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Citrus County chronicle
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/01685
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: June 21, 2009
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:01685

Full Text

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C I T R U. CO.0 U N T Y


TODAY & Monday morning
HIGH Heat advisory in effect.
96 10 percent chance of a
LOW stray shower.
S72 PAGE A4
JUNE 21, 2009 Florida's


Barn meeting remains a mystery


MIKE WRIGHT
mwright@chronicleonline.com
Chronicle
On one side is the state senator,
insisting he met with a top county
official, showed him plans for a
5,000-square-foot barn, and was
told it didn't require a building
permit
On the other is that official, a
27-year government veteran, sen-
ior member of the county staff,
saying he doesn't recall the con-
versation ever taking place - but
not outright denying that it did.
" In the.middle are Citrus County
commissioners who are left to
wonder what, if anything, hap-
pened between state Sen. Charlie
Dean and Development Services


Director Gary Maidhof.
Three commissioners said they
are inclined to believe Dean be-
cause his recollection of the con-
versation is specific.
They say Maidhof's explana-
tion - that the meeting took place
if Dean said it did - seems hol-
low.
"We haven't been able to get
straight answers," Commissioner
Winn Webb said. "Gary didn't re-
member the conversation with
Sen. Dean. Sen. Dean was pretty
adamant that it took place."
Neither Commissioners Dennis
Damato nor Joe Meek offered a
comment on whether they
thought the meeting occurred.
"I don't want to speculate at all
on that," Meek said.


Regardless, County Administra-
tor Brad Thorpe has removed
Maidhof from the loop in the
Dean barn permitting case. I
Thorpe is assigning the case to .
Building Division Director Den-
nis MacNeil, who works for Maid-
hof. However, MacNeil will report
directly to Thorpe.
Thorpe .said Friday he told
Dean's attorney that MacNeil, and
not Maidhof, will oversee permit-
ting compliance.
"I think because of the public
interest in this process, it just be-
comes more transparent," Thorpe
said. "Because of the sensitivity of
it, it's good that these people re-
port directly to me,"
See BARN/Page A4 Charlie Dean's "barn" is shown in this recent file photo.


Dad and daughter make 'dynamic duo'

KERi LYNN McHALE n .
kmchalegchronicleonline.com''
Chronicke . A.. .., .


A tthe end of February. Citrus
Springs resident David Tucker
was hospitalized for stomach
pains. On March 3. doctors di-
agnosed the 31-year-old husband and
father with Stage IV non-Hodgkin's
lymphoma - cancer.
"He had numerous tumors on his
liver, spleen.
Editor's note: lymph nodes
The Chronicle solicited and on some
on his bones,'
nominations for ex- s e
traordinary fathers for 32-year-o wife
a special Father's Day Jennifer,
feature. Out of all the wrote in her e-
submissions, one in mail to the
particular stood out. A Chronicle.
Citius Springs wife felt After the-di--
compelled to send an agnosis came
e-mail about her hus- the tests: liver
band. This is his story. biopsy, bone
marrow aspi-
ration, spinal tap, PET scan and more.
Then came the treatment
Through it all, the loss of hair and
weight and the nausea - the side ef-
fects of chemotherapy- Tucker has
remained positive and put his family
members' needs and feelings first
Tucker, a plant manager for the
phosphate rock mining com pany
Mankb, continues to work to support
his family in addition to pitching in
whenever he can to do housework or
cook dinner.
"Only when I force him to sit down,
rest, take a nap or just take it easy, will
he do that," Mrs. Tucker wrote in her e-
mail.
See DAD/Page A7


- DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
David Tucker, center, along with his Wife Jennifer, left, and daughter Courtney, 13, right, had been a "typical father" according
to a letter Jennifer wrote nominating her husband for being honored in the Citrus County Chronicle on Father's Day. In February
of this year everything changed and David Tucker is showing amazing strength playing the hand life has dealt him and his fam-


Several deserving area fathers were nominated to be recognized for their parenting abilities. They include:


Billy Lott, 74
OF LECANTO
Nominated by his
stepdaughter, Yvonne Sphon,
ofiCrystal River
Lott, who died June 7 of the
disease Wegener's granulomato-
sis, was married to his wife for 36


years and was the father of one,
stepfather of five. grandfather of
14 and great-grand father of 14.
"He was loved by every one of
them and he loved them dearly,"
Sphon said.
Lott raised his five stepchil-
dren like his own; his only bio-
logical child died in the 1970s


while serving in the Navy, Sphon
said. He taught multiple family
members, who are now success-
ful in the industry, trade skills
needed in the aluminum con-
struction industry, the industry
he worked in most of his life.
Lott loved spending time with
his family, the outdoors and


woodworking, especially con-
structing birdhouses.. Sphon
said.
"He was a wonderful dad,"
Sphon said. "He loved to be out-
side. We would do yard work to-
gether I remember going in the
garden with him when we were
small."


George
Zebrowski, 84
OF DUNNELLON
Nominated by his daughter,
Karen Zebrowski,
ofDunnellon.
See FATHERS/PageA7


Defiant Tehran protesters battle police


Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Thousands of
protesters defied Iran's highest
authority Saturday and marched
on waiting security forces that
fought back with baton charges,
tear gas and water cannons as the
crisis over disputed elections
lurched into volatile new ground.
In a separate incident, a state-
run television channel reported


that a suicide bombing at the
shrine of the Islamic Revolution
leader Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini killed at least two peo-
ple and wounded eight. The re-
port could be not independently
evaluated due to government re-
strictions on journalists.
If proven true, the reports could
enrage conservatives and bring
strains among backers of opposi-
tion leader Mir Hossein Mousavi.


Demonstrators line Wilshire Boulevard at Veteran Avenue on Saturday
in the Westwood district of Los Angeles in a display of solidarity with
the people of Iran who believe their presidential election was rigged.
Associated Press


Classifieds ......................D5
Crossword ..................A14
Editorial ..........................C2
Horoscope ...............A14
Lottery Numbers ............B4
Lottery Payouts ..............B6
M ovies ........................... All
Obituaries ...................A6
Together........................A13


Fatherly advice
The president urges men to be better dads than his./Page A8

DealI StrUck Drug companies will foot some bills./Page A8

Train derailed Gerry on Gary Publisher weighs in on Maidhof./Page Cl
Train hauling ethanol derails,. .-. ......... ....
explodes, killing 1./Page A8 FrOOee N.Y Times reporter escapes Afghan captivity./Page A6


Another state channel broadcast
images of broken glass but no
other damage or casualties, and
showed a witness saying three
people had been wounded.
The extent of injuries in the
street battles also was unclear.
Some witnesses said dozens were
hurt and gunfire was heard.
Some bloggers and Twitter
users claimed that there had been
numerous fatalities in Saturday's
unrest, reports that could not be
immediately verified.
The clashes along one of
See TEHRAN/Page A4


Hair necessities
Local businesswoman
recognized for getting
boost from SCORE.
6 /Page Dl



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CITRUS MEMORIAL

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CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fdb aumml� j uNn � 1, 4VU7











Page A3 - SUNDAY, JUNE 21,2009



,TATE&


LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SAroundthe
COUNTY
- Progress Energy rate
increase hearing set
The series of public hearings
:to discuss Progress Energy's
requested rate increases to
pay for the advance costs of its
nuclear power upgrades have
been scheduled.
The meetings will take
place in July throughout the
Tampa Bay area. A meeting
is scheduled from 9 a.m. to
noon July 17, at the Citrus
County Auditorium, 3610 S.
Florida Ave., Inverness.
The hearings are being con-
ducted prior to a full rate hear-
ing in September, when the
Florida Public Service Com-
; mission will make a decision on
the rate increase application.
* If additional information is
,needed regarding the hearing
j locations and related issues,
call state Sen. Mike Fasano's
office at (727) 848-5885 or
toll free at (800) 948-5885.
Key Center brings
Blues Brothers back
It's red carpet time again at
'The Key Training Center.
Everyone is invited to
"Reach for the Stars" with a
*fun-filled evening of unique
,entertainment featuring the
Classic Hollywood glamour of
the legendary Blues Broth-
ers. Back by popular de-
mand, the Jake and Elwood
Blues Revue is the only
Blues Brothers act in the
',world sanctioned by the
Belushi Estate and Dan
lAykroyd.
The 27th annual Run for the
Money DinnerAuction will be
,July 17, with food by Outback
,Steakhouse of Inverness, a
dinner show and unique live
sand silent auction items.
SThe social hour and silent
auction begins at 5:30'p.m.
-with dinner starting at 6:30.
Tickets are available at
,$50 per person with the event
,being at the Chet Cole Life
, Enrichment Center located at
:'the Key Center's Lecanto
campus.
Proceeds are used to pro-
�vide scholarships to more
than 50 individuals who re-
.iceive no funding from the
estate of Florida for needed
services and to deliver year-
;round services to 300 devel-
"opmentally disabled adults.
For more information and
tickets, call the Key Center
1Foundation at 527-8228.
Are you the next
American Idol?
Auditions for the 2010 sea-
son of "Americafi Idol" will be
,July 7 to 9 at the Amway
Arena in Orlando. If you're
.planning to try your luck at a
-shot at the title, we want to
' know and follow your journey.
,Contact Nancy Kennedy at
nkennedy@chronicleonline
.corn or call 564-2927.
Slow down, watch for
manatees on Fourth
Save the Manatee Club re-
Sminds the boating community
'to be extra cautious over the
busy Fourth of July weekend.
Boaters should follow all
posted boat speed regula-
tions, slow down if manatees
' are in the area, and stay in
' deep water channels when
possible.
, Call the Florida Fish &
'Wildlife Conservation Cornm-
' mission at (888) 404-3922 or
#FWC or*FWC on your cellu-
lar phone, or use VHF Chan-
' nel 16 on your marine radio, if:
* you see a manatee with
Sounds, tilting, in distress,
Wrapped in fishing line or
dead;
* you observe a manatee
calf (less than 6 feet in
. length) by itself with no adults
Around for an extended pe-
riod of time;
* you see anyone harass-
Sing a manatee;
* you see boaters speed-
ing in a protected area.
Florida boaters can request


a free, "Please Slow: Mana-
tees Below" waterproof yellow
banner by contacting Save
the Manatee Club via e-mail
at education@savetheman
atee.org. Include full mailing in-
formation along with the area
where you boat in Florida.
-From staff reports


Researchers take on rush hour


Miami students get crash course

on Florida's infamous roadways


Associated Press

MIAMI - The students sit
at long desks, their eyes
glued to big screens show-
ing traffic-choked highways.
A simulator allows the stu-
dents to create a traffic ac-
cident and try to reduce the
delay it causes.
Researchers at the Inte-
grated Intelligent Trans-
portation System
Laboratory at Florida Inter-
national University are-


working to advance traffic
research, a field that has
yielded technologies from
optimally timed stoplights
to highway ramps that
measure vehicle flow.
The lab debuted last
month in collaboration with
the Florida Department of
Transportation, as part of
the Lehman Center for
Transportation Research at
the College of Engineering.
Forty-five masters and
doctoral students seeking


degrees in transportation
engineering use the facility.
Its director, Mohammed
Hadi, said South Florida,
where congested roadways
can spur bouts of road rage,
gives students ample oppor-
tunities to put research to
test.
Cameras and motion de-
tectors along the highway
track traffic or vehicle
speeds and transmit the in-
formation to the DOT. Lab
researchers can use the in-
formation to see how many
vehicles are being diverted
or if traffic is slowing.
When ramp signals were
built along Interstate 95, stu-


dents participated in the re-
search and went out to the
field to see how the technol-
ogy was working. The lab is
also used to promote the 511
system of call-in traffic infor-
mation. If the state Depart-
ment of Transportation's
systems ever failed, the FIU
lab could fill in.
One of the lab's Ph.D. stu-
dents, Yohannes Kesete, 27,
came to FIU from the north-
eastern African country of
Eritrea in hopes of learning
how to improve road infra-
structure in his homeland.
He plans to return to Eritrea
after several years of engi-
neering work in the U.S. He's


fascinated by the fact that
whatever the traffic issue,
there's always a solution.
"We can work as far as
your imagination takes
you," he said.
John Augustine, deputy
director of the Intelligent
Transportation Systems
joint program office, a divi-
sion of the U.S. Department
of Transportation, said re-
searchers working in the
field could develop systems
to allow vehicles to commu-
nicate wirelessly and that
alert traffic controllers to
know, for example, when a
car's windshield wipers are
activated.


Rocket scientist


BRIAN LaPETER/Cnronmoie
Christian Miller, 5, lines up some homemade water-bottle rockets on Friday at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness during the final day of
Cub Scout camp. Camp Director Gwyn Young said 23 boys in first through fifth grades participated in the weeklong camp. Each day had a
different theme, she said, with Friday's being outer space.


State BRIEFS


Man shot 10 times drives
to sheriffs office for help
WEST PALM BEACH -Authorities
said a man who had been shot at least
10 times drove himself to the Palm
Beach County Sheriffs Office headquar-
ters for help.
The, man, who has not been identi-
fied, drove up to the building around 11
p.m. Thursday. A sheriffs spokeswoman
said the injured mfan was takernby heli-
copter to a Delray Beach hospital for
treatment. He was expected to survive.
The man told authorities he was driv-
ing near the Palm Beach International
Airport about a half hour earlier when an
unknown man approached his vehicle,
opened his passenger-side door and
began firing, hitting him mostly in the
torso.
Woman driving with baby
charged with DUI
ST. PETERSBURG - Authorities
said a St. Petersburg woman was driv-
ing drunk with her infant son in her truck
when she crashed into a house.
St. Petersburg police said witnesses
reported a woman, later identified as 28-
year-old Billie Jean Vercellona, running
red lights and driving into oncoming traf-
fic lanes just after midnight Friday. Ver-
cellona's truck eventually went off the
road, hit two parked vehicles and then
hit a house. Witnesses pulled the
woman and her 5-month-old son from
the truck. The mother and child were
both checked out at nearby hospitals.
Vercellona was charged with DUI in-
volving property damage, child abuse or
rieglect and three counts of battery on a
health care provider. She was being
held on $8,500 bail.
Officer put on leave after
two shootings in one week
MIAMI BEACH - Officials say a
Miami Beach Police officer is on admin-
istrative leave after being involved in two
fatal shootings in less than a week.
Last Sunday, police said Officer Adam
Tavss was involved in the shooting
death of a 29-year-old tourist from Vir-
ginia.
Tavss was placed on administrative
leave and was cleared for duty on
Thursday. Later that night, officers re-
sponded to an armed carjacking of a
taxi. Officers said the suspect then fled
onto the Macarthur Causeway, driving
west in the eastbound lanes.
That's when police say the suspect


struck another car head on. When he
got out of the taxi, he exchanged gunfire
with officers.
The suspect was killed. Police say
Tavss - and another officer involved -
are now on administrative leave.
Miami man killed while
inspecting train tracks
MIAMI - Police said a Metromover
car rolled over and killed a station su-
pervisor as he inspected the tracks.
The accident happened Saturday.
The computerized vehicle, which is not
driven by a conductor, was stopped, but
moved forward for an unknown reason.
Police found the body about 100 feet
from the platform; the identity of the su-
pervisor wasn't released.
This is the second public transit
worker death in the last week. On Sun-
day night, a 60-year-old Metrorail secu-
rity officer was shot and killed by two
men in a station garage.
Man charged with beating
puppy to'death
LAKE CITY -Authorities said a Lake
City man beat a puppy to death and en-
couraged two boys to help him.
The Columbia County Sheriff's Office
reported that 26-year-old Jerry David
Barker Jr. was arrested Monday on a
warrant for felony animal cruelty and
child abuse without bodily harm.
Authorities said the two boys were
playing with the 8-month-old dog in their
yard when the puppy apparently nipped
at one of them. Barker became angry
and started kicking and beating the ani-
mal. A sheriffs spokesman said Barker
then tied the dog up and hit him with a
shovel, a nail-studded board and a gar-
den hose.
Although Barker encouraged the boys
to hurt the dog, they reportedly refused.
Barker was being held without bail.
Man sentenced to 15.
years for fatal crash
LARGO -A Sarasota man has been
sentenced to 15 years in prison for
causing a crash that killed a Dunedin el-
ementary school teacher.
A Pinellas County judge handed
down 26-year-old James Fancher's sen-
tence, the maximum allowed by law, at
a hearing Friday. He had been found
guilty in April of vehicular homicide.
Authorities said Fancher's car was
traveling around 75 mph in a 45 mph
zone in October 2007 when he crashed
into a sport utility vehicle with three peo-


pie inside. Police say 26-year-old Jen-
nifer Nolletti was thrown from the back
seat and died at the scene of the crash.
Boys sought after playing
with dead rabid bat
FORT MYERS - Lee County health
officials are trying to track down several
boys spotted playing with a dead bat
later found to be infected with rabies.
The Lee County Health Department
reported that a witness saw at least five
boys, estimated to be between 10 and
12 years old, handling, kissing and play-
ing with a bat Monday on a Fort Myers
Beach pier. Witnesses retrieved the bat,
fearing it might be rabid, and turned it
over to authorities. The animal was sent
to a state lab in Tampa, where it tested
positive for rabies and was identified as.
at Brazilian Free Tail bat.
Two boy were located Friday after-
noon. Health officials said rabies is a po-
tentially fatal disease, and the remaining
boys must be found and vaccinated im-
mediately.
Road worker
injured by truck
PALM SPRINGS- Authorities said a
construction worker was seriously in-
jured when he was hit by a truck while
working on a Palm Springs road.
The Palm Beach County Sheriffs Of-
fice reported that 54-year-old Ernest
Chambers Howell was wearing a traffic
vest in a marked construction area early
Friday morning when 19-year-old Tiffany
Ann-Marie Lanieri drove through traffic
cones and hit him. Howell was part of a
road crew that was working on a resur-
facing project.
Howell was taken by helicopter to a
Delray Beach hospital and was ex-
pected to survive.
Authorities.are investigating the
cause of the crash.
Wendy's employee fatally
shot, co-worker sought
JACKSONVILLE - Authorities said
they captured a Jacksonville Wendy's
employee who shot and killed one of his
co-workers.
The sheriffs office reported that 27-
year-old Thomas Theo Brown was
picked up at a hotel off Interstate 95 on
Friday afternoon. His co-worker, 22-
year-old Jaunese Miller, was fatally shot
Thursday afternoon.
A sheriffs spokesman said Brown left
the store Thursday, went home to get a
gun and was overheard talking about


being fed up with work and threatening
to kill someone. Brown left home and ar-
rived back at the store wearing his
Wendy's uniform. One shot was heard
coming from inside, where several cus-
tomers were eating or ordering lunch.
Friends and family of Brown and
Miller said a dispute had been ongoing
between the two.
Louisville police officer
arrested near Ruskin
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -A Louisville po-
lice officer has been placed on paid ad-.
ministrative leave after being arrested
in Florida.
Louisville Metro police spokesman
Dwight Mitchell said Lt. Jerald Fifer will
remain on leave while an internal in-
vestigation is completed.
Fifer, 43, was arrested Thursday
near Ruskin and charged with false im-
prisonment, battery and aggravated
battery with a deadly weapon, accord-
ing to online jail records. He was being
held in the Hillborough County Jail on
Friday.
Mitchell says Fifer's arrest followed a
domestic dispute, but he did not have
details. Messages left for Florida High-
way Patrol Lt. Chris Miller and Fifer's
listed attorney, James Fifer, were not
immediately returned.Friday.
The Courier-Journal reported that
Fifer was suspended for 25 days in
2003 after crashing his personal car in
a drunken driving accident in Louisville.
Sentencings delayed
in Miami terror case
MIAMI -The sentencing of five
Miami men convicted of plotting terror
attacks against Chicago's Sears Tower
and several FBI offices are off until Sep-
tember.
The five had been scheduled for sen-
tencing July 27. But that date was de-
layed until Sept. 8 in an order dated
Thursday from U.S. District Judge Joan
Lenard.
The judge gave no reason but de-
fense attorneys had asked for additional
time to prepare various filings.
The five men were convicted in May
in their third trial of conspiring to stage
the attacks. Two earlier trials ended in
mistrials. Two of the original "Liberty City
Seven" defendants were acquitted.
Prosecutors said the men planned at-
tacks with an FBI informant posing as a
terrorist. The men insisted they intended
no violence.
*-From wire reports









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A4 SUNDAY. JUNE 21. 2009


JEHR AN off demonstrations or risk
being held responsible for
"bloodshed, violence and ri-
Continued from Page Al oting."
A police commander
Tehran's main avenues - as sharpened the message Sat-
described by witnesses - urday.Gen. EsmaeilAhmadi
had far fewer demonstrators Moghadam said more than a
than recent mass rallies for week of unrest and marches
Mousavi. But they marked had become "exhausting,
another blow to authorities bothersome and intolera-
who sought to intimidate ble." He threatened a more
protesters with harsh warn- "serious confrontation" if
ings and lines of black-clad protesters return.
police three deep in places. Mousavi's silence was bro-
The rallies also left ques- ken after the melee with an-
tions about Mousavi's ability other call to annul the
to hold together his protest election results. But there
movement, which claims was no mention of the
that widespread fraud in clashes - suggesting he
June 12 elections robbed wants to distance himself
Mousavi of victory and kept from the violence and possi-
hardline President Mah- bly opening the door for
moud Ahmadinejad in of- more militant factions to
fice. - -. _ ... reak away.
Mousavi bewildered many Amateur video showed
followers by not directly re- clashes erupting in the
plying to the ultimatum is- southern city of Shiraz and
sued Friday by Iran's most witnesses reported street vi-
powerftl figure, Supreme olence in Isfahan, south of
Leader Ayatollah Ali Tehran.
Khamenei. His stern order Other footage posted in
to Mousavi and others: Call the hours after the crack-


down showed blood pouring
from a young woman's nose
and mouth as frantic people
tried to help her Two sepa-
rate videos of the incident,
each shot from a different
angle, were uploaded onto
the social networking sites
Facebook and Youtube. The
Youtube video described the
location of the incident as
Amirabad, central Tehran,
and said the woman had
been fatally shot
The Associated Press
could not independently
verify the content of the
video, its location, or the
date it was shot
"I think the regime has
taken an enormous risk in
confronting this situation in
the manner that they have,"
said Mehrdad Khonsari, a
consultant to the London-
lbased Center for Arab and
Iranian Studies.
"Now they'll have to hold
their ground and hope that
people don't keep coming
back," he added. "But his-
tory has taught us that peo-
ple in these situations lose


their initial sense of fear
and become emboldened by
brutality."
In Washington, President
Barack Obama urged Iran-
ian authorities to halt "all vi-
olent and unjust actions
against its own people." He
said the United States
"stands by all who seek to
exercise" the universal
rights to assembly and free
speech.
Obama has offered to
open talks with Iran to ease
a nearly 30-year diplomatic
freeze, but the upheaval
could complicate any at-
tempts at outreach.
Full details of the street
battles 'could not be ob-
tained because of Iranian
media restrictions. But wit-
nesses described scenes that
could sharply escalate the
most serious internal con-
flict since the 1979 Islamic
Revolution.
An estimated 3,000
marchers - some chanting
"Death to dictatorship!" -
marched directly onto a
blockade of security forces


keeping them from ap-
proaching Azadi Square,
where Mousavi gathered
hundreds of thousands of
people on Monday.
Police first fired tear gas
and water cannons at the
protesters, witnesses said..
Then came a second wave. It
included volunteer militia-
men on motorcycles chasing
down demonstrators.
Witnesses claimed some
marchers were beaten with
batons by security forces or
metal pipes wielded by the
militiamen known as Basi-
jis, who are directed by the
powerful Revolutionary
Guard. .
An old woman cloaked in
a head-to-toe black chador
shouted, "Death to the dicta-
tor," drawing the attention of
Basij members who ran
from the other side of the
street and clubbed her, ac-
cording to one witness con-
tacted by the AP
Protesters lit trash bins on
fire - sending pillars of
black smoke over the city -
and hurled rocks. Some


managed to wrestle away a
few motorcycles and set.
them ablaze.
One witness told the AP
that people came from.
apartments to aid the-
wounded demonstrators or'
allowed them to take shelter
Helicopters hovered over
central Tehran until dusk.
The witnesses told AP that'
between 50 and 60 protest-
ers were seriously beaten by
police and pro-government
militia and taken to Imam
Khomeini hospital in cen-
tral Tehran. People could be
seen dragging: away com-
rades bloodied by baton
strikes.
Nearby, Tehran Univer-:
sity was cordoned off by po-
lice and militia.
On the streets, witnesses
said some protesters also
shouted "Death to
Khamenei!" - another sign
of once unthinkable chal-
lenges to the authority of the
successor of Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini, the fa-
ther of the Islamic Revolu-
tion.


BARN
Continued from Page Al

Meeting in middle of
permit debate
Attorney General Bill McCol-
lum issued an opinion last week
thatsaid the barn is a residence
even if no one lives there full
time.
Dean, R-Inverness, said, the
barn includes bedrooms, a bath-
room and kitchen. He said he
sometimes allows his grandchil-
dren to stay there and he enter-
tains clients on the property, east
of Inverness along the Withla-
coochee River.
The land has an agricultural
classification. Dean said he does-
n't believe the barn needed a
building permit because the state


Right to Farm act exempts non-
residential buildings from per-
mits when built on land
classified for agriculture.
Before building the barn in
2007, Dean said he went into
Maidhof's office, laid the build-
ing plans out on his desk and
asked if he needed a permit. Ac-
cording to Dean, Maidhof said a
permit wasn't necessary, though
he would need permits from the
health department for the septic
and well.
The conversation became an
issue earlier this year when.a cit-
izen complained to county com-
missioners that Dean was
allowed to build the structure
without permits.
Maidhof said he doesn't recall
the conversation with Dean tak-
ing place. He said he could find
nothing on his calendar that
showed a scheduled meeting


with Dean and he didn't issue attorney on Friday.
Dean a letter or memo about the County commissioners, mean-


permit.
Still, Maidhof is not denying
the conversation took place. In-
stead, he said that if Dean recalls
it, then it probably happened.
McCollum's opinion included
two points: a barn with bedrooms
is not exempt from building per-
mits and, because of that, the
county has the authority to regu-
late building and zoning codes.
A day after McCollum made his
ruling, Dean sent out a statement
saying he agreed-and that the
county had already told him he
didn't need permits.
As the week progressed, Dean
seemed to have softened his po-
sition. Thorpe said Dean agreed
to obtain whatever building per-
mits are necessary and pay an
impact fee. Thorpe said he sent
the permit application to Dean's


while, are wondering what, if
anything, took place between
Dean and Maidhof.
"I don't have that factual infor-
mation," Commissioner Gary
Bartell said. "If he told Charlie
Dean he didn't need permits, he.
was dead wrong."
Commission Chairman John
Thrumston said Wednesday that
he not only believed Dean's ver-
sion of the meeting with Maidhof,
he thinks that Maidhof did Dean
a "favor" by saying permits were
not required.
Thrumston said he believes
Maidhof is trying to "cover his
own rear end" by now saying he
doesn't recall the meeting with
Dean.
Other commissioners generally
distanced themselves from
Thrumston's comment


"I don't have the facts to say
one way or another," Bartell said.
Bartell, however, added he
thinks that Maidhof would re-
member a building-permit con-
versation with Dean.
"To forget that 6-foot-8 Charlie
Dean is standing next to you say-.
ing, 'What do you think?' - how
do you forget that?" Bartell said.
Meek said he agreed with
Thorpe's plan to have MacNeil
head up the permit review of,
Dean's barn.
"Because Gary Maidhof was in-
volved and this is a high-profile
issue, Brad's intent is to ensure
the process is looked at from an
independent individual," Meek'
said.
Bartell agreed, saying: "While,
I have the highest respect for
Charlie Dean, he needs to follow
the same set of rules as anybody
else."


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR HILC
98 75 0.00 797 75
1'-,97 77 .0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
99 76
92 78
94 76
10076
93 77
10277
89 80
98 77
95 75


F'cast
PC
ts
ts
PC
ts
pc,
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L
93 78
10075
98 76
98 78
91 78
102 74
94 80
95 77
94 77


F'cast
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK


West winds from 5 to 10 knots. Seas
1 to 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a light chop. Partly cloudy with
a slight chance of an afternoon thun-
derstorm.


HI LO PR HI LO PR
97 76 trace 96 73 0.00 '

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excusive daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 95 Low: 72
Heat Advisory; 10% chance of a
stray shower
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 93 Low: 72
Hot & humid; 20% chance of a thunderstorm

" TUESDAY &-WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 91 Low: 72
Partly cloudy; 40% chance of thunderstorms

Vf..


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 94/71
Record 98/65
Normal 90/71
Mean temp. 83
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 3.34 in.
Total for the year 22.06 in.
Normal for the year 21.42 in.
*As of 6 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.92 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 74
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 53�/
POLLEN COUNT**
Trees, grasses and weeds were all
light.
"LiUght - only extreme allergic will show symp-
toms, moderate - most allergic will experience
symptoms, heavy - all allergic will experience
symptoms.
AIR QUALITY


Saturday was good with po
mainly particulates.


llutants


DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
6/21 SUNDAY 4:27 10:43 4:59 11:15
6/22 MONDAY 5:28 11:45 ,6:01 12:18


. .SUNSET. TONIG ..... .................... ...8:32 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................6:33 A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY ....5:00 A.M.
JKi22 2nE M Y7 J315 MOONSET TODAY............................ 7:43 PM.


Today's Fire Danger Rating is: MODERATE. There is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For
more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's
Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdi


The current lawn watering restriction for the unincorporated areas of Citrus County
allow residents to water once a week. For county, Crystal River and Inverness residents,
addresses ending In 0 or 1, or A through E can water Mondays; addresses ending in 2 or 3,
or F through J can water Tuesdays; addresses ending In 4 or 5, or K through 0 can water
Wednesday; addresses ending in 6 or 7, or P through U can water Thursdays; addresses
ending in 8 or 9, or V through Z can water Fridays.
Properties under two acres In size may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on their day
and properties two acres or larger may only water before 10 a.m. or alter 4 p.m. on their day.


"From mouths

City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River"
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa* *


of rivers *At King's Bay ***At Mason's Creek
Sunday Monday
High/Low High/Low High/Low High/Low
6:11 a/1:11 a 4:41 p/12:48 p 7:03 a/2:02 a 5:31 p/1:39 p
4:32a/10:10 a 3:02 p/11:24 p 5:24 a/11:01 a 3:52 p/--
2:19a/7:58 a 12:49 p/9:12 p 3:11 a/8:49 a 1:39 p/10:01 p
5:21 a/12:10 a 3:51 p/11:47 a 6:13 a/1:01 a 4:41 p/12:38 p


Gulf water
temperature


na
Taken at Arlpeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.81 28.78 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 33.70 33.69 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 35.05 35.03 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.51 37.52 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded In any-one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for ny damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.


City


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L


LST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday


City H


Albany 71 57 .06 sh 73 60 New Orleans 96
Albuquerque 78 59 .05 s 89 64 New York City 71
Asheville 89 63 pc 85 62 Norfolk 93
Atlanta 94 73 pc 94 73 Oklahoma City 92
Atlantic City 76 60 .67 sh 74 64 Omaha 84 i
Austin 10077 pc 97 73 Palm Springs 96
Baltimore 86 66 .32 c 81 66 Philadelphia 77 i
Billings 82 56 ts 79 53 Phoenix 100
Birmingham 94 73 s 95 72 Pittsburgh 83
Boise 74 54 ts 69 48 Portland, ME 70
Boston 75 61 sh 66, 57 Portland, Ore 66
Buffalo 67 62 .30 pc 73 63 Providence, R.I. 73
Burlington, VT 74 62 c 75 59 Raleigh 96
Charleston, SC 96 76 pc 95 77 Rapid City 78
Charleston, WV 85 78 pc 84 63 Reno . 75
Charlotte 94 71 pc 92 66 Rochester, NY 64
Chicago 87 68 pc 82 63 Sacramento 81
Cincinnati 88 71 .07 pc 87 65 St. Louis 91
Cleveland 83 69 .33 pc 77 61 St. Ste. Marie 64
Columbia, SC 96 74 pc 94 71 Salt Lake City 72
Columbus, OH 87 71 .11 pc 87 63 San Antonio 100
Concord, N.H. 77 56 sh . 68 56 San Diego 656
Dallas 96 76 s 96 78 San Francisco 64
Denver 75 56 s 87 59 Savannah 96
Des Moines 86 66 ts 85 72 Seattle 65
Detroit 84 66 .66 pc 82 64 Spokane 70
El Paso 92 68 s 96 71 Syracuse 65
Evansville, IN 91 74 ts 90 72 Topeka 81
Harrisburg 80 64 1.00 sh 75 61 Washington 89
Hartford 75 61 .03 sh 69 60 YESTERDAY'S NATI
Houston 97 75 pc 96 75 HIGH 104 Laredo, Texas
Indianapolis 87 69 .04 pc 85 67
Jackson 98 74 s 98 75
Las Vegas 95 79 s 96 73 WORLD
Little Rock 95 75 s 97 75 S
Los Angeles 71 64 s 69 61 SUNDAY
Louisville 90 73 pc 89 70 CITY H/L/SKY
Memphis 96 77 s 98 78 Acapulco 88/78/ts
Milwaukee 87 69 .05 s 79 62 Amsterdam 62/48/sh
Minneapolis 86 66 ts 83 69 Athens 85/73/pc
Mobile 97 77 s 98 76 Beijing 92/63/pc
Montgomery 98 74 .01 s 98 73 Berlin 66/48/sh
Nashville 94 77 pc 94 73 Bermuda 87/77/ts
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; Cairo 98/70/s
f-fair; h-hazy; pc-partly cloudy; r=rain; Calgary 54/52/sh
rs-rain/snow mix; s-sunny; sh-showers; Havana 88/74/ts
sn-snow; ts-thunderstorms; w=windy. Hong Kong 88/81/pc
02009 Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Jerusalem 95/70/s


L Pcp. Fost H L
77 s 96 78
63 .24 sh 73 62
74 c 88 68
75 s 94 73
65 ts 89 71
71 s 101 70
64 .52 sh 77 64
74 s 104 80
70 .15 pc 78 60
59 c 60 55
56 .01 sh 69 52
61 sh 67 60
74 pc 91 66
51 .06 pc 87 60
53 s 75 50
57 1.23 c 73 61
57 s 83 55
74 .07 ts 94 78
56 A40 s 74 55
54 .27 pc 80 53
77 pc 98 76
63 trace s 70 63
53 pc 64 54
77 pc 99 76
52 sh 63 53
49 sh 65 48
53 .47 sh 74 60
70 .41 ts 92 73
72 .39 c 84 67
IONAL HIGH & LOW
LOW 32 Wolf Creek, Colo.

3 CITIES


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


88/69/s
68/52/c
93/56/pc
67/55/ts
77/61/pc
82/61/pc
79/54/pc
74/66/s
78/51/ts
76/64/sh
78/63/sh
79/63/pc
67/48/c


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Who's in charge:


I T R U S,, '-' '--C 0 U N T V


I









SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 A5


Local Republicans gather for annual dinner


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Republican
Party held its annual Lincoln Day
dinner June 5 at Citrus Hills Golf
and Country Club in Hernando.
The fundraising event brought
together many of the party's local
political luminaries and ended
the evening with a- keynote
speech from Congressman (and
candidate for Florida Agriculture
Commissioner) Adam Putnam.
The Lincoln Day Dinner, at-
tended by more than 220 people


this year, is one of the premier an-
nual fundraising events for all
County Republican Parties in
Florida.
Putnam, who was introduced
by Congresswoman Ginny Brown-
Waite, echoed the remarks of
other Republican speakers who
preceded him by underscoring a
common theme: To be successful,
the GOP needs to stick to its con-
servative principles.'
The congressman also praised
Citrus County Republicans for
their success in securing most of


the county's major offices
through their hard work.
This year's dinner also fea-
tured a junior guest speaker, Ho-
mosassa resident Werner
Ferrone, who recently gained a
third-place victory in the Na-
tional Oratorical Contest spon-
sored by the American Legion
and earned a $14,000 college
scholarship.
Mr. Ferrone's speech "The U.S.
Constitution - Our Rights and Re-
sponsibilities," emphasized how
the founding fathers intended for


the Constitution to be interpreted
by its original meaning, not
through evolving standards such
as the "living" document doc-
trine.
Along with GOP State Commit-
teewoman Debra Fredrick and
John McIsaac, who were given
the Republican of the Year
awards for 2008, the executive
committee recognized Sandy Bal-
four and Al Merbeth for their
dedication with Volunteer of the
Year awards and REC Treasurer
Charles Huelsmann for past serv-


ice to the organization.
Executive Committee Chair-
man Richard Windle remarked
on the success of the event, "In
terms of raising funds for the
party for future elections, thisahas
been one of our best years yet.
Citizens are very concerned
about the direction the current
administration is taking the coun-
try in."
Lincoln Day Dinner Committee
Chairman Michael Moberley
served as the master of cere-
monies.


SHEMIR WILES
swiles@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle

Deputies arrested a Crys-
tal River man Friday on sev-
-eral charges stemming from
a car crash on U.S. 19.
According to a Citrus
County Sheriff's Office ar-
rest report, police re-
sponded to a call that a
Crash happened at the in-
tersection of Third Avenue
and U.S. 19 in Crystal River.
Odus Wayne Jeane re-
portedly told a deputy that
he was on his way home
from work when the acci-
dent occurred. He told the
deputy that the car in front
of him stopped due to traf-
'fic and he was unable to
stop.
The driver of the vehicle
that was hit allegedly told
the. police that he was
stopped with traffic and had
, just started to move forward
when he "saw Jeane's car
, quickly approaching from
. behind. He went on to say
that he told his children to
hold on and that was when
he was hit from behind
When asked for a driver's
License, Jeane reportedly
handed the deputy an ex-
pired identification card
from Texas. According to
the -arrest report, police
.later discovered that


Jeane's license was sus-
pended for a DUI in Texas.
After completing an in-
vestigation of the crash, the
deputy reportedly advised
Jeane that he was citing him
for the crash and that he
would investigation the fact
that he believed Jeane was
intoxicated during the
crash.
Jeane denied he had been
drinking and agreed to par-
ticipate in some field sobri-
ety tasks.
According to the report,
Jeane was unable to suc-
cessfully perform any of the
tasks he was asked to per-
form. During one task,
Jeane allegedly said he did-
n't want to do the task any-
more and stated that he had
one drink at Castaways Bar
before the crash.
Once at the Citrus County
Detention Facility, Jeane re-
portedly refused to submit
to a test of his breath. After
further investigation by po-
lice, they discovered Jeane
had five prior DUI arrests in
Texas along with three ar-
rests for driving with a sus-
pended license.
Jeane was charged with
DUI, DUI with damage to
property, driving with a sus-
pended/revoked license and
driving with a. license ex-
pired for more than four
months. His bond was set at
$20,500.


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SCLC renews poverty campaign before small crowd


Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. -With a
wet towel draped across his
head and a garbage bag of
aluminum cans in his left
hand, Jamot Poe watched
members of the Southern
Christian Leadership Con-
ference march Saturday on
a sweltering spring day.
Poe, 32, was not among the
fewer than 1,000 marchers in
the roughly 1-mile trek to the
steps of the Mississippi State
Capitol through a tough
Jackson neighborhood.
He was just a former drug
addict without a home, Poe
said, and out collecting cans
for money. He paused for a
few minutes to watch the


SCLC marchers as they
passed by, renewing a
poverty campaign initiated
by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
more than 40 years ago.
"I think they're speaking
up for people like myself,"
Poe said. "I don't live on the
street because I stay at the
(homeless) shelter every
night I don't have to get out
here and beg or steal from
anybody But it means a lot
that they are doing this for
the homeless and for the
poor people in the commu-
nity."
The SCLC, co-founded by
King in 1957, had hoped to
mobilize 50,000 people Sat-
urday and though far fewer
-showed up, Interim SCLC


President Rev. Byron Clay
vowed to take the campaign
to Washington and challenge
Congress to help the poor.
The event was first envi-
sioned by King, who was
planning a Poor People's
Campaign and march' on
Washington before he was
assassinated in 1968. That
march originated in Marks,
Miss., but King was killed be-
fore its completion. Clay said
Mississippi leads the nation
in poverty and that's why the
campaign was being re-
newed in Jackson.
"If it's a thousand people.
If it's 5,000. If it's 10,000. God
has appointed 'them to be
here," Clay said. "But also
understand that this is a pro-


gressive process ... It will not
start and stop here in Jack-
son."
In October, Clay said the
SCLC will travel to Washing-
ton to demand Congres-
sional hearings on poverty.
'And at that time, we will call
the masses from all over this
country to come to Washing-
ton and to stand united," he
said.
"It is not about Jackson. It
is not about Mississippi,"
Clay said. "It's about people
all over this country who are
living in poverty, who are
hurting, who are suffering,
who are without jobs, who
are losing their homes, who
are losing their cars and los-
ing hope."


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
* Gary Alan Stetkar, 58, of 7063 N.
Lecanto Highway Lot 513, Beverly Hills, at
5:48 p.m. Friday on a misdemeanor charge
of driving under the influence. According to
an arrest report, Stetkar failed all field sobri-
ety tasks he was askedto perform and his
blood alcohol concentration were. .197 per-
cent and .184 percent. The legal limit in
Florida is .08 percent. Bond $1,000.


Other arrests
* Louise Howell Cartier, 61, of 3491 E.
Chappel Court, Hemando, at 7:03 p.m. Fri-
day on a misdemeanor charge of petit/retail
theft. Bond $250.
* Benjamin Robert Dick, 19, of 6983 W.
Cyrus St., Crystal River, at 11:45 p.m. Friday
on felony charges of assault/battery on a law
enforcement officer and resisting an officer
with violence. Bond $15,000:
* Crystal Lee Ramsey, 26, of 8570 W.
Mayo Drive 19, Crystal River, at 1:03 a.m.
Saturday on a felony charge of possession


ON THE NET
* For more information about ar-
rests made by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to www.sherif
fcit'rus.org and click-on the Pub-
lic Information link, then on
Arrest Reports.
* Watch the "Arrested Develop-
ments" show from the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office at


Crash leads to DUI arrest


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AS cJ.rAn, Tiifr2 1 2nno0


Reporter escapes


Associated Press
KABUL - A New York
Times reporter known for
making investigative trips
deep inside dangerous con-
flict zones escaped from mil-
itant captors after more than
seven months in captivity by
climbing over a wall, the
newspaper said Saturday.
David S. Rohde was ab-
ducted Nov. 10 along with an
Afghan reporter colleague
and. a driver south of the
Afghan capital, Kabul. He
had been traveling through
Logar province to interview
a Taliban commander, but
was apparently intercepted
and taken by other militants
on the way.
The Times reported that
Rohde and Afghan reporter
Tahi Ludin on Friday
climbed over the wall of a
compound where they were
held captive in the North
Waziristan region of Pakistan,
The twb then found a Pak-
istani army scout, who led
them to a nearby base, the
Times said. On Saturday, the
two were flown to the U.S.
military base in Bagram, the
Times reported.


A U.S. military spokes-
woman, Lt. Cmdr. Chrstine
Sidenstricker, said the mili-
tary had not been involved.
She could not say whether
the State Department or
CIA had flown the two to the
military facility.
Rohde, reported to be
in good health, said his
driver remained with their
captors.
In Washington, White
House press secretary
Robert Gibbs said the U.S. is
"very pleased" that Rohde
is safe and returning home.
He said the escape "marks
the end of a long and diffi-
cult ordeal."
Afghan officials con-
firmed the kidnapping in
the days after the abduc-
tion, but The Associated
Press and most other West-
ern news outlets respected
a request from the Times to
not report on the abductions
because the publicity could
negatively affect hostage
rescue efforts and imperil
Rohde's life.
"From the early days of
this ordeal, the prevailing
view among David's family,
experts in kidnapping


Afghan captivity
* a number of other news or-
ganizations that learned of
David's plight have done the
same. We are enormously
grateful for their support."
4 "We are very relieved that
our New York Times col-
league escaped safely, and
this episode has ended hap-
pily," said AP Senior Man-
aging Editor John
Daniszewski. "It was an un-
Sat usual and difficult news
Associated ress judgment to withhold re-
This Nov 0, 1995, file photo porting on his abduction,
porter David Rohde at Boston's transmitting s ietoes if we
Logan Airport. The Times re- transie hitting stories ianf we
ported that Rohde and an believe they endanger
Afghan reporter escaped more someone's life."
than seven months after they The Times said there had
were abducted in Afghanistan. been "sporadic communica-
tion" from Rohde and his
cases, officials of several kidnappers during the last
governments and others we seven .months but that no
consulted was that going ransom money had been
public could increase the paid.
danger to David and the Kristen Mulvihill,
other hostages. The kidnap- Rohde's wife, told the Times
pers initially said as much," that the two had been mar-
Bill Keller, the Times' exec- ried for nine months, "and
utive editor, said in a story seven of those David has
posted on the Times' Web been in captivity." She
site. thanked the Times, the U.S.
"We decided to respect government and "all the
that advice, as we have in others" who helped the fam-
other kidnapping cases, and ily during the kidnapping.


Report: Apple CEO Jobs

had liver transplant


Associated Press

NEW YORK - Apple
Inc. co-founder and CEO
Steve Jobs, whose recovery
from pancreatic cancer ap-
peared less certain when
he had to take medical
leave in January, received
a liver transplant two
months ago but is recover-
ing well, The Wall Street
Journal reported Saturday.
The newspaper didn't re-
veal a source for the report,
which comes as Jobs, 54, is
expected back in his day-
to-day duties at the com-
pany shortly CNBC said
later that it had confirmed
the Journal's account,
which said Jobs had the
transplant performed in
Tennessee.
Apple spokesman Steve
Dowling told The Associ-
ated Press he had no com-
ment. Dowling reiterated
what has become Apple's
standard line about the
CEO's health, that "Steve
continues to look forward
to returning to Apple at the
end of June and there is
nothing further to say."


Few CEOs are consid-
ered as instrumental to
their .companies as Jobs
has been to Apple since he
returned in 1997 after a 12-
year hiatus. With Jobs serv-
ing as head showman and
demanding elegance in
product design, Apple has
expanded from a niche,
computer maker to become
the dominant producer of
portable music players and,
a huge player in the cell
phone business. News and,
rumors about his health,
send Apple stock soaring,
or plunging.
Jobs disclosed in August
2004 that he had been di-
agnosed with - and cured
of - a rare .form of pan-
creatic cancer called an
islet cell neuroendocrine
tumor.
According to the Na-
tional Institutes of Health,
treatment for that form of.
pancreatic cancer can in-
clude the removal of a por-
tion of the liver if the
cancer spreads. The can-,
cer is curable if the tumors
are removed before they
spread to other organs.


Obituaries


Nedra
Barbre, 67
HERNANDO .
Nedra Barbre, 67, of Her-
nando, died Friday May 22,
2009 in Hernando. Born Au-
gust 2, 1942 in Millsprings,
Mo. Service of remem-
brance will be Monday June
22, 2009 at 6:30 PM First
United Methodist Church
Crystal River.





A. 'Chuck'
Chenoweth, 54
HOMOSASSA
A. "Chuck" Cheno.weth,
54, of Homosassa, Florida,
passed away on June 17,
2009.
He was born on Novem-
ber 22, 1954, in Dania,
Florida, and has lived the
majority of his life in Citrus
County.
Chuck proudly served this
country as a U.S. Army
Ranger at the end of the
Vietnam War.
He was a crew chief in
the Automobile Racing Car
Association (ARCA) Series,
also serving as a car
builder, a , high-perfor-
mance engine builder and
a designer and builder of
air boats in Citrus County.
Chuck also raced a drag
bike, loved fast cars, air
boats and motorcycles.
He was an avid sports-
man, enjoying hunting, fish-
ing, and serving as a fishing
guide.
He was a mason, serving
as a Past Master of Springs
Lodge No. 379; Past District
Deputy Grand Master of the
19th District of the Most
Worshipful Grand Lodge of
Florida; a 32nd Degree
Mason, Ocala Valley; and a
Member of the Royal Order
of Scotland.
Prior to his retirement,
Chuck was the manager and,
dock master of the
Tradewinds Marina in Old
Homosassa. During his time
with us, Chuck touched
many lives in the Citrus

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County area, helping many,
never asking for anything in
'return.
Chuck is survived by his
loving family: Wife Julie,
daughter Trisha, sons Jacob
and Private Afton
Chenoweth, U.S. Army, and
granddaughter Alexis.
He was an honorable
man who loved being with
*his family and friends. He
always believed in doing
the right thing and that was
his mantra in life. He was
loved by many and will be
missed by all who knew
him.,
At Chuck's request, his
body will be cremated with
no service or memorial.
Wilder Funeral Home.
Sign the guest book -at
wwwchronicleonline.com.
Annie
Madison, 77
HERNANDO
Annie M. Madison. age 77
of Hernando, died Saturday,
June 20,2009 at the Hospice
Care Unit at Citrus Memo-
rial Hospital. Private cre-
mation arrangements are
under the care of the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory, Inverness.

Leslie Jacob
Richards
AUGUST 5, 19,72
- JUNE 18, 2009
Leslie Jacob Richards,
age 36, beloved son,
brother, uncle and friend
passed away on June 18,
2009. Born August 5, 1972
in Huntington, WV, he was
the son of Billy J. and
Diana L. Richards. He was
an active member of Ho-
mosassa Springs Seventh-
Day Adventist Church and
Stage West Theatre Pro-
ductions.
Leslie was predeceased
by his grandmother, Naomi
Lee Lawson and grandfa-
ther, Frank P Richards. Sur-
vivors include 2
grandmothers: LaNora
Eskew and Shirley Mae
Giani; parents, Billy J.
Richards and Diana L
Richards; three brothers:
Harold L. Richards and
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wife, Tiffany, Tommy L.
Richards, Christopher P
Richards and wife, Annette;
three nephews and two
nieces. Leslie will be greatly
missed by all.
Services for Leslie will be
held 3:00pm, Monday, June
22, 2009 at the Seventh Day
Adventist Church located at
5863 W Cardinal St., Ho-
mosassa, FL with Rev. Dale
Wolfe officiating. Arrange-
ments are by the Homosassa
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes. Online condolences
may be sent to www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.





Salvatore
Rinaldi Jr., 86
INVERNESS
Salvatore Rinaldi Jr., 86,
of In\erness, died.onJune,
19, 2009 at Hospice of Cit-
rus County Care Unit in In-
verness. Salvatore was
born on April 1, 1923, in
Greenwich, CT, the son of
Salvatore and Antoinette
Rinaldi. He served in the
U.S. Army during WWII.
He * was a foreman for
Arnold's Bakery for 30
years. Salvatore moved to
Inverness in 1987 from
Port Chester, NY. He was a
member of Our Lady of Fa-
tima Catholic Church and
the VFW. Post 4337, both in
Inverness. /
Survivors include his
wife, Ada Rinaldi of Inver-
ness, FL; two brothers,
Joseph Rinaldi and his wife
Joyce of Inverness, FL, and
Anthony Salarno of Yonkers,
NY; and many nieces and




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nephews including Angela
Weaverof Jacksonville, FL
and Joseph Rinaldi of Mill-
brook, NY.
Visitation for Mr. Rinaldi
will be held from 10:00 AM
till the hour of service at
11:00 AM on Monday, June
22, 2009 at the Heinz Fu-
neral Home in .Inverness.
Deacon Eric Makoid will
preside. Entombment with
military honors provided by
the Inverness VEW Post
4337 will follow at the Me-
morial Gardens Cemetery
in Beverly Hills. Arrange-
ments by Heinz, Funeral
Home & Cremation, Inver-
ness.
Sign the guest book at
wwwchronicleonline.com.

Walter 'Paul,'
Wilyoung Jr., 74
INVERNESS
Walter P '"'Paul" Wilyoung
Jr., 74, Inverness, died June
,20,2009 in the Hospice Unit


of Citrus Memorial Hospital.
A native of Franklin, PA.,
he was born on Dec 4, 1934
to the late Walter and
Frances (Anderson) Wily-
oung, Sr.
and came to .
this area in
1974 from .
St. . Peters- ' *-
burg. He
was the .
owner and
operator of
Paul's Heat- Walter
ing & Air Wilyoung Jr.
Conditioning for many years
and later employed by the
Citrus Co. School Board
Maintenance Department
prior to retirement
He was a member of the
First Baptist Church of In-
verness. He had a passion
for John Deere Tractors and
for several years, chaired
the Citrus Co. Tractor Pull
at the fairgrounds.
He is survived by his wife
of 56 years, Edwina "'Eddie"


Wilyoung, Inverness�;
daughters, Dorrilynn".
"Dorri" Bower, Largo; San-.
dra Wilyoung Cohill, Semi-"
nole; his brother, Frank:.
"Mike" Wilyoung, Otto, NC;,'
2 sisters, Florence Kauf-,'
man, Inverness, Patricia
Piper, St. Petersburg; 4r
grandchildren, Kelly, Jef-i;
frey, Sean, and Jackie; 8"
Great Grandchildren. A
grandson, Steven Garriott,,
preceded him in death in,'
2002. Friends may call at;
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral'
Home on Tuesday from 4-7.1
PM where funeral services
will be conducted Wed,-
June 24th at 10:00 A.M. With'
Rev. Donnie Seagle officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in-
Hills of Rest Cemetery, Flo-
ral City. In lieu of flowers,
memorials are requested to-
Hospice of Citrus Co., PO'
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,-
FL 34464.
Sign the guest book at-,
www.chronicleonline.com.


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CITRUS COUNFATY (FL) CHRONICLE,


FATHERS
Continued from Page Al

Zebrowski, a World War II
veteran, is the father of
three adult children. He's
the first to volunteer to care
tor family and friends
through the most difficult
times in their lives, Karen
Zebrowski said, from keep-
ing people company during
chemotherapy sessions to
driving them to doctors' ap-
pointments.
"He's just done so much
for people. He's just that
type of person. He helps
everybody," Karen Ze-
browski said. "I think he's
just the best father in the
world."
Mitch Roe, 41,
OF DUNNELLON
Nominated by Key Train-
ing Center volunteer,
Linda Gordy, of Ho-
mosassa.
Gordy nominated Roe,
who was injured in a head-
on collision on April 29, be-


DAD
Continued from Page Al

' During an interview
Thursday, 13-year-old
daughter, Courtney, said her
father is her superman, the
epitome of strength.
* Tucker said he spent time
with his wife and daughter
before his cancer diagnosis
but not as much as he does
now.
"I'm really close to my
dad," Courtney said. "Hang-
ing out with him has always
been fun."
' Tucker and Courtney are
'an adventurous, dynamic
duo. One day they're hunt-
ing and hiking,' the next,
Tucker's helping his daugh-
ter with hair and makeup.
', "The other day I had to
help her straighten her
hair," Tucker said.
"I love him to death,"
Courtney said. "I'm always
going to be his little girl."
Although Tucker and
Courtney have shared a lot
of meaningful moments
over the years, it wasn't


cause of his devotion to his
two young daughters, his
dedication to being a Crys-
tal River Little League soft-
ball coach and his love for
Key Training Center pro-
gram participants. Roe is re-
covering from the crash and
has returned to volunteer-
ing and his work as a fore-
man for Citrus County Road
Maintenance, said Roe's
wife, Missy
"We've been married al-
most 20 years. He's phe-
nomenal. He's amazing.
He's a good Christian man,"
Mrs. Roe said.
Randy
Weber, 44,
OF CITRUS
SPRINGS
Nominated by his
wife,Theresa Weber,
of Citrus Springs.
Weber is the father of
three children, two biologi-
cal children and one
stepchild, ages ranging from
9 to 22. Despite suffering
from a serious heart condi-
tion, Weber works hard as a
superintendent at Palmetto-


based TLC Diversified Inc.,
to provide for his wife and
children, Mrs. Weber said.
SHe makes the nearly two
and a half hour drive from
Palmetto to Citrus Springs
on the weekends, and occa-
sional weekdays, to spend
time with his family
"He's just absolutely fab-
ulous. He is a phenomenal
person. He's a good person,
good-hearted. He does the
right thing every time...His
kids are everything to him,"
Mrs. Weber said. "This re-
markable man deserves
recognition for all he has
been through, continues to
live with- .and for his deter-
mination to give the best to
his family no matter the sac-
rifice to himself."
Joseph Darrell
Griffin, 81,
OF CRYSTAL
RIVER
Nominated by his daugh-
ter Benica Jane (Griffin)
Fox, ofBrooksville.
Griffin, a Progress Energy
retiree, raised three chil-
dren, two sons and one


!Uu
DAVE SIGLER/Chronicle
David Tucker, 31, left, was told in March of 2009 he had
Stage IV non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. David talks about the
family's emotional rollercoaster, his chemo treatments, and
about spending time with Courtney, center, and Jennifer,
right, while striving to live a normal life.


until after Tucker's diagno-
sis that he became focused
on spending as much qual-
ity time as possible with his
daughter and wife.
'After I found out I had
cancer, I spent a little more
time here or there," Tucker
said. "Life's too short to
take stuff for granted, that's
for sure."
"It's a big eye-opener,"


Mrs. Tucker said. ,
"Especially at 31," Tucker
added.
For the Tuckers, quality
family time, such as playing
in the pool, watching
movies and going for walks,
became top priority over
daily tasks.
"It makes you realize all
the small things in life are
really the big ones," Court-


daughter. He worked tire-
lessly for many years to sup-
port his family and never
once complained, Fox said.
He always encouraged his
children to pursue whatever
made them happy In 2007,
Griffin lost one of his sons,
who was 55, to brain cancer.
Griffin stayed by his son's
bedside until the end, Fox
said.
"My father never asks for
anything and I would give
him the world if I could,"
Fox said. "There are not
enough words to describe
what my dad means to me
and my daughter."
Don Thelen, 52,
OF FLORAL CITY
Nominated by his
mother-in-law, Betty Bauer,
of FloralCity.
Thelen, a longtime Chron-
icle employee, has two adult
daughters and one grand-
child. Bauer said Thelen is
very considerate and re-
called one time many years
ago when he, in the middle
of the night during the win-
tertime, bundled up his


ney said about facing a fam-
ily tragedy
The Tuckers have made a
conscious effort to push the
laundry and other everyday
chores aside to free time for
bonding and creating mem-
ories.
The Tuckers describe the
last few months as an emo-
tional rollercoaster ride; it's
holding tightly to each other
that has kept them on track,
they said.
Tucker is responding well
to treatment. He is nearing
the end of his first, and
maybe last, round of
chemotherapy and doctors
say he has a good chance of
going into remission.
The Tuckers hope those
who read their story will
learn an important lesson
about not waiting until
tragedy strikes to live life to
the fullest with their fami-.
lies.
"Spend time with your
family ... Spend time with
your kids, that's the most
important thing ... and lis-
ten to them when they have
something to say," Tucker
said.


baby daughter and took her
to the park to play so she
would get tired and his wife
could get some rest.
"He's very sensitive to
peoples' needs," Bauer said.
Craig
Doughman, 38,
OF CRYSTAL
RIVER
Nominated by his
mother, Sandy Doughman,
of Floral City.
Mrs. Doughman said she
watched her son transition
from a man into a father.
Her son, a certified welder
for Progress Energy, ma-
tured and changed his pri-
orities in life because he
became a father. He is al-
ways there for his three el-


ementary-age children,
Mrs. Doughman said, and
gives his children what
children really need - his
love, his time and his atten-
tion.
"The role of being a fa-
ther is a life-changing ex-
perience and it occurs way
deep down inside of a man.
That's what happened with
my son - an amazing dad.
From being a Citrus High
School graduate to a dad of
Citrus County elementary
students, growing into a
dad has been continual and
when you add it all up,
quite monumental..I am
proud that my three grand-
children are experiencing
a relationship with an ex-
traordinary dad," Mrs.
Doughman said.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
bLreaking ne-ws Call the newsroom at 563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 563-
5660 and ask for Nancy Kennedy. Again, be pre
pared to leave a detailed message.


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NATION


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CITRUS COUNT


WORLD


Y CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Hang twenty


Associated Press
Kla, a Russell terrier, waits
on her surfboard Saturday
before her turn at the'
Loews Coronado Bay Re-
sort Surf Dog Competition
held In Imperial Beach,
Calif. More than 50 dogs
and owners took part in the
annual dog surfing compe-
tition. Dogs are judged on
confidence level, length of
ride and overall ability.

Even in White House,
kids have chores
WASHINGTON -How do
the Obamas keep their girls'
lives normal in the White
House? Chores.
. 'We're pretty old school,"
President Barack Obama told
Harry Smith of CBS News in
a Friday interview to air on
Father's Day.
"Malia and Sasha, they
have to make their beds," the
president said. 'They have to
walk the dog. They have to
feed the dog. They have to do
their homework. They don't
watch TV during the week."
' Sasha, 8, and Malia, 10,
moved into the White House
with their parents in January.
Bo the dog became part of
the family a bit later.
The president is making a
prominent effort to promote re-,
sponsible fatherhood. He says
part of his job as a dad is to
give his daughters structure.
As the president put it:
"Kids thrive on order."

World ' .


Glad dad


Associated Press
Police officer John Duran,
who was held hostage by
the Revolutionary Armed
Forces of Colombia, FARC,
kisses his daughter Satur-
day during a meeting mark-
ing the first anniversary of
his release, In Bogota. The
official. and Colombian for-
mer presidential candidate
Ingrid Betancourt were res-
cued by Colombia's military
during the same operation.

British gov't spells
end of 'i before e'
LONDON - It's a spelling
mantra that generations of
schoolchildren have learned
- "i before e, except after c."
But new British govern-
ment guidance tells teachers
not to pass on the rule to stu-
dents, because there are too
many exceptions.
The "Support For Spelling"
document, which is being
sent to thousands of primary
schools, says the rule "is not
worth teaching" because it
doesn't account for words like
'sufficient,' "veil' and 'their.'
Jack Bovell of the Spelling
Society, which advocates sim-
plified spelling, said Saturday
he agreed with the decision.
But supporters say the ditty
has value because it is one of
the few language rules that
most people remember.
-From wire reports


Train
Associated Press
ROCKFORD, Ill. -
road tank cars holding
sands of gallons of 1
flammable ethanol dei
and exploded iri fl
killing a 41-year-old won
she tried to run to safety
a car stopped at a cross
Three other people
the same car escaped
severe burns. Hundre
people were evacuated
homes near the explos
. Eighteen tank carn
filled with ethanol, oret]
cohol, derailed Friday o
edge of Rockford, abo
miles northwest of Chic
The wreckage bi
through the night, but th
was dying down Saturd
ternoon as federal inve
tors began collecting evid


hauling ethanol
National Transportation
Safety Board spokesman B
Rail- Robert Sumwalt said inves-
thou- tigators wouldn't speculate
highly about what may have
railed caused the derailment. A
ames, thorough investigation
nan as could take a year, he said.
from Investigators will look
ing. into the train crew's per-
from formance, the train's me-
with chanical components,
3ds of signals, the integrity of the
I from cars containing ethanol and
ion. the emergency response,
s, all Sumwalt said. A vehicle bums Friday nea
hyl al- Reports that the derail- The Rockford Register St
on the ment was caused by a train derailed Friday night
,ut 80 washout of the tracks fol- heavy rains had washed o
ago. lowing heavy rain were "not
turned a'certainty and this remains The woman who was kil
ie fire under investigation," said - Zoila Tellez, 41, of Ro
ay af- Canadian National Railway ford - had escaped from
*stiga- Company spokesman stopped automobile, butE
lence. Patrick Waldron. managed to get only 20 f


drug industry

agree to tens

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The phar-
maceutical industry agreed Sat-
urday to spend $80 billion over
the next decade improving drug
benefits for seniors on Medicare
and defraying the cost of Presi-
dent Barack Obama's health
care legislation, capping secre-
tive negotiations involving key
lawmakers and the White House.
"This new coverage means af-
fordable prices on prescription
drugs when Medicare benefits
don't cover the cost of prescrip-
tions." Sen. Max Baucus, chair-
man of the Senate Finance
Committee, said in a statement
announcing the accord.
The deal marked a major tri-
umph for Baucus as well as the
administration. Obama praised
the deal.
"The agreement by pharma-
ceutical companies to contribute
to the health reform effort comes
on the heels of the landmark
pledge many health industry
leaders made to me last month,
when they offered to do their
part to reduce health spending
trillionn over the next decade."
Obama said "We are at a turning
point in America's journey to-
ward health care reform."
Baucus, a Montana Democrat.
has been negotiating with nu-
merous industry groups for
weeks as he tries to draft legisla-
tion that meets Obama's goal of
vastly expanding health cover-
age, has bipartisan support and
does not add to the deficit.
Baucus' announcement said
drug companies would pay half.
of the cost of brand-name drugs
for seniors in the so-called
doughnut hole - a gap in cover-
age that is a-feature of many of
the plans providing prescription
coverage under Medicare. Other
officials said wealthier Medicare
beneficiaries would not receive
the same break, but there was no
mention of that in the statement
In addition, the entire cost of
the drug would count toward a
patient's out-of-pocket costs,
meaning their insurance cover-
age would cover more of their
expenses than otherwise.
Billy Tauzin, president and CEO
of the Pharmaceutical Research
and Manufacturers of America
(PhRMA), said, "Millions of unin-
sured and financially struggling
Americans are depending on us to
accomplish comprehensive health
care reform this year. Today, Amer-
ica's pharmaceutical research and
biotechnology companies are sig-
naling their strong support for
these critically important efforts."


derails,


Associated Press
ir a train derailment in Rockford, III.
ar reported that witnesses say the
at about 8:30, apparently because
out the tracks.


led
)ck-
the
she
feet


away before she fell and died,
said Winnebago County Coro-
ner Sue Fiduccia. Tellez'
body was found face down on
the ground.


Associated Press
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., left,
and the committee's ranking Republican Sen. Charles Grassley, R-lowa
talk April 2 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.


While none of the changes in
the prescription drug program
would directly lower govern-
ment costs, several officials also
said the industry agreed to
measures that would give the
Treasury more money under
federal health programs. In par-
ticular, officials said drug com-
panies would likely wind up
paying pay higher rebates for
certain drugs under Medicaid,
the program that provides
health care for the poor.
Those funds would be used to
help pay for legislation expand-
ing health insurance for millions
who now lack it
One official said the deal
was agreed to late Friday night
when Tauzin called Baucus. The
senator's statement said the
White House was involved in the
agreement.
It was not clear what leverage
the agreement would give Baucus
with other health care providers
with whom he is in negotiations.
But at a minimum, the agree-
ment served as an effective
counter to impression that the
drive to enact health care legis-
lation was sputtering.
The disclosure of negotia-
tions came near the end of an
up-and-down week for the ad-
ministration and its allies on
health care.


Congressional Budget Office es-
timates showed early versions of
two major Senate bills were either
too costly or failed to make a large
enough dent in the ranks of the
uninsured. Republicans seized on
the reports as evidence that De-
mocrats were losing traction.
They leapt again when it was
disclosed that House Democrats
were considering a wide array of
tax increases to finance their
legislation, including ap income
tax surcharge, a tax on employ-
ers based on the size of their pay-
roll and a value-added tax, aw
form of a national sales tax.
House Democrats on Friday
unveiled draft legislation they
said would cover virtually all of
the nation's nearly 50 million
uninsured but it came without a
price tag or an indication of how
it would bepaid for.
Major provisions of the 850-
page measure would impose
new responsibilities On individ-
uals to obtain coverage and on
employers to provided it It also
would end insurance company
practices that deny coverage to
the sick and create a new gov-
ernment-sponsored plan to com-
pete with private companies.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said
she hopes the legislation can clear
the House before lawmakers leave
for their annual August vacation.


