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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01692
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 28, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01692

Full Text

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*********AUTO**SCH 3-DIGIT 326
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORYI2SI' 3I2
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Partly cloudy
90 with scattered
LOW thunderstorms.
73 PAGE A4


I T RU UNTY



I. ICL


JUNE 28, 2009 Florida's Best Communit


www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOLUME 114 ISSUE 325


THE STRUGGLE OF A STROKE


NANCY KENNEDY
nkennedy
@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
O n a . recent
Wednesday after-
noon, Steve
Starnes made an
announcement
"I did something today I
thought I'd never do."
He paused and said, "I
stood up by myself, took a
cane and walked down the
hall --with no help."
Thirty-nine years ago,
Starnes played linebacker
alongside Al Cowlings and
O.J. Simpson as the Buffalo
Bills' fifth-round draft pick
out of the University of
Tampa. He was also picked
up by the Green Bay Packers
and the Boston Patriots, but
his pro-football career was
cut short by a neck injury.
Three years ago, the
burly former athlete with
the Johnny Unitas crew cut
suffered a stroke.
At 59, two and a half years
into an extensive in-house
rehab program at Arbor
Trail Rehab and Nursing
Center in Inverness,
Starnes is making positive
steps toward going home.
Home is Lake Panasofl:
kee, where Starnes lives with
his son, also named Steve.
Although his football ca-
reer is a lifetime away,,
Starnes hasn't left behind
the winning spirit neces-
sary to overcome setbacks
and reach his goals.
"I had a broken neck from
football, but I think I also had
a prior injury from when I
was a kid, stealing fruit out of
a tree." Starnes said.
His hero
"My older brother, David,
was born with one arm, and
we were raised to treat him as
if there was nothing differ-
ent," Starnes said. "He played
a big part in raising me."
His brother could do one-
arm pull-ups and played
high school football as a
fullback and linebacker.
"I followed in his foot-
steps," he said. "Even when I
was in college, he'd help me
over the phone. I went' into
football because of him."
Now, as Starnes recovers
from his stroke and works
continually to be able to
leave, he said he keeps his
brother in his mind.
"He used to say his only
handicap is people thinking
he's handicapped," he said.
After his brief football ca-
reer, Starnes returned to
Tampa to find a job. He
worked for GTE as a field
engineer and then went
into the sheet metal busi-
ness with his dad.
Five years ago he moved
to Lake Panasoffkee where,
prior to his stroke, he
worked with his son at the
business he started with his-
late father, Starnes and Son
Sheet Metal.
"I'm the 'son' in Starnes
and Son," he said.
The day of his stroke,
Stamrnes and his son were in
-Indian Rocks Beach putting
a roof on a condominium.
He was on the ground and
fell, unaware that he was
having a stroke. His son
dragged him into the truck
and they sped to the hospi-
tal. He ended up at Citrus
Memorial Health System,
the left side of his body
"pretty much useless."


"I couldn't walk or get out
of bed," he said. "When I
tried to drink water, it fell
down my face. I was in bad
shape. Emotionally, it was
as low as low can get - I
was scared to death."
He entered the rehab fa-
cility a relatively young man,
surrounded by people 30 or
40 years his senior. But
rather than depress him fuir-
ther, he said he drew
strength and encouragement
from his fellow residents.
"Seeing what they go
through has made me want
to progress and do better all
the time," he said. "My par-
ents raised me right They
taught me to respect my
elders, and I do. For one
thing, you learn right away
that they have a wealth of
knowledge and they want to
share it with you."
A day in
Steve's shoes
First thing in the morn-
ing, Starnes heads out to
the Withlacoochee State
Trail next to Arbor Trail
and "walks." He pushes
himself backwards in his
wheelchair using his feet.
He usually goes to the
bridge and back, stopping
to talk to the people out
walking or riding bikes.
He does this three or four
times aday.
When he's back at the fa-
cility, he has therapy with
Tina PFitz. physical therapy
assistant, five days a week.
"I do rehab in my room,
too," he said. "Stretching.
flexibility. I have quite a
workout and I work real
hard. My weight's gone
down from 325 to 265, so
that's real good. If I was any
heavier than that I'd have a
hard time walking."
Fritz called Starnes a
hard worker, courageous -
a bulldog with grit and de-
terminatiori.
"He's still a young man,"
she said. "He recently had
knee surgery, which he
needed. He had so many
football injuries, and the
stroke affected his balance,
Now that his knee is fixed,
we're working on balance.
"It's not 100 percent, so
watching him walk by him-
self was scary for me, but it's
rewarding to see him getting
Close to achieving his goal"
Much of Starnes' day in-
volves relating with people.
He credits the staff at Arbor
Trail, the residents, his
family and friends for his
positive attitude.
Arbor Trail administrator
Andrea Harris said Starnes
is the one who inspires
them.
"He's very motivated,"
she said. "He always finds
the best in everyone and
everything."
Starnes likes to write let-
ters that encourage people
and motivate them. One of
the things he wants to do
when he leaves the facility
is public speaking.
"I would like to take a
cross-country trip to Ore-
gon, stopping along the way
to talk to stroke victims, to
show them that there is
hope, no matter how bleak
it looks. Don't give up
hope," he said. "There have
been some people in here
that I think I've. helped. I
get a lot of satisfaction out
ofthat."
See STARNES/Page A7


FROM TOP: Steve Stames suffered a stroke some three years ago. While the former professional football player works out with a therapist five times a week AJI photos by
for 90 minutes a day, his workouts really never cease. Here, Stames uses a bar hanging over his bed to pull himself up over and over again, 50 times In all. MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
* Arbor Trail physical therapy assistant Tina Fritz firmly motivates Stames to keep his balance. "I try real hard to please her," he said. * Stames pushes his wheelchair backwards
across Ella Avenue to the Withlacoochee State Trail. He uses his feet Instead of his hands to power his chair to a small bridge on the trail and back again. States says he usually com-
pletes the trek several times before lunch each day. * With a big smile, Stames credits the many people In his life for his positive, upbeat attitude. He says he wants to go fishing soon.

I - - , . i . - , ,, , . . , ,-' , -, - "-.- _ " _ , .- .. - - -. . - - , _ " . '


Classifieds ......................D5
Crossword ....................A14
Editorial..........................C2
Horoscope .............. A13
Lottery Numbers ............B4
Lottery Payouts .............'.B6
Movies ........................ A14
Obituaries .............. A6
Together......................A13


Scandal silence
It seems John Conyers does-
n't have much to say about
his wife's troubles./A5


Happy to be home
After a decade away from Citrus, Meredith Linley is back for good./D1

Climate bll Will it fail in the Senate?/A8

Forever Guantanamo detainees might be held indefinitely./A4

HacktiVISM Iran's underground at the forefront,/A5


$171 billion
That's the amount Bernard
Madoff has been ordered
to forfeit-T-he figure4in -
cludes all his assets./A5



6 18!Jl7l! 821010 1 o









A2 sUlNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009


=Holiday HAPPENINGS--
Dream Society Slow down, watch for
hosts 5K manatees


The Dream Society will host
a 5K run/1-mile walk to benefit
its programs. The Firecracker
5K will be held in conjunction
with Patriotic Evening on Friday
at Liberty Park in Inverness.
Sign-up is available now at
www.active.com or in person
starting at 5:30 p.m. on race
day. Early registration is $13 for
CRR Members and $15 for
non-members. Grab bags,
pizza, drinks, and raffle prizes
will be available to all runners.
For information, visit
www.citrusroadrunners.org or
www.active.com. The Dream
Society may be reached at
(352) 400-4967 or info@the-
dreamsociety.org for informa-
tion or to volunteer for the
event.
The Dream Society is also
selling tickets fori the fifth an-
nual Country Rocks the
Canyon.
Apply now for July
Fourth pageants
Applications are now being
accepted for the inaugural Little
Miss and Mr. Sparkler and Miss
Firecracker pageants, which
will begin at 4 p.m. as part of
the Patriotic Evening on Friday
at Liberty Park. in Inverness.
The Little Miss and Mr.
Sparkler pageant has the Miss
Sparkler division for girls 7 to 9
years and four divisions for girls
and boys: 0 to 11 months; 12 to
23 months; 2 to 3 years; and 4
to 6 years.
The Miss Firecracker Pag-
eant has three divisions: 10 to
13 years; 14 to 17 years; and
Miss Firecracker, 18 to 29
years.
One winner and four run-
ners-up will be selected in each
division.
Prizes, including jewelry, tan-
ning and gym, a massage/spa
day and cash will be awarded
winners.
Only 10 entries can be ac-
cepted per division. For infor-
mation, call 249-7174 or visit
www.MissFirecracker.org.
Rolling Oaks
closed July 3
The Beverld Hills Waste
Management (Rolling Oaks
Utilities Inc.) billing office will be
closed Friday in observance of
Independence Day.- -
There will be a normal sani-
tation pickup on Friday. There
will be no pickup for Saturday
customers on Saturday, July 4..
All Saturday customers will be
picked up Wednesday, July 8.
Party planned to
welcome home unit
Operation Yellow Bow,
Harley-Davidson of Crystal
River, VFW Post 8189, Lake
Panasoffkee Sunoco and
Moose Lodge 1271; are spon-
soring the "Welcome Home
Unit 356 Party" on Saturday at
Thunder Inn, 5210 N. Florida
A. a., Hemando.
The event begins at 2 p.m.
and features free food, live
music and giveaways. The unit
presentation begins 4 p.m.
For information, call (352)
465-7707.


Save the Manatee Club re-
minds the boating community to
be extra cautious over the busy
Fourth of July weekend.
Boaters should follow all
posted boat speed regulations,
slow down if manatees are in the
area, and stay in deep water
channels when possible.
Call the Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission at
(888) 404-3922 or #FWC or
*FWC on your cellular phone, or
use VHF Channel 16 on your ma-
rine radio, if.
* you see a manatee with
wounds, tilting, in distress,
wrapped in fishing line or dead;
N you observe a manatee calf
(less than 6 feet in length) by itself
with no adults around for an ex-
tended period of time;
* you see anyone harassing a
manatee;
* you see boaters speeding in
a protected area.
Florida boaters can request a
free, "Please Slow: Manatees
Below" Waterproof yellow banner
by contacting Save the Manatee
Club via e-mail at
education@savethemanatee.org.
Include full mailing information
along with the area where you
boat in Florida.
Family fun day
plannedfor Fou
The Crystal River Merchants
will host a variety of fun family ac-
tivities Saturday at the waterfront
park on Third Street in Crystal
River.
In addition, Crystal River is cel-
ebrating its 106th birthday with a
giant birthday cake.
The day will be filled with the
sights, sounds and smells 9f the
traditions of an old-fashioned red,
white and blue celebration of our
country's freedom and Crystal
River's birthday. The fun includes
the big tent with live entertain-
ment, food, and beer (no outside
alcohol allowed) and the day's
family activities such as kayak
water games, apple pie baking
contest, kids games, watermelon
eating contest and ends the day
with our city's giant fireworks dis-
play which can be seen right from
the park.
To be a part of this event, call,
Bill McKee (Ft. Island Marine
Supply) 436-4179 or Denise .
Burke (Burkes of Ireland), 795-
0956.
Register now for pie
balking contest.
The Crystal River Women's
Club is sponsoring an apple pie
baking contest in conjunction with
the Family Fun Day at King's Bay
Park on the Fourth of July.
The event is from noon to 2
p.m. at the Crystal River
Women's Club.
Prizes will be given for best
pies and the winner will appear in
Chronicle.
Entry fee is $5.
Pie must be 8 or 9 inches,
have at least one crust, must
have apples and must be home-
made.
Call Mary Lee Johnson (352)
503-3237, or Lois Thomas 382-
0777, to register early as limited
number of entries allowed.
-From staff reports


Key Center to host arts and crafts fair
Special to the Chronicle wares as part of this joyful celebration. The proceeds from the Runners'
M-l-- m. An Pl Ti-. C?- Li- F-- Adi 0 9, i-, .. . .,-,, / 'Or th 2009) fPin 4-nth


Each year runners start from the
Capitol steps in Tallahassee and run
180 miles to Key Training Center's
Lecanto campus to draw attention to
the challenges that adults with devel-
opmental disabilities face and over-
come each day.
The "run" culminates with a finish
at the Key Center's Lecanto Campus
with a jubilant celebration. This year,
the Key Center is inviting artisans and
crafters to come, display, and sell their


iThe 2uu9 Run for the Money Arts &
Crafts Fair takes place from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, July 25, at the Chet Cole
Life Enrichment Center on the Key
Center's Campus in Lecanto.
All spaces are outdoors. The fair
will go on regardless of weather. Ven-
dors are encouraged to register early
as space is limited. A 10-foot by 10-foot
space may be obtained for $20. To re-
ceive fair guidelines and registration
forms, contact the Key Center Foun-
dation at 527-8228.


Money Arts & Crafts Fair registrations
will be utilized to provide a broad
scope of life-enhancing services in-
cluding daily living and social skills,
job training, life-sustaining care, and
residential services to nearly 300 de-
velopmentally disabled adults, of
whom 50 individuals receive no state
funding.
To learn more about the "Run for
the Money" activities and how you can
help, call 527-8228.


Waterspout


Associated Press
A large waterspout forms above the St. Johns River as seen from downtown Jacksonville on Friday afternoon.
The Fuller Warren Bridge is seen in the foreground.


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter Is assigned.
* Call Editor Charlie Brennan at 563-3225, or call Mike
Arnold, managing editor, at 563-5660.
* Be prepared to leave a message with your name,
phone number and brief description ot the story idea.


A$Cpow


By pedalpermissionof
Musk Thenlre ldeemnatiol


Director: John Chesnovitz
July 10 thru July 26
2009


CALL 352-746-0924
......FORTICK .
* www.artcenter.cc
Tickets: $18 per person


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"""4"'"'


OTr~us CouNTn (FL) CHRONICLE


LocAI/STATE


i


3


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Page A3 - SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009



TATE &


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around
THE STATE

Citrus County
Crystal River street
closing Monday
N.E. Sixth Avenue will be
closed from Mondaythrough
Friday, July 3. N.E. Sixth Av-
enue will be closed from
Crystal Street south to N.E.
Sixth Street for culvert repair.
Women's political
group meets July 9
The Citrus Republican
Women's Club will meet at 7
p.m. Thursday, July 9, for its
regular monthly meeting, at
938 N. Suncoast Blvd. This is
the former campaign head-
quarters for Renee
McPheeters.
Cathy Pearson, director of
Community Support Services
will be this month's speaker.
Pearson will speak about her
new role in Citrus County
government.
The CRWC is a newly
formed club for women in Cit-
rus County, chartered by the
Republican Party of the State
of Florida. For information ,or
to apply for membership, call
Rosella Hale at 746-2545.
GARI offers free work-
shop, boat tour
Gulf Archaeology Research
Institute (GARI) invites inter-
ested Nature Coast residents
to take part in a free work-
shop and guided boat tour to
discover "OuriChanging4Na-
ture Coast."
The workshop is 9:30 to
noon Thursday, July.2, in the
conference room of the Crys-
tal River Preserve State'Park
headquarters. Lunch is noon
to 12:30 followed by the boat
four; 12:30 to 3 p.m.
Speakers include Gary
Ellis, director of GARI; and
Ken Nash, assistant director,
GARI. Participants will learn
to interpret local coastal land-
scapes and features, identify
changes in the coastal
ecosystems and how to re-
,port damage to the appropri-
ate persons.
Space is limited. To regis-
ter, call 564-0888 by June 30.
Water and drinks provide;
bring a bag lunch.
Resister for 'Ride
for the Future'
Register now for the 2009
Citrus County Cycling "Ride
for the Future" set for July 18,
on the Withlacoochee trail in
Inverness.
Riders can choose q 14-,
34- or 62-mire ride along the
Withlacoochee Trail and sce-
nic roads of Citrus and Her-,
nando counties.
Start time is 7 to 8:30 a.m.
for check in and registration.
No mass start. Event runs
rain or shine.
From 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
there will be a light lunch-and
Prize drawings. Ride support
ends at 2 p.m.
Visit www.citruscycling.org
to register and pay entry fee
or call 341-3910. Entry fee is
$25 prior to July 10 and $30
after July 10.
Ride benefits The Boys &
Girls Club of Citrus County.

Miami
Agencies warn of
mixing alcohol, boating
Law enforcement crews in
Florida will be out on the
water this weekend as part of
a national effort to crack down
on boating under the influ-
ence.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, the U.S. Coast
Guard and state and local law
enforcement agencies are
taking part in "Operation Dry
Water," which aims to reduce
the number of alcohol-related
accidents and fatalities that
occur on the water.
Capt. Richard Moore, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-


servation Commission's boat-
ing law administrator, said in
a statement that boaters can
expect increased patrols this
weekend. Crews will also be
educating boaters about other
safety measures, such as.
wearing a life jacket.
-From wire reports


Lawyer honored for 50 years of service


the honor.
Thomas said he became
interested in law at an
early age because his fa-
ther was a lawyer in west-
ern New York Thomas
attending law school at
Harvard University and
first began practicing law
in 1951 in New York. In
1959, Thomas said he left
New York and moved to
Hillsborough ' County in
Florida. For two years, he
worked as a law clerk for
U.S. District Judge George


Whitehurst. As a law clerk,
Thomas said he would as-
sist the judge with writing
court orders and he also
answered any question the
judge would have.
When Whitehurst retired
in 1961,- Thomas said he
moved to Pinellas County,
where he was in private
practice until he retired in
1994. While in private prac-
tice, Thomas said he han-
dled everything from real
estate to probate.
Looking back on his ca-


reer, Thomas said for the
most part, he has positive
recollections.
"I made a lot of friends, I
think," Thomas said.
Throughout his career,
Thomas said he meet many
nice people and found his
work to be very rewarding.
However, two of the things
he said he misses the most
are the fellowship with the
legal community and being
around people.
"I miss the contact with
the public," Thomas said.


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
The Florida Bar honored
attorneys who had reached
their 50th anniversary of
dedication to the practice
of law Friday in Orlando
during the Florida Bar's


Annual Convention.
Among those scheduled
to be honored was N. John
Thomas, a retired attorney
who currently resides. in
Hernando. Thomas said he
was unable to. attend the
recognition luncheon be-
cause of health issues, but
stated he was very pleased
to hear he was receiving


Crowd-pleasing paunch


' DAVE SIGLERICnroncde
Louis Cuern struts his stuff for the crowd during the Red, White and Blue Beer Belly Contest on Saturday at The Shed during the Homosassa
River Fireworks Festival.


Daytona engraver shines


For Daytona Beach Shores

engraver who does UFfootball

trophies, work is never dull


RAY WEiss While prestigious, the na-
The Daytona Beach tional championship foot-
News-Journal ball trophy is a
straightforward job, using
DAYTONA BEACH simple letters. But much of
SHORES - Over a rack of her work requires a sur-
small steel tools, Cathy geon's touch, carving-out
Fletcher Meirose looks out detailed and intricate de-
over a magnificent view of signs that take much more
the Halifax River from 18 time, although engraving-
stories up. something
.But the ultimate eye- like a ring Meirose
catcher in her office is usually takes
what's right in front of her about an never
- college football's na- hour.
tional championship tro- But that back th
phy. wasn't the one dayI
Back in early January, ease when
University of Florida fans she mono- clients
from across the country grammred a
celebrated a third national 194-piece come c
championship 'with high flatware set,
fives and partying. But on repeating the same design.
this day, Meirose, 57, is qui- "I have to admit, that got
etly hand-engraving the boring," she says, smiling.
name of the school into the Meirose is a very busy
side of college football's woman.
elusive prize for the second She does work for about
time this decade. 150 jewelry stores around
"I feel no pressure," says the. country - rings and
Meirose, a veteran hand en- pendants are common fare
graver. "I feel pride. I'm for the woman who has en-
very proud having the graved by hand since 1971.
honor of doing it." ,Her interest was sparked
Starting with Syracuse working part-time at a jew-
University in 1959, the din- elry store while in high
ner tray-sized, sterling sil- school. After graduation,
ver MacArthur Trophy - she headed to a trade
named after World War II school in Lancaster, Pa., for
Gen. Douglas MacArthur-- six months to learn the
has been presented to craft.
America's No. 1 team by the Meirose could never
National Football Founda- dream back then that one
tion and College Football day big-time clients would
Hall of.Fame in Indiana. come calling.
"I work for them," she She engraves and refur-
says, adding that the trophy bishes trophies and cups
will be on display in for Daytona International
Gainesville through much Speedway, including the
of this year. "Each school is Rolex 24-hour race and the
responsible for getting it. Daytona 500.
engraved." "Her work is excellent,"
Meirose and UF have be- says Larry Chinn, the tech
come a team, both at the top manager at the Daytona
of their games. 500 Experience, who over-


sees the care of everything
from rides to trophies at
the attraction. "She's had a
great reputation for a long
time."
Meirose has even gone
presidential, having en-
graved a Christmas tree or-
nament for the White
House in the late 1980s.
And she did work for U.S.
Open Golf championship
winners Lee Janzen and
the late Payne Stewart. ,
"It's never boring, al-
ways different," she says of
her job, glancing through
page after page of photos,
visual mem-
e could ories in a
':scrapbook.
dream "It's not a
ien that competitive
field. Hand
big-time engravers
now are few
would and far be-
tween. It's a
calling. dying art."
That's be-
cause most customers are.
now turning to less expen-
sive machine engraving,
including Ohio State Uni-
versity when it won the
football national champi-
onship in 2002.
Under her magnified
visor, Meirose can easily
point out machine versus
human engraving on the
trophy.
"Hand engraving cuts
out the metal," she says.
"Machine engraving just
scratches it on."
Meirose calls that level
of workmanship, or lack of
it, "a sin."
As if poetic justice,
Florida beat Ohio State
after the 2006 season, and
she, too, became a big win-
ner.
"For things of quality
and prestige, like this,"
she says, studying the
large and cherished cham-
pionship trophy, "you
need hand-engraving."
Needless to say, Meirose
won't be rooting for Ohio
State next football season.


Charity event features

everything equestrian


Special to the Chronicle
OCALA - The "Horses
Horses Horses" charity
event will bring all man-
ner of equestrian activities
to the Southeastern Live-
stock Pavilion in Ocala
Saturday and Sunday, July
11-12.
Attendees will have the
opportunity to see horses
of all breeds, many train-
ers, gala entertainment by
horses, a parade of breeds
and more. The festivities
will also include live
music, food, door prizes,
the chance to ride a Paso
Fino, a'Kids Zone and an
ugliest dog contest..
Twenty-two world cham-


pion trainers and horses
will provide breed train-
ing demonstrations.
Admission costs $12 per
day per person, with one
child aged 7 and under ad-
mitted free per paying
adult.
The weekend will bene-
fit Horses N Heroes, a
local charity that provides
a positive outlet for at-risk
youth through instruction
,in riding and experience
caring for horses. Horses
N Heroes is located just
outside of Ocala in Citra,
Fla.
I More information about
the event and the charity
is available online at
www.HorsesNHeroes.org.


7 injured in 1-75 crash


Associated Press
TAMPA - Tampa Fire-
Rescue said seven peo-
ple were injured in a
four-car crash on Inter-
state 75.
Tampa Fire-Rescue
Capt. Bill Wade said an
adult female was taken to
a hospital with life-
threatening injuries on
Saturday afternoon.
Two other people were
transported to hospitals


with serious injuries.
Four others suffered
injuries that weren't life
threatening, Wade said,
and among those four
were two children.
The names of the vic-
tims weren't immediately
released.
The crash happened
shortly after 2 p.m. on
Saturday, and several fire
and rescue units from
Tampa and Pasco County
were called to the scene.


Officials find missing boaters


Associated Press.
MIAMI - The Coast
Guard said two boaters
who went missing off the
Sebastian Inlet have been
located.
The Indian River Po-
lice Department found
the missing boat with
Kyle Simms aboard Satur-
day.
The other boater, J.C.


Palmer, had tried to swim
to shore after their boat
became disabled in the
Indian River.
Palmer was pulled from
the water Saturday after-
noon and transported to
emergency responders in
stable condition.
He was located in the
Intercoastal Waterway,
about two miles south of
Sebastian Inlet.


RetiredHernando attorney

recognized by Florida Bar


I









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


W OSJNNUIY, JUN*E ZLZ5, Z


Indefinite prison time for detainees?

Associated Press U t


WASHINGTON - The
White House is considering
whether to issue an execu-
tive order to indefinitely im-
prison a small number of
Guantanamo Bay detainees,
concerned that Congress
might otherwise stymie its
plans to quickly close the
naval prison in Cuba.
Under the proposal, de-
tainees considered too dan-
gerous to prosecute or
release would be kept in
confinement in the U.S. or
possibly overseas, two ad-
ministration officials said
Friday. Otherwise, the
White House could get
bogged down for months
seeking agreement with
Congress on a new legal de-
tention system.
No final decisions have
been made about the order,
which would be the fourth
major mandate by President
Barack Obama to deal with
how the United States treats
and prosecutes, terror sus-
pects and foreign fighters.
One of the officials said
the order, if issued, would
not take effect until after
the Oct. 1 start of the 2010
budget year. Already, Con-
gress has blocked the ad-
ministration from spending
any money this year to im-
prison the detainees in the
United States - which in
turn could slow or even halt
Obama's pledge to close the
prison by Jan. 21.(
The administration also,
is considering asking Con-
gress to pass new laws that
would allow the indefinite
detentions, the official said.
Both the officials spoke
Friday on' condition of
anonymity because they
were not authorized to dis-
cuss the still-tentative issue


Associated Press
In this photo reviewed by the U.S. military and shot through a window, a guard watches
over detainees in the exercise yard May 31 at the Camp Five detention facility on Guan-
tanln RU II US Naval Rase in IhCuba.


publicly. The possibility of tainees. Without the money,
an executive order was first Obama's order can't be car-
reported by the investiga- ried out.
tive group ProPublica and "Bipartisan majorities of
The Washington Post, Congress and the American
Christopher Anders, sen- people oppose closing
ior legislative counsel for Guantanamo without a plan,
the American Civil Liber- and several important ques-
ties Union's Washington, of- tions remain unanswered,"
fice, said the organization McConnell said. He said
opposes any plans for indef- Obama demanded the trans-
inite detention of prisoners. fers "before the administra-
"We're' saying it shouldn't tion even has a place to put
be done at all," he said Friday the detainees who are
Without legislative back- housed there, any plan for
ing, an executive order is military, commissions, or
the only route Obama has to any articulated plan for in-
get the needed authority. definite detention."
In a statement Friday There are 229 detainees
night, Senate Republican currently being held at Guan-
leader Mitch McConnell of tanamo. So far, 11 are ex-
Kentucky cast doubt that pected to be tried in military
Congress would approve tribunals, and at least one-
funding for transferring or Ahmed Ghailani, a Tanzan-
imprisoning detainees in ian accused intwoAmerican
the U.S. without detailed embassy bombings a decade
plans on how it would work ago - has been transferred
Lawmakers this month to United States for prosecu-
blocked $80 million the ad- tion by a -civilian federal
ministration had requested court in Manhattan.
for transferring the de- Still others, including


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR 8HI LO PR
89 72 1.30 76 0.68 87 74 0.79


four Chinese Muslims
known as Uighurs who were
transferred to Bermuda this
month, have been sent to,
foreign nations. The Obama
administration is trying to
relocate as many as 100
Yemneni detainees to Saudi
Arabia for rehabilitation.
Obama said last month
he was looking at continued
imprisonment for a small
number of Guantanamo de-
tainees whom he described
as too dangerous to release.
He called it "the toughest
issue we will face."
It's not clear how many de-
tainees could fall into that cat-
egory. Defense and Justice
Department officials have
privately said at least some
could be freed attrial because
prosecutors would be reluc-
tant to expose classified evi-
dence against the detainees.
Some of that evidence also
might be thrown out because
of how it was obtained - po-
tentiallyby cruel, inhuman or
degrading treatment


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City H
Daytona Bch. 95
Ft. Lauderdale 90
Fort Myers, 89
Gainesville 9'4
Homestead 88
Jacksonville 98
Key West 88
Lakeland ;92
Melbourne' , '93


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tarripa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


SFor the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrests
* Michael John Florian, 26,
of Homosassa, at 6:24 p.m.
Monday on a charge of domestic
battery. According to the arrest
report, Florian slapped a 29-
year-old woman in the face and
grabbed her neck after she told
him she was taking her kids from
his home. No bond.
* Ricky Erroll Greer, 34, of
Inverness, at 4:22 p.m. Tuesday
on a charge of domestic battery.
According to the arrest report,
Greer became violent during an
argument and pushed and
shoved a 49-year-old woman to
the ground. No bond.
i Theresa Rose Cannelle,
47, of Hemando, at 9:41 p.m.
Tuesday on a charge of domes-
tic battery. According to the arrest
report, Cannelle hit an 18-year-
old boy on the head with force
and slapped his face. No bond.
* Antwan Lemaine John-
son, 23, of Inverness, at 11:31
p.m. Tuesday on a charge of do-
mestic battery. According to the
arrest report, Johnson held a.21 -
year-old woman against a door
and spit in her face. No bond.
Other arrests
* Matthew Scott Vanduzer,
18, at large, at 12:36 p.m. Thurs-
day on a charge of burglary of an
unoccupied structure. Bond
$3,000.
* Vincenzo B. Minnela, 47. of
9246 S. Sweetwater Dr., Inver-
ness, at 1:54 a.m. Friday on a
charge of driving while license
suspended, canceled or revoked,
habitual offender. Bond $10,000.
* Christopher B. Groom, 25.
of 7822 Wisp Trail, Inverness, at
6:53 a.m. Friday on a charge of
burglary of an unoccupied struc-
ture. Bond $3,000.
* Darrell 0. Hanner, 46, of
5282 S. Curtis Point, Lecanto, at
8:23 a.m. Friday, on a warrant,
on a charge of obtaining property
by means of worthless check.
Bond $150.
C 0 T F ' s .


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc.
ts
ts
ts


S MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds from 5 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters a light chop. Chance of after-
noon thunderstorms today.


86 77 1.70 84 73 0.30

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusiveday
S"- TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 90 Low: 73
v* Partly cloudy; 40% chance of
thunderstorms
-MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 89 Low: 74
SPartly cloudy; 60%o chance of thunderstorms

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 74
Mostly cloudy; 70% chance of thunderstorms


".. ' : ALM
TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 88/75
Record 98/64
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. .82
Departure from mean 1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 1.10 in.
Total for the month 10.99 in.
Total for the year 29.71 in.
Normal for the year 23.24 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.


Gulf water
temperature


na
Taken atM Aftek


.. LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.66 28.71 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando. 33.71 33.71 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Lnverness 35.28 35.36 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.22 \ 38.32 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In any one year. This data Is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-721`1.


THE NATION


ANAC


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 75
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 82%
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
*ULight - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY


Saturday was good with pi


pollutants


mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/28 SUNDAY 11:36 5!24 11:59 5:47
6/29 MONDAY - 6:12 12:23 6:34

'i ;., _4WLETIAL OUTLOOK
, 0 SUNSET TONIGHT............................ 8:33 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.................6:35 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY................... 12:54 P.M.
JIIE A f 7 I511 JI 21 MOONSET TODAY .....................12:22 A.M.

,'d. -.BURN, CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi

i.1"'. -:- ATMERING,RULES
The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending in 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending In 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending in 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending In 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending In 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m. on their day.


-- 24,,C' ~ 7


*From mouths
City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withiacoochee*
Homosassa***


TIODS


of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
11:01 a/6:29 a 11:09 p/6:58 p
9:22 a/3:51 q 9:30 p/4:20 p
7:09 a/1:39 a 7:17 p/2:08 p
10:11 a/5:28 a 10:19 p/5:57 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
11:42 a/7:11 a -- /8:07 p
10:03 a/4:33 a 10:49 p/5:29 p
7:50 a/2:21 a 8:36 p/3:17 p
10152 a/6:10 a 11:38 p/7:06 p


LST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WM
Charlotte
Chicago .
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Lou sville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L
74 60 .07 ts 79 63
86 65 "pc 80 65
88 64 ts 89 631
94 76 pc 96 74
85 64 pc 77 65
10374 pc 101 73
85 67 ' ts 83 65
78 57 s 89 58
96 73 pc 97 68
82 49 S 92 56
77 59 sh 68 60
78 61 ts 77 62
76 62 .07 ts 77 62
97 78 pc 91 78
V 84 67 ts 85 64
95 70 pc 94 70
89 62 pc 83 62
90 64 .01 ts 85 60
79 60 ts 80 60
99 74 pc 98 76
84 64 ts 84 60
82 59 .28 ts 72 59
10376 pc 98 74
81 58 ts 85 57
91 72 s 81 58
81 60 pc 82 63
99 74 pc 95 70
96 74 s 90 63
81 63 ts 81 64
84 59 sh 78 63
101 82 pc 98 78
89 66 s 85 63
10076 pc 98 73
101 80 s 108 84
98 78 pc 94 68
71 61 s 78 66
91 74 s 89 66
98 81 ts 97 72
80 61 pc 82 62
81 69 .53 pc 79 59
95 76 .04 pc 97 76
98 75 pc 98 73
95 75 ts 93 67


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 94 79 pc 96 80
New York City 81 63 .02 ts .79 66
Norfolk 84 73 pc 87 70
Oklahoma City 10172 . pc 91 67
Omaha 84- 75 s 84 59
. Palm Springs 11073 s 112 77
Philadelphia 82 66 ts 81 65
Phoenix .10986 pc 108 86
Pittsburgh 81 57 ts 81 60
Portland, ME 74 57 sh 67 58
Portland, Ore 84 52 s 78 52
Providence, R.I. 79 63 sh 75 62
Raleigh 94 72 pc 92 68
Rapid City 75 52 s 86 55
Reno 93 60 s 97 62
Rochester, NY 77 62 ts . 78 61
Sacramento 10460 s 106 65
St. Louis 98. 74 s 89 64
St. Ste. Marie 79 53 sh. 67 54
Salt Lake City 82 56 s 87 61
San Antonio 10379 pc 101 76
San Diego 73 62 s 79 .67
San Francisco 84 53 s 83 56
Savannah 94 77 trace pc 96 77
Seattle 77 52 pc 71 51
Spokane 79 49 s 82 51
Syracuse 75 61 ts 77 60
Topeka 95 78 s 86 62
Washington 84 70 ts 85 67
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 111 Needles, Calif. LOW 27 Stanley, Idaho


WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/76/ts
Amsterdam 77/58/sh
Athens 81/63/pc
Beijing 96/69/ts
Berlin 76/58/pc
Bermuda 87/75/ts
957/


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; rdr=drizzle; Cairo
f=fairi h-hazy; pc=partly cloudy;, r=rain; Calgary
rs-rainlsnow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; Havana
sn=snow; tsathunderstorms; w=windy. Hong Kong
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Jerusalem


95/71/s
75/50/s
89/76/ts
89/79/ts
87/68/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw -


82/61/sh
72/53/sh
93/65/s
74/53/ts
77/62/sh
77/61/pc
77/57/sh
75/66/ts
80/61/ts
61/44/sh
83/64/ts
72/61/sh
79/59/pc


Burglaries
IA burglary, reported on June
25, occurred at approximately 9
p.m. June 24 to a conveyance on
Pine Street in Homosassa.
* A burglary to a residence
and a petit theft occurred at ap-
proximately midnight June 24, in
the 4100 block of W. Grover
Cleveland Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa.
* A commercial burglary, re-
ported on June 26, occurred at
approximately 3:04 a.m. to an
unoccupied structure in the 8800
block of S. Florida Avenue, In-
vemess.
* A burglary occurred at ap-
proximately 5:30 p.m. June 25, to
an unoccupied structure in the
1000 block of N. Suncoast
Boulevard, Crystal River.
Thefts
* A retail petit theft, reported
on June 25, occurred at approx-
imately 4 a.m. in the 6700 block'
of S. Suncoast Boulevard, Ho-
mosassa.
* A petit theft, reported on
June 25, occurred at approxi-
mately 10 a.m. in the 6700 block
of N. Capri Loop, Hemando.
* A grand theft, reported on
June 24, occurred at approxi-
mately 7:30 p.m. May 19, on
Honeysuckle Court N., Ho-
mosassa.
* A grand theft, reported on
June 25, occurred at approxi-
mately 8:30 p.m. in the 3800
block of E. Berry Street, Inver-
ness.
* A grand theft, reported on
June 26, occurred at approxi-
mately 9 p.m. June 25 in the 500
block of S. Monroe Street, Bev-
erly Hills.
Vandalisms
SA criminal mischief, reported
on June 25, occurred at approx-
imately 8 a.m. June 22, in the
4400 block of S. Dodge Point,
Floral City.
* A criminal mischief ($1,000
or more), reported on June 25,
occurred at approximately 6:30
p.m. June 24, in the 5000 block
of S. SwallowAvenue, Inverness.

- . 0 N 1


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I








SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009 A5


NATION/WORLD


Crrmvr CfnTNTv (FT) CrHRO NIcIrr


Conyers says little about


wife's corruption troubles
Associated Press "


DETROIT - On the day
City Councilwoman Monica
Conyers stepped into a fed-
eral courtroom at home in
Detroit to plead guilty to
bribery, her husband was at
home in Washington. Several
of Rep. John Conyers' col-
leagues in the U.S. House
said they weren't aware his
wife could soon wind up
spending five years in prison.
Rather than take the easy
shot, the top Republican on
the House ethics committee
declined to comment. Rep.
Jerrold Nadler, a New York
Democrat and a 'senior
member of the Judiciary
Committee, said "it should-
n't have any impact at all"
on John Conyers' work in
the House.
A few thousand dollars in
bribes - including one ac-
cepted outside a Detroit fast-
food restaurant named Mr.
Fish - have all but ended
the short political career of
Monica Conyers. They
haven't made so much as a
dent in the decades-long po-
litical career of John Cony-
ers, a reserved yet adamant
advocate for Detroit and
Michigan who appears al-
most indifferent to the cor-
ruption scandal at home.
"My inclination is that
John Conyers' constituency
is extremely independent of
hers," Wayne State Univer-
sity political science profes-
'sor Lyke Thompson said.
,"He has worked long and
hard to build up his own
electoral base.... He is well-
known for his accomplish-
ments in Washington."
It's in Washington where
the 80-year-old Conyers
spends most of his time,
apart from the wife who was
born in 1964 - the same
year he was first elected to
the House. He's rarely seen
with Monica Conyers and
the couple's two sons, and
has said little about the
,scandal that had swirled for
more than year around his


Madoff orderedto forfeit $171B


Associated Press ,

NEW YORK - Bernard
Madoff would be stripped of
all his possessions under a
$171 billion forfeiture order
handed down only days be-
fore prosecutors seek to put
the disgraced financier
away in prison for the rest of
his life.
U.S. District Judge Denny
Chin entered the prelimi-
nary order Friday, ruling
that Madoff must give up.his*
interests in all property, in-
cluding real estate, invest-
ments, cars pnd boats.,
The forfeiture represents
the total amount that could
be connected to Madoff's
fraud, not the amount stolen
or lost, and the order made
clear that nothing prevents
other departments or enti-
ties from seeking to recover
additional funds.
A call to Madoff's lawyer, Ira
Sorkin, after hours Friday was
not immediately returned. In
a court filing in March, Sorkin
said the government's forfei-
ture demand of $177 billion
was "grossly overstated - and
misleading - even for a case
of this magnitude."


The 71-ydar-old Madoff
pleaded guilty in March to
charges that his exclusive
investment advisory busi-
ness was actually a massive
Ponzi scheme. Federal
'prosecutors say Madoff or-
chestrated perhaps the
largest financial swindle in
history.
Acting U.S. Attorney Lev
Dassin, who released a
copy of the order Friday
night, plans to seek a 150-
year prison term'at Mad-
off's sentencing Monday.
Sorkin has argued in court
papers for a 12-year term.
According to Friday's
order, the government also
settled claims against Mad-


off's wife. Under the
arrangement, the govern-
ment obtained Ruth Mad-
off's interest in all
property, including more
than $80 million-worth that
she had claimed was hers,
prosecutors said. The
order.left her $2.5 million
in assets.
The agreements strip the
Madoffs of all their interest
in properties belonging to
them, including homes in
Manhattan, Montauk, N.Y,
and Palm Beach, Fla.,
worth a total of nearly $22
million. The Madoffs must
also forfeit all insured or
salable personal property
contained in the homes.


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Bring flags and signs.
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politically ambitious bride.
On Friday, as his wife was
in a courtroom pleading
guilty to a single count of
conspiracy to commit
bribery, Conyers declined to
answer a reporter's ques-
tions as he walked to the
House floor for a vote. "I
have no comment what-
ever," he said.
Prosecutors said Friday
that Monica Conyers ac-
cepted two payments in late
2007 to support a city con-
tract that would pay $47 mil-
lion to Texas-based Synagro
Technologies to recycle
wastewater sludge and
build a modern incinerator
in Detroit. The council
voted 5-4 to approve the
deal, with Conyers supply-
ing the decisive vote.
"She's going to have to re-
sign immediately, or (as) soon.
as she is sentenced," Wayne
State University law profes-
sor Peter Henning said. "She
will be. out of office within
two months. This is just bla-
tant bribery, the perception,
that someone on the Detroit
City Council can be bought"
Prosecutors have taken
care to say John Conyers
knew nothing about the
bribery, and there are no
signs it will affect his stand-
ing among voters who have


sent him back to Congress
every two years with at least
82 percent of the ballot
since he was first elected.
A former aide in Conyers'
House office, Monica Esters
married her boss in 1990.
The couple has two sons: the
eldest carries his father's
name and is a student at the
University of Georgia. The
younger son, Carl, attends
the prestigious Cranbrook
school in suburban Detroit
She was a political rookie
who largely campaigned on
her husband's name in 2005
'when she won election to
the nine-member council,
and her four years in office
have been defined by petty
squabbling and name-call-
ing. During a public hearing
last year, .she drew head-
lines for calling Council
President Ken Cockrel Jr.
"Shrek" - a reference to
the green movie ogre.
The nearly yearlong per-
jury investigation followed
a text-mnessaging sex scan-
dal involving ex-Mayor
Kwame Kilpatrick and his
former chief of staff, a
draining collection of City
Hall wrongdoing in a city
struggling with high unem-
ployment, rampant home
foreclosures and an unfor-
giving'economy


As Iranian streets quiet,


'hacktivists' take up fight


Associated Press
EDITOR'S NOTE: Iranian authorities
have barred journalists for international
news organizations from reporting on the
streets and ordered them to stay in their of-
fices. This report is based on the accounts
of witnesses reached in Iran and official
statements carried on Iranian media.

A sharp clampdown by Iranian authori-
ties may have quelled street protests, but
the fight goes on in cyberspace.
Groups of "hacktivists" - Web hackers
demanding Internet freedom - say they
are targeting Web pages of Iran's leader-
ship in response to the
regime's muzzling of blogs,
news outlets and other ON TH
sites. U NedaNet:
It's unclear how much http: N eww
the wired warriors have -esr/neda
disrupted official Iranian
sites. Attempts by The As- ' "War, War,
sociated Press to access http://yan
sites for state news organi- .blogspot.i
nations, including the Is- com/attac
lamic Republic News * "Freedom
Agency and Fars, were un- http:"/war
successful - with a mes- attack.blog
sage saying the links were
"broken."
Other Iranian Web sites, including the
official site for Supreme Leader Ayatollah
Ali Khamenei, were able to be viewed.
It's the latest in a widening front of at-
tempts at cyber attacks by activists and
others. Earlier this week, Defense Secre-
tary Robert Gates ordered the creation of
a new military cyber command that will
coordinate the Pentagon's efforts to de-
fend its networks and conduct cyberwar-
fare.
In the Iranian showdown, the co-
founder of the Open Source Movement,
Eric S. Raymond, has launched a site
called NedaNet, after 27-year-old Neda
Agha Soltan, who became a global symbol
of the postelection protest movement after
videos of her death by gunfire was posted
on Web sitesi,
Raymond described his site as a place
for hackers and Iranian protest movement
sympathizers from around the world to
team up in developing a system of proxy
sites that cloak the location of users in
Iran from the Iranian government
Iranian authorities have launched a
wide-ranging clampdown on many Web
sites, including blogs, independent news
outlets and sites linked to opposition
leader Mir Hossein Mousavi, who claims
the June 12 presidential election -was
rigged to hand victory to President Mah-
moud Ahmadinejad.


On Saturday, Raymond reported the
group would be forced to change some of
its tactics because the Iranian government
had "upped the level of Internet censor-
ship it's engaging in." Iranian government
monitors were inspecting traffic more
closely to see if users were accessing
blocked web sites, he said.
"We're trying to provide a covert com-
munication channel for dissenters and
revolutionaries to organize through," said.
Raymond in a telephone interview with
The Associated Press.
Raymond said a team of six hackers
spend their days writing software to help
Iranian Web users bypass state controls.
More than 1,000 other peo-
ple have offered band-
IE NET width on servers to host
proxy sites.
A Web page titled "Free-
.catb.org' dom Sucker" shows eight
Iranian government sites,
until victory:" including Ahmadinejad's
mobile blog, that are under a con-
googlepages. stant, automated attack by
k.html the page's anonymous cre-
Sucker:" ator. Every second, ,the
rriors. page attempts to reboot the
,spot.com/ pages in an attempt to
overload them.
Other groups are also
working to create Internet havens for Ira-
nians, including a group called Project
Hydra and the Free Net project Raymond
said that many' of the groups are wary of
allowing media interviews because hack-
ers tend to operate in anonymity.
Meanwhile, the average Web surfer can
simulate an attack on an Iranian-state
news organization of their choice. A Web
site "War, war, until victory" allows visitors
to engage in symbolic hacktivism and was
developed by an Iranian blogger from Is-
fahan.
With the click of a button, an attack is
simulated on the Web sites, including
IRNA and other state news organizations.
"These buttons are only a way for the
frustrations of young people to be settled
and in reality are only an attack on their
sorrows," the site's administrator wrote in
an e-mail to the AP The administrator
commented on condition of anonymity be-
cause of fears of government reprisals.
Cyber attacks have been around for
years, but have gained increasing atten-
tion from governments and security serv-
ices since Russian hackers Waged a
high-profile blitz on Estonia's govern-
ment and private sector Web sites in May
2007. In response, NATO set up an Esto-
nia-based, cyber defense center .and
plans to include cyber defense in NATO
exercises.'


Associated Press
Monica Conyers sits with her husband, Democratic U.S. Rep.
John Conyers, at a Labor Day rally Sept. 5, 2005, in Detroit.
Prosecutors on Friday charged Detroit City Council member
Monica Conyers with accepting cash bribes in exchange for
supporting a sludge contract with a Houston company.


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CITRUS CoUNTn (FL) CHRONICLE


AO SU


JNDAY, JUNE L2, 2LUU


Virginia
Baird, 87
FLORAL CITY
Virginia Louise Baird,
87, Floral City, died June
26, 2009 in the Hospice
Unit of Citrus Memorial
Hospital. A native of Clin-
ton, TN., she was born Jan
30, 1922, to the late Wymer
and Margaret Sharpe and
came to this area three
years ago from Alabama.
She was retired from the
restaurant business and
was a member of the First
United Methodist Church
of Inverness.
She loved spending time
with her family Survivors
include 4 children,
Michael Meade, New
Carlise, OH; Velma Ford,
Gadsden, AL; Janice Kil-
nowitz, Floral City; Lisa Al-
brecht, Portage, MI; her
brother and sister, Glenn
Sharpe and Patty Tracy,
both of Dayton, OH; 10
grandchildren and 10
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
two husbands, John Bairtd
and'Benjamin Meade. Fu-
neral services will be con-
ducted on Tuesday, June
30th at 2:00 PM from the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Rev. Kip
Younger officiating. Burial
will follow in Hills of Rest
Cemetery of Floral City.
The family will receive
friends at the funeral home
on Tuesday from 12 noon
until the hour of service.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Burton
Bellamy, 73
DUNNELLON
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Burton R.
Bellamy, age 73, of Dunnel-
lon, Florida, will be held
10:00 AM,Monday, June 29,
2009 at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Mr. Larry
Hartman and Mr. Charles
Dean officiating. Interment
will follow at Oak Ridge
Cemetery, Inverness,
Florida. Friends may call
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM, Sunday
at the Chapel. Online con-
dolences.may be sent to the
arnlly at'"wwwH6bperFzu-
,herfloniER., '-,
He was born February
13, 1936 in Hernando, FL,
son of Will u and Lola
(Fowler) Bellamy and
spent his life in Citrus
County. He died Saturday,
June 27, 2009 at his resi-
dence. Mr. Bellamy was a
United States Marine Vet-
eran. He was a cattle
- rancher; a member of the
Citrus County Cattleman's
Association; the B.PO.E. of
Hernando; and enjoyed
hunting and fishing. Mr.
Bellamy was preceded in
death by his parents: Will
and Lola Bellamy.
Survivors include his
wife of 50 years, Jimmie
Bellamy, Dunnellon; 4
sons: Bobby McKettrick
and Burton Bellamy both
of Williston, Carl McKet-
trick of Arcadia, Guy McK-
ettrick of Inverness; 4
daughters: Daphne Rooks
and Sybil Stokes both of
Hernando, Barbara Ren-
ney of Homosassa, FL,
Beverly Rooks of Safford,
AL, 2 sisters, Esther Can-
non of Bradenton, Mary
Adamkiewicz of Old Town,
17 Grandchildren, and 25
Great Grandchildren.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes.





James
Odom, 81
CITRUS SPRINGS
James Odom, 81, of.Cit-
rus Springs, FL, died on
June 24,2009 in Inverness,
under the loving care of his
family and Hospice of Cit-
rus County. James was born
on August 19, 1927 in


Akron, OH, the son of Clif-
ford and Leah Odom.
James served in the U.S.
Air Force during the occu-
pation of Japan. He was
employed in the Data Pro-
cessing Department of
the Chrysler Corp for most
of his career and retired as
the Manager of Data Pro-
cessing for the General Dy-
namics Corporation Tank
plant in Lima, Ohio. After
retiring from the Tank
Plant James and his wife,
Emylie, moved to Citrus
County in 1990. He was a


private man needing only
the joy of his wife and fam-
ily
James was preceded in
death by his brother,
Thomas Odom. He is sur-
vived by his wife Emylie
Odom of Citrus Springs,
FL; daughters, Denise Li-
pusch (Albert) of No-
blesville, IN, Deana
Hullibarger (David) of
Lima, OH and Debbie Pi-
casso (Joe) of Debary, FL;
son, David Odom (Erika) of
Saginaw, MI; brothers,
Ralph Odom of CA, Ken-
neth Odom of OH and Don
Odom of OH; grandchil-
dren, Ericka Collins, Jeff
Lipusch and James Odom;
Great Grandchildren,
Lucas Collins and Maxwell
Collins
A Memorial Service for
Mr. Odom will be held
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 at
Heinz Funeral Home in In-
verness. Visiting hours will
be from 1:00 pm unti[l00
pm with the service to fol-
low. Pastor Ron
Howard will preside. ,In-
verness VFW. Post 4337
will. provide Military Hon-
ors. Those who wish to
make a memorial contribu-
tion the family requests the
Hospice of Citrus County
Care Unit, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills. FL 34464.
Denote Care Unit on'. e
check. Heinz Ftlner-al
Home & Cremation, Inver-
ness,; FL.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.
JoAnne
Schonsheck, 89
LECANTO
JoAnne A Schonsheck of
Lecanto FL passed away
on Thursday, June 26, 2009
at Oak Hill Hospital,
Spring Hill, FL. Services
will be held at 11:30 am on
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 at
Fero Funeral Home. Burial
will be at Fero Memorial
Gardens, Beverly Hills,
FL. Arrangements by Fero
Funeral Home with Cre2.
matory 5955 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, FL
34465

Emil
Whitman, 77
iNV RNESS
Enmil Fredrick Whitman,
77, Inverness, died June 24,
2009 at his residence. A na-
tive of Canterbury, NH, he
was born to the late Emil
and Ella (Cummings) Whit-
man and moved to Florida
in 1999 from Williamstown,
Vermont.
He was a retired auto-
motive and heavy equip-
ment operator and
member of the Church of.
Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints in Lecanto and the
Highlands Watch Surveil-'
lance. Survivors include
his wife of 40 years, Bertha
Wood Whitman; 4 children,
Michael Whitman and his
wife, Jessica; Eric Whit-,
man; Cheryl Whitman and
her companion, Stanley
Sampson; Karen Vice and
her husband, Wayne; 2 sis-
ters, Patricia Tucker and
Pamela Shorey; 6 grand-
children, Haley, Michael,
Emma, Alex, Calvin, and
Kasey
He was preceded in
death by his daughter,
Kathy Dodge. Memorial
services will be conducted
on Wednesday, July 1st at
3:00 PM from the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Bishop Richard Sampson
officiating. Cremation
arrangements will follow.
There will be no calling
hours at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als requested to the
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Sairits, 3474 W
Southern, Lecanto, FL
34461 or the Charity of your
choice.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

OBITUARIES
* The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy per-
mits both free and


paid obituaries.
* Free obituaries can in-
clude: Full name of
deceased; age; home
town/state; date of
death; place of death.
date, time and place
of visitation and fu.
neral services.
* A flag will be includedd
for free for those who
served in the U.S. mil-
itary. (Please note this
service when submit
ting a free obituary.)


Unlike S.C.'s Sanford, most



governors easy are to find


Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
Texas Gov. Rick Perry was
raising money at campaign
headquarters when an As-
sociated Press reporter
called his press staff to ask
what he was doing. An hour
later, he walked into AP's
statehouse bureau to show
he was alive and well and
not, say, in South America
for a romantic rendezvous.
Mbst of the nation's gov-
ernors were willing - even
eager - to prove they were
on the job after revelations
that South Carolina Gov.
Mark Sanford ditched his
security'detail and disap-
peared for a secret week-
long tryst with a mistress in
Argentina.
'The day after Sanford
admitted his indiscretion
at a tearful, rambling press
conference, The Associ-
ated Press called gover-
nors' offices nationwide to
ask: What's the boss doing
right now?
Gov. Mike Beebe of
Arkansas was at the den-
tist. Maryland Gov. Martin
O'Malley was fishing with
his 10-year-old son. Wiscon-
sin Gov. Jim Doyle was fly-
ing back from a Washington
speaking engagement,
while Alaska Gov. Sarah
Palin was visiting U.S.
troops in eastern Europe.
Nebraska Gov. Dave
Heineman was in his of-
fice, but a few minutes
after a reporter called he,
too, showed up at the AP's
Capitol bureau - a state
trooper, the lieutenant gov-
ernor and his chief of staff
in tow - to jokingly show
he could be accounted for.
The AP had problems
finding Georgia's Sonny
Perdue, who is serving his
final term. His spokesman,
Bert Brantley, said Perdue
had worked-at his Capitol
office earlier, but he wasn't
sure where the governor
was precisely when the AP
called. When pressed,
Braintley said he would not
call the governor just to an-
swer a press inquiry into
his whereabouts.
"Even when he's on a
personal day. or family
time, he still keeps his
Blackberry on him," Brant-
ley said. "There's not a
time when he's not reach-
able."
Sanford's vanishing act
had his. fellow governors
scratching their heads, if
not cracking wise. Montana
Gov. Brian Schweitzer
began a news conference
Wednesday by joking he
was late because he'd been
in Venezuela.
"What was he thinking?"
said Schweitzer, a Democ-
rat. "Didn't he think any-
one would be watching?"
Impromptu checks by the
AP showed most guberna-
torial staffs keep close tabs
on their bosses.
Florida Gov. Charlie
Crist's love life has-
n't been an obstacle
to keeping in touch.
Erin Isaac, Crist's
communications di-
rector,' said: "I
talked to the gover-
nor 100 times while
he was on his hon-
eymoon." Crist just Go
got married in De- Cha
cember. Cr
SGenerally, state was in
officials and with
staffers should be durihoneyg
able to locate a gov-
ernor on a mo-
ment's notice, and the
public has a right to know
too, said Gene Policinski,
executive director of the
First Amendment Center, a
free speech education or-
ganization in Nashville,
Tenn., that is part of the
Freedom Forum.
Besides giving speeches,
signing bills and attending
ribbon-cuttings, governors
must take charge in natural
disasters. They command


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Associated Press
South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford tries to keep the media back as he makes his way to the
Statehouse after a cabinet meeting Friday in Columbia, S.C.


some keep closed-door
meetings and private func-
tions under wraps even if
they're official state busi-
ness. '
Pawlenty's staffers re-
jected a written request for
access to his appointment
calendar. On days when he
doesn't have news confer-
.ences or speeches, his
daily events schedule often
reads "No, Public Events."
The fundraiser he attended
wasn't on it.
Many states cited, secu-
rity reasons for refusing to
release schedules, while
others said they're npt con-
sidered public records.
Most states were also
tight-lipped about security,
saying revealing 'details
would put chief executives
at risk, and arrangements
varied widely in states will-
ing to talk about them. In
Virginia, State Police guard
Gov. Tim Kaine around the
clock, anywhere he goes,
without exception. North
Dakota Gov. John Hoeven,
by contrast, normally
drives his own car and
state law doesn't require
him to have a security de-
tail.
Sanford managed to slip
overseas undetected be-
cause he dismissed his se-
curity detail before driving
himself to the airport.
Reggie Lloyd, chief of the
South Carolina Law En-
forcement Division, told re-
porters his agency had no
legal authority to refuse
Sanford.
"As an adult male,. he's
free to come and go as he
pleases, and so we just hon-
estly quit looking for him,"
Lloyd said.
There was little need to
ask Sanford's office where
he was after he returned
Wednesday. His every move
has been monitored and
broadcast far beyond the
borders of South Carolina.
. On Friday, Sanford met
with his agency chiefs to
apologize for his baffling
absence, then move on with
any state business he may
have neglected while he
was AWOL in Argentina.







