Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02053
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: July 17, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:02053

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JULY 17, 2010


Florida s Best Community \Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOLUME 115 ISSUE 344


County cuts 16 positions


Pink slips issued to 13 workers in budget move


M IKE ''- .-'-:T
Chronicle
Citrus County Administrator Brad
Thorpe's proposed 2011 budget cuts jobs
and some capital projects but keeps serv-
ices and programs intact.


Thorpe released the $213.8 million
budget Friday It cuts total spending by 11.2
percent and eliminates 13 jobs.
Thorpe said affected employees were
told Friday. The dismissals begin immedi-
ately even though the fiscal year doesn't
begin until Oct. 1. Employees who lost


WHAT: Citrus County Commission
budget hearing.
WHEN: 9 a.m. Wednesday, July 28.
WHERE: Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka
Ave., Inverness,

their jobs will receive two weeks' pay and
health insurance benefits through August.
"We're getting smaller," Thorpe said.


"We're reducing the size of government."
Along with cutting a total of 16 jobs -
three positions were already vacant -
Thorpe added two new positions: deputy
public works director and legal secretary
for new County Attorney Richard Wesch.
The jobs cut include one of the two as-
sistant county attorneys. Other jobs elimi-
nated include an aquatic operations
See CUTS/Page A5


Crabbers feel the pinch


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Henry Huggins, left, and his son Joshua, right, come from a long line of Homosassa fishermen and crabbers. The father and son feel
the life they once loved and depended on to feed their families is gone because of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mex-
ico. While the water fisheries are not closed, Henry Huggins feels the bad publicity makes it impossible to sell their catch.

BP offers help to county's commercial fihermen who claim raw deal


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Chronicle


As oil roils in the Gulf of Mexico, a fish-
erman's lot is not a happy one.
"Never before have I felt so depressed,"
said Henry Huggins, 60, a commercial
fisherman. "My livelihood is gone. I'm
hoping for a miracle. Commercial fisher-
men are a breed of their own. It's all I've
ever done. I've seen the best, and now I've
seen the worst."


Since April 20, when the BP Deepwater
Horizon oil rig blew up off the coast of
Louisiana, Florida coastal residents and
businesspeople have scanned the waves
wondering when tar balls would turn up
on beaches. So far, no oil has appeared in
waters off Citrus County. But it still makes
a bad impression on the fish and seafood
industry.
Huggins said many commercial fisher-
men have been hurt by a downturn of
sales, while Bob Gill, who owns a seafood


company, said he did not know of any
commercial fishermen so far who have
felt an economic impact from the oil spill.
"I've been crabbing three times, but
can't sell for a good price," Huggins said.
The price he said he had been getting was
$1 to $1.20 a pound. "The price is low, but
the gas costs the same, the bait costs the
same. Everything costs the same except
the price I can get for crabs. Last time, I
See ....Page A5


Porn actors accused of killing Florida tattoo artist


Editor's note: This story in-
cludes sexual content through-
out. Typos in text message
quotes appear as they do in court
documents.
TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press writer
NEW PORT RICHEY- Jason
Andrews was a bisexual Chicago
DJ with a British accent whose
chiseled jaw and good looks
landed him roles in countless
gay porn videos. Amanda Logue
was a married, bleach-blond
Georgia woman who once owned
a lingerie shop, dabbled in pros-
titution and starred in several X-
rated videos herself.
Together, they stabbed and
bludgeoned a 41-year-old tattoo
shop owner to death with a
sledgehammer and hatched
some of their plans in typo- and
expletive-laden text messages,
Florida detectives said.
"I'm so glad you're really com-
mited to this take. Keep eyes for
a knife, etc for me!" Andrews


typed on his BlackBerry hours
before the slaying, according to a
transcript of the messages in-
cluded in court records.
Logue replied in a nearly in-
comprehensible text that she
was excited and she wanted to
have sex after they killed him.
Nearly two months after Den-
nis "Scooter" Abrahamsen was
found dead in his Tampa-area
home, Logue and Andrews were
indicted by a grand jury on first-
degree murder charges. Logue is
being held without bail at
Florida's Pasco County Jail -
her attorney didn't return calls
for comment and Andrews
was arrested Thursday in Chat-
tanooga, Tenn.
Andrews was arrested by U.S.
Marshals and the Chattanooga,
Tenn., Police Department after
working for several weeks as a
manager at the Chattanooga Bil-
liard Club, an upscale pool hall
and cigar lounge.
"I would say he was very sur-
prised. He was very clean-cut,


. : Jason Andrews, an actor
and former Chicago disc jockey,
was arrested Thursday evening in
Chattanooga, Tenn. RIGHT: This
image provided by the Pinellas
County Sheriff's Office on May 18
shows Amanda Logue. Florida In-
vestigators say Andrews and
Logue traded dozens of text mes-
sages in May about their plans to
kill Dennis Abrahamsen before
bludgeoning him to death with a
sledgehammer.
broad shoulders, dressed in a
suit, not in a suit and tie, but
more 'Miami Vice,' more of a GQ
appearance," said Paul Salayko,
a spokesman for the U.S. Mar-
See KILL :PageA2


Associated Press
A Feb. 25 photo provided by the
Pasco County Sherrif's Office
shows Dennis J. "Scooter" Abra-
hamsen, 41, of Tampa. Nearly
two months after Abrahamsen
was found dead in his Tampa-area
home, Amanda Logue and Jason
Andrews were indicted by a grand
jury on first-degree murder
charges.


Jobless


report


released


AMANDA MIMS
Chronicle
Florida's seasonally adjusted
unemployment rate for the
month of June is down to 11.4 per-
cent a third of a percentage
point less than the unemploy-
ment rate in May. However, the
unadjusted unemployment rate
is 11.6 percent, up half a percent-
age point over last month.
Seasonal adjustment of the un-
employment rate eliminates the
influences of events that happen
at about the same time each year
such as tourism, agriculture, hol-
idays and the
opening and
closing of We
schools from
economic haven't
time series,
according to had any
the Agency for big layoff
Workforce In- big layoff
no v a t i o n notices or
(AWI).
The unad- anything
justed unem- l ta
ployment like that.
rates went up
in nearly
every county
across the Rusty
state ,includ- Skinner
tae, includ- CEO of Workforce
ing Citrus, Connection.
Sumter, Levy
and Marion,
according to data the agency re-
leased Friday. Adjusted rates for
individual counties were not
available.
Rusty Skinner, Workforce Con-
nection CEO, said he hadn't ex-
pected to see an increase in
unemployment rates for June.
Workforce Connection serves Cit-
rus, Levy and Marion counties.
"That sort of caught us by sur-
prise. We haven't noticed a
change. We haven't had any big
layoff notices or anything like
that," he said.
"We've been hopeful that what
we'd been seeing was a reversal
of where we were. The fact that it
popped up on us this time caught
me a little bit by surprise."
Citrus County has the state's
eighth highest unemployment
rate. Levy is ranked No. 9, Marion
is No. 6 and Sumter has the 17th
lowest unemployment rate in the
state.
Florida's total nonagricultural
employment in June was
7,232,500, representing a loss of
1,900 jobs over the month, ac-
cording to the AWI.
AWI director Cynthia Lorenzo
said the numbers reflect a posi-
tive change in the state's econ-
omy
"The continuing decline in
Florida's unemployment rate is
another strong indication that
our economy is improving," she
said in a statement Friday.


Lottery Payouts ..............B6
Movies ............................C9 Guidance
Obituaries ......................A5
Stocks ......................... A6 Pastors-to-be often benefit
TV Listings.............. C8 from internships./Page Cl


British Open, South African leader
Louis 0osthuizen's name stays atop the leaderboard at tourney./Bl

British theater A new playhouse for an old site./Page B6

Medicare SCam Some 94 people face charges./Page A5

Falling down Old churches struggle with buildings./Page C6


Stocks drop
Investors are finding disap.
pointment everywhere and
taking out their frustration
on stocks./Page A7



6 1Il!151112101115


iVH








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


M A MTRA, LL l

Run for the Money events kick off with auction Candidate McCollum's


education proposal

would remove tenure


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Holly Giguere, Sandy and Dave Hutchins, Todd Cloud look over the silent auction merchandise on display Friday for the
Key Training Center's 28th annual Celebrity Dinner and Auction at the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center in Crystal River.
The auction is part of the annual Run for the Money event to raise funds for the nonprofit organization dedicated to help-
ing adults with developmental disabilities.



Teen dubbed 'Barefoot Bandit' soon headed to Washington


Associated Press

MIAMI Without saying a word,
the teenager accused in a two-year
string of sometimes shoeless burgla-
ries and other crimes that helped him
gain international notoriety as the
"Barefoot Bandit" agreed Friday to
return to Washington state to face fed-
eral charges.
Hector Dopico, an assistant federal
public defender temporarily repre-
senting 19-year-old Colton Harris-
Moore, told a federal judge that
Harris-Moore waived his right to a
hearing on whether he should be
transferred to Seattle. U.S. Magistrate
Judge Robert Dube said Harris-Moore
would be handed over to the U.S. Mar-'
shals Service, which will handle his
travel.
The U.S. Marshals office in Seattle
said the timing of Harris-Moore's re-
turn would depend on how soon the


KILLING
Continued from Page Al

shals Service.
He is jailed in Tennessee
until he can be extradited
to Florida. Authorities did
not yet know if he had a
lawyer.
Police in Florida say the
pair killed Abrahamsen in
the early morning of May 15
and swiped $6,000 cash, his
credit cards and a video
camera. Abrahamsen had
hired Logue whose porn
name is "Sunny Dae" to
work at a sex party at his
house, and police said
that's when Logue and An-
drews set him up. They
traded dozens of text mes-
sages about their homicidal
plan, police said.
According to an affidavit,
Logue would later deny
that she had anything to do
with the killing and claim
Andrews was the one who
bludgeoned Abrahamsen.
"Logue told (the detec-
tive) that Andrews grabbed
the back of her hair then
twisted her arm behind her
back Andrews forced her to
view Abrahamsen's
crushed skull and told her
that's what would happen
to her if she told anyone."
Logue and Andrews met
on the set of a porn video
late last year and fell in love
- even though Logue was
married to a man in Lees-
burg, Ga., authorities and
friends said. Her husband
did not return phone calls
from The Associated Press.
Andrews' Chicago friends
find it difficult to believe he
was involved in the killing.
The 27-year-old Andrews
was known in that city as DJ
Veritas, and his Facebook
and MySpace pages feature
several video clips of him
playing techno music in
large clubs.
"He was a really straight
up dude," said Michael
Sarkowicz, a Chicago club
photographer.
The 28-year-old Logue
seemed like a decent per-
son, said Kristen Cameron,
a Florida-based model who


marshals could line up a flight for
him. It could be as soon as next week
or three to four weeks from now, said
spokesman David Miller.
Dopico also said he had been in
contact with an attorney who will rep-
resent Harris-Moore in Seattle, but he
did not name that lawyer. Harris-
Moore's mother has asked Seattle de-
fense attorney John Henry Browne to
represent her son.
Harris-Moore, clad in the typical
tan jail jumpsuit, shackled at the
wrists and ankles and wearing socks
and sandals, said nothing during the
brief hearing. Dopico said a bail hear-
ing would likely be held in the coming
weeks in federal court in Seattle.
'The teen is suspected in about 70
crimes in nine states and British Co-
lumbia, some allegedly committed
shoeless.
He was first arrested at age 12 and
had been on the lam since escaping in


met her last year. According
to several profiles on mod-
eling websites, Logue did
bikini and fetish modeling.
"She was professional,
prompt and seemed all
around normal, well so I
thought," Cameron wrote in
an e-mail to the AP "She was
nice to me and was a great
model! I felt a connection to
her since we both have
southern backgrounds."
But Cameron's opinion
changed this spring when
she saw how Logue acted
around Andrews, her new
boyfriend.
"Amanda wasn't the
Amanda I knew," Cameron
wrote. "She wouldn't talk,
all she did was text with
Jason."
Andrews, Cameron said,
was obnoxious and brash.
He often bragged about his
military service, of which
Cameron was skeptical.
In April and May, accord-
ing to their Twitter ac-
counts, Logue and Andrews
spent several weeks in
Florida, shooting porn
videos, lolling on the beach
and professing their love
for each other. Photos on
Logue's Facebook show the
pair grinning and hugging.
On May 14, Andrews
posted a link to a porno-
graphic photo of Logue and
wrote on his Twitter ac-
count: "therealsunnydae
and I are killing time wait-
ing for a party to find us!"
The next day, detectives
said, Abrahamsen hired
Logue to have sex on cam-
era during a party at his
house. During the party,
Logue texted her boyfriend
several times, witnesses
told investigators.
Text messages retrieved
from Andrews' BlackBerry
show the couple discussed
vinyl gloves, when other
guests would leave Abra-
hamsen's home and what
was inside a safe.
According to an affidavit,
everyone at the party left
Abrahamsen's home
around 5 a.m. May 15 ex-
cept for Logue. Andrews
waited outside in his car,
still texting her.
"Just get him on his face


2008 from a halfway house.
Authorities say Harris-Moore stole
an airplane from an Indiana airport
and flew it to the Bahamas.
They say he then commandeered a
boat in a potential attempt to reach
the more remote Turks and Caicos Is-
lands and eventually hide in Cuba.
But it all ended Sunday when police
shot out the engine of Harris-Moore's
boat and took him into custody.
When he reaches Seattle, Harris-
Moore will face a criminal complaint
charging him with interstate transport
of stolen property for allegedly steal-
ing an aircraft from Idaho in 2009 and.
crash-landing it in Washington.
Other arrest warrants charge him
with fleeing prosecution and other
crimes.
He is accused of crimes in Washing-
ton, Oregon, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana,
Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska
and Iowa.


either bash or tell me to get
in and. Where to go." An-
drews wrote.
"K I'm horny! I'm getting
him tb play music," Logue
typed.
"Wicked. Ill just be wait-
ing. Really. Take. Your.
Time," Andrews replied.
Abrahamsen was found
dead in his house by a fam-
ily member some 18 hours
later, face down on a mas-
sage table with blood splat-
tered on the walls and
ceiling fan. Authorities
have not officially disclosed
a motive for the killing.
At 4:29 p.m. on May 16 -
less than a day after the
murder Logue wrote on
her Twitter account, using
Andrews' Twitter name
"Hearveritas:" "Taking it
easy with hearveritas! Lay-
ing around eating popcorn
and watching movies!"
At 5:20 p.m., Andrews
tweeted: "therealsunnydae
and I wanna go watch a



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movie tonight, any sugges-
tion?"
As detectives pieced to-
gether the slaying, Logue
and Andrews were arrested
May 18 in a neighboring
county after trying to use
Abrahamsen's credit card
at Home Depot
But officials didn't have
enough evidence to link the
pair to the killing, and re-
leased them. On May 19, she
went home to her husband
and child in Georgia.
On May 21, Andrews
wrote on his Twitter ac-
count in Hebrew: "Amanda
please let me know when
you are ok, really My heart
can't take the weight of the
fear that I would never see
you again."
It's unclear whether
Logue ever saw Andrews'
plea, or whether she
replied to him. On May 26,
she was arrested in Georgia
and taken to a Florida jail,
where she awaits trial.


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Re-
publican gubernatorial can-
didate Bill McCollum
announced his education
platform Friday, saying he
wants to make it easier to
fire teachers by eliminating
tenure and base their pay
raises on classroom per-
formance instead of senior-
ity.
McCollum would also in-
crease standards for teach-
ers in the state's voluntary
pre-kindergarten program
for 4-year-olds, expand a
program that gives corpora-
tions tax breaks for provid-
ing private school
scholarships for low-income
students and require most
high school students to take
at least one course online.
"We have to set priorities
that we haven't had to set
before," said McCollum, the
state's attorney general who
faces Naples businessman
Rick Scott in an Aug. 24 pri-
mary showdown of conser-
vative Republicans. "Gov-
ernment is going to be in-
volved until we see signifi-
cant improvement in
student improvement."
Scott hasn't formally re-
leased his education plat-
form, but his positions on
the major issues largely
mirror McCollum's.
"In order for Florida to at-
tract business, compete ef-
fectively in the global
economy, and create 21st
century jobs we must have
an educated workforce,"
Scott said in a statement re-
leased Friday by his cam-
paign. "I am committed to
improving education and
putting Florida back to
work."
McCollum largely em-
braces the educational
philosophies of former Gov.
Jeb Bush, with merit pay for
teachers a key element.
"I think most teachers
want to see good teachers
rewarded," said McCollum,
a product of Florida's pub-
lic education system from
:elementary school through
law school. "We must make
sure they meet escalating
professional standards. A
very serious problem in our
state."
A highly controversial
Senate bill (SB 6) that in-
cluded similar proposals
was vetoed by Gov. Charlie
Crist this spring, but is sure
to be resurrected again in
the 2011 session when there
will be a new governor.
Under McCollum's pro-
posal, tenure would be
phased out for new teach-
ers, who would receive
raises based on how their
classroom performance is
judged, not seniority.
Current teachers would
be allowed to waive tenure
in return for receiving merit
raises if they are judged to
have performed well.
District superintendents
and principals would be al-
lowed to easily fire teachers
who are deemed underper-
forming.
The state teachers union
worked hard against SB6,
arguing the lack of job secu-
rity would discourage good
teachers from working in
Florida. Union leaders also


- 1
Bill MIVCollum
candidate for governor.
argued that testing can be
skewed by outside factors
such as students' home
lives. It says McCollum's
plan is more of the same.
"It doesn't look a whole lot
different from the blueprint
that Republicans have been
following the last few
years," Florida Education
Association spokesman
Mark Pudlow said Friday.
"It appears that McCollum
hasn't really gauged the
view of some people, teach-
ers and parents to SB6."
McCollum's other propos-
als include:
Develop standards for
the pre-kindergarten pro-
gram and require that every
school be supervised by an
instructor with a post-sec-
ondary degree in early
childhood education or de-
velopment. He also calls for
collecting more data to
measure the children's and
schools' success.
Improve instruction in
elementary and middle
schools to support in-
creased high school gradua-
tion requirements,
particularly in math and sci-
ence.
Encourage school dis-
trict to work with local em-
ployers to develop programs
that will support their work
force needs.
Allow online schools in
other states and countries to
enroll Florida students. He
would also ::require that
every high school student,
where possible, take at least
one online course before
graduation.
Give financial incen-
tives for college students to
major in science, technol-
ogy, engineering or math, in-
cluding lower tuition and
possibly loan forgiveness.
Reward public colleges
that graduate more of their
students.
Increase funding for
community colleges and vo-
cational education pro-
grams.
The candidate conceded
that priorities would have to
be determined because of
the recession's affect on
state government.
"We're going to be in a
very difficult time," he said.
"Some programs will have
to be eliminated, at least in
the short run. Some pro-
grams will have to be con-
solidated. Where do we put
our resources?"


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A2 sTURDAYJULY 17 0


f









Page A3 SATURDAY, JULY 17 2010



TATE


L LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Eagle Snag closing
due to construction
Beginning Monday, the
Eagle Snag Bird Watching
Trail at the Citrus County
Central Landfill on State
Road 44 will be closed until
further notice due to con-
struction activities.
County Solid Waste Direc-
tor Casey Stephens said the
construction activities for the
Phase 3 expansion of the ex-
isting landfill will begin Monday
and contractors will be utilizing
the bird trail and operating
heavy equipment adjacent to it.
Therefore, he said, safety
concerns will require the trail
to be dosed until the construc-
tion project is completed. The
expansion project will add ap-
proximately 790,000 cubic
yards of additional capacity to
the existing landfill and allow
the landfill to serve the citi-
zens of the county for an esti-
mated additional 5 years.
The county will announce
when the trail is to be re-opened.
Engineer to address
TOO FAR
Paul Davis, an engineer with
the Citrus County Health De-
partment's Office of Environ-
mental Health, will be the guest
speaker at the TOO FAR
general meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday, July 22, at the East
Citrus Community Center, on
State Road 44 East approxi-
mately 4 miles east of Inver-
ness.
Join TOO FAR membership
and learn about septic system
inspections, high performance
septic systems and more.
Meetings open to the public.
Please call TOO FAR
(Jerri) at 726-5004 if you
have any questions.
Fish fry to benefit
'Bait Lady'
There will be a fish fry at
MacRae's of Homosassa from
noon to 3 p.m. Sunday a to *
help the area's beloved "Bait
Lady" get back on the water.
An on-water accident dam-
aged the shrimp-topped bait
boat of "Miss Bonnie"
VanAllen, a fixture on the Ho-
mosassa River for many
years. Proceeds from the fish
fry will help her make the
needed repairs to the boat
and return to serving the
area's fishing community and
visitors.
MacRae's is located at
5290 S. Cherokee Way, Ho-
mosassa. Fish fry plate tick-
ets will cost $8 each and
include the fish as well as
baked beans, coleslaw, hush
puppies and lemonade. Door
prizes will also be awarded.
Donations can also be mailed
to the Bonnie VanAllen Re-
build the "Big Shrimp" Trust
at Superior Bank, 45565 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa,
FL 34446. More information
on the trust is available from
the bank by calling (352) 628-
0009.
Former Brooksville
officer arrested
Agents with the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
ment's Tampa Bay Regional
Operations Center arrested
Shawn Terry, 33, of
Brooksville on Friday on per-
jury charges. Terry is a former
officer with the Brooksville
Police Department.
The 5th Judicial Circuit
State Attorney's Office asked
FDLE to investigate allega-
tions that Terry committed
perjury by providing false
statements while under oath
in an official proceeding. The
investigation revealed that
Terry knowingly made false
statements and solicited an-
other person to testify falsely
while under oath during a
deposition.
Terry was charged with
one count of perjury in an offi-


cial proceeding, a third-de-
gree felony, and one count of
solicitation to commit perjury
in an official proceeding, a
first-degree misdemeanor.
Terry was booked into the
Hernando County Jail. His
bond was set at $3,000. The
State Attorney's Office said it
will prosecute the case.
-From staff reports


0Calm amid crisis
Calm amid crisis


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office Deputy Steven Casada role-plays Thursday with Tawana McDonald at the Emer-
gency Operations Center in Lecanto during the final day of Crisis Intervention Team Training conducted by the
Centers mental health facility. At left is Alina Stoothoff, who taught the 40-hour class, and Sid Butler, an eval-
uator from the Centers.

Course teaches deputies how to master crisis intervention


TAYLOR PROVOST
Chronicle


A group of deputies
from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Of-
fice completed a four-
day Crisis
Intervention program Thursday
provided by the Centers, equip-
ping them with the know-how to
handle a person in mental or
emotional distress.
"(The deputies) are very com-
mitted," said Mary Lee Cubbison,
director of services at The Cen-
ters' Lecanto location. "It's very
gratifying to see so many here."
The training program is pro-
vided by the Centers using a
grant given to them by the county
to train officers for crises that
may involve mental health. The


Centers has put on two classes
and will likely have three more
within the next 18 months.
During the program, the
deputies visited the in-patient fa-
cilities in both counties and
agreed it was an eye-opening
learning experience.
The final 10 hours of the 40-
hour course involved the officers
using what they had learned in a
role-playing scenario as an offi-
cer called to a crisis that must
use verbal communication to
deescalate the situation. Staff
members from the Centers,
which is based in Marion County
played the role of the crisis vic-
tim, often basing their scenarios
on what they see every day at the
facility. Afterward, the 18
deputies received certificates
and pins to certify they had com-


pleted their training.
"I think it makes such a differ-
ence when you have a better un-
derstanding of the population we
deal with," Cubbison said.
As part of their training, the
deputies also wore earphones
that simulated voices inside the
head of a mentally ill person.
The class's instructor, Alina
Stoothoff, who worked for the
Centers for 20 years, said the ex-
perience, along with a better un-
derstanding of the Baker Act,
when a person is involuntarily
admitted for medical treatment,
would greatly help the officers in
the field.
"I see a huge difference from
day one to today," she said. "It's
not just about the class, it's about
living this so that you have a safer
community."


Office of Utility Regulation moves


Special to the Chronicle
As part of the Citrus
County administrator's on-
going reorganization, the
Office of Utility Regulation
has moved from the
Lecanto Government
Building to a larger office
space in the former Her-
nando Volunteer Fire De-
partment building, at 3675
E. Orange Drive, that is
shared with EMS.


The new mailing address
is: PO. Box 873, Hernando,
FL 34442-0873. The phone
numbers are (352) 419-6520
and (352) 419-6521. Fax:
(352) 419-6524. The e-mail
address for the director,
Charles Howard is: charles.
howard@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Information about utility
regulation is available on
the county's website at:
www.bocc.citrus. fl.us.
Under "Departments" at


the top, click on "Adminis-
trator," then "Deputy Ad-
ministrator," then "Utility
Regulation."
The Office of Utility Reg-
ulation and a five-member
volunteer board called the
Citrus County Water and
Wastewater Authority are
responsible forthe regulation
of 17 systems belonging to
10 for-profit owners of water
and wastewater treatment
facilities in the county.


The office was estab-
lished in 1999 to return ju-
risdiction for such private
utilities from the Florida
Public Service Commission
to the county. Private water
and sewer utilities come
under the authority by peti-
tion of a majority of a util-
ity's customers, by request
of the owner, or by action by
the authority to protect the
health and safety of the
public.


State BRIEFS


Positions open watching Sea creatures cause tar
wildlife in oil cleanup ball scare in Sarasota


FORT WALTON BEACH Residents
in northwest Florida can get paid $25 an
hour to keep an eye on sea turtles and
other wildlife during nighttime coastal
clean up efforts from the oil spill.
Wildlife observers are needed to help
ensure sea creatures are not endangered
during cleanup operations.
Interested candidates should have a
degree or completed academic work in
the biological or environmental sciences;
experience in bird or turtle watching; have
documented field biology experience as a
researcher, technician, intern or student;
or have documentation of a Marine Turtle
Permit issued by Florida.
For more information, go to
www.floridagulfrecoveryjobs.com.


SARASOTA- Those gooey globs
washing up on Sarasota's beaches are
not tar balls as many suspected.
The objects are oily enough and come
ashore as slimy, black blobs. They're colo-
nial tunicates, sea creatures that have a
brown jello-like body covered in mucus.
They feed on other small sea creatures
typically found on docks or rocks under
the water.
Local environmental officials noticed the
sea creatures several months ago, before
the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
Lately, though, several people had called
the county to report seeing what they
thought were tar balls.
Officials said no tar balls have washed
up on area beaches.


Ethics commission to clean
up Palm Beach County
WEST PALM BEACH Palm Beach
County is trying to improve its reputation
after three county commissioners went to
prison in corruption scandals.
The county's new ethics commission,
which met Thursday, will review deals and
relationships that could be compromising
for county officials.
The commission ruled that a lobbyist
could not donate more than $100 to a
charitable organization that is honoring a
public servant on his or her behalf.
The commission also said an employee
can take a second job with a company
that has a contract with the county as long
as the employee isn't involved with the
contract deal.
-From wire reports


More

outsourcing

likely for

Inverness
AMANDA MIMS
Chronicle
The city of Inverness isn't
unique in having to face the
challenge of meeting the de-
mands of residents while
dealing with ever-shrinking
revenues. While the nation's
economy is showing signs of
improvement, Inverness
City Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni said local govern-
ments won't feel relief any
time soon.
"We're going to have to
look at these conditions for
at least five years, at least
from a government stand-
point," he said. "We can't
print money and we have to
live within our means."
A large part of DiGio-
vanni's financial plan for
the city involves outsourc-
ing more of
its services.
The city
has already
Sw decreased
its staff by
more than
half since
the mid-
Frank 1990s. Back
DiGiovanni then, Inver-
says outsourdng ness had
of city services about 95
likely foratleast full-time
five years. employees;
now there are 45. The city's
part-time staff has also de-
creased from 18 to nine.
Much of that is due to the
city's decisions to contract
with outside companies for
garbage, water and sewer
services. It also no longer
has its own police force
since handing its police de-
partment over to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, a
move that DiGiovanni said
has served residents well
and has saved the city
money.
DiGiovanni is looking at
other areas where privatiza-
tion can save money and re-
duce the city's workforce,
including certain landscap-
ing services that city em-
ployees still provide. He
doesn't predict many lay-
offs, although nothing is cer-
tain. Privatization will
happen over time and posi-
tions will be lost to attrition,
he said..
"We will be a city of con-
tracts. That's where this is
heading. We have to change
how we do business perma-
nently," he said.
Even with the cuts, he
said the city will manage to
work with the current num-
ber of employees.
"We want to put people in
positions where they're ab-
solutely needed," he said.
"We're not looking at elimi-
nating existing people but
we are definitely looking at
changing how people work
We know there's going to be
attrition. We know there's
going to be turnover. Those
positions will not necessar-
ily be filled."
All of these things will be
presented to city council.
"We will not make every
decision this year. We're not
going to change everything
overnight"
DiGiovanni said Inver-
ness isn't looking at cutting
back on services.
"The city council has
been strong in wanting to
preserve the services and
forward motion of the city."


Officials gather for Dampier Street ribbon-cutting ceremony
City of Inverness and Citrus County dignitaries and Dampier Street Improve-
ment project engineers gather for a ceremonial ribbon-cutting ceremony on
S' the comer of Dr. MLK Jr. Avenue and Dampier Street to commemorate the
j completion of the section of the Dampier Street renovation project from the
Withlacoochee State Trail at Wallace Brooks Park to North Apopka Avenue in
downtown Inverness. Front row, from left: Frank DiGiovanni, city manager;
Katie Cottrell, director of public works; Susan Gill, supervisor of elections;
J Pat Damato; Jacquie Hepfer, city council member; Bob Plaisted, mayor; Jud-
son Fohr, construction project manager and Cabot McBride, city council
Member. Back row: Richard Wesch, county attorney; Dennis Damato, county
-. commissioner; Pati Smith, city of Inverness Parks and Recreation director;
Frank Schiraldi, office manager, Hoyle, Tanner & Associates; Joe Meek,
I county commissioner; Tom Dick, assistant city manager; Dave Pieklik, City
S| of Inverness assistant director satellite parks; Brad Thorpe, county adminis-
a Htrator; Ken Koch, City of Inverness director of development services; David
Borchert, Posplech Contracting; and Winn Webb, county commissioner.
-CATHY KAPULKA/Special to the Chronicle








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 SAT RnAY hliiy 17 2010


Lightning sparks fire



at Inverness home


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Fire Res-
cue responded Thursday to
a reported structure fire at
1022 S. Apopka Ave., Inver-
ness.
The first arriving crew
found the 1,700-square-foot
home, reportedly owned by
Rick Gibson, with light
smoke showing inside the
structure at 1:56 p.m. Fire
crews entered the building
with a 1 3/4-inch hose to lo-
cate the fire.
The fire was difficult to
locate due to it being in a
concealed space in the attic
area. The fire was in the
attic area near the washer
and dryer and the front
entry area to the structure.
Additional arriving units
cut a 4-foot by 4-inch hole in
the roof to keep the fire from
spreading further into the
attic area. Once vertical ven-
tilation was completed, inte-


Special to the Chronicle
A lightning strike Thursday is believed to have caused a
structure fire at this single-family residence in Inverness.


rior crews were able to
quickly extinguish the fire
by pushing it right out of the
ventilation hole at 2:23 p.m.
Units remained on the scene
to salvage personal property
in the structure and secure


the hole in the roof.
It was determined that a
lightning strike to the attic
area caused the fire.
No injuries to report.
The Red Cross was con-
tacted to assist the resident.


State BRIEFS


Tests negative
for dengue fever
MIAMI Test results for a
suspected case of dengue
fever in the Miami area have
come back negative.
The Miami-Dade County
Health Department announced
the first test results on Friday.
Dengue fever is a flulike ill-
ness spread by the bite of an in-
fected Aedes aegypti mosquito,
a common urban mosquito in
the U.S. and Caribbean.
According to health officials,
a Miami Beach man was sus-
pected of contracting the dis-
ease and has fully recovered.


A recent study found five per-
cent of Key West residents
show evidence they have been
exposed to the virus, but few
became ill.

Escaped inmate
back in Osceola
KISSIMMEE -Agang
leader who escaped from the
Osceola County Jail and was
caught in New Jersey is back in
central Florida.
Authorities say Michael
Rigby arrived at the sheriffs of-
fice Friday morning. He met
with detectives,, but wouldn't
answer any questions about his


escape. He's being held in jail
without bond.
The U.S. Marshals Service
was tracking Rigby around the
country since he escaped Feb.
19. He was wanted on five
counts of attempted murder and
escape charges. He was ar-
rested months later by the Pa-
terson, N.J., Police Department.
Authorities say Rigby used a
homemade saw to tunnel be-
hind a sink and a toilet at the
Osceola County Jail. Thirty cor-
rections officers from the jail
were disciplined after the es-
cape. Nearly a dozen have
been fired.
-From wire reports


For the RECORD


Citrus County Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Danny Thomas Speicher,
49, of 6950 W. Van Buren Drive,
Crystal River, at 1:02 a.m. Fri-
day on a charge of driving under
the influence. According to Spei-
cher's arrest report, a deputy
stopped Speicher after he was
seen swerving all over the road
on West Grover Cleveland
Boulevard in Homosassa. Spei-
cher reportedly stated he was
drunk and that he was going to
jail. It is reported that he also
had an open container of beer in
the middle console of the vehi-
cle and smelled of alcohol. Spei-
cher failed all field sobriety tasks
he was asked to perform and
his blood alcohol concentrations
were .173 percent and .163 per-
cent. The legal limit in Florida is
.08 percent. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Cornell D. Knight, 20, of
5522 W. Tinkerer Court, Crystal
River, at 3 p.m. Thursday on an
active Citrus County warrant for
charges of improper exhibition
of dangerous weapons or
firearms, knowingly discharge
firearm in public place/roadway
and possession of a firearm by a
convicted felon. Bond $11,000.
Lloyd Woodson Smith,
32, of 5926 Poplar Circle, Crys-
tal River, at 8:36 p.m. Thursday
on a charge of possession of a
controlled substance (oxy-
codone). Bond $2,000.
Chase E. Ash, 27, of 6796
N. Bent Way, Hernando, at
11:24 a.m. Friday on an active
Citrus County warrant for a fail-
ure to appear on original
charges of poession of a con-
trolled substance without a pre-
scription and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Dallas T. Williams, 27, of
4248 Oak St., Fruitland Park, at
11:08 a.m. Friday on an active
Lake County warrant for a viola-
tion of probation on original
charges of utter forged instru-
ment, trafficking stolen property
and rental property fraud. No


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office, go to vwww.shenriffcitrus
.org and click on the Public Information link, then on
Arrest Reports.
* Watch "Arrested Developments" show from the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicleonline.tv.


bond.
Burglaries
M A burglary to an occupied
residence and a grand theft oc-
curred at approximately 1 a.m.
on July 11 in the 8800 block of
E. Moccasin Slough Road, Flo-
ral City.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied conveyance and a petit
theft occurred at approximately
12:30 a.m. on July 12 in the
6050 block of E. Malveme
Street, Inverness.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence occurred at ap-
proximately midnight on July 9
in the 3200 block of E. Buffalo
Lane, Hemando.
*A burglary to a conveyance
occurred at approximately 10
p.m. on July 12 in the 1090
block of W. Olympia Street, Her-
nando.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied structure occurred at ap-
proximately 11 a.m. on July 10
in the 350 block of N.E. Second
Street, Crystal River.
A burglary to an unoccu-
pied residence and a petit theft
occurred at approximately mid-
night on July 13 in the 6400
block of W. Oaklawn Street, Ho-
mossassa.
Thefts
SA theft of utility services oc-
curred at approximately 8 a.m.
on June 18 in the 2100 block of
N.W. 16th Street, Crystal River.
A petit theft occurred at ap-
proximately 4 p.m. on July 12 in
the 220 block of E. Highland
Boulevard, Inverness.
An investigation on July 12
revealed that a grand theft of a
firearm occurred at approxi-
mately midnight on March 1 in


the 2300 block of N. Hickory
Glen Point, Hemando.
An arrest was made for a
retail petit theft, which occurred
at approximately 6:36 p.m. on
July 12 in the 220 block of E.
Highland Boulevard, Inverness.
N A petit theft occurred at ap-
proximately 8 a.m. on June 25
in the 10600 block of W. Halls
River Road, Homosassa.
N A petit theft occurred at ap-
proximately midnight on July 12
in the 6500 block of S. Tropi-
cana Avenue, Lecanto.
An investigation on July 13
revealed that a grand theft
(10,000 or more) occurred at
approximately midnight on May
22 in th6 5400 block of S. Burr
Terrace, Inverness.
M A petit theft occurred at ap-
proximately 5 p.m. on July 9 in
the 1300 block of Keats Street,
Floral City.
A grand theft occurred at
approximately 8 p.m. on July 9
in the area of E. Scott Lane,
Dunnellon.
A grand theft occurred at
approximately 6 p.m. on July 13
in the 1300 block of E. Bucknell
Avenue, Floral City.
Atheft of a boat occurred at
approximately 8 p.m. on July 13
in the 11400 block of W. Priest
Lane, Homosassa.
Vandalisms
A vandalism occurred at
approximately 8 p.m. on July 12
in the 3300 block of E. Buckskin
Court, Hemando.
A vandalism ($1,000 or
more) occurred at approxi-
mately 3 p.m. on July 4 in the
360 block of Fathom Loop, Bev-
erly Hills.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
s
pc
ts
s
pc
pc
pc
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light chop. Partly
cloudy with a chance of afternoon
thunderstorms today.


95 73 .00 --- 94 71 .00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 75
. Partly to mostly cloudy with scat-
tered showers and thunderstorms.
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING

Partly to mostly cloudy with scattered showers
and thunderstorms.
,r MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 76
Partly cloudy with scattered showers and
*-, thunderstorms.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 93/71
Record 97/67
Normal 91/72
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 9.46 in.
Total for the year 38.91 in.
Normal for the year 27.68 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Invemess
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.07 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 72
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 56%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, chenopods, grass
Today's Count: 3.2
Sunday's Count: 5.1
Monday's Count: 4.4
AIR QUALITY
Friday was moderate with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
7/17 SATURDAY 11:29 5:17 11:55 5:42
7/18 SUNDAY 6:09 12:22 6:34


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK


5.! 25


30
AILI3 AIl


SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:30 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:44 A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY........................... 1:04 P.M.
M OONSET TODAY .................................NONE


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
Citrus County/Inverness: Lawn watering is limited to twice per week. Even addresses may
water on Thursday and/or Sunday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Odd addresses may water
on Wednesday and/or Saturday before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. Crystal River: Lawn watering is
limited to once per week, before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m.
Report violations: Citrus County (352) 527-5543; Crystal River and Invemess: (352) 726-
4488.
Landscape Watering Schedule and Times: Hand watering and micro-irrigation of plants
(other than lawns) can be done on any day and at any time.
TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 10:33 a/6:11 a 11:16 p/6:57 p
Crystal River" 8:54 a/3:33 a 9:37 p/4:19 p
Withlacoochee* 6:41 a/1:21 a 7:24 p/2:07 p
Homosassa" 9:43 a/5:10 a 10:26 p/5:56 p


"*At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
11:16 a/6:52a -- /8:07 p
9:37 a/4:14 a 11:00 p/5:29 p
7:24 a/2:02 a 8:47 p/3:17 p
10:26 a/5:51 a 11:49 p/7:06 p


F'cast
s
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc


Gulf water
temperature


87
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.85 28.87 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.86 37.85 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.30 39.29 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.49 39.55 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L
89 67 na pc 88 66
93 73 s 95 71
89 69 ts 82 65
94 75 ts 88 72
91 75 s 88 74
95 75 s 97 74
97 72 pc 93 73
97 60 pc 90 59
94 76 ts 90 73
10067 s 94 60
91 66 pc 93 76
82 75 .01 ts 83 68
80 73 .20 ts 86 66
92 76 pc 91 75
89 68 pc 89 70
92 74 .08 ts 88 69
90 67 s 92 75
90 74 ts 89 71
86 75 pc 89 70
93 74 ts 92 73
87 73 .15 pc 89 69
93 66 pc 92 63
97 79 s 101 80
95 63 ts 99 64
90 66 s 93 73
87 68 ts 89 73
92 74 .02 s 98 74
92 73 ts 92 73
92 72 .04 pc 93 71
92 72 pc 95 71
96 79 ts 97 80
88 72 pc 90 71
97 75 .01 ts 91 75
11091 s 112 89
95 78 pc 95 77
79 66 s 79 68
94 77 .01 ts 91 76
94 79 ts 93 78
90 69 s 87 72
90 70 ts 93 69
90 73 .92 ts 89 74
93 73 .49 ts 93 73
94 75 ts 91 75


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=raln;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
M2010 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 88 73 .25 ts 89 78
New York City 92 74 pc 96 75
Norfolk 96 76 ts 96 75
Oklahoma City 94 77 s 101 75
Omaha 89 68 s 95 73
Palm Springs 11687 s 113 84
Philadelphia 97 75 s 93 74
Phoenix 11194 pc 112 91
Pittsburgh 86 71 pc 86 65
Portland, ME 75 67 pc 88 65
Portland, Ore 74 53 s 77 55
Providence, R.I. 88 68 pc 94 74
Raleigh 96 77 ts 93 73
Rapid City 94 56 s 96 60
Reno 96 69 .34 s 99 66
Rochester, NY 84 73 .04 ts 86 67
Sacramento 10065 s 102 66
St. Louis 92 74 pc 96 80
St. Ste. Marie 81 57 pc 72 56
Salt Lake City 10263 pc 97 70
San Antonio 93 77 s 97 78
San Diego 80 67 s 78 67
San Francisco 70 57 s 68 54
Savannah 93 75 pc 93 73
Seattle 66 52 s 73 54
Spokane 87 58 s 83 56
Syracuse 84 73 .15 pc 87 66
Topeka 92 72 s 95 76
Washington 97 77 pc 93 76
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 117 Goodyear, Ariz. LOW 32 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/79/ts
Amsterdam 69/56/sh
Athens 92174/s
Beijing 91/75/ts
Berlin 86/67/ts
Bermuda 86/76/s
Cairo 100/73/s
Calgary 80/55/s
Havana 91/75/pc
Hong Kong 881791ts
Jerusalem 89/71/s


Lisbon 82/65/s
London 65/55/sh
Madrid 95/64/s
Mexico City 78/58/ts
Montreal 82/64/ts
Moscow 91/67/pc
Paris 74/53/pc
Rio 74/66/sh
Rome 90/71/s
Sydney 62/46/s
Tokyo 87/75/ts
Toronto 84/65/ts
Warsaw 91/64/pc


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


94 charged in Medicare scams totaling $251M


Associated Press

MIAMI Elderly Russian immi-
grants lined up to take kickbacks
from the backroom of a Brooklyn
clinic. Claims flooded in from
Miami for HIV treatments that
never occurred. One professional
patient was named in nearly 4,000
false Medicare claims.
Authorities said busts carried out
this week in Miami, New York City,
Detroit, Houston and Baton Rouge,
La., were the largest Medicare
fraud takedown in history part of
a massive overhaul in the way fed-
eral officials are preventing and
prosecuting the crimes.
In all, 94 people including sev-
eral doctors and nurses were
charged Friday in scams totaling
$251 million. Federal authorities,
while touting the operation, cau-
tioned the cases represent only a
fraction of the estimated $60 billion
to $90 billion in Medicare fraud ab-
sorbed by taxpayers each year.
For the first time federal officials
have the power to overhaul the sys-
tem under Obama's Affordable
Care Act, which gives them author-
ity to stop paying a provider they
suspect is fraudulent. Critics have
complained the current process
did nothing more than rubber-


CUTS
Continued from Page Al

manager, four employees in
the engineering division,
two planners and a con-
struction manager in public
works.
In all, officials cut $10
million from the fund sup-
ported by property taxes
and fees.
Thorpe said none of the
cuts directly impact serv-
ices or ongoing projects.
He warned that might not
be the case next year, when
county officials could face
either increasing the tax
rate or cutting services.
"We're still going to have
problems next year,"
Thorpe said. "We need ei-
ther more revenue or cut
programs."
Thorpe is recommending
the commission keep the
tax rate of 6.497 mills,


PINCH


stamp payments to fraudulent
providers.
"That world is coming to an end,"
Health and Human Services Sec-
retary Kathleen Sebelius told The
Associated Press after speaking at
a health care fraud prevention
summit in Miami. "We've got new
ways to go after folks that we've
never had before."
Officials said they chose Miami
because it is ground zero for
Medicare fraud, generating
roughly $3 billion a year. Authori-
ties indicted 33 suspects in the
Miami area, accused of charging
Medicare for about $140 million in
various scams.
Suspects across the country were
accused of billing Medicare for un-
necessary equipment, physical
therapy and other treatments that
patients never received. In one $72
million scam at Bay Medical in
Brooklyn, clinic owners submitted
bogus physical therapy claims for
elderly Russian immigrants.
Patients, including undercover
agents, were paid $50 to $100 a visit
in exchange for using their
Medicare numbers and got bonuses
for recruiting new patients. Wire-
taps captured hundreds of kick-
back payments doled out in a
backroom by a man who did noth-


meaning the owner of a
house with a taxable value
of $100,000 would pay about
$650 in county property
taxes.
Because of a drop in tax-
able property values, the
millage would bring in $2.9
million less than this year
Budget highlights in-
clude:
E The workforce recom-
mendation cutting 16 po-
sitions while adding two -
provides a net savings of
$751,000. Thorpe said he
eliminated jobs where
workload has decreased,
such as planning, engineer-
ing and construction over-
sight.
He said because the jobs
also are budgeted for the
current year, the county will
have an additional savings
by not paying those employ-
ees through September.
Thorpe said he didn't know
what that savings would
add up to.


ing but pay patients all day, author-
ities said.
The so-called "kickback" room
had a Soviet-era propaganda
poster on the wall, showing a
woman with a finger to her lips and
two warnings in Russian: "Don't
Gossip" and "Be on the lookout: In
these days, the walls talk."
With the surveillance, the walls
"had ears and they had eyes," U.S.
Attorney Loretta Lynch said at a
news conference in Brooklyn.
In a separate Brooklyn case, au-
thorities charged six patients who
shopped their Medicare numbers
to various clinics. More than 3,744
claims were submitted on behalf of
one woman alone, 82-year-old
Valentina Mushinskaya, over the
past six years.
At a brief appearance in federal
court Friday, Mushinskaya was re-
leased on $30,000 bond and or-
dered not to return to the Solstice
Wellness Center, scene of an al-
leged $2.8 million scam.
Authorities called Mushinskaya
one of the clinic's "serial benefici-
aries," with phony bills totaling
$141,161 paid by Medicare.
Her nephew, Vladimir Olshan-
sky, told reporters his Ukrainian-
born aunt suffers from diabetes.
"She doesn't know what this is


HIGHLIGHTS OF BUDGET CUTS
* Eliminate 16 positions, including 13 layoffs:
$884,000.
* $3.4 million in excess fees that had beer collected
over three years to pay for government space needs
will be eliminated.
* $842,000 in capital projects, including a parking lot
near the Courthouse Annex.
* $2.6 million from the water quality fund, which was
set aside to match grants for water, sewer projects.
* $2 million cut from the sheriff's office
* $1 million cut from county reserves.
* Also, two new positions are recommended at a total
cost of $133,223.


Since 2008, and including
the proposed budget, the
county has cut its workforce
from 698 employees to 608.
The county commis-
sion had set aside excess
fees that exceeded ex-
penses in a savings ac-
count, or sorts, to plan for
government expansion to
meet space-needs issues. In


BP BY THE NUMBERS


Continued from Page Al U $191 million paid in claims (as of July 15)
60.600 checks written since May 3


only cleared $47 after I paid
for everything."
Huggins said he was born
in 1949 in Old Homosassa
and has worked in commer-
cial fishing since he was 9
years old. He has sons and
grandsons who join him in
harvesting blue crabs,
shrimp and mullet. They
sell the seafood to whole-
salers.
"Me, my five sons and
grandsons, three genera-
tions, we're all commercial
fishermen," Huggins said.
"My oldest son is 42. We all
make our living off the
water"
Lack of demand lowers
prices until commercial
fishermen can't go out
"The fishing is still open
here, but we just can't sell
anything," Huggins said. "I
want the public to know the
seafood is still good."
Huggins wonders if his
way of life will get back on
track or if the oil spill will
stop it
'"A restaurant can change
their menu if they can't get
the seafood. They can order
fish and shrimp from over-
seas, from China, Vietnam
and Thailand. But I can't
change where I fish. This is
where I was born and
raised," Huggins said.
Huggins and his son,
Joshua, stood last week be-
side dozens of crab traps
stacked in front of their
home. He said each crab
trap costs $32.50.
"They get rusted if they
are not in the water. They
deteriorate quickly I've got
thousands of dollars tied up
in equipment, and this isn't
going to get any better,"
Huggins said.
Still, Huggins said he has
not actually seen any oil
himself, though he's heard
from other fishermen who
say they have.
"But I haven't seen any
oil," Huggins said.
In his 50 years of fishing
off Homosassa, Huggins
said he's seen a lot of differ-
ent behaviors of aquatic an-
imals.
"But never before have I
seen the turtles infiltrating
the shorelines trying to get
away from the oil," Huggins
said. "They are Ridley tur-


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t

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a

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* 129,000 calls received
* 18.100 claims submitted online (as of July 12)
* 36 field offices, with translation capability at 9
* 112,000 total claims
* 1,500 member claims team
N 5 day average time from "claim to paid" for individu-
als who have received checks
8 day average time from "claim to paid" for commer-
cial entities who have received checks
More than 47,000 claims are awaiting document
tion for a first payment
More than 13,900 claims have "contact difficulties."

les and they are eating the stepped in to stop the prob-
egs off the crabs in my lems on the Deepwater
raps." Horizon rig before the ex-
With sales so low that plosion.
luggins said he could The money from BP
hardly afford to take his helps, but Huggins wonders
)oat out, he did the paper- what the future will hold.
vork to get some financial "We used to go out crab-
id from BP bing four days a week,"
"I filed a claim because I Huggins said. "For how, BP
ost sales," Huggins said. So is paying enough to cover
ar, Huggins said he and our bills. My equipment is
three sons who are fisher- going to pot I just bought a
ien have each received motor for nearly $5,000. I
ne check from BP, which, don't like sitting at home. I
combined total about $7,500. can't stand just watching TV
le said BP told them an- I've never felt so depressed
other check is in the mail. in my life."
When he filed a claim It's the reputation of
ith BP, Huggins showed Florida seafood rather than
hem three years of income closing of fishing areas that
ax records, his boat regis- is impacting the livelihood
rations, fishing licenses of commercial fishermen.
nd trip tickets. Bob Gill, owner of
"They paid us what we Shrimp Landing, a fish and
ost in May and June," Hug- seafood retail business,
ins said. said he had heard a few ru-
He went to the office in mors that some commercial
.rawfordville in Wakulla fishermen made claims
county in the Florida Pan- with BP, but he felt most
andle. It's twice as far to fishermen were not im-
ravel there as to drive to pacted by the oil spill.
he BP office in Clearwater, "The closure of fishing
ut the road is faster be- areas affect few of our fish-
ause of light traffic. ermen because most of
Right now, BP is paying them don't go out that far,"
ut claims that have the pa- Gill said. "It mostly affects
erwork to support them the ones in Madeira Beach


from its emergency funds.
Other commercial fisher-
men may not be able to
make claims because their
records are not complete.
"A lot of them don't file
their taxes right," Huggins
said. "BP is trying to make it
right It's just as much the
federal government's fault
because it didn't shut down
the oil rig on the 10th viola-
tion."
Huggins said the federal
government should have


2009 and 2010, plus the up-
coming year, that amounts
to $3.4 million.
Cathy Taylor, director of
the Office of Management
and Budget, said if the
county decides to expand it
can borrow money rather
than save for it. She said
debts for the county jail
and county emergency


about," he said. "She's in the dark."
In Miami, Daniel R. Levinson, in-
spector general of HHS, which
oversees Medicare, said the arrests
"illustrate how health care fraud
schemes can replicate virally and
migrate rapidly across communi-
ties."
Cleaning up Medicare fraud will
be key to paying for President
Barack Obama's proposed health
care overhaul. Federal officials
have allocated more money and
manpower to fight fraud, setting up
strike forces in seven cities with a
plan to expand to a dozen more. So
far, the operations are responsible
for more than 720 indictments that
collectively billed the Medicare
program more than $1.6 billion.
Around the country, the schemes
have morphed from the typical
medical equipment scam in which
clinic owners billed Medicare
dozens of times for the same wheel-
chair. Now, officials say, Medicare
fraud involves a sophisticated net-
work of doctors, clinic owners, pa-
tients and patient recruiters.
Violent criminals and mobsters
are also tapping into the scams,
seeing Medicare fraud as more lu-
crative than dealing drugs and hav-
ing less severe criminal penalties,
officials said.


radio system will be settled
this year, freeing up about
$1.2 million for debt serv-
ice.
Thorpe is recommend-
ing the county reduce its
water-quality fund by $2.3
million. This fund is used
as matching money for
state and federal
water/sewer grants. Thorpe
said most of those grants
have dried up, leaving the
fund expendable. About $1
million remains in the
fund.
The budget cuts
$842,000 in capital projects.
The cuts include $125,000
set aside for Historic Old
Courthouse repairs that
will be rolled over for one
year, and $300,000 for a
parking lot and drainage
near the Courthouse
Annex. County commis-
sioners twice voted against
buying property on Martin
Luther King Jr. Avenue to
accompany the parking.


HOW TO FILE A CLAIM WITH BP
Filing a claim can be done in several ways:
1. Call (800) 440.0858. TT1 de.ic's for hearing imn
paired: (800) 572 3053.
2. File a claim online at www.bp.com,'claims.
3. Visit a BP claim centers. These t.-o are the closest:
2551 Drew St., Suite 301, Clearwater or 3010 Cravw
fordville Highway, Suite A&B, Crawfordville (Wakulla
County). BP recommends that claimants first obtain
a claim number by calling the tll-free line to a,.cid
delays.
4. Mail a claim to ESIS, 1 Beaver Valley Road, Wilming.
ton, DE 19803.
5. Claims that are of large monetary value or are based
on complex economic predictions of loss should be
sent to. ESIS, 1 Beaver Valley Road, Wilmington, DE
19803. Specialized claim adjusters 'Aill handle these
claims with the assistance of accountants and other
claims professionals.


who go into the deep
water."
About of third of fishing
areas had been closed, but
that left two-thirds still
open, he said.
Abroad, national impres-
sion that all fish and
seafood from the Gulf
should not be consumed has
had an impact, Gill said.
"Yes, there is some reluc-
tance from the public that's
made the ability to move
fish tougher," Gill said. "But
the price always goes down
in the summer. The market
is soft and that's partly the
fault of economic condi-
tions."
Gill said he could under-
stand why people would
reach out to BP's offer of fi-
nancial assistance.
"I don't know of anyone
who's made a claim, but I
fully support giving help to
those folks who need it," he
said.
Gill said he hoped BP
could weed out any fraudu-
lent claims.
"We all suffer when that
happens," he said.
As small businesses,
commercial fishermen
could take advantage of a


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loan program offered
through the Small Business
Administration. Mike Orl-
ito, certified business ana-
lyst with the Small Business
Development Center for
Citrus County, said some
county business people
have asked about Economic
Injury Disaster Loans, but
no one has filed an applica-
tion.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and
Consumer Services has
launched a public service
announcement on televi-
sion to help counter the
mistaken public perception
that Florida seafood is un-
available or in limited sup-
ply It began airing last
week. Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson said, "Our state's
commercial fishermen con-
tinue to harvest seafood
daily from clean, unaf-
fected Florida waters. They
have seafood products to
sell, and they need cus-
tomers. This television pub-
lic service announcement
will help get out the mes-
sage that Florida seafood is
safe, plentiful and avail-
able."


12ua. E. 2rcavi
Funeral Home wih Crematory
CAROLYN ANGELOTTI
Memorial Serv: Thurs. 11:00 AM
St. Margaret's Episcopal Church
CHARLES SCHAEFFER
Private Cremation Arrangements
TERRY J. JOHNSTON
Service: Sat. 10:30 AM Chapel
JAMES SMITH, SR.
Arrangements Pending
726-8323


SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 A5


Obituaries

Joan Bogolo, 76
INVERNESS
The service of remem-
brance for Joan Bogolo, 76,
Inverness, will be at 5 p.m.
Saturday, July 17, 2010, at
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
The family will receive
friends from 3 to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday at the Inverness
Chapel. Committal services
will be at 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
July 18, 2010, at Oak Ridge
Cemetery, Inverness.

Jayne
St. Louis, 81
HERNANDO
Jayne M. St. Louis, 81,
Hernando, died Thursday,
July 15, 2010, in Hernando.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes & Crematory.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus Counht Chron-
: le': polic, permits
both tree and paid obit-
uaries
Obituar ies rimust be
submitted by the fu.
reral home or society
in charge of arrange-
menrts
Free obituaries, run one
day, c'an include: full
name of deceased;
age, hometown state:
date of death; place of
death; date, time and
,place of visitation and
funeral services.
E If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributionsons or other
information are in.
Clouded, this will be des-
ignated as a paid
obituary and a cost es
timate provided to the
sender.
A flag ill be included
for tree for those who
served in the U.S. mill.
tar/. (Please note this
ser.ce when submit
ting a free obituary.)
Additionally, all obituar-
ies will be posted online
at v..'.v..chronicleonline

Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted by
funeral homes or soci-
eties.
Paid obituaries may in-
,:ide the information
per mitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members: year married
and spouse's name
date of death, if pre
deceased by spouse);
religious affiliation; bi-
ographical information,
including education.
employment, military
service, organizations
and hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment 'in
ur nment; and memorial
contributions
* Area -'uneral homes
with established ac-
counts with the Chroni-
cle are charged $8.75
per column inch.
* Non-local funeral
homes and those with-
out accounts are re-
quired to pay in
advance by credit card,
and the cost is $10 per
column inch.
* Small photos of the de-
ceased's face can be in-
cluded for an additional
.charge.
* Larger photos, span-
ning the entire column,
can also be accommo-
dated, and will incur a
size-based fee.
* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear in
the next day's edition.
* E-mail obits@chronicle
online.com or fax 563-
3280. Call 563-5660
for details.


