782


CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 great neighborhood
7 mos min. No Pets
352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. Near
Town 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1.5, CHA, Nice/Quiet
Washer/dry/cable 828 5th
Ave NE $575. Mo.+ Sec.
(727) 343-7343/776-3120
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1 BDRM turn S125wk
incis all (352) 382-5661
HOMOSASSA
1BR, refr. stove, W&D,
air, until. included $600mo.
+ sec, 352-628-6537




1 BR & 3 BR
Starting c. $375/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985
Crystal River
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms
352-794-3322 office
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Laundry on site, no pets.
Lecanto Duplex 2/2
Dish/wash., wash/dryer.
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
Crystal River 2/1
CHA $425/mo. 1st, last,
sec. (352)697-1680


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious 3/1 carport
W/D hkup., $575 mo.
1st & Sec. 352-634-5499

Free Flat Scr Tv
w/lease near CR
Newer 2/2
duplex, all kitchen
appliances, patio,
W/D hook-up, nice
yard, Exc. Cond. $625
Maggie (352) 634-1341

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M, W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
2/2 Pool, tennis + facili-
ties, H20, W/D + apple's
incl. Scr. patio,Fst. fir.
$645. (973) 222-1100
INVERNESS
2-2/1, 2nd fl. Air, $370,
incl. H20. (352)344-1337
INVERNESS
Close to hasp. 1/1 $450
2/1 $500 352 422-2393

LECANTO
Nice I Bedroom
746-5238/ 527-3502,


Ask About

Move-In

Special
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am 5:00pm
Recent Foreclosures Welcome

(352) 489-1021 1


SUNDAIY, NOVE-IMBER 14, 201o Ell







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E12 SUNDAY, Nov'iiMBtI 1i, 2010


SUMMERHILL
at Meadowcrest Luxury
3/2.5 Townhouse $995
(352) 563-5657



INVERNESS
55+ waterfront park,
2BR, 1-1'BA, $475
includes lot rent; 1 BR,
$425; 1BR, 1BA Park
model, $475. Call
352-476-4964





SAct Now:I

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad






Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




CRYSTAL RIVEP
Comm. Storerronr,ve i
clean 1000 SF exc loc'
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-63.1-I52.3
HERNANDCO
Industrial Park 1801, % f.,
office, brk. rm 4 boy
garage, fen'cd, A sec.
cameras. Asking 1,000.
mo. (352) 637.2220


INVERNESS
Prime Retail & Office
FOR LEASE 900-2800 sf,
Hwy. 44 & Croft Ave.
726-3236, Cell 613-9000




CITRUS HILLS
2/2, unfurn. 1st. floor,
end unit, H20& sewer
incl. pool, tennis. No
pets, lease opt. owner
fin. $700. (352)697-1907
HERNANDO
Condo 2/2'//Carport,
C. Hills., long/sht term
furn./unfurn. 344-0235

HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000dn + lot rent,at
EvanRildge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/2 CHA dishwasher.
W/D hk-up $575 no dogs
$600 moves u n726-9570





HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225











INVERNESS
Unfurn. 2/1 Villa, $525
mo $525 dep. Incl.
elec. water, boat ramp,
dockage & pool.
(352) 726-1736


HOMES MOBILES APAKTMIENT
FEATURED PROPERTIES
*CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/2 House on golf course................ $900
Furnished SW Mobile, 2/1/cp............. $450
Comfy, cute, cozy house 2/1/1cp ...... $500
*BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 cp, nice, neat, clean....... ..... $550
3/2/2 pool home, inci. pool & lawn serve. $1300
*HOMOSASSA
Duplex, nice & clean, 2/1.......... ...... $500
Lovely waterfront stilt, furn. house
includes ultilies, 2/2/2cp.............. $1300
*SUGARMILL WOODS
4/4/3.......................... .................. $1000
*CITRUS SPRINGS
2/2 Duplex.RINGS................................ $625
Adorable, clean house, 3/2/1.............. $750


BEVERLY HILLS
(f^?i 21 2/1, $600. Mo. Fst./Lst.
Iaj.f *& dep. req. No pets/
..-- 1 smoking. (352)746-0330
J.,w W. EN,, E-~ I, BEVERLY HILLS
INVERNESS 2/1/carport. $540 Mo.
2/2/2 $625 + $400. Sec.(352)
2/1 $600 746-7824(352) 697-9339
2/2/1 $650
3/2/2 $750 Beverly Hills 2/2/1
BEVERLY HILLS Fm Rm, CHA, Xtra Rm
2/1 CARPORT $550 $625. (352) 795-1722
2/2/1 $600 Beverly Hills 2/2/1
2/2/2 +Den Sun Rm, FR, CHA. W/D
Maint Free Commnity No Smoke/Pets, $695.
POOL $825 352-563-2500, 212-9267
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Lawn Care BEVERLY HILLS
included $800 2/2/carport, $575
Rent or Rent to Own
Jennifer MChery (352)897-4447, 697-1384
(352) 726-9010 BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 CHA, Pets OK $575.
R(352) 563-0964
BEVERLY HILLS
Laurel Ridge, 3/2/2
Pool & Spa $1,200 mo.
Beverly Hills no pets 352-527-1051
2/1. Water/Garb. Incid
$600/mo. 352-400-4663 CITRUS HILLS
2/2.Unfurn. 1st. floor,
CITRUS HILLS end unit, H20& sewer
3bd w/membership Lawn inci. pool, tennis. No
care inc./Golf for into pets. lease opt. owner
Call 352 201 8687 fin. $700. (352)697-1907
(352) 527-8432
Property CITRUS HILLS
Management j/3/iV on 2 AC. $825.
& Investment $850 Sec352 628.5272
Group, Inc. CITRUS HILLS
Licensed R.E. Broker oo:a 12 10, 3 2 on 1
acre $1000/month
>- Proper\ & Comm w/purchase option
Assoc. Mlam is our (352) 201-0991
only Business I CITRUS SPRINGS
- Res.& Vac. Cozyv 3/2+den wash
Rental Specialists /dr/., shed, shaded yrd
. Coild!o & Home $725. 954-557-6211
Cwne; Assoc.gmt -
Robbie Anderson CR/HOM 2/2 $485
LCAM 2, $575' CH A (352)
352-628-5600 220-2447 or 212-2051
info@prooertv CRYSTAL RIVER
manaamentgrouo, 2',: .\ AC. CHA. Shaded
cam $44:,. mn (352) 563-0964
_CRYSTAL RIVER
'/:! C!eor S-0m n-o
I79 -6290 697-1240
FLORAL CITY
BEVERLY HILLS 0 r3/2/ Low dw
/1 w/flrm.C!H/,'i\.',) E7 term,- Near FRoial
$550/mo $1100 Mlo\ e in Elen,. 113-777-7586
(352) 422-/794 FLORAL CITY
BEVERLY HILLS 4 $495. Fst/Lst/Sec.
1/1/CrP w Fl. Rm. $425 HOMOSASSA
(352)897-4447/, 697-1384 ,3/2 $600. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-586-5013
BEVERLY HILLS 2/1 HOMOSASSA
,-AC fenc'd yd. $575 1 3/I, 9 Carports, CHA,
Mo. $500 sec. No Pets/ No pets $650. Ist/sec.
smoke (352) 746-2932 j (352) 628-4210

