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Citrus County chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01694
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 30, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01694

Full Text





Wimbledon lore: Brit makes


*AUTO*:SCI-l 3-DIGIT 326
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORYILD5'3)12
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


CIT R


TODAY & Wednesday morning l
HIGH Mostly cloudy with nu-
85 merous storms. Chance A
LOW of rain 70 percent.
75 PAGE A4
JUNE 30, 2009 Florida's Best Communityl


COUNTY
JC" U N T Y






www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 504 VO


It's time to buckle up


Strict enforcement ofseat belt law begins today


Wire reports
TALLAHASSEE - Don't expect state
troopers to let you off with just a warning if
they catch you driving with your seat belt un-
buckled when a new law goes into effect today
The Florida Highway Patrol plans to
strictly enforce the law that makes seat belt
violations a primary offense. Police have
been able to ticket unbelted motorists since
1986, but only if stopping them for another
"traffic violation such as speeding.
"We've always had a zero-tolerance policy
r some time and we're gonna continue with


that," said Highway Patrol Lt Chris Miller "If
we do stop you, you can expect a ticket We
.won't be giving any warnings."
Troopers, though, will be passing out in-
formational flyers to motorists on the road at
their public offices to get the word out about
the new law.
"We are committed to educating mo-
torists and modifying driver behavior to en-
sure that they buckle up," said Maj. Ryan
Burchnell, commander of the Florida High-
way Patrol Troop that covers Citrus County,
as well as Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk,
See BUCKLE/Page A5


CHUCK IT OR TICKET
M The cost for a seat belt violation is $30, plus administrative and court costs. For a
child that is not properly restrained, the violation is $60, plus administrative and
court costs.
* Seat belt laws apply to all cars, trucks, SUVs and vans operated on Florida roads.
* All passengers in the front seat must wear a seat belt.
0 All passengers under 18 must wear a seat belt.
* Children 3 and younger must be secured in a
federally approved child-restraint seat.
* Children 4 through 5 must be secured by ei.
their a federally approved child restraint seat or
safety belt.,
* The driver is responsible for buckling up the child.
- . . . Source: www.dn iflorida.orp/seat-belt-laws.shtml


Blessing the cross


ABOVE: Father Jim
Simeonidis blesses the
cross placed Monday
atop the new sanctuary
under construction at
Archangel Michael
Greek Orthodox Church
in Lecanto. Site foreman
Doug Riley, of Elder
Construction, at right,
said the church should
be completed in about
six weeks.
RIGHT- Church
members Nancy
Pontlcos, left,
Valerie Torres, and
Stephania Torres, 6,
watch the cross being
hoisted onto the new
sanctuary. Construction
on the $1.5 million
church began in
September 2007.
BRIAN LaPETER Cr,,..,r,,:i,,


Murder


trial set


to begin

19-year-old faces

life in prison
TAYLOR PROVOST
Chronicle
Jury selection is set to begin at
8:30 a.m. Monday for the trial of a 19-
year-old Beverly Hills man accused
of murdering an 18-year-old man
from Pine Ridge.
Christopher Muzzi was charged,
with first-degree, premeditated
murder with a
firearm and rob-
bery with a
firearm. He 'ccs,
life in prison At
Muzzi's pre-trial
hearing, Assistant
State Attornev
Pete Magrino said
everything would Christopher
be ready for the Muizi
trial by Monday had a pre-trial
and the only po- hearing on
tential hold-up Monday.
would be one last
deposition scheduled for Monday
afternoon.
On Oct. 15, 2008, Benjamin Fee
was found dead from a gunshot
wound inside his Jeep on the side of
the road near his home, according
to the Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
Muzzi was linked to the crime scene
by fingerprints on Fee's car and by a
gun later turned in as evidence.
Ifieuzzi's trial is delayed, Judge
Richard "Ric" Howard said, the
jury selection will begin for the trial
of 66-year-old Ronald Counts, who
was charged with arson, attempted
first-degree murder with a firearm
and aggravated stalking. Counts'
court-appointed attorney, Assistant
Public Defender Joseph Sowell,
said he was still waiting for forensic
evidence reports to come in but that
the trial would be ready to begin on
July 6 or after Muzzi's trial com-
pleted.
On May 12, 2008, Counts' ex-wife
woke up in her Homosassa home to
the sound ofgunshots. Realizing her
house was on fire, she tried to get
out of bed, collapsing on the floor
because she had been shot in the
leg, a sheriff's office arrest report
said.


Rate cases loom before county authority


Rolling Oaks, Meadows want to raise fees to offset upgrades


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The county's water and waste-
water authority is faced Monday
with two significant rate cases
that bring along identical staff


recommendations: Delay them.
Both the Rolling Oaks Utilities
Inc. and Meadows Utilities Inc.
rate cases should be continued
for different reasons, according
to a staff report with the Office of
Utility Regulation.
Both utilities are requesting


rate increases to pay for im-
provements to their systems. In
the Meadows case, requested in-
creases for combined water and
sewer users could top 100 per-
cent
Meadows, which serves about
144 homes in a small develop-


ment with the same name off
Grover Cleveland Boulevard, is
having its second review for pro-
posed new rates.
The staff-assisted rate study,
conducted by consultant Burton &
Associates, recommended in-
creases about 20 percent to 25 per-
cent below the company's original
recommendations in late March.
See RATE/Page A4


UWHAT: Citrus i
County Water
and Wastewater
Authority meeting.
*WHEN:
Monday,
July 6.
UWHERE: Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, Room 166.
RON THE AGENDA:
3 p.m., Rolling Oaks Utilities
rate case; 6 p.m., Meadows
Utilities rate case.


Comics .......................C7
Editorial .....................A16
Horoscope .................C6
Lottery Numbers ............B4
Lottery Payouts ..............B6
Movies ..........................C7
Obituaries ....................A6
Stocks ..........................A14
TV Listings.....................C6


Part of the clan
An AP poll finds many people
consider pets family./Page Cl


Honduras uproar
Countries denounce coup, but leaders defiant./Page A17

Help others Find a way to help the homeless./Page A16

Billy Mays Heart attack, not head trauma, likely./Page A6

Drug disposal Drop off old prescriptions./Page C4


Going up ...
SRising oil, commodity
' prices pull stocks
higher as second
\ quarter nears a
| close./Page A15


6 8145 78 20025 5


Lub /B1









LUME 114 ISSUE 327


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PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Bush Pest Control has changed


more than its name.
Over the past few years Bush Pest Control has been evolving into what it has become today.


Rita Johnson
Chronicle

For the past
four generations,
this area has
known and
trusted Bush Pest
Control to provide
quality care for
their home and
yard. Customers
can still count on
the staff of
qualified
technicians to
keep their lawns
green and weed
free, as well as
eliminating pests
both inside and
outside. Bush is
a fully licensed
irrigation
specialist and can
install irrigation systems
for a new development or
expand existing systems to


"The outdoor kitchen and fireplace is tru
meet changing needs. They
are also qualified to repair
any system on the market.
Nothing has changed in the
commitment Bush Pest
Control made when they
opened their doors for
business in Citrus County,
which was to provide
dependable, s ,what
top quality Here
care.


Over the
past few
years;
however,
Bush Pest
Control has
been evolving
into what it has
become today:
Bush Home
Services. Bush
acquired a local
landscaping
company several
years ago and
began adding
landscaping
services to their
resume. With the
recent addition of
Bob Munro to the


staff, Bush added an expert
not only in landscaping, but
also in a popular growing
trend of
water
features and
fish ponds.
Bush Home
Services is
now creating
total designs
for newhe
-home sites
under
construction,
and also
redesigning
uly a thing of beauty'" theentire
landscape
for existing homes. Bush is
transforming standard
building lots into unique
places of beauty.
Homeowners can add
privacy, create a haven for
birds and

re CUStome has to say


d n uneveloped .I510 0 n ald Wcyn li
V13 ni ~~Ie LAr 191 iiate d ori an W
10C ome It, 13S 1h14m ad
co Ic kven e' %tnrl L)L0g ibal I dmet ad with P(~
conrolClo. n Wce:b,1trdu


, deve cseint\V. us-elg. My 1 the
re 0 SCI " i'~~ p10oce."ed IIXU" all
caseal Wad1'ee n,
Oto~ omtig0 1 u jec e �a~
our I TuIv l . W e " ems and. In elli ent'Od"Cleaig ' c me U
Trie So d ma 9~a hi, de;B19"' hen an
,:Omucts (ov lc 31 leeW d n dO 11


siscereXYS
Th'e aoa'


butterflies, a koi pond
bordering a trellised patio,
or even a fully furnished
summer kitchen and
outdoor living room - the
possibilities are endless.

This evolution continues
into hardscape designs -
patio retaining walls, free
standing walls, and much
more. Bush Home Services
is now
providing
custom
outdoor
living areas
with the best
products on
the market.
Homeowners i
can add
hundreds of
square feet
of living
space to
their home -
Sm "lr) the end, it was
outdoors, with a beautiful Ian
Enjoy the
beauty and weather that
brings people to Florida to
T-.," a-" l i i 0 - TT^__


e, anid let -usII Hiome
services ensure that you


on't be
estered by "Thank,
bugs in the B
y o u r 0 ' u
outdoor Service
living your ou
areas., Comm
From the
routine quality,
care of
your lawn to the
addition of a Mist
Away Misting
System@ - you can
forget about gnats,
A mosquitoes, and
no-see-ums. Let
Bush Home
Services provide
an environment


that allows you to
create your living
space outdoors.

From outdoor
fireplaces and fire
pits, to entire
summer kitchens
with huge grills
with 304SS 6i
burners, and even
refrigerators,
Bush carries the
finest products on
the market.
Discriminating
buyers and
quality conscious
shoppers can tell
' the difference in
products that are
made to perform
and withstand
the extremes of
Florida weather.
Let Bush Home Services
create a carefree dream
space that you can enjoy for
many, many years to come.

Bush Home Services is
also an expert in outdoor
lighting and holiday
lighting designs. Create
beauty and safetywhile you
showcase your home with
outdoor lighting. Add to the


Wade and his design team that came up
dscape and landscape design."


itl
ty


excitement of the holidays
with custom lighting
designs - from traditional
designs to traffic stopping
displays with
Wade and animated
S.-Home lighting
features.
ream for Bush Home
standing Services is
ment to now able to
k, P turn your
work!" dreams into
reality.

You will notice the new
name of Bush Home
Services on their trucks and
uniforms. Let this new
name inspire ideas for you
to enjoy your home even
more - inside and outside.


Everything To Make
The Spaces Outside
Your Home Beautiful!


US

HOME$SERVICES


Financing Available

RET Block InstalersAre CTE ratified

Our Block Installers Are Certified


. Relddscaping * Landscaping & Landscape Design
* Retaining Walls* Landscapetighting * Water Gardens * planting Beds * Pavers * Summer Kitchens * Outdoor Fireplaces
HOMOSASSA 621-7700 * CRYSTAL RIVER 795-8600 * INVERNESS 860-1037* TOLL FREE 877-345-BUSH


A2 TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


r
/
;










SPage A3 -TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


FOOD PROGRAMS
* Find out what low-cost
and free food programs
are available in your
area of Citrus County.
/Page A7


Around
THE STATE

Jacksonville
CSX says it's on track
to cut emissions
Jacksonville-based freight
company CSX Corp. is mov-
ing full-steam ahead with
plans to reduce carbon diox-
ide emissions from its train
operations by the year 2011,
the company said Monday.
CSX, which until recently
had been negotiating a deal
to sell some of its tracks to,
the state for the proposed
SunRail commuter train in
Orlando, said the reductions
will be made because the
company is participating in
the Environmental Protection
Agency's voluntary Climate
Leaders Program.
The company will cut 8
percent of its emissions per
revenue ton mile, it said.

Tallahassee
Advertised jobs jump
in June in Florida
Job vacancies advertised
online were up a bit this
month in Florida, bucking a
national trend of declines,
The Conference Board re-
ported Monday.
Nationally, online labor de-
mand dropped modestly in
June after five months of
sharp declines. But in Florida
and neighboring Georgia
there was a slight bounce
into the positive.
The number of online help
wanted ads for jobs in Florida
jumped by 9,200 from May to
June - by far the largest
gain in the nation.
By contrast, several other
large states saw decreases in
June. The worst was Califor-
nia, which saw a month-over-
morith drop of 15,900 ads.
,Poll: Crist has big
A4 P4ienate race
A new poll shows Republi-
can Gov. Charlie Crist has a
sizable lead in his campaign
for Senate.
A Mason-Dixon Polling &
Research Inc. telephone sur-
vey taken June 24 to 26
shows Grist leading primary
opponent' Marco Rubio by a:
51-23 riargin.
In a general election
matchup with Democratic
U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek,
Crist leads 48-26.
, The poll was conductedlor,.
Ron Sachs Communications,
a Tallahassee-based public
relations firm. It carried a
margin of error of plus or
minus 4 percentage points for
the general election and plus
or minus 6 points for the pri-
mary.

Spring Hill
Main slide at Weeki
Wachee shut down
The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Weeki Wachee Springs State
Park has temporarily shut
down the main water slide."'
Due to necessary repair of
the boards, the slide will be
closed until it is deemed safe
for public use. During the clo-
sure, fees for Buccaneer Bay
will be adjusted to $15 plus
tax for adults and $10 plus
tax for children. All other
areas of the park are open for
use. Visit the Web at
www.floridastateparks.org.
-From wire reports


Schools challenge study


Report: Charters not held accountable


The News Service of Florida
TALLAHASSEE - Charter
school supporters are pushing back
against a new report listing Florida
as among a half-dozen states that
have done little to hold these alter-
native schools accountable.
With the Obama administration
calling for a major expansion of
charter schools to improve the na-
tion's education system, Florida, an
early pioneer of the movement, is
drawing poor marks from the Stan-
ford University study
The report found that only 17 per-
cent of Florida charter schools re-
ported academic gains that top
traditional public schools, while 37
percent showed learning gains that


were worse. Another 46 percent
showed no significant difference.
"The charter school movement
began in church fellowship halls
and around kitchen tables," said
Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceyille, who
sponsored legislation this spring
(S.B. 278) that tightens state over-
sight of charter schools. "I'm a
strong supporter. But I think we are
also taking steps to curb some of the
issues raised."
There are 385 charter schools op-
erating in Florida - one of the
largest concentrations in the nation
- and the number has steadily
risen since the effort's inception
here in 1996.
While most states require charter
schools to operate as nonprofits or


be governed by nonprofit boards,
Florida and several other states
also allow management by for-profit
corporations.
A Florida Senate study last year
showed that schools managed by
for-profits had higher rates of fi-
nancial difficulties.
Charter schools are funded by
taxpayer dollars, students must
take the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Tests, and schools must
also comply with state oversight
regulations. ' ,1
The Stanford study, available at
http://credo.stanford.edu, also
pointed out that:
N African-American,students in
Florida attending charter schools
performed significantly below their
publ ic school counterparts in read-
ing and math, While Hispanic stu-
dents showed' no difference in
performance between public or


Ditching work


DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Charlie Bryan, from Wilburn Construction, digs a trench to run conduit for wiring for lights around the new
sign at Cornerstone Baptist Church in Inverness. Bryan figured he dug more than 80 feet of ditch in the
sweltering Florida heat recently, and probably 300 feet more of trenches around the property to handle
the lighting installation.


County BRIEFS


Water to shut off today Crystal River street
in parts of Inverness culvert repair on hold


In order to complete water line re-
pairs, the city of Inverness Public
Works Department will need to inter-
rupt water service today, in the five-
block area between N. Line Avenue
and Cherry Avenue, from Tompkins
Street north to Little Lake Henderson.
Water will be off from 10 to 11:30
a.m. for the repairs.
For those citizens within the im-
pacted five-block area, precautionary
measures should be taken. Once
water service returns, water to be
used for consumption or cooking
should be boiled until notified other-
wise.
Call 726-2321 for information.


The culvert repair project for North-
east Sixth Avenue between Northeast
Sixth Avenue and Crystal Street
scheduled for this week has been put
on hold until further notice.
Soccer league offering
two youth camps
There is still time to attend either of
the two soccer camps being hosted
by Nature Coast Soccer League this
week or next. Players work with
U.K./U.S. staff and receive T-shirts.
Recreational soccer players can
attend camp from 9:30 a.m. to noon
this week and competitive teams and
players can attend camp from 9:30


a.m. to noon July 6 to 10. The camps
will be at Central Ridge Park off
County Road 491 in Holder.
Reduced prices are available for
the remainder of this week's camp.
Call or e-mail for sign-up forms:
Alan Verone, president, bbva05@
peoplepc.com, 637-1041; or Gary
Morrow at morrowg citrus.k12.fl.us,
563-1534.
NAMI Citrus taking
two-month break
NAMI Citrus is on a two month hia-
tus. The next meeting is scheduled
for Sept. 14. NAMI meets the second
Monday of every month at the Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church on
County Road 486 in Citrus Hills.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.


.Man airlifted following
Dunnellon fight
A Dunnellon man was airlifted to
Shands hospital Saturday night after
he suffered a head injury during an
argument at a party, Heather Yates of
the Citrus County Sheriffs Office said
Monday.
Andrew Frazier was struck in the
head by an unknown assailant who
fled the scene, Yates said, when a
fight broke out Saturday evening be-
tween about 12 to 15 people at a
party on Jay Williams Lane in Dun-
nellon.
Police have nMade any arrests,
but the incident is'still under investi- .
gation.
-From staff reports


charter schools.
* While many students struggled
in their first two years of charter
school education, by year three,
more positive achievement gains
were found.
* The Florida Education Depart-
ment, which has embraced charter
schools as a popular option for
many families, defended the state's
performance and raised questions
about the study's findings.
DOE spokesman Tom Butler said
that just as academic gains tended
to improve the longer students were
in charter schools, the movement's
durability in Florida is important
"After ...years of charter school
sponsorship, districts are doing a
better job of monitoring, providing
assistance where it's needed, and
closing down charter schools that
are not getting the job done for stu-
dents," Butler said.


8 apply


for PSC


openings

The News Service of Florida
TALLAHASSEE--A retired de-
tective, a longtime disc jockey, a
Border Patrol agent and a former
newspaper editorial page editor
are among a handful of people who.
have applied so far to fill two va-
cancies that will come up on the
Florida Public Service Commission
early next year
The nominating commission is
taking applications as it looks to
nominate replacements for
Matthew Carter and Katrina Mc-
Murrian, whose terms are up in
January.
S.The.salary is $130,036. With a July
7.deidline. more applicants are ex-
pected.
The applicants so far are:
* B i lie Calvin Greenlief of Jack-
sonvi lle most recently worked as an
assistant vice president at Bell-
South until last year when he re-
tired. Greenlief's expertise is in
engineering and network planning.
Greenlief also has an MBA.
* John W Myers, 64, retired in
2007 from the Hillsboiough County
Sheriff's Office as a detective, who
mainly worked/investigating miss-
ing children's cases and crimes
against children, including working
the Sabrina Aisenburg, Jessica
Lunsford and Sarah Lunde cases.
* Ja mes D. Kimbrel of Pensacola
is a workers compensation compli-
ance investigator for the Florida
Department of Financial Services.
But for three decades he has been
better knIown as Jim Golden, a radio
personality and musician, working
from town to town up and down the
dial at radio stations in Memphis,
Lou is\i lie. Mobile and Panama City.
* Joseph E; Ward Sr. .served
nearly 30 years of active duty in the
Navy, including duty aboard nu-
clear powered submarines and as a
commanding officer for more than
400 enlisted personnel. Since then,
Ward has worked for the Pensacola
Area Chamber of Commerce and as
a senior deputy court administrator
in Escambia County.
* David Klement of Bradenton is
currently the director of the Insti-
tute for Public Policy and Leader-
ship at the University of South
Florida Sarasota-Manatee campus,
but also spent more than 40 years as
a journalist, mostly as editorial
page editor for the Bradenton Her-
ald. He was also part of a group of
reporters and editors that won a
Pulitzer Prize at the Detroit Free
Press in 1968.
* Roop Ladharamr Khirsukhani
of Jacksonville is an engineer and
vice president with Genco Building
Services, doing plan reviews for
code compliance, among other
things. A civil engineer, Khir-
sukhani has worked in India, New
York, California, Atlanta, Ga., and
Florida on highways, bridges, tun-
nels, rail and buildings.
* Daniel Geoghegan of Cooper
City is a U.S. Border Patrol Agent in
South Florida. Geoghegan, 54, has
also worked for the Border Patrol in
Puerto Rico, Detroit and El Paso,
Texas and for the old Immigration
and Naturalization Service in
Miami and Washington, D.C.
* Carlos Manzano of New York
City is currently the executive di-
rector of an economic development
corporation, the Latin Media and
Entertainment Commission, which
was created by Mayor Michael
Bloomberg.





~ ~ I _ ~ _~_ 11_ I


_ __ ____








CImus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boy, 2, reunited
with his mother
SEMINOLE - Authorities
said a toddler who wandered
barefoot to a stranger's
Tampa Bay home has been
reunited with his mother.
The Pinellas County Sher-
iff's Office said 2-year-old
Marcus Willis and his mother
were visiting from Georgia
and staying at his grandfa-
ther's home.-- -.
On Monday morning,
deputies said the boy walked
to a neighbor's home and
opened the front door. It was
secured with a door chain, but
the homeowner saw the boy's
arm reaching through the
opening:
Marcus' mother, Natasha
Lee Cooper, woke up and
couldn't find her son. She
went outside and found the
news media activity, which led
her to the home where the
boy had wandered.
Authorities said the case re-
mains under investigation.



RATE
Continued from Page Al

Andrew J. Burnham, sen-
ior vice president for Burton
& Associates, recommends
the new rates be phased in
over several years.
He also is recommending
that utility owner Paul La-
Fond provide a detailed in-
ventory of its records to
verify their need for higher
rates.
Burnham also said that
LaFond should try to negoti-
ate their bulk water agree-
ment with Citrus County,
which could also bring about
lower rates. k
Meadows customers al-


Associated Press
Miss Pride-0-Nine Jill St. Claire performs Sunday at the
Streamline Hotel during the Daytona Beach festival pro-
moting gay pride and equality.


Autopsy: Couple died
of natural causes
- ST. AUGUSTINE - The St.
Johns County medical exam-
iner said an elderly St. Johns
County couple found dead in
their Treasure Beach home ap-
parently died of natural
causes.
St. Johns County Sheriff's

ready pay the second-high-
est water and sewer rates in
the county. If the water and
wastewater authority ap-
proves the recommended
*rates, they would be in the
highest rate class.
Someone using 2,000 gal-
lons of water a month would
see combined water/waste-
water bills jump from $61.7g2
to $136.28 - a 123 percent
increase.
- Residents say they cannot
afford the higher rates. They
blame LaFond for overbuild-
ing in the community and
then not having enough
water and sewer capacity to
handle the additional
homes.
. Rolling Oaks is the
county's largest and oldest


Office deputies responded to
the couple's home Sunday
morning after neighbors no-
ticed a foul odor coming from
their home.
The bodies of 80-year-old
Donald Hankey and his 77-
year-old wife were found on
the living room floor.
Foul play is not suspected
and the preliminary autopsy


private utility. Owned by the
Beverly Hills Development
Corp., it has about 5,700
water customers and 4,600
wastewater customers.
Rolling Oaks rates are the
lowest in the county: $6.19 a
month base rate for water
and $11.16 a month base for
sewer The consultant's rec-
ommendation is to . raise
water rates by 12 percent
and sewer rates by 3.4 per-
cent
Residents who oppose the
increase have asked the
Florida Public Counsel to in-
tervene. The Tallahassee-
based government office
represents citizens in utility
rate cases.
A staff attorney with the
Public Counsel's office is


showed both suffered heart atV
tacks.
Toxicology results are still
pending.
Man electrocuted
trying to grab fruit
OAKLAND PARK - Au-
thorities said a South Florida
man has died after being
electrocuted while trying to
knock mangoes from a tree.
The Broward Sheriff's Of-
fice said 43-year-old
Thanhkim Giang was attempt-
ing to knock the fruit down
from a friend's tree early Mon-
day morning.'He was trying to
get the fruit with a 23-foot alu-
minum pole that hit a high-
voltage wire, electrocuting
him.
Giang was pronounced
dead at the hospital.
Authorities said 40-year-old
Day Giang was injured when
she tried to push her husband
away from the live wire. She
was taken to the hospital and
is expected to survive.
- From wire reports


asking the Citrus County au-
thority to delay the Rolling
Oaks case one month to give
him time to review the rate
study.
John Patton, president of
Rolling Oaks, is asking the
delay be denied. He noted
that Rolling Oaks has filed
for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
and a "major component" of
the company's reorganiza-
tion plan includes a rate in-
crease.
However, representatives
of several community groups
in Beverly Hills support the
one-month delay.
Charles Howard, opera-
tions manager for Citrus
County Utility Regulation, is
recommending the authority
grant the one-month delay.


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrests
* Paul Samuel Moffat, 46,
of 5195 W. Cardamon Place,
Lecanto, at 1:10 a.m. Sunday
on a charge of driving under
the influence. The arrest oc-
curred at the intersection of
County Road 480 and U.S. 98.
According to the arrest report,
Moffat had a blood alcohol
concentration of .192 percent;
the legal limit in Florida is .08
percent. Bond $500.
* David Charles Frays, 44,
of 108 Pine St., Homosassa,
at 3:30 p.m. Sunday on
charges of driving under the in-
fluence, driving while license
suspended, canceled or re-
voked and refusing to submit a
sobriety test. The arrest oc-
curred near the intersection of
U.S. 19 and Mayo Drive. Bond
$1,250.
Other arrests
* Ricky F. Knight, 46, of
6870 S. Finale Point, Ho-
mosassa, at 6:39 p.m. Friday
on charge of aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weapon
without intent to kill. Bond
$5,000.
* Brandon L. Ratlif, 25, of
2308 Weber St., Lakeland, at
3:18 a.m. Saturday, on a war-
"rant, on a charge of aggra-
vated assault with a deadly
weapon without intent to kill.
No bond.
* James Lemar Boying-
ton, 49, of 24 S.E. 278th St.,


Cross City, at 8:58 p.m. Satur-
day on charges of theft and
driving while license sus-
pended, canceled or revoked.
Bond $12,000.
* Richard John Wamser,
56, at large, of Inverness, at
1:08 p.m. Sunday on a charge
of trespassing on other prop-
erty after warning. Bond $500.
* Jonathan Loganwesley
Spell, 27, of 20705 Chestnut
St., Dunnellon at 2:47 p.m.
Sunday on a charge of driving
while license suspended, can-
celed or revoked, habitual traf-
fic offender. Bond $2,000.
* Paul.Allen Clem, 39, of
5124 S. Elm Ave., Homosassa,
at 7:35 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of battery. Bond $500.
*, Jonathan Michael
Knouff, 26, of 11947 W. Bald
Eagle Court, Crystal River, at
10:50 p.m. Sunday on a
charge of driving while license
suspended, canceled or re-
voked, knowingly. Bond $250.
* Larry Oscar Nunnery,
38, of 1991 County Club Blvd.,
at 3:44 a.m. Monday on a
charge of battery. Bond $500.
* Richard H. Goodfellow,
43, of 7859 E. Wooded Trail,
Inverness, at 2:17 p.m. Mon-
day on a charge of workman's
compensation fraud. Bond
$2,000.
- Joe Edwin Rogers, 48, of
5 Stokesia Court S., Ho-
mosassa, at 3:18 p.m. Mon-
day, on a warrant, on a charge
of trespassing. Bond $500.


ON THE NET
* For more information about arrests made by the Cit.
rus County Sheriff's Office, go to www.sheriffcitrus.
org and click on the Public Information link, then on
Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Developments" show from the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office at www.chronicle
online.tv.
* For the Record reports are also archived online at
www.chronicleonline.com.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key.West -
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


West-southwest winds from 10 to 20
knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters a moderate chop. Scattered
� showers and thunderstorms today.


NA NA NA . 89 76 0.20

THREE DAY OUTLOOKforecast by
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 85 Low: 75
Showers and thunderstorms likely,
some heavy.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
-'.High: 87 Low: 74
'd 'T ' Showers and thunderstorms, some sunshine


THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 73
Scattered thunderstorms


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts


Gulf water
temperature


na
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.83 28.73 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.78 33.80 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.42 .35.45 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.44 38.53 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage-for lakes are based.on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages,arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 90/77
Record 100/64
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 84
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Monday , 0.38 in.
Total for the month 12.18 in.
Total for the year 30.90 in.
Normal for the year 23.74 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.78 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 75
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 62%
POLLEN COUNT**
-Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
**Light - only extreme allergic will show symp-
_loms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants,
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/30 TUESDAY 12:45 6:56 1:08 7:19
7/1 WEDNESDAY 1:27 7:39 1:51 8:03


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
C Al--,, SUNSET TONIGHT......................8:33 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.................6....6:36 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ...........................2:53 P.M.
JY 15 JLY 21 JUlY 28 MOONSET TODAY .....................1:27 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

WATERING RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under Iwo acres in size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10'a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:28 a/7:57 a 12:28 p/9:24 p
Crystal River" 10:49 a/5:19 a --- /6:46 p
Withlacoochee* 8:36 a/3:07 a 10:06 p/4:34 p
Homosassa"* 11:38 a/6:56 a - /8:23 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
1:58 a/8:51 a" 1:19p/10:40
12:19 a/6:13 a 11:40 a/8:02 p
9:27 a/4:01 a 11:36 p/5:50 p
1:08 a/7:50 a 12:29 p/9:39 p


AST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
Albany 80 65 .01 ts 78 64
Albuquerque 90 '61 pc 90 67
Asheville 81 66 s 82 57
Atlanta 95 74 s 90 68 -
Atlantic City 85 62 pc 80 64
Austin 10572 pc 93 72
Baltimore 84 62 ts 85 63
Billings 91 61 ts 92 59
Birmingham 90 73 pc 93. 64
Boise , 93 61 s 90 54
Boston 75 61 .45 ts 68 60
Buffalo 77 59 ts 67 57
Burlington, VT 69 63 .60 ts 76 65
Charleston, SC 94 76 s 92 74
Charleston, WV 83 60 ts 75 58
Charlotte 89 71 . s 90 64
Chicago 77 63 sh 69 55
Cincinnati 83 65 c 75 56
Cleveland 80 60 ts 66 56
Columbia, SC 95, 74 s 94 66
Columbus, OH 83 65 ts 71 54
Concord, N.H. 73 62 1.07 ts 75 59
Dallas 90 77 pc 96 73
Denver 89 55 pc 92 60
Des Moines 86 61 s 78 56
Detroit ,78 60 sh 67 56
El Paso 90 68 .09 pc 94 71
Evansville, IN 90 65 pc 81 60
Harrisburg 83 62 . .03 ts 79 61
Hartford 84 65 ts 82 63
Houston 101 80 ts 94 76
Indianapolis 83 63 sh 73 56
Jackson 95 74 pc 95 66
Las Vegas 10883 pc 105 83
Little Rock 92 70 pc 95 68
Los Angeles 69 60 s 74 63
Louisville 85 66 pc 81 62
Memphis 93 72 pc 95 70
Milwaukee 74 64 sh 66 54
Minneapolis 74 62 c 73 55
Mobile 98 77 .53 pc 96 73
Montgomery 95 76 pc 96 69
Nashville 88 62 pc 87 62
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair, h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=raln/snow mix;'s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=wlndy.
@2009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 97 77 .01 pc 93 77
New York City 81 65 ts 83 65
Norfolk 87 69 pc 90 70
Oklahoma City 91 67 pc 92 68
Omaha 88 59 s 82 58
Palm Springs 11082 s 109 80
Philadelphia 86 65 ts 86 66
Phoenix 10888 pc 106 85
Pittsburgh 79 58 ts 68 55
Portland, ME 63 56 .38 sh 67 57
Portland, Ore 78 53 s 81 55
Providence, R.I. 76 65 .15 ts 79 64
Raleigh 92 73 s 92 64
Rapid City 90 52 .03 pc 86 61
Reno 96 63 pc 97 64
Rochester, NY 78 57 ts 72 57
Sacramento 10865 s 101 62
St. Louis 91 66 pc 81 61
St. Ste. Marie 65 55 .21 sh 61 51
Salt Lake City 95 62 pc 94 68
San Antonio 10478 pc 94 74
San Diego 72 64 s 78 67
San Francisco 69 55 ' s 69 54
Savannah 97 76 s 95 72
Seattle 73 49 s 74 51
Spokane 81 51 s 82 52
Syracuse 77 63 .04 ts 74 56
Topeka 92 65 s 87 61
Washington 86 66 ts 85 65
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 113 Bullhead City, Ariz.
LOW 34 Yellowstone Lake, Wyo.
WORLD CITIES'
TUESDAY Lisbon 82/61/pc
CITY H/L/SKY London 81/60/pc
Acapulco 87/76/ts Madrid 93/67/pc
Amsterdam 78/58/pc Mexico City 72/53/ts
Athens 85/65/pc Montreal 79/60/sh
Beijing 93/67/pc Moscow 77/61/pc
Berlin 77/59/ts Paris 82/59/pc
Bermuda 84/74/ts Rip 78/65/s
Cairo 100/73/s Rome 80/62/sh
Calgary 78/50/sh Sydney 65/47/c
Havana 88/75/ts Tokyo 81/69/ts
Hong Kong 89/77/ts Toronto 68/53/sh
Jerusalem 88/68/s Warsaw 79/58/ts


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MJY 7


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State won't appeal campaign law ruling


Lawmaker criticizes secretary of state


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - Florida won't
appeal a federal judge's decision
that struck down a law he said un-
constitutionally limited political
free speech.
Secretary of State Kurt Browning
initially had said he would appeal
but has since changed his mind,
spokeswoman Jennifer Krell Davis
said Monday.
The stricken "electioneering com-
munications" law required nonpo-
litical organizations to register with


(the state, submit financial reports
and comply with other regulations if
they do so much as mention candi-
dates or issues in publications and
on Web sites, even without taking
sides.
The ruling does not affect other
laws regulating campaign and polit-
ical committees that advocate for or
against candidates or ballot issues.
Letting the decision stand will
give the Legislature more flexibility
if it wants to revisit the issue, Davis
said.
State Sen. Charlie Justice, D-St


Petersburg, issued a statement crit- Institute lawyer Bert Gall said
icizing Browning's refusal to Browning's decision was an
appeal, saying it "will essen- - acknowledgment that U.S.
tially allow shadow organi-- District Judge Stephan
zations to funnel millions of Mickle ruled correctly
dollars to political cam- & -n Mickle wrote that the Legis-
paigns without regulation or . lature has the power to reg-
disclosure." late elections but not
Justice's legislative aide, "purely political discus-
Bethany Linderman, said he sions about elections."
was looking at all his options Kurt "In America, the right to
including new legislation. Browning free speech means that the
The Institute for Justice, a has said he government cannot make it
libertarian legal organiza- won't appeal harder for some groups to
tion based in Arlington, Va., judge's ruling. speakbecause it doesn't like
challenged the law on be- what they have to say," Gall
half of four nonprofit groups and said.
their leaders. He said Mickle's ruling is part of a


growing body of case law question-
ing regulations such as Florida's
that have flourished since the U.S.
Supreme Court upheld the federal
McCain-Feingold law, the popular
name for 2002 revisions to the na-
tion's campaign finance law.
Gall sued on behalf of the
Broward Coalition of Condomini-
ums, Homeowners Associations and
Community Organizations; Univer-
sity of Florida College Libertarians;
National Taxpayers Union and na-
tional Taxpayers Union Foundation.
Mickle granted a preliminary in-
junction in October that prevented
the law from being enforced and
then issued a final ruling in May.


Crist signs investor
protection bill
MIAMI - Gov. Charlie Crist
has signed a new law de-
signed to strengthen Florida's
investor protection law.
Crist held a signing cere-
mony Monday as a judge in
New York sentenced Bernard
Madoff, who once owned a
Palm Beach mansion, to
spend the rest of his life in
prison for swindling billions
from investors including many
Floridians.
The new law will broaden
the state's ability to pursue se-
curities fraud and increases,
registration requirements for
investment advisers, dealers
and others.
Attorney General Bill Mc-
Collum was on hand for the
ceremony in Miami.
McCollum said the new law
will give his office the power to
participate in civil investiga-
tions and help protect Floridi-
ans "from another Bernie
Madoff-type scheme."
Police chief's wife
offered plea deal
FORT LAUDERDALE -An
attorney for the wife of the Fort
Lauderdale police chief said
she was given two weeks to
accept a plea deal or face trial.
Attorney David Bogen-
schutz said Eleanor Adderley
was given the July 13 plea
deadline at a hearing Monday


morning. Authorities said she
is accused of shooting a bullet
at her husband, Police Chief
Frank Adderley, while he was
lying in bed in July 2008.
She faces a 20-year mini-
mum sentence for'two felony
charges of aggravated assault
with a firearm and shooting
into a dwelling.
Adderley posted $25,000
bond in 2008.
Bogenschutz didn't immedi-
ately return a telephone call
from The Associated Press
during business hours.
Woman found
dead in home
TAMARAC -Authorities
say a woman facing.eviction
was found dead after barricad-
ing herself inside her South
Florida home.
SWAT team members from
the Broward Sheriffs Office
were called Monday afternoon
to try and speak with the
woman in the Tamarac home.
Bank personnel and amov-
ing van arrived at the house at
about 1 p.m. to evict the
woman. Officials say she told
them she needed to secure her
dogs and went back inside the
house. That's when the group
outside heard a gunshot.
SWAT members went into
the home around 4 p.m. and
found the woman dead with a
gunshot wound to the head.
The woman has hot been
- From wire reports


BUCKLE
Continued from Page Al

Pasco, Hernando and Sumter
counties, in a .news release.
"However, we will continue
our policy of zero tolerance for
violators. The Florida High-
way Patrol does not give warn-
ings for safety belt violations."
Motorists can be ticketed if
either they or their front seat
passengers fail to buckle up.
All passengers younger than
18 also are required to wear
seat belts regardless of where
they are sitting.
The penalty is a $30 fine,
plus administrative and court
costs.
Backers said during debate
over the seat belt bill this
spring that it Would prevent
124 traffic deaths and more
than 1,700 accident injuries in
Florida per year. Kevin
Bakewell, senior Vice Presi-
dent of AAAAuto Club South,
said Monday that when a sim-
ilar measure was passed re-
cently in Tennessee, the
organization's projections
were quickly surpassed.
"When we did this in Ten-
nessee, which is a much
smaller state, we projected
saving about 95 lives, but in
the first year there were 130
less traffic deaths," Bakewell
said.
Bakewell added that the
law is going into effect at the
beginning of a week that will
end with 30 million people
hitting the highway for the
July 4 holiday weekend.
Most state laws go into ef-


fect on July 1, the first day of
the new budget year, or on
Oct. 1, the start of the fiscal
year for the federal govern-
ment and many cities and
counties.
The seat belt law, though, is
going into effect todayto meet
a federal grant deadline. As a
result, Florida will qualify for
up to $35 million in federal
highway safety money.
Congress in 2005 offered
the grants as an incentive for,
states to adopt primary en-
forcement laws. To qualify, a
state must enact such a law by
June 30,2009, and begin issu-
ing citations by Sept. 30, 2009.
Florida is one of 30 states,
the District of Columbia,
Puerto Rico and four other
U.S.. territories that have
passed primary enforcement
laws, according to the Na-
tional Highway Traffic Safety,
Administration.
The Florida statute .is
known as the Dori Slosberg
and Katie Marchetti Safety,
Belt Law in memory of two
young women killed in acci-
dents while not wearing their
seat belts.


Dori Slosberg's father, Irv
Slosberg, is a former state
lawmaker from Boca Raton
who ran for the Florida
House in 2000 because of his
14-year-old daughter's death.
He sponsored the seat belt
bill arid other highway safety
measures until 2006. He ran
for the Florida Senate that
year but lost in the Demo-
cratic primary.
Katie Marchetti's parents,
who are from the Tampa Bay
area, also have been leaders
in the effort to get such a law
passed.
"It's kind of sad when you
think about all the lives that
could have been saved over
the years, but it's better late
than never," said Nan Rich,
D-Weston, about the law.
"It only took 20 years of try-
ing," Rich said of the new seat
belt rules, but the results of
primary _ enforcement af-
forded by the Dori Slosberg
and Katie Marchetti Safety
Belt Law will be felt as soon
as the clock strikes midnight
and Tuesday begins, she said.
"More people, will wear
seatbelts and that will result


in lives being saved and a re-
duction of medical costs,"
Rich said. "I think we'll see
the impact immediately with
the first crash of somebody
who wouldn't have been
wearing a seat belt but is now
because of this law."
It's been a struggle because
some opponents argued po-
lice would be prone to sin-
gling out racial and ethnic
minorities for tickets.
Others said it would in-
fringe on individual liberties.
That philosophy led to the re-
peal in 2000 of a similar re-
quirement for adult
motorcyclists to wear helmets.


787982 �h -" *' *


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TUEDAY - CTRUECriN0'(FL2CROCL


Obituaries


Stephen
Bickel, 76
INGLIS
Stephen Bickel, 76, of In-
glis, died June 26, 2009, at
his residence, under the lov-
ing care of his family and
friends.
Stephen was born Decem-
ber 8, 1932, in Chicago, IL.
He served in the U.S. Army.
He moved to Citrus County
in 1974 from Wilmot, WI.
Stephen established, owned
and operated "Trader Ed's
Statuary" in Crystal River.
He loved being outdoors, es-
pecially when he could
spend time on or in the
water. He loved sweets of
any kind but particularly
enjoyed spending time with
his favorite "Sweetie," Mary
Bickel, who preceded him
in death five days earlier.
Stephen was preceded in
death by his son, Arthur
John Bickel; his first wife,
Loretta Drop; his second
wife, Mary "Sweetie"
Livezey; and his brother,
Edward Bickel. Survivors
include his sons, Stephen
Leo Bickel Jr., of Crystal
River, FL, Richard Livezey
and Joseph Livezey; daugh-


ters, Chris Rosenbaum of Hernando, FL. Arrange-
Inverness, FL, Kathleen ments by Heinz Funeral
Livezey Vess, Cindy Livezey Home & Cremation, Inver-
and Lory Livezey; sister, ness.
Carol Swanson, son-in-law
Ken Swanson; grandchil-
dren, Jennifer McKinsey,
Stephen Brussel and Syble
Symka; and great-grandchil-
dren, Alexis Presley and
Ethan Brussel. Ralph
A Memorial Service will Drake, 81
be held Wednesday, July 1, INVERNESS
2009, at the Bickel resi-
dence. The family will re- Mr. Ralph L. Drake, age
ceive friends starting at 5:30 81, of Inverness, Florida,
p.m. with the service to start died Monday, June 29, 2009,
at 6:30 p.m. In lieu of flow- in Inverness, FL.
ers, the family suggests me- He was born September 6,
morals be sent in Stephei's '1927, in Cleveland, OH, son
name to Hospice of Citri s' of Ralph and Sophia Drake.
County, PO. Box 641270, Bev- He was an Army veteran,
early Hills, FL 34464. serving during WWII. He
Arrangements by Heinz Fu- worked as a truck driver for
neral Home & Cremation, Greenland Nursery and
Inverness. Trucking Inc. He moved to
Sign the guest book at Inverness, Florida, from
www.chronicleonline.com. Cleveland, Ohio, 30 years
ago. Mr. Drake was Catholic
Arthur by faith; a member of the
Christopher, 90 Fraternal Order of Police;
BEVERLY- HILLS and enjoyed knowing about
BEVERLY HILL and riding Harley-Davidson
Arthur Christopher, 90, of Motorcycles.
Beverly Hills, FL, died June Mr. Drake was preceded
24,2009, in Inverness, FL. ,in'death by his parents and
Memorial Service for Mr. his wife, Elizabeth Drake.
Christopher will be on Survivors include 3 sons,
Wednesday, July 1, 2009, at 9 Patrick Drake of Inverness,
a.m. at Good Shepherd Michael Allen Drake and
Lutheran Church, 439 E. Ralph Shawn Drake, both of
Norvell Bryant Highway, Cleveland, OH; and a grand-


daughter, Kendell Drake.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.

Gerald 'Jerry'
Rofofsky, 72
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Gerald
"Jerry" Rofofsky, age 72, of
Beverly Hills, Florida, will
be held 11:00 AM, Tuesday,
June 30,2009, at the Beverly
Hills Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes with Pastor
Gordon Condit officiating.
Cremation will be under
the direction of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness.
Friends may call 10:00 AM
- 11:00 AM Tuesday at the
Beverly Hills Chapel. Those
who wish may send memo-
rial donations to Florida
Boxer Rescue Inc., Colleen
Bigsby, 2347 Merrily Circle
South, Seffner, FL 33584.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral-
Home.com.
He was born March 29,
1937, in Bronx, NY, son of
the late Abraham and
Shirley (Zucker) Rofofsky.
He died June 24, 2009, in
Crystal River,. FL. He


worked as an Auxiliary Po-
ilice Officer of Ridgefield
Police Dept. and worked in
security upon moving to
Florida. He moved to Bev-
erly Hills from West Palm
Beach in 1999. Mr. Rofofsky
was a 38-year member of
the Knights of Pythias 616,
Bronx, NY.
Mr. Rofofsky was pre-
ceded in death by his wife,
Carol Rofofsky, and step-
daughter, Deborah Kimball.
Survivors include 2 sons,
Matthew Rofofsky of Fort
Lee, NJ, and Scott Rofofsky
of Cross City, NY; daughter,
Mindy Franzone of Nanuet,
NY; 2 stepsons, Steven A.
Kimball of. Ft. White, FL,
and Brian M. Kimball of
Dunnellon, FL; 2 brothers,
Howard Rofofsky and
Michael Paper; ,sister, Mar-
lene Paper; and 10 grand-
children.

Sharlene
Rubin, 79
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sharlene Rubin, 79, of
Crystal River, FL, died Fri-
day, June 26, 2009, at her
summer home in Luther,
MI.
Services were Sunday,
June 28, at 1 p.m. at Sinai
Temple with Rabbi Reni
Dickman officiating. Burial
was in Sinai Temple Ceme-


Medical examiner: Pitchman Billy Mays had heart disease


I Associated Press

TAMPA - Television
pitchman Billy Mays likely
died of a heart attack in his
sleep, but further tests are
needed to be sure of the
cause of death, a medical ex-
aminer said Monday
Hillsborough County Med-
ical Examiner Vernard
Adams said Mays suffered
from hypertensive heart dis-
ease, and the wall of the left
ventricle of Mays' heart and
the wall of one of his arteries
were enlarged. The boister-
ous, bearded 50-year-old
known for hawking OxiClean
and other products on na-
tional commercials was
found dead Sunday by his
wife in their Tampa condo-


minium.
"The heart disease is per-
fectly consistent with sudden
death," Adams said.
An official cause of death
will be issued after toxicology
and other tests are
completed in eight to.
10 weeks.
"While it provides
some closure to learn
that heart disease
took Billy from us, it .'
certainly doesn't
ease the enormous
void that his death Billy
has created in our died S
lives," his wife, Deb-
orah, said in a statement "As
you can imagine, we are all
devastated."
Adams said Mays was tak-
ing the prescription


r
ui


painkillers Tramadol and hy-
drocodone for hip pain, but
there was no indication of
drug abuse. Mays had
planned to have hip-replace-
ment surgery Monday
Mays told his wife
he didn't feel well
when he went to bed
sometime 'after 10
p.m. Saturday Ear-
lier in the day, he said
he was hit on the.
head when his flight
from Philadelphia
VIays had a rough landing
inday. at Tampa Interna-
tional Airport. The
airline said no passengers re-
ported serious injuries.
Adams said the autopsy
showed no evidence of head
trauma.


Born William Mays in Mc-
Kees Rocks, Pa., on July 20,
1958, Mays developed his
style demonstrating knives,
mops and other 'As Seen on
TV" gadgets on Atlantic City's
boardwalk For years he


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worked as a hired gun on the
state fair and home show cir-
cuits.
Besides his wife, Mays is
survived by a 3-year-old
daughter and a stepson in his
20s, police said.
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tery, Michigan City.
Mrs. Rubin was born May
28, 1930, in Chicago to
George and Betty (Shapiro)
Robbins, both of whom pre-
ceded her in death. In June
of 1951, in Chicago, she
married M. Robert Rubin.
He survives in Crystal
River, FL. Together they
lived in Michigan City for 27
years, where they owned
and operated Bob's Sport
Shop.
Also surviving is her son,
Ken (Linda) Rubin of
Luther, MI; daughter,
Francy (Tom Brown) Rubin
of Lynchburg, VA; 3 grand-
children; and 1 great-grand-
child.
Mrs. Rubin had been an
elementary school teacher
for 27 years in Michigan
City and Crystal River, FL.
She was a volunteer in
many community activities
including the Citrus County
Volunteer Sheriffs Patrol, a
Florida nursing home om-
budsman and a volunteer in
the local schools.
"Memorial contributions
may be made to Heartland
Hospice, .1041 W. Main St.,
Fremont, MI 49412 or the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Michi-
gan City
To leave private or public
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...T ... . C C


Food PROGRAMS


ANGEL FOOD
* Christ Lutheran Church,
Angel Food Ministries recog-
nizes its first anniversary in
helping the community in pro-
viding a savings each month on
grocery bills. Volunteer main-
tained, the ministry started out
as the only one in Hemando,
Citrus and Pasco counties
when gas prices were sky rock-
eting and unemployment had
been steadily increasing at an
alarming rate.
Angel Food Ministries helped
bridge a financial gap for many
residents by providing quality
and quantity for little money,
helping to ensure families have
food at home. Christ Lutheran
receives $1 for each unit sold
from its location and has been
able to reach out to local chari-
ties to financially support their
efforts and have received let-
ters of appreciation from Love
Thy Neighbor, The Dawn Cen-
ter and Jericho Road Ministries.
Christ Lutheran Church,
Angel Food Ministries has also
given to these charities the food
averages from distribution, do-
nations from individuals who
purchased units each month, or
individual menu items cus-
tomers give.
Support of the program had
steadily increased in its first few
months. Since then, other loca-
tions in the county have joined
the program and are providing
assistance around the Her-
nando, Citrus and Pasco coun-
ties. We are a not-for-profit,
food relief program to help you
save money on your groceries
each month. The food is high-
quality, never old or expired.
Christ Lutheran Church, at
475 North Ave. W. in
Brooksville, is a host site taking
Angel Food orders onsite (cash
or food stamps only) or online
(debit or credit card only)
www.CLCFLA.org, click on the
Angel Food link, to place order
online.
Volunteers will take orders:
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun-
days, July 5 and 12; from 6 to 8
p.m. Tuesday, July 7, and Fri-
day, July 10; or from 9 a.m. to
.noon Saturday, July 11. Distri-
bution day is from 9 to 11 a.m.
July 25. First Lutheran Church,
at 30419 Park Ridge Drive,
Ridge Manor, will take cash-


Great

and


N 4.


only orders from 4 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday, July 7, or from 8 to 10
a.m. Saturday, July 11. Orders
placed at this location are avail-
able for pick-up on from 9 11
a.m. July 25. Personal checks
or money orders not accepted.
For information, call (352) 799-
3452.
* Gulf to Lake Church, 1454
N. Gulf Ave., Crystal River, has
partnered with Nature Coast
Ministries in providing dis-
counted groceries through
Angel Food Ministries. The
church takes orders two Sun-
days monthly following the
three services at 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m. and noon, plus one
Wednesday a month. Food dis-
-tribution is done on a Saturday
at the Ministry Complex (di-
rectly across the street from the
church). Look for the Angel
Food Signs. Order and distribu-
tion dates are as follows.
New menu was issued June
18: Sunday order date July 5.
Wednesday date, July 8. Deliv-
ery date, July 25. .
New menu -July 16: Sun-
day order dates, Aug. 2 and 9.
Wednesday date,Aug. 12. De-
livery date, Aug. 29.
New menu -Aug. 20: Sun-
day order dates, Aug. 30 and
Sept. 6. Wednesday date, Sept.
9. Delivery date, Sept. 26.
New menu - Sept. 17: Sun-
day order dates, Sept. 27 and
Oct. 4. Wednesday date, Oct.
7. Delivery date, Oct. 24.
New mend - Oct. 15: Sun-
day order dates, Oct. 25 and
Nov. 1. Wednesday date, Oct.
28. Delivery date, Nov. 21.
New menu - Nov. 12: Sun-
day order dates, Nov. 22 and
29; Wednesday date, Nov. 25.
Delivery date, Dec. 19.
* Angel Food Ministry orders
are taken at First Baptist
Church (FBC) in Inverness, 550
Pleasant Grove Road (County
Road 581). FBC is now a host
church and a distribution site
and can now take orders for the
east side of Citrus County. If
your church or organization
would like to participate in plac-
ing orders at FBC of Inverness,
call FBC at 726-1252. When
placing reorders for the signa-
ture box, remember to bring an
18-gallon plastic tub. Call the
church at 726-1252 or Marti
Consuegra at 344-8843.


* Jesus is 2 DIE 4 Ministries,
a small ministry in Inverness, is
an Angel Food sponsor. Cal-
vary Christian Center has al-
lowed the use of their facility for
Angel Food ordering and deliv-
ery. We will take orders and dis-
tribute orders at Calvary
Christian Center, 2728 E Harley
St., Inverness. We ask for a $5
to $10 donation on.all first-time
orders of the Signature Box to
help cover container costs. You
can also order online with a
debit or charge card at an-
gelfoodministries.com. Not all
sites have this option. You can
also view the latest menu on
that site. Call the host site di-
rector Mary Waddington at
(352) 566-6786 for sign-up and
distribution dates and times.
Please do not contact Calvary
Christian Center. Volunteers
are needed. Come join us and
help make a difference.
* Nature Coast Ministries
(NCM) is hosting the reduced-
price, nonprofit Angel Food pro-
gram in Citrus County. This
program enables families to
stretch their food budget by
providing quality food (meats,
produce, dairy products, non-
perishable food, and even heat
and serve prepared meals that
are nutritionally balanced) at
half or less of the retail price.
There are no income restric-
tions or participation fees. All
orders are prepaid. View the
menu and order online with
credit or debit card at
www.MyNCM.com. Cash,
checks, money order or food
stamps (EBT) are accepted for
in-person orders. For sign-up
and distribution dates and loca-
tions, call 795-4046.
SHARE
* Help yourself and your
community. SHARE, acronym
for Self Help And Resource Ex-
change, is a private, not-for-
profit organization that
strengthens and builds commu-
nities through volunteer service
and offers participants great
savings on food. There are no
income requirements -just
you, your family and your de-
sire to make a difference.
* SHARE distribution/sign-
up at Hemando Civic Center,
3848 Parsons Point Road, Her-
nando. Sign-up is from 4 to 6
p.m. Tuesday, July 7. Distribu-


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tion and sign-up is from 9 to 10
a.m. Saturday, July 25. Sign-up
is from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 4.. Distribution and sign-
up is from 9 to 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Aug. 22. Payment must be
cash or an EBT card. The Civic
Club is unable to store food.
Orders must be claimed on the
announced Saturday. No re-
funds. With your receipt, a
friend or neighbor may accept
delivery for you. Unclaimed
packages will be donated to a
needy family or sold. No re-
funds, but if we sell your order
and you have made arrange-
ments with one of us, we will
order the next month's food for
you. A box or cooler is recom-..
mended to transport the frozen
-meat. Call Judy at 344-9833,
Terry at 726-9981, Margaret at
(352) 465-7203, or Civic Center
(from 8:30 to 10 a.m. on distri-
bution day) at 860-0225.
* First United Methodist
Church SHARE, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw'St., Homosassa. Call
382-1034 or 628-5945 for regis-
tration and distribution dates.
Bring a box or basket on pick-
up day. Minimum order is $6 to
be paid for in cash or food
stamps at time of order. No re-
funds. Food must be picked up
on delivery date.
* Peace Lutheran Church
SHARE, 7201 S. U.S. 41, five
miles north of downtown Dun-
nellon. For registration and dis-
tribution dates, call James
Spiegelberg, host site coordina-
tor at (352) 489-5249.
* Floral City United
Methodist Church Food Share
Program. Available to all, no
qualifications. Basic package
includes meat and fresh veg-
etables and fruit valued at $40
for the cost of $18. Other pack-
ages and single items avail-
able. For registration and
distribution dates, call the
. church office at 344-1771.
* North Oak Baptist Church
SHARE, 9324 N. Elkcam Blvd.,
Citrus Springs. For registration
and distribution dates, call (352)
489-1688 or 746-1500.
HUNGRY?
* Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church food pantry is
open from 9 to 10 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at 6 Roo-


sevelt Blvd. Food is distributed
on right side of parish office
garage area. Parking is avail-
able in right parking field next to
garage area. Our mission is to
assist the needy. The pantry is
open to those who truly qualify
for this program. No vouchers
or financial aid given. Call Anna
at 527-2381 or Pat at 270- -
3393.
* St. Anne's Episcopal
Church food pantry opens from
9:30 to 10:30 a.m. daily in the
administration building.
* First United Methodist
Church of Inverness God's
Kitchen serves from 11:30 a.m.
to noon Mondays in the fellow-
ship hall, 3896 S..Pleasant . .
Grove Road. The church has a
bus available to pick up anyone
in the community who needs a
ride to Monday's God's Kitchen.
If you need, or know of some-
one who needs to be picked up
on Monday for a free, deli-
cious and nutritious hot lunch,
call the church at 726-2522.
* The New Church Without
Walls gives free food boxes
away at 5 p.m. Monday at the
neighborhood park in Hemando
off of Railroad Drive where the
homeless'feeding takes place.
Call 344-2425 for more infor-
mation.
* Hernando Seventh-day
Adventist Church provides food
distribution for needy families
through its food pantry from 10
to 4 p.m. Tuesday at the
church at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hernando. Have proper photo
I.D. available at the time of the
request for food. Call 212-5159.
* First Presbyterian Church
of Crystal River Emergency
Food Relief Pantry is open
Tuesday and Thursdays from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. only. Call 795-
2259 or come to the church of-
fice.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church's food pantry, 82 Civic
Circle, Beverly Hills, distributes
food from 11 a.m. to noon and
6 to 7 p.m. the last Tuesday
monthly. To qualify for assis-
tance, you must be a Beverly
Hills resident with identification.
Call the church office at 746-
3620 for reservations. There is
an initial registration for each
recipient, then you will need to
call the office at least a week


ahead of time, every month, if
you will require food.
* EI-Shaddai food ministries
"brown bag of food" distribution
at Crystal River Church of God,
2180 W. 12th Ave., behind the
Lincoln Mercury dealership.
This food giveaway is normally
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the last
Wednesday monthly unless
otherwise noted. Call 628-9087
or 302-9925. Delivery to home-
bound available. The USDA is
an equal opportunity provider.
* St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church's Feed My Sheep out-
reach provides a hot lunch at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday. The
food pantry is open from 9:30
a.m. to noon Tuesdays,
Wednesday and Fridays. Call
726-3153.
* Dunnellon Presbyterian
and Holy Faith Episcopal food
pantry opens from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursdays at 19924 W.
Blue Cove Drive, Dunnellon.
* SOS Ministry food pantry
from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday
for those in need at the Key
Center in Lecanto. Those who
wish to come are welcome
twice monthly. If new to the pro-
gram, bring driver's license and
Social Security cards for all
family members for initial regis-
tration. Food distributed accord-
ing to family size.
* Calvary Chalpel of Inver-
ness "Feed the Hungry" free
lunch is served from noon to 1
p.m. Thursday in the fellow-
ship hall, 960 S. U.S. 41. Come
enjoy a home-cooked meal.
The food pantry is open from 1
to 2 p.m. Thursday. Call 726-
1480.
* St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs serves those in need
with free boxes of food from its
food pantry the third Saturday
moving monthly. Call 465-6613
on the preceding Tuesday to
sign up for the Saturday food
distribution. /
* Our Father's Table serves
free Saturday lunches from -
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church, one
mile west of the Plantation Inn
on West Fort Island Trail. This
soup kitchen is staffed weekly
. by different churches. All are '
welcome to stop by for a free
lunch. Call 795-2176.


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CiTRusS COUmy (FL) CHHONICLE


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A8 TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 NATION CITRUS COU NTY(PL ), .I.I...



Calif. budget crisis could ripple across U.S.


State's size gives it

enormous reach
Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Cali-
fornia faces a $24 billion budget
shortfall, an eye-popping amount
that dwarfs many states' entire an-
nual spending plans.
Beyond California's borders,
why should' anyone care that the
home of Google and the Walt Dis-
ney Co. might stop paying its bills
this week?
Virtually all states are suffering
in the recession, some worse than
California. But none has the eco-
nomic horsepower of the world's
eighth-largest economy, home to
one in eight Americans.
California accounts for 12 per-
cent of the nation's gross domestic
product and the largest share of
retail sales of any state, It also
sends far more in tax revenue to
the federal government than it re-
ceives - giving a dollar for every
80 cents it gets back - which
means Californians are. keeping
social programs afloat across the
country.
While the deficit only affects the
state, California's deepening eco-
nomic malaise could make it
harder for the entire nation's
economy to recover.


When the state stumbles, its
sheer size - 38.3 million people
- creates fallout for businesses
from Texas to Michigan.
"California is the key catalyst
for U.S. retail sales, and if Califor-
nia falls further you will see the
U.S. economy suffer significantly,"
said retail consultant Burt P
Flickinger, managing director of
Strategic Resource Group. He
warned of more bankruptcies of
national retail chains and brand
suppliers.
Even if California lawmakers
solve the deficit quickly, there will
likely be more government fur-
loughs and layoffs and tens of bil-
lions of dollars in spending cuts.
That will ripple through the state
economy, sowing fear of even
more job losses.
Californians have already been
scaling back for months as the
state's unemployment rate has
climbed to a record 11.5 percent in
May. Increases to the income,
sales and vehicle license taxes ap-
proved by lawmakers and Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger in Febru-
ary acted as a further drag on
spending.
Personal income declined in
California in 2008 for the first time
,since the Grbat Depression, and
income tax revenue fell by 34 per-
cent during the first five months of
this year.
The decrease in spending is es-


Associated Press
California State Sen. Bob Dutton, R-Rancho Cucamonga, left, gives a
thumbs down Monday as he votes against a Democratic budget proposal,
while Sen. Abel Maldonado, R-Santa Maria, looks on at the Capitol in


Sacramento, Calif.
pecially evident in automobiles.
California is the nation's largest
single auto market, and sales are
down 40 percent from last year.
Auto dealers see little hope of a
quick turnaround, especially after
a 1 percentage point increase in
the state sales tax and hike of the
vehicle license fee.
State agencies also canceled
contracts for hundreds of new ve-
hicles, retroactive to March, said
Brian Maas, director of govern-
ment affairs for the California
New Car Dealers Association.
Because California's $1.7 tril-


lion annual economy is so impor-
tant, the state's treasurer has
asked for federal help - in the
form of a guarantee that would
allow California and other states
to take out short-term loans at
lower interest rates.
A federal guarantee would cut
the interest rate on the state's bor-
rowing by as much as half, saving
California taxpayers hundreds of
millions of dollars.
"It's not that California got itself
into trouble and wants the federal
government to bail it out," said
Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Los Ange-


les. "California wants the federal
government to do for a fee that
which Wall Street would do for a
fee if Wall Street wasn't broken."
But some members of Congress
worry about setting a precedent
for bailing out local governments.
"You've got many states
throughout this country, you've got
many cities that are in tough fi-
nancial problems, so they will all
come for help," explained Rep.
Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield.
Any extra federal assistance is
sure to be a hard sell in Washing-
ton and elsewhere because of Cal-
ifornia's free-spending image.
That may have been true before
the recession, but the state cut $15
billion, in government spending in
February and plans to solve most
of the $24 billion deficit through
even more cuts.
Government workers face the
possibility of three-day-a-month
furloughs, teachers are being laid
off, lower-income college students
stand to lose their grants and hun-
dreds of thousands of poor chil-
dren could go without health care.
The recession is behind this fis-
cal turmoil. Some 1 million jobs
are expected to be lost in Califor-
nia in two years and unemploy-
ment is estimated to peak at 12.3
percent in early 2010, said Jeff
Michael, director of the Business
Forecasting Center at the Univer-
sity of the Pacific in Stockton.


U.S. retailers hammered by slow summer sales


Associated Press

NEW YORK - As con-
sumers get ready to celebrate
July Fourth, many merchants
already have dismissed sum-
mer as a washout
Macy's flagship store has
racks of summer tops,
swimwear and dresses
marked down as much as 50
percent, while- luxury re-
tailer Bergdorf Goodman is
slashing prices on designer
goods by as much as 70 per-
cent. Meanwhile, piles of
clothing, as well as barbe-
cue grills, tents and garden-
ing tools, are bypassing
stores and heading straight
to liquidators as merchants
try to conserve their cash.


Such deep discounting so
early in the season is great
news for bargain hunters,
but it's a worrisome sign
that shows a further weak-
ening in retail sales since
the end of May.
Consumers' confidence in
the economy, which had
surged in April and May, is
projected to be virtually un-
changed for June when The'
Conference Board releases
figures Tuesday. And major
retailers will release June
sales results next week
While unusually rainy
weather across a broad
swath of the country has
dampened business, some
analysts wonder whether
shoppers are waking up to


the harsh reality that the
economy won't be getting any
better soon - even as con-
sumer spending makes up 70
percent of economic activity.
That doesn't bode well for
merchants, which need to
get rid of summer inventory,
quickly to make room for
fall goods that start to arrive
next month.
BMO Capital Markets an-
alyst John Morris estimated
that the volume and size of
discounts for mall-based ap-
parel retailers he tracks is
10 percent higher than last
June even though inventory
is down 20 percent.
"It's the economy, not the
weather," said Ahmed
Youssef, a 28-year-old junior


engineer, from Jersey City,
explaining why he's stuck to
only necessities, like gro-
ceries at Walmart and com-
puter accessories such as a
$80 hard drive at Staples.
Pam MacWilliams, a
tourist from Oshkosh, Wis.,
who on, a recent Thursday
was planning to scour for
bargains at H&M's midtown
Manhattan location with
her two girls, said she's be-
coming less optimistic about
a quick economic recovery.
"I thought that the econ-
omy would turn faster," said
MacWilliams. "I had high
expectations. Now, I want to
save more."
MacWilliams, a. nurse
practitioner, said her com-


pany no longer matches her
401(k) contributions, and
she worries about the job
security of her husband, a
professor. So she's spent
only $200 this month on
clothes for her family, com-
pared with about $600 a
year ago. She also hasn't
loaded up her lake house
with the usual summer ac-
cessories like blowup toys.,
Employers are still cut-
ting jobs - although at a
slower rate - and home
prices are still falling, and
now Americans are seeing a
three-month stock market
rally stall.
Consumers' confidence in
the economy has been re-
bounding since February, fu-


eled in part by the stock mar-
ket rise. But that improved
mood hadn't translated into
much relief for merchants.
The concern is that shop-
pers' mood could actually
level off in coming months.
"There was a lot of hope
with the surge in confi-
dence," said Dennis Jacobe,
Gallup's chief economist.
He added that consumers
were convinced that the sec-
ond half would be better but
he noted, "you can live on
that hope for only so long."
According to a Gallup Poll
survey of 1,000 consumers
taken June 15-21, confi-
dence has faltered as stocks
have stumbled anid gas
prices have risen.