To Place Your


Deadline is
4 days prior to run date.
L I








STOCKS


A6S ATuIRDrAY. ILY 17. 2010


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I owT RAS TEMAKE N EIE


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SkildHcre 2.43 -.35 -12.6 CaracoP 4.57 -.40 -8.0 Jinpans 11.17 -3.10 -21.7
Comericwt 12.38 -1.74 -12.3 BioTimewt 2.90 -.25 -7.9 IridCwt15 2.25 -.53 -19.1
DrxFBull s 20.14 -2.80 -12.2 CnsTom 28.45 -2.35 -7.6 IntervestB 3.08 -.63 -17.0


DIARY


626 Advanced
2,450 Declined
79 Unchanged
3,155 Total issues
65 New Highs
27 New Lows
5,372,211,090 Volume


DIARY


136 Advanced
331 Declined
42 Unchanged
509 Total issues
11 New Highs
7 New Lows
64,407,026 Volume


320
2,348
98
2,766
13
71
2,121,333,825


52-Week
High Low Name
11,258.01 8,130.42Dow Jones Industrials
4,812.87 3,025.43Dow Jones Transportation
408.57 344.02Dow Jones Utilities
7,743.74 5,598.81 NYSE Composite
1,994.20 1,508.15Amex Index
2,535.28 1,736.95Nasdaq Composite
1,219.80 875.32S&P 500
12,847.91 8,953.90Wilshire 5000
745.95 475.28Russell 2000


Net % YTDIU% 52-WK
Last Chg Chg Chg % Chg
10,097.90 -261.41 -2.52 -3.17+15.48
4,119.00 -137.16 -3.22 +.47+24.29
377.65 -6.10 -1.59 -5.12 +5.00
6,709.51 -207.30 -3.00 -6.62+11.12
1,858.72 -43.98 -2.31 +1.85+14.41
2,179.05 -70.03 -3.11 -3.97+15.50
1,064.88 -31.60 -2.88 -4.50+13.24
11,140.70 -338.41 -2.95 -3.53+15.52
610.39 -24.23 -3.82 -2.40+17.56


YTD YTD
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg
AK Steel .20 1.5 46 13.43 -.63 -37.1 IBM 2.60 2.0 12128.03 -2.69 -2.2
AT&T Inc 1.68 6.8 11 24.69 -.31 -11.9 Lowes .44 2.2 16 20.04 -.84-14.3
Ametek .24 .6 22 41.83 -1.25 +9.4 McDnlds 2.20 3.1 16 69.94 -1.39 +12.0
BkofAm .04 .3 67 13.98 -1.41 -7.2 Microsoft .52 2.1 13 24.89 -.62 -18.3
CapCtyBk .40 3.2 ... 12.59 -.53 -9.0 Motorola ...... 83 7.50 -.22 -3.4
CntryLink 2.90 8.4 10 34.58 -.25 -4.5 NextEraEn 2.00 3.8 13 52.61 -.33 -.4
Citigrp ...... 98 3.90 -.26 +17.8 Penney .80 3.7 18 21.73 -1.02-18.3
CmwReitrs 2.00 8.2 44 24.36 -.42 -5.9 PiedmOfcn 1.26 7.1 ... 17.77 -.04 +13.9
Disney .35 1.1 17 33.03 -1.02 +2.4 ProgrssEn 2.48 6.1 13 40.48 -.61 -1.3
EKodak ...... 7 4.40 -.33 +4.3 RegionsFn .04 .6 ... 6.55 -.47 +23.8
EnterPT 2.60 6.8 ... 38.37 -1.61 +8.8 SearsHldgs ...... 32 63.23 -3.02 -24.2
ExxonMbI 1.76 3.0 13 57.96 -1.31 -15.0 Smucker 1.60 2.6 15 61.51 -1.25 -.4
FPL 67 1.86 6.9 ... 27.05 +.06 +.4 SprintNex ... ...... 4.56 -.14 +24.6
FordM ...... 6 11.34 -.52 +13.4 TimeWarn .85 2.9 14 29.53 -1.07 +1.3
GenElec .40 2.7 15 14.55 -.70 -3.8 UniFirst .15 .4 11 42.33 -1,69-12.0
HomeDp .95 3.5 16 27.11 -1.23 -6.3 VerizonCm 1.90 7.1 28 26.69 -13.8
Intel .63 3.0 13 21.02 -.49 +3.0 WalMart 1.21 2.4 13 49.67 -.74 -7.1


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing

the Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

tual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name

of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes


NEYOK T0KECANG


Name Last Chg


ABB Ltd 18.14 -.62
ACE Ltd 53.70 -1.30
AESCorp 9.98 -.22
AFLAC 46.26 -2.12
AGCO 29.53 -.33
AGL Res 37.49 -1.06
AK Steel 13.43 -.63
AMB Pr 23.00 -1.36
AMR 637 -.24
ASALtds 2620 -.58
AT&T nc 24.69 -.31
AU Opron 9.14 -.29
AbtLab 47.07 -.95
AberFitc 33.25 -2.11
Accenture 39.00 -1.02
AdamnsEx 9.37 -.23
AMD 7.37 -.04
Aeroposits 28.68 -1.26
Aetna 27.16 -1.06
Agilent 27.03 -1.37
Agnicog 56.00 -2.29
Agriumg 58.64 -1.69
AirProd 69.32 -1.00
Airgas 64.74 -.26
AirTran 4.76 -.17
AlcatelLuc 2.67 -.14
Alcoa 10.41 -.43
AlirEngy 22.30 -.13
AllegTch 44.73 -2.60
Alergan 64.00 -1.54
Allete 34.97 -.64
AlBG[bHi 13.89 +.07
AiBIno 8.22 +.06
AciBem 27.74 -.51
Aldlrish 2.28 -.07
Allstate 27.83 -1,05
AlphaNRs 33.99 -1.76
Altria 21.26 -.20
ArnbacFh .68 -.04
Ameren 24.60 -.48
AMovilL 48.00 -1.59
AmAxle 7.73 ,-.60
AEagleOut 11.84 -.21
AEP 34.76 -.52
AmExp 41.38 -2.05
AmlniGrp 35.64 -1.74
AmSIP3 .8.95 +.08
AmTower 44.19 -1.36
Amrnerigas 42.85 -.36
Amneriprise 37.55 -1.65
AmeriBrgn 32.14 -.59
Anadarko 47.46 -1.62
AnalogDev 29.21 -.52
AnnTaylr 16.02 -1.22
Annaly 17.50 -.12
Anworth 7.25 +.06
Aon Corp 3624 -.74
Apache 82.75 -3.38
AptInv 20.11 -.77
AquaAm 18.49 -.51
ArelorMit 29.05 -.81
ArchCoal 19.65 -.95
ArchDan 26.74 -.13
ArenaRes 35.98 +.69
ArvMerit 13.86 -.77
Ashland 46.48 -2.14
AsdEstal 13.02 -.12
Assurant 36.58 -.38
AssuredG 14,96 -.85
AsraZen 48.79 -1.54
ATMOS 28.02 -.73
AutoNata 19.99 -.01
AvisBudg 9.89 -.62
Avon 28.69 -.61
BB&TCp 26.38 -1.31


Name Last Chg


A-Power 7.64 -.47
ACMoorelf 2.40 +.05
ADCTel 12.52 +.02
ADPT 2.96 -.06
AMAGPh 36.00 -.79
ASMLHId 30.92 -.67
ATP O&G 9.89 -.23
ATS Med 3.97
AVIBio 1.81 +.18
Abiomed 11.12 -.12
Abraxas 2.81 -.09
AcaciaTc 15.16 -1.10
AcmePkt 29.75 -2.08
AcordaTh 33.28 -.95
ActivsBliz 11.12 -.21
Adoom 13.90 -.30
AdobeSy 27.39 -.83
Adtran 30.80 -.73
AdvBattery 3.22 -.13
AdvEnId 13.59 -.13
AeroViron 23.30 -1.21
AEtemag 1.11 -.01
Affymax 6.25 -.20
Affymetrix 4.23 -.14
ArTmsp 4.93 -.25
Aixtron 30.30 +.09
AkamaT 42.69 -1.54
Akom 324 -.23
AlaskCom 8.80 -.18
Alexion 50.40 -.97
AignTech 14.57 -.70
Alkerm 12.75 -.69
AlosThera 5.85 -.07
AlscripltM 16.77 -.43
Alphatec 4.55 -.10
AlteraCplf 27.53 -.68
AlterraCap 1924 -.68
Altisrcen 25.33 -.42
Alvarion 2.21 -.02
Amazon 118.49 -3.57
Amedisys 26.02 -.74
ACapAgy 26.97 -.07
AmCapUd 4.94 -.21
AmltPasta 52.94
AmerMed 23.55 -.57
AmSupr 28.17 -1.28
Amgen 52.17 -.75
AmkorTIf 5.46 -.38
Amylin 18.47 -.32
Anadigc 421 -.18
Anlogic 45.47 -1.07
Analystrs 2.54
AngioDyn 15.30 -.14
Antigenics .78 +.01
A123Sysn 8.96 -.47
ApolloGrp 45.57 +.79
Apololnv 9.68 -.22
Apple Inc 249.90 -1.55
ApidEnerg 1.00 -.07
ApldMalt 12.19 -.27
AMCC 10.64 -.49
ArQule 3.95 -.19
ArcSight 23.36 -.89
ArenaPhm 4.66 +.74
AresCap 13.49 -.42
ArgonSt 34.40 -.02
AriadP 2.94 -.05
Ariba Inc 16.57 -.74
ArkBest 20.88 -.87
ArmHld 13.79 -.49
Arris 11.29 -.34
ArtTech 3.64 -.24
AiubaNet 15.60 -.29
Asialnfo 24.50 -1.07
AspenBio .95 -.09
AssatBanc 13.25 -.39
athenahlih 22.87 -1.19
Atheros 2927 -.98
AtasEngy 28.80 -1.32
Almet 5.04 -.18
Audvox 6.89 -.24
Autodesk 25.35 -1.12
AutoData 40.63 -1.09
Auxilium 22.22 -.67


BHPBilILt 65.53 -1.97
BHPBilpic 55.03 -1.72
BPPLC 37.10 -1.82
BPZ Res 3.25 -.28
BRT 4.96 -.29
BakrHu 46.00 -1.16
BallCp 53.95 -1.48
BooBrades 16.43 -.45
BcoSantand 12.31 -.56
BcSBrasiln 11.62 -.59
BkofAm 13.98 -1.41
Bklrelnd 3.59 -.19
BkNYMel 25.73 -1.06
Barday 17.30 -1.54
BarVixShT 27.37 +1.67
BanickG 41.75 -1.32
Baxter 42.45 -.16
BaytexEg 31.25 -1.08
BeazerHm 3.70 -.26
BectDck 67.75 -1.61
BerkHaA115815.00-3855.00
BerkHBs 77.10 -2.61
BetBy 34.33 -1.09
Biovai 20.49 +.66
BIkHilisCp 29.19 -1.20
BIkDebtStr 3.83
BIkEnhC&l 13.78 -23
Blackstone 10.19 -.37
BlockHR 13.98 -.63
BlueChp 2.90 -.07
Boeing 61.90 -2.47
BoiseInc 5.78 -.29
Borders 1.35 -.14
BorgWam 40.43 -2.15
BostEeer 67.51 -1.49
BostProp 74.71 -2.60
BostonSc 6.11 -.48
BoydGm 7.74 -.48
BrMySqr 25.17 -.33
BrkfldPrp 14.23 -.42
Brunswick 12.50 -1.48
Buckeye 61.40 +.13
BungeLt 51.98 -2.02
CBREIlis 13.70 -.45
CBLAsc 12.07 -.40
CBS B 13.53 -.86
CF Inds 76.96 -1.00
CH Engy 39.72 -1.02
CIGNA 30.34 -1.27
CITGrpn 36.80 -.19
CMS Eng 15.62 -.38
CNO Find 4.84 -.32
CSS Inds 16.18 -.46
CSX 50.12 -1.90
CVS Care 30.04 -.74
CablvsnNY 25.48 -.65
CabotO&G 31.87 -1.45
CallGolf 5.99 -.28
Calpine 12.81 -.38
Camecog 23.99 -.83
Cameron 34.75 -.38
CampSp 35.82 -.23
CdnNRsgs 34.51 -1.07
CapOne 41.46 -1.80
CapitlSrce 5.28 -.06
CapMpfB 14.90
CardnlHts 35.15 -.73
CareFusnn 21.55 -.87
CarMax 18.67 -.94
Carnival 31.41 -1.39
Caterpillar 63.94 -2.13
Celanese 25.03 -1.20
Cemex 9.23 -.62
Cemigpf 14.39 -.25
CenterPnt 13.93 -.37
CntryUnk 34.58 -.25
Chockpnt 17.86 -.70
ChesEng 20.87 -.57
ChesUfl 30.72 -1.15


AvagoTn 21.99 -.92
AvanirPhm 3.12 -.17
AviatNetw 3.76 -.16
Aware 2.42 -.03
Axcelis 1.68 +.08
BEAero 26.72 -1.28
BGC Pts 5.08 -.06
BMCSft 36.48 -1.10
BMP Sunst 5.64 +.07
Baidus 73.53 -2.11
BannerCp 2.00 -.07
BeaconPw .35 -.01
BeacnRfg 17.76 -.32
BeasleyB 3.37 -.44
BebeStrs 6.79 -.09
BedBath 36.04 -1.78
BioRefs 20.80 -.55
Biocryst 5.64 -.41
Biodel 3.47 -.14
Biogenldc 51.86 -1.57
BioMarin 19.18 -.50
BioMimetic 8.33 -.14
BIkRKelso 10.07 -.33
Blkboard 37.87 -1.16
BlueCoat 21.12 -1.37
BlueNie 46.02 -321
BobEvans 24.08 -1.09
BostPrv 6.63 -.53
BrigExp 15.24 -.89
Bightpnt 7.20 -.32
Broadcom 35.99 -1.10
Broadwind 2.90 -.28
BrcdeCm 5.03 -.16
BrklneB 9.16 -.20
BrooksAuto 8.11 -.52
BrukerCph 11.30 -.52
Bucyrus 51.78 -1.57
BuffaloWW 39.96 -.65
CAInc 19.00 -.43
CBOE n 26.45 -.05
CDCCpA 2.09 -.09
CH Robins 57.45 -1.13
CMEGrp 266.23 -10.12
CNinsure 23.62 -.75
CTC Media 16.73 -.12
CVB Fnd 9.92 -.33
Cadence 6.12 -.25
CdnSolar 12.62 -.45
CapCtyBk 12.59 -.53
CpstnTrb .92 -.03
CareerEd 24.94 -.48
Carrizo 17.50 -.66
CarverBcp 6.75 -.25
Caseys 35.77 -.07
CatalystH 35.18 -.43
CalhayGen 11.05 -.49
CaviumNet 28.10 -.62
CeleraGrp 6.26 -.38
Celgene 52.04 -125
CeOlTher rsh .43 -.01
CelldexTh 4.51 -.30
CentEuro 24.78 -.60
CentAl 9.03 -.49
Cephin 59.45 -1.66
Cemer 74.62 -4.35
ChrmSh 3.93 -27
ChkPoint 32.56 -.58
Cheesecake 2421 -1.38
ChildPlace 44.16 -1.74
ChinAgris 10.64 -.83
ChinaBAK 1.47 -.02
ChinaCEd 6.11 +21
ChipMOS 1.36 -.13
ChrchMlD 32.16 -.92
CienaCorp 12.80 -.63
CinnFin 26.62 -.88
Cintas 2520 -.60
Cirrus 17.16 -.79
Cisco 22.75 -1.17
CitizRepB .81 -.08
CitrixSys 45.36 -127
CleanEngy 15.83 -.49
Cleawire 6.51 -26
Cogent 9.09 -23
CogniTech 52.63 -1.53
CogoGrp 6.46 -.16
Coinstar 47.00 -1.62
ColdwtrCrk 3.49 -.23


Chevron 71.50 -1.54
Chicos 9.49 -.38
Chimera 3.68 -.11
ChinaMble 49.21 -1.15
ChinaUni 12.55 -.42
Chubb 51.55 -1.24
Cimarex 71.21 -4.04
CincBell 2.95 -.10
Citigrp 3.90 -.26
CleanH 61.46 -3.09
CliffsNRs 46.55 -1.91
Clorox 64.41 -.81
Coach 34.76 -1.99
CocaCE 27.69 -.29
CCFemsa 67.03 -2.27
CocaCI 52.37 -.48
Coeur 14.39 -.65
CohStlnfra 13.67 -.21
ColgPal 82.83 -.26
CollctvBrd 15.49 -.86
Comerica 36.17 -262
CmlMtis 12.81 -.55
CmwReit rs 24.36 -.42
ComScop 24.75 -1.28
CompPrdS 15.49 -1.20
Con-Way 31.43 -1.37
ConAgra 23.66 -.44
ConocPhil 51.85 -1.01
ConsolEngy 35.09 -1.46
ConEd 45.06 -.68
ConstelLA 16.34 -.13
ConstellEn 32.59 -.93
CtlAirB 22.86 -.74
Cnvrgys 10.20 -.51
Coming 16.96 -.66
CottCp 6.20 -.03
CousPrp 6.24 -.14
Covidien 40.03 -.46
Crane 30.03 -1.14
CredSuiss 40.65 -2.19
Cummins 69.50 -3120
CurEuro 128.82 -.09

DCT Indl 4.35 -.20
DNP Selt 9.40 +.07
DPL 24.84 -.58
DR Horton 10.10 -.52
DTE 47.13 -1.11
DanaHldg 10.29 -.65
Danahers 37.41 -.94
Darden 39.76 -1.35
DeanFds 11.47 -.24
Deere 59.73 -1.35
DelMnte 13.77 -.32
Deltair 11.72 -.29
DenburyR 14.41 -.61
DevelDiv 10.03 -.57
DevonE 61.16 -219
DiaOffs 62.55 -336
DiamRk 8.74 -.20
DianaShip 13.02 -.08
DicksSptg 24.72 -.58
DrxTcBll s 28.87 -2'71
DrxEMBIIs 23.14 -2.24
DrSCBearrs 39.27 482.
DREBearrs 36.31 427
DirEMBrrs 44.26 +364
DirFnBear 15.81 +1.71
DrxFBulls 20.14 -280
DrxREBIIs 35.61 -3193
DirxSCBull 36.25 -4.38
DirxaLCBear 16,30 +1.27
DirxLCBull 42.90 -34896
DirxEnBull 26.19 -2.25
Discover 14.50 -.71
Disney 33.03 -1.02
DomRescs 40.43 -.84
DEmmett 14.07 -7.61


DowChm 25.17 -1.46
DrPepSnap 38.25 -.73
DuPont 35.98 -1.19
DukeEngy 16.87 -.21
DukeRlty 10.60 -.25
Dynegyrs 3.47 -.22
EMCCp 20.15 -.43
EOG Res 102.28 -3.91
EastChm 54.21 -1.82
EKodak 4.40 -.33
Eaton 67.20 -1.75
Edisonint 32.55 -.77
BPasoCp 11.97 -.49


Elan 4.85 -.23
EldorGldg 15.89 -.37
EmersonEl 45.22 -1.34
EmpDist 19.31 -.48
Emulex 9.44 -.49
EnbrEPtrs 57.27 +.64
EnCanags 31.84 -1.22
EnPro 27.34 -1.28
ENSCO 40.26 -1.43
Energy 75.96 -1.08
EqtyRsd 42.69 -2.11
EsteeLdr 63.47 -1.46
EvergmEn .10 +.00
ExcoRes 14.60 -.70
Exelon 41.48 -.28
ExxonMbl 57.96 -1.31
FPL67 27.05 +.06
FairchldS 9.84 -.41
FamilyDIr 38.12 +.02
FedExCp 74.61 -2.61
FedSignl 5.81 --35'
Fedlnvst 20.84 -.20
Ferrellgs 23.57 -.25
Ferro 7.20 -.47
RbriaCelu 13.73 -.64
RidNatlnfo 27.52 -.45
FstBcpPR .48 -.04
FstHortzon 11.79 -.32
FstlnRT 4.01 -.46
FTActDiv 11.44 -.04
FtTrEnEq 10.44 -.19
FirstEngy 37.11 -.46
Fluor 42.79 -1.60


Comarco 2.15 ... Ezcorp 19.97 -.69
CombinRx 1.42 -.05 F5 Netwks 76.37 -2.33
Comcast 18.54 -.77 FBRCap 3.42 -.05
Comcnspdl 17.52 -.70 FLIRSys 30.04 -.57
CmcBMO 37.27 -1.02 FSIIntl 3.89 -.23
CommSys 10.18 -.11 Fastenal 47.66 -2.12
CommVIt 18.14 -.33 FilthThird 12.17 -1.08
Compuwre 8.39 -.36 Fndclnst 17.87 -1.49
Concepts 12.59 -.42 Fnisarrs 15.44 -.59
Conexant 2.13 -.16 RnLine 13.77 -.64
Conmed 17.03 -.48 FstCashFn 22.52 -.69
ConvOrgh .65 -.04 FMidBO 12.30 -.51
CopanoEn 27.87 +.03 FstNiagara 12.90 -.42
CorinthC 9.53 -.17 FstSolar 128.92 -2.54
Costco 54.98 -1.57 FstMeit 17.95 -.66
Cray Inc 5.84 -.25 Fiserv 45.60 -1.58
CreeInc 65.12 -3.15 Rextlm 6.40 -.26
Crocs 10.50 +.25 FocusMda 16.67 -.41
CrosstexE 6.26 -.16 ForcePro 4.04 -.30
Ctrip.coms 36.48 -.33 FormFac 10.22 -.33
CubistPh 21.37 -.23 Fortinetn 16.28 -.32
CybrSrce 25.96 -.01 Forward 3.76
Cyclacel 1.54 -.09 FosterWhl 21.52 -.70
Cymer 31.51 -.46 FreeSeas 1.07 -.01
CyprsBio 2.50 +.21 FresKabirt .12 -.00
Cypemi 10.60 -.51 FuelCell 1.23 +.04
:vx .70 -.02 FultonFnd 9.69 -.46

DGFastCh 35.49 -.70
DeckOuts 44.79 -1.52 GFIGrp 5.53 -.19
Delcath 7.71 -.53 GSICmmrc 25.93 -1.50
Dell Inc 13.07 -.58 GT Solar 5.95 -.24
DItaPtr .75 -.04 Garmin 29.66 -.63
Dndreon 31.29 -1.16 GenProbe 45.24 -1.72
Dennys 2.54 -.11 GenBiotc h .35 -.02
Dentsply 29.25 -1.17 Genomic 12.31 -.11
Depomed 2.62 -.19 Gentex 18.77 -.59
DigRiver 25.04 -1.04 Gentivah 22.29 -.60
DirecTVA 34.97 -81 GenVech .46 -.01
DiscCmA 34.99 -1.30 Genzyme 51.77 -1.70
DiscCmC 30.63 -1.26 GeronCp 4.57 -.29
DiscvLabh .21 -.01 Gibraltar 9.53 -.92
DishNetwk 18.68 -.72 GileadSci 31.94 -2.96
DolirFn 17.22 -.82 GlacierBc 14.75 -.36
DlrTrees 42.40 -.18 Gleacher 2.37 -.29
DonlleyRR 16.24 -.87 Globlind 4.12 -.07
DoublTake 10.48 -.04 Gobalstar 1.80 -.04
DragnWgn 5.23 -.27 GlbSpMetn 10.05 -.42
DrmWksA 29.95 -.70 Google 459.61 -34.42
DressBam 23.87 -.98 GrCanyEd 20.61 -.25
drugstore 2.75 -.25 GrLkDrge 5.51 -.24
DryShips. 3.91 -14 GreenMtCs 27.83 -.82
DyaxCp 225 -.04 Gymbree 42.54 -1.61
Dynavax 1.95 -.06 HMNFn 4.50 -.15
ETraders 12.96 -.62 HSNInc 27.49 -1.18
eBay 20.09 -.94 HainCel 19.81 -.21
EFJohnson 1.45 -.01 Halozyme 6.58 -.38
eResrch 8.65 -.11 HanmiFncl 1.26 -.09
EagleBulk 4.48 -14 HansenMed 1.96 -.04
ErthUnk 8.33 +.01 HansenNat 41.09 -.97
EstWstBcp 16.70 -1.02 HarbinBec 17.25 -.74
Edipsys 19.52 -43 Harmonic 5.77 -.13
EducMgtn 15.76 +.36 HawHold 5.68 -.10
EduDv 5.36 -24 HithCSvcs 21.74 -.21
ElectSd 12.11 -.54 HrtlndEx 14.98 -.21
ElectArts 14.79 -.70 HSchein 53.34 -2.28
Emcore .77 -01 HercOftsh 2.44 -.14
EmmisCm 2.14 -.04 HercTGC 9.73 -.21
EndoPhrm 23.09 -.62 HiTchPhm 20.07 -.94
Enerl 2.94 -05 Hibbett 24.31 -1.11
EnerNOC 33.02 -280 Hologic 14.12 -.45
EngyConv 4.45 -23 Home Inns 38.88 -1.56
EgyXXIrs 15.43 -1.00 HorsehdH 7.48 -.45
Entegris 4.41 -25 HotTopic 5.10 -.08
EntropCom 6.67 -32 HudsCity 12.44 -.32
EnzonPhar 10.69 -30 HumGen 23.92 -1.44
Equinix 82.24 -3.79 HuntJB 35.10 +.32
EricsnTel 11.47 -38 HuntBnk 5.73 -.40
Euronet 14.93 -58 IAC Inter 22.50 -.59
EvrgrSlrh .69 -03 ICOGIbA 1.64 -.05
ExactSdci 3.43 -42 iGateCorp 15.97 -.18
Exelixis 3.11 -.35 IPC 24.88 -.33
EideTc 5.52 -.55 iShNsdqB 77.52 -2.71
Expedia 20.04 -.61 lconixBr 14.65 -.71
ExpdlntI 38.66 -79 Illumina 43.63 -1.19
ExpScrips 46.94 -.82 Imax Corp 12.54 -.56
ExtrmNet 2.77 -.11 Immucor 18.53 -.41


FootLockr 12.84 -.65
FordM 11.34 -.52
ForestLab 27.96 -.66
ForestOil 27.35 -1.69
Fortress 3.90 -.03
FortuneBr 40.48 -1.42
FMCG 60.08 -3.09
FrontierCm 7.39 +.05

GATX 27.63 -1.27
GLGPtrs 4.36 -.01
GabelliET 4.55 -.08


GabHIthW 6.22 -.13
GabUail 7.53 -.16
Gafsans 13.70 -.60
GameStop 18.95 -.57
Gannett 13.50 -1.61
Gap 18.13 -.66
GencoShip 16.24 +.11
GenDynar 58.90 -2.57
GenElec 14.55 -.70
avGnGrthP 13.23 -.54
GenMarit 5.85 -.04
GenMillss 35.54 -.53
GenuPd 43.23 +1.08
Genworth 13.46 -.90
GaPw8-44 26.30
Gerdaug 10.94 -.D4
Gerdau 13.06 -.42
GlaxoSKIn 36.42 -.79
GoldFLtd 12.95 -.49
Goldcrpg 40.14, -1.19,
GoldmanS 146.17 +.95
Goodrich F ".') '-2.80
Goodyear 5. 9i -.72
GtPlmnEn 17.20 -.54
Grifon 11.67 -.35
GpTelevisa 18.36 -.59
GuangRy 16.76 -.45
HCP Inc 33.46 -.72
HSBC 47.62 -1.66
HSBCCap 25.79 -.09
Hallibrtn 27.51 -.59
HanJS 14.25 -.05


HanPtDv2 10.84 +.01
Hanesbrds 24.44 -1.41
Hanoverins 43.24 -1.18
HarleyD 23.55 -1.46
HarmonyG 10.31 -.40
HartfdFn 21.77 -1.01
Hasbro 39.50 -1.59
HawaiiB 23.27 -.46
HItCrREIT 42.98 -.75
HitMgmt 7.22 -.27
HIthcrRiy 22.15 -.62
HedaM 4.70 -.21
Hain 44.80 -.41


HelixEn 9.60 -.60
HellnTel 4.07 -.13
Hertz 10.03 -.57
Hess 51.49 -1.83
HewittAsc 47.30 -.53
HewlettP 46.20 -1.22
HighwdPrp 28.28 -.33
HomeDp 27.11 -1.23
Honwlllnll 40.19 -1.60
HospPT 19.67 -.65
HostHols 13.45 -.73
Humana 45.66 -1.19
Huntsmn 9.13 -.33
AMGId g 15.91 -.79
ICICI Bk 37.62 -1.10
ING 8.36 -.56
iShCmxG s 11.68 -.15
iSAsiwa 20.04 -.67
iShBraz 64.15 -2.00
iSCan 25.68 -.79
iShEMU 31.28 -.98
;i.,.,Cr 20.12 -.50
,'hHK 15,15 -.21
iShJapn 9.35 -.24
iSh Kor 46,37 -1.82
iShMex 48.99 -1.56
iShSing 11,81 -.17
iSTalwn 11.83 -.22
iShSilver 17.49 -.46
iShChina25 38,74 -1.12
iSSPSO0 ,107.05 -3.05
iShEMkts 38,65 -1.19
iShB20T 100.80 +.49


ImunoGn 8.30 -.58 MagelnHI 36.45 -.81
Imunmd 3.04 -.11 Magma 3.12 -.26
ImpaxLabs 17.30 -.60 MannKd 6.01 -.45
Incyte 12.05 -.37 MarvelTf 16.63 -.72
IndBkMI h .28 ... Masimo 22.41 -.91
Infinera 6.43 -.41 Mattel 20.81 -2.19
InfoLgx rsh 5.07 +.05 Maximlntg 17.66 -.33
Informant 26.38 -.22 MaxwrlT 10.33 -.78
InfosysT 58,31 -1.04 MedAssets 23.71 -.31
InsightEnt 13.91 -.11 Mediacom 6.73 -.11
InspPhar 4.67 -.10 MedicAcIn 12.38 -.62
InigDv 5,09 -.22 MediCo 8.00 -.03
Intel 21.02 -.49 Medivation 9.07 -.76
InteractBrk 17.37 -.30 MelcoCrwn 3.65 -.05
InterDig 26.44 -.68 MentorGr 8.93 -.47
Intriace 10.77 -.50 MercadoL 58.10 -4.18
InterMune 9.88 -.24 Methanx 20.44 -.02
InitBcsh 16.10 -.95 Micrel 10.68 -.39
IntlSpdw 25.50 -.46 Microchp 29.37 -.74
Intersil 12.98 -.10 Micromet 6.15 -.37
Intuit 36.61 -.90 MicronT 8.27 -.39
IntSurg 324.61 -11.06 MicroSemi 15.13 -.62
inVenTiv 25.80 -.06 Microsoft 24.89 -.62
InvRIEst 8,26 -.21 MicroStr 75.69 -1.94
IridiumCm 9.75 -.81 Micrvisn 2.75 -.09
IsilonSys 13.88 -.41 Micrus 23.20 -.04
Isis 9.09 -.42 MillerHer 17.23 -.96
lron 61.52 -1,48 Millicom 85.88 -2.10
IvanhoeEn 1.84 -06 Mindspeed 7.16 -.27
Misonix 2.06 -.13
MolelnsPh 1.34
JASolar 6.15 -.03 Molex 18.59 -.26
JDASoft 23.73 -.36 Moticty n 8.26 +.20
JDSUniph 10.15 -.39 MoveInc 2.12 -.18
JackHenry 24.03 -.84 Mylan 17.71 -.61
JackInBox 19.12 -.70 MyriadG 15.48 -.24
Jamba 2.08 -.13 NETgear 20.19 -.60
JamesRiv 17.04 -.57 NICInc 6.37 -.49
JazzPhrm 8.50 -.15 NIl Hkg 35.61 -.23
JetBlue 5.87 -.16 Nanomtr 8.55 -.64
Jinpans 11.17 -3.10 NasdOMX 17.61 -.54
JoesJeans 1.98 -.09 NatPenn 5.99 -.40
JosphBnk 55.98 -.92 NektarTh 12.08 -.66
JoyGlbl 53.50 -1.36 NetServic 10.15 -.55
KLATnc 29.23 -1.29 NetLogics 29.73 -.80
KeryxBio 3.70 -.28 NetApp 40.50 -.23
Kirklands 16.75 -.46 Netease 33.00 -.74
Kulicke 6.89 -.06 Netflix 118.39 -2.72
L&LEgyn 9.61 -.69 Netlist 2.51 -.15
LHCGrp 22.04 -.58 NetwkEng 2.72 -.25
LKQCorp 19.94 -.70 Neurcrine 5.26 -.27
LSBCp 20.60 +6.48 NewsCpA 12.50 -.66
LSI IndIf 5.07 -.15 NewsCpB 14.14 -.62
LTX-Cred 2.70 -.15 NobltyH 8.79 -.03
LamResrch 40.04 -2.05 Nordson 57.57 -1.91
LamarAdv 25.39 -1.96 NorTrst 48.36 -1.37
Landstar 39.97 -.73 NwstBcsh 11.39 -.43
Lattice 5.12 -.40 Novavaxh 2.18 -.02
LawsnSft 7.63 -.25 Novell 6.10 -.08
LeapWirlss 12.49 -.54 Novius 26.11 -1.17
Level3 1.05 -.05 NuHorizIf 3.38 +.01
LedxPhrm 1.23 -.11 NuVasive 35.57 -.99
UbGlobA 27.34 -.56 NuanceCm 16.02 -.54
ULbGlobC 27.24 -.49 NutriSyst 23.06 -1.14
UbtyMIntA 11.04 -.19 Nvidia 10.05 -.67
LbMCapA 43.95 -1.67 OReillyAh 47.09 -1.23
LifeTech 46.92 -1.20 Odanors 12.04 -.97
UfePtH 31.00 -1.06 OdysseyHit 26.56 +.06
LgandPhm 1.45 -.09 OdysMar 1.16 +.08
UmelghtN 4.32 -.31 OmniEnh 2.69 -.02
Uncares 26.67 -.57 OmniVisn 22.12 -.05
UnearTch 30,33 -.78 OnAssign 4.43 -.55
UnnEngy 28.21 -.37 OnSmcnd 7.05 +.01
.ionbrdg 4.81 -.35 OnyxPh 20.91 -.91
LivePrsn 6.10 -.38 OpnwvSy 1.89 -.09
LodgeNet 3.39 -28 Oracle 2327 -.56
Logitech 1433 -.58 Orexigen 4.53 -47
LookSmart 1.47 -.03 OriginAg 7.63 -.23
lululemn 38.00 -1.60 Oritanis 9.81 -.18
Orthfx 30.26 -1.35
Orthovta 1.87 -.04
MCGCap 5.22 -.11 OtterTail 18.96 -.47
MDRNA .86 -.04 Overstk 17.86 -2.29
MELA So 6.61 -22 Oxigeneh .32 -, 04
MGE 3637 -1.09
MKS Inst 19.74 -.56
MTS 27.85 -.99 PDLBio 5.5 -14
MSGn 18.79 -.47 PFChng 40.24 -2.25


iS Eafe 49.58 -1.64
iSRusMCV 37.20 -1.26
iSR1KV 55.58 -1.69
iSRIKG 47.28 -1.33
iSRusiK 58.74 -1.74
iSR2KV 56.90 -2.12
iSR2KG 66.67 -2.51
iShR2K 61.07 -2.31
iShREst 47.95 -1.52
iStar 4.07 -.29
IT Corp 45.58 -1.51
Idacorp 34.73 -.92
ITW 42.70 -1.27


Imabon 9.64 -.34
IngerRd 34.37 -.56
IntegrysE 45.60 -1.42
IntontlEx 101.54 -3.99
IBM 128.03 -2.69
Inl Coal 4.04 -.18
IntlGame 14.97 -.79
InIPap 22.78 -.81
nterpublic 7.32 -.51
Invesco 18.14 -1.06
IronMtn 23.48 -.73
ItauUnibH 20.21 -.70
IvanhM 16.34 -.49

JCrew 33.05 -2.06
JPMorgCh 39.00 -1.46
Jabil 14.79 -.46
JanusCap 9.45 -.51
JohnJn 59.44 -.82
JohnsnoCi 28.51 -1.19
JnprNtwk 25.90 -.96
KB Home 10.52 -.74
KTCorp. 17.85 +.06
KVPhmA 1.28 -.13
KC South 34.72 -2.33
Kaydon 34.06 -1.11
KAEngTR 24.21 -.04
Kellogg 51.05 -.84
KeyEngy 8.58 -.34
Keycorp 7.75 -.46
KimbClk 62.06 -.47
Kimco 13.37 -.70


PMA Cap 6.70 -.21
PMCSra 7.97 -.20
PSS Wrld 20.27 -.90
PacWstBc 20.04 -.34
Paccar 41.99 -1.96
Pacerlnlf 7.71 -.34
PacCapB .69 -.02
PacEth h .42 -.05
PacSunwr 3.33 -.29
PaetecHId 3.62 -.19
PanASIv 23.99 -.80
ParamTch 16.52 -.80
Patterson 27.92 -1.04
PattLTI 14.15 -.73
Paychex 25.67 -.84
PnnNGm 22.79 -1.09
PeopUtdF 13.63 -.52
Peregmeurs 1.75 -.01
PerfecltWd 24.42 -.74
Perrigo 57.29 -1.51
PetMed 17.62 -.80
PetroDev 26.30 -2.01
PetsMart 31.61 -1.27
PharmPdt 27.11 -.71
Pharmacyc 6.88 -.43
PhaseFwd 16.79 -.04
Polycom 28.75 -3.26
PoolCorp 21.42 -.80
Popular 2.62 -.18
Power-One 8.50 -.54
PwShsQQQ 44.34 -1.26
Powrwav 1.75 +.02
PrmWBch .43 -.06
Presstek 2.95 -.12
PriceTR 46.93 -1.57
priceline 218.21 -4.40
PrivateB 10.94 -.64
PrUPShQQQ 63.09 +4.70
ProUltPQQQ 82.03 -7.18
PrognicsPh 4.66 -.53
ProspctCap 9.51 -.27
ProspBcsh 33.48 -1.63
PsychSol 32.90 -.09
PureCycle 2.80 +.04
OQIAGEN 19.92 -.70
QOikTechn 12.80
Olgic 18.29 -.54
Qualcom 35.96 -.92
QuaitySys 57.04 -1.61
QuestSft 18.54 -.54
Questcor 9.13 -.39
Quidel 12.09 -.29
RFMicD 3.89 -.19
RadioOneD 1.13 -.10
Rambus 18.08 -.76
Randgold 91.15 -3.01
RealNwk 3.40 -.03
RedRobin 20.44 -.59
Regenm 22.48 -.85
RentACt 21.15 -1.12
ReprosTh h .37 +.02
RepubAir 5.76 +.23
RschMotn 52.51 -3.13
RexEnergy 10.15 -.43
RINOInt 13.02 -1.03
Riverbed 29.89 -.68
RosettaR 21.51 -.88
RossSIrs 53.05 -1.74
RoviCorp 42.02 -.71
RoyGkd 43.82 -.73
RubiconTc 3056 -1.74

SBACom 34.01 -90
SEl Inv 21.01 -.75
STEC 14.44 -.67
SVB FnGp 40.21 -1.62
SaixPhm 42.43 -1.17
SandMorH 5.39 -.17
SanDisk 41.93 -2.04
Sanminars 14.17 -.89
Santarus 2.51 -.11
Sapient 10.41 -.46
Satcon h 2.72 -.16
SavientPh 13.65 -.55
Savvis 15.59 -.41
Schnitzer 41.91 -.44
SciCtlone 3.27 -.36


KindME 68.50 +.12 MSEmMkt 13.19 -.31
KingPhrm 8.37 -.40 Mosaic 44.76 +1.51
Kinrossg 15.71 -.37 Motorola 7.50 -.22
Kohls 46.42 -1.28 MuellerWat 3.60 -.18
Kraft ,28.81 -.51 MurphO 50.18 -.53
KrispKrm 3.51 -.12 NBTY 53.45 -.29
Kroger 20.37 -.42 NCRCorp 12.68 -.65
L-1 dent 8.20 -.45 NRG Egy 22.25 -.62
LG Display 15.37 -.84 NVEnergy 12.39 -.38
LSICorp 4.76 -.23 NYSEEur 26.91 -1.21
LTCPrp 23.89 -.70 Nabors 16.95 -.86
LaZBoy 7.20 -.25 NBkGreece 2.72 -.04
Ladede 33.41 -.80 NatFuGas 46.81 -1.59
LVSands 23.50 -.64 NatGrid 37.56 -.64
LeggMason 28.12 -1.18 NOilVarco 35.26 -1.03
LennarA 14.05 -.83 NatSemi 14.07 -.38
LbtyASG 3.47 -.06 NewAmHi 9.58 +.14
UbtProp 28.09 -1.27 NJ Rscs 35.46 -.99
UillyFBi 34.64 -.53 NYCmtyB 16.61 -.51
Umited 23.50 -1.55 NYTimes 8.80 -.78
LncNat 22.62 -1.25 NewellRub 14.95 -.57
Lindsay 32.42 -1.24 NewmtM 58.90 -1.80
LiveNatn 8.99 -1.20 NewpkRes 6.84 -.18
ozClaib 4.33 -.38 Nexeng 20.06 -1.38
LloydBkg 3.60 -.26 NextEraEn 52.61 -.33
LockhdM 73.93 -2.02 NiSource 15.61 -.41
Loews 35.56 -.88 Nicor 41.81 -1.01
LaPac 6.99 -.43 NikeB 68.96 -1.69
Lowes 20.04 -.84 NobleCorp 30.36 -121
NobleEn 65.61 -1.76
NokiaCp 8.74 -.12
M&T Bk 85.73 -3.05 Nordstrm 32.25 -1.98
MBIA 6.51 -.35 NorflkSo 53.36 -1.67
MDU Res 18.98 -.72 NoestUt 26.97 -.64
MEMC 10.09 -.52 NorthropG 54.74 -1.87
MFGlIoba 6.00 -.34 NovarAis 49.66 -1.55
MFA Fncl 7.23 -.06 NSTAR 36.49 -.86
MCR 9.32 +.11 Nucor 38.09 -1.18
MGIC 7.61 -.61 NvlMO 14.42 +.04
MGMRsts 9.63 -.62 NvMulSI&G 7.39 -.04
Macedch 37.51 -1.89 NuvQPf2 7.60 -.02
Macquarie 13.51 -.43 OGEEngy 37.93 -1.02
Macys 17.16 -1.14 OcciPet 79.38 -2.72
Magnalg 71.18 -2.20 OfficeDpt 4.06 -.24
Maniowoc 8.99 -.54 OffceMax 12.41 -.84
Manulife g 14.49 -.60 OilSvHT 100.65 -3.05
MarathonO 31.70 -.82 OldRepub 12.58 -.35
MarinerEn 21.45 -.67 Olin 18.40 -1.03
MktVGold 48.54 -1.63 OmegaHIt 21.21 +34
MklVRus 29.22 -1.00 Omnicom 35.31 -.85
MarlntA 30.31 -1.35 ONEOK 45.08 -.91
MarshM 22.47 -.56 ONEOK Pt 68.75 +.30
Marshlls 7.62 -.60 OshkoshCp 31.02 -1.33
MStewrt 5.00 -.05 OwensCom 28.56 -1.46
Masco 10.47 -.76 Owensill 28.67 -1.43
MssseyEn 28.15 -1,06
MasterCrd 197.22 -14.59
MoClatchy 3.44 -.32 PG&ECp 42.56 -.96
McDnlds 69.94 -1.39 PMIGrp 3.09 -.39
McGrwH 29.33 -1.24 PNC 58.23 -2.65
McKesson 68.00 -1.40 PNM Res 11.49 -.30
McMoRn 10.78 -.65 PPG 62.46 -2.14
McAfee 30.14 -.88 PPLCorp 25.72 -.47
MeadJohn 53.02 -1.36 PackAmer 22.74 -.36
Mechel 18.21 -1.14 PallCorp 36.01 -.95
MedcoHIth 56.57 -1.19 ParkerHan"56.26 -1.82
Medtmic 37.27 -.74 PatrfiotCoal 11.73 -.62
Merck 35.91 -.58 f-.r,,E 41.81 -1.39
MetUfe 37.80 -1.29 Fr .nr,,- 9.29 5
MetroPCS 8.83 -.49 Pr,v,'.,at 22.74 -
MidAApt 51.37 -1.44 PennWstg 19.27 -i .
Midas 7.41 -.47 Penney 21.73 -I -
MIsuUFJ 4.53 -.23 PepBoy 8.84 h,
MobileTels 20.35 -.75 PepoHold 16.18 -
MoneyGrn 2.28 -.12 PepsiCo 62.45 -71
Monsanto 56.20 +.17 PerkEBm 19.06 4
MonstrWw 11.95 -.93 Prmian 18.60 ;'
Moodys 21.94 -.53 Petrohawk 16.62 -
MorgStan 24.74 -.85 PetrbmrsA 30.15 -..1


AEIA N TOKXCANG


Name Last Chg


AbdAsPac 6.37 +.04
AbdnEMTel 16.46 -.28
AdmRsc 20.90 +.51
AlidNevG 17.25 -1.24
AmApparel 1.49 -.07
AmO&G 6.17 -.05
AntaresP 1.58 -.03
ArcadiaRs .56 +.01
Aurizong 4.79 -.23
BarcUBS36 38.40 -.45
BarcGSOil 22.24 -.27
BricndiaTR 63.97 -1.12


BioTime n 4.59 -.31
Bootsoots 2.96 -,01
CAMACn 3.50 -.31
CanoPet .55 -.03
CapGoldn 3.62 -.10
CardiumTh .35 +.01
CasateBr .39 -.01
CelSdc .53 -.01
CFCdag 14.53 -.33
CheniereEn 2.63 -.05
CheniereE 18.30 +.21
ChiArmM 3.39 -.14
ChlntLtg n 2.89 +.07
CIghGibOp 11.83 +.02
Contnucre 3.41 -.12


CrSuislnco 3.57 +.06
Crosshglf .13 -.02
Crvstalx a .39

DenisnMg 1.13 -.08
EVLtdDur 15.68 -.11
EVMuni2 13.53 -.08
EllswthFd 6.58 +.04
EmersnRh 2.10 -.02
Endvrint 1.03 -.06
EndvSilvg 3.28 -.19
EntreeGold 2.15 -.13
ExeterR gs 5.74 -.31
Express-1 1.37 -.10
FrkStPrp 11.47 -.43


FredHolly 88 -.02
Fronteera 6.11 -.28

GabGldNR 15.48 -.17
GascoEngy .34 -.01
Gastargrs 3.78 -.19
GenMoly 3.00 -.12
GenesisEn 20.44 -.12
GIbISape 2.94 +.12
GoldStrg 4.02 -.16
GranTrrag 5.27 -.09
GrtBasGg 1.75 -.05
Hemisphrx .46 -.01
Hyperdyn 1.03 -.02
ImpOlgs 37.71 -1.17


InovioPhm .95 -.03
IntellgSys 1.23
wer 6.00 -18

Kemet 2.94 +,05
KodiakOg 3.03 -.14
LadThalFn 1.13 -.07
UbertyAcq 9.93 -.02
LucasnE 224 + 07

MagHRes 4.28 -.34
Metalico 3.58
MetroHlth 3.57 -.11
MdwGoldg .43 -.04


Minefndg 8.41 -.18
NIVS IntT 2.27 -.03
Neuralstem 2.25 -.15
Nevsung 3.67 -.20
NDragon .06 +.00
NwOoldg 4.87 -.11
NAPallg 3.10 -.16
NthnO&G 14.16 -.56
NthgtMg 2.95 -.02
NovaGldg 6.48 -.06
Oilsands g .59 +.02
OpkoHlth 2.32 -.09
OrienPatn 5.89 -.42

Palatin .17 -.02


ParaG&S 1.27 -.01
PhrmAth 1.64
PionDll 6.05 -.11i
PlatGpMet 1.72 -.04
PolyMetg 1.34 -.03
ProceraNt .46 -.02
ProtaIl 6.08 -.27
PudaCoaln 7.35 -.39
PyramidOil 4.65 -.17
QuestCapg 1.48 -.02
RadientPh .94 -.01
RaeSyst .65 -.05
Rentech .93 -.02
RexahnPh 1.36 -.05
Rubicon g 3.37 -.07


SamsO&G .99 +.05
SeabGld g 27.20 -1.25
SulphCo .21 -.00
TanzRyg 4.92 -.08
Taseko 3.92 -.23
TimberinR .85 -.05
TmsatPtn 2.99 -.04
TwoHrblnv 8.31 -.09
UQMTech 3.60 -.07
US Geoth .78 +.01
US Gold 4.55 -.24
Uluru .12 -.01
Uranerz 1.00 -.03


UraniumEn 2.21 -.13


VantageDrl 1.13 -.12
VantDriwt .02 +.01
VimetX 5.73 -.16
VistaGold 1.48 -.05
WFAdvlnco 9.52 -.01
Westrild 7.95 -.16
WTDrfChn 24.99 ..
WTDrfBz 26.95 -.24
YMBiog 1.36 -.05


SciGames 9.80 -.63 Theravnce 12.73 -.33
SeagateT 14.16 -.61 Thoratec 43.03 -1.94
Seanergy 1.10 -.06 TibcoSft 12.82 -.23
SearsHdgs 63.23 -3.02 TiVo Inc 7.93 -.37
SeattGen 11.79 -.51 TowerSemi 1.42
SelCmfIr 7.85 -.46 Towte re 7 -7
Selecvlns 14.91 -.18 TructSupp 66.75 -2.07
Semtech 16.92 -.59 TradeStatn 6.81 -.10
Sequenom 6.00 -.19 TricoMar .69 +.03
ShandaG n 6.18 -.24 TridentMh 1.34 -.04
Shanda 38.97 -.45 TrimbleN 28.32 -1.44
Shire 67.36 -.77 TriQuint 6.58 -.21
ShufflMstr 7.88 -.38 TrueRelig 22.90 -.66
SigaTechh 7.92 -.14 TrstNY 5.46 -.29
SgmaDsg 10.03 -.18 Trustmk 20.53 -.94
SgmaAld 53.16 -1.33
SilganH s 28.34 -.73 TuesMm 4.25 -.43
,I,'.,,I,. 3.13 -24 UAL 21.35 -.63
:...Li,: 42.49 -1.24 UTiWridwd 13.43 -.44
Scnware 5.12 -.13 UTStrem 1.88 -.14
SivfStdg 16.21 -.50 UOtaSalon 22.77 -.53
Sina 39.91 +.19 Umpqua 11.98 -.49
Sinclair 5.39 -.64 UtdCBksGa 3.50 -.24
SiriusXM .95 -.02 UtdNtdF 32.13 -.39
SironaDent 32.73 -1.54
SkyWest 11.94 -.33 UtdOnln 5.83 -.31
SkywksSol 17.03 -.53 USEnr 4.55 -.34
SmartBal 4.00 -.01 UIdThrps 48.05 -1.74
SmartM 5.69 -.23 UnivDisp 19.09 -.95
SmartTgn 16.62 -.43 UnivFor 30.59 -.76
SmartHeat 6.15 -.35 UranmRh .47 +.03
SmthWes 3.87 -.13 UrbanOut 31,96 -1.36
SmthtnBcp 3.79
Solarfun 8.60 -.35
Somantic 24.94 VCAAnt 2364 -84
Somaxon 3.90 -.09 ValueClick 11.16 -.39
SonicCorp 8.08 -.34
SonicSolu 7.06 -.23 VarianSemi 28.65 -1.16
SncWall 11.45 -.01 Veecolnst 36.69 -1.77
Sonus 2.69 -.17 Verenmrs 3.11 -.09
SouMoBc 15.10 ... Verigy 8.40 -.34
Sourcefire 18.22 -1.03 Versign 27.90 -.83
SouthFnh .28 -.00 Veriskn 28.85 -.15
Staples 19.31 -.99 VertPh 32.47 -1.30
StarScient 1.80 -.07 Vr 1188 -.05
Starbucks 25.35 -.78 ragLog 118 -05
StDynam 14.21 -.44 VirgnMdah 17.68 -.51
SteinMrt 7.04 -.28 ViroPhrm 10,91 -.46
StemCells .90 -.04 VsnChina 3.30 -.02
Stereotaxis 3.63 -.22 VistaPrt 48.82 -1.50
Stericydcle 64.57 -1.30 rvus 5.41 -6.70
SterlBcsh 4.43 -.17 VocafTch 3.30 +1.98
StriFWAh .52 +.00 Vodafone 22.10 -.46
SMaddens 32.36 -1.21 Volcano 22.49 -.30
StewEnt 5,04 -.25 Volterra 2666 -1.17
SuccessF 20,30 -1.27 WamerChil 246 +.17
SunesisPh .49 -.03 WamerChl 24.03 +17
SunPowerA 13.46 -.52 WarrenRs 3.03 -.19
SuperGen 1.75 -.12 I WashFed 15.81 -.66
SuperWell 17.01 -.38 WaveSys 2.97 -.09
SusqBnc 8.31 -.68 Websense 19.79 -.44
Sycamrers 19.00 +.06 WernerEnt 23.19 -23
SykesEnt 15.02 -'48 WstCstB 2.46 -.19
Symantec 14.59 -.33 Wstpinng 18.52 -.28
Symetrim 5.06 -.14
Synopsys 21.15 -.61 WetSeal 3.35 -.17
Synovis 1424 -.67 WhitWeyH 8.14 -.13
Syntroleum 1.76 -.10 WholeFd 37,21 -1.78
TD Amertr 15.77 +.07 Windstrm 11.17 -.21
TFSFnd 12.40 -.34 Winn-Dixe 9.47 -46
THQ 4.37 -.17 Wntrust 33.89 -2.30
TTM Tch 9.54 4 WonderAuto 7.98 -.26
twtelecom 17.45 -.48 WdwrdGov 26.86 -1.49
TakeTwo 976 -.07 WrightM 16.25 -.62
TalecrisBn 21.31 +06 Wri 16
TASER 3,73 -.03 Wynn 79.57 -3.45
TechData 37.94 -1.29 XOMAh .39
Tekelec 1335 -.73 XenoPoat 630 +.05
TICmSys 4.34 -.15 Xi)linx 27.59 -.95
Telestone 923 +.11 Xyratex 13.06 -.50
Telabs 7.54 +.11 YRCWwdh .22 -.01
Terremk 7.76 -.22 Yahoo 14.90 -.47
TerreStar .63 +.14 Yogyen 7.16 -
TesaMotn 20.64 +.75 W 7.16 -30
TesseraT 15.73 -.61 Zaggn 2.61 -13
TetraTc 18.40 -50 ZoBcp 21.69 -1.46
TevaPhrm 5433 -1.40 Ziopharmn 3.25 -03
TexRdhse 12.62 -.67 Zoran 9.50 -.22


Petrobras 34.51 -.78
Pfizer 14.56 -.31
PhilipMor 49.67 -.43
PhilipsEl 31.94 -1.38
PiedNG 25.32 -.77
Pier 1 6.42 -.51
PimcoStrat 10.64 -.06
PinWst 37.84 -.76
PioNtl 58.85 -2.60
PtnyBw 22.93 -.61
PlainsEx 20.91 -.54
PlumCrk 36.06 -.85
Polaris 57.58 -2.71
PostlPrp 23.20 -1.17
Potash 96.59 -1.90
PS USDBull 24.01 +.04
Praxair 80.96 -1.85
PrecCastpt 107.19 -2.59
Pridelnd 24.03 -.75
PrinFnd 23.80 -1.50
ProShtS&P 53.02 +1.47
PrUShS&P 34,93 +1.83
ProUltDow 41.09 -2.15
PrUIShDow 28.72 +1.34
ProULOQQ 54.39 -3.17
PrUShQQQ 18.47 +.97
ProUISP 34.38 -2.04
ProUShL20 35.74 -.39
PmroUSRErs 27.77 +1.60
PmoUSBMrs 41.29 +2.49
ProUIlRErs 36.54 -2.40
ProUShtFn 21.95 +1.69
ProUFinrs 51.89 -4.79
ProUOm&G 26.78 -1.55
ProUBasM 26.22 -1.84
PmoUSR2K 22.70 +1.56
ProUltR2K 26.33 -2.05
PmroUSSP500 35.06 +2.71
PmrUItSP500125.48 -11.31
ProUltCrude ,9.60 -.24
ProUShEuro 22.27 -.03
ProctGam 61.99 -.74
ProgrssEn 40.48 -.61
ProgsvCp 19.59 -.51
ProLogis 10.15 -.53
ProvETg 6.77 -.15
Prudent 53.42 -2.56
PSEG 32.97 -.77
PubStrg 91.38 -3.33
PulteGrp 8.05 -.48
PPrIT 6.60 +.03
QuanexBid 17.05 -.83
QuantaSvc 20.31 -.99
Questars 15,99 -.27
QksilvRes 10.98 -.57
QwestCm 5.44 -.07
RPM 17.57 -.60
RRI Engy 3.87 -.12
Rackspace 16.64 -.66
RadianGrp 7.46 -1.03
RadioShk 21.09 -.52
Ralcorp 54.41 -1.07
RangeRs 40,12 -1.79
RJamesFn 24.78 -1.47
Rayonier 45,50 -1.44
Raytheon 47.73 -1,29 ,
RealDn 19.51
RItylynco. 30.73 -1.11 ,


Argent
Australia
Bahrain
Brazil
Britain
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Czech Rep
Denmark
Dominican Rep
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Jordan
Lebanon
Malaysia
Mexico
N. Zealand
Norway
Peru
Poland
Russia
Singapore
So. Africa
So. Korea
Sweden
Switzerlnd
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
U.A.E.
Uruguay
Venzuel


RedHat 31.58 -.89
RegalEnt 13.44 -.55
RegionsFn 6.55 -.47
Repsol 22.47 -.75
RepubSvc 29.98 -.76
RetailHT 87.18 -2.51
RetailVent 8.33 -.45
Revlon 12.46 -.38
ReynldAm 55.17 -.81
RioTintos 45.76 -1.36
RitchieBr 18.29 -.37
RiteAid .95 -.03
RockwlAut 50.49 -1.33
RockColl 54.16 -1.90
Rowan 24.02 -.66
RylCarb 23.39 -1.34
RoyDShllA 54.71 -1.13
Royce 10.61 -.42


SAIC 16,46 -.44
SCANA 37.93 -.58
SKTIcm 15.10 -.15
SLMCp 10.93 -.55
SpdrDJIA 101,01 -2.59
SpdrGold 116,67 -1.56
SPMId 131.94 -4.46
S&PSOOETF106.66 -3.02
SpdrHome 14,24 -.71
SpdrKbwBk 23.40 -1.39
SpdrLehHY 38.55 -.31
SpdrKbwRB 23.34 -1.06
SpdrRed 36,28 -1.34
SpdrOGEx 39.28 -1.39
SpdrMelM 46.27 -1.89
STMicro 8.59 -.25
Safeway 19.83 -.38
SUoe 25.40 -1.19
StJude 35.68 -1,08
Saks 7.45 -.47
Salesforce 92.05 -3.94
SJuanB 24.07 -.79
SandRdge 6.58 +.11
Sanofi 30.64 -.96
SaraLee 14.25 -.14
Schlmbrg 56.68 -1.99
Schwab 15.14 +.59
SemiHTr 27.45 -.67
SenHous 20.85 -.33
Sensilent 26.35 -.95
SiderNac s 14.59 -.41
SilvWhtng 18.59 -.65
SimonProp 82.23 -2.66
Skechers 32.09 -1.83
SmithAO 51.17 -2.04
Smithlnti 39.15 -1.14
SmthfF 14.08 -.89
Smucker 61.51 -1.25
SmurfStn n 21.34 +.74
Sothebys 24.13 -2.35
SoJerind 44.15 -1.40
SouthnCo 34.78 -.24
SthnCopper 28.93 -.86
SwstAid 11.76 -.27
SwstnEngy 37,41 -1.40
SpectraEn 20.83 -.38
SprinlNex A ,r i


The remainder of the
NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day


3.9355
1.1330
.3771
1.7730
1.5413
1.0380
532.45
6.7843
1873.00
19.72
5.7803
36.90
5.7013
.7754
7.7700
217.39
46.729
9040.00
3.8670
87.46
.7084
1500.50
3.2020
12.8115
1.3751
6.1920
2.823
3.16
30.4878
1.3748
7.5873
1199.00
7.3099
1.0434
32.15
32.26
1.5382
3.6738
20.8333
4.2974


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Yesterday Pvs Day


3.25 3.25
0.75 0.75
1-.25 .00-25


3-month 0.15 0.15
6-month 0.19 0.19
5-year 1.68 1.83
10-year 2.94 3.05
30-year 3.95 4.04



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMXAug 10 76.01 -.61
Corn CBOT Dec 10 407V4 +2
Wheat CBOT Sep 10 5871/4 -9
Soybeans CBOT Nov10 985 -3
Cattle CME Aug 10 92.27 -.13
Pork Bellies CME Aug 10 97.50 -1.50
Sugar (world) ICE Oct 10 17.11 -.28
Orange Juice ICE Sep 10 140.15 +2.05

SPOT
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz., spot) $1188.00 $120960
Silver (troy oz., spot) $17/.7I3 $1B.U5
Copper (pound) $2.9235 .$3.44b
Platinum (troy oz., spot)$150U8.4U $1529.0U
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


Prime Rate


3,9339
1.1476
.3771
1.7727
1.5307
1.0540
530.05
6.7843
1877.50
19.65
5.7571
36.90
5.6980
.7724
7.7760
222.22
46.948
9097.50
3.8551
86.71
.7078
1501.00
3.2062
12.9312
1.4033
6.2461
2.825
3.17
30.4878
1.3770
7.5930
1202.50
7.3314
1.0502
32.15
32.26
1.5406
3.6738
20.8333
4.2937


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F









CITRUS COUN7Y (FL) CHRONICLE BUSENESS SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 A7