BEVERLY HILLS 2/- INVERNESS
Fl. rm., CHA, Dsh./wsh. 3/1 Fenced. $750
$600. (352) 382-1344 352-804-4234




REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE Hw.
SCRYStAr. RIVER, FL 34429
OFFIE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAILt.:
SALES@ALEXRE.COM

CRYSTAL RIVER

APARTMENTS

2 bedroom, 1 bath

From $375 to $500.


,,, ___


Come into our office
for a FREE list of
foreclosures


INVERNESS
2/2 Lake Front 2 Story
loft, w/ dock priv. 1/i
acre lot $750. mo. $300
dep. 7511 E. Maggee
Ct. 352-362-3435
INVERNESS
3/2/2, New $850. Mo.
Waybright Real Estate
352.795.1600
INVERNESS
Great Neighboorhood!
Lrg. lovely 3/2/2, Totally
refurbished, next to Fort
Cooper St. Park, Rails To
Trails & close to town.
$800. (352) 409-1900
INVERNESS
Highlands 2 br + 1 ba
2 car. $650.
2/1/1 $590.1st Ist dp
(352) 344-2560
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 Starting $750.
Mo.(352) 601-2615
(352) 419-6268
INVERNESS
Large 3/2/2, Near Golf,
boat ramp, $750,
3/2 New tile, paint,
$645. 352-228-1542
LECANTO
4/2/2 Just Remodeled,
Ne\ granite flooring.
& carpet Free
cable Gated Comm.
Black Diamond
membership avail
$1,250. (352) 527-0456
LECANTO
Newer 2/2/2. i acre
cl appls Clean $750.
dep. 352-249-4460
NO CREDIT
CHECK!! RENT TO
OWN! ...3 BDRMS
352-484-0866
JADEMISSION.COM

RENT TO OWN
Easy Terms 2 BR
Fireplace. rustic
-ishing/boating
$4716 35-220-2573


56 PROPERTIES ACROSS CENTRAL FLORIDA
20 OFFERED ABSOLUTE!

CITRUS. LAKE, TAYLOR, MARION &
SUMTER PROPERTIES
6 PM Wednesday, December 1
Auction Held At: Holiday Inn & Suites Ocala
3600 SW 38th Ave.. Ocala (1-75. Exit 350)

7763 & 7765 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River Commecial B".gs.
4163 W. Picnic Lane, Homosassa ABSOLUTE! Mobile Home
3029 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Conmmernal Retail Buildngm
6698 N. Tree Farm Ave., Beverly Hills 13 Acres Vacant Land
5754 N. Calico Dr., Beverly Hills Acre Residential Lot
785 W. Virginis Dr., Citrus Springs 1.83 Acre Multi-Family Lot
9004 & 8996 E Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness ABSOLUTEI Residential Lots
9363 E. Mistwood Dr., Inverness ABSOLUTE! Residential Lot
306 N. Braemar Dr., Inverness 5 Acae Residential Lot

Addchional Proerties Available
Sll,,I \ ,' )THA I S *wee fo complete deblbs
S( /( / R. 800-257-4161

r"41 G. higgenbotham.com
| M,00 N H_1___' r i ., ... - 'IP., ,, C :. F 1.1. P mLI.K AF I'


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 bedroom. 2 bath. pri-
vate dock. Incl. cable
TV, water, pool, tennis,
clubhouse. $795. mo.
(414)690-6337
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 Duplex on canal,great
neighborhood, No pets
$600 + dp. 813-986-6630

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225

HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 $850/mo.
+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-3338
INVERNESS
2/2/1.5 Scenic views,
quiet neighborhood,
Irg. yd., tile/berber.
Super clean, $700 Mo.
(352) 476-4896
INVERNESS
3/2c/ Tile, W/D, Scrn'd.
Pch. Community pool,
tennis & dock. $875.
Mo. 352-812-3213




CITRUS COUNTY
Rent or Purchase
3000 UR ,3/2/2+pool
1 ac $800 incls poet
moint.(908) 322-6529
HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant Biding
For Lease. 3,200 St.
large parking lot. Great
visabilty from Hwy.
(352)584-9496 1305 E.
Norvell Bryant Hwy.
34432

LECANTO
Newer 2/2/2. 1 acre
half fenced all appls
$750. + do or bu'y$129K,
249-4460 /613-0277


A Gracious
Peaceful Mobile
Home and R.V.
Park
nestled on 13
beautiful lush acres in
Old Homosassa.
Reduced to sell at
$755,550.00 for more
information go to
www.Mo sbzmepa
e.com oremai
Stacy.alexander@cold
wellbanker.com.)



Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com


Plantation Realty Inc
352-795-0784
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner




C.R/Homosassa
1 & 2 Br.quiet park,util
inci clean, short/long term
352 220-2077
CHASSAHOWITZKA
Waterfront 3/2 $900+
HIGH POINT 55+
2/2 scrrm W/D $1100
Sugarmill Woods
3/2/2 Pool Home $1600
Agent (352) 382-1000
DUNNELLON
1 BR Accross from Lake
Rosseau, $750 mo. all
utilities Min. 3 mo.s (352)
794-6244, 906-458-6279
FLORAL CITY
Nice 2/2 scr prch. Nice
yard. Long/short term.
352-344-8213
HERNANDO
3/2, Res/Comm. Poss.
Office. Furn./ Unfurn. On
Withlacoochee River,,
scrn'd porch, dock $795
Mo.Dave (352)628-4878
(352)302-5875.