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AIO TUFSDW Ju'-." ..,O 2 .009 OPINION


Sound OFF


Wonderful job
I live in Pine Ridge. We
had a fire in the woods be-
hind our house, which we
expect was caused by a
lightning strike. The Florida
Forestry plane first noted
the smoke and reported the
conditions. When we called
the fire in, the Citrus County
Fire and Rescue squad was
already on the way. They cut
a firebreak and put out the
remaining flames. The fire
consumed about an acre of
our property. I commend all
that was involved for their
actions. They all did a won-
derful job. Thanks again.
Where's support?
The pundits are now bad-
mouthing the United Na-
tions for not jumping into
the crisis in Iran. The U.N.
can't operate without finan-
cial support, and Ginny
Brown-Waite, our represen-
tative, just voted against
paying our dues.
Pricing problems
Wrong prices ... You go to
buy something, you take it
off the shelf, the price says
one thing and you get home
and you found out it's dou-
ble the amount that it's sup-
posed to be. Nobody in that
store is putting the right
prices on the right items.
Now I've got to drive 16
more miles to return some
stuff because they cheated
me out of $8. So I mean
why don't the manager ...
talk to these associates and
get them to put the right
prices on the right shelf
and the right item? This is
ridiculous with the price of
gas being so high.
Shooting
I'm calling about a shoot-
ing. Since when is it OK to
go and shoot a neighbor
over disputes -,petty ones,
at that? Where is the law?
Where is our justice system?
A man was shot 10 days
ago in front of his children
and nobody has done noth-
ing ...
Everyday drunks
Have you watched the
news? Have you watched the


news? Every, every day,
drunks, drunks, drunks, sip-
ping, sipping drunks. "I only
had two beers, just two
beers, your honor." Every
day someone gets killed
from a drunk, or injured.
Your beer stinks and it isn't
fit for hogs. Will someone
do something about it or
will you wait until it hap-
pens to you?
On camera
As long as Citrus County
Sheriff's (Office) wants to
spend manpower sitting out
on Turner Camp Road and
not have these deputies
watching the intersection.
when the red lights are
being run, I'm suggesting
that maybe we should put
up cameras like the city of
Lakeland did ...
Policing police
Well, well, well, imagine
that - not one, but two Cit-
rus County deputies ar-
rested for breaking the law.
This time for sexual miscon-
duct ... Who.polices the po-
lice?
No Progress
I live in the Inverness
Heights on Hiawatha. Every
time it rains, our electricity
goes off. It's been reported
to Progress Energy, I don't
know how many hundreds
of times, and it's very
knowledgeable that they
have a bad cable under-
ground that cuts out when
the water hits it and blows
the transformer. All they'd
have to do is replace that.
Even the men working on it
said it should be replaced,
that it's old cable. So why
are they (charging) higher
rates when they don't carry
out their job in the first
place of what they've got?
Don't judge
I'm calling in response to
"Stamp suspicion," that
was in Wednesday's (June
24) Sound Off. You people
are so quick to judge other
people. Don't judge a book
by its cover. I understand
there are people that-take
advantage of the welfare
system, but you don't know
this guy's situation. Maybe


that wad of $100s was his
income tax return and that's
all the money he has in the
world. Why do people judge
somebody by just their
looks and what they see at
the first try? You never know.
Don't judge a book by its
cover. ,


















Not so gung-ho
For all you people that are
just gung-ho about the gov-
ernment's health care plan:
Look at California. They've
been overspending for years
and most of its on Medi-
caid. It's the biggest pro-


RAIPH E. MASSULLO, M.D, FA A.D. ,K
*WILLIAM WELTON, M.D., F A A D.
MICHAEL WARTELS, M.D.. F.A AD 'D
MARGARET COLLINS, M.D., F.A.A.D.
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gram they have. They give
out health care to every-
body. Well, they're going
broke - $24 billion in the
hole - and now they can't
pay the clinics that give out
Medicaid, they can't pay the
doctors and they can't pay
the health people. So this is
what you want to do to the
rest of the country? Florida
is right behind California in
the number of people on
Medicaid. You guys, we al-
ready have government
health care in a large sector.
And by the way, I think
there's more than 25 per-
cent of the population
that's Republican.
Keychain question
I just want to comment
on the fact that yesterday I
got a solicitation from the
U.S. Olympic Committee for
funds, and in that letter was
a keychain that had been
manufactured in China.
Does that make any sense
to anyone? If we're going to
do that kind of thing, the
money should go here.


Another answer
This is for the people that
are complaining about the
man who is operating an
auto body shop out of his
garage ... The man contin-
ues to keep on doing it al-
though Code Enforcement
has told him not to.
If you call Environmental
Services of Florida, they'll
actually send a team of
people out there to confis-
cate everything out of the
garage and lock it up for
good.
Again, you have to call En-
vironmental Services of
Florida.
Bingo or not?
I'm a bingo player. I was
at a bingo, a VFW bingo,
last night and they wouldn't
let me have my winnings be-
cause I didn't have the last
number called.
The Florida bingo laws
state you don't have to have
the last number called.
So I'm wondering what
can be done about it.


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A10 TuFSDAY, JUNE 30, 2(


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Ciu CONT (F)CRNCEOIoUEDY UE3,20 l


Sound OFF


Something's rotten
I want to tell you about
my little problem with Ani-
mal Control. I called them
last week three or four
times to tell them that there
was a rotting dog sitting on
the side of Yulee Drive. They
told me they couldn't get to
it that day, the first day that
I called, for the simple fact
is that it was already kind
of late in the afternoon -
meanwhile, it was 1 o'clock
- and that they would defi-
nitely get to it the next day.
Well, the next day goes by,
the next day goes by, the
next day goes by, the next
day goes by. I made two or
three more complaints to
them, telling them that the
stench was unbearable and
that they needed to come
and get the animal off the
side of the road, it was
dead. Well, the fourth time
that I called them up to
complain, they told me that
they went out there and the
animal was too rotting away
... for them to even pick up.
I said, "Well, what about
with a shovel - the smell is
unbearable?" They refused
to do it. In the meantime,
it's been way over a week
and a half now and that ani-
mal is still sitting on the
side rotting away on Yulee
Drive .;.
Rip it out
Charlie Dean's barn: I
think that he should be
made to rip out the walls-
and everything in that place,
to be sure that everything
meets and is up to code.
Everyone else that pulls this
nonsense has to do this and
I think he should have to do
it also.
Cushion collection
This call is to the people
who were driving down
(County Road) 490 on Tues- "
day, moving: You lost a
cushion off your couch or
chair right in front of 5065.
Call 628-3773. We have
your cushion. This ad was
supposed to be in Wednes-
day, but somehow the paper
has it coming in on Friday,
if you get this message, I'm
not there on the weekends.


Please give me a call at
628-3773. We have your
couch cushion.
Admit it
. The Sound Off caller
printed today (June 25),
who urged "Wake up, Cit-
rus," is way off base blam-
ing Republicans in Citrus
County for their woes.
Frankly, since all of
Obama's wild spending and
money-burning fiascos, I'm
finding it hard to find any-
one who admits voting De-
mocrat ...
Disagree
Most patriotic city in
Florida? I'm sorry but I have
to disagree with Inverness
beirng named the most pa-
triotic city in Florida. I know
the city does a lot to honor
the veterans and put up
flags on the street for all,
days honoring our veterans,
but the city also owns the
Oak Ridge Cemetery and
they never put flags on the


PHILIP SIMMONS
BLACKSMITH
1912-2009


veterans' graves. We've lived
in many cities in New York,
South Carolina and Florida
and any time flags were
risen to honor our veterans,
they also put flags on the
graves of the veterans.
Maybe they can get it right
the next time. If they need
volunteers for that, I'm sure
people would be willing to
go out and help.
Taxing
What's wrong with
Obama? Why do we need a
tax on our health insurance
policies? That's a disgrace.
Don't we pay enough? I pay
over $300-and something a
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we have to pay the doctors
because we have copay-
ments. What is wrong with
that man? Why do we need
a tax on health insurance?
Health insurance should be
affordable for everybody ...
Public option
There's not much differ-.
ence in this country be-
tween the United States and
Iran. Iran is ruled by the
mullahs and this country is
ruled by the military arms
complex and the insurance
companies.
There's no reason on
earth why we can't have a
public option on this health
care plan that they're work-
ing on. There is nothing
wrong with a public option.
' They've had socialized
medicine in Europe for
years and,it works beauti-


fully. What is Medicare but
socialized medicine? What
is the VA but socialized
medicine?
There is no reason on
earth why we can't have
public health care options
in this country.
The insurance companies
are blocking it and the sena-
tors who were bought and
paid for by the insurance
companies are blocking it.
Sick of it
I grew up here in this part
of Florida. I've lived in Dun-
nellon, Crystal River, Ho-
mosassa, Chassahowitzka,
over 50 years, and I'm sick
of you ... folks moving here
... going about and telling
us how things ought to be
like things was where you
just came from. This is the
country ...


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TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2oog All


OPINION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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I] I 111 H j FIVI







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thank-You LETTERS


Tourney success
On June 6 the inaugural HOPE
Wildlife Rehabilitation Inc., Golf
Tournament in memory of Harry
Wendler was held at Pine Ridge
Community Golf and Country
Club. The tournament committee
takes this opportunity to thank
the players who supported the
tournament, the volunteers who
helped us the day of the tourna-
ment and the following, for
whom, without their help, the
tournament would not have been
able to raise the money that it did
on behalf of HOPE.
Gold sponsors: Alan Beall
Corp., Citrus Alternative Medi-
cine, Citrus Orthopaedic & Joint
Institute, Clarence Stewart and
Associates, Dirk's Auto Clinic,
and Linda and Ed Turschmann.
. Tee and green sponsors: A Best
Bet Fishing Charters, Citrus Po-
diatry, Countryside Animal Hos-
pital, Darby Cerce, Don Kimpel,
Dream Custom Kitchens, Eagle
Buick, Pontiac and GMC, Edward
Serra, CPA, Fences by Ray Gibbs,
Joanne Chepulis and Mo Gille-
spie, Gardner Audiology, Gary's
Automotive, Holly Peterson, Jane
and Larry Woodard, Jenene's
Gourmet Coffee, Jim Robinson,
Julie Cunningham, Kidder Ortho-
pedic, Kinnard Chiropractic,
Mandy from KFC, R&B's
Chevron Auto Clinic, Rusaw
Homes, Schlabach Security &
Sound, Shelly's Seafood Inc.,
Karaoke Gang at Pine Ridge,
West Partners and Wood Finan-
cial.
And lastly, the providers of the
many items for our raffle, auction
and goodie bags: Applebee's,
Aroma Fine Wines and Spirits,
Barb Wendler, Beef'O' Brady's,
BKleen Car Wash, Boathouse
Restaurant, Bob Kaye, Brent-
wood Farms Golf Club, Chiefland
Golf and Country Club, Chili's
Restaurant, Citrus Fitness, Citrus
Hills Golf Course, Citrus Kia, Cit-
rus Orthopaedic & Joint Insti-
tute, Citrus Springs Golf Course,
Crystal Automotive Group,
Curves of Beverly Hills, Dick's
Sporting Goods, Dirk's Auto
Clinic, Eagle Buick GMC Trucks,
Edible Arrangements, Harley-
Davidson of Crystal River, Holly
Peterson LMT, Hollywood Tours,
Homosassa Springs State
Wildlife Park, JCPenny, Jenene's
Gourmet Coffee, Juliette's
Restaurant at Rainbow Springs


M. _- c-\AAOMO IqZ%'2009


Golf Club, Kinnard Chiropractic,
Lakeside Country Club, Pine .
Ridge Community Golf and Coun-
try Club, Plantation Inn and Golf
Resort, Rainbow Springs Golf
Club, Scissors Palace, Skyview
Golf Club, Steven Holland,
Twisted Oaks Golf Club, Village
Toyota, Walgreens, Walmart,
Winn Dixie and World Woods.
We also thank the Citrus
County Chronicle and the Central
Ridge Visitor for the many arti-
cles written on behalf of HOPE
Wildlife Rehabilitation Inc., and
the tournament And lastly, Pine
Ridge Community Golf and Coun-
try Club for the use of their facil-
ity for our inaugural event.
Linda and Ed Turschmann
tournament co-chairmen

Fine fry
Special Olympics of Citrus
County would like to thank the
Chronicle for all the advertising
for our fish fry May 30 at the Ho-
mosassa Lions Club. It was a
great help.
I want to thank Michael DeMar
for working out in that hot sun all
day frying fish, and David from
Lions for his wonderful help in
the kitchen. Thank you, Joan
from Lions, and Phyllis Smith
and Diane Phillips, for the table
decorations, they were great.
Thank you, Bill Heyden and


Terry DeMar, and all the women
from the Woman's Club and the
parents that helped. They all did
a great job.
Irene LaBarba
fundraising chairwoman

'Diploma debacle'
I would like to thank the edito-
rial staff at the Chronicle for pub-
lishing the letter about my
daughter's "diploma debacle." I
would like to extend an extra-
special thank you to Ms. Keri
McHale for her article and pro-
fessionalism. Thank you to the
people that took the time out of
their day to voice their opinion
and for the compassion shown by
so many of you.
As she gets ready to head off to
college in September, my daugh-
ter's only concern is that this
does not happen to another stu-
dent, and that the 10 cents she
owed the school for an overdue
(but returned) library book wasn't
going to bankrupt the county's
school budget
In the future, there must be
better communication from the
school to the parents and stu-
dents over such important mat-
ters.
Congratulations, class of 2009!
Tammy Williams
Dunnellon


Youth expo
The Sixth Annual Sheriff's
Summer Safety & Youth Expo
may be in the history books, but
the people, businesses and organ-
izations that made it all possible
are certainly worthy of public
recognition. Given the tough eco-
nomic times currently impacting
the county, the sponsorships of
both cash and in-kind donations
were especially meaningful and
crucial to the success of the day-
long, free-of-charge children's
safety event
Held at the Citrus County Audi-
torium in late April, the project
gave kids, parents and guardians
the opportunity to learn more
about summertime activities
being offered in the county, plus
ways to keep children safe while
online, riding a bicycle or escap-
ing a fire. With cool giveaways
like free bicycle helmets and
string backpacks, little ones had
the chance to be fingerprinted for
future safekeeping, as well.
More than 425 children at-
tended the event, representing 35
different area schools and a total,
of 212 classes.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice, along with its Chronicle and
Suncoast Business Masters part-
ners, extends grateful thanks to
all its sponsors including Plat-
inum sponsor Citrus Comity
Chronicle; gold sponsors Ho-


OPINIONS INVITED
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be lim-
ited to three letters per month.
0 SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 1
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to -
letters@chronicleonline.com.

mosassa Pizza Hut and the
Epilepsy Foundation of Florida; 0
silver sponsor Suncoast Schools :
Federal Credit Union; and bronze.
sponsors Inverness Pizza Hut,
Fleet Reserve Association No.
186, Dairy Queen, IR-RU.Family
Social Club, Crowley & Co., Her-
bert Surber No. 225 American Le-
gion Auxiliary, Comfort Keepers,
Coffee News, Inverness and Ho-
mosassa Papa John's Pizza, Bill
and Cindy Shaw, Inverness, Bev-
erly Hills and Crystal River Winn-'
Dixie, Lowe's of Inverness, Lora
Wilson, Childhood Development
Services, Early Learning Coali-
tion, Hernando-Pasco Hospice,
Homosassa Springs Wildlife State;
Park, Sylvan Learning Center,
Hospice of Citrus County, YMCA,
Carol Carpenter, Kirk Brown,
Sandy and Richard Mass, CCSO
Community Patrol 5, Jodi and
Allan Bartell, Joe Nic Barco VFW'
Post 7122; Ladies Auxiliary VFW
Post 7122, Suncoast Business Masi
ters, Angel Rivera, BestBuy Water,
Circle of Fire Art Center & Bead '
Shop, Citrus Chiropractic Group
(formerly Fakhoury Chiropractic
Clinic) and the Fun Factory.
My hope is that we can count orn
your continued support in the fu-'
ture.
Deputy Andy McEwen
Sheriff's Summer Safety
& Youth Expo chairman

Rachael's return
I wanted to write and say thank'
you to everyone who helped me
get my daughter Rachael to
Washington, D.C. I'm glad all the
kids and everyone came back
safely I want to give a big thank .
you to Gina at Cody's in Crystal /
River, Karen at Twisters Hair
Salon in Homosassa, Harley-
Davidson in Crystal River/Ho- '.
mosassa, and our neighbor Jim �
for his contributions, too. There
was also someone who paid for
half of her-trip. I don't know who -
you are, but thank you so much.
Mary Cooper,
Homosassa'


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4


A12 Tuiisjmy, JUN 30, 2009


OPINION


1J
?A


?i-.ASSOCIATION








OPINION TUEDAY, JUNE 0, 2099 A1


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


Stagnant homes
You asked three ques-
tiohs in your recent "stag-
najt homes" editorial that I
wculd like to address. The
first is, what can the neigh-
bors do? The answer is,
very little without running
afoul of trespassing laws
anp liability issues. Home
associations have a little
more leeway to do things
like mow the yards only be-
cause of better isolation
from the legal issues
through contracted labor
and association insurance.
Your second question
about altering legal meas-
ures shows the most prom-
ise. I propose that we need
to change the state laws
covering foreclosures to re-
quire the deposit of $1,000
of maintenance escrow
money at the filing of a
foreclosure action. I pro-
posed this to my property
owners association and
their eyes glazed over, but I
only see one place and time
where we can attack the
problem - at the time and
place of filing the action.
Of course, this will re-
quire the efforts of thou-
sands of people to band
together and attempt to in-
fluence our elected repre-
sentatives. It's not a
one-man project There will
be opposition to this pro-
posal from the lending in-
dustry. It will increase the
cost of borrowing money
and it will affect everyone
because there is no sure
way to tell who will default
on their loan. Making sure
they have a job and a credit
history would go a long way
toward solving the foreclo-
sure problem, but that's an-
other issue. I would suggest
that we look at the costs as
insurance and the effort as
an attempt to spread the
risk among'all homeown-
ers.
Who can draw on the
money in escrow to main-
tain the property? I would
suggest any incorporated
property owners associa-
tion, or any local govern-
ment entity.
Your third option of ap-
plying pressure on the re-
sponsible banks is worth
trying if you can find out


Letters to the EDITOR


who owns the property.
Some banks will be recep-
tive to your pressure and
some will ignore you, and
sometimes you won't be
able to determine owner-
ship. With my proposal,
ownership doesn't matter.
Once the foreclosure if
filed, the money is avail-
able to maintain the prop-
erty.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

In a word
Does a mere difference
in a word make a differ-
ence in the way things are
perceived in an attitude or
a relationship or even the
governing of a county?
Sure.it does. If the wrong
word is used for the right
one, then we imagine we
are saying something when
we are saying something
else.
I got the feeling former
County Administrator Tony
Shembri really believed in
what he was saying at
times. Yet those who wit-
nessed his descriptions of
shared events simply
scratched their heads in
disbelief at the disparity of
his "facts."
This is partially due to
two popular words used
frequently: "Information"
and "communications."
While used interchange-
ably they signify quite dif-
ferent things.
Information is one way -
giving out. Communica-
tions means "getting
through" or an exchange of.
thoughts.
When I was responsible
for public relations for sev-
eral Fortune 500 corpora-
tions I believed each press
. release, every gaudy an-
nual report, every CEO
speech was accepted as
gospel. Actually, I was
amazed that only a handful
of constituents actually
saw, read or even under-
stpod these things.
While most of our county
government members
strive to inform us con-
stituents, I sometimes won-
der if they fondly imagine


qA(R



AchaelJackso


what communicate
ally not - it is just
tion.
Communication
beginning of dialog
formation is a mon
Communication is
a response while i:
tion shuts off the s
when the message
Most of all, inform
tells what while co
cation explains wh
Let's hope.our n
county administra
derstands the differ
Bil


Health ca
I have been dism
the lack of knowledge
garding President
health care plan a:
folks sending lette
editor of this news
has been astoundi:
ness so much lame
after such a public
paign wherein cou
voter surveys had
health care reform
the single most uri
sis of our time.
I suppose it is n(
cult to understand
some folks are una
distinguish fact fro
tion; after all, the b


ion is re-
t informa-

is the
gue. In-
iologue.
alert for
nforma-
witch


care industry has spent
$127 million lobbying in
only the first three months
of 2009. The lobby's Swift-
boat operation, Conserva-
tives for Patients' Rights,
has vowed to spend $20 mil-
lion to scare Americans
about Obama's reforms.


ends. This is why Americans
ation should be informed about
)mmuni- the five key points of Presi-
y. dent Obama's public health
ew care option.
tor un- First, the public option is
erence. just that, an option. Ameri-
SPiecuch cans will always have a
SPiecuch choice to either stick with
Inverness their current health insur-
ance plan (or choose) a high-
are quality government-run
nayed at plan similar to Medicare.
dge re- Second, the public plan
Obama's will be a high-quality plan
mong with a choice of doctors.
rs to the Government plans are in-
paper. It novative because they're
ng to wit- not focused on short-term
rhetoric profits; plus, you can
cam- choose your doctors.
intless Third, we'll all save
indicated money because there will
i to be be no CEOs' shareholder
gent cri- dividends or advertising
costs, plus private insurers
ot diffi- will have to lower their pre-
why miums, providing better
ible to value in order to compete
)m fic- so folks who decide to keep
health their current plans will







�-W .


* % .
-^.,' AU


save money, too.
Fourth, you'll never be
kicked off or denied cover-
age because you're sick or
aging or because an insurer
leaves your area as is so
common today.
And fifth, because it is a
key part of universal health
care, low-income Ameri-
cans, those in rural areas
and folks with pre-existing
conditions will be able to
have coverage. This cover-
age, while not free, will be
based upon your income
level.
With so many good-pay-
ing jobs being outsourced,
teachers losing their jobs,
auto industry downsizing
and company closings, isn't
it about time all Americans
have access to affordable
high-quality health care?
Harriet Heywood
Homosassa

Public input
On June 23,1 I gave a
speech to the Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners, saying that I was
dedicating the occasion to
the freedom-seeking citi-
zens of Iran who oppose the
stoning of women, women
required to obtain male ap-
proval for jobs and men


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having multiple wives. I re-
ceived from the BOCC not
one extension of support
for the suffering citizens
who have been yearning for
the freedom that has been
taken for granted in this
country.
All of our commissioners
are Republican. What good
is merely using the name
Republican if you are
afraid and or do not care to
voice support for freedom?
The greatest Republican,
Abe Lincoln, who our cur-
rent president supposedly
admires greatly, was great
because he stood for free-
dom for the former slaves
and this country itself paid
for that freedom during the
course of the U.S. Civil War
in blood and suffering!
Stand up, commissioners,
for freedom and what is
right. (I have to give you
credit for voting unani-
mously for a resolution
against the Citrus County
citizens being overcharged
by an electric utility com-
pany.)
Public input was not al-
lowed at the special BOCC
meeting last week. I feel
that there should be public
input at all county commis-
sion meetings. I spoke to
Alexis Lambert, attorney
for the secretary of state,
who said that according to
statute, the BOCC is not re-
quired to allow public input
at a special meeting, but
that the BOCC could allow
it if the commissioners see
fit There will'be another
special meeting July 7,
since the remainder of the
last meeting was postponed
due to a thunderstorm. I
hope there will be public
input allowed prior to any
votes taken (this would be
the appropriate time).
From my discussion with
county staff, the BOCC has
made a discretionary deci-
sion to have a public input
time later in the meeting.
Let's just have public
input at every county com-
mission meeting, special or
not, prior to any votes by
the BOCC. Let's have free-
dom in Citrus County, along
with Iran!
Renee McPheeters
* Crystal River


TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2oo9 A13


OPINION


t


...... .. . ..


520 SE 8TH AVE.


CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429










A A - . ...... .. ..... 2n nnO


fL.& TUESDAY, JUINE -5, L'UJ


STOCKS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THEMAKE INREIE


MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIyE ($1 ORMORE) Here are the 825 most active stocks on the NewYork Stock Exchange, 765
Name Vol(oo) Last Chg Name Vol(OO) Last Cha Name Voll(Oo) Last Chq most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 116 most active on the Amen-
BkofAm 3194477 13.19 +.44 AntaresP 106871 1.06 +.34 PwShs QQQ852409 36.45 +.08 can Stock Exchange.Tables show name, price and net change.
SPDR 1537101 92.70 +.86 PSCrudeDL 89631 4.50 +.19 Microsoft 610051 23.86 +51. Name: Stocks appear alphabetically by the company's full name (not abbrevia-
DirxFinBear1517364 4.57 -.16 Hemisphrx 46307 2.57 -.28 ETrade 601178 1.30 +.02 ton). Namesconsisting of initials appear at the beginning of each letters list.
DirxFinBull 1298067 9.47 +.32 UraniumEn 38029 3.14 -.23 Intel 586005 16.38 +.09 Lst: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day.
SPDR Fncd1045522 12.07 +.15 EldorGdg 34910 9.45 +.05 Cisco 480470 18.99 +.08 Chg: Loss or gain forth day. No change indicated by ...
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) G S (2 , Stock Footnotes: old- Issue has been called for redemption by company. d- New 52-week
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) . GAINERS ($2 O' MORE) GAINERS 2 OR MOE) -. L,;:5 n 1l1 12 m' ,i . C,:-,p3,-, ,r t,i,vl Ar.tr, Amecr.r Er ..irg r:
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chq %Cho 'ame Lastj Cg 'Chg Emergng Corr,pry Mara1llc.Ia r,. i er-po.rrT e1.,Tpi ir.m NasdaQ capitiai and au'iwiu ii,i-
ChinaDEd 8.90 +2.54 +39.9 Gulfstream 2.00 +.29 +17.0 "*JeBr.id.B 2 2) .'58 3 ir, )suw.:ain r,-i . -ia o i f a i. ,a ew I ..' ,re i ar:.' rr4,.21-6e1 h.r, a. ia l5.
TRWAuto 11.35 +2.35 +26.1 PMCCT 6.49 +.94 +16.9 rc.wr,Ctn 2 :. '. *9 - .-t 3 u,.: .ale cnly irori, he begir,,9i..'.gj rrauni pi . Prelrea .10 .asue or . Piaereroce r'
InterOilg 29.27 +4.52 +18.3 LazKap 2.38 +.25 +11.7 EuroBncsh 2.00 +.56 +38.9 Mc.ia r :wa ili iiii,'ALrs our u:r.a-r e ,p ri . I ,grii' , . ~:, .,:ur,ry ar a l e" 6 t6'1 d ponc
Compx 5.97 +.79 +15.3 Lannett 7.52 +.77 +11.4 Crftmde 2.07 +.52 +33.7 SICk haE pii -ry at e5a 26 0 par,:, ..inm i.i irA.i r ,63 . Tradeai- il br s.smeia n r,ter. ire
ArvMerit h 4.45 +.51 +12.9 B&HO 4.05 +.40 +11.0 FFD FinI 15.00 +3.65 +32.2 s.xI' i. ,ui.5i ua *. Wen an Iitr,uiSe c WASnrni aii.ing a urer.naer ..iael .:.,-I. u- *
S52 wa k righ ur' . U ilr iri lud.'g 'rmois nan .r..a o6curry AS - CL. '.anyf ir. tarku ,.:y , 16-
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) LOSERS ($2 c. M.:.E) LOSERS [$2 Or MORE) ce,,rsr,,p or bairig reorgarizd .j',ar rme Dakrup:y . appears.-: ,n i,.r,' 1iit.. nram.e
Name Last Cha %Chq Name La __ Ch_ %Cng ame Last Cnq '.Cng Source: The Assoclted Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
AllisChE 2.72 -.43 -13.7 Wilber 10.47 -2.58 -19.8 ParkBnc 7.03 -2.82 -28.6
FstAccept 2.17 -.33 -13.2 Protalix 4.37 -.87 -16.6 ChinaBiotn 12.22 -4.13 -25.3
ScrippsEWs2.19 -.31 -12.4 UTEK 3.80 -.70 -15.6 eLoyalty 8.31 -2.08 -20.0
Zapata 6.63 -.93 -12.3 NIVSIntTn 2.91 -.46 -13.6 SptChalA 2.00 -.50 -20.0 52-Week Net % YTr
CPIh 16.62 -2.18 -11.6 Fdedmlnd 5.60 -.84 -13.0 Ikonics , 5.50 -1.37 -19.9 High Low Name- Last Chg Chg ChI


I ?"3 Ad.- n.:ed
1,183 Declined
100 Unchanged
3,156 Total issues
24 New Highs
6 New Lows
4,043,776,843 Volume


DIARY


DIARY


2)7 Adr.nced
270 Declined
68 Unchanged
605 Total issues
13 New Highs
2 New Lows
111,886,034 Volume"


1 198
1,484
129
2,811
61
7
1,954,885,018


11,924.19 6,469.95Dow Jones Industrials
5,293.41 2,134.21Dow Jones Transportation
528.07 288.66Dow Jones Utilities
8,945.54 4,181.75NYSE Composite
2,257.28 1,130.47Amex Index
2,473.20 1,265.52Nasdq Composite
1,335.63 666.79S&P 500
13,634.46 6,772.29Wilshire 5000
764.38 342.59Russell 2000


YTD YTD,
Name Div YId PE Last Chg %Chg Name DIv YId PE Last Chg %Chgi
AK Steel .20' 1.0 ... 19.38 -.11+107.9 Lowes .36 1.8 14 19.47 +.25 -9.5)
AT&T Inc 1.64 6.5 12 25.22 +.40 -11.5 McDnlds 2.00 3.5 15 57.23 +.23 -8.01
AlliedCap ...... ... 3.46 +.14 +28.6 Microsoft .52 2.2 14 23.86 +.51 +22.7q
BkofAm .04 .3 17 13.19 +.44 -6.3 Motorola .........6.61 -.01 +49.2
CapCtyBk .76 4.5 33 16.85 -.09 -38.1
Citigrp ......... 3.02 -.01 -55.0 Penney .80 2.8 14 28.89 +.52 +46.6..
Disney .35 1,5 12 23.66 +.23 +4.3 ProgrssEn 2.48 6.5 13 38.13 +.37 -4.3'
EKodak ... ... 13 3.00 +.05 -54.4 RegionsFn .04 1.0 ... 4.07 +.12-48.9,
Embarq 2.75 6.3 9 43.52 +.69 +21.0 SearsHIdgs ... 60 67.67 +2.77 +74.1,
ExxonMbI 1.68 2.4 9 70.58 +1.53 -11.6 Smucker 1.40 2.9 14 48.85 +.47 +12.7'
FPLGrp 1.89 3.3 13 57.62 +.93 +14.5 SprintNex ...... ... 4.92 -.07+168.%
FairPoint ... ...... .63 +.07 -80.8 TimeWrn rs .75 3.0 ... 25.33 +.38 +13.6'

GenElec .40 3.4 8 11.76 +.01-27.4 UniFirst .15 .4 11 36.84 -.56 +24.1;
HomeDp .90 3.8 17 23.87 +.26 +3.7 VerizonCm 1.84 5.9 14 31.36 +.37 -7.56
Intel .56 3.4 21 16.38 +.09 +11.7 WalMart 1.09 2.2 14 48.76 +.13 -13.0'
.IBM 2.20 2.1 12 105.83 +.15 +25.7 Walgrn .45 1.5 14 29.89 +.09 +21.Z,


D % 52-wk
ig % Chg


8,529.38 +90.99 +1.08 -2.81 -24.85
3,257.35 -5.72 -.18 -7.91 -34.17
359.95 +4.16 +1.17 -2.92-30.89
5,962.50 +55.54 +.94 +3.57-31.15
1,593.28 +2.10 +.13+14.01 -28.62
1,844.06 ' +5.84 +.32 +16.93-19.58
927.23 +8.33 +.91 +2.65 -27.56
9,493.98 +73.90 +.78 +4.48-27.38
510.61 -2.61 -.51 +2.23 -25.96


Request stocks or mutual funds to be listed here by writing .

Ihe Chronicle, Attn: Stock Requests, 1624 N. Meadowcrest

Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429; or call 563-5660. Include 5

the name of the stock, market and ticker symbol. For mu-

lual funds, list parent company, symbol and the exact name 3
.of the fund. Staff will not provide real-time quotes.


NEWORKSTOKECAG


Name Last Chg


ABB Ltd 15.99 +.55.
ACE Ltd 43.95 -.01
AESCorp 11.46 +.59
AFLAC 31.85 +.03
AGL Res 31.83 +.28
AKSteel 19.38 -.11
AMB Pr 18.65 +.24
AMR 4.25 - ...
ASA Lid 63.83 +.47
AT&T Inc 25.22 +.40
AU Optron 9.65 -.18
AXA 19.45 +.48
AbtLab 47.82 +.39
AberFRt 26.06 -.10
Accenture 33.43 -.29
AdamsEx 8.47 +.07
AdvAuto 41.56 -.21
AMD 3.72 +.10
AdvSemi 2.75 -.06
AecomTch 32.00 +2.76
AeroposL 34.29 +.80
Aetna 25.19 -.01
Agilent 20.43 +.05
Agnicog 54.49 +.06
Agriumgr 41.25 +.85
AirTran 6.25 +.29
AlcatelLuc 2.47 -.06
Alcoa' 10.44 -.22
AlIgEngy 26.00 +.02
AllegTch 34.78 +.23
Allergan 47.80 +1.64
Allete 28.86 +.12
AlliBGIbHi 10.46 -.03
AlliBInco 7.67 +.03
AlliBem 20.01, +.17
AlliedCap 3.46 +.14
Aldlrsh . 4.75 -.15
AllisChE 2.72 -.43
Allstate 24.60 +.44
AlphaNRs 26.75 '+19
Altra 16.50 +.02
AmrbacF .95 -.04
Ameren 24.94 +.41
AMovilL 39.07 +..34
AmArdehe 3.56 +.20
AEagIeOut 14.32 +.10
AEP 29.04 +.43
AmExp 24.00 +.24
AmrlntiGp 1.33 -.13
AmOdBio 5.27 +.17
AmnSIP3 8.73 -.01
AmTower 32.22 +.35
AnWtrWks 19.26 +19
Arrigas '33.73 -.21
Amedprise 24.15 +.26
AmedriBrgs 18.07 -.10
Anadarko 46.03 -.04
AnalogDev 24.68 -.10 ,
AnnTaylr 7.86 -.28
Annaly 15.05 -.07
Aon Corp 37.70 +.70
Apache 72.53 +.31
Aptlnv 8.98 -.18
AquaArn 17.69 +.66
ArceborMit 33.36 +.05'
- i,-.-;.. ' 15.36 +.01
,..rl.,, 27.25 +.56
.,-.. ;3'ir, .37 +.05
A.1',;,,1 , 4.45 +.51
Ashland 28.00 +1.15
Aspenlns 21.93 +.325
AsdEstat 5.70 -.41
AssuredG 12.29 +36
AstoriaF 8.50 -.14
ATMOS 25.31 +21


AutoNatn 17.55 +.32
Autoliv 29.09 +.81
AvatonBay 55.89 +50
AvisBudg 5.67 +.13
Avon 26,66 +.45
BB&TCp 22.49 -.18
BHP BiILt 55.40 +78
BJSvcs 13.68 -.02
BP PLC 47.96 +.72
BRT 4.31 +.01
BakrHu 36.78 -.10
BallCp 45.25 +2.36
BcoBrades 14.95 +.06
BcoSantand 12.17 +.32
BkofAm 13.19 +.44
BkArpfL 829.55 -13.65
BkNYMeIl . 29.71 +.35
Barclay 18.35 +.39
BarrickG 34.87 -.16
Baxter 52.95 +.70
BaytexEg 16.75 -.24
BestBuy 34.02 +.44
BigLots 21.14 -.02
B]kHillsCp 22.96 -.10
BIkDebtSyr 3.00 -.04
BIkEnhC&l 12.97 +.16
BlockHR 15.67 +.25
Blockbstr .67 +.05
BlueChp 2,51 +.06
Boeing 42.65 +.77
Borders 3.53 +.02
BorgWam 33.69 +1.14
BostBeer 30.12 +.15
BostlProp 46.55 -.36
BostonSci 10.42 +.07
Brandyw 7.38 +.10
Brinker 17.48 +.93
BrMySq 20.57 -.39
BrkldPrp 7.78' +.20
Brupswick 4.45 -.05
Buckeye 42.97 '+.65
BurgerKing 17.43 +.25
BuriNSF 74.56 -1.11
CB REllis 9.44 +.07
CBL Asc 5.37 -.21
CBSB 7.22 +.15
CF Inds 75.65 -.54
CH Engy 47.22 -.04
OIGNA 24.25 -.42
Crr Gp 2.30 -.05
CMSEng 12.20 +.22
CSS Inds 20.89 -.99
CSX 34.76 -1.44
CVS Care 32.13 +.77
CabotO&G 30.58 -.08
CallGoll 5.25 -.07
Calpine 10.94 '+39
Camecbgs 26.05
Cameron 28.72 -.18
CampSp 29.69 +.16
CdnNRsg 52.80 +1.21
CapOne 22.38 +.44
CapitlSrce 4.84 +.06
CapMpt8 13.40 +.05
CardnlHlth 30.87 +.09
CarMax 14.52 +.04
Carnival 26.09 +.74
Caterpillar. 34.74 +.18
Celanese 23.86 +.96
Cemex 9.60 +,09
Caeig pts 13.69 -.07
CenterPnt 11.24 +.18
Centex 8.63 +.17
CnryTel 31.77 +.38
ChampEh .34 +.04
Checkpnt 15.51 +21
ChesEng 19.46 -.10
Chevron 66.88 +.93
Chicos 9,51 +.41


Chimera 3.39 +.09
ChinaUni 13.71 -.26
Chubb 40.14 +.63
CinclBell 2.88 +.09
Cltgrp 3.02 -.01
CleanH 54.77 +.25
CliftsNRs 24.82 +.07
Clorox 56.53 +.62
Coach 26.59 -.34
CocaCE 16.74 -.06
CocaCI 48.29 +.16
Coeurrs 12.83 +,11
CohStSUII 12.10 +.17
ColgPal 71.74 -.02
CollctvBrd 14.82 +.21
ColBgp .68 -.04
ComstkRs 32.81 +.38
Con-Way 35.02 -.14
ConAgra 19.44 +10
ConocPhil 42,21 +.59
Conseco 2.24 -.16
ConsolEngy 34,76 -.10
ConEd 37,53 +.49
ConstellA 12.49 +.21
ConstellEn 26.81 +29
CtAirB 8.86 +.08
Onvrgys 9.17 -.01
Coming 16.27 -.10
CosanLtd 5.37 -.30
CoventyH 18.68 -.35
Covidien 37.57 +1.20
CrwnCstle 24.14 -.41
Cummins 36.09 +1.19
CDiSemi 9.05 .05

DCTIndl 4.16 -.09
DJIADiam 85.25 -+.98
DNP Selct 8.01 -.02
DPL 23.42 +.12
DR Horton 9.54 -.06
DTE 32.41 +.45
Daimler 37.03 +.71
Darden 33.78 +1.57
DeanFds 19.19 +.42
Deere 42.15 +.37
DelMnte 9.32 +.08

DeltaAir 5.79 +09
DenburyR 14.94 -.10
DevelDiv 4.87 +.03
DevonE 55.49 +.08
DiaOffs 84.45 -.13
DicksSptg 17.47 +.02
DigitalRIt 34.72 +.67
DirxFinBull 9.47. +32
DlirxFinBear' 4.57 -.16
DirxSCBear 22.52 +.02
DirxSCBull 28.24 +.19
.DirxLCBear 34.50 -.96
DirxLCBull 34.65 +.96
DirxEnBear 21.77 -.92
ODirxEnBull 29.81 41.04
Discover 10.69 +.81
Disney 23.66 +.23
DomResc s 33.87 +.48
DonlleyRR 11.80 +.23
DEmmeft 8.77 +.01
DowChm 16.07 +.02
DuPont' 26,01 +.63
DukeEngy 14.58 +.17
DukeRlty 8.62 -.01
Dynegy 2.21 +.11'
EMCCp 13.44 -.07
EOG Res 66.96 -.60
EQTCorp 35.41 +1.13
EastChm 38.79 +1.38
EKodak 3.00 +.05
Eaton 45.62 +.44


Ecolab 39.06 +.43
Edisonint 31.87 +.58
EIPasoCp 9.17 +.6
Elan 6.95 -.41
Embarq 43.52 +.69
EmarsonEl 33.27 +.18
EmpDist 16.54 -.05
EnbrEPtrs 38.74 +.34
EnCana 49.69 +.45
EncoreEn 14.30 -1.25
EnPro 18.21 +.13
ENSCO 35.43 +.10


Entergy 78.23 +1.80
EntPrPt 24A96 -.33
EqtyRsd 22.14 -.13
ExcelM 6.74 -.12
Exces 11.12 +.87
Exelon 50.48 -.22
.EaonMbl 70.58 +1.53
FMC Corp 48.11' +.74
FMCTech 38.07 +.26
FNBCpPA 6.35 -.06
FPLGrp, 57.62 +.93
FairchldS 7.12 -.12
FairPoint .63 +.07
FamilyDir 28.80. -.10
FannieMaeh .58 +.07
FedExCp 55.63" +.22
FedSignl 7.64 -.02
Ferreligs 16.24 +.05
Ferro 2.72 +.12
FdlNFin 13.71 +.05
FidNInfos 20.02 +.06
FstHorizon 12.19 +.25
FTActDiv 10.57 -.13
FtTrEnEq 8.92 +.07
FirstEngy . 39.52 +.13
FlowrsFds 21.86 +.37
Fluors. 52.15 +.32
FootLockr 10.66 -.16
FordM 5.78 +.17
ForestLab 25.15 -.08
ForestOil . 14.90 +.12
Fortress 3.55 +.30


FortuneBr 35.97 +.41
FdtnCoal 28.67 +.18
FredMach .61 +.08
FMCG 50.33 -.22
FrontierCm 719 +.15


GATX 25,57 +.45
GabelliET 4.57 +.09
GabHIthW 5.13 +.03
GabUtil 6.97 +.09
GameStop 22.17


HarmonyG 10.75 -.06
HartfdFn 12.10 +.23
Hasbro 24.47
HawaliEl 19.05 +.42
HItCrREIT 33.98 +.30
HItMgmt 5,06 +.24
HlthcrRlty 16.82 +23
HealthNet 15.56 -.08
HeclaM 2.79 -.10
Heinz 35.75 +.03
HellxEn 10.85 +.01
HelnTel 7.70 -.63


Gannett 3.76 +.03 Hertz 8.14 +.06
Gap 16.57 +.51 Hess 54.44 +.16
GenceShip 21,98 -.83 HewlettP 38.98 +1.37
GenDynam 57.00 +1.54 4,,ir..,mP.p 22.21. -.31
GenEec 11.76 +.01 -:,T.i:'p 23.87 +.26
GenMills 55.84 +.56 Honwilnt 32.18 +.41
Genworth 7.10 +.28 11.,.FT 11,77 +.24
GaPw8-44 25.14 +.14 . M,,.,|HiIl; 8.22 +.13
Gerdau 10.60 +.02 Humana 31,39 -.32
Gildan 14.64 -1.34 Huntsmn 5.16 -.12
GoldFLtd 12.39 +.07 IAMGIdg 10.30 -.18
Goldcrpg 36.17 +.11 ICICIBk 30.80 -.09
GoldmanS 149.36 +2.62 IMSHth 12.89 -.13
Goodrich 50.97 +1.01 iSAsta . 16.97 +,16
Goodyear 11.40 +.18 iShBraz, 53.44 -.17
Graffech 11.48 -.03 iSCan 21.85 +.27
GtPlainEn 15.69 +.26 iShHK 14.09 +.08
Griffon 8.51 -.05 iShJapn 9.50 -.05
GpTelevisa 17.25 +.12 iSh Kor 35.04 +.19
GuangRy 23.56 -1.01 iSMalas 8.90 +.09
GuamtyFIf .20 -.06 iShMex 37.01 +.15
HCC Ins 24,13 -.14 iShSing " 9.07 +.03
HCPInc 21.08 -.02 iSTaiwn 10.06 ...
� - ,T, 4.21 -.05 iShSilvers 13,66 .-24.
- C 42.57 +.11 iShCh25s 38.78 .. +41.
HSBC cap 23.62 -.27 iSSP500 92.98 +.97
Hallibrtn 20:94 I +.04 iShEMkts 32.56 +.24
HahJS 11.32 -.09 iShSPLAs 35.01 +16
HanPtDv2 7.89 +.08 iShB20T 94.73 +.14
Hanesbrds 15.02 -.48 iS Eafe 46.35 +.39
Hanoverlns 37.67 +.33 iSRMCVs 29.13 +.34
HadeyD 16.79 - +.12 iSRI1KV '47.95 +70


iSR1KG
iSRuslK
iSR2KV
ISR2KG
IShR2K
iShREst
iShFnSv
IShFnSc
iShSPSm
iStar
Idacorp
ITW


Imation 7.83 -.11
IngerRd 21.20 -.15
hgrmnM 17.57 -.17
IntegrysE 30.40 +1.11
IntcnlEx 118.36 +2.34
IBM 105.83 +.15
IntlGame' 16.38 -.14
InltPap 14.42 +.46
InterOig 29.27 +4.52
Interpublic 5.02 -.08
Invesco 17.68 +.05
IronMtn 2900 +.21
ItaUniMult 1603 +02

JPMorgCh 34.60 +.15
Jabil 7.46 +.30
JacobsEng 42.54 +1.17
Jefferies 22.06 -.03
JohnJn 56.96 +.36
JohnsnCtl 21.80 +.49
JonesApp 10.58 -.19
KBHome "14.11 +.69
KBRInc . 18.70 +.Q04
KCSouthn ,16.05: -.27
Kaydon 34.28 -.46
KA EngTR 18.20 +.31
Kellogg 46.60 +.37
KeyEngy 5.66 -.12
Keycorp 5.32 +.12
KimbClk 53.22 +.87
Kimco 9.88 -.09


KindME 50.68- +.23
KingPhrm 9.77 -.05
Kinrossg 18.76 -.16
Kohls 43.41 -.69
Kraft 25.58 +.02
KrispKrm 2.98 -.09
Kroger 22.23 -.15
LDK Solar 11.47 +.17
LLE Roy hit .55 -.00
LSI Corp 4.50 -.16
LTC Prp 21.03 +.35
LaZBoy 4.79 -.14
Ladede 32.99 -.27
LVSands 8.17 -.08
LeaCorp .47 +.08
LeggMason 25.10 -.27
LennarA 9.71 +.53
LbtyASG 2.72 +.04
LUbtProp 22.77 -.05
LillybEi 15.03 -.25
Limited 12.07 +.37
UncNat 17.08 +.90
Lindsay 32.70 -1.12
ULonsGtg 5.44 -.01
UzClaib 2.85 . -.10
UoydBkg 4.79 +.17
LockhdM .82.04 +1.07
Loews 27.44 +.27
Lowes 19.47 +.25
Matzl ,47.11 +2.17

M&TBk 51.235 +2.20
MBIA 4.47 +.25
MDU Res 19.03 +.50
MEMC 17.79 -.17
MF Global 5.84 -.23.
MFAFncI 6.78
MCR 8.15 +.03
MGIC 4.45 +.18
MGMMir 6.65 -.13
MSCI Inc 24.55 -.32
Macerich 17.40 -.21
MackCali 22.60 +.44
Maoquar h 3.84 +.29
Macys 11.94 +.27
Madeco. s 6.B5 +27
Magnalg 40.19 -.04
Manitowoc 5.44 +.15
Manulifgs 18.12 -.26
MaralhonO 29.81 +.29
MarinerEn 11.84 -.08
MktVGold 39.15 -.05
MarlntA 22.17 +.36
MarshM 20.43 +.11
Marshlls 4.97 +.19
MStewrt 3.17 -.03
Masco 9.54 +.13
MasseyEn 19.46 +.03
MasterCrd 168.15 -.76
Mattel 16.11 +.17
McDnlds 57.23 +.23
McKesson 44.47 -.20
McMoRn 6.05 +.21
McAfee 42.05 +1.89
Mechel 8.50 -.36
MedcoHIth 46.12 +.38
Medtmic 34.79 -.18
Merck 27.85 +.85
MedRsd h .35 +.03
... r,. 26.08 +20
*,.l.li.- 30.06 +.21.
MetroPCS 1426 -.41
MicronT 5.11 +.01
MidAApt 35.36 -.33
Midas 10.55 -.30
Millipomre 70.99 -.72
Mirant 15.10 +.75
MitsuUFJ 6.33 -.21


MoneyGrm 1.78
Monsanto 76.20 +.95
Moodys 26.48 +.47
MorgStan 29.10 +.48
MSEmMkt 10.99 +.08
Mosaic 45,94 +2.59
Motorola 6.61 -.01
MuellerWat 3.89 -.01
MurphO 54.72 +.87
NCI Bid 2.88 +.04
NCR Corp 12.04 +.37
NRG Egy 24.95 +1.15
NYSEEur 28.12 +.12
Nabors 15.27 +.06
NalcoHId 17.05 +.62
NatFuGas 36.02 +.28
NatGrid 46.01 +.48
NOilVarco 33.28 +.18
NatSemi 12.83 -.14
NewAEn s 7.30 +.04
NJ Rsce 37.16 -.07
NY CmtyB 10.71 +.03
NewellRub 10.39 +.11
NewlldExp 32.24 +.56
NewmtM 42.33 -.17
NwpkRs If , 2.90 -.07
NexenO g 21.81 +.55
NiSource 11.66 +.20
Nicor 34.94 +.26
NikeB 51.75 +.91
NobleCorp 31.24 -.14
NobleEn 59.31 +1.22
NoklaCp 15.01 +.19
Nordstrm 19.65 +.12
NorflkSo 38.22 -.97
NoestUt 22.40 +.28
NorthropG 46.64 +.68
NSTAR 31.89 +.32
Nucor 45.25 +.10
NvFL 11.56 +.06
NvIMO 12.20 -.10
NvMulSI&G 5.49 -.01
NuvQPf2 6.14 -.03
OGE Engy 28.37 +.22
OcciPet 66.13 +1.83
OfficeDpt 4.78 +.18
OfficeMax 6.32 -.24
OilSvHT 99:13 +.05,
Olin 12.12 -.22
OmegaHIt 15.54 +.01
Omncre 25.78 +.81
Omnicem 31.89 +.11
ONEOK 29.45 +.44
ONEOKPt 45.81 +.01
OshkoshCp 14.79 +.19
OwensCom 12.70 +53


PG&ECp 38.32
PNC 39.58
PNM Res 10.94
PPG 43.86
PPLCorp 33.39
Pactiv 21.45
PallCorp 27.14
ParkerHan 43.00
PatliotCs 6.21
PeabdyE 30.54
Pengrth g 7.89
F:,. : . 13.45
,,,,.., 12.78
S '....f '28.89
Penske 17.14
PepBoy 10.08
'PepcoHold 13.57
PepsiBott 33.67
PepsiCo 54.84
PepsiAmer 26.62
Prmlan 11.03


I A A E AN


Name Last Chg BarcUBS36 37.84 +.28
BarcGSOil 25.51', +.75
BrclndiaTR 50.80 +.41
AbdAsPac 5.57 +.05 BootsCoots 1.41 -.11
AdmRsc 17.63 +.13 BovieMed 9.15 -.54
Adventx .15 +.00 CanoPet .93 +,17
AlldNevG 8.47 ... CapAcq wt .47 +.03
AItAstMAc 9.79 ... CaracoP 3.04 -.35
Amp&G ,98 .+.09 CardiumTh 1.92 , -.98
AntaresP 1.06 +.34 CelSci .40 -.00
ApolloGg .44 +.01 CFCdag 11.82 -.17
AlasAcwtl .16 ... CheniereEn 2.85 -.15
Aurizong 3.61 -.03 ChinaGmn 8.50 +.19
BMBMunai 1.05 +.02 ChNEPetn 4.54 -.05
BPZRes 5.12 -.15 ClaudeRg .82 +.05


ClghGlbOp 10.85 +.07
Confinucre 2.48 -.01
Crosshglt .20 -.01
Crystalxg '.21 .:.
CubicEnn 1.55 -.27

DenisnMg 1.68 +.04
DOneEngy .13 +.00
EVInMu2 11.99 -.13
EldorGIdg 9.45 +.05
ElixirGam .16 +.03
EllswthFd 5.50 -.05
Endvrlnt 1.53 -.31
FiveStar 1.81 . +.17
RFlaPUtil 14.40 -.33


FrkStPrp 13.26 -.11


GabGldNR 13.66 -.03
GasoEngy .27 +.06
GastarEg ' .39 -.01 .
GerMoly 2.35 -.25
GeoGlobIR .94 +.10
GIbEnHId .12 +.02
GoldStrg 2.09 +.05
GormanR 20.36 -2.79
Grahams 13.51 -1.29
GranTrrag 3.46 -.04
GrtBasGg 1,44
GreenHntr 2.07 +.03


HQSustM 9.50 +.35
HealthFtn 6.42 +.27
Hemisphrx 2.57 -.28
HicksAcwt .07 +.01
HooperH .45 +.05
IA Global .04 -.00
ImpOilgs 38.95 +.34
IntellgSys .72
IntTower 3.25 4.24

JavelinPh 1.23 -.08
KodiakOg 1.10
LadThalFn .55 +.10
Lodgian 1.27 +.06


MadCatzg .26 -.03
Merrimac 7.84 -.81
Metallico 4.76 -.50
MetroHIth 2.01 -.18
Minefnd g 7.16 -.12
Nevsun'g 1.12 -.06
NDragon .15 -.00
NwGoldog 2.79 -.18
NAPallg 2.44 -.01
NDynMng 7.01 -.11
NthnO&G 6.66 -.18
NthgtMg 2.26 '-.11
NovaDeIP .35 +.04


NovaGIdg 4.50 -.10 RexahnPh .82 +.10
Oisandsg .9 ... Rubicon a 3.05 -.08
On2Tech .43 ..
SeabGld g 25.68 +.07
SivrcpM gn 3.78 +.26.
PacRim . 26 +.01 Sinovac 4.04 +.11
ParaG&S . 162 -.12 SulphCo ..97 -.09
PetroRes .68 +.17 Taseko 1.73 -.02
PionDrill 4.67 -.09 Telkonet .12
PSCrudeDS 70.96 -5.13 TianyinPn 2.88 -.07
PSCrudeDL 4.50 +.19 TnValley" 1.01 +.08
Protalix '' 4.37 -,87 USDatawk .26 -.05
PyramidOs 5.97 +.41 USGeoth 1.55 -.27
RaeSyst 1.44 -.13 USGold 2.47 -.15
Rentech .56 +.05 Uluru .17 +.01


UnivInsur. 5.35 -.25
UnivTravn 10.88 -.62
Umraneiz 1.87 -26
UraniumEn 3.14 -.23


VantageDr 1.74 -.17
Waterlnv 13.89 +.39
Westmrld 8.18 +.06
WilshrEnt 1.65 -.05
WizzardSft .51
ZionO&G 12.08 -1.22


NASDAQNATIOALMRE


Name Last Chg


A-Power 8.24 -.18
ACMooreIf 3.56 +.06
ADCTel 8.01 -.11
AMAG Ph 54.76 +.12
APACC 4.89 -.28
ASMLHid 21.49 +.11
ATP O&G 6.84 -.05
ATSMed 2 3.16 -.01
AVIBio 1.68 -.19
Aastrom .40 +.00
Abraxas . .94 +.02
AcaciaTc 7.58 -.02
Accelrys 5.84 -.34
Accuray 6.69 -.19
AcdvsB[zs 12.71 +.05
Acxiom 8.90 -.05
Adaptec 2.67 -.19
AdobeSy 28.62 +.62
Adtran 21.48 +.46
AdvBattery 4.02 -.04
AdvantaA .40
AdvantaB .36 +.01
Affymetrix 5.91 -.06
AgFeed 6.16 +.16
AirTmsp 2.47 -.01
AkamaiT 19.67 -.42
AkeenaS h 1.31 +.02
Akorn 1.18 +.08
Aldila 2.63 +.11
Alexions 40.02 +1.05
Alexza 2.40 -.07
AlignTech 10.96 +.15
Alkerm 10.88 -.32
AlegiantT 38.84 +2.97
AlidHithcr 2.20 -.08
AllionHIt 6.12 +.06
AllosThera 8.11 -.04
AliscriptM 16.27 +1.53
AltairNano .94 -.01
AlteraCplf 16.32 -.05
AltusPhmi .42 -.00
Alvarfon 4.61 -.04
Amazon 83.03 -.85
Amedisys 33.44 +.24
AmerBio h .20 -.02
ACapAgy 23.75 -.14
AmCapLId 3.09 -.08
ArnltPastan 28.59 -.98
AmerMed 15.84 -.23
AmSupr 26.14 +.33
Amrign 6.18 +.30
AmCasino 19.58 -.02
Amgen 53.11 +.31
AmkorTIf 4.70 +.19
Amylin 13.50 -.19
Anlogic 37.14 +.50
Analysts .56 -.04
AnchBcWI 1.10 -.41
Angiotchg 1.75 +.01
AngloAm 14.84 -.01
Ansys 30.99 -.02
Antigncs 1.84 -.08
ApogeeE 12.80 -.90
ApolloGrp 65,99 -2.51
Aplolnv 5.93 +.16
Apple Inc 141.97 -.47
ApidMatl 11.05 +.14
AMCC 8,19 +.19
ArcSight 18.09 +.68
ArdeaBio 15,86 +.42
ArenaPhm 4.86 -.14
AresCap 8.05 +.20
AriadP 1.60 -.06
Aribainc 9.81 -.13
ArkBest 26.59 -1.60
ArmHId 6.04 +.07
Arotech 1.67 +.27
Ards 12.40 +.36
Arrowhdh .44 -.03
ArtTech 3.93 +.12
ArubaNet 8.72 +.04
AscentSol 7.79 -.97
Asialnfo .17.94 +.64
AsscdBanc 13.37 +.02


athenahith 36.30 -.66
Atheros 19.05 -.36
AtasAm 17.74 +.04
Atmel 3.75 -.02
Audvox 6.32 -.02
AuthenTec 1.73 +.03
Autodesk 19.54 -.21
AutoData 35.29 +.60
Auxilium 31.20 +.86
AvanirPhm 2.48 +.09
Aware 2.50 -.14
Axcelis .45 +.05
AxsysTech 53.66 -.03
BEAero 14.18 -.03
BGC Ptrs 3,79 -.26
BJsRest 16.51 +.54
Baidu Inc 298.18 -3.00
BallardPw 1.84 +.14
BareEscent 8.81 +.46
Barzel Inds .23 +.00.
BeaconPw .78 +02
BeasleyB 2.11 -.43
BebeStrs 6.94 +.34
BedBath 31.14 +.11
BigBand 5.14 +.14
BioDIvy If 6.91 -.03
Biocryst ' 4.16 -.18
Biogenldc 47.32 L2.75
BioMarn 15.59 -.35
Biopurers .21 -.01
BioScrip 5.83 -.08
BlueCoat 16.93 -.47
BobEvn 28.84 +.69
BostPrv 4.46 -.47
BrigExp 3.65 -.20
Brightpnt 6.31 +.10
Broadcom 24.91 +29
BrdpntGIch 5.70 -.30
BrdwindEn' 10.72 -.26
BrodeCm 7.65 +.02
Bucyrus 28.86 +.01
BuffaloWW 32.09 -.41
CA Inc 17.43 +.22
CDCCpA 1.50
CH Robins 52.63 +.77'
CMEGrp 318.22 +.77
CTC Media 12.35 -.05
CVBFncl 6.15 -.18
Cadence 6.09 +.08
CaliperLSc 1.59 -.01
CdnSolar 12.44 +.03
CapCtyBk 16.85 -.09
CpslnTrb .85 +.09
CardioNet 16.59 -.40
CareprEd 23.76 -.29
Carrizo 17.24 +.02
CarverBcp 5.25
CasellaW 1.82 -.31
CasualMal 2.08 -.04
CathayGen 9.77 +.14
CaviumNet 16.89 -.64
Beyond 14.40 -.52
Celgene 48.33 +.30
CellGens h .31 +.03
CelfTher rsh 1.78 -.07
CelldexTh 8.11 +.37
CentlCom '8.38 -.02
CentEuro 26.64 +1.05
CentGardif 11.16 +.16
CentAl 6.27 -.40
Cephln 57.30 -.14
Cepheid 9.05 -.25
Cerner 63.82 +2.23
Changyoun 41.96 -3.57
ChrmSh 3.65 +.04
ChkPoinl 23.58 -.07
Cheesecake 16.47 +.05
ChildPlace 26.55 +.60
ChinaArch 1.97
ChinaBAK 3.04 -.20
ChinaDir 1.68 +.25
ChHousLd 5.55
Chinalnfo 2.93 -.11
ChinaMed 20.69 -.24
ChinaPSi 2.60 -.12
ChinaSun ' 4.33 -.17
ChinaTcF 2,03 -.15
ChlnsCEd 7.22 +.02


Chindex 12.62 +.24
ChrchllD 33.61 -.46
CienaCorp 10.39 .+.14
CinnRn 22.35 +.21
Cintas 22.93 +.01
Cirrus 4.53 -.06
Cisco 18.99 +.08
CitizRep .76 -.06
CitixSys 32.04 +.10
Clarienth 3.81 +.17
CleanEngy 8.66 -.29
Clearwire 5.73 +.86
ClickSIt 6.38 +.31
CognizTech 27.20 +.58
CogoGrp 5.99 -.25
Coinstar 26.10 +.45
ColdwtrCrk 5.38 -.01
ColumLab 1.09
Comarco 1.70 -.12
Comcast. 14.36 +.14
Comcspc! 13.92 +.01
CmciVehc 1.42 -.20
CommSys 9.66 -.40
CommVit 16.31 -.52
Compugn 1.89 +.30
Compuwf 6.93 +.03
Comtech 30.56 -.15
Comverge 12.81 +1.30
ConcurTch 31.22 +.72
Conmed 15.76 +.31
ConsolWlr 15.32 -1.27
ConstantC 20.03 , +.04
ConvOrgan 1.25 +.17
Copart 35.13 -.01
CodnthC 16.22 -.34
ComerThrs 11.54 +.14
CorpExc 20.73 +.06
CorusBksh .22 +.10
Costdo 46.20 -.21
CrackerE 28.10 +.25
Cray Inc 7.65 -.21
Cree Inc 29.50 -.42
Crocs 3.49 -.35
CrosstexE 4.17 -.03
CIrip.com 44.83 +.03
CubistPh 18.29 +.27
CuraGenh 1.41 -.01
Curs 1.55 -.03
Cyberoncs 16.51 +.27
CyprsBio 9.50 +.06


DUSA 1.01 -.02
DataDom 33.06 -.07
DealrTrk 17.85 +.52
DeckOut 70.20 -3.70
decodGenh .60 +.15
Dell Inc 13.86 +.18
DitaPtr 2.00 -.17
Dndreon '25.49 +1.50
Dentsply 30.89 -.04
Depomed 3.07 +.06
DigRiver 37.03 -1.49
DirecTV 25.02 +.45
DiscCmA 22.19 +.45
DiscCmCn 20.33 -.89
DiscvLabs 1.07 -.08
DishNetwk 16.10 +.29
DlrTree 42.72 +.06
DrmWksA 27.63 +.39
DressBam 14.52 +.11
DryShips 5.94 -.12
DyaxCp 2.08 -.10
Dynamex 14.87 -.57
Dynavax 1.32 -.06
ETrade 1.30 +.02
eBay 17.36 +.01
ev3nc 10.68 -.05
EagleBulk 4.86 -.34
ErthUnk 7.60 -.10
EstWstBcp 6.70 -.13
EchelonC 8.32 +.20
Edipsys 18.40 +.35
EduDv 5.10 -.15
ElectSci 11.58 -.50
ElectArts 20.81 -.09
Emcore 1.27 -.20


EndoPhrm 18.38 +.40
Endologix 3.36 -.09
Enerl 5.62 -.38
EngyConv 13.99 -.79
EnrgyRec 7.09 -.27
EngyXXI .54 +.05
Entegris 2.67 +.09
EntropCom 2.31 -.25
Entrust 1.83 . +.01
Equinix 69.08 -1.62
EricsnTel 9.85 . +.23
EvrgrSIr 2.23 . -.12
Exeixis 4.97 -.08
ExideTc 3.72 +.56
Expedia . 15.92
Expdlnd 33.47 +.41
ExpScripts. 68.60 +.81
ExtrmNet 1.95 -.08
Ezcorp 10.70 +.15
F5 Netwks 34.95 -.76
FCStone 4.16 -.51
FLIRSys 22.73 -.06
Fastenal 33.59 +.16
FiberTowr .46 +.12
FifthThird 7.07 +.12
Fncilnst 14.23 -.67
IRnisar .52 +.04
FinUne 7.77 +09
FstAdvnA 15,07 +2.32
FstCashFn 17.67 +.30
FMidBc 7.21 +.29
FstNiagara 11.56 +.11
FstSolar \ 157.20 -3.52
FstMerit 17.14 .-.02
Fiserv 45.75 -.25
Flextrn 4.09 -.12
FocusMda 7.91 -.19
ForcePro 9.15 +.16
FormFac 17.37 -.55
Fossil Inc 23.92 +.02
FosterWhl 23.88 +.11
FrankElec 26.06 +.18
FrontFncl 1.15 +.05
FuelSysSol' 19.35 -1.40
FuelCell 3.99 -.10
FultonFncd 5.26 -.01
Rol Int 19.79 +2.85