Truck bomb kills more than 70 in northern Iraq


Associated Press
BAGHDAD - A truck
bomb exploded as wor-
shippers left a Shiite
mosque in northern Iraq
on Saturday, killing more
than 70 people and wound-
ing nearly 200 in the dead-
liest bombing this year.


The blast near Kirkuk
came hours after the
prime minister warned
Iraqis to expect more vio-
lence as U.S. troops with-
draw from Iraqi cities by
the end of this month, but
he insisted the deadline
will be met "no matter
what happens."


Rescue teams searched
into the night to find peo-
ple buried under the rub-
ble while women begged
police to let them near the
site so they could search
for loved ones. The U.S.
military said it was pro-
viding generator lights
and water at the site.


The death toll rose to
at least 72 as more bodies
were found beneath the
debris, according to po-
lice and hospital offi-
cials, who spoke on
condition of anonymity
because they weren't au-
.thorized to release the
information.


dlling 1
Three people with the
woman also ran from the
car when it was bombarded
with flying railroad ties and
they were severely burned
by flaming ethanol, said
Rockford Fire Chief Derek
Bergsten. They were taken
to OSF Saint Anthony Med-
ical Center in serious to crit-
ical condition, and one was
transferred to Stroger Hos-
pital in Chicago, he said.
Officials evacuated about
600 homes in the area on the
edge of Rockford, about 80
miles northwest of Chicago,
Friday night amid concerns
about air pollution.
Some people were al-
lowed to return to their
homes Saturday, but author-.
ities were not letting anyone
within a quarter-mile of the
derailment site.


Mssoclalea rress
President Barack Obama leaves
The Dairy Godmother with daugh-
ters Malia Obama, 10, left, and
Sasha Obama, 8, not pictured.,
Saturday after having frozen cus-
tard in the Del Ray area of
Alexandria, Va.

Obama: Be a

better father

than mine

Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Barack
Obama got a basketball, his first
name and ambition from his:fa-
ther. Little else.
As a candidate and now presi-
dent, lie's been telling men what
sort of father they should be. It's
become his Father's Day ritual.
He's asking American men to
be better fathers than his own.
A Kenyan goatherder-turned-
intellectual who clawed his way
to scholarships and Harvard,
Barack Hussein Obama Sr. left
a family behind to get his
schooling in the United States.
He started another family here,
then left his second wife and 2-
year-old Barack Jr. to return to
Africa with another woman.
His promise flamed out in
Africa after stints working for an
oil company and the government;
he fell into drink and died in a
car crash when his son was 21, a
student at Columbia University.
"I don't want to be the kind of
father I had," the president is
quoted as telling a friend in a
new book about.him.
His finger-wagging is most
pointed when addressing other
black men, reflecting years of
worry about the fabric of black
families and single mothers, but
it applies to everyone.
Father's Day 2007: "Let's
admit to ourselves that there
are a lot of men out there that
need to stop acting like boys;
who need to realize that re-
sponsibility does not end at con-
ception; who need to know that
what makes you a man is not the
ability to have a child but the
courage to raise a child."
Father's Day 2008: '"Any f9ol
can have a child. That doesn't
make you a father. It's the
courage to raise a child that
makes you a father."
Father's Day 2009: "We need
to step out of our own heads and
tune in. We need to turn off the
television and start talking with
our kids, and listening to them,
and understanding what's going
on in their lives."
He doesn't hold himself out as
the ideal dad. No driven politi-
cian can.
"I know I have been an im-
perfect father," he writes in
Sunday's Parade magazine. -"I
know I have made mistakes.' I
have lost count of all the times,
over the years, when the de-
mands of work have taken me
from the duties of fatherhood."
Obama himself attributed his
"fierce ambitions" to his dad
while crediting his mother - a
loving but frequently absent fig-
ure - with giving him the
means to pursue them.


Health care deal struck

Baucus,

White House,












E Page A9 -SUNDAY, JUNE 21,2009

EXCURSIONS __
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Grand Canyon: No walk in the park


Nationalpark

fraught with peril

for unprepared
FELICIA FONSECA
Associated Press
- GRAND CANYON NA-
TIONAL PARK, Ariz.
rank Poole worked out at a
gym and hiked around his
Mississippi home carrying a
weighted packfor months in.
preparation for his trip to the
Grand Canyon.
But it wasn't long after Poole
started hiking on a popular
Grand Canyon trail that he was
struggling to breathe. Several
hours later, he was in a northern
Arizona hospital, where doctors
determined the 75-year-old Poole
had suffered a heart attack
"I never suspected,I was hav-
ing a heart attack," Poole said re-
cently from his home in Oxford,
Miss. "I just thought it was the
heat and extra exertion, the alti-
tude and things like that I was
just so naive."
At the Flagstaff Medical Center
- northern Arizona's only Level
I trauma center, and the place'
where Poole was treated - offi-
cials have a name for the spring
and summer months when many
tourists travel to the canyon.
They call it "Grand Canyon Sea-
son."
Emergency workers at the park
and' hospital officials know
they'll start seeing more people
with injuries or those who, like
Poole, didn't know they had un-
derlying health conditions that
surfaced during the strenuous
hikes at the canyon.
The canyon lures millions of
people each year with its colorful
landscape, immense size, and
awe-inspiring geology. But it
presents obstacles that can leave
even experienced hikers emerg-
ing sore and fatigued, including
scorching heat during summer
months, an altitude of 7,000 feet,
and steep, rocky, winding trails.
"There's a million ways you
can hurt yourself down there,"
said LonAyers, who works in the
park's backcountry office.
The last few weeks have illus-
trated that.
In late April, an Ohio man fell
60 feet when he was peering over
the edge of the canyon and lost
his balance. Two days later, two
teenagers and a young man who
were swimming in the Colorado
.RiVer at the bottom of the canyon
were swept away and drowned.
Another injury occurred'when a
mule lost its footing on a trail, fell
and rolled over the passenger it
was carrying.
Falls, fatigue, extreme temper-


A ;.;-:-il 3Pre;
Eric Gray, a trails maintenance worker at the Grand Canyon, leads a group of mules carrying supplies April 28
down a popular park trail in Grand Canyon National Park. The National Park Service is asking the public to
weigh in on mule operations at the Grand Canyon.


atures and horseplay at national
parks around the country lead to:
nearly 3.600 search and rescue
operations each year, according
to 2007 figures. The park service
also responds to 16,000 emer-
gency medical calls a year for
anything from abrasions to
twisted ankles, heat stroke and
cardiac arrest, said Dean Ross.
N PS branch chief of emergency
services in Washington, D.C.
Rangers at the Grand Canyon
perform more rescues than at
any other park. including 300 hel-
icopter rescues a year, said Ross.


People who come prepared,
bringing plenty of snacks and wat-
er, and who pace themselves and
listen to their bodies fare the best,
"Don't be afraid to try it, (but)
take it easy." said Dave Florence
of Green Bay. Wis , who recently.
completed a 40-mile. five-day
hike at the canyon.
But hikers don't always heed
warnings from rangers and on
signs posted around the canyon.
Allan Widener of Louisville,
Ky., recently took the Bright
Angel trail just off the canyon's
South' Rim. After a park staff


member strongly recommended
that Widener not head down
without water, the hiker quipped
that, "I don't drink water, I drink
Coke."
On the way back from his 1V2
mile hike, leaning against the
canyon wall in a shady spot, the
48-year-old said he wished he'd
had something to drink
Park rangers say they generally
encounter three types of people
hiking in the cahyonrThere are
the strong-headed ones, usually
in their teens and 20s who have
an invincibility complex and will


go against recommendations.
Others are excited and unpre-
pared but willing to change plans
if needed.
Then there are people like Al-
bert Shank, who are prepared
and generally stick to plans
they've made, but sometimes get
in trouble because of circum-
stance or because they made a
bad decision, said Marc Yeston,
deputy chief ranger.
Shank was about 28 miles into
what was supposed to be a 42-
mile rim-to-rim run in April ,
when his legs started cramping
and his body refused to keep
down any food or water He
nearly collapsed on a park bench
and spent several hours having
saline pumped into his body be-
fore he was able to walk out of
the canyon.
The Arizona State University
faculty associate, who often runs
distances longer than marathons,
had plenty of water, energy bars
and peanut butter and jelly sand-
wiches, but not enough elec-
trolytes or salty food.
"That was a rookie mistake,
and I'm not a rookie," he said. "I
learned that no matter how good
of shape you're in, the canyon is
something you need to respect,
and' dehydration will take you
down."
What can be deceptive at the
Grand Canyon is that the temper-
ature at the South Rim, where 90
percent of all visitors go, is about
20 degrees cooler than at the bot-
tom. And while most trails lead
hikers up a mountain before the
downward descent,,it's the oppo-
site at the Grand Canyon.
mom
"It's a unique set of circum-
stances," Ayers said. "People
from all over the world need to at
least hear it from somebody on
what to expect. People who have
never hiked the Grand Canyon
before expect it to be a walk in
the park"
Some hikers do undertake ex-
traordinary preparations. But
other times, rangers say they
aren't sure what people were
thinking. They've seen a man in a
business suit carrying a briefcase
full of water bottles, a man play-
ing a tuba and people hiking
without shoes or in flip-flops.
"It all stems from a lack of pre-
planning and knowledge of these
trails," said Ian Buchanan, a sea-
sonal park worker who advises
people on smart hiking. "A lot of
people get the sense that it's Dis-
neyland when it's an environ-
mental park"
This time of year, 30 percent of
the heart patients at Flagstaff
Medical Center are brought in
from the canyorinvith conditions
such as valve and rhythm prob-
lems, and heart disease and
blockages.


Ready
for the
plunge
In May 2009, Arthur and
Barbara McGlade took a
tour of South Africa dur-
ing which they enjoyed
many game drives In
Chobi National Park In
Botswana, and Kruger
National Park In South
Africa. There, they ob-
served the "Big Five," as
well as the rare sight of
a leopard and his mate
eating fast food - Im-
pala - for lunch. From
the town of Kleinbaal
(east of Cape Town),
they boarded a 42-foot
boat, traveling to the wa-
ters off Dyer Island.
Arthur entered a shark
cage, from which he ob-
served several Great
White sharks - the
largest longer than 15
feet. "It was the experi-
ence of a lifetime,"
Arthur McGlade writes.
Special io ihe Chronicle


DREAM
VCATJONS
tol Con�es�

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle ofice in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Magic mountain air cures ham


C rising down the Dalmatian coast.
destination Athens, and after having
spent a few days in Croatia, our small
50-passenger ship departed Split, Croatia,
to make calls at several notable ports, in-
cluding Hvar, Korcula and Dubrovnik.
These ports have rich histories dating from
the days of Marco Polo in the mid-1200s,
and each has survived numerous wars and
occupations by various marauding rulers.
The next destination, Kotor, Montenegro,
is a medieval port
town strategically se-
cluded in a back bay
of the Gulf of Kotor.
Access is through a
narrow passage
opening from the
Adriatic into the gulf.
Motoring into the bay
involved rounding a
very large spit of land Neil Sawyer
protruding into the
Adriatic, but because SPONTANEOUS
of the strong seasonal TOUR GUIDE
Bira Winds the cap-
tain deemed it unwise to have passengers
om board, so we were bussed from
Dubrovnik to Kotor - a full day's trip,
while the crew brought the ship around. A
wise decision, we were told later
The beautifulIly walled medieval town of
Kotor. a UNESCO World Heritage site, is on
a narrow strip of land hugging the shore-
line beneath the cliffs of Mount Lovcen.
The tight rows of centuries-old stone build-
ings with orange tile roofs have experi-
enced a tumultuous past under at least
eight different rulers, yet the town 'is re-
markably well preserved and embodies nu-
merous cathedrals, no doubt one built by
each of the conquering powers.
Kbtor Fortress, the defensive stronghold
of Kotor, rising vertically above the city, was
primarily built to protect against attack by


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
The clock tower at the base of Kotor
Fortress - these towers served several pur-
poses: they were Imposing and intimidating
to invading forces, served as lookout sta-
tions and served as functional bell towers.
land, rather than by water
A day trip to a couple of nearby towns
was enlightening as it revealed some inter-
esting and challenging geography, as well
as well-preserved folk architecture. The
first portion of the trip involved 25 switch-
backs rising 3,000 feet directly above the
town, a dizzying ride, only interrupted by a
couple of viewpoints to observe the bay and
the town of Kotor directly below - an ab-
solutely breathtaking sight! Looking down
on our ship, it suddenly took on the ap-
pearance of a row-boat.
Arrival in the village of Njegusi, popula-
tion 525, nestled in a fertile green alpine
See GUIDE/Page A12
� ,-* - ' .*>'( * 1 ' ,-- . - .."'-t-1 A.?. .-." - .' '*." --': *


I k'- A"-,








A 2iL SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009UU .....



Scientists give green travel advice


Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A scientist
group has put together a guide to
green travel to help you deter-
mine which modes of transporta-
tion have the smallest carbon
footprint, and the group, the
Union of Concerned Scientists,
says some of the greenest choices
can also save money.
UCS researchers compared the
amount of carbon dioxide - the
chief heat-trapping gas that drives
global warmirig - from driving,


flying, traveling by train or bus,
and also compared per-person
emissions for solo travelers versus
those traveling in pairs or as a
family of four. Here are some of
their findings:
* For trips of more than 500
miles, if you're traveling solo or
with one other person, it's greener
to fly direct in coach than to drive,
according to the UCS.
* First-class seating takes up
more space than coach seating, so
the average first-class passenger
on a domestic flight is responsible


for generating twice as much car-
bon as someone seated in coach,
UCS says. Budget airlines with no
first-class seats can lower a
plane's per-person emissions 10
percent to 15 percent.
* Compared with flying coach, a
couple traveling on a bus will cut
their trip's carbon dioxide emis-
sions 55 percent to 75 percent, de-
pending on the distance traveled.
Compared to even a fuel-efficient
hybrid car, a bus trip would cut a
couple's trip emissions nearly in
half. Bus travel is' usually less ex-


pensive than flying and for a solo
traveler, can be cheaper than driv-
ing.
* Trains emit 60 percent less
carbon per passenger-mile than a
typical car with a single occupant
And compared with a 500-mile
trip on a small jet plane, a train
emits roughly 30 percent less car-
bon. Trains also can save money
by dropping you in city centers, so
you don't need to get a taxi or
rental car to get into town.
* The type of car you use for a
road trip makes a big difference.


An SUV emits nearly four times the
amount of carbon dioxide emis-
sions of a highly efficient hybrid
such as a Toyota Prius, and uses
nearly four times the amount of gas.
N Traveling off-peak can also
lower your carbon footprint and
travel bills. Spending less time in
traffic means better mileage and
lower fuel bills; flying off-peak
means your plane won't be wast-
ing fuel in a holding pattern and
your ticket could be cheaper.
More details can be found at
http://tinyurl.com/5uzj9u.


,. . Homosassa pastor to


/4' " lead Bible Lands tour


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
The village of Njegusi is famous for its prosclutto ham and folk architecture.


GUIDE
Continued from Page A9

valley, revealed the precise
location of the country's pro-
sciutto industry. It is said
that this precise location was
chosen nearly a thousand
years ago because of the
unique combination of sea
breezes pouring .over the
coastal range, mixing with
the mountain air, being ideal
for curing the specialized
hams of the area.
The prosciutto cures in
tall wooden lofts bathed in
. the magic mountain air for at
least 15 months before being
distributed to stores and
restaurants. This prosciutto,
even though a true and
pricey delicacy, is deemed
too salty for the European
market and is, therefore,


marketed only in Montene-
gro. One of the curing lofts
that we visited had more
than 10,000 hams hanging
from overhead beams.
After winding through
some beautiful mountains,
we arrived at Centinji, the
old capital and religious cen-
ter of Montenegro, which
lies in a high mountain val-
ley. It is said that the clock
stopped in Centinji more
than a half-century ago, due
to the relocation of the capi-
tal to Podgorica in 1946.'
The seat of power in the
1700s, Centinji was plun-
dered numerous times by the
Turks. Finally, brazen King
Petrovic declared war on the
mighty Ottoman Empire. Ap-
parently Centinji has been
bypassed ever since. We vis-
ited King Nikola Petrovic's
Palace, a humble place in the
ranking of palaces.


Concluding our enjoyment
of this unique country, and
its tranquil beauty, we ar-
rived back in Kotor and
boarded our ship in time for
dinner, and a deserved
night's sleep. Tomorrow
we'll cruise the Adriatic,
bound for Corfu, Greece, an-
other UNESCO World Her-
itage site.
-- m----- .
Neil Sawyer is a 22-year
Crystal River resident and
businessman. He and his
wife, Karyn, are extensive
travelers, venturing to
foreign countries two to
three times a year in
addition to taking several
domestic excursions
annually. They prefer
independent travel or with
small group guided tours.
E-mail him at
gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


769923


Special to the Chronicle
The Rev. Mark Whittaker,
Pastor of First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa, will lead a Bible
Lands cruise-tour to four
countries from Nov. 11 to
22,2009. The tour will begin
in Greece where partici-
pants will visit Athens and
ancient Corinth (a city
where the Apostle Paul
lived for 1 1/2 years). Then
they will board a 1,000 pas-
senger cruise ship and sail
to several Mediterranean
ports before returning to
Athens.
In Egypt, participants
will see the great Pyramids
of Giza, along with the
Sphinx, and visit the Egypt
Museum while in Cairo.
The museum houses the
King Tut treasures. They
will trace the Old Testa-
ment Hebrew roots in that
land and remember the
New Testament journey of
the Holy Family escaping
King Herod's rampage.
During three days in Is-
rael, there will be visits to
Bethlehem (where Jesus
was born), Jerusalem
(where he spent his last
days and the site of his cru-
cifixion and resurrection),


and the Galilee (where he
spent two to three years
teaching, healing and per-
forming many miracles).
On the Greek Island of
Rhodes, travelers will re-
member the Apostle Paul's
brief visit there and recall
the crusaders known as the
Knights of St.John, who oc-
cupied the island for two
centuries.
Finally a stop at Ku-
sadasi, Turkey, will take
passengers to the grand city
of Ephesus (where St. Paul
lived and ministered for
three years). The restored
ruins are among the most
magnificent in the ancient
world.
Whittaker is opening reg-
istration to others in Citrus
County who may be inter-
ested, along with their rela-
tives and friends. "My wife
and I are looking forward
to this special pilgrimage,"
said. Pastor Whittaker. "I
have traveled to some of
these places before, but not
all of them. A trip like this
helps the places named in
the Bible really 'come
alive.' And to walk in the
footsteps of Jesus and Paul
is awesome. We invite oth-
ers who may be interested
to join us on this fabulous


Or If


Saturday, June 27th
8 a.m.-noon Registration- Homosassa Riverside Resort
11a.m. Free Boat Shuttle Begins,
S 1p.m. Tug-A-War- The Freezer '
-- 1-t 2p.m. Bikini Contest- Seagrass Pub & Grill
3 p.m. Pie Eating Contest - The Shed
4 p.m. Red, White & Blue Beer Belly Contest.-The Shed , ,
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4:30 p.m. Blue Crab Races - The Freezer
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SAwards 1st to 4th High Hand;
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In addition to motor
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shore' excursions and all
admissions, the tour also
will include background
lectures, Bible study and
times of prayer and reflec-
tion at some of the most sig-
nificant Biblical sites.
More information and
brochures are available
from the church office at
8831 W Bradshaw St in Ho-
mosassa, 628-4083.





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S 7 ,621 uRJ ...

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of County Commissioners
of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a public learing on Tuesday, July 14,
2009, at 3:15 p.m. in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida,
for the purpose of adding Alternate Key No. 1183821 & 1183758, 3 D & L
Inc., to the 2006 Chassahowitzka Water Special Assessment District
assessment roll. The total cost of the water improvements was
$3,184,960.72.

The affected property owner has the right to appear at this public hearing
and to file written objections with the Board of County Commissioners
within twenty (20) days of the date of this notice. Written objections or
comments should be mailed to the Board of County Commissioners, c/o
Land Section, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 205, Lecanto, Florida
34461.

The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem assessment applies is
as follows:


The unit of measure for which property within the 2006 Chassahowitzka
Water Special Assessment District will be levied is as follows: $3,094.46
per assessment unit.

The non-ad valorem assessments will be added to your ad valorem tax
bill mailed in November of each year. These non-ad valorem
assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Citrus County
pursuant to Chapter 197, Florida Statutes. FAILURE TO PAY THE
ASSESSMENTS WILL CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE ISSUED
AGAINST YOUR PROPERTY WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS OF
TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY.

' Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting
because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County
Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida,
34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting., If you are
hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 341-6580.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public
hearing, he will need to ensure.that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.


BY: JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


([1AY T


Crnius Coumn, (FL) CHRONICIE


TRAVEL


All 01 --.- � 1 mno








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AIO SnUNDAY IIINE 21. 2009


* Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 west on Veterans
Drive across from the Harley
Davidson dealership will be
honoring our young Marine,
Daniel "DJ" Williams, home on
leave from Afghanistan. Daniel
is the son of Dan and Diane
Williams of Crystal River. He
completed high school at WTI
in 2006, and all his friends and
classmates are invited to the
welcome-home party, which is
a surprise for him. The Surprise
Party is at 3 p.m. June 27. The
meal will be 5 p.m., deep-fried
turkeys and all the trimmings.
There is a donation of $6 for
the meal. DJ's MOS is Scout
Snyper Platoon. Please try to
make this celebration for him,
which is open to all his friends
and family. Any questions, call
Fran at 628-6374.
Other events for this week:
Today: Mixed pool league 3
p.m.
Wednesday: Bingo at 2 p.m.
with light lunch, open to public;
Women's pool league 7 p.m.
Friday: Light supper (pizza)
at 5 p.m.
Saturday: Welcome home
party for Daniel Williams (see
above).
Note: Bingos and meals are
open to-the public. Call 795-
5012 after 1 p.m.
* American Legion Post '
155 events for the week of
June 21 to 27:
Today: Breakfast 8:30 to 11
a.m., $5. Father's Day and
Birthday/Anniversary Bash
potluck dinner 3 to 6 p.m. Live
music. Dart tournament 6 p.m.
Monday: Bingo, 1 to 4 p.m.
Tuesday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. General/Auxiliary meeting
7:30 p.m.
, Wednesday: Chicken "hot
wings" noon to 3 p.m. Italian
dinner night 5 to 7 p.m., $5.
Live music 6 to 10 p.m.
Thursday: Lunch 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Bingo 1 to 4 p.m. Show
Me the Money 5 p.m. 91st An-
nual Department of Florida
Convention in Orlando.
Friday: Awesome steak din-
ner 5 to 7 p.m., $8.75. Live
music 6 to 10 p.m. 91st Annual
Department of Florida Conven-
tion in Orlando.
Saturday: Pool tournament 2
p.m. 91st Annual Department of
Florida Convention in Orlando.
Call Cmdr. Jim Woodman at
795-6526 or visit
www.postl55.org.
S Joe Nic Barco Memorial
VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City, 637-
0100.
Today: Happy Father's Day!
Welcome Home Party for new
officers, 2 to 6 p.m. Karaoke by
Mark B 3 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday: Bingo starting at 3
p.m. sponsored by the Ladies'
and Men's Auxiliaries. Guests
welcome.
Wednesday: Wings three for
$1,4 to 7 p.m. Karaoke by Jan-
nie Faye 6 to 9 p.m. Guests
welcome. 4
Friday: All-you-can-eat fish
(fried, baked or blackened) $7
or a three-piece fried chicken
dinner, served from 4 to 7 p.m.
Karaoke by Debbie G 6 to 9
p.m. Guests welcome.
Saturday: Dinner/Dance,
burgers on the grill $5.50
served from 5 to 7 p.m. Music
by Rambling Fever from 6 to 9
p.m. Guests welcome.
I VFW Post 7991, 3107 W.
Dunnellon Road, Dunnellon,
(352) 489-1772.
Friday: Bingo, starting at 1
p.m. Sandwiches or hot dogs
are available. Open to public.
The post isnow in the
process of forming pool, darts,
and horseshoe teams for tour-
naments. Everyone interested
should call the post after 1 p.m.
Monday through Saturday,
(352) 489-1772.
Come join us for breakfast.
on the second and fourth Sun-
day of every month; Full break-
fast menu, all for $5. Come out
and support your VFW, bring


your friends, family and neigh-
bors for a great meal. Children
younger than 12, $3. Open to
the public.
July 4: Fourth of July barbe-
cue. Ribs, beans, potato salad,
hot dogs, lots of fun for the en-
tire family. Music, and fun for
the children. Come show your
support for your service men
and women and all veterans.
Call the post for information.
We are a non-smoking post,
but we do have a large smok-
ing patio available. If you are
considering joining the VFW
and its auxiliaries, come in or
call the post.
* Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly meet-
ing 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Crys-
tal Paradise Restaurant in
Crystal River. Have lunch after
the meeting.
Luncheons are held at 1 p.m.
second Tuesdays at selected
restaurants, all are welcome.
July 14 will be at Frank's Family
Restaurant on U.S. 41 and S.R.
200 junction in Hemando.
Breakfasts are held at 8 a.m.
on the last Sunday monthly.
June 28 will be at Joe's Restau-
rant in Inverness and July 26 at
Crystal Paradise Restaurant in
Crystal River.
Call John Kister at 527-3172.
* The American Legion.
Wall-Rives Post 58,10730
U.S. 41, Dunnellon.
Regular meetings ofthefiPost
and Auxiliary are at 7 p.m. on
the first Wednesday monthly.
Dunnellon Young Marines
meet from 6 to 9 p.m. every
Tuesday except for June, July
and August.
Bingo is every Thursday
evening. Doors open at 4 p.m.
Games start at 6 p.m. Food is
available.
Third Saturday Outdoor.Flea
Market is every month on our
premises. Vendors - $10. Call
Larry Jones for details, 522-
0177.
Pancake breakfast held the,
third Saturday of each month
has been suspended for.July
and August: Will resume in
September. All-you-can-eat for
a $4 donation.
* Eugene Quinn VFW Post
4337, 906 State Road 44 E., In-
verness, phone 344-3495.
Karaoke is presented each
Sunday, Tuesday and Friday
evenings.
Bar Bingo is played Monday
and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday evening.
Wings are served each Tues-
day evening and fish or chicken
on Friday evenings,
"Show Me The Money" is
played each Saturday from 1 to
3 p.m. . .
* Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864
Karaoke night is Friday with J
& S and Joyce's Wings on Sat-
urday, noon to 3 p.m.
For more information, call the
post at (352) 465-4864.
* Beverly Hills Memorial
American Legion Post 237,
4077 N.-Lecanto Highway, in
the Beverly Plaza invites inter-
ested veterans to apply for
membership or transfer. Sons
of the American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary units are now
forming. Membership meeting
fourth Thursday at 7 p.m. Sun-
day darts at 3 p.m. with
karaoke following. Other activi-
ties being planned. All sporting
events available on five TVs.
Visit, or phone the post at 746-
5018.
* Marine Corps League,
Citrus County Detachment
819 will meet at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW Post
10087 in Beverly Hills. Call
Commandant Robert Deck at
527-1557.
* Landing Ship Dock (LSD)
Sailors meet at Denny's in
Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 621-0617.


~="== Sunday's PUZZLER

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6-21


Veterans NOTES

IN THE SERVICE

Bond graduates combat training
Army Pvt. Jonathon T. Bond has graduated from basic com-
bat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fit-
ness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training,
drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field
training exercises.
He is the son of Theodore Bond of Crystal River and Jen-
nifer O'Casio of Homosassa.
The private is a 2008 graduate of Crystal River High School.


* The Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association (AFA) will have its
June meeting at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 25. The location will
be the Landmark Aviation Build-
ing, 1200 S.W. 60th Ave.,
Ocala.
Guest speaker will be chap-
ter member Dave Suban. Dave
is retreed Senior.lntelligence An-
alyst HDQS, U.S. Special Oper-
ations CMD. Guests are always
welcome to the meetings.
Call Mike Emig (352) 854-
8328.
* Hunger and Homeless
Coalition - Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran in
need of food, haircut, voter ID,
food stamps, medical assis-
tance or more blankets is asked
to call John Young at the
Hunger and Homeless Coali-
tion at 628-4357, or pass along
this phone number to the vet-
eran.
* Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxiliary
Unit 77 meet the first Thursday
monthly at the Inverness High-
lands Civic Center at 4375 Little
Al Point Road, Inverness. Pot-
luck dinner at 6 p.m., meeting
starts at 7:15. Auxiliary Unit 77
meets at the same time and
place. Call Post Cmdr. Norman
Provencal at 726-4257 or Auxil-
iary president Alice Brumett at
860-2981.
* U.S. Submarine Veterans
(USSVI)-Sturgeon Base meets
at 11 a.m. the first Saturday
monthly at the American Legion
Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River. Visitors
and interested parties are al-
ways welcome. Call Base
Cmdr. Billy Wein at 726-5926.
* American Legion Post
166 meets at 1:30 p.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
Dumas-Hartson VFW Post
8189 Ladies Auxiliary facility lo-
cated on Veterans Drive, Ho-
mosassa, on the west side of
U.S. 19 at Dixon's Auto Sales
across from Harley Davidson.
. * The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the VFW
Post 10087, Beverly HHls, at 1
p.m. the first Tuesday monthly.
Anyone who has honorably
served within Korea or outside


Korea from June 25, 1950, to
Jan. 31, 1955, and anyone
serving within Korea from 1955
to present is eligible to join the
Korean War Veterans Associa-
tion (KWVA). Call Hank Butler
at 563-2496, Paul Salyer at
637-1161 or Neville Anderson
at 344-2529.
* Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
bane 1219 conducts its
meetings at 7 p.m. the second
Thursday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River (6585
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Richard Gannon
at 637-1236; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Debi Gan-
non at 637-1236 or visit
www.Post155.org.
* Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shonk Chap-
ter 70 and Auxiliary 1039 N..
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. DAV
Chapter 70 and Auxiliary meet-
ings are at 2 p.m. on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month.
The DAV Chapter is open
from 9 a.m. to noon every
Tuesday to assist disabled vet-
erans. A service officer is avail-
able by appointment. Call Bill
Geden at 341-6875.
For the Chapter, call Richard
Floyd, adjutant at 726-5031.
For the Auxiliary, call Lynn Ar-
mitage, adjutant at 341-5334.
* Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will conduct its.
monthly coordination meeting
for Citrus County's 17th Annual.
Veterans Appreciation Week at
1:30 p.m., Wednesday, July 15,
in the Conference Room of the
Citrus County Chronicle Build-
ing, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veteran service organiza-
tions and individual veterans
are welcome. Any organization
or person desiring additional in-
formation should contact Chair-
man Fred Daniels by e-mail at
fredinfloralcity@wildblue.net or
by phone at 422-2449.
* The Dan Campbell Air-
borne Association meets at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at American Legion
Post 155, 6585 Gulf-to-Lake


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Sunday, June 28" Marlins


Dm dIe eatingg is limid to ed vo game.
Calt 32-427-ST7 today to make rsemvatons for the gamee) you would tie to attend.
Thanks for your support and "GO RAYS!"

TAMPA BAY RAYS - BASEBALL TRIPS
All tickets $35 per person
(Checks payable to: Ctrus County Senior Foundation)
Price Includes Admission to Game
and Round-Trip Transportation Via Chartered Bus
Pick up and drop off location for the bus will be:
Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, FL 34461
Bus boards 30 minutes before listed departure time j
- - - - - - - - --^__ .���_. __- - - - - - - - - - ^
ThesM RaysI UbIl T r Fuedt Rabl id Ewe d
AD pwttd. ffrom tbute trips tgo le the Cia Cm mny Seiory Faidle a *sd
the Cir.t C.nty H-n dhere d MOls. PrpraFa;
for hbe dirlw bhefl tf Mtieales ia C oitel Ceaty.


S35.00


10:30 am


Highway (State Road 44), Crys-
tal River. All current and previ-
ous Airborne members and
their wives are welcome. Call
Steve Leonard at 726-3693.
* The Marine Corps
League, Samuel R. Wall De-
tachment 1139 will conduct its
regular meeting at 7 p.m. the
third Wednesday monthly at
DAV Post 70 in Inverness at the
intersection of Independence
Avenue and U.S. 41 North. All
former Marines are welcome.
Call Tom Heron at 637-2724 or
Joe Spoto at 746-3315.
* Gilley-Long-Osteen VFW
Post 8698, 520 State Road 40
East, Inglis (352) 447-3495.
Men's meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
the third Wednesday monthly.
Ladies Auxiliary meets at 5
p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly. Men's Auxiliary meets
at 7 p.m. the second Monday
monthly. House Committee
meets at 6 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly.
* Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 will meet at 3
p.m. the third Thursday monthly
at the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41


North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 344-
0727.
* Herbert Surber American
Legion Post 225 meets the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122, call
to order 7:30 p.m. The mem-
bership invites all eligible veter-
ans to come and join us as we
plan for the future of our Post.
* The Herbert Surber
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 225 meets at 7:30 p.m. the
third Thursday monthly at the
Floral City VFW Post 7122 on
U.S. 41, Floral City. Contact
Marcia Gallagher, membership
chairwoman, at 860-1629.
Come and join this newly re-
chartered unit and be a part of
the great accomplishments and
projects in the American Legion
Auxiliary.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will con-
duct its bimonthly meeting at
1:15 p.m., Tuesday, July 21, at
the Caf6 of the Citrus County
Resource CenterN/VA Clinic,
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court,
See NOTES/Page All


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S 12 Pack 12 Oz. Btls.


Alcoholic beverages not available at all Walgreens locations.
To find a location near you call 1-803-9254733. _ _ _
Rebates subject to the conditions of the manufacturer,
Right reserved to limit quantities on all items. I A
*Rebate details in store
FL-REG Good 6/21 thru 6/27/09


0 2009 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.


riLJ6%f aulNu^�, J.- -, -7


I1








kYrxlfw (,I~v(~. HOIL UDY UE2,20 l


Citrus Cinemas 6 - Inverness; 637-3377
"The Year One" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:40
p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Proposal" (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25
p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Taking of Pelham 123" (R) 12:15 p.m., 2:45
p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No
passes.
"The Hangover" (R) 12:20 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Up" (PG) Noon, 2:30 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:20
p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 12:05 p.m.,
2:35 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Year One" (PG-13) 12:10 p.m., 2:30
p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"The Proposal" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m., 2:50
p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No


passes.
"Imagine That" (PG) 12:25 p.m., 3 p.m., 5:30
p.m., 8:05 p.m.
"Taking of Pelham 123" (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:15
p.m., 5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"The Hangover" (R) 12:40 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
5:35 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Land of the Lost" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 2:50
p.m., 5:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Up" (PG) 12:05 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7
p.m., 9:35 p.m.
"Night at the Museum II" (PG) 12:15 p.m.,
2:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Terminator Salvation" (PG-13) 2:55 p.m.,
5:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Angels & Demons" (PG-13) 11:55 p.m.
"Star Trek" (PG-13) 10:35 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9 offers free children's films at
10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesdays through
Aug. 5, first-come, first-served.


-June 22 to 26MENUS


CONGREGATE DINING
Monday: Barbecued pork riblet, pinto beans
with peppers and onions, a slice of fresh baked
cornbread with margarine, pear cup, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter with ketchup and mus-
tard, baked beans with tomato, coleslaw, hot dog
bun, warm cinnamon apples, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Salisbury steak with brown
gravy, whipped potatoes, carrot cuts, a slice of
whole wheat bread with margarine, banana pud-
ding, low-fat milk.


NOTES
Continued from Page A10

Lecanto (west side of C.R. 491.
1 mile north of C.R. 486).
All combat-wounded veter-
ans and parents, spouses, sib-
lings and lineal descendants of
living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited to attend.
Military Order of the Purple
Heart life membership'is $50.
There are no chapter dues.
Visit the Chapter 776 Web site
at www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.
* VFW Post 4252 and
Ladies Auxiliary.
All. eligible persons are in-
vited to join. Stop in at the post
or call for information. Post
4252 is at 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, S.R. 200, Her-
nando; phone 726-3339. Send
e-mails to vfw4252@tam-
pabay.rr.com.
* The William Crow
AmVets Post 447 is at 33


Thursday: Texas hash, green peas, spiced
warm peaches, a slice of whole wheat bread
with margarine, one oatmeal cookie, low-fat milk.
Friday: Chicken salad, tossed salad with
French dressing, tomato and cucumber salad,
two slices of whole wheat bread with margarine,
fresh banana, low-fat milk.
Congregate dining sites include: Lecanto,
East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnellon. For information,
call Support Services at 527-5975.


Risher Ave. in Inglis. For more
information, call 447-4473.
* The H. F. Nesbitt VFW
Post 10087 is in Beverly Hills
off C.R. 491, across the street
from ROC's 491 Sports Bar and
directly behind the new Supe-
rior Bank.
* The Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition invites all honor-
ably discharged veterans, their
wives, widows and widowers to
its open business meeting at 6
p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly in the County Veterans
Service Office classroom at the
Citrus County Resource Center
in Lecanto next to the V.A.
Clinic. Come see what the Cit-
rus Veterans Coalition is all
about and if you feel you can
assist in the 'Veterans Helping
Veterans" program, come on
board as a member. The next
open business meeting will be
on Sept. 24 as the regular busi-
ness meetings for the summer
have, been suspended through
June, July and August.
We are a service to needy


veterans' organizations provid-
ing food supplements and non-
perishable foods through our
"Veterans Food Pantry." We are
providing assistance to needy
and disabled veterans and their
families with minor repairs to
their homes through the gen-
erosity of volunteers who are in
the plumbing, electrical and
construction industry. We are
also providing funds for annual
scholarships to veteran family
members who apply through
their school counseling serv-
ices. We have also assisted in
the CFCC building fund.
Annual membership donation
is $10 during a calendar year or
$25 for three years. The CCVC
is a nonprofit corporation and
your donations are tax de-
ductible. Current members
should check their membership
card for expiration dates and
renew with John Ring at 746-
0826..
For details, go to www.ccvcfl
.org Web site. Application forms
are available online.


Anderson appointed



battalion commander

I Special to the Chronicle


Special to the Chronicle
Col. Roarke L. Anderson, USMC, son of
Neville and Joyce Anderson, Inverness, re-
cently took command of the USMC Facility,
Henderson Hall, Washington, D.C.


Marines, soldiers and civilian employ-
ees surrounded the parade ground at
Henderson Hall, honoring outgoing Bat-
talion Commander Col. William K Lietzau
as he passed the guidon to new Com-
mander Col. Roarke L. Anderson.
Anderson, originally from Chicago,
joined the Marine Corps in 1975. He
served an enlistment before joining the
Marine Corps Reserve, earning a degree
in 1984 and accepting a commission into
the Corps.
He has served around the world, de-
ploying to Okinawa, the Philippines,
Korea, Guantanamo Bay, Japan, Bahrain,
Kuwait and Iraq. In 1999 he earned his
first master's degree, in business; he later
earned a second in national security and
strategic studies, from the Naval War Col-
lege in Newport, R.I.
Most recently, Anderson worked as the
Marine Corps Representative to the
Chairman's Joint Strategy Development
Group at the Pentagon.
Anderson's personal decorations in-
clude the Defense Superior Service
Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, De-
fense Meritorious Service Medal, Merito-
rious Service Medal, three Navy Marine
Corps Commendation Medals, Navy Ma-
rine Corps Achievement Medal and two
Combat Action Ribbons.


373-0621 SUCRN


789922


PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County,
Florida, will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 14, 2009, at 3:30 p.m. in the Board of
County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of including the properties shown in Exhibit."A" attached
hereto and made a part hereof, to the Citrus Springs Water Line Extension 2008 Special
Assessment District assessment roll. The total cost of the improvements was $8,274,439.18.
All affected property owners, as shown in Exhibit "A" attached, have a right to appear at this
public hearing and to file written objections with the Board of County Commissioners within
twenty (20) days of the date of this notice. Written objections or comments should be mailed to
the Board of County Commissioners, c/o Land Section, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 205,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.
The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem assessment applies is as follows:


The unit of measure for which property within the Citrus Springs Water Line Extensions 2008
Special Assessment District will be levied is as follows: $1,499.54 per assessment unit.
The non-ad valorem assessments will be added to your ad valorem tax bill mailed in
November of dach year. These non-ad valorem assessments will be collected by the Tax
Collector of Citrus County pursuant to Chapter 197, Florida Statutes. FAILURE TO PAY THE
ASSESSMENTS WILL CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE ISSUED AGAINST YOUR
PROPERTY WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS OF TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or
physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If
you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners with
respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he will, need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
BY: JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS 2008
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "A"


ALT KEY
1416281
1416302
1416248
1416680
1299519
1299527
1416655
1315727
1315735
1416272
1343593
1343607
1416698
1299560
1299586
1299578
1416612
1299730
1416221
1416647
1299713
1416591
1299543
1299551
1299721
1299705
1299691
2041498
1315751
1299748
2041536
131-5743
1416299
2041510
1315654
1418801
1415942
1315662
1299683
1299675
2156864
1416230
1418453
1315689
1418160
2041471
1416604
1315697


OWNER'S NAME
ATTWOOD R DEANE JR & SUSAN F
BROWN EVERTON N & JENNIFER
D AMICO EGIDIO GINO
DE LA CRUZ ABNER & CONSUELO
DYER ANGELINA TRUSTEE
pYER ANGELINA TRUSTEE
FABIAN GERDA
FAGAN THOMAS J ET AL
FAGAN THOMAS J ETAL
FERGERSON JEREMY &
CALENDA KATHLEEN & ANTHONY
CASAMENTO KAREN & SALVATORE
GARCIA REINALDO &
GULLO ANTHONY S & LISA
GULLO ANTHONY S & LISA
GULLO ANTHONY S & LISA
HUTCHINSON DEBBIE
JONES PAUL L
KENT RAY S & ETTA B
LAMBORN THOMAS R JR
LOUCK RICHARD &
VAN NESS THOMAS M
MARK JOHN K & MARIA SUSAN
MARK JOHN K & MARIA SUSAN
MEYER WENDY J
MINOR EDWARD M & CHARLES C
MINOR EDWARD M & CHARLES C.
NEW VISTA PROPERTIES INC
NEW VISTA PROPERTIES INC
PERKINS JOHNNY J & ZANNA P
PLATT TODD AUSTIN
RAMIREZ MELVIN & NANCY
RAMOS CLARA EDELIA
RAMOS RAPHAEL &
RASHID ISHRAT
RCT LLC
SHTAYNMETS BORIS & MARINA
SIMON MICHAEL J &
SOMMERS VIRGINIA M
SOMMERS VIRGINIA M
SOOKLAL VISHWA P
STICKLAND CLIFTON L JR & SUZAN
TEJEDA FERMIN & SYLVIA
TOYAMA JANE F
TREITZ JOHNA MILLER & RICHARD
V & K PROPERTIES LLC
VIDAL JOSE
YAMADA LAWRENCE R


PARCEL ID
18E17S100180 10150 0090
18E17S100180 10150 0110
18E17S100180 10150 0050
18E17S100180 10160 0270
18E17S100050 04810 0010
18E17S100050 04810 0020
18E17S100180 10160 0240
18E17S100060 05650 0100
18E17S100060 05650 0110
18E17S100180 10150 0080
18E17S100090 06090 0310
18E17S100090 06090 0320
18E17S100180 10160 0280
18E17S100050 04810 0060
18E17S100050 04810 0080
18E17S100050 04810 0070
18E17S100180 10160 0200
18E17S100050 04820 0150
18E17S100180 10150 0030
18E17S100180 10160 0230
18E17S100050 04820 0130
18E17S100180 10160 0180
18E17S100050 04810 0040
18E17S100050 04810 0050
18E17S100050 04820 0140
18E17S100050 04820 0120
18E17S100050 04820 0110
18E17S100230 16620 0020
18E17S100060 05650 0130
18E17S100050 04820 0160
18E17S100230 16620 0040
18E17S100060 05650 0120
18E17S100180 10150 0100
18E17S100230 16620 0030
18E17S100060 05650 0Q30
18E17S100180 10280 0140
18E17S100180 10130 0010
18E17S100060 05650 0040
18E17S100050 04820 0100
18E17S100050 04820 0090
18E17S100220 15380 0120
18E17S100180 10150 0040
18E17S100180 10260 0190
18E17S100060 05650 0060
18E17S100180 10250 0100
18E17S100230 16620 0010
18E17S100180 10160 0190
18E17S100060 05650 0070


Todays MOVIES


PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of County Commissioners of
Citrus County, Florida will hold a public hearing.on Tuesday, J1ly 14, 2009,
at 2:30 P.M. at the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida for the purpose of adopting a non-
ad valorem assessment roll for the 2009 Limerock Road Paving Program.
The total assessments collected for the improvements is $62,050.50.

All affected property owners have a right to appear at this public hearing
and to file written objections with the Board of County Commissioners
within twenty (20) days of the date of this notice. Written objections or
comments should be mailed to the Board of County Commissioners, c/o
Land Section, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 205, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem assessment applies is
as follows:
AiOC MP . 'O 76AMA













The unit of measure for which property within the 2009 Limerock Road
Paving Program will be levied is as follows:


$5.75 a front foot plus an additional lump sum cost for paving existing
driveway aprons as determined by the Road Maintenance Division


The non-ad valorem assessments will be added to your ad valorem tax
bill mailed in November of each year. These non-ad valorem assessments
will be collected by the Tax Collector of Citrus County pursuant to Chapter
197, Florida Statutes. FAILURE TO PAY THE ASSESSMENTS WILL
CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE ISSUED AGAINST YOUR
PROPERTY WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS OF TITLE TO YOUR
PROPERTY.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because
of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County
Administrator's Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 341-6580.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County
Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing,
he will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

76921, BY: /s/ JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN


I


SUNDAY, JuNE 21, 2009All


Crrnus CouNTY (FL E


789922








CITRUS COUNlY (FL) CHRONICLE TOGEThER SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 A13


65th ANNIVERSARY 60th ANNIVERSARY 55th ANNIVERSARY


The Frieslands


The Giansantis


The Coateses


Wilford and Marilyn
Friesland of Homosassa,
originally from Columbus,
Ohio, celebrated their 65th
wedding anniversary with
family in North Carolina.
They were married on
June 17, 1944, at Don Scott
Field AF Base, Bellville, Ill.
Prior to retirement, Mari-
lyn was a bookkeeper and
Wilford was an electrician.
They have a son, Ronald
Friesland of Homosassa, a
daughter, Pamela Meyer of
Blowing Rock, N.C., two
granddaughters, Tamara
Smith of Clemmons, N.C.,
and Gretchen Bayne of


Clemmons, N.C., and four
great-grandchildren,
Tucker Smith, Sydney
Smith, Caleb Bayne and
Joshua Bayne.
Th' Frieslands have lived
in Citrus County 10 years.


- Wedding

Fischer/Heisel


Scot Heisel and. Amy
Marie Elsa Fischer were
united in marriage Sept 19,
2008, at the home of the
bridegroom's parents. The 5
p.m. ceremony took place in
the Rocky Mountains on a
backyard hillside overlook-
ing the city. of Missoula,
Mont
The bride is the daughter
of the Rev. John and Judy
Fischer of Inverness.
The groom is the son of
Allen and Andrea Wold of
Missoula.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father, the
Rev. John Fischer, who also
officiated the ceremony She
wore a long, white silk gown
with a floral organza overlay,
flutter sleeves and a chapel-
length train. She wore flow-
ers in her hair and carried a
vibrant pink bouquet of
dahlias and cabbage roses.
The bridesmaids wore
strapless, tea-length fuchsia
dresses and carried bou-
quets of fuchsia gerbera
daisies. ;
Matron of honor was
Meredith Fischer, bride's
sister-in-law, and brides-
maids were Jacquelyn Wold,
groom's sister, Stephanie
Mathieu and Leila Sum-
mers. Clara Fischer was the
flower girl.
The best man was
Jonathan Hedditch and ush-
ers were Jeff Stetson and
David Floren.
An evening cocktail recep-
tion was held at MCT Center


for the Performing Arts.
Amy graduated from Cit-
rus High School in 1990 and
from New College of Florida
in 1994. She earned a mas-
ter's degree in journalism at
The University of Florida in
2002.
Scot graduated from Sen-
tinel High, School in 1989
and from The University of
Montana in 1994.
The couple met at The
Daily News in Longview,
Wash., where Amy is a re-
porter and Scot is the online
editor.
Their honeymoon was
spent at Glacier National
-Park -
They live in Longview
with their three dogs, Angel,
Tater and Pepe.


TOGETHER ITEMS
, Items for these pages are printed for free, but publica-
tion date and color photos cannot be guaranteed.


Phyllis and Al Giansanti,
longtime residents of Bev-
erly Hills, celebrated their
60th wedding anniversary at
a dinner reception given by
their children on June 20 in
Largo.
Married May 12, 1949,
they met in Washington,
D.C., while she was at the
Pentagon and Al was sta-
tioned at Quantico Marine
Base. A career United
States Marine, Al is a vet-
eran of World War II, Korea


and Vietnam. After retiring
from the Marine Corps, Al
spent 20 years with Eastern
Airlines before moving to
Beverly Hills.
Phyllis and Al have five
children and nine grand-
children living in Colorado,
Texas, Florida, Connecticut
and Massachusetts.
They have been active lo-
cally in the Knights of
Columbus, Marine Corps
League, Skillbank and many
,other volunteer positions.


---------- Engagement

Ingleriht/Bishop


Casey Anna Ingleright,
daughter of David and
Nancy Ingleright of
Lecanto, and Ian James
Bishop of London, Ky., son
of James Bishop and Sandra
Allen, will be joined in mar-
riage at the Unity Church in
Lecanto on Dec. 19,2009.
The bride-elect is a grad-
uate of Lecanto High School
and Jacksonville University,
where she was a member of
Gamma Phi Beta sorority
and the University Dance
team. Casey presently at-
tends graduate school at the
University of North Florida,
majoring in Counseling Psy-
chology.
The future bridegroom is
a graduate of North Laurel
High School in London, Ky.,
where he lettered in foot-


FORMS AVA
* The Chronicle has forms avai
gagements, anniversaries, bi


PHOTOS
* Photos submitted to
accompany Together
items cannot be
returned without
a stamped, self-ad-
dressed envelope from
the sender.


Our results show that our patients:
( Lose about 12-20 pounds per month FATH ER'S
Have decreased appetite IlAV


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Develop a rea
medically moi
Now Also Offe
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'ring the


(352) 564-8245
www.Cusme caleighssom
SCOTT REDRICK, M.D.


582 SE 7th Ave., Crystal River, FL 34429


Se Habla Espatiol
. ,- .. I


It's Hard To StopA Trane, .


CAC051484 CELEBRATING OUR 36th ANNIVERSARY
SCURRIER COOLING
& HEATING, INC.
(352) 628-4645 (352) 628-7473
4855 S. Suncoast Blvd.(Hwy. 19 So.) Homosassa, Florida 34446


ball and track Ian is
presently a QM2/Navigator
with the United States Navy.
He is planning to attend the
University of Kentucky and
major in Civil Engineering.
The couple will honey-
moon at a resort in the Do-
minican Republic.


Harold and Suzanne
Coates of Hernando cele-
brated their 55th wedding
anniversary recently.
. They were married on
June 18, 1954, in Lapeer,
Mich.
They have seven chil-
dren: Mrs. John (Kim) Carl-
son of Attica, Mich., Mrs.
Dean (Sarah) Hinkle of La
Plata, Md., Allen Coates of
Flint, Mich., and Melvin,
Melody,, Christina and Mon-
ica Coates (all at home) of


Hernando.
They have nine grandchil-
dren and six great-grand-
children, living in Michigan,
Maryland, Illinois and
Hawaii.


- 50th ANNIVERSARY -

The Sargents


Bob and Anne Sargent of
Inverness, formerly of Rut-
land, Ohio, observed their
50th wedding anniversary
June 13.
Married in 1959 in Lin-
dale, Ohio, they moved to
Meigs Co., Ohio, in 1966,
bought a farm in Rutland,
Ohio, in 1973 and resided
there for 31 years.
Bob was a carpenter for
34 years with Point Pleasant
Carpenter's Local, WVa.,
and his 'wife raised and
showed horses for more.
than 40 years. They moved
to Inverness in 2004.
I The, Sargents have two


daughters, three grand-
daughters and four great-
grandchildren.
In celebration of their
golden wedding anniver-
sary, Mr. and Mrs. Sargent
spent the evening on a Star-
lite dinner cruise and hotel
on the Clearwater beach.


Wedding

Yetman/Drouin

Adrian Mark Drouin and
Nancy Ellen Yetman, both
of Inverness, were united in .
marriage at 11 a.m. Satur-
day, May 16, 2009, at the
Wedding Chapel in Inver-
ness. Chaplain D. Viglione
performed the Christian
service.
The groom is employed at
LKQ in Lecanto.


LIABLE
lable for weddings, en-
rths and first birthdays.


375-0621 SUCRN

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, sitting as the governing body of
the Citrus County Municipal Service Benefit Unit for Water and
Wastewater Utility Services will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, July 14,
2009, at 3:00 p.m. in, the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting
Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida, for the purpose of correcting an inaccuracy in the non-ad valorem
assessment roll for the Halls River Road Wastewater Special Assessment
Area (2004), adopted on. May 13, 2008, with regard to Alternate Key
1141915, Roland Scott and Diane D. Grybek, only. The total cost of the
improvements was $4,588,970.22.

The affected property owner has the right to appear at this public
hearing and to file written objections with the Board of County
Commissioners within twenty (20) days of the date of this notice. Written
objections or comments should be mailed to the Board of County
Commissioners c/o Land Section, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 205,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.

The geographic area to which the non-ad valorem assessment
applies is as follows:











AREA LOCATOR MAP

The unit of measure for which property within the Halls River Road
Wastewater Special Assessment Area (2004) will be levied is as follows:
$5,160.00 per assessment unit.

The non-ad valorem assessments will be added to your ad valorem
tax bill mailed in November of each year. These non-ad valorem
assessments will be collected by the Tax Collector of Citrus County
pursuant to Chapter 197, Florida Statutes: FAILURE TO PAY THE
ASSESSMENTS WILL CAUSE A TAX CERTIFICATE TO BE'-ISSUED
AGAINST YOUR PROPERTY WHICH MAY RESULT IN A LOSS OF TITLE
TO YOUR PROPERTY.

Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting
because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County
Administrator's. Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida,
34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone (352) 341-6580.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at this public
hearing, he will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made which record shall include the testimony and evidence upon.which
the appeal is to be based.

BY: JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
324 OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA


SUNDAY, JUNr 21, 2009 A13


TOGETHER


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE


IB1








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AA4 SUPuAY, JUINE Z41, �.SJ'J


Ear today, gone tomorrow

I saw a living legend at a local club re- stage. Maybe the band was hearing some-
cently. I don't go to nightclubs very often, thing different than I was. No, it was just as
anymore. What was fun at 21 is now a loud and garbled and unpleasant as it was
chore. I don't know what to wear. I worry at my seat
about parking. I'm npt going to try and meet I went to the back of the club and stood
a girl. I don't need to relax from my stressful next to the soundman behind his gigantic
day job. I barely drink On top of that, the mixing board. It was worse. Lille a cross be-
first show starts about the same time that I tween an AM station in a thunderstorm and
usually go to bed. a NASCAR race. I'd have said
But this guy is a living legend; something, but there is no way
he made some of my favorite ,: he could have heard me over the
recordings of all time. He's a mu- tuneless din. Sometimes I'd rec-
sician's musician, he plays, per- ,ognize the snippet of a song, as.if
forms, writes and produces somewhere else someone was
music. Ten, 20 years ago, the only - .trying to drown out this racket by
place you could see this guy was - playing a recording of the Living
in a stadium or an arena. To see "Legend as loud as they could
him in a nightclub that seats 300 from another floor
hundred people is a rare treat I left after the second blast I
And tickets were half what you'd JIM : have been to a lot of concerts in
pay for a Hannah Montana con- MULLEN my life. I saw the Beatles at Hol-
cert. This would be something I'd MULLEN lywood Bowl, I saw the Rolling
be talking about for a long time. Stones in '72, because everyone
And sure enough, it was. The opening act knew it would be the last time they would
was talented and tight, and as the roadies ever go on tour. The way they lived, how
moved their equipment off the stage, the many of them could possibly be alive by
waiters moved to get everyone's orders be- 1973? I worked in nightclubs and radio.
fore the real show started. .The place was Opera, country, classical, folk, pop, rock,
crammed, six people sitting at tiny tables slack-key Hawaiian, fado, show tunes - I'm
that barely had room for two glasses. a fan of it all. But if the Living Legend had
The Living Legend appeared, the crowd made recordings that sounded like this, he
went crazy Groupies swarmed forward. would not be a Living Legend. How could he
From the first note it was obvious the Living not hear what a head-banging mess this
Legend was under the impression that he was? What about the other musicians on
was in the Superdome, not a small night- stage? Couldn't they tell the difference? The
club. soundman couldn't tell that this was dis-
The music you like, soft or loud, makes torted past all recognition?
you feel as if someone else understands you I've been to concerts before where the,
perfectly Even if its sad, it can make you feel bass player was too loud, or voices were lost
better, alter your mood. I always felt better in the mix, but nothing as painful as this. The
after abig dose of the Living Legend's music. saddest part of the whole evening is that
What was coming from the stage was the now I can no longer listen to the Living Leg-
exact opposite of music. If this was music, a end's music - because I wonder who really
jet engine could go platinum and sell out made it Certainly not the guy I saw on stage
Madison Square Garden ten nights in a row. that night
It has to be the seat, I thought I must be in :
a bad spot No person in their right mind
could possibly think this was the way this Reach author Jim Mullen at
was supposed to sound. I stood beside the jimmullenCanD'way.com.

Today's HOROSCOPE


Birthday: In the year ahead,
there's a strong possibility that
two people will enter your life, and
they will have a good influence on
you and your affairs. Something
you learn from these associations
will serve you well.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -
Keep-your thoughts to yourself,
especially those that are critical of
others. Otherwise, you might not
be able to keep more negative
comments from rushing out.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - The
smartest thing you can do is to
engage in activities that don't cost
an arm and leg, because this
might nfqe 6t.`Ar better
days 0Sling funM':
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Any
melancholy you experience is
likely t6 be self-induced. If you
tally up your assets, you'll dis-
cover you have more to be grate-
ful for than to fret over.
Libra (Sept. 23.-Oct. 23)--Al-
though your intuitive perceptions
are remarkable at times, this isn't
likely to be one of those days.
Rely solely on your logic and not
on your hunches.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
The best way not to get caught off
guard is to depend solely on your
abilities, especially for important
matters.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
/An open mind is the only thing
that can keep you from need-
lessly making a big mistake. Al-
ways position yourself so that you
can clearly see the entire
panorama of events.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -
Worrying in advance about how
something is going to turn out is
foolish and will only make you
miserable.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Before agreeing to do something


for another, be certain that you
know what you're getting into.
Surface indicators might be any-
thing but a true picture.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) - If'
you are forced into an arbitrating
position, think twice about bring-
ing in another to help with the ne-
gotiations.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- This
is supposed to be a day off, but all
those long-neglected jobs and
chores will demand attention, Ond


it's unlikely you'll come up with an
excuse for not doing them.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)-
Keep a close watch on your
spending, and do not foolishly
gamble money away. You may
think you're a millionaire, but your
bank account says different.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -
Your independence might be im-
portant to you, but chances are
others will be placing neavy de-
mands on your time.


\ Firecracker 5K before the opening ceremony
to benefit The Dream Society, followed by the
Miss Firecracker beauty pageant crowning.

Friday, July 3rd - 5-10 p.m.

Liberty & Wallace Brooks Parks
Downtown Inverness
Please no pets, alcohol or personal Fireworks!
Bring ypur lawn chairs and blankets and make plans to attend. For information
on taking part in the celebration or to make a donation towards the fireworks,
please contact the City of Inverness Department of ....
Parks and Recreation at 726-3913
or www.Invemess-FI.Gov
Fre Prkng FeeAdmsso


Pictured above: (far left) Mr. Charles Vickery and (far right) Mrs.
Vickery, winners of a beautiful granite patio set, awarded from the
Chronicle's Showcase of Homes held recently.
The patio set was donated by Rock Solid Creations of Homosassa.
Also shown (L-R) of Rock Solid Creations in Homosassa,
Josh Dunlap, Owner - John Crawley, and Keith Townsend.


oC I T R U SA|jMLC 0 U N T Y V


Father's Day poem marks


'What Makes a Dad'

D ear Readers: Happy Father's Day to First of all, I don't want to hurt my
all thfe Dads and father figures in mother's feelings. She named me after a
our reading audience. You are im- very significant person in her life. Second,
measurably important, and we hope your I don't want my brother to feel somehow
children will remember to acknowledge left out if I take Dad's name. Third, if I
you on this special day. legally become a "Jr.," does that simultane-
Here's a poem sent to us by a ously alter Dad's legal name to
reader in Michigan, author un- "Sr."?
known. "What Makes a Dad"- Can I legally change my name
God. took the strength of a without parental consent? Will
mountain, the majesty of a tree, I have to change my Social Se-
the warmth of a summer sun, the curity number or driver's li-
calm of a quiet sea, cense? Do I need a court order?
The generous soul of nature, Does it cost a lot? - Nameless
the comforting arm of night. the in New Mexico
wisdom of the ages, the power of Dear Nameless: In many
the eagle's flight, states, you can change your
The joy of a morning in spring, name simply by using it that
the faith of a mustard seed. the way, as long as you aren't doing
patience of eternity, the depth of it for fraudulent purposes. Oth-
a-familyneed; ANNIE'S erwise, you can do 'it by court
Then God combined these MAILBOX order, which will cost a small
qualities, when there was nothing fee, depending on the state. You
more to add, He knew His mas- may also need to change your
terpiece was complete, and so, He called it Social Security card, driver's license, pass-
... Dad. port, credit cards, etc..
Dear Annie: My wife and I had fertility We suggest you discuss this with both of
problems for a few years, but after several your parents. (Your father may not approve,
procedures, tests and adventures, we be- since having the same name could create
came pregnant and now have a beautiful 2- legal hassles for him.) If you decide to go
month-old son. I ahead, consider using your new name for a
'I am a social worker, and my main objec- while to see how it goes before making it
tive is to find adoptive homes for foster legally binding.
children. I myself was adopted, and now I Dear Readers: In honor of Father's Day,
help other people complete their families we thought you would enjoy these instruc-
through adoption. We do not discriminate tions on how to diaper a baby from baseball
against adoptive families due to age, but if great Jimmy Piersall:
an older couple is having difficulty adopt- "Spread the diaper in the position of the
ing, I hope they will check into becoming& diamond with you at bat Then fold second
foster parents through their local state base down to home and set the baby on the
agency or private agencies. There are so pitcher's mound. Put first base and third to-
many children in foster care who need per- gether, bring up home plate and pin the
manent homes. - Louisville, Ky. three together. Of course, in case of rain,
Dear Louisville: Thank you for remind- you gotta call the game and start all over
ing us, on Father's Day, that there is more again."
than one way to become a loving parent.
Anyone interested can contact their local
Child Welfare League or State Department Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy
of Human Resources, or the National Fos- Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
ter Parent Association (nfpaihc.org) at (800) editors of the Ann Landers column.
557-5238. E-mail your questions to
Dear Annie: I am a 20-year-old man and anniesmailbox@comcastnet, or write to:
would like to change my name. I don't care Annie's Mailbox, PO. Box 118190, Chicago,
for my first name and would like to take my IL 60611. To find out more aboutAnnie's
father's name and be a "junior." However, I Mailbox, visit the Creators Syndicate Web
have some concerns. page at www. creators.com.

Sunday PUZZLER

Puzzle answer is on Page A10.


ACROSS
1 Mickey or Mighty
6 Kind of lily
11 Attack on all
sides
16 Grand-
20 Feathered pro-
jectile
21 "Tempest"
sprite
22 Landmark in
STexas
23 Discussion
group
25 - tennis
26 French com-
poser
27 Denim trousers
28 Banishment
29 Letter after
zeta
30 Brigand
'32 Turnabout ,
34 Shoe part
35 Let
37 Not at all spicy
38 More secure
39 Sterilizes,
41 Peace goddess
43 Commenced
44 Went very fast
46 Violent storm
49 Drive back
50 Cassette
54 Itineraries
55 Kind of geome-
try
56 Macadamize
57 Seamen
58 "- Town"
59 Abdul or Pren-
tiss
60 Dressed to the-

61 Opera's Go-
dunov
62 Commotion
64 Sharp to the


taste
65 Poison
66 Calm
67 Brake part- '
68 Ill-mannered'"
69 - Earl Carter
70 That girl
71 Dentist's de-
gree
72 Common flower
74 Not widespread
75 Combination of
tones
77 Perform
80 Frozen dessert
81 Well-founded
82 Sketch'
83 Punta del -
87 Procession
89 Be worthy of
90 Prepared
91 Run-down-
neighborhood
92, Cordial flavor-
ing
93 Function
94 Hollandaise, for
one
95 Black cuckoo
96 Naval rank
(abbr.)
97 Lab burner
98 Sleek
99 Nonsensical
talk
102 To some other
place
105 Balance
106 Courage
107 Horned animal,
for short
108 Feather
109 Misdemeanor
110 Style
113 Captures by
trickery
114 Film spool
115 Food fish


119-trip
120 Recklessness
123 Group spirit
-125 summer drink
126 r..,itical card
128 Occurrence
129 Meek
130 Chocolate sub-
stitute
132 Usher's beat
133 Chop finely
134 Efface-
135 Evident
136 Be without
137 More senior
138 Beat with'a
stick
139 Appellations


DkOWN
1 Alma-
2 Deliver a speech
3 Citified
4 Costa del -
5 Pitcher
6 Rifle
7 Suitable for farm-
ing
8 Dwelled
9 Lascivious look
10 Totality
11 Pernicious
12 Football team
13 Frugal one
14 Arab VIP
15 Throw
16 Grade school
book
17 Careless
18 Loos or Bryant
19 Hard-rind fruit
24 Dregs
31 Portents
32 Stormed
33 Bookkeeping
record


(abbr.) hearts
36 Lean 84 Helot
38 Brownish color 85 Piano adjuster
40, Newspaper em- 86 Post or Dickin-
ployee !no:
42 Fish eggs 88 Toward the
43 Stomach back
44 Bird irn a poem of a ship
45 War god 89 Paris' subway
46 Traverse 90 Elevate
47 Period of early 93 Perceived
life ' 94 Diets, British
48 Unusual thing style
49 Baton - 98 Like a dense
50 Celestial dog fog
51 Was bold 99 Bore
enough 100 Butt
52 Daily routine 101 Currier's part-
53 Letters ner
,55 Of a yellowish 103 Sharpened
color 104 Put on the pay-
56 Computer roll .
image 105 Big dish
element 106 Covered with'
59 Temporary stop crumbs
60 Wanderer. 108- Charming
61 Drink in cans 109 Cherry red
63 Scarlet 110 Beyond (prefix)
64 In a - (quickly) 111 Another time
65 Implied but un- 112 Scandinavian
spoken 113 Tendency
66 Flamboyant 114 Kind of nu-
69 Actress An. meral
gelina - 116 Seraglio
70 Protect from 117 Like a lot
light. 118 Financial obli-
73 - -de-camp gations
74 Insect stage 121 Office note
75 Fissure . 122 Wicked
76 - Moines 123 Actress -
77 Swiftly Sorvino
78 Artificial water- 124 College course
* way (abbr.)
79 Stumbles 127 Spanish cheer
81 "20,000 129 Gumshoe
Leagues" 131 Gardner the ac-
author tress
82 The two of


783727


A4A ........ Tr.,., "1 2non0









SSection B SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009



SPORTS


" Golf, boxing/B2
" Baseball, IRL/B2
" MLB/B3
" Sports briefs/B4
" Auto racing, baseball/B5
I Basketball, football/B5
M Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Federer on verge of passing Sampras


Star out for 6th

Wimbledon,

15th major

Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England
- Roger Federer is build-
ing something of a reputa-
tion as an on-court crier,
and he remembers well the
first time he wept after win-
ning a match.
It was July 2,2001, at Wim-
bledon, the tournament that
means more to him than any
other. Federer was 19, up-


and-coming and making his
Centre Court debut in the
fourth round when he.
stunned Pete Sampras, who
was 29, seeded No. 1 and
seeking an eighth Wimble-
don title.
"I used to cry almost after
every single match I lost as a
junior It's not at all a feeling
like it's the end of the world
- of course not, because
tennis is not everything -
but some people can control
it, some people can't," Fed-
erer said. "Crying after a vic-
tory is something that
started when I beat Pete."
Back then, Federer had
yet to reach the semifinals,
let alone win a title, at any


Grand Slam event. Eight
years later, as Wimbledon
begins Monday with a roof
over Centre Court for the
first time, Federer arrives at
the All England Club bid-
ding to break Sampras' ca-
reer record of 14 major
championships.
And the complexion of
Federer's pursuit of a sixth
Wimbledon title changed
significantly Friday: He
doesn't have to worry about
dealing with his nemesis,
defending champion Rafael
Nadal, who withdrew from
the tournament because of
bad knees.