Inverness. Citrus County
Tree Farm 21 ac MOL
Shown by appt only
352-694-4442


WWII a -


Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!







lOAM i. r g iert.e, ThIdIiuu

Sale Site for All Properties:
6128 N. Parking Terrace, Hernando, R.
S2,400 sf Industrial Building on 0.93 ac
6128 N. Parking Terrace, Hernandc
0.91 acre Industrial Lot
Contiguous to N. Parking Terr. Industrial Bldg.
1007 E. Overdrive Circle, Hernando

0.90 acre Industrial Lot
1115 E. Overdrive Circle, Hernando
*0.16 acre Lakefront Homesite
7626 E. Pocono, Inverness, FL
0.23 acre Lakefront Homesite
Contiguous to 7626 E. Pocono Site
7632 E. Pocono, Inverness, FL


232 NE 2nd Court, Crystal River, FL



800-257-4161 higgenbotham.com
IGE.l ; VLOT-Ltu
1 TI EER


OWNER FINANCING
o- Bad/No Credit Okay
727-992-1372
$38.700. LECANTO
4 BR, tbth. 1500SF/
Block/Lg lot/Needs
total interior rehab/
structurally okay/
fenced/$7.7K down
$439/Mo.
$25K under Mkt.
$72,700. LECANTO
Buy one get 2 FREE
6bds-4Bths in 3
urts/3-2/1-2/2-1/+2 5AC-2P:r
ces/Horses
OK/Fenced/$37K
DW/Quiet Setting
$43.700 HOMOSASSA
3Bd-2Bt-single/Ig 4rm
dcition/1000C/25AC/bor-
der55000ac hunting
preserve/Horses
OK/$14.7Dw/$326/Mo
12yrs left on note

$58.700. DUNNELLON
3Bd-2Bt/Blt-200/85t/Db2 /
d/1AC//Move-in
ready/Fireplace/Hot
Tub/Quiet setting/
$9.7Dw/$439/Mo/
S25K Under Mkt,
$69.700 DUNNELLON/
LEVYCO. 2Bd-lBth/
925SF/Very Private/ 1
Natural AC/Mins from
Ocala/US19-US41-SR121/
$14,7Dw-$387/Mo


ACTION
KWAL MANAGENNY 0=, imp
!nm)
SS2-70S-IRIENT
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


-


I







SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2010 E13


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.













Thinking of buying?
Let me show you
what's available.
Thinking of selling?
Call me for FREE
Market Analysis.
Plantation Realty
Kristin Holland
352-220-1186
kristin@plantation
realtvinc.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


500+FLORIDA
BANK-OWNED
HOMES


Thur Nov18 1:00 P
Hampton Inn
Gainesville
and
Sun, Nov 21I1:00 PM
Orlando Airport
Marriott
PROPEPRnESOF LXAL NTEPEST
INCLUDE HOMES IN THESE 5 CTIElS
Crystal River
SFloral City
Herando Beach
OPEN HOUSE: Sat. & Sun.
November 13 & 14 from 1-3pm
Get All The Details
& BID NOW at
www,BidNowFL.com
866.518.9064
For FREE Brochure



Upto 2.5% to Buyers Agents!
$2,500 down in cash or
certified funds for each
property. 5% premium on
eac sale. All sales subject
to seller s approval
H&MAB110:RE-C01035357






CRYSTAL RIVER
Comm. Storefrontvery
clean 1000 SF, exc loc.
Hwy 19 Downtown
$795/mo 352-634-2528


New Homes
$79,900
3/2/2 1880 sq. ft.
Includes Lot
352-897-4447
352-697-1384


$44,900.
Completely Remod'ld
2/2/1, 1,200 St. new kit.,
baths, flooring, lights,
fans, etc.
Open house Sunday,
12P. 3P. 41 S. Jefferson
St. (352) 527-1239

NO CREDIT
CHECK!! RENT TO
OWN....3 BDRMS
352-484-0866
JADEMISSION.COM




3/2/2 Brentwood Villa in
Terra Vista/Citrus Hills
by Owner. All Kitchen
Appliances, carpet,
Laminate, tile floors.
1784 living SF, Home
has been well Main-
tained and move in
ready. $162,500
(352)527-1789






Fully Fum. Town Hse.
2/2t/2/Carport, 1850,
SF, 2 lanais, w/d.
Community Pool,
close to golfing & lots
of other amenities.
Social Membership
Avail. Easy access to
Orlando, Tampa,
& Ocala. $79,800.
(352) 422-5819

REDUCED!
Citrus Hills POOL HOME
4/3/oversz. 2 Car Gar
cir dr. tile fir. 2000 sf of
LA on 1 ac Membership
Avail .Not req $237,900.
352-527-7856




Arbor Lakes 55+,
3/2/2 New kit., GE Prof.
stainless appls. oak
cabs., walk in shower.
Prime loc. $234,900.
(352) 726-7952





3BR, 3BA, Pool home,
FSBO, 518 Poinsettia
352-860-0878. To view
www.invernessPool
Home.FSBOnetusa.com


-A




Foredosues
and
Short Sales
Call Quade Feeser
Century 21,
J.W. Morton Real
Estate Inc
Office: (352) 726-6668
Cell (352) 302-7699
qfeeser@yahoo.com



Move In Ready
3/2/2 '98 Pool Home,
ceiling fans, walk in
closets, all appls.
$182K. (352) 860-2303
(352) 586-0555



3/2, Fenced Yard,
Newly remodeled
1,250 sq. ft. Home
$45,000
(352) 362-9793



2/2 Home, Completely
furnished, near Publi\.
Walgreens &
Chassowotizka RIver
1 ,: lot city water &
sewer $47.500 Call Ray
(352) 382-5901
Six Room House 3/2
5951 Mink Ln $8,000
dwn, $400 mo 1/2 acre.
$47,000 Property sold
AS IS. Open House Sun
10-4 727-586-4292