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Associated Press

BEAUFORT, S.C. -
South Carolina Gov Mark
Sanford's mother tells The
Associated Press she is
praying for her son.
Speaking Saturday at
her Beaufort home. 83-
year-old Margaret Sanford
expressed love and sup-
port for the governor who
this week admitted having
an affair with a woman in
Argentina
Margaret Sanford said"
she'd just returned to ier
home froi the state capi-

their states' National
Guards. And their personal
time can become the pub-
lic's business, particularly
when they betray people's
trust, Polieinski said.
"As, unfortunately, recent
scandals seem to indicate,
there is legitimate public
interest in knowing where
a governor is and what
they're doing," Policinski
said.
When AP asked where
governors were, the most
common answer was in the
office. Louisiana Gov.
Bobby Jindal was reviewing
bills on the last day of the
legislative session. Okla-
homa Gov. Brad Henry was
interviewing a candidate
for a judicial appointment.
Even when governors
were traveling, staffers had
little trouble saying
S exactly where they
were. In Alabama,
Gov. Bob Riley's

rector, Jeff Emer-
son, knew Riley was
landing in Seattle
after an economic
>v. development trip
rlie overseas.
ist Palin's spokes-
touch woman, Sharon
staff Leighow, said the
recent Alaska governor
was visiting Na-
tional Guard troops
from her state abroad, but
wouldn't immediately dis-
close where. She called
back 30 minutes later, after
getting the Defense Depart-
ment's OK, to say Palin was
in Kosovo. Palin told the
world where she was that
same day in a Twitter up-
date.
As Minnesota Gov. Tim
Pawlenty left a Republican
fundraiser, he said he al-
ways tries to at least let his



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tal ofColumbia. She would
not say whether she'd seen
her son or what the two
have discussed.
Meanwhile, pressure
mounts for a criminal
probe into the governor's
secret trip.
Democratic leaders
want an investigation into
Sanford's use of state
money to help pay for an
earlier South America
trip. Others are question-
ing whether the governor
broke laws. by leaving
without giving the lieu-
tenant governor control.


Florida Gov.
Charlie Crist's
love life hasn't

been an obstacle
to keeping in
touch. Erin
Isaac, Crist's
communications
director, said:
'"I talked to the
governor 100
times while he
was on his
honeymoon."
Crist just got
married in
December.
staff know what he's doing.
"Regardless of whether
you're a governor or anyone
else, having a little clear-
your-head time is probably
a good thing," Pawlenty
said. "But you always have
to make sure you stay in
touch in case there's a
problem. You have to com-
municate."
. While finding governors
through their press offices
is easy, tracking them down
using schedules available
to the general public can
be trickier. Most release
calendars of public events
and news conferences, but




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rh








CtRFinS Cnrwry (FL CHRONICLE SS


STARN ES
Continued from Page Al

He said sometimes he does
a little cooking during the day,
and when there's a barbecue
outside, he's usually the one
manning the grill.


"When I get out of here I
want to do some fishing,"
he said. "I want to coach a
little high school football. I
had two majors in college,
mathematics and physical
education. I'd also like to
come back here and'volun-
teer, if they'll have me."
He said if anything good


has come from his stroke,
it's a change in'attitude. He
was married for 30 years
until his alcoholism de-
stroyed his marriage. He
said he doesn't want to
drink anymore. The doc-
tors told him if he ever
went back to his old
lifestyle, he'd be dead


within a month.
"At times I still have
anger fits, but I don't know
if it's from the stroke or
from alcohol," he said.-
"Whichever one it is, I sure
wish I didn't do it."
He said some of his for-
mer football teammates
still call him, and he has


an "absolutely fabulous
family."
The day he took his first
step he said it was so fan-
tastic he didn't know the
words to describe it.
'Tina told me we're mak-
ing good progress, and
Tina's not easy on praise,
so you know she means it,"


he said. "My number one
thing is to walk.
"I feel like I have to set
an example for my family
and try not to let them
down by quitting," he said.
"I can't stand to think about
quitting. My parents forgot
to teach me how to do that,
so I'm lucky that way.".


Once, the hulking frame of
Steve Starnes, a former
professional football player,
could stand without effort. Now, after
suffering a stroke three years ago, the
seemingly simple act of standing
takes an immense amount of physical
and mental effort. 1 Ph y sical
therapist assistant Tina'Fritz stead-*
ies Starnes, who also uses a cane for
balance. 5 Even lifting a leg off of
the ground can be difficult for the for-
mer athlete. N After his 90-
minute structured therapy session,


Photography and text by Matthew Beck


Starnes pushes himself along the
Withlacoochee State Trail. Some-
times he completes the trip down the
trail many times in a day. Once at his
stopping point, he locks the wheels
on his chair and pulls himself up
without help 'from anyone. He re-
peats the process each time he hits
the trail. The intensity Starnes once
carried onto the football field can be
seen in his face as he completes each
repetition of leg lifts. Even when his


formal 90-minute therapy session is
complete and his voluntary trail walk
is complete, Starnes' dogged deter-
mination doesn't cease. 5J As he
watches SportsCenter in his room at
Arbor Trail, Starnes refuses to let his
body rest. Throughout the day, every
day he completes thousands of repe-
titions of leg lifts, pull-ups and flexi-
bility exercises to rebuild his body
and mind into one that will stand and
walk again - on his terms.


SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2oog A7


STEVE STARNES: THE STRUGGLE OF A STROKE


CITRus Couwry (FL E










N Page A8 - SUNDA, JUNE 28, 2009



NATION


&
CITRUS CoutI


WORLD


TY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Ugly pooch


Associated Press
Miss Ellie competes in the
World's Ugliest Dog Con-
test at the Sonoma-Marin
Fair on Friday In Petaluma,
Calif. The blind 15-year-old
Chinese Crested Hairless
won the pedigree category.

Police: Day care
was drug haven
NEW YORK - Police shot
and wounded an armed man
during a brazen robbery at-
tempt at a day care center
that functioned as a drug
haven, with a trove of mari-
juana and more than
$100,000 in cash in its base-
ment, authorities said Satur-
day.
Police initially thought the
Special Momerts Daycare
might have been targeted for
a holdup Friday because it
was payday..But "it appears
now that the day care center
was a repository for drugs
and money," Police Commis-
sioner Raymond Kelly said.
Special Moments owner
Donna Rogers, 37, was ar-
rested Saturday on a Mnari-
juana-possession charge
after police said they found.
the money and 10 pounds of
the drug in the Brooklyn cen-
ter. Her husband was in ne-
gotiations to surrender, Kelly
,said.
', Phone numbers for the
couple and the center rang
unanswered Saturday, and
police didn't know whether
they had lawyers.


World BRIEF

Leaders mark
Iron Curtain fall
BUDAPEST, Hungary -
European leaders marked
the 20th anniversary of the
symbolic fall of the Iron Cur-
tain, often described as the
first crack in the Berlin Wall
and one of the key episodes
leading to the end of commu-
nism in Eastern Europe, in
Budapest on Saturday.
The presidents of Ger-
many, Austria, Finland,"
Slovenia and Switzerland, as
well as high-ranking officials
from Poland, Britain and
more than 20 other countries
participated in a commemo-
rative session at the Hungar-
ian parliament and a gala
event at the Hungarian State
Opera House.
On June 27,1989, the
then-foreign ministers of
Hungary, Gyula Horn, and
Austria, Alois Mock, cut
through some barbed wire on
the border between the two
countries, putting a symbolic
end to a physical and psy-
chological boundary of which
by then there was little left.
"Looking at the entire chain
of events, we rightfully and
deservingly celebrate June
27 as the day in which the
partitioning of Europe came
to an end," Hungarian Presi-
dent Laszlo Solyom said at
the start of the special ses-
sion in parliament. "We have
every reason to celebrate to-
gether. The cut barbed wire
fence was an immediate
symbol that helped the whole
world understand what was
happening here in the center
of Europe."
Hungry had begun to dis-
mantle the Iron Curtain
nearly two months earlier, on
May 2,1989 - partly be-
cause border guards said it
was in such poor condition
that even small animals were
setting off false alarms along
, the electrified fence.
S-From wire reports


Iran pledges 'crushing' response


Ahmadinejad

won't accept

U.S. critique

Associated Press

EDITOR'S NOTE.: Iranian au-
thorities have barred journalists for
international news organizations
from reporting on the streets and
ordered them to stay in their of-
fices. This report is based on the
accounts of witnesses reached in
Iran and ofTicial statements car-
ried on Iranian media.
President Mahmoud Ahmadine-
jad vowed Saturday to make the.
U.S. regret its criticism of Iran's
postelection crackdown and said
the "mask has been removed" from


the Obama administration's efforts The cleric-led regime
to improve relations. now appears to have
Ahmadinejad- with his internal quashed a protest move-
opponents virtually silenced - all ment that brought hundreds
but dared Obama to keep calling for of thousands to the streets
an end to repression ofdemonstra- of Tehran and other cities
tors who claim the hardline leader in the greatest challenge to
stole re-election through massive its authority, in 30 years.
fraud. There have been no signifi- Mah
"You should know that if you con- cant demonstrations in Mahn
tinue the response of the Iranian days, and the most signifi- vowed
nation will be strong," Ahmadine- cant signs of dissent are the the U.
jad said in a speech to members of cries of "God is great!" criti,
Iran's judiciary, which is directly echoing from the rooftops, a
controlled by the ruling clerics, technique dating to the days of
"The response of the Iranian nation protest against the U.S.-backed
will be crushing. The response will shah before the 1979 Islamic Revo-
cause remorse." lution.
Ahmadinejad has no authority to Days of relatively restrained talk
direct major policy decisions on his from both Washington and Tehran
own - a power that rests with the appear to be returning to a familiar
non-elected theocracy. But his com- pattern of condemnation and re-
ments often reflect the thinking of crimination despite Obama's stated
the ruling establishment. desire to move away from mutual


I

Im
d
to
S.
isc


hostility. Iran and the U.S.
still appear interested in ne-
gotiations over Iran's nu-
clear program, but the
rising rhetorical tempera-
ture can be expected to slow
progress toward a deal, ex-
perts said.
oud o"The political feasibility
?irjad of pursuing it, and the like-
o nakelihood of success has
remake changed," said Trita Parsi,
cim. president of the National
Iranian American Council.
"I have a hard time seeing any real
engagement taking place for at least
four to six months."
Obama acknowledged Friday that
Iran's violent suppression of unrest
would hinder progress, saying
"There is no doubt that any direct
dialogue or diplomacy with Iran is
going to be affected by the events of
the last several weeks."


, Associated Press
NEW YORK - In addi-
tion to raising energy prices,
the climate legislation that's
winding through Congress
would create a parallel fi-
nancial system with a car-
bon-based currency.
. The House on Friday nar-
rowly passed landmark leg-
islation meant to curb
greenhouse gas emissions
and create an energy-effi-
cient economy, voting 219-
.212. President Barack
Obama on Saturday urged
senators to follow suit
Everyone from small
farmers to nuclear energy
companies would be forced
to re-evaluate their place in
the new order Power plants,
factories and refineries
would feel the first impact if
the federal government
moves ahead with plans to
cut greenhouse gas emis-
sions by 17 percent from
2005 levels by 2020 and by
about 80 percent near the
end of the century.
The sharply debated bill's
fate is unclear in the Senate.
A major struggle is expected
with 60 votes needed to
overcome a certain Republi-
can filibuster
How much it will affect
other industries is still a
matter of intense debate,
though the primary winners
and losers are already
emerging.
THE WINNERS:
Solar, wind, geothermal
and other renewable energy
companies, including nu-
clear, are some of the obvi-
ous winners in a carbon
economy.


Obama pressures Senate on measure
Associated Press generators.
I''The potential impact on people's daily
WVASHINGTON - Hailing the House. lives isgreat Iftheproposal, which faces an
President Barack Obama put pressure on, uncertain rate in the Senate, were to be-
senators Saturday to follow its lead and pass come law, it could make it more expensive
legislation to limit greenhouse gas emis- for people to heat, cool and light their
sions, helping usher the U.S. into newage homes; mean more smaller, fuel efficient
ofenergy efficiency. and hybrid electric cars; and create more
"Now my call to every senator, as well as "green" jobs, or environmentally friendly
to every American, is this: We cannot be ones. Windmills and solar panels mightre-
afraid of the future. And we must not be place smokestacks.
prisoners of the past," the president said in The complex bill, would require the U.S.
his weekly radio and Internet address. to reduce carbon dioxide and other green-
"Don't believe the misinformation out there house gas emissions by 17 percent from
that suggests there is somehow a contradic- 2005 levels by 2020 and by 83 percent by
tion between investing in clean energy and midcentury.
economic growth. It's just not true." Opponents complain about the costs and
The legislation, which the House nar- say some industries will simply move their
rowly approved Friday night, would place operations and jobs out orthe U.S. to coun-
the first national limits on emissions of tries that don't control greenhouse-gas
greenhouse gases from major sources - emissions,
such as power plants, factories and oil re- House Democratic leaders said the bill
fineries - to reduce the gases linked to helped accomplish one of Obama's cam-
global climate change. It would also start paign promises and would make the U.S. a
moving the U.S. away from fossil fuels and leader in international efforts to address
toward cleaner power sources, such as ge- climate change when negotiations take
othermal. wind,, solar and more nuclear place in Denmark this year.


In addition to the billions
of federal stimulus dollars
they expect to receive, those
industries can expect to see
a huge boost in investment
as utilities and power com-
panies are forced to cut
their carbon emissions.
Companies like Florida
Power & Light Co., Arizona
Public Service, Southern
California Edison and oth-
ers are already investing in
solar farms and other re-
newable energy projects,
and they'll likely spend even
more to increase the mix of
carbon-neutral energy
sources.
Farmers also will find


new ways to make money in
a carbon economy. Carbon
consultants like the Interna-
tional Carbon Bank & Ex-
change in Florida see huge
potential in agriculture for
managing carbon emissions.
Farmers that till their soil
differently or apply new en-
vironmental techniques can
get money by cooperating
with,a polluter as a carbon
"offset"
Owners of large tracts of
forest land also will get a lot
of interest from the business
community. Like farmers,
environmental experts see
them as a huge player in the
carbon economy because of


their natural ability to ab-
sorb carbon.
Louis Blumberg, director
of climate change for the
Nature Conservancy's Cali-
fornia chapter, envisions a
system in which forest own-
ers could make money sim-
ply by signing an agreement
to cut down fewer trees for
lumber.
The Nature Conservancy
did just that last year with
the Conservation Fund, a
nonprofit agency that owns
about 24,000 acres of red-
wood and douglas fir forest
northwest of San Francisco.
The groups changed the log-
ging schedule on the prop-


erty, and the fund expects to
receive about $2 million
from Pacific Gas and Elec-
tric, which participates in a
regional climate initiative
similar to the one that the
Waxman-Markey bill would
create around the country.
"This is really a model of
what can happen," Blum-
berg said. "Property owners
everywhere want to'figure
out a way to be part of this."
THE LOSERS:
Anyone who pays an elec-
tric bill would likely feel the
impact of climate legisla-
tion. Utilities will try to raise
rates as they invest in
cleaner-yet-more-expensive
energy sources. Some have
already announced plans to
do so. Petroleum companies
also may try to import more
of their refined gas and
heating oil from countries
with no carbon law, which
will raise costs.
The nonpartisan Congres-
sional Budget Office and the
Environmental Protection
Agency both issued esti-
mates of how the climate
bill would affect energy
costs.
The CBO estimated the
cost at $175 a year for the av-
erage household. The EPA
forecasts $80 to $110 a year.
The American Petroleum
Institute disputed both esti-
mates, saying the bill could
cost the average household
up to $3,300 by 2020.
"That is more than a few
postage stamps," API Presi-
dent Jack Gerard said in a
slap at Rep. Edward
Markey, D-Mass. Markey has
compared new energy costs
to a postage stamp per day.


Pride parade


A participant poses during the Christopher Street Day parade Saturday in Berlin, Germany. Gays and lesbians celebrated diversity in the Ger-
man capital forte 31th consecutive year.





Winners and losers emerge in climate bill









E Page A9 -SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009



XCURSIONS __
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Try London for all-American 4th

RAPHAEL G. SATTER Even if you can't finagle an in-
Associated Press vite, the embassy's Grosvenor i
Su a ddr itssc ic still rth an a


: LONDON - There are few bet-
ter places to celebrate the United
states and its Independence Day
.than London.
' Whether you prefer sipping
bubbly at the wood-paneled home
-of America's brainiest founding
father, Ben Franklin, or downing
an ale on the jetty where the
Mayflower set off for Massachu-
setts, the British capital is packed
with options for a patriotic week
away.
"It is surprising - it's shocking
- how much
there really is it is
here," said De-
laina Stone, - it's sh
.the secretary
.of the Ameri- how much t
can Society in
London. is here
% American
"heroes cling to D
the corners of secretary of the
some of the London abo
'British capi-
.al's greatest
monuments. Abraham Lincoln
keeps watch over Parliament
-$quare, while Martin Luther King
Jr. peers serenely over the cam-
era-toting tourists thronging to
'Westminster Abbey. Even rebel-in-
ehief George Washington, whose
insurgency tore the British Em-
pire apart, has, a commanding
view of Trafalgar Square.
; Just down the street is Ben-
jamin Franklin House, where the
bespectacled philosopher-states-
mnan spent nearly 16 years probing
the mysteries of science, tinkering
with his inventions and trying,
with varying degrees of success, to
manage relations between Britain
and her petulant colonies.
, The curators of his recently re-
stored rou r-stoiy Georgian home
plan a reception on Friday. Keep
the kids busy with F-anklin action
figures (complete with kite) sold in
the gift shop.
The main event -,a party at the
U.S. Embassy - comes a day ear-
lier. The invitation-only bash
tends to feature barbecue, al-
though embassy spokesman
-Philip Breeden said mini-burgers
were also a possibility.


visit. The area has been associ-
ated with the United States ever
since John Adams, the first U.S.
Minister to the Court of St James,
moved here in 1785. Home to Gen.
Dwight Eisenhower's European
headquarters during World War II,
the square once known as "Little
America" is the perfect place for a
Fourth of July picnic.
Work up an appetite with Kim
Dewdney, who is leading an Inde-
pendence Day walking tour start-
ing at 2:30 p.m. On the itinerary:
The crypt of St
surprising Martin-in-the-
Fields' church,
rocking - where the bod-
ies of the king
there really and queen of
Hawaii were
a briefly kept
after they suc-
)elaina Stone cumbed to
aAmerican Society in measles dur-
ut the patriot sites for ing an 1824
Americans. ing an 1824
visit to Lon-
don.
Music lovers may want to stay
there all week St. Martin's hosts a
series of U.S.-themed concerts
from Thursday to Saturday, in-
cluding a family-friendly event
Saturday featuring works by
Aaron Copland, George Gershwin
and Leonard Bernstein.
Those hoping to catch a glimpse
of the rockets' red glare may be
disappointed. A U.S. military base,
northwest of the city, which used
to put on fireworks displays, has
been shut down. Stone said the
American Society wasn't throwing
a party this year either..
None of which prevents you
from celebrating in style. For
those in favor of a waterborne ex-
cursion, the Independence Day
Cruise down the River Thames
may be just the ticket.,The 5-hour
jaunt features a two-course bar-
becue and a Dixie Swing band.
The young and restless have a
range of Fourth of July-themed
nights to choose from - including
an 'American Independence Day
Party"' at Apt Bar in central Lon-
don. Promoter AjVnthony Balogun
See _,; OO '!,/Page A12


Associated Press
A statue of George Washington, the United States' first president, looks out over London's Trafalgar Square
on Queen Elizabeth 11's official birthday. Washington's statue is one of many tributes to American heroes
which pepper the British capital.


Symbol of reunification


AP Photo/Columbus Dispatch
Spectators watch the Red White and Boom fireworks display on July 2, 2004, from Civic
Center Drive in downtown Columbus, Ohio.



Must-see fireworks


Special Io Hie Chroncle
On a recent holiday in Germany, Tom Hampton of Inverness and Corrie Butler of
Hudson visited the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. Built to symbolize peace, the gate
now represents reunification of the two sides of Berlin after the fall of the wall.


BETH J. HARPAZ
A Associated Press

" NEW YORK-The reces-
sion has forced the cancel-
Aation of fireworks displays
in a. number of places
around the country like
lue Springs, Mo., and
,Mesa, Ariz. But many of the
biggest and best-known dis-
plays will be nearly as spec-
tacular as ever.


,"Some larger displays
have been trimmed a bit but
nothing that will have a
major impact on the indus-
try," said Julie Heckman,
executive director of the
American Pyrotechnics As-
sociation.
The timing of the holiday,
on a Saturday, has actually
"helped the fireworks in-
dustry" in some places, said
M. Philip Butler, spokesman


for Grucci, the famous fire-
works company. "Whenever
it's a Saturday Fourth of
July, we will have as much
as a 50 percent increase in
demand."
Grucci shows this year in-
clude displays in Dallas,
Omaha, Neb., Hawaii and
Portland, Maine, along with
Station Casinos in Las Vegas
and the Borgata Casino in
See MUST/Page A12


DREAM
CAT ONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of.-judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos with
dates on the print.
Photos should be sent to
the Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429 or
dropped off at the Chroni-
cle office in Inverness,
Crystal River or any Accent
Travel Office.


An edible garden
grows in the Bronx
. NEW YORK- The New
i 'rk Botanical Garden in the
Bronx is opening a new outdoor
exhibit called The Edible Gdr-
'den with programming that in-
cjudes tasting, tours,
demonstrations and celebrity
lectures.
' The Edible Garden, open
June 27-Sept. 13, will be a
'showcase for edible plants,
vegetable-growing techniques
and garden design. It will also
host presentations from famous
guests including Martha Stew-


TravelBRIEFS==


art, Emeril Lagasse, Lidia Bas-
tianich, and Dan Barber, who
recently won the James Beard
Award for "2009. Chef of the
Year." An audio tour includes
narration by Mario Batali and
Bette Midler.
Details, including directions
from Manhattan by train and
car, at www.nybg.org.
Create your own
travel guide
SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -
Looking for fun things to do
when you travel?
Check out a new Web site


called nextstop.com where
.users offer up ideas for interest-
ing places and activities, from
obscure cafes to major land-
marks.
Some nextstop members
recommend things they en-
counter in their travels, while
others are locals suggesting fa-
vorite places from their home-
towns and neighborhoods.
Many users create mini-
guides with evocative titles such
as "Man Up Texas BBQ: Eating
our way through Texas' BBQ
joints" and "I miss Pasadena,
won't you go there for me?"


You can browse recommen-
dations on a map, by city, by
topic or keyword, or by follow-
ing a member of the Web site
whose posts you enjoy. The
site also suggests other mem-
bers with similar tastes for you
to check out, and makes it easy
to share nextstop posts on
Facebook, Twitter and blogs.
Pet area opens at
St. Louis airport
ST. LOUIS - Lambert Airport
in St. Louis has opened two out-
door rest areas where traveling
animals can spend a few min-
utes off the leash and play.


Lambertsays the miniature
dog parks Have 400 square feet
of gated space with benches,
fire hydrants, and plastic mitts
for pet owners to clean up after
their animals.
Lambert spokesman Jeff Lea
said that several airports have
created areas for pets and
service animals to exercise,
play and relieve themselves be-
tween flights.
The area at the Main Termi-
nal has synthetic turf and is lo-
cated outside exit MT-6. The
East Terminal location has nat-
ural grass and is outside bag-
gage claim at exit ET-15.


Mexico gets Google
help for tourism
MEXICO CITY - Mexico's
National Institute of Anthropol-
ogy and History signed an
agreement with Google Mexico
to promote archaeological and
historical sites in a bid to revive
tourism following the swine flu
epidemic. The plan uses sev-
eral elements of the Google
platform, including placing
maps of archaeological sites
and directions to them on,
Google Earth.

-From wire reports


I


- 1111~----


81
34


. -,-. . -., . �, - ') -A; - T, " Y., , , , 1 .-








slW.UNDJAY, JU2NE , 9 '


* The American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meetings of the Post
. and Auxiliary are at 7 p.m. on
the first Wednesday monthly.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet from 6 to 9 p.m. every
Tuesday except for June, July
and August.
Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food is
available.
Third Saturday outdoor flea
market has been suspended for
July and August and will re-
sume in September.
Pancake breakfast held the
third Saturday of each month
has been suspended for July
and August and will resume in
September. All-you-can-eat for
a $4 donation.
* American Legion Post
155 events for the week of
June 28 to July 4:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Dart tournament 6
p.m.
Monday: Bingo, 1 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m.
Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
dinner night 5 to 7 p.m., $5.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m.
Friday: SAL dinner 5 to.7
p.m., $6. Live music 6 to 10
p.m.
Saturday: Pool tournament 2
p.m. Fourth of July Barbecue
Party 1 p.m.
Call Cmdr. Larry Pink at 795-
6526 or visit www.post155.org.
U Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100.
Monday: House Committee,
meets at7 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies'
and Men's Auxiliaries. Guests>
welcome. .
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1, 4 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Wild
Willy 6 to 9 p.m. Guests wel-
come.
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish -
(fried, baked or blackened) $7
or a three-piece chicken dinner,
served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Karaoke by Mad Cow 6 to 9
p.m. Guests welcome..
Saturday: Come celebrate
your freedoms with us 2 to 6
p.m. Jumbo hot dogs $1.50,
burgers $2; Brats $2. Add a
platter with baked beans, corn
on the cob only $4.50 total.
Karaoke by Turner Camp Dave
3 to 6 p.m. Guests welcome.
N VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Today: Breakfast from 8:30
to 11:30 a.m. Full menu of
eggs, bacon, sausage, home
fries, biscuits, biscuit gravy,
pancakes, toast, juice and cof-
fee. Cost is $5 for adults and $3
for children 12 and younger.
Public welcome.
Friday: Bingo, starting at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to.the pub-

Saturday: Fourth of July bar-
becue. Ribs, beans, potato
salad, hot dogs, music and lots
of fun for the entire family.
Come show your support for
your service men and women
and all veterans. Call the post
for more information.
The post is now in the
process of forming pool, darts,
and horseshoe teams for tour-
naments. Everyone interested
should call the post after 1 p.m.
Monday through Saturday,
(352)489-1772.
Rent our hall for your wed-
ding or function, a beautiful
non-smoking facility. Call for de-
tails.
If you or someone you know
is interested in joining the VFW,
please come in and talk to us,
we would love to talk to you
and tell you the story of the


FRA presents awards to cadets


Special to the Chronicle
The Fleet Reserve Association Branch/Unit 186 made a presentation of certificates and medals to cadets of the Crys-
tal River High School Navy ROTC Unit. Awards were presented to a cadet in each of the grades for leadership, disci-
pline and self-reliance. From left are: Bob Huscher, executive secretary, FRA; Devan Brown, sophomore; Kyle Bosanko,
senior; Heather Carson, freshman; Ashley Rietsch, junior and Tim Donovan, FRA member.


VFW and what we stand for.
We are here for our veterans
and their families.
* Seabee Veterans of
,America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Crys-
tal Paradise Restaurant in
*Crystal River. Have lunch after
the meeting.
Luncheons are at 1 p.m. sec-
ond Tuesdays at selected
restaurants, all are welcome.
July 14 will be at Frank's Family
Restaurant on US. 41 and
State Road 200 junction in Her-
nando.
Breakfasts are at 8 a.m. on
the last Sunday monthly. Today,
it will be at Joe's Restaurant in
Inverness and July 26 at Crystal
Paradise Restaurant in Crystal
River.
For information, call John
Kister at 527-3172.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
vemess, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.
SBar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evening.
Wings are served each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings.
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3 p.m.
Call Mike Emig (352) 854-
8328.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness.,
Potluck dinner at 6 p.m., meet-
ing starts at 7:15. Auxiliary Unit
77 meets at the same time and
place. Call Post Cmdr. Norman.
Provencal at 726-4257 or Auxil-
iary president Alice Brumett at
860-2981.'
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from Harley
Davidson dealership.
Today: 3 p.m., mixed pool.


Bingo and meals are open to
the public. For more informa-
tion, call 795-501.2 after 1 p.m.
* American Legion Post
166 meets at 1:30 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 Ladies Auxiliary facility' on
Veterans, Drive, Homosassa, on
,the west side of U.S. 19 at
Dixon's Auto Sales across from
Harley Davidson.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition --Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,.
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone number to the vet-
eran.
I Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second.
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Rick Logan at
795-4233; for the Cabane, call
La President Barbara Logan
at 795-4233, or visit
www.Postl55.org.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41.
DAV Chapter 70 and Auxil-
iary meetings are at 2 p.m. on
the second Tuesday of each
month except July and August.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Contact
Bill Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its
monthly coordination meeting
for Citrus County's 17th Annual
Veterans Appreciation Week at
1:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 15,


in the Conference Room of the
Citrus County Chronicle Build-
ing, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organiza-
tions and individual veterans
are welcome and encouraged
to send representatives to par-
ticipate in the planning process.
For more information, contact
Chairman Fred Daniels by e-
mail at fredinfloralcity@wild
blue.net or by phone at 422-
2449.
. The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake
Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and
their wives are welcome to join
us. Call Steve. Leonard at 726-
3693.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday
monthly.
House Committee meets at 6
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-


bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to come and join us as we
plan for the future of our Post.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629.
Come and join this newly re-
chartered unit and be a part of
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion
Auxiliary.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will con-
duct its bimonthly meeting at
1:15 p.m., Tuesday, July 21, at
the Caf6 of the Citrus County
Resource Center/VA Clinic,.
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,'
Lecanto (west side of County
Road 491 approximately 1 mile
north of C.R. 486).
All combat-wounded veter-
ans and parents, spouses, sib-
lings and lineal descendants of
living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend
the meeting and to become a
Chapter 776 member. Military
Order of the Purple Heart life
membership is $50. There are
no chapter does. Visit the
Chapter 776 Web site at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
* Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N. Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons
of the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now -
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with
karaoke following. Other activi-
ties being planned. All sporting
events available on five TVs.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call .
Jimmie at 621-0617.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment


819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
All eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando; phone 726-
3339. Send e-mails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33
Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864
For information, call the post
at (352) 465-4864.
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 is in Beverly Hills
off County Road 491, across
the street from ROC's 491
Sports Bar and directly behind
the new Superior Bank.
* The Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition invites all honor-
ably discharged veterans, their
wives, widows and widowers to
its open business meeting at 6
p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly in the County Veterans
Service Office classroom at the
Citrus County Resource Center
in Lecanto next to the VA Clinic.
Come see what the Citrus Vet-
erans Coalition is all about and
if you feel you can assist in the
,'"Veterans Helping Veterans"
program, please come on
board as a member. The next-
open business meeting will be
on Sept. 24 as the regular busi-
ness meetings for the summer
have been suspended through
June, July and August.
I We are a service to needy
veterans organizations provid-
ing food supplements and'non-
perishable foods through the
"Veterans Food Pantry." We are
providing assistance to needy
and disabled veterans and their
families with minor repairs-to
their homes through the gen-
erosity of volunteers who are in
the plumbing, electrical and
construction industry. We are
also providing funds for annual
'scholarships to veteran family
members who apply through
their school counseling serv-
ices. We have also assisted in
the CFCC building fund.
If you are looking for an or-
ganization that devotes all of its
energy and fundraising to the . -
philosophy of "Veterans Helping
Veterans," then the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
wants you! Annual membership
donation is just $10 during a
calendar year or $25 for three
years. The CCVC is a nonprofit
corporation and your donations
are tax deductible. Current
members should check their
membership card for expiration
dates and renew with John, -
Ring at 746-0826.
For information, go to
www.ccvcfl.org Web site. Applica-
tion forms are available on line.
* The USS Mount McKin-
ley Association will have a re-
union Sept. 9 through Sept. 1$
in Corpus Christi, Texas, for
veterans of all branches of the
military that served on the Am-
phibious Force Flagship, USS
Mount McKinley AGC/LCC-7,
and new members from the
Flagship Alliance group who
served any time during their
years of commissioned service.
Contact Lee Temanson, secre-
tary, 10749 108th Ave. N.,
Maple Grove, MN 55369-2609,
Phone: evenings and week-
ends (763) 425-6315, E-mail:
lateman@Comcast.net (pre-
ferred contact).


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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6-28 0 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


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CITRLcs Couivn, (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


American Legion Post 58 installations


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Special to the Chronicle
The Wall-Rives American Legion Post 58 officers for 2009-10, from left, are: Larry Jones, sergeant-at-arms; Charles Shaw, executive committeeman; Eugene M. Thomas, chap-
lain; Robert Schmidt, first vice commander; Dave Hacker, executive committeeman; John Taylor, commander; Tom Whalen, second vice commander; Carl F. Boos, historian; and
John Pollock, executive committeeman. Not shown are Bernard James, adjutant; Gladys Murphy, finance officer; Stuart Weisbaum, service officer; Gary Andrews, executive com-
mitteeman; and Roger Sullivan, executive committeeman.
The Wall-Rives American
-l " . ..Legion Post 58 auxiliary of-
"-ficers for 2009-10, from
left, are: Toni Leger, ser-
geant-at-arms; Mary.
AB Woitkin, executive commit-
-4tee; "Peg" Furst, executive
,' committee; Emily Czysz,
chaplain; Bonnie Scott,
treasurer; Liliane Whalen,
secretary; Virginia Tebby,
4 second vice president; Mar-
A"..ion Corbin, first vice presi-
dent; Bea Fischer,
president. Not shown are
Marilyn Boemi, sergeant-at-
arms; and Frances Mahfuz,
-. executive committee.


FRA donates to


naval sea cadets


Program builds

leadership skilsb

Special to the Chronicle
The Fleet Reserve Asso-
ciation Branch/Unit 186
recently made a donation
of $500 to the Manatee Di-
vision of the Naval Sea
Cadets Corps. Presenta-
tion was made at the pan-
cake fundraiser and
recruiting event at the
Jack Steele Fellowship


Hall in Beverly Hills.
The Naval Sea Cadet
Corps is a program for
young men and women 13 to
17 years old who are inter-
ested in developing skills in
leadership, basic seaman-
ship, courage, self-reliance,
military discipline and are
committed to being drug
and gang free.,
Donations enable cadets
to attend training activities
during the summer and
have uniforms.
For more information,
call 216-2342.


40 & 8 donates to nurses training


:. \


From left are: 40 & 8 Voiture 1219 Chef de Gare-elect Rick Logan; 40 & 8
Voiture 1219 Chef De Gare Richard Gannon; Joan Stearns, executive direc-
tor of Central Florida Community College Foundation; Past-Chef De Gare
Larry Pink; Citrus 40/8 Correspondent Jay Conti Sr.; and 40,& 8 Voiture*
Medicine John Hallowell..


Special to the Chronicle
On June 4, Citrus 40 .& 8 Voiture
1219 members Chef De Gare Richard
Gannon, with Past-Chef De Gare
Larry Pink, incoming Chef de Gare
Rick Logan, Correspondent Jay Conti
Sr. and Nurses Training Coordinator
John Hallowell presented a check for
$2,000 to Joan Stearns, executive di-
rector of Central Florida Community
College Foundation, from the on-
going Voiture 1219 perpetual nurses
training scholarship Fund.
The check that was presented rep-
resents a total scholarship fund value
over $28,000 before any potential.
matching funds for this year by the
State of Florida.
In the past 12 months, four nurses in
training have been assisted financially
through scholarships by this fund.


June 29 to July 3 MENUS


CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Meatballs with Ital-
ian tomato sauce, Italian blend
vegetables, carrots, whole.
wheat hot dog bun (for meatball
sub), chocolate brownie, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Chicken quarter
with Spanish sauce, fiesta rice,
green beans, slice of whole
wheat bread with margarine,
fresh orange, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Orange juice,
pork chop patty with brown
gravy, broccoli cuts, corn, slice
of whole wheat bread with mar-
garine, fruited yogurt.
Thursday: Chef salad
(turkey, ham, cheese and
boiled egg) with ranch dressing,
2 slices whole wheat bread with

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* Sign up to follow the
latest news from the
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by joining our Twitter
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* From a computer, you
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at http://twitter.com/
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* Or you can join Twitter
to get these short up-
dates sent to your mo-
bile phone as text
messages - but sepa-
rate charges may apply.


margarine, applesauce, low-fat
milk.,
Friday: Independence Day
holiday. All sites closed.
Congregate dining sites in-


clude: Lecanto, East Citrus,
Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information, call
Support Services at 527-5975.


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CnRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A12 SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009


MUST
Continued from Page A9
Atlantic City, N.J.
Butler said "the most
popular shell is still the
happy face." And fireworks
choreographed to music -
often patriotic medleys,
sometimes performed live
- also remain popular, usu-
ally with radio simulcasts.
Patterns and shapes like
stars, fish, hearts and cubes
are becoming more preva-
lent, Heckman said. "The
real challenge is making
letters appear in the sky,"
she said. "It's really diffi-
cult to get an aerial shell to
break so it looks like an M
and not a W"
Grucci's fireworks at the
Hickam Air Force Base and
Pearl Harbor in HaWaii are
scheduled to send up the
letters "USA' while the na-
tional anthem is played.
Heckman issues an an-
nual list of "must-see" fire-
works shows, but she says
your local display may be
just as much fun. "The low-
level show, which you're
not going to see in a big city
skyline, can be prettier,"
she said. "And a lot of the
fun of it is just the commu-
nity involvement, hanging
out and tailgating and wait-
ing for that first burst."
What Heckman calls
"star-spangled spectacu-
lars" Will take place, as
usual in New York City,
Philadelphia, San Fran-
cisco, Washington and
Boston, which is known for
its famous Fourth of July
Boston Pops concert, this
year featuring Neil Dia-
mond. But here are a dozen
more fireworks displays
recommended by the
American Pyrotechnics As-
sociation, including a few
scheduled for Friday:
* Addison, Texas: This
Dallas suburb has a popu-
lation of just 14,000 but tens
of thousands of spectators
turn out for the Kaboom


* Nonprofit organizations
are invited to submit
news releases about up-
coming community
events. Write the name
of the event, who spon-
sors it, when and where
it will take place and
other details.


Here are a dozen
more fireworks
displays
recommended
by the American
Pyrotechnics
Association.

Town fireworks held here
each July 3.
* Branson, Mo.: Another
July 3 event, this display at
Branson Landing in His-
toric Downtown Branson
on Lake Taneycomo is sur-
rounded by fountains and
choreographed to an out-
door concert.
* Chicago: Chicago's an-
nual. July 3 event on the
lakefront is considered
"one of the boldest, bright-
est, and biggest patriotic
fireworks spectaculars of
its kind," Heckman said.
The city's Taste of Chicago
event, open to July 5, is at
the same location. Be pre-
pared for massive crowds.
* Columbus, Ohio: The
event known as "Red,
White & BOOM!" is held
July 3 near Veteran's Me-
morial in downtown
Columbus. It's one of the
largest in the Midwest after
Chicago's, with a parade
and 400,000 folks attending.
* Mount Rushmore, S.D.:
This national monument
hosts a glorious pyrotech-
nic display on July 3 that at-
tracts 20,000 to 30,000
people. Officials say if
you're planning to attend,
be prepared to park any-
. wherd from 1 to 3 miles
away, and don't be in a
hurry to leave as it can take
an hour or more to clear
roadways after the show.
* Stone Mountain, Ga.:
This park near Atlanta will
host big fireworks shows
three nights in a row, Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday
The display will be com-
bined with a laser light


* Include a contact
name and phone num-
ber to be printed' in the
paper.
* News releases are
subject to editing.
* Call 563.5660 for
details.


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Saturday, June 27th
S8 a.m.- noon Registration- Homosassa Riverside Resort
11 a.m. Free Boat Shuttle Begins
S 1p.m. Tug-A-War - The Freezer " 7
--- 2 p.m. Bikini Contest- Seagrass Pub & Grill " 5 "
S3p.m. Pie Eating Contest- The Shed
S4p.m. Red, White & Blue Beer Belly Contest - The Shed . t, ]B..
4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Last Card Drawn - MacRaes of Homosassa
4:30 p.m. Blue Crab Races- The Freezer
7p.m. Free Boat Shuttle Ends
: 8p.m. Awards for Poker Run -The Shed.
S 9:15 p.m. FIREWORKS SHOW - FALCON FIREWORKS
Poker Run: Ricky Olpinski & Bob Vogel; Entrance Fee $10
. & non-parishable food item; Mystery Card $5 � . -.
4�L Awards 1st to 4th High Hand;
... ....... Poker Run proceeds benefit Hospice of Citrus County
BAJ SONATURDAY JUNE 27TH 2009




Homosassa Game & Fish, Publix of Homosassa, Barramundi Corp, Bruce & Stacy
Davidson, Kim's Cafe, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, Mac 1 Signs, Kanes Ace
Hardware, Homosassa Open MRI, Neon Leon's Zydeco Steakhouse, Gulf Coast Marine,
www.armyofwomen.com, Women's Heart Program Citrus Memorial Hospital
FORMO E IFO MATONCAL 32-32-77
OR EMAL: .oosas .a.re .o.sf .siva~ m. . C


show at the base of the
mountain. You have to pay
to park your car but the
shows are free.
* Charlotte, N.C.: Five
Charlotte radio stations
will host viewing parties
and will simulcast music
for Uptown Charlotte's
"Red, White and Boom"
display July Fourth, a 20-
minute computer-designed
"pyro-musical."
* Falmouth, Mass.: July
Fourth fireworks on Cape
Cod will honor Falmouth
native Katharine Lee
Bates, who was born 150
years ago and wrote the
words to "America the
Beautiful." The song will
lead off a musical accom-
paniment to the pyrotech-
nics. Twitter updates on the
fireworks are planned.
* Las Vegas: This one-of-
a-kind city is the location
for a one-of-a-kind Fourth
of July celebration, with in-
tegrated, simultaneous
fireworks at nine Station
Casinos, including Green
Valley Ranch, Red Rock
Resort, and Aliante Station,
with a separate fireworks
show at Mandalay Bay.
* Nashville: This is the
25th year for Nashville's
"Let Freedom Sing" July
Fourth fireworks on the
riverfront, choreographed-to
live music by the Nashville
Symphony. Pyrotechnics will
include shells breaking 800
feet above the river, low-
level fireworks from 10 spots
along the- shore, and fire-
works that erupt from the
surface of the Cumberland
River
* Oahu, Hawaii: Fire-
works will light up the skies
July Fourth with a tribute
to the U.S. military at
Hickam Air Force Base and
Pearl Harbor.
* South Lake Tahoe, Nev.:
The "Lights on the Lake"
July Fourth fireworks event
can be seen from the beach,
from boats on the lake and
from the surrounding Sierra
Nevada mountains.


LONDON
Continued from Page A9
said the celebrations will
last until 4 a.m. His advice:
Book ahead and wear red,
white and blue.
Those interested in some-
thing a little more sedate
should give some thought to
south and east London -
areas typicallyless troubled
by tourists than St. Martin's
or Trafalgar Square.
It's a healthy walk east
from London Bridge to the
sleepy riverside neighbor-
hood of Rotherhithe, home
to The Mayflower Pub and
Restaurant. Built on the
spot where the famous ship
set off for Plymouth before
its trip to the New World,
the restaurant's wood bal-
cony is 'an ideal to place to
have an ale and a tradi-
tional Sunday. roast while
listening to the Thames gur-
gle gently beneath your feet.
Across the river, in Lon-
don's East End, the
Whitechapel Bell Foundry
is intensely proud of its
American links. The 16th
century workshop has sup-
plied bells to churches
across the U.S., including
the National Cathedral in
Washington. But its most fa-
mous American export re-
mains the Liberty Bell,
whose chimes, according to
tradition, summoned the
citizens of Philadelphia to
hear the first public reading
of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence.
It was in recognition of
that , connection that
Philadelphia's Bicentennial
Bell was cast here, and
you'd be hard pressed to
finding a more touching tes-
tament to the links between
Britain and the United
States than its inscription:
"For The People of The
United States of America
From the People of
Britain
4 July 1976
Let Freedom Ring."


nCitrus
County
:1,11. RI


Kayaking for a Cure


JointheAmerican Saturday, Aug. 1
Cacer Societ'Relay 8 a.m . til ???
For Life Of Citrus and 8 a-m. Il ???
hundreds of fellost Withlacoochee River
kaakeers for "An Outstanding Florida Waterway"
E FLOAl Registration Details:
as we raise morte o 1East Citrus/Inverness:
ght cancer' Jane Tessmer 352-302-1726
Bring ) our kayaks Jane_Tessmer@lholmaii corn
and canoes' Awards
will be gwer out for Central Citrus/Lecanto:
best times longest Bonnie Turner 352--176-5-1371
distance. fundraising rnsbonnierfi@grnmai corn
goal prizes.
- 3 locations to launch West Citrus/Crystal River:
for 2 inspiring legs of Julia Swan 352-257-2095
the kayak rally Julia Swarti.'correclionscorp corn
- Speed through either
leg or relax and enjoy Outside Citrus County:
them all at a relaxing Bruce Garrison 352-637-5577
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Associated Press
A limestone sculpture of Martin Luther King, left, looks out
from London's Westminster Abbey. King is one of 10 mod-
ern Christian martyrs commemorated above the Great
West Door to the 900-year-old church. At right is an image
of El Salvador's Archbishop Oscar Romero. King's statue
is one of many tributes to American heroes in the British
capital.

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1570 W. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs - (352) 465-7007


Billy ELVIS Lindsey
Saturday, July 11
7-9 p.m.
$5 per person
To purchase Ickelts in advance
please come to irie Cilrus Springs
Communty Center



Come and join us for an evening of fun and
excitement with Billy Lindsey as ELVIS!!!
Sponsored by:
Citrus County Parks & Recreation 1.......... t
Citrus Springs Civic Association ...J......
Citrus Spnngs ivic Association is a Non-Profit 501uc 4) Corpoi'atin.i A copy of
the Official Registration and Financial Information may be obtained from Our
Treasurer Carlos E. Solorzano - 352-216-6255 or our office 352-489-8290.


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uCl-R,,c ',TVr lu( nJFTG HEIUAYJNE8, 2009-A13


Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J.
Holland marked their 60th
anniversary on June 25.
Dan Holland and Irene
Benoit were married on
June 25, 1949, at St Monica
Church in Barre, Vt
They have eight children,


13 grandchildren and five
great-grandchildren.
The Hollands have
resided in Beverly Hills
since 1988.


IstANNIVERSARY

WhiteKutz

Robert Kutz and Leslie
White, of Citrus Hills,
marked their first anniver-
sary June 21.
They were married at the
Plantation Inn Resort on
that date in 2008.
Robert is originally from
Allentown, Pa., and Leslie is
originally from the Fort
Lauderdale area.
They have two children,
one in Deltona and one in
Fort Lauderdale, and seven
grandchildren.
They are both retired and
have lived in Citrus County
nine years.


-60th ANNIVERSARY

The Hollands


Adam Livesay, son of Mr.
and Mrs. John and Cynthia
Livesay of Crystal River, and
Amanda Rogers, daughter
of Dr. Kenneth and Mrs. Jill
Rogers of Winter Haven, are
pleased to announce their
engagement
The future bridegroom is
a 2005 graduate of Crystal
River High School, 2009
graduate of the University
of Central Florida with a
bachelor's degree in politi-
cal science and a second
bachelor's degree in
radio/television with a
minor in history.
The bride-elect is a 2004
graduate of Winter Haven
High School, 2006 graduate
of Central Florida Commu-
nity College with an associ-
ate's degree in elementary
education, 2008 graduate of


University of North Florida
with a bachelor's degree in
special education: deaf
studies, presently working
on her master's degree in
deaf education and will
graduate in December.
The wedding is set for
Jan. 17, 2010 at Lake Mary
Event Center in Lake Mary.


Wedding =

Miller/Ellison

Deanna Miller, Jonathan
"JJ" Ellison, and children
Saryna Miller, Khorie
Miller, and Jessika Ellison
were united as one family in
marriage June 13, 2009. The
bride was given away by fa-
thers Charles Miller and
Gene Eye at the wedding f.,
(and reception) held at the
home of Gene and Candice
Eye. The union was blessed
by God, Sam Graham who
officiated, and the atten-
dance of the bride and
groom's immediate family,
extended family, adopted
family, countless friends, T
and the generosity of nu-
merous, talented others.

Engagement

Rogers/Livesay


Special to the Chronicle
New class: Zumba by
Marilynne Denison - from
7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, $25
per five-week session.
Crochet by Esther
Hughart - from 1 to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, registration fee
is $15 per six-week session.
Yoga by Lace Blue
McLean - from 6:30 to 8
p.m. Thursday, registra-
tion fee is $25 per five-week
session. These classes are
on-going and may be joined
any Thursday.
Introduction to Yoga by
Lace Blue McLean - from
6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday, reg-
istration fee is $25 per five-
week session.
Fishing by Bud Andrews
- During June and July
this class will be from 9 to
11 a.m. the third Saturday
of the month. Registration
fee is $20 per monthly
workshop.
Quilling by Chris Tran-
gus - Quilling, the art of
paper rolling will be of-
fered from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
July 7 and Aug. 4. Partici-
pants will complete two
projects at each class for
$15 per class. Tools and
supplies will be provided
by the instructor.
Tennis Lessons by Lind-
sey Rodriguez - Individ-


ual tennis lessons for all
ages, registration fee is $25
per hour or 10 hours for
$200. Fees are paid at
Whispering Pines ParkAd-
ministration office.
Water Fitness - Water
Fitness is offered from 8:30
to 9:30 a.m. Monday
through Friday at the pool.
A class punch card may be
purchased at the pool of-
fice. The fee is $35 for 20
classes.
Adult and Amateur Ath-
lete Swim Program - This
adult swim program is
from 6 to 7 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday and
meets at the pool. Register
at the pool office, the cost is
$30 per month.
Inverness Swim Team -
This recreational swim
program is designed for
young persons wanting to
improve their overall
swimming technique and
endurance. Participants
must be able to complete
25 meters continuously and
able to demonstrate other
competitive strokes. Swim
team meets from 5 to 6 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday at the pool. Register
at the pool office, the cost is
$30 per month.
For more information
about classes, call the park
office at 726-3913.


Fire department seeks community help


First BIRTHDAYS
Emma Grace Tracy cele-
brated her first birthday on
June 3. Emma is the daugh-
ter of Tyson and Kelly Tracy
of Inverness and has a big
sister, Rachel, and big'
brother, Caden. Maternal
grandparents are Ed and , .
Pat Grant of Crystal River. .
Paternal grandparents are
Robert and Carol Tracy of ,
Brooksville.


Special to the Chronicle
SSince 9/11, fire and emer-
gency service departments
all across the nation are
struggling with increasing
demands for service cou-
pled with reduced funding.
In order to respond to these
increasing demands and
provide more services to the
community, the Crystal
River Fire Department has
established a Fire Corps
program and is seeking vol-
unteers to help.
Fire Corps creates oppor-
tunities for citizens to give
back to their community by


Fire Corps creates opportunities for
citizens to give back to their
community by providing
non-emergency assistance to their
local fire/EMS department.


providing non-emergency
assistance to their local
fire/EMS department. From
creating Web sites to main-
taining vehicles, promoting
life safety education or of-
fering administrative assis-
tance, you can help your
community become safer


and better prepared for nat-
ural disasters, terrorist
threats and other emergen-
cies.
Fire Corps, a component
of the Department of Home-
land Security's Citizen Corps
program, is a national grass-
roots effort to increase the


capacity of volunteer, career
and combination fire and
EMS departments through
the use of community volun-
teers. Fire Corps provides re-
sources for departments to
utilize volunteers in non-
emergency roles so they can-
develop, implement and sus-
tain programs and services
that will help their depart-
ment meet the needs of their
community.
For more information or
to become a Fire Corps vol-
unteer, contact Peter
Kuhlman at 563-0342 or via
e-mail at pkuhlman@tam-
pabay.rr.com.


SToday's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: In the year ahead,
if certain goals do not work out
exactly as you envision, don't
waste valuable time attempting
to make them a reality. Spend
time on objectives that can re-
sult in successful endeavors.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
- Suggesting an untested idea
to others is not recommended.
What you propose might look
good on paper, but fail miser-
ably when put into practice.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Avoid taking gambles with your
resources. Lady Luck might be
somewhere in the area, but
busy pulling another person out
of trouble; when it comes to tak-
ing chances, try another time.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)-
Someone of the opposite gen-
der might come on rather
strong, but even if his or her at-
tention is flattering, get to know
the individual better before be-
coming too cozy. The person
could be wrong for you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
Attempting to attract others with
your wit and charm might not
accomplish all that you hope.
Even if it works at first, it can
get old fast, so you'll need sub-
stance to back it up..
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
- Weak foundations cannot
support your hopes and wishes
over any length of time. You
had better be prepared to build
your castle of expectations on
solid bedrock, not shifting
sands.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - Everyone you encounter
will scrutinize your motives and
behavior. If you're smart, you
won't do anything, foolish that
would be detrimental to your
image or reputation.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
- Beneath your serious out-
ward appearance, you are a
kind and warmhearted person.
Yet, for a self-serving reason,
you might ignore the deserving
and reward someone who
should be shunned.


Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) son to butt into anyone else's
- A proposition might appear business without being asked
to be quite nifty on the surface, - and then help only the most
but it could come with hidden needy.
strings attached. Don't be re- Taurus (April 20-May 20) -
luctant to look beneath the ob- Be wary of getting too chummy
vious. with someone you just met and
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) about whom you know little. An
-An involvement initiated by unsavory individual could cause
others might have been organ- problems; give yourself plenty
ized for a particular purpose, so of time to interact with someone
when it comes to a decision, be new.
sure that it doesn't only benefit Gemini (May 21-June 20)
them but you, too. - Suggesting a friend stop by
Aries (March 21-April 19) without setting a definite time
- You are likely to have will be a mistake. It could invite
enough problems taking care of an untimely disruption at a mo-
your affairs, so there is no rea- ment when you'll need privacy.


Happy Birthday

USA and


SIDIm _
k.~ O aSa wliJ l


P Family
Fun Day
ofat Kings Bay Park
Bring your chairs and blankets
Park Opens at 10am
* Live entertainment all day
* Beer and Food Vendors
(no outside alcohol allowed)
* Kayak Games
* Giant Water Slide
* Children Lawn Games
* Apple Pie Baking Contest
(register early - space is limited)
* Giant Birthday Cake
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Bill Mckee (FL Island Marine Supply) 436-4179
or Denise Burke 795-0956


0
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ur results show that our patients: July Special
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Now Also Offering the HCG Diet


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SMedical www.citrusmedicalweightloss.com
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F-


'OPP-,


Board Cerifid 52 E7hAve rsalRvr F 42i S al Epfo


Whispering


Pines Park


offers summer


class lineup


C e"Ithir a t e Yo u r F r e e dcriq

from Fat!


SUNDAY, JUNF. 28, 2oog A13


TOGETHER


CITRUS COUNTY (FL E


*







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Alid A C..*,-. rV,., INo mnn


Af # USNUAY, JUNE LO28,


Stocks and the single girl


In the late '70s, it was
hard to pick up a maga-
zine that didn't have a
story about testing your
sexual IQ - or your
boyfriend's. And for a
while, it seemed
that one best-
selling . book
after another
was a sexual
textbook. "The
Hite Report"
and Masters and
Johnson's books
were huge best
sellers. For a
while, it seemed
as if sex had just MUL
been discovered.
Before, there was no men-
tion of sex, at least not in
respectable magazines, and
it was very rarely discussed
in books, either. Today, the
average sixth-grader can
get a higher score on one of
those old sexual IQ tests
than I can.,
By the '80s, magazines
and afternoon talk shows
had printed and yakked so
much about sex that they'd
made it boring. Articles like
"How to Have Better Sex in
Seven Days" weren't mak-
ing magazines jump off the
newsstands anymore, so
the word "sex" was
changed to "health," and
publications ran the same
tests and stories as before.
"How's Your Health IQ?"


"Better Health in Seven
Days." "Is Your Partner Un-
interested in Health?"
"Has Health Spoiled Your
Marriage?" "Let's Get Phys-
ical" was a single entendre
hit.
By the '90s,
they had made

boring. Besides,
they were saying
things on prime
time television
that you couldn't
even say in mag-
azines. So the
M buzzword
LEN changed again.
This time they
replaced the words "sex"
and "health" with the word
"stress" and reran the same
IQ tests and stories once
again.
Like sex, at first, people
were embarrassed to talk
about stress. It did seem
silly to hear a guy who
worked in a turnpike toll-
booth complain about his
"stressful" job with a
straight face because after
all, what does he do all day
but make change. If that's
stressful, what would the
guys who landed on Omaha
Beach call stressful? But
now that I've become sensi-
tized to the plight of the
stressed, I can see that
work itself is causing the
problem. So I quit my job.


Today's MOVIES


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (PG-
13) 12:20 p.m., 3:40 p.m:, 7 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"My Sister's Keeper" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m.,
2:20 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Year One" (PG-13) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 5
p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Proposal" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Taking of Pelham 123" (R) 12:10 p.m., 2:35
p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Hangover" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:40 p.m., -
4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m.


But the stress of not work-
ing was killing me. Where
was my next dollar going to
come from? Who is going to
feed the kids? I went back
to work and felt better right
away. It turned out that the
pressure of trying to get a
high score on the "Do You
Know Your Stress IQ Test"
was stressing me out. But
now, the stress obsession
has disappeared, having
fallen into the topic grave-
yard along with sex and
health.
This morning I just took
the "What's Your Stock IQ
Test?" It turns out, I'm a
stock moron. But I bet if I
run to the book store I'll be
able to buy some books like
"The Joy of Stocks," "Stocks
Over 60," "Stocks for Mar-
ried Couples" and "Stocks
and the Single Girl."
Suze Orman's financial
advice books sell better
than any bodice ripper.
There are three stock mar-
ket channels that run 24/7.
They say money is the best
aphrodisiac in the world.
I'm not quite sure what that,
means. I think it was one of
the questions I missed long
ago on the "What's Your
Sexual IQ?" test


Reach author Jim
Mullen at
jimmullen@myway.com.


"The Year One" (PG-13) 12;10 p.m., 2:30
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Proposal" (PG-13) Noon, 2:40 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"Taking of Pelham 123" (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:15
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Hangover" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
5:35 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Land of the Lost" (PG-13) 5:15 p.m., 10:10
p.m.
"Up" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 9:35 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 12:30 p.m.,
2:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"My Sister's Keeper" (PG-13) 12:25 p.m., 3 Crystal River Mall 9 offers free children's films
p.m., 5:30 p.m., 8:05 p.m., 10:35 p.m. at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesdays through,
"Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (PG- Aug. 5, first-come, first-served.
13) 12:20 p.m., 12:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:10
p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:50 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
No passes. listings and entertainment information.
, ..