On the verge of history
Roger Federer can break Pete Sampras career record for Grand Slam
singles titles if he wins Wimbledon. He tied his record earlier this month
when he won the French Open. A


Grand Slam titles
Federeri 1.i1i Sampras 1 i-4
3S O .I BS ! 2
w I a
r.MIn - MM .. A
Federer .e a , iir . Sampras
27 . .. Grand Slam i.le .. '. 31
40 . Grand Slam even . 52
175-26 . GS record ....... 203-38
650-155 ... Career record ...... 762-222
.807 ..Career winning pci . .774
;.) 59 ... Career singles ,ilis 64


Clay, grass combo
Players who won the
S.,, . French Open and
SWmbliedon in
'^ inme same year.
Rafael Nadal - 2008
Bjorn Borg.- 198. 79 80
Rod Laver * 1962, '69
Lew Hoad - 1956
Tony Trabert * 1955
Budge Patty * 1950
Don Budge * 1938
Fred Perry * 1935
W^ Jack Crawford * 1933
SRene Lacoste * 1925
Jwin


See i - ..'Page B4 SOURCE:ATPWorldTour.com AP


Record scores abound


Barnes' 8-under is

best 36 holes ever

at US Open

Associated Press


FARMINGDALE, N.Y. - Ricky
Barnes had the best day of anyone
at Bethpage Black
He only had to play nine holes.
He knocked in a 45-foot birdie putt
that put him in the record books
with the lowest 36-hole score in
U.S. Open history. He had a one-
shot lead going into the. third
round. And he still hasn't hit a shot
in the rain.
Right when the water-logged
U.S. Open began to gain traction, a
burst of showers halted the third
round Saturday about a half-hour
before Barnes and Lucas Glover,
who was one shot behind, were to
tee off.
It didn't take long for the satu-
rated greens to be submerged, and
'the squeegees were simply no
match. The 60 players who made
the cut, including defending
champion Tiger Woods a whop-
ping 11 shots off the lead, were to
return at 7:30 a.m. Sunday.
The U.S. Open hasn't dealt with
!weather like this in 25 years.
Even more unusual were the
red numbers under par - not to
'mention the names next to them
on the leaderboard.
Not many could have imagined
the U.S. Open's 36-hole scoring
record being set at Bethpage
Black, a beast of a course. Even
fewer could have predicted it
would belong to Barnes, who took
six years to reach the PGA Tour
and has yet to crack the top 40 this
year.
He knocked in the long birdie
putt on his 17th hole - the par-3
eighth - and shot a 65 in the rain-
delayed second round Saturday
morning that put him at 8-under
132. That broke the previous mark
by one shot
"Obviously, at the beginning of
the week, you didn't think that
score was out there," Barnes said.
It sure wasn't for Woods, whose
bid to get back into contention was
stalled by too many bogeys. Woods
had to settle for a 69, leaving him
11 shots out of the lead.
The scoring was so easy that
Glover had a 20-foot birdie putt on
See U.S, i.. : Page B4
Ricky Barnes waves to the gallery
after a birdie putt on the eighth
green Saturday during the second
round of the U.S. Open Golf Cham-
pionship at Bethpage State Park's
Black Course in Farmingdale, N.Y.
Associated Press


USC


hires


O'Neill


Coach replaces

Floyd as Trojans'

basketball coach

Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Kevin
O'Neill returned to the col-
lege ranks Saturday when
he was announced as.South-
ern California's basketball
coach, taking over from Tim
Floyd.
The school announced
O'Neill's hiring in an e-mail.
Floyd suddenly resigned
June 9 amid allegations that
he paid to have O.J. Mayo de-
livered to the Trojans. He
said he was quitting after
four seasons because he no
longer .had
enthusiasm
for his job.
O'Neill is
scheduled
to be intro-
aduced Mon-
day at a statement. "I
news conach- Keving phO'Neill
ferenceipl tabbed as USC's
" We ' re new coach.
thrilled toe
have Kevin O'Neill as our
men's basketball coach,"
athletic director Mike Gar-
rett said in a statement. "I
love his coacmpionshilosophy
and principles: he's a no-
nonsense coach who is very
detail-oriented and pre-
parett as teams well. He
stresses defense and I've al-
ways believed that defense
wins championships."
O'Neill's NBA tenure
seemingly appealed to Gar-
rett as well.
"His 30 years of experi-
ence at the college and pro-
fessional levels has
prepared him well for this
opportunity," Garrett said.
The 52-year-old defense-
oriented coach was an assis-
tant with the NBA's
Memphis Grizzlies this past
season. Mayo plays for the
Grizzlies. O'Neill led the
Toronto Raptors to- a 33-49
record in 2004.
O'Neill also had stints
with the New York Knicks,
Detroit and Indiana.
He returns to the Pac-10
after serving as interim
coach at Arizona in 2008
when Lute Olson took a
leave of absence.


Pena's homer pushes Rays past Mets, 3-1


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays' Carlos Pena hits a solo home run in the sev-
enth Inning Saturday to put the Rays ahead 2-1 against the
New York Mets at CIti Field In New York. The Rays won 3-1.


Shields outduel

N. Ys Santana

Associated Press.
NEW YORK - Carlos
Pena hit a tiebreaking
homer off Johan Santana in
the seventh inning Saturday,
sending James Shields and
the Tampa Bay Rays to a
rainy 3-1 victory over the
New York Mets.
Shields allowed three hits


in seven innings and retired
his final 14 batters. He out-
pitched Santana, who was
back in fine form following
the worst start of his career.
Both starters were lifted
after a 73-minute rain delay
in the top of the eighth. Dan
Wheeler worked a perfect
inning and J.P Howell got
three outs for his fourth save.
Ben Zobrist added a solo
homer in the ninth, his 15th
in a breakout season for the
AL champions.
Santana was tagged for
nine runs and nine hits in


three-plus innings Sunday,
losing 15-0 in the Subway
Series finale at Yankee
Stadium.
The sluggish perform-
ance and diminished veloc-
ity on his fastball raised
questions about Santana's
health, though he insisted
he felt fine. After adjusting
his mechanics and grip dur-
ing a recent side session,
the ace left-hander looked
more likeshimself Saturday
against the top-scoring team
in the majors.
Santana (8-5) squandered


a 1-0 lead and took the loss,
but didn't allow a hit until
Jason Bartlett's one-out dou-
ble in the fifth. He yielded
three hits and three walks in
7 1-3 innings.
The two-time Cy Young
Award winner showed better
zip and command with his
fastball, which clocked
around 92 mph all game.
That's not Santana at his
best, but it was a noticeable
improvement from Sunday.
His strikeout totals,
See RAYS/Page B4








C SUNDAY, C JUNE 21, 'N2009C



Woods needs U.S. Open miracle


There are things that even
the great Tiger Woods can't
control.
Rain, for one, but he's not alone.
Had the USGA known what a mess
the heavens would make of this
U.S. Open, it would have taken the
millions it put into
Bethpage Black and
used it to build a
course somewhere in
the Mojave desert.
Then again, had the
USGA known that put-
ting Woods in the open-
ing pairings Thursday
morning would have
caused such havoc on
the leaderboard, it AP Col
surely would have TI
moved him to the after- DAHL
noon where he would
have the proper condi-
tions to defend his title. As great as
he may be, even Woods isn't nearly
that interesting when he's 11 shots
out of the lead and everyone from
Phil Mickelson to Rocco Mediate is
bunched somewhere in between.
That doesn't mean NBC won't
find a way to show him every five
minutes Sunday as the Open


du
.1
LE


marathon hopefully draws to a
close. Who knows, Woods may
even get more airtime than Al
Roker, who made his way up to
Bethpage on Saturday to drone on
incessantly about weather but was
mysteriously missing by the time
rain finally came.
What it does mean is
that Woods won't be jet-
ting home with any new
hardware from this
Open. He's too far back,
there are too many peo-,
ple in front of him, and,
as great as he is, he's
never come from be-
hind on Sunday to win a
umnist major championship.
M Bethpage is also play-
BERG ing way too easy so,
even if the remaining
field wanted to collapse
at the sound of Woods' gallery,
they would have to find some new
and imaginative ways to do so.
This, of course, was supposed to
be the week Woods made a tri-
umphant return to the site of his
2002 Open win and edged closer to
Jack Nicklaus with his 15th major
championship. With his knee fi-


nally healed and his drives finally
finding the fairways, there
seemed little the other 155 players
could do but watch in awe.
Nicklaus himself predicted it
would happen after Woods made
birdies on the final two holes two
weeks ago to win the Memorial.
"If he drives the ball this way,
and plays this way, I'm sure it
will," Nicklaus said. "And if not, it
will surprise me greatly."
Nicklaus isn't the only one sur-
prised. Woods arrived here Mon-
day in full swagger, confident in
his swing and eager to add to a col-
lection of major trophies second
only to the 18 won by Nicklaus.
Oddsmakers made him a pro-
hibitive favorite. His fellow play-
ers fell all over themselves
deferring to his greatness.
Then the rain came, and every-
thing changed. Woods was out of
this U.S. Open almost before he,
had a chance to get in.
Blame the pairings and the
weather for some of that. There
hasn't been a major championship
in recent memory where one
group of players got such an ad-,
vantage over another.


But Woods didn't himself any fa-
vors, either He was plugging along
OK in the rain and mud of the first
round before collapsing with two
bogeys and a double bogey over
the last four holes.
"Yesterday was the day that did
it," Woods said after finishing 36
holes at 3-over, then making one
final par to start his third round
before play was finally called be-
cause of rain Saturday. "Espe-
cially on my half of the draw. I had
to finish at even par, 1-over-par at
the worse. That would have been a
really good score."
Playing partner Padraig Harring-
ton said Woods was hitting the ball
better than he was when they
played together earlier this year at
Bay Hill, and his distance control
was as superb as ever. But the short
game was missing in, action on
greens slowed by heavy downpours.
"The worst part of his last two
days was his chipping and putting,
which is always his strength," Har-
rington said.
Woods didn't seem terribly dis-
tressed by it all, which by itself is
unusual for him in a major cham-
pionship. Maybe he just figures


that history will record this Open:
as one the weather gods simply re-
fused to let him have.
Barring some miracle, he'll
leave New York still stuck at 14
major titles and be without a.
major in his possession for the
first time in four years. He's still
relatively young at 33, but each
year that goes by without winning
one of the big four will make it
more difficult for him to accom-
plish the ultimate goal of his re-
markable career, which is to win,
more majors than Nicklaus.
Woods said earlier this week
that Nicklaus was still the greatest.
player of all time for that reason-
alone.
"He's got 18," Woods said. "I'm
at 14."
That's the way Woods keeps,,
score. And that's why, for him, this
Open will almost certainly be tal-
lied up as a big fat zero.

Tim Dahlbergis a national
sports columnist for The
Associated Press.
Write to him at
tdahlberg@ap.org


IRL's Helio


grabs Iowa


250 pole

Associated Press

NEWTON, Iowa - With an
assist from Will Power and
some water that had seeped
onto the track, Helio Castron-
eves was awarded the pole for
Sunday's Iowa Corn Indy 250.
Qualifying was first delayed
and then canceled, so the Iowa
250 field will be stacked based
on entrant points.
Ryan Briscoe, also from
Team Penske, will start sec-
ond. Target Chip Ganassi
teammates Scott Dixon and
Dario Franchitti will start
third and fourth followed by
Danica Patrick
Though it hadn't rained on
Saturday prior to qualifying,
heavy thunderstorms swept
through central Iowa on Fri-
day. Qualifying was held up
for about 75 minutes as offi-
cials worked to clear water on
the backstretch. The session
eventually got underway, but
only three drivers; Scott
Dixon, E.J. Viso and Hideki
Mutoh were able to run before
it was called off.
It was the second straight
Iowa 250 qualifying run
washed out because of rain.
Castroneves got the nod in
part because of the 28 points
earned by Power for the No. 3
car in the season opener in St.
Petersburg, and Castroneves
brought Power with him to ac-
cept the pole winner's trophy
"It's a shame, because obvi-
ously you want to put on a
great show for the fans," Cas-
troneves said. "But no ques-
tion, it turned out to. be the
luck of the draw for me."
There doesn't appear to be a
front-runner for Sunday's race
on Iowa's 7-8-mile oval, but.
that's been the case all season.
No driver has held the points
lead for more than one race,
and even though Briscoe is
currently atop the points
standings, only 32 points sepa-
rate him from Patrick in fifth.
"The good thing is,' we're up
there in the points and get the
front row start, so hopefully
that's going to help us tomor-
row," Briscoe said.
The driver to watch might be
Castroneves, who has won two
of the last three IRL races and
took the Indianapolis 500 after
also starting out from the pole.


Civil Rights still need work


'- , . ^i.K t,. Prc,.;
Cincinnati Reds manager Dusty Baker, left, stands with his son Darren Baker, center, and baseball great Hank Aaron, right, as the national an-
them plays Saturday during the Civil Rights Game ceremony before the game between the Chicago White Sox and the Cincinnati Reds at Great
American Ball Park in Cincinnati.


Clinton: Pushfor

racial equity in

sports farfrom over

Associated Press

CINCINNATI - The push for
racial equality is far from over, in
sports and in everyday, life, for-
mer President Bill Clinton told a
crowd at Major League Baseball's
Beacon Awards on Saturday, part
of its Civil Rights Game.
Clinton, who as president took
part in MLB's ceremony retiring
Jackie Robinson's No. 42 uniform
number in 1997, spoke at a lunch-
eon honoring Hall of Famer Hank


Aaron, Muhammad Ali and enter-
tainer Bill Cosby for the trio's con-
tributions to civil rights and
charitable works.
The former president told a
crowd of about 1,400 at the Duke
Energy Convention Center that
despite such racial progress as
the election of Barack Obama as
president, problems remain that
disproportionately hit minorities.
Clinton cited unemployment, the
mortgage crisis, high cost of col-
lege, and access to health care
among continuing issues.
'"A lotof people might be tempted
to believe that the struggle - which
both produced these three giants of
sports and comedy and gave them
the power to help so many others -
that struggle for racial equality is
over," Clinton said.


"But I really came here to say if
you want to honor HankAaron and
Muhammad Ali and Bill Cosby, you
must first recognize that this strug-
gle is nowhere near over," he said.
The luncheon was among
events leading to Saturday night's
first regular-season Civil Rights
Game, between the Chicago.
White Sox and Cincinnati Reds.
Ali, whose long battle with
Parkinson's disease has limited his
physical activity, remained seated
as fellow former boxing champion
Sugar Ray Leonard presented him
his award. Ali looked it over as his
wife, Lonnie, spoke on his behalf.
Cosby had the crowd roaring
during his acceptance speech,
and urged the audience to make
sure new generations know what
Ali, Aaron and others had to over-


come to be successful, and that
there is more to be overcome.
"This is not a time to rest,".
Cosby said.
Aaron, Ali and Cosby were;^
driven onto the field on carts be-.
fore the Reds played the Chicagod
White Sox in the Civil Rights?
Game, which was held in Memphis,
Tenn., the last two years. This was,
the first time it was held in con-
junction with a major league game.
Teams wore throwback jerseys
.from 1964, the .year that the Civi*"
Rights Act was passed outlawing.
racial segregation. Hall of Famer-
Frank Robinson, who became a',
star in Cincinnati before being
traded to Baltimore after the.,
1965 season, threw a ceremonialF
first pitch to Reds Hall of Famer
Tony Perez.


Heavyweight champion defends his titles


Associated Press
IBF, IBO and WBO World Champion Wiadimir Klitschko, left, punches
Ruslan Chagaev during their heavyweight fight at Veltins Arena in
Gelsenkirchen, Germany on Saturday.


Klitschko beats

Chagaev in front

of61,000 fans

Associated Press

GELSENKIRCHEN, Germany
- Wladimir Klitschko again.
proved his dominance of the
heavyweight division, stopping
Ruslan Chagaev in a hastily put to-
gether title fight Saturday night
before 61,000 fans at a German
soccer stadium.
The IBF and WBO champion
added the Ring Magazine belt to
his haul, knocking Chagaev down
in the second round and opening a
cut over the Uzbekistan-born


fighter's left eye in the eighth.
Referee Eddie Cotton stopped
the fight before the 10th round.
"You can't underestimate Cha-
gaev," said Klitschko, who stands
with his brother Vitali as clearly
the best in the division. "He did
everything today, but I was better."
Chagaev, who is the WBA's
"champion in recess,", raised a
deep bruise under Klitschko's right
eye, but was done in by the Ukrain-
ian's height advantage and supe-
rior power With his strong left jab
and hard straight rights, Klitschko
(53-3, 47 KOs) bloodied Chagaev
and never appeared in d~er
The sellout crowd Ws the
biggest boxing audience'ln Ger-
many since Max Schmeling
knocked out Adolf Heuser in front
of 70,000 people in Stuttgart in 1939.
"Throughout the fight, I


searched for the keys to unlock a'
win, but I just couldn't find them,".'
said Chagaev, whose win over Carl
Davis Drummond in February,
was stopped by a similar cut above;
his left eye.
The matchup at the Schalke,
soccer club's Veltins Arena was,
originally billed as a showdown
between Klitschko and former,.
cruiserweight champ David Haye,:
and the two had gone on a world-
wide press tour in which the out--
spoken Haye flaunted T-shirts'
showing him standing in the ring"
with the decapitated heads of the
Klitschko brothers.
But the British fighter, whose
only victory since moving toW
heavyweight was a knockout of'
Monte Barrett in November,
pulled out earlier this month cit-,
ing a back injury.


o C-. - -- r . 'MOOlflfl


Onus Coumy (Fl.) Crmomcu


SPORTS


I










%ITOFT Cnhr,.rTivi (P11 ('ynwwu rrrMAORLEGU B-EAL-SND - -N-2, -00-B


A Boston
NewYork
Toronto
. Tampa Bay
*. Baltimore


-NL


East Division
GB WCGB

3 -
5 2
6 3
10 7

East Division
GB WCGB

2 2
4 4
41 4/2
16 16


Philadelphia
New York
Florida
Atlanta
Washington


Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland



St. Louis
Milwaukee
Chicago
Cincinnati
Houston
Pittsburgh


L10 . Str
3-7 L-5
3-7 L-1
5-5 W-1
3-7 L-1
5-5 W-4


Central Division
GB WCGB

3 4
51 61�
7 810
9 10


Central Division
GB WCGB L10 Str
- - 7-3 W-2
Y2 - 4-6 L-2
214 2 5-5 W-3
212 2 5-5 W-1
5�4 5 6-4 W-1
6 5Y2 5-5 L-2


INTERLEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 8, Cleveland 7, 10 innings
Baltimore 7, Philadelphia 2
Detroit 10, Milwaukee 4, 7 innings
Washington 2, Toronto 1, 11 innings
Atlanta 8, Boston 2
Cincinnati 4, Chicago White Sox 3
N.Y. Yankees 5, Florida 1
N.Y. Mets 5, Tampa Bay 3
Minnesota 5, Houston 2
St. Louis 10, Kansas City 5
LA. Angels 5, L.A. Dodgers 4
Oakland 7, San Diego 5
Seattle 4, Arizona 3
San Francisco 6, Texas 4
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 6, Cleveland 5, 13 innings
Detroit 9, Milwaukee 5
St. Louis 7, Kansas City 1
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y. Mets 1
Baltimore 6, Philadelphia 5
Washington 5, Toronto 3, 12 innings
Boston 3, Atlanta 0
Houston 6, Minnesota 5
Florida 2, N.Y. Yankees 1
Chicago White Sox at Cincinnati, 7:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Texas at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Gallardo 7-3) at Detroit (Verlander
7-3), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-2) at Cincinnati
(Harang 5-6), 1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 6-4) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey
5-2), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Jurrjens 5-5) at Boston (Wakefield 9-3),
1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie4-7) at Philadelphia (Hamels
4-2), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 3-3) at Washington (Martis
5-1), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 5-6) at Minnesota
.(Perkins 2-3), 2:10 p.m.
St.-iouis (Wainwright 7-4) at Kansas City
(Mbche 4-5), 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Sowers 1-4) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Wells 0-3), 2:20 p.m.
Oakland (Braden 5-5) at San Diego (Correia 3-
5), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (Millwood 7-4) at San Francisco (Zito 3-
7), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (D.Davis 3-8) at Seattle (F.Hernandez
7-3), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 6-4) at Florida (Volstad
4-7), 5:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 3-5) at L.A. Angels
(Liackey.2-2), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Colorado at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m..
San Francisco at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
." Friday's Games
C P.a. . l : ouiO
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Colorado, late
, Today's Games
Pittsturgh (Maholm 4-3) at Colorado (De La
Rosa,2-7), 3:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chic4go Cubs at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
St. Lduis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox's Josh Beckett pitches against the Atlanta
Braves in the first inning Saturday in Boston. Beckett twiued a
shutout against the Braves as the Red Sox won 3-0.


Red Sox 3, Braves 0
BOSTON - Josh Beckett allowed
just five singles for his first shutout
since joining the Red Sox, and Jason
Varitek doubled twice and scored
twice to lead Boston to a 3-0 victory
over the Atlahta Braves on Saturday
night.
Beckett (8-4) rebounded from giving
up a season-high 11 hits in his last out-
ing for his first complete game of the
year. He struck out seven, walked none
and only allowed one runner to reach
second base to win for the sixth time in
seven decisions.
Varitek helped Boston spoil the
homecoming of ex-batterymate Derek
Lowe, who spent 71/2 seasons with the
Red Sox and helped them end their
86-year World Series drought.
In his first appearance at Fenway
since the 2004 AL championship se-
ries - and his first-ever game against
the Red Sox - Lowe (7-5) allowed
three runs on seven hits, walking one
and striking out two.
The Braves lost for the seventh time
in 10 games.
Lowe and Beckett were locked in a
scoreless game until the fifth, when
Varitek doubled off center fielder Nate
McLouth's glove and scored on Nick
Green's double. J.D. Drew doubled to
lead off the sixth and scored on Kevin
Youkilis' single to make it 2-0.
Boston scored another in the sev-
enth to chase Lowe, but the Fenway
crowd rose to give him a standing ova-
tion as he walked to the visitor's dugout


and he waved his cap in appreciation.
The lanky right-hander came to the
Red Sox with Varitek in 1997 a lop-
sided trade for heartbreak closer
Heathcliff Slocumb, and together they
became the core of the team that
would lead the franchise to the '04
World Series title. Lowe, who was
bounced from the rotation after strug-
gling down the stretch, earned the vic-
tory in the clinching game in all three
playoff series.
NOTES: 3B Mike Lowell got the day
off and might get another on Sunday
because he's "feeling beat up," Red
Sox manager Terry Francona said....
Beckett threw just 94 pitches.
Atlanta Boston
ab rhbi ab rh bi
McLdthcf 4 00 0 Pedroia2b 4 00 1
YEscorss 4 0 1 0 J.Drewrt 3 1 1 0
C.Jones dh 3 0 1 0 Youkils 3b 3 0 1 1
McCnnc 3 01 0 Bay if . 4 00 0
GAndrs If 3 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0
Prado3b 3 00 0 Kotsaylb 4 00 0
Ktchmlb 3 0 1 0 Ellsurycft 3 00 0
Francrrf 3 00 0 Varitekc 3 22 0
KJhnsn 2b 3 00 0 NGreen ss 3 02 1
Totals 29 0 5 0 Totals 31 3 7 3
Atlanta 000 000 000-0
Boston 000 011 10x-3
E-K.Johnson (5). DP-Boston 2. LOB-At-
lanta 2, Boston 6. 2B-J.Drew (14), D.Ortiz
(16), Varitek 2(15), N.Green (14).
, IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
DLoVW-EL.7-5 61-3 7 -3 3 1 2'
Benr,,,-n 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
O'Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 0
Boston .
Beckett W,8-3 '9 5 0 0 0 7
WP-D.Lowe.
Umpires-Home, Gary Darling; First, Bill Hohn;
Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Paul Emmel:
T-2:11. A-38,029 (37,373).


Cardinals 7, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Khalil Greene
hit a late three-run homer, Albert Pujols
hit a two-run shot and Chris Carpenter
outpitched Brian Bannister to give the
St. Louis Cardinals a 7-1 win over the
Kansas City Royals on Saturday.
St. Louis opened the three-game
series between the instate rivals Fri-
day night by pounding out 14 hits in
a 10-5 win.,
Pujols was a key factor in the first win
and had even bigger role in this one, hit-
ting his 24th homer off Bannister (5-4) to
put the Cardinals up 3-0 in the sixth in-
ning. Greene sealed it in the ninth, lifting
a shot just over the wall in left
That was more than enough the
way Carpenter (5-1) pitched.
Coming off his first loss of the sea-
son, Carpenter was at his whats-he-
going-throw best, hitting the corners
with a low 90s mph fastball and buck-
ling the Royals' knees with a chin-to-
ankles curveball.
Kansas City hit few hard balls of
him, spending most of the game drib-
bling grounders into foul territory.
Carpenter worked out of a few jams,
most notably in the third inning, when
he got two weak groundouts and a
strikeout to strand Mark Teahen at third
after a leadoff triple. Mitch Maier's two-
out double in the eighth chased Car-
penter, who allowed a run on three hits
and struck out six in 7 2-3 innings.
St. Louis Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Schmkr 2b-lf4 1 1 0. DeJess If 3 0 0 0
Rasms cf 4 0 0 0 LHrndz ss 3 0 0 0
TGreen ss 0 00 0 BImqst ss 1 0 1 1
Pujols lb 4 1 1 2 Butler 1b 4 0 0 0
Ludwckrf 4 1 2 0 Jacobs dh 3 0 0 0
Duncandh 4 1 1 0 JGuillnrf 4 0 1 0
YMolin c 4 1 2 1 Callasp 2b 3 0 0 0
Ankiel If-cf 4 1 1 0 Teahen 3b 4 0 1 0
.KGreen 3b 4 1 1 3 Olivo c 4 01 0
BrRyan ss. 2 0 1 1 Maierof 3 1 1 0
Thurstn 2b 2 0 0 0 '
Totals 36 710 7 Totals 32 1 5 1
St. Louis 001 '002 004-7
Kansas City 000 000 010-1
E-T.Greene (2), J.Guillen (4), Olivo (4). DP-
St. Louis 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-St. Louis 2,
Kansas City 7. 2B-Olivo (7), Maier (5). 3B-
Teahen (1). HR-Pujols (24), K.Greene (4).
IP H RERBBSO


Tigers 9, Brewers 5
DETROIT - Miguel Cabrera and
Placido Polanco homered and Alfredo
Figaro won his major-league debut as
the Detroit Tigers beat the Milwaukee
Brewers 9-5 on Saturday.
Figaro, who was called up from
Double-A to replace Dontrelle Willis in
the rotation, allowed two runs and eight
hits in five innings.
Dave Bush (3-4) took the loss, falling
to 0-4 in his last six starts. He gave up
five runs on seven hits in three innings.
Milwaukee went ahead 1-0 on Craig
Counsel's second-inning RBI single,
but the Tigers responded with three in
the bottom of the inning on a two-run
single by Josh Anderson and an RBI
triple by Gerald Laird.
Ryan Braun pulled the Brewers
within a run with a leadoff homer in the
third, but Cabrera's two-run shot made
it 5-2 in the bottom of the inning.
The Tigers added two more in the
fifth on Polanco's third homer and Bran-
don Inge's sacrifice fly, and made it 9-2
with another pair of runs in the sixth.
Milwaukee scored twice in the sev-
enth and once in the eighth, but De-
troit's bullpen held on.
Polanco left the game in the eighth
with stiffness in his left leg.


Milwaukee
ab- rhbi
Counsll2b 4 1 2.1
McGehdh 5 01 0
Braunlf 5 24 2
Fielder lb 4 1 1 0
Hart rf 4 0 1 0
Gamel 3b 3 1 2 1
Hardy ss 4 0.0 0
Gerutcf 4 0 0 1
Kendallc 4+ 0 0 0


Detroit

Grndrs cf
Polanc 2b
Santiag 2b
MiCarr lb
Thams dh
Kelly If
Inge 3b
JAndrs rf
Laird c
vFuertt tc


ab r h bi
5 000
3321

5 33 2
5 1 3 1
4 1 3 1
3 00 1
4 1 3 2
4 02 1
4 0 0 0


Totals 37 511 5 Totals 38 917 9
Milwaukee 011 000 210-5
Detroit 032 022 OOx-9
DP-,M.1=wau.eeI 2, Detroit 1. LOB-Milwaukee
11, Detroit 7. 2B-Counsell (9), Mi.Cabrera
(13), Kelly (2). 3B-Gamel (1), Laird (2). HR-
Braun (15), Polanco (3), Mi.Cabrera (14). SB-
Braun (6), Hart (5). CS-Thames (1). SF-Inge.
Iw IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Bush L,3-4, 3 7 '5 5 0 1
McClung 12-3 6, 2 2 0 0
DiFelice 1 0 1 1 0 0
Coffev 1-3 3 1 1 0 1


St. Louis C;Smith 2 -1 0 0 0 0
Carpenter W,5-1 72-3 3 1 1 2 6 Detroit-
T.Miller 0 0 0 0 1 0 Fig roWI.0 5' 86 2 2 7
Franklin S,17-18 11-3 2 0 0 0 1 i Roerelton 2-3 0 0 0 . 0
Kansas City Perry 1-3 1 2 2 2 1
Bannister L,5-4 8 6 3 2 0 4 Lyon 2 2 1 1 1 0
Farnsworth 1-3 3 3 3 0 1 Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bale 2-3 1 1 1 0 2 Perry pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
T.Millerpitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP-by DiFelice (Polanco). WP-Perry.
Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Paul Umpires-Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Ron
Nauert; Second, Joe West; Third, Ed Rapuano. Kulpa; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Jerry Meals.
T-2:37. A-38,769 (38,177). . T-3:01. A-39,156 (41,255)..


Cubs 6, Indians 5,
13 innings
CHICAGO - Andres Blanco hit a-
tying single and then scored the win-
ning run on Kerry Wood's wild pitch
in the 13th inning Saturday as the
Chicago Cubs staged another wild
comeback and beat the Cleveland
Indians 6-5.
Luis Valbuena hit his second homer
of the game, a solo shot in the top of
the 13th inning, to give the Indians a 5-
4 lead. But once again Wood, the for-
mer Cubs ace who spent a decade in
Chicago, couldn't hold it.
After blowing the save in Friday's 8-
7, 10-inning loss by giving up a ninth-
inning homer to Derrek Lee, Wood
(2-3) gave up a leadoff single Saturday
to Kosuke Fukudome.
Cleveland Chicago
ab rhbi ab r hbi
JCarrll 2b 6 1 2 0 ASorin If 5 00 0
JhPerlt 3b 5 1 2 3 AGzmn p 0 00 0
VMrtnzc 6 00 0 Zamrnph 1 00 0
Choorf 3 01 0 Greggp 0 00 0
Garkolb-lf 3 00 0 J.Foxlf 0 00 0
Crowe cf 2 00 0 Theriot ss 6 1 2 0
BFrncs cf-lf 5 0 1 0 Bradlyrf 5 0 1 0
Gimenzlf 2 1 0 0 D.Leelb 5 1.2 2
DeRosaph 1 00 0 Fontent 3b 4 00 0
Herges p 0 00 0 Heilmn p 0 00 0
Barfild ph j1 0 0 0 RJhnsn If 1 00 0
JoSmthp 0 00 0 Pattonp 0 00 0
RPerezp 1 00 0 .Fukdmcf 5 24 0
K.Woodp 0 0 0 0 K.Hill c 5 00 0
Valuenss 5 2 3 2 ABlanc2b 5 1 1 1
Ohkap 2 00 0 Lillyp 2 00 0
Hafnerph 1 0 1 0 Hoffparph 1 1'1 2
J.Lewisp 0 00 0 Ascaniop 0 0 0 0
Shppch c 3 0 0 0 Marshllp 0 0 0 0
Marmlp 0 0 0 0
Miles 3b 3 0 1 0
Totals 46 510 5 Totals 48 612 5
Cleveland 100 011 100 000 1-5
Chicago 000 022 000 000 2-6
One out when winning run scored.
E-Shoppach (3), Valbuena (2). DP-Chicago
2. LOB-Cleveland 10, Chicago 11. 2B-J.Car-
roll (4), Jh.Peralta (12), B.Francisco (14), Fuku-
dome (13). HR-Jh.Peralta (3), Valbuena 2 (4),
D.Lee (11), Hoffpauir (5). SB-Fukudome (5).
S-Garko, K.Hill.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Ohka 6 7 4 4 3 4
J.Lewis 1 0 0 0 1 1
Herges 2 1 0 0 0 0
Jo.Smith 2 1 0 0 1 2
R.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 2
KIWood L,2-3 1-3 3 2 2 0 1
Chicago
Lilly 6 6 3 3 0 6
Ascanio H,1 1-3 1 1 1 1 0
Marshall 0. 1 0 0 0 0
Marmol BS,3-6 2-3 0 0 0 1 2
Heilman 2 1 0. 0 4 3
A.Guzman 2:0 0 0 0"2 ,'
Gregg' 1 0 0 0 1 0
Patton W,3-1 1 1 1 1 0 1 -
Marshall pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-K.Wood.
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Lance
Barksdale; Second, Delfin Colon; Third, Randy
Marsh.
T-4:27. A-41,Q07 (41,210).


J MLB Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BAT NG-ISuzuki, Seattle, .347; VMartinez,
Clevdland, .335; MiCabrera, Detroit, .331;
Roleri, Toronto, .326; Figgins, Los Angeles, .324.
RUN$-Damon, New York, 52; QPena, Tampa
Bay,.52; Scutaro, Toronto, 52; BRoberts, Balti-
morel 50; Figgins, Los Angeles, 49; Morneau,
Minnesota, 49.
RBI-Bay, Boston, 65; Longoria, Tampa Bay,
60; Morneau, Minnesota, 57; Teixeira, New
York, 55; VMartinez, Cleveland, 53; TorHunter,
Los Angeles, 51; CPena, Tampa Bay, 51.
HITS-AHII, Toronto, 92;VMartinez, Cleveland, 90;
ISuzuki, Seattle, 90; Cano, NewYork, 86; Momeau,
Minnesota, 85; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 84.
DOUBLES-Lind, Toronto, 22; BRoberts, Balti-
more, 22; MYoung, Texas, 22; Byrd, Texas, 21;
Longoria, Tampa Bay, 21.
HOME RUNS-CPena, Tampa Bay, 22; Teix-
eira, New York, 20; Bay, Boston, 18; NCruz,
Texas, 18; Granderson, Detroit, 17; Kinsler,
Texas, 17; Branyan, Seattle, 16;TorHunter, Los
Angeles, 16; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 16;
Morneau, Minnesota, 16.
STOLEN BASES-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 37;
Ellsbury, Boston, 29; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 26;
Figgins, Los Angeles, 22; BAbreu, Los Ange-
les, 15; Gardner, New York, .15; Bartlett, Tampa
Bay, 14; BRoberts, Baltimore, 14.
PITIHING -Halladay, Toronto, 10-1; Slowey,
Minnesota, 10-2;Wakefield, Boston, 9-3; Greinke,
Kansas City, 8-3; Beckett, Boston, 8-3; Porcello,
Detroit, 8-4; JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 7-2.
STRIKEOUTS-Verlander, . Detroit, 110;
Greinke, Kansas City, 106; Lester, Boston, 100;
FHernandez, Seattle, 90; Halladay, Toronto, 88;
Beckett, Boston, 88; ABurnett, NewYork, 82.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-DWright, New York, .344; Hawpe,
Colorado, .343; Beltran, NewYork, .333; CGuz-
Sman, Washington, .332;Tejada, Houston, .331;
Sanddoval, San Francisco, .329; HaRamirez,
Florida, .328.
RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 54; Braun, Milwau-
kee, 52; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 51; Utley,
Philadelphia, 48; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 46;
Victorino, Philadelphia, 46.
RB!-Fielder, Milwaukee, 67; Pujols, St. Louis,
62; banez, Philadelphia, 59; Howard, Philadel-
phi,, 54; Braun, Milwaukee, 50; Hawpe, Col-
orado, 50.
HITS-Tejada, Houston, 90; Hudson, Los An-
geles, 85; DWright, New York, 85; FSanchez,
Pittsburgh, 83; HaRamirez, Florida, 82; Braun,
Milwaukee, 81;Victorino, Philadelphia, 81; Zim-
merman, Washington, 81.
DOUBLES-Hawpe, Colorado, 24; Tejada,
Houston, 23; FSanchez, Pittsburgh, 22; Hud-
sol Los Angeles, 21; AdLaRoche, Pittsburgh,
2i';+taRamirez, Florida, 21.
HOME RUNS-Pujols, St. Louis, 24; AdGon-
zalez, San Diego, 23; Ibanez, Philadelphia, 22;
Howard, Philadelphia, 20; Dunn, Washington,
18; Reynolds, Arizona, 18.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston, 23;
DWright, New York, 18; Kemp, Los Angeles, 17;
Morgan, Pittsburgh, 16; Pierre, Los Angeles, 16;
Reynolds, Arizona, 13; Taveras, Cincinnati, 13.
; PITCHING -Cain, San Francisco, 9-1; Billings-
ley, Los Angeles, 9-3; Marquis, Colorado, 9-4;
Arroyo, Cincinnati, 8-5; JSantana, New York, 8-
5; JoJohnson, Florida, 7-1; Gallardo, Milwau-
kee,'7-3.
STRIKEOUTS-Lincecum, San Francisco, 112;
JVazquez, Atlanta, 112; JSantana, NewYork, 97;
Billingsley, Los Angeles, 96; Haren, Arizona, 96;
Peavy, San Diego, 92; JoJohnson, Florida, 88.


Nationals 5, Blue Jays 3,
12 innings
WASHINGTON -Willie Harris hit'a
two-run homer in the 12th inning and
the Washington Nationals stretched
their winning streak to a season-high
four games by beating the Toronto Blue
Jays 5-3 on Saturday night.
Alberto Gonzalez led off the 12th with
a single against Scott Richmond (5-4).
Hanis followed hitting a full-count pitch
into the Nationals' right-field bullpen for
his second home run of the season.
The Nationals, with the worst record
in the majors, have their longest win-
ning streak since taking seven straight
from Aug. 26-Sept. 1,2008.
Julian Tavarez (3-4) got the victory
with 1 2-3 innings of scoreless relief.
Washington's Nick Johnson walked,
singled and doubled in his first three
times up, stretching his streak of
reaching base safely to 10 consecutive
plate appearances, a Nationals record.
Toronto Washington
ab rhbi abrh bi
Scutaro ss 4 00 0 CGzmnss 4 1 2 0
A.Hill2b 5 11 1 NJhnsnlb 4 1 2 1
V.Wellscf 5'1 1 1 Zmrmn3b 5 0 0 0
Rolen 3b 5 02 1 Dunn If 5 0 00
Lind If 4 02 0 Dukes rf. 5 02 1
Riosrf 4 00 0 AIGnzlz2b 5 1 3 0
Campp 0 000 WHarrs cf 4222
Overaylb 1 00 0 Nievesc 2 00 1
Millarlb 4 0 1 0 AHrndzph 1 0 0 0
Rchmnp 0 00 0 J.Bardc 000 0
RChavz c 5 0 1 0 Detwilr p 2 0 9 0
Cecilp 2 00 0 K.Wellsp 0 0 00
Bautist ph 1 11 0 Hanrhnp 0 00 0
BJRynp 0 00 0 Wlnghph 0 00 0
Inglett rf 2 00 0 MacDgl p 0 00 0
Kearnsph 1 0 0 0
Colome p 0 0 0 0
Tavarzp 0000
Totals 42 3 9 3 Totals 38 511 5
Toronto 000 001 020 000-3
Washington 000 012 000 002-5
No outs when winning run scored.
DP-Toronto 3, Washington 2. LOB-Toronto
8, Washington 5.2B-C.Guzman (14), N.John-
son (12), Dukes (13), W.Harris (8). HR-V.Wells
(6), W.Harris (2). SB-W.Harris (5). CS-Dukes
(7). S-Scutaro, C.Guzman. SF-Nieves.
IP H RER BB SO
Toronto
Cecil 7 8 3 3 1 4
B.J.Ryan 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Camp 21-3 1 0 0 1 2
Richmond L,5-4 1 2 2 2 0 1
Washington
Detwiler 7 6 2 2 1 3
K.Wells H,5 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Hanrahan BS,5-10 1-3 2 0 0 0 1
MacDougal 2 0 0 0 1 0
Colome 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
Tavarez W,3-4 12-3 0 0 0 1 2
Detwiler pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Richmond pitched to 2 batters in the 12th.
WP-Detwiler. PB-Nieves.
Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First, C.B. Buc-
knor; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Brian Gorman.
T-3:37. A-22,142 (41,888).


Astros 6, Twins 5
MINNEAPOLIS-- Lance Berkman
'and Michael Bourn homered, leading
Brian Moehler and the Houston As-
tros over the Minnesota Twins 6-5 on
Saturday night.
Moehler (4-4) evened his record de-
spite giving up three home runs, in-
cluding a leadoff shot by Brendan
Harris.
Joe Mauer hit his career-high 14th
homer and Delmon Young also con-
nected for Minnesota.
Twins starter Scott Baker took a 3-1
lead into the seventh. But Hunter
Pence keyed a four-run rally with a
one-out double and Ivan Rodriguez
chased Baker with an RBI single.
Jason Michaels followed with a
run-scoring double off reliever Sean
Henn (0-3) and Bourn put the Astros
ahead to stay with his second homer
of the season.
I Berkman's solo shot off Luis Ayala
in the eighth made it 6-3. Jason Kubel
pulled Minnesota to 6-5 in the eighth
with a two-run homer off reliever La-
Troy Hawkins.
Jose Valverde pitched a scoreless
ninth for his fourth save in six chances.
Houston Minnesota
ab rhbi ab r h bi
'Bourn cf 3 1 2 2 BHarrsss 4 1 3 1
Kppngr3b 3 0 1 0 Mauerc 4 2 1 1
Tejadass 4 00 0 Mornealb 4 00 0
Ca.Lee dh 4 0 0 0 Kubeldh 4 1 1 2
Brkmnlb 4 1 1 1 .Cuddyrrf 4 00 0
Pence rf 4 22 0 Buschr3b 4 0 1 0
IRdrgzc 4 1 2 2 DImYnlt 4 1 1 1
Erstad If 2 00 0 Gomez cf 2 00 0
Michals If 2 1 1 1 JMorls ph 1 0 1 0
Kata 2b 4 0 0"0 Pridie pr 0 0 0 0
Punto2b 2 0 0 0
Tolbert 2b 1 0 0 0
Crede ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 6 9 6 Totals 35 5 8 5
Houston 000 010 410-6
Minnesota 110 001 020-5
DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Houston 3, Minnesota
4.2B-Bourn (15), Pence (12), I.Rodriguez (8),
Michaels (8), B.Harris (11), J.Morales (4). HR-
Bourn (2), Berkman (14), B.Harris (4), Mauer
(14), Kubel (12), Delm.Young (2). SB-Mauer
(1), Gomez (7). S-Keppinger.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Moehler W,4-4 6 4 3 3 1 3
Sampson H,10 1 1 0 0 0 1
Hawkins H,5 1 2 2 2 0 1
Valverde S,4-6 1 1 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
S.Baker 61-3 6 3 3 1 6
HennL,0-3 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Ayala 11-3 1 1 1 0 0
Dickey 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Chris Ouccione; Third,
Mike Winters,
T-3:03. A-34,710 (46,632),


Orioles 6, Phillies 5
PHILADELPHIA- Brian Roberts
hit a two-run homer with two outs in the
ninth off fill-in closer Ryan Madson, and
the Baltimore Orioles beat the Philadel-
phia Phillies 6-5 Saturday night.
Pinch-hitter Ryan Howard gave the
Phillies a 5-3 lead with a three-run
homer in the seventh, hours after
being hospitalized for flu symptoms.
But Baltimore rallied against Madson
(2-3), who has two blown saves and
two losses this week in place of injured
closer Brad Lidge.
The NL-East leading Phillies have
lost a season-high five games and fell
to 13-21 at home. The defending World
Series champions are a major league-
best 23-9 on the road.
Gregg Zaun hit a solo homer off
Madson with one out in the ninth.
Pinch-hitter Oscar Salazar singled with
two outs and Roberts hit a 1-2 pitch
into the seats in right.
Mark Hendrickson (2-4) pitched a
scoreless eighth and George Sherrill
finished for his 14th save in 16
chances.
Baltimore Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab r h bi
BRorts2b 4 1 2 4 Rollinsss 3 00 0
Markks ff 6 0 1 0 Victorn cf 4 1 2 0
AdJonscf 4 1 2 0 Utley2b 4 1 1 1
A.Hufflb 4 02 1 Stairs Itf 4 1 1 0
Wggntn 3b 4 0 2 0 Madson p 0 0 0 0
Scott If 5 1 1 0 Werth rf 4 00 0
Mora3b 0000 Dobbslb 3 12 1
Zaunc 4 13 1 Costeph 1 00 0
Andinoss 4 1 2 0 Feliz3b 4 00 0
Reimld ph 1 00 0 Bako c 2 01 0
Sherrill p 0 00 0 Howard ph 1 1 1 3
Bergsn p 2 0 0 0 Parkp 0 00 0
Baez p . 0 00 0 Bmtitt If 1 00 0
Albers p 0 00 0 Happ p 1 00 0
Hndrckp 0 00 0' Mayrryph. 1 00 0
Salazar ph 1 0 1 0 Durbinp 0 00 0
Pie pr-lf 0 1 0 0 Ruiz ph-c 1 00 0
Totals 39 616 6 Totals 34 5 8 5
Baltimore 000 011 103-6
Philadelphia 000 000 500-5
DP-Baltimore 1, Philadelphia 1. LOB-Bafti-
more 14, Philadelphia 3. 2B-A.Huff (17),
Andino (3), Victorino (18), Utley (14). HR-
B.Roberts (7), Zaun (2), Howard (20). S-
Bergesen 2. SF-B.Roberts.
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Bergesen 61-3 6 4 4 0 2
BaezBS,1-1 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
Albers 1-3 1 0 0 1 1
Hendrickson W,2-4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Sherrill S,14-16 1 0 0 0 0 1 -
Philadelphia
Happ 6 10 2 2 4 4
Durbin 1 3 1 1 1 2
Park H,3 1 0 0 0 0 2
Madson L,2-3 BS,3-7 1 3 3 3 0 0
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Charlie Re-
Ilod; Second, LanyyVanover;Third, Sam Holbrook.
T-2:50, A-44,939 (43,647),


Associated Press
Florida Marlins shortstop Hanley Ramirez follows through on
a single in the first inning against the New York Yankees on
Saturday in Miami. The Marlins downed the Yankees, 2-1.


Marlins 2, Yankees 1
MIAMI - Josh Johnson pitched
seven innings of three-hit ball, Dan
Uggla homered and the Florida Mar-
lins beat the New York Yankees 2-1 on
Saturday night.
Johnson (7-1) struck out five and
walked two, outpitching former Marlins
teammate A.J. Burnett (5-4). The Yan-
kees didn't do much to help their start-
ing pitcher.
Johnny Damon misplayed a ball hit
to left field by Jorge Cantu in the sixth,
allowing Hanley Ramirez to score from
first to give the Marlins a 2-0 lead they
would never lose.
The play was ruled an error, with
Damon slow to read the ball, whiffing
on the catch and letting the ball to
trickle to the wall.
Johnson quieted a Yankees team
that kept a slumping Alex Rodriguez
out of the starting lineup for the sec-
ond straight game because of fa-
tigue. But the three-time AL MVP did
pinch-hit in the eighth, drawing a
walk in his first plate appearance
ever for a regular-season game in
his hometown of Miami.
Matt Lindstrom pitched the ninth for
his 13th save in 15 chances, getting
Robinson Cano to ground into a
game-ending double play.
The Yankees' fans turned out in
scores for the second straight game
with their team's rare visit to Miami.
The Bronx buzz helped fill the stadium
with 46,427 fans, the third-largest
home crowd in Marlins history.
The stadium's orange seats could
barely be seen, replaced with fans in
navy and pinstripes, who chanted and


ranted with every swing. Florida fans
fought back with cow bells that were
handed out at the gate, creating a cir-
cus-like atmosphere rarely seen at
baseball games in Miami.
They even to got cheer one of their
own.
It was Rodriguez's first regular-sea-
son plate appearance in his hometown
of Miami against the Martins. The
crowd stood throughout his at-bat and
gave him nothing but cheers, the cam-
era flashed with every pitch.


New York (AL)
ab rhbi


Florida


ab r h bi


Jeter ss 4 00 0 CoghinlIf 4 00 0
Damonif 3 00 0 Nunezp 0 00 0
Teixeirlb 3 0 1 0 Meyerp 0 0 00
Posada c 4 1 0 0 BCarrllrf 0 00 0
Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 Bonifac 3b 3 0 0 0
Swisherrf 3 0 1 1 HRmrzss 3 1 2 0
MeCarrcf 3 00 0 Cantulb 4 00 0
Berroa 3b 2 00 0 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 1
HMatsu ph 1 0 1 0 Hermid rf 2 00 0
Gardnr pr 0 0 d 0 Lndstr p 0 0 0 0
Hughes p 0 00 0 C.Ross cf 3 0 1 0
ABrnttp 2 0 1 0 JoBakrc 3 0 1 0
Coke p 0 00 0 JJhnsn p 2 00 0
ARdrgz3b 0 00 0 De Azalf 0 00 0
Totals 29 1 5 1 Totals 28 2 5 1
New York 000 000 100-1
Florida 010 001 00x-2
E-Damon (4), Berroa (3). DP-Florida 3.
LOB-New York 4. Florida 6. HR-Uggla (13).
SB-Damon (6), Gardner (15). CS-Bonifacio
(5), Ha.Ramirez (5). S-De Aza.
IP H R ER BB SO
NewYork
A.Burnett L,5-4 61-3 5 2 1 3 8
Coke 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 2
Florida
Jo.Johnson W,7-1 7 3 1 1 2 5
Nunez H,12 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
MeyerH,10 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Lindstrom S,13-15 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-A.Burnett.
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Tim Tim-
mons; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Rob Drake.
T-2:44. A-46,427 (38,560).


Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland




Los Angeles
San Fran.
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
GB WCGB
- -
41/2 4�
8 8


West Division
GB WCGB

8 1
9/2 2/2
14 7
15 8


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 B3


Ct�Rus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MAJOR LFAGuE BASEBALL










WCORE ARNCirns CONJY FL) HRO, -7'


B4 SIINDfAY. IJuNE21, 2009


GOLF
U.S. Open Leaderboard
Saturday
At Bethpage State Park, Black Course.
Farmlngdale, N.Y.
Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2008)
Yardage: 7.426; Par: 70
Third Round
No one finished the round due to rain.
Leaderboard
SCORE THRU
1. Ricky Bames -8 DNS*
2. Lucas Glover -7 DNS'
3. Mike Weir -6 DNS'
4. David Duval -3 DNS
4. AzumaYano -3 DNS
4. Peter Hanson -3 DNS'
7. Todd Hamilton -2 DNS*
7. Sean O'Hair -2 DNS"
7. Lee Westwood -2 DNS'
7. Nick Taylor -2 DNS
7. Ross Fisher -2 DNS*
12. Hunter Mahan -1 3
12. Steve Stricker -1 1
12. Gary Woodland -1 1
12. Phil Mickelson -1 1
12. Oliver Wilson -1 4
17. Michael Sim E 6
17. Retief Goosen E 5
17. Soren Hansen E 5
17. Stephen Ames E 3
17. Sergio Garcia E 3
17. Ryan Moore E 2
*Did not start third round
U.S. Open Par Scores
Saturday
At Bethpage State Park, Black Course
Farmlngdale, N.Y.
Purse:TBA ($7.5 million in 2008)
Yardage: 7,426; Par: 70
Completed Second Round
(a-amateur)


Ricky Barnes
Lucas Glover
Mike Weir
AzumaYano
David Duval
Peter Hansor
a-Nick Taylor
Sean O'Hair
Ross Fisher
Todd Hamilto
Lee Westwoc
Gary Woodla
Phil Mickelso
Steve Stricke
Ryan Moore
J.B. Holmes
Sergio Garcia
Adam Scott
Stephen Ame
Hunter Maha
Oliver Wilson
Geoff Ogilvy
Trevor Murph
Dustin Johns
Soren Hanse
Retief Goose
Rocco Media
Michael Sim
a-Drew Weav
John Mailinge
Graeme McD
Jim Furyk
Francesco M
Matt Bettenco
Anthony Kim
Rory Mcllroy
CamiloVilleg
Stewart Cink
Jeff Brehaut
Bubba Watso
Carl Petterss
Kenny Perry
Billy Mayfair
Andrew McLa
Ben Curtis
Henrik Stensi
K.J. Choi
Angel Cabrer
,Tger Wodu.
Andres Rome
a-Kyle Stanle
Fred Funk
Tom Lehman
Thomas Leve
Jean-Francois
Vijay Singh
lan Poulter
Tim Clark
Kevin Sutheri
Johan Edfors
Peter Tomasu
Martin Laird
Cameron Bed
David Toms
Ryan Blaum
Simon Khan
Rory Sabbati
Martin Kaymi
Luke Donald
Miguel A. Jim
George McNi
James Kamtt
Steve Allan
Alvaro Quiros
Nick Watney
Brandt Sned0
Raphael Jacq
Chris Stroud
Brian Gay
Cortland Low
Shawn Stefan
a-Rickle Fowl
Bo Van Pelt
Sangmoon B
Angelo Que
Justin Leonai
Robert Allent
Rod Pampling
Andrew Parr
Nathan Tyler
Ryan Spears
James Nittles
David Small
Chari Schwai
J.J. Henry
Briny Baird
D.J. Trahan
Colby Beckst
Charle Wi
Richard Bland
Jose Manuel
Ryuji Imada
Eduardo Rom
Zach Johnson
Ken Duke
a-Cameron Ti
Michael Miles
Kaname Yokc


67-65-132
69-64-133
64-70-134
72-65-137
67-70-137
n 66-71-137
73-65-138
69-69-138
70-68-138
n 67-71-138
id 72-66-138
nd 73-66-139
n 69-70-139
r 73-66-139
70-69-139
73-67-140
a 70-70-140
69-71-140
is 74-66-140
n 72-68-140
70-70-140
73-67-140
y 71-69-140
on 72-69-141
on 70-71-141
n 73-68-141
te . 68-73-141
71-70-141
ver 69-72-141
er 71-70-141
towell 69-72-141
72-69-141
olinari 71-70-141
court 75-67-142
71-71-142
72-70-142
as 71-71-142
73-69-142
70-72-142
on 72-70-142
on 75-68-143
71-72-143
73-70-143
irdy 71-72-143
72-71-143
on 73-70-143
72-71-143
a 74-69-143
74-69-143
r 73-70-143-
ey 70-74-144
70-74-144
71-73-144
it 72-72-144
s Lucquin 73-71-144
72-72-144
70-74-144
73-71-144
land 71-73-144
70-74-144
Failed to Qualify
Ulo 73-72-145
74-71-145
ckman 76-69-145
69-76-145
72-73-145
75-70-145
ni 72-73-145
r 76-69-145
74-71-145
ienez 77-68-145
eill 74-71-145
74-72-146
73-73-146
s 73-73-146
73-73-146
eker 71-75-146
luelin 73-73-146
76-70-146
73-73-146
ve 75-71-146
ni 73-73-146
ler 78-68-146
73-73-146
ae 74-72-146
77-69-146
rd 71-75-146
by 75-71-146
g 74-72-146
74-72-146
77-69-146
73-73-146
78-69-147
70-77-147
itzel 77-70-147
73-74-147
73-74-147
76-71-147
rom 76-71-147
75-72-147
d 77-70-147
I.ara 77-70-147
75-72-147
ero 76-71-147
n 75-72-147
76-71-147
ringale 70-77-147
S76-69-147
0 . 77-71-148


Gonzalo Femandez-Castan 75-73-148
Justin Rose 73-75-148
Matt Kuchar 71-77-148
a-Tyson Alexander 73-75-148
Doug Batty 74-74-148
J.P. Hayes 74-74-148
Craig Bowden 74-74-148
Simon Dyson 78-70-148
Scott Gutschewski 77-72-149
Steven Conway 80-69-149
Stuart Appleby 76-73-149
Michael Welch 73-76-149
Heath Slocum 76-73-149
Darren Clarke 74-76-'150
Clark Klaasen 76-74-150
Charlie Beljan 78-72-150
Chad Campbell 80-70-150
Paul Casey 75-75-150
John Merrick 73-77-150
a-Ben Martin 72-78-150
Kevin 811va 78-72-150
Greg Kraft 79-72-151
Casey Wittenberg 73-78-151
Jeev Milkha Singh 78-73-151
Ben Crane 76-75-151
Boo Weekley 79-72-151
Chris Kirk 74-77-151
Josh McCumber 78-73-151
Padraig Harrington 76-76-152
a-Davld Erdy 78-74-152
a-Drew Kittleson 80-73-153
Clinton Jensen 78-75-153


RomdaLotery,
Here are the winning
numbers selected
Saturday in the
Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
5-0-6
CASH 3 (late)
3-7-9
PLAY 4 (early)
1-8-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)
0-9-5-5
POWERBALL
3 - 11-18- 22 - 28
POWER BALL
33
POWER PLAY
2
FANTASY 5
6-12-19-28-31
LOTTERY
4- 23- 29- 38- 45- 52


==On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Sportsman Series
(Taped)
1 p.m. (9, 20, 28 ABC) IndyCar Racing: Iowa Corn Indy 250
3 p.m. (13, 51 FOX) Formula One: British Grand Prix
(Same-day Tape)
5 p.m. (TNT) Sprint Cup - Toyota/SaveMart 350
9 p.m. (47 FAM) ASA Southeast Asphalt Tour. (Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at New York Mets
1 p.m. (WGN) Chicago White Sox at Cincinnati Reds
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Atlanta Braves at Boston Red Sox
5 p.m. (FSNFL) New York Yankees at Florida Marlins
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at Los Angeles Angels
of Anaheim
I BICYCLING
5 p.m. (VERSUS) 2009 Tour du Suisse (Taped)
BOWLING
1:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling All-Star Shootout (Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling All-Star Shootout (Taped)
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling All-Star Shootout (Taped)
5 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Bowling King of Bowling (Taped)
GOLF
12 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) U.S. Open Challenge (Taped)
1:30 p.m. (2, 8 NBC) Golf U.S. Open Championship -
Final Round
1 a.m. (ESPN2) U.S, Open Championship - Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
2:25 p.m. (ESPN) FIFA Confederations Cup - Brazil vs. Italy
2:25 p.m. (ESPN2) FIFA Confederations Cup - Egypt vs.
United States
2:30 p.m. (62 UNI) FIFAConfederaciones 2009: Italia vs. Brasil
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) FIFA Confederations Cup'- Brazil vs.
Italy (Same-day Tape)


a-Bronson Burgoon 74-79-153 +13
Darron Stiles 75-79-154 +14
CameronYancey 74-80-154 +14
David Horsey 81-73-154 +14
Andrew Svoboda 80-74-154 +14
a-Vaughn Snyder 76-78-154 4.14
Err.,m El; 78-77-]i .15
Sear. F aer , 80-75-. t1 ' ,
a.Kyiei erem3r, 81.75.156 ti
a-Matt Nagy .76-80-156 +16
Michael Campbell 77-79-156 +16
Shintaro Kai. 79-78-157 +17
Eric Axley 79-80-159 +19
a-Scott Lewis 81-80-161 +21
a-Josh Brock 83-79-162 ,222
Matt Jones 78 VD

AUTO RACING

Camping World Trucks
Copart 200 Results
Saturday .
AtThe Milwaukee Mile
West Alllsa, Wis.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position In parentheses)
1. (3) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 200 laps,
150 rating, 195 points, $46,600.
2. (21) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet, 200, 94.5,
170, $30,595.
3. (12) Brian Scott, Toyota, 200, 99.8, 165,
$28,340.
4. (5) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 200, ;113.1,165,
$17,905.
5. (19) James Buescher, Ford, 200, 78.2,
155, $17,530.
6. (14) Stacy Compton, Toyota, 200, 86.8,
150, $13,930.
7. (9) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 200, 79, 146,
$12,530.
8. (13) Colin Braun, Ford, 200, 96.8, 142,
$12,430.
9. (7) David Starr, Toyota, 200, 102.7, 138,
$12,305.
10. (8) Terry Cook, Toyota, 200, 75.4, 134,
$13,530.
11. (31) Mikey Kile, Chevrolet, 200, 62.4,130,
$9,480.
12. (10) Rick Crawford, Ford, 200, 98.4, 127,
$11,555.
13. (32) Ryan Sleg, Chevrolet, 200, 67.8,
124, $9,205.
14. (15) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 199, 71.9,
121, $11,355.
15. (1) Brian Ickler, Toyota, 199, 74, 123,
$12,605.
16. (2) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 199, 91.2,
120, $11,155.
17. (27) Dexter Bean, Chevrolet, 199, 49.9,
112, $8,855.
18. (6) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 199, 83.8,
109, $10,980.
19.(4) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 198,106.9,111,
$10,930.
20. (18) Aric Almirola, Toyota, 198,79.6,103,
$11,580.
21. (17) Ricky Carmichael, Chevrolet, 197,
55, 100, $10,830.
22. (30) Dillon Oliver, Chevrolet, 193, 38.8,
97, $8,505.
23. (16) Jason White, Dodge, 192, 49.9, 94,
$9,455.
24. (23) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 188, 32.9,
91, $9,405.
25. (11) Chad McCumbee, Chevrolet, oil
pump, 185, 53.8, 93,'$8,380.
26. (33) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, transmis-
sion, 82, 37.9, 0, $8,355.
27. (22) Wayne Edwards, Chevrolet, brakes;
42, 34.7, 82, $8,330.
28. (20) T.J. Bell, Toyota, engine, 37, 47.2,79,
$8,305.
29. (28) Jason Leffler, Toyota, handling, 30,
42.1, 76, $8,280.
30. (24) Brandon Knupp, Chevrolet, over-
heating, 19, 34.9, 73, $8,755.
31. (26) Butch Miller, Chevrolet, wheel, 17,
29.9,70, $8,230.
32. (29) Peyton Sellers, Chevrolet, ignition,
10, 33.2, 67, $8,205.
33. (25) Nick Tucker, Dodge, brakes, 3, 28.3,
64, $8,180.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 95.012 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 6 minutes, 18 sec-
onds.
Margin of Victory: 1.39 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 23 laps.
Lead Changes: 8 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: B.Ickler 1; M.Crafton 2; R.Hor-


naday Jr. 3-40; C.McCumbee 41; T.Bodine 42-
48; R.Hornaday Jr. 49-120; M.Skinner 121-122;
T.Bodine 123-130; R.Hornaday Jr. 131-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): R.Hornaday Jr., 3 times for 180 laps;T.Bo-
dine, 2 times for 15 laps: M.Skinner, 1 time for
2 laps, B iciiler I hnmc I,.:, I ip M.Crafton, 1
rmir fort o ap, C M"CuTir,.E i ime for lap.
T.p 10'in Poinis I R H.:.ri- a,3dtJr., 1,518; 2.
M.Crafton, 1,482; 3. T.Bodine, 1,430; 4. M.Skin-
ner, 1,429; 5. D.Starr, 1,317; 6. T.Malsam, 1,303;
7. B.Scott, 1,293; 8 T.Cook, 1,291; 9. R.Craw-
ford, 1,267; 10. D.Setzer, 1,261.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in
a race.
The formula combines the following cate-
gories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Aver-
age Running Position While on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led
Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

TENNIS

Wimbledon Seeds List
At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet
Club
Wimbledon, England
June 22-July 5
(Ranking in parentheses)
Men
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain (1), withdrew
2. Roger Federer, Switzerland (2)
3. Andy Murray, Britain (3)
4. Novak Djokovic, Serbia (4)
5. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina (5)
6. Andy Roddick, United States (6)
7. Fernando Verdasco, Spain (8)
8. Gilles Simon, France (7)
9. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France (9)
10. Fernando Gonzalez, Chile (10)
11. Marin Cilic, Croatia (13)
12. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia (11)
13. Robin Soderling, Sweden (12)
14. Gael Monfils, France (14), withdrew
14. Marat Safin, Russia (23)
15. Tommy Robredo, Spain (15)
16. David Ferrer, Spain (19)
17. James Blake, United States (17)
18. Rainer Schuettler, Germany (30)
19. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland (18)
20.Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic (21)
21. Feliciano Lopez, Spain (28)
22. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia (31)
23. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic (22)
24. Tommy Haas, Germany (35)
25. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia (27)
26. Jurgen Melzer, Austria (26)
27. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany (33)
28. Mardy Fish, United States (24)
29. Igor Andreev, Russia (25)
30. Viktor Troicki, Serbia (32)
31. Victor Hanescu, Romania (29)
32. Albert Montanes, Spain (34)
33. Nicolas Kiefer, Germany (36)
Women
1. Dinara Safina, Russia (1)
2. Serena Williams, United States (2)
3. Venus Williams, United States (3)
4. Elena Dementieva, Russia (4)
5. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia (5)
6. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia (6)
7. Vera Zvonareva, Russia (7)
8. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus (8)
9. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark (9)
10. Nadia Petrova, Russia (10)
11. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland (11)
12. Marion Bartoli, France (12)
13. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia (13)
14. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia (14)
15. Flavia Pennetta, Italy (15)
16. Zheng Jie, China (16)
17. Amelie Mauresmo, France (17)
18. Samantha Stosur, Austria (18)
19. Li Na, China (19)
20. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain (20)
21. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland (21)
22. Alize Cornet, France (22)
23. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada (23)
24. Maria Sharapova, Russia (59)
25. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia (24)
26. Virginie Razzano, France (25)
27. Alisa Kleybanova, Russia (26)
28. Sorana Cirstea, Romania (27)
29. Sybille Bammer, Austria (28)
30. Agnes Szavay, Hungary (29)
31. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia (30)
32. Anna Chakvetadze, Russia (31)


For the record

-1 Flo LOTTERY =


RAYS
Continued from Page B8

however, have dropped dra-
matically. Santana fanned
three against Tampa Bay,
giving him 11 over his last
four starts. He averaged 8.6
strikeouts through his first
10 outings.
Gabe Kapler had an RBI
double for the Rays, who
snapped a three-game slide.
While Santana pitched
well, the Mets reverted back
to their early-season trend
of not supporting him with
much offense. Tampa Bay
pitchers retired 19 in a row
before Carlos Beltran's two-
out single in the ninth. How-
ell struck out David Wright
to end it
Making his 100th major
league start, Shields r6-5)
won for the first time in five
road outings since April 12
at Baltimore. The right-han-
der struck out four and
walked none. The only run
he allowed came on doubles
by Ryan Church and Omir
Santos in the second.
Five of Shields' wins this
season have come after
Rays losses. He has stopped