REALTY LEADERS
730 N SunIcoasi Bild
Crysial River, FL 34429


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For Youl
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY I Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com





CHARLES KELLY







"Satisfied Customers
are our Goal"
VIC MCDONALD











.W RM EI'*TI. 1
ofc 352-726-6668
cell 352-422-2387


Su rmill
;Woods -1


NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
property ll
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685

OWNER FINANCING
w- Bad/No Credit Okay
727-992-1372
$38.700. LECANTO
4 BR, lbth. 1500SF/
Block/Lg lot/Needs
total interior rehab/
structurally okay/
fenced/$7.7K down
$439/Mo.
$25K under Mkt.
$72.700. LECANTO
Buy one get 2 FREE
6bds-4Bths in 3
nits/3-2/1-2/2-1/+2.5AC-2Pcr
ces/Haoses
OK/Fenced/$37K
DW/Quiet Setting
$43.700 HOMOSASSA
3Bd-2Bt-single/Ig 4rm
oidtictV 1000f/2.5AC/bc-
ders S3Uoc huling
preserve/Horses
OK/S 14.7Dw/$326/Mo
12yrs left on note
$58.700. DUNNELLON
38d 2Bt/Bt-200/!1850/DbIw
d/IAC/Move-h
ready/Fireplace/Hot
Tub/Quiet setting/
S9.7Dw/S439/Mo/
S25K Under Mkt.
$69,700 DUNNELLON/
LEVY CO.
2Bd-1Bt/925SF/Very Pri-
vate/ 1 Natural AC/Mins
from
Ocala/US19-US41-SRI21/
$14.7Dw-S387/Mo



^-^





Whether you are
buying or selling
your home, you need
a Realtor you can
rely on. Call Bonita
Amonte, Realtor
Cell (386)562-6665
amonte08
@gmail.com
Plantation Realty Inc
1250 N. Country Club
Drive Crystal River,
Fl. 34429 Office
(352) 795-0784
Fax: (352) 795-2887


-w
Plantation Realty Inc
352-795-0784
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R) Owner
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 story, 2 covered boat
slips & seawall, 5br/3ba
2kit. near Kings Bay
$525K (352) 563-9857











and
Short Sales
Call Quade Feeser
Century 21,
J.W. Morton Real
Estate Inc
Office: (352) 726-6668
Cell (352) 302-7699
qfeeser@yahoo.com


ALISON MARKHAM- RMl LINDA BARNES
352-697-0761 REALTY ONE
STEVEN MCCLORY | : < Cell: 352-239-4844
352-422-3998 office 352.795-2441
vvirvinaturecoastivin5 coin |I _ __ -


, ?11164
. W. YEMASSEE LANE,
HOMOSASSA
::' 1-' Homosassa River
and Gulf of Mexico
access.
_,, .", $174,000

Directions: US 19 to Halls River Rd., bear lef inta Fishbowl Dr. and
follow aroiindil o Old Honosassa. straight onto W. Soinnole PI. at
Elementary School, left on Park Hill to Yeniassee, Home on left.


MEADOWCREST ARBOR COURT
1661 N. DOLTON POINT


ti/us 11sis's/
re/r ,r~/s
/ iss rr,/7te/i



or directions3.


INVERNESS, Great Loc!
2/2, 2nd floor. Encl
porch overlooks pool.
Updated kit, baths, etc.
Low maint fees reduced
$54,900 352-586-1920



ALABAMA
RIVERFRONT LOTS-
Final phase closeout
sale 11/20/10! Prices
Reduced. $19,900. Boat
launch/ sandy beach/
Ready to build. EZ
terms. Call for ap-
pointment.
(888)392-9944



BUY OWNER
panoramic, River view
4200 sf. 4 level custom
hm. 3 spacious suites
jocuzzi rm .4 ac $839K
(352) 503-2288
Come into our office
for a FREE list of


HOMOSASSA
REDUCED MUST
SELLI Owner Finance
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied. 2 frpls,
granite. $449K.Owner
Finance or Trade.
727-808-5229






2 ACRES $16,000!
Best price in Citrus Co.
Dead end road.,
overlooking open
acreage, very private.
Livestock & mobiles ok.
C.Mike Smith R. E.
Broker (352) 628-0505


10 ACRES
With Single Wide Trailer
$89,000 (786) 255-6955


Hernando City Heights,
2 side by side lots, well,
septic, pwr pole, water
conditioning system
and Shed incl. $13,000
firm. (352) 228-0769


HOMOSASSA/CHAZ
2 beautifully wooded
1 Oc lots for homes or
MH, close to shopping,
water & gulf $16 k ea or
S30K both 352 795-7235


INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106 &
#40/112 S. Crestview
Ave. both .324/acre
$30,000 each.
(919)329-7033


: Finder
www.,-'i, finder.com


. .. ,



F1i Yoar DreAi Hows
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www :"," finder.corn


f Norm Overfield c.u
7' Realtor ...---- .
'ea l KELLER WILLIAMS
352-586-8620 I A I I
Email normoverfield@kw.com 352-746-7113
4 E www.citrusover55.com 699 S. Adolph point, Lecanto



PARADE OF HOMES!
Start at this lovely 3/2/2 Split Plan, then
tour two other homes and the amenities in
this gated, lakefront active adult
,. community! Prices from $129,900 to
.'. $222,500. Parades start each hour on the
IM EIlK fi Li 6 hour, starting at noon.
S.il.M. rm slJ Directions: Take SR200 N. from
Hernando, right into Arbor Lakes. Stop at
guardhouse for access .& directions,


P


-----


II'R I CoiI (F~L) CHRONICLIF~


NC MOUNTAINS-
Cabin Shell, 2+ acres
with great view, very
private, big trees, wa-
terfalls & large public
lake nearby, $99,500
Bank financing
(866)275-0442