Key Training Center

33rd RUN FOR THE MONEY
THE RUN FOR THE MONEY" IS AN ANNUAL APPA TO THE COMMUNITY TO
ASSIST THE: KEY CENTER IN RAISING FIUNNDS TO ' E MORE T1HAN THE BARE
.ESSENTIALS OF SERVICE. SUPPORT PROGRAM T -ARE NOT COVERED BY.
GOVERNMENT .FUNDING, AND PROVIDE SERVICES' TOOVER 50,NDIrVIDUAL.
' '. THI-AT RECEIVE NO STATE FUNDING ASSISTANCE FOR SERVICES.'
;'.": -YOU CAN HELP AND YOU CAN SUPPORT THE RUNNERS '
ON SATURDAY, JULY 25'"'
.YOT ,CAt., WATCH the 22"� Annual Telethoi ftom the comfort of your home,: 7
from 9 a.m, to 6 p rn on local cable charitel 16 or digital channel 47. '
' :"YOU CAN MAKE a toax deductible pledge, by calling (352) 795-4919 ,
.. : ., signifying to runners that you appreciate their personal efforts
- on behalf of 1he mentally challenged.
:YOU CAN JOIN US in celebrating the Key runners return during the Comrmunity '
.- Celebration at the Key Center's Leconto Campus from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
YOU .CAN COME RELISH a hot lunch while enjoying other festivities such as
- .llsteningand dancing to live music, .dunk tanK. antique vehicles,.
.craft fair, carnival games and raffle Itern.. " � '. 7
YOU CAN.WALK in the Key. Center's Ist ever Walk for.the Money at 8 a.m. -
Enjoy arn invigorating morning walk In pleasant surroundlhgg around the Key
Center's Lecanto CampLis, and then stick around to watch the Key softball team
take on the CitrusQ County.Sheriffs'Office for their annudl-tournament at 10 a.m.

| fI Ki.nan Lcss. LCe Dgr.itv. om Rerecr - C n i
o130 Heighl .,.enue Ilnerness, noFIlcia ,34452 i f.
(352)527-8228 www.ke/Iroiningcenter.org
I wwwaAuntorrthemonevcomrs r-


S T * Program sponsored by the
'1, RotarivClu o .- .-
i I S 1 I 1 m l ood -.


for Fine Minds ntiv g
A Wine Tasting and Chinese Auction \.....



, Tuesday July 28

( 6:30 - 9:30 p.m.
S 'Sugarn-ill Woods Coun-trv Club
.I. 1 Douglas St., Homnosassa ,
111,c11iideS admiission \wine tasting A.
$ assorted cheese anid crackeis and '.
. initial supply of auLIction tickets.


d


For Tickets or Donations contact
Ken Steidel at 352-503-7355
Benefactorsi The Women to Sug,. millD Woods;
Scholarship Fund (Piimiarl and ohier charities


2!
'ii


Bride now regretting



impulsive wedding


Dear Annie: Two weeks ago, on the
spur of the moment, I went to Las
Vegas and married my boyfriend. I
can't tell you how much I regret it. I'm not
sure whether it's because I've only known
him a month or because the wedding ring
looks like gold dice.
I am in my 30s and ready to
settle down again (this was my
third wedding), but even I be-'
lieve this was too impulsive. My
new husband is really commit-
ted, but I don't think I can do this.
How can I let him down easy and
make him understand it was a
mistake? - What Happens in
Vegas Should Stay in Vegas
Dear Vegas: You entered this
union in haste, but please take
the time to see if there is some-
thing worth saving. This guy is ANI
willing to stick by you and de- MAIL
serves that much consideration.
You might discover that one se-
cret to lasting relationships is the willing-
ness to work through problems when things
get tough. If you decide, however, that the
marriage cannot possibly be successful, you
should be able to get an annulment, telling
your husband that you both deserve an op-
portunity to get to know each other better
before making this kind of commitment.
Dear Annie: I have a close friend who
"forgets" to pay for the items in the bottom
of her grocery cart and allows her' infant
son to play with toys in the store and then
walks out as if they belong to him. I have
warned "Nicole" about this practice, but so
far, she has not been caught. To add to that,
Nicole and her husband intend to file for
bankruptcy, so they are making out their
credit cards on jewelry, sporting events,
restaurants, etc., because they know they
won't have to repay the debt
I'm not sure why I am so upset Am I jeal-
ous because Nicole gets these expensive
items for "free" and I am going through dif-
ficult times right now? I have taken a sec-
ond job to help make ends meet, while
Nicole continues to steal from stores, driv-
ing up the prices for all of us- What should
I do? - Indiana
Dear Indiana: Nicole is a cheat and a,
thief, and that is reason enough to be upset
with her. We'd cross her off our friend list


5,
U
I


because she is not a person of integrity. As
for the pre-bankruptcy profligacy, federal
law denies the benefits of bankruptcy to
anyone who is shown to have gone on a
credit card spending spree during the 90
days leading up to a bankruptcy filing.
Credit card companies are on
the lookout for just this type of
situation. Even if the credit card
companies don't take legal ac-
tion against her, it is likely that
Nicole will still have to pay a
portion of those charges from fu-
ture earnings. She's not as clever
as she thinks.
Dear Annie: I read the letter
from "Total Loss," whose son
dropped out of college, played
video games all day and gave up
aE'S on everything he loved.
IIE'S My son was very successful in
.BOX high school, active in the church
youth group and was an Eagle
Scout When he went to college,
he could not get it together. He missed
classes and spent days in his dorm room.
When he came home he was violent. Our
doctor diagnosed him with "situational de-
pression." Two universities and another
year later, he was diagnosed with Adult At-
tention Deficit Disorder through the won-
derful university counseling center He just
graduated with honors and has applied for
graduate school. He has grown into every-
thing I expected he could be. Tell that fam-
ily to never give up. - Proud Mother
Dear Proud: Your son is lucky to have lov-
ing parents who obviously encouraged him
to get the help he so desperately needed.
And congratulations to him for having the
courage and strength to seek assistance.


Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers column.
Please e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118100, Chicago,
IL 60611. To find out more about An-nie's
Mailbox, and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate
Web page at www.creators.com.


Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle, answer is on Page A10.


ACROSS
1 Bird with a long
bill
6 Carefree adven-
-ture
11Amphitheater
16Cruel
21Run off with a
lover
22Cognizant
23St. John's-bread
24Fine violin
25A flower
,26Viewpoint
28Detested '
29- de Janeiro
30Choose
321f not
33Hair-like plant
parts
35Mineral
36Withered
38Betsy the flag
maker
41 Pull
43Time period
(abbr.)
44River in Austria
45Fragrant
48Serviceable
50Billy the -
52 Degraded
55Portent
57Piggery
58Looks at
amorously
62Salesperson, for
short
63A Deadly Sin
65Mongrel
67Notable time
6901d-fashioned
70High mountain
71Sherbet'
72Tried for office
74Light color
76Memory alone
77Tome


79Building extension
81 Meat stock gelatin
83Redact
85Gur, gp.
86Piagro:urnd :tem
88Smrlhm,
90Cut off
92Bqiled
94Name in Genesis
96Parting word
97Promise
9'9Vetch seed
100 Armed conflicts
103 Print measures
105. Passover meal.
107 City, in Florida'
110 Circular edge
111 Body structure
(abbr.) ,
113 Swine-like ani-
mal
115 Drag
117' Degree holder,
for short
118 War god
120 Fossil fuel
122 Triumph
123 - passim
125 Calendar abbr.
126 Seaport in Italy
128 Weight unit '
130 Destroy the inte-
rior of
132 Vote of a kind
133 A Gabor
134 Lab compound
135 Lummox
137 Wraparound
garment
139 Crowds
141 Political
acronym
143 Smile, in a way
145 Canal vessel
147 Glut
150 -de Cologne
152 Den


154 Girl's guy ,
155 - have you
159 Dernier-
160 Long stories
162 Merriment ,
164 Abbr; on a map
166 Kimono sash
167 Batman's side-
kick
169 Place to roll? (2
wds.) .
173 Up and about
175 Improve
176 Licit
177 'See eye-to-eye
178 Napped leather
179 Pieces
180 Destroy gradu-
ally
181 Also-ran
182 Roofing pieces



DOWN
1 Perceives
2 Borden's cow
3 Machine part
4 Unclose, poeti-
cally
5 Fiddling despot
6 Hostage-taker
7 Solemn fear
8 Average
9 Gaelic
lOAnswer
11 Puts stress on
12Rodent
13- the Red
14Beginner
15White poplar
16Sound of laughter
17Drs.' org.
18Boca -
19Unyielding
20Conceals


27Birthright seller,
31Make
34Writing fluid
37Dawn goddess
39Chimney dirt
40Find the total of
42Flying toy
44- Rice Burroughs
46Sandwich store,
for short
47Dry, as wine
4901d instrument
51 Promise to pay
52Bedouins
53Less than
54Date
56Hospital worker
59Brave
60- nous
61 Place
64The "I" -
66Knock "
68Playing card
69Make more calm
73Zilch
75Paved ways (abbr.)
78Tangle
80Throw in a high
- curve
81 Emissary
82Lid
84Group of players
87 Festival
89Cereal grass
91Seed vessel
93Math branch, for
short
95From now
98Rainy
100 "- New World"
101 Buenos-
102 - Paulo, Brazil
104 Viewed
105 Skull cavity
106 Fragrant flower
108 Purple color
109 Notions


112 Tit for -
114 Hog
116 Lacking
119 Blockade
.121 Devipe for weav-,,
ing
124 Chilly
127 --Magnon
129 Carpentry item
131 Playground
game
132 Grape plant
136 Delicate
138 Steal from
140 Uncooked
1,42 Vitality
143 Candy on a stick
144 Oven
146 More gloomy
147 Discard
148 Pleasant smell
149 River'in Italy
151 Way between
seats
153 Royal
156 Inn
157 Put up with
158 Whitewalls
160 Means' justifier
161 Kind of palm
163 Cogito - sum
165 Bridge position
168 Loan charge
(abbr.)
170 Little bit
171 Tax agcy.
172 Born (Fr.)
174 -generis


J


I
Ll


I


WWW.I""WQF""' '""ney










Section B SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009



.PORTS


Rays, Marlins go
down to the wire.
.Page B3


" NASCAR/B2
" Golf/B2
" MLB 'B3
" Sports Briefs'B4
" Tv, Lottery 'B4
" Soccer, NFL. B5
" Entertainment 'B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


District 15 Little League
All-Star Tournament
June 25 -July 2
9-10 Baseball
Pool A
Won Lose
Inverness 1 0
Central Citrus 1 1
West Hernando 0 1
Pool B
Won Lois
Crystal River 1 0
Lady Lake 1 0
Greater Hudson 0 2
Pool C
Dunnellon 1 0
Shady Hills 0 0
Dixie County 0 1
Friday's Games
Inverness 9, Central Citrus 1
Crystal River 16, Greater Hudson 0
Saturday's Games
Central Citrus 8, West Hernando 3 '
Lady Lake 6, Greater Hudson 2
Dunnellon. 11, Dixie County 1
Today's Games
10 a.m. Inverness vs. West Hernando
10 a.m. Crystal River vs. Lady Lake
12 p.m. Dixie County vs. Shady Hills
Senior Baseball
Won Loss
Greater Hudson 0 0
Shady Hills 0 0
West Hernando 0 0
Today's Game
10 a.m, Greater Hudson vs. West Hernando
9-10 Softball
PoolA
Won Loss
Inverness 1 0
Dunnellon 0 0
Central Citrus 0 1
Pool B
Won Loss
Crystal River 0 0
Shady Hills 0 0
South Sumter 0 0
Friday's Game
Inverness 6, Central Citrus 5
Saturday's Games
South Sumter vs. Shady Hills, postponed
Central Citrus vs., Dunnellon, postponed
11-12 Softball
Pool A
Won Loss
Inverness 1 0
Dixie County 0 0
Central Citrus . 0 . 1
Pool B
Crystal River 0 0
Dunnellon . 0 0
Shady Hills - . , .
South Sumter 0 0
SFriday's Geme
Inverness 10, Central Citrus 0
Saturday's Games
Shady Hills vs., Crystal River, suspended
Dunnellon vs. South Sumter, suspended
Inverness vs. Dixie. County, postponed
Today's Games
9 a.m. Shady Hills vs. Crystal River resumes
9a.m. Dunnellon vs, South Sumter resumes
10 a.m. Dunnellon vs. Shady Hills
12 p.m. Dixie County vs.Central Citrus
12 p.m. Crystal River vs. South Sumter
4 p.m. Inverness vs. Dixie County
Junior Softball
Won Loss
Dunnellon 1 0
Inverness 0 1
Crystal River " 0 0
Friday's Games
Dunnellon 12, Inverness 5
Saturday's Game
Crystal River vs. Dunnellon, postponed
Today's Game
2 p.m.*Crystal vs. Dunnellon
Senior Softball
Won Loss
Shady Hills .1 0
South Sumter 1 0
Central Citrus 0 1
Greater Hudson 0 1
Friday's Games
Shady Hills 4, Greater Hudson 3
South Sumter 10, Central Citrus 0
Saturday's Games
Shady Hills vs, Greater Hudson, postponed
Greater Hudson vs. South Sumter, postponed


Photos by DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
Torrential downpours halted the District 15 Little League All-Star tournament on Saturday at Bicentennial. Park in Crystal River. Games started
again Saturday evening after the rains had cleared and the fields had been sufficiently dried.





Wackweather


Central Citrus

victory sparked by

play at theplate

JOHN COSCIA
jcoscla@chronlcleonllne.com
Chronicle

If you don't like the weather in
Florida, wait a minute ...and it
will change. That was certainly
thi case on Saturday as a torren-
tdal rain storm moved through
Citrus County, flooding the base-
ball and softball fields at Bicen-
tennial Park.
, Although the softball slate was
completely postponed, the offi-
cials decided to reschedule the 9-
10 baseball games for later that
night.
As everyone left the park at
1:30 p.m. with the rain still com-
ing down few thought they would
be returning for baseball on th is
day. Mother Nature, however,
had other ideas. After emptying a
drenching rain, she quickly
switched gears and her hot
Florida sun baked the fields that'
only four hours earlier were com-
pletely under water.
And on this day no one was
happier that the games finally got
played the Central Citrus 9-10
All-Stars. Less than 24 hours re-
moved from a tough loss to Inver-
ness, Central Citrus rallied for an
8-3 victory over West Hernando,
improving its record to 1-1 in'
Pool A.
In every game there is that
spark, that moment, the turning
point that changes the. momen-
tum in one team's favor.


L `-- Ne .
Dan Epstein works to get the field in playing condition on Saturday morning before a major storm moved
its way through the county forcing the games to be played Saturday night at Bicentennial Park.


In the Central Citrus/West Her-
nando game that moment came
in the bottom of the fourth inning.
Central Citrus had entered the
frame leading 3-1 but when West
Hernando's Blake Drinkwater
reached on an error and the next
three batters, John Moron,
Miguel Martinez and Nicky
Scarangella all drew one-out
walks West Hernando had cut the
lead to 3-2 and still had the bases
loaded.
And then came the momentum
changer.
West Hernando's cleanup hit-


ter laced a single to left field eas-
ily scoring Moran but the Central
Citrus left fielder Tyler Price
handled the ball perfectly and
threw a strike to his catcher
Nathan Beard. The play was in
plenty of time to nail Martinez at
home who instead of sliding bar-
reled .into Beard at home which
is against Little League rules.
The play was deemed inten-
tional by the home plate umpire
and Martinez was ejected. The
concern, however, was for Beard
who was still on the ground.
After a few minutes Beard stood


up, ripped off his helmet, turned
to his teammates and let out a
grunt that spoke louder than any
words could.
After walking the next batter
Joel Lawrence struck out Trevor
Vendrone to end the West Her-
nando scoring threat.
In the next inning Central Cit-
rus responded to Beard's grunt
with five runs to blow the game
open. The frame was sparked by
Noah Carmon's two-RBI double
as Eric St. Pierre, Lawrence,
See BASEBALL/Page B4


17-year-old American shocks former No. 1 Jankovic


Jesse Levine falls;

Roddick only US.

man left in tourney
Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England - As a
tyke growing up in Marietta, Ga.,
Melanie Oudin would watch
Venus and Serena Williams on TV
and tell anyone who would listen
that she was going to play at Wim-
bledon, too, one day.
Who knew she'd be right? And
do so well, so quickly?
Making her Wimbledon debut at
age 17 after getting through quali-
fying, the 124th-ranked Oudin
joined the Williams sisters in the
fourth round at the All England
Club by beating former No. 1 Je-
lena Jankovic 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-2 Sat-
urday in the most startling result
of the tournament's opening week
. "I was just thinkingthat she was
any other player, and this was any
other match, and I was at any
other tournament - you know,
not, like, on the biggest stage, at


Associated Press
USA's Melanie Oudin returns a shot to Serbia's Jelena Jankovic during
their third round singles match on Saturday at Wimbledon.


Wimbledon, playing my first top-
10 player," Oudin said. "I mean, I
go into every match the exact
same, you know, like, no matter
who I play. It's not, like, 'Oh, my
gosh, I'm playing the No. 1 player
in the world.'"


Another U.S. qualifier, 133rd-
ranked Jesse Levine of Boca
Raton, couldn't extend his run in
the men's tournament, losing to
No. 19 Stanislas Wawrinka 5-7, 7-
5, 6-3, 6-3..That leaves No. 6 Andy
Roddick as the last American man


in the tournament.
The only time Oudin really lost
her way was when her match
ended and it was time to leave
Court 3, a patch of grass known as
"The Graveyard of Champions,"
because of the long list of stars
upset there. She wasn't quite sure
where to go and asked someone to
direct her toward the exit.
Not all that surprising, when
you consider that a year ago,
Oudin entered the junior event at
Wimbledon- seeded No. 1 among
the girls - and failed to make it
out of the second round, losing 6-1,
6-3 to eventual champion Laura
Robson of Britain.
Yet there Oudin was Saturday,
outlasting 2008 U.S. Open runner-
up Jankovic over nearly 3 hours,
then calling Mom and Dad back
home to share in the revelry.
"My emotions are all over the
place," Oudin's father, John, said
in a telephone interview. "When I
think about watching Bjorn Borg
and Boris Becker in their
starched whites at Wimbledon, I
just can't believe Melanie is there.
It's hardly any words other than,
'Wow!' We've been saying a lot of


that. Just, 'Wow!"'
Shortly after his daughter's vic-
tory, he and Oudin's mother,
Leslie, began scouring the Inter-
net for flights. Even Grandma -
who encouraged Melanie and
twin sister Katherine to take up
tennis - might make the overseas
trip to see Oudin face No. 11 Ag-
niesza Radwanska of Poland on
Monday with a quarterfinal berth
at stake, heady stuff for someone
who was 0-2 at Grand Slam tour-
naments until this week
Then again, Oudin - it's pro-
nounced "oo-DAN," on account of
her father's French ancestry -
long has shown ambition.
"My goal has always been, since
I was little, to become No. 1 in the
world one day," she said.
The only time Oudin showed.
signs of nerves during the most
important match of her nascent
career came in the opening set.
She held four set points, and blew
them all with unforced errors.
"Rushed them. Played undisci-
plined tennis," said Oudin's coach,
Brian de Villiers. "She played the
occasion, rather than the point
See TENNIS/Page B5


_ j













Goydos leads Travelers by one


Funk still ahead

atEn-Joie,
Associated Press
CROMWELL, Conn. -
Paul Goydos birdied five
holes on the back nine Sat-
urday and held a one-stroke
lead over Kenny Perry after
the third round of the Trav-
elers Championship.
Goydos' 28-foot putt from
off the green on the 16th
highlighted a third-round
63, tying Hunter Mahan for
the best round of the day.
"I had a circus putt on 16,"
Goydos said. "Again, it was
turning lemons into lemon-
ade. Those are the things
that are the difference be-
tween maybe shooting 68
today and 63."
Perry, who led after each
of the first two rounds, had
a seemingly comfortable
three-stroke lead after
birdies on 11 and 12. But he
dropped a stroke on the 14th
and Goydos took advantage,
making four straight birdies
starting on the.par-5 13th.
After a rain delay of just
over an hour, both golfers
parred in. Perry missed a 5-
foot birdie try on 18 that
would have given him a
share of the lead minutes
after Goydos misread the-
Sbreak on a 10-footer.
"When it gets dark I don't
see very good, I never had
and I complain every time,"
Perry said. "I can't see the
lines when it gets dark and
that's just the way it was."


David Toms shot a 66 and
was in third place at 14-
under par. Toms didn't
make his first bogey of the
tournament until Saturday
on the par-4 10th. hole,
when he missed a 5-foot par
putt. It was his only bogey
of the round and broke a
streak of 45 straight holes at
par or better.
John Merrick held the
lead several times during
the round after making
birdie on five of his. first
seven holes. But a double-
bogey on 12 led to a three-
stroke swing and put Perry
back on top. Merrick fin-
ished with a 65, and was tied
with Casey Wittenberg,
three strokes behind the
leaders at 13-under.
Wittenberg chipped in
from 51 feet on the 16th hole
and made five birdies on the
back nine.
"I got in a groove there,"
he said.
Bo Van Pelt's 23-foot
birdie putt on the par-4 18th
capped a round of 64 that
left him at 12-under for the
tournament and in a three-
way tie for sixth place with
Tag Ridings and Ben Curtis.
"I've got to hit some fair-
ways Sunday to go low
enough to scare anybody,"
Van Pelt said. "There are
going to be some low scores
Sunday. You better have
your ears pinned back and
go.get some birdies."
Mahan, who seems to al-
ways play well in Cromwell,
shot a 63 to move into con-
tention. Mahan got his only
Tour win here in 2007 and
finished tied for second in


2006 and 2008. On Saturday,
he birdied five consecutive
holes to get to 11 under.
"I wish I could find more
courses that suit me like this
one," Mahan said. "I just
like it. It suits my eye. It's a
fun course. You can make a
lot of birdies, and I just have
a lot of confidence when I
play here."
U.S. Open champion
Lucas Glover was seven
strokes behind after his sec-
ond 65 in three days.
Funk holds lead
at En-Joie
ENDICOTT N.Y.- Maybe
it's the brace.
Fred Funk, who was limping
badly just a few days ago after
playing the grueling U.S. Open
on his bum right knee, shot a 65
on Saturday to gain a three-shot
lead after two rounds at the
Dick's Sporting Goods Open.
Funk, who was fitted with a
new knee brace on Wednes-
day, had eight birdies to go with
one bogey to reach 15-under'
129 and open a lead over Ron-
hie Black, defending champion
Eduardo Romero and Lonnie
Nielsen (66). Black and
Romero each shot 9-under 63s,
the best rounds of the day.
Gary Hallberg (66) was alone
in fifth at 11 under and Jay Haas
(68) was another shot back.
Funk began the day with a
two-shot lead and continued his
stellar play. That he finished the
round carrying an umbrella in a
steady rain only made his smile
a bit wider. He had withstood a
stiff challenge from his closest
pursuers.


SShin leads Wegmans LPGA event


Associated Press
South Korea's Sun Young Yoo hits her ball out of a greenside
bunker on the 17th hole during the third round of the LPGA
Wegmans golf tournament on Saturday In Rochester, N.Y.


Woods misses

cut by 4 strokes
Associated Press

ROCHESTER, N.Y. - To
dispel her jitters, Jiyai Shin
reached for a sandwich.
The South Korean star,
seeking her fifth win in 11
months, shot a 5-u nder 67 on
Saturday 'to extend her lead
to four strokes at the Weg-
mans LPGA.
"On the front nine, I lost
my confidence," the 21-year-
old Shin said of a slow start.


"I tried eating. Eat some
bread on No. 10 and then I
made birdie."
With five of her six birdies
on the back nine, Shin
moved to 16-under 200 after
three rounds. Morgan Pres-
sel, a two-time winner on
tour whose season-best fin-
ish was a tie for seventh in
April, shot a 70 and was in
second place at 12 under -
one better than rookie Stacy
Lewis, who also shot 70.,,.;;
Cheyenne Woods, the
niece of Tiger Woods,
missed the cut by four
strokes in her professional
golf debut. Woods and 70


other players completed
their second rounds Satur-
day morning after play was
interrupted by thunder-
storms Friday. Defending
, champion Eun-Hee Ji could
only manage a 71 and
crashed at 7 over.
In 2008, Shin became the
first non-LPGA member to
win three events. A multiple
winner on the Korean tour,
she� reeled, in the Women's
British Open last August,
then followed with late-sea-
son wins in the Mizuno Clas-
sic and ADT Championship.
In March, she captured the
HSBC Women's'Champions


in Singapore for her first
victory as a tour member
Shin rolled in a 20-foot
birdie putt on No. 1, but she
failed to reach the par-4
sixth in two and missed a 6-
foot par putt for her only
bogey at Locust Hill, a tradi-
tional, tree-lined course
with compact; undulating
greens.
After failing to hit a suc-
cession of greens in regula-
tion, Shin made amends by
chipping in from 15 yards on
the par-4 10th and left her
approach shot inches away
for another birdie on the
next hole.


Busch gets fifth


Nationwide win

19-year-old Logano finishes 2nd


Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. - Kyle
Busch figured out a way to
win again in NASCAR's Na-
tionwide Series.
After two straight frustrat-
ing runner-up finishes in the
second tier series, Busch
passed Joe Gibbs Racing
teammate Joey Logano near
the end of the Camping
World 200 on Saturday and
held off the precocious 19-
year-old to get the victory at
New Hampshire Interna-
tional Speedway.
Logano, who started from
the pole and led 108 of the
200 laps, beat Busch out of
the pits by the length of a
hood on the final pit stop by
-the two leaders. But Busch
was able to stay with the
leader and eventually drive
past him with 36 laps left
"We just kept adjusting on
our car all day," said Busch,
who had led the most laps in
the last eight Nationwide
races while winning only
two of them. "Normally,
when we're out front, we
don't adjust on it Today we
didn't have the winning car,
we made the winning car
"(Crew chief) Jason (Rat-
cliff) and myself, we talked
this past week about what
we need in order to get bet-
ter, in order to take this
team to Victory Lane in-
stead of finishing second
week in and week out. This
is a good step in the right
direction."
Logano said the handling
on his car changed too much
during the final run and it
slowed him down enough
for Busch to move ahead.
"We had a pretty good car
today," the teenager said.
"Just not good enough. It's
not like he beat us by a lot.
(We were) just too tight at


the end. ... I guess this is
how Kyle felt lately, leading
all the laps and finishing
second."
Busch, who led a total of
37 laps Saturday, picked up
his fifth Nationwide win of
the year and 26th of his ca-
reer. The 24-year-old, who
also is a star in Sprint Cup
and the, Camping World
Truck Series, now has a
total of 52 wins in his
NASCAR career.
Saturday's victory was his
10th of the season, including
three in Cup heading into
Sunday's Lenox Industrial
Tools 301 on the same track
and two in trucks.
Busch's latest victory also
added to the remarkable
string of 23 different win-
ners in 23 Nationwide races
on the 1.058-mile New
Hampshire oval.
Former series champion
Carl Edwards challenged
Logano in the early going,
leading 51 laps. But his
crew had problems chang-
ing the right front tire on a
pit stop just past halfway
and he fell out of ,con-
tention, finishing sixth.
That left Edwards 162
points behind Busch in the
championship after 16 of 25
races. Logano, in his first
full season in Nationwide,
is fifth.
Brad Keselowski finished
third, followed by Mike
Bliss and Kevin Harvick.
As the leaders crossed the
finish line, Scott Speed hit
Brian Vickers from behind
and spun out his Cup team-
mate while they battled for
ninth place. Vickers recov-
ered to finish 12th. The
angry Vickers bumped the
rear of Speed's car several
times as the two drove
slowly along pit road after
the race.


Trend is no repeat winners at NHMS


Greg Biffle last

to win in at

track in Sept.

Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. -
Blame the tough race-
track, the Car of Tomorrow
or simply circumstance.
Whatever the reason,
there have been no repeat
winners in the last four
years of NASCAR Sprint
Cup racing at New Hamp-
shire Motor Speedway.
If that trend holds, Greg
Biffle, who won here in
September, won't be in Vic-
tory Lane on Sunday
Nor will Kurt Busch,
Clint Bowyer, Denny Ham-
lin, Kevin Harvick, Kyle
Busch, Ryan Newman or
Tony Stewart.
That impressive group
of drivers includes the last
eight Cup Winners on the
1.058-mile New Hamp-
shire oval.
No repeats.
The trend is even more
extensive in the Nation-
wide Series, which had 22
different winners in 22
races heading into Satur-
day's Camping World 200.
"Certainly, this racetrack
is one of the harder flat
tracks that we go to," Biffle
said.
"It's really, really flat,
and I think that it changes
a lot, and the guy that hits
it just right that weekend is
why you see different win-
ners all the time with no
repeat winners.
"Hopefully, we'll break
that trend this weekend.
We'll just have to wait and
see."
Stewart started the Cup
string when he won the
summer race in July 2005.
Jeff Gordon, Jeff Burton,
Jimmie Johnson and
Busch all won multiple


Associated Press
Greg BIffle, left, and Kyle Busch race each other during the practice session for the
NASCAR Lenox Industrial Tools 301 auto race on Saturday in Loudon, N.H.


races here before that, in-
cluding season sweeps by
Johnson in 2003 and Busch
in 2004.
Since then, though, no
repeaters.
Busch said at least part
of the explanation is the
Car of Tomorrow, which
began competing on
NASCAR's shorter tracks
in 2007.
"You can say that the
new car has added a differ-
ent twist because' we con-
tinually come back to the
racetracks that we've seen
before with completely dif-
ferent setups and that will
create different winners
and a trend such as that,"
Busch said.
"This racetrack has a lot
to do with pit strategy.
Once you get towards the
end, you want to pit and
stay out as long as you can
and, sometimes, guys who
haven't'been running well'
all day will stay out and
try to stretch their fuel
and they end up having
track position," added
Busch, who won a rain-
shortened race here last


June. "Timely yellows
come out, and so it creates
a road course-type atmos-
phere where you pit as
soon as you can make it to
the end and then stay out
and hang on."
Stewart, who. also won
here in July 2000, said he
has no idea why there has
been a string of different
winners in New Hamp-
shire.
"I think every year this
track changes a little bit
and every year everybody
gets a little bit better on
what it takes to be good
here," said Stewart, the se-
ries points leader who will
start from the pole in Sun-
day's Lenox Industrial
Tools 301.
"This is a unique place
and I think that's the rea-
son guys every year kind of
hit it or miss it."
Assuming the trend
holds, keep an eye on Mark
Martin, who won on the
one-mile oval at Phoenix
earlier this year and brings
the same car to New
Hampshire.
"This is a tough race


track," said Martin, who
has never won at NHMS.
"It's kind of tough to pass
on and it's tight quarters
and it's like an expanded
version of Martinsville in
some ways. So it can be fun
if your car is really good.
But, if your car is not really
good, it can sure be a chal-
lenge racing around the
middle of the pack"
Hamlin's car was really
good when he won at New
Hampshire in July 2007
and he's among several
drivers hoping to end the
streak of different winners
on Sunday.
"I know we've had a lot
of success here each time
we've been here, but we've
been here with a different
setup every single time,"
Hamlin said.
"It's just a real hard
track to kind of perfect and
get right.
"I think the drivers can
make up for a little bit, but
... I don't think, we've got it
figured out on the car side
yet. I don't think anyone
has."


CITRusS CouNT7Y (FL) CHRONICLE


SPORTS


B2 SUwnnAY. IUN R 28.200


I


r 9- ar


Associated Press
Paul Goydos acknowledges the gallery on the ninth hole during the third round at the Trav-
elers Championship golf tournament on Saturday at the TPC at River Highlands golf course
In Cromwell, Conn. Goydos leads the tournament by one stroke.










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL St YiI9B3


AL








NL


Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore


Philadelphia
New York
Florida
Atlanta
Washington


East Division
GB WCGB

4 -
6 2
6 2
12 8


East Division
GB WCGB

1� 2�
2 3
5 6
17 18


Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston
Pittsburgh


Central Division
GB WCGB

4 5
5 6
9� 10�/
11 12


Central Division
GB WCGB

3% 3)�
31 31�
4 4
5 5


Los Angeles
Texas
Seattle
Oakland


Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
GB WCGB

2 1Y
3% 4�
9 10


West Division
GB WCGB

81/ �
9� 1�
151 7�
18� 10%


INTERLEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Chicago White Sox 4
Cleveland 9, Cincinnati 2
Pittsburgh 5, Kansas City 3
Baltimore 11, Washington 1
Toronto 6, Philadelphia 1
N.Y.Yankees 9, N.Y. Mets 1
Boston 4, Atlanta 1
Tampa Bay 7, Florida 3
Houston 5, Detroit 4
Texas 12, San Diego 2
Milwaukee 5, San Francisco 1
Minnesota 3, St. Louis 1
L.A. Angels 12, Arizona 3
Colorado 4, Oakland 2
L.A. Dodgers 8, Seattle 2.
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia .10, Toronto 0
St. Louis 5, Minnesota 3
Boston 1, Atlanta 0
Chicago White Sox 8, Chicago Cubs 7
LA. Angels 2, Arizona 1
Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 3
Houston 8, Detroit 1
Pittsburgh 6, Kansas City 2
Milwaukee 7, San Francisco 6
Baltimore 6, Washington 3
Tampa Bay 3, Florida 2
N.Y. Yankees 5, N.Y. Mets 0
San Diego 7, Texas 3
Colorado at Oakland, late
Seattle at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Owings 4-8) at Cleveland (D.Huff 3-
2), 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Moyer 5-6) at Toronto (Tallet 5-4),
1:07 p.m.
Boston (Penny 6-2) at Atlanta (Hanson 3-0),
1:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Greinke 9-3) at Pittsburgh (Mor-
ton 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 4-5) at Baltimore (Da.Her-
nandez 1-1), 1:35 p.m.
Florida (A.Miller 2-3) at Tampa Bay (Price 1-2),
1:38 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 4-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Danks 5-6), 2:05 p.m.
Detroit (E.Jackson 6-4) at Houston (R.Ortiz 3-
3), 2:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Sadowski 0-0) at Milwaukee
(Suppan 5-5), 2:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 3-8) at St. Louis (Pineiro 6-
8), 2:15 p.m.
Colorado (Cook 7-3) at Oakland (Mazzaro 2-2),
4:05 p:m.
L.A. Angels (Palmer 6-1) at Arizona (Scherzer
5-4), 4:10 p.m.
Seattle (Olson 2-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 2-
3), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Wang 0-6) at N.Y. Mets (Li.Her-
nandez 5-2), 8:05 p.m.
San Diego (Gaudin 3-6) at Texas (Tom.Hunter.
0-0), 8:05 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:05,p,m.
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Minnesota a. "ansas City, 8:10 p.m.
D.-I'ilc 31 Jl -.iN I ] 03 : nT .
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 7:08 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


, MLB LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-ISuzuki, Seattle, .371; MiCabrera,
Detroit, .336; Rolen, Toronto,..329; VMartinez,
Cleveland, ,323; Figgins, Los Angeles, .321;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, .314;Youkilis, Boston, .313.
RUNS-Scutaro, Toronto, 58; CPena, Tampa
Bay, 57; Damon, NewYork, 55; Figgins, Los An-
geles, 54; Kinsler, .. 5a.4 1 P-tdcia Boston,
54; BRoberts, Baltimore, 54.
RBI-Bay, Boston, 69; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 62;
Momeau, Minnesota, 58;Teixeira, NewYork, 58;
TorHunter, Los Angeles, 56; VMartinez, Cleve-
Sland, 56; CPena, Tampa Bay, 55.
HITS-ISuzuki, Seattle, 106; AHill, Toronto,
.100; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 95; VMartinez,
Cleveland, 93; M!Cabrera, Detroit, 90; Cano,
New York, 90; MYoung, Texas, 90.
HOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 23; Teix-
eira, New York, 20; Bay, Boston, 19; Branyan,
Seattle, 18; NCruz, Texas, 18; Kinsler, Texas,
18; 5 tied at'17.
PITCHING -Halladay, Toronto, 10-1; Slowey,
Minnesota, 10-3; Wakefield, Boston, 10-3;
Beckett, Boston, 9-3; Greinke, Kansas City, 9-3;
JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 8-3; Verlander, De-
troit, 8-3.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, Detroit, 124;
Greinke, Kansas City, 111; Lester, Boston, 106;
FHernandez, Seattle, 98; Beckett, Boston, 94;,
ABurnett, New York, 92; Halladay, Toronto, 88.
SAVES-Fuentes, Los Angeles, 21; Papelbon,
Boston, 18; Nathan, Minnesota, 18; Jenks,
Chicago, 18; MaRivera, New York, 17; Rodney,
Detroit, 16; Sherrill, Baltimore, 16.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-DWright, NewYork, .346; Sandoval,
San Francisco, .340; CGuzman, Washington,
.336; Beltran, New York, .336; HaRamirez,
Florida, .335; Hawpe, Colorado, .332; Tejada,
Houston, .330.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 59; Braun, Milwau-
kee, 55; Utiey, Philadelphia, 52; Ibanez,
Philadelphia, 51; Victorinp, Philadelphia, 50;
Werth, Philadelphia, 50; AdGonzalez, San
Diego, 48; Hudson, Los Angeles, 48; Reynolds,
Arizona, 48; Zimmerman, Washington, 48.
RBI-Pujols, St. Louis', 74; Fielder, Milwaukee,
73; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 59; Howard, Philadel-
phia, 58; Braun, Milwaukee, 53; Hawpe, Col-
orado, 53; Reynolds, Arizona, 53.
HITS-Tejada, Houston, 97; DWright, New
York, 94; HaRamirez, Florida, 92; Hudson, Los
Angeles, 91; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 91; Braun,
Milwaukee, 88; CGuzman, Washington, 87;
Zimmerman, Washington, 87.
HOME RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 28; AdGon-
zalez, San Diego, 24; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 22;
Reynolds, Arizona, 21; Howard, Philadelphia,
20; Fielder, Milwaukee, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati,
18; Dunn, Washington, 18,
PITCHING -Cain, San Francisco, 9-2; Billings-
ley, Los Angeles, 9-3; JSantana, New York, 9-5;
Marquis, Colorado, 9-5; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 8-
4; Wainwright, St. Louis, 8-5; Duke; Pittsburgh,
8-5.
STRIKEOUTS--JVazquez, Atlanta, 125; Lince-
cum, San Francisco, 124; Haren, Arizona, 104;
Gallardo, Milwaukee, 102;JSantana, NewYork,
100; Billjngsley, Los Angeles, 99; JoJohnson,
Florida, 94.
SAVES-Bell, San Diego, 20; FrRodrlguez,
New York, 20; BWilson, San Francisco, 20;
Cordero, Cincinnati, 18; Franklin, St. Louis, 18;
Broxton, Los Angeles, 18; Hoffman, Milwaukee,
17; Street, Colorado, 17; Capps, Pittsburgh, 17


Assoaated Press
Tampa Bay Rays players mob Wily Aybar, third from right fore-
ground, after. he drove In the game-winning run to defeat the
Florida Madlns, 3-2, on Saturday in St. Petersburg.


Rays 3, Marlins 2 fifth. The r
ST. PETERSBURG - Carlos Pena in six innir
hit his AL-leading 23rd home run and five befor
Willy Aybar broke a ninth-inning tie with buper
a pinch-hit sacrifice fly, giving the Florida
Tampa Bay Rays a 3-2 victory over the Coghln If
Florida Marlins on Saturday night. Bonifac 3b
Jason Bartlett singled off Burke' HRmrz ss
Badenhop (5-3) with one out in the Cantu dh
Gload lb
ninth, stole second and moved to third Uggla 2b
on a wild pitch. He scored easily on C.Ross cf
Aybar's fly ball to center field, as.the RPauln c
Rays won their fourth straight to climb BCarril rf
a season-best six games over .500 at Totals
41-35. Florida
J.P Howell (4-2) pitched the ninth to Tampa Bay
earn the victory. Two outs wh
ear E-Longoria
Brett Carroll homered for Florida, 2- Ul_ o ,,


however the Marlins went 0 for 6 with
runners in scoring position and have
gone 1 for 16.in those situations in
dropping the first two games of the
weekend Citrus Series.'
Left-hander Scott Kazmir made his
first start in over a month for Tampa
Bay, allowing two runs and four hits in
five innings. He threw 61'of his 92''
pitches for strikes, walked one and
struck out five, including Chris Coghlan
three times.
Marlins starter Chris Volstad gave
up Pena's solo homer in the fourth and
'a RBI bunt single to B.J. Upton in the


Phillies 10, Blue Jays 0
TORONTO- J.A. Happ pitched a
five-hit shutout, Jayson Werth homered
twice and the Philadelphia Phillies beat
the Toronto Blue Jays 10-0 Saturday.
In the first complete game of his ca-
reer, Happ (5-0) struck out four and did-
n't walk a batter to win for the first time,
in four starts, helping the Phillies snap a
three-game losing streak. The victory
was Philadelphia's third in 14 games.
After going without an extra-base hit
for the first time in 97 games in Friday's
6-1 defeat, the Phillies used the long
ball to jump ahead quickly, homering
twice in the top of the first.
.Werth hit a towering two-run drive
into the upper deck, his 14th, and
Pedro Feliz added a two-out homer to
left.
Toronto left-hander Brad Mills (0-1)'
allowed eight runs on eight hits in four-
plus innings, striking out seven in his
second career start
Werth's upper deck blast was the
1'4th in the 20-year history of Rogers
Centre, formerly SkyDome. Toronto's
Vernon Wells was the last player to
reach the upper tier, on Sept. 16; 2004
against Baltimore's Rodrigo Lopez.
A Blue Jay in 2002 and 2003 before
he (vas traded to the Los Angeles
Dodgers, Werth singled in the third,
doubled and scored in the fifth and hit a
solo homer off reliever B.J. Ryan.


Philadelphia Toronto
ab rhbi
Victorn cf 4 1 1 0 Scutaro ss
Werth rf 4 3 4 3 A.Hill 2b
Utley 2b 4 1 0 0 V.Wells cf
Dobbs 3b 0 0 0 0 RAdms If
Howard lb 4 2 3 1 Millar lb
Mayrrylf 4 1 0 0 Linddh
Feliz 3b-ss 5 1 2 2 Rios ri-cf
Coste dh 5 1 2 1 Bautist if-rf
Bmtltt ss-2b 4 0 0 1 RChavz c
Ruiz c 5 0 2 2 JMcDnl3b
Totals 39,101410 Totals


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 01 0
3 00 0
1 00 0
3 00 0
3 01 0
3 00 0
3 01 0
3 00 0
3 02 0
30 0 5 0


Philadelphia 400 141 000-10
Toronto 000 000 000--0
DP-Philadelphia 2, Toronto 1. LOB-Philadel-
phia 8, Toronto 3. 2B-Werth (13), Feliz (17),
Ruiz (11), A.Hill (12). HR-Werth 2 (15), Feliz
(4). SF-Bruntlett.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Happ W,5-0 9 5 0 0 0 4
Toronto
Mills L,0-1 4 8 8 8 2 7
Camp \ 1 2 1 1 0 0
B.J.Ryan 1 2 1 1 '0 0
League 1 1 0 0 0' D
Hayhurst 1 1 0 0 2 1
Carlson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Mills pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Camp (Mayberry). WP-League.
Umpires-Home, Tim Tschlda; First, Bob David-
son; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Mark Carlson.
T-2:37. A-28,801 (49,539).


ight-hander yielded five hits
ngs, walked three and fanned
e leaving a 2-2 tie to the


Tampa Bay
ab rhbl
4 01 0 BUpton cf
3 1 1 0.CrwfrdlIf
4 00 1 Longori3b
4 0 0 0 C.Penalb
4 0 1 0 Zobrlst2b
3 0 1 0 Burrell dh
4 01 0 Gross rf
4 0 0 0 Bartlett ss
4 11 1 MHrndc
WAyar ph
34 2 6 2 Totals
101 0


ab r h bi
3011
4 01 0
4 00 0
4 1 1 1
2 000
3010
4000
422 0
3 01 0
0 0 01i
31 3 7 3
00 000-2


000 110 001-3
ien winning runscored.
ia (8). LOB-Florida 7, Tampa Bay 7.
12Y RBartl~tt (14) HR-B.Carrnll


(2), C.Pena (23). SB---Bnifacio 2 (15), Craw-
ford (39), Bartlett (16). CS-B.Upton (7). SF-
W.Aybar.
IP H RERBBSO
Florida
Volstad 6 5 2 2 3 5
Sanches 1 0 0 0 0 0
Nunez 1 1 0 0 1 2
Badenhop L,5-3 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Tampa Bay
Kazmir 5 4 2 2 1 5
Bradford 1 1 0 0 0 1
Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 1 .
Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 0
HowellW,4-2 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP-Badenhop, Kazmir.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Meals; First, Mike
DiMuro; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Dale Scott.
T-3:05. A-35,790 (36,973).



Cardinals 5, Twins 3
ST. LOUIS - Albert Pujols hit a pair
of two-run homers, helping the St. Louis
Cardinals pound 10-game winner Kevin
Slowey in a 5-3 victory over the Min-
nesota Twins on Saturday.
Pujols leads the majors with 28
homers and 74 RBIs after his 29th ca-
reer multihomer game, sixth this sea-
son and second in six days. Both
homers came off Slowey (10-3), whose
bid to take the major league lead in vic-
tories was a bust, and Pujols' second
long ball put the Cardinals ahead 5-3 in
the third.
Josh Kinney (1-0) allowed two hits in
1 2-3 innings of relief for his first career
victory and struck out feebly in his first
career at-bat after manager Tony La
Russa elected not to use an early pinch
hitter with two outs, the bases loaded
and Slowey on the ropes in the third.
Brendan Harris hit a rare three-run
single in the second for the Twins. The
runners were in motion on Harris'fly
ball to shallow left that glanced off Chris
Duncan's glove for a hit that briefly put
the Twins ahead 3-2.
Minnesota St. Louis
ab rhbl ab rhbi
Span cf. 4 1 0 0 Schmkr2b 4 2 3 0
BHarrs ss 4 0 2 3 Rasms c 5 00 0
Mornealb 3 00 0 Pujols 1b 2 22 4
Kubellf 3 00 0 Duncan f. 3 1 1 0
Cuddyrrf 4 01 0 Mottep 0 00 0
Crede 3b 4 0 1 0 Frnkin p I 0 0 0
Rdmndc 3 1 0 0 YMolinc 401 0
Tolbert2b 4 1 1 0 Anklel rf-lf 3 00 0
Slowey p 1 0 0 0 TGreen ss 3 00 1
DImYn ph 1 0 1 0 Wllmyr p 1 00 0
.Keppelp 0 00 0 Kinneyp 1 00 0
Hennp 0 00 0 TMillerp 0 00 0
Dickey p 0 0 0 0 McClllnp 1 00 0
Mauerph 1 00 0 DReyesp 0 00 0
Ludwck rf 1 00 0
Thurstn3b 2 0 1 0


Totals


32 36 3 Totals 30 58 5


Minnesota 030 000 000-3
St. Louis 203 000 00x-5
E-B.Harris (4). DP-Minnesota 1, St. Louis 1.
LOB-Minnesota 7, St. Louis 9. 2B-Cuddyer
(16), Schumaker (15). 3B-Thurston (4). HR-
Pujols 2 (28).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Slowey L,10-3 3 6 5 5 1 4
Keppel 4 2 0 0 3 3
Henn 1-3 0 0 0 2 1
Dickey 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
Wellemeyer 21-34 3 3 4 2
KinneyW,1-0 11-3 2 0 0 0 0
T.Miller 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
McClellan 2 0 0 0 1 3
D.ReyesH,13 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
MotteH,14 1 0 0 0 0 1
Franklin S,18-19 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Keppel (Thurston), by Slowey
(T.Greene). WP-Wellemeyer.
Umpires-Home, Mike Everitt; First, Brian Gor-
man; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Todd
TIchenor.
T-2:59. A-42,986 (43,975).


Yankees 5, Mets 0
NEW YORK -The Yankees are
turning this Subway Series into a mon-
umental mismatch.
A.J. Burnett combined with two re-
lievers on a one-hitter, Nick Swisher
and Jorge Posada made Citi Field
seem small with opposite-field homers,
and the Yankees rolled past the Mets
again, 5-0 Saturday night.
Alex Cora got the Mets' only hit, lin-
ing a clean single to center on a 0-1
-pitch leading off the sixth. He had been
0 for 21 with eight strikeouts against
Burnett.
The depleted Mets, playing with cen-
ter fielder Carlos Beltran, shortstop
Jose Reyes and first baseman Carlos
Delgado on the disabled list, didn't .
reach base after Cora. They've been.
outscored 14-1 and outhit 22-4 in the
first two games of the weekend series.
Burnett (6-4) struck out a season-
high 10 in seven innings and walked
three. Brian Bruney and David Robert-
son each followed with a perfect inning
before 41,302, the second straight
record crowd at Citi Field and just the
fourth sellout there this season.
Tim Redding (1-3) allowed five runs
and six hits in 51-3 innings.
The Yankees have won foor of five
against their crosstown rivals, clinching
the season series for the first time since
sweeping all six meetings in 2003.
NewYork (A) . NewYork (N)
ab rhbi ab r h bl
Gardnr cf 5 00 0 Cora ss 4 01 0
Swisher r 31 1 1 ArReys2b 4 00 0
Teixeirlb 3 11 0 DWrght3b 4 n0 00
ARdrgz3b 4 1 1 1 Churchrf 4 :0 00
Cano2b 4 11 -0 Sheffildtf , 2 00 0
Posada c 4 1 1 3 DnMrp lb 3 0'0 0
MeCarr If 4 02.0 Reed of 2 : ,0 0
R.Pena ss 4 0 1 0 Schndrc 2 0 00 0
ABrntt p 3 00 0 Reddng p 2 u 0 0
Bruney p 0 0 0 Stbkes p 0 0C0 0
HMatsu ph 1 00 0 Misch p 0 ,:' 0
DRrtsn p 0 00 0 FMrtnz ph 1 00 0
Dessns p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 8 5 Totals 28 ,0 1 0
NewYork(A) 001 004 000-5
NewYork (N) 000 000 000-0
LOB-New York (A) 7, New York (N) 4 2:B-
Teixeira (21), Cano (18), R.Pena (5). HR-
Swisher (14), Posada (10).
IP H RERBBSO


New York (A) . -
A.BurnettW,6-4
Bruney
D.Robertson .
New York I N)
-eddng L.1-3
Stokes
Misch
Dessens


7 1 0 0 3 10
1 0 0 0 0, 0
. 1 ' ,. 0 , ; . O ,
51-36 5 5 2 6
12-3 1 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 1 .1


Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Mike
Winters; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Tony Ran-
dazzo.
T-2:49. A-41,302 (41,800).



Angels 2, D-Backs 1
PHOENIX - Mike Napoli hit a
tiebreaking home run in the top of the
ninth inning to lift the Los Angeles An-
gels to a 2-1 victory over the Arizona
Diamondbacks on Saturday. '
Napoli hit an one-out, 0-1 pitch from
Chad Quails (1-1) 428 feet to center
field to give the'Angels their fourth
straight win and 11th in the last 14.
Darren Oliver (2-0) pitched a score-
less eighth and Brian Fuentes got the
last three outs for his major league-
leading 21st save.
Los Angeles also improved its
major league-best record in inter-
league play this season to 13-4 and
moved into a tie with Texas for the AL
West. The Rangers hosted San Diego
later Saturday night.
Arizona has lost four straight and
seven of eight. The D-backs are 0-7-1
in their last eight home series, and
have not won a series at home since
taking two of three from the Chicago
Cubs on May 27-29.
Los Angeles' John Lackey and Ari-
zona's Doug Davis had nearly identical
lines with each giving-up an unearned
run over seven innings. Lackey allowed
five hits - all singles - with three
walks and struck out nine. Davis also
gave up five singles, walked three and
struck out eight.


Los Angeles Arizona
ab rhbi


Figgins 3b
EAyar ss
BAreu rf
TrHntr cf
JRiver If
Napoli c
Quinlan lb
SRdrgz 2b
Lackey p
Oliver p
Fuents p

Totals


Los Angeles
Arizona


3 0 0 0 FLopez2b
4 1 1 0 S.Drew ss
3 0 0 0 J.Upton rf
4 0 1 0 Rynlds 3b
4 0 1 0 GParra cf
4 1 3 1 Clarklb
4 0 0 0 Monterc
3 0.0 0 ARomrIf
2 0 0 0 RRorts ph
0 00 0 DDavis p
0 0 0 0 CYoung ph
Rauch p
Qualls p
31 2 6 1 Totals


ab r h bi
4 01 0
4 01 0
300 0
2. 110.
4 000
3 00 1
4 020
2 01 0
1 00 0
2 00 0
1 00 0
000 0
0000
30 1 6 1


000 001 001-2
000 100 000-1


E--J.Rivera (1), D.Davis (3), J.Upton (5). DP-
Los Angeles 1, Arizona 1. LOB-Los Angeles
6, Arizona 7. HR-Napoli (10). SB-S.Drew (2).
CS-Reynolds (5). S-Lackey. SF-Clark.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Lackey 7 5 1 0 3 9
Oliver W,2-0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Fuentes S,21-24 1 1 0 0 0 2
Arizona
D.Davis 7 5 1 0 3 8
Rauch 1 0 0 0 0 0
Qualls L,1-1 1 1 1 1 0 1
Umpires-Home, Angel Hernandez; First,
Randy Marsh; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third,
Lance Barksdale,
T-2:34. A-27,742 (48,652),


Astros 8, Tigers 1
HOUSTON - Rookie right-hander
Felipe Paulino pitched seven solid in-
nings and the Houston Astros used a
five-run third to pull away from the De-
troit tigers for an 8-1 victory.
It was Houston's third straight win
and gave the Astros the series victory in
this interleague matchup which ends
Sunday.
The 25-year-old Paulino (2-4) came
off the disabled list for the start. Its his
first win as a starter after getting his
other victory this season as a reliever.
Paulino kept the Tigers off-balance
with an array of pitches including a
fastball that was routinely clocked at 97
mph. He struck out a career-high nine
and allowed three hits and one run -
a homer to Ramon Santiago in the
third inning.
Detroit starter Alfredo Figaro (1-1),
didn't fare as well in his ,second major
league start as he did in his first. He al-
lowed 10 hits and eight runs in six in-
nings after winning his first start by (
striking out seven and giving up just
two runs
Houston led 2-1 in the third before a
double by Lance Berkman scored Jeff
Keppinger and Miguel Tejada. Hunter
Pehnce followed with an RBI double be-
fore Kaz Matsui hit a two-run homer that
landed in the first row of the stands in


right field.
Detroit:

Grndrs cf
R.aburrph
Polaric2D'
MC.ar lb
MnCsy ib.
Kellryt-3D
ir.ge.jb
DolN p-'"
Laird c
D Ryan c
5 aniag,sz'
Fi.aro p
JA ~r


Houston


ab rhbl ab r h bl
3-00 0 Bourn of 4 13 1
1 00 0 KCpppr 3b 3 1 0 1
4 0 0 0 TeiadaE, ,3 1 1 0
4 0 0 CaLeeIt 4 02 1
3 0 1 0 BrKmn it. 4.1 2 2
; 0 0 0 Pence n 4 1 1 1
3 0 0 0 KMaiu 2u 4 22 2
0 o 0 0 Qu.nme c 4 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 FPauln p 2 00 0.
3 0 ': 0 Fulhir, p 0 0 0 0
3 1 1 1 Er.ia.dpr. 1 0 1 0
2 0 0 0 W Qhi p . 0 0 0 0
1 O 0I u
30 I 3 I TOuall 33 8138
0o1 00 000--1
115 001 BOx-8.


DP-Dei.,il '2 LOB-D-irOi, 2-, Houston 6.
.2B-Berkman (13), Pe-ice 1- i Erstad (3).
HR-Santiago (6), C Maisu, (2) SB-Bourpn
(25), Berkman,(5). S-F.Paulino..
IP H RERBBSO
Detro ... "- ' :, . .
. .30. "- 2 5

Houston
.F.PaulinoW,2-4 7 3 1 1 0 ,9.
Fulchino 1 0 0 0 0 0
W.Wright, 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Figaro (Tejada). PB-D.Ryan.
Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, James
Hoye; Second,-Bill Welke; Third, Jim Reynolds.
T-2:16. A-37,123 (40,976).


White Sox 8, Cubs 7
CHICAGO - Gordon Beckham sin-
gled in the winning run with two outs in.
the ninth, and Scott Podsednik home-
red while tying a career high with four
hits to lift the Chicago White Sox to an
8-7 victory over the Cubs on Saturday.
With the game tied at 7, Paul Kon-
erko lined a single to left with one out
off Sean Marshall (3-6) to start the win-
nirg rally.
Chris Getz ran for him and moved to
second on A.J. Pierzynski's grounder,
and Jose Ascanio walked pinch hitter
Jayson Nix. Beckham ended it with a
long drive to right and got mobbed near
second base by his teammates.
The dramatic game came on the
heels of two controversy-filled days for
the Cubs, who have now lost five of six.
Milton Bradley started for the Cubs
and went 1 for 5 a day after he was
sent home by manager Lou Piniella for
throwing a temper tantrum in the
dugout during Friday's 5-4 victory. That
outburst came a day after news that
Geovany Soto tested positive for mari-
juana at the World Baseball Classic.
Chicago (N)_ .Chicago (A)
ab rhbi ab r h bl
ASorin If 4 2 2 .2Pdsdnklf 5 2 4 3
Therjotss 4 1 2 2 AIRmrzss 4 1 2 1
Bradly rf 5 01 0 Dye rf 5 02 1
D.Leelb 4 01 2 Thomedh 3 10 0
J.Foxdh 5 00 0 Konerklb 3 0 1 0
Soto c 4 00 0 Fields pr 0 1 0 0
Freel3b 4.1 0 0 Przynsc 5 02 2
Fukdmcf 2 1 1 0 Getz2b 4 00 0
ABlanc2b 4 22 1 J.Nixph 0 00 0
Bckhm3b 5 1 2 1
7 ,' 9 7 Wisecf , 2 2 1 0
Totals 36 7 9 7 Totals 36 8148
Chicago (N) , 002 013 010-7
Chicago (A) 110 031 011-8
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-AI.Ramirez 2 '(10), Beckham (5). DP-
Chicago (N) 1. LOB-Chicago (N) .8, Chicago
(A) 10.2B-A.SorianQ (16), Podsednik (8), Dye
(12). 3B-Wise (2). HR-Podsednik (3). SB-
Getz (10), Wise (1). CS-Podsednik (5). S-
Fukudome, AI.Ramirez, Wise. SF-D.Lee.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago (N)
Dempster 5 8 5 5 3 2
Heilman BS,5-5 2 2 1 1 1 4
Marmol BS,4-7 1 2 1 1 0' 0
Marshall L,3-0 2-3 1 1 1 0 :0
Ascanio 0 1 0 0 1 0.
Chicago (A)
Buehrle 5 2-36 5 3 3 3
Carrasco BS,1-1 1.1-3 2 2 1 0 2
Poreda 1-3 1 0 0 0 .0
Dotel 2-3 0 0 0 1 11
JenksW,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2
Carrasco pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Ascanio pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Dempster (Konerko). Balk-Buehrle.
Umpires-Home, Angel Campos; First, Brian
Runge; Second, Derryl Cousins; Third, Bill
Miller.
T-3:31. A-39,529 (40,615).