Advance Capital : Eaton Vance A:
Balanc p 13.94 -25 GblMacAbp 10.33 -.01 Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq.Tables show the fund name, sell
Retlnc 8.54 +.02 ChinaAp 20.06 -.38 price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.
Alger Funds B: AMTFMulnc 9.70
SmCapGr 5.19 -.18 MuitiCGrA 6.43 -21 Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
AllianceBemrn A: InBosA 5.61 NAV:Net asset value
BalanAp 13.33 -.22 LgCpVal 15.71 -.50 NAV: Net assetvalue.
GIbThGrA p 60.63 -1.95 NatlMunnc 9.66 Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
SmCpGrA 24.41 -.84 SpEqtA 12.79 -.43 Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper by 6 p.m. Eastern.
AllianceBern Adv: TradGvA 7.59
LgCpGrAd 21.32 -.75 EatonVance B: NTFAp 13.10 Name NAV Chg PIMCO Funds P Name NAV Chg
AllianceBern B: l-thSBt 9.14 -24 NYTFAp 14.56 Name NAV Chg TotRtnP 11.33 +.03 Name NAV Chg
G bThGrBt 52.49 -1.70 Na"lMulnc 9.66 OppAp 21.40 -.68 ShTlmBdT 3.10 Pamrnassus Funds: TurnerFunds:
Grow t 2029 -61 EatonanceC: PATFAp 13.13 +01 TwentyT 56.34 -1.94 Eylncon 23.05 -.75 SmrCpGrn 25.99 -.95
SCpGrBt 19.71 -.69 GovtC p 7.58 SpSAp 18.96 -.57 VentureT 42.06 -1.21 Perm Port Funds: Tweedy Browne:
AllanceBernC: NatMuninc 966 TxExAp 9.88 ... WrdWTr 40.12 -.98 Permannt 39.65 -.65 GblValue 21.31 -.21
SCpGrCI 19.83 -.69 Eaton Vance TotRtA p 13.51 -22 John Hancock A: Pioneer Funds A: US Global Investors:
Allanz lnrstMMS: GbIMacAbR10.31 -.01 VaueBSp 6.03 -16 BondAp 1525 +.03 CullenVal 15.80 -.41 AIIAm 18.98 -.50
SmCpVI 2489 -.67 LgCapVal 1575 -.50 Firsthand Funds: RgBkA 14.20 -.67 BondAp 9.48 +01 ChinaReg 8.00 -.13
Allianz Funds A: Evergreen A- TechVal 27-05 -.60 StrdnAp 6.35 -02 IntValA 17.28 -.42 GIbRs 8.35 -.22
SmCpVA 23.76 -.65 AstWlp 11.01 -16 Forum Funds: John Hancock B: PionFdAp 33.82 -.96 GId&Mtls 15.51 -.51
Allianz Funds C: Evergreen C: AbsSt r 10.53 -.03 StrincB 6.35 -02 ValueA p 9.90 -.30 WdPrcMn 17.02 -.54
GOtaNICi 19.46 -.66 AstnIC t 1065 -16 Frank/Temp Fmk A: John Hancock CI 1l: Pioneer Funds B: USAA Group:
TargetC1 1150 -.38 FBRFunds: AdjUSp 8.90 +.03 LSAggr 10.28 -.31 HiYFdB :9.10 -.07 AgvGt 26.99 -.86
AmerBeaconnsti: Fcuslnv 39.36-1.39 ALTFAp 11.28 +.01 LSBaIanc 11.63 -.20 PioneerFundsC: CABd 10.17 +.01
LgCaplnst 16.85 -.50 FMIFunds: AZTFAp 10.82 .. LSConsrv 12.36 -06 HjYIdCt 9.19 -07 CmstStr 20.44 -.35
AmerBeaconinv: LgCapp 13.77 -.322 alnvp 41.55 -1.41 LSGrwth 1120 -25 Pioneer FdsY: GNMA 10.29
LgCaplnv 16.01 -.47 FPAFunds: CalinsAp 12.12 LSModer 11.80 -.13 CullenVY 15.88 -.41 GrTxStr 12.11 -.16
AmerCentry Adv:-.47 N F 1099 +.01 CAIntAp 11.50 +.01 KeeleyFunds: Price Funds: Grwh 12.18 -.39
EqGroAp 17.71 -.52 FPACresn 24.39 -.27 CaTFAp 7.07 .. SmCpValAp18.96 -.77 Balancen 1718 34 Gr&nc 12.58 -40
AmerCenturylnv: Farhtoirie 31.18 -.91 COTFAp 11.77 +.01 LazardInsth: BlChip 30.92 -1.03 IncStk 10.12 -28
Balnced 14.02 -24 Federated A: CTFAp 10.98 ... EMktl 18.25 -.32 CABondn 10.83 noD 12.74 +02
Dnrd 10.93 +.02 MidGrStA 28.11 -91 CvtScAp 13.29 -.17 Lazard Open: CapAppn 18.19 38 Intl 20.79 -.57
5Eqlr 6 2 a13 DbTFA 1181 EmgMkOp 1849 -.33 ron 1943 54 NYBd 11.66 +.01
Growthl 2125 -62 MuSecA 10.09 E TA 2 g Mason A: EmMktBn 12.93 recM 3.3 -.
Hentagel 15.86 -.51 Federated nstil: EqIncAp 14.30 -.34 C SAgGrp 87.59-2.49 EmEurp 18.11 -23 OTech 10.43 -.30
c2 20.1 f-12 Fedintp 11.74 +.01 CBApprp 11.94 -.32 EmMktSn 2906 -58 ShtTBnd 9.19 +.01
Iln AdjB 11.71 -.02 MunULAp 104 FedTFAp 11.89 +.01 CBLCGrp 20.3 -.63 Eqncn 20.27 -.64 SmCpSk 1085 -.38
IntAO 11.71 -23 MunT p 1028 +.04 FLTFAp 11.52 GCIAIICOp 7.67 -.18 Eqlndex n 28.71 -.8I5 TxEIt 13.01
IntDisc 8.56 -234 TuttBSd 11.22 +.02 FoundAlp 9.43 -.17 WAHincAt 5.78 -.01 Europen 12.55 -.40 TELT 12.97 +.01
IntlGrol 92.28 -.24 TtOS 11.22 +.02 GATFAp 12.02y WAMMup 15.82 NMAn 10.02 +.01 TxESh 10.69
NewOpp 5.81 -.21 FidelityAdvFocT: GoPrM A 42.73 -125 Legg Masonp : NMAn 12 VAB 11.0 +.01
neChAg 10.39 -.24 EergyT 27.01 -.1 Ms8439r Growth n 26.06 -.87 n WIdGr 15.89 -.41
OneChMd 10.31 -.184 HiCarT 18.47 -.48 G Ap 1 -06 C s -.59 G n 1703 -8 VALIC:
RealEstl 15.39 -.53 Fidelity Advisor A: HYTFAp 10.11 Legg Mason C: HthScin 25.11 -.85 MdCpldx 16.52 -.56
ra 1. -.5 HilncA 1.93 CMSplnvp 26.36 -.99 HiYieldn 6.49 -.01 SIkldx 21.48 -.54
Ultra 18.48 -.55 Nwlnsghp 16.68 -.47 IncomAp 2.04 -.01 CMVaITarp 33.52 -1.22 InBondn 9 72 +014
Valuelny 4.96 -.12 StrInA 12.35 +.01 InsTFA p 11.97 Longleaf Partners: 1IntDis n 36.35 -.67 Value Line Fd:
American Funds A: Fidelity Advisor NYITFp 1125 Partners 24.28 -67 IntlG&I 11.41 -36 LrgCo n 14.63 -46
AmncpAp 15.88 -.46 EqGdn 45.46-1.41 LATFAp 11.37 +.01I" n 13.04 -.26 IntStksn 1200 .31 Vanguard Admiral:
MulAp 22.34 -A9 Eqlnn 19.97 -.69 LMGvScA 10.52 +02 SmCap 22.03 -.80 Japann 703 -16 BalAdmln 19.25 -.33
BalAp 15.99 -.27 IntBoisn 11.13 +.03 MDTFAp 11.44 Loomis Sayles: LatAm n 45.26 -1'21 CAITAdm n1.03
BondAp 12.24 +.02 Nwinsgtin 16.85 -.486 MATFAp 11.70 L nd 13.71 -.06 MShn -25 CALTAdmn.17
apWAp 20.13 FidelityAdvisorT: MITFAp 2.01 +.01 StncC 14.22 -.07 MDBondn 1054 +.01 CpOpAd 4.06 -2.08
CaplBAp 45.79 -.62 BalancT 13.43 -22 MNInsA 12.28 +.01 LS BondR 13.65 -.07 MidCapn 48.22-1.61 EMAdmrrn32,77 -.71
CapWGAp 31.07 -.75 DmGrTp 9.95 -.3 MOTFAp 12.07 StdncA 14.15 -.07 MCpValn 20.37 -.60 Energyn 101.12 -3.03
EupacAp 35.82 -.85 DynCATp 15.16 -.49 NJTFAp 12.12 Lomis Saylesnv: NAmern 26.53 -.87 ExplAdmln 53.15 -181
FdlnvAp 31.17 -.85 EqGrTp 42.50 -1.32 NYInsAp 11.11 I"lnvGrBodAp 12.11 -.03 NAsia 16.46 -21 EStAdmn 32.58 -1.15
GovtAp 14.5 +.02 EqInT 19.68 -.68 NYTFAp 11.73 InvGrBdCp 12.03 -.03 New Eran 39.11-121 Ad 98.13 -2.91
GwthAp 25.95 -.75 GrOppT 27.09 -.93 NCTFAp 12.25 lnvGrBdY 12.12 -.03 NHorizn 25.61 -.01 | dn '77 1.04
HITrAp 10.82 HilnAdTp 9.23 -.06 OhiolA p 12.56 Lord Abbtt.1A: NInn -.61 +02 HiYCr 47.74n 5 -1.13
HilnMunA 13.93 +.d01 IntBdT 11.11 +.03 ORTFAp 11.97 AffiiAp 9.64 -.33 NYBondn 11.2261 i +.01 Irdn 5.27-.
IncoAp 15.08 -.21 MulncTp 12.85 +.01 PATFAp 10.37 BrDebAp 7.42 -.01 v 11.2 .01 5 nIoAdn 25.27 -.+0
IntdA p 13.51 +.02 OrseaT 15.32 -.41 ReEScAp 11.50 -.41 i DAp 4.4 verSSFr 7.15 -23 ITsdAdmIn 11.36 +.04
InCAAllnAp 2. -.64 FidelityFreedom: 01 RisvA p 28.27 -63 MidCpAp 13.02 -.44 RealEstn 14.62 -.55 IntGrAdm n 51.40 -1.36
UTEBAp 15.72 FF2010n 12.40 -.417 Stratlncp 10.14 LhduAbbettC R20s1 .9 -23 Tdm Ss 7 13.6
NEcoAp 21.34 -.57 FF2015n 10.32 -.15 USGovAp 6.85 +.2 ShoDunct 4.64 .. R2 n 10.61 -20 ITGrAdmn 10.09 +.03
NPerAp 24.34 -.64 FF2020 12.31 -.22 ilsAp 10.76 -.19 MFSFundsA: R2020n 14.42 -.32 LtdTrAdn 11.11
NAWrtdA 47.0 -.70 FF2020K 1.375 -.21 VATFAp 11.7 MITA 16.53 -.48 R2025n 10.41 -.26 LTGrAdml n 9.48 +04
SNBAp 10.12 .70 FF20250 10.13 -.20 Frankmp FrnkAdv: MIGA 12.69 -.35 R2030n 14.76 -39 LTAdmln 11.09
SmCpAp 31.85 -.72 FF2030 n 12.02 -.25 GibdAdvp HilA 3,30 ... R20352n 10.34 -29 MCpAdmln 74.47 -2.53
TExAp 12.24 +.01 FF2035n 9.58 -.3 InclMeAdp 2.02 -.0 MFLA 9.63 R2040u n 1472 -.41 MorgAdmn 45.88 -1.34
W A pa 12.41 -152 5n 9.82-1.23 n 3mp 1 TotRA 12.94 -.20 SciTecn 2125 -.64 MHYAdmn10.48
WshAp 23.54 -.57 FF2040 n 6.89 -.16 Frank/TempFrnkC: ValueA 19.73 -.64 Shidn 4.87 NYLAd 118
American Funds B: FF204n 8.13 -.20 FoundAp 9.30 -.17 MFSunds: 4 pSkn 27.21 1.02 NYLTAdn 11.18 +.
Asse p 415.93 -1.28 Incomen 10.84 -.06 IomC 1 62.0582.0 Funds B: 8 U A 82.21951.02 PrmCap r n 57.69 -1.73
lBp 15.93 -.62 Fidelity nvest: 10. -.06 Inmt 2.05 -.02 MIGn 11.42 .32 SmCapValn29.44 -1.00 PALTAdmn11.13
CaplGrBt 45.89 -.62 Fidelitynvest: USv. t 6.81 + B02 GScBn 510.34 +.02 SpecGrn 14.71 -.46 STsyAdmln10.n 5 +.01
CpWGrBt 30.90 -.74 iSectq 11.05 -.32 Frankremp MtiA&B: HinBn 3.31 ... Speclnn 11.98 -.04 STBdAdmll n1O.63 +.02
GnthBt 25.08 -.72 AMgr5On 13.79 -.20 SharesA 18.75 -.40 MuInB 8.42 TFInc n 9.95 +01 ShITrAdn 15.94
IncoBt 14.97 -.21 AMgr70rn 14.13 -.30 Frank/rempTempA: TdtRBn 12.94 TFrHn 10.82 S TAdn 1.904
Arel Investments: AMgr2O rn 12.17 -.06 DvMktAp 20.88 -.14 MFS Funds 1: -. TxFrS 5.61 +.01 STFdAdn 10.90 +.01
Apprec 33.68 -1.35 alancn 16.30 -.26 ForgnAp 6.02 -.12 RenT 13.16 -.37 STnt 6.04 02 SmGrAdn 27.4 -1.02
Anel 37.09 -1.59 BalancedK 16.29-.27 GIBAp 12.99-.06 Valel 19.82 -. USTLgn 12.17 +06 TxMCAdmprn 52.77 -1.02
Artio Global Funds: BlueChGrn 36.36 -1.20 GrwthAp 15.51 -.37 MFSFundslnstl: 19.82 -. VAo54 USTLg n 11.6517 +.0 TlBdmCap rn 1052.74 -1.5902
IniEqlir 26.00 -.58 CAMunn 12.07 +.01 WordAp 12.88 -.30 IMsluEqn st 15.3: -.46 Valueon 19.86 -.12 TStkIAdmn 26.879 -.80
InlEqA 25.35 -.57 Canada n 47.87 -1.31 Frank/TempTmp Adv: 1 5.4 rIlna 19.8 -.6 rn 26.3 -.
IntEqIlAt 10.68 -.25 CapAp .n 21.2 -.73 GdAve 15.53 -.37 MainStay FundsA: Principal Inv: WelislAdmn50.03 -.33
IntEqlIr 10.75 -.26 CapDevOn 8.62 -.29 FrankTempTmpB&C: HiYIdBA 5.73 +.01 LgCGIn 7.49 -.23 WelitnAdmn48.87 -.87
Artisan Funds: Cplncr n 8.65 -.04 DeFran epT 20.33p -14 &C MainStay Funds B: LgCV1 In 9.17 -.28 Windsorn 37.94 -1.30
Intl 18.65 -.51 ChinaRg r 26.30 -.52 FnC 05.83 -.12 ConvBt 13.80 -.18 LT20301n 10.06 -.22 WdsdrlAdn 39.43 -1.17
aIU r 22.2 -.52 C n 38.87 -9.3 GIBC p 13.02 -.06 -.20 Vanguard F -.47
MklCap 25.74 -.90 CTMunrn 11.58 +.01 HYIdBBI1 5.70 Prudential Fds A: AssetAn 21.56 -.47
MidCapVa 17.41 -.52 Contran 56.64 -1.64 auestA 16.78 -.31 IncmBdr 14.33 -.24 BlendA 14.26 -.45 CALTn 11.17
SCapVal 13.82 -.845 ContraK 56.64-1. t G 1E Elfun S&S IntlEqB 10.31 -.26 HiYldAp 5.29 CapOppn 27.73 -.89
Baron Funds: CnvSc n 21.59 -.46 GE Elfun S&S: Mairs & Power: MuHilncA 9.60 Convrt n 12.53 -.17
Asset 45.4 -1.265 DisEqn 20.02 -.59 S&Snc 34.53 -.99 Growth 62.82 -1.86 UtilityA 8.95 -.19 DvdGron 12.55 -.29
Growth 41.39 -1.15 Divinn 25.70 -.69 GEInstFunds Managers Funds: Prudential Fds B: Energyn 53.84 -1.62
SmalCap 18.95 -.63 DivrsntKr 2570 .69 GEIn s 9.94 -.2t Funds Bandn 25.36 +.01 Growth 13.35 -.41 Eqncn 17.65 -.43
Bernoteu l Fds: Di+. On 12.59 -.42 IntlEq 94 -.23 Manning&Napier Fds: HiYIdB t 529 .. xplrn 57.08 -1.95
nDur 13.83 +.03 DivGthn 2273 -77 GMO Trust: WIdOppA 7.62 -.16 Putnam Funds A: FLLT n 11.48 +.01
DivMu 14.60 EmrMkn 21.45 -.42 ShMDuCollr 12.82 MatthewsAsian: AmGvApx 10.26 -.03 GNMAn 11.04 ...
TxMgdlnf 13.57 -.38 EqlIncn 37.39 -1.25 GMOTrustll: AsianG&I 16.08 -.14 AZTE 9.07 +.01 GlobEqn 15.03 -.40
IntlPort 13.45 -.38 EQlin 15.49 -.53 EmergMIdr 11.86 -.25 China 25.24 -.50 Convp 17.55 -.24 Grolncn 22.48 -.66
BlackRock A: ECapAp 15.76 -.39 GMO Trust II: India r 18.63 -.23 DvrinA p 7.94 ... GrthEqn 8.98 -.25
AuroraA 15.01 -.54 Europe 26.22 -.64 Quality 17.76 -.41 PacnTger 19.74 -.26 EqlnAp 12.73 -.40 HYCorpn 5.53
CapDevAp Exchn 273.36 -6.91 GMOTrustlV: MergerFd 15.62 -.03 EuEq 17.04 -.52 HIlhCren 113.11 -2.67
EqyDv 15.13 -.39 EWxprtn 18.37 -.56 lntGrEq 19.34 -.51 MetroWestFds: GeoAp 10.82 -.17 InfaPron 12.87 -.03
GIAIAr 17.39 -.29 Fideln 26.80 -.83 IntlintrVI 18.90 -.52 TotRetBd 10.44 +.02 GlbEqtyp 7.42 -.22 IntlExpIrn 13.50 -.28
HiYInvA 7.25 -.01 Fiftyrn 14.47 -.38 GMOTrustV: TotRtBdI 10.43 +.01 GrInAp 11.32 -.36 IntlGrn 16.15 -.43
IntIOpAp 27.98 -.75 FtRateHirn 9.45 .. EmgMktsr 11.82 -.25 Midas Funds: GIbHIthA 42.31 -1.07 IntlValn 27.59 -.79
BlackRockB&C: FrInOne6n 23.54 -.57 IntlCorEq 24.75 -.69 MdasFdt 3.76 HiYdAp 7.39 ... ITIGrade n 10.09 +.03
GIAIJC 16.21 -26 GNMAn 11.87 +01 Quality 17.76 -.41 Monetta Funds: HiYId In 5.76 ... ITTsryn 11.67 +.05
BlackRocklnstl: Govtnc 10.80 +.03 StrFxnc 15.31 -.02 Menettan 12.56 -.49 IncmAp 6.88 +.01 Lifeonn 15.26 -.18
BaVII 22.03 -.66 GroCon 66.85 -2.19 GabelliFunds: Morgan Stanley B: IntGrInp 8.37 -.25 UfeGron 19.12 -.47
EquityD 15.17 -.39 Grolncn 15.17 -.49 Asset 40.37 -1.17 GIobral 16.96 -.25 InvAp 10.74 -.31 Ufelncn 13.62 -.08
GIbAItoc r 17.49 -.28 GrowthCoK 66.87 -2.20 Gateway Funds: MorganStanley Inst: NJTxA p 9.37 UfeMod n 17.62 -.32
BrandywlneFds: GrStratrn 16.19 -A49 GatewayA 24.44 -.26 EmMkIdl 22,44 -.38 NwOpAp 40.42 -123 LTIGraden 9.48 +.04
BlueFd 20.44 -.65 Highlncrn 8.55 Goldman Sachs A: InflEqI 12.05 -.34 PATE 9.11 LlT-sryn 12.01 +.06
Brinson FundsY: Indepn n 19.04 -.70 MdCVAp 28.86 -1.01 MCapGrl 29.50 -.80 TxAp 8.53 +.i Morg n 14.79 -.43
HiYdlYn 6.06 +.01 InProBdn 11.50 -.05 Goldman Sachs Inst: MCapGrPp28.58 -.77 TFInAp 14.88 +.01 MWHYn 10.48
Buffalo Funds: IntBd n 10.57 +.03 GrOppt 20.04 -.62 Munder FundsaA: TFHYA 11.72 Mulnt n 13.66
SmCap 2215 -74 IntGon 11.07 .02 HiYield 7.02 GwthOppA 22.60 -.68 USGvAp 15,13 MuUdn 11.11
CGM Funds: IntSMun 10.31 +.01 HYMunin 8.52 MundeFund1Y: GIblUtit 1021 -.2D MuLong s 11.09
Focusn 25.82 -.95 IntlDiscn 27.83 -71 MidCapV 29.11 -1.02 MpGrun9 -.67 btA 127 -. Mu gn 1
dnc 23.297 -.6 onI rn 17.24 -.28 iSDGov 1; MCpCGrYn22.95 -.67 VstaAp 8.97 -.31 MuShIn 15.94 .
Mun 23.29 -.1 In tprn 17.24 -.2 SDGuv 10. 40 MutualSeries: VoyAp 19.15 -.69 NJLTn 11.76
Realty 21.23 -.85 InGr Bon 11.76 .02 Harbor Funds: BeacnZ 11.19 -24 Putnam Funds : NYLTn 11.18 +01
IRM Funds: InvGBn 7.36 +.01 Bond 12.77 HB aZA -.24 Putnam Funds B: OHLTTEn 12.08 +01
MdCpRM q 9.25 -.74 Japan r 9.85 -.24 CapAplnst 30.52 -.92 GblDiscA 26.59 -.47 DvrnB 1 87.88
MdCpVII 23.25 -. an .85 -. CAtint0.52 GDiscC 26.30 -.46 EqInct 12.61 -40 PALTn 11.13
CalamosFunds:2 -.4 JpnSmn 7.87-1063 tl 5 1.6 GDscZ94 Int-.47 EuEq 16.27 -.49 PrecMUsrn19.51 -.6
GCrEthAp 42.66 -1.05 LgCapVa 10.6 -.35 str 51.06 -1.0 QuestZ 16.93 -.30 GeoBI 10.70 -.16 PrmcpCor n 11.59 -.36
rp LCpVrn 9.18 -.30 Hartford Fds A: ShareeZ 18.92 -.40 GIbEq1 6.69 -.20 Prmcp 55.5n -1.67
CalvertGroup: LatAmn 47.46-1.10 CpAppAp 28.73 -.85 Neuberger&BermInv: GINtRst 14.89 -51 SelValurn 15.88 -.49
Incop 15.80 +.01 LSvCoStkn 22.24 -.88 DivGthAp 16.37 -.46 Focus 1.7 -.47 GrnBt 11.12 -.36 STARn 17.22 -.31
IntEqAp 12.68 -.32 LowPrn 31.94 -.76 IntOpAp 12.60 -.37 Geneslnst 37.46 -1.8 GIbHItho 35.39 -. STGraden 10.77 .02
ShIurInAt 16.49 +.01 LowPnKr 31.97 -.77 MidCpAp 18.09 -.60 In st 14.37 -.31 HiYdBt 737 -.1 STFedn 10.90 +.01
SoalAp 24.65 -.36 Magallnn 60.01 -1.93 Hartford Fds C: arn .8 STsryn 10.85 +01
SocBdp 15.73 +.02 a 8.6 Hart5 5- -.7 .Partner 22.74 -.85 HYAdBt 5,66 S 0 +
Sc 15.3 0 allanK 59.99 -1.92 CapApCt 25.58 -.76 Neuberger&BermTr: IncmBt 6.83 +.- StratEqn 14.95 -.53
SocEqAp 29.60 -.90 MDMurn 11.09 +.01 Hartford Fd L: Genesis 3.87-1.13 IntGrlnt 824 25 TgtRetlncn 10.73 -.0
TxFLgp 15.74 +.01 MAMun n 12.02 1 GnppL 22.5 -.62 Ni+holas Group: 28.76 4 ot -3 -
Cohen &Steers: MegaCpStkn8.43 -.28 ar Fds 2. 5-.62 NicholasGrountpt 12.54 -.33 TgRe201 n2. 71 -.29
yhColumbia Class49.08 -.A: Md n 12-.0 CapAppln 28.70 -.85 Nichn 38.80 -1.06 NJTxBt 9.36 TgtRe2025n1.17 -.25
aola C s A M-9 HartfordHLS[ IAS: 0 Northrn FunHds NI 3 0 .e28 O15 ni J.33 -.2
Aomt1 23.60 -79 MNMunn 11.56.2 Northern Funds: NwOpBt 35.07-1.(08 Tg1Re25 1n 11.83 -.38
Column Cl Z: MtgSecn 10.89 .( CpApp 34.72 -1.01 Bondldx 10.71 +.02 TxExBt 8.53 +.01 TgRe2Ol n 19.85 -.38
S 2s n 02 iv&Gr 16.94 -47 HYFxlnc 6.99 +.01 TFHYBt 11.74 gRe3n .91 -.46
AcomRZ 24.32 -.61 Munilnn 12.69 7 Advisers 1.19 +8 MMIniEqr 8.46 -.23 USGvBtI 1507 +.i TgtRe203 nl .30 -.30
ontBdZ 0 N n 6 TotRetBd 11.21 03 SCpIdx 6.72 -.27 GIblUl 10.17 -.20 TgtRe24nI8.51 -.49
Z 9.05 +-01 NwMltrn 15.50 -02 Henderson Glbl Fds: Technly 11.73 -.38 VislaB t 7.55 -26 TgIRe2045 nl1.69 -.31
LgCpInTEBd 20.6947 .6 NYMun 24.13.09 0184 IntOppAp 18.76 -.46 Nuveen CIA: VoyBt 16.27 -.59 USGroVn 15.14 -7 9
MdCpVIZnp 10.8 -.841 OT n 40.59 -1.57 Hennessy Funds: HYMuBd p 15.52 +.01 RS Funds:USValue n 8.70 -.27
TIncZ 9.97 ... Mun 11.74+.01 orO 12.17 -.51 LtMBAp 10.95 ... IntGrA 1518 -41 Wlslyn 20.65 -.14
STMZ 10.56 100nde 755 -.2 HussmTURt r 12.39 -.01 NuveenCl R: LgCAphaA 3598 -1.25 Wellin n 28.29 -.51
Vestr 39.4 4 nd 55 -22 HussmnStrGr 13.42 +.06 IDMBd 9.03 Value 21.19 -.72 Wndsrn 11.25 -.308
ValRestr 39.44 -1.2m Orsea n 27.64 -.67 ICON Fds: Wndsltn 22.21 -.67
Die sis: mPcBsn 120.84 -.34 nvescoFunds Oak Assoc Fd: RidgeWorth Funds -. Vanguard Idxn Fd
CEomRettu 7.88 -.08 PAMunrn 10.90 -.4 Energy 15.10 -.40 WhIOkSG 32.66 -1.0 LCGrStkAp 8.03 -.25 Vang Id1 Fda:
1588n 12 4258 7.4 1 a500a n 98.13 -2.90
DFA Funds: Puritn n 15.88 -. HIlhcre 12.25 -.31 Oakmark Funds 1: RiverSource A: Balanced n 19.24 -.34
tlCorEq 9.40 .27 PurtianK 15.87-2 ISI Funds: Eqtylncr 24.88 -.44 BalanceA 8.82 -.17 DevMktn 8.77 -.24
USCorEqn9.04 -.30 Rertn 2153 77 NoAp 7.70 -.01 Global 18.81 -.54 DipEqAp 4.57 -.13 EMktn 24.90 -.54
USCorEq2n 8.94 -.31 SCmdtyS0rendI .1 -.12 IVAFundA: In70 r 16.79 -.45 DEi 8.32 -.2 E3ropen 23.37 -.69
DWSlnvestA: SUSlnGiw 92.0 .23 WdwideAr 14.96 -.23 Dokscarkr 36.05 -1.65 DivalO 4.8 ten9. 6 -.
CommAp 15.14 -.32 OrsntVal 8.82 -.24 Inveaco Fd Invest: Selectr 23.92 -.80 SvOppA 6.57 +.014 Ganrowdtns 2.0 -1.74
MgdMunip 9.04 ... SIlntMun 1072 DivrsDivp 10.70 -30 OldWestbury Fda: H-1 RdTEA 4.27 Gwthn d .s 0 -.3 4
SIrGoS0ecA 8.97 ... StBFn 845 2.21 Ench 36923 -.87 GlobOpp 7.30 -.05 MCpGrA 8.86 -.30 LTAldlrn 19.59 -+.0
DWS InvestB : pnd d GIbSMdCap 12.70 -.31 MidCpVlp 6.20 -.22 LTBndn 12.46 +.06
EmMkin 10.72 +.02 SCpVatur 12182 -71' Utiles 12.82 -.27 OppenheimerA: R0vernource h: Pa-ificn 9.26 -.23
EmMkGrr 15.82 -.37 SEAsian 24.98 -.51 4nveaco FundsA: AMTFMuY 6.8 ... T nEmgMktn8.54 -.18 REITrn 15.61 -.88
EuroEq 20.51 -.60 Stkf n 20.94 -.69 CATFA 16.69 +01 AMTFrNY 11.53 ... Royce Funds: SmCapn 27.42 -1.0
GNMAS 15.65 +.01 Sratlncn 11102 +101 CapGro 11.011 CAMuniAp 7.94 LwPrSkSvr13.59 .48 SmlCpgthn1.75 -.63
GUbBOSr 10.33 .0t1 SrReRtr 8.81 -.0 Chartp 14.22 -37 CapApAp 3n.41-1.e MicroCapt 13.49 -.40 S igCpVIn 13.06 -.48
GIbSCr 31.s99 -.: -3 Tarrn 10r1.64 CmeskA 13.35 40 CapdncAp 8.04 -.x2 PensMulr 9.30 -.31 ST8ndn 10.63 .02
GEMrbem 20.11 -.57 TotamBdn 10.89 -.5 Canaltp 19.08 u56 OmpincAp 1.84 .1 Prewierlr 16.05 -.50 TotBndn 10.74 +.02
















EmnMCrEon17.89 -..33 Hom~n 10.98 -45 TaxExY 10.67 -"RoMuAp 16.28 +01i GrowthA 3,99 -12 T^oI~,.~BdSgIn ,10.74, +,02..


EmMktV 30.31 -.66 Insurn 40.88-1.38 Ivy Funds: RcNtMuA 7.13 Sentinel Group: UTota"g n ."25 -.4 -
IntSmVan 14.15 -.34 Leisrn 72.75 -2.23 AssetSCt 20.39 -.33 OppenheimerY: ComSAp 26.54 -.73 Victory Funds:
LargeCo 8.41 -25 Materialn 50.19 -1.55 AssetStAp 20.95 -.34 DevMktY 28.48 -.45 Sequoian 114.99 -2.39 DvsStA 12.93 -.38
USLgVan 16.66 -.61 MedDIn 41.79 -1.08 AssetStrir 21.11 -.34 ItlBdY 6.38 +.01 Sit Funds: WMBlairMtlFds:
US Micron 10.65 -.42 MdEqSys n 23.67 -.58 GINatRsAp 15.73 -.46 ItGrowY 23.85 -.65 LrgCpGr 35.90 -1.05 IntlGthlr 19.07 -.47
USTgdVal 12.91 -.54 Multmd n 34.84 -1.35 JPMorgan A Class: PIMCO Admin PIMS: St FarmAssoc: Waddell & Reed Adv:
USSmalln 16.48 -.65 NtGasn 26.74 -.84 CoreBdA 11.52 +.02 ShtTmAdp 9.87 Gwth 46.00 -1.05 AssetS p 8.10 -.13
US SmVa 19.34 -.83 Paper ... ... JPMorgan C Class: TotRtAd 11.33 +.03 Stratton Funds: CorelnvA 4.88 -.15
IntSmCon 13.89 -.30 Pharmn 10.71 -.22 CoreBdp 11.57 +.02 PIMCOInstlPIMS: Multi-Cap 30.14 -.82 DivOppAp 11.99 -.38
EmgMkt n 26.37 -.52 Retail n 41.05 -1.44 JP Morgan Instl: AlAsetAutr 10.78 RealEstate 22.63 -.74 DivOppC t 11.90 -.38
Fixd n 10.35 Softwrn 70.57 -2.44 MdCpVal n 19.54 -.61 AlAsset 11.96 SmCap 39.52 -1.35 ScTechA 8.80 -.29
IntVa n 15.52 -.48 Tech n 74.01 -229 JPMorgan Sel CIs: ComodRR 7.48 -.09 SunAmerica Funds: Wasatch:
GIb5Fxlncn11.43 +.03 Telcmn 38.56 -.89 CoreBdn 11.51 +.02 DevLcMkr 10.00 -.04 USGvBt 9.94 +.01 SmCpGr 30.18 -.98
TM USTgtV 16.61 -.69 Trans n 45.30 -1.43 HighYld n 7.84 +.01 Divlnc 11.10 TCW Funds: Wells Fargo Adv:
2YGIFxdn 1026 U... Grn 44.14 -.78 IntmTFBdn 11.03 EmMkBd 10.88 +.01 TotReIBdl 10.19 +.01 CmStkZ 17.15 -.54
DFARIEn 18.28 -.65 Wirelessn 6.59 -.20 ShtDurBdn 10.99 +.01 FrgnBd 10.62 +.02 TCW Funds N: Opptylnv 31.70 -1.01
Dodge&Cox: Fidelity Spartan: TxAwRRet n 9.97 -.02 HiYld 8.99 +.01 ToRIBdN p 10.53 +.01 STMuWelln 9Fargo.9Ad ns:
Balanced 62.12 -1.51 ExtMkInn 3022 -1.05 USLCCrPIs n17.41 -.55 I nvGrCp 11.33 TIAA-CREFFunds: ellsFargoAdIns:
Income 1327 +.01 5001dxlnvn 37.71 -1.12 JP Morgan Ultra: iLowDu 10.51 ... Bondlnst 10.54 +.02 UISMulno 4.81
IntStk 29.98 -.91 Intllnxlnvn 30.58 -.75 ShtDurBd 10.99 +.-0 ModDur 10.93 +.01 Templeton Instit: Wells Fargonstl:
Stock 91.25 -3.10 TotMktInv n 30.56 -.94 Janus S Shrs: RealRet 11.49 -.07 ForEqS 1795 -.31 UIStMuln P4.81
Dreyfus: FidelitySpartAdv: Forty 28.89 -.94 RealRtnl 11.28 +.14 Third Avenue Fds: Western 10.73 +Asset: 01
Aprec 32.82 -.73 5001dxAdvn37.71 -1.12 JanusTShrs: ShortT 9.87 ... IntlValstr 14.42 -21 CorePlus I 10.73 +.01
CorVA 20.74 -.67 IntAdrn 30.58 -.75 BalancdT 23.82 -.39 TotRt 11.33 +.031 REVainstr 20.05 -.43 Corel 11.30 +.02
Dreyf 7.54 -25 TotMktAdrn30.57 -.93 ContramT 12.87 -.32 TRII 10.96 +.03 ValueInst 42.86 -1.07 William Blair N: -
DryMidr 22.72 -.77 First Eagle: EnterprT 46.11 -1.30 TRIll 10.04 +.02 Thornburg Fds GrowthN 918.631 -.26
Dr500Int 30.13 -.89 GIblA 40.30 -.91 FixBndT 10.75 +.02 RIMCO Funds A: ntValApo 2366 -.42 IntlGhN 18.63 -
EmgLd 15.63 -.65 OverseasA 19.91 -.34 GILffeScT r 20.04 -.51 LwDurA 10.51 ... IncBuidCp17.31 -.20
GrChinaAr 39.79 -.56 First Investors A GfTechTr 13.71 -.36 RealRtAp 11.28 +.14 IntValue I 24.18 -.43 Fund p 15.01 -.35
HiYIdAp 6.35 BIChpAp 18.38 -.48 Grw&lncT 26.48 -.76 TotRtA 11.33 +.03 Valuel 29.62 -.97
StralValA 23.82 -.83 GiobIAp 5.56 -.14 Janus T 24.78 -.71 i RIMCO Funds C: Thrivent Fds A:
TechGroA 25.13 -.76 GovtAp 11.47 OrionT 9.72 -.25 I ReaJRtCp 11.28 +.14 HiYId 4.62
DriehausFunds: GrolnAp 12.02 -.35 OvrseasTr 4285 -124 i TotRtCt 11.33 +.03 Incomrn 8.50 +.02
EMklGr 29.30 -.56 IncoAp 2.42 PrkMCVaIT 19.35 -.54 PIMCO Funds D: Transamerica A:
EVTxMgEml42.33 -.73 MATFAp 11.78 +.01 ResCoreT 18.13 -.57 TRtnp 11.33 +.03 AegonHYBp 8.72
MITFAp 12.26 ... ResearchT 23.74 -.74 exncp 8.4 -.01


Stocks decline


Associate

NEW YOR]
are finding di
everywhere a
their frustrati
Stocks slu:
after banks' sE
earnings fell s
stations and
found that c(
becoming mor
The Dow Jon
average lost 2
all the majo
dexes dropped
2.5 percent.
fell in the Tre
as investors
sought the saf
ment securities
The market
opening after
and Bank of A
released earn
banks, like JPI
& Co. a day ea.
higher earnir
from failed l
they are also
trading reven
the stock ma
this spring. Th
enue raised qi
how banks w
make big profi
curtailed by
regulations.
Stocks fell f
twice-monthly
the Universit
and Reuters fc
sumers' gloom
An index of co
ment compil
survey fell to




Less



COt


Associate

WASHINGT
sumers are h
thoughts aboul
Shoppers ar
dence, become
cerned about I
weak job mark
bargains. And
are threatening
the economy.
A report re]
showed that co
dence fell inJu
point in near
volatile stock
double-digit u
lackluster wag
stalled housing
raised fears tha
is on the verge
Americans
clamping dov
spending in MI
Many cut back
market lost ab(
of its value c
three months,
debt crisis shot
The resultingI
hold wealth hl
Americans les
spend.
Retail sales
this spring a
slowed growth
quarter Consu
accounts for a
cent of growth.
With unempl
percent, shop
to stay frugal i
months. If ti
sharply, busine
back on hirin
the economy ci
into recession.
that happening
low, have rise
three months
said.
"Consumers
their reset but
they were pret
their spending
year," said Br
economist at I]
sight. "People
'Time out The
progressing t
thought it woul
Their conf
likely to brigh



Name Last Chg


SP Mats 29.83 -.84
SPHIthC 28.68 -.61
SP CnSt 26.52 -.38
SPConsum 30.02 -1.09
SP Engy 51.73 -1.26
SPDR Fnd 14.13 -.62
SP Inds 28.07 -.97
SPTech 21.37 -.63
SP UII 29.69 -.52
StdPac 3.36 -.24
Standex 25.99 -2.12
StanB1kDk 51.06 -1.94
StarwdHtl 43.17 -3.18
StateStr 3691 -.93
Sters 30.13 -1.06
SftllwrM 12.68 -.49
SratHotels 3.86 -.32
Styken 51.20 -1.36
SturmRug 14.55 -.74
SubPpne 48.76 -.06
SunCmts 26.43 -1.24
Suncorgs 30.62 -.98
Sunoco 32.79 -.43
SunstnHt 9.16 -.63
Suntech 10.64 -.20
SunTrst 23.31 -1.88
SupEnrgy 21.82 +.10
Supvalu 10.87 -.56
Synovus 2.52 -.12
Sysco 29.87 -.31


ted Press

K Investors
appointment
and taking out
on on stocks.
mped Friday
econd-quarter
short of expec-
a new survey
consumers are
re pessimistic.
nes industrial
61 points, and
r market in-
ed more than
Interest rates
easury market
once again
fety of govern-
es.
et fell at the
Citigroup Inc.
America Corp.
.ings. The two
'Morgan Chase
rlier, reported
ngs as losses
loans fell. But
seeing lower
ue because of
rket's plunge
he drop in rev-
uestions about
ill be able to
its if trading is
new federal

further after a
y survey from
y of Michigan
found that con-
is increasing.
nsumer senti-
ed from the
66.5 in early


Market watch
July 16, 2010

Dow Jones -261.41
industrials 10,097.90

Nasdaq -70.03
composite 2,179.05

Standard & -31.60
Poor's 500 1,064.88

Russell -24.23
2000 610.39

NYSE diary
Advanced: 614
Declined: 2,434
Unchanged: 80
Volume: 5.53 b
Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 318
Declined: 2,325
Unchanged: 87
Volume: 2.11 b
SOURCE: SunGard AP

July from 76. That was a big-
ger drop than expected.
"It's mostly about the poor
consumer confidence num-
bers," said Anthony Conroy,
managing director and head
trader for BNY ConvergEx
Group. "The possibility of a
double dip also starts to
come to mind" for investors,
he said, referring to a
phrase that describes the
economy falling back into
recession.
The unexpectedly low
reading on consumer confi-
dence "spooks people and


reinforces fears that the
economy is slowing too
much too fast," said Scott
Marcouiller, chief technical
market strategist at Wells
Fargo Advisors. He noted
that stocks had just enjoyed
a seven-day winning streak,
which makes them vulnera-
ble to a big drop. And light
volume, typical for a sum-
mer Friday, exacerbated the
losses.
The market's retreat fol-
lowing a big gain fit with its
pattern since late April,
when the major indexes hit
2010 highs and then tum-
bled amid a variety of eco-
nomic worries. But it wasn't
just the economic data that
set investors off Friday.
"You get a few bad earn-
ings numbers and it's a lot of
excuses to take profits if you
got them," Marcouiller said.
Citigroup's shares were
off 6.3 percent while Bank of
America was off 9.2 percent
General Electric Co. fell 4.6
percent beating despite de-
livering stronger earnings
and a healthy outlook. The
company also reported a
drop in revenue.
The Dow fell 261.41, or 2.5
percent, to 10,097.90. The
Standard & Poor's 500 index
fell 31.60, or 2.9 percent, to
1,064.88. The Nasdaq com-
posite index fell 70.03, or 3.1
percent, to 2,179.05.
For the week, the Dow is
down 1 percent, the S&P 500
is down 1.2 percent, and the
Nasdaq is down 0.8 percent.


ted Press

'ON Con-
aving second
t the recovery
e losing confi-
ing more con-
low pay and a
ket than about
their worries
g to drag down

leased Friday
)nsumer confi-
ily to its lowest
'ly a year. A
market, near-
nemployment,
ge gains and a
g market have
it the recovery
of stalling.
reacted by
wn on their
day and June.
after the stock
out 10 percent
over the past
as Europe's
ok Wall Street
loss of house-
has left many
ss inclined to

s were weak
and probably
in the second
mer spending
bout 70 per-

loyment at 9.5
>ers are likely
in the coming
hey retrench
esses could cut
g. Potentially,
would slip back
. The odds of
ag, while still
n in the past
, economists

are hitting
ton now after
ty engaged in
g earlier this
ian Bethune,
HS Global In-
are saying,
economy isn't
he way we
d.'"
idence isn't
ten this sum-


Associated Press
A computer is displayed July 8 at a Staples in Menlo Park,
Calif. Consumer prices fell for the third straight month, pro-
viding some bargains to American shoppers.


mer. The index of consumer
sentiment sank to 66.5 in
early July, from 76, according
to the twice-monthly survey
by the University of Michigan
and Reuters. That's the low-
est point since August 2009.
The drop in confidence,
along with uneasiness about
future bank earnings, rattled
Wall Street The Dow Jones
industrial average tumbled
261 points to close at
10,097.90.
Many shoppers are hold-
ing on to their money even
though prices on most goods
fell for the third straight
month.
The Consumer Price
Index, the government's
most closely watched infla-
tion gauge, dipped 0.1 per-
cent in June, the Labor
Department said Friday.
Lower energy bills were a
big factor behind the drop.
Prices for some food, airline
fares, computers, phone
service and personal-care
products also fell in June.
When you exclude the
volatile categories of energy
and food, prices were essen-
tially flat for the month. Core
prices have risen only 0.9
percent over the past year.
That's below the Fed's infla-
tion target, and it means core
inflation is at a 44-year low.
The recent stretch of
falling prices, at the con-
sumer and wholesale level,
has stirred talk of possible


deflation a widespread
and prolonged period of
falling wages and declining
prices on retail goods, real
estate and stocks. America's
last serious case of deflation
was during the Depression
of the 1930s.
Most economists do not
believe deflation will hap-
pen, though some Fed offi-
cials have recently raised
such concerns.
With inflation largely non-
existent, workers have a lit-
tle more buying power.
Average hourly earnings ad-
justed for inflation rose 0.6
percent for the 12 months
ended June.
Because inflation as
measured by the govern-
ment has essentially disap-
peared, the Federal Reserve
has even more leeway now
to keep a key interest rate at
a record low near zero. Low
rates should help nurture
the economic recovery and
nip deflationary forces.
Economists predict the Fed
will not start boosting rates
until next year or possibly
2012.
Many analysts think the
economy's growth will slow
in the second half of this
year to a subpar 2 percent
range, from a modest 3 per-
cent in the first half. An
economy that is fragile is
more vulnerable to shocks
that could send it into re-
verse.


NEWORKSTOKECANG


TCF Fnd
TECO
TJX
TaiwSemi
Talbots
TalismE g
Target
TeckRes g
TelNorL
TelcmNZ
TelefEsp
TelMexL
I Tenaris
TenetHth
Teradyn
Terex
TerraNtro
Tesoro
TetraTech
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Textron
Theragen
ThermoFis
ThmBet
ThomCrk g
3M Co
Tiffany
TW Cable
TimeWam
Simken
i TanMet
ToddShip


TolBros 16.43
TorchEn if 4.25
Trchmrrk 48.99
TorDBkg 68,10
Total SA 48.99
TotalSys 14.15
Transocn 52.08
Travelers 49.62
Tredgar 16.20
TMCond 11.20
TnnaSols 22.26
TycoElec 25.37
Tycoino 35.95
Tyson 17.18
UBSAG 14.14
UDR 19.19
UIL Hold 25.71
US Airvw 8.95
USG 12.32
UltraPtg 44.09
UniFirst 42.33
UnilevNV 29.66
UnionPac 68.81
UldMicro 2.97
UPS B 59.68
UtdRentals 1025
US Bancrp 23.04
US NGsFd 7.61
USOirFd 34.16
USSteel 41.36
UtdTech 66.03
UtdhthGp 30.34


!UnumG 21.73 -.73 WelsFargo 26.24
*y j/ WenrdyArby 4.07
Vale SA 24,34 -65 WestarEn 22.85
ValeSApf 21,09 -.45 WAstEMkt 12.67
ValeanPh 5358 +1.04 WstAMgdHt 6.19
ValeroE 17,36 -.52 WAstinfOpp 12.26
VangTSM 54.23 -1.62 WDital 31.45
VangRErr 47,07 -1.58 WstUroon 1534
VangEmg 3937 -1,12
VaranMed 5351 -1.03 Weyedr 4050
Vectren 24.09 -.62 WhrM 90,41
Ventas 47.24 -1.08 WimCS 1.98
VeodiaEnv 25.15 -1.05 WmsCos 18.67
VenzonCn 26.69 -.11 WmsPIrs 45.22
ViacomB 31.79 -131
VimpelCn 15.44 +.03 WmsSon 23,87
Visa 71.45 -3.83 Wnrbgo 9.78
VYdsayint 7.83 -.41 WscEn 52.86
VMware 72.11 -2.34 WT India 22.80
Vonage 2.28 -.14 Worthgn 13.01
Vomado 74.67 -221
WGLHold 3485 -.97 Wydrrn 20.33
Wabash 6.96 -.35 XLGrp 16.80
WalMart 49.67 -.74 XcelEngy 21.45
Walgm 29.21 -51 Xerox 8.30
WahterEn 63,30 -2.23 Yamana g 953
WsteMIn 32.44 -.7471
Wealflnri 14.50 -31 1 YnnGm 11.71
WebsterFn 1796 -.86 YumBmds 40.07
WeinRit 19.79 -.46 I tmmer 55.91
WelPoint 51.39 -1.76 ZweigTI 3.70


s-confident consumers



ild stall U.S. recovery


8 F7_q


SxruRDAY, juix 17, 20 lo A7


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


BUSINESS









Page A8 SATURDAY, JULY 17 2010



PINION


PUBLIC LAND


Give the public



liberal access to



preserve lands


embers of the public
recently voiced their
opinions about land
use and management for the
Potts Preserve and Flying
Eagle Preserve areas and we
think many ideas have merit
and should be strongly consid-
ered when mak-
ing plans for the THE I
two properties.
Southwest Public inpu
Florida Water of Potts Pi
Management Flying Eag
District controls
the properties OUR 01
and hosted the
meeting, and carry gnput from F
encouraged carrygreat
those in atten- polcyr
dance to fill out
comment cards for later re-
view. Several people spoke at
the meeting.
The ideas ranged from plac-
ing the lands under control of
the Department of Environ-
mental Protection to opening
the gates and main roads to ve-
hicle traffic.
Potts Preserve is an 8,500-
acre parcel of land that is part
of the Tsala Apopka chain of
lakes and Withlacoochee
recharge/discharge system. It
runs from roughly the Arrow-
head area to the north all the
way to Turner Camp Road. The
Withlacoochee River com-
prises its eastern border


Don't waste water
Here we go into the thunder-
shower season where we have one
or two showers almost every day,
yet people keep watering their lawns
once or twice a week, wasting water.
Your lawns aren't going to die if we
go one or two days without rain, so
turn your sprinklers off. And some
of these sprinklers that are going
are between 1 to 4 p.m. the
hottest time of day, when the sun
evaporates half of it as it shoots
through the air. I can't wait 'til we
have a real dry season again and
listen to these people complain
because of the county putting re-
strictions on watering.
Job creation 0H
I'm reading in the Wall
Street Journal on Monday
(July 12) that President
Obama finally asked busi-
ness leaders to identify
specific regulations they
need to create jobs for CAL
the private industry. They
are the real creators of 563-
jobs. We need to see this
in a local paper so that
the young people can see who re-
ally creates jobs. Because without
big business hiring, nothing goes
anywhere.
Big hearts
This is in regards to Citrus
County's Little League. Ron and Dan
Baldner I used to carry them on
my bus and their mother took very
good care of them and she was an
excellent mother. She never, never
gave me a problem. The kids never
gave me a problem and I'm very
interested in what their children are
doing now with the Little League.
And I would just want to congratu-
late the Citrus County Little League,
the Pirates, for what they've done.
And if they don't win the title,
well, that's OK. They're still, you
know, perfect kids and they do
what they need to do.


S
t
re
le

P
p1
m


(


Flying Eagle Preserve is a
10,500-acre parcel of land and
lakes south of State Road 44
that butts the Withlacoochee
River. It is connected to the
Floridan Aquifer.
Both sites offer biking and
hiking trails, camping and fish-
ing areas, but
UE: those areas are
SUE. only accessible
for the use by foot or bike.
serve and We would en-
e Preserve. courage the
properties be
'INION: opened for as
much public
public should use as possible;
weight with after all, it is our
makers. tax dollars that
pay for its man-
agement. It is understandable
that some may be reluctant be-
cause managing such large
pieces of land is a monumen-
tal task, and measures to mini-
mize the potential for illegal
dumping and undesirable ac-
tivities would be critical. How-
ever, through well-designed
use plans with heavy public
input, the state is much more
likely to attract volunteers to
assist with the management of
the areas.
Residents have a reasonable
expectation that public land is
there for their use, as well as
its ecological and hydrological
purpose.


Demand better
After reading Debbie Ressler's
(guest column) in the Chronicle
today (July 13), I have to make
this call. I don't understand why
the taxpayers of Citrus County
haven't blown a gasket over the
fact that our hospital tax money
is being used to pay for an execu-
tive director, finance manager,
secretarial staff and a trustee at-
torney for the trustees. This is in
addition to rent and utilities. No
wonder they haven't released tax
money to the hospital to provide
medical care. Sure, there's no tax
money from other counties to
pay for their citizens that
JND are treated at Citrus Me-
morial. But it still costs
money to provide them
with care, hospital em-
ployees still need to be
paid and Citrus County
residents still expect the
hospital doors to be
open and lights to be on
when they need care.
579 Taxpayers should de-
mand that our tax
money be used for its in-
tended purposes and not on a
complete staff for five people on
a power trip.
Help the Bait Lady
I just want to say I'll be there
for the "Bait Lady's" fundraiser
this coming Sunday. I really ap-
preciate the coverage the paper,
the Chronicle, has given her. And I
think I'm from one of the other
49 northern states that boaters
are responsible for the damage
they do. I'm a boater myself and I
feel that a lot of people down here
are very discourteous, and the
damage to her boat should be
paid for by the people who caused
it. But anyway, the fundraiser's
great, I'm glad the coverage was
good and I'm just so pleased
somebody's doing something to
help her. I'll be there.


"There is no group in America that can withstand
the force of an aroused public opinion."
Franklin D. Roosevelt, statement on signing the
National Industrial Recovery Act, June 16, 1933


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Be careful what you wish for


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan........................................ publisher
Charlie Brennan ...................... ................. editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold .......................................... HR director
Cheri Harris............................... features editor
Curt Ebitz...................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....................................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ..................................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


Supporters of gay rights
were naturally thrilled
when a judge in Boston
ruled recently that same-sex cou-
ples who have been marrying
each other in Massachusetts
since 2003 are enti-
tled to the same fed-
eral benefits as other
legally wed partners.
"I am so happy I .
can't even put it into
words," said Nancy .
Gill, the postal worker
who brought the case. .
"I just think how life-
changing this can be," Cokie
added her spouse,
Marcelle Letourneau, Steven
who can now qualify OTH
under Gill's health- VOlt
care plan (assuming
the decision is upheld on appeal).
"I mean, it gives us peace of
mind."
As supporters of gay marriage,
we're happy for them and other
same-sex couples that could file
joint tax returns or inherit each
other's property. But liberals
might want to temper their cele-
brations. District Court Judge
Joseph L. Tauro wrote an opinion
that could fall smack into that an-
noying old category: "Be careful
what you wish for."
At issue is the Defense of Mar-
riage Act (DOMA), passed in 1996
and signed by President Clinton,
which limits marriage to a man
and a woman. Judge Tauro ruled
that the law violates the Tenth
Amendment, a provision beloved
by conservatives because it
stresses states' rights over federal
power
In using a conservative doc-
trine to achieve a liberal result,
the judge confused just about
everyone. Tea party activists
liked his legal reasoning, but as
one defensively told the New
York Times, "I don't want to come
off saying I support gay mar-
riage." Liberals are pleased with


the outcome but should be con-
cerned about how the judge
reached his conclusion.
Federal power has long been
used in this country to promote
social reforms and defend indi-
vidual rights. Just re-
cently, for example,
the Justice Depart-
ment filed suit against
Arizona's new immi-
gration law, saying it
could lead to racial
profiling.
Judge Tauro's affec-
tion for states' rights,
and if adopted by other ju-
rists, could do grave
Roberts damage to progressive
ER interests. Take the
CES healthcare bill en-
acted last March. Sev-
eral states are already trying to
stop it in the courts, on the
grounds that its federal mandates
violate the same Tenth Amend-
ment principle employed by
Judge Tauro.
"Judge Tauro has offered a
road map to attack a wide range
of federal welfare programs, in-
cluding healthcare reform,"
warned Yale Law School profes-
sor Jack Balkin, a gay-rights ad-
vocate. "No matter how much
they might like the result in this
particular case, this is not a road
that liberals want to travel."
The judge actually ruled in two
different cases. In the second, he
said that DOMA also violated the
constitutional guarantee of
"equal protection" under the law.
Here, too, Balkin suggested, lib-
erals should be wary. As he
wrote: "Whether one likes it or
not- and I do not-Judge Tauro
is way ahead of the national con-
sensus on the equal-protection
issue."
That "national consensus" is
clearly shifting. When DOMA was
passed 14 years ago, only 27 per-
cent of Americans favored gay
marriage. Today, that figure has


e
I
'I


CTAUW.
THE COLXh4SUS P[SFA"U. 2010-


LETTERS to the Editor


Separation clarifications
Sidney Rose, in an attempt to
correct some misconceptions of
a previous writer, unfortunately
has a few misconceptions of his
own.
I will begin with his statement
that "our country has a heritage
of leaders who were not particu-
larly religious," citing Abraham
Lincoln. The author was correct
in stating Mr. Lincoln was never
affiliated with any denomina-
tion, but incorrect in stating Lin-
coln was not a churchgoer.
Abraham Lincoln attended the
Presbyterian Church in Wash-
ington, was close friends with
the pastor, was an avid Bible
reader from early youth and
probably the most religious pres-
ident we have ever had. I suggest
reading a biography of Lincoln.
Second, I address the author's
understanding (or misunder-
standing) of the separation of
church and state. The purpose
was to keep the state out of the
church. Quoting John Locke,
"government lacked the author-
ity in the realm of individual
conscience." Somehow the con-
cept of separation of church and
state has been turned upside down.
Another statement by Mr. Rose
is, "more wars were fought and
more people died from religious
fanaticism and conflict than any


war was the Civil War. The prem-
ise of the war was whether the
statement "all men are created
equal, that they are endowed by
their Creator with certain un-
alienable rights, that among
these are life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness" is true.
We are currently engaged in
two religious wars. Our position
is that the enemy of freedom is
radical Islam. Islam is one of the
three great revealed religions of
the world. Radicalism is the hi-
jacking of any religion.
Unfortunately, I do not have
the learning and understanding
of history and politics, both cur-
rent and past, that I would like
to have. I hope to remedy this in
the future with more study of
facts.
Donna Lipke
Dunnellon

Teen theater
It's been written in the Chroni-
cle that a use for the Valerie
Theater in Inverness is yet to be
decided upon. One problem in
this area is the lack of a facility
for teens. Why not let them have
some input as to its use? The en-
tire community could benefit
Fred Schirmer
Inverness


OPINIONS INVITED
M The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call 563-5660.
0 All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

other cause." Two religious wars
were fought on American soil.
First the Revolutionary War was
fought for the separation of
church and state. We rebelled,
being under the rule of King
George and the Church of Eng-
land. The second and bloodiest


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


moved up to 39 percent, and
among voters under 30, three out
of five support it But still, outside
of liberal bastions like Massachu-
setts, the idea does not yet com-
mand popular support. Thirty
states have voted on gay marriage
in recent years, and every one
has defeated it (six jurisdictions
have gay marriage resulting from
court rulings and legislative ac-
tion). Even in California, voters
overturned a gay-marriage bill
enacted by the legislature.
Here's the rub. If Massachu-
setts can use the 10th Amend-
ment to expand gay rights,
Georgia or Idaho can use the
same provision to restrict those
rights. And history teaches that a
"states' rights" doctrine has often
been invoked to limit individual
liberty, not expand it
It took the Supreme Court and
Congress to overturn local Jim
Crow laws, and Presidents Eisen-
hower and Kennedy to enforce
those changes. Gov. George Wal-
lace did not stand "in the school-
house door" to welcome black
students to the University of Ala-
bama in 1963. Only federal power
made him step aside. Only the
Supreme Court could overturn
state statutes that once banned
interracial marriage and gay-sex
practices.
The trend favors gay marriage.
A generation from now, Ameri-
cans could well look back at
Nancy Gill and Marcelle Le-
tourneau and wonder what all
the fuss was about. But Balkin is
right a "national consensus"
has not yet formed behind this
idea. Judge Tauro might be a
brave man, but his opinion could
be used against the same pro-
gressive forces that now cheer
him as a hero.

Steve and Cokie Roberts
can be contacted by e-mail at
stevecokie@gmail.com.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Where's the love?
I would like to know why
people are so hateful. I have
a friend who has an adult
child who's been in trouble
with the law, and another
friend asked me why I'm
still friends with the par-
ents. Well, they're hardwork-
ing and honest people and I
told her I'd be there to sup-
port them. They're suffering
enough without being un-
justly criticized and
shunned. And I'd like to tell
her and all the oth-
ers like her, when
you're sitting in '0
church, you're in
God's house. You
ought to think
about how God's
first two children,
Adam and Eve,
were created per-
fect but they made CAL.
mistakes. So does 563-
that change how U0U"
you feel about God?
You ought to think about it.
Or are you criticizing God,
too?
Sheriff's spending
This message is for Sher-
iff Dawsy: Sheriff Dawsy is
going to have to make
budget cuts and it's now
about time that he returned
to the taxpayers all of
those bonuses he gave to
each of his employees. And
now that he has to cut his
budget, maybe he should
take fewer trips on the
sheriff's boat and maybe
they should quit flying the
helicopter around for
joyrides around Citrus
County. It's about time his
spending comes under con-
trol, like the rest of us.
Everybody else is on a
budget, has been for a long
time, and it's about time he
got his budget under con-
trol.
Benefits blockade
The GOP party of "no"
blocked extending unem-
ployment benefits for the
unemployed, including our
friends and family mem-
bers. Since Citrus County
has a history of voting Re-
publican "values," all those
unemployed can thank
those likeminded citizens
responsible for the Republi-
cans' filibuster to block ex-
tending weekly unem-
ployment benefits. The gov-
ernment can't afford it?
But the government can af-
ford to give tax breaks to
millionaires and big busi-
ness.
Hot dogs
Well, unfortunately, some
people still aren't getting it.
There were four dogs in the
back of a car, 88 degrees,
with the windows rolled up
while the person that owned
the car was inside the gro-
cery store doing their shop-
ping, I'm sure for quite a
long time. I guess the only
thing I could say is, I would
like for them to be put in
the car for half an hour to
an hour with the windows
rolled up at 88 degrees out-
side. Anyway, I hope some-
thing can be done about
this.
The death of fun
What a sad society it is
indeed when any fun at all
is illegal. Ah, yes, this is
Florida, "No fun state."
What is life without the lib-
erty to pursue happiness?
Race has no place
I read in another paper
where three women who
helped the innocent police
officers who were killed by
the cold-blooded killer
were criticized by their own
people for helping the po-
lice officers. Had the races
of the shooter and the po-
lice officer been reversed,
there'd be riots in the
streets and calls for imme-


diate justice and everything
else. People, when are we
going to learn that justice
is justice, no matter what
the race is. If a police offi-
cer was killed, the person
doing it, no matter what
their race, should be
brought to justice and
hanged.
Immigrant math
Unemployment and the
economy is a no-brainer. We
have 15 million illegals in
this country, and I don't
want to hear just
|- | about farm work.
U W They're working in
UF industrial, residen-
tial, roadwork, lay-
S ing cables for TV
and telephones,
S0. and other types of
Ak # work, making $14
Sto 26 an hour. We
have 15 million
079 homeless and
0579 soon-to-be home-
less legal Ameri-
cans in this country who
will keep our money in this
country, and not as many
empty food pantries and
unemployment checks
going out. You figure it out -
I did.
Go private
Citrus Memorial hospital
needs to stop taking our tax
dollars and become an in-
dependent hospital like
Seven Rivers.


to the Editor


Once is enough
The Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District has recently al-
lowed homeowners to water their
lawns twice a week Prior to this, the
allowed frequency was once per
week But why permit the extra day
now? Currently we are getting fre-
quent rain, and our water levels are
up. But it's no time to stop being fru-
gal with water It's time to let the
aquifer recharge. It's been three
years since we stopped watering
twice a week Have you seen your
lawn suffer? I haven't. If our watering
mandates were good enough, why
keep giving our water table more
work? We don't want to exhaust it
The original water cutback was an
emergency measure. Who's to say the
same thing won't happen again? The
weather changes so often, we could
be doing ourselves in by not storing
up. The extra day of watering means
that we are doubling the permitted
usage that we've already grown ac-
customed to. What's the logic in
breaking a good habit?
Michael Shapot
Citrus Springs

What a wreck
Florida's "Wrecker Law" demon-
strated a few days ago that it is a disas-
trously stupid and inappropriate
wreck
A crash on State Road 44 West re-
sulted in a non-drivable vehicle


stalled and blocking traffic, and ac-
cording to the law, only a certified
tow truck could move it
The crew of two FHP cars, a fire
truck and emergency vehicle could not,
by law, move it to the side ofthe road.
Meanwhile, cars loaded with beach
goers, people with boats headed for the
launching ramp, individuals with food
spoiling, invalids discharged from the
hospital, and other people attemptingto
return home to The Islands, Dixie
Shores, etc. were stranded for two hours.
No politicians provided any water in
the 93-degree heat, no food, and no
Porta Johns for much-needed relief. I
believe county and state law does not
allow for roadside sanitation purposes.
Just one line in the bill, such as,. "If
a tow truck is not available, police offi-
cials can push a car aside to free traf-
fic," could have provided relief for
several hundred citizens this day.
But alas, no tow vehicle was avail-
able, and that day became a wreck for
a lot of people.
William C. Young
Crystal River

Don't ignore primary
We are fast approaching another
primary election in Florida. Some
states have already had their primary
and most others will have theirs by
the end of August These are very im-
portant elections.
Typically, voter turnout for the pri-
mary is very low. However, primary


elections are really the most impor-
tant of elections. The candidates cho-
sen by the political parties at primary
time give us the choices for the gen-
eral election contest Shouldn't the
very best candidates in each party be
the ones competing for the next term?
All too often, most voters ignore the
primary elections. This leaves the
contest between the party-preferred
candidate or possibly a much better
candidate who is unable to get beyond
the ranks of an "also-ran." At times,
the political party chooses to work to
eliminate incumbents and at other
times works to protect the incum-
bents. This happens in a subtle way,
leaving most voters unaware.
This is the key reason anyone who is
eligible to vote should make an honest
effort to become as knowledgeable about
all primary candidates as possible.
One glaring example of what can
happen occurred in the Florida 2006
Senate race. The Republican Party's
choice for senate was defeated in the
primary This created such a disap-
pointment within the party leadership
that the winning primary candidate
got very little support in the general
election and a chance for a potentially
good senator (my opinion) was blown.
I urge everyone to become aware
and informed about the primary can-
didate choices and help ensure that
we have the best possible candidates
on the ballot in November


Robert E Hagaman
Homosassa


* ;


SA-ruRDAY, JuLy 17, 201o A9


OPINION


LETT


(









P.: A10 SATLi., -Y. -, 17,2010



ATION


&
CITRUS COUNT


Y CHRONICLE


WORLD


nubnoBRIEFS Not enough pot to go around


In New Mexico, medical marijuana users


Associated Press


Associated Press
In this Sept. 20, 2008, file
photo, Uga VII, the seventh
English bulldog mascot for
the University of Georgia
team, who died last foot-
ball season, keeps to the
sidelines in Tempe, Ariz.

Short snouts a
worry on planes
WASHINGTON Owners
of bulldogs and pugs, be-
ware: Short-snouted breeds
accounted for roughly half the
purebred dog deaths on air-
planes in the past five years,
government data released
Friday shows. That comes as
no surprise to the owner of
the University of Georgia's fa-
mous mascot, Uga, who has
a surgical procedure done on
the dog to help him fly safely.
Overall, at least 122 dog
deaths were reported since
May 2005, when U.S. airlines
were required to start disclos-
ing them, the Transportation
Department said. The dogs
died while being shipped as
cargo.
English bulldogs account
for the single highest number
of deaths among the 108
purebreds on the list: 25.
Pugs were next, with 11
deaths, followed by golden
retrievers and labradors, with
seven deaths each, French
bulldogs with six, and Ameri-
can Staffordshire terriers,
four.
Owners should consult
with veterinarians before put-
ting their dogs on planes, the
department said. It believes
the deaths represent a tiny
percentage of the pets
shipped on airlines.
Minor earthquake
shakes up D.C.
WASHINGTON Wash-
ington area residents are
used to politicians being the
region's movers and shakers,
so it was a surprise when the
earth below shook. The 3.6-
magnitude temblor rattled
windows and jostled dishes,
but apparently caused no se-
rious damage.
President Barack Obama
told reporters he didn't feel it.

World BRIEF


Castro


Associated Press
Cuban former President
Fidel Castro attends a
meeting Friday with Cuban
ambassadors in foreign
countries at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs in Havana.
Fidel appears with
ambassadors
HAVANA- Fidel Castro
took questions from Cuban
ambassadors at the Foreign
Ministry on Friday and
warned them of the threat of
global nuclear war in his most
overtly political public act
since re-emerging from four
years of near total seclusion.
It was the revolutionary
leader's fifth appearance in
less than a week, and the first
in which he met with senior
government officials.
The government now
run by his brother Raul is
in the midst of freeing dozens
of political prisoners, faces a
severe economic malaise
and has been cracking down
on high-level corruption.
-From wire reports


ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. Len
Goodman can't grow enough mari-
juana to keep up with demand.
He is one of 11 growers approved
by New Mexico to produce pot for
all of the state's 2,000 registered
medical marijuana patients, and
his customers routinely wipe out
his supply Once a strain of mari-
juana is harvested, dried and
cured, he sends an announcement
that patients can place orders, and
the pot is usually gone in 24 hours.
New Mexico has been so cautious
in licensing and regulating growers
under its 3-year-old medical mari-
juana law that the small number of
providers can't grow enough, creat-
ing a shortage that has forced some
patients to the street to buy illegal
drugs.
The dilemma in New Mexico
could have ramifications elsewhere
because the state's program has
been held up as a national model,
with other states looking to repli-
cate its strong regulatory structure


to avoid the chaos that has pre-
vailed in places like California.
Prospective pot growers are sub-
jected to a painstaking screening
process before being granted a li-
cense. Once that happens, they are
limited to 95 plants and seedlings
and an inventory "that reflects cur-
rent qualified patient needs."
The providers' identities and lo-
cations are kept secret, avoiding the
kind of storefront dispensaries that
have flourished in Colorado and
California.
State Health Secretary Dr. Al-
fredo Vigil says he must balance pa-
tients' needs against preventing so
much legal pot from being grown
that it ends up in the illegal market.
He said the program is being ex-
panded methodically to ensure suf-
ficient oversight and to get to know
producers and how they operate.
He also opposes having hundreds
of producers and many thousands
of patients, which he said "ab-
solutely takes it out of the arena of
use for in-state patients and into the
arena of defacto legalization."


overwhelm growers

Medical marijuana patient Larry
Love sees New Mexico as an exam-
ple of what not to do. He contends
the department approves new
growers much too slowly.
Love, who runs a radio blog and
has been highly critical of Vigil, got
his medical marijuana card in June
2009 but said it was November be-
fore he could get a supply from an
authorized grower. He said that
drove him and other patients to the
illegal market, despite the risks.
Goodman's Santa Fe County busi-
ness, NewMexicann, has 650 regis-
tered patients five times the
number of patients he said he can
supply Other producers are in sim-
ilar shape, he said.
As a result, he has to ration pot to
patients who are chronically ill.
"Sometimes they don't have
enough so they use it when it's re-
ally severe, which is not good," he
said. "It's like seniors cutting down
on their meds because they can't af-
ford it."
The situation in New Mexico is
being closely watched by other


So far, so good


On,


uuim "i ..~?"' -,- -- r

~ -. -a


CA~'


~k ,~
-. -.


Associated Press
A recreational boater passes oil cleanup boats returning to port Friday in Grand Isle, La. The wellhead from the Deep-
water Horizon incident has been capped and BP says there are no signs that the well has started leaking underground
more than a day after it was capped.


BP, scientists trying to make sense of latest z

Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS In a
nail-biting day across the
Gulf Coast, engineers strug-
gled to make sense of puz-
zling pressure readings
from the bottom of the sea
Friday to determine
whether BP's capped oil
well was holding tight
Halfway through a critical
48-hour window, the signs
were promising but far from
conclusive.
Kent Wells, a BP PLC vice
president, said on an
evening conference call that
engineers had found no in-
dication that the well has
started leaking under-
ground.
"No news is good news, I
guess that's how I'd say it,"
Wells said.
Engineers are keeping
watch over the well for a
two-day period in a scien-
tific, round-the-clock vigil to
see if the well's temporary
cap is strong enough to hold
back the oil, or if there are
leaks either in the well itself
or the sea floor. One myste-
rious development was that
the pressure readings were
not rising as high as ex-
pected, said retired Coast
Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the
government's point man on
the crisis.
Allen said two possible
reasons were being debated
by scientists: The reservoir
that is the source of the oil
could be running lower
three months into the spill.
Or there could be an undis-
covered leak somewhere
down in the well. Allen or-


Sealing the well
BP s most recent atermpt of
to seal the gushing well is
holding back the oil




Cap ThK
-1

Blow out
preventer '


Sea F
floor


dered further study but re-
mained confident
"This is generally good
news," he said. But he cau-
tioned, "We need to be care-
ful not to do any harm or
create a situation that can-
not be reversed."
He said the testing would
go on into the night, at which
point BP may decide
whether to reopen the cap
and allow some oil to spill
into the sea again.
Throughout the day, no
one was declaring victory -
or failure. President Barack
Obama cautioned the public
"not to get too far ahead of
ourselves," warning of the
danger of new leaks "that
could be even more cata-
strophic."
Even if the cap passes the
test, more uncertainties lie
ahead: Where will the oil al-


Lower Marine
Riser
Package Cap


Connector


,nsa Flange transition
.L 3 spool joins the
jj cap with the blow
out preventer
( stack.


ready spilled go? How long
will it take to clean up the
coast? What will happen to
the region's fishermen? And
will life on the Gulf Coast
ever be the same again?
"I'm happy the well is
shut off, that there's a light
at the end of the tunnel,"
said Tony Kennon, mayor of
hard-hit Orange Beach, Ala.
But "I'm watching people
moving away, people losing
their jobs, everything
they've got. How can I be
that happy when that's hap-
pening to my neighbor?"
On Thursday, BP closed
the vents on the new, tight-
fitting cap and finally
stopped crude from spew-
ing into the Gulf of Mexico
for the first time since the
April 20 oil-rig explosion
that killed 11 workers and
unleashed the spill 5,000


wellpuzzle

feet down.
With the cap working like
a giant cork to keep the oil
inside the well, scientists
kept watch on screens at sea
and at BP's Houston head-
quarters, in case the
buildup of pressure under-
ground caused new leaks in
the well pipe and in the sur-
rounding bedrock that could
make the disaster even
worse.
Pressure readings after 24
hours were about 6,700
pounds per square inch and
rising slowly, Allen said,
below the 7,500 psi that
would clearly show the well
was not leaking. He said
pressure continued to rise
between 2 and 10 psi per
hour. A low pressure read-
ing, or a falling one, could
mean the oil is escaping.
But Allen said a seismic
probe of the surrounding
sea floor found no sign of a
leak in the ground.
Benton E Baugh, presi-
dent of Radoil Inc. in Hous-
ton and a National Academy
of Engineering member
who specializes in underwa-
ter oil operations, warned
that the pressure readings
could mean that an under-
ground blowout could occur.
He said the oil coming up
the well may be leaking out
underground and entering a
geological pocket that might
not be able to hold it.
In a positive sign, work on
the relief wells resumed
Friday The project had
been suspended earlier this
week for fear that the cap-
ping of the well could inter-
fere with it


Associated Press
Len Goodman poses among his mari-
juana plants near Santa Fe, N.M. He
is one of only 11 growers approved
by New Mexico to produce pot for all
of the state's 2,000 registered med-
ical marijuana patients, and his cus-
tomers routinely exhaust his supply.
states as medical marijuana be-
comes increasingly popular nation-


Another

spy case,

this time

with

Cuba

Associated Press
WASHINGTON A fed-
eral judge on Friday sen-
tenced a former State
Department worker who is
the great grandson of
Alexander Graham Bell to
life'in prison without possi-
bility of parole for spying for
Cuba and sentenced the
man's wife to more than 5
years behind bars for help-
ing her husband steal U.S.
secrets.
U.S. District Judge Reggie
Walton said Kendall and
Gwendolyn Myers betrayed
the United States for three
decades and should receive
heavy punishment for hav-
ing done so.
In a 10-minute explana-
tion to the judge of his con-
duct, Kendall Myers said his
goal was to pass along infor-
mation about U.S. policies
toward Cuba, a nation that
he said feared the United
States because of its opposi-
tion to the Cuban govern-
ment.
Kendall Myers, 73, said he
stole secrets with no intent to
harm the United States.
The judge said he was
"perplexed" at how Myers
could have the notion that he
was not hurting the U.S.,
given the level of antagonism
between the two countries.
"The Cuban people feel
threatened" and "they have
good reason to feel threat-
ened" because the U.S. has
pursued a policy of regime
change in Cuba, Myers
replied.
"Part of our motivation,"
Myers said of himself and his
wife, was to report as accu-
rately as possible about what
he thought U.S. policy was
toward Cuba, to warn Cuba
and to try to assess the na-
ture of the threat.
"At the expense of the
United States," Walton inter-
jected.
Justice Department prose-
cutor Michael Harvey said
that Myers and his wife were
given medals by Cuban intel-
ligence officials and that in
1995, the two were flown to
Cuba where they had a pri-
vate audience with Fidel
Castro.
Kendall Myers had daily
access to classified informa-
tion and he pursued his col-
leagues in government for
more, said Harvey
When the FBI launched a
sting operation that brought
the couple down, Kendall
Myers was videotaped
telling an undercover agent
that he wanted to resume his
work for Cuba.









S- SA RTs



SPORTS


* First-place
New York
Yankees beat
second-place
Tampa Bay Rays
with one-run win
Friday./B3


0 Auto Racing, Cycling/B2
0 Olympics, Football/B2
I MLB/B3
N Scoreboard, lottery/B4
N NBA, sports briefs/B4
E British Open/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


South African's name on top at St. Andrews


Oosthuizen shoots 5-under 67for

lea Calcavecchia close behind


Associated Press
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland
-Around the loop at the far
end of St. Andrews, shots at
the mercy of a vicious wind
were flying in every direc-
tion as Rory McIlroy, Tiger
Woods and so many others
struggled to survive in the
British Open.
Just as daunting was one
thing that didn't move the
name of Louis Oosthuizen
atop the leaderboard.
:It stayed there over the
final 11 hours on a Friday
when the mood of the Old
Course turned foul. Oost-
huizen finished his 5-under
67 just as the flags starting
whipping and the grand-


stands creaked from gusts
that topped 40 mph, forcing
a round to be halted for the
first time in 12 years at the
British Open.
"She was naked yester-
day," Tom Watson said, "but
she put on her boxing gloves
today and just hit us with all
she had."
The next battle is catch-
ing Oosthuizen (WUHST'-
hy-zen).
The 27-year-old South
African, who had made only
one cut in his previous eight
majors, was at 12-under 132
and had a five-shot lead, the
largest after 36 holes in this
major since Bobby Clampett
at Royal Troon in 1982.
Equally surprising was


MORE GOLF INSIDE
* Calcavecchia, 50, surges ahead at British Open.
* Watson bids farewell to St. Andrews golf course.
* Check out a full list of Friday's scores.
See Page B5

British Open Top 5 after two rounds


SCORE


* Louis Oosthuizen
* Mark Calcavecchia
* Paul Casey
* Lee Westwood
* Steven Tiley

the guy right behind him -
Mark Calcavecchia, who
turned 50 a month ago and
shot 67 in the morning when
players only had to cope
with a light wind and short
spells of rain.


THRU
F
F
F
F


k~. '* l*;-'..- A


A pair of Englishmen, Lee
Westwood (71) and Paul
Casey (69), were at 6-under Associated Press
138. South Africa's Louis Oosthuizen lines up a putt on the 13th
Oosthuizen made seven green Friday during the second round of the British Open on
the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland. He shot a 5-under
See 'Page B5 67 on the second round for a five-shot lead Friday.


One grand game


~~A14


41


JOHN COSCIA/Chronicle
Inverness catcher Parker Pillsbury is mobbed by his teammates at home plate following his grand slam in the first inning Friday night. Inverness
won 14-4 over West Pasco in the opening round of the Little League Section 7 tournament in Pinellas Park.