GMXRs 10.76 -.40
GSICmmrc 13.89 -.60
GT Solar n 5.75 +.02-
Garmin, 24.16 +.52
GenBiotch .61 +.01
Genopltix 32.50 -.86
Gentex 11.71 +.28
GenVec .74 -.01
Genzyme 56.21 -.29
GeronCp 6.69 -.26
GigaMed 15.96 +.15
GileadSci 47.37 -.15
GladerBc 15.27 -.07
Globlind 5.65 -.05
Globalstar 1.01 -.15
Googie 424.14 -1.18
GrWIfRes 2.09 -.08
GreenMtCs 58.56 +2.48 .
Gymbree 34.88 +.29
HLTH 13.07 +.11
HMNFn . 3.14 -.21
HSNIncn 9.97 -.12
HSW Int .20 +.01
Halozyme 7.13 -.01
HanmiFnd 1.63 +.24
HansenNat 31.15 -.62
HarbinElca 16.11 +1.11
Harmonic 5.96 -.09
HarrisStrA 6.35 -.26
HawHold 5.61 -.13
Healthwys 13.31 -1.19
HrindEx 14.86 -.11
HSchein 47.68 +.17
HercOffsh 3.89
Hibbett 18.01 -.03
HimaxTch 3.60 +.13
Hologic 14.20 -.22
HotTopic 7.39 -.01
HubGroup 20.52 +.16


HudsCity 13.50 +.06 LodgeNet 3.37 -.24
HumGen 2.91 +.07 Logitech 14.02 -.18
HuntJB 30.44 -.33 LookSmart 1.22 +.08
HuntBnk 4.33 -.03 lululemng 13.23 -.18
IACInters 15.93 Luminex 18.83 +.74
ICOGIbA .61 +.166
IPCHold 27.15 -.24
IPC 26.70 -2.18 MCGCap 2.38 -.20
iPass 1.62 -.18 MDRNA 1.42 -.09
iShNsdqBio 72.98 +.15 MGE 33.27 -.09
IconixBr 15.31 -.08 MTS 20.55 -.28
Illuminas 38.73 +.57 MacrvsnSol 21.93 -.11
Imax Corp 8.28 +.09 Magma , 1.35 +.07
Immucor 13.46 -.34 MaidenH 6.27 +.27
ImunoGn 8.40 -.25 MannKd 8.44 +.15
Imunmd 2.56 +.08 MarvellT 11,67 -.13
ImpaxLb n 7.59 +.02 Masimo 24.05 +.09
Incyte 3.41 -.10 Matrixx 5.50 -.27
Infinera 9.21 +.11 Mattson 1.14 +.03
Informant 17.21 +.05 MaxCapital 18.44 +.32
InfoSonich 1.80 +.18 Maximlign 15.80 -.32
InfosysT 37.24 -.42 MaxwllT 13.81 -.29
Innophos 16.11 -.12 Medarex 8.23 -.10
InsitTc 17.22 +.78 MedicActn 11.79 -.32
Insmed 1.09 -.06 MediCo 8.25 +.08
Insulet 7.36 +.37 MedisTech .52 +.02
IntgDv 6.00 -.03 MelcoCwn 4.46 -.22
Intel � 16.38 +.09 MentGr 5.33 +.06
Intellon. 4.59 -.51 MercadoL 26.53 +.99
InteractBrk 15.49 +.25 Mercerntl .63 +.06
InterDig 24.12 +.22 MergeHith 4.32 +.02
InterMune 14,99 +.30 MesaAirh .10 -.01
IntlBcsh 10.25 -.10 Methanx 12.39 -.10
IntlSpdw 26.07 +.01 Micrel 7.41 -.10
Intersil 12.75 -.15 Microchp 22.57 +.16
Intuit 28.27 -.08 Micromet 5.00 +.06
IntSurg 163.32 +3,60 MicrosSys 25.53 +1.27
Isis 16.64 +.05 MicroSemi 13.60
IstaPh 4.55 -.14 Microsoft 23.86 +.51
Itron 55.41 +1.01 Micrvisn 2.95 -.18
IvanhoeEn 152 +04 MillerHer 15.47 -.15
Millicem 57.01 +37
Misonix 1.99 -.08
JA Solar 4.73 -.12 ModusLink 7.01 -.04
JDSUniph 5.72 +02 Molex 15.91 +.15
JackHenry 20.85 +.05 Momenta 11.97 -.03
JacklnBox 22.27 +.01 MonPwSys 22.81 -.18
Jamba 1.24 +.08 MoveInc 2.14 -.02
JamesRiv 15.27 -.34 Mylan 13.25 -.17
JazzPhrm 3.79 -.09 MyriadGs 36.16 +1.56
JetBlue 4.32 +.01 MyriadPwi 4.73 +.16
JosphBnk 32.76 +1.03 NICESys 22.72 +.56
JoyGIbl 36.80 +.25 Nil Hidg 19.91 +.43
JnprNtwk 23.63 +1.00 NasdOMX 21.45 +.30
.KLATnc . 24.81 -.01 NatCoal 1.18 +.02
KeryxBio .96 -.04 NatPenn 4.66 -.23
Kirklands 11.88 +1.05 Navarre ' 1.65 +.19
KnghtCap 17.04 +.20 NektarTh 6.45 -.02
KongZhg 10.98 .+1.03 NetlUEPS 13.37 +.46
LCA Vis 4.40 -.23 NetApp 19.78 +.38
UlntO 1.91 +.02 Netease 35.96 -1.72
LKQ Corp 16.30 +.03 Netflix 41.20 +.83
LSIIndt 4.82 -.04 Neurogenh .24 +.01
LTX-Cred .44 +,01 NeutTand 31.21 +.94
LaJoiPhkh .20 -.01 NewsCpA 9.27 +.17
Labophmg 2.10 -.05 NewsCpB 10.66 +.13
LamResrch 25.44 +.67 NexMed .36 +.08
LamarAdv 15.55 +.25 Nextwave h .44 +.01
Landstar 35.86 -.13 NobityH 825
Lattice 1.86 -.14 NorTrst 54.01 +1.01
LawsnSft 5.54 -.08 NovtWrds 9.12 +.19
Layne 20.13 -.43 Novavex 2.50 -.10
LeapWidss 34.36 +13 Novell 4.59 -.03
Level3 1.50 +.10 Novius 16.64 +.14
UbGkIbA 15.86 +.14 NuHorizIf 3.23 +.08
UbGIobC 15.72 +.14 NuVasive 44.50 +.45
UbtyMintA 4.98 -.01 NuanceCm 12.32 -.01
UbMCapA 14.09 +,35 Nvidia 11.57
UbMEntA 26.95 +61 OReillyAh 38.20 +.60
LdeTech 41.83 -.09 OSIPhrm 28.74 +1.18
LifePH 26.23 +.05 OceanPw h '6.06 +.06
UhirGold 23.54 +.11 OceanFrt 1.49 +.17
Uncare 22.15 +.58 Odaro .63 +.10
UncEdSv 20.71 +.24 Oculus 3.52 +.22
UnearTch 23.16 -.35 OdysMar 1.51 +.04
UnnEngy 19.62 +.16 OldDomFh 33.53 +.21
Uonbrdg 1.86 -.06 Omnture 13.24 +.09
LivePrsn 4.19 +.14 OmniVan 10.67 -.24


OnAssign 3.98, -.11
OnSmend 6.85 +.05
Oncothyrb" 3.72 +.27
OnyxPh 28.77 +1.13
OpenTxt 36.55 +.18
OpnwvSy 2.39 +.05
Oracle 21.50 +.26
Orbcomm 1.62 +.02
Orexgen , 5.15 -.06
OriginAg 4.81 +.59
Orthfx 25.54 -.11
Orlhovta 5.24 -.30
Oscientf ' .20 -.01
OtterTail 21.83 +.28
Oxiaeneh 2.32 -06

PDLBio 7.86 -.10
PFChng 31.55 +.33
PMCSra 8.06 +.18
PSSWrld 18.52 -.01
Paccar 32.79 +1.25
Pacerlnl 2.09 +.27
PacCapB 2.27 +.01
PacEthan .36 +.08
PacSunwr 3.37 -.04
PaetecHId 2.71 -.08
Palm Inc 15.82 -.40
PanASIv 18.55 -.53
PaneraBrd 50.02 -1.28
ParagShip 3.79 -.07
ParamTch 11.89 -.06
Parexel - 14.71 +.08
Palterson 21.57 +.16
PattUTI 12.86 +.15
Paychex 25.38 -.09
Pegasysff 26.55 +1.85
. PnnNGm 29.34 +.08
PensonWw 9.34 -.76
PeopUtdF 15.30 +.25
Peregrine h .83 +.01
PerfectWId 30.05 -2.55
PermFix 2.50 -.09
Perrigo 28.14 +.35
Petroev .15.94 -.13
PetasMart 21.29 +.10
PharmPdt 23.26 -.06
PhaseFwd 15.25 -.64
Photrin 4.03 -.04
PinnadFn 13.87 -.14
Plexus 20.82 -.10
PlugPower .89 +.16
Polycom 20.11 +.08
Poniard h 5.55 +.09
Pool Corp 16.52 +.47
Popular 2.35 -.04
PwrInteg 24.27 -.01
Power-One 1.54 -.09
PwShs QQQ 36.45 +.08
Powawav 1.59 -.08
Presstek 1.33 +.23
PriceTR 41.86 -.01
priceline 114.65 -.27
PrognicsPh 5.09 -.06
ProspctCap 9.93 -.24
ProspBcsh 29.83 -.33
PsychSol 22.83 -.36
PureCyde 3.57 +.13
QIAGEN 18.42 +.15
QiaoXing 1.89 -.03
QIogic 12.82 +.27
Qualcom 46.09 -.10
QualitySys 57.85 +1.38
QuantFuel .79 +.13
OQuestSft 14.04 +.22
Questcor 4.96
RF MicD 3.90 +.01
RAM Egy .79 +.11
Rambus 15.54 -.25
Randgold 66.63 +.06
RealNwk 2.98 -.14
Regenm 17.84 -.30
RentACt 18.00 +.15
RepubAir ' 6.84 +.03
RschMotn 69.64 -1.02
RexEnergy 5.72 +.24
RigelPh 12.23 -.02
Riverbed 23.69 +1.14


RosettaR 8.81 -.04 Tekelec 16.84
RossStrs 38.98 +.63 TICmSys 7.24
RoyGId 42.97 +.90 Tellabs 5.80
RubiconTc 15.96 +1.09 TerreStar 1.53
r28.71 +1.0 TesseraT 25.36
TetraTc 29.14
SBACom 24.89 -.04 TevaPhrm 49.15
SEI Inv 17.78 +.03 Thrmogn .64
STEC 23.57 -.23 Thoratec 26.76
SanDisk 14.80 -.07 3Com 4.85
Sanmina .43 +.03 TbcoSft 7.32
Santarus 2.95 -.20 Tktmslrn 6.56
Sapient 6.26 +.16 iVolnc 10.5
Saoteonh . 1.90 -26 TiVolIc 10.58
SavientPh 14.48 +.09 TomoThera 2.84
Schnitzer 60.21 -1.15 TractSupp 41.12
Schwab 17.90 +.09 TridentMh 1.80
SciClone 2.70 +.11 TrimbleN 1979
SciGames 16.37 +.15 TriQuint 5.22
SeaceastBk 2.47 +.32 TrueRelig 22.07
SeagaleT 10.29 +.02 TrstNY 6.09
SearsHidgs 67.67 +2.77 Tustmk 19.91
Seleclsivlns 12.91 +.01 U 3
Semlech 15.94 -.07 UAL 3.47
Sepracor 16.98 -.15 UCBH II 1.30
Sequenom 4.90 -.08 USCncrt 1.92
Shanda 55,70 -4.93 UTiWridwd 11.28
Shire ' 41.87 +.02 UTStrcm 1.70
ShufflMstr ' 6.66 +29 UltaSalon 10.93
SigaTech h 8.20 -.06 UlHalife 7.02
SigmaAld 50.35 +.69 Umpqua 8,06
Silicnlmg 2.30 -17 Utdn 8606
SilcnLab 38.21 -.54 USdOnr 6.50
Skcnware 6.15 -.02 USEnr 2.5
SilvStdg 19.16 -'.36 UtdThrp 83.52
Sina 30.31 -1.09 UnivFor 34.40
SinusXM .42 +.06 UraniumR 1.28
SkyWest 10.62 +.41 UrbanOut 21.04
SkywksSol 9.97 -.05
SmarlBal 6.69 -.27
SmithWes 5.53 -.32 VCAAnt 26.96
SmithMicro 10.00 -.10 ValenceTch 1.85
Sohu.cm 64.62 -3.11 VaVisA 1.94
Solarfun 6.55 -.11 ValueClick 11.35
SonicCorp 10.15 +.01 VaeClick 11.35
SonicSolu 2.77 -.02 VandaPhm 12.19
Sonus 1.71 -.07 VarianSemi 23.88
SouMoBc 9.90 ... Veecolnst 11.94
SouthFnd 1.23 -.04 Verenium .77
SpdUndAll 6.27 +.07 Vengy 11.66
SpectPh 7.11 +.33 Verisign 18.71
Spreadtrm 2.95 +.20 VertxPh 36.00
StaarSur 2.28 +.30 Vical 2.20
Staples 20.52 -.08
StarBuik 3.71 -.01 Vignette 13.16
StarScient ' .92 +.02 VirgnMdah 9.26
Starbucks 14.64 +.11 ViroPhrm 6.07
StarentNet 24.52 -.07 VistaPrt 43.07
StIDynam 15.17 -.33 ivus 6.06
SteinMrt 899 +.37 WPP plc 33.79
StemCells 1.68 -.11 WamerChil 13.34
Stericyde 51.80 +1.09 WashFed 13.11
StedBcsh 6.60 -.15 WemerEnt 1801
StewEnt 4.87 +.10 WemerEnt 18.01
SunHithGp 8.31 +.03 WstCstB 2.02
SunMicro 9.18 +.17 WetSeal 3.08
SunPowerA 26.27 -.54 .WhitneyH 9.38
SunPwrBn 23.41 -.62 WholeFd 18.79
SuperGen 2.01 -.22 WindFMr 11.46
SusqBnc 4.90 +.03 Winn-Dixe 12.83
Sycamore 3.27 +.06 WdwrdGov 20.08
Symantec 15.67 -.24 WrightM 1600
Symetricm 5.86 -.04 n 1690
Synapticss 38.31 +.21 Wynn 36.93
Synopsys 19.40 +.62 XOMA .80
Synovis 21.45 +.42 Xilinx 20.34
Syntel 31.26 +1.16 XinhuaSpt .93
Syntroleum 2.30 --.02 YRCWwde 1.68
Synutra 11.10 -.886 Yahoo 15.90
TBSIntIA 8.03 +.02 Youbetcom 3.41
TDAmertr 18.00 -.06 ZebraT 23.62
TFSFnd 10.88 +.20 Zitars .37
THQ 7.42 +.01
twtelecom 10.29 +.42 "onBcp 12.24
TakeTwo 9,49 -.01 ZixCorp 158
TASER 4.55 -.18 Zoltek 9.87
TechData 32.40 -.12 Zoran 10.81


+.06
-.09
+.12
-.01
+.16
-.60
+.55
+.02
+.66
+.05
-.09
+.05
-.45
-.16
+.06
-.26
+.01
-.02
+.49
-.13
-.25
-.01
-.03
+.02
+24
-.13
+.41
+.61
+.10
-.05
-.03
+1.24
-.51
+.09
-.11
m4


PetroCg 38.83 +.67
Petrohawk 21.75 +.26
PetbrsA 33.69 +.31
Petobras 41.37 +.52
Pfizer 15.26 +.07
PhilipMor 43.39 +.78
PiedNG 24.26 +.15
PimcoStrat 8.80 +.11
PioNtI 25.60 +.16
PitnyBw 22.07 +.13
PlalnsEx 27.11 +.16 .
PlumCrk 29.91 +.27
Polaris 33.15 +.96
PostPrp 13.53 -.07
Potash 95.59 +2.50
PwshDB 23.03 +.22
Praxair 72.32 +.14
Pnridelnt 25.39 +-19
PdnFncl 19.19 +.08
PrUShS&P 54.41 -1.13
ProUltDow 29.17 +.67
PrUIShDow 47.32 -1.18
ProUtQQQ 38.26 +.11
PrUShQQQ 31.86 -.09
ProUntSP 26.51 +.49
ProUShL20 50.65 -.19
PrUShCh25 11.95 -.21
ProUShtRE 20,01 -.10
ProUShOG 18.53 -.51
ProUShlFn 41.19 -.92
ProUShtBM 18,64 -.21
ProUltifRE 3.49
ProultO&G 26.95 +.69
ProUiFin 3.99 +.08
ProUBasM 17.97 +.30
ProUSR2K 42,11 -.52
ProUIfR2K 19.31 +.05
ProUltCrude 13.62 +.79
ProUShCmrde6.30 -1.02
ProctGam 52.23 +.48
PrograsEn 38.13 +.37,
ProgsvCp 15.32 +.27
ProLogis 8.31 +.16
ProvETg 4.91 +.05
Prudentl 37.78 +1.03
PSEG 32.76 +.53
PSEG pfA 72.45
PubStrg 64.56 -.10
PulteH 8.97 +.21
PPrrT 4.97 +.05
QuantaSvc 23.23 +.50 (
Questar 31.51 ' +.21
QksivRes 9.66 +.04
QwestCm 4.10 -.11
RPM 14.24 +.11
RRI Engy 4.82 +.28
RadioShk 13.95 +.21
Raloorp 59.88 -.12
RangeRs 41.84 -.10
RaserT 3.85 -.20
RJamesFn 17.18 +.47
Rayonier 36.35 +.42
Raytheon 45.40 +.90
Rhtylnco 21.63 -.01
RedHat 19.99 +.12
RegBkHT 66.99 +.88
RLegionsFn 4.07 +.12
ReneSola 5.75 -.11,


Repsol 22.65 +.43,
RepubSvc 24.29 +.559r
RetailHT 78.41 +.59-
RetailVent 2.20 -.11
Revton rs 5.38 +.33-
ReynldAn 38.54 +,06,
RiteAid h 1.45 +.21,
RockwtAut 32.53 +.60
RockColl 42.20 +.65
Rowan 19.37 +.12,
RoyalBkg 42.10 +.93
RyCarb 13.25 -.03
RoyDShllA 50.79 +1.15
Royce 8.40 "+.169


SAP AG 40.61 +.89.
SCANA 32.59 +.47
SKTcan 15.23 +.06..
SLGreen 22.99 +.55
SLM Cp 10.05 +.78
SpdrGold 92.04 -.25,
SpdrHome 11.92 +.16
SpdrKwBk 18.28 +.28;
SpdrKbwCM 33.90 +24
SpdrKbwRB 18.63 -.01
SpdrRet 27.77 +.19
SpdrOGEx 31.56 +.36
SpdrMetM 37.90 +.06
Safeway 20.54 +.12,
SUoe 27.27 +.684
Stude 41.59 -.08
Saks 4.44 +.13,
SJuanB 14.33 +.01
SandRdge 8.33 -.12.
Sanofl 29.48 +1.47
SaraLee 9.69 +.11 :
Satyam . 3.26 +.04.
SchergPl 25.10 +54
Schlmbrg 54.97 +.49
SealAir 18.38 +57
Sealys 1.96 -.06
SemiHTr 21.37 +.01
SempraEn .50.80 +1.01
SenHous 16.29 +.48
Sensient 22.59 -.07
Sherwin 53.78 /-.33
SiderNac 22.81 -.37
Siemens 70.46 +1.71,
SilvWhtn g 8.52 -.20'
SimonProp 51.42 -.50
Skechers 9.62 +.20-
SmihAO 32.86 +.62
Smith[ntl 26.00 -.32
SmithfF 13.81 +.08:
Smucker 48.85 +.47
Sothebys 14.48 -.03
SoJerInd 34.72 +.03
SouthnCo 31.86 -.04
SthnCopp s 20.76 +.06,
SwstAirl ' 6.67 +.11,
SwstnEngy 39.18 +.24
SpectraEn ' 16.92 +.21'
SpdrintNex 4.92 -.07"
SPDR 92.70 +.86
SPMid 105.59 +.98
SP Mats 26.05 +.23


The remainder of the

NYSE listings can be

found on the next page.





Yesterday Pvs Day
Argent 3.7880 3.7980
Australia 1.2370 '1.2375
Bahrain .3770 .3771
Brazil 1.9600 1.9392
Britain 1.6573 1.6531
Canada 1.1566 1.1524
Chile 529.75 528.45
China . 6.8363 6.8345
Colombia 2154.50 2158.00
Czech Rep 18.42 18.48
Denmark 5.2882 5.2910
Dominican Rep 36.00 35.80
Egypt 5.6036 5.6075
Euro .7099 .7104
Hong Kong 7.7501 7.7501
Hungary 195.35 196.54
India 48.024 48.035
Indnsia 10225.00 10175.00
Israel 3.9220 3.9584
Japan 95.99 95.18
Jordan .7084 .7090
Lebanon 1501.50 1500.50
Malaysia 3.5395 � 3.5325
Mexico 13.1705 13.2095
N. Zealand 1.5355 1.5489
Norway 6.4070 6.4537
Peru 3.025 3.026
Poland 3.19 3.20
Russia 31.1769 31.1488
Singalpore 1.4530 1.4533
So. Africa 7.8218 7.8915
So. Korea 1281.75 1277.50
Sweden 7.6923 7.7821
Switzerlnd 1.0818 1.0818
Taiwan 32.95 32.93
Thailand 34.03 34.05 .
Turkey 1.5409 1.5341
U.A.E. 3.6730 3.6713
Uruguay 23.1696 23.1696
Venzuel 2.1470 2.1460


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars.All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


DIARY


Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Volume


Pay for

your \13N X'


The]j!way









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V Hassles! V Checks! V Reminders!

S O .. ... .. . ,. .. � . ..= .


563-5655 It'sZ F !
Charge may vary at first transaction and at each vacation start.


YMesEY RATEr S D


~Yesterday Pvs Day:

Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal FundsRate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.195 0.195
R-mnnth n 5IR n0 .R5


5-year ' 2.52 2.70
10-year 3.49 3.69
30-year 4.30 4.43



FUTURES
Exch Contract Settle Chg
Lt Sweet Crude NYMX Aug09 71.49 +2.33
Corn CBOT Dec 09 397'14 -7
Wheat CBOT Sep09 5573/4 -5V4
Soybeans CBOT Nov09 9831/2 -71/2
Cattle CME Aug09 85.40 +3.00
Pork Bellies CME Aug09 57.45 -2.20
Sugar(world) NYBT Oct09 17.90+.59
OrangeJuice NYBT Sep09 76.35 -.05

SPOT "
Yesterday Pvs Day
Gold (troy oz.. spot) $940.40 $920.60
Silver (troy oz., spot) _13.947 513..Z592
Copper (pound) $2.3125 $$.127u
Platinum (troy oz.,spot)$1184.20 $11T6.1U
NMER = New York Mercantile Exchange. CBOT =
Chicago Board of Trade. CMER = Chicago Mercantile Ex-
change. NCSE = New York Cotton, Sugar & Cocoa Ex-
change. NCTN = New York Cotton Exchange.


11�1_�����


-1 -�


J


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CIRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUSINESS


- EhiJA J L.N 3)0, 2009 A15


Name NAV Chg
AlInvestments A:
CharlAp 12.58 +.07
Constp 17.37 +.08
HYdAp 3.44
IntlGrow 20.79 +.18
SelEqtyr 13.19 +.08
AIM Investments B:
CapDvBt 9.54 +.05
AIM Investor Cl:
Energy 28.95 +27
Utilities 13.07 +.19
Advance Capital I:
Balancp 12.35 +.06
Retlnc 7.80
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGrt 4.33 +.03
AllianceBlem A:
BalanAp 12.03 +.05
GIbThGrAp53.61 +.32
IntValAp 11.14 +.13
SmCpGrA 19.89 -.02
AllianceBem Adv:
LgCpGrAd 18.38 +.08
AllanceBemn B:
GIbThGrBt 46.89 +27
GrowthBt 17.60 +.11
SCpGrBt 16.21 -.01
AllianceBer C:
SCpGrCt 16.29 -.02
Allianz Instl MMS:
NFJOvVI 8.73 +.06
SmCpVl 20.24 +.10
Allanz Funds A:
NFJDvVIt 8.65 +.06
SmCpVA 19.35 +.09
Allianz Funds C:
GrowthCt 17.53 +.10
TargetCt 9.40 +.08
Amer Beacon Insti:
LgCaplnst 14.26 +.14
Amer Beacon Inv:
LgCaplnv 13.57 +.13
Amer Century Adv:
EqFroAp 15.42 +.15
Century Inv:
B 12.60 +.08
Eqc c 5.82 +.05
Growth 18.33 +.18
Heritage 13.06 +.05
IncGro 18.17 +.15
IntDisc 7.00 +.04
IntlGrol '8.14 +.10
NewOpp 4.69 +.03
OneChAg 9.05 +.07
OneChMd 9.17 +.06
RealEstl 9.97 +.02
Ultra 15.96 +.11
Valuelnv 4.31 +.04
Vista 11.34 +.07
American Funds A:
AmcpAp 13.54 +.09
pp 19.62 +.16
pp 14.17 +10
BondAp 1121 +.01
CapWAp 19.07 +.02
CaplBA p 42.27 '+29
CapWGAp 28.10 +.30
EupacAp 31.84 +.34
FdlnvAp 27.24 +.26
GovtAp 13.99 +.01
GwthAp 23,11 +.16
HITrAp 9.14 +.02
HilnMunA 12.55 +.01
IncoAp 13.19 +.09
IntBdAp 12.90
ICAAp 21.95 +.19
LtTEBAp 14.87 +.01
NEcoAp 18.71 +.13
NPerAp 20.97 +20
NwWrIdA 39.02 +.27
STBAp 9.95
SmCpAp 25.02 +.12
TxExAp 11.49 +.01
WshAp 20.77 +20
American Funds B:
BalBt 14.12 +.09
CaplBBt 42.28, +.28
CpWGrBt 27.97 +.31
,GrwthBt 22.34 +.15
IncoBt 13.10 +.09
ICABt 21.86 +.19
Ariel Investments:
Apprec. 25.16 +.13
Ariel 26.94 +.14
Artio Global Funds:
IntlEqlr - 25.18 +22
IntEqA' 24.59 +20
IntEqllAt 10.14 +.08
IntEqlllr 10.21 +.09
Artisan Funds:
Inti 16.82 +.18
MidCap 20.99 +J6-
MidCapVal 14.47 +.06
SCapVal 11.15 -.04
Baron Funds:
Asset 38.14 +.22
Growth 34.37 +.13
SmCap 15.82 +.05
Bernstein Fds:
IntDur 12.47 +.01
DivMu 14.08 +.01
NYMu 13.83
TxMadlnt 12.69 +.15
,', "f l I. l"- f , I--
EnMes * 21 80 + 18
BtlckRock A:
,urerwA 12 .0 * U5
CapDevAp 12.46 +.08
EqtyDiv 13.40 +.13
GIAIAr . 15.97 +.03
HiYInvA 5.88 +.02
ItlOpAp 25.83 +.12
BlackRock B&C:
GLICt 14.92 +.03
Bl kRock Intil:
Q'l ll, I~ l +.03
Br ndywine Fds:
Bl IFdn 19.11 +10
B wnn 19.38 +.01
Bri son FundsY:
Hll lYn 5.18 +.01
Bualo Funds:
sncsp 19.44 -.01
CG Funds:
sn '25.38 +.27
M Un 21.82 +A17
Re y n 14.80 +.02
CR Funds:
M pVI 20.68 +.12
Caenos Funds:
GrrlncAp 24.07 +.05
G iap 3525 +.09
GnwCt 132.44 +.09
Ca ert Group:
Irn)p 14.40
In1:qAp 11.76 +.06
M tint 10.27
SoalAp 21.73 +.07
So Bdp 14.52 +.01
SoEqAp 25.49 +.12
TYLt 9.40
Tx gp 15.41 +.01
TU :VT 15.35 +.01
en & Steers:
shra 32.43 +.04
C mbla Class A:
mt 18.94. +.05
n21lnyAt 927 +.6
MaGrAt 13.97 +.08
Columbia Class Z:
--Z 19.50 +.05
ntZ 27.72. +.07

dxZ 17.96 +.16
GrZ 14.19 +.07
MEpVIZp 8.78 +.09
Valestr 33.51 +.27
DFA Funds:
IntACorEqn 8.41 +.06
US &orEq1 n 7.61 +.05
US.orEq2 n 7.46 +.05
S3W S Invest A:
Co, mAp 12.66 +.07
DriIRAr 24.37 +.24
MgiMunip 8.53 +.01
DWS Invests: :
* ColPIsInd 9.88 +.01
EnlMkln 9.22 +`05
EnMkGrr 13.28 +.07
GI AS 15.00 +.01
316 1S' . 9,88 -.01
i. -.,:, 25.90 +.18
C.iihTr.i.' 17.30 +.16
God&Prc 16.34 -.03
GrdlncS 11.75 +.10
Hi1�dkTx 11.02
IntTxAMT 11.01 +.01
IntMFdS 37.58 +`50
LgaoGro 21.67 +`11"
Lati'nrEq 37.38 +.06
MA'FS 13.79 +.02
SPt0S 12.29 +.1t
DaVis Funds A:
NY~enA 25.29 +.27


Da4Is Funds B: '
NYaenB 24.24 +.26
Dia Funds C & Y:
NV enY 25.57 +.28
NY tenC 24.41 +26
Del ware Invest A:
Divirlncp 8.52
Tp IdAp 10.82 +.01
Tx lSAp 10.51 +.01
Del ware Invest B:
SelGrst 18.21 +.06
Di enslonal Fds:
EnrtCrEqn13.97 +.10
ErMlktdV 24.12 +.21
Int1mVan 1353 +.04
USgCon 27.34 +25
US Van 13.68 +.12
US Micron 8.70 -.05
US Small n 13.25 -.01
USfmVa 15.21 -.03
tnl nCon 11.94 +.04
En iMktn ,21.50 +.14
Fx n 10.30 -.01
G It .xlnc 11.02
2YilFxdn 10.23
DF RIEn 12.03 +.01
Do4ge&Cox:
Balnced 54.08 +.40
Inrnie 12.33 +.01
Infl tk 25.57 +.19
Stock 77.76 +.78


Retail n 35.11 -+.16
Sotlwrn '58.12 +.48
Techn 56.05 +.10
Telmn a 34.95 +.28
Trans n 29.61 -.31
UtilGrn 39.80 +.62
Wireless n 6.16 +.02
Fidelity Spartan: .
Eqldxlnvn 32.97 +.29
ExtMklnn 24.59 +.11
5001nxlnvrn64.15 +.58
Intlnxlnvn 28.38 +29
TotMkIlnvn 26.24 +.22
Fidelity Spart Adv:
EqldxAd n 32.98 +.30
IntAd r n 28.38 +.29
500Adrn 64.15 +.58
TotMktAd rn26.24 +.'21
First Eagle:
GIblA 34.74 +.09
OverseasA 17.50 -.Q3
First Investors A
BIChpAp 16.57 +.15
GloblA p 4.89 +.03
GovtAp 11.08
GrolnAp 10.51 +.07
IncoAp 2.17


Here are the 1,000 biggest mutual funds listed on Nasdaq.Tables show the fund name, sell
price or Net Asset Value (NAV) and daily net change.'
Name: Name of mutual fund and family.
NAV: Net asset value.
Chg: Net change in price of NAV.
Data based on NAVs reported to Upper by 6 p.m. Eastern.


Name NAV Chg
Dreyfus:
Aprec 28.52 +.29
CorVA 18.57 +23
Dreyf 6.38 +.05
Dr5OO1nt 26.21 +.23
EmgLd 13.42 +.02
GrChinaAr 37.15 +.03
HiYIdAp 5.81 +.02
LgCStAp 16.89 +.14
MunBdr 10.68
StratValA 21.01 +23
TechGroA 19.67 +.04
Driehaus Funds:
EMktGr 2229 -.05
Eaton Vance CI A:
ChinaAp 18.77 +.12
AMTFMBI 8.88 +.01
MutiCGrA 5.68 +.02
InBosA 4.79 +.01
LgCpVal 13.99 +.16
NatlMun 8.73 +.01
SpEqtA 10.08 +.01
TradGvA 7.47 .
Eaton Vance Cl B:
HIthSBt 8.56 +.02
NatlMBt 8.73
Eaton Vance CI C:
GovtCp .7.46
NatlMCt 8.73
Evergreen A:
AstAl p 10.14 +.05
Evergreen C:
AstAIIC t 9.82 +.05
Evergreen I:
SIMunil 9.62 +.01
FBR Funds:
Focuslnv 3521 +.15
FMI Funds:
LgCappn 11.69 +.08
FPA Funds:
Nwlnc 11.05
ePACmesn 22.05 +.11
Fairholme 25.62 ,+24
Federated A:
AmLdrA 10.68 +.12
MidGrStA 25.17 +.22
KaufmAp 3.90 +.02
MuSecA 9.57 +.01
Federated Instl:
KaufmnK 3.90 +.02
TotRetBd 10.47 +.01-
Fidelity Adv FocT:
EnergyT 24.53 +.15
HItCarT 15.93 +.13
Fidelity Advisor A:
DivlntAr 12.48 +.12
Nwlnsghp 1424 +.08
StrnA 11.00 +.04
Fidelity Advisor I:
DMntl n 12.67 +.12
EqGdrn 38.21 +.20
EqWnin 17.53 +21
IntBdln 10.12
Nwlnsgtin 14.37 +.08
Fidelity Advisor T:
BalancT 11.72 +.07
DivGrTp . 8.10 +.08
DynCATp 12.40 +.06
EqGrTp 35.92 +.18
EqinT � 17.27 +21
GrOppT 22.29 +.10
HilnAdTp 7.33 +.04
IntBdT 10.10
MulncTp 12.12 +.01
OwseaT 14.08 +.15
STFiT 8.83 ...
FIdelity Freedom:
FF2000n 10.58 +.03
FF2010n 11.14 +.06
FF2015n 924 +.05
FF2020n 10.90 +.07
FF2025n 8.95 +.06
FF2030n 10.55 +.08
FF2035 n 8.69 +.07
FF2040n 6.05 +.05
Incomena 10.02 +.02
Fidelity Invest:
AggrGrrn 13.18 +.08
AIlSectEq 9.94 +.10
AMgr50n 12.16 +.05
AMgr70rn 1220 +,.07
AMgr20rn 11.08 +.03
Balancn 1422 +.08
BlueChGr n 29.38 +.22
CAMunn 11.29
Canadan 41.40 +28
CapApn 16.98 +.07
CapDe4On 7.31 +.05
Cplncrn 6.86 +.03
ChinaRgr 23.58 +.14
CngSn 364.09 +4.12
CTMunrn 11.11 +.01'
Contran 48.14 +.29
CnvScn 17.93 +.14
OisEq n 17.70 +.18
Divlnt n 23.52 +.23
DiStkOn 10.19 +.09
DivGthn 18.63 +.18
EmrMkn 17.32 +.11
Eqlnpn 32.26 +.38
EQIIn 13.56 +.16
ECapAp 14.83 +.25
Europe 24.67 +.44
E.,:r,r. .-J . ..: * : :
Epoan'r . 15 6 +11
Fiem n . t 17. L
F.ty r r.i 12 s * 11
FitRateHirn 8.88
FrinOnen 20.86 +.15
GNMAn 11.28
Govtlnc 10.72
GroCon 55.75 +.20
Grolncn 13.48 +.14
Highlncrn 7.28 +.01
Indepnn 15.59 +.14
InProBdn 10.91 +.03
IntBd n 9.68
IntGovn 10.77
IntmMu n 9.89
IntlDiscn 2527 +.26.
InlSCprn 15.10 +.09
nvGrBd n 10.96
InvGB n 6.66 +.01
Japan 10.02 -.04
JpnSm n 8.09 -.01
LgCapVal 9.82 +.10
LCpVIrn 8.13 +.09
LatAm n 38.93 +.02
LevCoStkn 17.58 +,17
LownPrn 26.00 +.08
Magelln n 53.61 +.39
MOMurn 10.56 +.01"
MAMunn 11.39 +.01
MegaCpStkn7.30 +.08
MIMunn 11.55 5 +.01
r MidCapn 17.96 +.15
MNMupnn 11.15 +.01
MtgSecn 10:24 .
Munilncn 11.98 +.01-
�NJMunrrr 11.10 +.01
NwMktrn 13.56 +.06
*NwMilln 19.84 +.16'
NYMunn 12.41 +.01
OTCn 36.44 +.16
OhMunn 11.25 -+.01
100lndex 6.76 +.07
Ovrseaan 26.85 +.23
PcBasn 1725
PAMunrn 10.51 +.01
Puaitnn 14.02 +.08
RealEon 13.17
StintMu n 10.46
STBFn 8.10
SmCaplndr .36 +.0
SmIICpS rn 12.05 +.09
SEAsian 21.91 +`15
StkSlcn 18.13 +18
StratlncnE 9.82 +.03
StrReRtr 7.66 +.03
TotalBd n 9.90 +.01
Trendn ,44.92 +.34
USBIn 10.85
Utlity n 12.77 +.15
ValStratn 16.76 +.19
Value n 43.68 +.36
Wrldwn 13.34 +.13
Fidelity Selects:
Aim 21.62 +.38
Banking n 12.76 +`16
Biotch n 60.75 ..+.07
Bwkrn 40.56 +27
Chem n 57.81 +.76
ComEquip n17.09 +.02
Compn 33.,11 +.34
Conaisn 14.97 +.11
ConStapn 52.78 +.36
CstHo n 23.94 +21
DfAern 49.78 +.64
Electrn 30.28 +.07
Enrgyn 34.93 +22
EngSvn 47.11 +.10
Envirn 13.53 +.11
FnSvn 50.03 +.52
GolIr n 36.75 -.07
Health n 8925 +`73
HomFn 921 +.02
Insurn 31.63 +.52
Leisr n 56.70 +.32
Materialn a39.82 +.45
MedDIn 33.13 +.18
MdEqSysn 21.06 +.14
Mutlnd n 25.32 +.32
NtGas n 25.55 +.03
Paper . 19.07
Phansn 9.05 +.07


Keeley Funds: .
SmCpValA p 16.13 +.02
Lazard Instil:
EmgMktl 14.23 +.04
Lazard Open:
EmgMkOp 14.42 +.03
Legg Mason: Fd
SplnvCp 19.47 +.20
ValTrCp 29.91 +.41
Legg Mason Ptrs A:
AgGrAp 74.14 +.20
ApprAp 10.60 +.09
HilncAt 4.84 +.01
InAICGAp 6.73 +.10
LgCpGAp 18.45 +.06


Name NAV Chg
MATFAp 11.29 +.01
MITFAp 11.69 +.01
NJTFAp 12.52 +.01
NYTFAp 13.89 +.02
OppAp 17.94 +.10
PATFAp 12.64
SpSitAp 16.03 +.14
TxExAp 9.51
TotRtAp 1220 +.05
ValueB p 5.37 +.05
Firsthand Funds:
Ted) Val 25.67 +.05
FrankrTemp Fmk A:
AdjUS p 8.97
ALTFA p 10.74
AZTFAp 10.37 +.01
Ballnvp 34.88 +.11
CallnsAp 11.44
CAIntAp 10.86
CaflFAp 6.55
COTFA p 11.11
CTTFAp 10.38 +.01
CvtScAp 10.83" +.04
DblITFA 10.74 +.01
DynTchA 2023 +.11
EqlncAp 12.56 +.09
Fedlntp 11.01 +.01
FedTFAp 11.25 +.01
FLTFAp 11.05 +.01
FoundAlp 8.46 +.07
GATFAp 11.43 +.01
GoldPrMA 31.93 -.10
GrwthAp 31.32 +.24
HYTFA p 9.15
HilncA 1.69
IncormAp 1.80 +.01
InsTFAp 11.40 +.01
NYITF p 10.65
LATFAp 10.72
LMGvSeA 10.41
MDTFAp 10.69 +.01
MATFAp ,11.07 +.01
MITFAp 11.61 +.01
MNInsA 11.90 +.01
MOTFAp 11.47 +.01
NJTFAp 11.46 +.02
NYInsAp 10.59 +.01
NYTFAp 1126 +.01
NCTFAp ,11.64 +.01
OhiolAp 12.20 +.01
ORTFAp 11.38 +.01
PATFA p 9.83
ReEScAp 7.64
RisDvAp 23.99 +.16
SMCpGrA 23.41 +.18
Stratlncp 9.14 +.02
USGovAp 6.62 +.01
UtilsAp 10.29 +.12
VATFAp 11.15 +.01
FrsnkfTmp Frnk Adv:
GIbBdAdvp ...
IncmeAd 1.79 +.01
Frank/Temp Fmk B:
IncomeBt 1.79 +.01
Frank/Temp Fmk C:
FoundAlp 8.33 +.07
IncomC t 1.81 +.01
FrankTremp Mtl A&B:
BeacnA 9.61 +.07
DiscA 24.02 +.15
QualfdAt 15.32 +.13
SharesA 16.08 +.14
FrankTremp Mtl C:
DiscCt 23.79 +.15
FrankITemp Temp A:
DvMktAp 16.68 +.02
ForgnA p 528 +.04
GIBdAp 11.78 +.03
GrwthAp 13.78 +.12
WoridAp 11.56 +.08
FranklTemp Tmp Adv:
GrthAv 13.79 +.12
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
DevMktC 16.28 +.02
ForgnCp 5.16 +.04
GIBdCp 11.80 +.03
GE Effun S&S:
S&Slnc 10.48
S&SPM 31.53 +.26
TaxEx 11.25 -.01
GE Instl Funds:
IntlEq 9.50 +.08
GMO Trust IIIl:
EmMkr 9.58 +.05
For 10.32 +.09
IntIntrVI 18.38 . +.11
Quality 16.67 +.13
GMOTrust IV:
EmrMkt 9.54 +.06
IntlCorEq 23.86 +.16
IntlGrEq 17.84 +.09
InlaIntrVI 18.37 +.11
GMOTrust VI.
Er.Mh i k ii +.06
Quality 16.68 +.14,
StrFxInc ,15.84. +.03
Gabelll Funds:
Asset 32.86 +.31
Gateway Funds:
GatewayA 23.78 +.10
Goldman Sachs A:
HiYieldA 5.98
MdCVAp 23.29 +21
Goldman Sachs Inst:
HiYield ' 6.00 +.01
MidCapV 23.48 +.22
Harbor Funds:
Bondx 11.85 -.11
CapAplnst 26.88 +.13
InUlinvt 43.37 +.60
Int r 43.79 +.61
Hartford Fds A:
CpAppAp 25.07 +.26
DivGthAp 14.42 +.15
Hartford Fds C:
CapApCt 22.49 +.24
Hartford Fds L:
GwOppL 18.91 +.14
Hartford HLS IA:
CapApp 29.48 +.27
Div&Gr 14.89 +.15
Advisers 15.10 +.10
Stock 29.27 +.29
TotRetBd 10.22 +.01
Henderson GIbIlFds:
IntOppAp 17.80 +.08
Hennessy Funds:
CorGrIlOrig 10.75 +.04
SelLgVOng 16.91 +.19
HussmnStrGr12.94 -.07
ICON Fds:
Energy 14.65 +.09
Hlthcare 11.01 +.06
ISIFunds:
NoAm p. 7.51 -.01
Ivy Funds:
AssetSCt1 18.92 -.02
AssetStAp 19.37 -.01
AssetStrl r 19.50 -.02
GINatRsAp 14.74 +.11
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBd A 10.89
MCpValp 15.14
JPMorgan Select:
HBSMkNep16.15 -.01
JPMorgan Sel Cis:
. CoreBd 10.88
HiYldBdn 6.80 +01
IntmTFBd 10.63
IntrdAmern 16.64 +15
ShtDurBd n 10.76
TxAwRRetn 9.63 +.01
USLCCrPIs n14.83 +-.14
Janus:
Balanced 21.61 +.09
Contrarian 10.85 +.10
Enterpr 37.58 +.19
FedTE
Fund 21.33 +.13
FundaEq 15.90 +.19
GlUfeSd 18.32 +.15
GfTechr 11.28. +.06
Grlnc 23.99 +.17
Orion 7.81 +.07
Oroseasr 34.46 +.32
PrhMCVtnv 16.52 +.12
Research 19.94 +.17
* ShTmBd 3.00
Twenty 52.00 +.26
Ventur 34.92 -.18
WddWr, 34.06 +26
Janus Adv S Shrs:
Forty 26.48 '+.15
JennlsonDryden A:
BlendA 12.22 +.08
HIghlncA 8.68
HiYdAp 4.55 +.01
UtilityA 7.70 +.09
JennlsonDryden B:
GrowthB 1.1.78 +.06
HiYldBt 4.54
John Hancock A:
BondAp 13.19 +.01
RgBkA 11.83 +.05
St'lnAp 5.72 +.01
John Hancock B:
StrlncB 5.73 +.02
John Hancock ClI1:
LSAggr 8.85 +.06
LSBalanc 10.23 +.05
LSConsrv 11.22 +.03
LSGrwth 9.72 +.06
LSModer 10.49 +.04


BIChipn 26.98 +.15
CABondn 10.21 +.01
CapAppn 15.97 +.16
DivGrn 17.46 +.15
EmEurp 12.19 +.17
EmMktSn 23.30 +.12
Eqlncn 17.19 +.20
Eqlndexn 24.95 +.23
Europe n 11.87 +.18
GNMAn 9.64
Growth n 22.34 +.12
Gr&lnn ' 14.99 +.14
HthScI n 21.81 +.09
HIYield n 5.61 +.01
IntlBondn 9.43 -.01
IntDIsn 30.62 +.20
Intl G&I 10.33 +.11


Name NAV Chg
MgMuAp 14.97 +.01
Legg Mason Ptrs B:
LgCpGBt 16.91 +.06
Longleaf Partners:
Partners 19.52 +.20
Intl 11.77 -.09
SmCap 16.30 +.13
Loomis Sayles:
LSBondl 11.74 +.01
StrlncC 12.10 +.01
LSBondR 11.70 +.01
StrIncA 12.04 +.01
Loomis Sayles Inv:
InvGrBdAp 10.73 +.01
InvGrBdCp 10.66 +.01
InvGrBdY 10.74 +.01
Lord Abbett A:
AffilA p 8.58 +.08
AIIValA 9.00 +.09
BdDebAp 6.47 +.01
MidCpAp 10.54 +.10
MFS Funds A:
MIrTA 14.55 +.13
MIGA 10.92 +.06
HilnA 2.77
MFLA 9.11 +.01
TotRA 11.83 +.08
UUlA 12.79 +.17
ValueA 17.88 +.19
MFS Funds B:
MIGBn 9.86 +.06
GvScBn. 9.97 +.01
HilnB'n 2.78
MulnBn 7.89
TotRBn .11.82 +.08
MFS Funds Instl:
IntEqn 13.24 +.15
MainStay Funds A:
HiYIdBA 5.07 +.02
MaInStay Funds B:
CapApBt -2023 +.08
ConvBt 11.64 +.03
GovtBt 8.57 +.01
HYldBBt 5.04 +.01
Int]EqB 10.08 +.05
SmCGBp 9.28 +.02
ToIRtBt 12.94 +.04
Malrs & Power:
Growth 52.84 -.12
Managers Funds:
Bondn 22.02
Manning&Napler Fds:
WIdOppA 6.57 +.05
Marsico Funds:
Focus p 12.47 +.08
Matthews Asian:
AsianG&l 13.60 +.06
Indiar 12.64 +.15
PacTiger 15.49 +.12
MergerFd 14.99 +.02
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 9.16 +.01
TotRtBdI 9.16 +.01
Midas Funds:
Midas Fd 2.75
Monetta Funds:
Monettan 10.44 +.03
Morgan Stanley A:
DivGthA 11.60 +.13
Morgan Stanley B:
DivGtB 11.69 +.12
GIbDhvB 8.08 +.07
StratO 15.60 +.04
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMktIn 18.17 +.12
IntlEqln 11:.41 +.07
MCapGrin 2226 +.07
Under Funds A:
IntemtA 17.54 -.05
Under Funds Y:
MCpCGrYrn1&59 +.14
Mutual Series:
BeacnZ 9.72 +.07
DiscZ 24.32 +.15
QualfdZ , 15.44 +.13
SharesZ 16.21 +.14
Neuberger&Berm Inv:
Focus 14.87 +.13
Genesinst 31.38 +.17
Intlr 12.26 +.11
Partner 18.73 +.18
Neuberger&BermT':
Genesis 32.66 +.18
Nicholas Group:
HilnclIn 8.39 +.02
Nich n 33.88 +.26
Northern Funds:
HiYFxInc 6.33
SmCpldx 5.61 -.03-
Technly 9.83 +.07
Nuveen CI A:
LtMBAp 10.60
Nuveen ClR::
IntDMBd 8.59 +.01
Oak Assoc Fds:
WhitOkSGn27.16 +.14
Oakmark Funds I:
Eqtylncr 22.46 +.11
Globall 15.73 +,01
Intl I r 13.19 +.08
Oakmark r 28.90 +.23
Select r 18.80 +.09
Old Mutual Adv It:
Tc&ComZ 12.04 +.01
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp 6.29
GIbSMdCap 10.87 +.04
NonUSLgC p7.94 +.04
Oppenheimer A:
AMTFMu 5.45
AMTFrNY 9.60 -.01
CAMuniAp 6.56 +.01
CapApAp 32.91 +20
CapIncAp 7.04 +.03
ChmplncAp 1.63
DvMklAp 22.04 +.03
Discp 35.91 +.06
EquityA 6.65 +.06
GlobAp 43.22 +.52
GIbOppA 20.66 +.21
Goldkp 26.90 -.09
IntBdAp 6.07
MnStFdA 23.88 +.21
MSSCAp -13.78 +.02
MidOapA 10.78 +.08
PAMuniAp 9.13 +.01
StrnA p 3.58
USGvp 8.83 +.01
OppenheImer B:
AMTFMu 5.43 ...
AMTFrNY 9.60 -.01
CplncB t 6.93 +.04
ChmplncB t 1.63
EqutyB 6.18 +.06
StdrincBt 3.59
Oppenheimer C&M:
IntlBd C 6.05
Oppenheimer Roch:
LtdNYAp 3.06
RoMuAp 13.74 -.02
RcNtMuA 5.93 ' ...
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
ShtTmAdp 9.65
TotRtAd 10.47 ...
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AIIAsset 10.87 +.03
ComodRR 7.25 +.06
Divine 9.43
EmMkBd 9.37 +.01
FrgnBd 9.56
HiYid 7.51 +.01
InvGrCp 10.42 -.01
LowDu 9.87 +.01
ModDur 10.19
RealRet 10.44 +.05
RealRtnl 10.29 +.02
ShortT 9.65
TotRtI 10.47
TR II 10.186 :
TRIll 9.16 .
PIMCO Funds A:
LwDurA 9.87 +.01
, RealRtAp 1029 '+`02
TotRIA 10.47
PIMCO Funds C:
RealRtCp 10.29 +.02
TotRtCt 10.47
PIMCO Funds 0:
TRtn p 10.47
Parnmassus Funds:
Eqtylncon 2025 +.12
Pax World:
Balanced 18.06 +.08
Perm Port Funds:
Pemannt 34.04 +.05
Pioneer Funds A:
CullenVal 14.28 +.15
BondA p 8.64 +.01
IntiValA 16.35 +.13
MdCpGrA 10.21 +.07
PionFdAp 29.61 +26
TxFreAp 9.31 +.01
ValueA p 8.89 +.08
Pioneer Funds B:
HIYldBt 7.57 +.03
Pioneer Funds C:
HiYldCt 7.65 +.04
Price Funds Adv:
Eqlnc 17.16 +.20
Growthpn 22.19 +.13
Price Funds:
Balancen 15.24 +.10


AgvGt , 23.34 +14
CABd 9.42 -.02
CmstStr 17.48 +.08
GNMA 9.95
GrTxStr 10.92 +.05
Grwth 10.62 +05
Gr&lnc 10.59 +.10
IncStk 8.92 +.08
Inco 11.61
Inll 17.97 +.22


Name NAV Chg
IntlStkn 10.36 +10
I apan n 6.68 -.05
LatAman 33.82 +.11
MDShrtn 524
MDBond n 9.93
MidCapn 38.27 +.25
MCapValn 16.35 +.18
NAmnern 23.20 +.16
NAsin 12.73 +.15
NewEra n 35.17 +.31
NHorizn 20.61 +.01
N Incn 8.95 +.01
NYBondn 10.62 +.01
OverS SFr n 6.45 +.07
PSIncn 13.13 +.05
RealEst n 9.62 +.02
R2010n 12.33 +.07
R2015n 9.23 +.06
R2020n 12.45 +.08
R2025 n 8.95 +.06
R2030n 12.63 +.09
R2035n 8.84 +.07
R2040n 12.57 +.09
SoTecn 17.83 +.03
ShtBd n 4.75
SmCpStk n 21.48 +.06
SmCapValn24.30 -.04
SpecGrn 12.53 +.10
Specinn 10.90 +.03
TFIncn 9.38 +.01
TxFrHn 9.59
TxFrSIn 5.45
USTIntn 5.87 +.01
USTLg n 12.19 +.02
VABondn 11.09 +.01
Value n 16.74 +.17
Principal Inv,
BdMtgIn 8.83
DIscLCInst 9.41 +.08
LgCV3 In 7.74 +.08
LT20301n 8.64 +.05
LT20201n 8.90 +.04
Putnam Funds A:
AmGvAp 9.50 +.01
AZTE 8.56 -.01
CATxAp 7.18
Convsp 14.45 +.05
DvrinAp 6.90 +.02
EqlnA p 11.59 +.16
EuEq '15.29 +.22
GeoAp 9.72 +.07
GIbEqtyp 6.92 +.06
GrinAp 9.88 +.11
GIblHIthA 40.74 +,20
HIYdAp 6.29 +.01
HiYId In 4.97 +.01
IncmAp 5.86 +.02
IntGrln p 7.74 +.06
InvAp 9.38 +.09
NJTxAp 8.81 -.01'
NwOpAp 35.54 +.18
PATE 8.64
TxExAp 7.95
TFinAp .14.10
TFHYA 10.24 -.01
USGvAp 13.86 +.03
GlblUtiA 10.19 +.08
VstaA p 6.91 +.02
VoyAp 15.62 +.14
Putnam Funds B:
DvrnBt 6.85 +.02
Eqlnct 11.49 +.16
EuEq 14.64 +.21
GeoBt 9.62 +.07
GIbEqt 6.26 +.05
GINIRst 13.89 +.15
GrInBt 9.71 +.11
GIblHthB 34.37 +.17
HiYidBt 6.28 +.02
HYAdBt 4.89 +.01
IncmBt 5.82 +.02
IntGrInt 7.66 +.06
IntlNopt 11.27 +.07
.InvBt 8.44 +.08
NJTxBt 8.80 -.01
NwOpBt 31.05 +.15
TxExBt . 7.95
TFHYBt 10.26 -.01
USGvBt 13.79 +.02
GIblUtilB 10.16 +.09
VistaB t 5.87 +.03
VoyBt 13.31 +.12
RS Funds:
IntGrA 12.82 +.16
LgCAIphaA 30.87 +.33
Value 16.91 +.13
Rainier Inv Mgt:
SmMCap 20.87 +.12
RldgeWorth Funds:
LCGrStkAp 6.95 +.04
RlverSourceA:
BalanceA 7.84 +.06
:.E.4:. . p 4.02 +.03
:.l 7.168 +.09
DivrBd 4.60
DvOppA 5.62 +.06
Growth 19.26 +.16
HiYdTEA. 4.00 +.01
LgCpEq p 2.97 +.02
MCpGrA 7.35 +.03
MidCpVlp '5.08 +.04
RiverSource I:
TNEmgMktn6.74 +.03
Royce Funds:
LwPrSkSvr 10.82
MicroCapl' 10.93 -.01
PennMulr 7.56 +.01
Premier r 13.46 +.03
TotRetl r 8.95 +.02
ValSvct 8.13 +.01
VIPISvc . 9.28 -.02
Russell Funds S:
StratBd 9.59 +.01
Rydex Advisor:
NasdaqAdv 923 +.02
SEI Portfolios:
ComFxAn 9.35 +.02
IntEqA n 6.76 +.06
LgCGroAn 15.71 +.09
LgCValAn 12.00 +.14
SSgA Funds:
EmgMkth 15.05 +.09
Schwab Funds:
HlthCare 12.50 +.05
1l000nvr 27.55 +24
100OSel 27.53 +.24
S&P Inv 14.44 +.13
S&P Sel 14.48 +.13
S&PlnstSI 7.39 +.07
SmCplnv 13.35 +.02
Selected Funds:
AmShD 30.35 +.34
AmShSp 30.35 +.35
Seligman Group:
ComunAt 31.01 +25
FrontrAt 7.71 +.01
GIbSrnA 9.68 -.03
GIbTchA 14.22 +.12
HYdBAM p 2.28 +.01
Sentinel Group:
ComSAp 23.26 +.19
Sequoia n 97.36 +1.04
Sit Funds:
LrgCpGr 32.73 +21
Sound Shore:
SoundShore24.32 +.16
St FarmAssoc:
Gwth 42.44 +.49
Stratton Funds:
Dividend 15.22 -.02
Multi-Cap 28.51 +.29.
SmCap 32.85 +.01
SunAmerica Funds:
USGv t 9.73 +.01
TCW Funds:
TotRetBdl 9.60 '.
TCW Funds Nr
ToRtBdNp 9.94
TIAA-CREF Funds:
Bondlnst 9.90 ..
Tamarack Funds:
.EntSmCp' 14.52
Templeton Instlt:
ForEqS 16.25 +.17
Third Avenue Fds:
Intr 13.26 +.04
RIEstVIr 16.85 +07
Value 38.96 +.37
Thornburg Fds:
IntValAp 20.97 +19
IntValue I 21.42 +.20
Thrdvent Fds A:
HiYid 4.07
Incow 7.43
Transeamerica A:
Flexlncp 7.70
TA IDEX A:
TempGlbA p 20.44 +.16
TrCHYB p 7.37 +.02
Turner Funds:
SmICpGrn 21.71 +.08
Tweedy Browne:
GlobVal 17.31 +.17
UMB Scout Funds:
lnol 23.31 +.26
US Global Investors:
AIIAm 16.95 +.09
ChinaReg 7.18 -.04
GIbPs 6.67 +.01
GId&Mlls 12.70 -.04
WldPrcMn 13.17 -.09
USAA Group:


UIStMuln p 4.78 ...
Western Asset:
CorePlus 9.15 +.02
Core 9.58 +.03
William Blair N:
GrowthN 8.42 +,03
Int[llGthN 15.49 +.13
Yacktman Funds:
,Fundp 12.14 +.12


Chronicle staff do not provide
financial advice or real-time
quotes on stocks or funds.
Consult a financial adviser.


Stocks jump higher


Associated Press

NEW YORK-A jump in
oil prices sent investors
rushing to put money into
the stock market in the
final days of the second
quarter.
Energy, industrial and
materials stocks pulled the
market higher in light trad-.
ing Monday as investors
raced to keep up with the
gains in oil.
Crude rose $2.33 to settle
at $71.49 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile Ex.-
change after China said it
would boost oil reserves
and Nigerian militants
partly shut down an off-
shore oil platform.
With the quarter's end
coming today, some money
managers were making
last-minute adjustments to
theif portfolios just ahead


of issuing quarterly reports
to their clients. A bench-
miark against which many
fuaids ac'rc Cit r)ared, the
Standard & Poor's 500
index, is. .n I 2 vreent
since the star .i I .c April-
June quarter.
The Dow Jones indush la.i
average rose 90.99, or 1.1
percent, to 8,529.38. The
S&P 500 index rose 8.33. or
0.9 percent, to 927.23, while
the Nasdaq composite
index rose 5.84, or 0.3 per-
cent, to 1,844.06. * Stocks
ended last week mixed.
The Dow is up 30.3 per-
cent from a 12-year low on
March 9, though it has fallen
3.1 percent from a five-
month high on June 12. The
blue chips are now down
only 2.8 percent in 2009.
The. dollar was mixed
against other major curren-
cies. Gold prices fell.


Market watch
June 29, 2009

Dow Jones +90.99
industrials 8,529.38

Nasdaq +5.84
composite 1,844.06

Standard & +8.33
Poor's 500 927.23

Russell -2.61
2000
2000 510.61


NYSE diary
Advanced: 1,849
Declined: 1,166
Unchanged: 112
Volume: 4.21 b

Nasdaq diary
Advanced: 1,024
Declined: 1,283
Unchanged: 81
Volume: 1.93 b

SOURCE: SunGard AP


Name NAV Chg
NYBd 10.86 +.01
PrecMM 26.31 -.07
S&P Idx 13.89 +.13
SciTech 8.73 +.02
ShTffBnd 8.77
SmCpStk 8.67 +.02
TxEIt 12.20 +.01
TxELT 1205
TxESh 10.42
VABd 10.41
WIdGr 13.63 +.15
VALIC:
MdCpldx 13.48 +.10
Stkldx 19.27 +.18
Value Line Fd:
LrgCon 13.19 +.09
Van Kamp Funds A:
CATFAp 15.57 +.04
CapGro 8.64
CmstAp 11.16 +.11
CpBdA p 6.01 -.01
EqlncAp 6.58 +.04
Exch 346.63 +3.73
GrInAp 14.01 +.13
HarbA p 12.63 +.03
HiYIdA 8.39 +,.01
HYMuAp 8.28 +.01
InTFAp "15.45 +.02
MunlA p 12.07 +.01
PATFAp 14.70 +.02
StrMunlnc 9.28 +.01
US MtgeA 12.47
UtilAp 16.14 +.16
Van Kamp Funds B:
EnterpBt 10.04 +.01
EqlncBt 6.45 +.04
HYMyBt 8.28 +.01
MuIB 12.05 +.01
StrMunlnc 9.27
USMtge 12.41 +.01
UtilB ' 16.07 +.16
Vanguard Admiral:
BalAdmin 17.11 '+.09
CAITAdmn 10.46 +.01
CALTAdmn10.52
CpOpAdln 55.34 -.02
EMAdmr r n 26.60 +.17
Energy n 95.75 +1.20
ExplAdml n 43.57 +.17
ExtdAdmn 26.30 +,09
50Admln 85.45 +.77
GNMAAdn 10.63
HIthCrn 43.82 +.20
HiYldCpn 4.89 +.01
InfProAd n 23.75 +.05
ITBdAdml n 10.42 +.02
ITsryAdmlin 11.45 +.01
IntGrAdmn 44.76 +.42
ITAdmln 13.04 +.01
ITGrAdmn 9.06 +.01
.UdTrAdn 10.87 +.01
LTGrAdml n 8.45
LTAdmIn 10.53 +.01
MCpAdmIn 58.24 +.51
MorgAdm n 38.98 +24
MuHYAdmn 9.72 +.01
NYLTAdn 10.62 +.01
PrmCaprn 50.39 +.20
PALTAdmn 10.63 +.01
STsyAdmln 10.81 +.01
STBdAdmlnlO.33 +.01
ShtTrAdn 15.84
STFdAdn 10.86
STIGrAd n 10.23
^SmCAdmn 22.00 +.05
TxMCap r n 45.64. +.40
TOBAdmln 10.18 +.01
TStkAdmn 22.67 +.18
WellslAdm n44.57 +.24
WelitnAdmn43.81 +.31
Windsorn 32.54 +.33
WdsrllAd n 34.57 +.43
Vanguard Fds:
AssetAn 18.71 +.13
CALTn 10.52
CapOppn 23.95 -.01
Convrtn 10.72 +.02
DivdGron 11.20 +.09
Energy 50.99 +.64
Eqlncn 15.30, +.17
Expirn 46.81 +.18
FLLT n 10.87 +.01
GNMAn 10.63
GlobEqn 12.98 +.12
Groinc n 19.55 +.14
GrthEqn 7.64 +.05
HYCorp n 4.89 +.01
HlthCre n 103.80 +.46
InflaPron 12.09 +.03
IntlExpirn 11.56 +.06
IntlGrn 14.07 +.14
IntlValin 25.78 +.28
ITIGraden a9.06 +:01
ITTsryn 11.45 +.01
UfeCon n 13.73 +.06
UfeGron 16.67 +.12
Lifelno n 12.48 +.03
UfeModn 15.58 +.09
LTIGrade n 8.45
LTTsryn 11.32 +.02
Morgn 12.57 +.08
MuHYn 9.72 +.01
Mulnt n 13.04 +.01
MuLtd n 10.87 +.01
MuLongn 10.53 +.01
MuShrtn 15.84
NJLTn 11.20
NYLTn 10.62 +.01
OHLTTE' n 11.54 +.01
PALTn 10.63 +.01
PrecMtlsrn 15.29 3 ...
PrmcpCorn 9.89 +:04
Prmcprn 48.55 +.19
SelValurn 12.78 +.10
STARn 15.32 +.09
STIGraden 10.23
STFedn 10.86
ST-sryn 10.81 +.01
StratEqn 12.23 +.08
TgtRetlncn 9.83 +.03
TgRe2010n18.52 +.08
TgtRe200o5nl.14 +.03
TgtRe2O25 n 9.82 +.06
TgtRe2015n10.07 +.05
TgRe2020n17.51 +.10
TgRe203On16.51 +.11
TgtRe2035n 9.85 +.07
TgtRe2040n16.12 +.12
TgtRe2045nlO.19 +.08
USGron 13.60 +.09
USValue n 7.64 +.08
Wellslyn 18.40 +.10
Welltn n 25.37 +.18
Wndsr n 9.64 +.09
Wndslln 19.48 +.25
Vanguard Idx Fds:
500 n 85.44 +.76
Balancedn 17.11 +.09
DevMkt n 8.02 +.07
EMktn 20.22 +.13
Europe n 21.69 +.32
Extend n 26.29 +.09
Growth n 22.46 +.14
ITBnd n 10.42 +.02
LgCaplxn 16.98 +.14
LTBndn 11.27 +.02
MidCapn 12.84 +.12
Pacific n 8.80 -.02
REITrn 10.26
SmCapn 21.98' +.05
SmlCpGth n13.55 +.02
SmlCpVIn 10.39 +.03
STBndn 10,33 +.01
TotBndn 10.18 +.01
Totllnl n 12.06 +.10
TotStk n 22.67 +.18
Value n 15.55 +.17
Vanguard Instl Fds:
Ballnstn 17.11 +.09
.,P.tiri, in 7.96 +.08
Eu.,:,-.I.-i. 21.70 +.32
Extlnsn 26.31 +.09
Grwthlsln 22:47 +.15
InfProlnstn 9.67 +.01
Instldxn 84.89 +.76
InsPI n 84.89 +.76
TotlBdldxn 51.12 +.03
InstTStldxn 20.48 +.17
lnsTStPlus n20.48 +.16
MidCplstn 12.87 +.11
Paclnstn 8.82 -.01
SCInstIn 22.01 +.05
TBIstn 10.18 +.01
TSInstn 22.67 +.18
Valuelstn 15.55 +.16
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgln 70.58 +.63
,ITBdSign 10.42 +.02
MldCpldxn 18.38 +.16
STBdIdxn 10.33 +.01
TotBdSgln 10.18 +.01
TotStkSgln 21.88 +.17
Vantagepoint Fds:
Growth n 6.38 +.04
Victory Funds:
DvsStA 11.81 +.09
Waddell & Reed Adv:
AssetS p 7.47 -.01
CorelnvA 4.13 +.03
DivOppAp 11.19 +.06
DivOopCt 11.12 +.07
ScTechA 7.78 +.04
Wasstch:
SmCpGr 25.20 -.01
Wells Fargo Adv:
CmStkZ 13.52 +.04
Opptylnv 2528 +.17
Wells Fargo InstI:


Associated Press


WASHINGTON - Interest rates on short-
term Treasury bills were mixed in Mon-
day's auction. Rates on six-month bills rose
to the highest level since mid-April, while
three-month bills were unchanged.
The Treasury Department auctioned $30
billion in six-month bills at a discount rate
of 0.350 percent, up from 0.335 percent last
week Another $32 billion in three-month
bills were auctioned at a discount rate of
0.195 percent


The three-month rate for the past two
weeks has been at the highest level since
those bills averaged 0.200 percent on April
6. The six-month rate was the highest since
those bills averaged 0.370 percent on April
13.
The discount rates reflect that the bills
sell for less than face value. For a $10,000
bill, the three-month price was $9,995.07,
while a six-month bill sold for $9,982.31.
,That would equal an annualized rate of
0.198 percent for the three-month bills, and
0.355 percent for the six-month bills.