Associated Press
Boston red Sox relief pitcher Jonathan Papelbon reacts after
getting the final out in the ninth inning on Saturday against
the Atlanta Braves in Atlanta. Boston won, 1-0.


Red Sox 1, Braves 0
ATLANTA -Tim Wakefield pitched
six scoreless innings to win a duel with
Javier Vazquez, and the Boston Red
Sox blanked the punchless Atlanta
Braves 1-0 Saturday.
Mark Kotsay drove in the game's
only run with a sixth-inning single.
Wakefield (10-3) came up with a
performance worthy ofthe day he tied
Roger Clemens' record for the most
career starts by a Red Sox pitcher at
382. His knuckleball was really flutter-
ing on a sweltering day at Turner Field
- it was 95 degrees at first pitch -
and the Braves managed just three
singles off the 42-year-old right-hander.
Manny Delcarmen retired all four
hitters he faced, Justin Masterson got
out trouble in the eighth and Jonathan
Papelbon worked around a shaky ninth
to complete the four-hit shutout, his
18th save in 19 chances.
Brian McCann flied out to the wall in
right-center and Garret Anderson dou-
bled with'two outs, but Casey Kotch-
man grounded out to end the game.
IA fieldd became the ALs third 10-
ga 'inner, joining Minnesota's Kevin
SkI . id Toronto's Roy Halladay.


Boston Atlanta
ab rhbi
Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 GBlanc cf
J.Drewif 4 00 0 Prado2b
Youkils 3b 3 1 2 0 C.Jones 3b


ab r h bi
4'02 0
3 000
4000


D.Ortizlb 2 01 0 McCnnc 3 00 0
BaldellilIf 0 00 0 GAndrs If 4 0 1 0
Kotsay If-lb 3 0 1 1 Ktchm lb 4 0 0 0
Ellsurycf 4 0 0 0 Francrrf 3 0 0 0
Lugo ss . 4 00 0 DHrndz ss 3 0 1 0
Papeln p 0 00 0 JVazqz p 2 0 0 0
Kottars c 4 00 0 OFIhrt p 0 00 0
Wakfldp 2 0 1 0 M.Diazph 0 0 0 0
Lowell ph 1 00 0 RSorin p 0 00 0
DIcrmnp 0 0 0 0
Mstrsn p 0 0 0 0
NGreen ss 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 6 1 Totals 30 0 4 0
Boston 000 001 000-1
Atlanta 000 000 000-0
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Boston 7, Atlanta 6.2B-
G.Anderson (11). 3B-Youkilis (1). SB-
G.Blanco (2), McCann (3). CS-Pedroia (5).
S-Prado.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
WakefieldW,10-3 6 3 0 0 1 1
DelcarmenH,3 11-3 0 0 0 0 1
Masterson H,5 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Papelbon S,18-19 1 1 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
J.VazquezL,5-7 72-3 6 1 1 3 8
O'Flaherty 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
R.Soriano 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-Masterson.
Umpires-Home, Marty Foster; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third, Wally
Bell.
T-2:46,.A-48,151 (49,743).


Sc


�5. zoog B3j.i)0 8


MAJOR LEAGuE BASEBALL


ICITRLus C`OUNn, (F;L) CHRONICLE


1.










S~on~rs CITRUS COUNm' (FL) CJIRONIGLF


B4 SUrN AY ji h, 2,2009


Travelers or the record
Travelers Championship


Saturday
At TPC River Highlands
Cromwell, Conn.
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 6,837; Par 70
Third Round
Paul Goydos 63-68-63-194 -16
Kenny Perry 61-68-66-195 -15
David Toms 65-65-66-196 -14
Casey Wittenberg 67-65-65-197 -13
John Merrick 65-67-65-197 -13
Bo Van Pelt 66-68-64-198 -12
Tag Ridings 64-69-65-198 -12
Ben Curtis 68-64-66-198 -12
Hunter Mahan 66-70-63-199 -11
Anthony Kim 66-66-67-199 -11
Ryan Moore 66-6-68-199 -11
Jarrod Lyle 67-67-66-200 -10
Spencer Levin 64-69-67-200 -10
Chris Riley 67-67-66-200 -10
Bryce Molder 67-66-67-200 -10
. Michael Allen 68-65-67-200 -10
Lucas Glover 65-71-65-201 -9
Zach Johnson 67-68-66-201 -9
Michael Letzig 70-66-65-201 -9
Colt Knost. 66-66-69-201 -9
Boo Weekley 64-71-67-202 -8
Will MacKenzie 68-68-66-202 -8
D.J.Trahan 66-68-68-202 -8
Kevin Streelman 68-66-68-202 -8
Aaron Watkins 65-67-70-202 -8
Greg Chalmers 64-71-68-203 -7
Justin Leonard 69-66-68-203 -7
Bob Heintz 68-67-68-203 -7
Robert Garrigus 66-69-68--203 -7
Joe Durant 67-68-68-203 -7
Scott Verplank 67-68-68-203 -7
Matt Bettencourt 67-67-69-203 -7
Brandt Snedeker 67-67-69-203 -7
Nick O'Hern 68-68-67-203 -7
Kyle Stanley ' 66-67-70-203 -7
Peter Lonard 67-70-66-203 -7
Charles Warren 63-72-69-204 -6
Brian Gay 66-68-70-204 , -6
Chris Stroud 71-65-68-204 -6
J.J. Henry 66-70-68-204 -6
Kris Blanks 68-66-70-204 -6
Johnson Wagner 66-68-70-204 -6
Mathew Goggin 65-69-70-204 -6
Bubba Watson 66-68-70-204 -6
Nathan Green 69-67-68-204 -6
Patrick Sheehan 67-70-67-204 -6
Jason Bohn 67-70-67-204 -6
BillLunde 67-68-70-205 -5
Aron Price 67-68-70-205 -5
Luke List 66-69-70-205 -5
Jay Williamson 67-68-70-205 -5
Chad Campbell 67-69-69-205 -5
Charlie Wi 66-68-71-205 -5
James Driscoll 68-69-68-205 -5
Y.E.Yang . 65-71-70,--206 -4
Vijay Singh 66-70-70-206 -4
Mark Brooks 67-68-71-206 -4
Webb Simpson 67-69-70-206 e4
Brendon de Jonge 70-66-70-206 -4
D.A. Points 65-72-69-206 -4
Chez Reavie - 66-67-73-206 -4
Ricky Barnes 65-70-72-207 -3
Rich Beem 68-67-72-207 -3
Sergio Garcia 67-69-71-207 -3
Ryuji Imada 70-67-70-207 -3
Scott McCarron 70-67-70-207. -3
Jerry Kelly 65-70-73-208 -2
Gary Woodland 69-67-72-208 -2
Tim Petrovic 68-69-71-208 -2
Jason Gore 68-68-73-209 -1
Vaughn Taylor 69-68-72-209 -1
Marc Leishman 71-66-72-209 -1
Made cut, but did not qualify for final round
Billy Mayfair ' 70-66-74-210 E
Kevin Sutherland 69-68-73-210 E
Jesper Parnevik #7-70-73-210 E
Lee Janzen 66-71-73-210 E
Tyler Aldridge , E.-. 3 8-- 1 +3
Ai,,. idd'l, i EJ9l- . r.r,1-7 i r- .l �
OCii,,, Bruie - ' -c- 6- 1 +3
Chris DiMarco 68-69-76-213 +3'
Champions Tour - Dick's
Sporting Goods Open
Saturday
At En-Joie Golf Course
Endicott, N.Y.
Purse: $1.65 million
Yardage: 6,67; Par: 72
Second Round
Fred Funk 64-65-129 -15
Ronnie Black . 69-63-132 -12
Eduardo Romero 69-63-132 -12
SLonnie Nielsen '66-66-132 -12
Gary Hallberg. 67-66-133 -11
Jay Haas 66-68-134 -10
Mike Goodes 70-65-135 -9
Jeff Sluman 68-67-135 -9
Andy Bean 67-68-135 -9
Mike Hulbert 67-68-135 -9
- Nick Price 70-66-136 -8
John Morse . 69-67-136 -8
Brad Bryant 68-68-136 -8
Jeff Roth 66-70-136 -8
D.A. Weibring 67-69-136 -8
Scott Hoch .70-67-137 -7
David Ogrin 69-68-137 -7
Joey Sindelar 68-69-137 -7
Larry Mize | 68-69-137 -7
Tom Jenkins 68-69-137 -7
Tom Kite 67-70-137 . -7
Scott Simpson 70-68-138 ' -6
Dan Forsman 70-68-138 . -6
Gary Trivisonno 71-67-138 -6
Joe Ozaki 69-69-138 -6
Dana Quigley 69-69-138 -6
R.W. Eaks 69-69-138 -6
Mark McNulty 70-69-139 -5
David Edwards 69-70-139 -5
Mike San Filippo 73-66-139 -5
Hale Irwin 71-69-140 -4
Phil Blackmar 71-69-140 -4
Vjcente Fernandez 71-69-140 -4
Don Pooley 69-71-140 -4
Bruce Vaughan 72-68-140 -4
Fulton Allem 72-68-140 -4
Hal Sutton 68-72-140 -4
Tom Wargo . 71-70-141 -3
Jim Thorpe 70-71-141 :-3
Wayne Levi . 72-69-141 -3
John Harris - 69-72-141 -3
Morris Hatalsky 73-68-141 -3
Chip Beck 73-68-141 -3
Peter Jacobsen 71-71-142 -2
Gene Jones 71-71-142 -2
Russ Cochran . 71-71-142 -2
LannyWadkins 72-70-142 -2
Keith Fergus 72-70-142 -2
David Eger - 77-65-142 -2
Tomn McKnight '70-73-143 -1
Bobby Wadkins 71-72-143 -1
Jay Don Blake 70-73-143 -1
Clarence Rose 72-71-143 -1
Tim Simpson 69-74-143 -1
Tom Purtzer 69-74-143 * -1
Mark Wiebe 69-74-143 -1
Isao Aoki 73-70-143 -1
Mike Reid 73-70-143 -1
Steve Thomas - 70-74-144 E


Craig Stadler . 73-71-144 E
Fuzzy Zoeller 73-71-144 E
Allen Doyle 71-74-145 +1
Blaine McCallister 73-72-145 +1
Mike McCullough 74-71-145 4.1
Bruce Fleisher 74-71-145 +1
James Mason 72-74-146 +2
Jay Sigel 72-74-146 +2
Bob Gilder 73-74-147 +3
Robert L.Thompson 73-74-147 +3
Tim Conley 71-77-148 +4
Javier Sanchez 74-74-148 +4
Jim Albus 75-73-148 +4
Dave Stockton 75-74-149 +5
Jim Dent 72-78-150 +6
Wayne Grady . 73-79-152 +8
Denis Watson 74-78-152 +8
Rick Reynblds 77-80-157 +13
Richie Karl '76-DQ .


Florida LOTTERY

CASH 3 (early)
:9-8-1
CASH 3 (late)
5-2-7
PLAY 4 (early)
1-1-1-5
adaLaIy- PLAY 4 (late)
ttery 3-1-4-7
Here are the winning POWERBALL
numbers selected 18 - 22 - 26 - 39 - 48
Saturday in the POWER BALL
Florida Lottery: 17
POWER PLAY
4
FANTASY 5
1 - 3 - 5 -'17 - 28
LOTTERY
6 - 9 - 11 - 14 - 29 -36


===n the AIWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup - Lenox Industrial Tools 301
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA - Summit Racing Equipment
� Nationals - Final Eliminations (Same-day Tape)
/ MLB BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (FSNFL)-(SUN) Fla. Marlins at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Boston Red Sox at Atlanta Braves.
2 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Yankees at New York Mets
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour - BMW International
Open - Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour - Champions - Dick's Sporting
Goods Open - Final Round
3 p.m. (6, 10 CBS) PGA Tour - Travelers Championship -
\Final Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Professional Championship - First Rd.
5 p.m. (ESPN2) LPGA Tour - Wegman's LPGA-- Final Rd.
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour - Nationwide Tour-- Players Cup
- Final Round (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
8:55 a.m. (ESPN2) FIFA Confederations Cup Third-Place
Game - Teams TBA
2 p.m. (ESPN2) FIFA Confederations Cup Final -
USA vs. Brazil
10 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS - Houston Dynamo at
Los Angeles Galaxy
TENNIS
1 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Wirnbledon, early round ,
TRACK AND FIELD
4 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) U.S. Outdoor Championships


LPGA-Wegmans
Saturday
At Locust Hill Country Club
Pittsford, N.Y. -
Yardage: 6,328; Par: 72
Third Round
Jiyai Shin 65-68-67-200 -16
Morgan Pressel. 68-66-70-204 -12
Stacy Lewis 68-67-70-205 -11
Lindsey Wright 71-68-67-206 -10
Sandra Gal 64-73-69-206 -10
,,,,u.7,,.-- ' ' 7 .-�7.6 --L" -9

Mika Miyazato 69-72-67-208 -8
Mindy Kim . '69-68-71-208 -8
JiYoung Oh 69-72-68-209 -7
Alena Sharp 70-70-69-209 -7
Brittany Lang. 73:66-70-209 -7
In-Kyung Kim 71-71-68-210 '-6
Wendy Ward 70-72-68-2 i) -6
Meaghan Francella 71-68-71-210 -6
Irene Cho 71-72-68-211 -5
Ai Miyazato . 72-69-70-211 -5
Anna Grzebien 70-71-70-211 -5
NaYeon Choi 69-72-70-211 -5
Cristie Kerr 1 75-65-71--211 -5
Brittany Lincicome 70-75-67-212 -4
Yani Tseng -73-69-70-212 -4
Karen Stupples 69-72-71-212 -4
Sarah Kemp 69-70-73-212 -4
Jennifer Rosales 69-69-74-212 -4
Michelle Wie 69-68-75-212 -4
Kristy McPherson 67-69-76-212 -4
Karrie Webb 72-71-70-213 -3
M.J. Hur 68-73-72-213. -3
.Se Ri Pak 69-71-73-213 -3
Kyeong Bae 74-69-71-214 -2
Stacy Prammanasudh 71-71-72-214 . -2
Amy Yang 69-73-72-214 -2
Helen Alfredsson 69-73-72-214 -2
Anna Nordqvist 72-73-70-215 -1
Becky Morgan 71-73-71-215,- -1
Carri Wood 71-70-74-215 -1
Seon Hwa Lee 75-70-71-216 E
Young Kim 74-70-72-216 E
Lorie Kane 73-71-72-216 E
Joo Mi Kim 72-70-74-216 E
Hye Jung Choi 70-72-74-216 E
Michele Redman 67-74-75-216 E
Karine Icher 75-70-72-217 +1
Jimin Jeong 72-73-72-217 +1
Karin Sjodin 72-73-72-217 +1
Chella Choi 75-69-73-217 +1
Natalie Gulbis 71-72-74-217 +1
Jin Joo Hong 70-73-74-217 +1
Inbee Park 74-68-75-217 +1
Jee Young Lee 73-69-75-217 +1
Julieta Granada 76-69-73-218 +2
Sarah Lee 72-73-73-218 +2
KrisTamulis 74-70-74-218 +2
Jimin Kang 73-70-75-218 +2
Reilley Rankin 69-72-77-218 +2
Silvia Cavalleri 74-71-74-219 +3
Shi HyunAhn 74-71-74-219 +3
,Johanna Mundy 74-71-74-219 +3
Pat Hurst 70-75-74-219 +3
Allison Fouch - 72-72-75-219 +3
Beth Bader 71-73-75-219 +3
Aree Song 71-73-75-219 +3
Vicky Hurst 74-71-75-220 +4
Lisa Strom 73-72-75-220 +4
Marisa Baena 73-72-75-220. +4
Diana D'Alessio 68-76-76-220 +4
Giulia Sergas 73-69-78-220 +4
Amanda Blumenherst 70-71-79-220 +4
Minea Blomqvist 70-74-77-221 +5
,Brandi Jackson 68-75-79-222 +6
Soo-Yun Kang 73-72-78-223 +7
Jane Park 73-72-78-223 +7
Katie Futcher 72-73-80-225 +9
Nationwide-
Tour Players Cup
Saturday
At Pete Dye Golf Club Course
Bridgeport, W.Va.
Yardage: 7,308; Par: 72
Third Round
Tom Gillis 71-66-66-203
Kyle Reifers 70-70-64-204
Jeff Gove . 69-67-68-204
Won Joon Lee 73-68-64-205
Seung-su Han 71-68-66-205
Jhonattan Vegas 72-69-65-206
Chris Baryla 72-66-68-206
Ron Whittaker 67-71-68-206
David Peoples 69-65-72-206
Craig Barlow 71-65-71-207
Michael Arnaud 71-70-67-208
Jonas Blixt 69-72-67-208
Jon Mills 69-70-69-208
Roger Tambellini 69-70-69-208
Cameron Percy 70-69-69-208
Brian Stuard 67-71-71-209
Bob May 69-t9-71-209


Geoffrey Sisk 71-71-68-210
Todd Demsey 72-69-69-210
Andrew Svoboda 70-69-71-210
Josh Teater 69-70-71 -210
Fabian Gomez 69-69-72-210
Scott Gardiner 69-74-68-211
Oskar Bergman 70-73-68-211
Chris Tidland 74-69-68-211
Alistair Presnell' 71-71-69-211
Chris Kirk. 72-70-69-211
Rob Grube 73-69-69-211
Michael Putnam 72-69-70-211
l' A.li. T, .". 72-68-71-211
i i--- e r, T,:,i-,,:, 69-71-71-211
Sru,,.-,T,,-C ' 74,;9,69-212
Brendan Steele 68-74-70-212
Marco Dawson 70-72-70-212
Garrett Osborri 70-72-70-212
Vance Veazey 71-71-70-212
Stuart Deane 70-72-70-212
David Branshaw 72-68-72-212
Jin Park 69-73-71-213
Andrew Buckle 72-70-71-213
Tjaart van der Wait 69-73-71-213
Martin Piller. 72-69-72-213
Bradley miles 65-76-72-213
David McKenzie 70-7-1-72-213
Jason Enloe 70-71-72-213
Grant Waite 70-71-72-213
Jay Delsing 70-70-73-213
Sal Spallone 75-68-71-214
Jim Rutledge 70-73-71-214
Phil Tataurangi 72-71-71-214
Scott Brown 74-69-71-214
Robert Damron 70-72-72-214
Dustin Bray 72-69-73-214
Chris Anderson 69-72-73-214
J.J. Killeen 72-69-73-214
Brad Fritsch 66-74-74-214
Henrik Bjornstad 70-70-74-214
Ryan Armour 70-66-78-214
Matt Every 70-73-72-215
Brent Delahoussaye 70-72-73-215
Drew Laning 72-70-73-215
Jim Herman 69-72-74-215
Steve Wheatcroft 67-76-73-216
Andrew Johnson 68-73-75-216
Tom Scherrer 68-73-75-216
John Kimbell 69-69-78-216
Adam Short 71-71-75-217
Ryan Hietala 75-68-75-218
Michael Walton 70-72-76-218
Patrick Nagle 71-72-76-219
Jason Schultz 71-72-78-221
AUTO RACING
Lenox Industrial
Tools 301 Lineup ,
At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon, N.H.
Lap length: 1.058 miles
Qualifying set by owner's points.
1., (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet
2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet
4.(2) Kurt Busch, Dodge
5. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet
7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota
8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford
9. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota
10. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford
11. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet
13.(9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge
14. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota ,,.
15. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet
16. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet
17. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota
18. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Tqyota
19. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford
20. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet
21. (07) Casey Mears, Chevrolet ,
22. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet
23. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge
24. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota
25. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet
26. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge
27. (43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge
28. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford
29. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota
30. (44) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge
31. (6) David Ragan, Ford
32. (12) David Stremme, Dodge
33. (98) Paul Menard, Ford
34. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota
35. (34) John Andretti, Chevrole
36. (09) Brad Keselowski, Chevrolet
Qualified on attempts
37. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota
38. (71) David Gilliland, Chevrolet
39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota
40. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota.
41. (36) Patrick Carpentier, Toyota
42. (37) Tony Raines, Chevrolet
43. (78) Began Smith, Chevrolet


Wimbledon Results
Saturday
SAt The All England Lawn
Tennis & Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Purse: $20.5 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Third Round
Igor Andreev (29), Russia, def. Andreas
Seppi, Italy, 6-1, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-6 (5).
Tomas Berdych (20), Czech Republic, def.
Nikolay Davydenko (12), Russia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Tommy Haas (24), Germany, def. Marin Cilic
(11), croatia, 7-5, 7-5, 1-6, 6-7 (3), 10-8.
Radek Stepanek (23), Czech Republic, def.
David Ferrer (16), Spain, 7-5, 7-5, 3-6, 4-6, 6-4.
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Philipp Pet-
zschner, Germany, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Andy Roddick (6), United States, def. Jurgen
Melzer (26), Austria, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (2), 4-6, 6-3.
Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switzerland, def.
Jesse Levine, United States, 5-7, 7-5, 6-3, 6-3.
Gilles Simon (8), France, def. Victor Hanescu
(31), Romania, 6-2, 7-5, 6-2.
Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Viktor Troicki
(30), Serbia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4. '
Juan Carlos Ferrero, Spain, def. Fernando
Gonzalez (10), Chile, 4-6, 7-5, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4.
Women
Third Round
Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, def. Samantha
Stosur (18), Australia, 7-5, 6-2.
Caroline Wozniacki (9), Denmark, def. Anabel
Medina Garrigues (20), Spain, 6-2, 6-2.
Venus Williams (3), United States, def. Carla
Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-0, 6-4.
Melanie Oudin, United States, def. Jelena
Jankovic (6), Serbia, 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-2.
Amelie Mauresmo (17), France, def. Flavia
Pennetta (15), Italy, 7-5, 6-3.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Svetlana
Kuznetsova (5), Russia, 6-2, 7-5.
Agnieszka Radwanska (11), Poland, def. Li
Na (19), China, 6-4, 7-5.
Dinara Safina (1), Russia, def. Kirsten Flip-
kens, Belgium, 7-5, 6-1.
Doubles
Men
Second Round
Leos Friedl and David Skoch, Czech Repqb-
lic, def. Chris Eaton and Alexander.Slabinsky,
Britain, 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (0).
James Blake and Mardy Fish, United States,
def. Arnaud Clement pnd Marc Gicquel, France,
6-3, 6-4, 6-2.
Simon Aspelin, Sweden, and Paul Hanley, Aus-
tralia, def. Travis Parrott, United States, and Filip
Polasek (10), Slovakia, 7-5, 6-7 (1), 6-2, 6-3.
Women
Second Round
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and
Nadia Petrova (10), Russia, def. Julie Ditty,
United States, and Ekaterina Dzehalevich, Be-
larus, 6-2, 6-2.
Yan Zi and Zheng Jie (13), China, def. Gisela
Dulko, Argentina, and Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-4,
6-1.
Nuria Llagostera Vives and Maria Jose Mar-
tinez Sanchez (11), Spain, def. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, and Francesca Schi-
avone, Italy, 7-5, 6-3.
Alia Kudryavtseva, Russia, and Monica
Niculescu, Romania, def. Chuang Chia-jung,
Taiwan, and Sania Mirza (15), India, 6-2,.6-3.
Alisa Kleybanova and Ekaterina Makarova,
Russia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and
Ai Sugiyama (6), Japan, 4-6,7-6 (5), 6-2.
Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, and Tatiana
Poutchek, Belarus, def. Sorana Cirstea, Roma-
nia, and Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 4-6, 7-
.6 (8), 6-4.
Third Round
Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Vania
King (12), United States, def. Kaia Kanepi, Es-
-,:,, ,1 i',l l ,-,,'; -:pu TuiKey,, 6-3.6-3
*:.,rr,,rir,, ilesaru arand.-FR, rne SitdJmi- 3
uIiaii' i , e -..liani 'Ku n'fti .va RdnU'a
u 1.3 A ,T ,c -I , M i u li e r r , ( .1 6 ) , F r3 r , : :,.. " r1 ,.2
Mixed
First Round
Igor Andreev and Maria Kirilenko, Russia,
def. Andy Ram, Israel, and Anna Chakvetadze,
Russia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2.
Second Round
Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Nadia Petrova (8),
Russia, def. Rbgier Wassen, Netherlands, and
Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, walkover.
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Elena Vesnina
(5), Russia, def. James Auckland and Elena
Baltacha, Britain, 6-1, 6-2.
Lukas DIouhy and Iveta Benesova (15),
Czech Republic, def. Eric Butorac, United
States, and Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan,
7-5, 7-6 (1).
Kevin Ullyett, Zimbabwe, and Hsieh Su-wei
(4), Taiwan, def. Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands
Antilles, and Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan,
6-3, 6-4.
Fabrice Santoro, France, and Anabel Medina
Garrigues, Spain, def. Marcelo Melo, Brazil, and
Peng Shuai (14), China, 6-4, 6-3.
Mark Knowles, Bahamas, and Anna-Lena
Groenefeld (9), Germany, def. James Cerretani,
United States, and Sybille Bammer, Austria, 7-
6 (5), 6-3.
Stephen Huss, Australia, and Virginia Ruano
Pascual (12), Spain, def. Bruno Soares, Brazil,
and Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, 7-5,7-6 (5).
Andre Sa, Brazil, and Ai Sugiyama (11),
Japan, def. Ken Skupski and Katie O'Brien,
Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Mahesh Bhupathi and Sania Mirza .(13),
India, def. Colin Fleming and Sarah Borwell,
Britain, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
Leander Paes, India, and Cara Black (1),
Zimbabwe, def. Michal Mertinak, Slovakia, and-
Mara'Santangelo, Italy, walkover.
Jamie Murray, Britain, and Llezel Huber,
United States, def. Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, and
Yan Zi (10), China, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-3.
� . . .- . .* ' .

Saturday's Sports
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Agreed to terms
with RHP Matt Hobgood.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Signed C Josh
Phegley, RHP Matthew Heidenreich, RHP Kyle
Bellamy, RHP Jimmy Ballinger, INF Jared Mc-
Donald, 1B Leighton Pangilnan.
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Activated RHP
Jose Veras. Optioned RHP Jensen Lewis to
Columbus (IL). Signed RHP Kyle Smith.
National League
CINCINNATI REDS-Recalled RHP Homer
Bailey from Louisville (IL). Optioned INF Adam
Resales to Louisville.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ATLANTA THRASHERS-Traded their 2009


third-round (No. 95) draft pick to Los Angeles
for the Kings'two 2009 fourth-round (No. 117 &
120) and seventh-round (No. 207) draft picks.
Traded their sixth-round (No. 177) draft pick to
Chicago for a 2010 fifth-round draft pick.
'CALGARY FLAMES-Acquired D Jay
Bouwmeester from Florida for D Jordan
Leopold and a 2009 third-round (No. 67) draft
pick. Acquired F Brandon Prust from Phoenix
for D Jim Vandermeer. Traded their 2009 third-
(No. 84) and fourth-round (No. 107) draft picks
to Los Angeles for the Kings' 2009 third-round
(No. 74) draft pick.
DALLAS STARS-Traded their seventh-
round (No. 189) draft pick to San Jose for a
2010 sixth-round draft pick.
EDMONTON OILERS-Traded their sev-
enth-round (No. 191) draft pick to Ottawa for a
2010 sixth-round draft pick.
LOS ANGELES KINGS-Traded their fourth-
(No. 107) and fifth-round (No. 138) draft picks
to Florida for the Panthers' 2010 third-round
draft pick.Traded C Brian Boyle to the New York
Rangers for a 2010 third-round draft pick.


Phillies player



in confrontation



with Rays' fan


Associated Press

TORONTO - The
Philadelphia Phillies con-
firmed Saturday that one of
their players was involved
in a confrontation with a fan
following Thursday's game
at the Tampa Bay Rays.
The Phillies did not iden-
tify the player in their state-
ment. The Rays also
confirmed the incident but
did not release details.
The St. Petersburg Times
reported on its Web site Sat-
urday that Phillies reliever
J.C. Romero grabbed and
shoved Robert Eaton, 25, of
New Port Richey, Fla., after
the fan made two comments
about steroids.
Romero was suspended
for the first 50 games of the
season after testing positive
for androstenedione, a sub-
stance that Mark McGwire
used in the 1990s tkat was
later banned by baseball.
Romero, who earned tw6
wins in Philadelphia's
World Series victory over
Tampa Bay last year, has
sued the manufacturer of an
over-the-counter supple-
ment that he said led to, his
positive test.
Eaton told the newspaper
he called out to Romero
after a couple of Phillies
brushed off his requests for
autographs, asking the left-
hander to get him some


steroids. After Romero told
him to shut up and that he
didn't know what he was
talking about, Eaton said he
replied that Romero was
the one who'd been sus-
pended recently
"He reared back and
kinda grazed my chin and
grabbed me by the neck and
threw me back," Eaton told
the newspaper. "I was in
shock"'
Romero declined com-
ment when approached by
The Associated Press after
Philadelphia's 10-0 victory
over the Toronto Blue Jays
on Saturday.
"We're disappointed to
learn about the alleged inci-
dent with a Rays fan and,
one of our players following
Thursday night's game at
Tropicana Field," the
Phillies said in a statement.
"We are in the process of
gathering all of the details
surrounding the situation.
Until such information is
provided, it would be inap-
propriate for us to comment
at this time."
A St. Petersburg Police
Department supervisor con-
firmed to The Associated
Press that there was a bat-
tery allegation at Tropicana
Field on Thursday, but
wouldn't identify who was
involved. A message was left
seeking comment from
James Magazine, Eaton's
lawyer. -


==== Sports r p :


11U Cracker baseball
looking for new players
Coach Robert Brasher is
looking for players to start and
compete on the 11U AAU base-
ball team this fall. This team will
play both fall and spring games
and tournaments and will pre-
pare to compete at AAU Nation-
als at Disney the summer of
2010 and Cooperstown Dreams
Park the summer of 2011. Play-
ers may not tum 11 before May '
1 2009 to be eligible for this
team. Any interested players i
should contact Coach Brasher
at 352-726-5574 for team and
tryout information.
Sign-up for 13U/14U
Cracker baseball
The Cracker Baseball Club is
looking for players to fill its new
14U team. This team will play
both fall and spring and com-
pete in many tournaments. This
team will be made up of 14U
players as well as gifted 13U
players. Tryouts will be held this
summer. For information and to
get registered for tryouts please
contact John Lepore at 352-
746-4419 or Robert Brasher
at 352-726-5574.
Hornaday dominates
Memphis truck race
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Ron
Homaday dominated his second
race consecutive race and won
the NASCAR Camping World
Truck Series race at the Mem-
phis Motorsports Park.
Homaday, who won last week
at Milwaukee by leading 180 of
200 laps, had a similar perform-
*ance in the MemphisTravel.com
200 on Saturday night.
He started on the pole after a
qualifying lap of 117.7 mph and
led 176 of 200 laps on the 3/4-
mile oval.


BASEBALL
Continued from Page B1

Damon Coromilas, Logan
Wardlow and Robert Green
all scored in the inkling.
In addition to Price's
great play in left field Cen-
tral Citrus was also sparked
by a two-run saving catch by
Coromilas in a great defen-
sive third frame for the win-
ning squad.
In the top of the inning
Central citrus had taken its
first lead of the tournament
when Green, Jason Mooney
and Beard all scored to give
them a 3-1 lead over West
Hernando.
"We looked like a totally
different team out there
today," Central Citrus head
coach Randy Wardlow ad-
mitted. "I think Friday night
against Inverness we were a
little nervous and tight but
tonight we played the way
we're capable of. Joel
(Lawrence) threw a great
game for us and Noah (Car-
men) did a super job coming


A caution with five laps to go,
caused when Dennis Setzer
and Tayler Malsam got together,
cut Hornaday's commanding
lead with a restart and,a green-
white-checker finish.
Brian Scott, who was running
second, stayed with Homaday
through much of the first extra
period lap, but Homaday pulled
away on the final sweep.
Alabama files appeal to

NCAA over vacated wins
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. - The
University of Alabama has taken,
the first step toward appealing a
ruling by the NCAAthat forced
the Crimson Tide football pro-
gram to vacate 21 wins.
The university said Thursday
it has sent a notice of appeal to
the NCAA, but won't contest
other sanctions, including three
years of probation.
The NCAA placed Alabama's
football program and 15 other
sports on probation after 201
athletes were found to have
used their scholarships to get
free textbooks or other materials
they weren't entitled to.
That group included 22 "inten-
tional wrongdoers," including
seven football players. They ob-
tained more than $100 in sup-
plies for other students.
Alabama is also appealing
penalties vacating the individual
records of 15 student-athletes in
men's tennis and men's and
women's track.
Selanne to stay another
season with Ducks
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Ten-time
All-Star Teemu Selanne has de-
cided to play another season
with the Anaheim Ducks.
The team says Selanne told
Ducks general manager Bob
Murray of his decision on
Saturday.


in and closing it out for us."
West Hernando plays In-
verness today at 10 a.m. in
the final game of Pool A.
Dunnellon 11,
Dixie County 1

Dunnellon cruised to an
easy victory over Dixie County
on Friday night in 9-10 All
Stars. Leading the way offen-
sively for Dunnellon were
Michael Greaves with three
runs'scored, Mathew Mills with
two runs scored, Jase Williams
with two runs scored. Zack
West stole home in the bottom
of the fifth inning to end the
game early.
Lady Lake 6,
Greater Hudson 2
Leading the way offensively
for Lady Lake were Sergie
Balingit with two runs scored
and Shoalton Roberts, Daniel
Kutz, Trace Templeton and
Hayden Swerson each scored
a run. Jimmy Miller threw all but
two pitches in the game as he
recorded five strikeouts for the
victory.


Ch-IRus COUNTY (FL) CHI-RONICIEE


SPORTS









s u ... Cou,..-., CrsnoNICIr r UDYJN 8 09B



U.S. excited to play Brazil in final


SPORTS


Americans in

search offirst

FIFA title
Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG -
Landon Donovan remem-
bers the first time he played
the Brazilians, when his
under-23 team trudged off
the field, victims of a 7-0
thrashing.
"I haven't beaten Brazil
on any level," the U.S. for-
ward said. "It would be
amazing to do it tomorrow."
Amazing, unbelievable,
spectacular- any adjective
would apply
When the Americans play
Brazil in the Confederation
Cup final today, they have a
chance to create a water-
shed moment in U.S. soccer.
The Americans have never
won a FIFA tournament -
this is the first time they've
even made it to a final -
and a victory over the five-
time World Cup champions
would signal they are closer
than ever to the likes of
Spain, England, Argentina,
Italy and Germany.
It would be a big hit back
home, too, where fans who
couldn't tell a corner kick
from a handball just a few
days ago have suddenly be-
come soccer aficionados.
"For U.S. Soccer, this is a
very special day," coach Bob
Bradley said Saturday. "It's
the first time we're playing
in a final of a world compe-
tition like this, and to play
against Brazil - everybody
knows their history - is
extra special."
The United States has
beaten Brazil only once in
14 tries, and that 1-0 victory
came -in Los Angeles in the
semifinals of the 1998 CON-
CACAF Gold Cup, the cham-
pionship of North and
Central America and the


Associated Press
USA's Landon Donovan, left, vies for the ball with Spain's Sergio Ramos during their Confederations Cup semifinal soccer
match on Wednesday at Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein, South Africa. The U.S. will play Brazil in today's final.


Caribbean.
Just last week, Brazil
routed the Americans 3-0 in
group play at the Confeder-
ations Cup. The loss left
them on the verge of elimi-
nation, and had some critics
calling for Bradley's job.
But the U.S. men turned
their fortunes around im-
mediately after that game,
and are a different team
now.
"Winning a major FIFA
championship against
Brazil, on the heels of beat-.
ing Spain, the No. 1 team in
the world, would be an ex-
traordinary achievement,"
U.S. Soccer . Federation
president Sunil Gulati said.


"American soccer is on a
long term ascendancy - a
win tomorrow would cer-
tainly help people appreci-
ate that."
The Americans beat
Egypt 3-0 to squeak through
from the group stage. They
then stunfied top-ranked
Spain with a 2-0 victory,
ending the European cham-
pion's record 15-game win-
ning streak
And now; Brazil.
"This is a big opportunity
for us, and one we don't get
very often," Donovan said.
"There's no promise that
we'll ever get back to a final
like this, so we've got to try
to take advantage of it. If we


lose we lose, but we're going
to give everything we have."
For Brazil, playing in a
final is nothing new.' This is
its fourth at the Confedera-
tions Cup, and it's seeking a
record third title.
As if that's not daunting
enough for the Americans,
they'll also have to try to
corral Kaka, Robinho and
Luis,Fabiano without key
midfielder Michael
,Bradley Bradley, the
coach's son, picked up a red
card in the final minutes of
the victory over Spain and
'likely will be replaced by
Benny Feilhaber.
Brazil coach Dunga prob-
ably will stay with the same


lineup from the semifinals.
Although Daniel Alves gave
Brazil the late winner
coming off the bench,
Maicon is expected to stay
at right back
Luis Fabiano said he has
the flu and had trouble
sleeping after the match
against South Africa with a
fever, but should be ready
to play.
"(The first match) was dif-
ferent," Dunga said. "Now
they're more consistent.
They have more confidence
because of their results. We
have to impose our rhythm,
staying more with the ball
and taking advantage of our
characteristics." .


The Americans also are
hoping to get another boost
from the South African fans.
Though Spain was the
heavy favorite Wednesday
night, the Americans no-
ticed as the game wore on
that fans were firmly on the
side of the underdogs.
And the deafening blare
of the vuvuzelas that some
teams at the Confederation
Cup have complained
about? The Americans don't
mind them one bit.
"I think we've shown a
spirit and competitiveness
that people love, and that's
infectious for people,"
Donovan said. "We expect
the same for tomorrow
night, too, that people will
be out there wanting to see
us do well, and we thrive
off that."
Just so they don't get too
caught up in the love, Bob
Bradley warned.
The U.S. players have
been inundated with well-
wishes from back home
since their shocking upset
of Spain on Wednesday Peo-
ple magazine even posted a
story about the team on its
Web site, "Boys of Soccer:
Meet the U.S. Team's Victo-
rious Hunks."
It's a far cry from the crit-
icism they heard last week
"For a few games, it was
incredibly important that
we were very strong and
didn't let any of the distrac-
tions or outcries interfere
with our work Now, it's just
as important that we don't
allow any of our new friends
and any of the hoopla to in-
terfere with our work," Bob
Bradley said.
"It's great that as a coun-
try we're excited, that's part
of our responsibility, but at
the same time, the way we
go about our work, the way
we treat each other, the way
we continue to try to im-
prove and reach new
heights can't be affected by
those things."


NFL asks high court to weigh in on antitrust case


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - In the
legal equivalent of running
up the score, the National
Football'League is going to
the Supreme Court in
search of a bigger victory in
an antitrust tussle over team
merchandise than it already
won from a lower court.
The Supreme Court could
decide as early as Monday
whether it will hear the
case, which involves Ameri-
can Needle Inc.'s challenge
to the league's exclusive
contract for selling head-
wear such as caps and hats
with team logos on them.
American Needle of Buffalo
Grove, Ill., is also urging
high court review. Football
team owners hope the high
court will issue a broader
decision that would insulate
the NFL against what they
contend are costly, frivolous
antitrust lawsuits.
At the heart of the matter
is whether the NFEs teams
constitute 32 distinct busi-


nesses or a single entity that
can act collectively without
.violating antitrust law.
The case is important to
other professional sports
besides football. The Na-
tional Basketball Associa-
tion and the National
Hockey League both filed
friend-of-the-court briefs
siding with the NFL.
Notably absent is Major
League Baseball, which has,
'an antitrust exemption
thanks to a 1922 Supreme
Court ruling.
"Member clubs of the
NFL have no independent
value, no purpose, indeed
no meaningful reason for
existence but for their par-
ticipation in the league it-
self," the NFL argues. It
cited a ruling in an antitrust
challenge involving the
NBA, in which an appeals
court wrote, '"A league with
one team would be like one
hand clapping."
The NFL argued that pro-
fessional sports leagues
should be deemed single


in this Jan. 26, 1992 file pho
salesperson in Minneapolis, sh
sakes as crowds began arrival
decide as early as Monday w
which involves American Ne
league's exclusive contract f
caps and hats with team logo
entities for purposes of an-
titrust law, at least concern-
ing core venture functions.
American Needle had
been one of many compa-
nies that manufactured
NFL headwear. In 2001, the
league granted an exclusive


S - tity in licensing their intel-
A_ Jf lectual property. Last year,
the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in Chicago af-
,-I ,firmed that ruling.
. 'O"Asserting that a single
Football team could produce
a football game is less of a
g legal argument," the court
said, than "a Zen riddle:
Who wins when a football
S' team plays itself?"
The appeals court said
that the league isn't always
a single entity, but that noth-
ing in antitrust law pro-
Associated ress hibits the teams from
to, Tanya Driver, a souvenier cooperating so the league
lows off Superbowl XXVI keep- can compete against other
ng. The Supreme Court could forms of entertainment.
Whether It will hear the case, Ifot ofentpetmenCut.
edle Inc.'s challenge to the If the Supreme Court de-
or selling headwear such as lines to take the ase, the
s on them. appeals court ruling would
be left in place.
contract to Reebok Ameri- American Needle argued
can Needle sued the league in its legal filing that the ap-
and Reebok in 2004, claim- peals court decision contra-
ing the deal violated an- dicted a 1957 Supreme
titrust law. Court ruling that refused to
A federal district court extend baseball's antitrust
disagreed, saying that the exemption to professional
teams acted as a single en- football.


The solicitor general's of-
fice, after being asked by
the Supreme Court to
weigh in on the current
case, urged the court not to
take it. The government
said the lower court ruling
does not conflict with any
decisions by the Supreme
Court or other appeals
courts - contrary to argu-
ments made by American
Needle and the NFL.
Gary Roberts, dean of the
Indiana University School
of Law-Indianapolis and an
expert on sports law, said
that the NFL senses it has a
pretty favorable Supreme
Court makeup.
"They would like to have
the Supreme Court resolve
this single entity issue
now," said Roberts, a for-
mer lawyer for the NFL.
"Even though they risk los-
ing this case, the potential
gain for all sports leagues
from having the Supreme
Court affirm the decision
would be huge."


TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

But, hey, it's understandable."
When that 66-minute set
ended, Jankovic had the
lead, but she clearly was in
trouble on a sunny day with
the temperature in the 80s.
A trainer and doctor came
out to measure her pulse
and blood pressure, and she
began to cry. They put bags
of ice on Jankovic's legs and
abdomen, then the back of
her neck, and gave her an
energy drink to sip.
"I felt really dizzy, and I
thought that I was just going
to end up in the hospital. I
started to shake," said'
Jankovic, who blamed her
difficulty partly on what she
called "woman problems."
"I was feeling quite weak
No power," Jankovic said. "I
wasn't the same player"
While Oudin was working
on her big win, five-time
Wimbledon Venus Williams
was enjoying a matter-of-
fact contest on Centre Court,
winning the first eight
games en route to a 6-0, 6-4
victory over 34th-ranked
Carla Suarez Navarro of
Spain. The only other time
they played, on a hard court
at the Australian Open in
January, Suarez Navarro


.. . ..


Andy Roddick plays a return to Jurgen Melzer on Saturday at Wimbledon.


knocked off Williams in the
second round.
"Completely different cir-
cumstances," noted the
third-seeded Williams,
whose younger sister Serena
advanced Friday.
At Wimbledon, the elder
Williams has won 17 consec-
utive matches and 29
straight sets, and is trying to
become the first woman
since Steffi Graf in 1991-93
to win three consecutive ti-
tles. Next up: 2008 French
Open champion and former
No. 1 Ana Ivanovic, who is


seeded 13th aid eliminated
No. 18 Samantha Stosur 7-5,
6-2.
Williams was pleased to
have an American not
named Williams stick
around for Week 2.
"Super-good news," said
Williams, who called Oudin
"so enthusiastic about ten-
nis and about life, enjoying
herself, very well-adjusted."
Oudin's parents and her
11-year-old sister,
Christina, gathered with
about 30 other people at the
Racquet Club of the South


in suburban At]
breakfast while(
Saturday's ma
though because
coverage didn't
an hour in, they
low most of the
the Web.
"No strawbe
cream," John (
"but it was still
fun."
Oudin lost the
her opening
match, and als
the first set in
first two


matches, against 29th-
seeded Sybille Bammer
and 74th-ranked Yaroslava
Shvedova. So overcoming a
deficit against Jankovic
didn't seem impossible.
"I was right there with her
every single point," said
Oudin, who during
changeovers. munched on
raisins plucked from those
little red boxes kids use for
school lunches. "So I knew
I could do it if I just kept
trying and kept fighting."
She wasn't the only teen
who turned in a significant
win: 19-year-old Sabine
Lisicki of Germany beat
two-time major champion
S . -Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-2, 7-
- 5. When the match ended,.
Associated Press as her parents and best
friend watched from the
stands, Lisicki sat in her
lanta to eat chair, her body shaking as
e watching she sobbed.
tch - al- The 41st-ranked Lisicki
e U.S. TV now meets yet another teen;
begin until No. 9-seeded Caroline Woz-
had to fol- niacki, and No. 1 Dinara Sa-
first set on fina will play 2006
Wimbledon champion
berries and Amelie Mauresmo.
Oudin said, Williams has won five of
1 delightful six previous matches
against Ivanovic, who
e first set of nonetheless said: "Very
qualifying dangerous opponent, but I
so dropped think I have a great chance."
each of her Sometimes, such head-to-
main-draw head records are irrelevant,


and sometimes past is pro-
logue: No. 6 Roddick en-
tered Saturday 8-0 against
No. 26 Jurgen Melzer and
now is 9-0 after a 7-6 (2), 7-6
(2), 4-6,6-3 victory. But No. 20
Tomas Berdych improved
from 0-8 to 1-8 against No. 12
Nikolay Davydenko by win-
ning 6-2,6-3,6-2.
Elsewhere, No. 3 Andy
Murray's bid to end Britain's
73-year wait for a male
champion continued with a
-straight-set win against No.
30 Viktor Troicki; No. 24
Tommy Haas and No. 29 Igor
Andreev wrapped up victo-
ries in matches suspended
Friday because of darkness;
and 2002 champion Lleyton
Hewitt, No. 8 Gilles Simon,
No. 23 Radek Stepanek and
2003 French Open Juan Car-
los Ferrero also advanced.
Ferrero, a former No. 1 now
ranked 70th, needed a wild-
card invitation to get into the
field, but he beat No. 10 Fer-
nando Gonzalez 4-6, 7-5, 6-4,
4-6, 6-4 on Court 1 as a light
rain fell.
There was some consider-
ation given to moving the
conclusion of that match to
Centre Court, where the
new retractable roof was
closed, just in case. But Fer-
rero and Gonzalez finished,
and the roof has yet. to be
used as a barrier against
wet weather.


SUNDAY, JUN-E 28, 2009 B5


Cr^, c^..^.Ff Crr>�irrr.c










E Page B6 -SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009


ENTERTAINMENT
, ,I, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


jI


G


Jackson left legacy
as cultural


phenomenon
Associated Press
-ATLANTA
rom the wow to the weird,
Michael Jackson leaves a
fashion legacy to rival his
musical one.
His black fedora, silver glove
and red leather jacket were worn
by millions around the world who
channeled Jackson's spirit and
sartorial flair. Later, he made
fashion choices that weren't as
popular, but were no less memo-
rable: the pajamapants during
his child molestation trial, the
black robes and veils while living
in Bahrain, the germ masks that
were a regular accessory.
All combined to cement Jack-
son's legacy as a pop and fashion
icon.
"There are a few people who
are the innovators, who set the
trends that other people follow,"
said Stephane Dunn, a frequent
writer of popular culture who
teaches English at Morehouse
College. "Here was Michael, who
understood the power of style
and was able to translate it in a
way that everybody wanted to
copy it"
His costumes weren't just for
the stage. At a White House ap-
pearance, Jackson stood along-
side first lady Nancy Reagan,
looking the part of a glamorous
general in a sequined military-
style coat, aviator sunglasses and
single, studded glove.
Few could imitate Jackson's
talent, but for decades, millions
around the world stole his style,
and not just on Halloween. Jack-
son was constantly mimicked
among the miniature and the ma-
ture, in classrooms, at costume
parties, or at his concerts.
"He basicallywas the cool of
the moment," Dunn said. "He
was creating thiswhole persona,
and people ate it up. By them-,
selves, these things probably
could've been corny."
But onJackso Jackson,,they were in-
stant vintage.' Growing up, 25-
year-old Cinco Montoya
cherished his "Thriller" jacket
and black loafers that were Jack-
son's trademark
"I tried to do my hair like him,"
Montoya,said, recalling how he
used to wvet his black tresses, try-
ing to coif his curls like those of
his hero's. "I watched all of his
videos. I used to think he was like
Superman."'
Jackson's ability as a performer
electrified audiences, inspired
amateurs of all ages and
launched- the careers of enter-
tainers from Chris Brown to
Chris Tacker, said Mark Anthony
Neal, who teaches black popular
culture at Duke University


OFCU


RE


Associate d Press
Michael Jackson Is seen backstage at the 1984 Grammy Awards in Los Angeles, as he poses with the awards
he won In eight different categories.


"His success was a template for
them," Neal said of performers
like Brown, Ginuwine and Justin
Timberlake. "Usher doesn't have
a move that he didn't initially
think about because he saw
Michael Jackson do it."
Usher and Jackson once
shared the stage tor a perform-
ance of "You Rock My World."
and Brown did a "Thriller" trib-
ute performance at the World
Music Awards in 2006.
Neal described Jackson's
music as "black pop," and credits
the megastar with bringing the
sound into the mainstream,
which was later invoked by
Madonna, 'N Sync, the Backstreet


Boys and others.
But it was perhaps his unique
fashions that connected him most
to his fans-- and Jackson never
even had his own clothing line.
, "By wearing the clothing, he
became accessible to people, es-
pecially as his celebrity got to a
point where he became inacces-
sible," Neal said.
Jackson will be remembered as
a style pioneer, said Keith Brown,
a stylist based in Atlanta.,
"He was and is still, to this day,
an original," Brown said. "You
knew he had it. As he grew older,
he proved to not be afraid to
show his uniqueness, not only
through his music, but through


his evolution. He was ... a barrier
breaker."
Jackson's style evolved from
crystal and fringe to the narrow,
lean, clean silhouette: inspired by
American dance icon Fred As-
taire - with whom Jackson
shared a friendship. Jackson bor-
rowed from Asta ire's look for the
video "Black or White," ex-
plained Deborah Landis, who
also worked with Jackson on his
look for "Thriller"
"Michael reveled in his own
unique style," said Landis, who
was friends with Jackson for
decades. "He was a style icon be-
cause he created his own fashion
and followed no one."


Thread of pain ran through Jackson career


JAKE COYLE .
AP entertainment writer
It was the last day of
shooting for a Pepsi com-
mercial at the Shrine Audi-
torium in-Los Angeles in
1984, and the only hiccup
had been an argument be-
tween Michael Jackson and
an ad executive over
whether the young super-
star would take off his sun-
glasses.
"Then," as the executive
later wrote, "we set his hair
on fire."
Jackson was descending
a staircase in an extrava-
gant, pyrotechnic opening
sequence,; dancing to "Bil-
lie Jean," when a spark
landed on his head. Jack-
son cried out. People
nearby leapt on him to put
out the fire, but Jackson
was hospitalized for. days
with a burned scalp.
Thus began a thread of
pain that ran through a re-
markable career - and
made painkillers all too ac-
cessible.
Because of accidents, fre-
quent plastic surgery and
the sheer intensity, of his


dancing, physical agony
was the unshakable prob-
lem with being Michael
Jackson.
Medical examiners in
Los Angeles are perhaps
weeks away from' determin-
ing an official cause of
death, but officials did say
Friday that tests showed
Jackson was taking pre-.
scription medication.
I At the. end of his life, a
personal cardiologist was
living with Jackson while
he rehearsed rigorously for
a historic comeback.
Among the first steps police
took was to tow the doctor's
BMW, saying it might con-
tain medication or other ev-
idence.
Since his death, people
close to Jackson have said
they were worried about
his dependence on the
drugs. In 1993, while he was
defending himself against
child molestation charges,
Jackson himself called it an
addiction.
On Saturday, spiritual
teacher Dr. Deepak Chopra
said he had been con-
cerned since 2005 that
Jackson was abusing


painkillers and spoke to the
pop star about suspected
drug use as recently as six
months ago.
"In a way, this was com-'
ing, and in a way, it's frus-
trating that we couldn't do
anything about it," he told
The Associated Press. "The
problem has been going on
for a long time, but we did-
n't know what to do. There
were attempts at interven-
tion, and it didn't succeed."
Chopra said Jackson, a
longtime friend, personally
asked him for painkillers in
2005, when the singer was
staying with him after he
was acquitted on sex-abuse
charges. Chopra said he re-
fused.
He also said the nanny of
Jackson's children repeat-
edly contacted him with
concerns about Jackson's
drug use over the next four
years, and said Jackson
would avoid his calls when-
ever the subject came up.
Well before Jackson had
a doctor living under his
own roof, there were ample
reasons to turn to pharma-
ceuticals to relieve pain.
In the early 1990s, Jack-


son's dermatologist re-
vealed the singer had a skin
disorder known as vitiligo,
which leads to white
patches on the skin. And
over the years, Jackson un-
derwent numerous plastic
surgeries, the most.promi-
nent being the narrowing of
his nose. Few people know
exactly how many there
were in all.
Jackson was a passionate
performer and an excep-
tional dancer, renowned for
his choreographical perfec-
tion. Ailments were, or at
least began as, a byproduct
of his dedication.
In 1990, he was hospital-
ized with chest pains. In
1993, he canceled a per-
formance due to dehydra-
tion and later cut his tour
short because of his
painkiller addiction. In
1995, he collapsed on stage
at the Beacon Theater in
New York and was hospital-
ized.
Then there was London.
Mounting a comeback
aimed at least in part on
erasing the taint of years of
scandal, Jackson was to
perform a staggering 50


shows at the 02 arena, the
first of them in mid-July
It was a schedule daunt-
ing enough that Jackson
was training in recent
months with Lou Ferrigno,
the star of TV's "Incredible
Hulk" And while a 50-show
run would be challenging
even for an athlete in his
prime, Jackson was 50
years old. As he aged, his
appearance had become fa-
mously, almost spectrally,
drawn.
Those involved in the
production said Jackson
was heavily involved in all
aspects of the concert re-
hearsals. He had hired a
personal trainer and was
practicing with backup
dancers and choreogra-
phers several hours a day.
."He was working hard,
setting the example, over-
seeing the choreography,
kicking butt and taking
names," said Johnny
Caswell, president of Cen-
terStaging Musical Produc-
tions Inc., a Burbank, Calif.,
sound stage where Jackson
rehearsed until late May.
"He was ready to blow
everybody out of the water."


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
* Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, JUNE 26
Fantasy 5: 1- 7 - 11-27-36
5-of-5 2 winners $111,327.35
4-of-5 480 $74.50
3-of-5 11,892 $8
THURSDAY, JUNE 25
Fantasy 5: 6 - 12 - 14 - 16 - 33
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 249 $555
3.of-5 8,846 . $20.50
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24
Powerball: 16 - 18 - 24 - 51 - 53
Power Ball: 16
Power Play: 5
Jackpot No winner
Power Play No winner
5-of-5 2 $200,000
Lotto: 3- 15- 19- 24-'37- 51
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 46 $4,476
4-of-6 2,302 $72.50
3-of-6 46,314 $5
Fantasy 5:9- 20 - 28- 31 - 33
5-of-5 1 winner $222,958.82
4-of-5 277 $129.50
3-of-5 8,275 $12

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verify the accuracy
of winning lottery num-
bers, players should
double-check the num-
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or
call (850) 487.7777.