Inverness 9-10 All-Stars defeat West Pasco 14-4

in four innings during opening round oftourney


JOHN COSCIA
Chronicle
PINELLAS PARK It's
the grand slam that was -
and then wasn't.
That's how the District 15
champion Inverness 9-10
All-Stars will remember
their 14-4 victory over West
Pasco in the opening round


of the Little League Section
7 baseball tournament Fri-
day night in Pinellas Park.
As soon as Parker Pills-
bury hit it, everyone in the
park knew it was gone. Pills-
bury got all of the 3-0 fast-
ball and crushed it over the
centerfield fence for the
first home run of his Little
League career. To make it


even better it was a grand
slam in the first inning.
But hold everything. In
the massive celebration that
ensued at home plate, one
of the Inverness runners
missed home plate, erasing
that runner's score as well
as Pillsbury's since it was
See GRAND/Page B4


Inverness'
C.J. Bianco
delivers a
pitch to a
West Pasco
batter in the
top of the
third inning.
Bianco
allowed four
hits on four
runs in his
four-inning
complete
game.


CR senior

softball

wins

opener

15-16team

beat West Pasco

JON-MICHAEL
SORACCHI
Chronicle
The Crystal River Senior
softball team had a pen-
chant during its run through
the District 15 All-Stars
Tournament for breaking
games wide open in the lat-
ter innings.
On the opening night of
the Section 7 Tournament at
Bicentennial Park in Crys-
tal River, the squad broke
open a 1-1 tie in the bottom
of the third by plating six
runs over its next three at
bats en route to a 9-3 victory
over West Pasco on Friday
night.
Crystal River is 1-0 over-
all and plays Skyway Park at
noon today.
Rachel Roe got the vic-
tory by pitching four innings
and delivering the tie-
breaking blow in the bottom
of the third.
Roe's two-run double
scored teammates Amber
Russo and Danielle Gomez
to stake Crystal River to a 3-
1 advantage.
Liz Suaznavar added a
sacrifice fly one batter later
to plate Jordan Martin, and
Crystal River headed into
the top of the fourth inning
holding a three-run lead.
West Pasco got a pair of
runs back on a two-run sin-
gle by Briannah Nemetz in
the top of the fourth to close
the gap to 4-3.
Crystal River, however,
would get a bases-loaded
See 'Page B4


MORE TOP
STORIES INSIDE








* Danica Patrick plans
to simply drive 'fast' at
Honda Indy in Toronto.


* Joaquin Rodriguez wins
12th stage, but Alberto
Contador gains seconds.
See Page B2


Magic retaining J.J. Redick


Orlando

matches offer

from Chicago

Associated Press
ORLANDO The only
place J.J. Redick is heading
is to the bank.
In a move that highlights
his remarkable NBA turn-
around, the same Orlando
Magic team that once
benched Redick shelled out
$19 million Friday to retain
the shooting guard. They
matched a three-year offer
sheet that the Chicago Bulls
made for Redick last week
that could cost Orlando
much more.
The decision drives the
Magic deeper into the lux-
ury tax and gives them one


of the NBA's highest pay-
rolls at about $93 million
next season. The move
keeps Orlando's roster
mostly intact as the Magic
hope continuity will over-
come Miami's All-Star trio
and Boston's Big Three in
the Eastern Conference.
"When it came down to it,
when we're talking about
what we're trying to do here,
it came down for me to pedi-
gree, DNA, things that most
people don't think about,"
Orlando general manager
Otis Smith said. "It was less
about the money for me,
being the basketball guy,
and more about keeping a
guy around that we've had
in our organization for the
past four years."
The decision was ulti-
mately made by ownership.
Because Redick was a re-
stricted free agent, Orlando
had seven days to match the


contract. Billionaire owner .
Rich DeVos and team presi-
dent Bob Vander Weide took '
all seven days to make the '
move that nearly doubles l
Redick's salary from last
season.
Teams have to pay a dollar '
for every dollar they are over
the luxury tax, which the
league set at $70.3 million for
next season. The tax hit is -
based on the roster at the
end of the season, meaning
it's likely the Magic could
make trades before then to -.
lessen the financial burden.
Orlando should find relief
in a new downtown arena that
opens this year and creates
new revenue streams. Smith -. "
also believes a roster that re- .
mains one of the deepest in .- -- -- - --.
the league is attractive for po- Associated Press
tential moves and doesn't Orlando Magic guard J.J. Redick, right, drives past Charlotte
mortgage the Magic's future. Bobcats guard Larry Hughes during an April 21 game in
Orlando. Orlando Magic general manager Otis Smith said
See Page B4 Friday the team will retain Redick.








S~oi~rs CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Patrick plans


to simply drive


fast in Toronto


Associated Press
Joaquin Rodriguez Oliver of Spain, left, crosses the finish line to win the 12th stage of the Tour de France, which crossed
more than 130.8 miles Friday, starting in Bourg-de-Peage and finishing in Mende, France. Two-time champ Alberto
Contador of Spain took second place, but gained valuable seconds on overall leader Andy Schleck of Luxembourg.




Gaining crucial time


Rodriguez wins 12th stage, but

Contador cuts off 10 seconds


Associated Press

MENDE, France Al-
berto Contador sent a mes-
sage Friday to Tour de
France leader Andy
Schleck: Here I come.
The two-time Tour cham-
pion dropped the Luxem-
bourg rider on the steep final
climb of the 12th stage, the
Spaniard's first bold attack of
the race, gaining him crucial
seconds in the title chase.
Joaquin Rodriguez, a
Spaniard with the Katusha
team, got stage-win glory by
edging Contador in a two-
man sprint at the finish of
the 131-mile course from
Bourg-de-Peage to Mende.
Contador was content to
cut 10 precious seconds
from his deficit to Schleck
and was 31 seconds behind
after the stage. Samuel
Sanchez of Spain was a dis-
tant third, 2 minutes, 45
seconds.
The race has shaped up
as a duel between Contador
and Schleck, who are seem-
ingly unparalleled in the
climbs and the Pyrenees
await as the arena where
their rivalry will play out
beginning Sunday.
Schleck knows Contador
is stronger in the time trial,
and wants to have the
biggest lead possible before
the final race against the
clock on the eve of the July
25 finish on the Champs-El-
ysees in Paris.
Friday's stage finish was
destined for drama. In the
final miles, the pack scaled
the La Croix Neuve pass,
which ascends nearly 2
miles at an average gradient
of more than 10 percent.
Contador and Rodriguez


burst out of the pack near
the midpoint of that steep
final climb, dusting Schleck
and overtaking several
breakaway riders. Ro-
driguez then outsprinted
Contador in the last few
hundred yards to get his
first stage win in his first
Tour.
Both were given a time of
4 hours, 58 minutes, 26 sec-
onds, while Contador's As-
tana teammate Alexandre
Vinokourov was third, 4 sec-
onds back. Schleck, the
Saxo Bank team leader, was
fifth, while Sanchez crossed
in sixth.
Seven-time champion
Lance Armstrong, who has.
ruled himself out of con-
tention in his final Tour, lost
time to the leader for a third
straight day crossing in
57th place, 3:35 back of Ro-
driguez. He's 32nd overall,
21:16 behind Schleck. Arm-
strong didn't speak to re-
porters after the stage.
Vinokourov and three
other breakaway riders were
the first at the foot of the
climb. Initially, he and Be-
larus rider Vasil Kiryienka
slugged it out before the
Kazakh star rode out alone,
seeking a stage win in his
first Tour since being kicked
out of the 2007 race for blood
doping and serving a two-
year suspension.
Then with just over a mile
to go, Contador caught
Schleck off-guard by racing
out wide and mustering a
burst of speed. As the
Spaniard rose up out of his
saddle, his bike rocking side
to side, Schleck couldn't or
wouldn't match the acceler-
ation, staying seated and
pedaling in a steady rhythm.


Tour de France Results
12th Stage: Fr~day at Mende. France
A 130.8-mile nitty ride tram Bourg-de-Peage to Menae
1two, Category 2 and three Category 3 climbs)
1 J-55,juir, r~uzSpain K aIutl-'a 4 rour: SA mrnijrEI 5Z6,:r*
2 Ibpeio Criai.'a "Spwir 5,13ria i~nie irrv
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12 RljbEr P1la aSparn. CsE.ea0Et:-rqr, e41
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1 rd ,w LUkiPraine.Team SacBrn52"U1 ~~n Ctir1
1111 ie-'y r v A C' .r r-pa .r.a i1;r-:deO.
129Bret B..pI Sar,:r az Span EsO,i icICI.Luia-:d, IT45 i
L5 Jmilr'i."(ur,y er' B,':,erk 8elin TOrn Ra Plain.L 11.1513
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NEXT. A i ar 8.m,I;e plainn l rodE i--rn )'de'I-: i-.e


U.S. relay runners win Olympic appeal


Women will

retain gold,

bronze medals

Associated Press

GENEVA American
sprinters who were
stripped of their 2000
Olympics relay medals be-
cause teammate Marion
Jones was doping won an
appeal Friday to have them
restored.
The Court of Arbitration
for Sport ruled in favor of
the women, who had ap-
pealed the International
Olympic Committee's deci-
sion to disqualify them
from the Sydney Games.
The court said the IOC
and International Associa-
tion of Athletics Federa-
tions rules in 2000 did not
allow entire teams to be dis-
qualified because of doping
by one athlete.
The IOC said the ruling
was "disappointing and es-


have committed a doping
offense," CAS said.
Now that the case is over,
Richardson can relax, her
medal safe and secure in a
wooden frame at the home
of her parents in Florida.
"It's been a long three
years, a long hard fight,"
Richardson told The Asso-
ciated Press in a phone in-
terview. "I wanted to
believe they would do what
was right, but there were
some times where I wasn't
as certain. Today, they did
what was right."
Richardson spoke to
Gaines and Miles-Clark and
said that "everyone is ex-
tremely excited."
"Finally, the fight is over,"
Richardson said.
In 2007, Jones admitted
she was doping in Sydney
and also lost her individual
golds in the 100 and 200 me-
ters and bronze in the long
jump. She spent about six
months in a Texas prison in
2008 for lying about using
performance-enhancing
drugs and her role in a
check-fraud scam.


pecially unfortunate for the
athletes of the other teams
who competed according to
the rules."
In Sydney, Jearl Miles-
Clark, Monique Hennagan,
LaTasha Colander Clark and
Andrea Anderson were part
of the squad that won gold in
the 4x400 relay. Chryste
Gaines, Torri Edwards,
Nanceen Perry and Passion


Richardson were on the
4x100 bronze medal squad.
All but Perry joined the
appeal.
"The panel found that at
the time of the Sydney
Olympic Games there was
no express IOC or IAAF
rule in force that clearly al-
lowed the IOC to annul the
relay team results if one
team member was found to


IndyCar road

race Sunday

Associated Press

TORONTO Danica
Patrick is going back to ba-
sics in the Honda Indy
Toronto.
"I'm going to really try to
come at it with a slightly dif-
ferent approach and stop
chasing everything little
thing that I feel and just
start focusing on my driving
and really just try to keep it
really simple," Patrick said
Friday.
"There's a lot to be said
for being able to know what
you have when you go out on
a street course, especially,
because it's as an old driv-
ing coach from Atlantics
said, 'It doesn't have to be
pretty, it just has to be fast."'
The race Sunday is the
second of five straight street
or road races before the sea-
son ends with four oval
events. In the first five street
and road events of the year,
Patrick finished 15th, sev-
enth, 19th, 16th and 20th.
She was second at Texas
Motor Speedway and 11th,
sixth and 10th in the other
oval races.
Last year in the first Indy-
Car Series race on the 1.755-
mile, 11-turn street course
at Exhibition Place, Patrick
started 18th and finished
sixth. She also raced at the
track in Formula Atlantic in
2003 and 2004.
"I love coming to
Toronto," Patrick said. "It's
a great city and a great race
track I know street courses
are a little notorious for
being hard to pass and
being a lot of follow the
leader, but I was really im-
pressed last year, seeing just
how we were able to get


Associated Press
IRL driver Danica Patrick
adjusts her helmet before the
first practice session Friday
for the Honda Indy Toronto.
runs on the back straight
and make things happen.
"It's a little bumpy and
feels a little narrow, but it
has passing, something that
doesn't always happen on a
street course."
She was 24th last week in
the Nationwide race at
Chicagoland Speedway, her
best finish in five starts for
owner Dale Earnhardt Jr in
NASCAR's second-tier series.
"I'm really enjoying it,"
Patrick said. "There's a lot
of really great people. The
drivers are very generous
with their advice and time.
... It's humbling, to say the
least, at times, but it's also
very rewarding, too, when I
finally get it It's fun. There's
a lot of passing, and pass-
ing's fun to do."
She struggled in the first
practice session Friday
morning, finishing 22nd
among the 26 drivers with a
fast lap of 95.471 mph. She
was 11th in the afternoon
session at 100.452 in her No.
7 Andretti.Autosport entry.
"We made a few changes
from the first practice session
to the second and we were
able to find some speed,"
Patrick said. "I think the
changes that we made gave
us a much better idea on
where we need to go for to-
morrow. Overall, I'm happy
with today's practice sessions
and hope we have a strong
qualifying run tomorrow."


Associated Press
This 1987 file photo shows Notre Dame player Tim Brown.
Brown leads a class of 24 players and coaches being
enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame today.


1987 Heisman winner


credits coach for career


Brown enters

College Hall of

Fame today

Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Tim Brown never consid-
ered himself a standout col-
legiate football player until
Lou Holtz convinced him of
it.
Brown was ready
to accept the role of
regularly contribut-
ing wide receiver at
Notre Dame until
Holtz arrived after
the 1985 season.
During the second
day of spring prac- Tim E
tice, following will en
Brown's sophomore Colleg
season, Holtz called of Fame
him over and asked
why he hadn't been on the
field more for the Fighting
Irish during his first two
seasons.
Brown told him it was a
decision by the previous
coaching staff. Holtz didn't
believe him.
"He yelled at me, 'Son,
there's no way a coach could
be so dumb as to not play
you,"' Brown recalled him
saying.
Holtz told Brown the only
way he wasn't going to get
the ball during the upcom-
ing season was if the


defense intercepted the
snap from center.
"He not only said it, but
he was putting me in that
position time after time
after time," Brown said.
"The more I succeeded, the
more he kept putting me in
that position and the more
confidence I got"
Brown turned that confi-
dence into an outstanding
final two years with the
Irish, becoming the last
Notre Dame player to win
the Heisman Tro-
phy in 1987. He
heads a class of 24
players who will be
enshrined into the
College Football
Hall of Fame today.
Among the others
being honored are
3rown former Miami quar-
ter into terback Gino Tor-
ge Hall retta, who won the
e today. Heisman in 1992;
Penn State running
back Curt Warner; Ohio
State linebacker Chris
Spielman; West Virginia
quarterback Major Harris;
and John Robinson, who
coached Southern Califor-
nia and UNLV
Brown, who touched the
ball 79 times for 1,240 all-
purpose yards and six
touchdowns his first two
seasons at Notre Dame,
touched the ball 131 times
as a junior, setting a
school record with 1,937
all-purpose yards and nine
touchdowns.


B2 SATURDAY, JULY 17. 2010


Associated Press
Members of the U.S. women's 4x400 relay team from
left, Jearl Miles-Clark, Monique Hennagan, La Tasha
Colander-Richardson (now Colander Clark) and Marion
Jones will have their gold medals restored. They were
stripped of their 2000 medals because Jones was doping.


SPORTS


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


9
It
g









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 B3

SEast Division Central Division West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
NewYork 57 32 .640 9-1 W-2 29-13 28-19 Chicago 50 38 .568 9-1 W-9 27-19 23-19 Texas 51 38 .573 4-6 W-1 31-19 20-19
Tampa Bay 54 35 .607 3 8-2 L-1 26-20 28-15 Detroit 48 39 .552 1 5 7-3 L-2 32-13 16-26 Los Angeles 48 44 .522 4Y2 7/2 3-7 W-1 25-20 23-24
Boston 51 38 .573 6 3 4-6 L-1 29-18 22-20 Minnesota 46 43 .517 4 8 3-7 L-1 26-18 20-25 Oakland 44 46 .489 71 1012 5-5 W-3 26-20 18-26
Toronto 45 45 .500 12 92 5-5 W-1 24-22 21-23 Kansas City 39 50 .438 11 15 5-5 L-4 18-22 21-28 Seattle 35 54 .393 16 19 2-8 L-2 21-24 14-30
Baltimore 29 60 .326 28 25 5-5 L-1 16-26 13-34 Cleveland 35 54 .393 15 19 4-6 W-1 18-22 17-32


Atlanta
New York
Philadelphia
Florida
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB

5 1
6 2
11 7
13 9


Home
31-10
30-16
25-17
21-24
25-21


Cincinnati
St. Louis
Chicago
Milwaukee
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB

1 1
9 9
9% 9%2
12 12
19 19


Home
28-19
28-15
22-23
20-26
20-26
19-21


San Diego
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Fran.
Arizona


West Division
GB WCGB

2Y2 -
2Y2 -
3% 1
17% 15


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Texas 7, Boston 2
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 7
LA. Angels 8, Seattle 3
Friday's Games
Cleveland 8, Detroit 2
N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 4
Toronto 4, Baltimore 2
Oakland 5, Kansas City 1
Texas at Boston (LATE)
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota (LATE)
Seattle at L.A. Angels (LATE)
Today's Games
Detroit (Verlander 11-5) at Cleveland (Carmona
8-7), 1:05 p.m., 1st game
Tampa Bay (Niemann 7-2) at N.Y. Yankees
(A.J.Burnett 7-7), 4:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 4-7) at Cleveland (Talbot 8-8),
7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Toronto (Morrow 5-6) at Baltimore (Guthrie 3-
10), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 8-7) at Minnesota
(Pavano 10-6), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 9-3) at Kansas City (Chen 5-3),
7:10 p.m.
Texas (CI.Lee 8-4) at Boston (Lackey 9-5), 7:10
p.m.
Seattle (Rowland-Smith 1-9) at L.A. Angels
(J.Saunders 6-9), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Toronto at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1
Chicago Cubs 12, Philadelphia 6
St. Louis 7, L.A. Dodgers 1
San Francisco 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Philadelphia 3
Houston 5, Pittsburgh 2
Cincinnati 3, Colorado 2
Washington 4, Florida 0
Milwaukee at Atlanta (LATE)
L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis (LATE)
Arizona at San Diego (LATE)
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco (LATE)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Hamels 7-7) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Wells 4-7), 1:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kuroda 7-7) at St. Louis (Wain-
wright 13-5), 4:10 p.m.
Houston (Norris 2-6) at Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 1-
7), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (De La Rosa 3-1) at Cincinnati
(Volquez 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 7-6) at Atlanta (T.Hudson
9-4), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (LHemandez 6-5) at Florida
(Jo.Johnson 9-3), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (R.Lopez 5-7) at San Diego (Richard 6-
4), 8:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Takahashi 7-3) at San Francisco
(Cain 6-8), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Colorado at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.


.. - . .
... - -... - :. -- ,


Associated Press
New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia delivers the ball to
the Tampa Bay Rays during the second inning of Friday's
game at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Yankees won 54.


Yankees 5, Rays 4
NEW YORK Nick Swisher pro-
vided the most fitting tribute to George
Steinbrenner.
Swisher hit a game-winning single
with two outs in the ninth inning and
the New York Yankees ended a most
emotional Friday evening by beating
the Tampa Bay Rays 5-4.
On a night when manager Joe Gi-
rardi cried, captain Derek Jeter's face
went flush as he spoke to the crowd
and closer Mariano Rivera placed two
long-stemmed roses across home
plate to remember Steinbrenner and
beloved public address announcer Bob
Sheppard, the Yankees won what
better way for them to honor their de-
manding owner?
Swisher hit a tying home run in the
eighth, then lined a single that sent
Curtis Granderson sliding home for the
victory in a matchup of the teams with
the best records in baseball. The Yan-
kees streamed from the dugout to cel-
ebrate, and Swisher wound up way out
in right field, surrounded by jumping
teammates.
The joyful ending was in sharp con-
trast to earlier events that honored
Steinbrenner, who died Tuesday, two
days after the passing of Sheppard.
A 15-minute pregame tribute in-
cluded a 2-minute moment of absolute
silence. Not a single fan shouted out,
and the only sounds were the flags


flapping at half-staff and a passing
subway.
Crowds snapped pictures of Stein-
brenner's statue in the main lobby and
quietly gathered around a makeshift
memorial outside another gate.


Tampa Bay
ab
BUpton cf 4
Crwfrd If 5
Longori 3b 4
C.Pena Ib 3
Zobrist 2b 4
Shppch c 4
WAyar dh 1
Kapler rf 4
Bartlett ss 4

Totals 33
Tampa Bay
NewYork


NewYork
rh bi
1 2 0 Jeterss
0 2 0 Swisher rf
0 1 1 Teixeir lb
0 0 0 ARdrgz 3b
1 1 1 Cano 2b
0 1 0 Posadac
0 0 1 Grndrs cf
0 0 0 Mirand dh
2 2 0 R.Pena ph
Gardnr If
49 3 Totals
011 010 100
001 002 011


ab rhbi
5 0 0 7
5 1 3 3
2 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 1 1 1
3 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
3 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 1 0 0
325 7 5
4
5


Two outs when winning run scored.
E-A. Rodriguez (6), Swisher (3). DP-New
York 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 8, New York 7. 2B-
Longoria (28). HR-Swisher (16), Cano (17),
Posada (10). S-W.Aybar, R.Pena. SF-
W.Aybar.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
J.Shields 6 4 3 3 3 5
BalfourH,10 1 0 0 0 0 1
BenoitBS,1-2 1 1 1 1 1 1
Choate L,2-3 1-3 1 1 1 1 0
Wheeler 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Cormier 0 1 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Sabathia 7 8 4 3 4 6
D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 3
M.RiveraW,3-1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Cormier pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Umpires-Home, Derryl Cousins; First, D.J.
Reyburn; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Jim
Wolf.
T-3:28. A-47,524 (50,287).


Athletics 5, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo.- Gio Gonza-
lez outdueled Zack Greinke and the
Oakland Athletics caught a big break in
the first inning en route to a 5-1 victory
over the Kansas City Royals on Friday
night, disappointing a rare Kauffman
Stadium sellout crowd.
Kevin Kouzmanoff had a two-run
single for the Athletics while Gonzalez
(8-6) allowed seven hits and one walk
in seven innings. Relievers Craig Bres-
low and Michael Wuertz each pitched
a shutout inning.
Leading off the game, Oakland's
Coco Crisp was awarded a double
after first base umpire Larry Vanover
first ruled a foul ball on Crisp's liner
down the right field line. On replays, it
did appear to come down an inch or so
fair. A's manager Bob Geren came out
to argue, the umpires huddled, and the
call was reversed.
Jack Cust drove in Crisp with a sac-
rifice fly.
Greinke (5-9), who missed his previ-
ous start with stiffness in his right shoul-
der, was charged with five runs two
earned four hits and four walks in six
innings. He lost to the A's for the first
time in five career decisions.
With the help of shortstop Yuniesky
Betancourt's fielding error, the A's
scored three unearned runs in the third -
to take a 5-1 lead.


Oakland


Kansas City


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crisp cf 5 2 1 0 Pdsdnk If 4 1 1 0
Barton 1b 3 0 00 Kendallc 4 01 0
KSuzuk c 3 1 1 0 DeJess if 4 0 00
Custdh 3 0 0 1 BButlerlb 4 0 1 0
Kzmnff3b 4 1 2 2 JGuillndh 3 00 0
M.Ellis2b 4 02 1 Callasp3b 4 02 0
Gross rf 4 00 0 Aviles 2b 4 0 0 0
RDavisIf 3 01 0 BImqstcf 4 0 1 0
Pnngtnss 2 1 0 0 YBtncrss 3 0 1 0
Totals 31 57 4 Totals 341 7 0
Oakland 113 000 000 5
Kansas City 100 000 000 1
E-M.Ellis (1), Greinke (1), Y.Betancourt (11).
DP-Oakland 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-Oakland
6, Kansas City 7. 2B-Crisp (4), Kouzmanoff
(17), Podsednik (7). SB-K.Suzuki (2), R.Davis
(28). CS-K.Suzuki (1). S-Barton. SF-Cust.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
G.GonzalezW,8-6 7 7 1 1 1 3
Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 2
Wuertz 1 0 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
GreinkeL,5-9 6 4 5 2 4 3
Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tejeda 1 2 0 0 0 0
Soria 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP-G.Gonzalez, Farnsworth. Balk-Soria.
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First, Larry
Vanover; Second, Jeff Kellogg; Third, Jeff Nel-
son.
T-2:33. A-37,312 (37,840).


Indians 8, Tigers 2
CLEVELAND-- Andy Marte and
Austin Kearns hit two-run homers to
help the Cleveland Indians beat the
Detroit Tigers 8-2 on Friday night.
Marte broke at 2-2 tie in the fourth in-
ning against Max Scherzer (6-7). Kearns'
eighth homer of the season capped a
four-run sixth against the Tigers' bullpen
that put Cleveland ahead 8-2.
Marte started in place of Jhonny
Peralta, who missed an off-day practice
Thursday with a fever. Manager Manny
Acta said Peralta had improved and
was available, but he wanted to give
the veteran more rest as a precaution.
Jake Westbrook (6-5) gave up two
runs over 5 2-3 innings to win his first
home start against Detroit since Sept.
18, 2007. The right-hander missed
most of 2008 and all of 2009 following
reconstructive elbow surgery.
The Tigers came in one game be-
hind first-place Chicago in the AL Cen-
tral and hoped to start the second half
with a win against a team they have
dominated of late. Instead, the Indians
improved to 7-20 since the start of
2009 against Detroit, which has faded
in the second half of recent seasons.


Detroit

AJcksn cf
Damon dh
Ordonz rf
MiCarr lb
Boesch If
CGuilln 2b
Inge 3b
Avila c
Santiag ss

Totals
Detroit
Cleveland


Cleveland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
4 1 2 0 Brantlycf 5 1 1 0
4 0 1 0 J.Nix2b 5 1 1 0
4 1 2 0 CSantn c 2 00 1
3 0 1 1 Hafnerdh 3 1 2 1
4 0 0 1 Duncan ph-dhl 0 1 0
3 0 0 0 Kearnsrf 5 1 1 2


4 0 1 0 LaPort lb
3 0 0 0 Crowe If
3 0 0 0 AMarte 3b
Donald ss
32 27 2 Totals
100 100 000
020 204 OOx


3 1 0 0
3 22 1
3 1 1 2
4 0 1 1
34810 8
2
8


E-Inge (6). DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Detroit 5,
Cleveland 9. 2B-Ordonez (16), Crowe (11),
Donald (13). 3B-A.Jackson (5), Crowe (3).
HR-Keams (8), A.Marte (3). SB-A.Jackson
(15), C.Santana (2). CS-C.Guillen (2), Inge (3).
SF-C.Santana.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
SchprzerL,6-7 5 5 4 4 5 7
Weinhardt 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
B.Thomas 2-3 2 2 2 0 0
E.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 1 2
Schlereth 1 1 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
Westbrook W,6-5 52-35 2 2 1 5
J.Smith 0 0 0 0 1 0
SippH,9 11-30 0 0 0 1
Herrmann 1 2 0 0 0 1
R.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 0
J.Smith pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Scherzer.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Brian
Runge; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Mike
Muchlinski.
T-3:03. A-22,295 (45,569).


Blue Jays 4, Orioles 2
BALTIMORE Ricky Romero al-
lowed five hits in seven innings, Aaron
Hill homered and the Toronto Blue Jays
ended the Baltimore Orioles'four-
game winning streak with a 4-2 victory
Friday night.
Fred Lewis had two hits and scored
twice for the Blue Jays, who improved
to 7-0 against the Orioles this season,
including 4-0 in Baltimore. Toronto was
1-8 at Camden Yards last year.
Romero (7-6) gave up two un-
earned runs, walked one and struck
out five. The left-hander retired the first
12 batters and allowed hits in only the
fifth and seventh innings.
Romero lost his previous three
starts, yielding a combined 13 earned
runs over five innings in the last two.
After Shawn Camp struck out Adam
Jones with two outs and runners on
second and third in the eighth, Kevin
Gregg worked a perfect ninth for his
21st save.
Hill had three hits, including
Toronto's major league-leading 137th
home run. The Blue Jays have home-
red in nine straight games, collecting
22 over that span.
Yunel Escobar, obtained in a trade
Wednesday with Atlanta, went 1 for 4
with a walk in his Toronto debut.

Toronto Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
FLewisIf 4 22 0 CPttrsndh 4 00 0
YEscorss 4 01 0 MTejad3b 3 01 0
JBautstrf 5 00 0 Markksrt 4 00 0
V.Wellsof 3 01 1 Wggntnlb 4 1 2 0
Lind dh 4 0 1 1 SMoore pr-1b0 0 0 0
A.Hill2b 4 2 3 1 AdJonscf 4 0 0 0
Overay b 3 0 1 1 Pielf 4 1 2 0
J.Buckc 4 0 1 0 Tatumc 4 0 0 0
Encrnc 3b 4 0 0 0 Lugo 2b 4 02 1
Clzturs ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 35 4104 Totals 342 7 1
Toronto 111 001 000 4
Baltimore 000 020 000 2
E-Encarnacion (9), F.Lewis (3), M.Tejada (15).
DP-Toronto 1, Baltimore 2. LOB-Toronto 8,
Baltimore 6.2B-F.Lewis (25), A.Hill (13), Over-
bay (19), Wigginton (14), Pie (3). HR-A.Hill
(13). SF-V.Wells.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
R.RomeroW,7-6 7 5 2 0 1 5
S.Downs H,17 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
CampH,9 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Gregg S,21-24 1 0 0 0 0, 1
Baltimore
Bergesen L,3-7 6 9 4 4 2 3
Albers 1 0 0 0 0 0
Ohman 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Uehara 1 0 0 0 1 1
Da.Hernandez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
PB-Tatum.
Umpires-Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Jim
Reynolds; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Bill Welke.
T-2:44. A-18,120 (48,290).


Brewers 9, Braves 3
ATLANTA Ryan Braun's two-run
homer helped give Milwaukee an early
lead, Randy Wolf earned his first win
over Atlanta in seven years and the
Brewers beat the Braves 9-3.
Wolf (7-8) allowed seven hits and
three runs in six innings for his first win
over the Braves since Sept. 9, 2003,
also at Turner Field. Wolf improved to
5-12 in his career against Atlanta.
Wolf outlasted Tommy Hanson (8-
6), who gave up six hits and four runs,
three earned, in five innings.
Atlanta's Chipper Jones sustained a
mild left hamstring strain on a seventh-
inning swing. He grabbed the back of
his leg after the swing and left the
game after hitting a popup with the
bases loaded to Rickie Weeks at sec-
ond base. Jones is day to day.
Prince Fielder's two-run double in
the Brewers'three-run eighth padded
the lead.

Milwaukee Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Weeks2b 6 02 1 Prado2b 5 1 1 0
Hartrf 4 22 0 Heywrdrf 4 1 1 0
Braun If 5 1 1 2 C.Jones 3b 3 00 0
Fielder 1b 4 1 1 2 Kawkmp 0 00 0
McGeh3b 5 1 3 1 JChavzp 000 0
Kottarsc 5 1 1 0 Hinskeph 1 00 0
Gomezcf 4 23 0 Glaus lb 3 01 1
AEscorss 4 02 1 McCnnc 4 01 1
Brddck p 0 0 00 D.Ross c 0 0 00
Loe p 0 0 00 M.Diaz if 4 0 00
L.Cain ph 1 00 0 AIGnzIlzss 3 1 1 0
Hoffmnp 0 0 00 MeCarrcf 3 02 0
RaWolfp 1 00 1 Hansonp 1 0 00
Coffey p 0 0 0 0 Infante ph 1 0 0 0
Counsll ss 2 1 1 0 Medlen p 0 0 0 0
MDunn p 0 0 0 0
Conrad ph-3b2 0 1 0
Totals 41 9168 Totals 343 8 2
Milwaukee 022 002 030 9
Atlanta 000 101 100 3
E-Gomez (4), Glaus (7), Me.Cabrera (3).
DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-Milwaukee 10, At-
lanta 9. 2B-Fielder (15), McGehee (21),
Gomez (8), Glaus (14). 3B-Prado (3). HR-
Braun (14). SB-A.Escobar (8). S-Ra.Wolf.
SF-Ra.Wolf.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Ra.WolfW,7-8 6 7 3 3 3 4
CoffeyH,8 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Braddock H,5 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
LoeH,8 11-31 0 0 0 0
Hoffman 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
Hanson L,8-6 5 6 4 3 1 5
Medlen 1 3 2 1 0 2
M.Dunn 1 1 0 0 1 2
Kawakami 1 5 3 3 0 0
J.Chavez 1 1 0 0 0 0
Ra.Wolf pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Loe (Ale.Gonzalez), by Hanson
(Fielder). PB-Kottaras.
Umpires-Home, Joe West; First, Angel Her-
nandez; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Rob Drake.
T-3:08. A-37,014 (49,743).


Nationals 4, Marlins 0
MIAMI Stephen Strasburg strug-
gled through a 34-pitch first inning but
escaped early jams to lead the Wash-
ington Nationals past the Florida Mar-
lins 4-0 Friday night.
Strasburg (4-2) allowed two
baserunners in each of the first three
innings, walking three and throwing the
first wild pitch of his career. But he fin-
ished with seven strikeouts in six in-
nings and lowered his ERA to 2.03.
Two relievers completed a four-hitter.
The shutout was the third this year
for the Nationals, thanks in part to
Strasburg's first scoreless outing.
Making his eighth major league
start and facing Florida for the first
time, Strasburg was locked in a score-
less duel with Ricky Nolasco (9-7) until
Josh Willingham hit a three-run double
in the sixth.
Strasburg walked two in the first in-
ning, including Gaby Sanchez on 12
pitches, and received a visit from pitch-
ing coach Steve McCatty. Jorge
Cantu's flyout ended the threat.
Two singles and a sacrifice put Mar-
lins at second and third with two outs in
the second, but Chris Coghlan
grounded out.
Washington Florida
ab rhbi ab r hbi
Morgan cf 4110 Coghlan if 40 0 0
C.Guzman 2b41 10 G.Sanchez lb 30 0 0
Storen p 0 000 H.Ramirez ss 20 1 0
Cappsp 0000 Uggla2b 30 1 0
Zimmerman3b4t010 Cantu3b 40 0 0
A.Dunnlb 3 120 C.Rosscf 40 1 0
A.Kennedy 1bO0000 Stantonrf 30 0 0
Willingham If4 1 13 R.Paulino c 40 1 0
I.Rodriguez c3001 Nolasco p 1 0 0 0
Bemadina rf4 0 00 Sanches p 00 0 0
Desmond ss4 0 10 Tankersley p 00 0 0
Strasburg p 2 000 Marinez p 00 0 0
AbGTrhI 0 10 Lartbh 100 0
Badenhop p 00 0 0
Totals 33 4 84 Totals 29 0 4 0
Washington 000 004 000 4
Florida 000 000 000 0
DP-Florida 1. LOB-Washington 4, Florida
8.2B-Willingham (14), Alb.Gonzalez (5). SB-
Morgan (21). CS-Desmond (3), H.Ramirez (6).
S-Nolasco. SF-I.Rodriguez.


Washington
Strasburg W,4-2
Storen
Capps
Florida
Nolasco L,9-7
Sanches
Tankersley
Marinez
Badenhop
WP-Strasburg.


IP H RERBB SO


Umpires-Home, Brian Gorman; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Dan Bellino: Third, Tony Ran-
dazzo.
T-2:52. A-27,037 (38,560).


Reds 3, Rockies 2
Brandon Phillips followed his first All-
Star appearance with a three-hit game
and Arthur Rhodes pitched out of a
bases-loaded, none-out threat in the
eighth inning, preserving the Cincinnati
Reds' 3-2 win over the Colorado Rockies.
Finally back at home, the NL Central
leaders got backto winning. Cincinnati
hadn't played a home game all month and
had dropped five of its last six on the road.
Bronson Arroyo (10-4) gave up a solo
homer by Miguel Olivo that was upheld
after a review and cut it to 3-2 in the
eighth. Rhodes, who made the All-Star
roster for the first time in his 19 seasons,
then held the lead by retiring the top of
Colorado's order with the bases loaded.
Rhodes came on and walked Ryan
Spilborghs to load the bases the
pinch-hitter lost track of the count and
had to be coaxed to first base. The left-
hander then retired Dexter Fowler on a
shallow fly and struck out Jonathan
Herrera and Carlos Gonzalez while the
crowd of 37,188 stood and screamed.
Francisco Cordero gave up a walk in
the ninth before getting his 25th save in
31 tries.
Phillips scored twice and had three
hits off Jason Hammel (7-4), who had
won his last six decisions. Hammel
struck out a career-high 10 batters.


Colorado Cincinnati
ab rh bi
Fowler ocf 4 0 0 0 BPhllps 2b
JHerrr 2b 4 0 1 0 OCarer ss
CGnzlzrf 4 1 1 0 Vottolb
Giambilb 4 0 1 1 Rolen 3b
S.Smith If 4 0 0 0 Gomes If
Olivoc 3 1 1 1 Brucerf
Stewart 3b 3 0 0 0 Stubbs cf
Barmes ss 3 0 1 0 Hanign c
Hamml p 2 00 0 Arroyo p
Hawpeph 0 0 00 Rhodes p
Splrghs ph 0 0 0 0 FCordr p
Corpas p 0 000
Beimel p 0 000
Totals 31 25 2 Totals
Colorado 000 000 110
Cincinnati 002 010 00x


31 3 8 3
2
3


DP-Colorado 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB-Colorado
5, Cincinnati 6.2B--Giambi (7), B.Phillips (25),
O.Cabrera (21), Votto (16), Stubbs (8). HR-
Olivo (12). SB-B.Phillips (11), Rolen (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
HammelL,7-4 7 8 3 3 1 10
Corpas 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Beimel 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
ArroyoW,10-4 7 5 2 2 1 4
Rhodes H,16 1 0 0 0 1 2
F.Cordero S,25-31 1 0 0 0 1 1
Arroyo pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Sam Hol-
brook; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Ed Ra-
puano.
T-2:39. A-37,188 (42,319).


Astros 5, Pirates 2
PITTSBURGH Jeff Keppinger
homered and had three RBIs, Brett
Myers allowed two runs while working
into the eighth inning and the Houston
Astros remained unbeaten in seven
games against the Pittsburgh Pirates
this season with a 5-2 win Friday night.
Myers (7-6) extended his club record
for consecutive starts of at least six in-
nings to begin a season to 19 by allow-
ing two runs on five hits in 7 2/3 innings,
striking out four and walking one.
Matt Lindstrom worked a perfect ninth
for his 22nd save in 26 opportunities.
Andrew McCutchen went 2 for 4 with
an RBI and a run for Pittsburgh, which
has lost seven consecutive overall.
Making his first start in exactly one
month, the Pirates' Zach Duke (3-9)
pitched five effective innings, allowing
two runs on five hits with no walks and
five strikeouts. But he lost for the ninth
time in his last 10 decisions.
In the Astros' first game with former
star Jeff Bagwell as their hitting coach,
the team scored at least five runs for
only the third time in its past 10 contests.


Houston

Bourgs If
Bourn cf
Kppngr2b
Brkmn lb
Pence rf
CJhnsn 3b
AngSnc ss
Quinter c
Myers p
Lyon p
P.Feliz ph
Lndstr p


Pittsburgh
ab rhbi
4 2 1 0 AMcCt cf
4 0 0 0 Tabataif
4 1 2 3 NWalkr2b
4 0 0 0 GJones lb
3 2 2 0 Alvarez 3b
4 0 1 0 Doumitc
3 0 0 1 Milledg rf
4 0 2 1 Cedeno ss
2 0 0 0 Duke p
0 0 0 0 Carrsc p
1 00 0 AnLRc ph
0 0 0 0 Gallghr p
JaLopz p
Meek p
Church ph
Donnily p


ab rhbi
4 1 2 1
4020
3 00 1
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
3 1 1 0
3000
1 00 0
0000
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


Associated Press
Chicago Cubs' Marion Byrd, right, celebrates with Aramis
Ramirez after the Cubs defeated the Philadelphia Phillies
4-3 in Friday's game in Chicago.


Cubs 4, Phillies 3
rnuif^A(ZO Ammi:c Pamir07, hnm.^


CHICAGUU- Aramis Ramirez home-
red with two outs in the bottom of the
eighth Friday for his third hit of the game
and the Chicago Cubs rallied for a 4-3
victory over the Philadelphia Phillies.
Ramirez appears to be coming out
of a season-long slump. His 11th homer
came off Ryan Madson (2-1). It cleared
the bleachers in left field and gave him
14 RBIs in his last eight games.
Sean Marshall (6-2) pitched the
eighth in relief of Ted Lilly and Carlos
Marmol struck out the side in the ninth
for his 17th save in 20 chances.
Ryan Howard hit his 20th homer


Totals 33 58 5 Totals 31 2 6 2 witn two outs in the sixth, a drive onto
Houston 110 002 100 5 the roof of a batter's eye seating sec-
Pittsburgh 000 100 010 2 tion in straightaway center. It was his
LOB-Houston 5, Pittsburgh 4.2B-Keppinger ay
(24), Quintero (8), A.McCutchen (17), Milledge third home run in two games and it put
(17). HR-Keppinger (4). SB-Bourgeois 2 (5). the Phils up 3-1.
S-Ang.Sanchez, Myers. SF-N.Walker. After Howard's blast, the Cubs rallied
Houston H RERBBSO for two in the bottom of the inning with a
Myers W,7-6 72-35 2 2 1 4 two-out rally of their own off Joe Blanton
Lyon H,17 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 as Ramirez doubled and Marlon Byrd
Lindstrom S,22-26 1 0 0 0 0 0 followed with his 10th homer, tying it at 3.
Pittsburgh
Duke L,3-9 5 5 2 2 0 5 Shane Victorino also homered for
Carrasco 1 2 2 2 1 1 the Phillies off Lilly on a 90-degree day
Gallagher 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 at Wrigley Field.
Ja.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Blanton pitched seven innings and
Meek 1 0 0 0 0 3
Donnelly 1 0 0 0 0 2 gave up five hits and three runs with
WP-Duke, Carrasco. Balk-Gallagher. three walks while tying a season-high
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Laz Diaz; with eight strikeouts.
Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, John
Hirschbeck. Lilly, who can be a free agent after
T-2:37. A-23,273 (38,362). the season, has been the subject of


numerous trade rumors and met
Thursday with general manager Jim
Hendry to discuss his Cubs' future.
"He wants to stay here.... And we'd
like for him to stay here," Cubs man-
ager Lou Piniella said before Friday's
game. "At the same time, you never
know what is going to happen."

Philadelphia Chicago
ab r hbi ab r h bi
Rollinsss 4 000 Theriot 2b 40 0 0
Victorino cf 4 1 11 Colvin rf 40 0 0
Werthrf 3 100 D.Leelb 40 0 0
Howard lb 4 112 Ar.Ramirez 3b 43 3 1
B.Francisco 1I40 00 Byrd ocf 41 2 2
Ransom 3b 3 010 A.Soriano If 20 0 0
C.Ruiz c 3 010 S.Castro ss 30 1 0
W.Valdez 2b3 0 00 Soto c 20 0 0
Blantonp 2 000 Lilly p 10 0 1
Ju.Castro phi 000 Fukudome ph 10 0 0
Madsonp 0000 Marshall p 00 0 0
Marmolp 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 3 43 Totals 294 6 4
Philadelphia 000 102 000 3
Chicago 000 012 01x 4
E--Blanton (1). DP-Philadelphia 1. LOB-
Philadelphia 2, Chicago 4. 2B-Ar.Ramirez
(12). HR-Victorino (15), Howard (20),
Ar.Ramirez (11), Byrd (10).
IP H RERBB SO


Philadelphia
Blanton
Madson L,2-1
Chicago
Lilly
Marshall W,6-2
Marmol S,17-20
WP-Lilly.


7 5 3 3 3 8
1 1 1 0 0


Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, Gary
Cederstrom; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Fieldin
Culbreth.
T-2:12. A-40,622 (41,210).


. .


I

I









B4 SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 ScoIi~eoAIw CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


League Leaders For the rCcord
AMERICAN LEAGUE a
BATTING-Hamilton, Texas, .351; MiCabr- Fior7t uLO TTE R Y =
era, Detroit, .346; Morneau, Minnesota, .345;
Boesch, Detroit, .342; Cano, New York, .336;
ABeltre, Boston, .330; DeJesus, Kansas City, CASH 3 (early)
.326. 3-4-6
RUNS-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 70; Youkilis, >.
Boston, 67; MiCabrera, Detroit, 64; Teixeira, CASH 3 (late)
New York, 63; Cano, New York, 61; Hamilton, 4-0-5
Texas, 60; Jeter, New York, 60. PLAY 4 (early)
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 77; Guerrero, 9-0-0-4
Texas, 76; ARdriguez, NewYork, 70; Hamilton, Florida Lottery PLAY 4 (late)
Texas, 65; Konerko, Chicago, 63;TorHunter, Los PLAY 4 (late).
Angeles, 62; Quentin, Chicago, 62. Here are the winning 5-9-7-8
HITS-Hamiton, Texas, 121; ISuzuki, Seat- numbers selected FANTASY 5
tie, 119; Cano, NewYork, 115; MYoung, Texas, Friday in the 4- 14- 17 20 29
110; MiCabrera, Detroit, 108; ABetre, Boston, Florida Lottery: MEGA MONEY
107; DeJesus, Kansas City, 107. F ri-M A M Y
DOUBLES-Hamilton, Texas, 28; Markakis, 8 14 31 32
Baltimore, 28; MiCabrera, Detroit, 27; Longoria, MEGA BALL
Tampa Bay, 27; ABeltre, Boston, 26; Butler, 18
Kansas City, 26; Mauer, Minnesota, 26; VWells,
Toronto, 26.
TRIPLES-Span, Minnesota, 7; Crawford,
Tampa Bay, 6; Pennington, Oakland, 6;Youkilis, _ O n the A R WA Vi S ---
Boston, 5; 8 tied at 4. 5==l- =O n e .s W AV E


HOME RUNS-JBautista, Toronto, 24; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, 22; Hamilton, Texas, 22; Guer-
rero, Texas, 20; Konerko, Chicago, 20; Quentin,
Chicago, 19; VWells, Toronto, 19.
STOLEN BASES-Pierre, Chicago, 32;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 31; RDavis, Oakland, 27;
Gardner, New York, 25; Podsednik, Kansas City,
25; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 25; Figgins, Seattle, 24.
PITCHING-Sabathia, New York, 12-3; Price,
Tampa Bay, 12-4; PHughes, New York, 11-2;
Pettitte, New York, 11-2; Lester, Boston, 11-3;
Verlander, Detroit, 11-5; Buchholz, Boston, 10-
4; Garza, Tampa Bay, 10-5; Pineiro, Los Ange-
les, 10-6; Pavano, Minnesota, 10-6.
STRIKEOUTS-JerWeaver, Los Angeles,
137; FHernandez, Seattle, 131; Lester, Boston,
124; Liriano, Minnesota, 117; Morrow, Toronto,
111; Verlander, Detroit, 110; JShields, Tampa
Bay, 109.
SAVES-Soria, Kansas City, 25; NFeliz,
Texas, 23; RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 23; Rauch,
Minnesota, 20; Gregg, Toronto, 20; Jenks,
Chicago, 20; Papelbon, Boston, 20; MRivera,
New York, 20.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Ethier, Los Angeles, .326; Prado,
Atlanta, .324; Byrd, Chicago, .318; Polanco,
Philadelphia, .318; CGonzalez, Colorado, .314;
Votto, Cincinnati, .314; Pujols, St. Louis, .313.
RUNS-BPhillips, Cincinnati, 66; Prado, At-
lanta, 62; Votto, Cincinnati, 59; Howard,
Philadelphia, 58; Kemp, Los Angeles, 58;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 56; Pujols, St. Louis, 56;
Uggla, Florida, 56; Victorino, Philadelphia, 56;
Weeks, Milwaukee, 56.
RBI-Howard, Philadelphia, 71; Hart, Mil-
waukee, 66; DWright, New York, 65; Pujols, St.
Louis, 64; Loney, Los Angeles, 63; CYoung, Ari-
zona, 61; Gomes, Cincinnati, 60; CGonzalez,
Colorado, 60; Votto, Cincinnati, 60.
HITS-Prado, Atlanta, 122; BPhillips, Cincin-
nati, 108; Byrd, Chicago, 107; Howard, Philadel-
phia, 105; Loney, Los Angeles, 104; Braun,
Milwaukee, 103; CGonzalez, Colorado, 102; Pu-
jols, St. Louis, 102; DWright, New York, 102.
DOUBLES-Byrd, Chicago, 27; Werth,
Philadelphia, 27; Dunn, Washington, 26; Holli-
day, St. Louis, 25; Loney, Los Angeles, 25;
Prado, Atlanta, 25; DWright, New York, 25.
TRIPLES-Victorino, Philadelphia, 8; SDrew,
Arizona, 7; Fowler, Colorado, 7; Bay, NewYork,
6; Pagan, New York, 6; JosReyes, New York, 6;
AEscobar, Milwaukee, 5; Furcal, Los Angeles,
5; Morgan, Washington, 5; Olivo, Colorado, 5.
HOME RUNS-Dunn, Washington, 22; Hart,
Milwaukee, 22; Votto, Cincinnati, 22; Pujols, St.
Louis, 21; Fielder, Milwaukee, 20; Howard,
Philadelphia, 20; Reynolds, Arizona, 20.
STOLEN BASES-Boum, Houston, 28; AM-
cCutchen, Pittsburgh, 20; Morgan, Washington,
20; Pagan, New York,NewYork, 19; JosReyes, New York,
19; HRamirez, Florida, 18; Stubbs, Cincinnati,
17; Torres, San Francisco, 17; Victorino,
Philadelphia, 17; CYoung, Arizona, 17.
PITCHING-Jimenez, Colorado, 15-1; Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 13-5; Carpenter, St. Louis, 10-
3; Lincecum, San Francisco, 10-4; Latos, San
Diego, 10-4; Pelfrey, New York, 10-4; Halladay,
Philadelphia, 10-7.
STRIKEOUTS-Lincecum, San Francisco,
136; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 129; Dempster,
Chicago, 129; Halladay, Philadelphia, 128;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 127; Haren, Arizona, 125;
JoJohnson, Florida, 123.
SAVES-HBell, San Diego, 24; FCordero,
Cincinnati, 24; Capps, Washington, 23; BrWil-
son, San Francisco, 23; Lindstrom, Houston, 22;
FRodriguez, New York, 21; Wagner, Atlanta, 21.


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Selected the contract
of RHP Fernando Cabrera from Pawtucket (IL).
Optioned RHP Robert Manuel to Pawtucket.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Released C Mike
Redmond.
DETROIT TIGERS-Agreed to terms with
LHP Jack Duffey.
NEW YORK YANKEES-Recalled 1 B Juan
Miranda from Scranton-Wilkes-Barre (IL). Op-
tioned OF Kevin Russo to Scranton Wilkes-
Barre.
National League
MILWAUKEE BREWERS-Placed LHP
Doug Davis on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF
Lorenzo Cain from Nashville (PCL).
American Association
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS-Signed INF
Todd Sandell and RHP Austin Coan.
SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS-
Signed RHP Cardoza Tucker and INF Jeff
Hulett.
WICHITA WINGNUTS-Claimed INF Joe
Spiers off waivers from Grand Prairie.
Can-Am League
BROCKTON ROX-Signed INF Jeff Hanson.
NEW JERSEY JACKALS-Released RHP
Brandon Malkowski. Signed INF Travis Jones.
PITTSFIELD COLONIALS-Signed RHP
Kyle Bradley and RHP Matt Lyons.
WORCESTER TORNADOES-Released
RHP Baron Short and INF Gordon Gronkowski.
Signed RHP Justin Knoff.
United League
AMARILLO DILLAS-Signed RHP Chris Hol-
guin.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
BOSTON CELTICS-Agreed to terms with G
Nate Robinson.
MIAMI HEAT-Signed C Joel Anthony and C
Dexter Pittman.
ORLANDO MAGIC-Matched Chicago's
three-year offer sheet to G J.J. Redick.


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Nationwide Series:
Missouri-Illinois Dodge Dealers 250, Qualifying
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: Lucas Oil Sportsman Series
(Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Missouri-Illi-
nois Dodge Dealers 250
11 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: Fram Autolite Nationals, Qualifying
(Same-day tape)
BICYCLING
8:30 a.m. (VERSUS) Tour de France: Stage 13 from Rodez
to Revel
BOXING
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Humberto Soto vs. Ricardo Dominguez
(Taped)
9:45 p.m. (HBO) Luis Carlos Abregu vs. Timothy Bradley,
Welterweights
GOLF
7 a.m. (ESPN) British Open, Third Round
9 a.m. (ESPN) British Open, Third Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Nationwide Tour: Chiquita Classic,
Third Round
3 p.m. (8 NBC) American Century Championship, Second
Round
3 p.m. (11, 20 ABC) British Open, Third Round
(Same-day tape)
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Legends Reno-Tahoe Open,
Third Round
7 p.m. (ESPN) British Open, Best of the Third Round
(Same-day tape)
MLB
2 p.m. (ESPN2) 2010 State Farm Home Run Derby (Taped)
4 p.m. (13 FOX) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Florida Marlins
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Minnesota Twins
SOCCER
4 p.m. (ESPN) Tottenham Hotspur at San Jose Earthquakes


SUNDAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (11, 20 ABC) IRL: Honda Indy Toronto
1 p.m. (SPEED) Rolex Sports Car Series: NJMP 250
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA: Fram Autolite Nationals, Final
Eliminations (Same-day tape)
BICYCLING
7:30 a.m. (VERSUS) Tour de France: Stage 14
GOLF
6 a.m. (ESPN) British Open, Final Round
8 a.m. (ESPN) British Open, Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Nationwide Tour: Chiquita Classic,
Final Round
3 p.m. (8 NBC) American Century Championship, Final
Round
3 p.m. (11, 20 ABC) British Open, Final Round
(Same-day tape)
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Legends Reno-Tahoe Open,
Final Round
9 p.m. (ESPN2) British Open, Best of Final Round
(Same-day tape)
MLB
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Florida Marlins
1 p.m. (SUN) (TBS) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Minnesota Twins
8 p.m. (ESPN) Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago Cubs
RUGBY
9 p.m. (47 FAM) Six Nations: France vs. England (Taped)
SOCCER
3 p.m. (ESPN) Celtic at Seattle Sounders
VOLLEYBALL
Midnight (ESPN2) AVP Nivea Tour: Men's Finals
(Same-day tape)


Local CALENDAR

TODAY'S LOCAL SPORTS
Sectional 7 Little League Tournament
9-10 All-Stars baseball (Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg)
10 a.m. Inverness vs. District 6
9-10 All-Stars softball (Bicentennial Park, Crystal River)
10 a.m. Inverness vs. District 6
Senior All-Stars softball (Bicentennial Park, Crystal River)
Noon Crystal River vs. District 6


SUNDAY'S LOCAL SPORTS
Sectional 7 Little League Tournament
9-10 All-Stars baseball (Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg)
10 a.m. Inverness vs. District 5
9-10 All-Stars softball (Bicentennial Park, Crystal River)
10 a.m. Inverness vs. District 5
Senior All-Stars softball (Bicentennial Park, Crystal River)
10 a.m. Crystal River vs. District 5


Sports BRIEFS


Citrus Storm softball
holding tryouts July 24
The Citrus Storm 12-and-
under travel softball team is
holding tryouts from 10 a.m. to
12 p.m. on July 24 at Whisper-
ing Pines Park in Inverness.
Bring softball-appropriate
clothes and gear to work out in.
CRHS to conduct
sports physical
All Crystal River High School
students who plan to participate
in athletics during the 2010-
2011 school year need to have
an updated physical.
Citrus Chiropractic Group


has set aside Wednesday after-
noon to conduct physical for
CRHS students. All physical
will be conducted at their office
at highway 44 and 2320 Sun-
shine Path, next to Dan's Clam
Stand. Students will be seen in
alphabetical order according to
the first letter of their last name.
The following appointment
times, as scheduled by the
physicians, on this date only, by
the first letter of your last name
are: A-E, 1 p.m.; F-J, 2 p.m.; K-
0, 3 p.m.; P-R, 4 p.m. and S-Z,
4:30 p.m. The cost of the physi-
cals will be $15. Make checks
payable to CRHS.


Lecanto to hold sports
physical next month
Lecanto High School will
hold its annual sports physical
exams from 3-4:30 p.m. Aug. 3
in the LHS gym.
Cost is $15. The monies
raised will be used by the Gen-
eral Athletics fund of LHS.
Middle school students are
welcome. Parents and
guardians must attend.
The 2010-11 physical pack-
ets are online at www.citrus.
k12.fl.us/lhs/ or in the front of-
fice of the high school.
From staff reports


Miller, Miami reach deal


Associated Press

MIAMI Mike Miller's
deal with Miami is finally
complete, clearing the way
for the Heat to finish con-
tracts in the coming days
with Zydrunas Ilgauskas
and Juwan Howard.
Miller's contract was an-
nounced by the team Friday
afternoon. The 6-foot-8
shooter agreed in principle
about a week earlier to a
five-year deal worth about
$25 million and actually
signed his contract Thurs-
day, but it took about an-
other 24 hours for it become
finalized because of other
paperwork issues.
"From the first moment
that we met Mike on July 1, it
seemed like it would be a
match made in heaven,"
Heat president Pat Riley said
in a statement "We consider
him to be the finest perime-
ter shooter in the NBA"
Miller made 48 percent of
his 3-pointers last season for
Washington, second-best in
the NBAbehind Kyle Korver.
He was considered a vital
part of Miami's offseason
plan, which of course started
with the re-signing ofDwyane
Wade and the additions of Le-
Bron James Miller's close


REDICK
Continued from Page B1

"The fact that we have
players that other teams
want makes you pretty flex-
ible," Smith said. "Is it pos-
sible to give out contracts
and move a little bit less
money? Sure. My thing is
you don't want to take a step
back with talent."
At the very least, keeping
Redick assures that
The former Duke stand-
out was the 11th overall pick
in the 2006 draft. He strug-
gled early in his NBA career
but has become a significant
contributor for the Magic.
So much so that Smith de-
cided that Redick and re-
cently signed small forward



GRAND
Continued from Page B1

considered the third out.
Now, normally that might
deflate a team, but not this
group. They had already
scored nine runs in the in-
ning. Therefore, erasing
runs 10 and 11 wasn't going
to deter them from the task
at hand.
Despite West Pasco's an-
swer with two runs in the
second inning, Inverness re-
mained focused and re-
sponded with two more
runs in the third inning. The
team finished the game off
for good, invoking the mercy
rule with three runs in the
bottom of the fourth.
"Our kids have so much
heart. They just never quit,"
Inverness manager Lewis
Lindall said. "We gave up
those two early runs in the
first inning, but I wasn't wor-
ried. I trusted our bats and
they came through."
But it was the systematic,-
methodical way that Inver-
ness scored the nine runs
that was most impressive.
The team delivered on four
hits and four walks and took
advantage of three West
Pasco errors to send 13 bat-
ters to the plate in the frame
en route to a 9-2 lead that


SENIOR
Continued from Page B1

walk by Jordan Martin to
score Maegan McMichen in
the bottom of the fourth and
Bridget Whitley's two-run
ground rule double brought
home Cheyenna Lyons and
McMichen in the fifth to ex-
tend the lead to 7-3.
Breanna Martin, in the
half inning before Whitley's
blast, came on as a relief
pitcher for Crystal River
and quickly walked the
bases loaded with no outs.
The local team averted
any damage, though, by get-
ting a pair of harmless in-
field fly balls and then a
strikeout to end the top of
the fifth.
Crystal River's first run in
the top of the first came
when Gomez singled in
McMichen, who had doubled
and stolen third base before
her teammate's at bat


UMr. W HW
Associated Press
Mike Miller told Memphis radio station WHBQ that he would
sign his five-year contract with the Miami Heat by his scheduled
departure Thursday. Miller agreed in principle to a deal late last
week, and his agent Am Tellem revealed Monday that the
sharpshooter would be signing with Miami.


friend and Chris Bosh.
James said he wanted
Miller to play with him,
even talking the former
Florida Gator into passing
up higher-paying deals for a
chance to sign with Miami.
"He is a multi-faceted
player who can rebound,
handle the ball and make
plays," Riley said. "We ex-
pect big things from him."


Quentin Richardson had
more value than Matt
Barnes, who became a free
agent after one season with
Orlando. Smith said he
never offered Barnes a deal
and all but ruled out the
small forward returning
next season.
"It really came down to
out of those three, which of
the two do we bring in?"
Smith said. "We like what
Matt brought to the table,
but sometimes you have to
make decisions that's best
for your club long-term."
Now Redick is a part of
those plans.
, He might also be a future
starter after Vince Carter
becomes a free agent next
summer. Redick, who was
vacationing in Europe and
not immediately available


they would never relinquish.
Zavier Delgado (2-2, with
4 runs scored) led the frame
off with a single and Tanner
Toxen reached on an error.
Both scored on Westen Kin-
nard's two-RBI double.
Pillsbury then drew a
walk. He and Kinnard
scored on Chance Yates two-
RBI double.
Nicholas Bryant reached
on an error and scored on
Ryan Gladu's RBI single.
Three walks to the next
four batters C.J. Bianco,
Delgado and Kinnard --
loaded the bases and forced
Gladu in with the frame's
seventh run.
That set the stage for Pills-
bury's second plate appear-
ance in the inning where
he smashed the grand slam
that was but wasn't.
In the third inning, Inver-
ness scored two more runs
without the benefit of a base
hit Delgado and Kinnard (1-
1, double, 2 runs scored) both
walked and scored later in
the inning because of two
more West Pasco errors.
While the two runs in the
third may have been consid-
ered gifts, Inverness cer-
tainly earned the three
deciding runs of the game as
their bats scorched the West
Pasco defense in the bottom
of the fourth.
First, Gladu got hit by a


13-14 Junior Softball
Dunnellon 7, Safety Harbor 6
Leslie Maddox cracked a
walk-off double to score Ari-
anna Wunderly with the winning
run as Dunnellon erased a four-
run deficit over the final three
innings.
Down 6-5 heading into its
final at-bat, Dunnellon had
Marissa Pool walk and score
the tying run off Paige Richards'
fielder's choice.
That came after the team
plated three runs in the bottom
of the fifth inning to draw closer.
Dunnellon plays West Tampa
today.
9-10 Minor Softball
Tarpon Springs/Dunedin 12,
Inverness 1
District 15 champion Inver-
ness didn't look very sharp, giv-
ing free passes to six of its
opponent's opening batters dur-
ing a seven-run first inning.
Tarpon Springs/Dunedin
(TS/D) manufactured its runs
by drawing walks and wreaking


Miller becomes the sixth
Heat player under contract
for next season, joining
Wade, Bosh, James, Mario
Chalmers and Udonis
Haslem. Ilgauskas (who
agreed with Miami on Tues-
day) and Howard would fig-
ure to.become the next two
names formally added to the
mix, possibly as early as this
weekend.


for comment, was told of the
decision Thursday night by
Magic coach Stan Van
Gundy.
That alone shows how far
Redick has come.
Van Gundy limited
Redick's playing time so
much in 2008 that the shoot-
ing guard and his agent
went public with the frus-
tration, asking to get more
minutes or be traded.
"He and I laugh about it
now. His agent and I laugh
about it now," Smith said.
"Back to what he was to
what he has made himself
become, he's made himself
into a better basketball
player. We kind of snicker
about it now just because he
put in the work, got better
and it really became harder
to keep him off the court."


pitch. Then, Bianco (1-2, 2
runs scored) and Delgado
laced back-to-back singles,
scoring Gladu (1-1, 2 runs
scored). A double steal by
both base runners plated
Bianco's run. Finally, Toxen
ended the game by smoking
a triple into left field that
easily scored the speedy
Delgado.
"It's all about playing
solid fundamentals and
never giving up," Lindall
said. "I mean what can you
say about the effort that C.J.
(Bianco) had out there
tonight. He threw exactly 75
pitches, which is the limit.
He went the whole game for
us and that's huge."
Helping Bianco out was
his team's solid defense,
which played errorless
baseball including several
great plays at shortstop by
"TNT" Toxen who showed
how he's earned his nick-
name, with an explosive ef-
fort in the field and at the
plate.
"What else can you say
about these kids," Linnard
said. "They just keep bat-
tling and you can't teach
that."
John Coscia is the sports
editor of the Chronicle. He
can be reached via e-mail
atjcoscia@chronicle
online.com or by calling
(352) 564-2928.


havoc on the basepaths.
Emily Merino had a triple,
home run and four RBIs and
pitched two scoreless innings to
earn the victory for TS/D.
Inverness' only run came in
the top of the fourth when Madi-
son Moeckel's single plated
Kayla Stvan to provide the final
margin of the game.
Inverness plays Pinellas
Park at 10 a.m. today.
Other scores
9-10 Minor Softball
* Keystone 16, Pinellas Park 1

11-12 Major Softball
* West Pasco 9, South Sumter
1
* South Tampa 9, Northeast
Seminole 3

13-14 Junior Softball
* West Tampa 13, Seminole 0

13-16 Senior Softball
* Cross Bayou, Skyway was
not over at press time.