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N EWEA


Name Last
SPHIthC 26.53
SP CnSt 23.17
SP Consum 23.25
SP Eng 48.34
SPDRFnd 12.07
SPInds 22.19
SPTech 18.35
SP UtI 28.10
Standex 1151
StarwdHi 22.64
SlateStr 48.50
Ste ris 26.00
Sterite 13.17
Stryker 40.12
I SturmnRug 12.27
SSubPpne 42.54
SSunCmts 1370
I Suncorgs 30.50
Sunoco 23.29
Suntech 17.76
SunTrst 1635
Supal u 113,13
Sybase 31.68
Synovus 3.08
SyscO 22.71
TCFnd 13.14
TECO 12.04
TJX 31.37
TRWAuto 11.35
TaiwSmi 9.55
TalismEgs 14.38


Target
TeckResg
TelmNZ
TalMexL
Ternplelnld
TempurP
Tenais
TenetHIth
Tenneco h
Tepgco
Teradyn
Terex
Terra
TerraNuro1
Tesoro
TetraTech
TexInst
TexoDn
Theragen h
TherrnoFis
ThmBet
ThornCrkg
3MCoa
Tiffany
TW Cable rs
TimeWm rs
TiMnken
TitanMet
ToddShph
TorchEn If
Trchmnrk
TorODBkg


Total SA
TotalSys
Transoon
Travelers
Tredgar
TrCont]
TrinaSolar
TycoBeec
Tycolnt
Tyson
UBS AG
UDR
UIL Hold
US Ailwy
USEC
USG
UntaPtmg
Uniirst
UnilevNV
UnionPac
Unisys h
UtdMiao
UPSB
UtdRentlals
SUS Bancrp
US NGsFd
USORIFd
USSteel
UldTech
UtdhlthGp
UnumGrp


Vale SA
Vale SA pf
ValeantPh
ValeroE
VangTSM
VangRErrT
VangEong
VarianMed
Vectren
Ventas
VeoiaEnv
i VernzonCm
ViacormB
I VimpelCr
i Visa
I Vishay
Vodafone
Vomado
Votorantmr
VulcanM
W&TOff
WGL Hold
Wabash
SWalMart
Walgm
I WalterEn
WasteCon
WsteMInc
WatsonW
Weathflntl
WebsterFn


I WeinRIt 14.53
WellPoint 51.45
WellsFargo 24.53
WendyArby 4.01
WeslarEn 18.76
WAstEMkt 10.31
I WstAMgdHi 4.94
WAstlnfOpp 11.52
WDigi ng 26.49
WstnRefin 7.14
SWstnUnion 16.65
Weyerh 30.60
Whdpl 43.72
I WhiungPet 35.31
WilmCS 5.04
WmsCos 15.64
I WmsPtrs 1820
-WmsSon 12.04
Wndstrm 8.34
Wisnbgo 7.36
WiscEn 41,18
Worthgn 13.29
Wyeth 45.35
Wyndham 12.41
XLCap 11.49
XTO Engy 37.98
XcelErngy 18.44
Xerox 6.62
SYamanag 9.20
SYingliGm 13.16
! YumBmds 33.32
ZweigTl 3.36


\ I


T-bills rates mixed at weekly auction


ySSE~i^


I










Page Al16- TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009



PINION


bo. "The definition of affluence is
generally pinned to what comes in,
not to the quality of life as it's lived '
Peter Schrag


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


HAVE A HEART


Do not pretend



homelessness



does not exist


People who worked every
day of their adult life are
becoming homeless.
Families with- homes who
played by the rules are becom-
ing homeless. Seniors facing
foreclosure from a loss of in-
come are becom-
ing homeless. The
young who've lost THE I
jobs are becoming
homeless. The chanE
The face of of home
homelessness is
changing and it OUR OF
grows without
smile, but with ake an ahe
shame. The em-
barrassment of
not being, able to take care of
one's self and needing help
.from others brings despair.
Even some former business
owners who once helped oth-
ers need help.
X'^While- there are a few
f?'gypsy'""homeless, who have
cut themselves off from society,
the vast majority are, by the
grace of God, no different than
the rest of us. They paid taxes.
They owned, or rented an
.apartment or house.
With unemployment topping
11 percent in Citrus County,
rhore people are on the brink
of homelessness. This unem-
ployment rate does not even
count "discouraged workers"
who don't show up in statistics.
Every day, 10 to 20 people
contact the Family Resource
Center wondering what to do.
Many have families. They face
eviction, or foreclosure. Their
money has run out. Even if
they know of a job elsewhere,
they have no money for a bus
ticket. What should they do?
Options are few and their
predicament is great. For
some; the last option becomes
a tent in the woods.
It speaks to the depth of the
problem when you discover


Feral problems
I read about the Animal Serv-
ices not going out and picking up
cats. The stray cats are never
picked up by Animal Services in
any county. My sister even lives in
Pasco. There was a lot (of feral
cats) at Whispering Pines
Park and they (the park)
took care of it. (Animal
Services) tells people that,
if you don't want to have
the cats, don't feed them.
There's a lot of feral
cats all over the world,
especially in Florida
where the.weather's nice. CAL
So there's no way they 5
could run around-the 000
county and collect all the .
stray cats.
So, sorry, just don't feed them
if you don't want them around.
SS lottery
I'm sure the person suggesting
giving each senior $1 million was
joking, but how about this one:
Each person getting SS checks al-
lows Social Security to deduct $1
a month from their check.
Each month, several Social Se-
curity numbers will be picked at
random and those persons will
each receive a check for, say, $2
million tax free. A small fee could


what helping agencies need:
mosquito repellants, first aid
kits, resealable plastic bags,
candles, socks, flashlights, bat-
teries, tarps, ropes, tents,
sleeping bags and small grills.
Homelessness is such a big
problem, yet it can
be. softened with
;SE such little assis-
ISUE: tance.
going face Many, good peo-
essness. ple don't know
what to do. What
'INION: should ' we do?
Pretend the prob-
ctive role lem does not
ping. exist? Blame the
homeless for their
plight? Hope someone else
does something? You can do
something by donating the
above mentioned items to the
Family Resource Center.
Even though it is hot now,
within a few mhonths,the need.'.
for cold wMfat shelMerswillV
be upon us. Through the efforts
of many dedicated people a
system of notification and
transportation of the homeless
to shelters is in place. The final
piece of assistance is for vol-
unteers to man these sites on
the cold nights and for a
church to take in woman and
children.
If you or your organization is
interested in helping one of the
caring organizations involved
with the homeless contact Bar-
bara Wheeler with the Mid
Florida Homeless Coalition at
860-2308. Find your niche in
helping - our community,
whether it's collecting blan-
kets, jeans, sneakers, or flash-
lights.
Or maybe it's by volunteering
at one of the help agencies.
There are many ways to help.
Find a role that's right for you,
even if it's just thanking those
who work in the trenches doing
God's work.


be collected from the total contri-
butions to cover costs. The recipi-
ents would ho longer be allowed
to collect any money from Social
Security for the rest of their lives.
After a few years, there would be
so many less checks being sent
out that the government
UND W could greatly reduce the
IUND . amount of money col-
r elected from Social Secu-
rity.taxes. And the best
part is, this wouldn't cost
taxpayers a pepny.


Noisy shop


W This (body) shop in Cit-
rus Springs, the fumes
S579 are not that bad. It's the,
)7 (9 noise that drives us nuts
I (with) the banging all
through the hours. Jeff Dawsy,
code patrol, somebody help.
Young or old?
I'm watching the Tampa Bay
Rays game and the announcers
keep talking about all these young
players. They all look old to me
with the beards. How many of
them are young?
Editor's note: The active roster of
the Tampa Bay Rays has players
ranging in year of birth from 19 74 to
1985. Twelve players were born in
the 1970s and 13 were born in the
'80s.


'-


Government's money machine


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL B,4ARD
Gerry Mulligan.................... ...................publisher
Charlie Brennan ............................................editor
Neale Brennan ........ promotions/community affairs
* Mike Arnold ................................ managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz...................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ..... ..............................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ................................... guest member
'You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


-S==S LETTERS


Review options
I read with interest the com-
mentaries on Sunday, June 14.
The front page featured two sup-
porters of Citrus Memorial
Health System, each with some
different views.
Ms. Chadwick, in her first sen-
tence, dispatched concerns
which numerous citizens of the
county have about the viability
and fiscal responsibility of Cit-
rus Memorial Health System, as
well as the people who run the
healthcare system.
Dr. Ed Dodge, who is well
known and respected in the
county, seemed to take a more
neutral position, calling for both
sides of the story to be heard
fairly, as well as advocating an
audit
I was also concerned by Ms.
Chadwick's statement about
freezing any participation in the
benefit pension plan. I assume
this is the pension plan for the
Citrus Memorial Health System
employees. I wonder if, in con-
sidering this freeze, they looked
into other projects that could
have been frozen and saved
equal, if not more amounts of
money, while not causing the
employees untold stress and
anxiety about their future. After
all, the backbone of Citrus Me-
morial is the good people who


DOUGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
Not all federal spending is
spent In fact, the govern-
ment spends, invests, and
lends, and all of it is stimulative
in varying,degrees to the econ-
omy. Preside~it Reagan liked to
say the deficit is big enough to
take care of itself. He was joking,
but he was also serious. He didn't
let worries about deficit spending
get in the way of his priorities,
which were reducing tax rates
and increasing the military
budget. Reagan had his critics,
but he left office after two terms
having achieved his goals. As for
the deficit he left behind, it was
brought into balance by Presi-
dent Clinton in combination with
a Republican-controlled Con-
gress.
When voters are asked if they
worry about deficit-spending,
they say yes by a large majority.
It's the one issue airea where Re-
publicans think they can get trac-
tion against President Obama
and the Democrats in next year's
congressional elections.
Obama has responded to the
political challenge by ,highlight-
ing various cost-saving measures.
But this is not the time to talk
about tightening our belts. Deficit
spending is the path to recovery,"
and the deficit numbers that we
see looming ahead are not an
economic problem.. They don't
even set a record. The deficits in
1943 and 1944 were much bigger
as a share of GDP (gross domes-
tic product) than what we have
today Nobody objected then be-
cautse Pearl Harbor had been at-
tacked and we were in a war and
willing to spend whatever it took
to win. Did the nation go bank-
rupt? No, the greatest economic
boom in the nation's history was
set in motion.
When people look at the fed-


Unlike banks,
the government's
cost of money is
as low as zero when
it prints, rather than
borrows, money,
a fact that more
than offsets
bad loans.
eral budget, they focus on spend-
ing. But federal spending is not
like any other spending because
the government can (a) print
money, (b) borrow money for less
than any other entity on earth,
and (c) impose a wide array of
taxes. The government's primary
commodity is its citizens, which
are its money machines. There-
fore, the question always asked
by government economists is
what return can be generated by
spending on, investing in, or lend-
ing to those money machines.
First, there is spending. That is
money that cannot be classified
as an investment or a loan, and
there is surprisingly little of it.
Military spending comes to mind,
but that is too simplistic because
money spent for national defense
does for the country what police-
men do for the community: it pro-
vides the security shield behind
which commerce thrives. Yet,
even pure spending provides an
immediate, if not long term, stim-
ulus because it provides employ-
ment. Congressional salaries
come to mind.
Next, there is investment. In-
frastructure is obvious because
roads and bridges provide long-


X to the Editor --.-$-=


OPINIONS INVITED
U The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-.
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons; columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
U Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names add hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
" SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
etters@chronicleonline.com.

have worked there for years, and
look forward to reaping some
benefits from their contributions
when they retire.
I was truly impressed by Ms.
Chadwick's nine-year resume of
service to the county and the


MORE OPINION
* Pages AIO to A13.

hospital, and applaud her, as
many citizens do not devote tha
much time. But4 also was con-
cerned that -eriii -year tenui
could be partofthe problem. A
nine-year period of time that
one individual sits on one boan
could possibly impair the diver
sity of the board that may help
strengthen its~decisions and mi
sion.
I suggest that we continue to
look at all the information and
all the options, so that our
county hospital will be viable f(
decades to come.
Denis W. Gril
Crystal Riv

Eyeballing
The June 26 article on page 1
"Counterfeit bills passed in Flo
ral City," mentions that mer-
. chants are advised to "eyeball"
the cash they are taking in. :
Eyeball? Wouldn't you agree
that the words examine, inspec
scrutinize or even look over
might be more appropriate thai
eyeball?
Anthony Cos
Inverne


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


term benefits for commerce. S9
does education. And, of current
note, medical care, especially
.preventive care, is an investment
in us, the government money mr-
chines.
Finally, there is government
lending. The money the gover-
ment loaned to banks through
TARP (Troubled Assets Relif
Program) is already beginning to
come back.
Recently, several major banks
returned $80 billion, plus intext
est. Government lending is a n(r
lose proposition, because, likg
banks, the government makVp
money on the spread - the dit
ference between interest it pay
and interest it charges. ,
Unlike banks, the government
cost of money .is as low as zer)
when it prints, rather than bop-
rows, money, a fact that more
than offsets bad loans. j
Further, due to the current lowy
interest rates, the government j
in the process of retiring older,
higher interest borrowing (T-billV)
with new, low interest borrowing,
which means that interest on thl
national debt is decreasing bq-
cause interest rates have fallqu
much farther than new borrow-
ing has increased. )
The government's investment
in its money machines will brig
tremendous returns in the future,
a fact that will finally prove fal-s
all that pontificating about morl-
gaging our children's future. Ii
fact, we are creating for themI
future we never dreamed was
possible. 3
. ---
Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Cliq
author the Washington , I
Merry-Go-Round column, a
founded in 1932 by. :
DrewPearson.
* i


Other VOICES


5

Ig
le


R~b~







TU.SDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 A17


Crrprrrc Currrv F ) 1 (M WnNirCF


Countries line up to denounce coup


- Honduran

leaders remain

defiant

Associated Press
TEGUCIGALPA, Hon-
'duras -Police and soldiers
6Jashed with thousands of
Protesters outside Hon-
iduras' national palace Mon-
lay, leaving at least 15
people injured, as world
Maders from Barack Obama
f6 Hugo Chavez demanded
4he return of a president
Wasted in a military coup.
OJ Leftist leaders pulled
their ambassadors from
4tonduras and Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega
ahid El Salvador, Nicaragua
'find Guatemala would cut
1tade with neighboring
Honduras for at least 48
Vlours. Venezuelan Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez called for
tondurans to rise up
Against those who toppled
fHis ally, Manuel Zelaya.
T' "We're ready to support
the rebellion of the Hon-
'.uran people," Chavez said,
though he did not say what
,-ind of support he was of-
fering. " .
,' Protests outside the presi-
,lential palace grew from
1iundreds to thousands, and
soldiers and police advanced
Behind riot shields, using
tear gas to scatter the pro-
%sters. The demonstrators,
4hany of them choking on the
*gas, hurled rocks and bottles
'%s they retreated. At least 38
protesters were detained, ac-
Cording to human rights
prosecutor Sandra Ponce.
1 Red Cross paramedic
CristianVallejo said he had
transported 10 protesters to
hospitals. most of them with
Injuries from rubber bul-
lets. An Associated Press
photographer in another
area saw protesters carry-
ing away another five in-
jured people. It was not
-clear how they were hurt.
In Washington, Obama
4aid the United States will
'Istand on the side ofdemoc-


racy" and work with other
nations and international
* groups to resolve the matter
peacefully
"We believe that the coup
was not legal and that Pres-
ident Zelaya remains the
democratically elected
president there," Obama
said.
"It would be a terrible
precedent if we start moving
backwards into the era in
which we are seeing mili-
tary coups as a means of po-
litical transition rather than
democratic elections," he
added. "The region has
made enormous progress
over the last 20 years in es-
tablishing democratic tradi-
tions. ... We don't want to go
back to a dark past"
The Organization ofAmer-
ican States called an emer-
gency meeting for Tuesday
to consider suspending Hon-
duras under an agreement
meant to prevent the sort of
coups that for generations
made Latin America a tragic
spawning ground of military
dictatorships.
The new government,
however, was defiant.
Roberto Micheletti, named
by Congress to serve out the
final seven months of Ze-
laya's term, vowed to ignore
foreign pressure.
"We respect everybody
and we ask only that they re-
spect us and leave us in
peace because the country
is headed toward free and
transparent general elec-
tions in November,"
Micheletti told HRN radio.
He insisted Zelaya's
ouster was legal and ac-
cused the former president
himself of violating the con-
stitution by sponsoring a
referendum that was out-
lawed by the Supreme
Court. Many saw the foiled
vote as a step toward elimi-
nating barriers to his re-
election, as other Latin
American leaders have
done in recent years.
Despite the protests at the
palace, daily life appeared
normal in most of the capi-
tal, with nearly all busi-
nesses open. Some
expressed relief at the de-


Associated Press
Honduran army soldiers chase supporters of ousted Honduras President Manuel Zelaya on
Monday after violence broke out near the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa. Honduras'
new leaders defied growing global pressure on Monday to reverse a military coup, arguing
that they had followed their constitution in removing President Manuel Zelaya.


parture of Zelaya, who
alienated the courts, C6n-
gress, the military and even
his own party in his tumul-
tuous three years in power.
, "A coup d'etat is undemo-
cratic and you never want to
support it, but in the case of
this guy and his govern-
ment, maybe so," said
Roberto Cruz, a 61-year-old
metalworker.
But Zelaya retains the loy-
alty of many of Honduras'
poor, for having raised the
minimum wage and blam-
ing the country's problems
on the rich - despite the
considerable wealth he en-
joys as a successful rancher.
Farmworker Jesus Al-
mendares, 30, said he was
skipping work to protest the
coup.
"It's a tremendous shame,
yet another proof that the
armed forces control the
country - they and the
businessmen," he said.
Zelaya was arrested in his
pajamas Sunday morning by
soldiers who stormed his
residence and flew him into
exile. A day later, back in
suit and tie, he sat beside
Chavez and other allies at a'
Nicaragua meeting of the,
nine-nation ALBA alliance,
which agreed to pull its am-


bassadors from Honduras
and reject the replacement
government's envoys.
While Obama said Zelaya
is still president, U.S. Secre-
tary of State Hillary Rod-
ham Clinton hedged on that
point at an earlier, news
\conference, suggesting that
both the ousted president


and his foes should make
compromises.
Asked if the administra-
tion would insist that Zelaya
be restored to power, she
said: "We haven't laid out any
demands that we're insisting
on, because we're working
with others on behalf of our
ultimate objectives."


Mexico's government, one
of the most conservative in
Latin America, joined leftists
in denouncing the coup and
offered protection to Zelaya's
exiled foreign minister
The president of Latin
America's largest nation,
Brazil's Luiz Inacio Lula da
Silva, said on his weekly
radio program that his
country will not recognize
any Honduran government
that doesn't have Zelaya as
president "because he was
directly elected by the vote,
complying with the rules of
democracy."
"We in Latin America can
no longer accept someone
trying to resolve .his prob-
lem through the means of a
coup," Silva said.
Coups were common in
Central America until the
1980s, but Sunday's ouster
was the first military ouster
of a Central American pres-
ident since 1993, when
Guatemalan military offi-
cials refused to accept Pres-
ident Jorge Serrano's
attempt to seize absolute
power and removed him.
Honduras had not seen a
coup since 1978, when one
'military government over-
threw another.


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N Page A8 - TUESDAY, JUNE 30 2009



NATION


& WOORLD
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEF

Obama reassures
gay activists
WASHINGTON - Coun-
tering criticism that he's done
little on gay rights, President
Barack Obama commemo-
rated the 40th anniversary of
the birth of the modem move-
ment by welcoming its lead-
ers to the White House and
reaffirming his commitment to
their top priorities.
"I want you to know: You
have our support," Obama
told members of the core
Democratic constituency as
he and first lady Michelle
Obama hosted a cocktail-
and-appetizer reception in
the East Room for gay pride
month.
Since Obama took office in
January, some activists have
complained that Obama has
not followed through on his
campaign promises on is-
sues they hold dear and has
not championed their causes
from the White House, in-
cluding ending the ban on
gays in the military.
Obama pleaded for pa-
tience.
By the time he leaves of-
fice, the president said, "I
think youguys will have
pretty good feelings about
the Obama administration."

World BRIEFS


Pallum


Pope Benedict XVI blesses
archbishops Monday at the'
end of a Mass In which
they received the pallium,
a woollen shawl symboliz-
ing their bond to the pope,
In St. Peter's Basilica at
the Vatican.

Iran's rulers say
election valid
Iran's election oversight
body on Monday declared
the hotly disputed presiden-
tial vote to be valid after a
partial recount, rejecting op-
position allegations of fraud
and-further silencing calls for
a new vote...
State television reported
that the Guardian Council
presented the conclusion in a
letter to the Interior Minister
following a recount of a what
was described as a randomly
selected 10 percent of the al-
most 40 million ballots cast
June 12. '
The "meticulous and com-
prehensive examination" re-
vealed only "slight irreg-
ularities that are common to
any election and needless of
attention," Guardian Council
head Ahmed Jannati said.
Argentine leader
unfazed by losses
BUENOS AIRES, Ar-
gentina -Argentina's presi-
dent expressed defiance
Monday after voters took
away the ruling party's edge -
in Congress.
Sunday's midterm elec-
tions have severely weak-
ened President Cristina
Fernandez and her husband,
former President Nestor
Kirchner, who had warned
that "chaos" would ensue if
the government lost its leg-
islative majorities.
Instead, markets reacted
with relief, and political oppo-
nents were invigorated by the
reality that the autocratic
Kirchners will have to reach
compromises to get laws
passed once the new sena-
tors and deputies take office.
That's an uncomfortable
new situation for the ruling
couple, who have developed
a take-no-prisoners style of
politics over the last six
years.
-From wire reports


Madoff gets 150 years


Judge says message

must be sent, calls

huge swindle 'evil'

Associated Press
NEW YORK - A federal judge
rejected Bernard Madoff's plea for
leniency Monday, sentencing the 71-
year-old swindler to spend the rest
of his life in prison for an "extraor-
dinarily evil" fraud that took a stag-
gering toll on thousands of victims.
U.S. District Judge Denny Chin
cited the unprecedented nature of
the multibillion-dollar fraud as he
sentenced Madoff to the maximum


of 150 years in prison, a
term comparable only to
those given in the past to
terrorists, traitors and the
most violent criminals.
There is no parole in fed-
eral prison so Madoff will
most likely die there.
"Here, the message must Berr
be sent that Mr. Madoff's MVia
crimes were extraordinar- will spe
ily evil and that this kind of of life
irresponsible manipulation
of the system is not merely a blood-
less financial crime that takes place
just on paper, but it is instead ... one
that takes a staggering human toll,"
Chin said.
The massive Ponzi scheme run by
Madoff since at least the early 1990s
demolished the life savings of thou-


l sands of people, wrecked
charities and shook confi-
dence in the U.S. financial
system.
The actual loss so far has
been put at $13.2 billion. But
the judge said that was a
conservative estimate and
nard noted that even Madoff told
doff his sons in December it was
nd rest a $50 billion fraud.
in jail. The sentence reflected a'
growing tendency over the
last decade to give white-collar
criminals lengthy prison terms. But
nothing before has come close to
the time given Madoff - an out-
come that prompted scattered ap-
plause and whoops from a group of
burned former clients in a packed
Manhattan courtroom.


The judge noted that not one of
the more than 100 letters he re-
ceived supported Madoff or de-
scribed any good deeds he had done.
"The absence of such support is
telling," Chin said.
Chin announced the sentence with
Madoff standing at the defense table,
wearing a dark suit, white shirt and a
tie, and looking thinner than his last
court appearance in March. He gave
no noticeable reaction when the sen-
tence was announced. "
He also showed no emotion,
though he looked down earlier in
the hearing as he listened to nine
victims spend nearly an hour vent-
ing their despair and anger. Some
openly wept or raised their voices,
labeling Madoff a "monster," " true
beast" and an "evil low-life." 1


, Associated Press


BAGHDAD - Iraqi forces as-
sumed formal control of Bagh-
dad and other cities Tuesday
after American troops handed
over security in urban areas in a
defining step toward ending the
U.S.; combat role in the country
A countdown clock broadcast
on Iraqi TV ticked to zero as the
midnight deadline passed for
U.S. combat troops to finish their
pullback to bases outside cities.
"The withdrawal of American
troops is completed now from all
cities after everything they sac-
rificed for the sake of security,"
said Sadiq al-Rikabi, a senior ad-
viser to Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki. "We are now celebrating
the restoration of sovereignty."
The Pentagon did not offer any
comment to mark the deadline.
Fireworks, not bombings, col-
ored the Baghdad skyline late
Monday, and thousands attended
a party in a park where singers
performed patriotic songs. Loud-
speakers at police stations and


S71.


U.S. Army soldiers from 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment prepare
Sunday to move to a new area of operations at Forward Operating
Base Warhorse in Baqouba, Iraq.


military checkpoints played
recordings of similar tunes
throughout the day, as Iraqi mil-
itary vehicles decorated with
flowers and national flags pa-
trolled the capital.


High Court: Firefighters


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Only
white firefighters scored
well enough on the test to be
promoted. No blacks. So
New Haven, Conn., threw
out the test
In an important reverse
discrimination ruling Mon-
day, the Supreme Court re-
jected that decision,
cautioning employers na-


tionwide against changing
the rules once the game has
begun.
New Haven discrimi-
nated against its white fire-
fighters by ignoring the
results of a promotion exam
on which they did well but
no African-Americans
scored high enough to be
promoted to lieutenant or
captain, the justices said in
a 5-4 ruling.


High coui
Sonia Sotom
dorsed the cit
an appeals c
ammunition
porters and f
coming
hearing.
In its last
September, tl
servative maj
in the ruling
New Haven a


"All of us are happy - Shiites,
Sunnis and Kurds on this day,"
Waleed al-Bahadili said as he
celebrated at the park.- "The
Americans harmed and insulted
us too much."


Al-Maliki declared a public
holiday and proclaimed June 30
as "National Sovereignty Day."
Midnight's handover to Iraqi
forces filled many citizens with
pride but also trepidation that
government forces are not ready
and that violence will rise. Shiites
fear more bombings by Sunni mil-
itants; Sunnis fear that the Shiite-
dominated Iraqi security forces
will give them little protection.
The withdrawal, required
under a U.S.-Iraqi security pact,
marks the first major step to-
ward withdrawing all American
forces from the country by bec.
31,2011. Obama has said all com-
bat troops will be gone by the
end of August 2010.
Despite Tuesday's formal pull-
back some U.S. troops will re-
main in the cities to train and
advise Iraqi forces. U.S. troops
will return to the cities only if
asked. The U.S. military will con-
tinue combat operations in rural
areas and near the border, but
only with the Iraqi government's
permission.


victims of discrimination

irt nominee that had upheld the city's face workplace discrimin4-
layor had en- decision to discard the test tion based on race,;'
ty's position as results. The city said it acted Kennedy said.
2ourt judge - to avoid being sued by the The ruling restricts, but
for both sup- minority firefighters. does not eliminate employ-
oes in her up- Justice Anthony Kennedy ers' ability to take diversity
confirmation said in his majority opinion into account in employment
that New Haven's action decisions. But the ruling
session until amounted to discrimination could make it harder for mi-
he court's con- based on race against the norities to prove discrimi-
ority prevailed white firefighters who were nation based solely on
g that faulted likely to be promoted. lopsided racial hiring or
and the courts "No individual should promotions.


Iraqis celebrate U.S. pullback


Associated Press
Iraqis celebrate Monday In Baghdad, Iraq. U.S. troops were scheduled to be out of Iraqi cities by today, in the first step toward winding down
the American war effort by the end of 2011. To mark the milestone, fireworks colored Baghdad's skyline and thousands of people attended
a party In a city park late Monday where singers performed patriotic songs.

Fireworks, festivals across country as Iraqi forces assume control of cities


------------C


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Section B - TUESDAY. JUNE 30, 2009



PORTS


* Auto Racing/B2
* Baseball/B3
* TV, Lottery/B4
* The Game/B5
* Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


District 15 Little League
, AII-Star Tournament
June 25 - July 2
9-10 Baseball
Pool A
Won Loss
Inverness 2 0
Central Citrus 1 1
*Nest Hernando 0 2
Pool B
Won Loss
Crystal River 2 0
ady Lake 1 1
aireater Hudson 0 2
Pool C
.hady Hills 2 0
Dunnellon 1 1
'Dixie County 0 2
Monday's Game
Shady Hills 10, Dunnellon 6
Today's Games
6:30 p.m. Inverness vs. Lady Lake
6:30 p.m. Central Citrus vs. Dunnellon
Wednesday's Games
6:30 p.m. Shady Hills vs. Inverness/Lady Lake
6:30 p.m. Crystal River vs. Central Citrus/Dunnellon
Thursday's Game
6:30 p.m. Championship Game
Senior Baseball
Won Loss
Shady Hills 1, 0
West Hernando 1 I 1
Greater Hudson 0 1
Monday's Game I
Shady Hills 9, West Hernando 1
Today's Game
6:30 Shady Hills.vs. Greater Hudson
Wednesday's Game
,6:30 p.m. Championship Game
9-10 Softball
o. n Loss
Iriverres 0
Duricr, llir, 0
Cer.lal Cirus 0 1
Pool B
Wo,,. L.)'.
CrystalIiRve' 2 0
Srady Hills 0 I
i.:.uin Sumler 0 1
Monday's Game
Crystal Rivei 16. Sraay Hill. I
Today's Game
6 30 p m. Central Citrus vs Duri.iellnr
Wednesday's Game
S31) p rr a.m Sna,3y Hill; v. SGuin Sumrifer
Thursday's Game
9-10 Softball
. r, m TBA vs TBA
Friday's Game
6 3 p m. Cnamipior.isri Ga e
11-12 Softball
Pool A
Irnrness 2 U
Cei-ral Cnrds i 1
D, ie Couri, 0
' PoolB
Crv.sial River 0
Durnrellon 2 1
Souln Sumter I1
. dy'lllS '0 3
Monday's Games
S.uirA Spui'r 12 Snriay HIt 2
CrySlal Rivet 5.Dunnellon (i
" . Wednesday's Games
6 30 P m invamess v" Ddnnellor.
6 3u0 p,m CrySIl3 River vs Ceriiil Ciirui
Thursday's Game
6:30 p.m. Championship Game
Junior Softball-
Won Loss
Dunnellon 2 .0
Crystal River 1 1
Inverness 0 2
Monday's Game
Crystal River 12, Inverness 1
Today's Games
6:30 p.m. Dunnellon vs. Crystal River
8 p.m. Dunnellon vs. Crystal River (if nec.)
Senior Softball
Won Loss
. South Sumter 3 0
Shady Hills 2 1
Central Citrus 1 2
Greater Hudson 0 3
Monday's Games
Shady Hills 11, Central Citrus 1
South Sumter 11, Greater Hudson 2
Today's Game
6:30 p.m. South Sumter vs. Shady Hills


Brackets take shape


CR softball wins

'PoolB' with 5-0

victory over Dun.

JOHN COSCIA
jcoscia@chronicle6nline.com
Chronicle

Two, teams, Dunnellon and
Crystal River, would enter Mon-
day's game undefeated. Only
Crystal River, with a 5-0 victory,
would leave that way. The two top
teams in Pool B and what many
are calling the best teams in all of
District 15 Major Softball All-
Stars, certainly looked that way
last night as they battled it out on
the softball diamond.
Both squads' pitchers, Dunnel-
lon's Ariana Wunderly and Crys-
tal River's McCale Wilson, were
nearly perfect over the first three
innings as Wunderly only allowed
one walk while Wilson hit a bat-
ter, which ironically enough hap-
pened to be Wunderly.
The fourth inning was equally
as impressive for Wilson, who re-
tired the side in order. Wunderly,
however, would struggle to find
the strike zone in the bottom of
the fourth inning as she yielded
five walks to the first six Crystal
River batters. That, coupled with
four wild pitches and two stolen
bases, allowed Crystal River to
plate four runs in the frame with-
out the benefit of a single.hit.
The Crystal River rally started
when Amber Russo squared to
bunt to open the home half of the
fourth inning. It was clear that
Russo's attempted bunts were af-
fecting Wunderly's control. Wil-
son, Megan Winship and Shay
Huggins also earned walks and
scored in the inning. Crystal
River scored its final run in the
fifth inning when Danielle
Gomez drew a lead-off walk, stole
second and eventually scored on
a wild pitch.
Wilson pitched the complete
See .',-i I -:T Page B4


DAVE SIGLERICnronicle
Crystal River 11-12 All-Stars' Shay Huggins bats on Saturday against Shady Hills at Bicentennial Park.


Crystal River eliminates Inverness


CRscores16 to

-beat Shady Hills

in 9-10 softball

JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle-

With a spot in the champi-
onship game against Dunnellon
on the line, both the Inverness
and Crystal'River 13-14 Junior
Softball All-Stars had plenty of
incentive to win Monday night's
contest against one another.
Crystal River got the bats going
early and struck often, plating
five runs in the second inning
and never looking back during a
12-1 rout of Inverness.
Clarissa Consol got the win


from the pitcher's circle by going
four scoreless innings. The real
story, however, was Crystal
River's offense.
The team banged out eight hits
in six innings and put pressure
on Inverness at every turn by
continually putting the ball- in
play.
The bottom half of the order
;did most of the damage, as play-
ers hitting sixth through ninth
went a combined 6-for-ll at the
plate. -
Courtney Strifler went 2-for-2
with three RBIs and two runs
and Emily Laga scored, three
times and added an RBI on her
sixth-inning double.
"I'm glad they came out and hit
tonight," said Crystal River man-
ager Mitch Roe. "I couldn't even
tell you who stood out because
they all did something good."


Crystal River got going in the
second inning and sent 10 batters
to the plate.. Rachel Roe started
off by reaching on an error but
Inverness quickly retired the
next two batters. With two outs,
that's the exact time Crystal
River got itgoing.
Strifler's single scored cour-
tesy runner Laga for a 1-0 lead.
Tiffany MacDonald got on after
being hit by a pitch and
Cheyenne Phelps walked to load
the bases. Brooke Levins then de-
livered a two-run single that also
saw a third run come in on an In-
verness error for a 3-0 advantage.
Phelps and Levins also scored
in the inning to put Crystal River
up 5-0. The team plated three
more in the third on Strifler's
second RBI single and two Inver-
ness miscues brought in the other
two runs.


Preicious Flores and Laga
would each have RBI doubles
and Maegan McMichen picked
up an RBI single as well.t
"This is one of the best hitting
teams I've had the privilege to
coach," said Mitch Roe. "I hope
we've woken (our bats) up now."
Crystal River led 12-0 after
five-and-a-half innings before
Kelly Abramovich's RBI single
for Inverness kept her team from
being shut out
Next for Crystal River is a po-
tential two-game tilt against Dun-
nellon for the District 15
championship. Crystal River
must beat Dunnellon twice to ad-
vance to sectionals while Dun-
nellon need only win once.
The first game is at 6:30 tonight
and, should Crystal River win, a
second game between the two will
happen immediately afterward.
See CR/Page B4


Murray edges Wawrinka under Wimbledon's roof


Federer moves

closer to 6th title,
Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England - They
played into the night on Centre
Court, later than anyone ever had
in Wimbledon's long history, and
they played indoors, the first
match contested entirely under
-the new roof.
And at 10:39 p.m. Monday, when
No. 3-seeded Andy Murray of
Britain finally finished off a 2-6,6-
3, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3 victory over No. 19
Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzer-
land to reach the quarterfinals at
'the All England Club, the partisan
fans celebrated their guy's victory
'with quite a roar.
-' "It was pretty special," said
"Murray, who dropped to his knees
4vhen the match ended, then stood
ind swatted a ball straight up so
-hard it hit the roof.
" No man from Britain has won
"Wimbledon since Fred Perry in
11936, and, like his countrymen,
Murray- a 22-year-old from Scot-


Associated Press
Britain's Andy Murray plays a return to Switzerland's Stanislas Wawrinka
during their fourth round singles match on Monady at Wimbledon.


land - is more interested in that
sort of history than the sort he and
Wawrinka made Monday.
Still, these circumstances were
rather extraordinary, what with
Centre Court's roof shut, the lights
on and a chance to phly i I1 match


until its rightful conclusion, no
matter how late. That's never be-
fore been the case at Wimbledon,
where unlike the U.S. Open, there
never has been lighted courts, and
matches often are stopped in
iwogn . -' because of darkness. Pre-


viously, no Centre Court point had
been played later than 9:35 p.m.
"I'll have, a pretty deep sleep
after that one," Murray said.
At. a tournament that began in
1877, not a single point had been
contested indoors until earlier
Monday, when a light sprinkle in-
terrupted No. 1-ranked Dinara
Safina's 4-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory over
2006 champion Amelie Mau-
resmo. After the fifth game of the
second set, the translucent roof
above the main stadium was
closed, and Safina and Mauresmo
finished up underneath - even
though by the time they resumed,
the rain had stopped.
Because forecasts called for
later showers (none arrived), or-
ganizers left the contraption
sealed for Murray-Wawrinka,
which turned out to be a fortuitous
decision, even if Murray found the
conditions "very, very heavy and
very humid; sweating so much."
"When I finished, it was like I'd
been in a bath," he said.
All in all, though, the day's last
match provided far more excite-
ment than the generally open-and-
shut cases that dominated the rest


of the fourth round.
Five-time Wimbledon champion
Roger Federer won easily, as did
two-time runner-up Andy Roddick
and No. 4 Novak Djokovic. Venus
Williams, like Federer chasing a
sixth title at the All England Club,
was way ahead when her oppo-
nent, former No. 1 Ana Ivanovic,
quit with a thigh injury. Williams'
younger sister, Serena, herself a
two-time Wimbledon champion,
and No. 4 Elena Dementieva were
never challenged in their straight-
set victories.
One surprising run ended in the
fourth round. Melanie Oudin, a 17-
year-old qualifier from Marietta,
Ga., who never won a Grand Slam
match before last week, lost to No.
11 Agnieszka Radwanska of
Poland 6-4, 7-5.
"It's always difficult to play
someone who you don't know,"
said Radwanska, who did not ap-
pear to have any difficulty Mon-
day, but might find the road
rougher Tuesday.
That's when she will play in the
quarterfinals against Venus
See TENNIS/Page B4









'r- .. -AICU. 2. JU,


Dt - TUESDAY, JUNY 3D U 2 UU0




Good moves of the season


KIM COMMON
Chronicle

Involved in a racing inci-
dent? Go to the rear of
the field. Yes, Citrus
County Speedway officials
have recanted their current
"Spin Out Rule" and rein-
stated an old, and seemingly
just as controversial, rule
where any(all) drivers) in-
volved in a spin or incident
that brings out the caution
will be sent to the rear of the
field for the restart. The
only exception to this rule
would be if a driver admits
fault right away.
The track has gone both
ways on this rule over the
years and it seems as though
they always revert back to
the all-involved way of
thinking. It's fair for every-
one and keeps track offi-
cials from having to make a
bad call, a call where per-
haps they give the appear-
ance of playing favorites,
and makes the biggest part
of the driver field content
The new rule goes into ef-
fect on the next race night,
July 11.
Later start time to help
with summer heat. That's
why track officials have de-
cided to change the start
time for racing action to 6:30
p.m. effective July 18.
July 25 is Fan Apprecia-
tion Night at Citrus County
Speedway. Admission on
the grandstand side will be
$5 per person. It's a great
way to thank the many loyal
fans who come to Citrus
County Speedway every Sat-
urday night, and hopefully


Sportsman Feature
20 Laps -11 Cars
1.#725 LJ.Grimm - 1st Season Feature Win
2. #88 Bobby Ervien - St. Petersburg
3. #15 Joey Catterelli - Pinellas Park
4. #55 Emrnie Reed - Lecanto
5. #01 Tom Posavec- Dunnellon
1si Heat Winner - 55 Ernie Reed
2nd Heal Winner - #725 L J. Gnmmr
NAPA Auto Parts Street Stock Feature
20 Laps-8 Cars
Rainout Make up Race '
1. #4 Jay Witfoth - Beverly Hills - 3rd Season Win
2. a 5 Herb Hoelier- Floral City
3. #007 Mark Fallows - Crystal River
4. #0 Kenny May - Sprng Hill
5.#09 Canl Glaum - Cryial River
NAPA Auto Parts Feature
20 Laps-15 Cars
1. #42 Richie Smith - Hemando - 3rd Season Win
2. #4 Jay Witfoth- Beverly Hills
3. #007 MarK Fallows - Crysal River
4. #5 Herb Hoefler- Roral City
5 #91 David Fosr - Wildwood .
Isi Heal Winner � 4 J3 Witfoth ' '
2nd Heat Winner- #007 Mark Fallows
Curry Roofing Mini Stock Feature
S. 20 Laps-10 Cars
1. #62 Jesse Henley - Homosassa - 1st Season Win


2. #9 Richie Powers- Hernando
3. #51 Chris Harvey - Belleview
4. #44 Mike Lawhorn - Claremont
5. #98 James Ellis- Brooksville
Heat Winner - #9 Richie Powers
Mike Scott Plumbing 4 CylinderStreets
25 Laps-17 Cars
1. #47 Richard Kuhn - Ocala- 5 Season Wins
2. #26 Nathan Florian - Homosassa
3. #71 Sonya Heater- Homosassa
4. #13 Mike Ogren - Spring Hill � r
5. #21 Phil Edwards - Crystal River
1st Heat Winner- #47 Richard Kuhn
2nd Heat Winner - #24 Brian Scalise - Lutz
1st Figure 8 School Bus Feature
2 Laps-12 Buses
1. #96 Mike Camache
2. #85 Jay Seykora
3. #00 Dwayne Fults
4. #05 Gene Camche
5. #6 John Drye


Citrus Co. Speedway Results - 6/27/09


attract a few new fans along
the way!
Don't forget...there Will be
no race action this Saturday
night, July 4, but when the
races resume on July 11
there will be- plenty of ac-
tion to make up for it in-
cluding Open Wheel
Modifieds, Sportsman,
Curry Roofing Mini Stocks,
Pure Stocks, V8 Thunder
Stocks and the Mike Scott
Plumbing 4 Cylinder
Streets, plus the Fantastic
Super Modified Figure 8
and the American Mini Cup
Series.
School is out and that
means that School Bus Fig-
ure 8 action is in session at
Citrus County Speedway.
But, if you missed the races


Earning his first win in
Sportsman action was L.J.
Grimm over Bobby Ervien,
Joey Catterelli, Ernie Reed
and Tom Posavec.
Brian Scalise set the early
pace of the Mike Scott
Plumbing 4-cylinder Street
feature but it was Richard
Khun with the checkered
flag after taking the lead
with three laps to go and
driving off to his fifth fea-
ture win. Nathan Florian
snagged the lead on lap 6
but settled for second over
Sonya Heater, Mike Ogren
and Phil Edwards.
Jesse Henley took an un-
contested win in the Curry
Roofing Mini Stock feature
after starting third and lead-
ing the field to the stripe by
over 10 car lengths. The win
was his first in the division.
Richie Powers followed for
second, Chris Harvey third.
Mike Lawhorn won the four-
car battle for fourth over
James Ellis, Don Faunce
and David Mothershed.
Travis Nichols topped the
trial 4-cylinder Street 10-lap
Trophy Dash Figure 8 race.
Nathan Florian, Richard
Kuhn, Greg Valdes and Mike
Ogren rounded out the top
five. If there is enough in-
terest in the future for a 4-
cylinder Figure 8 division it
could be a new monthly fea-
ture in mid-September.
Winning the makeup race
in street stock action in-
cluded Jay Withfoth for his
third NAPA Auto Parts
Street Stock win of the sea-
son over Herb Hoefler, Mark
Fallows, Kenny May and
Carl Glaum.


1. # 2 Richard
2. #69 Mike H
3. #64 Justin I
4. #5 Big Ken
5.#3 lyan O


Saturday night, you will
have one more race night
to see the action when they
return to the figure 8 track
for the Fall Fiasco on Octo-
ber 10.
Saturday night's race ac-
tion included two School
Bus Figure 8 races, each
with 12 cars, and each 20
laps in length. Both gave the
fans everything they ex-
pected to see, and more: a
crash in the intersection, an
overturned school bus and
two drivers outrunning
'their fellow drivers to the
checkered flag.
In the first race, Mike Ca-
mache regained his early
lead with five laps to go to
beat Jay Seykora, Dwayne
Fults, Gene Camache and


2nd Figure 8 Bus Feature
20 Laps-12 Buses
J Dinkins
inde
Pretty
ny
'Neal

John Drye to the. Richard
Dinkins topped the official
finish of Race No. 2 with
Mike Hinde, Justin Cretty,
Big Kenny and Ryan O'Neal
following respectively.
In regular season action,
Richie Smith took his third
win of the NAPA Auto
Parts Street Stock feature
after rocketing to a six-car
advantage at one point of
the race, only to have the
caution come out with
three to go and have Jay
Withfoth on his rear deck
lid at the restart. The cau-
tion didn't seem to matter
though as Smith kept With-
foth at bay for the win.
Mark Fallows, Herb Hoe-
ftier and David Foster fol-
lowed respectively.


r EARN $25 IN THE CHRONICLE'S NASCAR CONTEST


Associated Press
Associated Press Joey Logano smiles in Victory Lane after winning the rain-shortened
Joey Logano makes a pit stop during the NASCAR Lenox Industrial NASCAR Lenox Industrial Tools 301 auto race on Sunday at New Hamp-
Tools 301 auto race on Sunday in Loudon, N.H. shire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H.


CONTEST RULES
* Pick the winner orthis Saturday's
Coke Zero 400 Powered by Cocal-Cola
in Daytona Beach. In the event that .
more than one contestant picks the
same driver, the tie will be broken by
guessing the average speed of the race.
* The closest contestant to the actual
average speed, over or under, will be
declared the winner If there is no win-
ner one week the $25 prize will carry
over to the following week making that
week's race contest worth $50.
* You may enter as many times as
you like but every entry form MUST
be an original entry form from the
Citrus County Chronicle. No copies
will be permitted.
* Please include your name, address
and telephone number on the printed
entry form. DON'T FORGET TO SUP-
PLY YOUR TIEBREAKER SPEED.
* You may drop off or mail entries to our
Meadowcrest office at 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd, Crystal River, FL, 34429. All
entrees MUST be in the office no later
than 5 p.m. on Fliday, July 3.


$-------------------------- -------------------------------------------
$75 up for grabs!. i

For nd week NASCAR CONTEST ENTRY FORM
a row nobody guessed the ":N
winner of the Sprint Cup I
series race.
As a result the accrued DRIVER'S NAME YOUR NAME PHONE NUMBER .
$50 prize will roll over to
the next race making this TIEBREAKER: (Guess the average speed of the race to three decimal places:) __
week's Coke Zero 400 in You may mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle, c/o John Coscia, Sports editor,
Daytona Beach worth
$75. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL, 34429. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. on July 3.
$75. , :
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Street Stocks
kick-off evening
LARRY MACMILLAN
Special to the Chronicle

The Street Stock rainout
make up race took to the
track to kick off the night
and it looked like it was
going to be Jay Witfoth's
night to dominate as he
came from the back end of -
the eight car 20-lap first fea-
ture to rocket to the point
and onto Victory Lane for
his third feature win of the
season. Herb Hoefler fol-
lowed in the tire tracks of
Witfoth on his way to the
front of the pack followed by
Dr. Mark Fallows to finish in
that order when the check-
ered flag flew. Rounding out
the top five were pole sitter
Kenny May and Carl Glaum.
Jay Witfoth came right back
t6dominate the first of two
heats in preparation for their
second feature of the night
with another win while point
leader Mark Fallows made it
a flag to flag win in the sec-
ond heat. In the regular fea-
ture race Richie Smith
rocketed from his 3rd start-
ing position to the point to
log his 3rd feature win of the
season in the Street Stock
division. Jay Witfoth gave
him all he had in the attempt
to make it two feature wins
for night but had to settle for
second followed by Mark
Fallows, Herb Hoefler and
David Foster to round out
the top five.


ic


1998


m 4


CITRusS COUNnk. (FL) CHRONICLEE


AUTO RACING


I










(~rmr;.' Cnrnv7v [FF1 CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 B3


AL


Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore


L Philadelphia
Florida
New York
Atlanta
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB
3� -
5 1�1
7 3�
13 91�


East Division
GB WCGB

2� 3Y�
3 4
5 6
17� 18'�


W
Detroit 42
Minnesota 39
Chicago 38
Kansas City 33
Cleveland 31


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB L10 Str
- - 8-2 W-1
4� 5� 5-5 L-1
4� 5� 7-3 W-3
9 10 4-6 W-2
12� 13� 2-8 L-3


Central Division
GB WCGB
- - I
1 1�2
3 3�
3� 4
4� 5
6 6�


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Boston 4, Baltimore 0
Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 3
Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 1
L.A. Angels 5, Texas 2
Kansas City 4, Minnesota 2
Detroit at Oakland, late
Today's Games
Boston (Smoltz 0-1) at Baltimore (R.Hill 3-2),
7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Richard 2-1) at Cleveland
(CI.Lee 4-6), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Morrow 0-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Cham-
beriain 4t2), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Garza 5-5) at Toronto (Richmond
6-4), 7:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Saunders 8-4) at Texas (Feldman
S5-2), 8:05 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 5-6) at Kansas City (Ban-
nister 5-5), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Galarraga 4-7) at Oakland (G.Gonza-
lez 0-1), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Boston at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
LA. Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs 3, Pittsburgh 1
Milwaukee 10, N.Y. Mets 6
Florida 4, Washington 2
San Francisco 10, St. Louis 0
Houston at San Diego, late
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 7-5) at Pittsburgh (Ohlen-
dorf 6-6), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Haren 6-5) at Cinbinnati (Arroyo 8-6),
7)0 p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 4-4) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 7-
6),7:10 p.m.
Washington (Stammen 1-3) at Florida (West 3-
2), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 9-5) at Milwaukee (Bums
0-1), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Ra.Johnson 7-5) at St. Louis
(C.Carperiter 5-2), 8:15 p.m.
Houston (Hampton 4-5) at San Diego (Banks 0-
0); 10:05 p.m.
Colorado (Marquis 9-5) at L.A. Dodgers
(Billingsley 9-3), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Florida, 12:10 p.m.
N Y Mets at Milwaukee 2-05 p m
Colorador al L A Doage.r. 3 1 p ar "
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m..
Houston at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Carl Crawford, left is congratulated by B.J.
Upton, center, and Evan Longoria following his two-run home
run during the third inning on Monday in Toronto.


Rays 4, Blue Jays 1
TORONTO - Carl Crawford and
Pat Burrell homered and the Tampa
BaRayRs ruined Roy Halladay's re-
turn with their sixth straight victory,'4-
1 over the Toronto Blue Jays on
Monday night.
Halladay (10-2) came in having won
his past seven decisions, the longest
streak in the majors, but lost for the first
time since April 21, against Texas. The
Blue Jays have lost three straight.
He was starting for the first time
since June 12, against Florida, when
he left two pitches into the fourth inning
with a sore groin that landed him on
the disabled list. Halladay allowed two
runs and five hits in six innings. The
right-hander, who walked two and
struck out seven, failed to pitch at least
seven innings for only the second time
in 15 starts.
Jeff Niemann (7-4) won his third
straight decision and is unbeaten in
five starts in June. He allowed one run
and four hits, walked two and struck
out one.
Randy. Choate got the last out for
his fourth save in as many chances.
The long layoff seemed to affect


Halladay's control, as he threw 88
pitches, 57 strikes.
The Rays touched Halladay for two


runs in the third.
Tampa Bay Toronto
ab rhbi


BUpton cf
Crwfrd If
Longori 3b
C.Pena lb
WAyar 2b
Zobrist 2b
Burrell dh
Gross rf
Bartlett ss
Navarr c


2 1 0 1 Scutaro ss
3 1 2 2 A.Hill2b
3 00 V.Wells cf
4 00 0 Rolen3b
4 0 00 Lind dh
0 0 0 0 Overaylb
4 1 1 1 Bautistrf
3 020 RAdms If
3 1 2 0 Barajsc
3 0 1 0 JMcDnl pr
RChavz c


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 00 0
4 010
4010
402 0
400 0
1 100
3000
3 0 1 1
0000
0000


Totals 29 4 8 4 Totals " 31 1 5 1
Tampa Bay. 002 000 200-4
Toronto 000 000 010-1
E-Barajas (6). DP-Tampa Bay 1, Toronto 2.
LOB-Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 5.2B-Rolen (23).
HR-Crawford (7), Burrell (3). SB-B.Upton
(29), Crawford (40), Bartlett (17), Rolen (4).
CS-Gross (3), Navarro (1). SF-B.Upton.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
NiemannW,7-4 71-3 4 1 1 2 1
Wheeler H,9 11-3 1 0 0 0 1
Choate S,4-4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Toronto
Hailladay L1'0-2 - '6 '5 2 2 2' 7"'"
Accardo 1 3 2 2 1 0
B.J.Ryan 1 0 0 0 1 0
Camp, 1 .0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Bill Miller; First, Mike Es-
tabrook; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Jim
Joyce.
T-2:32. A-15,665 (49,539).


Red Sox 4, Orioles 0
BALTIMORE - Jon Lester pitched
seven shutout innings, J.D. Drew
came within.a double of hitting for the
cycle, and the Boston Red Sox
cruised past the Baltimore Orioles 4-0
on Monday night.
Jonathan Papelbon got the final out
with two on to earn his 132nd career
save, tying Bob Stanley for the most in
Red Sox history. Papelbon has 19
saves this season in 20 opportunities.
Lester (7-6) gave up five hits, struck
out eight and.walked none. The left-
hander allowed only one runner past
first base, but even then he proved to
be overpowering: In the fifth inning, de-
spite yielding a pair of two-out singles,
Lester struck out the side. '
Lester is 8-0 with a 2.18 ERA
against Baltimore in 10 career starts.
The only other pitcher to win his first
eight decisions against the Orioles was
Todd Stottlemyre (1988-93).
Drew tripled and scored in the first
inning, hit a two-run homer in the fourth
and singled in the sixth. Needing a
double in the eighth inning to become
Sthe first.Red Sox player since John
Valentin (1996) to hit for the cycle,
Drew grounded out to second.
But that was perhaps the only dis-
appointing moment of the night for the
Red Sox, who have won eight straight
against Baltimore.


Boston Baltimore
ab rhbi
J.Drew rf 5 2 3 2 BRorts2b
Pedroia2b 3 0 1 1 AdJons cf
Youkils 3b_5 0 1 0 Markks rf
Bay If 5 00 0 A.Huff dh
D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 Reimld If
Kotsay lb 4 0 2 0 Wggntn lb
Ellsurycf 3 1 1 0 Mora3b
Varitekc 4. 1 2 1 Wieters c
NGreen ss 3 0 0 0 Andino ss
Totals 36 411 4 Totals


ab r h bi
400 0
3 00 0

4 0 1 0
4 02 0
3 00 0

3 0 1 0
33 0 6 0


Boston 100 300 000-4
Baltimore 000 000 000-0
DP-Baltimore 2. LOB-Boston 10, Baltimore
8. 2B-Youkilis (18). 3B-J.Drew (3). HR-
J.Drew (10). SB-Pedroia (13), Ellsbury 2 (33).
IP H RERBBSO


Boston
Lester W,7-6
Delcarmen
Okajima .
R.Ramirez
Papelbon S,19-20
Baltimore


BerkenL,1-5 5 8 4 4 2 3,
Bass 3 2 0 0 '- 0"
C.Ray 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Berken (N.Green, Elisbury). Balk-
Berken.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Tony Ran-
dazzo; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Mike
Winters.
T-2:48. A-36,548 (48,290).


White Sox 6, Indians 3
CLEVELAND-- Gavin Floyd shut
out Cleveland on five singles over 72-3
innings and the surging Chicago White
Sox climbed back to .500 with a 6-3
win Monday night over the free-falling
Indians, who lost for the 11th time in 13
games.
Floyd (6-5), who started the season
by losing four of his first six decisions,
improved to 3-0 in June, 4-1 since May
22 and has a 1.39 ERA in his last eight
starts. The right-hander walked two,
struck out five and escaped a bases-
loaded threat in the seventh with a
head's-up fielding play.
Floyd charged off the mound,
scooped Ryan Garko's slow roller as it
trickled up the first-base chalk and
threw to first for the inning's final out.
Floyd was lifted in the eighth by man-
ager Ozzie Guillen with a runner on
and Grady Sizemore coming up.
Thornton came on and got Sizemore
to swing at his first pitch and lift a
harmless fly out to left.
Jermaine Dye and Gordon Beck-
ham had RBI singles off Carl Pavano
(6-7) as the White Sox won for the 10th
time in 14 games.
The last-place Indians have
dropped three straight and only
avoided their fifth shutout with a
three-run ninth.


Chiacgo Cleveland
ab rhbi
Pdsdnklf 4 1 1 0 Carroll 2b
Rmirez ss 3 0 0 0 Szmore cf
Nixss 0 1 0 0 Mrtinez c
Dyerf 3 1 1 1 Choorf
Andrsncf 00 0 0 Peralta3b
Thome dh 3 0 0 0 Hafner dh
Knerko lb 4 0 0 0 Garko lb
Przynsc 4 1 0 1 VIbunss
Getz2b 4 2 2 1 Gmnezlf
Bckhm3b 3 0 3 2
Wise cf 4 0 0 0
Totals 32 6 7 5 Totals


ab r h bi
4 01 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
3 121

3 00 0
4 1 1 2
4 000
3 02 0


33 3 8 3


Chicago 110 000 004-6
Cleveland , 000 000 003-3
DP-Chicago 2, Cleveland 1. LOB-Chicago 3,
Cleveland 5. 2B-Getz 2 (11), Peralta (14).
HR-Choo (10), Garko (8). SB-Podsednik
(12), Nix (4), Beckham (1). CS-Beckham (3).
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Floyd W,6-5
Thornton
Dotel
Cleveland


72-3 5
1 2
1-3 1


PavanoL,6-7 7 5 2 2 0 6
Sipp ": . 1 0 0 0 1'0 "0
Perez 2-3 2 4. 4 1 0
Veras 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Perez (Dye), by Perez (Ramirez).
WP-Thornton, Perez.
Umpires-Home, Scott Barry; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Brian Runge; Third, Tom Hallion.
T-2:41. A-15,645 (45,199).


Royals 4, Twins 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- Miguel Olivo
homered, tripled and drove in two runs,
Luke Hochevar overcame some shaky
moments in seven scoreless innings
and the Kansas City Royals beat the
Minnesota Twins 4-2 on Monday night
to end a five-game home losing streak.
One of baseball's worst-hitting
teams, Kansas City missed a few early
chances against Twins starter Nick
Blackburn (6-4) before breaking open a
tight game on consecutive homers by
Alberto Callaspo and Olivo in the sixth
inning.
Olivo finished with three hits, a dou-
ble short of the cycle.
The Royals had 12 hits and sur-
vived a two-run homer by Justin
Morneau in the eighth inning to avoid
matching their longest home losing
streak in nearly two years.
Hochevar (3-3) struggled early, al-
lowing eight hitters to reach base in the
first three innings. He worked through
the traffic, though, holding the Twins
hitless in six at-bats with runners in
scoring position. The right-hander re-
tired 10 straight after a leadoff double
by Michael Cuddyer in the fourth inning
and didn't come out for the eighth after
allowing two hits.
-Morneau, who hit a three-run homer
in a win over St. Louis on Sunday, fol-
lowed with his 18th homer, a two-out,
two-run shot off John Bale that cut
Kansas City's lead to 4-2.


Minnesota


Kansas City


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Spancf 3 1 1 0 DeJess If 5 02 0
BHarrs ss 4 01 0 BImqstrf 4 00 0
Mauerc 4 0 0 0 Butlerlb 5 0 2 0
Mornealb 3 1 1 2 Jacobs dh 4 00 0
Kubel dh 3 00 0 Teahen 3b 4 01 0
Cuddyrrf 4 0 1 0 Callasp2b 4 22 1
Buschr3b 3 00 Olivoc 423 2
DImYnlf 4 0 1 0 Maiercf 3 0 1 0
Punto 2b 3 00 0 PenaJrss 4 0 1 0
Totals 31 2 5 2 Totals 37 412 3
Minnesota 000 000 020-2
Kansas City 010 002 10x-4
E-Cuddyer (4), B.Harris (5), Teahen (7). DP-
Kansas City 2. LOB-Minnesota 6, Kansas City
12.2B-Cuddyer (17), Maier (6). 3B-Olivo (2).
HR-Morneau (18), Callaspo (5), Olivo (12).


SB-Maier (3).

Minnesota
Blackburn L,6-4
Dickey
Mijares
Kansas City
HochevarW,3-3
Bale
Soia S,10-12.


IP H RERBBSO

6 10 3 2 1 4
1 2 1 1 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 1

7 2 0 0 4 2
1 3 2 2 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 3


Umpires-Home, Larry Vanover; First, Sam
Holbrook; Second, Dan lassogna; Third, Char-
lie Reliford.
T-2:44. A-22,066 (38,177).


MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-ISuzuki, Seattle, .372; Rolen,
Toronto, .332; MiCabrera, Detroit, .331; Craw-
ford, Tampa Bay, .319; Figgins, Los Angeles,
.319; Kubel, Minnesota, .317; VMartinez, Cleve-
land, .316.
RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 58; Scutaro,
Toronto, 58; Damon, NewYork, 55; Figgins, Los
Angeles, 55; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 54; Kinsler,
Texas, 54; Pedroia, Boston, 54; BRoberts, Bal-
timnore, 54.
RBI--Bay, Boston, 69; Longoria, Tampa Bay,
63; Morneau, Minnesota, 61; Teixeira, New
York, 60; VMartinez, Cleveland, 57; AHill,
Toronto, 56; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 56.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 110; AHill, Toronto,
102; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 99; VMartinez,.
Cleveland, 93; Lind, Toronto, 91; MYoung,
Texas, 91; MiCabrera, Detroit, 90; Cano, New
York, 90; Figgins, Los Angeles, 90; Markakis,
Baltimore, 90.
IOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 23; Teix-
Sera, New York, 20; Bay, Boston, 19; Branyan,
battle, 19; AHill, Toronto, 19; NCruz, Texas, 18;
e, Chicago, 18; Granderson, Detroit, 18;
lige, Detroit, 18; Kinsler, Texas, 18.
FVTCHING -Halladay, Toronto, 10-2; Slowey,
Minesota, 10-3; Wakefield, Boston, 10-3;
Greinke, Kansas City, 10-3; Beckett, Boston, 9-
A Veriander, Detroit, 8-3; JerWeaver, Los An-
gles, 8-3.
TRIKEOUTS--Verlander, Detroit, 124; Lester,
ston, 114; Greinke, Kansas City, 114; FHer-
ndez, Seattle, 107; Halladay, Toronto, 95;
Beckett, Boston, 94; ABumett, New York, 92.
,AVES-Fuentes, Los Angeles, 21; Nathan,
Minnesota, 19; Papelbon, Boston, 19;
daRivera, New York, 18; Jenks, Chicago, 18;
odney, Detroit, 17; Aardsma, Seattle, 16;
dnerrill, Baltimore, 16.
S NATIONAL LEAGUE
.ATTING-Sandoval, San Francisco, .340;
.aRamirez, Florida, .339; DWright, New York,
9; Beltran, New York, .336; Tejada, Hous-
ton, .330; Hawpe, Colorado, .329; Pujols, St.
Louis, .328.
FUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 59; Braun, Milwau-
Ve, 55; Utley, Philadelphia, 52; Ibanez,
Rhiladelphia, 51; Victorino, Philadelphia, 51;
(erth, Philadelphia, 51; Zimmerman, Wash-
ington, 50.
AIBI-Pujols, St. Louis, 74; Fielder, Milwaukee,
,3; Howard, Philadelphia, 59; Ibanez, Philadel-
hia, 59; Hawpe, Colorado, 55; Reynolds, Ari-
Zona, 54; Braun, Milwaukee, 53; Dunn,
Washington, 53; Herton, Colorado, 53.
ITS-Tejada, Houston, 97; HaRamirez,
lorida, 96; DWright, New York, 95; Hudson,
Ios Angeles, 92; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 91;
Braun, Milwaukee, 90; Zimmerman, Washing-
tbn, 90.
ROME RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 28; AdGonza-
liz, San Diego, 24; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 22;
leitynolds, Arizona, 21; Howard, Philadelphia, 20;
l9unn, Washington, 19; Fielder, Milwaukee, 19.
P, ITCHING -Cain, San Francisco, 9-2; Billings-
.Iy, Los Angeles, 9-3; JSantana, NewYork, 9-5;
Itlarquis, Colorado, 9-5; Cook, Colorado, 8-3;
(allardo, Milwaukee, 8-4; Wainwright, St. Louis,

uIKEOUTS-JIVazquez, Atlanta,,125; Lince-
um, San Francisco, 124; Haren, Arizona, 104;
$allardo, Milwaukee, 102; JSantana, New York,
100; Billingsley, Los Angeles, 99; JoJohnson,
filorida, 94.
SAVES-Bell, San Diego, 21; FrRodriguez,
Irew York, 20; BWilson, San Francisco, 20;
Street, Colorado, 19; Broxton, Los Angeles, 18;
0 rdero, Cincinnati, 18; Hoffman, Milwaukee,


Giants 10, Cardinals 0
ST. LOUIS -Tim Lincecum threw a
two-hitter for his third complete game
of the season, and Travis Ishikawa
homered in the San Francisco Giants'
10-0 rout of the slumping St. Louis Car-
dinals on Monday night.
Lincecum (8-2) tied with teammate
Matt Cain for the league lead in com-
plete games and his 2.37 ERA is sec-
ond in the NL after mastering the
punchless Cardinals with his third ca-
reer shutout and fifth career complete
game. He needed only 95 pitches to
match his career low complete game
and finished off the Cardinals in a
snappy 2 hours, 6 minutes.
. Brad Thompson (2-4) took the loss
for the Cardinals, who have lost five of
six while scoring three or fewer runs in
all of the setbacks.
Lincecum's three complete games
have all come within his last four out-
ings. The right-hander retired the first
14 in order before Rick Ankiel lofted a
soft single to center with two outs in the
fifth, then mowed down five more be-
fore Albert Pujols doubled off the left-
field wall with one out in the seventh.
Pujols was the only runner to reach
scoring position for the Cardinals, who
have totaled two runs in two games
since acquiring Mark DeRosa from the
Indians.
Edgar Renteria's three-run double
capped a five-run seventh.
San Francisco St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Rowndcf 3 00 0 Schmkr2b 4 00 0
Torres pr-cf 1 1 0 0 DeRosa 3b-1b4 0 0 0
Winn If 5 2 1 1 Pujols ib - 3 0 1 .0
Sandovl3b 3 0 0 1 TGreen 3b 0 00 0
BMolin c 5 1 3 1 Ludwck rf 3 00 0
Schrhit rf 4 22 0 Duncan If 3 00 0
Renteri ss 4 1 2 3 Ankielcof 3 0 1 0
Ishikawlb 4 1 1 3 LaRuec 3 00 0
Uribe2b 4 2 2 1 BThmpp 1 0 0 0
Linccm p 3 0 1 0 Thurstn ph 1 00 0
Mrtnsnp 1 0 0 0
BrRyanss 300 0
Totals 36101210 Totals 29 0 2 0
San Francisco 100 300 510-10
St. Louis 000 000 000- 0
E-Schumaker (6). DP-St. Louis 2. LOB-San
Francisco 4, St. Louis 2.2B-Winn (19), Rente-
ria (12), Uribe (13), Pujols (19). HR-Ishikawa
(5), Uribe (2). S-Lincecum. SF-Sandoval.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
LincecumW,8-2 9 2 0 0 0 8
St. Louis
B.Thompson L,2-4 ,6 7 4 4 1 2
Mortensen 3 5 6 2 1 2
HBP-by Mortensen (Rowand).
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First, Tim
Tschida; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Todd
Tichenor.
T-2:06. A-37,737 (43,975).


Brewers 10, Mets 6
MILWAUKEE -Casey McGehee
hit his first career grand slam moments
after committing a costly gaffe and J.J.
Hardy tied a career high with four hits,
including a homer, to lift the Milwaukee
Brewers to a 10-6 win over the reeling
New York Mets on Monday night.
The Mets have lost four straight,
falling under .500 (37-38) for the first
time since May 5, and not even the
previously unflappable Fernando Nieve
(3-1) could help. He gave up 11 hits
and three runs before being pulled.
McGehee made up for it giving the
Mets life with starter Braden Looper (6-
4) cruising and Milwaukee leading 3-0.
With two outs and a man on first in
the sixth inning, the Brewers third
baseman dropped Fernando Mar-
tinez's routine pop up, putting runners
on the corners.
Brian Schneider hit the next pitch
off the wall for a two-run double to cut


it to 3-2.
NewYork


Milwaukee


ab rhbl ab rhbi
ArReys ss 5 00 0 Counsll2b 6 1 1 0
DnMrplb 4 1 1 0 Hardyss 4 24 1
DWrght3b 5 1 1 1 Braun If 5 01 0
Sheffildlf 5 1 3 Fielder 1b 4 2 2 0
Churchrf 5 1 4 0 McGeh3b 3 1 1 4
FMrtnzcf 5 1 2 0 Stetterp 0 00 0
Schndrc 3 01 2 Gamelph 1 00 0
LCastill 2b -2 0 0 0 Villanvp 0 0 0 0
Dessns p 0 00 0 Hoffmn p 0 00 0
Evans ph 1 00 0 MCmrn cf 4 1 1 0
Stokes p 0 00 0 Catlntt rf 2 1 2 0
Mischp 0 00 0 C.Hartph-rf 2 1 1 1
Santos ph 1 0 0 0 Kendall c 4 1 3 1
Parnell p 0 00 0 Looperp 3 0 1 1
Nieve p 1 0 00 Coffey p 0 0 00
Tatis 2b 3 1 1 0 Hall 3b 2 02 2
Totals '40 613 6 Totals 40101910
NewYork 000 002 103- 6
Milwaukee 011 104 12x-10
E-McGehee (3). DP-New.York 3, ilwaukee
1. LOB-New York 10, Milwaukee 12. 2B-
Dan.Murphy (8), D.Wright (23), Schneider (6),
Hardy 2 (9), Fielder (19), Catalanottd (1), C.Hart
(15), Hall (10). 3B-Tatis (2). HR-Sheffield
(10), Hardy (8), McGehee (5).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
NieveL,3-1 31-311 3 3 1 1
Dessens 12-3 0 0 .0 1 0
Stokes 1 3 4 4 1 0
Misch 1 2 1 1 1 1
Parnell 1 3 2 2 1 1
Milwaukee
Looper W,6-4 61-3 7 3 1 2 2
Coffey 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
StetterH,14 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
Villanueva 1-3 5 3 3 0 0
HoffmanS,18-19 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Dessens (Catalanotto), by Stetter
(Schneider).
Umpires-Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Jim
Wolf; Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Fieldin
Culbreth.
T-3:11. A-39,872 (41,900).


Marlins 4, Nationals 2
MIAMI - Ricky Nolasco retired the
final 13 batters he faced, Emilio Bonifa-
cio drove in the go-ahead run in the
eighth and the Florida Marlins stayed
perfect against the Washington Nation-
als with a 3-2 victory Monday night.
Hanley Ramirez had three hits and
an RBI for Florida, which snapped a
three-game slide and is 7-0 against
Washington this season. Nolasco (5-6)
won his third straight start, going eight
innings and yielding four hits and two
runs with eight strikeouts.
Josh Willingham had two hits and
Ryan Zimmerman hit his 13th homer
for Washington, which wasted a stellar
effort from left-hander Scott Olsen in
his return from the disabled list.
Pinch-hitter Wes Helms hit a leadoff
double just inside the first-base bag off
Ron Villone (3-5) in the eighth. After a
sacrifice by Chris Coghlan, Bonifacio's
fly ball to center scored pinch-runner
Alejandro De Aza without a throw.
The Marlins scored an insurance
run later in the eighth, when Cody
goss drew a bases-loaded walk from
Julian Tavarez.
Leo Nunez got the final out for his
third save in six chances, coming in
after Dan Meyer gave up two singles.
With runners on the corners, Nunez got
Willingham to fly out, ending the game.


Washington Florida
ab rhbi


WHarrs cf 4
CGzmnss 4
NJhnsnlb 4
Zmrnm) 3b 4
Dunn If 4
AIGnzlz pr 0
Wlngh rf 4
AHmdz 2b 3
Nieves c 3
Olsen p 2
Dukes ph 1
Villone p 0
Tavarz p 0
Totals 33
Washington
Florida


0 Coghln If
0 Meyer p
0 Nunez p
1 Bonifac 3b
0 HRmrz ss
0 Cantu lb
0 Uggla 2b
0 C.Ross cf
1 RPauln c
0 BCarrllrf
0 Nolasco p
0 Helms ph
0 De Aza pr-lf
2 Totals


ab r h bi
3 0 1 1
0000
0 00 0
3 1 1 1
4 1 3 1
3 00 0
3 00 0
3 00 1
4 01 0
3 1 1 0
1 00 0
1 0 1 0
0 1 0 0
28 4 8 4


020 000 000-2
002 000 02x-4


LOB-Washington 4, Florida 6.2B-Willingham
(12), Ha.Ramirez (25), B.Carroll (3), Helms (3).
3B-Bonifacio (3). HR-Zimmerman (13). CS-
Coghlan (1). S-Coghlan, Nolasco. SF-Boni-
facio.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Olsen 7 6 2 2 0 7
VilloneL,3-5 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Tavarez . 1-3 1 1 1 3 0
Florida
Nolasco W,5-6 8 4 2 2 0 8
MeyerH,11 2-3 2 0 0 0 0
NunezS,3-6 ;1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires-Home, Bill Welke; First, Tim Welke;
Second, Ed Rapuano; Third, James Hoye.
T-2:30. A-10,623 (38,560).


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Pirates catcher Jason Jaramillo, right, can't get
the tag on Chicago Cubs' Jake Fox, who scored on a second-
inning single by Andres Bianco on Monday in Pittsburgh.


Cubs 3, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH - Rich Harden re-
peatedly worked out of trouble to win
for the first time in more than six
weeks, Ryan Theriot homered and the
Chicago Cubs maintained their mas-
tery of the Pittsburgh Pirates by win-
ning 3-1 on Monday night.
The Cubs were 1-6 on a 10-game
trip that included manager Lou
Piniella's run-in with Milton Bradley and
14-24 overall on the road before win-
ning their eighth in their last 10 in Pitts-
burgh. They have won 20 of their last
25 games there.
The Pirates, who only wish they had
the kind of success in PNC Park the
Cubs do, had numerous chances to
get to Harden (5-4), who was 0-3 with
a 5.64 ERA in four starts since last
winning May 12. They never did.
Pittsburgh stranded a combined five
runners during the fifth and sixth in-
nings, then had No. 3 hitter Freddy
Sanchez ground into a double play
with two on and one out in the seventh.
Sanchez, hitless in four at-bats, also
grounded out to Harden with the bases
loaded- knn in following Andy.
LaRd e in the fifth. An inning
later^ , , uck out Jason
Jaramillo and Jack Wilson following
one-out singles by Brandon Moss and
Andy LaRoche.


Harden, facing Pittsburgh for the
first time, gave up nine hits - eight
singles- and walked a batter, but
struck out nine. The Pirates were 1 for
8 with runners in scoring position
against the right-hander.


Chiacgo
ab rhbi


Pittsburgh


ab r h bi


ASorin If 4 00 0 McCtch cf 4 01 0
Theriot ss 4 1 1 1 Morgan If 4 03 0
D.Leelb 4 0 0.0 FSnchz 2b 4 0 00
J.Fox3b 3 1 2 0 AdLRc lb 4 0 0 0
Fuld pr-cf 0 00 0 Moss rf 4 0 1 0
Sotoc 3 1 1 0 AnLRc3b 4 1 2 0
Bradlyrf 4 0 2 1 Jarmll c 3 0 0 0
Freel cf 3 00 0 DIwYn ph 1 0 0 0
Marml p 0 0 0 0 JaWlsn ss 3 00 1
Hoffparph 1 00 0 Dukep 1 0 1 0
Greggp 0 0 0 0 RVazqzph 1 0 1 0
ABlanc2b 4 0 1 1 Meek p 0 0 00
Harden p 3 00 0 JChavz p 0 0 00
Fontent 3b 0 0 0 0 Hinske ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 34 1 9 1
Chicago 011 100 000-3
Pittsburgh 000 010 000-1
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 8.
2B-Bradley (8), An.LaRoche (15). HR-The-
riot (7). CS-Fuld (1). S-Duke.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Harden W,5-4 7 9 1 1 1 9
MarmolH,16 1 0 0 0 0 0
GreggS,13-16 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
DukeL,8-6 7 7 3 3 .1 3
Meek 1 0 0 0 1 0
J.Chavez 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Wally
Bell; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Chad
Fairchild.
T-2:17. A-15,400 (38,362).


Los Angeles
Texas
Seattle
Oakland




Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
GB WCGB

2% 3
3% 4
11 11�


West Division
GB WCGB
6� -
7� 1
14 7�
18 11�


TussDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 B3


MAJOR LEAGuE BASEBALL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL E


i










TWIiUESAY, JUJNE j'0, 2009 .'


TENNIS
Wimbledon Results
Monday
AtThe All England Lawn Tennis
& Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Purse: $20.5 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Fourth Round
Tommy Haas (24), Germany, def. Igor An-
dreev (29), Russia, 7-6 (8), 6-4, 6-4.
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Robin
Soderiing (13), Sweden, 6-4,7-6 (5), 7-6 (5).
Novak Djokovic (4), Serbia, def. Dudi Sela,
Israel, 6-2, 6-4, 6-1.
Ivo Kariovic (22), Croatia, def. Fernando Ver-
dasco (7), Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 6-3,7-6 (9).
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Radek
Stepanek (23), Czech Republic, 4-6, 2-6, 6-1,
6-2, 6-2.
Juan Carios Ferrero, Spain, def. Gilles Simon
(8), France, 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-2.
Andy Roddick (6), United States, def. Tomas
Berdych (20), Czech Republic, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3.
Andy Murray (3), Britain, -def. Stanislas
Wawrinka (19), Switzerland, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, 5-7,
6-3.
Women
Fourth Round
Elena Dementieva (4), Russia, def. Elena
Vesnina, Russia, 6-1,6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, def. Nadia
Petrova (10), Russia, 7-6 (5), 2-6, 6-3.
Agnieszka Radwanska (11), Poland, def.
Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-4, 7-5.
Venus Williams (3), United States, def. Ana
Ivanovic (13), Serbia, 6-1, 0-1, retired.
Serena Williams (2), United States, def.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-1.
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, def.Virginie Raz-
zano (26), France, 6-2,7-6(1).
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Caroline Woz-
niacki (9), Denmark, 6-4, 6-4'
Dinara Safina (1), Russia, def. Amelie Mau-
resmo (17), France, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Doubles
Men
Second Round
Wesley Moodie, South Africa, and Dick Nor-
man (9), Belgium, def. Igor Andreev and Evgeny
Korolev, Russia, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Third Round
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Leos Friedl and, Czech Republic David Skoch,
Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-3,.6-1.
James Blake and Mardy Fish, United States,'
def. Martin Damm, Czech Republic, and Robert
Lirdstedt (15), Sweden, 6-3,7-6 (4), 6-7 (4),'6-4.
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Olfver.Marach (8),
Austria, def. Christopher Kas, Germany, and
ViktorTroicki, Serbia, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (4), 6-1,6-3.
Bruno Soares, Brazil, and Kevin Ullyett (5),
Zimbabwe, def. Rogier Wassen, Netherlands,
and Igor Zelenay, Sloakia, 6-4, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (4).
Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and Mark Knowles
(41. Banamas. de Praka.ri Amnirl Infia, and
Aisam-ui-Haq Ourishi, Pasivan 6-4 5-7. 7-6
(3), 6-0.
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic
(2), Serbia, def. Jamie Delgado and Jonathan
Marray, Britain, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4.
Mhx Mirnyi, Belarus, and Andy Ram (7), Is-
rael, vs. Simon Aspelin, Sweden, and Paul Han-
ley, Australia, 2-6, 7,6'(3), 6-7 (5), 7-6 (2), 2-2,
susp., darkness.
Women
Third Round
Anabel Medina Garrigues and Virginia Ruano
Pascual (2), Spain, def. Alia Kudryavtseva, Rus-
sia, and Monica Niculescu, Romania, 7-5, 6-3.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (1),
United States, def. Iveta Benesova and
Barbora Zahlavova.Strycova, Czech Republic,
2-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Kristina Barroils, Germany, and Tathlana
Garbin, Italy, def. Marlya Koryttseva, Ukraine,
and Tatiana Poutchek, Belarus, 6-3, 6-4.
Nuriatfltaofera Vi~esand Maria Jose Mar-
tinez Sanchez (11), Spain, def. Victoria
Azarenka, Belarus, and Elena Vesnina (7), Rus-
sia, walkover.
Alisa Kleybanova and Ekaterina Makarova,
Russia, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United
States, and Nadia Petrova (10), Russia, 6-4,7-5.
Serene and Venus Williams (4), United
States, def.Yan Zi and Zheng Jie (13), China, 6-
0,6-0.
Mixed
Second Round
Bob Bryan, United States, and Samantha
Stosur (2), Australia, def. Lucas Arnold Ker and
Gisela Dulko, Argentina, 6-1, 6-4.
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Rennae
Stubbs (7), Australia, def. Andrei Pavel and
Monica Niculescu, Romania, 6-3, 2-6, 8-6.
Mike Bryan and Bethanie Mattek-Sands (6),
United States, def. Philipp Petzschner, Ger-
many, and Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech
Republic, 6-1, 6-1.
Third Round
Lukas Diouhy and Iveta Benesova (15),
Czech Republic, def. Marcin Matkowski, Poland,
and Lisa Raymond (3), United States, 4-6, 6-4,
6-2.
Leander Paes, India, and Cara Black (1),
Zimbabwe, def. Mahesh Bhupathi and Sania
Mirza (13), India, 6-2, 6-7 (2), 6-3.
GOLF

PGA Tour
Through June 28
Scoring Average
1, Tiger Woods, 68.62.2, David Toms, 69.23.
3, Steve Stricker, 69.46.4 (tie), Kenny Perry and
Brian Gay, 69.50.6, Tim Clark, 69.57.7, Sean
O'Hair, 69.61.8 , Jim Furyk; 69.66.9, Hunter
Mahan, 69.74.10, Lucas Glover, 69.75.
Driving Distance
1, Bubba Watson, 312.0.2, Robert Garrigus,
308.3.3, Dustin Johnson, 307.2.4, Gary Wood-
land, 306.3. 5, Nick Watney, 302.0. 6, Scott
Piercy, 301.6.7, J.B. Holmes, 301.2.8, Angel
Cabrera, 300.8.9, Charley Hoffman, 300.6.10,
Harrison Frazar, 300.1.
H driving Accuracy Percentage
1, David Toms, 75.97%. 2, Joe Durant,
73.99%. 3, Brian Gay, 73.27%. 4, Scott Ver-
plank, 73.18%. 5, Tim Clark, 72.66%. 6, Mark
Brooks, 72.31%. 7, Scott McCarron, 72.24%. 8,
Paul Goydos, 71.62%. 9, Bart Bryant, 71.21%.
10, Tom Lehman, 70.90%.
Greens in Regulation Pot.
1, John Senden, 71.40%. 2, Sean O'Hair,
70.58%. 3, Briny Baird, 69.69%. 4, Kenny Perry,
69.49%. 5, David Toms, 69.34%. 6, Jay
Williamson,. 69.26%. 7, Camilo Villegas,
69.10%. 8, D.J. Trahan, 68.91%. 9, Scott Ster-
ling, 68.89%. 10, Steve Marino, 68.87%.
Total Driving
1, Lucas Glover, 67.2, Mathew Goggin, 82.3,
John Senden, 86. 4, Jonathan Byrd , 87. 5,
Robert Allenby, 91.6, Kenny Perry, 96.7, Hunter
Mahan, 101.8, Bill Haas, 108.9, David Toms,


109.10, 2tied with 111.
Putting Average
1, Luke Donald, 1.701.2, Joe Ogilvie, 1.716.
3, Anthony Kim, 1.719.4, Steve Stricker, 1.721.
5 (tie), Justin Leonard and Charlie Wi, 1.725.7,
Kevin Na, 1.726.8, Brian Gay, 1.727.9, Geoff
Ogilvy, 1.728.10,4 tied with 1.731.
Birdie Average
1, Dustin Johnson, 4.43. 2, Anthony Kim,
4.36. 3, Hunter Mahan, 4.28.4, Sean O'Hair,
4.25. 5, Geoff Oglivy, ,4.23. 6, Lucas Glover,
4.19.7, Charley Hoffman, 4.17.8, Phil Mickel-
son, 4.15. 9, Fred Couples, 4.13. 10, Tiger
Woods, 4.11.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Bubba Watson , Tag Ridings, 79.7.
3, Nick Watney, 90.0.4, Davis Love III, 94.0.5,
Dustin Johnson, 97.2.6, Phil Mickelson, 100.3.
7, Zach Johnson, 112.0.8, Ryan Palmer, 112.5.
9 (tie), Fred Couples and Steve Elkington,
115.2.
Sand Save Percentage
t, David Mathis, 67.65%. 2, Luke Donald,
67.47%. 3, Kevin Na, 65.56%. 4, Webb Simp-


son, 63.72%. 5, Brian Gay, 62.22%. 6, Ben Cur-
tis, 61.96%. 7, Mike Weir, 61.63%. 8, Brad Ada-
monis, 61.11%. 9 (tie), Mark Wilson and Hunter
Mahan, 60.00%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Sean O'Hair, 244.2, David Toms, 276. 3,
Kenny Perry, 312. 4, Charlie Wi, 333. 5, Tim
Clark, 336.6, Dustin Johnson, 339.7, Stephen
Ames, 352.8, Steve Stricker, 358.9, Zach John-
son, 359 10 Tiger Woods 362
PGA TOUR Official Money Leaders.,
1, Ke-nny Perry (16), , 3.892.241 2, Phil MMd-
elson (12), $3,810,561. 3, Tiger Woods (8),
$3,480,163.4, Zach Johnson (17), $3,395,441.
5, Geoff Ogilvy (13), $3,346,454. 6, Steve
Stricker (14), $3,193,458.7, Sean O'Hair (14),
$3,123,964.8, Lucas Glover (161) 2 784.053
9, Brian Gay, (17), $2,782,235.- 0 C ick Wamoy
(14), $2,587,386.
LPGA Tour
Through June 28
Scoring
1, Lorena Ochoa, 70.0286. 2, Yani Tseng,
70.1000. 3, Cristie Kerr, 70.1400. 4, Angela
S-anloo 70 1538 5. J, a, Snr.. 702889 6
Pauia Creamer 70:15128 7 Suzann Perlersen
70 6000 8 in-Kyung Kim 70 6809 9, Song-
Hee K.m. 70 7333 10 A, M yazail 70 8372
Rounas Under Par
1, Angela Stlarord "44 2. J, 'ai Snin 733
3, Cristie Kerr, .720.4, Yani Tseng, .660. 5, In-
Kyung Kim, .660.6 (tie), Michelle Wie and'Paula
Creamer, .641.8,. Ai Miyazato, .628. 9, LIndsey
Wright, .619.10, 2 tied with .600.
Eagles
1, Yani Tseng, 8.2 (tie), Angela Stanford and
Cristie Kerr, 7.4,10 tied with 5.
Greens In Regulation
1, Paula Creamer, .789. 2, In-Kyung Kim,
.754.3, Ji Yai Shin, .734.4, Wendy Ward, .733.
5 (tie), Yani Tseng and Brittany Lang, .727.7,
Angela Stanford, .726. 8, Cristie Kerr, .719.9,
Suzann Pettersen, .719. 10, Lindsey Wright,
.713.
..-Top 10 Finishes
1, Angela Stanford, .700.2, Cristie Kerr, .615.
3, Lorena Ochoa, .556. 4, Yani Tseng, .538.5,
Suzann Pettersen, .500.6 (fie), Paula Creamer
and Ai Miyazato, .455.8 (tie), In-Kyung Kim and
Song-Hee Kim, ,417.10, Michelle Wie, .400.
Driving Distance
1, Brittany Lincicome, 273.2.2, Yani Tseng,
272.8.3, Vicky Hurst, 271.5. 4, Je Young Lee,
271.0.5 (tie), Suzann Peattersen and Michelle
Wie, 270.8. 7, Karen Stupples, 267.5.8 (tie),
Sophie Gustafson and Angela Stanford, 266.5.
10, Brittany Lang, 266.4.
Sand Saves
1, Mindy Kim, .750.2 (tie), Ji Young Oh and
In-Kyung Kim, .583. 4, Marisa Baena, .571.5,
Cindy Rarick, .556.6, Carri Wood, .545.7, Na
Yeon Choi, .531. 8, Mikaela Parmlid, .529. 9
(tie); Candie Kung and Russamee Gulyana-
mitta, .522.
Birdies
1, Yani Tseng, 198. 2, In-Kyung Kim, 196. 3,
Cristie Kerr, 195.4, Suzann Petterseh, 180.5,
Song-Hee Kim, 178. 6, Ji Yai Shin, 177.7, Jee
Young Lee, 176. 8, Na Yeon Choi, 171.9, Brit-
tany Lang, 169.10, Katherine Hull, 168.
Driving Accuracy
1 (tie), Ji Yai Shin and Mi Hyun Kim, .834. 3,
Seon'Hwa Lee, .827. 4, Leta Lindley, .821. 5,
Paula Creamer, .829. 6, Marcy Hart, .805.7,
Anna Nordqvist, .789.8 (tie), Eun-Hee Ji and
Jimin Kang, .786.10, Meena Lee, .783.
Putting Average Per Round
1, Leta Lindley, 15.44.2, Laura Davies, 16.73.
3, Lorena Ochoa, 17.11.4 (tie), Jane Park and
,Russamee Gulyanamitta, 17.81.6, Inbee Park,
18.35. 7, Louise Friberg, 18.83. 8, Shiho
Oyama, 18.93. 9, Song-Hee Kim, 19.00. 10,
Seon Hwa Lee, 19.02.
Putts Per Green (GIR)
1, Ashleigh Simon, 1.73. 2 (tie), Allison
Hanna-Williams and Song-Hee Kim, 1.74. 4
(tie), Inbee Park, Cristie Kerr, Kristy McPherson,
Natalie Gulbis, JiYai Shin, Michelle Wie and In-
Kyung Kim, 1.75.
Champions Tour
Through June 28
Charles Schwab Cup
1, Bernhard Langer, 1,162 Points. 2, Michael
Allen, 720.3, Larry Mize, 709.4, Loren Roberts,
625.5, Keith Fergus, 570.6, Fred Funk, 563.7,
Mark O'Meara, 541.8, Nick Price, 530.9, Joey
Sindelar, 526.10, Jay Haas, 522.
Scoring Average
1, Bernhard Langer, 69.03. 2, Fred Funk,
69.54. 3, Joey Sindelar, 69.64. 4, Jay Haas,
69.67.5, Andy Bean, 69.74.6, Dan Forsman,
69.91. 7, Eduardo Romero, 69.96. 8, Mark
O'Meara, 70.00. 9, Gene Jones, 70.09. 10,
Mark McNulty, 70.18.
Driving Distance
1, Tom Purtzer, 307.8. 2, Steve Thomas,
301.7. 3, Sandy Lyle, 299.1.4, Keith Fergus,
294.8. 5, Dan Forsman, 290.3. 6 (tie), Phil
Blackmar and Gil Morgan, 289.9. 8, Eduardo
Romero, 288.4.9, Bernhard Langer, 287.5.10,
Lonnie Nielsen, 286.1.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, David Edwards, 78.90%. 2, Hale Irwin,
75.97%. 3, Allen Doyle, 75.71%. 4, Blaine Mc-
Callister, 74.74%. 5, Fred Funk, 74.70%.,6,
Leonard Thompson, 73.98%. 7, John Morse,
73.65%. 8 (tie), Bruce Fleisher and Larry Mize,
73.54%. 10, Mark McNulty, 73.50%.
Greens In Regulation Pet.
1, Dan Forsman, 77.04%. 2, Bernhard
Langer, 76.54%. 3, John Cook, 75.00%. 4, Tom
Kite, 74.92%. 5, Bobby Wadkins, 74.14%. 6,
Tom Purtzer, 73.84%. 7, Gil Morgan, 73.61%.
8, Jeff Sluman, 73.57%. 9, Larry Mize, 73.46%.
10, Don Pooley, 73.25%.
Total Driving
1, Bernhard Langer, 24.2, Leonard Thomp-
son, 34.3, Tom Jenkins, 36.4, Tom Kite, 38.5,
Nick Price, 43. 6 (tie), Scott Hoch and Larry
Mize, 47. 8, Dan Forsman, 48. 9, Jeff Sluman,
50.10, 3 tied with 53.
Putting Average
1, Morris Hatalsky, 1.720.2, Jay Haas, 1.726.
3, Larry Nelson, 1.736.4, Ben Crenshaw, 1.740.


5, Eduardo Romero, 1.742. 6, Andy Bean,
1.749.7, Mark Wiebe, 1.754.8, Loren Roberts,
1.758. 9, R.W. Eaks, 1.759. 10, Gene Jones ,
1.760.
Birdie Average
1, Bernhard Langer, 4.47.2, Jay Haas, 4.39.
3, Eduardo Romero, 4.21.4, Andy Bean, 4.19.
5, Fred Funk, 4.17.6 (tie),'Brad Bryant and Joey
Sindelar, 4.12.8, Dan Forsman, 4.09. 9, Gene
Jones, 3.94.10, Nick Price, 3.93.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Jerry Pate, 69.0.2, Steve Thomas, 79.7.3,
Gene Jones, 84.9.4, Keith Fergus, 92.6.5, R.W.
Eaks, 103.5. 6 (tie), Bernhard Langer, Mark,
O'Meara and Eduardo Romero, 108.0.9, David
Edwards, 112.5.10, 2 tied with 118.8.
Sand Save Percentage
I Loren R,:,.erts, 73.47%. 2, Mark McNulty,
67 39 '. JrrV Pate, 62.86%. 4, John Morse,
6047"'. iIme), Larry Nelson,'and Mark
o Meara 60 ,) '/o. 7, Mike McCullough, 59.52%.
8, iKc Prce, 58.82%. 9, Mike Reid, 58.70%.
10, Jeff Sluman, 58.06%.
.All-Around Ranking
1, Bernhard Langer, 90.2, Eduardo Romero,
135. 3, Mark O'Meara, 160.4, Joey Sindelar,
163 5 Andy Eean, 167.6 (tie), John Cook, Dan
Forsman and Larry Mize, 170.9, Jeff Sluman,
174.10, Nick Price, 179.

MOVES
Monday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended Milwaukee RHP Jeremy
Jeffress (Brevard County-FSL) 100 games after
his third violation of baseball's minor league pro-
gram for a drug of abuse.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Activated RHP
Chris Perez. Optioned INF Josh Barfield to
Columbus (IL). Signed RHP Antwonie Hubbard.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Recalled OF Sam Fuld
from Iowa (PCL). Placed INF Aaron Miles on the
15-day DL, retroactive to June 21. Agreed to
terms with SS Wes Darvill, INF Blair Springfield
and RHP Robert Whitenack.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Agreed to
terms with 2B Jeffrey Kobernus, LHP Chad
Jenkins, LHP Daniel Rosenbaum, SS Kyle
Breault,.RHP Brandon King, RHP Malt Swynen-
berg, and RHP Shane McCatty.
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS-Released RHP Joe
Klein.
FORT WORTH CATS-Signed RHP Gary,
Lee. Released LHP Justin Garcia.
PENSACOLA PELICANS-Sold the contract
of INF Jimmy Mojica to the Seattle Mariners.
SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS-.
Signed 1B Joshua Collazo, INF Jose Salazar
andRHP Jimmy Heard. Released INF Albert
Gonzalez.
SIOUX' CITY EXPLORERS-Signed INF
Justin Toole and C Matt Lee. Released INF Dan
Vargas and RHP Charlie Benz.
SIOUX FALLS CANARIES-Signed RHP
Aaron Cotter. Released RHP Chris Weast.
ST. PAUL SAINTS-Signed OF Anthony Nor-
man. Released C Chris Herbert.
WICHITA WINGNUTS-Signed C Mike
Sharp. Released C Zach Goldberg.
Can-Am League
QUEBEC- CAPITALES-Released RHP
Jesse Freeman, OF Issael Gonzalez and RHP
Ivan planco. Signed OF Sebastian Boucher.
United League
RIO GRANDE VALLEY WHITEWINGS-
Signed C Justin Holloway.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MILWAUKEE BUCKS-Extended qualifying
offers to G Ramon Sessions and F Ersan
Ilyasova.
NEW JERSEY NETS-Exrecised the con-
tract option on F Jarvis Hayes for next season.
NBA Development League
FORT WAYNE MAD ANTS-Announced. re-
newal of their affiliation agreements with the In-
diana Pacers, Detroit Pistons and Milwaukee
Bucks for next season.
MAINE RED CLAWS-Announcedd an affil-
iation agreement with the Boston Celtics and
Charlotte Bobcats.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Extended qualifying
offers to LW David Booth and C David Brine.
NEW YORK RANGERS-Acquired F Brian
Boyle from Los Angeles for a 2010 third-round
entry draft pick.
SAN JOSE SHARKS-Extended qualifying
offers to G Thomas Greiss, F Ryane Clowe, F
Torrey Mitchell and F Brad Staubitz.
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING-Extended qualify-
ing offers to C Blair Jones, RW Martins Karums,
D Lukas Krajicek, D Matt Lashoff, D Mike
Lundin, G Karri Ramo, D Matt Smaby, LW
Radek Smolenak and RW Lauri Tukonen.
COLLEGE
ELON-Named Brian Tracy associate ath-
letic director for external affairs; Sarah Thomas
director of community relations and special
events; Megan Donald director of Web site op-
erations, and Michael Jacobs director of mar-
keting and ticket operations for athletics.
PHILADELPHIA-Named Dick DeLaney and
Dave Caporaletti men's assistant basektball
coaches; Jean-Marie Torpey women's assistant
basketball coach; Joseph Martin golf coach;
Stephanie Spada NCAA compliance coordina-
tor, and Sarah Punderson NCAA senior
women's administrator.
UNC GREENSBORO-Announced men's
golfer Colin Chapman is transferring to the
school from Oglethorpe.
UNIVERSITY OF THE OZARKS-Named
Carl Ramsey women's basketball soach.
WAKE FOREST-Named Dennis Healy
pitching coach and recruiting coordinator.
\


For the record


FlordaLOTTERY

CASH 3 (early)
S7-4-1
CASH 3 (late)
9-9-9
PLAY 4 (early)
6-3-3-4
PLAY 4 (late)
Fl; Loa LOt..ry 2-9-8-8
Here are the winning FANTASY 5
numbers selected 6 - 17 - 26 - 29 - 34
Monday in the
Florida Lottery:


==-On the AIRWAVES===

TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Florida Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Minnesota Lynx at Atlanta Dream GOLF
3:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Professional Championship -
Third Round
TENNIS
7 a.m. (ESPN2) Wimbledon - Women's Quarterfinals
10 a.m. (2,8 NBC) Wimbledon - Women's Quarterfinals
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Wimbledon - Women's Quarterfinals


CR
Continued from Page BI

9-10 Minor Softball
Crystal River 16,
Shady Hills 1
Crystal River walked off
with Pool A... literally
Shady Hills walked or hit
a combined 17 batters and
gave up six' hits, which
Crystal River took full ad-
vantage of.
Harley Broughton went 2-
for-4 with four RBIs and a
run scored as the only Crys-
tal River batter with multi-
ple hits.
Savannah Bostic walked
three times and scoredcoffof
each one. while Rebecca
Schuler had two runs and
two RBIs.
Alexa Mack and Shyann
Hunter each had two runs
and an RBI while Madison
Kaufman, Madison Winship,
Brittney Bloom and Morgan
Trotter each had a run and
an RBI.
Crystal River awaits ei-
ther Dunnellon or Central
Citrus, who still have to play
for the runner-up spot in
Pool B.
Senior Softball
Shady Hills 11,
Central Citrus 1
Central Citrus were elimi-
nated from moving on at the


BRACKETS
Continued from Page B1

game, allowed, just one hit
and struck out eight batters
in six innings of work
"McCale had her best
stuff today. She was very
consistent," Crystal River
head coach John Gomez


9-10 Baseball
Shady Hills 10,
Dunnellon 6
With the top seed and a
playoff bye on the line in Dun-
nellon and Shady Hills battled
it out in Pool C on Monday
night. The two teams were
knotted at 6-6 heading into
the sixth and final inning be-
fore Shady Hills scored four
runs in the top of the frame to
seal the victory.
With the Shady Hills victory
they earn a bye and won't
play again until Wednesday
in the 9-10 All-Stars semifi-
nals. They will play the win-
ner of tonight's game
between Inverness and Lady
Lake Dunnellon as the Pool
C runner up, will play Central
Citrus, the Pool A runner up
tonight with the winner ad-
vancing to play Crystal River,
the Pool B runner up.


District 15 tournament in the
loss. Shady Hills (2-1) scored
six runs in the second inning
and five in the fifth to over-
whelm its opponent.
Central Citrus (1-2) plated its
lone run in the fifth inning.
Shady Hills moves on to play
South Sumter, who defeated
Greater Hudson 11-2 to im-
prove to 3-0 in pool play, for the
Senior,Softball championship.

said. "That Dunnellon team
is very good. We played
them in the regular season
and only beat them 2-0. If we
see them in the champi-
onship game, I know they'll
be gunning for us.
"But first we've got to take
care of business on Wednes-
day," Gomez explained. "We
played small ball tonight


f'u~

- ----- - -------
---- .-'--


Associated Press
Stanislas Wawrinka, foreground, serves to Andy Murray during their fourth round singles
match on Monday at Wimbledon. Andy Murray won the match, which was the first to be
played with the Centre Court's new roof closed.


TENNIS
Continued from, Page BI

Williams, who has won 18
consecutive matches at
Wimbledon and is trying to
become the first woman
since Steffi Graf in 1991-93
to win the tournament three
years in a row.
Tuesday's other matches
are No. 2 Serena Williams
against No. 8 Victoria
Azarenka of Belarus, De-
mentieva against unseeded
Francesca Schiavone of
Italy, and Safina against un-
seeded Sabine Lisicki of
Germany.
The men get a day off be-
fore their quarterfinals
Wednesday, when the
matchups will be No. 2 Fed-
erer vs. No. 22 Ivo Karlovic
of Croatia, Murray vs. 2003
French Open champion
Juan Carlos Ferrero,
Djokovic vs. No. 24 Tommy
Haas, and Roddick vs. 2002
Wimbledon champion Lley-
ton Hewitt, who lost the first
two sets but came back to
beat No. 23 Radek Stepanek
4-6, 2-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2.
"Lleyton and I have built
up a very healthy respect for
one another throughout the
years," said Roddick, who
smacked 24 aces, never
faced a break point and
eliminated No. 20 Tomas
Berdych 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3.
"We're a couple of the old
guys now."
Well, Roddick is 26, and
Hewitt is 28. Neither has
anything on Haas, who at 31
was the oldest man to reach
the fourth round and now
meets the youngest,
Djokovic, who was born a
week after Murray.
Federer improved to 11-0
against Robin Soderling by
beating him in straight sets
in a rematch of the French
Open final three weeks ago.
Now Federer has to deal
with Karlovic, at 6-foot-10
the tallest player in tour
history, who pounded 35
aces and served 10 games
at love while defeating No.
7 Fernando Verdasco 7-6
(5), 6-7 (4), 6-3, 7-6 (9).
Karlovic leads Wimbledon


A~,o.,aiea Pretss
Serena Williams serves to Daniela Hantuchova during their
fourth round singles match on Monday at Wimbledon. i


with 137 aces and has gone
128 service games over his
past two tournaments with-
out being broken.
"I mean maybe it's not
the most fun match to go
through," Federer said.
"But I like to beat this guy
because he makes it hard
on us."
Federer and Wawrinka
teamed to win the doubles
gold medal at last year's
Beijing Olympics. Other-
wise, Wawrinka never has
come close to approaching
his friend's success. Bidding
to reach his first major
quarterfinal, though,
Wawrinka gave Murray
plenty of trouble.
It all felt more like a the-
ater than a sports venue,
thanks to the surroundings
and the momentum shifts.
Wawrinka came out playing
superbly, then things swung
in Murray's favor. With the
local favorite seemingly in
control, Wawrinka stole the
fourth set. And in the fifth,


which began at 9:56 p.m,'
Murray raced to a 3-0 lead?-
before Wawrinka took thIY'
next three games. The1'l
Murray closed with a three-r
game run. .1
Sounds echoed with tho.,
roof closed on Centre Court,.;
which originally was corni.,
structed in 1922. All thos$-
shouts of "Come on, Andy!i,
from all of those spectators
waving Union Jacks and
Scottish flags reverberated
around the arena as hun-
dreds of other people
watched on a TV screen s2#'
up outdoors. *-r
"At the end, it was proba-J
bly the noisiest crowd I'vd
ever played in front of,?),
Murray said. "It definitely:
sounds and feels much,
louder under the roof." jpt
Even Wawrinka was able.
to appreciate the setting, if-
not the result.
"I enjoy a lot the match, '
Wawrinka said. "But for
sure, I'm very sad after the4'
match."


, Senior Baseball
Shady Hills 9, West
Hernando 1
A day after trouncing
Greater Hudson 31-5 West
Hemrnando found out what it
felt like to be on the other
side of a lopsided victory as
Shady Hills crushed West
Hemando 9-1 in Senior
Baseball Little League on
Monday night,
Shady Hills took a 2-0
lead in the first inning and
added to it with four more
runs in the third frame. They
then scored their final three
runs in the sixth inning and
West Hernando scored Its
only run of the game in the
sixth as well.
West Hernando will play
Greater Hudson tonight with
the winner facing off against
Shady Hills for the
championship.


11-12 Softball
South Sumter 12,
Shady Hills 2
Kylie Jessner paced South
Sumter offensively by going 2-,
for-4 with two runs and three .
RBIs.
Monica Arnold plated three
runs as well while Kelsie Now-:
icki was the winning pitcher for
South Sumter.

and it paid off for us."
With the win, Crystal,
River will face Pool A run-,
ner up Central Citrus in on ,
of the two 11-12 Major Sofq;
ball All-Stars semifinals
games on Wednesday night
while Dunnellon, the run-
ner-up from Pool B, will:
play Inverness, the Pool Ak
champions.


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


RA n--...... ,- . 2nino












Citrus County
Parks & Recreation


YOUR GUIDE TO CITRUS COUNTY COMMUNITY SPORTS

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Camo takes flag football title


Team tops Pink

in 19-6 victory
Special to the Chronicle
The ten-team spring flag
football league ended, leav-
ing the top six teams in a
single elimination playoff.
After the dust settled, the
last two teams standing
were Pink and Camo.
As game time neared,
Pink's fans decorated the
field with pink ribbons and
signs that read, "only manly
men wear pink" and "think
pink."
These two talented
groups of young men went
head to head for the cham-
pionship trophy and a
$200.00 gift certificate.
Unfortunately, there was
only one trophy to be
handed out. The game was
ti'd 6-6 at half time. The
sdeond half Was intense,
wilh Camo pulling off a 19-6
wtn for the spring flag foot-
ball championship game.
JA special thanks goes out
tothe New England Pastry
&lCafd in Beverly Hills for
sponsoring the Camo team
this season. ,
The next flag football sea-
son starts on Aug. 3. There is
a: $50 dollar registration
d adline on July 17. If any-
oe is interested in putting
a iam together, games will
b played on Monday and
VXdnesday nights. Call 527-
58,8 for more information.


special to me unroncile
Team Camo won the spring flag football league with a 19-6 victory over Pink. Camo took home the trophy and a $200 gift certificate for its efforts.


Let's kick it


Special to the Chronicle
C4 gratulations to Wayne Saxer's team for winning their first kickball game in the spring season. For more information
o kickball call 527-5758.
. =--- - -i. .,":-'Sportsn- -


SSignup for for
summer football camp
,All football players ages 8-
16 sign-up now to improve
your football skills. Get a
change to work with local high
s ools coaches along with
former NFL and college play-
ers. The three-day camp goes
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., July 27-
29W Registration is done on line
attvww.fycc.net. For more in-
formation go to www.fycc.net.
TIo camp will be held at Cen-
tral Ridge District Park.
iMen's basketball to
L begin third season
,the men's basketball league,
hosted by Citrus County Parks
and Recreation, is preparing for
its-third straight season. This is
a highly competitive league if
ycid are interested in putting a
team together call 527-5758.
Gaines are on Tuesday and
Thursday nights at CREST
Gytn in Lecanto. Game times
are 6, 7 and 8 p.m. The fall sea-
sqp will start Sept. 1.
$1U Cracker baseball
looking for new players
Coach Robert Brasher is


looking for players to start and
compete on the 11U AAU base-
ball team this fall. This team will
play both fall and spring games
and tournaments and will pre-
pare to compete at AAU Nation-
als at Disney the summer of
2010 and Cooperstown Dreams
Park the summer of 2011. Play-
ers may not turn 11 before May
1, 2009 to be eligible for this
team. Any interested players
should contact Coach Brasher
at 352-726-5574 for team and
tryout information.
Sign-up for 13U/14U
Cracker baseball
The Cracker Baseball Club is
looking for players to fill its new
14U team. This team will play
both fall and spring and com-
pete in many tournaments. This
team will be made up of 14U
players as well as gifted 13U
players. Tryouts will be held this
summer. For information and to
get registered for tryouts please
contact John Lepore at 352-
746-4419 or Robert Brasher
at 352-726-5574.
Fishing tourney to
benefit CR football
King of the Water Big Fish


Tourney to benefit Pirate Foot-
ball will be Saturday, July 11, at
Pete's Pier in Crystal River. Win
over $4,000 in cash and prizes
(based on 80 boats entered).
Entry fee is $100 per boat; limit
of 125 entries, maximum of four
anglers per boat,
All proceeds from the tourna-
ment benefit Crystal River High
School's Football Program.
,First prize $1,000; second
prize $250; third prize $100 in
three categories: Trout, Grouper


and Redfish. Entry forms can be
picked up at the following loca-
tions: Pete's Pier, Blue Water
Bait & Tackle, Ed's Tackle, Ho-
mosassa Marine, Riverhaven
Marina, Skidmore Sports, and
West Marine.
All rules and regulations will
be available on entry forms and
at Captain's meeting at 6:30
p.m. Friday, July 10.
For additional tournament in-
formation, call 586-3038 or
302-2364.


---"--N-EW"S = ----


.. ..w. .- * FREE at 375 Upscale
. . Locations from Perry
t,- P,: -0
* New Each Month
* Homes, Land, Rentals
* Affordable Prices
W - ---


I S


CALL TODAY


Email od copy and photos to:
rtnows-pam@charternet o352-563-5592


Thousands


attend funeral


for Iowa coach


Associated Press
PARKERSBURG, Iowa
- Thousands of mourners
gathered Monday to re-
member a slain high school
football coach as a man of
faith who believed in lead-
ing by example.
Family, friends and for-
mer players packed into a
church, community center
and parking lot for the fu-
neral for Ed Thomas, the 58-
year-old longtime coach at
Aplington-Parkersburg
High School who was
gunned down Wednesday in
the school weight room.
Pastor Brad Zinnecker of
First Congregational
Church .said the huge
turnout was a testament to
Thomas' faith.
"They recognized a man
after God's own heart," Zin-
necker said. "His personal
life and public life were one
and the same."
The number of mourners
easily topped the roughly
1,800-person population of*
Parkersburg as people
filled the church, watched a


broadcast of the funeral in
the community center and
spilled into a parking lot to
listen to the service.
Media coverage of the fu-
neral was limited, with re-
porters banned from
enteringthe buildings. How-
ever, a transcript of an audio
recording of the service was
released after the funeral.
In the transcript, Al
Kerns, a longtime assistant
coach, described the rela-
tionship Thomas had with
members of the community.
"He only saw the best in
all of us," he said. "He never
said no when others asked
of him, so other people
could never say no to him."
Kerns, who has been
named a co-coach for the
team this fall, drew laughs
when he described how
Thomas would show his
players how much he cared.
"If Ed loved you, he'd
chew you out More than
once," Kerns said. "And he
could make you feelthis big,
but there was love in every
bit of it And sometimes, we
all needed that"


I w-- Firecracker 5K before the opening ceremony
to benefit The Dream Society, followed by the
Miss Firecracker beauty pageant crowning.
Friday, July 3rd -. 5-10 p.m.
Liberty & Wallace Brooks Parks
Downtown Inverness
Please no pets, alcohol or personal Rreworks!
Bring your lawn chairs and blankets and make plans to attend. For information
on taking part in the celebration or to make a donation towards the fireworks,
please contact the City of Inverness Department of .....- ....
Parks and Recreation at 726-3913
or wwwlnverness-F.Gov
Pa- --FeeAdmisio


''


I~










TO - T" . H R.O:L 30,2009



ENTERTAINMENT
'CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Lewis set to direct
'Nutty Professor'
NEW YORK-Jerry
Lewis - Broadway musi-
cal director?
The legendary come-
dian will direct a stage
version of





"The show will feature
Nutty
Profes-
sor," the
1963 film
he co-
wrote and
Jery durLewisng the 20102011starred
as the nerdy title charac-
ter
The show will feature
music by Marvin Ham-. ,
lisch and a book-and lyrics
by Rupert Holmes. It is ex-
pected to land on Broad-
way during the 2010-2011
season.
The 83-year-old Lewis
last appeared on Broad-
way in 1995 in a revival of
"Damn Yankees."

Simpson to have
bond hearing
LAS VEGAS -A state
Supreme Court panel will
hear oral arguments about
o a. Simp-
son'sbid
to get out
of a Ne-
vada
prison
pending
his appeal
to over-
OsJ. turn a con-
Simpson viction in
an armed hotel room heist,
officials said Monday.
Athree-member panel
of the state's only appellate
court will hear 30 minutes
of arguments in Las Vegas
from Simpson's lawyers
seeking his release on
bond and prosecutors op-
posing the request, court
spokesman Bill Gang said.
The hearing was sched-
uled for Aug 3, he said.
"We're thrilled they're
entertaining oral argu-
ments on our motion,"
Simpson lawyer Yale
Galanter said by telephone
from Miami. "We're hope-
ful the court will grant our
request for bond."
Clark County District At-
torney David Roger de-
clined comment.

'Law & Order'
stars re-signed
NEW YORK-- Rest
easy, fans of "Law &
Order: SVU." Stars
Marisalm Hargitay and
Chris Meloni have signed
contracts for another sea-
son.
That was in some doubt,
with fans of the show won-
dering whether the actors
might be replaced after
their two-year contracts
expired. NBC renewed
the drama, its most popu-
lar scripted series, with-
out knowing for sure
whether they would be
back
Pam Golum, a spokes-
woman for producer Dick
Wolf, says the two stars
will be back at work next
week, when the show be-
gins filming its new sea-
son.
Christine Lahti will also
be joining the show for the
first four episodes of next
season.
- From wire reports


Pnoto counesy or DreamworKs
Optimus Prime is shown in a scene from "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen." Should the movie reach or
eclipse the $400-million mark, it would be the highest-grossing, worst review movie to reach that plateau.


'Transformers,

DAVID GERMAIN
AP movie writer


-LOS ANGE

A after just five days,
"Transformers: Reve
of the Fallen" is half
to $400 million dome
cally, a box-office milestone o
eight other movies have reach
If it climbs that high, the "Tra
former" sequel will be by far
worst-reviewed movie ever to
make the $400 million club.
Critics and mainstream cro
often disagree, but "Revenge
the Fallen" sets a new standai
for the gulf between what rev.
ers and mass audiences like.
The movie pulled in $2G(1.2
lion since opening Wednesda,
the second-best result for a m
in its first five days, just behir
"The Dark Knight" with $203.
million. Even after its whopph
$60.6 million opening day, "Re
venge of the Fallen" was pack
theaters, a sign that unlike cri
ics, who mostly hated the mov
audiences felt they were getti
their nioney's worth and were
giving the flick good word of
mouth. . .
Critics "forget what the goa
the movie was. The goal of the
movie is to entertain and havi
fun," said Rob Moore, vice cha
man of Paramount, which is d
tributing "Transformers" for
DreamWorks. "What the audi
ence tells us is, 'We couldn't b
more entertained and having
more fun.' They kind of roll th
eyes at the critics and say, 'Yo
have no idea what you're talk
about'"'
According to Paramount's e
polls, 91 percent of the audien
thought the sequel was as goo
or better than the first "Trans
formers" which received far
ter reviews.
Most.of Hollywood's all-tim
biggest hits are ,accompanied


' trashed by critics is h

either good or at least passable
reviews, and some can be among
the year's most-acclaimed, such
LES as this year's "Up" and "Star
Trek" and last year's "The Dark
rnge Knight," "WALL-E" and "Iron
way Man.",
sti- Not so for the new "Transform-
nly ers."' On Rottentomatoes.com, a,
ied. Web site that compiles critics'
ns- opinions, the sequel had only 38
the positive reviews out of 187, a
lowly 20 percent,
rating usually re-
wds served for box-of-
of fice duds.
rd Many cities who
iew- liked the movie /
had reservations,
mil- praising the movie's B"..
y, visual effects and A.-
ovie relentless action but
id generally advising
8 audiences to check
ing their brains at th0 door.
e- The critical dr..bbing
ing was a new low f� -Transform-
it- ers" director :ic;iael Bay, never
vie, a favorite among professional
ng movie reviewers. But he has long
been a favorite among fans, scor-
ing hits with the first "Transform-
ers" and such flicks as
1 of 'Armageddon," "Pearl Harbor,"
e "Bad Boys II" and "The Rock"
e Like blockbuster maestro Jerry
air- Bruckheimer, who produced
Iis- many of Bay's movies, the direc-
tor aims to please audiences, not
- critics.
e "He really had blinders on
when it comes to what he be-
aeir lived the picture needs to be,
u and then he executed it," said
ing Brad Grey, Paramount chairman
and chief executive officer. "He's
'xit a director who is the definition of.
nce blockbuster at this point. His
Ad as grosses speak for themselves."
- Bay's previous worst score on
bet- Rottentomatoes was 23 percent
for "Bad Boys II," followed by 25
e percent for "Pearl Harbor." Even
by his commercial flop "The Island"


7alfivay to $400M

rated well above the "Transform-
ers" sequel, with 40 percent posi-
tive reviews.
Of the eight movies that have
grossed more than $400 million
domestically, four scored 90 per-
cent or higher on Rottentoma-
toes: "The Dark Knight,"
"Spider-Man," "E.T. the Extra-ter-
restrial" and "Star Wars." Two
others, "Shrek 2" and "Titanic,"
topped 80 percent.
The other two had mixed re-
views but still
came in far higher
than "Revenge of
ithe Fallen," with
"Star Wars: Episode
I - The Phantom
. Menace" scoring 63
I percent and "Pirates of
A the Caribbean: Dead
Man's Chest" rating 53
percent.
This year's biggest hits so
far had terrific scores, "Up"
with 97 percent and "Star Trek"
with 95 percent Both movies
have grossed about $250 million,
a number the "Transformers" se-
quel will soar past by next week-
end.
On Metacritic.com, a site that
assigns ratings of zero to 100
based on movie reviews, "Re-
venge of the Fallen" received a
36, a lowly score barely above
those given to recent box-office
duds "Year One" and "Land of
the Lost"
Bay has said that if there is a
third "Transformers" movie, he
would like to come back for it
But his next project could be far
quieter than the explosions and
action for which he is known.
"I've got to take a little time off
from the robot world," Bay said
before the movie opened. "I've
got to do something totally differ-
ent It's enough of this for right
now. I keep saying I'm going to do
my small movie. I've got one I
want to do."


Jackson's family moves quick to take control


Associated Press


LOS ANGELES -
Michael Jackson's family
moved quickly Monday to
take control of his compli-
cated personal and financial
affairs, winning temporary
custody of his three children
and asking a judge to name
the King of Pop's mother as
administrator of his estate.
In documents filed in Su-
perior Court, Jackson's par-
ents said they believe their
50-year-old son died without
a valid will.
They also made it clear
they believe they should
take charge of both his debt-
ridden but potentially lucra-


tive financial empire and act
as permanent caretakers of
his three children.
Judge Mitchell Beckloff
granted 79-year-old Kather-
ine Jackson temporary
guardianship of the chil-
dren, who range in age from
7 to 12. He did not immedi-
ately rule on her requests to
take charge of the children's
and Jackson's estates.
Beckloff scheduled a
hearing for July 6 and an-
other for Aug. 3 to consider
those issues and whether
Katherine Jackson should
be appointed the children's
permanent guardian.
The judge later on Mon-
day also granted Katherine


Katherine Jackson was
granted temporary custody of
her son's children. She is
seeking control over his es-
tate.
Jackson the right to take
control of her son's personal
property that is now in the
hands of an unnamed third
party. The ruling does not
detail the nature of those


items and does not provide
control of any money in the
estate.
L. Londell McMillan, the
family's attorney, said in a
statement that the Jacksons
are pleased with the results
of their Monday filings.
"Mrs. Jackson deserves
custody, and the family
should have the administra-
tion of the brilliance of Mr.
Michael Jackson. Mrs. Jack-
son is a wonderful, loving
and strong woman with a
special family many of us
have admired for years. The
personal and legal priorities
are focused on first protect-
ing the best interests of Mr.
Michael Jackson's children,


his family, his memorial
services and then preserv-
ing his creative and business
legacy with the dignity and
honor it deserves."
When Jackson died
Thursday, he left behind a
12-year-old son and 11-year-
old daughter by his ex-wife
Deborah Rowe, as well as a
7-year-old son born to a sur-
rogate mother.
The Jackson family said
the children - Michael
Joseph Jackson Jr (known as
Prince Michael), Paris
Michael Katherine Jackson
and Prince Michael II - are
living at the Jackson family
compound in Los Angeles'
San Fernando Valley.


loPsl-


can Idol") is 25. Olympic gold
medal swimmer Michael
Phelps is 24.
Thought for Today:
'Those who love deeply never
grow old; they may die of old
age, but they die young." -
Sir Arthur Wing Pinero, Eng-
lish dramatist (1855-1934).


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4..

SUNDAY, JUNE 28
Fantasy 5:14 - 22 - 26 - 31'- 32
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Powerball: 18 - 22 - 26 - 39--,48
Powerball: 17
5-of-5 PB 1 winner $25 million
5-of-5 5 $200,000
Lotto: 6-9-11 -14-29-36
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3-of-6 77,454 $3.50 .
Fantasy 5: 1 - 3 - 5 - 17 - 28
5-of-5 4 winners $61,560 18
4-of-5 525 $75.50
3-of-5 13,879 $8

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should *
double-check the num-
bers printed above with.
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487-7777.


Today in ;
HISTORY,--_
Today is Tuesday, June 30,
the 181st day of 2009. There
are 184 days left in the year..,
Today's Highlight: T
On June 30,1859, Frendi
acrobat Charles Blondin (born
Jean Francois Gravelet)
walked back and forth on a
tightrope above thegorge of
Niagara Falls as thousands of
spectators watched.
On this date:
In 1908, the Tunguska
Event took place in Russia as
an asteroid exploded above
Siberia, leaving 800 square
miles of scorched or1 blown-
down trees.
In 1921, President Warren
G. Harding nominated former
President William Howard Taft
to be chief justice of the United
States, succeeding the late
Edward Douglass White.
In 1934, Adolf Hitler carried
out his "blood purge" of politi-
cal and military rivals in Ger-
many in what came to be
known as "The Night of the
Long Knives." '
In 1936, the novel "Gone
with the Wind" by Margaret -
Mitchell was published in New
York.
In 1958, the U.S. Senate:
passed the Alaska statehood
bill by a vote of 64-20, -
In 1971, a Soviet space
mission ended in tragedy)
when three cosmonauts "
aboard Soyuz 11 were found
dead inside their spacecraft
after it had returned to Earth.,
In 1985, 39 American
hostages from a hijacked T A
jetliner were freed in Beirut
after being held 17 days.
Ten years ago: On the day
the independent counsel law
expired, Kenneth Starr
wrapped up the Whitewater
phase of his investigation as
presidential friend Webster
Hubbell pleaded guilty to a
felony and a misdemeanor.
Five years ago: The Iraqis
took legal custody of Saddam
Hussein and 11 of his top lieu-
tenants, a first step toward the
ousted dictator's expected trial
for crimes against humanity.
One year ago: President
George W. Bush signed legis-
lation to pay for the war opera-
tions in Iraq and Afghanistan
for the rest of his presidency
and beyond, hailing the $162
billion plan as a rare product of
bipartisan cooperation.
Today's Birthdays: Singer
Lena Home is 92. Actor Tony
Musante is 73. Actress Nancy
Dussault is 73. Rock musician
Hal Lindes (Dire Straits) is 56.
Actor-comedian David Alan
Grier is 53 Actor Vincent .-.-
D'Onofrio is 50. Actor Rupert
Graves is 46. Boxer Mike '
Tyson is 43. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Fantasia ("Ameri-








Section C- TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009


HEALTH


&
CITRUS COUNTY


LIFE


CHRONICLE


SDr. Ed
Dodge
discusses the
origin of his
interest in
nutrition.
/Page C5


Ruff






life


AP Poll Americans
consider pets as family
MEGAN K. SCOTT
Associated Press
- NEW YORK
Susan Jacobs and her companion
Kingston both like chicken and col-
lards, chilling on the couch and riding
in her convertible with the breeze tus-
sling his curly black hair
Kingston, it should be said, is a black poodle.
But for Jacobs, 45, of Long Beach, Calif., he is
like a child.
"The next time I travel, I'll probably take
him with me," said Jacobs, a Mary Kay consult-
aht and freelance writer
ON THE NET "I'm just used to him
being around."
* www.petside An Associated Press-
.com. petspoll Petside.com poll released
June 23 found that half of
all American pet owners consider their pets as
much a part of the family as any other person
in the household; another 36 percent said their
pet is part of the family but not a full member.
Arid that means pets often get the human,
touch: Most pet owners cop to feeding animals
human food, nearly half give the animals.
human names and nearly a third let them
sleep in a human bed. While just 19 percent
had bought an outfit for a pet, 43 percent felt
See RUFF/Page 0C2


REED SAXON/Associated Press
Susan Jacobs, cosmetics consultant and freelance journalist, and Kingston, her 4-year-old poodle
mix, take a walk recently outside her home In Long Beach, Calif.
BELOW: This photo released by the Copley Square Hotel shows Lola, a 16 month-old yellow lab that
belongs to the hotel's general manager, John Malbach. Copley Square Hotel/AP photo


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY

Finally,

tobacco

regulation
Monumental step
took place recently
in the battle over
tobacco use in this coun-
try, especially in our
younger citizens. Presi-
dent Barack Obama has
signed into law a sweep-
ing tobacco bill that will
drastically change how to-
bacco is regulated and
marketed in the United
States.
Combined with the re-
cent increase in the fed-
eral and state taxes on
tobacco products, 2009
will go down as one of the
most important, years re-
garding decreasing the
use of tobacco products,
and eventually, saving
lives.
The legislation, known
as "The Family Smoking
Prevention and Tobacco
See BENNETT/Page C4


Do our patients


understand us?
A s an ear, nose and .. sess only marginal read-
throatdoctorI en- ing skills. If patients
counter hearing have these types ofdifli-
lqss every day and I culties, it is hard for
know that sometimes my , . them to understand clin-
patients do not under- ical options that may be
stand me because of . . offered to them, medi-
their hearing loss prob- ,. . cine vs. surgery, scan vs.
lems. But there is a more : / biopsy, etc.
sinister underlying Problems with read-
problem that can affect Dr. Denis Grillo ing and understanding
patient care and patient also cause patients to
safety and that is the fact EAR, NOSE become noncompliant
that patients sometimes & THROAT and not follow through
are unable to read. � with a physician's in-
It is estimated that one in three structions. They sometimes will
Americans has a limited ability to also take medications incorrectly,
understand and nearly 50 million which could theoretically result in
Americans are functionally illiter-
ate. About another 50 million pos- See GRILLO/Page C03


Moving mayhenfcontinues


e were supposed to close
on our house on June 15
and we haven't yet - so as
you can imagine, the Barkers have
been a little stressed.
For one thing, we had
to cancel our family va-
cation to Port St. Joe
Also, we have a renter
moving in our old home
July 1 and we need to get
out. So we spent this past
weekend packing up our
things in a U-Haul with
no_ destination. Yep,
we're moving all right - Shalyn
we just don't know FULL
where yet.
Saturday morning,
Patrick and I woke up early to go
pick up the 26-foot truck, only to be
welcomed by a torrential down-
pour. Only laughing to keep back
the tears, I began to pack up my be-


I


longings in the worst of weather
conditions.
The entire day was used. and we
got about 75 percent fimushed. Mike
came up to help Patrick
do all the heavy. lifting.
About midday Mike
asked me. "'Are you OK?"
I have to admit, I was
starting to feel bad. I
don't think I drank
enough water
I told him I was 'fine"
though - a woman's fa-
vorite word Men should
Barker know by know when we
lATE 'say "fine," it means no!
PLATE That night, we stayed
at my mother's house
and I went to bed with the kids at 8
p.m.. which is quite early for me.
And at about 11 p.m., I woke up
with a fever.
See BARKER/Page C4


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


New drug

for breast

cancer
saw a 55-year-old pa-
tient. She was diag-
nosed with breast
cancer. Her cancer does
not express hormone re-
ceptors (estrogen receptor
or progesterone receptor).
In addition, it does not ex-
press HiR 2 (a special
gene) receptors. This is
called triple-negative
breast cancer (TNBC), be-
cause it does not express
both hormone receptors
and HER 2 receptors. Re-
ceptors are targets on can-
cer cells.
These patients carry a
poorer prognosis. They
cannot take' hormone
therapy like tamoxifen be-
cause their cancer does
not express hormone re-
ceptors. At present, the
only treatment available
See GANDHI/Page C4


World-class heart care

ju ft inches from home.