FEDERER
Continued from Page BI

Nadal's exit was-the talk
of the grounds Saturday, and
Federer called it "very dis-
appointing for the tourna-
ment, and also for myself."
"It's unfortunate. I'm sad
for him, because it must
have been a very difficult
decision to make," Federer
said. "I'd love to play him.
He's my main rival. We've
had some wonderful
matches over the years, and
especially the one here last
year was the one that obvi-
ously stands out."
Ah, yes, lat year, when
Nadal reduced Federer to
tears by winning the longest
singles final in tournament
history, a 4-hour, 48-minute
test of skill and will that
ended 9-7 in the fifth set as
darkness descended.
That 2008 setback ended
Federer's streaks of 40 con-
secutive wins at Wimbledon
and 65 in a row on grass, and
he is ready to start anew.
"The focus is on the first
round - and the first point,"
Federer said. "Trying to re-
gain my Wimbledon crown, I
guess, stands over trying to
beat Pete's record right
now."
There was something apt
about the way Federer tied
Sampras' Grand Slam mark
by completing a career
Grand Slam at the French
Open, a tournament the
American never won and
that the Swiss star came so
close to winning, year after
year, before finally breaking
through this month.
There also would be some-
thing fitting if Federer sur-
passes Sampras at
Wimbledon, a tournament
that means so much to both
men - and where their
paths crossed all those years
ago.
"I don't feel like I have


U.S. OPEN
Continued from Page B1

his final hole to match the
U.S. Open record of 63. He
came up short and had to set-
tle for a share of the course
record, set the day before by
Mike Weir
"I'm a little ashamed I did
leave it short," Glover said.
"But I played well. Probably
as good a round of golf as I've
played."
With no chance the course
can get firm and fast, no
record is safe.
Birdies were dropping
from all corners of the course
- first in the morning by play-
ers completing their second
rounds, and even some in the
afternoon when the players
on the wrong end of the draw
tried hopelessly to catch up.
About the only thing not
falling was the heavy rain pre-
dicted for early afternoon -
but not for long.
Woods and Mickelson, des-
perately trying to catch up,
each scrambled for par on op-
posite sides of the golf course,
when the umbrellas came
down, the rain grew stronger
and play was suspended.
How benign is Bethpage
Black?
There already have been 45
scores in the 60s, compared
with 26 scores for the week in
the 2002 U.S. Open on ithe
same course. Most of them
came from the side of the


a five-game skid and a pair
of three-gamers.
With the score tied 1-all,
Santana grooved a 92 mph
fastball to Pena leading off
the seventh and he got all
of it.
The booming drive
landed about five rows deep
in the right-center bleach-
ers, between the 408 and 415
signs, for Pena's AL-leading
22nd home run.
Zobrist, subbing beauti-
fully for injured second
baseman Akinori Iwamura,
connected off Sean Green in
the ninth.
Rain fell for much of the
day in New York and the fore-
cast indicated heavy showers.
were on the way, but the game
started right on time.
Despite an occasional
drizzle, the first six innings
were played in 1 hour, 32
minutes. The --downpotur
began at 6 p.m., just as ex-
pected.
Umpires called for the
tarp and halted play. after
Michel Hernandez flied out
to start the eighth.
The same storm soon
soaked the golf course at
Bethpage Black on Long Is-
land, where the third
round of the U.S. Open was


extra pressure now having to
win the tournament or trying
to. I mean, anyway, there's a
lot of weight off my shoul-
ders since Paris," Federer
said. "So I'm entering tour-
naments, I guess, a little bit
more relaxed these days."
On the day Federer won at
Roland Garros, Sampras
said he expected Federer to
get No. 15 "in the next cou-
ple of weeks." Asked
whether he would travel to
the All England Club this
year, Sampras replied: "We'll
sort of see what happens."
Many current players fig-
ure Federer is set to re-es-
tablish his supremacy at
Wimbledon. As 2002 cham-
pion Lleyton Hewitt put it:
"Roger's going to be the one
to beat"
The same must be said of
the Williams sisters, particu-
larly Venus. As has been the
case with Federer in recent
years, Wimbledon is their
turf.
Venus has played in seven
finals at the All England
Club, winning five champi-
onships, including the past
two. Serena has played in
four finals, winning two.
Pay no heed to the rank-
ings, which have both sisters
behind No. 1 Dinara Safina.
Here are the numbers that
really matter: Serena has
won 10 Grand Slam titles
overall, and Venus seven,
while Marat Safin's little sis-
ter is 0-3 in major finals.
Maria Sharapova, the 2004
Wimbledon champion, can't
be counted out, even if her
serve has been a trouble spot
in her return from shoulder
surgery, while a teenager
such as Victoria Azarenka or
Caroline Wozniacki - who
won a grass-court title at
Eastbourne on Saturday -
could be ready for a break-
through.
It seems far less likely that
someone who isn't a house-
hold name will win the
men's championship July 5.


draw that played 36 holes over
the last two days without a
drop of rain and mostly sun-
shine in the sky
Barnes was on the good
side.
"If you would have told me
I would have been 8 under
and only a one-shot lead, I
would have said, 'You're. kid-
ding me,"' Barnes said. "But
I'll take it. It was solid play"
Lee Westwood of England
had a 66 and was at 2-under
138, the only player from the
other side of the draw among
the top 11.
"I actually set out today to
win my side of the draw be-
cause I felt that it was a good
target and all I could do given
how dramatic the split was
between the two sides," West-
wood said. "I am very pleased
with that effort"
Steve Stricker, in his hotel
room Friday as the others
took aim at the flags, did his
best to make up ground with a
66, leaving him 1 under for the
tournament and seven shots
behind in a group that in-
cluded Phil Mickelson, who
scratched out a 70.
"You realize you got the
short end of the stick,"
Stricker said. "I watched it
yesterday and it was a
birdiefest, and everybody that
they showed was flying it in
there and making birdies left
and right And we were strug-
gling to make pars and stuff
like that But you can't dwell
on that Even par was my goal
today, and I did one better",


suspended. '
Bartlett's fifth-inning d -
ble extended his career-list
hitting streak to 15 games.
Kapler followed with an -
posite-field double to right,
tying it at 1.
Rays 3, Mets 1 -
Tampa Bay, NewYork (NL)
ab rhbI ab rn I
BUptoncf 3 0 1 0 Corass 4 0,,1.0
Crwfrdlf 4 00 0 DnMrplb 3 O-d0O
Longori3b 4 00 0 Tatisph 1 0 't-O
C.Penalb 3 1 1 1 Beltrancf 4 Orl1'0
Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 1 DWrght 3b 4 O-eP
Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0 Church rf 3 1 J -0
Kapler rf 3 0 1 1 Reed If 3 O00,
MHrndc 3 00 0 Santosc 3 01'1
JShildsp 1 00 0 LCastill2b 3 0-0 0
Burrell ph 0 0 0 0 JSantn p 2 00O,,0
Wheeir p 0 0 0 0 Parnell p 0 0,0 0
Howellp 0 00 0 Felicinp 0 0.0-0
Sheffild ph 1 0k'
SGreenhp 0 O'Mf
Totals 29 3 5 3 Totals 31 1,4@.1
Tampa Bay 000 010 10lt-8
NewYork 010 000 000-1
DP-New York 2. LOB-Tampa Bay 3,(NeaV
York 3. 2B-Bartlett (13), Kapier (8), Cora(7),
Church (12), Santos (7). HR-C.Pena (22)-,%o-
b,. f, i, c-5-- ,,. ,.(4).;i .j'; ) <;rJ[- s
T .a , IP H RERBBSQ.i
Tampa Bay ,
J.ShieldsW,6-5 7 3 1 1 0
Wheeler H,8 "1 0 0 0 0 '-1
Howell S,4-9 1 1 0 0 0 t'
NewYork r
Santana L,8-5 71-3 3 2 2 3 3,
Parnell 0 1 0 0 1 '.
Feliciano 2-3 0 0 0 0 5
S.Green 1 1 1 1 0 0 1
Parnell pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. . rr'
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Jerry Craw-
ford; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Phil Cuzf -
T-2:24 (Rain delay: 1:13). A-37,992 (411,0Q).
' d':>


For Federer, there
other laurels at stake thl
fortnight: He could matqh
Nadal's feat from 2008"oT
winning the French Open
and Wimbledon in the sae
season - that hadn't bin
done since Bjorn Borg. i'.
1980.
Plus, Federer can reclaJim
the No. 1 ranking, althoVgh
he said that doesn't concern
him.
Right now, he is focusing
on adding to his haul' of
major championships. JH,e
bawled during the post-
match ceremonies after pnr
other five-set setback agaip~t
* Nadal at the Australia
Open this year, then shed
tears of joy when he won.-,
French Open.
Now comes Wimbledon.
"I do think I'm the favorite,
actually, with the success 1%e
had and how close I ca*fe
again last year," said F;-
erelr whose wife is due to
give birth to their first child
this summer. "Without a�ly
disrespect to any of the other
players - because I think
this year's field is going to be
very difficult to topple." -
Those words were spo en
before Nadal became only
the second Wimbledon
men's champion in 35 yea's
to decide not to defend his
title.
Federer said the rivals
chatted briefly Wednesday,
and Nadal congratulated
him for winning the French
Open.
"I asked him how his ko e
was. He was, like, 'It's 01
So I kind of knew it wa�rYt
great, because he's very hL-
est to me," Federer said. 'J"
I knew something could 'be
coming up." .
Federer had other menidh
mind, too, such as Andy Mur-
ray, the 22-year-old from
Scotland who gives ld4l
fans a real chance for the
first British male champtf6
at the All England Club sirine
Fred Perry in 1936. ".J-


Weir followed his 64 witi a
70 and was two shots beh*d.
David Duval rallied froi. a
sluggish start for a 70 that put
him in the group at 3-under
137.
Woods appeared poised to
climb quickly, but for every
birdie he made to build some
momentum, a bogey stopped
him. Woods hit 10 fairways
and only missed four greens,
but took 30 putts. /
"Unfortunately, my score
doesn't reflect how I've beeii
playing," he said. "It is whatit
is. But you never know. I'vegot
36 more holes over the next
probably three days." ,
He was joking- maybe .
The forecast, which can go
longer be trusted at the T;,.
Open, was for a chance ofrain
the next two days. Finishing
the second round, however, at
least gave the tournameabt
chance to finish on schedule
with a marathon Sunday. That
would mean 36 holes for a
dozen players, including
leaders.
It also helped that onlylhe
minimum 60 players mide
the cut at 4-over 144. Among
those headed home - and
some were thankful to getbot
of this quagmire - were dan-
ble major winner Padrqig
.Harrington, Ernie Els �ad
Paul Casey
Woods at least has hope.
"It's just one of those things
where ifI keep plugging along
like any U.S. Open ... we'll see
where it ends up," said
Woods.


Criwis Coumy (FL) Ci-iRoNtot


SCOREBOARD


w w ..... ),d ...... mvvl








`�IRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICa.; SPoxrs SUNDAYv, JUNE- 21, 2009 0



Mornaday gets fantastic birthday present


pr iver turns 51;

:,"wins trucks race

Associated Press

WEST ALLIS, Wis. -After Ron
Hornaday Jr. celebrated his 51st
-birthday by winning Saturday's
:NASCAR Camping World Truck
series race at the Milwaukee Mile,
'hes opted not to do a victory
burnout Tire-smoking. celebra-
tions have become commonplace
idi recent years, but now they're a
luxury his team just can't afford.
"Welcome to life in NASCAR
*ifter General Motors cutbacks.
4, VWe're saving dimes right now,"
b6rnaday said.
111'),


Burnouts might be a fun way to
show off for the crowd, but dump-
ing the clutch and letting the
wheels spin wildly also is a good
way to, damage a driveshaft
And now that GM has cut back
funding to its NASCAR teams
across the board, including the
Chevrolet team Hornaday drives
for, any potential cost-saving meas-
ure has to be looked at- even the
way drivers celebrate wins.
Hornaday said his team owner,
Sprint Cup series star Kevin Har-
vick and his wife, DeLana, are
doing everything they can to keep
the team competitive in the wake
of GM's budget cuts.
"I think Kevin and DeLana
were ready for this, and we're all
buckling down," Hornaday said.
And Hornaday said Saturday's


win was a good way for Chevrolet
to show its strength.
"Buy a Chevrolet," crew chief
Rick Ren said before leaving a
post-race interview session.
Hornaday led 180 of 200 laps in
a race that originally was sched-
uled for Friday night but was
postponed until Saturday be-
cause of rain.
The win also allowed Hornaday
to take the series points lead from
Matt Crafton, who finished 16th.
Hornaday leaves Milwaukee with
a 36-point lead over Crafton in the
standings - not that he thinks it
matters in midseason.
Dennis Setzer finished second,
also in a Chevrolet, followed by
Brian Scott in a Toyota. Scott
drove Saturday's race with a cast
on his right wrist after breaking a


bone in a crash at Michigan last
weekend.
It was the 41st career trucks se-
ries victory and second win of the
season for Hornaday - and his
second career victory in a trucks
race at Milwaukee, where he also
won in 1997.
Hornaday led comfortably for
most of the race before a late cau-
tion flag bunched up the field for a
restart with eight laps to go. But
Hornaday squirted away from Set-
zer when the green flag dropped,
and he wasn't challenged for the
lead the rest of the way.
It's not the first checkered flag-
themed birthday celebration for
Hornaday, who also won a trucks
series race on his birthday at Bris-
tol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway in
1998. And Hornaday's big day is


just getting started this year; he
also is scheduled to race in the
Nationwide Series at Milwaukee
on Saturday night.
I Todd Bodine finished fourth
and James Buescher was fifth.
One of Hornaday's strongest
challengers, Mike Skinner, was
making a green-flag pit stop
when Aric Almirola spun on lap
127 to bring out a yellow flag. It
was a tough break for Skinner, as
the rest of the leaders were able
to make their pit stops under
caution.
Skinner eventually lost two laps
to the leaders and finished 19th.
Saturday's race was run without
reigning series champion Johnny
Benson, who won the previous
three trucks races at the Milwau-
kee Mile.


ilo M4


Tigers


:lWSfinals match

ISUpower, Texas

, dramatic flair

Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. - Texas coach
Augie Garrido conceded that his
team's College World Series finals
opponent has played the best
bAseball of any team in Omaha.
' SU, after all, has hit nine
'fmie runs and holds a 32-11 scor-
ij advantage in its three wins.
. But if it's about drama," Gar-
rido said, "we've got that."
Yes, the Longhorns certainly do.
-No matter what happens in the
'btst-of-three finals starting Mon-
:..y, it'll be tough for Texas to top
its finish in a 4-3 victory over Ari-
zona State in Friday night's
,Bracket 2 final. That followed
LSU's 14-5 Bracket 1 win over
Arkansas in the afternoon.
, -Texas' Connor Rowe hit a game-
winning solo home run with two
buts in the bottom of the ninth in-
uing, moments after Cameron
.Iiupp tied it with a homer of his.
own as the Longhorns came from
behind.
V owe sent a shot into the left-
field seats, then sprinted around
dih bases with his helmet raised
in-his right-hand as his celebrat-,
ing teammates waited at home
plate to greet him.
. .So now a Texas team that won
its first game here on a bases-
loaded walk in the, ninth and its
second game after rallying from
sixc runs down will try to become
the first No. 1 national seed to win
the title since Miami in 1999.
-"'exas (49-14-1) returns to the
,S finals for the first time since
2005, when the Longhorns won
the last of their six national cham-
bhlbnships. LSU (54-16) will play
ofd a sixth title, and first since
tRowe, who batted in the No. 9
'sbt, hit the first walkoff homer in
Omiaha since Texas' Chance
'Wfieeless did it in a win over Bay-
16r in 2005.
.It looked as if the Sun Devils
$(V-14) would force a Saturday re-
n tch for the Bracket 2 champi-
6nrhip after they took a 3-2 lead in
the top of the ninth on Zach Wil-
A' i's RBI triple.
l Mitchell Lambson (9-5) struck
'out Brandon Loy to start the bot-
tfofn of the ninth, but Rupp tied it
with a homer that carried at least
420 feet to dead center, one of the
l6ngest in recent CWS memory.
''-*"When I hit it," Rupp said, "I
I ew it was gone."
v "'4 .


'Horns locked in


Associated Press
Texas' Connor Rowe rounds the bases after hitting the winning home run against Arizona State in the ninth
Inning Friday in Omaha, Neb; Texas beat Arizona State 4-3 after scoring two home runs in the ninth inning.


After Preston Clark popped out,
Rowe hit the first offering from
Lambson over the left-field wall,
well above the leaping Kole Cal-
houn.
'"As time passes, this is probably
going to be a game to watch on TV
and recap and say I was glad to be
a part of it," Calhoun said. "But
right now, this one hurts."
Austin Wood (6-1), who gave up
Zach Wilson's go-ahead triple in
the top of the ninth, got the win
with three innings of relief of
starter Cole Green.
LSU used an impressive show
of power and pitching to win


Bracket 1. The Tigers hit four
home runs against the Razor-
backs and Anthony Ranaudo
bounced back from a subpar out-
ing to throw six shutout innings.
"It's a dream come true that we
got to this point," said' LSU coach
Paul Mainieri. "When I say a
dream, it's not that I didn't think
we couldn't. We thought we could
when we started the year. Now
there's an opportunity for us, and
now we'll see if we can seize it"
The Tigers hadn't played since
Monday's 9-1 win over Arkansas,
and they had to wait even longer
begausegof a thunderstorm that


pushed back the start of Friday's
game 2V2 hours.
"They were chomping at the bit
to get back out there on the ball-
field," Mainieri said.
Once out there, the Tigers
showed no signs of rust against an
Arkansas team they dominated all
year. Arkansas (41-24) was
outscored 23-6 by LSU in two CWS
games, and the Razorbacks lost
four of five overall against the
Tigers this season.
LSU scored in six of the nine in-
nings Friday and shut out
Arkansas for 14 straight innings
over their two meetings in Omaha.


Kobe to


stay; Phil


not sure


Bryant says he

plans to return

to Lakers

Associated Press
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -
Kobe Bryant said he plans to
stay with the NBA champion
Los Angeles Lakers and won't
opt out of his contract this
summer. Phil Jackson said his
health will dictate whether he
returns as coach.
Bryant met with Jackson
and general manager Mitch
Kupchak for an individual exit
interview Friday.
The finals MVP can termi-
nate the last two years of his
contract and become an unre-
stricted free agent on July 1.
He's spent his entire 13-year
career with the Lakers, win-
ning four NBA championships.
Asked by reporters if. he
would opt out, Bryant said,
"I've been deflecting that all-
year and I ain't going to stop
now."
Pressed to explain n, he. re-
sponded, "I'm not going any-
where. I know I ain't going
nowhere, so it's just a waste
of our breaths just talking
about it."
Bryant turns 31 in August
He averaged 32.4 points, 7.4 as-
sists and 5.6 rebounds during
the finals, when the Lakers de-
feated the Orlando Magic in
five games.
Kupchak met with reporters
before Bryant did and said,
"We have no indication of what
he may or may not do."
Jackson, who turns 64 in
September, said he'll decide
about next season after he
gets some health issues
checked out.
This season, he missed two
West Coast road games be-
cause of pain and swelling in
his lower legs caused by plan-
tar fasciitis, an issue "that con-
cerned me a little bit," he said.
He blamed late-night flights
that aggravated the condition.
He has undergone two hip
replacement operations since
October 2006 -using a cane at
various times - and walks
with a noticeable hitch in his
step.


,'Coach Haley tries to tighten up Kansas City

takinhir ac/nblunt rated his young assistant, showing no what I want," Haley said after Waters' ...
eW hiretaking blunt sympathy when something went wrong. first workout. "I'm not, Scott's not, in the
- o o - He even made Haley run laps after one business of giving, players away. He's
h t foul-up. here. He's working, trying to learnmwhat
- Now, Haley has become a sort of.mini- we're teaching, trying to do it the way
Chie o football suad Tuna, shouting at his players, not allow- we're teaching it. We obviously need as
q, S ,, aiing any excuses or distractions. many players as we can get."
qiit 11q11- XTN 1 0,;- 1 - f- ha LUU nUU n101 P i1 .l dVn d t thtu


:KANSAS CITY, Mo: - Herm Edwards
was the kind of coach who would put his
tiia around players walking through the
Slo6ker room.
" 'Todd Haley takes a little different tack
�"'iery and blunt, Kansas City's first-
. far coach is using his no-nonsense ap-
pjrach to try to change a losing culture
tt's bogged the Chiefs down the past
Wo seasons. After the team completed
,ftseason practices under Haley this
wpek, it's clear everything - from the
workouts to the attitude - is going to be
different around Arrowhead.
'. all Haley the anti-Herm.
'It's been like night and day," fullback
Mike Cox said..
,1 aley's demanding coaching style
traces back to his days as an assistant
iiider Bill Parcells with the New York
Jets and Dallas Cowboys. The Tuna be-


nThe No. I thing nas to bUe ootball oru
all these guys," Haley said. "That's been
made clear to every player on this team."
Haley's in-your-face style has rubbed
players the wrong way in the past. He
had an ongoing spat with Terrell Owens
as the receivers coach in Dallas and a
confrontation in Arizona with receiver
Anquan Boldin that was caught by tele-
vision cameras during the NFC champi-
onship game.
Chiefs Pro Bowl guard Brian Waters
had issues with Haley shortly after his
hiring, saying the coach had been disre-
spectful of him during a meeting, then
that new general manager Scott Pioli re-
fused to meet with him. Waters later told
a newspaper columnist that he wanted
to be traded and did not attend any of the
team's voluntary workouts this spring.
Waters showed up for the Chiefs'
mandatory minicamp, but how longthe
stays in Kansas City remains to be seen.
"He is here. He's practicing. That's


..L iebiacker Mike vrae V i, trLI U eU o e
Chiefs after eight seasons and .three
Super Bowl rings with New England,
may be another unhappy player in
Kansas City. He missed all the voluntary
workouts, showing up only for the
mandatory minicamp.
"For lack of a better term, I was just
trying to exercise my rights within the
(collective bargaining agreement)," Vra-
bel said. "We bargained for rights to
make these workouts voluntary, and
that's all I was trying to do, to exercise
my rights within the CBA"
OK, so maybe not everyone is buying
in quite yet Overall, though, the Chiefs
seem to be catching on to what their new
scream-til-you-get-it-right coach wants.
In this May 8 file photo, Kansas City Chiefs
coach Todd Haley listens to questions dur-
ing a news conference at the team's foot-
ball practice facility in Kansas City, Mo.
Associated Press


C,
,f4''


Associated Press


i.,.- 1 -'l"f< as


Q--


f""









E Page B6- SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009



ENTERTAINMENT
, CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Album feat.
Lambert tunes
expected soon
LOS ANGELES - An
album featuring Adam
Lambert is coming out
sooner than expected.
Songs from the "Ameri-
can Idol" runner-up will
be released this summer
by Hi Fi
Record-
ings and
Wilshire
Records,
beginning
with the
single
"Want."
Adam John
Lambert Hecker,
CEO of Hi Fi Recordings,
said the tracks were
recorded in 2007 and
2008 before Lambert's
rise on the popular Fox
singing competition. The
album will be titled "On
with the Show."
"We were presented
with a business opportu-
nity," said Hecker "We
accepted because
Wilshire Records had a
long working relationship
with Adam, and it re-
sulted in excellent music
that they had the rights
to. The music has an au-
dience, and it deserves to
be heard. I think it's great
music. At the end of the
day, from my perspective,
we're really helping
Adam."
He described "On with
the Show" as a "complete
album" that would in-
clude mid- and up-tempo.
songs, ballads and rock
tunes.
Lambert inked a record
deal with 19 Entertain-
ment and RCA Recordings
earlier this month after
losing to Kris Allen onathe
"Idol" finale. Lambert is
scheduled to record that
album while on the road
with the show's finalists
for the ""Idols Live Tour,"
whiehstartsJuly 5 in Port-
land, Ore. The untitled
album from 19 and RCA is
expected for release in
the fall.

Madonna's
adopted daughter
leaves Malawi
� LILONGWE, Malawi -
Madonna's new daughter
has flown out of her na-
tive Malawi on a private
jet headed for London, an
airport employee and.a
person familiar with
Madonna's adoption pro-
ceedings in this southern
African country said Sat-
urday.
The airport employee,
speaking on condition of
anonymity because he
was not

ized to
discuss.,
the msat-
ter, said 3-
year-old
Chifinido
Madonna James left
late Friday headed to

The girl, the second child




The-person familiar
with the adoption, who
also was not authorized
to discuss the matter pub-
licly, said the girl known
as Mercy should have
reached London on Sat-
urday morning. Madonna
has homes in England
and in the United States.
Malawi's highest court
had granted the adoption
June 12, overturning an
April lower court ruling
that Madonna had not
spent enough time in-
Malawi to be given a
child.
The high court said the


first judge had imposed
too narrow a definition of
residency, and lauded
Madonna for her work
with children in a poor
country where half a mil-
lion have lost a parent to
AIDS.
-From wire reports


Acropolis museum opens

is m, m- U _


Associated Press
Officials and guests view exhibits Saturday as they visit the new Acropolis museum during the opening ceremony
In Athens.

Antiquities showcase opens its doors after years of delay
Associa d Press


ATHENS, Greece - The golden
age of ancient Athens came to life
Saturday as Greece opened its new
Acropolis Museum with a lavish
party, bolstering its long campaign
for the return 'of 2,500-year-old
sculptures striped from the
citadel more than two centuries
ago.
Years of delays and often vocif-
erous criticism about the mu-
seum's hulking design and location
in the capital's 1od district came to
an end with a nearly $4.1 million
opening ceremony to be attended
by foreign heads of state and gov-
ernment - though conspicuously
not from Britain, where the sculp-
tures currently reside.
The reinbo reed concrete and
glass structure sits near the foot of
the ancient citadel like a skewed
stack of glass boxes. With UV coat-
ing on its walls of windows,,air fil-
ters and clirnate control, the $180
million museum is'Gree&e's aft-
swer to the argument that it had
nowhere to safely house the frieze
pried off the Parthenon in the 19th
century by British diplomat Lord
Elgin and currently displayed in
London's British'Mutseum.
'"This new state ofthe art Acropo-
lis Museum now demolishes that ex-
cuse," said Culture MinisterAntonis
Samaras, who on Friday described
the sculptures widely known as the
Parthenon, or Elgin. Marbles, as
being in "enforced exile."
Greece sees the return of 'the
sculptures -- part of a stunning
525-foot marble frieze mainly of a
religious procession that adorned
the top of the ancient citadel's"
grandest structure;, the Parthenon
- as an issue of national pride.
The Parthenon was built at the
height of Athens' glory between
447-432 B.C. in honor of the city's
patron goddess, Athena. Despite its
conversion into a Christian church,
and Ottoman occupation from the
15th century, it survived virtually
intact until a Veietian cannon shot
caused a massive explosion in
1687. Elgin removed about half the
surviving sculptures in the early
1800s, when Greece was an unwill-
ing part of the Ottoman Empire.
"On this momentous day, at this
historic site, we appeal to everyone
around the w6rld who believes in the
values and.ideas that emerged on the
slopes or the Acropolis, to join our
quest to bring the missing Parthenon


Associated Press
Journalists walk amongst statues Friday during a tour of the new Acropolis
museum in Athens. Greece opened its long-anticipated new Acropolis Mu-
seum Saturday, boosting its decades-old campaign for the return of 2,500-
year-old sculptures removed from the ancient citadel by a 19th-century
British diplomat. After years of delays and legal wrangling, the museum
opens its doors to the public on Sunday at a nominal $1.40 charge, the
price of a public bus ticket.


marbles home," Samaras said.
The British Museum has repeat-
edly rejected calls foritheir return.
It says it legally owns the collection
it bought from Elgin, who sold it to
stave off bankruptcy, and that it "is
displayed free of charge in an in-
ternational cultural context.
"I think they belong to all of us.
We are all global citizens these
days," said British Museum
spokeswoman Hannah Boulton.
But on the top floor of the new
Acropolis Museum, Greece's
counter-argument-that the sculp-
tures were looted from a work of art
. so important that the surviving
pieces should all be exhibited to-
gether- is displayed in stark relief.
The glass hall with a 360-degree
panoramic view onto central
Athens and the Parthenon itself
displays the section of the frieze
that Elgin left behind, joined to
plaster casts of the works held in
London.
The soft brownish patina of the
original marble contrasts starkly
with the bright white of the plaster
casts sent by the British Museum in
1845: battle scenes are cut jaggedly
in half, with the torso and heads of
warriors and horses in London and
the legs in Athens. The attempt to
shock is deliberate.
"Until the missing marbles are
back, all people. Greeks and non-
Greeks alike, who visit this mu-


seum will feel great pride and
great anguish when they walk up to
the Parthenon Gallery and see the
inspiring sculptures from the tem-
ple interspersed with the replicas
of the pieces in the British Mu-
seum," Samaras said.
"It is like looking at a family pic-
tute and seeing images of loved
ones far away or lost to us."
But the museum is not only
about the Parthenon Marbles. -
With about 150,000 square feet of
exhibition space, it holds more
than 4,000 ancient works, many of
them never displayed before due to
lack of space in the cramped old
museum which sat atop the Acrop-
olis hill.
Now, visitors can walk among
statues and friezes with surviving
traces of paint; view fragments of
sculptures and coins still bearing
scorch marks from the Persians'
sacking of the city in 480 B.C.; gaze
through three stories of glass floors
from the top of the museum
straight into the foundations,
where construction revealed an
entire underlying neighborhood of
ancient and early Christian
Athens.
The museum opens to the public
on Sunday. Entry is at a nominal
charge of $1.40 until the end of the
year. The first four days are already
completely sold out through Inter-
net sales.


ABC: T.R. Knight leaving 'Grey's Anatomy'


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - A med-
ical mystery was solved Fri-
day: T.R. Knight won't be
back on -'Grey's Anatomy."
"Leaving "Gre3's Anatomy'
was not an easy decision for
me to make. I am extremely
grateful to have had the op-
portunity to play this iarac-


ter and will miss my fellow
-cast and crew very much,"
Knight said in a statement
He also thanked fans for
their support, but conspicu-
ously didn't mention series
creator and executive pro-
ducer Shonda Rhimes.
Knight, who played Dr.
George O'Malley, had seen
his role diminished this sea-


son and asked to be let out
of a contract that still had
three years to go. In the sea-
son finale, his character had
been injured - fatally, it ap-
peared - as he saved a
woman from a bus collision.
In a statement from ABC
announcing Knight's much-
rumored departure, Rhimes
wished Knight "the best in


his future endeavors" on be-
half of the show's "family"
"He is an incredibly tal-
ented actor and a person
whose strength of character
is admired by all of us,"
Rhimes said.
Knight, who has a theater
background, is said to be
weighing the stage as well as
films for his post-"Grey's" life.


Pro skater Tony Hawk rides the White House


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Hey
kids, don't try this at home.
Professional skate-
boarder Tony Hawk on Fri-
day took a brief ride at the
White House as part of a Fa-
ther's Day celebration.


Hawk, 44 skated in the
grand foyer and the nearby
Old Executive Office Build-
ing, with the permission of
White House officials.
The skateboarding icon
posted photos to his Web site
and Twitter page.
One photo shows Hawk


on his skateboard with his
hands in the air in what ap-
pears to be a hallway
"...and here is my exit," he
wrote in a message on Twitter,
which linked to a picture of him
skating "Supposed to return at
noon forthe First Fathers event
if they let me back in."


Hawk posted other in-
sights on his Twitter page,
telling fans about eating
Frosted Flakes cereal inside
the gates of 1600 Pennsylva-
nia Ave. In another tweet, he
says "back at White House,
Tweeting live from the Diplo-
matic Room. Unbelievable."


Florida
LOTTERIES,,.

SO YOU KNOW
a Last night's winning '
numbers, Page B4.1

FRIDAY, JUNE 19
Mega Money: 31 - 35 - 36 - 88-
Mega Ball: 18
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 2 $3,732
3-of-4 MB 32 $511
3-of-4 854 $57
2-of-4 MB 1,072 $31.50
2-of-4 24,124 $2
1-of-4 MB 10,065 $3
Fantasy 5:1 - 5 - 13 - 24 - 33
5-of-5 3 winners $75,142.55
4-of-5 295 $123
3-of-5 9,647 $10.50
THURSDAY, JUNE 18 '-'
Fantasy 5:2-10-17-29-36
5-of-5 3 winners $68,553.71
4-of-5 ' 293 $113
3-of-5 8,557 $10.50
INSIDE THE NUMBERS
* To verity the accuracy
of winning lottery num- .
bers, players should
double-check the nurm
bers printed above with
numbers officially
posted by the Florida .
Lottery. Go to
www.flalottery.com, or.,
call (850) 487-7777.

Today in
HISTORY ==

Today is Sunday, June 21,
the 172nd day of 2009. Thqre
are 193 days left in the year,
This is Father's Day. Summer
arrives at 1:45 a.m. EDT.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 21, 1788, the U.S:
Constitution went into effect
as New Hampshire became'
the ninth state to ratify it.
On this date:
In 1834, Cyrus Hall Mc-
Cormick received a patent for
his reaping machine.
In 1932, heavyweight Max
Schmeling lost a title fight re-
match in New York by dpci-
sion to Jack Sharkey, . ,
prompting ihmeiog's mno-
ager, Joe Jacobs, to exclaim:
'We was robbed!"
In 1963, Cardinal Giovanni
Battista Montini was chosen
to succeed the late Pope
John XXIII; the new pope" '
took the name Paul VI.
In 1964, civil rights workers
Michael H. Schwemer, An-.
drew Goodman and James-
E. Chaney disappeared irn..
Philadelphia, Miss.; their blod-
ies were found buried in an
earthen dam six weeks later.
In 1973, the Supreme
Court, in Miller v. Califomia,
ruled that states may ban,'
materials found to be ob-
scene according to local :
standards.
In 1982, a jury in Washing-
ton found John Hinckley Jr.
not guilty by reason of insan-
ity in the shootings of Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan and -
three other men.
In 1985, scientists an-
nounced that skeletal re-
mains exhumed in Brazil
were those bf Nazi war crimi-
nal Josef Mengele.
In 1989, a sharply divided
Supreme Court ruled that bum-
ing the American flag as a form
of political protest is protected
by the First Amendment. .
In 1990, an estimated ,
50,000 Iranians were killed
by an earthquake.
Ten years ago: President
Bill Clinton visited Slovenly
formerly part of Yugoslavia@
where he publicly urged v'
Serbs to reject Yugoslav -
leader Slobodan Milosevic.
Five years ago: The
SpaceShipOne rocket plane
punched through Earth's a]-
mosphere, then glided to a"
landing in California's Mojave
Desert in the first privately fi-
nanced manned spaceflight.
One year ago: A ferry car-
rying more than 800 people
capsized as Typhoon Feng-
shen battered the Philip- ;'
pines; only about four dozen
people survived. ^"


Today's Birthdays: Ac-'
tress Jane Russell is 88.
Actor Bemie Kopell is 76.
Thought for Today:
"Three o'clock is always to"o
late or too early for anythifig
you want to do." - Jean-
Paul Sartre, French philoso-
pher (1905-1980).


.,r . ~.-


- . ,.. " (-: . ,. L'-. -F..









C Section C SUNDAY, JUNE 21;2009

OMMENTARY

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE





Hidden homelessness


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press


Michelle DeStoop is seen June I through a window in her apartment at the Tedford Housing family shelter in Brunswick, Maine.

Study reveals large number of 'hidden homeless' in rural America

Associated Press H .... W�s ? I ,h


I BRUNSWICK, Maine - The old, run-down
trailer in the backcountry near Norridgewock
wasn't much to look at, but it was home.
That was before the landlord died, setting in
motion events that left Michelle DeStoop,
.Bobby Landry and their six children without
a place of their own.
After losing their home, they sold their car to
a junkyard when they couldn't afford to have it
repaired. Without a car, they couldn't get around.
Low n money, they lost their meager possePs
sons when they couldn't pay the bill for storage.
Homelessness often means life in soup lines
and on city streets, but as a new study com-
missioned by the state shows, it isn't confined
to cities. It also can be found across rural
areas, so concealed that some people are sui^
prised it exists at all, the study finds.
"It's the hidden homeless," said Melany
Mondello of the Shalom House mental health
housing organization, who headed the study
and a resulting 32-page report called "Cost of
Rural Homelessness."
The study, commissioned by the Maine State
Housing Authority, is believed to be the first
study in the nation to provide a look at the costs
of rural homelessness in a state. It concludes
that providing "permanent supportive housing"
- subsidized housing in combination with men-
tal health, employment and other support serv-
ices - for homeless people is less costly than
serving them while they're without a home.
Moreover, the report sheds light on a seg-
ment of society that is often overlooked.
Many of the rural homeless stay at shelters
- just like their urban counterparts - but
some counties don't even have shelters, forc-
ing the homeless to live in encampments,
abandoned buildings, barns or cars. Many
move from place to place, sleeping on a
friend's or relative's couch or floor until they
move on to the next person willing to take
them in for a while.
All told, 1,200 people sought help at Maine's
rural shelters last year, but the number of rural
homeless is thought to be much higher. Of
those who were looked at for the study, 97 per,
cent had mental illness, 18 percent were alco-
hol abusers and 16 percent were drug abusers.
Eleven percent were veterans.
DeStoop, 30, and Landry, 44, lived a simple
life in the two-bedroom trailer they rented
along Route 139 in Norridgewock, a town of
3,300 in central Maine. She worked in a dining
hall at Colby College in Waterville; Landry,
who is disabled and can't read or write, tended
to things at home.
They lived next door to her mother's trailer
and adjacent to an old roller skating rink that
had been converted to a flea market A farm
down the road sold fresh produce in the sum-
mer months.
But when the trailer owner died, his heirs
evicted them, removed the trailers and sold
the property. At first, DeStoop and her family
shared a house with her mother in Waterville.
But after her mother moved out, it wasn't long
before they followed - not able to pay the
rent, heat and electricity on their own.
They bounced between her mother's and
her grandfather's small apartments. But rela-
tionships can become strained when so many
people live in such cramped quarters, so the
family moved to Brunswick - where they
eventually sought refuge at the Tedford Hous-
ing family shelter and have lived there for
eight months now. Moving an hour away meant
DeStoop had to quit her job at the college.
Besides losing their home, their car and
their possessions, DeStoop and Landry had
three of their six children - ages 10, 8 and 6 -
taken by the state and put into a foster home,
she said. The other kids - ages 4, 5 and 8 -


Bobby Landry mows the lawn near his apartment June 1 at the Tedford Housing family shelter in
Brunswick, Maine.


live with them at the shelter.
Last winter, Landry had to leave the shelter
and spend more than three months on the
streets because of a state investigation into
their children's welfare. When he couldn't
hook up with friends, he slept behind trash
bins and in a gazebo on the town common, with
a blanket to keep him warm.
He hit bottom in April when - in despair
over his situation - he slashed his arm re-
peatedly with a razor blade to take his own life.
He was hospitalized overnight, and by coin-
cidence was cleared by state investigators the
very next day, setting the stage for his move
back to the shelter, said Landry, the slash
marks clearly visible on his arm.
"It's depressing. Very depressing," Michelle
said. She later added: "You just keep your
head up and keep on trying."
For the "Cost of Rural Homelessness" study,
researchers looked at 163 people in all parts of
Maine except Portland, the state's largest city,
who were homeless and now live in permanent
supportive housing. The study examined the
costs of mental health care, physical health care,
shelters, hospitals, jails and ambulance services
while they were homeless and compared them
to those same costs after they had housing.
The study found that the additional cost of
the housing was more than offset by lower
costs for the other services, said Nancy Fritz,
Director of Homeless Initiatives at the Hous-
ing Authority.
For instance, people with the housing saw a
99 percent reduction in shelter costs, a 57 per-
cent reduction in mental health care costs, a
32 percent reduction in ambulance service
costs and a 95 percent reduction in jail costs.
Physical health care costs rose by 9 percent,
perhaps because people had easier access to
doctors when they had housing.
Without housing, the average six-month cost to
support the homeless was $18,629, according to
the study; with the housing, the cost was $17,281,
for an average savings of $1,348 per person.
"Yet there's a myth out there that when a
person is homeless, it's not really costing us
money. In fact, homelessness costs all of us
money," Fritz said.
Even in Maine, a largely rural state with a
population of 1.3 million people, the number
of rural homeless are far outnumbered by the
number of homeless in cities.
Nationally, there are about 675,000 homeless
people on any given night Of that figure, an es-
timated 9 percent - or just over 60,000 people
- live in rural areas, said Nan Roman, presi-
dent of the National Alliance to End Home-


lessness. The Maine study will be presented at
the Washington-based ,organization's annual
conference this summer.'.
Rural homelessness presents challenges be-
cause there is less transitional housing, fewer
employment programs, fewer social service
agencies, fewer health care programs and the
like than in cities, Roman said. At the same
time, though, finding solutions for homeless
people can be easier iin rural areas, in part be-
cause the numbers ar ten't so overwhelming,
she said.
"Take the extreme, say Los Angeles, that has
a city's worth of homeless people, 60,000 or
70,000 homeless peopled:It's difficult to think
what you might do about that," she said.
"Whereas rural communities... may have 10 or
12 homeless people."
Rhonda Fisher was once part of that hidden
homelessness. ..
Following a late-night fight fueled by drink-
ing three years ago, Fisher's boyfriend booted
her out of the home they shared in the small
central Maine town of Fairfield. She ended up
at the homeless shelter in Waterville, where
she and four other women shared a bedroom.
Fisher, who is 42, had already been through
hard times: She dropped out of school at 15.
She's had six children, giving up three to adop-
tion. She's been married four times. She takes
medication for bipolar disorder and anxiety.
Still, she couldn't believe she was homeless
- again.
Years ago, she and her husband found them-
selves homeless in Durham, N.C. Their money
ran out not long after moving there from Maine in
search of new surroundings and opportunities.
The Durham shelter had more than 100 peo-
ple in it, she said, with 40 or more women
packed into a single sleeping room. The shel-
ter would lock the residents down at, night It
was dirty. During the day, she had to walk the
city streets until the shelter reopened. "It was
almost like a jail," she said.
For two years now, Fisher has lived in a sub-
sidized one-bedroom apartment in Waterville,
and she works at a local fast-food restaurant.
Like Fisher, Michelle DeStoop is hopeful for
the future. She's been told that she is near the
top of the waiting list for subsidized housing
and thinks she and her family could be in a
home of their own this summer.
Any home is better than being homeless, she
said.
Even a dilapidated trailer from the 1970s on
a country road in the middle of nowhere.
"We were living there," she said. "We called
it home."


Gary

Maidhof

is a man of

integrity
here are some
things you can be
certain about.
The sun will rise each
morning. During the sum-
mer, this part of Florida
gets thunderstorms in the
afternoon. And, Gary
Maidhof is an honest per-
son.
Maidhof is the director
of Citrus County's Devel-
opment Services Depart-
ment and he is now at the
center of the storm over
Sen. Charlie Dean's barn.
The chairman of the
county commission said
Wednesday to a Chronicle
reporter that Maidhof was
doing Sen. Dean a favor
when he approved the
construction of a
barn/house on some farm-
land' the senator owns
along the Withlacoochee
River.
In a situation like this,
when you say someone
has done a favor for an-
other in an official capac-
ity, you are saying they are
dishonest
Chairman John Thrum-
See WINDOW/Page C4


Charlie Brennan
SHADES
OF GRAY


Barn, rain,

mouse keep

life interesting
Our Sound Off line
has gotten several
calls about the
state attorney general's
opinion on Sen. Charlie
Dean's barn. Make that
several dozen calls ... and
that was as of mid-week!
We will publish dozens
of those calls, but not hun-
dreds of them. Because of
the volume and many peo-
ple offering similar com-
ments, we're limiting what
we publish to a represen-
tative sampling. ,
There's a lot of accusa-
tions voiced from callers,
and the anger, disbelief
and frustration are palpa-
ble. Many of the nastier
comments wouldn't be
published even if we were
to dedicate enough space
to do so.
If I had to guess, no
other telephone line in
the world carried the
words "good-ol' boy" more
than our Sound Off line
this past week
Again, many, many of
these calls will be pub-
lished but don't be dis-
couraged if yours doesn't
make it.
* Speaking of stormy
matters, after work a few
nights ago, I decided to
take the motorcycle out
for a spin. In my nine
months of being a motor-
cyclist - if you can con-
sider somebody who rides
a little bike like mine a
motorcyclist - I've only
been caught in "showers,"
See SHADES/Page C4


I'M










Page C2 - SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009



PINION


C]


11o "In reading and writing, you cannot
lay down rules until you have learnt
to obey them. Much more so in life."
Marcus Aurelius


ITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan..................................... publisher
Charlie Brennan ....................................... editor
Neale Brennan ........promotions/community affairs
Mike Arnold ...................................managing editor
Cheri Harris......................................features editor
* Curt Ebitz................................... citizen member
Founded Mac Harris...................................... citizen member
by Albert M.
Williamson Cliff Pierson ...............................guest member
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
- David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CHARLIE DEAN'S BARN




The barn,,



the residence



and the law


tate Sen. Charlie Dean,
JR-Inverness, is going to
make his barn right
That was the word this past
week out of Inverness after
County Administrator, Brad
Thorpe talked
with the former
sheriff, current THE I
senator and al- Charlie De
ways farmer. Charlie D
According to the
county administra- OUR 01
tor, Sen. Dean has An app
agreed to seek the resol
proper permits,
pay the impact
fees and secure the appropri-
ate setback variance for the
structure he built on his With-
lacoochee Riverfront farmland
in east Citrus County.
The structure Sen. Dean had
built on, his .agriculturally'
zoned property created an up-
roar earlier in the year when it
was determined that none of
the "traditional permits were
secured or fees paid.
State law does not require
farmers to get permits or pay
fees when they are building
structures for agricultural pur-
poses. Sen. Dean said the
structure he built is a barn.,
Many critics claimed it was a
residence with a barn con-
nected.
The senator argued that
since he didn't live in ,the
"barn" it-is not a residence and
therefore he was in compli-
ance with the law.
The- key to the controversy
was a meeting that Sen. Dean
had prior to, the construction
project. when he visited with
county Development Services
Director Gary Maidhof. The
senator said that the Develop-
ment Services director signed
off on the project Maidhof said
he didn't remember the meet-
ing, but that if the senator said
it happened - it happened.
Nothing was put in writing.,
The ambiguity did not give any
of us a warm and fuzzy feeling.
Florida Attorney, General
Bill McCollum was asked to


weigh !in on the controversy
and he ruled last week that the
county does in fact have the au-
thority to make such a deci-
sion.
McCollum also said that a
structure is a res-
idence, even if no
SSUE: one lives in the
means barn. structure.
So everyone
can claim victory
PINION: with that kind of
ropriate political ambigu-
ution. ity.
Sen. Dean has
apparently put
the issue to rest by agreeing to
pay all fees and file all the nec-
essary paperwork to be in com-
pliance with the county
regulations. That action cer-
tainly mitigates the mess.
The county has some culpa-
bility ,in the controversy- be-
cause its rules for agricultural
property are vague and the:
documentation of this meeting
with the senator does not exist.
That lack of follow-through is
disappointing. *
Elected officials have no spe-
cial rights. They must live
under the same rules and reg-
ulations that everyone else fol-
lows. There should be a special
understanding on the part of
regulators everywhere that
when a politician does make a
request for service, every step
along the way will be docu-
mented.
A skeptical public believes
the worst. The Development
Services director should have
anticipated what would hap-
pen in a case like this.
The county has already
begun the process to change its
policy. Any agricultural excep-
tion must have written docu-
mentation that shows the
exemption in question has
been reviewed and approved.
The issue of the difference be-
tween a "barn" and a "resi-
dence" remains ambiguous. Our
county and state leaders should
clear that up so everyone is
playing by the same set of rules.


Vote them out
, Read this morning Commis-
sioner Damato says raise self-
haulers to $5. People wouldn't
take their garbage if they could
afford garbage pickup. The major-
ity of people don't live off the fat
of the land with their big busi-
nesses and their commissioners'
salaries. These commissioners
have done nothing but wasteful
spending. You voted out two; it
should have been three. Another
chance (is) coming up next year.
Go to the polls. Be the Americans
we were known to be. Vote them
out 'til they get it right. They do
nothing for the people.
Garbage resentment
My family could easily generate
more than 12 bags of trash a
month. Instead we separate alu-
minum and tin cans, glass, news-
paper, magazines, cardboard,
plastic jugs, and compost almost
all of our food waste. We go to re-
cycle centers about once a week.
Every three or four months we
travel to the landfill with the waste


we cannot possibly recycle. We are
not a very good revenue stream for
the landfill, and we resent com-
missioners Bartell and Damato
wanting to make a profit on our ef-
forts. If the county needs the rev-
enue, we will gladly send 12 bags
a month and even more through a
hauler. We want to do our part and
it would save us time and money.
Roadside dumping
I have a question for the people
at the landfill: If they raise our
fees to bring our garbage out
there from $2 to $5, is .it going to
cost them more to pick it up
alongside the road if we decide to
throw it out in the road? What
about the people that can't afford
to go to the dump? They're going
to start dumping'alongside the
road or on side roads or in the
Woods. It's going to cost more to
clean it up, isn't it? That's just a
kind of a question I'd like to have
answered. What is more impor-
tant-.to keep the place clean
and get the stuff to the dump or
to make money and have the peo-
ple throw it on the road?


Sharia continues to strangle free speech


DIANA WEST
COPENHAGEN, Denmark - I
am being patted down by a fe-
male Danish security officer in
the basement of the parliament
building in .Copenhagen and I
have a thought I have just trig-
gered the metal detector - my
heels, I'm sure - en route up-
stairs to the Landstingssalen, for-
merly the parliament's upper
house. There, I am scheduled to
deliver a speech at the invitation
of the Danish Free Press Society,
or Trykkefrihedsselskabet. (Say
that three times fast - or slow.)
Indeed, I am holding the text of
my 20-minute address inside a
folder in one of my hands, now
rigidly outstretched as I am being
searched. The speech is called
"The impact of Islam on Free
Speech in the U.S.," but as I am
checked for bombs and knives
and whatnot, my thought is of the
impact of Islam on free society-
everywhere.
Such a thought surely tops the
heights of "political incorrect-
ness," I know. But what should I
do - not express it? Not think it?
Not even notice that Western'civ-
ilization, in skewing to accommo-
date the jihad threat of Islam
within, has already traded away
too much precious freedom?
As the security officer contin-
ues patting me down, I follow this
forbidden train of thought to the
realization that it is only due to
the incursions of Islam into the
West - Islam with its death
penalty for criticism of Islam -
that I am now standing here
under guard. Here we are (for
there is a long line behind me by
now), participants in a confer-
ence to consider Islam's censor-
ing impact on free speech, and
Danish security is doing its best
to prevent Islam from censoring
the speech of anyone here per-
manently. This strikes me as an
exceedingly hard way to prove a
point.
Not that there are many people


Other VOICES


likely to try outside the elegant,
security-ringed conference room
upstairs. In PC lingo, security in
the basement is looking for "ter-
rorists" or "extremists" - those
postmodern designations for per-
petrators of Islamic jihad that,
presto, turn everything Islamic
into something generic. Still, with
Islam comes jihad, and with jihad
comes Islamic law (Sharia), no
matter what "experts" tell you.
And because Islam is a growing
presence in the West, Western
countries must now and presum-
ably forever expend vast sums of
money and manpower to manage
- not defeat, just manage - the
jihad that can break out in acts
large and small at any time. In-
creasingly, this also means defer-
ring to Sharia.
Finally, my pre-conference
frisk is over. Hallelujah, I am no
threat to society and allowed to
pass. I go on to meet for the first
time the great author Wafa Sul-
tan, and meet again the great
Dutch parliamentarian Geert
Wilders, the two most illustrious*
speakers on the conference ros-
ter.
Both Sultan and Wilders, of
course, live under unrelenting,
permanent and Islamic threat of
death for their critiques of Islam,
in a very real way suffering every
day for defying Sharia's prohibi-
tion against criticizing Islam. But
does the outrageousness of their
plight resonate with their fellow
citizens? I don't think so. I think
we've all grown much too used to
it, and dully complacent. But
imagine if I had written, circa
1970, that for his critique of com-
munism, Ronald Reagan lived
under unrelenting, permanent
and communist threat of death in
his beloved. California, that he
couldn't travel the streets of Los
Angeles without a massive secu-
rity retinue, that he could no
-longer even sleep in his own


home. Wouldn't Americans have
become, rightly agitated over the
communist enemy within?
I think the answer would have
been yes, but the point is, no such
mortal homeland danger existed
at that time for those who spoke
against the leading threat to
Western-style liberty. Today, a
mortal 'homeland danger does
exist. I won't tell you what it was
like to slip in and out of the
Wilders security bubble during
the course of his stay in Copen-
hagen, but suffice it'to say, it is
both a veritable shame and'an
outrage that his life depends on
that bubble, and that for speaking
his mind in defense of Western-
style liberty he has lost his own
freedom.
The same goes for Wafa Sultan,
who, for attacking the repressive-
ness of Islamic law (under which
she existed for 30 years in Syria),
.also lives privately a similarly
wary, hunted life that necessitates
protective security measures.
Remember, this is happening
in the "Free World." Whether in
Denmark, Holland or the United
States, the heavy hand of Islamic
law is pressing in on its leading
critics, squeezing the freedom out
of their existence. It is time to say
enough - literally enough, for
example, and stop Sharia by stop-
ping Islamic immigration - and
throw off the rising chokehold of
jihad-advanced Sharia. I guaran-
tee it will take a lot more effort
than just patting down the occa-
sional free speechnik, but I also
guarantee that for the sake of free
speech it is with it

Diana West is the author of "The
Death of the Grown-up: How
America's Arrested Development
Is BringingDown Western Civi-
lization," and blogs at di-
anawestnet She can be contacted
via dianawest@verizon.net


====--===- LETTERS to the Editor ---------


Be fair
To all Citrus County commis-
sioners and staff: Pleased be ad-
vised that as a citizen of Citrus
County, I am very pleased with
the decision of Florida Attorney
General McCollum backing the
Citrus County attorney's office be-
lief that Sen. Dean's barn struc-
ture can be considered a
residence, as reported in the
Chronicle June 16.
The attorney general, accord-
ing to the same article, stated that
enforcing the Florida Building
Code in any case is a call the
county must make. The attorney
general stated that a uniform
building code is to protect public
health, safety and welfare.
My question to you is: If you are
concerned about public health,
safety and welfare of Citrus
County citizens at all, why has it
taken so long to resolve the Dean
barn situation? Why have the of-
fices of the Department of Com-
munity Affairs and the Florida
Attorney General been asked for
opinions? Instead, if you had just
listened to Citrus County Attorney
Battista and the Chronicle, the
Citrus County citizens would not
have been dragged through the
mud of embarrassment because
of the intense media coverage.
Honestly, I am beginning to feel
like I am living on one of the
"Green Acres" TV programs -


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in Chroni-
cle editorials are the opinions of
the editorial board of the newspa-
per.
" Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* All letters must be signed and in-.
clude a phone number and home-
town, including letters sent via
e-mail. Names and hometowns
will be printed; phone numbers
will not be published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit let-
ters for length, libel, fairness and
good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
S350 words, and writers will be
limited to three letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crys-
tal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to
(352) 563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

only here in Citrus County, com-
plete with barn and hay!
The media attention has not
been good for business and I
know about business, since I
have been in business for years
in several counties including
Citrus. And it has been embar-
rassing when a friend in another
county told me that the Citrus
County BOCC does not abide by
the Florida Building Code.
Please, if you care at all about
the citizens of Citrus county, re-


spect and follow the opinion of
the attorney general for the
State of Florida; this would be
the ethical and fair thing to do!
Renee McPheeters
Crystal River
Do what's right
The Dean barn saga continues
to annoy those of us in Citrus
County who have already gradu-
ated from kindergarten. Kinder-
garten, you ask? Because
everything I needed to know I
learned there.
Poor Gary Maidhoff If the scape-
goat costume fits, you must wear it?
Shame on you, Charlie Dean. Did
you skip kindergarten altogether?
Here are a few of the rules you
need to learn in order to graduate.
1. Play fair. (Bill McCollum
says your barn with bedrooms is
a residence - live with it)
2. Clean up your own mess
(stop blaming everyone else).
3. Don't take things that aren't
yours (like good ol' boy liberties).
4. Say you're sorry when you
hurt others (you owe Gary Maid-
hoff an apology).
U.S. senator? Does that earn you a
privilege I'm not entitled to? Do the
right thing and put this county em-
barrassment out of its misery I'm
sick of repeatedly reading about
how you tried to beat the system
Leslie L. Granville
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about any subject. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Hot Corner: GARBAGE


{
I
)












Taking the cracker thing to another level


M y family and I
moved to Inverness
26 years ago. The
first Sunday we were here,
Cheryl and I attended Sun-
day School and church at
the Inverness Church of
God. The Sunday School
class was taught by Harvey
Dunn. We were immediately
impressed with Harvey and
with his wife, Astrid, both of
whom made us feel right at
home.
But that was only the be-
ginning.
It's tough to uproot your


family, especially when you
have children. It wasn't as
difficult for the younger
ones, but the eldest, Beth,
was a high school junior. She
left behind the friendships,
recognition and status she
had achieved in Tallahassee
to become a "new kid" at
Citrus High School. Harvey
and Astrid's daughter, Vicky,
quickly took Beth under her
wing - they became the
best of friends and remain
so until this very day.
Having the Dunns as a
part of our world is a bright


spot for my fam-
ily and me,
something we
cherish.
Speaking of
cherishing - a
few weeks ago, I
wrote about how
some of us na-
tive-born Florid-
ians cherish our * Fred Brannen
status as crack- A SLICE
ers. I then reluc- OF LIFE
tantly passed
along Mr. Web-
ster's determination that Astrid's
native birth isn't required - cracker.


residency is suf-
ficient
Harvey, who,
as I have, has
worn his crack-
erhood as a
badge of honor,
recently told me
that particular
column made his
wife's day.
Just as I had
done with
Cheryl, Harvey
had disallowed
aspirations to be


Astrid wasn't even as
close - Cheryl was born in
another state, but Astrid
was born in another coun-
try, German by birth.
Now - according to Har-
vey - Astrid has taken the
cracker thing to another level
- she has proclaimed herself
to be a sauerkraut cracker!
Interesting.
With such a concept in
mind, I'd classify my classy
sweetheart as a Ritz cracker
and we could probably find
all of our grandchildren in a
box of animal crackers. One


of 'em, the Texan, Eric, is
neither by birth nor resi-
dency a Florida cracker, but
he'd be in the box - as an
adorable little monkey.
I see this becoming com-
plicated, but my friend Har-
vey and I have agreed to
remain as we've always
been - a pair of native-
born, sand-in- the-shoes,
salty Florida saltines.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
Chronicle columnist.


=Hot Corner: DEAN'S BARN=


Wait and see
So now we have a state
attorney general who knows.
a house from a barn, and a
state lawmaker who still in-
sists his really nice barn is
not a house. Let's see if Cit-
rus officials still have trou-
ble determining which is
which or whether they have'
the gumption to stand up to
Charlie Dean and collect the
fees he owes us taxpayers.
Equal treatment
Well, Citrus County politi-
cians, you now have a sec,
ond chance to earn the
money the taxpayers pay
you to do your job. Also,
now we have to pay the
state politicians for working
on your job for you. We pay
their salaries, too. You have
been told this barn business
should never have left the
county. Now Gary Maidhof
wants to meet with Thorpe
and Battista. He already has
his answers and he should
be held responsible. If his
memory's bad, he should
have the papers (from)
when Dean came to see
him. Let's see Dean get the
proper permits and pay the
fines the law says for these
offenses. Please treat the
politicians like you treated
me when I applied for a per-
mit to build a carport. I was
9 inches short for the set-
backs. I was refused a per-
mit but told for $150, I
could get a variance.
Sucking up
This iSn response to the
frbnt iage this morning,
"Thrumston: Dean got
favor." I'd just like to say
that it appears to me John
Thrumston is sucking up to
our state politician ... I
think Charlie Dean knew it
wasn't a barn when he went
to them.. He just wanted to
get somebody's permission
to do the wrong thing and
now he doesn't mind throw-
ing somebody else under
the bus just to protect him-
. self. I think he ought to be
fined for it.
Fire and demolish
Mr. Maidhof had selective
memory ... Mr. Maidhof
had nothing inwriting be-
cause he did not want a
paper trail. He should be
terminated. My tax dollars
pay for his salary, pension,
etc. He violated his position
that was entrusted to him.
Fire him immediately. Mr.
Dean knew what he was
dong when building. He
should be treated like any-
one else would be treated.
Demolish the barn and
foundation and then start
over with proper permits.
Also, he knew he was wrong
if he has an attorney in-
volved now. The good-ol'-boy
system at work in Citrus -
or is that Circus County?
Remember this
We are in trouble when a
senator doesn't know the ,
difference from a barn and
a house when he designed
this edifice. Good-ol'-boys
will bail him out. Taxpayers
will still lose out. Remember
elections.
Time to comply
Charlie Dean has )
shrewdly built a two-bed-
room, one-bath residence
and a two-car garage and is
trying to pass it off as an
agricultural use building.
Florida Attorney General Bill
McCollum has decreed that
this barn is not a barn, but
a dwelling. It's good to know
someone in this state has
common sense. Now is the
time for BFad Thorpe, our
new county (administrator),
to stand strong for the citi-
zens of Citrus County. Mr.
Dean does not warrant any
special consideration. He is
not in compliance with land
development codes of our


county. It's time for Charlie
to write a personal check for
his after-the-fact permits
and fines and get his prop-
erty and structures into
county compliance.
Who'd-athunk?
Please show Dean and
Gary a picture of a barn.
Dean doesn't know what a
barn is. It has no bathroom,
kitchen or bedroom. Gary
thought he was going to
build a barn; he didn't know
he was going to build a
mansion. No favors, just like
the (Freezer).
Memory lapse
I'm wondering if Gary
Maidhof could go to court
and take an oath that he
doesn't remember Sen.
Dean coming in his office
with these building plans. I
didn't think much of Dean's
story before, but I'm start-
ing to support him. If Maid-
hof can't remember
somebody as important and
identifiable as the state sen-
ator, maybe he needs to do
something else.
Disassemble
About Sen. Dean's barn:
The law here in Citrus
County is, anybody that
puts up a building without a
permit, it is supposed to be.
disassembled and a permit
issued for a new building to
be put up. That building
should be disassembled be-
cause they cannot look in
between the walls once it
was built, to make sure
everything is up to code. So
if he gets away with this
here, 'there's.something
wrong with these county
commissioners.
Fine the builder
On Dean's barn: Whoever
put that barn together, sup-,
posedly where it looks like a
house, is just as much at
fault as Sen. Dean because
they knew there was no per-
mit issued. So they should
be held responsible, who-
ever built that building for
him, just as much as Dean.
You're supposed to have a
permit and if they're a
builder, they know there's
supposed to be a permit is-
sued and they shouldn't get
away with it. If he's getting
fined, whoever helped put
that building together
should be fined with him.
Case in point
Years ago when the no-
name storm come through
here, I remember on (U.S.)
19 across the street from
the Cadillac dealership,
there was a house and the
shingles blew off, a few shin-
gles blew off, and there was
a gentleman up on the roof
trying to keep his house dry,
the inside dry. I remember
the building department
going down there and fining
him and putting him in jail
because he did not have a
permit to fix his roof. There
is no difference between
that gentleman and Sen.
Dean. Dean made it worse
because he built a big build-
ing. This old guy was there
just trying to close a hole so
his house wouldn't get
flooded. I hope the law
straightens this out because
if not, if it's good for one,
it's got to be good for all.
Believe Maidhof
I was just wondering why
Commission Chairman John
Thrumston believes Charlie
Dean's side of the story and
not Gary Maidhof's. If
there's nothing in writing,
how can he accuse Gary
Maidhof of anything? If all
it was a conversation, why is
he taking Charlie Dean's
side? I would believe Gary
Maidhof before I'd believe a
politician any day, and I be-
lieve that Maidhof doesn't
remember the conversation
because it never took place.