B4 SATuRD.,ky, JuLy 17, 2010


SCOREBOARD


CiTRus CouNry (FL) CHRoNicLE









Cii;a s Cuuvry (FL) CHRQVICLF GOLF SAURDAYJLLY 17, 2010 B5


British Open Par Scores
Friday, Second Round, At St. Andrews (Old
Course), St. Andrews, Scotland, Purse: S7.3
million, Yardage: 7,305, Par: 72, (a-amateur):
Louis Oosthuizen 65-67-132 -12
Mark Calcavecchia 70-67-137 -7
Paul Casey 69-69-138 -6
Lee Westwood 67-71 138 -6
Tom Lehman 71-68- 139 -5
Ricky Barnes 68-71 --139 -5
Peter Hanson 66-73 139 -5
Miguel Angel Jimenez 72-67-139 -5
Graeme McDowell 71-68-139 -5
Retief Goosen 69-70-139 -5
Sean O'Hair 67-72 139 -5
Ignacio Garrido 69-71 -140 -4
Toru Taniguchi 70-70-140 -4
Robert Karisson 69-71 -140 -4
Martin Kaymer 69-71 -140 -4
Nick Watney 67-73-140 -4
TigerWoods 67-73-140 -4
Ignacio Garrido 69-71 140 -4
Toru Taniguchi 70-70 140 -4
Robert Karlsson 69-71 -140 -4
Martin Kaymer 69-71 -140 -4
Nick Watney 67-73-140 -4
Tiger Woods 67-73-140 -4
Shane Lowry 68-73-141 -3
VijaySingh 68-73-141 -3
YE.Yang 67-74-141 -3
Dustin Johnson 69-72-141 -3
Ryo Ishikawa 68-73- 141 -3
Jeff Overton 73-69-142 -2
Bradley Dredge 66-76-142 -2
Alvaro Quiros 72-76 142 -2
Adam Scott 72-70-142 -2
Sergio Garcia 71-71-142 -2
Marcel Siem 67-75-142 -2
John Daly 66-76-142 -2
Trevor Immelman 68-74 142 -2
Simon Khan 74-69-143 -1
Andrew Coltart 66-77-143 -1
Lucas Glover 67-76-143 -1
Rory Mcllroy 63-80-143 -1
Camilo Villegas 68-75-143 -1
Peter Senior 73-71-144 E
Kevin Na 70-74-144 E
Marc Leishman 73-71-144 E
Phil Mickelson 73-71 -144 E
Thomas Aiken 71-73-144 E
John Senden 68-76-144 E
Simon Dyson 69-75-144 E
Robert Allenby 69-75 -144 E
lan Poulter 71-73-144 E
Stewart Cink 70-74 144 E
Colm Moriarty 72-73-145 +1
ScottVerplank 72-73-145 +1
Luke Donald 73-72-145 +1
Steve Stricker 71-74-145 +1
Colin Montgomerie 74-71-145 +1
Edoardo Molinari 69-76-145 +1
Heath Slocum 71-74-145 +1
Steve Marino 69-76-145 +1
Hunter Mahan 69-76-145 +1
Ross Fisher 68-77-145 +1
Hirofumi Miyase 71-75-146 +2
Rickie Fowler 79-67- 146 +2
Zach Johnson 72-74-146 +2
Richard S. Johnson 73-73-146 +2
Danny Chia 69-77-146 +2
Robert Rock 68-78-146 +2
Soren Kjeldsen 72-74-146 +2
Chari Schwartzel 71-75-146 +2
a-Eric Chun 71-76-147 +3
Bubba Watson 74-73-147 +3
Oliver Wilson 68-79-147 +3
Thomas Bjorn 70-77- 147 +3
Justin Rose 70-77-147 +3
Rhys Davies 73-75-148 +4
Ben Crane 72-76- 148 +4
Gareth Maybin 72-76-148 +4
Ryuichi Oda 76-72-148 +4
Seung-yul Noh 72-76-148 +4
Ross McGowan 68-80-148 +4
G.Fernandez-Castano 72-76 -148 +4
Ernie Els 69-79-148 +4
Tom Watson 73-75-148 +4
Ben Curtis 76-73-149 +5
Angel Cabrera 73-76-149 +5
Jason Bohn 75-74-149 +5
D.A. Points 72-77-149 +5
Todd Hamilton 72-77-149 +5
Koumei Oda 74-76-150 +6
Jim Furyk 77-73-150 +6
GeoffOgilvy 72-78-150 +6
Hiroyuki Fujita 75-75-150 +6
Justin Leonard 76-74-150 +6
K.J.Choi 76-74-150 +6
Paul Goydos 74-76-150 +6
Bill Haas 73-77-150 +6
Yuta Ikeda 72-78-150 +6
Padraig Harrington 73-77-150 +6
Anders Hansen 77-74-151 +7
Sandy Lyle 75-76-151 +7
Francesco Molinari 74-77-151 +7
Tim Petrovic 71-80-151 +7
Jean Hugo 76-75-151 +7
Paul Lawrie 69-82-151 +7
Loren Roberts 73-78-151 +7
Soren Hansen 72-79-151 +7
Tim Clark 71-80-151 +7
Kurt Barnes 75-77-152 +8
Darren Fichardt 74-78-152 +8
Paul Streeter 76-76-152 +8
Josh Cunliffe 75-77-152 +8
Shunsuke Sonoda 74-78-152 +8
Katsumasa Miyamoto 77-76-153 +9
a-Victor Dubuisson 80-73-153 +9
Mathew Goggin 74-79-153 +9
Alexander Noren 73-80-153 +9
Nick Faldo 72-81 -153 +9
Jerry Kelly 79-75-154 +10
Thomas Levet 73-81 154 +10
Ryan Moore 70-84-154 +10
Jose Manual Lara 80-75-155 +11
Brian Gay 72-83-155 +11
a-Tyrell Hatton 78-77-155 +11
Jae-Bum Park 76-79-155 +11
George McNeill 78-77-155 +11
Jason Dufner 73-82 -155 +11
David Duval 77-78-155 +11
Gary Clark 79-77-156 +12
Glen Day 78-79-157 +13
Martin Laird 74-83-157 +13
a-LaurieCanter 81-79-160 +16
Simon Edwards 79-86 -165 +21
30 Failed to finish second round
Jason Day 71
Steven Tiley 66
Fredrik Andersson Hed 67
Alejandro Canizares 67
Henrik Stenson 68
a-Jin Jeong 68
Mark O'Meara 69
Bo Van Pelt 69
Chris Wood 70
Darren Clarke 70
J.B. Holmes 70
Zane Scotland 70
Tano Goya 70
Kyung-tae Kim 70
Kenny Perry 71
Stephen Gallacher 71
Matt Kuchar 72
a-Byeong-Hun An 72


Michael Sim 72
Tom Pernice Jr. 72
Mark F. Haastrup 72
Mike Weir 73
Davis Love III 73
Gregory Havret 73
a-Jamie Abbott 73
Tom Whitehouse 73
Thongchai Jaidee 75
Phillip Archer 75
Cameron Percy 76
Ewan Porter 81
Leaderboard


1. Louis Oosthuizen
2. Mark Calcavecchia
3. Paul Casey
3. Lee Westwood
3. Steven Tiley
6. Tom Lehman
6. Ricky Barnes
6. Peter Hanson
6. Miguel Angel Jimenez
6. Graeme McDowell
6. Retief Goosen
6. Sean O'Hair


SCORE
-12
-7
-6
-6
-6
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5


Associated Press
Mark Calcavecchia of the U.S. watches his tee shot on the 17th hole Friday during the second round of the British Open
on the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland. He shot a 5-under 67, putting him five shot behind the leader.




Senior surges ahead


Calcavecchia climbs leaderboard

with 5-under 67 on second day


Associated Press

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland
- This year, it's Mark Cal-
cavecchia doing the old
guys proud.
The 1989 British Open
champion posted the early
low score of the day with a
5-under 67 Friday, his best
round ever at St. Andrews.
With the wind wreaking
havoc on the Old Course,
the score stood up, leaving
Calcavecchia alone in sec-
ond place, five strokes be-
hind leader Louis
Oosthuizen.
Not bad for a guy making
the shuffle to the senior
tour after turning 50 on
June 12.
"It's confidence," Cal-
cavecchia said. "You see a
guy like Tom Watson last
year almost winning at 60. It
doesn't really matter how
old you are if you're feeling
good about what you're
doing. I think old guys can
hang with the young guys."


And nowhere, it seems, is
age merely a number than
at the British Open.
Two years ago, Greg Nor-
man nearly won his third.
claret jug at 53, taking a two-
shot lead into the final
round at Royal Birkdale.
Watson's showing at Turn-
berry last year was even
more amazing. A few
months shy of his 60th birth-
day, he went to the 72nd
hole with a one-stroke lead.
Both fell short of becom-
ing the oldest major cham-
pion in golf history, a title
that still belongs to Julius
Boros, who was 48 when he
captured the 1968 PGA.
Now it's up to Calcavecchia
to see if he can finish the
senior surge.
"How about that? Calc!"
said Watson, who is likely to
miss the cut in his final
British Open at St. Andrews
after shooting a 3-over 75
on Friday. "Third year in a'
row. Calc's right in there."
While the monstrous


lengths at U.S. Open
courses and even Augusta
National often take their
toll on the senior set -
heck, they're tough on the
youngsters, too nowhere
does experience matter
more than at a links course,
where fickle weather, de-
ceptive greens and fairways
filled with humps and
bumps make every hole an
adventure.
Calcavecchia hasn't
played the other majors in
two years. But he's missed
only two cuts at the British
Open since 1999. The only
real miscue if you can
call it that in his bogey-
free round Friday came on
17. After eagling the Road
Hole on Thursday, he
missed an 8-footer for
birdie Friday.
"I always enjoy the Open.
Having not played well at
St. Andrews in the past
doesn't mean anything to
me," said Calcavecchia,
whose previous best round
at St. Andrews was a 69 in
2000. "I know the course
and I got a few good breaks
out there, missed a couple
of bunkers by a couple of


yards, and it's a difference
of a couple of shots. Your
ball rolls into one of those
things, and who knows what
you're going to make.
"You need a few good
breaks out here, and so far
I've gotten them."
It's been a while since
Calcavecchia has been in
the mix at a major, and Nor-
man and Watson set the bar
pretty high. But Calcavec-
chia is going to enjoy this -
and not simply because this
is one of those rare tourna-
ments where wife Brenda
is on the bag. Or because he
gets to enjoy a pint or two of
that Scottish ale he enjoys
so much.
"When you're 30, I don't
think you think about it. I
thought 50-year-olds were
pretty (darn) old when I was
30," Calcavecchia said. "Or
your parents are 50, you
think, 'How can anybody be
that old?' But now that I'm
50, you really don't think
about what you were think-
ing about when you were 30.
"I haven't grown up any.
I'm still 30," Calcavecchia
said. "I may feel 50 or 60.
But inside, I'm still 30."


Watson bids farewell to St. Andrews


American plan

to play at future

British Opens

Associated Press

ST ANDREWS, Scotland
- Tom Watson put one
hand on the Swilcan
Bridge, bent over and
kissed the ancient stones.
This was no tearful good-
bye. Rather, a fond farewell,
Watson played his last
round in a British Open al
St. Andrews on Friday, as-
sured of missing the cul
after shooting a 3-over 75.
"St. Andrews, when I first
played here, I didn't like it,'
he said. "But I learned tc
like it. And, eventually, tc
love it."
Several hundred fans
stuck around in the fading
light for one last glimpse of
Watson on the Old Course.
and he didn't disappoint.
With playing partners
Padraig Harrington and
Ryo Ishikawa well ahead so
as not to steal his moment
Watson kissed the bridge
and then took a last, nostal-
gic walk over it.
As applause and shouts
of "We love you, Tom!" rang
out, Watson stood on top of
the bridge, took off his cap
and waved it at the crowd.
He gave a thumbs up and
then stood still, soaking it




ANDREWS
Continued from Page BI

birdies in his round of 67,
finishing with a 15-foot
birdie putt
Far more compelling
were the players trying to
make par as the wind
raged off St. Andrews Bay.
No one suffered quite
like McIllroy.
One day after his
record-tying 63, the 21-
year-old from Northern


Associated Press
Tom Watson of the U.S. stands on the Swilken Burn bridge and gives the thumbs up on
his final round at St. Andrews. Watson shot a 3-over 75 during the second round of the
British Open on the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland. He will not make the cut.


f all in just as his old
, friends and rivals Arnold
Palmer and Jack Nicklaus
3 had done before him.
I "It just seemed the right
thing to do," Watson said. "I
, thought of Arnold on the
bridge and I thought of Jack
on the bridge. Their last
Opens were both right here
3 at St. Andrews. My last
D Open is not, the good Lord
f willing and the creek don't
rise."
Thanks in large part to
I Watson, the Royal and An-
t cient now allows past


Ireland was blown away by
shots into the rough and
putts that he could not con-
trol in the wind. He wound
up with an 80 and staggered
off the course 11 shots out of
the lead.
"I think all the guys were
finding it tough this after-
noon, and I just let it get
away from me a little bit,"
Mcllroy said. "I actually did
well to par the last three
holes, if I'm totally honest. It
could have been an 82 or an
83. I'm here for the week-
end, so it's not all bad, but


champions to play the Open
until they are 65.
He put on a feel-good
show for the ages at Turn-
berry last year, nearly be-
coming the oldest major
champion in history a few
months shy of his 60th
birthday. He went to the
72nd hole with a one-stroke
lead, but there was no mag-
ical ending he missed an
8-foot par putt and then lost
the playoff to Stewart Cink.
While almost everyone
outside of Cink's family was
crushed, Watson was gra-


definitely a complete con-
trast to what it was like yes-
terday"
How tough?
Of the last 75 players who
completed the round, none
broke par. Thirty players had
to return Saturday morning
to finish the second round,
including British Amateur
champion Jin Jeong, who
was at 5-under par.
Woods won the last two
times at St. Andrews by a
combined 13 shots. The Old
Course was nothing like it
was Friday afternoon, and it


cious in defeat That gentle-
manly manner is part of
what has drawn fans to him
for so many years, and that
love was evident Friday
night.
Fans leaned out second-
floor windows of one of the
hotels lining the 18th hole to
cheer him. Every time he
started to walk off the
Swilcan Bridge, they broke
into a new round of ap-
plause to hold him there just
a few seconds longer. Fi-
nally, with one long, last look
around, he waved and left.


was rare for the world's No.
1 player to feel so satisfied
after a 73.
He three-putted the first
two holes as the wind made
lag putts difficult to get
within 6 feet. Woods fin-
ished with the most dra-
matic shot of this
tournament, a driver on the
357-yard 18th hole that
climbed the hill and rolled
within inches of banging
into the pin. His eagle putt
caught the left lip, meaning
one more stroke he has to
make up.


--i


gusting around 40 mph, play
was actually suspended
midafternoon for 65 minutes.
"I would say it was un-
playable for a wee while be-
fore they stopped it, to be
honest," said Lawrie, who was
already 4 over when play was
suspended. "When you're
over three- and four-foot putts
and the ball is (moving) all the
time, I think it's unplayable."
Lawrie was on the 10th
green when play was
stopped. Some golfers came
back to the clubhouse while
others parked themselves on
the grass and relaxed. Lawrie
headed for one of the nearby
food stands and grabbed
some sausage and fries.


Westwood


near top


despite


bad leg


Englishman

at 6-underfor

British Open

Associated Press

ST. ANDREWS, Scot-
land For a guy with a
bum leg, Lee Westwood is
playing pretty well.
The Englishman is at 6-
under for the British
Open, leaving him tied for
third when the second
round was halted by dark-
ness Friday Westwood
shot a 1-under 71 on a day
when blustery winds
made any score below par
look like a 62.
"I'm in a good position
for the weekend, I think,"
he said. "(But) I'm behind
where I ought to be. I
should really be 10-under,
at worst. But I didn't play
last week I didn't really
hit any balls, either."
Westwood was at the
French Open two weeks ago
when his right calf swelled
so badly doctors feared the
37-year-old might have a,
blood clot Further tests
showed he had instead rup-
tured the plantaris muscle,
which runs down the calf.
He played the tournament
- tying for 18th but
skipped last week's Scottish
Open at Loch Lomond to
give the leg a chance to
heal.
He took almost all of
last week off, not hitting
balls until Friday, and
played just one full prac-
tice round before the
Open began.
"I knew I was hitting the
ball well, so there was not
really any need to do too
much practicing," West-
wood said. "I'm just a bit
rusty on the greens, which
I might expect. We can
sharpen it over the week-
end and, no matter what
the conditions are, I've
still got a couple good
scores in me."
The No. 3 player in the
world has finished in the
top 20 in all but three of his
14 starts this year, includ-
ing getting his second PGA
Tour win at St Jude's. He's
been in contention at each
of the four majors at least
once, including finishing
second at this year's Mas-
ters and tying for third at
Turnberry and the PGA
last year.
Backed up
This wasn't the kind of move
Paul Lawrie wanted to make.
The last British player to win
his own Open shot a 10-over
82 in Friday's blustery condi-
tions, a 13-stroke swing from
the first round. At 10 over for
the tournament, he's all but
assured of missing the cut for
the fourth time in five years.
'That was one of the tough-
est days out on the golf course
I can ever remember, to be
honest," the 1999 British Open
champion said. "But I played
very poorly, putted and
chipped even worse, so 82
was about right. I really strug-
gled, just couldn't quite get into
it at all. Had a poor three-putt
at the third from not very far
away, and it just got worse."
Lawrie opened with a 69
on Thursday, only the second
time since 2001 he'd broken
70; he shot 68 in the final
round at Tumberry last time.
But he went off in the very
first group of the day, when
the Old Course was playing
as mild as it gets.
On Friday, it was about as
nasty as it gets. With winds


SATURDAY, JULY 17, 201o BS


GOLF


CiiiLs Couvry (FL) CHRo-vicLE










E age B6 SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2.-



NTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Most-watched
video on YouTube
NEW YORK Justin
Bieber's music video for
"Baby" is the most-
watched video ever on
YouTube.
The 16-year-old pop
star's video passed Lady
Gaga's "Bad Romance"

take the
all-time
lead.
S More
than 246
million
have
watched
Justin Bieber's
Bieber video on
the
Google Inc.-owned web-
site.
Bieber's video and
Lady Gaga's switched po-
sitions briefly Friday, but
as of late afternoon,
Bieber was ahead by
more than 600,000 views.


Panel upholds
Snipes sentence
ATLANTA A federal
appeals panel has upheld
a three-year prison sen-
tence on federal tax
charges for film star Wes-
ley Snipes.
The 11th Circuit Court
of Appeals in Atlanta
concluded Friday that
the judge properly sen-
tenced Snipes to three
years in federal prison.
Attorneys for the action
movie star argued that
the sentence was "unrea-
sonable" and that he
should have been
granted a hearing to de-
cide whether his trial
should have been held in
New York instead of
Florida. A jury convicted
Snipes in 2008 of three
misdemeanor counts of
willful failure to file his
income tax returns.

Ad campaign goes
viral for Old Spice
NEW YORK In one
of the largest viral video
ad campaigns ever
launched, Old Spice is
swarming YouTube.
The Procter & Gamble
Co. brand released more
than 180 videos featuring
the campaign's star, ex-
football player Isaiah
Mustafa. In the videos, he
responds personally to
online queries or com-
ments from various Web
users and some famous
ones, including Ellen De-
Generes and Alyssa Mi-
lano.
The videos, all of
which feature Mustafa in
a towel speaking directly
to the camera, have been
steadily
released
over the
Mustaf past fewp
days. On
Friday,
they ac-m
for eight
Isaiah of this year
Mustafa most pop-
ular 11P
videosion YouTubeeand
more than 21 million
views in total award.
The "Smell Like a Maeports
ad campaign was
launched earlier this year
by Portland, Ore.-based
ad agency
Wieden+Kennedy. The
television spots have been
popular and the first TV
spot won a Cannes adver-
tising festival award.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Archaeologists work Thursday on an excavation site of London's first theater. In the middle of London is a plot of earth,
dug across with trenches and studded with old bricks. If theater has hallowed ground, this is it. It is the site where William
Shakespeare's plays were performed and where the Bard himself once trod the boards.


New playhouse will be built on historic Shakespeare theater site


Associated Press


LONDON- In the middle ofLondon,
a plot of earth is dug across with
trenches and studded with old bricks. If
the world of theater ever has hallowed
ground, this is it
It's the site of London's first theater,
where William Shakespeare's plays
were performed and where the Bard
himself once trod the boards.
Archaeologists who have been dig-
ging here since 2008 have uncovered a
section of outer wall and floor
surface from the building, 3- *-
completed in 1576 and known
simply as The Theatre -
whose timbers were later
used to build The Globe the-
ater.
Now a London drama
troupe plans to erect a new
building on the site, bringing
live performances backto the
spot where Elizabethan '
drama flourished more than
400 years ago.
This week actor Paul Mc-
Gann stood amid the dirt and
bricks and recited the pro-
logue to "Romeo and Juliet" .
- a play historians believe
had its premiere on this site and in
which Shakespeare may have taken a
small acting role.
"It's possible the prologue was spoken
by Shakespeare himself," McGann said.
"I hope so. I want to channel him."
For theater fans and especially for
actors this spot is special.
Shakespeare's influence on English
culture is incalculable, but relatively
few physical links to him remain.
Tourists can visit his birth and burial
places in the town of Stratford-upon-
Avon. In London, there's a reconstruc-
tion of the Globe playhouse where he
worked near its original site south of the
River Thames. Remains have been
found nearby of The Rose, another Eliz-
abethan venue.
Nowhere else but at The Theater,
however, can actors stand exactly where
their Elizabethan predecessors once
stood.
"Extraordinary," said actor Susannah
Harker, who performed parts of'AMid-


summer Night's Dream" alongside Mc-
Gann at the site on Thursday "To some
people it might look like a bit of old
brick, but to me it stimulates the actor's
imagination."
The remains of The Theatre were dis-
covered underneath a Victorian ware-
house, which, unlike many similar
buildings, had no basement That meant
the layers below had been preserved.
The Tower Theatre Company, an 80-
year-old amateur troupe that has been
searching for a permanent home,



6 To some people it migl
look like a bit of old brick,
but to me it stimulates
the actor's imagination.
: ,
SSusannah H
actor, talking about .The."


bought the site a few years ago and
asked Museum of London archaeolo-
gists to have a look
"We thought we'd better find out
whether there was anything under
there that would stop us building," said
Penny Tuerk, chair of the troupe's
trustees. "And they came back and said,
Actually, we've found a bit of Tudor
brickwork' We got tremendously ex-
cited at that point"
The bricks were the remains of a
curved wall, indicating a polygonal
building, a common style for Eliza-
bethan theaters. Beside that was a
patch of hard-pressed gravel, part of the
area where the groundlingss" the-
atergoers holding cheap standing-
room-only tickets crowded together
to watch plays.
Even older remains have been found,
identified as part of a brewhouse from
a medieval priory that once stood on
the site. The archaeologists believe it
was still functioning in Elizabethan


times, serving beer to thirsty theatergo-
ers.
They have also dug up drinking ves-
sels and pottery shards, including a
piece of a 16th-century jug decorated
with the face of an Elizabethan gentle-
man, distinctive in his ruff and pointy
beard.
The site lies behind white boards on
a side street in Shoreditch,-a scruffy
area of bars and clubs east of London's
business district In Elizabethan times
it lay outside the city walls free from
regulation by city leaders
hostile to theaters and other
sp disreputable entertainments.
ht ( "It was called the suburb of
S- sin," said Museum of London
.5 archaeologist Heather
Knight. "It has always been
( the area of entertainment
Woo and fun."
- 7) The Theater was London's
first successful playhouse -
r ,e previously, plays had been
a rke staged in inn yards and other
j makeshift spaces. There is
evidence that an earlier
venue, The Red Lion, was
built outside the city in the
1560s but lasted only a few
months.
It's thought plays including "Romeo
and Juliet" and "The Merchant of
Venice" as well as works by Christo-
pher Marlowe and Thomas Kyd were
performed at The Theatre, which
served as a base for Shakespeare's
troupe, the Chamberlain's Men.
But by 1598, a dispute with the site's
landlord threatened to leave the com-
pany homeless. Shakespeare and his
colleagues took drastic action: over the
Christmas holiday, while the landlord
was away, they dismantled the building
and hauled its stout oak beans into stor-
age. In the spring, the timbers were fer-
ried across the river and used to build a
new theater, the Globe.
Archaeologists say they should finish
their excavations next month, after
which Tower Theatre hopes to begin
erecting a new theater on the site. The
company has planning permission, a
design and 4 million pounds. It is cam-
paigning to raise 3 million pounds more
and hopes to start construction in 2012.


Today's


Birthday: In the year ahead, share with others what they
help you acquire and it will enhance and magnify what each
person does for the other.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Those with whom you spend
your day will follow the example the majority sets. If most
people seem congenial and at peace with the word, so will
be the rest of the group.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Rest your muscles if you can, and,
do something you do well with your mind, such as writing
letters, making phone calls, paying bills or playing a game
like bridge with your friends.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Its OK if you get involved on a
social level with a friend and end up talking about things of a
commercial nature. One or both of you might have a mon-
eymaking tip for the other.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You're likely to be quite effective
in delegating assignments to others when need be. How-


ever, you'll be even more effective if, instead of passing
everything onto others, you do a job yourself.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Don't make a person whom
you know is in need of help come to you, hat in hand. Qui-
etly go to him/her first and offer whatever it is that you can
comfortably manage without offending your pal.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Others looking for your
shortcomings can be avoided if you aren't judgmental about
them. Picking on others can be avoided by appreciating
what brought you together in the first place.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Discussing your ambitious
intentions with others should be avoided until your plans are
a fait accompli. Delays in carrying things out could be em-
barrassing if everything doesn't go as planned.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you find yourself involved
with someone who has a mind you greatly admire, do more
listening than talking. The encounter could be very pleasant,


as well as constructive.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It will be much easier to ad-
just or change a specific condition that is gnawing at you
then merely complaining about it. Take it upon yourself to do
what you can when you can.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Relax and don't take yourself
or life too seriously. If you keep everything light and easy,
and let events run their own course, this could be a very
pleasant day for you.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Make an effort to do some-
thing outside in the fresh air and sunshine that will keep you
moving and active. It could do more for your well-being than
anything else you might engage in at this time.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Partake in something like golf
or tennis with your friends for the mere enjoyment of being
outdoors and with fun people. Unstructured activities should
produce a genuinely good time.


Florida


SO YOU KNOW
a Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, JULY 15
Fantasy 5: 7 29 30 31 35
5-of-5 1 winner $203,073.56
4-of-5 235 $139
3-of-5 7,731 $11.50
WEDNESDAY, JULY 14
Powerball: 20 21 23 38 42
Powerball: 6
5-of-5 PB No winner
5-of-5 9 winners $200,000
Lotto: 13 21 25 26 37 46
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 23 $6,843
4-of-6 1,724 $74
3-of-6 35,728 $5
Fantasy 5: 7 15 19 23 22
5-of-5 4 winners $57,045
4-of-5 399 $92
3-of-5 11,556 $8.50
TUESDAY, JULY 13
Mega Money: 1 -5- 18 19
Mega Ball: 16
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 17 $378.50
3-of-4 MB 85 $167.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
8 To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go.to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
.. .

Today is Saturday, July 17,
the 198th day of 2010. There
are 167 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in His-
tory:
On July 17,1918, Russia's
Czar Nicholas II and his fam-
ily were executed by the Bol-
sheviks.
On this date:
In 1821, Spain ceded
Florida to the United States.
In 1936, the Spanish Civil
War began as right-wing
army generals launched a
coup attempt against the
Second Spanish Republic.
In 1944, during World War
II, 320 men, two-thirds of
them African-Americans,
were killed when a pair of
ammunition ships exploded
at the Port Chicago Naval
Magazine in California.
In 1959, influential jazz vo-
calist Billie Holiday, known to
her fans as "Lady Day," died
in a New York City hospital at
age 44.
In 1975, an Apollo space-
ship docked with a Soyuz
spacecraft in orbit in the first
superpower link-up of its
kind.
In 1981, 114 people were
killed when a pair of walk-
ways above the lobby of the
Kansas City Hyatt Regency
Hotel collapsed, one atop the
other, during a tea dance.
In 1996, TWA Flight 800, a
Paris-bound Boeing 747, ex-
ploded and crashed off Long
Island, N.Y., shortly after
leaving John F. Kennedy In-
ternational Airport, killing all
230 people aboard.
Ten years ago: Ajet
smashed into two homes in
Patna, India, killing a total of
60 people on board and on
the ground (three passengers
survived).
Five years ago: The Iraqi
Special Tribunal filed its first
Criminal case against Sad-
dam Hussein for a 1982
massacre of Shites
One year ago: Former
CBS anchorman Walter
Cronkite died in New York at
92.
Today's Birthdays: Co-
median Phyllis Diller is 93.
Jazz singer Jimmy Scott is
85. Actor Donald Sutherland
is 75. Rock musician
Spencer Davis is 68. Actor
David Hasselhoff is 58.
Singer Phoebe Snow is 58.


Singer Regina Belle is 47.
Actor Jason Clarke is 41.
Country singer Luke Bryan is
34. Hockey player Marc
Savard is 33.
Thought for Today:
"Dreams have as much influ-
ence as actions." -
Stephane Mallarme, French
essayist and poet (1842-
1898).













RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Wisdom of experience


Nancy Kennedy


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Intern John Lup, left, listens to the Rev. Bob Miller on a recent morning at the First Christian Church of Homosassa. Lup is studying to become
a minister at a school in Kissimmee and is interning in Homosassa.

Future pastors intern with seasoned vets to learn what can't be taught in class


"Don't let anyone

look down on

you because you

are young, but

set an example

for the believers

in speech, in life,

in love, in faith

and in purity."
i Timothy 4:12


NANCY . Y
Chronicle


rom the early days of the Chris-
tian church, older pastors have
taken young pastors-in-training
under their wings, just as the Apostle
Paul did with Timothy, his "son in the
faith."
Continuing the tradition, 20-year-old
John Lup, a ministry student at
Florida Christian College in Kissim-
mee, is completing an internship at
First Christian Church in Homosassa,
under the wing of senior pastor the
Rev. Bob Miller.
"What I do, he does," Miller said.
Together, they've visited the sick
and homebound and studied the
Bible. Lup is reading through the New
Testament every two weeks.
They've also been systematically
working through 101 practical min-
istry tips things not learned in a
seminary classroom.
"We go through different scenarios,"
Lup said. "Like, 'what would you do in
this situation? How would you handle
it?' He shows me different sides of
being involved in a church."
'A lot of it is just being together and


talking," he said. "I'm soaking in as
much as I can."
Then, at the end of the day Lup goes
home with Miller.
"He's living with us, which is like
having another son in our home,"
Miller said.
It's an up close and personal crash
course in pastoral life. It's learning by
observing how a pastor lives his call-
ing 24 hours a day, seven days a week
"I was always drawn to the ministry,
the academic side of it," Lup said. "I
enjoy the studying aspect of it, getting
to know the Word, but also the rela-
tionship side and being involved in
someone's life."
Lup, who grew up in Kissimmee, is
the son of a preacher and Bible pro-
fessor at the college he attends. Bible
study and church life has been central
to his home life.
"I've taken a lot of classes under my
dad, and I've gotten to know him very
well in class, which is different from
home," he said.
Lup said so far he loves preaching,
although he hates public speaking.
"You wouldn't think a preacher


. Page C5


Religion~


It's summertime!
Vacation Bible School for
ages 3 through 10 is from 6:30
to 8:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday, July 26-30, at First
Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa, 7030 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa.
The theme is "Hero Headquar-
ters." A fantastic week is
planned with amazing Bible he-
roes, powerful projects, super
snacks, action-packed games
and fun. For registration, call
628-5556.
North Oak Baptist Church
in Citrus Springs offers sum-
mer day camp for children K3
through fifth grade. Planned ac-
tivities, free lunch and break-
fast, weekly field trips. Camp is
open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday through Friday and is
licensed by DCF. North Oak
Camp accepts CDS for quali-
fied families and offers multiple
child discounts. Call Karen Pin-
ney, camp director, at (352)
489-3359. The church is at the
intersection of North Citrus
Springs Boulevard and North
Elkcam.
Abba Mission Church free
summer camp for kids who
cannot afford to pay. For infor-
mation, call 465-7383.
Vacation Bible Celebra-
tion from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Sunday through Wednesday at
First Assembly of God, 4201 S.
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness. Young and old will enjoy
the Rev. Don Lunsford of "Spirit
Force" Ministries. Meet Buster,
a loveable hunk of red fur, and


his puppet friends, enjoy action-
packed, adventure-filled stories,
skits, puppet shows, tricks and
more. Pastor Dairold Rushing
invites parents and children of
all ages to attend. For informa-
tion, call 726-1107.
Children from kindergarten
through fifth grade are invited to
attend "Baobab Blast" VBS
from 9 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday at Joy Lutheran
Church, 705 S.W. 83rd Place at
State Road 200, Ocala.
Baobab is a tree grown on the
African Savannah. It can grow
to 98 feet tall and 36 inches
wide. The tree provides foliage,
fruit and bark basic life
needs for many creatures. It
serves as a meeting place for
people to gather it is a sym-
bol of community. Through
music, art projects, games and
Bible stories, the children will
understand how to build nurtur-
ing relationships with God, fam-
ily and others. Fee for the week
is $12 per child. Scholarships
available. For information, call
(352) 854-4509, Ext. 221.
Vacation Bible School
from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday at First Baptist
Church of Beverly Hills, 4950
N. Lecanto Highway at Forest
Ridge. Light westem-style
meals served to partici-
pants. Children preschool
through fifth grade invited. For
more information, call 746-
2970.
Floral City United
Methodist Church invites all
See NOTES/Page C2


VBS hoedown today!


Special to the Chronicle
Tony Montecalvo and Al McNamara and a special cowboy guest wait to sign kids up for Va-
cation Bible School at a big hoedown set for the occasion at 1 p.m. today. Everyone is in-
vited for children's games and activities that day, as well as free pony rides and a free
petting zoo, plus hot dogs, hamburgers and popcorn. VBS "Saddle Ridge Ranch" is from 6
to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Children ages preschool through fifth grade are in-
vited. The church is at 4950 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. For more information, call
746-2970. Y'all come!


Messy


and


blessed
W hen I was 16 or so
I made sand can-
dles.
A hole in damp sand
acts like a mold that you
pour hot wax into. When
the wax dries, you lift out
a candle and brush the
sand off. Voila!
A friend taught me how
to make them while we
were at the beach one day,
and I decided it would be
fun to try it at home. So,
we loaded up my mom's
car with boxes of sand and
once home, I set out to
show Mom what I had
learned by putting huge
hunks of wax and red
crayons in a pot on the
stove to melt. Mom loves
candles and I was eager to
present her with a waxen
masterpiece.
I thought I knew what I
was doing, and I did know
- until the wax got too hot
and flashed into flames.
Panicking, I ran up-
stairs where Mom was
taking a shower and, with
faked calmness, asked
through the door, "Um,
how do you put out a fire
on the stove?"
I don't remember ex-
actly what happened after
See Page C5


Judi Siegal

JOURNAL


Naming


a Jewish


house of


worship

S hakespeare, in Ro-
meo and Juliet,
asks: "What's in a
name? A rose by any other
name still smells as
sweet." Obviously, Shake-
speare did not know
much about Jewish names
for synagogues, for, as one
will discover, names are
very important and have a
lot to say about a particu-
lar congregation.
When the Second Tem-
ple was destroyed by the
Romans in 70A.D. and the
Jews were driven out into
exile, Judaism teetered
on the brink of destruc-
tion. Its central place of
worship was gone and
there was much belief
that God had abandoned
the Jewish people. Some
far thinking rabbis looked
to the future and after
much thought and consid-
eration, arrived at the
conclusion that although
the Temple was de-
stroyed, synagogues
would now fulfill an im-
portant role and that the
future of Judaism would
be secured with a decen-
tralized group of houses
of worship where prayer
and study would replace
the animal sacrificial cult
See NAMES/Page C5


.TES








C2 SATX LR JLI.Y 17. 2010


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

young people from sixth grade
up to come for a new program
titled "Saturday Night ...
Alive," from 7 to 10 p.m. on
July 24. Enjoy music, table ten-
nis, football, pool and board
games. Cafe will offer food for
sale. Door prizes. Free popcorn
and lemonade.
Saddle up and ride to Cir-
cle J Ranch at St. Paul's
Lutheran Church to leam God's
Word. All children in the com-
munity ages 3 through 12 are
invited to join Vacation Bible
School with a dude ranch
theme from 9 to 11:45 a.m.
Monday through Friday, July
26-30. Theme-related songs,
Bible study, games and crafts.
Church is at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway. For information,
call the Rev. Mark Gabb at
(352) 489-3027.
"Creation Everything
God Made is Good" VBS for
kindergarten through fourth
grade from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday, July 26-28
at Hope Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 9425 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. Music,
workshops, snacks, prayer. Call
(352) 489-5511.
Cooking, games, drama,
music, and science are mixed
with Bible stories during Vaca-
tion Bible School at Hope
Evangelical Lutheran Church
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday, July 26-
28. The program is open to chil-
dren who have completed
kindergarten through fourth
grade. Snacks are planned with
the traditional ice cream social
Wednesday evening. Pre-regis-
ter by calling the church office
at (352) 489-5511 or stop by
and fill out a form for each child
for this free program. The
church is at 9425 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
Celebrating 50 Years of
Serving God and the Community
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along

9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River I mile west of Plantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CIRmus couiY
CORKS'
SUNDAY:
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.

TUESDAY:
Home League 11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller

395' roe

-21553


Ca
N "The
W Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community,



SUDYSRIE


g.. Westf
HEKE, YOU'LL FIND Citrus
, CPJ NG; FAMILY
I N CNH FAMI L Church of Christ
IN CHP.JST!


CKYSVTL
RIVEK a t-
UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH H

4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)


E Crystal 795-3148
River www.crumc.com
0 Rev. David Gill, Pastor
Foursquare Sunday Worship
Gospel Chr 8:00 Early Communion
Gospel Church 9:0 Praise & Worsip
11:00 Traditional


1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pmr

Pastor Brona Larder


Bible Study
At 9:30 and 11:00 For All Ages.
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship Sunday, 4:30
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 7a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
i. A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


9592 W. Deep Woods
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.

'



US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
I Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00
EVANGELISTS
Melvin Curry
David Curry


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


next to the firehouse.
First Assembly of God in
Crystal River is offering kids in
first through sixth grade an
awesome time. At MEGA
Sports Camp The Great
Comeback, kids can choose
between soccer, basketball and
cheerleading. It doesn't matter
if they've played all their lives or
just started yesterday, MEGA
Sports Camp helps kids im-
prove their skills. All sorts of
drills and practice games will
get kids focused on the funda-
mentals that make athletes
great. Plus, MEGA Sports
Camp creates a positive and
encouraging environment that
pumps up their confidence and
self-esteem. Between sports
sessions, coaches lead in
songs, tell stories., and do cool
object lessons that help charac-
ter-building themes take hold in
kids' hearts. And most impor-
tantly, kids will discover God's
great love for them. Join the
MEGA Sports Camp team at
First Assembly of God from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday
through July 28. For information
call 795-2594.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave,
downtown Inverness, invites
children 3 years old through
adulthood to participate in Va-
cation Bible School from 5:30 to
8 p.m. Sunday through Thurs-
day, Aug. 1-5. Supper served at
5:30 p.m. Theme: "Baobab
Blast: God's Great Get-To-
gether." Baobab Blast is a
VBS experience designed to be
as lasting and sustaining as the
baobab tree. For information
and to register, call 726-3153.
Food & fun
Beverly Hills Community
Church hosts pancake sup-
pers from 4 to 6 p.m. the third
Friday monthly through August
in Jack Steele Hall, 82 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills. Donation
of $4 per person includes bev-
erage, sausage or bacon, and


all the pancakes you can
eat. Tickets available at door.
"Serendipity Men's Pan-
cake Breakfast" from 8 to 10
a.m. the second Saturday
monthly at First United
Methodist Church on Bradshaw
Street in Homosassa. All-you-
can-eat restaurant-style grilled
pancakes and sausages, cof-
fee, tea and orange juice for $4
per person. Public invited. The
needy and homeless are fed
free. Call the church office at
628-4083 so enough food is
prepared for those attending.
Archangel Michael Greek
Orthodox Church hosts Greek
night meals from noon to 8
p.m. the first Saturday monthly
(except in October). Menu in-
cludes various Greek special-
ties and bakery items. Menu
may change month to month.
See menu board when order-
ing. Prices are typically the
same as the church's spring
and fall festivals. Enjoy gyros,
souvlakia, spanakopitas, pastit-
sios, chicken and more with
Greek salad, coffee or iced tea.
The church also hosts weekly
Friday night dinners from 4 to
8 p.m. (except Oct. 29, Nov. 26,
Dec. 24 and Dec. 31). Enjoy
fried fish or calamari ($7.50) or
a combination of both ($9), with
coleslaw, potatoes, hushpup-
pies, dessert, and coffee or iced
tea. All meals are eat -in or
takeout and served at the Can-
tonis Parish Center at the
church property, 4705 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. For
information, call 527-0766.
Special events
Gospel sing featuring the
Marksmen Quartet at 6 p.m.
Sunday, July 25, at New Hope
Baptist Church of Homosassa,
8635 W. Goodman Lane, Ho-
mosassa. Free admission.
Everyone welcome. For infor-
mation, call 795-5391.
Geron Davis and his group
Kindred Souls will perform a
concert as a part of the an-


Movie night


.
..-1 ^^ 7 ". "

Special to the Chronicle
Mary James and Evelyn LaPlante serve food to Cinda at Re-
flections Church Movie Night at Wesley Jones Park on July
9. The movie, "To Save a Life," will be shown again at 6 p.m.
Friday, July 30 at Beverly Hills Park. The movie and food are
free and are sponsored by Reflections Church and the Boys
and Girls Club.


niversary services at 6 p.m.
Sunday, July 25, at Crystal
River Church of God, 2180
N.W. 12th Ave., Crystal River.
Davis, most known for his song,
"Holy Ground," has been in the
Christian music industry for
more than 25 years, and is well
known as a singer, songwriter,
musician and producer. His
music has been used in wor-
ship services by churches
everywhere, across the country
and internationally. Geron and
his wife Becky Davis have be-
come names synonymous with
church music everywhere and
have written many songs to-
gether. Although "Holy Ground"
remains one of the most well
known, a few others include "In
the Presence of Jehovah,"
"Mercy Saw Me," "Holy Of
Holies," and "Peace Speaker."
Co-partners in life and ministry,
Geron and Becky have dedi-
cated themselves to a passion
that is the culmination of talent
and ingenuity, but most impor-
tantly a calling. Not only have

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
M- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pni
795-4479


FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
CRYSTAL RIVER
700 N. Citrus Avenue
352-795-3367
Dr. Tim Lantzy
Senior Pastor
Sunday AM Services
8:45 Contemporary Worship
11:00 -oBlended Worship Service
9:55 Sunday School
(For all ages)
Sunday PM
Youth Bible Study 5:30
Wednesday PM Service
5:00 Family Supper (RSVP)
5:30 Awana Clubs
5:30 Youth Fellowship &
Worship Service
6:00 Bible Study & Prayer













Sunday School
9:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:00 a.m.
Wiggle Worshp
is the place to be
for kids ages 3 through 11
(PreK through 5th grade).
Join us on Sunday mornings:
9 to 10 = games, snacks, & crafts
10 to 10:30 = worship and songs
10:30 to 11 = Bible lesson
AA Meetings
MOM Care
Play with Purpose
* Habitat for Humanity Ministries
Bear Ladies!
Monthly Family Events
Visit our Web site for information
on all of our upcoming ministry
events and activities.

1501 SE Highway 19
Crystal River, FL
352-795-2259
www.fpccrflorida.com
Dr. Robert Allen, Pastor


they grown to be leaders in the
music industry as songwriters
and vocalists, they are an inte-
gral part of the current upward
trend the praise and worship
genre is experiencing around
the world today. Crystal River
Church of God is celebrating
two years in the new sanctuary,
and will host Ministers Randall
and Annette Watson of Ocala
as a part of their morning wor-
ship services at 8:30 and 11
a.m. The event is free, and
open to the public. All are in-
vited to attend. If church groups
of more than 15 are interested
in attending the event, contact
the church office to inquire
about reserved seating in ad-
vance.
New Hope United
Methodist Church on Istachatta
Road in Floral City will have its
annual "Cow Appreciation
Dinner" at 6 p.m. Friday. No
beef served at this dinner. All
are welcome for a wonderful
evening of fellowship and good
food. For more information, call


+ St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River
795-5325
Saturday Informal Worship
5:00pm
Monthly Bluegrass Service
5:00pm
Sunday Worship
7:30am, 8:30am & 11:00am
Sunday School
All Ages & Adults 10:00am
Nursery Provided
Youth Activities
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Crystal iver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided




W First

Assembly

of God

Come One
Come All!!!





Service Times:
Sunday School
9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship
10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible
Study
7:00 p.m.
Richard Hart SeniorPostor



4 MILES EAST OF Hwy. 19

(327529


Carol at (352) 754-9879 or Bev-
erly at (352) 637-3897.
Mark Smythe, talented
musician and singer, will per-
form in concert from 6 to 7:30
p.m. tonight at Our Lady of Fa-
tima Church in the hall, to ben-
efit Good Counsel Camp.
Smythe will also sell his 15-
song CD, "More Precious Than
My Own," for $10. CD sales will
benefit the Blessed Trinity Sis-
ter School in Uganda. A
karaoke soundstage with San-
dra Craig will follow the concert
from 8 to 10 p.m. Come enjoy
the concert and share your tal-
ent. Concessions available for
purchase by OLF Teens for Life
Youth Group serving pizza,
snacks and drinks. Admission is
$3.
Our Lady of Grace Church
in Beverly Hills will host its
"Feel Better Blood Drive"
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. today in
the Parish Life Center. Local
blood supplies are low and are
approaching the critical
stage. Donors will receive a
complimentary continental
breakfast, souvenir T-shirt and
free cholesterol reading. Photo
ID required. Donors must be 16
years of age and older and at
least 110 pounds. For informa-
tion, call Barbara Waitkevich at
249 7394 or Don Irwin at 527
8450.
Suncoast Baptist Church
will celebrate "Gospel Music
Week" continues with a Gospel
concert featuring "Sonshine
Quartet" at 10:55 a.m. Sunday
followed by a potluck dinner.
Bring a favorite dish. All invited.
Church is at 5310 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19), Homosassa.
For information, call 621-3008.
Inverness Church of God
will have as its guest speaker
Bruce Chivers during the wor-
ship service at 6 p.m. Sunday.
Public invited. Church is at 416
U.S. 41 South, Inverness. For
information, call 726-4524.
See Page C3


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
Saturday 4:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 A.M.
1 'in-in A


S 9'-rriilte1
C:.:irr'ir,,i lSt


I' U.r, A. NeI.
Hc'trt ot wE.i


[ 2-7I0


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.- 11:00 A.M.- 6:00 PM,
Wednesday a
7:30 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. Bob Dickey
Ev. Charlie Graham Sr.
795-8883 746-1239
503-2331


GULF-TO-

LAKE

CHURCH
(SBC)


Rev. & Mrs. Bertine
"Exciting &
Contagious Worship"

Sunday 8:00, 9:30
and 11:00 am
Adult Worship
Kid's Worship -
(Worship just for Kids)
5:30 pm Evening
Activities:
*Adult Bible Studies
Teen Program
(Grades 6-12)
Kids Connection
(3 yr. old 5th Grade)

^Hwy 44, Cryst lRe


Places of worship that ; :.... '". ;;' :.,
IPlaces of worship that
,=liP.. -. ^ I ... ^-,,, J


oter love, peace ana


harmony to all.

C'oit' Oil O 'HIS' lo I is11 i, i ,t0 Mi1, 1 llirt ,l..

SERVICIG THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA
. ,,Fa-, 7-s ',,--.,,"* .:: : ; .* "-


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship with Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Sunday
9 00 arr, Sunday School iIn A, :,.,..p
0 30 amn Worshrp Celebralin
Chorr 3pe..al Muse ; 1 'ori WiorhiUp
Sunday Night
6 pmrn tV hip .elebraliuri,
Wednesday Night
7 pm Worship Celebraliorn
Children s Awanas Group
Youth A.ciilces


RELIGION


I







CTRnUS COLTWY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

The Homosassa United
Methodist Church will have a
"Christmas in July" bag sale
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
through Saturday, July 24 at the
church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa. Come fill a large
bag for $5.
Watercolor classes are
offered twice monthly at First
Presbyterian Church of Crystal
River, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19, north
of Sweetbay. Next class is at 9
a.m. Friday. Have a wonderful,
artistic time ($6 with own


RELIGION


brushes, paint and paper; $8
without.) Call the church office
at 795-2259 for information.
Inverness Church of God
will have a healing service at 6
p.m. Sunday, July 25. Prayers
will focus on those with cancer,
fibromyalgia, sleeping disorders
and arthritis. The service will
close with a prayer for all others
in attendance. Public invited.
Church is at 416 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness. For information, call
726-4524.
The Friendship Caravan
is coming to Ocala. This tal-
ented group of Israeli Scouts
cum goodwill ambassadors
from Israel, bring to the stage
singing, dancing and humor ap-


propriate for the whole family.
The troupe will perform at 7
p.m. Monday, July 26.Tickets
are $8. Call Estelle at (352)
861-2542 or Shirley at (352)
873-6186 for information.
Movie night at Beverly
Hills Skate Park at 6 p.m. Fri-
day, July 30. Reflections
Church and the Boys and Girls
Club will show the movie "To
Save A Life." Admission is free
and so are the snacks. Come
see a great movie under the
stars with your friends and fam-
ily.
North Oak Baptist Church
of Citrus Springs will offer a
study in the Book of Revela-
tion beginning Sunday, Aug. 1,


at 6 p.m. This study is taught by
Dr. Charles Hayes, retired vice
president of Central Florida
Community College and former
Southern Baptist pastor. No
charge. Community invited. The
church is at the intersection of
North Citrus Springs Boulevard.
and North Elkcam in Citrus
Springs. For information, call
(352) 489-1688 or 746-1500.
FootSteps Preschool
with daycare hours, also be-
fore- and after-school care, will
be offered at First United
Methodist of Invemess, 3896 S.
Pleasant Grove Road (two
miles south of Applebee's, on
the right). Hours are from 6:30
a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through


Friday, beginning Aug. 2, for
ages 3 months to 10 years.
Christian-based care and cur-
riculum. For more information,
call Pam at 344-4331.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church's next Rite of
Christian Initiation for Adults
(RCIA) season begins
Wednesday, Aug. 4. RCIA is
open to everyone, Catholic and
non-Catholic, who would like to
learn more about the Catholic
faith. RCIA will meet from 7 to
8:30 p.m. in the parish office at
1460 W. St. Elizabeth Place,
(directly behind the church at
1401 W. Country Club Blvd.,
Citrus Springs). For informa-
tion, call (352) 489-4889.


SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 C3

Gospel meetings featur-
ing guest speaker Allen Bailey
on Aug. 11-15 at Hernando
Church of Christ, 7187 N.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491). Services are at 7
p.m. Wednesday through Fri-
day, 5 p.m. Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday with a second
service after lunch. For informa-
tion or directions, call David
Smith at 400-5222 or James
Mentz at 341-5507.
Boys and girls from kinder-
garten through sixth grade, in
the southwestern area of Mar-
ion County and Ocala, are en-
couraged to register for
See "' Page C4


Places of


offer love


and harm

Come on over to "His"

SERVICING THE COMML


w

h,


101

housT

JNITIE
-* .". %'\,.


worship that '


peace ....


ny to all. .

e. your spirits will be lifted!!!

:S OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Special
Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call
Beverly at
564-2912
For
Advertising
Information



T Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith
known for engaging
all persons in the
love and truth of
Jesus Christ.
Bishop Jim Adams
Vicar
527-0052
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:00 am
Adult Christian
Formation
9:15 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am I
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
:. wwwSOTHEC.org .:


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
9:30 AM Sunday School
10:45 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available


L.C1~LS.*
L


935 S. Crystal Glen Dr. Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwyv.44 jusl E. of 490
527-3325


-- 0. 1 -

S nd Sr Sic9

Satrda Serv* itt' 6 :0 M-i .
r lllT* ,'lf[ rTi!
Weekl 'yCommunion
Felowsip.fte Suda
Worship .


Sunday
9:30 AM..................Discovery Time
11:00AM.................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.................. Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ...................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept.- Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.................. Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1 mi.eastofUS.19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O.Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
e-mail: gbc@tampabay.rr.com
0198872


FAITH BAPTIST

CHURCH
lHomosassa Springs
Pastor Chris (-O ens
SUNDAY
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 9:45 am
WORSHIP: 11:00 am & 6 pm
WEDNESDAY
WORSHIP: 7 pm
YOUTH: 6:30pm
Independent & Fnrdamenita!
On Sparan I ',ile f,:rnm i .i lS
oA'fC.,rdirij 628-4793


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
36, Floral City, FL.


Hcrnando
Churchor
TheNazarene
.4 Place to BiehiI'

2101 N. Florida Ave.
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided
"The Church with the big r"

*CHILDREN
*YOUTH
*SINGLES
*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor


S/.


HERNANDO

United
Methodist
Church


OPa&
DOWr


"A Safe Sancti y ', I'lp r. ,I ,a f,i,,,
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1/2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245

Rci rend
helly Greenahald
.

Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.


Sclolaic, a


Iomaui (iloi

Lit re can/o


Masses:
Saturday Vigil
4:00 p.m.
Sunday
9:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m.

Daily Mass:
8:30 a.m. Mon. Fri.
Confessions:
Saturday 2:45 3:30 p.m.

4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida 34461
(352)746-9422
www.stscholastica.org
Located one mile south of
Hwzy 44 on SR 490 adjacent
to Pope John Paul II
Catholic School


Douglas & Teresa
Alexander Sr.
Sunday School 9am
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study 7pmr
3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemrnando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com
"The perfect church for a
people who aren't"


Homosassa Springs
S C '. Hf. -.'\'n ..-'L i- L'H I I I..lH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com

U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomersfeel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Steven Todd Riddle
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


GOOD


SHEPHERD

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
ELCA

Come

Worship

With Us!

Worship
9:30 AM.

Fellowship
after Worship
Weekly
Communion
Nursery
Provided
Building Is Barrier-Free

746-7161
Hwy. 486
Across From
Citrus Hills Boulevard
Rev. Kenneth C. Blyth, Pastor
http://gslutheran.googlepages.com
% _-f


lm,.Wnd.,FL1442
352-726-6734
L Visit us on the Web at


I









C4 SA1LRDAYJ1LY 17, 2010 RELIGION ('ITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Upward Flag Football or
Cheerleading. Deadline for
registration is Aug. 15. Form
and registration fee may be
dropped off at the church office
between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Cost is $65 for football and in-
cludes a jersey, belt and flags,
car magnet and end-of-season
award. Cheerleading costs $65
and includes a uniform, mega-
phone, poms, hair ribbon, car
magnet and end-of season re-
ward. Scholarships available.
Practice begins Tuesday, Aug.
24. First game is Saturday,
Sept. 11 at Joy Lutheran
Church Hope Field. Every par-
ticipant must attend one evalu-
ation/orientation session
between Aug. 2-7.
Upward is a nondenomina-
tional Christian sports ministry
where every child plays, learns
and is a winner. Volunteers are
needed to help coach, referee,
assist, time keep and work with
the participants in either football
or cheerleading. For information,
call Pastor Ed Holloway at (352)
854-4509, Ext. 223. Church is at
7045 S.W. 83rd Place, at State
Road 200, Ocala.


First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa will
sponsor a fall cruise to
Canada on the St. Lawrence
River on Sept. 19-27. The Rev.
Richard Evans will lead the trip
on the seven-day cruise on the
M/V Canadian Empress from
Quebec City to Kingston, On-
tario. Cruise/tour open to all Cit-
rus County residents and their
friends. Per-person price in-
cludes airfare, cruise, meals on
ship, hotels, taxes and fees,
ground transportation in
Canada and Florida, shore ex-
cursions and travel insurance.
For more information, call the
church at 628-4083 or the Rev.
Evans at 563-5833.
Teens After God (TAG)
meets at 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
days at North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs. A
great night every week where
middle and high school youths
are challenged to meet life
head on using the Word of
God. Contemporary worship,
rec time, and Bible time in
breakout groups. All teens in-
vited. For more information, call
Denis Jacobson, minister to
youth, at (352) 302-3410. The
church is at the intersection of
North Citrus Springs Boulevard
and North Elkcam.
Women: Feel unappreci-
ated, overworked, misunder-


stood and need someone to
talk to? Come be part of "Vic-
tory Friends" at 6:30 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at Vic-
tory Baptist Church, 5040 E.
Shady Acres Drive, Inverness.
The group discusses issues
women face in today's world.
For information, call 726-9719.
Nondenominational,
weekly silent meditation takes
place at 1 p.m. Friday. Enjoy
like-minded people, seeking
inner peace. Find the power of
practicing in a group. Thirty-
and 60-minute group sessions
are at 7633 N. Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41, north of the Holder in-
tersection, at the Unitarian-Uni-
versalist Fellowship). Great for
stress reduction. No charge
and open to all. For information,
call Carll at 464-4955.
Beverly Hills Community
Church's Teen Team meets
from 3 to 5:30 p.m. Sunday All
teens welcome to join the teen-
administered, adult-supervised
involvement program to make a
difference in their communities.
Call (352) 216-2342.
One of the programs of-
fered by Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church is as a Community
Partner to ACCESS Florida, a
division of the Florida Depart-
ment of Children and Families
(DCF). The church provides a
confidential application process


point for those in need of food
stamps, and other DCF related
programs. The church provides
application assistance only and
is not an approval/disapproval
authority. If you are in need or
know someone who is, call the
church at 746-3620.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
5164 S. Florida Ave., in the
Heath Mini Storage Units. Thrift
store is full of household goods
and donated items. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. Call 726-
2660.
Cornerstone Christian
Supply, a ministry of the Inver-
ness Church of God, has avail-
able for sale Joyce Meyer's
new bestseller, "Eat the
cookie...buy the shoes." Cor-
nerstone Christian Supply is at
416 U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
For information, call 344-2470.
Worship
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills, continues
Sunday summer worship at
9:30 a.m. St. Paul's Lutheran
School and Precious Lambs
Preschool are hosting Vacation
Bible School for all children in
the community ages 3 through


12 from 9 to 11:45 a.m. Monday
through Friday, July 26-30. This
year's theme, "Circle J Ranch,"
has a dude ranch flavor includ-
ing upbeat, theme-related
songs, Bible study, games and
crafts. No charge for
anything. For more information,
call (352) 489-3027.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church will cele-
brate the eighth Sunday after
Pentecost with Holy Eucharist
services at 5 p.m. today and 8
and 10 a.m. Sunday. Healing
Eucharist at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day. SOS from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at Key Training Cen-
ter.
St. Anne's Church (a
parish in the Anglican Com-
munion) will celebrate the
eighth Sunday after Pentecost
with Masses at 8 and 10:15
a.m. Sunday. St. Anne's will
host "Our Father's Table" from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today.
Alcoholics Anonymous meets
at 8 p.m. Friday and Monday in
the parish library. Overeaters
Anonymous meets from 10 to
11:30 a.m. and 7 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday in the parish li-
brary.
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness. Holy Eucharist serv-
ices at 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day with Sunday school at 9:30


a.m. Children's church follow-
ing. Feed my Sheep feeding
program for people in need at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by Holy Eucharist and
healing service celebrating St.
Mary Magdalene at 12:30
p.m. Food pantry is open from
9:30 to 11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday and 4 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday. VBS from 5:30 to
8 p.m. Sunday through Thurs-
day, Aug. 1-5, for ages 3 to
adult, with supper served at
5:30 p.m.
N The Rev. Guy Weatherly,
a United Methodist minister
from the Florida Confer-
ence, will preach at the 8, 9 and
10:30 a.m. services Sunday at
Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N.
Citrus Ave. The Rev. Weatherly
was an executive with the Boy
Scouts of America before going
into the ministry. After graduat-
ing from seminary at Emory
University, he served churches
in St. Petersburg, the Florida
Keys, Tampa, Jacksonville,
Bradenton and Land O' Lakes.
Now retired, he continues work
with local congregations,
teaches Contagious Christian
Classes and with his wife,
Lynda, mentors couples in their
ministry called Restoration Min-

See NOTES/Page C5


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! !


'' :.
*1y~. ~ ,, '

1'


SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS
SERVIC ING THE CO M M UNITIES ....CI.. U......... ... ................ ...... .... DUNNE............... ...


2018l' a de 1Il I (W l Ina LeSt r s) 4 IN



Mission Possible

V. David Lucas, Jr.
Senior Pastor
!Ll A 9921 N. Deltona Boulevard
(352) 489-3886
www.missionpossibleministries.com
I Sundays I
Worship ..................10:30 am
Spanish Translation Provided
(Nursery Care & Children's Church Provided)
[ Wednesday
Youth Group, Bible Study &
Kid's Programs..........7 pm
(Nursery Care Provided)
ARMS OF MERCY FOOD PANTRY
1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month.
8:00 am-11:00 am

The difference
is worth the distance!

G RACE* |
BAPTIST CHURCH

Independent
2672 W. Edison PI. at Elkcam Blvd.
Citrus Springs, FL
Expositional Bible Teaching
Conservative Music
For a map, schedule of services, and
sample messages check our website
www.gracebapchurch.org
Sunday School 9:45 am
Sun. Services 11:00 am & 6:00 pm
Wed. Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 pm
Rev. Richard W. Brosseau, Pastor
Phone (352) 445-9013


AND JEsus Is LORD
MOUNTAIN ASSEMBLY
10117 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Inverness, FL 34450-5430
East Hwy. 44 (352) 637-3110
Sunday School 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Worship 10:30 A.M.
Sunday Evening 6:30 P.M.
Thursday 7:00 P.M.
Rev. & Mrs.
Junior Brarson
(352) 341-2884 '



Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School...............9:00
Worship...........10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School................6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing Light)
For more
information call \
352-422-6535
Pastor
Todd '
Langdon


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


SINVERNESS
CHURCH
SOF GOD
Re,.Larr). Po,% rs
Sunday) Sernices:
Trdidmoiil Ser,icee . S 3(1.-M
Sunday Schoul .. ... .. 311 C.onemporarN Ser ice I 31? \M
E .e n en n er ... i ie i-i, F
Ev edne da% Night
Adull Clji-.. 1 ) PM
B io .iijd Girl, Brigade 1.11.
Teen_... .. .. . 7 .. PM
"Welcome Home"
L,',: -d il J '.1 H 1 1 S.'. iI.
f.1- l --i.:vv )u I .P..i fi=,ur,.,., Inc
It n Sit "tLille- Frndi Daicari and
Learning -fnitr"-



First Baptist Church
of Beverly Hills *
Marple Lewis, III Jeff Owen
Pastor Minister of Worship
and Youth
Sunday Services:
Traditional Worship 9:15 A.M.
Bible Study 9:15 A.M.
Bible Study 10:45 A.M.
Contemporary Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Services:
Prayer and Youth Activities
6:00 P.M.
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL
Located at the intersection of
Hwy. 491 (Lecanto Hwy.)
and Forest Ridge Blvd.
For more information call
(352) 746-2970 a
Office Hours 9-3 P.M.
or email us at:
beverlyhillsbaptist@tampabay.rr.com
www.fbcbh.com








N Hwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness n

SSunday Services
Traditional *
* 11:00 AM
m Contemporary
N 9:30 AM
E 11:00 AM Service
E Tapes & CD's available U
E Sunday School for all ages
N 9:30 AM
0 Nursery Provided U
m Fellowship & Youth Group U
. 5:00 PM
S24-Hour Prayer Line
* 563-3639
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
S Podcast:FPCinv.com m
SChurch Office 637-0770
Pastors: Craig Davies
and Michael F. Fonfara


FIRST B C--

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
8:45 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
www.lstlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson



Are you looking
for a Church
that is warm &
friendly?
Visit our website
www.citrussprings
congregational.org

or join us at:
Community
Congregational
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday at lOam


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Foufara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:15 a.m.
Commnitruon Every Sunday
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
Information:
489-5511
Go To Om 1 eb PPage
hopelatheranelca .com



nature Cost

Unitarian Universalists
SUNDAY SERVICES
10:30 A.M.





WHERE REASON & RELIGION MEET
7633 N. Florida Ave.
(Route 41)
Citrus Springs
465-4225
WWW.NCUU.ORG












VIGILMASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 PM

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. &10:00 AM.

SPANISH MASS:
12:00 P.M.

CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:30 P.M. Sat.
orByAppointment
********* ** *
WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
-: .cathollcweb.com r.n


A friendly church where
Christ is exalted!!!


Sunday School 9:00 A.M.
Morning Worship '10:15 A.M.
Evening Service 6:00 P.M.

Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 P.M.
Awana (K-61 grade) 6:45 8:15 P.M.
746-6171


.- -- -i







A LITTLE STRESSED?
FIND RELIEF HERE!

First United

Methodist

(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
S Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
KIP YOUNGER
Senior Pastor
9:00 AM & 10:45 AM
Sunday School Classes
for all ages
5:00 PM Student
Connection Time
6th Grade thru 12th
Nursery care available starting at 9.00 AM
WEDNESDAYS
6:15 PM Bible Studies &
Connection Groups for everyone
Join us for a casual
uplifting service with family
praise & worship on
Sunday at 9:00 AM
Additional Sunday Worship
Opportunities

WE ALSO OFFER
8:00 AM
Holy Communion
10:45 AM
Traditional Worship
Signing for hearing impaired
available upon request
Open Hearts,
Open Minds, |
Open Doors -
www.invernessfirstumc.org
- -m S -I


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
U.S. Hwy. 41 South, Inverness,
Florida
Sunday Masses e
9:00 A.M. & 11.00 A.M
Saturday Vigil
4:00 P.M.
Weekdays 8:00 A.M.
Confessions 2:30 3:30 P.M.

726-1670 1


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
115800 352-726-4033


IIIIIIIIININIM11111111 Immoll ml I No Immomm 11 0 M I I mollillismom


C4 SA-ruRDAY, JuLy 17, 20 10


RELIGION


Cn-Rus CouNy (FL) CHRoNicLE









(2rRus CaL N7Y (FL) CHRONICLE RELIGION SAl URDAY, Joiy 17, 2010 C5


NAMES
Continued from Page Cl

of the ancient temple.
And so synagogues, or
Jewish houses of worship,
sprung up throughout the
Diaspora as places for wor-
ship, study and fellowship.
They acquired names so
they could be differentiated
from each other and be-
came the centers of Jewish
life wherever they were es-
tablished.
In a recent article, I wrote
about the historic syna-
gogues in America. I would
now like to point out the
various names of Jewish re-
ligious institutions and how
their meanings convey the
history, location and even
clues to the direction of the
congregation whether it
is traditional or liberal.
A sampling of the Jewish
synagogues in the greater
Orlando-Gainesville area
reveals an interesting fact.
Many congregations have
the word "shalom" or
"Sholom," which means
"peace," in their moniker.
Sometimes this is because
the congregation has broken
off from an older group and
the new group wishes a
"house of peace." More
often, in my opinion, espe-
cially here in the South,
"shalom" is a recognizable
word, and people like what
they know, so they name
their congregation with a fa-
miliar, comfortable name.
So we get "Anshei Shalom,"
People of Peace, "Ohev
Shalom," Lovers of Peace,
"Shir Shalom," Song of
Peace, and when all else
fails, the familiar Hebrew
greeting "Shalom Ale-
ichem" we greet you with
peace.
Which leads us to another
familiar term: Israel. As
president of a congregation
with that name, I can attest
that having "Israel" in your
name means "the Jewish
people." So we get names
such as "Beth Israel," Is-
rael's house, or "B'nai Is-
rael," Sons descendentss) of
Israel. "Israel" is a very pop-
ular name for a synagogue
wanting a recognizable
term.
Since a synagogue is a
house of worship, the word
for "house" is often part of
the name. In its various
forms, we have "beth" "beit"


WISDOM
Continued from Page C1

would be like that, and I'm
not good at public speak-
ing," he said. "But preach-
ing is different."
He preached his first ser-
mon this past fall, although
he said he mostly read his
manuscript.
It took him about 15 min-
utes.
Even though he was nerv-
ous, he was well-prepared,
having used the text and
notes from an 18-page re-
search packet on Titus 3:5-7.
"I put in at least 20 hours
into writing it," he said.
As a ministry student, he
said he's had to preach ser-
mons in class, but that's for
critique purposes a dozen
fellow students giving their
judgments and opinions,
"destroying you to make you
better," he said.
But preaching to a con-
gregation of 100 was com-
pletely different, and the
second time he delivered
the same Titus 3 message,
he was able to step away
from his manuscript and in-
teract with his listeners.
"I'm learning to (move)
around I'm enjoying
watching people as I
preach, what they're doing
as I'm preaching and I'll talk
directly to people and en-
gage with them."
So far Lup has preached
twice at First Christian
Church in Homosassa, once
at Real Life Christian Church
in Crystal River and will be at


First Christian Church in
Chassahowitzka Aug. 1.
Lup was actually hired at


and "bet." All these terms
mean "house of." Combin-
ing this with other terms, we
have "Bet-el" or "Beth El,"
House of God, "Beth Am,"
House of the People, "Beit
Emeth," House of Truth,
"Beth Chayim," House of
Life, and the old chestnut,
"Beth Shalom," House of
Peace.
Even the word "Temple"
before the name gives a clue
as to the affiliation of the
congregation. A traditional
Jewish house of worship
will never use that name,
because the original Holy
Temple was in Jerusalem.
More liberal congregations
allow its use, since the orig-
inal Temple has been de-
stroyed.
The term "or," light, often
refers to congregations of
the Reconstructionist move-
ment. Because the Recon-
structionist movement is
liberal, it gives "new light"
to the observance of Ju-
daism. Congregation Or
Chayim of Leesburg, a Re-
constructionist prayer
group, is a good example.
The name means light of
life, a reference to the Torah
and its teachings. Congrega-
tion Beth Israel of Ocala
(Reconstructionist) almost
became Or Hadash (new
light) but for one vote.
Some congregations are
inspired by famous sages or
heroes of Jewish history, so
we get names such as Beth
Hillel (House of Hillel, a
first century rabbi) or Beth
David (King David of the
Bible).
We have place names,
such as Garden Street Syna-
gogue, Hebrew Congrega-
tion of Springfield, or
Garden City Jewish Center.
While many congregations
prefer Hebrew names, still
others will use English
terms, as these examples
show.
Whatever name Jews
choose to give to their
houses of worship, the pur-
pose of the building re-
mains the same; a place for
Jewish worship, study and
fellowship, whether it be
liberal, traditional or some-
thing in between.