Citrus/Lecanto
ABSOLUTE
SOLD REGARDLESS
OF PRICE
AUCTION
IN CRYSTAL OAKS
Westchase Sub.
Phase I: 52 Lots
"Sold Separately"
Phase II: 21+/-Ac
Phase 111:37+/Ac
All Sold Separately
Auction held at
Lot 12 Westchase Lp.
Sat. Dec. 4th
at 11am
Preview From
10am Sale Day
Additional Info
On Website
AmericanHeritage
Auctioneers.com
Call David Slavinsky
813-928-6832









Homosassa
.4 Acre Lot
wooded, river access,
$17,000 owner finance
352-621-1664







E14 SUNAY, NNovinM.,, 14, 2010


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

stuck the handle of the dusting
stick through the hole in the
broom's handle at a right angle.
Instant ceiling-fan duster that cost
us $0! I was so psyched I went
through the living room, taking
down all the cobwebs.
Not only is the living room full
of boxes of books, so you can't get
at the ceiling easily, but this is a
post-and-beam house, so the ceil-
ing is high. And I managed to get
down a lot of them! Bye bye cob-
webs! -Judi, New Hampshire
REUSE COFFEE CANISTER:
We use a large plastic coffee can
for a "lights out" canister In one of
the taller Folgers cans, we put
these items inside: a small flash-
light, extra batteries, votive can-
dles and small holders, a lighter
and a small wind-up radio. My
husband then attached the can to


y Cail Hlrrrar s j-,, ^ y';

(352l 795-9123"
wwwzrystalriverhomesandlandxom

WE HAVE RENTALS!
Residential and commercial
Furnished and unfurnished

Property management
services available



I REALTY
LEADERS
S www e lrealtyleaders c om
CRYSTAL RIVER 794-0888 -'-.
INVERNESS 341-1233 tL't I
,BEVERLY HILLS 527-1112 ,
'RENTAL DEPARTMENT 527-1129


WELCOME HOME to
this move-in condition,
well maintained home in . .
Citrus Spdngs, Freshly
painted and newer ceiling ,
fans and appliances.,
including washer & dryer
Pull down attic stairs, in
garage for extra storage space. Relax on your 12 x 12 covered
patio with a private backyard selling. Plenty of room for a pool!
Priced to sell., bring us an offer! MLS #345228.
Directions: Hwy. 491 to North on Deltona, right on North
Citrus Springs Blvd., right on Anson, left on Sandree, right
on Jourden, left on Loretta. 2nd home on right.
GARY AYRES 352-527-1112


LIVE THE FLORIDA i .
UFESTYLE n in)
Meadowcrest!! Original .
owner, beautifully
maintainedbedroom, -
2 bath, 2 car garage split
floor plan home. Enjoy
the beautiful clubhouse,
pools, tennis courts, and
walking trails!! What more could you ask for!! Just move in &
make this your home today!! MLS #345620.
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-n179.


II WOODASH CT (SO. WOODS)
3'22 on GC heated pool MLS =322;78 $199,900


PRICED RIGHT!
*3/2/2 Sweetwater Sand Dollar Ill -.
* Heated pool w/total privacy .
* Dual pane windows/wood cabinets "'.
- AC/heat new in 2009
* Extra deep garage w/workbench Ep
* Furniture available separately '
-.11 #345434 $160,000 '


Ir- r


' '.,'"' ,.'!.'" l"m"" ."
.l. t.
8378 W. BRADSHAW (HOMOSASSA)
22 New *t s't home MLS 342731. $169,000


DESIRABLE SOUTH OAK VILLAGE!
* 3 + office/2/2 Great Room home
* Well for irrigation
* Double door entry lots of tile
* Tinted windows/sliders in rear
* All rooms are vaulted
* Move-in ready!
#340650 $167,500 .1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


the wall in the laundry/pantry
room off the main room. In the
event we lose power, we will not
have to root around for candles,
lighter, batteries or a flashlight.
This happened to us once late at
night, and finding those things
while in total darkness was not
fun. It's also helped when we've
had sitters at the house. We show
them where it is, and it has been
used more than once. (Unfortu-
nately we're in an area that loses
power a lot!) No matter how dark
it is, all I have to do is find the
pantry door, and the can is just in-
side on the right-hand wall. -
M.K., e-mail
CLEAN SHOWER DOOR: I
clean my glass shower door with
1/2 cup white vinegar to a 1/2 gal-
lon of water. Sponge it down,
squeegee it clean. No scrubbing.
The vinegar dissolves the soap
scum on contact. I have new
brushed-nickel hardware and
cannot use any commercial
cleaner on the finish, so I use the


vinegar/water solution to clean
the hardware and dry/buff with a
clean, lint-free cloth. -C.H., e-
mail
BURN REMEDY: You can slice
potatoes thin and lay them on the
burned area. This also works for
burns in the kitchen. I have used
this many times and even on bad
grease splatters. Never got a blis-
ter. If the potatoes have been in
the fridge, it feels even better. Just
keep them on until the stinging
stops, and then rinse off the po-
tato-starch residue. Karen,
Texas

MEN

The top tip I get is for cutting
dryer sheets in half. Using them
twice ranks second. Many people
don't use dryer sheets. They pre-
f'er liquid fabric softener; vinegar;
a combination of vinegar, baking
soda and water: cheap hair condi-
tioner; Charlie's Soap; or none at
all. If you do use dryer sheets, you


can reserve some to use around
the house or reuse a few, too.
Here's how.
CLEANING: Reuse them to
dust and clean around your house.
Dust furniture, blinds or ceil-
ing fans, or use or reuse them to
clean faucets, tile, tubs, shower
doors, sinks, mirrors and win-
dows.
They work well to help you
clean your dryer lint trap. Use one
dry, and if lint remains, run under
water and scrub the screen clean
with the dryer sheet.
They can help remove gum in
your dryer Use a wet fabric sof-
tener dryer sheet (hot water) and
Spray 'N Wash. Let the dryer sheet
set on the gum for a while before
trying to scrub it off.
You can use a green scrub pad
or a Mr Clean Magic eraser if it re-
quires a bit more elbow grease to
get it all off.
Reuse one to remove deodor-
ant marks on your shirts by rub-
bing the sheet on the clothing
quickly and gently Pantyhose
work well, too.
Use a wet one to remove bugs
from the windshield, or tar from
the bumper or grate of your car,
quickly.
Reuse them as Swiffer pads to
help you remove pet hair on your
floors.
Stash a couple in your mani-
cure kit to remove nail polish.
Use new dryer sheets to clean
your iron or curling iron. Heat ap-
pliances on a low setting and iron
the dryer sheet. If this doesn't
work well enough, shut the appli-
ance off and wait for it to cool.
Wet the sheet and with a little
elbow grease, the iron(s) will come
clean.
Have a pan that has baked-on
and stuck-on food, such as a
scrambled egg or lasagna pan?