Today in
HISTORY=
Today Is Sunday, June 28,
the 179th day of 2009, There
are 186 days left In the year.
Today's Highlights In
History:
On June 28, 1919, the
, Treaty of Versailles was
signed In France, ending
World War I. In Independ-
ence, Mo,, future president -
Harry S, Truman married
Elizabeth Virginhia Wallace.
On this date:
In 1491, England's King
Henry VIII was born at
Greenwich,
In 1778, the Revolutionary
War Battle of Monmouth took
place in New Jersey; It was
from this battle that the leg-
end of "Molly Pitcher" arose.
In,1836, the fourth presi-
dent of the United States,
James Madison, died in
Montpelier, Va.
In.1838, Britain's Queen
Victoria was crowned in
Westminster Abbey.
In 1914, Archduke Franz
Ferdinand of Austria and his
wife, Sophie, were assassi-
nated in Sarajevo by a Serb
nationalist - the event which
sparked World War I.
Ten years ago: Announc-
ing even bigger projected
budget surpluses, President
Bill Clinton said the govern-
ment could drastically reduce
the national debt while still
buttressing Social Security
and Medicare.
Five years ago: The U.S.-
led coalition transferred sov-
ereignty to the interim Iraqi
government two days ahead
of schedule.
One year ago: Presiden- .
tial rivals John McCain and
Barack Obama vied for the
support of Hispanics in sepa-
rate appearances before the
National Association of Latino
Elected and Appointed Offi-
cials conference in Washing-
ton, with each vowing to
remake immigration policy.
Today's Birthdays: Blues
singer-musician David "Hon-
eyboy" Edwards is 94. Co-
median-movie director Mel
Brooks is 83. Senate Armed
Services Chairman Carl
Levin (D-Mich.) is 75. Come-
dian-impressionist John
Byner is 72. CIA Director
Leon Panetta is 71. Rock
musician Dave Knights
(Procul Harum) is 64. Actor
Bruce Davison is 63. Actress
Kathy Bates is 61. Actress


Alice Krige is 55. Actor Gil
Bellows is 42.
Thought for Today:
"Heresy is what the minority
believe; it is the name given
by the powerful to the doc-
trines of the weak." - Robert
G. Ingersoll, American lawyer
and statesman (1833-1899).










C Section C -SUNDAY JUNE 28,2009



OMMENTARY_
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Liberals prod Obama on health bill I


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., talks on the subway from the Capitol June 9 following weekly policy luncheons.


Activists curious why Democratic leadership is pushing Republican-backed bill

CHARLES BABINGTON
AP analysis


Presidents quickly learn that
legislative showdowns on
tough issues, such as over-
hauling.the nation's health care
system, must be dealt with even-
tually Some liberal Democrats
worry that President Barack
Obama may be waiting too long to
face down Republicans on one of
the issue's knottiest questions.
, Obama says he supports a gov-
ernment-run health insurance
program to compete with private
,'insurers, a proposal that is popu-
lar with many Americans, espe-
cially Democrats. But he is
standingby as a watered-down, bi-
partisan version appears likely to
'be included in a Senate package.
The president's allies hope it
can be strengthened later, or at
least accepted by liberals who
want a tougher measure. Compro-
mise is essential to every tough
political battle, they say, and
Obama may prove wise by keep-
ing his options open in a health
care debate certain to last for
months. :
Frustrated liberal activists,-
however, point to polls showing
strong public support for a gov-
ernment-run option that is more
robust than the one apparently fa-
vored by the Senate Finance Com-
mittee. They ask why Democrats,
who control the House, Senate
and White House, are pushing a
version backed by many Republi-
cans.
White House aides say Obama
wants to avoid issuing nonnego-
tiable demands early in the -leg-
islative process. He feels
President Bill Clinton made such
a mistake in a failed 1993 bid to
revamp the health care system.
Obama has made clear that he
supports a bona fide public option
for health insurance, which critics
say is missing from the Senate Fi-
nance package, at least for now.
. But Obama "wants comprehen-
sive health reform even more,"
said former Sen. Tom Daschle,
who has advised the administra-
tion on health care. "He will do all
*he can to get a public option,"
Daschle said, "but at the end of
the day, the only thing nonnego-
tiable is success."
Some Democrats, however, feel
Obama has over-learned the les-
sons of 1993 and is bending over
too far to attract GOP support in
the Senate. Unless he and con-
gressional Democratic leaders
agree to strengthen the public in-
surance provision later in the leg-
islative process, they say, he may
regret his hands-off approach.
. "No one in this building wants
health care reform as much as we
do," California Democratic Rep.
Lynn Woolsey, co-chair of the Con-
gressional Progressive Caucus,
told reporters in.the Capitol this
week. However, she said, if a bill
"does not include a real and ro-
bust public option that lives up to
our criteria, then we will fight it
with. everything that we have."
The legislative focus is on the
100-member Senate, where the
rules make it difficult to pass con-
tested bills without 60 votes; there


Associated Press
In this Feb. 2 photo, former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington.


Some proponents of revamping health care hope
a modified public option will win support from doc-
tors, hospitals and makers of medical devices and
drugs, which would leave insurance companies as
the main opponents. The insurers' cause was hurt
this week when congressional investigators said
two-thirds of the industry used a faulty database
that overcharged patients for seeing doctors out-
side their insurance network, costing Americans
billions of dollars in inflated medical bills.


are 57 Democrats, plus two inde-
pendents who usually vote with
Democrats. The House is moving
a Democratic-crafted bill virtually
certain to include a publicly run
health insurance provider with.
the clout to compete with private
insurers.
In the Senate, Finance Commit-
tee Chairman Max Baucus, D-
Mont., is determined to win some
Republican support for a far-
reaching health care bill, which
eventually must' be reconciled
with the House version to become
law. GOP members oppose a pub-
lic option similar to the House's
plan, saying it would have unfair
advantages that would drive pri-
vate insurers out of business.
Many Democrats dispute that
claim, but Baucus is leaning to-
ward a compromise version in-
volving nonprofit cooperatives.
Critics say co-ops would not be
genuine public options for health
insurance.
Proposed by Sen. Kent Conrad,
D-N.D., the co-ops would receive
federal startup money, but then
would operate independently of


the government. They would have
to maintain the same financial re-
serves that private companies are
required to keep in case of unex-
pectedly high claims.
With the administration declin-
ing to publicly criticize the co-op
proposal, other Democrats have
stepped in.
Sen. Chuck Schumer of New
York says the co-ops would lack
sufficient startup funding, and
they would be too decentralized to
bargain for the best values for in-
,surance buyers nationwide. An
acceptable public option must
have a presidentially appointed
board to make rules without in-
terference from the insurance in-
dustry, he says.
"Right now, this co-op idea
doesn't come close to satisfying
anyone who wants a public plan,"
Schumer said this week
In an interview, Thursday, he
said Baucus was weighing his re-
quest to bulk up Conrad's pro-
posal.
If that fails, critics of the co-op
compromise will have other
chances to change it, and Obama


can weigh in if he likes. Senators
could amend the Finance Com-
mittee bill on the chamber floor.
House-Senate negotiators could
rework the provisions. Or Senate
Democrats could use a strong-arm
measure, called reconciliation, to
pass a version with little or no
GOP support.
All those options carry political
risks and uncertainty
Obama repeatedly promotes a
public insurance option that
sounds similar to the robust pro-
gram the House wants.
"The public plan, I think, is an
important tool to discipline insur-
ance companies," he said in a
news conference Tuesday. But he
said he would draw no "lines in
the sand," leaving proponents to
wonder whether he might eventu-
ally drop the public program in
exchange for something else.
Some proponents of revamping
health care hope a modified pub-
lic option will win support from
doctors, hospitals and makers of
medical devices and drugs, which
would leave insurance companies
as the main opponents. The insur-
ers' cause was hurt this week when
congressional investigators said
two-thirds of the industry used a
faulty database that overcharged
patients for seeing doctors outside
their insurance network, costing
Americans billions of dollars in in-
flated medical bills.
The investigation was headed
by Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-WVa.
He is among those who will press
Obama to back a potent govern-
ment-run health insurance pro-
gram.
"Health care reform cannot suc-
ceed without a strong public plan
option that works for the Ameri-
can people," Rockefeller's office
said this week .


Our local

kitchen gets

pretty hot
he good news is
that we are going to
hold an apprecia-
tion dinner for the mem-
bers of our county
commission because they
have done so many good
things lately. They deserve
some positive public
recognition.
The bad news is that
we're going to hold the
event at the Freezer in
Homosassa. None of the
commissioners will come
to their own appreciation
event.
The Freezer is that very
popular restaurant on the
Homosassa River that is
unappreciated by its im-
mediate neighbors. The
owners are also suing the
county commission over
the zoning and land-use
dispute.
The. controversy over
the zoning problems of the
.Freezer is the perfect ex-
ample of a "lose-lose" sit-
uation. And it's a good
example of why there
never are any apprecia-
tion dinners for county
commissioners.
If the commissioners
vote to shut down the
Freezer, they will face an-
other lawsuit from the
owners and' complaints
from. residents. If they
don't vote to shut down
the Freezer, they will get
grief from the residents of
that Old Homosassa
neighborhood and might
have to further defend
their zoning laws in court.
Either way, people will
be mad. (I learned this
first-hand how mad peo-
ple can get when I wrote a
column about the Freezer
a few months back. I am
now apparently a wanted
man in Homosassa, but
not wanted for the right
reasons.)
The State Sen. Charlie
Dean "barn" issue is an-
other example of a very
rough spot for commis-
sioners. Citizens are
pretty darn mad that the
powerful Senator built a
barn/house on his agricul-
tural property in east Cit-
rus County without paying
impact fees or going
through the building per-
mit process.
But if commissioners
rule against Dean in the
controversy, you can
pretty much bet that com-
munication with Tallahas-
see is going have a few'
rough patches in the
months to come. If the
commissioners vote to
support Dean, they will be
accused of having a life
time membership in the
"Good-Ol'-Boy" Club and
will be knocked around
during the next election
season.
Here's the rub: if you're
on the county commission,
you can't-really care about
doing the popular thing.
You've got tdo the
right thing. And most of
the time, the right thing is
not the popular thing.
Over the next few
months we will begin to
see candidates line up to
run for the county com-
mission in 2010. Gary
Bartell in Homosassa and
John Thrumston in Inver-
ness will both be on the
ballot next year.
As potential challengers
consider their campaign-
they need to consider the
problems of the Freezer
and Charlie Dean's barn.
Those specific issues may
be resolved by the end of
2010 - but I promise you -
new dilemmas will erupt
See WINDOW/Page C4










Page C2 - SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009



PINION


S "Animals are not brethren, they are not
underlings; they are other nations, caught
with ourselves in the net of life and time."
Henry Beston, 1928


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


GENTLE GIANTS


Enforcement


needed to ensure


protection of


manatees


T he law enforcement arm
of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission
(FWC) says we need more edu-
cation, more law enforcement
and more sanctuaries to save
manatees in King's Bay.
Manatee advocates . say
touching should be outlawed.
They suggest making some or
all the area around Buzzard Is-
land a year-round sanctuary.
They suggest banning divers
from wearing flip- .
pers and putting
limits on the num- THE I
bers of people in,
manatee areas. FWC m
The solution protect
rests somewhere
in the middle. OUR O0
Education is im-
portant, but we Seek pal
wonder if those to en
who abuse the enforce
present rules
would really learn anything


from additional education.
More law enforcement would
be a huge help, but realistically
there is no money in the budget
for additional officers. If any-
thing, the trend has been to cut
personnel.
. Adding more sanctuaries is
also a good' suggestion, but
someone has to enforce the
rules.
Though we know that
tougher restrictions are
needed, we shouldn't go so far
as to take the fun out of the,
water by banning flippers and
creating year-round speeding


Someone else's shoes
This is to Brad Thorpe's com-
ment about Animal Services and
'the people that "retrieve animals."
We are not animal retrievers, We
are officers certified in what we
do. We have been taking classes
and believe that that term is not
only offensive, but tells us
that you know not what
we do. So maybe before 0 1
you go ahead and change
everything around, you
(should) fully understand
what we do in our jobs
and maybe come out for
a day and see what we
do. This seems to be
quite unfair to the offi-. CAL
cers that work so hard in C5 Q
everything that they've 0U56
done in their education to
do cruelty cases and get convic-
tions - felony convictions, mind.
you. To call us animal retrievers is
just a total insult.
River Beach
This is in response to "Rope
Swing" in Sunday's (June 21)
Sound Off. Apparently you don't
live here because it's called "River
Beach." Also, it isn't just one
complaining neighbor; it is all of
us who actually live here. You also
need to get your facts straight be-
cause it is not being sold as of
now, but we are pushing to have it
given back to the residents only.
We are tired of cleaning up the
trash that people are too lazy to
put into the two trashcans on the
beach. The signs say "No pets,"
yet you bring dogs. The sign says,
"No alcohol," yet you litter our
beach with beer cans and beer
bottles. We aren't taking it away


limits.
Manatees are certainly being
stressed by the sheer numbers
of folks clamoring to see them
on a daily basis. But to be fair,
the dive shops deserve an op-
portunity to make a living, and
manatee watching is a big draw
to this area.
A majority of the boat cap-
tains and dive businesses fol-
low the rules and realize their
long-term livelihood depends
on preserving the
resources. The
SSUE: real problem is
that some people
manatee abuse the re-
on plan. source, which
brings us full cir-
PINION: cle back to law en-
.- forcement.
tnerships No one govern-
hance ment entity has
ement. the political will
or the. financial
means to pay fdr the staff
needed to patrol King's Bay
full time. Therefore, a partner-
ship between the state, county
and city seems to be the likely
solution to enforcing the exist-
ing rules.
Certainly the county and city
have a vested interest to make
this a viable enterprise for
businesses, environmentalists
and recreational boaters and
swimmers. With all three gov-
ernments pitching in to help, it
seems we could at least im-
prove the law enforcement as-
pect of the FWC's
three-pronged plan.


from people. They took it away
from themselves when they chose
to ignore the rules and chose to
trash our property. Just like with
Big Blue, you ruined it for your-
selves. Hopefully by the end of
this year, it will be closed to the
public, and the residents will be
able to enjoy it once again.
111e .Body shop


I would like to give
kudos to the Code En-
forcement people for
shutting down that body
shop in Citrus
Springs...Thank you,
Code Enforcement..


W1 - No sign of trucks
579Q I'm calling in reference
.0U 15 to the Mosquito Control. I
haven't seen a Mosquito
Control truck in my neighborhood
just north of Hernando in over
two years. Maybe we should all
get together and deduct that from
our taxes and not pay it. If they're
not going to give us the service,
then what are they doing with the
money?
Philatelist
To the reader of "Newfound
stamps": I would be more than
happy to help you get evaluation
on your collection if you will give
me a call at 382-7002.
Scruffy bunch
What gives with these big-league
baseball players? Do they travel so
much they don't have time to
shave? They sure are a scruffy-
looking bunch. Plus the fact, their
pants are so long that they drag
on the ground. I'd be ashamed to
look like that if I was a player.


Speaking with purpose


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan......................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan .......................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold .................................. managing editor
Cheri Harris.................................... features editor
Curt Ebitz..................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris ....................................citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson .................................... guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


Other VOICES '


DOUGLAS COHN
AND ELEANOR CLIFT
P resident Obama said at the
start of his press confer-
ence on Tuesday that he
was "appalled and outraged" at
the violent crackdown on protest-
ers in Iran. "What took you so
long?" a Fox News reporter
asked. The question reflected the
ongoing debate in Washington
over whether Obama has suffi-
ciently aligned himself with the
reformers and is doing enough to
promote their cause. .
Precisely what his critics
want him to say or do is unclear,
but events on the ground in
Iran, including video of a young
girl shot to death, prompted
Obama to ratchet up his rheto-
ric a notch while still stopping
far short of where European
leaders are in denouncing the
Iranian leadership. Obama said
in the press conference that he
did not want to become a foil for
,the regime., This should be
about Iranians protesting the
outcome of an election and de-
manding more 'freedoms, not
about him.
Obama said that injecting him-
self into the controversy would
only give the regime an excuse to
discount the legitimacy of its own
people. He faces multiple prob-
lems in taking a more assertive
stance. First, to what extent can
he play a constructive role in the
internal affairs of another coun-
try, particularly one that is an
avowed enemy? Obama wants to
engage with Iran, and the way
events are unfolding, it looks like
the current president, Mahmoud


was criticized for not taking
enough credit for himself. He un-
derstood that as the various revo-
lutions played out in the former
Soviet republics, the best thing to
do for America was to let the pop-
ular forces take hold. If Bush and
President Reagan before him
had attempted to foment rebel-
lion, it would have been a lot
harder and perhaps impossible
for Russian President Mikhail
Gorbachev to stand aside and
peacefully allow the Soviet em-
pire to come apart. The, Cold War
ended without a bloodbath
thanks to the restraint of these
leaders.
Obama has got to deal with the
government that is in power, and
even if the reformers should suc-
ceed, some things are unlikely to
change. Iran wants to develop nu-
clear capability as a matter of de-
terrence and national pride.
Hardliners who think a military
strike will be necessary at some
point to destroy Iran's nuclear
program are emboldened by the
recalcitrance of the regime, say-
ing if they lie about an election,
they will lie about their nuclear
intentions. Obama has to be care-
ful not to play into their hands
any more than the mullahs. In the
realm of world realpolitik, it pays-
to speak with purpose when pur-
pose is served.

Douglas Cohtihand Eleanor Clift
. author the Washington Merry-
Go-Round column, founded in
1932 byDrew Pearson.


MA~JL.JS


LETTERS


. Golden fleece
Our senators/congressmen do
not pay into Social Security and,
therefore, they do not collect
from it. Social Security benefits
were riot suitable for them. They
felt they should have a special
plan.
Many years ago, they voted in
their benefit plan. In more re-
cent years, no Congressperson
has felt the need to change it.
When they retire, no matter how
long they have been in office,
they continue to draw their same
pay until they die, except it may
be increased from time to time
by the cost-of-living adjustments.
For example, former Sen. Bill
Bradley (New Jersey) and his
wife may be expected to draw
$7,900,000 over an average life
span, with Mrs. Bradley drawing
$275,000 during the last year of
her life. Their cost for this excel-
lent plan is (nothing). This little
perk they voted in for them-
selves is free to them. You and I
pick up the tab for this plan. So-
cial Security, which you and I
pay into every payday for our
own retirement, with an equal
amount matched by our em-
ployer, we can expect to get an
average of $1,000 per month. Or,
we would have to collect our
benefits for 68 years and one
month to equal the Bradleys'
benefits.
Imagine that you could struc-
ture a retirement plan so desir-
able, a retirement plan that
worked so well that railroad em-
ployees, postal workers and oth-
ers who were not in the plan


to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
" Groups or individuals are invited
to express their opinions in a let-
ter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board', which meets
weekly, should call Mike Arnold at
(352) 563-5660.
" All letters must be signed and in-
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
" Letters must be no longer than
350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

would clamor to be included. .
This is how good Social Security
could be, if only one small
change was made. That change
would be to jerk the Golden
Fleece Retirement Plan out
from under the senators/con-
gressmen. Put them into the So-
cial Security plan with the rest
of us. Watch how fast they fix it!
It's common knowledge that,
in order for (Hillary Clinton) to
establish (New York) residency,
(the Clintons) purchased a mil-
lion-dollar-plus house in upscale


Chappaqua, N.Y. Now they are
entitled to Secret Service pro-
tection for life. Here is where it
becomes interesting. A resi-
dency had to be built in order to
house the Secret Service agents.
The Clintons now charge the Se-
cret Service rent for the use of
said residence and that rent is
just about equal to their mort-
gage payment, meaning that we,
the taxpayers, are paying the
Clintons' mortgage and it's
called perfectly legal.
Robert M. Cummings
Inverness

Insurance acceptance
Re: "No Blue Cross;" I must
add insult to injury to the
writer's frustration with Citrus
Memorial hospital's position on
not taking his Blue Cross insur-
ance by pointing out that all
homeowners pay a millage rate
of 1.1689 each year on our prop-
erty tax bills to support the hos-.
pital.
Mine amounts to $168.14, paid
to Citrus Memorial hospital
since it is a "public" hospital as .
opposed to Seven Rivers, which -
is a "private" hospital, and as
such does not receive one red
cent from us but accepts the
writer's insurance.
The commissioners should ad-
dress this with Citrus Memorial
and see to it that they accept all
taxpayers' insurance plans or
face losing their huge financial
support
Joseph Benedetto
Hernando


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Achmadinijad, will be inaugu-
rated for a second term later this
summer.
Obama has spoken out on be-
half of what he called a universal
principle for people to assemble
and to peacefully dissent, but if
U.S. diplomats are able to engage
in talks with Iran, they will likely
be facing members of the current
government The protests in Iran
have revealed schisms that' ex-
tend to the very top of the regime
with more moderate mullahs
challenging the supreme leader,
but these will have to play out
over a period of time. As Obama
noted in the press conference,.
the reporters questioning him
are on a 24-hour news cycle. "I'm
not," he said.
Thinking back to similar mo-
ments in history, there was
Tiananmen Square in 1989 when
the Chinese leadership sent in
tanks to brutally put down pro-
' testers. President George H.W
Bush responded in a very meas-
ured fashion, angering Democ-
rats and many Americans,
perhaps because he had been-an
envoy to China and knew the
leadership. If he had responded
more forcefully, would it have
made a difference for better or
worse? China's human rights
record is still poor, but democra-
tization is occurring if only be-
cause capitalism forces it, and
China needs capitalism and the
economic growth it brings to feed
its huge population.
When the Soviet empire col-
lapsed, the first President Bush


11
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CITRUS_ CONI (F)Cj~ cECMETR I-N)' ~Id 09


I might have told you this already, but...


I always cringe when I
see my name in a
"Sound Off" entry. It
isn't that I'm thin-skinned -
then again, maybe it is.
In any event, most re-
cently a caller said some
very nice things about my
writing which made me
smile, but they also com-
mented on having read my
column .for many years, re-
ferring to " a photo of a
young fellow with chubby
cheeks which has now been
replaced with one of an old
guy."


Chubby-cheeks?
Old? Ouch!
While both descriptions
are accurate, it was painful
to see them in print.
Nonetheless, facts are facts
- I was once a young fellow
with chubby cheeks, but
have become an old guy.
I used to make fun of old
folks and most especially of
my parents as they began to
get older.
I remember both my
mother and father when
they were quite young. My
father was 27 and my


mother was 21 "Have you
when I was born; . seen my
they were noth- glasses?"
ing but kids . .. I couldn't un-
themselves. derstand why it.
The earth was necessary to
made its way have the volume
around the sun on their TV set at
several times. I full bore.
grew -up and It was an ad-
they grew older. Fred Brannen venture to be in
I snickered A SLICE an automobile
and teased them OF LIFE with either one
about their in- of 'em behind
ability to find the steering
things. wheel.
"Have you seen my keys?" "Watch out for that curb!"


And, for each of them the
proviso, "I might have told
you this already, but ...", be-
came the beginning line for
almost any statement.
Yes, I snickered.
The earth has made its
way around the sun several
.more times and changes
have occurred over which
I've had absolutely no con-
trol.
My children now put their
hands over their mouths to
muffle snickers when I ask
if they've seen -my keys or
my glasses.


The only salvation for the
ear drums of visitors in our
home is a marvelous feature
on modern TV sets - closed
captions.
And, no curb in Citrus
County is safe when I'm be-
hind the wheel.
I might have told you this
already, but I used to make
fun of old people.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
Chronicle columnist


The Great Citrus Discussion


LINUS F. UPON I II
Special to the Chronicle


Might I present here for the
reader a quick-ish supple-
ment to articles the Chronicle
has printed over the past few months.
This piece is deliberately provocative
in order to gauge interest in a county-
wide discussion over what we want
Citrus County to be five, 10, 50 years
from now.
I feel the county is drifting; that it is
going into a circle-the-wagons and
hunker-down mode.
To that end, I propose "The Great
Citrus Discussion."
Let's get a buzz going.
How about a brand? Citrus County
should create a brand, such as Inver-
ness is attempting. Anybody coming
into the county should quickly get a
feeling that Citrus is different
* Get rid of all the plastic, primary-
color roadside signs that pollute
Florida.
* Bury all power/data/telephone
lines. Citrus Hills looks much better
for it; and they will have better sur-
vive-ability in storms and lightning
strikes. Wires on poles are so 19th cen-
tury.
* See ifWal-Mart will change its ar-
chitectural elevations here to some-
thing more like the Orlando and south
Jacksonville stores, which look like a
series of smaller, more human-scale
places. Make that sort of forethought a
requirement for all future large con-
struction outside designated indtis-
trial zones, not visible from residential
areas and publicly traveled highways.
#7 Control all outdoor lighting to
limit very carefully the so-called light
pollution. Look in the southern sky,
low on the horizon, and you will see
what is coming this way, destroying
our night skies.
* Make offset taxes to new busi-
nesses meet well-known, published
requirements and then stick with
them. No bending over and trying to
count ghosts. Let's be straightforward
here. A proper offset tax is a good
thing. If a company is headquartered
in Tokyo, Arkansas, Chicago, London,
Bimini or Dubai, I believe it should
meet the lions' share of the tax ob~liga-
tions that otherwise each of us citizens
is going to have to pay in
property/school/mosquito taxes/fees.
That is money coming out of county
property owners' pockets and going
out of the-county as we pay for the
roads, lights, classrooms,
power/water/sewage upgrades needed
by the "investor" to do its business
here. They pay. Simple. But the ex-
penses have to be real and their ap-
plication transparent
* Make the change-of-use taxes also
very transparent and, designed to,
again, meet the real, defined, costs
which would otherwise be absorbed
by property owners. There should
never be a hint of favoritism nor of re-
venge, Replacing a restaurant with a
restaurant is not rocket science --
even if the new establishment may
have to meet new codes.
* All county officers should make
public promptly all conversations
about new, or changes to, county land
uses, in the broadest possible use of
that term. Certainly all agendas must
be posted publicly.
* The county should make public a
detailed and specific list of pertinent
off-set charges at the earliest possible
time in every land-use process for
every proposed development.
Changes should be posted promptly.
* Let's take a year or so for a major
discussion on "Whither Citrus." The
commission's efforts in seeking a vi-
sion are laudable and there should be
no shame in it. How do you get some-
where without knowing where you
want to go? But, have the commission-
ers attempted to aggregate the views
of the many groups essential to Citrus?
Are the talks open, free and are the
ideas well disseminated? Can we get
a buzz going? What about the environ-
mentalists/park rangers/conservation-
ists? Artists and craftsmen and
craftswomen? Watermen, fishermen?
/,High school juniors and seniors, stu-
dents of Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute and CFCC? Educators?
Farmers and ranchers? Medical per-
sonnel of all stripes in the county? Re-
tirees? Latinos? Churchmen?
* The Suncoast Parkway will almost
certainly be put through some day but
we should be able to exact a price. We
now appear to have some more time
and let's take advantage of it. For in-
stance, make the Easy Pass charge for


Let's take a year or so
for a major discussion
on "Whither Citrus."
The commission's
efforts in seeking a
vision are laudable
and there should
be no shame in it.
How do you get
somewhere without'
knowing where you
want to go?
people and businesses with existing
addresses half or less the usual rate
for the first several years for travel
within the county. What about requir-
ing that the whole median be wide
enough for the greenery as now in
parts of the length in Hernando? And
what about having frescoes and colors
other than! cement grey at all abut-
ments, overpasses, and so forth (simi-
lar to Ybor City)? To help get the buzz
going, how about having a county-wide
contest to design those frescoes. Buzz
and being all about "Citrus is Differ-
ent"
* Work with insurance companies
and government/nonprofit organiza-
tions, universities, Progress Energy
and developers/contractors to help de-
sign new construction regulations for
all new residential and non-residen-
tial buildings with the idea of making
them more green, cheaper to live in,
safer in storms, and easier to insure
reasonably.
* There are two real hazards here
in Citrus for construction: wind/water
(hurricanes/tornados) and high
heat/low temps. So:
* Every power box should have a
manual switch so that non-mains
power (generator/solar/wind/who-
knows) can be. quickly and easily
switched on.
* Every roof should have attach
points for solar energy panels, built in
to allow later installation with risk to
roof insurance and-not risk losing roof
insurance.
* Every building should be designed
to meet stringent real Florida heat-
ing/cooling requirements as seen here
in Citrus. The code should be very
stringent in making sure that the goals
of saving power costs are met; but be
very open as to how they are met.
* Every building must have an on-
line document giving the names of the
development company and its key of-
ficers, ditto with key contracting com-
panies, county and other inspectors
identified and so forth. The original of
these papers must be maintained by
the county.
* Work with Progress Energy:
* To have an online portal where all
county property owners can discover
their power usage at any time and
have online tools to allow a person to
play "what-if?".
I * To provide 99.99 percent availabil-
ity to one or several highlands "busi-
ness parks" where businesses with
stringent,"up" time requirements will
feel comfortable coming to the county.
Hey, we may be crackers, but we are
crackers with a nuke.
* To undertake to provide very fast,
priority, repair to power lines that are
buried. Suggest strongly that Progress
Energy consider making all power cir-
cuits at least dual-headed, so that one
break alone will not take out any - or at
least not many - down wire customers.
* Establish. as a firm goal to make
fiber optic, dual feed, loops for data a,
county utility or the highest possible
wireless access to every property in
the county, as a start. This data back-
bone and the user lines should have
high survivable internet/phone/cable
(which are really all the same). When
we are burying the power cables or
the data cables let's bury the other,
too. This county really should have at
least the data through-put of Estoni-
ans or Koreans, don't you think? Per-
sonally, I want to download an HD
quality movie in minutes.
* Ask all the county stakeholders
how they could use very high-speed
cable. Ask telecommunications/inter-
net/call center/software businesses if
they would come to. Citrus if there
were a 99.99 percent 'on' guarantee
and a real superhighway for data -
plus super bass fishing and golfing and


birding. And no risk of earthquakes.
* How would our commercial fish-
ermen, farmers and ranchers, hospi-
tals and hospices become a greater
part of the county economic engine
with ubiquitous high-speed data trans-
mission? Like 30 seconds to move an
-x-ray from there ... to here?
* You might notice that if we have
high-speed data to all locations in the
county, there might be some huge ben-
efits. How about almost free tele-
phones, very cheap cable TV and.
Internet access? What about schools
and libraries moving toward e-books
at huge savings and greatly increased
choice for study materials. We may al-
ready have the first online high school
newspaper Maybe our kids "get it" Do.
we?
* The county could also provide
everyone an e-mail account for intra-
county use. How about a Citrus busi-
ness Internet site, which helps carvers
and horse breeders connect with sup-,
pliers, purchasers? What about a
basic online presence for free for
every business in the county upon fil-
ing incorporation papers so that every
business can be immediately discov-
erable by location services on tele-
phones? And be covered by 911.
The world is going to an informa-
tion-based economy That is a fact Cit- ;
rus is not It is still trying to entice big
box stores to hire cheap county labor
and look ugly instead of enticing high
quality businesses with a kind envi-
ronmental footprint. I am not against
jobs; but I am definitely more inter-
ested in careers and professions.
Here. Do we want our kids to forever
leave the county in order to ciihase
their dreams?
Second, I am a third-generation
Floridian who has spent about half his
life outside the United States. My fam-'
ily has felt the failure of equating the
building and selling of houses and re-
tail buildings with having "real" econ-
omy. How many "panics" and
"crashes" have occurred in this state
when developers and county/city offi-
cials have become indistinguishable.
And I have observed what old thinking,
and lack of direction can wreak on
countries and cities. This county
seems to be stuck in the same-
old/same-old mold.
Third, why aren't we taking advan-
tage-of these hard times looking down
the road to making Citrus a place
where our kids and grandkids will
want to stay because the really good
work opportunities and Nature Coast
life are here. But of course, we could
build over all the marshes, kill the
bears and manatees, pave our side-
walks in beer cans. If that is the desired ,
county, I hope we get used to shopping
at Wal-Mart; and waiting for hours in
traffic jams; and successfully catching
cast-off off-brand sneakers in the
rivers; and seeing few stars when we
look up and wonder what happened.
The odd thing is many of us point
out ways in which this county is out of
step with the president If you look at
the above, you will see that his vision
tracks very well with the proposals
above. I'd like to say that in fact this is
a smart way to go regardless of the pol-
itics of this moment. But if we have a
vision, I wouldn't turn down President
Obama's largess. For those who say we
cannot do some of the things I've men-
tioned because of restrictive state
laws, I would say that laws are made
to change - and positioning Citrus to
take advantage of 1/100th of a trillion
dollars and improve our futures at the
same time is a good thing.
Well, it's time to walk the dog. Enjoy
the clean air! And, maybe pause to
consider what we want our kids and
grandkids to think about Citrus in
2060. They depend on us. Today.
Say, come to think of it, why don't we
get a couple of old pipe lay barges,
hook them together, put rooms to rent
and restaurants inside, wave power
generators, a research institute, a.
beach, docks, a casino, an amusement
park, and park it 4 miles off the coast
That would be fun!

Linus FE Upson III received a Foreign
Service degree in 1965 from George-
town University and a master's de-
gree in Latin American Studies in
1967 fro the University of Florida. A
U.S. Army veteran and third-genera-
tion Floridian, he has worked for
three federal agencies within the
United States government He re-
tired in 2005 and now lives in Citrus
. Hills. He can be e-mailed at
CitrusBuzz@tampabayrrcom


Bring back.


boating etiquette

STACY AND MIKE DUNN
Special to the Chronicle

I felt the need to write a quick letter after reading
this week's Tight Lines by RG Schmidt I feel a huge
correction needs to be made or you'll have an up-
heaval of angry fisherman writing and calling. We at-
tended the first and second sessions of FWC meetings
recently about manatee-human interaction. The bay
speed zones always come up as this has become a dan-
gerous bay for all. We offered and took members of the
Chronicle and a couple of FWC folks on a boat ride to
explain the needed changes. I don't remember ever
, hearing a suggestion of slowing down the Crystal River
to the Gulf. I did, however, have the wonderful oppor-
tunity to meet Mr Schmidt and have him ride with us. I
was even able to recite a few past articles he had writ-
ten, as I am a fan. What we spoke of and suggested
needed to be done, would accommodate and make the
bay safe for everyone. What we have here, as said in the
"Cool Hand Luke" movie, "is failure to communicate!"
Let me start by saying first of all, we are tour guides,
so we have a stake in the human-manatee interaction
part of the meeting. We are also boaters and kayakers
out in the bay daily, so we have a stake in that part of
the meeting too. We chose to speak about both.
We offered our suggestions which included the fol-
lowing after months of thinking and observations and,
hopefully, a compromise for the majority who use this
bay, including the manatees that live here: Our sug-
gestions were as follows:
1. Move the moored boats from the Sportszone to give
the sportszone more area that was taken away from
them with the moored boats. Put the moored boats in a
slow speed area and regulate them! (No dumping of
waste into the waters we use! Yucky and unhealthy)
2. Put up a year-round sanctuary around all or at least
half of Buzzard Island, this to allow the manatees a safe
haven in a major, feeding zone from boats, tour guides
and people. A place to escape and fedd, purse their
young and rest Many of the PWC users, some boats and
airboaters have'abused the rule of riding a safe distance
from the shorelines by skirting along them and into the
grasslands, both a violation. Many manatees are being
struck or killed since they dwell in the shallow waters.
3. Or make King's Bay slow speed year-round........we
never heard anyone make the suggestion of the entire
Crystal River being slowed down....ouch!
We enjoy fishing and scalloping ourselves, so I would
find it tiring and unpleasant myself if I had to go slow
speed all the way to the Gulf. We live in the very far-
thest corner of the bay to the Gulf, so to go scalloping
would take two days! I will, however, tell you, there all
lots of "Bad Apples" out in the bay both boating, ski-
ing, PWC's and tour guides and as Mr. Schmidt com-
mented, if you all don't start helping to get rid of them,
then we'll all pay the price.
Since Mr. Schmidt didn't put the phone numbers to
call in the paper, let me do that: To report fishing, boat-
ing, manatee violations, call FWC (888) 404-3922, this
will send you to the Jacksonville dispatch, be patient!
Tell them you are in Citrus County, King's Bay or Crys-
tal River, try to describe the immediate area such as
Parker Island, Banana Island, or marker number and
explain quickly what you see,.the type vessel, how
many people aboard and FL numbers, if possible. The
barge canal office use to field these calls but they have
been understaffed for what seems forever, so this is
what we have to do. I have witnessed on many occa-
sions an officer coming right away. If the dispatch says
there is not an officer available, then hang up and dial
9-1-1. The sheriff's office is doing their part, too! Please
program these numbers into your cell phone, a call on
the VHF is rarely answered by an officer.
To make this bay pleasant, safe and usable for both
humans and manatees we all must be stewards, set the
example and do our part. Both adults and children. We
need to bring back boating etiquette. And officers need
to enforce the laws.

Stacy and Mike Dunn are diving and
tour boat captains in Crystal River

Sound OFF


Tattered flag
This is to those...that
are supposed to be main-
taining the flag across
from Hampton Square on
(County Road) 486. They
should be ashamed of
themselves. It is a dis-
grace to display the
American flag in the con-
dition it's in right now.
These people do not
know how to secure a flag
to the post. And, in this
condition, it should not
even be flown. If they
don't know how to prop-
erly maintain a flag, they
shouldn't be flying it.
This is a concerned vet-
eran.
Enforcement
I just wanted to make a
comment about the old
bait shop in Hernando
that's been in the paper
as of late. The last two
-turday nights, there has


been Code Enforcement
people out there with a
meter to meter the deci-
bels of the music that's
played there. I wonder
how that can be when
where I sit in Old Ho-
mosassa is about a half a
mile from The Shed and I
can hear their music on
Saturday and Sunday. No-
body's there checking
their decibel level of their
music. Why are they
hounding the old bait
shop?
Heat help
I'd like to know where
old people that don't have
much income can get an
air conditioner for their
home. I know two or three
people that needs air con-
ditioners and they can't
afford them. Is (there)
anybody around Citrus
County that can help
them people get air condi-
tioners?


SL


UNllly, JUNE 2�,, 2oog C3


COMMENTARY


CITRusS CouINTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


I - I - - --- - - - - -I- - - P --1�









C 4 SVN D~rm' ['y" F. 28


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* 2UUY


Carbon smoke and mirrors


TODD DARLING
Los Angeles Times

President George W Bush
fought global-warming pol-
icy all the, way to the
Supreme Court And he lost
Despite this judicial rebuke,
he opposed climate-change
legislation to the end. Now,
with President Barack
Obama, White House views
on global warming finally
are in line with scientific
data. But this doesn't mean
that politics can't still trump
science.
Congressional response
to the climate crisis has
taken shape in the Waxman-,
Markey American Clean En-
ergy and Security Act. The
bill has a lot to like. It sets
efficiency standards, en-
courages alternative energy
and establishes emissions
ceilings on vehicles, indus-
tries and power companies
by 2020.
However, key provisions
of Waxman-Markey resem-
ble earlier European ef-
forts, and , Europe's
experience raises serious
questions about the ability
of this legislation to cut
emissions or fund green so-
lutions adequately.
The Waxman-Markey bill,
proposes a market-based
"carbon trading" plan that
mirrors a European system
initiated in 2005. This plan
requires polluters to obtain
government-issued "carbon
credits,", which then allow
them to pollute above the
agreed-on limit.
Think of these pollution
credits like a golf handicap.
You would like to shoot 72 on
18 holes, but you rack up 108
on your card. So just as the
hapless golfer would use his
handicap to cover the 36-
stroke deficit, polluters
would use pollution credits
to cover their extra emis-
sions. What if a polluter
doesn't have 36 credits?
Then it must buy them on the
open market or pay a penalty.
The penalties are expensive,
and so the polluter is moti-
vated to find either a solution,
or more credits.


The European trading scheme, started
with free pollution credits, has not
produced dramatic cuts in pollution or
dramatic developments in technology
or a robust market in carbon credits.
The Financial Times of London was
blunt: "Carbon markets leave much
room for unverifiable manipulation.
(Carbon) taxes are better, partly
because they are less vulnerable
to such improprieties."


In theory, money gener-
ated by this "carbon market"
will jump-start investment
in clean technology.
In a recent conference
call to climate activists, Rep.
Henry) Waxman, D-Calif.,
stated that his bill's carbon-
trading plan "is based on
work by the USCAP"
USCAP, or the United States
Climate Action Partnership,
is a coalition of environ-
mental groups, including
the Natural Resources De-
fense Council, the Nature
Conservancy and a couple
dozen A-list corporations,
including General Electric;
Duke Energy; oil companies
Shell, ConocoPhillips and
BP America; chemical com-
panies DuPont and Dow,
and numerous utilities.
USCAP's carbon-trading'
plan, which became part of
the Waxman-Markey plan,
shares key details of the Eu-
ropean system - most im-
portant, it gives 85 percent
of the pollution credits to
the biggest polluters for
free.
The European experi-
ence shows the critical
weakness of this plan. In
Europe, the distribution of
free pollution credits to in-
dustries failedto establish a
strong carbon market. In
turn, the weak market in
carbon credits failed to gen-
erate the money needed to
fund new technology. And
because there was a-glutof
free credits, polluters that


went over the emissions
limit could buy the neces-
sary credits cheaply.
Faced with disappointing
results, Europe began auc-
tioning off more credits in
2006. But the damage was
done. The arrival of the re-
cession caused the "carbon
price" to plummet further.
Critics point at companies
that cut back their produc-
tion 20 percent- and there-
fore presumably pollute 20
percent less - and now sell
their unused pollution cred-
its to prop up their bottom
line. Money that was sup-
posed to be generated from
pollution credits to fund
clean technology goes else-
where.
The European trading
scheme, started with free
pollution credits, has not
produced dramatic cuts in
pollution or dramatic devel-
opments in technology or a
robust market in carbon
credits. The Financial
Times of London was blunt:
"Carbon markets leave
much room for unverifiable
manipulation. (Carbon)
taxes are better, partly be-
cause they are less vulnera-
ble to such improprieties."
Unfortunately, global
warming and its solutions
are complicated, but we
have little time for mistakes.'
A recent scientific report.
from the Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change
~varns that a 2-degree-
Celsiusi warming of our at-


mosphere has a 90 percent
chance of undoing the con-
ditions on Earth that al-
lowed and supported the
development of human civi-
lization.
Scientists from Oxford
University, using this report,
calculate that we can avoid
this potentially catastrophic
2-degree warming if we
limit our emissions between
2000 and 2050 to 1 trillion
metric tons of carbon. They
note that we already have
burned 25 percent of that
limit since 2000.
In response to criticism of
the Waxman-Markey bill,
the NRDC's Dan Lashoftold
National Public Radio's
Warren Olney: "This is the
best bill that can actually get
through committee." Other
supporters of the bill fre-
quently cite Bismarck's line:
"Politics is the art of the
possible."
But which "possible" do
they see? The 2007 corpo-
rate gauge of the best possi-
ble deal? Or the 2009 update
of broad populist sentiment
that favors coherent action
over special interests?
Controlling pollution will
require incentives. But does
that mean giving away 85
percent of the credits for
free, possibly setting up yet
another questionable Wall
Street "market"?
We need this bill to pass,
but in a strengthened form:
Put the emissions cap in line
with the trillion-ton limit, cut
back the freebies to fund in-
novation and green jobs and
protect poor families from
utility rate spikes.
In the face of clear scien-
tific warnings, we have
broad support for climate
legislation. Don't let Con-
gress waste this crisis on a
historic miscalculation of
what is possible. Talk to your
representatives this week

Darling produced and di-
rected 'A Snow Mobile for
George," a documentary
that examines the effect of
environmental deregula-
tion on individuals.


Road games
Next weekend I'm going
to Jacksonville and then
from there, down to
Miami and then back up
to Crystal River. Are the
Rays baseball games
broadcast anywhere on
the radio? If so, please
tell me what station. I
don't want to miss them.
Editor's note: You may
have to settle for the Marlins
while in Miami, but you can
find a list of the radio sta-
tions broadcasting Rays
games on the MLB Web
site: http://mlb.mlb.com/
tb/schedule/radio_net-
work.jsp '
Park is for all
The Boys & Girls Club
should have no impact on
Whispering Pines Park. That
park is paid for aqd main-
tained by taxpayers. I, for
one, have no interest in tak-
ing a portion of the park and
turning it over to an organi-
zation. What about all the
other organizations in town
who have to have a place to
meet and do things? If the
Boys & Girls Club want their
own building, they should
use the old police station.
The park is for everybody,
not just for a select group.
My taxpayer money is not for
that purpose.
DTV query
Is there anyone in the
Mini Farms area of Vel-
veteen Point...able to re-
ceive regular television
reception with an outdoor
antenna since the digital
transmission began? Not
satellite or cable. If so, what-
type of antenna are you
using and how high is it,
etc.? We have an HD TV and
would love to get rid of the
lousy satellite service.
Wilderness Palms
Whatever happened to
Wild Palms on Turner Camp
Road? It looks ridiculous. All
the money that they spent
landscaping and fixing the
place and nobody's even
there to pull the weeds and
mow it. It really looks bad.
It really looks bad for peo-
I


pie driving by it every day
And if you call the phone
number that they have in
the phonebook, no one an-
swers at all. Just wondering
if anybody else has noticed
how bad it looks.
Out of control
I would like to know
what is wrong with our
Animal Control system.
People have dropped off
little kittens at my house
and they refuse to come
and get these kittens.
They're all over the place
and nobody cares enough
to come and get them. I
don't know what to do
with them. There's 12 of
them. Animal Control re-
fuses to come out to get
them. They want me to go
to Inverness and pick up
some traps so I can trap
these kittens. These kit-
tens are wild and they will
never go into a trap, No.
1. No. 2, I'd like to know
what we're paying them
for. Comes out of our
taxes and they do ab-
solutely nothing.
Torn, worn flag
Apparently there's no
U.S. patriots living in Ho-
mosassa or Citrus
County...Homosassa's
British Petroleum flag;
seems no one cares what
the flag stands for any-
more. How long is this
torn, worn flag going to
fly? I guess it's not as big
a deal as, well let's see,
the barn, the Freezer,
crooked politicians,
lawyers, sex offenders,
(Progress) Energy, over-
paid school board. Oh my
God, I guess it's not even
important to the people in
the Chronicle. So I hope-
you have great day...
No answer
I've been calling 746-
6555 for three days to en-
roll in the Code Red'
Weather System. No one'
answers. Do you have a
911 number that you have
to call? The number I have
been calling was given out
by Capt. Joe Eckstein.


Twitter, a tyrant's nightmare
TIM RUTTEN As Mahmoud Over the'last week, avari-
Los Angeles Times , ety of Western bloggers and
Ahmadinejad's alternative media outlets -
Twenty years ago, the notably Andrew Sullivan's
world was transfixed by an government and blog and Al Gore's.Current
image of courageous resist- its thuggish TV - have sorted through
ance - a lone young man and ordered the incredible
standing in the road before clerical allies volume of information. Tra-
a column of Chinese army - ditional news organizations
tanks moving into Tianan- have choked off - most notably CNN and
men Square to crush the the BBC - have relied on
students and others who'd more and more of lots of information from or-
gone there to demonstrate the Western dinary citizens and have
for reform., been extremely transparent
Since Saturday, the global media's access about how they've done so,
community has been simi- sorting it out right in front of
larly gripped by the tragic to events, their viewers.
photos and video of Neda The hard work of verify-
Agha-Soltan,,the 26-year-old' thousands of ing, analyzing and fleshing
Iranian, woman shot to Iranians armed out the facts has been left to
death on the streets of the journalists on the scene
Tehran while on her way to With cell phones - notably New York Times
one of the protests over that columnist Roger Cohen and
country's disputed presi- and social network the LosAngeles Times' Bor-
dential election. zou Daragahi, whose profile
The most famous of the connections have of Neda Agha-Soltan was a
photos of the Chinese hero taken th porters' model of what only print
was taken by Associated taken the reporters' journalism can provide.
Press photographer Jeff and photographers' This hybrid journalism-
Widener. Other memorable developed without plan and
images of the standoff were. place. under the most intense
shot by photo journalists ' pressure imaginable - is
who were in Beijing work- cell phones with the ability the best and most workable
ing for Newsweek, Reuters to text-message and to glimpse of the West's infor-
and the Magnum photo record and transmit images national future we've yet
agency. In Iran, by contrast, have become interwoven seen.
we still don't know who took with their daily lives. Meanwhile, the mullahs
the. stills, video and audio The Iranian resistance is and their buddies can throw
recordings of the dying the first popular movement out all the correspondents'
young woman, who has be- to present itself to the they want, but the facts keep
come known to tens of mil- world, in significant part, flowing. This is bad news for
lions simply as "Neda," through new media. But authoritarian governments.
because the images and while it's true. that some- In the future, they'll have to
sound were collected on the thing new and unexpected choose between underde-
cell phones of her fellow is happening here, the velopment - denying their
demonstrators and surrepti- process hasn't gone As ei- people social medina, cell
tiously transmitted over the their many traditional jour- phones and the Internet -
Internet to the rest of the nalists or the Web's and control. It's a little
world. theoretical triumphalists clearer now why the Chi-
In those differing attribu- ever foresaw, nese are demanding that all,
tions, we can begin to see As Mahmoud Ahmadine- -PCs-and hand-helds sold in
the future of foreign news jad's government and its that country come with
reporting, thuggish clerical allies have built-in censorship hard-
Two things of immense choked off more and more ware. Lots of luck with that
consequence have occurred of the Western media's ac- Tyranny's irreducible
since the 1989 massacre in cess to events, thousands of dilemma is that the Web is,
Tiananmen Square: For Iranians armed with cell in its chaotic essence, the
economic reasons, far fewer phones and social network product of an open society.
Western journalists are dis- connections have taken the You can't have its benefits
patched to cover interna- reporters' and photogra- without accepting the dem-
tional crises, like the June phers' place. However, in- ocratic baggage.
12 Iranian election; at the stead of the emergence of Somewhere, there's a
same time, millions of peo- full-blown "citizen journal- mullah gnashing his teeth,
ple around the world - and ists" - the ideal of Internet just as his great-grandfather
particularly in countries enthusiasts - you've seen did in the 1920s after point-
with large, well-educated thousands of ordinary Irani- lessly denouncing Reza
young urban populations, ans on the scene feeding in- Shah's introduction of anti-
like China and Iran - have formation and images to septics as heretical corrup-
joined the new media revo- other media, traditional and tion. Modernity's a bitch.


lution. The Internet, social
,media networks such as
Twitter and Facebook, and


nontraditional, much in the
manner of volunteer
stringers.


Rutten is a Times columnist


The quest for 3-D vision


SUSAN R. BARRY
Los Angeles Times

I was 20 years old and a
college student before I
learned that I did not see
the world like everyone
else. I had been cross-eyed
as a baby, but three child-
hood surgeries made my
eyes look straight Because
my eyes looked normal, I
assumed I saw normally
too. But, in fact, I was
"stereoblind" - unable to
see in three dimensions.
That means I could not
see the volumes of space
between objects. Instead,
things in depth appeared'
piled one on top of an-
other, making me feel
nervous and confused in
cluttered environments.
As a child, I didn't un-
derstand why my friends
were so entertained when
they looked through a
View-Master I didn't see
Disney characters or Su-
perman popping out at me.
All I saw was a flat image.
When I 'got older, my
gaze - particularly at a
distance - was jittery,
making it difficult to read
signs while driving. I was
always disoriented and
easily lost.
The biggest effect of my
vision was on my perform-
ance in school. I had trou-
ble learningto read and
did poorly ohf standardized
tests.' These' problems
were blamed not on my vi-
sion but on a lack of intel-
ligence, and I was put in a
class with other problem
children.
That was in the early
1960s, but the situation
hasn't greatly improved..
Children are still not rou-
tinely tested for binocular
vision deficits because the
standard school vision
exam (reading the eye


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

and if elected you will
have to resolve them.
Doing the right thing is-
not always easy.
It is much easier to be
political and go with the


chart with one eye at a
time) doesn't screen for de-
fects in eye coordination
or stereovision. As a result,
many children with vision
problems might be labeled
learning disabled or, if
they misbehave in frustra-
tion, diagnosed with atten-
tion-deficit hyperactivity
disorder.
Despite my visual short-
comings, when my hus-
band and I took our
children to Disney World
16 years ago, I insisted that
we see the 3-D movies. As
my kids watched gigantic
insects fly off the screen to-
ward us, they screamed
and retreated to the safety
of my lap. They were
thrilled, and so was I. Al-
though the bugs did not
pop off the screen at me, I
knew that my children's
view of the world was
much more stable and
depth-filled than mine,.
and that they were. less
likely to encounter the
problems that I had faced
in school.
Then, at age 48, I con-
sulted a developmental
optometrist who pre-
scribed, a program of opto-
metric vision therapy,
which taught me how to
coordinate my eyes and
see in stereo. With my new
stereovision, I learned to
play tennis and could
drive with confidence and
without fatigue.
Most surprisingly, my
view of the world changed
in ways I couldn't have
imagined. Ordinary objects
looked extraordinary. Sink
faucets popped out at me;
light fixtures appeared to
float in midair Tree limbs
reached out toward me or
grew upward, enclosing
palpable volumes of space.
Snowflakes no longer
appeared to be falling in


flow of popular public
opinion. But there are
many times when popular
public opinion conflicts
with other popular public
opinion. That's when
things get difficult.
Harry Truman had his
famous saying about heat
in the kitchen. Potential
candidates should keep in


one plane slightly in front
of me but were falling at
different depths all around
me in a beautiful three-di-
mensional dance. I felt my-
self immersed in a
three-dimensional world.
So it was with great an-
ticipation that I recently
attended a showing of
"Up," the new 3-D Dis-
ney/Pixar film. When I put
on the Polaroid glasses at
the theater last week, the
film scenery bloomed into
three dimensions. Bal-
loons floated off the screen
and clouds receded far
into the distance. Even the
characters' noses seemed
solid and palpable.
Combined with feelings
of joy at my new view of 3-
D movies, were feelings of
anger Why hadn't anyone
told me when I was a child
that I lacked stereovision?
Why had all my problems
in school been blamed on
my supposed lack of intel-
ligence and not on my vi-
sion? Why hadn't my
parents been told about
optometric vision therapy?
Why do these issues per-
sist today?
Perhaps 3-D movies
have more to offer than
pure entertainment With
the growing number of 3-D
films for children, more
parents may spot visual
deficits in their kids. De-
tecting these problems
early and then seeking
proper treatment can im-
prove a child's vision and
transform a child's life.

Barry is a professor of
neurobiology in the de-
partment of biological sci-
ences at Mount Holyoke
College and author of
"Fixing My Gaze: A Scien-
tist's Journey Into Seeing
in Three Dimensions."


mind that they shouldn't
run for political office if
they don't have the forti-
tude to stand in our very
hot Citrus County kitchen.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulli-
gan@chronicleonline.com.


Sound OFF


/� �/~ �


^ ^ ^








CitPIM Y


Sound OFF ---


Key flag
I just drove back into In-
verness on (County Road)
491 past the Key Center
training area. The American
flag that they are flying out
there, they ought to be
ashamed of. It's the most
disgraceful, dirty, filthy-
looking flag that you could
want. Of all the operations
in town, they ought to be
ashamed of themselves.
Salaries
When are the county com-
missioners going to take a
reduction in pay? They're
putting Mr. Brad Thorpe in
there for $129,000 a year
and they ain't taking no pay
cuts. You know, this town is
not rich no more. How
about taking a pay cut or
get out of office.
Party people
I'm calling upon legisla-
tors of both parties to think
and do what is right for the
country and not to follow
along like little mice behind
the pied piper. Think and do
what's right for the country,
not just the party.
Community change
When people ask me
where I live, I always said I
lived in the golfing commu-
nity of Citrus Hills. I guess
I'll have to change that to "I
live in the forest of Citrus
Hills."
Soaring costs
Our county commission-
ers-need to get off their col-
lective backsides and start
to assist some of the
Progress Energy customers.
Our bills this past month -
my bill - had a bigger fuel


surcharge than my actual
bill. This is only going to
continue, and they now
want to put more charges
on our backs. Our commis-
sioners need to stop and
think that electricity is nec-
essary and Progress Energy
will cut us off. If my bill is
double and triple my taxes,
I'm not going to pay my
property taxes because I
have to pay my electric bill.
We either need Progress En-
ergy to back off and put
these new charges where
they need to go, or offer us
an alternative... Progress En-
ergy has been just so nice
to give us a couple of
months' respite on our bills,
and now are looking to sur-
charge us again for a nu-
clear plant that will benefit
us in absolutely no way. All
of the electricity that will be
generated when, if and as
it's built, will be going
somewhere else, as is all
the energy that is here in
Citrus County. Although
they are a taxpayer and they
do employ people, I suspect
that they get a generous de-
duction on their taxes and
either the people of Citrus
County need to get a reduc-
tion due to this, or we need
to be offered an alternative.
In a county that has many
retirees and where unem-
ployment has reached 11
percent, Progress Energy is
being unconscionable in
what they're trying to push
through. And our county
commissioners and leaders
need to try to do something
for us or offer an alternative.
It would be nice to see
some facts and figures as to
just what Progress Energy's
figures are and where this


energy is going to go. It
won't be here in Citrus
County.
Gentle mischief
I see in the paper where
they say we are going to'
spend millions of dollars to
change all the General Mo-
tors signs from GM. Why
should we change the signs?
It stands for "Government
Management."
Common practice
I'm calling in regards to
the diploma delay at Dun-
nellon High School. This
happens at all the schools.
This happened for my
nephew at Citrus High
School this year when he
graduated. He got a bill for
$2-and-some-cents for a
non-returned library book
and did not receive his
diploma, but yet he had
turned in the book previ-
ously and it was "an error
on their part." And his
graduation was also
tainted because of this. On
that one, the library book
was already turned in. So I
want to know why these
faculty members are not
double-checking records
first.
No nicknames
As I was growing up, and
today being many years
later, I was taught that nick-
names had no place in busi-
ness or in public business.
Apparently the Chronicle
doesn't agree with this and
they publish nicknames. But
I've got two examples that
seem to violate that princi-
ple: the county attorney and
the school board superinten-
dent. Just don't feel nick-
names are appropriate.