Undergoing open-heart surgery is a lot less stressful when you don't have to travel far from home.
Citrus Memorial Heart Center is located right here on the Nature Coast and we provide the
same amazing care as big-city hospitals. In fact, since January 2004, more than 1,200 patients
have trusted us for open-heart surgery. It may be because we use the most sophisticated technology,
or maybe it's because we have some of the most knowledgeable cardiovascular physicians and staff.
Whatever the reason, we're going to continue to grow and heal even more hearts.
For more information, call the Heart Center at 352-344-6416

CITRUS MEMORIAL
- . 4-',:, -~~w ,3^/,,


4


e









C2 __I TUSA.TN 0 09ELh &LIECTU ONY(L HOIL


* LifeSouth bloodmobile
schedule. To find a donor cen-
ter or a blood drive near you,
call 527-3061. Anyone 16 or
older who is in good health and
weighs at least 110 pounds is
eligible to donate.
The Donors in Paradise sum-
mer campaign offers special in-
centives. Donors will be
Entered in a sweepstakes
drawing for a $500 travel
voucher from Cruise Planners
travel agency. Donate during
July and receive a blue donor
T-shirt. The campaign ends
Aug. 31.
Apheresis donors in July re-
ceive flip-flops, and in August
get lunch coolers. Apheresis
donors who give twice between
May and August also receive
beach towels.
* 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today,
Subway, 2639 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
* 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednes-
day, West Citrus Elks Lodge
2693, 7890 W. Grover Cleve-
land Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, Walmart, 3826 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.



RUFF
Continued from Page Cl

their pet had its own "sense
of style."- ,
Nathan Nommensen, 19, a
college student who lives
-with his parents in Winthrop
Harbor, Ill., said their golden
retriever Molly sleeps in his
parents' room, goes with
them on camping trips and
appears in their annual fam-
ily Christmas photo.
. He doesn't consider her a
full member of the family,
though. "She's part of the
family but not a human part
of the family," he said.
Singles were more likely to
say a pet was a full member
of the family than married
people - 66 percent of single
women vs. 46 percent of mar-
ried women, for example.
And men were less likely to
call their pet a full member
of the household.
For some single women,
pets become surrogate chil-
dren, said Kristen Nelson, a
veterinarian in Scottsdale,
Ariz. She said men are also





� , . . .


* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thurs-
day, Walmart Super Center,
2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Invemess.
* 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday,
Walmart, 3826 S. Suncoast ,
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Sonic Drive In, 310 S.E. U.S.
19, Crystal River.
* 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
Homosassa Springs Wildlife .
State Park, 4150-S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
* 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
Walmart Super Center, 2461 W'
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness.
* 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, July 8, Subway,
4089 N. Lecanto Highway, Bev-
erly Hills.
* Donate blood during July
at LifeSouth's centers to be eli-
gible to win a. The Lecanto
branch is at 1241 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491)
and the Invemess branch is at
301 W. Main St. Both center
are open from 8:30 a.m. to 5.
p.m. weekdays and 8:30 a.m."'
to 2 p.m. Saturday. The cen-
ters stay open late Thursdays,


attached to pets - but are
less likely to admit it because
it's not seen as masculine.
Debbie Jablonski, 50, of
Wilmington, N.C., talks about
her cats like a mom talks
about her children.
Milkshake, who sleeps at
the foot of her bed, sticks his
cold nose on her eyelid and
touches his paw to her face at
4:30 a.m. so she knows it's
time to wake up and reed
him. The other eat,.Licorice,
sleeps on the couch and has
a habit of sitting on her news-
paper when she is trying to
read it
"Ifyou try to budge her, she
will not move," said Jablon-,
ski, laughing. "You will have
to practically pick her up and
move her."
Jablonski, who works for a
laboratory equipment manu-
facturer, celebrates the cats'
birthdays, includes photos of
the cats in holiday cards and
watches home movies of
them playing.
Most pet owners don't go
that far, according to the sur-
vey. Only a little over a quar-
ter celebrate their pet's
birthday or the day it came td


until 7 p.m. The Lecanto center
is also open from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Sunday. Donate any day
in July at the centers for a com-
plimentary meal of hot dogs.
Anyone 16 or older who is in
good health and weighs at least
110 pounds is eligible to do-
nate. Visit www.lifesouth.org for
details.
* Diabetes classes are of-
fered from 9 to.10 a.m. Mon-
days at the Citrus County
'Health Department in Lecanto.
Classes are free. No registra-
tion is required.
* Meal planning - Monday.
* More about meal plans -
July 13.
*4 Medications and monitor-
ing - July 27.
* Sick days -Aug. 3.
* Avoiding complications -
Aug. 10.,
Fasting blood sugars are of-
fered from 8 to 9 a.m. Monday
through Friday in all three Cit-
rus County Health Department
sites; There is a $10 fee for this
service. No appointment is nec-
essary. Every Monday before


live with them and just a
third have included a pet's
ph6to or name in a holiday,
card.
Still, 42 percent of pet own-
ers have taken a pet on vaca-
tion, with dogs more likelyto
accompany the family than
cats. Dog owners were also
more likely to take their pets
to work (21 percent) or some-
:where the animal wasn't al-
lowed (18 percent).
When it comes to feedings,
nearly half of all dog owners
and 40 percent of cat owners
admit giving their pets,
human food at least some-
times.
Jimmy Ruth Martin, 73;
who sells real estate in
Louisville, Texas, said she
gives her border collie Sam-
antha table food: chicken,
steak, potatoes, salad, ice
cream. "She'll eat anything
I'm eating," she said.
She said her dog has got-
ten so fat, she can't climb up
on the bed. "The table scraps
,:have done that"
Helen Reed, 60, of
Clearfield, Pa., said her cat
Sadie has personality:- she
is not a'lap cat, _tseeps at the


the Lecanto class, anyone who
would like to have a blood
sugar test should come fasting.
Call Lynece Hand, R.N., 527-
0068, ext. 278, or Carol Burke,
R.D., 726-5222.
* The deadline to apply for
the Penny Duteau Nursing
Scholarship is July 15. Inter-
ested students should call 344-
4460 for an application.
The applicant must be a Cit-
rus County resident and they
must be accepted to a recog-
nized nursing program.
* Sand Tray Workshop 10
a.m. to 2 p.m'. Saturday July 25,
Isaiah's Place, 6210 Harmony
Lane, Yankeetown.
Supervision for Play Thera-
pists APT Provider No. 08-216
Penny L. Phares ARNP/RPTS..
The cost is $40 for APT
Members, $45 non-members.
To register send check to:
Child's Play Foundation, P.O.
Box 430, Yankeetown, FL
'34498 or register online at
www.childsplayfoundation.org
(352) 447-1775.
* Seven Rivers Regional


foot of the bed and likes to be
in the same room as her. But
she doesn't dress her up.
Martin doesn't squeeze
Samantha into cute outfits,
either, though she said the
dog does have her own sense
of style. "She's still a dog and
I know it," she said.
Bernice Miller, 71, of
Springfield, Mo., said she
likes to dress her Maltese up
as a pumpkin on Thanksgiv-
ing and Santa on Christmas.
She has a photo of she and
the dog on her wall, signs his
name "Tully" to cards and
gives him treats on his birth-
day
"He's the-best little thing,"
said Miller, who is retired.
"He just begs to go with me,
so I don't leave him too
much. He's just like a little
kid."
The AP-Petside.com poll
was conducted by GfK Roper
Public Affairs & Media from
May 28 to June 1, 2009. It is
based on landline and cellu-
lar telephone interviews
with a random sample of
1,110 pet owners. The margin
of error is plus or minus 2.9
percentage points. ': I '


Health NOTES


--


Medical Center's health edu-
cation programs are in the com-
munity room, second floor of
the Medical Offices Building
(across the street from the hos-
pital) unless otherwise noted.
Call 795-1234 or visit
www.srrmc.com to register.
* Balance screening: 11:15
a.m. to noon, first and third
Wednesday monthly, Seven
Rivers Rehab & Wound Center,
1675 S.E. U.S. 19, in the Crys-
tal River Shopping Center. No
appointment needed. Call 795-
0534. Free.
* Diet therapy for diabetes:
6 p.m. Tuesday, June 30. Free.
* Parkinson's Exercise
Group: 10 a.m. Wednesday,
July 1, 15, 29 and Aug. 12
(four-class program) teaches
Parkinson's patients and their
caregiver therapeutic exercises.
Take-home instructions also
provided. Free.
* Childbirth-related educa-
tion from the Women's & Fam-
ily Center. To make an
appointment, call 795-BABY
(2229).
* Respite care for develop-
mentally/physically disabled or


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HOMOSASSA OFFICE
8469 W Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
352-628-1030


HERNANDO OFFICE
1037 E. Norvell Bryant Hw., Hernando, FL 34442
352-341-4661


781654


autistic children is available on
a sliding scale fee in Citrus and
Levy counties. Supported by
United Way of Citrus County,
area businesses, groups, and
individuals. Call Dorothy at Isa-
iah Foundation Inc. (352) 447-
1775.
* SPRING HILL- Health
Matters Home Care has a Reg-
istered Nurse available to do
free speaking engagements
for your group, club, church or
organization. Call (352) 686-
4493 or (352) 686-5593.
* The Citrus Team of HPH
Hospice and its not-for-profit
Homecare affiliate, HPH Home-
care, provide ongoing educa-
tion to Citrus County residents
about their many programs,
services and volunteer opportu-
nities. There is no charge for a
speaker and the solicitation of
funds is never involved. Educa-
tional materials are provided at
no charge. Call Wendy Hall,
community liaison, at 527-4600.
* The Lighthouse for the
Visually Impaired offers serv-
ices to Citrus County residents.
Workshops will include learning
See NOTES/Page C3


Auto


CITRUS
FIRST
MMI/'llullMIM .


Lj--IlSheldon 4 Palme


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C2 TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009












One alpha blocker medication affects cataract surgery


9 Can Flomax four men by the age of
* interfere with 70.
* cataract sur- , Flomax is classified
g ery. as an alpha blocker
A: It may, according medication that helps
to a large study recently , to relieve urinary
reported in The Jour- symptoms of BPH by
nal of the American /-' relaxing smooth mus-
Medical Association cles in the prostate and
(JAMA). Flomax (tam- neck of the bladder.
sulosin) is commonly Richard Hoffmann However, it can also
used to treat an en- ASK THE relax the smooth mus-
larged prostate gland PHARMACIST cles in the iris of the
(benign prostatic hy- eye, leading to a condi-
perplasia or BPH), tion known as intraop-
which affects nearly three out of erative floppy iris syndrome or


IFIS, which can increase the risk
of complications during cataract
surgery.
In the recent study published in
JAMA, researchers looked at the
medical records of more than
96,000 men older than 65 who had
cataract surgery between 2002
and 2007.
Findings from this study
showed that men who had pre-
scriptions filled for Flomax within
14 days of the cataract surgery had
more than double the risk of seri-
ous complications following the
surgery than did men who were


not prescribed Flomax, or those
who received Flomax more than
15 days before the surgery, or
those who were taking other
alpha-blocking drugs for BPH or
high blood pressure. Why other
alpha-blockers were not associ-
ated with complications in this
study is not clear, but it may be re-
lated to their lower specificity for
relaxing smooth muscle.
The serio4 surgical complica-
tions reported with Flomax use
within 14 days of the cataract pro-
cedure included a lost lens or lens
fragment, retinal detachment and


inflammation within or around
the eye.
Results from this study point out
the importance of making sure
that your physician performing
cataract surgery is aware of all the
medications you are taking prior
to surgery so that the surgeon can
plan and prepare accordingly

Richard Hoffmann has been a
pharmacist for more than 20
years. Send questions to him
. at 1135 N. Timucuan Trail,
Inverness FL 34453.


W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Call Laura Henderson
of Gulfcoast Spine Institute at
341-4778.
E WnmenHeart of Nature


skills, such as managing med- Coast (the National Coalition of
ications, money identification, Women With Heart Disease)
using adaptive equipment, will not meet again until Sep-
home management, use of tember, but offers online and
magnification equipment for telephone support. Contact
reading and managing mail and Martha at 341-0614 or bowma-
more. All workshops are free. nia48@yahoo.com, or.visit
Call (866) 962-5254 or 527- www.womenheart.org.
8399 The -workshops will from N Free Breastfeeding Sup-
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at port Group, 10 a.m. to noon
the Center for Independent Liv- the first Thursday monthly at
ing of North Central Florida at Nature Coast Birth Center in
3774 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River. Call 564-4224.
Lecanto, across from Cowboy E The Fibromyalgia Sup-
Junction. port Group of the First United
* SHINE (Serving Health Insur- Methodist Church of Ho-
ance Needs of the Elders) is a mosassa meets the first and
free program where volunteers third Thursday in the confer-
assist clients with Medicare, ence room of the administration
Medicaid, private health insur- building at the church. Call 628-
ances, long-term care options, 4083.
benefit and claim issues, pre- X Alzheimer's caregiver's
scription, drug assistance pro- support group, 3 p.m. the first
grams and much more. To Thursday monthly at Sugarmill
receive assistance to solve Manor, 8985 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
health insurance problems or Homosassa, hosted by the Cit-
inquire about becoming a vol- rus team of HPH Hospice.
unteer, call 527-5956 and a Free. Call Wendy Hall at 527-
SHINE counselor will call. 4600.
* "Straight Talk Medicine" N "Connections" fireside-
hosted by Dr. Jeffery Kinnard discussion-style support
and co-hosted by Dr. Emily group for cancer patients, 7
Tovar, will air this week on p.m. the first Thursday monthly,
WYKE at 8 p.m. today and at 3 WellSpring Oncology, 6600
p.m. Thursday. 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, (727)
This weeks' guest will be Dr. 343-0600 or www.wellspringon
John Kinrrard of Kinnard Chiro- cology.org.,
practice in Tampa. Dr. Kinnard N Families Against Multiple
will be discussing "Best Tech- Sclerosis Support Group, 11
unique " a.m. the first Saturday monthly
For more information call .at-392. -ineAve.-invemess,
Kathi.-at-39271LineAvenvemess,
Kathie Henderson at 503-7091. for families, friends and anyone
Upcoming shows arelisted at fected by MS. Call341-3740.
ww.kinnardchiropractic.com: affected by Call 3413740.
0 The Citrus County Health n Alzheimer's Family Or-
Department offers child safety ganization, serving Central
seat checks by appointment at, Florida, offers monthlyIsupport,
thelnverness office, 120 N. group meetings. Public is in-
Montgomery Ave. Call Sue Lit- vited
tnan.at 726-1731, ext.242. Visit. 0 2:30 p.m. Monday, July 6,
citruscountyhealth.org. Crystal Gem Manor, 10845
u ot 3 OUPs Gem St., Crystal River. Call:
SupportGROUPS Coral Price at 794-7601.


* Scleroderma Support
Group organizing for North
Central Florida. All persons in-
terested, call. Melba Withrow at
746-7752.
* National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County.
Support Group. Meeting day
June 30 at 1 p.m. at Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto. Please bring articles
for open forum discussion. Call
Laura Hendersoh at 341-4778.
' National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group, 1 p.m. the last
Tuesday monthly at the Citrus
County Resource Center, 2804


GRILLO
Continued from Page Cl

hospitalization and more se-
rious problems.
There are many times in a
day when my staffers have
told me that a patient re-
fuses to fill out routine pa-
perwork and this is
something that is very im-
portant and for many years
I thought the patient was
just trying to be difficult and
did not realize that he or shd
may have had difficulty
reading or understanding
the paperwork.
As we know, paperwork
has become very compli-
cated in a doctor's office
over the years, but, unfortu-
nately, necessary to be done.
Other clues can be that pa-
tients are missing appoint-


The Alzheimer's Family Or-
ganization branch office in Cit-
rus County is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. the second Mon-
day monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service rep-
resentative Ellen Mallon at 860-
2525.
* OCALA- The Alz-
heimer's and Memory Disor-
ders support group of Ocala, 3
to 5 p.m. the first Monday
monthly at the Medical Office
Building at West Marion Com-
munity Hospital, 4600 S.W.
46th Court, second-floor Com-
munity Room. Call (352) 401-
1453.
* BROOKSVILLE --"Man


ments, referring to medica-
tions by color and shape.
They may even claim that
they forgot their glasses or
defer written information to
a companion.
Just as there are all sorts
of problems, there are all
sorts of solutions. The pa-
tient, if comfortable, could
confide in a friend or family
member and have them
come along for an office
visit. Also because the doc-
tor-patient visit is a privi-
leged and private event, the
patient could inform the
doctor of his or her inability
to read and write and staff
would be happy to provide
assistance in filling out in-
formation and reviewing
recommendations until the
patient feels comfortable.
As doctors, we try to adjust
our communication style if
we sense there is a problem.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2


This means avoiding com-
plicated medical terminol-
ogy.
Sometimes the doctor, if
the patient has a compan-
ion, will ask the patient to
repeat the directions to
reaffirm that the patient un-
derstands the findings and
information for his or her
care. Pictures and/or mod-
els are used also to illus-
trate problems and planned
treatments.
Medical encounters need
not be a scary thing for pa-
tients as long as they open
up to friends, family or their.
doctor about their reading
skills and ability to under-
stand.

Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO,
is an ear, nose and throat
specialist in Crystal River.
Call him at 795-0011.


Accepting New OBIGYN Patients
Saturday Appointments Available 1
Rose Mary Sobel, MD - Bo.trdCertiried OB.GYN. FACOG
Jackie Duncan.ARNP - NCC Cernried in \,omen'. Health

Cystaf River Women's leafth Center
WI .I N Surn,i,, bIld .Sul IC.'....... ..,i .,,. .r ,, . 'A,,r f i A :,
Mi:r, Fr i 'N.,1 . PM . 3IPM � i I .I A N,,I J.52/ 7-I"'U 8 10


tions and details. ,,
* Citrus Abuse Shelter As-
sociation (CASA), 1100 Turner
Camp Road, Inverness, offers
two free weekly women's do-
mestic abuse support groups:
* 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
* 10:30 a.m. to noon
Wednesday.
Child care available.
Call CASA at 344-8111.
* Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 628-2874.
* Dunnellon Life Recovery
group for adults where addic-
tion, compulsion and co-depen-
dency issues are dealt with, at
7 p.m. Monday at Rainbow
Springs Village Church, 20222
S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnel-
lon. Call Char at (352) 465-
1644 or Nancy at (352)
794-0017.
* Al-Anon groups meet reg-
ularly in Citrus County. Call
(352) 697-0497.
* Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
* Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
* Last Resort AFG: 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S. -
Pleasant Grove Road, Inver-
ness.
* Lecqnto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of Cit-
rus . GCpp , 2.2... .\.odyi ,.-


Lan, Lecanto.
qO Courage AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa.
Open meeting. Call Victoria at
503-3961.
iCrystal River AFG: 11:30
a.m hlursdays at YANA Club,
147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 Ni Osceola Ave., Inver-
fes'.
* Beginners AI-Anon: 10
a.m. Saturday at Yana Club,
1N47Seventh St. (off Citrus Av-
enue), Crystal River.
* Alcoholics Anonymous:
if you drink, and want to stop,
call Alcoholics Anonymous Na-
ture Coast Intergroup at 621-
0�9, Web site:
ww.ncintergroup.com.
, AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laveme at 637-
4563. Web site: "
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
-u~*Overeaters Anonymous:
Call746-7749 or 341-0777.
* 3 p.m. Monday at the
senior center (VA building) on
County Road 491, Lecanto.
Call Delores, 746-5019..
0* 3 p.m. Tuesday at Lakes
Region Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness. Call Maralyn,
726-9112.
* 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at
St. Anne's Episcopal Church '
(Mary Chapel), 9870 W. Fort Is-
land Trail, Crystal River. Call
Peg, (352) 447-5080., ,,Yi;!


* 1 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Parish Hall, 6
Roosevelt Blvd, Beverly Hills.
Call Francisca, 746-7749.
* 7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady
of Grace Parish Hall, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Call
Carolyn, 341-0777.
* CEA-HOW, for people who
have an eating disorder, at
noon Wednesdays at the First
Presbyterian Church, 206
Washington Ave., Inverness.
Call Judi M. at 726-5882.
* Reiki clinic, 7 to 9 p.m.
most Wednesdays at the Bev-
erly Hills Community Center, 1
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. Call
Ann Thonen at 795-5116 or
Kristi Kobler at 628-5537.
* Narcotics Anonymous:
* Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Saturday, Lions Den,
U.S. 41, Floral City.
* It Works How and Why, 7
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Saturday and noon Sunday,
YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh
St., Crystal River.
* Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m.
Thursday, First Christian
-Church, Grover Cleveland
Boulevard, Homosassa.
* Recovery on the River, .8
p.m. Monday and Friday,
Lecanto Church of Christ, State
Road 44 and County Road 491,
Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of
County Road 491 and State
Road 44.
Narcotics Anonymous is not
affiliated with any of the meet-
ing facilities listed. Information
line: 382-0851.
a .: 1.See GROU'1PS/Page,C4


to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Florida
Cancer Institute - New Hope's
Brooksville Center, 7154 Med-
ical Center Drive just behind
Johnny Carino's. Call Mary
Capo at (352) 596-1926.
* BROOKSVILILE - Wo-
men's breast cancer support
group, 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first
Tuesday monthly at Florida
Cancer Institute.- New Hope
Center at 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra
Randazzo, R.T., at (352) 592-
8128.
Wpekly meetings
* Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the-Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at 422-3234.
* Independent Living
Skills, Peer Support and Lit-
eracy workshops, 9 to 11:45
a.m. Monday at the Center for
Independent Living of North .
Central Florida, 3774 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Lecanto. Call
Cathy Jackson at 527-8399.
* Beverly Hills Community
Church Community Support
Group, a 12-step program, 6
p.m. Tuesday in the fellowship
hall, 88 Civic Circle. Free. All
are invited. Call the church at
746-3620 or Meg at 527-2443.
* HPH Hospice presents
free grief support programs,
2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center
for anyone who has experi-.
enced the suddertloss of a ,'
loved one. Registration re-
quired. Call (800) 486-8784.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7
to 9 p.m. Friday at Seven
Rivers Christian School in
Rooms 216/217 of school build-
ing C. Dinner available before
' the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for
$3 donation and a coffee house
after. Call SRPC at 746-6200.
* Celebrate Recovery, 7
p.m. Wednesday and Fridays
at the Christian Recovery Fel-
SIowship Church, 2242 W. State
Road 44. Call 726-2800.
* Celebrate Recovery at
Gulf to Lake Church Ministry
Complex, West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway in Crystal River. Din-
ner at 6 p.m. Friday, followed
by large- and small-group time
and a Coffee Caf6 at 9. Call
795-0649.
* Beverly Hills Gay and
Lesbian Support Group
meets weekly. Free, open to
everyone. Group organizer is
PamelaRae and co-organize'r is
Wayne Thomas. Call Pame-
laRae at 560-3247 for direc-


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^ J e More than 15 000 people die each year in the U.S. from rupture of an
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SVascular disease can impair circulation and lead to limb amputation.
CITRUS culatrokes remain the third leading cause of death in the Utation.

FIR ST "One in every 20 Americans over the age of 50 has peripheral arterial
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403 West Highland boulevard , Inverness 352-726-3646
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TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 C3


HEALTH & LIFE


C COUNTY (EQ CHRON h









%4 TUJESDAY,JUNIE r , . 2UU.


Monthly safe Rx drug disposal open to residents


Special to the Chronicle

County residents who want to
safely dispose of unwanted, un-
used or expired prescription and
certain over-the-counter medica-
tions are encouraged to be part of
Operation Medicine Cabinet on
Friday. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. that
day, residents can bring in their
medications to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office in Inverness,
where the medications will be dis-


BENNETT
Continued from Page Cl

Control Act," grants the
Food and Drug Administra-
tion (FDA) power over the
sale, production, and mar-
keting of cigarettes and
other tobacco products. It
also includes provisions
specifically designed to de-
crease youth smoking.
. Thanks to the work of De-
mocrats and Republicans,
health care and consumer
advocates, the decades-long
effort to protect our chil-
dren from the harmful ef-
fects of tobacco has
emerged victorious. Presi-
dent Obama stated clearly
that "Today, change has
come to Washington" during
the bill signing ceremony at
the White House Rose Gar-
den.
This law will save Ameri-
can lives and make Ameri-
cans healthier.
Both the Senate and the
House of Representatives
passed the bill by over-
whelming margins earlier
this month. John R. Seffrin,
Ph.D, chief executive offi-


GROUPS- .
Continued from Page C3


* Narconon provides an-
swers to drug addiction, pro-
vides free assessments,
evaluation and referral services
to internationally recognized al-
ternative and traditional treat-
ment facilities. When con-
tinuing relapse is occurring, call


posed of properly
Operation Medicine Cabinet is
conducted the first Friday
monthly The coalition is sponsor-
ing the strategy along with the Cit-
rus County Sheriff's Office.
Following are guidelines for
OMC:
* Medications must be brought
in their original container.
* The event is free of charge
and open to Citrus County resi-
dents.


cer of the American Cancer
Society and its advocacy af-
filiate, the American Can-
cer Society Cancer Action
Network (ACS CAN), called
the law "lifesaving."
Forty-five years after to-
bacco smoke was first found
to be hazardous to health,
tobacco products will fi-
nally be regulated. Prod-
ucts that kill more than
400,000 people in America
each year will finally expe-
rience some control over
advertising gimmicks and
flavoring that is clearly
aimed at America's youth.
This lifesaving new law has
the potential to break the
deadly cycle of addiction
and put an end to big to-
bacco's targeting of our na-
tion's children.
The bill' requires ciga-
rette makers to disclose
product ingredients to the
FDA and prohibits them
from using misleading la-
bels such as "low tar" or
"light" on cigarette pack-
ages. It also imposes bans
on candy- and fruit-flavored
cigarettes, which often ap-
peal to kids and teenagers.
The bill also holds to-
bacco companies to market-


(800) 468-6933 or visit
www.stopaddiction.corm- -
* Depression and Bipolar
Support Alliance of Citrus
County at 7 p.m. Thursday in
Bailey Hall, First Lutheran
Church, 1900 State Road 44
W., Inverness. Doors open at 6
p.m. Call 503-3262. The Na-
tional DBSA Association's num-
ber is (800) 826-3632..
P The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping


* Other items will not be ac-
cepted.
* Each drug must be cataloged
and paperwork signed by the res-
ident - if others have many items
to deliver, expect to wait.
"All this costs is effort on the
part of residents to bring in their
medications to the sheriff's office.
This does not cost taxpayers any-
thing extra," said Deborah Scott,
coalition executive director
"Federal regulations are very


ing restrictions. For exam-
ple, they will no longer be
allowed to advertise near
schools or sponsor enter-
tainment and sporting
peyents. The American Can-
cer Society's advocacy affil-
iate, ACS CAN, worked
tirelessly in support of this
bill. Today's signing culmi-
nates an effort of more than
a decade to regulate a
rogue industry whose busi-
ness is addiction.
Every day, 3,500 children
pick up their first cigarette
and 1,000 children become
addicted smokers.'This law
will help to reduce youth
smoking and help save
lives.

Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist, past president
of the Citrus County Unit
of the American Cancer
Society and a member of
the Board of Directors and
Executive Committee of
the Florida Division of the
American -Cancer Society.
Contact him at 522 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail
cjbennett@rboi.com.


people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar and more for
more than 15 years.
Weekly meeting. Call 628-
3831 or 637-3196.
* SPRING HILL-- Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital of
Spring Hill.
Call Charissa Haffner at
.(352),346-8864..


strict about drug disposal. Opera-
tion Medicine Cabinet, with its
simple design, allows county resi-
dent turn over their medications
to law enforcement with no ques-
tions asked; the medications are
then processed as abandoned
property. The abandoned medica-
tions are sealed and marked as
any other property turned over to
the sheriff's office and then de-
stroyed properly, gone from Citrus
County medicine cabinets and not


GANDHI
Continued from Page Cl

is chemotherapy for these
groups of patients. This
kind of breast cancer repre-
sents 15 percent of all
breast cancers in the
United States.
In a recent American So-
ciety of Clinical Oncology
meeting, researchers pre-
sented an excellent paper
on a new class of drugs
called PARP inhibitors.
Cancer cells make exten-
sive use of the enzyme poly
(ADP-ribose) polymerase,
or PARP, to repair DNA
damage, including damage
caused by chemotherapeu-
tic agents.
PARP inhibitors evolved
from the rationale that inhi-
bition of the enzyme would
disrupt cancer cells' self-re-
pair mechanisms, thereby
potentiating ' chemother-
apy's ability,to inflict DNA
damage.
Dr. O'Shaughnessy pre-
sented data from a clinical
trial involving 116 women


BARKER
Continued from Page Cl

At that point, it seemed
like everything that could
go wrong did. But, it got
worse - at 3 a.m., Graham
woke up with a 102.9 fever
Anyone knows that when
you have children and they
are sick, your health comes
second. Only when your
health endangers the life of


dumped into drinking ,water
sources," Scott said.
Community residents are wel-
come to join the coalition in its
work.
The coalition meets at 10 a.m.
the second Thursday monthly at
the School District Center in In-
verness.
Meetings are open to the public
and membership is free.
For more information, call Deb-
orah Scott at 341-7480.


This is very exciting news.


with metastatic triple-nega-
tive breast cancer. The pa-
tients received
conventional chemother-
apy with Gemcitabine
(Gemzar) and Carboplatin
and were randomized to
BSI-201 (PARP inhibitor) or
no additional therapy.
The addition of the PARP
inhibitor to chemotherapy
resulted in an overall re-
sponse rate of 48 percent
compared with 16 percent
in the chemotherapy-only
group.
The progression-free sur-
vival also more than dou-
bled in patients who
received this experimental
drug compared to those
who did not get it.,
Fortunately, the drug did
not cause any significant
side effects. It is given in the
vein as an outpatient proce-
dure in the doctor's office.
It is unlikely to work with-
out chemotherapy.
This is very exciting
news. A development of a
new class of drugs in this
kind of breast cancer with


your child is it the other
way around.
So, like any mother with a
fever, I forgot about it and
began to rock Graham until
his moans became a whim-
per, and those became si-
lence. And then, from all
the rocking, I had to vomit
The next day, we woke up
and feeling much better,
went to the house to start
another day of packing.
Even though I have 'a
heavy heart right now, I


extremely pbor prognosis is
very important Also,
though the drug is now
being studied in breast can-
cer, I suppose that it will
help in many other situa-
tions, too. This drug is still
in its early phase of devel-
opment. Researchers in-
formed that a new
confirmatory trial is under
way and if the results are
confirmed, this drug will
become available for gen-
eral use.
I hope that this drug will
be approved expeditiously
enough so my patients can
use it in the future.

Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the volun-
teer medical adviser of the
Citrus Unit of the
American Cancer Society.
Send questions or
comments to 521 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
FL 34461 or e-mail to
sgandhi@tampabay.rrcom
or call 746-0707.


know that it could be a lot
worse - but also that it will
get better. We will have a
home, large enough for all
of us and a place to call
home.

Shalyn Barker resides with
her husband, Patrick,
daughter, Emmy, and son,
Graham, in the Beverly
Hills area. She can be
reached at citrusamom
@yahoo.com.


Why Haven't People Who've Had A Car


Wreck Been Told These Facts?


If you've recently been involved in a car wreck r
and suffer from any of the following...


* Neck pain

* Sharp, shooting pains in the. arms

* Numbness and tingling in the arms or hands

* Painful headaches or dizziness

* Unrelenting muscle soreness

...there may be cause for concern. This may be the most
important article you will ever read about your injuries.


Don't let pain caused by a crash affect you
for years. Discover this drug-free,
natural way to be pain free.


It's amazing how different life can be after a split second
collision.

One minute everything is fine, the next you are hurting
for days and uncertain if life .will ever go back to normal.
Tasks you used to perform with ease, like reading,
concentrating or even sleeping, now :take more energy
and cause annoying pain.

If you feel like this, or have any of the symptoms listed
above, you could be suffering from whiplash. Whiplash is
an injury to the spine caused by a jerking motion, either
backward, forward or from the side.

Whiplash can severely damage your ligaments, even if
you feel just a little sore after the accident. If not healed'
properly, painful scar tissue will develop, causing misery
in your neck joints for decades.

One medical study concluded 43% of patients "will suffer
long-term symptoms following 'whiplash' injury, for
which no conventional treatment has proven to be
effective."
This means that almost half the people who have neck
trauma after a car wreck will suffer for years. Plus the
traditional methods of treatment like neck collars, 'wait-
and-see', and pain pills are not working.'

Could This Non-Invasive, Natural Treatment
Be The Answer To Your Pain?

My name is Dr. David Kreinbrook of 7 Rivers
Chiropractic Center. I've been helping people heal and be
pain free after car wrecks for 15 years. Chiropractic
treatment has proven to be a very effective method of
healing whiplash injuries. Here's the results of one
chiropractic study...


"The results of this retrospective study would suggest that
benefits can occur in over 90% of patients undergoing
chiropractic treatment for chronic whiplash injury."
--European Spine Journal


788884Seven Rivers Chiro'


Special Opportunity To Have
A Professional Evaluation

For a limited time, I'm running a very special offer where
you can find out how bad your injuries are and if I can
help you.
What does this offer include? Everything I normally do in
my "Car Wreck Evaluation"; Just call before July 13,
2009 and here's what you'll get...
* An in-depth consultation about your problem where I
will listen.. really .listen...to the details of your case.
* A complete neuromuscular examination.
* A thorough analysis of your exam and x-ray findings (if
necessary) so we can start mapping out your plan to be
pain free.
* You'll see everything first hand and find out if this
arri zing treatment will be your pain solution, like it has
been for so many other patients.

Until July 13,2009 you can get everything I've listed
here for only $49. The normal price for this type of
evaluation including x-rays is $150 -- you're saving a
considerable amount on this offer.

Now you may be wondering why as a doctor, I would
practically give away my services. It's simple really. I've
seen too many people come in years after their car
accident, and have nasty, degenerative arthritis, most of
which could have been prevented with the right care early
on. I'm tired of seeing this scenario over and over, so I
wanted to offer this special evaluation to help make a
difference.

Here's How To Get Rid Of Your Pain

With my Evaluation we'll be able to find the problem and
then correct it. Think of'how you'll feel in just a few
short weeks. You'll be feeling your life change for the
better. Starting your body on the way to a pain-free,
normal living. Feeling tight joints rest, relax, free up.
Feeling muscles tied in knots become more supple.
Paid Advertising


As you begin to see motion returning to your joints,
you're preventing and reducing chances of disability and
a crippling future. You're playing golf again, doing yard
work or playing with the kids ...without pain.

Here's What To Do About your Pain.

Call 352-794-3824 between the hours of 9am and 5:30
pm Monday, Tuesday and Thursday and tell the
receptionist you'd like to come in. for the Special Car
Wreck Evaluation before July 13,2009.

Call today and we can get started with your consultation,
exam and x-rays as soon as there's an. opening in the
schedule. Our office is called 7 Rivers Chiropractic
Center and you. can find us at 927 N. Citrus Ave. in
Crystal River (across from the Citrus Diagnostic Center.)

Sincerely,

David Kreinbrook, D.C.

PS. What will your pain feel like months,
even years from today"?

A study published in the Journal of Bone and Surgery
looked at people who had been in a car accident 15 years
ago. They found that 70% of the whiplash injured
patients continued to complain of problems related to the
original accident.

With women it was even higher --. 80% still had
symptoms after 15 years!


Don't let scar tissue build up and be
painful for life. Take me up on
my offer and call today.

352-794-3824.


I I


CITRUS CoUNTY (FL) CHRo~icLE


HEALTH & LIFE


PA'- tn'fl).


I


SAW
CITRUS
FIRST


I *










Page C5 - TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009



COMMUNITY
I CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Club ready
for speed bingo
Supper of baked ziti, salad
and dessert followed by 40
games of speed bingo is
planned for Monday at the
Inverness Highlands Civic
Center on Little Al Point. All of
this is included for an entry
fee of $30 ($10 deposit re-
quired). Doors will open at 4
p.m., supper at 5, speed
games begin at 6.
For reservations, call
Pauline at 637-4102, Flo at
344-1563 or Sharon at 637-
6379. Cut-off date is
Wednesday.
Celebrate
American heritage
The Hernando Heritage
Council invites the public to
celebrate our American Her-
itage with family, friends and
neighbors from noon to 6
p.m. Saturday at the Historic
Hemando School on U.S. 41
in. Hemando.:
Food is traditional American
- hot dogs, freedom fries
and apple pie with refresh-
ments. Games, music and
more. Afterward, you can see
Inverness fireworks from the
lake at the park in Hemando.
Call Mary Sue Rife for
more details or to participate,
at 302-1429.
Beef '0' Brady's
to help Hospice
Monday is "Hospice of Cit-
rus County Day" at Beef '0'
Brady's Family Sports Pub in
Inverness. On Monday, July
6, Beef O' Brady's will donate
15 percent of the day's pro-
ceeds to benefit the, bereave-
ment camp program of the
Herry's Kids Division of Hos-
pice of Citrus County.-
On Monday, Beef '0'
Brady's will also accept
check and cash donations
made payable to Hospice of
Citrus County.
New afternoon
yoga classes
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation, with instructor
Laura Boetto, is offering yoga
classes in the evening at the
Citrus Springs Community
Building and new aftemoon
classes at the Homosassa
Lions Club.
Classes at the Citrus
Springs Community Center
are from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednes-
days and Thursdays. New af-*
ternoon classes are at the
Homosassa Lions Club on
Tuesdays-starting July 7,
from 2 to 3 p.m. The yoga
class will cost is $8 per class.
Register online at www.citr-
uscountyfl.org, click on Parks
& Recreation, then online
registration and complete the
checkout process. If you
need additional information,
call (352) 465-7007.
Springs update
and paddle
The Friends of Chassa-
howitzka National Wildlife
Refuge Complex will provide
a Three Sisters Springs up-
date at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July
7 at Kayaks And Beyond (a
Crystal River Kayak Comn-
pany). John Peterlin, Friends
of Chassahowitzka, will pro-
vide information about the
springs project and what is
intended for the property,
both now and in the future.
Following the presentation,
there will be a paddle up to
the Three Sisters Springs
property for a tour of the
springs by kayaks and/or ca-
noes. The trip will also in-
clude a sunset/moonlight
paddle about King's Bay.
Kayaks or canoes will be pro-
vided to those that need one
as supply lasts. Tour cost is a
S$35. Proceeds from the tour
will go entirely to the Save
Three Sisters Springs proj-
ect. For reservations, direc-
tions and further information
call 795-2255.
USCG maritime nighttime


rules apply. For rules info
check online at: www.navcen
.uscg.gov/mwv/navrules/rules
/Rule20.htm.


SSpecial to the Chronicle
Event sponsors were recognized by Ryan Beaty, Citrus Memorial CEO, with plaques for their role in supporting the 2009 Citrus Memorial
Ball.



Ball benefits Citrus Memorial


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus Memorial Health
Foundation recently hosted its
Fourth Annual Citrus Memorial
Ball; "Diamonds are Forever."
The sold-out event at Black Dia-
mond Ranch was coordinated
with the help of twenty commit-


The new center will be built at the
Allen Ridge Medical Facility,.

tee members, including co-chairs Memorial's Capital Campaign
Susan Gill and Ellen Zane. project for the planned Family
Funds raised from "Diamonds Care Health and Education Cen-
are Forever" will benefit Citrus ter in Lecanto. The new center


will be built at the Allen Ridge
Medical Facility on County Road
491 in Lecanto and will focus on
health care education and family
medical services.
For more information about
the capital campaign project, call
Chris Pool,. Foundation develop-
ment director at 344-6560.


Dance academy recital wows audience


r- onnie's Academy of Dance ing the show as the buffoon stepsis-
presented "Rags to Riches," ters and Sandy Floyd surprising us
featuring Cinderella, on as a quite petite and lovely step-
June 13 at the Curtis Peterson Audi- mother.
torium. With a cast of 200 Pretty little ballerinas,
plus, the hall was filled' all smiles, wowed the au-
with parents, grandpar- . dience with Stephanie
ents and friends anx- Sears as the Dance Mis-
iously awaiting the result . " tress-
of months of lessons, re- Next, an array of dress-
hearsals, .costume fit- - makers performed to per-
tings, scene-making and fection. Lovely Heather
the always important Fortson as the Fairy God-
blending of the art of .. mother, Chauncey Pauley
music to the art of dance., as the Dragonfly and Lil-
This 23rd recital of the Ruth Levins liana Hagerman as the
academy presented to AROUND THE Spring Fairy brought,
Citrus County was a spec- COMMUNITY thunderous- applause
tacular event, an extraor- - from a delighted audi-
dinary . culmination of - the ence.
dedication of Ronnie and Ryan Bog- Bumblebees and Butterflies filled
art in their strict adherence to thor- the stage in perfectly timed se-
ough professional instructioit and quences and Meghan Andes ap-
curriculum. peared as the Summer Fairy in
It was a classic Cinderella story exquisite form.
including the wicked stepmother, As each sequence unfolded, we
mean stepsisters and the invitation were in awe of the discipline of the
that comes to the ball from the students and their apparent love of
prince. There is a lovely fairy god- the art of the dance, the beauty of
mother who waves her magic wand the dance, choreography, the light-
and the story unfolds with Jacque- ing, the exquisite costuming, set de-
lyn King as Cinderella, David Easter signs and music enhancement.
and Dan Epstein hilariously steal- Breathtaking doesn't begin to de-


scribe the emotional experience
one receives when attending a Ron-
nie's Academy of Dance recital.
There were Grasshoppers and
Fireflies; along with Michelle
Canete as the Autumn Fairy, Blue-
birds with Julia Teter-Jones as the
Winter Fairy, an'array of mice, royal
horses; timekeepers: and brilliant
evening stars, each group showcas-
ing their talents to our delight
Scene Two was the prince's ball-
room, with elegant courtiers, court
dancers and a lively court jester by
Jared Bogart and the prince, dance
master Ryan Bogart.
In Scene Three, Cinderella's
House, the entire'cast filled the
stage as Cinderella sits at her stool
thinking of the night with the prince.
Act II was a glittering sensation to
the eye with the "Diamonds are For-
ever" sequence featuring brilliant
performers, the "Consider Your-
self" set, a .lively "Puttin' on the
Ritz" set, the "Emeralds," "Dia-
monds are a Girl's Best Friend" se-
quence, a "Rubies" set followed by
"I Found a Million Dollar Baby" set,
"Pennies from Heaven" and "Rags
to Riches" glamour personified.
The final set included "Original
Rags,". "Hard Knock Life," "The


Money Tree," "We're in the Money,"
"Diamonds," "Little Orphan Annie,"
"On the Sunny Side of the .Street,"
"Sapphires" and "Money," all show-
casing the talented groups 6f per-
formers.
As the finale heralded the per-
formers, we felt blessed to have this
'fine academy in our midst and the
myriad of opportunities it affords the
students enrolled with Ryan and Ron-
nie. Poise, confidence, cooperation,
discipline, creativity, appreciation of
the dance as an art form are just a few.
Sincere admiration and appreci-
ation to Ronnie's Academy of
Dance! Bravo! Bravo! Bravo!
To enroll a student, call 795-1010.
Note: In a recent story for the Sal-
vation Army, I failed to have the in-
formation that 75 volunteers from
the First Presbyterian Church par-
ticipated in the Kettle Drive at the
Winn-Dixie store.


Ruth Levins participates in a
variety ofprojects around the
community . Let her know about
your group's upcoming activities by
writing to PO. Box 803, Crystal
River, FL 34423.


Interest in nutrition rooted in childhood, education


M y interest
in nutri-
tion goes
back many years. ..
Subconsciously, I
guess, it goes all
the way back to
my childhood in
Africa. I learned
to routinely eat
and love many Dr. Ed
fruits like guava, PASS
papaya, mango, FOR H
soursop, Suri-
nam cherries,
and others, not realizing
they were exotic fruits that
most kids never heard of in
the 1940s, much less tasted.
Dad regularly had all kinds
of vegetables from his gar-
den for our kitchen, and I
also learned to eat and like
them all.
We had almost no nutrition
classes in medical school,
but I was exposed to vegetar-
ian diets at L.A County Gen-


Dodge
SION
HEALTH

portance
obtained
lie Health
Hopkins
searching
tion whe,
health in
cal impor
became de
my mind.
Nathan
the book
Now," in


eral Hospital dur- extensive research, and es-
ing my internship- tablished the Pritikin Clinic
there, because it in California in 1976. I was
was then the main impressed with the book's
teaching hospital central thesis, flew to Cali-
for Loma Linda fornia for a few days immer-
University (Sev- sion in his dietary program
enth-day Adven- and philosophy, and con-
tist.) I did not eluded that his teaching was
become vegetar- genuinely valid. The prob-
ian then, but the lem was that few people
concept was 'would stay with the strict
planted. Pritikin diet.
I became more Dr. Dean Ornish became
aware of the im- convinced early in his med-
of nutrition when I ical career that a well-de-
the Master of Pub- signed lifestyle program
degree from Johns could reverse or prevent
University. In re- coronary heart disease. He
' infant malnutri- published his research data
n I taught public in a top medical journal in
Ethiopia, the criti- 1990, proving reversal of
stance of nutrition coronary heart disease
eeply embedded in through his program, and
became immediately fa-
Pritikin published mous for achieving some-
k, "Live Longer thing top heart specialists
1974 as a result of had declared impossible. He


Wori prestigious awards for
his outstanding work In ad-
dition to his scientific arti-
cles, he has written many
good books for the public.
Dr. Walter Willett, profes-
sor of medicine at Harvard
Medical School, began care-
ful nutritional research
among more than 121,000
women in 1980 in the
Nurses' Health Study A
wealth of important nutri-
tional information flowed
out of that research, well
documented in more than
600 scientific articles over
the years. Much of this was
summarized in his excellent
book for the public, "Eat,
Drink, and Be Healthy."
Ornish and Willett are gi-
ants in the field of applied
.nutrition and health. Be-
cause of the work they and
others have done, we know
how essential sound nutri-
tion is for good health. Many


of the chronic health prob-
lems we see in America
today are due to unhealthy
nutritional practices.
Our health care model
today is deficient in many
ways. Based on the tacit as-
sumption that the medical
model can fix any health
problems, it pays little atten-
tion to lifestyles. Yet pills
and surgery, while some-
times necessary or lifesav-
ing, do not build good
health. In the future, good
systems of health care will
build on a foundation of
healthy lifestyles and sound
nutrition. Any model that
fails to do this will be re-
garded as woefully inade-
quate and unscientific.

Dr Ed Dodge is a retired
physician living in Texas.
Visit his Web site,
www passionforhealth.info.


CFCC Citrus Campus offers courses with Motorcycle Training Institute


Special to the Chronicle

Central Florida Commu-
nity College offers the Mo-
torcycle Basic Rider course
in partnership with the Mo-
torcycle Training Institute.
Classes meet Friday 5:30


The course is geared for beginning motorcyclists.


to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m. to
2:30 p.m.; and Sunday, 7 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. at 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
The course fee is $245. New


sessions start each week
The course is geared to
give beginning motorcy-
clists of all ages the physical
and mental skills necessary


to ride safely on the street.
Student workbooks, hel-
mets and motorcycles are
provided. Upon successful
completion of the course,


graduates are exempt from
further testing at the De-
partment of Motor Vehicles
and may be entitled to in-
surance discounts through
participating companies.
Visit www.mtii.com or call
(877) 308-7246 for information.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but
multiple publications cannot be guaranteed


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 563-3280; or e-mail to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be guaranteed.
* Expect notes to run no more than once.


,










ENTRTINUN Qmsoj U' (L)CHONCL


TUESDAY EVENING JUNE 30, 2009 C: omcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast, Dunnellon I: Comcast, Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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"Killer Instinct: From the Files of Agent Candice DeLong" (2003) Jean "Killer Hair" (2009, Mystery) Magle Lawson, Mark Consuelos A fashion "Hostile Makeover" (2009. Mystery) Maggie Laws Mark Consuelos. A;
LMN 50 Smart A retiring FBI agent is drawn int one last case. a journalist investigates murders at hair salon. NR' fashion journalist witnesses the murder ofs supermodel a
S** "Hellbo ll: The Golden Army"(2008) Ron Perman Hellboyand * "What Happens in Vegas" (2008) Cameron Diaz Two strangers * "Babylon A.D. "(2008) Vn Diesel. A mercenary Co-Ed
[3 3 his team bathe an underworld pnnce (In Stereo)'PG-13 a awake together and find they are marked. (In Stereo)'PG-13' guards a woman who is mankind's last hope Confidential 3
MSNBC 42 41 42 42 The Ed Snow Hardball iQ. Countlown WINh Keiti, Otiurmann The Rachel Maddo.w Snow Counidiown With Keiin Oibeirmann The Rachel Maddow Show
TV 97 66 97 97 39 DJ & the Fro I11l) iReally Goirn ** "Summer Catch"(20011 Freade Prinze Jr In Stereo)'PG-13' Paris HnI:ons My New BFF 14 Pans Hilon. My New BFF IN14' Paris Hilon s My New BFF'14' I
(GC 65 44 53 E [LK] 28 36 28 28 35 25 Drake & Josh Drake Josh iCarly 'YT7'ia iCarly 'Y7' a ed's School |SpongeBob Hnme Improve Home Improve George Lo:pez George Lopez The Nanny'PG' |The Nanny 'PG'
) 44 Ton & Dean Home Ton & Dean Home ITnr 6 Dean Home orn & Dean Ho meo Tor & Dean Home Danc:e 'iur A Oh! 'PG'
,6LEn 62 ** "MyFather, My Son"l(988) . ** "Cocoon"(1985, Farnasy) Don Amache Florida retirees eel young * "Flowers in the Attic"11987 Horror) Vicona *** "The Burning Bed"(1984) Farran FawcetA A
Keit62 eilh C rradine. 'N 'a again after swimmig among alien pods (In Stereo PG-13' a Tennant, Louise Fletcher. PG-13' a battered woman sets fire to her abusive husband.
(SCF) 31 59 31 31 26 29 Scare Tactics IScareTactics Scare Ta:les Scare Tacics S-carec Tacics Scare Tactics Scare Tacti Scare Tactics ECW lUvel 14 Lv* "Hybrid"(1997) R'
PEE B122 112 12 122 Unique Whips 14 Pmp My Ride Pas Timre Pimp Mv Ride Pimp My Ride Super Birvei Super Bikes' Drag RRace High Dra:I Rae High Pimp My Ride Pass Time
( 37 43 37 37 27 36 ** "Star Wars: Episode II- Attack of the Clones"(20021 Ewan McGregor (In Siereo PG' Worlds Scarne: Police Chases 2 Worlds Scarest Poli:e Cnases 3 Jesse James Is a Dead Man'14'
(S0 ) 36 31 .3636 6 Pleasure Boaler nsirde Ihe Rays MLB Basenbai Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays Frcom Rogers Cenrie in Tiornio ILivel Iniade Ire Rays PowerboaliAg Global Chall. The Game 365
I49 23 49 49 16 19 Every-Raymori Frier.ds'1' Seinrleld'PG' Seinleld'PG' Family GuyGuy'' Family Guy'1' [Family Guy'14' Family Guy'14' TheOffire'14' The Offce'14' Seinfeld'G SeinfeldPG'
S*** "Pride and Prejudice"(1940 Romance-Comedy) Greer Garson. ***s "The Man From Laramie"(1955, Wesiemi James Stewar A man *** "Strategic Air Command"(1955 Adventure) James Stewart. A
i 53 30 35 Sisters seek husbands in 1800s England. 'NR' (DVS) seeks luslice atler his brother is killed by Apaches 'NR' a.i professional Baseball player must rejoin the Air Force. 'NR E
(J 53 34 53 53 24 26 Casn Cab G Cash Cab Dark DeadliesiCaCin'14 i Deaaliest Carch'LCi'.(ut 14' DeadliesitCatchn(iirl'-I i After theCaji.hiNl'14 B DeadiestCalch'iockouf" 14
S50 465 50 50 29 30 Whnal ti'm to Wear 'Ellen E PG Say Yes-Dress Cake Boss'PG' Stager Invasion Slager Invasion 18 Kids-Count 18 Kids.Courn Litle Couple Littie Couple 18 Kids.Couii 18 KiJd-Count
(TNi 48 33 48 48 31 34 Bones The Graft in the Grl 14 Bones (In Stereo)' 14 i Bones (In Slereoi 1c 4 I HawihoR le' wielding (NJ)'4 Saving Grace (ri)'MA'irE' HawrtoRie 'reldng '14 Eii
TRAV 9 54 9 9 44 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bite Me With Dr. Mike'PG' s Extreme Terror Rides 'G' Bizarre Foods-Zimmern Bite Me With Dr. Mike'PG'm Bite Me With Dr. Mike 'PG' a
[truii J 25 55 25 25 98 980Cops'PG'. - Cops 'PG' Operation Repo Operation Repo Operation Repo OperationRepo Most Shocking '14' Hot Pursuit'14' Hot Pursuit'14' Forensic Files Forensic Files
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(GNJ 188 I118 18 18 18 20 Beck.'PG' Beker'PG ~Ameri:asFunniest Horme Videos ** "MoulinRouge"(2001) Nicole KJman. A writer shares a bittersweet romance wih a nigntclub diva Scrubs 14 Scruts'14-


PHILLIP ALDER ' '.
Newspaper Enterprise Assn. .. ....i


James Callaghan, a former Prime
Minister of Great Britain, said, "A
leader must have the courage to act
against an expert's advice."
That sometimes applies at the
bridge table, but not often. In this
deal, look at only the West hand.
What would you lead against three
no-trump? And would you have bid
two hearts over one no-trump (or
whatever your conventional bid is
to show a one-suiter)?
To take the questions in reverse
order, West should not bid over one
no-trump. To intervene with a one-
suited hand requires at least six
cards in that suit. And he has ex-
cellent defense should the oppo-
nents plow higher.
It looks so obvious to lead the
heart king. How could it be wrong
to lead the top of a long, strong se-


West
AA AK2
K KQJ
S 52
8 4 3


)-09


North 06-34
A Q 7

* J 10 6 3
4 A Q J 10
East
'"A J 10
10 9 " 7 2
S9'7 4
* 9 7 6
South
A 8 4 3
IA 6 3
* A Ki- '8
4 K 5 2


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: ??


6 51.


.quence? Well, sometimes it can.
South wins with his ace and takes
eight tricks in the minors for nine
in all.
Since West has both the ace and
king of spades, he should have the
courage to lead the ace. If the.
dummy or East's signal suggests
that continuing spades is wrong,
West can shift to the heart king with
nothing lost
Here, though, East would drop
the jack to show a sequence
headed by the J-10-9. That would -
should - persuade West to con-
tinue with the .king and another
spade, giving the defense the first
five tricks.
Phillip Alder is running a bridge
cruise from Oct. 24 to Nov. 2 out of
and back to Fort Lauderdale that
will go around the Caribbean and
into the Panama Canal. Details are
at www.phillipalderbridge.com.


ACROSS 38 Neither's mate
39 Stoneworkers
Remind too 41 Captures
often 43 -- of hands
- fide 47 Ickl
Engine part 49 Cream puff
Tire filler 50 View from the
Pizzeria must dorm
Sub - 53 Protective
(secretly) 55 Refs' cousins
Put on a . 56 Aware of
pedestal 57 Jeans
Deep black go-with
Swerved 58 Boat
Roll of bills implement
Organic 59 Wave
compound makers
Bridal attire 60 Do the wrong
Bulletin thing


28 River tamer
30 Japanese clog
33 Wheel buy
(2 wds.)
34 Goddess
of spring
35 Sporty
vehicles
36 Tunnel blaster
37 Org.


DOWN
1 Gullible
2 Candy-stripers
3 Welcome
4 Short jacket
5 Classical poet
6 Gendarme's
schnoz


Answer to Previous Puzzle
R LS CO ABL
PA AIL ODE LEAD
0IAO RINGLETS
DRUDGE EO NS
GAl MST
MAHS KISSED

LS IIL LS MEAN
DOIBBI N SUIDA


LO E ST U S
OLE APIT KNI
M R aSS S ETS


7 Over again
8 Against
9 Make inquiry
10 Has permission
13 Trot or
gallop


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


15 Sporting
venues
19 Blvd.
22 "Et tu" time
'23'. Big black
dogs
25 Cheerio!
(hyph.)
26 Rustic
lodgings
2 7 - E r er - ' . .
statesman
29 Some males
30 Desperado's
piece
31 Thames school
32 Prefix for
"trillion"
34 Headache
39 Food
additive
40 Cheesy
snacks
42 Leafs out
44 Writer Brett -
45 Fuel tanker
46 More crooked
48 RN employers
49 Sundance
Kid's girl
50 Quid pro-
51 "Pulp Fiction"
name
52 Aries mo.
54 Small bill


Dear Annie: I have been
married to my true love
for 16 years. "Daniel" is a
wonderful husband, a
fantastic father to our
three boys, a generous
and successful busi-
nessman with many
friends, and a great
guy. My problem is his
mother. She cannot see
what a wonderful per-
son her son is.
For years I have lis-
tened to her verbally
abuse him. In her.
opinion, he'does noth- ANNI
ing right. About 12 MAIL
years ago, his now-de-
ceased father had a
minor stroke and turned the fam-
ily business over to Daniel. It was
quite stressful since he had to
learn everything and then pay his
father to buy him out. Daniel also


paid his sisters an early "inheri-
tance" for their share of the busi-
ness. He has since more than
doubled the size of the
00M " company.
However, his
mother never ceases
to tell him he's lazy
and doesn't work hard
enough. His sisters
never defend him and
are quick to criticize,
as well. They don't ap-'
preciate that Daniel's
sense of responsibility
has enabled their cur-
IIE'S rent lifestyles. Daniel
BOX tries to be a loving son,
and we do lots of fam-
ily things together. He
helps his mother whenever she
calls, yet she constantly bad-
mouths him to everyone. She ac-
tually told one employee that he
is a terrible son and nothing like


his father. This hurt him tremen-
dously, and now he's thinking of
quitting the business.
It makes me sad to the point of
tears that a mother cannot re-
spect, love and be proud of her
son. How do I convince her that
he is a good person and she is
throwing away the relationship?
- Heartbroken for Hubby
Dear Heartbroken: This dy-
namic has probablybeen set in
concrete since Daniel was a child
and isn't likely to change unless
someone establishes new rules.
Daniel needs to assert himself
and refuse to be treated so poorly
It might help to discuss this with
a third party - perhaps a coun-
selor or clergyperson who can
work with the entire family. Oth-
erwise, let Daniel handle this as
he chooses. Your job is to be sup-
portive, which you already are.
We hope Daniel appreciates you.


Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: The year ahead could turn out
to be an exciting one. Two new friends
are likely to be responsible for playing
important roles in bringing wonderful
conditions for adventure into your life.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A small
gesture from someone with whom you
have strong emotional bonds will make
your day. S
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - Something
you do or say could open doors of op-
portunity in your present field of en-
deavor. Lady Luck has been waiting for
just such an opening.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -This could
be one of those rare times when oppor-
tunity will seek you out instead of the
other way around. Make the most of
what is being dropped in your lap.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - This is not
the time to be fainthearted about taking a


chance on something that, if successful,
could better your lot in life. You're in an
extremely fortunate cycle.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - Listen to
your inner voice because it is trying to
guide you toward an extremely fortuitous
situation that would make a big differ-
ence in your life. Follow your instincts.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - That
long-awaited opportunity to gratify a
major aspiration is now at hand. It has
been in the works for a while, and it is
likely to revolve around a good friend.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - General
conditions look promising for you, espe-
cially those that deal with commerce or
finances.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --What
puts you miles ahead of the competition
is your ability not to only look at things
on a grand scale but also see the entire


picture.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - Be a
team player whenever you can instead
of an independent operator. It isn't that
you wouldn't do well on your own, but it
won't measure up to what could occur in
joint endeavors.
Aries (March 21-April 19) - It be-
hooves you to get involved with others,
because more than one among them will
tum out to be quite lucky for you, espe-
cially in areas where more than the
usual amount of cooperation is required.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - Once you
establish some clearly defined objectives
and have a good game plan in mind, it
should be clear sailing ahead.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) - What at
first may seem like a small gesture from
a friend could tum out to be enormously
huge in bringing about your success.


ITVL


I 'UiA


,W / THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
JU i r lby Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SHURTT d I Watch your You always
- diet and get say that
- ~ L more exercise s ta

@2009 Tribune Media Services, Inc. ' Z
All Rights Reserved.-0
ARVEG 0 o'



30

HOW HE PESCRI8EP I o
NEWJUMBLENINTENDOwwwjumble.com/ds THE TALK WITH HIS
CARDOLOGIST E
ROTTAH .


, T -Now arrange the circled letters -
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon. "'

Ans: ( To w
(Answers tomorrow)


1 I
4
8 I
11
12 I
13 .
14 I
16
17 f
18 I
20 (
21 E
24 I


6-30 �2009 by NEA, Inc.


t


L


__


I


--7


r-


_ ~I~CII_


___


CmusLI CouNTn (FL) CmROvICLE


CS TUESDAY. IUNE 30. 2009


ENTERTAINMENT


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ennaesoR PG Ros G


L


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nouseInS Ouereou is 14'


nouuse UUin vei Un./ange 14' i


Law O urueI;.oU:pIa viuIIms unII









Crrurr'� (Vyr (F1 C L MCUE ,J'3


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


The Born Loser


The Grizzwells


Blondle


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


"An alleged wise man of questionable
integrity, who was fond of quoting the
words of many renowned philosophers
and claiming them as his own, once said ..."


Doonesbury


Big Nate


THIS I5 THE PERFECT TIS ONE'S 'THIS
TREE FOR OU ., BIGGER. -V 54 M O OE'S
TREE HOUSE. THAT H ONE's I MORE HE'S
WHATAOUT STRAIGHT. A CESSBAE R6GHT.
'THi S ONEr S T+-iiS oNe's

Arlo and Jans STURDIER.E
THAT ONE'S THAT ONE'S E




Arlo and Janis


Today's MOVIES


, Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377 7:30 p.m., 10:2
"Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (PG-13) "The Year On.
1220 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. p.m., 7:20 p.m
"My Sister's Keeper" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:20 "The Proposa
p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m. p.m., 7:50 p.m
"The Year One" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 "Taking of Pe
p.m., 10:25 p.m. p.m., 7:40 p.m
"The Proposal" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25 p.m., 5 "The Hangovi
p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes. p.m., 8 p.m., 1
"Taking of Pelham 123" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:35 p.m., "Land of the I
5:05 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m. "Up" (PG) 12:
"The Hangover" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 9:35 p.m
p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m. "Night at the I
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 p.m, 7:45 p.m
"My Sister's Keeper" (PG-13) 12:25 p.m., 3 p.m.,
5:30 p.m., 8:05 p.m., 10:35 p.m. Crystal River A
"Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (PG-13) a.m. Tuesday,
12:20 p.m., 12:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7 p.m., first-come, first
Times subject to change; call ahead.


20 p.m., 10:50 p.m. No passes.
e" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4:50
., 9:55 p.m.
al" (PG-13) Noon, 2:40 p.m., 5:10
., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
lham 123" (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:15 p.m., 5
., 10:05 p.m.
er" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:10 p.m., 5:35
0:25 p.m.
Lost" (PG-13) 5:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
05 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:10

Museum II" (PG) 12:30 p.m., 2:50


Mall 9 offers free children's films at 10
and Wednesdays through Aug. 5,
t-served.