Sound OFF


Bunch of bunk
The Chronicle's saying the com-
missioners should hold the line on
taxes. What a bunch of bunk. They
published how much money the
commissioners spent in '03 and '04
and it was obvious that they had an
extra $3 billion or $4 billion all of a
sudden. How did that change the
quality of life for the citizens? They
blew that money. The sheriff's de-
partment blew that money. And to
say that there's only an 8 percent
decrease is a terrible joke (by) this
new assessor. Everybody knows it's
a 30 percent loss in value. Of
course they'll never lower your taxes
30 percent, but they didn't mind
raising them 50 or 60 percent in
'04 and '05. Don't perpetuate this
fraud on the people of this county.
Cut the spending.
Acting like banks
Employers are now doing to em-
ployees what banks are doing to
good customers - treating them"
like garbage. Now employers feel like
the job shortage means that they
can dog the people that they have
working for them already, making
them do two jobs, not giving them
raises, making them be fearful that
they're going to lose their job, so,
therefore, mistreating them. So now
the employers have come to start.
acting just like the banks are. Some-
thing's got to be done about this.
Wise up
All you Republicans out there had
better listen to this: If you don't
stop that hard-line, rightwing, do-it-
for-us-only (attitude) - meaning
you Republicans in Congress and in
the Senate and all the other Repub-
licans that are governing us - I
want to tell you something, you will
be an extinct party. Within five to 10
years, people will never even have
heard about the Republican Party.
So wise up, get more for the people,
and not so much for yourself.
Objection
I'm calling about the article in
Sunday's Commentary section on
June 7, "CMHS must be account-
able to the taxpayers." I'm amazed
at the amount of tax revenue that
Citrus Memorial has received of
over $44 million in the past six
years as opposed to zero for Her-
nando County and Seven Rivers
hospitals. Also, they do not pay real
estate, sales, tangible and federal
taxes while other hospitals do. As a
taxpayer, I strongly object to their
tax millage rate of 1.1689 for the
tax year 2008, which is 7.3 percent
of the total county and school tax
millage rate of 16.085.
Cleaning yards
This is for "Burn ban is back-
wards": I guess you must live where
there isn't any trees. We live on 1
acre and have about 75 trees on our
property. Every time we have a high
wind or rain, limbs fall. What would
you do with them? A lot of people
don't have a truck or trailer to carry
them to the landfill. If you carry
bags of leaves, it's $1 a bag and it
is a long way off. We also recycle


and we believe that they'd encour-
age that. We can't always recycle
everything, so we have a burn barrel
and we burn them. We can't all sit
on our porch and drink coffee. We
are out there cleaning our yards.
Good old boys
In this county, it seems some
businesses can stay in business ille-
gally; others can't stay in business
legally. It seems that some people
can put up buildings and houses '
legally, and then there are the pre-
cious few who can do whatever they
want. I think it's time that the laws
were equal for .everyone and I think
it's time we really look hard at who,
we elected and who we should be
voting for in the next election. This
good-ol'-boy system has got to go.
Apples, oranges
I'm calling about Sunday's news-
paper article about Citrus Memorial,
comparing Citrus to Seven Rivers
and Hernando. Everybody needs to
understand that Citrus Memorial is
a not-for-prdfit hospital. It's like
comparing apples to oranges.
No blessing
Never a blessing ... This is for the
thief who stole my plants at lot 34
in Inverness: You know who you are.
Remember that stolen plants is
never a blessing from God.... I hope
you enjoy them. Have a godly day ...
Failure to act
Once again our great county com-
missioners have failed to act. We
need this low-income-housing proj-
ect in Beverly Hills ... This is one
reason you have so many homeless,
because the rents are so high and
people that are making minimum
wage can't afford to pay $650,
$700, $800 for a small apartment.
There's just not enough low-income
housing, but yet they could waive
the fees. The commissioners could
waive the fees, but they chose not
to and I think it's a shame.
Recreation
I see that Bill McCollum, Florida's
attorney general, is trying to recre-
ate himself. He was a disaster when
he was in the United States Con-
gress and now he's trying to recre-
ate himself as a better leader.
What's with the Republicans? I
mean, Newt Gingrich, who broke
the law and was kicked out back in
the '90s, and Bill McCollum. You
know, there's a whole list. I can't
think of them right now, but there's
a whole list ... that are hoping the
American people have short memo-
ries, like me, and that they'll think
that they're some new kind of star
that's going to help the Republi-
cans. They couldn't do it before and
now they're coming back and trying
to do it now.
Fast times
Thank you, thank you, thank you
for finally printing all the NHRA re-
sults. That was something great to
see in the paper. Please keep up the
good work. There is more than
NASCAR out there. We appreciate it.
There are a lot of us fans that be-
long to the NHRA. It's not just


NASCAR. Thank you, thank you!
What time?
With all the work that's been done
on the Old Courthouse and its clock
tower and cupola, you'd think that
they could get the clock to function.
It used to work great, but since they
fixed it, the cupola, the clock
doesn't work at all. High noon all
the time.'Like so much around here,'
it's only right twice a day.
Promotions
I see where the school board pro-
moted the principal at Hernando El-
ementary to the county office, but
they moved an assistant principal
from Pleasant Grove to Hernando
Elementary. Hernando Elementary
had a very good assistant principal
.and he wasn't even offered, the job,
and now a very good administrator
has left the county. He took a job in
Levy County where, apparently, they
thought he could handle a high
school principalship.
War creates jobs
I wholeheartedly agree; let's bring
back all our service people home
where they belong. Then what - put
them all in the unemployment lines
with the rest of us? Sadly to say, war
creates jobs. OK, let's start up our
iron mills, clothes factories and all
other made-in-USA products. At
what price it costs to make them
here, who but the rich can afford to
buy made-in-the-USA (products)?
Doctor Ride
I want to thank Doctor Ride and
all their associates for their help in
giving me a ride to the doctor for a
colonoscopy, which I was unable to
drive home myself. (It was) the first
time I ever used their services, and
their driver by the name 6f Mickey
was the most wonderful person you
could ever want to help you out. He
was very nice and tried to help out
in any way he could. I appreciate
your services very much. Thank you.
Unbelievable
As a World War II veteran, I'm ab-
solutely devastated today that this
man (James) von Brunn would deny
the Holocaust, yet he was a World
War II veteran. I cannot believe this
blemish on the name of World War II
veterans that this man has done to
us. This is terrible ... I hope that he
gets the full extent of the law. That
man should be executed just as soon
as possible because there is a man
laying dead right now that he killed
in the Holocaust museum. This can-
not stay. Things like this must stop.
'Rope Swing'
Our brainless county commission
just voted to sell a dedicated public
park site on the Withlacoochee River
known as "Rope Swing," to a com-
plaining neighbor. Public waterfront
access is very hard to find, and,
once gone, it can never be.replaced.
Rowdy behavior can be dealt with by
other means. Since when is public
policy set by a whining neighbor
who knew he bought next to a park
site? The sale can be stopped if
there is a public outcry. It sounds
like an issue for Ron Schultz.


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 200� C3


COMMENTARY


Onus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNicLE








,W JNULJA, JUi A.DI, JUNEZ( ) RIUU



Health care reform based on skewed statistics


The president's new
health care propos-
als start the nation
on a long journey to a place
from which there is no re-
turn.
It is a proposal driven by
distorted statistics. It is in
response to the tens of tril-
lions of dollars of future
benefits promised to citi-
zens that cannot be deliv-
ered. When the journey is
completed, politicians will
control a full 18 percent of
our economy.
The propaganda begins
with the "big lie" that 47
million Americans are
uninsured and, by infer-
ence, cannot get health
care. The reality is quite
different Of the uninsured,
10 to 12 million are not citi-
zens. This equates fairly
well with the number of il-
legal aliens in the country.
Another 10 million or so
report annual incomes


greater than $70,000. These
people could buy insurance
but choose to spend their
money on other goods.
Many are young, healthy
and unlikely to need much
beyond auto insurance.
Several million of the
uninsured are children who
are entitled to Medicaid
coverage. No one .knows
why their parents have not
signed them up, but cover-
age is available.
The real number, then, of
uninsured is closer to 20 to
25 million. Many of these
people are between jobs
and insurance coverage.
Most regain coverage
within a year. The truly and
permanently poor are cov-
ered by Medicaid, if they
would but apply
Team Obama would re-
make our health care sys-
tem because 15 to 20 million
are uninsured out of a pop-
ulation of 300 million!


But what of the other is- mothers into proper man-
sues: High costs and low agement. These outcomes
quality? We are told over would not be different
and over that we spend under a government plan.
more per capital The administra-
than any other tion knows this,
country and that, but they figure
judging by life you don't
expectancy. and Saying quality
survival of new- of care in Amer-
borns, our system '. ica is poor in
is to be ranked L comparison to
much lower than other countries is
Western nations difficult to d'o
with government Dr. William Dixon while maintain-
care. OTHER ing a straight
These "facts" OTHER face. Cancer is di-
are statistical VOICES agnosed earlier
distortions! Life and treated bet-
expectancy in America is ter here than anywhere in
affected by population mix, the world. Survivors live
drug use, diet, violence and longer. Much the same can
other things no doctor can be said for-heart disease and
control. These and other every other medical condi-
factors affect newborn tion. Citizens from around
birth-weight, which in turn the world come to America
dictates newborn survival to get advanced medical
rates. Even free prenatal therapies. Many of the best
care has not drawn at-risk foreign doctors have trained


in America. When was the
last time an American had to
travel to Canada for special-
ized care?
The Obama health plan's
"public option" creates a
government-run insurance
company to compete with
private companies. It won't
have to show a profit and
likely won't pay taxes. It will
charge less for the policies.
In short order, the private
companies will be gone.
The takeover will be com-
plete.
Then the rationing and
cost control will begin in
earnest Health care will be
managed by unelected gate-
keepers who will claim to
know what is best for you
and your doctor. Access to
medicines will be limited to
the "approved" list. Like-
wise, procedures and sur-
geries.
My biggest concern is that
once the government pro-


vides all health care, even if
it is poor in quality and
service, there will be no
turning back. Seniors
should be especially wor-
ried. That is where most
health care money is spent
and where the cuts will
occur:

William Dixon graduated
from Columbia College in
New York City, from New
York Medical College and
from the College ofBusi-
ness Administration at the
University of South
Florida. He was an assis-
tant professor at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and he
has worked in the veterans
administration system. He
served 11 years in the Army
as a surgeon and as special
forces officer, achieving the
rank of lieutenant colonel.
Dr Dixon can be reached
at Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


SKV95 OF O.f
000*


=Letters to THE EDITOR


Political satire?
When I first read Ms Mattos' letter ti-
tled 'Tyranny," I thought it might be in
opposition to the current administration
of President Obama. But, on careful
reading, I found it to be a very cleverly
written satire about the policies of the
past administration of former President
George W Bush. Let's take a look at a
few of those well hidden gibes.
For example, "Our government has
emptied the treasury .. " Surely that
is related to the fact that President
Bush inherited a hefty surplus which
he decided to eliminate by granting
the large tax breaks to the country's
wealthiest people.
'This administration uses exaggerated
staged events to acquire popular sup-
port" That clearly refers to President
Bush keeping a returning aircraft carrier
at sea for extra time, sufficiently far from
the coastline of San Diego that the TV


cameras could not show it, and then Pres-
ident Bush landing on the carrier in a
cargo plane when a helicopter would
have been sufficient (but then he wouldn't
have needed his flight suit). Then Presi-
dent Bush made a speech with the large
banner backdrop stating "MISSION AC-
COMPLISHED." Does anyone remember
how many years ago that was? Yet the
mission remains unaccomplished.
"Political opponents are now blamed
for acts of terrorism, followed with
well-rehearsed proposals for increased
power and budgets for suppressive
agencies." Certainly that must refer to
former Vice President Dick Cheney
casting the blame. President Bush in-
creased budgets for the National Secu-
rity Agency to conduct the surveillance
of citizens without the constitutional re-
quirement for issuance of a search war-
rant by a judge to be issued upon cause.
"Competition suppression" can only
refer to the no-bid billions of dollars


awarded to Halliburton and its sub-
sidiaries; incidentally, a company run
by former Vice President Cheney be-
fore he selected himself to be the vice
presidential candidate for Mr. Bush.
Yes, Ms. Mattos' letter was an art-
fully written piece of political satire of
the first magnitude.
Walter Wynn
Pine Ridge
Get out
The faster we get out of Iraq, the bet-
ter We have lost more people in these
wars than died in the World Trade Cen-
ter to begin with. If there is anything to
be gained by our staying there, it is
being withheld from the American peo-
ple. Any hope of peace between us and
the Muslim world is being undermined
by our presence in their countries.
Mary Ferguson
Homosassa


Sound OFF


Two-faced
I'm disappointed in
the Chronicle for several
reasons, but will limit
my remarks to the lat-
est.: Friday, June 5's
Opinion criticizes Gov.
Crist for signing Senate
Bill 360. I totally agree
with that. However, why
did the Chronicle limit its
criticism only to Crist?
Why not have our local
representative and two
state senators justify
their votes to pass Sen-
ate Bill 360? Didn't read
a word in the Chronicle
about their votes and its
negative impact on Cit-
rus County. They all
voted for it. I expressed
my opposition to the bill
to all three. Dean, of
course, will never ac-
knowledge a call. At
least Schultz responds.
Now our county commis-
sion will rush to support
the developers at tax-
payers' expense, and the
Chronicle still 'opposes
impact fees. Chronicle,
.you're two-faced.
Venting
While they're doing
the dome restoration on
the courthouse, are they
finally going to
straighten the west fac-
ing eyebrow roof vent?
Gas groans
Here we go again with
the gas prices. It's $2.69
.... Keeps on going up
and up and up again.
Where's all this money
going at? I'm sure it's not
the commissioners - or
maybe it is. Or is it the
whatever? But anyway,
it's getting ridiculous.
Not in Mayberry
I'm just reading your
paper and I just read the
article ?bout "Shades of
Mayberry." I think the
person who called that
in seems to think we're
looking for somebody
with a purple face, a


black hat and things like
that. We're looking for
an ordinary person
who's hanging out by
schools, by playgrounds
with children, by bus
stops ... This is not May-
berry.-Something like
that would not happen
on the television pro-
gram like Mayberry.
Wake up ...
Kerosene tip
This is to the person
who was looking for
kerosene in the Sound
Off: Crystal River Coastal
Whetstone Oil on (U.S.)
19 in Crystal River does
carry.kerosene. Hope
this helps you.
Czar crazy
With less and less
people working and
more people on unem-
ployment, how does the
president of the United
States figure he can
keep putting people on
the government payroll
with these new czars? I
mean, let's face it; if
there's no one paying
taxes to support the gov-
ernment employees,
how do you justify
adding more and more
every day? Common
sense says you can't.
More kerosene
For the person who's
wanting kerosene: Try
Rick's gas station in Flo-
ral City. He used to have
it. Good luck.
Bizarre, I think
If you people don't
think we aren't turning
into a communist na-
tion, can you tell me why
everybody that Obama
appoints he calls them a
czar? I think it's kind of
bizarre, myself.
Missing magnifier
I got my new phone-
book today but you for-
got to put the magnifying
glass in with it. You can't
read the darn thing.


SHADES
Continued from Page C1

not "storms.'" Tuesday was
different
From Hernando, I headed
up State Road 200. After get-
ting into Marion County, I
took a right onto County
Road 484, thinking maybe
I'd have my first visit to
Belleview (the Florida com-


munity - not New York's
Bellevue Hospital).
After a few minutes I
could no longer ignore the
churning, slate-colored sky
to the north that was shoot-
ing off impressive bolts of
lightning.
I turned around and
headed back toward S.R.
200 but was trying to outrun
the southward-bound storm.
For a time I was convinced I
could get ahead of the storm


and beat it on our race to
Hernando - and then C.R.
484 took a sharp right, right
into the storm.
Despite knowing that
nasty petrochemicals make
roads slippery when initially
wetted by rain, I forged
ahead. Along the way I saw a
wiser motorcyclist, who was
pulled over, wrapped in a
rain parka, waiting and
watching as I rode by in my
rain-soaked yellow, button-


down-collar work shirt.
A photograph of that guy
and a photograph of yours
truly could have easily illus-
trated the "do's" and don'tt"
of safe motorcycling. This
weekend I'm strapping my
rain gear onto the rack on
my bike, where it'll stay until
the rainy season passes.
N There's a mouse in the
newsroom and it's causing
some concern.
Personally, I haven't seen


it but enough people have -
including one coworker who
felt something bounce off
her leg, then watched the
little guy scamper off.
Even though it's a pest
and freaking some people
out, the mouse has brought
a subtle sense of unity to the
various work groups in the
department.
As the late Beatle George
Harrison observed, "All
Things Must Pass," and that's


true for Sen. Dean's barn
being a big issue, for summer
storms and for little animals
that strike fear in big people.
But for right now, the Bea-
tles album titled "Help"
seems more apropos.

Charlie Brennan is editor
of the Citrus County Chron-
icle and can be e-mailed at
cbrennan
@chronicleonline.com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

ston was trying to be sup-
portive of Sen. Dean and
suggested Maidhof was try-
ing to cover up a mistake he
made.
Well, as sure as I am that
the sun will rise tomorrow,
I'm sure that Maidhof is an
honest guy who wasn't try-
ing to do a favor for anyone.
Gary Maidhof is a Boy
Scout. He does not do fa-
vors for wealthy or influen-
tial people. In fact, he is
such a stickler for the rules
and regulations that most
folks think he a royal pain
in the you-know-what.
And because of that, a lot
of folks wish Maidhof didn't
hold the important job that
he now has.


But you can't question
the man's honesty.
Maidhof could have
talked his way out of the
Sen. Dean barn contro-
versy, but he refused to do
so - even though his expla-
nation of the events is
somewhat lame.
The Development Serv-
ices director does not re-
member a meeting that
Sen. Dean says took place
when the plans for the barn
were reviewed and ap-
proved. While his memory
may have lapsed, his in-
tegrity has not. He has re-
fused to make up some
memory of the meeting
even though it would help
save his job.
Unlike all of the other
characters in this drama,
Maidhof is the only player
who does not have a huge
ego. ..


The political intrigue
around this is pretty thick.
Sen. Dean appeared to try
and make the whole thing
go away on Wednesday
when he told County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe
that he agreed to pay all
permit fees, impact fees
and file the necessary pa-
perwork. The senator has
received huge negative
public reaction as he has
tried to explain that the
structure on his property is
a barn and not a house, and
therefore was exempt from
the fees and permits.
But Chairman Thrum-
ston's "favor" remark has
dumped more gasoline on
the fire and who knows
where things will end up
now.
Maidhof's response to
Thrumston was that of a
typical Boy Scout who has


been crossed with a mad
scientist. He suggested the
chairman should file a com-
plaint with the State Attor-
ney's Office if he believes a
crime has been committed.
There have been a lot of
dumb things done and said
dilring this controversy
There have been a lot of
reputations that have been
damaged. And there have
been plenty of mistakes
made. But here's one thing
you can hang onto: Gary
Maidhof, is a man of in-
tegrity.
Now we will see if that is
enough to keep his job in
this overheated political
arena.

Gerry Mulligan is the pub-
lisher of the Chronicle. His
e-mail address is gmulligan
@chronicleonline.com,


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COMMENTARY


C4 21 2009


I








L~,ITRc Cr.. NTY (P) fTJNI(,LbW 7CM E~R UDY UE2,20C


Sound OFF


Fond farewell
Goodbye, Citrus County.
Tomorrow I'm leaving the
place that made me who I
am. I was born here, I was
raised here and now it's
time to spread my wings
and see what the world
has to offer. Growing up in
a small town is exactly
- what it's cracked up to be.
. Through my travels and
meeting a range of diverse
cultures, I've come to real-
ize that I'm glad I grew up
in a small town. I hear
regularly "there is nothing
to do here" ... I've come to
realize that even though
this problem is getting
better as time passes and
places grow, that this
place isn't meant to have
things to offer. This isn't a
place to make it big. This
place isn't about the indi-
vidual. This place is ori-
ented around close friends
and family. Although I've
never felt I belonged here,
looking back it was my
ambitions telling me this.
You are whoever you want
to be and you will be wher-
ever you need to be. I hear
stories of people who have
traveled far and wide who
.go on to do great things.
These people are my in-
spiration. I will miss my
family, I will miss my
friends, I will miss my
lovers and I will even miss
my enemies, for they let
me learn a different side
of myself. For now, my
story doesn't end here.
I'm not going to say I will,
never be back, but for now.
this is a goodbye. Thank
you to anyone who was
ever there for me. Good-
bye, Citrus.


Don't get it
Well, you can call me stu-
pid, but I just don't get it. I
noticed since it has started
raining- it's rained.at least
10 inches, I'm sure more--
and I live in a cove off of


so many potholes there. I'm
tired of falling in there and
having my car being just out
of; alignment here. So
please fix those potholes.
I'm tired of it..
Good Republican


Big Lake Henderson and, by Kudos to Gov. Crist for ap-
golly, the water's lower than proving the growth bill, al-
it was before it started rain- though he is taking a lot of
ing. I just don't get it. heat from the environmental
extremists like the Sierra
Pothole plea Club, Audubon Society and so
This is for the Citrus forth. He had the courage to
County Maintenance De- stand up against these short-
partment:.Please fix the sighted groups that have run
potholes from Croft Street California into the ground. He
to East Harley Street and sounds like a good Republi-
Ray Street all the way can for a change.
through Annapolis. There's


Based on law
In response to the article
by Leonard Pitts regarding
Sotomayor as a judge candi-
date: First of all, if you look
at her background and her
history, she has a history of
making judicial decisions
and court decisions based
on her personal opinion and
her upbringing. Somebody'
sitting on the bench in the
Supreme Court is supposed
to make decisions based on
the law, and that is it. By
whatever the Constitution
says, is what you go by, not:
your personal opinion or
how you're interpreting what
the Constitution says...


Caring for Dixie
I would like to thank Dr.
Kenny Ferrara of the Planta-
tion Animal Clinic and her
staff for the excellent, car-
ing-care given to my Dixie. I
thought I was going to lose
her. Thanks again.
Historical landmark
This is in, reference to the
old bait shop, Lassiter's Gro-'
cery Store and Deli in Lake
Hernando. It is presently
zoned commercial. It's estab-.
lishediih 1952 and grandfa-
thered in before zoning was
established in Citrus County.
We, the citizens of Hernando,
support the old bait shop. We


can buy fishing poles, tackle
and bait, and fish off the old
dock. Like many have over
the last 62 years that grew
up there, the citizens of Her-
nando are moving forward to
establish it as a historical
landmark. My personal view
is not to view one person's
view; it's.not the view of the
community that grew up
there. As for the music - we
love it. The owners restrict
the music to only gospel,
country and western and
jazz. The atmosphere is very
peaceful and great. Thank
you, owners, for all your hard
work.
Speed trap
Beverly Hills just became
a speed trap. It's been that
way for about six months
now. I want everybody to go
20 mph and let's slow down
in Beverly Hills. If not, you
will get a ticket.
Safety first
This is in regard to the
homeless and showers in
Hernando. Even though I
have compassion for the
� homeless, I can't imagine en-
dangering children by having
them put in a situation where
people that we have no idea
* (of) their background will be
mixed together. It's not worth
it. Compassion is great, but
the safety of our children is
far more important.
Freedom of speech
"Apologize for views," the
writer of that article doesn't
need to read Dr. Dixon. Dr.
Dixon has the First Amend-
ment rights just as (she)
does. Believe me, I don't read
radical leftwing stuff because
it irritates me. So freedom of
speech for both parties.


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 C5


COMMENTARY


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SSection D - SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009



BUSINESS


How much of your
budget is dedicated
to marketing? Con-
ventional wisdom during
tough times is to cut ex-
penses, including marketing
dollars, because your sales
are down. In
2001, advertising
dollars took a
major hit in that
downturn, but
those companies
that continued to
market had less
competition and
recovered faster
than those that Randy
.hadn't
Keep market- TALE
ing and telling BUSH
people about
your services.
That doesn't mean that you
, can't find different means of
maintaining contact with
your customers or potential
customer. Good marketing
during tough times requires
you to target your best cus-
tomers. It may require you
to be more selective in
choosing where to adver-
tise, but targeting can save
you money while still get-
ting your message out
So what is the best
method of targeting? Start
-with your best customers.
.Know who that customer is
.and make sure they know
you are alive and well. By
targeting your best cus-
tomers, you can tell them
about changes in your prod-


uct line and what events you
are holding. Don't rely on
hoping that a new customer
is going to magically happen
to come through your door.
Anyone in retail right now
knows how important it is to
keep marketing
to keep the doors
open. Laura Lou
Fitzpatrick of
Heritage Village
in Crystal River
knows the value
of letting people
know about their
Market Days. And
W one way to get
Walker more traffic is for
(ING the stores to co-
NESS operate by shar-
ing their client
lists. Anyone who
has visited one of the stores
in Heritage Village is likely
to shop other stores or have
lunch while there.
Taking it from retail to
your business in home re-
pair, you might share your
list with others that aren't
your direct competition.
Heating and cooling compa-
nies might want to work
with window replacement
companies. You can target
your marketing to find that
customer who may be in
need of upgrading their
home to make it more en-
ergy efficient
For Heritage Village,
Laura Lou believes the

See TALKING/Page D2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


HAIR NECESSITIES


Donna Slusser, owner of Tiffany Wigs in Homosassa, is a SCORE Client of the Year.

Local businesswoman recognized for getting a boostfrom SCORE


CHRIS VAN ORMER
cvanormer@
chronicleonline.com
Chronicle,


rom the time Donna
Slusser opened her wig
boutique Nov. 15, 2007, to
June 10 when she became one
of the two SCORE Clients of
. the Year, 1,115 women have
left her shop in Servos Square
with luxuriant heads of hai'.
"When a woman comes in
here, it's to get back her
crowning glory," Slusser said.
Slusser has dealt with the
loss of her own hair, and that
was the life-changing event
that caused her to open her
wig salon.
"I knew I wasn't the only
person with a hair-loss prob-
lem," Slusser said.
Slusser's hair was lost due
to a medical condition called
alopecia totalis, an autoim-
mune disorder of unknown
origin. It happened to her at,
the age of 45, eight months


The SCORE retired people are the
greatest minds in the county. We'rq
lucky to have them. I can't imagine any
business contemplating opening
without contacting them.
Donna Slusser
SCORE client of the year.


after she gave birth. Her hair
started thinning. Then it was
gone.
At first, Slusser went into a
depression and had to take
time off work as heritage man-
ager at Fountain Memorial
Park But then she realized
she had to get on with her life.
"What you'can't cure can
heal you," Slusser said. "Wigs
are healing."
First, Slusser had to find
wig salons. She did not find
many sources in Citrus
County, although some hair sa-


lons carry some lines of wigs.
When she found wig salons,
Slusser discovered that often
the staff did not wear wigs
themselves. In that regard,
the staff had less rapport with
customers.
Another source of wigs was
catalogues. There, again,
Slusser found the experience
of buying a wig less than ideal.
"It's too personal a decision
to buy from a catalogue," she
said.
The wig would arrive and
would disappoint in style,


color or fit, she said.
Becoming something of an
expert about wigs and how to
give customer satisfaction,,
Slusser started her own busi-
ness, with a mentor from
SCORE, Counselors to Amer-
ica's Small Businesses, Ralph
Russo.
"Ralph encouraged me to
research wig companies,"
Slusser said. "He gave me di-
rection and homework I
wanted to pick his brain as
much as I could."
SCORE represented-a-.- -
wealth of business experience.
"The SCORE retired people
are the greatest minds in the
county," she said. "We're lucky
to have them. I can't imagine
any business contemplating
opening without contacting
them."
Even before Tiffany Wigs
opened, Slusser said women
telephoned her, eager to come
in.
'See HAIR/Page D2


Business DIGEST


Rhoades elected
to NAPFA Board
Ron A. Rhoades, J.D., CFP,
has been elected to serve a
three-year term on the Board
of Directors of the National As-
sociation of Personal Financial
Advisors (NAPFA). NAPFA is
the nation's leading organiza-
tion dedicated to the advance-
ment of Fee-Only comp-
rehensive financial planning.
All of NAPFA's more than
2,000 members adhere to a Fi-
duciary Oath which places the
best interests of the adviser's
client paramount at all times.
Ron serves as Director of Re-
search and as a Private
Wealth Manager for Joseph
Capital Management; LLC,
with offices in Citrus Hills (Her-
nando); Atlanta, Ga.; and
Raleigh, N.C. He may be
reached at 746-4460 or toll-
free at (800) 746-4460.
Auto tech receives
ASE certification
Todd Holloway, the owner of
Powell Square Auto Service is
proud to announce that one of
his technicians, Evan Lathrop
has joined the ranks of thou-
sands of other skilled auto
technicians by completing the
necessary training and course
work to become ASE certified.
According to Holloway, "Until
the early 1970s, consumers
had no way to distinguish be-
tween incompetent and com-
petent mechanics. In response
to this need, the independent,
non-profit National Institute for
Automotive Service Excellence
(ASE) was established in
1972. The mission of the ASE


is to improve the quality of ve-
hicle repair and service
Through the testing and certifi-
cation of repair and service
professionals. In addition to
passing the exam, part of Lath-
rop's requirements was provid-
ing proof of two years of
relevant work experience. Cer-
tification, however, is not for
life. To remain certified, those
with ASE credentials must be
retested every five years."
Holloway went on to say
that, "Having an ASE certified
technician working on your car
gives the consumer confidence
that the technician is a profes-
sional and at the top of his
field."
Call Evan Lathrop at Powell
Square Auto Service at 637-
1552. They're at 1213 N. U.S.
41 next to Beef O'Brady's.
SECO announces
builder outreach
Sumter Electric Cooperative,
aka SECO Energy, has
launched a new effort aimed at
helping builders in the region
get their homes certified as en-
ergy efficient.
SECO Director of Corporate
Communications Barry Bow-
man said, 'We have had
SECO's energy services spe-
cialists trained at the Florida
Solar Energy Center to be able
to offer builders a very valu-
able service. Our energy serv-
ices group has passed the
exams necessary to receive
their Green Building Rater Cer-
tification. Now area builders
can have SECO rate their new
home construction as truly en-
ergy efficient and receive offi-
cial certification through the


Florida Green Building Coali-
tion Inc. (FGBC).
'That's a good thing be-
cause more energy efficient
homes in Florida mean lower
utility bills and help conserve
energy resources. Not only
that, a green certification will
give builders an edge in mar-
keting their new construction to
potential buyers."
Bowman noted that SECO's
green team will work hand-in-
hand with builders as construc-
tion progresses to ensure their
building practices are meeting
the standards for certification.
He said SECO will use the
recommended tiered rating
system where scoring is
awarded at different levels ac-
cording to points achieved
over the minimum point thresh-
old. Builders can achieve a
bronze, silver, gold or platinum
level certification.
'We are going to look at a
wide variety of categories in-
cluding energy and water use,
site prep, construction materi-
als and more. Each item evalu-
ated has a point value
associated with it. The more
points achieved, the higher the
rating In addition to their offi-
cial certification through FGBC,
builders participating in the
program will also receive a
special certificate from SECO
documenting their home rat-
ings, which can be used for
marketing purposes," Bowman
concluded.
Area builders interested in
finding out more about green
building certifications are in-
vited to call SECO at (352)
793-3801, ext. 1202.
See DIGEST/Page D2


I
I


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Limited


funds,


limited


options
DEAR BRUCE:
Most of my
younger years
were involved in raising
my four children and
sending them to "better"
schools. I am now 65 and
find that I only have about
$50,000 in savings. The
money is not gaining
much interest at all and I
would like to know what
to do. Is there any invest-
ment adviser that would
give me the straight scoop
(as opposed to one that
might have a self inter-
est)? What about Roth
IRAs? I need help and
don't know where to get it
- HB., via e-mail
DEAR I.B.: Unfortu-
nately, at 65 and with only
$50,000 in assets, you are
going to have to do a lot of
fancy maneuvering. Even
if you have the maximum
in Social Security bene-
fits, as a married couple
you would receive only
about $20,000 a year -
probably less. As to invest-
ment advisers, there is
very little that anyone can
tell you other than you
have so little money that
you will probably have to
continue to work part-
time. At today's interest
rates, your $50,000 very
likely would not even earn
$1,800 a year. Whether
your children who at-
tended "better" schools
are in a position to help
you is a matter between
you and them.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band and I own a home
and two vehicles. Our
house payment is $1,400 a
month. One of our vehi-
cles is paid for, and the
. other has a $9,000 balance
with a monthly payment
of $400. We have no trou-
ble making these pay-
ments with our income.
We have roughly $8,000 in
savings and expect an-
other $8,500 from our tax
refund. With this $16,500, I
think we should pay off
the remaining vehicle
debt, as the interest rate is
7.99 percent My husband
does not agree. He thinks
we should pay more than
the monthly $400 payment
for the next few months. I
realize we should keep
our savings at a comfort-
able level for emergen-
cies, but I hate the idea of
paying the interest every
month when we have the
money to pay it off. What
do you recommend? -
KM., West Virginia
DEAR K.M.: Is this sim-
ple interest, or is it com-
puted under some
arrangement where you
not only borrow the prin-
cipal but the interest in
advance, as well? If it is
the former, then paying it
off in advance makes
sense, since you're paying
a relatively high percent-
age. If it is computed
under a system where you
borrow the interest as
well as the principal, then
the majority of your pay-
ments first go to pay off
the interest leaving the
principal until last If
that's the case, then the
likelihood is that you've
paid off most of the inter-
est, so there's no great sav-
ing. If it's a simple interest
loan at 8 percent, it may
make sense. You are cor-
rect in observing that you
should have some money
See MONEY/Page D2


Don't stop marketing

Improve your bottom line by

keeping in touch with customers








ED2 sUNDAY, JUINI 21, 2009


HAIR
Continued from Page Dl

From her research and
experience, she decided
to become a supplier of
Raquel Welch wigs as her
main line.
She also car- I Tiffany Wig
ries wigs Square Pla
from Gabor, Suncoast I
R e v o n , mosassa,
Aspen and 10 a.m. to
Bobbi Boss. day to Frid
"I put a to 2 p.m.i
Ra q u el and Sunda
Welch wig on day by app
my head and
never looked Phone 62:
b a c k , " K Onthenel
Slusser said. wigs4u.coi
Her busi-
ness is a Raquel Welch
Star Pro salon, which
means Raquel Welch is
Slusser's main line and
that she gets all previews
and new styles first from
the parent company, Hair
U Wear.
Although many cus-
tomers who are new to
wigs ask about human hair
wigs, Slusser recommends
trying a syn-
thetic fiber Having
wig to see
what. new market
develop-
ments have COunty
to offer. Her
line of wigs her bu
includes stro
styles made
o f
Kanekalon fiber that looks
as natural as human hair,
but is low maintenance
and holds its style. She
said the fiber would keep
its color and hold curl in-
definitely when properly
handled.
The synthetic fibers are
styled with highlight arid
lowlight colors for a natu-
ral look. One of the fibers
used in wigs, called
FlexLite, makes finer and
more lightweight wigs.
"On this new fiber, Vi-
bralite, you can use curl-
ing irons and hot rollers,"
Slusser said. "Normally,
you couldn't use those on
synthetic wigs."
Hundreds of heads line
the shelves inside the
Tiffany Wigs shop. Each
head wears a wig showing
a different style, length
ahd color. The customer
sits at a vanity to try on

"I'm very blessed to have:
this line," Slusser said
about the Raquel Welch
wigs as she showed how
they fall back into their
styles.
"I have a private vanity
area in the back if a client
wants to be alone,'- she
said. "I have different hair


textures, wiglets for thin-
ning hair, extensions, buns
and other hair pieces.",
About 60 percent of her
customers are women who
have hair loss because of
medical reasons, Slusser
said.
"Sometimes, I tell them,
I "7 ' . n i a


gs at Servos
aza, 5460 S.
Blvd.. Ho-
is open from
D 6 p.m. Tues-
lay; 11 a.m.
Saturday;
ay and Mon.
ointment.
1-4727.
A: www.tiffany
m.


t

I


I Y U I e
lucky: Your
hair will
grow back.
M i n e
won't,'"
Slusser said.
"Then they
know that I
know how
they feel
about losing
their hair.
One lady
told me, 'I


felt so bad I didn't want to
get up this morning. You
changed my life."'
The remainder of
Slusser's customers love to
shop for wigs as a great
fashion alternative, she
said. Although she was,
forced to wear them,
Slusser sees great advan-
tages.
"You never have a bad
hair day,"
a niche Slusser said.
a niche "You can
t in the change
styles and
keeps colors as
siness often as you
siness like. Some
)ng, customers
. g keep coming
back even
after their own hair grows
back."
For new customers who
lose their hair for medical
reasons, Slusser feels she
serves a need and devel-
ops a relationship with
each customer. Having a
niche market in the county
keeps her business strong.
"Hair loss doesn't stop
because of the economy,"
she said.
She also carries a line of
hair replacement pieces
for men.
"Although, personally, I
think bald men are attrac-
tive," Slusser said.
Slusser now regards her
hair loss as a good experi-
ence.
"Like many other things
in life, don't take your hair
for granted," she said. "I
feel I was meant to help
people with their hair loss,
to understand their emo-
tions and. feelings."'
Tiffany Wigs at Servos
Square Plaza, 5460 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa, is
open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Tuesday to Friday; 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday; and
Sunday and Monday by ap-
pointment. Phone 621-
4727. On the net:
www.tiffanywigs4u.com.


DIGEST
Continued from Page Dl

SECO offers
vidcast on storm
restoration
Sumter Electric Coopera-
tive (SECO) has a vidcast
available on its corporate
Web site www.seco-
energy.com that deals with
how SECO prepares for storm
season and restores power
during a severe weather
event.
Storm season has arrived
here in Florida. The SECO
vidcast offers a behind-the-
scenes look into the compre-
hensive plan the co-op uses
to restore power during an
emergency situation. In addi-
tion, viewers will learn about
resources available to them
through SECO that will help
them prepare their home and
family for heavyweather, re-
port outages, track SECO's
restoration, progress at any
time during the year and
more.
The vidcast format is an in-
formal conversation between
SECO Director, of Corporate
Communications Barry Bow-
man and SECO Director of
Reliability and Operations
John LaSelva.
SECO serves 170,000 cus-
tomers in parts of Marion,
Lake, Sumter, Citrus, Pasco,
Levy ahd Hernando counties.
The co-op's service territory is
2,000 square miles in size .
and it delivers electricity to its
member/customers over.
'11,350 miles of SECO owned
power lines.
Legendary Market-
ing tests interns
Legendary Marketing, in-
troduces the 2009 Legendary
Apprentice Stars internship
program where four aspiring


Small business can apply for ARC loans


Special to the Chronicle

WASHINGTON - The
SBA began accepting loans
Monday for a temporary
new program called Amer-
ica's Recovery Capital.
'ARC" loans ofupto $35,000
are designed to provide a
"bridge" for viable small
businesses with immediate
financial hardship - to keep
their doors open until they
get back on track
"These ARC loans are
another tool in the SBA
toolkit, which will provide
critical support to small
businesses struggling to
make it through these tough
economic times," said Ad-
ministrator Karen G. Mills.
ARC loans are deferred-
payment loans of up to
marketing professionals com-
pete for cash prizes, another
$1,000 cash prize and a paid
position with the company.
This summer's team of L.A.
Stars is Brittany Goodman,
Danielle Gianfilippo,
Stephanie Campbell, all from
Florida State University, and
Mark Teague from University
of Florida.
"They're doing a fantastic
job, I'm proud of them all.
They could be on the beach
with their friends, but chose to
jumpstart their careers, it's
commendable and something
more young people should
do," said Andrew Wood, Leg-
endary Marketing president
and founder.
The Legendary Apprentice
internship program was devel-
oped to help undergrads and
recent grads gain advertising,
public relations and sales ex-
perience. Intems assist in au-
thoring advertising and PR
copy, the production of print
ads, brochures, radio spots,
flyers, direct mail, work with
graphic artists to produce vari-


TALKING
Continued from Page D1'

stores in Heritage Village might get.
customers from visitors to Citrus
County who are spending a night or
two at one of the hotels. She's trying
to establish a closer relationship with
local hotels and has put together a
walking map for visitors to find their
way around.
Diana and daughter Betsy Brim of
the Cotton Club in Heritage Village
understand the value of sharing their
list of more than 300 customers, but
they also go above and beyond to get
people through the door Constant
marketing is a must and for them, it's
all about events. From special shop-
ping nights to "Margarita day" on Fri-
days, they let their customers know


$35,000, available to estab-
lished, viable, for-profit
small businesses that need
short-term help to make
their principal and interest
payments on existing and
qualifying business debt
ARC loans are 100 percent
guaranteed by the SBA and
have no SBA fees associ-
ated with them.
ARC loans will be dis-
bursed over a period of up
to six months and will pro-
vide funimds to be used for
payments of principal and
interest for existing, quali-
fying small business debt
including mortgages, term
and revolving lines of
credit, capital leases, credit
card obligations and notes
payable to vendors, suppli-
ers and utilities. SBA will
ous print and display advertis-
ing, interact with clients during
weekly conference calls and,
learn how to manage ac-.
counts. It's a comprehensive
crash course on the fundamen-
tals of advertising, public rela-
tions and sales.
For more information about
the Legendary Apprentice intern-
ship program, e-mail Internship
Director Elvis Anderson at
Elvis@LegendaryMarketing.com

Florida Bar honors
50-year members
Two attorneys from the 5th
Judicial Circuit will be among
124 attorneys honored by The
Florida Bar on Friday, June 26,
for 50 years of dedication to
the practice of law. The attor-
neys are:
* William Terrell Hodges,
Ocala.
* E N. John Thomas, Her-
nando.
Their service to the profes-
sion will be acknowledged dur-
ing a luncheon at The Florida


about their special promotions and
their product lines.
Rule one: maintain a database of
all your clients arnd potential cus-
tomers. How do we get this database
started so you can reach them effec-
tively?
In business, your business card is
the most used item to get people to
know how they can reach you. Most
cards have the basic information such
as the name of their company, what
the cardholder's position is and how
to reach her Most of us have drawers
full if we do any kind of networking.
Every time someone comes
through your door or does business
with you, make sure you have their
contact information, preferably their
e-mail address. You can offer incen-
tives to get their cards such as offer-
ing a drawing each week or a special
discount for your product if they give


pay the interest on ARC
loans to the lenders at the
variable rate of Prime plus
two percent
Repayment will not
begin until 12 months after
the final disbursement
After the 12-month deferral
period, borrowers will pay
back the loan principal
over a period of five years.
ARC loans will be made
by commercial lenders, not
SBA directly. Fbr more in-
formation on ARC loans,
visit www.sba.gov
For more information
about all of the SBA's pro-
grams for small businesses,
call the SBA Answer Desk
at (800) U ASK SBA or TDD
(704) 344-6640, or visit the
SBA's Web site at
www.sba.gov.
Bar's Annual Convention,
being held at the Orlando
World Center Marriott from
June 24 to 27. To be recog-
nized, attomeys must be
members in good standing of
The Florida Bar and attain
.their 50th anniversary of ad-
mittance to the practice of law
in 2009.
Senior Counselors -
who've practiced for 50 years
or more but have not been
members of The Florida Bar
for the entire period - will also
be recognized at the luncheon.
The 5th Judicial Circuit en-
compasses Citrus, Hemando,
Lake, Marion and Sumter
counties.
The luncheon is sponsored
by The Florida Bar's Young
Lawyers Division and will be at
12:30 p.m. Friday, June 26.
The Hon. Joseph W. Hatchett,
a 50-year honoree and former
Florida Supreme Court justice
and former chief judge for the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
11th Circuit, will be the fea-
tured speaker.
-From staff reports


you their contact information.
Once you have a card, use a simple
card scanner to develop your data-
base. These individuals are your
starting point. By keeping in touch
with them each week offering an up-
date of your services or a special in-
centive to buy, you keep your
company in your customer's mind,
and you target your customers with
your specials and product line.' **'
The real deal is to keep marketing,
but market efficiently. For more in-
formation about simple marketing
techniques, check out www.tech-
basedmarketing.com.


Randy Welker, executive director
of the Citrus County Economic
Development Council, can be
reached at 795-2000 or
rwelker@citrusedc.com.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

for emergencies, but a
credit line can provide thst
at no cost. If you don't need
the money, then you don't
get charged.
DEAR BRUCE: After 45
years of computer program-
ming, I 'want to retire. I
started a small business in
2000 working from home.
I've never pushed it, and
I'm doing OK. I'd like to sell
the business, but brokers
don't seem to be interested
because it really isn't very
big. I have no idea how to
find a buyer. I'd be willing to
provide training and even
stick around until the buyer
is comfortable. I' have re-
ceived favorable write-ups
in business journals, but
how do I let people know
that it is for sale? -J.W, via
e-mail
DEAR J.W.: I have a feel-
ing that you are going to
have some trouble in. this
economy trying to sell a
business. Having said that,
have you tried advertising?
I'm not being sarcastic.
There are numerous trade
publications that deal with
computer-related issues,
and most have classified
sections. There are of
course the national news-
papers such as The Wall
Street Journal, that have
well-read business sections.
Try local advertising in
your newspapers. There are
costs to doing business and
costs to sell them. Don't be
bashful.

DEAR BRUCE: About 20
years ago, we bought a
membership in a lot 500
miles away for $6,000. The
annual dues are $290 and
the property taxes $11. The
lot has a land value of
$3,000. We contacted a local


real estate agent regarding
selling. He was not inter-
ested. We asked the resort if
we could gift it to them.
They-said "no," and if you
don't pay your dues we turn
you over to collections. If
we don't pay property taxes,
the county will sell the land.
It takes several years for
this to happen. We are in
our 60s and want to clean
up this mess. Please help. -
A.B., via e-mail
DEAR AJ3.: In your letter
you say that the lot has a
value of $3,000, but I think
what you mean is that the
lot is assessed by the county
at $3,000. It clearly has little
or no real value. This is
demonstrated by the fact
that the real estate agent
cannot find a market The
promoters know that there
is no value, and they would
prefer to have the dues paid
to them. I'm reluctant to
suggest this, but you really
ought to get an attorney to
review the contracts that
you signed. They can
threaten collections, but
whether it would actually
pay for them to do that is
another story. As you point
out you could allow the
property to be foreclosed
upon by the county, but,
until that action takes
place, you will continue to
be responsible for not only
the taxes but the annual
dues. You signed yourself as
"suckers" in your letter and,
unfortunately, member-
ships in these deals geher-
ally do not work out well.
DEAR BRUCE: A friend
. of mine passed away, leav-
ing his wife with a $400,000
mortgage and $900,000 in
life insurance. She earns
$70,000 a year and has a 1-
year-old child. I told her
that she should pay off the
mortgage and invest the
balance in something safe
like CDs. Others have sug-
gested investing the entire


$900,000. Which do you
think is the best? I have as-
sumed a 4 percent return
on her investments if she
were to make them. --- PK,
Indiana
DEAR PK.: First, you in-
dicated in your lengthy let-
ter that they are paying only
5-1/3 percent. That in itself
would dissuade me from
prepaying. You also men-
tioned CDs and then you
said assuming 4 percent re-
turn. Where and what CDs?
Either way, the lady seems
in pretty good shape finan-
cially. She could invest the
entire amount of money in
long-term government
bonds, but even taking taxes
into account, there would
be a small net loss. All that
having been said, the other
part of the equation, which
has to be addressed, is this
is a young person, and no-
body anticipates that the in-
terest rates are going to stay
low forever. This is why I
would recommend that she
continue the very low-rate
mortgage and invest her
monies over a decent spec-
trum, not in just interest-
bearing investments, but
equities, as well. Her best
move would be to get a good
fee-based planner to give
her an outline of her op-
tions. She is a great deal bet-
ter off than most young
widows.
DEAR BRUCE: I was re-
cently contacted by an annu-
ities company about an
annuity I have from a job
that I held 20 years ago that
I didn't know about. It ap-
pears, to be matching funds
that the employer made to
my contributions. The
amount is somewhere
around $3,800. The company
wants me to cash it out or
roll it over so they can clean
up this account If I cash it
out, there are no penalties to
pay I'm not sure if this
amount is, something I


should save when I could
use the cash flow right now. I
pay into a teacher retire-
ment fund for my state, have
a small annuity that I con-
tribute to with each pay-
check and my husband
contributes what seems like
a large amount to a retire-
ment fund plus Social Secu-
rity. - WJ., via e-mail
DEAR WJ.: Since the an-
nuity is 20 years old, the
penalty phase is long behind
us. The former employer is
saying that this is cluttering
up their books for a rela-
tively minor amount of
money You can roll it into
another annuity and there
will be no immediate tax im-
pact If you cash it out, there
very likely will be income
tax due. Since you and your
husband are employed, it's
likely that you are in a fairly
high income-tax bracket Be-
fore you cash this or roll it
over, you really ought to talk
to an accountant who can
run the numbers so you can
see the consequences of
your action. Whether it's im-
portant for you to maintain
this account for your
"golden years" is something
that I do not know with the
information at my disposal.
Before you act, you truly
owe it to yourself to run this
past an accountant. The
costs should be modest
DEAR BRUCE: My grand-
mother has money conserv-
atively invested in
commercial bank CDs. She
is elderly and often frets the
government will seize the
money and house and she'll
be on the streets. My sister
and I have told her not to
worry. Still, grandmother
will tell us she is scared of
the government taking
everything. Under what cir-
cumstances could the gov-
ernment seize money and
property? Does it happen
often? We think it would
ease her mind if we told her


Bruce Williams said, "Stop
worrying." - J.P, via e-mail
DEAR J.P: I think what
your grandmother is refer-
ring to is the possibility that
she may have to go into
some kind of a care facility,
and, in the event thai the
money is not there, they
could attach her property if
she was a Medicaid recipi-
ent It's very unlikely this is
going to happen, but other
than that, I don't know any
other way that the govern-
ment is out taking people's
assets. Tell her that Bruce
said, "Please stop worrying."
Nothing is going to happen
to her home and property.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
tried to call the IRS but have
spent a great deal of time on
hold. My husband recently
passed away. There were
three life insurance policies
with me as the beneficiary.
Is this money taxable? All
policies were payable upon
the death of my husband. -
D.D., via e-mail
DEAR D.D.: Ordinarily,
under most circumstances,
the proceeds from life in-
surance is not taxable.
However, the owner of the
policy and by whom and
how the premiums are paid
can sometimes dictate any
tax consequences. For the
relatively modest amount
of money involved, I would
suggest that you sit down
with an accountant of your
choice (not the IRS) and
have this individual exam-
ine the polices, how they
were paid and if there
were any tax advantages
taken in regard to the pay-
ment of the policy. All of
these things could enter
into the picture, and a gen-
eral answer is not in your
best interest.
DEAR BRUCE: How
much is enough? I have
had it .right up to my eye-
brows. I am a parent paying
the full tuition of a college


junior in a very expensive
private school. My son has
constantly told me that he
is afraid to express his po-
litical views in class be-
cause the professors have
made it abundantly clear
that conservative ideas are
wrong and will not be coun-
tenanced. He is of the opin-
ion that he has to keep his
mouth shut in order to get
decent grades. I feel that I
am paying the tuition and
that free speech is not just
free liberal speech but free
speech period. I want to
confront the administra-
tion. My wife says don't
make waves, let the kid
graduate. What do you
think? - L.C., via e-mail
DEAR LC.: You've got to
be kidding. I would be
down there talking with the
administration of that col-
lege so quickly their eye-
balls would snap. There is
no question that there is a
liberal bias in academia,
it's always been so. This is
not to say that there are not
conservative professors.
The good ones on either
side encourage dialogue.
Those that discourage it
should be replaced. At the
very least, I would ask the
administration for the op-
portunity to confront these
individuals. With the
amount of money that you
are spending for your son's
education, this does give
you the right to confront
and question the adminis-
tration.


Send your questions to:
Smart Money, PO. Box
2095, Elfers, FL 34680. E-
'mail to: bruce@brucewil-
liams.com. Questions of
general interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies can-
not be provided.


CiTRus CouNTY (FL) CHRoNiq.E


BUSINESS


n141o UN-D I .TN h-.- 91 ir /


I









S AURTI COUNTY (LL. ) HRONSISCAY UN 1,209


Active managers try to shake up passive ETF niche


f there's any wis-
dom to the maxim
"If it ain't br6ke,
don't fix it," you might
not know it from look-
ing at what the ex-
change-traded fund
industry has been up to
lately
ETFs' heritage, now
16 years old, is rooted Mark
firmly in index invest- OF MU
ing. ETFs generally INTE|
hold a basket of invest- NTE
ments that passively
track a market index. But unlike
mutual funds, ETFs can be traded
like a stock during daily trading
sessions.
Their no-frills index approach
to investing means ETFs charge
smaller management expenses
than actively managed mutual
funds, which pitch the value of
professional expertise and the
prospect that market-beating per-
formance can offset higher ex-
penses.
That premise has proved a hard
sell amid the recent market tur-
moil, with nearly $283 billion
flowing out of stock and bond mu-
tual funds over the nine months
ended March 31. Some went to
ETFs, which have seen $162 bil-
lion flow in during that span, ac-
cording to Financial Research
Corp.
Meanwhile, 15 actively man-
aged ETFs have been launched
since April 2008, aiming to stretch
the investment product beyond its


index strategy comfort
zone. Fund-comipahies
have recently filed to
come to market with a
handful of other active
ETFs, with many more
expected in coming
. years.
So why -are ETF
providers messing with
Jewell success by trying active
JTUAL management? Think
evolution: There are
REST now more than 700.
index ETFs, ranging
from funds mirroring the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index to higher-
risk ETFs offering exposure to a
single industry, overseas market
or commodity.
So something new that seeks to
juice returns by using some de-
gree of investment screening is a
natural outgrowth.
'"Actively managed ETFs seem
like an obvious avenue to go down
to see what kind of traction that
they can get," said Loren Fox, an
analyst who helps lead ETF re-
search at the New York-based
firm Strategic Insight. "We think
there is genuine potential there."
Now, a megadeal is expected to
accelerate the rollout. New York-
based BlackRock Inc. announced
plans June 11 to buy the invest-
ment unit.of Barclays in a $13.5
billion deal that includes the
British bank's market-leading
ETF business, iShares. Last
month, iShares filed with regula-
tors to offer two active ETFs, in


hopes of expanding its current
share of about half the U.S. ETF
market. Its closest ETF rivals are
State Street Global Advisors and
Vanguard Group.
The first two active ETFs from
San Francisco-based iShares
could be just the start. BlackRock,
which would become the world's
largest asset manager with com-
pletion of the Barclays deal later
this year, is looking to play off its
strength in actively managed mu-
tual funds by expanding beyond
iShares' more than 170 index
ETFs.
BlackRock will consider active
ETF launches "in the broader
context of product design, regula-
tory and marketing considera-
tions," spokesman Brian Beades
said.
The active ETFs on the market
now include offerings from Pow-
erShares, Wisdom Tree and Grail
Advisors. Some invest in baskets
of stocks, some in bonds, and oth-
ers are geared toward real estate
investment trusts and bets on for-
eign currency markets.
Actively managed ETFs hold
nearly $314 million in assets, a
tiny slice of the ETF total of $535
billion. And even the ETF total is
dwarfed by mutual funds, which
hold about $18 for every dollar in
U.S. ETFs.
So far ETFs haven't caught on
with individual investors as much
as with institutions such as pen-
sion funds and foundations. But
Fox, of Strategic Insight, said that


could change with the BlackRock
deal and growth of active ETFs.
"What that could mean for ordi-
nary investors is a much larger
range of choices of how they may
want to invest in active strategies,"
Fox said, "whether it's through
mutual funds or ETFs."
As for performance, active
ETFs are too new to have a long-
term track record. That's why
Robert Mann, a computer systems
analyst from Grosse Pointe Woods,
Mich., won't be adding active
ETFs into his portfolio of index-
based ETFs anytime soon. The 47-
year-old is a member of a small
ETF investing club who caught
the ETF bug a couple years ago,
enticed by their low expenses and
ease of trading. He trades them
like a stock, unlike mutual fund
shares that are priced just once a
day - a disadvantage that has
boosted ETFs' appeal amid recent
market volatility.
But active ETFs? "It's going to
be a while," Mann says, "before we
have enough historical data to
show whether they offer any ad-
vanthge over passive ETFs or
not."
There are plenty of other obsta-
cles.for active ETFs, and ETFs in
general. They've barely made a
dent in 401(k)s, in part because
plan administrators' back offices
haven't adjusted operations to
handle the unique way ETFs are
bought and sold.
Despite ETFs' complexities, it
could be just a matter of time be-


fore 401(k)s adapt to include ETFs
on their investment menus.
"Retirement and ETF
providers have been hard at work
to solve the operational issues,"
said Rob Ivanoff, an analyst with
Financial Research Corp.
However, with more ETFs em-
bracing active management, their
cost advantage over most mutual
funds could erode. Actively man-
aged mutual funds' average ex-
pense ratio - the ongoing
charges that investors pay, ex-
pressed as a percentage of assets
- now stands at 1.25 percent, ac-
cording to Morningstar Inc. The
average is just 0.56 for all ETFs.
The five actively managed ETFs
already on the market that focus
on stocks are a bit pricier, carry-
ing expenses of 0.75 percent to
0.80 percent.
But keep in mind: Even though
ETFs can be traded daily, unlike
mutual funds, the risks and bene-
fits are much the same.
"They don't offer any tremen-
dously greater risk based on their
structure, and they're not magic
bullets for ordinary investors,"
said Fox, of Strategic Insight
"They are tools you can use with
or without mutual funds to put to-
gether a diversified investment
portfolio. The more good choices
out there, the better."


Questions? E-mail investorin-
sight@ap.org.


Documentary about workers draws ire
Associated Press


LOS ANGELES - A doc-
umentary on Nicaraguan
banana workers who
claimed they became sterile
from pesticides is set for its
American premiere on Sat-
urday- unless a threatened
lawsuit stops the show.
Swedish filmmaker
Fredrik Gertten's film "Ba-
nanas!" might now be more
appropriately punctuated
with a question mark after a
judge declared its star, a Los
Angeles lawyer, a fraud for
recruiting plaintiffs to lie.
Attorney Juan J.
Dominguez previously won a
$1.5 million award for the
p�urp.owrted workers before
being discredited by Supe-.
rior Court Judge Victoria
Chaney as the engineer of a
massive scheme targeting
Dole Food Co. in cases in the
U.S. and Central America.
The cases sought more than
$40 billion in damages.
The fraud was not uncov-
ered until the film was fin-
ished, and questions are
swirling about whether the
filmmaker has an ethical ob-
ligation to change the docu-
mentary
The Los Angeles Film Fes-
tival has pulled the docu-
mentary from contention for
a prize. It also plans a dis-
cussion about the perils of
wrapping a documentary
production before a story
has reached its conclusion.
Festival director Rebecca
Yeldham did not immedi-
ately return a phone mes-
sage seeking comment
Friday.
Gertten, 53, stands by the
film and his experiences in-
terviewing workers. in
Nicaragua.
"I haven't seen any fraud.
If I saw it, I would publish it,"
he said. "This film is valid. I
hope Dole will understand it
is a legitimate piece of work
... I believe in freedom of
speech and telling the story
as I saw it"
Gertten would not provide
an advance copy of the
movie to The Associated
Press. However, a trailer on
his Web site shows a man in
his coffin with a voiceover
from one of his relatives say-
ing: "Every time a banana
worker who was exposed to
this chemical dies, that is a
victory for Dole. Every death
. is another victory.. "
Dole attorney Theodore
Boutrous Jr said Gertten has
refused to let Dole represen-
tatives see the film before it
is screened.
"This isn't complex and it
isn't remotely a free speech
or artistic expression issue,"
Boutrous said.
"Mr. Gertten got duped,
but he won't admit it and in-
stead apparently is intent on
screening a knowingly false
film."
Dole has threatened to
sue for defamation if the film
is shown and then distrib-
uted commercially
"Bananas!" which has the
subtitle "On Trial for Mal-
ice," documents the plight of
workers who say they were


Associated Press
This still image taken from the documentary "Bananas!" provided by WG Film shows a
crop dusting plane spraying pesticide on a field of produce. The film by Fredrik Gertten is
about claims by purported Nicaraguan banana workers that they were harmed by a pes-
ticide used on Dole plantations In the 1970s and a trial which was held on the issue. But
what is not included in the film is a series of recent post-trial hearings in which a California
judge concluded that the claims brought by a Los Angeles lawyer, Juan J. Dominguez,
were a massive fraud designed to extort millions from Dole.


made sterile by the pesticide
DBCP used on Dole banana
plantations in the 1970s.
It uses footage of a trial
against Dole and details the
efforts of Dominguez-to help
the workers.
An advance review in the
LA Weekly says the film por-
trays Dominguez as "the un-
q u.e s t i o n e d
man-of-the-people hero,"
seeking justice for down-
trodden workers.
But Judge Chaney said
Dominguez and his
.Nicaraguan counterpart re-
cruited men to pretend they
had been banana workers
and to make false allegations
against Dole.
Chaney heard testimony
that the men recruited by
Dominguez were given false
work histories and schooled
in what it would have been
like to work on a plantation.
Some denied fathering their
own children in their at-
tempt to prove sterility.
The judge said if she had
known the extent of the
fraud, she would have
stopped the trial over which
she presided - the same
trial depicted in the movie.
The case is now being ap-
pealed. Chaney dismissed
two other similar cases
brought by Dominguez after
hearing testimony.
"Contrary to their sworn
testimony, most of the plain-
tiffs never worked on Dole-.
affiliated banana farms and
.none were involved in the
DBCP application process,"
Chaney wrote in a 60-page
dismissal ruling issued
Wednesday.
"These plaintiffs and their
counsel were part of a
broader conspiracy that per-
meates all DBCP litigation
arising from Nicaragua," it
said.
Chaney was shown the
trailer for the movie but said
she would not intercede in
its release because that
would be impermissible
prior restraint on free
speech.
Dominguez's lawyer,
Michael McCarthy, has told-
the AP his client is not being
treated fairly by the court.


Filmmaker Fredrik Gertten, producer of "Bananas!," poses
Friday in Los Angeles.


He would not comment fur-
ther.
Gertten said he is a former
journalist who has produced
or directed more than 20
documentaries, most of
them on human interest sub-
jects. He said "Bananas!"
was made with support from
a number.of public broad-
casting companies across-
Europe and the Sundance
Channel.
"I'm not an activist film-
maker," he said, adding he
was drawn to the subject
when he heard that former
banana workers had been
camped outside the
Nicaraguan Parliament in
Managua for years demand-
ing justice for being harmed
by pesticides. He went there
to see for himself.
Gertten said that if the ac-
cusations against
Dominguez are true, "Of
course it's terrible, but it's a
complex situation."
In light of the controversy,
-film festival directors re-
moved "Bananas!" from
competition and placed it on


the program as a case study.
Viewers at the planned
screening will be given writ-
ten material about the de-
velopments in the case and
hear a statement that at-
tempts to place the film's
subject matter in context
with Chaney's ruling. It will
be followed by a discussion
of the plight of a documen-
tarian when a story contin-
ues to develop after the film
is completed.
Gertten has also added a
written card at the end ex-
plaining that the case de-
picted is on appeal and
there are ongoing develop-
ments.
He repeatedly cited Judge
Chaney's remark in her ini-
tial ruling that because of
the fraud, "We will never
know what happened in
Nicaragua."
Asked if he now feels vic-
timized by Dominguez, Gert-
ten said, "Right now, I'm
being victimized by Dole
Food Co. I have to find out
what really happened.
Maybe that's my next film."


New net timer could

save sea turtles


Associated Press

BOURNE, Mass. - Fish-
ery managers trying to pro-
tect rare sea turtles from
dying in fishing nets have
tapped a Cape Cod company
to build a device they think
can help balance turtle pro-
tection with profitable fish-
ing.
The "tow-time logger" is a
7-inch, silver cylinder that
attaches to fishing nets and
records how long the net
stays underwater.
That time is crucial if a
turtle gets snared in the nets
dragged , behind fishing
trawleis. 'Federal research
indicates the vast majority
of sea turtles survive entan-
glement - but only if the
net is pulled up in less than
50 minutes. .
With the logger, regulators
can avoid other, potentially
more onerous, restrictions
on perpetually struggling
fishermen - such as shut-
ting down fishing areas or
requiring turtle-saving gear
that doesn't work well in all
nets. In fisheries where they
decide time limits would
work best, they wouldn't
have to depend on an honor
system to make sure nets
are pulled up in time.
"Turtles have also been
around since the time of the
dinosaurs," said Elizabeth
Griffin of the environmental
group, Oceana. "They're
cool animals that I think
most people want to see
continue to exist"
The logger was built
under a $25,000 federal con-
tract with the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration by Onset
Computer Corp., a Bourne-
based supplier of data log-
gers : for energy and
environmental monitoring.
It starts recording water
depth every 30 seconds
once the net drops below
two meters. If the net stays
under beyond a preset time
limit, the logger records it,
and the infraction can be
discovered when regulators
download its data.
The device's early tests at
sea have been successful,
and work is ongoing to
toughen it for the real-life
rigors, such as being
banged on fishing boat
decks. The company ex-
pects it to cost between
$600 and $800, an expense
that would fall to fisher-
men.
Even when the logger is
perfected, regulators know
limiting how long the nets
stay underwater is no cure-
all as they devise rules,
which they hope to propose
for public comment by 2010,
to meet a new federal re-
quirement to protect sea
turtles from trawler fishing
nets.
Some environmentalists
say turtles shouldn't be kept
underwater at all because
even relatively short times
of being trapped underwa-
ter without oxygen hurt


them.
Griffin says there's also
not enough data on how
trapped turtles fare in
colder waters, so no one re-
ally knows how long they
can be kept under and sur-
vive.
The data logger at least
makes briefer tow times a
feasible way to protect tur-
tles, if researchers can sort
out what's safe, she said.
Fishermen are skeptical.
They say short tows aren't
practical in most fisheries,
such as those in deeper wa-
ters, where a worthw14ie
catch is impossible if'fth
nets must constantly,,; be
pulled up.
"It's a bad idea," said
James Fletcher, a veteran
fisherman and now head of
the North Carolina-based
United National Fisher-
man's Association.
"Nobody's going to love
the idea," acknowledged
Henry Milliken, a biologist
with the National Marine
Fisheries Service, which is
part of NOAA. But he added
fishermen might prefer lim-
its on how long the net can
be underwater to.harsher
alternatives, such as closing
fishing areas.
"The idea is that we're
looking at providing options
to the managers in the fu-
ture," Milliken said.
As the NMFS tries to de-
termine which steps will or
won't work, it's held public
meetings this spring from
New York to Georgia.
The turtle most fre-
quently caught in trawl nets
in the Atlantic is the logger-
head, the threatened 250-
pound giants named for
their relatively large heads.
In U.S. waters, every sea
turtle is listed as either en-
dangered or threatened, so
any turtle deaths in fishing
nets hit the populations
hard.
The most common way to
protect turtles right now is
the Turtle Excluder Device,
often a circular, barred
frame attached near the
front of fishing nets, The
bars are big enough for fish
and other sea life to slip
through, but too narrow for
turtles, which bounce out of
the net before they get
caught
The excluder devices
have had success in some
fisheries, including the
Southeast's shrimp trawl
fishery, but bigger species,
such as horseshoe crab,
monkfish and flounder, can
bounce out along with the
turtles and make the nets
far too inefficient.
Greg DiDomenico of the
Garden State Seafood Asso-
ciation, a New Jersey trade
group, said since the new
rules will apply to fisheries
from Cape Cod to Florida
- where the turtles swim
- whatever shakes out is
bound to be felt industry-
wide. That includes "huge
negative impacts on some
fisheries," he said,


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2oog D3


BUSINESS


(-.yFLrrQ t- ,ri-rv ITI C\ F4.NfrlE


J












D4

SUNDAY
JUNE 21. 2009


Promotional information provided by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce


Chamber Connection


Stewart Title Company


The Park Avenue of Hair Designs Inc.


Shari J. Justice, Branch Manager, Chad Sweet, Marketing and Search, Patti Sweet, Division
President were part of a ribbon cutting ceremony held to welcome Stewart Title Company
as new members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Also present for the ceremony
were Ambassadors Nancy Hautop, David Heinz, Tammy LaVelle, John Porter and Janet
Mayo. Stewart Title Company fka Advance Homestead Title has been in business in Citrus
County for 14 years and are backed by Stewart Title Guaranty Company which is the only
major national title insurer to receive an Insurer Financial Strength rating of 'A' with a sta-
ble outlook from Fitch Ratings Ltd.. We handle all types of real estate closings, refinances,
short sales, relocations, 1031 exchanges, Reverse Mortgage's, 0 & E reports and Escrow
only accounts. We are located at 4771 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 and would
be happy to address all of your real estate needs, give us a call 628-3800.