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.

the Homosassa church last
summer as the youth minis-
ter, and prior to his intern-
ship, he commuted from
Kissimmee on weekends.
Now, however, his intern-
ship takes all of his 40 hours
and more each week at the
church.
"A lot of it's reading and
studying," he said, "and a lot
of calling (on people.) That's
huge at this church."
In his last year of school,
Lup said he's not sure ex-
actly what he wants to do
after he graduates, other
than continue with graduate
school. He had considered
being a professor, but now
that he's tasted church min-
istry, he said he likes it.
"The academic side can
be very nitpicky, and you
can miss the main point," he
said. "I like being involved
in the church, and maybe
I'll teach on the side."
Miller said in the time he
has worked with Lup, he
has seen the makings of a
great preacher.
"He is a preacher," Miller
said. "He's more mature in
his preaching than many
who are already in preach-
ing. He's well-prepared; he
doesn't stay behind the pul-
pit; he meets the people
well and makes good eye
contact, and he's really pro-
gressed."
Miller said having Lup
around has made him
younger
"He's taught me some
new stuff," he said. "You al-
ways learn. I'm teaching
him and he's teaching me."
Chronicle reporter Nancy


Kennedy can be reached at
564-2927 or nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


MEET AND GREET
* Clubs are invited to submit information about regular
meetings for publication in The Meeting Place each
Thursday.
* Include the name of the organization, the time,, day
and place of the meeting, whether it meets weekly, bi-
weekly or monthly, and whom to call for details..
* Send in information attn: The Meeting Place, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River, FL 34429, or fax to
563-3280, attention: The Meeting Place.
* E-mail to community@chronicleonline.com. Include
"The Meeting Place" in the subject line.
* For special events or fund-raisers, submit a separate
news release.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

that other than a lot of
yelling and running and
white powder (baking
soda?) everywhere.
Later, in my attempt to
make things right, I cleaned
up all the white powder
until all that was left was a
pot of unusable red wax -
which I poured down the
sink and turned on the cold
water.
That's when the washing
machine made a horrible
groaning noise.
My mom called my dad
and said, "Please come
home NOW Nancy--"
That's all she needed to
say. Ten minutes later my
dad walked in with a huge
wrench in his hand and I
ran. I wasn't sure if he was
heading for the plumbing fi-
asco or for me!
The truth is, I am better at
making messes than I am at
fixing them.
Another time I'll never
forget is when I made split
pea soup and tried to hurry
it along by dumping the hot,
yet still hard, peas and broth
into the blender up to the
brim.
Not realizing that heat
makes things expand, when
I turned the blender on, the
top exploded and split peas
and broth flung wildly all
over the kitchen cabinets,
ala the scene from "The Ex-
orcist."
Wisdom and common
sense not being my strong
points, I decided the mess
could wait until later. That's
when I learned that split
pea soup hardens like ce-
ment on everything it
touches and I spent hours
scraping it all off.
The only saving grace was
that my dad and his big
wrench were nowhere
around.
Life gets messy, doesn't it?
One of my favorite books
is a thin volume called
"Messy Spirituality: God's


Kevin & Ruth Ballard
Sunday
10 AM Worship
7 PM Bible Prophecy
Wednesday
Dinner 6 PM
Bible Study 7 PM
960 S. Hwy 41, Inverness, FL
www.calvarychapelinverness.com
352-726-1480






SICHRISTIAN
I CENTER
"Big Enough To Serve,
Small Enough To Care"

637-5100




Clean & Safe Nursery
Exciting Children & Youth Services
Warm Fellowship
Powerful Worship
Practical Messages
Sunday Worship
8'30 A M. & 10:30 A M.
10:30 A.M. Dicipleship
Wednesday
Prayer 6:15 P.M.
Adult Service 7:15 PM.
,Youth Service 6:00 P.M.
Agape Kids Preschool & Davcare
Infants Pre K 4
Before & After School Care
Mon-Fri 6:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M.
Two miles from Hwy. 44 on the
corner of Croft & Harley
2728 E. Harley St., Inverness FL


Annoying Love for Imper-
fect People." Before he died
last year, the author,
Michael Yaconelli, was pas-
tor of a church in California
"for people who didn't like
going to church."
They were mostly a mess,
Yaconelli said, and called
himself the messiest of them
all. He also said that we're
all messes, but some of us
like to think we're not.
He called messy spiritual-
ity "the place where our
messiness and Jesus meet."
He wrote about the myth
of fixing ourselves and how
people refuse to come to
church and come to God "as
they aren't."
"Some of us actually be-
lieve that until we choose the
correct way to live, we aren't
'choose-able,' that until we
clean up the mess, Jesus
won't have anything to do
with us," he wrote. "The op-
posite is true. Until we admit
we are a mess, Jesus won't
have anything to do with us."
I love what Yaconelli said
about our messes being
where Jesus meets us. In-
stead of being repulsed by
them (and by us), instead of
being annoyed or disap-
pointed or ashamed to be
associated with us, instead
of waiting until we get our
acts together and be worthy
of his drawing near, he
draws near anyway.
He enters into our messy
lives, actually seeks us
there, saves us, redeems our
brokenness, gives us worth.
As Yaconelli said, he
turns our messes into mas-
terpieces.
That's good news to some-
one like me, who excels at
making a mess.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victoria
-I Know the Real Secret,"
"Girl on a Swing," and her
latest book, "Lipstick
Grace." She can be reached
at 564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via e-
mail atnkennedy@
chronicleonline.com.


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is still welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


You're invited to

our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201
19"- -C::X=)


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

istries. He is filling the pulpit
while the Rev. David Gill,
senior pastor of CRUMC, is
on vacation.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship serv-
ices at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Children's church
is during the 10:30 a.m. wor-
ship service. Sunday school
classes for everyone at 9:30
a.m. Christian education op-
portunities for all ages at 7
p.m. Wednesday. Mis-
sionettes and Royal Rangers
Clubs meet for children from
the age of 3. Teenagers are
invited to attend "Frontline"
Youth Church with Youth
Leader Freddie Feliciano.
The adult class is in the sanc-
tuary. Church is at 416 U.S.
41 South, Inverness. Call
726-4524.
Mount Olive Mission-
ary Baptist Church of Crys-
tal River invites everyone to
weekly services. Sunday
school starts at 9:30 a.m., fol-
lowed by the worship service
at 11 a.m. This Sunday will
feature performances by the
church's male chorus. The
Wednesday evening prayer
meeting at 6 is followed by
Bible study at 6:30 p.m. The
church's motto is, "Where
Love Makes the Difference,"
and it is at 2105 N. Georgia
Road. Directions: From Crys-
tal River, take State Road 44
East to Pennsylvania Road;
turn right; then turn right at
Georgia Road. The church is
on the left. For more informa-
tion, call 563-1577.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school
classes begin at 9:30 a.m.,
following fellowship, coffee
and doughnuts. Morning
service begins at 10:45. Sun-
day evening service begins
at 6 p.m. Midweek service is
at 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day. Young Musicians/Pup-
peteers meet at 6:30 p.m.


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoracion y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711



) First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Wednesday. The church is
on East Parsons Point Road
in Hemando (directly across
from the Hernando Post Of-
fice).
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church will ob-
serve its summer worship
schedule with only one serv-
ice at 9:30 a.m. during July
and August. Pastor Kenneth
Blyth will bring an inspira-
tional message. All are in-
vited. Coffee hour follows in
fellowship hall. Large-print
service helps, hearing de-
vices and free tape ministry
available. Weekly fellowship
breakfast at 8;15 a.m. Tues-
days at Mama's Kuntry Kafe
in Inverness. Bible study on
book of Philippians led by
Madelyn Hickey from 9:30 to
11 a.m. Tuesday through
Aug. 17. Pairs & Spares
lunch at 1 p.m. Friday at In-
verness Golden Corral.
Church is on County Road
486, opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando. Call
746-7161.
First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness sum-
mer worship: Contemporary
service at 9:30 a.m.; Sunday
school from 9:30 to 10:30
a.m.; traditional service at 11
a.m. The Rev. Michael E.
Fonfara, D. Min., will preach
on "Which Way Will You
Choose?" Church is at 206
Washington Ave., Inverness.
Call 637-0770.
Faith Baptist Church
Sunday school classes at
9:45 a.m. followed by wor-
ship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
"King's Kids" and "Flyers" for
K-5 grades from 6 to 7:15
p.m. Sunday. Wednesday
Bible study and prayer meet-
ing at 7 p.m. with "Warriors"
for grades 6 through 12 from
6:30 to 8 p.m. Church is at
6918 S. Spartan Ave. (one
mile from U.S. 19, off Cardi-
nal Street). Call 628-4793.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalists invite
the public to weekly services
See NOTES/Page C6


Pastor Tom Walker
Inverness First Church of God
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Phone: 726-8986
Non-denominational
Sunday:
10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed. 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Songs, Pitch-in Dinners,
Singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church Family.g
z


At

Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong.A place to become."


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and .


harmony to all.

C owne on over to "His" house, vour spirits w'il hbe lift !l

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS -
7tW su


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107J


RELIGION


SAwRDAY, JuLy 17, 20 10 CS


ChrRus CoLmy (FL) CHRoNicLE







C6 SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010


Aging facilities NOTES
Continued from


pose challenge


for churches


Maintenance

sometimes

overlooked

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. About
halfway through Sunday
service at Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, as
worshipers passed around
the collection plate, a cho-
rus of screams pierced the
air.
Chunks of the ceiling in
the 52-year-old church near
Hickory came crashing
down on the crowd of 200 or
so, striking about 14, who
were later treated and re-
leased from nearby hospi-
tals. A jagged piece of the
ceiling, roughly 10 feet by 10
feet, dangled from exposed
wires over the back pews as
deacons struggled to guide
panicking worshipers from
the building.
"My jaw just dropped,"
the Rev. Antonio Logan said.
"I thought, 'This can't be
real."'
Caring for old church fa-
cilities is an increasingly
acute problem, particularly
for mainline Protestant de-
nominations. As member-
ship declines and budgets
shrink, the beautiful edi-
fices of American Christian-
ity can feel like weights
dragging down churches
that are forced to spend
money on maintenance and
repairs instead of ministry,
charity and other Gospel-
derived imperatives.
"It's hard times in para-
dise," said the Rev. William
Quick, pastor emeritus at
Metropolitan United
Methodist Church in De-
troit.
Metropolitan's Gothic
church was completed in
1926 at a cost of $1.6 million,
at the time the most expen-
sive Methodist house of
worship ever built. By 1949,
it had 10,300 members,
more than any Methodist
congregation in the world.
Today, membership is at
375, in a city where
Methodist churches have
fallen from 77 to 16. Its de-
cline in fortune is mirrored
among Protestant denomi-
nations like the Lutherans,
Presbyterians and Episco-
palians, which have seen
membership drop in recent
decades while the average
age of remaining worship-
pers gets older.
A church can be an an-
chor for a whole neighbor-
hood, and its loss can hurt
beyond the borders of a sin-
gle congregation, as a coali-
tion of residents and
preservationists in Char-
lotte discovered when they
tried to save the old Garr
Memorial Church from the
wrecking ball.
The building had stood
for nearly 70 years, with its
iconic rooftop 'Jesus Saves"
sign a beacon that locals
used as a landmark when
giving directions.
On a Wednesday in July,
the old building came down
after its new owners, the
New Bethel Church of God
in Christ, couldn't justify re-
furbishing the building.
"It's regretful, but the eco-
nomics, just the roof repair
cost was just excessive,"
said Bobby Drakeford, a
real estate developer and
consultant for New Bethel.
New Bethel plans to de-
velop the property, but for
churches that try to stay in
their old buildings, even
necessary upkeep can be-
come a burden.
The Rev. Phyllis Norman
is the pastor of Prospect
Congregational Church in
Prospect, Conn., which is
planning to add an elevator
to its 59-year-old building.
Churches are exempt from
federal regulations requir-
ing buildings to be accessi-
ble to people with
disabilities, but many con-
gregations with aging mem-


bers are installing
wheelchair ramps, eleva-
tors and other features.
Before that effort had re-
ally taken off, though, the
Connecticut church's
decades-old septic system
failed, dumping a $30,000
repair bill in the congrega-
tion's lap.


"The timing was just pa-
thetic," she said.
Making things, harder is
that many pastors are loath
to set aside money for main-
tenance that could be used
on missionary work or char-
itable services like soup
kitchens, said the Rev. Ken
Carder, a retired Methodist
bishop and professor at the
Duke Divinity School.
"I was the same way about
endowments when I started
out. You know, 'Lay not up
for yourselves treasure
upon the earth, where moth
and rust corrupt,"' he said,
quoting the Gospel of
Matthew.
Prudent planning
But setting aside money
for maintenance costs will
enable future generations to
pursue those ministries by
freeing them from the bur-
den of emergency repairs,
Carder said.
A reluctance to spend
money on upkeep has
caught the attention of
churches' insurers, who are
making more maintenance
recommendations since the
start of the Great Recession,
according to Rick Schaber,
risk control manager for
Church Mutual Insurance, a
Wisconsin-based company
that insures more than
100,000 religious institu-
tions in the U.S.
"We're finding some
things are starting to get a
little bit worse," he said. "If
our customers are forced to
make cuts, we're finding
that maintenance budgets
are commonly the first
place they look"
Norman's congregation,
like many, does not want to
reduce its commitment to
efforts like the local food
pantry and soup kitchen,
it's getting creative: The
church is seeking a tax sta-
tus that would let them
apply for grants to fund the
elevator and is considering
a loan from a United
Church of Christ fund
specifically designed for
building needs.
The UCC's Cornerstone
Fund typically has 200 or so
low-interest loans outstand-
ing at any given time, rang-
ing anywhere from $15,000
to $3 million, according to
Mary Seymour, vice presi-
dent of the fund. Seymour
has seen the number of
loans rise as churches fund
more emergency repairs.
"Many of our churches
are 150 years old 'or older,
and many others were built
in the 1950s, when no one
gave a thought to handicap
accessibility," she said.
Most mainline denomina-
tions have similar funds,
partly because local congre-
gations can't pay for work
they might have been able
to afford in the past
"A lot of these churches
have shrunk from 500 mem-
bers to 100 members, or
from 800 members to 200
members," said Robert
Jaeger, executive director of
the Partnership for Sacred
Places. "They look at the
trend lines and they see the
decline in membership and
wonder, 'Gosh, in 10 or 15
years are we going to be
gone?'"
Jaeger's group strives to
prevent that, primarily
through an intensive, year-
long training with smaller
churches designed to show
them how they can find new
ways to pay for repairs and
maintenance.
The partnership's main
theme comes from research
it conducted showing that
roughly 80 percent of the
people who use church fa-
cilities for things like after-
school programs or
Alcoholics Anonymous
meetings are not members
of the individual congrega-
tions.
"Our larger task is really
to convince America's lead-
ers that these sacred places
are public assets, not just
Presbyterian places of wor-
ship, or Methodist, or Jew-


ish, or Catholic, but
something for the entire
community," he said.
The partnership has
trained about 600 congrega-
tions, and does about eight
or 10 training sessions a
year, Jaeger said, working
with several congregations
at a time.


RELIGION


n Page C5


at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Cit-
rus Springs. Dan Callaghan's
talk is titled "Jail," and is about
civil disobedience Refresh-
ments and discussion follow
the service. For information,
call 465- 4225.
Citrus Vineyard Com-
munity Church meets in the
First Christian Church of Inver-
ness family life center, at 2018
Colonade Street. Sunday serv-
ices are at 10:30 a.m. Home
groups meet in Inverness and
Beverly Hills on Tuesdays. Call
the church at 637-0923.
Mt. Zion Christian
Church has a new home at
6570 West St., Homosassa. All
welcome. Come as you are.
"Worship and Word" is at 10:30
a.m. Sunday. Children's "God
Squad" meets at 7 p.m. Tues-
days. For information or direc-
tions, call Pastor John at (352)
573-7198.
Living Water Ministries
adult nondenominational
breakfast and Bible study hour
from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Satur-
days studying the Gospel of
John. Sunday evening service
at 5 begins with contemporary
Christian music followed by
Bible message and prayer,
closing with traditional hymn
sing. Come as you are to any
or all parts of this service. Liv-
ing Water Ministries is at 2 N.
Melbourne St. (corner of Bev-
erly Hills Boulevard), Beverly
Hills. Call 270-8886 for infor-
mation.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness Sunday activities:
SONrise class at 7:45 a.m.,
blended worship service at 9
a.m., children's church for ages
4 through fourth grade during 9
a.m. service featuring Bible
stories, skits, music and group
activities, Sunday school
classes for all ages at 10:30
a.m. Evening worship at 6.
Nursery available at all serv-
ices. Call 726-1252.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa weekly schedule:
Sunday school for all ages at 9
a.m. followed by morning wor-
ship at 10:25 a.m. Kids wor-
ship dismisses from service.
Youth Bible study at 4:30 p.m.
in fellowship hall. Sunday
evening Bible study at 6. Life-
care center is open (food and
clothing) from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m. Monday and Thursdays.
The church is in Old Ho-
mosassa at 10540 W Yulee
Drive. Turn onto Yulee Drive
from U.S. 19 at Burger King,
follow to stop sign, turn left,
church is about one mile on
left. Call 628-3858.
Reflections Church serv-
ice times are at 9:27 a.m. and
10:57 a.m. Sunday. Nursery
and child care available. Re-
flections Church meets at the
Citrus Springs Community
Center at 1570 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd. For more infor-
mation, call (352) 601-0911.
First Christian Church
of Chassahowitzka, 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for
morning worship. The church
is nondenominational and
Bible based, only preaching
the Word as it is in the Bible.
All are welcome. For informa-
tion, call 382-2557.
First Christian Church
of Homosassa Springs Bible
school classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m. Sunday followed by
morning worship at 10:30 (chil-
dren's church provided for
kindergarten through third
grade). Evening worship at 6
p.m. Sunday. Wednesday night
dinners will resume Sept. 6
and the cost is $3 per person.
Sign up by noon Tuesdays.
Church is at 7030 W. Grover
Cleveland Blvd.
Lighthouse Baptist
Church, 974 W.G. Martinelli
Blvd., Citrus Springs, offers
Sunday school for all ages at
9:45 a.m. Worship services


under the direction of Pastor
Jess Burton at 11 a.m., with
evening service at 5:30 p.m.
Children's/youth program for
ages 5 and older from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesday featuring
Bible study, fun and games,
with adult Bible study at 7 p.m.
Call (352) 489-7515.
Beverly Hills Community
Church is nondenominational.
Worship services at 10 a.m.
Sunday. Bible study at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in chapel. Every-
one welcome. Call 746-3620.
All welcome to learn to be
inspired by God's Word in an
open format at 10 a.m. Sun-
days at The Little House,
4929 Shady Acres Drive, Inver-
ness. All welcome. Call Joe
Hupchick at 726-9998.
House of Power Sunday
worship services at 10 a.m.
and 6 p.m. at North Lecanto
Highway and North Dawson
Drive, Hernando. Wednesday
Bible studies and youth meet-
ing at 7 p.m.
Living Word of God
Church, on Cason Boulevard
in Inglis, offers Sunday school
classes at 10 a.m. and Sunday
evening worship at 6. Every-
one is welcome. Jessie Lolley
is the pastor. Call 621-7260 for
information.
Church of Christ serv-
ices at 304 N.E. 5th St., Crystal
River. Bible classes at 10 a.m.
Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday
and by appointment. Worship
services at 11 a.m. Sunday.
Everyone invited. Call 795-
4943 or 563-0056.
Parsons Memorial Pres-
byterian Church coffee fellow-
ship from 10 to 10:55 a.m.
Sunday in fellowship hall,
5850 Riverside Drive, Yankee-
town. Sunday school at 9:30
a.m. Nursery available. Tradi-
tional church service begins at
11 a.m. Holy Communion
served the first Sunday
monthly. Call (352) 447-2506.
House of Peace, a non-
denominational full-gospel
church and a division of House
of Power, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the Lions Club on
Homosassa Trail, two blocks
east of U.S. 19. All are invited.
First Church of Christ,
Scientist, Inverness, wor-
ships Sunday mornings at
10:30 and Wednesday
evenings at 5 at 224 N. Osce-
ola Ave. Sunday school class
is the same time as the church
service. All are welcome.
Heritage Baptist Church
services led by Pastor David
Hamilton, at 2 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. Call 746-6171.
Christ Lutheran Church
services led by the Rev. Paul
R. Meseke, senior pastor, at
475 North Avenue West,
Brooksville. Call (352) 796-
8331.
Unity Church of Citrus
County healing/prayer service
at 6:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Beverly
Hills. Call 746-1270.
Butterfly Ministries wor-
ship, Bible study and personal
ministry from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
the third Saturday monthly at
The Sanctuary, 3888 S. King
Ave., Homosassa. Food and
fellowship follow. Call Margie
Sipes at 212-4320.
Congregation Beth Is-
rael of Ocala offers Shabbat
evening services the second
Friday monthly at 8 p.m. at the
Collins Resource Center,
Building 300 in the Timber
Ridge Medical Complex on
State Road 200 in Ocala. Call
Judi at (352) 237-8277.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit, Hernando, is a
traditional Anglican mission
with ancient roots. The 1928
Prayer Book is used. The
church is at 1023 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Hemando.
Call 637-5922.
Grupo Misionero Adven-
tista del 7mo. Dia de Citrus
County. Horario de Reuniones.
Miercoles 7 p.m. Sabados 11
a.m. Address: 1880 N. Trucks
Ave., Hernando. Call 535-


7141.


/


1914.OT


795-3367


Vacation Bible School

July 19 23, 9am Noon
Ages 3 5th grade
LO .C.i.tu sAB .


Live & learn
North Oak Christian Pre-
school is registering students
for the 2010-11 school year.
Classes for K3 and K4 are
available. North Oak is a li-
censed, ACSI Gold Seal, and
VPK school. A quality
prekindergarten program is of-
fered and students graduating
from NOCPS have consistently
scored high on progress test-
ing required by the state.
Donna Durr is preschool direc-
tor. To register, visit the pre-
school office daily from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. or call the center at
(352) 489-3359. The preschool
is on the corner of North Citrus
Springs Boulevard and North
Elkcam in Citrus Springs.
Learn to teach the Bible
(2 Timothy 2:15). Your gift may
be teaching you don't know
unless you apply it. If you are a
teacher, these classes will help
enhance your ability. A basic
guide to understanding the
Word of God that won't inter-
fere with your home church
teaching. Learn how to express
the meaning of the Bible and
apply it to your life and then
share it with others. No church
doctrines or denominational
traditions only, a personal rela-
tionship with the Word of God
that He gave us to live by. If
you feel you are not teacher
material, at least you will have
a better understanding of the
Bible. The course is free. Mate-
rials provided. We will help you
set up your own bible study.
Classes start in August.
Choose from Tuesday or
Thursday evenings or Wednes-
day mornings. Call Joe or Kathi
Hupchick at the Little House
Fellowship at 726-9998.
Nature Coast Community
Bible Study (CBS) will begin a
30-week study of the book of
Genesis on Thursday, Sept. 9,
from 9:15 to 11:15 a.m., at First
Baptist Church of Beverly Hills
at the intersection of Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491)
and Forest Ridge Boulevard.
Class is open to men and
women and includes care for
children ages 4 years and
younger. CBS is part of an in-
ternational organization that
provides interdenominational
Bible study for people who de-
sire an in-depth study of God's
Word along with opportunities
for fellowship. Pre-registration
is necessary. To register or for
more information, call Terry at
382-2365.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs of-
fers weekly Bible studies:
Men's Bible study at 7 a.m.
Tuesday is led by Associate
Pastor Tim Daugherty; a study
on the Book of Lamentations is
led by the senior pastor at 6:45
p.m. Wednesday; and Dr.
Charles Hayes leads a study
on the promises of God at 10
a.m. Thursday. Community
invited. No charge. Bring a
Bible. The church is at the in-
tersection of North Citrus
Springs Boulevard and North
Elkcam in Citrus Springs.
Peace Lutheran Church
Wednesday evening Bible
study at 6:30 p.m., preceded
by a light meal. Other Bible
studies at 10 a.m. Wednes-
days and 9 a.m. Sunday. All
invited. Church at 7201 S. U.S.
41, five miles north of Dunnel-
lon. Call (352) 489-5881.
All are invited to a study
on "Revelation, the Myth, the


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Mystery, and the Message,"
at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Her-
nando United Methodist
Church, 2125 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway (County Road 486).
At 7 p.m., study the Gospels
"Side by Side" and there is a
fun time for children and
youths. The family is invited to
a time of fellowship and learn-
ing as Pastor Kelly
Greenawald leads both stud-
ies. Call 726-7245.
"Basic Boating and
Safety" class taught by
Charles Ayers Wednesdays at
Crystal River United Methodist
Church. Free. Participants re-
ceive Coast Guard certification
upon completion of course.
Call 795-3148.
Joy Ministries, a non-de-
nominational ministry, contin-
ues adult Bible studies on the
book "From Creation to Reve-
lation," with teacher Pat Peter-
son, pastor, from 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Wednesday at the
Homosassa Library on Grover
Cleveland Boulevard.
Celebrate recovery
Celebrate Recovery is a
biblically based program de-
signed to work through life's
hurts, habits and hang-ups in
fellowship with others. This
program is open to the com-
munity and takes place at the
following churches:
Gulf to Lake Church -
In the Ministry Complex, West
Gulf-to-Lake Highway in Crys-
tal River. Every Friday night
dinner is at 6 followed by large
and small group time and a
Coffee Caf6 at 9 p.m. Call 795-
0649.
Seven Rivers Presbyte-
rian Church -At 6 p.m. Fri-
days at 4221 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Lecanto at the
Seven Rivers Christian School
building (rooms 216/217), with
dinner, large and small group
time, and Coffee House gath-
ering at 9 p.m. The cost for din-
ner is $4. Call 746-6200.
Announcements
Golden Agers meet at 11
a.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at First Baptist Church
of Floral City. Ages 50 and
older are welcome. Call 726-
4296.
Faith Baptist Church
scrap-booking club meets
from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in
the fellowship hall, 6918 S.
Spartan Ave., Homosassa. Call
Sharon at 628-4360 or Carolyn
at 382-7868.
AI-Anon: Courage A-
Anon Family Group meets at
First United Methodist Church,
88831 Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa. For day and time,
call 270-3827.
Meals on Wheels pro-
gram at First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness needs vol-
unteer drivers one to two hours
weekly to deliver noontime
meals. Call Fran at 726-0350.
Unity of Citrus Book-
store opens from 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, and before and after the
10:30 a.m. service Saturdays.
Call 746-1270.
Our Lady of Grace Church
in Beverly Hills Catholic Chari-
ties Respite Care Program
has openings for persons in
the early stages of Alzheimer's
disease or related dementia
disorders, from 12:30 to 4:30
p.m. Wednesday. Call (800)
242-9012, Ext. 22.


Sing along with well-known songs:

Cto be Wild," "Country Road," and many more.



p6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hillsents


ofFriday, August 6th 7:30 p.m.60s
Crystal River United Methodist Churchki Doxey


4801to be Wild," "Coun. Citrus Ave., Crystal Rivere.

Sunday, August 1s8th 2 p.m.



Faith Lutheran Church
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
General Admission: $10 Children under 12 are free

Call 352-382-7071 for more information
SJfR(Ou"r Thank you for supporting music education in Citrus county
W6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills


. PREE















COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News ^-2

Civil War exhibit
in Floral City
A rotating exhibit, "The
Civil War in Florida," is now at
the Floral City Heritage Hall
Museum.
The Museum and Museum
Country Store are open from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Fri-
day and Saturday in the Flo-
ral City Town Center on
Orange Avenue and County
Road 48, one block east of
the U.S. 41 traffic light.
Call 860-0101 or 726-7740
or visit the website at
www.floralcityhc.org.
Masons plan
country breakfast
Floral City Masonic Lodge
No. 133, 8350 Orange Ave.,
will have its Old Time Coun-
try Breakfast from 8 to 10
a.m. today. Sojourning Ma-
sons are always made wel-
come.
Pancakes, sausage,
homemade biscuits and
sausage gravy, grits, eggs,
toast, orange juice and coffee
are on the menu.
Lodge Communications
are at 7:30 p.m. the first and
third Thursdays. The first
Thursday dinner is at 6 p.m.
For more information, call
344-4074.
Jerseyans, friends
plan activities
The remaining activities of
the New Jersey and Friends
Club for July include a trip to
the Show Palace in Hudson
to see "Red, White & Blue
Tuna" today and dinner at
Cody's in Crystal River on
July 28. Contact Frank Sasse
for further details: (352) 489-
0053.
The club website lists all
the coming activities, meeting
information and the happen-
ings of the club. Go to
http://njclubfl.tripod.com/.
For more.information, call,
527-3568.
Vendors wanted
for model show
Vendors are wanted for
upcoming model train show
slated for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
on Saturday, Oct. 23, at The
Lions Club, Homosassa,
3705 S. Indiana Terrace and
County Road 490 (Ho-
mosassa Trail). All scales are
welcome; bring any train
memorabilia, trains, tracks,
accessories, or any other
hobby-related items you may
be interested in selling.
Six-foot tables are $15
each. Call Joe at (727) 244-
1341 or go online at www.
regalrailways.com.

Humanitarians
OF FP.' :::


Turvey


Special to the Chronicle
Turvey is one cute kitty
boy. Born in April, he is a
curious kitten with a gray
and white, short-haired
coat. Turvey is one of many
sweet and playful kittens
and cats that remain at the
Harden Haven while wait-
ing for a forever home. All
are neutered, have up-to-
date vaccinations, and are
free of feline leukemia,
AIDS and heartworms. Vis-
itors are welcome from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday, at the
Humanitarians' Manches-
ter House on the corner of
State Road 44 and Conant
Avenue, east of Crystal
River. Call the Humanitari-
ans at 613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Haven's felines online at
www.hofspha.org.


Have fun, throw a shoeN
Volunteers sought
.. .. .... .. ... as ombudsmen


Horseshoe Club offersAm competition


Special to the Chronicle

The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
was established to promote the sport
of horseshoes by maintaining a facil-
ity and providing enjoyable competi-
tion and camaraderie.
Bylaws originated on Oct. 26, 1983,
by the founding members and have
been revised by the membership to re-
flect the ongoing needs of the club.
Many improvements have been done


through the years. We have 26 clay
courts and hold national tournaments
once a month.
Anyone can join the club, no matter
what their abilities. League play is
handicapped. We have members who
throw almost no ringers, up to 65 per-
cent ringers. A junior 4-H horseshoe-
pitching club is also in the planning
stages. Nominal membership dues
apply
Men pitch from 40 feet unless older


than u or handicapped; then, they
can move to 30 feet. Women pitch from
30 feet. Anyone can go to the courts
and pitch horseshoes at any time.
There is usually someone there dur-
ing the day
Regular league play starts in Octo-
ber. Club members are always willing
to help new players. Go to http://
beverlyhillshc.9f.com/ to visit the Bev-
erly Hills Horseshoe club website.
For more information, call Ed
Tauber at 527-2983 e-mail edmarie7
@tampabay.rr.com or e-mail eileenf-
fox@gmail.com.


Cooperation, commitment to care


Libraries hosting free

educational clinics
Special to the Chronicle

Mulch, glorious mulch! The benefits
of using mulch in the home landscape
are numerous. But just what is mulch?
How can I get it, where can I use it,
and how to I apply it? Does it do any-
thing beneficial for my plants? What's
up with red mulch and rubber mulch?


WE WANT
TO USE
YOUR
PHOTOS


Most importantly, will it bring termites
to my house?
These are just a few of the questions
to be answered at any one of the free
Citrus County Master Gardener Plant
Clinics.
The July topic is "Mulch in the
Landscape." Master Gardener Plant
Clinics are conducted at various li-
braries throughout Citrus County. The
schedule for the remaining July free
plants clinics is:
1 p.m. Wednesday Citrus
Springs Library, Citrus Springs.


* Photos must be in sharp focus.
* Photos submitted electronically must have
resolution of at least 800, and be in JPEG
(.jpg) format.


2 p.m. Tuesday, July 27 Ho-
mosassa Library, Homosassa.
Come to any of these free clinics to
learn about mulch. Also, as always,
bring any questions about your land-
scape or samples of plant identifica-
tion or problems.
Master gardener volunteers will be
available to address these and any
other concerns you may have regard-
ing plants, plant selec-
tion/problems/diseases/insects,
animals, anything related to your
home landscape.


Ray Finnerty, right, was
recognized recently as Florida
State parks District 2 Volunteer
of the Month. Finnerty has
volunteered at Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park since 2003 and has
contributed more than 2,000
hours. He works primarily in the
Wildlife Care Department, but
also assists with maintenance
projects and interpretation. As
Rocky, the Manatee, Ray is
always popular at park events
and in the annual Christmas
Parade. "Ray sets a great
example for other volunteers
and employees and is well
liked," said Park Manager Art
Yerian, left, pictured as he
surprises Finnerty with a
certificate and leather portfolio
at the park's Felburn Wildlife
Care Center. Finnerty was
nominated and selected for
Volunteer of the Month
recognition in District 2 of
Florida State Parks.
Special to the Chronicle


* All persons in the photo must be identified,
with full names, from left to right.
* For more information or to talk to a Chronicle
photographer for tips, call 563-5660.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event. U Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


Florida's Long-term Care
Ombudsman Program needs
volunteers to join its corps of
dedicated advocates who
protect the rights of elders re-
siding in nursing homes, as-
sisted-living facilities and
adult family-care homes.
All interested individuals
who care about protecting
the health, safety, welfare
and rights of long-term care
facility residents who often
have no one else to advocate
for them are encouraged to
call toll-free (888) 831-0404
or visit the program's website
at http://ombudsman.
myflorida.com.
USCG Auxiliary
seeks members
The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary is composed of uni-
formed volunteers who assist
the Coast Guard in all its var-
ied missions, except military
and direct law enforcement.
These people perform Mar-
itime Domain Awareness Pa-
trols, safety patrols, vessel
safety checks and public ed-
ucation.
If you can volunteer a few
days a month, join Team
Coast Guard Crystal River
Auxiliary 15-01. Both men
and women will be offered
training to participate as radio
watch stander, safety patrol
crew, inspection of aids to
navigation and more.
Meetings are at 6:30 p.m.
the first Monday monthly at
the Flotilla building at 148
N.E. Fifth St. (off Citrus Av-
enue, one block west of U.S.
19) in Crystal River.
For more information, call
Steve Hampton, FSO per-
sonnel services, at (352)
465-9169, or e-mail
S753@bellsouth.net. Addi-
tional information may be ob-
tained at http://a0701501
.uscgaux.info or Google
"Flotilla 15-01."
Drivers needed for
meal deliveries
Do you have a few hours a
week to volunteer your time?
If so, Citrus County Support
Services has the "feel-good"
volunteer opportunity you
have been looking for. Be-
come a volunteer home-de-
livered meal driver today.
Each meal route consists
of 10 to 20 meals, taking one
to two hours to complete,
and volunteers are paid for
mileage. With numerous lo-
cations countywide, you are
sure to find a convenient
route in a familiar neighbor-
hood. In many cases, our
drivers are the only personal
contact our recipients receive
each day. Groups and clubs
are also welcome and en-
couraged to volunteer. A
group can share the respon-
sibility of a delivery route on
a given day of the week with
members taking tums mak-
ing deliveries. For more infor-
mation, call Janice at
527-5975.
Tickets on sale for
annual Fur Ball
SPRING HILL-The Hu-
mane Society of the Nature
Coast will stage its seventh
annual Humane Society Fur
Ball at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
18, at the Silverthom Country
Club, 4550 Golf Club Lane,
in Spring Hill. Tickets are $75
and include dinner at 7 p.m.
with music and dancing. A
cash bar cocktail hour will be
from 6 to 7 p.m., along with
complimentary hors d'oeu-
vres.
The Humane Society's tra-
ditional silent auction will be
from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Entertain-
ment and music for dancing
will be provided by the Non-
Breeders. Dinner includes a
vegetarian alternative.
For more information and
tickets, call (352) 796-2711.
The Fur Ball is sponsored in
part by AT&T The Real Yel-
low Pages, Hemando County
Tourist Development and
Bright House Networks.


Special to the Chronicle
The Daystar Life Center has been gathering handicap equipment for use by those in need of such items. Citrus Countians
have donated an abundance of walkers and bedside commodes. Denise Kennard, the newly appointed executive director
of Daystar, felt that these items could be better utilized by HPH Hospice. Established in 1982, and initially licensed in 1984,
HPH provides hospice care to the residents of Pasco, Hernando and Citrus counties. Today, HPH is among the country's
largest hospices, serving about 1,000 patients each day. Those in need of hospice care can reach HPH at (727) 863-7971.
Pictured are: Jeff Carpenter, representative and delivery driver for HPH Hospice; Denise Kennard, executive director of
Daystar; and Linda Evens, manager of the Food Pantry at Daystar. Daystar Life Center is an agency of United Way. The
thrift store is at 6571 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway (State Road 44), directly across from Publix. Hours are 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Monday through Friday.



Master gardeners offer mulch advice


Park district Volunteer of the Month


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PHILULP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
Bridge is a strange game in that
sometimes two wrongs can produce.
a right. Two partners err, but they
counterbalance each other, result-
ing in the correct contract.
This deal, also from the social
game I kibitzed earlier this year, is
an example.
What do you think of the auction?
How should South plan the play in
four spades after West leads the di-
amond queen?
North's takeout double, with
only two low diamonds, is not text-
book And South's jump to two
spades was an underbid. By an un-
passed hand, a jump advance
promises 9-11 points and a cue-bid
of opener's suit shows 12-plus. But
by a passed hand, these ranges are
lowered by a couple of points.
South should have cue-bid two
hearts. Then North should have


Bridge

North 07-17-10
SK 10 9 6
V K Q 4
10 7
K Q 5 2
West East
SA 8 4 7 5 4
VJ9762 V 8
* QJ 863 K954
4A 4J10973
South
4 QJ 3 2
V A 10 5 3
SA 2
S8 6 4
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West


passed out two spades but four
spades had good play.
South should see three top los-
ers: one spade, one diamond and
one club. The trick is to avoid a sec-
ond club loser. But the opening
lead marks East with the diamond
king. So West must have the club
ace. It is time to lead toward hon-
ors.
After South wins with the dia-
mond ace and plays a trump, let's
assume West takes the second
spade and continues with another
diamond. East will win this trick
and shift to his heart, hoping to get
a heart ruff. However, his luck is
out. Declarer wins on the board,
plays a trump to his hand, and
leads a club. When the ace appears,
South can claim. He takes two
spades, three hearts, one diamond,
two clubs, one heart ruff in the
dummy and one club ruff in his
hand.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I CUMIS I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


0O




0= E
00E


rin
U ) -
ii)(
Ei
Ei


CAUPTE "
WHEN THE STORM
HIT, THE PIL-OT'5
SPEO151ON O L- ANP
INBELB WA5 ---
S -- -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:
(Answers Monday)


ACROSS
1 Swear solemn-
ly
4 Horror-film
street
7 Deep sleep
11 Lamb's ma
12 Heroic tale
13 Baseball stats
14 Smitten
16 Egg part
17 Norwegian
toast
18 Pre-owned
19 Vinyl records
20 Behind, at sea
21 Lessen
"24 Ghostly noises
27 Quick lunch
28 Bug repellent
30 Many August
people
32 Packs it away
34 majeste
36 Boxing great
37 Carrion feed-
ers
39 Steam


7-17


41 Camper,
maybe
42 Jaunty lid
43 Cheese in a
trap
45 Come clean
48 Empty, in math
49 Swift
52 Footnote abbr.
(2 wds.)
53 Blvds.
54 Santa winds
55 Latin I verb
56 Part of mpg
57 Doze
DOWN


Answer to Previous Puz
LEI OW L
OWS REEK E
BEL LIV Y N
ORATORIO T
IND TAR
IHOP ELOPE
FIB TRI SE
SMILE MAE
ARROW E
ASTRO END
SITIE OBSES


1 Sweater front [A L AJN Mi
2 Pays for RENT S
3 Feeble
4 British peers D
5 Size above
med. 10 Say please
6 Infuriated 12 Lathered up
7 Snowflake 15 Shed one's
8 Woodwind coat
instrument 18 Pilot's sighting
9 Bland 20 Diploma word


EL OW
AMVEI
D ER!
21 Mr.'
22 Hum
23 Law
brief
24 Turn
25 Low
Side
26 Rec
29 Joie
31 Knig
33 "Car
setti
35 Find
hole
38 Nata
father
40 Hun
need
42 Spu
43 No i
or-
44 Mou
46 OPE
ber
47 "Ty;
Male
48 Born
49 Glov
part
item
50 Day
51 Sur|


ear Annie: I am 16 years
zle old. Right now, I am living
F E W with my aunt (my father's
L B A sister). My mother and father
O 0 K have never really been in my life,
although I did live briefly with
O N E my mom.
D Y My father is in jail
for manslaughter and
R U M will be out in two
E M U years. He and my
S P Y mother have been
writing each other and
S ED have developed a
E A U close relationship. Re-
A C E cently, my father pro-
posed, and Mom
accepted. She asked
Vigoda me how I felt about it,
drum and I didn't say any-
yr, thing. ANN
is right Annie, I don't know MAIL
'est high how I feel about it. I'm MAI
ital piece angry with my parents
? de vivre for not being in my life when I
ght's title needed them, and now they de-
rmen" cide to get married when it no
ing
Is a loop- longer matters to my welfare.
B Please tell me what to do and say
alie's to my mother How can I get rid of
her's the resentment so I can be happy
d for them? Left Out Daughter
d Dear Left Out: You sound wise
fs, ands, beyond your years. You under-
irnful wail stand the importance of putting
:C mem- aside your anger and resentment,
icl not only for your parents' sake,
el singer but for your own. Try to forgive
n as them for not being the parents
ve com- you deserved and should have
ment grown up with. If you can accept
before them as they are, warts and all, it
pass will help you feel less cheated.
After all, you seem to have turned
out OK in spite of their short-
comings. It might help to talk
about this with an unbiased third
party a school or camp coun-


I


selor, favorite teacher, friend,
adult neighbor or clergyperson.
Dear Annie: My husband and I
recently had to move in with my
mother, and I discovered she
does something really disturbing.
Mom does not think it is neces-
sary to wash her hands
after using the bath-
room. She will go right
into the kitchen and
start cooking. Occa-
sionally, she will rinse
them at the kitchen
sink, using only cold
water. She told me that
cold water kills germs.
Am I being overly
concerned? I am al-
ways the one who
IE'S catches every virus
and infection that
.BgOX comes to town. How
can I convince her that
this is not healthy? She likes your
column, so maybe reading this
will help. Cringing Violet
Dear Violet: We hope so. Your
mother is misinformed. Washing
your hands with soap and water
is the best way to prevent infec-
tion and illness. Rinsing her
hands under cold water does
nothing. Here are some guide-
lines from the Mayo Clinic:
Always wash your hands
AFTER using the toilet, changing
a diaper, preparing food (espe-
cially raw meat or poultry),
touching an animal, blowing your
nose, coughing or sneezing, treat-
ing wounds, touching a sick or in-
jured person, or handling
garbage or anything that could be
contaminated. You also should be
sure to wash your hands BE-
FORE preparing food, eating,
treating wounds or giving medi-


cine, touching a sick or injured
person, and inserting or remov-
ing contact lenses. If Mom does-
n't like to use soap, perhaps she
would be willing to try an alco-
hol-based hand sanitizer that
doesn't require water. (Please,
Mom, do this to keep your family
healthy)
Dear Annie: Like "Help," I, too,
have a husband who refuses to
close things. He leaves the house
and car doors wide open, and
often, I find the refrigerator and
freezer doors left ajar. Any bottle
or package sits without the top
on. Bagged lettuce spills all over
the fridge, pills scatter all over
the vanity, and more shampoo
has fallen down the drain than
you can imagine. He also refuses
to hang up his clothes. Instead,
his shirts are stuffed on shelves,
and his pants hang on decorative
hooks.
It doesn't matter if it costs him
money, injures him or forces him
to clean up spills. My pleas fall on
deaf ears, and if I say too much,
he accuses me of being overly
critical. I am open to all sugges-
tions. The Closer
Dear Closer: Leaving the car
and house doors open is an ex-
treme version of this problem.
Suggest that your husband see
his doctor.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar,
longtime editors of the Ann Lan-
ders column. Please e-mail your
questions to anniesmailbox@
comcastnet, or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate,
5777 W Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.


North
Dbl.
4 A


Opening lead: Q


2010 by UFS, Inc.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ENTERTAINMENT


CS 17 2010


South
Pass
24


West
SPass
Pass


East
Pass
All pass









CITRUS Coijxm' (FL) CHRONICLE COMICS SATURnAY, JULY 17, 2010 C9


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


I'M ON MY WAY
TO A MEETING WITH
A PROSPECTIVE
CUSTOMER.


The Born Loser

RELLO, WURR1CAME -LATTlE?'


WE HAVE SUCH
A LONG SALES
GESTATION PERIOD
THAT THE VALUE OF
MY EFFORTS WON'T
BE KNOWN FOR TWO
YEARS.


JUST REMEMBER THAT
OPTIMISM LOOKS
EXACTLY LIKE DOING
NOTHING.


1*50,9-T RRVSRO LISTEN A guz-1F lAUR.lcWFt ,
RugikURmE Mu~Tle keg&L.'YOU ~TTl.IF SN'T TEAE,YOU'RE TE
NAST I.VE TRkE\ 1OKNEK R5
W ROR( ,NUfABM, .R ,1,) -1 WOGUM!


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondle


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Oh, dear. I had a feeling once your father
saw your new piercing he'd come
completely unhinged."


02010BIIK,.. .'. j)S
www.famllyclrcus.com vjSWW
"Billy, you better be sure to stay
in the shallow end."


""I LIKS W4AMlNWW1f1-1 GIRAIAPA.Me'S ,ASW


Doonesbury


Big Nate


Arlo and Janis


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness
637-3377
"Inception" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No Passes.
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m. No Passes.
"Despicable Me" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:30 p.m.
"Predators" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:30
p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Grown Ups" (PG-13) 12:05 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:55
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Inception" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 12:45 p.m., 3:40
p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m. 10:45
p.m. No Passes.


Local RADIO


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
Contemporary WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies


"The Sorcerer's Apprentice" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:30
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m. No Passes.
"Predators" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 8
p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Despicable Me" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50
p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m.
"The Last Airbender" (PG) 12:35 p.m., 3 p.m., 5:25
p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Grown Ups" (PG-13) 12:25 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:20
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Knight and Day" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings
and entertainment information.


Times subject to change; call ahead.


Peanuts


Cathy


WIFL-FM 104.3 Adult Mix
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: C equals L

"R ... NHS ND XNTS RE T ODEXNTEN


XNTNK DW ODEWJXRDE FJXN UKOTJXK


DW NBK KLMHKXXRDE RN CKTZKX DE AS


WTOK." FDBEES


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If you want to sacrifice the admiration of many men for the
criticism of one, go ahead, get married." Katharine Hepburn
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 7-17


-------------


COMICS


SATuRDAY, JuLy 17, 20 10 C9


CiTRus Cou.,%,-Ty (FL) CHRo-,vicLE


GKMM










CIO SA1LRD~,JLIY 17, 2010 RELIGION CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Hotel backs away from
hosting Muslim group
CHICAGO -A Muslim group
whose teachings are considered dan-
gerous by some scholars canceled its
annual U.S. meeting after a suburban
Chicago hotel backed out of hosting
the event.
American members of Hizb ut-Tahrir
had planned a 2010 conference at the
Chicago Marriott Oak Brook last week-
end. Organizer Ayman Hamed said
the hotel sent a late cancellation no-
tice without explanation. The hotel did-
n't return calls for comment.
The self-described political organi-
zation wants to establish a worldwide
Islamic state. The group is banned in
Turkey and other countries.
The group doesn't advocate vio-
lence and isn't considered a terrorist
organization by the U.S., however,
several scholars criticize the organiza-
tion's secretive workings. One scholar
has called the group a "conveyor belt
to terrorism."
Last year, a conference in suburban
Oak Lawn drew about 800 people and
a handful of protesters.


More sex assault claims
against former bishop
ERIE, Pa. More claims of sexual
abuse have been made against a for-
mer Erie Episcopal bishop after the
current bishop publicly discussed the
case over the weekend.
The current bishop, the Rt. Rev.
Sean Rowe, said in a statement Tues-
day that more than five more women
contacted him to say they had been
molested by the late Bishop Donald
Davis.
Rowe released a statement last
Sunday that was read in every parish
in the Diocese of Northwestern Penn-
sylvania saying that Davis had abused
four girls. Davis served as bishop in
Erie from 1974 until 1991. He died in
2007. Rowe has asked for anyone
who was abused by Davis to come
forward.

Official: Anti-Semitism
popular with extremists
BERLIN -Atop security official
said he sees anti-Semitism in both
right-wing and Muslim extremists in
Germany.


Heinz Fromm, president of the do-
mestic intelligence agency, told Der
Spiegel that both have "a similar pic-
ture of the enemy: Israel and the Jews
overall."
Fromm said that while neo-Nazis
adhere to a racist anti-Semitism, Mus-
lim extremists "are oriented toward the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict."
He said both groups have the idea
"that Israel and the Jews have undue
power that needs to be fought."
Last month, a group of Arab youths
attacked and shouted anti-Semitic slo-
gans at a Jewish dance group during
a street festival in Hannover.

Conservationists cite
peril to spiritual sites
DURANGO, Colo. -A conserva-
tion group is warning about vandalism,
looting and destruction at the Canyons
of the Ancients National Monument,
among other protected lands.
The nonprofit Conservation Lands
Foundation, based in Durango, said
Monday it's leading a volunteer
restoration project at the Canyons of
the Ancients.
The project recognizes the 10th an-


niversary of the National Landscape
Conservation System, which includes
the Canyons of the Ancients in south-
west Colorado.
The system also encompasses 15
other national monuments overseen
by the Bureau of Land Management in
Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana,
New Mexico, Oregon and Utah.
The monuments are home to rare
plants and animals, dinosaur fossils
and sites of religious significance to
Native Americans.

Pope appoints new
envoy to Poland
WARSAW, Poland The pope has
appointed Archbishop Celestino
Migliore as his new envoy to Poland,
the nation's Catholic leaders said.
Migliore, an Italian, succeeds Polish
Archbishop Jozef Kowalczyk, who re-
cently took over as Poland's primate,
the senior leader of the church.
Poland's episcopate said on its
website Wednesday that Pope Bene-
dict XVI appointed Migliore to repre-
sent the Vatican in Poland, the
homeland of the late Pope John Paul
II. The 58-year-old Migliore served as


assistant to Kowalczyk in Poland from
1989-92 and recently was the Vati-
can's observer at the United Nations in
New York.

Atheists sue city over
prayers at meetings
LAKELAND, Fla. -Atheists in cen-
tral Florida have sued the city of Lake-
land over its practice of opening city
commission meetings with prayers.
Atheists of Florida filed the lawsuit
Monday in U.S. District Court in Tampa.
A federal appeals court has ruled
that Lakeland's invitations to local
clergy to offer prayers is constitutional,
but the judges also stipulated that gov-
ernments must make a reasonable ef-
fort to include all religious faiths.
The director of the atheist group's
Lakeland chapter said Lakeland hasn't
made that effort. The lawsuit claims
the group was made to feel uncomfort-
able because they did not stand dur-
ing the prayers or say "under God"
while reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.
Mayor Gow Fields said he had ex-
pected the lawsuit. He declined further
comment.
-From wire reports


* Croicle [


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds



In Print



and



Online



All



The Time


Attractive Widow
Seeks nice guy, honest,
cheerful, independent.
For companionship
conversation, travel,
outdoor activity 60-70
Please reply to
Blind Box 1629P
Citrus Co. Chronicle
106 W. Main St.
Inverness, FL 34450
LADIES- active, caring,
middle aged man with
personality & trustwor-
thiness seeks active
lady 45-55 who is
friendly caring for future
relationship.382-0481
SWM, Desires SWF 67+
Yrs. West side or Hills
areas. For dining, short
drives, flea markets,
quiet times. Respond to
Blind Box 1628P
Citrus Co Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal Riv. 34429
-I/

Air Condition, Rheem,
4 Ton split system
complete, 10 yrs. old,
works great $650.
352-586-0510
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/12, Scrn'd Rm. $625.
+ Sec. 2120 Devon Dr.
(352) 212-3997
Couch & Love seat
$250.
Entertainment Center
3 pcs. 7ft wide
$250.
(352) 249-7521
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, turn., CHA, H20,no
pets. $500.352.795.0061
HOMOSASSA
Rent to Own. Lrg 3/1/2,
1/2 ac fenced, W/D,
dish washer $750/mo
(352) 560-3355








#I Employment
source is...






iwww.chronicleonline.com


Fa: 32)53-65 6Tl Fe : (8)85-30 m i: ca *ifedscrnce iecmI S S sit w w Shrniceoli*eco

Chroict:re Ofers FreeI FundChid Cre6


LOCAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER

Florida Public Utilities
is seeking a propane
delivery'driver.
Applicants must have
a valid CDL with
Hazmat,Tanker
& Airbrake endorse-
ments or the ability
to attain one. Must
have a good driving
record, neat appear-
ance and the ability
to pass a DOT
Physical. Applications
Can Be Done Online
At: fpuc.com
Or Faxed To:
(352)447-2780.
Applications Can
Also Be Picked Up At
50 Diana St, Inglis Fl
34449 EOE

LPN'S
Needed for a
Hospice Team to
care for patients
with special needs.
One yr. exp. nec.
Please Fax Resume
to: (352) 385-0164
or Email to:
karey@acehss.com
Web Design
Property Maintenance
House Cleaning.
(352)795-1194



r7--q-
r $$ TOP DOLLAR $$
I For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trks. |
* $$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for junk vehicles
(352) 634-5389
A FREE...FREE...FREE...
Removal of scrap
metal a/c, appls. auto's
& dump runs. 476-6600
FREE PICK UP
For Used Appliances
& Scrap Metal.
(352) 794-3669
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
Instant Cash
For Junk Vehicles
(352) 476-1023


I Male cat & 1 Female
cat. Both 1 yr. old.
Inside cats. Would like
to keep together. If
someone takes the
cats and wants to
return them, the owner
will accept them back.
(352) 257-0323
2 Kittens
9 Wks. old I calico,
bobtail, I black long
haired, both w/blue
eyes. (352) 257-0599
Beautiful
3 month old Male Tiger
Striped Kitten call
637-2758.
Curtain Rods
Several sizes.
Drapery Rods
Several sizes. Call after
3:00. (352) 637-2881
Excell. Home for any
exotic birds or poultry
IU-R unable to care for.
(352) 726-9966
Firewood
'One cord. Dunnellon.
(352) 615-3596
Free Adult Cat
Spayed & declawed
owner have allergies
(352) 419-4148
Free CB Tower
352-344-5311
FREE TO GOOD HOME
Lab Mix Puppies
(352) 746-1154
Free Water bed
Deluxe Queen Sz.
(352) 746-5157
Horse Manure
Bring Shovel & Help
yourself.
(352) 697-5252
HORSES
arab mare, &
thoughbred geld.
broke to ride & up to
date on shots &
,cogglns(352) 628-4121
Jack Russell,
male, 2 years, old,
neutered, great dog,
High Energy
(352) 382-1492
Kittens
13 weeks old, 2 m,
1 fem.short tux. blk,&
long hair grey tabby
spots (352) 270-2393
MAKE YOUR AD
STAND OUT FROM
THE REST I
USE OUR SPECIAL
HEADERS

Ask your classified rep
for the details.
352-563-5966


Mixed Puppies
2 males, teddy bear
faces, 9 wks old, small
to medium size.
352-220-2573
Mixed Puppies
Terrier, pomeranian,
& poodle, 8 wks. old.
(352) 628-3342



Blueberries, You pick.
Citrus Springs, Open
Daily 7A./7P.
(352) 746-2511


CHECK CITRUS
COUNTY ANIMAL
SERVICE FOR YOUR
LOST ANIMAL PLEASE
SPAY/NUDER & MICRO-
CHIP CALL 746-8400
Found in April and lost in
July female mini pin/chi?
age adult orangy brown
white on chest, one ear
up the other half way.
Wearing a pink collar
lost near Chiltons Garage
Florida Ave (Hwy 41) Flo-
ral City from her home on
July 13,2010 around 9
am. Maybe taken by her
former owner? But gone
if you have her now
please let us know you
can keep her if you like
just let us know. Call
344-3905 we called her
freeway :)
Lost 2 dogs around Mayo
Dr/NE 12th Ave..1 about
60 pounds bloodhound
mix Sara, 1 about 10
pounds looks like
Chewbacca from star
wars named Chewie..call
795-0189 if found.
LOST A PET? DON'T
FORGET TO CHECK
YOUR LOCAL ANIMAL
SHELTER!
www.citruscritters.com
Reward!
Chihuahua & Jack
Russell Mix. Female,
small reddish, brown,
wearing red collar.
Answers to Zippy.
Lost on Hwy 44 by
Dan's Clam Stand.
Owner heartbroken.
(352) 257-8554



AM STAFF FEMALE
RED NOSE BRINDLE
CROPPED EARS
DOCKED TAIL FOUND
IN DUNN.BLACK COL-
LAR CALL 746-8400
AUSTRALIAN
SHEPPARD MALE
FOUND 2 MONTHS
AGO 1 BLUE EYE ONE
BROWN CALL 746-8400
BEAGLE MALE TRI
COLLAR HAS RUSTY
SILVER COLLAR
FOUND IN FLORAL
CITY CALL 746-8400
BOSTON TERRIER
MALE HAS CHIP DOG
FOUND IN BEVERLY
HILLS CALL 746-8400
BULL DOG MALE
WHITE BLACK DOTS
ON EARS BLACK COL-
LAR CALL 746-8400
Cell Phone
Found on Corner of
Marines and South
Rose in Seven Lakes.
(352) 726-1500
CHIHUAHUA FEMALE
BROWN/BLACK
BRINDLE FOUND IN
BEVERLY HILLS CALL
746-8400
CHIHUAHUA MALE
NEUTERED TAN/BLACK
FOUND CITRUS
SPRINGS CALL
746-8400
DACHSHUND FEMALE
NURSING MOM FOUND
BEVERLY HILLS
CALL746-8400


DACHSHUND RUST
COLOR MALE FOUND
ON HY 44 INVERNESS
RED COLLAR CALL
746-8400
Found Chicken
Oak Run Area
Call btw. 10a-8p
(352) 621-0665
HOUND MALE TRI
COLOR FOUND ON
MOCCASIN SLOUGH
INV. CALL 746-8400
LAB MIX MALE HAS
BLACK SPOTS ON
TONG FOUND ON
BURGER CT. INVER-
NESS BLACK COLLAR
CALL 746-8400
LAB RETRIEVER FE-
MALE CREAM/WHITE
FOUND ON 2ND ST. IN
CRYSTAL RIVER CALL
746-8400
LOST A PET? DON'T
FORGET TO CHECK
YOUR LOCAL ANIMAL
SHELTER!
www.citruscritters.com
SHEBA EHU FEMALE
MIX BLOND/WHITE
FOUND BEVERLY
HILLS CALL 746-8400



Vendors Wanted
For a CRAFT SHOW
FRIDAY, OCT. 29 and
SATURDAY, OCT. 30
1st Annual Craft show
First Presbyterian
Church, Crystal River.
For more Info
Call: 795-2259



Advertise in Over 100
Papers throughout
Florida.
Advertising
Networks of Florida,
Put us to work for Youl
(866)742-1373 or visit:
www.florida-classifeds.
corn
BANKRUPTCY 1
DIVORCES
CHILD SUPPORT I
352-613-3674 *
--= --- J

BANKRUPTCY,
DIVORCE & More
(352) 860-1533

CLOSING FOR
SUMMER SALE
All Plants Are 50% Off
The Original Price.
All Mulch, Pine Bark,
Fertilizer, Chemicals,
Are 20% Off The
Original Price. Sale
Last Until 7/31/10.
Color Country
Nursery Mon-Sat.
9A/5P.
Weather Permitting
1405 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Hwy. Lecanto, Fl.
34461 (352) 746-6465






Reward For Into leading
to the recovery of my
14' Jon boat w/9.9 elec
start Evinr Lake Her-
nando 352-613-4702



FRESH FLA JUMBO
SHRIMP 15ct. Load
up now! $5 Ib
727-771-7500



Exp. CARE GIVER
seeking position
references avail
352-527-6683


TEACHER
F/T or P/T, Exp. Required
CDA Preferred
TODAY'S CHILD
(352) 344-9444



Accounting Clerk Fast
paced office seeks FT/PT
self starter. Must be well
versed in MS Office
Suite. Prev. accounting
exper. preferred, not re-
quired. Fax resume to:
352-795-4778.



ELDER SITTER
for elder lady. Prefer
someone in Hernando
/Inv area. Must be flexi-
ble. $10 per hr.419-5603






Tell that special
person
SHappy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




#1 Affordable
CNA Prep Course
CPR-AED & book
included. I week class
getvourcna.com
352-341-PREP (7737)
A CNA Prep &
Test Program.
CPR Available Day &
Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
ezleamingservices.com
/ us @ zoomcitrus.com

BECOME A CNA
Low Fees CPR ,AED
Info 352-564-8378 or
ficnatestorea.com

CERTIFIED/
LICENSED
MA Or LPN

F/T Position Available.
Fax Resume To:
(352)794-3876

CNA

Immediate Opening
CNA Live In, certified,
background check
req. Must drive.
Call 352 503-2354

DIETARY
MANAGER

Must have 3 + Yrs.
Exp. in a assisted
living facility.
No phone calls.
Please apply @ New
Horizon Senior Citizen
Home 1745 Forest Dr.
Inverness, Fl.

Experienced
Medical Staffing
Specialist
On-Call, Night &
Weekends required.
Human Resource
Director
with at least 2 yrs. exp
NURSE TEMPS
(352) 344-9828


IilmnltaBi ss
Learn skills for
a career in the
medical field
in the National
Guard.
Earn money for
college while training
one weekend a
month and two
weeks a year.
A part time career
with full time rewards.
Call today for details.
SSG RODNEY MEDINA
352-795-9757
RODNEY.MEDINA
@US.ARMY.MIL
To learn more, visit
National Guard.com

LPN'S
Needed for a
Hospice Team to
care for patients
with special needs.
One yr. exp. nec.
Please Fax Resume
to: (352) 385-0164
or Email to:
karey@acehss.com

Make a difference
in a young Man's life
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offender
Correctional Center,
a residential program
for high and
maximum risk males
committed to the
Dept. of Juvenile
Justice is recruiting for
Juvenile Corrections
Officers.
Mental Health
Therapist
and
RN and LPN
Apply in person ofat:
CYPRESSCREEK
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Or fax resume to
(352) 527-2235
Drug Free Workplace
/ EEO

MEDICAL ASSIST.
Fulltime for busy office.
Fax Resume To:
352- 795-5608

P/T RECEPTIONIST
For busy family
practice. Must have
computer & front desk
experience
Send Resume To:
P.O. Box 585
Dunnellon Fl. 34430

PHYSICAL
THERAPIST

Wanted to manage
and operate a busy
outpatient clinic.
Compensation
commensurate with
experience. Fax
resume 746-2236




Assistant to
Director
Of Local Charity.
Part-time, computer
and managerial skills.
Fax Resume to:
352-344-2146

Insurance Agent
Qualified personal
lines agent for local
insurance agency.
220 or 440 lic. req.
Fax resume:
352-489-0384 or emai
birdins@bellsouth.net


ZONING & CODE
ENFORCEMENT.
OFFICIAL
The Town of
Yankeetown
is accepting
applications for an
experienced Zoning
& Code Enforcement
Official for part time
employment.
Job may Include
administration
of the Community
Rate System.
Submit resumes by
12 noon 7-23-10
to the
Town of Yankeetown,
6241 Harmony Lane,
Yankeetown, FL
34498.
Town Hall is open
Mon. Fri.
9am 12 noon.




Kitchen Utility
Part time, Golf course.
Kitchen experience
a must. Email Resume:
marl6n7rivers@
tampabay.rr.com




COLONIAL LIFE

Seeks entrepreneurial
professional with
sales experience to
become a District
Manager. Life/Health
license is required.
Substantial earnings
potential. Please
contact
meredith.brewer@colo
nialilfe.com or
Call 904-424-5697

Here We Grow
Again!
Due to ever expand-
ing customer base,
A-I PEST CONTROL
is in search of
Self motivated, sales
oriented individuals.
Co. vehicle provided
pd. vacations &
holidays. Pest control
exp. not necessary,
sales ability a must.
Apply In Person
925S Hwy41
Inverness, Fl. DFWP
No phone calls
Please


I STAND OUT FROM I
S THE RER
use one of ur
SPECIAL HEADERS






SAsk your classified
representative for
details.
352-563-5966
Lkmmmmm1


Salesperson
Needed

J.D. Smith Pest Control
(352) 726-3921




ASPHALT POSITIONS

Asphalt Paver, Operator
Roller Operator & Truck
Driver 5 yrs. exp. nec.
(352) 303-2525

CABINETS

Exp. & Motivated,
In all aspects of
Millwork/Casework
Apply In Person
Bulit-Rite Cabinets
from 9-12 438
E. Hwy 40 Inglis.

LOCAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER

Florida Public Utilities
Is seeking a propane
delivery driver.
Applicants must have
a valid CDL with
Hazmat,Tanker
& Airbrake endorse-
ments or the ability
to attain one. Must
have a good driving
record, neat appear-
ance and the ability
to pass a DOT
Physical. Applications
Can Be Done Online
At: fpuc.com
Or Faxed To:
(352)447-2780.
Applications Can
Also Be Picked Up At
50 Diana St, Inglls Ft
34449 EOE





Drivers
FLORIDA TRUCK
DRIVERS NEEDED ASAPI
IN-STATE DRIVING
POSITIONS AVAILABLE!
CDL-A w/ 1 yr. experi-
ence Outstanding pay
& Benefits! Call a
recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.ookleytransport
.com







Exp. Rodbusters,
Form Carpenters &
Concrete Finishers.
Must be able to pass
background check,
(Jessica Lunsford
Act), social security
verification & drug
screen. Interviews by
appt. only. Job Local
Crystal River, FL.
Ph. (352) 854-0169
Fax (352) 854-1209


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SUCdoku ****** 4puz.com


6 38

36







3 4 8 4
6! 5 l 7










19 7 8

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


CIO Sm-uRD.AN, juix 17, 20 10


RELIGION











CitrusKIA)
., ,.- 1 ,, :--- .- .


KIA MOTORS
Th. Powi r. to, c.


YOUR
CHOICE


ONLY 40,000 MILES


2004 Kia

optuma .095


2007 Honda
Civic
HYBRID
38,000 MILS
50+ MILES TO
THE GALLON!


s15,000


IF YOU DO NOT SEE WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR, WE HAVE OVER 40 MORE VEHICLES IN STOCK TO CHOOSE FROM
I A M, L ,10


2005 CHEVROLET AVEO 2007 CHEVROLET AVEO 2007 CHEVROLET COBALT
6,490 $6,995 $8,685


2004 AMANTI
2,000 Miles
$8,995


2004 KIA SORENTO
Only 48,000 Miles
$9,500


2006 DODGE CARAVAN
$9,900


2007 HYUNDAI SONATA
Wow!
$10,500


2007 DODGE DAKOTA
Loaded, White
$14,995


2006 KIA SEDONA 2009 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
47,000 Miles
$10,900 *12,900


2009 KIA RONDO
$15,500


ILoaded
$12999


2009 KIA SEDONA 2007 TOYOTA SIENNA 2009 KIA BORREGO
2 To Choose From, Low 20k Miles
$17,495 EACH $18,979 $19,495
'PICPIUESF FOR IlU TION PUao S h OlY.


WE NEED EVERY TRADE- HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE AND LOWEST PRICES ON EVERY NEW KIA IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA


Shop from Home @ www.citruslaa.com
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, LICENSE AND $699 DEALER FEE, REBATE & INCENTIVES INCLUDED & RETAINED BY DEALER. MUST QUALIFY FOR KIA OWNER LOYALTY AND/OR COMPETITIVE BONUSES.!


Citrus Kia "Peace Of Mind Warranty" program
Starting November 1st, 2009 Citrus Kia will introduce the New "Peace Of Mind" Warranty program on Used vehicles. Peace of mind is a Dealership
promise... When you Buy a used car, truck, van, or SUV from us we will be at your side for the 1st 90 days /or 3000 miles of your driving. If anything,
and we are talking anything breaks* on your vehicle, from the head lights to the tail lights we will fix it for you at NO CHARGE. You have trusted us for
Now on ALL used all your NEW car needs and and have made us the #1 New Kia dealer in the state. Now we want to prove to you that Citrus Kia is the best place in the
state of Florida to buy a Used vehicle also.
vehicles sold At Citrus Kia, "We just don't close car deals, we open relationships".
I I I III II II II III III I I II III II~ lll lll IIII I II I I I Il I I~ l lll lll ll~ lll lll rlll lll lll lll lll H I II III III I ... ... . .. . . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . .


Om 0005HN6


SPECIAL PURCHASEI. WHILE SUPPL'IESLAST


I


SATuRDAY, JuLy 17, 20 10 Cil


CITRUS Cou-YTY (FL) CHRo.vicLE


2007 IaA AMANn
$139900


I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C12 SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010


AIRLINES ARE
HIRING -
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FAA
approved program. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified -
Job placement assis-
tance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance (866) 314-3769
Front Desk
Evenings 3-11 Apply
in Person. Quality Inn.
Crystal River 563-1500 C
NmHuMAL GUBHM
Secure Your
Future. Call
your local "
Recruiter!
SSG RODNEY MEDINA
(352)795-9757
RODNEY.MEDINA
@US.ARMY.MIL
www.NationalGuard.c
om

S 7-17


Botto






LI


m






NE
II--






MODEL

YEAR-END

SALES EVENT


DELI PERSON
Experience. A MUST!
352-527-9013



------I.
SALON
I PROFESSIONAL
ACADEMY
Cosmetology
Start Dates
August 9
September 13
October 18
352-753-5511
11915 CR 103
The Villages, FI 32162
www.thevillagest
sea.com



$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOWI $$$
As seen on 1V.$$$ Injury
Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++
within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE!
Call Todayl Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321
www.iawcaoital.com
Investor Wanted
Great Return!
Short Term or Long
No Risk! 352-461-4518


Schools
BENE'S
International
I School of Beauty
Barber
& Massage
Therapy
*NOW ENROLLING*
Cosmo Days
Aug. 16,
Sept. 27, Nov. 8
Cosmo Nights
Aug. 16, Nov. 8
Massage Days
September 7,
Massage Nights
September 7
Barber Stylist
(Nights Only)
Sept. 27,
Nails & Skincare
Classes begin wkly.
Days & Nights
when possible
(352) 263-2744
1486 Pinehurst Dr
Sprina Hill Fl. 34606


CASH NOW!
Get cash for your
structured settlement
or annuity payments.
High payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth.
1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536). Rated
A+ by the Better
Business Bureau.
Vendors Wanted
For a CRAFT SHOW
FRIDAY, OCT. 29 and
SATURDAY, OCT. 30
Ist Annual Craft show
First Presbyterian
Church, Crystal River.
For more info
Call: 795-2259



Need Cash Fast?
(352) 422-3043

C01100BBe


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
*A ** *ir *ii *r *


Hot Tub
Family Size
Runs good, Looks Good
$480
(352) 795-0783
Jacuzzi, Leisure Spa,
6 person, all electrical.
$2K. Exc. cond.
(850) 602-5830
LEISURE BAY HOT TUB,
poly steel, 3 person, 2
yrs old. Perfect Shape.
$1400. 344-0324
Outdoor Spa
Polysteel, 78 x 59 x 30
2 HP,2 speed pump. 4
Kilo. heater, 1 Yr. old.
Exc. cond.,$1,000.
Obo. (352) 795-7520
Spa-2-Go
Portable Spa,
100 jets, seats up to 4.
Nearly new all chemi-
cals Incl. $400. obo
(352) 563-5464



Air Condition, Rheem,
4 Ton split system
complete, 10 yrs. old,
works great $650.
352-586-0510
BEVERLY HILLS
Sat. 17th, 8am-?
85 S. Barbour Street
FRIDGE 10 cubic foot
Maytag with top
freezer, perfect for gar-
age First $50.00 In Pine
Ridge 352 746 1661
G E Washer $75.
Queen Mattresses
Numbers bed/2
remotes., $125.
(352) 628-4766
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Equipment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&lns. CAC 057914
HOT WATER
HEATER, 40 gal, 2
yrs old $100.
453-6789
NEW WHIRLPOOL SS
FRIG & ADMIRAL
WASHER/DRYER SET
$995. & $475.
352-446 6558
Refrigerator, Roper/
By whirlpool, 14cu, 5 yrs.
old, white, new blower
motor 28x28x63
$100. aba
(352) 344-3881
WASHER GE heavy
duty, 14 cycle super large
capacity, white, excellent
condition, moving must
sell $200 obo 795-4878


CORNER WORK TA-
BLE WITH keyboard tray,
matching work table and
bookcase $150
352.465.2374



JACK &
SHOP VACUM
each $25.
352-503-6037
LINEMAN BELT NEW
Bashlin D-ring safety belt,
never used, size=20,
$150.00352-949-0147



65 INCH BIG SCREEN
needs a little work or
good for parts. $75
352-422-3157
HIGH QUALITY: 7 PC
Panasonic surround
stereo w/5 dvd/cd al-
most new $130/obo.
Two quality Lg, spkrs
$70obo. 382-7555
JVC 32" TV
Great Picture
Only $125.00 OBO
352-527-9742
T.V. 57 inch Hitachi, Hi
Definition console 7 yrs
old. No problems ever.
Excellent TV. $350
352-341-6866.



METAL ROOFING
22/24 gauge, pan
24" wide, 30+ length
$1500. 352-794-3603 or
813-244-3945 cell.
SINKS 2 bath 22" white
china & dbl white kitchen
porcelain Moen fixtures like
new $100. 352-628-0698



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer repair/sales
(352)344-4839
Computer Repair
we come to you. Call
today! visa/mc. 352-
212-1551/422-6020
DESKTOP COMPUTER
TOWER pent 4, 2.0
processor wn xph good
spread software S165.00
352 382 3895
DESKTOP COMPUTER
TOWER Pent 4,XP PRO
lots of software S 160.00
352 382 3895


New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
GATEWAY COMPUTER
FLAT SCREEN monitor
light tan in color asking
$25 352-422-3157


CRANE Petibone Crane
Come look make an offer
795-1139


Yanmar Deisel Tractor
Model #YM2200, 26.5
HP, 2003, 96.3 hrs.
w/ brushhog & E-Z pull
tandum-axle trailer
GVWR, 7,000lbs 2006
$6,200 both obo
(352) 795-2749, Jim


PORTABLE GENERA-
TOR Peligro 10000-watt.
$750.00. 352-726-4992
SHOP VAC AND
FLOOR JACK both
50. 352-503-6037
^^^; -I^


2 Matching
Recliners
$25. EA
(352) 746-0643
2 RED SWIVEL ROCK-
ERS Fabric, excellent
condition $40 each.
352-465-2374
4 White Wooden Dress-
ers $60. ea
or 4 for $125.
Office Chair,
Like new $50.
Must sell excess
Excel. cond.
(352)503-6313
5 PC. FULL SIZE. BED-
ROOM SET, BEAUTIFUL
CONDITION W/BOX
SPRING &
MATRESS,$350
352-341-1928
BAR STOOLS (4) Beau-
tiful solid wood, with arm
rest, cushioned seats.
Ex. Cond. $500.00
(352) 794-3067
BASSETT- RECLINER
Green, comfortable and
clean. Good condition.
$60 586-8928
BEAUTIFUL HAND-
MADE DINING ROOM
TABLE WITH 8 CHAIRS
1- SWIVEL, 4 DRAWS,
MADE BYAMISH IN
LAWRANCEBURG, TN.
6'4" X 3'4" OAK. WE
PAID $2200, SPECIAL
ORDER MOVED TO BIG
FOR NEW HOME SELL
FOR $1200 OBO HAVE
TO SEE TO BELIEVE
COMES WITH 2 SWIVEL
BAR STOOLS ALL
HAND MADE
352-400-8991
BED
Single, mattress & box
springs, good cond.
$50.(352) 503-6313
BLACK SHINY COFFEE
TABLE and two matching
end tables $40
352-465-2374
Bunk Beds
All wood, honey
colored, with drawers &
stairs. Exc. cond. $500.
(352) 302-0951
CHERRY BEDROOM SET.
Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in
factory boxes. English
Dovetail. Original cost
$4500. Sell for $895. Can
deliver. Call Tom
(954) 302-2423
China Cabinet
Pecan Wood,3 shelves,
glass doors. Exc. cond.
$125.(352) 628-4115
Coffee Tables
High quality, perfect
cond. Sq. coffee &
1 end table. Iron
w/marble & glass tops
$175.(352) 795-7240
COMFORTS OF
HOME USED FURN.
352-795-0121
Couch & Love seat
$250.
Entertainment Center
3 pcs. 7ff wide
$250.
(352) 249-7521
DAYBED
w/trundel oakframe,
2 matt. 3 twin sets of
sheets 2 comforters
+ more $125 firm
good cond 746-4126
Desk 7 drawers
with chair
$40.00
Microwave Table
$25.
(352) 746-0643
Dining room hutch,
oak finish, top glass
doors, 3 shelves, bot-
tom 3 carved wood
doors, very nice, $125
(352) 637-3983
Dining Room Set
glass table w/4 chairs
S150o abo.
Ent center w/ 19" TV
$100 obo(352)
628-2965 989-429-3862
DINING ROOM TABLE
Solid wood, light color
with light green accents.
$200 OBO, need to sell
asap 352-697-4339
DINING TBL: LG SOLID
WOOD w/6 carved
chairs (plush clothe
seat, clean) inclI 1 capt
chr & leaf. Cost $2500
Now S475obo 563-2927


Leather, excel cond.
$35.
(352) 637-2032
Entertainment Center
Town & Country,
Solid oak,
holds 32" Flat screen
$275
(352) 344-4357
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER walnut solid
wood two 75" towers
with lighting and ad-
justable bridge and
shelve, accommodates
different size tv's.
towers have 2 glass
doors on top and 2
wood doors on bottom.
excellent condition.
$450. 352-341-6866
FRENCH PROVINCIAL
BEDROOM SET 7
pieces, like new King Koil
Queen Mattress. $750.
Avail FriSatSun.
727-463-4411
Full Size Serta Bed
mattress, boxspring &
frame. less than a year
old $400 firm
(352) 419-5281
Moving to Michigan
FURNITURE NEEDED
We Pick Up/Tax Deduct
CITRUS THRIFT &
COLLECTIBLES 794-3885
Supporting the
Boys & Girls Club
Kitchen Set, real
wood/wrought iron
+ 4 chairs on casters
$125.
Blue clothe Recliner
$95. (352) 637-2032
Kitchen-Dining tables
$150 each. Armories
$100 and $75, China
Hutch $150.
352-344-1365
LEATHER LIVING ROOM
SET. In original plastic,
never used. Orig price
$3000, Sacrifice $975.
Can deliver. Call Bill
(813)600-3653
Lighted Hutch-
$60. Wooden Book
Cabinet-
$60. 400-4173
Loveseat &sofa, off
white background,
excellent cond.,$75
(352) 637-2938
Luggage carrier, $50
Table, 4 chairs, &
coffee table, $50
(352) 344-9163
PECAN DINING TABLE
6 straight back chairs, 2
18" leafs, table cover
$200 352-465-2374
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
352-628.0808
Twin Bedroom Set
White wicker, 2 beds,
night stand, dresser, ta-
ble w/mirror & hamper.
$250. (352) 489-6346


'05 Craftsman DGT 6000
Garden Tract Tach,
Amp & Hr. gauges,
Dual Range Hyd Trans
27 HP Kohler,
Command Pro w/ oil
cooler 75 hrs., 54" Deck
w/mulch kit & bagger
kit., Excel. cond. $1,700.
Call 352-746-2138
Chipper Shredder
8 HP, Troybilt
$425
(352) 382-0158
Riding Lawn Mower,
craftsman, w/ bagger
& trailer, 13.5HP, 38' cut
pickup, $500. abo
Lawn Boy Push mower
'09, 22" used 5 times,
$160. (352) 344-3881

ZMAN LAWN SERVICE
Looking for new cus-
tomers SugarMill
Woods area
352-503-7971



CLOSING FOR
SUMMER SALE
All Plants Are 50% Off
The Original Price.
All Mulch, Pine Bark,
Fertilizer, Chemicals,
Are 20% Off The
Original Price. Sale
Last Until 7/31/10.
Color Country
Nursery Mon-Sat.
9A/5P.
Weather Permitting
1405 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Hwy. Lecanto, Fl.
34461 (352) 746-6465



BEVERLY HILLS
5635 N Princewood Dr
7/17-18 10-5
Household Items
CITRUS HILLS
Fri & Sat 8a-2p. Someth-
ing for Everyone!!
1388W Tacoma St.
CITRUS HILLS
Multi Family Sale
Sat. 8A./?, Longa
berger baskets
774 E.. Gaines Lane
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 8a -Ip
414 N. Michael Mas Terr
off Ft Island Trail &
Green leaf Forest
DUNNELLON
Moving Sale Rainbow
Springs Country Club
Estates. Fri. & Sat. 7A./?
Fum., appis. & hse.
hold items. 9583
S.W. 195th Circle.


32010 NISSAN ALTIMA


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING


800-584-8755 Ext. 6101





$14,999or 199mo.


42010 VIRSA" 20101
iMPG MPG



iAft


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING

805848755 Ext. 6112



7,999+




o$ 139mo'


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING


800,584.8755 Ext. 6116



$ 16,999+





or $269mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING

800,584,8755 Ext. 6109

tA aiA+


$1169mo.Y




2010 MURANO








FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING


800.5848755 Ext 6106




$24,999+





.or 299mo.


BAD CREDIT? NO PROBLEM.
FIND OUT HOW TO BUY THE CAR YOU WANT TODAY!I
24 HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE

800.584-8755 EXT. 88




CRYSTAL NISSAN

937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA



800-584-8755 Ext. 1
*a. ofC fi S w 0r9,r ACif e i E, '. S Aas C0.TK OWO sm mp i UiEt t M r0e1M I S. M 39
,Ct wsimfl 0 5 5 4n 4 (C'.Si! i 1 Cll;0r/ llC A0im 4a if 'Ctlii( Nei,9C TrraiCNti(StaC6 Sei3ltS IEaSialCIESA
O r, fa Gl5 W I l E 4 6IW


F


CLASSIFIED











CL4SSIFIEDS SAI'L IIDAY, JULY 17, 2010 C13


,'/.codsi.l 1 r ihur S.l
DUNNELLON
The Woodlands,
Huge Tool Sale! Sat.
8A./12:00. 20861
S.W. 81st. Loop
FLORAL CITY
Fri. & Sat. 8A./2P.
Hse. hold & more!
7655 E. Parkview PI.
FURNITURE NEEDED
e.e Pck Up/rT Deduct
CITRUS THRIFT &
COLLECTIBLES 794-3885
oys G,'r,, Cri )
HOMOSASSA
RIVERHAVEN VILLAGE
Sat. 8A./3P. 4743
S. Myrtle Way.
HOMOSASSA
Saturday 8A./4P. Model
homo [/ Estate Furn.,
rD'lure's bdroorn furn
& Much More! 8827 S.
Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19)
INVERNESS
1560 S Hillock Ter. Sat
Only. Tools/Books/Misc
INVERNESS
r &. SIl ,i'i '3p Collect-
ileI, A lnhques, ,Music.
Ir ,itnj t'ii Iuih rni ore
404 Iris Ln
INVERNESS
Moving Sale All Must
Go! Fri. & Sat. 8A./4P.
Hse. hid., Turn., & more.
Eaton Terr. 581 To Amy,
follow signs or from Hwy
41, to Inverness Blvd.
follow signs.
INVERNESS
Sat & Sun 8a-6pm
Hshrod, Tools, Clothes,
Toys & misc.
4439 E STALLION LN
INVERNESS
Something For Every-
one! Fri. & Sat. 8A./3P.
Tools, turn., hse. hold,
go cart. 2791 E. Mary
Lue. St. Off Croft Ave.
LECANTO 1902 N. Ot-
tawa Ave. off Hwy 486
Sat. 7/15, 8-1pm, baby
iterns, fitness equip,
Sega Genesis, clothes,
etc...
LECANTO
Multi Family Sale
Thurs., Sun. 7A./?
Antiques, boats,
camper, camping
gear, tools & collec.
3910 W. King B St.
PINE RIDGE
BEV. HILLS 5236 CLIFF
Dr. off Pineridge Blvd.
Fri-Sat 7/16- 7/17 8-1pm,
Golf cart, ride mwr w
/cart, Livrm set & tbls,
L-shape desk, lanai
sets, hshid, garden,
clothes, etc. 527-0646
PINE RIDGE
Sat 17th, 8-1 Multi Fam
Electronics, light houses
baby items, much more
5181 El Paso Terr.
YANKEETOWN
Fri. & Sat. 8a-4p, Tools,
collectibles, grafts, &
more, #5 59th Street



INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 9a-? Misc.
Tools, Ete:-Off Annajo
5740 Calgary Terr.:



Posture & Hay Field
Spraying: Army Worm,
Weed Control. Over 5
Yrs. Exp. (352) 303-9202
TRACTOR WORK
Grading, Mowing,
Loader work, Cleanup,
BIG jobs, small jobs,
$25 + $25/hr. Steve
352-270-6800/527-7733



4 MICHELIN WSW
TIRES p225/60R 16
$35 each
352-382-1191
30 GAL FISH TANK
AND STAND all accesso-
ries, $200obo
352-697-4339
109 MOVIES AND VCR
Variety movies with
Westinghouse VCR in-
cluded at $60.00 Call Bill
at 352 621-0710
$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
Adrian sm. riding
mower, good cond.,
$150. Wooden dinette
set 4 chairs, good
cond., $30
(352) 419-5499
Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
Antique Dining Set
Beautifully inlaid, 65" X
40" turns into a 95" X
40", W/6 cane back
chairs, $600. Obo.
Gas Range
30" Tapan, never used.
$75.(352) 563-2583
AQUARIUM SUPPLIES
Three boxes miscella-
neous-, light bulbs, filters,
fish food. etc. $50 for all.
352 465-6811
AREA RUG: 7.5' x 9.5',
brown neutral, I mo
old, Pd $430. Now $300.
Sm Cedar/Wood dog
house, Pd S70, Now
$40.251-714-0559
CLOSING FOR
SUMMER SALE
All Plants Are 50% Off
The Original Price.
All Mulch, Pine Bark,
Fertilizer, Chemicals,
Are 20% Off The
Original Price. Sale
Last Until 7/31/10.
Color Country
Nursery Mon-Sat.
9A/5P.
Weather Permitting
1405W. Gulf-to-Lake


Hwy. Lecanto, FI.
34461 (352) 746-6465
Converta Crib
All wood, medium
colored. Good cond.
$100.Obo(352)563-5651
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. ROCKER
RECLINER, STEREO w/2
spkrs, 27" SANYO TV.
$200 For all or will
separate. 621-3673
FREE PALM TREES you
remove and fill in holes,
2 types
(352)949-0147
FRESH FLA JUMBO
SHRIMP 15ct. Load
up now! $5 Ib
(727) 771-7500
Goodman natural gas
furnace, (new) never
used, $900 new, asking
S600. (352) 419-5499
Kiln
Cress B-27-H w/stand,
molds & extra ceram-
ics. Comes w/shelving
kit, tools & supplies.
$800.(352) 795-5444


oewsNZ


WORDY GUTRICKY RICKKANE


1. Horizontal arrangements of a schnoz (1) Ee ansr a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Is acquainted with Reds star Pete (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
Definition tells you how many
3. Bond villain Dr.'s Greek R's (1) syllables in each word.

IT 10 I = J I 2010 United Feature Syndicate. Inc
4. Swarthy drug-ring buster (1)


5. Shoots water streams on blouses (1)

6. Putting a clock on Wordy Gurdy making (2)
6. Putting a clock on Wordy Gurdy making (2)

FIIITI --


7. King's sons' fruit-filled pancakes (2)


SSr'lINI'lg SHONI1Id -L ONINAHU ONILAIL -9 &LHIHS SLItIflbS -g
.MIVN lMltVII SOHH S ON -CIISOIISMONH 'Z SMOH lISON'T
SHlamsmv


Ill receiver type fits 03-08
Honda Pilot / 01-06 Acura
MDX. Like new. $95.00
352 212-1754
LAWN MOWER, Push
lawn mower-runs good
$35. MIRROR: Large
beautiful entry way
mirror-$40.
352-746-4118
OFFICE CHAIR- secre-
tary chair $5.00;
box of aquarium supplies
$50.00. 465-6811
Portable Honeywell
HEPA Air Cleaner 17000
$40. 19" Color TV $20.
352-447-4380 between
12 noon & 8PM
Portable Kenmore Zig
Zag Sewing Machine
$50.
Wall Mirror 21" x 4'
$25.
(352) 628-6858
RATTAN DINING SET
almond color with octa-
gon bevel glass top and
four padded chairs.
$90.00 352 212-1754
Scrapbooking Set
Creative Memories kit.
$300.
50 Gal. Fish Tank
w/stand, filter & extras.
$100.(352) 795-5444
Sealy Posturepedic
Extra firm mattress
boxspring, frame,
excel.cond. w/ com-
forter, bedskirt, shams,
decorative pillows $250
Cell 352-442-8101
SINGER SEWING MA-
CHINE CABINET Walnut
$25. Liz, M-F
8:30AM-6:OOPM,
352.628.1363
SOLD
SIMMONS MATTRESS,
queen, 80x60x11 inch,
DeepSleep, pillowtop, like
new, $100,
Stainless Steel
Kitchen Sink
3 section
very good cond.
$100.
(352) 465-7638
TPE -'DI iI IlL .l:r., -a,,,.
cal, "Cardio Stride Plus,"
like new, folds to store,
$60, Dunnellon
iV- j. i 1. I 1. :
I ...r
fee maker $3.00
352 465-6811
WE PAY CASH
for your storage shed
(352) 634-5183
WEDDING GOWN
Never used,sill tag Size
4, Diamond white ,can
email pics $600 obo
(352) 628-2965
WINDOW 30x7 65.
352-503-6037
WIRE TRAINING
CRATES for small dogs.
Fold down design for
storage. 2 for $20.00 Call
Ruth 352-382-1000



BUYING US COINS
Beating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
We Also Buy Gold
Jewelry (352) 228-7676



HARP. Handcrafted and
signed. 4 ft. tall. Case
and instruction book
included. $795. Call
527-6709
KAWAI ORGAN
for sale
$500.
(352) 527-4809
Organ
Columbia By Estey
W/LED, exc.cond. Paid
$15,000, asking $1,200.
(352) 287-9073
SOLD
ORGAN
Hammond-Suzuki,
Super EX2000E, with
owners man. $500.
YAMAHA M-1 ORGAN
Sounds great, back-
ground musicfree stand-
ing, bench, $75.00
352-949-0147



COMFORTER SET
floral 352-503-6037



MAXX STRENGTH weight
bench, barbell,80-lbs,
butterfly, leg & curl
pad,$75.00
352-949-0147
Tony Uttle's Gazelle
Sprint Master. New
$100. (352) 637-1085



(2) KAYAKS
LL Beam special
edition, built by old
town & Wilderness
System, tarpon 160.
$300 ea (352) 628-3856
.357 MAG AMMO 1 box
of FMJ ammo $36: 2
boxes of Fed
Self-Defense Ammo
$65/each. 860-2475
CASH FOR GUNS &
GOLD, Concealed
Weapons Course
Gunslingers 341-4867
Colt 1911
Series 70 Goldcup.
excel cond. 2 clips,
$1,100
(352) 527-8669
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


7.17-10


- gin

MEN'S 18" MOTIV BICY-
CLE Smoothie, 21 speed,
wide tires, red aluminum
frame $30 352.465.2374
NEW BALANCE 826
RUNNING SHOE size 9
2E brand new in box $30
352-464-4400
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238




19FT enclosed, 8FT
high, 8FT wide,
14,000 Ibs., $3,695
(315) 466-2268
GULF TO LAKE
TRAILER SALES
Largest Selection &
Lowest Prices.
Cargo, Utility, Motor-
cycle & Boat Trailers
352-527-0555
Hwy 44, Lecanto
Utility trailer 12 x 5,
w/ sides and ramp
single axle $600
12 x 5 Flat Trailer
$150.352 503-3332
(325) 628-1722



DOUBLE ELECTRIC
BREAST PUMP Medela
brand, adjustable
speeds.asking $100
OBO 352-422-3157



POPEYE WATCH $50
NEW, NEVER WORN
75TH ANNIVERSARY
COLLECTION E-MAIL
PICS 352-637-2949

YOU'LL THIS!
Y'LO GLD AND D'MOND
ENGA+BRIDAL RING
SET lovely, never worn,
documented by int'l
gemol inst; md d'mond
with matched d'mond
studs wedding ring; .325
carat, vs1 clarity, perfect
grade 0+ color, pur-
chased local '04; $2,100;
selling for same; receipts,
documentation; Richard,
Citrus: 919-630-6610


Sell o Siva


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




BUYING US COINS 1964
AND BEFORE. What do
you have? Please Iv
msg 352-795-3842
GUNS WANTED
Collector not a dealer.
Fair Prices
Call 726-5162 Home
201-4849 Cell
WANTED HOUSE,
MOBILE Any L~Qat&g..
Condition or Situation.
Call (352) 726-9369
WANTED: DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS. Will pay
up to $10/Box Cash.
352-621-3001



6 Maltese Puppies
Cute as can bel Male
$500, Female $650.
HIth crts. 352-212-4504
or 212-1258
AMERICAN PIT BULL
PUPS, 6 wks $150.
taking dep.
(352) 302-6069


BEAUTIFUL KOI FISH
All sizes, long or short
fin. Show quality or
pond. Great prices!
JEAN (352) 634-1783
Bull Dog Puppies
8 weeks old
$250.
(352) 601-2600
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES,
white/cream, 8wks old,
male & female Shots.
S350 ea. 621-0561
CHIHUAHUAS Male &
Females available for
$250. All have first
shots/are dewormed.
First come first serve.
352-201-8004
CHOW PUPPIES CKC
Registered. 3 Blue, 1
Blonde and 1 Cinnamon.
S350.00 503-3271
FRENCH BULL DOG
PUPS. 2 F, 1 M, 2 crm &
white, 1 fawn & white.
Avail 7/31, HC & Shots,
$800. Connie 613-3778


Female, white w/ brin-
dle markings. about
2 yrs. old, spayed,
friendly & loveable.
$100.(352) 795-5444
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832


LOVING, PLAYFUL
ADULT CATS One male,
one female. Love to
cuddle! Spayed/neutered,
vaccinated, litter box
trained. Requesting
adoption fee .of $40 each.
Email
browningda@gmail.com
or call (941) 920-4758.
Miniature Chihuahua
Male 7 Mos. old, fawn
colored, shots, weighs
51bs. Health cert. $275.
(352) 341-0934
OBEDIENCE CLASSES
indoors A/C, 6 wks $65.
Top Dog 527-2551,In
home boarding avail.
PIT BULL PUPPIES Red
Nose/American. Mostly
white, some red. Parents
on premises $250 & up
Accepting deposits, will
be ready August 21
Please call 352-563-1794
Pug Puppies
pure bred, just over
9 wks old., black or
buckskin, home raised,
$350-$400 call for appt.
Crys. Riv. 352795-8054
ShihTzu Puppies
Females $500. Variety of
colors. Registered (ACA),
H/C, shots. Home raised
& loved. Come meet the
parents. Also avail. 2
Young adult females
$300. each. Call for
appt. 3902 N. Lecanto
Hwy Beverly Hills, FL
(352)872-8099
(352)270-8827
TOY POODLE
PUPS,, tiny, males,2.blk,
1 phanton markings
$500-$600
(802) 782-6572



CARNAHAN SUPPLY
BARN YARD ANIMAL
& TACK SWAP
Sat July 24 8-2pm
In house Specials and
Prizes. Purina, Nutrena,
and Central States
Dealel. Call to Reserve
Space (352) 527-0578

Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




CRYSTAL RIVER
1BR, perfect for single,
no pets, $325 1st, last,
sec. 352-613-4652
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, tum., CHA, H20,no
pets. $500.352.795.0061
FLORAL CITY
2 Mobiles on canal
to lakes & River. Rent to
own. 2/1 singlewide,
$3,000 down, $285 mo
3/2 Doublewide, $4,000
down, $425 mo. Needs
TLC 352-726-9369
HERNANDO
2/1 on Lake Park Dr.
Fenc'd yd. $350. Mo.Fst.
Mo. Free(352)464-2091
(352) 464-0641
HERNANDO
2/2. DW,$525mo/$525
dep., 2/1 $400. mo+
$400dep. 352-464-0719.
HERNANDO
2BR, Dining rm. indoor
laundry, $400 mo., 1st,
last, sec., 352-613-4652
HOMOSASSA
1 Br .urn & Unfum
nice park w/pool $400/up
No Pets. 352- 628-4441


MN1O=RFRe


mopor


MOPAR5


Crystal [hrysler


2U77 Hwy. 44 W


For More infOFMaftiofl contact

MikE Hurmidonna i352-341-11119

or Ken McNalgdIj It 352-341-11655


FU


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 CJL3


(,//[?[ (,Ol VII l1:L) CHRONICLE


00058,NZI









C14 SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010


3/2 $750. Mo. Fst..&
Sec.(352) 489-9239
HOMOSASSA
2/1 $500. 3/I $525.
Clean & Quiet area, Lg
Lots 621-4974, 628-0913
HOMOSASSA
2/1 MH furn., priv. ranch
no pets. (386) 871-5506
HOMOSASSA
2/1, FURN MH, Util.incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 564-0201
HOMOSASSA
2/I/2, Newly renovate.
$500. (352) 250-8581
INV/HERNANDO
2/1 Close to town $425
mo + $425 sec. Lease.
No Pets. 352-726-7319
INVERNESS
1st MONTH FREE
55-Plus waterfront park,
602 Conroy, 1 BR, 1 BA.
furn., $450 incl. lot rent,
352-476-4964




$650 Mo. Assume
Mortgage or low
down payment, 4/2
DW, new carpet,
W/D ceiling fans,
stove refrigerator,
Hernando off 486
(352) 568-2500

BEST OF THE BEST
JACOBSEN, New 2010
Custom Home 28x60,
3/2, Open living, 2 x 6
construction, cherry
cabinets, big pantry,
large rooms, monster
closets, eat on raised
bar. $10,000 in
upgrade options.
Only $54,900
352-621-9181
Inverness,
Stoneridge Landing 55+
3/2 xtra Irge dw, corner
lot carport w/ storage turn
$39,500.352-201-9371
LEFT OVER
2007 Jacobsen Home
1700 sq. ft. high end
home, tape-n-
textured walls,
18" ceramic tile,
granite countertops,
stainless appliance
pkg. 6" crown moldi-
ing, 6" baseboard,
craneboard siding.
R30-19-22 insulation,
$20,000 under
invoice, $65,817
SEE IT AT
TAYLOR MADE HOMES
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor
3/2 HUGE, Loaded
14 houses to choose
from Starting at $399
per mo 800-622-2832

USED HOMES
FLEETWOOD
28x56, $29,900
SKYLINE
28X60, $32,000
HOMES OF MERIT
28X40, $22,900
PALM HARBOR
28x46, $19,900
SINGLEWIDES
from $3,000
DOUBLEWIDES
from $8,000
CALL TO VIEW
352-621-9183




INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, 1/BA, unfurn.,
$425 Includes lot rent.
Call 352-476-4964



10175 W. Fishbowl Dr.
#17 2 bedroom. 1 bath.
Homosassa River & Gulf
access, private dock, 20ft
pontoon. $13,000
352-503-6772
Lake Henderson
$12,999, 55+ Waterfront
Park, Close To The
Water A Beautiful View,
Boat Dock & Storage,
Pool. 1/1/Carport, Fl.
rm. Will consider ti-
nanclng.(352) 476-8364


LAKE ROUSSEAU
RV Park. See the lake
fully furn. immaculate
1/1 scr porch PRICED
REDUCED S15K obo.
352-220-1570
931-537-3202




1 ACRE HOMESITE
3/2. L/R & den, appx.
1400 sq. ft. on dead
end, private country
living, great shape,
deck, fenced back
yard has shed.
Bank short sale only
$67,400 or $449/mo
w/ $2,500 down WAC
352-621-9182

For Sale4
Crystal River
3 bedroom 2 bath nice
28' by 52' mobile home
approx.1/2 acre corner
lot, nice garden tub.
$58,000 139 N. Griffith
Ave. 14 Mi from new
pwr plant 352-382-2049
Crystal River
6594 N. Citrus Ave. 5.4
acres, 3/2 MH. $120K.
(352) 586-7952
CRYSTAL RIVER
Beautiful 3/2 DWMH,
fenced rear yard,
workshop/storage.Lg
rear porch, 1/2 acre,
X-tra clean $45K.Obo
850-260-4575
Floral City
01' 3/2 D.W., carport
on 4 acres, 1,600 Sq.
Ft. fenc'd b-yard,
work shop. $97,900
(352) 726-2286
HOMOSASSA
95' DW 3/2,wlk-in closets
& pantry ,2 car CB gar.
w/wkshp & storagelge
cvrd/scrnd lanai, fen'cd
yard,1/2 ac corner lot.
RV hkups,1 yr Home war-
ranty, $89K OBO may fi-
nance (352) 423-0220
SOLD
SELLER FINANCE
$5,000 Down, $500. mo
Balance at 3% Interest
2/2 1 Acre, Move In
Ready, Many upgrades
$49,500




FLORAL CITY
SINGING FOREST
00' 3BR, 2Ba, 28x48
Fleetwood manufac-
tured home,1344sf,
all appliances incl.
$36,990.00 Call
352-796-6360 or
352-796-3925
Ask for Jack
Homosassa 55 + Park
2/2 Dbl. w/upgrades,
carport, new roof, kit.,
patio, CHA, part. turn.
$11,900. (352) 503-7558
WEST WIND VILL 55+1
DWMH,part turn.
stainless appls, $34,900
Well maintain
PetokL.352-628-2090




BEVERLY HILLS
2 br. 1 V2 ba $500
CHASSAHOWITZA
Furn, Waterfront $700
HIGHPOINT 55 +
2/2, furnished
Comm. Pool $700
352-382-1000 Agent




Crystal River
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms
954-918-4644 cell #
352-794-3322 office
CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 Great neighbrhd.
7mos min. No Pets
352-422-0374
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Bdrm. $600 mo. Near
Town 352-563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1/2, 828 NE 5th Ave.
Nice, CH/A, W/D, TV
$550. mo. Negotiable
(727)343-7343, 455-8998


LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
FLORAL CITY
Studio, Incid.'s Cable &
Util. $575. mo. + dep.
No pets. (352) 228-1325





BED?&RMS
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985





Crystal River
1 & 2 Bdrm Easy Terms
954-918-4644 cell #
352-794-3322 office
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Laundry on site, no pets.
Lecanto Duplex 2/2
Dish'wash., wash/dryer.
Lv. Msg. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacious Apt, Tile firs &
garageS600 incis trash
& Cable 352-257-5179
352-795-5672
FLORAL CITY
IBD $300 mo. $200.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
INVERNESS 2/1
Great Neigh. W&D
hkup, incls H20, trash,
lawn maint.storage rm.
$450 + sec. 634-5499
INVERNESS
2/1 Triplex on Waterfrt
incl grbg & Water $525.
mo., $525 sec. 344-4617
LECANTO
1 Bedroom $500/mo
Ist/sec (352)746-5238
H 527-3502, C 216-0012

MAYODRIVE
I APARTMENTS I
1Ist MO. RENT FREE
(352) 795-2626 I
-.- -- -. J







PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chnonicleonline.com
and click place
an ad







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with; a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




CRYSTAL RIVER
1000SF, HWY 19 loca-
tion, next to Dairy Qn.
$500/mo + tax. Call Lisa
352-634-0129
CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse,
1200 Sq. Ft., Hwy 44.
$600/mo+ 1 mo. sec.
352-628-6764, 220-0488
FLORAL CITY
STOREFRONT
Ideal location corer
Hwy. 41 & 48. $595 mo.
813-310-5391
FOR LEASE
Prime Retail Space
on CR 48 Bushnell, FL
4200 sqft.
3 Office Spaces
250 up to 850 sq. ft.
Call (352) 457-1877


INVERNESS-
470 Pleasant Grove Rd.
Prime office suite in
prof.complex. 1017 sf
S1100+ tx Dwain Reeder
352-563-9527
INVERNESS
DOWNTOWN OFFICE
SPACE AVAIL $350 per
Unit. (352) 400-4967



CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furn'd, member-
ship seasonal/long
term preferred 476-4242
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Pool, extra clean.
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Townhs., 2-3/2.5, Pool
/Carport, All appl., 1 yr.
lease. $800/mo Ist/sec.
(352) 746-7562
HOMOSASSA
Best Housing Value
DW's & SW's Homes,
from $14,500 or Lease
to Own from$199mo.
$1000dn + lot rent,at
EvanRidge
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977




CITRUS SPRINGS
NEW 2/2 Duplex, nice pri-
vate area, near shopping
& schools. Wtr, sewer incl
$600mo 352-558-4477
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, $565. incl. H20,
lawn & Gar. 795-1722
CRYSTAL RIVER
Lg. 2/2 CHA dishwasher,
W/D hk-up $545 no dogs
$600 moves u n726-9570
HOMOSASSA
2/2, lawn & garb. $525.
Pets? (352) 795-0207
HOMOSASSA
All turn, ideal for 1
person $460 352-
628-2703 586-3132
INVERNESS
1/1, Furn'd or unfurn'd
Incls. water/gas. $600.
Fst./Sec.352 726-6515
LECANTO
$99. Move In Special.
Marion, 352-746-0373
SUGARMILL WD'S
2/2, H20 incl. Scr. prch.
$675. (352) 382-1866




CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn w/equip
kitchen. Starting at $30
per day, Wkly or monthly
only. Incl all util. Call
John 352-586-1813

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225











Rental
w 2 M Rmi Evm, t
RENTALS
LAUREL RIDGE
2/2/2 Malint Free,
Comm Pool $850
3/3/2 Comm Pool,
Lawncare ncl$1100
INVERNESS
3/2/2 Avail Aug $750
3/2/2 $700
2/1 Apt 500
1/1 Apt $400
2/2/1 $700
FLORAL CITY
3/2 Dblwide $700
2/1 Home $575
HERNANDO
3/2/2 Newer Home
$900
Jennifer Fudge,
Century 21 J.W.
Morton, Inc
Property Mngr
/Realtor-Assoc
352-726-9010


CLASSIFIED




CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse. 2/21/2/1
Terra Vista, Club incl.
$1.000 516-991-5747

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, util.incl. $800. Mo.
Fst./ Lst./Sec. (352)
447-7012(352) 228-9282

FLORAL CITY
3/2/3 Lg Priv estate.
Caged Pool, 2 jacuzzis,
2 FP, $1,195 .1st, last,
sec. 352-586-5013

INVERNESS
Lg. 3/2/2. turn. $950.
incl Iwn maint., bkgrnd
chk req. 352-476-7090

Property
Management &
Investment
Group, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
>- Property & Comm.
Assoc. Mgmt. is our
only Business
>- Res.& Vac.
Rental Specialists
)> Condo & Home
Owner Assoc.Mgmt.
Robbie Anderson
LCAM
352-628-5600
info@oropertv
managmentgrouo.
com





BEVERLY HILLS
1/1, poss 2/1 cha $515.
352-302-4057

BEVERLY HILLS
12 Michael, Nice 2/1/1
$550 + (352)628-0033

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 and 3/2/2
352-464-2514

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 plus Fl rm, 10 N. Bar-
bour, $600. 422-2798

BEVERLY HILLS
2/112, Remodeled, Dish-
washer, W/D, Gazebo
$550. mo. 352-795-7374

BEVERLY HILLS
4 Hoover St., 2/2
w/carport. $500mo +
$500 dep. 352-220-3402

CITRUS HILLS
New 3/2.5/2,1 ac
office, 3800sf must see
membership $1400/mo
(352) 476-4242






CITRUS SPRINGS
2/1/Carport, scrn'd
porch, shed, no pets
$600. Mo. Fst./Sec.
(352) 212-2591

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1 2, Scrn'd Rm. $625.
+ Sec. 2120 Devon Dr.
(352) 212-3997

CRYSTAL RIVER
1/1 home $390mo.
352-795-9633. 228-3921


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, $690. mo. 1700 sf
(352) 445-0483
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/1, FL. Rm., scrnd rm.
W/D, on 1/2 ac. Lawn
inc. $750 mo. 1st & Sec.
(352) 697-5700
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2/2, $700. mo + sec.
850-371-1568
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2/1, $600 F/Sec.
352-746-3073
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2/1 + carport, Clean,
$775.Mo. 352-464-3518
CRYSTAL RIVER
Rent or Rent to Own
$699. Move-In Special
3/2, Lrg Fam. Room.
Tiled, spotless,
fenced, Pets OK,
352-527-0493
FLORAL CITY
Small Cottage on water.
$550/mo(352)726-6197
GOLF COURSE AT
SUGARMILL WD'S
On Green & Tee.
Lecanto Schools
3/2/2. Fire price.
Animals ok. $1,000
Mo. (352) 422-1933

HOMOSASSA
2/1 From $425.
3/2 Meadows $725.
River Links Realty
riverlinksrentals.com
(352) 628-1616
HOMOSASSA
4/2,2,300 sf, /2 acre
$1,000. mo + until &sec.
rent or w/ opt to buy
518-378-0391
850-602-5830
INV HIGHLANDS
3/2/2 fenc'd yard,
Very Clean. $825/mo
407-435-7486
INVERNESS
1/1 ,$450 incls water &
garage (352) 422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1/1. updated home
Avail Aug $600 201-0842
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA, $775 mo
306 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 cell
Lecanto 2/1
$550. fenced yd. F/L/S
352-628-7042
Property &
Management
Investment Group
Inc. Lic. R.E Broker

Rentals Available

3/2 Homosassa
Newer Home In The
Meadows. $650. Mo.

3/2 Crystal River
Near 7 River Hosp.
& Power Plant.
Newer Home In Deed
Restricted Comm.
$800. Mo.
www.oropertv-manaa
e mentgroub.com

Rabble Anderson
(352) 628-5600 Office
(352) 302-7790 Cell

Rent To Own
Beautiful 4/2, on 1 acre,
fire place, cherry wood
firs. elegant Int. hot tub.
Flex Terms. 220-2573


ElJRD
3/2/2 pool home,
$1200mo. 352-464-1320
RENT TO OWN
No Credit Check
4/2/2 352-484-0866
JADEMISSION.COM




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL RIVER
$120/wk, priv bth, incl
everything 352-634-0708
INVERNESS
Mansion to Share,
phone, pool incl.
$120 wk. 352-419-0166
NOBLETON
3/2/2, pool home,
$650. Fst./Lst. + Sec.
No pets.(352) 303-3351



Homosassa
Lg. Bdrm w/bth, scrn
lanai $375. mo. + dep
352-586-9667, 287-1902



2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 564-0201
CITRUS HILLS
Townhouse, 2/212/1
Terra Vista, Club incl.
$1,600 516-991-5747




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to Fair Housing
Act which makes it ille-
gal to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with par-
ents or legal custodi-
ans, pregnant women
and people securing
custody of children
under 18. This newspa-
per will not knowingly
accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




a01r'ease


AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20
lines of copy w/
photo.
352-563-5966


New Pine Ridge
Model
July 2010 completion.
3 Bedroom 2 Bath
3 Car Garage
Built- In Dining Hutch,
Entertainment Center,
& Breakfast Nook
Call Today
(352) 302-0910.
Citrus Builder.
#RB0033452


Specializing in
Acreage
Farms/Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 344-8018
RCOUCH.com






FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION 700+ HOMES I
Auction: 7/29 Open
House: 7/17, 7/24,&
7/25. REDC I View Full
Listings NOW
www.Auctlon.com
RE Brkr CQ1031187


New Home For
Sale or Trade
$98,700 ask about
trading in older home or
mobile for new 3/2/2
352-897-4447
352-697-1384



New Ready to
Occupy July 2010.
Pine Ridge.
3/bed/2/bath.
3 car garage.
Nice elevated lot.
Come visit. 6024 N.
Peardale Terrace.
Call Citrus Builder.
(352) 302-0910.
#RB0033452




2 bed/l.5 bath/lcg
Eat-in kit. Inside laun-
dry. Den. Screen/glass
porch. Vaulted ceiling.
1268 sf und air. CHA
VAC. $54,900. 214 S.
Lincoln 352/527-1239


Rusaw L g 3/2/2.5
Pool, Park Like setting.
Appl's ton of Extra's.
Move in condition,
close to golf course.
Immed occupancy.
BEST DEAL IN CITRUS
CO. $105,900.
3881 N. Grapefern
Open House Sundays
1-2pm (352) 476-1543



LECANTO MINI RANCH
2/2/2 3.5 acs. fenced
& cross fenced, barn
ride to Withlacoochee.
By appt call owner.
352-628-6965





Fully Furn. Town Hse.
2/2/2/Carport, 1850,
SF., 2 lanais, w/d.
Community Pool,
close to golfing & lots
of other amenities.
Social Membership
Avail. Easy access to
Orlando, Tampa,
& Ocala. $88,200.
(352) 422-5819


0 -


Sweetwater Homes Oakwood Model
Pool w/pavers-3 bdrm/21l2ba/3-car garage, with den.
Many upgrades included. 2797 SF of living area, prof decorated.
4260 Pine Ridge Blvd Pine Ridge Estates
Beverly Hills, FL





I OF CITRUS, INC. (352) 382-4888


I


IS


U -AL


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

CAREYS TREE SERV
Free Est. 18 yrs Exp.
Complete Serv.364-1309

DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852

R WRIGHT Tree Service
Tree removal & trimming.
lns.& Lic.# 0256879
352-341-6827





COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer repair/sales.
(352)344-4839


DIESTLER COMPUTER
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
Options. 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129
CheapCheapCheap
DP press, clean/paint
100's of References.
352-637-3765
FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleaning..352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



Phil's Mobile
Marine Repair 28 yrs
Cert. Best prices/Guar
352-220-9435
Pontoon Boat Services.
Bimini Tops. Canvas.
Boat Screen Rooms.
Boat Camper Rooms.
Boat seats, Uphl Carpet
Tony Tops 352-563-0066


VACATION IN Pool
YOUR OWN .Pato&
BACKYARD. Dvays
o*Interiodong
Order Your Pool Todayl Brick Pavers
Pool Servce
Lic. & Insured
-CPC14558865

352.400=18


AT YOUR HOME
Mower, Lawn Tractor, Sm
engine repair 220-4244
Ltc#99990001273
Mower Repair,
Hernando. Pick up &
delivery, Don Mead
352- 400-1483




The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584



Nursing Homes are not
the only alternative!
Loving Adult Care
Home #6906368
Alzheimer/Dementia
No problem 503-7052




A SPARKLING
KLEAN
Maid Service
352-220-7147
CINDY'S
Christian Cleaning Serv.
Honest & Reliable, Free
Est. (863) 709-7629 Cell


Affordable CABINETS
& COUNTER TOPS
Custom or Resurface
352-586-8415



ROGERS Construction
All Construction
Free Estimates (352)
637-4373 CRC 1326872



SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
628-0562 (CBC1257141)




POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIP.
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
I SALT SYSTEMS I
I CALL ALAN 422-6956
LIC #CPC051584




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


Choice. EasvPayment
OptionQ, 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Lic.#5863 352-746-3777
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smallReli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
It Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
ABC Always a Better
Choice. Easy Payment
Options, 25 yrs exp
lic/ins Dale 586-8129
Around To It
Home Repairs serving
Citrus Co. Handyman
w/contractor skills. Int./Ext
repairs & remodels. Kris
603-616-9003
*3 HANYA


Al paeso hm


Boulerice

& SUPPLY INC.
Family Owned And Operated In Citrus
County For 25 Years...
We're Here To Stay!
NEW ROOFS RE-ROOFS REPAIRS
--- - - - - - - - -
$100 OFF :
ANY RE-ROOF:
FREE ESTIMATES
S (352)628-5079


FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *
MASTER CRAFTSMAN
Repairs at Affordable
Rates. Refs. Lic. & Ins.
#35836 (352)628-6960
Residential Contractor
Repair, remod., or build
mobile homes/homes.
Free Est. Lic. CRC-
1330081 (352) 949-2292



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Plasma TV installed
Uc.#5863 352-746-3777
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726.2907
EC13002699
Thomas Electric LLC
Generator maint
repair. Guardian
Homestandby. &
Centurion. Cert.
Tech. 352-621-1248
#'ER00015377


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions TooT!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM
00050Y


Res./Comm. Lic & Ins.
$50.hr. Service Calls
352 -302-2366



FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
(352) 257-9508 *



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs, trash,
lawn maint. turn. & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422




ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Uc. & Ins.,
352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



John Gordon
Roofing Expert
Repairs & Reroof s
ccc132549 302-9269



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Slabs
Lic#2579/lns, 257-0078
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repairstaining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. 1l476, 726-6554


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768

Renovations Repairs,
Quality Work
Ref. Avail. #cbc1251997
Lic/Ins (352) 302-4512




COUNTYWIDE DRY-
WALL 25 years exp.
For all your drywall needs
Ceiling & Wall Repairs.
Lic/ins. 352-302-6838




Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone
Driveways/Tractor work
341-2019 or 302-7325
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,Hauling,
Site Prep, Driveways.
Lic. & Ins. 352) 795-5755




All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep,Driveways Lic/Ins
352-795-5755




CUSTOM SERVICES
Lawn Service/haul
Press Wash, Home re-
pairs (352) 613-7934
HENLEY'S GROUND
MAINT. Free Est.
Serving all Citrus Co
(352) 302-6589
L & J SERVICES INC.
Lawncare/Home Repair
Res./Comm./Acerage
(352) 302-8348

Sm Acreage/Lot
bushhogging, mow-
ing, debris removal
Free Est 352 795-9522


POOL-TEC
REPAIRS EQUIP. I
PUMPS FILTERS
HEAT PUMPS
I SALT SYSTEMS I
CALL ALAN 422-6956
LIC #CPC051584





WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard




ROOTER MAN SEPTIC
Tank Pumping/Repair
Drain Field Clean/Rep.
Lic./Ins. (352) 503-3815





ALAKAZAAM
Clean Ups &
Clean Outs
(352) 220-9190





ALL EXTERIOR
ALUMINUM
Quality Price! 6"
Seamless Gutters
Lic & Ins 621-0881

ALUMINUM
STRUCTURES
5" & 6E Seamless Gutters
Free Estimates, Lic &
Ins. (352) 563-2977




Vertical Blind Factory
We custom make all
types. Best prices any-
where! Hwy 44 & CR
491. (352) 746-1998


SACTION- 352-795-RENT
(IALMAlNIMDITEIMil, INC.) www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


HOMES a MOBILES APARTMENTS
--- FEATURED PROPERTIES
*CRYSTAL RIVER
Large House 3/2/ ................................. $850
Furnished apartment includes utilities....$800
Affordable Apt. 2/1...................................$375
*HOMOSASSA
Affordable Duplex 2/1..............................$500
2/2/2 carport Condo..... .... ............. $750
*INVERNESS
Large House, Nice Yard, 3/2/2............... $800
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


MODEL HOME FOR SALEq


Cimus Coumy (FL) CHRONICLE


/7N'


14 W, 011 l1w
i. N-.


7:1!.3


www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com


I ALUMINUM I









CLASSIFIED


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Sell Homes & Get
Results! Douglas
Undsey Realtor. ERA
American Realty & Inv.
Cell (352) 212-7056
Office (352) 746-3600
Douglas.lindsey
@era.com


MEADOWVIEW VILLA
Fully Fumn. Beautiful
2/2/1 duplex on quiet
cul de sac. Nicely deco-
rated and landscaped -
Move right it! Citrus
Hills Social member-
ship available. Call for
an appointment
(352)527-9888
We Have short/long
term rentals
www.olantation
rentals9coml


I-.-
ADVICE FROM
REGIS:
Mortgages on
Vacant Homes are
RUFF! Call Plantation
Rentals, Inc.
to start making
income!
352-795-0782 and
visit our website:
www.Plantation
Rentals.com


Plantation Realty,
Inc.
(352) 795-0784
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner



-S=


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work For You!
BETTY HUNT, REALTOR
ERA KEY I Realty Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com






4/2 CEMENT HOME
Remodeled on 1/4 AC
Ready to Go. Great
Family Neighborhood
Must Sell $75K. Make
Offer 305-619-0282



CHARLES KELLY







"Satisfied Customers
ore our Goal"

VIC MCDONALD









On.k


ofc 352-726-6668
cell 352-422-2387






-A






Michele Rose. Realtor
Simply put I 'll work
harder 352-212-5097
isellcitruscountvly
vahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


NEW HOMES
Starting at
$71,500. on your
propertylilli
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic.# CBC059685


New Pine Ridge
Home
Complete July 2010.
1 acre- 3 Bedroom
2 bath plus exterior
shower. 3 car garage.
3400 sq. feet under
roof. Save Thousands.
Full Warranty
6024 Peardale
Terrace. Call Today
Citrus Builder
(352) 302-0910
#RB0033452







For Sale o`a
LUXURY HOME ON
FAIRWAYS OF THE
PLANTATION RESORT
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
4/3/3. 4700 sq ft. Stunn-
ing & Immaculate 3 yr.
old home was built to
perfection & offered
now by the owner. For
more information & pic-
tures go to
www.forsalebvowner
corn
listing # 22545043. For
appointment to see this
beautiful home phone
the owner or email her
atL
toiavne@lrocketmail.com(
352) 794-3067


Hooas


I Sell Homes & Get
Results! Douglas
Lindsey Realtor. ERA
American Realty & Inv.
Cell (352) 212-7056
Office (352) 746-3600
Douglas.lindsey
@era.com

OPEN HOUSE
INVERNESS
Sat./Sun. lpm-4pm
2+/2/2+ Brick Beauty
REDUCED $179,900
7436 E. Allen Drive
(352) 726-0660


WE BUY
HOUSES
Any Area,
Any condition,
Any Price,
Fast, Hassle Free
Closing.
(352) 503-3245
http://tampabay
housebuyer's.com





AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50

Ad includes 20
lines of copy w/
photo.
352-563-5966

DEAL FELL THROUGH
2.5 acres, Now asking
$26,000, loc. in Crystal
Hills Mini Farms off An-
thony & 486 Horse Dirt
Rd. & Trees own fin.
Poss. 352-212-7613

Hernando City Heights,
2 side by side lots, well,
septic, pwr pole, water
conditioning system
and Shed Incl. $13,000
firm. (352) 228-0769

INVERNESS VILLAGE
Corner Lots # 39/106
S. Crestview Ave, #
40/112S. Crestview
Ave. Both .324 of an
acre $30,000 each.
(919) 329-7033





Citrus Springs
Nice Building Lot
80x125, 1135 Cairo Dr.
$3,500 Owner finance
352-621-1664


@ "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"

NANCY Direct: 352.634-4225
SKEY 1 REALTY INC.
PONTICOS 1 ;
Multi-Million SSS Producer i:- "


QUIET CORNER CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION! SWEETWATER WESTW1ND HAS 37' POOU
* 3 Bed + Office/3 CAR Grage Well for Yord 3 Bed + Den w/Closet Corian Kitchen
* GRANITE & Stainless Kitchen Heated POOL Wheelchair Accessible Added Insulation
$199,000 MLS#325939 $267,500 MLS#341669

ydcenyvw.tv''al.to Iuli(...


Ctmrus Hills
HoesI^^H


hrs., T top. Jack Plate, 2
live wells, GPS Garmin,
FF, alum. tandem trir.
$22,500 (352) 442-3119

RIVERHAVEN
MARINA


1996 Quest
19' Bay Boat
Johnson 115
$7,995.00
2000 Sea Swirl
19' Bow Rider
4.3L I/O $6000
2003 Sundance
18 Skiff, Merc
75hp 2 Stroke
$7,995.00
2005 Sea Pro
19 Bay Boat
Yamaha 4strk
$15,900
Call for Prices
(352) 628-5545


Golf Course Lot on the
Twisted Oaks 8th Hole
Public Utilities, view of
the green & pond
Asking $55,000
Call 352-249-8118




NC MOUNTAINS -
BEST LAND BUY!
2.5acres. spectacular
views, gated, paved
road. High altitude.
Easily accessible,
secluded. Bryson City.
$45,000. Owner fi-
nancing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com


atO er3font


Crystal River
Point Lot on river,
In Woodland Estates.
Home Is a tear down
on 1/2 acre lot. Offered
at $399.000 open t o
offers. 1301 N.W. 20th
Ave. Call David,
Remax Midway
1-800-965-7253

Floral City, 2/2 Modular
on 2 lots, 80 X 120.
Canal goes to lake &
river. Furn, large scrn'd
room, deck & sheds.
$90,000 Or make offer.
6545 S. Dolphin Dr.
(352)341-7798

HOMOSASSA
REDUCED! MUST
SELL1 Owner Finance
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163'wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $469K
727-808-5229


V-10, gas, work horse
chassis, w/d, 4 dr.
fridg/icemaker, sleep
# queen bed, elec
fire pice., HD TV, King
Dome satellite, auto
level, back-up cam.,
To many opts. to
mention. $125.K.
(352) 897-4451




WINNEBAGO
2008 'Class C" Ford
V10, Outlook, 1 slide.
Exc cond. New Mi-
chelin
tires & alignment. Just
Serviced. Under Fact
Warri; ext warranty on
coach. 32K miles,
Hoses, leveling biks, etc
convey. Asking $59,900
352-503-3611


Floral City
2, 1 acre lots, fenced,
secluded, high & dry.
Airboat ready. $40,000
for both. (352) 726-1300
(352) 726-0025



Boat Trailer
Performance, 14 ft,
2007, but never used
$650.
352-621-0848
Pontoon Boat Services.
Bimini Tops, Canvas.
Boat Screen Rooms.
Boat Camper Rooms.
Boat seats, Uphl Carpet
Tony Tops 352-563-0066




Ocean Kayak
(Caper) storage
compartments, &
adjust, paddle $400.
(352) 503-7058




AIR BOAT
2010 14'x8' alum. hull,
very low hrs. 2' grass
rake. 350 GM, stinger
reduction gear, bllg,
many other options
(352) 465-3983
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic
inch, Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
BAYLINER 18'
02', Great fishing boat.
Lots of bells & whistles!
Inci fish fndr, safety
vests & extras.$8,000
Obo. (352) 586-7346
CAROLINA SKIFF
19.8 DLX C/C 07,
Perfect cond 90 hp
4 stroke Suzuki, trailer
$12,500 352-586-9349








CATAMARAN
40'x 20' Live-Aboard.
Windlass, twin 15hp,
Edsen steering $15K
obo(352) 628-2825
C-HAWK 2001 CC
175 Yamaha HPDI
Otbrd, modified V hull,
70 gal inbrd fuel tank,
VHF radio, depth/fish
finder, spare prop, E-Z
load trir w/surge brakes.
Low hrs, fuel efficient.
Fast & Rugged. $10,000.
Obo. 352-542-0605
COBIA
22 ft. w/Cuddy Cab.,
1990 225 Johnson, VHS,
FF, trir. ready to fish
$3,200 (352) 302-6620
CRYSTAL RIVER
MARINE
17' Sundance Skiff
50 Johnson $7,995.
19' Carolina Skiff V
50 Honda $5,850.
17' Proline 90 Suzuki
$13,995.
20' Pontoon 70
Yamaha $9,995.
22' Hurricane 115
Yamaha $19,995.
HONDA/YAMAHA
SERVICE SECURE
STORAGE
WE NEED BOATS!
352-795-2597

FOUR WINNS
21' Liberator 88,460
Ford big block, 340hp
king cobra, out driv,
Alum. Continental trial,
1st $4K 352 302-8833
FRESH FLA JUMBO
SHRIMP 15ct.
Load up now! $5 Ib
727-771-7500
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For Used
Clean Boats
2010 20' Bentley
Pontoon, 40hp,
4 stroke, $14,995
2010 14' Pondtoon
electric motor $6995
Many late model used
Fishing & Pontoon Boats
Avail
(352) 527-0555
boatsupercenter.com

HOMOSASSA
MARINE
NEW PONTOON BLOW
OUT !!!
2011'S ARE ON THE
WAY
2010'S GOTTA GOal
Example: 2010 18' Fish
2010 Yamaha T-50
2010 Galv. Trailer
WAS $ 20,995.
NOW $17,994.
www.homosassa
marine.com
WE SELL BOATS ON
CONSIGNMENT
(352) 628-2991

HYDRA SPORTS
20' CC, kevlar hull, fish
finder, VHF, 200 HP Evin.
& trail Reduced to
,$5,100 obo.
(352) 563-6618
JON BOAT
14' X 3' $150.
352-453-6789
JON BOAT 14FT
W/Trailer, all extra's, like
new, 10 HP. Merc. 4
strk. $3,000. Crystal
River (352) 794-3083
KEY WEST 1999 1720
CC 90HP Mercury, GPS,
jackplate, fishing plat-
form, storage cover, alu-
minum trailer 746-1329
$6000 OBO.
PRO SPORTS
21 ft. 6", Baykat, 2004,
200 stroke, Suzuki, low


Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,500 (352) 628-0281
PROLINE
21' 150 hp Evinrude,
cutty cab, good shape
alum trailer $5500 will talk
(352) 489-3661
PROLINE
21' Cuddy, full transom,
w/brack, 150 HP Yam.,
Bimini, VHF, porta pot,
dep. finder, trailer
$6,900. (352) 382-3298
SEAFOX 09
17' Suzuki 90,4 Str. 10 hrs
on boat & motor. 5 yr
warranty on motor, trailer
$14,500 352-795-2053
SECURE BOAT STOR-
AGE AND LAUNCH
from Ozello St. Martin's
Marina.$100/mo. Fish,
Kayak or short ride to the
scallop field. Boat detail &
tune ups. 352-422-1284
Mark or 795-0505
SOLD!!
G3 2004 JON BOAT
ALUM, 18', tunnel hull,
hydr. jack plate, trim
tabs, GPS, troll mtr, 60HP
Yamaha, bimini top &
trir w/new tires. $9,900.
STAMAS 26'
'70 hard top, Yam. 4
stroke 225, 400 hrs., full
elecs. auto pilot ect.
$19,500. (352) 447-3842
(352) 978-0658
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
14' Alumacraft
15 Honda $4,295.
J16' Carolina Skiff
25 Yamaha $4,495.
2072 Sea Ark
90 Johnson $7,295.
18'SeaChaser
90 Yamaha $10,495.
20' Sweetwater
Pontoon T50 Yamaha
$9,995.
WE NEED BOATS!
352-563-5510
TRIUMPH 195CC
'08 115 Yamaha 4 stk,
Tamden Trlr, Lowera-
nce. Radios, jump
seats, bow cushions.
$24,000. 352-212-5810
TROPHY 22FT
1999 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force,
E-Z Load Tand.Trlr. elec-
tronics will sacrifice for
$7900. 352-726-1489























'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 39 K Mi.
NON SMOKER NO
PETS, Immaculate
Loaded $27,700 obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
Car Tow Package
Road Master Falcon
#5250, base plate
included New $800.
$450 obo 746-2873
COACHMAN
05' Concord, 3 slide
outs, fully loaded as-
sume payments, like
new, (352) 341-5948
COACHMAN
1997, Class B, Motor
Home, very clean,
excel, cond. 2 cold airs
$13,000. 352-220-2112
COACHMAN
84' 22', loaded, exc.
cond. Needs nothing,
but a driver, $6,900.
obo (352) 726-9647
DAMON ULTRA-
SPORT
'02 DIESEL PUSHER 38'
300 CAT, FREIGHTLINER
CHASS, SXS, FRIG,
ICEMAKER, W/D
FULL PAINT, 2 SLIDES
MANY MORE OPTIONS,
FULLY EQUIPPED,
$78,000. 352-419-4332
ENDEAVOR
'98, 38', w/slide, turbo
diesel, 12 mpg, 6spd,
Jake levelors, air ride,
7.5 gen., 4 DRw/Ice,
DSS, W/D $45,900
352-228-0976
FLEETWOOD
94' Bounder, 34',
wide body, cellar
model motor home,
REDUCED TO $14,000
(352) 628-7993
FLEETWOOD
Class A '94, Bounder,

$14,200 352-795-6736
GEORGIA BOY
05' 36', Pursuit, 2 slides.
Fully loaded, exc.
cond. Must See!
$45,000. (352) 503-5002
INFINITY
'05 RV, 38FT, 4 slides,
8K miles, Bal. owing
$102,000 (352) 344-1215
LAYTON 5TH WHEEL
99' 34', 2 slides, $12,000.
Or pkg. deal w/00 cus-
tom 350,4 diesel 4 dr,.
$25k (352) 628-3617
Luxury Motor Home
Diesel Pusher,
readyto go
many extras
304-281-3744
PACE ARROW
35' Class A, 1996, dual
AC, new tires, 5K gen,
60K mi. Exc Cond. $25K.
352-382-1000
WINNEBAGO
08' 38' Adventurer,


99 V.W. 6 cyc. 20 mpg,
gen. new tires, & batt,
65K mi .dbl bed
$24,300 (352) 628-3019
SOUTHWIND
1990 36' Class A, 52k Mi
4 TV's good shape, gas
engine. $4,800 Crystal
River 727-534-1655
WINNEBAGO
94' 31' Brand new gen-
erator, brakes, batter-
ies, & vehicle tow trailer
best offer 352-637-5525



2000 mallard travel
trailer slide out com-
plete with dishes a/c
ready to go 795-1139
COLEMAN
'97, Pop Up. 2 queen
beds, indr/outdr stove,
CHA, great cond.
$3,000. (352) 746-9510
CREE
'78, Travel Trailer, 35ft,
2 slide outs, roof-over
fully furn., $3,500
352-621-0848
GULFSTREAM
'06 Bunkhouse, 32FT,
sleeps 8, used 3 times,
many extras $9,800.
(352) 634-4439
HOLIDAY RAMBLER
05' Alumascape 5th wh.
29', 3 slides, no smoke
or pet owner. W/D, rear
kit. $25K. incis nation
wide 1000 trail camp
memebersip
(352) 465-4081
HY-LINE
'99, 32', 12FT slide out
on Liv. Rm. Cen. Air &
heat exc. cond. $7,000
obo (269) 240-5014
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
ROCKWOOD 30
2005, Model 8285SS ,
5th wheel. 1 slideout,
exc. cond $10,500 obo
352-422-1789
ROCKWOOD 30
2005, Model 8285SS,
5th wheel, 1 slldeout.
exc, cond $10,500 obo
352-422-1789




SMITTY'S AUTO
(352) 628-9118
Service Now Availlil
Vehicle Sales and
SERVICE
WE pay CASH for all
vehicles.
Trades are WELCOME
We have Used PaRts
Call us for your
SERVICE NEEDS
(352) 628-9118




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, junk or
unwanted cars/trks.
No title, no problem. |
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
* --- --- Ji
$$CASH PAID$$
Vehicles, Dead or Alive,
New or Used Parts
Dale's Auto Parts
352-628-4144
ANY JUNK CAR
CASH PAID
Free Pick-up. Up to
$500. Running or Notl
352-445-3909
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not*
CASH PAID -$150 & UP
(352) 771-6191







CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars Trucks
& Vans, For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES,
Hwy 19... 352 564-8333
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
.RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON
UNITED BREAST CANCER
FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms,
Breast Cancer Info
www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Tax
Deductible,
Non-Runners
Accepted,
888-468-5964
Looking for car,truck,van
for my scooter I have little
or no money will make
payments (352)201-6113




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
CASH SPECIALS
93' BUICK $695
94' TRACER $795
97 TAURUS $825
Clean, Dependable.
CALL TOM TODAY
(352)563-1 902
WE BUYS CARS!
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa, FL

AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
E-Z LOANS
$495. DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL TONY TODAY
(352)563-1 902
WE BUYS CARS!
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa FI.