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


/ "What else are you planning to do
6-30 today besides 'nothing'?"
"'MY GRAMPA SAY5 IF YAVON'T KNOW IOUR
EGoeRAPHY, ou'R( NOWER .7/"
Betty


Frank & Ernest


Local RADIO


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious,
WXCV-FM 95-3 Adult Contemp.
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix


WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious
WKTK 97.3 FM News Talk
WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies
WIFL.FM 104.3 Adult Mix


WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s, '60s, '70s
WRZN-AM 720 Adult Standards


Peanuts


Cathy


HOW WOUD1 WE
KNOW WHICH ONE OF
WU THE' LIKE BEST7?
m -


TOOETIIER WIrh
ALL THE T0115
A14D TEACH A
LE550A ABOUT
NICE, HNow
COMPETITIVE
PL.ANI'


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: Z equals 0


"YBS FOMM XKP IPVVRRS? XRI OBSRRS,


XRI OBSRRS! BOBREX-RODNE YBS


ENTRR-ZPYTERTI CRTVRBE


DPYTYBERRS!" - ST. IRPII
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Failure has no friends." - John E Kennedy
"You'll find the key to success under the alarm clock." - Benjamin Franklin
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 6-30


- 111----~ 1 -~--~


nMTSDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 C7


COMICS


Crrrrusrra rorrv /T f.F (lnmHRoNir









UESDAY,,JUN ,


Health NOTES


* The Center for Independent
Living of North Central Florida in
Lecanto offers free Social Security
workshops, SSI, SSDI, Medicare and
Medicaid. All questions are answered
the third Wednesday monthly from 10
a.m. to noon. Call for reservations,
527-8399.
* "Every Day Is A Gift" 30-minute
community affairs program airs 7:30
p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays and 10
a.m. Friday on Key TV channel 47
and cable channel 16. On the radio, it
airs at 8 a.m. Sunday on WRGO
102.7 FM. Both programs highlight
local programs, resources, and valu-
able health information of interest to
you and your family.
* Citrus Hearing Impaired Pro-
gram Services in Crystal River, pro-
vides assistance with hearing aids and
devices needed to enhance the quality
of life for deaf, hard of hearing and
speech impaired individuals. Call 795-
5000 (voice) or 795-7243 (TTY) to find
out more about this program. CHIPS
is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
* Free Medical Loan Closet offers
wheelchairs, crutches, shower chairs
and more, sponsored by the Yankee-
town Inglis Woman's Club. Call volun-
teer chairwoman Dee Dixon at (352)
447-0164. Donations of money or
items welcomed, especially small
wheelchairs.
Support GROUPS

* Citrus County Continuity of
Care Council, 10 a.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at Nature Coast
Lodge, 279 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call Ann Grant, president, at
563-0880,
* Bereaved Parents of the USA
(BP/USA) grief support group for par-
ents and grandparents who have ex-
perienced the death of a child, 7 p.m.
the second Wednesday monthly at the
First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call
Bemadette Passalacqua at 746-4664
or visit www.bereavedparentsusa.org.
* Look Good ... Feel Better, a free
two-hour session for women undergo-
ing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3
p.m. the second Wednesday monthly
at the Cancer & Blood Disease Cen-
ter, Lecanto, ahd 3 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
Lecanto. Call Mildred Roseberry (746-'
7212) or the American Cancer Society
(800) 395-LOOK (5665) to register.
* Suicide support group for any
adult who is trying to cope with com-
plex feelings of grief, shock, confusion,
anger and guilt due to thb impact of
suicide by a family member or friend;,
6:30 p.m. the second Thursday
monthly at the HPH Hospice office,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. Free. Call Wendy Hall at 527- "
4600.
* Emotions Anonymous 12-step
support group, noon the second and
fourth Thursdays monthly at Central
Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 527-2443.
* SPRING HILL - Caregiver Sup-
port Group, 4 to 5 p.m. second


Thursday monthly at the Florida Can-
cer Institute - New Hope's Spring Hill
Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203
in the Medical Arts Building next
Spring Hill Hospital. Call Dorothy
Hiller, MLT, support group facilitator, at
(352) 688-7744.
* SPRING HILL - Spinal Cord In-
jury support group, 5 p.m. second
Thursday monthly in the gym at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital.
Call Dee Hardee at (352) 592-7237.
* NEW PORT RICHEY - "Com-
munity Chatterboxes" is a support
group to assist individuals suffering
from communication deficits (i.e.,
aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a
result of a Cerebral Vascular Accident
or other neurological disorders. The
group meets from 3 to 4 p.m. every
other Thursday (July 9) at Community
Hospital Health Care Center, 5400
School Road, New Port Richey. Care-
givers and spouses are encouraged to
attend. Call (727) 845-0757.
* Friends of the Blind, 9 a.m. to
noon the second Friday monthly at the
Church of the Nazarene in Hernando.
Call Butch Shultz at 344-2693 or Bob.
Johnson at 563-1890.
* FFRA (Families and Friends of
Real Adults), second Friday monthly at
the Key Training Center in Inverness
at 130 Heights Ave. Social time and
business meeting at 9 a.m. is followed
by a speaker at 10 a.m. who will ad-
dress issues pertaining to the develop-
mentally disabled. Call Ron Phillips at
382-7819.
* The North Central Florida Post-
Polio Support Group will be on "sum-
mer vacation" during the months of �
June, July and August. Regular pro-
grams will resume on Sept. 13 at the
Collins Health Resource Center, 9401
S.W. Highway 200, Building 300, Suite
303, Ocala. Web: PostPolioSupport
.com. Carolyn Raville (352) 489-1731.
* The Area 13 Family Care Coun-
cil, 10 a.m. to noon the second Mon-
day monthly at the Wildwood
DCF/APD office, 1601 .W. Gulf Atlantic
Highway (State Road 44). Call Do-
minic Christofaro, (352) 489-6279.
* NAMI-Citrus, locally chartered
group of the National Alliance on Men-
tal Illness will meet the second Mon-
day monthly at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church on County Road
486. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. All those
with an interest in mental health issues
are welcome.
* Caregiver Support Group, 1
p.m. the second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Central Citrus Commu-
nity Center, at 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto, by Hospice of Citrus
County. Free and open to the public.
No reservations are required. Call
Mary Williams at 527-2020.
* Head and Neck Cancer Support
Group, 11 a.m. to noon the third
Wednesday monthly at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute, 522
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, north of
State Road 44. Call Dr. Patrick
Meadors, (352) 342-1822.
* SPRING HILL - Look Good
Feel Better Support Group, 3 to 5
p.m. third Wednesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute - New Hope's
Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality
Drive, Suite 203, in the Medical Arts


NOTE GUIDELINES
* Support group information
will list monthly meetings
first, as space is available,
then weekly meetings.
* It is the responsibility of each
organization to inform the
Chronicle about changes to
existing listings.
* To submit information about
upcoming seminars, health.
related events open to the
public or support group
meetings, e-mail new'sdesP@
chronicleonline.com attn:
Health Notes; fax 563-5660
or write to: Health Notes c c
Citrus Counts Chronicle, 1624
NP Meadc.wcrest Blvd., Crystal
River, FL 34429.
* Information relating to profes
sional training or seminars at
tended by those in the health
care industries are consid
ered business briefs, and
would appear' in the Business
Digest listings of Sunday's
Business section


Building next to Spring Hill Hospital.
Call Peggy Dome, R.N., support group
facilitator, at (352) 688-7744.
* The Fibromyalgia Support
. Group of the First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa meets the first
and third Thursday in the conference
room of the administration building at
the church. Call 628-4083.
* NEW PORT RICHEY-Lym-
phedema support group, 3 to 4 p.m.
third Thursday monthly meetings at
Florida Cancer Institute - New
Hope's center at 8763 River Crossing
Blvd., New Port Richey,
Call Lindsey Wisniewski at (727)
845-0757.
* Alzheimer's caregivers sup-
port, 5:15 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the Memory Unit at Bar-
rington Place, 2341 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Lecanto, 34461, for care-
givers and their dementia patients, by
the Citrus team of HPH Hospice. Din-
ner served to patients while caregivers
attend the 5:30 p.m. meeting. Free.
Call Wendy Hall at 527-4600..
* If interested in a day program
and support group for Alzheimer's
and dementia patients, call 344-5228
for more information.
* The Ostomy Support Group of
Citrus County, 2 p.m. the third Sunday
monthly in the Cypress Room on the
first floor in the Citrus Memorial Health
System's Administration's Annex
Building, across the street from the
Medical Offices Building at 131 S. Cit-
rus Ave., Inverness. Call Mel or Betty
at 726-3802, Sally at 637-2055 or
Frank at 341-0005. E-mail: OSGofCC
@yahoo.com.
* Beyond Grief Support Group,
Christian-based meeting for people
'who have lost someone through
death, 1:15 p.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at the ministry complex room
behind the SunTrust Bank in Meadow-
crest, off Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crys-
tal River. Call Betty Jo at 628-2933 or
the church office at 795-8077.
1 Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, serving Central Florida, offers
monthly support group meetings. Pub-


lic is invited.
* 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 21, Highland
Terrace, 700 Medical Court E., Inver-
ness. Call Ellen Mallon or Valerie Tay-
lor at 860-2525.
The Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion branch office in Citrus County is
open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the sec-
ond Monday monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service representa-
tive Ellen Mallon at 860-2525.
* Look Good ... Feel Better, a free
two-hour session for women undergo-
ing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3
p.m. the second Wednesday monthly
at the Cancer & Blood Disease Cen-
ter, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute,
Lecanto. Call Mildred Roseberry (746-
7212) or the American Cancer Society
(800) 395-LOOK (5665) to register.
0 BROOKSVILLE - Look Good
Feel Better Support Group, 3 to 5
p.m. Thursday, July 23, in the confer-
ence room at Florida Cancer Institute -
New Hope, 7154 Medical Center
Drive, Spring Hill. Reservations are re-
quired, call Mary Capo at (352) 596-
1926, ext.150.
* Emotions Anonymous 12-step
support group, noon the second and
fourth Thursdays monthly at Central
Ridge Library, Forest Ridge'Boulevard
and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 527-2443.
* SPRING HILL - Stroke Sup-
port Group, noon the fourth Thursday
monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital's private dining room. Call
Pam McDonald at (352) 346-6359.
* Celiac support meeting for all
,people who have celiac disease or
dermatitis, from 1'0 a.m. to noon fourth
Saturday monthly, in the Community
Room at the Coastal Region Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call
Mary Lou Thomas at 628-9559.
* Fibromyalgia Support Group;,
1:30 to 3 p.m. the fourth Saturday
monthly at B&W Rexall Drugs in Inver-
ness. Call Ada Fox at 637-3364.
* Caregiver Support Group, 1
p.m. the second and fourth Monday
monthly at the Central Citrus Commu-
nity Center, at 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto, by Hospice of Citrus
County. Free and open to the public.
No reservations are required. Call
Mary Williams at 527-2020.
* Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, serving Central Florida, offers
monthly support group meetings. Pub-
lic is invited.
* 10 a.m. Thursday, July 30, Wood-
land Terrace, 124 W. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Call Pam Pepi-
tone at 249-3100.
The Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion branch office in Cttrus County is
open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the sec-
ond Monday monthly. Call the Citrus
County community service representa-
tive Ellen Mallon at 860-2525.
* Homosassa Springs Area Can-
cer Survivors' Support Group, 1
p.m. monthly at First United Methodist
Church. Call Anna Cooley, 382-4132,
or Earl Cadaret, 382-1923.
Organizations
* Support group meetings are in
the CMHS Administration Building un-


less otherwise indicated.
* ACS Man to Man Prostate Sup-
port and Education Program meets
in the conference room at the Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522
N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge
Medical Mall. Spouses and caregivers
are welcome. Call 527-0106.
* Bariatric Support Group: 6:30
p.m. every three months, Cypress
Room. Call Claudia Blotz at 697-0051
or Bette Clark at 860-0383.
* Breast Cancer Support Group:
noon the second Friday, Robert Bois-
soneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy
Bonard at 527-4389.
* Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30
p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meet-
ing room. July 21: Importance of Skin
Care by CMHS wound care nurse.
Call Carol at 726-1551, ext. 6596 or
ext. 3329.
* Cancer Support: 3 p.m. last
Thursday, Cancer Treatment Center.
Call 746-1100.
* Diabetes Support Group: 11:30
a.m. the fourth Wednesday, Cypress
Room. Call Carol McHugh at 341-
6110.
* Hospice of Citrus County sup-
port groups. Free, but reservations
suggested. Call Jonathan Beard at
527-2020.
* Caregiver support group, 1 p.m.
second and fourth Monday monthly at
-the Citrus County Community Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
* Newly Bereaved Workshop, 1
p.m. Thursday at the Hospice of Cit-
rus County Clinical Office, 326 S. Line
Ave., Inverness.
* Grief support group, 11 a.m.
Tuesday at Our Lady of Grace Parish
Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills.
* Grief support group, 1 p.m. Tues-
days at the Hospice of Citrus County,
Clinical Office, 326 S. Line Ave., Inver-
ness.
* Grief support group, 10:30 a.m.
Saturday at First United Methodist
Church, 831 W. Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa.
* Christian-based grief support
group, 1:15 p.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Gulf To Lake Ministry Com-
plex, 1506 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River.
* Social support group, 10 a.m.
Tuesday at Crystal Paradise Restau-
rant, 508 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River.
* Social support group, 3:30 p.m.
Friday at Joe's Family Restaurant,
911 W. Main St., Inverness.
* LIFT luncheon (for widows anid
widowers), 11:30 a.m. the third Tues-
day monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call Teddi
Holler at 746-6518 for reservations ,
and details.
* Parents support group, a chapter
of Bereaved Parents of the USA, 7
p.m. the second Wednesday monthly
at First Presbyterian Church, 1501
S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
* Alzheimer's Association-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support
groups:
* Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11
a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call
Wendy Hall at 527-4600.


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


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Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and.
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


I am volunteering to
drive for seniors.
Please Call
(352) 726-6960


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus. com

aAdOttlllo'e
Your world first.
Every Day

CHRONICLE
Chl, " ,;' J.


AKC Registerred
female Rottweller. 1-1/2
yrs. old. Good home
only 220-8598
Akita, female,
4 yrs old, spade, shots up
to date. Great w/male
dogs (not female doas)
also great w/ kids & cats
(352) 249-6250
Excell. Home for any
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE HORSE MANURE
All natural feed. You
come and get it. Easy
access. (352) 527-9530
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com "
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Free to good
home..Pitt/Kerr
mix..Spayed female..Very
good dog..Due to change
in living situations must
find new home for
her..Must be kept inside
and must have fenced
yard..Very good with
children..746-1669
Three Tires
P265-70R 16" Truck
Tires
(352) 302-4139
- I e a
HRZX"


Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, open daily,
8A./12P. $3.50 per
pound. 9333 Hwy
48 Floral City.
MADDOX FARMS
Fresh Cut Okra Daily
(352) 303-0105


blue & (ola Macaw
Near Anna Jo & Apopka
Inverness.NOT Friendly
(352) 419-421
(352) 201-1508
CAT 15 Ibs
male, nuet. grey short
coat, blue eyes, last
seen N Bridle Terr.
Pine Ridge 6/24/09
(352) 270-3802
LOST: Pink Jewelry Box
& Contents
Lost on Friday, June
19th, between Citrus
Springs & Ocala.
Left it on top of my
car...Cherished items
from husband and
grandmother.
Please call Courtney at
352-287-9949 with any
information. Thank you!
RED HEELER PUPPY,
RED & WHITE FUR,
RED POINTED EARS,
ABOUT 15 LBS,
TURNER CAMP AREA
$REWARD$ PLEASE
CALL 352-328-0081 OR
352-400-5178
Get
Results in
the
home front
classified I


ADULT DOG & PUPPY
found on CR39 &
Country Club Rd. in
Citrus Spring.
352-258-5625.
BLACK & WHITE
Hound/hunting dog.
Corner of Hwy 491 &
King B Street, Lecanto.
Dog is at
animal control.
Female puppy on 486
towards Croft Road
Found on Wed. 6/24
Call to describe
(352) 527-3003


REWARD-MISSING CAT
since about 6/23/09
Large Nuet. Male, part
siamese w/white paws
& tralangle on nose.
"Smokey" is micro chip-
ped. Last seen in the
area N. Bridle Terr. In
Pine Ridge. Please call
Dave or Joann @
352-746-3901
We have found a male
yellow lab in the crystal
river area around citrus
ave and dunnellon
road. If you are missing
this dog please contact
me at (352)302-8051


V--IcCmc 40 Finder]


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEALTH & LIFE


CS T E 30 2009










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"PICK UP THIS
PICK UP THIS
PICK UP THAT"
Grocery Shopping Plus
Call (352) 422-2187

BANKRUPTCY
DIVORCES
CHILD SUPPORT
352-613-3674

Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
dculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com








CAT
ADOPTIONS










Come see

our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofsha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Comer of 44 and Co-
nant
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prints.




. Wanted home or
mobile, any area or
any condition. I can
pay you cash & close
quickly (352) 726-9369




LIVE IN CARE GIVER
for elderly disabled
S. gentleman in ex-
change for room &
board. Background
check required.
Call (352) 795-1699 or
(352) 220-2552
MAY I PRAY FOR
YOU?
Bill 352-726-9064
Cell 352-201-6038




A FREE.Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast





Teacher
40hr. cert. req'd
ARK ANGELS
(352) 795-2360




Medical Records
Clerk

Maintains patient
files and statistics;
responds to requests
for medical records;
performs clerical
duties, High School
Diploma or G.E.D.
required Office
clerical experience
required; three (3)
months of medical
office experience
preferred.
Microsoft word and
excel a must.

Please apply in
person or submit
resume to:
Cypress Creek
Juvenile Offenders
Correctional Center
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto, FL
34461 or fax: to
(352) 527-2235













-. .


Italian Salon & Spa
to Open in Crystal River
Great opportunity
for hair stylist,
estheticians, massage
therapist, & nail techs
at a new Italian
inspired salon & spa.
Call to set up interview
(352)795-8088




BE A CNA
One week Prep Course
Train & test with us.
FREE CPR & AED Training
GETYOURCNA.COM
341-PREP (7737)
BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA PREP & TEST
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
CNA TEST PREP
Summer Discounts.Now
Offering am/pm. Classes
Free CPR training
w/enrollment. New
classes begin ev 3 wks
341-2311/scholarships
Dental/
Surgical Assistant
For an oral surgery
practice, in Lecanto &
Springhill.
Experience a must
Email Resume to:
maryamoll@
yahoo.com
or Fax 352-527-8087
DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB

V COME CHECK V
US OUTI
We offer a great working
environment, excellent
wages and berTefits. We
Are Ready to Hire "You"
for the following position
R.N. Supervisor, full time
for 11:00 to 7:00. Drop in
for an interview, tour, and
join our customer service
oriented team geared
toward excellent
resident outcomes.
2730 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.
Granny Nannies
Seeking Experienced
CNA & HHA
Call 352-560-4229
MED ASST - FT/PT

For med. practice In
..Beverly Hills. Exp. req'd.
Fax resume Att: Helen
352-746-3779
Medical Assistant
Experience needed.
Please send resume
, to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-In,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE


for asst. living. Call
352-344-5555 ext102
RADIATION
THERAPIST

Bev Hills (Ocala) Can
cer Center. RTT license
required. Please fax
resume Aft: Helen
352-746-3779

RECEPTIONIST

FIT with knowledge
of insurance billing.
Great benefits.
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-6333

RN / LPN
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
Full-time, 3.p.m.-t11.
p.m., and PRN posi-
tions are available.
Must have a current
Florida nursing
license. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
We offer competitive
pay and benefits,
including continuing
education and career
growth opportunities,
In a mlssion-driven
environment.

Apply in person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
www.LCCA.com.
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job #9552





- 4Chmft owm2"





POPE JOHN
PAUL II
CATHOLIC
SCHOOL

Is seeking a
P/T GUIDANCE
COUNSELOR
For 3 1/2 days per wk.
Call: 746-2020
www.pjp2.net


FRONT HOUSE
STAFF NEEDED
Opportunities for front of
the house staff of an
upscale county club
restaurant. Applications
available at 2100 Terra
Vista Blvd, Hemando
352-746-6727





A/C DUCT
INSTALLER

Exp. only, must know
sheet metal.Call for
appt. (352) 564-8822

A/C Installer

5+ yrs. change-out exp.
Own tools. Clean dr.
license. Benefits, top
pay. 344-0636

Auto Mechanic

Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools, Automation,
Floral City 352-341-1881

ENTRY LEVEL &
EXPERIENCED

AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIANS
Apply at Citrus Kia
1850 SE HWY 19
Crystal River, Fl.

Exp. Wood Finisher With
Custom Color Stains, Pre
& Post Cat. Lacquers.
4625 W. Homoasass
Trail
Lecanto, FL 34461

EXP. PLUMBERS
| Only plumbers with |
exp. Need APPLY,
352-621-7705


QC INSPECTOR
of PC Boards
Experienced or
entry-level, training
period is req'd. Must
be dependable, am-
bitious, hard working
& able to visually
Inspect very small
components. Apply
in person at 1760 S.
Dimensions Terrace,
Homosassa, FL or fax
resume: 352-564-0772

ROOFING CREWS
EXP.ONLY Apply
own truck/equipment,
commercial
roofers/repairmen
6171 N Florida Av
Hernando/Holder







SETTERS

Up For A Challenge?
SSerious minded
S individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254

EXP. PET GROOMER
P/T for busy vet hospital.
Could work into full time.
Start immediately! email
resume w/references
animaldoc24z@yahoo.com













































HOME BASED
MAGAZINE FOR
CITRUS COUNTY.
Christian theme.
Training. P/T hrs. Nets
$70K, Retiring $24,900.
941-685-8291


Massa Nig


25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
SRoof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab,
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
* Fl. Engineered Plans
+ A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/inst by others.
+ Many sizes available
* We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-91600
Lic # CBC1256991
www, metal
structureslic.com


DUCK HOUSE DOLLS
Several (6) cases. Will
wholesale. $65 per
case. 352-527-1145
leave message



ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Amana
Commerical Quality
Clothes Dryer $150.
after 9am
(352) 621-0213

/ THIS OUT!
DOUBLE DOOR
STAINLESS STEEL
REFRIGERATOR ex-
cellent condition ice
cube maker and water
$800.00 can be seen
at excel automotive
352-637-3700
ELECTRIC STOVE
white, standard size,
5 years old,-excellent
condition $180, Cpll
(352) 465-6818
FLAVIA FUSION Coffee
Machine NEW Coffee,
cappuccino, tea, hot
chocolate. $80. 419-5535
GE Range, white
self-cleaning, 4 radiant
surfaces, glass top
stove. Exc. cond. $195
(352) 860-2828
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
S Eulpment
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
Lic.&Ins. CAC 057914
SKENMORE FRIDGE
14cu, Almond, Clean
Ice Maker capability.
4 Q. Crock Pot both
$200 (352) 860-1097
Kenrrmore
side by side, white $150
(352) 726-6336
KENMORE WASHING
MACHINE Large capac-
ity, heavy duty, works
good. $100 or best offer.
352-637-1488
Maytag Dryer
Heavy Duty
Commercial quality
oversize capacity,
like new cond. $195.
(352) 634-2528
MOVING MUST GO
Used Washer $85.
Gas Dryer $135.
(352)527-1176 Lye mess
will return call quickly
Recliner
Beige color, soft micro
suede, excellent cond.
$165. Obo.
(352)249-6800
Refrigerator '05
GE white, 22.3 Cubic ft.,
single door, bottom
freezer, icemaker. Works
& looks great. $400.
(352) 465-2459
REFRIGERATOR
Amana refrigerator works
good. $125.00
352-527-8999
leave message
Refrigerator
Amana, white, bottom
freezer, like new, must
see, cost $1,300, will
sell for $850 Obo.
Stove
Maytag, white w/glass
top, like new cost
$650, will sell for.'
$375. (352) 249-6800
SOLAR WATER HEATER
Collector 3'x7' $300
(352) 302-4139
WASHER OR DRYER
Exc Cond. Guaranteed
$100 each. Can
deliver (352) 835-1155
WHIRLPOOL WASHER
S& GE ELECTRIC DRYER
Whirlpool washer and GE
Electric dryer. Both for
$200. 352-527-8999




THURS. JULY2
Ant. & Estate Auction
4 PM Outside w/tools,
hardware & misc. .
5:30 PM Inside w/gen.
furn. & estate merch.
6:30 PM Antiques &
Collectibles Incl. Case
XX, Signed Herman
.Miller & other Mid Cent
Modern Furn., Oak,
Mahog, Teak. Coins,
Pottery & smalls
4000 S. 41, Inverness
dudleysauction.com
AB1667-AU2246 12%BP



Ext. Ladder
28' Fiberglass, heavy
duty, good cond. $175.
(352) 503-7665




27" Sharp Color TV
$100 (352)302-8529




TRIPLE GLASS SLIDER
DOOR WALL. Like new.
12' X 8'w/track & hard-
ware. $100/obo.
(352) 637-4694




COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4869
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ Miard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
HEWLETT PACKARD


wireless keyboard and
mouse. Good condition.
$15.00 352 560 3677




SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
'seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815


CLASSIFIED



Aluminum & Red wood
Set 4 chairs & lounger
$125 (352) 637-0360
PATIO TABLE AND
CHAIRS Rectangular ta-
ble, 40 x 64 inches, glass
top, 4 chairs, sage green,
4 years old, excellent
condition, $125 (352)
465-6818

Furniture


Pre Owned Furniture
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788
AMISH STYLE
Hoosier Hutch/Buffet
$295. also available
sofa, armoire & more
(352) 489-6641
Armoire Desk
slide-out keyboard.
Great for CPU. Cabinet
doors. CD tray, $200:

Bassett, like new, kid's
bunk bed set, incl. 3
dressers, one w/mirror
($2,700 New)
Will sacrifice for $900.
(352) 400-1501
Bedroom Set
Dble. 4/piece, walnut
headboard & night stand
combined, includes box
spring & mattress, cedar
chest. $200.(352)
564-2346 after 71P.M.
Chromecraft Kitchen
Table & 4 chairs, $250.
(2) Ethan Aliens Dark
Cherry Side Chairs $85.
ea., (352) 746-1305
COFFEE TABLE Wood
with ornamental metal
frame, 28 by 50 inches,
liftable top with storage, 6
yrs old, great condition
$50 (352)' 465-6818
COMPUTER HUTCH
AND CHINA CABINET
computer desk with hutch
$35 lighted china cabinet
$165 795-4878
ENT. CENTER
llgth wood 3 cabinets
82"w. 76"h,$500. Dinrm
set 4 chairs life wood,
glass top, sofa table
$250.(352) 382-3270
ENTERTAINMENT
CABINET 44X28X 17.
Oak finish, glass door, 3
shelves. Wheeled, side
CD & DVD storage. Like
new. $75. ,352-382-3322
Glider Rocker
Solid Oak
cushions Ivory color,
perfect cond. $100.
697-9713
KING SIZE HEAD
BOARD solid pine, me-
dium dark, very good
condition. $75.00
352-422-2029
KING WICKER HEAD-
BOARD & 2 NIGHT
STANDS white king size
wicker headboard and 2
night stands. $85.00
637-5537 .
Leather LR Furn, Wood
DIN/KIT Furniture &
barstools, (813)300-7929
Sugarmill Woods
Preowned Mattress'
Sets from Twin $30;Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen size sleeper sofa,
loveseat and end
table,Najavo Indian Print
Good condition, May
separate $250.00 or best of-
fer 352-560-7378
Swivel Recllner
oversized, tan, soft
suede $230

White Entertainment Ctr
$75; Love seat & couch,
dk blue w/flowers $140
(352) 637-0360
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



CRAFTSMAN'S
Riding Mower 42 deck,
19.5 hp Briggs/Staton,
new cond. $500
(352) 746-7357
DIXON Zero Turn Riding
Lawnmower. $550 firm
(352) 419-4662
(727) 688-5643
LAWN TRACTOR John
Deere GT-235 18hpwith
48 inch mower deck.
great shape- $1200
352-503-6793, leave
msg
Murray mower, 22"
elec. start, front wheel
drive, $135
Snapper moWer, 21"
rear wheel drive, $80.
(352) 344-5021




Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sod!
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221




(2) TV's 19"& 16"
$25. ea. Computer
desk, lite wood $50.
(352) 382-3270
3 AVON ANEW REJU-
VENATE REVITALIZING
CREAM.' Retail $32.00.

BENCH WITH
WEIGHTS arm + leg pulls
reclining bench with 16
steel weights + dumbbells
130.00 352-628-1669
BICYCLE RACK fits in
car hitch, holds 4 bikes,
Thule brand. New, only
used once. Excellent
cond. $75 firm 628-4429
Car Trailer
14 x 7.5, double axel and
electric brakes
$500 352-503-7201
CONVERTIBLE COVER
saddle color from 99 se-
bring 100.00
352-628-1669
Hot Water Heater,
T-24 tankless,
Cost $1295.00.
Like new. Only $275.00
352-527-9767


ILi.SLAY, JUNE 30, 2009 C9


"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124
Restaurant Equipment
Grill, coffee maker,
upright freezers, fridge,
tables, chairs, & much
more (352) 465-7269
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimini's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
SCAN YOUR PHOTOS.
'Your photos put on CD or
DVD in your home.
As low as $.19 each.
352-613-0419
SILVER CAP Silver cap,
full sized, good condition
asking $100 OBO

SMALL FREEZER ken-
more freezer upright 3ft
by 2ft $70 obo 352
270-3641
SONY RADIO W/ RE-
MOTE /TOOLS sony
radio.is in good.shape
and a big box of tools
$100.00 637-0046
TANNING BED
COMMERCIAL SUN-
VISION,PRO 28 LET
$500/ WILL BARTER
352-634-0129



SWING-A-WAY
Wheelchair lift,
$500/obo.
WHEELCHAIR Manuel,
new. $50.
352-637-1153


BICYCLES Fuji Ace
Road Sport $120.00. Fuji
Del Rey Road Sport
S$140.00. Fuji ATB
$120.00. Mongoose
Crossway 250 Aluminium
$125.00. All excellent
condition. 628 - 1947 or
jimj4479@gmail.com
Browning 12 gauge
Grade 1 model 425
O&U, 32" barrels,
beautiful wood,
$1,750 obo
(352) 726-9369
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CARTS
Ranging from
$800 to $1400
352-795-2631
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
Rifle AK47 w/extras $750
New in box. Will take
trade. (813) 789-0592
In Crystal River Area
Tennis Ball Machine
Tennis Tutor, tower,
speed, feed, spin,
elevation, oscillation
$150.
(352) 621-1664
WANTED
Brass for reloading,
all calibers,
(352) 586-7516
WE BUY GUNS'
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



'03 CARGO MATE
Enclosed CAR HAULER.
20 x 8.5, ramp/side
door, dual axle, elect
brks., mint $4200 abo
Steve (352) 503-6542
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
Cargo Trailer

(352) 476-8907
SINGLE AXLE TRAILER
2008 7X12 with side and
rear gates. new spare
tire. 20001b capacity.
never used, only $1200
352-503-6793 leave msg
Utility Trailer,
homemade,
4-1/2' x 7' box.
$200.00
621-0392






CActNow E
7--
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad


Furn. couch, pillows
eic. exercise
bike,,525.diine. $5. obo
SUGARMILL WOODS
(352) 220-4634

ActNow


ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
ourall new
CLASSIFIED SITE,.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the top right
hand corner.
Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodi
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221.


o romeraian sni izu mix
mom, pop & 9 mo.
puppy $150 each
(352) 400-3236 or
(352)746-6352
American Bulldog pups
NKC reg. Great marks.
Champion lines, ready
to go smart loving breed
$600 (352) 302-5563
AQUARIUM w/5 Black
Mollies, 1 Gold Fish, sev-
eral guppies. $5;00 call
Ruth 382-1000
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BIRDS zebra finches,
baby & adults, $10.00
each 637-5537
BLACK LAB PUPS
AKC, OFA. Beautiful
block heads. Home
raised, H cert. $800
352-489-1879; www.
quallmeadowlabs.com
Chihuahua Puppies
AKC registered, health
cert., 1st shots,,all sizes.
all colors $175. males,
$200. females, ready
6/7 352-399-2368


GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppies. 14 wks, 3 Fern.
1 male. All black & tan.
Health cert. $250
(352) 795-7897
(352) 212-7192
JACK RUSSELL PUP-
PIES Males and Females
$300.00. Tailes have
been docked and dew
claws have been re-
moved. First shots and








many breeds, all


neutereMix. Good withcro chipldren.
dewrminq done at 8$85-$150




352-6Bry 76278 b-2
LOST DOG female,
white with black collar,
* "sammy". Lost on 6/18 in
Citronelle- mini farms
area. 302-3044
MALE BASSETT

good home. Very sweet
nature Bassett Beagle
Mix. Good with children.
Approx. 3 years old.
352-628-7678 between
-. 8:30 to 5:00
Shlh-Tzu Puppies

All shots included. $300+
(1) tiny 2 yo toy fern
Poodle $450. 3902 N.
Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099
Shih-Tzu's

looking for a loving
home. $350. to $400.
(352) 563-1479
T. Yorkie Poo's
Health Cert. 10-wks,
Male $325
Female, $350
(352) 220-8817



HAY
2009 Indiana 1st Quality
delivered wkly, yr round
. to Crystal Riv. area
300 sq balls per load.
Timothy, Alfalfa, or
TNA mix $12/Bail at
truck, taking orders
(813) 431-8946
ORGANIC
FERTILIZERS
For hay, pastures & all
growers. $40 per acre
Dealer's Wanted, Call
Rob (352) 585-2758




BABY SHEEP
AND PIGEONS
FOR PETS ONLY
(863) 843-2495




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. Incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759
AIVALUEINN.com
Hemando New Effic.
$250wk. Free int./long
distLTrialers$185wk;
Inverness BLuxury
Homes turn. $450wk.
(352) 7264744
POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT
LECANTO
Nice 3/2, On . 5 acre.
deck, utility shed.
New CHA unit, quiet,
excellent well water,
small pets ok, $575.
+ Sec.

LECANTO
Charming, 2/1 on .5
acre, utility shed,
crystal clear well
water, quiet, small
pets ok. $525. + Sec
(813) 695-4037


CHANGING TABLE by
Pali, Natural ail wood w/
infantry oddle: ;,-attress, g.
aw,. & toodi. ,ail. Table w/
pad, 2 shelves & 2 dwrs.
i400. Excel. Cond.
'352'249 5851
W/S:Iti:..' .AN witax
On wheel!, rin &i;i
$75. Large a,',
CARRIAGE. -,
nice. $50. 352-34 -u/lu



WANTED OLD
LIONEL TRAINS


2/1 Apartment,
partially furnished,
washer/dryer,
clean & quiet. No dogs.
$600.+ Sec.
(352) 447-0333

DUNNELLON
Close To Power
Plantll 2/2 Carport, on
3 fenced, wooded lots.
Furn., fla. rm. scm'd
patio, wsh./dry. Nearby
river dock access.
$750. Mo. Fi/S.
(772) 486-0070
F.C./HERNANDO
2BR; BA,CH/A
$300/$400 1st, last, sec.
No.pets 564-0578
FLORAL CITY
2 br. $450. Mo.
+ $450./Sec
(352) 584-4194
HERNANDO
2/1, $380 mo.+ Utilities
No Pets, 1st + Sec.
352-344-5098, 697-1651
HERNANDO
2/2, large fenced yard,
$350/Mo.+ $700. Sec.
(920) 948-4767
(920) 922-6800
HERNANDO
3/2, SW On 2 acres.
private property, lots of
trees, Wash/Dry, front
& back porch, No pets
$650. mo (352)201-0111
Hernando Heights
2/2 SW, 5 Appi's, porch
& shed, nice neighbhd
$600 mo. (352)270-3074
HOME-N-LAND
New home on 1/2
acre. 3/2 1500sqft. 10
yr. warranty, sodded
lawn, paved Rd. Get
your stimulus check
($8,000) cash back
only $665/mo. W.A.C.
Own your own home!
CALL (352) 621-9183
HOMOSASSA
1&2 Brfurn'& Unfurn.
In beautiful park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/2 Furn. Great area
Sr. Dic. 352-746-0524
HOMOSASSA
2/2/Carport, Cleanl
Nopets! $475 + Utti. +
Sec. (352) 586-2976
HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 - $850/mo.
+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-3338

INVERNESS
1st Month Freel
Waterfront 55+ Park, 1BR,
1BA $350.2 BR BA, I ,.
also fuii, f.au . ir,c l ...
&8 glo . ... .. .. ...


INVERNESS 2/1
RENT OR RENT
TO OWN
Spacious DW,
beautifully renovated.
Fenced lot & country
setting. CHA,
covered parking.
screened porch,
laundry room. New
paint, carpet & tile.
$650 rent + $300 dep.
Rent to Own w/$600
dep & $650 - Includes
taxes & insurance. No
credit check just job
verification.
4235 Quiver Terr.
863-860-5292
Inverness/
Crystal River
2/2 $450./mo clean
563-5117
FLORAL CITY
Must See!!!
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec.
No. pets. For application
Call Lee at 352-250-0664
or 800 -692-4162.



1972 BUDD, Melody
Mobile Home Park
1/I, lanal, carport, all
apple's, furniture ind'd
$6,500 Great Shape
Call (352) 586-9697
1992 Fleetwood
26x52, 3/2
fireplace,completely
remodeled,building
home must move
(352) 445-9155
60ft x 14 ft, IN PARK
2/2, W/D, scrn. In room.
owner finance $12,500.
(352) 201-7276
CITRONELLE
3/2 DW, 2 1/2 acres.
6280 W. Stockholm Lane
comer of Dacca. Off
Dunklin (no sign)
$59,900 352-375-2852
HOMOSASSA
2/2, fenced lot, carport,
shed, glass enclosed
(352) 795-0932
NEW 2009 2/2, large
rooms, appliance
pkg. 2x6 construction
10 yr. warranty, must
seel $37,900 includes
A/C & heat, steps,
skirting on new padl
352-621-9182




Floral City .211
Carport, scrn'd rm. Newer
appl. 8788 E. Moonrise.
$ 58,000. (352)726-6644
www.crossland
realty.com




BANK FORECLOSURE
3/2 approx. 1300 sqft
on 1/2 ac. fenced
back yd, scrn room,
work shop, concrete
drive on paved road.
Private but close to
town! Home in great-
conditionl $3,000
down, $565/mo.
W.A.C. Call to view.
(352) 621-9181


crystal river 2/2,sw,on
1/2acre new
carpet&stove very clean
10x14 workshop $35000
o.b.o.813-792-1355


adaoilH


turn. incl. elec. cable,
laundry, lawn maint.
Quiet neighborhood
$600 mo.(352) 419-5999
CRYSTAL RIVER
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Partially
furnished,
' rasner''orveron 1/2
are. cleq-s. quiet, no
d;oa, $500,- Sec.
INGLO-
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT


Pets Ok - Pool Molnt.

838 W. Massachusetts
St. 3/2/2 Pool - $1400_
Pool & lawn maint.

Beverv Hills
27 New York Blvd.
2/2/2 Fam Rm $800
188 W. Seymeria St.
2/2/1 Fam Rm $675
95 S. Desoto St.
2/2/1 Fom Rm $650
218 S. Lincoln Ave.
2/1/1 Farm& Screen
Room $650
907 Penn Hills Dr.
2/2/1 Adult Comm
$600
42 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1 Family Rm $550

Lynn Davis
352-422-2522
352-746-3390


L 8 Z'IE 9 6'T it S
t' 6 I S'S:^ � Z- 9
S �.9 T-| L,-I= 8_ g_ 6

'Z|T;Z!6 �: S 99j8_f
, 6 9 L F8 Z7 :TE;
,. ' j 8 9 ? : 8 ,"I �:,


8 S 175 Z 6; �:9 T
Z L� �S;89 t'I6 Z
9 le _L__S � 8


Weekly - Days
& Nights
(727) 848-8415
BENE'S
[international School
h y
of Beauty, Barber &
Massage Therapy
7027 U.S. Hwy. 19
ew Port Richey,
N , FIL 34652]


I


Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOMOSASSA
3/2- 1999 remodeled
2000+sqft. Owner
financing. $675/mo
352-302-9217
Homosossa, 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1/2
acre MOL, remodeled,
owner finance $63,500.
$5,000 down, 8% int.
$560 mo. or discount
for cash (352) 726-9369
INGLIS '95 SW
2/1'/, onl% ac. Private,
wooded,covered deck,
garage w/work shop,
new vinyl shed. All appl.
include Some furnishings.
$49,9001 Cash price.
$45,000, or lease opt.
$10,000 Dwn. & $500.
Mo. (352) 419-5777
(352) 476-9005


-'-
FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump, $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl., A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. log
rent. Fully turn., financ-
Ing avail 352-476-4964
LECANTO
3/2 dblwlde, furnished.
New Carpet, New Kit.
Fir., Lot rent $215. mo.
$15,500. 607-217-7002
MELODY PARK 55+
Inverness 2/1, Move iri
cond.appllances Incl.
S10.000 QUICK SALE.ot
rent $265/mo Lye mess
(352) 637-4823
MOSS MOBILE PARK
lot #23, 1/1 ,cha,
Screened room. Totally
Remodeled. S5.000
irm (352) 201-0903
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Price Resales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
fuimished. 352-628-2090



CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000
HOUSE'S -CONDO'S &
1 VILLA'S
Available Nowl!
Clean, fumished,
2/2 price varies de-
pends on the length
of stay. Riverfnks Rty
(352) 628-1616
800-488-5184
----- Eu
MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS I
Units Available |
from $395. mo.
(352) 795-2626

--- --- Jv


NATURE COAST
Crystal River:
2/2 home $675
Furnished Homes:
2/1 - $1000
1/1 -$1200
3/2 MH furnish $800.
3/2 MH furnish $850.
The Islands/Condos:
2/2 -$1200 and up
fully furnished
Paradise Point Villas:
2 & 3/2 WF w/dock
Several units to
,choose from
Fully furnish
starting@ $1800
2/1 Apartments:
$550 and up

Homosassa:
3/2/2 - $775

Visit our website:
www.c2 I1naturecoast.c
or call 352-795-0021




d.W. Ite' ,- Ru Earn, Q .
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
Fully furnished, 2/2/2
long term - $900
Unfurnished 3/2/f
$875

2/2/2 - $625
3/2/2 - $800
2/2/1 - $750
3/2/2- $850
2/2/2 - $625
3/2/2 - $750

3/2 - $650
2/2/1 - $650


1/1 - $350
See our website:
www.Jwmoronreal
estafe.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010

THE HEDICK
GROUP REAL
ESTATE SERVICES
hedickgroup.net

5169 N. Perry Dr.
Lg. 3/2/2 Pool $1800
3794 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Lg. 3/2/2 Pool $1500












C10 TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009


River Links Realty
352-628-1616

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
CRYSTAL RIVER
WF 3/2/2 $1075
4/2/2 $1050
HOMOSASSA
Duplex 1/1350.
2/1 $495/up
Homes 3/2/2 $675.
Sugarmill Wds 2/2/2
Condo or Villa $625.
3/2/2 Villa $800



2
AIVALUEINN.com
Hemando New Effic.
$250wk. Free int./long
dist. Trai ers $185wk.
Inverness 3Br Luxury
Homes fum. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
POOL& POND OPEN
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant

CRYSTAL RIVER.J1/
Great nelghbrhd.
7mos minlum lease
352-795-7261/No pets

FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $550 Sec.
Includes water & cable
No pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





BED1R&MS
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985


4th OF JULY SPECIAL
$76 MOVES YOU INI
2 BEDROOMS
STARTING AT $450.
352-257-8048

FLORAL CITY
2BR 1% BA, MH, just
150 yards from fishing
dock, $475. + $300 dep.
No Pets/ Near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699

FLORAL OAKS
8092 S. Floral Oaks
Circle, Floral City
352-860-0829
1-2 bd. $468-$498
Elderly, Handicap &
Disabled regardless,
age.
Carpet & Appliances
Cent. Heat & Air
TDD 800-955-8771
"This Institution Is an
equal opportunity
provider & employer."


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR/SERVICE
Gas & Diesel
25 Yrs Experience En-
gine Specialist
home-professional-farm
No lob too bio or small.
352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out z6orncltus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 362-563-0272










OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Trel/Shrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT TreeServlce
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256879 352-341-6827








At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Ml. S.E. Inv. Walmart
SComputer sales/repair





Restretch .Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-128



Chris Satchell Painting
, & Walcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397


1g -


FREE RENTI.
SUMMERHILL
Luxury Apts.
Umited Timel
Call for details.
352-563-5657

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2,3BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: MW, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

INVERNESS
2/ITri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/LstlSec.
352-341-1847

INVERNESS COUNTRY
SIDE ESTATES, very Ig
2/1, CHA, W/D hook
up, garage, acre
private, nice area,
upscale neighbor-
hood, waterlnc.
beaufful &
spotless $595/mo
(352) 422-3217

- LECANTO
I Bedroom
(352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
duplex, all kitchen appli-
ances, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard,
Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
' Opportunity





INVERNESS
2/1- All new floors
nice setting. $500;
2/2- Earge-rooms,
completely tiled,
screen lanal, very
quiet & private. $600.
Washer dryer
hook-ups.
727-446-5871
352-344-0238


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs: Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
3rd GENERATION SERV-
ICE Int./ Ext. Painting,
Lic/Ins. FREE Estimate
(352) 201-0658
CheapCheapCheap
DP press. clean/paint
Many references.
637-3765








INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchlck Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcltrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Biminl's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com

-.


AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244



Gas / Diesel Engines
No lob too bia or small.
352-228-2067





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. L/c/ns. #2441.
352.634-1584




SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimlnl's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com


PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronlcleonllne.com
and click place
an ad

We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane -
311 W Main St. Inv




CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-592]:
(888) 446-5921
gi-enDri.rrental.c om
Citrus Hills
New A/C, new rugs, Unf.
2/2, use of pool, patio,
W/D, carport, No Pets
$699 (718) 833-3767

INVERNESS 2/2/1
Whispering Pines Villa
Washer & Dryer;
community pool.
Small pets only. $600.
352-464-2731

INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, restricted
pets. $600 mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631 TOLL FREE
INVERNESS
Waterfront 2/2v'
Community Pool/Boat
Ramp All apple's $700.
mo 352-400-0731




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg, 2/2 C/H/A, Nice
$585/mo., Includes,
lawn, garbage, water,
No dogs 352-726-9570

HOMOSASSA
New, 2/2, Rent w/option to
buy. 1300 sq. ft. w/d hk.
up, fans, blinds, refr.,
stovemicrowave, tile,
carpet. $700. month
(352) 592-0893

INVERNESS COUNTRY
SIDE ESTATES, very'lg
2/1, CHA, W/D, hook
up, garage. 1 acre
priv. upscale area,
nice neighborhood,
water inc. beautiful
& spotless $595/mo
(352) 422-3217

ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO
Newer 2/2 duplex, all
kitchen appliances,
patio, W/D hook-up;
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341


PRIVATEDUTY
CAREGIVER 30 Yrs.
Exp.Great References.
(603) 661-9054




a- SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352),
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum,. 352-422-7904
/us out � zoomcltrus.com




ANN'S CLEANING

352-601-3174




REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969.
rc0066915/cbc057605
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872




FL RESCREEN
352-257-1011
1 panel,1 window or
Complete Cage
SUBURBAN IND..INC:
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers.
wood decks, fila rms,
windows, garage scrns
628-0562 (CBC1257141)


Presur


I.OOSPAER


2/1, $550 mo. + dep.
C/H/A (352) 464-2716



AlVALUEINN.com
Hemando New Eff c.
$250wk. Free int./long
dist..Tailater $185wk.
Inverness 3Br Luxury
Homesrfum. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant
HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
-Quiet park like setting.
Mobiles, effic.cabins,
$300. to $650. Mo. Pets
ok. (352) 726-2225






LECANTO
Very private cottage.
Furnished, All utilities.
Cable, net, lawn clre,
trash Incld. From $695
per mo. (352) 621-4725



GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Inverness
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIGI Like new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood VIII. 3/2/2
3/2 Great area I
Citrus Sprinas
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/21/2
FltoraLC
3/2 Mobile waterfront.
352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com

INVERNESS
NEWER
IMMACULATE HOMES
3/212 Back porch, nice,
yard, split plan, non '
smoker, $800. Mo.

212/1 Patio home,
close to shopping,
garbage pick up and
lawn malnt. included.
$700. Mo.

Floral City
Gated community 55 +
2/2/2 + Fla. room,
pool + exercise room.
$750. Mo.
(352) 344-2500
(3,52) 464-2508


CALL STELLAR'BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996 -
PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
Roofs w/no pressure,
houses,driveways. 25
yrs ex lc/Ins 341-3300



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
LiUo 5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 HOME SOLUTIONS
Press Wash, paint,
repairs, ceilings, baths,
low rates, exc. rets.'
Llc# 260098 Call Don,
(352) 634-0171
Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/aalnt/Repairs
'Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too smallReli able ,ins.
025-2Q1352-465-9201
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Any Home
Repair.CBC #1253431
(352) 464-3748








FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc0256374




Peterson Maintenance
Beverly Hills A/C
specialists. $49.00 yrly
check-ups 697-1143



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Uc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696


Service for A/C, Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator & More!

* Call Anytime * Same Day Service
S* 42 Years Experience

NMI One Man
Low
Serving citrus and Overhead
Marion Counties Low
352-445-0072 Prices
Doc Johnson #RA0067081


CLASSIFIEDS



INVERNESS
1/1, CH/A, furn.or
unfurn. $500
352-634-5586
SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chlefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




AIVALUEINN.com
Hemando New E
$250wk. Free int/long
dist. ailers $185wk.
Inverness 38r LuxuLy
Homes fum. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
INVERNESS
1st Month Freel Water-
front 55+ Park, 1BR, 1BA
Incl. water & mowing
$475. 352-476-4964



2 to 4 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Downl
352-484-0866
iademission.com
2/1 ..$575/MO
+ $600 sec.
2/1 ..$595./mo $600 sec
(352) 563-5304
BEVERLY HILLS
1 BD w/fla. rm. +
bonus rm.$575/mo
FIRST Month Free
30 S. Desoto 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
Carport, shed. Clean.,
$550.352-678-8874
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 w/ carport $475 mo.+
$475. Dep.(352)
746-7824
(352) 697-9339
BEVERLY HILLS
2 Poss 3BR, 1BA IGar
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1.5 + Fm Rm $650
2/1/1 $600
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 2/1/1, Fla rm $595
E-Z terms 352-400-4275

CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
1 Acre, $975
(352)746-4821

CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/2/1
Large master suite,
stainless steel appl.
Large lanai. Lease,
+ Dep. No Pets $800.
Mo. (352) 697-3133


DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699



FAST AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422
S Mobile Home
Demolition & Debris
Removal. 30 Cubic Yds.
$200.00 (352) 634-0329



Expert Repairs & Sales
All -types of flooring.
Lowest rates. Mitch, Jr.
352-341-0909, 25yrs



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC - tIc/Ins
www.TAR-MAX.com
Free Est (3521726-3093



Aaron's Fence 24/7
Serving Citrus Courty
since 1985. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352) 795-7373
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
* 352 422-7279

A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins



SPRINKLER REPAIR
Clean, Adjust & Install
15 Years Experience
Uc. & Ins. (352) 270-1150


Cmus CouNTY (FL) CHoONICLE1


2356 Jonquel 2/2/1
$625. mo.
352-697-1907;526-8432
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 31/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800/mo
795-6299 697-1240
DUNNELLON
3/2/1, Rainbow. Lks. Est.
remodeled, 1/4 Acr.
fenced, end. porch.,
Close to Rainbow River
downtown & schls., $875.
mo. (561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718
GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sf $850/mo.
Ist mo. is $500.
(908) 322-6529
HERNANDO
3/2.5/2 $695 mo. OR
ownl CHA (352)
322-0149
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210









HOMOSASSA
4/2, Newer, Acre lot.
$875 mo., Immed.
occupancy,Ref. Req.
,352-628-3543
or 305-804-6168

2/2, Modern, light
& bright. $650/mo.
F/L/S/352-634-1141
INVERNESS
2/2/lscr rr, Pels
Ok.
$6001st, last, sec
352-
697-0970 local
cell
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal a upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, WD. $800/mo.
Incls, cable /water
949-633-5633
INVERNESS
3/2/2 $800/mo Bit 2005
3605 E. Sanders St.
(813) 739-5965
INVERNESS
3/2/2 privacy fence
Move in Speciall $700 I1st
mo. /$950 mo.thereafter.
352-346-2932/650-1232
INVERNESS
Spacious 3/2/2
Newer construction
conveniently
located. Corner lot,
screen porch.
$825 monthly.
Call Kathy or Janet
at 352-726-9136.


John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
,352-564-0?69 ,
rc0066915/cbc057605




BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lio#2579/lns, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Uc.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
- 352-464-3967 �
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Uc. #1476, 726-6554

---


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768

REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
.rc0066915/cbc057605
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic. #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfgillesple.com




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.


ALdMwIee M
Installations by
Brian CBC1253853

352-628-7519
/l" -"l- nl - " asiSiding, Soffit


I Roofovers,
w vCarports, &
.Screen
A d Rooms. 1
www.advancedaluminum.info


HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 3/2/2 Starting
at $760 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615

Sugarmill Woods
Rent to own. 3/2/2
w/ fireplace, new w/d
750/mo. 382-2904

TERRA VISTA
3/2/2, Newly built,
gated community,
washer/dryer, lawn
care, free golf & club
membership
included. $950. Mo.
HUDSON
Pasco County,
3/2/2 Vaulted ceilings,
eat in kitchen, split
bedroom, washer/
dryer, & community
pool included.
Screened patio,
fenced back yard.
$850. Mo.
Mark Fredrick
(813) 215-3446









+. utilities. Large dock
INVERNESS 3/2






secluded yet conven-
I ent 10x20 b0d. 5




tCITRUSLaPRINGS
schools (352-422-333852)









270-9256
CRYSTAL RIVER
$Rent to o0/wk ncr fin.s
everything, hasf

private bath
$875/mo 352-634-0708





Homosassa, Util. incl.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759

CIAlVALUEINN.com

HeRoomando ew Eic.
$250wk. Free int./long
dist. Tmiaers $185wk.
Inverness 3Br uxur.
Homes/furn. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
CRYSTAPOOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant


All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/lns795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com




Complete Lawn care w/
Sod Install Landscaping,
Pressure Washing
15 Years exp. Lic & Ins
(352)270-1150
D's Landscape &
SExpert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272
















I Lowest Price I
L Guaranteed |
Barker's Lawn T.
Service Monthly or I
Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN1 Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.


HOMOSASSA
Weekly or weekend
rental. Sleeps 6, w/large
screen porch & dock.
On Homosassa River
w/dock. (336) 384-2054


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
Familial status
includes children under
the'age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



-.p' nt: r,..


w awree
Cuts starting at $10
We do it AIMII
Call 352-563-9824
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality Work
Residential / Comm.
Lic./Ins. 352-613-4250
Complete Lawn Care
w/Sod Install,Landscape
Pressure Wash., 15 Yrs
exp Uc/Ins
(352)270-1150
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Soecials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcltrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up, ,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681 ....
check zoomcitrs.com
INVERNESS AREA
Mowtrim, beds,
Fast Reoonse since
1991 352- 422-5978
V zoomcitrus.com
Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes; beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commr
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com

Yard work
Affordable Rates
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWESTRATES
352-400-6016 Licllns
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Uc. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166



EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
a 352-464-3967




MOBILE RV
S SERVICE I
SWE COME TO YOU I
Motor Homes I
I 5th WhIs/Rv's I
Master Tech
352-586-5870
Storage Available
L m a mm m ml


I5


JUST SOLD!!
3284 Daffodil Dr.
Pine Ridge






Let me sell yours
DAVE CROWE
The Hedick Group




iTARTIlG.At $75,00
On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lic # CBC059685




INVERNESS COUNTRY
SIDE ESTATES, very Ig.
2/1, CHA, W/D
hook-up, garage,
1 acre priv. upscale
area, nice neighbor-
hood, water inc.
beautiful &
spotless $595/mo
(352) 422-3217




2/2 with carport. FL
room.Remodeled,new
appliances, inside laun-
dry, tile baths.$66,700 or
will rent for $650 per mo.
352-489-1239

3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460









5770 N ELKCAM BLVD
Mitch Underwoood
Dipomat II,' 05,
3 bedrm, office,
3 bath: 2 car garage
formal DR. Living rm.
famrm 3,611 s.f undrf.
solar hted pool
breakfast bar, eat-in
kit. Manv grades
on I acre $335,000
Leslie Landham
Foxfire Realty
352-422-2382


WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Aoytfime,
344-2556, Richard


Professiona


rnotograpiy
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price


arbA Mak
Photogaplhi
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Sratisfacinn auaranteedt


--i.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace It with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221
Complete Lawncare w/
Sod Install, Landscaping, -
PressureWashing 15
Years exp. Uc & Ins
(352)270-1150


1st Choice -
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE


HOME OR LAWN
SiPROBLEMS?
C&11 503-6821
Owner/Operators ,
Llo)d Smith Bil Bill Bedenstein � Jim'C
7a6o58 5340W. Glenbrook St.


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE.
In-Home Estimate N

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


!











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



I


6-30 0 LaughingStock International IncJdist. by UFS Inc., 2009

"I can start work Monday if I don't
win the lottery this weekend:'."
781496


2004 3/2/3 pool home,
sprinklers, fenced yd on
Equestrian trail, 2100'
under air, $239,000
OBO 4577 W Pinto
Loop. 352-422-0174

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Ra ls led

(352) 795-1555




FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2/22FP, FP Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093

S RENT TO OWN
Easy Terms
3 BD or 2BD
NoCredit l/No Prob-
lem 11352-795-0088




ARBOR COURT
2/2/1, Glass Enclosed
Lanal, Corner Location
$79,900
Dianne McDonald
REMAX REALTY, ONE
(352) 795-2441



-i
4/3, Pool, 2.1/; acre
farm,2-stall bam, $198k
NO Owner Financing
28675 E. Timberwood Ct.
(352) 302-0951




2 to 4 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Downl
352-484-0866
iademission.com

3/2/1 office, nice area,
1036 Fordham Terr.
$82,500. Highlands
- 560-7379/613-9616
3/2/2 1560 SQFT.
Pool w/oversized cage
& decking. Granite kit.,
new roof. Cul-de-sac.
Nice Indscap/frult trees
$161,900, 352-422-0429
Affordable 2/2/1,
on 3/4 acre In the Cityl
$76,900. 352-344-4192;
613-6364/3005W.
Monroe St off
Indepence




By Owner $85,500.
8725 Gospel Island
3BR, 90 x 120 fenced
Lot, If Interested
Call 726-3238
to see Inside,
Furniture Included

By Owner,
3/2/1, pool, 1/2 acre,
(352) 341-4378
For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hasp., library,
WTI, 518 Polnsettia, Ave.
S (352) 860-0878

FORECLOSURES
EVERYWHERE!
RATES-R-LOW!
BUY NOW!


Deb Infantine
RE/MAX Realty One
Cell (352) 302-8046
.Office (352) 637-6200

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

R(2 ledc

(352)795-1555


3/2/2 custom built 2005
Famrm. 18x24 sports
pool w/scr encl. 6x6
JaccuzzI, wood firs.
wood burning Firepl
Wood cabinets &
granite counter tops,
15K back up house
gen. privatel.25 acres.
4439 Stallion Ln. In The
Ranches asking $239k
OBO (352) 573-0029
WHISPERING PINES
VILLA 2/2 screen porch,
garage, fully furnished.
W/D. End unit. $75K
352-201-7916



'05, 3/2 W/Deck
1512 Sq. ft. on 1 hill top
acre. 7770 Pinto Ct.
$159,900 (352) 726-6644
www.crossland
realty.com
2/1/1 Cottage on
.33 AC. Pretty Country
Rd. 93393 Istachatta Rd.
$92,400.(352) 726-6644
www.crossland,
realty.com
Great Neighborhood
2/2/1, Enclosed porch.
9071 Tara Pt. $69,900.
Bring All Offersill
(352) 726-6644
www.crossland
realty.com



4 ml to Power Pldnt &
boat rampi Beautiful
c.b. 3/2/2, dbl lot, trees
& privacy. Newer apple,
roof & A/C. iove In
ready. Energy efficient-
$140 avgl Fenced yard,
,boat/ car port storage,
shed, etc. $99,000, OBO
352-795-8926


CONNELL HEIGHTS
'2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scm. por., new app'1s,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172W.
Pine Cir/C.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603
Horses, Horses,
Horses II
4/2.5/2 on 2.5 acres,
5-15 horses allowed.
$249K. $8,750
1Dwn, FHA.
2/1/2 on 5,acres, $149K.
$5,200 Dwn, FHA.
Realty USA
(800) 559-4321

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION



(352) 795-1555


-I ,









CUSTOM BUILDING
ON YOUR LOT
OR OURSII
NEW INVENTORY
AVAILABLEIII
352-688-6864
www.VanOrden
HomeBuilders.com





BUYER REBATE
*$1.000 At Closinag*k

Buy Nowl Great
Values & Low Rates
$8,000 Tax Credit

25+ Yrs Experience
Knowledge/Integrity
Call For Details
RON NEITZ
Broker/Instructor
CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060


garage, very. nice,
$3,500 down & $450
mo. with average
credit. (352) 726-9369


$8000 Tax
Credit
for first time home
buyers ,lf you have
not owned a home in
3 years. Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
S(3.52) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI

Your SATISFACTION
IsMy Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC





. . .-






DAVE CROWE
Residential & Comm.
Knowledge &
Experience to better
serve you/
352,585-4449
The Hedick Group
Beverly Hills, FL












Michele Rose
REALTOR
"Simply Put-
I'll Work Harder"
352-212-5097
thorn@atlantic.het
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515

Picture Perfect
Homes NEW HOMES
STAR IIN At $75,000
On Your Lot Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
'Lic.# CBC059685
VIC MCDONALD
(3521 637-6200


My Goal is Satisfied
Customers

REALTY ONE -4
Oaaand AgentiaIs
Outstanding Results




2/1/1 carport garage
CB homefireplace
3 porches, on 1 acre
fenced yard. Owner
Finance Aval $53,000
Needs little TLC
(352) 209-8065
931-937-7578




FREE HOME
BUYERS
Seminar like none-
other June 23rd
6pm I/RSVP
$8,000
'


Plantation Realty. Inc
(352) 795-0784
Questions about
the new $8000 tax.
credit? Don't miss
this seminarllill
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner


$174,900., Reducedl
3/2/2 Deck
w/fireplace. dock
352-341-5611
HERNANDO
WATERFRONT HOME ON
LAKE TSALA APOPKA
Open lakefront fenced
2/2 home & garage
with 108' of waterfront,
boat dock, boat slip &
sun deck, Owner
finance $155,000
(352) 465-3674
3684 Diamond Circle
Willola Heights
HOMOSASSA
REDUCED!
MUST SELL
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpls, granite. $499K
727-808-5229


must sell!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644

RealtySelect
Citrus.com.


BETTY MORTON

2.8% COMMISSION

Reaii'Slect

(352) 795-1555




LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR MOBILES & LAND
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372




HOMOSASSA 3.45 acres
dead end road two
streets from hwy 19 btwn.
C.R.& Hom. 30000.00 or
20% with financing
352-228-1789


. I

Boat Trailer for 14' boat.
Uke new. $300; Jet ski lift
"manual" 800 Ib
capacity $475
(352) 860-0854
FLOATING DOCK NEW
ALUMINUM FLOATING
DOCK 10'X14'/ 8'X 3'
HINGED GANGWAY.NO
PILINGS REQUIRED. 12
YEAR WARRANTY ON
FLOATS. NICE.
$2900.00 CAN DELIVER.
727-514-1151




13 ft. Kayak &
14 ft. Kayak. $400 each
(352) 746-6072
16FT JON BOAT
with 2Q03 Yamaha
25HP motor, with trailer
$2,500 obo
(352) 726-9369
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest: Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
' Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
ALUMACRAFT '07
25HP Evinrude, new
trolling motor, Trailer.
Swivel seats. $2800/obo
301-693-7796
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
baft. w/switch, bimlni,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp.Johnson
wlwarranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$9.iL352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230

AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/lwln '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Merc. gal trail.
many Xtra's $7,750
Call for info
(813)-293-0392 cell
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
. power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838

DECK PONTOON w/
center console
30 used in stock
Gulf to Lake Marine
www.boatsupercenter.
con (352) 527-0555


DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$1(2,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640


CLASSIFIED




Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
GULF TO LAKE MARINE
New,Used & Service
Brokerage. We pay $$
for clean used boats
(352) 527-0555
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/ tri. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
Jon Boat
'94, 20ft. alum. 40hp
Tohatsu, like new, great
flats boat w/trailer
$3500 (352) 795-4129
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedition
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717
OLD TOWN DISCOVERY
15ft 8in. Canoe. Asking
$425/obo. Very good
cond. Paid $879.
352-563-5150
OSPREY
1994- 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4000.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras,
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/9.9 HP
Johnson klcker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
. new, trdr. w/brks
$5,995 352-489-3661
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
.1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352)563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
� good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
261nch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Uke new brakes & tires,
Reduced f ~CK AL
$3,000 (352) 503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO BAY
37' 1992, diesel pusher
motor home, 90 k ml
6 cycle, generator,
good cond $8000.
(352) 228-7711


DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
S$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS -
'03, Hurricane, 30Q, class
A m6tor home, 311/a ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
$29,900. abo
(352)397-5007,
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352)445-9155
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NATION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371 ,
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every op-
tion. Center Island Kit.
incis sep.W/D, added 2nd
alc in bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES


21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
Roadtrek 200
Chevy '02, 20'.5 ft. 43K.
Mi.,16/19 MPG New
tires, garage kept.
Exc. cond. $33,500.
(352) 447-0102
WINNABAGO
NO TITLE
$600.352-634-0129



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


ALPHA 2006 See Ya
35L1K Fifth Wheel 36'
Luxury beauty, triple
slides, king bed, desk, is-
land kitchen, loads of
storage, dual refrigerators
- Must Seel
Asking $36,500
Nature Coast RV Inc.
352-795-7820


'88 FORD MOTORHOME
Class-C. 57k ml.,
roof-air-generac
Ex. tires & brakes
$4k obo 352-422-3033
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Uke new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
CIKRA TRAILER
'06, Classic Cruiser,
self con., 14 X 7, can
pull w/car. $11,900.
(352) 637-2848 After 4.
FLEETWOOD
'08, Niagra,
Pop Up Camper
Uke New,
352-746-0524
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
MEADOWBROOK
lent. Photos'at
http://picasaweb.google.c
onimeadowbrook.Glenn-
$13,995.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$30,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731

a and read
TRAVEL TRAILER'S AND
FIFTH WHEELS
Sales,Service,Parts. Full
service RV dealer offer-
ing all types of trailer
service, parts in stock or
special order, new/used
RVs. Stop in and meet
our friendly staff. See our
www.naturecoastrv.com
.Jature Coast RV Inc.,
9b00 N. Citrus Ave. (CR
495) Crystal River
352-795-7820
WORK & PLAY
'06 Deluxe, Dual Axle,
A/C & heat, refrig,
micro, & stove, bath
w/shower & outside
shower. Sleeps 4, Toy
tie-downs, awning,
nearly new, $9,000 obo
(352) 212-1776



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Buying Junk Cars
SRUnning or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buving Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
S, For usea car loi
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
H'i I1u S r stal R., er
S.,rc 1973 564-8333



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
R dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
102 BUICK
LeSabre Limited.
Estate Sale. Senior
driven. Exc. cond.,
Come see. Asking
$4995. (352) 382-1088
'07 Buick Lacrosse CXL
5400 Original miles.
Exc.-cond. V6, white,
leather, senior owned.
Under warranty.
$15,500
(352) 563-6542
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352)746-2696


TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 C-I


ORDY GUARD BYTRICKYRICKYKANE


1. Slugged an Addams Family cousin (1)


2. "Ro, America's symbolic Uncle!" (1)

I I I U m i I I
3. Iliad city's sneaky tactics (1),


4. Actor Travolta's third-place medal (1)
i1 1 . 1 1l I I I I I I


Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
syllables in each word. To win
$10, send your original rhymes
with your definitions to this
newspaper. All entries become
the property of UFS, Inc.


I I I I I= I I I I iLj I 2009UnitedFeatureSyndcate, Inc.
.9 6Jvif~.nnlnJ88U wUOU UV~p. enmnpl..u.v (2)


I I I 1 1- I N [ I I I I


6. Curly French dog noggin, slangily (2)


7. ield goal attempted's decals or burrs (2)


Thanks and $10 to
Tim Fredericks of
Glendale, CAfor #6.
Send your entry to
this newspaper.