Chicken King
I was wondering if any-
body out there knows what
happened to the Chicken
King restaurant up in Her-
nando. I went in there and
it's been closed. It's closed
up. Are they closed for good?
Editor's note: Yes, Dave's
Chicken King is closed for
good. The restaurant's owners
wrote a farewell letter to Cit-
rus County residents, which
the Chronicle published June
5. You can read the letter on
our Web site:
http://www.chronicleonline.c
om/cgi-bin/c2.cgi?071 +arti-
cle+Letters+200906051955
18071302.
Florida vs. Jersey
I just recently traveled up
North to central Jersey and
I was with a very close and
dear friend of mine who's
an assemblyman, equiva-
lent to your county cornmis-
sioners. He runs a district
where there's light industry,
small businesses, mom-
and-pop businesses, and
there's a lot of residential
- about the size of Citrus
County - in his district.
And he loves his job. He en-
joys working with these peo-
ple and he's been doing it
for the last 15 years as an
assemblyman and a part-
time lawyer. He don't make
near as much money as
these county commission-
ers here and'he's got more
businesses in the area and
he has a lot of people em-
ployed and he takes care of
veterans also. If you've got
a problem, his door is al-
ways open. You can walk
into his office and talk to
him. But he doesn't make
near as much money as


these people make down
here.
Lyrica
This call is for the lady
who sent the letter asking
about medication for fi-
bromyalgia. There's a new
drug on the market called
Lyrica and she could ask
her doctor about that. Best
wishes to her.
Fuzzy math
Progress meters are
funny things. I take readings
daily. There can be 40 per-
cent more on some days
than others. One month I
had an extra 1,000 kilo-
watts of usage. Funny thing,
the same heating and cool-
ing system supplied and I
watched the meter readings
increase for no apparent


reason. I suggest you keep a
daily reading and get an ed-
ucation of your own.
Maidhof support
Gary Maidhof is a man of
integrity. We should have
more people like him in Cit-
rus County. And the com-
missioners could not do
their job and do it right if
there wasn't employees like
Gary Maidhof.
You read correctly
Did I read correctly? A
man shot and killed his
neighbor in front of the
man's children and the man
was not arrested? The neigh-
bor was not arrested for
shooting and killing his
neighbor. Kind of like the
man who shot his neighbor's
dog and wasn't arrested.'


#2 Rely on local entertainment and free
festivals in town for weekend fun

Save at least 45% on your
Citrus County Chronicle by
subscribing to home delivery

Call 563-3295 V , 'I IL'
Start Saving today! CI 1 VJI(I,-


_ _ __________I___N__B_1_______~.


SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009 C5


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CS'SUNDAY.r TUNE 28. 2009nn


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B Section D - SUNDAY, JUNE 28,2009



SIN ESS COUNTY CHRONICLE
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


BRIAN LaPETER/Chronicle
Meredith Linley grew up in Citrus County and has recently moved back to be the manager of member services at the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce.



IN FAMILIAR TERRITORY


CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
Clicking the heels of her
ruby slippers, Dorothy
leaves the Land of Oz
chanting "There's no place like
home."
Many people share the senti-
ment
"I think I'm starting a trend,"
said Meredith Linley, who has
come back to Citrus County and
is envied by others who left when
she did. ,
Linley was recently appointed
manager of member services at
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce. A 1999 graduate of
Crystal River High School, Linley
finds she is reconnecting with
many of the people with whom
she grew up, both those who have
stayed here and those who are
coming back or would like to re-


A 1999 graduate of Crystal River High
School, Linley finds she is reconnecting with
many of the people with whom she grew up,
both those who have stayed here and those
who are coming back or would like to return.


turn.
During the 10 years.she's been
away, Linley has built up valu-
able education and experience.
She graduated,'rom Florida
State with a degree in political
science, then spent four years in
the Capitol working for members
of the House of Representatives.
'"At one point, I was dealing
with a member's constituents
from Miami," she said. She han-
dled such inquiries as school
planning, building permits and
other issues. Working for the ma-
jority whip, she helped analyze
amendments and advise all mem-


bers about bills.
If that job was not hectic
enough, Linley went on to work
for the Bush-Cheney campaign in
Jacksonville.
"It was just insane," she said.
"The craziest thing ever.".
She helped organize campaign
activities such as walks and
phone banks, and helped get
53,000 people into Alltel Stadium
for a rally. She also tracked all
the groups Who had been con-
tacted.
While in Jacksonville, Linley
ran several political campaigns
that included a state house race


Have skills, ready to transfer


T ransfer-
able skills
are two
valuable words.
What are trans-
ferable skills?
These are the
skills used at
work or in life, in-
cluding the gen-
eral areas of Janne
communication, WORK
working with CONNI
people, analyzing
data, working
with equipment or things
and ideas. The career field
you are in is changing or no
longer exists. Discovering
your skills and communi-
cating to potential employ-


t
IE


ers is not just
needed, but re-
quired.
If you have
skills organizing
events at work
or as a volun-
teer, this is
something you
want potential
tWalsh employers to
FORCE know. If you
ECTION have trade skills
in construction
or related fields,
you have skills of value in
the green jobs sector, such
as solar panel installation.
If you work at home taking
See SKILLS/Page D3


ON THE NET
* Transferable Skills
Resources:
http:///www.quint
careers.com.'transfer
able_skills.html
* Online Free Trans-
ferable Skills Survey:
* http://www.d.umn.
edukmc/career_tran
sfer_survey.htmln
* Online Learning:
http://www.gcflearn
free.org/
* Ready to Work:
http://www.clmwork
force.com/career_Rea
dytoWork.asp


SCORE helps businesses prepare

for and recover from disasters


Special to the Chronicle


WASHINGTON, D.C. - Disaster can
strike any business at any time, including
equipment failures, thefts, accidents or nat-
ural disasters. SCORE "Counselors to
America's Small Business" offer' expert
mentoring and workshops that can help a
business prepare for and recover from a
disaster.
Find a SCORE mentor near you and ask
SCORE for free disaster preparation and
recovery advice. Take advantage of newly
updated resources online at
www.score.org/disaster preparedness.html.
These tips from SCORE can help you
make sure your business is ready for a dis-
aster:
* Prepare a disaster recovery plan. The
plan should include phone numbers and e-
mail addresses of all employees; bank, in-
surance and leasing information; customer
information; and any information vital for
running the business. Employees should


know what steps to take during an emer-
gency.
M Keep the lines of communication open.
Contact your employees to make sure they
are safe and well. Update them on the status
ofyour business and the potential impact to
their employment and income. Reassure
customers that you are working to deal with
the situation.
* Review your business insurance cover-
age and contact your insurance carrier to
schedule an appraisal You should have cov-
erage not only for property damage and loss,
including inventory, but also for business in-
terruption.
* Put a backup computer system in place.
You should have programs, files and dupli-
cate records, including accounts receivable
and client information, at a separate, safe
location.
* Learn about funding available for dis-
aster recovery Research U.S. Small Busi-
ness Administration (SBA)-backed loans
See SCOREPage D3


and a public defender's race. She
also ran special events for the
campaigns of Charlie Crist and
the McCain-Palin ticket
But even with that level of ac-
tion, Linley said she hoped some
day to come back to Citrus
County. Not only did she grow up
here, but also she has strong ties
to the community.,,
Her father, Tom Linley, left Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife State
Park as manager in 2004, having
worked at the park for 14 years.
Her mother worked atSeven
Rivers Christian School for 10
years and was active with the Na-
ture Coast Community Church.
Tom Linley took a position as di-
rector of volunteer service and
chief of staff for Volunteer
Florida, the governor's commis-
sion dedicated to promoting vol-
unteerism and community
service. The couple resides in
Tallahassee.
See FAMILIAR/Page D3


Market-battered

fundsefy easy fixes


T he past
year's dev-
astating
losses on Wall
Street could mean
some much-
needed changes
in target-date mu-
tual funds. But a
revamp could be
problematic if
anxiety from the Mark
market's short- OF M
term distress INTE
hurts the funds' |NTE
long-haul ap-
proach.
The government and fund
industry are considering
proposed fixes to an in-
creasingly popular product
that appeals to hands-off in-
vestors - those who are too
uncomfortable, disinter-
ested or procrastination-
prone to periodically adjust
their portfolios.
Target-date funds - also
known as life-cycle funds -
do that automatically, dial-
ing down risk by tweaking
the ratio of stocks to bonds
as shareholders' retirement
dates approach.
That's how they're sup-
posed to work The reality is
that funds designed to con-
serve 60-somethings' nest
eggs for near-term retire-
ments lost an average of 25
percent in 2008, compared
with nearly 39 percent for
the Standard & Poor's 500
index.
One fund with a 2010 tar-
get year lost 41 percent, far-
ing worse than an investor
entirely in stocks via the
S&P 500.
So how to fix a product
whose warts have been ex-


k
IL


posed, 15 years
at after emerging
as the industry's
closest thing to a
one-size-fits-all
retirement sav-
ings solution?
The U.S. De-
partment of
Labor and the
Securities and
Jewell Exchange Com-
UTUAL mission are sort-
ing through
REST proposals to
strengthen dis-
closures of what the funds
invest in, and their "glide
paths" - how the funds ad-
just the mix of stocks versus
generally safer bonds and
money-market funds ap-
proaching and during re-
tirement
That's the easy part. The
harder question that
emerged in a June 18 hear-
ing the agencies held was
whether to restrict target-
date funds' investment
strategies.
Many financial planners,
and some in the fund indus-
try, want standards specify-
ing how much stock
exposure is too much or too
little for a fund with a given
target date.
But there's no consensus
that the answer should lie in
setting ceilings or floors for
funds' asset allocations -
say, for example, limiting
2020 funds to no more than
75 percent stocks, but also
no less than 50 percent to
ensure that investors don't
miss out too much on future
market rebounds.
See FIXES/Page D3


Do I


need a


credit


card?
DEAR BRUCE: I
will be starting col-
lege this fall. I have
been listening to your
show with my parents for
many years. I work 35
hours a week and will be a
full-time student. My dad
seems to think I ought to
get a credit card. I'm not
sure why, but I guess it's a
good idea to start building
credit. What dp you suig-
gest? - E.W, Pennsylva-
nia
DEAR E.W Congratula-
tions on being a hustler
and getting your degree.
Many people will say to do
both is not possible, but
people like you will prove
them wrong. It may very
well be that you will have
to have your dad's signa-
ture to get a credit card,
although many companies,
'are very liberal in issuihg
cards to college students.
Just bear in mind that a
credit card is a'tool. It's
neither good nor bad, but,
like any tool, it can be
abused.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I are in a major
disagreement as to what
we should do about our
savings. We have a combi-
nation of 401(k) accounts,
Roth IRAs and other tax-
sheltered accounts, all of
which are in mutual
funds. Needless to say
we've seen nothing but
losses over the last two
years and have lost about
40 percent of our retire-
ment savings. We are both
44. 'My husband con-
tributes the maximum to
his, but I have not been
able to for the past year
Currently, we are invest-
ing.$150 a month each into
our Roth IRAs. I'm ready
to pull out what I have and
invest in bonds or a
money market My feeling
is that we won't gain
much, but we won't lose
anymore, either. My hus-
band feels that we don't
lose anything until we sell
and that we should keep
buying while the share
price is low. I totally re-
spect your opinion and
have an open mind. - LP
Las Vegas
DEAR LP: Your letter
could have been written
by hundreds of thousands
of folks who have had the
same experience over the
past year. The economy is
in the tank, but hopefully
it is on its way back up.
Given your relatively
young age, I think your
husband is on the right
path. It's a bit late to get
out now. You've taken
what most people feel is
the biggest part of the hit
When these securities re-
cover, as most will, you
will then be stuck with
bonds that very likely will
be going down in value. If
they are held to maturity,
you will receive your prin-
cipal. Many times, people
buy long-term bonds be-
cause the interest is a lit-
tle higher When the
interest rates go back up
again and the resale value
of the bonds go down,
they've found a double
whammy I'm inclined to
agree with your husband.
DEAR BRUCE: I'm 60.
The company that I've
worked for almost my

See MONEY/Page D3














D2

SUNDAY
JuNE 28, 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


chamberr Connection


Hungry Howie's Pizza and'Subs


Hungry Howie's Pizza & Subs has now re-opened in Inverness! Call them today for Pizza, oven baked subs,
Howie Wings & Tenders, Salads, Howie Bread, Desserts, Pasta, Cheese Stix and Calzones. Their Inverness
location is next to K-Mart at 1650 Hwy 41 North. Call them at 344-3435. You can even order online at www.fl-
hungryhowies.com. Dine In, Carry-Out and Delivery are available. Joining owner William Smith and the gang
at Hungry Howies in a recent ribbon cutting ceremony are Ambassadors Megan Ennis, Jennifer Duca, James
Segovia, Jessica Holcomb and Rhonda Lestinsky.

Quick Stop Barber Shop


Quick Stop Barber Shop is a full Service Unisex Men's and Women's Barber Shop. We have 4 stylists on staff
with over 25 yrs experience. We offer a wide variety of services including Hot Towel Shaves .We offer 8.00$
barber cuts for men every Wednesday. Each haircut comes with a straight razor neck shave and a 3 min neck
massage. We are open 6 days a week. Monday thru Friday from 9-6 and Saturday from 10-4. We take ap-
pointments , as well as walk-ins. We are located in the Winn Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills facing Tru-
man Blvd (3541N. Lecanto Hwy. Please stop by and visit us or call to set up your appointment
today.352-527-3030. Pictured above, representing Quick Stop Barber Shop is Owner Donna Bowman, George
Drewry, Debi Albrecht, Jennifer Swain (not pictured). Representing the Chamber Ambassador program is Frank
Yetner, David Heinz, Wendy Hall, Dan Pushee, Lillian Smith, Nancy Hautop and John Porter.


Expo on tap


Call the Chamber for details on the

Women's Health & Fitness Expo 2009


Act now to make sure you'll be
part of the Women's HEALTH &
FITNESS Expo 2008,. hosted by
the Business Women's Alliance
of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce.
The Expo will be from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27,
2008, from at the National
Guard Armory in Crystal River.
Details on exhibit registra-
tion, sponsorship opportunities
and a call for speakers are avail-
able from the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, Inver-
ness office, at 401 Tompkins
Street. Phone 726-2801.
These opportunities are for
health-, fitness- and wellness-
related organizations, and on a
"first come, first served" basis.
Chamber members receive dis-
counted exhibit registration
fees. �
The Expo's purpose is to edu-
cate women and those around
them about their health, fitness
and wellness. Proceeds will fur-
ther the education of students
from Citrus High School, Crystal
River High School, Lecanto
High School, Withlacoochee


Technical Institute and Camp E-
Nini-Hasse.
Our Mission:
Women fulfill many roles in
their lifetime -from student to
career woman to friend to
mother to wife to caretaker The
Citrus County Chamber of Com-
merce Business Women's Al-
liance Women's HEALTH &
FITNESS Expo was created to
be all about YOU.
Our Goals:
Our. goals for YOU are for
healthier and happier living
through:
* Appreciating the impor-
tance of women taking time for
themselves.
* Proactively pursuing pre-
vention techniques and educa-
tion opportunities.
N Improving your fitness for
life.
* Eating healthy and enjoy-
ing every bite.
M Recognizing the value of
the mind, body, spirit connec-
tion.
* Supporting friends and
family in pursuing a healthier
lifestyle.


THANK YOU!
There are many people who do things on a day to day basis that
we do not always remember to thank. This is our chance to thank
those Chamber members who have stood out this past month! We
thank you for your continued support of the Chamber.
N Captain Joe Eckstein
5 The Citrus County Sheriffs Office
E Debbie Lattin, Citrus County Harvest
N Maronda Homes
0 Sheree Monroe, Boys & Girls Club of Citrus County
0 Insurance Resources & Risk Management, Inc
0 B & W Rexall Drugs
N Citrus County Chronicle
0 Dan's Clam Stand
0 Ralph Panduano
0 Ray Chirayath, BCM Business Cost Management
0 John Porter, Porter's Locksmithing
0 Larry Ellis


Celebrate Independence Day


Patriotic Evening in Inverness Fireworks Over Kings Bay


5 p.m. July 3
This patriotic festival is on the evening of July
3 and encompasses both Wallace Brooks and
Liberty Park. Besides a phenomenal fireworks
display at dusk, the event includes children's
games, rides and nonprofit food booths. See for
yourself!
Dozens of boaters joined thousands of spec-
tators in Liberty and Wallace Brooks parks along
Lake Henderson to listen to patriotic concerts
and watch the breathtaking fireworks.
FREE admission and parking! Call (352) 726-
3913 for more information


Approximately 9 p.m. July 4
To celebrate the freedom we all enjoy, the
Crystal River fireworks will return to Three Sis-
ters Property to increase the viewing area for the
community.
This year's show is dedicated to all the veter-
ans and active military service members who
have given so much of themselves so we' can be
free.
The Crystal River Special Events Foundation
will again sponsor the show, put on by Drag-
onworks of Homosassa.
For more information call 352-795-2946


Member NEWS


Garlock Enterprises intro-
duces Atmosphere Air Purifier.
The Atmosphere Air Purifier is
the first and only air purifier cer-
tified by the Asthma and Allergy
Foundation of America and Al-
lergy Standards LTD. Products
carrying this certification mark
have been scientifically tested
and proven more suitable for
people with asthma and related
allergic sensitivities. Atmos-
phere Air Purifier also carries
the US EPA's Energy Star. You
can find out more by contacting
us at www.garlock
enterprises.com or calling 563-
1513.
MEN
Scallop season is here!!! Join
the fun and find these tasty little
creatures off the St. Martins and
Homosassa rivers. They are
easiest to find in water that is 4
feet or less. Scallop season
runs from July 1st through Sept.
10th. Stop in at our local
Seatow office for bag limits and
other scalloping info. Sea Tow is
located at 9070 W. Fort Island
Trail in Crystal River. We can be
reached at 795-2236.
ME
Monday, July 6 is "Hospice of
Citrus County Day" at Beef 0'
Brady's Family Sports Pub in In-
verness. On July 6, Beef 0'
Brady's will donate 15% of the
day's proceeds to benefit the
bereavement camp program of
the Herry's Kids Division of Hos-
pice of Citrus County. On July 6,
Beef O' Brady's will also accept
check and cash donations
made payable to Hospice of Cit-
rus County. Bringing a family-
friendly element to the
traditional sports pub concept,
Beef O'Brady's is a fast growing
national chain of family sports
pubs that achieves its success
by building relationships with
local community and civic or-
ganizations. Beef O' Brady's is
an ongoing supporter of Hos-
pice of Citrus County's Herry's
Kids Division. In addition to the
United Way, Hospice of Citrus


County is supported by commu-
nity donations, corporate spon-
sorships and grants. Hospice of
Citrus County has earned the
gold seal of approval from the
Joint Commission. Licensed in
1985, Hospice of Citrus County
is your hometown hospice, pre-
serving the integrity of the hos-
pice philosophy in the finest
traditions of serving you. For in-
formation on services, call
352.527.2020 or 866.642.0962.
Visit us on the web at www.hos-
piceofcitruscounty.org..
NE.
.Auditions for the Art Center
Theater's production of Death-
trap will be heldo 8:30 p.m. at
the Art CenterAE building. This
thriller with a dash of
comedy runs weekends Sep-
tember 18-October 4. The cast
calls for three men and two
women, ages may vary. For ad-
ditional information contact di-
rector Peter Abrams
at 746-1123.
MEN
The Citrus Business Net-
work is happy to receive new
members, Charles and Aria
Walterson, new owners of the
Olde Towne Latin Cafe, 108 N.
Pine Ave., Inverness. The Citrus
Business Network meets every
Friday morning at Tuscany On
The Meadow, Citrus Hills
Lodge, 350 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Breakfast
starts at 7:00 AM, and the meet-
ing is conducted from 7:30 AM
to 8:30 AM. Members benefit by
exchanging information and re-
ferrals with other business own-
ers. Guests are always
welcome. Attendees should
bring business cards,
brochures, coupons, etc., to ex-
change with other business
owners. Each person is given
an opportunity to introduce their
products or services. For more
information call Liz Koehlinger,
Membership Director, 527-9790
or Ron Radford, President, 795-
0003, or visit www.citrusbusi-
nessnetwork.com.


MEN
Second Saturday "Market
Day with Art" is July 11il from
10 a.m. till 3 p.m... Join the Vil-
lage Shoppes by supporting
local vendors selling fresh Pro-
duce, Herbs, Orchids, and
flowering Plants and more, on
the grounds of Heritage2 OVil-
lage. LocafrArtists and crafters
join this outdoor event, along
with nature and wildlife exhibits.
Heritage Village is in the
heart of Historic Downtown
Crystal River. For more info go
to www.theshoppesofher-
itagevillage.com or call 352-
564-1400.
OEM
Tally Ho Vacations recently
announced a three-day trip to
Sarasota over the Christmas
holidays.'We realize that there
are many people, both couples
and singles, who don't want to
remain at home over Christ-
mas," said Barbara Whittemore
from the Tally Ho staff. 'They
want to do something fun and
different, and be with a group of
friends. We hope this trip will fill
that need."
For more information on this
trip, please call Tally Ho Vaca-
tions at 860-2805.
MEN
On Sunday, July 5 and July
19, the Humanitarians of
Florida, Inc., will hold its feline
adoption-a-thon. Come and visit
our kittens and cats from noon
to 4 p.m. All our felines are
spayed/neutered, litter box
trained, and tested for feline
leukemia and AIDS. They have
been given age-appropriate
vaccines and flea preventative,
and their nails trimmed and ears
cleaned. The Humanitarians'
Manchester House - look for
the white building with the
brightly colored paw prints - is
on the comer of State Road 44
and Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. To view our kit-
tens and cats, go on-line at
www.hofspha.org, or call 563-
2370.


- r� _I 1'1 l1llC


-- -~11--1~-









CTPIP (?o uNTY(F) CROICk.BSIESSSU-A JUE-8,-00-


CUNNINGLY CLEVER MARKETING MUSTS

FOR CITRUS COUNTY BUSINESS OWNERS


ANDREW WOOD
Special to the Chronicle

Here are five marketing tips
from Legendary Marketing
president and founder Andrew
Wood's new book, "Cunningly
Clever Marketing":
1 He with the largest data- " '
* base wins! And don't let
your database collect dust! .
Send brochures, send post i
cards, send direct mail to it and r
make the phone ring! And
Preach to the choir: don't WA
2.try to reach new con-
verts! Identify your perfect customer
and allocate your marketing dollars on
consumers like them.
H3 ave a world-class Web site or
.don't have one at all! First and
foremost, the reason for having a Web
site is to generate leads. It's good to


have pretty pictures and information,
but lead generation is pinnacle.
4 Be unique! Know what
Your competition is doing,
but don't copy them. Be different
and be better.
5 Train your staffto sell; it's
eJ. the fastest way to increase
4!0 revenue. Get better at answering
. ^ the phones and handling walk-
ins and watch profits soar!
A E-mail the best marketing
campaign you've ever run at
rew your business; send it to
od
Elvis@LegendaryMarketing.com and
the best three campaigns win compli-
mentary copies of "Cunningly Clever
Marketing" ($40 cover price). Be sure to
include your mailing address.
Cunningly Clever Marketing by An-
drew Wood is available for sale online
at www.CunninglyClever.com


Florida Bar honors 50-year members


Special to the Chronicle

Two attorneys from the
5th Judicial Circuit were
among 124 attorneys hon-
ored by The Florida Bar on
June 26, for 50 years of ded-
ication to the practice of
law. The attorneys are:
* William Terrell
Hodges, Ocala..
* N. John Thomas, Her-
nando.
. Their service to the pro-
fession will be acknowl-


SCORE


edged during a luncheon at
The Florida Bar's Annual
Convention, being held at
the Orlando World Center
Marriott from June 24 to 27.
To be recognized, attorneys
must be members in good
standing of The Florida
Bar and attain their 50th
anniversary of admittance
to the practice of law in
2009.
Senior Counselors -
who've practiced for 50
years or more but have not


Continued from Page D1


that can help you rebuild. Loans to busi-
nesses of all sizes are available up to $1.5
million to repair damage to real estate
and replace machinery, equipment and
inventory. Economic Injury Disaster
Loans help qualified businesses unable
to pay bills or meet operations.
SCORE recently updated information
online with free mentoring, tools and
checklists, plus links to state and federal
resources, , at
www.score.org/disaster_preparedness.ht
ml. In addition, SCORE and HP are host-
ing a series of free workshops across the


been members of The
Florida Bar for the entire
period - will also be rec-
ognized at the luncheon.
The luncheon was spon-
sored by The Florida Bar's
Young Lawyers Division.
The Hon. Joseph W Hatch-
ett, a 50-year honoree and
former Florida Supreme
Court justice and former
chief. judge for the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the
11th Circuit, was featured
speaker.


country, "For the Good of Your Busi-
ness-Surviving Challenging Times."
Learn more at
www.score.org/HP_events.html.*
Since 1964, SCORE "Counselors to,
America's Small Business" has helped
more than 8.4 million aspiring entrepre-
neurs and small business owners through
counseling and business workshops.
More than 11,200 volunteer business
counselors in 370 chapters serve their
communities through entrepreneur edu-
cation dedicated to the formation, growth
and'success of small businesses.
For more information about starting or
operating a small business, call (800) 634-
0245 for the SCORE chapter nearest you.
Visit SCORE on the Web at www.score.org
or www.score.org/women.


SIX X El posed solutions.
SWithin the fund industry, there's a range
FIXESof opinions about what should be done
Continued from Page D1 with the funds. Here are some perspec-
tives:
"The danger is that we overreact to one U Jeff Coons, a research director at tar-
year, 2008, which was the second-worst get-date fund provider Manning & Napier,
stock market on record," said F-an Kinniry, argues that managers need wide freedom
an investment strategist at Vanguard to depart from preset targets for a fund's
Group, which manages nearly $34 billion in proportion of stocks vs. bonds. Market con-
target-date fund assets, second only to Fi- editions fluctuate too much to stay passive,
delity Investments' $66 billion. Coons said.
He fears a heat-of-the-moment push to "The failure to adapt to the changing na-
steer target-dates toward more conserva- ture of investment risk can turn a glide
tive bond-oriented path into a glide
strategies, or even While trap," Coons said.
bolster the funds While many target-dates Restricting equity
with small doses of inveSt in lower-risk bonds exposure iii target
income-guaranteed invest in lower-risk bonds funds "makes a basic
variable annuities the funds are hardly assumption that the
that could offer world is going to be-'
downside protection plain-as-vanilla have the way it has in
from stock and bond the past," he said,
risks. Kinniy noted, although many investors "but each bear mar-
that bonds have al- think o them that way ketwillbedifferent"
most always fallen think Kinniry, of Van-
short of stock re- One survey showed that guard, also opposes
turns over periods of equity caps, but dis-
more than a few more than a third of agrees with Coons on
years, going back as investors believed rival the need for man-
far a the 1920s; invest lived rival agers to shift occa-
And excessive funds with the same sionally from the
stock exposure isn't asset allocation tar-
the only short-term target dates carry more or gets in a fund's glide
risk target-dates path He backs Van
face. After all, the less the same risk levels. guard's emphasis on
fund that suffered funds that passively


the 41 percent loss last year, Oppenheimer,
Transition 2010 (OTTAX), was dragged
down in part by bond investments in mort-
gage-backed securities.
"Diversification across asset classes, or
across geographies, provided weak defense
against these market losses," said Jeffrey
Kriight, head of asset allocation at Putnam
Investments, a target-date fund provider.
While many target-dates invest in lower-
risk bonds, the funds are hardly plain-as-
vanilla although many investors think of
them that way.
One survey showed that more than a
third of investors believed rival funds with
the same target dates carry more or less the
same risk levels. It turns out the stock com-
ponents of 2010 funds ranged from as low
as 24 percent to high as 68 percent, ac-.
cording to a congressional study.
The scrutiny comes just three years after
Congress allowed target-date funds to6
serve as defaults in 401(k) plans for auto-
matic enrollees who don't specify how to'
invest their money.
The funds now hold moire than $160 bil-
lion, and by 2015 are expected to account
for one-third of all savings in 401(k)s and
other defined contribution plans.
It's still early in the debate on how to re-'
spond to 2008's lessons. The agencies that
held this month's hearing haven't yet pro-


track indexes.
"It's extremely difficult to predict a bear
market," Kinniry said. "Most people have
been on the losing side of that proposition
over time."
* Richard Michaud, president and chief
investment officer of New Frontier Advi-
sors, disputes a basic premise of target-
date funds: that age, and projected
retirement date, should be primary con-
siderations in choosing the right fund and
approach to asset mix. Michaud favors
what he calls a "target-risk" approach giv-
ing greater weight to factors such as a per-
son's wealth, job security, income stability,
marital status, and demands such as sup-
porting children or elderly parents.
An investor can account for such factors.
through homework and help from a finan-
cial planner. But too.often, Michaud said,
age-based target-date fund selection be-
comes a fallback for financial profession-
als legally protecting themselves from
allegations that they breached fiduciary
obligations to a client
"It relieves me of the duty to 'Know thy
client,'" Michaud said.


Questions? E-mail
investorinsight@ap.org.


SKILLS
Continued from Page D!

care of your children and
family, there are skills to be
evaluated - really!
My "career suitcase" was
recently packed, unpacked,
evaluated and repacked, just
like the thousands of those
who have lost jobs during the
current economic crisis in
our nation. The reality is we
live in changing times. You
could think of the transfer-
able skills as tools you have in
your suitcase that are ready


to be offered to your next em- took the "Retooling and Re-
ployer. The best way to see fueling for Success Profes-
what you have in your suit- sional Workshop" offered by
case is to take all your items Workforce Connection. I dis-
out to see what you have and covered by taking the Trans-
then repack ferable Skills Scale
Author Spencer Johnson, evaluation that my strengths
M.D., wrote the book "Who are in the area of interper-
Moved My Cheese?", which sonal, communicative, ana-
tells how we must be willing lytical and creative. This all
to find new locations to find made sense as I worked for
cheese, also known as money years in journalism, mainly
for survival for humans, just as a visual journalist This in-
like mice search for cheese, if formation helped me draft
we want to survive. I wanted my cover letters for job appli-
to survive and find my' cations. I wanted employers
cheese, to know.I could do the job, if
On my path to finding my they were willing to look at
next location: for cheese, I what skills I could transfer to


their businesses.
What can you do to deter-
mine your transferable
skills? Trained consultants at
Workforce 'Conhection are
ready be help guide you on
your career path. There are a
variety of ways to evaluate
your skills. Listed below are
a few ways to start the trans-
ferable skills evaluation.
* Prove It! - Evaluates
specific skills requested by
employers to qualify or prove
you have skills need for a
specific job.
* Ready to Work Creden-
tial - This is an evaluating
tool of math, reading and lo-


eating information. This test
looks at your employability
skills, not adult education
skills. The test is free and
used by some employers for
hiring purposes..
M Test of Adult Basic Edu-
cation, TABE - This test
helps to determine ,educa-
tional paths, evaluating areas
of reading, math and lan-
guage arts. .
* Transferable Skills Scale
- Helps you evaluate your
transferable skills for your
next job or career field.
It's time to get your "career
suitcase" unpacked to see
what skills you have stowed


away and start communicat-
ing to employers the skills
you have to offer at your next
job! Your cheese will be eas-,,
ier to find with your suitcase
packed properly for the trip.
Find out more about ca-
reer opportunities by visiting
www.clmworkforce.com.


Contact Jannet Walsh, com-
munity relations/communi-
cations manager at
Workforce Connection, for
additional information at
(352) 873-7939, ext 1234 or e-
mailjwalsh@clmwork-
force.com.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

whole adult life has gone
bankrupt. At my age, it's
very difficult finding an-
other job. I am several thou-
sand dollars in debt with
two credit cards. Do you
think the credit card com-
pany would be willing to ac-
cept 50 'cents on a dollar for
a full payoff? - Reader, via
e-mail
DEAR READER: Unfor-
tunately, I doubt the com-
pany will take that deal
unless you are very much in
arrears. As long as you are
current from their perspec-
tive, you,are good for the
money. They advanced the
money to you and they ex-
pect to get paid. Seldom are
companies willing to negoti-
ate unless they feel that un-
less they do negotiate, they
will receive nothing. But in
these hard economic times,
it's worth a shot to at least
see what they have to say.
While you certainly have my
sympathy I seriously doubt
the companies will negoti-
ate unless you are in de-
fault
DEAR BRUCE: You have
said that as a landlord you
should get at least 1 percent
a month of the value of the
property in rental income.
How do you come up with
this figure, meaning, what
do you base getting 1 per-
cent on? I am in my 30s, and
I was interested in looking
into buying rental property.
Houses right now are a bar-
gain, and then I could just
rent it out until the market
recovers. - Reader, via e-
mail
DEAR READER: Yes, the
housing market is in the
tank, but, as history has


shown us, it will rise again.
So now is a good time, if you
have the money, to invest in.
a house. There is any num-
ber of ways to compute min-
imum acceptable rentals,
but the 1 percent number is
pretty much an industry
standard. There are rental
properties that will gener-
ate 1.4 percent and higher,
so why be satisfied with 1
percent? Understand that
you just can't go out this
weekend, find a house on
Monday and become a land-
lord. You might, but the like-
lihood is that you are going
to have to spend some time
looking. As to the type of
properties to invest in, that's
entirely up to you and the
area that you live in. The
one thing I would avoid is
single-family homes, which
seldom produce income
commensurate with their
value.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
$4,000 left in a 401(k) ac-
count from my former em-
ployer. I have to do
something between now
and August of this year or it
will automatically be taxed
and sent to me. Do you have
any suggestions? - PR.
Georgia
DEAR PR.: First, you
need to get this taken care
of so you don't have to pay
any taxes. That's just throw-
ing money down the drain.
You could have the money
transferred either to a tradi-
tional IRA or a Roth IRA If
you chose the Roth IRA, you
will have to pay the taxes at
your regular income rate. If
you chose this route, by all
means pay the taxes from
some outside source so that
the entire $4,000 can remain
sheltered. The alternative
would be the traditional
IRA where the tax will be
deferred until the time you


retire. Before you know it,
August will be here, so
whatever you decide, get it
done!
DEAR BRUCE: My wife
and I are 60.1 currently earn
$55,000 a year and I have
$150,000 in my 401(k). I have
a first mortgage balance of
$15,000 and a second at
$25,000. We both plan on
working until we're 65. I
would like to retire the sec-
ond mortgage against my
home because ofjob insecu-
rity in these bad times.
Would you advise that I
leave things as they are?
What's the best way to pay
off the second mortgage? -
Reader, via e-mail
DEAR 'READER:, You
didn't share with me what
the interest rate is on your
second mortgage, but I
would leave things as they
are unless the interest rates
are very high. The reason
that I say this is, if your job
is insecure, you will always
have the option of paying off
the mortgage with the
money you have saved. In
other words, you could
make payments out of that
money until you get back on
your feet If your job condi-
-tions stabilize, and you
would still like to pay off the
second mortgage lien, then I
would have no problem with
that I would stay as liquid
.as I can given your current
instability.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box 209
percent, Elfers,
FL 34680. E-mail to:
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions ofgeneral inter-
est will be answered in fu-
ture columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.


FAMILIAR
Continued from Page Dl

One day, Linley said, she
received a phone call and
learned that Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce was
planning to hire a chief ex-
ecutive officer. So she sent
her resume.
"I made the final three,
but I was beaten by Josh
Wooten," Linley said.
"Then, two weeks later,
Josh called and offered me
this job. It was an opportu-
nity I couldn't pass up."
Wooten understood that
Linley had a lot to offer the
goals he brings to the cham-
ber.
"I heard many positive
things about Meredith,"
Wooten said. "I heard that
she's a real up-and-comer.
As I had one position to fill,
I thought of her because of
her background and her
public relations skills. And,
of course, she has a history
here. She knows a lot of the
players and is a great addi-
tion to the staff."
With her job in member
services, Linley is taking
over a traditional position
with the chamber, but it has


a new job description.
"She's working with the
members both internally
and externally," Wooten
said. "She not just running
the database, but giving the
.members service and ad-,.
vice."
- Wooten said the focus of
the chamber in recent
years had settled down to
running its bureaucracy, so
his task is to reach out more
to the business people.
"If a member has a ques-
tion or needs advice,
.Meredith will be there to
help them;" he 'said.
Meredith is enthusiastic
to get the county economy
rolling and has some big
plans.
"I'm the person for mem-
bers to call when they have
ideas for business," she
said. "We have a full-time
events coordinator, and I
can help her with festival
planning. I'm also going to
spruce up the Web site and
start a young professionals'
association for network-
ing."
Linley has found that
many of the county's young
professionals are members
of the class of 1999 as she is.
"I have four friends I
went to high school with


who have recently moved
back here, too," she said. "I
want to stay in Crystal
River."
Becoming a mother was
an influence on Linley's de-
cision to return, too.
"I have a 4-year-old
daughter and I like the net-
working support of a close-
knit community,";she said.
Tallahassee was "miser-
able," Linley said, as it was
not near a body of water
and "it's freezing in Janu-
ary."
Jacksonville was wrong
also, but for different rea ---
sons.
"It's too fast-paced. Not
for me," Linley said.
She is excited about her
work with the chamber and
its staff.
"Kitty Barnes (executive
director) knows absolutely
everything about the his-
tory of the county and its
businesses," Linley said.
"Where could you find a re-
source like that? Every-
body's great to work with."
Linley said she has re-
turned with plenty to offer.
"My dad told me a long
time ago you can't save the
world," she said. "But I can
come back to make this
place better."


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SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2oog D3


BUSINESS


RTIC US COUNTY (FL E


Ir
D4











D4 SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


ChroinicleW


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds



In Print



and



Online



All



The Time


Fa:(32 53565 1 ol r e: 88)822301 m i: ls, es~hoiclonine* mI w*bite:ww cro iconie*o


I am volunteering to
drive for seniors.
Please Call
(352) 726-6960
SWM seeking SWF 40's
early 50's. Am off of
work for 3 months look-
ing to walk the trail &
Workout at the gym,
movies and other ac-
tivities, Height & weight
proportionate. Me
5'10, 190, muscular
build, 49, look younger,
Inverness area. Call
Brian 352-220-3094
Will cook and drive for
elderly, clean, non
smoking or drinking
. gentleman In ex-
change for room with
. no pets. I have superior
driving score. Call
(352) 726-6960'



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles
J.W. 352-228-9645.
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale, Hshold.
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcltrus.com


AKC Registerred
female Rottweiler. 1-1/2
yrs. old. Good home
only 220-8598
Akita, female,
4 yrs old, spade, shots up
to date. Great w/male
dogs (not female dogs)
also great w/ kids & cats
(352) 249-6250
Excell. Home for any
'unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
Free 3 yr. old
Lab Mix, Tinkabell
Good w/ children,
micro chipped,
spayed, house broken
(352) 476-5226
Free horse manure,you
load 344-2321
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad .
KITTENS
7 wks ,to good home
Also momma cat.
Will separate.
(352) 560-3353
Momma Cat
w/2 kittens,males,,3 mos.
Gray & black tiger striped.
Momma must go as well.
Can be separated.
(352) 201-9446


Blackberries
SOrganically Grown.
U-pick, open daily,
8A./12P. $3.50 per d.


CHIHUAHUA
Male, Black snout w/tan
body. Lost in area of
Charles Avein "
Inverness. Has a blue
color w/ gems.no tag.
(352) 726-1583
COLLIE ,
Male; blue -merle
color, vic
Bev Hills
-Brentwood,last seen
SWed pm352-212-0902
Full blooded male Boxer
Brown/white, cropped
tail, back of neck has
white bird shaped mark
Service dog. Choke
collar no tags Reward
offered Lost In vicinity of
Hwy 40 between
Dunnellon & Inglls
(352) 489-9773
Gold wedding band w/
thistle pattern lost in
Crystal River.
Inscription inside. Senti-
mentva lue REWARD.
1 795-8792
Lost Mini Fox Terrier
Pine Ridge or Mini Farm
area REWARD
(352) 563-5120
Lost Tan Shar-Pei
vicinity Crystal Glen De-
velopment, Lecanto
352-601-3506



Couch Cushion
brown with colored
pattern in it. Hwy. 490
628-3773
Female Brown Dog
VacInity of Hwy 44
In Inverness
352-476-5226
Found Beautiful
Siamese Cat
(352) 795-4865
LARGE BLACK DUFFLE.
BAG/BACK PACK -
Found at Publix, Inver-
ness. Call to identify
contents. 352-637-6108 ,



"PICK UP THIS
PICK UP THAT" ,
Grocery Shopping Plus
Call (352) 422-2187
BANKRUPTCY
DIVORCES
CHILD SUPPORT
352-613-3674
Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com


www.adopta
rescued oeLtcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations
Crystal River Mall
June 6th 11-3pm
Pet Supermarket
Inverness
June 13th, 20th &
29th... 11-2pm


Come see
our .
adorable cafs and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at
www.hofspha.oro.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conait Ave.
Corner of 44 and Co-
nant.
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prints.




Wanted home or
mobile, any area or
any condition. I can
pay you cash & close
quickly (352) 726-9369


- -


Help II!
Family in desperate need
of air conditioning unit of
any sort. Can not afford
to buy one. Would truly
appreciate the help.
(352) 423-3518
LIVE IN CARE GIVER
for elderly disabled-
gentleman In ex-
change for room &
board. Background
check required.
Call (352) 795-1699 or
(352) 220-2552
MAY I PRAY FOR
YOU?
Bill 352-726-9064
Cell 352-201-6038




A FREE Report of, Your
Home's Value
ww.naturecoast





Medical Records
Clerk
Maintains patient
files and statistics;
responds to requests
for medical records;
performs clerical
* duties. High School
Diploma or G.E.D.
required Office
clerical experience
required; three (3)
months of medical
office experience
preferred.
Microsoft word and
excel a must.
Please apply in
person or submit
- resume to:
Cypress Creek
JuvenIle Offenders
Correctional Center
2855 W Woodland
Ridge Dr. Lecanto, FL
34461 or fax: to
(352) 527-2235








































Italian Salon & Spa
to Open in Cnjrystal River
Great opportunity
for hair stylist,
estheticians, massage.
therapist, & nail techs
at a new Italian
inspired salon & spa.
Call to set up interview
(352)795-8088




Arbor Village Nursing
IS CURRENTLY HIRING

CNAs

TO JOIN OUR
DEDICATED
TEAM OF
PROFESSIONALS
FULL TIME - 7-3 & 3-11
PART-TIME- 11-7
LTC EXP. REQUIRED
WE OFFER
COMPETITIVE
WAGES & GREAT



J-S@CQCARE.COM
490 S. Old Wire Rd.
Wildwood

BE A CNA
One week Prep Course
Train & test with us.
FREE CPR & AED Training
GETYOURCNA.COM
341-PREP (7737)
BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
CNA PREP & TEST
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcilrus.com


CNA TEST PREP
Summer Discounts.Now
Offering am/pm. Classes
Free CPR training
w/enrollment. New
classes begin ev 3 wks
341-2311/scholarshlps

COME
GROW
WITH US!

-i LI

I-I l ' " L


Hospice House
(1)'RN 3p-1 1p
(2) RN 1 lp-7a
(1) Inpt Svc Coord
Wknd 7a-7p
(2) FT RN
Green Team
Blue Team
(1) FT LPN
Green Team
Social Worker
Levy Team
PRN Staff
RN's
LPN's
CNA's
Job descriptions,
other open positions
and applications
found at:
www.hosolceofcitrusco
unfy.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
.hr@hosplceof
citruscounty.org
HOSPICE OF
CITRUS COUNTY
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FI 34464
DFWP/EOE

Dental/
Surgical Assistant
For an oral surgery
practice. In Lecanto &
Springhll.
Experience a must
Email Resume to:
maryamoli@
yahoo.com
or Fax 352-527-8087
DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB

V COME CHECK "
US OUT!
We offer a great working
environment, excellent
wages and benefits. We
Are Ready to Hire "You"
for the following position
R.N. Supervisor, full time
for 11:00 to 7:00. Drop in
for an interview, tour, and
join our customer service
oriented team geared
toward excellent
resident outcomes.
2730 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits.
Fax esume to:
(352) 746-6333

Granny Nannies
Seeking Experienced
CNA&HHA
Call 352-560-4229

Medical Assistant
Experience needed.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-In,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE
(352)860-0885


Nurse Practitioner
or
Physician Assist.
For Busy Medical
Office. Full time
with Benefits,
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512


MED ASST - FT/PT

For med. practice In
Beverly Hills. Exp. req'd.
Fax resume Aft: Helen
352-746-3779

Nursing
Put your Career
In motion at
. Heartland
of Brooksvlllel

Care Integration
Aides
Full-time
Friday, Sat. and Sun.
12hr shifts every wknd
SWill assist in
admissions,
on-boarding process
and special
programs. Must have
excellent, communi-
cation skills and enjoy
working with people.
Minimum of 2 years
as a CNA
We offer competitive
pay,.a comprehen-
sive benefits pack-
age, 401(K) with
company match,
tultution assistance
and much morel
Interested candidates
may send/fax their
resume to HR:
575 Lamar Avenue,
Brooksville, FL 34601
Fax: 352-799-3368.
Email: 3171hr@hcr-
manorcare.com
Apply online at
www.hcr-
manorcare.com
EEO/Drug-Free
Employer
A Proven Leader

RADIATION
THERAPIST

Bev Hills (Ocala) Can-
cer Center. R1T license'
required. Please fax
resume Aft: Helen
352-746-3779
RECEPTIONIST

F/Tr with knowledge
of insurance billing.
Great benefits.
Fax Resume To:
(352) 746-6333

Rehab Program
Manager
Are you a leader?
Arbor Trail Rehab a
116 bed SNF offers an
excellent opportunity
to join an exciting
team. Candidate
must have 1-3 years
experience and
FL licensed OTR,
RPT. or SLP-CCC.
Responsible
for the overall
administration,
clinical planning,
development and
operations of the
Rehab Dept.
Excellent benefits.
Send or fax resume
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd
Inverness, FL 34453
Fax 352-637-1921

RN / LPN
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
Full-time, 3 p.m.-11
p.m., and PRN poslt
tons are available.
Must have a current
Florida nursing
license. Long-term
care experience
preferred.
We offer competitive
pay and benefits,
Including continuing
education and career
growth opportunities,
In a mission-driven
environment.
Apply In person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
www.LCCA,com.
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job #9552



C'mer Cp


P/T ACTIVITIES
DIRECTOR

for asst. living. Call
352-344-5555 ext 102

RN's, LPN's
CNA's,
HHA's





HEUTHCAnR 'S.ICEr
ATTENTION NURSES:
WANT A FLEXIBLE
SCHEDULE & GREAT
BENEFITS?
Maxim is recruiting
qualified RN's, LPN's,
CNA' s and HHA's for
private duty in home
care
C All Shifts Available
* Competitive Pay
* Health, Vision,
Dental, Life &
401K
* Weekly Pay Checks
* Direct DeRosit
* Currently a need
for Full Time
Homecare Nurses
in Hernando and
Citrus County
Contact Us Today!
(352) 683-2885
www.maximnurses.
com


Confi

Seeking Dynamic &
Patient centered
RN's, PT's, ST'S
Full Time & PRN

For home care visits.
Excellent benefits
including 401K
CHAP Certified
Fax resume
352-291-9423
Call 352-291-9422 or
msav-
age@conficare.com
EOE




POPE JOHN
PAUL II
CATHOLIC
SCHOOL

Is seeking a
PIT GUIDANCE
COUNSELOR
For 3 1/2 days per wk.
Call: 746-2020
www.pjp2.net




FRONT HOUSE
STAFF NEEDED
Opportunities for front of
the house staff of an
upscale county club
restaurant. Applications.
available at 2100 Terra
Vista Blvd, Hernando
352-746-6727




Looking For A
CAREER
CHANGE

The best opportunity
In Citrus County.
Average income for
2008 was $56.000.
Our 15
representatives
enjoy company trips,
bonuses, and many
other Incentives.
Qualifications;
* Self-motivated
* Team Player
* Outgoing
Personality
and the
A Willingness to Leamrn
2 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
necessary,
training available.

Fax Resumes
to Atten: Joe
352,-726-6813


- Now Accepting Applications!-

The Wireless Co., a Verizon Premium Retailer, is a growing
company in an exciting industry. We currently have retail
locations in Southeast Alabama, Southwest Georgia,
North & Central Florida... and coming soon to Homosassa!

Do you love technology & work well with the public? Do you
believe in "Customer Service Done Right?" If so, we need you.

Now accepting applications for sales positions at our new
store in the Janek Plaza, 1 mile south of Wal-mart.
Send Resume or call to learn more.

E-mail Resumes to

sterling.wirelessco@comcast.net

Call 352-318-1966

www.thewirelessco.net


A/C DUCT,
INSTALLER
Exp. only, must know
sheet et metal.Call for
appt. (352) 564-8822

A/C Installer

5+ yrs. change-out exp.
Own tools. Clean dr.
license. Benefits, top
pay. 344-0636

Auto Mechanic
Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools, Automation,
Floral City 352-341-1881

ENTRY LEVEL &
EXPERIENCED

AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIANS
Apply at Citrus Kla
1850 SE HWY 19
Crystal River, Fl. :

Exp. Wood Finisher With
Custom Color Stains, Pre
& Post Cat. Lacquers.
4625 W. Homosassa
Trail
Lecanto, FL 34461
EXPERIENCED
AUTO TECHNICIAN
Own tools. Busy Bosch
foreign car repair shop
Crystal River 795-7000

/ MAINTENANCE
PERSON - F/T
Exp. Must have own
transportation.
Call Cindy, 352-
860-0829, Floral City.
Office hrs. 9-5 M-F

r EXP. PLUMBERS'
Only plumbers with |
exp. Need APPLY,
6-- --0
352-621-7705 =

QC INSPECTOR
of PC Boards
Experienced or
entry-level, training
period Is req'd. Must
be dependable, am-
bitious, hard working
& able to visually
inspect very small
components. Apply
in person at 1760 S.
Dimensions Terrace,
Homosassa, FL or fax
resume: 352-564-0772





AC INSTALLERS
Experience Only
Great Pay & Benefits
352-726-1002, Grady

LIFEGUARD
Announcement
#09-17

Position Involves
technically skilled
duties lifeguarding
at Bicentennial Park
Pool. Graduation
from H.S or GED.
Ability to swim 500
meters in less than
10 minutes and work
a flexible schedule
Including days,
nights, weekends
and holidays. Must
possess and maintain
Lifeguard and CPR
for the Professional
Rescuer certifica-
tions. Must have
current valid Florida
Driver License.
$9.99 hourly to start.
Excellent Benefits.
Applications may
be submitted to the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

no later than
Thursday, July 2, 2009
EOE/ADA.


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS
Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254

EXP. PET GROOMER
P/T for busy vet hospital.
Could work into full time.
Start immediately! email
resume w/references
animaldoc24z@yahoo.com

F/T NIGHT
AUDITOR
Apply In person,
Holiday Inn Express,
Lecanto

JANITORIAL
CLEANER
F/T Days, Nights &
Wkends. (352) 422-5956

Martial Arts
Instructor
Casual Labor

Casual employment
with Citrus County
Parks & Recreation
teaching Martial Arts
classes to children
and adults.
Applicants must have
received sufficient
training to be eligible
to teach Martial Arts.
Rate of pay Is 70% of
collected fees.
Casual labor
applications may be
picked up and
submitted to the
Citrus Springs
Community Center,
1570 W Citrus Springs,
FL 34434
EOE/ADA
For more information,
please call Dina @
352-465-7007





HOUSEKEEPER
' Floral City - 2 days
Thurs & Fri 9-5:30
$8.50 hrly (W2 only)
Backgrnd ck/drug
test. 3 Refs needed.
Must love cats &
dogs.'
General Cleaning,
1Windows, laundry,
Ironing, plant
watering. Fax
resume: 352-344-8010


^fi (10^
















M--^*


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY
Founitains Memorial Park currently has
an opening in our Family Service
Department. The selected candidate will
be responsible for helping families
select arrangements, confirm those that
already have, and sell and market the
benefits of advance planning.
The qualified applicant will be:
* Motivated and driven
* Compassionate and empathetic
* Professionally detailed
* Above all, a team player
We offer:
* Professional training
* Comprehensive Benefits/40 1k
* Recession-Proof Industry
* 30k + first year earning potential
Don't reject what you don't understand.
For confidential consideration
submit resume to:
Chuck Horvath
Chuck.Horvath.carriageservices.com
Or fax to: 713-332-5417
E.O.E/M.F.


.. i , .? ' " . .












How To

Make

Your

Car Disappear...


Simply advertise in the
Classifieds and get results
quickly!





(352) 563-5966

0 r , u s... C 0 U

CIKdN icLE

www.chronicleonline.com











CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME BASED
MAGAZINE FOR
CITRUS COUNTY.
Christian theme,
Training. P/T hrs. Nets
$70K, Retiring $24,900 .
941-685-8291
POOL ROUTE

Beverly Hills Net $70K
+ year. Will
train.Guaranteed
accounts $ 53K full
price. 877-766-5757
www.noolroutesales.
cam NPRS Inc. Broker









25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795. INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
Roof overhang,
2-10xi0 Rollu'p Doors,
2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
+ Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local FI Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others.
* Many sizes available
* We specialize in
Commercial Buildings
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic c CBC1256991
www. metal -
structuresllc.com



8 LITE CRYSTAL
CHANDELIER very ele-
gant, must sell, reduced
to $125. 352-232-7790
randy



DUCK HOUSE DOLLS
Several (6) cases. Will
.wholesale. $65 per
case. 352-527-1145
leave message


DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR/SERVICE
Gas & Diesel
25 Yrs Experience En-
gine Specialist
home-professional-farm
No job too big or small.
352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
rates Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ us out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
SBobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272










OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrube
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins
R WRIGHT Treeervice
Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, lns.& Lic
0256879352-341-6827


At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839


MUSIC BOX COLLEC-
TION 23 music boxes,
some antiques, some
bisque $100. obo
352-232-7790 randy




ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrlg., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Amana
Commerical Quality
Clothes Dryer $150.
after 9am
(352) 621-0213

v' THIS OUT!
DOUBLE DOOR
STAINLESS STEEL
REFRIGERATOR ex-
cellent condition ice
cube maker and water
$800.00 can be seen
at excel automotive
352-637-3700

Electric Dryer Whirlpool
2.5 yrs. left on warranty.
$275. (352) 527-8181
FLAVIA FUSION Coffee
Machine NEW Coffee,
cappuccino, tea, hot
chocolate. $80. 419-5535
GE Range, white
self-cleaning, 4 radiant
surfaces, glass top
stove. Exc. cond. $195
(352) 860-2828
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
EaulIment
Installation w/permtt
352-746-4394
LIc.&Ins. CAC 057914
KENMORE FRIDGE
14cu, Almond, Clean
Ice Maker capability.
4 Q. Crock Pot both
$200 (352) 860-1097
Kenmore
side by side, whtle
$150 (352) 726-6336
Maytag Dryer
Heavy Duty
Commercial quality
oversize capacity,
like new cond. $195.
(352) 634-2528
Recliner
Beige color, soft micro
suede, excellent cond.
$165. Obo.
(352)249-6800
Refrigerator '05
GE white, 22.3 Cubic ft.,
single door, bottom
freezer, icemaker. Works
& looks great. $400.
(352) 465-2459
Refrigerator
Amana, white, bottom
freezer, like new, must
see, cost $1,300, will
sell for $850 Obo.
Stove
Maytag, white wlglass
top, like new cost
$650, will sell for.
$375. (352) 249-6800
Refrigerator
GE, 21.6, Side by Side
with ice maker
$100.
(352) 382-4094


REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch Installation
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728




Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
3rd GENERATION SERV-
ICE Int./ Ext. Painting,
Lic/Ins. FREE Estimate
(352) 201-0658
CheapCheapCheap
DP press. clean/paint
Many references.
637-3765








FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




PH'IL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp. Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimini's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273

DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No iob too bio or small.
352-228-2067




* ** * * * *
The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins. #2441.
352-634-1584




SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 &up
Wave Runner Bimiln's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


WASHER & DRYER
6 months old front
loaded, like new, under
warranty $600.
352-476-1270
WASHER OR DRYER
Exc Cond. Guaranteed
$100 each. Can
deliver (352) 835-1155
WASHER&GAS DRYER
crosley gas dryer 100.00 '
Frngidaire washer 75.00
352-302-3118
Washer/Dryer
for $150
352-220-4082




SOUTHERN
AUCTION
MARKETING
& APPRAISAL

AUCTION
Mon., June 29th,
6:30 PM
Antiques featured
this week! Chippen-
dale china cabinet,
ornate carved sofa,
Hoosier hutch top
bow-front oak curio,
Emperor
grandfather clock,
collectibles,
primitives, & more....
See weekly pictures
and descriptions @
www.southern
auctionmktg.net:
15991 NE Hwy 27Alt.
Williston, FL,
352-528-2950
Col. Joel Kulcsar
AU1437-AB2240
/13% P on all sales




Ext. Ladder
28' Fiberglass, heavy
duty, good cond. $175.
(352) 503-7665
PASLODE CORDLESS
NAIL GUN Framing nailer
like new,handyman retir-
ing. $175 obo
352-232-7790
RYOBI CORDLESS
TOOL SET saws-all, skill
saw, Brad nailer,3 batts
and charger. like new
$135. obo 352-232-7790



'27" Sharp Color TV,
$100 (352) 302-8529



SLIDING GLASS-"
DOORS AND COLEMAN
TRAILER Sliding glass
doors with aluminum
frame,6 feet wide $35.00
or best offer, wooden
Coleman trailer 5' x6'
needs wheel bearings
and tires $75.00 or best
offer 344-2321
USED DOORWALLS &
WINDOWS 2 Doorwalls
with frames & hardware
(8' & 6') plus 4 thermo-
pane windows (5X4 &
5X3) (352) 637-4694
. $150/OBO.


PRIVATE DUTY
CAREGIVER 30 Yrs.
Exp./Great References.
(603) 661-9054



. SEE THROUGH
Window Wdshing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcitrus.com



Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com



ANN'S CLEANING
.SERVICE
352-601-3174



REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605
ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872



FL RESCREEN
352-257-1011
I panel, I window or
Complete Cage
SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 62&Q562



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996.