Put a dryer sheet in the pan with
hot water and let it sit overnight.
No scrubbing is needed. Be sure
to wash it thoroughly.
AIR FRESHENER: Put a sheet
in a linen closet, a suitcase when
traveling, sneakers, the trunk of
your car, in your trash can under
the bag, at the bottom of your
clothes hamper, in your vacuum
bag, tucked inside a toilet paper
roll or around the holder, etc., to
keep odors at bay.
LINE A POT: Reuse a couple of
dryer sheets in the bottom of a
plant pot to prevent soil from
falling out. Water can still drain
through.
WALLPAPER-REMOVAL
HELP: Wet new dryer sheets
down, apply to scored wallpaper,
and scrub and peel the wallpaper
off. Continue to wet the sheet with
hot water as you work. Be sure to
cover your floors to protect them
from the residue that is hard to re-
move from floors and carpeting.
Results may vary depending on
the type of wallpaper and glue
that is being removed.
PEST DETERRENT: From
mosquitoes to rodents, dryer
sheets will repel bugs and critters.
Tuck a sheet into your sock or
back pocket when you're outside,
or add a few inside a car hood (re-
move before driving), or inside a
boat or camper that's parked out-
side.


Sara Noel is the owner of F'ugal
Village (wwvfrugalvillage. corn),
a Web site that offers practical.
money-saving strategies for
everyday living To send tips.
comments or questions. write to
Sara Noel. co United Media, 200
Madison Ave.. 4th Floor New
York, NY 10016, or e-mail
sara (C'frugalvillage. corn.


Timeshare owners to meet Nov. 28


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Timeshare Owners
Group will meet at 1 p.m. Sunday,
Nov. 28, at the Pelican Pointe Golf
& Country Club, in Venice.
Attorney Keith Stephenson, di-
rector of Government Affairs,
ARDA, will discuss the current
legal issues on timeshare resales.
Scott Riddle, president of Trading
Times, will discuss the various
rental and resale options now
available, as well as maintenance
fes,and special assessmipgnt Js,,


sues.
A question-and-answer session
will follow each guest speaker. In-
formation about timeshare ex-
change company benefits will be
provided by Karen Donohue,
Trading Places International, and
Sarah Goodwin, Platinum Inter-
change.
Timeshare owners interested in
attending this meeting may
arrange for reserved seating and
additional information by contact-
ing Frank Debar, at fdebar
,4@gmail.com. or (941) 351-1384.


SCAROLE LISTER t
Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
E. cell: 422-4620 KL |
ER Office: 382-1700 .M...
View virtual tours @ wwwJ.steristsngs.com
.']6 :* [. [ :6i:' I 1: 1 ]


5 SALVIA CT. (NO. OAK VIAGE) I SALVIA CT. (NO. OAK VlULAGE)
32;2 pool tam ml &Ft mi MLS..,461 $149,000 322' ool new roof &AC MLS=ts5075 $159,900

L j 4/2/2 w/pool + farn. rm., fireplace
.gB MLS #345246 $260,000


SKE "Always There For You"
SGAIL COOPER
ME N Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
E ERA Cell: (352) 634-4346
OFFICE : (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com
s"" F7







SINJMAxi Nov''laBER 14, 2010 E15


Homefix: Brick patio walls falling apart; what to do


Q I have a brick wall
around my patio and
I'm noticing the bricks
are starting to fall
apart. At first there was a white
powder on the face of the bricks
and then the bricks started to
flake apart. What is causing this
and what can be done to prevent
it?
A: Bricks used for residential
construction are usually installed
as a veneer over a wood or steel
stud wall.
Since the bricks allow some
water penetration, the installers
create a drainage plane between
the backside of the brick and the


frame of the home.
Any water that enters f
the cavity drains out
through openings at the
base of the wall.
In some cases, for ex-
ample at a chimney, a <
drainage plane cannot
be created and water
collects in the openings
or gaps in the bricks. As Dw
the water migrates to
the surface of the brick
it evaporates, leaving _:_"
behind a whitish
residue called efflorescence.
If' the water migrates and
lects under the surface of


ight
MO


brick, freezing weather
can cause the face of'
the brick to flake off.
This process is called
S spelling and can be
seen on garden walls,
S chimneys, parapet
Swalls and under win-
dows.
The problem with
garden or patio walls is
Barnett there is usually no
-ss drainage plane for the
bricks. Water enters
through the top of the
wall or through stones or concrete
caps for the walls and collects in-
side the bricks.


Here are some suggestions for
repairs from The Brick Industry
Association:
1. Remove failed sealant and
clean, prime and replace with an
appropriate grade of elastomeric
sealant at all windows, copings,
sills, expansion joints and be-
tween brick masonry and other
materials.
2. Repoint the incompletely
filled, cracked or disintegrated
mortar joints.
3. Remove and replace brick
with spalled faces or cracks ex-
tending through the face shell.
4. Grout surface of separations
between the brick units and the


mortar.
The association also suggests a
colorless coating to prevent water
absorption, but only after all of the
above have been tried.
For more information: www.go
brick.com/html/frmset_thnt.htm.


Dwight Barnett is a certified
master inspector with the
American Society of Home
Inspectors. Write to him with
home improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier & Press, PO. Box 286,
Evansville, Ind. 47702 or e-mail
him at d.Barnett ifinsightbb. com.