SHaHOLLS SHaHI[)31L WIOON 2'IUOOdc 09 UTI gdS lTMI1S '
a2zNozlif St.or p sAO~d sxi c.t -s wvs wvaDS'Z UI ILfi1


C 08, DTS, Luxury II, Red,
all options; except.
moon rf. & GPS, $28,900
352-344-5796
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
. CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER '06
SEBRING Convertible.
30k mi., Exc. cond., sil-
ver w/ tantop, garaged,
$10,900 (352) 726-3427
CHRYSLER '07
Town & Country
HANDICAP EQUIPPED
Barely driven. Only
60 miles. Cost $53K:
Asking $33K/obo.
Call 352-726-9111.
CHRYSLER pt cruser
2002 excellent condi-
tion only 54,550miles
asking 7,000.00 or best*
offer 352 249 0815:'

CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Aulo's*
hr,.jL ,,. , h', - . ,111
US.19,Across Airport
(352).461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
le% on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
'Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included. Your's
for only 7 $48 000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOW CAR!
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
.-FORD
00 Focus 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
* runs.'g'eat,30'mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
'00 Mustang GT, Cony.
leather int. loaded. 75 K.
mi. Exc. cond.. $10,00
Obo. (352) 860-1567
(347) 967-6004
FORD 06
FOCUS, .ZXW SES
WAGON, 47k ml
X warranty 7yr/75k
$9750 (352) 746-0100
HONDA
'02 Civic EX, black, 2 dr,
spoiler, cruise, custom
whis., sunroof, tinted win.,
one owner, $6,795.
(352) 220-4084
:HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


IMMACULATE



tion.$7,800
352-795-7820
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2000. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MAZDA 1999 Miata
5-spd,convertible, runs
excellent,cold AC,recent
tires,pw-ps-pb-pm,rear
defogger,cd playeralloy
rims.$4799 419-4966
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MGB
Convertible 1977, 57k mi.
Blue, many xtras
Excellent Condition
$10,500 (352)628-0281
MITSUBISHI
'03. Diamante LS, excel.
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PONTIAC
.1969 Catallna, runs
good, new parts &
palnt,$2000.obo
(352) 465-0960
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scrn nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'01, Corolla LE, very
clean, AC, red, new
: .Miche� r, tar : i FPl
$3,995. (352) 344-1204
TOYOTA'-
03 Corolla LE, auto, air,
loaded, extra clean, must
see. $6,995. Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 ml.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k mi.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof.,Original
owner. Garaged,
$5,600
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
S'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala VolvO.
(352) 629-7299
VW JETTA '07
Wolfsbury Edition
$16,780. Leather,
sunroof, 23,280 mi. Call
Bill Mlian At Rallye
Motors 352-732-6035



1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
1976 MGB
Red w/blk top. Runs &
looks good. 58k orig.
$5800. 352-503-7536
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale'
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade In pdrt.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
" dan 6 cil auto $9.500


CHEVROLET
'61, Apache 10, / ton
pickup, short wheel
base; step side, V8,
auto. New 10" mag.(
& fires $5,900.
(352) 228-1325
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
GM El Camino
'84,1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
Strains. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126


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SWAP MEETS
NO SHOWS
JULY OR AUGUST
SEE YOU SEPT. 6
1-800-438-8559
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter.
Converted to camper.
Runs well. New brakes.
$4500. 352-726-5926



CHEVY
'04 Sllverado LS, V-8,
short bed, step side. All
pwr. exc. cond., low mi.
$8,500.(352) 344-9920
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
DODGE
'03 Dakota SLT, V-6,
5 spd., cd, cold air, 56K.
mi. $6,995 Wooten's
(352) 637-7117
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rbdeo-Edit." Loaded
every'special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
\$40K
invested\Sale $21,750
See onlihl ad photos
www.autotrrder.com/atca
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (35 26-1076
DODGE
'99'Dakota Sport
Cream Puff, only 44k
mi. Custom Top. Exc
cond. $4995
(352) 795-4129 \
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, heml,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims& tires. Dependable
$3700.352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng..Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 E.350, Cutaway,
sen. van; 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome,
.$17,000(352) 628-6985
Ford 2004 f-150 triton 5.4
looks new in & out, runs
great, gold, white leather
interior, 6 cd changer,
electric backsliding win-
dow dual exhaust, heavy
duty tow package 98k mi-
les$12k 352-601-0376
GMC 2000
Sierra 2500 4x4
$8995. Ext cab, SLE trim
low miles. Call Bill
Million at.lallye Motors
a'seMrisew.'J245Z3B-6035.. .

Srontier EX- 129 ispod
e', cond Cold air
$3500;oco Greal cond.
352-746-9704



$500i Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer EXT LS
LOADED,Q 6-disc CD &
DVD, 3rd row. Leather.
47K mni. Retails $38K
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
Second. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
aobo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,150.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993c4 WD 454 rebuilt
eng,, new transm.,
great tires, good cond.
cy$2,900 ab4x4 $4200
(352)201-1413
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 64829-7299
LAND ROVER
Discovery '98, 102k ml
8Cars frcyom 4x4 $4200
(352) 746-9607
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMa. Silver
W/back int. Loaded,
57K. m. Like new Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
TOYOTA
'05 Tacoma, Ext. Cab,
SR-5, 6sp. 4 X 4, loaded.
30K. ml. $19,800.
(352) 382-5055
TOYOTA
"89, Landcrulser, cam-


pletely restored $11,500
Call for Specifics
(352) 220-2666



$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE '07
Caravan SE $11,690
Only 12,300 ml. 3rd seat
V6. LOADE Call Bill
Mllian at Rallye Motors
352-732-6035
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


'05 TOMBERLIN 220 $999
YAMAHA 80 Dirt bike
$399. More In Stock.
352-489-4870
HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River
Small ATV $400
(352) 302-4139




2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. HI pert.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k ml. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,650.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., bik cherry, Incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $11,000
(352) 746-3069
\ HONDA 04 GL 1800
IKE, champ kit 26k
m E-Z steer, CB/FM ra-
dl \heel/toe shlft, trial


C12 TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009


599-0630 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The 2008 Annuql Drinking Water Quality Report for
Royal Oaks of Citrus Homeowners Assn, Inc. will not be
mailed to each resident or unit owner. This report Is
available upon request at Joseph, Community Mgmt,
LLC, 2412 N. Essex Ave, Hernando, FL 34442. Please call
352-527-0839.
fu:,c.IIr .:.J ,.- . i II,. rr,.. C,.lru '..uu .r, Cr,roric.le



588-0630 TUCRN I ' J
:.Cr.:.:. ''C.r,' , L r ':C- I N,:.n,:-. r C '-e,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
S ' .PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2009-CP-160
IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES L. MCGEE
Deceased, " '
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate ofl tre ;lare of
Charles L. McGee, deceased, ovr.c,.e aore of aeair,
was Dec. 23, 2008; is pending In irie Circulf Coun for
Citrus County, Florida, Probate Di.i.ionr. File Jurn'..er
2009-CP-160; the address of whicr, ii 110 Nortn Apopio
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450 ir.e rman or, a a-
dresses of the personal-representative, and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
Ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
Anom a *:op, 0. 1Iof ilr.ice in require to oe ser.ed
rrnuiT i.l rer clairr.r .ir. ir.i cr;,urt IuiTHIN THE LATER CF
) r.ONl.4't zrel I iiTH hr.lE CF THE FIFRT PUBLICATION COF
lH' I(QICE --% "3j 0- 6-r1E-; IHE DETEE OP7E- ICE OF
&0-. .F'I'TH NOiLCE ON TH1�El., -- .-
SCfi hoer craiGsc, of me i 15.;.r 31i 4d,1 ersorn
naorng claims or aemor.s ao gair, aeceder.t's esrote
mui rile tr.eir claim: .lmin Trl co.jur WIFHIr THREE i' i'
l.t.r.l.rMH .r tE iHE D�TE CF'H i:H FIISI PUBuCTiCli COF
THIS NOTICE. '
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY-CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEfRS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S C.ATE CF DLE IH IS BARIPED.
The date of first putijbli.J:.'- cr tir.i r,lnce li 6/1 2 ,K2 v
W',' \fJFlnla Ctrui
P f -,noai Reilre'entQll.,
Robert A. Stermer, F. aaa Bar Jo i 96 ' ',
7763 SW SR 200, Oc 31 F: -,:.a iJ-.: ' .
(352) 861-0447
Attorney for F'e:0"c.a'el ic.s -entntr.e
Published two (2) tiMT.e: r. Irt, C.r.j. Co.rnir, Cr,ronicie
June 23 and 30, 2009,


589-0630 TUCRN
2009-CFP,'.5 Ge, a ,:-ur l ic r li.:e aG Crec.,
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE FIFH Jr.'I.I.:-IL I:Iir ij '. C':, iT OF FLORIDL Ill
AriD F,.lr .DiruSCOuFir.
IN FROBAlEi
FILt rt.C 2009-CP-'O3
IN RE: ESTATE O, GERARD GRUPPO,.
SDeceased. '.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of GERARb GRUPPO,
deceased, whose date of deoir. '.-.a p'rii .i2! � -l
and whose Social Security NT.be,' .o. 132-.-'' ,'.
File Number 2009-CP-500, is p- inr,r, C in the. Circuit
Court for Citrus County, Florica F,,ov.-te'Divi.io-. rr,-
qddress of which ,is 110 North ,c.:.o . A.nr.ue Ir...r.
ness, Florida 34450. The name arn' a-. ires 'or r pie
sonal representative and the ,..al riepieser.,l .n
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the deceder i a''-a c.Ir.ei per.on. no.
Ing claims or demands agalnsit rI.e ae:eer. ., . miate
Including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice Is served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE 'FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons'having claims or demands against decedent's es-
tate, Including unmatured, contingent or unllquldated
claims, must tile their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS'NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice Is 6/23/2009,
i ( /s/ ROBERT GRUPPO
Personal Representative
DEAN AND DEAN, L.LP.
BY: /s/ Susan E, Dean, Esq. Florida Bar No, 746827
230 Northeast 25th Ave., Ocala, Florida 34470
(352) 368-2800
Attorney for Personal Representative
Published two (2) times In Citrus County Chronicle,.
June 23 and 30, 2009.


590-0630 TUCRN
09-V-01
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Zoning Board of Adjust-
ment for the City of Inverness, Florida, pursuant to,
Chapter 2 and 3, of the City of Inverness Land Devel-
opment Regulations, that they will hold a Public Hear-
Ing on the 15th of July, 2009 at 5:00 P.M. at City Hall,
212 West Main Street, Inverness, to act upon the follow-
Ing case:
Case 09-V-01 - To act upon a Variance from Chapter
2. Section 2,4 of the City of inverness Land Develop-
ment Regulations on the following described property:
211 Wright Street
Lots 15 and 16, Black 215 of Inverness Highlands South,
according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
3, Pages(s) 51 through 66. Public Records of Citrus
County. Florida.
Applicant Paul G. Harrington request 'a six and one
quarter percent (6.25%) building coverage variance
from the twenty-five percent (25%) maximum building
coverage allowed In the LD/R-1 Zoning District In order
to construct a single-family home.
Copies of the full legal description and the proposed
changes are on file In the Office of the Department of.
Development Services In City Hall, and may be re-
viewed between the hours of 8 A.M. and 5 P.M., Mon-
day through Friday of each week.
All property owners and interested persons, are invited
to Inspect such proposed regulation changes and to
be present at and participate in the Public Hearing by
the Zoning Board of Adjustment on the 15th of July.
2009.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Board with respect to any matter considered to these
hearings will need a record of proceedings, and for
such purpose, may need to ensure a verbatim record
of proceedings Is made, which Includes the testimony
and evidence upon which this appeal Is based.
(Section 286.0101 F.Sb)
Accommodations for the disabled (hearing or visually
Impaired, etc.) may be arranged with advanced notifl-


Impounds for safel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, nt rain ra
\floorboard $6�00 obo
(347)223-7269.aft 3i30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. ML.Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. MI. Very
fast, many extra's.
$3,800
(352)621-3764
, Kawasaki
'83, 750LTD looks new,
4,600 original miles,
$1,800 OBO 726-2286 .
MOTOR GUZZI 2008 Cali-
fornia Vintage Black tour-
Ing model, 2700 miles, 1
year on warranty,
$10.950.00
352-465-7812,
SOFT TAIL '88'
JusT broke In 113 CubIC
incr, SSS Stroker
mticr wiSiaggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carllni handle bars.
Chrome to max, .Tis.
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jackt. Asking $3,500. obo
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. ml. Like�


AA-06-04 Acklev Investments II Inc. Is requesting a
Land Development Code (LDCA) Atlas Amendment,
pursuant to LDC Section 2270, Planned Developments.
to amend a Master Plan for Nature's Resort, an existing
recreational vehicle park, In a Recreational Vehicle
Park (RVP) District, by Increasing the number of units by
184 new RV sites for a total of 468 units, The property
under application Is located at 10359 W. Halls River
Road, Homosassa Florida (Section 29. Townshipa 19
South. Ranae 17 East). (A complete legal description of
the property is on file with the Department of Develop-
ment Services)

Interested parties may appear qt the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.

A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting
materials Is available for public Inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division. Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more Information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
http://www.bocc.ctrus.flt.us (Click on Departments. De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-
ment link).
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to In-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



cation of 5 day prior to the scheduled meeting.
Pre-arrangements may be Initiated by dialing (352)
726-3401 weekdays from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Signed: /s/Kenneth Koch
Director Development Services
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30, 2009.


598-0630 TUCRN
Notice of Application
PUBLIC NOTICE
State of Florida
Department of Environmental protection
Notice of Application
The Department announces receipt of an application
"for permit from Citrus County Solid Waste Division for a
permit to construct a landfill gas collection and control
system, subject to Department rules, In Phases 1, 1A,
and 2 of an existing Class I landfill, referred to as the
Citrus County Central Class I Landfill, located on S.R. 44,
3 miles east of. Lecanto, Citrus County, Florida.
This application Is being processed and Is available for
public Inspection during normal business hours, 8:00
a.m, to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protec-
tion, Southwest District Office, 13051 North Telecom
Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chfonlcle,
June 30, 2009.

593-0707 TUCRN
CU-09- 14
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN
ORDINANCE TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) will conduct a Public Hearing on July 16.
2002, at 9:00 AM In the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida.
Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that a particular item Is discussed will
vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves through
the agenda,
CU-09-14 Linda Caldwell Is requesting a Conditional
Use from the Citrus County Land Development Code
(LDC), pursuant to Section 4613, Other Uses Permitted In
Realdential Districts, to allow for silviculture In Coastal
and Lakes Residential (CLR) District. The property under
application Is Lots 1-6 (less conservation areas) and
Tracts 1, 2, and 4 of Pelican Point, Crystal River, Florida.
(Section 19. Township 18 South. Range 17 East) (A com-
plete legal description of the property Is on file with the
Community Development Division)
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting,
materials Is available for public Inspection and copying,
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more Information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive" Plan Is available on the Internet at
hto://www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-
ment link).
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
Ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to In-
sure that a verbatim record * v irv proceedings Is
made', which record Includes "-:rinc.r., and evidence
upon Which'the appeal Is to be based,
Any person requiring reasonable, accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability"or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office;
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450,, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting, If you are hearing or speech
i' impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580,

Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the cirrus Counr,r Chronicle,
SJune 30 drld July 7, 2009.'

. 592-0707 TUCRN
\ CU-09-11I
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABUSH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Pianri',g and Development Review
Board (PDRB) will cor.au~i a Public Hearing on JulyJ16.
2002. at 9:00 AM In the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida.
Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that a particular Item Is discussed will
vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves through
the agenda,
CU-09-11 David Heinz Is requesting a Conditional Use
from the Citrus County Land Development Code
(LDC), pursuant to Section 4400. Accessory Uses and
Structures, to allow for a detached accessory structure
on a residentially committed lot that, exceeds the al-
lowable height, Ir a Low Density Residential (LDR) Dis-
trict, The property under appllcatl6n Is Lot 220 of Tim-
beriane Estates Revised, located at 1141 N. Carnevale
Terrace, Lecanto, Florida (Section 27. Township 18
South. Range 18 East). (A complete legal description of
the property Is on file with the Community Develop-
ment Division)
Interested parties may appear aof the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting
materials Is available for public Inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m, and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more Information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-
ment link).
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to In-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is
made, which record Includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based,
Any person requiring-reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. if you are hearing or speech
Impaired use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7,2009.

597-0707 TUCRN
AA-06-04
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board will conduct a Pubilic Hearlng on July1.J2009, at
9:00 AM in the Lecanto Government Building, 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto. Florida.
Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that a particular Item Is discussed will
vary deDending on how fast the PDRB moves through
theaggenda.


A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting
materials is available for public Inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division. Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plqn Is available on the Internet at
hltt-//www.bocc.cItrus.fl.us (Click on Departments. De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-
ment link),

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to in-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is
made, which record Includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse. 110 North Apopka Avenue.
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.


sure that a verbatim record of me proceedings is
made, which record Includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired:use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7, 2009.


591-0707 TUCRN
CU-09-09
- PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) will conduct a Public Hearing on July 16.
2002, at 9:00 AM In the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida.
Please not that the note that the PDRB meeting benas at 900 AM
The actual time that a particular Item Is discussed will
vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves through
the agenda.
CU-09-09 Lynn D. Hartwav. Jr. Is requesting a Condi-
tional Use from the Citrus County Land Development
Code (LDC), pursuant to Section 4400. Accessory Uses
and Structures, to allow for a detached accessory
structure ona residentially committed lot; exceeding
the allowable size limit of 2,500 square feet, In a
Coastal and Lakes Residential (CLR) District - Mobile
Homes Allowed, The property under application Is Lot
1, Block 2A000, Shady Acres Unrecorded Subdivision,
located at 8246 W. Pebble Lane, Homosassa, Florida
(Section 26. Township 20 South. Range 17 East), (A com-
plete legal description of the property Is on file with the
Community Development Division)
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance' and supporting
materials Is available for public Inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the
Community Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more Information
about this application please contact a, Planner. at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
htl://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-
ment link). *

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings ,and, for such purpose, he or she may need to In-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is
made, which record Includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrators Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board .
Citrus'County, Florida
Published two .(2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7, 2009.


595-0707 TUCRN
V-09-09
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
,. AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planng and Development Review
Board (PDRB) will conduct a Public Hearing on July 16.
200f, &at9:00 AM In the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto,. Florida,
Please note that the PDRBKmeetIng beans at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that o particular Item Is discussed will
vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves, through

V-09-09 Donald T. Monus Is requesting a Variance from
the Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC), pur-
suant to LDC Section 4440, Fences and Walls, to allow
for the Installation of a fence exceeding the maximum
,allowable height of four feet when placed In the re-'
quired front yard (the yard abutting a road or public
right-of-way for residential development), In Rural Resi-
dential (RUR) District. The property under application Is
Lots 49 & 50, Pleasant Grove Acres 1st Addition, as re-
corded In Plat Book 4, Page 134, located at 5130 East
Stage Coach Trail, Floral City, Florida (Sectlori 31. Town-
shlo 20 South. Range 20 East). (A complete legal de-
scription of the property Is on file with the Community
Development Division.)
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting
materials Is available for public Inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 am. and' 5:00 p.m. at, the
Community Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanta, Florida, For more Information
about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352)' 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet at
htto://www.bocc.cItrus.fi.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services then the Community Develop-
ment link). F
If any person decides to appeCl any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to In-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is
made, which record Includes testimony and evidence
upon which'the appeal Is to be based,
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's'Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue.
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6565, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman '
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7, 2009.

594-0707 TUCRN
V-09-08
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) will conduct a Public Hearing on iuy.
200f2. at 9:00 AM In the Lecanto Government 'Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecantao. Florida,
Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that ao particular Item Is discussed will
var depending on how fast the PDRB moves through

V-09-08 Terry Marks Is requesting a Variance from the
Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC), pursu-
ant to LDC' Section 4245, Building Setback Reaulre-
ments. to allow for the construction of a detached ac-
cessory structure having less than the required 50-foot
minimum front yard setback from the centerlne of a lo-
cal roadway (minimum 25 feet from the existing
right-of-way line). In Coastal and Lakes Residential
(CLR) District. The property under application Is Lots 40,
41 & 42, Block 35 of With-La-Popka Island Unit 5B, as re-
corded In Plat Book 4, Page 144, located at 11834 East
Crowder Court, Floral City, Florida (Section 07. Townshlp
20 South. Ranae 21 East). (A complete legal descrip-
tion of the property Is on file with the Community De-
velopment Division.)
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be
heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance
Amendment.


Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.
2424 N, Essex Avenue
Hernando, Florida 34442
A copy of the Documents may be obtained from
Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc. 2424 N. Essex Avenue,*
Hernando, Florida 34442 upon payment of 125l00,
for each Document (Florida sales tax Is Included). All
mailing costs for the contract documents shall be
borne by the prospective bidders. Return of the docq-
ments is not required; the amount paid for the docu-
ments Is non-refundable.
A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference wil be held at 2:00
P.M. on July 15, 2009 by the City of Inverness In the In-
verness Government Center Council Chambers (1st.
Floor).

The City of Inverness reserves the right to waive formali-
ties, waive any technical defects, reject any and all
bids, and accept any bid which represents the lowest
and best offer to the City.
/s/ Tom Dick
Asst. City Manager
City of Inverness, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7,2009.


Chairman
Planning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida
Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7, 2009.


587-0630 TUCRN
2009 CP 453 John W. Kimber. Sr.Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2009 CP 453
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN W. KIMBER, SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JOHN W. KIMBER.
SR,, deceased, whose date of death was Dec. 8, 2008,
file number 2009 CP 453, Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division; the address
of which Is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, . .
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION'733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED..
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWo (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The dae of first publication of this Notices Notice Is 6/23/2009.
Personal Representative:
/s/ John S. Clardy IIll
PO Box 2410
Crystal River, Florida 34423-2410
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John S. Clardy III. Florida Bar No. 123129
Clardy Law Firm PA
PO Box 2410. Crystal River, FL 34423-2410
Telephone: (352) 795-2946
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 23 and 30, 2009.

596-0707 TUCRN "
V-09-12
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN ORDINANCE
TO ESTABLISH OR CHANGE REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND

The Citrus County Planning and Development Review
Board (PDRB) will conduct a Public Hearing on July 16.
2002, at 9:00 AM In the Lecanto Government Building,
3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida.
Please note that the PDRB meeting begins at 9:00 AM.
The actual time that a particular Item Is discussed will
vary depending on how fast the PDRB moves through
the agenda.
V-09-12 A Cvil Desiagn Group. LLC for Paul Jallo is re-
questing a Four-Part Variance from the Citrus County
Land Development Code (LDC). to allow for a pro-
posed car wash drive thru having, (1) less than the re-
quired 15-foot type C buffer required along all collec-,
tar and arterial roadways pursuant to LDC Section.
4661. Design Standards for Small Nonresidential Devel-
opment Protects: (2) less than the required 12-foot wide
one-way Isle width pursuant to LDC Section 4235, De-
sign of Parking Lots: (3) less than the required interior
landscape requirement pursuant to LDC Section 4661,
Design Standards for Small Nonresidential Develooment
o oand (4) less than the required dimensional
area for width of parking spaces pursuant to. LDC Sec-
tion 4235. Design of Parking Lots. Land Use Descriptior:
GNC, General Commercial. -

Interested parties may appear at the 'meeting and be
heard with respect to the' proposed Ordinance
Amendment.

A copy of the proposed Ordinance and supporting
materials Is available for public inspection and copying
between the hours of 8:00 a.m, and 500 p.m. at the
Community Development Division, Suite 140, 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For more Information -
'about this application please contact a Planner at the
Department of Development Services (352) 527-5239.
Information regarding the Land Development Code or
Comprehensive Plan Is available on the Internet atf
http://www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, De-
velopment Services, then the Community Develop-'
ment link).

If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the board with respect to any matter considered at this
r.3,rng n- ,r :r.e will need a record of the proceed-
Irngi aord r:, iucr. purpose, he or she may need to In-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is,
made, which record Includes'testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical lrpair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness; Florida 34450, (352) 341-6665, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
Impaired, use the .TDD telephone (352) 341-680.'
Chairman
SPlanning and Development Review Board
Citrus County, Florida

Published two (2) times In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 30 and July 7, 2009.

500-0707 TUCRN
Invitation to Bid DWP 2009-02
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
The City of Inverness Invites established
Contractors/Firms to submit sealed bids for the City of
Inverness Phase I Tompklns Improvement Project de-
scribed below. Four (4) originals of the bid proposals
must either be hand delivered or mailed to Debbie Da-
vis, City Clerk, City of Inverness, 212 West Main Street.
inverness, Florida 34450, no later than 4:00 P.M. on
Thursday, July 30, 2009. Sealed envelopes containing
proposals must bear the name of theecontractor/firm
making the proposal, and clearly state "Proposal for
City of Inverness Phase I Tompkins Improvements" writ-
ten on the fae of the envelope. A bid security In the
amount of 5% of the bid price Is required.
Contractors/Firms must be prequalifled by the State of
Florida Department of Transportation as required by
Section 2 of the Standard Specifications for Road and
Bridge Construction (2007) as amended, Sealed bids,
will be opened In a public -meeting and read aloud,
beginning at 4:15 P.M. Thursday, July 30, 2009. In the In-
verness Government Center, 1st Floor Conference.
Room 105,212 West Main Street, Inverness Florida.
BID NO: 20002 '
DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS
ITEM: Construction of the CITY OF INVERNESS PHASE I
TOMPKINS STREET IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
* consisting of the following major components:

1. 1700 LF of Roadway Reconstruction
2. Paving
3. Sidewalk Construction
4. Curb & Gutter
5. Storm Drainage
6. Water Main Replacement
7. Street Ughting
8. Landscaping

All sealed bids are to be submitted on the Bid Form and'
envelope marked to indicate bid number and vendor
name. Proposals submitted via facsimile will be consid-
ered non-responsive and will not be accepted.
DEUVER BY: 4:00 P.M. on THURSDAY. JULY 30. 2009 to:
City of Inverness
Attn.: Debble Davis, City Clerk
212 West Main Street
Inverness, Florida 34450
Bids to be opened at 4:15 P.M. THURSDAY, JULY 30.
2009
Drawings and specifications will be available starting
JUL2009 and may be examined In the offices of:
City of Inverness Public Works
212 W. Main Street


I Lgal


I Legals


I Legal


I Lgal











June 30, 2009


A weekly advertising supplement of the Citrus County Chronicle

Autos, Trucks, RVs, ATVs, Motorcycles, Campers & More!


Must



Haves


THEY'RE CALLED OPTIONS.
BUT ONCE SAMPLED,
THESE INDULGENT AUTO
FEATURES HAVE A FUNNY
WAY OF BECOME
ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL.
CHECK OUT THE
ALLURING ARRAY.


By JAY KOBLENZ I CTW FEATURES

R member when items like power win-
dows and CD players were considered
.. upscale-auto accoutrements? Today
they're standard on all but the least-expensive
models and are among features most new-car
buyers consider essential. -
Those who haven't been in the market for a
new vehicle in several years will find a host of
accessories offered that were either limited to
the luxury market last time they visited a deal-
ership or weren't .yet offered. While some re-
main vehicular frills, others are fast becoming
automotive essentials, particularly among those
who spend a great deal of time in their cars
commuting or taking long road trip-,.
Here's a quick look listed in alphabetical
order) at several key convenience features that,
once they try them, drivers quickly find they
simply can't live without.

* BLUETOOTH INTERFACE. Fast
becoming available on models in all price
ranges, Bluetooth wirelessly links a com-
patible cell phone to a car's audio system,
using an embedded microphone to carry
on hands-free conversations: many such
systems will download phone number lists
from the phone and display them on a
screen for easy access, and provide a key-
pad for dialing numbers. Some cars can
even do all this via voice activation.

* GARAGE-DOOR OPENER. Widely
offered, this enables users to program a
small remote that's usually incorporated
into a vehicle's sun visor or rearview mir-
ror to replicate up to three clickerss." in-
cluding those for garage doors.
power-operated gates and exterior light-
ing. Programming the device takes about a
minute and precludes having to carry (and
potentially misplace) the original remotes.

* HEATED SEATS. Those who live in
northern climates will find this feature's
appeal a no-brainer, and even those who
live in warmer areas can find comfort in
heated seats if they have back problems or
joint paint. They're now offered on even
some otherwise inexpensive cars, with
higher-end models often adding a cooling
feature that helps prevent one's bottom
from sticking to the seat on hot summer
days.

* iPOD CONNECTIVITY. Proliferat-
ing across multiple model ranges is the
ability to play and control an iPod or other
personal portable device through a car's
audio system. This is especially Iworth-
while for those who maintain their entire'
music collections digitally. Some offer a
simple headphone-type connection, while
others include a USB plug: the latter can
usually also accommodate a tiny' "thumb
drive" for those who don't choose to take
a portable player along for the ride.

* KEYLESS ENTRY. Remote door and
trunk unlocking is now offered on most
cars. Some models now add a remote-
starter feature that engages the engine and
additionally turns on the climate control to
pre-heat or cool the cabin., while most
minivans and larger SU-Vs offer a power
rear liftgate that's operated via the key fob.
The latest twist on keyless entry allows a
motorist to unlock a vehicle by merely
touching the door handle and start it via a
push button on the dashboard. so long as
the key fob is sitting in his or her pocket or
purse.




SEE MUST-HAVES/PAGE 6


_ --~-A~ '~3~�.kFE"


5 (Nl b~i~iee7m~


t's a candy store for anyone
with a need for speed.
Highcroft Racing's. headquarters is a
fully-equipped ultra-modem facility that's
home to the race car that Acuia fields' in the
American Le Mans endurance series.
It seems like a fitting place to launch
Acura's newest TL mid-luxury sedan, but
you have to drive it to understand why.
Much praise has been heaped upon the
TL since it came to life for the 1997 model
year. Regular updates and complete
makeovers have'kept Acura's automotive
beacon shining brightly as hordes of return-
again buyers will attest.
The TL (Touring
Luxury) is positioned as
an upscale automobile. Type
However, in the past few
years its performance Engines
capabilities and "dri- Transmissio
ver's-car" persona have Market position
made it popular with
those who appreciate
such capabilities and Points
enjoy making full use of
them. Hence the visit to
Highcroft.
Compared to the out-
oing model, the new Safety
fourth-generation TL,
which arrives this fall, is The numbers
longer by six inches and
wider by 1.8 inches. By
There's also 1.4 inches comparison
more distance between
the front and rear
wheels.
That's a suitable plat-
form to give sporty types
plenty to enjoy while at
the same time catering to


I


buyers who are perfectly content with pilot--
ing a competent luxury sedan that overflows
with bells and whistles.
/ The result is two very distinct cars with
two totally different personalities.
The base model, if you dare call a loaded
TL base," is as stylish as they come andfea-
turesthe same shield-like grille motif that's
worn by every other model in the Acura fam-
ily. Inside is literally crammed with the kind
of content that true lovers of luxury crave.
The starting-point TL also delivers its fair
share of gusto from a 280-horsepower 3.5-
liter V6 that transmits its torque to the front
wheels via a five-speed automatic transmis-
sion with steering-wheel-mounted paddle
shifters. The output compares to the 2008
3.2-liter V6TL with 258 horsepower and

N 2009 Acura TL


SFour-door, front- /al-wheel-drive mid-size luxury sedan
3 5-lter SOHC V6 (280 np) 3 7-liter SOHC V6 (305hp)


)n1 Five-speed automatic with steering-colurin-mounted paddle s
)n: A best-seller for Acura becomes even more appealing in a lea!
every automaker in the world produces at least one-direct corr
* Bigger, more stylish than outgoing, model.* Stiffer body struct
pounds.' Quiet ride over variety of surfaces.* All-wheel-drive i
pricier RL seem a bit redundant. * Sportier Type S version with
sion should return by 2010.' Options in costly Technology Pac
available separately.' A refined, highly sophisticated luxury ca
Front airbags, side-impact airtiags, siae-curtain airbags, anti-lo
traction control: stability control
S MPG (city/hwy): 18/26 (3.5 V6) Base price: $34,000 (es


BMW 328i
Base price: $33,200
Smaller, but famous for
I A. n.t, , i.on, ' quality.
AWD optional.

.w .


Cadillac CTS
Base price: $33,000
Spacious with emphasis
on luxury. High output
CTS-V should thrill.


Lexu
Ba
Sty
sed
roa


nearly matches the 285 ponies in the 2008
TL Type S fitted with.a 3.5-liter V6.
If that was as good as it gets, TL fans
would be a happy bunch, but there's plenty
more in store with the up-level TL SH-
AWD. As the initials imply, this all-new
model features Acura's advanced "Super
Handling" all-wheel-drive system that can
send up to 100 percent of the available rear
torque to the outside wheel to help drive
around turns.
Ordering the AWD model also gets you a
305-horsepower 3.7-liter V6 that's also
mated to a paddle-shifted five-speed auto-
matic transmission.
The TL SH-AWD serves up some other
specific, mechanical tidbits, including spe-
cially tuned power steering, sport suspension
and 18-inch wheels
(19-inchers optional),
one inch larger than on
the standard TL. The
brakes are ducted with
cool air . entering
hifters through the front
gue where nearly bumper/grille for im-
ipetior proved cooling and re-
ture lighter by 170 duced fade under
model makes persistent use.
i manual transmis- Front passengers
kage should be are treated to power-
r. adjustable sport bucket
ock brakes, seats and the driver
gets a meatier steering
wheel that seems al-
t.) most Formula One-in-
s IS 250 spired.
se price: $31,300 After sampling both
lish rear-/all-Wheel TLs along a twisty
Ian with excellent rural Connecticut
d Manners, roads, the differences
- . in each are readily ap-
. - , parent.


SEE TL/PAGE 6


I


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price "* 36 month closed-end,lease, 12,000 miles per year, 200 per
99 cashldu 'at signing on Civlc, Accord, CR-V and Element. $2799
le at signing on Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline. Offers expire 6-30-09.


You WI LOVE Doing aP om
B usin ess wir us 1 ON=
-on, Highway 44West



LoveChevySaIes.conT

* All prices include $2,000 cash or trade equity plus tax, tag and $449 administrative fee. Prices
include all rebates & GM owner loyalty. Pictures for illustrative purposes only. Offers expire 6-30-09.


CITRusS CouNvn (FL) CHRo~icLE


W$r r UD-N- ..qnna


11pol JW11:11 6. N-- "j;








%Cimua UCn- k. (FL)CROIL-TEDY.JNE3,209D


SUNDAY
* Citrus County Retreads meet for breakfast at 8 a.m.Sundays at the restaurant at
rear of B&W Rexall Drugs, Inverness.All makes and models of motorcycles welcome.
Ride follows.
WEDNESDAY
* Inverness"Big Dogs" motorcycle club meets for breakfast at 8 a.m.Wednesdays
at rearof B&W Rexall Drugs.Ride follows,all bikes welcome.Call J.R.and Rachel Har-
,C 26-6128.

* Gold Wing Road Riders Chapter 0L1-R of Dunnellon meets at 6:30 p.m.on the
second, third and fourth Thursday of each month at McDonald's in Dunnellon.
Monthly gathering is the first Thursday at the Charlie Horse Restaurant, 20049 E.
Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, 6 p.m. to eat and 7:30 to meet. Call chapter director
Bruce Schlimme at (352) 465-1228.
* Gold Wing Road Riders Association ChapterT of Inverness kick tire at 6 p.m.
,.,Mursdays at Burger King parking lotcorner of U.S.41 and S.R.44 East.Call directors,
Richel,JR Harris at 726-6128 or Ken and Jackie Smith at (352) 476-7151.
FRIDAY
* Nature Coast Mustangs meets at 7 p.m. Friday at the Wendy's on U.S. 19 in Ho-
mosassa across from the wildlife park. Bring your car and enjoy a fun evening. Call
Bob at 860-2598.
* The Wanderers Club meets from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the parking lot of the
Beall's Department Store on State Road 44West of Inverness.Bring your old car and
have fun with other car enthusiasts. Call Frank at 212-2966 or visit wandererscar-,
clubofinvernessfl.com.
SATURDAY
* Free Wheelin' Sertoma Club motorcycle club meets at 9 a.m. Saturdays"on the
road."Call Rainer Jakob at 726-7903 for destinations.
* Nature Coast Retreads meets at 8 a.m.Saturdays at Harrington's Restaurant,4135
S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A ride follows. All styles of motorcycles are welcome.
Call Jacque at 637-4693 or Dave at 628-2401.
* Citrus County Cruisers car club invites you t6'its cruise-in from 6 to 9 p.m. Sat-
ujday at King; By Plaza ine. to Wendy ,inC'rystal River.Canned goods are col-
lecled for Io31l charilie:; Call. Ir Morari at 527-0024 or Lester Barnes 628-7021.
E)Citrus County Speedway: JULY 11: Open Wheel Modified, Sportsman, Mini
Sick. Pure .od.V Thunder Sto.:,, 4 Cylinder Bombers, Fig8,Mini Cup.Any addi-
tional questions please contact the speedway at (352) 726-9339.

Send us your automotive and
auto club events information to
wheels@chronicleonline.com


FINE LINES
FORD BRONCO
1 96 6 - ' 7 7
S port-utility vehicles moved from

the fringe to mainstream when

Ford created the Bronco.
The success of the company's off-roader also pushed
General Motors and Chrysler into developing similar prod-
ucts and ultimately led to the popularnty..of this hot seg-
ment.
Before the Bronco, Jeep's CJ \%as the reigning cham-
pion of the sport ute set Its only rivals were few\ ahd far be-
tween and included the International Scout as well as a
trickle of British Land Rovers that managed to make it to
our shores. And with buyer interest focused on full-size
sedans and pickups, there seemed to be very little mterest
in making vehicles that specialized wo going where most
buyers feared to tread.
Ford's product planners, however, saw things a bit dif-
ferently. They correctly surmised that a market existed for
a small, lightweight and economical multi-purpose ma-
chine beyond the obvious commercial or military appli-
cations. With literally millions of farmers, ranchers and
outdoor enthusiasts of every stripe to draw upon, four-
wheel-drive remained an untapped area of sales and rev-
enue.
To keep the price down and the versatility up, the truck
they designed was not much larger than a Jeep, with a
short (92-inch) wheelbase and generous ground clearance
to help it navigate around - and over - tight spots.
The initial 1966 Bronco that arrived in August of 1965
(and was unveiled in dealer showrooms two-months later)
was similar to the Mustang in many respects. Other than
their equine-derived names, both vehicles used mechani-
cal components borrowed from Ford's compact Falcon,
which helped keep development costs down. Although
-base prices were low (around $2,300), each tried to seduce
buyers with a host of extra-cost options and features.
Originally, first-year Broncos were equipped with a
tin)' 170-cubic-inch inline six-cylinder engine that pro-
duced 105 horsepower. However, by mid-year, a 200-
horsepower 289 cubic-inch V8 was added to the option
sheet. Both were connected to a column-shifted three-
speed standard transmission, a necessary feature that
helped make the most of the base motor's barely adequate
power.
Each of the three body styles offered - wagon, half-
cab (pickup) and open-top roadster - came with a two-
speed transfer case that was engaged via a T-handled floor
shifter.
A rear bench seat, secondary fuel tank' nd floor mats
were optional on all models, as were an assortment of
dealer-installed winches, air-lift springs, snow-plow kits
and trailer hitches.
Encouraged by the more than 18.000 first-year Bronco
sales, Ford added more optional goodies in 1967. includ-
ing a chrome grille and a more car-like interior trim pack-
age.
In its first four years, the Bronco had the market pretty
much to itself, with nary a peep from GM or Chrysler.
That all changed in 1969 % bhen the Chevy Blazer first ap-
peared to challenge Ford's exclusivity among the Big
Three automakers. The pickup-based Chevy ute offered
more power and features than the Bronco and quickly
gained a strong foothold in what was becoming a rapidly
growing category.
Still, the Bronco remained the class favorite, especially
with fans of off-road competition. The highlight of this
emerging form of motorsports was the Baja 1000. a pun-
ishing 1,.000-mile journey across the the Mexican desert.
Led by former stock car racer Bill Stroppe. a specially pre-
pared factory-sponsored Bronco co-driven by Indy-car
driver Parnelli Jones took first place in the 1971 event.


WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS


That year, Ford dealers began taking orders for the Baja
Bronco, a specially equipped model that came with a 302-
cubic-inch V8, four-speed gearbox. roll bar, dual front and
rear shocks, fender flares and a distinctive paint scheme.
During the next three years, about 650 of these tough-as-
nails stallions were shipped from Bill Stroppe's Long
Beach. Calif. facility.
With nearly 26,000 wagons sold (the roadster and pickup
styles had been discontinued earlier) in 1974. the summit
had been reached. GM was experiencing elen greater suc-
cess with both it Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy sport
utes growing in popularity. Chrysler also joined the fray


The early Bronco definitely put the utility in the term

"sport utility." Being all business was part of the charm.


that year with its Dodge Ramcharger, a rig similar in over-
all dimensions and power to the Blazer/Jimmy duo.
With size clearly becoming a factor with buyers, Ford
ended production of its onginal Bronco in 1977 to launch
an all-new version based on the company's popular F-150
pickup.
Today, the few remaining first-generation Broncos are
sought-after b. collectors who appreciate its clean and sim-
ple lines and rugged demeanor.
That's high praise for this pioneering little truck that
helped to bring sport-utility vehicles out of the automotive
wilderness and into our driveways
U Maltolnm Gunn is afeature writer with H heelbase Communications. He
can be reached on the Heb at: ww .wheelbaseawsmailbas.htm Fheelmbae
Communications supplies automotive news and features to newspapers and
Web sites acro North America.


� I �


� .. ---


TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009 81


CFFRUS COUNTY (FL E







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


D4 TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009


CONSERVATION.
Q. I keep hearing about the extraordinary lengths to which people
are going to conserve fuel consumption. I'd like to fill up less often and
spend less at the pumps, too, but not by employing such extreme means
as my friends are talking about - like no longer taking my very hefty
mother-in-law for weekly outings (because the extra weight decreases
fuel efficiency), or buying a car the entire family hated simply because
the dealer was offering $3-a-gallon gas for the next two years, guaran-
teed. You seem fairly sensible. I'd be interested in what you're doing to
lower your cash outlay for fuel.

A. Here are some other things I'm doing that many others could work
into their driving routines:

* First and foremost, I'm driving slower. The average vehicle gets its
top efficiency at between 35 and 50 or 55 mph. At speeds above
that, you're using 15 to 20 percent more fuel (because of wind re-
sistance), which, for most vehicles, amounts to four miles per gal-
lon. I've known people who have traded in cars and lost money on
the transaction to gain four miles a gallon, and all they really had
to do was let up on the lead foot.
I live in a region where the posted speed on the interstate is
75 miles per hour (which means, in most cases, folks drive 80).
I'm now going 60 or 63 and am getting nearly 100 more miles
from a tank of gas than when I was driving the posted limit. Is that
worth the time I'm losing? The way I look at it (now) is this: When
I was going 75 miles per hour, it took me exactly one hour to get
from my house to Denver. Now it takes me one hour and 10 min-
utes. I can cope with that. And, happily, I'm noticing others are
driving slower too, which, in the aggregate, reduces the national
fuel consumption and may lead to lowei prices (or at least a slow-
ing in the escalation of prices).

* I have a supermarket loyalty card and now buy virtually all my gro-
ceries at that store, which (because of the volume of my purchases)
allows me to pay 10 to 12 cents per gallon less for their gas, which
is already competitively priced.

* I'm shopping much closer to home, arranging my route for maxi-
mum efficiencyland eliminating old travel patterns that I'd fallen
into but which added miles to my travels. And I've figured out how
..to almost completely avoid the heaviest stop-and-go traffic periods
that significantly reduce a car's fuel efficiency. You may not be
able to schedule your workday to completely eliminate such gas-
guzzling congestibn, but you can probably arrange your days off
and errand running to avoid most of it.

* I generally keep my fuel tank at one-quarter to two-thirds full, rather
than cramming every tablespoon of gas possible into the tank
whenever I fill up. If you've ever hefted a give-gallon container of
gas for your lawnmower, you know that stuff is heavy. So I'm elim-
inating some of that weight. Not a huge saving, for sure, and not
practical for people who commute long distances to work, but it's
a marginally effective approach for those of us who have flexible
schedules and drive a low number of miles every week.

* Three of us who live on the same street have a pact that whenever
any of us has the need to visit a store or gardening center that's lo-
cated more than 10 miles away, we check with the others to see if
they need anything there, too. Yes, if two of us tag along, that's
nearly 300 pounds of extra weight that one person is burdened
with, but we take some comfort in the fact that the other two saved
money!
When you consider that any little errand that causes you to
drive 10 miles to get there costs about $4 (round-trip), you begin
to realize that clustering up, finding bargains closer to home, being
efficient in your errand-running, and discovering new, more direct
routes can.save you $15 or $20 a week in gas.
All that said, I don't fall apart at the seams when my weekly
volunteer work requires that I drive 54 miles round-trip (although
I often stop for an errand or two on the way back) or when I have
an evening craving for Dairy Queen and have to drive 12 miles to
satisfy it I've developed practices that I believe contribute to re-
ducing my routine fuel consumption, and I'm calmly accepting
when the realities of life demand variations from them.r

Q. I'm in the process of getting a divorce, and am getting the four-
year-old minivan. I'm wondering what your thoughts are about whether,
given the price of gas, I should trade it in and begin making payments
on a hybrid.

A. It's almost never cost effective to replace an older paid-for or al-
most-paid-for vehicle with a new one. Naturally, when a vehicle gets to
be six or eight years old there can be repairs that begin to add up pretty
fast But you're not there yet '
Conventional wisdom has held that if you buy a new hybrid (which
will generally cost $2,000 to $8,000 more than a conventional model),
it will take four-to-six years before you begin to realize any financial
benefit from having not purchased a traditional fuel burner.
Now remember, we're talking one new car versus another new car,
and that takes years for the balance to tip.
I offer that little piece of information merely to give you some sense
of what the pencil-to-paper experts have come up with regarding the
long-term offset of buying a hybrid. When you're talking about keep-
ing an older vehicle versus buying a new hybrid, it would be a really, re-
ally, really long time.
Naturally, there are hundreds of variables. What may make the most
sense for your situation is to investigate the possibility of buying a
smaller two-year-old conventionally powered vehicle - you can find
many that will give you 28 miles or more per gallon.
But before you cut the deal, make sure you have also taken into ac-
count the probable increase in your insurance rates (you'll usually pay
more when you have a later-model car) and factor in the cost of sales tax
and registration.


SWhat's your question?
.Saron. Peters would like to hear what's on your mind when it
don'e to caring for, driving, repairing and making the most of
�ot vehicle. Send your questions to sharon@ctwfeatures.com


YOU CAN PURCHASE EVERY HIGH-TECH ACCIDENT

AVOIDANCE FEATURE ON THE MARKET AND STILL

BE AT DIRE RISK. AUTOMOTIVE SAFETY STILL

BEGINS WITH THE DRIVER.


By JAY KOBLENZ I CTW FEATURES '
Americans' increasing concern for automotive safety
and vast improvements made in accident-avoid-
ance technology, people generally feel less safe on
the road today than they did just a few years ago.
Some 54 percent of respondents feel driving is less safe than it
was five years earlier, according to the most recent Drive for
Life poll conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research.More
than half believe it's more likely they'll be involved in a motor-
vehicle collision.
In addition, people also found driving more "aggravating"
than before. While only 39 percent of men find driving more ir-
ritating, 58 percent of women found it to be the case.
Such attitudes exist despite the recent infusion of automotive
safety features. In the past several years, technologies such as-
stability control systems and antilock brakes, improved air bags
and sensors that help make parking safer have made great
strides toward protecting passengers in a collision and helping
a motorist avoid accidents. Yet the public still realizes that no
technology can overcome what is essentially bad driving.
The Drive for Life data notes two reasons why this is such
an issue. The first is that people believe the greatest threat on
the road is the behavior of other motorists. The second is that
most people admit to (at least occasionally) being guilty of bad
driving habits themselves. Some 68 percent of respondents ad-
mitted to speeding, while one in three confessed to driving
through a red light or driving through a stop sign without com-
ing to a complete stop. "Aggressive driving" and "distracted
driving" were considered' to be particularly strong safety
threats.
Number one on the list of safe driving assets is to be a sober
.and alertdriver. An alert driver avoids accidents by anticipat-
ing what might occur down the road and allowing for the time
it takes to identify potential hazards and take the proper course
of action to avoid a collision. This is why tailgating so often
leads to accidents,
The key here is not to focus solely on the car in front of


yours, but to continually scan the road ahead, to the sides and,
using the rear-view and side mirrors, behind the vehicle. This
helps a motorist predict if the car in front will suddenly brake
or swerve and be able to react accordingly and safely. "Be es-
pecially cautious when approaching stop lights, intersections,
and when changing lanes," warns NHTSA. "Anticipate poten-
tially hazardous situations that could cause the driver in front of
you to stop suddenly."
Intersections require the greatest caution. According to the
Federal Highway Safety Administration, 21 percent of all fatal
traffic collisions occur at intersections. Keeping a watchful eye
for cross traffic includes looking for people, bicycles and other
moving objects.
Accidents are frequently caused by unexpected occurrences,
something that can frequently be avoided simply by keeping
an eye out for any possible situation. For example, if children
are playing ahead, a dri\ er should be prepared to react if a ball
suddenly bounces onto the road - a child may be running after
it. In heavily forested areas, deer or other animals may sud-
denly decide to cross the road.
Driving while sleepy is among the most dangerous situations
on the road. According to Michigan's Department of Motor Ve-
hicles drowsy driving causes as many as half of all crashes.
Drowsy drivers should pull off the road. Get out of the car and
stretch or walk. If you're sleep deprived, take a short nap.
An increasingly common problem among drivers is the dis-
traction of all the entertainment available within,cars today.
From cell phones and GPS devices to iPods and video players,
there are simply too many things competing with the road for
a driver's attention. And the situation is only likely to get worse:
In.the Drive for Life survey, the youngest drivers, ages 16-20,
were far more likely to talk on a cell phone while driving (64
percent compared to 43 percent of all drivers) and to read or
send text messages while driving (32 percent compared to six
percent.)
While it can often be a struggle to pay attention and drive
safely, the payoff is considerable. � CTWFeatures


WORTH THE WAIT
CAR-DEALER SERVICE DEPARTMENTS ARE FAST BECOMING THE PLACE TO GO
FOR PREMIUM COFFEE, GYM WORKOUTS AND EVEN THE LATEST FEATURE FILMS.


By DEB ACORD I CTW FEATURES
There's a health and fitness center. Gour-
met coffee shop. Restaurant. Internet business
center. Barbershop. Boutique. Movie theater.
Is it a high-end mall? A big-city airport
concourse? No, it's the customer service area
at Island Lincoln-Mercury-Jaguar-Land
Rover, a car dealership on the east coast of
Florida.
Drivers waiting for their cars to be serviced
here don't have to pass the time flipping
through two-year-old magazines, trying to
find a comfortable position on cheap plastic
chairs, and choking down burnt coffee.
No, while these car owners wait, they can
get in their 30 minutes of cardio on a treadmill
at the Cougar Health and Fitness Center which
also features free weights and weight ma-
chines.
Not their day to work out? There's gourmet
coffee and treats at the Carbuck's coffee shop,
lunch at the Tiki Grill, Internet access in the
Wall Street business area and an 1890s-style
barbershop with $2 haircuts. And, oh yeah,
movie times are at 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
This dealership in Merritt Island and others
around the country have taken the concept of
customer service to new heights. As the car
business has become ever more competitive,
dealers are being increasingly creative in their
efforts to lure new customers and to keep their
regulars coming back again and again. A re-
cent survey by the market research firm J.D.


Power and Associates in Westlake Village,
Calif, asked consumers to list amenities that
add value to the waiting room experience.
Both customers of premium and non-pre-
mium car models said clean and comfortable
seating was the most important element at a
dealership. Other amenities in the top five in
both categories (in order of priority) were
wireless Internet access, premium coffee,
large-screen TVs and computers with Internet
access.
Adding a touch of luxury at Island, a deal-
ership that opened in 1985, has made waiting
a positive experience. "When this facility was
opened, the owner and his wife had this vision
that would place us well above other dealers,"
says Jim Cavanaugh, general manager.
Island customers have enthusiastically em-
braced the dealership's amenities, Cavanaugh
says. "We have one couple who cancelled their
gym memberships after they bought their car
here. Now, they come in every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday to use the gym." Oh,
and gym rats don't have to worry about fresh-
ening up after their workout - the dealership
has men's and women's full-service locker
rooms with showers.
Island's idea of the perfect full-service
dealership "has worked really well," Ca-
vanaugh says. "Customers don't pay a penny
more here than they would anywhere else, but
we have created a place that is the talk of the
town."


The dealership hasn't forgotten traditional-
ists and offers them a more ordinary waiting
room with a TV. But the other amenities - a
Cartoon Zon6 play area for kids, a library
stocked with books, a bar (open for special oc-
casions) and a great viewing window which
happens to offer a panoramic view of lift-offs
at the nearby Kennedy Space Center - make it
unique. "We don't want people to get bored,"
Cavanaugh says. "We want people to feel sat-
isfied when they come here."
Maintaining a high level of comfort for
customers is tantamount at Herb Chambers
Lexus in Sharon, Mass., says general manager
Giovanni Tosti. "We are trying to not miss
anything," he says.
"That's the key to selling cars right now. That's
the difference. Everybody is selling the same cars,
so you have to make yourself different."
Chambers Lexus has an elaborate waiting
room with a fireplace, big-screen TVs and a
well-equipped playroom for children. And like
many dealers, it takes service beyond its facil-
ities, offering pickup and delivery programs
for test drives and monitoring car update and
news that could affect its customers.
Tosti says more elaborate dealerships and
thoughtful amenities are going to help the in-
dustry survive. "We are trying to bring the re-
tail auto industry into the 21st century. We
have to think outside the box to do that. It has
taken a long time for our industry to change."
0 CTW Features


Steering


rLA- - �-. n


I




QTRIJS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE '1 tii '~DAY, JUNI 30, 2009 D5
U


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2009 FRONTIER 2009 ALTIMA'


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All PrcesPayments exclude tax, tag, tille, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50). Price/Payments include $4500 down (Cash or Trade Equity). Payments are at 7.99 A.PR. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009 and 7.70 APR. for 66 months for model years 2002-2005
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TUESDAYu JUN8z 30, 2oog DS


CmusU CouNvn (FL) CHRONICLEE









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TL/FROM PAGE 1

In those conditions, the SH-AWD-equipped TL feels more re-
sponsive and much more composed over rough roads and espe-
cially in tight cornering situations. It's not that the front-drive TL
performed poorly under similar conditions, but if you're the kind
of driver who likes to step lively, the AWD version will be a lot
more to your liking.
Both cars can be had with an optional Technology Package that
includes high-tech navigation and communications systems, pre-
mium leather interior and an up-level audio package. Otherwise,
everything you'd expect in a premium sedan is included.
Your biggest decision, then, is to figure out which kind of TL
driver you are, or would like to be, and act accordingly.


MUST HAVES/FROM PAGE 1

* MEMORY SETTINGS. Widely offered as a premium
option, this allows drivers to "save" their power-seat ahd
mirror adjustments (and in some higher-end models, other
functions like radio presets) and recall them at the touch of
a button. This is a handy feature in vehicles that are shared
among family members.
* PARKING AIDS. Modem auto designs usually incorpo-
rate short front and rear, overhangs (what's ahead of or be-
hind the wheels), with sharply sloping front-end designs that
can combine to confound even the most adept parallel park-
ers. Many cars now offer a sonar-based proximity alarm sys-
tem that employs a succession of beeps to tell a driver how'
close the car is to the one behind it; it will also alert a mo-
\torist if a person or object is in the car's path. Better systems
add sensors to the front of the car, and top proximity arrays
can tell the driver how close' each of the four comers of a
vehicle is to an obstruction.
What's more, many vehicles now offer rear-view cameras that
provide a back-bumper view of what's immediately behind it, dis-
playing images on a dashboard mounted display or one that's in-
corporated into the rearview mirror that appear when the
transmission is shifted into reverse. Thismakes parallel parking
both easier and safer. Infiniti now offers a video system that can
display a 360-degree view around the car.
* Telescoping steering wheel and adjustable pedals. While tilt
steering columns have been offered for decades, many cars in ll
price ranges now additionally offer telescoping steering wheels
that let motorists position the steering wheel at a comfortable
arm's length.
Many cars now offer adjustable accelerator and brake pedals
to help accommodate shorter drivers. In addition to making for a
more-accommodating driving experience these enable the air bag
housed in the steering wheel hub to remain a safe distance away
from the driver's head and chest. � CTWFeatures








Automotive


D-O W N
2. Gas process requires a hose
3. Mazda's greal escape"
4. control
5, Early auto propulsion
6. 'Four-door Maseratl
7. Torque
8. Sun or moon
9. Non-revving engine
10, GTOvangni
S3. Comes from cows
14. Door found on fender
17. Dean's last car
18. Tune-up strobe
19. A special plating
22. Lotus founder


23. First U.S. V6 builder
24, Ponliac models included 2M4,
2M6 and GT
27, Outback based-pickup
28. Help a dead battery
29. Olds shared Grand Am platform
for this
31 A "lost" option
.34, Model A rearseat
36. Not quile an Impala
37. Amage or Continental
41. Isuzu or cowboy event
42. Over water car transporter
44. Toyota, Toyota, Toyota (..
47. Wheel centerpiece


COPYRIGHT WHEELBASE COMMUNICATIONS


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The Time


Fa: 32)56-66 1Tlltre .(88 52240 f m il. cas fie s,9c rnilonIi e.com I esie:w w8hrnclonie 6o


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FLOATING DOCK NEW
ALUMINUM FLOATING
DOCK 10'X14'/ 8'X 3'
HINGED GANGWAY.NO
PILINGS REQUIRED. 12
YEAR WARRANTY ON
FLOATS. NICE.
$2900.00 CAN DELIVER.
727-514-1151



AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
ALUMACRAFT '07
25HP Evinrude, new
trolling motor. Trailer.
Swivel seats. $2800/obo
301-693-7796
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimini,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$9.900L352-746-5856
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Mer, gal trail.
many Xtra's 7,750
Call for Info
(813)-293-0392 cell
Deck Boat
95'19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop,/hub,$6,000
(352) 726-0838
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamoha,
w/trlr, $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90, 26' New '08 c/c-,
t-top, -gas tank -wiring
'99 250 Merc. on
bracket '05 trailer, many
upgrades exc cond.
$14,900 (352) 586-1754
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expeditlon
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras �
352-503-6797

.a t no rio o e"
Yourworld first.
Every Day

Cip)Ni El I
Cla siffJ'


Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras $12,000
(352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W, '02 50H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, tdr. w/brks
$5,995 352-489-3661
TROPHY '99 22FT
99-2052 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force, E-Z
Load Tandem Trir. Elec-
tronics, well kept, must
sell $8950.352-726-1489
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260'hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slldes,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Like new brakes & tires,
Reduced for QUICK SALE
$3,000 (352) 503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO BAY
37' 1992, diesel pusher
motor home, 90 k ml
6 cycle, generator,
good cond $8000.
(352) 228-7711
Chevy Road Treck
200, '02 20'.5 ft. 46K.
Mi.,16/19 MPG. New
tires, garage kept.
Exc. cond. $33,500.
(352) 447-0102
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane, 300, class
A motor home, 31'� ft., 22k
mi. V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
$29,900. obo
(352)397-5007


HAMPTON BAY.
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
ITASCA NATION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371









- - -, --Ira
'88 FORD MOTORHOME
Class-C. 57k ml.,
roof-air-generac
Ex. tires & brakes
$4k obo 352-422-3033
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Like new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
CIKRA TRAILER
'06, Classic Cruiser,
self con., 14 X 7, can
pull wlcar. $11,900.
(352) 637-2848 After 4.
FLEETWOOD
'08, Niagra, %
Pop Up Camper
Uke New,
352-746-0524
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes-
Call Glenn '.
(352) 302-0778
Sun Valley
'09, Apache, slide in
Camper, fully equip.
qn. sz. bed, fits, 8ft truck
bed. $10,500 obo
352-795-0511



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new fires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
'01 Toyota Camry
119k ml. $4,500
(352) 527-8706
'02 BUICK
LeSabre ULmited.
Estate Sale. Senior
driven. Exc. con., ,
Come see. Asking
$4995. (352) 382-1088
'07 Buick Lacrosse CXL
5400 Original miles.
Exc. cond. V6, white,
leather, senior owned.
Under warranty.
$15,500
(352) 563-6542


CADILLAC
08, DTS, Luxury II, Red,
all options, except.
moon rf. & GPS, $28,900
352-344-5796
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
.CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352)'629-7299
CHRYSLER '06
SEBRING Convertible.
30k mi., Exc. cond., sil-
ver w/ tan top, garaged,
$10,900 (352) 726-3427
CHRYSLER pt cruser
2002 excellent condi-
tion only 54,550miles
asking 7,000.00 or best
offer 352 249 0815
CORVETTE
2001 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 In
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only, $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOW CAR
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
'00 Mustang GT, Cony.
leather int. loaded. 75 K.
mi. Exc. cond.. $10,00
Obo. (352) 860-1567
(347) 967-6004
FORD 06
FOCUS, ZXW SES
WAGON. 47k ml
X warranty 7yr/75k
$9750 (352) 746-0100
HONDA
'02 Civic EX, black, 2 dr,
spoiler, cruise, custom
whis., sunroof, tinted win.,
one owner, $6,795.
(352) 220-4084
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


Im
LINCOLN '94
. 2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2000. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PONTIAC
1969 Catallna, runs
good, new parts &
palnt,$2000.obo
(352) 465-0960
TOYOTA
'01, Corolla LE, very
clean, AC, red, new
Michelin tires, PW, PL
$3,995. (352) 344-1204
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
S (352) 629-7299
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k mi.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,200
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
.(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299



1976 MGB
Red w/blk top. Runs &
looks good. 58k orlg.
$5800. 352-503-7536
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
CHEVROLET
'61, Apache 10, /2 ton
pickup, short wheel
base, step side, V8,
auto, New 10" mag.
& tires $5,900.
(352) 228-1325
CHEVROLET Corvette
1957 clear title, $4800,
2 doors, exterior or-
ange, interior red, 8
line, leather seats,
you can call me
206-309-0136 or
e-mail me
johnervln@gmx.com
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter.
Converted to camper.
Runs well. New brakes.
$4500. 352-726-5926


DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.com/atca
ridlat-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv.van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi.5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985
Ford 2004 f-150 triton 5.4
looks new in & out, runs
great, gold, white leather
interior, 6 cd changer,
electric back sliding win-
dow, dual exhaust, heavy
duty tow package 98k mi-
les $12k 352-601-0376
NISSAN '96
Frontier EX - 129k, 5spd,
$3500/obo Great cond.
352-746-9704



CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer EXT LS
LOADED 6-disc CD &
DVD, 3rd row. Leather.
47K mi. Retails $38K
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded. dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,150.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm.,
great tires, good cond.
$2,900 obo
(352) 201-1413


HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
JEEP '98
Grd Cherokee Laredo
4x4, 6-cyl., auto,122k
ml. LOADEDI Exc cond.
$3995. 352-341-0004
LAND ROVER
Discovery '98, 102k mi
8 cyl. 4x4 $4200
(352) 746-9607
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674



TOYOTA
'05 Tacoma, Ext. Cab,
SR-5, 6sp. 4 X 4, loaded.
30K. mi. $19,800.
(352) 382-5055
TOYOTA
'89, Landcruiser, com-
pletely restored $11,500
Call for Specifics
(352) 220-2666



CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615 .
Crystal River



2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi pert.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k mi. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River


HARLEY
'96Sporster1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,650.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., blk cherry, Incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $11,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04 GL 1800
TRIKE, champ kit 26k
mi. E-Z steer, CB/FM ra-
dio, heel/toe shift, til
hitch & much more
$27k 352 465-7755
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra's.
$3,800
(352)621-3764
Kawasaki
'83, 750LTD, looks new,
4,600 original miles,
$1,800 080 726-2286
MOTO GUZZI 2008 Cali-
fomia Vintage Black tour-
ing model, 2700 miles, 1
year on warranty,
$10,950.00
352-465-7812
SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke In 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Bik w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy Is not for the
fant of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500. obo
(352) 527-0679
TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. mi. Like
new, $11,000
(352) 489-7674
Volkswagen Trike
In storage 5 yrs. Call for
details. $1,000 obo
(352)746-1117


WO I UESDAY, j UNL W, LVU�l


fl TIUriS.DAv r iN: 3n 2nno


...' " .. .B ,


WELCOME I l A C


*IvtLUIVIIU II terna1CI IIo l Uto ' Urls. -

a puzzle dedicated to the automobile enthusiast'

AuloCross will lest your I N T E R N A T I 0.- If ,

knowledge of cars. brand names and

auto-related people from all over the world. Good luck'





A C 0 ACROSS
1 British term fo'rfenders
S4 Helps "mesh" the gears
7 This is a Mini model
S11 Piston-travel distance
Al 12 Renpult import, once
15. Wheel option
1 6 Coovertible slang
20. Fee on some highways
21. Understeer slang
22 Mercury's Maverick
25 Sports-car maker Healey
26 Great Race starTony
28 Edsel model or an island
29. Once owned by Renault
30. Paint problem
S32. Ferrari model or home town
33. Wrench or "key" type
35 1950s Lincoln
36. "Little Deuce Coupe" artists
38 X-Men ride
39 Cord model
40. Bucket-seat divider
4 3. Purge air from brake lines
45. Wankel engine part
46 Blade's ride
S4B "Alpha" cancelled
49. Classic-collecting fashion
designer


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isCUNTYFL) HRONCLE302009


JENKINS HYUNDAI


SANS hINS WlJY BUY HYUNI),AI...
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Advertised prices are plus tax, tag and $599 dealer fee, are before any dealer installed options and include all available manufacturer rebates & incentives. Vehicles subject to prior sale. All offers with approved credit and some cannot be combined. 'Expected range for most drivers, your
actual mileage may vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle. ** On the Accent. As listed on Monroney sticker., t Genesis Coupe lease, $259 per mo, $1999 down, Genesis lease, $399 per mo, $2599 down, Elantra Touring lease, $239 per mo, $2499 down, Sonata lease,
I 195er I mA I2599 don: al l3 6 IInAm AA s es. n.A Ac tet h O ..l. .O n11 Drm o. A 7 A l. ft mo .n CAAmo Amffsa maatoir nnfn Af Innng tl Iln Ct T +Musdh lit ben r 18 vear | o rlder NTn 1prchasa ne 'sarv. fi S neu for fllll rulles reulatinns. Phntos lra for illuntration nrllnses only. I


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Please dO GA'S PFOSG"? m eswy A a eca.Ap,^oA'sncc.-r Ev 07.31
* Jenkins Hyundai * 1602 SW College Rd *SR 200 * Ocala Jenkins Hyundai 1602 SW College Rd * SR 200 * Ocala
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1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD., HOMOSASSA
crystalautos.com
*All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50) Price/Payments Include $2000 down (Cash o Trade Equity). Payments are at 7.99 A PR. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009 and 7.70 A.P.R. for 60 months for model
,,20. Onn S Cnn o t Aw s bnt emn n for t>noronhical Arror. All orifr saleeaxlc eldd and may restrict stock. Cannot behombined with other ffers Vehiclesare nre-owned andnictures are for illustration ourooses only.


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CRY.STAL CHEVROLET