PICARD'S Pressure
Cleaning & Painting
Roofs w/no pressure,
housesdriveways. 25
yrs ex lic/Ins 341-3300



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141
#1 HOME SOLUTIONS
Press Wash, paint,
repairs, ceilings, baths,
low rates, exc. refs.
Llc# 260098 Call Don,
(352) 634-0171


COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
HEWLETT PACKARD
wireless keyboard and
mouse. Good condition.
$15.00 352 560 3677
SAMSUNG MINI CAM HI
8 used once with tripod,
83 yo Mom couldn't work
it. $125 obo
352-232-7790 Randy
Video Camera
Sony, digital, DVD-92,
still in the box, used once.
Cost $600. will sell for
$295. (352) 249-6800



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames 6n all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815



Aluminum & Red wood
Set 4 chairs & lounger
$125 (352) 637-0360



Pre Owned Furniture
Unbeatable Prices
NU 2 U FURNITURE
Homosassa 621-7788 ,
AMISH STYLE
Hoosier Hutch/Buffet
$295. also available
sofa, armoire & more
(352) 489-6641
Armoire Desk
slide-out keyboard.
Great for CPU. Cabinet
doors. CD tray. $200;
(352) 382-3675
Bassett, like new, kid's
bunk bed set, Incl. 3
dressers, one w/mlrror
($2,700 New)
Will sacrifice for $900.
(352) 400-1501
Bedroom Set
Dble. 4/piece, walnut
� headboard & night stand
- combined, includes box
spring & mattress, cedar
chest. $200.(352)
564-2346 after 71P.M.
BROYHILL SLEEPER
SOFA Queen size,excellent
condition, slept on once.
Tan shades with some
green. $225.00 Call /
352-257-1815


Andrew Joehl
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Any Home
Repair.CBCj#1253431
(352) 464-3748








FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *




Peterson Maintenance
Beverly Hills A/C
specialists. $49.00 yrly
check-ups 697-1143




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699




FASI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Llc#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *




C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422
Mobile Home
Demolition & Debris
Removal. 30 Cubic Yds.
$200.00 (352) 634-0329




Expert Repairs & Sales
. All-types of flooring.
Lowest rates. Mitch, Jr.
352-341-0909, 25yrs




PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC - fic/Ins
www. TAR-MAX, com
Free Est (3521726-3093


CLASSIFIED



Chromecraft Kitchen
Table & 4 chairs, $250.
(2) Ethan Aliens Dark
Cherry Side Chairs $85.
ea., (352) 746-1305
COMPUTER HUTCH
AND CHINA CABINET
computer desk with hutch
$35 lighted china cabinet
$165 795-4878
Dining Table
+ 4 chairs, beautiful solid
redwood, must see! only
$295. Hoover Vacuum,
wide path, like new,
cost $95. asking $45.
Obo.(352) 249-6800
ENTERTAINMENT
CABINET 44X28X17.
Oak finish, glass door, 3
shelves. Wheeled, side
CD & DVD storage. Like
new. $75. 352-382-3322
Filing Cabinet
2 drawer, like wood finish,
excellent for home or
office. $45.(352)249-6800
Glider Rocker
Solid Oak
cushions ivory color,
perfect cond. $100.
697-9713
KING SIZE HEAD
BOARD solid pine, me-
dium dark, very good
condition. $75.00
352-422-2029
KING WICKER HEAD-
BOARD & 2 NIGHT
STANDS white king size
wicker headboard and 2
night stands. $85.00
637-5537 . '
Leather LR Furn, Wood
DIN/KIT Furniture &
barstools, (813)300-7929
Sugarmill Woods
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
Queen size sleeper sofa,
loveseat and end
table,Najavo Indian Print
Good condition, May
separate $250.00 or best of-
* fer 352-560-7378
SECTIONAL
3 pcs. w/ 2 recliners,
multi color, very good
condition
$150. (352) 795-5421
Sofa
Rolled arms, skirted, off
white, 2 cushions. 6
months old, Pd. $1,200,
$875. local, Terra Vista.
(352) 746-6975
Student Computer
Desk w/roll around chair.
$100.
Office Desk Chair,
around, nice cond.
$65.(352)249-8179
Swivel Recliner
oversized, tan, soft
suede $230
(352) 476-6842
White Entertainment Ctr
$75; Love seat & couch,
dk blue w/flowers $140
(352) 637-0360
WOOD DINING SET ta-
ble, 4 chairs with cane
back, 2 leaves, painted,
excellent condition, $85
OBO 637-3968
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084


.Aaron's Fence 24/7
Serving Citrus County
since 1985. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352) 795-7373
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
- 352 422-7279
A 5 STAR COMPANY
Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
S OSBORNE'S

Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lic (352) 400-6016 Ins










John Gordon Roofing

Free est. 352-795-7003


Roofs, additions,i
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605


BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/Ins, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Uc.6960)
Father & Son .
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
i 352-464-3967 i
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
,ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Uc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Uc. #1476, 726-6554

-II


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
REX MULLIS LLC
JESSE MOORE Const.
Roofs, additions,
remodel, handyman
352-564-0969
rc0066915/cbc057605
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic. #CRC1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfgillesple.com


SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009 D5


2-CYCLE TRIMMER
Cub Cadet Model
CC3075. Like new. Man-
ual included. $100.
352-637-6118
CRAFTSMAN
LAWNMOWER. It is a 6.0
with bagger, 21 inch cut.
Paid $450.00 will sell for
$200.00. 352-341-4847
CRAFTSMAN'S
Riding Mower 42 deck,
19.5 hp Brilggs/Staton,
new cond. $500
(352) 746-7357
Cub Cadet BRUSH
CUTTER Attachment for
Trimmer Model CC3075.
Manual. $35
352-637-6118
DIXON Zero Turn Riding
Lawnmower. $550 firm
(352) 419-4662
(727)688-5643
Electric Saw
Remington, 16", w/extra
new blade, $55.
(352) 249-6800
Kubota Garden Tractor
Diesel, 12 HP, PTO,
4' Woods, mowing deck.
Mod. B-6000. $900.
Obo.(352) 447-0572
LAWN TRACTOR John
Deere GT-235 18hp with
48 inch mower deck.
great shape- $1200
352-503-6793, leave
msg
Murray mower, 22"
elec. start, front wheel
drive, $135
Snapper mower, 21"
rear wheel drive, $80.
(352) 344-5021




PINE RIDGE
Fri, Sat & Sun 8-2
2168 W. Begonia Dr.
Pine Ridge
Sat. & Sun. 9am-3pm
2867 W. Aleuts Drive




Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodl
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221




25 PAIRS OF WONENS
SHOES Hi-heels and
sandals mostly new,
sizes 6-8 med. $100. obo
352-232-7790
DESIGNER DRESSES
AND OUTFITS Mostly
new, mink stole[med], red
hats, everything goes
$200. obo 352-232-7790



3 AVON ANEW REJU-
VENATE REVITALIZING
CREAM. Retail $32.00.
$15.00 each or all for
$32.00. 419-5535,
BENCH WITH
*WEIGHTS arm + leg pulls
reclining bench with 16
steel weights + dumbbells
130.00 352-628-1669.


A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019





Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways & Tractor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436




All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/lns795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com



Complete Lawn care w/
Sod Install Landscaping,
Pressure Washing
15 Years exp. Lic & Ins
(352)270-1150
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272









Ldan&ee


F #1 Absolute
I Lowest Pricech
| 'Guaranteed |
SBarker's Lawn
SService Monthly or I
S Per cut rate I
(352) 232-8166

#1 AGAIN! Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family.
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Uc/Ins.
AFFORDABLE Lawncare
Cuts starting at $10
We do I AIIIII
Call 352-563-9824
Bob's Pro Lawn Care
Reliable, Quality Work
Residential / Comm.
Lic./lns. 352-613-4250


Boston Accoustics
home entertainment



CONVERTIBLE COVER
saddle color from 99 se-
bring 100.00
352-628-1669,

Electric 18" mulching
Mower exc. cond $55
Coleman sure frier grill
w/side burner, good
cond. $40.
(352) 382-3666






ITS FREE
Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.
5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 Items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an Ad in the.top right
hand corner.


Complete Lawn Care
w/Sod Install,Landscape
Pressure Wash., 15 Yrs
exp Lic/Ins
(352)270-1150
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoomcitrus.com
INVERNESS AREA
Mow,trim, beds,
Fast Reponse since
1991 352- 422-5978
V zoomcitrus.com

Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up,
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com

MOWING & TRIMMING
Yard work
Affordable Rates
352-302-1511;341-5182

OSBORNE'S
Quality Work- Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins

STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up; Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122


Full size, w/rails.
Good cond. $200.
(352) 628-4766

Let us pay YOU to
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sod!
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221

Mattress & Boxspring
Full size, $90.00
(352) 628-4766


Photography
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124

REFRIGERATOR AND
FREEZER kenmore re-
frigerator 4.4cf $40 and
kenmore upright freezer
7.5cf $90 both hardly
used call 352-341-0759


- ----I^

POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete'
* 352-464-3967 "




r MOBILE RV
SERVICE
. WE COME TO YOU
I Motor Homes I
S 5th WhIs/Rv's
Master Tech
| 352-586-5870 |
SStorage Available





WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


Professiona


"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE
In-Home Estimate |

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM




st Choice ....
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE



'HdME OR LAWN
SPROBLEMS?-
tall 503-6821
Owner/Operators '
Uoyd Smith * Bill Bledenstein � Jim C,,)
7ieo5e 5340W. GlenbrooK St.


BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Biminl's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitruscom
SCAN YOUR PHOTOS.
Your photos put on CD or
DVD in your home.
As low as $.19 each.
352-613-0419
SHED 10x13 metal shed
wi gable roof.you take
down $50 352-341-0759
SMALL FREEZER ken-
more freezer upright 3ft
by 2ft $70 obo 352
270-3641
TANNING BED
COMMERCIAL SUN-
VISION,PRO 28 LET
$500/WILL BARTER
352-634-0129



*Sporty Scooter
3 wheel, w/charger, 250
lb. capacity. $200. firm
(352) 628-5386
SWING-A-WAY
Wheelchair lift.
$500/obo.
WHEELCHAIR Manuel,
new. $50.
352-637-1153




"THE REVENUER"
Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency
352-302-8159


5arb * Mal
Fhotograpphi
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits
Indoor or natural
outdoor settings
.Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed





Circle T Sod Farms.
10nc.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

Complete Lawncare w/
Sod Install, Landscaping,
PressureWashing 15
Years exp. Lic & Ins
(352)270-1150

LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low maint Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049


Installations by
/ Brian CBC1253853

352-628-7519
Siding, Soffit
& Fascia,
Roofovers,

Carports, &
Screen
Rooms.
www.advancedaluminum.info




Cope's Pool & Pavers
* Pool Refinishing
* Interlocking Brick Paver
* Patio & Driveways

SVACATION IN
YOUR OWN
BACKYARD...
Order Your Pool Todayl
"FREE QUOTES"
Lic. & Insured
CPC1456565
.... 352.400M 188


Looking co, me


For A Place ro,
V^ \\with us!!/

To Make A


Difference? - 1/
Look no further!! .





SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
is dedicated to quality patient care with a personal touch.

Staff and/or Charge RNs:
MedSurg, Telemetry
ICU, Case Manager

Other Opportunities: * Physical Therapist
*Occupational Therapist* Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA)
* Speech Therapist * Coder II* Clinical Dietician * Histology Technologist

Our highly skilled nurses and physicians, state-of-the-art technology, flexible scheduling,
competitive wages and benefits package are just a few of the reasons why you will want
to call SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER your home.
For these and other opportunities, please apply to:
Human Resources
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34428
Fax # 352-795-8464 Job Line # 352-795-8418
Email: Linda.Macaulay@hma.com * Web Site: www.srrmc.com


e S EVEN RIVERS Be part of a team with a passion for
REGIONAL ME DICAL CENTER "excellence in healthcare"
78,o EOE/DRUO FREE WORKPLACE


I roesio


Poe 16M^^
^^^'7 i9A'' ^*k











D6 SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009
---- -I
Musical


Music Lessons - Citrus
Beginner & Advanced
BanjoGuitar, Bass &
Piano. Call Paul Ready
(352) 795-7305


-I

small frame auto pistol.
5+1 rounds. I have 2 clips
for it. $325.00 obo Please
call 352-303-1895 or
email aniwee8@aol.com
BICYCLES Fuji Ace
Road Sport $120.00. Fuji
Del Rey Road Sport
$140.00. Fuji ATB
$120.00. Mongoose
Crossway 250 Aluminium
$125.00. All excellent
condition. 628 - 1947 or
jimj4479@gmail.com
Browning 12 gauge
Grade 1 model 425
O&U, 32" barrels,
beautiful wood, $1,750
obo Ruger Red Label
12 gauge, O&U
w/chokes, $800 obo
(352) 726-9369
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CARTS
Ranging from
$800 to $1400
352-795-2631
Horizon Fitness
Treadmill mod. #RCT7.6.
w/electrical, adjustable
Incline. Originally $1,000.
Barely used. $700
(352) 464-4821
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
Rhoades Car
4-wheel bicycle with 2
seats'& electric
rechargeable motor.
$600 obe (352) 341-3390
Rifle AK47 w/extras $750
New in box. Will take
trade. (813) 789-0592
In Crystal River Area
Tennis Ball Machine
Tennis Tutor, tower,
speed, feed, spin,
elevation, oscillation
$150.
(352)621-1664

Brass for reloading,
all calibers,
(352)586-7516
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



'03 CARGO MATE
Enclosed CAR HAULER.
20 x 8.5, ramp/side
door, dual axle, elect
brks., mint $4200 obo
Steve (352) 503-6542
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
S Cargo Trailer /
'09,Brand new, 7' x 14'.
V-nosed w/ramp. .$3,300
(352) 476-8907
SINGLE AXLE TRAILER
2008 7X12 with side and
rear gates. new spare
tire. 20001b capacity.
never used, only $1200
352-503L6793 leave msg
Uti1ty Trailer,
homemade,
4-1/2' x 7' box.
$200.00
621-0392



BABY CRIB AND
CHANGING TABLE by
Pali, Natural all wood w/
infant/toddler mattress, ig.
dwr. & todlr. rail. Table w/
pad, 2 shelves & 2 dwrs.
$400. Excel. Cond.
(352)249-0851


Act Now

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrsA DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com.
and click place
an ad
PLAY PEN
W/SLEEPER & CHANGER
On wheels, mint color.
$75. Large BABY
CARRIAGE. Gray, very
nice. $50. 352-341-0770



Conventional VCR
Player/Recorder with
remote (352) 746-1108
WANTED OLD
LIONEL TRAINS
Collector Top Prices
Paid. (352) 795-3970




3 Pomeralan Shl Tzu mix
mom, pop & 9 mo.
puppy $150 each
(352) 400-3236 or
(352)746-6352
American Bulldog pups
NKC reg. Great marks.
Champion lines, ready
to go smart loving breed
$600 (352) 302-5563
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BLACK LAB PUPS
AKC, OFA. Beautiful
block heads. Home.
� raised, H cert. $800
352-489-1879; www.
quallmeadowlabs.com
Chihuahua Puppies
AKC registered, health
cert, 1st shots, all sizes,
all colors, $175. males,
$200. females, ready
6/7 352-399-2368


EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS


New small breed, Hip-
pies $25.- $35 ea.
All colors, baby bun-
nies 2 to 3.5 lbs.
New Zealand Breeders
$20 each. 5.5-8 Ibs


baby & adults, $10.00
each 637-5537
GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppies. 14 wks, 3 Fem.
1 male. All black & tan.
Health cert. $250
(352) 795-7897
(352) 212-7192
JACK RUSSELL PUP-
PIES Males and Females
$300.00. Tailes have
been docked and dew
claws have been re-
moved. First shots and
deworming done at 8
weeks old. Puppies will
be sold with health certifi-
cates. Please call Jill and
Bryan at 628-2705
KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352476-6832
LOST DOG female,
white with black collar,
"sammy". Lost on 6/18 in
Citronelle- mini farms
area. 302-3044
MALE BASSETT
BEAGLE MIX Free to

natured Bassett Beagle
Mix. Good with children.
Approx. 3 years old.
352-628-7678 between
S 8:30 to 5:00
PUPPIES shih-tzu pup-
pies 9 weeks old 3 males
&. 1 female multiple
colors.first shots & health
certificates. $350.00 call
(352)795-5719
Shih-Tzu Puppies
Home raised w/ love.
All shots Includ'd. $300+
(1) tiny 2 yo toy fem
Poodle $450. 3902 N.
Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099
Yorkle Poo's
Health Cert. 10-wks,
Male $325
Female. $350
(352) 220-8817




HAY ,
2009 Indiana 1st Quality
delivered wkly, yr round
to Crystal Riv. area
300 sq balls per load.
Timothy, Alfalfa, or
TNA mix,$12/Ball at
truck, taking orders
(813)431-8946
ORGANIC
FERTILIZERS
For hay, pastures & all
growers. $40 per acre
Dealer's Wanted, Call
Rob (352) 585-2758



Mini Horse
Stud, 5 yrs. old.
friendly $200
obo.(352) 628-1277



BABY SHEEP
AND PIGEONS
FOR PETS ONLY
(863) 843-2495



Boat Trailer for 14' boat
Like new. $300; Jet ski lift
"manual" 800 Ib
S capacity $475
(352) 860-0854
EVINRUDE O/B MOTOR
4HP - Excellent
condition. $300.
352-621-0574 after 6PM.
FLOATING DOCK NEW
ALUMINUM,FLOATING
DOCK 10'X14'/ 8'X3'
HINGED GANGWAY.NO
PILINGS REQUIRED. 12
YEAR WARRANTY ON
-FLOATS. NICE.
$2900.00 CAN DELIVER.
727-514-1151
Mercury motor,,
1999 200hp, saltwater
series, needs repair or
has lots of good parts.
$1000.
726-4197



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats.. Approx. 375-400.
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
.2-1 reduction gear box.
Used 100 hrs.+Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
ALUMACRAFT '07
25HP Evlnrude, new
trolling motor. Trailer.
Swivel seats. $2800/obo
301-693-7796
SAQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, biminl,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
$9.9001352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle,
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 Optimax
150hp & double
axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
50hp Mere. gal tril.
many Xtra's $7,750
Call for Info


.(813)-293-0392 cell
Deck Boat
95'19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23ft, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras
$12,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
GULF TO LAKE MARINE
New,Used & Service
Brokerage. We pay $$
for clean used boats
(352) 527-0555
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
w/trdr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778


14 ft. Kayak. $400 each
(352) 746-6072
HYDRA - SPORT
'90,26' New '08 c/c-,
t-top, -gas tank -wiring
'99 250 Merc. on
bracket '05 traller.many
upgrades exc cond.
$14,900 (352) 586-1754
Jon Boat
'94 20ft. alum, 40hp
Tohatsu, like new, great
flats boat w/traller
$3500 (352) 795-4129
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedition
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717
LOWES '98 15ft
25hp Johnson. EIc start,
tr/mtr, ped seats, trailer
$3000. 352-560-3354
OLD TOWN DISCOVERY
15ft 8in. Canoe. Asking
$425/obo. Very good
cond. Paid $879.
352-563-5150
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC,bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4000.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
8 n stock $3995/up
Gulf to Lake Marine
www.boatsuoercenter.
cor (352) 527-0555

PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC Engine Like New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352)628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
T-CRAFT
23'L, 6' W,'02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trlr. w/brks
$5,995 352-489-3661
TROPHY '99 22FT
99-2052 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force, E-Z
Load Tandem Iir. Elec-
tronics, well kept, must
sell $8950.352-726-1489




















WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30 draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
1railer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie

dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creqk 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-sligies,
queen bed.bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,.
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets..
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Like new brakes & tires,
Reduced for QEUICALE
$3,000 (352) 503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
ALLEGRO BAY
37' 1992, diesel pusher
motor home, 90 k ml
6 cycle, generator, .
good cond $8000.,
: (352)228-7711


DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
6 Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
Chevy Road Treck
200, '02 20'.5 ft. 46K.
Mi.,16/19 MPG. New
tires, garage kept. (
Exc. cond. $33,500.
(352) 447-0102
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-427.3
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane, 30Q, class
A motor home, 31% ft., 22k
mi: V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed, etc.
$29,900. obo
(352)397-5007
HAVIPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely furnished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo


(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352) 445-9155
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every op-
tion. Center Island Kit.
incis sep.W/D, added 2nd
a/c in bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068


21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743
WINNABAGO
NO TITLE
$600.352-634-0129



$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'88 FORD MOTORHOME
Class-C. 57k mi.,
roof-alr-generac
Ex. tires & brakes
$4k obo 352-422-3033
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. On bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Uke new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
CIKRA TRAILER
'06, Classic Cruiser,
self con., 14 X 7, can
pull w/car. $11,900.
(352) 637-2848 After 4.
FLEETWOOD
'08, Niagra,
Pop Up Camper
Uke New,
352-746-0524
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
SMotor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twice, smells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://picasaweb.google.c
omfeadmwbrook Glem-
$13,995.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$30,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
Sun Valley
'09, Apache,,slide In
Camper, fullyequip.
qn. sz. bed, fits, 8ft truck
bed. $10,500 obo
352-795-0511
WORKS& PLAY ,
'06 Deluxe, Dual Axle,
A/C & heat, refrig,
micro, & stove, bath
w/shower & outside
shower. Sleeps 4, Toy
tie-downs, awning,
nearly new, $9,000 obo
(352) 212-1776



5 Truck Toppers
$200.00 for all.
(352) 464-0220



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Buying Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352)771-6191
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buyina Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333



1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche.
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
'01 Toyota Camry
119k mi. $4,500
(352) 527-8706
'02 BUICK
LeSabre Umited.
Estate Sale. Senior
driven. Exc.' cond.,
Come see. Asking
$4995. (352) 382-1088
'07 Buick Lacrosse CXL
5400 Original miles.
Exc. cond. V6, white,
'leather, senior owned.
Under warranty.
$15,500
(352) 563-6542
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352)746-2696
CADILLAC
08, DTS, Luxury II, Red,
all options, except.
moon rf. & GPS, $28,900
352-344-5796
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER '06


SEBRING Convertible.
30k mi., Exc. cond., sil-
ver w/ tan top, garaged,-
$10,900 (352) 726-3427
CHRYSLER '07
Town & Country.
HANDICAP EQUIPPED
Barely driven. Only
60 miles. Cost $53K:
Asking $33K/obo.
Call 352-726-9111.
CHRYSLER pt cruser
2002 excellent condi-
tion only 54,550miles
asking 7,000.00 or best
offer 352 249 0815

CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmentusa.org
CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi., over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355


CLASSIFIED




2007 convertible
corvetteonly 4,076 mi-
les on this rare sliver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertable top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
options available are on
this gorgeous vette ,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only , $48,000.-
352- 270-3193


SHOW CAR
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD
'00 Mustang GT, Conv.
leather int. loaded.75 K.
mi. Exc. cond.. $10,00
Obo. (352) 860-1567
(347) 967-6004
FORD 06
FOCUS, ZXW SES
WAGON, 47k ml
X warranty 7yr/75k
$9750 (352) 746-0100
FORD '99
Crown Victoria - runs
great. Asking $1,075,.
352-637-5394
HONDA
'02 Civic EX, black, 2 dr,
spoiler, cruise, custom
whls., sunroof, tinted win.,
one owner, $6,795.
(352) 220-4084
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2000. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
S Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MITSUBISHI
'03. Diamante LS. excel,
cond. Always serviced.
Fully equip. Priced be-
low Kelly BB. $7,900.
352-382-5702
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PONTIAC
1969 Catalina, runs
good, new parts &
palnt$20000.obo
(352) 465-0960
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scm nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'01, Corolla LE very
clean, AC. redinew
MIchelin tires, PW, PL,
$3,995. (352) 344-1204
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTAI '
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 ml.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3429
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
'Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA SUPRA '89
All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,200
(352) 726-3427
VOLSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Qcala Volvo.
Motors 352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VW JETTA'07
Wolfsbury Edition
$16,780. Leather,
sunroof, 23,280 ml. Call
Bill Milian At Rallye
Motors 352-732-6035




1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
1976 MGB


Red w/blk top. Runs &
looks good. 58k orig.
$5800. 352-503-7536
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade in part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
CHEVROLET
'61, Apache 10, '2 ton
pickup, short wheel
base, step.slde. V8,
auto, New 10" mag.
& tires $5,900.
(352) 228-1325
CHEVROLET Corvette
1957 clear title, $4800,
2 doors, exterior or-
ange, interior red, 8
cyl. automatic, gaso-
line, leather seats,
you can call me
206-309-0136 or
e-mail me
johnervin@gmx.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Custom line 4 door se-
dan. 6 cyl auto. $9,500.
Will consider trade for
travel trailer of equal
value.(352) 628-4053
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS,
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles. $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe!
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
VOLKSWAGON '68
bus/transporter,
Converted to camper.
Runs well. New brakes.
$4500. 352-726-5926



CHEVY
'04 Silverado LS, V-8,
short bed, step side. All
pwr. exc. cond., low mi.
$8,500.(352) 344-9920
CHEVY '95 /2ton
Silverado. Auto, air,
shell, tow pkg. ext. cab.
$3500. 352-560-3354
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K


www.autotrader.comlatca
rid/at-f3fd39f
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE
'99 Dakibta Sport
Cream Puff, only 44k
ml. Custom Top. Exc
cond. $4995
(352) 795-4129
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD 04
Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi..SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500


FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van.41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serv. van. 41K Mi./5.4 L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serv. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg. 4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985
Ford 2004 f-150 triton 5.4
looks new in & out, runs
great, gold, white leather
interior, 6 cd changer,
electric back sliding win-
dow, dual exhaust, heavy
duty tow package 98k mi-
les $12k 352-601-0376
GMC 2000
Sierra 2500 4x4
$8995. Ext cab, SLE trim
low miles. Call Bill
Mllian at Rallye Motors
352-732-6035
NISSAN '96
Frontier EX - 129k, 5spd,
exc cond. Cold air,
$3500/obo Great cond.
352-746-9704




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500 �
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer EXT LS
LOADEDr 6-disc CD &
DVD, 3rd row. Leather.
47K mi. Retails $38K
.$12,500.(352) 527-0456
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class 3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,150.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm.,
great tires, good cond.
$2,900 obo
(352) 201-1413
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
JEEP '98
Grd Cherokee Laredo
4x4, 6-cyl., auto,122k
ml. LOADED/ Exc cond.
$3995. 352-341-0004


385-0628 SUCRN
Order to Demolish - Ronald & Joyce Bryson
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH & SECURE
CASE NUMBER: 0904-79048
Description of property: AK: .1496861 and legally de-
scribed as NEW MAYFIELD ACRES PB 2 PG 42 LOT 6 BLK
B
RONALD & JOYCE BRYSON
140 S Sanhds Cut Ter
Lecanto FL
On April 16, 2009, an order was Issued by the Citrus
County Certified Building Official to demolish and se-
cure the deteriorated and dilapidated structures on
the property located at: 140 S. Sands Cut Terr.,
Lecanto, Florida. If the property owners) fall to comply
-with this order, the Code Enforcement Section will Issue
a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal Interest In this property
may contact the Code Enforcement Office within 30
days of this publication. Board of County Commission-
ers, Dept. of Development Services, Code Enforce-
ment Section, 3600 W. Sovereign .Path, Lecanto, FL.
352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech. Impaired,
use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 28, 2009.

386-0628 SUCRN
7/8 Regular Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a regular
meeting on Wednesday, July 8, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further Information regarding this
meeting may contact the Executive Offices of the
Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida, 34450 - (352) 341-6560.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida,
34450 - (352) 341-6560, at least one day before the
meeting, If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to
appeal any decision of the Governing Body with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will
need a record of the proceedings and for such'pur-
pose may need to provide that a verbatim record of
the proceeding Is made, which record Includes testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be
based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 28, 2009.

389-0628 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 056-09
Food Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners Invites in-
terested parties to submit a Bid to provide food services
for the County's Food Service Programs under the
Older Americans Act, Community Care for the Elderly,
Medicaid Waiver and Private Pay Programs, as well as
any other Programs that the County may need to pro-
vide, including disaster and emergency situations. The
County routinely requires approximately 510 meals per
day throughout the year (excluding weekends and
holidays). The types of meals are: hot (fresh), frozen,
and shelf stable (breakfast and dinners) for both con-
gregate and home delivery programs. The selected
Contractor must be able to provide all three types of
meals and deliver such between the hours of 8:00 AM
and 11:00 AM each day.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before July 17,
2009 @ 2:00 PM to Ronald Bamer, Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path.
Suite 266. Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for July 17,
2009 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path. Room
226, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the
Public Opening because of a disability or physical Im-
pairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the
meetings. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use
the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this an-
nouncement, please visit the Citrus County Website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select *BIDS/PURCHASING'
on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the
Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at. (352)
527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
John Thrumston, Chairman


LAND ROVER
Discovery '98, 102k mi
8 cyl. 4x4 $4200
(352) 746-9607
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
TOYOTA
'05 Tacoma, Ext. Cab,
SR-5, 6sp. 4 X 4, loaded.
30K. mi. $19,800.
(352) 382-5055
TOYOTA
'89, Landcrulser, com-
pletely restored $11,500
Call for Specifics
(352) 220-2666




$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
.Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352) 467-0872
DODGE '07
Caravan SE $11,690
Only 12,300 ml. 3rd seat
V6. LOADED Call Bill
Milian at Rallye Motors
352-732-6035
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299



HONDA
'03 Rancher. 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + (everse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy,loads.
$3200/or trade.
352- 563-0615
Crystal River




2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900ml. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,'
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. HI perf.
Over $43,000 In receipts.
17k mi. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374


kLE
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,650.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., bik cherry, incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109
HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 Mi.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $11,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04 GL 1800
TRIKE, champ kit 26k
ml. E-Z steer, CB/FM ra-
dio, heel/toe shift, trial
hitch & much more
$27k 352 465-7755
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
Kawasaki
'83, 750LTD, looks new,
4,600 original miles,
$1,800 OBO 726-2286
MOTO GUZZI 2008 Cali-
fornia Vintage Black tour-
ing model, 2700 miles, 1
year on warranty,
$10,950.00
352-465-7812
SSOFT TAIL'88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, TMhis
bad boy is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815 ,
SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500. obo
(352) 527-0679
\ TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. mi. Like
new, $11,000
(352) 489-7674
Volkswagen Trlke
In storage 5 yrs. Call for
details. $1,000 aba
(352) 746-1117


Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
June 28,2009.


387-0628 SUCRN
Req. for Proposals 2009-04- City of Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS #2009-04
SPECIAL MAGISTRATE FOR CODE ENFORCEMENT
The City of Dunnellon is seeking an individual Interested
In serving as the Special Magistrate for the City's Code
Enforcement. Requirements are as follows: Must be
member of the Florida Bar with no less than 5 years ex-
perience In municipal law, . Experience as a special
magistrate Is preferred. Contract position with limited
hours depending on code cases filed. Hourly rate yet
to be determined. The submission deadline Is no later
than 4:00 p.m. on July 20, 2009. The applications must
be in a sealed envelope with requested rate of com-
pensation and marked "Request for Proposal #2009-04,
Special Magistrate". The City of Dunnellon reserves the
right to reject any or all proposals. The City of
Dunnellon is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
City of Dunnellon
20750 River Drive
Dunnellon, Florida 34431
(352) 465-8500
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 28, 2009.

384-0628 SUCRN
Order to Demolish - James E & Patty Yates
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 0901-76722
Description of property: AK: 2594519 and legally de-
scribed as YATES SCENIC GDNS UNREC SUB OF LOTS I,
2,.7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 & 13 BLK J OF MAYFAIR GDN ACRES
LOT 8 BLK B FURTHER DESC IN OR BK 808 PG 1404
JAMES E & PATTY YATES
1888 N Scenic Way
Crystal River, FL
On February 16, 2009, an order was Issued by the Citrus
County Certified Building Official to demolish the dete-
riorated and dilapidated structures on the property lo-
cated at: 1888 N Scenic Way, Crystal River, Florida. If
the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the
Code Enforcement Section will issue a work order to
abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal Interest In this property
I may contact the Code Enforcement Office within 30
days of this publication. Board of County Commission-
ers, Dept. of Development Services, Code Enforce-.
ment Section, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL.
352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech Impaired,
use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 28, 2009.

388-0628 SJCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
RFP No. 057-09
Utility Meter Reading and Billing Services
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners In-
vites interested parties to submit a Proposal to provide
meter reading and billing services for the County's
water, wastewater, and reclaim water service areas.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before July
28, 2009 @ 2:00 PM to Ronald Bamer, Office of Man-
agement & 'Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for July
28, 2009 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room
226, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only Information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the
companies who submitted Proposals.
A MANDATORY Pre-Proposal Conference will be held
on July 7, 2009 at 10:00 AM. The Conference will be
held at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. Propos-
als will be accepted from only those companies whose
representatives attend the mandatory conference.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the
pre-proposal conference or the public opening be-
cause of a disability or physical Impairment should con-
tact the Office of Management & Budget at (352)
527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you
are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Docu-
ment for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.cltrus.tf.us and select
BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home
Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
John Thrumston, Chairman
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle
June 28, 2009.





SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009 D7


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E2 s~nAy JUINE 28 2009CisCONY()CHoci


Real Estate DIGEST


ERA American salutes
achievements of agents


titioners because it indicates to the public
that the individual has obtained a profes-
sional educational foundation on which to


&Bento Resal


Barbara Hopkins, a base the services they provide and that
Realtor with ERA Ameri- they are a member of the National Associ- REALTY GROUP pwTr
can Realty, was recently ation of Realtors.
awarded the Graduate ERAAmerican salutes Barbara Hopkins
Realtor Institute (GRI) and her commitment to excellence as a " e ,
designation. real estate professional. -
Barbara, a member of - Call her at 726-5855 or -
the ERAAmerican Inver- ,-e-mail her at Barbara. M. '- --
ness office, completed Hopkins@era.com Single Family / 3Bd+Den- Single Family I 3Bd-2Bath-
ness office, compGary and opinsera.com. 2Bath-2Car / Hillside South 2Car+Pool I Brentwood
the.curriculum required Karen * ERAAmerican is also This 3/2 plus den with a 3 car garage, pool Single Family home in Brentwood. Lanai with
to achieve the highly ac- Baxley , . proud to announce the and jacuzzi home has so much to offer, a summer kitchen, heated pool/ spa.
claimed designation. She ERAAmerican - latest production levels TVRG# 1118 $369,000. TVRG# 1083 $214,900.
joins Realty. achieved by its agents .
other through June 24. 1"- - - -
top producers in the resi- Denise Mc- Gary and Karen Bax-- . -
Sdential real estate indus- EA enanley, of the hvemess of- ... . - ,i
(! ' ^f trywho hold the RA Realty. floe, have achieved the
designation across the over $2 million in closed Detached Villa I 2Bd+Den- Detached Villa / 2Bd-Den-
nation. sales volume this year. In addition, the Bax-. 2Bath-2Car / Woodview Villas 2Bath-2Car I/ Hillside Villas
n sales vlume this year. In addition, the Bax- Priced to sell Lantana model on a preserve Priced to Sell popular Lantana Model. Hard
S She eamed the GRI leys are the top team in closed adjusted lot. Granite countertops, tile/ wood floors, wood floors thru out living area.
designation by attending gross commission through May 31 in the TVRG# 1078 $3151000. TVRG#1115 $264.000.
Barbara an intensive series of a ERA Citrus-Hemando Broker Council. -
Hopkins minimum of 90 hours of In the Beverly Hills office, Denise Mc .-
ERAAmerican classroom instruction, Keever has achieved the over $1 million in .. .,
Realty. covering a variety of sub-_ closed sales volume in 2009. I -. ... A. ... .
jects, including contract ERAAmerican Realty is proud to recog-
law, professional standards, sales and mar- nize the achievements of these real estate Detached Villa / 2Bd+Den- Single Family I 3Bd+Den-
keting, finance, and risk reduction. professionals. 2Bath-2Car / Woodview Villas 2Bath-2Car I Bellamy Ridge
The GR i natin ets th individual Bright and open Ventura Model. Tile/Hard- Beautiful custom home in gated Estate Com-
The GRI designation sets the individuals wood Floors, Maple Cabinetry. munity. Expanded lanai & screen enclosure.
who have attained it apart from other prac- -From staff reports TVRG# 1111 $255 000. TVRG# 1089 $639,000.


Register now for 'green' . .

600 S Single Family / 3Bd+Den- Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
|Co |rse offerings a .t CIF 2.SBath-3Car+Pool / Foxfire 2Car I Woodview Villas
BREATHTAKING Davinci Deluxe pool home. Fabulous Malibu model on Preserve Lot.
Gourmet kitchen. Luxurious master bath. Hardwood/tile floors. Move in Ready!
Special to the Chronicle green courses that a student can start TVRG# 1079 $699,000. TVRG# 1067 $254,900.
anytime and complete at their con-
The CF Institute at Central Florida venience. Courses include Carbon
Community College is.accepting regis- Strategies, Fundamentals of Solar
tration for a green building course Water Heating, Photovoltaic System
that will be offered in July. . Design and Installation, Sustainability
Designing and Building Healthful 101, and more. For information and
and Sustainable Structures will meet registration, call (352) 854-2322, ext.
from 10 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays and 1204, or visit www.CFCCtraining.com, Terra 6 t or M or
Thursday, July 14 to 23 at the Ocala Register for Classes, then Green
Campus, 3001 St.W College Road. The Training.-
course fee is $149. exam.-ine. " " .
The course will examine systems ..
and components of new and. existing 2400
structures for contribution and value -
based upon economics and sound All
business principles. Included will be Single Family I 2Bd+Den. Townhome / 2Bd-2.5Bath-lCar
sin systems of wood steel, 352-795-7357 2Bath-2Car I Brentwood Brentwood Townhomes
construction systems of wood, steel, 352-795-7357 Come take a look at this nicely maintained Fully Furnished Townhome. Lake View, Lots
masonry, synthetic materials, solar, 888-795-7356 Brentwood Home. Move In ready! of Tile, Professionally Decorated.
plumbing, water, air conditioning, TrVRG# 1119 $1,100. TVRG# 1110 $1 100.
roofing and interior and exterior fin- www.rhemarealty.com TerraVista Realty Group, LLC
dishes meeting the Leadership in En-
ergy and Environmental Design 2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
standards., -,- , *.. 1 ........ (A5. I 2746 (.I 21 . (8.0),323-T'�
CEC~3." al1 ..ter �s'e " "l -4 621, - (80 323-7,70*


Skyview Villa / 3Bd-3Bath-
2Car+Pool/ Detached Villas
Spectacular Dover Model pool home on pre-
serve lot. Oversized Pool with spill over spa.
TVRG# 1109 $599,000.





Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Lakeview Villas
Malibu Model on Preserve lot. Carpet and
tile. Move in Ready.
TVRG# 1076 $259.900.





Detached Villa 12Bd+Den-
2Bath- 2Car I Hillside Villas
A maintenance free Lantana Villa with all the
amenities Terra Vista has to offer.
TVRG# 1106 $285,000.





Detached Villa 73Bd-2Bath-
2Car I Lakeview Villas
Popular Malibu model. Upgraded Kitchen
Cabinetry. Expanded lanai.
TVRG# 1082 $264,900.





Detached Villa 13Bd-2Bath-
2Car/ Woodview Villas
Malibu Villa. Tile in all wet areas. Never Lived
In. Upgraded Landscaping.
TVRG# 1094 $1,200.





Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car / Hillside Villas
Fully furnished Lantana Villa. Tile, Carpet and
Hardwood flooring throughout. Move in ready.
TVRG# 1101 . $1,500.
Office in the
Terra Vista
* �ri * a

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Cimus Cou= (FL) CHRomcmc


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REALTY LEADERS _




Crystal River 794-0888 Inverness 341-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112


H NANCY

! LITTLE LEWIS
REALTOR'


(352) 302-6082


IF YOU HAVE EVER WANTED TO LIVE OUT
IN THE COUNTRY THIS IS YOUR .
CHANCE. This beautiful 96 acres MOL. leels
like you are in the middle of a park seeing
Deer turkey and nogs abound Property made
up of Meadow and Virgin Hammock 3 homes
3 pole barns, several olner oui-buildings offer
plenty of room for company If you like to hunt -
this would make a greal qenilemar s hunt club
if you like nature it would make a wonderful
relreat to rela,. in and truli enjoy nature and
Florida's wildlife at its besi MLSt#332218


b Sherry
SPotts
.i bradfordpottssr@aol.com - sherylpotts@aol.com
-.. .J ..


www.pottsteam.com

(352) 697-1368
(352) 697-5500


a4-y-10 I 4.


--__~_~_ 1._ ~~__


WANT A QUIET SECLUDED RETREAT? Tr,,.
;,7r. ,''-i ,a,:.:,,J |T|.:. .|I , r .:l T.. ,r,-:1l,,3, : >:.: .3
fireplace in the family room, large kitchen, master
bedroom with an office/sitting area...plus 3 more
bedrooms and a 30x11 screened porch.
MLS#326129
MARY GULLING 352-422-2994





.' . - .L. .� -' , -^s

LOCATION, LOCATION! Fuii rur,,r,.1 I,.:.A-, r,...m,
with a beautiful water view of Homosassa River.
Dock your boat on the river with easy access to the
Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful oaks &-river from pool.
MI- 2#"QSV&-09


mSUGARMILL WOODS!t 2/2 golf villa. Relax sittingm
on your screened porch, overlooking the 8th fairway
of the Cypress Course. Very spacious home withm
bright, open floor plan'and fireplace. MLS#328229 U
m MIKE STOKLEY 352-206-9096 U


U


.I.:- ' .I i : l '..ti, r- --:.rr ..z . n :.
study, sewing room, or 3rd bedroom. Updated
kitchen and master bath. Nice back porch, backyard
ei -o& w rag heds. Ext 0 insulatio- i


*


185 W. GORGE LN. IN PINE RIDG
iOTIVATED SELLER" Directions: Pine Ridge BIwv
I N. on Flagstaff Ave., to right on W. Gorge Lr
house on left. MLS#324652
PEGGY PRICE 352-302-5633








IOTIVATED SELLER! L,. .I. . r,,:.m. A.ir. 5 ;m.r
Dor plan just perfect for the first time home buye
Basonal resident or investor! Nice fenced backyar
ir children and/or Pets. MLS#328758
NANCY AYRES 352-279-5058


SHORT SALE .:...- ,i,-,:, Ih , .:.r...,,1,ul hl.:.r,.3i
lifestyle in the Oak Village section of Sugarmill
Woods in a 4/2/2. Large family room, breakfast bar,
split floor plan, walk-in closets, spacious master suite
& great screened back porch. MLS#334205
MIKE STOKLEY 352-206-9096


_ .... ... ... U .... � ..... � �


SHORT SALE ll c.i ll.. .' ..II t...i . , ' l-..r ,: E6..,ar.Il ;..,:.u :
almlu a , .ll . i., : i.[., :1 . .,i 'l in1l:.:. ,|4. h .'.*. : i .' ,
and plumbing fixtures. A 14'x10' site built separate bldg.
could be studio, hobby room, workshop, etc. Extremely
quiet v'r .I-ai'iirt i.:I. . r "i Ir.. lr*t bi- e


owl


HB~~w'"''"' ~ - -e ? -fl' A


LOVELY 2'12'1 HOME ..r, . .::... r .r, .-.ai .:.:..1
Village. Great room with dining area. Kitchen with
newer appliances, breakfast bar and large dining
-cofrEi 'rflT ri na T.-?n 't. ,.tDr * , tile is a
w,^s^ ^'.^


THIS BEAUTIFUL 2'212 IMPERIAL EXECUTIVE I HOME
-. ph ,- , T.. :r.l.. n , ., ,. , ._ .,,l '., : . :fl0 . I.A . :-- . , ..

detectors, garage door opener, custom built shelved cabinets in
laundry room and garage. All this and more, in a fine
neighborhood. Before buying any house in-Bevedy NlfliJdqk at
tbis enel MLSS310158 ,.30


1 m


1111


m


m _ __ ' - _ _ __ . . . ...


mm . . .mV- --- --- ----


- - poP


STM3US60 4


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SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009 E3


CrrRus COUNTY (TL CHRONxCLE


-hJ


SUGARMOLL POOL
RFROMT Eor�.-nA,...
lrom this rar..1. W. jl C e�
-1-- :n.: 3 I.A. W-
1`- 4 -11-A i; I IJI. 9 �.Ic-04 J
nmr� III
lvww
d P
J'., b�-zmmeI. N�-p
NEW HOME �e,
ONE ACRE

tdh.-O . ;11 . ......
131 j i E. ar..]
f. r IL )J I-L-- 5--. U L ...


77







CrTRU COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keeping spares around can make frugal sense


Frugality and declut-
tering can sometimes
conflict You don't
want to save everything, but
you don't want to
toss a useful item
that can be
reused or be left
without anything
when something
breaks. You
might want a
spare item for
work, the car,
when you travel Sara
or if something is
lost, too. It's help- FRU
ful if you buy LIV
your spare items
deeply discounted or sec-
ondhand, so you don't pay
full price for a replacement
But what items are worth-
while to have two or more
of?
Each person makes his or
her own assessments, but
here are a few suggestions.
OUTDOOR APPAREL:
You should have at least one
extra set of mittens or gloves


and a spare hat, scarf and
jacket These items are eas-
ily misplaced or lost It can
be frustrating to look for
these items later
in the season, too.
SUPPLIES: It's
wise to have
more than one
pen, pair of scis-
- ssors and roll of
tape in the house.
These types of
items seem to
Noel walk off even
when they have
GAL their own special
ING place they be-
long. If you're a
parent, you already know
the frustration of trying to
write down a message with
.yellow crayon because you
can't find a decent pen. It's
not fun. While designating a
drawer for these types- of
supplies is helpful, having
one next to the phone or on
the counter ensures you
have it when you need it
COFFEE POTS: Pick up a


cheap spare at a garage sale
so if your coffee maker or
carafe breaks, you aren't
stranded without your daily
cup of java:
CLEANING ITEMS: You
can create a cleaning caddy


I s l Ulwnt - Rn
Furnished 2BR/2BA coa
Community pool & club


to bring from room to room,
but if you have a two-floor
home, it's easier to have one
set stored on each floor.
Along the same lines, it's
beneficial to have more
than one laundry basket or


.S CONDO GOSPEL ISLAND LOCALE
airs end puni t. orpor 3BR/2BA home situated on 1 acre.
diate occupan7y. Fireplace central water & well, fenced yard.
33400 152,500 MLS#326641
VACANT LOTS
OAKS GOLF COURSE
1/2 Acre Lot ............ $69,900
CITRUS HILLS
1 Acre with Central Water . . . $29,900
JENCY PARK LECANTO
house. $70,900 5 Acres, Poved St. & Nice Oak Trees $58,000


ICALL Roy Bass TODAY(32) 726-2471
[ Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.nlcilrusrealty.com After Hours (352) 302-6714 [w!h]


hamper, too. One per family
member keeps laundry well
organized. And unless you
have a central vacuum, hav-
ing two makes life much
easier.
SLOW COOKER: These


Realty elect
Real Estate Your Way


are wonderful to use during
holidays or when guests
come over. They help keep
foods warm. They're easy to
find secondhand, too.

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Harold Morton
Broker
352-586-9349


CRYSTAL RIVER PINE RIDGE
WATERFRONT GOLF COURSE HOME
Looking for a great buy? Home Fantastic buy, home features
features 3 bed/2 bath, dock 3 bed/2 bath, caged-heated
w/lift, seawall, unbelievable pool, fireplace, Great view,
a storage, rear upper dedk. drastically reduced.
I Priced to Sell! $249,900. $299,000. "nso.yne.y


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
saw 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
(352) 634-2371 Cell
(800) 476-2590 Toll Free .
E R A For a Visual Tour of our listings
.REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com


pla A Jo~ c')d C,&r..r n1t.. I.f ,1.
mva an3-aEreufled 13,;..vuiTh J ,,1 C.fl ii
Q- . .or:6 . I .a . p ... I31 ~ 3. 1 ,
n334559 &15ii 000


E4 sUNIMYJUNE 28 2009


'Iq






Crrus CUNrT (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2009 E5


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

HAIR DRYER: Air-dried
hair works fine for many
people, but in some families
it can be a very ugly morn-
ing if the hair dryer dies.
SHEETS: You can get
away with one or two, sets,
but it's good to have four
sets of sheets per bed to
swap out This is especially
useful for when you have
guests or an illness such as
the flu that might soil multi-
ple sheets in a short period
of time. One set can be
higher quality, with the re-


maining sets having a lesser
thread count
SNEAKERS: Having
three sets of sneakers is
ideal. They don't need to be
new. Have one best pair for
public yet casual use, a sec-
ondary pair for at home and
to rotate occasionally with
your best pair and a third
pair for yardwork
PLUNGER: If you have
more than one bathroom,
you don't want to run a
marathon to get to your
plunger.
ALTERNATIVE LIGHT-
ING: If the power goes out,
you'll want multiple candles
and flashlights.
KEYS: It's always useful


to have a spare set of keys.
Leave the spare set for the
car at home and the spare
set to the house with a
trusted friend, family mem-
ber or neighbor.
o m.
Produce can be expen-
sive. Fortunately, there are
frugal ways to keep it low-
cost. First, find out what is
grown locally at your state
department of agriculture
Web site. Or visit www.local-
harvest org/csa to find com-
munLty-supported
agriculture in your area.
CSAs allow you to buy pro-
duce directly from a local
farmer. You pay to be a sub-
scriber or shareholder and


receive produce throughout
the season.
Here are a few more ways
to stretch your produce dol-
lars.
SHOP LOSS LEADERS:
Buy produce that is on sale
at your grocery store. Sup-
plement with frozen or
canned to avoid paying too
much and to waste less, too.
Shop at multiple sources to
find the best price and qual-
ity. For example, roadside
stands are often overlooked.
Don't forget to check dis-
count-produce bins, tod.
They aren't at the peak of
freshness, but they aren't


See FRUGAL/Page E7


REAY1 GAIL COOPER
~ �3 ^ Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
KRIS Cell: (352) 634-4346
E OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com







TERRIFIC NEW PRICING! CHECK OUT THIS VIEW!
* 2003 custom 3+office/2.5/2.5 2/2/2 detached villa near #4 green
* Minutes to Southern Woods golfing Newer pergo flooring
* Corian kitchen w/maple cabinetry * New roof in Nov. 2006
* Garden tub & snail shower in Master New heat pump in 2005
* Well for yard - central vacuum Skylights - vaulted ceilings
#329994 $199,000 #315335 $144,900
-. S * u -ij Ai.i.-iij~~






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRF�~~r r�m�a 913 9AAQ


HomeFron
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information................................. .................. 563-5592
Classified advertising information ...................................................... 563-5966
News information........ ......................................................................563-5660
. .. . ........................................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.............. www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com...................................563-3206
Advertise online..............................................................................563-3206
............ . .................................................. NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CV NICLE



To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting'information, please make sure it is'printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
e-maill - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
-We accept color and black and white photos. We also accept negatives. We do no et Polaroid prints.
-All photos need to e cropped tightly. That means no wasted space in your photo.
- Photos need to be in sharp focus. We do not accept photos that are out of focus.
- B sure that photos or negatiVes you submit are taken using 35 mm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Please include your address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
- Phoos or negatives submitted will be returned if supplied with a return envelope and postage.
- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo team leader, at 563-5660. -


Crape myrtles: Hardy.


and Florida-friendly

Crape myrtles (Lagerstroemia indica) tolerance and low fertilizer needs. The
are a great addition to almost any University of Florida article "Irrigating
sunny spot due to their high drought Landscape Plants During Establishment"
tolerance, tolerance of a wide provides valuable information
range of soil types, and the va- regarding how much to water
riety of flower colors. Crape during plant establishment; it
myrtles are available in a vari- can be accessed at www.solu-
ety of sizes ranging from dwarfs - - tionsforyourlife.org or by call-
(less than four feet after five . ' ing the extension office at
years) up to medium-sized trees .. 527-5700.
(taller than 20 feet after ten The crape myrtle aphid (with
years). . its associated sooty mold) and
Crape myrtles may flower for . powdery mildew are the pri-
up to 100 days during the sum- - mary pests of this mostly pest-
mer and fall. Flower colors in- Audrey Durr free plant. Insecticidal soaps
elude red, fuchsia, light pink, :-. and horticultural oils are the
white, lavender, purple and most environmentally safe pes-
sometimes combinations of ticides for controlling crape
these colors, such as pink and white. After myrtle aphids (populations peak June
the tree has lost its leaves in the winter, through August).
the interesting, peeling bark is given cen- Powdery mildew can be avoided or re-
ter stage, ranging in color from pale cream duced by choosing a sunny location with
or dark cinnamon to rich brown or even good air circulation, preventing frequent
bright orange. wetting of the foliage by irrigation and
Container-grown crape myrtles are best choosing variety that has been bred to be
planted in early summer, such as right resistant to powdery mildew. The UF arti-
now. All plants require regular watering- cle "Crape Myrtle in Florida" lists over 90
during establishment, but once estab-
lished, crape myrtles have a high drought See FYN/Page E10


Inside...




XM t


New coat of paint
PAGE E9
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E2

WHERE'S JANE?
.1 Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break. from her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re
turn later this year.

For current property' transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


'Cheese boards' probably fall into kitchen collectibles category


Dear John: For some time I
have tried to find out the
value of these cheese boards.
My aunt collected antiques in the
southern part
of New Jersey
and south-
eastern- part
of Pennsylva-
nia in the b .
1950s. I be-
lieve she
bought these
around New
Hope, Penn-
sylvania � or John Sikorski
perhaps SIKORSKIS
around Lan-
caster. She al- ATTIC
ways referred
to them as cheese boards.
They are porcelain glazed on all
sides. The writings are old German
proverbs and I believe they were
brought over here by the Amish in
the mid-20th century. As you can
see, I have a ruler in some of the
pics to give you an. idea of size.
Therpsa~e,~oa fiae t-npaki4gs pp


Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE AC RIGHT: These 'cheese
boards' were collected in Pennsylva-
nia, and each sports an old German
proverb. They might be Amish in ori-
gin; their value is uncertain. These
items would most likely fall into the
category of kitchen collectibles.

the reverse on three of them.
I have tried for years to find out
about these on eBay, books at li-


S� ~~. Page[


EA Q nd- jum 28 '71109��VV







CresCupr F) HOILESNA J__E28 09E


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

rotten. They can be con-
sumed quickly or preserved
to use later.
GROW YOUR OWN:
Plant fruit trees, berries,
herbs and vegetables. Some
plants lend themselves well
to containers such as toma-
toes, strawberries, garlic
and herbs and won't take up
a lot of space. You can
freeze, home can or dehy-
drate to have less expensive


food to enjoy throughout the
year. For example, if you see
cheap bell peppers, buy
what you can use within a
few months. Chop and
freeze them. They'll be
prepped for your next cook-
ing session that includes
peppers. Another reader,
Karen in Kansas, shares:
"One of the most nutritious
and least expensive vegeta-
bles you can grow yourself is
sprouts. It's the perfect little
'garden in a jar' no matter
where you live. Suggested
reading: 'The Sprouting
Book' by Ann Wigmore."


LEARN A NEW SKILL:
Join a master food-pre-
server or gardener program.
Be around people who grow
food to make new friends
and share. You'll learn how
to preserve and properly
store fruits and vegetables,
too.
BULK BARGAINS: Get a
discount by buying bagged
fruit and vegetables in bulk
or at U-pick farms. Can't
consume it all? Divide it
among friends and family
Be sure to weigh bagged
produce on the scale. With
bagged apples, onions, pota-


C S ~~J iS euot 0NA
S p7OiT


,nI1I PIN .D n


HOMFASS


toes or lettuce, you can
often get an additional serv-
ing by comparing the pack-
age's weight Join or start a
food co-op. Visit
www.coopdirectory org to
locate a co-op or
www.cgin.coop/how to start
to learn how to start one.
One reader, Sue in Texas,
shares: "I am fortunate
enough to live near a farm-
ers' market. Our home-
school group has a co-op.
For $10, we get a big box of
assorted fruits and veggies.
See FRUGAL/Page E10


www~ctrusbstbySo
PNRIDG PIN PI PO


[77NEW2 STOR


I EWDPLX


;* George E L Heureu> Brokcr ,'1 -'
_.C JR i'') E, i Gu.I ,',kI. Ha, lL, ,Tr:s FL (352) 637 - CURB (2872)
APPEAL www.curbappealcitrus.com ,-, c,,....,r.,'..,....,.
- -rr (First Time Buyers) Up to $8.000 in Cashl Call Tooay
7134 WHIPPO0RWIIL M2NEWRORUIA
set in a sough This is a great
,1llr area is this 2 Imperial Executive
2BA homeon with many updates
P ark ike comer and upgrades. This
lot. This homre shows like a model with lots of 2 BR, 2 BA home
upgrades. This community has a pool, tennis courts has a large 2 car garage and a beautiful stone fire-
& communi center/clubhouse. $99 900 pace See this beauty today $96,500.
k n i . ... ...2196W. W .KENMORE 5...i. .s
-F- . . I,,- , . ,,,, r,,. It Ir i

has beautiful ceramic ile baths & upgraded carpeting in ,.:. . . r- r.
the bedrooms. A must see[ $114,900. $84,000.




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You Need A Pool Home - lets Make A Deall'


827 Great Pine Pt.
INVERNESS 3/2/2
Pool, Security System,
New A/C in '06, Cul-de-sac.
$164,900



1475 E. Monopoly Loop
CITRUS HILLS
Solar Heated Pool Home, 31212, Upgrades
Galore, Professional Landscape
$269,900


695 W. Starjasmine St.
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
312/2, New Paint and Flooring,
Solar Heated Pool, 1700 sq. ft.
$129,900



3861 N. Everlasting Dr.
2/2/2
Solar Heated Pool, New AH '08,
Furniture can be purchased separately
$109,900


II� II


I PINE PJDGE POOL I


PINE RIDGE


I CANTERBURY LAKE EST.