* \Watch for Real Estate Digest to retLurn
in next Sunday's Home Front section.


the link between plans and reality


Dennis amato
State Certified CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
Consultation & Project/Plan Review
Design Services
Cost Estimating Design-Build Construction
Custom Crafted Homes Waterfront Homes
"Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
Residential Renovations
Commercial Construction & Remodeling
Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings 4

0 30 irdl Sr I .' l 132. l tI Ri, 'r cir. I 44'3- l.
1I3,R1


All C^T'itrus ReatyBI Nc


BANK-OWNED
HOMES & PROPERTY
5BR/2BA HOME
In Pine Grove, Inverness, FL ... $82,900
8 lots (79 x 104 ea)
Crystal River .. .......... $15,000
2BR/2BA HOME
In Spring Hill, FL ..... S49,900
3BR/2BA POOL HOME
In Spring Hill, FL .. ..... S89,900
2 ACRES W/DEDICATED ACCESc,
To Lake Rousseau, Crystal River, F...... 18,000
1.84 ACRES
In Rainbow Acres, Dunnellon, FL. . . $15,000
3 ACRES
In Pine Ridge, Beverly Hills, FL. . . . $54,000


VACANT LOTS
PINE RIDGE
1 acre lot $19,900
OPEN LAKE HENDERSON PROPERTY
Owner will finance.. $164,900
CANTERBURY LAKE ESTATES
Make Offer! .... .... $17,998
CITRUS SPRINGS
5 Lot package ....... .. $15,000


CONDO ON OPEN LAKE HENDERSON
2-story 2BR/2BA condo on Lake Henderson. Pritchard
Island locale. Close to town & Rails-to-Trails.
MIS #342198 $69,900


L. P N R- -I I S. E


RENTALS AVAILABLE


(y Prudential
W FLORIDA SHOWCASE PROPERTIES


Open 7 Days For Your Convenience
20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
1-888-222-0856 (352) 746-0744
1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
1-888-553-2223 (352) 527-1820


-.. For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to: www.floridashowcaseproperties.com Q


1626 N. BOWMAN TERR.
$549,000
Large executive home in Hampton Hills Huge
master suite has air extra room w/it s own full
bath. perfect as aii exercise in nursery or office.
Continuous hot water in master suite Granite in
kRichen
Directions: Rte 486 to right on Essex, to right
on Albany to left on Bowman, to home on right.
Leo Smith 352-746-0744 MLS #345363


6301 N. MISTY OAK TERR.
$164,800
Elegantly decorated 3/2/2 home is bright, cheery and
spotless. Features double pane windows + Iugh impact
film., covered + screened lanai. French doors, garden tub.
lots of tile, in move-m condition.
Directions: Rte 491 to Oak Ridge Village/Whispering
Oaks Lp., to Ist left on Misty Oak, to home on right.
Jo Ann Martin 352-746-0744 MLS #344979


309 S. BARBOUR ST.
$79,900
2/2/2 Imperial Executive model with family
room and a 17x18 screen room. Home presents a
spacious floor plan. This is a great value even in
today's market New roof in 1998 and carpeting
in 20060744 M
352-746-0744 MLS #345619


2263 N. OVERLOOK PATH
$499,000
Outstanding home nestled in the private
gated community of Waterford Place. Immnculate
3/4/2.5 w/tile roof. courtyard 8 Kon ponild
12 ceilings, 20i\40 solar heated pool 8 spa.
Required social membership
Directions: Rte 486 to Essex, to right on Glen
Arbor to right on Overlook, to house on right.
Kathy Dagle 352-746-0744 MLS #345540


719 W. KELLER ST.
$299,900
Impeccable 3/3/3 Mitch Underwood custom
home on 1.16 acre in Citrus Hills w/heated
inground pool & spa, summer kitchen,
42" plasma, gas fireplace, security system,
paver driveway & shed w/electric.
352-746-0744 MLS #345628


1107 E. BLUEBIRD CT.
$199,900
This beautiful, bright & open home sits on over
1 acre 6 shows like a model. It has 3 Ig. BRs,
2 Ig. BAs, 2 car garage &T office/den w/an
oversized lanai that looks out to a very private
wooded backyaid.
352-527-1820 MLS #343369


1800 E. TRADEWIND DR.
$319,900
Customer designed 'Courtyard' home, kidney shape pool.
spa waterfall, gourmet kitchen. Conan. island, Bosch
di-h,--r and mnpnih--Ii ppliqroe Summeri
Directions. Rte 486 to north on Annapolis, to
right on Indianhead, to right on Tradewind, to
,< 1800 on right.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-746-0744 MLS #339935


4944 N. GOLDWOOD TERRY.
$249,900
Beautiful 3/2.5/2 plus office. Home was built
in 2003 and is located on a corner lot in
prestigious Pine Ridge Estates. This home is a
must see. Call today.
352-746-0744 MLS #345578


1816 W. QUAIL MEADOW CT.
$299,000
Bellamy Ridge the ONLY separate gated
neighborhood inside the Terra Vista gates. Best
neighborhood, great home 6 price! Don't let the
price fool you, this home is elegant, well
maintained 6 gorgeous.
352-746-0744 MLS #345433


I~~ U - UIL. .--I.~--- ..-1-- L


51 W. DOERR PATH
$239,900
Attractive 3/2/2 villa on a beautifully landscaped
lot. Special features include tray ceilings, lots of tile,
mural in formal dining room. custom blinds,
recessed lighting. Social membership required
Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista Blvd.,
through main gate, to first left on Doerr Path,
to home on left.
Jo Ann Martin 352-746-0744 MILS #341806


: ""
4 .


2931 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
$199,000
Pine Ridge Golf Course home sitting high above
the road & overlooking the 17th tee. This lovely
home offers a spacious great rm. floor plan
open to kit. 8 pool area, ideal for entertaining.
352-527-1820 MLS #345574


-'-- 1 t w S'- I\*.
156 E. GLASSBORO CT.
13-6A
$55,000
Now is the time to buy this lovely upstairs unit
in Citrus Hills. Priced to sell, well cared for and
ready for a new owner.
352-746-0744 MIS #344656


CITRt S C 01 NIY (FL) CHRONICLE


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352) 726-2471
Email: royboss@tompabay.rr.com www.ollcitrusrenlty.com After Hours su 302-6714 I'


- "








E16 SUNO.;, Novi' mri 1-i, 2010


* Terrific price cut. Maintenance-free living.
* 2/2/1 with enclosed porch.
* Move-in condition. Pool & clubhouse.
* A lot of services for low HOA fee.
MLS #343175 ASKING $84,900
Call Pat Davis 352-212-7280
View listings: www. c21patdavis. com