Advanced Gas Services


I . *''" * w - -' ^ ' ^ ^ "---------------------- ----
" ,*::" .- '". " I." "

Park Avenue of Hair Design Is a full service salon, specializing in total image; from hair to
skin, and nails. Pictured above, representing The Park Avenue of Hair Designs is Christo-
pher Haimbaugh, Tara Hall, Monica Cracolici, not pictured is Sherry Haimbaugh, Nancy
Broeker, Felicia Haimbaugh, Michelle Roberts, Nicole Roberts, Ericia Whitley, Ashton
Tuller,Reva Churchill and Lorrie Penna. Representing the Chamber Ambassador program is
Jessica Holcomb, Megan Ennis, Wench Hall, Jennifer Duca, David Heinz, Nancy Hautop,
Wendy Hall, Rhonda Lestinsky and John Porter. Park Avenue has been bringing a touch of
class to Citrus County for nearly 3 decades. Our Total Image Consultants are here for you.
Call today to find out how we can Create your Total Image Solution. You can reach us at
352-726-9099. We are located at 3433 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy in Inverness. You can also visit
our web site at www.theparkavenueofhairdesign.com


= Member NEWS


The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome Advanced Gas Services,
Inc. as new members. Pictured above, representing Advanced Gas Services is Dan Johnson,-
Adam Jackson and Ray Johnson. Welcoming the new members are Ambassadors Jessica
Holcomb, Megan Ennis, Ullian Smith, Janet Mayo, Frank Yetner, Pete Burrell, David Heinz
and John Porter. Also congratulating Advanced Gas Service is Chamber President/CEO
Josh Wooten., Advanced Gas Services, Inc. is a natural gas and propane service company
family owned and operated by Ray Johnson and Daniel Johnson. They specialize in both
commercial and residential gas piping, appliance installation and service repair on most
brands of gas utilizing appliances. Retailing the full line of Notriz tankless water heating sys-
tems, gas fireplaces and log sets installed in existing wood burning fire places and summer
kitchens. Give them a call today at 352-400-5449 email them at advancedgasser-
vices@yahoo.com

Democratic Executive Committee


Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cit-
rus County invites the public out
for a "Big Night at Beefs" at Beef
'O' Brady's, 6738 W Gulf to Lake
Highway in Crystal River, for din-
ner between 5 PM and closing
on Thursday, June 18 2009. This
"Big Night at Beefs" gives our
community a chance to have a
great dinner and help Big Broth-
ers Big Sisters just by being
there! Kids who stop by Beefs
throughout the month will get a
free ticket for a special drawing
for a bicycle that is given away
on the BIG NIGHT! Come out,
meet and greet mentors, chil-
dren and staff from Big Brothers
Big Sisters and many guests
who support Big Brothers Big
Sisters! Twenty percent of all
meal purchases will be donated
to support Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters 'one-to-one mentoring pro-
grams. In addition to the
wonderful evening of food and
fun, the evening will serve as an
BOWL FOR KIDS SAKE TEAM
RALLY, offering teams a fun
night out to plan strategies,
make challenges, meet the
teams, learn tips to help their
teams and get ready for a suc-
cessful event. For more informa-
tion about this event or to learn
more about donating to or volun-
teering with Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters programs, call
352-464-3968.
MMM
In an effort to provide even
more extensive assistance to


boaters, Seatow has added an
airboat to our fleet. Our same
great 24/7 service is now readily
available in the shallow waters of
the Salt and St. Martins' rivers
for those shallow water fisher-
man. Come by our new office on
Ft. Island Trail Crystal River for
new memberships, renewals,
tide charts and a wide variety of
boating related information. Call
us at 352-795-2236. Our hours
are 8-4 Mon-Sat and closed
Wed & Sun.
SEE
Those who know Hemando-
Pasco Hospice as a community
organization to which they can
turn when faced with a life-limit-
ing illness can expect to con-
tinue to receive care, comfort
and support regardless of ability
to pay. However, as the not-for-
profit agency recognizes its 25th
anniversary this week (June 15,
2009), its name officially be-
comes HPH Hospice (HPH).
'When the State of Florida
granted us a Certificate of Need
to serve Citrus County residents
in 2005, our former name no
longer reflected our service
area," said Tom Barb, HPH Hos-
pice president and chief execu-
tive officer. "Still, we wanted to
retain a large part of our legacy
while building a bridge from the
past to the present and on into
the future." Barb added that the
hospice's board of directors
unanimously approved the new
name in January and that it has


been accepted by the Agency for
Health Care Administration. The
hospice's long-standing teal logo
has been updated to green and
gold. The candle, which Barb
said has been the agency's key
identifier, is still the "i" in hospice
but has been given a more con-
temporary look. HPH began with
a handful of volunteers and staff
in 1984 who served all of Pasco
and Hemando counties. One of
them was Anne Huette, who is
now Regional Director for HPH
Hospice in Citrus County. When
HPH Hospice began serving Cit-
rus County, it had a small office
in Lecanto. In February 2007,
HPH opened its Citrus Hospice
Care.Center and a month later,
moved into a new office in Bev-
erly Hills to better accommodate a
growing number of volunteers in
staff. A HPH Hospice House
opened in February 2008 in
Lecanto. The agency's Hospice
House is primarily intended for
hospice patients who do not
have a caregiver. "Over the past
quarter of a century, HPH has
emerged as one of the largest
not-for-profit hospices in the
United States, caring for an av-
erage of 1,000 patients daily,"
said Barb. In total, HPH has
seven team offices, four Hospice
Houses, five Hospice Care Cen-
ters, a pharmacy and durable
medical equipment company,
two thrift stores and a not-for-
profit home health affiliate called
HPH Home Health.


Recently, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held, welcoming the Citrus County Democratic Ex-
ecutive Committee as new members of the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce. Members
present were Frank "Pinky" Yetner (Also Chamber Ambassador), Walter Roberts, Mike
Gudis, Deb DeVito, Brigette Still and Helene Wersching. Ambassadors present were Dan
Pushee, Janet Mayo, Bonnie Hardiman, David Heinz, Jennifer Duca and Lillian Smith. The
Democratic Executive Committee meets on the third Wednesday of every month at the
Beverly Hills Community Center on 1 Civic Circle in Beverly Hills. They meet at 7 p.m. For
more information, contact Mike Gudis at 795-2044 or Frank Yetner at 341-0005.


Call the Chamber for details on the

Women's Health & Fitness Expo 2009


Act now to make sure
you'll be part of the
Women's HEALTH & FIT-
NESS Expo 2009, hosted by
the Business Women's Al-
liance of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce.
The Expo will be on Sat-
urday, September 26, 2009,
from 9 AM to 2 PM at the Na-
tional Guard Armory in
Crystal River.
Details on exhibit regis-
tration, sponsorship oppor-
tunities, and a new exhibit/
services offering called The
.Spa Zone are available from
the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, Inverness of-
fice, at 401 Tompkins Street
Phone 726-2801.
These opportunities are
for health-, fitness- and well-
ness-related organizations,
and on a "first come, first
served" basis. Chamber
members receive dis-


- ' "


counted exhibit registration
fees.
The Expo's purpose is to
educate women and those
around them about their
health, fitness and wellness.
Proceeds will further the
education of students from


Hernando-Pasco Hospice hosts the


Chamber Aft tUqr ixrt


June 25, 2009

5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

No need to RSVP

Questions? Call Hernando-Pasco
Hospice at (352) 527-4600






3545 N. Lecanto Hvy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465


www.hphospice.org


Citrus High School, Crystal
River High School, Lecanto
High School and / or Withla-
coochee Technical Institute.
Proceeds from last year's
Expo funded three scholar-
ship awards to students in
health careers.


Enjoy an informal meet
and greet with
Tom Barb
New President & CEO of
Hernanclo-Pasco Hospice

Complimentary
hors d'oeuvi-cs, desserts
and beveriges


I fornando-Pasco I lospice ext(-(k iN
thanks to community
leaders and partners lik(.' �IOLI I DI'
helping us to make a diffel-once
in Illp, lix,(-% of olhers.













Google tricycle snaps views from Philly campus


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA - Coming
soon to a campus near you - the
Google tricycle.
A pedicab-like vehicle
mounted with an 8-foot-high
camera has been rolling around
the pedestrian walkways of the
University of Pennsylvania to
collect panoramic images of the
campus for Google Maps' Street
View feature, which gives users
detailed, street-level views of
map locations over the Internet.
Google Inc. has been using car-
mounted cameras' to prowl
streets in the U.S. and around
the world. The human-powered
version allows coverage of
pedestrian-only areas on cam-
puses, in public parks and at
theme parks, as well as along
hiking and bicycling trails, -as
Google seeks to expand coverage
of its maps.
The effort comes as Google
faces complaints from many in-
dividuals and institutions that
have been photographed around
the world. Since launching in
2007, Street View has expanded
to more than 100 cities world-
wide.
Danny Sullivan, editor-in-chief
of the industry news site Search
Engine Land, called the new ef-
fort a good public relations move
by Google.
"This is a nice way for them to
say 'Hey, look, Street View: It's
really warm and fuzzy,"' he said.
"It's not just about, taking pic-
tures of people's houses. We can
find these footpaths that people
want to go on and walling areas,
places people will like."
Officials say the photos of
Penn's tree-lined Locust Walk
mall and other places will allow
prospective students and their
parents to get a good feel for the
campus, give incoming students
a way to map out the best route
to their classes - and.let alumni
fondly remember their school
days.


"We see this as an opportunity
.. for people to see as much of
Penn as possible from their com-
puter," said Marie Witt, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania vice-
president for business services.
"Students can show their parents
where they're living, where the
student union is, where their fa-
vorite classroom building is."
The 250-pound vehicle, which
resembles the pedicabs that
carry tourists around Philadel-
phia and other cities, has the cy-
clist pumping the pedals up
front, with the camera mounted
on a tower in the back. On the
rear is a red generator along
with a large white chest that
looks like it might dispense ice
cream but actually contains the
computer recording the digital
images.
On Friday, the tricycle trun-
dled through the Ivy League
school quads enclosed by stu-
dent housing buildings and along
campus footpaths, drawing
stares from students and em-
ployees.
"I think it's fantastic," said
Caitlin Hanrahan, 28, a nursing
student. "This campus is really
confusing ... and when you try
and explain to people how to get
to the building, people get lost all
the time. I think something like
that, where you can see a picture
of it and what you have to walk
through to get there, would actu-
ally be really helpful.
Lyndsey Hauck, 25, eating Chi-
nese takeout on a bench in front
of a green campus pond, dove for
her cell phone to grab a picture
as the tricycle apparatus
swooped by, ignored by ducks
and turtles even after it got stuck
on the path and needed a slight
push. -
"Pretty cool - always kind of
interested in how they've done it,
so now we know," said her com-
panion, Cody Strohl, 29, also a
Penn employee.
The tricycle has also been
cruising around other colleges


Classifieds


and universities, including Penn
State, San Diego State and the
University of San Diego, Google
spokesman Sean Carlson said.
It has also been seen cruising
past Rome's Trevi fountain, at
Santa Monica's Third Street
promenade and pier and along a
Monterey, Calif. bicycle trail.
Soon, views will be featured
from along walkways of theme
parks such as Legoland near
Carlsbad, Calif., Carlson said.
In other countries, privacy
concerns have been raised about
the images.
Mountain View, Calif.-based
Google this week acceded to Ger-
man demands to erase the raw
footage of faces,.house numbers,
license plates and individuals
who have told authorities they
do not want their information
used in the service.
Last month, Greek officials re-
jected a bid to photograph the
nation's streets until more pri-
vacy safeguards are provided. In
April, residents of one English
village formed a human chain to
stop a camera van, and in Japan
the company agreed to reshoot
views taken by a camera high
enough to peer over fences.
Witt said university officials
escorting -the Google teams
around campus were working to
make sure privacy concerns
were addressed. The company
says faces and license plates will
be blurred, and anyone can
quickly flag for removal images
they consider inappropriate by
clicking a box on the bottom of
each page.
,One of the tricycle operators,
Martin D.E Angelo, 27, said the
camera occasionally gets a leery
reaction from older people but
seems universally embraced by
the young.
"The biggest disappointment
that most people seem to voice is
that we're actually going to blur
out their faces," he said, "so
they're not going to be Internet-
famous or something like that."


4


0-~


I-f
Associated Press
Google cartographer Dexter Harris rides a tricycle equipped with cam
eras Friday through the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in
Philadelphia. The internet search engine has started taking pictures at
the University of Pennsylvania so that it can add college campuses to its
Google Maps service.


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(5)53-65 1Tl Fe:(8)82-30 1E al:.asfes hoilolnecm Iwb.t:w wcrnilolnao


SWM seeking SWF 40's
early 50's. Am off of
work for 3 months look-
ing to walk the trail &
workout at the gym,
movies and other ac-
tivities, Height & weight
proportionate, Me
5'10", 190, muscular
build, 49, look younger,
Inverness area. Call
Brian 352-220-3094
Will cook and drive for
elderly, clean, non
smoking or drinking
gentleman in ex-
change for room with
no pets, I have superior
driving score. Call
(352) 726-6960


Finder
www.ch finder comr


FuuI Your trw* Hom
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehc , finder.com


$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$$ CASH PAID $$
Cash for your junk car,
truck or van
(352) 634-5389
FREE REMOVAL OF
Garage Sale,.Hshold,
& Furniture Items
Call 352-476-8949
WANTED
Junk Lawn Mowers,
& Power Equip.
Free Pick-up (352)
564-8014/601-5053
/Us out zoomcitrus.com


2 young adult neut.
males, BIK w/gray strips,
all shots, no flea, mites
etc.incls pet taxi
(352) 527-3754
Chow
8 yrs. nuet, up to date
on shots, owner passed
away.(352) 794-3628
Excell. Home for any'
unwanted birds, poultry
U-R unable to care for
726-9874
FREE Horse
Manure, U Haul
(352) 249-1127
FREE MALE SIAMESE
CAT, 11 yrs old,
neutered, good health,
to good home
(352) 586-0082
FREE PUPPY TO GOOD
HOME. Male, 4 mths
old, kennel trained.
352-726-2980.
FREE TO GOOD
HOME-2 female cats, 1
male cat. Very good with
children and dogs. Mov-
ing and have to find new
homes. Call
352-302-1886
HAVE SOMETHING TO
GIVE AWAY?
Place your
ad 24 hrs a day.
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
1 Select Place an Ad
2 Create an Account
3 Select Cust. type
4 Select Heading of
Special Notices
5 Select Free
6 Create Ad

a�[01ron1rve
Your lorld Iirst.
Every Day

Ci Ii )i(NIli
Classijieds


Kittens
Persian/tabby mix
7 weeks old, 3 males
(352) 274-8109
KITTENS/CATS
To good home.
352-400-2870
Momma Cat
w/2 kittens,males, 3 mos.
Gray & black tiger striped.
Momma must go as well.
Can be separated.
(352) 201-9446
Red Nose Pit Bull,
spayed female, all
shots, 11 mos. old
(352) .795-1198
YOUNG CAT
11 mo. old. Extremely
loveable, well
behaved. No fleas or
worms. Call Rosa or
Shannon
(352) 464-1567
YOUNG MOTHER
w/4 newborns, need
an exc perm or foster
home Call Rosa Or
Shannon (352) 464-1567


Blackberries
Organically Grown.
U-pick, open daily,
8A./12P. $3.50 per pd.
9333 Hwy 48 Floral City.
Sweet Corn @ Bellamy
Grove, located 1.5 mi.
east on Eden Dr. from
Hwy. 41, Inverness.
Conch peas, butter
beans, watermelons.


GOLDEN RETRIEVER MIX
Female. Lost at Bingo
hall in Dunnellon, 6/12.
352-489-1098.
Grey Short haired Cat
Inverness Mobile Home
Park, afraid of people
If seen please
Call (352) 637-5722

a and read
Lost Beverly Hills /
Brentwood
Blu Merle Sheltie, 12
yrs, Female, requires
medication and spe-
cial diet. NINA is
VERY friendly, she
has a thryoid condi-
tion, bad heart mur-
mur and her kidneys
are failing.
Please call
352-327-3355.


AT THE 'HEART OF OUR COMMUNITY


RING ...FOR MANY YEARS,

IN MANY WAYS.


For r, .I ,cear . Crru- pi. ri, l H lrth ', rr, n l iem t H h- . L r. pr-.. ,J1-i. >i u.l'is i'i
r, [th1 c.,.n m '-,r-,n, ,A.l 0i,'.u1h i.,. r .-i."i i,:n-g [1hi tuiur i ., th lo- rn *i i: ,:, h ih ll
jrd j3 r i. , : rrgcT., iriT ,''.'r'h r,: n ., . rL .1.1] ,:h,. i ,r,,[ [ i: 1 - h. , ir. ' ,.p|,: \ I,\ i.j ',,:
|[ i-+-T ,r i..r r .11-

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N e.ur . ,-r l":i n ri * E -,t " F,.i>:: ri-hnic.i J 'ri:r' , * ,.,,r * ,.1 :.i, ,r-Ll I '-,. ,.r.-n :t.
u t<]\l'.N u'u l ir '.l,..li..: :.':. ru..J, : M r..u . , l ,n -i * � N l(b sl ug -rm ll ',', .,,,,1 ,'. Jk.in r lnr.i :
C 'Rf * H ..n'< H .. ,ih * N ur-. t .Ala ']g,:r .:.l7''. -" i', -" l-'. ,r. ,,:..

Hyperbaric Tech
I ' r l ,..iitd m u ,[ an' . r l , . 1 L. r ,J .1 r . . i , ln d f H y -[ ,: r l '. ] r ' i .. . l i , - l . ..: :i,: r i - . . .: . 1 h i p . . 1 . .
.� , .r,. .*.,h iF, i . -,i- I Tr ........ .11- ,,.l ,I ir.i TitK.'uii , ,I . . ,i-,npl,.rr, ...h.,', I h ,,. ..,Tt. ' -"1
" ., r.in r l I.,I'h . r'l,-, a'. dlr,, ..II1:'. llIx r.. |u ..u IT,, ',IT ,, :( r . ,...h...r , . ' H i .'.,illi. , I
m.,.r.rli. ri[ 4 1 : .ur i \ c..rr.ii .ir-.i...n r,:qu| rcd

Certified Scrub Tech
ik quire . lu ir. , ,t F,; i.:>:r,'.:r = '..1 t ..1 surg .' ,I I ,, 'l. -.l. ,- > i ,t .r ,gr i '.Im hr ,r, r[ in.. o ,..r I 1 1 'j
p c,.,,-u ur. :.l.l. u:n h u ..:rI, :rn:,, .' .5 i . -' I . ,,h-i I p, . r-I rr. .,i hir. ,IT.

Physical Therapist-Home Health
Requires Bachelor's, Master's or DPT in Physical Therapy in an APTA approved program; FlH
licensure; and CPR certification.
Billing Compliance Auditor
Requires Bachelor's degree; and ICD-9-CM/CPT coding certification and/or CPAT/C(RC
certification with coding background.
Patient Processing Supervisor
Requires 3 years hospital or medical office experience; ability to type 30-401 wpm; and knowledge
of third party payers. Supervisory experience and Certified Patient Account Technician with an
Associate's degree preferred.
Come join us in Inverness, our scenic town on Florida's Nature Coast, just north of the Tampa
Bay area. Citrus Memorial offers a competitive salary, and a generous benefits package that
includes 403b+match as well as merit raises. Not to mention, relocation assistance. If you're
looking for a friendly workplace where people truly care, make yourself at home here.
Please apply online at CITRUS MEMORIAL
www.dtrusmh.com

EOE


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Results


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Classifieds!


SUNDAY, JUN F, 2 1, 2 oog D5


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D6 SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009


Black lab mix
In vaclnlty of Ox Eye
on Homosassa Trail
Call to Indentify
(352) 503-7343

Car Keys, Crystal River,
Woodland Estates Area
795-6056

Two dogs no collars.
One is grey Welmaraner
type running w/ a black
lab mix. both appx. a
year old. Vacinity of 491
& Tram Rd Holder area.
(352) 522-0214 or
220-2605





PRECIOUS PAWS
RESCUE, INC.
352-726-4700
See adoptable pets
on our website
www.oreclousoaws
-florfda.com
Visit our Pets every
Saturday
at Petsupermarket
Inverness 10-lpm
& Crystal River Mall
Sat June 20th 10- 1pm
or call us.


www.adopta
rescued netcom
View available pets on
our website or call
(352) 795-9550
Adoption Locations

Crystal River Mall
June 6th 11-3pm
Pet Supermnarket
Inverness
June 13th, 20th &
29th... 11-2pm


Citrus County Home
Inspections
$75. Any house in
June. (352) 978-8403
DAVE'S MOBILE
REPAIR/SERVICE
Gas & Diesel
25 Yrs Experience En-
gine Specialist
home-professional-farm
No job too bio or small.
352-228-2067




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Exp'd
friendly serve. Lowest
Ltes Free est.
352-860-1452
All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/ ys out zoomcitrus.com
COLEMAN TREE SERV.
Trim & Removal. Lic.
Ins. FREE EST. Lowest
rates. 352-270-8462
check out zoomcitrus.com
DOUBLE J STUMP
GRINDING, Mowing,
Hauling,Cleanup,
Mulch, Dirt. 302-8852 ,
D's Landscape &
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272










OSBORNE'S
Lawni/TreeShrub
Quality Work Free Est.
LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lie (352) 400-6016 Ins





Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top.
removal, Free Est
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881
Richard Mills Tree Serv
Trim, haul, top,
removal, Free Est.
Reasonable Rates
(352) 398-9881


- --- m-iq
-Bank Probate
Divorces /Evictions
352-613-3674

Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs - Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com








ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$
* LIFE INSURANCE
HEALTH
* ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com

CAT
ADOPTIONS


sf.p r. . P .. r-,pa ) L&Ui�H

Come see
our
adorable cats and
kittens that are
available for
adoption.
We are open
10:00 A till 3:00 P
Monday-Friday.
Adoptions
every other Sunday
beginning Jan. 4
All Cats and Kittens are
altered, tested for Fe-
line Luk and Aids. Up to
date on
vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-563-2370
Visit us at '
www.hofspha.ora.
or stop by our offices
at 1149 N Conant Ave.
Comer of 44 and Co-
nant."
Look for the big white
building with the bright
paw prnts.




Wanted home or
mobile, any area or
any condition. I can
pay you cash & close
quickly (352) 726-9369


Tree removal, stump
grind, trim, Ins.& Uc
0256879 352-341-6827



AFFORDABLE TUTORING
K-5, Exp. teacher
Flexible times.
410-0446



At Home Computer
Repairs & custom
computers.
Call (352)228-7823
COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 MI. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839



REPAIR SPECIALIST
Restretch.Installatlon
Call for Fast Service
C & R SERVICES
Sr. Discount 586-1728



Chris Satchell Painting
& Wallcovering.
work fully coated. 30 yrs.
Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins.
352-795-6533
352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
3rd GENERATION SERV-
ICE Int./ Ext. Painting,
Lc/Ins. FREE Estimate
(352) 201-0658
CheapCheapCheap
DP press, clean/paint
Many references.
637-3765
FERRARO'S
Painting Service
Int/Ext. Free Est. Press
Cleanin 352 465-6631
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lie./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



PHIL'S MOBILE MARINE
27 yrs. exp.Certified
Best prices/guaranteed
352-220-9435
check out zoomcitrus.com
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimlni's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com


Widow Wants
Female Companion
Over 60 to share lovely
home on 2 acres.
Share utilities.
352-220-6100




Looking to Rent
Large House
or Facility
to accommodate
up to 18 people,
Nov. 21- Nov.28
For extended
Family Reunion
In Crystal River Area
Call 802-758-2017
or email
Iconnor@gmavt.net

MAY I PRAY FOR
YOU?
Bill 352-726-9064
RENT a Son

House cleaning,laundry
shopping, errands
windows. Pet Sitting
etc. Call Mindy
(352) 419-5522
TUTORING - All subjects
& Spanish. Exp. Certified
teacher. Reading
specialist (619) 307-9277
Citrus County




A FREE Report of Your
Home's Value
www.naturecoast








S T N


AT YOUR HOME
Mower & Generator
Repair. 352-220-4244
Lic#99990001273
DAVE'S MOBILE ,
REPAIR
Gas / Diesel Engines
No job too bia or small.
352-228-2067





The Tile Man
Bathroom remodel
Specializing in handi-
cap. Lic/Ins #2441.
352-634-1584-




S, ALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner BImini's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcitrus.com




OUTREACH SENIOR
COMPANION
SERVICES
Affordable, quality
Senior Care.
Companions,
Homemakers, Sitters,
Licenced, Bonded &
Insured Call toll free
1-877-803-1608
www.outreachsenlor
companion.conr
Uc #231103
PRIVATE DUTY
CAREGIVER 30 Yrs.
Exp./Great References.
(603) 661-9054



* SEE THROUGH
Window Washing
All Aspects (352)
489-4189; 322-0962
/ us out zoomcltrus.com



Reg'd HOME DAYCARE
Citrus Springs- Summer
Program/Planned Cur-
riculum. 352-422-7904
/us out @ zoomcitrus.com



ANN'S CLEANING
SERVICE
352-601-3174


ARBOR MEDICAL
STAFFING
STEADY WORK!
UNLIMITED HOURS!
12 HR. SHIFTS IN
CITRUS COUNTY

RN'S $25/hr.
LPN'S $23/hr.
CNA'S $14/hr.
Call Aneita Today!!

arborstaff.com
Ph: (800) 919-8964
Fx: (800) 919-8965
BE A CNA
One week Prep Course
Train & test with us.
GETYOURCNA.COM
341-PREP (7737)
Certified
Medical Assistant

F/T Must be able to
work quickly &
accurately. Prior
Medical office
experience req'd
Competitive wages.
Benefits
Email resume to
resumes 10764


CNA
Medical office exp.
Required. Full time
with benefits. For
busy medical office.
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512
DIAMOND RIDGE
HEALTH & REHAB

V COME CHECK /
US OUT!
We offer a great working
environment, excellent'
wages and benefits. We
Are Ready to Hire "You"
for the following positions:
R.N. Supervisor, full time
for 11-7 shift..C.N.A.'S full
time for 11-7 shift. LPN.'S
or R.N'S for part time
and pm 3-11 & 11-7
shifts. Drop in for an
interview, tour, and join
our customer service
oriented team geared
toward excellent
resident outcomes.
2730 W., Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.


ROGERS Construction
New Homes & All
Construction (352)
637-4373 CRC1326872

Sdcnettler
Construction, LLC.
Renovations,room
additions, decks, barns,
garagesvarious home
repairs. (352)637-4629
cell 352-266-6756
Uc. & Ins CBC1253348




SUBURBAN IND. INC.
Screen rms, rescreens,
siding, carports, rfovers,
wood decks, fla rms,
windows, garage scrns
(CBC1257141) 628-0562




CALL STELLAR BLUE .
All Int./Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
.All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Lic. 5863 (352) 746-0141

Andrew Joehi
Handyman.
Gen/Maint/Repairs
Pressure cleaning.
Lawns/Gutters. No job
too small!Reli able ,ins.
0256271 352-465-9201

NATURE COAST
HOME REPAIR 1
& MAINT INC
w- Offering a Full I
Range of Services
www.naturecoast
r homerealr.corm
Lc. 2776/Ins.,
352-634-5499
Vlsa/MC/Discover
L .--.
ALL HOME REPAIR
painting, drywall
Malley's Home Maint
220-9486 (lic0259169)
/ out zoomcitrus.com
X'D HADYMA


Al paeso hm


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!t
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Call now for a FREE,
In-Home Estimate

1-866-585-8827
BATHFITTER.COM


CLASSIFIED




CNA/HHA/
Caregiver
Friendly & Cheerful
people needed
to provide
CNA, HHA or
Caregiver Services for
seniors.
Part time, must be
available days, eve-
nings & weekends,
Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
3770 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
10am-2p, Mon.-Fri.


LPNs



,. :. . *. -.


Arbor Village
Rehab &
.NNitasg
Center. A
bedroom
Community
of the
Villages
In Wildwood
Is currently accepting
applications for
Licensed Practical
Nurses (LPNs)
positions as part of
our Nursing team.

Some of the many
reasons to Join our
team Include:
Competitive wages
Strong benefits
package for
Full-Time Employee
recognition programs
Strong management
team


Full-time - 3-11
Part-Time - 11-7
Requirements for
consideration:
Current CNA
Licensure in the state
of FLorida.
Criminal Background
check and drug
screen required for all
candidates.
To apply, please
e-mail your resume to
-Jobs@CQCare.com

You may also fax your
resume to
(877) 571-1952 or
apply by phone - toll
free (800) 442-1353.

We also accept
applications In
person.
490 S. Old Wire Road
Wildwood, Florida
34785


Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Any Home
Repair.CBC #1253431
(352) 464-3748
FAST! AFFORDABLE!
RELIABLE! Most repairs
Free Est., Lic#0256374
*(352) 257-9508 *



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
Also Phone, Cable, Lan
& Plasma TV's Installed,
pressure wash & gutters
Llc. 5863 (352) 746-0141
ANNIE'S ELECTRIC
Res./Commercial
Beverly Hills Area.
Husband & Wife
Team.(352) 341-5952
EC-13002696
DUN-RITE
ELECTRIC INC.
Elec/Serv/Repairs
New const. Remodel
Free Est 726-2907
EC13002699




FASTI AFFORDABLE
RELIABLEI Most repairs
Free Est,, Lic#0256374
* (352) 257-9508 *



C.J.'S Sm.Local Moves
Furniture, clean-outs,
Dump runs & Brush
726-2264/201-1422




Expert Repairs &8 Sales
All types of flooring.
Lowest rates. Mitch, Jr.
352-341-0909, 25yrs



PAVING & SEAL COAT
VIGLIONE LLC-lie/Ins
www. TAR-MAX.com
Free Est(352)726-3093




Aaron's Fence 24/7
Serving Citrus County
since 1985. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. (352) 795-7373
ROCKY'S Fencing
WORKING IN CITRUS
COUNTY FOR 26 YRS.
Free Est., Lic. & Ins.,
*,352 422-7279


hope's Pool & Pool Todaers
*Pool Refinishing
I nterlocking Brick Paver


VACATION IN
YOUR OWN


"FREE QUOTES"
MLic. & Insured
.... -.. . ^ 3 CPC1456565
..- 352400.3188


C'sITRUS COUNn (FL.) CHOIii',CLE


CNA PREP & TEST
EZ Learning Services
Day & Evening Classes
352-382-EASY; 586-2715
/ us out zoomcltrus.comr
CNA TEST PREP
Now Offering am/pm.
Classes Free CPR train-
ing w/enrollment. New
classes begin ev 3 wks
341-2311/scholarsitips
Dental/
Surgical Assistant
For an oral surgery
practice, in Lecanto &
Springhill.
Experience a must
Email Resume to:
maryamoli@
yahoo.cam
or Fax 352-527-8087

Full Time
Lic. Lab Tech &
Phlebotomist.

For busy Physician
Lab. Competitive
Salary & Benefits�
Fax Resume to:
(352) 746-6333

Granny Nannies
Seeking Experienced
CNA & HHA
Call 352-560-4229
GYN OFFICE IN
CRYSTAL RIVER
LOOKING FOR:
Cart. Medical Asst.
Receptionist - Billing
Dietician
Cert. Nursing Asst.
Proactive, 1 year
exp. in Medical Of-
fices. Knowledge In
medical software
Please send resume:
mredrick@earthlink.net
or fax 352-564-8201

Medical Assistant
Experience needed.
Please send resume
to P.O. Box 3087
Homosassa Springs,
Florida 34447

, MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Full or Part Time
Crystal River or
Inverness.
Fax Resume:
352-795-2017

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office based
medical practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

MEDICAL
TRANSCRIPTIONIST

F/T to work from home
for orthorpedic practice.
Must have PC, & exp.
220 patients a week.
PIs email to
jen@citrusortho.net
or call 352-746-2663


Go Owens Fencing.
All Types. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
OSBORNE'S
Lawn/Tree/Shrub
Quality Fence Work Free
Est. LOWEST
RATES GUARANTEED!
Lie (352) 400-6016 Ins



AAA ROOFING
Free est. 30 yrs exp.
352-563-0411ccc057537
John Gordon Roofing
For a hole in your roof
or a whole new roof.
Free est. 352-795-7003



BIANCHI CONCRETE
Driveways-Patios-
Sidewalks. Estimates
Lic#2579/Ins, 257-0078
Decorative concrete,
Landscape curbing
River rock resealing
344-4209 (Lic.6960)
Father & Son
Decorative Concrete
textures, Stamp,spray
crack repair,staining
& Garage Floors
352-527-1097
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
. 352-464-3967 -
Quality Concrete Serv.
Layout to Lentil
ALL TYPES, Tractor
352-726-2383, Llc#2567
ROB'S MASONRY
& CONCRETE Slabs,
Driveways & tear outs
Tractor work, All kinds
Lic. #1476,726-6554

- I -


Remodeling, kitchens
baths, ceramic tile &
tops. Decks, Garages
Handyman Services
40 Yrs Exp. crc058140
344-3536; 563-9768
W. F. GILLESPIE CONST.
Lic. #CRC 1327902
(352) 344-0009
www.wfgillesple.com




A Cutting Edge
Tile Job
Showers. Firs etc
(352) 422-2019
Lic. #2713, Insured.


BECOME A CNA
For Career and
Test Preparation
Call 352-564-8378
NOW HIRING
Experienced,
Caring &
Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
Flexible schedules
offered. $10.00/hr.
CALL LOVING CARE


Nurse Practitioner
or
Physician Assist.
For Busy Medical
Office. Full time
with Benefits,
Fax Resume to:
352-563-2512

RN / LPN
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center
of Citrus County
Full-time, 3 p.m.-I 1
p.m., and PRN posi-
tions are available.
Must have a current
Florida nursing
license. Long-term
care experience
preferred.

We offer competitive
pay and benefits,
including continuing
education and career
growth opportunities,
in a mission-driven
environment.

Apply in person to
Hannah Mand.
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Visit us online at
www.LCCA.com.
EOE/M/F/V/D
Job #9552


Lift1




STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
COORDINATOR/
RISK MANAGER

Come join an
exciting team.
Qualified candidate
must have knowl-
edge of Federal,
State and OSHA
Regs. Two years exp,
in HealthCare field,
teaching, training
and development.
FL RN license '
required. Excellent
benefits. EOE.

Resume to:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd-
Inverness, FL 34453
Fax: 352-637-1921
Email: dispangler@
southernltc.com


Affordable Top Soil,
Dirt, Rock, Stone Drive-
ways &.TLactor work
341-2019 or 257-1562
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,
Hauling, Site Prep,
Driveways. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 795-5755
*TOP SOIL SPECIAL*
3 Yd -$60/ 5 Yd $85
10Yd $175/20Yd $275
Red Mulch $22.yd
352-302-6436



All Tractor/Dirt
Service - Land clear,
bushhog, tree/debris
removal. 352-302-6955
/us out zoomcitrus.com
All AROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing,HaulingSite
Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins795-5755
Ck out zoomcitrus.com
Pasture mowing, lots
acreage, commercial.
$18. per acre & up.
(352) 978-8403



D's Landscape.&
Expert Tree Svc
Personalized design.
Bobcatwork fill/rock
& sod 352-563-0272





Lawn Care, Sod, Plugs,
Landscaping,SprinklersPres.
Wsh.15yrsexp.
Lic. & Ins.(352)270-1150




I--- - - -




I Lowest Price
Guaranteed.
Barker's Lawn
Service Monthly or
I Per cut rate
(352) 232-8166
-l-lw h


Installations by
Brian CBC1253853

352-628-7519
.. .Sidin





w a.., .,d..i n f
www.advancedaluminum.info


POPE JOHN
PAUL II
CATHOLIC
SCHOOL

Is seeking a
P/T GUIDANCE
COUNSELOR
For 3 1/2 days per wk.
Call: 746-2020
www.pjp2.net




Chef

Some exp, in Italion
cuisine, food license,
own transportation.
Inglis 447-1313
or 447-2406
Homosassa Riverside
Resort Now hiring ,
SERVERS * COOKS
BAR TENDER
BOAT CAPT USCG Lic.
Master for Narrated River
Tours.
E-mail qualifications and
contact info to
personnel@
riversideresorts.com
or fax 352-628-5208 for
appt.
Location information at
www.riversideresorts.com





Looking For A
CAREER
CHANGE

The best opportunity
In Citrus County.
Average income taor
2008 was $56.000.
Our 15
representatives
enjoy company trips,
bonuses, and many
other incentives.
Qualifications:
* Self-motivated
* Team Player
* Outgoing
Personality
and the
k Willingness to Learn
2 POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Mon. through Fri.
No late evenings,
weekends or holidays.
No experience
.necessary,
training available.

Fax Resumes
to Atten: Joe
352-726-6813

SGN Wireless
AT&T

Authorized Retailer
store in Citrus County
is looking to fill full
time sales position
Please E-mail
resume to: resume
@sgnwireless.com


#1 AGAIN Pro Tech
Lawn Service. Family
owned & operated.
Serving central Citrus
Cty since 1999. Call
for free estimate
302-7800 - Lic/Ins.

AFFORDABLE Lawncare
Cuts starting at $10
We do it Ali!!!
Call 352-563-9824
Conner Lawn &
Landscaping
Ask about our Specials
Free Est (352) 341-3930
check out zoomcitrus.com
DUN-RITE LAWN SERV
Lic & Ins Clean up,,
Full Service
(352) 344-2681
check zoorncitrus.com
HEDGE TRIMMING,
HAULING(ANY KIND),
LAWN MOWING,
MULCH. FREE ESTI-
MATES. 352-344-9273
OR 352-201-9371
INVERNESS AREA
Mowtrim, beds,
Fast Reonse since
1991 352- 422-5978
1/ zoomcitrus.com

Lawn Care 'N' More
Mow, clean up
brushes, beds
Friendly Service since
1991
Residential/Commrl
(352) 726-9570
out zoomcitrus.com

Lawn Care, Sod, Plugs,
LanscapingSp&n ersPresJ
Wash. 15 yrs exp.
Lic. & Ins.(352)270-1150
MOWING & TRIMMING
Yard work
Affordable Rates
352-302-1511;341-5182
OSBORNE'S
Quality Work - Free
Est. LOWEST RATES
352-400-6016 Lic/Ins

STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166




EVERCLEAR POOL
SERV. & Maint.
Concrete Pools Only
(352)344-5122
POOL BOY SERVICES
Total Pool Care
Decorative Concrete
S352-464-3967


1st Choice ......
PEST CONTROL, INC.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE



HOME OR LAWN
PROBLEMS?
Call 503-6821
Owner/operators
Lloyd Smiti * Bill Biedenstein * Jim Ctrry
7A42 5340W. GlenDrook St.


Salesperson

Familiar with doors and
trim. Fax resume to
352- 489-0709
TIMES ARE HARD
NEED TO EARN
$$ MONEY $$?
352-560-7065: 560-7029



CHIEF ENGINEER
F/T, prefer hotel exp
MAID & LAUNDRY
PERSON
Fax or email
resume 352-563-1112:
gsm.crystalriver@gmail.
cornm
Exp. Wood Finisher
Needed, Part time,
4625 W. Homosassa TrI
Lecanto, Florida
LANDSCAPING CO.
Seeking
RETAIL SALES &
NURSERY MANAGER
Exp. only need to
apply. 352-621-1944

ROOFING CREW
Exp, own equip. &
truck. Apply AAA
Roofing. 1000 NE 5th
St. Crystal River
TOP QUALITY
PLASTERER
Hard coat - Veneer
Call Mike 561-319-8182




CUSTODIAN
Announcement
#09 -15

Full time position
performing janitorial
duties maintaining
County buildings and
facilities. Sweeps and
mops floors, vacuums
carpets and polishes
furniture. Cleans
restrooms, windows,
blinds, air condition-
ing vents, etc.
Graduation from H.S
or GED certificate.
Some knowledge
of building mainte-
nance and custodial
requirements. ,
Knowledge of floor
care such as
stripping, waxing and
buffing. Must have
janitorial experience
and/or experience
as a semi-skilled
handyman.
$7.69 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.

Applications may
be submitted to the
Citrus County Human
Resources Office,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

no later than Friday,
June 26, 2009. /
EOE/ADA.


--- --- q
S"MOBILE RV
SERVICE
WE COME TO YOU
Motor Homes
I 5th Whls/Rv's
Master Tech
S352-586-5870
L Storage Available





WATER PUMP SERVICE
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Anytime,
344-2556, Richard


Professiona


Photography
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124


farb * Maz
Fhotograph5
Specializing in:
Children, families
pets. Business
Portraits. Indoor
or natural
outdoor settings
Call for great
pricing
352-212-2439
Satisfaction guaranteed





Circle T Sod Farms.
Inc.
Tired of your dead
lawn?
Replace it with
Bahia. Delivery
Avail (352)400-2221

Lawn Care, Sod, Plugs,
LandscapingSpr-dnMersPresJ
Wsh. 15yrsexp.
Lic. & Ins.(352)270-1150
LAWN RESTORATION
All types of Grasses
Low main Lawns Avail.
J & J Sod 352-302-6049


71� ml� let, �,,

JL










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


APPOINTMENT
SETTERS

Up For A Challenge?
Serious minded
individuals will earn
great $$$ setting appts
for our very busy local
company. Call Steve
@ 352-628-0254
AQUATEK

Is hiring for general
maintenance, property
preservation, work truck
a plus, Will train right
person. Starting pay
$400. wkly. Ask for
DIno. (352) 726-2523















MAINTENANCE
Floral City - 2 days
Thurs & Fri 9-5:30
$8.50 hrly (W2 only)
Backgrnd ck/drug
test. 3 Refs needed.
Must love cats &
dogs. General Clean-
ing, windows, laun-
dry, ironing, plant
watering. Fax
resume: 352-344-8010












































POOL ROUTE

Beverly Hills Net $70K
+ year. Will
train.Guaranteed
accounts $ 53K full
price. 877-766-5757
www.ooolroutesales.
corn NPRS Inc. Broker
Start Up TelecommunI-
cation Company
CELL PHONES, WIRELESS
CARRIERS, HOME SE-
CURITY & SATELLITE TV.
352-560-7065:560-7029









25x30x9(3:12 pitch)
. Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry Door, 2 Vents,
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.795..INSTALLED
30x30x9(3:12 pitch)
Roof Overhang,
2-9x7 Garage Doors,
'2 Vents, 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
S14.995. INSTALLED
35x50x12(3:12 pitch)
. Roof overhang,
2-10x10 Rollup Doors,
2 Vents. 1 Entry Door,
4" Concrete Slab
$29.995 Installed
* Fl. Engineered Plans
* A local Fl Manufact.
* Meets or exceeds
Florida wind codes.
* Conc/Inst by others.
* Many sizes available
* We specialize In
Commercial Bulldings
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-91100
Uc # CBC1256991
www. metal
structuresllc.com



BIRDSEYE MAPLE
Dresser w/mlrror $300.
Matching WASH STAND
$275; Other antiques
also available. Call
352-382-2433



Collectable Dolls
Ashton Drake, & other
dolls. (352) 795-7513
LIONEL TRAIN SET Lio-
nel train set circa 1957 all


in very good condition
with boxes, track and
some accessories.
$350.00 or best offer
Call(352) 634-1315



25 c.f., side .by side,
refrigerator w/Ice
maker Good condition.
$300 (352) 382-0263
(352) 613-5107
ABC Briscoe Appl.
Refrig., washers, stoves.
Serv. & Parts
(352) 344-2928
Fullsize Frigidaire
stacked washer &
dryer, white, fine
shape, $350
(352) 726-8961
HEAT PUMP &
A/C SYSTEMS
Starting $880
$1500 Tax Incentive
& Rebates on Select
Installation w/permit
352-746-4394
LIc.&Ins. CAC 057914


'------ AAr

WASHER & DRYER
6 months old front
loaded, like new, under
warranty $600.
352-476-1270
Washer& Dryer
Maytag, White, $125.00
for both.
352-465-8726
Washer
Maytag, Lg. capacity.
$75. Dryer, Whirlpool, 2.5
yrs. left on warranty.
$275. (352) 527-8181
Washer/Dryer
for $150
352-220-4082
WHIRLPOOL WASHER &
DRYER Super capacity.
2yrsold, perfect
condition. $475.
352-489-1486



COMPUTER DESK
With hutch and side ta-
ble. Brown. Large. Great
condition.
$100 352-563-5859



PANASONIC 27"
Flat screen TV. Exc.
picture. $100.
352-344-5021
SPEAKERS Jensen
Tower Speakers
37x17x12. Mint condition.
Great sound $40 firm
746-6858



Aluminum Soffit Brown,
4" & 6" wide, 8' & 10' links,
$5; White Fascia Soffit 4"
wide 12' long $5. Call
George (352) 621-0726
USED WHITE ALUMINUM
ROOFING PANS
Ift x 15ft $15 ea.
(352) 382-1735



COMPUTER DOCTORS
1/2 Mi. S.E. Inv. Walmart
Computer sales/repair
X-Box 360(352)344-4839
DIESTLER
COMPUTERS
New & Used systems
upgrades. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
www.rdeeii.com
Video Camera
Sony, digital, DVD-92,
still in the box, used once.
Cost $600. will sell for
$295. (352) 249-6800



SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather bik os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, Blk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, ThiL
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k in-
vested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815

Furniture


$89.HEAD BOARD
KING SZ.WHITE
WICKER
(352) 341-0204
ADJUSTABLE BEDS
Two twin size adjust-
able beds gopd con-
- edition. $99.00 each
phone 352-628-3162
AMISH STYLE
Hoosier Hutch/Buffet
$295. also available
sofa, armoire & more
(352) 489-6641
Bassett sofa & love
seating perfect cond.
$400 for set.
(352) 341-1896
BLUE COUCH
w/2 recliners on end.
Good condition. $135
RECLINER w/massager.
$200/obo.
352-795-7513
BROYHILL SLEEPER
SOFA Queen size,excellent
condition, slept on once.
Tan shades with some
green. $225.00 Call
352-257-1815
China Cabinet - dk.
wood, antique $150.00
726-9151
Coffee Table
2 side tables, glass top,
bleached wood. Very
nice, $95. for all.
Filing Cabinet
2 drawer, like wood finish,
excellent for home or
office. $45.(352)249-6800
DINETTE SET W/4
CHAIRS Chromecraft
white formica table'
(42x60) with 4 rolling,
cushioned chairs. Cush-
ions are cream, peach
and light green. $250.
Call 527-6509
Dinette Set,
Chromecraft, 42 x 60"
Table, w/ 4 caster
chairs, good cond.
$300.
(352) 341-1857
Dining Table
+ 4 chairs, beautiful solid
redwood, must see! only
$350. Hoover Vacuum,
wide path, like new,
cost $95. asking $45.
Obo.(352) 249-6800
Entertainment Center
Med. Oak, 58" wide x
58" high x 21" deep.
Holds 32" tv, $150.00
352-489-4576
FLEX STEEL SET
Love seat, 2 wing back
chairs & ottoman.
Upholstered In neutral
floral print, good cond.
All 4 pieces $225.
352-382-7042
Ice Cream Table w/4
padded Ice cream
chairs. Marble top, cast
Iron base. Exc. cond.
$250 (352) 527-4301
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30; Full
$40.Qn $50; Kg $75.
628-0808
RATTAN TABLE
glass top, w/4 new
chairs $400
(352) 563-0595
' Sofa bed,
7 months old,
color blue, $450.
(352) 637-5903
Sofa
Rolled arms, skirted, off
white, 2 cushions. 6
months old, Pd. $1,200,
$875. local, Terra Vista.
(352) 746-6975


chair, matching,
beige, excel. cond,
$425.
obo 726-2038
Sofa,
dark green
$75. very good cond.
(352) 382-1502
Sofa, sleeper,
queen size, 7'. beige
tweed, excel, cond,
$100.00
637-5209
Student Computer
Desk wlroll around chair.
$100.
Office Desk Chair,
roll around, nice cond.
$65.(352)249-8179
YOUR FURNITURE
DONATIONS
SUPPORTS THE PATH
HOMELESS SHELTER
Call (352) 746-9084



6 UTILITY SCREENING
LATTICE
white vinyl w/connections.
$50 for all.
Call 527-6425
21" SNAPPER MOWER
Electric start. Rear
wheel drive. $100.
S352-344-5021
Craftsman
7HP self propelled
w/bagger 21" cut
Can be seen at
1148 N. Foxrun Terr./lnv.
$190 (352)419-6144
Craftsman Lawn Tractor
& edger, 17.5 hp, 42" w/
grass catcher, elec. start,
auto transmission $550;
Edger/trimmer $125
(352) 382-3057
CRAFTSMAN'S
Riding Mower 42 deck,
19,5 hp Briggs/Staton,
new cond. $500
(352) 746-7357
DIXON Zero Turn Riding
Lawnmower. $550 firm
(352) 419-4662
(727) 688-5643
Electric Saw
Remington, 16", w/extra
new blade, $55.
Hedge Trimmer
Black & Decker, 18",
never used. $25.
(352) 249-6800
Kubota Garden Tractor
Diesel, 12 HP, PTO,
4' Woods, mowing deck.
Mod. B-6000. $900.
Obo.(352) 447-0572
Lawn Mower
Yardman, 13.5 HP, 38"
cut, Hydrostatic, auto.
trans., well maintained,
runs great. $600. OBO0
746-0737
Lawnmower, Riding
Yard Machine MTD,
8hp, 30" cut, new
battery, runs good.
Attachments Incl.
$250.00 465-0190
Leaf Blower
Toro power sweep,
$25.
Wet Vac
9 gal. barely used.
$25. (352) 249-6800
Log Splitter $325.00
DR Trimmer $115.00
726-2721
Murray
Self propelled, 21'",
4HP, good cond. $50.
Call (352) 746-1748
before 9am-aftr 5pm
TROYBUILT 21"
Self Prop, Electric start.
Like new, ext.
warranty. $175
352-601-7086


CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. & Sun. 8A./1P.
Fishing gear, tools, boat-
ing, house hid.
1331 N.W. 20th. Ave.



PLUS SIZE WEDDING
DRESS, Freshly dry
cleaned, very
beautiful,fits like 16/18
$125 352-422-0594



14 LOUVERED BI-FOLD
DOORS $70 for all or $7
each Call 527-9459
Armature Radio Equip.
. Silent key, for a list email
iavbe7332(a)tampa

Bedroom Set KingSZ
7 pcs. Contemporary
style very nice $500.
Amanda Commerical
qualify dryer $150.
aft 9am(352) 621-0213
BISSELL CARPET
SHAMPOO/Cleaner,
pro heat, brand new,
$95.(352) 601-3654
Carpet Cleaner,
Hoover $99.00
348-2695
CAT GENIE Flushable
Litter Box. Everything
you need. Like New
Condition.
$75 352-563-5859
Commercial Pressure
Washer w/ Wisconsin
engine, 150 ft. hose
$400
(352)341-1569
CRAFTSMAN 83-928
CORD REEL $35.00
portable work light $10.00
1-352-489-7141
CURIO
2-plece Burled wood.
Beveled glass doors.
8 drawers. $250
352-637-6310
DELTA CIRCLE CUTT-
ING ATTACHMENT
$60.00 Dewalt 12"32
tooth saw blade $20.00
1-353-489-7141
DeVllbiss
Electric Generator
5,250 Watts, 120\240V
10HP Gasollne $275.
(352) 628-6537
Dog box,
aluminum
Full size truck, $300.00
352-465-8726
Electric Bed
Full size, w/rails.
Good cond. $200.
(352) 628-4766
Floor Cleaner
Eureka $75.00
348-2695





ITS FREE

Place any General Mer-
chandise Ad for FREE on
our all new
CLASSIFIED SITE.

5 Days, 5 Lines.
2 items totaling less than
$100.00 each.
Go to:
chronlcleonline.com
and click place
an Ad In the top right
hand corner.


Race ready. $650.
See It at Citrus Cty
Speedway Thurs. 6/18
or call 352-344-1441.
LADIES CLOTHING
casual to business
sz 2-12....Complete
Queen Comforter set
Incd designer pillows
shower curtain &
draperies, Spring colors
(352) 489-0976
Let us pay YOU Qto
cut your 5+ acre
bahia field for sodi
Circle T Sod
352-400-2221
Mattress & Boxspring


r n uituyia yii
"Melissa Fields"
specializing in
weddings, events,
group & individual.
portraits, professional
portfolios, live concerts.
call for special price
(352) 220-4124
POOL COVER
SUNDOME ,fits 12ft
round above
ground,vinyl-Alum sup-
ports,$200.352-465-2459
SALE
BIMINI TOPS $149 & up
Wave Runner Bimini's
352-563-0066
/ us out zoomcltrus.com
Sewing Machine,
Janome. computer-
ized, like new with
carrying case on
wheels. $300.00

ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCENAGENT






















$750. copy
$$ SAVE $$
ILIFE- INSURANCE
* HEALTH
-ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

S(352-422-6956
www.ANUSSO.com














Bzedair mattress, the-
WORKCENTER COPIER
XEROXuse very little
$750. copy.
cartridge/toner
cartridge both $75.
obo (352) 795-3334























MTHeiE alEUER- 1
Hospital Bed
Hillron Bed, computer-
Ized air mattress, the,
BeCating allac of hospital
beds, $900.00
352-447-5595
POWER CHAIR just
used twice al condition
waside-like new $500.00now
$400.00 or bo 352 249
0815
SWING-A-WAY
Washeelchair-lift.
$700/obo.
WHEELCHAIR Manuel,
new. $75/obo.
352-637-1153



,"THE REVENUER"

Buy & Sell
Vintage coins/currency

BUYING US COINS
oBeating all Written
offers. Top $$$$ Paid
(352) 228-7676



Music Lessons - Citrus
Beginner & Advanced
Banjo,Guitar, Bass &
Piano. Call Pau Ready
(352) 795-7305



HOUSEHOLD FURNI-
TURE AND APPLI-
ANCES Refrigerator-Side
by side-like new $500.00.
Washer/Dryer-like
new-$550 for both. Many
other items-Moving. Call
(352)812-1971 after 5
p.m.



2 HUFFY BIKES
Men's/Ladles, almost
new $35.each, 1 tent
New 12x17 $50
352) 860-1795
13 ft. IKayak &
14 ft. Kayak. $400 each
(352) 746-6072
38 CAL. EIBAR PISTOL
DOUBLE ACTION 1927
ON BUTr. $200.
352-219-9078
AMT .380 BACKUP
small frame auto pistol.
5+1 rounds. I have 2 clips
for it. $325.00 obouger RPlease
email aniwee8@aol.com
A-R 15 W/Scope
Ammo, 4 mags.
Consider part in trade.
$1,200. (352) 746-1417
Browning 12 gauge
Grade 1 model 425
O&U, 32" barrels,
beautiful wood, $1,750
obo Ruger Red Label
12 gauge, O&U
w/chokes, $800 abo
(352) 726-9369
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN-ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Horizon Fitness
Treadmill mod. #RCT7.6.
w/electrical, adjustable
incline. Originally $1,000.
Barely used. $700
(352) 464-4821
Plow Swivel Head (Cor)
Anchor made in
Switzerland, 20 Ibs $199;
Fortress Anchor $12; Call
George (352) 621-0726
PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Buying Guns,
Ammunition&
reloading supplies
(352) 586-7516
PRO FORM TREAD-
MILL Excellent condition,
new safety key. Must sell
* $100.00 352 - 409- 6588


CLASSIFIED




4-wheel bicycle with 2
seats & electric
rechargeable motor.
$600 obo (352) 341-3390
WANTED
Brass for reloading,
all calibers,
(352) 586-7516
WE BUY GUNS
On Site Gun Smithing
(352) 726-5238



'03 CARGO MATE
Enclosed CAR HAULER.
20 x 8.5, ramp/side
door, dual axle, elect
brks., mint $4200 oab
Steve (352) 503-6542
CAR HAULER
'06, 32 Ft. Dominator XT.
By Classic C. Trpl.
axels. $14,200. Like
new.(352) 835-4273
Cargo Trailer
'09, Brand new, 7' x 14'.
V-nosed w/ramp. $3,300
(352) 476-8907
Trailer,
2 axle, alum. floor, car
hauler or construction,
25' wench, two 6'
ramps, $1095.00
465-1892
Utility Trailer
4' x 6', Tilt bed, no
tailgate, $275.00
Go Kart, single seat
$250.00
726-9151



Changing Table
Lt. wood, with small
armoire, Ig. dwr., 2
shelves, excel, cond.
$65.00 726-9151


- ActNow

PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAY AT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITEI
Go to:
chronlcleonline.com
and click place
an ad
PLAY PEN
W/SLEEPER & CHANGER "
On wheels, mint color.
$75. Large BABY
CARRIAGE. Gray, very
nice. $50. 352-341-0770



WANTED OLD
LION EL TRAINS
Collector Top Prices
Paid. (352) 795-3970



AKC, CHINESE CRESTED
PUPS, champion sired
9 weeks old, h/c,
1 male fem$250 -$450
(352) 795-0336
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
BLACK LAB PUPS
AKC, OFA. Beautiful
block heads. Home
raised, H cert. $800
352-489-1879; www.
quallmeadowlabs.com
Chihuahua Puppies
AKC registered, health
cert., 1st shots, all sizes,
all colors, $175. males,
$200. females, ready
6/7 352-399-2368
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
All boys, 3 mos, short
hair. 1st shots/h/c,
starts @$175.00
(352) 341-4021
Cockatiel. 4 months
old, talks, sings, comes
with small cage. $35.
' 726-9151
COCKER SPANIEL'
9 mth old male.
All shots. Must find a
new home due to
owners Illness. $150.
352-628-5085







EXOTIC HIPPIE
BUNNY RABBITS

For S4te
New small breed, Hip-
pies $25.- $35 ea.
All colors, baby bun-
nies 2 to 3.5 Ibs.
New Zealand Breeders
$20 each. 5.5-8 Ibs


KITTENS & CATS
many breeds, all
neutered micro chip,
tested, shots some
declawed $85-$150
352-476-6832
POMAPOOS
Pomapoos:
1 male, 2 females, health
cert., $400 call
352-628-0635
PUPPIES shih-tzu pup-
pies 9 weeks old 3 males
& 1 female multiple
colors.first shots & health
certificates. $350.00 call
(352)795-5719
Shih-Tzu Puppies
Home raised w/ love.
All shots included. $300+
(1) tiny 2 yo toy femn
Poodle $450. 3902 N.
Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, FL
(352) 270-8827
(305) 872-8099



ORGANIC.
FERTILIZERS
For hay, pastures & all
growers. $40 per acre
Dealer's Wanted, Call
Rob (352) 585-2758
TIMOTHY ALFALFA HAY
20 Bales $8.00 each
501b bales
352-726-3093



FREE Thoroughbred
5 yr. old Gelding,
hoofs redone, needs
exp. rider, sweet, 16
hands (352) 794-3628
Mini Horse
Stud, 5 yrs. old.
friendly $200
obo.(352) 628-1277



EVINRUDE O/B MOTOR
4HP - Excellent
condition. $300.
352-621-0574 after 6PM.


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 D7


1999 200hp. saltwater
series, needs repair or
has lots of good parts.
$1000.
726-4197



JET SKI'S
'04, Kawasaki's,
STX-900 & STX-15F,
under 60 hrs., $7,500 for
both. (352) 476-3548
Sea Doo
& Trailer, new
motor, real fast
$2,800 obo
352-794-3669
SeaDoo GTX DI
02,exc cond3 sweater,
blu/white,2 stroke
130hp, 71 hrs 130 mi.
45-50mph $5500
(352) 795-5974



18FT PONTOON
Boat, fully redone, very
nice, 35HP Merc,. runs
good, $2,900 will deliver
352-637-3983
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
AIR BOAT
Big 13 Ft. haul,
2 seats. Approx. 375-400
HP. 8 blade warp drive.
2-1 reduction gear box,
Used 100 hrs.+ Trl.
$18,500 invest. Sell
for $10,000 firm.
(352) 302-4535
AIRBOAT
1996, 15', 500cubic inch,
Cadillac engine
completely rebuilt
(352) 560-3019
AQUA SPORT '05
175 Osprey, 90hp Yam,
VHF, depth finder, dual
batt. w/switch, bimlnl,
easy load trailer. Low
hours.$9,990
352-860-0277
AQUA SPORT
190 Osprey, 2001
115 hp Johnson
w/warranty & trailer.
Ready to fish. Reduced
S.g0Q1 352-746-5856
AQUA SPORT
2000; 225 Explorer 24'
Cuddy cabin. 225
Johnson Ocean Pro.
Loadmaster tandem axle
trailer. Exc. cond.
$14,500.352-493-7377;
352-221-5230
AQUA SPORT
'86 25FT.Cuddy Cabin.
W/twin '06 OptImax
150hp & double
. axle trailer. $16,900
(352)257-1355
BASS TRACKER 04
PT 175 Special Edition,
O50hp Merc. gal tril.
many Xtra's $7,750
Call for info
(813)-293-0392 cell
BOSTON WHALER
14' w/ 40 hp Johnson,
Everything works good
$1600 (352) 302-0033
Deck Boat
95' 19 Ft. Slyvan, w/ra-
dio & fishfinder. New Bat-
.tery switch. 2 batteries,
power pk.
prop./hub.$6,000
(352) 726-0838
DONZI '90
23fi, OAL 25ft, open fish-
ermen, C-console, Twin
140HP Johnsons. Trailer,
Many extras!
$12,500/obo.
(352) 489-9640
FORMULA 20'
225HP JOHNSON
W/TRAILER $2500
352-634-0708
GULF TO LAKE MARINE
New,Used & Service
Brokerage. We pay $$
for clean used boats
(352) 527-0555
HURRICANE
'01, Deckboat, 20ft.,
115HP, 4strke Yamaha,
S w/trlr. $11,200. will
trade (352) 503-3778
HYDRA - SPORT
'90, 26' New '08 c/c-,
t-top, -gas tank -wiring
'99 250 Merc. on
bracket '05 traller,many
upgrades exc cond.
$14,900 (352) 586-1754
KEY WEST & FORD
05/2020cc/98Expedition
Yam4stk150/5.4L
4x4EBRed Together
$32500 or $26000 Boat
(352)586-6717
O DAY
. 27Ft. Sailboat, In Board,
Auto pilot, fiberglass
$4,800
628-6188 or 795-5896
OSPREY
1994 - 16ft, CC, bay boat.
88 HP Evinrude, Garmin
GPS/recorder $4000.
352-621-4711
PONTOON '08
Sweetwater 21ft. 25
hours. 90hp Yamaha.
$16,500. Many Extras
352-503-6797
PONTOON
'08, Sun Tracker, 18ff,
s50H Merc. mtr, w/ trier,
less than 10hrs, use,
$11,000 (352) 795-5413
PONTOON
8 In stock $3995/up
Gulf Coast Marine
www.boatsuoercenter.
caQ (352) 527-0555

PONTOON
Sylvan 20' Yamaha T50
TLRC EnginkeLike New
40hrs. Playpen Cover
port-o-potty, extras
$12,000 (352) 628-0281
PRO-LINE 221
WALKAROUND 1999
200 HP Mercury w/ 9.9 HP
Johnson kicker,$ 12k
obo. Call Kurt at Pete's
Pier 352-795-6067
SEA PRO
'00 19 FT. C/C. Loaded.