All power, cruise, key-
less ent., anti theft,
$7,800. (352) 302-9217
TOYOTA
05 Prius, Pkg 5,37K mi.
60mpg, well equipped,
warranty, like new
$13K (352) 220-2112

TOYOTA
'07, Camary, LE,
Immaculate cond.
Non Smoker $10,900
(352) 461-4518

TOYOTA
08' Prius, 43K. Mi.
White,cloth int. back
up camera,CD player
$16,800. (352) 258-6796

TOYOTA
1988, Supra, Sweetl
Black. 5-speed
Cash Only $4,995
1-800-733-9138

TOYOTA
92' Paseo, 2dr.,auto,
190K. Mi. Runs great,
$975. (352) 697-0889


BUICK
'00, Century, good
cond. well maintained
117k hwy ml. 30mpg
$2,400 (352) 212-1704
BUICK
'03, Park Ave., Loaded,
runs, drives & looks like
new, garage kept., 98k
mi. $8000.obo 220-2112
Cadillac
'93, El Dorado, Blue w/
white leather int. 94K
mi., runs good $3,900
obo (352) 344-8553
CHEVROLET
'05, Malabu, LS. V6
good cond. 80k ml.,
many accessories, gray
$5,000? (352) 746-7416
CHRYSLER
SPORTY WHITE 2000 Se-
bring JX1 convertible,,
in showroom cond.
Low mi. $6000. 382-7002
CORVETTE
1981 T-top coupe,
torch red w/sldepipes.
Has mirrored clear
T-Tops, originally a
$1,200 option. $6,995
(352) 464-3293
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvetteonly 5100 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
after market parts
included, Your's
for only, $42K
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'81, 350 Chrome
engine, Air, automatic
new tires, excel, cond.
352-601-2053, 228-1053
DODGE
2005, Neon
Sunroof, Gas Saver
Pmt of $139 per mo.
1-800-733-9138
FORD
1968 Falcon Futura,
less than 86K miles,
auto, 2nd owner $3,200
(352) 746-1580, 9a-8p
HONDA
1990 Accord, LX,
4 DR, auto, new bat-
tery, looks & runs good
$1,500. (352) 503-7039

HONDA
1999, Accord Sedan
LX 1-own. 59k orig. mi.
Better hurryll .$7990
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2004, Accord EX
w/leather V6 low mil.
$10990 or $199 mo
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2004, Accord EX
w/leather V6 low mi.
$10990 or $199 mo
1866-838-4376

HONDA
2007, S2000 A very
rare findil 39k original
mllesl Convertiblel!
Call For Deall!
1866-838-4376

HYUNDAI
2006, Sonata LX
Leather, Lw Miles
Assume pint $199/mo
1-800-733-9138

HYUNDAI
2006, Sonata SE V6
leather sunroof alloy
wheels, Better hurry
wont last Call for
Deal 1866-838-4376

KIA
07' Rondo EX, V-6.
Very clean, 27K. mi.
Deluxe CD/Stereo sys-
tem, moon roof & lug-
gage rack. $13,500.
(352) 726-8358
KIA
2009, Rondo,
Roomy & Great Fuel
Economy Assume
$219 mo pmt
1-800-733-9138
LINCOLN
'07, MKZ, 14K miles, red
exterior and leather in-
terior w/wood trim, AM
FM in Dash 6 CD player
Sat. Radio, mint cond.
$19,995. (352) 746-6584
MERCEDES BENZ
'91, SEL, 88k org mil.
great Interior, runs
excel. $4,200
(352) 568-1753
MERCURY
1995 Grand Marquis,
86k, garage kept, $2700.
352-527-3498

MINI COOPER
2007, Convertible,
Leather, auto, As-
sume Pmt $299 per
mo. 1-800-733-9138
SATURN
'00, sC2, 3 door, 91k mi.
excel, cond. Red,
$4,200.
(352)397-5007
SATURN
'07, Sky, red conver.,
auto, 10,800 mi.. trans.
ext. warr., 1 own. ga-
raged, many opt. $24K
obo 352-212-5810
SOLD
TOYOTA
'91, Tercel, 2DR,
gets great ml., cold air
$750.
SUBARU
95 Legacy LS wagon,
4 whl dr. auto. 95k ml
org owner, moon roof
$4900 (352) 637-2803
SUZUKI
08' Forenza, 51K. MI.


2009,
Beau

1-8

'09, Ji
auto
sirus ra
$20,0C
v
'05, G
fully 1(
gar. I
$16,43


E

'55, 2
off/res
or Ob
(3

'81 E
nev
Interim
$10K/
trade
CHI
Irr
HOBE
Eng
3

03' 2
edititc
Mi. S
fully Il
dispaic
vid@i

'81
engin
new ti
352-60

Cony
paint,
ml. $1
(3

Cony


Invemess
Homes I


paint, top & leather 91k
ml. $10, 500. exc. cond
(352) 628-5513
CORVETTE COUPE
1996 Collector Edition
Sebring silver/black
35k ml., $18,000 firm
(352) 601-4615
MERCURY
71' Cougar Cony.
351 auto. 72K. actual
mi. Nice car, $5,500.
(352)344-9153
PORSCHE 79
911 SC Whi/ blk Interior,
& sunroof, perfect tires
& many new parts
$15,500(352) 897-4307
TC by Maserati
'89,16 valve, 5spd,
turbo, conv. hard top,
29K mi., 1 ow, excel
cond. $14,000.
Call 352-621-4600


S. ,- .




Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified ad
under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966

VOLKSWAGEN '68
bus/transporter. Con-
verted to camper. Runs
well. New brakes. $4,500.
352-726-5926



1995 DODGE ram 1995
Dodge Ram 2500 Pick up
214,953 Miles $1,800.00
OBO 795-1139
CHEVY
87' C-30, dump, BDS,
57K. Lots of new com-
ponents. $12,000 Obo.
(352)860-2214
DODGE
88 Dakota Pick up
V6 ,automatic$1200
obo(352) 628-3720
DODGE
97' Ram 2500, 4 wh. dr.,
auto, liner, tow, turbo
diesel, 246K. ml.
$6,575. (352) 634-2590
FORD '01
F-250 XL Super
dutyTritlon crew cab
chrome whis.fenders,
running bds. 97k mi.
exc $9100 352 795-0288
FORD '01
F-250 XL Super
dutyTrition crew cab
chrome whls.fenders,
running bds. 97k ml.
exc $9100 352 795-0288
FORD F-150
1983, auto., 4 wheel
drive, 300, 6-cyl.. lots of
new extras $1,600.
(352) 341-5936
GMC
2007, Yukon XL SLT
3rd row of seating
leather DVD,
20" wheels low miles
Call For Deall
1866-838-4376
MITSUBISHI
2007, Raider X-cab
Pickup V6 37k org. mi.
$13990 or $229 mo.
1866-838-4376




CHEVY
00' Blazer, 4 wh. drive.
Needs radiator &
head gasket. $2,000.
(352) 860-0817
DODGE
DURANGO 03, 4whl dr.
1 owner, 54K mi leather
3rd row seat Exc cond
inside/out, new tires
$15K (352) 795-1015
FORD
2005, Expedition XLT
3rd row of seating
nicely equipped,
$12990 or $219 mo.
1866-838-4376
GMC 2004 2004 GMC
DENALI 120,446 Miles
10,500.00 OBO
795-1139
HONDA
2004, Pilot EX-L
4x4 Loaded, Hurry!
Assume $239 mo pmt
1-800-733-9138

HONDA
2008, CR-V LX
This one won't last!
Don't hesitate,
$12990 or $219 mo
1866-838-4376
HONDA
2008, Element LX
42k original miles
7 year 100k warr. Cer-
tified Call for Deal!
1866-838-4376


SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 C15



LLKSWAGON HONDA
CC, Luxury VW, 2009, CR Pearl
ty, $398 per mo White, Don't Miss. As-
\ssume Pmt sume $299 mo pmt
800-733-9138 1-800-733-9138
VW HYUNDAI
etta TDI.45MPG, 2004, Sante Fe GLS
matic, sunroof, leather, V6, 65k orig.
dio, Michilan tires mi., $10990 or $189
00 (352) 746-3069 mo. 1866-838-4376
VW BEETLE
;LS, convertible, JEEP
loaded, like new. 2004, Wrangler Sport
kept. 28.108ml. premium wheels A/C
3 (352) 382-3269 34k original miles
$14990 or $239 mo.
1866-838-4376

JEEP
CHEVY 2008, Liberty Sport
dr. wagon, frame 19k orig. ml. 1-owner
storation. $25,900 $16990 or 319 moa.
Do.(727) 946-3794 1866-838-4376
.52) 419-6045 I
CHEVY JEEP
I Camino Black, 96 GrandCherokee,
v motor, tires & ln-lineV6 automatic,
or. $15K Invested, $1500 aobo
/ obo. May take (352) 628-3720
e. 352-628-7077 KIA
RYSLER 1954 '02, Sportage, 5spd
perial, GREAT black, tint, well main-
3BY CAR, Needs tainted $4,100. obo
gine $1,700/obo. (352) 795-8792
352-228-0597 KIA
CORVETTE 2007, Sportage
Z06, 50th. anniv. Versatile & FunI
on. $30K., 18,800 Assume $199 mo pmt
Show car cond., 1-800-733-9138
loaded, heads up
cy, new tires. Da- KIA
8(352) 637-6443 2009 KIA Borrego EX
CORVETTE w/leather 3rd row of
350 Chrome seating leather
e, Air, automatic Loaded! 8k original
ires, excel, cond. miles call for deal!
11-2053, 228-1053 1866-838-4376
CORVETTE
v. 91,2 tops, new TOYOTA
top & leather 91k 2004, Sequoia,
0, 500. exc. cond Special Edition Low
352) 628-5513 miles Assume pmt
52 $229 per mo
CORVETTE 1-800-733-9138
v. 91.9 tops. new


American
Auto Sales
of Crystal River
Guaranteed
Credit Approval

Summer
Blow Out!

'00 Chevy Cav. 224
Convertible
$5A95 To $3A95
'99 Pontiac
Grand Am
$5.495 To $3,495
'99, Chevy Malibu
$4,995 To $3,495
'98 GMC Jimmy
$5A95 To $3A95
'95, Jeep Cherokee
$3995 To $3,295
Discount for Cash
Warranty's Available

(352) 794-6012
Tire Kinadom
L I


CHRYSLER
05' Touring Town &
Country. LWB, 4 Capt.
seats, 17,700K. ML.
$11,750.(352) 341-4864
CHRYSLER
1999 Mini Van 100K ml,
synthetic oil, no wear,
all access. Good tires.
$3,100. 564-1390

CHRYSLER
2009, Town & Country
Touring low miles, one
-owner Call for dealil
$289 per mo., WAC
1866-838-4376

FORD
'05, Econoline, white,
Ac, new transmission,
good tires. One owner,
$5,200 (352) 465-7469
FORD
'96, E150, 302 & over-
drive 190K, no leaks,
runs good $895.
(352) 563-1993
FORD E-150
1987, fullsize work van,
runs great, $1,000 obo
(352) 804-6091
FORD WORK VAN
'03 E150, pwr windows,
cold AC, 85K mi, Very
Gd cond. $5500.
746-4644 or 302-4705



Polaris
'03, 330, 2 WD, lowi
hours almost never .
used Like new $2,200
352-628-1277
POLARIS Sportsman,
2002 Like new ATV,
looks new, almost never
used, black, 300 miles,
$3,200 (352)746-6604,
(218)529-9331



HARLEY
05' Ultra Classic,10,900
Mi. newly serviced,
ready to ride, loaded.
$14,500 (352) 465-3668
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'03 ROADKING Fact.
custom. Hi perf.
Over $43k in receipts.
17k mi. $12,200
563-0615 Crystal River
HARLEY DAVIDSON
'05 DynaGlIde, black,
13K. Mi. Wind shield,
chrome, one owner.
Warranty/2012. $9,500.
(352) 672-4348
Harley Davidson
'07, Fat Boy, w/ extras,
12k miles, $13,000
for sale or trade on
Boat CC (352)634-1789
Harley Sportster
2008 1200 XL, 2,000 mi.
Power clutch, sissy bar,
saddlebags, windshield,
upgraded seat, engine
guard, more. White/gray
two-tone.Pristine. $8400
firm. 352-400-5016
HONDA
'01, Shadow 1100, Red,
13K mi.. Excel. Cond.!
Extras, $3,000
Lecanto (970) 412-5560
HONDA
02 VTX 1800 R
7,900 mi, Exc Cond.
$6,400 w/extras
352-212-8860
HONDA
'02, Sabre 1100,
10,700mi., many extras,
excel. cond. $3,875
obo. (352) 344-4537
HONDA
2007, Scooter, pur-
chased 2008, 3,700 mil.,
100 mpg. excel conn.
$1,000 (352) 586-1671
KAWASAKI
1981, 750, LTD, 16,000.
mi., look and runs
good, sharp bike
$1,500. (352) 249-7027
KAWASAKI
2006 Concourse
2,600 miles $5,499
obo
(352) 697-2760
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incds. helmet &
jacket. Asking S3,500.
obo. (352) 527-0679
SUZUKI
'04, SVIOOOS. less than
3,500 mi. full ferring,
adult own'd with extras
$4,200. (352) 249-7736
SUZUKI
'05, 50C, Sub, only 6 mi.,
garage stored
like new $6,500 obo
(352) 344-8553
TRIUMPH
'05 Rocket 3, 14K. Mi.
Black, loaded. $8,300
Obo.(352) 746-1895
/ THIS OUT!
YAMAHA '07
STRATOLINER S, 5200 mi,
exc cond, Ext warr to
2012. Extras Galore.
$9500obo. 847-226-3893
Cell, Homosassa


Firal Cit
Homes^j^


Crystal River
Homes 9


Homosa sa







CIB SATLRDAZJLLY 17, 2010 CITRUS Courvm (FL) CHRONICLE


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C16SATURDA) JULY 17, 20 10


CITRus CouNyy (FL) CHRONICLE






Cimiis COLVFY (FL) CHRoxIcu~ SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 C17


MSRP
k- Dealer Discount


HI
FA


ii
~
.1'
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ALL NEW O
2010 FORD


* .. -. _


$24,310
.1,400


Sales Price 22,910
Retail Customer Cash .1,000
Promo Retail Bonus Cash .1,000


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MSRP
Dealer Discount


$28,290
.812


Sales Price 27,478
Retail Customer Cash .2,000
FMCC Bonus Cash .500
Promo Retail Bonus Cash 1,000


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ALL NEW
2010 FORD










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We Welcome All Owners

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SATURDAY, JULY 17, 201OC17


Cn-Rus Cou.,vTY (FL) CHRoNicfF


IGE DISCOUNTS &
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-Dealer Discount. 7

Sales Price 17,410 !
Retail Customer Cash .1,500
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MSRP $18,760
Dealer Discount -600
Sales Price 18,160 |
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CIS SATURDAY- ILLY 17. 2010


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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i4 Lr Jt senior

Soothing, simple style at
the Trimmer home/G6












". August 2010
Young and
active after 50


~. --,; r.5..;0- -. -
,c-. -b, . ' .- . .
Cover photoby bVESIGLER/Chronicle
4


.IL


Feeling crafty?
Citrus County's community
centers offer a variety of
activities and chances to
learn new things./PageG8







G2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 SENIOR STYLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Enjoy These Area Golf Courses!
Black Diamond Citrus Springs Lakeside Point 0' Woods Southern W\ooi
Ranch Golf & Countr) Country Club Golf Club Golf &
45 holes Pni ate Club 18 holes Par 72 9 holes Par 30 Country Clut
3125 W. Black 18 holes Semi-prikate Executive 18 holes Pri\ %
Diamond Circle Par 72 Public 4555 E. 174 S.Golf 1501
Beierl\ Hills 8960 N Windmill Dr. Cork17ood BlS
746-34-h , r- Inverness Harbor Pat Ck


Brent"wood Farms
Golf Club
Regulation
9 holes
Par 39 Public
1745 W.
Nicole Ct.
Lecanto
527-2600
t Citrus Hills Golf
& County Club
2 courses -
I:- 18 holes
Par 70 -
g' Semi-pritate
509 E.
Hartfobrd St.
Hemando
S 746-4425


Citrus Springs
352-489-5-1045

El Diablo Golf &
Country Club
18 holes -
Par 72 Public
10405 N.
Sherman Dr.
Citrus Springs
465-0986

Inverness Golf &
Country Club
IS holes Par 72 -
Private
3150 S.
Country Club Dr.
Inverness
726-2583


726-1461

Pine Ridge
Golf Club
18 hole Par 72
9 holes Par 27
Public
5600 Elkcam Blvd
Be'erlv Hills
746-617 7
Plantation Inn
& Golf Resort
18 hole -
championship
9 hole executive
Public
9301 W.Fort
Island Trail
Crystal River
795-7211


Inmerness
726-3113

Seven Ri'ers Golf
& Country Club
18 holes Par 72
Pri\ ate
7395 W.
Pinebrook St.
Crystal Rj'er
795-6665

Sk.vview
at Terra Vista
18 holes Par 72
Semi-private
2100 N. Terra
Vista Blvd.
Hernando


'Is



d.


Homosassa
382-1200

Sugarmill Woods
Golf &
Country Club
27 holes Par 72 -
Pri ate
1 Douglas St.
Homosassa
382-2663

Twisted Oaks
Golf Course
18 holes Par 72
Public
4801 Forest
Ridge Blvd.
Beverly Hills
746-6257


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G2 Saturday, July 17, 20 10


SENIOR STYLE






0,i s (kt.u \ iY 'FL) CHRa-NsCLJ-


SENIOR STYI.I.


Seeing through 8-year-old eyes


We have had our 8-year-old
granddaughter visiting with
us for the past two weeks.
I'm tired!
She wakes up bouncing and contin-
ues throughout the day and doesn't
stop until way past my
bedtime. I
I'm tired.
But I'm also refreshed
because for the past two
weeks, I've been seeing
life through 8-year-old
eyes the beach for the
very first time and playing 4 l
in the waves. Huge clam
shells on the sand.
Grandpa and I watched Nancy E
"Hannah Montana" and
"iCarly" and learned that
today's third-grade math
isn't like the math we
learned in the third grade.
Our house is a wreck, but it's been
fun throwing socks and eating things
that turn our teeth blue.
Quiet is nice and so is not having to
constantly pretend to be startled at


.e


every "Boo!" shouted from behind
our backs, but it's also been nice hav-
ing that gangly legged kid around.
She said, "Everybody has a
grandma in Florida." That's probably
true.
She recently got her own
e-mail address, so we'll be
able to keep in touch more
often when she goes home
to Virginia.
It still surprises me that a
lot of seniors don't want to
learn computers, even if it's
just to learn e-mail. Even if
you don't want to buy a com-
puter, you can use one at
ennedy the library for free.
Check out the information
in this issue about computer
classes at the local commu-
nity centers and also at the
College of Central Florida (formerly
Central Florida Community College).
Also, check out Amy Kingery's great
information about tips to prevent
medical errors. She's the public rela-
tions and communications coordina-


tor at Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center.
While you're checking things out in
this issue, note that the county's
home-delivered meals program needs
volunteer drivers. Even if it's just one
day a week for one to two hours, it'll
help.
Our featured story this month is
about a delightful couple, George and
Bunny Trimmer. They have a collec-
tion of mid-century furniture that be-
longs in an art museum.
What I found amusing was the term
"mid-century" that's when I was
born!
Now, not only am I tired from en-
tertaining a little kid, but I'm "mid-
century" (I just hope I'm as well
preserved as some of the Trimmer's
chairs.)
Until next month
(when I've had a nap),
Nancy Kennedy
Senior Style editor Nancy Kennedy
can be reached at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


Saturday, July 17, 2010 G3





SFoot Solutions
S Using Modern
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F001w


Communllity DIABETIC FITTINGS
Comfort Schedule your private filting
Shoes Diabetic & Therapeutic Shoes


Pondering those frustrating pet peeves


I know it's hard to believe
that someone as cheer-
ful as me could ever
have a pet peeve or two or
three, but it's true.
Some of my friends tell
me their pet peeve is when
people are so darn cheerful
all the time! Mmm?
A few of my pet peeves
are:
You know when you put
your fitted bed sheets in the
dryer along with other
clothes and the other
clothes bunch up inside the
corners so when you pull
out the load of clothes
thinking they are .all dry,
that bunch stuck inside the
corner is still wet? Don't you
just hate that?
Or people think and say
they know everything, but
they really don't, unlike my
parents who said they knew
everything and actually did.
Or people who whine all
the time! You know what I
mean, don't you? They have
whined for so long, their
voice has a constant whin-
ing sound!


I really can't down on a car.
stand that com- What ad agency
mercial for an in- could possibly
surance company have thought this
where the guy one up? It has to
pretends he is the be one of the
puppy that ate dumbest com-
the couch. He .4 mercials I've
spits all of this ...- ... ever seen. I don't
furniture foam even understand
rubber out of his Mary Alice it, do you?
mouth. On that Tillman Speaking of
same commer- commercials,
cial, there is a guy what about that
who is supposed office supply
to be a wind storm. He is on commercial where the guys
a tree limb and he falls are yelling about how low


Senior Style

Publisher
Gerard Mulligan
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com

Features Editor
Cheri Harris
charris@chronicleonline.com


the price is as they pick up
item after item. They say
something like, "Wow!
That's really a low price!"
Can't stand it. It's like lis-
tening to nails screech
across a chalkboard to me.
Not to change the subject,
but whatever happened to
iced tea spoons? Every sil-
ver service used to have an
iced tea spoon with it. Tup-
perware used to make an
iced tea spoon. Now you
never see them in the store.

See

Senior Style is a monthly publication
of the Citrus County Chronicle
for and about senior lifestyles
in Citrus County.

Senior Style Editor
Nancy Kennedy
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com

Advertising Contact
April Zay
azay@chronicleonline.com


WE ARE COMFORT


KEEPERS'


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Nothing hits home like the decision of how to care for a loved one.
We provide the kind of trusted, non-medical, in-home care that helps
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5 tips to help prevent medical errors


In April, we announced
that Seven Rivers Re-
gional was named a na-
tional leader in patient
safety and received the
HealthGrades' 2010 Patient
Safety Excellence Award.
Today, we want to continue
efforts to improve patient
safety by sharing five tips
you can use to help prevent
medical errors.
Medical errors happen
when something that was
planned as part of medical
care doesn't work out, or
when the wrong plan was
used in the first place. They
can occur anywhere in the
health care system: in hospi-
tals, clinics, outpatient sur-
gery centers, doctors' offices,


nursing homes,
pharmacies and
in your home.
The single most
important way T ^
you can help pre- .
vent medical er-
rors is to be an
active member of
your health care
team. This means A
taking part in Kin
every decision NE WS
about your care. SRF
Research shows
that patients who
are more involved with their
care tend to get better re-
sults.
Here are five specific tips
you can implement:
M "Brown bag" your med-


I


3


ications. At least
once a year, bring
all of your pre-
scription and
over-the-counter
medicines, as
well as any di-
.* etary supple-
ments (vitamins
and herbs), with
ay you to your doc-
gery tor This can help
FROM you and your doc-
tor talk about
'MC them and find out
if there are any
problems. It can also help
your doctor keep records up-
to-date.
Check the writing.
When your doctor writes you
a prescription, make sure


Bang-up time at Whatcher Point


Well, it certainly has been an excit-
ing week in our little community.
Who knew palm trees could burn
so quickly? I realize that some of you are
still upset because the fire department
pushed your barbecue grills into the pool.
We don't believe for a minute that manage-
ment will carry out their threat to fill in the
swimming pool with dirt. And we shouldn't
blame Sven Gustafson for all those fires, ei-
ther. As we all know, Sven recently recov-
ered from cataract surgery and __
hadn't realized that hamburger
patties he bought were still .
wrapped in the cellophane
packaging. And it wasn't fair for -,-
the fire department to blame the
cooks just because they went ..
through a keg and a half of beer.
And as far as the fire depart- .. .
ment confiscating the remaining
beer, well, we would have given El
it to them anyways. Lary
Management is still upset be- WHAT
cause their no-fireworks policy PO
was violated. Some residents
pointed out that the propane
tank explosion, although spectacular,
shouldn't be construed as fireworks.
Fortunately, Ray Flowers' baby-back ribs
were located when his barbeque grill was
found in the guest parking lot. Luckily, the
car it landed on was insured. Ray's wife,
Rita, assured us that the ribs on the car
were still edible.
Our annual Fourth of July parade was a
success. We want to thank all of you who
participated in the event, especially our


I
e


resident drum majorette, Freda Finkle-
myer, with her unique way of twirling her
baton while marching with her walker. We
again apologize for not being able to pres-
ent awards for the best costumes this year.
Funding for this event was depleted to pay
for hospital deductibles for last month's pa-
rade.
Since no one won the "Name the Dis-
ease" contest at last Friday morning's cof-
fee, the jackpot now includes a free
colonoscopy, along with a high
colonic, donated by Ed's Diag-
nostic Center. We need more con-
S testants, folks.

AN form us that in order to be a
member of the "'Merry Widows
Club," you must be a widow. A
warning to some of you husbands
out there to watch your step.
If it weren't for the Maalox con-
nheimer cession stand, our chili contest
"HER would have ended up in the hole
NT again. The winner won't be an-
nounced until next Friday morn-
ing's coffee. By then, the judges'
vocal cords should return to normal. Man-
agement didn't appreciate the chalk out-
lines on the floor of the clubhouse, making
it appear to be a crime scene.
The wine and cheese party is cancelled
since the wine turned up missing again.
This popular event will be rescheduled at a
later date. The guest speaker for last Fri-
day morning's coffee was supposed to


See WHATCHER/Page GIO


you can read it. If you can't
read your doctor's handwrit-
ing, your pharmacist may
not be able to, either.
Talk to the hand. If you
are in a hospital, consider
asking all health care work-
ers who have direct contact
with you whether they have
washed their hands. Hand
washing is an important way
to prevent the spread of in-
fections in hospitals.
No news may not be
good news. If you have a test,
don't assume that no news is
good news. Ask about the re-
sults.
Speak up. You have a
right to question anyone
who is involved with your
care. If you have a question

IDEAS WANTED
Send your idea; for
Senior Style features
to nl ennedy@
chronicleonline.com
or cairl 563-5660.


or concern, share it with
your health care provider.
These tips are provided in
part by the Agency for
Healthcare Research and
Quality. AHRQ is the govern-
ment's lead agency, charged
with supporting research
designed to improve health
care, reduce its cost, address
patient safety and medical
errors and broaden access to
essential services. The in-
formation AHRQ provides
helps health care decision
makers patients and clini-


cians, health system leaders
and policymakers make
more informed decisions.
To learn more about our
commitment to patient
safety, visit www.srrmc.
com/about/commitment-to-
patient-safety.


Amy Kingery is
community relations
coordinator at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical
Center in Crystal River


7-iv j for IV

AT KINGS BAY t Tree!
WWW.CEDARCREEKLIFE.COM

Every Thursday at 3:00, we welcome the
community to join us for tea and treats. Meet :?,
our residents and see first hand how we've -.
given "assisted living" a whole new meaning. ,
And if you wish, we'll give you a tour of ,rre, IN.,
what we feel is the most comfortable and
caring assisted living residence in Florida. i
*No appointment necessary.

NO HIDDEN FEES.
Monthly rent includes
EVERYTHING except personal
medications & telephone e\pense.s.

Respite Care Available!
231 NW Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
(352) 564-2446 Lc. #AL10230


Serving Florida since 1955!And here tomorrow!
Lecanto Showroom
Hwy. 44 & S. Otis Ave. 7463312
www.whitealuminum.com
Licensed Florida Contractor CBC001467 Licensed Florida Roofing Contractor CCC035617


G4 Saturday, July 17, 2010


SENIOR STYLE


OTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Financial help available


for family caregivers


D ear Savvy ties you should
Senior: check into and a
I've been variety of support
taking care of my services that can
elderly mother help, too.
for nearly a year If your mom is
now and it's _4 eligible for Medi-
wearing me out caid, you may be
both physically able to get paid a
and financially. small amount by
Is there any Jim Miller the government.
way I could get .-,.: In 15 states, Medi-
paid to be her caid offers a Cash
caregiver? and Counseling
Tapped Out program (see
Dear Tapped: To get paid cashandcounseling.org) that
as your mother's caregiver, provides direct financial as-
there are several possibili- distance to their beneficiar-


ies, and that money can be
used to pay in-home care-
givers. A few other states
have similar programs for
low-income seniors, even if
the person receiving care
doesn't quite qualify for
Medicaid. To find out about
these options, contact your
local Medicaid office or visit
benefitscheckup.org an
online service that helps
seniors and their families
find and enroll in federal,
state, local and private ben-
efit programs.
See Page G9


Learn something new this summer


Special to the Chronicle


The College of Central Florida Citrus
Campus will offer the following Continuing
Education courses in the upcoming weeks.
For information or registration, call 249-
1210 or log onto CFItraining.cf.edu.
Senior Computers I and II
Learn the basics in a class designed for
the senior learner. This class will provide
an overview including basic software sys-
tems, the internet, e-mail, mouse use and
windows. No previous computer experi-
ence is needed. Class will be from 3 to 5
p.m. Monday, July 26 through Aug. 9, and
will be followed by Senior Computers II.
Learn to cut and paste, organize and cus-
tomize your desktop. Search the internet
more efficiently and perform downloads.
Directions will be given on how to use the
help features available on your computer.
Some basic computer knowledge is neces-
sary. Senior Computers II will be from 3 to
5 p.m. Monday, Aug. 16 through 30. Fee for
the class is $40.
Web Design I
Focus on the design of Internet sites. An
emphasis is placed on the visual design,
navigation development, communication
and authoring ofwebsites. This course will
provide a basic understanding of the meth-
ods and techniques of developing a simple
to moderately complex web site. Using the
current standard web page language, stu-
dents will be instructed on creating and
maintaining a simple web site. Class will be
from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays,
July 20 through Aug. 12. Fee is $159.
N Pool Care for the Pool Owner
This course will provide the swimming


pool owner the information necessary to
maintain a pool economically and safely.
The course will cover water chemistry and
health issues, filter and pump maintenance
and repair, as well as pool cleaning and
safety. Fee for this class is $49. The class
will meet from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday, July 27 and July 29.
Pottery
This class is designed to enrich your tal-
ents in working with clay. Learn hand and
wheel techniques. Class is from 5 to 8 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays, Aug. 9 through
Sept 1 at Lecanto High School. The course
fee of $65 does not include the cost of clay,
which can be purchased in class.
Let's Get to know Herbs
Have you always wanted to know about
herbs? Learn about herbs that grow best in
Florida weather, the biblical herbs and
herbs for beauty and health. Discuss cook-
ing with herbs, making teas and other sim-
ple recipes. Learn about planning an herb
garden, gardening and harvesting your
herbs. A variety of herbs will be displayed
at every class. Class will be from 5:30 to 7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays, Sept. 15
through 24. Fee is $39.
Beginning Golf
Learn the basics of golf with a Profes-
sional Golfers' Association instructor with
more than 20 years of experience. See how
proper grip and posture can get you offto a
great start and teach you the pre-shot fun-
damentals. Class will be from 4 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, Aug. 24 through
Sept 9. Fee is $89.
The Citrus campus is at 3800 S Lecanto
Highway in Lecanto. Visit the campus and
pick up a Continuing Education schedule.


ENJOY EATING


OUT TODAY!
HERE ARE A FEW CHOICES...


Armantes Restaurant
5813 Craig G. Rose Hwy., Hernando
637-4700
Burke's of Ireland
564 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
795-0956
China First Buffet
618 US Hwy 19, Crystal River
795-5445
Cody's Original Roadhouse
305 SE US HWY 19, Crystal River
795-7223
Cozy Country Kitchen
5705 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
794-3830
Crystal River Ale House
1610 SE Paradise Point, Crystal River
795-3113
Dan's Clam Stand
Famous Burgers and fresh Seafood
7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa
Hwy. 44, Crystal River
795-9081
Enrico's Italian Restaurant
Casual Fine Dining
439 US Hwy. 41 S., Inverness
341-4555
Heidi's Italian Restaurant
Hwy. 41 & 44W, Inverness
637-1355
Homosassa Riverside Resort/
Riverside Crab House
Waterfront Resort
5297 S. Cherokee Way, Old Homosassa
628-2474
Manatee Lanes
7715 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
795-4546
Mango Grill & Wine Bar
Casual and Fine Dining
9576 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs
489-1288


McLeod House Bistro
207 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness
726-7700
Peck's Old Port Cove
Home of the original Garlic Crabs
On the water in Ozello, (9 mi. W. of US 19 on CR 494)
795-2806
The Plantation Inn
9301 West Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
795-4211
Rocco's Cafe
6612 W Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
352-563-0442
Seagrass Pub & Grill
Outdoor Tiki Bar and Patio Dining
10386 W. Halls River Rd., Homosassa
628-3595
Shuck 'Ems
13982 W. Ozello Trail, Crystal River
563-1204
Stumpknockers Restaurant
Historic Downtown Inverness
726-2212
Sugarmill Family Restaurant
5446 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
628-0800
SunCruz Casino
FREE Food and Drink While Gambling
www.portricheycosino.com
800-464-DICE
Turner's Fish Camp
N. 581 Turner Camp Rd., Inverness
726-0085
Van der Valk Fine Dining & Bistro
European & American Casual Fine Dining
On Lakeside Golf Course off Hwy. 41, Hernando
637-1140
Yanni's
3297 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
503-6853


See the Chronicle's restaurant lineup
each Wednesday & Friday.

C I T R US C 0 U N T Y

-H-
HRkONkClLE
00.5DZG a www.chronicleonline.com
000U5DZG3 ho ft lu n ....______________a___________________________________


SENIOR STYLE


Saturday, July 17, 20 io G5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[Win $100
It's Easy!


DAVE SIGLERIChronicle
George and Bunny Trimmer have a colorful life and the furniture to match. The womb chair
was designed by Eero Saarinen. Designed in the 1940s, the chair is featured in the Museum
of Modern Art. It continues to be one of the most recognized representations of mid-cen-
tury modernism.

Citrus home replete with mid-century furniture


NANCY KENNEDY
Chronicle


4 visit to the Sugarmill
Woods home of George
and Bunny Trimmer is
like a trip to an art museum,
with George Trimmer as the
museum docent.
Trimmer spent his career as a furniture
dealer specializing in museum-quality mid-


century designs.
Think "The Jetsons" clean lines, lots
of glass and metal and names like Mies van
de Rohe, Eero Saarinen, Isamu Noguchi
and Harry Bertoia.
"They're all classics, and they are as good
today as they were in 1950," Trimmer said.
As Trimmer went from room to room,
pointing out different pieces a 1948 Eero
Saarinen "womb chair" and a Harry
Bertoia "bird chair" he talked about the
architects who designed them.
"Eero Saarinen designed the arch in St
Louis," he said. "And this glass table is a
See STYLE/Page G7


Drawing to be held
.- Tues.,July 27th,2010
Simply submit the coupon below to the Chronicle's
Meadowcrest or Inverness Office, or mail it to:
No reproductions accepted.
Must reach the Chronicle's Meadowcrest office by I ( ATTN Senior Style
Monday,July 26th,2010 to qualify. (C II| \ I(I E 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Gift card valid for six months and is not redeemable for cash. Crystal River, FL 34429
rame -----------_-- _- ---------- I
Name


Gift Card -
State Zip
Drawing Phone Number I
SE-Mail _________E-


G6 Saturday, July 17, 2010


SENIOR STYLE








Cnxu Coi',-n'(FL CHONILE ENIR SYLESaturday, July 17, 20 10 G7


STYLE
Continued from Page G6
Mies van de Rohe. His first
building was the Seagram's
Building in New York He
was a very prolific furni-
ture designer."
Many of the pieces of fur-
niture are the same as the
pieces that sit in the Mu-
seum of Art in New York
"Here's a chair that was
the beginning of molded
plywood, designed by
Charles Eames," Trimmer
said. It's numbered 1287.
"It was Eames who
started the movement for
Fiberglas seating," he said.
When the Trimmers mar-
ried four years ago, the fur-
niture was already in
place, which suited Mrs.
Trimmer just fine.
"I always had traditional
furniture," she said, "and
when we married, this
house was totally furnished.
and I wasn't going to im-
prove on that.
"I love living with this,"
she said. "It's so unclut-
tered and so simple. It's
very soothing, and it's com-
fortable to live with."
However, some of the fur-
niture isn't comfortable to
sit in, such as metal-backed
chairs that resemble shop-
ping carts or chainlink
fences. Some you sink into
and need a crane to lift you
out, joked Mrs. Trimmer.


A lifetime ago, the two
had been neighbors.
Trimmer, 79, grew up in
Washington Court House,
Ohio, the son of an ice
cream shop owner and
spent his childhood ped-
dling ice cream bars on the
street and scooping up sun-
daes and sodas from behind
the counter as soon as he
was tall enough to do so.
"My childhood absolutely
was surrounded by the ice
cream parlor," he said.
His move from ice cream
to furniture came in college
when he got a job at a furni-
ture store in Columbus,
Ohio. The company had
hired him and another guy
to move furniture around to
the displays, but eventually
he got a chance to try his


hand at sales.
All his years of hawking
ice cream bars on the street
paid off. It was 1949 and he
made $10,000 selling furni-
ture on straight commis-
sion.
'"All the old guys that were
plodding around the furni-
ture store were making
$4,000 or $5,000 a year and
they thought that was good,"
Trimmer said.
"This was when this fur-
niture was just starting," he


said. "We did a job for North
American Aviation and we
used Herman Miller Furni-
ture and Knoll furniture
throughout and one of the
items was a stack chair that
Charles Eames had de-
signed. They asked each of
the major vendors to say
something at the opening
and I said, 'These are the
antiques of tomorrow."'
Today, a $19 stack chair
sells for up to $125. A Saari-
nen womb chair starts at


ABOVE: The Charles Eames
lounge chair with ottoman is
another of the highly col-
lectable chairs in the Trim-
mer collection.



AT : The diamond
chairs were also designed
by Harry Bertoia and are
part of the same collection
as the bird chair.


$2,900 and a Bertoia bird
chair at nearly $2,500. A
matching ottoman starts at
$800.
Trimmer said he lost a
good portion of his collec-
tion during Hurricane Opal


in 1995.
"I had a three-story town-
house and lost everything
that was on the lower level,"
he said.

See STYLE/Page G11


1w



Did you know tha,
are available to I
Spouses and their
for Assisted Li
At Nevw Horizon, we can sho
qualify, vhai forms n10 ill
f Q,:,. to simplifyf the process.
for more
SWe're Here 0
Assisted Living
Temporary or SI


t benefits
Veterans,
r Widows
ving?
w you hov to
out and hon
Stop by today
information.
Help!

hornl Term Stay


WHORIZON
Assisted Living
1745 Forest Dr., Inverness
352-726-5466
i Assisted Living 5778


"A DAY TO REMEMBER"
IMPROVE YOUR MEMORY & STUDY SKILLS
Reserve your seat today!
Saturday, Aug. 7, 2010
Citrus County Auditorium, 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness
8:30-10am "A Short Seminar for Short Memories" $30pp
3 Secrets to remembering anything, quickly and easily
5 Rules for remembering names
5 Ways to reduce absentmindedness...and more!
10:30-12 noon "A Short Workshop for Short Memories" $30pp
How to Remember Names and Faces
1-3pm "A Student Memory Workshop" $40pp
Reading comprehension
Word Power (Vocabulary building)... and more!
3:30-4:45pm "A Super Spanish Seminar" (FREE with
enrollment in any seminar or workshop)
Conversational Spanish (read, write and speak)
An instant 5,000 Spanish word vocabulary... and more!
Faculty: Mr. Jon Keith, The Memory Trainer
As per national TV www.memorytrainer.com
and "Dr. Joe" Ponds, The Memory Magician
www.memorycollege.com
For additional information call (352) 586-7455 or
email doctorjoe@memoryquest.net


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLF


SENIOR STYLE







G8 Saturday. Iulv17. 2010 SNO TL iu ONY(L HOIL


Community ,T


COMPUTER CLASSES
These are conducted using the Microsoft Operat-
ing System; call the center to register and next class
date.
Introduction to the Computer: A class for the be-
ginner that will take you through the Windows Oper-
ating System, word processing, Intemet activity and
e-mailing. $25 for a five-week session.
WCCC Mondays at 2 p.m. Instructor is Dick
Bromley.
CCCC Fridays at 2 p.m. Instructor is Dick
Bromley.
Advanced Computer:
CCCC Wednesdays at 2 p.m. Instructor is Dick
Bromley. $25 for a five-week session.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES
Instructor for all classes is Sue Paulus. Cost is
$35 for eight weeks.
Call East Citrus, West Citrus or Central centers to
register. The classes are Introduction to American
Sign Language, Basic Sign Language and American
Sign Language I and II1. Home-school students class
at Central Citrus.
For more information, call Sue at 527-8479 or e-
mail at handjivesue@yahoo.com.
GAMES
Bingo: Call centers for days and times.
Duplicate Bridge Groups
CCCC Wednesdays at 1 p.m. and Thursdays
at noon.
ECCC Thursdays and Fridays at noon.
Bridge and mah-jongg lessons: Instructor is
Sandra Brown. $4 per lesson.
CCCC Tuesdays; ECCC Fridays; WCCC -
Wednesdays.
Billiards: Offered at all centers.
WCCC Pool lessons with Ron at 2 p.m. Mon-
days. Women's pool lessons at 12:30 p.m. Thurs-
days.
Table tennis: Offered at all centers.
Pinochle: At WCCC and CCCC.
Cribbage and canasta: At CCCC.
Wii Games Sports at Central Citrus, East Cit-
rus and West Citrus community centers. Join the fun
with the latest games, great exercise and entertain-
ment. Wii Bowling Leagues at Central Citrus.
Skipbo: At WCCC, CCCC and ECCC.
Hand and Foot card game: At CCCC on
Wednesday at 1 p.m. and Fridays at 1 p.m.
DANCING & MUSIC
New Social Tea Ballroom Dance. Hosted by
deejay Sapphire, $5 per person, light refreshments.
West Citrus 2 p.m. last Friday of the month.
Central Citrus 1:30 p.m. second Wednesday of
the month.
Karaoke
ECCC- Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
CCCC Fourth Thursday at 10 a.m. with Jamie
Roldan.
Musical Entertainment and Social Dances:
WCCC Social dance Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m.
Thursday Back Porch Band at 10 a.m.
ECCC Country Sunshine classic country band
on Friday from noon to 2 p.m.
CCCC Latney and Meg Cartwright on the guitar
and singing.
Karaoke with Jaime Rolan the last Thursday of the
month.
Ballroom dance lessons: Vince and June
Queripel, instructors.


CALL THE CENTERS
(ECCC) East Citrus center 344-9666
(WCCC) West Citrus center 795-3831
(ICC) Inverness center 726-1009
(CCCC) Central Citrus center 527-5993

CCCC Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. for beginners
and 2:45 p.m. for advanced. $4 per person, per
class.
WCCC Fridays at 1:30 p.m. beginners class.
$4 per person, per class.
Line Dancing: Tuesdays and Thursdays with in-
structor Linn.
ECCC Beginners and intermediate classes. $3
a class.
WCCC Beginners and intermediate classes. $2
a class.
CCCC True Beginners Step by Step, $3. In-
structor is Sandy Brown.
Beginners and intermediate classes, $3. Instructor
is Sara Bendel on Mondays and Thursdays.
Couples Country Doubles dance lessons:
ECCC Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m. $3 per lesson
with instructor Kathy Reynolds.
Tap dancing lessons: Sandra Brown instructs all
ages.
CCCC Tuesdays. $5 per class.
Fun Klogging class: Marcy Male instructs.
WCCC Beginners and intermediate. $2 per
class.
Tap and jazz dance class:
WCCC Joyce Lane teaches all types of dance.
$4 per class.
Belly dance class: Find the creative dance in
you.
WCCC Mondays at 1 p.m. $25 for four weeks.
Debbie Boydston is instructor.
CCCC Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. No charge for
class. Denise Alessi is instructor.
EXERCISE PROGRAMS
Yoga for seniors:
WCCC Tuesdays and Thursdays. $7 per class.
Chair exercises:
WCCC Wednesdays and Fridays at 10:45 a.m.
CCCC Monday through Friday at 10 a.m.
ECCC Mondays and Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
Walking program:
ECCC Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:30
a.m.
Tai Chi:
CCCC Tuesdays at 10:15 a.m.
WCCC Mondays at 10:30 a.m. with Nancy.
*Aerobics
WCCC Power Hour aerobic video on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
CCCC Indoor walking video on Mondays and
Wednesday.
ECCC Aerobics class with Tammy on Mondays
at 5:15 p.m.
ARTS & CRAFTS
ECCC Ceramic Painting, Crocheting, Quilting
and Knitting.
CCCC Stamping class: Mondays at 9 a.m. $3.
Nature Coast Carvers meet Thursdays at 12:30
p.m.
WCCC Craft Time on Wednesdays at 1 p.m.
Art Classes all kinds Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
$10.


NAUE OS


Arthritis Care, Hips,

Shoulders, Arthroscopy,

Knees, Hand Surgery,

Sports Medicine, Joint

Replacement, Minimally

Invasive Surgery

215 W. Mustang Blvd Bevery H 4 -5
2236 E^^^^EfdS^^ Hw.4 es nenes34Boe(63
520 SE8th Av. Cry tal Rivr 564130e(2663


Kenneth M.
Lemos, PA-C
1It) 1. lu'w 1.IwJll


- hen Should I Call Hospice?


Information & referrals
1-866-940-0962


When some, but not necessarily all,
of these signs are of concern to you:

Uncontrolled or increasing pain
Increased shortness of breath
Uncontrolled nausea and vomiting
Oxygen dependence
Progressive weight loss
Mounting urinary difficulties
Profound weakness and fatigue
Steady decline in mobility
Frequent hospitalizations and ER visits





a not-for-rof gan on initially licensed 984
formerly Hernando-Pasco Hospice


SENIOR STYLE


CYTRus CouNTY (FL) ChRoNicm


.......... J J J --J 2 ....


www.HPH-Hospice.org 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy. I Beverly Hills, FL 34465

Partnering with Braishear's Pharmacy to bring comfort when it's needed most.








CITRUS CouNri' (FL) CHRONICLE SENIOR S'ntE Saturday, July 17, 2010 G9


-Stu ,-ff.

Home-delivered deliveries. For more informa-
meal drivers needed tion, call Janice at 527-5975.
Inf Anfl&nant I vuind


Do you have a few hours a
week to volunteer your time? If
so, Citrus County Support
Services has the "feel-good"
volunteer opportunity you have
been looking for. Become a vol-
unteer home-delivered meal
driver today.
Each meal route consists of
10 to 20 meals, taking one to
two hours to complete, and vol-
unteers are paid for mileage.
With numerous locations coun-
tywide, you are sure to find a
convenient route in a familiar
neighborhood. In many cases,
our drivers are the only per-
sonal contact our recipients re-
ceive each day. Groups and
clubs are also welcome and
encouraged to volunteer. A
group can share the responsi-
bility of a delivery route on a
given day of the week with
members taking turns making


center needs help
The Center for Independent
Living needs volunteers for a
fundraising committee. It is a
great way to interact with the
public and a fun way to get
community service hours.
Volunteers ;must possess
good communications skills
and must enjoy working with
the community. It is from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. every Thursday at the
Center for Independent Living.
Call Cathy at 527-8399.

Center has 'seniors
on the move'
"Seniors on the Move" offers
trips to the community centers,
movies, flea markets, libraries,
parks, beach, theater, shopping
trips you name it.
Recent surveys have shown


that seniors in our county listed
socialization as something they
lacked our Seniors on the
Move hope to change this -
so if you would like to enjoy the
benefits of this program, or just
want further information, call
Sue Carscadden at 527-5959.

Cruise with seniors
to the Caribbean
Citrus County Senior Foun-
dation will host a seven-night
Eastem Caribbean cruise on
Oct. 23, sailing from Port
Canaveral on the Norwegian
Sun and visiting Nassau, St.
Thomas and St. Maarten.
Participants can from inside
cabins, ocean-view cabins and
balcony cabins. Prices will in-
clude all taxes, fees and port
charges, roundtrip bus, a pri-
vate cocktail party and a $150
per cabin donation.
To reserve, call 628-0668.
For information, call 564-0669.


RB oREoNT


_'WOOD
RETIREMENT COMMUNITY


to visit and tour our beautiful campus
-both independent and assisted living apartments
providing many amenities and services...
Senior retirement Residence Apartments
Month to Month Rentals
Preference of Studio or One or Two bedroom Apartments
Patio for Easy Access to Outdoors
Fine Dining Country Store Library Pool Jacuzzi Beauty & Barber Shop
Housekeeping/Laundry Transportation Planned Programs, Activities, Outings


SAVVY
Continued from Page G5
Other options
If your mom has financial resources of
her own, find out if she can afford to pay
you herself. If she agrees, it may be a good
idea for both of you to draft a short written
contract detailing your work and payment
arrangements. Or, if your mom has long-
term care insurance that includes in-home
care coverage, in some cases those benefits
can be used to pay you.
Tax breaks
The IRS may also be able to help you out
if you can show that you pay at least half of
your mother's yearly expenses, and her an-
nual income was below $3,650 in 2009 (not
counting Social Security). If so, you can
claim her as a dependent on your taxes,
and reduce your taxable income by $3,650.
Your mom doesn't have to live with you to
qualify as a dependent. IRS Publication
501 see www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf
or call (800) 829-3676 to get a copy mailed to
you has a worksheet that can help you
with this.
If your mom's income, however, is more
than $3,650, you can't claim her as a depend-
ent But if you're paying at least half her liv-
ing expenses, you can still get a tax break if
you're helping pay her medical and long-
term care costs and they exceed 7.5 percent
of your adjusted gross income.
You can include your own medical ex-
penses in calculating the total. See the IRS


publication 502 (www.irs.gov/pub/irs-
pdf/p502.pdf) for details.
Support services
If you don't qualify for caregivers pay or a
tax break, you can still get some financial re-
lief through the National Family Caregiver
Support Program (NFCSP). This is a feder-
ally funded program that provides aid for
specific caregiver needs like respite care or
adult day care to give you a break, counsel-
ing and support groups, and supplemental
services including the purchase of medical
supplies, SOS emergency response systems
and even home modifications. In addition to
the NFCSP, you should also check into home-
delivered meal programs, volunteer com-
panion programs and even home and
personal care services. These, too, can
lighten your load. To locate all the various
programs and support services near you,
contact your Area Agency on Aging. Call the
Eldercare Locator at (800).677-1116 to get
your local number or visit
www.eldercare.gov.
Savvy tip
The best Web resource to search for care-
giver support services and programs in your
area is the Family Caregiver Alliance at care-
giver.org. When you get there, click on "Fam-
ily Care Navigator," or call (800) 445.8106.
----N-
Send your senior questions to: Savvy
Senior, PO. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070,
or visit SavvySenior .org Jim Miller is a
contributor to the NBC "Today" show and
author of "The Savvy Senior" book


[211S. popk Av ., I ver ess ww .Inv rne s~eaing com


SENIOR STYLE


Saturday, July 17, 20 10 Q9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLF







G10 Saturday, July 17, 2010

TALK
Continued from Page G3
Just wondering. Maybe it's a conspiracy?
Did you know that in Georgia if a restau-
rant serves iced tea they are required to
serve sweet tea? Yes, it is true, I'm not
making this up. Now, that's a law that
makes me happy!
Back to the peeves. Oh, yes, I hate to
order a hamburger anywhere you have to
put it all together. Half the work of making
a hamburger is putting it all together!
I don't like the condiment packets that
you have to rip open, either. They usually
give you these when you have to put your
own hamburger together. The stuff never
goes where it is supposed to, even if you
can actually get them open. (Hence, the
mustard stain on my good pants.) Along the
same lines, I hate it when people open the
package with their teeth! Yuk! I've actually
had people (family members) snatch one
from my hand and say, "Here, let me do
that!" They proceed to open it with their
teeth. That leaves me with a real dilemma.
There is no way I would use that ketchup
in that package! No way! I can't hurt their
feelings, so what now? Usually I will just
"accidentally" drop it on the floor or some-
thing.
You see what I mean: If you have to put
your own hamburger together, it just leads


WATCHER
Continued from Page G4
speak on how to improve
our memories. He failed to
show up because someone
forgot to remind him.
Madison Monroe didn't
appreciate winning the
worst female impersonator
contest. She threatens to
sue the person who submit-
ted her name when she
finds out who it was.
Arnold Sublicker is upset
when he learned Medicare
wouldn't pay for his motor-
ized conveyance. They told
him that golf carts don't fall
into the prescribed cate-
gory
Speaking of golf carts, we
need to remind people
again that the handicap
parking isn't for golf carts.
So please be considerate.
Congratulations to
Wilbur Winters on being
Whatcher Point's most eli-
gible bachelor. As we all
know, Wilbur is quite mod-
est. He claims his only qual-
ification is that he has a
pulse.


CiIRS I COLN'IY (FL) CHRONICLED


to a whole set of problems. I mean, if the
cook would just put it together in the first
place ...
I don't like a cheeseburger with cold
cheese on it either. Yuk! A cheeseburger is
supposed to have melted cheese on it!
How about butter served cold? Can't
spread it. Makes a hole in your bread. Not
good.
Pill packages you can't open! You know,
the ones you have to break open or punch
out. That tics me off'! Especially when I re-
ally, really need to get into it in a hurry
Then instead of coming out when you
punch them, they roll under the seat next
to you. Then you have to start all over
again! Yipes!
Can't stand to watch people lick their fin-
gers, especially when they are getting
ready to serve cake or any other foods to
others. Just the thought of licking my fin-
gers makes me gag. Do you know what
could be lurking under your fingernails?
Don't do it!
But a lot of things do make me happy and
we'll talk about those next time! Until then,
remember that "laughter is the best medi-
cine!"

Mary Alice Tillman, executive director at
Brentwood Retirement Community in
Lecanto, can be reached at
mtillman9@tampabay.rrcom.


Loretta Olds is
head of the
neighborhood
watch program
and is not,
repeat, not the
neighborhood
witch.


Management refuses to
replace the clubhouse ta-
bles and chairs that were
raffled off to buy a new
bingo display. A full-time
guard has been hired to
keep an eye on the pool fur-
niture. Myrtle Pearl, self-
appointed spokesperson for
the park, denied accusa-
tions that someone goofed
because no one thought to
raffle off the pool furniture
first.
And, finally, another
apology needs to be offered.
This one's for Loretta Olds


for a small mistake made on
the bulletin board. Loretta
is head of the neighborhood
watch program and is not,
repeat, not the neighbor-
hood witch. Any reference
to Loretta having training
wheels on her broom will
most certainly inspire more
litigation.
Remember to take your
meds. Until next time, stay
healthy.

Larry Elsenheimer and his
wife of 41 years, Kathleen,
live in Homosassa. Before
moving here, they lived
five years in a retirement
community where he
served as vice president
for a year and president for
two years of a homeowners
association. He also called
bingo and was privileged to
host Friday morning
coffees. It is from his
experiences and folks he
met that he draws the
ideas for the "Whatcher
Point Community
Newsletter" The names
have been changed to
prevent lawsuits.


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Cimus Gou,-'ny (FL) CHRONICLE SENIOR STYLE Saturday, July 17, 2010 Gil


STYLE
Continued from Page G7
That included volumes of
memories he had been writ-
ing about his childhood.
About five years ago he
started writing again.
SON
Mrs. Trimmer, 86, origi-
nally came from Delaware.
"George and I were
friends 30 years ago," she
said. "Both of our spouses
died the same week and we
were consoling each other."
Mrs. Trimmer had been
married for 58 years to a
Navy man. They had moved
26 times, one of those times
to Longwood, Fla., in the
same neighborhood as
Trimmer and his late wife.
"Our kids became very
best friends from eighth
grade on," Mrs. Trimmer
said.
"I had a powder blue Lin-
coln Continental, and when
Bunny's daughter got mar-
ried she came to me and
asked me if she and her
husband could have the
Continental for their honey-
moon," Trimmer said,
laughing.
"I was so mad at her!"
Mrs. Trimmer said.
"Pete (Bunny's late hus-
band) was a
gourmet
cook, a true
gourmet, so someboc
Bunny didn't .
cook very airport
much," Trim- take h
mer said. a
"He'd some- and ply I
times follow
me when I
was on the
road. At one
time I had three houses in
Florida because I traveled
so much ...Pete would stop
by and spend a couple days
with me and I always wel-
comed those visits because
I knew I was going to get
fed."
Mrs. Trimmer and her
late husband moved to Cali-
fornia and then to North
Carolina to be near their
first grandchild. Pete died
and Trimmer's wife died
within three days of each
other.
"We didn't know that at
the time, because I hadn't


"", ,F


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle


The Noguchi table and Harry Bertoia bird chair are two of
the prized pieces in the Trimmers' collection.


been in touch with George
for a long time," Mrs. Trim-
mer said.
"I sent her a letter, be-
cause I knew her husband
and she met my wife be-
fore," Trimmer said. 'And a
year later we got married."
They had spent the year
e-mailing each other, then

lere's how you impr


fish san
dered a
she rer
Trimme
"We
never lo
They
olina a
mer's
days.

ess


ly: You pick her up at the
, flash her a smile, then
.r over to Margaritaville
er with margaritas.
George Trirnmmer

Trimmer bought a round- roller s
trip ticket for Bunny to visit they're u
and she never used the gether,
return ticket, now bei
"Here's how you impress "He
somebody," Trimmer said. when I
"You pick her up at the air- school!"
port, flash her a smile, then laughing
take her over to Margari- younger
taville and ply her with mar- Isn't thai
garitas." "Well,
That was a memorable mer add
night for both of them, since our luck
Mrs. Trimmer didn't drink Chron
and didn't realize how po- Kenned.
tent a frosty margarita could 564-2927
be. nkenne
Tipsy, she gobbled up the line.com


.dwich they had or-
md that's about all
members, although
:r remembers.
came home and
oked back," he said.
drove to North Car-
id sold Mrs. Trim-
house within two
They married
Oct. 15, 2005, with
all their combined
children present at
the house they now
share.
At this stage in
their lives, they're
currently downsiz-
ing their posses-
sions, including
Trimmer's many
collections from
kates to art. But
ipsizing their fun to-
despite Trimmer
ng in a wheelchair.
was 10 years old
vas graduating high
Mrs. Trimmer said,
9. "I'm only 12 years
than his mother!
t funny?"
it's worked," Trim-
[ed. "And we thank
y stars every day."
icle reporter Nancy
y can be reached at
7 or
dy@chronicleon-
1.


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Saturday, July 17, 2010 G11


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SENIOR STYLE









PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Are You Living With Sciatica Or Back Pain

... When There Is A Non-Invasive,

Drugless Solution?


Having back and sciatic pain is a
miserable even crippling condition.

You might not be able to play golf,
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minute drive. It's almost impossible for
anyone around you to understand how
you feel. You can't remember the last
time you even had a restful night's
sleep.

You may have a condition called
"Sciatica" if you're suffering from any
of these annoying conditions. Sciatica is
a compression of the sciatic nerve,
usually by an L4 or L5 disc hemiations.

Nothing's worse than feeling great
mentally, but physically feeling held
back from life because your back or
sciatica hurts and the pain just won't go
away!

Do You Have Any
of the Following?
0 Sharp pains in theback of the leg
E] Lower Back Pain
D Herniated/bulging discs
ED Numbness or soreness in
your legs
E[ Shooting hip or thigh pain
El Muscle spasm, sprains & strains


Fortunately, if you are suffering from
any of these problems, they may be
relieved or eliminated with chiropractic
adjustments.

"What's The Chance
This Will Work For Me?"

Chiropractic has been around for over a
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help everyone from tiny babies to the
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Even top sports star and entertainers ...
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These professional athletes have the
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Here's what some of the top medical
researchers had to say about
chiropractic ...

"Manipulation [chiropractic
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improved symptoms more than medical
care did after both 3 and 12 months."-
British Medical Journal

"Chiropractor's manipulation of the
spine was more helpful than any of the
following: traction, massage,
biofeedback, acupuncture, injection of
steroids into the spine and back corsets,
and ultrasound." Stanley Bigos, MD,
Professor of Orthopedic Surgery

This means in just a matter of weeks
you could be back on the golf course,
enjoying your love life, or traveling
again.

Feel the Improvement and
Say "Yes" to Life Again

With my "Back Pain And Sciatica
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problem and then correct it.

Think of how you'll feel in just a few
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See and feel your life change for the
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pain-free, normal living. Feel tight
joints rest, relax, free up. Feel muscles
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As you begin to see motion returning to
your joints, you're preventing and
reducing chances of disability and a
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The Single Most Important Solution
To Your Sciatica and Back Pain


It's time for you to find out if
chiropractic will be your sciatic
and back pain solution. |

For 10 days only, $49 will get you all
the services I normally charge new
patients $150 for!

What does this offer include?
Everything I normally do in my new
patient evaluation.

[ An in-depth consultation about your
health and well-being where I will listen
"really listen" to the details of your
case.

El A complete neuromuscular
examination.

El A thorough analysis of your exam
and x-ray findings (if necessary) so we
can start mapping out your plan to being
pain free.

El I'll provide answers to your
questions,
like ...

... the best nutritional supplements
proven to help with joint problems.

... which position, mattress, and pillow
you should use for a good night's rest.

... the foods that can help you and
which ones can make you worse.

... how to exercise the right way so you
aren't making your pain worse.

Don't Let Your Sciatica Get Worse

Tim Mick, DC, an associate professor
and chair of the Department of
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"Untreated, sciatica can lead to a loss
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that may be irreversible. Eventually,
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Sciatica can be successfully treated. You
can recover. Healthy, pain-free living
should be yours.

Call today and we can get started with
your consultation and exam as soon as
there's an opening in the schedule.

Our office is called 7 Rivers
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Tell the receptionist you'd like to come
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I look forward to helping you get rid of
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P.S. You've got too many dreams left
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short to let pain slow you down.

Don't live another day like this. Call
and schedule for your evaluation.
352-794-3824.

OUR NO RISK POLICY: The patient
and any other person responsible for
payments has a right to refuse to pay,
cancel payment or be reimbursed for
payment for any service, examination,
or treatment which is performed as a
result of and within 72 hours of
responding to the advertisement for the
discounted service. Excludes PI, WC,
Medicare, Medicaid or Federal
Insurances.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


G12 Saturday, July 17, 2010


SENIOR STYLE




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