. UNDAY, JUNE 28, 2oog E7


CITRUSs COUNTY (FL CHRONICLE


I NEW HOME


I MEW HOME , I


1. BEVERLY HI


BEVERLY WILLS


I BOMRLY HILLS I


I NEW HOME I


I NEW HOME


I NEW HOME


I NEW HOME


I NEW HONE I


NEW HOME






Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FR '~,mjnv Trmrp 9R 9naA


More about instant hot water


Q Ed, we love read-
ing your column
down here in
Florida. Your recent article
on "re-circulating hot
water" systems
for . residential
use has sparked a
lot of interest. In
many areas of
Florida we pay
for every drop of
water - we use,
and having in-
stant hot water
ready at the Ed Del
shower should be el
able to save us a ASK
lot of water since PLUI
we n6w wait two
to three minutes
and all that cold water just
goes down the drain. But we
can't figure out how these
re-circulating systems can
work in existing homes. Can
you please give us a plumb-
ing lesson on how a home
can possibly have a hot-
water system like a hotel? -
Mandy in Florida


A: Mandy, you are not
alone. When I wrote the ar-
ticle, I thought that I in-
cluded a lot of information
about how it is possible to
make your home
plumbing system
work like a
hotel's by having
almost instant
hot water at all
the fixtures. But
after that column
ran, I was flooded
with requests for
Grande more information
Grande on exactly how
THE - they can work
IBER without doing
major work on
the existing
plumbing system. So, here
goes my attempt to simplify
how a basic residential re-
circulating hot-water kit can
work in your home.
First, in a hotel or other
commercial-like setting, the
plumbing system usually
will have three water, lines
connected to the faucets:


SHNS file photo by DIY Network
Recently, a few companies have developed low-cost re-cir-
culating options for you to install in existing homes, without
the high cost of adding a return hot-water line back to the
water heater.


and showers: a cold-water
feed line, a hot-water feed
line and a hot-water return
line. The hot water feed and
return lines make a closed
loop from the water heater
to the fixtures. Powered by
a circulator, and heated by
the water heater, this loop
circulates hot water back


and forth to all the fixtures.
Because the lines are insu-
lated and the unused hot
water will flow back to the
water heater, wasted energy
is kept as low as possible.
Now, when a hot-water
faucet or shower is turned
See PLUMBER/Page E15


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are Rinited to submit news re-
leases about upcoming community events. News re-
leases are subject to editing.
* Call 563 5660 for details.








If you haven't owned a home in the last 3
years you may be eligible for up to
$8000 Federal Tax Credit
towards the purchase of a home!
Call Me Today!
Tom Read
Cell: 352-613-3436
Office: 352-746-7113 KELLER
699 S. Adolph Pt. WbL M.
Lecanto, FL R E A L T Y


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CHAO CUMD
CB-C112411i$4 Marri Flaw Plans to Cliaase Fiuw c5C&400&


ES suN TUNE 28 200


I


II


(












New life for old furniture


JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press
ot the do-it-yourself
itch but little time or
cash to spare? Look
around at the furniture
you've already got Some of
it probably could use a re-
freshing coat of paint In
fact, a new color may put
the "wow" back into a
room.
Too timid? Don't be.
"Everyone should have
lots of courage and confi-
dence," says Neil
Wertheimer, editor-in-chief
of "Fresh Home," a new
DIY magazine that features
three table makeovers in
its summer issue. "This is
not hard! A piece of wood
furniture is wood and
screws and coating, and all
three are easily fixed and
replaced."
The key to a good redo is
to take your time and work
through all the steps.
Wertheimer should know.
He admits to skipping a
critical step - the primer
- in the past, and paying
the price with a less attrac-
tive piece.
"The primer creates
something for paint to ad-
here to so much better. It's
made to be
sticky for ON TH
paint," Wert-
heimer says. U freshhoml
"Paint does * bhg.com
not stick well
to old finishes U hgtv.com
and old paint
and to whatever else might
be on there."
John Gidding, a judge on
"HGTV's $250,000 Chal-
lenge," has seen, and done,
a lot of furniture rehabbing
as an HGTV designer. He
says primary candidates
for a paint job often.are a
handed-down dining room
.table and chairs.
"THe reason for this is


This product image released
by Fresh Home shows milk
paint being applied to a
wooden table. Mix the milk
paint per the manufacturer's
instructions. Apply the first
coat, then when dry, lightly
sand to remove "fuzz." Apply
second coat.
they're expensive," Gid-
ding says. "You either get
something really cheap or
you take what your mom
gives you."
E WEB Either way,
these dining
iemag.com. sets often
don't fit a cou-
ple's style, and
. painting them
can fix that.
Gidding offers one
caveat: Don't paint the an-
tiques. Ever. They'll drop in
value.
Instead, he suggests
painting a room a color
that complements the color
of an antique piece to help
it blend in, no matter how
monstrous.


This product image re-
leased by Fresh Home
shows a finished
wooden table after get-
ting refurbished.
FiYi:n mo vAz ;.:..c.at Pr�:;


SP~e "'-Page E10


Repainting and refurbishing

pieces can add visual flair


�a


4r~
b~ ~.


I t



'I,,,


Sunday, June 28, 2009 E9


Ch-Rus CouNTY (FL) CimomcmL


r


--


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EIO TTfaY 0,rNFIM 2. 2009


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

You can't beat the price! We
do this every other Satur-
day, and usually I order two
boxes, which lasts until the
next trip."
PLAN: Get organized, and
create a meal plan. It will
help you to buy only what
you need and will actually
use. Your meal plans can in-
corporate fruits and vegeta-
bles that are in season, too.
Put the word out that you'll
accept excess fruits and veg-
etables. Talk to neighbors,
local farmers, produce man-
agers and friends. One
reader, Denise in Illinois,
writes: ."If someone says
they have fruit that has
dropped on the ground from
their trees, I'll offer to clean
it up for them.- I take the


dropped fruits, cut out the LiILI
bad parts, and make pie fill- rill
ings, fruit leather, butters,
sauces, etc. We keep our Conti
eyes and ears open for of-
fers. A year ago, a potato varieties of
farmer had fields of pota- eluding th
toes that were not accept- color, bark
able to sell to the resistance
potato-chip companies. He mildew; th
mentioned that if anyone available a
wanted potatoes, come and foryourlife.
get them." the extensi
MEN Crape mn
Gathering your baking salt tolera
supplies can be time-con-, poorly in c
suming. Sometimes measur- soils. Aside
ing cups and spoons get limitations
separated or pans get are a versa
shoved far back into the nance ch
cabinets. It can end up a Florida-fri
real workout before you've Visit w
even started mixing ingredi- org to acc
ents. You might end up buy- friendly Pl
ing replacements for more plant
supplies you've misplaced. teractive pl


See FRUGAL/Page E16


rates list
your yard b


nued from Page E6

crape myrtle, in-
eir size, flower
color, and level of
to powdery
is article is also
t www.solutions-
org or by calling
on office.
yrtles have a low
tnce and grow
ontinuously wet-
from these few
, crape myrtles
tile, low-mainte-
oice for your
endly yard.
vw.FloridaYards.
ess the Florida-
ant Database for
choices. The in-
ant database gen-
of plants suited to
ased upon infor-


mation that you provide.
Citrus County UF/IFAS Ex-.
tension's Florida-friendly
landscaping program is a
free public education pro-
gram, funded jointly by the
Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners and
the Coastal Rivers and With-
lacoochee River Basin
Boards of the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District Visit www.Solutions-
ForYourLife.org or contact
the Citrus County UF/IFAS
Extension.
All programs and related
activities sponsored for, or
assisted by, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences are open to all per-
sons with non-dis-
crimination with respect to
race, creed, color, religion,
.age, disability, sex, sexual
orientation, marital status,
national origin, political
opinions, or affiliations.


. ing plastic furniture because it'll likely
r-PAI T |chip. Metal furniture can be tricky to
nt Ppaint, too, so use a primer and paint
Continued from Page E9 especially made for metals. (Instead of
sanding, scour off any rust using steel
"I advise not spray-painting Louis the wool.) Wicker spray paints. easily.
15th furniture," he says with a laugh: Thankfully, most furniture is forgiv-
Spray paint will work, however, on ing. Lay on a bad paint job? Sand it,
lesser wood pieces. prime it and paint it again.
"We use (spray paint) for everything "Sometimes you just have to have a
around here," says Veronica Toney, as- laid-back attitude about it and know
sociate decorating editor at BHG.com, that you'll have to throw on another
the Web site for "Better Homes and coat next summer," Gidding says.
Gardens" magazine. - You can do that with fun accent
She says it's inexpensive, easy to use pieces and the outdoor furniture. Save
and doesn't leave behind pesky brush the elbow grease for those dining ta-
strokes. The trick is to spray slowly to bles and chairs.
avoid dripsand uneven painting. For A HANDSOME,
larger projects, be prepared to stop HIGH-GLOSS TABLE
often or have extra hands at the ready: (adapted from "Fresh Home"
That nozzle can be tough on index-fin- magazine)
ger muscles. Supplies:
The first step in any wood-furniture * A wood table (new or old).
rehab project, says Wertheimer, is to * Wood putty.
inspect the piece for structural and vi- M 180-grit sandpaper.
sual flaws. Tighten loose legs, grease * Tack cloth.
sticky drawers, buy new knobs, etc. M Oil-based, black satin paint
Use wood putty to fill in any cracks or N Mineral spirits
holes. Then, lightly sand the piece and E High-gloss, oil-based poly-
go over it with a tack cloth to remove urethane.
the dust. Finally, prime it, paint it and, - E Paintbrushes.
if necessary, give it a protective layer 1. Prepare the. surface: Fill cracks
of polyurethane. and holes with wood putty, let harden,
A piece that sits around and looks then lightly sand all surfaces. Use a
pretty but isn't actually used? That tack cloth to remove dust.
doesn't need the protective top coat. 2. Apply the primer: Brush primer
But a piece such as the DIY project onto entire surface, let dry. (Oil paint
below, which could find itself home to will adhere to latex primer, but an oil-
keys and loose coins, needs at least based primer works better)
one coat of polyurethane. 3. Apply the paint: Thin the black
What about furniture other than paint about 10 percent with the min-
woQdc?, QjdjMgYLs agafinstjit- meralsMirits. tbhel apnly.a srvaoth.cot,.


brushing in one direction. .u i
4. Apply the top coat: Let the paint
dry,-then lightly sand and remove dust Spectacular
with a tack cloth. Apply a coat of water view at
polyurethane. Lightly sand and repeat water view at
with another coat, if desired. :.. . onvengs
Tips: Remove any drawers and .. '....... of Inverness
paint them separately. Flip the table w/private,
upside down and paint the legs and w/privale.
underside before flipping the table heated pool.
upright to finish. - .,. Paradise Found'
�.


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So �Greeii -BUILT FOR SIREAGIH ENERGY EFFICIENCY & STYLE
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REAL ESTATE
1 6a2 Wes!t Mai Ir
Invemess, FL 44(

bVVL'~tqL ,'i.TOW07
AND&r"D ,,11-4TR


CUSTOM HOME ON 1.0 ACRES - REDUCED $50,000



� , , : m ;,, , :l ,, ...
SELLERS ARE SACAInCIG - CI lbS HILS 2007 CLASSiCALly LOMPBSED


a. 3, ,ST . Z

2 3 ACRES SURROUND THE SUPER SIZED HOMES OF MERII


Model For Sale






(- / dMonday-Friday 10:00am-4:00pm


[ www.encorehomesofcitrus.com ] shicl986
2271 South Olympic Hills Terrace (352) 726-2179
Directions: Hwy. 41 S. of Inverness, turn left on Eden Drive; go 3 miles to South Olympic Hills.


E10SUN- TUNE 28 2009 1--~


- I I ~I --







Cimus oui~n (F)C/ NcESNA~ u'e2,20 l


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

braries and antiques
sites on the Web. I hope
you can find something
out - W, Internet
Dear W.: I am not fa-
miliar with cheese
boards and was not able
to find any specific col-
lector interest. The
cobalt blue floral deco-
ration on the white
porcelain background
gives them a very deco-
rative look. They would
fall into the big category
of Kitchen Collectibles. I
suggest you do further
research in this direc-
tion. There is a collec-
tor's club known as the
KO.O.K.S., Kollectors of
Old Kitchen Stuff; per-
haps they can help you.
Janet Hoy is one of the
founders in Port Huron,
Michigan. The phone
number is (810) 841-0231.
Good luck, and let us
know what you discover.
Dear John: My mom is
94 years old and she has
a lot of buttons which at
this time I cannot find. I
do have 21 that she gave
me a couple of years ago.
I do not know if they are
worth anything but I am
enclosing a picture of
them.
I also have a cuckoo
clock that is an original
Schartzwalder Black
Forest cuckoo clock with
Swiss musical move-


ment. It is solid wood, I
bought it about 18 years
ago. I paid $125 for it. I
will appreciate any in-
formation you can give
me. - A T, Inverness
Dear A.T: The photo-
graph of the political
campaign button is out
of focus. Political cam-
paign buttons are a spe-
cific category of
collecting. In order to
help you with an esti-
mate of potential dollar
value I need good clear
photographs.
The cuckoo clock is
not old enough to be of
interest to those inter-
ested in antique cuckoo
clocks, although if you
were to sell it you might
get more than you paid
for it.
Dear John: I read your
column every week and
love it I have a few ques-
tions I would like to ask
you about. We are trying
to downsize as we are
thinking of moving to a
condo. I have quite a
large collection of silver-
plated pieces from the
1950s, including a serv-
ing tray, teapot, sugar,
creamer, and many
bowls.. My kids do not
want any part of them.
They remember all the
polishing they entailed.
Where could I find
someone that would
want them?
I also have a large col-
lection of Liberty Falls
houses and the Santa
Claus collection of Santa


Clauses from different
countries - 56 houses,
and 66 Santas. Any ideas
of who would be inter-
ested?
Also, my daughter's fa-
ther-in-law just passed
away, and she inherited
1,700 decorative shoes.
He used to go to flea
markets all over the
country and started a
collection.
Tell your readers hob-
bies like this get out of
hand and can really be a
pain. Thanks for any
help you can give me. -
M., Internet
Dear M.: You have not
given me any details
about your silver-plated
pieces. In general, if the
style of the pieces is tra-
ditional, there is very lit-
tle market interest. If
they are contemporary
patterns of mid-20th cen-
tury modem, there could
be some collector inter-
est. Without photos that
is all I can say.
Current market inter-
est in the Liberty Falls
houses is very soft. I sug-
gest donating them to a
charity of your choice or
Hospice.
There is always inter-
est in Santa Claus col-
lectibles. Without
specific information on
what you actually have,
that is all I can say. You
need to make a full in-
ventory of the Santa
Claus collection before
you contact anyone to.
sell. The specifics are


KELLER THE HOFFMAN TEAM
WUJJAMS 699 S. Adolph Pt., Lecanto, FL 34461 Cell 352-601-3638
ATTENTION HOME BUYERS AND SELLERS
FREE 1 YEAR HOME WARRANTY provided by
THE HOFFMAN TEAM, KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY of Citrus County.
Call us at 352-601-3638 when you're ready to buy or sell.



BUY I Io1SEW a NG
.t4 or Remodeling a Home

We Need To Talk, I Will Save You Money!

John Decker - Home Inspector

eed T TalE I W i e You Money!
Remodeling Consultant -
3 52.2 893


what make the differ-
ence in dollar value.


John Sikorski has
been a professional
in the antiques
business for more
than 20 years. He
hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from 11 a.m.
to noon. Send
questions to Sikorski's
Attic, c/o The Citrus
County Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or e-mail
asksikorski@aol. com.


Pruning vs. removal


B eing a tree
preservationist
and a tree hugger,
I know the value of tree , . -
preservation versus re-
moval. To properly ' (
prune a tree, the cost --- . ,
may be comparably . i
equal. By pruning a -'
tree, you still have all --
the benefits that a Kerry Kreider
healthy tree provides. THE
It takes much more ARBORIST
skill to properly prune a A
tree than it does to re-
move it. And don't forget - there
may be some hidden costs to re-


SOnru Jy.w
_R RE
164
Email: cent21@infionline.net SALES: (3
www. jwmortonrealestate.com Properi

SNEW TO MARKET -
Great starter or
S'.. investor house. Neat &
clean 2 bedroom,
1 bath in "homes-
I ". only" area Family
room and screen porch. Round out this great
deal. MLS#334862 555,000
Call Martha Snyder 352-476-8727.

SPACIOUS, COUNTRY
' LIVING! d bedroom. 2 bath
S, claoubled,.de ..rh tm.i, i0.m
-', lairal dnig ,nforrnol large
eca .,r, koc:l-,. n. P, r. '.,- fo.'rin
l"rE " or, mal I.,r , .., ,.,
garden rub and ieparatE ih .v:- oall on 2 5 o.:r=.: Deached
garage , '.cod de-.:k, and . ,' i.tL'.i .33-.13 ONLY
5121,000.
Call Doris Miner fo: mc -i information at
352-726-6668, 344-75 15 or cell 352-422-4627.
KENSINGTON ESTATES -
S 2 . .:. home F,..Il
it , lu re I.....q qrEat
_ ,"'h 'L , nook o.rl:.o ,q
" . . . .. - b,.:l.'.,ard L.no. aria ha:
-,- -,. . rd.-. : a, r,. ,
addic.naol li.ng . ara all ,ear .,:.L, d Id~-ll, Ic.: cor,.enernce to gola :hc.pping ei: C K i parl' f. b. 3r.an .,ii.
Asking S218,900 9332Ai
Call Pat Davis, Realtor (352) 212-7280. -

, . INVERNESS HIGHLANDS -
" . ' ': ' (. reot horre ir, a greal
.- pa pw-T neWghborhoo.d boaosing
S. * .. 3 bedr.Dcom. 2 bath, .pli.
! "^ plot . faorn;il r.oomn eat.
in kilche,-. dir.ng & II.ngq
room creenred porch and 2nd loi a.ailoble priced
separate, i... r il riq it . rieh._;ol i.: bu',er of ihe cmrn,
MLS#3.34325 5149,900
Call Martha Snyder at 352-476-8727.


A
15
52
ty


moval. Some of these
costs may be time, labor,
or replacement with a
new tree (or trees). Re-
moving a tree may hurt
the wallet when it
comes to paying that
electric bill.
Sometimes, there are
consequences to cutting
down trees that the av-
erage person may not
think about until the
tree is gone. Then, it is
too late.

See .- -: ' ,'Page E16


. MORTON -
L ESTATE, INC.
W. Main St., Inverness, FL
) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163 -:
Management (352) 726-9010 u93, 2006

Z WATERFRONT HOME
FOR ONLY $155,000!!
Really nice 3/2 directly
on the waler in Floral
City. Mo,,e.in ready for
someone who wants easy
living in a quiet neighborhood Freshly pointed. Large
eat-in kitchen plus dining room See to apprec;alei!
MLS#334922
Call Barb Monahan at 352-726-0094.

,f PRICED LESS THAN OWED! Iur.
.d .n-. 2 ed -, . 2



. . . . . . .. . pler, r 1 3o, 3-6a ercl.�.ed
p, ,.J. r-.. ..,y lj...; h.i .i-:. fl:u.. . ppl.oi.ce! ard .miorA
Ask for Maxine Hellmers 352-212-4147 or Kimberly Miner
352-586-9549 or visit our website at www.twac21agents.com
for more listings.


FO HT


HEATHER POINT -
Duplex in Floral City
:2/1 each side
;laundry room, big
yard Completely
-redone inside & out.


MLS#334933 ALL FOR $115,000.
Call Emil Lupu for appointment
352-302-1713.

.. HIGHLANDS BEAUTY -
1his %er, nice 2 bedroom
2 bath home hos open
floor plan .-.,rh a iamil.
m(oomr oif the k.tcher, and
---._ _ _ __la ,creenr room has tenced
backward ...ith some , r'i rd, 40oat, in a quiet
neighborhood :hart di.iarce i., t.:.,.n lake-i and ihe
troil 5139,900
Call Ruth Frederick 352-563-6866.


"' I 1 ~_ I~_I U


I I~ -


SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2oog Ell


Ch-Rurs CouNTY (FL) CfmomcLErc


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E12 5~rmnav TuMe 2R 9AAQ


Chronkle 1


Real Estate


Classifieds


To place an ad, call 563-5966
.,. . ..1


~ ~. -~ ..bIb*1


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax (32 56-56 1


2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Uti. Incl.
cleon, quiet-park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759
55+, clean doublewide.
turn. ncl. elec. cable,
laundry, lawn maint.
Quiet neighborhood
$600 mo.(352) 419-5999

AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando New Effic.
$250wk. Free int/long
dist. Trailers $185wk.
Inverness'3Br Luxury
Homes turn. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT
LECANTO
Nice 312, On . 5 acre.
deck, utility shed.
New CHA unit, quiet,
excellent well water,
small pets ok, $575.
+ Sec.
LECANTO
Charming, 2/1 on .5
acre, utility shed,
crystal clear well
water, quiet, small
pets ok. $525. + Sec
(813) 695-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 & 3/1,Starting at
$500 mo., wkly. plan
available, No Pets
352-795-3605

CRYSTAL RIVER
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Partially
furnished,
washer/dryer,on 1/2
acre, clean, quiet, no
dogs. $500.+ Sec.
INGLIS
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT
2/1 Apartment,
partially furnished,
washer/dryer,
clean & quiet. No dogs.
$600.+ Sec.
(352) 447-0333


DUNNELLON
Close To Power
Plantll 2/2 Carport, on
3 fenced, wooded lots.
Furn., fla. rm. scrn'd
patio, wsh./dry. Nearby
river dock access.
$750. Mo. FIL/S.
(772) 486-0070
F.C./HERNANDO
2BR, 1BA, CH/A
$300/$400 1st, last, sec.
No pets 564-0578
FLORAL CITY
2 br. $450. Mo.
+ $450./Sec
(352) 5844194
HERNANDO 2/1
$400 + $400 sec. Pets
Ok. (352) 464-0719
HERNANDO
2/1, $400 mo.+ Utilities
No Pes, 1st + Sec.
352-344-5098, 697-1651
HERNANDO
2/2, large fenced yard,
$350/Mo.+ $700. Sec.
(920) 948-4767
(920) 922-6800
HERNANDO
3/2, SW On 2 acres.
private properly, lots of
trees, Wash/Dry, front
& back porch, No pets
$650. mo (352)201-0111
Hernando Heights
2/2 SW, 5 Appl's, porch
& shed, nice nelghbhd
$600 mo. (352)270-3074
HOME-N-LAND
New home on 1/2
acre. 3/2 1500sqft. 10
yr. warranty, sodded
lawn, paved Rd. Get
your stimulus check
($8,000) cash back
only $665/mo. W.A.C.
Own your own home!
CALL (352) 621-9183
HOMOSASSA
1& 2 Brfum & Unfurn .
In beautiful park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, furn. Fst./Lst./Sec.
Ref. req. $400. Mo.
(352) 621-3868
HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big lot, Near 19
$425 mo + Sec. + Ref.
No pets 352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
2/2 Furn. Great area.
Sr. Disc. 352746-0524


HOMOSASSA
2/2/Carport, Clean!
No pets! $475 + Util. +
Sec. (352) 586-2976

3/2,Clean, W/D, on


HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 - $850/mo.
+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-33338

INVERNESS
1st Month Free!
Waterfront 55+ Park, 1BR,
1BA $350. 2 BR, 1BA, $450,
also fully turn., incl water
& grass mowing.
352-476-4964
INVERNESS /1I
RENT OR RENT
TO OWN
Spacious DW, beau-
tifully renovated.
Fenced lot & country
setting. CHA,
covered parking.
screened porch,
laundry room. New
paint, carpet & tile.
$650 rent + $300 dep.
Rent to Own w/$600
dep & $650- Includes
taxes & Insurance.
No credit check just
job verification.
4235 Quiver Terr.
863-860-5292
Inverness/
Crystal River
2/2 $450./mo clean
563-5117
FLORAL CITY
Must Seell!
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec.
No. pets. For application
Call Lee at 352-250-0664
or 800 -692-4162.



1972 BUDD, Melody
Mobile Home Park
1/1, lanai, carport, all
apple's, furniture incl'd
$6,500 Great Shape
Call (352) 586-9697
60ft x 14 ft, IN PARK
2/2, W/D, scrn. In room.
owner finance $12,500.
(352) 201-7276


1992 Fleetwood
26x52, 3/2
fireplace completely.
remodeled,building
home must move
(352) 445-9155
HOMOSASSA
2/2, fenced lot, carport,
shed, glass enclosed
porch, $39,900
(352) 795-0932
NEW 2009 2/2, large
rooms, appliance
pkg. 2x6 construction
10 yr. warranty, must
see! $37,900 includes
A/C & heat, steps,
skirting on new padl
352-621-9182
Used Mobiles and
Modular for Resale.
LOW prices, call
Palm Harbor for
inventory list. On Your
Lot. 800-622-2832
ext. 210- Mr. Lyons



Floral.City 2/1
Carport, scrn'd rm. Newer
appl. 8788 E. Moonrise.
$ 58,000. (352)726-6644
www.crossland
realty.com




BANK FORECLOSUREl
3/2 approx. 1300 sqft
* on 1/2 ac, fenced
back yd, scrn room,
work shop, concrete
drive on paved road.
Private but close to
townI Home in great-
conditioni $3,000
down, $565/mo.
W.A.C. Call to view.
(352) 621-9181
crystal river 2/2,sw,on
1/2acre new
carpet&stove very clean
10x14 workshop $35000
o.b.o.813-792-1355
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.


HOMOSASSA
3/2- 1999 remodeled
2000+sqft. Owner
financing. $675/mo
352-302-9217
Homosassa, 3BR, 2BA
doublewide on 1/2
acre MOL, remodeled,
owner finance $63,500.
$5,000 down, 8% int.
$560 mo. or discount
for cash (352) 726-9369
INGLIS '95 SW
2/11, onl14 ac. Private,
wooded,covered deck,
garage w/work shop,
new vinyl shed. All apple.
include Some furnishings.
$49,9001 Cash price.
$45,000, or lease opt.
$10,000 Dwn. & $500.
Mo. (352) 419-5777
(352) 476-9005




FOREST VIEW ESTATES
Great Loc. Pools, clbhs.
& more. Move-in ready,
comp. turn. 2/2 DW,
wheelchair acc., shed
& sprinkler. New heat
pump. $39,900
563-6428/563-1297
I'M A LONELY MOBILE
2 bdrm home in a
beautiful park In
Homosassa. Brand new
kit, bath, livrm, tile firs.
A/C. I need someone
to love me. Only $15K.
will talk. At night I see
all the lights on In the
other houses and I stay
dark & alone. Please
fome & love me. Call
Robert 352-249-6239.
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl., A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. log
rent. Fully turn., financ-
ing avail 352-476-4964
LECANTO
3/2 dblwlde, furnished,
New Carpet, New Kit.
Fir., Lot rent $215. mo.
$15,500. 607-217-7002

MELODY PARK 55+
Inverness 2/1, Move in
condappliances Incl.
$ 10.000 QUICK SALE.lot
rent $265/mo Lve mess
(352)6337-4823


MOSS MOBILE PARK
lot#23, 1/1 cha,
Screened room. Totally
Remodeled. $5.000
firm (352) 201-0903
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2)-NEW 2005 Incredible
Price Resales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet ok.
furnished. 352-628-2090


Castro
Realty and Property
Management Inc.
333 N. Croft Avenue
Inverness FL 34453
352-341-4663
Beverly Hills
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms ,
$475 - $750/mo.
Citrus Sporngs
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$600 - $1050/mo.
Invernes
2 & 3 Bedrooms
$450 - $800/mo.
Citrus Hills
2,3 & 4 Bedrooms
$825 - $1050/mo.
Pine Ridae
3 & 4 Bedrooms
$800 - $1800/mo.
Hernando
1,2 & 3 Bedrooms
$475 - $800/mo.
Check Out Our
Website At www.
castrorealtyl.com
Rental Inventory
changes daily.
Furnished rentals also
available.
See Our Rental Ad In
The Real Estate News
Magazine
CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/1 carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000

HOUSE'S -CONDO'S &
VILLA'S
Available Nowl!
Clean, furnished,
2/2 price varies de-
pends on the length
of stay. Riverlinks RIty
(352) 628-1616
800-488-5184


MAYO DRIVE
APARTMENTS
| Units Available
I from $395. mo.
(352) 795-2626



S,,)
NATURE COAST
Crystal River:
2/2 home $675
Furnished Homes:
2/1 -$1000
1/1 -$1200
3/2 MH furnish $800.
3/2 MH furnish $850.
The Islands/Condos:
2/2 - $1200 and up
fully furnished'
Paradise Point Villas:
2 & 3/2 WF w/dock
Several units to
choose from
Fully furnish
starting@ $1800
2/1 Apartments:
$550 and up
Homosassa:
3/2/2 - $775

Visit our website:
www.c21nature-
coast.com
or call 352-795-0021

River Links Realty
352-628-1616

3/2/2 900.
CRYSTAL RIVER
WF 3/2/2 $1075
4/2/2 $1050
HOMOSASSA
Duplex 1/1 $350.
2/1 $495/up
Homes 3/2/2 $675.
Sugarmlll Wds 2/2/2
Condo or Villa $625.
3/2/2 Villa $800


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


THE HEDICK
GROUP REAL
_ | ESTATE SERVICES
J ,r.OPER., . hedlckgroup.net
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT Pine de
5169 N. Perry Dr.
Pritchard Island Lg. 3/2/2 Pool $1800
Fully furnished, 2/2/2 3794 Pine Ridge Blvd.
long term - $900 Lg. 3/2/2 Pool $1500
Unfurnished 3/2/1 Pets Ok - Pool Maint.
$875 ctrus
Inverness 838 W. Massachusetts
2/2/2 - $625 St. 3/2/2 Pool - $1400
3/2/2 - $800 Pool & lawn maint.
2/2/1 - $750
3/2/2 - $850 BeverHills
2/2/2 - $625 27 New York Blvd.
3/2/2 - $750 2/2/2 Fam Rm $800
188W. Seymerda St.
yam 2/2/1 Fam Rm $675
3/2 - $650 95 S. Desoto St.
2/2/1 - $650 2/2/1 Fam Rm $650
218 S. Lincoln Ave.
rmens 2/1/1 Fam & Screen
2/1 - $500 Room $650
1/1 - $350 907 Penn Hills Dr.
2/2/1 Adult Comm
' See our website: $600
www.jwmortonreal 42 S. Monroe St.
estate.com 2/1/1 Family Rm $550
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs Lynn Davis
352-726-9010 352-422-2522


-primi0


CRYSTAL RIVER,_ 11
Great neighbrhd.
7mos minium lease
S 352-795-7261/No pets







Move In Special

1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 6130/09
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Accepted.

(352) 489-1021


I Free (88 85-24 1. Emil cfg tsfos grncenie o -I .esie wwS . S Sonin-
Mobi 'Hme al Esat Rea Es I Esat
Moil Hoe Moil Hom Moie oes ee e


E12 s TuNE 28 200


I I - I - I


I


I


I










CnRr COUNTYr (FL) CHRONICLE S J 820


-g
AlVALUEINN.com
Hemrnando New Effic.
$250wk. Free int./long
dist. Trailers $185wk.
Inverness 3Br Luxury
Homes fum. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
POND OPEN
11-15 ml to Pwr Plant
FLORAL CITY
1/1, $450/Mo. $550Sec.
Includes water & cable
No pets. (352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





BED1RMS
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985


4th OF JULY SPECIAL
$76 MOVES YOU IN!
. 2 BEDROOMS
STARTING AT $450.
352-257-8048
FLORAL CITY
2BR 1% BA, MH, just
150 yards from fishing
dock, $475. + $300 dep.
No Pets/ Near
Floral City, 10 min. from
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699
FLORAL OAKS
8092 S. Floral Oaks
Circle, Floral City
S352-860-0829
1-2 bd. $468-$498
Elderly, Handicap &
Disabled regardless'
age.
Carpet & Appliances
Cent. Heat & Air
TDD 800-955-8771
"This institution is an
equal opportunity -
provider & employer."





..- : .




FREE RENT!
SUiMMERHILL
Luxury Apts.
Limited Time!
Call for details.
352-563-5657

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Inglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity

LECANTO
I Bedroom
- =(352746-5238-
613-6000/613-5974


INVERNESS
211Tri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. Fst/Lst/Sec.
352-341-1847

INVERNESS COUNTRY
SIDE ESTATES, very Ig
2/1, CHA, W/D hook
up, garage, acre
private, nice area,
upscale neighbor-
hood, waterinc.
beautiful &
spotless $595/mo
(352) 422-3217

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
duplex, all kitchen appli-
ances, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard,
Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1,2,3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
RentalAsst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
SOpportunity




INVERNESS
2/1- All new floors,
nice setting. $500;
2/2- Large rooms,
completely tiled,
screen lanai, very
quief & private. $600'
Washer dryer
hook-ups.
727-446-5871
352-344-0238





- ,- . - - .. .

I
PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs ADAYATOUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad
We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv




CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREIENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
areenbrlarrental.com
Citrus Hills
New A/C, new rugs, Unf.
/2, lsp Qfipog,,ptioLo,
W/D, carport, No Pets
$699 (718) 833-3767


INVERNESS 2/2/1
Whispering Pines Villa
Washer & Dryer,
community pool.
Small pets only. $600.
352-464-2731
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, restricted
pets. $600 mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631 TOLL FREE
INVERNESS
Waterfront 2/2'/2
Community Pool/Boat
Ramp All apple's $700.
mo 352-400-0731




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, $550 mo. + dep.
C/H/A (352) 464-2716
CRYSTAL RIVER
Irg, 2/2 C/H/A, Nice
$585/mo., Includes,
lawn, garbage, water,
No dogs 352-726-9570
HOMOSASSA
New, 212, Rent w/option to
buy. 1300 sq. ft. w/d hk.
up, fans, blinds, refr.,
stovemicrowave, tile,
carpet. $700. month
(352) 592-0893

INVERNESS COUNTRY
SIDE ESTATES, very Ig
2/1, CHA, W/D, hook
up, garage. 1 acre
priv. upscale area,
nice neighborhood,
water inc. beautiful
& spotless $595/mo
(352) 422-3217

Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry, H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815

ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO
Newer 2/2 duplex, all
kitchen appliances,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




AlVALUEINN.com
Hernando New Effic.
$250wk. Free int/long
dist. Trails $185wk.
Inverness 3Br Luxury
Homes furn. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744 ,
POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
HERNANDO
Wateon's Fish Camnp


I





I


GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Invernes
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIGI ULike new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
Beverivd Hills
O Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood.VIII. 3/2/2
3/2 Great area
Citrus Springs
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1
Citrus Hills
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/21/2/2
3/2 Mobile waterfront
352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com

/-** *****
INVERNESS
NEWER
IMMACULATE HOMES
3/212 Back porch, nice
yard, split plan, non
smoker, $800. Mo.

212/1 Patio home,
close to shopping,
garbage pick up and
lawn maint. Included.
$700. Mo. "

Floral City
Gated community 55 +
212/2 + Fla. room,
pool + exercise room.
$750. Mo.
(352) 344-2500
(352) 464-2508
RAINBOW LAKES EST.
2/1 $625/mo., fenced
yd, Irg fl rm. Dunnellon
school district. (239)
438-8085: 455-8858
SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Fl.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
-Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.'
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.


B*1


Quiet park like setting. A1VALUEINN.com
Mobiles, effic.cabins, Hernando New Effic.
00. to $650. Mo. Pets $250wk. Free nt/long
ok. (352) 726-2225 dist. Trailers $185wk.
Inverness 3Br Luxury
IHo turn. $450wk.
S(352)726-4744
. POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant

BEVERLY HILLS
_ en lProoress Ene
fully turn avail now
$825. includes all util-
INVERNESS ties, 100 channel
1 ,1 -TV/internet.
unfurn. $500 --2/ s able-
352-634-5586 (352) 220-2666


Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/21/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747
INVERNESS
Ist Month Free! Water-
front 55+ Park, 1 BR, 1BA
Incl. water & mowing
$475. 352-476-4964




2 to 4 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECKII
Low Down!
352-484-0866
ademission.com
2/1 ..$575/MO
+ $600 sec.
2/1 ..$595./mo $600 sec
(352) 563-5304
BEVERLY HILLS
1 BD w/fla. rm. +
bonus rm.$575/mo
FIRST Month Free
30 S. Desoto 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
111 Carport $525
2/2/1 End porch, patio
$675 (845)282-3504
BEVERLY HILLS 1/1
Carport, shed. Clean.
$550. 352-678-8874 -
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 w/ carport $475 mo.+
$475. Dep.(352)
746-7824
(352) 697-9339
BEVERLY HILLS
2 Poss3BR, BA, Gar
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, CHA, D/W,
19 N. Wadsworth $575
Mo.(352) 422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, CHA, Sec. 8 avail
$625 (352) 382-1344
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1.5 fam rm, porch,.
shed. New carp. & tile
dishwsh c/h/a $650 mo.
86 S. ULincoln 795-7374
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1, $650. monthly.
22 N. Davis/ 586-4474
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1.5 + Fm Rm $650
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
3/2 Nice, CHA. $595/
mo. 352-563-0964 .
BEVERLY HILLS
68 S. Jackson
2/1/1 upgrade
bathrm new paint
& floors through
out. Can be seen
anytime
(352) 746-1300
BEVERLY HILLS
Move in special!
Immaculate 2/2/1, kids
OK, 1st, last, sec. $645
mo Nukes welcome.
352-400-1501
BEVERLY HILLS
Nice 2/1/1, Fla rm $595
E-Z terms 352-400-4275


CITRUS HILLS
3/2 Pool Home
4. Acre, $975
(352)746-4821


CITRUS SPRING
2356 Jonquel 2/2/1
$625. mo.
352-697-1907;526-8432
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/211
Large master suite,
stainless steel appl.
Large lanai. Lease,
+ Dep. No Pets $800.
Mo. (352) 697-3133
CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2, Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731
CRYSTAL RIVER
2-3/1 Near hosp. $695
(727) 631-2680
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 CHA Immed Occup
1st mo. free
(732)942-0666, (848)
525-9047 Iv. msg.
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800/mo
795-6299 697-1240
DUNNELLON
3/2/1, Rainbow.s.ks. Est.
remodeled, 1/4 Acr.
fenced, endcl porch.,
Close to Rainbow River
downtown & schis., $835."
mo. (561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718
FLORAL CITY
1/1 on Lakefront. Stack
W/D, Pets OK, util. Incl.
$625. (813) 241-7117
GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 st $850/mo.
Ist mo. Is $500.
(908) 322-6529
HERNANDO
3/2.5/2 $695 mo. OR
owql.CHA (352) 322-0149
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/rho. st + sec
(352) 628-4210









HOMOSASSA
4/2, Newer, Acre lot.
$875 mo., immed.
occupancy, Ref. Req.
352-628-3543
or 305-804-6168
INVERNESS
2/2, Modern, light
& bright. $650/mo.
F/L/S/352-634-1141
INVERNESS 21211
Clean Nice! $750mo
352-637-0765: 302-9810
INVERNESS
2/2/1scr. rm, Pets
Ok
$600. 1st last, sec
352-
697-0970 local
cell
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
Royal Oaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serve, WD. $B00/moa.
incls, cable /water
949-633-5633


INVERNESS
3/2/2 $800/mo Bit 2005
3605 E. Sanders St.
(813) 739-5965
INVERNESS
3/2/2 privacy fence
Move in Special! $700 1st
mo. /$950 mo.thereafter.
352-346-2932/650-1232
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
412/2 or 312/2 Starting
at $760 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615
INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS WEST 2/2/1
Cute house in woods.
5 Mins, from down-
town. Fenc'd 1/2 acre.
pet dep $700mo
727-410-3248
INVERNESS
Spacious 3/2/2
Newer construction
conveniently
located. Corner lot,
screen porch.
$825 monthly.
Call Kathy or Janet
at 352-726-9136.
PINE RIDGE
3/2/2 w/pool, $950. Mo.
Sally, P&R Realty
(352) 697-2420
Sugarmill Woods
Rent to own. 3/2/2
w/ fireplace, new w/d
750/mo. 382-2904
TERRA VISTA
32/2, Newly built,
gated community,
washerldryer, lawn
care, free golf & club
membership
included. $950. Mo.
HUDSON
Pasco. County,
3/212 Vaulted ceilings,
eat in kitchen, split
bedroom, washer/
dryer, & community
pool included.
Screened patio,

Mark Fredrick
(813) 215-3446
Charles Rutenberg
REALITY




HERNANDO
211.5 SW $495 mo.
OR own. (352) 322-0149
HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 - $850/mo.
+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-3338




BROOKSVILLE
Priv entry & bath, satel-
lite, furn'd. $125wk +
dep. 352-307-0772
CITRUS SPRINGS
Roomates wanted to
share 4 BR house near
schools. (352)
270-9256

CRYSTAL RIVER
Share Condo w/own
priv. rm & Bth. Quiet &
nice neighbors,.Full kit.
priv & pool $100/wk
(352) 795-7263


FORMULA
20' 225 HP Johnson
W/TRIL. $2500
352-634-0708



2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. ncl.
Sclean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
(352) 628-9759

-II

A1VALUEINN.com
Hemando New Effic.
$250wk. Free int./long
dist. TaileS $185wk.
Inverness 3Br ILuur
Homes furn. $450wk.
(352) 726-4744
POOL & POND OPEN
11-15 mi to Pwr Plant
HOMOSASSA
Weekly or weekend
rental. Sleeps 6, w/large
screen porch & dock.
On Homosassa River
w/dock. (336) 384-2054





BUYER REBATE
S 1.000 At Closing*
Buy Now! Great
Values & Low Rates
$8,000 Tax Credit
25+ Yrs Experience
Knowledge/Integrity
Call For Details
RON NEITZ
Broker/Instructor
CITRUS.REALTY
GRbUP
352-795-0060

AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.


JUST SOLD!!
3284 Daffodil Dr.
Pine Ridge






Let me sell vours!
DAVE CROWE
The Hedick Group
352-585-4449

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is" in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
Informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



P , ,', ,


NEW HOMES
STARTING At 575,000
On Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Lc.# CBCO59685


Couch

SRealty
& Investments, Inc.
SFor All Your Real Estate Needs.

Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker


1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL 34442
. " Office: 352 344-8018- efl:-352 212'3559- -.
www.Rcouch.com


CrrRUS COUNTY (FL E


SUNDAYv, JUNiB 28, 2oog E13









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E14 simflAv Trnri 2R. 2009


INVERNESS COUNTRY
SIDE ESTATES, very Ig.
2/1, CHA, W/D
hook-up, garage,
1 acre priv. upscale
area, nice neighbor-
hood, water inc.
beautiful &
spotless $595/mo
(352) 422-3217




2/2 with carport. FL
room.Remodeled,new
appliances, inside laun-
dry, tile baths.$66,700 or
will rent for $650 per mo.
352-489-1239
3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
Home, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324

ATTENTION!!
BRAND NEW
DOI3BLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, SO-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
Repos Available
Kinder
Mobile Home
(352) 622-2460

ONLY $129K 6rm/ POOL
OPEN SUNDAY 12-5
Bay Wind/Eat in Kit
New Berb/Wood/Tlle
2-Sts Bhind Comm Ctr
GAINSBORO 465-8863





sprinklers, fenced yd on
Equestrian trail, 2100'
under air, $239,000
OBO 4577 W Pinto
Loop. 352-422-0174






5770 N ELKCAM BLVD
Mitch Underwoood
Dipomat II,' 05,
3 bedrm, office,
3 bath. 2 car garage
formal DR. Living rm.
famrm 3,611 s.f undrf.
solar hted pool
breakfast bar, eat-in
kit. Many upgrades
on 1 acre $335,000
Leslie Landham
Foxfire Realty
352-422-2382


RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION -








First Time Home Buyers!!
Must See!! 414 Adams,
$8,000. down payment
credit. Everything New.
(352)746-9770
P&R Realty
FOR SALE BY OWNER
88 SJ Kellner, Bev. Hills
2/2/2/2, FP, Call Anytime
OPEN HOUSE on
SUNDAYS 11A-3P
$118K, 352-746-6093
RENT TO OWN
Easy Terms
3 BD or 2BD
NoCredit !!No Prob-
lem !!352-795-0088




ARBOR COURT
2/2/1,'Glass Enclosed
Lanai, Corner Location
$79,900
Dianne McDonald
REMAX REALTY ONE
(352) 795-2441

-I

4/3, Pool, 2.1/2 acre
farm,2-stall barn, $198k
NO Owner Financing
2875 E. Timberwood Ct.
(352) 302-0951




2 to 4 Bedrooms.
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low Down!
352-484-0866
iademission.com


-ACTIONM 352-795-RENT
EUIUMAAIDIT AW, OC.www.CitrusCauntyftamellentalsxcomj


HOMES * MOBILES * APARTMENTS
- FEATURED PROPERTIES
.CRYSTAL RIVER 21Apartment ........................$475
3/2/2 Furn. Waterfront .......$1,500
SMW on Golf Course, Cqndo, Furn. w/Uties.......$950
PINE RIDGE 3/2/2 House .....................................$950
INVERNESS 2/2.5 Canal Front Townhouse ........$650
HOMOSASSA 2 1A.4prerl . . $600 AMou:.- uu rj


H
3/2/1 office, nice area,
1036 Fordham Terr.
$82,500. Highlands
560-7379/613-9616
3/2/2 1560 SQFT.
Pool w/oversized cage
& decking. Granite kit.,
new roof. Cul-de-sac.
Nice Indscap/fruit trees
$161,900. 352-422-0429
Affordable 2/2/1,
on 3/4 acre in the Cityl
$76,900. 352-344-4192;
613-6364/3005 W.
Monroe St off
Indepence




By Owner $85,500.
8725 Gospel Island
3BR, 90 x 120 fenced
Lot, If Interested
Call 726-3238
to see inside,
Furniture Included

By Owner,
3/2/1, pool, 1/2 acre,
(352) 341-4378
For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hosp.; library,
WTI, 518 Poinsettia, Ave.
(352) 860-0878

FORECLOSURES
EVERYWHERE!
RATES-R-LOW!
BUY NOW!


Deb Infantine
RE/MAX Realty One
Cell (352) 302-8046
Office (352) 637-6200

Like Country Living?
3/2/2 custom built 2005
Famrm. 18x24 sports
pool w/scr encl. 6x6
jaccuzzi, wood firs.
wood burning Firepl
Wood cabinets &
granite counter tops,
15K back up house
gen. privatel.25 acres.
4439 Stallion Ln. In The
Ranches asking $239k
OBO (352) 573-0029

RealtySelect
Citrus.corn


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Ret lect
, , L . .. . " )r 1


C6aj frqor e ip J tt~fi9 LOER 40 TO CH OrdROM I .J5?t1759& 5 65


WHISPERING PINES
VILLA 2/2 screen porch,
garage, fully furnished.
W/D. End unit. $75K
352-201-7916




'05, 312 WlDeck
1512 Sq. ft. on 1 hill top
acre. 7770 Pinto Ct.
$159,900 (352) 726-6644
www.crossland
realty.com

2/111 Cottage on
.33 AC. Pretty Country
Rd. 93393 Istachatta Rd.
$92,400.(352) 726-6644
www.crossland
realty.com

3/2/1, 1 Acre,
On Private Lake,
Beautiful, New rf., new
siding. Has Separate
Guest house. Serious
Inquires only! $320,000.
(352) 726-0477

Great Neighborhood
2/2/1, Enclosed porch.
9071 Tara Pt. $69,900.
Bring All Offersl!!
(352) 726-6644
www.crosslandc
realty.com




4 ml to Power Plant &
boat ramp! Beautiful
c.b. 3/2/2, dbl lot, trees
& privacy. Newer appl.
roof & A/C. Move in
ready, Energy efficient-
$140 avg! Fenced yard,
boat/ car port storage,
shed, etc. $99,000, OBO
352-795-8926









BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI-





Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

CONNELL HEIGHTS
2/2, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scr. por., new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir /C.R.. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603

Horses, Horses,
Horses II
4/2.5/2 on 2.5 acres,
5-15 horses allowed.
- $249K. $8,750
Dwn, FHA.
2/1/2 on 5 acres, $149K.
$5,200 Dwn. FHA.
' - Rpalty5,USA .
j:'' (800)1 559-4321 . .


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Homesu I^^ Homes I


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Waterfront
Homes I


Citrus Cou
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Lots For Sale


CitusCouty









CrnrRus CoI!NTV (F[) CHRoNvicLE SNA UE2,20 1


PLUMBER
Continued from Page E9

on, since hot water is already flowing
at the fixture, the result is almost in-
stant hot water for the user. This con-
cept has been around for decades, and
many larger homes in the. past have
used this type of commercial system.
Recently, a few companies have de-
veloped some low-cost re-circulating
options for the rest of us to install in
existing homes, without the high cost
of adding a return hot-water line back
to the water heater. It was a brilliant
idea that made this all possible. These
new systems are actually using the
cold-water lines in your home for the
return lines back to the water heater.
Here is my attempt to simplify this
type of system: Most homes have two
water lines (hot and cold) going to
faucets and showers. The hot- and
cold-water lines run together through-
out a home to the same places, but are
not usually connected. Think of them
like north and south lanes on a high-
way system. However, if you install a U-
turn on a highway, you can easily
change direction and go back to where
you came from.
This is the basic principle of a resi-
dential re-circulating hot-water system.
A pump is installed at the water heater
and a "special" mixing tee or valve is
installed at the farthest fixture. This
backflow-controlled tee fitting safely
connects the hot and cold lines, and

E Clubs are invited to submit infor
nation about regular meetings
for publication in The Meeting
Place each Thursday. E-mail to
community@chronicleonline.corn.
Include "The Meeting Place" in
the subject line.


creates a loop back to the water heater.
The tricky part is that the system is
designed to keep the hot-water lines
hot, but stops the circulation before the
hot water fills the cold-water lines. So,
instead of having constant circulation
all day like the hotels, the residential
system willawork in spurts, pushing hot
water- in a few short bursts several
times throughout the day. The result is
almost the same - hot or at least warm
water ready to go at the fixture without
having to drain the line of cold water.
Please note that even though I'm
trying to explain this in an "easy to un-
derstand" way, this is a complicated
system and needs to be installed by a
licensed plumber only. The good news
is that this type of system can usually
be installed in a day and the equip-
ment is affordable, so it should not
break the bank


Master Contractor/Plumber Ed Del
Grande is known internationally as
the author of the book "Ed Del
Grande's House Call" and for hosting
TVshows on Scripps Networks and
HGTVPro.com. For information, visit
eddelgrande.com or write eddel-
grande@hgtvpro.com. Always consult
local contractors and codes.


*NE HOE FO SALE


4, ..


:5 B W D
P*OO HOE325/ TD


17 BLCK WLLOW T. N
POOL HOE3253+MDAR


* Gourmet Kitchen * Granite Counters * Tile Floors
* Spa Master Bath * Security System * Vacuum System

Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd. W. mIAm Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd.
to Left on Cypress Blvd t. to Left on W. to Left on Cypress Blvd. E.to Left
Corkwood Blvd. to Left on Boxwood on Black Willow st. to Left on Black
CL House on Right of cul-de-sac. Willow C. N. House op Right.


S6nhoner.com-I


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS

* Photos need to be in sharp focus When identifying persons in your photo, do so from left to
right. Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well: submit the digital image via disk
or e mail. Photos submitted electronically should be in ma> mum resolution JPEG (.jpg) for
mat. Photos cannot be returned without a self addressed, stamped envelope.
* For more information, call 563-5660.


CHEERFUL AND BRIGHT only start to
d, j-,rn.e his beautiful custom built h..4n�, 1VIh
remarkable quality, in the very j , Ai.e
Swetwtlr Point neighborhood. Design;d r, Ir, '
2r ',r uites this home has somehlr,,,',g I..,r E - -
everyone Third bedroom is currently ueid i- ]i :
REDUCED PRICEI ,, b, f:.:. cr.'. sv ruI-
I. . . .. a i cp.ri.,:iu r, nome office with built-ins. U[.j.'yad " .,:.,, C,.,i,lJuiI, h. -, j . ,, ,. ,.' a � ,.-i
508 QUAIL ROOST - 2/1 close to town with many galore, including ultra-violet air filters built in screened lanal with. hot tub. 694 N. SAVARY AVE.
updates. Make an offerl!! MLS#319947 ONLY the central A/C system. $289,900 $79,900 Owners motivated. MLS#333588 Call
$89,900. Call Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752 for ML#332113 Call Linda Bega 352-726-5263. Toya Koch 352-613-6427 or Debbie Tannery 352-
more details CT. -MLS#332113 Call Linda Bega 352-726-5263. 613983.




WELL-KEPT 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH, POOL
HOME. ]. , -. ,:i..l ,:,:.i . r..t>,, :., BEST DEAL IN TOWN- uJr,,T,,r,-1 ", d.:.:.,,, LOVELY HOME ON PARK-LIKE SETTING
, m.ir, . ii...,'- ,1y.1 . ,,-, � , -.,�] ; i,' i '-Ju,,'.j Ir. r,.:,[ " r, ,o ... .. - : HII: .:,,�,.].:. i^ ,,,, ,K : PO N D. E.u.:., irf. H,1,1: i,.] ..c j. , i : ,u. :. . .,-1
summers days in your own private pool. Large rooms pool, lawn maintenance, building insurance and more. porch. Roomy 3/2/2, open floor plan, vaulted ceilings.
thru-out. One Year Home Warranty to buyer. 99,500 Must see this home, not a drive by. MLS#330148 Appliances included, even the washer and dryer.
MLS#333937 - 9573 N. BUNKER WAY - Call Linda ASKING $97,900. Call Kathy Chapman-Tibbetts Every Mhing is like new $129,900 - 1 . BLE
Bega 352-7265263. 352-726-5263. CT Call Unda Bega 352-726-5263.




- PICTURE PERFECT 31212 HOME ON 12 ACRE
ITS THE CADILLAC OF FIXER UPPERSI IT IS HOTTER THAN HECK - Co.:,,, ,.,. ,.:u r,']i i,,,:i o, ,).: .i,.:... ]ii.,. ,.i, :i :r., '
2/1 featuring newer roof and detached shed. Take a remodeled. in & out! Detached two-car garage with appliances, interior laundry..:and topped off with One
peek and make an offer! MLS#327677 - 1104 workshop, dock, and topped with One Year Home Year Home Warranty! 9327 E. MOCASSIN SLOUGH
MAPLENUT, INVERNESS - $34,900 Call Tomika Warranty. $149,900 MLS#332353 Call Tmika RD., .INVERNESS - $129,900 MLS#332363 Call
Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Michelle Wells Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or .Michelle Wells Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 or Michelle
352-400-0263. 352-400-0263. Wells 352-400-0263. *


SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 2oog E15


CrrRUS COU1VTr(F E






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E16 SrUNDAY Irni 28. 2009


ARBORIST
Continued from Page Ell

According to the American Forest Magazine, a tree
left to grow is worth $196,250. A tree grows to this
worth because in 50 years it produced $62,500 in air
pollution control, $37,500 in water recycling and hu-
midity control, $32,250 in wildlife shelter and $2,500
worth of protein in the leaves and bark consumed by
wildlife. Also, - a tree properly placed provides a
shade benefit equivalent to a four-ton air conditioner
- and the aesthetic value is priceless. Before you re-
move a tree, think about the whole picture. Pruning
may be a the best way to go in certain situations.

Kerry Kreider is a practicing arborist, a member of
the International Society ofArboriculture, a tree
preservationist and president ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. Ifyou have any questionshe can be reached at
302-2815 or email actionproarborist@yahoo.com


FRI


Thef
way to
supplies
memory
ORGt
KITCH


UG AL SHARPEN SCISSORS: When
UGAL using soap-filled scrubbing pads
like S.O.S., wet the object to be
Continued from Page E10 scrubbed instead of the pad.
The pad lasts a lot longer and
irst tip is a wonderful doesn't rust as quickly. I also
organize your baking usually cut the pad in two pieces
s. It will create fond before using. This stretches the
ies for children, too. pads and sharpens my kitchen
ANIZE YOUR shears at the same time. - Di-
EN: Buy three large, anne, New England.


clear plastic tubs (40 quarts).
Label them cookies, cake and'
pie. Then put into each tub all
the supplies and utensils relat-
ing to that category. Baking is a
snap now when the grandkids
come and bring out one plastic
tub. I use a closet near the.
kitchen to store the tubs. It
clears out the kitchen and
makes it so easy to find things.
-Janice G., Washington


Sara Noel is the owner of Fru-
gal Village (wwwfrugalvil-
lage.com), a Web site that
offers practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday living.
Write to Sara Noel, c/o United
Media, 200 Madison Ave.,
4th Floor, New York, NY
10016, or e-mail sara@
frugalvillage.com.


784770


20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. 1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Hernando, FL 34442 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-0744 (352) 527-1820 t
i 1-888-222-0856 1-888-553-2223 LENDER
For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to:www.floridashowcaseproperties.com

li ~~~~ ~ u A--. lw1 IB ..^ IL� ^ ^


the link between plans and reality

= Dennis |)amato
State Co ,t,. J CGC-004344

GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC. I
A TRADITION OF QUALITY SINCE 1972
* Consultation & Project/Plan Review
* Design Services
* Cost Estimating * Design-Build Construction
S * Custom Crafted Homes * Waterfront Homes
* "Cracker-Style" Homes & Buildings
* Residential Renovations
.- * Commercial Construction & Remodeling
- Adaptive Re-Use & Restoration of Buildings

430NE 3rdl Street P.O.Box 1312,CrsltalRiver,FL34423-1312 a


s 1KEYl Your Suamnnill Woods Specialists
,ERA K- , -.c L 8015 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446
Office 382-1700 * 1-800-237-1112 * Facx: (352) 382-5S80 1

CAROLYN LISTER 120
S Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
- * cell: 422-4620 KEY
SA Office: 382-70oo0
' View virtual tours '; wwwjstersUngs.com

OPEN HOUSES
Sunday, June 28, 2009 1-3 PM


*nT * FIRST TIME BUYERS DRIVE-BY
IN SUGARMILL WOODS:
57 Douglas #110 $85,000
Enjoy a 2 Story Condo where all the
outside work is done for you. There are 2
master suites with their own private 6aths
& great closet space + one w/ a 5 x 24'
balcony. Main floor has great room with
sliders to screened lanai; large kitchen,
2.5 bath and 1 car garage. #331935
S26 Chinaberry $90,000
8 Oleander Ln $94,750 Maintain your own 48 x 90 lot. Here are 2
* Spacious Villa: 1528 Sq Ft under air bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 car garage +
* 2 bedrm, 2 bath, 2 car garage parking for 3 more cars. Great-room plus
* Vaulted ceilings, Atrium enclosed Lanai. Newer appliances & heat
Dir: Sugarmill entrance on Cypress E to pump. Use $5,000 decorating allowance
Left on 2nd Douglas (Pro Shop); rt on for new carpeting. Backs up to protected
Bumelia; It on Oleander #334963 greenbelt. #329648


'Ut


Prudential Florida Showcase Properties
CITRUS HILLS OFFICE PINE RIDGE OFFICE


E16 sNDAY UNE 2 200