WOW $105,000 for a
Commercial/Residential home.
2,365 SF of air conditioned space, 3/2 with a
large office and bathroom. This would be a
great place to operate a home based business
out of like a CPA, or hair salon, located in
Homosassa and close to everything!
MLS #344770
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


* OH WHAT A VIEW!!!! 10 acres, 2005 custom home.
* diii j iijk ii .e to state forest.
* All wood cabinets & granite. 12' brick fireplace.
* MUCH MUCH MOREl!!
MLS #345058 $599,000
Call Charles Kelly 352-422-2387










BLACK DIAMOND 3 bedroom 4.5 bath home (3432
ft. living) tile floors, crown moulding, tray ceiling,
plantation shutters and his and her bathrooms large
screened lanai, hot tub spilling into the pool. Club
membership available but not required.
MLS# 343980 Listed for $785,000
Maxine Hellmers 352-212-4147


* Country beauty with city convenience!
* 4/2 Doublewide, workshop, fam. rm. w/fpl..
* Large living room and island eat-in kitchen.
* Adjacent to the forest!
* Two raised decks, back one is roofed.
* Close to shopping, schools.
MLS #345078 $59,900.
Call Doris Miner for appt. 352-726-6668


$87,900 WATERFRONT!
Estate sale. Diamond in the rough! Older
waterfront home needs a facelift. City water,
new air conditioning, Terrazzo flooring,
carport. Opportunity to buy waterfront in nice
neighborhood and make it your own!
Call Mary Parsons 352-534-1273
Directions: 44E to right on Westlake Drive. to right on
S. Cove Walk, to right on S. Mooring Drive, home on right


* Inverness.
* 3/2 home, detached 30x14 gar./workshop
on 1.12 acres.
* New gourmet kitchen with 27 ft.
granite countertops,
MLS #342272 $134,000
David Kurtz
Cell 954-383-8786 Ofc:352-726-6668









* 55+ gated community with all the bells
& whistles
* 3/2/2, only 3 years young.
* Illness forces sale.
PRICE REDUCED $140,000
Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727
to preview. Ask for file #342031


* Move-in ready Cambridge Greens.
* Spotless, perfect, 38R, 2.5BAs
* Florida room open floor plan
* Newly painted, new shingles, new sod.
* Citrus Hills membership.
MLS #345466 $175,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www.CitrusCountYSold.com


* 3/2/2 with family room.
* 2,157 sq. ft. LA, double corner lot.
* City water 8 city sewer.
* Close to schools, library, hospital.
MLS #341421 $130,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www. CitrusCountySold. conm


* Litrus Hills pool name.
* 3/2/2 open, split plan, large lot.
* Move right in. Good condition.
MLS #345431
COMPETITIVELY PRICED AT $158,900
Call Pat Davis 352-212-7280
View listing: www.c21patdavis.cornm
c2 ipatdavisgearthlink. net


SOUTH POINTE. 3/2/2 split plan has caged
inground pool with pocket doors to lanai for
the most awesome waterfront view of the
open Floral City lakefront, great landscaping.
$299,900
Call Ruth Frederick 1-352-563-6866


* Tuii county Ioving
* 3/2 OW detached garage, screened rm.
* 2.32 Acres peace and quiet.
* House redone move-in ready.
MLS #344286 REDUCED TO $99,900
Call Pat Davis 352-212-7280
c21patdavisdearthlink.net


* Wonderful, 4BR. 38A (4th BR has sep. entrance
kitchenette 8 bath.)
* 1' car garage and 2 car carport. Bar-B-Q Hut.
* One enclosed porch and one screened.
* Above ground pool. Half acre, great water & more,
MLS #344912 REDUCED TO $169,000
OWNERS SAY BRING OFFERS.
Call Doris Miner for appointment.
352-344-1515 or 352-422-4627 (cell)


2 DUPLEX'S!!!
* 2 bedroom 2 bath each.
* Great location, close to all amenities.
* Great rental investments.
MLS#'s 344175 & 344171
Both listed for $149,000 each
Kimberly Miner 352-212-4147








* Country living. 4.9 ACRES. 2007 DW mobile.
* 1680 Liv. area 4BR, 2BA, living & family rm,
* 14'x16' Pole barn, 2 stall horse stable.
* Bring your horses, fenced, treed property.
* Will consider all reasonable offers.
MLS #345521 ASKING $115,500
Call Cheryl Scruggs or Jennifer Fudge
352-726-9010


$60,000 Settle this estate! Very large
home on oversized lot in Beverly Hills. Tons
of square footage good bones, needs work.
Call Mary Parsons 352-634-1273
Directions: Forest Ridge to left on
Roosevelt, to left on Harrison.


* ",,, I TI, ', ,i., 1, [ | l ill ll l! J"ht If I' dll 'if .
* Lots of upgrades throughout this lovely neat 5 clean home.
L .i :ii rii ,ii. n i '. .iiid lj .' r gar.
* Lanai to pool and shed. More than worth the price.
MLS #338857 $122,900
Call Martha Snyder today 352-476-8727




4 ^ -- ^ =




FOREST AND WATERFRONT: is what you will
get if you buy this custom-built builder home.
3/3 with possible in-law setup, workshop
and hot tub room, on small lake with
Withlacoochee River access, abuts the forest.
$189,900
Call Ruth Frederick 1-352- 563-6866










* Waterfront 2/1 on canal.
* Open and airy interior.
* Large kitchen with DR, LR & FR.
* Detached bonus room & garage.
MLS #340495 $109,900
Charles Kelly 352-422-2387


* 5 Acres fenced, x fenced.
* 3 Sheds, 2 with A/C.
* 3/2 Doublewide split plan. Decking w/spa.
* Beautiful view of farm land. Private.
MLS #344830 $120,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352-212-3410
www. CitrusCountySold.com









7.5 ACRES IN INVERNESS
Ready for you to come build your house and
enjoy country living at its finest. This would
make a great little farm, paved road frontage
at on 2 ends. Make an offer!! MLS#341870
PRICED TO SELL AT $39,900
Call Quade Feeser 352-302-7699


0'r7iis Cot.,wi-) (FL) CHRONK.U.I




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