Elec. Pkg. 115 FI 4 Strk.
Yam. 100 hrs. Bim. top.
Best offer(352)533-3093
T-CRAFT
23L,6'W,'02 150H
Evin. mtr. w fuel enj. like
new, trr. w/brks
$5,995 352-489-3661







WORLD WIDEE
IT RNE-T:
EXPOSUREE

l27511


Mecuy ut Prt


15ft 8in. Canoe. Asking
$425/obo. Very good
cond. Paid $879.
352-563-5150
TROPHY '99 22FT
99-2052 W/A Cuddy
Cabin, 120HP Force, E-Z
Load Tandem Trir. Elec-
tronics, well kept, must
sell $8950.352-726-1489
WELLCRAFT
1987, 250 Sportsman,
25', Gas eng., 30" draft,
260 hp I/O, alum.
trailer.$8,000
(352) 344-9651



22 FT. Minnie Winnie
1993, Class C, 16 mpg,
dependable, like new
small V-8, sleeps 6
$7,300 (352) 563-9964
'02 Cedar Creek 5th
Wheel 29ft, 2-slides,
queen bed,bath/shower,
low mileage, loaded,
good cond. $16,800
(352) 746-4969
05' TITANUM
5 Th Wheel, 28E33SB
1 slide. 1000 Wets.
Inverted, central van.
26inch. TV.$30,500.
Or reasonable offer.
(352) 489-6835
32' 1992 ITASKA Motor
Home. Exc. cond., 60k
ml asking $11,900
(352) 726-5086
'87 Coachman C-Class
Clean & Good cond.,
Like new brakes & tires,
350 Motor, 71k miles
$3,900 obo (352)
503-7304
'98 ENDEAVOR
38 Ft. W/ Slide. 36 K Mi.
Dual air. $37,700 Obo.
352-637-5149 or
352-586-3090
* AUTO. BOAT *
* &RV*
DONATIONS
43 year old
Non-reporting
501-C-3 Charity.
Maritime Ministries
(352) 795-9621
* Tax Deductible *

CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CRUISE AIR
'94, Class A, Wide
body. Diesel pusher.
Alison Trans. & more.
$34,000. 352 835-4273
FOUR WINDS
'03, Hurricane New
deal. 30Q, class A motor
home, 31% ft., 22k mi.
V10 gas, ducted rf. air,
onan 4K gen., qn bed,
etc. Saturn tow incl.
$35,000. (352) 397-5007
GULF STREAM
BT Cruiser 03, 22' fully
loaded, ready to travel
$27,500....
(352) 341-1297
HAMPTON BAY
43ft. 2008
Completely fumished. In
great RV Park, pool,
clubhouse etc. Can be
moved $26,900/obo
(352) 464-2722
Holiday Rambler
'03, By Monico, 300
Cummins, 2 slides,
under warranty
mint cond. $69,900.
(352)445-9155
Holiday Rambler
Admiral Motor Home 36'
2 slides, 340hp, gas eng.
all options transf ext.
warr. $51,900
352 795-3970
ITASCA NAVION
'06 24FT, Mercedes die-
sel, Class C. Good mpg,
low mi, 1, slide, loaded.
$52,995. 352-464-0371
Keystone 07
Big Sky 5th Wheel Prem.
Pkg 340RLQ every option.
Center Island Kit. incis
sep.W/D, added 2nd a/c in
bedroom
Price to Sale $52K firm
352-794-3068
PACE ARROW
04, 38' 3 SLIDES
21k mi fully loaded
3 tv's $92,500 obo
352-302-0743



$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500 '
800-366-9813 x 7374
'88 FORD MOTORHOME
Class-C. 57k mi.,
roof-air-generac
Ex. tires & brakes
$4k abo 352-422-3033
AEROLITE
2007, 21 FT.,
$12,000 obo
(352) 516-3665
BONAIR '01
19FT. 5th wheel. Qn bed,
microwave, Irg refrig.
Like new. $8,900.
352-489-3661
I BUY RV'S,
Travel Trailers,
5th Wheels,
Motor Homes
Call Glenn
(352) 302-0778
JAYCO
07 Jay Flight
28' used twicesmells &
looks new, green clean,
sips 6 $16,800 (352)
503-7431
MEADOWBROOK
5th Wheel, 2000 Excel-
lent. Photos at
http://picasaweb.google.c
om/meadowbrook.Glenn-
$13995.00
(352)302-6055 or
(727)692-9045
Montana
'03, 5th wheel, 3 slides
like new,$30,000.
Truck avail also for tow
(352) 422-5731
POP UP CAMPER
'99 Coleman, in exc. cond.


inside & out.$4,800
Obo.(352) 465-9056
(352) 208-9281
SKYLINE 04
32' sleeps 8, used
once $11,500
(352) 586-9614
Sun Valley
'09, Apache, slide in
Camper, fully equip.
qn. sz. bed, fits, 8ft truck
bed. $10,500 obo
352-795-0511



5 Truck Toppers
$200.00 for all.
(352) 464-0220
Truck Topper/
ARE Brand Bedcover
Toyota Tacoma. dbl.
cab, silver, $600.00
excel, cond. obo
352-302-3199


Aluminum Truck bed
tool boxes. $150 & 100
Call George
(352) 621-0726



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
Paid for Junk Vehicles,
J.W. 352-228-9645
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
Buying Junk Cars
Running or Not
Cash Paid, $150 & Up
(352) 771-6191
CARS, TRUCKS,
RV'S, BOATS
Cash or Consign
CONSIGNMENT USA
US19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
CASH BUYER
Buyvin Used Cars
Trucks & Vans
For used car lot
LARRY'S AUTO SALES
Hwy 19 S. Crystal River
Since 1973 564-8333


1997 MAZDA MIATA
Convertable, Fun &
dependable, Porche
Red, new top, 36mpg,
5-speed, A/C, new tires.
Mint $5,700 352)
563-9964
$5001 Police
Impounds for sale
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
f BMW
'03, 745 LI, NAV, black,
sun roof. all options $29K
Mint
(352) 746-2696
CADILLAC
'99 DeVille, 39 K. Mi.
Car Fax avail. Light gold,
exc. cond. $7,500
(352) 382-2715
CHEVY
'96 Camaro, Conv. rare
auto, AC, V6, 36 mpg jet
black, dependable.
$5200 352- 563-0615
CHRYSLER '04
Sebring Cony. 34,5K ml.
excellent cond. white
w/tan top, illness
forces sale $9500
(352) 726-7765
CHRYSLER
'06 Sebring Convertable
$12,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
CHRYSLER '06
SEBRING Convertible.
30k mi., Exc. cond., sil-
ver w/ tan top, garaged,
$10,900 (352) 726-3427
CHRYSLER '07
Town & Country
HANDICAP EQUIPPED
Barely driven. Only
60 miles. Cost $53K:
Asking $33K/obo.
Call 352-726-9111.
CHRYSLER pt cruser
2002 excellent condi-
tion only 54,550miles
asking 7,000.00 or best
offer 352 249 0815

CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Safe Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US 19, Across Airport
(352) 461-4518
conslgnmenluso.org

CORVETTE
02, Z06,
Black, low mi.,: over
30 mpg hwy. $24,400.
(352) 613-5355
CORVETTE
2007 convertible
corvette,only 4,076 mi-
les on this rare silver on
silver on silver vette,
power convertible top,
6 sp auto, paddle shift,
heads up display, mag-
netic F55 suspension,
navigation system, all
options available are on
this gorgeous vette,
Over $2,000 in
aftermarket parts
included, Your's
for only , $48,000.
352- 270-3193
CORVETTE
'80, Stingray, white, auto,
SHOW CARL
$11,500 or will trade for
truck. 352-563-6428
FORD
'00 Focus, 4 dr. AC,
Auto. New tires & brakes
runs great,30 mpg.
$3,950.(352) 302-9217
FORD '99
Crown Victoria.- runs
great. Asking $1,075.
352-637-5394
HONDA
'02 Civic EX, black, 2 dr,
spoiler, cruise, custom
whis., sunroof, tinted win.,
one owner, $6,795.
(352) 220-4084
HONDA
'08 Civic, $17,995
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
LINCOLN '94
2-dr, sun roof, 131k mi,
white. Well maintained.
$2000. (352) 628-7410:
628-6370
LINCOLN 95
Town car, good cond.
a/c, 4 dr. Forest green
$1700 (352) 746-4161
MAZDA
'08 MZ 3 Sedan,
$12,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
MERCEDES
'08 E-350, $38,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
NISSAN
'07 Versa,
$11,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
PONTIAC
1969 Catalina, runs
good, new parts &
palnt,$2000.obo
(352) 465-0960
SUZUKI
'07 Forenza. 30K mi,
w/100k warr. LOADED
w/touch scm nav.
$12,800. 352-613-6613
TOYOTA
'06 Corolla,
$11,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'06, Highlander,
Hybrid,, 100,000 mi.
warranty. $19,000
(352) 697-3428
TOYOTA
'07 Camry,
$16,995 Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
TOYOTA
'07 FJ Cruiser.
$23,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299


Ranger, X-cab. Exc. cond
38k mi. SLASHED THE
PRICE $97K to $8,500
(352)746-3919
FORD
'06 E 350, Cutaway,
serve. van. 41K Mi./5.4L.
Eng. Auto.Knapheide
Serve. body/dble lock drs.
$20,000 Obo.
(352) 726-9397
(678) 617-3767,
FORD
'06 F 250 Lariat, Diesel,
Super tow pkg.,4 wheel
drive, lots of chrome.
$17,000(352) 628-6985
Ford 2004 f-150 triton 5.4
looks new in & out, runs
great, gold, white leather
interior, 6 cd changer,
electric back sliding win-
dow, dual exhaust, heavy
duty tow package 98k mi-
les $12k 352-601-0376


All original, red, 79k ml.,
6 cylinder, all power,
targa roof. Original
owner. Garaged, $6,200
(352) 726-3427
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Beetle, $15,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLKSWAGON
'08 Jetta, $13,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-40,
$15,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-60, $16,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 S-80,
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'06 XC-90,
$20,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 S-40
$16,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'07 V-70
$21,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VOLVO
'08 S-80
$19,995. Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
VW JETTA '07
Wolfsbury Edition
$16,780, Leather,
sunroof, 23,280 mi. Call
Bill Millian At Rallye
Motors 352-732-6035



1954 CHRYSLER
Imperial, Restorer's
Dream. $3500/obo
352-228-0597
$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
'53 MERCURY
2-Dr hardtop, auto, May
trade In part.
352-621-0182;
727-422-4433
'56 FORD
Custom line 4 door sedan. 6
cyl auto. $9,500. Will con-
sider trade for travel trailer
of equal value.(352)
628-4053
AMC
'81, Concord,
very restorable, $300.
(352) 489-3605
BUICK 67
RIVIERA, 430 wildcat
motor, 86k ml. amfm,
a/c, titi whi. elect seats,
very good cond. $8000
(352) 527-3961
CADILLAC
'75, Eldorado
convertible
$8,500.
(352) 795-5t13
CHEVROLET
'61, Apache 10, 1hton
pickup, short wheel
base, step side, V8,
auto, New 10" mag.
& tires $5,900.
(352) 228-1325
CHEVY
'69 Classic C10 SHT BD
350/350 AC, PS, :
$15K or trade
(352) 746-9212
EL CAMINO'81
305 Auto, All new
interior, & paint. Crager
mags & tires. 4" raised
hood. $3,250.
(352)341-3613.
GM El Camino
'84, 1-owner, low
miles, $5,000/obo or will
consider trade.
352-628-7077
GTO
1967, The real deal, older
restoration, just out of
storage $25K or trade
(352) 621-0666
JAGUAR
'76 XJ6C Rare coupe
Silver, new paint;
63K mi., $8,900 obo
(352) 527-4221
(908) 763-8384
MG MIDGET
'77, New int. & seats.
Need to be install. Extra
trans. & parts. $4,000.
(352) 621-0126
THUNDERBIRD
'73, New paint, tires.
38K. Mi. Like New.
$12,900 Obo. Will trade.
(352) 795-0122
VW Super Beetle 1973
Fully restored.
Excellent condition,
$5000.00 352-564-0788



CHEVY
'03 S-10, LS, Ext. cab,
3rd. door, auto, V-6, cold
air, loaded, $5,450.
Wooten's (352)637-7117
CHEVY
'04 Sllverado LS, V-8,
short bed, step side. All
pwr. exa cond., low mi.
$8,500.(352) 344-9920
CONSIGNMENT USA
*Clean Sate Auto's*
Financing Avail.
US19, Across AIrport
(352) 461-4518
consignmentusa.org
DODGE
'05, Quad Cab, Awe-
some Hemi-pwrd, special
"Rodeo-Edit." Loaded
every special feature. Sr.
own, gar. kept., 27K mi,
$40K-
invested Sale $21,750
See online ad photos
www.autotrader.comlatca
John (352) 726-1076
DODGE RAM '00
Std cab, rare 5spd, hemi,
V8, a/c, 25mpg, new 22"
rims & tires. Dependable
$3700. 352-563-0615
FORD
'02 F-150, V-8,
4 x 4, Cold air, leather,
lifted, low mi. $6,995
Wooten's(352) 637-7117
FORD 04











D8 SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009


Sierra 2500 4x4
$8995. Ext cab, SLE trim
low miles. Call Bill
Milian at Rallye Motors
352-732-6035



$5001 Police
Impounds for saleI
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'04 Trailblazer EXT LS
LOADED 6-disc CD &
DVD, 3rd row. Leather.
47K mi. Retails $38K
$12,500.(352) 527-0456
CHEVY
BLAZER '99 LS 4dr.
126k mi. loaded, great
cond. sunroof, $4k obo
352-422-0065
DODGE
99, DURANGO 4x4, 80K
mi., loaded, dual air & ex-
haust, Exc. Cond. $6,000
obo
(352) 344-0505
FORD '03
Escape, 89kmi, 4whl
drive, class,3 hitch, Orig
owner. Great shape &
price. $8,750.
352-564-1128:
703-338-7177
GMC ENVOY
Red,'03, 60k mi., On-Star,
tow package
5-passenger, $10,500
obo (352) 527-3445
GMC SUBURBAN
1993 4 WD, 454 rebuilt
eng., new transm.,
great fires, good cond.
'$2,900 obo
(352) 201-1413
HYUNDAI
'07 Santa Fe, $19,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
JEEP '98
Grd Cherokee Laredo
4x4, 6-cyl., auto,122k
ml. LOADEDI Exc cond.
$3995. 352-341-0004
MERCEDES BENZ
'01 ML. 55 AMG. Silver
W/black int. Loaded,
57K.Mi. Like new .Ask
$18.5K. (352)489-7674
PT CRUISER Touring -
2008 8900 Miles, super
clean, $10,000 firm 352
586 1221




$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
TOYOTA
'05 Tacoma, Ext. Cab,
SR-5, 6sp. 4 X 4, loaded.
30K. mi. $19,800.
(352) 382-5055




$5001 Police
Impounds for salel
Cars from $500
800-366-9813 x 7374
CHEVY
'94 Handicapped Van.
Low Mi. $4,000 Obo.
(352) 726-8996
CHRYSLER
'03 Town & Country LXI,
75K. Mi. All power,
Leather, rear air, new ti-
res, & brakes. $7,495.
(352)'467-0872
DODGE '07
Caravan SE $11,690
'Only 12,300 ml. 3rd seat
V6. LOADED Call Bill
MIllan at Rallye Motors
352-732-6035
Dodge Caravan
'96, good cond.', trans.
, good, motor over-.
hauled, full pwr., good
tires, $1695. 465-1892
ECONOLINE
'01 Van White, regular or
hand controls. Wheel-
chair acc., w/lift, $4200
obo (352) 341-7798
MAZDA
'08 Mazda 5 Van,
$14,995.
Ocala Volvo.
(352) 629-7299
ALAN NUSSO
INSURANCE AGENT









$$ SAVE $$

* LIFE INSURANCE
* HEALTH
*ANNUITIES
* DISABILITY

352-422-6956






'03 Rancher 350cc,
4wdr, 5spd + reverse.
Climbs mountains &
tows heavy loads.

352- 563-0615
Crystal River




1995 RIVA
Motor scooter,
9700 ml. good cond.,
asking $500
(352) 726-2425
2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
DYNA WIDEGLIDE
2900mi. HD custom
wheels, mustang seat,
plus HD access. $15,500
(352) 489-6237
'03 HD ROADKING
Fact. custom. Hi perf.
Over $43,000 in receipts.
17k ml. $10,900
352-563-0615
Crystal River
$5001 Police .,
impounds for salel
Cars from $500


800-366-9813 x 7374
CHOPPER 3/4 SCALE
08 Uke new, 200cc Elec
start, disc brks, alum
whis, & more must see
$1200.
(352) 212-6497
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,850.(352) 637-5143
HARLEY
'96 Sporster 1200, Cus-
tom. 15K. Scream Eagle
pipes,chro. Ex. clean
$4,650.(352) 637-5143
Harley Davidson
'06, Road King Classic
low ml., blk cherry, Incl.
helmets/trvl luggage
$14,000 (352) 382-0907
Harley Davidson
'81 Shovelhead, 80",
completely serviced,
good shape. Ex.
access. $5,395. obo
352-746-7655; 726-4109


HARLEY
DAVIDSON
96 Heritage Soft tail, red
many extras $9600 call
evenings (352) 746-3613
H-D, SOFTAIL
'02 6 Spd. 8,700 MI.
124 S & S EVO. Lots
of chrome. $12,000
(352) 746-3069
HONDA 04 GL 1800
TRIKE, champ kit 26k
ml. E-Z steer, CB/FM ra-
dio, heel/toe shift, trail
hitch & much more
$27k 352 465-7755
HONDA
Shadow Arrow 06,
garage kept, not in rain,
floorboard $6200 obo
(347)223-7269 aft 3:30
KAWASAKI
'00, ZRX 1100
CC,15K. Mi. Very
fast, many extra s.
$4k obo.
(352)621-3764
Scooter
Yamaha, 2000, 50cc,
cSn m.n miea aSn9 .


- 380-0621 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote-Farr, Fennimore, Miller, Jr,, Walters, Webb
PUBUC NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given:
Scott H. Farr
Last Known Address of
3474 South Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida 34452
Florence M. Fennlmore
Last Known Address of
9223 North Commodore Drive
Citrus Springs, Florida 34434
Charles F. Miller, Jr.
Last Known Address of
1039 Northeast Fifth Avenue
Crystal River, Florida 34428
David R. Walters
Last Known Address of
3901 South Sonny Terrace
Homosassa, Florida 34448

Nell B. Webb
Last Known Address of
4805 South Worldwide Drive
Inverness, Florida 34452
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote Is in
question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond
will result In a determination of Ineligibllity by the Super-
visor and your name will be removed from the state-
wide voter registration system. If further assistance Is
needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections at the
below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 North Apopka Avenue
Inverness, Florida, 34450

Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
June 21, 2009.


361-0621 SUCRN
2008-(P-747 Estate Uese-Lotte Hlldebrandt
Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
UCN: 092008CP000747
CASE NUMBER: 2008-CP-747
DIVISION: Probate

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF UESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT
(A/K/A LIESE-LOTTE HILDEBRAND),
Deceased .
Kemp & Associates, Inc., as Owner and Holder of a
Partial Assignment of Interest of MARTA BOPZIN, et al.,
Petitioner,
v.
HENRY L. STAUFFER, as Personal Representative of the
Estate of UESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT (A/K/A LIESE-LOTTE
HILDEBRAND), et al.,
Respondents.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANY UNKNOWN OR UNASCERTAINED BENEFICIARIES,
CLAIMANTS OR ,HEIRS OF LIESE-LOTTE HILDEBRANDT
(a/k/a LIESE LOTTE HILDEBRAND) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THEM.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Determination of
Heirs & Their Respective Shares has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses,. If any, to it on Sherri M. Stinson, Petition-
ers' attorney, whose address Is 1239 S. Myrtle Avenue.
Clearwater, Fleorda 33756, on or before June 30, 2009,
and file the original with the clerk of this court either
before service on Petitioners' attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against
you for 'the relief demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
Dated May 27, 2009.
BETTY STRIFLER
As Clerk of the Court
(Court Seal)
By /s/ P. Hendrickson
As Deputy Clerk

Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle,
May 31, June 7, 14 and 21,2009.


378-0621 SUCRN
Chassahowitzka Water Spec. Assess. Dist. - BOCC
( PUBUC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, certifies that
the final assessment roll for the 2006 Chassahowltzka
Water Special Assessment District has been examined
and approved by the Board of County Commissioners.
The Board of County Commissioners, sitting as the gov-
erning body of the Citrus County Municipal Service
Benefit Unit for Water and WasteWater Utility Services,
will hold a public hearing for the purpose of hearing
public comment regarding the addition of Alternate
Key No. 1183821 & 1183758, 3 D & L Inc., to the 2Q06
Chassahowltzka Water Special Assessment District as-
sessment roll, confirmed and adopted on July 22, 2008,
and for hearing objections to the correction of such
assessment roll on Tuesday, July 14, 2009, at 3:15 P.M. In
the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room,
Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida. The assessment roll for the 2006
Chassahowltzka Water Special Assessment District shall
be available In the office of the Clerk of the Board In,
the County' Courthouse of Citrus County, 110 N,
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, beginning on the
22nd day of June, 2009, and shall remain so available
.until the day for hearing objections to such assessment
roll.

Improvements covered by the special assessment
consisted of the design and construction of a water
system and water system Improvements to Include the
Installation of all water piping, valves, backflow pre-
venters, water meters, services, and "other miscellane-
ous appurtenances as required for the conveyance of
potable, water In order to connect to the County's
water system; and also Included and embraced the In-
stallation of other water facilities necessary to provide
for the health, safety and welfare of all residents of
Chossahowitzka and the surrounding areas. Soaid Im-
provements were constructed on all lands, streets,
roads and property described In Exhibit "A". It Is the In-
tent of the Board of County Commissioners that the lots
abutting the water system, water system Improve-
ments, described above shall bear the entire cost of
said Improvements by payment of a special assess-
ment levied against each property In the assessment
area on the basis of assessment units.
- At the public hearing the Board shall meet and re-
�celve objections of all Interested persons to the assess-
ments and accuracy of the amount thereof against Al-
ternate .Key No. 1183821 & 1183758, 3 D & L Inc. At
such hearing, or thereafter at a definite time an-
nounced at such hearing, the Board shall equalize and
either annul, sustain or modify In whole or In part the
special assessment roll according to the special bene-
fits which the Board determines each lot or parcel of
land will receive as a result of such Improvements.
When the assessment roll becomes final by the confir-
mation and approval of the Board, the assessment roll
and the Resolution confirming and approving the
same shall be recorded In the 9ffice of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court. From the date of such recording the as-
&essments shall constitute liens upon the properties as-
sessed co-equal wlth the lien of general County and
district taxes, Including ad valorem taxes, and shall be
superior in rank and priority to all other liens, titles and
claims.

If a person decides to appeal any' decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing, they will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made which record shall Include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office.
111 West Main Street. Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you
are hearing or speech Impaired; use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.


SOFT TAIL '88
Just broke in 113 cubic
inch S&S Stroker
motor w/Staggered
Hooker headers. New
Gangster white walls,
seat in all leather blk os-
trich skin, Paint by Jesse
James painter of Calf.,
w/Double Damon signa-
ture, House of Color
paint, BIk w/colored ghost
flames on all sheet metal.
2" Carlini handle bars.
Chrome to max, This
bad boy Is not for the
faint of heart. $30k
invested, may trade for
nice tractor w/bucket or
bobcat etc.
Call for more info.
352-302-2815

SUZUKI '04
Katana 600, Low
miles. Incls. helmet &
jacket. Asking $3,500. obo
(352) 527-0679

TITAN
'00 Phoenix, TRM.
Ferrari red, 6K. mi. Like


WEST HOLIDAY STREET plattedd at Holiday Lane) from
the east right-of-way line of South Evergreen Avenue
plattedd as Evergreen Drive) to the east lot line of lots
209 and 210, Green Acres Addition No. 6 Unit No. 2 as
recorded In Plat Book 7. Pages 70-72, Green Acres Ad-
dition No. 6 Unit No. 2. Section 25. Township 19 South,
Range 17 East, Citrus County, Florida,
EAST LAGUNA LOOP plattedd as Lakeshore Drive) from
East Shorewood Drive plattedd as Lakeshore Drive) to
the south lot line of Lot 55A, Block 21, River Lakes Manor
Unit No. 1 as recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 96-101,
River Lakes Manor Unit No. 1, Sections 1 and 2, Town-
ship 18 South, Range 19 East, Citrus County, Florida.

NORTH LAKESIDE DRIVE plattedd as Lakeside Drive) from
North Shorewood Drive plattedd as Lakeview Drive) to
the west right-of-way line of North Wild Rose Way
plattedd as Rose Dive) as recorded In Plat Book 4,
Pages 47-48, River Lakes Manor Unit No. 3, Section 1,
Township 18 South. Range 19 East, Citrus County,
Florida.
NORTH LOCHSHIRE WAY plattedd as Lochshore Drive)
from East Mulr Place plattedd as Muir Place) to the
north lot line of Lot 8, Block 13, Lochshlre Park and the
north lot line of Lot 53, Replat of Block 16, Lochshlre
Park as recorded In Plot Book 3, Pages 129-130.
Lochshlre Park and Plat Book 5, Page 79, Replat of
Block 16, Lochshire Park, Section 3, Township 19 South,
Range 20 East, Citrus County, Florida.
EAST PINTAIL LANE plattedd as Pintall Drive) from the
end of the existing pavement at the Southwest corner


CLASSIFIED



BY: JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS'
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

CHASSAHOWITZKA WATER SPECIAL
ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "A"

The Chassahowltzka Water Special Assessment District
consisting of all lots and parcels which abut the streets
and roads in which a water system and water system
Improvements are constructed or reconstructed and
all lots and parcels which are served or to be served by
a water system and water system Improvements, lo-
cated in Section 25, Section 26, and Section 35 of
Township 20 South, Range 17 East, Citrus County,
Florida. Soaid Improvements shall be constructed on all
streets and roads listed below.

West Alton Court South Nova Terrace
West Bounty Court West Peacock Court
West Crane Court . West Pebble Lane
South Devon Terrace West Pinoak Court
West Dixie Court South Pitcher Point
West Drew Court South Plymouth Terrace
West Egret Court South Riviera Drive
West Heron Court South Riviera Point
South Jade Drive South Sandra Terrace
West La Parade Loop West Scott Court
South Le Baron Avenue South Sherry Loop
South Le Baron Drive West Simril Court
South Mandelay Loop West Southampton Court
South McClung Loop West Tropical Lane
West Mesa Lane West Turkeyneck Court
West Milo Court South Woodward Point
West Miss Maggie Drive South York Way
West Nectar Lane South Zaneri Circle
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle.
June 21,.2009,


381-0621 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
RFP No. 054-09
Operation and Maintenance Services
For Citrus County's
Sugarmilll Woods and Citrus Springs / Pine Ridge
Water Treatment and Waste Water Treatment Systems

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites In-
terested parties to submit a Proposal to provide
full-time, on-site operation and maintenance of the fol-
lowing utility systems:
* Sugarmill Woods Wastewater Treatment System in
accordance with FDEP Permit FLA011903, Including
sewer collection system with all lift stations, force mains,
and gravity lines. '

* Sugarmill Woods Water Treatment System in ac-
cordance with SWFWMD Permit 20009791.008, includ-
ing water distribution system with all valves, water lines,
hydrants, .and other appurtenances, Including water
distribution system with all valves, water lines, hydrants,
and other appurtenances.
* Citrus Springs / Pine Ridge Water Treatment System
In accordance with SWFWMD Permit 20002842.008,.
Including water distribution system with all valves, water
lines, hydrants, and other appurtenances.,
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before July
21, 2009 @ 2:00 PM to Ronald Bamer, Office of Man-
agement & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals Is scheduled for July
21, 2009 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room
.226, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only Information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the
companies who submitted Proposals.
A MANDATORY Pre-Proposal Conference will be held
on June 30, 2009 at 1:30 PM. The Conference will be
held at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida 34461. A tour
of the treatment plants will be conducted immediately
after the mandatory pre-proposal conference. Propos-
als will be accepted from only those companies whose
representatives attend the mandatory conference.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the
pre-proposal conference or the public opening be-
cause of a disability or physical Impairment should con-
tact the Office of Management & Budget at (352)
527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you
are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Docu-
ment for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Webslte at www.bocc.cltrus.fl.us and select
"BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home
Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
John Thrumston, Chairman

Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle
June 21,2009.


376-0621 SUCRN
2009 Umerock Road Paving Program- BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the.Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, will hold a pub-
lic hearing on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 2:30 o'clock
P.M. at the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting
Room, .Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of hearing
objections to the assessment roll prepared for the 2009
Umerock Road Paving Program. A copy of the preliml-
nary assessment roll as examined and approved by the
Board, Is available In the office of the Assessment Coor-
dinator In the Citrus County Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite #205, Lecanto,
Florida, beginning June 22. 2009, for examination by
.the public and shall continue to be available until July
14, 2009. At said hearing the Board will meet and re-
celve objections of all Interested persons to the assess-
ments, the accuracy and the amount thereof against
any lot or parcel of land owned by such Interested per-
sons, The Board will also equalize and either annul, sus-
tain or modify in whole, or In part, the special assess-
ment. roll according to the special benefits that the
Board determines that each lot of record or parcel of
land will receive as a result of such Improvements. The
streets to be Improved are more particularly described
In Exhibit "A" which is attached hereto and made a
part hereof.
It Is the Intent of the Board the special assessments
heretofore described may be collected in the same
manner as ad valorem taxes and that If they are col-
lected In the some manner as ad valorem taxes that
the failure to pay any Installment payment of principal
or Interest when due shall result in tax certificates being
Issued and ultimately the owner of the benefited prop-
erty could lose title to said property at a tax deed sale


above,

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing he will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made which record shall Include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
SAny person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
(352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Tel-
ephone (352) 341-6580.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: /s/ JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN

2009 LIMEROCK ROAD PAVING PROGRAM

WEST BETH COURT from North Lazy Trail to the end,
Seven Rivers Farms Unrecorded Subdivision, Section 28,
Township 17 South, Range 17 East, Citrus County, .
Florida.

SOUTH CORAL BELLS AVENUE plottedd as South Coral
Bells Avenue) from West Central Street plattedd as West
Central Street) to West Oliver Street plattedd as West
Oliver Street) as recorded In Citrus County Prescriptive
Road Plat Book 1 Page 42, Town of Homosassa.Section
32, Township 19 South, Range 17 East, Citrus County,
Florida.


water system and water system Improvements de-
scribed above shall bear the entire cost of said im-
provements by payment of a special assessment levied
against each property in the assessment area on the
basis of assessment units.
At the public hearing the Board shall meet and re-
ceive objections of all Interested persons to the assess-
ments and accuracy of the amount thereof against
any lot or parcel ,of land described In Exhibit "A" at-
tached hereto and made a part hereof. At such hear-
ing, or thereafter at a definite time announced at such
hearing, the Board shall equalize and either annul, sus-
tain or modify In whole or in part the special assess-
ment roll according to the special benefits which the
Board determines each lot or parcel of land will re-
ceive as q result of such improvements. When the as-
sessment roll becomes final by the confirmation and
approval of the Board, the assessment roll and the Res-
olution confirming and approving the same shall be .re-
corded In the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
From the date of such recording the assessment shall
constitute liens upon the properties assessed co-equa!
with the lien of general County and district taxes. In-
cluding ad valorem taxes, and shall be superior in rank
and priority to all other liens, titles and claims.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing, they will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-


of Lot 2, Block 14, With-La-Popka Islands Unit No. 2 to
the Southeast corner of Lot 9, Block 16, With-La-Popka
Islands Unit No. 2 (Intersection of the eastern end of
East Boblink Lane plattedd as Dove Street) and East Pin-
tall Lane) -as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 128,
With-La-Popka Islands Unit No. 2. Section 36, Township
19 South, Range 20 East, Citrus County, Florida.
EAST TROUT COURT plattedd as Trout Court) from South
Withlapopka Drive plattedd as County Road) to the
end as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 81,
With-La-Popka Islands Unit No. 4. Section 6, Township 20
South, Range 21 East, Citrus County, Florida.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 21,2009.


377-0621 SUCRN
Halls River Rd Wastewater Spec.Assess.- BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County. Florida, certifies that
the final assessment roll for the Halls River Road Waste-
water Special Assessment Area (2004) has been exam-
ined anedapproved by the Board of County Commis-
sioners. The Board of County Commissioners, sitting as
the governing body of the Citrus County Municipal
Service .Benefit Unit for Water and Wastewater Utility
Services, will hold a public hearing for the purpose of
correcting an Inaccuracy In the non-ad valorem as-
sessment roll for the Halls River Road Wastewater Spe-
cial Assessment Area (2004). adopted on May 13, 2008,
with regard to Alternate Key 1141915, Roland Scott
and Diane D. Grybek, only and for hearing objections
to the correction of such assessment roll on Tuesday,
July 14, 2009, at 3:00 P.M. In the Board of County Com-
missioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida. The as-
sessment roll for the Halls River Road Wastewater Spe-
cial Assessment Area (2004) shall be available in the of-
fice of the Clerk of the Board In the County Courthouse
of Citrus County, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida, beginning on the 22nd day of June, 2009, and
shall remain so available until the day for hearing ob-
jections to such assessment roll.
The nature of the Improvements consisted of con-
struction of a sewage disposal system and sewer Im-
provements In the Halls River Road area and surround-
ing areas more particularly described as the Installation
of collection lines, mains, laterals, force mains, lift sta-
tions, and other miscellaneous appurtenances as were
required to connect to the County's wastewater facili-
ties and shall also Include and .embrace the Installation
of sewage lines, mains, laterals and other wastewater
facilities as may be necessary in order to provide for
the health, safety and welfare of all residents of the
area. Said improvements were constructed on all
lands, streets, roads and property described In Exhibit
"A'. It Is the Intent of the Board of County Commission-
ers that the lots abutting the sewage disposal system
and sewer Improvements described above shall bear
the entire cost of said Improvements by payment of a
special assessment levied against each property in the
assessment area on the basis of assessment units.
At the public hearing the Board shall meet and re-
ceive objections of all Interested persons to the assess-
ments and accuracy of the amount thereof against
the lot or parcel of land owned by Roland Scott and
Diane D. Grybek. At such hearing, or thereafter at a
definite time announced- at such hearing, the Board
shall equalize and either annul, sustain or modify in
whole or In part the special assessment roll according
to the special benefits which the Board determines
each lot or parcel of land will receive as a result of
such Improvements. When the assessment roll be-.
comes final by the confirmation and approval of, the
Board, the assessment roll and the Resolution confirm-
ing and approving the same shall be recorded In the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court. From the date
of such recording the assessment shall constitute liens
upon the properties assessed co-equal with the lien of
general County and district taxes, Including ad
valorem taxes, and shall be superior In rank and priority
to all other liens, titles and claims.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Board of County Commissioners with respect to
any matter considered at this public hearing, they will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings Is made which record shall Include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal Is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical Impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
111 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you
are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580. ,
SBY: JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

HOMOSASSA PHASE III HALLS RIVER ROAD
WASTEWATER SPECIAL ASSESSMENT AREA 2004
EXHIBIT "A"

West Halls River Road SR 490-A: Beginning at the east-
erly line of Parcel 33110, Section 22, Township 19 South,
Range 17 East'and Parcel 41230, Section 27, Township
19 South, Range 17 East, adjacent to West Halls River
Road SR 490-A, to the westerly line of West Halls River
Road SR 490-A, Section 31, Township 19 South, Range
17 East.
Blue River Cove East Plat Book 13 Pages 31 - 32:
West Wood Fern Court, South RiverpoInte Terrace &
West Riveri-olly Path
Blue River Cove Unrecorded Subdivision:
West River Cove Place, West Fern Creek Trall, South
Blue River Cove Terrace & South Wood Creek Point.
Also Included Is a 30.38' Temporary Utility Construction
Easement, over and across Lot 4-5-2.1, to the easterly
line of Lot 4-5-2.5.
Blue Springs Park Unrecorded Subdivision:
West Grotto Court & West Blue Springs Court
Hadlev's Unrecorded Subdivision:
West Hadley Court
Homosossa Company Subdivision - Unrecorded
Subdivision of Lot 28
West Lenz Lane,'South Cox Point & South Charles
Albert Point
Twin River Estates:
West Port Court, West Twin River Lane & South
Capecove Loop
Volonte Springs Unit 1 Plat Book 3 Page 102:
South Washington Point & South Jefferson Point
Volonte Sprinas Unit 2 Plat Book 4 Page 95:
South Roosevelt Point, South Taylor Terrace, West Hazel
Lane, South Eve Point, South Marva Terrace & West
Marva Court.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 21, 2009.


379-0621 SUCRN
Citrus Springs Water Line Extensions. - BOCC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County
Commissioners of Citrus County. Florida, certifies that
the final assessment roll for the Citrus Springs Water Line
Extensions 2008 Special Assessment District has been
examined and approved by the Board of County,
Commissioners. The Board of County Commissioners of
Citrus County, Florida. will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, July 14, 2009. at 3:30 p.m. In the Board of
County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County
Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida, for the purpose of Including the properties shown
In Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part
hereof, to the Citrus Springs Water Une Extension 2008
Special Assessment District assessment roll. -

The assessment roll for the Citrus Springs Water Une
Extensions 2008 Special Assessment District shall be
available In the office of the Clerk of the Board In the
County Courthouse of Citrus County, 110 N. Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida, beginning en the 22nd day
of June, 2009, and shall remain so available until the
day for hearing objections to such assessment roll.
The nature of the Improvements consisted of con-
struction of a water .system and water system Improve-
ments In the Citrus Springs area more particularly de-
scribed as the Installation of water mains, valves, back-
flow preventers, water meters, and other miscellaneous
appurtenances In order to connect to the County's
water facilities and also include and embrace the In-
stallation of water mains, laterals, Individual water
meters, and other facilities as may be necessary In or-
der to provide for the health, safety and welfare of all
residents In the Citrus Springs area. Said Improvements
were constructed on all lands, streets, roads and prop-
erty described In Exhibit 'B'. It Is the intent of the Board
of County Commissioners that the lots abutting the


Section 2: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through
133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24 respectively
and conclusively.

Township 17 South, Range 19 East
All of Sections 18 and 19.
Section 6: All that area southwest of the
Wlthlacoochee River lying in the Southwest 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4 of sold Section 6. �

Section 7: The Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of
said Section 7; and the West 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of
said Section 7: and the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 7;
and the West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section
7.
Section 17: The Southwest 1/4 of said Section 17; and
the East 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of solaid Section 17.

Section 20: The West 1/2 of said Section 20; and the
South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4; and the Southeast 1/4
less and except the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4
of saiold Section 20.

Section 30: All Section 30 less and except the Southeast
1/4 of the Southeast 1/4.
Published one (1) time In the Citrus County Chronicle,
June 21, 2009.


I Legals


I Legals


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



-U
Ings is made which record shall include the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at
this meeting because of a disability or physical impair-
ment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
111 West Main Street, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6560. at least two days before the meeting. If you
are hearing or speech Impaired, use the TDD Tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
BY: JOHN THRUMSTON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS
2008 SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "A"

OWNER'S NAME ALT KEY
ATTWOOD R DEANE JR & SUSAN F 1416281
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0090
BROWN EVERTON N & JENNIFER 1416302
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0110
D AMICO EGIDIO GINO 1416248
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0050
DE LA CRUZ ABNER & CONSUELO 1416680
PARCEL ID 18E17SI100180 10160 0270
DYER ANGEUNA TRUSTEE 1299519
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0010
DYER ANGEUNA TRUSTEE 1299527
PARCELID 18E17S100050 04810 0020
FABIAN GERDA 1416655
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 101600240
.FAGAN THOMAS J ET AL 1315727
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0100
FAGAN THOMAS JET AL 1315735
PARCELID 18E17S100060 05650 0110
FERGERSON JEREMY & 1416272
PARCELID 18E17S100180 10150 0080
CALENDA KATHLEEN & ANTHONY 1343593
PARCELID 18E17S100090 06090 0310
CASAMENTO KAREN & SALVATORE 1343607
PARCEL ID 18E17S100090 06090 0320
GARCIA REINALDO & 1416698
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0280
GULLO ANTHONY S & USA . 1299560
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0060
GULLO ANTHONY S & USA 1299586
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0080
GULLO ANTHONY S & USA, 1299578
PARCELID 18E17S100050 04810 0070
HUTCHINSON DEBBIE" ' ' 1416612
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0200
JONES PAUL L 1299730
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0150
KENT RAY S & ETTA B 1416221
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0030
LAMBORN THOMAS R JR 1416647
PARCELID 18E17S100180 101600230
LOUCK RICHARD & 1299713
PARCELID 18E17S100050 04820 0130
VAN NESS THOMAS M 1416591
PARCELID 18E17S100180 101600180
MARK JOHN K & MARIA SUSAN 1299543
PARCELID 18E17S100050 04810 0040
MARK JOHN K & MARIA SUSAN 1299551
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04810 0050
MEYER WENDY J 1299721
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0140
MINOR EDWARD M & CHARLES C 1299705
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0120
MINOR EDWARD M & CHARLES C 1299691
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0110
NEW VISTA PROPERTIES INC 2041498
PARCEL ID 18E17S100230 16620 0020 �
NEW VISTA PROPERTIES INC 1315751
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 013Q
PERKINS JOHNNY J & ZANNA P 1299748
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0160
PLATT TODD AUSTIN 2041536
PARCEL ID 18E17S100230 166200040
RAMIREZ MELVIN & NANCY . 1315743
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0120
RAMOS CLARA EDELIA 1416299
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10150 0100
RAMOS RAPHAEL & 2041510
PARCEL ID 18E17S100230 16620 0030
RASHID ISHRAT 1315654
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0030
RCT LLC 1418801
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10280 0140
SHTAYNMETS BORIS & MARINA 1415942
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 101300010
SIMON MICHAEL J & 1315662
PARCEL ID 18E17S100060 05650 0040
SOMMERS VIRGINIA M 1299683
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0100
SOMMERS VIRGINIA M ' 1299675
PARCEL ID 18E17S100050 04820 0090
SOOKLALVISHWA P . 2156864
PARCEL ID 18E17S100220 153800120
STICKLAND CUFTON L JR & SUZAN 1416230
PARCEL ID , 18E17S100180 10150 0040
TEJEDA FERMIN & SYLVIA 1418453
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10260 0190
TOYAMA JANEF F . 1315689
PARCELID 18E17S100060 05650 0060
TREITZ JOHNA MILLER & RICHARD 1418160
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 102500100
V & K PROPERTIES LLC 2041471
PARCELID 18E17S100230 166200010
VIDAL JOSE 1416604
PARCEL ID 18E17S100180 10160 0190
YAMADA LAWRENCE R 1315697
PARCEL ID - 18E17S100060 05650 0070
CITRUS SPRINGS WATER LINE EXTENSIONS 2008
SPECIAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICT
EXHIBIT "B"
The Citrus Springs Water Line Extensions 2008 Special As-
sessment District consisting of all Yacant lots and par-
cels which abut the streets and roads In which a water
system and water system improvements 'are con-
structed or reconstructed and all vacant lots and par-
cels which are to be served by a water system and
water system Improvements, located In Citrus County,
Florida, further described as follows:
CITRUS SPRINGS (Description of Territory Served)
Township 16 South, Range 18 East
Section 34: The Southeast 1/4 of said Section 34; and
the Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section
34.

Township 17 South, Range 18 East
All of Sections 10, 11, 12,13,14, 15, 16,21,22,23,24,25,
26, 27 and 28.
Section 1: All of said Section 1 lying and being South-
westerly of the Withlacoochee River less and except
,the following parcels: The East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4
and the North 770' of the West 330' of the Northwest
1/4 of said Section 1.-

Section 2: The Southwest 1/4 of said Section 2; and
the South 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 2;
and all that portion of the West 1/2 of the Northwest
1/4 of said Section 2 lying Westerly of the Seaboard
Railroad R.OW.; and the South 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4
of the Northeast 1/4; and all that portion of the South-
east 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 2 lying
North of State Road 39.
Section 3: All of said Section 3 LESS and EXCEPT the
West 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4.
Section 20: The East 1/2 of said Section 20.
Section 29: The East 1/4 of solid Section 29; and the
Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4; and the Northwest
1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of solaid Section 29.
Section 32: All that portion of the East 1/2 of said Sec-
tion 32 lying and being 570 feet more or less North of a
line North of and parallel to the South boundary AND
the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section
32,

Section 33: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 22
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 93 through
109, and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively
and Inclusively of the Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida.

Section 34: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 22,
23, and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 93
through 109, and Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through 133
and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively and
inclusively.

Section 35: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through
133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24, respectively
and Inclusively.

Section 36: The North 3/4 of said Section 36.
Township 18 South, Range 18 East

Section 1: All those portions of Citrus Springs Units 23
and 25 as recorded In Plat Book 7, Pages 115 through
133 and Plat Book 8, Pages 19 through 24 respectively
and conclusively.




SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 D9


CITRS (,UN tfYA (PL).lCHRO~NICLEl


BR


YEARS

Serving Citrus County



OUR


MISSION
To deliver ' '
an extraordinary level
of service at every point of
contact with the customer
in a personal and


professional


I


manner.


7


LOOK AROUND. EVERYONE'S DRIVING ONE!


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA .'


Jeep
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA


mCmiv aLIN


2077 HWY.44 W.
INVERNESS


_-- AN AMERICAN
REVOLUTION


14358 CORTEZ BLVD.
BROOKSVILLE


1035 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA


800-584-8755 Ext.
crystalautos.com


Komi


1


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MIt


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"You must know what your trade is worth,

no matter where you plan to buy..."


ILII


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2008 CAMRY

, ' '. I' -le


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO,AND SPECIAL PRICING WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2143 800-584-8755 Ext. 2141
*15,990* $13,990*
lDrive for only 282* mo. Drive for only 246* mo.


r 2008 SEBRING '


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2145
$1 0,990*
Drive for only$194* mo.


(2008 SILVERADO'


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2146


2007 ALTIMAC


FREE 241HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2136
c1 2,990*
,Drive for only5229* mo.


2008 RAM


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2144
=15,990*
Drive for only 282* mo.

2007 EXPLORER
I^Mr lMMM-f


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584.8755 Ext. 2137
!1 4,990*
Drive for only 264* mo.


r2007 MALIBU" (2007 MUSTANG)


- (-.
1 ..-,--. -


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800.584-8755 Ext. 2139
C8,990*
Drive or onlysl58* mo.
r2006 TOWN & COUNTRY-


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584-8755 Ext. 2140
12,990*
Drive for only$229* mo.


FREE 24 HR RECORDED MESSAGE
WITH INFO AND SPECIAL PRICING
800-584.8755 Ext. 2135
$8,990*
Drive for only 158* mo.,


I'


7


LOOK AROUND.


EVERYONE'S


DRIVING


ONE!


937 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA


Jeep
1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA


CHftYSL*R


2077 HWY. 44 W.
INVERNESS


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14358 CORTEZ BLVD.
BROOKSVILLE


4-;- M~ AM E R IOC
REYDUJTION


1035 . SUNCOAST BLVD.
HOMOSASSA


800-584-8755 Ext.


1


crystalautos.com
"All Prices/Payments exclude tax, tag, title, dealer ads and dealer fee ($599.50) Price/Payments Include $2000 down (Cash or Trade Equity). Payments are at 7.99 A.P.R. for 72 Months for model years 2006-2009 and 7.70 A.P.R. for 60 months for model
years 2002-2005 W.A.C. Not responsible for typographical errors. All prior sales excluded and may restrict stock. Cannot be combined with other offers. Vehicles are pre-owned and pictures are for Illustration purposes only.


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CIMtS CoukiY (ML) CHIRONICLE


Small frugal choices can add up to big savings


F rugality is about
choices. Frequent
small expenditures
can leave you wondering
where your money has gone.
Ever backtrack your pur-
chases and. discover you
didn't lose that $20 after all?
Tracking your spending will
pinpoint your money leaks,
and wise consistent choices
will help improve your sav-
ings, too. It's as simple as
adopting new, painless and
cheaper alternatives to your
old, automatic spending
ways. For example, Lindsay
in Alabama shares: "I've
discovered the wonder of
coconut oil mixed with corn-
starch and baking soda
(about 1/4 cup of each,
mixed with enough.coconut
oil to make it not powdery)
and will notbe going back to
regular deodorant!"
Here are a few more
cheap options.
LESS PAPER: It's easy to
swap out paper towels and
napkins in favor of cloth.


You can make
your own from
older towels,
sheets, etc. It
seems the biggest
excuse to keep
paper is ... how in
the world do you
drain bacon?
Easy. Use a splat-
ter screen, and Sara
drain the bacon FRL
grease back into LIV
your frying pan or
use a wire rack
over a cookie sheet
FABRIC SOFTENER: Di-
lute liquid fabric softener or
cheap hair conditioner with
water, and place in a spray
bottle or plastic container,
such as a baby-wipes con-
tainer. Use the spray bottle
of softener and spritz a
washcloth, or soak the cloth
in the plastic container,
wring it out and toss into the
dryer. You can use 1/4 cup
vinegar in your washer's
dispenser or reuse a Downy
Ball by refilling it with vine-


14
'I


gar. If you miss
the scent, add a
few drops of es-
sential oil.
One reader,
Karen in Kansas,
. recommends a
cheaper option:
"Ifyou have prob-
lems with static,
Noel there are ways to
GAL help reduce it
ING Static is a sign
you are overdry-
ing your clothing,
so reduce the drying time.
Keep a spritz bottle of water
at hand, and, when you open
the dryer, give the contents a
few spritzes to break the
static charge. You can also
add a wet washcloth and
start the dryer for a few tum-
bles to rehydrate the air and
break the static charge. Fab-
rics that are made from syn-
thetics are great at creating
static, so remove them from
the dryer before the load is


completely. dry; or hang
them on a hanger, drying
rack or line to dry." Previ-
ously, I've mentioned using
homemade wool dryer balls,
too. If you missed it, you can
find the recipe at www.fru-
galvillage.net/2009/05/14/find
-washing-soda-in-local-
stores.
FOOD: Look at the pack-
aged foods you buy and re-
create them yourself. Try
frugal recipes on my Web.
site, such as homemade
soups, salad dressings,
marinades, waffles, pita
bread, granola bars, cookies
or your own homemade
pudding.
IME
Swap parties have re-
gained popularity because
of the economy. Many peo-
ple don't have a lot of money
to throw parties, and if they
do, maybe their friends
don't. It works well whether
you're going through a tough


time or not, and no one has
to know if you are. It's a
great way to get together for
a home party without hav-
ing to sell or buy anything. It
saves money and is eco-
friendly, too. People are put-
ting a modern twist on it.
Here's how.
GREEN AND FRUGAL
PARTY: Guests make home-
made cleaners, such as
laundry soap or fun kid
recipes, such as homemade
play dough or finger paint
One reader, Lori in Illinois,
shares: "Bring all of those
extra, unused (greeting)
cards from years past and
exchange them. Everyone
gets new cards. Each person
gets to take home as many
cards as they bring. Suggest
they try to bring a total of 25
cards. Everyone puts then
in a box when they enter.
Pass the box around while
you have coffee. Let every-
one choose five, and pass it


around until all the cards
are gone. You can have a
craft exchange, too. Have
each guest makes five of
their favorite crafts. At the
exchange, everyone gets
one craft from each person.
Now all of you have just
done some of your gift shop-
ping for the year."
ORGANIZING PARTY:
Everyone helps the hostess
organize closets or the play-
room, for example, and the
guest "helpers" can divvy up
any castoffs. The idea isn't
to get something. You simply
get together with friends,
have some snacks, catch up,
help out and have fun. It's a
great excuse to rent a chick
flick, too.
DVDS, CDS, BOOKS AND
GAMES SWAP: You might
have these items sitting
around collecting dust They
often have poor trade-in or

See FRUGAL/Page E10


Jackie & Bob Davis
American Realty & Investments
117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
mom (352) 634-2371 Cell
(800) 476-2590 Toll Free
ERA For a Visual Tour of our listings
REAL ESTATE and all MLS: bidavis.com ,a
SUP INTO SOMETHING COMFORTABLE Tr.:




W i s seawall. Includes 2 buildable lots.
. "3A-.060 S46?') O,)(


2 SUNDAY�,JUNE 21, 2009














REALTY LEADERS



Crystal River 794-0888 Inverness 341-1233 Beverly Hills 527-1112


AUSON P (352) 697-0761 STEE NANCY
M mREALO (352) 422-3998 MCCLORY IEWIS
www.naturecoastliving.com * info@naturecoastliving.com REALTOR


(352) 302-6082


iffF.




5,


7".


OAK VULAGE. Cuslom upgrades e4vrswherv ,ncludrdg
granite double Irayed ceiling,. e.*.erior rad Irnm. d enrlrv
oversized 2 car garage zlaggered hardwood cabrels .,
crown iTiolding, arched doorways and hallways, upgracdcd
SUGARMILL WOODS 1/2 Acre Lot. Hot lighting fixtures. Details this special rarely seen at this
Tub. Immaculate condition. MLS #330581. price. Treat yourself to something special. MLS#334297.


HAVE YOU EVER DREAMED
OF LIVING ON LAKE
J ROUSSEAU. H..' ,. ,.:..
' i l l' i , ir i.. - i. ri. a

^ ' de, v'. ..rr, r, �.,:,,_d -. i-.. .l-:r


SSPORTSMANS PARADISE"., I
- .r , Q .... r . r, ,.
h :, . ii
' r
,) I, r ~ ~k .l- rI-1 l 1"


IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR
." %LT WATERFRONT WIrH
SiPRIVACY,.r.. . ...,1. -1





q IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR
SSECLUSION THIS IS IT.
this beautiful almost six acres
� , . overlooking Lake Rousseau. Sit
out on your screen porch facing
the Lake and enjoy watching
Sand Hill Cranes, Eagles and
other wildlife. Separate
workshop and garage for
tinkering. Fenced on three sides.
MLS #334686.


:BARBARA STONE
352-586-3072
zUebZuta 5SLe" 'Ad

M' 9181 ABBOT i
C " CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/1 Perfection in
country club area.
- ' ~," -; ..... MLS #334139

3046 W.CENTURY BLVD.
CH1TRUS SPRINGS


4/2/2 Built in 2005 -
with fenced yard.
MLS #334827


ISEI '1
- I . *l = -


,T r, DON'T MISS THIS PRIVATE SETTING
oy rm., fam. rm. w/wood-buming fireplace,
skylights in kitchen, tile backsplash &
suited double kitchen sink. Master has garden tub
e and & walk-in closet. Plenty of room to roam,
inside & out! See it today!! MLS #330653.
S CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179


i, --I I. . 1


LOCATON, LOCATION! Funl, iu, ,-,.;r B ,.,,,,. ,.,,. - ' rI.1 . ,. BANK O . , , ulu
3.,-A ru:, rrrrRS , RAW OWNED Pool Sr.i:il Jui sjl-.rur
IoA ," a r .T.e ih er Deauldrul a lori ..ne o1 , '- l.r,,,, , I r,,,: s,,' , , , t ,:,ir ,,l r.i ,: r , r, a n . ' .r, CrL , 11 P.,.er Tr,,s 2 ~. .I,:.,Ti .' i.r, pI i
Homosassa River. Dock your Doal on me ood-bumlng fireplace, cable, ceilingfans Master reu, rooms ... O.fiCe, study, easing -rooiTm, isIT. I':.5'] on adrap anal ir31 23
river with eas access to the Gulf of suite offers whirlpool bath and private balcony or 3rd BR. Updated kit. and Mbath. Nice back directly off the Indian River which takes
Mexico. Beautiful oaks & river from pool. Single garage, wonderful riverfront pool with shade rch, backyard gazebo & two storage sheds. you to the Crystal River. Access the Gulf of V
New A/C, refrigerator, garbage disposal & trees. Convenient to Suncoast Parkway. MLS nsulation in roof over and behind new Mexico. Live the waterfront dreamll MLS
garage freezer. MLS #324508. #328165. vinyl siding. MLS #329308. #333806. b
MICE STOKEY 352-206-9096 MIKE STOKLEY 352-206-9096 M E SITOKEY 352-206-9096 CHARDINE ANGELO 352-464-4179


L-2-1 ATTRACTIVE HOME .,ir, I,g
rooms, newly painted interior and exterior
Mth all new windows, new roof, new HW
heater, new tile in shower master
bathroom. Move-in ready!l MLS #332601.
BARBARA STONE 352-586-3072


dstone34@tampabay.rr.com


BaAI B al" !
9362 CITRUS
SPRINGS BLVD.
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/1/1 With tiled
screen porch
MLS #334212


U


THIS 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOME

painted, well-maintained home with large
screened room overlooking private yard.
House has fenced yard, alarm system,
irrigation, large workshop with a few fruit
trees to complete it. MLS #333329.
CHARLENE ANGELO 352-464-4179


LOVEIf 2. 2 I HOME ON A CORNER
LOT ., i s..:.a ,lljge c' e l room ,.ir,
dining area. Kitchen with newer appliances,
breakfast bar and large dining section.
Large Florida room with decorative tile is a
must to see. MLS #323381.
BARBARA STONE 352-586-3072


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009E3


-CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONIChE







~iftusC~r~rFr� L)i&CrAk5&1L


-94 Suidmi, 30WN1.,' 2009


Real Estate DIGEST


RE/MAX Realty
recognizes top agents,
Realtors Vicki Love
and Nancy Bowdish re- . . .

lion mark in sales
volume. Each of these .
agents has joined a se-
lect group of agents who
have more than $1 mil-
lion in sales volume this Vicki Love
year. Vicki and Nancy RE/MAX
are both agents with Realty One.
RE/MAX Realty One.
Nancy works out of the
Homosassa office on
U.S. 19 just south of
Sugarmill Woods. Vicki
works in the Lecanto of-
fice located on County
Road 491.
The brokers and staff
of RE/MAX Realty One Nancy
are also pleased to an- Bowdish
nounce the recent addi- RE/MAX
tion of Deb Infantine to Realty One.
their team in Citrus
County. Deb is a successful and respected
Realtor in the area who has relocated to


the Inverness RE/MAX --
office. Having been li-
censed since 1981, Deb
has sold real estate in
Tennessee and Florida. ,
She has received numer-
ous awards for her pro-
duction and is
consistently in the top Deb
percentage of local Real- Infantine
tors. Deb would like to in- RE/MAX
vite all of her friends and Realty One.
past customers to visit
her at her new location on Main Street in
Inverness. Call her at 637-6200.

DIGEST DEADUNES
* Submit information for the Real
Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday
for publication Sunday.
* News notes are published as
space is available. The Chronicle
reserves the right to edit items.
* Submit material, ann: Home-
Front, at Chronicle offices in Inver.
ness or Crystal River; fax to
563-3280; or e-mail to newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com.


DIGEST PHOTOS

* Headshots of real estate agents and associates submitted for the Real Es
tate Digest are kept on file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is the
responsibility of the individuals submitting news notes to ensure head.
shots have been sent to the newsroom, and to advise staff of any name
changes.
* Photos need to be in sharp focus and should be in maximum resolution
JPEG (.jpg) format.
* E mail headshots to go with the Real Estate Digest to newsdesk@chroni
cleon line.com, attn: HomeFront. For more information, call 563 5660.














* Gourmet Kitchen * Granite Counters * Tile Floors
* Spa Master Bath * Security System * Vacuum System

Directions: US 19 to Cypress Blvd. W. mi'llJ Directions: US 19 Lo Cypress Blvd.
to Left on Cypress Blvd E. to Left on W.to Left on Cypress Blvd. E to Left
Corkwood Blvd. to Left on Boxwood on Black Willow st. to Left on Black
Ct.House on Right of cul-de-sac. Willow Ct N. House on Right

I*


REALTY GROUP
Spcaiigi er it


Detached Villa / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car+Pool / Woodview Villas
Popular Malibu Model Pool home. Enjoy the
Terra Vista lifestyle.
TVRG# 1113 $294,000.





Single Family I 3Bd-2.SBath-
2Car+Pool / . Hillside South
Attractive comer lot pool home with upgrade
kitchen and so much more.
TVRG# 1034 $549,000.


Detached Villa 12Bd-2Bath-
2Car I Brentwood Villas
Perfectly suited for cozy permanent residence
or seasonal retreat.
TVRG# 1028 $179,900.


Single Family I 3Bd-2Bath-
2.5Car+Pool / Bellamy Ridge
Gorgeous Charleston Model pool home sitting
on a half acre lot.
TVRG# 1066 $549,000.


Detached Villa I 2Bd+Den-
2Bath-2Car / Woodview Villas
Immaculate Lantana model. Perfect for
entertaining
TVRG# 1070 $355,000.


-..- . ag-
Single Family / 4Bd-2.5Bath-
3Car I Woodside
Spectacular Cordova model loaded with
upgrades. Priced to sell.
TVRG# 1050 $469,000.





Detached Villa i 3Bd+Den-
2.5Bath-2Car / Woodview Villas
Customized Windward model. Side load
garage on an oversized lot.
TVRG# 1081 $334,900.


SingleFamily / 2Bd+Den- Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
2Bath-2Car / Brentwood 2Car / Woodview Villas
Come take a look at this nicely maintained Fully furnished Cypress model home. Located
Brentwood Home. Move in ready! on a quiet Cul De Sac. Move in ready.
TVRG# 1119 $1,100. TVRG# 1105 $1,300.
Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442
(352) 746-6121 * (800) 323-7703
r80904


Single Family / 3Bd-2Bath-
2Car I Hunt Club
Expanded Richmond model. Upgraded
Kitchen. Awesome curb appeal.
TVRG# 1075 $399,900.


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


-- o - .


Detached Villa / 3Bd+Den- Detached Villa I 3Bd-2Bath-
3Bath-2Car / Hillside Villas 2Car / Hillside Villas
Bright home w/Guest BR Suite. Tile in wet Open great room plan. Unique Golf course
areas, Bay Window in Master. setting.
TVRG# 1018 $324,900. TVRG# 1037 $379 000.


I l l









Giwiws Coumy (FL) CHRONIeLE SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 E5


K Y "Always There For You"
REALTYGAIL COOPER
i Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
!OA 1 "Cell: (352) 634-4346
......... OFFICE: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


OPE HOS0TDY


Directions: Hwy 491 on to Pine Ridge Blvd at Main Gate, turn left on Apple Valley Ave.
4850 N APPLE VALLEY AVE. (Corner Of Apple Valley)
SPACIOUS 4/3/2 POOL HOME 3/2/2 STUNNING POOL HOME
* 2 Master Suites * Hardwood Floors
* Plus den & bonus hobby room * Custom Cherrywood Cabinets
* Over 2700 sq. ft. of living space * Spacious Kitchen
* Jacuzzi * Upgraded Features
* On 1 acre, lots of privacy * On 1 acre


SGlass enclosed lanai J car garage rgu .rc rpt . j. Msn
* Upgraded appliances heated pool . :. $279, Marge aszota * n o Realtor - .KEL . Realtnra
Hurricane resistant windows Fireplace I,.,s 8. '; - n Eon o , ,si, , Realtor n Realtor-
* Oversized lot * Security system and more! Xra n-n A.' o ,Cell 352-464-4220 Wn N S Cell 352-220-3991
#333138 $193,000 #334216 $215,000 1 -- . 'a -.-, I 699 S.Adolph Pt., Lecanto,FL 34461 * Office: 352-746-7113







D * E Ld


OWNER'S TOUCH SHOWS!
*3/213 WITH OFFICE * 2005 BUILT
* Ceramic tile/granite * Dream kit/great DR
* Large lanai & POOL
*Circle Drive - corner lot
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
www.FloridaListinginlo.com


.r.

* . .,u~
'II * III


LIIKUI rIKINhIM
* 3BR/2BA/2CG
Granite kitchen countertops
42 in. Hickory cabinets
* Heated pool
* Detached 30 x 40 garage/
workshop/heated & cooled
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Femi lenpal I,,- i . i .,


WHAI A 0fcm:
3/2/2 situated on 1 + acre.
This home is a work in
progress.
1 - MAIHONEY 13521220-4023 \
S, tL ,~ ae1,,3raee0,aer r
SMiA CURE (t352-220-3001


COUNT THE WAYS TO ENJOY
THE GOOD THINGS IN LIFE
2/2 villa is the place for you to relax
and a view that feeds your soul,
covered patio, w/double lot in
Sugarmill. Better act quickly
NANCY BOWDISH (352) 628-7800 1
Direct: (352) 422-0296
Visual Tours at www.bfdtiscounaty.c .


i KEIm.I L nluMEW.KC
You'll have plenty of room for
company in this 2/2/2 w/spacious LR,
vinyl enclosed lanai, large BRs.
Fabulous wooded view. A careful
buyer's dream
NANCY BOWDIS *(352) 628-7800
Direcmh (352) 422-0296
Visual Tomrs ot ww.hIrdiestosy


WU mIAIN LLU�Ill::l
* 3/2/2 - NICE DECOR * MOVE RIGHT INI
* Gas range & dryer * Loads of cabinets
* OH gar. door has.creen
* Newer shingles, other updates
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
EllIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: kellyg@remax.net


SOwn your PLACE IN THE SUNI
- VERY NICE HALF ACRE LOT
* 2BR/2 bath - screened porch
* Split plan - lots of storage
* Roofover
* Paved street
KELLY GODDARD 476-8536
ELLIE SUTTON 287-3997
Email: elliesullon 3 remax.nel


* Living & Family Rms. * Well maintained
* Pretty neighborhood * 1644 sf. living
PETER & MARVIA KOROL D -E
www.TheKorolTeaim.om
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


Foreclosure?
Short Sale?

B Certified Distressed
Property Experts

If you need help with your
distressed property sale -
Call Kelly & Ellie
Certified CDPE Consultants
(Confidentiall Alwaysl)


*2BR/2BA/2-Car Garage Built in 1988 SUGARMILL WOODS BRING OFFERS!
* Withlacoochee River Not Far Away 2BR/2BA/2 car garage, 1650 see this 2BR, gt loca onc rt homp with
* Seawall & Concrete Boat Slip SF living area. Golf course lot. shed utility building to store tools and lawn mower.
Too many uaa de to . This home has an add'l rm. that can be used as an
* A Cooks Kitchen" Too many upgrades to list. office/den or 3rd BR. Great locations in Inverness
*' Workshop with O NO EXPENSE SPARED. Highlands South close to shopping,
Workshop With A/C i hospital, and area amenities.
LOU VALLEY DAWN WRIGHT
DEBRA PILNY (352) 637-6200 (352) 257-9016 (352) 400-1080
HomeinOtmatsCounty.com Emakl: eeaaiey@tampabsy.rr.com Emlok dowwight@toampaby.rr.co








3/2/2 ON TWO BEAUTIFUL 5TH ON QUARRY COURSE BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2 HEATED POOL
1/2 ACRE LOTS * 4/3-3460 sq ft Masterw/balcony wth den (2718 sq. ft.) in the
Roomy eat-in kitchen, living/dining 4/3- Master very desirable development of
room, FL room w/vinyl windows, ' Pool + hot tub * Summer kitchen Fairview Estates. Home has been
fenced-in yard, large shed. 1/2 way to * Wine Cellar Fireplace lovingly cared for and is in great
Dunnellon or Crystal River. condition.
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 (352) 637-6200 www.ronmovo .remax.bom
Emaik moadol@errthflk.neot E.1i- kmraoyoghom@romox.net Certified Distres Property Expert


2 BATH CONDO
in Inverness Village, a 55+
community. Upgraded carpet & tile,
kitchen cabinets. Glassed Florida
room.
DNNY UNDWOOD (352) 56-1743
Integrity Sellng Specia
E6aihFiolddoiafestykeoeanid.au L


* 4/3, 1993 doublewide (1,728 sq. ft. lv.)
* Split floor plan Large master suite
* Large eat-in kitchen * 2.5 Acres
* Huge liv. rm. w/fpl. * Near riding trails
* Beautiful Pasture with
2-stall barn in back
CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Ema& dotheryloaert@reinmsrt


PINE RIDGE ESTATES
BUILT IN 2007
S3BD/3BA/2CG on 3 acres Inground Sat Pool
Plus Den or Office * Prnces Suite
* Fenced & Gated lot * Many added features
PETER & MARVIA KOROL I1
www.TheKorolTeaum.com I
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 ES


CmRusZoumy (F CwRoNicm


. o








SUNIi~$J~UN'E ~1,2%d�~ dPklYs t~o'(FC1'Ro~L)i


HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
It is also distributed to approximately
300 business locations throughout Citrus County.
Display advertising information....................................................... 563-5592
Classified advertising information................................................... 563-5966
News information................................................................................563-5660
........ . .........................................................newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listings.......................... ..www.naturecoasthomefront.com
Sign up for www.naturecoasthomefront.com.................................. 563-3206
Advertise online..................................................................................563-3206
....................................................................NCCsales@chronicleonline.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CH0NqICLE .



To have your news in the Chronicle's HomeFront section, you may mail, fax or email the
information to the Chronicle, 1624 North Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. The
newsroom fax number is 563-3280 and email is newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
You may also drop off your information at the Meadowcrest office or the newspaper's
Inverness office at 106 W. Main Street.
When submitting information, please make sure it is printed or typed, is concise and includes a
contact telephone number.
If you have any questions or comments, contact the section editor, Mike Arnold, at 563-5660
(email - newsdesk@chronicleonline.com).
HOW TO GET YOUR PHOTOS INTO THE PAPER:
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- Be sure that photos or negatives you submit are taken using 35 rm film. Others will not be accepted.
- Pleaseincludeyour address and phone number on any photos or negatives submitted.
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- When identifying persons in your photo, please do so from left to right, front to back.
- For more information, please contact Matt Beck, photo 'eam leader, at 563-5660.


Get in touch with



nature this summer


On hot summer days when it seems
like there is no relief in sight from
the scorching sun, there are some
cool, fun outdoor adventures to
enjoy. Think of paddling down
a river! There are few activities
more refreshing in the summer
months than being close to the
water, paddling down one of
Citrus County's many water- " -.
ways.
Paddling is great exercise
and definitely affords you the Joan Bi
ability to be closer to nature Joan
than a lot of other activities. In FLO0
many cases you will be able to FRIE
travel to and see sights only ac- LIV
cessible to a very small per-
centage of the population.
Canoeing or kayaking definitely provide
an avenue for up-close and personal ex-
periences with nature that can be found in
few other places.
Citrus County is rich in natural re-
sources and one of the great paddling ad-
venture opportunities is along the
Withlacoochee River. This river originates
in central Florida's Green Swamp, east of


Polk City, and is one of the few rivers that
flow north, twisting and bending through
the sand hill area as it moves northwest,
finally empting into the Gulf of
Mexico near Yankeetown. The
Withlacoochee River is 86 miles
long and has.a drainage basin of
1,170 square miles.
The Withlacoochee River is
. ^ officially designated as part of
Florida's statewide system of
greenways and trails. Canoeists
and kayakers enjoy a wide vari-
adshaw ety of habitats that offer oppor-
IDA- tunities for nature study.
NDLY Wildlife is abundant along the
!NG river. Deer, turkey, otter and al-
ING ligator are common. Wood duck,
wood stork, white ibis and an-
hinga can also be seen along the trail. The
diversity of the vegetation and wildlife is a
reflection of the constantly changing ter-
rain of the river. Beginning in cypress and
hardwood swamp, it progresses through
upland hardwood and pine forests, past
cypress ponds, palmetto hammocks and
landscaped backyards. Hardwood forests
See NATURE/Page E8


Inside...


Cedar-riff ic
PAGE E9
Home Maintenance
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E4

WHERE'S JANE?
* Gardening columnist
Jane Weber is taking a
break from her column,
Jane's Garden. It will re-
turn later this year.

For current property transac-
tions, use the search features on
the Web site for the Citrus
County Property Appraiser's Of-
fice, www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Historic pottery piece has considerable collector interest


Dear John: I'hope you
can help identify
and value the porce-
lain vase in the photograph.
It is 8 inches tall. On the
bottom is im-
pressed - what
looks like a sail-
ing ship and on
either side of the
ship are the let- .
ters M.P
It belonged to
a relative and
was given to me
about 30 years John S
ago. I guess no
one in the family SIKOF
wanted the vase AT
and so it was
given to me. I


was pleased to get it. The
color is a deep blue with no
decoration. I will appreci-
ate any help you can offer.
- C.C., Internet
Dear C.C.: You have a
very collectible vase made
-by a company with an inter-


1
IL


"I


testing story. The vase was
made by Marblehead Pot-
tery. Starting in 1905, Dr. J.
Hall introduced a thera-
peutic ceramics program
for patients con-
fined to a sanato-
rium located in
Marblehead,
Mass., as a reha-
bilitative pro-
. gram. Two years
- ) ^li^ later it was sepa-
rated from the
sanatorium and
ikorski continued oper-
ating until 1936.
iSKI'S Marblehead
nIC Pottery vases
have been a cat-
egory of specific
collector interest for
decades and are aggres-
sively sought after. Your
vase appears to be in excel-
lent condition. Potential
dollar value is below $1,000,
but likely not for long.
Dear John: This weather-


man figure .was purchased
in the early 1930s. I cannot
find any markings on it. Do
you think he is worth any-
thing? I appreciate your
help and enjoy your col-
umn. -AY., Crystal River
Dear A.Y: Yes, your
weatherman has some dol-
lar value. Before I can give
you an opinion, I need the'
following , information:
What is the figurine made
of, what are the dimen-
sions, and include good
clear photographs of the
front, back and the under-
side. Then I will finish the
story.
Dear John: I listen to
your show and read your
articles. I appreciate you
being there and learning
about the things I have ac-
quired over the years. I
have a cedar chest and a
cedar wardrobe from my
grandparents. I have a cou-
ple of other things also, but


what brings.me here today
is the lipstick case I inher-
ited from my mom. I doubt
its monetary value can
compare with its sentimen-
tal value to me, but I am in-
terested in any background
you can offer. It is inscribed,
silver plated, and was made
in Denmark. The raised
picture on both sides de-
picts people playing music
and dancing, including a
dog! It has some nice de-
tails with tile floor, curtains,
See ATTIC/Page E11
This vase was produced by
Marblehead Pottery of Mar-
blehead, Mass. The com-
pany had its origin in a
therapeutic ceramics pro-
gram at a sanatorium.
These pieces are highly
sought after by collectors.
This vase might fetch less
than $1,000, but its value
is likely to increase.
Special to the Chronicle


ES lf�'E


di&


1"
FI







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S1I41$PAY5JUNE21, 2009o 7


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2360 ERIC 9356 JOURDEN 9230 N. ELLIOT WAY 101 E. HILL ST. 5577 N. LENA DR. 4754 ELKCAM BLVD
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$240.000 $185 000 $166 980 $120.800 s69.7S0 $99.9


cmq��,�PVN, �YA,







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


E SUNIMX IUNE 21. 2009


Fighting algae stains on shingles NATURE
Continued from Page E6


Q I look "gles. The air-
fo r- borne algae are
w ward actually attracted
each time to your .... ' to the limestone
Home Fix col- -'., " 'it powder that is
umn and have used to add
been a reader for weight and
a long time. I ap- - longevity to the
preciate your common asphalt
writings. roof shingle.
About algae on Dwight Brnett While inspecting
shingle roofs: Is DwightBarne the roof you will
there a best time HOME notice there are
or two during the MAINTENANCE no algae stains
year to apply a directly below
recommended cleaner with the metal flashings, flue
a garden sprayer? pipes or roof vents. Why?
A: Although algae stains Because metal oxides (rust)
are unsightly, the stains do released when rain hits the
little to damage the shin- metal prevent the formation


and growth of algae.
When the time comes to
replace the shingles, ask the
roofer to install algae-resis-
tant shingles, which contain
small granules of copper or
zinc to prevent the forma-
tion of algae. In the mean-
time, the stains can be
cleaned with a simple home
remedy by mixing 1 quart of
bleach with 1/4 cup of
trisodium phosphate (TSP)
and 1 gallon of water.
A word of warning: Any
cleaner you apply to the
shingles will make the roof
very slippery and haz-
ardous. I would strongly ad-
vise that a qualified


professional perform the
cleaning work Make sure
the contractor you hire is
fully insured; any damage to
the shingles should be cov-
ered under the contract
If you decide to do the
cleaning yourself, apply the
cleaning solution using a
Hudson garden sprayer and
scrub the affected areas
with a stiff long-handled
brush. After cleaning, spray
the area with a garden hose,
making sure all the shingles
are fully rinsed. You can
also purchase oxygen
bleach roof cleaners, which
See STAINS/Page E11


with an understory of cab-
bage palm and saw palmetto
border the river. Further
downstream, the hills disap-
pear as you paddle through
lush swampland with cy-
press, gum and maple
adorned with air plants. The
overhanging limbs form a
lacy canopy Much of the
trail flows through the With-
lacoochee State Forest, but
there are scattered residen-
tial areas along the river.
The Tsala Apopka Lakes
region is a miniature Ever-
glades with an abundance of
birds and reptiles, hammocks
of water weeds, and multi-


faceted channels. Fishing is
excellent along the river, but
wildlife maybe scarce except
in isolated pockets.
Call Citrus County Exten-
sion at 527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS's
knowledge, research, and re-
sources to address youth,
family, community, and agri-
cultural needs. Programs and
activities offered by the Ex-
tension Service are available
to all persons without regard
to race, color, handicap, sex,
religion, or national origin.

Dr Joan Bradshaw is the
University of Florida/IFAS
Extension Service Director
in Citrus County


.uwmerroflt"


SECO offers energy
efficiency certification
Sumter Electric Cooperative, SECO,
today announced that it has launched a
new effort aimed at helping builders in the
region get their homes certified as energy
efficient


SECO will use the recommended tiered
rating system where scoring is awarded at
different levels according to points
achieved over the minimum point thresh-
old. Builders can achieve a bronze, silver,
gold or platinum level certification.
. Inspectors will look at a wide variety of
categories, including energy and water


use, site prep, construction materials and
more. Builders participating in the program
will also receive a special certificate from
.SECO documenting their home ratings,
which can be used for marketing purposes.
Builders interested in finding out more
about green building certifications can call
SECO at (352) 793-3801, ext. 1202.


I I KUJ1 ni
Refurnished 2BR/2BAi
Wood flooring. Im


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11145 W. Bentbow Path, Crystal River, FL 34428 * U.S. Hwy. 19,2 miles north of the Crystal River Mall


ES suNDA j u-N'E 21 2009












Cedar gives garden rustic flair


KATHERINE FREY/Washington Post
.... Nancy and Pierre Moitrier fashioned wood from red cedar trees to create
their elaborate garden enclosure. RIGHT: The Moitrier's tree house, outside of An-
napolis, Md., appears to rise out of a garden fence, which is draped in Dortmund
climbing rose.

Couple collaborate on unique vision


ADRIAN HIGGINS.
The Washington Post


he Eastern red cedar is a hand-
some native evergreen but apt
to become a bit weedy if left to.
its own devices. A meadow can
change over 20 years from an open
field to a thicket of cedars reaching
15 to 20 feet Enter Pierre Moitrier.
Moitrier, who runs a landscape de-
sign and gardening firm with his
wife, Nancy, is always looking for sur-
plus trees to cull. He gets them from
countryside clients or developers
about to clear land for building. The
trunks and larger branches are har-
vested to become a lumber of rustic
charm. Spared the mill saw, the wood
is round and still clothed in its
stringy bark even as it is used to
make fences, trellising and railing for
the couple's jewel of a garden in a
suburb of Annapolis. The structures
form a skilled puzzle of branches and
boughs, assembled to suggest Gothic
arches and chevrons or Chinese
Chippendale motifs.
The cedar-branch masterpiece is


the enclosure for the vegetable gar-
den, 25 feet by 25 feet, and 8 feet
high. Built to keep out deer, it may be
the prettiest critter fence in the
parish. The cedar (botanically a ju-
niper) yields two basic shapes -the
straight, tapered trunk and curving,
twisting branches. The fence consists
of straight posts and rails that frame
the organic lines of the branches.
Pierre Moitrier grew up in central
France, so the notion of a traditional
rustic craft is in the blood. It is labor-
intensive nonetheless. Each tree
takes time to dismember, and a high
fence consumes a lot of wood. He
used about 100 trees for the veg-
etable garden enclosure.
He built it in 2004, two years after
the couple moved in to their rambler
on a corner lot, and the rot-resistant
cedar has held up well. Some of the
bark has been stolen. "Squirrels strip
the bark to line their nest," Moitrier
said. He is intent on showing me the
nest, a journey that first involves
climbing an orchard ladder. The lad-


See CEDAR/Page E10


Craus Couyry (FL) Cmomcu


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2oog E9







Q1T~S~3QJN77~J~L) ~HRqN~C.~.E


Klfl.~nt.fluV TTThW 91 9000


CEDAR
Continued from Page E9

der leads to another
striking feature in, or
rather, above, the land-
scape.
High in a sweet gum
tree, Moitrier has con-
structed an' enchanting
tree house. From the out-
side, the siding retains
the red stain of its original
incarnation, as a tobacco
barn on terra firma. It is
capped with a cedar
shake roof with four
dormers. Inside is a cozy
perch from which to view
the garden, or to sit and
dream of one's childhood.
The dominant feature
is the block-like bark of
the tree trunk, actually
two trunks that have
melded where they
cross, and on one is the
vestige of a squirrel nest
For the Moitriers, the
tree house is a piece of
whimsy, a folly that gives
additional character to
the garden, but it is also a
neighborhood landmark
"So many people get a
kick out of it," said Pierre
Moitrier. "We had a lady
who would set up an
easel across the street
and painted the tree
house." He enjoys its.
Tolkienesque feel' and
loves to be in it when the
wind is blowing. "It
sounds like a boat, creak-
ing," said Nancy Moitrier.
"It's quite wonderful."
All this talk of Pierre
Moitrier's handiwork
may suggest a landscape
defined mainly by cute


structures, but this is
foremost a garden of
plants. He works with
stone and wood, and
Nancy Moitrier is a gar-
den designer and horti-
culturist. (Their
company is called De-
signs for Greener Gar-
dens.) They met 10 years
ago in London. She was
studying English gar-
dens; he was working in
a restaurant
In their seven years at
the house, they have
transformed an ordinary
corner lot into a garden
of memorable charm
and inspiration. Origi-
nally, the edge of the
property was flat and
featured a stand of dying
trees. They brought in a
double truckload of soil,
created an elevated.
area, retained with a
stone-seat wall and pro-
ceeded to plant unusual
trees and shrubs that
have grown into a lay-
ered screen from the
street. A path is lined
with Japanese plum yew
under-planted with the
orange leafed heuchera
Caramel.
. The gardener stops to
point out betony, a rela-
tive of lamb's ears with
rich green. leaves and
showy flower spikes that
bloom from now through
June. Four large decora-
tive shrubs from China
named- heptacodium
have been shaped into
small trees, and on the
other side of the path, a
prairie garden features
baptisias, poppies, am-
sonia, prairie dock and
groundsel bush, whose


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E2

resale value, so a swap party makes
perfect sense. Get rid of these items
you don't want, need or use and ex-
change for items you do.
CLOTHING SWAP: With some
women being let go from high-profile
jobs and seeking new employment,
and'other women who were stay-at-
home moms returning to the work-
force, they're able to swap business
attire and casual clothing without


white blossoms appear
in the fall.
One of the most uplift-
ing plants is comfrey,
now flourishing after a
wet season. Its gray-
green leaves are smoth-
ered in bluebell-like
flowers, a perfect choice
for heavy soil that stays
moist It is bordered by a
path of 40 huge land-
scape stones, some
weighing as much as 600
pounds. They are essen-
tially steppingstone
through a low-lying wet
area. The edge of the ad-
joining bed has been
graded to steer rainwa-
ter around the house,
and the stones keep the
feet high and dry.
It must be the French
influence: The vegetable
garden is especially
charming, and not just
for its cedar fence. It is
framed with masses of
strawberry plants begin-
ning to fruit. Inside the
garden, the heirloom
tomatoes are safely in,
the salad greens are col-
orful and the fence is
draped with two classy
rose climbers. The later-
to-flower is the work-
horse New Dawn, the
other a distinctly under-
used climber named
Dortmund. It is smoth-
ered in large, single
crimson blooms and
looks fabulous. "It does-
n't need to be sprayed; it
blooms all summer long,
and the leaves are really
glossy," Nancy Moitrier
said. "I have used it in a
number of my garden
plans, and it performs
well."


spending a dime. In some situations,
fishionistas share high-end acces-
sories and clothing, and the venue
might be a salon or restaurant. An-
other reader, Kellie in New Jersey,
shares: "We've had swap parties with
formalwear! Many of my friends are
all around the same size, and one year
after the summer round of weddings
and parties, we got together and
swapped. Most of our outfits were $200
each, and you can only wear a formal
so many times. This way, they had a
whole new life!" For others, it's simply

See FRUGAL/Page Ell


UrnI r~i r~ rii i~i Ii!I 111 iF' iF' IF' IF' IF' ~


U "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" �

NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225

PONTICOS r KEY REALTY INC.
P OMMO ," ' ns , M. .ri...a 'Innin-i. R R2.17nn


[i


L SWEETWATER TRADEWINDS III WITH HEATED POOL SWEETWATER BUILT 3 BEDROOM HEATED POOL HOME! -
l 3 Bed Office " Corian & Maple KiLchen * Baths " Cathedral Celings w/Fans " Doule Panea Windows I
SLush Landsc3png Double Tray Ceilinqs MusL See' Spacious Open Great. Room Well for Large L
1 MLS#3346'03 S275,000 MLS#331843 S165,000
j 1E ' Yk~e my viulual I', ulsL1


- ~ i~i


ullgJu s mu11121110 W -u W W == L= L= L- = - - - - - - - - - -1-

8W5


u & RE
RI 164
Email: cent21@infionline.net SALES: (3
www. jwmortonrealestate.com Propert
|WOND ERFUL
W'IND DERM E R3E,
"'' f~~i rA maintenance free h, ing 3BR
-. 2 5BA Beaurifully kept writh
newer appliances and new.
caree Tile uoaer den or 4tt
BR Garogeouclubhouse and
I pool Loe access and dock
for residences Just minutes to shopp;r.g 5153,000 #332771
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-212-3410 or 800-543-9163
www.CitrusCountySold.com
-KENSINGTON ESTATES -
3/2 5/'2 Pool home Full one
acre lot Large I,.vng/'great
room with Frlace Ktc, en
with sunny rook o.,erlooking
spacouc and private
backyard Lanai area has
-- ---. .n'yl windows rto make it
addionral lining area all ?ear around. ideally located for
coarvemence ro golF., shopping etc OK to park RV/boat or, sire
Asking $218,900 #332818
Call Pat Davis, Realtor (352) 212-7280.

TIDE WATER RED
S. orne 9el aw ' Log home r. th
3 be OOT.. 2 baths lob den
openr Floor plan tre irand.ngc
fireplace, tiled countertops
oper Front paorh :.re.ened
back porch -,th :,.mmer
kitchen detached 2-car garage would houze a, Rv ..ih laundr,
lacilities utIlt, bldg hai shower and .-nk, dog pen ba.n fre
Florida landzcap.ng. All this on one plus acre. 5219,900
Call Ruth Frederick 352-563-6866.
808 OLD FLORAL CITY
*RD. - Great price for this
4 bedroom home Great
location Close to
downtown Inverness
shopping, ho sptal
doctor, New metal roof
and a greal plus. Wood-burning fireplace S115,000
#33252 I
Call David Kurtz (cell) 954-383-8786
or (office) 352-726-6668.


V. MORTON
AL ESTATE, INC.
15 W. Main St., Inverness, FL
52) 726-6668 * 1-800-543-9163
y Management (352) 726-9010


Centurion Office
1993-2006


5115 ARBOR STREET,
INVERNESS. Lotis oF room
for the famoI or rl,ts 2 acre
loll With over I. 400 kq t
of I;vng in this 2 bedroom 2
both home ..th a 2-car
_.garag1e liir.iq room. family
room enclosed porch, utility shed irsde laundry and more
#334299
Ask for Maxine Hellmers 352-212-4147
or Kimberly Miner 352-586-9549.

' .YOU MUST SEE - YOU
T WILL LOVE IT! Prtced al



to mo.e in Located n the cry You .11 loae the many feature
and the cleanlines Lot sze is 200 xi 35 334519 OK to
drive by at 7Al'7 Howard St
Call Casey Kearse at 352-726-6668.

HERNANDO: CUSTOM
-- la 1ndry Ne.er li.ed in and is
awatir.ng new owners n Th,
* doubLie.,de has a wonderful
kitchen Open l-nq with
S trch' . D .ded accsies te
street foIr all -ur oatirng needs Vie f the tal r. oTih the great
room You .eon i be :rry when ou &Ie th: onE Seller aill ,ak
ar hold.r. the mortgage 599,900 5'32Q333
Call Deb Thompson cell 352-634-2656.

. OPEN LAKEFRONT ON
LITTLE LAKE SPIVEY. ell-
cared loit 2BP 2BA homr hai
ram plus large Flor
room BTa...ti2ul ,ack,ard is
lenced ha u.rt, shed and

boaa ramp and 'athlacox.-bhr- Bke Trot. S159,000 ;325649
Ask for Jeanne or Willard Pickrel
352-212-3410 or 800-543-9163
hwwnw.CitrusCoun eSold.com


11111111-, TTw 21 ?Q0Q


a 0 IFF3 rr]


Im










FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

because they've lost or
gained weight, want t6
save money or just for
frugal fun. They are held
at the host's home, li-
brary or church. Addi-
tional swap-party ideas
include plants, seeds and


perennials, baby gear
and toys, budget recipes,
coupons and home decor
PLAN IT: You should
have criteria such as
how many items each
guest brings and in what
order guests can ex-
change their items. For
example, you-can draw
names from a hat. Cate-
gorize items according to
value, and do a one-for-


one exchange. If a guest
brings more expensive
items to exchange, she
can swap for more ex-
pensive items someone
else brought. And if
there are two people in-
terested in a single item,
you can do a random
drawing to decide who
gets it, or have an auc-
tion with proceeds going
to charity. All items


brought to the party
should be in good condi-
tion because the left-
overs are often donated
to charity, too.

A kitchen-inventory
list helps you to plan and


organize your meals. You
waste less, too. It can be
as easy as using a dry-
erase board, notebook or
printable sheets; you can
use a simple slash sys-

See FRUGAL/Page E15


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to
submit news releases about upcoming
community events. Include a contact
name and phone number to be printed
in the paper. Call 563 5660 for details.


LANDMARK


STAINS
Continued from Page E8

do an excellent job of removing algae
stains. Oxygen bleaches are materials
that release oxygen for cleaning and
bleaching of stains when mixed with
water.
There are two types of powdered oxy-
gen bleaches available to the consumer,
sodium percarbonate and sodium
perborate. Sodium percarbonate is'
used in deck-, carpet-, household- and
laundry-cleaning products. Sodium
perborate is used mostly in automatic
dishwashing and laundry products as a
hot-water bleaching agent
Products such as Spray and Forget,
Stain Solver, Oxyclean, Oxygen Boost,
Clorox Oxygen Action and Natural
Oxygen Bleach all work well at re-
moving stains. An excellent Web site


that helps to explain how and what to
use on algae stains is my friend Danny
Lipford's site, www.dannylipford.
com/diy-home-improvement/remove-
prevent-algae-stains-asphalt-shingle.
Also check out www.inspect-
ny.com/roof/ShingleMoss.htm for addi-
tional information. i
Once the shingles are free of algae,
to prevent its future growth, metal zinc
strips can be installed at the peak of
the roof that will leach out zinc oxide
whenever it rains. For more informa-
tion, go to www.chicagometallic.com.
-m--
Dwight Barnett is a certified master
inspector with the American Society
of Home Inspectors. Write to him
with home improvement questions at
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville
Courier & Press, PO. Box 286, Evans-
ville, Ind. 47702 or e-mail him at
d.Barnett@insightbb.com.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

fiddle, and flute. It is so interesting to
me. I would really like to know what
the artist was re-creating, and when it
was made. Can you tell me about it, or
direct me to a place to learn more? -
G.R., Internet
Dear G.R.: There is considerable in-
terest in 20th-century modern Danish
decorative arts. At this point all I can
say is the lipstick case was made in the
20th century. In order to help you fur-
ther, I need a couple of good clear pho-
tographs.
Dear John: I am wondering if you
can help. I was just cleaning out my
parents' basement and came across a
one-pint bottle from the Charlotte
Home Dairy in Charlotte, Mich. Do
you know if this is trash or treasure?
The bottle is in nice condition. It is
clean with no chlps and has a large
letter "F" on the bottom. - D., Inter-
net
Dear D.: The one-pint bottle you
have is in the Milk Bottle collecting
. category. There is a collectors club,
'The National Association of Milk Bot-


tie Collectors, www.milkbottlecollec-
tors.com. It might be a small treasure
to a collector interested in Michigan
dairy bottles, perhaps someone look-
ing for a Charlotte dairy. Potential dol-
lar value is below $10.

John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
more than 20years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from 11 a.m.
until noon. Send questions to Siko-
rski's Attic, c/o The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.






352-795-7357
888-795-7356
w w w.rhemarealtv.com


PROPERTiES FOR SALE & RENT


,n.. I*i : ,i" . . .. . . . ' . , . . ... .
508 QUAIL ROOST � -. I ., i.. r.,.'. . ,:,j.,-l,i u.,l a , I. i- ..:.l, . r.lCT,- ,: . . 1 bul '
sie.'lil oiw er '.. ' Pin e . Lt ' i1' ^ ONLY U ,'', ,' , * J . .'. l al,',90 I . JzI ,
S89,900. Owner will entertain offers. Cal inr,, .:,r,,,li ". ,.:,,T, S289,900 HL :l 111i: C3


S- COME LIVE THE LIFE OF LUXURY e

BULOUS LAKEFRONT RETREATII *:.. .:,.u; . -"",,a * ' "'
w of lake, gourmet kitchen, and remodeled e fgsargll drive ayl i0 wa.ll, I an-d.0 0ol lt
oughout. One Year Warranty. $269,900 with custom brick papers, firepit located on open lana]
S#334661 Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586- 1ToPd w lOne Year Home Waantyl 335,(
bMLi 1$N3dRR7 Call Tmrlka Sodres-Hanssen 352-586


'0'
SY 'DAY,�ONE" Ar








Cws.Coumnry (FL), CHRomn1LE


ka Estatkie


Real Estate


Classifieds



' ..-, , ...-,. ... " '
-. .r ' " .. 0 NZ,""




'"-. *t_.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


...In Print





Z.- 7Online



,AThe Tll
~The Timle


faI M S6 I6 I Tol Fre lose I5-24 1 . EIIea~ dst rneeeile o I *. II.I*w hrnilatire

FoI o � J'FrR t Fo Ren anIa .nar Io~n. Fr~n o


2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util, incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term, $695
(352) 628-9759
2/2 SNOWBIRD OASIS
$600 mo. + $600dep.
Lawn, Water, Sewer,
Garb. Inc. 352-746-7595

CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT
LECANTO
. Nice 312, On. 5 acre.
deck, utility shed.
New CHA unit, quiet,
excellent well water,
small pets ok, $575.
+ Sec.
LECANTO
Charming, 2/1 on .5
acre, utility shed,
crystal clear well
water, quiet, small
pets ok. $525. + Sec
(813) 695-4037

CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2, W/D hook-ups,
CHA, double carport,
screen porch- front:.&
back, 1.75 acres, shed
Nice. $700 1st & sec.
(352) 628-1928 /
503-6747

DUNNELLON
Close To Power
Plantll 2/2 Carport, on
3 fenced, wooded lots.
Fum., fla. rm. scm'd
patio, wsh./dry. Nearby
River dock access.
$750. Mo. FILUS.
(772) 486-0070


CRYSTAL RIVER
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Partially
furnished,
washer/dryer,on 1/2
acre, clean, quiet, no
dogs. $500.+ Sec.
INGLIS
CLOSE TO
POWER PLANT

2/1 Apartment,
partially furnished,
washer/dryer,
clean & quiet. No dogs.
$600:+ Sec.
(352) 447-0333
HERNANDO
2/1 $400.Mo.
+ $400. Sec. Pets
Ok. (352) 464-0719
HERNANDO
2/2, large fenced yard,
$350/Mo.+ $700. Sec.
(920) 948-4767
(920) 922-6800
HERNANDO
3/2, SW On 2 acres.
private property, lots of
trees, Wash/Dry, front
& back porch. No pets
$650. mo (352)201-0111
HOMOSASSA
1&2 Brfum & Unfurn .
In beautiful park w/pool.
No Pets. 352- 628-4441

HOMOSASSA
2/1, fum. Fst./Lst./Sec.
Ref. req. $550. Mo.
(352) 621-3868


Move In Special

1-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $150
2-BR Sec Dep. 1st Month $200
Exp. 6130109
Call Monday Through Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
We accept HUD Vouchers, Foreclosures Accepted.

(352) 489-1021 i


HOME-N-LAND
New home on 1/2
acre. 3/2 1500sqft. 10
yr. warranty, sodded
lawn, paved Rd. Get
your stimulus check
($8,000) cash back
only $665/mo. W.A.C.
Own your own home!
CALL (352) 621-9183
HOMOSASSA
2/11%, Big lot, Near 19
$425 mo + Sec. + Ref.
No pets 352-628-3019
HOMOSASSA
2/2/Carport, Clean!
No pets! $475 + Util. +
Sec. (352) 586-2976
HOMOSASSA 55+
2/2 Stonebrook
Estates
Unfurnished, Car Port.
Pool, Club house.
Boat & RV storage
$595. Mo.
(352) 422-7887

HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 - $850/mo. :
+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-3338
HOMOSASSA
Sm. Mobile, suitable for
1 person, Adult park,
$350/mo. $150/sec. No
pets. (352) 628-6188
HOMOSASSA
Small 2/1 w/porch. $450.
Mo. Fst./Lst. + Sec. No
pets. (352) 637-1142
(352) 220-1341
INVERNESS
1st Month Freel
Waterfront 55+ Park, 1BR,
IBA $350.2 BR, 1BA,'$450,
also fully furn., Inci water
& grass mowing.
352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Clean 1 bdrm, CHA,
priv. lot w/river access.
$400. 727-492-1442
Inverness/
Crystal River
2/2 $450./mo clean
563-5117
FLORAL CITY
Must Seelli
2/2 in Country Setting.
$500/mo. + $500 Sec.
No. pets. For application
Call Lee at 352-250-0664
or 800 -6924162.


INVERNESS 2/1
RENT OR RENT
TO OWN
Spacious DW, beau-
tifully renovated.
Fenced lot & country
setting. CHA,
covered parking.
screened porch,
laundry room. New
paint, carpet & tile.
$650 rent + $300 dep.
Rent to Own w/$600
dep & $650 - Inc udes
taxes & insurance.
No credit check just
job verification.
4235 Quiver Terr.
863-860-5292





NEW 2009 2/2, large
rooms, appliance
pkg. 2x6 construction
10 yr. warranty, must
seel $37,900 Includes
A/C & heat, steps,
skirting on new pad!
352-621-9182

Palm Harbor 3/2
Singlewide
Introductory Model
$299/mo wac. 10
models to choose from
On Your Lot
Call John Lyons
1-800-622-2832 ext.210
Walden Woods Village
3 Bedroom 13 bath,.
carport, Lrg. eat in kit,
liv.,din. rm., Scm'd la-
nai, outside storage.
Exc. loc. Avail. June.
$56,400(352) 382-0681





BANK FORECLOSURE
3/2-approx. 1300 sqft
on 1/2 ac, fenced
back yd, scrn room,
work shop, concrete
drive on paved road.
Private but close to
town Home In great-
conditloni $3,000
down, $565/mo.
W.A.C. Call to view.
(352) 621-9181


crystal river 2/2,sw,on
1/2acre new
carpet&stove very clean
10x14 workshop $35000
o.b.o.813-792-1355
Floral City
2/2 DW on 3.5 + or -
acres. Withlacoochee
Forest area great for
horse riding.Priced to
sell. (352) 341-6281
(352) 634-0787
(352) 634-1290.
HOMOSASSA
3/2- 1999 remodeled
2000+sqft. Owner
financing. $675/mo
352-302-9217
Homosassa, 3BR, 2BA
doublewlde on 1/2'
acre MOL, remodeled,
owner finance $63,500.
$5,000 down, 8% int.
$560 mo. or discount
for cash (352) 726-9369
INGLIS '95 SW
2/1%, onl%' ac. Private,
wooded,covered deck,
garage w/work shop,
new vinyl shed. All appl.
include Some furnishings.
$49,9001 Cash price.
$45,000, or lease opt.
$10,000 Dwn. & $500.
Mo. (352) 419-5777
(352) 476-9005




I'M A LONELY MOBILE
2 bdrm home In a
beautiful park In
Homosassa. Brand new
kit, bath, llvrm, tile firs.
A/C . I need someone
to love me. Only $15K,
will talk. At night I see
all the lights on in the
other houses and I stay
dark & alone. Please
come & love me. Call
Robert 352-249-6239.
INVERNESS
55+ Waterfront Park,
1BR, water incl., A/C
$3,500 + $270 mo. log
rent. Fully furn., financ-
ing avail 352-476-4964

MELODY PARK 55+
Inverness 2/1, Move In
cond.appliances Incl.
$13,000 obo.lot rent
$265/mo Lve mess
(352) 637-4823


MOSS MOBILE PARK
lot #23, 1/1 cha,
Screened room. Totally
Remodeled. $5,000
firm (352) 201-0903
WEST WIND VILL 55+
(2) NEW 2005 Incredible
Prices Resales/Rentals
avail w/lease - Pet.ok.
furnished. 352-628-2090




POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - RV SITES
Waterfront homes
Weekly private rooms
352-628-0011




CHASSAHOWITZKA
2/2 waterfront DW $600
2/2 furnished DW $700
2/I carport - $500
SUGARMILL WOODS
3/2/2 furnished $900
Agent, 352-382-1000

CITRUS RENTAL
MANAGEMENT &
REALTY LLC
527-2428
Full Service
Full Time
www.citruscounty

2/1/1 Carport 475
2/1/1 ...................... 565
2/2 Co $rn...S850
4/3/2 Pool ...........$1700
3/2,5 95
3/2/2 Pool, furn..$1100
Canterbury Lakes
3/2/2 ............$1000
Crystal River
900 sf Trpl Towers 80
1160 sf Office... $800
Jennifer Foreman
Realtor PRM
Alex Griffin Realtor

r Ma? o iv mu M

APARTMENTS I
U| nits Available |
I from $395. mo
L (352) 795-2626
l--,,,- J


---
NATURE COAST
Crystal River:
2/2 home $650
Furnished Homes:
2/1 -$1000
1/1 -$1200
2/1 - $1800 W/F
2/2 -$1500 W/F

The Islands/Condos:
2/2 - $1200 and up
furnished
Port Paradise:
2 & 3/2 WF w/dock
Several units to
choose from
Fully furnished
2/1 Apartments:
$550 to $575
Homosassa:
3/2/2 - $775
3/2/2 - $850
Citrus Sorlngs:
3/2/2 - $950

Visit our website:
www.c21nature-
coast.co,
or call 352-795-0021

River Links Realty
352-628-1616

CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 $900.
CRYSTAL RIVER
WF 3/2/2 $1075
4/2/2 $1050
HOMOSASSA
Duplex 1/1 $350.
2/1 $495/up
Homes 3/2/2 $675.
Sugarmill Wds 2/2/2
Condo or Villa $625.
3/2/2 Villa $800


PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Pritchard Island
2/2 Townhouse - $650
3/2/1 Villa - $875

2/2/2 on '2 Ac. - $750
2/2 Bonus Rm - $725
2/1/IPet Friendly -
$595
2/2/2 Comer Lot -
$625
2/2/1 filed Sun Room
$695
Condos
2/2/Carport - $650
2/2/1 - $650
See our website:
www.jwmortonreal
estate.com
Jennifer Fudge
Cheryl Scruggs
352-726-9010

SINGLE FAMILY
HOMES,
DUPLEXES,
WATERFRONT,
MOBILE HOMES

FURNISHED/
UNFURNISHED,
WE HAVE THEM ALL
THROUGH OUT THE
COUNTY GIVE US A
CALL...From
$5251mo to
$12501mo
Alexander
Real Estate, Inc.
Crystal River
352-795-6633 ph
352-795-6133 fx


Get Results


In The Homefront


Classifieds!


THE HEDICK
GROUP REAL
ESTATE SERVICES
hedickgroup.net
PioneRidge
5169 N. Perry Dr.
Lg. 3/2/2 Pool $1800
3794 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Lg. 3/2/2 Pool $1500
Pets Ok - Pool Maint.
Cirus Hills
838 W. Massachusetts
St. 3/2/2 Pool - $1400_
SPool & lawn maint.
Beverlv Hills *
27 New York Blvd.
2/2/2 Fam Rm $800
188W. Seymeria St.
2/2/1 Fam Rm $675
95 S. Desoto St.
/2/1 Fam Rm $650
218 S. Lincoln Ave.
2/1/1 Fam & Screen
Room $650
907 Penn Hills Dr.
2/2/1 Adult Comm
$600
S42 S. Monroe St.
2/1/1 Family Rm $550
Lynn Davis
352-422-2522
352-746-3390




CRYSTAL RIVER, J/1
Great nelghbrhd.
7mos mlnium lease
352-795-7261/No pets
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INGLIS lbdrm
Furn. & equipped on
Withlacoochee River.
Bring your boat & dog.
5 fenced acres. New &
clean. $600 + electric.
Refs. & 1 mth sec.
352-447-2291





BED MS
Starting @ $425/mo
Laundry on premises.
352-465-2985


allNDAY, J UNE 4 1, ZVU7


C44 i-*-~._.,. T.,*,,. rti Qf\nn








SNbAY, U'JNE 21, 20091E1


4th OF JULY SPECIAL
$76 MOVES YOU INI
2 BEDROOMS
STARTING AT $450.
352-257-8048

Citrus County
Rentals
(352) 634-5499

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1, V% OFF FIRST
Mo.(352) 263-6321

SDuplex 2/1
Rent $550/mo. Option
to buy. Owner
finance, low down,
easy terms!
CHA, W/D hook-ups,.
city limits, spotless
(352) 422-3217

FLORAL CITY
2BR 1% BA, MH, just
150 yards from fishing
dock, $475. + $300 dep.
No Pets/ Near
Floral City, 10 min. fr6m
Inverness.
Trails End Camp
352-726-3699






FREE RENT!
SUMMERHILL
Luxury Apts.
Limited Timel
Call for details.
352-563-5657

HOMOSASSA 2/1
CHA, New paint, car-
pet, tile. No pets. $525
incls H20. 352-563-211.4

INGLIS VILLAS
Is now accepting
applications for our
1,2, 3BRApts.
Located 10 minutes
North of Crys. Riv.
Rental Asst. Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-447-0106
Or Apply: M,W, F
33 Tronu Drive
Iniglis Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity


INVERNESS
2/ITri-plex, Great Loc,
clean & roomy. No
smoke/no pets $500
Mo. FstlLst/Sec.
352-341-1847


LECANTO
1 Bedroom
(352)746-5238
613-6000/613-5974

LECANTO
Lrg 2/2, C/H/A, screen
porch, water incl. $550.
F/L/S, 352-746-4191
352-697-5900

ONE MONTH FREE
LECANTO newer 2/2
duplex, all kitchen appli-
ances, patio, W/D
hook-up, nice yard,
Exc. Cond. $625
(352) 634-1341

Pinewood Villas
Is now Accepting
applications for our
1, 2, 3 BR Apts.
Located in Bronson
Rental Asst Avail.
Foreclosures
Welcome
Call 352-486-2612
Or Apply Tues & Thur
7291 NE 92nd Ct. #17,
Bronson, Florida
Equal Housing
Opportunity





INVERNESS
2/1- All new floors,
nice setting. $500;
2/2- Large rooms,
completely tiled,
screen lanai, very
quiet & private..$600.
Washer dryer
hook-ups.
727-446-5871
352-344-0238








PLACE YOUR AD
24hrs A DAYAT OUR
ALL NEW EBIZ CITRUS
CLASSIFIED SITE!
Go to:
chronicleonline.com
and click place
an ad

We Have Rentals
Starting at $425/mo +
Many others
LANDMARK
REALTY
352-726-9136
Kathy or Jane
311 W Main St. Inv


SACTIONW 352-795-RENT
(R1TALMANAGIEMMITllA, IC.) www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com


HOMES * MOBILES * APARTMENTS
FEATURED PROPERTIES
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1 Apartment........................ $475
3/2/2Furn. Waterfront .........$1,500
CITRUS SPRINGS 4/2/2 House ..........................$900
INVERNESS 2/1/1 House .....................................$650
HOMOSASSA 3/2 Doublewide ............................$700
BEVERLY HILLS 21/1 ............................... $600
Call for more information. OVER 40 TO CHOOSE FROM


CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Townhome, turn.
(352) 613-5655
CITRUS HILLS
Home, Villa, Condo
GREENBRIAR RENTALS
(352) 746-5921
(888) 446-5921
greenbrlarrental.com
Citrus Hills
New A/C, new rugs, Unf.
2/2, use of pool, patio,
W/D, carport, No Pets
$699 (718) 833-3767
INVERNESS 2/2/1
Whispering Pines Villa
Washer & Dryer,
community pool.
Small pets only. $600.
352-464-2731
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Cypress Cove
Townhouse. Tile, new
carpet. Pets ok. $650
mo. 352-220-8254
INVERNESS
Extra Irg. 2/2/1 Lakeside
Community, pool, dock,
no smoke, restricted
pets. $600 mo. + sec.
(866)637-2631 TOLL FREE




CRYSTAL RIVER
Lrg, 2/2 C/H/A, Nice
$585/mo., Includes,
lawn, garbage, water,
Move in with $900.
No dogs 352-726-9570
Duplex 2/1
Rent $550/mo, Option
to buy. Owner.
finance, low down,
easy terms!
CHA, W/D hook-ups,.
city limits, spotless
(352) 422-3217
HOMOSASSA
2/1 w/carport $550 mo.
+sec.; 2/2 w/ fam. rm &
carport $650 + sec.
Both remodeled
(352) 746-3228
INVERNESS
1/1 wlscmd prch. WID
$4951mo. (352) 274-1594
Lecanto
Newer 2/2, dsh/Wsh.
W/dry,. H20 incl. No pets.
Lg.Yd. (352)628-2815
ONE MONTH FREE!
LECANTO
Newer 2/2 duplex, all
kitchen appliances,
patio, W/D hook-up,
nice yard, Exc. Cond.
$625 (352) 634-1341




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
Quiet park like setting,
Mobiles, effic.cabins,
$300. to $650. Mo. Pets
ok. (352) 726-2225
LECANTO 1/1
Log Cabin CHA, n/pets
$475 + 1st, Ist.sec. Wtr.
Garbg. inc. 352-746-3073




BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2 w/Fla Rm. All new
Inside, $850/mo F/Sec
121 W. Sugarberry Ln.
(352) 746-3228


GREAT AMERICAN
REALTY
Invemes
X-Lrg 2/2/2 all utilities.
2/2 Condo main-free
BIGI Like new 3/2/2
Studio Apts.all utilities.
Bever.Hily s
Very Nice 2/2
Oakwood VIII. 3/2/2
3/2 Great area
Citrus Springs
3/2/2 Newer home
2/2 Duplex
Adorable 1/1 & 2/1
Hemando
Brentwood 3 & 2 bd
Townhouses
Very Nice 1/1
2/2 with Pool
Brand New 4/21/2/2
3/2 Mobile waterfront
352-637-3800
www.choosegar.com

INVERNESS
1/1, CH/A, very clean
$495 352-634-5586

INVERNESS
NEWER
IMMACULATE HOMES
3/212 Back porch, nice
yard, split plan, non
smoker, $800. Mo.

2/2/1 Patio home,
close to shopping,
garbage pick up and
lawn maint. included.
$700. Mo.

Floral City

Gated community 55 +
212/2 + Fla. room,
pool + exercise room.
$750. Mo.
(352) 344-2500
(352) 464-2508

RAINBOW LAKES EST.
2/1 $625/mo.. fenced
yd, Irg fl rm. Dunnellon
school district. (239)
438-8085:455-8858

SUNSET VILLAS
Senior Community
Chiefland Ft.
Accepting
Applications for
1 & 2 BR APTS
Please Apply
M, W, F, 8am-12p
124 SW 14th Ave.
(352) 493-0220
Rental Assist. Avail
Foreclosures
Welcome
Equal Housing Op.




BEVERLY HILLS
Progress Eneray
Contractors 1/1,
fully furn avail now
$825. includes all util-
ities, 100 channel
TV/internet.
2/1 also available
(352) 220-2666

Citrus Hills
Townhouse 2/2%/1.
Terra Vista Club incl.
$1,000 Mo + util.
(516) 991-5747


CITRUS SPRINGS
1/1/1 Furn. fl rm. wash.
/dryer. Util. & cable incl.,
$750+ Sec. 249-1127
CRYSTAL RIVER
312/2 Waterfront Furn.
8 rm. house on Lake
Russo, boat ramp &
private dock. $1,200
Mo. RV. sight also
avail. $350.Mo.
(850) 5664195
HERNANDO
River Lakes Manor
3/2.5/2 Scm'd patio, CHA,
washer/dryer.
$750. Mo., fst./Ist. + sec.
(352) 322-0149
INVERNESS
1st Month Free! Water-
front 55+ Park, 1BR, 1BA
Incl. water & mowing
$475. 352-476-4964
SUGARMILL
WOODS
2/2/2 Just off U.S. 19
Quiet $850. Mo. FILUS.
(352) 212-7716.



BEVERLY HILLS
1 BD w/fla. rm. +
bonus rm.$575/mo
FIRST Month Free
30 S. Desoto 422-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
1/1 Carport $525
212/1 Encl porch, patio
$675 (845)282-3504
Beverly Hills 2 bed/1
bth.Avail 7/1 .Clean with
carport.Lanal as 3rd
bedroom.Rent $650.No
Pets.Mike 646-773-6844
BEVERLY HILLS
2 Poss3BR, IBA, IGar
352-464-2514
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1, CHA, Sec. 8 avail.
$625 (352) 382-1344
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1.5 fam rm, porch,
shed. New carp. & tile
dishwsh c/h/a $650 mo.
86 S. Lincoln 795-7374
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1. Newly painted,
new floors, nice porch,
big back yard
746-1300
68 S. Jackson St.
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1, $650. monthly.
(352) 586-4474
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1.5 + Fm Rm $650
9 N. Wadsworth
352-795-1722
BEVERLY HILLS
Immaculate 2/2/1,
quiet neighborhood,
kids OK, 1st, last, sec.
$695 mo Nukes wel-
come. 352-400-1501
CITRUS HILLS 2/2
Beautiful pool home,
redecorated, 2,600 sf.
All new apple. on 1 ac.
of land. $975 Mo.
Will consider poss.
sale. (904) 412-2181
CITRUS SPRINGS
Newer 3/211
Large master suite,
stainless steel appl.
Large lanai. Lease,
+ Dep. No Pets $800.
Mo. (352) 697-3133

CITRUS SPRINGS
Nice 3/2/2 , Near Sch.
$875. mo 352-628-0731


CRYSTAL RIVER
2-3/1 Near hosp. $695
(727) 631-2680
CRYSTAL RIVER
3/2 Clean, $800/mo
795-6299 697-1240
Crystal River Close to
Power Plant 3/2/1 w/ all
appliances on large lot
Non smoker and no pets.
$775 mo., first/last + se-
curity deposit
352-302-1321

DUNNELLON
3/2/1, Rainbow Lks Est.
remodeled, Like new
1/4 Acre. fenced;
wd. floors encl. porch.,
Close to Rainbow River
downtown & schools,
$835 mo. (561)719-8787
(561) 575-1718 after 7pm
DUNNELLON
3/2/1, Rainbow. Lks. Est.
remodeled, 1/4 Acr.
� fenced, encl. porch.,
Close to Rainbow River
downtown & schls., $875.
mo. (561) 719-8787
(561) 575-1718
FLORAL CITY
I/I on Lakefront. Stack
W/D, Pets OK, until. incl.
$625. (813) 241-7117

GOLFER'S DREAM
Home 3/2/2
3000 sf $850/mo.
Ist mo. Is $500.
(908) 322-6529

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$550/mo. 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210

HOMOSASSA
Bev Hills or
Sugarmill Woods
Beautiful, 312 ,pass 2/2
Lease Opt .Flexible
Financing 352-795-0088

INVERNESS
2/2, Modem, light
& bright. $650/mo.
F/US/352-634-1141

INVERNESS 2/2/1
Clean Nicel $750mo
352-637-0765: 302-9810

INVERNESS
2/2/2 Detached home,
RoyaGOaks upgrds,
clubhouse, pool, lawn
serv, WD. S800/mo.
inds. cable /water
949-633-5633

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS
4/2/2 or 31212 Starting
at $790 (352) 341-1142
(352) 601-2615

INVERNESS
HIGHLANDS WEST 2/2/1
Cute house in woods.
5 Mins. from down-
town. Fenc'd 1/2 acre.
pet dep $700mo
727-410-3248

INVERNESS
Move In Special
Spacious 4/2/2,
newly remodel, back
yrd. fenced $695 1st,
last. sec. Lease opt. to
purchase & owner fin.'
avail, great terms.
352-400-1501


INVERNESS
Spacious 3/2/2
Newer construction
conveniently
located. Corner lot,
screen porch.
.$825 monthly.
Call Kathy or Janet
at 352-726-9136.

TERRA VISTA
31212, Newly built,
gated community,'
washer/dryer, lawn
care, free golf & club
membership
included. $950. Mo.

HUDSON
Pasco County,
312/2 Vaulted ceilings,
eat in kitchen, split
bedroom, washer/
dryer, & community
pool included.
Screened patio,
fenced back yard.
$850. Mo.
Mark Fredrick
(813) 215-3446
Charles Rutenberg
REALITY





HOMOSASSA
RIVER FRONT
2/1.5 - $850/mo.
+ utilities. Large dock
352-422-3338

POWER PLANT &
Seasonal - Waterfront
homes, Wkly priv. rms,
RV lots. 352-628-0011





CITRUS SPRINGS
Roomates wanted to
share 4 BR house near
schools. (352)
270-9256

CRYSTAL RIVER
Widow would like to
share lovely home Rm.
w/private bath $250
incl. util. 352-220-6100




2/1, FURN MH
Homosassa, Util. incl.
clean, quiet park.
short/long term. $695
.(352) 628-9759





BUYER REBATE

* 33% of Comm. *
Buy Nowl Great
Values,& Low Rates
$8,000 Tax Credit
25+ Yrs Experience
Knowledge/Integrity
Call For Details

RON NEITZ
Broker/Instructor

CITRUS REALTY
GROUP
352-795-0060


AGENT ADs

Advertise your
services for
30 days for
only$54.50
Ad includes 20 lines of copy
w/ photo.

CAN'T SELL??
Consider allowing a
responsible family to
care for your home,
While we wait out the
market.Educated,
smoke/pet free In
need of reasonable
rent. 3/2/2 In nice
neighborhood.
Let's Help Each Other
(352) 527-3941
Picture Perfect Homes
NEW HOMES START-
INGAt $75,000 On
Your Lot
Atkinson
Construction
352-637-4138
Li # CBCOS,685

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to
advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status or national origin,
or an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
" Familial status
includes children under
the age of 18
living with parents or
legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing
custody of children
under 18. This
newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real
estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.
To complain of
discrimination
call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.








Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


100% MORTGAGE
LOAN
NO DOWN
PAYMENT
'Low income applicants
can quality
FIRST TIME
HOMEBUYER'S UP TO
100%
Little or No credit
OKAY
*recent bankruptcy
OKAY*
CAll TIM OR CANDY
Premier Mortgage
Group
352-563-2661 local
866-785-3604 toll free
*Credit and income
restriction apply*
Florida licensed mort-
gage lender











Duplex 2/1
Rent $550/mo. Option
to buy. Owner
finance, low down,
easy termsl
CHA, W/D hook-ups,.
city limits, spotless
(352) 422-3217






3/2/2 For Sale or Rent
Citrus Springs Newer
lome, low/dn, easy
terms 352-840-3324


ATTENTION!
. BRAND NEW
DOUBLEWIDE
$39,900. Delivered
and Set, $0-Down
Land/Home $650. mo.
i Repos Available
Kinder
i Mobile Home
.(352) 622-2460






2004 3/2/3 pool home,
sprinklers, fenced yd on
Equestrian trail. 2100'
under air, $239,000
OBO 4577 W Pinto
Loop. 352-422-0174







5770 N ELKCAM BLVD
Mitch Underwoood
Dipomat II,' 05,
3 bedrm, office,
3 bath. 2 car garage
formal DR. Living rm.
famrm 3,611 s.f undrf.
solar hted pool break-
fast bar, eat-in kit._
Many upgrades
on I acre $314,900
(352) 527-7404


'C1W1J�'t,06A1i' XFtl ICARb9kiJ3







-0imUSZCOUNI- (FL)'CHRONJChi'


~E2.~IJNDAY TUNE 21. 2009


ReltySelect
I Citrus.comi


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Re tSelect

(352) 795-1555



First Time Home Buyers!!
Must Seell 414 Adams,
$8,000. down payment
credit. Everything New.
(352)746-9770
P&R Realty



4/3, Pool, 2.1/2 acre
farm,2-stall barn, $198k
NO Owner Financing
2875 E. Timberwood Ct.
(352) 302-0951



2 to 4 Bedrooms
RENT TO OWN- NO
CREDIT CHECK!!
Low Downl
352-484-0866
iademlssion.com
3/2/1 office, nice area,
1036 Fordham Terr.
$82,500. Highlands
560-7379/613-9616
3/2/2 1560.SQFT.
Pool w/oversized cage
S& decking. Granriite kit.,
new roof. Cul-de-sac.
Nice lndscap/fruit trees
$161,900. 352-422-0429
4+Acres, Canal front
3/2 large garage/
workshop +bonus
efficiency apt.
REDUCED TO $175KI
(352) 560-0019
Affordable 2/2/1,
on 3/4 acre in the City!
$76,900. 352-344-4192;
613-6364/3005W.
Monroe St off
Independe



By Owner $85,500.
8725 Gospel Island
3BR, 90 x 120 fenced
Lot, If Interested
Call 726-3238
to see inside,
Furniture Included
By Owner,
3/2/1, pool, 1/2 acre,
(352) 341-4378
For Sale, By Owner
3BR 3BA, Pool, 16x24
workshop, close to
school, hasp., library.
WTI, 518 PoInsettia, Ave.
(352) 860-0878


FORECLOSURES
EVERYWHERE!
RATES-R-LOW!
BUY NOW!


Deb Infantine
RE/MAX Realty One
Cell (352) 302-8046
Office (352) 637-6200

Like Country Living?
3/2/2 custom built 2005
Famrm. 18x24 sports
pool w/scr encl. 6x6
jaccuzzi, wood firs.
wood burning FirepI
Wood cabinets &
granite counter tops,
15K back up house
gen. privatel.25 acres.
4439 Stallion Ln. In The
Ranches asking $239k
OBO (352) 573-0029

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


3/2/1, 1 Acre,
On Private Lake,
Beautiful, New rf., new
siding, Has Separate
Guest house, Serious
Inquires only! $320,000.
(352) 726-0477




4 mi to Power Plant &
boat ramp! Beautiful
c.b. 3/2/2, dbl lot, trees
& privacy. Newer apple,
roof & A/C. Move in
ready. Energy efficient-
$140 avg! Fenced yard,
boat/ car port storage,
shed, etc. $110,000,
OBO 352-795-8926

3/2/2, ULiving Rm. Din-
ing & Fam. Rm., eat in
Kit., scrn. back porch,
fenced back yrd., Lrg.
15 x 30 above ground
pool w/attach. deck.
new roof, Insulated
windows, $139,500
5901 W WOODSIDE DR
(352) 563-0093


BONNIE
PETERSON
Realtor, GRI
Your SATISFACTION
Is My Futurell
(352) 586-6921
or (352)795-9123
. Charlotte G Realty
& Investments LLC

CONNELL HEIGHTS
212, Great Rm, vaulted
ceil. open kit. b/bar,
fenced back yrd.
scrn. por., new apple's,
1600 sf,(mol) 6172 W.
Pine Cir /C.R. Priced to
Sell (352) 795-9603

Crystal River Mini
Ranch
4/2.5/2 on 2 acres, up
to 5 horses allowed,
$29,000 down, owner
financing @ 6%. Will
trade for equity.Realty
USA (800) 559-4231

RealtySelect
Citrus.com


BETTY MORTON
2.8% COMMISSION

Rea Slect

(352) 795-1555




2 BR, 2 Bath, I car
garage, very nice,
$3,500 down & $450
mo. with average
credit. (352) 726-9369









$8000 Tax
Credit
for first time home
buyers ,if you have
not owned a home In
3 years. Call for info
Phyllis Strickland
(352) 613-3503
Kellers Williams RIty


FC�itrus County
I Homes I


Plantation Realty. Inc
1Q352) 795-0784
Questions about
the new $8000 tax
credit? Don't miss
this seminarlM!l!
Lisa VanDeboe
Broker (R)/Owner

HERNANDO
WATERFRONT HOME ON
LAKE TSALA APOPKA
Open lakefront fenced
2/2 home & garage
with 108' of waterfront,
boat dock, boat slip &
sun deck, Owner
finance $155,000
(352) 465-3674
3684 Diamond Circle
Willola Heights
HOMOSASSA
REDUCED!
MUST SELL
3-story stilt. 3/3. Next to
head spring. 163' wfrt,
dock/slip. Brand
new/unoccupied.
2 frpis, granite. $499K
727-808-5229


must seil!
Inverness
MUST SELL QUICK!
UNIQUE CUSTOM
HOME ON 1 ACRE ON
CANAL TO LAKE
TSALA POPKA. 3,323
sq. ft LIVING! 30'
ATRIUM. 3 BED/2.5
BATH. 2-CAR GAR-
AGE. LIVE OAKS.
NEEDS TLC. PRICED
TO SELL! ONLY
$194,500. CALL
MYRIAM @ KELLER
WILLIAMS REALTY of
CITRUS COUNTY.
352-613-2644


LOOKING FOR HOMES
OR.MOBILES & LAND �
Purchase, lease, mort-
gage assumptions, take
over payments + cash.
Any location, price, con-
dition, foreclosure, late on
payments okay.
1-727-992-1372



HOMOSASSA 3.45 acres
dead end road two
streets from hwy 19 btwn.
C.R.& Hom. 30000.00 or
20% with financing
352-228-1789




7 Rivers Golf & C.C.
priv. member owned.
corner lot I ac (mol)
$30K (813) 766-9354 or
sweetscapeauestl(
verizon.net


Waterfron",
HoZes


The key to a tree's good
health, growth and
development is
proper care and mainte-
nance. Mainte-
nance pruning is
the most common
type of pruning.
In the urban
landscape situa-
tion, pruning is
necessary, not -z
only for the
health of the tree,
but for the safety
of our homes and Kerry-
property. - T
Maintenance ARB
prunmng consists
of removal of
dead, dying or cross
branches. To get rid of any
parasites on the tree, thin-
ning out trees and selective
removal of interior
branches is also very bene-
ficial.
Thinning out trees allows
greater air and light pene-
tration. It also. reduces
weight; therefore helping
the stability of the structure
of the tree in windstorms.
However, removing too
much foliage from a tree is
not recommended.
Understanding how or
why a tree needs pruning is


K
4
O


very important for the
health of a tree.
. A commonly asked ques-
tion is "When is the best time
to prune?" The
answer depends
on what species
of the tree we are
talking about. If
your trees have
not been properly
pruned in a few
years, or have not
been pruned at
all, now would be
�reider a good time.
IE If your trees
tRIST are in need of
regular mainte-
nance pruning,
this can be done any time of
the year for most species. To
help ensure the survival of
our trees, they must be
properly cared for.


Kerry Kreider is a practic-
ing arborist, a member of
the International Society of
Arboriculture, a tree
preservationist and presi-
dent ofAction Tree Serv-
ice. Ifyou have any
questions he can be
reached at 302-2815 or
email actionpro
arborist@yahoo.com.


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS

* Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos need to be in proper exposure' neither too
light nor too dark.
* Include your name, address and phone number on all
photos. When identifying persons in your photo, do so
from left to right.
* We discourage the use of Polaroid prints.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce
well; submit the digLtal image via disk or e-mail. Staff
will color correct and otherwise "work up" the image
to Chronicle publication standards.
* Photos submitted electronically should be in maxi-
mum-resolution JPEG (.Ipg) format.
* Photos cannot be returned without a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
* For more information, call 563-5660.


Couch

SRealty
& Investments, Inc.
-| r , For All Your Real Estate Needs.
Richard (Rick)
Couch
Lic. Real Estate Broker

1045 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL 34442
Office: 352 344-8018 * Cell: 352 212-3559
www.Rcouch.com


MMSOWTW� JUNE -21 2009


$174,900., Reducedl
3/2/2 Deck
w/flreplace, dock
352-341-5611

FREE HOME
BUYERS
Seminar like none
other June 23rd
6pm/RSVP
$8,000


Proper pruning



key ingredient



to thriving trees







Cnius CbuiAfrrfPL)'CHf~0MdtE SUNDAY JUNO 21, 2009 'E15


FRUGAL
Continued from Page Ell

tem to keep track of what
you have on hand. One ex-
ample can be found on my
forums at www.frugalvil-
lage.com/forums/showthrea
d.php?t120035. The first tip
below is a quick way to keep
track at a glance and add va-
riety, too.
FOOD CODE: If I bought
Burbank/Idaho potatoes last
time, I'll try to buy red pota-
toes this time. The same for
eggs - I try and buy white
and then brown and then
white. Also works for apples,
pears and such. I do this to
help me use the oldest food
first If the old potatoes are
nearly gone and they're red,
then I get Burbank. It's re-
ally-obvious to me when I go
to grab a potato what's the
oldest. Same with eggs and
onions. The eggs, onions and
potatoes are where I use this
the most - Judi, New
Hampshire
REUSE PLASTIC BAGS:
I love to do jigsaw puzzles
(1,000 pieces and up), and I
keep a lot of them to work
again later. I hate losing the
pieces, so I use the gallon-
size plastic baggies for stor-
ing the pieces. They work
great because I sometimes


send a puzzle to my mom
out of state, and this way I
know she will have all the
pieces. - Cat, Ohio
STRETCH DISH SOAP:
Everything today is "con-
centrated." But I noticed
that my kids overuse the
dish detergent. When they
do dishes, we can go
through a bottle in a week.
When I do it, the bottle lasts
for a couple months. I
learned a trick. I save an
empty bottle. I fill it one-
quarter with the detergent
and then top with water. Ah,
but it's watery, no one likes
watery soap. So add 1/2 to 1
teaspoon salt to it, and
shake it up. It will gel again.
I use dish detergent for
hand soap and do the same
'thing. My husband has to
use two pumps, what a.
waste. But once reduced
like this, he's using really a.
half squirt, if that One bot-
tle now lasts two to three
months. - Noella, Canada
HOMEMADE BABY
FOOD: I finalized my adop-
tion. I am the new mother of
a 9-month-old. I remember
trying to save money when
my others were little, and I
made my own baby food.
.Well, I did it again. This
time, I pureed a bag of peas,
green beans, potatoes and
chicken. All of these were
separate. I took my muffin


tins and covered them with to blame my kitty cat for this.
pieces of plastic wrap twice It's that red color, and I have
as large, and filled each spot been cleaning it today, and it
with the food. Then I cov- is a little lighter but still
ered them with another there. - Palooka, forums
piece of wrap. I did four DEAR PALOOKA. I use
separate muffin tins and melamine foam, such as Mr.
stacked them up, making Clean's Magic Eraser. As-
sure there was plastic wrap suming you don't have gran-
between everything. I left ite countertops, you can use
them in the freezer for a day. bleach and water, Bon Ami,
This morning. I pull all the Bar Keeper's Friend, baking
frozen separate foods and soda and a damp rag, pow-
put them in a freezer bag dered Comet or Soft Scrub
and labeled them. I tested to remove the drink stains.
them, and it takes 45 sec- DEAR SARA: How do you
onds to thaw in a mi- .get an adhesive sticker off
crowave. I can also put them plastic? I have a toy that I
in a carrier, and they will tried removing the price
thaw before lunch. So now I sticker from. The label
have enough for at least two came off but not the adhe-
weeks. - Louise, Georgia sive guck. I've tried rubbing
NOTE FROM SARA. Ice- it, putting water to it and
cube trays work well,-too. rubbing it, using a curled
You can also simply drop piece of tape and "dabbing"
spoonfuls of the food onto a off the other adhesive, and
wax-paper-lined baking nothing works. I have to get
sheet and put it into the the tape off and have the toy
freezer Once frozen, trans- looking nice because I'm
fer to freezer bags. giving it away. Any sugges-
Sm. tions? I'll give almost any-
DEAR SARA: How do you thing a try. - Q.M., Canada
get a Crystal Light stain off a , DEAR Q.M.: Use veg-
kitchen counter? I am going etable or baby oil, Goo Gone


or WD-40. Any of them will
work to remove the adhe-
sive from plastic.
DEAR SARA: Any recom-
mendations on what to use
for deodorant? I want to get
away from using a lot of
chemicals. - Cindy, Florida
DEAR CINDY: My mom
gave me a deodorant stone. I
had my doubts, but it works
well. It's made from potas-
sium-alum mineral salts. I
apply it directly after I
shower. You can find.some-
thing similar at www.the-
crystal.com. I've had readers


report that witch hazel ap-
plied to the skin with a cot-
ton ball works well, too.

Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfru-
.galvillage.com), a Web site
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o United Media, 200 Madi-
son Ave., 4th Floor, New e
York, NY 10016, or e-mail
sara@frugalvillage.com.


. 699 S.Adolph Pt. CAT FARRELL 10
(ELLMR Lecanto,FL 34461 (352) 4003287
MAM. h c [frrell-.r.:l-,r.'nmhlm ine


SUGARMILL WOODS OAK
VILLAGE cul-de-sac lot. Just
relax and listen to nature after
building your dream home
here. Golf, tennis, fishing &
Suncoast Pkwy nearby.
MLS# 326780 $?9,900


CRYSTAL HILLS MINI
FARMS Wonderful 2+ acre
wooded lot. Privacy galore.
Great area to ride horses.
Plenty of golf, fishing,
shopping, dining nearby.
MLS# 315113 '$69,900


RExA -EA REMA REMA REMA -- MA REA RE -


A RD IWNNNG s M Vic McDonald
SJackie AWARD NNING REALTY ONE Office: (352) 637-6200 ,
* MULTI-MIL.ION SSS f, REALTY ON Email:vicmcdoad@remax.net
v * PRODUCER
y t,.. 352-302-3179 i "Serving Citrus County
- -_ 'I Cheri 3 0Kelly 30 Years
-1 mLa Bring all offers! Realtor * 1100w ., ""
..1Bev HleBlviid. Re r. W EEKS REAJ.Y cell- 352-422-2387 Inverness. FL 34450 Doar Producer


164t9I


p.lo


22 1' * Motivated Sellers
4 -L* Low Interest Rates
* f Banks have low interest rates.
SIW Nowis theUnime to hv!

COMMERCIAL BUILDING BULDNG
& SIGN BUSINESS ZONEDGNC FORLEASE
2,000 Sq. Ft. GINC
Sale includes business building, established, lucrative Grat retail store, office
sign business and all equipment, wide format printers, orntet cae and mo
laminators, vinyl covers, trimmers, bucket truck. We will oce, retalorflorst
also stay on after the sale to assist in running the business, AU 302-31a
Take all for $199,000 OWNERA2GENT


DOUBLEWIDE /.5 ACRE BAY MEADOWS
Beautiful and spacious Stunning leaded glass windows and
4 bedroom 2 bath doublewide on transoms are just the beginning of some of
the upgrades in this home. 4/2.5/2 custom
.5 acre, paved street, area of nice home.with a kitchen that is out of this world
mobile homes. Split plan, large featuring cherry cabinets, quartz
kitchen with lots of cabinets, countertops and stainless steel appliances.
master bedroom has large Home features 10 foot ceilings w/crown
bathroom with garden tub and molding. Relax in your living room with a
bathroom with garden tub and remote start fireplace or enjoy the pool
shower and a huge walk-in area which includes a summer kitchen.
closet. Priced to sell! AMENITIES GALORE!
$89,900 #344855 $389,900 #332409


MW


SUNDAY, JUNE 21, 2009 1EI-5


,6ryids Cbml�ft fFL)'CKR6?WUE






CiRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


~ii75rfl8V Cr18415 91 2(100


SUBMISSION DEADLINES

Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely public
tion of submitted material. The earlier Chronicle edi-
tors receive submissions, the better chance of notes
running more than once.

* Community notes: At least one week in advance of the
event

* Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for puLlication
Sunday.

* Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Sat-
urday.
* Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication
Sunday.
* Photos and stories are published as space is available.
The Chronicle cannot guarantee placement on color
pages.

* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River: by fax at 563 3280; or by e-mail to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


Peter & @
Io -- - REALTY ONE
KOROL - Offie: 352.527.7842
e-mal: p .em. a@aol.com 11:Cet 352422-3875
--- www.TheKorolTeam.com
, $95,000 r. . I $99,500, M, .j,::ir




228 W. HOLLYFERN PL. 5335 S. ALICE PT.
BEVERLY HILLS HOMOSASSA
*2BD/2BA/1CG * Screened Patio *'. * Ceramic, Carpet & Laminate
* Family Room * All Appliaces . , ,,,. i oversized Lanai
* Kitchen Skylight * Great Location ,- ,,,. 1,435LA
$113,500 MLS #329421 $99,000 MLS#331625




3600 N. WILLOWIREE PT. 2034 W. SHINNING DAWN LN.
BEVERLY HILLS LECANTO
* . " I l':',, :.. � ,-- *M -. ,-, ,'r:P *3BD/2BANI1CG *1136 SF living
Si r i,- Built in 2004 * Fenced comer lot
*l- ..- ,a . ,,, .:..: .; i . u.. I Upgraded appliances *Above ground pool


785031


20 W. NorveH Bryant Hwy. 1481 Pine Ridge Blvd.
Hernando, FL 34442 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
(352) 746-0744 (352) 527-1820 1
1-888-222-0856 ' 1-888-553-2223
For a Visual Tour or Multiple Photos, Go to:www.floridashowcaseproperties.com

=Ak r-aA


2526 E. Celina St. 3708 W. Douglas Fir Cir.
$197,500 $164,900
made for Florida living. The open w/lovely landscaping & shed. Home
floor plan leads to a tremendous has bright & open floor plan w/Ig.
covered lanai with an additional great rm., eat-in kitchen & dining
17x28 screen enclosure. Citrus Hills area. Well-maintained with newer
Membership available. roof, heat pump & appl.
352-746-0744 MLS#333770 352-527-1820 MLS#325940


CITRUS SPRINGS -3/2 Brand
- New. Almost completed! Come
and see! $94,900 #331133


INV -2/2 Move-in ready Pool 120 L:
x 200 lot, fruit trees. "Secret
Garden" feel... $119,900 #332504


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW AT .IFY RFC M ir -MAI.* RATI.FS(AIfEXRE.COM


CRYSTAL RIVER I' :ii : ,t. i,", r.- 'a) *,s-1m,
Em. i-n,'- . il-r. . -, ,:',-1 ,. ,',,T.n K Lvl F. h," .,:, , i
Water, Fam Rm, Din Rm, & Office. Walk To Shoppingf
Medical/School Et. #327613 REDUCED TO $69,100


SUGARMILL WOODS, CYPRESS VILLAGE -Almost
' 1. l .1.- ' 's i.r . . K r '- . 1 . 1 . ...1 FC C
,., - , J,-,' 'l' i ,-, ,. : ':. ,.,,'..l ,r 1 . F i..T F T, '
Car Garage, Ceramic Tile & Carpeting, Two Zoned AC..
Reduced #326146 $345,000
-I



MOMOSASSA F.uuf .) ..r, :') F.-,'^,
Home W/ 2 Bdrms, 1 Bath, Screen Porch, 1976
S/WNV M/H With Additions, Also Has Workshop. All
This On 2.13 Acres Of Land. #323483
$119,500


INVERNESS 1977 Broadmore S/W (14 X 60) W1
3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths On 0.73 Acres. Central AC,
Covered Porch, Needs Work, Livable, City Water
& Septic, Tenants On Mo To Mo Basis. #329637
$29,900 __


IfimVcn'nl.S - C :Ol.'llhll"", .:lii 'j I J U'ki
,,'H " . il,," -i 1 r, I r. i, , : . ,-e :i, - I

Deck, Fully Fenced, Lg Shed W/Electric.
Updated Baths & Kitchen. #329036 $49,000


SUGARMILL WOODS - Cypress Village Bright,
.c.,/3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage, On
"i, .:.: Half Acre. Split Floor Plan, Large
Screened Lanai, Newer Appliances, Priced Right
#332411 $106,000


NORTH HOM3"SASA I' 1. 1i . 1. .
Baths, New Roof W/ 3 Inch Insulation, Double Pane
Windows, Vinyl Siding W/Extra Insulation, On Almost
Half Acre (0.48). Paved Dead End Road, No Thru
Traffic, Safe For Children Playing. #327661 $79,900


CRYSTAL OAKS 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car
Garage, High Ceilings W! Fans, Open And Airy.
Corian Counters, Wood Cabinets, Built In
..; ,, Almost 1 Acre Of Land. Park
- i '-.) L.I. OfTrees. $209,900 #332270


I ~


Prudential Florida Showcase Properties

CIRTTuS -ITT .T.I OFFT C PINE RIDGE OFFICE


-z- 1UNE 21 200Q


...... 1